Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01007
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 16, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01007

Full Text











FORECAST:
Partly cloudy
with scattered
thunderstorms.
PAGE 4


^ < -( =

1 nnas give a splash of summer color to gard


_: : S COU NTY
W, V


FEEL THE BREES:
^ BUCS vs.
Saints
Tampa Bay
Bucs'
defense will
1be put
to the test Sunday
against New Orleans./Page 1B

OUT THE WINDOW:
A question of race
Chronicle publisher Gerry
Mulligan responds to reader
feedback about coverage of a
brawl at an area football
game./Page 4C


planned for fall by the major
broadcast networks./Page 6B

WORTH QUOTING:

Nobody's
fussing and
fighting over
grilled chicken in
the South.
' . T. EDGE, ID

RETIREES AT WORK:
Perceptions shift
Older Americans are choosing
to remain in the workforce
longer, offering skills younger
job competitors sometimes
lack./Page 3D
SAVE NOW OR PAY LATER:


Water woes
Guest contributors Cheryl
Phillips and Matt Clemons
discuss the state of local
waters./Page 1C
OLD-FASHION POST OFFICE:
Time warp
Alachua County landmark
lacks air conditioning, but
loves being stuck in the
past./Page 3A
ONLINE POLL:
Share your view
Is $65,000 an appropriate
salary for Mosquito Control's
helicopter pilot?
A. No. The sheriff's
@ office only pays its
two full-time and
four part-time
pilots a total of
$112,000.
B. Yes. Flying helicopters is
dangerous and requires spe-
cial skills and training.
C. No. The position is part
time.
D. Where can I sign up for
that job?
To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the
Sept. 23 edition.
Last week's results./Page 2A


Annie's Mailbox ...... .20A
Classified ........... . 7D
Crossword ......... . 20A
Entertainment ......... 6B
Horoscope .......... 20A
Lottery Payouts ....... .6B
Movies .............. 20A
Obituaries ............ 6A
Together ............ 19A
Eight Sections


6 11811517' l I07111o


GM, UAW resume talks


Significant

hurdles remain

Associated Press

DETROIT - General Motors Corp.
and the United Auto Workers made
progress at the bargaining table
Saturday but still faced significant hur-
dles and weren't expected to agree on a
new contract until later in the weekend.
Some union subcommittees - which
handle issues such as pensions, bene-
fits and job security - have wrapped


up talks, but an agreement wasn't
expected Saturday because negotiators
were still dealing with some key issues,
according to a person who was briefed
on the negotiations.
The person, who spoke on condition
of anonymity because the talks are pri-
vate, also confirmed that GM Chairman
and CEO Rick Wagoner is actively
involved in the talks.
Talks were ongoing Saturday
evening, GM spokesman Tom Wickham
said.
Several local union officials who
have been in touch with bargainers said
the outstanding issue is retiree health
care expenses. GM wants the union to


take over responsibility for retiree
health care costs using a company-
funded trust and the union was asking
for job guarantees in exchange for tak-
ing on the costs. The local officials
spoke on condition of anonymity
because they weren't authorized to
speak publicly about the talks.
GM's 73,000 U.S. auto workers were
without a contract as of midnight
Friday and could go on strike at any
time if negotiations break down. In
Spring Hill, Tenn., hundreds of union
members were at the local UAW hall
Saturday, waiting for news.
"Members are very apprehensive.
These are historic times and everybody


Buzz surrounds pilot's salary


MATTHEW BECK,Cr,,rr.... :l
Citrus County Mosquito Control Director Joel Jacobson, left, and pilot Luis Sanchez discuss the district's aviation pro-
gram from the Inverness Airport. Sanchez has a personal agreement with the district's board that pays him $65,000
annually - nearly $10,000 more than his boss.


Mosquito control
MIKE WRIGHTr
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The highest-paid employee at th
Citrus County Mosquito Contro
District is not Joel Jacobson, th
director hired in January after 1
years of similar expe-
rience in
Hillsborough County.
It isn't Bill
Harmon, the assis-
tant director who in
2008 will mark his
20th year with the
Citrus Couny dis-
trict. Joel
The highestpaid Jacobson
employee is not a was hired in
supervisor, and the January.
job for which he was
hired is not even full time.
It is Luis Sanchez, the district's hel
icopter pilot who has an exclusive
written agreement with the district
board that pays him $65,000 a year.


helicopter pilot paid more than his bosses
Sanchez, 33, has about two full*
years' experience with the taxpayer- J Cl LOlter
funded district. His work history ,
includes pilot instructor for the U.S. best toolfor the i
e State Department and flying an emer-
1 agency medical service helicopter in MIKE VWRS;.4IT
e the Panhandle. mwright@chronicleonline.c(
1 But his biggest asset to the Citrus Chronicle
County mosquito district is this: He ronic --
wants the job. Skeeters don't stand a cha
Interviews and district records against this bird.
show that the mosquito control board Thagaie Citrus County Mosq
agreed to pay Sanchez essentially Control District's helicopter
what he asked because the district to places where the fog truck (
couldn't find anyone else. go, sprays at much farther
"They searched the world over tances and in a shorter time.
advertising for a pilot and couldn't Mosquito board members
find a pilot," board member Bev district director Joel Jacobson
Davis said. Citrus County's battle against
Sanchez has worked off and on with biting bugs would be lost. wit]
mosquito control since late 2004 and the helicopter.
has had several pay fluctuations. "We have the ability to pi
He was hired in 2004 at an annual where it needs to be," board n
l- pay of $43,867 to pilot the district hel- ber Ken Frink said. "It's imp
e icopter. Sanchez said he wanted to
Please see PILOT/Page 5A Please see . . /Page


is

ob

:om

dance
uito
goes
can't
dis-
and
say
the
[hout
ut it
lem-
pera-
*4A


realized that," said UAW Local 1853
President Mike O'Rourke. Workers
have faith in the UAW's negotiating
team, he added.
Some other union halls were quiet as
local leaders prepared for membership
meetings or awaited word from the
UAW. In Lansing, UAW Local 652
President Chris "Tiny" Sherwood said
he was keeping the hall open and mak-
ing sure members were ready if a strike
was called.
A message was left Saturday for UAW
spokesman Roger Kerson.
Five of GM's 18 U.S. assembly plants
Please see TALKS/Page 4A


Analysis:


Many fear no


end in site

Bush speech did little

to ease Iraq differences

Associated Press
Outside a Brooklyn art gallery, Kristy
Knight threw her arms in the air in
exasperation when she was asked about
the war in Iraq, which has her angry,
frustrated and flatly disbelieving
President Bush.
Across the'country, as A
he finished off a cup of |y0 '71
coffee in Grants Pass,
Ore., Gerald Fitzgerald, '
insisted the only way
the United States
should leave Iraq is
with victory - no "cut-
ting and running or bail- President
ing or anything else." Bush
But when Knight gave addressed the
her forecast for the war, nation about
she could have been the Iraq war
speaking for either of Thursday.
them: "I don't think it's
ending anytime soon."
President Bush, addressing the
nation on the war Thursday from the
Oval Office, said it was possible, "for the
first time in years, for people who have
been on opposite sides of this difficult
debate to come together"
And in a way, they have, if interviews
scattered around the nation after the
speech are any indication: Americans
expect a large U.S. presence in Iraq for
years to come, including well after Bush
leaves office in January 2009.
They still disagree passionately about
whether the war was a good idea to
begin with, and whether, as the presi-
dent insists, maintaining it will ulti-
mately make the United States safer.
But few appear to think an end is in
sight
"We'll be there for at least another
two, three years," predicted Jim
Hudgens, a bartender and musician
who was out for a bike ride in Fresno,
Calif., and who described himself as a
liberal Democrat "No one seems to
have the guts to change policy."
The president told Americans the
"surge" strategy he announced in
January; which increased the American
force in Iraq by about 30,000 troops, was
meeting its objectives, citing security
gains in Anbar province.
Bush said it was possible for about
5,700 U.S. troops to come home by
Christmas, and by late Friday, Defense


KERI LYNN IVIMCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
What's with all the trash talk around
Citrus County?
More than 650 volunteers spent
Saturday morning cleaning up county-
wide waterways. Employees from local
businesses, students and faculty mem-
bers from Citrus County schools, mem-
bers of various community organiza-
tions, individual residents and families
participated in the annual Adopt-A-
Alycia Porro, 13, left, Meghan Hackey,
12, Khyesha Brooks, 13, and John
Hackey scour the shore Saturday at
Fort Island Gulf Beach during the Adopt-
A-Shore and Professional Association of
Diving Instructors Cleanup.
BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle


TALKING TRASH
* This year, volunteers collected more
than an estimated 6,720 pounds of
garbage, according to Citrus County
Aquatic Services Director Mark
Edwards.
Shore and Professional Association of
Diving Instructors' Cleanup.
"I just like to help the world ... it real-
ly wouldn't be fun going to the beach if
its full of garbage," 12-year-old Alex
Sheffield of Lecanto Middle School
said.
The cleanup is one of many "Know
Where It Flows" scheduled activities
for the 12th annual Save Our Waters
Week taking place Sept 14 to 22. The
week of awareness is sponsored by


Please see EVENT/Page 7A


Bloomir


ItIGH
91

71


IV


r" 4 ,1
f


No. 259


Please see ANALYSIS/Page 5A


Volunteers take to the shore for annual event









2A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007 Cimus COUNTY (FL) CJIRoNIcLF


No waiting list


for nursing


program at CFCC


Special to the Chronicle
Central Florida Community
College will host information
sessions for nursing programs,
which have openings in the
January class.
There are no waiting lists
for Practical Nursing or
Associate Degree Nursing,
ADN, programs at CFCC
according to Dr. Gwen Alcorn,
associate dean for Health and
Human Services. "We now
have ADN options for part-
time, full-time and
evening/weekend programs,"
she said.
The sessions will be Friday,
Sept. 21, in Building 19, Room
118, at the Ocala Campus, 3001
S.W College Road, and will be
broadcast by live videoconfer-
ence to the Citrus Campus,
3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, and Levy Center, 114
Rodgers Blvd, Chiefland. The
Practical Nursing session will
meet. at 1 p.m. Nursing and
Licensed Practical Nurse to


Associate Degree Nurse
Bridge programs will be dis-
cussed at a 1:30 p.m. session.
"No pre-registration is
required for the free sessions
which art required for enroll-
ment in any of our Health and
Human Services programs,"
said Dr. Mark Paugh, dean for
Health and Human Se'tvices.
"The sessions provide infor-
mation on admissions criteria,
program requirements, cost
and more.
'"Attendees will also learn
about the limited access com-
ponent of the programs,"
Paugh said. "Students from
our tri-county service area of
Marion, Citrus and Levy coun-
ties are accepted into nursing
programs before any consider-
ation can be given to out-of-
district applicants. There is no
waiting list, as some residents
believe."
For information about the
programs or information ses-
sions, call (352) 873-5817, or
visit www.GoCFCC.com.


Public input welcome at task force meeting


Special to the Chronicle
The public is invited to share
ideas concerning potential
water resources restoration
projects at the upcoming Citrus
County Task Force meeting.
The meeting is at 2 p.m.
Monday, at St. Martin's Marsh
Aquatic Preserve, located in
the Crystal River Preserve
State Park, 3266 N. Sailboat
Avenue, Crystal River.
During the meeting, the task


force will consider" potential
restoration projects to enhance
fish and wildlife habitats in
Citrus County. Examples of
restoration' projects may
include, but are not limited to,
shoreline restoration, sand and
sediment control or removal,
and exotic species management
The Citrus County Task
Force is part of the
Citrus/Hernando Waterways
Restoration Council, which
was formed by the Florida


Legislature in 2003. The coun-
cil is responsible for reviewing
data related to lake and river
restoration techniques, sport-
fish population recovery, and
sand and sediment control.
The task force also submits
recommendations to the
Legislature in an annual
report for funding to address
those issues.
For information, call Josie
Guillen at 796-7211, Ext 4227
or (800) 423-1476, Ext. 4227.


Everybody is a


Name Phone
- ---rn-rn-----


Please mail to: |
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcret Blvd.
Crv tal River, FL 34429
Fax to: 563-5665
or
Call: 563-3295
(',IIINI, -I


* QUESTION: Should the state spray herbicides to kill aquatic vegetation on area
lakes?

* YOUR ANSWERS:
A. Yes, as long as they monitor the water. (98 votes, 42 percent.)
B. No. The spraying isn't getting the job done. (19 votes, 8 percent.)
C. Yes. How else can they control invasive plant life on the water? (25 votes, 11 percent.)
D. No. It's poisoning the water. (94 votes, 40 percent.)
* To vote in this week's Online Poll, simply access the Chronicle Web site, www.chronicleonline.com.


S725074


Compression faucet


Repair a Leaky

Washer-Type Faucet
If you're not into water torture, then you probably can't stand.the
drip, drip of a leaky faucet. Fortunately, you don't need to call a
plumber to save you. These steps detail how to fix the leak in a
washer-type faucet in no time.
Washer-type faucets work with a rubber or composition washer that
closes onto a metal washer seat. When the washer becomes
hardened, worn or the washer seat wears, it causes the faucet to
leak. You can close the faucet tighter to stop the leaking
temporarily, but this increases the internal damage to the faucet.
Here's how to fix it.


Step 1. Turn off the Water Supply.
Step 2. Remove faucet handle, screw and nut.
Step 3. Examine the Stem: If the threads are badly corroded or worn, take it to your retailer and get a
new stem to match. Clean the stem if it's dirty.
Step 4. Check the Washer: The washer is located on the lower end of the stem and held in place by a
brass screw. If the washer is squeezed flat or has a groove worn in it, replace it - this should stop any
dripping. Take the washer to your hardware store to ensure an exact match in size and style. If the brass
screw is damaged, replace it with a new brass screw.
Tip: It's important to install the correct type of faucet washer (Fig. 1, bottom).
Step 5. Look at. Washer Seat: Any faucet that needs frequent washer replacement usually has a
damaged seat. The washer seat is located inside the faucet body. The seat should either be refaced with
a seat-dressing tool or replaced.
Step 6. Put Back Together: Put the parts back together in the reverse order of taking them apart.
Spread a bit of petroleum jelly or silicone grease on the threads of the stem to lubricate the faucet's
action.
Citrus County residents can obtain an assortment of
flat faucet washers FREE of charge by calling 527-7648.

Protecting Florida's water reserves is everyone's job. Each of us can play a role by decreasing water
consumption.

The Department of Water Resources, in partnerships with various expert affiliations, offers public
education and outreach programs, which are funded jointly by Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners and Withlacoochee Regional Water Supply Authority.


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Grand opening


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Larry Chesteen, secretary of the treasury, Randy Campbell, executive director of the South Dunnellon Civic Association, Deputy
Ken Wear and Deputy Juan Santiago at the grand opening of the River Ridge Community Resource Office.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICI.r


2ASUNDAY, SFPTFMBrR 16, 2007


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SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007:
www.chronicleonline.com:


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Pensacola's last class


70-year-old

tradition ends

with graduates

Associated Press

PENSACOLA NAVAL AIR
STATION - The 56 recent col-
lege graduates who lined up
near an old sea wall on a
steamy summer morning
wanted to be Naval officers.
It wouldn't be easy - but
those who survived the three
months of training would be
the final class to graduate from
Officers Candidate School at
the nation's oldest Naval Air
Station.
For 68 years young men and
women have morphed into
confident Naval officers here
during intensive training over-
seen by Marine drill instruc-
tors. Richard Gere portrayed
an officer candidate in the
1982 mega-hit "An Officer and
A Gentleman." The movie was
set at a fictional Naval Air
Station and filmed elsewhere,
but was based on the
Pensacola school.
When class 20-07 - the 20th
Pensacola officer class of 2007
- graduates on Friday, the
school will close and consoli-
date with training at Newport,
R.I., under realignment plans.
"Hundreds of classes have
suffered out there on the
grinder, the parade deck and
we are going to be the last class
doing it," said Allen Hamby, a
21-year-old University of
Central Florida graduate who
plans to be a supply officer, two
months into training.
His classmates nodded in
agreement as he said, "You.
either limp through it or you go
out with a bang to show people
what's up."
The class's first morning did
not begin auspiciously Ten
minutes after reporting for
duty last July, a few lost their
composure, their voices crack-
ing as instructors barked com-
mands over the ocean breeze.
It was a first taste of military
discipline for some.
"Every time you are given a
command you will respond
..aye sir'," an instructor elled.
"When you stand at atten-
tion your heels are together
and your feet are straight out"
When one candidate was
slow answering a question, an
instructor scrawled "Goldfish"
on masking tape and stuck it
on his back
"Goldfish die after a week,
you know that? We might have
to change your name to 'Gnat,'
though, because gnats only live
for day," he said.
The candidate listened and
did not respond.
For Pensacolans accus-
tomed to seeing candidates out
on the town in dress white uni-
forms, an era is ending.
"It is one of those things you
don't appreciate until they tell
you it's going," said Jack
Williams, whose family owns
Seville Quarter, a block of
clubs and restaurants fre-
quented by officer candidates.
"We will miss seeing them
walking around downtown
and coming in here and check-
ing their hats in our gift shop,"
he said.


S- --. ..
Associated Press
Naval officer candidates line up Wednesday for training at the Pensacola Naval Air Station.


Over the years. he's taken
some early moriinig calls from
candidates who forgot to
retrieve their hats before leav-
ing his bar. And he's headed off
a le% fights
"It's rare that \ou hale to
make a call out to the school,
but it does happen. They train
them to be confident and that
comes out some times. Usually
it's about a girl or someone
looking at a girl," he said.
The school c.losinri i.: also
the end ,, an era at the base
w here candidates nrun along
streets in na3y blue shorts and
white T-shirts. and the sound
of instructors putting candi-
dates through their moningi
push-ups and marching drills
often filters into offices
"Ex\eN time ie come across
people out on the base they let
us k-now how long they have
been supporting the officer
candidate program and how
sad they. are to. see it go." said
William Briinlokne.el: an officer
candidate trom the final class.
Flight training at Pensacola
Na\al Air Station dates to
1914. but those original auia-
tois came as officers froin the
U.S Natal Academy The base
began officer training for avia-
tors in 1936 In 1994, the
Aviation Officer School was
combined to include candi-
dates in other career fields.
"It's been such a visible
aspect of the base for such a
long time," base historian Hill
Goodspeed said.
And Marine drill instructors
have always overseen the
training.
"Every candidate I've ever
talked to always remembers
their drill instructor because
they are such a dominating
presence, a larger-than-life
presence," Goodspeed said.
The drill instructor for class
20-07 is Gunnery Sgt Jason
Jones, a veteran-of two -Iraq-
combat tours. His gravelly
voice comes from years of
yelling commands.


"You'd be surprised hov\
manii people sa3. I have a prob-
lem with my vi voice or some-
thing is 'wi'onrg k ith the way I
speak, but the candidates
learn real quick to understand
what I'i talking about," said
Jones, who stands \\with perfect
posture and eazes with a clas-
sic thousand-yard stare
He -was quick to remind 20-
07 of its place as the last of
thousands of classes to march
on the parade field and rtui
the streets of Pensacola Naval
Air Station.
"Go out with a bang.," he told
them, including William Gum
Gum, 25, was teaching high
school math and science when
he enlisted to chase a dream of
being a Navy pilot He asked to
attend training in Pensacola
before the school closed.
"Pensacola is the place to go
if you are a Naval aviator.
\\ien I aiii out there doing
drills..and the-Blue-Angels-are
flying around. I try not to look
at them because the drill
instructor doesn't like it It
sounds cheesy but it makes the
hairs on your anrms stick up."
he said.
He will attend flight school
iii Pensacola alter graduating.
Jamlie Steffensmieil a 23-
year-old former college and
arena league football player
who wants to serve in Iraq,
struggled in training because
of his bulk He'd lost 15 pounds
before reporting, but his
hunger was hard to overcome.
Candidates are required to
eat their meals using only a
large metal "war spoon."
"There were times when my
stomach would be growling
and everyone would be laugh-
ing," he said. "You'd be
amazed how you can eat a
piece of fried chicken or peel a
banana with the war spoon."
About two months into the
training,- he-estimated he'd
dropped about 20 pounds and
was down to about 205.
Class 20-07 itself dropped 25


Naval Chief Jimmie Johnson assists cadets in a flooded engine
room simulator excersize at the Pensacola Naval Air Station.


of its 56 candidates - Goldfish
was one of the casualties.
As graduation approached,
students became more confi-
dent in their future as officers.
"The entire experience is
worth too much to give up, We
are starting to come together
as a class and it is starting to be
fun," said candidate Julie
Wonder, 22. A University of
Oregon architecture graduate,
she had said a month earlier
each day she felt she was
reaching her breaking point
but was continuing to push on.
Lt. Scott Kykendall, an
instructor and Naval aviator,


will return to Iraq instead of
moving to Rhode Island. As he
watched officer candidates-
maneuver an obstacle course,
he said Pensacola will always
be a unique place, especially
for would-be aviators.
"It's just so motivating in the
mornings to run students
around these streets and see
the history. When you think
about the people who have
gone through flight training
here - Neil Armstrong, Buzz
Aldrin, John McCain. Need I
say more? They are walking
the same streets as those indi-
viduals," he said.


Old post office loves being stuck in the past


WES SMITH
Orlando Sentinel

EVINSTON - Since 1882,
Wood & Swink Old Store and
Post Office has weathered
shootings, hurricanes and ill-
mannered Yankees.
But can it survive air condi-
tioning?
"Oh, it won't change that
much - except in summer, the
candy in the case won't melt,
and the envelopes won't glue
shut on their own," said Wilma
Sue Wood, Evinston's postmas-
ter for 28 years.
Wood, 62, yearns to retire to
her grandchildren and her gar-
den. But she long has fretted
that no one will want to replace


her as postmaster in a place
that, despite its rustic charms,
swelters in summer and frosts
over in winter
So, as Florida's oldest post
office delivers its 125th year, its
admirers have crafted an unusu-
al plan to ensure its future.
They hope to preserve the
timeworn shop by modernizing.
Plans call for adding central
air and heat, a fire-sprinkler sys-
tem, and ramps and bathrooms
for the disabled in stages during
the next two years.
The renovations will bring
great relief to the Woods. The
couple long have feared that if
they lost the post office, their
store - whose stock is mostly
limited to Yoo-hoo drinks,


MoonPie snacks and Freddie
Wood 's homegrown vegetables
- might not survive as the vil-
lage hub.
Now, Wilma Sue Wood can
look forward to retiring in
peace, sort of.
"I'll stay at least until the ren-
ovations so they can put on my
tombstone: 'She did her part,"'
Wood said. "But then I probably
can't go until Freddie retires
from whatever it is that he
does."
"People from all over come in
and claim this place reminds
them of the stores in their home-
towns long ago," Freddie said.
"Then they say we should never
let it change.
"And we tell them we don't


intend to."
Not all who enter Wood &
Swink are overcome with nos-
talgic bliss. But Wilma Sue
knows how to handle malcon-
tents, too.
"One day these people from
New York came in. Three of
them were real nice, but one
man was obnoxious, demanding
to know how much this was and
that was and muttering about
Southerners trying to rob him
blind," she recalled.
Weary of the whining, Wilma
Sue picked up a cedar turkey
call and gave it a pull.
The rude Yankee trotted over
"What was that?" he said.
"It's a turkey call," Wilma Sue
replied. "It works every time."


Associated Press'
The Wood & Swink Old Store and Post Office in Evinston.


N

~I)


Two men


facing


molestation


charges
KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Two men were arrested:
Friday, both on charges of lewd:
and lascivious molestation
involving 15-year-old girls, but
the cases were unrelated.
Scott Joseph Kelly, 34, 405 W
Inverness Boulevard,:
Inverness, was arrested at 5:11
p.m. on charges of lewd and:
lascivious molestation and dis-
orderly intoxication.
According to the arrest report,
Kelly approached a 15-year-
old girl when she was leaving:
McDonald's in Citrus Plaza in:
Inverness. The girl told
deputies Kelly grabbed her
and rubbed her breasts
through her shirt. He also
grabbed her waist and said
obscene comments, according
to both the girl and her friend
who was with her at the time.
When deputies arrived, they
found Kelly by the McDonald's
children's playground. He was
extremely intoxicated, accord-
ing the arrest report. After
deputies arrested Kelly, he
threatened to kill them when
he got out of the Citrus County
Detention Facility, they said'
Bond was set at $15,150.
The same day, Shawn M.
Woodin, 26, 1658 W Manila
Lane, Lecanto, was arrested at
7:51 p.m. on charges of lewd
and lascivious battery and
molestation. A 15-year-old
Inverness girl told deputies
she and Woodin had sexual
intercourse. On two separate
occasions, she performed oral
-sex on Woodin, according to
the arrest report
. Woodin told deputies he
knew the girl was 15 years old
and admitted to engaging in
the sex acts with the minor.
Bond was set at $15,000.


Ingrid

downgraded

, Associated Press

MIAMI - Ingrid lost
strength Saturday and was
downgraded from a tropical
storm to a tropical depression
as it moved through the open
Atlantic.
The weak system was not
expected to pose a threat to
land, forecasters said.
At 5 p.m., Ingrid's center was
about 425 miles east of the
Lesser Antilles.
The storm was moving to the
west near 12 mph and was
expected to make a gradual
turn to the northwest and
decrease in forward speed
over the next 24 hours, accord-
ing to the National Hurricane
Center. Maximum sustained
winds were near 35 mph with
higher gusts. :
On Thursday, Ingrid became
the ninth storm of the Atlantic
hurricane season, which rufis
from June 1 to Nov. 3.0.
Hurricane specialists expect
this year's season to be busier
than average, with as many as
16 tropical storms, nine pf
them strengthening into hurri-
canes.










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TALKS
Continued from Page 1A

were operating Saturday,
Wickham said, including two
plants in the Lansing area and
one each in Flint, Wentzville,
Mo., and Lordstown, Ohio. Only
two plants in Flint and Lansing
were scheduled to be running
Sunday
David Cole, chairman of the
,Center for Automotive Research
in Ann Arbor, said tensions often
run high when the union and the
automakers dive into the details.
, "If there aren't some raised
voices and sweaty palms, you're
not doing your job," he said.
I But Cole said he believes
-there's little chance for a strike.
A short strike might not have


much effect on GM but could
backfire against the UAW if the
public believes the union is ask-
ing for too much from a company
that is struggling, Cole said.
"They've got to be very careful
of anything that could hurt their
public image," he said.
This year's contract talks are
considered crucial to the sur-
vival of GM and its U.S.-based
counterparts, Ford Motor Co.
and Chrysler LLC. Ford and
Chrysler were also in talks over
the weekend, but they extended
their contracts with the UAW
indefinitely Thursday after the
UAW named GM the lead com-
pany in the negotiations. Once
the union wraps up talks with
GM it will try to implement simi-
lar agreements at Ford and
Chrysler
All three companies want to


cut or eliminate what they say is
about a $25-per-hour labor cost
gap with their Japanese com-
petitors. The gap, the companies
say, is one reason why the
Detroit Three collectively lost
about $15 billion last year, forc-
ing them all to restructure by
shedding workers and closing
factories.
The UAW is also fighting for its
survival. The union represented
302,500 active workers during
the last contract talks in 2003.
This year, that number fell to
180,681.
The central issue this year has
been skyrocketing health care
costs. Automakers have been
pushing the union to take over
responsibility for retirees'
health care, an unfunded
expense estimated at more than
$90 billion for GM, Ford and


Chrysler The automakers want
that liability off their books in
order to improve their stock
prices and credit ratings.
Both sides have been wran-
gling over how much the
automakers would contribute to
the trust In a note to investors
Friday, Lehman Brothers ana-
lyst Brian Johnson said the
automakers want to fund the
trust at 65 to 67 percent of their
total health care obligation. But
Johnson said he believes
automakers will agree to 75 per-
cent because they don't want
strikes.
Johnson also said he expects.
the union to compromise and
accept a two-tier wage system
that pays newer employees less
money in order to ensure contin-
uing membership and work at
U.S. plants.


Associated Press
United Auto Workers members Mike Freeman, left, who has worked
at General Motors Corp. for 35 years, and Roger Kendrick, right,
who has also worked at GM for 35 years, get picket signs ready in
case of a strike, Friday at UAW Local No. 599 in Flint, Mich.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic Battery
* Harold Patrick Buck, 43,
10535 E. Rabbit Lane, Floral City, at
3:46 p.m. Wednesday on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic battery.
No bond. '
DUI arrests
* Dimitrious loannis Fassoulas,
36, 5590 S. Marlin Point, Floral City,
at 9:24 p.m. Friday on a misde-
meanor charge of driving under the
influence. According to the arrest
report, Fassoulas refused to con-
sent to field sobriety tasks or a
breath test. When deputies ran a
criminal history check, they found
Fassoulas was convicted twice for
driving under the influence in previ-
ous years. Bond $5,000.
* Christopher Scott Carroll, 21,
2834 N. Reynolds Ave., Crystal
River, at 9:13 p.m. Friday on misde-
meanor charges of driving under the
influence with property damage and
bodily injury, resisting arrest without
violence and disorderly intoxication.
According to the arrest report,


Carroll was involved in an accident
at the intersection of State Road 44
and Northeast 12th Avenue in
Crystal River. Deputies said Carroll
approached deputies, screaming
about how the accident was not his
fault. After they warned Carroll to
stand on the side of the road while
they talked to the other driver
involved in the accident, Carroll
refused and continued yelling, they
said. The deputies tried to secure
him with :handcuffs, but Carroll
pulled away, they said. After they
were able to place handcuffs on
Carroll, they escorted him to the
patrol vehicle and noticed his slurred
speech and unsteadiness, they
said. Carroll's blood alcohol levels
were 0.97 percent and 0.95 percent;
the legal limit in Florida is 0.08 per-
cent. Bond $1,650.
Other arrests
* James Vernon Roundtree Jr.,
60,6279 N. KhyberAve., Dunnellon,
at 11:03 p.m. Wednesday on a mis-
demeanor charge of battery.
According to the arrest report,
Roundtree cut in front of a 25-year-
old Crystal River woman standing in


line at a supermarket in Crystal
River. The woman said she told
Roundtree: "Thanks for cutting in
line, but you are welcome anyway;"
and he responded by swearing and
calling her fat. After Roundtree
checked out, the woman left her cart
with her boyfriend and followed
Roundtree as he left the store to ask
him why he had been so mean, she
said. The woman said Roundtree
shoved his elbow into her chest and
swore at her. Then, he punched her
on the left side of her face, knocking
her to the ground, according to a wit-
ness. The woman held onto
Roundtree's shirt so he wouldn't
leave and he hit her multiple times
on the head, she said. Then, the
woman's boyfriend ran to her aid
and told Roundtree to let the woman
go, according to the arrest report.
Bond $500.
* Wade Kirby Clary, 38, 2700
Croton Road, 6, Melbourne, at 12:30
p.m. Thursday on an active Citrus
County warrant for an original charge
of grand theft and for felony violation
of probation on original charges of
burglary of a structure and dealing in


stolen property. No bond.
* Daniele Marie Rozmus, 18,
2325 Stanley Terrace, Homosassa,
at 2:15 p.m. Friday on an active
Hernando County warrant for an
original felony charge of burglary of
structure. Bond $2,000.
Florida
Highway Patrol
Arrests
* Lazaro Sanchez, 37, 15301
Pinellas Ave., Dade City, at 11:31
a.m. Friday on a charge of driving
while license suspended/revoked.
According to the arrest report,
Sanchez's license had been can-
celed because he is not a United
States citizen and his renewal for
citizenship was denied. Bond
$500.

Crystal River Police
Department
* Crystal River Police
Department reports, in the case of
Juanita Marie Lockley, who was
arrested Friday, Aug. 3, the case
was not found and charges were
dropped.


SKEETER
Continued from Page 1A


tive. It's absolutely the best way
to do mosquito control."
The district bought the 1973
Bell 206 in December 2004 for
$350,000. It's housed in a hangar
at the Inverness Airport that the
district bought in 2003 for
$24,000.
Since then, the district has
paid about $284,000 in expenses,
including parts, labor, fuel and
repairs, according to district
records.
The helicopter has flown
about 87 hours this year, mostly
in August Flight log records
show the helicopter flew about
44 hours surveying for mosqui-
toes in remote areas and anoth-
er 30 hours spraying with lar-
vacide or adulticide treatment
Jacobson, who was hired in
January after 11 years as section
manager mosquito control for
Hillsborough County, said he


Records show the

helicopter flew 37

hours in 2005 ....


tries not to utilize the helicopter
during dry periods.
"It's an excellent tool, but it is
expensive," he said.
This is the first year the heli-
copter is being used on a regular
basis. Records show the helicop-
ter flew 37 hours in 2005 and 22
hours in 2006.
Jacobson said the helicopter
covers a much broader area
than any ground units.
For example: A two-hour heli-
copter mission may cover 8,000
acres of spraying; it would take
the fog truck eight hours to cover
about half of that much ground,
he said.
The helicopter's most recent
flight on Sept 5 covered 80 acres
in just under an hour.
'"To cover 80 acres by ground,"
Jacobson said, "would take a
week"


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


U S , . r' C


City H
Daytona Bch. 86
Ft. Lauderdale 89
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 90
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 86
Key West 90
Lakeland 92
Melbourne 88

' 7 '


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm'
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
,*. ,* ,


Northeast winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light chop. Partly cloudy today with scat-
tered showers and thunderstorms.


DAY OUTLOOK
TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 91 Low: 71
.- Partly sunny with scattered showers
v- and thunderstorms


.w-- MONDAY
High: 90 Low: 70
., Afternoon and evening thunderstorms will be
heavy at times

p *p ^TUESDAY
' High: 89 Low: 70
. .. Wa Sunshine to start, then developing
thunderstorms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


91/72
97/62
71/90
82
+2

0.03 in.
1.45 in.
35.75 in.
42.84 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DATE DAY

9/16 SUNDAY
9/17 MONDAY


Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.00 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 76
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 77%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were light, grasses were
moderate and weeds were
absent.
*Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Qnfi..rUinw redo YUUU t ..:JIL Ilt-


Saturday was good with
ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MIN
(MORNING) (A
9:36 3:25 9:59
10:28 4:16 10:5;

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


OR I
FTERN(
3
2 4


SUNSET TONIGHT........
( SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY
OC. 3 0C.11 MOONSET TODAY


'BRUN CONDITIOlNS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777.
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's V
http://flarne.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi


WATERING RULES


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus Count
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness res
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending;
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 c.
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; a
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. o
S .. . . . . , . .


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka 8:20 a/4:22 a 9:37 p/5:00 p. 8:49 a/4:50
Crystal River 6:41 a/1:44 a 7:58 p/2:22 p 7:10 a/2:12
Withlacoochee 4:28 a/12:10 p 5:45 p/- 4:57 a/12:0(
Homosassa 7:30 a/3:21 a 8:47 p/3:59 p 7:59 a/3:49


Monday


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
sunny
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


K

Gulf water
temperature


87�
Taken at Egmont Key


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.52 28.52 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.27 34.27 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.80 34.79 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 36.25 36.28 42.40
Levels reported In feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

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I_..


PUllut- City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
MAJO Atlanta
AJOR Atlantic City
OON) Austin
3:48 Baltimore
,:40 Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
...7:34 P.M. Buffalo
Burlington, VT
S7:16A.M. Charleston, SC
.11:47 A.M. Charleston, WV
.10:16 P.M. Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
For more Dallas
Web site: Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
ty Hartford
sidents, Houston
g in 2 or 3, Indianapolis
an water Jackson
dresses Las Vegas
Little Rock
n their day Los Angeles
on their day. Louisville
' � Memphis
S.'' Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
V Montgomery
High/Low Nashville


a 10:28 p/5:41 p
a 8:49 p/3:03 p
0 a 6:36 p/12:51 p
a 9:38 p/4:40 p


Saturday
H L Pcp.
67 53 .25
89 67
72 61
81 65 .92
74 62 .90
91 67
72 62 .02
82 48
81 63
83 55
65 59 .34
56 50 .04
66 52 .62
86 72
66 54
83 62
61 39
68 48
59 51
89 71 .10
63 48
64 54 .28
90 66
88 50
61 37 .01
60 43
89 68
70 48
67 59 .01
68 58 .13
92 74
64 43
82 67
97 76
76 61
73 60
72 52
76 60
59 40
63 36
89 70
88 68
73 56


Sunday
Fcst H L
sunny 63 37
ptcldy 88 61
sunny 70 46
ptcldy 78 60
sunny 67 56
sunny 93 66
sunny 67 45
ptcldy 86 52
sunny 82 57
sunny 79 50
sunny 63 47
ptcldy 66 44
sunny 62 39
ptcldy 79 68
sunny 69 47
sunny 73 53
ptcldy 71 53
sunny 72 48
ptcldy 65 46
sunny 78 59
sunny 69 48
sunny 60 34
sunny 92 70
ptcldy 86 53
sunny 75 61
ptcldy 67 48
sunny 91 65
ptcldy 75 52
sunny 68 45
sunny 64 38
sunny 91 69
ptcldy 70 50
sunny 84 60
sunny 96 72
sunny 83 60
sunny 73 60
sunny 75 52
sunny 82 62
sunny 68 55
sunny 74 55
sunny 87 63
sunny 87 61
sunny 77 56


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy; dr=drlzzle;
f-fair h-hazy; pc-partly cloudy; r-raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; a=sunny, shashowers;
an-snow; ta=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 88 76 sunny 87 71
New York City 69 60 .08 .sunny 68 53
Norfolk 76 68 .04 sunny 70 55
Oklahoma City 84 56 sunny 89 68
Omaha 59 37 sunny 82 63
Palm Springs 10470 sunny 10270
Philadelphia 72 60 .15 sunny 69 50
Phoenix 10387 ptcldy 10279
Pittsburgh 60 49 ptcldy 66 43
Portland, ME 63 55 .13 sunny 63 43
Portland, Ore 68 57 ptcldy 69 56
Providence, R.I. 68 60 .36 sunny 64 40
Raleigh 82 65 sunny 73 47
Rapid City 82 48 sunny 89 55
Reno 80 47 sunny 79 47
Rochester, NY 57 51 .15 ptcldy 66 43
Sacramento 77 56 sunny 84 57
St. Louis 65 45 ptcldy 76 62
St. Ste. Marie 54 35 .01 ptcldy 67 49
Salt Lake City 89 59 tstrm 83 56
San Antonio 91 71 ptcldy 93 70
San Diego 75 65 sunny 76 64
San Francisco 70 58 sunny 69 55
Savannah 89 73 .10 ptcldy 81 68
Seattle 67 55 shwrs 64 54
Spokane 77 52 ptcldy 77 47
Syracuse 63 52 .31 sunny 63 43
Topeka 58 45 .03 ptcldy 84 66
Washington 71 64 sunny 69 48
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Imperial, Calif. LOW 21 Hibbing, Minn.

WORLD CITIES .


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 68/47/pc
Athens 84/65/s
Beijing 79/65/pc
Berlin 65/44/pc
Bermuda 86/74/pc
Cairo 89/65/s
Calgary 68/45/pc
Havana 89/78/ts
Hong Kong 90/78/ts
Jerusalem 85/65/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


86/62/s
72/53/pc
86/61/s
74/52/ts
61/43/pc
58/43/sh
74/45/pc
83/66/pc
79/60/s
65/45/pe
87/77/ts
66/43/pc
63/42/pc


44
Norvell Brvl nt:HwV
inkenflield
nene .Cannondale Dr.
N \ \ Meadowcrest
I \\ - Blvd


c


Meadowcrest
office
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429




Inverness
office

106 W. Main
St., Inverness,
FL 34450


Who's In charge:


For the RECORD


THREE


ED
'wEIV i


SEPT 20


Courthouse
Tompkins St. 0 2 square
- C On

< 1 ..44-
Cc


A*J4 NUNDAY, -�FFTEMBER 10, .4VV I


...................
...................
.............


.........................


odA SI YNDAY- SRPTFMBER 16. 2007


Gerry Mulligan ....................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ........................... Operations Manager, 563-3232-
Charlie Brennan ...................................... . Editor, 563-3225
John Provost ................. Advertising/Marketing Director, 563-3240
Tom Feeney .............................. Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart ........................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John Murphy ................................ Online Manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan ..... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Jennifer Wall ........................... Classified Manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon .............................. Business Manager, 564-2908
Deborah Kamlot ................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ...................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ....................... Linda Johnson, 563-5660
News and feature stories .......................... Mike Arnold, 564-2930
Community/wire service content ................. Cheryl Jacob, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... John Coscia, 563-3261
Sound Off ............................. ........... ................ . 563-0579
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Gimus COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE SuNDAY, SEP FEMBFR 16, 2007 5A


ANALYSIS
Continued from Page 1A

Secretary Robert Gates had
raised the possibility that the
U.S. force could drop to 100,000
by the end of 2008.
That would mean a significant
withdrawal from the roughly
168,000 U.S. troops in Iraq now
but would guarantee a large
American presence there when
Bush hands the presidency to
his successor in 16 months.
That sits just fine with Lee
Daugherty, a salesman at The
Gun Shop in Savannah, Ga., who
considers himself a conserva-
tive-leaning independent and
who keeps a crossed-through
picture of Democratic presiden-
tial candidate Sen. Hillary
Clinton in the store.
"I think we're going to be
involved for several more years,
there's no doubt in my mind,"
said Daugherty, 58. "If we're
going to see this through, we've
got to finish it We've got to play
to win."
Daugherty said he agrees "100
percent" with Bush's assertion
that a free Iraq will help protect
the U.S. from terrorism at home.
Bush said Thursday a free Iraq
would also counter Iran and be
an "anchor of stability" in the
Middle East
Sen. Jack Reed of Rhode
Island, delivering the
Democratic response, said Bush
had failed to provide an ade-
quate plan to end the war in Iraq
or a "convincing rationale" to
keep it going.
The interviews Friday, an-
unscientific sampling, reflected
some of the familiar opinions of
the war itself. Some people men-
tioned weapons of mass destruc-
tion that have never been found;
others complained the media
was not reporting enough good
news from Iraq. I
Scientific surveys, mean-
while, have shown an American
public clearly turned against the
war
According to the most recent
Associated Press-Ipsos poll on
Iraq, 57 percent of Americans
say the war was a mistake, com-
pared with just 37 percent who
said say it was the right decision.
Those figures have held roughly
steady for more than a year
A separate AP-Ipsos poll put
approval of the president's han-
dling of the war at just 33 per-
cent Both polls were completed
before the Bush address and
had margins of sampling error of
3.1 percent
Other recent opinion polls -
- also taken before the Bush
speech - have shown solid
majorities of Americans believe
the "surge" has not stabilized
Iraq and favor some type of U.S.
withdrawal, gradual or immedi-
ate.
One of them is Joan Stander, a


-- AP-IPSOS POLL -- PILOT

Approval ratings Continued from Page 1A
show mixed results


Congressional support r
slightly, while president
approval dropped 2 perch
Presidential and congi
approval ratings
40 percent . .........
Bush ..Con
35 3

3 0 . . .. ....... ... .. ..
(both)
2 5 ..... ....... .. ....... ..

20. 1 " r' . r..T
Jan. Feb. April June
8-10 /5-7 2-4 4-6
Jan. March May
16-18 5-7 7-9
NOTE: Poll of about 1,000 ac
Jan. to Sept. 2007; margin of
percent. Poll was not taken ii
congressional approval.


76-year-old part-time
teacher, who turned
small weekly antiwar
Montpelier, Vt, carry
that read, "Demand a
this unjust war"
But she said she
expect an end unless
pulled the plug on final
war "I don't think they
guts," she said.
Frustration with Ira
Democrats regain cont
House and Senate, but
has been unwilling
behind proposals to cu
ing for the war
Several people int
around the nation said
conflicted about the ne
Iraq, discouraged as
death toll climbs steady
4,000 but worried ab
might happen if th<
States pulls out
"I think it's going to 1
a 10-year war unless wi
out," said Barbara Tud(
tomer service repre
from Topeka, Kan.,
Friday was visiting
Lincoln landmark
Springfield, Ill.
But she fretted: "If ta
States pulls out, what
say about us? That w
scared off? That- we
intimidated? I think w
just have to stay the c
the best can and show
that we're a power to
oned with."
And at the Alamo,
Antonio church that
symbolize a heroic
freedom and independ
Stovall, a . 50
Republican visiting
Seattle, figured it wo'
least 2009 before the T
conduct a major with
"I think we'll always
presence there," she
we get out too early, x
done it for nothing"


rose live in Citrus County because his
al parents and his wife's family live
cent. in Citrus Springs.
einal In April 2005, the district
board reacted to a salary study
by slashing Sanchez's pay to
gress $35,827. The study, which com-
pared the pay rates of 25 district
positions to other mosquito con-
33 trol districts in Florida, showed
Sanchez's pay at about the medi-
26 an.
� .. .'- Board members, however,
elected to reduce his pay to the
e .Au... minimum suggested by the
s A6g study
July Sept. Sanchez, saying the pay was
9-11 10-13 too low, quit on May 6, 2005. He
adults taken agreed to stay with the district
f error �t 3 on a monthly contract basis to
n June for provide mosquito-control spray-
ing on an as-needed basis.
AP The contract, which Sanchez
said he wrote himself, states that
substitute he will "...on weekends or when-
up at a ever possible perform duties of
protest in all the Citrus County Mosquito
ng a sign Control District rotary wing air-
an end to craft in support of aerial appli-
cation of insecticides and other
did not administrative flights in and
Congress around Citrus County."
mcing the For that, Sanchez was paid $52
' have the an hour- plus mileage from his
Titusville home.
)q helped Invoices from May to
trol of the December 2005 show he billed
t the party the county for about 200 hours
to unite work Of that, about 30 hours are
t off fund- devoted to spraying for mosqui-
toes in Citrus County. The other
erviewed billed hours include flying the
d they felt helicopter to Kissimmee for new
�xt step in equipment and training for that
the U.S. new equipment
ily toward In all, the district paid
out what Sanchez $11,629 for the month-
e United to-month contract work
Meanwhile, the district was
be at least unable to hire a replacement
e just pull Longtime board member
der, a cus- Brenda Buzby said the job sim-
sentative ply didn't get much response.
who on One applicant, from Manatee
Abraham County wanted to fly the district
ks in helicopter home every night as if
it was a company vehicle.
he United ' "That wasn't going to work,"
does that she said.
'e can be So the board brought Sanchez
can be back and asked him if he would
e literally return full time. Sanchez said he
course, do would, but with a written agree-
the world ment to protect him from anoth-
be reck- er pay cut
According to Sanchez, the
the San three board members were split
came to on what to offer One suggested
stand for $70,000 annually, another
lence, Joy $60,000 and a third $65,000. They
)-year-old all agreed on $65,000; Buzby and
g from Sanchez signed the letter of


uld be at
U.S. could
rawal.
ys have a
added. "If
we'll have


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PAY PERFORMANCE
Here is the history of Luis
Sanchez's pay arrangements
with Mosquito Control:
* October 2004: District hires
Sanchez at an annual pay of
$43,867 to pilot the district
helicopter.
" April 2005:
Mosquito
control
board cuts
Sanchez's
annual pay
to $35,827
-the min.
amount Luis
amount Sanchez
recom-
mended in
a salary study.
* May 6, 2005: Sanchez
resigns.
" May 7, 2005: Sanchez and
district sign a continuing
one month contract to pro-
vide weekend and as-needed
aerial treatment at a rate of
$52 an hour. Through early
December, he bills the coun-
ty for about 200 hours -
plus mileage - and is paid
$11,629. Of those hours
billed, about 22 are for aeri
al spraying in Citrus County.
* Dec. 8, 2005: District board
and Sanchez sign "letter of
agreement" that pays
Sanchez $65,000 per year,
or $31.25 per hour. to oper
ate the aviation program.

agreement Dec. 8,2005.
The letter gives Sanchez
responsibility of the aviation
program, including helicopter
maintenance and scheduling
missions for larvaciding and
adulticiding.
Sanchez said in an interview
that he insisted on the formal
agreement because of what hap-
pened to his pay just a few
months earlier


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"I told them my wife will kill
me ifI don't get it in writing," he
said.
He also said board members
wanted to groom him as a possi-
ble future district director and
encouraged him to take college
classes online. He said he did
that at his own expense, but did
much of his school work in the
mosquito control office in
Lecanto while not flying because
board members wanted him to
do that
Buzby said she doesn't recall
that conversation occurring at a
board meeting. Neither Gerald
Kelley nor Keith Anderson, who
were on the board at the time,
could be reached for comment
Saturday.
Sanchez said he began to hear
complaints from other workers
about his studying on district
time. He said he has since given
up the schooling.
Records show Sanchez
logged 22 hours of flight time for
spraying or surveying in 2006.
He said that log doesn't reflect
the time it takes to prepare
flights for missions, or the time
for maintenance and inspec-
tions.
This year, Sanchez has logged
about 88 hours of missions in
Citrus County.
Sanchez also performs other
duties, such as operating the
district's fog truck Director Joel
Jacobson, who started in
January, said Sanchez helps
perform duties in open posi-
tions that have hot been filled
because of budget cutbacks.
Davis, who along with Ken
Frink was elected to the mos-
quito control board in 2006, said
Sanchez earns his pay.
"I've even seen the man mow-
ing the grass, for God's sake,"


she said. "He just doesn't hang
around and play tiddlywinks. He
does everything that's required
to be done."
A 2006 pay study, similar in
scope to the one done in 2004,
showed that Sanchez's pay was
higher than of any of the coun-
ties that participated in the sur-
vey It is about $5,000 above the
high end of the study's recom-
mended pay for pilots.
It's also higher than the pay
range for Citrus County Sheriff's
Office helicopter pilots. Sheriff's
spokeswoman Gail Tierney said
the range is $38,600 to $59,830 for
pilots certified to fly either fixed-
wing or rotor-wing aircraft
Jacobson, whose pay is $9,500
a year less than Sanchez, said his
wife Pamela is a chief mosquito
control pilot in Hillsborough
County and is paid $55,000 a year
with five years' experience.
Buzby said she has no issue
with Sanchez's pay because the
flying is dangerous.
"I think $65,000 is reasonable
pay," she said. "Not only does he
fly at treetop level, he does other
things, too."
Frink, however, said the board
should review Sanchez's pay
agreement
"I don't agree with the con-
tractual arrangement with the
board," he said. "He should be a
regular employee like anyone
else out there. It's not fair to any
of the other employees. I don't
know how they came across this
salary they got I'm very certain
other capable pilots are out
there."
Sanchez said he doesn't want
to cause any concerns.
"I try to be as honest as I can
possibly be," he said. "When I
work for someone, I do my very
best I give 200 percent"


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SUNDAY, SFPTEMBER 16, 2007 SA


CiTwus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


I








CITRUS COUN'I (FL) CHRONICI.E


Obituaries-


James 'Jimmy'
Eack, 65
CRYSTAL RIVER
James M. 'Jimmy" Eack, 65,
Crystal River, died Friday,
Sept 14, 2007, at the Munroe
Regional Medical Center,
Ocala.
Born Nov. 27, 1941, in Bronx,
N.Y., to John
and Eleanor
Eack, he came
here 13 years
ago from
Matawan, N.J.,
where he retired as a tractor-
trailer driver.
He was a member of
Teamsters Local Union in
Newark, N.J. He hauled pre-
cast concrete and steel con-
struction beams needed in
helping to build the World
Trade Center, bridges and
other structures.
He was a U.S. Army veteran,
serving in the 82nd Airborne
and served in the 11th Special
Forces Reserves.
He was a member and
served as past president of the
Dan Campbell All Airborne
Association of Citrus County
and a member of the Spring
Run Homeowners Association,
serving as past director for
three years and secretary for
two years.
He enjoyed fishing, boating
and scuba diving, and he
restored antique clocks as a
hobby.
He was Catholic, and he
attended the St. Joseph
Catholic Church in Keyport,
N.J.
Survivors include: his wife of
38 years, Cynthia, Crystal
River; and his son, Scott Eack
and Robin, Keyport, N.J.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

William Lynch, 87
CRYSTAL RIVER
William Thomas Lynch, 87,
Crystal River, died Wednesday,
Sept 12,2007, in Lecanto.
Born in Baltimore, Md., he
lived in Anchorage, Alaska,
until 1983,
when he
moved to Lutz,
then to
Lecanto. He '
has lived for
the past six years in Crystal
River
Formerly a Maryland Marine
Patrol officer, he worked for
the Corps of Engineers as a
marine inspector in Palatka,
Anchorage, Alaska, and retired
from Tampa.
A veteran of World War II, he
served in the U.S. Army Air
Force. He was a member of
Disabled American Veterans
and the Moose Lodge.
. He loved the outdoors, boat-
ing and saltwater fishing. He
loved to travel and drive
around, and made several trips
to Alaska. He enjoyed bowling.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Bobbi Lynch.
Survivors include: his son,
William Thomas Lynch Jr. and
his wife Rhonda, Crystal River;
his daughter, Kathy L. Pitton
and her husband John,
Seminole; four grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.
; Lawrence
" Nyegard, 84
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lawrence Kenneth Nyegard,
84, Crystal River, formerly of
Tampa, died Friday, Sept 14,
2007, at home, under the care
of his family and Hospice of
Citrus County.

HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation






David Heinz & Family
341-1288
Inverness, Florida



Funeral Home


Born May 17, 1923, in
Pittsburgh, Pa., he was a first-
generation American born to
Norwegian immigrant parents.
For many years, he was a
masonry contractor in the
Tampa area.
He joined
the U.S. Coast
Guard at the
onset of World
War II and : .
served as a
flight engineer
assigned to aer- -
ial reconnais-
sance of the Lawrence
North Atlantic. .--,'
He and his
crew flew sev-
eral perilous
missions for
which he was
awarded the World War II Air
Medal.
Following the service, he
continued his love of flying and
remained an accomplished
pilot. He also was a skilled
mechanic and craftsman.
At the end of the war,, he
married Edith Sellers and
eventually moved to Florida in
1953 with his wife and chil-
dren. He loved boating and
fishing on the open waters of
the Gulf of Mexico and the
inland waters of north-central
Florida. He spend the final
years of his life near the shores
of Lake Rousseau close to his
daughter, grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
his son, Lawrence K. Nyegard
Jr., and his daughter Sandra
Pennington.
. Survivors include, his wife of
63 years, Edith Nyegard,
Crystal River; his daughters,
Mary Butler and Gene, Crystal
River, and Lauren Marriott
and Dave, Perrysburgh, Ohio;
his son, James R. Nyegard and
Rose M., Zephyrhills; 10 grand-
children; 21 great-grandchil-
dren; one great-great-grand-
child; and five of the original
12 siblings.
Cremation arrangements
under the care of Roberts
Funeral Home, Dunnellon.

Mary Rivers, 90
LECANTO
Mary G. Rivers, 90, Lecanto,
died Friday, Sept. 14, 2007, in
Lecanto.
Born Feb. 2, 1917, in
Massena, N.Y., she was the
daughter of the late John
Barna and the late Amelia
Merk She came here in 1985
from Stratford, Conn. She was
a seamstress.
She was Catholic.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Albert M.
Rivers, who died Sept. 18, 1995.
Hooper Funeral Homes and
Crematory, Inverness.

David
Schneider, 75
INVERNESS
David Charles Schneider, 75,
Inverness, died Friday, Sept.
14, 2007, at Arbor Trail Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center,
Inverness.
Born Jan. 29,
1932, in Jersey
City, N.J., he
was the son of
the late Fred
and Violet (Hunt) Schneider,
and moved here in 1997 from
Tellico Plains, Tenn.
He was retired from his


occupation of residential
painter.
He served in the U.S. Marine
Corps during the Korean War.
He was Methodist.
He was a member ofVFW Post
No. 7987 in New Port Richey.
Survivors include: his wife of
34 years, Barbara (Hankinson)
Schneider; two sons, Kurt
Schneider, Roswell, N.M., and
Brandon M. Schneider,
Inverness; two daughters,
Linda Anaya, Roswell, N.M.,
and Bonniejean Schneider,
Roswell, N.M.; one stepson,
Tommy Coggin, Reno, Nev.; two
stepdaughters, Kim L.
Roberson, Las Vegas, Nev., and
Annemarie Craig, Norman,
Okla.; one brother, Fred
Schneider Jr., North Caldwell,
N.J.; one sister, Ruth Lloyd,
Lakewood, N.J.; 15 grandchil-
dren; and three great-grand-
children.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Funeral

NOTICE

James "Jimmy" Eack A
Funeral Mass for James M.
"Jimmy" Eack, 65, will be cele-
brated at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept
17, 2007, from St. Benedict
Catholic Church in Crystal
River, with Father Michael
Suzyynski as celebrant.
Friends may call from 5 to 8
p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16, 2007, at
the Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River, with
prayer and vigils at 7:30 p.m.
Private cremation will follow
the service, under the direc-
tion of the Strickland Funeral
Home, Crystal River

Deaths
ELSEWHERE


Martin
Abeloff, 65
DOCTOR
BALTIMORE - Dr. Martin
Abeloff, who guided Johns
Hopkins University's Kimmel
Cancer Center through a peri-
od of rapid growth, has died.
He was 65.
Abeloff, who led the center
for 15 years, died Friday after a
battle with leukemia, said
Vanessa Wasta, a cancer center
spokeswoman. Abeloff was the
second director of the center,
following Dr. Albert Owens Jr,
who founded what was then
called the Johns Hopkins
Oncology Center.
Abeloff, a 1966 graduate of
the Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine, was known
for his work in developing solid
tumor clinical research pro-
grams and breast cancer.

