Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01000
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 9, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01000

Full Text




Kid


Bucs take on

-.
C I T R U


S


COUNTY


FORECAST:
Partly sunny
with afternoon
thunderstorms
PAGE 4A


SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


HOT AND BOTHERED:
Paris sues
Hallmark
Hotel heiress
Paris Hilton is
waging a legal
battle with the
greeting card o
company over a
card bearing her
likeness and
patch phrase.
/Page 8B
COUNCIL CHAIR SUICIDE:
Last words
The St. Petersberg Council
chair who committed suicide
Friday night left behind a
note./Page 3A
TECH TURMOIL:


Cancer chip?
It's been approved for human
implantation. The FDA and the
chip's manufacturer say it's
safe. Studies suggest
btherwise./Page 3A
STUDENT LOANS:
Better debt
Congress approves an
overhaul of the student loan
program, offering debt forgive-
ness for students who go into
certain professions./Page 6A
MORE FROM CHINA:
Export costs rise
America is used to cheap
Chinese goods, but those in
the know say that won't be
the case for much
longer./Page 6A
POLITICS
Obama's game
Friend says presidential candi-
date hopeful plays the game
of politics well./Page 8A
FASTER WIRELESS:
Gadget to gadget
Future increases in WiFi speed
will improve file transfer
speeds when sharing data
between gadgets. /Page 9A
HOMEBUYING AUCTIONS:


On the block
Buyers look for bargains at
auctions./Page 1D
ONLINE POLL:
Share your view
Should the state spray herbi-
cides to kill aquatic vegetation
on area lakes?
A. Yes, as long as
@ they monitor the
water.
B. No. The spray-
ing isn't getting the
job done.
C. Yes. How else can they con-
trol invasive plant life on the
water?
D. No. It's poisoning the
Water.
To vote, simply access the
�Chronicle Web site,.
3#ww.chronicleonline.com.
:Fesults will appear in the
,6ept. 16 edition.
4ast week's results./Page 3A


Annie's 'lailboc ...... . 18A
Classified ........... . 7D
Crossword ........... 18A
Entertainment ...... . ... .8B
Horoscope .......... 18A
Lottery Payouts ....... .8B
Movies ............. 16A
Obituaries .......... . 6A
together .. .......... . 17A
Eight Sections



6 84 57 8 20 5 o


Storm expected to slosh N.C.


Tropical Storm

Gabrielle to hit

Outer Banks

Associated Press


CHARLESTON, S.C. - Gabrielle
became a tropical storm Saturday as it
swirled toward the East Coast, where
coastal residents in the Carolinas were
preparing for rain and the possibility of
minor flooding.
"It's going to get a little gnarly," said
51-year-old Sharon Peele Kennedy, a
lifetime resident of the Outer Banks


who works at the Hatteras Harbor
Marina in Hatteras, N.C.
"We're securing, but not too fast," she
said. "There's rio evacuation issue at
all. This is just a little breeze."
The National Hurricane Center fore-
cast called for Gabrielle to brush North
Carolina's Outer Banks on Sunday
afternoon before curving back out into
the Atlantic. Forecasters don't expect
the storm to become a hurricane.
At 5 p.m. Saturday, Gabrielle had top
sustained winds near 40 mph and was
centered about 185 miles southeast of
Cape Lookout, N.C., and moving north-
west about 8 mph.
Forecasters discontinued a tropical
storm watch from Surf City south to
Cape Fear. But an alert remained in


force for the North Carolina coastline
north of Surf City through the Outer
Banks and to the Virginia border.
"It's not expected to get too strong.
There are a lot of negative factors work-
ing against it - a lot of dry air aloft,"
said James Wingenroth, a forecaster
with the National Weather Service in
Morehead City, N.C. "It's just not look-
ing at this point that it's going to be any-
thing more than a strong tropical
storm."
Gabrielle formed along an old frontal
boundary that stalled about midway
between the Southeast coast and
Bermuda, drawing the attention of
coastal residents for the past few days.
Please see .'' * '' /Page 7A


Riverbed to death be


SI A , Lar- 1
Doug Rush and his neighbors on the lower Withlacoochee River believe herbicides sprayed by the DEP on Lake Ri
up-river have gradually killed off all plant life on the river bottom and bank.

Withlacoochee River looks like it's dying residents blame herb
_R-m WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Doug and Melody Rush can walk
out the back door of their home on
the lower Withlacoochee River and
see the river running fast and clear
below them, but the.\ say something
is missing from this picture of rural
tranquility. They say the river has lost
all of its all plant life for many miles.
The Rushes and a half-dozen
neighbor couples believe herbicides
sprayed by the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection on
4,000-acre Lake Rousseau up-river
has killed all the plant life along the
river bottom and on its banks up to
the high water line.
They have no scientific proof their
claims are true, but John Fuichs, a
retired environmental specialist
with the Federal Emergency
Management Agency and one of the
Rushes' neighbors, said DEP can't
prove its chemicals aren't to blame
without a long-term monitoring pro-
gram for the lower river.
"There's really something wrong.
We don't know what is, but the first
place they need to look at is herbi-
cides," he said.
Lake Rousseau lies between north-
ern Citrus County and southern Levy
County. It was created in the early
1900s when Florida Power
Corporation dammed the


Bonnie Drake said vegetation used to be thick on the banks near her riv
and now nothing grows below the high-water mark.


Withlacoochee and Rainbow rivers
to build a hydro plant for electricity
generation. The lower
Withlacoochee River receives all its
water from the lake.
State defends herbicide use
Fuchs said the location of the
spraying on the lake, its closeness to
the small dam and the amount of
water flow all determine how much
herbicide drifts downstream to the
lower Withlacoochee.
In a letter to DEP regional biologist


Terry K. Sullivan on May 9,
the herbicide Reward used c
Rousseau does not degrade if
n't touch plant life in the wa
can drift downstream and s
silt. He said Aquathol K, also
Lake Rousseau, does degr
water, but small amounts ar
urable for up to 12 hours after
cation in amounts high en
cause eye irritation in swim
Sullivan disputes the claim
Please see . .-..


WTI-CFCC program gives students a head s


New curriculum allows dual enrollment


KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
They're juniors in high school and
college freshmen at the same time.
Through Withlacoochee Technical
Institute and Central Florida
Community College Collegiate
Academy, students have the opportuni-
ty to straddle both worlds simultane-
ously


This school year, 32 Citrus County
high school juniors and seniors began
college-level courses at WTI under the
instruction of CFCC professors. They
are the first students enrolled in the
new program.
"It's exciting and it's going to grow,"
WTI Assistant Director Michael
D'Angelo said.
In September 2006, WTI officials
decided to brainstorm how to increase
the use of the WTI facility and expand


educational opportunities fc
To turn their vision into r
administrators teamed up
and Citrus County school
addition to local and state
to launch the Collegiate A
the 2007-08 school year.
"Our primary target audie
incoming juniors," D'An
Juniors have the ability to
program for two full years a:
60 credits, 15 per semester,
graduate with their Associ
Please see ' '


Associated Press
This NOAA satellite image taken
Saturday shows a line of clouds stretch-
ing from the Plains through the Northeast
as scattered showers and thunderstorms
are noted throughout the region.
W " 1 *l ' .


1? IExhibit,


walk to



honor 9/11



heroes

MIKE ARNOLD
marnold@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

For Andrew Tarpey, making sure the
heroes of 9/11 are remembered is per-
sonal.
Tarpey, a retired Port Authority Police
Officer, worked 22 years for the Port
Authority and personally knew seven of
the 37 officers who died during the
attacks on the two World Trade Centers.
Tarpey has
collected scores PATRIOT DAY
of pieces
of memorabilia The World Trade
from Ground Center memorial
Zero to display exhibit and trib.
Tuesday during ute will be open
the World from noon to 6
sCr, ,-,,s Trade Center p.m. Tuesday,at
o u Memorial the Inverness
ousseau M e min o r i a Go1 the Invernessnt
Exhibit & Governtmentr.
Tribute at Center.
, Gthe Inverness U The America
Government Supports You
Center. Freedom Walk
"We need to ceremony will
keep their begin at 5:30
honor," Tarpey p.m. Tuesday in
said. "They the parking lot of
could have ran, the Inverness
but they didn't Government
It's important to Center. The
< keep their Freedom Walk
memory alive." will include
The exhibit is music and com-
part of an after- ments from
part of an after- Thelma Stuart,
memorial thatong whose husband
memorial that Walwyn died in
culminates with the attacks.
the Freedom the attacks.
Walk Freedom M All United States
Walk is a nation- Flags should be
al event created flown at half-staff
by Pentagon Tuesday, in
employees in honor of Patriot
2005 to pay trib- Day.
ter home ute to those who
erhome died during the
attacks on Sept 11, 2001, to renew their
he said commitment to freedom and the values
on Lake of the country and to honor veterans,
fit does- past and present Inverness is one of 11
Water and cities in Florida that participate in the
settle in Freedom Walk. This is the second year
used on Inverness has joined in Freedom Walk.
trade in Thelma Stuart, whose husband
e meas- Walwyn died in the North Tower col-
Er appli- lapse, will speak at this year's ceremony.
ough to Walwyn Stuart, who worked for the
ners. Port Authority Trans-Hudson, got a
is of trainload of people to return to New
'Page 4A Jersey, then evacuated his station before
f/Page 4A returning to the North Tower to help
with rescue efforts there. He died later
that day when the tower collapsed. He
tarL was 28.
trt ~Tarpey said this year's exhibit would
contain pieces of broken glass, beams,
pins, bolts and various other memora-
or students. bilia from Ground Zero.
-eality, WTI Additionally, there will be a Flag of
with CFCC Honor and a Flag of Heroes that con-
officials, in tains every name of those who died that
authorities, day, including at the Pentagon and those
academyy for on United Flight 93.
Tarpey added there will be a lot of
nce are the new items added to the exhibit, includ-
gelo said. ing sketches of the memorial planned
attend the for Ground Zero, posters, pictures, news
nd earn the stories and other stories of the hundreds
, needed to of heroes who gave their lives that day.
ate in Arts "Sometimes, we take for granted what
we have," Tarpey said. "That each day is
. ./Page 5A a gift."


Seattle in season opener /1B


1!IzE�7x


HIGH
91
LOW
72





2A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


SaiLocked

LOCked]1


www.SweetbaySupermarket.com


ALL


DAY


,--


SowPrices
EVERY DAY


Don't worry about stocking up, get what you need, when you need it for the same low price...


This week, next


"A'


week,


EVERY WEEK!


- 44ht


12-Pack Pepsi Products
12 oz, Cans- MA Varieties
2/$5
Locked In Low Price


24 Pack Zephyrthis Spring Water
16.9 oz
$3.88
Locked In Low Price


9-Double Roll Angel Soft
Batt Tissue
375.70 Sq. Ft

$4.49
Locked-in Low Price


Tide Liquid
Laundry Deterqent
00 . - Select Va trees
$9.99
\ locked In
Low Price


Brick Coffee
W513 oz
Excudes Decaffeiated
$1.89


Locked in
Low Price


Tyson
Chicken Fillets
20-3 oz.L
ngs, Bites, Strips
$7.99
Locked-ln
Low Price


r.r~,r
~




Ketoqq's Special K
Red Berries Cereal
14 oz, Vanilla Almond or
t2 oz. Fruit & Yogurt
$2.99
Lockedin
i l ow Price


CapriSun
i O0-Pack
Select Varieties
3/$5
Locked-In
Low Price


iW0- , f' 'KeSoqq's
*'d. Pop-Tarts
O '14.152 oz.
S Al Varieties
r - 43/$5
Locked-in
; Low Price


And this week's Hot Spot items...


HotA Spot -
*F~. ,,.� * <


Boneless Pork
Sirloin Chops
Smithfield Self Basting
$1.29 I b.
YOU SAVE $2.40 LS.


Hot4, Spott
Tree Ripened
California Peaches

97C Ib.
YOU SAVE $1.02 LS.


HotASpot
Sirloin Tip Roast
USDA Choice Beef
$1.89 lb.
YOU SAVE $2.40 LB.


Hot spot items on sale until September 11, 2007.
Quality and variety are two great reasons to come see what all the fuss is about. From the
abundance of our fresh picked produce, top quality meats and diverse ethnic offerings to the
well stocked grocery aisles, you'll never have to shop anywhere else again!


it"


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicix


'ago"


' %


a










'K. i - .., ..
Kj~l I


* .97


-j

I .*


r2~ ~


3A
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Miami Beach

Synagogue auctions
seats on eBay
MIAMI BEACH - Just in time
for the Jewish High Holidays,
two lifetime front-row seats to
services at the historic Temple
Emanu-EI synagogue here are
being auctioned off on eBay
with an opening bid of $1.8 mil-
lion.
Besides getting to schmooz
up front with the rabbi, the lucky
winner's family name will be
engraved on Seats 1 and 2 of
Row 1, Section DD, and they'll
receive free parking, two cus-
tom-made prayer shawls and
yarmulkes, and a hefty tax write-
off. And it's for life.
"It's a gift that goes from one
generation to another," said
Rabbi Kliel Rose, who came up
with the concept with a little bit
of chutzpah and the help of two
congregants who work in adver-
tising and marketing.
The auction ends Monday
evening, but as of Saturday
morning, no one had made a
wager. Rose said he wasn't sur-
prised. He said the auction was
more about gaining the attention
of Jews who are disconnected
from their faith.
"It has very little to do with the
money," Rose said.
"Hypothetically, if the money
comes, it would be great, but
the idea was really just to be
edgy."
The auction might hit a nerve,
though. A popular criticism with-
in American Judaism, particular-
ly around the High Holidays, is
of the hundreds or thousands of
dollars it costs to be a member
of a synagogue or to simply
attend Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur services.
Kliel says he'll give away over
500 seats for free over the holy
days to those who can't afford
them. Throughout the year, he
says, no one is ever turned
away for services.
___ _"ThisJsnia-country-yclub," he-
said. "That's not what I'm here
to do."
Temple Emanu-EI is a 1,400-
seat conservative congregation
that was founded in the 1940s
on South Beach. It's steps away
from the shopper's paradise of
Lincoln Road.

Tallahassee

Prison chief suggests
areas for budget cuts
The state could save millions
of dollars by housing low-securi-
ty inmates in tents, slapping
them in leg irons and putting
them to work maintaining roads,
Florida's prisons chief said
Friday.
Department of Corrections
SecretaryJames McDonough
also offered to take a 10 percent
pay cut - more than $11,000
- as part of his recommenda-
tions for helping the state trim its
budget.
Gov. Charlie Crist and the
Florida Legislature are looking
for ways to cover a $1.1 billion
budget gap this year due to
lower-than-expected tax collec-
tions caused mainly by Florida's
housing slump.
McDonough believes the
tents and road work would save
about $43 million.
"It would actually put them on
the streets, the ones that are eli-
gible, but they would go onto I-
75 and 1-10 as part of a work
program in striped uniforms - a
chain gang for lack of a better
term," said department
spokesman Robby Cunningham.
It's the kind of program that
helped Crist earn the nickname
"Chain Gang Charlie" when he
served in the Florida Senate.
Crist then had sponsored legis-
lation to revive chain gangs.
McDonough's proposal is
aimed at "year-and-day"
inmates who ordinarily would be
in county jails. Florida law,
though, requires sentences of
more than a year to be served


in state prisons.
Judges have beengiving
nonviolent offenders such sen-
tences to keep them out of over-
crowded county jails,
McDonough said.
- From wire reports


'Dad' signed suicide note


KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Former St. Petersburg city
council chairman John Bryan
left an apparent suicide letter
in the Floral City residence
where his body was discovered
Friday evening, according to
authorities.
"It was a handwritten note
and it was found on the kitchen
table ... it was signed 'Dad,"'
Citrus County Sheriff's Office


spokeswoman Gail Tierney
said.
Bryan, 56, committed suicide
Friday, hours after he resigned
amid allegations that he sexu-
ally abused two teenage girls
and a woman, authorities said.
A St. Petersburg Times
reporter found Bryan and
called authorities at 5:43 p.m.
Friday. Bryan was slumped in a
golf cart in the garage of his
second home at 9285 E.
Gobbler Drive, Floral City.
Paramedics pronounced him


dead at the scene, Tierney
said.
A riding lawn mower was
running and two nearby four-
wheelers also appeared to
have been running, but were
out of gas.
Bryan was being investigat-
ed on suspicion of sexually
abusing three females, said
Ron Stuart, spokesman for the
Pinellas-Pasco Circuit Court.
Earlier Friday, Bryan had
acknowledged in court a sexu-
al relationship with a young


Could this






give you


cancer?


Despite FDA approval for

implantation in humans,

microchips are being linked to

tumors in animals.


BY TODD LEWAN
Associated Press
W hen the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration approved
implanting microchips in
humans, the manufacturer said it
would-save-lives-letting-doctors-scan-
the tiny transponders to access
patients' medical records almost
instantly The FDA found "reasonable
assurance" the device was safe, and a
sub-agency even called it one of 2005's
top "innovative technologies."
But neither the company, nor the
regulators publicly mentioned this: A
series of veterinary and toxicology
studies, dating to the mid-1990s, stated
chip implants had "induced" malig-
nant tumors in some lab mice and rats.
"The transponders were the cause
of the tumors," said Keith Johnson, a
retired toxicologic pathologist,
explaining in a phone interview the
findings of a 1996 study he led at the
Dow Chemical Co. in Midland, Mich.
Leading cancer specialists reviewed
the research for The Associated Press
and, while cautioning that animal test
results do not necessarily apply to
humans, said the findings troubled
them. Some said they would not allow
family members to receive implants,
and all urged further research before
the glass-encased transponders are
widely implanted in people.
To date, about 2,000 of the so-called
radio frequency identification, or
RFID, devices have been implanted in
humans worldwide, according to
VeriChip Corp. The company, which
sees a target market of 45 million
Americans for its medical monitoring
chips, insists the devices are safe, as
does its parent company, Applied
Digital Solutions, of Delray Beach.
"We stand by our implantable prod-
ucts which have been approved by the
FDA and/or other U.S. regulatory
authorities," Scott Silverman,
VeriChip Corp. chairman and chief
executive officer, said in a written
response to AP questions.
The company was "not aware of any
studies that have resulted in malig-
nant tumors in laboratory rats, mice
and certainly not dogs or cats," but he
added millions of domestic pets have
been implanted with microchips, with-
out reports of significant problems.


The FDA also stands by
its approval.
Did the agency know of
the tumor findings before
approving the chip A VeriCi
implants? The FDA 2002, fil
declined repeated AP medic
requeststo specify what stud-
ies it reviewed.

The FDA is over-
seen by the
Department of Health
and Human Services,
which, at the time of
VeriChip's approval,
was headed by Tommy
Thompson. Two weeks Tommy
after the device's Thompson
approval took effect on former head,
Jan. 10, 2005, Department of
Jan. 10, 2005, Health and
Thompson left his Human
Cabinet post, and with- Services.
in five months was a
board member of VeriChip Corp. and
Applied Digital Solutions. He was com-
pensated in cash and stock options.
Thompson, until recently a candi-
date for the 2008 Republican presi-
dential nomination, says he had no
personal relationship with the compa-
ny as the VeriChip was being evaluat-
ed, nor did he play any role in FDA's
approval process of the RFID tag.
"I didn't even know VeriChip before
I stepped down from the Department
of Health and Human Services," he
said in a telephone interview.
Also making no mention of the find-
ings on animal tumors was a June
report by the ethics committee of the
American Medical Association, which
touted the benefits of implantable
RFID devices.
Had committee members reviewed
the literature on cancer in animals?
No, said Dr Steven Stack, an AMA
board member with knowledge of the
committee's review.
Was the AMA aware of the studies?
No, he said.
1-3

Published in veterinary and toxicol-
ogy journals between 1996 and 2006,
the studies found that lab mice and
rats injected with microchips some-
times developed subcutaneous "sarco-
mas" - malignant tuTmors, most of


* QUESTION: Should the federal government adopt Crystal River Council's
suggestion to approve year-round slow-speed zones in the bay and keep
people from touching manatees?
* YOUR ANSWERS: __-- -
A. Yes. It's the best way to protect manatees. (131 votes, 52 percent.)
B. No. The rules are too restrictive. (49 votes, 19 percent.)
C. They should adopt the slow-speed zones only. (49 votes, 19 percent.)
D. They should adopt the no-touching manatees policy only. (23 votes, 9 percent.)
* To vote in this week's Online Poll, simply access the Chronicle Web site, www.chronicleonline.com.


woman, but he said that it was
consensual and that she was
18, Stuart said. At the hearing,
Bryan agreed not to have con-
tact with the suspected teenage
victims.
"It is imperative for me to
preserve what is of utmost
importance to me, my family,"
Bryan wrote in the resignation
letter he released hours before
his death.
Councilman Earnest
Williams told The Associated
Press he was shocked by


Bryan's death.
"I was very surprised and
amazed," Williams said. "He
was always willing to help out
other folks. It's just a sad day
for everyone involved."
Bryan's body was removed
from the residence and taken
to the medical examiner's
office in Leesburg, according
to a Citrus County Sheriff press
release.
Information from the
Associated Press was used, in
this report.


F,


d


I


,~, '~d~%.


d


4


*~.


Associated Press
lip microchip held in pair of tweezers is displayed in Boca Raton in this May 10,
e photo. Proponents say the chips, when implanted in people, offer security and
al identification benefits. Detractors worry that abuse of the chips will eliminate
personal privacy in the digital age.


them encasing the implants.
* A 1998 study in Ridgefield, Conn.,
of 177 mice reported cancer incidence
to be slightly higher than 10 percent -
a result the researchers described as
"surprising."
* A 2006 study in France detected
tumors in 4.1 percent of 1,260
microchipped mice. This was one of six
studies in which the scientists did not
set out to find microchip-induced can-
cer but noticed the growths incidental-
ly. They were testing compounds on
behalf of chemical and pharmaceutical
companies; but they ruled out the com-
pounds as the tumors' cause. Because
researchers only noted the most obvi-
ous tumors, the French study said,
"These incidences may therefore
slightly underestimate the true occur-
rence" of cancer
* In 1997, a study in Germany found
cancers in 1 percent of 4,279 chipped
mice. The tumors "are clearly due to
the implanted microchips," . the
authors wrote.
Caveats accompanied the findings.
"Blind leaps from the detection of
tumors to the prediction of human
health risk should be avoided," one
study cautioned. Also, because none of
the studies had a control group of ani-
mals without chips, the normal rate of
tumors cannot be determined.
Still, after reviewing the research,
specialists at some pre-eminent can-
cer institutions said the findings
raised red flags.
"There's no way in the world, having
read this information, that I would
have one of those chips implanted in
my skin, or in one of my family mem-
bers," said Dr Robert Benezra, head of
the Cancer Biology Genetics Program
at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering
Cancer Center in New York.
Before microchips are implanted on
a large scale in humans, he said, test-
ing should be done on larger animals,
such as dogs or monkeys. "I mean,
these are bad diseases. They are life-


threatening. And given the prelimi-
nary animal data, it looks to me that
there's definitely cause for concern."
In humans, sarcomas, which strike
connective tissues, can range from the
highly curable to "tumors that are
incredibly aggressive and can kill peo-
ple in three to six months," he said.
Meanwhile, the animal study find-
ings should be disclosed to anyone
considering a chip implant, the cancer
specialists agreed.
To date, that hasn't happened.

And what of Thompson?
When asked what role he played in
VeriChip's approval, Thompson said:
"I had nothing to do with it And if you
look back at my record, you will find
that there has never been any impro-
prieties whatsoever."
Thompson vigorously campaigned
for electronic medical records and
healthcare technology both as gover-
nor of Wisconsin and at HHS. While in
President Bush's Cabinet, he formed a
"medical innovation" task force that
worked to partner FDA with compa-
nies developing medical information
technologies.
After leaving the Cabinet and join-
ing the company board, Thompson
received options on 166,667 shares of
VeriChip Corp. stock, and options on
an additional 100,000 shares of stock
from its parent company, Applied
Digital Solutions, according to SEC
records. He also received $40,000 in
cash in 2005 and again in 2006.
In a TV interview while still on the
board, Thompson was explaining the
benefits of being chipped when an
interviewer interrupted:
"I'm sorry, sir Did you just say you
would get one implanted in your arm?"
"Absolutely," Thompson replied.
"Without a doubt"
"No concerns at all?"
"No."
Thompson has yet to be chipped.


Helicopter crash injures two


Associated Press


EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE -
An Air Force officer and an air-
man were injured when the
helicopter they were aboard
crashed during training.
The injuries suffered by Col.
William Nelson and Airman 1st
Class Bradley Jordan in the late
Friday crash were described as


non-life-threatening. Five oth-
ers on the MH-53 Pave Low hel-
icopter were unhurt, according
to the military.
The accident happened at
about 11:45 p.m. Friday near
Duke Field. Nelson and
Jordan were transferred to
Pensacola hospitals.
No one on the ground was
hurt, according to the military.







Criwus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


RIVER
Continued f

Rush and Fuchs an
tests taken by DE
University of Florid


the request of
his neighbors
showed the
herbicides
applied in Lake
Rousseau were
breaking down
and dissolving
in the water as
they were sup-
posed to. He
said they found
no evidence
that herbicides
were killing
plant life in the
lower river.
He said
Fuchs' claim
thatAquathol K
causes eye irri-
tation is not
supported by
U.S. Envi-
ronmental


I






I


neighbors in the health of the
river was heightened on May 4
rom Page 1A when millions of small clams
died and floated downstream,
Ssays water turning the river white with
d says water shells. Piles of small shells can
anune h still be seen in cavities in the
a in June at rock on the river bottom, a testa-
us and ment that something went terri-
bly wrong in
HERBICIDE USE the river that
IN CANALS day, Rush said.
IN CANALSSullivan
* Citrus County Aquatics said it was a
sprays herbicides on three coincidence
canals off Lake Rousseau. that the clam
I in 2006, total herbicide d i e - o f f
sprays used on Jan 12. occurred on
April, 28, May 19, Sept. May 4, the
18 and Oct. 12 were 10 same day a
gallons of Reward, .38 gal state DEPcon-
lonsof Sonar AF, and .375 t r a c t o r
gallons of Glyphosate sprayed 414.8
gallons of
l In 2007. total herbicide Aquathol K
sprays for Jan. 11 and herbicide and
May 30 were 1 gallon of 8.4 gallons of
Reward, 188 gallons of 8.4 gReward herbi-of
Glyphosate, and 25 Reward herbi-
pounds of Aquathol Super cidRousseau. He
said the clams
are an exotic


Protection Agency testing,
"which allows this product to be
used at label rates with no swim-
ming restriction required."
"As explained during my visit,
these products break down with-
in hours to a few days in the lake
environment and as indicated
above are thoroughly tested
prior to approval by the U.S. EPA
for their safe use in water,"
Sullivan wrote on May 25 in
reply to Flichs' letter.
Neighbors asked Sullivan to
establish a monitoring program
on the lower river, but Pamala
Vasquez, spokeswoman for DEP,
said Sullivan has no plans to
continue monitoring the area.
Neighbors said Sullivan told
them not to call him back
Dead clams cover river
The interest of Rush and his


species. He said they didn't die
from contact with herbicides,
but whatever the cause, it is a
good thing.
"Every now and then, they
have a dense die-off," Sullivan
said, noting the species is called
corbicula fluminea. "If every
one of them died, it would be a
blessing."
Sullivan said he supervises
herbicide spraying of the lake,
but a contractor, Applied
Aquatic Management of Eagle
Lake, does the work and has
been doing the spraying for
years. He said the work is con-
sidered "maintenance control"
spraying to keep boat trails,
docks and shoreline areas free
of aquatic weeds.
He said mechanical harvest-
ing is an alternative to spraying,
but because Lake Rousseau is


full of stumps, he said contrac-
tors have reported bending the
weed-cutting bar on the front of
their harvesters when they hit
unseen underwater obstacles.
He said the cost of harvesting
also could increase, depending
on how far contractors must
transport the weeds to disposal
sites.
Spraying effective
Sullivan said herbicide spray-
ing is the most efficient and
effective way of killing aquatic
weeds on Lake Rousseau. The
herbicides are those registered
with the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and approved
by the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services for use in Florida
waters. Without the spraying, he
said, Lake Rousseau would be
choked with aquatic weeds.
If directions on the label of the
herbicide packaging are fol-
lowed - and Sullivan said the
contractor for Lake Rousseau
does follow label instructions -
the chemicals are safe and do
not harm downstream plant or
animal life.
But Sullivan left a poor
impression with residents who
complained about the lower
Withlacoochee being a dying
river
Neighbors said Sullivan was
dismissive of them when they
complained about the herbicide
spraying. Rush said Sullivan first
told him that the dead clams
were plant bulbs floating down
the river It was only after he
paid a visit and saw the clams
that he admitted they were in
fact clams. Rush said Sullivan
told him he had never been on
that part of the river before.
Sullivan told the Chronicle
that in his 14 years of working in
that area, he has never known
the lower river to have much
vegetation.
Regardless of Sullivan's
claims, those who live on the


lower river say herbicides are
changing it
Neighbor Bonnie Drake said
river grass once grew so thick in
front of her and her husband's
river home that she cleared
weeds by hand each time her
grandchildren visited to give
them a swimming spot She said
the neighbors probably thought
she was crazy
"Now there's not a blade
there; nothing but shells," she
said.
"Barren like a desert"
Realtor Sally Price, who has
lived in the Withlacoochee River
area for 45 years, and swam in it
as a young person, said the river
began changing after it was cut
in half by the Cross Florida
Barge Canal. As a child, she and
friends would snorkel all the
way from below the hydropower
plant on Lake Rousseau to
Yankeetown.
"I'm pre-B.C.," she chuckled.
"I'm before the barge canal."
She said the river in its pris-
tine state was a thing of beauty
Aquatic grasses were every-
where in the river, moving
gracefully to the movements of
the water's flow. She said bass


and catfish could be seen lying
on ledges in the river. She said
cutting the river in half started
its decline. Herbicides are fin-
ishing the job.
Price said she didn't know the
state was spraying herbicides in
the lake until one day she was
teaching her young granddaugh-
ter how to swim in a bend in the
river across from what is now
the Rushes' house. Like all
small children, she accidentally
gulped and swallowed some
river water as she splashed
around, Price said.
The child became gravely ill
and vomited for four or five
days. As she began to investi-
gate, Price said she discovered
pesticides were being used in
Lake Rousseau to kill weeds.
She believes the herbicides
made her granddaughter sick,
and the same herbicides have
stripped the lower-river of plant
life.
"The river is barren like a
desert," she said.
Rush said the defoliated por-
tion of the river bottom and
riverbank stretch for about four
miles. He said there is a point in
the Yankeetown area where the
bottom grasses appear again.


He said the cause of the grass
die-offis not saltwater intrusion.
He said there are no barnacles
on his boat or any of his neigh-
bors'. Barnacles are an indica-
tion of saltwater. An avid fisher-
man, he said most fishermen
believe they have reached fresh-
water, and the motors are out of
saltwater, by the time they get to
. Yankeetown.
Rush said he and his neigh-
bors haven't given up. They
hoped Sullivan would launch a
serious, long-term monitoring
program for the entire lower
river, beginning at the bypass
canal on Lake Rousseau. But
Sullivan has indicated that
won't happen.
Sondra Fuchs, who is John
Fuchs' wife, produced a photo-
graph of a thick mat of foam
floating in the river in front of
her home Thursday. Even
though there the small dam is
upriver from her, she said the
foam doesn't look like some-
thing that would be created by
just falling water. She said it
looks more like something cre-
ated by detergents or chemi-
cals.
"I think we have a right to
complain," she said.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H
Daytona Bch. 88
Ft. Lauderdale 90
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 92
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 91
Key West 92
Lakeland 90
Melbourne 89


Fecast
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
ptcldy
ptcldy


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
ptcldy
ptcldy
sunny
ptcldy
sunny
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm


MARINE OUTLOOK


- iNV The Weather Channel 90 68 0.00
-weather-com __0_8_0OO_

THREE DAY OUTLOOK
TODAY Exciusi,.e daily i.recalt tby
High: 91 Low: 72
Partly Cloudy; 40% Chance of PM
T-Storms
- MONDAY

High: 90 Low: 73
Partly Cloudy; 60% Chance of T-Storms


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 91/71
Record 96/64
Normal 71/90
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.93 in.
Total for the year 35.23 in.
Normal for the year 41 33 in.
'As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
9/9 SUNDAY 4:26 10:38
9/10 MONDAY .5:08 11:19


Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.97 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 70
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees were light, grasses were
moderate and weeds were
absent.
. ught C rno x. j al era,.: .I11- .ml -.
'um'r moderate . m-.il ll y: . a ,Ii si %il (c
�.J ,pic.m- hE vy * al llyr,]," /-ll h-p,.a.re- Ts
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
4:49 11:00
5:29 11:40


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUd - SUNSET TONIGHT............................ 7:43RP.M.
S O SUNRISE TOMORROW ............. 7:13 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY............,..............5:21 A.M.
w n un1 itS1P21 OC o MOONSET TODAY............................ 6:49 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more Information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7. or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending In 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before-8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers,
Sunday Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
5:48 a/1:13 a 5:07 p/12;55 p 6:10 a/1:47 a 5:50 p/1:37 p
4:09 a/10:17 a 3:28 p/11:09 p 4:31 a/10:59 a 4:11 p/11:39 p
1:56 a/8:05 a 1:15 p/8:57 p 2:18 a/8:47 a 1:58 p/9:27 p
4:58 a/12;12 a 4:17 p/11:54 a 5:20 a/12:46 a 5:00 p/12:36 p


Southeast winds in the morning, then
becoming west near the coast from 5 to
10 knots during the afternoon. Seas 1 to
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Partly cloudy with a few thunder-
storms in the afternoon.


Gulf water
temperature


860
Taken at Egmont Key


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.47 28.44 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.39 34.38 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.83 34.81 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.96 35.98 42.40
L 6 II". i n , ,rl6 a i E *.r a :.'.'.e ;-c 1 .. ::1 san, _ r lIn-) y e 'a',&cd V' : ", 3 vear ild tha msn-
anrnu;al flC Ah.i:h rl -. 3 .-I. -p,. 3 .r-e.:.,! C '3,.:e u., rb i,',, Qual~ . r rexceee *r r, 'y c .nr y.ea' r This data is
oble,r,.ed fr.mI,,n IrJ . Scouir,,,e.:! IFirnda Wal. r f.ar,,n ',rr.er,1 0, ar.. .ars.] s ui e,': le re. i .,r n in rn i,.: . il
&,il11 Jr C.i r C 0 .r ri 'LE UrlJare ,'L.eri a 1 ?,: 1 Sur./e Ibe hltt- tnr arC t ,u,'Jan , jr ssrr Ut r 1 the use u6
ink a a 'a1 u ra .6 3.,y que6 -t.i:,,i V" \ I',u j ' ,,ij con ri ,a ' in i " rar. c.jical D aD ta S e ncnr, a t 3aI 1S i .9 . 111

THE NATION


�osi
qijiK1.?e monla
-'7c n


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pep. Fcst H L
Albany 86 73 tstrm 77 65
Albuquerque 89 65 tstrm 85 64
Asheville 86 55 sunny 88 62
Atlanta 86 69 sunny 91 69
Atlantic City 85 68 ptcldy 85 68
Austin 93 73 . cldy 90 73
Baltimore 91 68 ptcldy 87 67
Billings 59 45 .08 tstrm 60 40
Birmingham 91 72 pIcldy 92 71
Boise 78 50 sunny 75 45
Boston 95 71 shwrs 73 64
Buffalo 84 72 .02 tstrm 73 60
Burlington, VT 90 71 tstrm 72 60
Charleston, SC 88 66 tstrm 88 73
Charleston, WV 94 65 tstrm 87 67
Charlotte 92 66 sunny 91 63
Chicago 78 64 cidy 79 61
Cincinnati 92 74 .14 tstrm 82 64
Cleveland 79 70 .41 tstrm 79 62
Columbia, SC 92 65 ptcldy 93 67
Columbus, OH 87 70 .28 tstrm 82 63
Concord, N.H. 93 66 shwrs 70 59
Dallas 95 78 tstrm 88 71
Denver 84 59 shwrs 65 42
Des Moines 80 57 cldy 70 52
Detroit 80 66 tstrm 76 57
El Paso 98 71 tstrm 92 70
Evansville, IN 86 73 .17 tstrm 82 65
Harrisburg 90 72 ptcldy 87 68
Hartford 90 70 ptcldy 81 64
Houston 93 76 tstrm 89 75
Indianapolis 82 71 .45 tstrm 83 64
Jackson 91 72 ptcldy 91 69
Las Vegas 10278 sunny 10375
Little Rock 94 74 tstrm 86 70
Los Angeles 72 64 sunny 74 65
Louisville 90 77 tstrm 83 68
Memphis 94 76 tstrm 89 74
Milwaukee 74 58 cldy 72 55
Minneapolis 69 54 cidy 64 50
Mobile 89 72 ptcldy 93 72
Montgomery 93 68 ptcidy 93 68
Nashville 86 75 .03 tstrm 86 72
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair hnhazy; pchpartly cloudy; sraln;
rs=ran/snow mix; s=sunmy; sh=showers;
snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


= . )22
8mb 90S a


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fest H L
New Orleans 93 78 ptcldy 92 77
New York City 88 71 ptcldy 84 71
Norfolk 85 64 shwrs 86 72
Oklahoma City 88 74 .49 tstrm 84 67
Omaha 81 54 cidy 65 50
Palm Springs 10974 sunny 10779
Philadelphia 90 70 ptcidy 88 70
Phoenix 10682 sunny 10683
Pittsburgh 83 69 .53 tstrm 83 63
Portland, ME 92 70 shwrs 67 58
Portland, Ore , 85 53 sunny 86 58
Providence, R.I. 92 69 shwrs 78 65
Raleigh 93 65 ptcldy 89 68
Rapid City 67 51 shwrs 53 41
Reno 90 55 sunny 89 51
Rochester, NY 80 71 .57 tstrm 72 60
Sacramento 89 55 sunny 96 60
St. Louis 79 73 .04 ptcldy 84 63
St. Ste. Marie 68 47 shwrs 66 48
Salt Lake City 83 57 ptcidy 82 49
San Antonio 91 78 cldy 91 75
San Diego 74 66 sunny 75 68
San Francisco 68 58 sunny 70 56
Savannah 88 67 ptcldy 89 72
Seattle 71 53 sunny 77 55
Spokane 73 48 sunny 75 44
Syracuse 85 71 .08 tstrm 75 62
Topeka 85 61 ptcldy 78 58
Washington 90 70 ptcldy 89 71
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Thermal, Calif. LOW 26 Meacham, Ore.
WORLD CITIrS


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 66/47/pc
Athens 80/64/s
Beijing 89173/s
Berlin 64/46/sh
Bermuda 88/78/pc
Cairo 89/69/s
Calgary 63/43/s
Havana 87/78/ts
Hong Kong 88/79/ts
Jerusalem 78/64/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


84/62/pc
66/52/pc
94/63/pc
71/57/ts
72/59/sh
64/46/r
66/48/s
80/68/s
74/52/pc
62/50/pc
84/77/ts
70/55/sh
61/44/r


LHRONICLL'
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: (352) 563-5655 Marion County: 1-888-852-2340
or visit us on the Web at www.shop.naturecoastcentral.com/chronicl
.html to subscribe.
13 wks.: $34.00* - 6 mos.: $59.50* - 1 year: $105.00'
*Plus 6% Florida sales tax
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks - Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks

To contact us regarding your service:
563-5655
Call for redelivery: 6 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday
6:30 to 1.1. a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Call with questions: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday
6:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County - 563-6363. Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion
County residents, call toll-free at 1-888-852-2340
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus - 563-5966
Marion - 1-888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 563-5592
To place an online display ad: 563-3206 or e-mail us at
nccsales@chronicleontine.com
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL IT TO US The Chronicle, P.O. Box 1899, Inverness, FL 34451
FAX IT TO US Advertising- 563-5665, Newsroom - 563-3280
E-MAIL IT TO US Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Where to find us:
. - . Meadowcrest
I _office
N Norvell BryjnijHwV Me adowcrest
Dunkenfelcl \Blvd., Crystal
Ae \Cannondale Dr River, FL 34429
, 1 \-\ Meadowcrest
Blvd.

SInverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. o-. square
m--kn / 106 W. Main
" " " . ;M '. _ / . St., Inverness,
41 44 FL 34450
4 ~A

Who's in charge:
Gerry Mulligan ............. ............ ....... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ................. ....... Operations Manager, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan .......................................... Editor, 563-3225
John Provost ................. Advertising/Marketing Director, 563-3240
Tom Feeney .............................. Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart ........................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John Murphy ........................ Online Manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan ...... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Jennifer Wall ............................... Classified Manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon ..... ........................ Business Manager, 564-2908
Deborah Kamlot ................. Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............ ..... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken .............. .... Linda Johnson, 563-5660
News and feature stories .......................... Mike Arnold, 564-2930
Community/wire service content ............... Cheryl Jacob, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... John Coscia, 563-3261
Sound Off ............................ ............ ............... .. 563-0579
Founded in 1891, The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint.
Please recycle your newspaper.
Visit us on the World Wide Web www.chronlcleonllne.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone (352) 563-6363
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
POST OFFICE BOX 1899, INVERNESS, FL 34451-1899
106 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL 34450
S PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
UI SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


le


TUESDAY
High: 90 Low: 74
Partly Cloudy; 50% Chance of T-Storms


ALMANAC


SOLUNAR TABLES


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


9


5
D
D


LAKE ROUSSEAU HERBICIDE APPUCATIONS
* May 15 to 24, 2006 - 45.5 gallons of Reward, 30 gallons of Aquathol K to control
hyacinths/lettuce.
* July 6 to 21, 2006- 177 gallons of Reward to control hyacinths/lettuce.
* Aug 15 to 25, 2006 - 27.7 gallons of Reward, nearly all for water lettuce.
* Oct. 2 to 12, 2006 - 53.5 gallons of Reward and 50 gallons of Aquathol K, nearly all for
water lettuce. The Reward was used for water lettuce, Aquathol K for hydrilla.
* Dec. 5 to 12, 2006 - 375 gallons of Aquathol K and 38 gallons of Reward. The Reward was
used for water lettuce, Aquathol K for hydrilla.
* March 3 to 14 - 1,050 gallons of Aquathol K for hydrilla.
* May 1 to 10 - 647.6 gallons of Aquathol K and 123.6 gallons of Reward. The Reward was
used primarily for water lettuce and the Aquathol K for Hydr ila. Reward was also used for
hydrilla on two occasions.
* June 5 to 8 - 1,689.8 gallons of Aquathol K; 5.355 pounds of Aquathol Super K granuals;
123.7 gallons of Reward. The chemicals were used to control hydrilla.
* July 17 to 26 - 1,885 gallons of Aquathol K and 25.1 gallons of Reward. The Reward was
used to control water lettuce, the Aquathol K for hydrilla.







ouiNDAY, SI:l"I'EMBmIR 9, 2007 SA


: CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PROGRAM
Continued from Page 1A
degree in one hand and high
school diploma in the other.
If they complete the program,
they will graduate from high
school with two years of college
under their belts.
"We're not just preparing them
for college, we're getting them
into college," D'Angelo said.
After earning 60 credits,
Collegiate Academy students are
guaranteed admission and credit
acceptance into one of Florida's
11 state universities, according to
a Collegiate Academy informa-
tion pamphlet
The courses students take
through the Collegiate Academy
match the generic, required
courses students usually take
during their first two years at
four-year universities.
Therefore, they would enter
four-year universities with 60
credits and would be considered
juniors in college right out of
high school.
"Now it's not, 'I have four more
years of college,' it's, 'I already
have two years behind me,'"
D'Angelo said. When the stu-
dents complete the Collegiate
Academy, they have already
invested two years of their time
in college and are more likely to'
continue to four-year universi-
ties to graduate with a bachelor's
degree, he added. Also, earning a
college degree at an early age
allows students to have enough
time to continue to earn masters
degrees or double majors, he
said.
"There's definitely some
incentive for students to contin-
ue on the higher level path if it's
offered to them," D'Angelo said.
When students continue to
higher education institutions,
they will already be accustomed
to the college workload and
schedule. Collegiate Academy


K-RI McHAL/~unronicle
Ashley Burr, 16 (left), steadies Ashley Zuppa, 16 (right), as she
stands on a miniature version of a Roman arch in Professor Wendy
Neeld's Introduction to Humanities course at WTI.


students attend three classes
from 7:30 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. on
Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday and two classes from
7:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. on
Tuesday and Thursdays.
Summer classes also are avail-
able, and incoming seniors can
apply to the program.
D'Angelo and enrolled stu-
dents talked about another
major advantage of the program:
It's free. Students attend two
years of college at no cost
because the program is state


funded. It is open to all students,
16 years of age or older, in high
schools or home schools, who
meet the admission criteria. The
application packet, which con-
tains information and qualifica-
tions, is on WTI's Web site,
http://www.wtionline.cc/colle-




Uniimited Hours. No Contracts!


* Instant Messaging - Keep your buddy list
* 10 e-mail addresses with Webmaill
* FREE Technical Support
* Custom Start Page - News, Weather& more!
Surf'up to 6X faster/ )
(j ust 3 more
Sign Up Online! www.LocalNet.com
14 A._ Call Today & Save!
LocaNet 795-7691


giate.htm, under the Collegiate
Academy Application link
For students interested in the
academy, who do not meet
requirements, such as qualifying
test scores, WTI officials provide
preparatory classes arid support
services to students who want to
enter the program.
"It's not necessarily how smart
you are but really, how hard
you're willing to work at it,"
D'Angelo said. The program is
not designed for everyone but is
another option for students.
"I like it because we get out
early and some courses are chal-
lenging," Jennifer Reeves, a 16-
year-old Collegiate Academy stu-
dent said.
Academy students are still
allowed to return to their high
schools for events and extra cur-
ricular activities such as sports..
Michael Carey, a 16-year-old
Collegiate Academy student,
splits his time between high
school and WTI.
"I go to Citrus High School fbr
fourth-block Spanish, but I like
this better," Carey said. Students
have to take a minimum of four
classes per semester to be con-
sidered a full-time student in the
program and meet high school
credit requirements. Four class-.
es at WTI are equivalent to four
blocks at the high schools. Some
students choose to take high
school classes in the afternoon in
addition to their college courses.
"They're able to get the bene-
fits of from both college and highi
school," D'Angelo said. His. door
is open anytime for interested
students and parents, he added.


90 DAYS-*O AYET-NOIERS


Frthe ~ o:'T. ~ -


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI
arrests
* Sharla Ann Weaver, 33,
7486 W. McKinley St.,
Homosassa, at 6:58 p.m.
Thursday on a misdemeanor
t charge of driving under the influ-
� ence. According to the arrest
report, Weaver was pulled over by
deputies for speeding on U.S. 19
and failed her field sobriety tasks.
Her blood alcohol levels were
0.202 percent and 0.205 percent;
the legal limit in Florida is 0.080
percent. Bond $500.
Other
arrests
* David Anthony Hulcher, 55,
no address listed, at 12:57 a.m.
Friday on charges of assault or
battery on a law enforcement offi-
cer, resisting arrest without vio-
lence and disorderly intoxication.
According to the arrest report,
deputies were at Citrus Memorial
Health System and heard a nurse
yell for help with an "unruly
, patient." Hulcher was arguing with
medical staff because they would
not give him pain medication,
deputies said. Hulcher yelled
obscenities and threats at the
* deputies and medical staff,
according to the report. Deputies
said he smelled of alcohol and
slurred his words. They escorted
Hulcher out of the waiting room via
wheelchair and asked him to walk
away from the hospital. Hulcher
got out of the wheelchair, began
laughing and punched a deputy in


the stomach. Then, deputies
brought Hulcher to the ground and
placed him under arrest. When
they tried to place him in the patrol
vehicle, he spit in a deputy's face.
Bond $10,650.
* Demitrious D. Douglas, 25,
3518 N.E. 159th Place,
Gainesville, at 11:11 p.m.
Thursday on a charge of posses-
sion of less than 20 grams of mar-
ijuana. Bond $500.
* Timothy Robert Beville, 28,
6822 W. Hilger Court,
Homosassa, at 10:41 p.m.
Thursday on an active Citrus
County warrant for an original
felony charge of burglary with bat-
tery. Bond $25,000.
* James Dean Hodges, 42,
2710 W. Adams St., Inverness, at
8:35 p.m. Thursday on a charge of
leaving the scene of an accident
with property damage. According
to the arrest report, Hodges
crashed his vehicle into a railing
around an outside patio of a bar
and restaurant in Inverness and
left the scene. Bond $250.


September 29
Old Courthouse
Downtown Inverness
This year's race will wind
through scenic downtown
Inverness. It begins at the
Old Courthouse.
Race start - 7:30 a.m.
Kids fun run - 8:15 a.m.
Several businesses will be
providing services the
morning of the race.
All proceeds will be donated
to the Citrus County
Children's Advocacy Center
(Jessie's Place).
Visit www.citrusroadrunners.org
to print registration form.
Register early, save $5.
SFor more information
call 637-2475
CfKp1NICjT


STA


LEY STE":E


ERLO


AIR DUCT CLEANING
CC&SS, INC LIC #CMC044828
Call Stanley Steemer today for a free video inspection of your heating,
ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system. And get rid of the dust and debris
in your home's air ducts to help you breathe more easily.


STANLEY STEEMER
AIR DUCT CLEANING |'
,-, .. ' I -


CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY

CLEANING
Residentially or commercially, Stanley Steemer's carpet and upholstery
cleaning services are backed by 50 years of proven cleaning methods,
proprietary equipment and high quality standards.


ST LEY STEAMER

CARFPEl CLEANERi
- :------ - - --- - ---


ERENCY WATER EXTRACTION AND RESTORATION
HOURATER DAMAGET At the first sign of flooding call the Water Extraction experts at Stanley Steemer. Our trained technicians use
state-of-the-art equipment and proven techniques to get your home dry in the quickest possible time.
__i _^^ ___ __i _^_ ___ __^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ _^^ ^_^ ^^_ _.^ ^_^ ^__ ^-^ ^_- -^^ ->- ^^- --^ -**-**-*- ^***--*-- *--**|- ' -^ -- - "---i^---- - ^" i^^^


TILE AND GROUT CLEANING
Dirt doesn't stop where the carpet ends. And neither do we. The same experts you know and trust
to care for your carpet are also experts at cleaning your tile floors. Our fully trained technicians will
restore the beauty of your tile and grout, safely and gently.


TILE&GROUT
CLEANING EXPERTS


Call 726-4646

or for outlying areas 1-800-STEEMER (783-3637)


You can also schedule appointments 24 hours a day at www.stanleysteemer.com
Locally owned & opr ted.


BLIEN DS
WE'LL MEET OR BEATANY COMPETITORS PRICE*
The Sawngs Are Yours Be~ause The Factor), Is Ours!
FAST DELIVERY * PROFESSIONAL STAFF
FA C00fD FACTORY
FREE
. In Home Consulting
* Installation

. Aw


-WodBind


LECANTO-TREETOPS PLAZA*1657 W GULF TO LAE HW 527-0012
I � , ... . . . . ;. I - ,,, -....1 ,- -,-,.,1-,r ,, I ,,,,, .....,_ . -,. , . , ,,- TO LL FREE 1-877-746-0017


Vricas IFu WodBinds-huter ClllarShde


-W


7 ,,


MWWL- r, - i


hftL��,, �I-t,.71'--'�A


iM


��'C
VIS4.













Chinese exports will cost Americans more money


Los Angeles Times

SHANGHAI, China - Get
ready for a new Chinese
export: higher prices.
For years, American con-
sumers have enjoyed falling
prices for goods made in China
thanks to relentless cost cutting
by retailers such as Wal-Mart
and Target
But the spate of product
recalls in recent months -
Mattel announced another this
past week - has exposed deep
fault lines in Chinese manufac-
turing. Manufacturers and ana-


lysts say some of the quality
breakdowns are a result of
financially strapped factories
substituting materials or taking
other shortcuts to cover higher
operating costs.
Now, retailers that largely
had dismissed Chinese suppli-
ers' complaints about the soar-
ing cost of wages, energy and
raw materials are preparing to
pay manufacturers more to
ensure better quality. By doing
so, they hope to prevent recalls
that hurt their bottom lines and
reputations.
But those added costs - on a


host of items including toys and
frozen fish - mean either
lower profits for retailers or
higher prices for consumers.
"For American consumers,
this big China sale over the last
20 years is over," said Andy Xie,
former chief economist for
Morgan Stanley in Asia who
works independently in
Shanghai. "China's cost is
going up. They need to get used
to it."
William H. Wilhoit, president
and chief operating officer at
Seattle-based Skyway Luggage
Co., which makes all of its


products in China, said that a
year ago retailers wouldn't
even consider price increases.
"It's a different story today,"
said Wilhoit, whose company's
bags are carried by many major
U.S. retailers. "Now, they are
willing to listen."
Although Skyway hasn't yet
raised prices for retail buyers,
Wilhoit said the company w as
"at a point where we have to if
we want to remain profitable."
Business executives don't
anticipate significantly higher
prices on store shelves this hol-
iday season, because


Christmas goods already have
been ordered. But over the
next 12 to 18 months, they say,
prices for merchandise from
China are likely to creep high-
er.
Already there are signs: The
price of imports from China in
July rose 0.4 percent from
June, the largest monthly
increase since the price index
was first published by the U.S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics in
late 2003. Prices had declined
steadily in the previous three
years, helping tamp down
inflation in the U.S. and else-


Obituaries


Lois Andrian, 64
INVERNESS
Lois Marie Andrian, 64,
Inverness, died Friday, Sept. 7,
2007, in Inverness.
Born in Long Island, N.Y, to
Edmund and Mary (Ahearn)
Cornwell, she was raised in St.
Petersburg, and resided in
Miami until moving to
Inverness in 1971. She was a
licensed caregiver and devot-
ed 30 years to taking care of
the elderly in her home.
She was an accomplished
draftswoman, and enjoyed
photography and art, especial-
ly pen and ink. She liked, to
research her family tree, and
was a member of the
Genealogy Society. She was a
member of the Red Hat
Society.
She was Catholic.
Survivors include: her
daughter, Christina Marie
Messer and her husband, John,
Floral City; her son, Nicholas
Andrian Sr., Inverness; two
brothers, James Cornwell,
Pennsylvania, and Edward
Cornwell, Dunnellon; and
grandchildren, Nicholas
Andrian Jr., Inverness, Jillian
Marie Messer, Floral City, and
Taylor Marie Andrian and
Geoffrey George Andrian,
Inverness.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.

Daniel
Bedford, 61
HOMOSASSA
Daniel C. Bedford, 61,
Homosassa, died Friday, Sept.
7, 2007, at his residence.
Born Nov.
25, 1945, in
Tampa, he
came here 31
years ago form
Hialeah.
He was a U.S. Army veteran
of the Vietnam War, a member
of the DAV and he enjoyed
boating.
Survivors include: his moth-
er,. Pansy Saco, Palm Harbor;
his son, John Bedford,
Hernando; two daughters,
Donna Guth, Inverness, and
Christine Coester, Crystal
River; his -sister, Dot Oliver
and her husband, Jimmy,
Gaston, Ala.; a stepson, Patrick
Robinson, Hernando; a step-
daughter, Tammy Collins,
Ohio; and 14 grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Dorothy
Benvenuto, 78
CITRUS SPRINGS
Dorothy E. Benvenuto, 78,
Citrus Springs, died
Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2007, in
Inverness.
She resided in the area for
19 years.
She enjoyed volunteering at
Seven Rivers Regional
. Medical Center in Crystal
River.
She was Catholic.
Survivors include: her lov-
ing husband of 57 years,
Nicholas Anthony Benvenuto;
Edward Benvenuto and his
wife, Mary, Hicksville, N.Y;
and many nieces and nephews.
Roberts Funeral Home,
Dunnellon.

Shirley Clark, 79
CRYSTAL RIVER
Shirley Nelson Clark, 79,
Crystal River, died Thursday,
Sept. 6, 2007, in Ocala.
She came to this area three
years ago from Annapolis, Md.
She enjoyed gardening.
She was Presbyterian.


Survivors include: three
sons, Gary Burris, Warick,
N.Y, Thomas Burris,
Jacksonville, and James Curd,
Crystal River; two daughters,
Susan Burris, Dunedin, and
Deborah Weinberger and her
husband, Jerry, Homosassa;
her sister, Patricia Atherton,
Silver Spring, Md.; nine grand-
children; and one great-grand-
child.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.

Isabel
Rodriguez, 81
DUNNELLON
Isabel Rodriguez, 81,
Dunnellon, died Thursday,
Sept. 6, 2007, at Munroe
Regional Center, Ocala.
Born July 8, 1926, in
Santulce, Puerto Rico, she was
the daughter of Antolin and
Felicita (Valdez) Rivera. She
moved to this area in 1985 from
Brentwood, N.Y.
She was a chaplain, and she
enjoyed doing missionary
work, especially to prison
inmates.
She was preceded in death
by her son, Daniel Rodriguez.
Survivors include: her sons,
Raymond Rodriguez and his
wife, Crucita, Hernando,
Samuel Rodriguez and his
wife, Susie, Central Islip, N.Y,
Paul Rodriguez and his wife,
Alison, Inverness, and Rodrick
Rodriguez and his wife,
Laurie, Melbourne; her daugh-
ters, Gricell Conklin and her
husband, Glen, Orlando,
Matilda Avizinis and her hus-
band, Paul, Dunnellon, Agnes
Contes and her husband, John,
Nesconset, N.Y, and Irma
Neveu and her husband,
Leonard, Inverness; her sis-
ters, Matilde and Tita, both of
Puerto Rico; her brother,
Esteban, Orlando; 17 grand-
children; and 12 grandchil-
dren.
Heinz Funeral Home and
Cremation, Inverness.

Janet Vaughn, 90
HOMOSASSA
Janet Vaughn, 90,
Homosassa, died Wednesday,
Sept. 5, 2007, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center,
Crystal River.
Born Oct. 14, 1916, in
Melrose, Minn., to Paul Meide
and Mary Olmshank Meide,
she came here 39 years ago
from California.
She had retired as a beauti-
cian.
She was a member of St.
Thomas the Apostle Catholic
Church of Homosassa.
She was preceded in death

HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation






David Heinz & Family
341-1288
Inverness, Florida


by her husband, Kenneth
Vaughn.
Survivors include: her son,
Sean P Kinney, Homosassa;
her brother, James Meide and
his wife, Beverly, Minneapolis,
Minn.; her granddaughter,
Jessica Weiss; two great-grand-
children, Caitlyn Weiss and Ty
Britt; three nephews, Robert,
Richard and Paul; and three
nieces, Diane, Mary and
Susan.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.

Buffy
Whitlock, 40
BEVERLY HILLS
Buffy Joann Whitlock, 40,
Beverly Hills, died Thursday,
Sept. 6, 2007, in Beverly Hills.
Born in Grand Island, Neb.,
she came here five months ago
from Wesley Chapel.
She was a loan officer for a
mortgage company.
She enjoyed fishing and
camping, especially at Lithia
Springs in Brandon.
She attended Grace Family
Church in Wesley Chapel.
She was preceded in death
by her father, James Edward
Garner.
Survivors include: her hus-
band, Michael Whitlock,
Beverly Hills; her son, Braxton
Ford, Tampa; her daughter,
Ashleigh Whitlock, Tampa; her
'sisters, Brenda Kennedy, Lutz'
and Brandi Witkowski and her
husband, David, Wesley
Chapel; her mother, Jan
Schneider and her husband,
Richard, Tampa; and her
father-in-law and mother-in-
law, Jim and Elaine Whitlock,
Beverly Hills.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.