Bobby Byrd, 73
MUSICIAN
LOGANVILLE, Ga. - Bobby
Byrd, longtime collaborator
with the late Godfather of Soul,
James Brown, and co-founder
of the Famous Flames, has
died. He was 73.
Byrd died Wednesday at his
home near Atlanta, according
to the Willie A. Watkins Funeral
Home. News accounts attrib-
uted Byrd's death to cancer.
- From wire reports


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Spy chief gets political crash course
Associated Press


WASHINGTON - President
Bush's spy chief is in the midst of
a crash course on how to navi-
gate some of Washington's most
dangerous terrain: Capitol Hill.
By many accounts, National
Intelligence Director Mike
McConnell has a lot to learn as
the administration's point man
on its controversial effort this
fall to overhaul the law that gov-
erns how national security agen-
cies snoop on U.S. soil.
When Congress created
McConnell's job in late 2004,
lawmakers intentionally kept
the spy chief off the president's
Cabinet, adhering to the tradi-
tion that intelligence officials
should eschew politics. But in
recent months, McConnell has
opened himself up to criticism
that he has become too political
to oversee the 16 spy agencies.
Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif, a
co-author of the legislation that
helped create his job, put it
bluntly to a Washington audi-
ence last week: 'Jane to Mike:
Please stop. You're undermining
the authorities of your office."
To some, McConnell is a well-
regarded retired Navy vice
admiral who left a lucrative
career as a government consult-
ant to respond to Bush's search
for a spy chief; a much-needed
veteran to help the often clumsy
intelligence agencies adapt to a
post-Sept 11 world.
To others, McConnell is out of
the shadows and in over his
head. Worse, he either does not
always think before he speaks or
he intentionally misstates key
facts. Just last week, he waited
two days before retracting
Senate testimony in which he
wrongly credited changes in
August to the Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance Act
with this month's success in
breaking up a plot against U.S.
targets in Germany
"Those arrests were made
with the assistance of intelli-
gence gathered under U.S. laws
in effect earlier this year," said
Rep. Rush Holt, D-N.J., chair-
man of a House Appropriations
panel that oversees intelligence
spending. 'The DNI knew that"
This summer, McConnell dove
headfirst into the FISA debate,
championing a bill that he said
would modernize the law to
ensure spy agencies adequately
could eavesdrop on adversaries.
Civil liberties advocates say his
ideas trample the Constitution.
McConnell caught the atten-
tion of Democrats in May when
he wrote an opinion column for
The Washington Post that left
the impression FISA had not
been updated since 1978. Among
other factual differences, House
Intelligence Chairman Silvestre
Reyes, D-Texas, responded that
the law had been updated in 50
ways since its passage.
Yet the breaking point for
some came when McConnell
stood just off the Senate floor as
lawmakers hotly debated how


Associated Press
National Intelligence Director Mike McConnell testifies on Capitol
Hill in this Feb. 27 file photo. By many accounts, McConnell has a
lot to learn as the administration's point man on its controversial
effort to overhaul the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.


best to update the law. That was
unusual for intelligence leaders,
who most often meet with law-
makers in Capitol Hill's window-
less, secure rooms.
Last month, he went to Texas-
for a border security conference
and gave an interview to the El
Paso Times in which he
revealed classified details about
how FISA works. He also con-
firmed for the first time that the
private sector assisted with
Bush's terrorist surveillance
program, among details that his
office had argued in court filings:;
could not be discussed publicly.
Senior Justice Department


officials questioned whether the
intelligence chief had over-
stepped. Reyes, who attended
much of the interview, said he,
too, was surprised by how much
McConnell divulged.
"I don't know why he went to
the extent that he did in that
interview, but certainly I hope
that doesn't recur," Reyes said.
McConnell's spokesman, Ross
Feinstein, said that the director
by law has declassification
authority but declined to say
whether McConnell followed
established processes to declas-
sify the information in the inter-
view.


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SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 16. 2007


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SUNDAY, SIi' iTIMjImt 16, 2007 7A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EVENT
Continued from Page 1A
members of the Citrus 20/20 Inc.,
a citizen-based community
organization, in partnership
with leaders from the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
Citrus County Government,
Progress Energy Inc. and the
Chronicle.
"It's just an opportunity for
public awareness," Citrus
County Aquatic Services
Director Mark Edwards said. It's
important to preserve the water-
ways "near and dear to hearts,"
he added.
Officials from County Aquatic
Services and the international
organization- - .- --Ocean
Conservancy hosted the event
and provided supplies for the
cleanup. Adopt-A-Shore has
taken place in Citrus County for
18 years, Edwards said. When
Save Our Waters Week launched,
it became a scheduled event
The Adopt-A-Shore event is
part of the Ocean Conservancy's
International Coastal Cleanup,
which started in 1986. Since its
beginning, volunteers world-
wide have collected "100 million
pounds of trash from 170,000
miles of shorelines, rivers, lakes
and wetlands," according to the
Ocean Conservancy's Web site,
www.oceanconservancy.com.
Therefore, Citrus County resi-
dents who participated in Adopt-
A-Shore were part of a world-
wide initiative to conserve
waterways.
In years past, Edwards said
local volunteers have collected
up to 15,000 pounds of garbage
from countywide waterways.
That's equivalent to about 15
fully-grown manatees.
"To me it's amazing that
there's that amount of trash,"
Edwards said.
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* For more information call
the Southwest Florida
Water Management
District Lecanto Service
Office, 527-8131.

What was even more outra-
geous were the objects found in
the water, according to volun-
teers and local officials. This
year, volunteers collected a
couch, freezer, television, vacu-
um, chain-link fence, two 55-gal-
lon drums and 20 tires.
"You name it, we found it,"
said Sandy Pope, a Crystal River
Middle School science teacher
She and four other facility mem-
bers, along with parents, super-
vised Crystal River Middle
School students, the largest
number of volunteers this year
On the west side of the county,
the two groups with the largest
number of volunteers were the
local not-for-profit organization
and singer Jimmy Buffet fan
club, the Parrot Heads of Citrus
County and Crystal River Middle
School; on the east side, the
largest number of volunteers
were from the airboaters' club,
the Citrus County Airboat
Alliance, and the Arbor Lakes
group.
Science teacher Sherry Alban
recruited the environmental
enthusiasts from Crystal River
Middle School. Pope, along with
media specialist Mary Nigels,
math teacher Kelly Gainer and
reading teacher Marge Sanchez
jumped on board. They chaper-
oned all the students and got
their hands dirty, too.


The students collected truck-
loads of garbage from areas
around Fort Island Beach and
Ozello Trail; some objects found
were beer bottles, underwear
and feminine products, she said.
Crystal River Middle School
parent Jaemette Almodovar said
she was surprised and alarmed
to see how many broken glass
pieces were scattered along the
shores and in the water She
decided to join the cleanup with
her 13-year-old daughter,
Precious Flores, who loves sci-
ence, Almodovar said.
"It's something her and I got to
do together," Almodovar added.
For many, the event was a fam-
ily affair Crystal River Middle
School and Rock Crusher
Elementary School parent John
Maisel collected garbage with
his two daughters, 11-year-old
Miranda and 8-year-old Destiny.
"We found 83 cigarettes, 26
caps and lids ... we found a but-
ton," Miranda said, reading off
her tally sheet. Ocean
Conservancy officials provided
data collection sheets for
research purposes.
On their day off from school,
the students could have
watched television or played
video games. Instead, they spent
time cleaning up the environ-
ment They rode out a thunder-
storm, which produced heavy
rain and lightning, and saved an
injured seagull - all in a day's
work
"They take pride in what
they've done because its some-
thing to help their community,"
Pope said.


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BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Sarah Kern, 12, tosses an old beer bottle to another volunteer
Saturday at Fort Island Gulf Beach during the Adopt-A-Shore and
Professional Association of Diving Instructors Cleanup. She was
with a group of Crystal River Middle School students participating
in the Save Our Waters Week event.


EVENTS ON TAP THIS
WEEK INCLUDE:
* 1:30 to 6 p.m. today:
Nature Coast Volkssport
Guide Hikes. 5- to 10-km
hikes. Starting point is
Fort Cooper State Park. $1
per person/ $2 carload.
Call 628-4543 for informa-
tion.
* Monday:
Kayaking with Matt Clemons.
County Boat Ramp at
Pirates Cove, Ozello. Call '
795-5650 for times and
registration, or visit
http://floridakayakcompa-
ny.com/eregistration.html.
$10 per person.
* 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday:
Homosassa River Springs
Tour. Starting Point: River
Safaris, 10823 W. Yulee ,
Drive, Homosassa Springs.,;
Call 628 5222 for reserve
tions. Capacity 30 per-
sons. Free.
* 6 p.m. Wednesday:
"Our Waters in Jeopardy"
Interactive game with local.
high school competing on"
water is-ues using the I
Jeopardy game format.
Jerome MultIPut pose
Room, Central room,
Central Florida Com1iunity
College, Citrus Campus,
Lecanto. Public invited.


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SA SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


Winds whip



mountain fire


Evacuations set

in California

Los Angeles Times
A fast-moving wildfire in the
San Bernardino National
Forest near Big Bear Lake in
Southern California has
scorched at least 18,000 acres
,and forced the evacuation of
hundreds of residents in what
U.S. Forest Service officials
called their top priority among
blazes across the nation
Saturday
The fire continues to grow as
winds reaching 20 mph pushed
flames fueled mostly by brush
and timber from one dry area
in the forest to the next.
� At least 500 people were told
,to evacuate in Fawnskin, on
:the north shore of the lake,
said U.S.. Forest Service
spokesman John Miller And a
mandatory evacuation also
was issued for Green Valley
Lake, an area with a popula-
tion of more than 500 which
touts itself as the "Hidden
Gem" of the San Bernardino
Mountains.
The fire, which started
Friday afternoon, has moved
so rapidly that firefighters are
unable to get ahead of it
Officials hoped winds would
die down overnight Friday, but
instead, they picked up.
Between midnight and 6 a.m.
Saturday morning, the fire
increased by 2 1/2 miles and


scorched at least 4,000 acres by
late morning. By 3:30 p.m. the
total had reached 18,000 and
was increasing fast
"When you have wind on
brush, it's a real flashy fuel that
allows the fire to spread real
quickly," Miller said.
"Right now, this fire is
nationally the No. 1 priority.
That means if we request a
resource we get it."
Among the resources being
used to battle the blaze are
more than 630 personnel, four
helicopters, 15 bulldozers and
a large DC-10 aircraft that
drops retardant.
No one has been hurt in the
fire, Miller said.
The cause of the fire has not
been determined.
Farther south, another wild-
fire was spreading in San
Diego County in areas north
and east of Julian, an old his-
toric mining camp about 40
miles northeast of downtown
San Diego.
The blaze was ignited about
mid-day Saturday and grew
quickly, burning about 500
acres by 4:15 p.m., said
California Department of
Forestry and Fire Prevention
spokesman Matt Streck.
Mandatory evacuations for sev-
eral hundred people were
ordered in the communities of
Whispering Pines and Wynola,
areas just outside Julian.
No one has been hurt and
about 500 personnel are bat-
tling the fire. Officials said they
were not sure what caused it to
start.


Chinese troops prepare for Darfur duties


The Washington Post
QINYANG BASE, China - The Chinese
military put on a display of its first Darfur-
bound peacekeepers Saturday, having
troops throw up Bailey bridges and feign
combat to dramatize Beijing's desire to be
seen as a partner in bringing peace to the
violence-torn corner of Sudan.
The training demonstration, by an engi-
neering unit of the People's Liberation
Army, was observed by foreign journalists
as part of a new campaign by the Chinese
government to show that it is cooperating
with the United States and other nations
to end the Darfur fighting, which since
2003 has displaced about 2.5 million peo-
ple and contributed to the deaths of as
many as 450,000 from violence and dis-
ease.
Military engineers wearing U.N.-blue
caps worked feverishly to build a stretch
of road, erect a bridge and put together a
prefab shelter designed to serve as a head-
quarters building. Force protection
troops, meanwhile, simulated reacting to
an ambush and sped about the training
grounds here in armored personnel carri-
ers in what an army announcer called "a


military training show."
In another facet of China's initiative, its
special diplomatic envoy for Darfur, Liu
Guijin, repeatedly has sought in
Washington and at the United Nations to
broadcast China's role in persuading the
Sudanese government to drop its opposi-
tion to allowing in a full U.N. peacekeep-
ing force. After long delays caused by hes-
itations in Khartoum, the Security Council
decided in late July to dispatch to Darfur
a 26,000-member unit, the largest peace-
keeping force in the world. Deployment is
scheduled to begin by the end of the year.
Since then, several nations have redou-
bled their efforts to get peace negotiations
under way
"On the resolution of the Darfur issue,
we have played a very constructive and
even unique role," Liu told reporters this
week at U.N. headquarters in New York
China's previous unwillingness to be
seen pressuring the Sudanese government
had generated appeals for a boycott of the
2008 Beijing Olympics, endangering what
the Communist Party government hopes
will be a showcase at home and abroad for
the country's swift economic transforma-
tion. With Olympic enthusiasm high


among the Chinese public, anything that
casts a shadow over the Games would
become a political problem for President
Hu Jintao and the party.
Several U.S. entertainment figures,
including Mia Farrow and Steven
Spielberg, raised the idea of a boycott ear-
lier this year Joining the chorus, 108 mem-
bers of the U.S. House of Representatives
wrote a letter to the Chinese government
in May warning that the Beijing Games
could be spoiled unless China gets more
actively involved in stopping the violence
in Sudan.
It is unclear to what degree the Security
Council's decision and Sudan's willing-
ness to accept the U.N. force have dissi-
pated the threat of an Olympic boycott.
Spielberg, for instance, had threatened to
back out of his role as artistic adviser for
the opening ceremony; his spokesman did
not respond to a question whether the
threat still stands.
China has become Sudan's largest oil
customer in recent years and has signed
large-scale oil exploration deals with the
government in Khartoum. In addition, it
has sold weapons to the Sudanese mili-
tary.


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SUNDAY, SlipTEIMiBiR 1.6, 2007 9A


C'rRUS COUNnTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fashionable Raul Castro takes small steps to win over Cubans


Associated Press
HAVANA - With Raul Castro in
charge, Cuba has raised payments to milk
and meat producers, is paying off its
debts to farmers and has stopped block-
ing the import of parts needed to keep
vintage cars rumbling along. Travelers
can even bring in DVD players and game
consoles, highly coveted by Cubans
starved for high-tech entertainment
Raul's ailing brother Fidel is still show-
ing leadership behind the scenes, and as
provisional president, he has only taken
small steps. But he's already giving clues
to how he might govern once he takes full
control - paying special attention to
quality-of-life problems, publicly scolding
state managers and bluntly acknowledg-
ing that salaries don't cover basic needs.
The new Chinese buses on intercity


routes are evidence of the Raul effect.
They were in the planning before Fidel
got sick, but they have become much
more visible since Raul gave a speech
late last year saying he was sick of hear-
ing bureaucrats' excuses and wanted
results.
To boost food production, lawmakers
agreed in June to pay producers 2 1/2
times more for milk and meat included in
the island's heavily subsidized ration pro-
gram and in meals provided at similarly
low-cost workplace cafeterias, schools,
hospitals and community centers. The
prices consumers pay will remain the
same.
At the same gathering, National
Assembly members were told that the
state had just paid off debts worth $23
million to the small farmers and coopera-
tives that grow two-thirds of the island's


fruits and vegetables, and renegotiated
$35 million in other debts.
The change is evident in style, too.
Where a Fidel speech could devote hours
to communism, his brother's oratory is
much more short and direct, and Cubans
love his public attacks on government
failures.
But 76-year-old Raul is only a caretak-
er president, and officials insist that 81-
year-old Fidel will be back And as long as
Fidel is alive, no one thinks Raul will
dare to make big moves that could annoy
the older brother he has loved and
admired since they were boys.
Thomas Fingar, the U.S. Deputy
Director of Nationai Intelligence, told the
U.S. Congress in June that while the
Cuban public has high expectations of
improvement, "Significant, positive polit-
ical change is unlikely immediately"


As caretaker president, Raul has "very
limited running room," said Cuba analyst
Phil Peters, of the pro-democracy
Lexington Institute think tank outside
Washington. "He seems to be looking for
small practical things that can make
Cubans' lives easier."
Cuban exiles in Miami are consumed
with rumors that Fidel is dying or dead.
But Cubans on the island rarely mention
him nowadays - they're already more
focused on what Raul, Fidel's constitu-
tionally designated successor, will do.
They were pleased to hear him confirm
on television that state salaries fail to
cover basic necessities, and some even
cheered when Raul delivered a slap at
inefficient state managers by comment-
ing sardonically about government farms
infested with a fast-growing, thorny bush
called marabu.


YO LASPYLS


Associated Press
A Cuban model performs
Saturday during a fashion show
commemorating the 17th
anniversary of the Handmade
Paper Workshop .in Old Havana.

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iOA SUNDAY. SEP MEMBER 16. 2007 WORLD CITRUS C0UNVY (FL) CuRoNcI.f~


Associated Press
A Shiite family gathers Saturday for Iftar, the breaking of
the fast, in their central Baghdad, Iraq home. Muslims
throughout the world are celebrating the holy month of
Ramadan, where observants fast from dawn till dusk.



_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 0v L 7 0 ~1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __=


U.S. nuclear experts
talk with N. Korea
SEOUL, South Korea - Recent
talks between a U.S.-led team of
nuclear experts and North Korea
were "businesslike" and "positive,"
an official said Saturday, raising
hopes for a deal on how to disable
the North's nuclear facilities.
Lim Sung-nam, South Korea's
No. 2 nuclear negotiator, made the
remark after receiving a briefing
from the American team of experts
who returned to Seoul earlier in the
day after a five-day survey of the
Nofth's main atomic facilities.
"The talks between the U.S. and
the North this time were conducted
in a businesslike manner in a very
positive atmosphere," Lim told
reporters. "Additional consultations
and a decision are expected at
next week's six-party talks."


Syria-to-Iraq crossings
by fighters decrease
WASHINGTON -The number
of foreign fighters entering Iraq
from Syria has decreased notice-
ably in recent months, correspon-
ding to a similar decrease in sui-
cide bombings and other attacks
by the group al-Qaida in Iraq,
according to U.S. military and intel-
ligence officials.
"There is an early indication of a
trend," said Gen. David H. Petrae-
us, the U.S. commander in Iraq, in
an interview. Border crossings from
Syria that averaged 80 to 90 a
month have fallen to "half or two-
thirds of that over the last two or
three months," Petraeus said.
One official said there is evi-
dence the Syrians have also been
stopping return crossings.
- From wire reports


Converts gain clout in militant cells


The Washington Post
BERLIN - Religious converts are play-
ing an increasingly influential role in
Islamic militant networks, having trans-
formed themselves in recent years from
curiosities to key players in terrorist cells
in Europe, according to counterterrorism
officials and analysts.
The arrests this month of two German
converts to Islam - Fritz Gelowicz and
Daniel Schneider - on suspicions that
they were plotting to bomb American tar-
gets are just one example of terrorism
cases in Europe in which converts to Islam
have figured prominently.
In Copenhagen, a convert is among four
defendants who went on trial this month
for plotting to blow up political targets. In
Sweden, a webmaster who changed his
name from RalfWadman to Abu Usama el-
Swede was arrested last year on suspicion
of recruiting fighters on the Internet. In
Britain, three converts - including the
son of a British politician - are awaiting
trial on charges of participating in last
year's trans-Atlantic airline plot.
"The number of converts, it seems, is
definitely on the rise," said Michael
Taarnby, a terrorism researcher at the
Danish Institute for International Studies.
"We've reached a point where I think al-
Qaida and other groups recognize the
value of converts, not just from an opera-
tional viewpoint but from a cultural one as
well."
Religious converts are sometimes more
prone to radicalization because of their
zeal to prove their newfound faith, ana-
lysts said. They are also less likely to
attract police scrutiny in Europe, where
investigators often rely on outdated demo-
graphic profiles in terrorism cases.
Converts are a tiny.subset of the Muslim
population in Europe, but their numbers


In Germany, government
officials estimated that
4,000 people converted
to Islam last year,
compared with an annual
average of 300 in the late
1990s. Less than 1
percent of Germany's
3.3 million Muslims
are converts.

are growing in isome-countries. In
Germany, government officials estimated
that 4,000 people converted to Islam last
year, compared with an annual average of
300 in the late 1990s. Less than 1 percent of
Germany's 3.3 million Muslims are con-
verts.
While religious leaders emphasize that
most converts are law-abiding citizens
who often promote interfaith understand-
ing, the recent arrests in Germany prompt-
ed some lawmakers to suggest that police
should keep converts under surveillance.
"Of course not all converts are problem-
atic, but some are particularly dangerous
because they want to demonstrate through
extreme fanaticism that they are particu-
larly good Muslims," Guenther Beckstein,
interior minister for the state of Bavaria,
said last week.
The trend is not limited to Europe. In
Florida, U.S. citizen and convert Jose
Padilla was convicted last month on con-
spiracy charges for participating in an al-
Qaida support cell. In March, David M.


Hicks, an Australian convert, became the
first prisoner at the U.S. prison at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to be convicted on
terrorism charges.
Converts have joined militant groups,
including al-Qaida, for years. Wadih el-
Hage, a Lebanese Christian who convert-
ed to Islam and became a U.S. citizen,
served as an aide to al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden in the 1990s and was
convicted for his role in the 1998 U.S.
embassy bombings in East Africa.
But counterterrorist analysts and offi-
cials said they have become much more
common and are now playing leadership
roles. They said there is also evidence that
militant groups, which used to eye con-
verts suspiciously as potential infiltrators,
are now encouraging them to join.
In May, al-Qaida deputy chief Ayman al-
Zawahiri released a videotape in which he
repeatedly praised Muslim leader
Malcolm X and urged African-American
soldiers to stop fighting in Iraq and
embrace Islam.
"I am hurt when I find a black American
fighting the Muslims under the American
flag," Zawahiri said, according to a trans-
lation of the speech by the SITE Institute,
a terrorism research group. "Why is he
fighting us when the racist Crusader
regime in America is persecuting him like
it persecutes us?"
This month, bin Laden released a rare
videotape in which he called upon all
Americans to convert to Islam. Analysts
said bin Laden's remarks, though theolog-
ical in nature, were probably not intended
as a direct recruiting pitch for al-Qaida.
But they said his speech likely was influ-
enced by Adam Gadahn, a U.S. citizen
from California who converted to Islam as
a teen-ager and is a media adviser for al-
Qaida. He was indicted in the United
States on treason charges last year.


* 'P. S


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IOASUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


WORLD


Cn-Rus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


Ramadan





CRTI, USn OUNT, (C )I Hnn;RO r EUDY lnME 6 07


w Prices
E V E R Y D AY


Don't worry about stocking up, get what you need, when you need it for the same low price...
This week, next week, EVERY WEEK!


12-Pack Coke Products
12 oz. Cans- All Varieties
2/$5
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Gain Laundry
Detergent
200 oz.
$8.79
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Thomas' Plain English
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6-Pack 1H2 oz. Whole Grain
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24 Pack Zephyrhills Spring Water


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10.13-12.5 oz.
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And this week's Hot Spot items..


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5 Lb. Bag -U.S.No. 1
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YOU SAVE $2.10 LB.


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Quality and variety are two great reasons to come see what all the fuss is about. From the
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SUNDAY, Sl--Vl't:M]317[Z 16, 2007 11A


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SUNDAY \V Q; '::
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007
www chronicleonline com rin:
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SNation

Air show


archers gather in D.C.


Iraq war protesters, supporters

both convene near the CapitolHO RI- K VA ol


Associated Press
The U.S. Navy Blue Angels fly-
ing team maneuvers Saturday
over the airspace above
Brunswick Naval Air Station
in Brunswick, Maine. The
popular flying team is in town
for another show on Sunday,
which may be the last one
before the base is scheduled
to close in 2011.


Prestigious awards
go to researchers
SNEW YORK -Two re-
. . searchers who opened up the
field of heart-valve replacement
have won a prestigious medical
prize.
The $150,000 Albert Lasker
Medical Research Awards will
be presented Sept. 28 in New
York by the Albert & Mary
Lasker Foundation.
Dr. Albert Starr of the Provi-
dence Health System in Port-
land, Ore., and Dr. Alain Car-
pentier of the Georges Pom-
pidou European Hospital in
Paris will share the clinical
research prize for developing
replacement heart valves.
More than 300,000 people a
year worldwide get heart valves
replaced, and it's the second
most common heart surgery in
the United States, the founda-
tion said.

WorldV s

Visiting


Associated Press
U.S. Commerce Secretary
Carlos Gutierrez, left, talks to
Medellin's mayor Sergio
Fajado during a visit Saturday
to the city's cable railway
system in Medellin, Colom-
bia.


Tour bus crashes
in western Mexico
MEXICO CITY - A bus car-
rying tourists who arrived on a
flight from Phoenix crashed in
.western Mexico on Saturday,
killing at least 18, bus company
and Red Cross officials said.
The Vallarta Plus bus was
'carrying 35 passengers from the
S'resort city of Puerto Vallarta to
Guadalajara when it ran off a
mountain road and plunged into
a ravine, Nayarit state police
director Fernando Carbajal said.
At least 18 people were killed
and 13 injured, five of them seri-
ously, said Nayarit state Red
Cross spokesman Miguel
Langarica.
Vallarta Plus spokesman
Daniel Rios said as many as
half of the passengers were
from a flight that had left Phoe-
nix on Friday for Guadalajara.
- From wire reports


Associated Press

. WASHINGTON - Thousands
of protesters gathered Saturday
outside the White House to
demand an end to the Iraq war
as counter-protesters rallied to
meet them on a planned march
to the Capitol.
The protesters gathered in
Lafayette Park with signs saying
"End the war now" and calling
for President Bush's impeach-
ment The rally, organized by the
ANSWER Coalition and other
groups, was expected to con-
clude with a march to the
Capitol.
Army veteran Justin Cliburn,
25, of Lawton, Okla., was among
a contingent of Iraq veterans in
attendance.
"We're occupying a people
who do not want us there,"
Cliburn said of Iraq. "We're here


to show that it isn't just a bunch
of old hippies from the 60s who
are against this war"
About 13 blocks away, nearly
1,000 counter-protesters gath-
ered near the Washington
Monument, frequently erupting
in chants of "U-S-A' and waving
American flags.
They planned to line both
sides of Pennsylvania Avenue to
confront anti-war protesters as
they marched by and follow
them to the Capitol.
Retired Air Force Lt. Col.
Robert "Buzz" Patterson, speak-
ing from a stage to crowds clad in
camouflage, American flag ban-
dannas and Harley Davidson
jackets, said he wanted to send
three messages.
"Congress, quit playing games
with our troops. Terrorists, we
will find you and kill you," he
said. 'And to our troops, we're


Arctic ice




retreating


Route could vastly trim shipping miles
Experts believe global warming has melted Arctic ice which may
allow the opening of the Northwest Passage sooner than
expected. It could trim thousands of miles off shipping from Europe
to Asia compared to the current route through the Panama Canal.


RUssIa


I ', i 1,, ,


-~Canamai.Ar r,-TIC
1%rcliipeIago GREErnLAND


.,',.
0 N
N


CVArjD.L


Northwest
.Passage
'.--* (Approximate
route


SOURCES: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; ESRI

Northwest Passage possibly

opening sooner than thought


Associated Press

PARIS - Arctic ice cover-
age has receded this week to
record lows, the European
Space Agency said, raising
the prospect of greater mar-
itime traffic through a long-
sought waterway known as
the Northwest Passage.
Until now, the passage has
been expected to remain
closed even during reduced
ice cover by multiyear ice
pack - sea ice that remains
through one or more sum-
mers, ESA said.
But satellite images this
week showed Arctic ice cover
fell to the lowest level since
scientists started collecting
such information in 1978,
Paris-based ESA said on its
Web site.
Many experts believe that
global warming is to blame
for melting the passage.
The waters are exposing
unexplored resources, and
vessels could trim thousands
of miles from Europe to Asia
compared with the current
routes through the Panama
Canal.
Ice has retreated to about 1
million square miles, said
Leif Toudal Pedersen, of the


Danish National Space
Center, in the statement ESA
said the previous low was 1.5
million square miles, back in
2005.
Ice levels in the Arctic ebb
and flow with the seasons,
allowing for intermittent traf-
fic between Europe and Asia
across northern Canada - a
route explorers and traders
have long dreamt could open
fully
Environmentalists fear
increased maritime traffic
and efforts to tap natural
resources in the area could
one day lead to oil spills and
harm regional wildlife.
Pedersen said the extreme
retreat this year suggested
the passage could fully open
sooner than expected. ESA
did not say when that might
be.
An agency spokesman
could not be reached by
phone Saturday.
With ice levels shrinking,
some countries - including
the United States and Canada
- have jockeyed for claims
over the passage, also a
potentially oil-region region
under North Pole from the
Atlantic to the Pacific through
the Arctic archipelago.


Associated Press
Demonstrators opposing the war in Iraq march Saturday in front of
the White House in Washington, D.C. At least 150 protesters were
arrested Saturday as thousands of demonstrators marched to the
Capitol demanding an end to the Iraq war.


here for you, and we support ated this year by veterans who " -
you." wanted to challenge war protest- An unidentified member of a
Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., ers. counter protest, center, yells at
made a surprise visit to the "We're a people of faith, anti-war demonstrators Satur-
counter-protest, which was courage and fidelity," said day as they march down
organized by the group Gather- Hunter, a 2008 presidential can- Pennsylvania Ave., towards the
ing of Eagles. The group was cre- didate. U.S. Capitol grounds.


Associated Press
In this photo made available by the European Space Agency, the McClure Strait in the Canadian
Arctic Archipelago is shown Aug. 31. The McClure Strait is the most direct route of the
Northwest Passage and has been fully open since early August 2007. The European Space
Agency said nearly 200 satellite photos taken together in September 2007 showed an ice-free
passage along northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland, and ice retreating to its lowest level
since such images were first taken in 1978.


Arctic sea ice naturally
extends its surface coverage
each winter in the Northern
Hemisphere, and recedes
each summer, ESA said, but


the overall loss has increased
since satellite records were
begun in 1978.
The opening this week was
not the most direct waterway,


ESA said. That would be
through northern Canada
along the coast of Siberia,
which remains partially
blocked.


Al-Qaida threatens Sunni leaders as Iraq's political crisis deepens


Associated Press
BAGHDAD - An al-Qaida front
group threatened to assassinate Sunni
leaders who support American troops
in Iraq as a Shiite bloc loyal to radical
cleric Muqtada al-Sadr defected
Saturday from the Iraqi government's
parliament base.
The two developments cast doubt
over prospects for political and military
progress in Iraq as the U.S. Senate
gears up for a debate next week on
Democratic demands for deeper and


faster troop cuts than President Bush
plans.
The threat against Sunni leaders
came from the Islamic State of Iraq,
which claimed responsibility for the
assassination Thursday of Abdul-Sattar
Abu Risha, the mastermind of the
Sunni Arab revolt against al-Qaida, in
Anbar province. Bush met Abu Risha at
a U.S. base in Anbar this month and
praised his courage.
In a Web posting, the Islamic State
said it had formed "special security
committees" to track down and "assas-


sinate the tribal figures, the traitors,
who stained the reputations of the real
tribes by submitting to the soldiers of
the Crusade" and the Shiite-led govern-
ment of Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki.
"We will publish lists of names of the
tribal figures to scandalize them in
front of our blessed tribes," the state-
ment added.
In a second statement, the purported
head of the Islamic State, Abu Omar al-
Baghdadi, said he was "honored to
announce" a new Ramadan offensive in


memory of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the
founder of al-Qaida in Iraq killed last
year in a U.S. air strike.
Hours after the announcement, a car
bomb exploded late Saturday in a most-
ly Shiite area of southwest Baghdad,
killing at least 11 people lined up to buy
bread at a bakery. Two of the dead were
children, police said.
Also Saturday, the U.S. military said a
soldier from the Army's Task Force
Marne was killed and four were wound-
ed the day before when a bomb explod-
ed near their foot patrol.









,~ 4
I,
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SFPTE181 1.6,-l


4


A2


.2007


CITRU-S COU)'.4TY CHRONIC.___________________________


Travel :

Maui B & B's hit
by strict regulation
WAILUKU, Hawaii - Maui's
long-established bed-and-break-
fast industry has faltered since
county officials cracked down on
illegal vacation rentals, leaving
the island with fewer accommo-
dations for visitors, according to
the Honolulu Star-Bulletin.
Maui County officials told
more than 50 operators of vaca-
tion rentals in July that they
couldn't continue operating with-
out permits.
Many family-run vacation
renters and small businesses
have suffered, said David
Dantes, president of the Maui
Vacation Rentals Association.
Those with pending permits
were allowed to honor reserva-
tions until the end of the year.
Others were ordered to cease
operations, immediately.
The county planning depart-
ment is working on a bill that will
restrict vacation rentals to resort
areas and business districts,
and help bed and breakfasts get
their permits in six to eight
months, Hunt said.
Deer Valley, Utah,
best ski resort
NEW YORK-Autumn
leaves are just starting to turn
color in most parts of the coun-
try. But if you love to ski, you're
already looking ahead to the
arrival of winter, planning your
visits to snowy slopes and shop-
ping for preseason offers.
SKI Magazine is just out with
its annual "Top 50 Resort
Guide," which names Deer
Valley,- Utah, as the No. 1 ski
resort in North America.
Deer Valley also received top
honors from SKI readers in the
categories of service, grooming
and dining. Other Utah resorts
that were No. 1 in various cate-
gories included Snowbird, voted
"Best Skier's Mountain," and Alta,
voted top "Weekend Escape."
Colorado had six resorts in
the overall top 10 list, more than
any other state. Vail was No. 2,
after Deer Valley. Whistler
Blackcomb, in British Columbia,
Canada, was third on the list,
f, followedd by Aspen and Snow-
mass, both in Colorado; Park
City, Utah; Breckenridge,
Beaver Creek and Steamboat,
Colo., and in the No. 10 spot,
Sun Valley, Idaho.
From wire reports


'On the Road' again


Jack Kerouac

slept where?

CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
Los Angeles Times
Fifty years ago this month, the Beat
Generation writer's novel "On the
Road" hit bookstores, its story told in
breathless, jazz-inflected cadences, its
plot lifted from the author's life. The
plot follows two friends and their
assorted pals on four cross-country
road trips, their adventures packed
with enough fast chatter to make Aaron
Sorkin's head spin, enough drink and
drugs and casual sex to satisfy a platoon
of rock stars, enough discovery and
enthusiasm and motion and exclama-
tion points and careening overloaded
sentences to give any reader a pang of
wanderlust.
But have you looked at those pages


lately? If you do and you're older than
30, Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty -
Kerouac's names for himself and his
mercurial friend Neal Cassady - might
seem more desperate and doomed than
you remember. And the North America
they're exploring might seem far away
indeed. (For details, consult the blog
www.littourature.blogspot.com.)
As you check this 21st century chart-
ing of Sal's travels, remember that it
was 1948 and 1949 when Kerouac and
Cassady made the trips that dominate
"On the Road," 1951 when Kerouac
wrote the bulk of the book and 1957
when Viking published it. Cassady died
at 41 in 1968, Kerouac at 47 in 1969. In
both deaths, alcohol was implicated.
As for the road then and the road
now:
E In 1957, Greyhound buses ruled the
roads, and the interstate highway sys-
tem was in its infancy. There were 40
McDonald's restaurants, fewer than 75
Holiday Inns, and there was one San


Francisco bookshop called City Lights,
run by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
Now, Greyhound and its parent com-
pany have been through bankruptcy
twice in the last 20 years. The interstate
highway system has grown to more than
45,000 miles, allowing for faster trips
and less local color. There are more
than 30,000 McDonald's locations and
1,384 Holiday Inns worldwide. There's
still one City Lights, now 54 years old,
on Columbus Avenue, still run by
Ferlinghetti.
* In the book, Moriarty takes a girl-
friend to Hector's, a cafeteria near 50th
Street in Manhattan's Times Square, for
"beautiful big glazed cakes and cream
puffs," and Paradise adds that Hector's
"has always been a big symbol of New
York for Dean." Later, Sal and Dean dig
the jazz at Birdland, a club on
Broadway near 52nd Street. Later still,
Sal and Dean eat franks and beans in a
Please see -./Page 18A


Los Angeles Times
City Lights has been a beacon for intel-
lectuals for 54 years. And it's still run by
Lawrence Ferlinghetti.


High, but not dry


DREAM
VACATJONS
Foto Onties�

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo contest,
for readers of the newspa-
per.
Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle.
At the end of the year, a
, - panel of judges will select
- . the best photo during the
year and that photographer
will win a prize.
, oPlease avoid photos with
computerized dates on the
print.
,Please make sure photo-
graphs are in sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to
the Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or dropped
Special to te Cnroricle Off at any Chronicle office
del and Jim Edwards took the tour to Hoover Dam. where everywhere they looked or any Accent Travel office.


the view was beautiful and unforgettable.y ..
the view was beautiful and unforgettable.


Oln their' first trio to Las Veg'as together.Mary Enj


Place names conjure images


Tipperary Town, Cona-
mara, Edenderry, Shan-
non, Kinsale, and Bally-
cotton - don't you just love the
sound of those names? Then
there's Bunratty (nice castle
there and Durty
Nellie's Pub, circa
1620) and
Crookhaven and r "
Crosshaven just
down the road a bit. - -
I never saw a -
Mulligan; I think
that has something !
to do with golf. .-
You've just got to
love Ireland. The Neil SE
names, to me, con-
jure up images of SPONTr
fluffy sheep, stone TOURC
walls, misty cliffs
and pubs - you knew I'd get
back to pubs. Pubs are all
about Irish brew. I won't get
into the finer points of ale,
beer, lager, etc., even if I knew
them, and whether they are
pale or dark, drunk warm or
cold, or whether the brew is to
be served in steins, pints, or
dimpled mugs. But, I do know a
few things about Ireland's
finest that I'd like to share with
you: 1. They have it! 2. It's good!
Smithwicks, Harps, and
Guinness come to mind. 3. The
finer points - I don't care,
especially on a hot day
I was going to press on to
other venues, but I have this
pub thing on my mind. Pub
names, like the brew, can be
interesting: O'Curry's, Blue
Bull Pub, Kyteler's Inn, Red
Fox Inn, Haughton's Pub, Hair
o'the Dog Pub - and nearly
11,000 more - love 'em all!


Finally, most offer Red Brick
Ale, "good for what ales you."
In almost all pictures of
Ireland, you will see stone
walls and sheep. The stone
walls are of particular interest
and serve a very
real purpose, as
well as being works
of art. In olden days,
as settlers cleared
fields for farming,
they stacked the
stones, which also
'- served as boundary
markers. Their
homes and field
awyer houses were also
awyer , made of stone, func-
ANEOUS tional and beauti-
GUIDE ful. Stone masons
are a highly regard-
ed bunch which has turned the
task into an art form that is
very refined and applied
according to local stone and
style.
Driving to scenic destina-
tions involves navigating over
the narrowest roads of any civ-
ilized country, where stone
walls, about 250,000 miles of
them, usually line the roadway,
offering no forgiveness if a car,
truck or a herd of sheep,
crowds one off the road. They
also drive on the "wrong" side
of the road.
Ireland is the land ofB & B's,
our preferred choice for lodg-
ing. Prices were moderate and
always included an Irish
breakfast - a hot drink, cereal,
toast, fried eggs, meat and the
ubiquitous cooked tomato.
Breakfast was predictable. Our
first stop, after breakfast and
hitting the road, was usually a


Special to the Chronicle
This typical sheep scene can be found almost everywhere in
Ireland.


pub or an inn, as they all serve
delicious soup and bread start-
ing late morning.
I won't leave you in suspense
as to shopping as you must
come home with some special
finds from this beautiful coun-
try. Ireland is famous for its
fine wool knitting, particularly
sweaters, and there is no better
place than the Blarney
Knitting Mills right there near
"the Stone."
Beautiful, and expensive,
crystal and pottery are also
specialties of Ireland. The
most popular makers,
Waterford Crystal and Balleek
Pottery, offer tours of their


plants and exhibits of work in
progress. Their showrooms
and museums are also very
interesting.
There is no room to spare in
our luggage, so we're headed to
the airport and home.

Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and his wife,
Karyn, are extensive travelers,
venturing to foreign countries
two to three times a year in
addition to taking several
domestic excursions
annually. They prefer
independent travel
or with small-group guided


Veterans and


friends tour Hawaii


DON MCLEAN
Special to the Chronicle
Veterans and friends travel
to places of historical interest
throughout the United States,
and Hawaii is a favorite.
In May and June, 72 veterans
and friends traveled to Hawaii
for 15 days of unequaled beau-
ty and sights. For many of the
veterans who had not been
back to the islands since World
War II, Korea and Vietnam, it
was a multiple experience to
relive past youthful endeavors;
view the incredible beauty cre-
ated by nature in the islands
and to pay respect to our fallen
comrades who paid the ulti-
mate sacrifice during our
country's fights for freedom.
For guests and friends who had
never seen the islands or had
the opportunity to visit the mil-
itary memorials, it was a very
moving experience.
The state capitol is in
Honolulu on Oahu at the
Kapioloni Palace and is the
home of the University of
Hawaii Rainbows. While stay-
ing six nights at the Ilikai and
the Hale Koa Hotels on Waikiki
Beach, our first day of travel
events included sightseeing at
the Diamond Head Crater, the
famous Blow Hole and fantas-
tic Hanama Bay, where "Blue
Hawaii" with Elvis Presley was
filmed. We went to the
Windward side of the island to
Kanoehe Bay and then to the
"Pali Lookout," where King
Kamaamae and his legions
fought At the Pearl Harbor


Special to the Chronicle
A Navy bugler played for our
services.
Naval Base, we held private
Memorial Services on the USS
Arizona Memorial, and from
there, we went to National
Cemetery of the Pacific, "The
Punchbowl," where further
services were held for our
departed comrades who are
interred at this national site.
While there we also visited the
Polynesian Cultural Center for
a day of viewing and partici-
pating in the Seven Cultures of
Polynesia. Taking a Hawaiian
Air flight to the city of Hilo on
the Island of Hawaii, we were
transported to the Hawaiian
Volcanoes National Park in the
heart of the Kilauea Crater
where we stayed at the Kilauea
Military Rest Camp, a beauti-
ful modern facility. While at

Please see TOUR/Page 18A


'~
.7


A"


j.








Crrius CouN'i (FL) CHRONICLE


* Rolling Thunder Florida
Chapter 7 in Citrus County will
host a tribute to former POWs at
the National POW Museum in
Andersonville, Ga., site of the
National POW Memorial. POWs
from every Florida chapter are
invited.
Open to the public, "The Ride
Home" from Wednesday to
Saturday will feature a POW/MIA
convocation honoring all former
POWs. Costs for this national
event are funded by public and pri-
vate sponsors. Call (813) 230-
9750.
The chapter has two groups
scheduled to depart from the
Beverly Hills VFW. The first group
will leave at 7 a.m. Thursday and
* the second will leave Friday.
Chapter 7 meets at 11 a.m. the
second Saturday monthly at VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills.
* Blanton-Thompson
'American Legion Auxiliary Unit
155, Crystal River, meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River. The auxiliary is dedicated to
helping the veterans, their families
and the youth of the community.
SAnyone interested in joining or get-
ting additional information about
the unit, call membership chair-
woman Barbara Logan at 795-
4233.
* The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition will resume its regular
open business meetings at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 27, at the Citrus
.County Resource Center next to
the VA clinic in Lecanto. All veter-
ans and veterans' organizations
are urged to attend as the Coalition
inakes final preparations for the
Citrus County Veterans Coalition
forum scheduled for Saturday, Oct.
20.
The "Veterans Forum" will be
from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Citrus
County Board of Realtors building
on State Road 44 in Lecanto, fea-
turing national, state and local leg-
islative speakers, plus representa-
tives from the North Florida/South
Georgia Health Care System to
bring all veterans up to date about
pending legislation and changes in
VA benefits. A contribution lunch-
eon will be served in the patio area
from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with
local talent rendering familiar patri-
otic music. There will be door
prizes and 50/50 tickets will be
sold.
Veterans organizations are invit-
ed to set up table displays at the
forum and you can make arrange-
ments at the Sept. 27 open busi-


ness meeting or by contacting
Chairman Ray Michael, First Vice
Chairman Fred Daniels, Second
Vice Chairman Joel Smoyer or
Forum Chairman Richard Floyd.
Their phone numbers are listed on
the CCVC Web directory at
www.ccvcfl.org.
All local veterans are invited to
the speaker program, free of
charge, at 12:30 p.m. in the main
auditorium. The speakers will field
questions after the program is
completed in a one-on-one basis.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary are at
906 E. State Road 44, Inverness;
telephone 344-3495; fax 344-3514.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 ison Veterans Drive,
Homosassa, west of U.S. 19. Turn
on to Veterans Drive from U.S. 19
at Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harle, Davidson. Phone 795-5012
during canteen hours from 1 to 10
p.m.
* DAV Chapter 70 and the
Auxiliary meets at the comers of
Independence Highway and U.S.


41 N. For more information visit,
www.davmembersportal.org./chap-
ters/fl/70.
* Island X-18 Sea Bee
Veterans of America Upcoming
Events:
Wednesday: 1:30 p.m. luncheon:
Stumpknockers On The Square,
110 W Main St., Inverness.
Oct. 12: 11 a.m. meeting: VA
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
Oct. 19: 1:30 p.m. luncheon:
Joe's Family Restaurant, 911 W.
Main St., Inverness.
Please note the change of meet-
ing date and place. As always all
Sea Bees, Honey Bees, relatives,
and friends are welcome to our
events. The meetings are at 11
a.m. second Wednesday, and
luncheons are at 1:30 p.m. third
Wednesday. We have a short
meeting, about one hour, at the VA
Office in Lecanto, then we will eat
lunch at a local restaurant decided
at the meeting. Luncheons are
third Wednesday picked by
Charley Rhodes, if you have an


idea of a place to go let Charley
know. If you have any questions,
call David Puffer Cmdr. at 746-
9327.
* Ladies Auxiliary to Harry F.
Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 plan a
Chinese auction Thursday, Oct. 11,
at the post home. Doors open at
11:30 a.m. and the auction starts at
1 p.m. Hot dogs are $1, cake and
coffee are free. Donation is $2.50,
raffle tickets available at the post
canteen and from auxiliary mem-
bers.
* VFW Post 7122 has adopted
1st Sgt. Dale LaSonda and his
Marine Corps unit now stationed in
Iraq. The goal is to send two good
packages to them each week. Call
the post at 637-0100 to find out
how you can contribute.
Post 7122 is accepting nonper-
ishable food items to refurbish
CUB's food bank. Please donate to
this worthy cause.
Post 7122 has tickets for the
District 7 picnic scheduled for Oct.
6 at Post 10084. A donation of $7
covers food, music, games and


door prizes.
Now is the time to join or renew
you VFW, Ladies Auxiliary, or
Men's Auxiliary memberships. Call
or come by the post for details.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776, Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) will conduct its
bimonthly meeting at 1:15 p.m.
Tuesday in the Citrus County
Veterans Service Office classroom,
Citrus County Resources
CenterNA Clinic, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto (off of
County Road 491 north of C.R.
486).
Chapter 776 is comprised of
combat-wounded veterans. All
combat-wounded veterans are
invited to attend and to learn more
about Chapter 776. Visit the
Chapter 776 Web site at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call 382-3847
or 527-2460.
* Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23, Crystal
River, conducts regular meetings at
11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the Crystal Paradise


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Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. We also have break-
fast at 8 a.m. on the last Sunday of
the month and a luncheon on the
second Tuesday at a location
decided by the group and the
social director, Gordon Levins at
795-7662.
We welcome new members,
who are veterans, who served
under the command of the U.S.
Naval Construction Forces/Naval
Facilities Engineering
Command/Bureau of Yards and
Docks.
For additional information, call
Cmdr. John Kister at 527-3172.
* Public invited to a number of
activities at Dunnellon VFW Post
7991, State Road 488/West
Dunnellon Road:
Every first and third Tuesday:
steak dinner, 6 to 8 p.m., reserva-
tions needed. $9. Call post at (352)
489-1772, Cmdr. Chester at 564-
4135, Ron Audette at (352) 465-
5647 or Billy Ellis at (352) 465-
6429. If no answer, leave message
on answering machine.
Wednesday bingo begins at 5:30
p.m.
Every second and fourth Friday:
fish fry from 4 to 7 p.m., fish, hush
puppies, fries and coleslaw. $6.
* The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its monthly
planning meeting for the 15th
Annual Veterans Appreciation
Week activities at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the
Conference Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle building, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River.
Contact Chairman Chris Gregoriou
by e-mail at allpres@infi.net or by
phone at 795-7000.
The committee will conduct its
annual Veterans-in-the-Classroom
program, Oct. 29 through Nov. 9 .
Call Gary Runyon at 563-5727,
Mac McLeod at 746-1384 or Bob
Truax at 860-1630.
* Floral City American Legion
Auxiliary Unit No. 225 (also
known as Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225) would like to
invite the women in Citrus County
to feel free to join us. We meet at
7:30 p.m. every Thursday at the
Floral City VFW Post on U.S. 41,
Floral City. We are very proud to
belong to this organization. Hope
the following info will help you to
decide to join us. Contact Pat
Whitman, membership chairman at
(352) 793-9091 if you have any

Please see VETS/Page 15A


Special to the Chronicle
Recently, at the monthly meeting of the Fleet Reserve Association Branch 186 and Ladies Auxiliary, a $1,000 check was pre-
sented to Nola Gravius, executive director of Citrus United Basket, to help stock its shelves for the needy of Citrus County.
From left are: Bob Huscher, FRA secretary; Bob Woods, FRA president; Gravius; Dorothy Mayhew, FRA Ladies Auxiliary presi-
dent; and James Delafraisse, FRA treasurer.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETS
Continued from Page 14A

questions.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357, or
pass along this phone number to
the veteran.
* Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will meet at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River. All current and previous
Airborne members and their wives
are welcome to join. For additional
information, call Steve Leonard at
726-3693.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 County Road 40
E., Inglis (one mile east of U.S.
19). Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30
p.m. the third Wednesday monthly
at the post. Men's Auxiliary meets
at 7 p.m. the second Monday
monthly. Call Randy Sutton, (352)
447-3495.
* The Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will conduct its regular meeting at 7
p.m. on the third Wednesday
monthly at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness at the intersection of
Independence Avenue and U.S. 41
North. All former Marines are wel-
come. Call Tom Heron at 637-2724
or Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* The Marine Corps League No.
819 Citrus Detachment celebrated
its 15th anniversary on Aug. 14.
We are an active group as we
do the county's Military Ball in.
November, Toys for Tots program
(with. over 15,00Q toys given to chil-
dren in our county last year), one
or two scholarships to high school
students, and our honor guard for
any military burial. We also have
several family get-togethers
throughout the year. Our next get-
together will be at 5 p.m. on Sept.
19 at the Beverly Hills VFW.
For more information on becom-
ing a member, call Commandant
Robert Deck at 527-1557 or Senior
Vice Commandant Fred Lightell at
726-4415.
* Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 will meet at 3 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.
* The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at VFW Post 10087, 2170


W. Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
All military veterans who honor-
ably served within Korea, including
territorial waters and airspace
(Sept. 3, 1945, to June 25, 1950)
and within or without Korea (June
25, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955) or who
served honorably in Korea from
Feb. 1, 1955, until present, are eli-
gible for membership in the KWVA.
Any Medal of Honor recipient for
service during the Korean War is
eligible for free life membership.
Any prisoner of war by the North
Koreans, Chinese of Russian
forces during or after hostilities
from June 25, 1950, forward is eli-
gible for free life membership.
Call Cmdr. Hank Butler at 563-
2496; Vice Cmdr. Paul Salyer at
637-1161; or Director Neville
Anderson at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls-American .
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet at 6 p.m. the first
Thursday monthly behind the Key
Training Center in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. We kick off our meet-
ings with a potluck dinner, then
meet at 7:30, with the auxiliary
breaking off to its separate meeting
room. Bring a covered dish if you
can. Interested in being member,
call Post Cmdr. Fabio Sanservino
at 637-9285 or Auxiliary President
Sandy Scott at 860-2090. Visit the
Web site at www.ALPost77.org.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at American Legion Post 155, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal
River.
Visitors and interested parties
are always welcome. For more
information, call Base Cmdr. Billy
Wein at 726-5926.
* The MarineCorps League,
Department of Florida under the
sponsorship of Holiday
Detachment 567 will hold their Fa-II
Conference at the Quality Inn and
Suites at 5316 U.S. Highway 19,
New Port Richey. The dates will
be: Oct. 11, 12 and 13. Room rates
are $69 for a regular room.
Reservations may be made by call-
ing (727) 847-9005 or (800)
4CHOICE. Ask for the MCL confer-
ence rate. For further information
and dinner selections, go to the
Department Web site.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II
meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at the Boston
Cooker, 5375 Spring Hill Drive,
Spring Hill. The next meeting is
Oct. 13.
* The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 186 and its
Ladies Auxiliary hosts a "Pearl
Harbor Remembrance" luncheon
each year on Dec. 7 to honor
those who served at Pearl Harbor
during the attack in 1941
A few years ago Citrus County
awarded a Proclamation that


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reads: "Whereby, commemorating
the attack on Pearl Harbor will
instill in all people of Citrus County
a greater understanding and
appreciation of the selfless sacri-
fice of the individuals who served
in the Armed Forces of the United
States during World War II," and
furthermore "The Board hereby
recognizes Dec. 7 of each year as
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day"
in Citrus County.
The Fleet Reserve and Auxiliary
are proud to host an annual lunch-
eon in their honor.
* VFW Edward W. Penno Post
4864 is at 10199 N. Citrus Springs
_Blvd~,_Citrus Springs. (352) 465-
4864. Oct. 27, 8 a.m. rent-a-space
yard sale, blood drive, pancake
breakfast and bake sale. Free pan-
cake breakfast to anyone who
donates blood.
* VFW Post 4252 and The
Ladies Auxiliary in Hernando on
State Road 200 Serves dinner
every Friday from 5 to 6:30 p.m..
$6.50 donation.Post 4252 Ladies
Auxiliary is having a flea market on
Sunday Oct. 21. Flea market items
will include biker apparel, house-
hold items, clothes, books, movies,
odds and ends and a whole lot
more. Inside tables are $10.
Outside tables are $5. Donations
are also accepted.
The Post 4252 winter hours of
operation will be in effect on Oct. 1.
Post 4252 and The Ladies
Auxiliary announces a $10,000
Youth Essay Contest and a


$30,000 High School Scholarship
Competition. Call Judy at 726-3339
for details.
All eligible persons are invited to
join our Post or Ladies Auxiliary.
Stop by the post or call for further
information.
Send e-mails to
VFW4252@tampabay.rr.com.
2008 Dues can be paid now. We
are over 80 percent. Please send
your payments as soon as possi-
ble. Life Members Cancer
Insurance of $4.95 can be paid
now for 2008.
Post Honor Guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and nurs-
ing homes. Call Post Cmdr. Bob
Prive at 212-3393 or Ladies
Auxiliary President Judy Prive at
726-3339 for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando, FL 34442.


=-==- In SERVICE


Carter honored by
National Guard
Brig. Gen.
Joseph Carter,
grandson of the
late James and
Juanita Ward of
Crystal River, is
the first African .
American to be
federally recog-
nized as a gen- Joseph
eral officer in the Carter
Massachusetts
National Guard's 370-year history.
Johnson graduates
Basic Training
P.F.C. Daniel J. Johnson gradu-
ated from Basic Combat Training


at Fort Jackson, S.C., on Aug. 3.,.
During the 10 weeks of basic
training, Pfc. Johnson upheld the
Army's "7 core
values," studied
military customs
and missions,
proficiency in
physical training,
rifle marksman-
ship, field training
and drill and cer- Daniel
emony exercises, Johnson
and is currently
studying Human
Resources at Fort Jackson.
He is the son of James and
Gayle Johnson of Old Homosassa.
Johnson attended Crystal River
High School and is a 2007 gradu-
ate from W.T.I. in Inverness.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too light nor too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all photos.
* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to right.
* If desired, include the name of the photographer for credit.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well; submit the digital image via disk or e-
mail. Staff Will color correct and otherwise "work up" the image to Chronicle publication stan-
dards.
* Prpotos -submitted electronically should be in maximum.resolution JPEG ( pg) format
* Photo..'s cannot be returned Without a self addressed. stamped envelope.
* For more intc'rmatic'n, call Linda Johnson, newsroom coordinator, at 563-5660.