Julia
Wilkinson, 95
CRYSTAL RIVER
Julia Harriet Wilkinson, 95,
Crystal River, Died Saturday,
Sept. 8, 2007, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center,
Crystal River.
Born in 1911 in Kokomo,
Ind., to Anna Albright Ulrich
and William Allen Ulrich, she
graduated from Kokomo High
School and received nurse's
training at Ball Memorial
Hospital in Muncie, Ind. She
was a secretary for her hus-
band, the superintendent of
schools for Steuben County,
Ind., and, for many years, she
worked alongside him on their
Indiana farms. She also was an
accomplished seamstress and
upholsterer.
She moved to Crystal River


in 1967 from Winchester, Ind.
She was a member of the
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, Crystal River
Woman's Club and was a
docent at the Coastal Museum
for several years.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, I. Ross
Wilkinson, in 1980, and her
brother, Jack Albright Ulrich,
in 1922.
Survivors include: her
daughter, Joan Eyster and her
husband, Jim, Crystal River;
her sister, Barbara Rawlings,
Kempton, Ind.; two grandsons,
Jim Eyster and his wife,
Wendy, Ocala, and Jeff Eyster,
Stone Mountain, Ga.; one
granddaughter, Jacquelyn
Balmert and her husband,
David, Crystal River; five
great-grandchildren, Cristen,
Andres and Hannah Eyster,
Ocala, Megan Kohnke and her
husband, Rob, Tampa, and
Cody Sexton, Crystal River;
three great-great-grandchil-
dren, Ashlyn Sexton and
Michael Kohnke, Tampa, and
Jaden Cox, Ocala; and many
nieces and nephews, including
locally Horace L. Wilkinson
and his wife, Betty, George E.
Wilkinson and Ann M. Ice of
Crystal Ricer.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Funeral



Daniel Bedford. A visita-
tion for Daniel C. Bedford, 61,
Homosassa, will be from 2 to 4
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2007,
at the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River. A graveside memorial
service will be conducted at
10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, at
the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.


C . & . E. av
Funeral Home
With Crematory

* Burial
* Shipping
* Cremation
Member of
International Order of the
G LDEN



For Information
and costs, call
726-8323


Dorothy Benvenuto. A
funeral Mass will be celebrat-
ed at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept.
11, 2007, at St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Catholic Church, with
Father Eric Peters, celebrant.
Interment will follow at 1 p.m.
at Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell. The Family will
receive friends from 2 to 4
p.m. and from 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday at Roberts Funeral
Home, 19939 E. Pennsylvania
Ave., Dunnellon.
Shirley Clark. A memorial
service for Shirley Nelson
Clark, 79, of Crystal River will
be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 11, 2007, at Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa
Springs, with the Rev.
LaVerle Coats officiating.
Inurnment will be held at a
later date.
Isabel Rodriguez. Visitation
for Isabel Rodriguez, 81, will
be from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 10, 2007, at Heinz
Funeral Home, 2507 State
Road 44 West, Inverness. A
service of remembrance will
be conducted at 10 a.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2007, at
Heinz funeral Home, with
Pastor Paul Sallee presiding.
Entombment will follow at
Fountains Memorial Park,
Homosassa.
Julia Wilkinson. A grave-
side service for Julia
Wilkinson, 95, of Crystal
River will be conducted at
2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11,
2007, at the Fountains
Memorial Park Cemetery in
Homosassa. Visitation will be
from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel.


where.
Most economists believe that
manufacturing prices will have
to rise at least 10 percent to
reflect China's current produc-
tion situation, although it's
unclear how much of that
could be passed on to con-
sumers. Companies that import
goods from China might have to
absorb some of the costs or
share them with retailers.
And large retailers might be
forced to absorb all of the extra
costs on Chinese-made prod-
ucts that they commission for
their own private labels.


Congress

overhauls

student loan

program
Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON - Congress
on Friday approved the largest
overhaul of education funding
in 60 years, slashing subsidies
to lenders by $20.9 billion over
five years and redirecting the
funds to boost financial aid to
students and reduce interest
payments on their loans.
The bill would offer debt for-
giveness for students who
enter certain public sector
jobs and invest $510 million in
minority colleges.
The bill would halve interest
rates for students starting July
1, from a current 6.8 percent to
3.4 percent phased in over four
years. Those rates reverse an
increase that the previous
Republican-led Congress
allowed as a way to fund tax
cuts. The lower rates would
expire after five years unless
Congress renews them.
At the beginning of the 2008-
2009 academic year, the bill
would begin increasing the
maximum Pell Grant from
$4,300 to $5,400 by 2012.
Students with direct loans
from the government would
receive debt forgiveness after
10 years of work in certain
public sectors, including emer-
gency first-responders, nurses,
firefighters, prosecutors, early
childhood educators and
librarians.


OUR COMMITMENTTO YOU:
Comfort and Care with a personal touch


--0 oopezr
- NERAU HOMES
& CREMATORY

cv .(352)726/-2271
www.HooperFuneralHome.com 1-888-7HOOPER (746-6737)



VERTICAL BLINDS
�-- �OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.

We're More Than Just Verticals
Complete Interior Design & Decorating


OR TOOXLARGE Lorrie

- * . I \Vhiol HOLIs Dis,:'ounts
* 15 l3' OFF .lhutters and ADO Wrap
To, rTreatmn .nt_


* Decorati\ &- Plain PVC Verticals
r--r s_=.. Cellular i.hd,s


Plantation Shutters
Wood * Faux Wood * Vinyl
Many Styles
Lifetime Warranty


Thousands Of Satisfied Customers..
NOT ONE COMPLAINT!

SERVOS PLAZA * 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next toSugarmill Family Rest.)
- www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com
T . .: %


GO


No Fees To Join... .


Free Online Banking & Bill Pay... .. .

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?

There's more to 0 credit union t on tnan ou think.
* Traditional Savings & Checking 0 Loans & Credit Cards 0 Home Equity Rates '
SHome Equity Loans Same Day Approval starting at 6.75' APR

Call or log on
to apply today!

M martin X'V \WW.lartillCtl.org
715 W. Main Street * Inverness, Florida 34450
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 726-1359
0Everyone living, working, volunteering, worshipping or attending school in Citrus County, east of Highway 491 and Highway 200, is eligible to join Martin Federal Credit Union.


Our Family Serving Your Family


�Iricklaad
Funeral Home and Crematory
Since 1962
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com Since 1962
352-795-2678 * 1901 SE HWY. 19 * CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34423


CALL NOW! I


I I - - MENOW


Cnwus Coumy (FI) Ci-momcix


AA �-WnA� .4;Fwrrmnrn Q 2007


I


ftwaftowopo"" I.








SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007 7A


C.J2ITRUS. JtJ11IY(PL.) CHRON5flICLE 1 -


*24 Hour Staff
* Exciting Social Activities
* Complimentary
"Welcome Package"
* Home Style Cooking Served
in the "Country Dining Room"
* Prescription Delivery
* Chauffeured Transportation
* Barber / Beauty Shop / Library
* Quarterly Family Night Dinners
* "Country Store" on Premises
* Specialty Care for
Alzheimer's & Dementia


Nation BRIEFS


Senator will not seek First lady has surgery
third term for pinched nerves


WASHINGTON - Nebraska
Sen. Chuck Hagel, a persistent
Republican critic of the Iraq war,
intends to announce on Monday he
will not seek a third term, according
to Republican officials.
The officials also said Hagel does
not plan to run for the White House
in 2008, despite earlier flirting with a
candidacy.
The 60-year-old senator arranged
a news conference for Monday in
Omaha, Neb., to make his formal
announcement. The officials spoke
on condition of anonymity to avoid
pre-empting the event.


WASHINGTON - First lady
Laura Bush underwent surgery
Saturday to relieve pain from
pinched nerves in her neck. The
White House said the procedure
was successful.
The problem kept her from join-
ing President Bush on a trip to
Australia this week for the annual
meeting of the Asia-Pacific
Economic Cooperation forum in
Sydney.
Mrs. Bush underwent the 2 1/2-
hour procedure at The George
Washington University Hospital. The
surgical team was led by Dr.


Anthony Caputy, chairman of the
Department of Neurosurgery and
co-director of the Neurological
Institute, in consultation with Dr.
Richard Tubb, who is the presi-
dent's doctor.
Mrs. Bush returned to the White
House in the afternoon and was
said to be resting comfortably. She
had no public events scheduled
through Monday. It was not immedi-
ately clear how much time she
would need to recuperate.
"Every patient is different, so
there's no kind of set timeframe.
She will certainly ease back into her
schedule," said Sally McDonough,
Mrs. Bush's spokeswoman.
- From wire reports


STORM
Continued from Page 1A - -


It finally spun into a storm late
Friday evening.
Officials urged residents and
visitors to the Outer Banks, a
popular beach vacation spot, to
get ready for the storm by secur-
ing loose items outside their
homes and to remain indoors as
the storm blows through.
"The greatest danger will be
flooding in low-lying areas and
on roads, such as Highway 12 on
the Outer Banks," said North
Carolina Gov. Mike Easley. "The
most deaths during tropical
storms occur when people drive
into flood waters and drown. Rip
currents will be strong in the
ocean. The safest place to be will
be indoors."
Gabrielle had formed as a sub-
tropical storm, which is a hybrid
system and typically weaker
than hurricanes. They share the
characteristics of tropical
storms, which get their power
from the warm ocean, as well as
storms that form when warm
and cold fronts collide.
Forecasters said Gabrielle
could bring between 1 and 3
inches of rain to eastern North


-'-if
- ~6:4.


. - .. - ..-* * .- . - .'-.r :� ' ^ ' ^,. " - ...
.. ..... * 1.- = .. ... -- .... -._,
. .- - I

.- �" _ .. .. . ..... ...,- -.. -, .

Associated Press
The surf kicks up along the beach Saturday in Nags Head, N.C.
Gabrielle became a tropical storm Saturday as it swirled toward
North Carolina's Outer Banks, where residents and beach vaca-
tioners prepared for rain and the possibility of minor flooding.


Carolina with some areas
receiving as much as 5 inches.
The rain will be welcome in
the parched Carolinas. Of
North Carolina's 100 counties,
seven are in exceptional
drought, 66 are in extreme
drought, 20 are in severe
drought and seven are in mod-
erate drought, according to the
U.S. Drought Monitor
North Carolina Gov. Mike
Easley asked Friday that all of
the state's local governments to
immediately enact voluntary or
mandatory water restrictions.


Earlier this week, South
Carolina officials urged water
systems to conserve water as
nearly all the state was declared
to be in an extreme drought
The only two counties not
included -Jasper and Beaufort
- have, in essence, already got-
ten some rain from Gabrielle.
The front that spawned the
storm moved through last week-
end, dumping as much as 8 inch-
es of rain in the area.


Senior

Apartment

Special


Starting at .5. m mo.


A Community of
t^ yPride aniid Co paNsiiOn.

, Barrnmgton

- Place
Assisted Li*ing Communirv
Call for a Tour Toda�!
S' .' 746-2273
-. .. <" ,. .^*�LF~a 'some rtiomit ,:nsrapph


S I .*OVLLBYAT w . E SNO


We're


SReplacement

Do you suffer from arthritis pain or have trouble walking?
Partial Knee Resurfacing may be your answer.
This innovative, minimally-invasive procedure is an
alternative to knee replacement. The advantages?
In most cases:
* Back to activities in 4-6 weeks
* No physical therapy
* No blood transfusion
* One-night stay in our hotel-like accommodations

F R E E S E M I N A R S A


Sept. 14
Sept. 19
Sept. 26


11 a rr Bella Oasis Hotel, 4076 S. Suricoasl Bl-d Homos. Springs
11 a.m. Central Motel, 727 Hwy. 41 South Inverness
11 a.m. Plantation Inn, 9301 Fort Island Trail Crystal River


Florida Knee
& Orthopedic
aviro Medical Center

Largo Medical Center I


~jwww~largomedicalfcom
Reevtin&Inomtin1-886 5154(ol-re


Alumni, history buffs



up in arms over statue


Associated Press

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -
The swashbuckling sea captain
who helped found America's
first permanent English settle-
ment lost his right arm in battle
nearly two decades earlier -
but you wouldn't know it to look
at the two-armed statue on the
campus of the university
named for him.
Some annoyed and angry
alumni and history buffs want
the monument to get the hook
- the prosthetic that
Christopher Newport is
believed to have used 400 years
ago.
The pair of arms on 24-foot
bronze statue shows a lack of
respect for history, said Andy
Kiser of Winchester, a 1995
graduate of Christopher
Newport University who stud-
ied colonial Virginia.
That's especially galling,
Kiser said, in a part of Virginia
filled with historic attractions,
such as Colonial Williamsburg,
and at a time when Jamestown
is commemorating its 400th
anniversary.
"In the middle of a communi-
ty that tries so hard to get it
right, here's a 4-ton 'Oops, we
got it wrong,"' he said.
CNU, a public university
with about 4,800 students, is a
few blocks from where the
James River flows into the
Chesapeake Bay. Up river is
Jamestown, the swampy penin-
sula where the settlers landed
in May 1607.
Newport was captain of the
Susan Constant, largest of the.
settlers' three ships. He lost his
arm in about 1590, when he was


working in the West Indies as a
privateer hired by London mer-
chants to raid Spanish and
Portuguese ships, said Mike
Lund, ships interpretive super-
visor at Jamestown Settlement,
a state-run living history muse-
um.
It's unclear how he was hurt,
or how much of the arm he lost,
Lund said. Historical accounts
say Newport's arm was "strick-
en off" during a fight.
The two-armed, 7,500-pound
statue, donated to CNU by a
benefactor, was installed in
June.
Newport is shown in floppy
hat and cape, standing with his
left hand on his hip and his
right arm stretched in front of
him, hand resting on the hilt of
his sword.
The inclusion of the right
arm - as well as sculptor Jon
Hair's comment to the local
newspaper that "We don't show
our heroes maimed" -
touched off a spate of letters to
the editor.
Ted Crossland of Yorktown
wrote a letter to the DailyPress
calling the statue a "monstrosi-
ty that recreates history and
presents another lie to the pub-
lic about our past."
"He accomplished more in
his short life span with one arm


than normal people do with
two arms, and the university is
not recognizing that fact,"
wrote Crossland, a retired
naval officer with an interest in
history.
Hair, who has a studio in
Cornelius, N.C., did not return
repeated messages from The
Associated Press seeking com-
ment.
He told the Daily Pregs that
the university decided to por-
tray the captain with two arms
and he agreed.
"I wouldn't show an impor-
tant historical figure like this
with his arm cut off," Hair said.
CNU President Paul Trible
did not recall having any con-
versation with the artist about
how many arms the statue
should have, university spokes-
woman Emily Lucier said in an
e-mail response to questions.
Trible approved a model of
the statue "and he is very
pleased with the statue,"
Lucier wrote. She said the uni-
versity would have no other
comment.
Jack Marshall was intrigued
by the statue flap and wrote
about it on
EthicsScoreboard.com, a proj-
ect of ProEthics Ltd., the ethics
training and consulting firm he
founded in Alexandria.


P JkCAATARACT_&
MRLASER INSTITUTE
LOP ' "Excellence... with love"
FREE

HEALTH SCREENING
In Association With:
Anne Marie Newcomer, OD
Friday, Sept. 21'
Vision * Cataract

SBlood Pressure
Eyeglass Adjustments

Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
For an appointment call: 352-628-3029

THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICES, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENTTHAT
PERFORMED AS A RESULTOFAND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE
FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.


Your best move yet!
Assisted Living At Its Best!


Visit Our NEW "PINK HOUSE" SHOWROOM!





2968 W. Gulf to Lake Highway 44, Lecanto, FL 34461

S352-746-1998 js___
Toll Free 877-202-1991


All Types of Window Treatments
713233 Family Owned and Serving the Area Since 1980


Catch the Fever'
New
Color Fever
Shine Lipstick
24 ,ri


/1>1


Choose your color collection.
H5u with any 29.e0 Lnauan purch.
Warm or Cool colors-,.the choice Is yours*
LpColour (ull-srzo) and Color Dos gn Eye
Sensational Effects eye shadow
Hypnose Mascara, Absolue Prem num BX Replenishing
Cream. Absolue Night Premium BX and
a Lancome Signature train case and cosmetic bag
Uor, 0,oo whfl* HuppEs,, E one oalt 0, ci nr. ploon

LANCOME
PARIS


o0oboooo(Y
Oco
0-00
D
Vo, Pf


I


(-.r�w-- rnin.vrvT fCT) ,mtnNi-r F


Fl.







CoITRUS COUNTY (Fl) CuROtNwC'M


SA SUNDAY, SIPITEMBIR 9, 2007


Faster wireless


is in the works

Movies, other large files could easily

be transferred from gadget to gadget


Associated Press
ATLANTA - With a wave of
his hand over a homemade
receiver, Georgia Tech profes-
sor Joy Laskar shows how easi-
ly - and quickly - large data
files could someday be trans-
ferred from a portable media
player to a TV
Poof! "You just moved a
movie onto your device,"
Laskar says.
While Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
have emerged as efficient ways
to zap small amounts of data
between gadgets, neither is
well suited for quickly trans-
ferring high-definition video,
large audio libraries and other
massive files.
Laskar and other scientists
at the Georgia Electronic
Design Center have turned to
extremely high radio frequen-
cies to transfer huge data files
over short distances.
The high frequencies -
which use the unlicensed 60
gigahertz band - have been a
mostly untapped resource.
Researchers say it could one
day become the conventional
wireless way to zap data over
short distances.
Laskar hopes it could soon
become a rival to other wire-
less technologies. Getting gov-
ernment permission to use the
spectrum would not be a prob-
lem, since that radio band,
much like the one used for Wi-
Fi, in unlicensed. Because the
range will likely be less than 33
feet, interference is less likely
and transmissions could be
more secure.
A similar short-range tech-
nology, known as ultra-wide-
band, is just now reaching the
market after several years of
wrangling between different
companies and engineering
bodies. It exploits another
unlicensed band, reaching up
to 10.3 GHz. Last month,
Toshiba Corp. introduced lap-
tops with built-in UWB chips
that can communicate wire-
lessly with a docking station.
Other possible uses include
transmission of high-definition
video.
But the maximum current
speed of UWB is about 480
megabits per second, equiva-
lent to a high-speed computer
cable but possibly not be
enough for all applications.


Use of the 60 GHz band prom-
ises much higher speeds.
"There will be a constant
pressure for speed and it will
never cease," said M. Kursat
Kimyacioglu, director of strate-
gy and wireless business devel-
opment at the semiconductor
subsidiary of Philips
Electronics NV "We need
much faster wireless data net-
working technologies to make
much faster downloads and
back-ups and higher resolution
HD video streaming possible."
He said Philips is looking at
using the technology to elimi-
nate cable bundles, but much
more research will be needed.
The signals don't penetrate
walls very well and are too eas-
ily disturbed by passing people
and pets, Kimyacioglu said.
The research is far from
over, Laskar said, but he hopes
those challenges can be over-
come in the next year or so. If
so, the hardware for transfer-
ring files could be available by
2009, and new TV sets could be
built with the chips the next
year.
The center has already
achieved wireless data-trans-
fer rates of 15 gigabits per sec-
ond from a span of 1 meter.
That would mean a download
time of less than five seconds
for a DVD-quality copy of "The
Matrix" or other Hollywood
movies.
Specialized radios have
been sending and receiving
high-frequency signals for
years, but they're big and can
cost tens of thousands of dol-
lars. The Georgia center's chal-
lenge has been to convert these
devices into tiny chips that can
be slipped directly into phones
and computers. To be competi-
tive with other technologies,
Laskar's set his sights on a $5
chip, and so far his researchers
have hammered together a few
prototypes to show off the tech-
nology.
"We don't want to replace
these guys," says Laskar, point-
ing at an HD receiver and TV
set. "We want to complement
them."
A cheap chip would launch a
new round of competition for
the technology, said Anh-Vu
Pham, an associate professor
of electrical and computer
engineering at the University
of California, Davis.


..'t- C , *


iaun F. Saint, MD
L." Aparoscopic Surgery
gallbladder * Hernia * Colon
Hemorrhoid * Breast
Other General Surgery


i .
:, ". M e d ic a l D e gre e
S University of Alabama Sc:n:c..i io Med,,ire
i Residernc
S..laplUst Health System. Birmingnam, Alabrama

[533 W. Emerald Oaks Dr.. Crystal River
p . NeV.1 f[' c 11 Ri i Rit i-Re nil ot , ii C i


I opened a checking



account and helped



provide shelter.

Now, SunTrust checking accounts benefit you and your community. Just open
a SunTrust checking account, accept and make any purchase with your new
SunTrust Visa', Check Card, and we'll donate $100 in your name to the charity
of your choice. Or you can get a $50 SunTrust Visa Gift Card to keep for your
own cause. So, how will you help your community today?

This is a limited time offer, so stop by your local SunTrust branch,
call 800.485.8982, or visit suntrust.com/mycause for more details.











SUNTRUST
Seeing beyond money


S '' , ' . . . i.: - 1 : , '' i. J- :n , i nc. . unTrustandSeeingbeyondmoneyareservice.marksof SunTrust I Banks, . r ,:.



_u,-.T ., P j $ [.-.. :| ,-r., I f",j-,-,i, . u nks, Inc. SunTrust and Seeing beyondmoney are service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


Balloon show


Associated Press
Two members of the Split-Tail hot air balloon crew prepare the balloon Saturday for the 26th annual Great Reno Balloon Race
at Rancho San Rafael Regional Park in Reno, Nev.


ARE YOU TIRED DURING

THE DAY BECAUSE YOU

CAN'T SLEEP AT NIGHT?
If you usually fall asleep easily, but have trouble staying
asleep, you might be interested in learning more about this
research study.
Eligible participants receive investigatiornal medication,
study-related physical exams and compensation for time
and travel up to $420.

ri Iridien For more information about this research study,
please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
.,C,'O Participation is completely voluntary
IRB Approved www.newstudyinfo.com
3/21/07 V.2
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd.,
(Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


I







NA'r1O SUJNDAY, SE~PTEMBEiR 9, 2007 9A


Obama is a pro at political game


Los Angeles Times
CHICAGO - He managed to
burnish a reformer's reputation
while swimming in the muddy
waters of special-interest-infest-
ed state politics.
He worked on a nice-guy
image while practicing the hard-
ball tactics of Chicago-style poli-
tics.
Now, promoting himself as a
fresh face on the national politi-
cal stage, proclaiming his dis-
tance from lobbyists and
Washington special interests,
Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., has to
contend with his own history.
From Chicago to Springfield,
his past is filled with old-school
political tactics - befriending
powerful local elders, assisting
benefactors and special inter-
ests, and neutralizing rivals.
Obama may be packaged as
something new among presiden-
tial contenders, but in this town
where politics is played like a
blood sport he fits right in.
"He knows how the game is
played," said Jay Stewart, execu-
tive director of Better
Government Association, a non-
partisan group that recognized
Obama with an award for help-
ing overhaul state ethics law.
Stewart called Illinois politics
"deeply troubled, if not corrupt"
at its core.
"It is very difficult to come out
of a system that is flawed and
walk out unscathed. Senator
Obama has done better than
most But it's not as if he is a babe
in the woods," Stewart said.
In fact, Obama's first venture
into politics suggested he came
to the game ready to throw


elbows. That was in 1995. He had
been invited to succeed Alice
Palmer when she left the state
senate to run for Congress.
He reached out to local power
brokers and financial backers -
among them entrepreneur
Antoin Rezko and politically
connected Al Johnson, a retired
auto dealer who was the late
Mayor Harold Washington's
bridge to the business communi-
ty.
Palmer backed Obama, too.
But Palmer's congressional bid
failed. She asked Obama to step
aside and let her run for her old
seat in the state senate.
Obama did more than refuse.
The one-time voting-rights
activist in Chicago's poor dis-
tricts challenged the signatures
qualifying Palmer for the ballot
Palmer was disqualified and
Obama, then 35, took office run-
ning unopposed.
"Some can say it was cold, but
that is how the game is played,"
said Illinois state Sen. Donne E.
Trotter, a Democrat whose dis-
trict bordered Obama's.
That first race cemented ties
with Johnson and Rezko that
have spanned Obama's political
career. Both made significant
donations. And Rezko became
one of Obama's most important
patrons. He and his associates
are responsible for $160,000 in
campaign aid over the past 12
years.
Rezko has helped numerous
politicians from both parties. In
2003, he gave President Bush
$4,000 and co-hosted a fundrais-
er in downtown Chicago said to
have generated $3 million for
the president's re- election.


. "', .. . Suncoast Obstetrics & Gynecology, PA
Scott Redrick, M.D. FACOG
Board Certified OB/GYN


582 SE 7th Ave., Crystal River, FL 34429
ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
Medicare, Blue Cross Blue Shield, First Health, CIGNA, Humana,
United Healthcare& most other insurance plans
Full Scope Gynecologic Services
* Repair of Cystocele and Rectocele
* Treatment of Genital Prolapse
* Well Woman Care * Ultrasound
* Evaluation and Treatment of Female Urinary
Incontinence
Surgery for: Endometriosis, Pelvic Pain,
Pelvic Adhesion, Ovarian Cyst, Prolapse Repair,
i Endometrial Ablation, Vaginal Rejuvenation & more.


You've


never looked


better.


What It Means
To You
- Shsod examti/ic s


*h~ Snt~brea/ih-/iolI



*A 1011 11api'd 1~~f


Superior, high-resolution CT images for a more
accurate diagnosis.
In diagnostic medicine, better images can lead to better
outcomes. To provide your doctor with clear, accurate
images, our new multislice CT scanner produces high-
resolution images of any part of the body - in just
seconds. See us when you need a CT scan, and we'll see
you better.
Call ONE CALL Scheduling to learn more, 352.795.8394
or 352.489.2022, x8394.

SEVENN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


'~vsr rrnc.com

-q pelA,1 la~i.Ipo~/ o Hea/thcaen-


Associated Press
Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Barack Obama, D-IIl., speaks
Friday at a Women for Obama event in San Francisco.


But Rezko also represents
another rule of old-style politics:
Beware of your friends. Last fall,
Rezko was indicted here on fed-
eral public corruption charges,
forcing politicians, including
Obama, to distance themselves.
Obama arrived in Springfield
with another familiar tool from
the kitbag of Chicago politics -
ambition.
Cynthia K. Miller, who set up
his district office, recalls an inci-
dent shortly after Obama's elec-
tion. She had taken a longer-
than-normal lunch break and
returned to find an impatient


state senator waiting for her
He didn't raise his voice, she
said, but turned stern as he
explained the importance of
time management and the need
to focus on goals. Then he
shared his own goal: "I plan to
be president."
"When he said it, he wasn't
just whistling 'Dixie.' I
believed," Miller said.
Oprah Winfrey, who is hosting
a fundraiser for Obama at her
Montecito estate in Santa
Barbara County in California on
Saturday , keeps a residence in
the old district The Rev Jesse


_ ^ CATARACT &s
I ifmmlmLASER INSTITUTE
U "Excellence... with love
considering

CATARACT

SURGERY?
Appointments are available for cataract evaluations with:

James P. Gills, MD
Thursday, September 13th

Seven Hills Center
1180 Mariner Blvd. Spring Hill
1-800-282-7785 * StLukesCataract.com
We Accept Medicare Assignment and Most Insurances
St. Luke's also offers all possible surgical treatments for astigmatism.


INTRODUCTORY OFFER f E
3-Month U50% UFF
Rental Special SERVICE SPECIAL
95 per month AnyMakeorModel
for the first :.Xi ,. u I.al ,Culi ' WjaIri .0 3, a . * 0 '%ia 3
3 m o n th s p ro te ',! i ri ;1 .'?l ,'t , , ,,:h'' n ,, ipg c r ' u ,p
r . in anlal,.S ar ,llout rn - a . :iler
Tr' anitLu giW i.tWae r1itinSyemm * uTp r e " C' , r :rF. k up
nc ng conditioners soers s or eu mo 'sis' drink *FRinse check-up and adjustment (if necessary)
wo ter ' W tm orl 9 S9 . er m onth for q* Fag 3 rm onths6lm 1i4 J Mv Il',Ien, t v.H I ri, - .1 a".i ;
UNITED APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

better water, pure and simple.
866-490-81 71 better water. pure and simple.
866-490-817 A nAQnt.R171


Jackson, who has endorsed
Obama, and Minister Louis
Farrakhan, head of the black
separatist Nation of Islam, live
within three blocks of Obama's
home.
As the new state senator,
Democrat Obama cut an inde-
pendent swath in Springfield.
He teamed with Republican
state Sen. Kirk Dillard to revoke
a law that allowed lawmakers to
convert campaign money to per-
sonal use, for some legislators a
source of substantial largesse.
"It didn't take long to see he is
a man of intelligence and
ethics," said Dillard, who
recently taped a pro-Obama tel-
evision ad aired in neighboring
Iowa.
In 1999, Obama voted against
an expansion of gambling, even
though two of his biggest backers
- Rezko and Johnson - were to
share interest in a new casino
planned in suburban Chicago.
And Obama backed a ban on


fundraising on state property -
again teaming with Dillard - an
action aimed at Springfield lob-
byists like Alfred Ronan, noted
for handing out campaign
checks in the capital.
But there are other, less flat-
tering examples.
Obama later would tap
Ronan, who represented state
gambling interests, and others
in his firm for $10,500 in cam-
paign donations. And in 2003,
while running for the U.S.
Senate, Obama switched posi-
tions and cast a decisive vote
authorizing the state to operate
casinos.
Ronan said his financial sup-
port for Obama was unrelated to
any legislative assistance.
"I supported him for U.S.
Senate, and I support him for
president - and he voted
against me 100 percent of the
time; or, maybe it was only 98
percent of the time," Ronan
said in a recent interview.


The Beverage Center


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION







1OA SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


Nation/World B rErS


Ex-Duke lacrosse
prosecutor jailed
DURHAM, N.C. - Former
Durham County prosecutor Mike
Nifong walked out of jail Saturday
morning after completing a 24-hour
contempt sentence imposed by a
judge for lying to the court about criti-
cal DNA evidence in the Duke
lacrosse rape case. Nifong left the
county jail shortly after 9 a.m., where
he was greeted with cheers and
applause by a crowd of about 20
supporters waiting for him in the
lobby. As they did Friday when
Nifong reported to jail, they surround-
ed the disgraced and disbarred pros-
ecutor as he moved through a crowd
of reporters to a waiting car.

Diocese to settle 144
claims of abuse
SAN DIEGO -The Roman
Catholic Diocese of San Diego said
Friday it has agreed to pay $198.1
million to settle 144 claims of sexual
abuse by clergy, the second-largest
payment by a diocese. The agree-
ment caps more than four years of
negotiations in state and federal
courts.
Earlier this year, the diocese
abruptly filed for bankruptcy protec-
tion just hours before trial was
scheduled to begin on 42 lawsuits
alleging sexual abuse. Bankruptcy
could shield the diocese's assets, but
a judge recently threatened to throw
out the bankruptcy case if church
officials did not reach an agreement
with the plaintiffs.
The San Diego diocese initially
offered about $95 million to settle the
claims. The victims were seeking
about $200 million.


Saturday, weary rescuers were no
closer to understanding where he
was flying or where his small plane
might have gone down.
Searchers tried to glean any posi-
tive news they could from the old
crashes they discovered from an
otherwise discouraging week.
'This does give us hope. We are
finding a lot of stuff we didn't know
was there," Civil Air Patrol Maj.
Cynthia Ryan said.
Glitch shuts service for
BlackBerry users
SAN FRANCISCO -A software
glitch shut down e-mail service for
some BlackBerry users, and delays
were still being felt hours after the
problem was fixed.
Research in Motion Ltd., the
Waterloo, Ontario-based company
that makes the ubiquitous mobile
device, said Friday that no e-mails
were lost in the shutdown that
affected an unspecified number of
customers in North America who
subscribe to the BlackBerry Internet
Service. Phone service and text
messaging were unaffected.
However, even after e-mail serv-
ice was restored, slowdowns per-
sisted into Friday night as message
backlogs were being cleared out.
The company did not provide an
estimate of when service would
return to normal and did not specify
the software problem.
"(Research in Motion) is continu-
ing to monitor the situation and
apologizes to customers for any
inconvenience," the company said
in a statement.
BlackBerry Enterprise Server, a
higher tier of software geared
toward large businesses, was not
affected.


MINDEN, Nev. - In their quest to
find missing aviator Steve Fossett,
searchers have come across
uncharted plane crashes six times.
But none of the wrecks shed light on
what may have happened to the
multimillionaire.
Hopes that a wrecked plane spot-
ted on the side of a hill might be
Fossett's were dashed quickly Friday
when ground crews learned the
plane last was registered more than
three decades ago.
As the search for Fossett
stretched into its fifth full day


MODENA, Italy - Recordings of
Luciano Pavarotti's voice boomed
out in Modena's main piazza on
Saturday as moumers waited to
pay their final respects to the tenor
before an invitation-only funeral in
his hometown's cathedral.
Some well-wishers waited under
the large loudspeakers erected in
Piazza Grande, arms crossed and
eyes closed, as they listened to the
voice that was as much at home in
the world's great opera houses as it
was on stage with rock stars.
.- From wire report;


A tale of two cities


Baltimore mayor poised to continue

leadership of city divided by haves, have-nots


Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Mayor Sheila Dixon
appears poised for an easy victory in
Baltimore's Democratic mayoral primary,
which would assure her of serving a full
four-year term as the city's first female
elected mayor
With a victory, she would continue as
the public face of a city more starkly divid-
ed than ever between the prosperity
enjoyed by downtown and many neigh-
borhoods and the blight that strangles
large swaths of the city.
"The city has become more extreme in
terms of the gap between the community
of haves and the community of have-nots,"
said Anirban Basu, director of the Sage
Policy Group Inc., an economic and policy
consulting firm.
Dixon was elevated to the mayor's
office from the City Council presidency in
January when her predecessor, Martin
O'Malley, became governor
A poll conducted in late August showed
Dixon with a 27-percentage point lead
over her closest rival. She has raised more
than twice as much money, and she's
picked up the endorsement of the popular
O'Malley Analysts have proclaimed the
race a virtual lock
Baltimore presents a glittering facade
to visitors that stretches beyond the Inner
Harbor into neighborhoods including
Federal Hill, Fells Point, Canton and
Mount Vernon. The city is spending $300
million to build a sprawling Hilton hotel
next to its convention center
But much of the city remains plagued
by crime, poverty and drugs. Nearly 23
percent of Baltimore's 608,000 residents
live below the poverty line, according to
the Census bureau's most recent
American Community Survey. And the
city has an estimated 60,000 addicts, the
vast majority of whom are hooked on
heroin, according to Baltimore Substance


Abuse Systems Inc.
A surge in homicides, however, pres-
ents the most obvious symptom of
Baltimore's woes. With 213 slaying as of
Sept 7, the city is on pace to easily top 300
homicides, a threshold it has not exceed-
ed since 1999.
Upon becoming mayor, Dixon was
immediately confronted with a dramatic
upturn in homicides and nonfatal shoot-
ings, and in July she replaced Police
Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm with
his top deputy on an interim basis.
Experts believe a short-term increase
in homicides should not be blamed on
Dixon. Several other East Coast cities,
including Philadelphia and Trenton, NJ.,
have seen more murders in 2007.
But if she is not perceived as an effec-
tive crime fighter, Dixon will bear the bur-
den.
Police statistics show the vast majority
of murder victims have criminal records
and the city's wealthier neighborhoods
are relatively safe. But sometimes the two
Baltimores intersect, crystallizing resi-
dents' anxieties.
Anna Sowers, 27, has become an out-
spoken community advocate since her
husband,'Zach, was beaten nearly to
death just a block away from the couple's
Patterson Park home. He remains in a
coma.
Patterson Park, like many city neigh-
borhoods, has been transformed by an
influx of young professionals like the
Sowerses. But some of the city's most dis-
advantaged neighborhoods are not far
away, and four teenagers who live within
a few blocks of the couple have been
charged in the attack
"I just really hope to be able to walk
from my car to my house without feeling
intense fear," said Sowers, who has met
with both Dixon and her top challenger,
City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr
Mitchell is running stark television ads


Associated Press
Then-City Council President Sheila Dixon
answers questions from reporters Nov.
8, 2006, in Baltimore. Dixon, became
mayor in January 2007, promoted from
the City Council presidency after her
predecessor, Martin O'Malley, was
elected governor.
in which he claims that Baltimore is fac-
ing a "murder crisis," and he has pledged
to put more police officers on the street
The city's police and firefighters' unions
have endorsed him.
Dixon has stressed targeted enforce-
ment of the most violent offenders and
stronger ties between police officers and
the communities they serve. She also
revived a police unit that traces illegal
guns.
Dixon's supporters preach patience
with her crime strategy And they believe
her personal history leaves her well-posi-
tioned to lead the two Baltimores.
Dixon worked for 17 years in the state
economic development office and has
strong ties to the business community. She
is also a native of West Baltimore and. a
former kindergarten teacher


VACATION


TIME!


newspaper in education


DEPRESSED?

Not Having Fun Anymore?
Feeling Hopeless?
Tired?
Overwhelmed?
Feeling Down?
Difficulty Sleeping?

Call today if you have been suffering from. these or other
symptoms of depression. You may be eligible for a
research study of an investigational medication for
depression for women who are postmenopausal and
between the ages of 40 and 70. Qualified participants will
receive study medication, laboratory tests, study related
physical examination, and compensation for time and
travel.
. . For more information about this research study,
MeCri(.11 ."i[i please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
. IB Approved Participation is completely voluntary
- 2/23/07oV.2 www.newstudyinfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613
725546

330-0909 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of
County Commissioners, Citrus County, will
hold a public hearing on September 13, 2007
at 5:01 P.M. at the Citrus County Commission
meeting room, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida for the purpose of
REVIEWING THE TENTATIVE BUDGET FOR
THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER
1, 2007 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2008.



Dennis Demato, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Citrus County, Florida


69~






I


0,,


S"
4 - --


Y44
, '~4


& 1 i.


& THE MINDPOWER OF MORE


., .5.~


.1,


DOCTORS ON YOUR CASE.


Combine the minds, talents. and passions of 20.000 people, and you have something truly
extraordinary. two world-class academic medical centers. working as one - to bring you more thinking.
more treatments, and more answers than ever. Already. this
* approach is yielding incredible rewards. And we can't wait to U F& Shands
. show you what the-future-holds.- tih-J S-CE-LCE..of_ HOPE TheUniversityOfFIorida HeathSys.tem

'SIia d ..h IU s.or, ig


Search for aviator Thousands pay
Steve Fossett continues respects to Pavarotti


'I


NA,,fioN/Wc3R-Ln


CITRUS COUN7Y (H) CIIRONICLI..'


70-4tlii






SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007 11A


SEPTEMBER 2007

Don't Buy An Analog Hearing
Florida Based Hearing Aid Company to Introduce the
World's First Natural Hearing System powered by Natural3
Inverness, FL- Mr. Denny Dingler, President of that hearing centers are selling the public short by digital hearing devices (GN I
Professional Hearing Centers announced today that running almost identical ads and trying to beat each 6 channels and 6 adjustable
Professional Hearing Centers is leading a national other's price by $5 or $10 but still advertising outdat- offered at an amazing $69
campaign to inform the public of the benefits of ed hearing aids only hurts and confuses the public" price for the Canta 2 is the lo
digital over analog technology. This event is says Dingler. Dingler continues, "This national cam- U.S. Don't be fooled by
scheduled for Wednesday, September 12th through paign that we have chosen to take part in is designed says Dingier.
Saturday, September 15th. to set the record straight. We want to allow the pub- T p , r hf rr ir ,
TnI fact- the manufacturer is o


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Aid!


(n')
ReSound's Canta 2) have
e bands and all sizes are
5 price. "This amazing
)west price offered in the
inferior technology"

Tf'nrrne it's Tntl.-A-pHear


"I think it's sad when companies out there are trying
to confuse the public by advertising fifty year old
technology," says Dingler. "Class A Circuits were
being sold for $200 to $300 forty years ago. Now, I
see companies advertising this aid for $395 like this is
a great deal." Dingler also states that technology has
changed so drastically, that there is no reason for any-
one to wear analog devices. Analog distorts at 83
decibels, which is equivalent to a pretty quiet restau-
rant. This circuit is pretty much useless in any noisy
environment. Dingler states, "What a difference fifty
years makes--trying to compare analog technology to
new digital technology is like comparing the horse
and buggy to today's automobile."
Price should not force someone into old technology.
We at Professional Hearing Centers would like to
give everyone the opportunity to experience digital
technology without paying a sky high price. "I feel


"During this special event,
for those who are trapped
with outdated technology,
we offer an opportunity to
upgrade to the digital
through a generous buy
back program. "

lic a chance to come in for a free hearing evaluation.
Once a hearing loss is determined, they will have the
chance to feel confident in choosing one of a full line
of 100% digital devices that Professional Hearing
Centers offers.
Just as an example of our commitment to offer the
best technology at the best prices, our entry level


Prem6re� at 50% off MSRP, which is one of the
world's first Natural Hearing Systems. This system
has 3 levels of natural, which are Natural Sound,
Natural Awareness, & Natural Amplification and
comes with an unprecedented Manufacturer's 3 Year
Warranty. Everyone who purchases the Premere�
during this special event will receive an additional
10% off of the sales price--that's 55% off MSRP! For
more information, please visit intelahear.com
This special test market event is being
held in Inverness at Professional Hearing
Centers located at 211 S. Apopka Ave. Be
one of the first in the Inverness area to
take part in this 4 day event beginning on
September 12th thru September 15th,
between the hours of 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.
Call Now (352) 726-4327 for more informa-
tion and to secure your appointment time.


* People who have trouble hearing in background noise
* People whose hearing does not require a traditional hearing aid
* People who have trouble hearing only in certain situations
* People who can hear but not understand

Professional Hearing Centers
Is Introducing the World's 1s Natural Hearing System


Natural Sound
* No distortion
* No digital delay
* No echo I


Natural
Awareness
* Instantly priorities
speech from any
direction
* Superior speech
intelligibility


Natural Amplification
* 98% personalized comfort
* seamless volume transitions between environments


BENEFITS OF OPEN EAR TECHNOLOGY:
* No big & bulky hearing aids
* Hear clear & natural
* No volume controls to adjust
* Eliminate the annoying chamber feeling
* Especially designed to work best in background noise
* One of the only devices that may be successful in masking Tinnitus


Intel-A-Hear
.. . _- __ -TM


PI


.7 -


remere: -v" I-! intelahear.com

Actual Size
100% Financing with no interest O.A.C. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED with
Professional's 23 years of customer service & hearing health guaranteed program.
BE ONE OF THE FIRST IN INVERNESS TO DISCOVER
OPEN EAR TECHNOLOGY WITHOUT RISKING ONE PENNY.


I,''k Al R GN C na CONSUMER COMPARISON CHART
1' fi eW All IVIodels GU ReSound Canta2 Manufacturer Model Channels # Bands Avg. Retail Price
O l LOWEST PRICE OFFERED IN .S GN ReSound Canta2 6 6 $1995.00
OOl S 00 PRICE OFFEREDIU.S. Oticon Go 2 1 $1349.00 I
Entry Level Digital CIC $695(regular price *1995.00 ea) O 1con Tego 4 3 $1849.00
'.-, ii,- Otican Tego Pro 6 4 $1999.00
channel, 6 band ONE WEEK ONLY icon Deia4ooo 3 $1400.00
Don't be fooled by inferior technology. 100% Digital ; Siemens Cielao 6 3 $1699.00
C m ltl by te h oo y *Nu-Ear kqulty Digital 2 2 $1500.00 I
Completely In Canal Fitting range 35/40db loss. At time of purchases only. Expires 9/15/07. Custom Canal Audina Simplex 2 2 $700.00 1

wHUoB" LIMITED APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CALL NOW!





HOnD. 1--. C

e Professional Hearing Centers

"Helping People Hear... With Quality Care"
725048 nnerstpe AdvetisingAgency


The Intel-A-Hear PremereTM
powered by n .has 3 levels of natural


A., CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


725048


Innerscope Advertising AgencyTm












S N DAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Hoops


Top aide to aI-Sadr slain


Associated Press
A border collie competes
Saturday in the Agility Trial as
part of the Westchester
Kennel Club's 91st annual All
Breed Dog Show in
Tarrytown, N.Y.

Tot tumbles
out of towed car
AURORA, III. -A reposses-
sion crew got a surprise when a
4-year-old boy leaped out of the
sport-utility vehicle they were
towing away.
Fashawn Parker, of
Naperville, was sitting in the
back seat of a Ford Excursion
that was parked outside of a
house on Thursday when the
repo crew approached, hooked
the car to a tow truck and began
driving away, Aurora police
spokesman Dan Ferrelli said.
7ashawn opened the door
and jumped out into a construc-
tion area, Ferrelli said. It was
not known how fast the truck
was going, Ferrelli said, but the
truck was moving in slow traffic
because of construction.
Fashawn was treated for
minor injuries and released from
a nearby hospital.
The tow truck stopped after a
colleague in a separate car
phoned the driver to tell him that
someone had fallen out of the
back seat of the SUV, Ferrelli
said.
No charges were filed against
the two men driving the repo
truck, police said, adding that
the men checked the back of
the truck and did not see the
boy inside.
The car had been parked at
the home of an acquaintance of
the driver, who was picking up
another child, Ferrelli said.
Officials did not name the driver.
Fashawn's mother, Camille
Parker, said she was grateful
her son was not more seriously
injured.


World BRIEFS

Election day


Associated Press
Mario Artun Sipac poses for
his portait in front of a pinata
shop in Patzun, Guatemala,
Saturday, the day before pres-
idential elections.

City to shame
spitting workers
MUMBAI, India - Mumbai's
top civic agency is trying public
shame in hopes of keeping its
employees from spitting in the
halls and stairways at work.
Offenders will find their photo-
graphs, names and titles posted
on bulletin boards at the head-
quarters of the Brihanmumbai
Municipal Corporation, the body
responsible for sanitation stan-
dards and the upkeep of roads
and buildings.
They will also be fined 200
rupees ($5), an agency official,
R.A. Rajeev, said Wednesday.
One worker already has
become "Spit Employee of
Today" since the campaign start-
ed Monday, Rajeev said.
The campaign comes ahead
of a cleanup drive planned to
begin in November for Mumbai,
India's financial and entertain-
ment capital, as well as one of
its filthiest cities.
- From wire reports


Los Angeles Times

BAGHDAD, Iraq - Gunmen
shot and killed a prominent
aide to radical cleric Muqtada
al-Sadr, police said Saturday ,
and a car bomb killed 15 peo-
ple after the driver sped past a
checkpoint toward a crowded
Baghdad marketplace.'
Police ordered the driver to
stop as he drove past a road-
block in the Dakhil neighbor-
hood on the capital's east side.
Officers shot at the car before
it could reach the market, trig-
gering an explosion.
"We heard gunshots from
the police station and then we
saw a big explosion," said
Mohammed Abul Khaleq, 22,
who was at a'kiosk selling cell-
phone accessories. "The time


of the explosion was around
the peak at this market, when
people come to shop, eat ice
cream and meet friends."
The driver and 14 others
were killed, police said, and 45
people were injured. The blast
also damaged three restau-
rants and three barbershops.
Authorities Saturday also
reported the bodies of 11 men
found in various spots of the
capital, each apparently killed
by gunfire. In northern Iraq,
the U.S. military reported the
Army's first use of a new type
of remote-controlled
unmanned aircraft. The air-
craft was used to kill two Iraqis
who were spotted trying to
plant a roadside bomb, it said.
The fatal shooting of al-Sadr
aide Mohammed Garaawi late


Friday was thought to repre-
sent another round in the esca-
lating violence between rival
Shiite militia groups. Garaawi
was shot 12 times by gunmen
outside his home in Najaf,
about 100 miles south of
Baghdad, officials said.
Al- Sadr's so-called Mahdi
Army militia allegedly has tar-
geted Shiite militias loyal to
the rival Supreme Islamic
Iraqi Council, Iraq's largest
Shiite political group, who
regard Grand Ayatollah Ali al-
Sistani as their religious
leader.
In the last three months,
four al- Sistani aides have
been killed. Only one slaying
has been solved: A stabbing
during a robbery by a guard at
the al-Sistani compound.


Garaawi's killing might be
seen as retaliation and could
ratchet up tensions in south
Iraq, where rival Shiites have
been battling for control of
the country's richest oil-pro-
ducing regions. Garaawi over-
saw the tribal affairs office
for the al-Sadr organization
and was linked to the Mahdi
Army.
"This man was very peace-
ful," said Sheik Salah Ubaidi,
an al-Sadr spokesman. "But
we think he was targeted
because he was a vital mem-
ber of the Sadr office."
A few miles east of Najaf, a
bomb killed five people at a
busy marketplace in Kufa, an
al- Sadr stronghold where the
cleric also has a home.
"These tensions have sur-


Associated Press
Members of the band from Northeast Unified School District 246 in Arma, Kan., stay dry Saturday as they entertain the crowd
during a light rain at the annual Old Settler's Festival parade in Arcadia, Kan.





Missing girl's parents want to leave Portugal


Toddler disappeared four months ago


Associated Press

PRAIA DA LUZ, Portugal -
The father of a 4-year-old
British girl who disappeared in
Portugal said he and his wife
were desperate to go home but
did not want to be perceived as
running from justice since
being named suspects in the
case.
Kate and Gerry McCann
have strenuously professed
their innocence since police
declared them formal suspects
Friday following hours of gru-
eling interrogation.
"We thought we were in our
worst nightmare, but now it
just keeps getting worse and
worse," Gerry McCann was
quoted as saying in an inter-
view with the Sunday newspa-
per The News of the World.
He said he was concerned
their treatment indicates
Portuguese police were under
intense pressure to solve the
case, the Sunday newspaper
reported.
He said the couple was nego-
tiating with police on whether
they could return to Britain
after the lease on the villa they
are renting in Portugal runs
out next week.
"I don't know if they will
agree, but we're desperate to
get back for the kids' sake and
emotional reasons," he was
quoted as saying. "It's not that
we're running away."
Gerry McCann's sister
Philomena said her brother
and his family had planned to


return home on Monday.
"They are still hoping to
come home on Monday, but
Gerry is saying he doesn't want
it to look like they are running
scared," she told the Scottish
Press Association after speak-
ing to her brother by phone.
The McCanns' Portuguese
lawyer, Carlos Pinto Abreu,
said after the separate interro-
gations ended late Friday that
police had not imposed any
restrictions on them, "meaning
they have total freedom of
movement"
However, after reviewing
their statements, authorities
could decide to bring charges
against them in the May 3 dis-
appearance of their daughter
Madeleine from the family's
hotel room in southern
Portugal's Algarve region.
Neither the police nor the
McCanns were available for
further comment Saturday.
Their spokeswoman, Justine
McGuinness, said the couple
had canceled plans to attend a
local church service Saturday
evening because the huge
media interest could unsettle
the local community.
A family friend, Clarence
Mitchell, said Gerry McCann
told him that he and his wife
expected clarification of their
legal status within 48 hours.
Mitchell said the McCanns,
both doctors from central
England, were considering hir-
ing lawyers in Britain where
they would also have support
from family and friends.


"They are determined to
prove this is a travesty ... and
clear their names," Mitchell
said of the police allegations
about their possible involve-
ment
The couple's
ordeal has WC
drawn attention
around the we wer
world, partly
because of an worst nil
unprecedented
international but now
campaign they
led to find their getting v
daughter.
The police worse
decision to
name the par- Get
ents as suspects about his daughter
brought a dra-
matic twist in
the four-month-old case which
had initially focused on an
apparent abductor.
Until Friday, suspicion had
centered on Robert Murat, a
British man who lived near the
hotel from which Madeleine
disappeared, and who was the
only formal suspect
But police said new forensic
tests done on evidence gath-
ered months after the girl van-
ished found traces of blood in
the couple's car, said Justine
McGuinness, a spokeswoman
for the family.
The traces of blood, appar-
ently missed in earlier foren-
sic tests, were uncovered by
sniffer dogs brought from
Britain.
Residents in the village of
Praia da Luz, where
Madeleine disappeared and
where her parents have


remained for the past four
months, said they were bewil-
dered by the developments in
the case.
"I don't know what to believe
any more,"
said Filomena
e thought Teixeira, a
retired resi-
e in our dent "But it's
not a matter of
ghtmare, belief or dis-
belief, it's
it keeps about what the
Evidence
worse and says."
Philomena,
G e r r y
McCann's sis-
rry McCann ter, - said
war's disappearance. Friday that
police had
proposed a
plea bargain to the McCann's
lawyer, suggesting Madeleine
might have been killed acci-
dentally and offering the moth-
er a limited sentence if she con-
fessed.
The McCanns said they were
dining with friends in a hotel
restaurant when Madeleine van-
ished, Madeleine was in their
hotel room with her twin 2-year-
old siblings, and the parents said
they returned frequently to
check on them.
Since then, the McCanns have
toured Europe with photos of
Madeleine and the child's
stuffed animals and clothing,
even meeting with Pope
Benedict XVI at the Vatican.
Celebrities including children's
author J.K Rowling and soccer
star David Beckham made pub-
lic appeals that helped the fami-
ly raise more than $2 million.


faced in pitched battles, and
also in assassinations, not just
of Sistani representatives but
governors," said Vali Nasr, a
Middle East expert at the
Council on Foreign Relations.
The governors of two south-
ern Iraqi provinces, Qadisiya
and Muthanna, were killed by
car bombs a little more than a
week apart in August. Al-
Sadr's militia is suspected of
carrying out both attacks,
something al-Sadr denies.
British military officials
handed over their last base in
the southern city of Basra to
Iraqi security forces last week,
and are camped at the airport.
Their exit is intended to allow
Iraqis to police themselves,
with the British there for
emergencies.


Analysts:

Bin Laden


video timing

is crucial

Associated Press

Osama bin Laden's latest
message is a hodgepodge of
anti-capitalist vitriol, impas-
sioned Islamic evangelism and
what can best be described as a
twisted attempt at reconcilia-
tion: Join us, or we'll kill you.
Analysts say .
the video that f
came out days
before the
sixth anniver-
sary of the
Sept 11 attacks
is more about
timing than
substance, an Osarnma
attempt by his- bin Laden
tory's most recently
wanted fugitive released video.
to thumb his
nose at the forces arrayed
against him and remind the
world that he hasn't been
caught
He ridiculed President Bush
on Iraq, saying events there
have gotten "out of control"
and comparing the American
leader to "one who plows and
sows the sea: He harvests noth-
ing but failure."
Despite widespread fears,
al-Qaida has so far failed to
launch a second attack on the
scale of Sept 11, and many
believe the video message -
bin Laden's first since 2004 -
was also an attempt to stay rel-
evant
Anne Giudicelli, a former
French diplomat specializing
in the Middle East who now
runs the Paris-based consul-
tancy Terrorisc, said bin Laden
is well aware that his reap-
pearance on the world stage -
looking fit and with his beard
dyed a youthful black - was
itself a victory that went
beyond anything he actually
said.
"The objective is obviously to
show that despite everything in
place against him, he has sur-
vived. That's the No. 1 mes-
sage," she said. "The mere fact
of appearing in a video is
already a message."
Louis Caprioli of the risk
management firm Geos, and
former head of the French
intelligence agency DST's anti-
terrorism operations, said,
"What's important is that he
made an appearance."
"The question everyone was
asking is, is he dead or alive?"
Caprioli said. "Now we have
proof that he's alive, surprising
a lot of experts who thought he
was dead."
In the tape released Friday,
bin Laden mentions the
anniversary of the Aug. 6, 1945,
atomic bomb attack on
Hiroshima. He also refers to
the Democratic Party's con-
gressional victory in last fall's
election and to French
President Nicolas Sarkozy, who
was elected in May
Ben Venzke of the
IntelCenter, a U.S.-based intel-
ligence group that monitors ter-
rorism messages, said the
Hiroshima reference means
the earliest the tape could have
been made is on or shortly after
Aug. 9 - less than a month ago.


Dry parade


I


�e

r(




N



.er
















SE PTFN 19E . '2007


Atl' CITRUS COUaiTVY CHRONIC 4r




Australia's Gold Coast party town


SHEILA FLYNN
Associated Press

' SURFERS PARADISE, Australia -
'With a glitzy name like Surfers
'Paradise, it's hard to expect more
from this Gold Coast town than
'beachy souvenir shops and all-you-
ican-eat pancakes.
So you won't be disappointed when
you arrive; the moniker itself is
'preparation for the onslaught of surf-
board memorabilia and shoulder-to-
shoulder visitors, jostling each other
as they rush to the sand and wait to
make bookings at the tourist informa-
tion center.
' But something about this place
evokes a feeling of guilty pleasure -
whether it be the faultless beaches a
block from the chaos, the countless
day tours to everywhere or the simple
ability to party all night and lounge all
day, free from the need for a single
intelligent thought.
Sometimes, that tried-and-true
tourism is exactly what you need - if
only for a few days.
Surfers is a default vacation spot for
Australians themselves, attracting
everyone from young families to posh


Associated Press
This 2001 photo, released by Tourism Australia, shows skyscrapers and the
beach at Surfers Paradise, Queensland, Australia. People come to Surfers not
only for the hopping nightlife, waves and beaches - which can be found in a mul-
titude of locations along Australia's coast - but also because of the wealth of
excursion options.
urbanites to students, who descend break down under). Peak beach sea-
upon the city for a raucous period son is December-February - summer
known as "Schoolies Week" every in the Southern Hemisphere.
year in late November (think spring Multiple 80-minute flights on Qantas,


Virgin Blue and Jetstar scoot up to the
Surfers Paradise airport from Sydney
every day (though the airport in
Brisbane, an hour away by train, is the
nearest international gateway), and
hotels sport "No Vacancy" signs even
in (their) winter.
They come to Surfers
not only for the hop- But son
ping nightlife, waves
and beaches - which about tI
can be found in a mul-
titude of locations evoke
along Australia's coast foelin;d
- but also because of heIig
the avalanche of excur- pleas
sion options. Day trips
abound to satisfy every
taste: SeaWorld and a theme park
called Dreamworld for families,
whale-watching trips for marine
enthusiasts and nearby Brisbane
tours for steadfast urbanites.
The outings are admittedly touristy.
But the area's natural beauty and the
carefree fun of the parks make that
forgivable, especially if you've
already resigned yourself to an indul-
gence in kitsch.
A day trip to the Green Mountains,
for example, showcases lovely little


m





M


high-altitude towns, exotic animals
and an unexpected rainforest.
Various operators offer day tours.
The full-day O'Reilly's Green
Mountains tour, which offers compli-
mentary tea and scones at Gallery
Walk craft village and
tasting at a local win-
nething ery, drives passengers
up Mount Tamborine
is place past the tough terrain
of Canungra and its
es a Jungle Warfare
if guilty Training Centre, which
serves as a training
ilre post for national and
i " .. international troops.
Tour guides joke about
the danger of stray bullets, warning
passengers that while Australian
marksmen aren't likely to send way-
ward bullets their way, the same can't
be promised of the English - a
tongue-in-cheek nod to the country's
colonial past.
The tour spends the most time
around O'Reilly's Guesthouse, a
familial enterprise started by famed
bushman Bernard O'Reilly Walking
Please see TOWN/Page 16A


Travel -- .

Halloween 2007 not
kid's play at Universal
ORLANDO - Halloween at
Universal Studios theme parks is
not for the faint of heart.
New this year, Universal
Studios parks both in Hollywood
and Orlando are bringing the
legendary horror film series,
"Friday the 13th," "A Nightmare
on Elm Street" and "The Texas
Chainsaw Massacre" to life. The
event - which includes guest
encounters with actors portray-
ing Freddy Krueger, Jason and
Leatherface - is not suitable for
children under 12.
In Orlando, the themed nights-
will take place Sept. 28 to 29 to
Oct. 4 to 7,11 to 14, 18 to 21, 24
to 28, and Oct. 31 to Nov. 3.
The Hollywood park, which
will also have horror sets from
Hollywood history, a new
Backlot Terror Tram Tour, and
mazes themed on "Nightmare"
and "Chainsaw," will offer the
themed nights on Oct. 5, 6, 12,
13,19, 20, 26, 27, 28 and.31.
The event begins each night
at7 p.m. Closing times vary.
Each night, the Universal
parks in Hollywood and Orlando
are transformed with haunted
houses and shows.
For more information, dis-
counts, travel packages and
tickets, visit www.halloweenhor-
rornights.com.
- From wire reports


*The� fatoar .TV ,tilin vhi. iI

I The Bdlenr TV oniho she de9o% iky3Is
nfws for allypes of beat o nors CitshL. Siut.
Upheal tocai JuNI Perry. !wpWSs rMpaL-ii
hao enI in thewos(I' ....


tri s 07:1B i
YouTube.com
The Boaters TV, which airs three days a week, has become an Al
boating video podcast in less than two months.


The Boaters TVA1 in

less than two months


Associated Press

MIAMI - The Boaters TV, a
thrice-weekly podcast covering
boating news and features, was
viewed in excess of 50,000
times in the two months since
the first episode was released
June 18, quickly establishing
itself as the top video podcast
for boat owners and enthusi-
asts in the United States.
The podcast is published at
www.TheBoaters.tv, and it is
syndicated through other pop-
ular online video content
aggregators such as YouTube,
DailyMotion, and Yahoo Video.
The podcast is also distributed
through the iTunes Store's free
podcast download center.
Recent episodes have covered
the current debate over


mandatory boater education
and licensing, the EPA's
Recreational Boating Act, and
popular boating destinations
such as Sea Ray's Aquapalooza
celebration.
Episodes are hosted by Julie
Perry, long active in the boat-
ing community with years of
experience in yacht crew
recruitment and the mega-
yacht service niche. Perry
recently authored The
Insiders' Guide to Becoming a
Yacht Stewardess (October
2006). Perry resides in South
Florida, the birthplace of The
Boaters TV and the boating
capital of the United States.
"The momentum gathered
by The Boaters TV can be
Please see BOAT/Page 16A


Plenty to do and see in Ireland


N ever a dull moment in view around every curve. The
Ireland as there is sur- word is out - see the "Ring of
prise, beauty, contrast Kerry" -bbut don't plan on this
and friendly people around being a two-hour drive, as
every bend in the narrow there are too many distractions
roads. Guinness, along the way. We
stone walls, Irish .. spent the night
dancers, sheep, about half way
B&Bs, castles and We then went
fine crystal - southeast to the
Ireland will rock 1 < beautiful port town
your senses. - of Kinsale, and sam-
We, along with pled their many fine
another couple, pubs and eateries,
flew into Shannon, before heading
rented a car and Nl Sa er north to Blarney
departed on a won- ei Sawyer Castle and the
derfully relaxing (at SPONTANEOUS famous Stone.
times) and surprise- TOUR GUIDE Kissing the Stone
filled trip around has not dramatical-
the country. Well, almost ly changed my life - even
"around," as two weeks is not though Karyn thinks it did.
enough time to hit the four cor- Next stop - Waterford - and
ners of Ireland. you ladies, especially, know
"Be sure to see the Ring of about Waterford - 'nuf said!
Kerry," we were told by prior Eastward-ho to Wexford. Note:
visitors. This was high on the All of this was not done in one
lisf of things to see according day.


to Gerry Mulligan, who briefed
us about where to go and what
to see. What could be so impor-
tant about a ring, we thought,
yet we agreed that we would
see it. And a beautiful ring it
was. This ring is about 100
miles in length, and loops
around a peninsula bounded
by Dingle Bay on the north and
the Kenmare River on the
south, and offers a surprise


Departing Wexford, and
avoiding the large cities of
Cork and Dublin, we darted
northwest to the Cliffs of
Moher. Be careful when
attempting to see the frothy
breakers at the Cliffs. There
are only limited stretches of
fence or rail separating the
curious sightseer from a
plunge of about 700 feet to the
rocks below. A shroud of fog


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Michael John's Pub is one of the picturesque pubs in the northern
area of Ireland.


and mist frequently masks the
divide between terra firma and
a surprise of dynamic propor-
tions. The reward, on a clear
day, is a view that won't soon be
forgotten.


Heading north through
Galway, Donegal, Letterkenny
and Buncrana, we finally
arrived at Malin Head, the

Please see GUIDE/Page 16A


4$ I
~� 4


~
I.


High-tech Spain



DREAM
'r,.. ...- V"CATONS
: .... .................................... ............................ .............. ........... ...........

: '." . .. ~ The Chronicle and The
. . Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo contest
for readers of the newspa-
per.
Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle.
At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photographer
\ ... will win a prize.
computerized dates on the
print.
Please make sure photo-
graphs are in sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to
the Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or dropped
off at any Chronicle office
S " ROBERT FEENEYISpecial to the Chronicle or any Accent Travel office.
Robert Feeney of Beverly Hills took this photograph of one of the corridors in the airport in Madrid, Spain. He was returning to the
United States after a two-week European tour.


-admahlb.-
Ampnm








14A SUNDAY, StNI',rMBiER 9, 2007


Support our troops; they are future veterans


Each time I leave my drive
go shopping or to a d(
appointment or to attend I
ings, etc., I think of our
troops who are currently
serving to protect this
great country My first
daily reminder is my next-
door neighbor's house,
whose son is in Iraq; we
are all concerned about
him and his safety. One out
of three vehicles on the
road is wearing "Support
Our Troops" magnetic rib- La
bons. License plates on VE
cars declare patriotism
and the hats and pins vet-
erans wear indicate that
they are veterans of past conflict:
are proud to have served. Let's fa
our present military personnel
the veterans of the future.
An unknown author defined a
eran as "a person, whether a
duty, retired, National Guar(
Reserve - is someone who, at
point in his or her life, wrote a I

* Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Auxiliary Unit
155, Crystal River, recently installed
new officers for the coming year:
Sandy White, president; Barbara
Logan, vice president; Marie Pink,
secretary; Carol Kaiserian, treasur-
er; Johnnie Hair, chaplain; Judy
Bartalis, sergeant-at-arms; and
Mary White, historian. The unit
meets at 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Tuesday monthly at American
Legion Post 155, Crystal River. The
auxiliary is dedicated to helping vet-
erans, their families and the youths
of the community. For information
about joining or about the unit, call
membership chairwoman Barbara
Logan at 795-4233.
* The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition will resume its regular
open business meetings at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 27, at the Citrus
County Resource Center next to the
VA clinic in Lecanto. All veterans and
veterans' organizations are urged to
attend as the Coalition makes final


Lrry Ma
ETER
VIE


check made payable to the "United
States of America," in the amount of
"up to and including their life."
Kudos to Barbara Mills
who is spearheading an
honorable and joyful
return of our local troops
unlike the circumstances
that surrounded the recep-
tion that Korean and
Vietnam veterans
received. Mills started her
campaign to support our
troops by setting up tables
acMillan at local events to encour-
IAN'S age people to sign and
2W send cards and letters to
the military in Iraq and
Afghanistan. Then she
joined in on what has now become
"Operation Shoe Box," providing
these men and women with essentials
they don't have easy access to and let-
ting them know someone back home
really cares about their well-being.
With the anticipated return of her son
Kevin and other military personnel
that she found out about, Barbara


preparations for the Citrus County
Veterans Coalition forum scheduled
for Saturday, Oct. 20.
The "Veterans Forum" will be
from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Citrus
County Board of Realtors building
on State Road 44 in Lecanto. A
contribution luncheon will be
served in the patio area from 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with local talent
rendering familiar patriotic music.
There will be door prizes and 50/50
tickets will be sold.
Veterans organizations are invit-
ed to set up table displays at the
forum and you can make arrange-
ments at the Sept. 27 open busi-
ness meeting or by contacting
Chairman Ray Michael, First Vice
Chairman Fred Daniels, Second
Vice Chairman Joel Smoyer or
Forum Chairman Richard Floyd.
Their phone numbers are listed on


solicited local merchants, attractions,
entertainment spots, restaurants and
motels and hotels to make up
"Welcome Home Baskets." Local mer-
chants put up welcome home signs on
their marquees. At this point, approx-
imately 18 local military personnel
have come home or are expected to
return by January She has partnered
with the VFW 4252 Women's
Auxiliary, the pastor of the First
Lutheran Church in Inverness whose
son, Staff Sgt. Ryan Beaverson,
received one of the first baskets, as
did Kevin Mills, valued at approxi-
mately $800. Other local merchants
have put out contribution boxes for
donations, gift certificates and gift
cards to help put together welcome-
home baskets. If you or your organiza-
tion would like to get involved in this
project, contact Barbara Mills at 422-
6236 or barbaramills@remax.net
Recently, local veterans' organiza-
tions and citizens of Citrus County
lined U.S. 41 from Floral City to
Inverness to honor Army Sgt. Robert
Surber on his return home. He unfor-


Veterans NOTES


the CCVC Web directory at
www.ccvcfl.org.
All area veterans are invited to
the speaker program, free of
charge, at 12:30 p.m. in the main
auditorium. The speakers will field
questions after the program is
completed in a one-on-one basis.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906 E.
State Road 44, Inverness; tele-
phone 344-3495; fax 344-3514,
announce daily activities schedule
for the week of Sept. 9 to 15:
Today: Pool tourney 2 p.m.; Wild
Willy karaoke 5 p.m.
Monday: Bar bingo 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Chicken wings four for
$1, 9 flavors 4:30 to 7 p.m.; Mark
B. karaoke 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Ladies Auxiliary bar


tunately gave the ultimate sacrifice
for his country three months prior to
his expected return from his second
tour in Iraq. The Citrus County
Veterans Coalition and the Floral City
American Legion Post thank all the
participants who gave this fallen hero
an honorable welcome home.
The Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners presented a procla-
mation to the Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart, designating Aug. 7 as
Purple Heart Day in Citrus County
commemorating the 225th anniver-
sary of the Purple Heart and 75th
anniversary of the Order. Untold num-
bers of our current troops have
earned the right to become members
of this elite organization; they face
some difficult recovery from their
injuries that will be with them for life.
The Citrus County Veterans Coali-
tion is making plans for their Third
Annual Veterans Forum featuring
speakers from national, state and
county government and Veterans
Affairs representatives from the


team to benefit the post. Veterans
interested in joining VFW Post
8189 should bring a copy of their
DD 214 or a Transfer Request.
Call Commander Ron Houlihan
at 628-3160 or VFW Post 8189 at
795-5012 during its canteen hours
from 1 to 10 p.m.
M DAV Chapter 70 and the
Auxiliary will meet at 2 p.m. Tues-
day at the comers of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. The
chapter has five new Junior Auxiliary
members who are being sponsored
by Nick Nicholas Ford and the Ice
Cream Doctor. The chapter has
some sponsors of its own: Citrus
Tire & Automotive Center, as well as
Gus's Gold & Gems.
For more information, visit
www.davmembersportal.org./chap-
ters/fl/70. For ideas or suggestions
for the Web site, call Adjutant


bingo 6 p.m.
Thursday: Bar bingo 3 p.m.
Friday: Fish fry (southern fried
chicken available) $6.50 4:30 to 7
p.m.; Wild Willie karaoke 6 p.m.
Saturday: No dinner, no enter-
tainment.
N Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 will meet at 7 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 10, at its facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, west ofU.S.
19. Turn on to Veterans Drive from
U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley Davidson.
All members are strongly
encouraged to attend, and post
officers are requested to be in
proper uniform for the meeting. All
veterans are treated with respect,
with everyone having an opportuni-
ty to be heard as we work as a


N. I


0
C



94


IM thd Ro
Publix Beef, USDA-In'
Ground Fresh Sev
Times Daily,
Any Size Packac
SAVE UP TO .5


California Italian &
Seedless Grapes......................... .. 9ib Five Grain Bread ...........................
Black, Red, or White, Best Flavor of the Year, Handmade in Our Bakery With Oats, Cracked Wheat, Barley, Millet,
Perfect for Healthy Snacking Flaxseed, and Sunflower Seeds, From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE SAVE UP TO .40


Publix Large
Cooked Ham..... 6.59.b White Shrimp..... 5991b


With Natural Juices,
Sliced Fresh
in the Publix Deli
SAVE UP TO.50 LB


Farm-Raised,
Previously Frozen,
21 to 25 per Pound
SAVE UP TO 4.00 LB


Lfl


12-Pack
Bud Light Beer.... 8.69
Or Budweiser, Budweiser Select,
Bud Ice, or Bud Ice Light,
12-oz bot. (12-Pack Milwaukee's
Best, Milwaukee's Best Light,
or Milwaukee's Best Ice Beer,
12-oz can ... 5.79)


Doritos
Tortilla Chips


BUY ONE C
GET ONEVI


Assorted Varieties,
12.25 to 13-oz bag (Excluding
Baked!, Light, and Natural ChiF
(Limit two deals on selected
advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 3.49


LEND US

YOUR EARS













Participants

Sought for

Hearing Aid

Field Study
My audiology clinics have
received a generous grant
from Magnatone to conduct
an important field study on
a new model of open ear
hearing aid. It is smaller
and more comfortable than
traditional hearing aids. We
are seeking people with mild
to moderate hearing loss to
participate in the study. Both
current hearing aid users and
non-users are needed.
In exchange for completing
a pre-and post-fitting ques-
tionnaire, the participants
will earn the free use of this
hearing aid for thirty days. My
audiologists will provide the
exams and lab services at
no charge through the grant.
At the end of this thirty day
trial, participants will return
the aids to one of my clinics
or purchase the aids at a
discounted price.
For information or to
schedule a free candidate
screening, call us at
795-5700 or visit our
Latest News Link at
www.gardneraudiology.com
Thank You
Dan Gardner, M.S.
35 years experience
President









Gardner Audiology
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
Crystal River ,


lb
und
spected,
veral

ge ,
0 LB



5''




















2i19














REE


ps.)

'1




12, 2007. ^
ceola.


," . .-... , 1 _
*, .'.'t


.4,


PublixE
W H E R E S HO P PI N G IS A P L E A S U,.R E .


I

A


SSAVE UP IUTO 1.00U


Prices effective Thursday, September 6 through Wednesday, September
Only in the Following Counties: Sumter, Lake, Hernando, Collier, Citrus, Polk, and Osi
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved.
www. p u b l ix. com/ads


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS


'. . * . ..*'; *


th Florida/South Georgia
rans Health Services to bring all
rans up to date about what is
g done to improve veterans serv-
Thomas A. Cappello is replacing
Nicholson as director.
closing, let's "Support our
)ps." From a news article by R.W,
:er in the Hays Daily News: "They
el miles in the heat, they risk their
crossing a border, they don't g�t
enough wages, they do jobs that
rs won't do or are afraid to do,
live in crowded conditions
ng a people who speak a different
nage, they rarely see their fami-
and they face adversity all day
y day. They are not illegal aliens,
are our troops in Iraq and
anistan." God Bless America. -

Larry MacMillan is an 11-year
veteran of the United States Air
Force during the Korean and .
tnam era and currently serves as
public information officer for the
trus County Veterans Coalition. *

Annamarie Perrigo at 344-3464.
* Island X-18 Sea Bee
Veterans of America Upcoming
Events:
Wednesday: 11 a.m. meeting:
VA Office, 2804 Marc Knighton "
Court, Lecanto.
Sept. 19:1:30 p.m. luncheon: '.
Stumpknockers On The Square,
110 W Main St., Inverness. -
Oct. 12:11 a.m. meeting: VA ,-
Office, 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. -u
Oct. 19:1:30 p.m. luncheon: 4L
Joe's Family Restaurant, 911 W.
Main St., Inverness.
Please note the change of meet-
ing date and place. As always all
Sea Bees, Honey Bees, relatives,
and friends are welcome to our
events. The meetings are at 11 ,

Please see VETS/Page 15
0


*0








ulrnarr' CUUNTY (� -fL) ---s UDY i 'LIIH ,20


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, cereal (variety), mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, grits, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Pepperoni
pizza, fish patty on bun, salad
shaker, garden salad, com, green
beans, crackers, pineapple, fresh
fruit, milk, juice.
'Tuesday: Breakfast-
Breakfast wrap, sweet potato muf-
fin, seasonal fruit, peaches, grits,
thter tots, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Tacos, chicken and noo-
dles, vegetarian plate, garden
salad, cabbage, combread, gelatin,
fesh fruit, mixed fruit, milk, juice.
. Wednesday: Breakfast -
Breakfast bar, cereal (variety), sea-
snal fruit, pineapple, toast/jelly,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
-- Barbecued chicken on bun, tuna
plate, salad shaker, garden salad,
pasta salad, mixed vegetables,
baked french fries, fresh fruit,
crackers, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Cheese grits, apple muffin, season-
al fruit, pears, tater tots, milk vari-
ety, orange juice. Lunch -


Manager's choice.
Friday: Breakfast - Cheese
toast, ham slice, oatmeal, seasonal
fruit, applesauce, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Chili, turkey
salad on bun, salad shaker, garden
salad, peas, Spanish rice, crackers,
fresh fruit, peaches, milk, juice.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, breakfast sausage pizza,
cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
peaches, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice. Lunch -
Barbecued rib hoagie, chicken and
noodles, chef salad plate, crackers,
garden salad, spinach, island veg-
etable blend, fresh fruit, pears,
cookie, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, cheese
grits, cereal (variety), seasonal
fruit, applesauce, pineapple muffin,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Macaroni
and cheese with ham, Salisbury
steak with gravy, chicken Caesar
salad plate, garden salad, peas
and carrots, green beans, rice,
crackers, fresh fruit, cornbread,


pineapple, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Waffle sticks, bagelers, cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, pears,
grits, tater tots, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Quesadilla, chili,
tuna combo salad plate, garden
salad, baked beans, seasoned
noodles, broccoli, baked french
fries, fresh fruit, apple crisp, crack-
ers, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese grits, grilled cheese,
cereal (variety), seasonal fruit, ap-
ple slices, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice. Lunch -
French bread pizza, fish sandwich,
turkey combo salad plate, garden
salad, cabbage, corn, pasta salad,
fresh fruit, applesauce, cookie,
milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
wrap, cereal (variety), seasonal fruit,
pineapple, sweet potato muffin,
grits, tater tots, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Soft tacos, baked
chicken, mashed potatoes with
gravy, garden salad, carrots, turnip


greens, refried beans, fresh fruit,
peaches, combread, milk, juice.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday: Breakfast - Sausage
biscuit, cheese grits, cereal, scram-
bled eggs with cheese, doughnut,
tater tots, toast/jelly, mixed fruit,
seasonal fruit, milk variety, orange
juice. Lunch - Chicken and yel-
low rice, hamburger and hoagie
bars, salad plate, pizza bar, chili,
corn on cob, roll, garden salad,
green beans, sliced apples, crack-
ers, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Tuesday: Breakfast - Ham,
egg and cheese bagel, biscuit and
gravy, cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly,
grits, apple muffin, tater tots, sea-
sonal fruit, peaches, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Sliced pork
and gravy, chicken and hoagie
bars, salads, pizza bar, chili, spin-
ach, garden salad, corn, noodles,
cornbread, peas, mixed fruit, cook-
ie, crackers, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese toast, scrambled eggs
with cheese, cereal, doughnut,


Sept. 10 to 14 MENUS


toast/jelly, tater tots, pineapple muf-
fin, grits, seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Tacos, salad plate, ham-
burger and hoagie bars, pizza bar,
chili, corn, garden salad, Spanish
rice, refried beans, crackers, winter
mix, peaches, fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Breakfast wrap, biscuit and gravy,
cereal, doughnut, toast/jelly, tater
tots, sweet potato muffin, grits, sea-
sonal fruit, sliced apples, milk vari-
ety, orange juice. Lunch -
Rotisserie chicken, chicken and
hoagie bars, pizza, bar, salad
plate, garden salad, baked potato,
Normandy vegetables, green
beans, corn, roll, crackers, fresh
fruit, fries, milk.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, scrambled eggs with
cheese, doughnut, cereal, grits,
tater tots, toast/jelly, pineapple, sea-
sonal fruit, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Manager's choice.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Chicken and yellow


VETS
Continued from Page 14A

a.m. second Wednesday, and
/luncheons are at 1:30 p.m. third
/ Wednesday. We have a short
meeting, about 1 hour, at the VA
Office in Lecanto, then we will eat
lunch at a local restaurant decided
at the meeting. Luncheons are
third Wednesday picked by
Charley Rhodes. If you have any
questions, call David Puffer Cmdr.
at 746-9327.
* Ladies Auxiliary to Harry F.
Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 meeting
will be conducted at 2 p.m.
Thursday at the post home.
* VFW Post 7122 Sept. 9 to 15
Thursday: The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7:30 p.m.
Friday: AUCE fish dinner or 3-
iece chicken dinner is served from
3to 7 p.m. for $6.75. Jannie
Faye's karaoke starts at 7 p.m.
Saturday: New York strip or filet
mignon served from 3 to 7 p.m.
Post 7122 has adopted 1st Sgt.
Dale LaSonda and his Marine
Corps unit stationed in Iraq. The
goal is to send two good packages
weekly. Call the post at 637-0100
to find out how you can.contribute.
Post 7122 is accepting nonper-
ishable food items to refurbish
CUB's food bank. Please donate to
this cause.
Post 7122 has tickets for the-
District 7 picnic scheduled for Oct.
6 at Post 10084. A donation of $7
covers food, music, games and
door prizes.
Now is the time to join or renew
VFW, Ladies Auxiliary or Men's
Auxiliary memberships. Call or
come by the post for details.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776, Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) will conduct its
bimonthly meeting at 1:15 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 18, in the Citrus
County Veterans Service Office
classroom, Citrus County
Resources CenterNA Clinic, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
(off County Road 491 north of
County Road 486).
Chapter 776 is comprised of
combat-wounded veterans. All


combat wounded veterans are
invited to attend and to learn more
about Chapter 776. Visit Web site
at www.citruspurpleheart.org or call
382-3847 or 527-2460.
* Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-23, Crystal
River, conducts regular meetings at
11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the Crystal Paradise
Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. We also have break-
fast at 8 a.m. the last Sunday of
the month and a luncheon on the
second Tuesday. Call Gordon
Levins at 795-7662.
We welcome new members who
are veterans, who served under
the command of the U.S. Naval
Construction Forces/Naval .
Facilities Engineering Command/
Bureau of Yards and Docks.
For information, call Cmdr. John
Kister at 527-3172. .
* Public invited to a number of
activities at Dunnellon VFW Post
7991, State Road 488/West Dun-
nellon Road:
Every first and third Tuesday:
steak dinner, 6 to 8 p.m., reserva-
tions needed. $9. Call post at (352)
489-1772, Cmdr. Chester at 564-
4135, Ron Audette at (352) 465-
5647 or Billy Ellis at (352) 465-6429.
Wednesday bingo begins at 5:30
p.m.
Every second and fourth Friday:
fish fry from 4 to 7 p.m., fish, hush
puppies, fries and coleslaw $6
* The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating Com-
mittee will conduct its monthly plan-
ning meeting for the 15th Annual
Veterans Appreciation Week activi-
ties at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
19, in the Conference Room of the
Citrus County Chronicle building,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River. Contact Chairman Chris
Gregoriou by e-mail at allpres@
infi.net or by phone at 795-7000.
The committee will conduct its
annual Veterans-in-the-Classroom
program, Oct. 29 through Nov. 9.
Call Gary Runyon at 563L5727,
Mac McLeod at 746-1384 or Bob
Truax at 860-1630.
* Floral City American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 225 (also known as
Herbert Surber American Legion
Post 225) would like to invite the


Worried About

Your Cholesterol?

Do you have high cholesterol? If so, you may qualify
for a clinical research study at Meridien Research.
Qualified participants will receive study medication,
study related lab tests, physical examination, and
compensation for time and travel up to $175.00. If
you are worried about your cholesterol, call Meridien
Research at 352-59-STUDY, that's 352-597-8839.
Offices located on route 50 between Highway 19 and
Mariner Boulevard in Spring Hill.
For more information about this research study,
_rifhieen please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
heKOS Chleserol Participation is completely voluntary
research 7/05/07 V2 www.newstudyinfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613


= Sunday's PUZZLER ANSWER =

Puzzle is on Page 15A.
PASTA BLABS TENDS BLADE
ASHE ROGUE ALEUT EAGER
STUN ARENA LLAMA ERATO
SIN ACID SAC TATER Z ED
ERS ES HIM SEN ERE
E WE D BICYCLE NICE
STRESS S LANK POME DAGGER
R EfS E ABUE AUS SN A S ASP
SARE EVIL ARM ANGER DELL


ET--A ET L WET SLAT HAT

I aNC BOEELOWM mtCO E GfOVEI
LEEWAY SERA CROP BOILER
TIM IM VVOW TIN THAN
ARI A DBOR MAR MEEND
I NAN E LABEL LEASE ADDER
T ERE EN EY N E
9-9 @ 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


women in Citrus County to join us.
We meet at 7:30 p.m. every Thurs-
day at the Floral City VFW Post on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Call Pat
Whitman, membership chairman at
(352) 793-9091.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food stamps,
medical assistance or more blan-
kets is asked to call John Young at
the Hunger and Homeless Coalition
at 628-4357, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
* Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will meet at 6:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, Crystal
River. All current and previous
Airborne members and wives are
welcome to join. For information,
call Steve Leonard at 726-3693.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 County Road 40 E.,
Inglis (one mile east of U.S. 19).
Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at the
post. Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday monthly.
Call Randy Sutton, (352) 447-3495.
* The Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will meet at 7 p.m. the third Wed-
nesday monthly at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness at the intersection of
Independence Avenue and U.S. 41
North. All former Marines are wel-
come. Call Tonm.Heron at 637-2724
or Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* The Marine Corps League
819 Citrus Detachment celebrat-
ed its 15th anniversary Aug. 14.
This is an active group as we do
the county's Military Ball in Novem-
ber, Toys for Tots program (with
more than 15,000 toys given to


children in our county last year),
one or two scholarships to high
school students and the honor
guard for any military burial. We
also have several family get-
togethers throughout the year. Our
next get-together will be at 5 p.m.
Sept. 19 at the Beverly Hills VFW.
For more information about
becoming a member, call Com-
mandant Robert Deck at 527-1557
or Senior Vice Commandant Fred
Lightell at 726-4415.
* Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 meets at 3 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Invemess. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 344-0727.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in Crystal
River at 2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.
* The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday
. monthly at VFW Post 10087, 2170
W. Vet Lane, Beverly Hills.
Call Cmdr. Hank Butler at 563-
2496; Vice Cmdr. Paul Salyer at
637-1161; or Director Neville
Anderson at 344-2529.
* Allen-Rawls American Le-
gion Post 77 and Auxiliary Unit
77 meet at 6 p.m. the first Thurs-
day monthly behind the Key
Training Center in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. We kick off our meet-
ing with a potluck dinner. The
meeting is at 7:30. Bring a covered
dish if you can. For information,
call Post Cmdr. Fabio Sanservino
at 637-9285 or Auxiliary President
Sandy Scott at 860-2090. Visit the
Web site at www.ALPost77.org.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at 11


Take the H&R Block Income
Tax Course and see if you'd
enjoy earning extra income
preparing taxes* Even if
you don't go on to become
a tax professional, you'll be
able to complete your own
return and help others with
theirs. Bilingual students
encouraged to enroll
For class times and locations,
visit hrblock.comitaxcourses
or call 1-800-HRBLOCK.

Enroll now!

DUNNELLON
(352) 489-4760
BELLEVIEW
(352) 245-4511
INVERNESS
(352) 726-5349

EH&R BLOCK'



*En lmnent evir,-iion, may apple%
inrollimerl In, cr cnomplerlon 0o.
the HAR Blork Incornme 7a Course is
neither an ,fler n ro a gaiar, ee of
emplormei n ,I 007 H&R Block T3,
5,�rjiccl. Inc. Dpl.rVAdE4rOF


HAIR



After
Before i 2nd Treatment
ROSACEA
.- ,. ,.,,- , . .. .. .


PIGMENT LESIONS




efO


a.m. the first Saturday monthly at
American Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal River.
Visitors and interested parties are
welcome. For information, call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* The Marine Corps League,
Department of Florida under the
sponsorship of Holiday Detachment
567 will hold its Fall Conference at
the Quality Inn and Suites at 5316
U.S. 19, New Port Richey. The
dates are Oct. 11, 12 and 13. Call
(727) 847-9005 or (800) 4CHOICE
for reservation. Ask for the MCL
conference rate. For information
and dinner selections, go to the
department Web site.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II
meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at the Boston
Cooker, 5375 Spring Hill Drive, Spring
Hill. The next meetrig is Oct. 13.
* VFW Post 4252 and The
Ladies Auxiliary in Hernando on
State Road 200 Serves dinner
every Friday from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
This week's menu is fish or barbe-
cue ribs. Music by Starburst from
6 to 10 p.m. $6.50 donation.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary host
bingo every Saturday at 10:30 a.m.
with food available.
Post 4252 has bar bingo every
Sunday at 2 to 5 p.m.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary has
"Show Me The Money" card game
everyfMonday'at 5to 7:30 p.m.
Lots of fun and chances to win.
Food is available.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary has
bar bingo every Tuesday at 2 to 5
p.m. Profits go to local charities.
This Month is for CREST School.
Post 4252 has chicken wings


I


every Wednesday from 2 to 6 p.m.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary goes
to nursing homes four times a
month to play bingo with the resi-
dents. Everyone is welcome.
Post 4252 Ladies Auxiliary is
having a flea market on Sunday
Oct. 21. Flea market items will
include biker apparel, household
items, clothes, books, movies,
odds and ends and a whole lot
more. Inside tables are $10.
Outside tables are $5. Donations
are also accepted.
Post 4252 is having a service on
Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 11 a.m. for
the memory of 9/11 and the POW
MIA.
The Post 4252 winter hours of
operation will be in effect on Oct. 1.
Post 4252 and The Ladies
Auxiliary announces a $10,000
Youth Essay Contest and a
$30,000 High School Scholarship
Competition. Call Judy at 726-3339
for details.
All eligible persons are invited to
join our Post or Ladies Auxiliary.
Stop by the post or call for further
information.
Send e-mails to
VFW4252@tampabay.rr.com.
2008 dues can be paid now. We
are over 80 percent. Please send
your payments as soon as possi-
ble. Life Members Cancer
Insurance of $4.95 can be paid
now for 2008.
Post Honor Guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and nurs-
ing homes. Call Post Commander
Bob Prive at 212-3393 or Ladies
Auxiliary President Judy Prive at
726-3339 for information. Post
4252 is located at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando, FL 34442.


*SOLATUBE.

Ban it lot l: l.,- ht ia


dark room in about 2 hours.
13624 S. US Hwy. 441
BmSummtrfidld, FL 34491
OneMRee'.., i h..... oU Utr c'o
Mon- Fri * 8:30am - 4:30pm

TL1-866-767-6527


Ocal 35-30 -707wwv,.Tie~laruyscoI


Focusing On Your Skin Needs

__ SEE YOUR DERMATOLOGIST NOW
FOR AN EXAMINATION
[mpertections can be greatly diminished or in many cases totally removed t inth ninimal t.. h ,no visible markings.
State of the art FDA Approved Intense Pulse Light for.
Removal of Unwanted Hair * Skin Discoloration * Roeasei'l'.edened Areai
We can safely and effectiely restore the natural beaut) ot your -kan to make ou look and le- vnour best


RALPH E. MASSULLO, M.D., F.A.A.D.
WILLIAM WELTON, M.D., F.A.A.D.
MARGARET COLLINS, M.D., F.A.A.D.
MICHAEL WARTELS, M.D., F.A.A.D.
BRIAN BONOMO, P.A.-C
KRISTY CHATHAM, P.A.-C
ELIZABETH ESTES, ARNP
Surgery and Diseases of the Skin. Hair and Nails .
Cosmetic Laser Dept. At
SUnCORIT DERMATOLGYv |
nD I/Kin SURGERY CenTER I


BoajiJ Cerl-Al, rsner-i.: ,ll jid Jo Dermialogy
MEDICARE,
BLUE CROSS &
PPC PART ICIPATING

Allen Ridge
Professional Village
525 Norlh Dacie Point,
Lecjnto Florida 34461


rice casserole, green peas,
Harvard beets, whole wheat bread
with margarine, oatmeal cookie,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sliced turkey and
sliced cheese, three bean salad,
dill potato salad, whole wheat
bread, mayonnaise and mustard
packets, fresh banana, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Meatloaf with
Creole sauce, cheesy lyonnaise
potatoes, spinach, whole wheat
bread with margarine, fresh apple,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken coq au vin,
garlic mashed potato, broccoli cuts,
whole wheat bread with margarine,
slice of fruit pie, low-fat milk.
Friday: Italian spaghetti with
meatballs, parmesan cheese, cut
green beans, California vegetable
blend, Italian bread with margarine,
fruit filled bar, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 527-
5975.


35274 -2 00ww .dermtolgyolingco


SUNDAY, Silrr�mm7'it 9,2007 15A


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


L






ISA SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


Talking 'elstuoba' with


my good friend Briton


The early computer pioneer Alan Turing
thought a good test of a computer's intel-
ligence would be if you couldn't tell
whether you were dealing with a
human or a computer during, say, an
extended e-mail -exchange. To pass
the Turing Test, the computer would
.have to answer and ask questions,
understand slang and have a lively
sense of humor
It would also have to be rude, ..,!
unpleasant and irrational at times, or ,
people would guess right away that
they were talking to a computer and
not a human. JI
To pass the Turing Test, a computer MUL
could not reply, "You misspelled
'mother'" to the message "My mothre
just died." It would have to understand the mes-
sage and respond in a sympathetic way
Turing came up with his test 57 years ago, and
I'm not sure whether any computers have met
his challenge. However, most computers aren't
designed to fool humans that way any more than
a wrench is designed to remove screws. Acting
human is not a goal to which computers aspire,
so the test is never really applicable.
I say the true test of a computer's intelligence
is how it handles spam. If a computer can tell
that an e-mail from someone with the unlikely
name of Briton Elveros with a subject line of
"elstuoba" is junk mail and the monthly state-
ment from my cable TV company is not, it pass-
es. I will buy that program.
Based on this simple test, most programs are
complete failures. While mine correctly put the
"elstuoba" message in the trash, it also put an e-
mail from an old friend and this month's phone
bill in the trash. I have to go through the trash
box every few days to reclaim the misfiled mail,
including e-mail from services I subscribe to.
How do I know Briton Elveros is a fake name?
-I don't But I'm pretty sure I don't know anyone
named Briton Elveros, so why should I read his
e-mail, especially when he (or she) wants to talk
about elstuoba? I knew it was bogus right away,


GUIDE
Continued from Page A2

northernmost point of land in
Ireland. It is crystal clear why
the Vikings chose a different
landing place when invading
Ireland. Don't even think about
getting your umbrella out, even
in the rain, as this spot
between the Atlantic Ocean
and the North Sea is the most
windy spot in Ireland, along
with Connor's Pass, and ironi-
cally, is the most sunny.


BOAT
Continued from Page A2

attributed to its format, its pro-
duction, the need it fills in the
boating community, and the
general rise of the podcast
medium," said CEO Leonard
Boord. The short, casual for-
mat delivers a wide variety of
news in easily digestible
episode-bites, and a quick scan


I
L


but my computer probably had to exert a good
deal of effort trying to figure out how fishy it was.
Sometimes I wish my mail program would
throw out the junk mail but save the
names of the senders for me. Fake
names like Weldon Gomez, Carmen
Sweeny, Humberto Yang and Kenny
Hinkle might come in handy if I ever
decide to write crime fiction.
So here's where we stand: We have
programs that can send a spacecraft
to Alpha Centauri, programs that run
giant factories, and programs that
search millions of fingerprints in a
M few moments - but none that can
.LEN figure out that Mrs. Achabe from
Nigeria really isn't going to share
$130 million with me.
No program can tell the difference between
the "urgent" in the subject line of an e-mail that
means "absolutely, positively, completely non-
urgent" and the "urgent" that means get to
school right away, your child is sick The differ-
ence between the two is something humans can
do almost without effort.
Today, with all my e-mail filters in place, I
received an e-mail from Rizan Kougias whose
subject line was "keeping your girlfriend
happy." Why doesn't my computer know I'm
married and don't have a girlfriend? Even if I
did have a girlfriend, I'm not sure Rizan's
advice was such a sure thing. It turns out that
"keeping your girlfriend happy" did not involve
buying her a dozen long-stemmed roses or tak-
ing her to dinner and a movie but something
spectacularly personal, crude and vulgar
I had to tell the computer not to accept mail
from Rizan ever again. But why did it think I
wanted that message in the first place? Maybe
the hard part of the Turing Test is not getting
computers to act human, but getting humans to
act human.

Reach author Jim Mullen
atjim mullen@myway.com.


One outstanding aspect of
Ireland is the congenial peo-
ple. We often thought that they
thought we were one of them,
that is until we opened our
mouths - a dead giveaway Not
only do we not speak Gaelic,
but the Irish have a special way
of saying most everything and
we never quite adapted to the
delightful Irish accent - and
they thought we had an accent.
Our Irish adventure came to an
end with a brief dash into
Northern Ireland at Derry
before heading back to
Shannon for our flight home

of the notes accompanying
each installment gives an
overview of topics such as
America's Cup, wakeboarding,
boat maintenance, sportfish-
ing, sailing and houseboats.
"The Boaters TV does not
focus on a single boating sub-
community such as mega-
yachts or sportfishing, but nei-
ther does it get lost trying to be
everything to everybody," said
Perry. "Instead, episodes are
covering stories from a variety


CheckThose

Toilets for the




Silent


and dreams of a return trip
someday.


Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and his wife,
Karyn, are extensive travelers,
venturing to foreign countries
two to three times a year in
addition to taking several
domestic excursions annually.
They prefer independent
travel or with small-group
guided tours. E-mail him at
gobuddy@tammpabay.rr. com.

of angles: from serious to light-
hearted, from everyday
boaters to luxury yachters."
The Podcast is easily portable
with a video iPod or similar
device. Bolstered by rapidly ris-
ing viewing and subscription
rates, show is expanding its
reach to on-location coverage of
major events, and exclusive
interviews with boating industry
news-makers including manu-
facturers, association represen-
tatives and industry regulators.


Leaking toilets cause more indoor water loss and potential damage ' -
than any other fixture inside the home. A "silent" leak in or around the
toilet is not detected by normal hearing. Left unfixed, silent leaks can
cause from several to hundreds of gallons of water loss per day.
In order to detect a silent leak, upon request, the Department of Water Resources will provide Citrus County residents with leak
detection tablets. You simply drop a tablet in the toilet tank and wait approximately 15 minutes. At the end of 15 minutes, if you
observe dye color in the toilet bowl then you know that you have a leak. A frequent source of the leak is a faulty flapper valve.
Repairing a Worn Flapper Valve is not too difficult
The flapper valve is a large rubber seal located in the middle of the bottom of the tank. It is typically attached by a chain to an
arm that's connected to the toilet's handle. When functioning correctly, a flapper valve prevents water from seeping into the bowl
by sealing against the drain seat (the hole in the bottom of the tank through which water releases into the bowl during flushing).
Here's how to make the repair:
1. First, turn off the water. The supply valve is usually located under the lower left part of the tank.
2. Flush the toilet so that water drains out of the tank.
3. Take off the lid of the tank and check the flapper valve. Make sure it's clean and smooth. If it's dirty or has a build up of
minerals or algae on it, then it may not be able to seal properly. Also make sure that the tank drain is clean and smooth.
4. If either the flapper or the drain has any build up on them, simply clean them up so that they are both clean and smooth.
5. If the flapper is dried, warped, cracked, or pitted, replace it.
6. Before you replace the tank lid, check the chain that links the flapper to the arm. Make sure there is some slack in the chain.
If it's too tight, it can hold the flapper open enough to allow the leak to persist. If there is too much slack, then the chain can
get caught between the flapper and drain. You may need to flush several times and adjust the flapper and chain until the
flapper rests evenly against the seal on the bottom of the tank.
Other sources of a toilet leak include malfunctioning "float-cup" or float ball, the fill tube adjustments, a broken handle rod or
flush lever, loose connections or high-water level in the tank. If you are not the "do-it-yourself" type, you may need to call a
plumber to help find the source of the leak and repair it. .: ., .
The leak detection tablets are FREE. Call 521-7648 to request r tifets.
Protecting Florida's waters is everyone's job. Each of us can play a role by decreasing water consumption. Call 527-7648 to
learn more about some of the simple steps you can take to protect nature's gems.
The Department of Water Resources, in partnerships with various expert affiliations, offers public education and outreach
programs, which are funded jointly by the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) and Withlacoochee Regional
Water Supply Authority (WRWSA).
713155


TOWN
Continued from Page A2

paths depart from land near
the guesthouse to guide visi-
tors through tangled trees and
rain forest terrain, and the
trails lead to
suspended
bridges amidst ... Surfe
the canopy of
trees. Tourists great
wandering
along the rickety and e
wooden slats get enthu
an actual birds-
eye view of the with CC
terrain and can
climb a special places
ladder to an
even higher or buy
viewpoint.
Quieter paths
yield glimpses of local wildlife,
and visitors to the mountain
get the chance to see a half-
dozen wallabies hopping by
just feet away - or a platypus
swimming in his small residen-
tial pond.
The guesthouse and a tour
bus video also detail a heroic
rescue executed by O'Reilly,
who discovered two plane
crash survivors in 1937 more
than 10 days after their aircraft
went down. Authorities
focused the search near the
plane's destination in Sydney,
but O'Reilly was convinced the


e
Is




b


crash occurred closer to
Brisbane and his land. He
hiked 20 miles and proved his
theory right, finding two sur-
viving passengers and reck-
lessly running for help through
the treacherous terrain.
Such stories add to the
already fantastic aura of the
region, which
lies sleepily
rs offers near the coast,
peaceful yet
waves vaguely threat-
,ager ening for its
hard-to-navigate
iasts, forests. It is a
drastic change
unless from the crash-
ing waves about
to rent an hour away,
and when visi-
boards, tors return to the
coast, they're
ready for a drink
and a relaxed night out.
That's not a problem in
Surfers Paradise.
Bars, clubs and restaurants
line the streets, and they're all
hopping nightly Live music is
omnipresent as bands cover
past and current hits while vis-
itors dance in sandaled feet.
For great atmosphere and com-
pany, try Shooters Saloon Bar,
the Rose & Crown Nightclub or
Melba's, which features both a
trendy restaurant and a club.
The clientele in every venue
ranges from Brisbane week-
enders to European backpack-

SToday's MOV ES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Digital.
"Halloween" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45
p.m.
"Superbad" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:505 p.m.
"The Bourne Ultimatum" (PG-13) 1:20 p m., 4:10
p.m., 7:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Shoot 'Em Up" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4.10 p.m., 7155
p.m., 10:05 p.m. Digital.


Crnus CouNmY (FL) CHRONICLE

ers to dreadlocked internation-
al surfers who've relocated to
live year-round in the Gold
Coast town.
For the under-35 set, Surf N
Sun Beachside Backpackers
and several other hostels organ-
ize a pub crawl every Saturday
and Wednesday, charging guts
and their friends $25 for a coih
bus trip to local hotspots, whi e.
they're given free entry *id
drink vouchers. The outing a
great way to meet other tra l-
ers and scope out the Sur rs
party scene.
And for surfing itself, Surfers
offers great waves and eager
enthusiasts, with county s
places to rent or buy boa s.
But for optimum waves, r i-
dents say it's not necessa ly
the best location on the 1id
Coast - suggesting nea y
Burleigh Heads as an alte a-
tive, where the locals do t ir
surfing.
Burleigh Heads is among] a
string of quieter, picturesque
beach towns within minutes of
Surfers. Others include -Main
Beach and Broadbeach, which
is just barely walkable, ifyot�re
up for a hike. The locations still
have great shops, eateries apd
drinking establishments, ut,
they're filled with locals seek-
ing an escape from the furinius
pace of Surfers.
Whether the visit be for a day
or a week, this town is something
to see - if only for the name.-


"3:10 to Yuma" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:35
p.m., 10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Halloween" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.mq
10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m, 4:45 p.m., 7:30
p.m, 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"The Nanny Diaries" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m. 4
"Superbad" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:40 p m.,,
10:25 p.m.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:t1)
p.m., 9:35 p.m. Digital.
"Underdog" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.
"The Bourne Ultimatum" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:O
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:55 p.m. Digital.
"Transformers" (PG-13) 7 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


Gulf Coast

CITRUS MEMORIAL -
and Rehabilitation Center
Meadowcrest Professional Center * ,/' 't //i ( ' ,
6043 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River






(,IL�, (JF'AlAY


Becky's vel Store 35415

Alaska Cruise Tour
Departing Sept. 6,2008
- Cruie loarprices
_.- r�l. starting at
" 1700 Per Person
-* - . i..- ,, .r ..cupancy
Air Program Available.Please call for details.
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy. � Beverly Hills, FL 34465
352-527-8855


41'r~


F eaturing:
* Alaska xperts'
* Stunning Film
Footage
* Useful
Planning
Advice
* Exclusive
Travel Benefits


Date: Monday, October 8,2007
Place & Time: Citrus Hills at 4:30pm.
RS.V.P.Phone: (352) 726-2889
Space is limited! RS.VP. today
to plan your Alaskan Adventure!

& Travel
3802 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. - Inverness 34453
726-2889 or (800) 306-7477
www.justcruiseandtravel.com *:
Holland America line
A ginturf of fi lterre 713257


- - Capt. Mike's -
Swim with
the Manatees
MANATEE TOURS
$10pp
FREE Underwater Camera
352-628-3450

-Capt. Stu's -
Custom Airboat Tours
, 352 302-9207
www.aibaor.com


'25


Travel Your Way
New Travel in Citrus Springs
Bill Peeples has opened a full service agency.
Te makes house calls and he knows the cruise business.
' Call- (52) 465.9329 Toda, '-7
Cruises from $299 . - $9,999. 0
Bus'trips to Branson, MI. - Group Tours ..

Yo~lw ^Wy�^ .


2 Day Bus Trip
to visit & explore !
TALLAHASSE &
WAKULLA SPRINGS!
Sept. 21-22, 2007 A
Includes: Guided Tours of Historic $ifa
Sites,Lodging,Breakfast, 1 Lunch, UJ7
Glassbottom Boat Tour, Admissions, 'P,
Taxes & Gratuities ST 137240 u .c.y
The Travel Shoppe
of C�dVla9c,*
Call for more details or to request a flyC.
Contact Joan Sweety
352-564-87735
www.thetravelshoppeofcrystalriverAmydeaIs.cI -


If you want to I

advertise here in the ]

Great Getaways !

call 563-5592 I
r-j








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-----50thAN ERvns


SThe Evanses
- - ra


, The Rev. and Mrs. Richard L.
Evans of Crystal River cele-
4 brated 50 years of marriage
'"Saturday, June 23, in North
' i' Andover, Mass. Their four chil-
b-'dren and their families sur-
K,'rised them with an outdoor
party at Rolling Ridge United
"l Methodist Conference Center,
where Richard and Myrna met
'.rin 1953. More than 100 friends
8IAand family members joined in
the celebration - some com-
ing from as far as Arizona,
California and Washington.
The Evanses were married
on June 22,1957, in Winchester,
Mass.
Evans is a United Methodist
pastor and he served churches


in Boston, Milton, Spencer,
Gardner and Wilmington,
Mass., before becoming assis-
tant to the Resident Bishop in
New England, a position he
held for 15 years. He retired in
1997. Mrs. Evans was a high
school teacher before her
retirement. After moving to
Citrus County, Evans went back
to work part time as assistant
pastor at First United
Methodist Church of Homo-
sassa until he retired again at
the end of 2004.
The Evanses have four chil-
dren, six grandchildren and
five great-grandchildren, all
living in Massachusetts and
New Hampshire.


* Patricia and Robert
Whitworth of Citrus Hills cele-
hi ated their 50th wedding
_nniversary. They were mar-
S� ed Aug. 9, 1957. at the Okolona
; aptist Church in Louisville.
SK.. by Brother John Carter.
. who still pastors the church.
I They have two sons. Stephen


Whitworth of Midway, Ky., and
Brian Whitworth of Woodland.
Hills, Calif.
Bob works as an inspector
for his own company and Pat is
a Realtor with ERA American
Realty in Beverly Hills.
They have lived here for four
years.


TOGETHER


- Weddings " :I'::


Callihan/Biance


Bret Michael Biance and
Kristen Paige Callihan were
united in marriage Friday, July
6, 2007, at Tortola, British
Virgin Islands. The BVI
Registrar officiated.
The bride is the daughter of
Steven and Mary Callihan of
Jacksonville.
The groom is the son of Greg
and Kim Biance of Inverness.
Given in marriage by her
parents, the bride wore a
SanPatrick gown, mermaid
style with a bateau neckline.
Flowers were white roses,
calla lilies and orchids.
Maid of honor was Stephanie
Albright, Miramar; best man
was Darin Ramos, cousin,
Jacksonville; bridesmaids were
Heather Biance, sister,
Tallahassee, Jennifer Dennard,
cousin of bride, Atlanta, Ga.,
Elizabeth Wheeler, cousin of
bride, Atlanta, Ga., Merritt Bell,
cousin of bride, Jacksonville,
and Rebecca Thompson,
Jacksonville. Ushers were
Jason Callihan, brother,
Jacksonville, Jimmy Ellis,
Colorado Springs, Colo., Nick
Albright, U.S. Army, and Jaret
Moore.
The attendants wore choco-
late brown dresses of their
choosing and they carried a
single calla lily.


,- . - *


The wedding, recepti
held immediately follow
ceremony at The Sug
Resort, Tortola.
Out-of-town guests ii
Paula Bell, aunt of
Kathy Qualls, Kelly Qua
Dustin, close family fri
the bride.
The bride is a Florid
University graduate
employed as an account
tive at Hill & Knowlton,
The groom is a grad
Florida State Universit
a Graduate Student of
Services at the Unive
South Florida.
After a honeymoon t
ing around the British
Islands, the couple wil
Tampa.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007 17A


= = = =,Engagements-_


Dalton/Conti

Alfonso Conti and Kathy
Dalton, Lecanto, wish to
announce their engagement.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Edward and Judith
French of Brooklyn, N.Y
She is employed at Suncoast -
Dermatology - pathology '
department.
The future groom is
employed by the U.S. Postal
Service.
The wedding is set for Sept.
27, 2008, at First United
Methodist Church of Inver-
ness. Reception to be held at
ion was Citrus Hills Golf and Country
wing the Club.
ar Mill
VncludedadnLeeuwen/Roth


Dride;
alls and
lends of

da State
and is
t execu-
Tampa.
luate of
y and is
Student
*rsity of

rip sail-
h Virgin
1 live in


Stuart/Otero


Alexis Otero and Nissa
Kirsten Stuart were united in
marriage Saturday, June 2,
2007, at the First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness. The Revs.
Bruce and Karen Wismer per-
formed the service.
The bride is the daughter of
Stefan and Inger Stuart of
Inverness.
The groom is the son of
Aristides and Jo Ann Otero of
Inverness.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her parents.
Matron of honor was Mettina
Maggiore and best men were
Aristides Otero III, groom's
brother, and Anthony Allegretta.
Bridesmaids were Tiffany
Miller, Brittany Vitter, Leilani
Otero, Rachel Dorn and Laura
Woythaler. Ushers were Andy
Stuart, Brian Lattin, Rick
Miller and Demetrius
Dallcalitsis.
The reception followed at


Black Diamond Ranch, given
by bride's parents.
The bride and groom are
both University of Florida
alumni.
Following a Hawaiian
cruise, they plan to move to
Tampa.


Dr. Steven Austin Roth,
Inverness, and Crystal
Michelle VanLeeuwen, Bever-
ly Hills, have announced their
recent engagement
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of the late Sandra Verbiski
and granddaughter of the late
Roberta Otis of Inverness.
The future bridegroom is the
son of Mrs. Mary Roth of
Alabama.
Crystal is a graduate of
Citrus High School (1996),
Central Florida Community
College, Ocala (1998), Uni-
versity of West Alabama (2000),
University of Central Florida-
CBSN-Nursing (2003) and will
receive her Masters of Nursing
at University of Central Flori-
da in April 2008. She is a mem-
ber of Phi Kappa Theta,
Cardinal Key, Alpha Chi, presi-
dent of SNA, Sigma Theta Tau
honor society, and AORN.
Current position: R.N., BSN,
CNOR - unit manager/ADON
at the Health Center at
Brentwood, Lecanto.
Steven is a graduate of


New

Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
* To David and Shelley
Dottillis, Gainesville, a son,
David Lucius Dottillis, born at
2:20 p.m. Wednesday, July 25,
2007, at North Florida
Regional. He weighed 8
pounds, 14 ounces.
* To Matthew and Jennifer
Price, Chester, Va., a daughter,


Heidelberg American High
School in Germany; University
of South Florida, Tampa; Uni-
versity of South Florida
Medical School (president of
class); and Residency at Carr-
away Medical Center, Birming-
ham, Ala. Current position:
M.D. at Genesis Women's Cen-
ter, Inverness, Board Certifica-
tion American Board of
Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Date and place of wedding to
be announced.


Emma Jean Price, born at 3:30
a.m. Friday, July 20, 2007, at St.
Francis Medical Center. She
weighed 5 pounds, 12 ounces.
* To Matthew and Jennifer
Price, Chester, Va., a son,
Matthew Allen Price II, born at
3:32 a.m. Friday, July 20, 2007,
at St. Francis Medical Center.
He weighed 5 pounds, 10
ounces.


GROUPS
W I A WELCOME


Cornplimentory Cocktoils at Six
Fine Dining at Seven

Dancing until rMidnight




Lim uLI.rine S .Cr .'icc Hcr-Ie
"' ,.: ljt ,.- -.. .,r i ,r.- lfr-4 � ,.


Saturday, October 13, 2007
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club


Call for reservations --.. . . ,. . . /


352.527.2020 HOSPICE c ,
www.hospiceofcitruscouniy.org OF CITRUS COUNTY INC. edtedby
All proceeds benefit Hospice of Citrus County Licensed I 985 The Joint commission

--------------_---_-





-0-
f * I




















-i. he .. =. p -
3 = S Ir#ate IPlow
Must present ad.
i\ I I I 1 m im 1m 1iR ml Im i mm
-� -il~tM -^ t**.^ B CWH


('f / I N


Isle of Capri/Biloxi Island View
4 Days/3 Nights Casino Hotel
Call For Available Dates 10114
with FiEEPb & Food Book Early
179 $189
(PP/DO) Can For Details (PP/DO) Call For Details


Imperial Palace Every Sunday
2 meals, $25 slot play - 2 casinos
or
4 meals, $25 slot play - no casinos
Starting Oc. 2rid. $ 1 5 9
Toes. Departures,
no casinos. Trinity bas 5 p9 ,


Pompano Beach, FL
Isle of Capri
Oct 3 * 1 nite, 3 meals
S109, ..


Branson
11/7107
8 Days/5 Shows
*697
(PPIDOm Call For Details


Octoberfest
Helen, GA
4 days
10/22/07
$379


Everyby l













Sub scri bei '


If so,.-filout the cQupolb
-: . - : , _ -_ , " - .- or call us. ,-" ;- , .

- Give us the name and pBoA(
n number of.a neighbor, frind
' relative who would lilet.-
receive the Chronicle.'i:-

Every time you give us a name,


Beau Rivage
Biloxi
$45 FREE Play
$179
9/23 onl
SPECIAL Si69
_PP/DO) Call Foa Detaia
Sterling Cruise
Inverness & Homosassa
9/12, 9/20, 9/27

Pholo I Rered


Seminole
Hardrock
Homosassa, Beverly
Hills & Ocala
Pick Up 9/13 & 10/18

120
In-cenmw For Otup
___________I PM o


s . .-


U1


of a person who subscribes,
you will receive, .... :




S, i ao pat


-mail'


I Your Name Phone_


, List of Names
Name_____
* Name_
f Name_
- -im-m


Phone_
Phone_
Phone___
------


Fax: 563-5665
S- or
~'j Call: 563-3295
SAsk for code PL.

Please mail to:
Citrud C.uritv Chlorecle
1624 N. Meadowcre9t Blvd
Crystal River. FL.34429
Fax to: 563-5665
or
Call: 563-3295
CitNii'.E 1!
-----


~~j* ~ , ~ a a .."~*'A a ~


ThU Whitworths


-1


Toll Free 1-877-604-4822 - 352-597-482,2 - 5331 Commercial Way, Suite #114, Spring Hill, Fl 346416
r 36624


LZ


mo 'mid I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IL A IA SNDfAY.Svr mBER9.2007


Your Birthday: There is a strong possibility you
could enter into a joint venture in the year ahead with
someone who complements your abilities. However, it
will be important that you stay in charge and always be
included in calling the shots.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - The wisest course of
action to follow at any time is not to count your chickens
before they are hatched. Your timetable could be way off.
Libra (Sept 23-Oct. 23) - Important matters you
should have taken care of yourself might overwhelm
you when it's discovered that someone to whom you
had given the assignments failed to finish the work.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - There is a possibility
someone you recently met, a person you judged to be
a good guy or gal, turns out to be anything but the per-
son you thought. It's a mistake that could be quite
upsetting to you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - To advance your
financial interests, you could be inclined to buck the
odds in hopes of making a killing. Unfortunately, long
shots are so named for proven, valid reasons.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Avoid getting into
controversial subjects with friends that deal with issues
nobody has the power to resolve. The only thing that'll
be achieved is a lot of hard feelings.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Don't let someone


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
animalcontrol.citrus.fl.us/
and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.
To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group


who has a poor track record for running his or her own
affairs handle something for you just so you don't hurt
this person's feelings. Be strong about saying "no."
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - When it comes to
decision-making for an important matter, don't delegate
that privilege to another who thinks he or she has all the
answers.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Being an independent
thinker is an admirable quality, but make sure you apply
it in ways that do not conflict with an authority figure,
such as your boss. Do things his or her way.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - If something unpleasant
occurs in a social setting, don't overreact. If you keep
your cool, you'll be the one who'll come off graciously.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - It's not like you to let
your ego govern your actions, yet it may be more
important to you to actually appear like a bully just so
another can't trump you. Don't trip over your own pride.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you use the idea of
another, give this person full credit, even if you're the
one v 'o puts it into action. If you don't, it would belittle
what you do and make you look bad.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Be 'extremely careful in
handling your funds, especially large amounts, so that
you don't purchase something that is way over your
head. The lesson could cost you a bundle.


and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
is open for adoptions from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
,through Friday and from 10
a.m. to,3 p.m. Saturday.
Call the Citrus County


NAME: (none) NAME: Jackie NAME: (none)
AGE: Parakeet AGE: Ferret ' AGE: Inf
SEX: (?) SEX: Adult NM SEX: F
ID #: 84864 ID #: 84851 , ID #: 84942


Animal Shelter at 726-7660
for more information.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida at 563-
2370, or from the Humane
Society of Citrus County at
341-2222.