F ~


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Businesses appreciated


Special to the Chronicle
LEFT: American Legion Post 77 Web Master and Advertising Chairman Jay Conti, left, presents the American Legion Certificate
of Appreciation to Mike Shaughnessy and Art Yanni of Citrus KIA.
RIGHT: First Vice Cmdr. Bob Scott, right, presents the American Legion Certificate of Appreciation to Dwight Hooper of Hooper
Funeral Homes.
Both organizations provided outstanding support through tax-deductible donations to American Legion Post 77 Web site and
newsletter. Call Conti at 344-4122 or see the post's Web site at www.alpost77.org.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007 ISA





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SUNDAY, Sli~rTEMBEIR 16, 2007 17A


First
'Proud
Supporter'
honored
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart Cmdr. J.B.
Haskins, left, presented Dr.
H. Christopher Ward with a
"Proud Supporter" plaque
for his generous support of
Chapter 776. Ward has the
distinction of being the
chapter's first "Proud
Supporter" recipient.
Special to the Chronicle


Special to the Chronicle
The Chorus of Beverly Hills
held its first rehearsal for the
Saturday, Dec. 15, Christmas
Concert. Rehearsals will con-
tinue from 10:30 a.m. to noon
on Friday in the Sanctuary of
the Beverly Hills Community
Church, 82 Civic Circle.
Volena Van Gunst, music
chairman, announced that
recruiting efforts exceeded
expectations, when 11 new
members were registered.
There is still a need to fill out
the alto and tenor sections and
new members are encouraged


to join the group during the
next two weeks. Since registra-
tion went smoothly, the group
was able to begin sight reading
the music for the concert,
under the able direction of
Renate Williams and with
accompanist Vee Balemian.
Those interested in joining
are reminded there is a regis-
tration fee of $10 to cover cho-
rus expenses. All music will be
provided and the ability to
read music is not required.
Come join these talented,
dedicated singers. For more
information, call Volena at 746-
5680.


Sept. 17-21


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
patty, cereal (variety), yogurt
(assorted), seasonal fruit, peaches,
toast/jelly, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Cheese pizza
round, chicken nuggets, salad
shaker, garden salad, crackers,
corn, turnip greens, fresh fruit,
pineapple, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Cheese
grits, ham slice, seasonal fruit,
applesauce, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Turkey sandwich, vegetarian
plate, garden salad, cabbage,
black eyed peas, fresh fruit, peach-
es, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Waffle sticks, chicken breakfast
biscuit, seasonal fruit, pineapple,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Country fried steak, hot dog,
salad shaker, garden salad, corn-
bread, vegetable blend (Italian),
baked french fries, fresh fruit,
crackers, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Scrambled eggs with cheese, oat-
meal, seasonal fruit, mixed fruit,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Spaghetti
with meat sauce, ham and cheese
sandwich, vegetarian plate, garden
salad, green beans, cookie, apple-
sauce, fresh fruit, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, bagelers (assort-
ed), seasonal fruit, apple slices,
grits, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Chicken tender fritters,
cheese stuffed bread stick, salad
shaker, garden salad, rice, peas,
baked beans, crackers, fresh fruit,


mixed fruit, milk, juice.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Waffle
sticks, bagelers (assorted), cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice. Lunch -
Turkey melt, ravioli, breaded chick-
en combo plate, garden salad,
corn, green beans, pretzel rod,
fresh fruit, peaches, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast -
Scrambled eggs with cheese,
cheese grits, cereal (variety), sea-
sonal fruit, pineapple muffin,
peaches, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Chicken
and yellow rice, barbecued chicken
on bun, tuna combo salad plate,
garden salad, winter mix, carrots,
fresh fruit, apple crisp, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, mixed fruit,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch -
Hamburger, hot dog, chicken .
Caesar salad plate, garden salad,
coleslaw, peas, baked french fries,
baked beans, crackers, fresh fruit,
milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast-
Country ham and potato, ham and
cheese toast, cereal (variety),
apple muffin, seasonal fruit,
pineapple, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Chicken
soft taco, ham with pineapple,
turkey combo salad plate, garden
salad, turnip greens, sweet potato
souffle, refried beans, cornbread,
fresh fruit, mixed fruit, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Chicken
breakfast biscuit, French toast,


cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
apple slices, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Pepperoni pizza wedge, fish
scribbles, garden salad, broccoli,
pasta salad, fresh fruit, ranger
cookie, milk, juice.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, cheese grits, cereal, scram-
bled eggs with cheese, doughnut,
tater tots, toast/jelly, mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Chicken and yel-
low rice, hamburger and hoagie
bars, salad plate, pizza bar, chili,
green beans, corn, garden salad,
crackers, winter mix, peaches,
fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, biscuit and
gravy, cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly,
grits, apple muffin, tater tots, sea-
sonal fruit, peaches, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Beef-a-
roni, chicken and hoagie bars,
salad plate, pizza bar, chili, peas,
corn, garden salad, crackers, corn-
bread, mixed fruit, fresh fruit, fries,
milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese toast, scrambled eggs
with cheese, cereal, doughnut,
toast/jelly, tater tots, pineapple muf-
fin, grits, seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Tacos, salad plate, ham-
burger and hoagie bars, pizza bar,
chili, salad, Spanish rice, lima
beans, refried beans, crackers,
corn, applesauce, gelatin, fresh
fruit, fries, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Breakfast wrap, biscuit and gravy,


cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly, tater
tots, sweet potato muffin, grits, sea-
sonal fruit, sliced apples, milk vari-
ety, orange juice. Lunch - Turkey
and dressing supreme, chicken
and hoagie bars, chili, salads,
pizza bar, garden salad, rice, car-
rots, corn, black eyed peas, broc-
coli, crackers, roll, cookie, fresh
fruit, fries, milk.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, scrambled eggs
with cheese, doughnut, cereal,
grits, tater tots, toast/jelly, pineap-
ple, seasonal fruit, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Chicken
and noodles, chili, hamburger and
hoagie bars, salad plate, pizza bar,
salad, bread stick, corn, Normandy
vegetables, crackers, baked beans,
apple slices, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Barbecued pork riblet,
pinto beans with peppers and
onions, mixed greens, cornbread
with margarine, pear cup, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Steamed frankfurter
over baked beans with tomato bits,
hot dog bun, ketchup/mustard
packets, coleslaw with carrot, cin-
namon apples, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, lyonnaise potato,
carrot cuts, whole wheat bread with


margarine, banana pudding with
bananas and vanilla wafers, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Sliced roast turkey
with turkey gravy, mixed garden
vegetables, mashed sweet potato,
whole wheat bread with margarine,
cranberry-orange relish mold, low-
fat milk.
Friday: Curried chicken salad,

Sunday s ..-


garden salad with French dressing,
marinated broccoli salad, whole
wheat bread with margarine, cake,
low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 527-
5975.

. � . - ," . -.5


Puzzle is on Page 20A.

LARVA BELOIT OI LER SLUR
ADDED RAIDER FRAME PANE
SIO HARES OATiEN STANCE
SORT ASSN LURED SHORTEN
TRENDY HIRES HATE EGGS
SHEARS SONAR BANANA RAY
IT DY ATHENS ART.SA D L
EVE DOOR ERIIN THOLE
ERG ONIO SCALE HOT FAD
IMPEL ARGO BETE NET
BALLOT YALE ROOTED MILO
ADULT DEBATE AR IL GAMER
BA T HERALD MUSIC CURATE
AMIEN SORE DO RIS TUSSLE
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TRAVAIL TRATL VER B YELP
HEL M PIANO SOFAS LIL
PJ IC AMM'ITY NI |A I I|LED CA I NE
SAVE TULLE SI|N GWLE ATSEA
EffY jfE MEER R E A LP EERS


9-16


� 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


713963


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.... NA.SETMBR ., 07 iu CONT (F)CI/ N


Days of chicken a la


king dethroned


ur server at the Ciao Down Cafe has just
placed a little, shallow dish of olive oil
and a basket of different types of bread
on our table. We're supposed to dip our bread in
the olive oil because if there's one thing every-
one needs right before dinner, it's some nice oily
bread. We would never eat oily bread before
dinner at home or tell the kids they can't eat din-
ner until they finish their oily bread, but restau-
rants seem to think we want it.
The real reason they serve it is so
that you'll have something to do with
your hands before the real food
arrives - a good idea when you've got
a bunch of bored people sitting .
around a knife-festooned table drink- j
ing the local vino.
The bread is free, of course, which
means it's not free at all; it means .
they're charging you more for some-
thing else. Why not? If you'll pay $11
for the handmade squash ravioli, JI
you'll probably pay $12 without much MUL
squawking. I can usually tell how
expensive a restaurant is by how
many "free" things they offer:
"A tablecloth: Add $3.
MA paper tablecloth: Add $5.
"A candle on the table: Add $1.
MA flower on the table: Add $1.
" A menu on the table: Add $2.
" Lots of children's seats: Add $5.
" Servers wear T-shirts with logo: Add $1.
" Servers wear black pants, white cotton
shirts, skinny black ties: Add $6.
M If the restaurant is on a pier or docked boat:
Add $3.
" If that boat plans on moving: Add $10.
" Visible kitchen: Subtract $4.
" In a tourist city in season: Add $8.
" If the restaurant is on top of a skyscraper:
Add $15.
. If it's on top of a skyscraper and it revolves:
Add $25.
So as you can see, I know my restaurants. I'm
just sorry I didn't eat more oily bread before the
food arrived. I got three raviolis in the center of
a gigantic white-stoneware plate (add $1) with a
sprig of rosemary over it (add $1). It looked like .


a painting (add $1), a real work of art. And it was
about as filling as eating a small Picasso, though
I'm sure they tasted much better.
I still haven't figured out how trends like dip-
ping bread in olive oil start. One day, no restau-
rants served olive oil with bread, the next day, it
comes with your grilled cheese at the lunch
counter at Walgreen's, and McDonald's is trying
to figure out a way to turn it into a breakfast
sandwich.
Who knew food could be so trendy?
What happened to all that stuff We
used to eat in the '50s? Chicken a la
king used to be one of the fanciest
things you could eat, Now, you could-
n't serve it in prison without being
accused of cruel and unusual punish-
ment. Lobster Newburg, tuna
casseroles, ring-mold salads? In one
year and out the other.
And when did we start blackening
M everything? When did we stop black-
.LEN ening everything? My grocery store
now has an entire section devoted to
peppercorns and salt. There is mus-
tard from every country in the world.
Forty years ago, the most fashionable order in
the most fashionable place in town was a large
wedge of iceberg lettuce dripping with blue
cheese dressing. It screamed sophistication and
class. Then it was a starter, now it would be the
meal.
The lettuce wedge would be followed by the
Surf and Turf, (add $5) or maybe just the Prime
Rib. And for dessert, she'll have the Crepe
Suzette flambe, and I'll take the Floating Island.
That kind of food - and ordering for the
woman - has gone the way of Nehru jackets
and Princess phones, replaced by California
rolls with chipotle and paninis. The lettuce
wedge was replaced by the radicchio decade,
followed by the arugula decade and now mixed
baby green decade. What's next? Well, I already
know. Iceberg lettuce wedge smothered in blue
cheese dressing is making a comeback I know
because it came "free" with my three raviolis.


Reach author Jim Mullen
atjim mullen@myway.com.


Excursions


Inverness Elks plan
Caribbean cruise
Join the Inverness Elks Lodge
for a seven-night cruise to
Labadee, Haiti; Ocho Rios,
Jamaica; George Town, Grand
Cayman; Cozumel, Mexico; April
27 through May 4. Round trip
motorcoach to Miami included in
price. Open to the public, Elks and
Red Hatters. Book before Oct. 22.
Call Betty or Chuck Osborn at 860-
1140 for details.
BHRA sponsor
cruise, day trip
Friday, Sept. 28, the Beverly
Hills Recreation Association will
sponsor a gambling cruise to Port
Canaveral. The public invited. The
bus will depart from the parking lot
at 6:30-amr. sharp. Participants
must have a valid government-
issued photo I.D. such as a driver's


license, to board the ship.
Join the Beverly Hills Recreation
Center Thursday, Oct. 11, for a trip
to Austin Carriage Museum in
Weirsdale. Cost includes trans-
portation to and from the museum,
lunch and guided tour of three gal-
leries featuring more than 135 car-
riages from Europe and America.
Seating is limited. Advance ticket
sales only for this trip.
Register and buy tickets from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to
Friday at the office at 77 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
Call 746-4882 for more informa-
tion about both excursions.
County groups
offer Rays trip
Citrus County Community
Support Services and the Senior
Foundation of Citrus County are
offering a Devil Rays trip Sept. 26
- Devil Rays vs. New York


Yankees. Tickets are $25 each.
Cost includes round-trip transporta-
tion on a chartered bus and admis-
sion to 7:10 p.m. game.
For more information and to pur-
chase tickets, call 527-5900.
New Jersey club
plans trip to Biloxi
The New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County are having a.
bus trip to a resort in Biloxi. The
dates are Jan. 27 to 30.
For more information and/or
reservations, call Mary Anne at
746-3386.
Citrus Singles
sponsors outing
Citrus Singles offers the follow-
ing to the members and the public:
* Sunday, Nov. 8: Gambling
cruise at Cape Canaveral. Includes
bus and buffet. Deadline is Oct. 10.
Call Sol at 795-1336.


TOUR
Continued from Page A2

Kilauea we toured the craters,
Seismographic Observatory,
Thurston Lava Tube and the
museum in the park We trav-
eled to the black sand beaches
and walked the black sand in
bare feet with the big green sea
turtles walking alongside as we
passed sleeping turtles. This is
truly an experience to behold.
We also visited the orchid grow-
ers, the macadamia nut fields
and plant, the absolutely breath-
taking waterfalls on the big
island and the ultimate experi-
ence - shopping at the Hilo
Farmers Market with local resi-
dents.
- We-returned-to-Hilo -to-catch-
another Hawaiian Air flight to
Kahului, Maui. Residing at the
famous Royal Lahina Resort for
five nights on the beaches of
Maui is a pleasure one can really
enjoy. Many different experi-


ROAD
Continued from Page A2

Riker's coffee shop on Seventh
Avenue.
Now, Hector's is no more.
Birdland closed in 1965 -
although another club with
that name does business now
on West 44th Street. Riker's is
gone too. But the company
behind that chain, Restaurant
Associates Corp., has endured
and evolved.
N In the book, Sal Paradise
takes a bus to Chicago and gets
a room at the Y.
Now, the Chicago YMCA
doesn't accept short-term over-
night-guests-and hasn't for..at
least a decade, a spokeswoman
says. The YMCA's Lawson
House, which goes back to 1931
in central Chicago, houses
about 600 residents, most of
them working poor, formerly
homeless and the mentally ill,
who pay $375 a month and up.
* In the book, Sal reaches
Cheyenne, Wyo., during Wild
West Week, is appalled by the
sight of fat businessmen in
boots and 10-gallon hats, their
wives outfitted as cowgirls. "In
my first shot at the West I was
seeing to what absurd devices
it had fallen to keep its proud
tradition," he says. He winds
up sleeping in the bus station.
Now, Cheyenne still throws
its annual party. But for 111
years it has been called
Frontier Days. This year's bill
in July included a rodeo, art
and air shows, pancake break-
fasts, a carnival and concerts
by Bon Jovi and Reba
McEntire. The old bus station
has been leveled, and the old
train depot next door is a
museum.
N In the book, Sal stays with
friends in Denver, decides not
totaie -ajobbhauling produce
at the Camargo market and
gets cornered into attending an


Special to the Chronicle
Veterans and friends visited the National Cemetery of the Pacific,
"The Punchbowl," while touring Hawaii in May and June.


ences were explored; Some folks
biked from the top of the
Haleakala Volcano to the bottom
- 36 miles and watched the sun-
rise at4 a.m. Parasailing was also
enjoyed by many along with sub-
marine rides, catamaran rides,
_snorkeling and scuba diving.
It turned otit age was no factor
in what this group would enjoy.
For the mild mannered, golf was
the sport of choice while on
Maui, playing at the world-.
famous Kanapali Golf Club.

opera (Beethoven's "Fidelio")
in nearby Central City. The rest
of the time, he knocks around
bars and pool halls on Larimer
Street and Lower Downtown,
including the Windsor Hotel,
"once Denver's great Gold
Rush hotel," says Sal; it's said
to have historic bullet holes in
the walls.
Now, Larimer and LoDo
have been renovated. The
Denargo Market, a 29-acre area
north of downtown, has been
proposed for redevelopment.
In Central City, the 1878 opera
house has four productions
every summer. The Windsor
was leveled in 1959. Mean-
while, a Denver developer has
put up Jack Kerouac Lofts - 60
units.-on Huron Street near
Union Station, most priced at
$300,000 to $400,000.
* In the book, Sal and his San
Francisco Bay Area friend
Remi spend an outlandish $50
on a disastrous dinner for five
at "a swank restaurant" called
Alfred's in San Francisco's
North Beach. Now, Alfred's has
moved a few blocks from
Broadway to 659 Merchant St A
30-ounce porterhouse costs $40.
* In the book, Sausalito is a
"little fishing village." Now, just


The Hawaiian Experience is
a once-in-a-lifetime dream to
enjoy The beauty is breathtak-
ing, the luaus fantastic and you
believe heaven is on this Earth
when in the Islands. We will be
returning to the Islands in
February 2008 for another visit;
should you have an interest in
joining us, call Don at 637-5131.
Don McLean is retired
from the U.S. Navy
and is the president of Utility
Squadron One Association.

try to find a room on a Saturday
night for less than $150.
* In the book, Sal and Dean
wander Mexico City "in a fren-
zy and a dream. We ate beauti-
ful steaks for forty-eight cents
in a strange tiled Mexican cafe-
teria with generations of
marimba musicians."
Sal never mentions a name
for that eatery, but it sounds a
lot like Sanborns' La Casa de
los Azulejos, a city landmark -
and cafeteria and department
store - that dates to the 16th
century. Famed for its tile work
and murals, the building has
included a restaurant since
about 1919.
* In 1957, "On the Road"
(hardcover edition, $3.95) was
released in the first week of
September to a rapturous
review from the New York
Times. That same week, Ford
rolled out the Edsel, priced at
about $2,500 and up. No rapture.
Now, Kerouac's original 120-
foot-long typescript scroll for the
book is on tour, having sold at
auction in 2001 for $2.4 million.
Lately, rare-book dealers
have been offering first-edition
copies of "On the Road" for as
much as $8,000. You sometimes
can buy an Edsel for less.


1. Write about a day trip to a
town or attraction within three
hours' drive of Citrus County.
2. Include your name, home-
town and phone number (the
phone number will not be pub-
lished - it's for our reference).
3. Submit a photo or photos
of the place you visit Drop off
copies at the Chronicle offices
in Inverness or Crystal River, or
e-mail the images as separate,
high-resolution jpeg (.jpg)
attachments to
community@chronicleonline.co-
m. Include information about


what's in the pictures. Photos
cannot be returned without a
stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope.
4. Include the name of the
area, the county it's in, the
major roads leading to it, its
main attractions and prices. You
can include a list of favorite
restaurants, or upcoming events
planned in that area.
5. Limit reports to 350 words.
The Chronicle will edit any
reports chosen for publication.
6. Duplicate reports-will be
eliminated.


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Golden Nugget Hotel
Must sign up quickly due to airline booking
Branson
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Beau Rivage
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18ASUNDAY, SFPTEM13ER 16, 2007


Crmus CouNry (FL) Cimomcmi


�.Ilr.'�'I-S77-6(04--IN22 - 352---,97-4822 - --,331 Commercial Way, Suite #114, Spring Hill, Fl 346416
ST 3fG24


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Omus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE TOGETHER SUNDAY, SEPTIiMBI-R 16, 2007 i9A


---70th ANNIVERSARY


Weddings - --- Engagements


The Cummingses


Akers/Knighten


Greer/Glover


Wilmer and Lillian
-Cummings of Dunnellon cele-
Sbrated their 70th anniversary
:with a party at Crackers in
' Crystal River, with 16 in atten-
dance, organized by daughters
Fern and Genesta.
The Cummingses were mar-
ried Sept 7, 1937, in Mechanic
Falls, Maine, and have lived in
,Dunnellon for six months. Lil
is a homemaker, and Wil was a
truck driver.
They have five children, Reg
and Sondra Cummings of
.Oklahoma, Fern Brooks of
Florida, Randy and Sandy
,Cummings of Connecticut,
Genesta Cartonio of Maine and
Phil and Jane Cummings, also
of Maine; 14 grandchildren; 22
great-grandchildren; and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Mr. Cummings retired from
the Teamsters Union after 32


Robin Wayne Knighten and
Meredith Ann Marie Akers,
both of Homosassa, were unit-
ed in marriage at 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 7, 2007, at The
Wedding Chapel in Inverness.
Chaplain Sal Viglione per-
formed the Christian ceremo-
ny.
Bride and groom are
employed at Pro-Line in
Crystal River.
The reception was held at


years, and served in World War
II. Mrs. Cummings supported
her husband and traveled
throughout Florida, watching
Wil play in many horseshoe
tournaments. His name is well
known in the Clearwater Hall
of Fame for horseshoe players.
He supports and is a member
of the Masons and Shriner
clubs.


60th.. - . -

The Paparazzis

Dominick and Ann
.Paparazzi of Inverness cele-
brated 60 years of marriage on i
Sept. 14. Formerly of Staten i
Island, N.Y, they moved to
Inverness in 1971. Dominick is
a veteran of World War II,
-member of the VFW in
,Inverness, Knights of
.Columbus, a volunteer fire-
fighter, and was employed by
.,Joe's Carpet for many years
,until retirement. Ann was a
receptionist for Drs. Osterhau
'and Jenkins and a volunteer at
. CMH for 10 years. Dom and
Ann are members of Citrus sister, also active in Catholic
'American Italian Club and Our Women's organizations. They
Lady of Fatima Parish, where have four children and seven
Ann was active in the choir, a grandchildren now residing in
lecturer and Eucharistic min- Florida.

GET THE WORD OUT
� Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releas.-
es about upcoming community events.
" Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and other details.
" Include a contact name and phone number to be printed
in the paper
* News releases are subject to editing
* Call 563-5660 for details.


Alexander Daniel Marrero
and Teresa Marie Mason, both
of Inverness, were united in
marriage at 7 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 4, 2007, at The Lake
House B&B on Gospel Island
in Inverness. Chaplain Sal
Viglione from The Wedding
Chapel performed the Chris-
tian ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
John and Josephine Mason III
of Inverness.
The groom is the son of
Marvin and Isabell Marrero of
Tampa.
Maid of honor was Morgan
Schmidt and best man was
Raul Darriba. Bridesmaids
were Sarah Robichaud, Sable
West and Jessica Myklegard
and groomsmen were Adam
Cardinal and Nicholas Mason.


Anthony Craig Ballard and
Shirley Anne McCarthy were
united in marriage on
Saturday, Sept. 1, 2007, at the
home of the groom's parents,
Mack and Lynn Ballard, in
Crystal River. Michele Cirone
performed the service.
The bride is the daughter of
the late James and Betty
McCarthy
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her sons, Israel Burgos
and Danilo Martinez.
Matron of honor was Desi
Marlow and best man was
Charles Marlow.
Flower girls were Kaetlyn
Olbeck and Kaetlyn Ballard
and ring bearers were Christian
Olbeck and Matt Ballard.
The reception was im-


Romano's restaurant


Flower girl was Savannah
Glover and ring bearers were
A.J. Marrero and Jacob Glover.
The bride is employed at the
Inverness Big Lots and the
groom is employed at Tires
Plus.
They honeymooned in
Orlando.


, . -
mediately following the cere-
mony at the Ballard residence.
Out of town guests were Bob
Ballard and Mary McCarthy.
The newlyweds are planning
a honeymoon cruise to the
Caribbean in November.
They will live in Crystal
River.


Stefanie Ann Greer of
Beverly Hills and Lance Cpl.
Paul Ryan Glover of Floral City
announce their engagement
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Michael and Deborah
Greer of Inverness. She is a
graduate of Citrus High
School, holding a bachelor's
degree in legal studies with a
minor in criminal justice from
the university of Central
Florida. She is currently pur-
suing a bachelor's degree in
forensic science, with a minor
in chemistry. She works for the'
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office.
The future bridegroom is the
son of Bobby Glover of
Phoenix, Ariz., and Susan and
Dennis Freier of Floral City
He is a graduate of Citrus High
School. He is a lance corporal
in the U.S. Marine Corps, cur-
rently deployed in Iraq.
The wedding is planned for


July 4, 2008, at Palace Grande
in Spring Hill.


YahyavilAchramowicz

Amanda Clare Yahyavi and
David Jeffrey Achramowicz,
both of Pensacola, announce
their engagement.
The bride-elect is the daugh- 4 ..
ter of Judi Yahyavi of Beverly
Hills. She is a 1997 graduate of
Lecanto High School; holding a
2006 B.S. degree in psychology
from the University of North
Florida. She is a case manager
at Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Northwest Florida.
The future bridegroom is the
son of Zdzislaw and Sally
Achramowicz of Fort Wayne,
Ind. He holds a 2001 B.S.
degree in industrial engineer-
ing from Purdue University He
is a second lieutenant in the
U.S. Air Force, currently
attending flight school at NAS,
Pensacola.
The wedding is planned for
May 3, 2008, in Pensacola.


New ARR U.'. .


Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
* To Heather Price and John
Kersnowsky of Inverness, a


daughter, Olivia Kersnowsky,
born at 9:22 a.m. Sept. 3, 2007,
at Spring Hill Regional
Hospital. She weighed 6
pounds, 14 ounces.


Clinical P .E.T.

OF CITRUS

1. AT MEADOWCREST, LLC




offering PET/CT scans to breast cancer survivors during the month of October.
: scans. are one of the best diagnostic tools available to detect recurrence or metastasis.


To schedule






~ ...
* ' ' . . -. . t.-


(4o-t/b'nt tliat qo(-i ae ejasuier fr~ee.

rhMer wUL be iix W id n-f pa ete eXpkq is!

WJUb iuurmne will &e billed.

an appointment, or for further information, please contact:


Clinical P.E.T. of Citrus

at Meadowcrest

(352) 795.0847

* In the month of October, scheduling preference
will he given to breast cancer survivors.


Ocf is
k '1. &'a


* Nati 'WrM ncer
A *Awareness Month


Mason/Marrero


McCarthy/Ballard


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBI-11 16, 2007 19A


TOGETHER


� CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


fl?*-LM.3-l.-3a';? <;i'--3) *-'.'-- *-









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.e


20ASUTNDfAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


Your Birthday: Involving yourself in something you
like doing offers you a greater chance for success,
because you'll spend quality time on the endeavor to
make it what you envision. Don't waste your time
engaging in what you truly dislike.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - If you depend more
upon your muscles than your smarts, you are likely to
find yourself hammering square pegs into round holes.
Libra (Sept 23-Oct 23) - Grandiose ideas provide a
great deal of fodder for pleasant daydreams, but they
usually have little chance of materializing in the real world.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If you've got a bit of
extra cash in your pocket, don't feel compelled to
'spend it on meaningless gratification.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - The optimism that
is part of your natural makeup is a fine quality when
applied toward a realistic goal.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - You could have a
tendency to jump to conclusions before you have all the
facts at your disposal.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Your worst enemy
could be a well-intentioned person who is kidding


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"The Brave One" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20
p.m. Digital.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Halloween" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Mr. Bean's Holiday" (G) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 8
p.m.
"Stardust" (PG-13) 1 p.m. 4 p.m.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 7:50 p.m.
"Becoming Jane" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dragon Wars" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10 p.m. Digital.


. The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
animalcontrol.citrus.fl.us and
click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.
To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group


NAME: Shadow
AGE: Goat
SEX: YA M
ID #: 73109


NAME: Lexie
AGE: Infant
SEX: F
ID #: 85189


him/herself about the value of getting involved in some-
thing that is too good to be true.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Expecting too much
from others might fool you into believing it is they who
are being uncooperative, but in reality, it might be you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Before discarding a
new idea that you think is too good to be true, run a few
tests to see if it has possibilities.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Carefully choose your
companions and the activities you wish to engage in,
and you'll avoid finding yourself in an uncomfortable
position.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Your temperament
might be a bit erratic, especially in dealing with people
you think you know. Take nothing for granted and don't
thoughtlessly hurt another's feelings.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - In your haste to get
things out of the way, you could create more trouble for
yourself than you would have doing things slowly.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - In order to gratify a
momentary whim, you are likely to dip into funds that
are earmarked for something more essential.


"The Brave One" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:35 p.m. Digital.
"Mr. Woodcock" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Shoot 'Em Up" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. Digital.
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. Digital.
"Halloween" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m, 4:45 p.m., 7:35
p.m, 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"The Nanny Diaries" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
9:40 p.m.
"Superbad" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.


and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
is open for adoptions from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday and from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Call the Citrus County


NAME: Lucky
AGE: Adult
SEX: SF
ID #: 78480


,NAME: Ltl Boy
AGE: YA
SEX: M
ID #: 85087


Animal Shelter at 726-7660
for more information.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida at 563-
2370, or from the Humane
Society of Citrus County at
341-2222.


NAME: Daisy
AGE: YA
SEX: F,
ID #: 85088


NAME: (none)
AGE: Infant
SEX: M
ID #: 85111


4 -
.,


MONTGOMERY TRACE





GENTRY ADK1NS


For Tickets: Log onto Ticketmaster.com
Fancy's Pets - 669 NE Hwy 19 or call
Crystal River, 352-563-5100 1-800-370-8669

Wishful Thinking
Western World ^t iM
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg) PITCH-IN1G-IN QUNOATiON
352-629-7676 352-527-3297


Counseling will help wife


make important decisions


Dear Annie: Seven months ago, I found out
that my husband of 24 years has been
having an affair with a woman in his
office. He thought I would never find out He
informed me that he didn't love me enough dur-
ing the last 21 years of our marriage
and went on to confess to three addi-
tional affairs. This has destroyed me
completely
Am I crazy for still loving this
man? I made him move out, but he is
always at my house. I have had zero
time alone to heal. Because of the
most recent affair, my husband is
going to lose his job, and he doesn't
seem to care.
Annie, I am a homemaker and
frightened to death, but I'm about
ready to end this marriage and get a
job. Right now, I am the sole owner ANN
of my home. Should I sell and move, MAUI
or stay and forgive him? I know
counseling is what is needed, but
when my husband and I tried it, he straight-out
lied.
My husband says he is sorry and that he loves
me "now" and expects me to accept it. I need
your help. - Confused and Frightened
Dear Confused: Don't make any rash deci-
sions about the house just yet. Your husband
obviously cannot be trusted to remain faithful.
Some women are willing to live with that. If you
are not, we strongly urge you to get counseling
on your own. It will not make your husband
more honest, but it will help you decide if you
want to continue in this marriage. Either way, it
would be a good idea for you to get some job
training and prepare yourself. No woman
should be so completely dependent on her hus-
band. Life is too unpredictable.
Dear Annie: My 24-year-old son and his wife
are the parents of two toddler boys and are
expecting another baby soon. They live four
hours away. I recently learned that my son goes
off to work early in the morning and his wife
sleeps until noon, while the boys are locked in
their bedroom "watching cartoons."
I don't know what they tell themselves to be
convinced this is OK. I think it is serious child
neglect and poses a danger to the boys. I am
really worried, but I'm afraid if I say anything, I
could alienate both my son and daughter-in-law.


L


But, Annie, I can't just do nothing. Any sugges-
tions? - Scared Grandmother
Dear Grandmother- Why is Mom sleeping
until noon? Is she ill? Is she depressed? Of
course it's dangerous to leave young children
locked in a room for hours, but you
might get better results if you
address this as a matter of health,
instead of an issue of child neglect.
Lovingly tell your son that you are
concerned at the level of exhaustion
his pregnant wife is experiencing,
and if she is suffering from any kind
of hormonal imbalance, it could kick
into severe postpartum depression
after the baby is born. She needs to
speak to her doctor about this imme-
diately, and in the meantime, they
should look into hiring a sitter or
IE'S having your son drop the kids at a
.BOX day care center until Mom can pick
them up.
Dear Annie: Wow! The letter from
"Frigid Mom" just knocked my socks off. She
admitted she hasn't been interested in sex for
years. I'm having trouble in my own home on
this same matter. But her letter sure made me
feel better, knowing there are other couples out
there going through the same thing.
I'd like to thank "Frigid Mom" for having the
strength to tell her story, and the courage to
admit her contribution to the problem. I took
that clip straight home and read it to my wife. It
didn't make much difference to her, but it made
a world of difference to me, knowing there is
one woman out there who cares enough about
her man to ask these questions. Frigid Mom,
thank you, thank you, thank you! - S.D.
Dear S.D.: Opening the lines of communica-
tion is the first step. We hope it will help your
wife be willing to address the issue.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page 17A.


ACROSS
1 Plait
6 Stony
10 Walking stick
15 Burst open
18 Insect stage
19 City in Wisconsin
21 Cargo ship
22 Aspersion
23 Said further
24 Freebooter
25 Supporting structure
26 Glass square
27 Life story, for short
28 Rabbits
29 Of a grain
31 Point of view
33 Type
35 Cousin to an org.
36 Tempted
37 Abbreviate
38 Setting on
a washing machine
40 Kind of printer
41 OT book
42 Fashionable
44 Engages
45 Detest
47 Nest and Easter
51 Heavy-duty scissors
52 Radar relative
53 Tropical fruit
55 Sunbeam
56 In a rage
57 High point
58 Purloined
60 Guy with smarts
62 Orderly
63 City in Greece
65 - and crafts
66 Compass part
67 First woman
68 Kind of prize
69 "- go bragh!"
71 Oar peg
73 Unit of work
75 Yoko -
76 Weighing device
77 Fiery
78 Craze .
81 Drive forward
83 Jason's mythical ship
84 - noire
85 Amount after
deductions
87 Vote
90 Connecticut college


1 2 3 4 5



27 2
33


42 43.




56

73 74 7

I7 489


92 Cheered
94 Venus de -
95 Grownup
96 Formal argument
98 Seed appendage
99 Computer-fun
enthusiast
100 Cudgel
101 King's messenger
103 "The Sound of -"
105 Clergyman
106 Prayer ending
108 Achy
109 Day of the movies
110 Fight
111 Director - Preminger
113 Greek letters
114 Kind of certificate
115 Hard work
118 Hikers' path
119 Part of speech
120 Canine cry
124 Elementa gas
125 Spinet
126 Upholstered pieces
127 - Abner
128 Long story
129 Friendliness
131 Fastened, in a way
133 "The - Mutiny"
135 Rescue
136 Stiffened fabric
137 Unmarried
138 Lost (2 wds.)
139 Peeper
140 Arab VIP (var.)
141 Genuine
142 Looks searchingly


DOWN
1 Tattles
2 Walkie-talkie
3 Passion
4 "- Got a Secret"'
5 Pop
6 Funeral vehicle
-7 Not of this world ,
8 Stewart and Steiger
9 Expire
10 More gentle
11 All in.
12 Ladd or Alda
13 Abbr. in grammar
14 Undergraduate
students
15 Factory
16 Unit of weight
17 Pretty oneself up
19 Loud and showy
20 Pants
22 Not dense
28 Ship's crew
30 God of war
32 Also
34 Agreement between
nations
36 Pasternak character
37 Old Nick
39 Concerning (2 wds.)
40 Flaxen fabric
42 Grow stronger
43 Elementary-school
book
44 "Iliad" author
45 Stop
46 Novocaine, e.g.
48 Former student,
for short
49 Feminine name
50 Auld Lang -
51 Scene
52 Educational period
(2 wds.)
53 Carried
54 Cain's victim
57 Make expiation
59 Clothes maker
61 Coral ridge
63 Take as one's own
64 Hidden
66 Well-known
70 Cloth for cleaning
72 Resort building
74 Fish organ
76 Plate of greens
79 Beast


80 Take out
82 Nocturnal insect
84 "- Godunov"
86 Ripped
87 Ali -
88 Eden resident
89 Old stringed
instrument
91 Competent
93 Fertile spot
in a desert
94 Like a bog
96 Slobber
97 Feelings
99 Blow hard
102 Anticipated cost
104 River in Russia
105 Restrains
107 Beginner
109 College official
110 Harangue
112 Greek letter
113 Hand roller for ink'
114 Happened to
115 The ones here
116 Refund
117 - and kicking
118 Name
119 Volgograd's river
121 "Fur -"
122 Garment part
123 Entreaties
125 Stack
126 - qua non
130 Not talking
132 Ventilate
133 Beanie
134 Had a bite


Today'sHOROSCOPE


Today's MOVIES


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL

PET PROFILES


4


,16%ppm 5ul-4u,�X, .-, - /


i










* College football/2B
* MLB/3B
* Scoreboard/4B
* NFL game previews/5B
* Entertainment/6B


B
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Bucs, Saints coming off losses


Saints aim to get offense in working order,

Bucs look to tighten up on defensive holes


Associated Press


TAMPA - Derrick Brooks detests
the questions.
With the New Orleans Saints and
their potent .offense coming to town,
the leader of the Tampa Bay defense
would much rather talk about what
the Buccaneers have to do to contain
Drew Brees, Deuce McAllister and
Reggie Bush than respond to critics of
his play.
The 10-time Pro Bowl linebacker
made a couple of crucial errors dur-
ing the Bucs' season-opening loss to
the Seattle Seahawks, once again


fueling suspicions that - at 34 years
old - he's lost a step.
Brooks scoffs at the notion he's
approaching the twilight of his career.
The next opportunity to state his argu-
ment on the field is today against the
Saints, who also are answering a lot of
questions after sputtering through a
lopsided loss to Super Bowl champi-
on Indianapolis Colts.
"For every bad thing that people
say, I can turn around and give them
two or three gbod (plays) that I had,"
Brooks said, reflecting on his per-
formance during the Bucs' 20-6 loss to
the Seahawks. "But that's not going to


ON TELEVISION
9 New Orleans Saints at Tampa
Bay Buccaneers: 1 p.m. on FOX.

get us anywhere. That's not going to
get us a win."
The Saints, coming off a dramatic
turnaround that saw them go from 3-
13 two years ago to a division title and
NFC championship game appearance
last season, fizzled during a 41-10 loss
to the Colts.


Brees struggled, throwing two inter-
ceptions and failing to produce any
second-half points. McAllister and
Bush were shut down, too, finishing
with a combined 76 yards rushing on
22 carries and catching six passes for
another 14 yards.
The disappointment of playing
poorly was bad enough. But New
Orleans and Indianapolis opened the
season three days before the rest of
the NFL, so the Saints had a lot more
time than usual to lament on failing to
play up to expectations.
"I think we all walk away from that
game asking what happened. It just
didn't seem like we showed up,"
Brees said. "We were so prepared. I
was more prepared for that game
than any one in my life. Things just
didn't go our way. I think you have to


understand at times that's going to
happen. It shows the strength and
character of the team to see how
we're going to respond."
Just as Brooks is confident he and
the Bucs will rebound, the Saints
expect to play much better this week.
"We're such a better team than we
showed. ... We want to redeem our-
selves," said Brees, who led two victo-
ries over Tampa Bay a year ago. "It's
not a must-win situation, but it is an
important game."
New Orleans coach Sean Payton,
insisting the Saints (0-1) will be fine if
they can clean up the mistakes that
held them back against the Colts,
agreed.
"The best thing about the schedule in
this league is that you get a chance to
Please see BUCS/Page 4B


Vols vanquished, 59-20


Associated Press
Florida's Jermaine Cunningham, left, reaches for a fumble by Tennessee running back Arian Foster (27) during the second half Saturday in Gainesville.
Florida's Dustin Doe recovered the fumble and ran 18 yards for a touchdown.

Gators' home winning streak continues with rout of Tennessee in SEC showdown


Associated Press
� GAINESVILLE - Tim
Tebow made one huge play
against Tennessee last year.
He made nearly all of them
Saturday.
Tebow threw for 299 yards
and two touchdowns, ran for
61 yards and two scores, and
lifted No. 5 Florida to a 59-
20 romp over the 22nd-
ranked Volunteers.
Not bad for his first
Southeastern Conference
start.


Tebow completed two pass-
es underhand and another
one falling down. He hit Riley
Cooper and Cornelius
Ingram with perfect throws in
the end zone. And he
ran over and around Tennes-
see defenders much of the
day.
His performance even
earned him a kiss on the
side of the face from room-
mate Tony Joiner.
The defending national
champion Gators (3-0, 1-0)
extended their winning


streak to 10 games,
stretched their home win-
ning streak to 18 and
improved to 7-0 against their
three biggest rivals un-
der coach Urban
Meyer. Florida
hasn't lost to
Tennessee,
Georgia or Flori-
da State since 2004.
Last year in
Knoxville, Tebow replaced
Chris Leak and converted a
fourth-and-1 play in the
fourth quarter that led to the


go-ahead touchdown in the
21-20 victory.
He did much more
Saturday
His best play
probably will be
overlooked, too.
He rolled left on
fourth-and-3,
bought time and
then threw across
his body to David Nelson
for a 14-yard gain.
Percy Harvin scored on
the next play, making it 42-20
and essentially sealing the


victory on the opening play
of the fourth quarter. Harvin
shook two defenders, spun
out of a tackle and then trot-
ted into the end zone.
Harvin finished with 195
total yards - 75 rushing and
120 receiving.
Tebow and Harvin weren't
the only stars, either.
Brandon James returned
a punt 83 yards for a touch-
down, making two ankle-
breaking moves before
Please see GATORS/Page 4B


Associated Press
O.J. Simpson said he only went into a
casino hotel room to retrieve memorabil-
ia that he felt was stolen from him. But
police are investigating it as an armed
robbery and named the fallen football
star as a suspect Friday in yet another
surprising chapter to his legal saga.


Simpson



accuser:


I'm on



O.J.'s side

Associated Press
LAS VEGAS - A sports memorabil-
ia collector who accused O.J. Simpspn
of armed robbery said Saturday that
he was "on O.J.'s side" and wants the
case dropped. 1
"I want this thing to go away. I hqve
health problems," said Alfred
Beardsley, the collector who told
police on Thursday that Simpson ahd
several other men stormed a gas
Vegas hotel room and stole memofa-
bilia at gunpoint
Beardsley, of Burbank, Calif., tnld
The Associated Press he is not intOr-
ested in pursuing the case.
"I have no desire to fly back and
forth to Las Vegas to testify," he said.
"How are they going to have a witness
who's on O.J.'s side?"
Beardsley said he called police only
because the items were valuable and
if he had not reported them as stolen
he would be "held accountable for all
the stuff." Beardsley said Friday that
Simpson had called him to apologize.
Lt Clint Nichols said later Saturday
that Beardsley had not formally with-
drawn his complaint and that another
collector in the room, Bruce Fromong,
had not indicated that he wants to
drop the complaint
Please see .i.-.'o0-,/Page4B


Tiger
Woods fol-
lows his
drive
Saturday
on the
14th hole
during
the third 0,
round at .|
the Tour .
Champ-
ionship
East Lake
Golf Club
in Atlanta.
Associated - . ,
Press


Woods' 64 leaves him on verge of 7th win


Associated Press
ATLANTA - PGA Tour commis-
sioner Tim Finchem was lost in a sea
of fans on the sixth hole, hearing
cheers from every corner of East Lake
without knowing for sure what they
meant.
Once he was filled in on the details
- two quick birdies for Tiger Woods
to stretch his lead to five shots at the
Tour Championship - he looked at a
scoreboard in the distance and said,


"We need this thing to tighten up."
The FedEx Cup? Not a chance.
Woods took care of the $10 million
retirement deposit with a 6-under 64
on Saturday to retain a three-shot
lead. The odds are stacked so great in
his favor that even if Phil Mickelson
were to birdie every hole in the final
round, it still probably wouldn't be
enough.
What matters to Woods now is the
crystal trophy for winning the Tour
Championship.


And even that 64 to give him the low-
est 54-hole start of his PGA Tour was-
n't enough to guarantee that Not on a
pushover like East Lake, where the
greens are slow and soft and pins look-
ing like something the players see in a
pro-am. The perfect storm of scoring
conditions were never more evident
in a sunny afternoon at East Lake.
Zach Johnson came within a birdie
on the 18th hole of a 59, instead hitting
into a bunker and settling for a 60 that
broke the East Lake record by two


shots. Mark Calcavecchia shot a 63
and only gained one shot on the lead.
Sergio Garcia shot a 64 and didn't
make up any ground at all.
Woods has never played in the Bob
Hope Classic. After a week like this,
he doesn't have to.
"I can't remember too many golf
courses that have been easier than
this one," he said after missing a 7-
foot birdie on the final hole to settle
Please see WOODS/Page 4B


rts









2K SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 16. 2007 COLLEGE FOOThALL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) C'HRONIcLJI


Knights hang with


'Horns


UCF refuses to

bend in 35-32

loss to Texas

Associated Press

ORLANDO - Colt McCoy
wouldn't let Texas lose.
McCoy threw 259 yards and
two touchdowns and Jamaal
Charles scored on a 46-yard
run Saturday to clinch the
,sixth-ranked Longhorns' 35-32
victory over Central Florida in
the first game in UCF's new on-
'campus stadium.
Ryan Bailey kicked five field
,goals for Texas (3-0), which
regrouped after squandering a
13-point lead to fall behind 24-
'23 early in the fourth quarter.
"Bailey put the Longhorns
:,ahead for good, then tied a
school record with a fifth field
goal that made it 29-24 with
5:19 left.
I.' Charles, who rushed 153
yards on 22 carries, put the
Longhorns up 35-24 with his
long run after cornerback
Marcus Griffin recovered a
UCF fumble. The Texas run-
ning back was. trying to help
the Longhorns kill the clock
when he fumbled for the sec-
ond time, giving UCF one more
chance to get back in the game.
McCoy completed 32 of 47
passes and was intercepted
once. Quan Cosby had 10
.receptions for 67 yards in the
*Longhorns' first appearance in
the state of Florida in 34 years.
, Kyle Isreal's 7-yard TD pass
Ito Kamar Aiken and a 2-point
conversion trimmed UCF's
,deficit to three with 35 seconds
'left. But Brandon Foster, who
.scored on a 33-yard intercep-
-tion return in the second quar-
ter, recovered the ensuing
onside kick to seal the victory.
Kevin Smith ran for 149
yards and scored on runs on 2
-and 3 yards for UCF (1-1).
Isreal finished 9-of-26 for 134
yards, one TD and one inter-
ception.
The game was delayed for 15
minutes during the first quar-
ter because of lightning. Part of
the: second half was played
through heavy rain that sent
many in the sellout crowd run-
ning for cover.
No. 3 Oklahoma 54,
Utah St. 3
NORMAN, Okla. - Sam
Bradford threw for 255 yards and
three touchdowns in another effi-
cient performance, and No. 3
Oklahoma notched its third blowout
bf the season with a 54-3 win
against Utah State on Saturday.
Malcolm Kelly caught his sixth
and seventh touchdown passes of
the season and Allen Patrick
showed his sprained ankle has
fully healed with a 69-yard TD
sprint as the Sooners (3-0) piled it
on again.
Bradford, a redshirt freshman
who came into the game as the
nation's top-rated passer, complet-
ed his first 11 passes - including
two for scores - to reach 21
straight passes without an incom-
pletion. He'd already had a school-
Tecord run of 22 straight comple-
' tions that ended in the Sooners'
51-13 rout of Miami last week.
No. 7 Wisconsin 45,
The Citadel 31
MADISON, Wis. - Given the
*fact that he outweighed all but two
of the defensive starters he was
facing, it wasn't a surprise to see
Wisconsin running back P.J. Hill
rumble for a school record-tying
five touchdowns.
The surprise was that The
Citadel offense managed to keep
up with the Badgers for a half.
The Bulldogs gave the seventh-
. ranked Badgers a scare of
Appalachian proportions in the first
,half before Wisconsin pulled away
'to a 45-31 victory.
No. 8 California 42,
Louisiana Tech 12
SBERKELEY, Calif. - Lavelle
SHawkins returned the opening kick-
off 90 yards for a touchdown, and
Justin Forsett ran for 152 yards
and three scores in No. 8
California's 42-12 victory over
Louisiana Tech on Saturday.
Craig Stevens and Jahvid Best


caught TD passes from Nate
Longshore, who passed for 230
shaky yards as Cal (3-0) comfort-
ably finished its nonconference
schedule with its ninth straight win
at Memorial Stadium.
,.. The Golden Bears shook off
their letdown from a season-open-


-~ ;~.. ~ *7
~


.5-


Central Florida's tailback Kevin Smith dives into the end zone Saturday to score the Knights' first offensive touchdown against Texas in Orlando.


UCLA quarterback Ben Olson is sacked Saturday by Utah defensive lineman Koa Misi and defensive
end Paul Kruger, top right, for a 2-yard loss during the second quarter in Salt Lake City.


ing win over Tennessee with an
improved defensive effort and sev-
eral big plays from their offensive
stars. Forsett had another out-
standing game behind Cal's offen-
sive line, finishing with a 1-yard
stroll over the goal line with 9:46
left in the eighth 100-yard perform-
ance of his career.
No. 10 Ohio St. 33,
Washington 14
SEATTLE - Chris Wells ran for
135 yards and a touchdown and
No. 10 Ohio State scored 24 con-
secutive points in the second half
to beat Washington 33-14 on
Saturday.
Linebacker James Laurinaitis
intercepted Washington's Jake
Locker twice deep in Buckeyes ter-
ritory. Last season's Nagurski
Award winner as the nation's best
defensive player also had a key
sack of the Huskies' redshirt fresh-
man star during the decisive
sequence of the third quarter.
Ohio State (3-0) tied their school
record for consecutive wins in the
regular season with 21, matching a
mark set from 1967-69.
Utah 44, No. 11 UCLA 6
SALT LAKE CITY - Tommy
Grady threw for three touchdowns,
Darrell Mack-ran for 107 yards and
Utah capitalized on a long list of
mistakes by No. 11 UCLA in a 44-6
upset of the Bruins on Saturday.
Robert Johnson made two inter-
ceptions and forced a fumble at the
2-yard line, making what could
have been a touchdown into one of
five turnovers by the Bruins (2-1).
UCLA committed 10 penalties
and unraveled in the second half
as Utah (1-2) scored 30 straight
points and beat the Bruins for the
first time. Utah had been 0-8
against UCLA, which failed to
score a touchdown for the first time
in four years.
Louie Sakoda kicked three field
goals and Mack became the first
Ute to rush for 100 yards since


Quinton Ganther gained 120 in the
2005 Emerald Bowl against No. 24
Georgia Tech, which was also
Utah's last win over a ranked team.
No. 12 Penn St. 45,
Buffalo 24
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Rodney Kinlaw has made a career
out of standing on the sidelines,
waiting for a chance to prove he
can produce at Penn State.
On Saturday, the career backup
finally got a chance to be star.
Kinlaw jump-started a sputtering
offense with 129 yards and a
touchdown, and Anthony Morelli
threw for a career-high four scores
as the 12th-ranked Nittany Lions
defeated Buffalo 45-24.
Penn State (3-0) also got a lift
from a couple of lucky bounces
that led to 17 points in the last 6:29
of the first half.
No. 13 Rutgers 59,
Norfolk State 0
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - No. 13
Rutgers produced the biggest sec-
ond quarter in the school history,
and all it needed was 11 plays and
91 seconds to amass 277 yards
and score 42 points.
Ray Rice ran for three touch-
downs and Mike Teel threw for
three more in the lightning-quick
outburst that carried the Scarlet
Knights to a 59-0 victory over
Norfolk State on Saturday.
While the result wasn't surprising,
Rutgers coach Greg Schiano raised
some eyebrows just before the half
by calling three timeouts in an
attempt to get the ball back with the
Scarlet Knights (3-0) ahead 45-0.
Alabama 41,
No. 16 Arkansas 38
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. - Matt
Caddell caught a 4-yard touch-
down pass in the comer of the end
zone from John Parker Wilson with
8 seconds left, lifting Alabama to a
41-38 victory over No. 16 Arkansas
on Saturday night, for the first


major win of the Nick Saban era.
The Crimson Tide (2-1, 2-0
Southeastern Conference) moved
from its own 27-yard line with 2:13
left after twice blowing 21-point
leads, mostly on the Wilson-to-
Caddell connection.
Wilson hit Caddell across the
middle for a 19-yard completion
and two 9-yarders to move the ball
across midfield. Arkansas' Kevin
Woods and Matterral Richardson
were both whistled for pass inter-
ference, Richardson on a third-
and-9 play. That set Alabama up
with a first down at the 13, and
Wilson hit Keith Brown for a 9-
yarder.
Wilson found a leaping Caddell
in the left side of the end zone,
sending the crowd into a frenzy
and prompting a celebratory pileup
on the receiver.
No. 17 South Carolina 38,
South Carolina St. 3
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Blake
Mitchell threw three touchdowns
and No. 17 South Carolina defeat-
ed South Carolina State 38-3
Saturday to make the Gamecocks
3-0 for the first time in six years.
South Carolina won its sixth con-
secutive game and the defense
didn't allow a touchdown for the
second straight.
That streak - and South
Carolina's perfect start - will get
severely tested next week with a
trip to No. 2 LSU.
The numbers looked strong for
South Carolina.
Mitchell finished 14-for-21 for
147 yards. Cory Boyd (132) and
Mike Davis (102) went over 100
yards rushing, but the Gamecocks'
offense looked lost for a half
against the Bulldogs (1-2).
No. 18 Virginia Tech 28,
Ohio 7
BLACKSBURG, Va. - Tyrod
Taylor didn't exactly make No. 18
Virginia Tech's offense shine, but
the freshman quarterback ran for a


touchdown and didn't make any
mistakes as the Hokies struggled
again but beat Ohio 28-7 on
Saturday.
Inserted into the lineup in place
of Sean Glennon to energize the
running game and help mask the
deficiencies in the offensive line,
Taylor limited his running and com-
pleted 18 of 31 passes for 287
yards. He also scored on a 6-yard
draw play with 3:38 left in the third
quarter, giving the Hokies (2-1)
their first lead at 14-7.
His biggest play came on the first
play of that drive when he was
there to pick up Branden Ore's fum-
ble at the Hokies 45, the only one
of three fumbles Tech didn't lose.
The Bobcats (2-1) gained just
114 yards and got their only points
on a 26-yard drive set up by Eddie
Royal's muffed punt in the first half.
Ohio spent most of the second half
trying to get out of its own territory
and only got as far as midfield.
No. 19 Oregon 52,
Fresno State 21
EUGENE, Ore. - Dennis Dixon
threw for two touchdowns and ran
for another, Jonathan Stewart ran
for 165 yards and No. 19 Oregon
defeated Fresno State 52-21 on
Saturday.
Stewart scored two touchdowns,
including an 88-yard dash to the
end zone, and the Ducks (3-0) out-
rushed the Bulldogs 307-60.
While not posting the gaudy
numbers he did in Oregon's 39-7
victory over Michigan the previous
weekend, Dixon was solid, com-
pleting 14-for-20 for 139 yards and
running for 59 yards.
No. 20 Clemson 38,
Furman 10
CLEMSON, S.C. - Cullen
Harper went 16-for-19 for 266
yards and three touchdowns as
No. 20 Clemson beat Furman 38-
10 on Saturday.
In just his third start, Harper con-
tinued to show his mastery of the
Tigers offense. He has 10 touch-
down passes, no interceptions and
has completed 72.5 percent of his
passes.
Even so, one of the biggest
cheers of the day for Clemson (3-
0) came when highly touted fresh-
man Willy Korn got in the game
early in the fourth quarter. On just
his third play, Kom threw a 42-yard
touchdown pass to La'Donte Harris
for the first TD of his career and a
38-3 Tigers lead.
The Tigers (3-0) made few mis-
takes and their defense made
stops when it needed to. The
Paladins (1-2) gained 384 yards,
but failed to score more than 10
points for the 10th time in their last
11 games with Clemson.
No. 23 Georgia 45,
Western Carolina 16
ATHENS, Ga. - For one quar-
ter, it was difficult to tell if Georgia
was playing Western Carolina or
South Carolina.
Then Matthew Stafford and the
Bulldogs started rolling.
Stafford threw two second-quar-


Associated Press


ter scoring passes and No. 23
Georgia recovered from the early'
offensive malaise to beat Western
Carolina 45-16 on Saturday.
Georgia, held without a touch-
down last week for the first time in
six years in a 16-12 loss to South
Carolina, struggled early before
enjoying an offensive revival
against the Catamounts of the
Championship Subdivision, former-
ly I-AA.
Stafford directed four straight
touchdown drives before leaving
the game in the third quarter.
Stafford was 14-for-20 for 174
yards and two touchdowns.".'
Backup Joe Cox added a 34-yard
scoring pass and three running
backs ran for touchdowns:
Michigan 38, Notre Dame 0
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Michigan
took care of Mike Hart's guarantee
with ease.
Hart ran for 187 yards on 35 car-
ries and scored two touchdowns,
and Ryan Mallett threw for three
scores, leading the Wolverines to a
38-0 win over Notre Dame on
Saturday.
Michigan handed the Fighting
Irish their worst loss since beating
them by the same score in 2003.
The Wolverines (1-2) avoided
their first 0-3 start in seven
decades.
Notre Dame (0-3) is winless after
three games for just the second
time in school history, putting
coach Charlie Weis in unwanted
company with Bob Davie.
Michigan's defense suddenly
was swarming to the football after
giving up 73 points in losses to
Appalachian State and Oregon.
Freshman Jimmy Clausen was
11-of-17 for just 74 yards and an
interception. He was sacked seven
times, leading to Notre Dame's
rushing total of minus-6.
Miami 23,
Florida International 9
MIAMI - Kyle Wright threw an
80-yard pass to Lance Leggett for
Miami's longest offensive score in
nearly two years, and the
Hurricanes beat Florida
International 23-9 Saturday in the
rematch of South Florida rivals who
got into an on-field melee last sea-
son.
Darnell Jenkins had a career-
high 108 yards receiving, Javarris
James ran for 92 yards and Kenny
Phillips and Chavez Grant had
interceptions for Miami (2-1). The
Hurricanes held a 428-264 edge in
total yards, sending the Golden
Panthers (0-3) to their 15th straight
loss.
Wright finished 10-of-19 for 224
yards, and Francesco Zampogna
kicked three field goals for Miami.
Just as both teams vowed, there
was no repeat of the sideline-
clearing brawl that led to 31 play-
ers getting suspended last season.
To be safe, the Atlantic Coast
Conference sent its top referee -
Jack Childress - to keep order,
and his crew set a strict tone, sep-
arating Miami and FlU players
when necessary.


"2BSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLF


CC>LLE4GE Fc>C>XBA.LL











Cimus COUNTY (FL,) C~ JA'ONI('IF 1~4AToR LEAGUE BASEBALL SUNDAY, Sm' 1'EMSFR 16, 2007 3B


INL


WILD CARD GLANCE
American League
W L Pct GB
New York 84 64 .568 -
Detroit 82 67 .544 21,
National League
W L Pct GB
San Diego 79 67 .541 -
Philadelphia 79 69 .534 1
Los Angeles 79 69 .534 1%
Colorado 76 71 .517 3%
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
f N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 7
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 4
Baltimore 6, Toronto 2
Detroit 4, Minnesota 2
Chicago White Sox 5, L.A. Angels 3
Oakland 11, Texas 9
Seattle 2, Tampa Bay 1
Saturday's Games
Toronto 8, Baltimore 3
Oakland 7, Texas 3
Boston 10, N.Y. Yankees 1
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 0
Detroit 4, Minnesota 3
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, late
Tampa Bay at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Kansas City (Buckner 0-1) at Cleveland
(Laffey 3-1), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Santos 1-5) at Toronto (Marcum
S42-6), 1:07 p.m.
SLA. Angels (Saunders 8-3) at Chicago
,.White Sox (Buehrle 9-9), 2:05 p.m.
'Detroit (Jurrjens 2-1) at Minnesota (Baker
".9-7), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Padilla 6-9) at Oakland (DiNardo 8-
;f9), 4:05 p.m.
gTampa Bay (Sonnanstine 5-9) at Seattle
,(Washbum 9-14), 4:05 p.m.
.-N.Y Yankees (Clemens 6-6) at Boston
S.(Schilling 8-7), 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
"Atlanta 8, Washington 5, 13 innings
'-"Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Mets 2, 10 innings
.Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 5
'Pittsburgh 4, Houston 3
'Chicago Cubs 5, St. Louis 3
S"Florida 7, Colorado 6
San Diego 5, San Francisco 4, 10 innings
L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 4
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 3
Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 2, 1st game
L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 2
Washington 7, Atlanta 4
Houston 9, Pittsburgh 7
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at Colorado, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at SL Louis, 8:10 p.m., 2nd game
San Francisco at San Diego; 10:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Eaton 9-9) at N.Y. Mets
(O.Perez 14-9), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 15-8) at Washington
(Hill 4-3), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 10-14) at Houston
(Backe 0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Belisle 8-8) at Milwaukee
(Villanueva 7-4), 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Marquis 11-8) at St. Louis
(Mulder 0-2), 2:15 p.m.
Florida (Olsen 9-13) at Colorado (Morales
1-2), 3:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 7-4) at San
Diego (Peavy 17-6), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (Gonzalez 7-2) at L.A. Dodgers
(Loaiza 2-1), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Florida at Atlanta, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .356;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .351; Polanco, Detroit,
.341; Posada, New York, .338; VGuerrero,
Los Angeles, .328; Lowell, Boston, .326;
DOrtiz, Boston, .326.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 134;
Granderson, Detroit, 114; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 113; MOrdonez, Detroit, 110;
BAbreu, New York, 109; DOrtiz, Boston,
107; ISuzuki, Seattle, 105.
RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 141;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 132; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 118; CPena, Tampa Bay, 111;
Momeau, Minnesota, 107; Lowell, Boston,
106; DOrtiz, Boston, 106.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 215;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 196; MYoung, Texas,
183; Jeter, New York, 183; Polanco,
Detroit, 182; Rios, Toronto, 178; Crawford,
Tampa Bay, 178; OCabrera, Los Angeles,
178.
DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 48;
DOrtiz, Boston, 46; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 45; THunter, Minnesota, 42;
AHill, Toronto, 41; Markakis, Baltimore, 40;
Posada, New York, 40.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 22;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit,
9; Iwamura, Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera,
New York, 8.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
52; CPena, Tampa Bay, 39; DOrtiz,
Boston, 31; Morneau, Minnesota, 30;
Konerko, Chicago, 29; THunter,
Minnesota, 28; MOrdonez, Detroit, 27;
Thome, Chicago, 27.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 49; BRoberts, Baltimore, 43; Figgins,
Los Angeles, 39; ISuzuki, Seattle, 37;
CPatterson, Baltimore, 37; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 33; JLugo, Boston, 30.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Renteria, Atlanta, .337;
Utley, Philadelphia, .335; CJones, Atlanta,
.334; HaRamirez, Florida, .332; Holliday,
Colorado, .332; DYoung, Washington,
.323; Pujols, St. Louis, .321.
RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 126;
HaRamirez, Florida, 113; JBReyes, New
York, 108; Holliday, Colorado, 104; Uggla,
Florida, 102; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 102;
Wright, New York, 99; Dunn, Cincinnati,
99.
RBI-Holliday, Colorado, 120; Howard,
Philadelphia, 115; CaLee, Houston, 109;
Fielder, Milwaukee, 108; Dunn, Cincinnati,
103; Atkins, Colorado, 102; MiCabrera,
Florida, 99.
HITS-Holliday, Colorado,'193; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 193; HaRamirez, Florida,
191; JBReyes, New York, 179; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 178; Pierre, Los Angeles, 177;
Francoeur, Atlanta, 175.
DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 48;
Uggia, Florida, 43; HaRamirez, Florida,43;
Utley, Philadelphia, 43; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 42; Rowand, Philadelphia, 42;
CaLee, Houston, 40; CJones, Atlanta, 40.
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 18;
JBReyes, New York, 12; Johnson, Atlanta,
10; Pence, Houston, 9; Amezaga, Florida,
9; OHudson, Arizona, 9; CHart,
Milwaukee, 8; Harris, Atlanta, 8; Bymes,


Arizona, 8; DRoberts, San Francisco, 8.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 45;
Dunn, Cincinnati, 39; Howard,
Philadelphia, 38; Holliday, Colorado, 31;
MiCabrera, Florida, 31; Pujols, St. Louis,
31; Braun, Milwaukee, 30; CBYoung,
Arizona, 30; Berkman, Houston, 30;
Griffey Jr., Cincinnati, 30.
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New York,
78; Pierre, Los Angeles, 58; HaRamirez,
Florida, 46; Bymes, Arizona, 45; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 37; Rollins, Philadelphia, 35;
Taveras, Colorado, 33.


Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
Florida


W L
83 64
79 69
75 73
66 82
64 83


East Division
GB L10
- 6-4
5% z-8-2
15% z-4-6
26 3-7
28% 4-6

East Division
GB L10
- z-6-4
4% 6-4
8% 5-5
17% z-5-5
19 4-6


Home
47-27
47-27
44-30
32-42
35-40


Home
40-33
43-32
38-36
37-36
32-42


Boston Red Sox's Jacoby EIIsbury, left,
Saturday as New York Yankees catcher Joi
the tag as Ellsbury scores on David Ortiz's
at Fenway Park in Boston.


Red Sox 10, Yankees 1
BOSTON - Josh Beckett's 19th
victory pushed back the surging
New York Yankees.
Beckett pitched three-hit ball over
seven innings, leading Boston to a
10-1 win Saturday that dropped
New York 5% games back of the
first-place Red Sox with a little more
than two weeks to play.
In a physical game that featured
a bruising home-plate collision and
couple more hit batters, David Ortiz
went 3-for-3 with a two-run double
and Eric Hinske homered. Boston
lowered its magic number to nine
for clinching the division and ending
the Yankees' streak of nine consec-
utive AL titles.
New York had rallied from a 7-2
deficit Friday to beat Boston for the
fifth straight time, but Beckett (19-6)
stopped the Yankees' momentum.
He allowed one run and a walk
while striking out seven, winning his
third straight start. He is likely to
have three tries to reach 20 wins for
the first time in his career.
Chien-Ming Wang (18-7), who
had won his previous five starts,
allowed five runs, nine hits and
three walks in 5 2-3 innings.


Phillies 5, Mets 3
NEW YORK - Carlos Beltran
misplayed Jimmy Rollins' line drive
into a two-run triple and the
Philadelphia Phillies rallied to beat
New York 5-3 Saturday for their
seventh straight victory over the
Mets.
New York wasted another terrific
start by Pedro Martinez, who struck
out nine and held the Phillies to one
run in six innings. Martinez was
sidelined for most of the season
after having major shoulder surgery
last October, but is 2-0 in three
starts since he came off the dis-
abled list Sept. 3.
The Mets led 3-1 after six innings
but couldn't hold on for the second
straight game.


PHILA

Rollins ss
Utley 2b
Burrell.If
Bourn If
Howard lb
Rwand cf
Dobbs 3b
Helms ph
Robrsn pr
Nunez 3b
Werth rf
Coste c
Lohse p
KDavis p
Iguchi ph
Alfnsca p
Lforest ph
Rmero p
Gordon p
BMyers p


NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab
5 02 2 JBRyesss 3
5 11 0 LCstillo 2b 3
4 00 0 Wright 3b 5
1 00 0 Beltran cf 5
5 020 Alou If 4
5 132 ShGren lb 0
3000 Gomez ph 1
0 00 0 Conine lb 0
0 10 0 L Duca c 4
0 00 0 MIIdge rf 3
4 00 0 PMrtnzp 2
4 010 Gotay ph 0
1 01 0 Felicno p 0
0 000 JSosa p 0
1 11 0 Schnws p 0
0 00 0 Mota p 0
0 10 0 MrAnd ph 1
0 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0


r h bi
0 1 0
1 2 0
0 1 0
1 2 1
1 1 0

00 0

0 1 1
0 0 1


Totals 38511 4 Totals 31 3 8 3
Philadelphia 100 000 130- 5
New York 012 000 000- 3
E-ShGreen (4). DP-Philadelphia 1.
LOB-Philadelphia 11, New York 10. 2B-
Howard (25), Rowand (42), Iguchi (10),
Beltran (33). 3B-Rollins (18). HR-Rowand
(24). SB-Rollins 2 (35), JBReyes 2 (78),
LCastillo (9), Beltran 2 (23), ShGreen (11).
CS-JBReyes 2 (20), Gotay (3). S-Werth.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Lohse 5 7 3 3 4. 3
KDavis 1 0 0 0 3 0
Alfonseca W,5-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Romero 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Gordon 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
BMyersS,17 1 1 0 0 1 2
New York
PMartinez 6 7 1 1 0 9
Feliciano 1 2 2 1 0 3
JSosa L,9-7 2-3 1 2 2 2 0
Schoeneweis 2-3 1 0 0 0 2
Mota 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Feliciano pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by PMartinez (Lohse), by Lohse
(Milledge). WP-Mota. PB-Coste.
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First,
Dale Scott; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Paul
Emmel.
T-3:43. A-55,477 (57,343).


NEW YOR


Away
43-32
37-37
30-44
31-42
26-47


Intr
12-6
10-8
10-8
6-12
7-11


Away
43-31
36-37
37-37
29-46
32-41


Cleveland
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City


Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Houston


Central Division
Pct GB L10
.588 - z-7-3
.550 5% z-8-2
.486 15 3-7
.429 23% z-5-5
.429 23% 1-9


Central Division
Pct GB LIO Str
.520 - 6-4 W-4
.507 2 5-5 L-2
.473 7 z-1-9 L-9
.463 8% 6-4 W-4
.446 11 z-6-4 L-1
.432 13 2-8 W-1


Home
46-27
41-34
37-37
33-40
32-42


Home
39-36
45-27
39-33
38-37
35-40
38-36


Athletics 7, Rangers 3
OAKLAND, Calif. - Nick Swisher
homered for the third straight game,
Dan Johnson connected twice and
had a.two-run single to help Joe
Blanton win his third straight start,
-- \s and the Oakland Athletics beat the
Texas Rangers 7-3 on Saturday.
Johnson hit solo shots in the
fourth and sixth innings for his third
career multihomer game and sec-
ond this season, then singled in two
runs in Oakland's three-run seventh.
Mark Ellis doubled in a run and
Jack Cust added an RBI single for
" ' the A's, who have won the first three
games in this four-game set
Between the bottom two teams in
I the AL West.
Blanton (14-9) didn't allow a hit
until Jason Botts lined a single to
Associated Press right to start the fifth, the first of
slides safely into home three straight base hits in the inning.
rge Posada tries to apply David Murphy had an RBI single
double in the sixth inning and the Rangers scored another run

when Jarrod Saltalamacchia
K BOSTON grounded into a double play that.
ab rhbi ab rhbi made it 3-2.


Damon if 4 000 Pedroia 2b 5 2 1 0
Jeter ss 4 12 1 Yukilis lb 2 0 0 0
JMolna c 0000 Ellsbry If 2 223
BAbreurf 401 0 DOrtizdh 3 032
Mntkw lb 0 00 0 Lowell 3b 3 0 1 2
ARod 3b 3 00 0 JDrew rf 3 1 1 1
Btemit 3b 0 00 0 Varitek c 5 0 0 0
Posada c 2 00 0 Cash c 0 0 0 0
Gnzalez ss 1 00 0 Hinske If 4 2 2 1
Matsui dh 3 00 0 Crisp cf 5 2 2 1
Giambi lb 2 000 JLugo ss 4 1 0 0
Srdinha rf 1 00 0
Cano 2b 3 01 0
MeCbr cf 3 00 0
Totals 301 4 1 Totals 36101210
New York 100 000 000- 1
Boston 100 013 41x- 10
DP-Boston 1. LOB-New York 6, Boston
11. 2B-DOrtiz (46), Hinske (10), Crisp
(27). HR-Jeter (10), Hinske (6). SB-
ARodriguez (24), Pedroia (6), Crisp (26). -
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Wang L,18-7 52-3 9 5 5 3 3
Ramirez 2-3 0 1 1 1 2
Villone 0 0 1 1 1 0
Bruney 1-3 1 2 2 1 1
Henn . 0 1 0 0 1 0
Ohlendorf 11-3 1 1 1 1 4
Boston
Beckett W,19-6 7 3 1 1 2 7
Timlin 1 1 0 0 0 2
Corey 1 0 0 0 1 0
Villone pitched to 1 batter in the 7th, Henn
pitclied to 2 ,aners in the 7n -
HBP-by Beci.en Giarnmbli, by Wang
(Youkilis).
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First,
Lance Barksdale; Second, Tim Welke;
Third, Jim Reynolds.
T-3:38. A-36,215 (36,109).


Dodgers 6, Diamondbacks 2
LOS ANGELES - A bruised
pitching hand only served to bring
out the best in Derek Lowe.
Lowe, who missed a start after
being injured while playing catch,
allowed one run in seven innings,
Luis Gonzalez hit a three-run homer
to cap a four-run first, and the Los
Angeles Dodgers beat the Arizona
Diamondbacks 6-2 on Saturday.
By winning their second straight
over Arizona, the Dodgers moved
within 3% games of the NL West-
leading Diamondbacks, and trailed
San Diego by one game in the wild-
card race pending the Padres'
game against the San Francisco
Giants later Saturday.
The Philadelphia Phillies beat the
New York Mets 5-3, leaving them
one game behind the Padres as
well.
Lowe (12-12) gave up four hits
while walking one and striking out
five before being relieved by Joe
Beimel to start the eighth with the
game well in hand. It was the
Dodgers' fourth straight win.


ARIZONA
ab rhbi


Bnfacio 2b
ClIspo 2b
Drew ss
Byrnes If
TClark lb
Rynlds 3b
Salazar rf
CBYng cf
Mntero c
Hmck c
LHrndz p
Slaten p
Wckmn p
Cirillo ph
Mdders p


3 00 0
1 01 1
401 0
4 00 0
3 11 1
4 01 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
201 0
1 1 1 -0
2 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
1 00 0
0 00 0


LOS ANGELES
ab r h bi
Furcal ss 4 2 2 0
Pierre cf 3 1 0 0
Loney lb 3 1 1 1
LGnzizlf 2 1 1 3
Kemp rf 0 0 0 0
Grcprr 3b 4 0 2 0
Martin c 4 0 0 0
Ethier rf 4 1 1 1
TAbru2b 4 0 1 0
DLowe p 3 0 0 0
Beimel p 0 00 0
Brxtn p 0 0 0 0
MaSwyph 1 0 0 0
Prctr p 0 0 0 0


Totals 332 6 2 Totals 32 6 8 5
Arizona 000 000 110- 2
Los Angeles 400 001 10x- 6
E-Wickman (3), Garciaparra (10). DP-
Los Angeles 1. LOB-Arizona 5, Los
Angeles 7. 2B-Callaspo (7), Montero (7),
Hammock (2), TAbreu (13). HR-TClark


(15), LGonzalez (14),
Furcal 4 (25).


Ethier (12). SB-


IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
LHrndzL,10-10 6 6 5 5 3 3
Slaten 1-3 1 1 0 2 0
Wickman 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Medders 1 1 0 0 0 1
Los Angeles
DLoweW,12-12 7 4 1 1 1 5
Beimel 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
Broxton 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Proctor 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Brian Runge; First,
Mike Winters; Second, Bruce Froemming;
Third, Mark Wegner.
T-2:39. A-48,366 (56,000).


TEXAS OAKLAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Ctlnotto lb 3 00 0ShStwrt If 5 1 1 0
Quiroz ph 0 00 0 Barton lb 4 0 0 0
Metcalf 3b 0 00 0 Swishercf 4 2 2 1
Kinsler2b 3 00 1 Cust rf 4 0 2 1
MYong ss 4 00 0 DVnon cf 0 1 0 0
MBrd rf 401 0 Ellis 2b 4 1 1 1
Botts If 4 11 0 DJnson dh 4 2 34
Blalock dh 4 11 0 Scutaro ss 4 0 0 0
DaMpy cf 4 12 1 Hnnhn 3b 4 0 1 0
Sltmca c 2 01 0 Suzuki c 2 0 0 0
Vzquez3b 2 00 0
Sosa ph 1 00 0
Wlkrsn lb 0 00 0
Totals 313 6 2 Totals 35 710 7
Texas 000 020 010- 3
Oakland 101 101 30x- 7
E-Vazquez (6). DP-Oakland 1. LOB-
Texas 4, Oakland 8. 2B-DaMurphy (9),
Swisher (34), Ellis (31). HR-Swisher (22),
DJohnson 2 (17). SF-Kinsler.


IP
Texas
McCarthy L,5-10 3
Murray 22-3
Littleton 2-3
White 1-3
Mendoza 1-3
Galarraga 1
Oakland
Blanton W,14-9 7
Braden 1-3
ErTee S 17 12-3


H RERBBSO


3 2 2
4 2 2
00 0
1 2 2
2 1 1
0 0 0


5 3 3 1 6
00 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 1


Blanton pilchea o10 Dahers in the 8th
HBP-by White (Swisher).
Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First,
Chuck Meriwether; Second, Rick Reed;
Third, Tim Timmons.
T-2:40. A-24,517 (34,077).


Nationals 7, Braves 4
WASHINGTON - Spacious and
aging RFK Stadium, down to the
final homestand of its baseball life,
had a rare night as a home-run-hit-
tin' ballpark.
Two players hit their first homers
of the season, another player hit
No. 2, and Chipper Jones clobbered
No. 26 Saturday night as the
Washington Nationals put another
dent into the Atlanta Braves' fading
playoff hopes with a 7-4 victory.
Jason Bargeman (5-5) pitched 6
2-3 innings to win his third straight
start, and D'Angelo Jimenez took
advantage of a rare spot in the line-
up to get three hits and increase his
average from .176 to .208.
The Nationals beat Atlanta starter.
Lance Cormier (2-6) for the second
time in less than a week, keeping
the Braves 8� games behind the
NL East leading New York Mets and
at least 4% behind San Diego in the
wild card race.


ATLANTA


WASHINGTON


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Jhnson 2b 4 10 0 Logan cf 4 1 0 0
Rnteria ss 4 13 0 Jimnz ss 3 2 32
Wcwrd pr 0 00 0 FLopez ss 1 0 0 0
CJones 3b 4 123 Zmrmn 3b 3 2 1 0
Txeira lb 401 0 DYong Ib 0 000
Frncurrf 401 0 Fick lb 3 1 1 3
AJones cf 3 01 0 Kearns rf 3 1 1 1
Diaz If 4 00 0 WPena If 3 0 0 0
CMIIr c 3 11 1 CCrdro p 0 0 0 0
YEscbr ph 1 01 0 Blliard 2b 4 0 1 1
Crmerp 1 000 Schndrc 3 0 1 0
Carlyle p 1 00 0 Brgmn p 1 0 0 0
Moylan p 0 00 0 Munoz p 0 0 0 0
Harris ph 1 00 0 Batista ph 1 0 0 0
Mahayp 0 00 0 Rauch p 0 0 0 0
Ring p 0 00 0 Lngrhri If 0 0 0 0
McCnn ph 1 01 0
Orr pr 0 00 0
Totals 35411 4 Totals 29 7 8 7
Atlanta 003 100 000- 4
Washington 203 000 02x- 7
E-Johnson (12), Francoeur (4). DP-
Atlanta 3, Washington 2. LOB-Atlanta 8,
Washington 4. 2B-Jimenez (4),
Zimmerman (38), Kearns (34). HR-
CJones (26), CMiller (1), Jimenez (1), Fick
(2). CS-Jimenez (1). S-Bergmann.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Cormier L,2-6 2 3 5 4 4 0
Carlyle 2 1 0 0 0 1
Moylan 2 1 0 0 0 2
Mahay 12-3.2 2 2 1 2
Ring 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Washington
Bergmann W,5-5 62-3 8 4 4 3 3
Munoz 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Rauch 1 1 0 0 0 0
CCorderoS,34 1 2 0 0 1 0
Cormier pitched to 3 batters in the 3rd.
WP-Bergmann.
Umpires-Home, Tim Tschida; First, Jim
Joyce; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Jim
Wolf.
T-2:51. A-26,866 (46,382).


Away
41-34
41-33
35-39
30-44
31-42


Away
38-35
29-45
30-44
30-42
31-42
26-48


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas


Arizona
San Diego
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Francisco


W L
86 61
78 68
74 76
69 79


W L
8366
7967
7969
7671
6681


Tigers 4, Twins 3
MINNEAPOLIS - Carios Guillen
and Ivan Rodriguez quickly got to
Johan Santana, helping the Detroit
Tigers gain ground on the New York
Yankees in the AL wild-card race.
Guillen had an RBI single and
Rodriguez hit a three-run double in the
first inning, and Detroit held on for a 4-
3 victory over the Minnesota Twins on
Saturday night that pulled the Tigers
within 2% games of New York.
Joel Zumaya (2-3) pitched 1 2-3 hit-
less innings for the victory in relief of
Yorman Bazardo, a 23-year-old right-
hander who pitched effectively in his
first major league start. Todd Jones got
around a two-out walk in the ninth,
retiring Jason Bartlett on a game-end-
ing grounder for his 36th save this
season and the 299th of his career.
Santana (15-12) pitched well after
a rough first, allowing four runs and
six hits in eight innings with seven
strikeouts. The reigning AL Cy
Young winner lost for the third time
in four starts and dropped to 5-6
since the All-Star break.


DETROIT


MINNESOTA


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Raburn If 4 11 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 1 1
RSntgo ss 0 00 0 Kubel if 3 0 1 0
Planco 2b 4 11 0 Mauer c 4 0 0 0
Shffield dh 4000 THnter cf 4 0 0 0
MOrdz rf 2 10 0 Mrneau lb 4 0 0 0
CGillen ss 3 11 1 Cddyer rf 2 0 1 0
IRdrgzc 401 3 GJones dh 2 0 0 0
Thmes lb 3 000 LeCroy dh 1 0 0 0
Grndsn cf 0 000 Tyner ph 1 0 00
Inge3b 4 01 0 LRdrgz2b 4 1 1 0
Clevlen cf 401 0 Punto 3b 3 2 2 0
Bscher ph 0 00 0
Casilla pr 0 0 0 0
Totals 324 6 4 Totals 32 3 6 1
Detroit 400 000 000- 4
Minnesota 001 010 100- 3
E-Miner (2). DP-Detroit 2, Minnesota 1.
LOB-Detroit 5, Minnesota 7. 2B-
IRodriguez (29), Inge (23), Cuddyer (26),
LRodriguez (5). SB-Punto (16).
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Bazardo 42-
Seay 1
Miner 2-
Zumaya W,2-3 12.
TJones S,36 1
Minnesota
JoSantana L,15-128
GuErner 1


6 4 4 2 7
0 0 0-1 2


HBP-by Guerrier (CGuillen), by Bazardo
(Cuddyer). WP-Baiardo.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First,
Tony Randazzo; Second, Greg Gibson;
Third, Larry Vanover.
T-2:53. A-35,230 (46,632).


Astros 9, Pirates 7
HOUSTON - Ty Wigginton home-
red twice and Carlos Lee drove in
three runs during a seven-run fourth
inning, as the Houston Astros rallied
from five down to beat the Pittsburgh
Pirates 9-7 on Saturday night.
The Astros snapped a three-
game losing streak, but have still
lost eight of 10 and are three games
back of Pittsburgh for last place in
the NL Central.
Juan Gutierrez (1-1) relieved in
the fourth inning and went two
innings without allowing a hit to earn
the win. Brad Lidge pitched the
ninth for his 15th save in 21 tries.
Wandy Rodriguez lasted only
three innings and allowed five runs
on five hits and three walks, striking
out five. Rodriguez, who was 6-1 at
home from May through July, is 0-1
with four no-decisions in his last five
home starts.


PITTSBURGH


Morgan cf
JBtsta 3b
FSnchz 2b
Bay If
Nady rf
Pearce lb
Duke p
Kata ph
Perez p
Palino c
JWlson ss
Morris p
STorres p
Phelps lb


ab rhbi


HOUSTON


4 01 0 Andrsn cf
4 00 0 Biggio2b
5 11 0 Lidge p
3 10 0 Brkmn lb
5 00 0 CaLee If
2 11 0 Pence rf
0 00 0 Loretta ss
1 00 0 Wggntn 3b
0 00 0 Towles c
3 22 4 WRdgz p
4 23 3 Rnsm ph
1 00 0 Gterrez p
0 00 0 Lane ph
2 00 0 Paulino p
Sarfate p
Burke ph
Rndlph p
Quails p
Brntltt ss


Totals 347 8 7
Pittsburgh
Houston


ab r h bi
5 1 2 1
4 1 1 0
0000
4 0 1 1
4 1 23
4 1 1 0
4 1 20
4223
4 120
0000
0000
0 1 00
1 00 1
0000
0000
1 000
0000
0000
0000


Totals 35 913 9
014 000 020- 7
000 710 1Ox- 9


E-JBautista (16). DP-Pittsburgh 2.
LOB-Pittsburgh 7, Houston 6. 2B-Pearce
(4), Anderson (1). 3B-Morgan (1). HR-
Paulino (11), JWilson 2 (11), CaLee (29),
Wigginton 2 (5). S-Morris, Biggio,
Gutierrez.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Morris L,9-10 31-3 9 7 7 1 0
STorres 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Duke 3 3 2 1 0 0
Perez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
WRodriguez 3 5 5 5 3 5
Gutierrez W, 1-1 2 0 0 0 1 0
Paulino 1 1 0 0 0 2
Sarfate 1 0 0 0 0 1
Randolph 2-3 2 2 2 1 1
Quails 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
LidgeS,15 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Morris (Berkman), by
WRodriguez (Bay). PB-Towles.
Umpires-Home, Gary Darling; First,
Brian Knight; Second, Larry Poncino; Third,
Jerry Meals.
T-2:32. A-40,425 (40,976).


West Division
t GB L10
5 - z-5-5
4 7% 4-6
3 13% z-6-4
6 17% z-5-5


West Division
Pct GB L10
.557 - z-7-3
.541 2% z-4-6
.534 3% 6-4
.517 6 z-5-5
.449 16 4-6


Home
49-25
44-29
39-35
42-32


Home
46-29
41-31
41-33
43-29
36-38


Away
37-37
38-36
38-36
33-42
30-43


Indians 6, Royals 0
CLEVELAND - Fausto Carmona
pitched three-hit ball over eight
innings, retiring his final 16 batters
and leading the Cleveland Indians
over the Kansas City Royals 6-0
Saturday night.
Travis Hafner homered for
Cleveland, which cut its magic num-
ber to nine for clinching its first AL
Central title since 2001. The Indians,
who have won 17 of their last 21
games, remained 5% games ahead
of second-place Detroit.
Carmona (17-8) struck out nine and
walked none, winning his third straight
start. Rafael Perez finished with a per-
fect ninth, striking out the side.
Cleveland first baseman Ryan
Garko left the game in the bottom of
the eighth when he was hit on the
right hand by a throw from shortstop
Jason Smith.
Kansas City, which lost for the
ninth time in 10 games, advanced
one runner to third base.
Zack Grienke (6-6) allowed two
runs - one earned - and four hits
in 5 1-3 innings.

KANSAS CITY CLEVELAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DJesus cf 3 01 0 Szmore cf 4 1 00
JuHbrph 1 00 0 ACbera 2b 4 0 1 1
Grdzln2b 4 00 0 Hafner dh 5 1 1 1
Teahen rf 3 00 0 VMrtnzc 3 1 1 0
Butler dh 3 01 0 Garko 1b 2 0 1 0
Gload lb 3 00 0 Brfield pr 0 1 0 0
Gordon 3b 3 000 Gomez lb 0 000
Costa If 3 00 0 JhPIta ss 4 0 2 0
JSmith ss 3 01 0 Lofton If 3 1 00
LaRue c 3 00 0 Gutirrz rf 3 1 0 1
Blake 3b 3 0 1 2
Totals 290 3 0 Totals 31 6 7 5
Kansas City 000 000 000- 0
Cleveland 101 000 04x- 6
E-Teahen (6), Gload (3), JSmith (2).
DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Kansas City 2,
Cleveland 9. 2B-JSmith (2), ACabrera (8),
VMartinez (39), JhPeralta (26). HR-Hafner
(22). SB-Lofton (23). SF-Gutierrez.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Greinke L,6-6 51-3 4 2 1 5 3
Nunez 2-3 00 0 0 2
Gobble 1 0 0 0 0 1
Braun 1 3 4 2 2 1
Cleveland
Carmona W,17-8 8 3 0 0 0 9
RPerez 1 0 0 0 0 3
WP-Greinke, Nunez.
Umpires-Home, Ed Hickox; First, C.B.
Bucknor; Second, Joe West; Third, Ed
Rapuano.
T-2:43. A-32,113 (43,415).


Brewers 5, Reds 3
MILWAUKEE - Prince Fielder hit
his NL-leading 46th homer, setting a
Brewers franchise record, and
Milwaukee beat the Cincinnati Reds
5-3 on Saturday night to stay close
in the NL Central.
Milwaukee began the night two
games back of the NL Central-lead-
ing Chicago Cubs, who won the
opener of a day-night doubleheader
at St. Louis.
Fielder's solo homer in the third
off Kirk Saarioos (1-5) gave the
Brewers a 3-1 lead and surpassed
the previous team home-run mark
he shared with Gorman Thomas
(1979) and Richie Sexson (2001,
2003).
Fielder extended his career-best
hitting streak to 13 games and is -
batting .422 with seven homers and
12 RBIs in September. He came out
for a curtain call and got a hug in
the dugout from Damian Miller.
CINCINNATI MILWAUKEE
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Hopper cf 5 12 1 Weeks 2b 3 1 00
Kppngrss 5 010 Gross rf 4 020
Grf Jr. rf 5 00 0 BHall cf 0 000
BPhllps 2b 5 01 1 Braun 3b 4 1 1 1
Dunn If 3 120 Cunsell 3b 1 0 0 0
EEcrcn 3b 4 01 0 Fildr lb 3 2 2 1
Vottolb 301 1 CHartcf 3 01 0
Ross c 3 00 0 Jenkins If 4 0 1 1
Ellison pr 0 00 0 FCdero p 0 0 0 '0
Gosling p 0 00 0 DMiller c 4 0 1 1
Srloos p 1 00 0 Hardy ss 4 1 2 1
Ctlngus p 0 00 0 Suppan p 3 0 0.0
Coffey p 0 000 BShse p 0 0 0 0
Mcbth p 0 00 0 Lnbmk p 0 000
Coats ph 0 100 King p 0 0 0 0
Stanton p 0 00 0 Turnbw p 0 0 0 0
JaVltinc 0 00 0 Nix If 1 000
Totals 343 8 3 Totals 34 510 '5
Cincinnati 010 000 200- 3
Milwaukee 201 010 01x- 5
E-EEncarnacion (14), Braun (22), Hardy
(13). DP-Milwaukee 2. LOB-Cincinnati
10, Milwaukee 10. 2B-Hopper (12), Dunn
2 (27), Hardy (27). HR-Fielder (46), Hardy
(25). SB-Weeks (20). CS-Braun (5). S-
Saarloos.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Saarloos L,1-5 4 6 3 3 1 3
Coutlangus 2-3 1 1 1 1 2
Coffey 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
McBeth 1 0 0 0 0 1'
Stanton 1 1 0 0 1 1
Gosling 1 1 1 1 2 1
Milwaukee
Suppan W,10-11 61-3 7 3 3 2 2,
BShouse 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Linebrink 0 1 0 0 0 0
King 1-3 00 0 0 1
Turnbow 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
FCordero S,42 11-3 0 0 0 0 3
Linebrink pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Suppan (Dunn). WP--Stanton.
Umpires-Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Bill
Welke; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third,
Wally Bell.
T-3:12. A-40,710 (41,900).


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007 3B


AIAJ4:3H EEACiUE BASEBA.LL


RI ONICLE


Cmus Comy (FL) CH









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-- S EPEM3Ec1,TVU


--- the cord


S-On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
,-6 a.m. (SPEED) GP2 Championship Series.
,730 a.m. (SPEED) Formula One - Grand Prix of Belgium.
2 p.m. (9. 20, 28 ABC) NASCAR Nextel Cup - Sylvania 300.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- O'Reilly Mid-South Nationals - Final
- Eliminations.
MLB
.1:30 p.m. (TBS) Atlanta Braves at Washington Nationals.
2 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at St. Louis Cardinals.
'4 p.m. (FSNFL) Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Seattle Mariners.
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox.
WNBA
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Finals Game 5 - Phoenix Mercury at Detroit Shock.
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) Women's U.S. Open.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Tennessee at Florida. (Taped from Saturday)
7 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Colorado. (Taped from Saturday)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Florida State at Colorado. (Taped from Saturday)
NFL
1 p.m. (6 CBS) Indianapolis Colts at Tennessee Titans.
1 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) New Orleans Saints at Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
4 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Kansas City Chiefs at Chicago Bears.
8:15 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) San Diego Chargers at New England Patriots.
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) Solheim Cup - Day Three.
11:30 a.m. (GOLF) PGA - The Tour Championship - Final Round.
1:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) PGA--The Tour Championship - Final
Round.
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) European PGA-- Mercedes-Benz
Championship - Final Round.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Champions Tour - Greater Hickory Classic
- Final Round.
RODEO
4:30 p.m. (51 FOX) PBR Built Ford Tough U.S. Army Invitational.
RUGBY
6 p.m. (VERSUS) World Cup 2007 - England vs. South Africa.
TRACK AND FIELD
3 p.m. (VERSUS) IAAF Golden League - Memorial Van Damme.


GOLF
PGA Tour Championship
Par Scores
Saturday
Third Round
Tiger Woods 64-63-64 - 191 -19
Mark Calcavecchia65-66-63-- 194 -16
Sergio Garcia 68-64-64 - 196 -14
Zach Johnson 71-66-60 - 197 -13
Hunter Mahan 65-68-65 - 198 -12
Woody Austin 65-65-69 - 199 -11
Geoff Ogilvy 68-70-62 - 200 -10
Padraig Harrington63-70-67 - 200 -10
Vijay Singh '68-68-65 - 201 -9
Scott Verplank 66-68-67 - 201 -9
Tim Clark 62-69-70 - 201 -9
Adam Scott 65-66-71 - 202 -8
Rory Sabbatini 68-68-67 - 203 -7
Phil Mickelson 68-66-70 - 204 -6
Heath Slocum 71-64-69 - 204 -6
Stewart Cink 67-66-71 - 204 -6
Boo Weekley 70-67-68 - 205 -5
Camilo Villegas 67-68-70 - 205 -5
Jonathan Byrd 71-70-65 - 206 -4
Justin Rose 69-71-66 - 206 -4
John Rollins 64-69-73 - 206 -4
Jim Furyk 71-69-67 - 207 -3
Charles Howell 11168-71-68 - 207 -3
Aaron Baddeley69-70-68 - 207 -3
Robert Allenby 68-71-68 - 207 -3
Brett Wetterich 68-69-70, - 207 -3
Steve Stricker 69-67-71 - 207 -3
K.J. Choi 67-65-75 - 207 -3
Brandt Snedeker71-72-68 - 211 +1
Ernie Els 69-69-73 - 211 +1
COLLEGE
FOOTBALL
No. 5 Florida 59,
No. 22 Tennessee 20
Tennessee 3 10 7 0 - 20
Florida 14 14 7 24 - 59
First Quarter
Fla-James 83 punt return (Ijjas kick),
13:03.
Tenn-FG Lincoln 28, 1:45.
Fla-Cooper 30 pass from Tebow (Ijjas
kick), :33.
Second Quarter
Tenn-FG Lincoln 22, 9:55.
Fla-Tebow 7 run (Ijjas kick), 5:38.
Fla-Ingram 20 pass from Tebow (Ijjas
kick), 1:30.
Tenn-C.Brown 15 pass from Ainge
(Lincoln kick), :25.
Third Quarter
Tenn-Berry .96 interception return
(Lincoln kick), 8:47.
Fla-Doe 18 fumble return (Ijjas kick),
5:18.


Fourth Quarter
Fla-Harvin 19 run (Ijjas kick), 14:50.
Fla-Tebow 5 run (Ijjas kick), 11:25.
Fla-FG Ijjas 25, 4:55.
Fla-Newton 4 run (Ijjas kick), 1:14.
A-90,707.
Tenn I
irst downs 14
?ushes-yards 21-37 ,


255
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
19-1
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
33.7
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


261 299
28-46-2 14-
96 100
5-46.2 3-
2-1 0-0
7-40 9-66
25:10 34:50


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Tennessee, A.Foster 11-26,
Creer 4-15, Coker 5-5, B.Vinson 1-(minus
9). Florida, Harvin 9-75, Tebow 18-61,
Moore 11-48, Fayson 3-29, Newton 2-15,
James 1-13, Rainey 1-10, Walker 1-4.
PASSING-Tennessee, Ainge 26-41-1-
249, Crompton 2-5-1-12. Florida, Tebow
14-19-1-299.
RECEIVING-Tennessee, Briscoe 8-76,
Taylor 6-57, Rogers 4-64, C.Brown 4-35,
A.Foster 2-11, Coker 2-9, Hancock 2-9.
Florida, Harvin 4-120, Ingram 3-56, Moore
3-19, Murphy 2-60, Cooper 1-30, Nelson
1-14.

AUTO RACING
NASCAR Nextel Cup
Sylvania 300 Uneup
Race today at New Hampshire
International-Speedway, Loudon, N.H.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (07) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 130.412
mph.
2. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet,
136.255.
3. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 130.011.
4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
129.798.
5. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 129.723.
6. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 129.679.
7. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 129.679.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
129.362.
9. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 129.226.
10. (22) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 129.164.
11. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 129.024.
12. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 129.024.
13. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge,


129.007.
14. (11)
128.946.
15. (25)
128.885.
16. (01)
128.859.
17. (15)
S128.854.
18. (24)
128.828.


Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet,
Casey Mears, Chevrolet,
Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,


19. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
128.784.
20. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
128.776.
21. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 128.771.
22. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 128.294.
23. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 128.199.
24. (96) Tony Raines, Chevrolet,
128.191.
25. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 128.143.
26. (43) Bobby Labonte, Dodge,
128.087.
27. (88) Kenny Wallace, Ford, 128.014.
28. (4) Ward Burton, Chevrolet, 128.014.
29. (10) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 127.868.
30. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 127.838.
31. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge.
127.829.
32. (40) David Stremme, Dodge,
127.825.
33. (66) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 127.791.
34. (21) Ken Schrader, Ford, 127.688.
35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 127.615.
36. (70) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet,
127.525.
37. (78) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
127.470.
38. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 127.155.
39. (84) AJ Allmendinger, Toyota,
126.998.
40. (7) Robby Gordon, Ford, 126.960.
41. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 126.960.
42. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 126.812.
43. (98) Boris Said, Dodge, 126.745.


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say.
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Off messages.


BUCS
Continued from Page 1B

play again a week later," Payton
said. "We talk about that, we
harp on it following a win and
the same thing applies following
a loss: make the corrections and
get on to the next opponent"
The Bucs led their opener 6-
0 before the game gradually
slipped away. Brooks missed
an open-field tackle on Shaun
Alexander that the 13th-year
pro normally makes, then was
beaten in pass coverage on
Seattle's clinching touchdown
in the fourth quarter.
Tampa Bay coach Jon Gruden
came to his star's defense.


GATORS
Continued from Page 1B

outrunning everyone else.
The return gave Florida a 7-0
lead and all the momentum.
Linebacker Dustin Doe's
return meant even more.
Florida led 28-6 late in the
second half, but Erik Ainge


SIMPSON
Continued from Page 1B

Earlier, Las Vegas police
said they were questioning one
of the three or four men who
were thought to have accompa-
nied Simpson to the hotel
room. No arrests had been
made and police were still try-
ing to determine what took
place before Simpson left the
room with memorabilia he says
was stolen from him, Nichols
said. Police think a weapon
was involved and want to
review hotel surveillance
tapes., '
Simpson told The Associated
Press on Saturday that he did
he did not even consider call-
ing the police to help reclaim
personal items he believed
were stolen from him, because
he has found the police unre-
sponsive when he needed help
ever since his ex-wife, Nicole
Brown Simpson, and her
friend, Ron Goldman, were
killed in 1994.
'The police, since my trou-
ble, have not worked out for
me," he said, noting that when-
ever he has called the police
"It just becomes a story about
O.J."
"I'm at the point where I


WOODS
Continued from Page 1B

for a 19-under 191 and a three-
shot lead over Calcavecchia.
Woods was watching and
laughing from the par-5 15th
fairway as Calcavecchia made
eagle to join him atop the
leaderboard, but that didn't
last long. Woods birdied his
next two holes to give himself a
cushion for the final round.
"If I lose the tournament and
win the FedEx Cup, I don't
think I'm going to be too happy,
really, that I've lost the tourna-
ment," he said.
Woods has never lost as pro
when leading by more than one
shot going into the final round.
But on this golf course, he
won't be able to protect his
lead by making pars. That
much was clear on Saturday.
"If you made a bunch of pars,
you were going to get run over,
so it was nice to make .some
birdies and get out there and
still maintain the same size
lead I had starting out the day,"
Woods said. "You see the
rounds today - 60, 62 - and
guys were taking it deep. I was
hoping that I could make some
birdies myself and basically
shoot something in the mid-
60s."
Calcavecchia missed the
16th fairway for his only bogey
He will play with Woods for the
first time in the final pairing,
although that must have felt
like a victory in itself consider-
ing his play the last the last two weeks.
Calcavecchia, at 47 the oldest


"He had some good plays,
too," Gruden said. "You get
opened up sometimes, you're
going to sometimes be vulnera-
ble to a great player in space.
Derrick Brooks is, again, the
least of my concerns."
It's not the first time skeptics
have questioned whether
Brooks' most productive days
are behind him.
The Bucs had.one of the NFEs
best defenses for 10 consecutive
seasons before tumbling to the
middle of the pack in 2006. A
year after allowing the fewest
yards in the league, the unit fin-
ished 17th in total defense, and
Tampa Bay went from NFC
South champions to 4-12.
In two games against Tampa
Bay last season, Brees threw


drove Tennessee 64 yards in
about a minute. His TD pass to
Chris Brown cut the lead to 28-
13 heading into the locker
room.
The Volunteers (1-2, 0-1) got it
even closer to start the second
half. Eric Berry, beaten earlier
in the game for a touchdown,
picked off Tebow's pass and
returned it 96 yards for a score.
The Gators were ready to


don't rely on the police and this
is not a police issue anyway,"
he said, expressing hope that it
will soon be resolved.
Simpson, 60, said he was just
trying to retrieve memorabilia,
particularly photos of his wife
and children. There were no
guns and no break-in, he said.
As police try to determine
what happened in the hotel
room, they must unravel the
contorted relationships
between the erstwhile athlete
and a cadre of collectors that
has profited from his infamy
since the slaying of his ex-wife
and Goldman. He was acquit-
ted of murder in 1995, but was
found liable for their deaths in
a civil case.
Fromong considered
Simpson a close friend.
Beardsley had collected
Simpson items for years.
On Saturday, Simpson
declared: "None of these guys
are friends of mine."
Attempts by the AP to reach
Fromong on Saturday were
unsuccessful.
Simpson, who lives in Miami,
said he expected to find the
stolen items when he went to
an arranged meeting Thursday.
The man who arranged the
ieetigaccordng to Sini psb,.
was another man who makes a
living on the fringes of the

player in the 30-man field, has
become so tired during this
four-week stretch that he was
in last place and teed off as a
single in the final round of his
last two events. When he fin-
ished at Cog Hill on Sunday, he
assessed his chances at East
Lake this way:
"Somebody is going to finish
first and somebody is going to
finish 30th, and I know who the
favorite is for that"
Even playing in the final
group doesn't change is outlook
on the first part of that equa-
tion.
"If I play like I did today, I'll
have a lot of fun, even if it's not
enough," Calcavecchia said.
"He'll probably keep me
relaxed to some degree a little
bit. But it's a round of golf with
Tiger Woods. It's where you
want to be. It's a good spot to be
in."
The sliver of hope in his
favor?
Woods is 40-3 on the PGA
Tour when he has at least a
share of the 54-hole lead, and
two of those losses came at
East Lake - in 2000 when he
was tied with Vijay Singh and
was overtaken by Mickelson,
and in 2004, when he was tied
with Jay Haas and both were
blown away by Retief Goosen.
But a three-shot advantage is
daunting, especially the way
Woods is playing. His average
score is 65.7 in these playoffs.
"That's a pretty big hill to
climb," Calcavecchia said. "If
he was hitting a few foul balls,
it might help. But every time I
turned around, he was 40 yards
ahead of Woody Austin in the


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for 485 yards, four touchdowns
and no interceptions. The Bucs
threw 65 passes without being
sacked.
"He's an outstanding quar-
terback. He's proven that He's
got a really good supporting
cast," Gruden said. "Just a sim-
ple check-down can become a
25-yard gain with these guys.
They are very explosive, and
Drew knows a lot about what to
do with the ball. ... We've got to
get to him. We've got to disrupt
his timing, and we've got to
make some plays against the
pass, that's for sure."
Although Brooks is con-
vinced Tampa Bay's defense is
capable of reverting to its old
form and that he can continue


blow the game open, but
instead Berry had given the
Volunteers plenty of juice. The
Vols then -forced a punt and
had a chance to tie, but Arian
-.Foster fumbled, and Doe
returned it 18 yards to make it
35-20.
The Gators rolled from
there, turning Meyer's "blue-
out" into a blowout. Meyer
asked Florida fans to wear


celebrity.
Thomas Riccio, a well-
known memorabilia dealer,
made headlines when his auc-
tion house, Corona, Calif.-
based Universal Rarities, han-
dled the eBay auction of Anna
Nicole Smith's handwritten
diaries.
Simpson said Riccio called
him several weeks ago to
inform him that people "have a
lot of your stuff and they don't
want anyone to know they are
selling it," Simpson said.
Along with the personal pho-
tos, Simpson expected to find
one item in particular: the suit
he was wearing when he was
acquitted of murder.
It's not clear where they got
the suit, but Beardsley, a for-
mer real estate agent and long-
time Simpson collector, and
Fromong had been trying to
sell it for several months.
They'd recently tried eBay and
the celebrity gossip Web site
TMZ.com.
Simpson said Beardsley and
Fromong were attempting to
profit off personal items
including the wedding video
from his first marriage.
In an interview with
TMZ com. Beardsley noted that
during the alleged robbery in
the hotel room Simpsoni
appeared surprised the pair

fairway So it's pretty hard to
screw up with a pitching wedge
into every par 4 and reaching
every par 5 easily."
Austin was within two shots
after a tap-in birdie at No. 2,
then hit his next approach to
within 6 feet Woods followed
with a wedge that spun back to 6
'inches for birdie, Austin missed
his putt, and that was that
Americans hold shaky
lead in Solheim Cup
HALMSTAD, Sweden - The
score after Day 2 of the Solheim
Cup: "Chokin' Dogs" 6%,
Europeans 5�. On a miserable,
windblown day in which only half
the matches were completed, it
was a "choke" comment from for-
mer American player Dottie Pepper
that made as big a splas any-
thing her one-time teammates did.
The Americans led 6'-5%, but
after they let two victories in the
morning matches slip away and
settled for ties, Pepper, now an
analyst for the Golf Channel,
uttered "Chokin' freakin' dogs" on
the air, thinking the network had
gone to commercial.
When play was suspended, the
Europeans led 1-up in three of the
best-ball matches and were all-
square in the other, making the
one-point American lead as precar-
ious as it could be. The restart was
set for early this morning, and once
the fourball matches were com-


to perform at a high level, he
shrugged off a question about
how much longer he thinks he
can play.
"You want to leave on your
terms if there's an ending to be
wrote. I'm quite sure everyone
has one, but I've not thought of
one. I really just want to con-
tinue playing because I feel I'm
playing at a Pro Bowl or All-
Pro level," he said.
"Now if that level slips, and
the people I trust to evaluate
my game every year start
telling me that, then it's time to
not start writing that chapter
but it's time to anticipate. At
this point in my career, there's
no need for that."


blue in hopes of limiting the.
amount of Tennessee-like
orange in the stands.
Tebow completed two more
long passes, one leading to his
second TD run and the other to a
field goal. He finished 14-for-19.
Ainge was 26-of-41 for 249
yards with a touchdown and an
interception. He was replaced
by Jonathan Crompton in the,
closing minutes.


were the ones selling the items.'
"Simpson was saying that 'I
liked you, I thought you were a
good guy,"' Beardsley said.
Simpson accused Mike
Gilbert, a one-time associate,-
of stealing the items from him..'
He said he believes Gilbert
stole items from a storage lock-
er once held in Simpson's
mother's name.
Attempts to reach Gilbert by
phone were.unsuccessful.
' As Simpson's licensing agent-
in the late 1990s, Gilbert admit--
ted snatching Simpson's
Heisman Trophy and other
items from his client's
Brentwood home as payment
for money he said was owed to
him. He later turned the items
over to authorities, save the
trophy's nameplate.
Gilbert swore he'd go to jail
before turning the nameplate
over to the Goldman family,
which was trying to collect on
the $33.5 million civil judgment
it won against Simpson. Gilbert
later, surrendered it under
court order
As questions swirled around
the curious cast of characters
and their mysterious meeting,
media scrutiny and public
interest that has dogged' the
fallen athlete was in full swing.

plete, the 12 singles matches
would go off.
The Americans had plenty of
chances to get more from the
morning altemate-shot matches.
Juli Inkster and Paula Creamer had
a 1-up lead through 15 holes, while
Sherri Steinhauer and Laura Diaz
were 2-up with three holes to play.
Pat Hurst and Angela Stanford
were already in with a 4-and-2 vic-
tory and the final American team of
Cristie Kerr and Nicole Castrale
was rallying nicely against Annika
Sorenstam and Catriona Matthew.
But it all unraveled.
Suzann Pettersen hit the shot of
the day to salvage one of the ties
for Europe. Standing in the rough
to the left of the 18th fairway, she
played a big hook around some
trees and nearly skimmed the flag-
stick with a shot that stopped 4 feet
from the hole. Sophie Gustafson
made the putt to halve the match
against Inkster and Creamer.
Moments earlier, Steinhauer
missed a 3-foot putt that would
have clinched the win over Maria
Hjorth and Gwladys Nocera.
Still, all that might have been
wiped out had Kerr and Castrale
rallied from 5-down to tie their
match. It was possible until
Castrale's birdie putt on No. 18
cruelly lipped out, leaving
Sorenstam and Matthew with a 1-
up victory.
Forsyth (62) was a stroke back.


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Defenses seek to improve


Miami, Dallas

gave up a total

of51 points
Associated Press

MIAMI - The Dallas
Cowboys gave up 35 points last
week and won. The Miami
Dolphins allowed only 16
points, but folded in overtime.
Both defensive units will
seek improvement Sunday
when the Cowboys play at
Miami for the first time in 11
years.
The Cowboys' defense was
without three starters for much
of their season opener, and it
showed as they gave up 438
yards in a 45-35 victory over the
New York Giants. It was not the
sort of Dallas debut anticipat-
ed for head coach Wade
Phillips, hired after three sea-
sons as defensive coordinator
for the San Diego Chargers.
"It's one game, it isn't a sea-
son," Phillips said. 'At the end
of season, we'll see where we
are. I'd be surprised if we score
45 points a game and gave up
35 a game. If we did, we'd be 16-
0, and that would be nice."
Miami allowed a 58-yard
scoring drive to start overtime
and lost at Washington 16-13.
The late collapse was all too
familiar for the Dolphins,
whose defense has a reputa-
tion for struggling to protect
late leads despite finishing
among the NFL leaders statis-
tically each year.