NAME: (none) NAME: Tinker- NAME: Fido
AGE: Infant bell AGE: Infant
SEX: M SEX: F SEX: M
'ID #: 84941 ID #: 84994. ID #: 84995


Give brother another


chance for sake of niece


Dear Annie: My brother, "Rex," lives out of
state. Two years ago, we invited him and
his daughter, a preteen, to stay with us
for a week. During their visit, we noticed that
Rex drank all day and tried to disguise it by put-
ting the booze in a coffee cup. Also,
at bedtime, I asked if he wanted a cot
for his daughter to sleep on instead
of sharing the bed. He said, "No,
we're just fine." I shot him a look of
concern but didn't say anything
more.
After that visit, my wife decided
she doesn't want Rex in our home
again. Recently, he's called a few
times indicating he's coming our
way. I'm sure he wants to stay with us
(with his "coffee cup," no doubt). So a
far, I have let the answering machine AN N
record his calls and have not
responded. What can I do to make MAIL
this situation palatable? -Rock and
Hard Place
Dear Rock: A lot can happen in two years, and
you have no idea what condition Rex is in now,
and more importantly, how his daughter is
doing. You may be the only ones in a position to
make a difference in her life. Give Rex another
chance. He owes it to his child to be sober and
responsible. If he is drinking to excess, don't be
afraid to tell him he needs help. Alcoholics
Anonymous is in the phone book. Set up a sepa-
rate bed in a private area ftr his daughter with-
out asking if he wants one iIfyou suspect abuse.
report him to the authorities.) Instead of making
Rex an adversary, enlist your wife's help to cre-
ate a positive environment for his child. She
needs you in her life.
Dear Annie: I was recently asked to be in the
wedding party for a close relative. The engaged
couple has since decided to hold the reception
on a cruise ship.
The cost for me to participate now would be
far beyond my means. While I respect their right
to have the reception they choose, I think it's
unfair to expect that kind of financial commit-
ment I'm considering declining the invitation.
How do I do this? - Sunken Bridesmaid
Dear Bridesmaid: Many bridal couples do not
realize they have an obligation to provide their
out-of-state attendants with accommodations,
whether that means a spare bed at a neighbor's


or a cabin on a cruise ship. While your clothing"-
and transportation are your responsibility, lodg-.
ing is not If your relative is unwilling to help ,.
you, it is perfectly OK to say, "I'm so, : ry I can-
not be part of your wedding. It is over my budg-
et I hope you have time to find some-
one else."
Dear Annie: I read the letter from ,
"Floundering in Florida," who
thought she had a right to pursue an
affair with a married man because
his wife is obese. My husband is thin,
handsome and a physician, and I am
obese. Yet we have a satisfying mar-
riage. I also am very accomplished, ,:
having been president of several;.;
charities and named Citizen of the:;,
Year in our city.
IE'S Recently, we moved to a small ';
town. I can see women look at my
.BOX husbandan d then at me. In my pres-
ence, they have openly flirted with
him so outrageously that it was embarrassing i
for him. I am treated as if I am blind or stupid, i,
and worse, I am ignored.
Being obese does not mean you are not val-.
ued. It doesn't mean you aren't active or that no
one loves you. It does not mean you have no feel- 0
ings. "Floundering" should realize that when:'
the man wished he had his wife's companion-
ship when running, it didn't mean he'd prefer
the bimbo who wants to ruin other people's
lives. - Married in a Small Town
Dear Married: We were dismayed by the num-
ber of overweight women who wrote to tell us
how often they are treated as if they are invisi-
ble. For shame.
Annie's Snippet for Grandparents Day (an old
Welsh proverb): Perfect love sometimes does I
not come till the first grandchild. �


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Landers
column. E-mail questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


SEVEN RIVERS| bas
OUTPATIENT LABORATORY ytOU)d
Affiliated With Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center .


Easy Access * Convenient Parking * No Appointment Necessary
352.795.1283 M-F 7:30a-5p
Seven Rivers Professional Center, 11503 W. Emefald Oaks Dr.
ju.t North of the Hospital





























U. ,


MO


For Tickets:
Fancy's Pets - 669 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, 352-563-5100


Wishful Thinking
Western World
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg)
352-629-7676


, nT








CRY TRACE




f ADKINS

Log onto Ticketmaster.com
or call
1-800-370-8669



5 -ri .. -. 3.,
PITCHINB-IN FOUNDATION
352-527-3297 O I


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page 18A.


ACROSS
1 Spaghetti, linguine,
etc.
6 Spills the beans
11 Watches
16 Knife part
21 Pale -
22 Scoundrel
23 Native of Alaska
24 - beaver
25 Tricky feat
26 Place of contest
27 Woolly haired
mammal
28 A Muse
29 Transgression
30 Sour substance
31 Cul-de- -
33 Spud
35 Last British letter
36 Formerly, formerly
38 French article
39 That guy
40 Elected official (abbr.)
41 "Able was I - I saw
Elba"
42 Join metal parts
44 Tandem, e.g.
48 Agreeable
51 Emphasize
54 Long and thin
55 Pear or apple, e.g.
57 Stiletto
61 Baby bird's cry
62 Discover
63 Tequila source
65 Code name
66 What remains
67 For the reason that
70 Catches unexpectedly
72 Snake
73 Exist
74 Morally bad
75 Garment part
77 Fury
79 Punta - Este
80 Office
communication,
for short
82 Airplane
83 Display proudly
85 Overly charming
87 Vicious animal
89 Hair preparation
90 Cravat
91 Saplings
92 Young and inexperienced


94 Beyond ethical
concerns
96 Insect
97 Repeat
100 Letter after zeta
101 Scrap or sheet
104 Damp
105 Wood strip
106 Chapeau
107 Arroz - polio
108 - lazuli
110 Feel contempt for
112 Idiot
113 Peruvian Indians
116 Under
118 Approach
119 Group of trees
120 Wiggle room
122 Antitoxins '
123 Field's output
124 Water-heating tank
125 Paradise
127 Of clay
129 Canine cry
130 Burton or Allen
133 Goal
135 Solemn promise
136 Metallic element
137 Easier said - done
141 "Exodus" hero
142 Shelter of branches.
144 Impair
145 Repair
146 Southern state (abbr.)
147 Movie star, for short
149 Loud noise
151 Emissary
153 Wild fear
155 Silly
156 Sticker
157 Rental contract
158 Venomous snake
159 Doctrine
160 Build
161 Stage direction
162 Gretzky or Newton


DOWN
1 Outmoded
2 Moving about
3 Eschews
4 Playing card
5 Tiny colonist
6 Shored up
7 Tree-dwelling animal
8 Old
9 Bread roll
10 Unwell on a cruise
11 Soft mineral
12 Building annex
13 Tidy
14 "Three Musketeers"
author
15 New York's - Island
16 Lager
17 Roman household
god
18 Staring
19 Prevent from acting
20 Destroy gradually
30 "- Well that Ends
Well"
32 Irving or Tan
34 Oklahoma city
37 Bird sound
39 East Indian
43 Psychic's ability
(abbr.)
44 Commonplace
45 Books pro (abbr.)
46 Ships' records
47 Emit
49 Rotating machine
art
50 The "I"
51 Get lost!
52 Then and -
53 Similarity
54 Lawful
56 Form of "John"
58 Place for young
students (2 wds.)
59 Letters
60 Answer
62 Flu symptom
64 Item for breakfast
67 Adorn with gems
68 Sickly in color
69 Time
71 Exude
76 Change biologically
78 Regret
81 Artist's paint
83 Abbr. in grammar


84 Nothing
86 To a- |
88 Male animal
89 New Testament
province
91 Tantalize
92 - B. DeMille
93 Make expiation
95 Crimson
96 Dirigible
98 Divide in two
99 Aquatic mammal
102 Bill at a bar
103 Simian creatures
105 Kitchen item
109 Marsh bird
111 Metal fastener
112 Go aimlessly
114 Solemn fear
115 Blue
117 Armed conflict
119 Something sticky
121 Twelvemonth
123 Hymn
124 He's 007
126 Take small bites of '
128 Depression-era org.i
129 Time of year
130 Implied but unsaid
131 Peace goddess
132 City in Italy
134 Back tooth
136 Taut
138 Convenient
139 Foreign
140 Mother-of-pearl
142 Help in wrongdoing
143 Broccoli -
144 Liquefy
145 Edible part
148 Dir. letters
150 Chronicle (abbr.)
152 Mil. rank
153 Forefoot
154 Oklahoma city


Today's HOROSCOPE


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL
PET PROFILES


olLcoift -%UNIAAT, am-Atimisr-K 7, �Mm/ I -


11


7
1










* College football/2B
. Scoreboard/3B
* Golf/4B
* MLB/5B
* NFL game previews/6B, 7B
* Entertainment/8B


B
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
wwwchronicleonline.com


Bucs, Garcia face first test


Tampa Bay kicks offseason today at Seattle


Associated Press
SEATTLE - Mike Holmgren has
what Jon Gruden wants. No, craves.
Not Holmgren's dockside, island
home, his power boat or his motorcy-
cles. Not the 16-year head coach's sen-
iority. Not necessarily his Super Bowl
ring, either, because Gruden already
has one of those.
What the Tampa Bay coach wants
most is the luxury Seattle's coach has
enjoyed for five years - and for
seven years before that in Green Bay:
,one quarterback upon whom you
build a team.
"I personally think that's absolute-
ly necessary to maintain consistency
and have the development of the rest


of the football team. You've got to
start there," said Holmgren, who's
had Matt Hasselbeck running the
Seahawks since 2002, .after Brett
Favre led the Packers for him from
1992-98.
"I believe Jon feels the same
way."
Oh, yes, you can bet Gruden's signa-
ture, pulled-down visor and sideline
snarl he feels the same way.
Especially entering today's game
between the Buccaneers and
Seahawks, the opener to a season in
which people' already have asked
Gruden about his job security.
"The continuity, I think, between
play-caller, coach, and quarterback is
a huge winning edge," Gruden said,


ON TELEVISION
* Tampa Bay Buccaneers at
Seattle Seahawks: 4 p.m. on FOX
emphasizing "huge."
"That's the thing we're trying to
get here in Tampa is a guy that we
can build a franchise around, a guy
that will be durable and complete
every single Sunday. And it's been
hard to get."
Paris Hilton's life has been more
stable than Tampa Bay's quarterback


situation since Gruden arrived in
2002. When Jeff Garcia makes his
Bucs debut today, he will try to
become the 11th quarterback to win a
game for Gruden in Tampa Bay. No
other NFL coach has prepped more
passers in the last six seasons.
Holmgren has had Hasselbeck. Oh,
there have also been backups Trent
Dilfer (two games in 2004) and Seneca
Wallace (four games last season), but
only for spot starts while Hasselbeck
was hurt.
Seattle is coming off a third consec-
utive division championship. Tampa
Bay is coming off a 4-12 disaster.
"It's been hard here," Gruden said.
"If you don't do some things to get a
guy at that position they don't just fall
out of the stars into your lap. ... We
hope Garcia can really solve a mys-
tery for us and give us some stability


at a position that you have to have to
be successful in pro football."
Garcia, a three-time Pro Bowler,
resurrected his career late last sea-
son by winning five of six starts with
Philadelphia as an injury replace-
ment. Now, he's Gruden's unques-i
tioned starter.
"I think it's something that I'm very
well prepared for I've been doing it for
a lot of years and I'm excited about it,"
Garcia said. "I'm excited to be able to
get into some sort of rhythm."
Garcia will play in his 100th game
today, his 93rd start. He is fourth on
the league's list for interception per-
centage (2.46 - with 73 intercep-
tions in almost 3,000 throws) and
sixth in ratio of touchdowns to inter-
ceptions (1.86).
Please see ' /Page 3B


Associated Press
Justine Henin celebrates her two set victory Saturday over Svetlana Kuznetsova in the women's finals at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York.





Magnificent seven


Henin wins US. Op

Associated Press
NEW YORK - Let those big-
spending spectators or TV types
gripe about Justine Henin's lop-
sided Grand Slam final victories. I
She'll take 'em. Every last one.
Capping a dominant run, the top-
seeded Henin overwhelmed No. 4
Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-1, 6-3
Saturday night to win her second
U.S. Open title and seventh major
championship overall.


en, 7th Grand Slam

"I had two amazing weeks,"
Henin said, "and played my best
tennis."
Henin, also the 2003 Open winner,
didn't drop a set all tournament and
became the first woman to win a
Grand Slam after beating both
Williams sisters along the way.
The only help Henin needed was
when she got a boost from a couple
of fans while she climbed into the
stands to greet her coach after the
match ended.


Kuznetsova matched the fewest
number of games for an Open
women's runner-up in the past 31
years, making Henin work for less
than 11/2 hours.
"I hope to be back with a better
game in the final next time," the
Russian said, praising her opponent
for "an unbelievable tournament."
It was reminiscent of some of
Henin's past routs in major finals,
including dropping three games to
Ana Ivanovic while winning a third
consecutive French Open title in
June, and ceding two games to Mary
Pierce at Roland Garros in 2005.


Oh, and let's not forget Henin's 6-
4, 6-4 victory over Kuznetsova in
2006, also in Paris. That was part of
Henin's 15-2 career record against
Kuznetsova.
Still, don't think this was a com-
pletely unfair matchup from the get-
go. Kuznetsova, after all, was the
2004 champion at Flushing
Meadows and will move up to No. 2
in the rankings next week.
That merely makes Henin's per-
formance that much more impres-
sive.' She was simply spectacular,


Federer



advances


to final
Associated Press
NEW YORK - Roger Federer
watched his opponent's last shot of
their U.S. Open semifinal sail
wide, then calmly walked to the net
for a handshake.
He didn't drop to his knees, did-
n't thrust an index finger to the sky
to declare, "I'm No. 1," didn't take
off his shirt - the sort of celebrato-
ry gestures Novak Djokovic came
up with earlier Saturday upon
reaching his first Grand Slam final.
You see, Federer does not get
overly excited about semifinal vic-
tories,. even at major tournaments.
He's all about titles, and now he's
one victory away from yet another:
No. 4 at the U.S. Open, No. 12 over-
all at Slams.
Tested at the start and again late,
the No. 1-seeded Federer worked
his way past No. 4 Nikolay
Davydenko 7-5, 6-1, 7-5 Saturday,
stretching his winning streak at
Flushing Meadows to 26 matches.
"I'm always very well-prepared
for the majors. I know what it
takes," Federer said. "When the
second week comes around, I play
my best."
In today's championship match,
Federer will face the only man to
beat him over the past three
months: Djokovic. The No. 3-seed-
ed Serb had a harder time with the
heat and humidity than with his
foe but overcame all three to
defeat No. 15 David Ferrer 6-4, 6-4,
6-3.
"I guess the best players of the
summer are in the final," said
Federer, all too aware that he lost
to Djokovic at a hard-court event in
Montreal in early August.
That was Djokovic's big break-
through: He 'also beat Rarael
Nadal and Andy Roddick there,
becoming the first man in 13 years
to beat Nos. 1-3 in the rankings at a
single tournament
While Djokovic will be aiming
for his first major title, Federer
will be trying to tie Roy Emerson
for second in tennis history behind
Pete Sampras' 14.


Please see ' . '. /Page 3B


Gators take sloppy


win over Troy, 59-31


Associated Press


GAINESVILLE - No. 4 Florida was
nearly perfect early and sloppy late.
Tim Tebow threw three touchdown
passes, ran for two more scores and
led the defending national champion
Gators to a 59-31 victory against Troy
on Saturday night
Florida scored on all seven posses-
sions in the first half, moving the ball
with relative ease against Troy's soft
zone.
The Trojans (0-2) refused to give the
Gators (2-0) anything deep, keeping
two safeties well back and prompting
Tebow to throw underneath.
Tebow obliged, and the Gators


ended up stringing together seven
consecutive scoring drives. They led
49-7 at halftime, and the starters fig-
ured to get much of the rest of the
night off before facing SEC East rival
Tennessee in a week.
But the second half was much dif-
ferent from the first.
Florida had two turnovers and two
punts, and the Trojans took advan-
Please see GATORS/Page 3B
Florida quarterback TimTebow, left,
runs out of bounds Saturday as he
tries to get by a Troy defender during
the first half of their college football
game in Gainesville.
Associated Press


Maddon to remain Rays'

manager until at least '09


Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG - The Tampa
Bay Devil Rays picked up manager
Joe Maddon's two-year option for the
2008 and 2009 seasons on Saturday.
The move had been expected since
Tampa Bay principal owner Stuart
Sternberg spoke highly last month
about Maddon's developmental work
with the youthful Devil Rays, the
American League's youngest team.
"I know it's just a two-year exten-
sion, but I want to be here for years to
come," Maddon said. "I see this as
being one of the prime places to be in
all of Major League Baseball in the
course of the next decade. I want to be
a part of it"
Maddon, in his second season as


Tampa Bay manager,
had a record of 119-
184 entering play on
Saturday.
"You can see the'
growth in the past two
years and that's just
the tip of the iceberg,"'
Maddon said. "It's just
Maddon going to keep getting:
better."
Tampa Bay executive vice presi-
dent of baseball operations Andrew
Friedman said retaining Maddon was'
not a tough decision.
"Everyone we talked to said he was,
definitely the right person for player.
and staff development, and teaching
Please see . * R .,t/Page 3B


,._ ,:"-' ,1 ,':. 4 . '",-,' ... .. .. . . :
' ; ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .'.


rt








COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Florida State comes up with win


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - Major college
football's winningest coach, Florida
State's Bobby Bowden, isn't fussy
about style points anymore.
"I'll just take a win," Bowden said
after the Seminoles 34-24 come-from-
behind victory Saturday over a scrap-
py UAB team hoping to avoid its
eighth straight loss.
Drew Weatherford threw for 332
yards and three touchdowns as
Florida State rallied from an early
two-touchdown deficit to put away the
Blazers.
"They just came in here and took it
to us and kept fighting," said Bowden,
who has 367 career wins, two more
than Penn State's Joe Paterno.
It was a much-needed win for the
Seminoles, who fell out of the Top 25
after losing Monday at Clemson, and
are now just 9-11 in their last 20 games
dating back to the last five games of
the 2005 season.
Weatherford hit a streaking
Richard Goodman in stride for a 50-
yard touchdown on the final play of
the third period that gave the
Seminoles a 31-24 lead and Gary
Cismesia's 40-yard field goal two min-
utes later finally gave Florida State
some breathing room at 34-24.
"We finally figured it out," said
Weatherford said. "We responded
very well."
Florida State didn't get its first lead,
24-17, until late in the third quarter on
Marcus Sim's 1-yard TD run, but UAB
countered on Joseph Webb's one-
handed catch on a 16-yard pass from
Sam Hunt to tie the game at 24.
Tight end Charlie Graham and
wideout Greg Carr also caught TD
passes for Florida State (1-1, 0-1
Atlantic Coast Conference), which
totaled 520 yards offense.
Although the offensive statistics
were virtually even at the half, UAB
held a 17-10 lead on the strength of
Will Dunbar's 21-yard interception
return touchdown just five minutes
into the game that made it 10-0.
"I was a little antsy in the pocket in
the beginning," Weatherford said.
"That was an ill-advised throw."
After a 28-yard field goal by
Cismesia, Hunt's 4-yard scoring
scramble early in the second quarter
boosted UAB into its 17-3 lead.
"It's a game we were in," UAB coach
Neil Callaway said. "We had a
chance."
UAB (0-2) has not won since a 35-29
win over Memphis last Oct. 7.
-Florida State lost starting tailback
Antone Smith with a concussion mid-
way through the third period and his
status for next Saturday's game at
Colorado was not immediately known.
Smith gained 62 yards on 19 carries
before leaving and backup Jamaal
Edwards added 45 on a dozen tries.
Florida State's Preston Parker
totaled 172 all-purpose yards, includ-
ing 89 yards receiving and another 74
yards on punt returns.
Hunt completed 17 of 35 for 226
yards for UAB and Webb finished with
6 receptions for 89 yards.
No. 3 West Virginia 48,
Marshall 23
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pat White and
Steve Slaton eventually wore down
Marshall.
White threw for two touchdowns and ran
for another, Slaton rushed for two scores
ahd No. 3 West Virginia used a 42-point
second half to beat Marshall 48-23
Saturday.
. Held to three first downs and 118 total
yards in the opening half, heavy favorite
West Virginia (2-0) scored on its first three
possessions of the third quarter and hand-
ed Marshall its worst home loss since it
opened Joan C. Edwards Stadium opened
in 1991.
Slaton, held to two first-half yards, erupt-
ed after West Virginia went to a power run-
ning game. Behind the blocking of fullback
Owen Schmitt, Slaton finished with 146
yards and scored on runs of one and 18
yprds. White ran for 125 yards.
No. 5 Oklahoma 51, Miami 13
NORMAN, Okla. - Sam Bradford tied a
school record with five touchdown passes
and Reggie Smith returned a fumble for a
score as No. 5 Oklahoma earned a meas-
ure of redemption Saturday with a 51-13
Win against Miami in their first meeting
since the Hurricanes swept three games in
the 1980s.
All three of Oklahoma's losses came in
a three-year span when the Sooners went
33-0 against all opponents except the
Hurricanes.
Bradford completed 19-of-25 passes for
205 yards in his second career start, and
Malcolm Kelly caught three of his touch-
down passes as the Sooners (2-0) evened
the all-time series at three games each.
, Oklahoma built a 21-3 first-half lead on
Bradford's touchdown passes of 23 and 24
yards to Kelly and Smith's 61-yard return
of a Javarris James fumble - the third-


longest fumble return in Sooners' history.
No. 7 Texas 34, No. 19 TCU 13
AUSTIN, Texas - Colt McCoy passed
for a touchdown, set up another with a
long run, and a dominant performance by
No. 7 Texas' defense carried the
Longhoms to a 34-13 win over No. 19
TCU Saturday night.


Associated Press
Florida State quarterback Drew Weatherford, right, runs for third-quarter yardage Saturday as UAB defender Will Dunbar,
left, moves in to make the tackle during their game in Tallahassee. Florida State won, 34-24.


McCoy, who threw two first-half intercep-
tions, including one that was returned for a
touchdown, cut a 10-0 TCU lead in the
third quarter with a 33-yard strike to Nate
Jones. His 23-yard scramble early in the
fourth set up the go-ahead score before
the Longhorns started piling it on.
The Texas defense did the rest.
Brandon Foster returned a fumble by TCU
punter Derek Walsh for a TD and the
Longhorns (2-0) held the Homed Frogs (1-
1) to 251 totals yards. TCU had just 17
yards and no first downs in the third quar-
ter when Texas started surging.
Jones had eight catches for catches for
91 yards and Jamaal Charles tacked on a
39-yard touchdown run in the fourth for the
Longhorns with just under three minutes
left. McCoy finished 25-of-38 passing for
239 yards. Charles finished with 134
yards, most of it coming in the second half.
The loss was a bitter disappointment for
TCU, which came in with a five-game win-
ning streak over Big 12 teams and chip-
on-the-shoulder visions of more payback
for a league that snubbed the Horned
Frogs in the mid-1990s.
No. 10 Calfonia 34, Coloado St. 28
FORT COLLINS, Colo. - DeSean
Jackson is spectacular from scrimmage, too.
The junior wide receiver scored on a 73-
yard reverse Saturday as the 10th-ranked
California Golden Bears held off scrappy
Colorado State 34-28.
Jackson, who opened the season with
an electrifying 77-yard punt return TD
against Tennessee, again flashed his
Heisman Trophy credentials when he cir-
cled left, deked cornerback Joey Rucks at
midfield and raced all alone down the
Rams' sideline for Cal's first touchdown.
Jackson, who had 143 all-purpose yards
on only six touches against Tennessee,
collected 141 all-purpose yards against the
Rams, gaining 78 yards on two carries, 39
yards on five receptions and 24 on two
punt returns.
South Carolina 16,
No. 11 Georgia 12
ATHENS, Ga. - Steve Spurrier did it to
Georgia again.
The ol' ball coach, who beat the
Bulldogs regularly while at Florida, guided
South Carolina to a 16-12 upset of No. 11
Georgia on Saturday night, signaling the
Gamecocks as a possible title contender in
the Southeastern Conference.
Just like it was for Spurrier in his days
with the Gators.
Ryan Succop kicked three field goals,
Cory Boyd ran for the game's only touch-
down and South Carolina's defense kept
the Bulldogs out of the end zone.
Succop connected from 41, 35 and 34
yards, the last of those giving the Gamecocks
at 16-6 lead with 9:25 remaining.
The Bulldogs drove into South Carolina
territory on their next two possessions, but
settled for Brandon Coutu's third and
fourth field goals. The kicker accounted for
all of Georgia's points.
No. 12 Ohio St. 20, Akron 2
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio State coach
Jim Tressel always says the punt is the
most important play in football.
This, however, was ridiculous.
The 12th-ranked Buckeyes forced
befuddled Akron to punt 14 times, includ-
ing after 12 consecutive three-and-out
series, and beat the Zips 20-2 on
Saturday.
The Buckeyes led Akron 3-2 at the half
before putting the game away on Brandon
Saine's 6-yard touchdown run in the third
quarter and Todd Boeckman's 13-yard
scoring pass to Brian Robiskie in the fourth.
No. 13 UCLA 27, BYU 17
PASADENA, Calif. - Chris Markey ran
for a late touchdown, Trey Brown returned


an interception 56 yards for a score and
the No. 13 UCLA defense held off a sec-
ond-half BYU rally Saturday night for a 27-
17 victory.
Kahlil Bell also ran for a touchdown in
the first half to help the Bruins open the
season with two victories and stop an 11-
game BYU winning streak.
Down 20-3, BYU opened the second
half with a pair of touchdown drives, but
the UCLA defense forced a fumble on the
ensuing possession and held the Cougars
to three-and-out on the next.
UCLA (2-0) used a slow, 45-yard drive
in the final three minutes that included a
timely pass interference penalty on BYU
and a Ben Olson completion on third-and-
7. Markey's 3-yard touchdown run with
1:12 remaining sealed the win.
Most of the pre-game attention in both
Provo and Pasadena was on Olson, who
had redshirted at BYU before serving a
church mission and transferring to UGLA.
He pass for 126 yards, but no TDs.
Much of the game he was outplayed by
BYU quarterback Max Hall, who also
served a mission and came to the starting
job last week, after not taking a snap for
three years.
A transfer from Arizona State, Hall threw
for 380 yards and two touchdowns.
After BYU was held to a field goal in the
first half, Hall opened the second with a
pair of touchdown drives.
No. 14 Pernn St. 31, Nobe Dame 10
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -All the talk
was about Notre Dame freshman quarter-
back Jimmy Clausen. Penn State's
defense and Derrick Williams took the
spotlight.
The 14th-ranked Nittany Lions bottled
up Clausen in his starting debut, Williams
had a 78-yard punt return for a touchdown
and Austin Scott ran for two second-half
scores in a 31-10 win Saturday night over
the Irish.
Anthony Morelli threw for 131 yards and
a touchdown, though Penn State's offense
looked shaky much of the day.
The Irish were worse, in almost every
way.
Notre Dame opened the season 0-2 for
the first time since 2001, when the Irish
lost their first three games.
Morelli hit Jordan Norwood for a 10-yard
TD pass midway through the second quar-
ter to give Penn State a 14-7 advantage,
and a relentless defense took over from
there. Scott finished with 28 carries and
116 yards along with his two scores.
Morelli was 12-of-22 passing and had an
interception.
Notre Dame's offensive line, which was
battered for nine sacks in the 33-3 season-
opening loss to Georgia Tech, couldn't
handle the Nittany Lions most of the game.
No. 15 Rutgers 41, Navy 24
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - Ray Rice
became the career rushing leader at No.
15 Rutgers, and still had to share the spot-
light with his defense.
Rice rushed for 175 yards and scored
three touchdowns, and the Scarlet Knights
defense intercepted three passes and
made a big fourth-quarter stand to hold off
stubborn Navy 41-24 on Friday night.
Rice scored on runs of 4 and 2 yards
and caught his first touchdown pass on a
22-yard catch and run from Mike Teel late
in the first half. He has gained 3,273 yards
rushing in his career, breaking the old
school record of 3,114 set by Terrell Willis
(1993-95).
No. 16 Nebraska 20,
Wake Forest 17
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Sam Keller
threw for 258 yards and a touchdown in
his first road start at Nebraska and
Zackary Bowman had a critical interception


in the end zone, leading the 16th-ranked
Cornhuskers past Wake Forest 20-17 on
Saturday.
Keller completed 24-of-41 passes'for
Nebraska (2-0), which lacked the gaudy
offensive numbers of last week but with-
stood its first real challenge of the season
and now can focus on next week's visit
from No. 1 Southern California.
Wake Forest had a prime opportunity to
take the lead - or at least tie it - midway
through the fourth quarter, when defensive
end Zach Stukes smothered Keller and
John Russell intercepted the pass at the
Nebraska 10.
No. 21 Georgia Tech 69,
Samford 14
ATLANTA-- Tashard Choice secured
his ninth straight 100-yard game with a 73-
yard touchdown run in the first quarter and
No. 21 Georgia Tech scored its most
points in a half since 1916, blowing out
Samford 69-14 on Saturday.
Choice, who set a career high with 196
yards rushing in Tech's 33-3 win over Notre
Dame last week, did not play after rushing
for 110 yards and two touchdowns in the
first quarter. Choice scored on runs of 9
and 73 yards - the longest of his career.
Freshman Jonathan Dwyer added 138
yards rushing and three touchdowns on
only nine carries. Quarterback Taylor
Bennett, receiver Greg Smith and tailbacks
Jamaal Evans and Jason Davis also had
scoring runs for Tech.
Georgia Tech led 45-0 at halftime, its
most points in any half since its 222-0 win
over Cumberland on Oct. 7, 1916.
Washington 24, No. 22 Boise St 10
SEATTLE - Redshirt freshman Jake
Locker threw for one score and ran for
another as resurgent Washington held No.
22 Boise State scoreless in the second
half of a 24-10 victory Saturday, ending the
longest winning streak in major college
football at 14 games.
Two key defensive plays sealed the win.
Roy Lewis broke up a fourth-down pass in
the end zone with four minutes left and
Vonzell McDowell had an interception at
the 2 with 2:40 remaining.
Boise State running back lan Johnson
saw his streak of seven consecutive 100-
yard games end. He had 81 yards on 20
carries, as the Broncos found themselves
in unfamiliar long-yardage situations.
Boise State (1-1) is 0-13 in road games
against teams from BCS conferences. The
Broncos, second in the nation in scoring
last season at 40 points per game, were
held to their lowest point total since a 17-7
loss to Fresno State on Nov. 10, 2005.
Washington is 2-0 for the first time since
2001 heading into its home game next
week against No. 12 Ohio State.
No. 23 Texas A&M 47,
Fresno State 45, 30T
COLLEGE STATION, Texas - Texas
A&M blew a 19-point lead, had a game-
winning play negated by a penalty, then
needed Jorvorskie Lane's power and one
last defensive stand to finally put away
Fresno State at Kyle Field on Saturday.
Lane rushed for two of his four touch-
downs in the second and third extra peri-
ods as the 23rd-ranked Aggies beat the
feisty Bulldogs 47-45 in three overtimes.
After Matt Szymanski kicked a 27-yard
field goal to give A&M a 32-29 lead,
Fresno State receiver Marion Moore
caught a Tom Brandstater pass and tried
to stretch the ball over the goal line with
one hand. He fumbled into the end zone
as he stepped out of bounds, and the
Aggies recovered the loose ball. The offi-
cial on the spot ruled that Moore went out
at the 1.
Officials reviewed replays and ruled that
Moore had fumbled, but A&M nose tackle


Henry Smith was flagged for roughing the
passer on the play and Fresno State (1-1)
was given a first down inside the A&M 13.
Clint Stitser kicked a field goal to force
another overtime.
Anthony Harding scored on Fresno's
next chance, but Lane had a 1-yard TD
run to force the third overtime.
No. 25 Clemson 49,
Louisiana-Monroe 26
CLEMSON, S.C. - Cullen Harper threw
a school-record five touchdown passes
and No. 25 Clemson capped a frenzied
week with a 49-26 victory over Louisiana-
Monroe on Saturday.
The Tigers started 2-0 for the second
time in three seasons, following up Monday
night's 24-18 win over Florida State with
the wipeout of the Warhawks (0-2).
Harper finished 20-of-26 passing for 270 -
yards and no interceptions.
C.J. Spiller was stopped on a fourth-
and-2 on the Tigers' second possession.
The Warhawks answered back with a 67-
yard drive that ended on Calvin Dawson's
1-yard TD run for a 7-0 lead.
He found Tyler Grisham with a 14-
yarder to tie the game, then connected
with Jacoby Ford on a 52-yarder that put
the Tigers ahead to stay.
Harper also hit freshman tight end Brian
Linthicum for an 8-yard touchdown pass.
He tied the school record with a 6-yard
throw to Aaron Kelly right before halftime.
Oregon 39, Michigan 7
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Michigan got
embarrassed again, just in a different way.
A week after being upset by
Appalachian State, the Wolverines were
handed their most-lopsided loss in 39
years as Dennis Dixon and the Ducks
cruised 39-7 on Saturday. Dixon account-
ed for 368 yards and a career-high four
touchdowns.
Michigan (0-2) has opened a season
with two straight losses at home for the
first time since 1959 and has dropped four
straight, dating to last season, for the first
time in four decades.
Unlike the stunning loss to the second-
tier Mountaineers, the Wolverines didn't
even keep it close against Oregon. The
32-point setback was Michigan's worst
since losing 50-14 at Ohio State in 1968,
the season before Bo Schembechler's
debut in Ann Arbor.
Dixon led the way with his arm and feet,
throwing for 292 yards and tying a career
high with three passing TDs - to three
receivers - and running for 76 yards and
a score. Jonathan Stewart ran for 111
-.yards and-a TD. -
Tennessee 39,
Southern Miss 19
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Erik Ainge threw
touchdown passes, Arian Foster ran for
two scores and No. 24 Tennessee defeat-
ed Southern Mississippi 39-19 Saturday
night.
Ainge completed 23 of 36 for 276 yards,
and got a lot of help from his developing
receivers. Austin Rogers caught seven
passes for 112 yards and Lucas Taylor
adding 118 yards on five catches. Josh
Briscoe also caught a touchdown.
The Vols made a key conversion on
third-and-short with when Ainge connected
on a 5-yard touchdown pass to Briscoe
with 41 seconds left in the second quarter
to send Tennessee into the locker room
with a 17-16 lead.
After trailing Southern Miss most of the
first half, the Vols held the lead after the
Briscoe touchdown, capitalizing on three
Southern Mississippi fumbles.
Maryland 26,
Florida International 10
MIAMI - For years, Keon Lattimore
watched his brother run all over the turf at
the Orange Bowl, making big plays and
leading his teams to victories.
Ray Lewis' younger sibling apparently
learned a thing or two along the way, too.
Lattimore ran for 111 yards and two
early touchdowns, and Maryland held off
pesky Florida International 26-10 on
Saturday night.
Jordan Steffy completed 18 of 25 pass-
es for 135 yards and Lance Ball had a 1-
yard scoring run with 53 seconds left to
seal the win for Maryland, now 2-0 for the
fourth time in Ralph Friedgen's seven sea-
sons. The Terrapins host No. 3 West
Virginia on Thursday night.
Air Force 20, Utah 12
SALT LAKE CITY - Shaun Carney ran
for 113 yards and Air Force stopped Utah
twice at the 1-yard line in the final 1:25 in a
20-12 win Saturday, the Falcons' first over
the Utes in five years,
Jim Ollis and Savier Stevens both ran
for touchdowns and the Air Force defense
kept Utah from rallying in the fourth quar-
ter.


On third-and-goal from the 1, the
Falcons stopped Eddie Wide on a direct
snap that fooled nobody with 1:09 left. The
Utes had one more chance, but Drew
Fowler stood up Darryl Poston a couple
feet short of the goal line to end Utah's
scoring threat.
Air Force (2-0, 1-0 Mountain West) was
able to run out the clock and end a four-
game losing streak to the Utes (0-2, 0-1).


3B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


Onus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE'










CIRF-- -'- (F) HRNCLkS OR S UDA--EPEME-9 2073


GOLF

BMW Championship
Par Scores


Saturday
Third Round
Steve Stricker 68-66-64 -
Aaron Baddeley 68-65-65 -
Tiger Woods 67-67-65 -
Justin Rose 65-69-69 -
Tim Clark 68-69-67 -
Jonathan Byrd 64-69-71 -
Adam Scott 69-69-67 -
Nathan Green 67-71-67 -
Pat Perez 66-69-70 -
Camilo Villegas 65-69-71 -
Brandt Snedeker 70-71-65 -
Jim Furyk 70-69-67 -
Stewart Cink 66-73-68 -
Ryan Moore 69-70-68 -
Sergio Garcia 68-70-69 -
Stuart Appleby 68-68-71 -
Kenny Perry 71-71-66 -
Lucas Glover 70-71-67 -
Charles Howell III 68-73-67 -
Billy Mayfair 72-69-67 -
Rocco Mediate 70-70-68 -
Bo Van Pelt 69-71-68 -
Ernie Els 73-67-68 -
Stephen Ames 71-68-69 -
Carl Pettersson 71-68-69 -
Ryuji Imada 67-70-71 -
Hunter Mahan 69-68-71 -
Rory Sabbatini 69-72-68 -
Bubba Watson 71-69-69 -
Trevor Immelman 70-70-69 -
lan Poulter 68-72-69 -
Jose Coceres 70-69-70 -
Scott Verplank 69-70-70 -
K.J. Choi 68-70-71 -
David Toms 72-70-68 -
Vaughn Taylor 73-68-69 -
Charley Hoffman 68-70-72 -
Rod Pampling 73-72-66 -
Troy Matteson 66-77-68 -
John Mallinger 74-68-69 -
Ken Duke 67-73-71 -
WoodyAustin 67-73-71 -
Brett Wetterich 68-72-71 -
Heath Slocum 71-68-72 -
Steve Marino 73-70-69 -
Robert Allenby 75-68-69 -
Kevin Sutherland 70-73-69 -
Angel Cabrera 72-69-71 -
Mark Wilson 76-69-68 -
Zach Johnson 72-71-70 -
Henrik Stenson 75-71-68 -
Luke Donald 76-70-68 -
Jerry Kelly 74-72-68 -
Anthony Kim 74-70-70 -
Brian Bateman 70-72-72 -
John Rollins 69-71-74 -
Jeff Quinney 72-73-70 -
John Senden 71-75-71 -
Sean O'Hair 74-72-71 -
Nick Watney 72-73-72 -
Nick O'Hern 70-73-74 -
Geoff Ogilvy 78-73-68 -
Boo Weekley 75-72-72 -
Vijay Singh 74-69-77 -
M Calcavecchia 77-71-75 -
NWAikmisas


198 -15
198 -15
199 -14
203 -10
204 -9
204 -9
205 -8
205 -8
205 -8
205 -8
206 -7
206 -7
207 -6
207 -6
207 -6
207 -6
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
209 -4
209 -4
209 -4
209 -4
209 -4
209 -4
209 -4
210 -3
210 -3
210 -3
211 -2
211 -2
211 -2
211 -2
211 -2
211 -2
211 -2
212 -1
212 -1
212 -1
212 -1
213 E
213 E
214 +1
214 +1
214 +1
214 +1
214 +1
214 +1
215 +2
217 +4
217 +4
217 +4
217 +4
219 +6
219 +6
220 +7
223+10


Chmpiohlp Par scores
Saturday
a-amateur
Note: Play was suspended due to weath-
er with 32 players not finishing. The tour-
nament has been reduced from 54 to 18
holes. The round will be completed


Sunday.
a-Stacy Lewis 34-31
Teresa Lu 32-34
Kristy McPherson 32-34
Katherine Hull 34-32
Sherri Turner 33-34
Juli Inkster 34-33
Maria Hjorth 34-34
Beth Bader 35-33
Dorothy Delasin 36-33
Alena Sharp 34-35
Julieta Granada 33-36
Pat Hurst 34-35
Cristie Kerr 37-32
Natalie Gulbis 33-36
Reilley Rankin 37-32
Rachel Hetherington 33-36
Jennifer Gleason . 35-35
Seon Hwa Lee 32-38
II Mi Chung 36-34
Laura Diaz 35-35
Amy Hung 34-36
Sarah Lee 36-34
Diana D'Alessio 37-33
Gloria Park 35-35
Aree Song 35-35
Eva Dahllof 37-34
Karen Stupples 35-36
In-Kyung Kim 33-38
Karine Icher 38-33
Kyeong Bae 36-35
Nicole Castrale 37-34
Joo Mi Kim 36-35
Johanna Head 38-34
Soo Young Moon 38-34
Tracy Hanson 37-35
H. Daly-Donofrio 36-36
Simi Mehra 35-37
Song-Hee Kim 38-34
Heather Young 36-36
Janice Moodie 35-37
Karin Sjodin 36-36
Inbee Park 36-36
Se Ri Pak 36-36
Hye Jung Choi 37-35
Giulia Sergas 34-38
Becky Morgan 35-37
Michele Redman 33-39
Angela Park 36-36
Carin Koch 37-35
Miriam Nagl 37-35
Siew-Ai Lim 36-36
Maggie Will 37-36
Clarissa Childs 37-36
Kim Williams 37-36
V. Nirapathpongporn 38-35
Jacqueline Yang 37-36
Kim Saiki-Maloney 36-37
Carri Wood 38-35
Jennifer Rosales 36-37
Christina Kim 36-37
S. Prammanasudh 37-36
Lorie Kane 36-37
Meg Mallon 39-34
Kim Hall 37-36
Meredith Duncan 37-36
Paige Mackenzie 37-37
Brooke Tull 35-39
Jenna Daniels 37-37
Moira Dunn 36-38
Jane Park 37-37
Marcy Hart 37-37
Meaghan Francella 39-35
Meena Lee 37-37
Brittany Lincicome 37-37
Charlotte Mayorkas 37-37
Jimin Kang 38-36
Sophia Sheridan 33-41
Joanne Morley 37-38
Sarah Lynn Sargent 37-38
Mikaela Parmlid 37-38
Na Ri Kim 36-39
Michelle McGann 37-38
Louise Stahle 39-36
Won Lee 36-39
Lindsey Wright 39-36
Birdie Kim 37-38
Sherri Steinhauer 38-37
Kris Tamulis 37-38
Jill McGill 37-38
Christi Cano 38-38
Kate Golden 37-39
Mhairi McKay 36-40
Wendy Ward 40-36
Soo-Yun Kang 39-37
Grace Park 39-37
Liselotte Neumann 37-39
Jeanne Cho-Hunicke 38-38


76 +4


For the record


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
6 a.m. (SPEED) GP2 Championship Series.
7:30 a.m. (SPEED) Formula One - Italian Grand Prix.
11 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- Lucas Oil Sportsman Series.
12 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- Lucas Oil Sportsman Series.
4 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Chicagoland Indy 300.
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) Washington Nationals at Atlanta Braves.
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
2 p.m. (WGN) Minnesota Twins at Chicago White Sox.
8 p.m. (ESPN) Cleveland Indians at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Troy at Florida. (Taped)
7 p.m. (SUN) Alabama-Birmingham at Florida State. (Taped)
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) Miami Dolphins at Washington Redskins.
1 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Philadelphia Eagles at Green Bay Packers.
4 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Seattle Seahawks.
8:15 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys.
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA-- Omega European Masters -
Final Round.
1 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA- NW Arkansas Championship - Final Round.
2 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) PGA-- BMW Championship - Final Round.
2 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Walker Cup.'
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Nationwide Tour - Envirocare Utah Classic
- Final Round.
RODEO
5 p.m. (ESPN) Dodge Xtreme Bulls Tour.
7 p.m. (VERSUS) PBR Reno Classic.
RUGBY
3 p.m. (VERSUS) IRB World Cup 2007 -Argentina vs. France.
COLLEGE SOCCER
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Women's - Florida State at Florida.
TENNIS
1 p.m. (USA) U.S. Open - Women's Doubles Final.
4 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) U.S. Open - Men's Final.


Erica Blasberg 40-37
Barb Mucha 41-36
Charlotta Sorenstam 39-38


Katie Futcher
Nicole Jeray
Sung Ah Yim
Angela Jerman
Young Jo
Brittany Lang
Na On Min
Christa Johnson
Danielle Downey
Stephanie Louden
JeongJang
Mi Hyun Kim
Sophie Giquel


37-40
38-39
39-38
43-35
42-37
37-42
38-41
38-42
39-42
37-44
38-39
DNS
DQ


77 +5
77 +5
77 +5
77 +5
77 +5
77 +5
78 +6
79 +7
79 +7
79 +7
80 +8
81 +9
81 +9
77 WD


Did Not Finish
Dina Ammaccapane
Veronica Zorzi
Linda Wessberg
A.J. Eathorne
Audra Burks
Riko Higashio
Patricia Meunier-Lebouc
Diane Irvin
Natalie Tucker
Yu Ping Lin
Lisa Fernandes
Sun Young Yoo
Aram Cho
Dawn Coe-Jones
Nancy Scranton
Leta Lindley
Minea Blomqvist
Beth Allen
Lee Ann Walker-Cooper
Kelli Kuehne
Vicki Goetze-Ackerman
Jamie Hullett
Jin Young Pak
Kelly Cap
Ji-Young Oh
Sae-Hee Son
Michelle Ellis
Allison Hanna-Williams
Cindy Pasechnik
Irene Cho
Sarah Huarte
Nina Reis

BASEBALL
Tigers 12, Mariners 6
DETROIT - Brandon Inge hit a
Stiebreaking homer in the sixth inning
to help the Detroit Tigers beat
Seattle 12-6 Saturday night and
move ahead of the Mariners in the
American League wild-card race.
Ivan Rodriguez went 4-for-5 with
a home run in the eighth for the
Tigers, who entered the day trailing
the New York Yankees by three
games for the wild-card playoff spot.
Placido Polanco had three hits
and drove in four runs and Timo
Perez also had three hits for the
Tigers, who have won the first two
games of the three-game series.
Magglio Ordonez also drove in a
pair of runs for Detroit.
SEATTLE DETROIT
ab rhbi ab r hbi
ISuzuki cf 5 11 0Grndsn cf 4 320
Vidro dh 4 11 0 Planco 2b 4 2 34
JGillen rf 5 01 1 Shffield dh 5 0 0 0
Ibanez If 5 11 0 MOrdz rf 3 2 1 2
Beltre 3b 3222 Moore rf 0 0 00
JClmnt ph 1 00 0 CGillen ss 4 0 0 0
Sexson lb 3 00 0 IRdrgz c 5 24 2
Jhjima c 4 02 1 TPerez If 5 0 3 2
JoLpez2b 4 01 0 Casey lb 3 0 1 0
YBtcrt ss 4 111 Maybin pr 0 1 00
RSntgoss 2 000
Inge 3b 3 2 1 2
Totals 38610 5 Totals 38121512
Seattle 111 110 100- 6
Detroit 301 103 31x- 12
E-JGuillen (8), Inge (16). LOB-Seattle
8, Detroit 8. 2B-Beltre (37), Polanco (32),
MOrdonez (47), Casey (29). 3B-Ibanez
(4), Granderson (22), TPerez (1). HR-
Beltre (23), YBetancourt (9), IRodriguez
(11), Inge (14). SF-Polanco, MOrdonez.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
JfWeaver L,6-12 5 9 7 6 2 2
Green 1 3 2 2 0 2
Roland-Smith 2-3 0 2 2 2 1
White 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
07548 1 2 1 1 0 2
Detroit
Robertson 42-3 7 5 4 3 3
Miner W,3-3 21-3 3 1 1 0 0
Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bazardo 1 0 0 0 0 1
JfWeaver pitched to 2 batters in the 6th,
Green pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Green.
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First,
Brian Gorman; Second, Paul Nauert;
Third, Rob Drake.
T-3:01. A-42,184 (41,070)


Padres 3, Rockies 1
DENVER - Greg Maddux didn't
walk a batter for the eighth straight
start and scattered three hits over six
innings to lead the San Diego
Padres to a 3-1 win over the
Colorado Rockies on Saturday night.
The win allowed the Padres to
maintain their 2%-game lead over
the Los Angeles Dodgers in the
wild-card race. San Diego entered
the game trailing Arizona by two
games in the NL West.
SAN DIEGO COLORADO


BGiles rf
BClark If
MCmrn cf
AdGnlz lb
KGreen ss
Kzmnff 3b
HBell p
Sledge ph
Barrett ph
Hffman p
Bard c
Blum 2b
Mddux p
Brocail p
Stnsbry 2b
Ensbrg 3b


ab rhbi
4 01 0 Tveras cf
3 01 0 Sllivan pr
3 10 0 Julio p
3 11 0 Affeldt p
4 12 1 KMtsui 2b
3 01 1 Carroll 2b
0 00 0 Hlliday If
0 00 0 Helton 1lb
1 00 0 Atkins 3b
0 00 0 Hawpe rf
3 00 0 Tlowzki ss
3 00 0 Trralba c
2 00 0 Spbrgh cf
0 00 0 Francis p
0 00 0 Stewart ph
1 00 0 Innetta c


ab r h bi
4 01 0
0000
0 0000
0000
4 01 0
0000
4000
4021
3000
3000
2000
1 000
2 000
1 000
0000


Totals 303 6 2 Totals 32 1 5 1
San Diego 020 000 001- 3
Colorado 010 000 000- 1
E-AdGonzalez (9). DP-San Diego 1,
Colorado 2. LOB-San Diego 3, Colorado
5. 2B-KGreene (38), Helton (34). SB-
MCameron (16), Taveras (33).
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
MadduxW,12-9 6 3 1 1 0 3
Brocail 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
HBell 11-3 2 0 0 0 3
HoffmanS,37 1 0 0 0 0 2
Colorado
Francis L,15-7 8 4 2 2 2 3
Julio 2-3 2 1 1 1 1
Affeldt 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Chuck Meriwether;
First, Rick Reed; Second, Alfonso
Marquez; Third, Adam Dowdy.
T-2:30. A-30,429 (50,449).
Brewers 4, Reds 3
CINCINNATI - Rickie Weeks
tripled to drive in Craig Counsell
with the go-ahead run in the ninth
inning, and the Milwaukee Brewers
beat the Cincinnati Reds 4-3
Saturday night to remain tied for
first place in the NL Central.
, Counsel led off against David
Weathers (2-5) with a single and
moved to second on Mike Rivera's
sacrifice, setting up Weeks' RBI
triple to the right-center field gap,
his third hit of the game.
MILWAUKEE CINCINNATI


Weeks 2b
Gross rf
Stocker rf
Braun 3b
FCdero p
Fildr 1 b
BHall cf
Jenkins If
DMiller c
JEstda ph
Turnbw p
Hardy ss
Cunsell ss
Suppan p
CHart ph
King p
Lnbmk p
Rivera c


ab rhbi


5 03 1 Hoppercf
3 00 1 AIGnzlz ss
0 00 0 Kppngrss
5 00 0 Grf Jr. rf
0 00 0 BPhllps 2b
4 22 1 DunnIlf
3 01 0 EEcrcn 3b
3 00 1 Votto lb
3 01 0 Ross c
1 00 0 Harang p
0 00 0 Cantu ph
0 00 0 Burton p
4 12 0 Wthers p
211 0
1 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0


ab r hbi
4010
3000
1 000
4000
4000
2100
4120
3 1 1 3
3 000
2 0 0 0.
1 000
0000
0000


Totals 34410 4 Totals 31 3 4 3
Milwaukee 000 011 011- 4
Cincinnati 030 000 000- 3
DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-Milwaukee 9,
Cincinnati 3. 2B-BHall (35), DMiller (7).
3B-Weeks (6). HR-Fielder (43), Votto
(2). SB-Hopper (10). S-Rivera. SF-
Jenkins.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Suppan 6 3 3 3 1 4
King 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
Linebrink 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
TurnbowW,4-4 1 0 0 0 0 1
FCorderoS,41 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
Harang 7 7 2 2 2 7
Burton 1 1 1 1 1 1
Weathers L,2-5 1 2 1 1 1 1
Umpires-Home, Bruce Froemming;
First, Mark Wegner; Second, Brian Runge;
Third, Mike Winters.
T-2:48. A-22,758 (42,271).


Rookie Gaines vs. Pro Bowler Jones


Associated Press

KIRKLAND, Wash. -
Gaines Adams is not easing his
way into the NFL.
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers'
rookie and fourth overall pick
in April's draft is making his
NFL debut on Sunday against
Walter Jones.
The Seattle Seahawks left
tackle is a consensus pick as
the league's best offensive line-
man, the dominator who makes
Bucs coach Jon Gruden say,
"He blocks the sun out, man."
Hey, kid, good luck eclipsing
him on Sunday
"Some things you just have to
get put in the fire and see for
yourself," Bucs linebacker
Derrick Brooks said. "We can
tell him how great Walter is and
he knows that At the same time,
he has to look forward to his
first NFL game going against,
arguably, one of the best left
tackles to play the game.


BUCS
Continued from Page 1B

But the mobile guy whom
Holmgren tried to sign two
years ago as Hasselbeck's back-
up is 37. He is on his fifth team
in five years. How long can
Gruden count on Garcia?
"I saw George Foreman win
a heavyweight title. I think he
was 44 years old," Gruden
said, chuckling. "I'm hoping
he has seven years left, let's
put it that way"
Even Garcia at 44 may be
better than this recent past:
Brad Johnson was efficient
while winning the Super Bowl
with Gruden at the end of the
'02 season. Then again, cynics
claimed with the Bucs'
swarming defense, Elmer
Fudd could have quarter-
backed them to a title.
In 2003, the offense rose to
10th behind Johnson's 27
touchdown passes and a bal-
anced running game. But after
four games of '04, Brian Griese



SEVEN
Continued from Page 1B

just as she was while getting
past Serena Williams in the
quarterfinals and Venus
Williams in the semifinals.
If it wasn't clear already,
Henin has cemented her status
as the No. 1 woman in the game
today.
Just how good has she been
in 2007? She won two majors
and a tour-leading seven titles
while going 50-4 at 11 tourna-
ments.
Still, she's apparently not a
household name. During the
trophy ceremony, CBS
announcer Dick Enberg
referred to her as "Justine
Henin-Hardenne" - even
though she dropped that


GATORS
Continued from Page 1B

tage. Omar Haugabook ran for
a touchdown, then hooked up
with Austin Silvoy for two
scores as Troy whittled into the
lead.
Haugabook finished 29-of-52
for 283 yards, with an intercep-
tion. Troy finished with 336
yards against Florida's inexpe-
rienced defense.
Florida's 42-point lead was
cut in half in the fourth quarter.
Haugabook's second TD pass
made it 52-31 with 7 minutes to
play, but Tebow and Percy
Harvin ended any thoughts of a
comeback
Tebow scrambled for 25
yards, then Harvin followed
with a 20-yard run. Tebow ran a
few more times and scored
from 16 yards out to make it 59-
31 with 2:50 remaining.
Tebow finished 18-of-25 pass-
ing for 236 yards. He also ran
17 times for 93 yards.
Although Tebow made it look


MADDON
Continued from Page 1B

the game," Friedman said.
"But we also feel he's the
right person for the transition
into a winning team.
Obviously time was going to
tell, but we felt strongly that
he would, and now after see-
ing him for two years and
appreciating what he is all
about, we're extremely confi-
dent he's the right person to
get us to that point."
All-Star left fielder Carl
Crawford is hopeful that
brighter days are ahead for the


"To me there is not a bigger
stage and no bigger challenge
coming out of the box to make a
statement of where you want
your career to go in playing
against Walter."
So how is Brooks, a 10-time
Pro Bowler and leader of the
defense, advising Adams?
"One, make sure you pre-
pare yourself for a long day,"
Brooks said. "And two, don't
back down, step up, make the
play."
Seahawks quarterback Matt
Hasselbeck hopes he won't
notice the matchup. He usually
doesn't pay attention to Jones
during games because the
perennial Pro Bowl left tackle
is usually dominating a pass
rusher.
"Most guys think it's an
honor to go up against Walter
Jones," Hasselbeck said. "He's
a very respectful player.When
he gets you, he gets you. And
then when you get him, he'll


took Johnson's job. The
Buccaneers sank to 5-11, then
Johnson signed with
Minnesota.-The following year,
Griese's season ended with a
knee injury in the sixth game.
Tampa Bay rallied to 11-5 and
won the NFC South when inex-
perienced quarterback Chris
Simms benefited from Carnell
"Cadillac" Williams' 1,178
yards rushing.
But Tampa Bay continued to
watch idly because of salary
cap problems as Griese signed
with Chicago.
Three games into 2006,
Simms had thrown seven inter-
ceptions and just one touch-
down, then was injured and
needed his spleen removed.
Bruce Gradkowski, a rookie
sixth-round pick, started 11
games. The well-traveled Tim
Rattay threw 101 passes. The
Bucs fell to their worst record
since 1991 (3-13).
Holmgren, who brought
Gruden into the NFL as the
league's first part-time, "quali-
ty-control" assistants when he
was the offensive coordinator
with San Francisco in 1990, has

hyphenated part when she left
her husband at the beginning
of the year. That split was
Henin's reason for skipping the
Australian Open; otherwise,
she might have another major
title to her credit
The other time Henin won
the Open, a representative of
the main tournament sponsor
called her "Christine" while
presenting the champion's tro-
phy and check
Against Kuznetsova, Henin
finished with a 25-11 edge in
winners and saved all six break
points she faced, including
three in the final game.
She showed off all aspects of
her versatile game, from vol-
leys - winning the point on 13
of 16 trips to the net - to pass-
ing shots on the run to returns
of serve, punctuating most with
shouts of "Allez!"


easy at times, Troy made it
interesting, too.
Andre Caldwell fumbled on
the first play of the third quar-
ter, and Leodis McKelvin
returned it to the 4-yard line.
The Trojans, who nearly upset
Florida State last year and
played Arkansas tough last
week, settled for a field goal.
The Gators punted on the
next drive, and Haugabook
capped a 68-yard drive with a
1-yard TD run. Freshman Chris
Rainey fumbled the ensuing
kickoff, and Troy had good
field position again.
The drive ended when Greg
Whibbs missed a 45-yard field
goal. But the Gators punted the
ball right back after Tebow was
sacked on third down.
Haugabook hooked up with
Silvoy for an 11-yard score, cut-
ting the lead to 49-24 with 2:53
remaining in the third quarter.
The Gators looked like they
would snap out of the funk
when they picked up a first
down on the next drive. But
Tebow was sacked again, and
Troy got the ball back with all


Devil Rays, who have never
won more than 70 games in a
season.
"Everything looks like
they've been getting better,"
Crawford said. "Two more
years we get to see, see if the
positives keep coming in.
Developing players keeps hap-
pening and everything has
been fine so far. Switching
managers would have stopped
the system that had already
been in place."
One key piece of Tampa
Bay's future is left-hander
Scott Kazmir, who is 11-8 with a
3.79 ERA in 30 starts. He will
be eligible for arbitration for
the first time this coming off-


congratulate you.
"That's happened a couple
times. I've heard about it."
Opponents have said that
respectfulness actually makes
battling Jones even more
demoralizing. They say there's
a certain uneasiness about
hearing Jones' praise on the
rare occasion the 6-foot-5, 325-
pound lineman actually yields
ground - let alone permits his
man to get near the ball carrier
or quarterback
Adams, at 6-5 and 258 pounds
with receiver-like speed, is
going to start because Patrick
Chukwurah is out with a knee
injury. He has the quickness
plus moves that are'unfamiliar
to Jones to test the 33-year-old
star And Jones knows it
"You look forward to the
challenge," Jones said. "It's
going to be a great challenge
for him and a great challenge
for me."


had no such constraints.
And that's going back to 1992,,
when Holmgren replaced,
Packers starter Don Majkowski-
with a raw Favre early in the:
season. All Favre has done,
since is start 257 consecutive,
regular-season and playoff
games, a league record for.
quarterbacks.
"In Brett's case, who knew?"
Holmgren said, deflecting any-
credit for him.
Hasselbeck led the,
Seahawks to the Super Bowl:
and was elected to the Pro,
Bowl following the 2005 sea-
son, but he hasn't had an,
entirely smooth tenure in,
Seattle. Yet team executives
allowed Holmgren to stick with
Hasselbeck for years, which
the coach feels is a must to,
develop a quarterback for the.
long term.
"Understanding there are.,
going to be bumps on the road,.
you kind of commit - but then
you give yourself three years,".
Holmgren said.
"I think every coach would
like that situation."
Gruden, for one, sure would.

Henin missed her trademark
backhand on the match's first
two points, then went to work,
taking nine of the next 10
points while going up 4-0. Even
when she faltered, double-
faulting twice in a row at 3-0,
she recovered to hold, throw-
ing her 5-foot-5, 125-pound
frame into a 110 mph service
winner and a 98 mph second-
serve ace.
Now that's gutsy.
In the next game, a fan per-
haps hoping for something
more competitive - or wishing
an American were involved -
yelled out, "Let's go, Venus!"
As CBS analyst Mary Carillo
pointed out on-air to viewers,
it's been 12 years since the U.S.
Open women's final went three
sets, adding: "We've had some
real blowouts."
This was no exception.


the momentum.
Florida looked like it had
regrouped following Joey Ijjas'
first field goal of the season;
But Haugabook found Silvoy
for a 26-yard score with 7 min-
utes to go.
Tebow then took over.
The second half should pros:
vided plenty of apprehension'
for Florida as it heads into con-
ference play against the 24th-.
ranked Volunteers.
The Gators had no such wor-
ries early.
Kestahn Moore had two.
short TD runs in the first half,
and Tebow connected with.
Harvin, Cornelius Ingram and
Jarred Fayson for scores.
Brandon James, who
returned from a one-game sus-
pension, had a 59-yard kickoff .
return and a 32-yard punt
return that helped set up early .
touchdowns. Caldwell, lining
up at quarterback, had an 18-
yard TD run.
Ingram caught seven passes
for a career-high 105 yards.
Louis Murphy had six recep-'
tions for 78 yards.


season.
"I'm not really focused on.
that right now," Kazmir said;
"I'm just thinking about the
next game here, my next start
and worrying about playing
here. I want to be a Devil Ray.
I'm happy where I am right,
now, and I'm not thinking about
anything else."
Kazmir said discussions on a
potential long-term contract.
could take place after the sea-
son.
"We haven't really talked, but
they said we would have talks
in the offseason," Kazmir said.
"They haven't approached me
about anything else."


SUNDAY, SFPTFMBI---R 9, 2007 3B*:


SPORTS


Crrnus CouNTY (FL E







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONCIL.I


Stricker tries to hold off Woods


Associated Press

LEMONT, Ill. - The roar
that shook Cog Hill on
Saturday could only mean one
thing - an eagle from the fair-
way - and it was loud enough
that it could only belong to 6ne
player
Even Tiger Woods turned
around.
Steve Stricker holed out with
a wedge for eagle on the eighth
hole to keep pace with Woods,
then he surged ahead with
birdie chances on every hole in
a tidy round of 7-under 64 that
left him. tied with Aaron
Baddeley in the BMW
Championship.
Baddeley birdied his final
two holes for a 65 that allowed
him to join Stricker at 15-under
198 and play in the final group.
The third round of these
PGA Tour Playolls looks much
like the first two events - ter-
rific golf by the top players, set-
ting the stage for what could be
more great theater in the final
round.
Stricken who won the first
playoff event at The Barclays
for his first victory in 6�/2 years,
might be the hottest player in
golf and is wildly popular in
these parts, having played golf
at Illinois and grown up nearby
in Wisconsin. Another victory
would give him a commanding
lead in the chase for the FedEx
Cup, with Woods or the absent
Phil Mickelson having to win
the Tour Championship to
catch him.
Baddeley, who won in
Phoenix earlier this yeai; was a
forgotten figure on the back
nine even though he was
always in range. Then came a
30-foot birdie putt on the 17th
hole, followed by an approach
into 5 fbet at the last to get into
the final group.
Woods never looked more
subdued after a 65, but he
missed only one fairway and
two greens, and figured his put-
ter kept him from one of his
best scores of the year Not that
lie was complaining after fin-
ishing the round a stroke back.


Steve Stricker tees off on the fifth hole Saturday during the third round of the BMW Championship in


"I felt like 6 under was the
highest score I could have
shot," Woods said. "But I'm in a
good spot going into tomor-
row."
Barring an amazing charge
from behind, it appears to be a
three-man race at the BMW
Championship.
Woods will be playing with
Justin Rose, who birdied his
last two holes to salvage an oth-
erwise ho-hum round of 69,
leaving him five shots behind
the leaders.
Jonathan Byrd, who was tied
with Baddeley at the start of
the third round, shot an even-
par 71 and fell six shots behind.
"You make par out here you
get run over," Woods said.
Stricker usually had to settle
for par. He hit all 18 greens in
regulation and has not missed
a green since the 13th hole of
the second round. Despite
making five birdies and his
eagle, he missed five birdie


putts from inside 12 feet.
"I had real good opportuni-
ties," he said. "But at this point,
you can't be greedy. Nobody
makes them all. And when you
do, you have one of those '60'
rounds."
Woods felt like he was going
to have one, also missing a
number of good chances from
short range. A three-time win-
ner at Cog Hill, Woods spent
most of the back nine atop the
leaderboard, with impressive
shots on the par 5s.
He wanted to go for the par-5
11th green with a 2-iron, hitting
a draw that would bend left
with the breeze. But he felt it
shift to the right, so chose to hit
a slice with his 3-wood that dis-
appeared over the trees and
settled onto the green.
The birdie on No. 15 was
peculiar only until he reached
the green.
Woods safely found the fair-
way with a 3-wood, then Camilo


Villegas drive landed on
Woods' ball and knocked it
back Under the rules, he had
to drop it in the vicinity where
it had been, and his drop
bounced back about a foot into
the front of a divot.
Needing to carry the bunker
at 232 yards, Woods played a 3-
iron back in his stance to about
35 feet for a two-putt birdie.
Stricker was in the group
behind him, and matched him
birdie-for-birdie, picking up a
shot on the par-4 13th, from a
bunker on the 15th and with his
approach into 5 feet on the
final hole that gave him the
lead.
The applause was deafening
as Stricker walked off the
green, something he only hears
in Chicago and Milwaukee.
"Any other part of the coun-
try, they don't even know who I
am," said Stricker, who had to
scrounge up 50 tickets for Cog
Hill.


at LPGA; Lewis leads
ROGERS, Ark. -At one point,
the 18th fairway was flooded -
and large puddles were all over the
course at Pinnacle Country Club.
Rain again stopped play at the
LPGA NW Arkansas Championship
on Saturday - with several golfers
still trying to finish the first round of
the 54-hole event. Tournament offi-
cials were reviewing contingency
plans while players await word of
what lies ahead.
"We're going to have a couple
more long days ahead of us,"
Natalie Gulbis said. "This is just
part of our job and what we do,
and you just kind of take it as it is ',
and see what happens next."
NCAA champion Stacy Lewis
was atop the leaderboard, trying to
become the first amateur to win an
LPGA Tour event since JoAnne
Carner in 1969. Lewis plays col-
lege golf at nearby Arkansas, so
she can at least head home while
waiting out the weather.
Associated Press Even the scoring system was
Lemont, I1. disrupted by the rain. A handful of'
players were sent out to start their
The guy who lost his PGA second rounds just before play was
Tour card two years ago now is suspended, but their scores on
hard to miss. This has been an whatever holes they completed
amazing rebirth for Stricker, could not be included on the official
who squandered three good leaderboard. The computerized
chances to win from May scoring system would not allow
through July, then cashed it at second-round scores to be entered
Westchester.
And he's not willing to stop with the first round still in progress
until his season is over. He - and officials could not confirm
birdied the last three holes at any scores from the second round.
The Barclays by hitting clutch Long after players departed, the
shots and making big putts, course appeared slightly improved
"and it seems to carry on to during the afternoon Saturday -
each and every event" the small stream that covered the-
Baddeley is 11th in the play- fairway just below the 18th green,
off standings, and a victory was gone. But more rain is expect-
would give him a chance at the ed Sunday.
$10 million prize for the FedEx 'There are a lot of options," said
Cup. It will be his first time in There are a lot of options," said
the final pairing since the U.S. Andy Bush, the tournaments execu-
Open, where he shot 80 while tive director. "First and foremost, we
playing with Woods, but the need to wait out this weather, evalu-
Australian only wants to keep ate the golf course - figure out how
giving himself chances.- to get in, at a minimum, 36 holes.
That's one thing the top Obviously, we'd still love to play 54,
three guys on the leaderboard but as it continues to rain and the
have in common. hours mount up against us..."


Colts coach Dungy, football trainers hope DVD will reduce spinal injuries


:Associated Press

PENSACOLA - Football
players usually hoot and holler
when viewing tapes of bone-
crunching hits.
Recently, however, the West
Florida High Jaguars could
only gasp and cringe as they
watched clip after clip of tack-
les that broke necks and dam-
aged brains.
That's the . reaction
Indianapolis Colts coach Tony
Dungy and a coalition of sports
doctors and trainers hope to get
with "IHeads Up," a DVD being
distributed to high school foot-
ball teams nationwide.
Annually, between four and
12 football players from youth
leagues through the pros suffer
paralyzing injuries each year,
,I


according the National:
Athletic Trainers Association
(NATA).
Many others suffer severe
spine and brain injuries
because of improper tackling
- hits made with the crown of
the head instead of the shoul-
ders - or helmet-to-helmet
contact
"What we are concerned
about is that one hit that can
cause a quadriplegic, the per-
fect storm that happens when
the neck is (not) in the right
position," said Ron Courson,
an athletic trainer at the
University of Georgia who's
featured in the video.
"We are not trying to scare
them. Football is a violent
sport, and we want the defend-
ers to be aggressive. But when


you lower your head down, you
take away the normal curve in
your neck that allows for shock
absorption."
Chris Canales of San Marcos,
Texas, hasn't moved his body
below his chest since Nov. 2,
2001, when the all-conference
defensive back and punter
fractured his spinal cord on a
touchdown-saving tackle for
San Marcos Baptist Academy.
Following the injury,
Canales and his father, Eddie,
founded the Gridiron Heroes
Spinal Cord Injury Foun-
dation. They travel Texas pro-
viding moral support and rais-
ing money for other paralyzed
high school football players.
Of the 14 "Gridiron Heroes"
they help, "pretty much all of
them-were the same type of


injuries where the heads were
down," Eddie Canales said.
"Heads Up" will cause play-
ers to think before they lead
into tackles with their heads,
he said. "This is great, because
it is on the prevention side.
"The thing for so many of
these kids is that they need
sports. I wouldn't deter anyone
from playing football. Driving a
car is more dangerous."
Chris Canales, now 23, said
coaches, especially those in
peewee football, should see the
video, but many avoid dis-
cussing paralysis or permanent
brain injuries with their play-
ers.
"I don't think anybody likes
to talk about the injury, but it's
out there and it needs to be
prevented," he said.


World-renowned orthopedic'
sports surgeon Dr. James
Andrews and his Gulf Breeze,
Fla.-based Andrews Institute
for Orthopedics and Sports
Medicine funded the distribu-
tion of the video after NATA
sought his help.
The association produced
the video and provided it to the
NCAA last year. But Andrews
said coaches and trainers
feared the message wasn't
reaching the audience that
needed to hear it most - high
school and youth league play-
ers.
"It's part of my mission, pre-
venting injuries in youth
sports," Andrews said.
West Florida High coach
Ronnie Gilliland has 34 years'
coaching experience and can


describe devastating hits, but
he's no match for the video.
"The video really made them
realize that these things can
happen," he said.
Josh Hyde, a 16-year-old jun-
ior offensive lineman, sat in
the front row, cringing as mes-
sages flashed on the screen
after many of the hits stating
they had led to permanent
quadriplegia.
In the video, doctors use
graphics to demonstrate how
vertebra in the cervical spine
are crushed when the head
hits.
"You just have to keep your
head up, so your neck doesn't
get hurt," Hyde said. "It's some-
thing the coach always tells us
to do."


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the
,Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include
the names of anyone pictured, and include a conta.:t name
and phone number on the back.
" Weekly winners will be published in the Sunday Chonicle.
" At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best
photo during the year and that photographer will win a prize.
" Avoid photos with computerized dates on the print
" Make sure photographs are in sharp focus.
0 Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd.. Crystal River, FL 34429.



Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a


New Office

in Citrus County


I,,.


jm

















' / .


Be sure your business is part of

Citrus County's award-winning

lifestyle magazine!
Discover Citrus County continue. to draw oitention nol only from readers and
newcomers, but from advertising and lournalhsm as.,ocioalons
Awad sei receed om. .. - -.
* Florida Press Association "
* Florida Newspaper .
Marketing Executives
* Greater Ocala
Ad Federation
* Landmark Community
Newspapers, Inc.


Florida's Best


Discover
____i__r_ _>.:T B C ITRUS COUiNiT
Ij tA D - , C, -,-'T-,B E P 2A . ,C2 07


It "A


Ad L)Ladincu. 1*m, i/it. Sept. /-I


Cal 7 6500


'4BSUNDA"', Sciri-Ainvit 9, 2007


spc>RIrs


.^-,


^
J^










'CITRiUS COUNTY (FL.) CIROr'aCLIY


NIMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL______NS_92


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.574 - z-7-3 L-2
.542 41/ 6-4 W-4
.486 12% 2-8 L-6
.440 19 3-7 L-4
.430 20% 4-6 W-2

Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.511 - z-5-5 W-1
.511 - z-7-3 W-1
.500 1% 5-5 L-1
.451 8% z-4-6 L-1
.437 10% z-4-6 L-4
.437 10% 3-7 L-1


Home
44-27
38-32
37-35
31-39
31-37


Home
38-36
45-26
39-31
35-36
36-33
32-39


Away
37-33
39-33
32-38
31-40
30-44


Away
34-33
27-43
30-38
29-42
26-47
30-41


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas


East Division
GB L10
- 6-4
5% z-7-3
13 z-6-4
24 3-7
26% z-7-3

East Division
GB L10
- 7-3
6 z-5-5
7% 5-5
17% 5-5
19% z-4-6


West Division
L Pct GB L10
57 .596 - z-7-3
66 .529 9% 1-9
73 .486 15% 4-6
74 .471 17% z-8-2


West Division
L Pct GB L10
63 .556 - 5-5
64 .543 2 z-5-5
67 .528 4 z-6-4
67 .521 5 6-4
78 .451 15 z-4-6


WILD CARD GLANCE
American League
W L Pct GB
New York 80 62 .563 -
Detroit 77 65 . .542 3
Seattle 74 66 .529 5
National League
W L Pct GB
San Diego 76 64 .543 -
Los Angeles 75 67 .528 2
Philadelphia 74 67 .525 2Y2
Colorado 73 67 .521 3

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 7
Detroit 12, Seattle 6
SBaltimore 11, Boston 5
Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 4
N.Y. Yankees 11, Kansas City 5
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Seattle (F.Hernandez 11-7) at Detroit
(Bonderman 11-8), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 17-6) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 7-5), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Litsch 5-7) at Tampa Bay (Shields
11-8), 1:40 p.m.
Minnesota (J.Santana 14-11) at Chicago
White Sox (Garland 9-10), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Wang 17-6) at Kansas City
(Greinke 6-5), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (DiNardo 8-8) at Texas (Millwood
9-11), 3:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Laffey 2-1) at L.A. Angels
(Jer.Weaver 11-6), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:11 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets 3, Houston 1
L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 2
Philadelphia 9, Florida 1
Atlanta 9, Washington 2
Chicago Cubs 5, Pittsburgh 1
Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 3
San Diego at Colorado, 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Today's Games
Washington (Bergmann 3-5) at Atlanta
(Cormier 2-4), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (Oswalt 14-6) at N.Y. Mets
(Martinez 1-0), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Sheets 11-4) at Cincinnati
(Dumatrait 0-3), 1:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Trachsel 6-9) at Pittsburgh
(Morris 8-9), 1:35 p.m.
-Florida (Willis 8-14) at Philadelphia (Moyer
12-11), 1:35 p.m.
San Diego (Young 9-6) at Colorado (Fogg
8-9), 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Penny 15-4) at San
Francisco (Cain 7-14), 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Thompson 6-5) at Arizona (Davis
13-11), 4:40 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 3:20 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .354;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .348; Polanco, Detroit,.
'.343; Posada, New York, .336; VGuerrero,
Los Angeles, .326; Lowell, Boston, .324;
,Pedroia, Boston, .322.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 128;
'Granderson, Detroit, 109; MOrdonez,
Detroit, 105; Sizemore, Cleveland, 104;
BAbreu, New York, 104; DOrtiz, Boston,
101; Rios, Toronto, 100.
, RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 135;
'MOrdonez, Detroit, 123; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 110; CPena, Tampa Bay, 105;
,Morneau, Minnesota, 101; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 101; Lowell, Boston, 101.
', HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 204;
,MOrdonez, Detroit, 187; Jeter, New York,
'179; Polanco, Detroit, 175; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, 175; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 174;
.Rios, Toronto, 173.
_ DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 47;
'VGuerrero, Los Angeles, 45; DOrtiz,
,Boston, 43; THunter, Minnesota, 40;
Markakis, Baltimore, 39; BRoberts,
,Baltimore, 39; AHill, Toronto, 37; Rios,
Toronto, 37; VMartinez, Cleveland, 37;
Beltre, Seattle, 37.
', TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 22;
,Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit,
9; Iwamura, Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera,
New York, 8; Cano, New York, 7; Teahen,
,.ansas City, 7; Crisp, Boston, 7; MByrd,
Texas, 7; ISuzuki, Seattle, 7.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
49; *CPena, Tampa Bay, 37; Momeau,
Minnesota, 29; DOrtiz, Boston, 28;
,jonerko, Chicago, 28; THunter,
.-Minnesota, 28; MOrdonez, Detroit, 26;
.0ye, Chicago, 26.
S' 0 STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
'Bay, 49; BRoberts, Baltimore, 41; ISuzuki,
,Seattle, 37; CPatterson, Baltimore, 37;
,Figgins, Los Angeles, 34; Sizemore,
tleveland, 30; JLugo, Boston, 28.
. PITCHING (14 Decisions)-Veriander,
'..,'c.-,, 16-5, .762, 3.56; Wang, New York,
.1. 739, 3.68; Beckett, Boston, 17-6,
,'i'0. i.30; Bedard, Baltimore, 13-5, .722,
;6.16; Marcum, Toronto, 12-5, .706, 3.74;
;iyrd, Cleveland, 14-6, .700, 4.34;
-abathia, Cleveland, 16-7, .696, 3.24;
hEscobar, Los Angeles, 16-7, .696, 3.04.
I NATIONAL LEAGUE
r' BATTING-Utley, Philadelphia, .339;
B'Renteria, Atlanta, .337; Holliday, Colorado,
P'33; CJones, Atlanta, .330; HaRamirez,
'Florida, .329; DYoung, Washington, .325;
,Pujols, St. Louis, .318.
, RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 122;
P'laRamirez, Florida, 108; JBReyes, New
",'ork, 104; Wright, New York, 97; Uggla,
Florida, 96; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 96;
1,Holliday, Colorado, 94; Fielder, Milwaukee,
i', RBI-Howard, Philadelphia, 113;
Jlolliday, Colorado, 110; CaLee, Houston,
.105; Fielder, Milwaukee, 104; Hawpe,
Colorado, 96; MiCabrera, Florida, 96;
^Atkins, Colorado, 96; Dunn, Cincinnati, 96.
; HITS-Holliday, Colorado, 185;
'kaRamirez, Florida, 184; Rollins,
.-Philadelphia, 183; Pierre, Los Angeles,
't72; JBReyes, New York, 171; FSanchez,
'Pittsburgh, 170; Francoeur, Atlanta, 167;
i~Phillips, Cincinnati, 167.
,' DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 45;
l.,ggla, Florida, 43; Utley, Philadelphia, 43;
r'HaRamirez, Florida, 42; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 41; AdGonzalez, San Diego,
',39; Rowand, Philadelphia, 39; CaLee,
Houston, 39; CJones, Atlanta, 39.
'.TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 17;
fJBReyes, New York, 12; Johnson, Atlanta,
10; Amezaga, Florida, 9; OHudson,
Arizona, 9; Pence, Houston, 8; Harris,
'. Atlanta. 8; Byrnes, Arizona, 8.
. HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 43;
SHoward, Philadelphia, 37; Dunn,
"Cincinnati, 36; MiCabrera, Florida, 31;
'.Pujols, St. Louis, 30; Griffey Jr., Cincinnati,
3p; Berkman, Houston, 29.
.. STOLEN BASES--JBReyes, New York,
'4; Pierre, Los Angeles, 56; HaRamirez,
.Florida, 46; Byrnes, Arizona, 42; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 35; Taveras, Colorado, 32;
VV,,qr, i New York, 30; KMatsui, Colorado,
3,
, ', PITCHING (14 Decisions)-Penny, Los


'Angeles, 15-4, .789, 2.82; Harang,
.tincinnati, 14-4, .778, 3.64; Hamels,
S 'hiladelphia, 14-5, .737, 3.50; BSheets,
"'Milwaukee, 11-4, .733, 3.36; Peavy, San
'.Diego, 16-6, .727, 243; Francis, Colorado,
"1ii5-6, .714, 4.12; Billingsley, Los Angeles,
?10-4, .714, 3.22; CVargas, Milwaukee, 10-
"4; .714, 5.13.


II





Associated Press
New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez is all smiles
Saturday as he is congratulated by teammates following a two-run
homer in the fourth inning of a baseball game with the Kansas City
Royals in Kansas City, Mo. The homer was Rodriguez's 50th of the
season, and 514th for his career.


Yankees 11, Royals 4
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -Alex
Rodriguez reached 50 home runs
for the first time in five seasons, and
promptly added to his total.
A-Rod homered in consecutive
at-bats against rookie Brian
Bannister to set a single-season
record for a third baseman, helping
the New York Yankees overpower
the Kansas City Royals 11-3 on
Saturday night.
Rodriguez just missed homering
in three straight at-bats, flying out to
the center field wall in the sixth, and
was hit by a pitch from rookie Luke
Hochevar in the seventh before
coming out for a pinch runner.
Andy Pettitte (13-8) pitched into
the seventh and Johnny Damon
and Wilson Betemit also homered
for New York, which has won four in
a row and is a major league-best
37-19 since the All-Star break. The
Yankees have dominated the
Royals, going 8-1 this year and 18-3
since 2005.
*, The Yankees, who remained three-
games ahead of Detroit in the wild-
card race, are a season-best 18
games above .500 and moved within
5% games of AL East-leading Boston.


Mets 3, Astros 1
NEW YORK - Tom Glavine car-
ried a perfect game into the sixth
and allowed one run over seven-
plus innings to lead the New York
Mets past the slumping Houston
Astros 3-1 on Saturday.
David Wright matched his career
high with his 27th homer for the NL
East-leading Mets (80-61), who
have won seven of eight to improve
to a season best 19 games above
.500. Paul Lo Duca had an RBI
double and Luis Castillo scored on
a wild pitch.
Houston has lost six of its last
seven and scored just nine runs in
its last four games, all losses.
Glavine (13-6) departed to a
hearty ovation after allowing singles
to Carlos Lee and Mark Loretta with
no outs in the eighth. The left-han-
der doffed his hat to acknowledge
the crowd as he made his way to
the dugout.
Aaron Heilman came in and
allowed Ty Wigginton's RBI single
before striking out three straight to
get out of the inning. Billy Wagner,
who had allowed at least one run in
each of his previous five outings,
pitched the ninth for his 31st save in
35 opportunities.
HOUSTON NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Pence cf 4 000 JBRyes ss 4 0 0 0
Burke rf 4000 LCstillo2b 3 1 00
Brkmn lb 4 00 0 Wright 3b 3 1 1 1
CaLee If 3 11 0 Beltran cf 4 0 0 0
Loretta 2b 3 01 0 Alou If 4 0 1 0
Wggntn 3b 3 01 1 BWgnr p 0 0 0 0
Rnsm ss 201 0 ShGren lb 4 1 1 0
Scott rf 1 00 0 LDucac 3 0 1 1
Munsn c 3 00 0 Mlldge rf 2 0 1 0
WWIms p 2 00 0 TGIvin p 2 0 0 0
Quails p 0 00 0 Heilmn p 0 0 0 0
Lamb ph 1 00 0 Chavez If 0 0 0 0
Lidge p 0 00 0
Totals 301 4 1 Totals 29 3 5 2
Houston 000 000 010- 1
New York 001 110 00x- 3
E-Berkman (11). DP-New York 1.
LOB-Houston 2, New York 6. 2B-
ShGreen (29), Lo Duca (14). HR-Wright
(27). SB-LCastillo (6). S-TGlavine.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
WWilliams L,8-146 5 3 3 3 3
Quails 1 0 0 0 0 1
Lidge 1 0 0 0 0 1
New York
TGlavineW,13-6 7 3 1 1 0 4
Heilman 1 1 0 0 0 3
BWagnerS,31 1 0 0 0 0 1
TGlavine pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP-WWilliams.
Umpires-Home, Mike Everitt; First, Dana
DeMuth; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third,
Doug Eddings.
T-2:18. A-53,061 (57,343).


NEW YORK KANSAS CITY
ab rhbi ab


Damon dh
Jeter ss
Gnzalez ss
BAbreu rf
Mntkw lb
ARod 3b
Duncan rf
Matsui If
Posada c
JMolna c
Cano 2b
Btemit lb
MeCbr cf


6 23 2 EGrmn 3b
3 00 0 Brazell ph
3 10 1 Grdzin 2b
4 12 2 JSmith 2b
1 01 0 Butler lb
3 22 3 MiSwy dh
0 00 0 Teahen rf
4 10 0 Costa rf
3 10 0 Brown If
1 00 0 TPena ss
4 02 0 LaRuec
4 22 3 Gthrght cf
4120


r h bi
020
1 0 0
000
000
220

000
0 02
022
0 1 0
000
1 0 0


Totals 40111411 Totals 36 510 5
New York 002 207 000- 11
Kansas City 000 200 012- 5
E-TPena (22). DP-New York 1. LOB-
New York 9, Kansas City 10. 2B-Damon
(21), BAbreu 2 (31), Cano (36), MeCabrera
(22), EGerman (13), Butler 2 (21), Brown
(12). HR-Damon (10), ARodriguez 2 (51),
Betemit (4). SB-EGerman (10). CS-
ARodriguez (3). S-Cano.


IP
New York
PettitteW,13-8 61
Britton 12
Bruney
Ramirez
Kansas City
Bannister L,12-8 5
Braun 1
Hochevar 3


H RERBBSO


1-3 7 2 2
2-3 2 1 1
1-3 0 2 2
2-3 1 0 0


7 7 7 3 1
4, 4 4 0 .0
3 0 0 1 1


Bannister pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
, HBP-by Hochevar (ARodriguez), by
Bannister (Matsui).
Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First,
Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Tim McClelland;
Third, Marty Foster.
T-3:14. A-35,518 (40,785).


Dodgers 6, Giants 2
SAN FRANCISCO - David Wells
took a perfect game into the sixth
inning and Luis Gonzalez hit a three-
run homer in the first, leading the Los
Angeles Dodgers past the San
Francisco Giants 6-2 on Saturday.
The Dodgers started the day 2%
games back of the Padres in the NL
West and wild-card races after
missing a chance to gain ground
Friday. San Diego had a night game
at Colorado on Saturday.
Kevin Frandsen's one-out single
to left in the sixth broke up Boomer's
bid. The burly left-hander became
the 14th pitcher in major league his-
tory to throw a perfect game in the
regular season on May 17, 1998, a
4-0 victory over Minnesota while
with the New York Yankees.
After Frandsen's base hit, the 44-
year-old Wells took a deep breath
and wiped his brow. Scott McClain
then reached on a fielder's choice in
his Giants debut and scored on an
error when third baseman Shea
Hillenbrand's wild throw hit McClain
as he rounded second on Rajai
Davis' single. Rookie Nate
Schierholtz followed with his second
triple in as many days, scoring
Davis to make it 3-2.
LOS ANGELES SAN FRAN


Furcal ss
Pierre cf
Kemp rf
JKent 2b
Brxtn p
Saito p
LGnzlz If
Valdez pr
Ethier If
Martin c
Loney lb
Hlnbrn 3b
TAbru 3b
DWells p
RMrtnz 3b
Totals


ab rhbi
4 00 1 RDavis cf
5 11 0 Schrhlt rf
2 10 0 Winn If
3 01 0 Feliz3b
0 00 0 Aurilia ss
0 00 0 Ortmr lb
3 11 3 Rdrgez c
0 10 0 Frndsn 2b
0 00 0 Zito p
4 00 0 McClain ph
4 11 0 Giese p
3 01 0 Bonds ph
1 11 1 Kline p
3 00 0 Munter p
1 01 1


336 7 6


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0
4 01 1
4000
3 01 0
4000
3000
3000
3 01 0
1 000
1 1 00
0000
1 000
0 000
0 000


Totals 31 2 4 1


Los Angeles 300 000 003- 6
San Francisco 000 002 000- 2
E-Hillenbrand (4). LOB-Los Angeles 5,
San Francisco 3. 2B-Feliz (25). 3B-
Schierholtz (3). HR-LGonzalez (13). S-
Furcal.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
DWells W,7-8 7 4 2 2 0 4
Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 1
Saito 1 0 0 0 1 0
San Francisco
ZitoL,9-12 6 4 3 3 3 5
Giese 2 0 0 0 0 1
Kline 0 0 1 1 1 0
Munter 1 3 2 2 0 1
Kline pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Umpires-Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Tim Tschida; Third, Jim
Joyce.
T-2:31. A-42,228 (41,777).


White Sox 8, Twins 7
CHICAGO - Jim Thome hit his
497th career home run and added
the go-ahead RBI single in the sev-
enth inning as the Chicago White
Sox beat the Minnesota Twins 8-7
on Saturday.
A.J. Pierzynski hit a pinch-hit two-
run homer in the seventh to tie the
game and Paul Konerko also home-
red for the White Sox, who won for
just the seventh time in 26 games.
Torii Hunter homered and Jason
Tyner drove in three runs as the
Twins lost their season-high sixth
straight game.
After blowing a six-run lead in the
ninth on Friday night, the Twins
couldn't hold on to a two-run lead in
the seventh.
. Juan Uribe doubled off Twins
reliever Kevin Slowey, then with two-
outs, Pierzynski hit a pinch-hit
homer off Carmen Cali (0-1) on the
first pitch. After Jerry Owens walked,
Scott Podsednik singled and Thome
followed with an RBI-single to put
the White Sox ahead 8-7.
MINNESOTA CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Tyner If
LRdrgz 2b
THnter cf,
Mrneau 1lb
Cddyer rf
Kubel dh
RoWhte ph
Bscher 3b
Bartlett ph
Mrales c
Heintz c
Punto ss


5 02 3 Owens cf
5 01 0 Pdsdnk If
5 12 1 Thome dh
4 10 0 Knerko lb
5 12 0 Dye rf
3 11 1 Cintron 3b
1 00 0 Uribess
4 22 2 Richar2b
1 00 0 THallc
3 13 0 Przyns c
1 00 0
4 01 0


Totals 417147 Totals 40 816 8
Minnesota 014 011 000- 7
Chicago 200 300 30x- 8
E-Buscher (4), Cintron (8). LOB-
Minnesota 9, Chicago 14. 2B-THunter
(40), Cuddyer (25), Kubel (25), Morales (1),
Uribe 2 (14), Richar 2 (5). HR-THunter
(28), Buscher (2), Thome (25), Konerko
(28), Pierzynski (14). SF-Kubel.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Garza 4 9 5 3 3 5
Slowey 22-3 3 1 1 0 2
CaliL,0-1 0 3 2 2 1 0
Neshek 1 1 0 0 1 1
Guerrier 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Contreras 5 13 7 4 1 2
MMyers W,4-0 2 1 0 0 0 1
MacDougal 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
ThorntonS,2 11-3 0 0 0 0 3
Cali pitched to 4 batters in the 7th,
Contreras pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Neshek (Cintron). PB-THall.
Umpires-Home, C.B. Bucknor; First, Joe
West; Second, Ed Rapuano; Third, Ed
Hickox.
T-3:25. A-31,747 (40,615).


Phillies 9, Marlins 1
PHILADELPHIA- Greg Dobbs
and Chris Coste gave Philadelphia
all the offense it needed, and the
Phillies' bullpen shut down the
Florida Marlins in a 9-1 victory on
Saturday.
Dobbs tied the game with a two-
out triple in the fourth and Coste
lined the next offering from Florida
starter Rick VandenHurk into the
left-field seats as the Phillies
snapped a two-game losing streak.
Clay Condrey (5-0) pitched 2 1-3
innings of relief to eam the victory for
the Phillies, who pulled within 2%
games of the San Diego Padres in
the wild-card race. San Diego played
at Colorado on Saturday night.
Condrey, who has spent the sea-
son shuttling back-and-forth to
Triple-A Ottawa, now has as many
wins as stints with the big league
club this season.
VandenHurk (4-6) took the loss
for Florida, which fell to 5-18 in its
last 23 games.


FLORIDA

HaRmz ss
Uggla 2b
Hrmida rf
MiCbr 3b
Wlnhm If
Jacobs lb
CRoss cf
Olivo c
VndHrk p
De aza ph
Seddon p
Garcia p
Linden ph
Knsng p
Wolf p
Carroll ph


PHILA
ab rhbi
4 11 1 Rollins ss
4 00 0 Vctmo rf
4 02 0 Utley2b
4 01 0 Howard lb
4 01 0 Burrell If
4 00 0 Gordon p
4 01 0 Geary p
3 02 0 Rwand cf
1 00 0 Dobbs 3b
1 01 0 Nunez 3b
0 00 0 Coste c
0 00 0 Ennis p
1 00 0 Cndry p
0 00 0 Rmero p
0 00 0 Werth If
1 00 0


r h bi
1 2 2
1 1 0


000
1 0 0
000
120
1 2 0
222
1 1 1
1 1 2
0 1 0
000
000
1 1 1 ,


Totals 351 9 1 Totals 35 912 9
Florida 100 000 000- 1
Philadelphia 000 301 14x- 9
E-VandenHurk (1). DP-Florida 2,
Philadelphia 1. LOB-Florida 8,
Philadelphia 6. 2B-Hermida (27), Nunez
(10). 3B-Dobbs (4). HR-HaRamirez (25),
Rollins (26), Dobbs (9), Coste (5). SB-
Olivo (3), Victorino (35), Utley (9).
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
VndHrkL,4-6 4 5 3 3 3 4
Seddon 1 0 0 0 0 1
Garcia 1 1 1 1 0 2
Kensing 1 2 1 1 0 2
Wolf 1 4 4 4 0 0
Philadelphia
Ennis 4 6 1 1 0 5
Condrey W,5-0 21-3 1 0 0 0 1
Romero 2-3 00 0 0 0
Gordon 1 2 0 0 0 2
Geary 1 0 0 0 1 0
Ennis pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Seddon (Utley). WP-Wolf.
Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First,
Larry Vanover; Second, Chad Fairchild;
Third, Tony Randazzo.
T-2:50. A-38,559 (43,647).


Devil Rays 5, Blue Jays 4
ST. PETERSBURG - B.J.
Upton's pinch-hit two-run homer
capped Tampa Bay's four-run rally
in the ninth inning and lifted the
Devil Rays to a 5-4 victory over the
Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday
night.
Carl Crawford opened the Devil
Rays' ninth by reaching on an error
when shortstop John McDonald
misplayed his grounder. One out
later, Delmon Young hit a two-run
homer off closer Jeremy Accardo
(4-4), who blew his fifth save in 32
opportunities, to pull the Devil Rays
to 4-3.
Jonny Gomes drew a two-out
walk before Upton, who was out of
the starting lineup with a sore left
ankle, hit the first pitch for the
game-winning opposite-field homer
to right.
Al Reyes (2-2) struck out two dur-
ing a perfect ninth for the win.
A.J. Burnett allowed one run and
three hits in eight innings and Alex
Rios hit a two-run homer as the
Blue Jays appeared headed for
their ninth win in 13 games. Burnett
also struck out eight and walked
one.


TORONTO


TAMPA BAY


ab rhbi ab r hbi
VWells cf 501 1 Iwmra 3b 4 0 0 0
Stairs If 3 12 1 Crwfrd If 4 1 1 0
Jhnsonlf 0 00 0 CPena lb 2 0 0 0
Rios rf 3 11 2 DYong cf 4 1 22
Thmas dh 4 01 0 BHarrs 2b 4 00 0
Glaus 3b 2 01 0 Gomes rf 3 1 0 0
Ovrbayl b 4 000 Norton dh 3 00 0
AHill2b 3 11 0 Upton ph 1 1 1 2
Zaun c 4 11 0 Nvarro c 3 1 1 1
JMcDId ss 3 00 0 JoWlsn ss 3 0 00
Totals 314 84 Totals 31 5 5 5
Toronto 000 002 200- 4
Tampa Bay 010 000 004- 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Zaun (7), JMcDonald (7). DP-
Toronto 1, Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Toronto 6,
Tampa Bay 3. 2B-Thomas (26). HR-Rios
(23), DYoung (12), Upton (23), Navarro (8).
SB-Crawford (49). S-JMcDonald. SF-
Stairs.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Burnett 8 3 1 1 1 8
Accardo L,4-4 2-3 24 1 1 0
Tampa Bay
Hammel 6 5 2 2 2 1
Balfour 1 3 2 2 1 0
Glover 1 0 0 0 1 1
ReyesW,2-2 1 ' 0 0 0' 2
HBP-by Burnett (CPena).
Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Paul
Emmel; Second, Dan lassogna; Third,
Angel Campos.
T-2:44. A-19,822 (43,772).


Braves 9, Nationals 2
ATLANTA - Jeff Francoeur
drove in four runs, including a
three-run homer against the bum-
bling Washington Nationals, who
made three errors leading to six
unearned runs in a 9-2 loss to the
Atlanta Braves on Saturday night.
Atlanta, keeping its slim playoff
hopes alive, won its third in a row,
the longest streak since winning
three straight Aug. 4-7. The
Braves are third in the NL East,
7% games behind the New York
Mets, and 4% games back of San
Diego in the wild-card race prior
to the Padres' game at Colorado.
Washington made five errors,
including three by third baseman
Ryan Zimmerman in Friday
night's 7-1 loss to Atlanta. Only
one run was earned. After winning
five in a row at home, the
Nationals lost their second
straight to the Braves and extend-
ed their road losing streak to
eight.
WASHINGTON ATLANTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Logan cf 5020 YEscbr 2b 4 321
FLopez ss 4 01 0 Rnteria ss 4 1 2 0
Zmrmn 3b 2 000 Jhnson 2b 1 000
DYong Ib 4 00 0 CJones 3b 4 2 0 0
Kearns rf 4 11 0 Wdwrd 3b 0 00 0
WPena If 4 01 0 Txeira lb 4 22 2
Blliard 2b 4 11 2 Frncur rf 2 1 1 4
Flores c 4 01 0 AJones cf 3 00 1
Chico p 1 000 McCnn c 3 0 1 1
Mxwellph 1 000 Diaz If 4 000
Albldjo p 0 00 0 James p 3 000
Batista ph 1 01 0 Moylan p 0 00 0
Rivera p 0 00 0 Acosta p 0 0 0 0
Munoz p 0 00 0 Thrmn ph 1 0 0 0
Abreu p 0 000 Yates p 0 0 0 0
Lngrhn ph 1 01 0
Totals 352 9 2 Totals 33 9 8 9
Washington 000 000 200- 2
Atlanta 200 040 21x- 9
E-Logan (2), FLopez (18), Zimmerman
(23). DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Washington 8,
Atlanta 6. 2B-Flores (8). 3B-Langerhans
(2). HR-Belliard (9), YEscobar (4),
Francoeur (17). SF-AJones.
IP H RERBBSO


Washington
Chico L,5-8
Albaladejo
Rivera
Munoz
Abreu
Atlanta
James W,10-10
Moylan
Acosta
Yates
Balk-James.


5 6 6 0
1 0 0 0
2-3 1 2 2
1-3 0 0 0
1 1 1 1

61-3 8 2 2
2-3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 1 0 0


Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, Jim
Reynolds; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third,
Lance Barksdale.
T-2:45. A-36,940 (49,583).


Orioles 11, Red Sox 5
BALTIMORE - Rookie Scott
Moore hit a grand slam to cap a
seven-run third inning against
Daisuke Matsuzaka, and the
Baltimore Orioles ended a record
11-game home losing streak by
beating the Boston Red Sox 11-5
Saturday night.
Tike Redman and Nick Markakis
also homered for the Orioles, who
won for only the third time in 18
games. The 11 consecutive home
losses were the most for Baltimore
since the franchise moved from St.
Louis in 1954.
David Ortiz homered and hit two
doubles for the Red Sox. The AL East-
leaders led 4-1 before the Orioles ral-
lied against Matsuzaka (14-12).
Gustavo Molina led off with a sin-
gle and took third on a double by
Brian Roberts before a walk to
Redman loaded the bases.
Matsuzaka walked Markakis to force
in a run, Miguel Tejada hit an RBI
single and Kevin Millar walked to
push across another run.


BOSTON


BALTIMORE
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Ellsbry If 501 1 BRbrts 2b 5 2 3 0
Pedroia 2b 5 110 Fahey 2b 0 00 0
DOrtiz dh 3 132 Redmn cf 4 3 1 1
Cora dh 0 00 0 Mrkkis rf 3 2 1 3
Lowell 3b 2 000 Bynum If 1 0 0 0
Clayton 3b 1 00 0 Tejada ss 4 1 2 1
Yukilis lb 3000 LHrndz ss 1 0 00
Hinske lb 1 01 0 Millar lb 2 1 0 1
JDrew rf 3 110 Huff dh 4 0 I 0
Kielty rf 1 00 0 Payton If 4 0 00
Varitek c 3 00 0 Moore 3b 4 1 2 4
Moss If 1 11 0 Molina c 4 1 1 0
Crisp cf 3 00 0
Cash c 1 00 0
JLugo ss 4 12 2
Totals 36510 5 Totals 3611 11 10
Boston 220 000 001- 5
Baltimore 107 300 00x- 11
E-JLugo (18), Hoey (1). DP-Baltimore
1. LOB-Boston 6, Baltimore 5. 2B-
Ellsbury (4), DOrtiz 2 (43), JDrew (26),
JLugo 2 (34), BRoberts (39), Huff (28).
HR-DOrtiz (28), Redman (1), Maikakis
(17), Moore (1).


Boston
Mtszka L,14-12
Tavarez
Hansack
Timlin
Baltimore
Leicester W, 1-1
Cherry
Hoey
DBaez


IP H RERBBSO


22-3 6
11-3 3
3 2
1 0


5 7 4 4
2 0 0 0
11-3 3 1 1
'23 0 0 ' 0


PB-Varitek.
Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Laz
Diaz; Second, Wally Bell; Third, Mike
DiMuro.
T-3:03. A-48,043 (48,290).


Cubs 5, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH - Carlos
Zambrano pitched himself out of an
extended slump with one of his best
starts of the season, limiting the
Pirates to two hits and a run over six-
plus innings as the Chicago Cubs
got a much-needed win by beating
Pittsburgh 5-1 Saturday night.
The Cubs had lost four of five,
including a 6-1 defeat Friday night
to last-place Pittsburgh, and were in
danger of falling out of the NL
Central lead for the first time since
Aug. 16 before Zambrano and four
relievers combined on a two-hitter.
Zambrano (15-12) had been 0-3
since signing a $91.5 million contract
extension last month and was 0-5
with an 8.29 ERA over six starts since
last winning July 29, a slump that was
dearly frustrating him. He ripped
Cubs fans for their lack of support
after he gave up eight runs in 4 1-3
innings Monday against Los Angeles,
though apologized a day later.
After Nate McLouth singled into
left field with one out in the first,
Zambrano didn't allow another hit
until Adam LaRoche singled to start
the seventh.
CHICAGO PITTSBURGH
ab rhbi ab r hbi
ASrano If 4 11 2 Morgan cf 5 000
Theriot ss 4 11 0 McLth rf 2 0 1 0
DeLee lb 401 1 FSnchz2b 4 000
ARmrz3b 4 01 0 Bay If 0 000
CFloyd rf 4 00 0 Doumit rf 3 0 00(
Pie cf 0 000 LaRche ib 3 1 10,
DeRosa 2b 3 110 JBtsta 3b 1 000
Kendall c 4 11 0 Palinoc 3 0 0:0
JJones cf 311 2 JWison ss 3 00 1,
CZmro p 2 01 0 Snell p 2 00 0,
Mrml p 000 0 Phelps ph 1 00 0,
Howry p 0 000 Osoria p 0 00 0'
Soto ph 1 00 0 Grabow p 0 00 0.
Dmpstr p 0 00 0 Kata ph 1 00 0
Totals 335 8 5 Totals 28 1 2 V
Chicago 100 020 101- 5
Pittsburgh 000 000 100- 1
E-Morgan (1), LaRoche (5). LOB--
Chicago 4, Pittsburgh 9. 2B-Kendall (8)
3B-Theriot (2), JJones (2). HR-ASoiianu
(23). CS-Kendall (3). S-CZambrano.
SF-JWilson.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
CZmro W,15-12 6 2 1 1 5 8 -
Marmol 12-3 0 0 0 2 2
Howry 1-3 00 0 0 0
Dempster 1 0 0 0 0 2
Pittsburgh
Snell L,9-12 7 7 4 3 1 3
Osoria 12-3 0 1 1 0 0
Grabow 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
CZambrano pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Osoria (DeRosa), by Marmnl
(McLouth). Balk-Marmol.
Ulipires-Home, Sam Holbrook; First,
Randy Marsh; Second, Bob Davidson;
Third, Hunter Wendelstedt.
T-2:31. A-33,373 (38,496).


Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
Florida


Intr
12-6
10-8
10-8
6-12
7-11


Home
44-25
47-27
42-27
31-39
34-40


Home
37-30
40-30
38-35
36-35
30-41


W
Cleveland 81
Detroit 77
Minnesota 69
Kansas City 62
Chicago 61


Away
42-32
33-35
30-42
30-41
25-43


Away
43-31
34-37
35-34
27-44
31-40


Arizona
San Diego
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Francisco


Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Home Away
49-23 35-34
41-27 33-39
36-35 33-38
40-32 26-42


Home
44-29
40-31
37-32
42-27
34-36


Away
35-34
36-33
38-35
31-40
30-42


SUNDAY, 9, 2007







OB SUNDAY, Surnamm 9, 2007 fttTEL PREVIEWS C
S UTTI COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE,




Former Redskins return as Dolphin#


Associated Press

LANDOVER, Md. - Flash
back to those nostalgic 1990s,
when fresh-faced Cam
Cameron and Trent Green
were with the Washington
Redskins.
Cameron was learning the
ropes in his first job as an NFL
assistant, while Green was con-
templating retirement because
he couldn't get on the field.
A decade or so later,
Cameron is back in Washington
with the Miami Dolphins, mak-
ing his NFL head coaching
debut in Sunday's game against
the Redskins. His quarter-
back? None other than Green,
who has been to two Pro Bowls
since those days when he was
third fiddle to Gus Frerotte and
Heath Shuler or Jeff Hostetler.
"In 1998, I told my wife
before I left for camp that if I
didn't play that year, I really
felt my career was over," Green
said. "I was 28 at the time. To
think that they were going to
bring back a 29-year-old third-
string quarterback with no
experience when they could go
out and get a 22-, 23-year old,
pay him quite a bit less money
and have the same experience
level, I felt in '98 I would have
to get a chance to play."
Green had taken only one
snap over four NFL seasons -
an incomplete pass in the last
game of 1997 - but an incredi-
ble string of circumstances got


Associated Press
Miami Dolphins quarterback Trent Green (10) scrambles'as he looks for a receiver during their Aug.
25 preseason football game in Miami against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Dolphins will soon
learn whether their quarterback is the old Trent Green or merely an old Trent Green.


him where he is today. Frerotte
and Hostetler were injured,
and Green took over and threw
23 touchdown passes in 1998.
He would have been the long-
term solution at quarterback if
the Redskins had not been in
an ownership flux following
the death of Jack Kent Cooke.
Instead, he left as a free
agent. Then came a major knee


injury with the St. Louis Rams
- leading to Kurt Warner's
ascent to stardom - six pro-
ductive seasons in Kansas City
that ended last year after a
scary concussion, and now a
chance for a final comeback
with the Dolphins under
Cameron.
Cameron's own NFL journey
has also been heavily colored


by his experiences in
Washington.
While an assistant at
Michigan in the 1980s,
Cameron would attend coach
Joe Gibbs' Redskins training
camps in Carlisle, Pa. Much of
his offensive philosophy comes
from coach Norv Turner, who
employed Cameron as a quar-
terbacks coach in Washington


from 1994-96.
"In this business, time flies,"
said Cameron, who went on to
coach Indiana for five seasons
before returning to the NFL as
an offensive coordinator with
San Diego. "It was a fun three
years. Looking back, had I not
had that experience it would be
tough for me to be sitting where
I'm sitting today."
The combination of new
coach and new quarterback
usually doesn't bode well for a
team on opening weekend, but
the Dolphins have to heartened
by the Redskins' recent history.
Last year, Washington was
upset at home in Vikings coach
Brad Childress' debut, with
late-30s quarterback Brad
Johnson calling the signals. The
year before, the Redskins were
nearly stunned by a team with a
rookie quarterback, Chicago's
Kyle Orton, before winning 9-7
in a Week 1 home game.
The 19-16 loss to the Vikings,
which started a 5-11 season,
still has a fresh sting.
"The success we had that
year before kind of got us com-
placent," defensive end Phillip
Daniels said. '"And we thought
we could just roll our helmets
on the field and beat anybody
We started slow. We started too
slow."
Points could be at a premium
again Sunday. The Dolphins
are strong defensively, led by
reigning AP Defensive Player
of the Year Jason Taylor, and


the Redskins were slow to
piece together the offense
because of preseason injuries
to Jason Campbell, Clinton.,
Portis and Chris Samuels, and '
a late trade for offensive line-'
man Pete Kendall. ,
Meanwhile, Washington' s
defense has made significant.,
upgrades after being ranked
31st a year ago, while the::
Miami offense is adjusting o1,i
the fly with six new starters-
from opening day last year.
Green got a late start with his'
new team, arriving in June in',
the trade with Kansas City. ,
"If it's 3-2, I'll be cheering,",,
Gibbs said.
Only, of course, if the,
Redskins are the team with 3.
As usual, Gibbs is a bundle o6f
nerves this week, even when'
compared to the rookie coach
who will man the other side-,,
line. Cameron and Greenh
aren't exactly spending their ,
week making look-how-far-'
we've-come talk about their1,
days in Washington. There s,
plenty of pressure on both-.'
sides to go around.
"We had a couple of quick,,
conversations," Cameron said.,
"Trent's story is a unique story, .
for all the right reasons. But he'.
and I both know that therein
aren't any Miami Dolphin fans a
sitting around and reminiscing,i
and really giving two cents,y
about when Trent and I havey,1
talked in the past This is a now
business." -. ,


71HOO YOHHg, JOHOS-DreW Thomas still searching for playoff success

f
believe '07 will be better Miami LB !"i&,'"st reached the playoffs 2006 NaFL Defensive Player o
"
t sujI want to et back - "He had a reat reat ear


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Tennessee's Vince Young and
Jacksonville's Maurice Jones-
Drew were two of the most
impressive rookies in the
league last season.
Young went 8-5 as a starter
and led the Titans to six consec-
utive wins before a season-end-
ing loss to New England ended
their playoff hopes.
Jones-Drew , totaled 2,250
yards of offense, the third most.
a rookie in-NEL history, and
scored 16 touchdowns while
playing behind Fred Taylor
Both of them believe they can
do better. They begin their sec-
ond seasons on opposite side-
lines Sunday, when the Jaguars
host the Titans.
"It is what you make it,"
Jones-Drew said. "If you go out
there and play like you did
before and don't think you know
the game and you still try to be
coachable and learn, then that's
when you keep making plays. I
haven't done enough to be all
high on myself because I didn't
do anything."
Yeah, right
Jones-Drew ran for 941 yards,
averaging 5.7 yards per carry
and finishing 59 yards shy of
making the Jaguars the fifth
team in NFL history with two
1,000 rushers. He added 436
yards receiving and 860 yards
on kickoff returns.
Not bad for a 5-foot-7, 208-
pound back from UCLA who
was the 60th overall pick in the
draft Then again, Jones-Drew
expected success even though
Reggie Bush, Laurence
Maroney, DeAngelo Williams,
Joseph Addai and LenDale
White were selected ahead of
him.
"I don't see any surprises in
this league," Jones-Drew said..
"I don't underestimate anyone.
If you're fighting a guy 5-2, 100
pounds, you're going to fight
him the same way you fight a
guy who's 6-6, 300 pounds
because you don't want to lose.
That's how I see it That's how I
view life."
Jones-Drew spent the better


Associated Press
Tennessee Titans' Vince Young (10) passes under pressure from the
New England Patriots defense in the first quarter of an NFL presea-
son football game in this Aug. 17 file photo in Foxborough, Mass.


part of last season trying to
prove everyone wrong. All 32
teams passed on him at least
once in the draft - the reason
he wears No. 32 - and several
overlooked him twice, includ-
ing the Titans.
"Every game is a rivalry game
for me because they didn't pick
me," he said. "I'm going to go
out there angry and play."
Jones-Drew may have been
most upset when the Offensive
Rookie of the Year award was
announced last season. He
thought he had outperformed
the other top contenders:
Young, Bush, New Orleans
receiver Marques Colston and
San Diego left tackle Marcus
McNeill.
But Young won by a wide
margin. Colston and Jones-
Drew tied for second.
"I can't be mad at Vince
because I didn't get to vote for it,
and he didn't either," Jones-
Drew said. "You guys voted for
it, so I should be mad at you
guys. It was terrible."
Nonetheless, Jones-Drew
found plenty of fame in the off-
season.
He got a weekly radio show,
started blogging on the team
Web site, launched his own site
and filmed several national
commercials, including one for
the NFL Network and another
with his mother for Campbell's


Soup.
Coincidentally, Young turned
down a chance to be in the
Campbell's commercial.
"I had a commitment to my
teammates," Young said. "I felt
like if my teammates are out
here sweating and going
through practice and the quar-
terback's not there, that is a bad
example that I don't want to put
out. I really felt like I needed to
be there with my team."
It was a clear indication
Young was ready to take the
next step as a leader.
The first one came on the
field last season, when he
sparked the winning streak by
making plays with his arm and
legs. Five of the victories came
after the Titans either were tied
or trailing in the fourth quarter
Young's heroics landed him
on the cover of the Madden
2007 video game and gave the
Titans high expectations for
this season.
But, Young feels he still has
room for improvement He com-
pleted 51.5 percent of his passes
- 70th out of all NFL players
who threw a pass in 2006 - and
had more interceptions (13)
than TD passes (12).
Now, he wants to be more
patient in the pocket, not make
as many mistakes and learn to
find his second and third
receivers.


Private
Member
Owned
No T-times


7 Rivers Country Club

Membership Special
Experience fine Country Club dining and friendly atmosphere all on a 18 hole golf course
7 Rivers Golf & Country Club is welcoming New Golfing Members
with this limited offer you just can't pass up!
Join Now with a payment of annual dues and we'll waive the initiation fee! "'.
Call NOWfor details . 795 6665 ,
Social Membership are also available 1 .w696


begins 12th year
Associated Press

DAVIE - Middle line-
backer Zach Thomas has
proved he can pla. beyond
what his 5-foot. 11-inch frame
would suggest.
He has seven Pro Bowl
appearances, but as he enters
his 12th year with the Miami
Dolphins, the most of any
active player: Thomas is still
searching for playoff success.
He has yet to play in an AFC
championship game. ihuch
less the Super Bowl, and his


get back to winning," Thomas
said.
He hopes the turnaround
will start Sunday when Miami
opens the season at
Washington.
The Dolphins finished 6-10
in 2006, only their third losing
season since 1969. Thomas
takes defeat hard, teammate
Chauung Crowder said.
Thomas started every game
last season and led the team in
tackles for the 10th time. His
play was a bright spot during a
disappointing season, but he
was still overshadowed by
teammate Jason Taylor. the


ALv, I U d Lt m, glJ y1CL J
last year," said Taylor, who is
Thomas' brother-in-law "Zach
is still young enough to do
what le needs to do at a very
high level, and never gets the
respect he should. Zach blows
away half the guys I hear
talked about all the time. One
day people will realize how
good a player he really was."
Thomas, who turned 34 on
Sept. 1, jokes about his hair-
line, but refuses to think about
retiring.
"They always say that I'm
rmuninag on fumes. but I feel
like I've got years to play,"
Thomas said.


Who will be the next

Citrus County


Enter your pet in the Citrus
County Chronicle's Pet Idol
Contest and support student .mnd
teachers through the .f
Newspaper in Education
(NIE) program. I


-"-- - .-.....Cl.. .