Associated Press
Washington Redskins quarterback Jason Campbell is sacked by Miami Dolphins' Jason Taylor in the
second quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday in Landover, Md


'As bad we played in the sec-
ond half at Washington, there
are lot of things we can get cor-
rected," All-Pro end Jason
Taylor said. "I know people are
overreacting and talking about


how bad we were, and we were
pretty bad in the second half.
We've got to stop giving up
leads late in games."
The Dolphins failed to pro-
tect a third-quarter advantage,


gave up 400 yards and allowed
Washington to convert seven of
14 third-down situations.
"If we play Washington 10
times, that's the only one they'll
win," linebacker Joey Porter


said. "We're not going to be in
the business of giving games
away. That will be the last time
we give one away like that."
But the challenge for the
Dolphins' defense will be even
stiffer Sunday. Dallas' offense
is off to a fast start, and Tony
Romo threw for 345 yards and
four scores in the opener
"I watched the end of that
game last week," Miami defen-
sive tackle Vonnie Holliday
said.
"It was a shootout. Every
four or five plays, it seemed
like someone was scoring. We
know the job we have before us
to stop these guys.",
The matchup includes two of
the league's two biggest trash-
talkers: Porter and Dallas
receiver Terrell Owens.
"He does his trash-talking in
a different type of way," Porter
said. "Mine is not to make the
media. Mine is strictly person-
al to the person I'm talking to.
It's really confidential. If it
leaks out, he told it, not me.
Mine is trying to get inside your
head - degrade you so I can
win the football game. I'm not
trying to make a media circus
out of it."
Porter and his teammates on
defense say they learned from
their mistakes against
Washington. They gave up 191
yards rushing, and Porter fig-
ures the Cowboys will attack
the same way.
"I'm expecting them to run
the ball, because obviously we
had a little problem with it last
week," Porter said. "We're
going to try to take the run
away from them and see if


Romo can be the gunslinger
they say he is."
On the other hand, Romo
may attack a secondary miss-
ing its best safety, Yeremiah
Bell, sidelined in the opener by
a season-ending Achilles' ten-
don injury.
Dallas' defense was short-
handed in the first game, too.
Cornerback Terence Newman
and linebacker Greg Ellis sat
out with injuries, but might
play against Miami. Nose tack-
le Jason Ferguson was side-
lined for the season in the first
quarter with torn biceps.
The injuries may be one rea-
son the Cowboys forced the
Giants to punt only twice.
"We gave up a lot of yards,"
cornerback Anthony Henry.
said. "Teams are going to look
at that It was a bittersweet win.
If we don't get in and correct
those things, then it's going to
be a problem for us throughout
the season."
The last time Dallas visited
Miami was in 1996, when the
Cowboys won 29-10. With
another victory, they would be
2-0 for the first time since
1999.
The game will be a matchup
of Marty Schottenheimer pro-
t6gds. When he was head coach
of the Chargers, Phillips and
offensive coordinator Cam
Cameron were among his assis-
tants.
Cameron is in his first year
as the Dolphins' head coach.
"It's kind of like playing
against a real good player,"
Phillips said. "You realize what
they can do, and that's what
you worry about"


Taylor, Dunn hoping for


win as they near milestone


Jags, Falcons

backs closing in ---

on 10,000 yards
Associated Press


*JACKSONVILLE - Fred
Taylor was a prized high
school recruit trying to decide
between Florida and Florida
State in November 1993.
He was sitting on metal
bleachers in the south end
zone at Florida Field, watch-
ing the Gators and Seminoles
play their annual rivalry
game. He had already verbally
committed to FSU coach
Bobby Bowden.
Then one play changed his
mind.
Charlie Ward scrambled left
on third down and floated a
perfect pass to freshman
Warrick Dunn near the side-
line. Dunn outran five defend-
ers en route to a 79-yard
touchdown reception that
essentially ended any chance
the Gators had of upsetting
eventual national champion
Florida State.
' Had it not been for that
score, Taylor and Dunn proba-
bly would have been college
teammates.
"I had a change of heart
after watching him play,"
Taylor said. "I'll never forget
it."
Rather than compete with
Dunn for carries in
Tallahassee, Taylor decided to
play about 130 miles southeast
in Gainesville. Their careers,
though, never strayed -too far
apart.
Dunn became Florida
State's all-time leading rusher,
was drafted 12th overall by
Tampa Bay in 1997 and has
amassed 9,516 yards rushing
�ince.
;. Taylor was one of the best to
ilay for the Gators, was picked
iinth by Jacksonville in 1998
4nd has 9,529 yards on the
ground despite missing sever-
.l games because of injuries
early in his career.
' They will be on opposite
Sidelines for the first time
4ince 1998 on Sunday, when
* the Jaguars (0-1) host the
Atlanta Falcons (0-1), both
teams looking for wins after
disappointing season openers.
"We've got 15 more opportu-
nities to make right from what
happenedd last week, and it
starts this week," Taylor said.
4 Jacksohville gave up a fran-
* hise-record 282 yards rush-
Ig in a 13-10 loss to
Tennessee.
, defensive line was over-
* matched from the start, failing
to create any push, allowing


Associated Press
Atlanta Falcons running back Warrick Dunn (28) is stopped after
a four-yard run against the Minnesota Vikings during the first half
in an NFL football game on Sunday in Minneapolis.


gaping holes and showing
signs of fatigue while spend-
ing nearly 37 minutes on the
field.
"Whatever didn't work for
us last week, I'm sure we'll see
it until we stop it," linebacker
Mike Peterson said."You know
how this league is. It's a copy-
cat league."
Atlanta had trouble on the
other side of the ball. Joey
Harrington was sacked six
times and threw two intercep-
tions, including one that was
returned for a touchdown, in a
24-3 loss at Minnesota.
"We need to learn how to
finish a little bit better and
then hopefully the offensive
explosion that people are
waiting for will develop from
there," Harrington said.
Both teams also expect
more from their running
games, and it starts with
Taylor and Dunn.
They rank second and third,
respectively, among active
NFL backs in rushing yards.
Trailing only Arizona's
Edgerrin James, both have
their sights set on becoming
the 21st player to eclipse the
10,000-yard milestone.
"Hopefully both of us get
there," Taylor said. "That's all
that matters.
Not who gets there first. In
this game, you never know.
One play you expect to get it
and all signs say you're going
to get, but then that fatal blow
could happen. Who knows?
We're going to pray that does-
n't happen."


They also have to hope play-
ing time doesn't become a fac-
tor because both have second-
year pros behind them who
have earned more carries.
Dunn ran 22 times for 55
yards in the opener. Trying to
prove he's healthy following
offseason back surgery, he
averaged a paltry 2.5 yards a
carry. Jerious Norwood came
off the bench and carried five
times for 33 yards.
The Falcons don't anticipate
a change yet.
"Warrick has a gear that I
think people just don't
expect," Harrington said. "He
is obviously a little guy in
stature, but he has tremen-
dous vision, incredibly fast
and just runs unbelievably
hard. You put those three
things together - talent,
vision and drive - and you
are going to get a running back
that will stay in the league for
a while."
Taylor gained 16 yards on
six carries last week, and that
was with a 17-yard run.
Maurice Jones-Drew ran
seven times for 32 yards off the
bench.
"We've got to turn the page
on that one," Taylor said.
And hope for that all-impor-
tant first win.
"It's not about just me and
Warrick," Taylor said. "Both of
us need a win real bad, both
teams.
I think that will be more sig-
nificant. I don't think an 0-2
start is the end of the world.
But we don't want to be 0-2."


Survival of the fittest


InjuredJets

face limping

Baltimore
Associated Press

BALTIMORE - Each
team made the playoffs last
year. Neither is certain if its
starting quarterback can
play Sunday. Both began the
season with a loss.
The New York Jets and
Baltimore Ravens have
plenty in common. On a neu-
tral field, under different
circumstances, Ravens line-
backer Ray Lewis might
deem a matchup between
the teams to be a tossup.
But Baltimore is at home
and coming off an error-
filled performance in


Cincinnati. So, when asked if
he considered the possibility
of starting the season with
two consecutive defeats,
Lewis smiled knowingly.
"I don't know one person
in our organization, as well
as our city, that's talking
about going 0-2," Lewis said.
"The bottom line is the Jets
pulled a bad draw. That's
just the way it comes down.
We're a very dominant team
at home, and dropping that
game the way we did, mak-
ing a lot of mistakes -
there's no way you're going
to turn the ball over six
times again."
Steve McNair was guilty of
four of those turnovers, and
there was some question
whether the quarterback
would be healthy enough to
rebound against New York
McNair left Monday night's


opener with a groin injury,
and his availability for
Sunday was expected to be
game-time decision.
"Steve is OK, but you
could see on some of the
throws (against Cincinnati)
that he wasn't getting the
push. That's why some of the
throws took off on him,"
Ravens coach Brian Billick
said. "That's going to be the
litmus test. He's a tough guy.
If it's just pain, that's a no-
brainer. But can he throw
and push off it comfortably
and be functional? That's
the big issue."
McNair intends to play
unless his presence, on the
field would be a detriment to
the Ravens. If he can't go,
Kyle Boller will start in his
place.
The Jets are, ready for
either one.


Westbrook's younger brother


Splays his role for Redskins


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Byron Westbrook emulated
his older brother without
taking the hard hits.
The younger _
Westbrook is a prac-
tice squad corner-
back on the
Redskins. Brian
Westbrook is one of
the league's top run-
ning backs with the
Eagles. Since
Washington (1-0) plays at
Philadelphia (0-1) on Monday
night, Byron played Brian's
role on the scout team.
"I'll probably give him a
call and ask for some tips,"
Byron said during the week


Brian spent a couple of
off-days with his sibling. He
wouldn't give any advice
without getting some infor-
mation in return.
"I quizzed him on all
the defenses
and every-
thing like
that," he
said


with
a smile.
The Westbrooks both
attended DeMatha High
School in the Washington
area and took slightly differ-
ent paths to reach the NFL,
each overcoming long odds


in the process.
Brian had a record-setting
career at Division I-AA
Villanova, but was consid-
ered too small - he's 5-foot-
8 and 203 pounds - to
be more than a third-
round pick. The
Eagles took a
chance on him in
2002, and he's
developed into per-
haps the team's most
valuable player.
Byron had 18 inter-
ceptions and was a return
specialist at Division III
Salisbury. He signed as an
undrafted rookie with the
Redskins in May, and earned
a spot on the practice squad
with a solid training camp.


Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
The Tennessee Titans think
they're better. They're look-
ing forward to measuring
just how much they've
improved when they play
the defending Super Bowl
champions.
It's . not cockiness from
their season-opening win at
Jacksonville, when they put
282 yards rushing in 13-10
win against a top defense. It's
confidence from winning
seven of their last eight
games overall, a streak that


included their first victory
over Indianapolis since 2002.
The Colts (1-0) offer the
perfect measuring stick
They have the NFEs best
regular-season record since
1999 at 90-39, and have lost
only twice in September
since coach Tony Dungy took
over in 2002.
"It's a big game for this
organization," Titans defen-
sive end Kyle Vanden Bosch
said. "We started off good. If
we want to take that next
step and really make a name
for ourselves and make a
splash, I think playing well


against the Colts will be it"
The Titans finally started
holding up their end of this
divisional rivalry last season
between the only teams to
win the AFC South since
realignment
They held the Colts to 31
points, losing 14-13 on the
road before snapping a
seven-game skid to
Indianapolis last December
on Rob Bironas' 60-yard field
goal. Vince Young became
the first quarterback in NFL
history to lead two come-
backs of 14 points or more as
a rookie.


Titans ready to see how they


measure up against Colts


SUNDAY, SEPrEMBER 16, 2007 5B


Crrnus Counry (FL E


NFL PREVIEWS


Im












6B


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




When the going gets tough, watch TV FlorIES


Fall season's

shows offer escape

LYNN ELBER
AP television writer

LOS ANGELES - The same
television networks that bring
chilling news of war, natural
disaster and economic woes
into American homes will try to
make amends this fall by offer-
ing viewers an escape route.
In a retreat from reality (if
not reality shows), the 2007-08
TV season is rife with dramas
in the supernatural and sci-
ence-fiction genres, populated
by heroes who draw on extraor-
dinary gifts to battle the bad
guys.
"Heroes" is a key word here;
the success of NBC's sci-fi
series has fired up the hopes
and, possibly, the imagination
of the TV industry. Since view-
ers liked it so much, maybe
they'll also go for CBS'
"Moonlight," with a vampire
who fights crime and his baser
instincts.
Or ABC's "Pushing Daisies,"
about a man who can revive the
dead to solve crimes. Or NBC's
'"Journeyman," in which a
reporter becomes a time travel-
er able to change events. Or
"Bionic Woman," also NBC, an
update of the 1970s show about
an accident victim with a
rebuilt chassis.
Then there's Fox's "The
Sarah Connor Chronicles,"
drawn from the "Terminator"
movie franchise, and "New
Amsterdam," with a New York
detective who was made
immortal by an Indian spell
cast in 1642 (yes, they pinned
down the year).
CW has "Reaper," the humor-
tinged tale of a 20-something
slacker who discovers that his
parents sold him out to the
devil and he's now gainfully
employed as Satan's bounty
hunter. NBC's "Chuck," in
which a computer geek's brain
mysteriously downloads gov-
ernment secrets, also goes for
laughs.
If such programs reflect the
times in any substantive way, it
would be the general yearning
for someone - whether a
statesman or a Superman - to
rescue us. (One maverick at
least promises to have the ring
of truth:. Fox's "K-Ville" is a
police drama set in post-
Katrina New Orleans.)
As with any industry, televi-
sion is attempting to give its
customers what they want, said
Tim Brooks, co-author of "The
Complete Directory to Prime
Time Network and Cable
Shows" and an executive who's
worked for several networks.
"We don't see more of the
'chalk-line TV"' coming this
fall, said Brooks, referring to
the long-dominant "CSI" school
of gritty crime drama. "We want
something escapist, upbeat ....
shows that take you out of the
world of Osama bin Laden, and
politicians throwing mud at
each other, and Katrina."
"The world is so heavy and
dark," he observed.
It's a familiar historical road
that television is traveling.
In the 1960s, as America was
increasingly engulfed in the
fallout from Vietnam and social
upheaval, viewers were spoon-
fed diversions such as
"Bewitched" and "F Troop."
Then the pendulum swung,
courtesy of the breakthrough
topical comedy '1"All in the
Family" and faux-relevance
dramas such as "The Mod
Squad."
It shifted back in the late '70s
with a vengeance, as fluffy
"Happy Days," "Laverne &
Shirley" and "Charlie's Angels"
filled the airwaves and topped
the ratings.
As for copycatting, that TV
quirk is truly entrenched.
"Imitation is the sincerest form
of television," humorist Fred
Allen observed in TV's earliest
days. (Another '50s Allen obser-
vation worth recalling: "Tele-
vision is a medium because
anything well done is rare.")
"We go through cycles, and
this is one where all the net-
works are trying to do things
that .have that sort of larger-
than-life element," said analyst
Bill Carroll of ad-buyer Katz
Television.


"Heroes" is carrying on what
"Lost" started, unleashing a
flood of programs that can
loosely be deemed fantasy
Such shows are making


Supernatural to



the super nrchM


broadcast networks will debut 28 new
series this fall, including six half-hour
comedies and six reality programs.


7 . -ir


R . r(


AK America s Funniest Home Videos


cQ 60 Minutes
(W CW Now


*. -a


Extreme Makeover. Home Edition Desperate Housewives Brothers & Sisters
Viva Laughlin Cold Case Shark


Online Nation Life is Wild


F1 Comedy repeal Comedy repeal The Simpsons King of the Hill


Of- Football Ilight in "merica


Jimmy Smits stars in
"Cane" on CBS


America s Next Top Model (repeat)


Family Guy


American Dad


Sunday Night Football


Dancing wih the Stars
How I Met ''our The Big Bang ...


LW Everybody
FOX Prison Break
NBC Chuck


ABC Cavemen


*I W


. 'l* i^ H


NCIS


Kevin McKidd is
,"Journeyman"'
on NBC


Samantha Who? The Bachelor
Two Hall Men Ruls 01c Engage CSI Miami


Aliens in America Girllriends


The Game


K-Ville
Heroes


Carpoolers Dancing with the Stars results)
The Unit


Beauty and the Geek
Bones
The Biggest Loser


ABC Pushing Daisies*
CBS Kid Nation
CW America s r Jext Top Model


Kate Walsh leaves
Seattle Grace Hospital
to join "Private
Practice"
on ABC


Back to You
Deal or No Deal
Ugly Betly
Survivor" China
Smallville


Til Death


Reaper
House
The Singing Bee


Private Practice
Criminal Minds
Gossip Girl
Kitchen Nightmares
Bionic Woman
Grey., 4naiomyv


Sjl -
P'h,-,i,,


Journeyman


Boston Legal
Cane


Law 8 Order Special Viciims Unir


Dirty Sexy Money
CSI N,


Adhir Kalyan is one
of the "Aliens in
America" on
The CW


CSI Crime Scene Investigaiion


Life
Big Shots
k Without a Trace


Supernatural


ER
Men
Numr


Las


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
8-9-3
PLAY 4
4-7-9-3
LOTTO
3- 6 - 25- 28- 33- 37
FANTASY 5
1- 10- 13- 16- 33

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
Cash 3:7-8-4
- Play 4:1 - 9 - 7 - 7
Fantasy 5:11 - 13- 14-22 -25
5-of-5 1 $264,359.01
4-of-5 372 $114.50
3-of-5 12,071 $9.50
Mega Money: 9- 18 -25- 38
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winners
4-of-4 6 $1,840.50
3-of-4MB 86 $281.50
3-of-4 1,493 $48
2-of-4 MB 2,331 $21.50
2-of-4 44,074 $2
1-of-4 MB 17,592 $2.50
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
Cash 3:9-8-7
Play 4:5 - 5 - 6 - 2
Fantasy 5:17 - 18 - 30 - 32 - 35
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 251 $1,079.50
3-of-5 7,902 $13


INSIDE THE NUMBERS-
* To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY


Today is Sunday, Sept. 16, the
259th day of 2007. There are 106
in Trees days left in the year.
ib3rs Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 16,1810, Mexico
began its successful revolt against
Spanish rule.
On this date:
Vegas In 1498, Tomas de Torquemada,
notorious for his role in the
Spanish Inquisition, died in Avila,
Spain.
In 1893, more than 100,000 set-
tlers swarmed onto a section of
land in Oklahoma known as the
"Cherokee Strip."
c. osgood * AP In 1919, the American Legion
ramas, which was formally chartered by an act
disaster for the of Congress.
r. In 1940, President Franklin D.
refused to Roosevelt signed into law the
at demanded Selective Training and Service Act,
nation, while which set up the first peacetime
found them- military draft in U.S. history.
ut an ending Ten years ago: Attorney
d shows were General Janet Reno named
eled. "Day Charles La Bella the Justice
"Vanished," Department's new lead prosecutor
re among the in the campaign fund-raising inves-
found that . tigation.
ouniewers that Five years ago: U.N. Secre-
ed story line tary-General Kofi Annan an-
reruns or long nounced that Iraq had uncondition-
earned that ally accepted the return of U.N.
I now will fol- weapons inspectors.
odel, shifting Today's Birthdays: Actress
it to air with- Janis Paige is 85. Actress Lauren
Bacall is 83. Blues singer B.B. King
n't feel slight- is 82. Clergyman-author the Rev.
Newcomers Robert H. Schuller is 81. Actor Pet-
t-button "Kid er Falk is 80. Actress Anne Francis
strands chil- is 77. Movie director Jim McBride
wn, and Fox's is 66. Actress Linda Miller is 65.
Next Great Rhythm-and-blues singer Betty
and" and Kelly (Martha & the Vandellas) is
'11 be part of 63. Musician Kenney Jones (Small
the genre on Faces; Faces; The Who) is 59.
Jules. Actress Susan Ruttan is 59. Actor
more to come Ed Begley Jr. is 58. Country singer
luding a new David Bellamy (The Bellamy Bro-
'he Search for others) is 57. Country singer-song-
Doll"- even writer Phil Lee is 56. Rock musi-
irst winner cian Ron Blair (Tom Petty & the
Heartbreakers) is 55. Singer Frank
ng gone really Reed (The Chi-Lites) is 53. TV per-
critic David sonality Mark McEwen is 53. Actor
d Nationrk Mickey Rourke is 51. Magician

eshAir"said David Copperfield is 51. Country
reality TV's singer-songwriter Terry McBride is
49. Actress Jennifer Tilly is 49.
much comic Singer Richard Marx is 44. Come-
s ago, there dian Molly Shannon is 43. Singer
nd returning Marc Anthony is 38. Comedian
fall schedule, Amy Poehler is 36. Singer Musiq is
-buyer Carat 30. Actress Alexis Bledel is 26.
the number is Actress Madeline Zima is 22.
nen. Thought for Today: "Who loves
is ABC's himself best need fear no rival." -
of the Geico Latin proverb.


At evolved but
Cro-Magnons.
been raised
)rigins and its
nly disguised
merican race


REMEMBER WHEN
* For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


CBS Crime series repeat


FOX Cops
NBC Dateline NBC


SOURCES: The networks


New series


Cops


New time slot


ring Lucy Liu and ABC's
"Cashmere Mafia" with Brooke
Shields (both midseason en-
tries) revolve around successful
women. "Big Shots," starring
Dylan McDermott, Christopher
Titus, Michael Vartan and
Joshua Malina, gives the stage
to well-off male buddies.
At a Television Critics
Association meeting in July,
ABC Entertainment President
Stephen McPherson was asked
whether there was room on TV
for blue-collar shows in the


Crime series repeat
America s Most WanTed
Drama sees repeal


vein of past hits "Roseanne"
and "Sanford and Son."
While several shows depict
the wealthy, "I would be careful
to think there's any kind of ...
rule or movement right now to
just put rich people on televi-
sion," McPherson said.
That's a relief; multimillion-
aires are not scheming to take
over the airwaves. But don't
expect a sitcom about an out-of-
work real estate agent any time
soon.
Also unwelcome this season


48 Hours Mystery


Drama series repeat


All times are Eastern. Schedule subject to network changes.


Associated Press
In this undated publicity photo provided by ABC, "Cavemen" stars Nick Kroll as Nick, left, Bill English
as Joel and Sam Huntington as Andy pose on the show's set. The comedy, born of Geico commer-
cials, premiers this fall.


inroads, at least for now, among
the more realistic dramas that
have dominated TV
Last year, of 52 dramas on
five networks, 25 focused on the
battle against crime or terror-
ism by police, the CIA, FBI or'
the military, according to an
analysis by Madison Avenue
firm Magna Global.
This fall, Magna Global found
that traditional crimebusters
are featured in 17 of the 47 new
and returning dramas, includ-
ing newcomer "Women's Mur-
der Club" on ABC, about
friends (including former "Law
& Order" prosecutor Angie
Harmon) who crack cases
together.
There are other ways to keep
the harsh world at bay:
Lifestyles of the fictional rich.
In a mini-trend, several new
shows are set among the afflu-
ent or downright loaded, in-
cluding CBS' "Cane" with
Jimmy Smits as a Florida sugar
baron; CW's "Gossip Girl,"
about Manhattan prep school-
ers, and a show that flaunts
what it's got, "Dirty Sexy
Money" on ABC.
NBC's "Lipstick Jungle" star-


are serialized dr
largely proved a d
networks last yeai
Many viewers
invest in shows th
unblinking atte]
those who did
selves left 'withoi
when the low-rate
abruptly cancer
Break,"
"Kidnapped" wer
casualties.
Networks also
shows expecting v
low a complicate
are wise to avoid r
breaks. "Lost" 1
painful lesson and
low Fox's "24" m
to a January debi
out interruption.
Reality buffs wo
ed this year.
include CBS' hot
Nation," which
dren in a ghost to'
"Search for the
American Ba
"Nashville." They
some 20 hours of
network fall sched
There will be r
at midseason, inc
version of CW's "T
the Next Pussycat
though the fi
declined the job.
"Carnival barking
bad," television
Bianculli of The
Daily News an
Public Radio's "FR
dismissively of
empty promises.
Don't look for
relief. Two year
were 46 new ai
comedies on the
according to ad-
USA; this season, t
22, with six fresh
Among them
"Caveman," born
commercials about
socially slighted C
Questions have
both about its ad o
intent: Is it a thi:
parable about Ar
relations?


FOX Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader' Don I Forgei the Lyric;s
NBC My Name is Earl 30 Rock The Office Scrubs
AB 20/20 Women s Murder Club
CM~ Ghost Whisperer Moonlight
CW Friday Nigrit Smackdown,
K0 The Next Great American Band Nashville
NBC Deal or No Deal Friday Night Lights
ABK Saturday Night College Football


MICHAEL COURTNEY/The CW
In this publicity photo provided by The CW, Ray Wise, left, plays
The Devil and Bret Harrison is Sam in "Reaper," a new series for
fall 2007 on The CW.


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C
SUNDAY
ER 16, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Save now or pay later


CHERYL PHILLIPS
Special to the Chronicle
Water is finite. Only 3 per-
cent of the earth's water is
fresh water, with 97 per-
cent of our fresh water in polar ice-
caps.
Today, our planet has the same
amount of water as it did 2,000 years
ago, when the world's population
was only 3 percent of today's 6.6-bil-
lion global population.
Since 1940, annual global fresh
water use has increased by 3 per-
cent compared to an annual popu-
lation growth of 2 percent.
According to some reports, develop-
ing countries have been withdraw-
ing water at an increasing rate of 4
to 8 percent annually for the past
decade. And, according to the World
Bank, the worldwide demand for
water is doubling every 21 years or
more in some regions.
Each year, developing countries
produce 95 percent of the 80 million
people added to the world's popula-
tion. Not surprisingly, their demand
for fresh water has been rising to
support industrial development,
increased reliance on irrigation,
massive urbanization and rising liv-
ing standards.
With world population growth
projected to rise to 7.6 billion by
2020 and 9.4 billion by 2050, the
future for the Earth's finite fresh
water resources is bleak, to say the
least. Already, nearly half a billion
people in 31 countries currently
face water shortages. Some reports
predict that by 2025, another 17
countries - including Ethiopia,
India, Kenya, Nigeria and Peru,
totaling 2.8 billion people - will be
in a water crisis.
One of the reasons the With
Earth's supply of fresh
water is rapidly shrink- pOpu
ing is pollution.
According to the gro
"Population Reports"
published by the Johns prOje
Hopkins University of
School of Public Health, to ris
all of India's 14 major 7.6 bil
rivers are badly pollut-
ed and about 75 percent 202(
of China's 50,000 kilo-
meters of major rivers 9.4 bil
are unable to support
fish. 205(
While agriculture is
the biggest source of future
pollution in India and
China, other sources Earth'
also contribute signifi-
cantly to their water pol- fresh
lution. As noted by
"Population Reports," reSOUI
"an average of 90 to 95 bleak,
percent of all domestic
sewage and 75 percent the I
of all industrial waste is
discharged into surface
waters without any treatment."
In 2002, an estimated 1.1 billion
people had no access to safe drink-
ing water, 2.5 billion people lacked
proper sanitation and more than 5
million people died from water-
borne diseases. In regard to deaths
caused by waterborne diseases, the
United Nations claims they repre-
sent 10 times the number of deaths
from wars around the globe.
Awareness of the global water
issues helps us maintain perspec-
tive on our own fresh water
resources in Citrus County. For
many years, we have been blessed
with an abundance of quality water
to sustain population growth, eco-
nomic development and our


|Adam Smil

[ n he Frey Institute, in
- conjunction with the
SFriends of Adam
Smith Foundation and the
Florida Council on
Economic Education, pre-
*sented The Adam Smith
Seminar: American Public
'-Policy and Free Enterprise
on Sept 6. As usual, we had a L
turn-away audience and ou
broadcasted the program OTI
over the Internet VOI
The idea was to explain to
. young people what our free
enterprise system is and how it devel-
oped through the years.
e Adam Smith is not a household name,
and some asked me if he would be pres-
ent at the meeting. I responded: "In
"* -' . . . /,-/ m ,


KAITH M IN PHILLIPS/Special to the Chronicle
Katherine Phillips won second place in the Save Our Waters Week photo contest with this shot of a sunset.


lifestyles. In years past, the cheap
price tag conditioned many of us to
not even think about water conser-
vation and the protection of our
aquifers. Today, as a result of
droughts, overpumping, pollution
and spiraling population, we are
being forced to take our heads out
of the sand and confront
world the reality that our
water resources are
action finite.
As the vice chair of
wth the Citrus County Water
and Wastewater
hcted Authority, I am con-
cerned about chronic
se to overpumping by several
lion by of our largest residen-
tial communities. This
) and concern is heightened
by the fact that there are
lion by more than 25,000 pri-
vate wells in our county
, the used entirely for lawn
irrigation.
for the There are many resi-
dents in Citrus County
s finite who strongly believe
water that the only way to pre-
water serve our lifestyle is to
ces is stop growth. However,
this is not realistic.
to say People will continue to
have babies, buy land
east. and build homes.
Presently our water
source for the county is
sufficient. But with the region's
population projected to increase,
an alternative source of water may
well be needed. In this regard, the
Withlacoochee Regional Water
Supply Authority has determined
the most cost effective way of "cre-
ating new water" is to sidestream a
portion of the flow of the
Withlacoochee during high flow
periods.
Nonetheless, Citrus 20/20's
Growth Management Committee,
one of four working groups estab-
lished as a result of the January
2007 Vision Check, recommended
the development of a master plan
Please see CONSERVE/Page 3C


Requiem for a


water body?


Chronicle file photo
Lyngbya, seen above, can be kept in check by hydrilla, which has
been cleared from Kings Bay.

Resident remembers Kings Bay


MATT CLEMONS
Special to the Chronicle
A requiem is prayer for
the salvation of the souls
of the departed.
I hope that is not what we are
doing here, but I'm beginning
to get more than a little wor-
ried that we are running out of
time and that government
agencies and officials have
already written the obituary
for Kings Bay.
Kings Bay is a far cry from
the water body many of us
remember. Who is to blame?
Nobody and everybody
Nobody is to blame because
no one is trying to halt the


decline and no one is trying to
restore our waters.
Development in the watershed
and springshed continues
unabated with only token
efforts to protect water quality.
Despite the state's Springs
Initiative, an Outstanding
Florida Waterway designation
in 1983, a Surface Water
Improvement Management
Priority Water Body
Designation in 1989, numerous
comprehensive plan goals and
policy statements, and study
upon ,study on water quality,
the waters of Kings Bay are
continuing to decline at an
Please see -. "-. '/Page 3C


th and the free enterprise system


Frey
HER
CES


spirit"
For those who don't know,
Adam Smith was an 18th-
century philosopher who
authored "An Inquiry into
the Nature and Causes of
the Wealth of Nations,"
whose work helped to build
the foundation of the mod-
ern academic discipline of
free-market economics and
provided one of the best-
known intellectual ratio-
nales for free trade, capital-
ism and libertarianism.


Speakers at the seminar included
Jim Pugh, chairman and CEO of Epoch
Properties, whose father was a carpen-
ter. Pugh is now the owner and presi-
dent of a multi-family housing develop-


ment company that has developed
more than 30,000 housing units in 56
cities from Florida to California. As he
told the young people:. "Think big," and
"Reach for your dreams, because we
have a system that allows you to reach
those dreams."
Charles W Stenholm (D-Texas), who
was a member of the House of
Representatives for 26 years, discussed
the public policy issues that confront
the Congress in dealing with our free
enterprise system. He knows the prob-
lems personally, as his family has been
in farming for four generations.
Stenholm used humor in his talk to
explain a subject that has been termed
the "dismal science," i.e. economics. He
told the story of a friend in Texas, John,
who is very successful. This friend was


always encouraging people to reach for
the moon and use the free enterprise
system to their advantage.
His neighbor's son, Josh, was 12 years
old and listened to this sermon day
after day. Finally one morning when
John got up and went outside he saw a
sign: "Dog for Sale: $50,000."
He went up to Josh and said, 'Josh, do
you think you can get $50,000 for this
dog?" The reply was: "Yes, you told me
to think big, and I am doing that."
Every day for the next week, when
John would get up, he would see the
sign and go over to Josh and ask him
how he was doing. The reply was
always: "No one has bought yet, but it is
going to happen."
Please see SMITH/Page 3C


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


The logic

behind the

news stories
ome news stories in the
Chronicle really catch
the attention of readers.
Early this past week, many
readers wanted to know why
the Chronicle identified stu-
dents as "black" or "white" in a
story about a fight that broke
out in during a Lecanto High
School football game.
For the record, the designa-
tion was used because the con-
frontation that took place was
of a racial nature and the des-
ignations helped explain to
readers how things happened.
If you missed the story, a
Lecanto High football player
took a hit from an opponent
and got into a verbal con-
frontation that included racial
slurs. One the Lecanto player's
fellow teammates - one who
happened to be black -
stepped in and tried to stop the
confrontation before things got
out of hand.
The Lecanto player, appar-
ently overcome with rage,
turned on his teammate. The
teammate responded by
whacking him in the head with
his helmet, resulting in an
injury that took 18 stitches to
repair.
Yet another Lecanto player
charged into the melee and
actually hit the coach.
It was not a great day in the
history of the high school.
Please see '. i'. i"i'/Page 4C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Numbing

news was

unexpected
ST f these walls could
Stalk," I thought
But, in a sense, they
did. Photographs reflected a
homeowner who loved good
times, politics and family.
The knickknacks, signs and
posters in and around the
house reflected great humor.
The "stuff" in the garage
included good-quality toys for
big boys - a tractor, four-
wheelers, boating gear, etc.
That's what I saw more than
a decade ago while consider-
ing the purchase of the home
that I live in today.
One photograph of the
owner showed him with a
high-level politician, but I
don't recall whom. Another
had a makeshift comic-strip
bubble tacked on with a good-
hearted sarcastic comment
one could only assume the hus-
band added to tease his wife.
All this fun stuff - why is
this .guy selling this place, I
wondered. It was the perfect
getaway from his primary resi-
dence in St Pete, I thought
I caught on as the owner, his
wife and I sat around a table
while signing papers during
the closing of the sale. This
wife was not the wife in the
photos.
Comments about divorce
settlement terms, as related to
the sale of the property, were
Please see SHADES/Page 4C

' Ir-.. t- . ". . .. " I


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2C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


1 "When we quarrel how we
wish we had been blameless."


Ralph Waldo Emerson


SHAME


Incitement



reflects poorly



on community


It is never a good thing when
fights between students erupt,
as happened at the Lecanto
High School football game on
Friday, Sept 7. But when parents
and other adults get involved, it
becomes an event of criminal pro-
portions.
Three football THE Ii
players who were
involved in the Behavio
altercation will be
disciplined. They OUR 01
are aware of the Sad
seriousness of their Citrus
behavior, and the
Florida High YOUR OPIi
School Athletic .:hroncieor
Association is con- comment a
sidering what Chronicle
actions will be
taken against them. The stu-
dents and teams at LHS, led by
Principal Kelly Tyler and foot-
ball coach Ron Allan, are deal-
ing productively with what took
'place and are moving on.
The larger issue is the partici-
pation of the people in the
stands in what turned into a
racial altercation that quickly
got out of hand. Verbal abuse of
any kind is unacceptable and as
a society should not be tolerated.
Although the audience partici-
pants have not been identified,
their behavior is an embarrass-
ment to the football team,
Lecanto High School and Citrus
County. The Mount Dora High
School fans and players must
have gone home with a very dis-
tasteful view of our community.
Sports can be challenging and
fun. Competition between play-
ers and teams can be healthy and
high school athletic programs
can contribute to the building of
character, positive self-esteem,
and work ethic of students. The
high emotion of an athletic com-

Cheap tips CO!
This is in response to a
call in Sound Off that ran
sometime around July 26,
27 or 28 - I'm not exactly
sure. This is in response to
why people cannot eat out
anymore due to gas
prices. All I have to say is cAI.LL
that at least some people 5
actually realize that they 563-
cannot afford to dine out. I
work in the restaurant
business and I'm fed up with cheap
tips. If nobody has informed you,
tips should be at least 20 percent of
your total bill including tax. If you
cannot figure that out, that's $2
every $10 you spend. Some couples
Should reevaluate their tipping sys-
tem because $2 is not always
. enough. I give every customer the
benefit of the doubt that they will
determine the proper tip, and I'm
* let down time and time again. I feel
like customer service has gone too
far for a buck. Many people do not
realize that waitresses go. through a
lot for only $3.50 an hour. We all
know time is money and I am sick
of $1 tippers holding up my four-
table section for hours on end ...
There are customers waiting to be
seated.
Be a sport
To the Sound Off remarking on
the tennis photos in the Sports sec-
tion: Whoa, your hatred bias and
prejudice are screaming at us. What
kind of sports enthusiast are you?


5
r

P
d
C

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in
tb


q

,(


petition can cause students to
react in the wrong way to each
other. It happens. And when it
happens, those involved should
be dealt with quickly and the sit-
uation resolved.
But there is no justification for
fans and/or parents
;SUE: getting involved in
those altercations.
at LHS. Too often parents
are too emotional
DINION: about their chil-
ay in dren's involvement
county . in sports. From T-
ball to youth-league
1ION: Go to football, from girls'
hne.com to tennis teams to the
out tod3a 's boys on the football
editorial, team, the disrespect
for other players,
other parents and coaches is a
disgrace. Parents become incred-
ibly angry and behave poorly in
front of their children who, in
turn, mimic their behavior.
Violence begets violence and the
father who shoves the referee
because he disagrees with a call
gives silent permission for his
son to do the same.
This behavior should never be
tolerated. And if the individuals
who participated in this pitiful
incident at Lecanto High can be
identified, they should be
banned from all athletic events
at the school.
LHS will take its medicine. The
school and this community have
been damaged by this event. Our
respect is increased for Tyler and
Allan who are determined to take
the high road, and use this inci-
dent to teach students the right
way to win.
Those antagonists in this inci-
dent should be ashamed of them-
selves. They have diminished
themselves and embarrassed the
school and this county.

Baseball lingo
To today's callers who
have inquired about what
is a walk-on homerun: I'd
like to inform them that
the term is actually "walk-
off homerun." What it
refers to is, in the ninth
inning when someone hits
0~579 a homerun that pulls their
0579 team ahead - and it's got
to be the bottom of the
ninth inning -then the
game is over and the teams walk off
the field. Hence, the term "walk-off
homerun."
Don't paint dogs
This is in reference to your Sept. 9
Sound Off, "Rainbow dog." To the
person who was painting that dog
blue, green and purple: This is animal
abuse and I hope you get caught.
Bouncy fun
I just wanted to say that I was
unaware of this Saturday event that
took place, but we went. We were
driving by and my husband and I
and the kids went and had a great
time on Saturday in the bouncy
house and everything that they had.
I was wondering if we're going to
have more stuff like that in the
future ... I just wanted to say to who-
ever- I didn't get much informa-
tion - but to whoever put that on,
you know, my hat's off to them. That
was great - great to not have to go
out of town to go to these events. I
hope they do something soon.


The non-candidate: God


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ............................publisher
Charlie Brennan .............................. editor
, Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart .................circulation director
. Mike Arnold ........................ managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............... ..... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ....... ................ citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


.lhi
h

HI
I
C


he field of presiden-
tial candidates is
nearly complete.
Only Newt Gingrich
remains to decide - or
announce if he has decided
- whether he, too, will run
for president His decision
is expected in November.
There is one person who
is definitely not running,
but may be invoked as the Cal TI
ultimate adviser. That OTI
would be God. VO01
Writing in Time maga-
zine, essayist Michael
Kinsley raises some questions about
presidential candidates who want God
as their "running mate." Kinsley
would like them to go beyond the
superficial "God bless you and God
bless America" benediction. He wants
to know to what extent God and a can-
didate's understanding of Him might
affect public policy should that person
be elected.
Kinsley asserts that former New
York Governor Mario Cuomo was
unable to be a "good Catholic" and
simultaneously a good governor of
New York because he differed with his
church's teachings on abortion, among
other controversial social issues. He
also says he thinks it impossible - or
at least very difficult - for Mitt
Romney to be president and a good
Mormon for the same reason. "I want
to know what God is telling them,"
writes Kinsley, "just as I would want to
know what Karl Rove was telling them
if they claimed him for an adviser. If
religion is central to their lives and
moral systems, then it cannot be the
candidates' 'own private affair.'"
Fair enough. While the two "king-
doms" are separated and, some might


argue, headed in different
directions, it is perfectly
proper for candidates to be
asked whether God
requires them to impose
His will as they perceive it
through legislation and
judicial mandate. If not,
why not? If one believes, for
example, that God created
life at conception, does that
omas mean all life is sacred and
|ER deserves protection in law,
6ES or are certain lives, namely
those created in difficult
circumstances, such as the
tiny number conceived through rape
or incest, dispensable?
But this coin has a flip side. If
Kinsley would require candidates who
worship and claim to know God to
come clean about any hidden agendas
they might have, should not full disclo-
sure also be required of those who
practice a religion of political conven-
ience and even the secularist and the
practical atheist (which would include
a non-theistic candidate, as well as
one who simply invokes God's name
for political reasons, but doesn't seri-
ously believe in Him)?
On what basis does the non-theistic
and practical atheist make moral
choices, which include going to war
and capital punishment? One might
answer, "the Constitution," but to
many liberals the Constitution is a "liv-
ing document" subject to constant
interpretation, re-interpretation and
revision to match "the times." So is it
the times that shape such a presiden-
tial candidate, or something more per-
manent?
Democrats, most notably Senators
Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama,
have invoked God and Scripture dur-


LETTERS to the Editor


Death penalty
Most of us American citizens are
happy with life in the U.S.
I have a question, however, con-
cerning the justice system - especial-
ly the death penalty.
I'm sure most people are glad for it
and that's the way it should be.
People with the death penalty have
been found guilty by juries and
judges.
My concern is: Why, with people
getting that penalty, are they living in
prisons for everywhere from 10 years
to 25 or 30?
Why is that left to exist? Why not,
within the year after the penalty is
given, let the judgment be carried out
- put anyone convicted to die.
Enforce the threat and I'll bet those
kinds of unlawful things will change,
for the better
Couey is a real example. Watch how
many years it will take to enforce it
Leroy W. Loveland
Homosassa

No blind devotion
I'm accustomed to reading weird
points of view in the letters to the
Chronicle, some of them my own. But
Gene Courtemanche's letter was
absolutely astonishing.
The press should not dare to criti-
cize county government! Once the
government has decided (as in
"Commission members selected June
Fisher"), that should stand!
Why? Did that writer graduate from
the Vladimir Putin school of Civics
and Journalism?


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352)563-3280; or e-
mail to Iltters@chronlctlonllne.com.

Obviously, his heroine June Fisher
studied personnel management under
the Red Queen from Alice in
Wonderland.
"You cannot have an effective com-
mission with the media challenging
its decisions."
"You should support their choice!"
Really? Even if I agreed with
Fisher's decision to fire Tom Dick, it
would never occur to me that the
press was obliged to agree with it
Reverence for governmental authori-
ty is no part of the political or jour-
nalistic traditions of the United States
of America. None whatever.
No governmental body in this
Republic is entitled to blind devotion
from the press. Nor is it likely to
receive it Any such body which feels
itself incapable of operating where
the First Amendment to the
Constitution of the United States is


binding should resign and call for
new elections.
Pat Condray
Ozello
Rehab for Vick
Finally, Michael Vick appeared
for about 10 minutes to say he was
sorry for his dog behavior.
Supposedly now everything is A-OK,
and his rehabilitation is complete.
Not so quick, Mr. Vick! The DSM IV
psychiatric manual details substan-
tially problems of sadism, which often
begins with cruelty to animals and
may gravitate to abuse of humans.
Sometimes, the sadism is immedi-
ately transferred, but may be
delayed for a period of time before
the aberrant behavior may reappear
as child/spousal abuse and/or physi-
cal and mental cruelty to others.
"Rehabilitation" may begin with a
well rehearsed public relations
statement and grooming by his
attorney, but psychotherapy may be
needed to ferret out causative psy-
chodynamic factors in order to get
rid of negative syndrome patterns.
A second step to indicate serious
regret may be to donate some of his
millions to the Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
Then move from there to person-
ally develop empathy for the life
problems of others, and volunteer
his time to nonprofit organizations.
Finally, maybe it would be helpful
to him and his image if he adopted a
dog and began a sensitive relationship
with this most delightful creature.
William C. Young
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


ing their campaigns. But theirs is a
selective reading. Their theology
meshes with the political objectives of
their party and personal ideology.
They quote Scripture about caring for
the poor and interpret that to mean
higher taxes and bigger government
They ignore those passages that speak
of the inner life.
Conservatives can also practice' a
theology of political convenience,
cherry-picking those subjects that
rally "the base" and tickle the ears of
the church-going, while ignoring man-
dates that make them uncomfortable, '
such as opposing racial discrimina-
tion, injustice and poverty. They want
lower taxes and smaller government
but often are not willing to take up the
slack and get their hands dirty to help
the poor, unlike the One they claim to
follow. Not always, but mostly.
While Kinsley asks some good ques-
tions, who among the journalists and
talk show hosts has the background to
ask them directly of the candidates?
Those without theological training or
experience in faith often find such
questions embarrassing because they
don't want to face ridicule from their
mostly secular colleagues. But to hide
these issues in the catacombs of jour-
nalism is a poor excuse. The questions
should be asked of both the religious
and the secular to help voters make up
their minds which ones best adhere to
godly principles and to determine what
standards govern the ones who do not

Direct all mail for Cal Thomas to:
Tribune Media Services, 2225
Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo,
N. Y. 14207. Readers may also e-mail
Cal Thomas at
tmseditors@tribune.com.














A Republican by any other name...


residential politics have
changed much during
the past 50 years. I
remember the excitement of
watching the national conven-
tions on television when I was
much younger. Ballot after bal-
lot was cast, vote after vote was
taken, until the party's nomi-
* nee was selected.
I was naive. I believed the
delegates voted their con-
sciences each and every time. I
had no idea what was going on
behind closed doors, no concept
of deals being hammered out
outside the smoke-filled halls.
Nowadays, presidential aspi-
rants announce their candida-


Bridge bumps S o
I have called the
Sound Off three other l
occasions and no
response in the paper.
I take the paper daily 1
and I read Sound Off
daily My question
was: Could anyone tell CALL
me when is the last 5n63
time the barge canal 56 "
bridge going from
Crystal River to Inglis
has been inspected? The bridge
is looking like it needs an
inspection. On the gaps in the
bridge, you go bump, bump,
bump when you go over it. I
was just wondering if it's
inspected on a regular basis or
when the last time the inspec-
tion was. I drive over this
bridge daily and I have not
seen any inspectors out there
and I have lived in Crystal River
and Levy County most of my
life. If someone could please
tell me when the last time this
bridge was inspected, I would
feel very much safer having to,
drive over it.
Channel surfing
If anybody has ever surfed
through the TV channels via the


cy months, even
years, before the
election. Some states
are opting for earlier .
primary dates, each *
trying to best the
other.
Recently, I read
that Fred Thompson,
actor and former
U.S. senator from Fred B
the state of A SLI1
Tennessee, is "belat- LI
edly trying to get into
the race" to become the
Republican nominee. The
writer suggested Thompson
might have waited too long.
It's only September.


.0579


satellite dish or the
cable, there was an
interesting thing I have
found, that 80 or 90
percent of the time I
randomly switched to
another station,
there's always a com-
mercial on. Very rarely
have I ever had the
success of going from
channel to channel


and actually seeing
the actual film presentation or
the presentation that's sup-
posed to be viewed. Now what
does that tell us? That money is
the key issue here with the tele-
vision industry and this country.
Our values have sunk so low
that the only way we're going to
feel that we've gained any credi-
bility in this country, is by dol-
lars. It's kind of sad that it's
happened this way and I don't
see it getting any better. So I
hope the television industry
tries to give everybody a break
and not let dollars be the priori-
ty more than their obligation to
the public.
Fading signal
Every day between 12 and 5
my (cable) signal gets deterio.
rated. I've called and called,


Brannen
CE OF
FE


September 2007, for
heaven's sake. The
election is still 14
months away.
Waiting too long to
get into the race
won't be Thompson's
undoing, but his
political history
could be. Thompson
was a senator - this
sounds good until
one realizes sena-
tors haven't fared


well as presidential candidates
- just ask Sens. Goldwater,
McGovern, Dole, Gore and
Kerry. In the modern era, we've
most often elected presidents

but nothing's been done. Does
anybody else have this prob-
lem? Who else can I call?
Bad show
I guess I'm officially a senior
citizen because I'm watching
the MTV video awards show. I
used to make it a special occa-
sion each year and I'd party a
little bit and watch it. I ain't
taping it this year and I'm glad
because this is the biggest
piece of garbage I've ever seen
in my life. The only thing I
found interesting was the little
bit of Rihanna when they
showed her doing "Umbrella."
Or. course, they didn't let her
sing the whole song.
Civil court
This is in reference to "Give
back tools." You need to take
this person to civil court-
tools are expensive - and it's
your right to do so. You 'need to
organize your facts and get a
witness, if possible. You should
be able to get your tools back.
Sound Off is only, you know,
good for blowing off steam and
maybe complimenting people
for doing good things. It doesn't
do any good to complain about
things like, ydu.know, like this.


Hot Corner: ENGLISH


Speak or leave
If you live in America,
speak English. I was the one
in the paper today, Speak
English or leave. It's been
this way since '58, '59. Time
to change your language.
Live and learn
I spent two tours overseas
with my husband - three
years in Germany and three
years in Japan - and I defi-
nitely tried to learn their lan-
guage, and after about a
year I was getting along real
well. I think the people who
come to the United States, if
they're going to live here,
they should learn English.
Don't use your native
tongue. Speak it at home,
but at least when you're out
shopping and you're with
Americans, learn to speak
English, especially the pro-
fessional people. Some of
them you can't understand,
but there's no reason why
they can't learn to speak
English.
Speak Cherokee
I'm calling in regards to
"English spoken here."
Honestly, this person was so


CONSERVE
Continued from Page 1C

that includes a desalination
plant as a public/private part-
nership to a long-term alterna-
tive water source.
Citrus County has a unique
situation in regard to this alter-
native water source - the
Crystal River nuclear power
plant During normal opera-
tion of this facility, thousands
of gallons of clean, clear Gulf
water is used in the plant's con-
densers and discharged (at a
higher temperature) back out
into the Gulf in a continuous
24/7 cycle.


SMITH
Continued from Page 1C

Finally, one morning when
John went outside, the sign
was gone. Josh was there and
John said, "Josh, did you sell
the dog for $50,000?"
Josh said: "Yes sir, I did sell
it for $50,000, and I got an
exchange for the dog: two


upset about, you know, pos-
sibly learning some Spanish.
And then they said some-
thing about waking up in
America and all this stuff. It
didn't sound to me like this
person knows one word of
Cherokee, which was the
predominant language in
this country at one time.
And the Cherokee language
also has no word for "hyp-
ocrite."
Lack of backbone
In regard to the person
who called about the Latino
communities
increasing in
numbers
here in and the
fact that we have
to learn Spanish
to help them out
and they cannot
understand what
the reason was. My
feeling is that it's a
lack-of concern
and poor leader-
ship of the govern-
ment we have in
place now. Bush
lives too close to
Mexico and he's
too friendly with
the president of


The use of this hot water
greatly increases the efficiency
of a reverse osmosis desalina-
tion plant, and the brine from
this process can also be dis-
charged into the plant's outfall,
preventing "pooling" of high
concentrations of salt water.
The question is not if, but when
will we need desalination.
With about 11,000 desalina-
tion plants in 120 nations
around the world today, some
scientists fault the United
States' parsimonious funding
that has seen it abdicate its
role as a leader in desalination
research to Saudi Arabia,
Israel and Japan.
Faced with finite water
resources that are projected to


$25,000-cats."
Finally, Sean Snaith,
Director of the Institute for
Economic Competitiveness at
the University of Central
Florida, discussed the
American economy, public
policy and our interaction
with countries such as China.
To give you some back-
ground on the other two spon-
sors, the Friends of Adam
Smith Foundation was estab-


Mexico to want to disturb
that. But he'll do everything
in his power to try to help
them out and he doesn't care
about what happens to. us.
If he did, this country
wouldn't be in the situation
it is, thanks to him. But
because of this government
not having a backbone and
being able to stand up to
the issues and to what is
right for the American peo-
pie, is why we're having this
problem. And until that
changes, it's going to con-
tinue to get worse.


diminish, abundant and cheap
water promises to become a
thing of the past. Accordingly,
we must conserve and protect
our waters now and begin plan-
ning and preparing for the
future.
No matter what our water
future may hold, an alternative
to groundwater pumping will
be many times more expensive
than pumping directly from the
aquifer To protect our own
wallets from a very costly move
to alternative water resources,
we must stretch the use of
water from the aquifer by prac-
ticing conservation and halting
pollution.
It's either save now or pay
later.


lished as a way to reaffirm
the reality that free market
capitalism is an equal part-
ner in the grand experiment
that created the greatest,
most prosperous nation on
earth.
To achieve that mission,
the Friends will reinforce the
importance of free enterprise
to America's lasting prosperi-
ty; promote the historical
link between politics, public


who were previously gover-
nors: A peanut farmer turned
governor from Georgia; a good
ol' boy turned governor from
Arkansas; a son of a president
turned governor from Texas;
and, lest we forget, an actor
turned governor from
California.
Maybe Thompson should
forego showcasing his senatori-
al service and capitalize on his
experience as an actor.
Stop laughing.
Stop shouting, "Fred
Thompson is no Ronald
Reagan!"
We weren't aware Ronald
Reagan was Ronald Reagan


either, until we elected him.
During the 2004 primaries, I
pulled for Joe Lieberman to get
the nod from the Democrats. As
a straight-laced, red-state
Republican, I'm not sure I
could have pulled the lever by
his name, but I liked the
thought of "letting Joe do it"
We've never had a Joe for pres-
ident G.I. Joe won World War
II, but once the war was over
and Joe came home, the coun-
try elected a president named
Dwight Dwight?
For the 2008 elections, we're
being offered Hillary, Barack,
Rudy, Mitt, a couple of Johns
and now, perhaps, Fred.


S PY ON PWOfLU
TO MAKF= RG NO
MOR 3GG LAMd
us!


If Thompson's on the Florida
primary ballot, he'll get my
vote; and, if he's the GOP nom-
inee, he'll get it again in the
general election.
Why?
Because his name is Fred.
I believe it was little Willy
Shakespeare who said a rose
would smell like a rose regard-
less of its name. I suppose the
same is true of how
Republicans smell, and since
there's no Joe, I'll go with Fred.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


I SPY N OPC OFLF=
TO ,MAi1' SUF--Tw4 ju~s
POUTI SLAM UG No
LM\ORP-!


LETTERS to the Editor


Mention of race,
Re: Melee leads to discipline
Do we really need to know
that a "white player from
Lecanto got into an altercation
with a Mount Dora player?"
Which begs the (unan-
swered) question: What color
was the Mount Dora player?
Do we really need to know
that "another Lecanto player,
who is black," got involved?
And do we really need to
know "another white Lecanto
player charged both the coach
and (black) player"?
If there were no racial
implications in the incident,
you certainly have fostered
them with this story.



REQUIEM
Continued from Page 1C

accelerating rate.
Everybody is to blame
because every individual who
uses water affects what and
how much flows from the
downstream end (the springs)
of the hose (the aquifer).
Whether you live on the water-
front or in the driest, most
remote area of the central
ridge, you have an effect.
Water clarity declines were
beginning to be noted in the
1980s. The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
has funded a number of studies
through time and learned that
rooted aquatic plants help
improve water clarity and
reduce the presence of lyng-
bya, and that removing lyngbya
mats does not encourage
regrowth of desired plant
- species.
That being the case, one
must ask why we are spending
so much money trying to
remove lyngbya mats without
trying to establish the rooted
aquatic plants that will help
control lyngbya and increase
water clarity. It is sadly ironic
that the one entity spending
lots of money removing lyngbya
is focused on a task that is
doomed to fail and, in fact, like-
ly to make matters worse when
it comes to water clarity.
Disregarding its own rules
on turbidity among other
things, The Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP) Bureau of


policy and economic free-
dom; educate the citizenry on
the principles that made
America great; and, highlight
the positive contributions of
business and business lead-
ers to the development of
good government.
The Florida Council on
Economic Education has
been preparing Florida's
young people to make sound
personal financial decisions


I can't believe I read such a
thing in your newspaper, let
alone seeing this piece of
trash in a banner on the cover
of your publication.
Shame on the writer; shame
on the editor; shame on you.
W.L. Pickett
Crystal River
Cover-all deal
I agree with your suggesting
that all Gulf border states
combine into a cover-all insur-
ance agreement.
Remember, I say all insur-
ance types - homes, cars,
business. If an insurance com-
pany wants to sell, it cannot
pick and choose. It must sell
all types of coverage or none.


Whether you live
on the waterfront
or in the driest,
most remote area
of the central
ridge, you have an
effect.