A AM
"KA: iL


To enter, simply fill out the form below and return it with your
favorite pet photo and a $10 Entry Donation.
Deadline for entries is 5:00 PM, Sept. 26,2007.
Voting begins Oct. 1 through Oct. 7,2007.
Votes are 25� each or 5 for a $1.00. Vote as many times as you like!
Pictures will not be returned


I Owner's Name


Pl-el---e Pri-
Pt, cPr,,,


I Pet Name

I Address

I Phone
- - - - - - - - - - U


Please mail to:
Citrus County Chronicle
Attn: NIE
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

IIi )NI,,E I


- - - 1-


I


-I-- �--- --l-


f,

r









NFL PREVIEWS


Falcons eager to get season going


Associated Press 'mU U* - I " "


MINNEAPOLIS - Finally,
the Atlanta Falcons get to have
some fun.
Their you-can't-make-this-up
offseason, marred by the big
trouble Michael Vick found
himself in for his role in a dog-
fighting ring, is over. The
Falcons are eager for the regu-
lar season to begin.
"I don't think we're distract-
ed' at all," new coach Bobby
Petrino said. "I think we're
focused and we're really look-
ing forward to the upcoming
game.",
They play at Minnesota,
where the Vikings - a fran-
chise familiar with off-field
tumult - enjoyed a quiet win-
ter, spring and summer without
major controversy or court
appearances. In .fact, buzz
about the team has dipped to
the point that Sunday's game
was in danger of not selling out
and being blacked out on local
television for the first time in
10 years.
Atlanta went 7-9 in 2006
while showing several weak-
nesses and fighting injuries.
Coach Jim Mora was fired and
replaced by Petrino, who was
all' set to shape Vick into a
stronger passer with his col-
lege-style spread offense.
Then, that plan was foiled by
the feds.
Minnesota went 6-10 in the
first season under coach Brad
Childress and did little beyond
drafting running back Adrian
Peterson to inspire external
predictions of great improve-
ment. An offense that set team
records for fewest first downs


Associated Press
Atlanta Falcons running back Jerious Norwood (32) looks for running room as Baltimore Ravens defend-
ers Dwan Edwards (93) and Dennis Haley (58) close in during the first quarter on Aug. 31 in Atlanta.


and touchdowns passing is one
reason for the declining local
interest.
But because of the unending
attention Vick's guilty plea and
indefinite NFL suspension
brought to the Falcons, this
game turned into more than a
meeting of two teams expected
by most observers to be
mediocre.
The absence of Vick and the
psychological effect, whether
negative or positive, on the
Falcons makes an intriguing


story line - though it's one that
means more on the outside
than to the players who actual-
ly participate in these contests.
"It really hasn't crossed my
mind. I doubt it's really crossed
anybody else's mind," Vikings
cornerback Cedric Griffin said.
In Vick's place is Joey
Harrington, the underperform-
ing former third overall draft
choice of the Detroit Lions who
made a one-year stop in Miami.
Harrington never beat
Minnesota in four seasons with


the Lions, though he threw for
254 yards and one touchdown
for the Dolphins in a defense-
driven 24-20 victory last year
over the Vikings.
He knows his opponent well,
which goes both ways. The
mystery here is more how
Petrino will attack a team that
barely missed a modern NFL
record for allowing the fewest
yards rushing, but didn't gener-
ate enough quarterback pres-
sure and tied for the second-
worst ranking against the pass.


Warrick Dunn and Jerious
Norwood are a reliable pair
returning from the top rushing
team in the league, but that fig-
ure included 1,039 yards by
Vick With the addition of aging
but accomplished receiver Joe
Horn in free agency, Petrino's
background as a passing-game
technician and Minnesota's
recent struggles against
spread-out formations, Atlanta
is bound to start the 2007 sea-
son throwing more.
"I expect them to throw us
curveballs," Childress said. "I
expect them to roll personnel.
I expect them to be no-huddle.
I expect them to be four wides,
five wides, if they get an oppor-
tunity."
This is quite an opportunity
for Harrington.
He's less mobile than Vick,
but, well, so is everybody
"I am not trying to step in
and fill Michael's shoes. I am
not trying to be Michael. I am
not going to replace Mike,"
Harrington said.
Though it will be impossible
to fully escape the shadow of
Vick, the Falcons have been
proactive about eliminating
that "elephant in the room," as
Harrington put it
"We tried to face it, tried to
talk about it, speak about it,
really understand what every-
thing was that was going on,
and then understand that we
needed to move on and do our
jobs and prepare and be able to
control what we can control,"
Petrino said, offering a mouth-
ful about his approach. "I think
we've shown a lot of leadership
in the team, a lot of leadership
in the locker room. I think the


QB McNabb out to prove he's back


Eagles set to

take on Packers
Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. -
Donovan McNabb bristled
when the Philadelphia
Eagles drafted a quarter-
back in April.
. Brett Favre has been there
before, facing the first hint
of his football mortality.
"First of all, Donovan has
nothing to worry about,"
said Favre, who will face
McNabb and the Eagles in
Sunday's season opener at
Lambeau Field. "I think he
knows that. But you wonder,
you question."
Just like Favre did after
the Packers drafted Aaron
Rodgers in 2005.
"Sometimes you go, 'Hey,
is this the first step in the
phase out, or what?" said
Favre, who needs one victo-
ry to tie John Elway's quar-
terback record of 148 career
wins. "And at some point,
'they have to groom some-
body else, either by draft or
free agency or whatever. But
once again, Donovan has
nothing to worry about."
Not if he can prove he's
still Donovan McNabb, any-
way.
McNabb tore a knee liga-
ment last November and fin-
ished the regular season on
the sidelines for the third
time in five years.
Now he's back, insisting
he'll be just as able to take
off and run as he was before
the injury. And he said he
isn't using the presence of
rookie quarterback Kevin
Kolb as added motivation.
"I don't have enough room
on my shoulders for any


Associated Press
Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb drops back
to pass in the first quarter of the pre-season football game
against the Pittsburgh Steelers on Aug. 26 in Pittsburgh.


more motivation than I've
had in previous years,"
McNabb said.
"Every year that I come
and I challenge myself train-
ing to be better than I was
before. By stepping out on
that field, I'm truly motivat-
ed already."
Whereas Favre's refusal to
mentor Rodgers led to ten-
sion during the Packers'
training camp in 2005,
Eagles coach Andy Reid said
McNabb has been working
closely with Kolb, a second-
round pick
Kolb played extensively in
the preseason as McNabb
sat out the first and last


games. McNabb didn't
scramble much when he did
play, but might be inclined to
take off running early on
Sunday to prove he can still
do it.
Especially against a
defense he has dominated in
the past.
"I'm just going to try to run
the offense," McNabb said.
"And if that allows me to
kind of ad-lib a little bit,
then that's what I'll do."
McNabb is 4-1 against
Green Bay, most recently
throwing for 288 yards and
two touchdowns in the
Eagles' 31-9 victory in
Philadelphia last October.


Going into the 50th season
of football at Lambeau
Field, the Packers seem to
have lost their home-field
advantage of late. Green Bay
was 3-5 at Lambeau last sea-
son.
Packers coach Mike
McCarthy joked that the
Packers' locker room might
be too nice.
"We have a great home-
field advantage here, great
energy," McCarthy said. "We
just didn't handle the adver-
sity, that's what I'm most dis-
appointed in. When things
don't go right we need to
keep playing and keep
rolling. We'll do a better job
of that this year."
The Packers will have to
start by doing a better job
against running back Brian
Westbrook. He sat out last
year's game against the
Packers with a knee injury,
but had 120 yards rushing in
a victory over the Packers in
2005 and 156 yards receiving
against the Packers in 2004.
"Every time we play them,
it's the same two problems
- McNabb and Westbrook -
every year," defensive line-
man Cullen Jenkins said. "I
don't think it's going to
change as long as they're
there. So we've just got to go
in and stop them."
The Packers expect to
have one of the top defenses
in the league, even if they
aren't yet getting league-
wide recognition.
"We still feel unrespect-
ed," Jenkins said. "We still
feel like people are kind of
putting us (on the) backburn-
er and we're not going to be
that good, everybody else is
going to be better than us.
It's still a challenge. We're
still trying to go out there
and earn respect."


Bears-Chargers could be Super Bowl preview


Associated Pres

:SAN DIEGO - This could
have been the Super Bowl
matchup in February, the
Chicago Bears against the San
Diego Chargers.
"We felt it should have been,
but we didn't do the things nec-
s essary to make that happen,"
Chargers quarterback Philip
Rivers said.
These teams had the best
records in their respective con-
ferences. The Bears made it to
Miami. The Chargers stumbled
around like drunk sailors on
shore leave in losing their play-
- off opener at home against New
England.
'"That's why we're so disgust-
ed with the loss," Rivers said.
'"That was kind of our expecta-
tions. We're getting to play them
si,, seven months later"


Consolation or not, it'll be a and enthusiasm," Archuleta
marquee matchup when Rivers, added. "Guys are ready to play
reigning NFL MVP LaDainian ball. Guys are hyped up and
Tomlinson and the rest of the can't wait for it to get here. I
Chargers host the Bears think it's been that way
in Sunday's season open- 4 M all year, but now, it's just
er a little bit more focused."
It could even be a The Chargers were an
Super Bowl preview for NFL-best 14-2 last year
next February. before flaming out in a
"It'd be just fine," shower of miscues that
Rivers said. . let New England rally
Whether they're still - for a 24-21 divisional-
playing five months LaDainian round win. The Bears
from now, the Bears and Tomlinson topped the NFC at 13-3
Chargers are looking Chargers before losing to
forward to this running back. Indianapolis in the
matchup. Super Bowl.
"What a great way to start the The Bears are looking to
season off," new Bears strong make a statement, with their
safety Adam Archuleta said. tough defense facing a talent-
"We feel good about ourselves, laden Chargers offense that
but we can't rest on what we've scored an NFL-high 492 points
done. last year.
"I think there's a lot of energy "I know we can," cornerback


Charles Tillman said. "I think
it'll be a good challenge for us to
see where we are and what we
need to do and what lies ahead
of us for the rest of the season."
San Diego has won 10 straight
regular-season games and was
undefeated at home in 2006.
For sheer star power, the
Chargers had five players make
the elite All-Pro team last year
and Chicago had four. San Diego
topped the league with 11 Pro
Bowlers, while Chicago had
eight, although not all played
due to injury.
San Diego's Norv Turner
begins his third stint as an NFL
coach, taking over for the
deposed Marty Schottenheimer
Turner's first two gigs didn't end
well; he was a combined 58-82-1
with Washington and Oakland.


Associated Press
Dallas Cowboys' kick returned Jerhere Urban (15) breaks the tack-
le of Minnesota Vikings kicker Chris Kluwe on his way to a 95-yard
kick-off return during the first half in a preseason football game
Aug. 30 in Minneapolis.


Cowboys QB Romo


ready for first opener


Associated Press

IRVING, Texas - The last
time the New York Giants
came to Texas Stadium, Tony
Romo was a backup quarter-
back whose only time on the
field had been as a holder and
in some mop-up duty.
Still, before that Monday
night game in October, coach
Bill Parcells had a message for
Romo: "Stay ready"
At halftime, the Cowboys
were trailing and starter Drew
Bledsoe was struggling.
Parcells decided he'd seen
enough of the old guy and was
ready to give the kid a.chance.
So off went quarterbacks coach
Chris Palmer with the news.
"Romo," Palmer growled,
"you're in."
Things have been looking up
for the Cowboys ever since.
Now Romo is on the
verge of beginning his
first season in charge.
It begins Sunday
night under eerily.
similar circunm-
stances to his first
big outing: against
the Giants, at Texas
Stadium, in prime time, before
a national television audience
and with recent comments
from Tiki Barber giving
announcers something else to
talk about
OK, some things have
changed. Barber and Parcells
are retired. Michael Strahan
nearly did, too. The Cowboys
have a new coach in Wade
Phillips and he has a new staff.
The Giants have new coaches,
too, including Palmer now
coaching their quarterbacks.
The most important thing,
though, is that the stakes
remain high. The winner gets
first place in the NFC East, the
loser plummets to last. True,
it's only a difference of 1-0 or 0-
1, but to fans of these teams, it's
the penthouse or the outhouse
every week
"It is always a big game when


you play the Cowboys," Giants
quarterback Eli Manning said.
"You have to play them twice a
year, so you know it's going to
be a physical game. They get
fired up for it, too."
Romo is the center of atten-
tion for many reasons. Such as
the way he started last year (5-
1 and seemingly on the verge of
sainthood). Or the way he
ended it, bungling the hold of a
short, go-ahead field goal in a
playoff loss to Seattle. And his
glitzy offseason, dating an
"American Idol" winner, judg-
ing the Miss Universe pageant.
The biggest issue is figuring
out how good he really is. After
all, he's only started 11 games.
The Giants will be the first
team he's started against twice
and the first he's gone against
three times.
"I think he feels he has
some things to prove,"
teammate Terrell
- - Owens said. "Last
year, he made the
Pro Bowl. This year,
he wants to make it
legitimately"
What TO. meant is
that Romo was voted into
the all-star game based on a
brief sample of work, not the
grind of a full season. While
Romo insists there was nothing
illegitimate about his trip to
Hawaii - he was voted in by
the players - he gets the point
It's part of the "whole new set
of challenges" he's ready to
experience.
"I think I've improved," he
said. "I'll be a better player. I
can feel that"
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones
needs to see it.
Jones believes Romo can be
a perennial Pro Bowler, but
he's not ready to put his money
where his mouth is. Jones has
opted to let Romo play out his
contract this season rather
than giving him a lucrative
extension based on potential.
The risk is that the pricetag
could go up.


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007 7B


00


players have truly tried to put
it on the backburner and focus
on doing their job and getting
ready to play football."
When Steve Spurrier
brought his "Fun 'n' Gun"
offense from college to the
NFL, it fizzled with the
Washington Redskins. Atlanta
hopes Petrino's transition will
be more successful.
"We certainly didn't do any
funning and gunning in the
preseason," he said. "We were
just trying to get the ball in the
end zone and get some field
goals on the board and try to
execute and do things that we
could do. My offensive philoso-
phy has always been built
around the players, and trying
to get them in position where
they can make plays."
The Vikings have their own
offensive puzzle to put togeth-
er, with Tarvaris Jackson tak-
ing over at quarterback with
only two unimpressive starts at
the end of his rookie year.
"He's our leader, so we're
going to follow him to the end,"
said running back Chester
Taylor.
With another nondescript
group of receivers, they're sure
to run the ball as much as they
can.
Taylor set a team record
with 303 carries and totaled
1,200 yards rushing. Peterson
will certainly play a lot, too,
sometimes in the same set
"I know in my mind how I
want to use them," Childress
said. "I know how they are in
the game plan, what plays we
think this guy is going to be in
for and what plays we think
that guy is going to be in for."










SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on


Jenna Fischer says
goodbye to husband
NEW YORK - Jenna
Fischer of "The Office" and
her husband, filmmaker
James Gunn, have separated
after six years of marriage,
Fischer's publicist, Lewis
Kay, said Friday.
"We are
sorry for any

causes family
and friends,"
the pair said
in a state-
ment on
Gunn's
Jenna MySpace
Fischer page. "The
enthusiasm
we have for each other's
lives, spirits and careers is
real - we have been each
other's cheerleader and
friend during the past six
years and continue to be so
now and in the future."
The 33-year-old actress
was nominated for an Emmy
this year for her work on
NBC's "The Office." She
portrays mousy secretary
Pam Beesly, who found con-
fidence last season when
she confessed her romantic
feelings to co-worker Jim
Halpert (John Krasinksi).
Gunn, 37, directed last
year's "Slither," which co-
starred Fischer.

Closing arguments
end in Spector trial
LOS ANGELES - After
five months of contentious
testimony in Phil Spector's
murder trial, both sides
closed their cases Friday
with competing views of
whether it was murder or
suicide that claimed actress
Lana Clarkson's life.
Superior Court Judge
Larry Paul Fidler said he
would instruct jurors
Monday and submit the case
for deliberations.
Clarkson,
40, died of a
gunshot fired
inside her
mouth as she



hours after
Spector at her job as
a VIP hostess
at the House of Blues.
Spector, 67, is charged with
second-degree murder and
faces 15 years to life in
prison if convicted.
Prosecutor Pat Dixon,
speaking last, showed a dra-
matic animated video pur-
porting to recreate the shoot-
ing of Clarkson.
One frame offered a view
of how Clarkson might have
seen the gun entering her
mouth. In every frame,
Spector was within inches.
"These are not evidence,"o
Dixoni said of the animations.
"They are our view of what
happened."
Earlier, defense attorney
Linda Kenney-Baden entreat-
ed jurors to focus on scientific
evidence and not to become
"vigilantes," convicting
Spector because of his looks,
reputation and the "tall tales"
of women he dated.
Kenney-Baden said they
should acquit because he did
not murder Clarkson. She
said, "We don't convict peo-
ple in this country because
we don't like them, because
we don't like their hair or
their clothes."
Dixon focused on the testi-
mony of five women who por-
trayed Spector as terrorizing
them at gunpoint in the past,
and the chauffeur who testi-
fied that Spector emerged
from the house with a gun
and said, "I think I killed
somebody"
Spector, an eccentric mil-
lionaire rock music producer
past his prime, has sat silent-
ly at the counsel table, a
diminutive figure in frock
coats and colorful ties and
shirts listening to former girl-


friends testify about threats.
She suggested the chauf-
feur was mistaken about
what he saw and heard
because of stress, and high-
lighted what she said was
missing from the case - sci-
entific evidence to place the
gun in Spector's hand.
- From wire reports


Toons meet teens Here are the
B M winning numbers
Ha ' selected Saturday
Cartoon Network's 'Out of fJmmy's Head' splices live action, animation Lotte ry


BY FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer

Looks like real-life folks are finally
demanding equal TV time with all those
rambunctious cartoon characters.
Cartoon Network is introducing its first
live-action series, "Out of Jimmy's Head,"
which features flesh-and-blood seventh-
grader Jimmy Roberts in a human world
infested with animated creatures ... crea-
tures that only he (and the viewer, of
course) can see.
Here's the concept: After a trolley acci-
dent at Gollyworld theme park, Jimmy had
an emergency brain transplant that left
him seeing things - namely, the charac-
ters of legendary cartoonist Milt Appleday,
whose brain he got
Only Jimmy's best friends, Craig and
Robin, have any idea that he cohabits with
cartoons on an everyday basis. And they
think it's cool. But it really complicates
Jimmy's life, only adding to the zany prob-
lems any live-action kid would already be
dealing with on a weekly TV series.
Based on Cartoon Network's movie "Re-
Animated," "Out of Jimmy's Head" calls
on Jimmy to keep his clashing realities
sorted out, while upholding the values of
the cartoon world he reveres.
And along the way he must also contend
with parents, siblings, teachers, bullies
and an eighth-grade girl he has a crush on.
Dominic Janes plays Jimmy, while Tom
Kenny (SpongeBob SquarePants) is among
the stellar talent voicing the cartoon char-
acters.
"Out of Jimmy's Head" premieres
Friday at 7 p.m.
,Other shows to look out for:
* On the heels of an official progress
report on the war in Iraq, "NOW" takes its


Associated Press
This undated publicity photo provided by Cartoon Network shows actors Dominic Janes as
Jimfimy Roberts, left, Tinashe Kashingwe as Robin Wheeler, center, and Jon Kent Ethridge II
as Craig Wheeler, who star in the new Cartoon Network series "Out of Jimmy's Head."


own hard look at the war through the eyes
of the U.S. men and women fighting it. In a
special hour-long edition, "NOW" focuses
on the Third Infantry's First Brigade from
Georgia's Ft. Stewart, which earlier this
year headed back to Iraq for the third
deployment in four years. As the long
months of the "surge" unfold, these troops
are seen fighting in the country's volatile
Anbar province, while, back at home, their
newborns become toddlers, and birthdays
and anniversaries pass them by. What are
the personal and political costs of constant
redeployment? Is the war effort at a turn-


ing point, or a breaking point? Do
American soldiers think this is a war.
worth fighting, a war they can win? "My
biggest concern is just to make it home
with 10 fingers and toes," one soldier tells
"NOW" Its report airs Friday on PBS.
E Call it the first new series of the fall
broadcast season. You can also call
"Nashville" a "high-stakes, high-drama
docu-soap" set in Music City. The Fox net-
work does, anyway. Could the members of
this cast be poised to fulfill their dreams
and capture stardom? Find out when
"Nashville" premieres Friday at 9 p.m.


Hilton suing Hallmark


Hotel heiress not hot on cards featuring her name


Associated Pre
This image, provided by Paris Hilton's attorney Brent H. Blakely, shows a Hallmark card labele
"Exhibit A" which is part of a lawsuit brought by Paris Hilton against Hallmark Cards filed Thursda
in the U.S. District Court in California. The lawsuit claims commercial appropriation of identity, invw
sion of privacy, misappropriation of publicity, false representation that Hilton endorses the produce'
and infringement of a federally registered trademark. The suit says Hilton owns the trademark "That'
hot," which was registered on Feb. 13. The lawsuit is seeking an injunction and unspecified damage
to be determined at trial.


and catch phrase
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Paris
Hilton is suing over the use of
her picture and catchphrase
"That's hot" on a greeting card.
Hilton sued Hallmark Cards
Inc. in U.S. District Court seek-
ing an injunction and unspeci-
fied damages to be determined
at trial.
According to the lawsuit
filed Thursday, the card is
titled "Paris's First Day as a
Waitress" and shows a photo of
Hilton's face on a cartoon of a
waitress serving a plate of food
to a patron. In a dialogue bub-
ble she says, "Don't touch that,
it's hot" The customer cartoon
asks, "What's hot?" She
answers, "That's hot"
The suit says Hilton owns the
trademark "That's hot," which
was registered on Feb. 13,2007.
The lawsuit claims commer-
cial appropriation of identity,
invasion of privacy, misappro-
priation of publicity, false rep-
resentation that Hilton endors-
es the product, and infringe-
ment of a federally registered
trademark. The damages
would be based on profits from
the $2.49 cards, said Hilton
attorney Brent Blakely
Hallmark defended the card
as parody, which is normally
protected under fair-use law.
"Some of Hallmark's new
humor greeting cards are par-
odies of today's most popular
celebrities and politicians,"
said Hallmark spokeswoman
Julie O'Dell in an e-mailed
ss statement.
.d "These cards take a satirical
iy look at news and gossip sur-
a- rounding these public figures,
t, including Paris Hilton, and we
's do not believe Hallmark has
is violated any of Ms. Hilton's
rights," she said.


TMZ hits the airwaves with new show


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Wander
through TMZ.com at any given
moment and it's easy to grasp
what the Web site is gleefully
pushing. There are stars
smooching. Stars sunning. Stars
looking hot, or not And, always,
there are stars misbehaving.
It all adds up to the most pop-
ular online entertainment site
and, starting Monday, a televi-
sion show. "TMZ," joining the
crowded field of entertainment


news magazines, will test the
bounds of the TV audience's
fascination with celebrity.
The new venture also is a
groundbreaking bid to turn an
online success into an even
more lucrative TV commodity,
a tantalizing possibility that
has yet to be realized.
Harvey Levin, managing edi-
tor of TMZ.com and host and
executive producer oPfthe syn-
dicated series, says he isn't
thinking about being a
crossover pioneer. He's just


preoccupied with getting
"TMZ" going.
"I am so charged right now....
We've been running test shows
for a month now and I just want
to put the show on the air," said
Levin, a lawyer who became a
TV reporter, commentator and
producer ("Celebrity Justice,"
"The People's Court").
"TMZ," which will be carried
on Fox-owned stations, as well
as on a mix of other network
outlets, is to air as a half-hour
show on weekdays (mostly


within the 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. win-
dow) and in an hourlong ver-
sion on the weekend.
The competition for "TMZ"
includes "Entertainment
Tonight," the elder statesman
of the Hollywood news shows,
along with "The Insider,"
"Access Hollywood" and, also
from Telepictures, "Extra."
Levin is unfazed by the list
"It doesn't feel like the other
shows ... We're not sucking up
(to stars). We're not doing jun-
kets. We're notdoing red carpets."


CASH 3
2-5-1
PLAY 4
5-7-3-4
L. 3 T-
6- 10- 18- 23- 27 - 34
FANTASY 5
9- 22- 23- 28- 32
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31
Cash 3: 3-5-6
Play 4: 3 - 7 - 9 - 9
Fantasy 5:7 -13 -18 - 20 - 25
5-of-5 2 $128,068.28
4-of-5 415 $99.50
3-of-5 12,024 $9.50
Mega Money: 4 - 18 - 35 - 38
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB No winners
4-of-4 5 $2,057
3-of-4 MB 60 $375
3-of-4 1,112 $60.50
2-of-4 MB 1,679 $27.50
2-of-4 36,133 $2
1-of-4 MB 16,233 $2.50
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
Cash 3: 8 - 0 - 8
Play 4: 9 - 7 - 2 - 6
Fantasy 5:1 - 13 - 20 - 26 - 31
5-of-5 2 winners $113,344.37
4-of-5 300 $121.50
3-of-5 9,014 $11

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
N To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery .
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


Today in
' TORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 9, the "
252nd day of 2007. There are 113
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
Fifty years ago, on Sept. 9,
1957, President Eisenhower
signed into law the first civil rights
bill to pass Congress since
Reconstruction.
On this date:
In 1776, the second Continental
Congress made the term "United
States" official, replacing "United
Colonies."
In 1850, California became the
31st state of the union.
In 1971, prisoners seized control
of the maximum-security Attica
Correctional Facility near Buffalo,
N.Y., beginning a siege that ended
up claiming 43 lives.
In 1976, Communist Chinese
leader Mao Zedong died in Beijing
at age 82.
Ten years ago: Sinn Fein, the
IRA's political ally, formally
renounced violence as it took its
place in talks on Northern Ireland's
future.
Five years ago: Iraq challenged
the United States to produce "one
piece of evidence" that it was pro-
ducing weapons of mass destruc-
tion. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi
Annan said the Security Council
must be allowed to have its say on
a possible attack against Iraq.
One year ago: After two frus-
trating weeks of delays, space
shuttle Atlantis and its six astro-
nauts blasted off on a 12-day mis-
sion to install a big new piece of
the international space station.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Cliff
Robertson is 82. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Luther Simmons is
65. Singer Inez Foxx is 65. Singer
Dee Dee Sharp is 62. Rock
singer-musician Doug Ingle is 61.
Country singer Freddy Weller is
60. Football commentator Joe
Theismann is 58. Actor Tom
Wopat is 56. Actress Angela
Cartwright is 55. Musician-produc-
er Dave Stewart is 55. Actor Hugh
Grant is 47. Actor Adam Sandier is
41. Actor David Bennent is 41.
Model Rachel Hunter is 38. Actor
Goran Visnjic is 35. Pop-jazz
singer Michael Buble is 32. Latin
singer Maria Rita is 30. Actress
Michelle Williams is 27.
Thought for Today: "Think
wrongly if you please, but in all
cases, think for yourself." -
Gotthold Lessing, German drama-
tist-critic (1729-1781).

REMEMBER WHEN
* For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


hAt ot?




tam










P(Xpl~s Rpt Da


.7.


Entert'ammeut


I











C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Past present, future







iP













.. ..










' R






Virginia Svoboda
Virginia Svoboda of Homosassa won third place in the Save Our Waters Week Photo Contest with this shot of Halls River looking west.


Area waters provide a We can avoid plight of


window through time theEverglades
1B DON Cox economically In addition to being SAM LYONS Florida's ever-burgeoning popula-
For the Chronicle our primary drinking water source, For the Chronicle tion than the restoration of the
j they serve as habitats for countless Everglades.
The past species from the manatees to inver- In my capacity as a member on The parallels between what has
Our Coastal and River Basin tebrates in spring-fed hammocks, the Coastal Rivers Basin Board, happened to the Everglades and
r st and s etlands and rivers. Our springs the Amy Remley Foundation what is happening to Citrus
seeps, sinks ahotd subter also support a host of recreation- (www.amyhremleyfoundation.org) County are strikingly similar. For
ranean lcavesearetashotbed ofkoriented businessesse and the Kings Bay Association, I example, thle natural "sheet tlow
archaeological and pale ontological and kayak rentals, dive shops, boat often find myself delving into vari- of water in the Tsala Apopka Lake
S portals to the way life was thou- tours and the auxiliary businesses ous articles and books pertaining Chain has been disrupted by
S sands of year s ago and how beauti- that attend such activity, to Florida's water resources. dikes, ditches and water-control
ful our basprings onced were. Pe ple like to live near water Recently, I finished reading structures. The lake system, no
known by the early Spanish explor- and even springs have attracted Florida and the Politics of itself, suffers rom accuinulat on
ers, who wrote about ur very shal- ro vid a e of
rs wowrad arter outl o ro v e variousdevelopmental and recre- Paradise." This book is not only an of muck, tussocks, loss of native
bays to the Gulf of Mexico. prclearwateroutlets fromthe national uses. In many cases, this informative history of the submerged aquatic vegetation and
i bays to the Gulf of Mexico. proximity to water bodies leads to Everglades, but also an accounting loss of fish habitat.
According to their writings, these visual and water quality degrada- of man's near destruction of this The correspond irig loss of wet-
bay water bodies received their tion of the very waterfrontthat is so nique ecosystem due to igno- lands througIout the coun ia
water from the large bodies of ham- attractive. Some of the land around rance and greed. It is a bookevery- led to the loss oft natural flood con-
mocks and other rich land mean- the springs and streams has been ranee adg read. Itboklevery le ade rso r naga leooa con-
dering through this beautiful purchased through the Florida on should read o the Civi tro water storage, less water
region. parkas system andmen ofpu S ubsequent to the Civil War, filtration and loss of ildlife habi-
An 1800s travel guide provides an liclandprogrems eb Florida's Trustees of the Internal tat With no storage and eitration
coastal springs 'Arcadian county's power for this important to bolster the economy, put mil- runoff, pollutants contaminate our
coastal springs. "Aradianspngis effort has been shrinking as land lions of acres of swamp land and surface and ground after In addi-
easily reached by row-boatfrom the costsgoup and water management over-flowed" land up for grabs. tion to threatening g our drinking
hotel, and, like thegother wonderful decisions shift the focus from pro- Draining these wetlands was the water, water that is heavily ladenl
springs of this region, always pres- testing to maintaining a cheap only obstacle standing in the way with nitrates and phosphorus
entssome new and suppressing fea- source of water supp ly of speculators developing millions eventually works its way to our,
tures under changing aspects Of sky Like the portal to the past, our of acres for agriculture and hous- coastal estuaries and sea-grass
or season. This spring (Homossa springsl giveu us a unique insight to ing. No one seemed to foresee that beds, compromising their biologi-
is about 60 feet deep, with a strong the quality of groundwater and pro- changing the topography, hydrolo- calproducii
boiling action of the water that vide a baseline for lake, bay and ndchemistryofthelandwould As phosphorus concentrations
' causes khept ian to d shoreowar riveaterquaH.Durnthe lead to devastating consequences. increase the potential for deslruc-
po byconstant rowing. d e Environmental Protection (FDEP) attempts were made to ditch and lar to those in Florida Bay increas-
TTh t guie pa ss describedha observed ao shedy imncrtee inter- In my caepac hut it was ae o n The rallels beare what has


urystai rver as a snaiow cnannei
full of oyster bars with fine shell
mounds and islands with pictur-
esque rock formations worn down
by the action of the sea and river
into strange caverns and columns.
In 1859, Professor John Le Conte
visited Silver Springs and other
area springs to include Kings Bay.
His account of the optical proper-
ties of the springs and their extraor-
dinary transparency are well docu-
mented in the first Florida
Geological Survey Bulletin.
According to Le Conte, the extraor-
dinary transparency was due to the
water being filtered and decol-
orized in its passage through beds
of sand and from the lime solution
in the groundwater.
The present
In Citrus County, springs are
important both ecologically and


nitrate concentrations in 36 springs,
including Hunter, Homosassa and
Chassahowitzka. These nitrate
increases in Kings Bay and other
coastal springs threaten fish and
wildlife habitats, as well as the aes-
thetic and recreational value of our
springs.
Threats to the integrity of our nat-
ural groundwater and springs arise
from uncontrolled growth acceler-
ated by poor land use controls and
local land use decisions. Impacts to
our groundwater are created by
commercial and residential devel-
opment that usually require
drainage ponds and increased
water withdrawal permits for
domestic and public consumptive
use. Poor land use decisions chal-
lenge the protection of water

Please see WATERS/Page 3C


not until the Corps of Engineers
took on the challenge in the mid-
20th century that real progress
was made. That "progress" led to
destroyed wetlands, polluted
water, dried-up springs, salt water
intrusion and eradication of
wildlife. A devastating environ-
mental price was paid to open up
south Florida to rampant develop-
ment. No doubt, "taming" the
Everglades will be remembered as
one of man's most dramatic alter-
ations of an ecosystem.
The natural water regime of the
Everglades is so disrupted that it
is questionable whether the $12-
billion restoration attempt (The
Comprehensive Everglades
Restoration Plan) will be success-
ful. And, to add insult to injury, the
plan is more about creating suffi-
cient water supply for South


manifestation of an imbalance in
nature) suffer from reduced water
flow. Spring flows have dropped
dramatically from sedimentation,
increased groundwater with-
drawals and drought Ironically,
many scientists theorize that the
drought has been exacerbated by
too many roof tops and too much
asphalt replacing forested land,
thereby reducing transpiration.
The common denominator
responsible for the degradation of
our water resources, whether in
the Everglades or Citrus County, is
the cumulative impact of unabat-
ed growth.
Although I have painted a some-
what somber picture, Citrus
County is still in a position to avoid
the plight of the Everglades. We


Please see PLIGHT/Page 3C


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


It's time for

Crystal River

to shine
Frank DiGiovanni has
helped make Inverness
a proud town.
Andy Houston and Bruce
Garrison would like to do the
same thing in Crystal River.
DiGiovanni, the city manag-
er of the county seat, has
helped create and direct the
revitalization of downtown
Inverness.
It wasn't too long ago that
Inverness was headed in the
wrong direction. Stores were
boarded up. Commerce- was
broken. County government
was fleeing to Lecanto and res-
idents were in a funk.
The city manager (and many
others) had a vision of what
Inverness could be and they
started working toward achiev-
ing that goal. Today, Inverness
is a vibrant small town that has
a healthy business district,
expanding government center
and a thriving tourist trade.
The old courthouse has
become a heritage museum
and is the center of the
restored downtown. There are
restaurants and shops and
people interested in investing.
The city tax rate keeps drop-
ping as the level of services
increases.
The Rails-to-Trails is a
jewel, new parks dot the land-
scapeand the place looks nice.
Cooter Pond was turned
from a huge stormwater reten-
Please see r.-::' /Page 4C

Jack Levine
OTHER
VOICES


Reflections on

Grandparents

Day
For most of us, no one
provided a more vital
link to our heritage and
family history than our grand-
parents. Wherever they were
from, and no matter their back-
ground, our grandparents pro-
vided a first-person connec-
tion to our past
Whether by birth or through
adoption, grandparents are
treasures deserving of honor
and respect. Like all of us,
none was perfect, but most
were there for us when we
needed them most
I am not alone in receiving
the gift of grandparenting.
Family history is a living lega-
cy It's not only the story of who
our elders were, but it defines
in many ways who we are.
Whether they came by force
or for freedom, the values our
grandparents brought with
them are heirlooms, which our
children deserve to inherit
While I'm not yet a grand-
parent, my appreciation of
family history is translated to
our sons, and perhaps some-
day, they will in turn have the
opportunity to pass along the
gift
The wisdom of our elders is
irreplaceable. I distinctly
remember so many ways my
grandparents, especially my
dear Grandma Minnie, influ-
enced me by example. Here
are just a few life lessons I
learned at her kitchen table.
A Baker's Dozen Lessons I
Learned from Grandma
Minnie:
M Love knows no boundary.
Keeping close to the people
you love, and learning to love
them without having to love
everything they do, is the key
to family strength. "You don't

Please see ' .. ,' , -/Page4C


..NNW
AMF-


ar,
Y-,











2C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


1l "Time, which changes people,
does not alter the image we
have retained of them."


Marcel Proust


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan .............................. publisher
Charlie Brennan .............................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ...................circulation director
Mike Arnold ........................ managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

MORE ENERGY, CLEANER ENERGY



Progress Energy



plans welcome



improvements


P progress Energy has
announced plans to spend
over $1.6 billion in
improvements at the Crystal
River Energy Complex. The
improvements include new pol-
lution control equipment for
coal-burning plants and modifi-
cations to the nuclear power
plant that will increase electric
power output.
The Crystal River Energy
Complex has five electric gener-
ating plants. Four of these plants
burn coal, and the fifth uses
nuclear fuel to produce electric
power.
The improve-
ments and modifi- THE I1
cations include Progress
over $1 billion to invest $1.
add equipment.that Crystal Ri
will remove sulfur Corn
oxides and nitrogen
oxides from the OUR 01
emissions of the two UR 01
largest coal-burning A wel
plants and : over invest
$600 million during
the next four years YOUR OPII
to upgrade equip- chronleor
ment and increase chronicle
power output at the
nuclear plant. The
upgrades will increase the
nuclear plant's output by enough
electricity to power more than
110,000 homes.
In addition to reducing emis-
sions and increasing power out-
put, the upgrades will provide
employment opportunities and
an economic boost to the com-
munity as workers are needed
through the next several years to
perform the planned work
While the addition of pollu-
tion-control equipment is in
response to federal clean air
standards, we commend the
company for moving ahead with
installing the equipment rather
than using delaying tactics in an
effort to avoid meeting the new
standards. We also encourage
them to take steps to reduce

Cheapskate stops 0
Whatever happened to
the section called "Cheap"
in the Sunday section
HomeFront? It was one of
the best I've seen. It gave
you articles on recipes,
homes, everything. Where
did it go? Bring it back. cA.LL
Editor's note: The A
Chronicle no longer carries 563
"Everyday Cheapskate" or
Mr. Handyperson" columns
in Sunday's HomeFront section. Our
new features are from HGTV and local
gardening expert Jane Weber.
What is it?
I, too, would like to know what a
walk-on homerun is from the Little
League World Series in the Sports
page last week. I see another per-
son has asked the question but we
didn't get an answer. I just don't
know what a walk-on homerun is.
Elevated home
Relative to the call about eleva-
tion: Our house at Citrus Hills in
Presidential Estates, the elevation is
105 feet, as per Google Earth.
Editorial view
I saw your editorial in Sunday's
Chronicle, the Sept. 2 Opinion page,
endorsing Tom Dick and saying the
commission was wrong in firing him.


emissions from the two older
and smaller coal-burning plants.
The modifications to the
nuclear power plant will
increase the amount of electrici-
ty produced by nuclear power,
which has the lowest fuel cost of
all the fuels used by the compa-
ny to produce electricity. Since
the cost of fuel is a significant
part of the final cost of electric
power, reductions in fuel cost
can translate into lower power
costs to homes and businesses.
Last week, the company filed a
request with state regulators for
a small reduction in
electric rates based
SSUE: on lower total fuel
Energy to costs for the compa-
6 billion at ny. We can hope that
ver Energy the production of
iplex. more electricity
from the nuclear
PINION: power plant will
help the company
come continue to control
tment. its fuel costs.
The Crystal River
NION: Go to Energy Complex
bnhn.today s has long been a sta-
Seditorial. ble employer pro-
viding good jobs in
the community, and
its employees have been
involved in many community
projects. At the same time, the
plant's regular appearance on
the list of the major polluters in
the state has been a source of
concern to many in Citrus
County.
It is encouraging to see the
company making a major invest-
ment to reduce the amount of
pollutants emitted from the
plant. During the short term, this
investment will be an economic
boost to the community as new
jobs are created in construction
and installation of the equip-
ment For the long term, the new
equipment will help make our
environment cleaner, which is
an improvement we can all
appreciate.

U I guess by this pretext you
also endorse insubordina-
tion and failure to follow the
orders of his superior, with
the possibility of putting his
fellow workers in jeopardy.
This is not the first time I
have seen your endorse.
ment of Tom Dick in the
section. Everything I have
0579 read about it points to him
0 9I being in the wrong. What is
the point of your opinion on
Tom Dick? Are you trying to conjure
up sympathy for a rule-breaker?
Long light
I was wondering why nobody's fix-
ing the light at the Bealls shopping
center. You sit and wait and burn
gas and nobody's coming. I was
hoping enough people would have
listened, because I read in Sounding
Off of somebody else who was frus-
trated with it. So I figured by now
the street people - whoever fixes
that kind of stuff - would have
done it. So maybe they'll read this.
Please go away
I am so sick and tired of hearing
about Tom Dick. When you go over
your boss's head, you suffer the con-
sequences. Please, Tom Dick, take
your 25-year service and go some-
where else. You've enjoyed a lengthy
career with[ Citrus County, and that's
enough. Go on your way, please.


Tuesday, six years later...


S ept. 11 falls on a
Tuesday this year. It
will be the first time A
since that other Sept 11, :
six years ago.
Do you remember? Can
you recall how difficult it
was to even conceive of
going forward from that
moment? The events of that
day had so thoroughly lac-
erated us that it seemed as Leonard
if, in some small corner of OTH
our collective soul, the VOI
clock had stopped. In that
corner, it would forever be
8:46 EDT on the morning of Sept. 11,
2001.
Do you remember? If so, then the
world as it stands six years later must
come as something of a shock
Six years ago, we saw people rush-
ing to the World Trade Center site to
search for survivors and recover bod-
ies. Heroes, we said. Six years later,
largely removed from public attention,
many of those same heroes are sick
and even dying, poisoned by the soot
and dirt they breathed.
Six years ago, appalled and infuriat-
ed, the world rallied to our side.
Candles and cards were left at our
embassies. The French newspaper Le
Monde declared "We Are All
Americans Now." The Masai, a tribe in
rural Kenya, sent us 14 cows, a gift
regarded by their culture as sacred.
Six years later, angry demonstrators
trail our president wherever he trav-
els, and it is headline news when he is
actually cheered in Albania.
Six years ago, we vowed revenge on


I


Osama bin Laden, the
wealthy Saudi who master-
minded the attacks. We
would bring him in, said
the president, "dead or
alive." Six years later, bin
- Laden is still free, and the
president has said he is not
h particularly concerned
about that
Do you remember?
Pitts Jr. The terrorist attacks of
IER six years ago this week are
CES sometimes compared to the
Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor 66 years ago this
Dec. 7. That is, of course, a reference
to the shock, disbelief and anger
Americans of both eras felt
But there is a telling difference
between 12/7 and 9/11. From the 1941
attack, there was forged a sense of
national mission and purpose. Those
feelings of shock, disbelief and anger
became the building blocks of a con-
sensus that we would do whatever,
spend whatever, sacrifice whatever,
until victory was won. After the
attacks of 2001, by contrast, we talked
national mission and purpose, but it
soon became apparent that it was only
talk.
Those feelings of shock, disbelief
and anger became instead the build-
ing blocks of a political machine that
duped the nation into a war of choice
that had nothing to do with the terror-
ist attacks, eroded American civil lib-
erties under the guise of protecting
American lives and branded as trai-
tors those who said, 'Hey, wait a
minute.'


LETTERS


Double standard
I made my first trip to the tiki bar
three weeks ago by boat and had
some great boiled shrimp. We spent
maybe two hours enjoying the nice
seating and pleasant water view. We
have returned one time by car
It was the closest thing to the
Homosassa of 40 to 50 years ago:
Fishing boats all around, traps, old
nets and many items that reflect the
look of what once was Homosassa.
The tiki bar also was much like the
surroundings. Palm fronds for a roof
and cypress logs as the support struc-
ture made for a very pleasant look
What was absent was the noise that
is being claimed by the neighbor
Every seat was filled, yet it was easy to
talk and enjoy the overall experience.
No band, no loud music, no rowdy cus-
tomers; just pleasant time and good
eats. The crowd changed as we ate, but
remained low-key and enjoyable.
Somehow, I find it funny that a four-
story addition to an already over-
crowded Riverside Resort was con-
sidered a wonderful addition to Old
Homosassa by our commissioners.
Yet, a tastefully designed and well-
controlled bar with true Homosassa
flavor is somehow considered out of
place at a fishing boat dock Sure
seems to be a different standard for
two locations just hundreds of feet
apart by land or water.
I strongly voiced my opposition to
any high structures in Old
Homosassa, as it does destroy the old
look and flavor of the area. Yet, I
think the tiki bar is truly a nice addi-
tion that will help retain the old fla-
vor of the business of fishing and
crabbing in this area.
We met Mr. Lawson and found him
to be the type of person I would like
to own a business and be my neigh-


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
" Writers will be limited to three letters
per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronlcleonllne.com.

bor. He has done everything to make
his business be a good neighbor and
control impacts. He is in a very tough
position of making a living in a dying
trade.
So if growth is the plan, perhaps
just once it should be something nice
and enjoyable for the public.
John Cassell
Homosassa
Remember New Orleans
In today's issue, you show the peo-
ple of New Orleans mourning the
1,600 or so of their fellow citizens
killed by the Katrina disaster and ask-
ing why so much of the federal funds
allocated to help them have not got-
ten to those who need help. In talking
to my fellow citizens of Citrus County,
I have heard, more than once, the
notion that New Orleans should be
abandoned and that tax money


Worst of all, it squandered the
moment, threw away a historic chance
to build a national - and internation-
al - consensus that could have mar-
ginalized the architects of terror,
maybe even reshaped the world, more
effectively than all the bombs and bul-
lets used to date in Iraq.
This anniversary, then, laments not
simply the loss of life, but of opportu-
nity. And perhaps the worst thing is,
one senses most Americans are like
their president: We don't think about
bin Laden that much these days. He is
not front-of-mind anymore.
So it is worth pausing here to
remember that just six years ago, we
were attacked.
Six years ago, people leaped from
flaming skyscrapers.
Six years ago, flaming skyscrapers
fell.
Six years ago, dust-caked people
wandered the streets of New York City.
Six years ago, an airplane tore a
hole in the Pentagon.
Six years ago, a hijacked plane
crashed.
Six years ago, searing, airless shock
was followed by resolve. Clear, cold,
irion-fisted resolve.
Six years later, the shock is gone and
it seems like the resolve is, too.
Do we remember? You couldn't
prove it by me.

Leonard Pitts is a columnist for the
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami,
Fla., 33132. Readers may contact him
via e-mail at Ipitts
@miamiherald.com.


should not be spent on helping the
people of New Orleans rebuild their
city. This is very disturbing to me.
First of all, only an economic illiter-
ate would even consider America
with a major port facility at the mouth
of the Mississippi River Grain pro-
duced in the Midwest for export goes
through the Port of New Orleans.
New Orleans is a major entry point
for imports into the United States, not
just Disney World without the kids. It
is a major economic link between
America and the outside world.
Second, I cannot think of any more
blatant example of the loss of values
than the willingness of some
Americans to amputate one of their
nation's major cities from the rest of
their country. During the depths of the
Great Depression, no one would have
questioned the creation of a major
WPA program to restore an American
city after a natural disaster. There was
no such talk of turning our backs on
Los Angeles after the major earth-
quake of several decades ago, or of not
restoring New York after Sept 11. Is
it because so many of the dispos-
sessed were black? Can such racism
still be vibrant in today's America?
John Bassett
Inverness
Taxes rising
Gov. Charlie Crist told the counties
in Florida that they need to lower
taxes. Citrus County didn't listen.
I received my tax bill for 2008. My
taxes went up, not down.
We need to get rid of our commis-
sioners and get new ones. In three
years my taxes went from $191 to
$618, and they keep wanting more.
Gil Buechly
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


to the Editor


{


iv
nf
\P
k

,t

frY
�n







CcM ENT YS U NDAY, Si.I"IIimiwi N 9, 20(07:3c


A first impression, a lasting memory


On a Saturday afternoon
in late July 1965,1 I saw a
girl at the local golf
course. She was some distance
away, but even so, I could see
she was put together quite
well. Her blond hair was shin-
ing in the sun and she had a
marvelous tan that would
cause any ordinary mortal man
to gasp. (I gasped!)
I saw her again that night at a
dance.
Midway through the evening,
I found enough courage to
approach, make small talk and
ask her to dance, giving me an
opportunity for a close-up view.


I was taken by the
way her face was
shaped - I adored
the smile which -
curled on her per- '
fect, pink lips, and I
was totally smitten
by the bluest eyes I'd
ever seen.
My first impres-
sion of my future Fred B
wife was that I was A SLI
very impressed - in LI
a word, she was gor-
geous.
Some time after we were
married, Cheryl told me she
had noticed me before I first


r


noticed her - there
were two specific
instances. I thought I
was in for an ego-
boosting revelation,
but then she began to
give details:
She said the first
. time was when she
saw a newspaper
rannen photo in which I was
DE OF included as a mem-
FE ber of the high
school homecoming
court. I expected her
to say how handsome she
thought I was in my brand new
suit, but no, she said when she


saw the picture she laughed,
pointed at me and exclaimed
to a friend, "Look at his big
ears!"
Big ears? Not true! It was my
closely cropped hair, the cam-
era angle and an unforgiving
background created by the
black of night.
I knew it had to get better, so
I listened intently as she con-
tinued:
The second time was a for-
mal affair where selected
young ladies strolled in, each
on the arm of an escort, to be
introduced. I was one of the
escorts. The girl who was des-


tined to become the love of my
life was at the event with
another young man.
Cheryl said when the young
lady I was escorting was pre-
sented, she whispered to her
date, "He's too short for her!"
Too short?!
Big ears?!
To put it mildly, her first
impression of me didn't meas-
ure up to mine of her.
In a few days, we'll celebrate
our 41st wedding anniversary.
My sweetheart obviously got
beyond her first impression -
she not only married me, but
was willing to take her chances


with genetics. We collaborated
on birthing three children,
children who have been fruit-
ful and multiplied, giving us
seven grandchildren. We now
have a total of 10 offspring -
some are short, some have big
ears, but all of 'em are gor-
geous.
We only get one chance to
make a first impression, but it's
what we do afterward that real-
ly counts!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist


Letters to the EDITOR


Gambling risk
As history has proven over
and over; gambling establish-
ments do more to hurt the
poor and middle class than
benefit them.
It will cost the state and tax-
payers far more money to
resolve the problems that are
Brought about by gambling
than the small amount of good
that it might benefit them,
such as the small amount that
is received from the Florida
Lotto.
I know some politicians con-
trolled by the gambling sector
quote high amounts of dollars
given to help education, but
what we the voting taxpayers
want to know is what percent
of the whole amount goes back


PLIGHT
Continued from Page 1C

- are fortunate to have many
grassroots organizations in
Citrus County that dedicate
themselves to the protection
and restoration of our natural
resources. We should, whole-
heartedly, support these
organizations, as well as make
personal commitments to be
conservationists and stewards
of our water resources.
Furthermore, we must insist
that government protect sensi-
tive lands and water quality,
and recognize the need for
controlled, sustainable growth.
- To quote Pogo, "We have met
the enemy, and he is us." Let's
not let apathy allow "paradise"
to slip away from Citrus
County.


Sam Lyons is a member of
the Coastal Rivers Basin
Board, the Amy Remley.
Foundation and the Kings
Bay Association.



WATERS
Continued from Page 1C

resources and recharge areas
by allowing exotic vegetation,
encroachment of floodplains
and wetlands and reduction of
natural habitats in protected
areas.
Additional threats include
careless use of fertilizer and
pesticides, landscaping and
arsenic from golf courses next
to water bodies. Citrus County
homes and businesses generate
: about 64 million gallons of
sewage and 319 tons of residual


to the taxpayer in the form of
something good?
So far, Gov. Charlie Crist has
promised to be an unusual
governor, and he may have the
character and the foresight to
become one of Florida's best
governors.
I hope that my letter to him
and his response will be print-
ed in every local newspaper in
the state of Florida.
James W. Price
Crystal River

Security rights
This is to advise the public
of what has been the current
policy of the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office:
1. Citizens entering the


sludge every day. This sewage
is treated to varying degrees,
aerated or percolated to the
ground with the residual sludge
disposed at residual sludge
facilities in the county. Other
threats come from develop-
ment in high aquifer recharge
areas from spills, leaking septic
tanks, silt buildup, runoff and
sedimentation that eventually
blocks spring flow.
The future
Hundreds of years ago, our
springs were clear with
extraordinary transparency,
strong boiling action and down-
stream shallow channels full of


Citrus County Courthouse
have been and may be subject
to security checks by volun-
teers.
2. Volunteers have moni-
tored and used the metal
detector machines including
hand-wand detectors, using
hand-wand detectors on citi-
zens of opposite sex.
A letter that I received from
U.S. Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite,
dated Aug. 2, states (in part):
"I appreciate your insightful
suggestions to help improve
security procedures in
Florida and throughout the
nation. As you are no doubt
aware, the Fourth
Amendment of our
Constitution provides for the
right of individuals to be


oyster, bars with fine shell
mounds, islands and wildlife.
Water quality measurements
that were taken then show very
little, if any, pollution. Now,
most of our springs have very
little boiling action, vegetation
that grows uncontrolled, scum
and algae in the bays, and
increased nutrient enrichment
that presents a potentially seri-
ous ecological issue.
To prevent the increasing
pollution and enrichment of
nutriments of our springs and
groundwater, we need to
implement enforceable best
management practices for our
springsheds and watersheds.


secure in their persons, hous-
es, papers and effects, against
unreasonable searches and
seizures. The Supreme Court
has found a balancing test to
protect citizens from intru-
sions by the government, but
to also not restrict police so
they cannot adequately
enforce the law or provide
security. Under federal law,
individuals have a form of
redress in the form of civil
liability suits against the offi-
cial.
"The Department of
Homeland Security and the
Department of Justice's offi-
cials have specific protocols
they must follow in compli-
ance with the Constitution
and U.S. Code. For instance,
the Transportation Security


These best practices include
modifying wastewater treat-
ment to reduce nitrates and
pollutants being introduced
into the groundwater, effective
management of landscaping,
pesticide application and fer-
tilizers throughout the county
plus establishment of water
withdrawal budgets and water
conservation practices to, at
least, maintain current ground-
water pressure. Setbacks from
springs, spring runs, sinks, and
rivers and land application of
sludge close to water bodies
need to be based on how fast
pollutants can percolate into
groundwater and travel time to


Administration ... has specific
regulations that require
agents only to search individ-
uals of the same sex with a
pat down or hand-wand
method....
"The Citrus County Circuit
Court, to which you refer, is a
state court and therefore sub-
ject to state laws and regula-
tions governing specific
search criteria and gender
requirements... I am limited
in what I can do because it
comes under the direct
authority of the state of
Florida.
"Because I am a represen-
tative in the federal govern-
ment and no longer serve in
the Florida Senate, I have no
jurisdiction in such state mat-

Special thanks S 1
Our warmest
thanks for a special
couple. Upon exiting
Applebee's after an
80th birthday celebra- I
tion, we met a very
nice couple who
agreed to take our cALL
picture. They not only
took our picture, but .
they sang their very
own "Happy Birthday"
song. It was very special.
Library moat
In regards to the new
Homosassa Library: Why is
there a moat around it? It looks
like the grading is wrong. I
think the library is on the-
wrong location. Dampness and
books do not go together.
Volunteers needed
I took my grandchildren to
visit Animal Control last week.
It was a nice visit. I'm getting
ready to make a check out, a
donation to give to Animal
Control ... They also need vol-
unteers to walk the animals,


the spring head - not building
requirements.
But these practices alone
will not protect our springs and
groundwater. Policymakers
need to close the gap that
exists today between regulato-
ry programs at the state and
district levels with local land
use planning that's designed to
protect our water resources.
Shared groundwater protec-
tion programs and comprehen-
sive plans need to be linked
with land acquisition, water
conservation, water reuse and
better wastewater treatment as
part of the overall solution.
The future is in our hands


ters. I encourage you to con-
tact your state senator, Mike
Fasano, or your state repre-
sentative, Ron Shultz, to
explain the situation that
occurred and get more infor-
mation on the regulations
governing Florida court
searches and your options to
address the situation...."
As a concerned citizen, I do
plan on following the advice
of Ginny Brown-Waite, and I
encourage others to do so,
because if we do not look out
for our rights, who will? Also,
should we not have profes-
sionals providing security -
not volunteers in a court-
house?
Renee McPheeters
Crystal River

Sand they need a larg-
Ser facility ...
Thanks for lunch
S The Red Hat Ladies
want to thank the
gentleman who paid
for our lunch at
Charlie's Fish House
on Tuesday. You cer-
05 79 tainly made 16 Red
0U57 1Hat Ladies smile.
Thank you.
Heatherwood power
In Sunday's paper, there's a
picture of the energy plant in
Crystal River and it says they
spent $1 billion, and then
below there's another
$600,000 in modernizing ...
We live out here in
Heatherwood and it would be
great if they could spend $5 or
$10 to figure out how they
could get the power to
Heatherwood without it going
off every time it rains about a
half a dozen times. You know,
it's time to start at the root of
this stuff and the heck with the
rest of this business. Think of
the local people that pay bills.


and government policy makers.
Do we have the personal con-
cern and political will to make
the necessary changes to pro-
tect the quality of our waters
today? Or, will our ancestors
find the artifacts of our society
and ask the question where did
they go wrong?


Don Cox is a Citrus 20/20
director with a 30-year back-
ground in environmental mon-
itoring and analysis, source
engineering, enforcement
processes and environmental
planning at the local, state, fed-
eral and volunteer levels.


When it comes to politics, follow the money


We have dis-
cussed how
control of
the Congress gives
'the majority party
tremendous advan-
tage in moving legis-
lation. We have
pointed out that
Democratic candi-
dates can now raise Lou
many times more OTI
dollars than when VON
they were in the
minority.
A recent report in
USAToday highlighted the
advantage the Democrats had
in the top 10 sources of cam-
paign contributions from Jan. 1
to June 30, 2007. Lawyers and
law firms gave $27.8 million -
78 percent to Democrats;
Securities and Investments $18
million - 56 percent to
Democrats; Business Services
$6 million - 63 percent to
Democrats; TV, movies and
, music $4.6 million - 82 per-
cent to Democrats; Retired and
Real Estate split their money
($28.2 million).
Most business leaders, don't


H
(


agree with many
proposals made by
the Democratic
Party, especially in
the tax, labor, and
energy areas, but
they are realists.
They believe that
the Democrats will
win the election and
Frey run the Congress in
IER 2009.
CES You don't have to
look at the national
public opinion polls
to see how the election is going.
If you suddenly see
Republicans are getting the
most money, it means that the
business leaders feel the
Republicans can win. If the
percentage continues to
increase for the Democrats, it
means that business leaders
believe the Republicans will
lose both the House and the
Senate. The philosophy of the
Republican and Democrat par-
ties is second to who can win.
Political power overrides
philosophical compatibility.
The retirement of Sen. John
Warner (R-Va.) and the "forced"


resignation of Sen. Larry Craig
(R-Idaho), adds further to the
Republican problems in trying
to take back the Senate. The
Republicans now have two
more open seats to defend.
Idaho has been a Republican
stronghold for some time.
Former Democrat
Congressman Larry LaRocco
unsuccessfully ran for lieu-
tenant governor last year, part-
ly in an effort to build a base for
the 2008 Senate race. He has
been campaigning since
January '07 for the Senate seat
A lot will depend on who
Idaho's Republican Gov. C.L.
"Butch" Otter appoints to fill
Craig's term. It is unfortunate
from LaRocco's standpoint that
the Craig problem did not sur-
face in the spring or summer of
'08. As we saw in the last sena-
torial race in Virginia, it is a
toss-up state. If the popular for-
mer Gov. Mark Warner (D) runs,
he will go in as the favorite.
The Republican Senatorial
Committee is having trouble
raising funds and the
Republicans have only two
Democrats on the "hit list,"


Sens. Mary Landrieu (D-La.)
and Tim Johnson (D-S.D.). The
Republicans are going to find it
hard to campaign against
Johnson, who had a brain hem-
orrhage last year and is slowly
recovering.
The fight between Florida
Democrats, Democratic presi-
dential candidates and the
Democratic National
Committee continues to esca-
late. Last weekend, the six top
Democrats in the presidential
field bowed to pressure from
the early states, Iowa, New
Hampshire, Nevada and South
Carolina, and agreed not to
campaign in Florida. It was a
smart move on the Democratic
candidates' part, as if any one
of them had not agreed to this
proposal they would have been
dead in the primary elections
in those states.
Florida Democrats have
been given 30 days to work out
a solution with the Democratic
National Committee. Several
Democrat State Legislators
from South Florida, including
Democrat House Leader Steve
Geller, said they are withdraw-


ing their support for presiden-
tial candidates because of the
boycott
It now appears that some, if
not all, of the candidates will
avoid the state Democratic
Party Convention in Orlando in
October. Raising money
increasingly will become diffi-
cult for the National
Democratic Party and
Democratic presidential candi-
dates if this issue isn't resolved.
You can be sure that the
Republican governor and
Republican State Legislature
will not help the Democrats.
Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) has
threatened legal action and the
Democrat members of
Congress are trying to put pres-
sure on the Democratic
National Committee to change
the rules.
Florida once again will be a
key state in the presidential
election. Nelson is under con-
sideration as the vice presiden-
tial nominee, but Florida's
non-participation in the con-
vention could end any chances
he has. In a close race, the bit-
terness this issue is causing


could convince some
Democrats not to vote in
November 2008. This could be
enough to have Florida by a
narrow margin once again go
Republican. The Republican
Party in Florida and the
Republican National
Committee is keeping their
heads down, and while Florida
Republicans will be penalized,
they won't be put out of the
ballgame.
Finally, the remarks of
Republican Senate Leader
Mitch McConnell (Ky.) illus-
trates what a tough, cruel
world members of Congress
live in. Last week, he was for
Craig resigning because of his
conduct The day after Craig
announced his resignation,
McConnell talked about Craig's
"great" 30-year career he
helped end and didn't blush.

Lou Frey Jr. is a political
analyst, commentator and
newspaper columnist and for-
mer Florida rep-resentative in
Congress. Send e-mail to
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


uLCflOhIm FLEEIO
HELD TDAY.-IS TODAY.


COMMENTARY


.t








4C SUNDAY, SErPTIMBEIR 9, 2007 COMMENTARY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Where do teens go to get alcohol?


It's that time of year again
when students shed their
beach towels for book bags
and embark on a school year
full of new challenges and expe-
riences. As students prepare for
their academic lessons, the fed-
eral government is reaching out
to parents and other adults
about an important life lesson
on underage drinking.
During the week of Sept. 10,
the Federal Trade
Commission (FTC) is putting a
national spotlight on underage
drinking with "National We
Don't Serve Teens Week" to
spread the word that serving
alcohol to teens is unsafe, ille-


gal and irresponsible. Ray
Federal and state Sca:
government leaders, OTI
state attorneys gener-
al, media organiza- VOI
tions, the beverage
alcohol industry and communi-
ty groups across the country are
supporting this initiative by dis-
playing and distributing free
materials publicizing the cam-
paign.
Having spent more than 40
years in the practice of medi-
cine, I have spoken to numer-
ous parents about the serious
consequences of underage
drinking. While most parents
realize that teen drinking is


rn
le
H
M


nond linked to injury and
ttar risky behavior, they
are often surprised to
IER learn where their
CES teens are getting the
alcohol.
According to scientific
research, most teens who drink
obtain alcohol from social
sources. This means they are
sneaking alcohol from their par-
ents' homes, having older
friends buy it or are obtaining it
at parties. Adults who provide
alcohol to teens not only under-
mine the efforts of parents to
protect their kids, but they also
are breaking the law.
Recognizing these concerns,


the FTC, the nation's consumer
protection agency, has devel-
oped an education campaign,
"We Don't Serve Teens," provid-
ing information about teen
drinking, how to reduce teens'
access to alcohol and practical
tips on talking to teens about
alcohol. The FTC's campaign
message and resource materi-
als can be accessed via the
www.DontServeTeens.gov Web
site.
There are a few easy steps
parents can take at home. Let
your teen know that underage
drinking can cause health and
safety consequences, as well as
serious legal consequences for


the person who provides the
alcohol. Keep track of the alco-
hol in your home. Make sure
teens can't access it without
your knowledge.
Take steps outside your
home, too. Stand up and spread
the word to your friends, neigh-
bors and family members that
you do not want other people
serving alcohol to your teen.
Don't let your silence be misin-
terpreted.
While parents may think they
have no impact on their teens'
behavior, teenagers consistently
rank their parents as the most
influential factor in their deci-
sions about alcohol consump-


tion. Importantly, parents need
to talk to their teens about
underage drinking.
Join the effort to mark
"National We Don't Serve Teen
Week" in your own home and in
your community. Working
together, we can reduce teen
drinking by stopping teens' easy
access to alcohol.


Raymond Scalettar, M.D.,
D.Sc., is the former Chair of
the American Medical
Association and is a medical
adviser to the Distilled Spirits
Council. He can be reached at
(202) 223-8911.


LETTERS Kto the Editor-


Crackdown on illegals
Now that the government has decided to
enforce 1-9 requirements, many employers are
crying foul. What gives? They broke the law
and got by with it for years.
During this time, all the money saved by
employing these workers should have been
used to build their financial reserves. After all,
they should have anticipated a day of reckon-
ing. If they had been saving all the extra money
they earned using cheap help, they should be
able to coast while they bring their hiring prac-
tices into compliance with the law.
Also, the argument is often repeated that
these illegals are good, law-abiding citizens.
Huh? Is it not illegal to enter this country with-
out proper documentation? I would argue that
no illegal resident is a law-abiding citizen.
Most of us are not given the option of obeying
only the laws we agree with.
More than anything else, our government is
failing us when this situation is allowed to per-
sist. If more immigrants are needed, there
surely can be a way to bring them here legally.
Lacking is the will to accomplish this.
When one thinks about the situation, it really
amounts to cruel and unusual punishment
These people risk their wellbeing and their
lives to get here, and then have to live in con-
stant fear of being caught Unscrupulous


employers often keep them in bondage as well.
Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had people in
leadership who would do the right thing for a
change by correcting this bad situation?
Instead, they continue making excuses just to
get a few votes or another large campaign
donation from a misguided lobbyist
Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa

District thanks
The Most Worshipful Grand Master of Masons,
Robert P Harry Jr., along with the Grand Staff
Officers, District Deputy Grand Masters, District
Instructors and Appointed Grand Line Officers
made their official visit Aug. 17.
District 19 is composed of 11 Masonic lodges,
which hosted an indoor picnic with more than
350 in attendance. The host lodges formally
received the Grand Master in full and ancient
custom in Brotherhood Masonic Lodge No. 375,
Brooksville.
I would like to take this opportunity to
extend a thank you on behalf of the Most
Worshipful Grand Master, to all who participat-
ed in the preparation of making this event a
great success.
Alan Walls
District Deputy Grand Master, Dist. 19


Mulligan stew 0
I hope to God Gerry
Mulligan is a frustrat- ' . ,
ed fiction writer. I
can't believe he has .00
all this trouble putting
a pontoon boat in the
wateriand going to
the airport and going
to Ireland and back - ,L'
He's just a frustrated .563
writer, I hope. I hope
this is not really
Gerry.
Drinking at park
It's about time the Citrus
County sheriff took a look at
the homeless/alcohol problem
at Hernando Beach Park in
Hernando. The alcohol and the
homeless people go hand in
hand, as does the local day
labor. Things are starting to get
violent between the people who
don't drink and the people who
do drink. Somebody's going to
get seriously hurt if the county
and the sheriff's office don't
take a serious look real soon.
Utter at park
I'm calling about the Beverly
Hills Community Park. The


REFLECTIONS
Continued from Page 1C

have to be perfect to be loved."
Minnie held tight to those she
needed and those who needed
her.
* An open door is an open
heart. Minnie's kitchen table
was a place where others came
to eat and be fed spiritually. If
a neighbor or their family had
a problem, she was there for
them. "If I needed them, I'd
hope for the same treatment."
The golden rule cannot tar-
nish.
* Waste not; want not.
Finishing our meals or saving
leftovers for another time is
one of the most compelling
constants for our elders. Many
remembered the pangs of dep-
rivation, so therefore valued
the food on their plates and
the treasure of having enough



WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

tion pond into a beautiful
place to visit. The city even
developed a festival to cele-
brate the place. While Crystal
River may have seen more
commercial growth than
Inverness, the downtown sec-
tion along Citrus Avenue has
remained pretty sleepy. Ed
and Kay Tolle own properties


4


destruction and litter
over the past few
months, apparently
during the overnight
hours, is terrible.
Lots of people walk
the park in the morn-
,.l. ing and now we're
_A .walking around trash
and debris and every-
thing else. It's time
579 for the sheriff or
somebody to do
overnight patrols in
there. We need to take that
back for the people that really
enjoy it.
Break for clubs
Citrus County tax assessor
has exempted 55 clubs, club-
houses in different subdivi-
sions. I wish the county would
have the guts to list all 55 of
these clubs. I would hate to
think that maybe the club-
house in Black Diamond is
being exempt from property
tax. I've got a feeling we're
going to see some of the rich-
est developers in this county
just got a huge break while
they raised the taxes on the
working people.


to eat for everyone. Minnie
always made a little extra, just
in case an unexpected visitor
came for dinner.
* Charity begins at home. As
little as they had, our grand-
parents always seemed to find
a way to help others in need.
Minnie had a tin can in which
she would drop coins. 'A little
something for those with less
than us." Their example of giv-
ing, both through volunteer
time and money, provided the
family a clear sense of appre-
ciating the value of what we
had. Reaching across the
street to help others is good for
them and us, too!
* Cleanliness is next to god-
liness. A clean home is the
symbol of how we should con-
duct our lives in the sight of
others. Minnie swept the side-
walk in front of her house
almost every day. "When our
guests come to our door, they
should have a clear and wel-


on Citrus Avenue and they
have developed those sections
nicely, but the downtown
Crystal River area was a lot
busier in the 1940s than it is
today
Bruce Garrison, an unsuc-
cessful candidate for mayor
during the last election, was
not discouraged by his election
loss. Instead of having hurt
feelings, Garrison has become
an enthused leader of the
Crystal River Redevelopment
Agency


Tennis stars
Could you please explain why
you have a picture of Serena
Williams, that tacky, obnoxious
girl, on the front page of
Sports when Justine Henin, No.
1 in the world, sent her home
with her tail between her legs,
and there's no picture of
Justine?
Rainbow dog
To the people in Homosassa
whose dog has come home col-
ored blue, green and purple
this past week: He will continue
to come home in a variety of
colors until I can get animal
control out here to pick him
up. If you don't want a rain-
bow-colored dog, please keep
him home.
Ant nuisance
I was wondering if some-
body out there could tell me
how to get rid of ants in the
yard. I've got them all on the
sidewalk, in the yard. I've
sprayed, but it doesn't seem
to keep them away but only for
about a couple of hours.
Anybody got any suggestions?
I'd appreciate it.


coming path." Picking up after
ourselves so those who follow
us have a clean path is a great
lesson personally and environ-
mentally.
* Progress comes in little
steps. Expecting too much too
soon is unreasonable. "A drop
plus a drop fills up the pot"
was among Minnie's favorite
phrases. Every day is another
opportunity to take positive
steps for family and for com-
munity. Her crocheting and
knitting prowess proved that
each stitch is essential to make
a beautiful garment.
* Laughter is the closest dis-
tance between two people. It's
a pleasure to enjoy the compa-
ny of others and to hear a good
joke, tell a witty story, and lis-
ten to the folk tales of the old
country. These amusements
are among life's great gifts.
"Frowns make more wrinkles
than smiles," Minnie would
say with glee.


The CRA is an independent
semi-government agency that
actually has its own funding
source from the increased
value of land in the downtown
district The group has been
using those dollars to begin the
revitalization of the downtown
district, but the going has been
slow. Because the valuation of
property in the district has
increased in recent years, the
CRA suddenly finds that more
dollars are flowing its way.
Garrison and the other mem-


* Honest compliments are
our most valued possessions.
Giving credit when credit is
due, and honoring the leader-
ship of those whose energy and
enthusiasm helps others, is
important. "People shouldn't
assume you know about their
good works. Tell them they are
appreciated." And if someone
compliments you, accept the
gift with grace.
* If there's a problem, try to
fix it. Minnie said, "You'll sit a
long time with your mouth
wide open before a roasted
chicken will fly in." Ignoring a
problem is neither smart nor
sensible. Even a failed attempt
at solving the problem is better
than not doing anything.
* Don't leave politics up to
someone else. As an immigrant
girl, Minnie felt the sting of dis-
crimination and injustice. She
was a suffragist as a young
woman, and upon becoming a
naturalized citizen, she voted


bers of the CRA want to start
making things happen.
Property has been pur-
chased on Third Street and a
dock has been constructed.
The group has not given up on
the idea of building a board-
walk from the Best Western all
the way around to the Third
Street park. Wouldn't it be
great if visitors and residents
could actually see Kings Bay
and enjoy the incredible beau-
ty of our area?
But the district won't get


for the first time in 1920.
Minnie celebrated that right by
never missing an election in
her life. Even into her 90s,
when she had to be helped into
the voting booth, she did her
duty with dignity. "Power is
never given, it's won with
courage and hard work," she
said.
* Words without deeds are
empty. Someone who makes a
promise and doesn't keep his
word is an emotional thief.
"It's better to keep quiet than
make a meaningless offer."
How many people set others
up for disappointment by say-
ing rather than doing?
* Patience pays dividends.
Whether it was baking her
famous cinnamon buns or
preparing a full holiday dinner
for 16, Minnie knew that the
process required patience and
persistence. Slow food prepa-
ration may seem archaic, but
the beauty of yeast-raised


going until private investors
decide to work with the CRA to
map out a vision of what the
area should look like and then
pump the resources into the
area.
While city government is on
board, wouldn't it be nice if
county government relocated
its west side offices to the
downtown area? With a lot of
hard work, the old section of
Crystal River could end up
looking like downtown
Inverness.


dough, simmering spices, and
closely watched pots gave the
family an appreciation of the
love that went into so many
meals. "I like to cook because
when I see the faces of satis-
fied eaters, I'm happy."
* Resting is a reward for
working hard. Minnie earned
her rest, and made the time to
relax, listen to music, observe
nature, or read for pleasure.
"Too much of anything isn't
good." When the Sabbath
came, Minnie understood that
her rest provided the emotion-
al and physical renewal she
needed for a productive week
ahead.


Jack Levine is the founder
of4Generations Institute in
Tallahassee. Since 1973,
National Grandparents Day is
a United States secular holi-
day celebrated on the first
Sunday after Labor Day.


More jobs, more tourists,
more business and a nice place
to visit It all makes sense. It's
time for Crystal River to take a
big step forward.
The CRA meets at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 26,' at the
Yeoman House, 203 N.W Third
St, Crystal River.


Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com.


�.,- - �-. . '. .... , I - . I.- -


E










Crrnus or, /C( C) ox,,C HWETR UDY EPEBR9 075


LETTERS ! to the Editor


Spoiled brat
Kids like Nick Hogan are the rea-
son other parents have to pay high
insurance for their teenagers to
drive.
His father, whom I know from busi-
ness we did some years ago, must
know his kid has a spoiled brat syn-
drome and needs serious attention
now. I hope his license is pulled for a
while. I pray Hoke will take action,
not to protect, but to instruct before
someone is killed.
Gerald Ruble
Inverness

Don't cut education
During the special session in June
when lawmakers voted to trim prop-
erty taxes, they all promised to "hold
education harmless" against any
budget cutbacks. But mere weeks
later, a budget shortfall has threat-
ened to make that promise hollow.
Because of an economic downturn,
lawmakers will meet in September in
another special session to adjust the
budget downward. The governor and
legislative leaders are looking at pro-
gram cutbacks as the only option to
alleviate the shortfall. There is no
talk about other revenue options or
using the state's reserves.
My concern is that with the state
and federal government and the pub-
lic demanding more of schools, we
simply cannot afford the cutbacks.
Florida has always underfinanced
education. Just look at how we rank
when compared with other states.
And that's why public school employ-
ees are paid thousands less than


their counterparts in other states.
Please consider other options than
cutting public education when revis-
ing the budget
Chris Becker
Lecanto

Small steps
I was impressed with a letter pub-
lished in July by John L. Gaskins:
'Although our technology has
advanced dramatically during the
past 100 years, the mentality and
humanity of a great deal of the
human race hasn't advanced at all.
"We live in a world where coun-
tries still settle their differences by
killing large amounts of each other"
I was born in 1925 and lived
through the most violent, barbaric
20th century.
Theodore Dreiser (American
author 1871-1945) said: "Our civiliza-
tion is still in the middle stage:
scarcely beast, in that it is no longer
wholly guided by instinct; scarcely
human, in that it is not yet wholly
guided by reason."
David Collier
Inverness

Watching the river
The Aug. 29 edition of the
Chronicle mentioned the successful
river watch program run in neighbor-
ing Marion County on the Rainbow
River, and asked if this might be a
good idea here on the Crystal.
I think it is for many reasons.
There are a number of recreational
boaters who have taken safe boating


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETrERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to Ietters@chronicleonline.com.


courses and would present a confi-
dent, law-abiding presence, especial-
ly during the week when patrol boats
aren't often on the water. Having a
shallow draft boat would allow idling
into the headwaters of Kings Bay
(most law enforcement vessels stay in
deep water), at the "shallows" and
around the islands and into canals.
Please consider me a volunteer
interested in helping get such a citi-
zens' watch group together.
Bob Lewis
Crystal River

Levels of betrayal
We are writing a response to
Marilyn Day's letter of Aug. 28,


"Treasonous presidency." To use the
word treasonous to describe our
president is like the pot calling the
kettle black Definition of treason is:
"betrayal of one's own country, by
waging war against it or by con-
sciously and purposely acting to aid
its enemies," and that's exactly what
her letter does.
We are at war and there were and
still are WMDs. The war is not politi-
cal; it is religious. The WMDs are the
radical and fanatical faction of the
Moslem Religion. They have
declared war on us as Christians, not
Democrats or Republicans. Even the
atheists are not safe. There is no way
to negotiate with fanatics. We are
saddened by the fact that the main
stream Moslems have chosen not to,
or are afraid to, speak out against
this hatred. We, as a nation, must
march in unison. We must show a
united front against this global
threat. If we choose to continue this
internal political bickering, this war
will be lost and our children's chil-
dren will be quoting the Koran!
Those fanatics take no prisoners, and
do not respect life as we know it.
We are proud to be American, even
with her imperfections. America was
and still is the best hope this old
world has going for it. We are proud
of our president, also. He is a man of
conviction, and has the backbone to
stay the course, which he has set We
must be steadfast in our convictions,
"speak softly and carry a big stick!"
Wake up, America and speak up, tell
your congressmen to stay the course!
Also, the U.N. when first organized
was a legitimate organization, but
has now become corrupt and a waste


of time and money, aka, Somalia,
Darfur and Sudan.
Harold and Marilee Juricny
Hernando

Worst airport
I never would have believed it -
this is the second time this year I
have been in full agreement with
Gerry Mulligan's Sunday editorial
thoughts.
JFK is indeed the world's worst
airport, and I don't even have golf
clubs. I travel abroad several times
each year and have been in 23 or
more countries - some of which do
not even exist any longer - and I
absolutely refuse to go through JFK
Airport. It borders on the impossible
to get from one terminal to another
and the "go-to-hell!" attitude of work-
ers there just heightens the frustra-
tions.
When I flew into Sheremtiavo
Airport (Moscow) in the days of the
Soviet Union, they did not welcome
you to Moscow on the PA system -
they threatened prison if you took
photographs. Coming into Peng Lai,
Wei Hai or Luiten, there were always
Chinese soldiers with AK-47 weapons
every 100 feet or so.
None of that compares to the "You
are an intruder into my life" attitude
from just about everyone at JFK
And so for the second time this year,
I am in full agreement with Gerry
Mulligan - whooda' thunk it? I'd bet-
ter check my voter's card to make
sure I'm not turning into a liberal.
Harry Cooper

Hernando


13
Playhioue 19-
Threepenny Opera


14
Save Our Waters
Week Begins
CCH Fundraising
Banquet
Plj\ house 19-
Threepennr, Opera


15
AKC
Responsible Dog
Ownership DJa
Playhouse 10
Threepenrn Operr


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Sird

, PIhu,,ew Three MNanatee MNster ACT-The Mouse \CT-Thc ..ue Tr:.
S Pennn ()per Golf Tournamnient Trap Sunsei Festikal
Pljahouse \I - Plaj\huse I-10- Chnsinu', in Scpl
Threepenny Opera Threepen, Opera Spanish Amer Golf

, hJi A \ D[.j l)Bc ' .\Suul
'__ _ Threepenn\ i(peri


23
Playhouse 19 - Three
Pennri Opera
Sweet Adelines
Beuond the Mu n


26

De il Rays Tnp
E-Nini-Hassee
Spauheni Dinner
Nlilitar Crad Pany


27


Pla. houe 19 -
Threepenn) Opera
ACT-Mouse Trap


28


Playhouse 19-
Threepenny Opera
ACT-Miouse Trap


29 Heaklh E.po
Threepenny Opera
ACT-Nlouse Trap
Shenff 5K Run
(OkLoberfest

K-9 Deputh D,., .:


- N
"'V
'N ~


September 15 - 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Chronicle 1524 N MeadoAcrestBl.d Crystal Ri.er






The dogs are

coming! m a


b...d r..j 1- 1- A jr, 1-- I :tO -c ,I'' jl
i~kI.I-.2. iiu Ii j r.J Lf.�[iji


Pet Look-A-Like Contest ]j...-.


*Sherlfi s dog demo
*Meet the Breeds
*Micro-Chip clinic
guiltyy demo


*Canine massage
*Bloodhound search demo
*Pel contests
edsndors for dog items


Canine Good Citizen testing

For more irtrnm rion call Janet at 79r - ir,.ernssskenrielclub cor
S : 7.: .3 i.,.1 .:1 311 -r . C, :,)r.. ~r.-:y p 3, ir .-A:,, a kC org


I _____________ .5 1 J ______________ & _____________ J ______________ _________________
ii.-


* Citrus Spring
* Playhouse 19
- Salute to our
t Citrus Jazz S
* Manatee Fes
* Sporls/Celeb
* Flanagan Me
* Martin Lulher
* Martin Luther
* CFCC Perfor
* Caltle Barons
* West Citrus E
* Tractor Pull &
A ACT - Pygma
* Parade of Fa
* Galaxy of Sta
* Gulf-Island T


* ACT - Pygma
* Allrusa Monti
* Junior Achiev
* Crusin' At Th
* Light Shine-I
* Fitness in Cil
* Citrus County
, NAMI - Walk
* Citrus Spring
* Barbershopp
* CFCC Perfor
* Playhouse 1!
* Beverly Hills
* Celebration I
* 'School'astic
* CCBA Parad
* Grand Ole O
* Purple Heart
* African-Amei
* Spring Fling
* Savor The Ar
* GCUSBCAV

. -
* Playhouse 1'
* Strawberry F
* Manalee Cai
* WCE Card P
* CR Historic I
* Citrus Count
* Fourth Annua
* Italian Street
* Sleak & Stea
. Charity Ball
* Irish Variety
* CFCC Perlor
* Plant S Gard
* Citrus Memo
Ou
* CS Concert


s Concert Series -
9-Assassins
Community
Society
tival
rity Auction/Dinner Dance
mortal Golf Tournament
r King, Jr. Celebration
r King, Jr. Parade
ming Arts -Mac Frampton
s' Ball
Elks Parade of Fashions
&Show
lion
shions
irs
heater-Knock Em Dead


lion
e Carlo Night
vement Bowl-a-thon
e Hop
A Social History of Florida
trus begins
y Jazz Society Jam
of Hope
is Conceit Series -Rich Natole
ers Singing Valentines
rming Arts-
9 - Assassins
International Festival
Fashion Show
Golf Tournamnet
e of Homes
pry
Ceremony
rican History Month
rt
/omen's Bowling


9 - Songs for a New World
estival
r & Truck Show
arty
Home Tours
y Jazz Society Jam
al Car & Truck Show
t Festival
ak
Show
rming Arts
len Expo
irial Health Systems Salute to
r Community
Series
.i t W'"t ..


* Fashion Cares
* Homosassa Rotary - New Odyssey
* St. Pal's Golf Tournament
* Citrus County Fair
* Crazy For Quilting
* Mickey Finn Show
* Fort Cooper Days
* Springs Fashion Show
* Luminary Art Night
* Corvettes In The Sunshine
* Walk For Life
* Marble Expo
* Captivating Styles
* Clean Air Ride
* Wood Wind & Water
* SCORE Golf Classic
* ACT - Wife Begins at Forty
* Fitness in Citrus
* Inverness Relay For Life
* United Way Awards Luncheon
* Power Boat Races
* Black Tie & Blue Jeans
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Citrus Community Concert Choir
* Sugamill Chorale Concert


Power Boat Races
Friends of the Library Book Sale
Citrus Jazz Jam
Citrus Community Concert Choir
Engaging Mature Workers Week
* Fnends of the Library Book Sale
Swing For A Cure
Christians United In Christ Golf
Citrus Spnngs Concert Series
Dinner and a Song
Nature Coast Dog Walk
Zeke Lapinski Golf Tournament
Playhouse 19 - Proof
Market Days and Garden Show
Run With The Mayor
Am Irish Club Golf Tournament
Friends of Dunnellon Library Book Sale
Bowl For Kids Sake
Me and My SK8 Contest
Week of the Young Child
Citrus County Bass Challenge

I.. l _ I I
* Supenntendent's Golf
* Volunteer Fair
* Earth Day Bird-A-Thon
* ACT- Curtain Up On Murder
* Car Wash and Bazaar
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Swing Inlo Spring
* CCBA Fishing Tournament
* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Central Ridge Relay For Life


* Panther Golf Tournament
* Casting For Kids
* Goods and Services Dinner/Auction
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Nereids Cards & Games Party
* Cool Springs Ranch Balloon Classic
* Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
* Gospel Jubilee
* Greater Gas Association Fishing Tournm.
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Informational Fiesta
* Flag Day
* A Day of Fine Arts
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Rotoract Kickball Tournament
* Swing With The Breez
* Mother's Tea
* ACT - Curtain Up On Murder
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
* Citrus Memorial Ball
* Spring Greek Festival
* Fly-In
* LHS Project Graduation
* CHS Project Graduation
* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Comedy Show


* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Fiesta Tropicale
* An Affair To Remember
Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
Homosassa Fireworks Show
Cobia Big Fish Tournament
Hernando Heritage Yard Sale
Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
Rolling Thunder Golf Tournament
* ACT- Music Man


Patriotic Evening
See II My Way Exhibit
Crystal River Fireworks
ACT- Music Man
Run For The Money Auclion
Key Run For the Money
Key Center Telethon
Boys & Girls Club Car Raffle Drawing
Stuff The Bus
Citrus Community Concert Choir


Stuff The Bus
Kids Take Me Fishing Clinic
Business Women's Luncheon
Ovarian Cancer 5K Run
* CRHS Pirates Golf Tournament
* United Way Kickoff
* Back To School Workshop


* Senior Foundation Devil Rays Trip
* Citrus Radiology Golf Tournament
* Gulf Island Theater - One Hundred Years
* CHS Reunion

- -E�~iiL-'
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Sell Your Own Treasures
* Veterans Golf Tournament
* Save our Waters Week
* CCH Annual Fundraiser Banquet
* AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day
* Manatee Masters Golf Tournament
* Sertoma Sock Hop
* ACT- The Mouse Trap
* Sunset Festival
* Playhouse 19 - Threepenny Opera
* Spanish American Golf Tournament
* What A Day To Be A Scout!
* Beat The Sheriff 5K Run
*Chnstmas in September
* Sweet Adelines Beyond The Music
* Senior Foundation Devil Rays Trip
* Knights of Columbus Card Party
* German Club Oktoberfest
* Women's Health & Fitness Expo
* Big Yard Sale
* E-Ninm-Hassee Spaghetti Dinner
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog


ACT- The Mouse Trap
Rails to Trails Bike Ride
* Playhouse 19 - Threepenny Opera
* West Citrus Elks Annual Card Party
* Realtors Benefit Golf Tournament
* Night of the Heron
* Arts De Fall
SKnights of Coumbus Craft Fair
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Sertoma Oktoberfest
* Day of Caring/Make a Difference Day
* Fnends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* SI. Scholastica Men's Club Craft Show
* ACT-The Mouse Trap
E-Nini-Hassee Pumkin Patch
Columbus Day Memonal Service
National Wildlife Refuge Week
Southwest Regional Chili Cook Off
CCBA Parade of Homes
Nature Coast Fine Arts Show
2007-2008 Jazz Concert Series
* Artisans Boutique
* Cattle Drive
* Taste of Citrus
* CRWC Arts and Crafts Festival
* Great American Cooler Fest
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Coolerween
* Cooler Tnathalon


J-li i: l l
- -- - T,, O
* Women of Sugarmill Woods Fashion Show
* Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
* Support Staff Workshop
* BH Lions Arts & Crafts Show
* One Man Show
* Playhouse 19 - Rumors
* Healthy Living Fair
* Dodge For Dollars
* ACT- The Gingerbread Lady
. CMH Concert Series - One-Man Variety
* St. Scholastica CCW Fall Fashion Show
* CCBA Home and Outdoors Show
* Women of Sugarmill Fashion Show
* Festival of the Arts
* St. Scholastica Golf
* Continuity of Care Wine Auction
* Veterans Fair
. Homosassa Lions Christmas Square
* Rotary Radio/TV Auction
. Knights of Columbus Nickle Social
* Citrus Springs Concert Series
* Veterans Day Parade/Memorial Service
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Homosassa Book Sale
* Humane Society Ride For Rescue
* Caruth Camp Challenge
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
* Parade of Trees
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
* Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
* West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
* Dunnellon Library Book Sale


* CMH Concert Senes-The Amazing Crooner
* CRWC Silver BElls
. Floral City Heritage Days
* Playhouse 19 - Rumors
* CCCC Handels' Messiah
* IWC Aunt Sarah's Kitchen
* Father Chnstmas Ball
* Crystal River Chnstmas Parade
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* Crystal River Chnstmas Parade
* CFCC Performing Arts
* Crystal River Chnstmas Parade
* BH Holiday Parade
* Sugarmill Chorale Concert
* Celebration of Lights
* Chronicle/Pines Tennis Tournament
* Country Rocks the Canyon
. Inverness Chnstmas Parade
* Citrus Jazz Society
SBeverly Hills Parade
* Citrus Spnngs Parade
* Homosassa Boat Parade
* Night of Lights


4,j9






AIsI


10


CF


11


12


JOIN THE FUN!


24


25


ii


. ..... .. ..
Ft -r-! M
ON Ilk


. q.P.- -


SUNDAY, SEPrEmBER 9, 2007 SC


C OMMEN1CARY


Ciw~ FL) CHRONICLE






BC SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 9. 2007 CIJRUs CoUN'IY (FL) Ci IIONICLli


U


V ....<......7>


-0-- HYunDRI
2008 SONATA GLS Drive your way'


A/C* Power Windows & Locks Stereo w/CD .. 7-.
*Airbags *Electronic Stability Control
OWN FOR OR LEASE FOR
MO




. SAFETY LEADER * AT VALUE
q - " ' .- "
'cc.. "'... . .. " ""I " '"-J4

S. ,j ;. 3 ,.-
L.7A , . , i.,, ,
2�W7 A,


PAMVIERICA'S BEST WARRANTY


5 Year/60,000 Mile Bumper To Bumper Coverage * 5 Year Unlimited Miles 24 hr Roadside Assistance
*See dealer for LIMITED WARRANTY details."The Hyundai AdvantageTM"


Front & Side Curtain
Airbags


2007 ACCENT


." *'""'^ ^ . .


Model#14323


2007 TUCSON
Air Conditinninqs Power Windows &
Lucks, AM/FM Stereo CD
-i" 0 K L * rilcely Equipped


2007 ELANTRA


Keyless Entry * Power
Windows & Locks * Airbags


2007 TIBURON
AM/FM Stereo* Front
& Side Curtain Alrbags


I


Model #43403 J



2007 ENTOURAGE
World's Most Etquipped
Minivan


Model u o "- Model #90522 ,
._ .;. -. --- ..l,.- t,,

a'-a .-_ , . -


Model#52323


2007 AZ RA
Beautifully Equipped * ABS * Auto ' Full
41P' Fov'el �Air -iaction & Stability Control
�,tAlloy Wheels More


Model#72402


$!,990


2007 SANTA FE GLS



SV=6
Model #61423
OWN FOR OR LEASE FOR
i lMO

MONTHS


NEW 2007 VERACRUZ




IN 3 ROWS
S Model #A0422
E FOR
2QQ C:4
59^mes-�


10 YEAR/100,000 MILES FACTORY WARRANTY* 150 POINT INSPECTION * ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE * COMPLIMENTARY TOWING * VEHICLE RENTAL
All offers with approved credit and cannot be combined. Prices are plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee. Prices before any dealer Installed options. Offers can not be combined. Programs subject to change without notice **This policy s In place to guarantee customer satisfaction and
should not be confused with return policy. All prices include all manufacturer rebates and Incentives. Sonata GLS Option kg 1, $199 mo lease x 24 months requires $2499 plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee due at signing. Santa Fe GS Option Pkg 21, $259 mo lease x 24 months
requires $1999 plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee due at signing. Veracruz GLS, $299 mo lease x 24 months requires $2499 plus tax, tag & $599 dealer fee due at signing. tSee us for details. Certified Factory Warranty begins from date vehicle first put into service & 0 mileage.


f~


100% CONFIDENTIAL! "
NO SALESPERSON INVOLVED! L A A .


Model#26403


3 DAY EXCHANGE FOR HASSLE FREE BUYING.I**


Onus CouNjy (FL) Cfmowcix


6CSUNDAY, SEHITFMBFR 9, 2007


SN � � LIR'' V� � I C. E.,


tap
tap


%i, I1


41,110,


MW
LEAS









CHAMBER CONNECTION
BANK RATE CHART
BUSINESS DIGEST
CLASSIFIED


D
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007
www.chronicleonline corn


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Houses on the auction block


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


People gather around to bid July 20 on the house in the ba'-kgn in. for auction ir Ocean Township. N.J.

Wamnabe home buyers comb real estate auctiomns for bargains


Ai-lsointed Prc..'5


About 60 people huddle on the front la nii ofthe
white b.uniaa-low with green shutters in Ocean
Touwnshlip. NJ. Parents itith children in too,
meander on the porch. while others weave in and
out of the reshIhl painted rooms. inspecting appli-
ances andr their' w-id 'i ,-loir plinks
Man.\ of them clutch bright yellow paper -i_' ls
showing a bidder number. The.\ hope to walk
away \ ith a house. w\innini a good deal at an autc-
tion while sidestepping the typical six-month
house hunt \ ith a real estate agent
.As the hotisin market sslows aknd toreelosirees
spike, people who ha\e to sell quickly or lenders
\ ho need to unload properties they took back at
sheriff's auctions are turning to the tast-talkung
spectacle for quick sales Even somiie home-
builders and condo developers are using autc-
tions to reduce exces-, in'entorly
These auctions differ tromi sheriff's sales,
trustee's sales or coui'thousLIe sales. which con-
clude the foreclosure process and are conducted
by the count Often. the lender wins the proper-
t\ at these sales and then trie- to resell it b. auc-
tion
Last year: revenue from housing auctions grew%

� o-- . - - . - - . .


12.5 percent to $16 billion from $14.22 billion inI
2005. according to the National Auctioneers
Association From 2003 through 2006. residential
real estate w\as the fastest expanding auction sec-
tor, the trade mroup reported.
Auctions represent only a sliver of the overall
housing sales market,
lust less than 1 percent From 2003 tl
of the- $1 74 trilli ,in in
exi-ting home sales last residential real
\eal:
But those in the real fastest expai
estate auction industry
are hoping the current sector, the trade
market conditions will
continue to boost bust-
ness Already, states that never hosted many
housing auctions are seeing demand jump as'
home prices plunge and more borrowers find
themselves trapped in unmanageable mortgages.
"Until six nionths ago, we were only selling
assets in Califlornia periodicall.. now we're sell-
ing dozens and it could get into the hundreds."
said Dean Williams, chief executive of auction
firm Williams & Williams Marketing Sernices Inc
"Same things in Massachusetts. New York,
Mar land and Virginia. Places where volume has
been light has probably doubled since last \ear"


h


n


At the Williams & Williams auction in Ocean
Tow nship. the schedule is futill Thie bun, ialow and
tci ollsite properties - a condo in Monroe. N.J..
and a four-bedroom house in Trenton, N J. - are
up tor sale
Offsite auctions are risk~, though, auctioneer
Da nnI Greeni sas "YO
rough 2006, na u 1e ,no one look at
thW,.e h,_, bI %-" eore-
estate was the Ianld aid i1e icddine
-uLfters a bit." hlie said
hiding auction But the prospects 10br
the bungalow look 3ood
group reported. Us the -ro.1 gro) s to :80.
.iilh 35 registered bid-

"If .\ou Let a crowd thil- laire. ,oi, call get Lair
market value,' he said
However. 29-year-old Tricia Kell$. a local living
with her parents, is hoping t'or a bargain. Exeni
though the housing sltinp lias stopped the sharp
acceleration orf home prices. Kelly still finds
prices are too high for her in this toxin
She's been looking around tor three months
\with a real estate agent, but wanted to see what
an atiction could offer
Pleae e /Page 2D


Help File: Stick with MP3s for Mac and PC


RoB PEGORARO
The Washington Post
Q. Can I use both Windows
Media Player and iTunes with
the same music collection? I
have an iPod, but I can't use
iTunes in my PC's Media
Center interface.
A The easiest way to do this
is to keep an MP3-only music
collection. Both iTunes and
Windows Media Player can


read that file format, and both
programs store songs in the
same standard music folders.
' But you'll have to change the
defaults in Windows Media
Player and iTunes to have them
rip audio CDs in MP3 format In
Windows Media Player, click on
the "Rip" heading and select
the "Format" submenu. In
iTunes, go to the Edit menu,
select Preferences, click on the
Advanced tab and then click on


the "Importing" tab. (In each
program, picking a higher bit
rate than the usual 128 kbps can
yield better sound quality.)
If you have some Windows
Media Audio files in your col-
lection, iTunes can convert
them to MP3 files automatically
when you first run it If, howev-
er, your iTunes library includes
songs in AAC format - bought
at Apple's iTunes Store or
copied from your own CDs -


you'll need extra help.
Try MCE Tunes
(mcetunes.com); its $15 version
can merge regular AAC files
into Windows Media Player's
library, while its $30 Pro version
can also bring over iTunes Store
downloads.
Q. Regular Mac and PC key-
boards have a "forward delete"
key, but my new MacBook does-
n't Is that command not possi-
ble on Apple laptops?


A Hit the Fn and Delete keys
together to erase text to the
right of the cursor This is a bit
of a secret, as the labels on
these keys don't mention this,
nor does the MacBook manual.
Even a rep on Apple's help line
didn't know of this shortcut
when I called last week Apple's
technical-support site lists this
and other keyboard shortcuts at
docs,info.apple.com/article.htm
l?artnum75459.


Creative coupon use pays off for some readers


our savings strategies
have helped me save
more, so I naturally
believe these will help some
of you save more money, too.
Despite the fact that grocery
prices seem to be rising every
week, smart shoppers can
manage to stretch their dol-
lars if they look for special
promotional programs.


Stephani
COUI


DEAR STEPHANIE: I have M4
a family of six and don't know
what I'd do without coupons.
Many people (including my parents)
don't use coupons and don't realize how
much money they could save within one
shopping trip especially with "free
items." One time I showed my father my
shopping list, which consisted of at
least 35 items (including meat), and it
only cost me $20. His eyes got huge! -
April E. of Pottsville, Pa.


Vitamin-buying ABCs
DEAR STEPHANIE:
Here's a suggestion for peo-
ple who buy vitamins. Buy
Nature Made Vitamins and
earn points for a free bottle
of vitamins. After you earn
500 points, they mail you a
coupon for a free bottle of
e Nelson vitamins (worth up to $7).
PON When you get your coupon,
wait for the store to have
"buy one, get one free" deals.
If you redeem your coupon
during the deal time period,
you can get two bottles of vitamins (up
to $7) for almost nothing (you may have
to pay taxes). - Josh B. of Matthews,
N.C.
I went to the Nature Made Web site to
learn more about the program. Each
vitamin is worth a different number of
points, which are listed. On average, a


bottle is worth about 100 points, so buy-
ing about five bottles would earn a free
bottle. You do not need to mail in any
UPC codes or labels, you simply join
their "Wellness Rewards" program and
enter the codes online at the Nature
Made Web site. You can also print free
coupons for the vitamins from the
Nature Made Web site on your first
visit. So if you buy your initial bottles
when they are selling at half price and
use your coupons, you may be on your
way to a free bottle (or two during "buy
one, get one free" sales) very soon at a
very low cost. Visit
www.naturemade.com for more details.
No prescription for saving
DEAR STEPHANIE: I have conclud-
ed that I am not enchanted with the
CVS Extra Rewards bonuses. Although
one receives their rebate on the spot, it
is essentially a CVS gift certificate, one
which must be used within 30 days, can


easily be misplaced and which, unlike a
gift card, must be used entirely in one
visit. I often find myself scrambling to
spend my Extra Rewards at CVS before
they expire, and having to buy things
that I might not necessarily be ready to
purchase, diminishing the luster of the
"free" promotions on which rebates are
offered. Although one must wait for a
check to be received by mail, I like Rite
Aid's rebate program the best. It is easy
to enter receipts through the Internet,
and a check is more desirable than
what is essentially store credit. The
problem I have with Rite Aid is that
throughout the chain's locations, I con-
sistently have difficulty finding sale
items in stock Walgreens provides a gift
card, which is less advantageous than a
check, but at least it may be used for
less than the full amount of its value,
and does not expire. - Oren S. of
Please see . ./Page 3D


From


fetus to


finals
DEAR BRUCE: I would
like to start saving edu-
cation money for my
unborn grandchild. I have
about $500 to start and would
like to continue to make
biweekly contributions, at
least $100. I have heard of a
Roth IRA, but I am not exactly
sure what that is. Could you
tell me the best avenue for my
savings? - M.J., via e-mail
DEAR M.J.: You are really
getting started early, investing
money for the kid when he's
not even out of the womb. You
mentioned the Roth, now
called the Coverdell
Education Savings Account,
which is not a bad way to go,
given that the money is spent
on education. It's 18 years'
worth of savings, and there is
no tax consequence. You also
should look into some of the
529 plans. There is a bunch out
there, but they are not all cre-
ated equal. Still, 529s have a
lot to recommend, but be cer-
tain to name yourself or the
parent as the custodian. Never
put money in a kid's name.
DEAR BRUCE: I saw my
insurance man, today and
made a few adjustments to my
auto policy. Since I have two
drivers under the age of 18, I
asked him if I had enough lia-
bility insurance. He said I
should have an umbrella poli-
cy for $1 million. My current
liability is $300,000 to $500,000.
Is this the policy I should
have? - KL, via e-mail
DEAR K.L: Your insurance
agent is doing you a service,
but the fact that you went to
see him and had to ask makes
me wonder about his paying
attention to details: $300,000 to
$500,000 an automobile is
almost like .being uninsured. It
is certainly underinsured. An
umbrella policy, which simply
means when your $300,000 or
$500,000 is exhausted the
umbrella will pick up an extra
million, is an absolute requi-
site. In fact, I would suggest $2
million or $3 million. The fact
that you have kids under 18
who are driving might make
the insurance company a little
nervous about underwriting
such a large umbrella policy If
you can get it, grab it You can
do a million dollars' worth of
damage without working up a
sweat. There are so many peo-
ple who run around with very
little insurance and think
they're properly insured, but
they are sadly mistaken.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 42, and
my husband is 46. Our
youngest will graduate high
school next year, and he wants
to find a way to go to college. I
need to know where we stand;
we have no retirement, but we
have several thousand'dollars
saved because we knew my
husband's job of 18 years
would be ending, as the film-
processing industry is going
the way of the dinosaur. We are
$20,000 in debt (mostly a car
loan). We have a 10-year-old
home on five acres, and owe
$50,000 on the mortgage. We
have not had it appraised, but
I would estimate its worth at
$200,000. Our house payment
is affordable no matter what
income level my husband's
next job will be. A few weeks
ago, a person asked you
whether he should buy a house
or rent and invest the differ-
ence. It got me to thinking ...
would it be foolish to sell our
house and use the profit to
invest for retirement? - B.H.,
via e-mail
DEAR B.H.: I like your style
Please see ; '. c/Page 2D


1:








"I

II



"I
Ii,
'II
,41
hA


�3


sl








2 D SUNDA',, SEPTrEMBER 9, 2007


Comcast cuts internet



service to bandwidth hogs


The Washington Post

The rapid growth of online
videos, music and games has
created a new Internet sin:
using it too much.
Comcast has punished some
transgressors by cutting off
their Internet service, arguing
that excessive downloaders
hog Internet capacity and slow
down the network for other
customers. The company
declines to reveal its down-
load limits.
"You have no way of know-
ing how much is too much,"
said Sandra Spalletta of
Rockville, Md., whose Internet
service was suspended in
March after Comcast sent her
a letter warning that she and
her teen-age son were using
too much bandwidth. They cut
back on downloads but were
still disconnected. She said
the company would not tell
her how to monitor their band-
width use in order to comply
with the limits.
"You want to think you can
rely on your home Internet
service and not wake up one
morning to find it turned off,"
said Spalletta, who filed a
* complaint with the
Montgomery County Office of
Cable and Communication


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

when you say your youngster
will find a way to go to college.
The idea that parents have to
pay for college when they can't
afford to is nonsense. You say
you have a few thousand dol-
lars saved - that's the good
news - but since you owe more
than $20,000, you are really in a
large hole. Your mortgage is
modest, and it is clear you can
afford it Leave the mortgage in
place and don't even consider
refinancing, even though, in
today's world, that would not be
possible. I see no reason to sell,
particularly since the market is
soft and you have to live some-
where. A house is more than a
financial investment; it's a way
of life.
You also mentioned your hus-
band's job will be going away,
and that's understandable. It
happened to people making
buggy whips, too. What are you
doing to prepare for that, and
what is he doing to scope out a
new occupation? It may be a lit-
tle more difficult at his
"advanced" age. He also might
want to consider some type of
self-employment. That has a lot
to recommend it
DEAR BRUCE: I have
$150,000 in my savings. I know I
need to move it, but I don't know
what to do. I have a 403(b) at
work and have lost quite a bit of
my initial investment. I am
reluctant to put it into stocks
and bonds, etc. Right now, I am
earning a disgusting .5 percent
interest on my savings. CDs are
not a good option because their
interest rates would only yield a
penalty at tax time. I would like
something safe that earns bet-
ter interest and doesn't tie up
my money I've spent too many
years being poor, so I don't want
my funds to be unavailable
should something untoward
happen.
Any suggestions? My bank is
hounding me, but I think that is
because they want me to invest
my money in their institution.
Please help. - J.M., via e-mail
DEAR J.M.: You are correct:
You are doing just about every-
thing wrong. You said you are
earning .5 percent of interest; in
reality, you are losing money
because inflation is greater
than .5 percent, so at the end of
the year, you have less buying
power than you had at the
beginning.
Like a lot of people, you got
burned in the marketplace so
you don't want to go there any-
more and that is a terrible
penalty. Anyone who has invest-
ed in the market has lost money
on occasion, but most usually
make money With the amount
of dollars in your savings, you
could clearly get some decent
advice from an honest, skilled
stockbroker. You will have to
take a little bit of risk, and you
shouldn't be looking at the mar-
ket every day With all its roller-


coaster moves, the market can
be a little disconcerting, but
you are investing for the longer
term. Whether the bank is the
place to invest is another mat-
ter In my opinion, the brokers
who work for banks are the
least talented of the crowd.
On balance, you should earn


Services. "I thought it was
unlimited service."
As Internet service
providers try to keep up with
the demand for increasingly
sophisticated online enter-
tainment such as high-defini-
tion movies, streaming TV
shows and interactive games,
such caps could become more
common, some analysts said.
It's unclear how many cus-
tomers have lost Internet serv-
ice because of overuse. So far,
only Comcast customers have
reported being affected.
Comcast said only a small
fraction of its customers use
enough bandwidth to warrant
pulling the plug on their serv-
ice.
Cable companies are facing
tough competition from tele-
phone giants like AT&T and
Verizon, which are installing
new cables capable of carry-
ing more Internet traffic.
The cable companies collec-
tively spent about $90 billion
in the past decade to improve
their networks. And on cable
networks, several hundred
subscribers often share an
Internet connection, so one
high-traffic user could slow
the rest of a neighborhood's
connections. Phone lines are
run directly to each home, so a

something on the average of 10
percent a year in the market-
place. That includes growth, as
well as interest, which is about
20 times better than you are
doing now. You are asking for
something safe, earns high
interest and doesn't tie up your
money Those are tough things
to combine. A certain amount
of risk is not a big deal; howev-
er, if you are totally risk-averse,
you are condemned to a very
low return on your savings.
That's the reality.
DEAR BRUCE: I am a single,
37-year-old female with no chil-
dren. I make $30,000 a year. I'm
paying off a student loan at $200
a month, a credit card at $200 a
month and the rest are regular
monthly bills ($1,000 per). I
recently started a 401(k), and I
am trying to save money for my
future and live more comfort-
ably now. I had a house foreclo-
sure in 2006, and my credit
went to boot I also plan to buy
a car at the end of 2007. How
can I increase my savings and
clean up my credit? - T.B., via
e-mail
DEAR T.B.: You have $25,000
to $26,000 a year after taxes aid
$1,400 minimum in monthly
expenses - that's got to be
pretty tight You most surely
want to make your 401(k) con-
tribution at least equal to the
employer's contribution.
There's not much you can do
about your credit. Since the
upheaval in the mortgage mar-
ket, a recent foreclosure is
going to be devastating to your
credit. And stay away from
companies that claim to fix
your credit score. That will just
wind up costing more money
Have you considered looking
for some part-time activity that
would generate more income?
If you put every dime of that
money toward savings, you
would geometrically increase
the likelihood of a happy
future.
DEAR BRUCE: What are the
pros and cons of having a nota-
rized document instead of a
will? Is it sufficient? I have
stubborn parents who refuse to
have a will made up. I have two
sisters, and one still lives at
home with my parents. I'm try-
ing to put something in writing
to alleviate future problems. -
R.M., via e-mail
DEAR R.M.: A notarization is
a legal notice that proves some-
one has signed a document-
nothing more, nothing less. A
notarized document does not in
any way supplement a will. You
mentioned your parents are
stubborn. You should consider
going to an attorney, explaining
the situation and having him
draw a simple reciprocal will,
leaving one to the other, with
you and your sisters as second-
ary beneficiaries. Then show
this to your parents, who would
just have to sign on the dotted
line. Many people don't want to
make a will because it says, in
essence, "I'm going to die," and
that's not something we choose


to acknowledge, particularly in
writing. Everyone needs a will.
You may want to explain to
your parents that if they worry
about expenses, dying without
a will is much more expensive
than dying with one.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a son
who is in prison. What kind of
investment plan can I start, in


single bandwidth hog will not
slow other connections.
As Internet users make
more demands of the network,
cable companies in particular
could soon end up with a criti-
cally short supply of band-
width, according to a report
released this month by ABI
Research, a New York market-
research firm. This could lead
to a bigger crackdown on
heavy bandwidth users, said
the report's author, Stan
Schatt.
"These new applications
require huge amounts of
bandwidth," he said. Cable
"used to have the upper hand
because they basically
enjoyed monopolies, but there
are more competitive pres-
sures now."
To trigger a disconnection
warning, customers would be
downloading the equivalent of
1,000 songs or four full-length
movies every day. Comcast
spokesman Charlie Douglas
declined to reveal specific
bandwidth limits.
"It's our responsibility to
make sure everyone has the
best service possible," he said,
"so we have to address abu-
sive activities so they won't
damage the experience for
other customers."

trust, for him? He is 22. -B.M.,
via e-mail
DEAR B.M.: I commiserate
with your having a kid in the
slammer. On the other hand,
maybe that's the best place for
him. At his age, he may learn
that whatever put him there is
not worth playing again. That
said: 1) How long is he in for?
and 2) In terms of his convic-
tion, were there any monetary
responsibilities placed on him?
These are things you ought to
know before putting money
away for him. Why not just
make investments in your own
name that are earmarked for
him? That way, there is no pos-
sibility of the money being
levied for any reason.
Furthermore, he would have no
access to it until such time as
you wish to provide access. If
he is still having problems, the
last thing you want to do is to
dump money into his pocket
You can start any type of invest-
ment plan you wish, just keep it
in your name for now.
DEAR BRUCE: At what age
should someone stop contribut-
ing to a Roth IRA? - KS., via e-
mail
DEAR KS.: There's no rea-
son to stop contributing to a
Roth IRA at any age as long as
you are eligible, meaning you
don't make too much money
The money will always be tax-
free and after the appropriate
time frame, it can be removed
with no penalties. The Roth is a
wonderful deal and if you have
after-tax dollars to invest, it can
be a wonderful thing. The
investments inside the Roth
need to be fine-tuned from time
to time. What is appropriate
now may not be appropriate
later on.
DEAR BRUCE: I am a stay-
at-home mom, and my husband
makes less than $50,000 a year,
so finances are tight. We have
four children ages 3 to 10, and
we have some money in savings
accounts for them. We try to
add a little when we can. I
know savings accounts don't
earn much interest, but every-
thing else seems too confusing. I
don't know whether to put it in a
529 plan, an IRA, a CD or some-
thing else. -J.V., via e-mail
DEAR J.V.: Saving money for
kids is always a good idea.
Saving in accounts with their
names on it is always a bad
idea. As you point out, regular
savings accounts earn almost no
interest If things are confusing,
you will have to do a little study-
ing. In general, a good 529 plan
is the way to go. If it's very mod-
est amounts of money, you could
take advantage of the Coverdell
Education Savings Account.
You understand that, with any
of these choices, you are going
to have to make some decisions
about whether the money goes
into mutual funds, stocks, etc. It
makes no sense to sock money
away in a savings account that is
actually worth less at the end of
the year than at the beginning.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, P. 0. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
of mail, personal replies can-
not be provided.


BLOCK
Continued from Page 1D

"I've never been to one. If
it's going where I want, I
might jump in," she.says.
Nearby, Sylvia Davis,
dressed coolly for the sum-
mer sun in a white skirt, tunic
and cap, watches the crowd. A
veteran of housing auctions
and real estate investments,
Davis has come to play ball.
Her advice to new bidders:
"Put a figure in mind, evalu-
ate the neighborhood and
come prepared to make a
price."
Lingering on the sidewalk,
Tim Lane is curious to see
what his old house will go for.
He sold the house two-and-a-
half years ago for $255,000 to
the investor who lost it in
foreclosure.
"The guy tried to flip it for
$379,000 a month later.
Obviously, it didn't work out,"
the 39-year-old electrician
says with a chuckle.
The house, on a main thor-
oughfare, is a mile from the
beach - a perfect starter
home. The two bedrooms are
generously proportioned and
a third small room could eas-


ily be turned into a nursery or
office.
The other two properties
are mysteries. The auction
notes describe the condo as a
two-bedroom, two-bath resi-
dence in a senior living com-
munity. The condo appears
decent in pictures on the auc-
tion Web site.
On the other hand, there
are no pictures of the single-
family home in Trenton,
which seems to turn off most
of the bidders.
"You all came here to buy
the houses as cheap as you
can, right? You came here to
steal it," Green roars into the
microphone. "Well, we're
here to sell it as high as those
trees." A murmur travels
through the crowd.
"Don't worry, we'll end up
somewhere in the middle," he
reassures them.
The condo is first and, just
like in the movies, Green rat-
tles off the bids without a
breath. The offers start to stall
on the condo after its opening
bid of $25,000, so Green tries
to entice the crowd.
"The last listing prices, for
this condo was $160,000," he
says.
Hands shoot up and Tony
Nardini, a 50-year-old mort-


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

gage broker, finally wins the
condo for $75,000.
The Trenton house is next.
After opening the bidding at
$10,000, Green quickly drops
it to $9,000, then $8,000. No
takers. Finally, at $7,000,
Davis raises her hand and the
crowd applauds.
"Now, here's the one you
have all come for," Green
says, pointing to the quiet
bungalow.
Opening at $50,000, the bid-
ding surges above $200,000.
Kelly shakes her head as the
price soars beyond her budg-
et.
Finally, Antonio Pragosa's
offer of $283,000 ends the bat-
tle for the bungalow, and the
West Long Branch, N.J., resi-
dent slips away shortly after
signing the auction papers.
Nardini, who grabbed the
condo for his parents, says:
"That guy paid way too much.
He let emotion take over as
opposed to reality. At
$200,000, it would have made
sense."
As for Davis, who paid
$7,000 for her house, sight
unseen, she hurries to her car
to drive to Trenton.
"It's a good buy, less thah
my watch," she pauses. "I
know, it's crazy"


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events.
* Include a contact name and phone number to be printed in the paper
* News releases are subject to editing
* Call 563.5660 for details.


When You Use The Advertising Power Of

The Chronicle And Add Chronicle Direct Mail,

You Will Reach Over




68,000 Households!



For more information call

352-563-5592.
ir � Puou y C I T R U S0


SCH NICLE

724774








ASUNDAY, S"I''jiM3 1 9, 2007 3D


:'CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pepsi to offer new


low-cal sports drink


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Pepsi is offer-
ing a new low-calorie version of
.Gatorade in an effort to keep
customers who have strayed
.from the sports drink in search
.of lower calorie drinks.
PepsiCo Inc., which
,announced plans for the low-cal
_G2 version of Gatorade on
/Friday, and its bigger rival The
-Coca-Cola Co. are aggressively
..competing for sales of non-car-
bonated beverages as health-
,conscious consumers shy away
from carbonated soft drinks.
PepsiCo, the nation's second
.biggest soft drink company, said
jin July that its sales of carbon-
ated soft drinks fell 4 percent in
the second quarter while non-
�arbonated drinks grew 3 per-
cent
Last year, non-carbonated
beverages accounted for 69 per-
,cent of PepsiCo Beverages
TNorth America's $9.57 billion in
2006 revenue, more than dou-
ble that from soft drinks that
made up 31 percent of the unit's
total. Gatorade has been a key
growth driver but sales have
slowed recently.
"G2 should help limit the
downside risk to a Gatorade
slowdown," Morgan Stanley
analyst Bill Pecoriello told
investors in a research report.


Gatorade sales slowed in the
second quarter after a 2 percent
to 3 percent price hike in March
and in comparison to sales that
had grown 29 percent a year
earlier
G2, PepsiCo said, will have 25
calories per eight-ounce serv-
ing and is the first new
Gatorade product since the
original drink was introduced
in 1967. The original lemon-
lime Gatorade has 50 calories
per eight-ounce serving.
Purchase, N.Y.-based
PepsiCo said it will distribute
G2 starting in December to con-
venience stores, gas stations
and retail outlets. The new
Gatorade will come in three fla-
vors: fruit punch, grape and
orange.
PepsiCo also announced on
Friday that it would introduce a
bottled water with caffeine and
vitamins called Propel
Invigorating Water; reformulate
its SoBe Life Water with
sucrose, antioxidants, vitamins
and fewer calories; and use a
new sweetener blend with
fewer calories for its Aquafina
Alive water.
In June, Coca-Cola bought
VitaminWater maker Glaceau
for $4.1 billion, a price tag that
signaled the company's serious-
ness in pursuing growth of non-
carbonated beverages.