Invasive Plant Management is
condoning the current removal
of lyngbya in Kings Bay.
Further, Citrus County's
Aquatic Services Division is
targeting lyngbya mats for
removal, as well as milfoil,
which is a rooted aquatic plant
that helps control lyngbya.
What's wrong with this pic-
ture?
The failure at the state level
comes from an oversimplified
and outdated single species
approach to aquatic plant con-
trol. If it is an exotic species, it
is bad and we need to get rid of
it at all costs. This approach,
called "spray and pray," is at
the core of the problem. While
exotic species can certainly
alter ecosystems, one has to
wonder at some point if it is
really realistic to believe fixing
the system is simply a matter of
weeding out what we don't like.
Target one species for removal
and, if you succeed, hope to
God that whatever fills its open
niche is more desirable than
the last.
Unfortunately, that is most
often not the case. Lyngbya is a


and to assume productive
roles in our free enterprise
system for more than 30
years. The council has
trained thousands of Florida
teachers to teach students
from Kindergarten through
12th grade to be financially
savvy and to understand the
underlying economic princi-
ples of personal financial
management.
For those of you who are


I, for one, do not blame the
insurance companies from
picking and choosing the most
profitable insurance if they
can get away with it I also am
against government getting
into most private-sector busi-
ness, but, when those compa-
nies start to take advantage of
their customers, then the gov-
ernment must intervene. This
will work and get the attention
of the insurance companies.
Time for our leaders to lead.
Then watch the insurance
companies change their tune.
New insurance motto: "All for
one or else you're done, get out
of state when we legislate."
Gerald Ruble
Inverness


prime example.
We have cleared the bay of
hydrilla, which is a rooted,
exotic aquatic plant that
improves water clarity and
reduces lyngbya. Now, we have
lyngbya, a chemically resistant,
potentially toxic cyanobacteria
that needs almost no light and
can pull its nutrients from the
air.
What do we need to do at this
point?
Foremost, we need a cham-
pion from among our elected
county officials. The official
needs to push a more proactive
agenda that focuses on ecosys-
tems rather than single-species
removal projects. The official
must be able to overcome the
self-serving and shortsighted
agendas of those fearing that
protecting the public interest
will cost them potential rev-
enues or votes. Thus, only an
elected official, short of a citi-
zens' rebellion, has the neces-
sary political clout to move
local and state agencies to
action.
In 2000, a county official stat-
ed: "The Board of County
Commissioners has made
water quality a No. 1 priority
and, obviously, Kings Bay is a
high-profile and important sur-
face water within the county
from an environmental, cultur-
al and economic standpoint"
All of our local elected offi-
cials and political candidates
have agreed that water quality
is one of our most pressing
issues. So what happened?
Who will be our champion?
We can't wait much longer for
the answer.


interested, a DVD of the sem-
inar is available for a small
fee by contacting the Frey
Institute at (407) 823-0665 or
going to www.loufrey.org.

Lou Frey Jr. is a political
analyst, commentator and
newspaper columnist and for-
mer Florida representative in
Congress. Send e-mail to
lou.frey@lowndes-law. corm.


SUNDAY, SE111'EMBER 16, 2007 3C


CITRUS COUN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


IRP








4C SU NDAY, Si p FMISER 16, 2007CMEA RCiusCNl(l)CUINe


Our nation's greatest threat


It ,is not global Islamic ter-
rorism. If an administra-
tion weak on defense is
elected, the terrorists will hit
us again at home. Americans
will come together, ignoring
the things that divide us, and
fight with vengeance until the
war is won.
Nor is it global warming,
man-made or otherwise. At this
very moment, entrepreneurial
Americans are working on pos-
sible solutions to manage tem-
perature and rainfall changes
that may be encountered.
Others are working on meas-
ures to conserve energy and to
develop alternate sources. The
best science, not driven by pol-
itics, suggests there is no crisis
on the horizon, that there is
time enough to evaluate and
react rationally


It is certainly not
"globalization," "off-
shoring" of manufac-
turing jobs or illegal -
immigration. The A
American economy
is the largest and
strongest, by far, in
the world.
Consumption in the
USA has supported Dr. Willi
foreign economies
for the past 10 years, -.
pulling them out of
recession and creat-
ing wealth and the ability to
buy our exports. Our economic
future remains bright.-
What does threaten our sur-
vival as a great and free nation
is the ignorance and apathy of
our people regarding their
responsibilities as citizens.
"Fat, dumb and happy" are we,


S indeed. We don't
know how our gov-
ernment works, and
*-�r we don't really care.
Half of us do not
bother to vote at all!
Most of us do not
know who represents
us, much less what
am Dio they are proposing.
am Dixon And most don't care
:.-..' what the Congress
does, what laws they
pass, what harm they
may be doing to the
welfare of our nation.
Our schoolchildren receive
little to no training in civics or
American history. They remain
clueless as to their responsibil-
ities as citizens in a republican
democracy. Their parents and
teachers are no better.
Even college students, our


"best and brightest," are
abysmally ignorant of how our
government works and what
their role should be. The latest
hit tune? What happened on
the last episode of "Desperate
Housewives?" How the Gators
did last week? Got that.
But how Sens. Mel Martinez
and Bill Nelson are voting on
the issues? Nobody knows or
seems to care. How long can we
remain free, if no one keeps a
watch on our government?
The major media pursue a
progressive political agenda,
posing propaganda as journal-
ism. Special interest groups vie
for control of our nation. Some
would guide us towards becom-
ing a welfare state, a "social
democracy" with less emphasis
on free markets and individual
responsibility. Some support a


more libertarian agenda that
might require legalizing drugs
and mercy killings, and
demand drastic reduction in
the size and services of govern-
ment. Others, still, argue for
special rights for one group of
citizens at the expense of oth-
ers. The highest bidders may
prevail. Most of us don't care!
Knowing that, our "govern-
ing class" treats most us as the
idiots we apparently choose to
be. Their campaign literature,
the surveys and polls, always
with a request for money,
always warnings about the dan-
gers if the other party gains
control, suggests we are chil-
dren, easily fooled, easily led.
Are we? Have we come to that?
I wish I were wise enough to
know how to involve my fellow
citizens more in our gover-


nance. Short of a major tragedy
or government meltdown, my
bet is that most of us will be
watching "Monday Night
Football" or "American Idol"
rather than the political debates
to determine who will be leader
of the only remaining superpow-
er in the world. How sad!


Dr. William Dixon is an
Inverness resident and retired
surgeon. He earned his MD
degree from New York
Medical College, an MBA from
University of South Florida
and his bachelor's from
Columbia College. He served
11 years in the U.S. Army
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. He can be
e-mailed at dixonbill
@chronicleonline. com.


to the Editor


Tax squeeze SO
County commis-
sioners, wake up. Just
wake up. Keep on put-
ting more taxes on,
more taxes on,,not
lowering them, and P
you'll soon have more
people leaving this
area than are coming
in. They say now that OOO.
most insurance com-
panies will tell you
that more people are leaving
than coming in. So wake up.
We'd like to keep our good
state, but (it's) not going to
happen if you keep putting
more taxes on.
Too much sampling
I'm calling in response to the
article in Sunday's Sound Off
about restaurants over serving
their customers, and the per-
son who called, I agree. I'd also
like to know, is there a .law
against the owner of a restau-



WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

The truly disappointing part
of this mess was that some
Lecanto parents in the stands
then started to yell racial slurs
of their own at members of the
opposing team.
The behavior was a disgrace
and an embarrassment for all
of Citrus County.
The game officials, using
some good judgment, canceled
the rest of the game. (Lecanto
was already losing 41-0).
Our use of the "black" and
"white" designations were
important, we felt, to help
explain the racial aspect of the
confrontation. Most of us would
hope that such blatant racism
does not exist in our communi-
ty, but the behavior that Friday
night proves otherwise.
The actions of the football
players might be written off to
the high emotions and testos-
terone that game-night pro-



SHADES
Continued from Page 1C
grumbled from across the
table. He clarified that his
upset was only his concern, not
mine.
Minutes after we closed on
the house, we went there - me
checking out my new digs and
he:loading up his tractor and
other valuables. Some of the
personal effects were left for
me to do with as I wished. Most
were discarded. A "Parking
with Handicapped Permit
Only" sign remains on a tree in
the yard - in a spot no dis-
abled person would choose if
coming to visit.


rant that runs her
business (being)
intoxicated day after
day after day? Is there
a law against that? Or
just because you own
h'a the business, you're
-V < allowed to get as
,.*1 drunk as you want?
Just curious.

0579 Saving Inverness
In answer to the let-
ter about the call-in
about the sinkhole in Morrison
Pool: That is not the responsi-
bility of the city of Inverness;
it's the responsibility of
Swiftmud and the county. It's a
lake system. In regards to
Cooter Pond - that money'
came from grants that the city
received. If you're so interested
in saving Inverness, attend the
meetings.
Pull the weeds
Beautiful downtown
Inverness. People coming in


duces. The actions of the par-
ents in the stands are beyond
any reasonable explanation.
Some readers complained
that the newspaper made this a
racial incident by reporting the
race of the players involved.
That's not what happened.
This was a racial incident and
the Chronicle is not going to
ignore it because it makes peo-
ple uncomfortable and embar-
rassed.
On the positive side, LHS
Principal Kelly Tyler and foot-
ball coach Ron Allan had very
appropriate reactions to the
melee. Principal Tyler was
forthcoming about the incident
and publicly expressed his dis-
appointment with the football
players and the parents. He
pledged that actions would be
taken against the players
involved.
He also promised to try to
identify the parents who creat-
ed the problem in the stands
and ban them from future foot-
ball games.
That would certainly send


It was clear that this was a
pivotal point in his life. He was
moving on. This old fishing
cabin contained too many
memories.
Still, he seemed like a man
who was on the move and on
top of the world. The wife I met
was gracious and a good bal-
ance between a man who was
packing up his memories and a
stranger who was moving into
the old Cracker cabin on the
lake.
Noting that he was in the
construction business, he told
me that the center part of the.
house was the entire structure
when he bought the place. He
moved the house closer to the
lake, added a screened porch,


see first the weed-infested
Cooter Pond in the pond and
along the banks - a real eye-
sore. Let the builders pull the
weeds and trim the bushes
along the banks and give us
something we could be proud
of when the people come into
our beautiful city.
Hiring consultants
I'm wondering why our com-
missioners must always hire
consultants at exorbitant fees
to conduct a study for their
needs for space. Why can't they
figure this out for themselves?
Shouldn't this be part of their
responsibilities? It appears they
would rather spend money for
consultants rather than use
common sense and better judg-
ment for the taxpayers. They
usually don't act on the con-
sultants' recommendations any-
way. Oh well, it's just taxpayers'
money, so tax, tax, tax and
spend, spend, spend. Thank
you, commissioners.


out the message that this type
of behavior - especially from
adults - will not be tolerated.
* On the aggravation scale
the John Couey murder trial
probably produced the largest
amount of feedback we've got-
ten in a long time. Many read-
ers objected every time we put
Couey's picture in the paper
because, they complained, he
didn't deserve the notoriety.
Readers also complained
that it was inappropriate that
the taxpayers had to pick up
the legal bill to defend Couey
Couey's notoriety was of an
evil kind. And while it's true
that Couey's legal bill will
probably be a six-figure
expense, that's a cost that has
to be incurred.
Our judicial system, and the
constitutional guarantees we
provide to even the most evil of
our citizens, is the measure of
our definition of justice. That is
especially true when a defen-
dant faces the possibility of the
death penalty. A vigorous
defense must be provided, and


a bedroom and a bathroom,
then built a garage where the
house previously stood.
There was a history to the
house - including good times
turned bad - and it seemed to
pain him to say good-bye.

Now, nearly a dozen years
later, the man who sold me that
home has made Page 1 head-
lines in the Tampa Bay metro
newspapers for the past week.
This time, I read that while
his life had spiraled upward in
the political arena, it came
crashing down amid allega-
tions of child sexual abuse. An
investigation was launched
after an unnamed person
called the state's child abuse


Iraq mission
Former U.N. inspectors
Richard Butler and Scott
Ritter have stated that Iraqi
WMDs were destroyed or
sealed during inspections that
ended in 1998. Chief Inspector
Hans Blix in 2003 maintained
there were no WMDs in Iraq,
despite middle-of-the-night
telephone calls from
Administration officials giving
them specific sites to check,
which had no WMDs. Sealed
sites were still sealed. Hussein
Kamal, when he defected in
1995, said he had personally
seen to the destruction of all
weapons. (Saddam later talked
Kamal into returning to Iraq,
where he was murdered.) Paul
Wolfowitz: "For bureaucratic
reasons, we settled on one
issue, weapons of mass
destruction, because it was the
one reason everyone could
agree on."
Tyler Drumheller, former
CIA chief of clandestine opera-
tions in Europe, has long main-
tained that President Bush was
briefed by George Tenet in
September 2002 that there
were no WMDs in Iraq. Bush
dismissed the information as
worthless, even though it came
from the Iraq Foreign Minister,
Naji Sabri, the only Iraqi gov-
ernmental official who did not
have his face on a playing card.
Sidney Blumenthal, in an arti-
cle last week, has written that
two former CIA senior officers
have confirmed Drumheller's ,
account. CIA officials have
written of the pressure to
change their assessments.
Congress was never told of
Sabri's information.
We know that the yellow
cake claims were false. We
know that the aluminum tube


if the defendant is indigent, the
public must pay the bill.
There is a cost involved in
being serious about constitu-
tional rights. Lots of other
countries have the rights on
paper, but that's where the
guarantee stops. In the United
States, we must demonstrate
the financial willingness to
really provide those rights.
Even when it comes to some-
one as despicable and evil as
John Couey.
E We've also had a number of
reader calls - and Sound Off
calls - complaining about our
coverage of the firing of assis-
tant county administrator Tom
Dick
At the root of the criticism
has been the argument that the
newspaper shouldn't question
county government. While
some of those calls probably
came from the county attor-
ney's office, there are some
people who believe that the
actions of the county adminis-
trator shouldn't be questioned.
While it might make some


hotline a week and a half ago.
"... St Petersburg City
Council Chairman John Bryan
kills himself," a St. Petersburg
Times headline read, in part.

While I'd only had two or
three encounters with him, he
made an impression. He
seemed a little brash, kind of
guarded, sharp-minded and,
under the right circumstances,
jovial and friendly
News reports about his funer-
al service reflect a numbing mix
of emotions among genuine
acquaintances and friends.
What if the allegations are
wrong? What if the allegations
are right? How do friends react
when someone they really like


claims were false. We know the
mobile weapons labs were
false. Bush admitted that Iraq
had nothing to do with 9/11,
even though he couples this
date with Iraq in his propagan-
da speeches. Bush has admit-
ted that Iraq and al-Qaida had
no connection until we invaded
Iraq.
The reasons for the Iraq
Attack have changed regularly,
as do the means to measure
progress. We have turned so
many corners as to be
labyrinthian. It is more and
more apparent that we went
into an unnecessary war based
upon fiction.
Just what is the mission? It
seems to be to keep the war
going long enough for its bur-
den to fall upon the next presi-
dent
Mr. President, shame, shame,
shame.
Marilyn J. Day
Beverly Hills
Healthy children
If we are serious about giv-
ing every child the opportunity
for a good life and a good edu-
cation, and if we are serious
about strengthening Florida's
future, then we need to make
sure every child in Florida has
access to quality, affordable
health care.
Children's health insurance
is one of the best partnerships
in our nation. The federal gov-
ernment, the states, nonprofits
and parents all join together to
help ensure quality health care
for our kids. Like you, I strong-
ly believe no parent in Florida.
should have to worry about
being able to afford to take a
sick child to the doctor, no sick
child should go without health
care and no child should go
without preventative health


folks uncomfortable, that's not
going to happen.
One of the roles a newspaper
plays is to question and criti-
cize the actions of those elect-
ed - or appointed - to spend
public money and do the work
of the people.
In the Tom Dick case, the ter-
mination of the 25-year
employee was so bungled and
mishandled that it was almost
funny. The humor disappears
when you realize how easy it is
for politics to ruin someone's
life.
Not a day goes by that this
newspaper doesn't publish
something that makes people
angry. And there are certainly
times our logic may be lacking.
It's appreciated when readers
will take the time to write a
note or make a telephone call
to question us.


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His e-
mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


may have committed an intol-
erable offense? Was his suicide
an admission of guilt?
In the case of child abuse,
victims are the No. 1 concern.
It seems an added tragedy,
though, when a man who had a
zeal for life, many friends and a
commitment to public service
did something - or had an
overwhelming concern about
allegations of having done
something - that leads to sui-
cide.
It's a tragedy on all fronts.


Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Citrus County Chronicle. He
can be e-mailed at cbrennan
@chronicleonline.com.


care. And that is why Florida's
KidCare program is so impor-
tant
Current estimates are that
more than a half-million
Florida children are without
health insurance of any kind.
(Agency for Health Care
Administration, Florida Health
Insurance Study at 3). The
KidCare program is designed
to provide coverage to children
whose parents do not qualify
for Medicaid, and who do not
make enough income to afford
private health insurance.
In 2004, the legislature enact-
ed changes to the KidCare pro-
gram that actually made it
more difficult for parents to
enroll their children and keep
them enrolled in this critical
program.
Children' health care is not
a partisan issue. A package of
reforms was proposed in this
year's legislative session with
wide, bipartisan support
including Gov. Charlie Crist,
DFO Alex Sink and most leg-
islative leaders, but the
Legislature failed to act on this
important reform bill.
I ask you to join me and con-
tact your state legislators and
state senators and urge them to
take up this urgent piece of leg-
islation in the upcoming
September legislative special
session. The health and future
of hundreds of thousands of
our children are at risk Our
kids deserve better, and they
can't wait until 2008.
Suzan Franks
Hernando


r' -.---- .

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CITRUS COUNIY(111) CHRONICLE


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uTrrI I~ ( Iruv Irv (PLj tA (7,4vrcFC M E TA YSNA SiTMFR 6 07


Mosquito control
I'm curious about something.
Maybe you could explain about
how the county works. I'm
from up North and I've been
down here about 28 years.
When I lived up North we never
heard of mosquito control and
nobody did it. When we moved
down in Florida, they never told
us that it was an option that we
had to have mosquito control,
that it was a guaranteed thing.
I never heard about mosquito
control until I saw them go by
one day. I always thought it
was just something that the
county gave you. Are we paying
for it? I hear a lot of people
complaining about where are
the mosquito control, but I
never knew that it was auto-
matic. I thought, you know,
that mosquitoes come. You
know, if they want to spray our
street, they do it. But I mean I
don't think that it's a must.
Can you holler at them
because they don't come? I
mean, I don't understand that.
I just thought it was something
the county gave you as a gift. I
don't think that people should
complain. I mean they're doing
a good job at what they're
doing. The mosquitoes are
going to be there. If you don't
like them, buy some mosquito-
control ointment and put it on
your arms or something, like
we used up North.
Ribbon funds
I've been buying these rib-
bons that you stick on your car
- the bows to support the sol-
diers overseas, our troops -
and I'm curious, where does


the money go? Do these people
that sell them in flea markets
and stuff like that, do they save
the money? Do they
keep the money? Do
they give it to the S
Veterans
Administration? Where
does the money go
when everybody buys
these bows to support
the troops? Where is
that money going? Is
it going in somebody's CALL
pocket or is it actually 563
going to support the 000
troops?
Leftover books
I would like to suggest, if
other arrangements have not
already been made, that some
of the books left over from the
book sale in October be distrib-
uted among the veterans' hos-
pitals and nursing homes. Also,
maybe some of the local nurs-
ing homes and assisted living
facilities would like to have a
few books to add to their
libraries.
Memorial vandalized
I'd like to know why the news
media is not reporting the fact
that the Vietnam Memorial in
Washington was vandalized. It
was done during the weekend,
sometime on Sept. 8 or 9. Is
this another one of your cen-
sorships by omission by not
reporting it? Come on now, get
on the ball and start giving the
news the way it's supposed to
be given.
Unfair comment
Your editorial on Sept. 11
about FWC giving manatees a


I







.'


raw deal is way out of line. FWC
doesn't want to cut its posi-
tions, but it's forced to because
of the budget crunch.
5 Also, many FWC. patrol
officers have left and
actually quit because
Florida's one of the
lowest-paid state offi-
cers jobs in the coun-
try. Additionally, now
with positions cut,
FWC officers will have
twice the areas of cov-
0579 erage. They're making
ul57 less money than the
Citrus County dog-
catcher. Even with all
this, because of the hard work
by FWC officers, the manatee
numbers continue to improve.
Yet in your editorial you say,
"FWC deserves the public's
scorn." How fair is that?
Made in USA
Where can I buy a steam iron
and a pop-up toaster for my
wife that's made in the USA?
Please help.
River dying
I'm calling in reference to the
article in Sunday's paper about
the Withlacoochee River dying.
That's true. I used to collect the
vegetation on my banks and lay
it between the rows in my gar-
den back in 1999, 2000 and
2001. In 2001, it started dying
off and there's no vegetation
left. It's a shame. This stuff was
great for my garden. And anoth-
er fact is that I can't even use
the water to irrigate my garden
anymore. It will kill my pepper
plants and a lot of my garden
plants. It's a shame. I often
wondered what was causing it.


Valet parking
I'm calling about the valet
parking at Citrus Memorial
Hospital. I was there this after-
noon and I heard people talking
that they're going to disband it
by the end of this year. I find it
very ironic that they had a serv-
ice that was very well accepted
by the community for two years
and now they're just going to
up and take it away from us
elderly people and people with
handicaps.
Harder look
It's unfortunate that in this
day and age, certain people
have to come under a micro-


scope or come to the attention
of investigations, such as the
two Egyptian students that
were found to have explosives
in their car near a U.S. military
facility. But unfortunately, you
know, I mean just like that pro-
fessor from the same college
was getting away with these
things for years, we have to
take a harder look at the peo-
ple who are doing it, and actu-
ally it is the ones from Asia
and your Arab countries. It's
unfortunate, but it's going to
happen.
Local experts
I just wanted to say that I
miss the "Everyday *


Cheapskate" column, but I do
enjoy Jane's Garden, and it's
about time you went with some
local people ... We have some
wonderful designers here and I
think you're doing a good start
with Jane. Keep up the good
work.
Columns missed
I'm sorry you dropped the
"Everyday Cheapskate" and
"Mr. Handyperson" columns in
the Sunday paper. There was
always a lot of useful informa-
tion in them. Their replace-
ments just don't cut it. Now
there are only real estate ads,
so I guess I can just skip that
section entirely.


SUNDAY, SFPTEMBER 16, 2007 SC


COMMENTARY


CTrrui nowi7v /TFL) CRnNrcL


IL





ft S3UINDAY, oIr EnfEMBR 0, VU


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Crazy for fried chicken


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chain, which is ranked 70th in the nati
top restaurant chains based on sales,
to Restaurants & Institutions magazine
Last month, the privately held compE
restaurants reported a net income of$
lion for the 26 weeks ended June 30. a
cent increase o\er the $1.256 millic
income it reported for the same peri
ago. The company Nwas puirchased iin N
2005 by affiliates ufthe Newi .Irk-bas
investment firm Trimaran Capital L
company management
El Polio Loco is under contract % with
ny led by a formerChu rch's Chicken ex
open 50( restaurants in the Atlanta ar
next six \ears. The chain also plans;
restaurants in the Orlando and Tampa
Charlotte. N.C.. and in Norfolk, Va.
'"We think the South is ready for
Loco." Carley said "'We have a high lev
fidence this is going to be a big winner
Although grilled chicken is not ne
South - it's often found on backyard(
labor of love for w weekend chefs - it's n
ditional focus of Southern palates, sai
Edge, director of the University of Mis
Southern Food ays Alliance


on's list of
according
any of 340
1588 mil-
26 4 per-
)n in net
od a year
November
Led equity
.L.C and


GENE BLYTHEI;.: -.c.I-, Picti
Robert Bowman, a 67-year-old retired postal worker, eats at the newly opened El Polio Loco restaurant
that features Mexican-style grilled chicken, Sept. 5, in Hiram. Ga.


"\\e tend to armue about the foods to which we


the South, testimony to the tact that tried ciick-


are .devoted - fried chicken and barbecue." en is a Southern staple." said Kirk Waisner. \ice
a compa- Edge said. "Nobody's fussing and fighting over president of menu development for Pope.es
ecutive to grilled chicken in the South." Chicken & Biscuits.
*ea in the Indeed, the South's chicken ON THE NET Most of the country's "major
s to open wars tend to be of the tried vari- chicken players" in the $15.1
* areas, in ety Some of the nation's Top 100 U El Pollo Loco: billion industry of limited serv-
restaurant chains built upon htp: www.elpolloloco.corn. ice chicken chains - which
El Pollo their success serving up fried includes fried chicken outlets
el of con- chicken in the South. including - are based in the South. said
Louisville, K%.-based KFC, which is part of' Yum Darren Tristano, executive \ice president of the
-w to the Brands Inc.; the Atlanta-based chains Chick-fil-A Chicago-based Technomic Inc. a research and
d _rills. a and Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits: San Antonio- consulting firm that serves the food industry.
ot the tra- based Church's Chicken. Charlotte, N.C.-based If successful. El Polio Loco's move into the
d John T. Bojangles' Restaurants Inc.: and Athens, Ga.- heavily competitive Southern market gives the
ssissippi's based Zaxby's.
"The heaviest weighting of our outlets are in Please see '. '"''. /Page 2D
|:


Free software can open mystery attachment


Ros PEGORARO
The Washington Post


Q: Some of my buddies' e-mails show
up with an unopenable attachment
called "winmail.dat" Am I at fault, or are
my friends?
A. You can blame your pals, but the
responsibility properly falls on
Microsoft, whose Outlook e-mail pro-
gram can format messages in a way that
puzzles other mail software.
So instead of seeing the "rich text" for-
matting of the original message, you get a


Help FILE


plain-text copy, plus a mysterious "win-
mail.dat" attached file.
You can read these attachments with
extra software. If you run Windows, try
the free Winmail Opener
(www.eolsoftcom). If you use Mac OS X,
a shareware program called OMiC
(www.restorootorg) will let Apple's Mail
program read these attachments. It costs
about $14.
But you shouldn't feel compelled to
add any software because winmail.dat


files almost never contain any useful
information. I opened the last 10 mes-
sages to arrive with a winmail.dat attach-
ment in OMiC; my only reward for that
work was seeing each message in a dif-
ferent typeface or two.
If your copy of Outlook has been a
source of winmail.dat pollution, you can
change its behavior. See the tech-support
article at
support.microsoft.com/kb/278061 for
instructions on how to turn off this


annoying defect
Q: Should I use DVD-R or DVD+R
media with my DVD recorder?
A With any reasonably new DVD burn-
er, you can buy whichever kind of disc
happens to be cheaper. Both work just as
well. (For very long recordings, look for
"DVD+R DE' blanks, which offer twice
as much storage space as usual.)
Old DVD burners, however, often
accept only one of the two main formats
for recordable discs. To be sure, look on
the front of the recorder or in its manual
to see what formats it will accept


Department stores often offer 'super' grocery savings


As I've mentioned in
recent weeks, grocery
prices are rising. To stay
ahead of the savings game,
smart shoppers may want to
consider some non-
traditional grocery-
shopping options.
I have always been
a traditional super-
market shopper, pri-
marily because I am
a coupon user and
supermarkets tend to
have the most gener-
ous coupon policies. Stephan
Supermarkets also COU
have a "high-low" M4
pricing strategy,
meaning they feature
deeply discounted
sale items each week (known as
"loss leaders"). Combining a
loss leader with a double
coupon generally results in
the lowest possible price


on an item.
However, there are other
smart savings strategies avail-
able at nontraditional grocery
alternatives, such as discount
stores. Both Wal-
Mart and Target sell
some grocery items.
Both chains have
opened "super" ver-
sions of their stores
in some cities that
feature an expanded
selection of grocery
items including
e Nelson meats, produce and
PON frozen items. In
O1M recent weeks, I have
been researching
specific grocery
prices at both of
these stores and added weekly
deals lists (matching prices
with coupons available) to the
Coupon Mom Web site. In many
cases, I have seen that the dis-


count store's grocery deals
have been lower than my gro-
cery stores' deals.
I recently took a TV reporter
shopping at our local Super
Target Remember, the key to
saving on groceries is to know
how to save the most by
researching the store's savings
programs and combining them
when possible. Super Target
has a number of attractive sav-
ings programs. First, they have
a pricing strategy that is not
limited to weekly loss leaders.
They do have a few sale items
featured in their weekly ad, but
they do not have an abundance
of "buy one, get one free" deals
or half-off prices for dozens of
items as supermarkets do. They
do not double coupons but they
do accept grocery coupons at
face value.
I began by comparing the reg-
ular prices for a list of 20 com-


mon grocery items to the regu-
lar prices for the same items at
my grocery store (which was
five minutes from this particu-
lar Super Target). In every case,
the regular price was lower at
Target, and on average the
prices were 28 percent less
than the grocery store prices. I
plan to do a more detailed
price comparison with 100
items to further test this theory.
In addition to everyday low
prices, shoppers can save more
by printing store coupons
directly from the Web site
Targetcom. Shoppers do not
have to register for the
coupons. If the Target store
coupon is for a brand name
item that also has a manufac-
turers' coupon available from
the newspaper (or other
source), shoppers can combine
the two coupons to save the
most on a single item. I was


able to do this with a few items,
paying only 34 cents for
Pillsbury Toaster Strudel and
$1.34 for Nature Valley granola
bars. Target also had printable
store coupons for some of their
own store brands, so I paid only
74 cents for Target's Market
Pantry brand of granola bars
and 59 cents for their hamburg-
er buns. I paid only $1.99 per
pound for extra lean ground
beef using a $1.50 off coupon
from Target's Web site. Even if
your city does not have a Super
Target, you can print Target's
coupons and use them at your
standard Target store that prob-
ably has a small grocery section
with some of these items.

Stephanie Nelson shares her
savings tips as a regular con-
tributor on ABC News'
"Good Morning America."


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


,- -' - . t, ' - -' ,' " , , , ' " �. . . - :


California grilled chicken

chain takes on the

deep-fried South

DANIEL YEE
Associa ted Press
HIRAJ\l, Ga. - Robert B:,wnman loves his
chicken, especially \\hen it's breaded and
loaded in a fieir.
"When I go on a trip, that's all I'll eat is fried
chicken. I just like tried chicken." the 67-y ear-old
retired postal worker says.
But duirin12 a recent innch at a restaurant near
his home, the poultry on Bowman's plate was
prepared differently t'romi the Southern style he
%was used to. Instead o' being fried. it was grilled
and marinated w ith citrus. herb; and spices
It's pailrt o'f a moe by a
Calit, ornia-based fast
tood chain to sell
Mexican-style grilled
Nobody's chicken deep inside the
deep-t'ried South and
fussing and begin expanding beyond
it, West Coast markets.
fighting over -We're giving the
111 u South, which loves its
grilled chicken, a healthy.
chicken in wholesome e alternative
to tried chicken." said
the South. Steve Carley. CEO or
Irvine, Calif.-based El
Polio Loco Inc. (pro-
nou nced El Po-yo Lo-col.
The suburban Atlanta
hic - a restaurant, which
aboul chicken and
Soulhernm od opened at the end of
ALeLust, is the first
Southern location for the


i
Cl


Tenants


should


spell out


lease

DEAR BRUCE: We are
in the process of build-
ing a home, so we've
had to rent for a short period
of time. The landlord charged
the outgoing tenant for clean-
ing the carpets and painting.
Many years have passed since
I've rented: Is it normal for the
owner to expect this from ten-
ants? - LP., via e-mail
DEAR LP.: If the lease
spells it out, yes. If it's a long-
term lease, the landlord will
pay for things like painting and
cleaning. If the tenants leave
after a year and the paint is
beat up or heavy smoking has
stained the walls, the landlord
can reasonably look to the ten-
ant for reimbursement.
Cleaning is quite another mat-
ter. Most leases have some ref-
erence to cleaning, but the
problem is that one person's
clean is another person's filthy
Many tenants will move out
and swear the place was spot-
less. A dispassionate observer
must suggest otherwise.
It is to each party's advan-
tage to have the details spelled
out in the lease and do walk-
throughs in the beginning and
at the end. This way, there will
be no disagreement about the
condition at the outset and the
conclusion of the tenancy To
protect yourself, just make
sure you have made note, in
writing to the landlord, of
potential problems: damaged
carpet areas, paint problems, a
broken appliance - you get
the picture.
DEAR BRUCE: What are
the limitations on a Roth IRA
account? Is there a combined-
income limit for couples? -
MA, via e-mail
DEAR MA: If a single per-
son is allowed to earn $95,000,
a married couple can have a
combined income of $150,000.
If you exceed that amount in
any year, you are not allowed
to make a contribution to a
Roth account However, exist-
ing Roths may continue to
work and earn interest without
penalty.
DEAR BRUCE: I have been
putting money into a Roth IRA,
but haven't pulled the trigger
on investing it. I'm gun-shy
over previous investments that
have gone badly. The good
news is that the money is in a
Roth, and the bad news is that
it's just sitting there. Should I
invest it all at once, or should I
use dollar-cost averaging? I
have to admit being nervous
about seeing the market hit-
ting all-time highs, knowing
that a reversal is in the cards.
- D.K, via e-mail ,
DEAR D.K: I don't know
exactly what you are talking
about How do you put money
into a Roth without investing it
in something? A third party is
managing your investments,
and he just can't put it in his
back pocket and wait for you. It
may be in some type of day-to-
day money-market account
with his firm, but it's doing
something. As to your invest-
ment strategies, dollar-cost
averaging - whatever that is
- is entirely your choice.
Without question, a stock-mar-
ket reversal is coming. When it
will happen, and to what
extent, no one knows. But hav-
ing money sit around doing lit-
tle or nothing is a tragedy
DEAR BRUCE: I am work-
ing toward settling one of two
debts by the end of this year
Should I pay off a car loan with

Please see MONEY/Page 3D


,siness








'U SLINDAY, SEP'TFMB51 16, 2007


Business DIGEST


GENE BLYTHE/ Associated Press
Chris Elliott, right, CEO of Fiesta Brands, Inc., and business partner Joe Uhl, left, talk Sept. 5 about
the newly opened El Polio Loco restaurant in Hiram, Ga. Fiesta Brands Inc., has contracted with El
Polio Loco to open 50 new restaurants.


CHICKEN
Continued from Page 1D

company a good chance to
become a national chain
instead of remaining a region-
al West Coast brand, Tristano
said.
"The more they are able to
grow in larger cities in the
East, the stronger their brand
is, which allows them to lever-


age their adver-
tising, market-
ing and cus-
tomer loyalty as
their brand
grows," he said.
Once in the
South, Carley
said, the chain
will stick to its
roots, meaning
fried chicken
won't be served
anytime soon.
The chain is
banking on the
view that offer-
ing grilled
chicken instead
of fried food
will be attrac-


The ch
banking
view that
grilled c
instead
food v
attract
region
struggle
obese


tive in a region that struggles
with obesity.
Last month Mississippi was
named the first state to pass
the 30 percent mark of adults
considered obese, with


For the same size chicken breast,
if you fry one vs. grill it, it's about
300 calories difference.

Chris Elliiot
Fiesta Brands Inc. CEO, about health benefits.


Alabama and West Virginia not
far behind, according to the
Trust for America's Health, a
research group
main is that focuses on
disease preven-
on the tion.
"Everybody I
t offering think needs to
change .their
chickenn eating habits,"
said Kimberly
of fried Newkirk, a 38-
year-old nurse
vill be from Dallas,
yie in a Ga., who came
vIre in a to El Pollo Loco
that at a friend's rec-
ommendation.
es with Chris Elliott
is a former
sity. Church' s
Chicken COO
and the CEO of
Fiesta Brands Inc., which has
contracted with El Pollo Loco
to open the 50 new restau-
rants. He said grilling the
chicken provides "healthy
overtones."


"For the same size chicken
breast if you fry one vs. grill it,
it's about 300 calories differ-
ence," he said.
El Pollo Loco's plan of attack
also includes a year's worth of
marketing to people who live
within a few miles of a store,
including offers to try the
chicken for free. In addition to
Hiram, the chain initially will
focus on suburban Atlanta. In
January the company plans to
open a restaurant inside the
city.
"We know we do have to
work to get in people's consid-
erations, we have to change
their routines," Carley said.
Bowman said he's not sure
all lovers of fried chicken will
turn to the grilled variety. But
he hopes many will at least try
it.
"That's the way Southerners
are - a bunch of them will
stick to fried chicken,"
Bowman said. "But when
something new comes to them,
they'll get used to it."


Employee of the
quarter announced
Katherine Scarpello, front
office administrator and rehab
tech at the Beverly Hills SPORT,
has been named the employee
of the quarter. Ms. Scarpello has
been employed by SPORT for 18
months.
She was nominated by her
peers and selected from others
by senior management based on
teamwork, attendance, profes-
sionalism, willingness to con-
tribute, customer feedback, loyal-
ty and flexibility.
SPORT has 27 clinics that are
located on the Gulf Coast. Our
clinics provide outpatient physi-
cal therapy services in:
* Beverly Hills, 352-527-8489
3400 N. Lecanto Highway, or
* Inverness, 352-341-3740
302 S. Line Ave.
Benefit for
family planned
Stixx Billiards is hosting a ben-
efit for the David Murphy family,
Sept. 15 at 1 p.m. Barbecue by
Wendy. Door prizes, drawings
and horseshoes, with a pool
tournament at 4 p.m. Live music
and karaoke for your entertain-
ment.
Stop by and help us with this
worthy cause.
Donations for auction accept-
ed anytime.
Stixx Billiards, 3283 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, in
the Golden Eagle Plaza next to
A-Z. Call 628-0432.


REX store to close
in Crystal River
DAYTON, Ohio - REX Stores
announces the REX TV store at
2061 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River,
has been sold and the premises
must be vacated.
The nearby REX TV stores at
3055 S.W. College Road in Ocala
and 8522 U.S. 441 in leesburg are
unaffected by the event. Regional
Vice president David Hyatt said all
the employees of the Crystal River
store are being offered positions in
the nearby REX TV stores, and all
warranty issues will be handled by
those stores.
"REX TV is very appreciative of
the many thousands of customers
we have had the privilege of serv-
ing over the past 13 years," Hyatt
stated, "and we look forward to
continuing to serve each and every
one of them from our Ocala and
Leesburg location."
REX Stores Corp. operates as a
specialty retailer in the consumer
electronics and appliance industry.
As of July 2007, REX operated
142 stores in 35 states.
Local designer taps
into creative power
Budget Print Center graphic
designer Jo Ann Manna recently
attended the Conference for
Photoshop Users in Orlando. The
information-packed event moti-
vates designers to unleash their
creative power and produce high
quality images using Adobe
Photoshop software.
Budget Print Center relies on


Adobe Photoshop and other
design software to create eye-
catching designs for printed materi-
al. As well,
Photoshop allows
Budget Print
Center designers
to color correct
photographs,
improve
grayscale images
and add fascinat-
ing special effects Jo Ann
- all of which Manna
lead to a higher
quality printed product.
The conference is an annual
event that shares the newest tips,
tricks and special effects with
designers all around the nation. By
attending, Manna gained access to
the same techniques used by top
industry professionals.
Budget Print Center, part of
Mackler Graphics Inc., is at 912
N.E. Fifth St. (State Road 44) in
Crystal River. Call 795-1232.

PHOTO GUIDE
* Photos need to be in
sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in
proper exposure: neither
too light nor too dark.
* Include your name,
address and phone num-
ber on all photos.
* For more information,
call Linda Johnson,'news-
room coordinator, at
563-5660.


I __


Complimentary Cocktails at Six
Fine Dining at Seven
Dancing until Midnight


Cornplimnenlary * clel Fork.ng


UrmoUsip-'neer..~e Hrn',C-


CHRoNi(diE


Saturday, October 13, 2007
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club

Call for reservations

352.527.2020
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org
"Il proc e,':t, ,-ne M PIC? a of Citrus County


Lunset Fosrtival

SSaturday, September 22


From 4-9

Fort Island Qulf Beach


CHRONICLE


Applaud the sunset Key West Style among the

Music - Entertainment - Food - Arts
- Crafts - Family Fun
For more information call 422-7910


When You Use The Advertising Power Of

The Chronicle And Add Chronicle Direct Mail,

You Will Reach Over



68,000 Households!



For more information call

352-563-5592.
C I T W& U C ITCItRU'6 CO CO U N T Y U -UNTY



724774


1rr T-.YTVIc C


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOS$ICt
OF CITRUS COUNTY INC. s-
Licensed 1985 r :. . ....


i


1 0%0% - -- - - -- �nn








SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007 3D


Older workers shift employer perceptions


JONATHAN PETERSON
Los Angeles Times

Every time John Remore
steps up to his work station to
form a piece of sheet metal, he
brings an intangible asset to
the job: 42 years of experience,
dating to lessons from his
father.
Remore, 60, doesn't brag, but
that won't stop his boss.
"He's invaluable. He is price-
less," said Kellie Johnson,
president of El Segundo, Calif.-
based Ace Clearwater
Enterprises, which makes
parts for big aerospace compa-
nies.
Johnson worries that when
Remore and others of his gen-
eration retire, she will find it
almost impossible to replace
their skills. The average age of
her work force
is 48. From 2
"We're in the
fight of our lives 2014,
for skilled tal-
ent," said who are
Johnson, whose d i
grandfather older will
launched the at four t
business in the four t
1940s welding rate of la
bicycles, coffee
pots and tools. growth
"Looking for-
ward, that will
be the No. 1


issue that affects our ability to
compete in the global market-
place, without a doubt"
In a society that exalts youth,
older workers might feel like
outcasts of the economy -
prodded into early retirement
by corporate buyouts, over-
i[ looked for training and promo-
l' tions, typecast by younger man-
agers as past their prime.
One 2005 study found that


YourEncoi


can hell

Los Angeles Times

A potential brain drain as
baby boomers leave the U.S.
| work force has led at least one
-company to carve out a role
linking aging scientists and
engineers with companies in
need of their talents.
; "When they retire they find
themselves wanting to remain
i engaged," said Brad Lawson,
chief executive of Indianapolis-
based YourEncore. "We pro-
vide them with an outlet"
As it turns out, a lot of
employers wish to engage their
services, typi-
cally for short-
term projects. W
Started - in
2003 with early retire tl
support from
i:Proctor & them
Gamble, Eli
Lilly & Co. and wanting 1
Boeing Co.,
YourEncore engage
has expanded
to a network of
more than 20
companies in a
growing range
Sof industries, including med-
ical devices, food and defense.
At the same time, its pool of
retirees has grown from 300 to
3,000.
The numbers underscore the
reality that individuals with
coveted technical skills - even
those who have reached retire-
ment age - remain valued
commodities.
In one case, YourEncore
linked a retired rocket scientist
who was expert in avalanche


ti


job applicants under age 50
were 42 percent more likely to
be called for interviews than
those over 50.
Yet there might be early
glimmers of change.
The oldest baby boomers are
starting to enter their 60s, rais-
ing the prospect of a vast wave
of retirements. The post-World
War II baby boom, moreover,
was followed by a smaller
"baby bust" generation. As a
result, some employers are
worried that they will lose too
many people - and are pio-
neering policies to make the
workplace more friendly to
older employees.
"I think we're beginning to
see a much bYoader range of-
options and opportunities for
mature workers," said Diane
Piktialis, a specialist in older-
worker issues
007 to with the
Conference
workers Board, a busi-
ness research
55 and organization in
New York "This
increase is an area
times the where there's
just enormous
bor force room for cre-
ativity in terms
overall. of how compa-
nies can adapt."
Concerns are
particularly
acute in the areas of manufac-
turing, health care and govern-
ment. In the 3-million member
federal work force, for exam-
ple, 6 of 10 employees could
retire over the next decade,
prompting a recent congres-
sional proposal to lure retirees
back to work with- financial
incentives.
In other cases, some compa-
nies are showing a willingness


re network


p retires


ON THE NET
* ','ourEncore:
wwwi.yourenccr e com

prediction with a consumer
products company that wanted"
to reduce the clumps in pow-
dered detergent.
In another, it hooked up a
retired expert on miniature
electric motors with a company
that wanted to develop such a
motor for a hand-held appli-
ance.
A retired chemist from the
photography
industry
hen they helped a com-
pany produce
ley find a hair dye that
was .less abra-.
elves sive to the
scalp.
to remain Retirees can
register with
d. YourEncore
for free by
ad Lawson going to its Web
about retirees. s t e
www.youren-
core.com.
Companies, which pay a fee,
then can search the database
for the expertise they seek The
experts become employees of
YourEncore, which pays them
at their former wage level
adjusted for inflation, plus a 20,
percent premium.
"Really sophisticated, spe-
cialized skill is in demand
someplace in the world by
someone," Lawson said.
"Making that connection is
what we do for retirees."


It really makes sense - from an
employment perspective - for us to
target individuals who are over 50,
because so much of our consumer
population is over 50.

Suzann Trevisan
about hiring older workers.


to make work schedules more
flexible, an approach much
desired by older employees.
At CVS pharmacies, more
than 1,000 employees take part.
in a "snhowbird" program that
allows them to migrate
between stores throughout the
country as the seasons change.
Pharmacist Bill Duclos, 80,
shifts his part-time job in
Massachusetts every October
for a CVS store in Florida. The
arrangement lets him spend
part of the year in the
Northeast near his children,
grandchildren and a great-
grandchild, and part of the
year enjoying golf, shuffle-
board and card games in
Florida.
It also happens that his sea-
sonal pattern tracks business
realities, because the Florida
stores are much busier in the
winter, when snowbirds such
as Duclos show up.
Managers of the Rhode
Island-based chain of drug-
stores say there's another ben-
efit: Older workers are friend-
lier to customers and have a
better work ethic than their
younger counterparts.
"It gives us a competitive
advantage," said Steve Wing,
director of government affairs


for CVS, which began the snow-
bird effort as part of a broader
initiative to retain older
employees. "If we don't contin-
. ue to recruit.and train and
retain older people, we won't
have a business. We rely on
them. We need them."
Some retail executives con-
tend that older employees are
more tuned in to the needs of
aging customers.
In the book business, for
example, more than half of
consumers are over age 45, a
finding that prompted Borders
Group Inc. to intensify efforts
at employing middle-age work-
ers. Today, 16 percent of its
32,000 employees are over 50 -
up from 6 percent several years
ago.
"It really makes sense -
from an employment.perspec-
tive - for us to target individu-
als who are over 50, because so
much of our consumer popula-
tion is over 50," said Suzann
Trevisan, director of organiza-
tional development for
Borders Group in Ann Arbor,
Mich.
Although such views are not
in sync with much of popular
culture, they might become
more common as the popula-
tion gets older.-


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D.


APY IS/I


APY


About one-third of employ-
ers have adopted strategies to
help older workers work on
beyond the traditional retire-
ment age, according to a study
of 578 employers by Boston
College.
And, increasingly, older
workers may be a fact of busi-
ness life.
From 2007 to 2014, workers
who are 55 and older will
increase at four times the rate
of labor force growth overall.
During this same period,
younger age groups will grow
much more slowly The 78.2
million boomers, born from
1946 to 1964, are followed by a
generation that is about 16 per-
cent smaller
Starting in 2008, the oldest
baby boomers will turn 62,
qualifying for Social Security
early retirement benefits.
Some have predicted that
mass retirements by baby
boomers could trigger a short-
age of workers in the coming
years, depriving the U.S. econ-
omy of millions of needed
employees and an immeasura-
ble loss of skill.
But some economists say the
concerns .,are overblown.
Employers, can outsource jobs
overseas, they point out.
Companies can invest in labor-
saving technologies. They can
restructure jobs. And, econo-
mists argue, they can pay more
money to attract the workers
they require.
"I don't think there's any pos-
sibility of there being a major
shortage," said Richard B.
Freeman, a-labor economist at
Harvard University.
Still, some companies and
industries are bracing for an
exodus of boomers. Those with
the oldest workers, including


12-MONTH 24-MONTH
C.D. C.D.


30-MONTH
C.D.


APY


S/I APY


government, manufacturing,
utilities and transportation -,
as well as those already con-
tending with skill shortages,
such as the healthcare industry
- might face pressure to over-
haul benefits and other poli-
cies in a bid to recruit and
retain older workers, say
experts.
To help meet the need for
nurses, Massachusetts General
Hospital now provides training
for older nurses who wish to
return to their occupation but
are no longer current with the
latest technology.
"It's a pretty big thing to be
able to say, 'We'll be patient
and we're able to work with
you a little bit longer,' " said
Patricia Sheehan, a human
resources manager.
The hospital, she said, also
has installed lifts in intensive
care to make it easier for older
nurses to move heavy patients.
Nor is the issue limited to
the private sector.
Recently, Sen. Susan Collinls,
R-Maine, introduced a bill that
would enable federal agencies
to re-hire retired workers on a
part-time basis without the
usual penalty - a pay cut tied
to their retirement benefit.
"This legislation will prove
vital as the federal government
loses many of its skilled, expe-
rienced, senior employees,"
Collins said.
Some believe that employers
are starting to get the message.
Since 2001, AARP has put
together a list of "best employ-
ers" for workers over age 50,
based on recruitment prac-
tices, training and education
opportunities, benefits and
support of work options,
including flexible scheduling
and job sharing.


36-MONTH
C.D.


60-MONTH
C.D.


I r 1 7 I* 1 t t 7 7 I* -,


EDWARD JONES 4.47 4.57 .155.15 5.15 5.15 5.0 5.05 .90 4.90 N/A N/A 4.90 4.90 N/A N/A
(352)527-3700 -.-0'N/A
STATE FARM 1.64 1.65 4.74 4.85 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00 5.07 5.20 N/A N/A 5.02 5.15 4.88 5.00
Call your local agent
RAYMOND -JAMES N/A 4.75 4.64 4.73 4.64 4.75 4.88 4.90 4.78 5.00 N/A N/A 4.88 5.00 5.02 5.15

Please note: Banks and other financial institutions offer a wide variety of investment opportunities. Each institution has its own set of
requirements to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact these financial institutions directly for up-to-date information on the
options listed above, or inquire at your bank for other investment opportunities. Financial institutions interested in listing their rates
can call the Citrus County.Chronicle at 563-5660.


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

a 4.9 percent interest rate, a
balance of $17,086 and 44 pay-
ments or a tax-deductible sec-
ond-mortgage loan with 9 per-
cent interest, a balance- of-
$11,416 and 63 payments? -
S.D., via e-mail
DEAR S.D.: You did not
include your tax bracket. If you
are in a high bracket, taking
the deduction on the second
mortgage at 9 percent may put
you close to the 5 percent you
are paying on the automobile.
If I have a choice between an
automobile and a home, I
would rather reduce the debt
on my home, all things consid-
ered. But if there is a clear dol-
lar advantage, go with the one
that works for you. You have to
do the math, and it's relatively
simple. At the end of the year,
figure out the tax impact in dol-
lars on the home payments and
look at the number of non-tax-
deductible payments on the
car. Your answer will be staring
you in the face.


Who will be the next

Citrus County


/ To enter, simply fill out the form below and return it with your
favorite pet photo and a $10 Entry Donation.
/ Deadline for entries is 5:00 PM, Sept. 26, 2007.
/ Voting begins Oct. 1 through Oct. 7, 2007.
/ Votes are 25� each or 5 for a $1.00. Vote as many times as you like!
Pictures will not be returned


------ - --


Owner's Name_

Pet Name

Address

I Phone


6~85
m - -


- -


Please mail to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Attn: NIE
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Ci i, I'u)N i 01


1-- - -I - I [ --" -


APY


APY


APY


I SAVINGS RATES


-1 CaRus CouNn- (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


s


t
(
Ic


I leasejrnmt












4D1

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Chamber


[onnection


...........................-.


EDC events



coming soon


Plan to attend Luncheon on

Wednesday, barbeque Thursday

Make your reservation today lie and presented by The Citrus
for the 25th annual Industry County Economic Development
Appreciation Week Industry Council along with The Citrus
Appreciation Awards County Chamber of Commerce.


Luncheon at
Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club
at 11:30 a.m. Sept
19.
Industry
Appreciation
Annual Barneque
at Holcim Ranch
from 6:30 to 10:30
p.m. Sept 20.


cllrul Coun,
DaveIopmwat
Council. Ing ..


Featuring the
'Mick Sharp Band'
"The Mick Sharp Band"
takes the stage at the 25th
Annual EDC Barbeque in
Crystal River on Sept 20.
A versatile, high energy band
that enjoys interacting with the
crowd, The Mick Sharp Band
will make sure you get up and
shake it! Enjoy the total experi-
ence both musically and visual-
ly with a great mix of Blues and
Rock and Roll.
This event is open to the pub-


The event will
take place from
6:30 to 10:30 p.m.
The evening
includes:
* An awesome
catered bar-
beque buffet.
* Cocktails and
beer


* Door prizes to include four
Tampa Bay Bucs tickets to one
of the games.
SA50/50 raffle.
* Live entertainment
* Tickets cost $35.
* RSVP and don't miss this
event
Holcim Ranch is off of U.S.
Highway 19, north of Crystal
River, just past County Road
488 (Dunnellon Road), on your
feft side.
For more information or to
purchase tickets to either of
these events call the EDC office
at 795-2000.


Special to the Chronicle i
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for King's Bay Self Storage. Pictured front row:i
Chamber Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky, Charles Bohner, Lorraine Bohner, Ed Zwolski, Jr., Sarah Zwolski, Lara Zwolski.
Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Jackie Marx, Wendy Hall, Janet Mayo, David Heinz, Judith
Yaiser and Ed Zwolski. Kings Bay Self Storage is a brand new storage facility and is now "Open for Business". They are,
conveniently located 1 1/2 miles east of Hwy 19 just past Turkey Oak Drive on the north side. They have the lowest
move-in costs in the area! Call (352) 563-1412 or stop in at 7957 W Gulf to Lake Hwy 44 in Crystal River. Picture taken
by Chamber Ambassador John Porter.


Southern


Don't miss this free event!

Women's Health & Fitness Expo 2007
N Withlacoochee Technical Institute.
* Saturday, Sept. 29.
* 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Breeze Garden Art
....... != ' '


Chamber Staff

Kitty Barnes ...................... . . . .Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ............Office Manager (Inverness) and
Special Events Coordinator
Tomarra Post ............. Office Manager (Crystal River) and
Membership Coordinator
Marion Elson .......".......... .Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Joyce Greene ................. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally ..................... Office Assistant (Inverness)
Kelly Marker .................... Office Assistant (Inverness)

Inverness ................... ................. . 726-2801
Homosassa .................................. . 628-2666
Crystal River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .795-3149




www.citruscountychamber.com





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with Tennessee Valley
Authority Notes. These
high-grade bonds come
with a variety of features
and maturities. They're
even exempt from state
and local taxes.


5.OO%*

Yield to Call
Callable on: 09/15/09 @ 100
Final Maturity: 09/15/17


"Yield effective 09/12/07, subject to availability and price change. Yield and
market value may fluctuate if sold prior to maturity, and the amount received
from the sale of these securities may be less than the amount originally invested.
TVA bonds are not guaranteed by and are not debts or obligations of the United
States or any federal agency or instrumentality other than TVA, nor are they
FDIC-insured. TVA reserves the right to redeem prior to maturity. These bonds
are not suitable for all investors. Bond investments are subject to interest rate
risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease, and the
investor can lose principle value. These securities are also subject to credit risk.

Call or visit your local financial advisor today.


ILi ilJ
Stephen Kara Purcell John Wann Van Jason
Kuhn Williams Breese Robinson Worley
230M 8 Sunco6t Bld 45M, Olit BM 35sHLk y 230 Gulf to La H. Gulf to Lie y
C7y9 -R H,-FL HoPno-3 pa .527.0-0 Hi 3 l-nN8 I34-81*
795-1811 628-3466 52780606 344-8189 344-8189


www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


Scott L.
Lee
10 W. MnSL
860-2839


Cralg
230 Sunc.ilBlvd.
Cy R..iR, FL
795-1811 8


L'dwar~oneS


Associated Press
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Southern Breeze Garden Art. Pictured front row:
Chamber Ambassador Bonnie Hardiman with grandson Christian Paul; Rhonda Lestinsky, Hunter Manfredo, Pat
Haeseker, Dana & Joe Manfredo; Chamber Ambassador Reyna Bell. Pictured middle row: Chamber Ambassador Jennifer
Duca, Janet Mayo, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes, Peggy Kahler, Jeff Collins, Chamber Ambassador Chuck
Morgan. Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors John Porter, David Heinz and Julie Vaughan. Southern Breeze Garden
Art specializes in making your garden unique. They offer concrete with inlaid stained glass, stained glass hangings,
door art and also fountains and statuary. If they don't have the design you are looking for contact them with your idea
and their talented staff can make it happen. Visit them at 6532 W Gulf to Lake Hwy in Crystal River or visit them on,
the web at www.southernbreezegardenart.com. For further information please call (352) 563-5284.



Member News


Southern Sun Title has moved to
their new location! Visit them at the
new Sweetwater Plaza on the east
side of Hwy 19 just north of Sugarmill
Woods Main Entrance. Call (352)
382-3339 for more information.
MuE
Don't have time to stop by for
lunch at Koffee Kafe and more?
Delivery service is available from
11am to 1pm Monday through Friday
with a 20.00 minimum order. Please
call 352-564-2633 or fax your order
to 352-564-2631. Please allow at
least 30 - 45 minutes as all of our
sandwiches, wraps, etc. are made to
order.
MEN


Florida River Tours is offering fish-
ing trips for families on the Dream
Catcher. The Dream Catcher is a 20'
pontoon boat that has been cus-
tomized to make it handicap accessi-
ble. The Dream Catcher has accom-
modations for two wheel chair lock
downs along with guests for a total of
six passengers. We will offer morning
trips Monday through Friday on the
Homosassa River. Call to make your
reservations today! (352) 621-6619.
son
Kandy Kremnetz of Hemando
recently joined thousands of entre-
preneurs from the U.S. and around
the world at the Shaklee Global
Conference in Nashville, Tenn.,


August 8-12. Shaklee, the number
one natural nutrition company in the
U.S., holds its Global Conference
annually to recognize and congratu-
late members of the Shaklee family
for their successes and achieve-
ments. "Shaklee is committed to cre-
ating the best natural nutrition prod-
ucts available based on extensive
research," said Kandy Kremnetz "I
know that my clients and I can trust
that Shaklee products are not only
safe, but provide the best supple-
mental nutrition on the market."
Kandy Kremnetz started her health
and wellness outreach 17 ago, and
has found that helping others learn
about the benefits of a wellness pro-


gram has led to a successful home-
based business. For more informa-
tion, contact Kandy Kremnetz at
(352) 344-2372 or visit.
MuE
ERAAmerican Realty &
Investments is proud to announce the
latest production levels achieved by
several of its agents through August,
2007. In the company's Inverness
office, Dawn and Joe Theroux have
achieved the over $1 million dollar
mark. Mark Augustsson has reachedJ
over the $1 million dollar mark for the
company's Homosassa office. ERA
American Realty is proud to recog-
nize the achievements of these fine
Real Estate Professionals.


Upcoming CLASSES


CFCC and Hospice
offer "Good Grief"
Are you trying to make sense of the
losses in your life? CFCC and
Hospice of Citrus County have joined
forces to help you. The Good Grief
seminar will meet 5:30pm to 7:00pm
in L2-102 Mondays, Sept. 17 through
Oct. 8, at the Citrus Campus, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. The dass
is free. Good Grief classes will explore
the various aspects of grief. what it is,
what it isn't, and why it is normal. This


seminar also examines the array of
emotions experienced with grief.
Participants do not need to be
Hospice families or experience a
recent loss to attend this class. For
information or registration, call 352-
249-1210 or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com
Guardianship
Training at CFCC
Central Florida Community College
will offer Guardianship Training at
3800 S Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto. The


training will be on Tuesday, Oct 2 and
Thursday, Oct 4, 2007 from 6pm to
10pm in Bldg 91-Rm 102. The cost of
the training is $79. This course is an 8
hour court mandated training course
concerning guardianship issues,
duties and responsibilities. For infor-
mation and registration, call 352-249-
1210 or visit www.CFCCtraining.com
College and Career
Night planned
The Citrus Campus of Central
Florida Community College will host


the Citrus County College and Career
Night this fall Monday, October 8,
2007 from 6:30pm-8pm in room L2-
103. This event features representa-
tives from nearly 40 colleges, universi-.
ties and other recruiting entities that
are able to provide information regard-,
ing their institutions or companies.
Area high school students, their par-
ents, and community college students
are invited to attend. For information,
call 352-249-1202 or email
bairdm@cf.edu


X-Am








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


h hImber


(onnEction


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


- l. -- '*( *-. r . *-*, . f. *** -. ,- ,-' -. ; -' *. .- ! **. q -'?''rl " .". -� . ' -1 ., ' --" - " ,- %- . Y -' -' _ " '* - ' .-,.i.-. -J J-* . .. :; ' .* ::;'.-^*,,. *^. .: ' * - . -:.! s/ ' -
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,Don't mess with Citrus County


On Saturday, Oct 27, Gulf-to-Lake
highway and Fort Island Gulf Beach
vill be filled with hundreds of volun-
teers cleaning up the environment on
Make a Difference Day. The organiz-
brs of this event are not only hoping to
Lean up the litter along the main thor-
oughfare in the county, but also pro-
vide education to drivers on how litter
hnd cigarette butts make a mess of our
beautiful county. Educational signs
will be posted along the highway for
local residents. Also eco-green bags of
litter will be piled at the gates of the
county landfill so the public can see
how much litter is thrown onto our
roads. Hopefully this visual display
�vill encourage local drivers to assist
in keeping litter off the roadways.
; Families with children under age 12
Will be deployed to Fort Island Gulf
Peach to clean up litter there and also
help with planting of native trees that
will beautify and someday provide
fhade to future beach goers.
WYKE will be interviewing and
filming volunteers making Citrus


County a better place to live!
The four-hour cleanup will begin at
the Citrus County Resource Center in
Lecanto at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct 27
with a continental breakfast provided
by Publix. After a welcome from the
organizing community partners and a
safety briefing, volunteer teams will
be dispatched by buses to assign sec-
tions of the Highway 44. Families with
children will go by bus to Fort Island
Gulf Beach. The first 300 volunteers to
register will receive a "Don't Mess
with Citrus County!" tee shirt, a vouch-
er for a tree sapling and an eco-friend-
ly shopping bag that shoppers can use
in place of using plastic bags that fill
our landfill or paper bags that cut
down our trees. At noon, Wal-Mart
Super Center will roast hot-dogs for
the volunteers back at the Citrus
County Resource Center.
Green tee shirts will be given to the
first 300 registered volunteers and will
have the message: "Don't Mess with
Citrus County!" on the front side and a
list of sponsors on the backside.


Sponsorships are available until
Oct. 1. Call United Way of Citrus
County at 527-8894 to learn more about
becoming a sponsor of this event.
Platinum Sponsorship Level is at
$2,500, the Gold Sponsor Level is
$1,000, Silver Level is $500, and
Bronze Level is $100. Sponsorship
money goes for tee shirts, safety vests,
grabbers and trash bags. In-kind dona-
tions of bottled water, grabbers or
work gloves will also be accepted in
lieu of cash for the various sponsor
levels.
Volunteers must register to partici-
pate by Oct. 5. Registration forms may
be down loaded from the United Way
Web site: www.citrusunitedwayorg,
click on volunteer, and then click on
Day of Caring. Registration forms
need to be completed and mailed to
United Way of Citrus County by Oct 12.
If unable to download the forms,
please call United Way at 527-8894 and
the registration forms will be mailed
to you.
Everyone is invited to participate


on this community wide project.
Volunteer teams from local business-
es, hospitals, banks, church groups,
home-owner asso-
ciations, service
Rotary, Kiwanis,
Lions Clubs,
Sertoma, high
school club mem-
bers needing vol-
unteer hours,
interested resi-
dents, Boy Scout
Troops, Girl 0
Scouts, are all
invited to volun-
teer for this four
hour volunteer AD Ng OW
project. DOING
Organizing a � .)I\ (
partners for this
community wide
project are Nature Coast Volunteer
Center, Solid Waste Management,
Citrus County Parks and Recreation,
Adopt-a-Highway Volunteers, Citrus


County Chamber of Commerce, Keep
Citrus County Beautiful! and United
Way of Citrus County.
Sponsors to
date at the
. . Platinum Level
S are Citrus County
H e a l t h
Department
Tobacco and Drug
Education and
the Citrus County
Chronicle. Silver
Level Sponsors
are Publix, Wal-
S John and Irene
C O Piersall. Bronze
SSponsors are
SCitrus Waste
. Services, Inc., City
of Inverness,
Veolia, Sand
Land, MAJA Signs and Designs and
the Parrott Heads of Citrus County.
Remember: Don't Mess with Citrus
County!


Recently, the
Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce hosted
a ribbon cutting
for Beverly Hills
Cleaners. An
incorrect address
was listed in their
ribbon cutting
notice. Their new
location is at
"Island Plaza"
2181 N. Lecanto
Hwy. in Lecanto
or call for more
information (352)
527-3140.


Nature Coast Insurance Agency

Recently, the
.. .Citrus County
Chamber of
R Commerce host-
ed a ribbon cut-
ting for Nature
'i- Coast Insurance
. . Agency. An
incorrect
address and
phone number
�was listed in
their ribbon cut-
,.ting notice. Their
new location is
- ~ 5at 3814 E Gulf
to Lake Hwy. in
S-.- . .! . Inverness or call
. cF "for more informa-
- -.! ::"tion (352) 341-
.0040.


Rails to Trails



plans bike ride


Group to ride Oct. 7 in Inverness

as part ofannual event


You can get your exercise,
enjoy the outdoors, mingle with
your neighbors and perhaps win
a door prize all if you register for
the 13 annual Rails to Trails
Bike Ride on the Withlacoochee
State Trail on Sunday, Oct 7. The
cost is only $15.00 per person as
long as your postmark is
September 21, 2007 or before.
You may register by going to
www.railstotrailsonline.com,
clicking on "bike ride in
October" and downloading the
application. If you register after
Sept 21, the cost is $20 per rider
Ride day applications will also
be accepted. The possibility of
no ride shirt exists after Sept 21.
Registration/packet pickup is
held between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. at
the North Apopka Trailhead in
Inverness. Each rider can deter-
mine the number of miles he/she
wants to ride. For those who just
want a short distance to ride,
they can go to Floral City and


back which is only 14 miles. For
those conditioned bikers, a cen-
tury ride is offered which
includes riding the 46-mile trail
completely from one end to the
other and back, along with an 8-
mile loop off trail in Citrus
Springs. Maps are provided to
the century riders for the off
trail portion. If additional infor-
mation is needed, please contact
Al at (352) 527-3263 or octbik-
eride@earthlinknet
A continental breakfast and a
lite lunch are included in your
registration and six SAG stops
are positioned along the trail for
food and drink
The bike ride is handled sole-
ly by volunteers and 100 percent
of the money earned from this
annual event goes into the
upkeep and improvements of
the Withlacoochee State Trail.
It is a fun day for the entire
family and we hope you will
come join us!


Take Stock in Children seeks volunteers


Take Stock In Children
(www.takestockinchildren.com)
is an award-winning school-
based mentoring program that
assists deserving youth from
low-income families by provid-
ing the opportunity for a better
education and a brighter future.
Founded in 1995, the mission
of Take Stock in Children is to
provide deserving qualified
children in our community with
scholarships to college and
guidance from caring mentors.
Since 1995, Take Stock in
Children has provided over
12,000 children with scholar-


ships (totaling over 90 million
dollars) and mentors in the
state of Florida. All money
raised in Citrus County is used
to provide scholarships and stu-
dent-mentor services to Citrus
County middle and high school
students.
All scholarship contributions
are raised locally through com-
munity partnerships and are
used to purchase Florida
Prepaid 2+2 scholarships (2
years at a community
college/two years at a universi-
ty) through the Florida Prepaid
College Foundation.


Scholarship contributions are
matched dollar for dollar by the
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation. Community part-
nerships and local area busi-
nesses make it possible to be
able to provide scholarships
and "the promise of hope" to
middle and high school stu-
dents. All monies raised in
Citrus County are used to pro-
vide scholarships and student-
mentor services to Citrus
County students.
Take Stock in Children of
Citrus County is seeking indi-
viduals interested in becoiiiig.


a positive influence in a young
person's life by becoming a
mentor for the Take Stock in
Children Program. Mentors
meet one hour per week in a
school-based setting only at
local Citrus County middle or
high schools
For further information on
how you can make the differ-
once in the life of a Citrus
County child by providing
"scholarships, mentors, and
hope," please call Janet E.
Clymer, Program Coordinator
(352) 746-6721, ext 6148 jely-
IInet',d,_'iIw rk]heii't.comn.


experience something more.


AVEDA
See and feel the
difference. We're now an
Aveda Concept Salon,
infusing each service,
each client experience
with fresh style and
soothing personal
touches-from a moment
of stress relief for head
and shoulders to a
makeup touch-up. Free
with your hair cut, style or
color. Join in our journey
of style-book your
appointment today.
- Awarded TOP 200
Salon in U.S. 2007 -


ANTQ *KPAgNS


Beverly Hills Cleaners









:EDS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


24yr Old Hspanic r m m gFREE r q" HAlRCARE in your home HI RSE
Male Seeking Female i $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ WOOD PASTURE GATES i RENTAL FINDER by Licensed Hairdresser BOOKKEEPER HYGIENE ASSISTANT
20 140 bs Age 2 ) 55l(2230 TOP DOLLAR (352) 746-5031 ww1E chronle Curts/Perms/Wash/Style Following preferred. HSp ENS S
120-14ronicl Ae 22-0, TP DLLAR(352 74-503 [i ClerirenafidereomsoCallGalP35-422631


For Movies i For Junk Cars i $ $ CASH PAID $ $ nne m Gall 3524226315 Part-time full charge High Commission. Crystal River &
& y nr ip $3522 3 20-152- j Junk Cars Trucks, Vans -* SODy SOD * SR bookkeeper for (352) 628-4888 Inverness
_ 352)_25_-5513 iiiii SD OD*OD accrualbased fim._______
66 YEAR OLD MAN $$$ ArENTION $$$ (352) 228-9645 BANG LANDANG Quickbooks and STYLIST & NAIL TECH $250 Sign-On Bonus!
new to Homosassa I WANT YOUR JUNK (352) 341-3032 Microsoft Office a NEEDED Coast Dental is the
-1 Followinmpreferred HYGIENIST

looking for a woman to CARS, TRUCKS, ETC. *Mcosoft Offce a southeast's leading
be my best friend Tommy 352- 302-1276 MR CITRUS JCM 352-7460816 Nw invrno lSn provider, with 115seadng
-d " AS JCM 352-746 0816 oiewt15
be my best fren Tommy 352- 302-1276MRCTU*Dy


COUNTY REALTY



_.- , f.



ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
CAT ADOPTIONS


neighborhood dental
practices and
growing. Lucrative
compensation
package includes
great wages,
medical, life &
disability insurance,
paid time off, 401(k)
and more!

Apply at
CoastDental.c
Om
Cal(877)
COAST-17
ext. 139
Fax (813)
289-4500




CoastDental
www.CoastDental,
com
EOE/M/F/D/V
Drug-free workplace

RI s

up iti$35

LPB

up tS$2


* ps


upto$1


buddy, companion for
LTR. Like eating out,
dancing, camping,
Harleys. Gardening &
just about everything
else that can be done
as a couple! Age not
important, happy
personality is!! If you are
lonely too, call
(727) 430-2379, lets talk.




r 7E r N
www.chronicle i
rentalfinder.com

14- Offers

$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
8 Wk. Mixed PUPPIES
Hound/Collie
Avail. now to good
home. 3 M & 3F
(352) 382-1780
8 x 24 ALUMINUM
TRAVEL TRAILER
Just Haul It All Away!
(352) 628-1726





Your world first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

C iqopMcLE
Classifieds
ss l ". "ifi


CASHPAIDINo title ok
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545

$ CASH $
PAID FOR
Unwanted |

l 352-220-0687 l
--- -- El
Chihuahua &
Miniature Poodle,
To good home only
Due to family illness
(352) 637-3172
Leave Message
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
Dishwasher
needs minor repair
(352) 341-1456
FREE - 2 MOBILE HOMES
8315 W Balloon & 2984
N Turkey Oak Crystal
River. Must move
634-2462
FREE AD SPECIAL
free kittens wormed, and
litter box trained grey &
orange tabbies, 2
Siamese, short and long
hair. 352 563-0493
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl. s A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
FREE Walker hound
puppy. To good home
(352) 344-0430
PIT BULL
male, 3-4 yrs. old,
housebroken.
Call 201-2061
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084


Boston Terrier
Male, B&W w/ brown
spots, Leisure Acres
(352) 621-1259
(352) 302-0554
Cat, Long Hair,
Siamese, Last seen in
Cardinal & S. Ridge Pt.
(352) 628-5312
MULTI COLOR Fem Cat,
leath coir. Rabies &
county tags. May be
hurt. Appalachian ter.
Crys Rvr, (352) 563-0790

C=


. DIVORCES 1
BANKRUPTCY I
| Name Change
*Child Support
- Wills
SWe Come To You
637-4022.795-5999
$CASH FOR CARS$
Free pickup appIs & Metal
352-302-2781
352-489-2925
BANK OWNED
AUCTION
121 Homes
All thru-out FL
Props. In your area
Fin. Avail .on many of
these properties.
Sun., Sept. 23rd, 1 PM
Held in Orlando, FL
Broker Cooperation
For terms/info/more
bidding sites visit
fisherauction.com
L. Fisher AU220;AB 106
(800) 331-6620
Sale subject to terms.

BUY or SELL!
Receive Quality
Customer Care!
FLRealEstateSale.Com






TERI PADUANO,
REALTOR
C21 JW Morton
(352) 212-1446
Hablo Espanol
FREE Home Warranty
& Visual Tour
ON ALL MY LISTINGS


Community Association
MANAGEMENT
w/attention to detail.
Lic. & Ins.352-726-6165

t-ActNow

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD
Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run.a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

Humane Society
of Inverness
Has a New Vet
Dr. Mattew Fox
Joined our team.
We offer low cost Spay
&
Neuter
Starting at $20,
Low cost vacches,
Heartworm
test, Heartworm treat-
ment,
Cat Declawing. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsha.or a.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.

-

FULL BODY DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE &
AROMATHERAPY
by Terri Lic. MM17442
(352) 628-1036


& an irei(U

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.




-H
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441




BooT affit

Chronicle Website
Directory in print
and online.
Our search engine
I will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
+ Online
= One Price I
I $51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966

CAR SALES
www.naturecoast
wheels.com
NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
online.comr

www.naturecoast
homefront.com

www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com



EXP. TEACHERS
Quality childcare hiring.
(352) 795-5862
INFANT/TODDLER
TEACHER NEEDED
(352) 795-6890


Friends of Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge Complex

1 1st Annual


lManatee Masters



Celf Tournament


-. 0 qv


Select Your Choice of Sponsorships:

t<'/ Manatee Jdul Sponsor
J ($500 and above)
* Full page advertisement in the Golf Program
* Inclusion in all sponsorship drive advertising
* 4 complimentary player entry fees ($50 per player value)
* Special prize/appreciation package for each player

4 Manatee Cow Sponsor
I ($250)
* Half page advertisement in the Golf PniSrami
* Inclusion in all sponsorship drive adiJrliin4iil
* 2 complimentary player entry fees ($50 per player value)
* Special prize/appreciation package for each p'lr i/i


|ZYES, I wish to become a sponsor as indicated below:
Check one: E] Manatee Bull Sponsor ($500 or more)
[O Manatee Cow Sponsor ($250)
O Manatee Calf -Hole Sponsor ($100)
F] Donation Only (Any Amount)
T


vwww.fcriwr. org


Make checks payable to: FCNWR
and mail to:
Manatee Masters Golf Tournament'
682 N. Afterglow Circle
Crystal River, FL 34429

TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED [$' ]


St: Zin:


Telephone: ( ) Fax: ( )

Note: If you plan to enter into the golf tournament, please complete the Golfer's Entry Form.
If you don't have a Golfer's Entry Form call Bill at 352-563-2480.
Check here if you DO NOT plan to use your complimentary golf entry fees.


or email to
mceparano@joseph
capital.comrn

EXECUTIVE
PERSONAL
ASSISTANT
Reception exp. is a
plus. Must have
reliable transportation.
(352) 341-5425

P/T RECEPTIONIST
For Front Desk, requires
working knowledge
of computer, excellent
phone & people skills.
Flexible hours. Need to
be organized, responsi-
ble, hard working & self
motivated. Apply in
person. (352) 795-5000
EOE


Sept. 24 Barbering
'Nights
Oct. 1 Massage Thr)
Nights
Oct. 22 Cosmetology
Nights
Dec. 8 Massage Thpv
'Weekends
Skin & Nail Specialty
Classes 'Form Monthly
(727) 848-8415
Bene's International
School of Beauty,
Barber & Massage
Therapy
7127 U.S. Hwy. 19
New Port Richey, FL
34662




M �


RNs:


NledSulw
Telern-etr\
SEmergenc\ i per diem I


Other Opportunities:
Director of Rehab Services
Blood Bank Supervisor
Medical Technologist
Histology Technologist
Physical Therapist
Physical Therapy Assistant
Radiology Technologist
Respiratory Therapist
Patient Account Representative
Security Guard (per diem)
Coder
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select FT positions!
SRRMC is part of the HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email: ./-,
Linda.Macaulay@srrmc hma-corp.com SJlrI'ulIN I
Web Site: www.srrmc.com
EOEDRUG FREE WORKPLACE 'ew. , m (sno), O5 1
iSSEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
713B95 )


(352) 476-2821
youToepia Day Spa
is now conducting
Interviews for
HAIR, NAIL,
& MASSAGE
F/T or P/T Positions.
Welcome to
Dunnellon's newest.
Urban Retreat!
(352) 489-2100




Compliance
Analyst
$2,500.00
Sign-On Bonus

The Centers
is seeking a
Compliance Analyst
to manage &
prepare contracts &
permanent records;
develop budgets
& accounting
procedures for grants
& contracts; prepare
audit schedules &
other financial/
analytical reports,
etc. Ideal candidate
is self-starter with
excellent writing & MS
Excel skills. BA in
Accounting & min 1+
yrs exp with GAAP
financial.
Salary Range:
$38,000-$42,000/yr.
Position located In
Ocala. Full benefits
pkg DFWP/EOE.
Fax or e-mail resume
to HR, the Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580.
iobs@thecenters, us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us



Your World

o pvu4e J440





CHINONICLE
Chlnae.s;cds


wwcrtroncleornline cam


AT THE "HEART OF OUR COMMUNITY



OARING... FOR MANY YEARS,

IN MANY WAYS.


i'. ,r .' ).i,.r%.. M.iIT......,I -. l tll- ) :.T�ip " ,' . h - :.,.n [ pr. il.- . i, .) i I.. lr- : ,. - ,- r. .i
Although we're embracing the future with innovative technology and an energetic atmosphere, we're still
a dose-knit team who greets people by name. It's just our way.

RNs
* Critical Care Unit * Emergency Room * Neuro Telemetry * CV/PCU * Orthopedics
* Operating Room and First Assistant * Home Health * External Clinics
* Manager, Neuro Telemetry * Manager, Clinical Services/DON - Home Health

LPNs
. External Clinics * Neuro Telemetry * Home Health

Nurse Recruiter
Requires a Bachelor's degree (additional coursework in Human Resources Management, Business Administration
or Psychology preferred); an RN or LPN with current FL licensure, Department of Health Division of Quality
Assurance; and proficiency with computer applications. A minimum of 2 years recruiting experience, preferably in
an acute setting, preferred.
Case Manager
Requires an RN or LPN with current FL licensure, Department of Health Division of Quality Assurance and the
ability to effectively communicate and interact with other professionals. Certification as an Accreditation Medical
Record Technician or certification in Utilization Review or Case Manager and previous experience in Utilization
Review/Case Management desirable.
Rehabilitation - Clinical Coordinator
Requires a Bachelor's degree or entry level Master's degree, as required in Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy
or Speech/Language Pathology, from an accredited university and current FL licensure, Department of Health
Division of Quality Assurance. Minimum of 3 years experience in a Hospital setting preferred but not required.
Speech Language Pathologist
Requires a Master's degree in Speech and Language Pathology from an accredited university and current FL
licensure, Department of Health Division of Quality Assurance. Minimum of 1-year experience in a Hospital
setting and modified barium swallow study experience preferred.
Staff Pharmacist - Part Time
Requires current FL licensure, Department of Health Division of Quality Assurance and a Bachelor's degree or
PharmD.
Physical Therapist
Requires a Bachelor's degree (Master's degree preferred) in Physical Therapy from an accredited university and
current FL licensure, Department of Health Division of Quality Assurance.
Come join us in Inverness, our scenic town on Florida's Nature Coast, iust north of the Tampa Bay area.
I!' ,',,- ro I.'..: i . ,-, n i... di i T-1 .d l ..ip lj,:i .h.. i. c,. -1. . r.- j I .:- A r.. I . . . . i .... ll I ' . ,. h.'r.


u'. Ire I..r I, .-F, 131.


(:ITRUiS ?ENIORI'sL


'I________________________U


Q

0/


Manatee Calf - Hole Sponsor
($100)
* Printed sign at fee of sponsored hole
* Recognition in the Golf Program


00
O�


Support t4e Ae he that Suapport the fManatees"



SPONSORSHIP ACKNOWLEDGMENT


Name:s
Address:


Company: --


11










. CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A Skilled Facility has
an opening for:
MDS Coordinator
F/T RN
Salary comensurate
with experience.
11-7 F/T & P/T
RN/LPN

Excellent Health &
Dental Blue Cross/
Blue Shield of FL &
paid vacation. Come
ioin our Exceptional
Nursing Teaml
Fax Resume
(352) 746-0748 or
Apply in person
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100


1C." Medical


Adult Case
Managers

The Centers
is seeking Adult Case
Managers for Marion
& Citrus counties.
Duties include
advocating for &
linking adults to
needed services in
the community.
Bachelor's in a field of
Human Services w/
mini yr exp reqd.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fax or
-e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters. us
For more info visit
www. thecenters.us_



Your% world first.
Even Da'


CHKONICLo
_-LlJ '*ir; ,l,.


COME JOIN
OUR GREAT
TEAM!

LPN
FT/ Excellent
Benefits including
insurance option
Please apply
within at
Cedar Creek ALF
231 NW HWY 19
Drug Free Workplace


SF/TCHECK-OUT
RECEPTIONIST
Experience w/CPT
& ICD-9 required I
4-10 hour days,
occasional Saturday U
a.m. Apply in person I
to: WEST COAST
EYE INSTITUTE I
240 N. Lecanto Hwy, I
I Lecanto, FL 34461, I
(352) 746-2246 |
Ext 834
IL - - - - E ll!i


LPN's FT
1:30 -10:30pm

For Assisted Living
Facility. Pay by
experience.
Sign on bonus!
Insurance after 60
days Vacation
After Jan 1st.
Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE


MATURE PERSON
For in home care of
82yr. old dementia,
lady, up to 8hr. shifts.
5 days/wk. Light
cooking. Ref. & Bkgnd
check. Seek exp.
person, caring &
compassionate
toward elderly.
Competitive Wages.
Call (352) 637-6482


MEDICAL HELP
Seeking
Surgical Tech or Nurse
Must be energetic,
self motivated &
interested in pursuing
an excellent
opportunity for career
growth. The selected
Individual should be
able to work In a fast
paced environment
and easily handle
multiple medical tasks
efficiently with a
willingness to
learn surgery.
Please Fax resume to:
352-746-9320
No phone
Calls please.
References required


(I to
Your world first.
Eter\ Da%


CHIONIE
.'\ ii .t/,


I


LPN NEEDED

Must have strong
computer skills for
clinical research
position.
Research experience
desirable.
Please call
(352)563-1865 or
email rwood@encore

Medicare
Marketing Sales
Reps & Brokers
A Dynamic Managed
Care Org. offering un-
limited, earning po-
tential, Commissions,
Car/Cell
allowance for FT
Marketing Reps,
lead support &
training provided.
Competitive benefits.
Must have active
health lic, and highly
motivated!
Email resume:
fsanabria@auality
healtholans.com
or fax 727-756-1082


NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

Office Needs
Person
That has Experience
Assisting Doctor. Must
give injections, draw
blood. EKG and have
some front desk exp.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1370M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
Florida, 34429

"Xrrww, I re I
Your world d tirs't.
Et .~.i )a,


FRONT DESK
TEAM LEADER
Check in/out,
insurance ver.
Ophtal/Bushnell,
Fax resume to
813-960-0042
RECEPTIONIST/
BILLING MANAGER
Needed for medical
office. Exp. preferred.
Fax Resume to
352-489-6920
RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
* ALL STAR A
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RNs, LPNs,

& MAs
Needed to provide
Public FLU Clinics.
(352) 683-2885
MAXIM HEALTH
CARE SERVICES


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870
rk k



ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
I SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
I sss$$$sssssss$s$$ssss$ I
Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.
$$$$SS$$$$$$$$$$$ I
; IF WE DON'T HAVE
. I YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
JUSTASK.
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOU!!!

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966


.i


"DEBRIS HAULING"
0 & Misc. Clean-Up,
STree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
55' BUCKET TRUCK
20% off, mention of
this ad. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 344-2696

A AFFORDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE
S Trash, Trees, Brush
Apple. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126
All------ J
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
Design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827

TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding, land I
clearing, bushhog.
I 352-220-5054

A TREE SURGEON
Uc. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
estimates.352-860-1452


All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165
ATLAS COMPUTER
Over 15 Years Exp!
NEVER a Bench
Charge! NO Charge if
NO Repair!
Flat Hourly Rate!
Senior Discount!
We come to YOU!
MICROSOFT CERT.
352-586-3636
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
Husband & Wife DP
Press.Cleaning & Paint-
ing. Lic.&Ins. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERVE
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
.(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
All Phaze Construction
Quality painting &
repairs. Faux fin.
#0255709 352-586-1026
637-3632 .







FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Uc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Maids on Call
"We Make House Calls"

, Residential &
Commercial
Cleaning

Serving Citrus
& Hernando Counties

Phone: (352) 726-8077
Lic. # 99990003051



New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
*Roof Repairs * Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes







1 r I ,t a 1 a t i 7 11 s.
(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
S Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
State Certified Lic tCCC1327843


Free Estimates
(800) 942-3738
Dave Rodgers Painting
20 + yrs. exp., int./ext.
satisfaction guarantee
lic./Ins. (352) 726-5698
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext., Free Estimates
Pressure Wash., Lic./Ins.
24/7, (352) 476-9013
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Lic. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407




Affomdale Boat Mmnt. &
Repair,
Mexhan a, Electrical,
Custom
Rig. John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)



CAREGIVER
in your home,
Exc. Ref. Exc. Care.
(352) 344-8491
CNA for in home care,
20yrs exp. Can live in.
(352) 860-1982 (352)
613-4618. 613-4614
FT ADULT CARE IN
Private home has
opening. $4.50 hr. Eden
Alternative Practice,
Please call 563-0434
HEAVEN SENT
Prvt. rm. of home. 1 on
1 care. CNA & Med,
Tech. (352) 621-3337
W LOVING CARE wV
That makes a
difference. Will care
for elderly person in
my home or yours 24 hr.
care. Louisa, 201-1663




-Windows & Doors
-Storm Shutters
-Board-Up Service
-Resident./Commercial
CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613




IN HOME, except. 1
child, lots of TLC & exp.
Off US 19, Wkee Wach./
Homa. (352) 263-1860
O REG HOME DAY CARE
Openings NOW FT/PT
0 Infants Welcome ft
v 352-726-5163 "


/Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397




AVERAGE HOME
Professionally Cleaned
$50/ea. Twice per mo.
Supplies & Equip. Incl.
Joe's Cleaning Service
(352) 628-1539
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Special Introductory
offer 20% Discount
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558




DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
PRICE Finish Carpentry
Wood moldings & doors
30+ yrs. Lic. 17510184057
352-860-0675/302-4389
ROGERS Construction
New Homes,Additions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257 - 1011
1 panel or comp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too smaIll 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913


I INFORMATrION I


Renewing
Existing
Concrete

Driveways,]
Pool Decks, "'
LLanais, Etc.

Maintenance-Free
Acrylic, Designs, Patterns, Colors

352-220-8630
LicensedlInsuredlDependable ,7


PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 341-3300
* ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner. No streaks!
24 yrs. Lic. 352-726-3878
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Uc. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan & ,
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
1 Call does it All! No lob
too sm.l Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean,,
etc. CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd GENERATION SERVE
All types of fencing, General
home repairs, Int/Ext paint-
ing FREE Est., 10% off any
job. lic # 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too smaIll 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
r-A- -- -
AFFORDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE I
- Trash Trees Brush, -
I Apple. Furn, Const, I
Debris & Garages
352-697-1126

ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est,
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001







FAST AFFORDABLE!


HANDYMAN
If its Broke, Jerry
Can Fix It. Lic#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
HAUTER & CLARK
HANDYMAN & MORE
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911

NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services. Lic.2776/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC


FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
Spa, Sheds Lic. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276
MALLEY's Elect. Service
Resid. & Comm.
Ins. & Lic. #EC0001840
Rob @352-220-9326
Mel 352-255-4034




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

r AFFORDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126
A-I Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash turn. & apple. Misc.
Mark (352) 344-0034
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., a pp, trash, brush,
Low $ $/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264 /201-1422
Furn. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-726-7022
Towing, '97, F250
will work and travel
(352) 382-3642
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352)
527-3431
ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job, lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260 .
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing in vinyl
(352) 621-0929


Ideal Carports
Custom Build Your Dream
.0 Carport

* Garage

SBarn
* RV Cover
* Any Metal Bldg.
' - " hatk .r ) ou need,
we've got you covered"
352-795-6568
7958 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., (Hwy. 44) Crystal River





B 1 * rsen-ing All of Cirrus Count


CCC025464 B00002180 ^ 0 P1 I m
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated

NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES

1 -1

-------------------------
'(352) 628-5079 s (352) 628-7445


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const, reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC 1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est. Ptoudto
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358
RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates!!
Exp'd, Lic, CCC1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557
ROOFOVERS - MH
2" insul, lifetime warr. no
leaks, colors avail. Do it
yourself kits avail. Uc
1983. 352-746-1600




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC 1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sidewalks, Driveways Patios,
slabs.
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs. Stamp
concrete Fusion's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Lic.1476 726-6554

-I-

ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)302-8001
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
FAST! AFFORDABLE
SRELIABLE! Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508






We do it ALL! Big or Sm.!
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall,Crown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 795-7241


CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Uc. #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
STONE MASON
Outdoor Fireplaces,
Waterfalls & Ponds,
Walks & Patios, Etc.
(352) 592-4455




ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC 131149747




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tyves of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog. Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
* TOP SOIL SPECIAL *
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 q 352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955

LANDCLEARING
I Site prep, Tree Serv., I
Dump Truck, Demo
352-220-5054

M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris, Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Line Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrinding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114




D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
* SOD * SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032


S S
What's Missing?






f rI
, . _


ARD VAC




Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming
(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & Insured


"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
ANDERSEN'S YARDMAN
SERVICES, Mowing, Pres.
Washing, Trash Hauling,
Low ratesl352-277-6781
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
Coon, Robert
Lawn Service
FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 563-0376
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
FreeEstimate 795-4798.
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Acrylic Decking
� 352-464-3967 w
" POOL LINERS! A
*15 Yrs. Exp.*
Call for free estimate
i (352) 591-3641 �

POOL REPAIRS?
Comm. & Res., & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778, 302-6060




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
Keller Williams
Realty





0 RAINDANCER 0
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Available!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714

S"ATLETERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Price!
6" Seamless Gutters
SUc & ns 621-0881






NEED A NEW DOOR?
Pre-Hung Door units
New Const. or remod.
ENTRY POINT by Perry's
Lic. 2598(352)726-6125





Gopher Gully Sod Inc.
Form Direct Rolls
Sod Installation
Seeding & Mulching
352-812-4345/817-4887





Your world first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classified
rEmsssss


Handyman Tom
All Phases of Home Repair
Window and Door Replacements
Drywall Repair
Pressure Wash
Deck and Dock Repair
Interior Trim
Painting

637-7250 or
(352) 442-7772
713968 Lic. & Ins.





Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore Protect Beautify - Residential & Commercial

.Suncoast

Exterior
- Restoration Service Inc.

,877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


TEMBER 16, 2007 7D

Im Medical


RN/LPN "
CNA/HHA'S
I Interim Health Care |
(352) 637-3111


Substance
Abuse
Counselors

the Center's
is seeking SA
counselors to work
with our adult and
child/adolescent
populations in Marion
& Citrus Counties.
Bachelors Degree in
a field of Human Svcs
and a 1 yr min,
related exp required.
Salary range:
$13.00 - $14.28/hr
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE Fox or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
iobs@thecenters, us
For more info visit
www. thecenters. us


CLASSIFIED


Single Family
Physician
Needs Person w/Front
& Back Office Exp.
Apply in Person
521 SE Fort Island TrI.
Suite E, Crystal River
No Phone Calls Pise.







2 , --N (T)
2 *- RN (PT &[PRN:





I 0 T(T


Fi E-











8D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2007


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/ Cell 422-3656
XRAY TECH
Xray Tech PT/weekends
call 800.557-8787 ext 154



-4
R-----

ADOPTIONS
CASE MANAGER
SUPERVISOR

To manage the daily
operations of our
Adoptions Case
Management unit
which recruits for
and matches
children with forever
families; supervise
DCM and support
staff; coordinate
service delivery to
ensure that client
needs, program
goals and contract
objectives are
effectively met,
Qualified applicants
must have a
Bachelor's or
Master's degree in
Human Services and
must possess a State
of Florida Child Pro-
tection Certification.
Position available
in Tavares,
Apply online @
www.chsfl.org
or Fax Resume to:
1-888-466-7615

children's
home
Society
OF FLORIDCA

EOE/DFWP
L--=P
Auto Svc. Mgrs

Svc Managers
wanted. Must be
motivated to
increase productivity
& performance. F/T.
Benes & $3k signing
bonus avail. Call
(727)726-2577
or fax resume to
(727)726-2531

D DEPENDENCY
CASE MANAGER
SUPERVISOR
To manage the daily
Operations of our
Dependency Case
Management unit
which identifies and
assesses client and
family needs of
minors placed in
care by DCF due to
abuse or neglect by
caretakers, with the I
ultimate goal of
permanency;
supervise DCM and
support staff;
coordinate service
delivery to ensure
that client needs,
program goals and
contract objectives
are effectively met.
Qualified applicants
must have a
I Bachelor's or
Master's degree in
Human
Services and must
I possess a State of
Florida Child
S Protection
Certification. Two
positions available
in Wildwood.
Apply online @
www.chsfi.ora
or Fox Resume to:
1-888-466-7615
I I
S children's
I home
I J . society I
S J .... FLORIDA'

EOE/DFWP
L POM A

" PROGRAM-
DIRECTOR

Will direct, manage
and develop
Adoptions Program.
Qualified applicants
will possess proven
experience in
contracting
procedures, working
knowledge of
Medicaid policies
for children's
services, strong .
supervision skills &
budgetary/fiscal
management.
Master's degree in
Human Services field
with 5 years
experience.
Supervisory
experience in a
social welfare/
health care agency
with 1 yr. of program
management
experience is
required, Position
available
in Gainesville.
Apply online @
www.chsfl.org
or Fax Resume to;
1-888-466-7615
I children's
I home
i J $ society


EOE/DFWP.
------ml


Now Hiring
F/T BOOKKEEPER/
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASST.
Quick Book exp.
REQUIRED
Contractor's version
pref'd, Good Pay &
working conditions.
Email resume &
contact information
to: capitalsteelinc@
yahoo.com





.COOKS
*FOOD RUNNERS
*SERVERS
Exp, preferred. High
volume environment.
COACH'S Pub&Eaterv
114W, Main St., Inv.
11582 N. Williams St.,
Dunnellon EOE

FOOD SERVICE
COOK

Immediate Cook
Opening at Cypress
Creek Juvenile
Offender Center.
Institutional cooking,
hands-on experience
and good math skills
preferred. $9,00.
per hour. Must pass
background check
& drug screen.
Contact 352-527-0395
Or Fax Resume w/
Salary History to
225-273-2165
Attn #648 EOE

Positions Available
CREW
CREW TRAINER
MANAGEMENT
COMPETITIVE PAY
& Benefits
Directions & Details
Dunnellon
(352) 489-4620
SR200
(352) 854-4005
or Send Resume to:
humanresources@asc
enterprises coam











$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts, for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187


ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist In the
enrollment of the new
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work in
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area,
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance Ist
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813

SALES
$100K + YEAR
$$$ motivated Reps.
Leads, leads, leadsll
Large Co. seeking
exp'd one call Sales
Closers. Big $$$$
commissions,
bonuses, incentives.
Projected 3 appoints.
daily. Vehicle req. for
local area travel.
1-800-518-5532






AUTO MECHANIC
Air Conditioning,
brakes, tune-up,
tires, etc.

* GOOD PAY
* GOOD BENEFITS
*GREAT WORK
ENVIRONMENT.
Mon-Fri 8pm-5pm
Call John Wood
746-8850
LKQ Auto Service,
St. Rd. 486 CR


Serving the Developmentally
Disabled Since 1966.

$ Increased pay rates and $

competitive benefit package for

all F/T employees after 90 days

Positions Available:
Bus Driver - P/T Inverness area
Residential - F/T & P/T
Supported Living Coach - F/T
Transitional Living Coach - F/T
Instructor- F/T

DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Apply at the Key Training Center
Business Office
130 Heights Ave., Inverness
352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347)
*EOE*
-uss1ss


5cMedical


employment a valid
Florida CDL Class "A"
with endorsement N.
Must have the
physical ability to
operate the assigned
equipment and to
perform the
necessary manual
labor tasks. Must be
knowledgeable of
the operating
characteristics of
medium and heavy
public works
equipment.

$10.77 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461
No later than Friday
September 21, 2007.
EOE/ADA.


I Prfesinl


AUTO BODY
WORK/PAINT
Exp'd, must have Drivers
lic. 352-613-4532

BUSY BODY SHOP

In need of ambitious
AUTO REFINISH
TECHNICIAN
Only Quality
Craftsman need
apply. (352) 628-4878

Car Detailer/
All Around Helper
Must have good clean
valid driver's license.
Alec's Collision is a Drug
Free Workplace
(352) 489-2882

Construction
Plumber& Helpers
Apply in Person @
SUNCOAST PLUMBING
6938 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.
Homosassa

DRILLER'S ASST. &
SERVICEMEN

Needed. Long hours.
Clean Class D license &
driving record. Paid
holidays & vacations
352-400-0398 before 9p

ELECTRICAL
HELPER
1 yr. Exp. Necessary
Apply in Person
6938 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.

ELECTRICIANS

Repair Pole lighting,
Signs,& Electrical.
Building maint. &
repair. Bucket Truck
Operator. Class A or B
license a plus.
Up to $600 wkly.
Office (352) 794-0412
or Fax (352) 794-0417
flamaintenance
@hotmail.com

EXP. PLUMBER

Experienced in all
3 phases
.(352) 746-5807

EXP'D PAINTER
Top Pay- Spray a Plus
Own tools & transp.
(352) 302-6397














EXPERIENCED
Plasterers
& Laborers
Must have own
transportation.
352-690-7268
Supt. 352-302-6474

INSTRUCTORS
WANTED

HEAVY EQUIP.
OPERATOR SCHOOL
Located in Lecanto
Patience, punctuality,
ability to work w/ other
instructors, min. 3 yrs.
exp. in Construction
required,
Training provided.
Fax Resume to
and or e-mail
atsmarv (ayahoo.com

MECHANIC
Min. 5 Yrs, exp. w/ small
engine repairs, prefer
stihl exp. Fulltime
(352) 489r7930
"--
-PLUMBERS
I ONLY
I Experienced I
I Rough Tubset Trim
Service.
| If not don't apply |
S 621-7705
5*--- - -- *


Apply btw. 9am-1pm
at SPORTS RADAR
9119 W. Veterans Dr.
(352) 563-5298




-4

MEDIUM
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR

Skilled work in the
operation of
moderately complex
public works
construction and
maintenance
equipment, primarily
the mower and
dump trucks. May
operate heavier
equipment on
a temporary,
emergency or trainee
basis. Performs
manual labor tasks.
H.S diploma or G.E.D.
One year experience
in the operation and
routine maintenance
of the type aof
equipment of primary
assignment. Must
have or obtain
within 90 days of


$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187
CITRUS SECURITY
Needs F/T
SECURITY OFFICERS

Class D License req'd.
Call ASAP to:
352-341-1997/697-1079

DOCUMENT
PREPARER
NO Criminal
Background
Must have
experience in Typing
and filing alphabeti-
cally and numerically
Please Call Melissa @
352-603-0607
Monday-Friday 9a-4p

EXP. LANDSCAPE
CURBING LABOR
352-212-2142
F/T CUSTOMER
SERVICE/DELIVERY
For Flower Shop
Multi-Task. Valid. D.L.
Able to lift 30 lbs.
(352) 465-5547
Must have at least
5 Yrs. Recent Exp.
In Florida Lawncare
Desire to work & valid
Dri. Lic. Good starting
Pay. Paid Vacations
(352) 228-7472
Property
Maintenance
Homosassa
Full time maintenance
person to work at Forest
View/ Stonebrook
Communities in
Homosassa, General
maintenance, lawn
mowing and swimming
pool maintenance.
Experience preferred
but will train right
person. We offer
competitive wages
and excellent benefits
including medical,
dental and long-term
disability and 401(K).
Fax resume or work
history to Steve Herrick
at 352-628-4489 or
e-mail to
Stephen.Herrick@
allforestview.com
EOE/MF
PT. WAREHOUSE

Must have clean
driver's license
(352) 563-5958,
ask for Liz

REPS.
ALWAYS...
on vacation. Girls and
guys 18+ travel every-
where representing
sport and fashion news.
Contact Sarah at
877-710-1160._

RESIDENT
MANAGER
Needed
For Government
subsidized
apartments in
Wildwood,
Maintenance expert.
a must! Apartment
rent, electric & water
is provided.
EOE
Fax resume to:
(863) 683-4693


PAINT SPRAYER
Graco Magnum XR7
w/2 spray hds, 2 shields.
Used once. Undr. Warr.
$350 (352) 522-0807
(727) 688-4020
PRESSURE WASHER
GENERAL 2300 PSI,
Extra Hose. $325;
ROTOTILLER Bolens 6 hp.
$225 Barely Used!
(352) 465-7219
TABLESAW &
MORTISING MACHINE
Ridgid 3650 $400.
ShopFox 1671 $200.
352-613-3843 After 5pm
TOOLS, MECHANIC'S
3 Boxes, Loaded. Many
Craftsman. Citrus Sprgs.
(352) 342-1922

WHEEL OF A
DEAL









GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95

Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
'Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.





FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type w/ 18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai.
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811
MH Roofover Kits Avail.
do it yourself, will deliv,
Used roofing material
also avail 352-746-1600



BROTHERS LAZER
PRINTER $50/obo
SHARP FAX MACHINE
like new, $50/obo
(352) 637-1173


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r -
NOW IH
LOCAL
Large n<
organize
Avg. Pay
Over $55K
Including
benefits &
I training, v
F/Tr&
1-866-51




ESTABLISHED
FOR SALE. Ex
352-341 -
352-212-051.
LAWN BUS
EQUIP. F(
Steady ye
income (352
POOL
HERNANDO
year. Will train
tee account
price. 877-
www.poolr.
com NPRS




COMMERCE
Prime, Sub-P
Money, REHA
Also, equi
Mark (352)




ALL STEEL B
, i �

.., ".-'.--.""

25x25x7 (2
1- 9x7 gara
2 ve
4" concr
INSTALLED
25x30x9 (3
Roof Ove
2-9x7 gara
2 vents, er
4" concre
INSTALLED
Many Size
We Custom
We Are The
Fl. Enginee
Meets or
Florida Wi,
METAL STR
LLCC
1-866-62
metalstructu
FACTORY
METAL BU
CARPORT
Custom Ins
Up to 14
Wind R
Gulf to La
(352) 52

LOCAL
30 X 3
Vertical Re
8 X 7 Gorc
& (1) 36" VW
& 4"s
Installed
(352) 48


CLASSIFIED



* -- ql AIR CONDITIONER
1IRING Nordine, 5 yrs. old. 2.5
ALLY ton, Heat Pump/AC,
recently serviced. Runs
national Great! Asking $550
action. (352) 344-2615
$20/hr. ALMOST NEW
annually. FRIGADAIRE SIDE BY
ng full SIDE REFRIG. 26cu. ft.
OT, paid * Wtr/Ice in door. Black
action. I w/SS drs, 68YA"H 35
P/T I 5/8"W
5-1762 $700/obo 352-503-4733
BRAND NEW
22 cu. ft., sided by side
ice & water in door
$600. 352-642-6700
COMPACT
C SALON RERIGERATOR
c5043 or GE, 3 cu. Ft. $50
4/637-5078 (352) 465-7219
SINESS & Dryer
OR SALE Mint condition
ar rouhd $150. obo
2) 628-4500 (352) 302-7985
2-- ELECTRIC STOVE
ROUTE 20", 4 BURNER, perfect for
Net $84K + small mobile, cabin or
in Guran- camper. $100
)ts $67K full (352) 613-3503
766-5757
outesales. Freezer
Inc. Broker Comm. Upright 11 cu.
ft. 55HX28WX26.5D
<2 yrs, old. Exc.Cond.
$250 (352) 628-4216
Freezer for sale, 16
Scu.f., exc. cond., too
AL LOANS big for family, $125.
Prime, Hard (352) 344-5299
AB, Private, KENMORE 21CU. FT.
ip. loans, side by side, water &
422-1284 ice in door, white, good
clean cond. $150.
352-621-4721
Maytag dryer,
I yr old $150
UILDINGS (352) 464-2735,
,.- . after 3:30PM
S NEW KENMORE
WASHER & DRYER
Extra Ig. capacity
:12 Pitch) $250/set abo
age door, (352)341-1848
nts, REFRIG. & STOVE
ete slab MATCHING
-$15.995 Ceramic top, almond.
:12 Pitch) Freezer on Top,
erhang $300/both
ge doors, (352) 746-0243
entry door, REFRIGERATOR
ste slab Frigidaire, 18cu. ft, , w/
- $16,495 ice maker excel cond.
es Avail. $235./obo.
am Build (352) 637-4645
e Factory REFRIGERATOR
red Plans Side By Side, Kenmore
Exceeds Ice & water in door.
ind Code $450
UCTURES GE SPACEMAKER, XL
-OM 1800 Microwave, $150
24-9100 (352) 341-5247
reslc.com Refrigerator
DIRECT w/ice maker, bisque,
ILDINGS very clean, $135.
S, SHEDS (352) 726-6224
is , Washer & Dryer $265/
stalation, set. Great cond. Best
40MPH Guarant. Free delivery
Rating & setup (352) 835-1175
ke Sales Washer & Dryer
27-0555 Good condition
$250. obo, pair
Y MFG. (352) 634-2527
0X 9 Washer, Amana, white,
)of w/(2) $200.
ige Doors Dryer, Amana, white
Valk Door $200.
slab. (352) 560-3342
$14,995 WHIRLPOOL WASHER &
39-9397 GE DRYER
Both good condition
75 each.
(352) 563-1807


Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery. avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeeli.com




CATERPILLAR
Loader Backhoe
1995, $25,000.
1584 N. Marion Way
(352) 634-1728




8 PC. PATIO SET
w/Tea Cart $550
Like New!
(352) 613-4891
WICKER PATIO SET,
round table, 4 chairs,
$100,
(352) n38Ri2A5


"BOMBAY" BUFFET
(Cherry) $100;
LG. COFFEE TABLE w/2
drawers 3' X 4' $175
(352)522-0807
(727) 688-4020
2 COMPLETE BDRM SETS
1 Set 2 twins, dresser,
desk & chair, $225; 2nd
Set Qu, 4 poster bed,
chest, dresser, mirror,
nightstand, $175.
(352) 270-9136
2 CRAFTMATIC BEDS
TWIN SIZE
Cost $2000 each. Sell
$500 each or both $800
352-344-0807 after 3pm
2 LEATHER RECLINERS
Ivory Color $50/ea
or $75/both;
2 BRASS Bedroom Table
Lamps $25/both
(352) 726-4689
2 MATCHING FUTONS
w/twin mattresses.
$75 each/obo
(352) 270-9136
3 pc. Wall Unit
Solid oak, $775.
Leather recliner sofa,
pd. $1,200. will sell $800
352-637-1061
9 PC. LIVING RM. SET
Good Cond. $250;
YOUTH BED
White Heavy Plastic.
Good Cond. $40
(352) 628-4210
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
Amish made, solid oak
dining table w/6 Irg
chairs 82"x42" must sell
$600 Elegant plush sofa
& matching chair, $300.
All like new
(352) 560-3743
BAR STOOLS
2 - 29" oak bar stools at
$35,00 each
(352) 795-0625
Bassett Sofa Sleeper,
green black, new cond.
$250. obo
8 Pc. Patio Set,
neutral $250. obo
(352) 382-4757
BEDS ** BEDS .- BEDS
The factory outlet stores
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 .*. Full $159
Queen $199/ King $249
Please call 795-6006
BR SET California KG
Waterbed, Triple
Dresser, Hi-Boy, Lighted.
Solid Oak. Pd. $4,000
$600 obo 352-503-6169
Cell 453-6362
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Wal-Mart Plaza,
Consignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Coffee & 2 end table
set, Cherry wood color,
$50. Glasstop coffee &
sofa table set, $70
(352) 270-8178
COFFEE TABLE
Lg. Wood $25;
COMPLETE TWIN BED
Wood Hdbrd. Comp.
w/bedspread. $75
(352) 746-5031
COFFEE TABLE, END
TABLE, LAMP $50/Set
Straight Back WOOD
CHAIR. Cane seat
w/metal fish back. $40
(352) 341-2091
Couch & matching chair
& ottoman, $350 Antique
Grandfather clock, solid
walnut, $700 (352)
637-1321
Couch,
blue contemporary,
$200 abo
Entertainment Center
Black, w/ lights
$200. obo
(352) 302-7985
DBL. RECLINER SOFA
Navy Leather $500;
MICRO-SUEDE CHAISE
(Mocha) $250
Like New!(352)522-0807
(727) 688-4020
DINING RM. SET
8 upholstered chairs, 7'
table w/leaf & glass
top. $200.
(352) 527-9876
DINING RM. SET Table
w/2 leaves, 6 upholst.
chairs, china cbnt,
sldebd. $550; COFFEE
TBL. w/2 end tbls &
Imps. $150 352-382-2488
DINING ROOM SET
6 upholstered chairs
(includes 7 yards
matching fabric) table
& hutch, Whitewash.
$475; 352-382-7553
401-474-0089
END TABLES &
COFFEE TABLE
Solid Oak, Glass Top
$400
(352) 637-1061
EXECUTIVE
METAL DESK & CHAIR
60"x30". Exc. cond.
$150/obo
(352) 628-0941
La-Z-Boy Recliner/
Rocker, like new,
antique map pattern,
$380. Computer
desk/hutch/ filing table
set, $150 (352) 270-8178
Leaders Rattan Dinette
42" tbi, 4 Chrs w/ cast-
ers, 2 matching bar stis,
soft med. blue cush.
Orig. $1,400/Sell $650
ULike New Cond.
(352) 527-2327
Leather Chair and
Ottoman, Ashley, paid
$1,500, will sacrifice
$650. Coffee & end
tables wood w/ stone
top $500. for both,
new, excel, cond.
(352) 422-1909


Large Dining Table
w/6 chairs, $125. obo,
836 Great Pine Pine Pt. In-
verness Sat. & Sun. Only
(352) 220-9011
LOFT BED
Natural Hardwood.
Top Bunk & pull out
bottom bed. Built in
dresser, TV/Comp.
area. Full length closet
in back. Pd. $1,000/Sell
$400 (352) 270-1052
NEW DESK, CHAIR, & FILE
CABINET, teakwood
$500. PATIO TABLE W/4
CHAIRS $200. Like new.
(352) 522-0580
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Open for New Season
Beginning Tues Sept 11
Shop while It's cooler
In the mornings.
Tues-Sat. 9a-lp
Turn at Paul's sign on
Grover Cleveland
to Holiday St.
Homosassa 628-2306
Poplar wood writing
desk, $50. Kroehler
American Signature
kakhl green sofa,
loveseat, 2 side tables,
slip covers, set, $500
(352) 270-8178
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808

R MENTAL FINER
wwwchronicle
rentalfinder.com

SECTIONAL SOFA
4 major pieces $150
(352) 726-7421
SLEEPER SOFA
Blue Cloth $150;
TILE Mural Kitchen Table
(Beach/Shells) w/4 Wh.
Chairs $195
(352) 637-0440
SOFA & LOVESEAT
$375; RECLINERS,
ROCKER, $100 each.
352-697-1754
Solid pine natural and
cream dining set, $250
Cream & burgundy
La-Z-Boy recliner
rocker, $150.
(352) 270-8178
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
Wh. WICKER/RATTAN
Loveseat, 2 Chairs &
Table. $175; WROUGHT
IRON CHAIRS (4) White
w/cushions. $100/set
(352) 637-0440




2 Hustler commercial
mowers and 18Ft utility
trailer, 6 mo old, must be
sold (352) 726-7393
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
MULCH 5-6 Yrd. Loads
$95 Deliv'd, Citrus Co.
Gravel $75 + Materials.
352-563-9979/400-0150
Riding LAWN MOWER
Craftsman, Elec. Start, 6
spd. Transaxle., 17 hp,
42" cut. Like New!
$1,200 Negot.
(352) 637-2375
SIMPLICITY RIDING
MOWER
16 hp, 36" Lf. Bagger
& dump wagon
352-795-2567/228-3747
Stihl grass edger,
model FC-55, bought
new Aug. 2004,
like new, $100 firm
(352) 726-2645
YARD MACHINE
Lawn Tractor
42" cut, 17.5 hp, auto
drive, mulch kit & dbl.
bag grass catcher.
$700 (352) 212-6735
YARD VACUUM/
CHIPPER
Craftsman 6.5 H.P. self
propelled. Almost New
$500. 352-270-3625




BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. & Sun. 15 & 16, 8-4
402 W. Blueflax Ct.
FLORAL CITY
Street Wide Yard Sale
14th, 15th, 16th. 8-?
S COVE PT.


- ct [ Noi .

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

HOMOSASSA
ESTATE SALE
SAT. & SUN 8a-3p.
3451 S. Corona Way.
(352) 726-7122




Baby Clothes,
girls, 0-3T, shoes, toys,
books, highchair, etc.
over 150 pcs
$150. for All
(352) 601-5341


(352) 382-1628
2 Wheel Chairs
$65. & $90.
(352) 382-1628
ASTHMA/POLLEN/DUST
Breathing problems?
Cloud 9 Sterile HEPA
Filter Air Purifiers, exc,
cond. 3.Cost $1485.00
Sell (3) w/filters $300
cash (352) 344-9073
Hoveround Power
wheelchair, 2 yrs old,
elec., exc. cond., $600
Handicap ramp, fold-
ing for van never used,
$250. (352) 344-3032




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676


5 PC. PATIO SET
Table w/4 swivel rockers &
rug. $250;
PET WINDOW 8 mo. old.
Fits MOST windows $100
(352) 382-2076
12,000 BTU AIR COND.
Never used, $150;
Call after 5pm.
If no answer leave msg.
(352) 860-1723
17" KDS Computer
Monitor $40;
Men's NEXT Mountain
Bike $40
(352) 726-9183
61" RCA GREY TV
Works well $900,
SUZUKI DIRT BIKE JR80
2 stroke. Great shape.
$600. (352) 422-6911
7'X 12" Trailer w/ramp
gate, $800 YAMAHA
Golf Cart, Ights, charger,
$1200. 795-4770
Above Ground Pool
FENCE
24 ft., brand new
$150 obo
(352) 527-4171
AIR CONDITIONER
For Mobile Home 2/2% ton.
$300/obo
POWER POLE 200/250
amp serve, for Mobile Home.
$300/obo
(352) 400-1424
Approximately
300 Concrete Blocks
8 x 8 x 16
$250 for All
(352) 726-3093
BURN BARRELS
Heavy duty w/ out tops
$7.50 EA (352) 344-9752
CCTV
ALADDIN CLASSIC
Black & white in exc.
cond. $1500
(352) 637-1173
Complete gas log
fireplace & ducting
cost $1,500,
Sell $300
(352) 746-3319
DELL DESKTOP
COMPUTER, WinXP
complete, like new
$450. DRESSER, solid
wood, light, was $795
sell $250. (352) 726-5310
Desk Top Sign Maker
Roland 24" Comm 1
PNC-1100, soft ware in-
cluded, works great
$1,000. (352) 726-0979
after. 6pm
Desk- wrought iron
treadle sew mach.
base w/rock maple
desk top, beautiful,
$298. BBQ extra side
burner, propane tank,
cover, & utensils great
cond., $65. 726-2269
FLOOR SAFE (Large)
W/2 Lg. Doors
34"D X 44"W X 48"H
on wheels $500
(352) 598-6266
Or (352) 341-6266
GENERATOR
6250 Watt. $400
Used for 6 days.
Like New!
(352) 637-7150
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
Beaded Jackets,
$150/all or will sell
separately.
(352) 382-1191
HIDE-A BED SOFA
Floral Print, Exc. Cond.
$175; Lg. Husky Toolbox
w/Craftsman Tools
$350 OBO
(352) 613-4891
KNITTING MACHINES
Brother 280 & 260
Inc. Ribber & Stand
$500/ea,
352-563-6371/422-4630
MASSAGE TABLE
Professional &
Stationary;
Good Cond.
$150 (352)746-5077
PRESSURE WASHER
Excell 2500, $120;
HARMONY 880
Univ. REMOTE CONTROL
$90
(352) 563-9987 .
REAL CLOWN ITEMS
Hats. Shoes, Wigs,
Jackets, Clothes.
$150 all or will sell
separately,
(352) 382-1191
SATELLITE DISH SYSTEMS
Direc Way H.S. Internet
Model DW7000;
Direct TV 1-HD Rec'r
2 Std. Rec'r w/cards.
$400/bth 352-489-6894
SEWING MACHINES
New Home $65
Kenmore $45
Excellent condition
(352) 527-0424
SINGER ATHENA Sewing
Machine. Walnut
cabinet & chair $300;
GATOR "Time Out" Doll
$25
(352)341-2091
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
TANNING BED 32 BULB
3 facial Tanners,
salon style. $500.
(352) 257-1864
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Thompson Mini Walking
foot Commercial
Sewing Machine,
Perfect condition
$300.
(352) 628-4527
Vinyl rack, holds 8 rolls, Is-
land type, on rollers, $100.
Slot machine, needs re-
pair. $50
(352) 341-0787




2 Port A Potty's
$22 ea.


$700 OBO
(352) 634-1674
30' 5th Wheel, enclosed
car trailer, 40001b. tan-
dem axles. $9000. 6X10
enclosed trailer $2200.
(352) 341-1143
CAR HAULER
Dbl Axle. Steel Deck,
ramps. Spare tire and
winch. $1495.
352-228-2608.
Equipment Trailer
$800. Sell or Trade
(352) 382-3642
HEAVY DUTY TRAILER
16' w/ramps.
$750
352-634-1728/527-0403




(2) His/Hers SAPPHIRE/
DIAMOND BRACELETS.
14K Gold. Offers
352-795-2567/228-3747


Flute, Bundy/case,
$65.
excel, cond.
for info/see
(352) 795-0636
PIANO
Baldwin, Baby Grand
Approx. 50 yrs. old.
$500
(352) 302-6025
Piano, Wurlitzer $850,
Guitar, Honer/Case
$250.
All in excel, cond.
for info/see
(352) 795-0636
WERSI ORGAN
w/bench. $250 abo;
(352) 795-8828
Wurlitzer Piano
$500.
(352) 344-4204
Leave Message




AB Lounge A,
exerciser never
used, $60.
(352) 249-3184
Ellipical Trainer
$100
(352) 464-2735
after 3:30 PM
ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE by Horizon
Fitness Ltd, Series.
Model #LS625E
Used very little. $595.
(352) 465-1698
EXERCISE EQUIP
VISION HEALTHSPA
FITNESS EQUIP.
Treadmill with 60"
deck/ Elliptical,
Recumnet Bike with
built in heart monitors
paid 5k will sell for
$2500 Rarely used
collecting dust
795-0466
LIFE GEAR RECUMBENT
Exercise Bike. Lists for
$360. Like new. Sell for
$165. (352) 746-6975
PRO-FORM 520X
TREADMILL, sell as is
$100/obo Working
condition. Will need
console board.
(352) 249-1118




8' POOL TABLE
Custom built 8'. 1"
Slate. New Felt. Ex.
Cond. $1195.
228-2608.
ANTIQUE COLT
Pocket Revolver
22 Cal. Brass Frame
$600
(352) 628-7818
ASSAULT SHOTGUN
12 GA, Semi-auto. 8
shot. "Franchi" Law 12.
$500, GLOCK 40 Cal.
w/2 mags. $450.
(352) 697-1200
BERETTA
22 Semi-Auto.
Exc. Cond. $375
(352) 637-7150
BOW FLEX
Pro Edition
Exc. Cond. $300
(352) 637-1061
BRAND NEW
MEN'S BIKE needs new
back tire. Grandson
took out, and got flat
right away. Paid $99,
sell $40..(352) 746-5810
COLT VEST POCKET
25cal. $375
COLT POLICE POSITIVE
22cal. Revolver $425
Old/Looks New.
(352) 344-9502
ELEC. POOL HEATER,
$25;
(352) 422-5529
ELLIPTICAL TRAINER
Pro Form 160
Almost New!
$300 OBO
(352) 201-9538
EVERLAST
BOXING GYM
HEAVY & SPEED BAGS
$125 352- 287-9847
Folding Bicycles,
like new $75. ea. or
$100 for pair
$250. ea. new,
great for travel & RV's
(352) 208-4428
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We sell
ATV parts 628-2084
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
GOLF CART
Harley Davidson Gas
$750
352-527-0403/634-1728
Golf Cart, 2001 EZ -Go,
4 seats, Exc cond,
$3500.
(352)249-1031 L/M
MI 30 cal Carbine
red dot scope clips,
pouches, Extra Stock,
case, good hunting
gun, $450. Erma LA22
German luger. 2 clips,
ammo, $300.
(352) 344-9668
RELOADER 12 GA.
MEC Grabber 76. Plus,
powder, wads, primers.
$200, 352-270-3625
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
WEIGHT SET
Bar, numerous weights
& bench, Also separate
slant board for
crunches, $100/all
(352) 621-0848




8 X14 Single Axle
HD Utility Trailer
w/ramp gate & 3' sides
Bed is 6 X 10.


Earn extra
income after
taking course

Flexible
schedules,
convenient
locations.

Courses start
in Sept.

Call
, 877-766-1829
Liberty
Tax Service
g Fee for books.

CLEANING
POSITION
Inverness. Exp'd w/ ref.
Will train right person,
Must have trans. DFWP
352-637-0611 10a-2p
Evangelical
Church
Looking for Volunteer
Accompanist.
Reply to Box 1377P
c/o Citrus Publishing
1634 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crys. Rvr, Fl 34429
HOUSEKEEPING

Cleaning, gardening,
etc, (352) 527-9247
Yard/Gen. Maint.
Part time, Yard &
Home Repair CALL
(352) 522-1109 after
7pm Only, Cit. Springs


3 Various sizes area
rugs, burgundy print,
$50. Others $25 each
(352) 270-8178

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150 ........... $7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply


ARMOIRE
6'X4' wide, double
doors, Cherry,
$575.
(352) 637-1161
BARBER'S CHAIR
"Emil J. Paidar",
Chicago. Over 75 yrs,
old. Access, Good to
Exc. Cond. $1,250 obo
352-746-5077
DRESSER
$50
(352) 341-5247





















RADIO/
PHONOGRAPH
$75
(352) 341-5247
VICTOR SAFE
$300;
SEWING CABINET
$35 OBO
(352) 341-5247




























3 PERSON HYDRO SPA
Hottub. Barely Used.
Blue Inside $1,900
(352) 746-7220




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
- 2 Ton $780.00
-6 2-'/2ton $814.00
- 3 Ton $882.00
* Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery'
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
e'g5� 797.


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
3 YORKIE MALES
CKC & AKC, Health
Cert. & all shots.
Ready to go! $550
352-563-2557/697-1790
BEAUTIFUL CHOCOLATE
LAB PUPS AKC 9wks.
Old. Parents on prem-
ises. $600 each. Health
cert. (352) 465-6535
BOXER PUPPIES
Purebred, 12 wks.,
Male & Female
Brindles & Fawns. $300
352-344-5712/978-3202
CHIHUAHUAS
Shots, Vet checked
health cert. M $250 &
F $275. 352-563-0826,
352-220-9751 cell.
COCKATIEL
25 wks, w/Ig. cage &
toys + playland for top.
Gray, yllw & wht. $125
352-220-6325/220-9532


-i Act Now�F .

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?

We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95

The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

HANS MACAW
5 mos. old w/Ig. cage &
cage toys. $600
352-220-6325/220-9532

Humane Society
of Inverness
Has a New Vet
Dr. Mattew Fox
Joined our team.
We offer low cost
Spay & Neuter
Starting at $20,
Low cost vaccines,
Heartworm test,
Heartworm treat-
ment, Cat
Declawing. Call
for prices and appt.
(352) 726-8801

Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Soaved $25
Doa Neutered &-
Spayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
LAB PUPPIES, Registered
Choc. & Black. Health
Cert. & Shots. Parents
on Premises $200
(352) 746-0221
MASTIFF, English
Male, AKC, 15 mos. Big
Boned Beauty! Pick of
the litter MUST SELL!
$800 (352) 621-0848
MINI DACHSHUNDS
puppies, AKC, 2 male, 2
female, 8-wks, $425
(352) 726-4007
MINI DACHSHUNDS
Reg., Shots, Health
Cert., MUST SEEI $400
(352) 563-1479
MINIATURE HORSE
7 Mos. old Mare,
very sweet & gentle
$400. obo
(352) 795-7513

PETS-
Breeding parakeets
$40 pr; 1 pr canaries
$150;2 finches w/cge
$50; many cages
628-3393

PIT PUP
$150.00 white female
4 mo. call 4 Info
352-854-9663
PIT PUPS (8) BLACK
Gorgeous/Reg. Phatt
Head Colby Villains.
Simply the best! $150
(352) 621-0268.
ROTTWEILER
Male, 14 mos. AKC, in
tact, beautiful dog.
Pick of litter. MUST SELL!
$500(352)621-0848
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt.,
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906
YORKIE PUP
$600. parents on
premises.
352-400-4913/476-1208
YORKIE PUPPIES
2 CKC Reg. 10 wk.
males. Health Cert.
$800 (352) 795-0144
YORKIE PUPS AKC
2 Female, 1 male. will
be small 352-726-5576
Yorkshire Puppies
2 8wk old males
(352) 637-9543




10 yr.Gelding Arab/
Quarter. Great Trails.
Eng./West. $1,200
(352) 322-0534
HORSE SHOEING/


TRIMMING, AFA, Ceft.
Farrier, Richard Iversen
(352) 628-9186




2 BLACK ANGUS COWS
2 yr. old. Thorobred.
, (352) 344-2395
BULLS 5-6 mos. old
White Face Hereford &
Red Angus,
(352) 344-5895
LG. HEALTHY COW
Friendly. Red/White
$700 Delivery Extra
(352) 726-3093


40 HP JOHNSON '87
w/controls + prop.
Runs great. $850.
(352) 212-6497
15HP MERCURY
4 stroke, 2007, SS prop.
Under warranty.
$1400
(352) 795-1816
PONTOON BOAT
TRAILER
Tandem axle, 13" tires,
galv, 31 ft.adjustable.
$1,400. (352) 447-0572






L .



WE NEED

BOATS!!
SOLD at NO FEE
Selling them as fast








Air Boat
13 ft. fiberglass,
Rivermaster, hull, S/S,
cage, 403 Buick runs
good. Bilge pumps etc.
trir. needs paint $4,295.
(352) 860-0513
AIRBOAT 16'
Panther, Alum. w/trlr.
New prop & motor.
$5,500
(352) 489-3440
AIRBOAT 18'
Rivermaster, S.S. Belt
drive, trolling mtr. 500 Cad-
illac w/warranty.
$15K (352)628-1883
ALUMACRAFT 18'
Loaded, 90HP Johnson
saltwtr ed. 20hrs Magic
tilt BSS trailer, like new.
$11,500. (352) 212-3382
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510

**-* *.** * ** *
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597

Barvan Pontoon
Boat,.'79, 20' w/trailer,
35HP Merc, runs good;
many new parts. $2000
obo. (352) 563-0272
BENTLY
'05, 20 ft. Pontoon
custom made cover, 4
stroke, 60HP, merc., big
ft., lots of extras. low
eng. mi. + trlr. $12,500.
352-344-1828
CAROLINA SKIFF
'04, 115 Yamaha 4strk.
Bimini top, Minkota Rip
tide trolling mtr. Magic
tilt trir. $11,500
(352) 697-1172
Ebbtide 16'
w/trailer 75HP Merc Force
Engine runs great. $2,200.
352-628-6284
GHENOE '03
14' hi sider, 4HP 4strk Su-
zuki outboard, inc. '04 trlr.
like new, $1750.
Inverness (941) 650-5512
GRADY '89
24' Offshore. 2000-225
Yamaha, trailer. Exc.
$18,000
352-628-3551/302-7816
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper

352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper

352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
I Sales & Service I
I Present this Ad for
10% Off on all I
Parts & Service
1590 US 19,
Homosassa
352-794-0094










NEW T-TOPS &
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last LonglI
Call for Pricing
Mon-FrL. 9am-5pm
(352) 527-3555
NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Traller. Ready to fish
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209
POLAR 2300
2005, Twin 150 Yamaha
4 strk, all electronics,
$43,000
(352) 302-2240
PONTOON 16'
2003 Sylvan 16' w/02
40hp 4-stroke and 02
galv trailer. BImini


top,trolling motor,
livewell, depth finder,
much more. VERY NICE
$8950. 212-5179
PONTOON
21 ' Party Barge 40 HP
Evinrude-lots of Extras
Like New $6,000.00
352-634-2360
PONTOON
24' 1999 Landau DX-24
w/75HP Yamaha OB
Bimini, PortaPotti, Lad-
der $6900 352-564-1049
SEA RAY 18'
'99 Bowrlder w/ trailer,
115 Merc, OB, Tilt &
Trim, Extras, $8,900 OBO.
(352) 628-9056
SEAPRO 1999 21'
V2100cc bay series.150
Yamaha w/trailer,
bimlnl, radio, trolling
mtr. 13,000.
(352)748-5005


=IsOBa
c^ AceMoiesM


(352) 228-9645




'02, Honda Accord
#1, car sold in the
U.S. Loaded for only
$8,988. Call Now
866-838-4376

I'06, Hyundai Elantra
hatch back 20k mi.
LOADED with power
windows, power
locks, tilt, cruise, cd,

only $11,988.
866-838-4376



RR, Co, LoadedeL ..ot. $6,995
Auto, Sunrf Loaded.$7,995
'02 TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
V6, Duali, Loaded..........$7,995


ff-


'01, Corolla, auto, AC, P/S,
P/B, 114k hwy. mi.
1 owner, well maint.,
all records $5,995.
(352) 628-9984
TOYOTA
'98, Camry LE. 146K,
Hwy. mi., 1 own., SpIr.,
Grn./Slvr. ext., Lth. Int.
Ally whis, Great Cond.
$4,200. (352) 794-0054
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500


9


FORD EXPLORER
'97 XLT, 129K mi.,
Exc. Cond. $5,000 obo
(352) 563-2399
JIMMY
1991 runs good, no rust,
$700 or best offer
(352) 212-2114
(352) 220-5056
TAHOE LT
LT 2002 Loaded.
Leather, Sunroof, All
Power. $14,900 OBO.
352-228-2608
TOYOTA Highlander
'05 Limited, Wht, 10K,
Loaded, warr., Exc. New
$36K Now $24K Firm
352-341-4313/212-0615
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374


SUNDANCE
02, 14', Skiff, 25hp, Exc
Cond, Many extras,
$3700 OBO.
(352) 628-9323
SUNDANCE 19' '97
90HP Evin. BIm, Nicel
$5,.200 352-726-0939
SUNRAY PONTOON
'81,20', w/a '95,40 hp,
Tohatsu & trir.
Runs Great! $2,700 obo
(352) 628-7403
TREMBLAY 17'
Fiberglass, live-well,
center console, 60 hp
Evinrude. Runs great!
Swivel seats, front cast-
ing deck. Exc. Cond.
$5,500 (352) 795-1411
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497
Well Boat
30 ft., & trailer
$3,800. Sell or Trade
(352) 382-3642





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
.2 weeks in the
Chroniclelt
*2 weeks Online!
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
Beaver Monterey
38ft. 2005, C-9 Cat eng. 3
slides, fully loaded, 10k mi.
$185,000.
(352) 795-9873
DAMON 32', 1992
454 Chevy eng, 27K mi, 2
ACs, queen bed.Non
Smoking, No pets, Lots of
extras & Exc. Cond!
$18.900 (352) 527-8247
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg. 13K mi 1 slide, walk
arnd qn. bd. very clean.
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
THOR Windsport
'00,31 FT., V10 Ford,
like new, no pets, no
smoke, 16k mi. $28,000.
(352) 621-1655




BOBCAT
By Keystone
'99, 20', expandable, T.T.
air, awning. Nice Cond.
$3,500obo 352-382-2272
COACHMAN
5TH Wheel 26'/ needs
work. $1,000
(352) 634-1728
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
LANCE
'03 8.6 slide in camper full
upper queen, 3 way fridge,
A/C, outside shower, port
potty bath, fits short or long
bed, 1pc. SS roof $6,500
(352) 726-6485




350 CHEVY ENG. &
TRANSMISSION
$1,450 OBO
(352)746-5077
454 CHEVY ENG. &
TRANSMISSION
$1,050 080
(352)746-5077
1992 Ford Mustang
Good Parts or Project
car. No trans.
$1000/obo
(352) 212-2359
'04 DODGE RAM
2500 stock wheels, 17"
chrome, $100.00
352-422-5529
MUSTANG SET
OF 4
Set of 4 Mustang
Cobra Tires on Rims
17" fits
1994-2003 Mustang
$300 OBO
352-502-0014
RACING RIMS
SOUTHERN COMFORT
18", 6 lugs on 5'V2",
Chrome. Good Shape!
Sharp! Orig. $562 ea.
RACING TIRES on Same
Rims. TOYO "PROXI"
ES S/T, 255/55 R18
109V M+S. Orig. $150ea.
All 4 Tires & Rims, Asking
$1,000 Ask for Ray
Bev. Hills (352)746-1161
RED FIBERGLASS
TOPPER
For Reg. Cab Ranger.
$400
(352) 746-5441





TOP DOLLAR
| For Junk Cars |
$ (352)201-1052 $
---- -- m a
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF*.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf cads. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.


S'05,Chevy Impala
S4 Dr., auto, ac,
and more for less
$10,988.
866-838-4376
S- - -- - E
S'94,Honda Accord
I Extra Clean with low I
Smi. for only $3,988. |
866-838-4376

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Online!
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
p$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACCENT -HYUNDAI
1999, AC, AM/FM Cass.
5spd. well maint. Gas
saver, 35/45mph. $1900
obo, (352) 860-2517
ACURA MDX '04
Sport w/ navigation,
59K mi. Exc. cond.
Garage kept. $24,800
352-746-7402, Iv msg.

SLL SAVE AUTO
AFFORDABLE CARS
100+ Clean
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN
30MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US HWY 19 I
HOMOSASSA
352-563-2003

* AUTOMOBILE*
DONATIONS
Needed for Local
Battered Women
in Citrus County
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *






. BUICK LASABRE
'92
Blue, 4dr, runs great
$1400
(352) 563-0642, eve.
CADILLAC
1996 DeVille, 119K mi.
Minor TLC, $599.
(352) 563-4169
CADILLAC Deville
'92, 145K mi., Cold AC,
Runs & Drives Great!
$1,500 OBO
Marla (352) 795-4718
CHEVY CAVALIER
1998
$1850 Cold A/C, Clean int &
ext, New Tires. Call
352-613-5869
CHEVY COBALT '06
31k mi. 4dr. Metallic
sand, Air, CD plyr. Exc,
cond. PS. $10,200
(352) 746-5802
CHRYSLER SEBR-
ING1998
$3295. Convertible, A/C
Cold, Excellent Condition,
New Tires. 352-613-5869
DODGE
'73, Dart Swinger, 6 cyl.
auto, daily driver $2,950
obo (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
FORD
'93 Taurus GL Station
Wagon, Loaded! $3,300
OBO (352) 563-1181
(813)244-3945
HONDA ACCORD
'99, EXL, 6 cyl., very low
miles. Pristine Cond.
$11,000 (352) 634-5665
HYUNDAI
2001 Accent, 5-spd, PS,
PB, A/C, am/fm CD
radio, 70K, good cond
$2,850 (352) 795-1933
INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 10K mi. Blue/
creme, beautiful &
perfect! $30,800
(352) 860-1239
LINCOLN
'89 Limo, W/title, '89
Lincoln Towncar, V/G
Cond. Parts only. Both
have mtr. & trans,
$500/both. Will
separate. Great
project!(352) 628-2613
MAZDA
MIATA '94 Convertible
Pearl White, gd. cond
Garage kept. $3,995
(352) 637-4127





MERCEDES
I 1987, 560 SL, 126K,
IWhite, Both tops,
New tires, $10,500
S 352-586-6805/
� 382-1204

MERCURY
'98, Sable, V6, 3.0 eng.
repair or for parts, right
front end damage. U
haul $500/obo
(352) 628-0608
MERCURY Marquis
LS, 2006, Ultimate
Edition, 12,900mi,
under warr, $16,100.
(352) 795-5554
MUSTANG - RED
'01
15,000 mi. 1 owner, loaded,
$9,900.
(352) 212-5628
OLDS AURORA
2001, V-6 Sedan, 48K,
Exc. Cond. Leather,
Dual Pwr Seats/Wndws/
Drs., Radio/Cass./CD,
Chrome Wheels,
Pearl White. $10,995
(352) 746-2001
PLY. ACCLAIM
'94, 4 DR, AC, auto, very
depend. 35mpg, cruise
control 100k + mi.,clean,
$1,350. (352) 586-3854
TOYOTA


TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./AII pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
$5001 Poe ImpoundsFor
sie!
Cars from $50 For isings cl
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




CHEVY
'84, Stepslde. Many
new partsV-, A/T, AC
$4,500 (352) 447-0909
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,500. worked 350,
turbo 350 tranny. Needs
some finishing touches.
352-489-8633
LINCOLN LIMO
1988 vintage 6 pass. all
works, cold AC, garage
kept. $2,800
(352) 422-1675
MERCEDES 1984
380SL, 69K orig. mi. 2
tops w/stand, garage
kept. $13,500
(352) 302-5698
TRIUMPH SPITFIRE
'80. Very low miles, runs
great, perfect project car.
$3,700
(352) 503-6263
VOLKSWAGON '70
7 pass bus. Rebuilt mtr
runs great, new brakes,
needs body wrk, $1975
352-637-1894, after 9am
$500! Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





S'02, Nissan Frontier,
4x4 Perfect work
truck with only 37k
CALL NOW |
866-838-4376

'05,Dodge Ram
V6, Gas Saver
with only 32k
Call Now $8,988.
866-838-4376

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the

*2 weeks Online!
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply






CHEVY
Chevy Silverado 2006
Like new! Club Cab,
V8, Leather, Dual Ex-
haust, Loaded! Hard
Cover Bed. Chrome
Rims, 32K Mi, $20,999
OBO Call 352-464-1411
DODGE
1984 Power RAM, 4x4,
LB, 140K mi. no radio,
A/C, strong work truck
$1,500 obo 341-1567
DODGE DAKOTA
'01 SLT
44K, $8500, Tinted Glass,
Bedliner, Exc Cond,
Call 352-726-0156
DODGRE RAM
'89, 150, Needs Paint,
runs good $650
352-726-0939
F-150 XLT '97
Super Cab, 4wd,.auto,
exc. cond. $7,495.
(352) 302-3048
FORD
'04,F150 XL, Super Cab
V8, Auto, A/C, P/S, 34k well
maint., 1 owner, $14,300.
(352) 628-9984
FORD
'99 E-350 Box Truck
AC, Ramp. $4,000 obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
FORD EXPLORER
SPORT '02, AC, runs great.
57K mi., exc. cond.
$10,000/obo
(352) 637-2582
FORD F250 '99
Quad Cab Long Bed, 7.3
Diesel, 4" New exhaust,
Tuner, cold air filter, 177K
mi $12950.00 OBO, Alloy
Wheels, Power Seating,
AM/FM Stereo, Goose neck
hitch, Power Door Locks,
Power Windows, Air Condi-
tion New tires, New shocks,
Like new in and out. (352)
465-2761
FORD RANGER
1998 with topper, 6cyl.
$2,000 (352) 422-3700
NISSAN
Frontier XE '04, Ext. Cab,
auto, cruise, 1 Owner.
Exc. Cond,
$9,500 (352) 302-7073
SUBARU BAJA
2005 24K mi. AWD, stand-
ard, cruise, CD, bed ext., ex-
tras, $18,000 obo (352)
560-7696
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




'03, Ford Ranger
Don't miss out on
this one, great work
truck for only $7,995.
866-838-4376

'03, Hyundal Santa
I Fe.Gas saver, family I
* SUV for only $6,988.
866-838-4376

CHEVY Blazer S10
'88. 4.3, Low miles, A/C
Sr. owned, very sharp.
$2,700.00 (352)
465-0721


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Online!
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" SectionI
all Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

DODGE 1500
'97 Magnum, Ext. Cab,
5,9 L, Loaded! After
mkt. Chrome.
$7,500firm352-422-7279
NISSAN FRONTIER
'99, w/cap, 75K,
Ice Cold AC; 4 X4
$7,500
352-564-8476/422-5081
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





'05,Dodge Grand
Caravan Loaded
Call now $10,988.
Don't Miss Out
866-838-4376

S"06,FordFreesta"rs
I 3 to Choose from I
the perfect mini van
for the family 7
I passenger Loaded I
for only $198. mo.
S 866-838-4376

CHEVY VENTURE
1999, synthetic oil, new
brakes, dual ac, pwr
door, red color $3100.
352-564-1390
DODGE
'88 Ext. Van, Just Tuned
Up, Rear Brakes, new
tires. Asking $2,000obo
352-341-4848/400-1327
Dodge Conv. Van
'95, 318, Auto, cold AC,
Capt. seats, bck bnch seat
/bed. Gd cond.
$3,000 (352) 344-2999
DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 1994
$1650 Dual A/C, 7.pass,
clean in & out, Good Tire,
352-613-5869
FORD E-150
'94, 7 Passenger, White,
At pwr., AC, tow pkg. .
$2,500 (352) 344-1413
FORD WINDSTAR
2000 SEL, All options
Leather Interior
$2,500 firm
(352) 257-1864

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY









ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM

$500! Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




* FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084

SUZUKI DRZ 125
2006 DRZ 125, Excel-
lent condition, have
only been riden very
little Asking $1200.00
(C) 352-257-2051

WOLF
'06, 150cc 4 wheeler,
$1,500. OBO.
(352) 476-6512





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chronicle
* 2 weeks Online!
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

*FREE REMOVAL OF*.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY CHOPPER
Will Turn Heads! '71 Old
School Iron Head
Springer. All redone!
A steal @ $5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HARLEY HERITAGE
CLASSIC '04
Too many extras to list!
Low miles $18,000 obo
(352) 634-5665
HONDA
'00, Scooter, Elite, 80CC.
black, approx 2k mi.l
$1,000.
(352) 489-1878


YAMAHA
'05, Roadstar Silverdo,
650 CC. 7,400 ml.,
Like New! $4,900
(352) 726-6128

YAMAHA
1979 400 SX, runs good
great starter bike
must sell $800 obo
(352) 464-2735,
after 3:30PM

YAMAHA SCOOTER
125cc. 1989 RIVA, 2970
mi. Recent tune-up, gd.
tires, $700.
(352) 563-5387


333-0916 SUCRN
2007CP585 Estate of
Sarah R. Giles
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007CP585
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SARAH R. GILES
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Sarah R. Giles,
deceased, whose date of
death was April 28, 2007,
Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is
110 N, Apopka Ave.,
Room 101. Inverness, FL
34450. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice is required to be
served must file their
claims with .this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
' The date of first
publication of this notice
is September 9, 2007.
Personal Representative:
Jose A. LeGrand
PO Box 2626
Winter Park, FL 32790-2626
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Julle W. Kronhaus
Attorney for Jose A.
LeGrand
Florida Bar No. 0994243
1330 Palmetto Avenue
Winter Park, FL 32789
Telephone: (407) 539-3939
Fax: (407) 539-6111
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September 9 and 16, 2007
336-0923 SUCRN
2007-CP-797 Estate of
Audra Maureen Hanna
McKim Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS
,COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2007-CP-797
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AUDRA MAUREEN HANNA
MCKIM A/K/A
SAM MCKIM A/K/A
MAUREEN H. MCKIM
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of Audra
Maureen Hanna McKlm
a/k/a Sam McKIm a/k/a
Maureen H. McKim.., de-
ceased, whose date of
death was September 5,
2007, Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue,. Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733,702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is
September 16,2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, FL 34453
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymrnaker
Esquire
Florida Bar No. 398535
Slaymaker and
Nelson, P.A.
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness. Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726-6129
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,.
September 16 & 23, 2007
337-0923 SUCRN
2007 CP 675 Estate of
Daniel Lee Hucklns
Notice to Creditors


Summary Administration
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007 CP 675
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DANIEL LEE HUCKINS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Sumary
Administration has been
entered In the estate of
DANIEL LEE HUCKINS, de-
ceased, File Number 2007
CP 675, by the Circuit
Court tar Citrus County,,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is
110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450;
that the decedent's date
of death was May 11,
2007; that the total value
of the estate Is
$128,000.00 for home-
stead property and that
the names and addresses
of those to whom It has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
Rae Huckins
9358 N. Citrus Springs Blvd
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the es-
tate of the decedent and
persons having claims or
demands against the
estate of the decedent
other than those for
whom provision for full
payment was made In
the Order of Summary Ad-
ministration must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is Sep-
tember 16, 2007.
Person Giving Notice:
RAE HUCKINS
9358 N. Citrus Springs Blvd
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
LEWIS E. DINKINS, P.A.
LEWIS E. DINKINS
Florida Bar No. 019741 .
201 N.E. 8th Avenue
Ocala, FL 34470
(352) 622-4176
Published two (2) times in
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 16 & 23, 2007.
338-0923 SUCRN
2007-CP-673 Estate of
DorothyK. Clark
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2007-CP-673
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY K. CLARK,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of DOROTHY K.
CLARK deceased, whose
date of death was June
20, 2007 and whose Social
Security Number Is
148-09-5496, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the Co-Personal Repre-
sentative and the
Co-Personal
Representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this no-
tice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate, must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publi-
cation of this notice is
September 16, 2007.
Co-Personal
Representative:
Bruce B. Clark
115 Alabama Trail
Browns Mills, NJ 08015
Co-Personal
Representative
Glenn W. Clark
21 Rldgmount Ave.
Mariton, NJ 08053
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
/s/ AVONELLE
R. MACKEREL, PA.
Florida Bar # 521980
20743 W.
Pennsylvania Ave.
P.O. Box 717
Dunnellon. FL 34430
352-489-2264
FAX 352-489-6890


$2,405.80. Said funds are
all of the assets due to:
LYNDA ROBIN
whose lask known address
was:
4509 E. JUDGE PEREZ BLVD
MERAUX. LA 70075
and said assets remain
unclaimed.
Unless said funds are
claimed on or before six
(6) months from the date
of the first publication of
this notice, said funds will
be forwarded to the State
of Florida, pursuant to
Florida Staiutes 733..816.


340-0916 SUCRN
Citrus County Animal Services
PUBLIC NOTICE
Board of County Commissioners
Department of Public Safety
Animal Services Division
4030 S. Airport Rd. Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 726-7660 Fax: (352) 726-4120 TTY (352) 527-5312
September 13, 2007
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice is hereby given that Citrus County Animal
Services will offer for sale at public auction two ponies;
one white face roan mare and a brown gelding, Also
offered for sale Is one rale black and white pygmy
goat.
At the conclusion of the sale, the buyer must make full
payment for the horse/goat and immediately following
the sale, the buyer will be required to make arrange-
ments for hauling the horse/goat away that same day.
AUCTION:
DATE: Saturday, -
September 22, 2007
TIME: 1:00 PM
LOCATION: 4030 S. Airport
Road
Inverness, FL 34450
. PHONE: (352) 726-7660
CONTACT: Sandy Watson
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle.
September 16, 2007.

931-0924 SU/M CRN
Citrus County School Board
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
INVITATION TO SUBMIT STATEMENT
OF QUALIFICATIONS
The School Board of Citrus County, Florida will receive
Statement of Qualifications for the selection of
Architecture, Engineering & Surveying Firms Interested
In contracting services for the following Projects:
1. Heating, ventilating, air conditioning and Electrical
projects
2. Re roofing projects
3. Site drainage and development projects
4. Architectural projects
5. Site Selection projects
6. Structural Engineering projects
7. Site Utility projects
8. Construction Materials, Testing & Inspection,
Threshold Inspection & Geotechnlcal Services
9. Surveying projects
These services will be utilized as required for small
projects as defined by F.S. 287.055(2) g. continuing
contract. Firms may be selected for projects, as the
District deems necessary. The District reserves the right
to select multiple firms in each category, to eliminate
categories and/or to combine categories. The firms
selected shall provide proposals on a per project basis
for a period of one year with the option of the District
to renew for up to two additional one-year periods. The
District may require a unit price master Agreement for
Construction Materials, Testing & Inspection, Threshold
Inspection & Geotechnical Services.
The District will accept statement of qualifications until
2:00 P.M. on October 9, 2007. Please submit three (3)
copies of statements, which must be completed on
forms provided by the Citrus County School Board.
Submittal forms and the Request for Statements of
Qualifications can be obtained from the Facilities and
Construction Department (352) 726-1931, extension
2478. Final selection will be made In accordance with
the policies and administrative directives of the Citrus
County School Board and other statutory provisions,
The Citrus County School Board reserves the right to
reject any or all Statement of qualifications and
to waive any informality in any Statement of
Qualifications received.
All questions concerning this request shall be made to
the Director, Facilities and Construction, Citrus County
School Board. 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida
34450, Telephone (352) 726-1931. extension, 2478
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 16, 17,23 and 24, 2007.

339-0916 SUCRN
Citrus County Construction Licensing
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND
APPEALS BOARD.WILL CONDUCT A MEETING ON
SEPTEMBER 26, 2007 AT 2:00 P.M., AT THE LECANTO
GOVERNMENT BUILDING, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH.
RM 166 LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461.
SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
1. SHAD SANDERS. TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR TILE AND MARBLE CON-
TRACTOR.
2. MICHAEL A. FLORIAN. TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR MASONRY CONTRACTOR.
3. STEVEN G. ROBERTS. TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AP-
PROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR WINDOW & DOOR CON-
TRACTOR.
4. WESLEY R. ANTILL. TO MEET THE BOARD FOR
RE-APPROVAL TO TAKE EXAM FOR CONCRETE CON-
TRACTOR.
5. PETER FOSTER. TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL
FOR MASONRY & CONCRETE CONTRACTOR COMPE-
TENCY CARD.
CITATIONS'
1. JAKE MORDOH. CITATION#0726- "ENGAGE IN THE:
BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR.
OR ADVERTISE HIMSELF OR HERSELF OR A BUSINESS OR-
GANIZATION AS AVAILABLE TO ENGAGE IN THE BUSI-
NESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR -
WITHOUT BEING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED OR
HAVING A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY."
2. GREGORY WORDEN CORNE.- CITATION #0728-
"ENGAGE IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF
A CONTRACTOR OR ADVERTISE HIMSELF OR HERSELF OR
A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AS AVAILABLE TO ENGAGE
IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR WITHOUT BEING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTI-
FIED OR HAVING A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY."
3. EDWIN RICHARD SAMAYOA.- CITATION #0774-
"ENGAGE IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF
A CONTRACTOR OR ADVERTISE HIMSELF OR HERSELF OR
A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AS AVAILABLE TO ENGAGE
IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR WITHOUT BEING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTI-
FIED OR HAVING A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY."
4. RUSSELL POLICASTRO.- CITATION #0779- "ENGAGE IN
THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRAC-
TOR OR ADVERTISE HIMSELF OR HERSELF OR A BUSINESS
ORGANIZATION AS AVAILABLE TO ENGAGE IN THE BUSI-
NESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR-
WITHOUT BEING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED OR
HAVING A CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY."
ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINTS:
1. MURPHY BALKCOM. - d/b/a- COMPLETE CONCRETE
FINISHING, INC.
1 COUNT CASE #2007-104.
2. DAVID NICKERSON. d/b/o - MONTE CARLO
SWIMMING POOLS, INC.
1 COUNT CASE #2007-105
3. JOSEPH PEDONE. - d/b/a - PEDONE ENTERPRISES,
INC.
1 COUNT CASE #2007-113.
4. CHUNILAL RAMKISSOON.- CHUNILAL RAMKISSOON
1 COUNT CASE #2007-114.
OLD/NEW BUSINESS:
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION
MADE BY THE CONSTRUCTION LICENSING & APPEALS
BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR
PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, MASONIC BUILDING, 111
WEST MAIN STREET, 3RD FLOOR, and INVERNESS, FL.
34450, (352) 341-9801 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE
MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED,
USE THE TDD TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO
GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5312).
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronlcle,
September 16, 2007.


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
have set my hand and of-
ficial seal at Inverness,
Florida, on August 9, 2007.
PUBLISH ONCE A MONTH
FOR TWO (2) CONSECU
TIVE MONTHS:.
BETTY STRIFLER
ClerK of Circuit Court
By: M.Davis
Deputy Clerk
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
August 16 and September
16. 2007.


16 2007 9D


HONDA
NIGHTHAWK 1993
18k mi, $650 New Paint,
Ties, 250CC. Great
condition. Citrus Springs
352-359-0508
HONDA SHADOW
'06, 750, 2,600 Ml.,
Gray Flame. CB, BR.
Like New! $5,000
Ed. (352) 465-1124
KAWASAKI '04
Vulcan, 2000cc, mint
cond. Many extras.
$8,500/obo
352-628-7403
YAMAHA
'02, Warrio, 1700 CC.
4,900 mi.,
Like Newl $6,900
(352) 726-6128
YAMAHA
'04, V Star 650, Siverado
windshield, sattlebags,
many extras, like new
2,060 ml. $4,795.
(352) 422-4335


Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September 16 & 23,2007.
914-0916 TH/SUCRN
Notice of Escheat
Estate/Thomas A. Everard
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2006-CP-728
Division:
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS A EVERARD
Deceased,
NOQnCE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that
on August 9, 2007, there
was placed on deposit In
this office, funds received
from Nancy Jeanne Gra-
zlano, as Personal Repre-
sentative of the Estate of
Thomas A. Everard, de-
ceased, In the amount of


CLASS IFIERDS







.OD SUNDAY, SEi i'EMNii 16, 2007


(SWAPYOUR RIDE)


Cinius COUNTY (FL) C'HONICuI:


/9
m
'-9


AP Tup

APR0


ORUP
TO


MONTHS


07 F-150


07 Escape


07 Ranger


07 Edge


NEW '07 SHELBY GT 500 CONVERTIBLE
s59,590


'04 HONDA CIVIC LX
S12,995


6 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX
S17,995


07 Focus


07 Fusion


DIIID YOU

IKINOW
Ford Focus comes with a five year
100,000 mile Power Train limited
warranty?'
* 5-year/100,000-mile Powertrain Limited Warranty includes roadside assistance and is
transferable from one owner to the next. Deductible applies in Florida for the Extended Service
Plan. See dealer for details.


1' -
- -,.. ~-,


'02 CHEVY S10 CREW CAB LS 4X4
S14,995

^t^^AA


-f 1 w a '03 FORD F150


FORD E350 CLUB WAGON ]
$19,995
pml* -- -I-


CHRYSLER SEBRING '07 FORD TAURUS SE
Convertible.
$9.995 $14.995


'05 FORD "500" LIMITED


One owner.


'02 FORD EXPLORER SPORT TRAC 4
Moon roof.
$15 995


'05 FORD F350 4X4 KING RANCH CREW CAB '96 FORD TAURUS WAGON LX
Power stroke, turbo diesel
$31,995 $4,995


'04 FORD FOCUS ZX5
Full power 16,000 miles.
*11,995


'05 FORD EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition.
1 8.995


'02 FORD RANGER XLT
$8.995


150 XL


'06 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS
$16,995


'02 LINCOLN LS
Loaded!
$8,995


'07 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE '01 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB XLT '04 FORD RANGER XLT SUPER CAB '04 FORD EXPEDITION 4X4
Eddie Bauer, loaded, TV and navagation.
$21,995 $9,995 $14,995 $23,995


Full power.
$22,995


COME MEET ""

YOUR FRIENDS
GH ORS Ron Tesar Rick Petro Scott Parker
n T R e S 25 years - Sales 15 years - Sales 6 years - Sales

v 'FREE LIFETIME TIRE


ROTATION & BALANCE
S C With Purchase of
Any Four Tires \
MixOn nltf 7gOffer Expires 9/30/07 IM(aa


S


Greta Miner
5 years - Sales


Jeremy Welsen
1 year - Sales


E GenuineMotorcrafiPremium
SSynthetic Blend oil and
R w filter change
R Rotae and inspect four tires
6 R K * Check air and cabin air filters
* Inspect brake system
FUEL SAVER , Test battery
A KAGE,....-. , . Check belts and hoses
Top off all fluids
U p , r v I . - q , 1ar.- ,l f.1.:.l.:..: r' t'E' .:.i1 T3 . - i i r,, ,3iei: l ,i .; r .. - E ' ,: ... rce.
r..-l ,rilu .3- Pd r, so e 1 . ,ir.r i .. r ,i r i:er l i.r 3i a i. i,ri.,u.r' i i,1'i,


nu.


I


REBATE ON SELECT VEHICLES


07 Mustang


NEW '07 SHELBY
$439339


GT


owner
95


Salesperson of ire iMontlh
JULY


10 years Sales


III III


TTe AFe NUUKIng Mr NUIT-LIMt! 5AMb PeUple anUll
service technicians.
Great Benefits
Bonuses &-Commission - 401 K - Medical Benefits
Apply in person I Oarn-Spm - No Appointment Necessary
Interviews will be held at:
Gulf Coast Ford 47"!
2440 N.W. Hwy. 19 - Crysuil Riy�i,. FL 34428
352-7195-7371
Ask for Jim Preston in Sales or Bobbie Grubb in Service:
Equal Oppor-ity Enployor - Drug Fi � Vbrkplace


I


I


� .-* ". -t^-'


S*1.999


Nib, -
195 FORD
14' box, one a
$519i








SUNDAY, SEnPTMBiER 16, 2007 11D


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1I4I 4II


III II


~. 'I


* ... ~4 v


- rtlf" 4 .- '. -


ALL VEHICLES INCLUDING $5 CARS ARE 1st COME 1st SERVED.

SOMEONE ELSE HAS THE RIGHT TO PURCHASE THE VEHICLE IF

YOU HESITATE. SORRY, NO CARS CAN BE HELD. ALL VEHICLES

MUST BE CONTRACTED DAY OF SALE.


I1'1 11 I I I


Y' il


:1i3k I I


I FRIDAY

PREVIEW WILL BE HELD FRIDAY

NIGHT FROM 10AM UNTIL7PM

I ONLY. EVERY VEHICLE WILL BE

LOCATED AT JOHNSON BROS.

SUZUKI. THE SLASHER WILL BE

- PRESENT TO ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS
, 'c . - ..... . -..' - , . , ,


B ~ROS.SUZUKI


Name
I


S1 Address


Home Phone (__ )


Cell Phone ( )__


Cars i1t be sold for $5 daily. Purchaser must be able to provide insurance and posses a valid rivers Itcense


SALE BEGINS AT10AM. SIMPLY FIND

I THE CAR, TRUCK, VANl O8SUV THAT YOU

LIKE AND START

THE SLASHER WILL REDUCE THE PRICE

OF THAT VEHICLE BY THOUSANDS OF

DOLLARS. MAYBE YOU WILL BE SITTING

IN A $5 CAR! THIS SALE IS SO UNIQUE IT

ONLY LASTS FOR 4 HOURS.. SO YOU MUST

4 GET TO JOHNSON BROS.SUZUKI EARLY..

S ITS A CAR BUYER'S DREAM!






t '.








I SUNDAY
IF NECESSARY, SALE MAY BE HELD-OVER
UNTIL SUNDAY SEPT.16TH FROM 1PM TO
3PM. PLEASE CALL 1-352-795-0000 FOR

SALE INFORMATION.
vf s -- '


18233520...........2001......CHEVROLET......SI..O PICKUP .,.........WHITE...............47721
21427666..........2002....CHEVROLET...........SILVERADO1500......WHITE..............15634
3Ei90r305. 003 . GMC . ENVOY WHITE 3�45
37260658.......2003,....CHEVROLET ..........CAVALIER................,SEIGE...............45426
424347"9 2' J4 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER 57973
47101130 0lil *CHEVROL LET CAVALIER BLACK 55115
51,.38l155 2005 loA OPTIMA . SILVER 24291
82,5301i 2005 CHEVROLET COLORADO BLUE 6i37
61193919 2006 FUICK LACROSSE WHITE 19M4?
1 A005029 2101 HONDA ACCORD . BURGUINDY 730.48
1D2092f.9 2001 DODGE . EON GOLD . 904.8
1G206,84 21)001 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 1500 GOLD 16.1432
1K124097 2001 .CHEVROLE1 SIO PICUP SILVER 1007-.5
1S134171 2301 DODGE DAKOTA SILVER 74-11
1YFi1iO5 21100 GMC SONOMA iLVER 18591
2ME62595 2002 CHEVROLET MALIBU WHITE 741f4
2ME65i8 ?2'?J2 CHEVROLET MALIBU WHITE G87:30
2NA7TE37 2lrl2 FORD F150 BLACK 115921
A03i,773 2003 ACURA TL. 2 . ... . . 47907
3A8712"7 2003 HYUNDAI SONATA GRAY 83523
3C261.452 . 2uu3 PONTIAC GRANDAM. GOLD 66890
3E112354 2.03 GMC . SIERRA2U I . . .WHITE . 7200ri
3FA.)66 200r FORD . .MUSTANG SLVER . . 3391'
3PA73761l 2003 FORD . RANGER ... .. . 9737
3UA77944 2OL3 FORD EXPLORER SPORT RED . 49820
3Z482938 2003.. PONTIAC . ViBE ... .. . BLACK 74367
41B S 041 ... 2004.... FORD . .. .. . .F50 .. . . . . .36073
4PA9O079.. . 2004 FORD. . .RANGER .. RED .. .36115
4PA99079....., . 2004 FORD ... .RANGER . . RED 36115
4R515751.. .. .2004 . DODGE . . GRAND CARAVAN BLUE 46594
41153329 . . . 2004 SATURN . . ION 29279
4Z3523114 .-2004. GMC SIERRA 150J . . 44051
5D152382 . 2005 . CHEVROLET VENTURE , ...... 437
5J229413 .2005 .. GMC YUKON BLACK. 33518
5R115927 2005 FORD . FOCUS . .WHITE 28. 6
52150507 2005 SATURN . ION RED 19443
5Z284695 . 2005 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 15,)0 BLUE...... 12871
6F15878. . 2006 GMC . . . SiERRA2500 BLACK .... .12014
6H174527 2006 DODGE MAGNUM . . . . .24083
7Z107811 2i j0 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 15)0 SILVER 9522
KL607840. 1989 JEEP . CHEROKEE . 168320
LC1i3526 1990 HONDA ACCORD SILVER 11211)
LHB1252� 1990 FORD ECONOUNEE 150 WHITE 130320
LL191815 1990 JEEP CiEROKEE BLUE 18O000O
NTA27533 1992 FORD .RANGER . . TEAL 193927
P0047737. 2004 LEXUS . . RX330 ... GOLD . . 27B837
P0116004 2006 CAOILLAC .SRX PLATINUM 29049
POf61239. . 2006 CADILLAC . SRX LIGHTGRAY 32763
P1305952........,,2005, .. .MAZDA . . . 3 . GOLD 3;200 0


I I
I


m Meow m w m m m m m


P1372303 . '003 CHEVROLET-. SILVER 47045
P2100567. 2002 CHEVROLET . CAMt O SILVER. .46916
P2132149..........2003....GMCC........................ENVOY .......................RE .................... 40661
P2168134..........2005.....CHEVROLET..........TRAILBLAZER.,.........-WHITE..............71170


P., 315 364
P2335875
P419 1255,
P42181042
P.12IS797
P42.10'26
3P60 I92
rc11526v)
P616116B
P11231975
P953U6C91

P , -720E44
P7081600
P7786
P7795
P7837
P1840
p 70 5
P78,10
P7871
P7872..
P7092
P7893.
P7914-.
P79ib
P7921
P71.36.
P7953
P7050c
P79763
P7989
P7396.
P8018
Ip802l
P80 22
P8028
P60,39
P80 408
P8046
P6057
P8059
P8069
P8075


2005 .CHEVROLET
2004 CHEVROLET
30>1. PONTIAC
:006 PONTIAC
200f, PONTIAC
?0l06 . .PONTLAC.
:005 . KIA. ....
2006 CHEVROLET ..
20u7 .CHEVROLET..
2. 0j, CHEVROLET
S2003 CHEVROLET . .
200 KIA .
20 3 CHEVROLET
. 204.. CHEVROLET
.2006 CHEVROLET
200M .CADILLAC
2005 CHEVROLET ..
2003 .. FORD ....
2005 DODGE . .
2003 .FORD ..
2004 NISSAN .
2004 CHEVROLET.
.2005 . DODGE . ..
2005 . FORD
..200 . FORD
.2004 .. NISSAN ....
'006.. ..HYuNDAI
2005. .CHEVRPOLET
2005 FORD
.. 2004 FORD
2005 FORD
2096 DODGE
2005 CHRYSLER
2005 KIA.
200r CHEVROLET
'8001 CHEVROLET
2007 . CHEVROLET
2807 CHEVROLET
2007 CHEVROLET
2007 SATURN
2007 CHEVROLET
2002 CHEVROLET
2005 DODGE
2007 . SATURN .
2007 PONTIAC


TRAiLBLAZER
TRAILBLAZER


Gf.
. ,6 . .. .
. OPTIMA . .
. EQUINOX .
EQUINOX.
. EQUINOX ...
TRAILBLAZER
SEDONA
CAVALIER
CAVALIER
COBALT
DEVILLE
IMPALA
MUSTANGS


. GPANDCARAVAN


RANGER
ALTIMA .
SSILJRADO
CARAVAN
FISO
RANGER
.. FRONTIER
SONATA
EQUINOX
FOCUS
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
STRATUS


SEDONA.
MALIBU
TRAILBLAZER
1IRAILBLAZER
TRAILBLAZER
TRAILBLAZER
ION
COBALT


SILVERAD01500
CARAVAN
ION
.. GRANDPRIX


BLACK M .115,')i
BLACK . 42Erj
SILVER 11370
BEiGE 3E7,88
SILVER . 3325
WHITE . 1942
WHITE .. 35866
GRAY. . 28926
BLUE .. . 2954
.SILVERMETALLIC20912
SILVER 42680
WHITE 2M481
RED 63236
RED . 28988
WHITE 36790
BLUE 91887
TAN 115324
BURGANDO 46121
BLUE 7t1111


RED 45254
GOLD 105455
TAN 866525
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GRAY 22536
GRAY 102065
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SILVER 88243
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SALE


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RAIN OR SNINE. o ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCE"ED

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1_2D SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 16. 2007


FLORIDA'S FASTEST GROWING MITSUBISHI DEALER


08 LANCER
SAVE!
up to
-_ s5,000


A BOUT THI'tS VIE-H I C L
306-325-1415 EXT, 2801

8 %08 PERTM'ONTH*


07 RAIDED


FREE 2


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12,


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up to
s7,000


4 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE -
800-325-1415 EXT. 2807
RARR 288


PER MONTH*


2008 ECLIPSE


kV~ IM '1-01, 1.H10iq III


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1 6,888
I VyyWWPER MONTH*


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07 SPYDER


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
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800-325-.1415 EXT, 2803

21,888


2006 U S p '3 I. '3 U '3 3 2003


2006
GALANT
'12,195


2006
ENDEAVOR
114,795


2006
LANCER
1,595


2006
ECLIPSE


2004
OUTLANDER


2003
LANCER
5,495


2005
ENDEAVOR
$13,888


2004
ENDEAVOR
SwI


2003
ECLIPSE
'9,195


I I I I I I I I I
OCALA MITSUB ISHI
2200 SR 200 (352)622-4111 * (800)342-3008
0% FINANCING FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS IN LIEU OF ALL REBATES/INCENTIVES ON SELECT MODELS W.A.C. PRICES NET 2000 TRADE EQUITY. CUSTOMER RESPONSIBLE FOR TAX, TAG, DESTINATION AND FEES, NET REBATES (LOYALTY) FOR B3 MONTH ADVANTAGE LOAN (740 BEACON REQUIRED) WA.C. PHOTOS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. ALL
7243 VEHICLES SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED. SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE, REGISTRATION FEE, FINANCE CHARGES, EMISSION TESTING FEES AND COMPLIANCE FEES ARE ADDITIONAL TO ADVERTISED PRICES.


Crmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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7,


07 OUTLANDER
SAVE
up to


17 7388


07 GALANT



11 1, ?A FOJIf 0 If I I i 11W 0 MI */I.f .1
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2003
GALANT
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