4 Business DIGEST-

Lender to cut jobs Department used incorrect legal
LOS ANGELES - Struggling theories and "coercive and abu-
lender Countrywide Financial Corpg sive tactics" to win a conviction,
lender Countrywide Financial Corp. including threatening witnesses.
paid Friday it will cut as many as Skilling was sentenced last
2,000 jobs as it struggles to deal October to more than 24 years in
vith challenging conditions in the prison for his role in the collapse
mortgage industry, of Enron Corp., once the nation's
The company said the cuts, seventh-largest company. He was
amounting to as much as 20 per- convicted along with company
|cent of its workforce, are needed founder Kenneth Lay on May25,
Because it expects mortgage origi- 2006, on 19 counts of fraud, con-
ations to fall about 25 percent in spiracy, insider trading and lying
2008 from this year's levels. to auditors.
GM leadership shifts Skilling reported to a federal
SHANGHAI, China - Chrysler prison in Minnesota in December.
SHANGHAI, China CLay died on July 4, 2006, and his
iured its second high-profile exec- convictions were v acated.
Strive in as many days, appointing convictions were vacated-
1AIC Motor Corp.'s Phil Murtaugh Skilling is the highest-ranking
as chief executive of its Asian executive to be punished for the
operations Friday. accounting tricks and shady busi-
Murtaugh has served as vice ness deals that led to the loss of

)resident of GM's joint venture thousands of jobs, more than $60
partnerr in China since June 2006. billion in Enron stock value and
Chrysler is quickly assembling more than $2 billion in employee
n- executive team under new pri- pension plans after the company-..
hate equity owner Cerberus imploded in 2001.
Capital Management. On Homebuilder defaults
Thursday Toyota Motor Corp.'s ATLANTA - Homebuilder
top North American executive, Jim. Beazer Homes USA Inc. says it
press, was named vice chairman has received default notices for
Fand president. five senior notes due between
Cerberus announced Aug. 6 2011 and 2016, though the com-
Jhat Robert Nardelli, the former pany denies it is in default on that
CEO of Home Depot Inc., would debt.
become Chrysler's chairman and Shares fell $1.41, or 13 per-
ihief executive. Later in August, cent, to $9.50 Friday, a little more
kChrysler hired Deborah Wahl than two weeks after Beazer had
Yveyer, 44, a top marketing execu- asked a federal court to stop U.S.
tive from Toyota's Lexus luxury Bank National Association from
^brand and a colleague of Press. demanding the builder repay
S Drop expected $1.38 billion in loans.
MILWAUKEE -- Harley- Minnesota-based U.S. Bank is
,Davidson Inc. lowered its earnings the trustee for the loans, meaning
expectations for the year on it must ensure that the borrower
Friday and said it would cut bike is in compliance with the lending
shipments, sending shares plung- terms. The bank also enforces
1ing more than 8 percent, any default declaration by the
Chief Executive Jim Ziemer lenders.
"said the move was necessary Power company sold
,.given that now is a "difficult time DALLAS - The biggest power
for the U.S. consumer. DALLAS - The biggest power
for the U.S. consumer. "generator in Texas could soon
u Dealer sales fell sharply in belong to private owners, after
'August, he said, and Harley- shareholders of TXU Corp. voted
Davidson Inc. doesn't expect Friday to sell the company for
sales to increase the rest of the $32 billion in one of the largest
;-year. Worldwide sales were down leveraged buyouts ever.
;1 2 percent in the most recent levestors led buyouts ever.
',.quarter InVelgto-rs-led bypnivate equity
quarterr firms Kohlberg Kravis Roberts &
. Harley-Davidson's shares turn- Co. and TPG, formerly Texas
;bled on the news, falling $5, or Pacific Group, hope to get the
r9.2 percent, to $49.09 Friday. last regulatory approval and com-
i Earlier in the day, shares fell to a plete the deal in the next few
T new 52-week low of $48.94. weeks.
They've traded as high as $75.87 There may not be many more
in the past 52 weeks deals this size for a while, as
Exec seeks new trial banks have become reluctant to
HOUSTON - Imprisoned for- finance big takeovers because
mer Enron chief executive Jeffrey they are struggling to resell buy-
Skilling asked Friday for a new out debt to investors.
trial, saying the Justice - From wire reports

ferent, so I would encourage
!m o g readers to visit the drugstores'
Web sites directly to learn more
Continued from Page ID about their rebate programs. If
you find one you like, you can
Upper St Clair, Pa. save hundreds of dollars over
I agree with Oren's assess- the course of a year.
ment of the Walgreens and Rite
Aid programs, but I personally
believe the CVS Extra Bucks Stephanie Nelson shares
Reward program is easier. That her savings tips as a regular
may be because I always seem contributor on ABC News'
to need the current week's pro- "Good Morning America." You
motional items, which uses up can find more of her savings
the Extra Buck reward certifi- tips in her book "The Greatest
cate from the prior week easily. Secrets of the Coupon Mom"
However, everyone's shopping and on her Web site at
.-needs and preferences are dif- www.couponmom.com.


Wal-Mart's eco-friendly focus sets example


The Washington Post

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark -
Daniel Sanker has traveled to
the most chic cities - London,
New York, Los Angeles - as
founder of the shipping and
logistics firm CaseStack But his
quest to create a more sustain-
able business is taking him to the
home turf of a company that is
virtually synonymous with sub-
urban sprawl: Wal-Mart
Two years ago, the world's
largest retailer set out on a mis-
sion to change that reputation by
promising to transform itself
into an eco-friendly business. It
set wildly ambitious goals to cre-
ate no waste, be supplied by
renewable energy and sell more
sustainable merchandise.
Critics have dismissed the
effort as a public relations stunt
designed to draw attention away
from Wal-Mart's controversial
labor and health-care policies.
-How successful Wal-Mart will be
at greening itself remains to be
seen. But there is little question
that it already is reshaping its
own back yard.
A wave of start-ups developing
the technology to help suppliers
prove their green credentials
has swept into this sleepy col-
lege town, half an hour from the
company's headquarters in
Bentonville. Sanker is looking at
ways to improve fuel efficiency
in shipping. Others are develop-
ing agricultural-based alterna-
tives to petroleum or studying
how electronics can function at
higher temperatures, thereby
cutting energy use. The


University of Arkansas has
established the Applied
Sustainability Center at the
campus here using a $1.5 mil-
lion grant from Wal-Mart
It may seem an unlikely place
for a green revolution, far from
such traditional environmental
strongholds as Portland and
Seattle, but local officials hope
Fayetteville will become to sus-
tainability what Detroit is to the
automotive industry and the
Silicon Valley is to technology. In
fact, they've coined their own
term for the vision: Green
Valley.
"We are driving a stake in the
ground to become the center of
the sustainability movement,"
Fayetteville Mayor Dan Coody
said.
Wal-Mart's magnetic power
has brought explosive growth to
Bentonville and nearby Rogers.
Scores of vendors who supply
the merchandise for Wal-Mart's
shelves - from massive con-
glomerates like PepsiCo to
smaller players like Sassy baby
products - have opened satel-
lite offices in the region to keep
up with their most important
client Construction cranes dot
the landscape, and strip malls
are clogged with traffic.
The effect has been less in
Fayetteville, a progressive out-
post in this largely conservative
landscape. It is home to the
University of Arkansas and
boasts a walkable downtown,
quaint coffee shops and an
organic restaurant Locals call
residents of Bentonville and
Rogers "Wal-Martians," while


they scoff at the strict city ordi-
nances and more liberal postur-
ing of "Fayette-Nam." .
Fayetteville's quirky person-
ality is proving attractive to sus-
tainable businesses. Eventually,
the town may consider financial
and tax incentives to help lure
more green companies. But for
now, news is spreading through
word of mouth and Wal-Mart
Arkansas "is called the
Natural State," said Tom
Muccio, founder of BioBased
Technologies, which manufac-
tures agricultural-based chemi-
cals that can replace petroleum
in the production of plastic. "I
think now we have the opportu-
nity to really bring that alive."
"The environmental commu-
nity is really focused on
Northwest Arkansas," said
Jonathan Johnson, executive
director of the university's
Applied Sustainability Center.
"There's a huge experiment
going on here."
Critics argue that the big-box
model of retailing is inherently
unsustainable because it eats up
large tracts of land and forces
customers to drive long dis-
tances to run errands. A report
released last week by Wal-Mart
Watch, which is funded by the
Service Employees
International Union, estimated
that the retailer's new stores
will use more energy than can
be saved through its current
programs.
But some suppliers and local
officials say they think Wal-Mart
is serious and that being green
is key to winning new business


from the retailer Coody recalled
attending the screening of 'An
Inconvenient Truth," the envi-
ronmental documentary featur-
ing former vice president Al
Gore, at Wal-Mart's home office
last summer. At the event, Chief
Executive H. Lee Scott Jr. told
the audience of suppliers that
the company would consider
environmental impact when
choosing products to sell. The
crowd grew visibly tense.
"Everybody was looking
around the room at each other
going 'uh-oh,'" Coody said.
Such statements are spurring
companies such as BioBased to
move their headquarters to
Fayetteville. Muccio has pur-
chased a 20-acre site on Cato
Springs Road in the southern
part of town. Rust envisions the
facility as anchoring the western
end of a technology and
research corridor along the
road, which is now dotted by
small single-family homes.
At the eastern end is a
research and technology park
owned by the University of
Arkansas, where one of the
buildings is a former pantyhose
factory and another is the first
structure in the state to be certi-
fied by the U.S. Green Building
Council. Tenants include
Arkansas Power Electronics
International, a $2 million
research and development firm
that works on electronics sys-
tems; BioDetection Instruments,
which helps find pathogens and
chemicals in food; and Virtual
Incubation, a venture capital
firm focusing on green business.


Business 4- 7 .., * i


The union of the Florida Cancer Institute
and New Hope Cancer Centers brings togeth-
er two premiere oncology groups providing
progressive diagnostic, treatment and pallia-
tion services to patients battling solid tumor
cancers and hematologic (blood) diseases.
Together, the two organizations operate four
comprehensive diagnostic and treatment cen-
ters, three specialty centers and a mobile
PET/CT unit. The combined practice will have
12 experienced medical oncologists, five radia-
tion oncologists and a palliative care specialist.
The new practice will be a member of the U.S.
Oncology network, one of the nation's largest
for cancer treatment and research.
"New Hope and FCI have a shared vision of
providing high-quality cancer care close to
home. By working together we can offer our
patients a greater opportunity to participate in
clinical trials and ensure our continued ability
to invest in advanced technology on behalf of
our patients," said FCI's President, Dr. Richard
Caradonna.
The two oncology and hematology practices
have been providing cancer care to their
respective communities since 1978. Physician
leadership started exploring ways to enhance


their community cancer care offering almost
three years ago.
"We wanted to make absolutely certain that
we're giving our patients every opportunity to
battle this life-threatening disease by remain-
ing on the leading edge of cancer care," said
Dr. Jorge Ayub, Managing Partner of New
Hope. "We took our time with the development
of this new entity so that each practice could
be sure that the new.organization would be,
first and foremost, patient centered."
This should be a seamless experience for
patients. Existing patients will continue to see
their respective doctors and their local physi-
cian's office will continue to maintain their
appointments. In addition, patients will benefit
from the opportunity to participate in a greater
number of clinical trials and access advanced
technologies not otherwise available in a com-
munity setting. Research physicians in the
U.S. Oncology network have played a pivotal
role in the development of 24 of the last 30
cancer drugs approved for use by the FDA.
More than 32,000 patients have participated in
U.S. Oncology Research trials, nationwide.
- From staff reports


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH 12-MONTH 24-MONTH 30-MONTH 36-MONTH 60-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D.
I


APY S/I


SAPY S/I


APY


APY


S/I APY


EDWARD JONES 4.33 4.425.05.05 5 .05 5.15 5.15 5.10 5.10 5.05 5.05 N/A N/A 5.10 5.10 5.10 5.10
(352)527-3700. I ~ \ * _ _ _
STATE FARM N/A N/A 4.55 4.65 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00 5.16 5.30 N/A N/A 5.02 S5.15 4.88 5.00
Call your local agent ! i : I
RAYMOND(352) 527-3JAMES N/A 4.73 4.62 4.73 4.62 4.73 4.88 5.00 5.16 5.15 N/A N/A 5.02 5.15 4.88 5.15

Please note: Banks and other financial institutions offer a wide variety of investment opportunities. Each institution has its own set of
requirements to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact these financial institutions directly for up-to-date information on the
options listed above, or inquire at your bank for other investment opportunities. Financial institutions interested in listing their rates
can call the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-5660.


APY S/I APY S/I APY


Doctor attends seminar
Dr. Michael A. Pikos, Board Certified Oral
and Maxillofacial Surgeon and founder of
Coastal Jaw Surgery - The Center for Dental
Implants, Facial and Oral Reconstruction and
the Pikos Implant Institute recently lectured on
dental implants, advanced bone grafting, and
interactive CT diagnosis and treatment planning
at the International Congress of Oral
Implantologists World Congress in San
Francisco, Calif.
In the field of oral implantology and implant
dentistry, Dr. Pikos is both a clinician and edu-
cator. His scientific lectures and presentations
of advanced live surgical courses over the past
17 years are part of an ongoing commitment to
share his dental and surgical expertise both
nationally and internationally.
Cancer centers join forces
The Florida Cancer Institute (FCI) and New
Hope Cancer Centers announced that they will
combine their practices in early 2008. The new
combined entity will enhance patient access to
cutting edge cancer care in the rapidly growing
communities of Central Florida.









Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


41n

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


(hbmber


Connection


Chamber, EDC Maritime Ministries, Consignment and Thrift
Cha be r,, EDC+i

* i i :.rt I. i 1 , 7" !,ii ' : ' '1

plan event 1 1 Ni!i ^'fc i I
',: ,,, ,;i, j .w w , ,,I, Ti, i'


The Citrus County Economic Bar-B-Que is Thursday, Sept 20.
Development Council (EDC) in The event will take place from
conjunction with the Citrus 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. at Holcim
County Chamber of Commerce Ranch in Crystal River Cost for
announces the 25th annual this event is $30 per person in
Industry Appreciation Week advance or $35 per person after
The Awards Luncheon, spon- Sept 7 and at the gate. The
scored by Progress Energy, will evening promises entertain-
be at Citrus Hills Golf and ment, great food and beverages.
Country Club at 11:30 a.m. Come in your best western
Wednesday, Sept 19. Cost is $15 wear, dress casual and be com-
per person. Reservations are fortable. Get ready to kick up
required. Awards will be given those boots and have a great
to the Outstanding Small time!
Business, Outstanding For more information or to
Employer or Corporate Citizen purchase tickets to either of
and to the Person of the Year. these events, call the EDC
The date set for the annual office at 795-2000.


Do business with a


Chamber member

In keeping in line with our upcoming Health
and Fitness Expo, this month we are featuring
physicians who are Chamber members.

Since taking care of yourself should be your number one pri-
ority, finding a good physician is a key to success! Remember
to tell these doctors that you saw them in the Chamber
Connection.
Physician -Allergy/Asthma
Advanced Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Beverly Hills
746-3336
Physician - Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine and Pediatric Wellness Center, Crystal
River
563-5070
PedI.M. Healthcare, Beverly Hills
527-6888
Physician - Pain Management
Naturecoast Pain Associates, Lecanto
527-4444
Physician - Pediatric
Babydoc@Your Door
637-3099
Citrus County Pediatrics Inc., Crystal River
794-7391
Fialko, D.O., PA., Dr. Ira, Crystal River
563-0220
PedI.M. Healthcare, Beverly Hills
527-6888
Physicians and Surgeons
Inverness Surgical Association, Inverness
426-3646
Iyer, HV, MD, PA, Homosassa Springs
628-7672
Lecanto Surgery Center, Lecanto
527-0102
Marcus, Jeffrey M.D., FACS, Inverness
726-3131
Physicians - Family Practice
Access Healthcare, LLC Beverly Hills 522-0094
Citrus Primary Care Crystal River Crystal River 563-1720
Physicians - Orthopedic
Citrus Orthopedic & Joint Institute Lecanto 746-2663
Physicians - Radiology
Citrus Diagnostic Center Crystal River 795-9200
Physicians -Urology
Citrus Urology Inverness 726-9707


JIM SHIELDSISpecial to the Chronici
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Maritime Ministries Consignment and Thrift. Pictured front row
Chamber Ambassador Bonnie Hardiman, Janice Cushman, Catfish, Betty Stalneker - Owner, Heather Puryear, Anita Svendsen, Sharoo
Hatton, Mary Ann Franklin, Chamber Ambassador Rhonda Lestinsky. Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors Wendy Hall, Julie I
Vaughan, Jackie Marx, David Heinz, Janet Mayo, Crystal Jefferson, Jennifer Duca and Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes."-
Maritime Ministries Consignment & Thrift is conveniently located in the Kings Bay Plaza - 431 SE Kings Bay Dr in Crystal River. They
accept gently used and new items and will also take your charitable car, boat or RV donations to benefit the local battered women's'
shelter. All items are tax deductible. For more information call (352) 795-0324.



Ridge Masonic Lodge No.398


IS YOUR BROKER GIVING YOU

THE COLD SHOULDER?

At Edward Jones, the level of service
you receive depends on your personal
needs and preferences, not on the
size of your investment portfolio.

If you'd like to experience exceptional ,.
personal service, consider Edward
Jones. We offer solutions for all your ~-.c. .
financial needs. Get to know us. 1 I
Edward Jones ranked "Highest in Investor Satisfaction With Full Service Brokerage
Firms, Three Years in a Row"
Edward Jones received the highest numerical score three years in a row among full service
brokerage firms in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2005-2007 Full Service Investor
Satisfaction Study". 2007 study based on 3,043 total responses measuring 16 brokerage
firms and measures opinions of investors who used full-service investment institutions.
Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed
from March-May 2007. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.
Call today to schedule a free portfolio review.


Stephen KaraPurcell John WannVan Jason
Kuhn Williams Breese Robinson Worley
230 S.ur0oll B.d' 4M.0 SunroeBlFd. UItkpLi-l.0t H. 2305oulftoLl. Hy. 23H 5HlfIoL". H%.Y
Cll River, FL Hor.la, FL P1aPeala,.Iy Inarn1 In-v.mll
795-1811 628-3466 527-0606 344-8189 344-8189


www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


Scott L. Crag
Lee O'De l
10 a WMkiL 20 S. sucolt Bvd.
860v289 Cry 5l Rivr, FL
860-2839 795-1811


mI


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle:d
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for the Ridge Masonic Lodge No. 398. Pictured front row: Chambefb
Ambassador Bonnie Hardiman with grandson Christian Paul, William Hogancamp, Charley Rhodes, John Lee, Afton Chenoweth, Henry-1
Oppenborn, Robert Owen, Jim Corbin, William Horton, Les Hopkins, Doug Vollmer, Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Rhonda+l
Lestinsky with Sam Heinz. Pictured back row: Charles Taylor, William Harms, Earl Garlock, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes,;
William Head, Francis Kinter, Milt Olsen and Chamber Ambassador David Heinz. To find out more information on the Ridge Masonic
Lodge call (352) 746-7732. The Lodge was started because several of our members had trouble driving at night. We solved that prob-
lem by starting a Day-Light Lodge in "Beautiful Down-Town Beverly Hills," the epicenter of "senior" Masons in Citrus County. We areq
now in our eighth year as a Lodge and are now located at Springs Lodge in Homosassa Springs. We now have our meetings on thei.i
first Monday of the month, except June, July and August, at 9:30 A.M. Coffee and doughnuts are in ample supply and all Masons,, ;
young and er.. older are welcome. In September, because of Labor Day, we meet on the second Monday, this year it falls on the lOth.,-
Please call Robert H. "Slim" Owen at 746-6936 if you would like to attend. >,



Member News


mom
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center donated $1,000 to the
Homosassa Civic Club for the
2007 Homosassa Arts, Crafts and
Seafood Festival. This year the
festival will be November 10 and
11, and is expected to attract more
than 45,000 people from all over
Florida. Money raised from the
event are donated to a variety of
community organizations including
Crest School (a school for the
physically and mentally chal-
lenged), Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts,
Nature Coast Young Marines, Boys
& Girls Club of Citrus County,
Marine Science Center, and many
others-in addition to providing
$10,000 in scholarships.
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center will hold a soap and sham-


poo drive through Sept. 28.
Collection bins will be located in
the cafeteria of the hospital, at the
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound
Center (1675 S.E. US Hwy. 19,
Crystal River, next to Sweetbay)
and at the Seven Rivers Outpatient
Laboratory (at 11503 W. Emerald
Oaks Drive, Crystal River, just
north of the hospital). The first of its
kind for Citrus County, the soap
and shampoo drive will benefit the
efforts of the Homosassa Civic
Club's 'We Care' food pantry. Items
requested for donation include:
body soap, shampoo, toothpaste,
deodorant, laundry soap and dish
detergent. Seven Rivers Regional
encourages the residents of Citrus
County to participate in the drive
and to drop off soap, shampoo,
deodorant, etc. at any one of the
locations noted.


m om
Birding expert Dick Blewett will
be offering his popular Birding
Basics class in the Florida Room at
the Visitor Center of the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park. The six-week course begins
on Tuesday, Sept. 25, and will be
from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. Besides the
classroom work, students will have
opportunities to put their new bird-
ing skills to work on Saturday
morning field trips to a variety of
birding trails around Citrus County.
Blewett will provide bird watching
basics on Florida bird life and
explain the basic tools of the trade.
mom
"Save Our Waters" Fundraiser
Dinner is slated for Sept. 14, at the
West Citrus Elks in Homosassa.
Doors open at 6 p.m. and dinner
will be at 7. The show will begin


at 8 p.m.
Tickets cost $35 and a table
seats 8. For more information, call
Cheryl Phillips at (352) 527-0800.
MEN
The Parrot Heads of Citrus Inc.,
met Aug. 21 at Cravings on the
Water in Crystal River to present a
donation to Hospice of Citrus
County designated for the organi-
zation's bi-annual grieving camp for
kids, Camp Good Hope. The dona-
tion was raised from proceeds from
the Parrot Heads annual fundraiser
Fiesta Tropicale'. Camp Good
Hope and Teen Encounter are
overnight camps which will be held
on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 19
and 20, at Camp Good Council in
Floral City. For additional informa-
tion on the abc Children's Division
of Hospice of Citrus County, call
Jonathan Beard at (352) 527-2020.









Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Chamber


[onnection


SUNDAY
SEPrVISm,>: 9, 2007


~ - .~ ~v- v 4-1c,.
-w ,**! **** a-. , - ,,-*- ; - .- .... ** - ----- *.,- :"*.*",''-'-;! ", ---*-- ," ,-*^--'.^."A..K-^-y ; ,-;'1'-?-,?^'.^"':=. i:';.^^-i^?'? W * a **?- .l ' ^;-i : : '. ,.:,..:;'*- t:; . rT : N .--', :i ---- a:i'' '; :- /^ -' ,";'*^'l:- },"-*^ *,,....*-' ^: *- ' :, :"- :"' " , " . ." '. *'-7:; S.S
.| ."^^ ^ J fe ^ , - ** :., : . . . . .. .,.' ''-- t , . .,, ', ,,.; 1,_,''%. .q. :-. U _..,-; :., . : *..'2-.,k ;% .';. . . . .,.':.-... .. -t,.' "'L "%,. '...., .;x,


__==___CFCC CLASSES


Nature Coast Insurance Agency


Central Florida Community
College will offer Florida Notary
Training classes at 3800 S.
Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto. The train-
ing will be Friday, Sept. 14, from
12:30pm to 3:30pm in L3- 107.
The cost will be $89 and includes
materials. Each student will be
given a Florida Notary Handbook
and a class completion certificate.
This class is also recommended as
a refresher course for veteran
notaries.
s o
Microsoft A-Z will be offered
from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 19 to Oct. 10 at Central
Florida Community College in
Building L2-201B, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. The class fee is
$95 (materials included). Microsoft
Windows A-Z will introduce stu-
dents to the computer control
panel, windows view, toolbars and
file manipulation. Students will
review computer applications,
installing and removing software,


internet, different mail applications
and attachments. Class will also
include a demonstration on Vista.
OEM
Central Florida Community
College is offering American Sign
Language and Religious Songs in
Sign Language in September on
the Citrus Campus, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. The
American Sign Language class will
learn about the deaf culture and
awareness. This course will cover
finger spelling, number, facial
expression and body language.
The class will be held on
Tuesday, Sept 18 through Nov. 6
from 6:30pm to 8:30pm and the
cost is $50. Material cost is
approximately $40. Enhance the
beauty of the songs sung at your
church by learning the signs that
go with them. The Religious Songs
in Sign Language class will be held
on Tuesday, Sept. 18 through
No.v 6 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and
the cost is $50.


Member _ ... ..


JIM oSIELUDOopeudal tu se .CIIUIIILue
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Nature Coast Insurance Agency. Pictured front row: Chamber
Ambassadors Reyna Bell and Nancy Coffey; Kathy and Glen Sanders; Chamber Ambassadors Rhonda Lestinsky and Jennifer Duca.
Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors David Heinz, Crystal Jefferson, Wendy Hall and Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes.
Nature Coast Insurance Agency specializes in Auto, Homeowners, Mobile Home, Motorcycle and RV insurance. They are locally owned
and operated and are open Monday - Friday 9:00 to 5:00 and on Friday 9:00 to 4:30. Call them to receive a quote or for more infor-
mation at (352) 302-0176 or visit them at 2521 W Highway 44 in Inverness


-Health

1 The Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce Business Women's
Alliance is proud to announce its
plans for the first annual
Women's Health & Fitness Expo
2007, to take place from 9 am. to
2 p.m. Saturday, Sept 29 at WTI
iii Inverness, presented by
Sven Rivers Regional Medical
Center After surveying over 200
local business women, it was
concluded that women want to
klow more about health and fit-
ness! So, we are answering the
call!
! With the ultimate goal in sight,
the next step was to find out
what our mission was in creating
this event
'Mission Statement: Women
fulfill many roles in their life-
I


Take Stock in Children seeks volunteers


[Take Stock In Children
(www.takestockinchildren.com)
is an award-winning school-
based mentoring program that
assists deserving youth from
low-income families by provid-
ing the opportunity for a better
education and a brighter future.
Founded in 1995, the mission
of Take Stock in Children is to
provide deserving qualified
children in our community with
scholarships to college and
guidance from caring mentors.
Since 1995, Take Stock in
Children has provided over
12,000 children with scholar-


ships (totaling over 90 million
dollars) and mentors in the
state of Florida. All money
raised in Citrus County is used
to provide scholarships and stu-
dent-mentor services to Citrus
County middle and high school
students.
All scholarship contributions
are raised locally through com-
munity partnerships and are
used to purchase Florida
Prepaid 2+2 scholarships (2
years at a community
college/two years at a universi-
ty) through the Florida Prepaid
College Foundation.


Scholarship contributions are
matched dollar for dollar by the
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation. Community part-
nerships and local area busi-
nesses make it possible to be
able to provide scholarships
and "the promise of hope" to
middle and high school stu-
dents. All monies raised in
Citrus County are used to pro-
vide scholarships and student-
mentor services to Citrus
County students.
Take Stock in Children of
Citrus County is seeking indi-
viduals interested in becoming


a positive influence in a young
person's life by becoming a
mentor for the Take Stock in
Children Program. Mentors
meet one hour per week in a
school-based setting only at
local Citrus County middle or
high schools
For further information on
how you can make the differ-
ence in the life of a Citrus
County child by providing
"scholarships, .mentors, and
hope," please call Janet E.
Clymer, Program Coordinator
(352) 746-6721, ext. 6148 jcly-
mer@clmworkforce.com.


T he Chamber would
like to recognize the
New Chamber Members
for August. Thank you
for supporting YOUR
SChamber!

*Back Porch Garden and Tea Bar
* Backyard Choppers LLC


time-from student to career
woman to friend to mother to
wife to caregiver. The Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
Business Women's Alliance
Women's Health & Fitness Expo
was created to be all about YOU!
Goals: Our goals for YOU are
for a healthier and happier liv-
ing through:
* Appreciating the impor-
tance of women taking time for
themselves.
* Proactively pursuing pre-
vention techniques and educa-
tion opportunities.
* Improving your fitness for
life.
M Eating healthy and enjoying
every bite.
M Recognizing the value of the


mind, body and spirit connec- sponsored this "first of its kind"
tion. event!
N Supporting friends and fam- Thank you to: Seven Rivers
ily in pursuing Regional
a healthier N The event will take place Center (our
lifestyle. from 9 a.m. to 2 p m. presenting
Men, don't Saturday, Sept. 29 at WVVTI sponsor r),
feel left out! in Inverness. For more Withlacoochee
This Expo will information, call the Technical
have some- Chamber at 795-3149 Institute,
thing for every- Citrus County
one! There will Chronicle,


be key-note speakers, demon-
strations, exercise demonstra-
tions, vendors and information
galore aimed at making your
decisions easier when it comes
to your health & fitness! Your
entire family is welcome and
encouraged to attend.
Thank you to those who have


Citrus Memorial Health System
and Sweetbay Supermarket.
Each of our sponsors has shown
that they care about our commu-
nity and the health and well-
being of everyone in it Each
sponsor plays an important role
in making this event a great suc-
cess!


" Barehuggers, Inc.
" BCM - Business Cost Management
" Brashear's Pharmacy
" Cedar Key Fish and Crab of
Homosassa Inc., The Freezer
" Christie Helbig Priority Cleaning
" Citrus Injury and Wellness
" Comfort Mattress
" D'Lites Emporium dba Citrus Hills
D'Lites, LLC
" Ebenezer Fashion Store
" Elements of Health


m Florida River Tours LLC
� Hurry-Cane Securing Systems
N Jessie's Place - Citrus County
Children's Advocacy Center
" Judy's Scrapbook Memories
" Lunch Box LLC
" Marlin Realty & Investments Inc.
" Schultz, Ron, US Representative
" Sherri C. Parker & Associates,
Realtors LLC
" Sibex Inc.
" Sunshine Lifeline LLC
" Windsor Capital Mortgage Corp.


Shoe and sock drive
planned
"Citrus County Cares" shoe-and-
sock drive is scheduled for through
Sept. 11. Citrus County govem-
ment employees are urged to par-
ticipate in this worthy cause by
bringing new shoes and socks for
school-aged children of all sizes to
one of the following drop off loca-
tions:
* Citrus County Resource
Center
* Inverness Courthouse
* Lecanto Government Building
* Citrus County Extension
Office
* Central Citrus Community
Center
* East Citrus Community Center
* Inverness Community Center
* West Citrus Community
Center
For more information, please call
Heidi Blanchette 352-527-5950


Hospice seeks
volunteers
Hospice of Citrus County will pro-
vide Orientation Training for individu-
als who are interested in learning
more about Hospice volunteer oppor-
tunities, including positions at our
Thrift and Gift Shoppes in Inverness,
Homosassa, and Crystal River. The
class will be from 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 11
at our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic
Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Beverly
Hills, from 1-4 p.m. The class pro-
vides an overview of Hospice philos-
ophy and history. Participants will
become acquainted with Hospice of
Citrus County services for patients
and families, become familiar with the
concept of palliative care, and leam
the importance of confidentiality. To
register for this class or to request
training for your group, contact Judy
Knowlton, Hospice of Citrus County
Volunteer Program Manager, at (352)
527-6613.


www.citruscountychamber.com




body in touch, heart at peace
Experience breakthrough
botanical formulas that deliver
powerful therapeutic benefits.
Aveda spa facials, massages D
and body treatments
reconnect you to the Earth
through the power of touch
and the life force of plants.
Book your personalized
spa treatment today.


AITAQE' PARI& Day Spa & Salon
Awarded TOP 200 Salon in U.S. 2007 AVEDA
Hwy 44 * Crystal River * Next to Publix Plaza * 563-0011


people take about 9,000 steps per day.
ing and other aerobic exercises also put
essure on the feet. No wonder that aches
"d pains in this part of the body are common.
ors such as flat or over-pronated feet and
e wrong type of shoe can increase irritation.
ese factors can also affect the health of
e back, knees and legs.
Heel pain is one of the most common foot
ailments. The cause is usually inflammation of
the plantar lascia. a band of connective tissue
that surrounds the muscles on the bottom of
the foot. It connects the heel bone to the ball
of the foot, supporting the arch, protecting
the foot and absorbing shock.
Patients with plantar fasciitis often have pain
when getting up out of bed and standing up after
they have been sitting for a while. The pain
onginates in front of the heel bone, but can spread
over the entire bottom of the foot. Over time,
inflammation associated with the condition can
lead to scar tissue, calcium deposits and heel
spurs. These spurs, which are a bony growth on
the front part of the heel bone, can cause sharp
stabbing pain when walking. A chiropractor will
be ableto determine the basis of the problem
and the best treatments. These might include
ultrasound, joint manipulation, muscle stretching
and strengtAening exercises, and orthotics.
Let the caring professionals at
Neck and Back Care Center help you
regain the joy's of living life, pain free!


Neck aBack
Care Center
"Understanding arut Comrnting
the Sounre ofYour Patn"


Jeffery S. Kinnard DC
527-5433
Beverly Hills
in the Winn Dixie Shopping Center


Chiropractic Care Fitness Center Occupaona/VRehab Therapy Massage AquaBed Therapy
impovngth Q aliyoYu ife


and fitness expo planned


Welcome, new members!


Anthony B. Oliverlo DC
563-5055
Crystal River
next to the Boys & Gits Club









Promotional information from the Citrus County Builders Association


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


Builders


[onnE[tion


...... is... ..... .A . Cis tyBirssoc tio
,:, ..;, . ",. . ' - ' , <- i,4 td'. " . ,. ,


August renewing members


August Renewing Members are pictured from front to back: Ron Knight - Home Depot; Dick Dolbow - Citrus County School District;
Gregory Berger - Countrywide Home Loans; Ed Stern - Greg Construction; Thomas Long - Long Enterprises of the Nature Coast;
John Osborne - Pinecrest Building Corp.; Lloyd Meyers - Sherwin Williams, Inverness Store; Rich Gelfand - Sherwin Williams,Crystal
River Store. Renewing members not pictured: First Quality Inc., Action Electric and Lighting Inc., Avid Engineering Inc., Bank of
America, Black Diamond Construction Inc., Bright House Networks, Daly and Zilch (Florida) Inc., Engineered Structure Services Inc.,
First American Title, Gale Insulation, Gator Door and Supply Co. Inc., Golden X Plumbing Supply Inc., Habitat For Humanity, Homestead
Builders of the Nature Coast, J & B Contractors LLC, Keene Contractor's Inc., Lassiter-Ware Insurers of Citrus County, Lawman Builders
Inc., M.H. Services, M.L. Davis Construction Inc., Maronda Homes of Florida Inc., MH Thrasher Framing Co., Quality Crafted Builders,
Senica Air Conditioning Inc., Southeastern Structures, Southern Security Title Service, Three Rivers Building Inc., Tile Importers Inc.,
Wheeler Construction Inc., Williston Door and Millwork and Withlacoochee River Electric Corp.


Building Career Partnership sponsors

I U U UI E IUILERI RS


Building Careers Partnership sponsors are pictured from left to right: Eric Swart - Citrus Pest Management; Ron Radford - Best Buy
Water; John Osborne - Pinecrest Building Corp.; Thomas Long - Long Enterprises of the Nature Coast; Cyndi McRee - Progress
Energy; Jim Loos - Schlabach Security and Sound; Barbara Vargo - SunTrust Mortgage; Larry Hensley - Southeastern Foam
Insulators; and Walt Stachowicz - Citrus CAD Design. Sponsors not pictured: Blackshears II Aluminum, Florida Low Income Housing,
Franklin Realty (Roger and Hazel), Gold Crest Homes Inc., Larder and Sons Construction Co., Porter's Locksmith, Quality Crafted
Builders, Schnettler Construction, Tile Importers and Will Construction.


NAHB president applauds Bush's effort


Brian Catalde, president of
the National Association of
Home Builders (NAHB) and a
home builder from El Segundo,
Calif., released the following
statement in support of policy
changes announced today by
President Bush to help a grow-
ing number of home owners who
are facing default as a result of
the subprime mortgage crisis.
"We applaud the President's


efforts to help keep families in
their homes by allowing the
Federal HousingAdministration
to insure refinance loans for
some struggling subprime
mortgage borrowers and call-
ing on Congress to pass legisla-
tion that would modernize the
FHA, give the agency updated
tools to respond to the needs of
borrowers and provide a viable
alternative to the volatile sub-


prime market.
"By calling for an immediate
administrative action to allow
the FHA to guarantee loans for
borrowers who have fallen
behind on their mortgage pay-
ments, the President is moving
quickly to address the problems
of home owners who are facing
foreclosure.
"NAHB has been a long-time
proponent of FHA revitalization,


and testified before Congress
this spring in support of FHA
reform bill H.R. 1852 that is now
pending in the House.
"Our association is ready to
work with the White House,
Congress and federal regulators
to seek solutions to alleviate the
mortgage credit crunch, provide
stability to the markets and help
a rising number of home owners
avoid default"


Board shares tips for dealing with contractors


H ere's some advice from
Florida's Construction
Industry Licensing Board:
Don't be victimized by some-
one making a door-to-door
presentation offering to do
repair jobs or home improve-
ments "on-the-spot" and
requiring a cash deposit.
Ask to see their Florida
state registered or Florida
state certified contractor's
license. Visit


www.myflorida.com or call the
number below to verify that
the license is valid.
Get at least three bids, and
ask for references of work the
contractor has completed in
your area. Make personal con-
tacts and ask about the quality
of work.
Require a written contract
with the contractor's license
number on it. Don't sign if
there are any blank areas and


until you fully understand the
terms.
Don't pay cash, don't let pay-
ments get ahead of the work
completed, and don't pay the
full cost of the job up-front.
Make sure that building mate-
rial costs are paid; ask for
receipts.
Check workers' compensa-
tion coverage by requesting to
see a certificate of insurance.
If injuries occur on your prop-


erty, you may be liable.
You can verify if a Florida
contractor has a state license
by visiting www.myflorida.com
or by calling the board office
at (850) 487-1395.
Check the Citrus County
Builders Association website
to see if they are a member at
www.citrusbuilders.com, call
(352) 746-9028, ext. 6300 to ver-
ify how long they've been a
member.


CCBA Staff Members
L inda T hom pson ............................................................................................. Executive O ffi cer
Erik Stellm ach ................. .................................................................... D director of M em ber Services
Karen Balzanti . . . ........ ..................................................................... ........Office Manager


Builders plan Fall

Parade of Homes

Event slatedfor October 13-28

The Parade isn't just for builders anymore!
Communities, tradesmen, associates and even custom
builders who don't have a model can get in on the act! We have >'
something for everyone! The advertising package is unbeat-
able, the sponsorship opportunities are incredible and the
awards banquet is to die for! Please call (352) 746-9028 or visit
www.citrusbuilders.com if you are interested in getting in on
this wonderful event. Buyers come from all over the country to
visit our homes.

Home and Outdoor Show

coming soon to Crystal River
The CCBAs annual Home and Outdoor Show will be 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday Nov. 4 at the
Crystal River National Guard Armory Adverttising and booths
are still available for the event.
The event is free, open to the public and will feature indoor 1-.
and outdoor displays.Home Depot will offer workshops for both
children and adults and a special home remodeling seminar is '!
also scheduled for a full day of hands-on learning experiences.


= 2007-08 Board ofDIRECTORS =

The officers listed below will be installed
Sept. 29 at the CCBA's Installation Banquett
at Black Diamond in Lecanto.
N President
- Michael Moberley, Tropical Window
* President Elect
- Randy Clark, Clark Construction
* Immediate Past President
- Ron Lieberman, Nu-Era Homes
* First Vice-President
- Larry Tate, Sweetwater Homes
* Associate Vice-President
- Mathew Baillargeon, Marketing Solutions
* Second Associate V.P.
- Richard Gelfand, Sherwin Williams
E Immediate Past Associate V.P.
- Joe Bell, Surfaces Flooring
* Treasurer
- Gaston Hall, Hall Brothers
* Secretary
- Barbara Vargo, SunTrust Mortgage
* Builder Directors
- Edward Johnston, Edward R. Johnston Inc.
- Jim Crosley, Rusaw Homes
- Susan Hadley, Summerwind Homes, Inc.
- Thomas Long III, Long Enterprises of the Nature Coast
* Associate Directors
- Eric Swart, Citrus Pest Mgmt.
- John Hanna, Dirt Boys Inc.
- Cyndi McRee, Progress Energy
- Sarah Fitts, First American Title
* Life Directors
- George Rusaw, Rusaw Homes
- Lorie Mills-Clark, Clark Construction
- John Osborne, Pinecrest Building Corporation
- Gaston Hall, Hall Brothers of Citrus County
- Jim Loos, Schlabach Security and Sound
- Chuck Sanders, Sanderson Bay Fine Home
- Gerry Gaudette, Gaudette Electric
- Dick Dolbow, Citrus County Schools
- Lloyd Myer, Sherwin Williams
- Chris Ensing, Southern Exposure Construction
- Mike Moberley, Tropical Windows Inc.
- Todd Workman, Suncoast Plumbing and Electric
- Greg Conard, Gold Crest Homes


Golf event on tap
The 2007 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing is slated for Oct.
27 at Plantation Inn and Golf Resort. Registration begins at 7 a.m.
and the outing kicks off with a shotgun start at 8'30 a.m. The even
is open to the public and the entry fee is $85 per player. This year's
event is limited to the first 36 teams registered.
Please visit the CCBA's Web site at www.citrusbuilders.com for
more information about upcoming events, or call (352) 746-9028.


CCBA upcoming events
* Sept. 29 - Installation Banquet
* Oct. 13-28 - Fall Parade of Homes
* Oct. 20 - Fall Parade of Homes, Awards Banquet
* Oct. 25 - GMM 6 p.m.
* Oct 27 - Golf Tournament andFamily Fun Day at Plantation
in
* Nov. 3 and 4 - Home and Outdoor Show
* Nov. 29 - General Membership Meeting. 6 p.m.
Visit www.citrusbuilders com/events.html for more information











0-mIu.s Coumn (H.) CHRONICLE



inqit hroicleIi[h


IT


Classifieds ,.


SUNDAY, SiEPTEMBEiR 9, 2007 7D


To place an ad, call 563=5966


.1


.. =



_ I.-.


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35).6-565 1.ol re: 88)85-240 1*mil.ca(iied~hroicenln - m ebi:ww hrnclonie6o


24 yr. Old Hispanic
Male Seeking Female
120-140 lbs. Age 22-30.
For Movies
& Companionship
(352) 257-5513
MIDDLE AGED MAN
would like to meet lady
for dining & dancing.
Call (352) 382-5661




RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
en afinde com




$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receiot

TOP DOLLAR
I For Junk Cars
L $(352) 201-1052 $ _
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545

$ CASH $
PAID FOR |
Unwanted

I 352-220-0687 I
BEAGLES
Two left, to good home.
Less than 1 year old.
352-302-8696
Cat
female, 2 yrs. old
Free to good home
(443) 452-7163
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
COMPUTER DESK
Computer desk w/printer
stand. Blck & gray. Like
new. 352-637-0194
FREE AD SPECIAL
free kittens wormed, and
litter box trained grey, or-
anges, whites, short and
long hair 352 563-0493
FREE CATS & KITTENS
Spayed & Neutered
(352) 697-1705
FREE KITTENS
To good home.
352-341-1352/476-3776
FREE KITTENS
To good homes, 3
males, 3 females,
black/ white or grey,
tabby mixed, 8-10 wks
old, (352) 476-0271,
after 5.
FREE Pickup Unwanted
Furniture - Garage
Sale & Household Items
Call (352) 476-8949
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl.'s, A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
HEMINGWAY CAT
(5 TOE) female, creme
& white w/blues eyes,
must also take kittens
which are 1/2 minx.
(352) 400-3203
LEAD FOR SINKERS
FOR BULLETS, 4 SHOT
Free you pick up
(352) 344-9073
PIT BULL/MIX?
Large male/ To good
home w/ Ig yard /time
to spend. 352-212-1131.
PIT/BULL DOG MIX
1 yr. Good Natured,
Needs plenty of room
to run.(352) 560-3878







I

Swoor'vorld first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!




Classifieds


RAILROAD TIES
Some good, some not.
Take all, bring help,
(352) 726-4788
TABBY CAT Female, 4
yrs., spayed, declawed,
all shots. Loving &
playful. Fearful of other
animals. (352)634-4350
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



WHITE TERRIER MIX
Male, Vic. Colby St,
Inverness. 9/4.
(352) 257-2639
Yorkie,
silver, 25 Ibs, Beverly Hills
(352) 249-0860
C'P1A 76-1 11.1


BLACK LAB MIX
APPROX. 1YR YEAR
OLD. WHT. UNDERSIDE,
loveable. Found Gulf &
Cherrywood St. Crystal
River. (352) 220-6199
Cat
female, gray & white
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 746-7531
Dog
Boxer type puppy,
found in Wildwood
(443) 452-7163
Found Pigeon,
DeRosa Village,
Call to Identify
(352) 563-5038



VO---
- DIVORCES
* BANKRUPTCY I
SName Change |
*Child Support
I Wills
SWe Come To You
637-4022 *795-5999









BANK OWNED
AUCTION
121 Homes
All thru-out FL
Props. in your area
Fin. Avail. on many of
these properties.
Sun., Sept. 23rd, 1 PM
Held in Orlando, FL
Broker Cooperation
For terms/info/more
bidding sites visit
fisherauction. coam
L. Fisher AU220;AB 106
(800) 331-6620
Sale subject to terms.

BUY or SELL!
Receive Quality
Customer Care!
FLRealEstateSale.Com






TERI PADUANO,
REALTOR
C21 JWMorton
(352) 212-1446
Hablo Espanol
FREE Home Warranty
& Visual Tour
ON ALL MY LISTINGS




GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207


-U
FLORAL DESIGN
CLASSES All Holiday,
wedding & funeral
designs. (352) 400-4912

r ENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

* SOD * SOD * SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY



...) -



S .
ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM

CAT ADOPTIONS







..' .--- _.


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M fill 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment,
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsha.orag.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.

-

FRIEND OR FAMILY
WITH HEALTH WORRIES?
I did too, but not
anymore. For Help call
Jim (352) 628-3017




FULL BODY DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE &
AROMATHERAPY
by Terri Lic. MM 17442
(352) 628-1036
HAIRCARE in your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gall 352-422-6315





( and read

S1,000'sof Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff,


CHR-ONI(1LE
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441




A free report of your
home's value
www.naturecoast
living.net

Boost TrafficTo
Your Website
Chronicle Website
Directory in print
and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print

I = One Price I
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966

CA SALES
www.naturecoast

NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
online.com


www.naturecoast
homefront.com


RENTALS
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

SOUND OFF NOW
hushaboom.com
YOUR voice heard!




BABY SITTER
Needed in my
Homosassa Home
M-F, 7:00am-5:30pm.
352-422-2806
PRE SCHOOL
TEACHER &
SCHOOL AGE
TEACHER
F/T or P/T Experience
required CDA preferred
TODAY'S CHILD or
TADPOLES
(352) 344-9444
(352) 560-4222




ACCOUNTING
CLERK
Responsible clerical
and bookkeeping
work maintaining
fiscal records. Track
and maintain
inventory records,
fiscal reports, classifies
receipts and
disbursements.
Prepares and codes
vouchers, invoices
and bills for
payments, maintains
expenditure records.
Compiles reports and
assembles data.
Assists in answering
phones and public
inquiries. H. S diploma
or GED certificate
supplemented with
some coursework in
accounting and
bookkeeping. Two
years bookkeeping/
secretarial
experience required.
Knowledge and
understanding of the
Microsoft Office Suite
of Products.
$10.77 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at Citrus
County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 14, 2007.
EOE/ADA
EXECUTIVE
PERSONAL
ASSISTANT

Reception exp. is a
plus. Must have
reliable transportation.
(352) 341-5425
OFFICE HELP
Individual with good
phone & people skills,
organized & able to
multi-task.
Quickbooks exp.
pref'd, good
computer skills In a
casual work environ-
ment.
Email resume to:
careerincitrus@
yahoo.coam
































NAIL TECH
For Upscale
Country Club
Spa & Fitness Center
Apply in Person:
240 W. Fenway Drive
Hernando

SPA Receptionist
/FRONT DESK
PERSON

For Upscale
Country Club
Spa & Fitness Center
Spa exp. a Plus.
Apply in Person:
240 W. Fenway Drive
Hernando


.$$$$$$ HealthSouth
500.00 Rehabilitation
n Bonus! Hospital of
ED NURSES Spring Hill
11-7
ssess above Marketing
?e skills, are Inpatient Rehab
cited to the Liaison -
tandards of Citrus County
-are, good Responsibilities
Dntation and include providing
uine caring Marketing Support,
, we have a Business
or you. We Development and
salary range performing Clinical
able to your Evaluations.
ence and Marketing
t benefits, experience and
River Health abilities required.
hab Center RN,LPN,or
E 12th Ave. Individuals with a
river, FL 34429 medical back-
795-5044 ground preferred.
'Connie
h., & F 9-3) Please apply in
VP/ EOE person or send
resume to:
*DENTAL HealthSouth
SlSTANT Rehabilitation
st have Hospital of
ence with Spring Hill
biology & Human Resources
ad Functions. 12440 Cortez Blvd.
3 contact: Brooksville, Fl 34613
orVlcky@ or fax to
746-0330 352-592-4283
email
NA's ava.mclellan@health-
& 11-7
at Inverness HYGIENIST
;urrentiy Inverness &
cepting South Port Richey
nations for
3-11 & 11-7 Coast Dental is the
;NA's Southeast's leading
provider, with 115
e apply at: neighborhood dental
Citrus Ave, practices and
verness growing. Lucrative
resume to compensation
0333 or email
3vore mai package includes
arooogreat wages,
medical, life &
disability insurance,
IE JOIN paid time off, 401(k)
GREAT and more!
A A TI $250 Sign-On Bonus!
EAM'! Apply at
CoastDental.com
FT 3-11 Call (877) COAST-17
A PT/FT ext. 139
Fax (813) 289-4500
?nt Benefits
se apply
thin at
Creek ALF CoastDental'
W HWY 19 www.CoastDental.
e Workplace com
EOE/M/F/D/V
Care Drug-free workplace
ireer path is Licensed
open at
lanor Care Practical
ooksville, Nurse/Certified
the nation's Medical Assistant
providers of Allen Ridge Family
citation and Care Center
cute care.
n us as: We are currently
seeking an LPN/CMA
RTIFIED for our fast-paced
'SE AIDE family medical care
ill-time center located in
n-11pm Lecanto, FL, Ideal
candidate must have
kRY AIDE previous physician
lights- office experience to
im-8:30am be responsible for
performing EKGs,
ar excellent PFTs, vital signs and
and benefits phlebotomy. Will also
ling 401(k)l assist the physician
and be responsible
e send/fax for front desk duties.
to: Heartland Must be a Licensed
ooksville, Practical Nurse with
nor Avenue, current licensure by
ille, FL 34601. the State of Florida,
2-799-3662. Department of Health
: 3171hr@ Division of Quality
norcare.com Assurance; or
line at www. Certified Medical
norcare.com Assistant.
Drug-Free Please apply online
nployer at www.citrusmh.com
e. Strength. CMHS is an equal
rimitment, opportunity employer


('I i, al Educator
(Criticl Care
kledSuro
. T[elemetr,


Other Opportunities:
Director of Rehab Services
Blood Bank Supervisor
Medical Technologist
Histology Technologist
Physical Therapist
Physical Therapy Assistant
Radiology Technologist
Respiratory Therapist
Patient Account Representative
Coder
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select FT positions!
SRRMC is part of the HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N.Suncoast Blvd.,Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email: . .
Linda.Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com i I
Web Site: www.srrmc.comn
EOF/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE .F 2ooo00ton) 01
e SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
725001


Evening
Receptionist
Come join a fun
team Multi-phone
system and data
entry skills preferred.
Dependability a must.
Apply in person
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness. FL EOE
LPN
For Dr's office in Homra:
Sprngs. Gd sal. & ben,
Fax resume to
1-727-841-9848
or call 1-800-573-0123

LPNPMDS
NURSE

Position requires a
* reliable positive
team player.
Mail or Fax Resume:
Att: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL
34429
OR FAX RESUME to:
(352) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
Mail or FAX ONLY!!
DFWP/EOE

LPN NEEDED

Must have strong
computer skills foi
clinical research
position.
Research experience
desirable,
Please call
(352)563-1865 or
email rwood@encore
docs.com

LPN's FT
1:30 -10:30pm

For Assisted Living
Facility. Pay by
experience.
Sign on bonus!
Insurance after 60
days Vacation
After Jan 1st.
Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE

MEDICAL HELP
Seeking
Surgical Tech or Nurse
Must be energetic,
self motivated &
interested in pursuing
an excellent
opportunity for career
growth. The selected
individual should be
able to work In a fast
paced environment
and easily handle
multiple medical tasks
efficiently with a
willingness to
learn surgery
Please Fax resume to:
352-746-9320
No phone
Calls please.
References required
..n


MEDICAL OFFICE/
ASSISTANT

Front & back office,
patient care, P/T or F/T.
Medical experience
req'd, Transcription
experience a plus.
Competitive pay/
benefits for the
right person.
Mail resume to:
108 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST
Busy medical practice
Exp. med. terminology,
65-75 wpm w/1-2 yrs
medical exp. Excellent
written & oral commu-
nication skills needed.
Excellent benefits.
Mon thru Fri. Fax
Resume to Gwen
352-637-4510
Nurse Recruiter

Ideal candidate must
have a Bachelor's
Degree; additional
coursework in
Human Resources
Management,
Business Administra-
tion or Psychology
preferred. Must also
be a Registered
Nurse or Licensed
Practical Nurse with
current license with
the State of Florida.
A minimum of two
years recruiting
experience,
preferably in an
acute setting
preferred. Proficiency
with computer
applications required.
Please apply online
at www.citrusmh.com
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer




























I M -0*0 fl


NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352)60-088*5



NURSES
3-11, 7A-7P, &
7P-7A WEEKEND
FLEX SHIFTS
If you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044
&. HR/Conniee
(M, T, Th. & F 9-3)
DFWP/EOE

NURSES
Avante at Inverness
is currently accepting
applications for a
Fulltime 3-11 Nurse
and a
Part-Time 7-3 Nurse.
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave,
inverness
or fax resume to
352-637-0333
or email to
tcvoreMa
avantegrouo.com

Office Needs
Person
That has Experience
Assisting Doctor. Must
give injections, draw
blood, EKG and have
some front desk exp.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1370M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
Florida, 34429

Orthopedic Exp'd
SURGICAL
SCHEDULER
LPN/MA

Orthopedic Practice.
Fax resume to: Nettie
(352) 746-0333

RECEPTIONIST

F/T for Busy Drs. Office.
Exp'd w/Medical Mgr.
& accounts receivable.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333


RECEPTIONIST/
BILLING MANAGER
Needed for medical
office. Exp. preferred.
Fax Resume to
352-489-6920
Registered Nurse
Allen Ridge Family
Care Center
We are currently
seeking a Registered
Nurse for our
fast-paced family
medical care center
located in Lecanto,
FL. Responsibilities
include, but not
limited to, the
delivery of patient
care through the use
of the nursing process
of assessment,
planning, implemen-
tation and evalua-
tion; participating In
Quality Assessment
and Improvement
and integrates
appropriate
recommendations
into the provision of
patient care. Ideal
candidate must be a
Registered Nurse with
current licensure by
the State of Florida,
Department of Health
Division of Quality
Assurance. Previous
clinic experience
preferred and Basic
Cardiac Life Support
within 30 days from
hire.
Please apply online
at www.citrusmh,com
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer

RN
Management
Positions
Available
Exp. preferred,
competitive
salary & benefits
package.
PRN
CNA, LPN & RN
Positions Also
Available all shifts

Please apply at;
Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab
2730 W Marc
Knighton Ct
Lecanto, FL
EOE

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
ALL STAR *
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S

New competitive
pay rates. Call
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111


* Registered Nurses

* Certified Nursing Assistants

* Clinical Pharmacist

* Respiratory Therapist, Certified or Registered

* Certified Surgical Techs

* Registered Dieticians

* Sterile Processing Techs

We offer an excellent salary and
benefits package. Apply online
at www.MunroeRegional.com.
Smoke-free & drug-free workplace.
Equal Opportunity Employer.


www.Mnroe-giona.com


h


CILASSI]FIEIF-r-)S







8D SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 9. 2007


Crius COUNTY (FL) CIIRoNICI.


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!

CALL THE


INSTANT APPRAISAL L


,.. ITS FREE!


800-342-3008


2007 GRAND MARQUIS
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 951
2007 MUSTANG
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 952
2007 CAMRY
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 953
2007 F250
2007 F250FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON
THIS VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 954
2007 CIVIC


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 955


2007 IMPALA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 956


2007 DURANGO
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 957
2007 SENTRA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 958


S


$ 3,999


S16,9991


1 6,999


26,9991


1 3,999


'1 4,999


$4 999


2006 F150
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 961


2006 ACCORD
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 962


2006 RAM
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 963
2006 TITAN
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 964


2006 SONATA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 965


2006 COROLLA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 966


F 2006 TACOMA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
* VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 967


$13,999


$13,999


$ 13,999

$ 4,999


$14,999


#12,999


12,9991


2007 YUKON
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 959


26,9991


2006 ODYSSEY
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH 2r 1 9
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 968
2006 SEBRING O TI
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH $
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 969 9 9


2007 EXPLORER
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 960


2005 SILVERADO
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 971


2005 ALTIMA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 972


2005 TRAILBLAZER
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 973


1 9,999


S12,999


S11,999


S12,999


2006 HUMMER
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 970


2004 EXPEDITION
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 977


2004 ACCORD
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 978


2004 DURANGO
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 979


$37,999


16,999


1 111,9991


$12,999


2005 GRAND CARAVAN
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 974


4 AA2004 DAKOTA
9 N FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 980


2005 FRONTIER (
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH 8
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 975
2005 CR-V 4
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH 1
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 976
2003 SILVERADO
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH 9
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 983
2003 TRAILBLAZER
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 984 1


2004 GRAND CHEROKEE
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 981


2004 EXPLORER
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 982


$11,999


02002 F150 (
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS $4 ,999
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 989
.oo2002 EXPEDITION ( 9 9
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH 11 9
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 990!


2003 EXPLORER
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 985
2003 MUSTANG
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 986


$9,999


$9,999


2002 LESABRE
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 991


2002 ALTIMA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 992


$7,999


s8,999


2003 CAMRY
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 987


2001 RAM
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 994


$10,999


s8_,999 1


2001 COROLLA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 995


2002 GRAND MARQUIS
--- FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH 7
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 993
rI


2000 ALTIMA
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 996


2000 GRAND MARQUIS
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH
INFORMATION AND SPECIAL PRICING ON THIS
VEHICLE. 800-325-1415 EXT. 997


CALANI SSAN &
(800) 342-3008 2200 SR 200 OCALA (352) 622-4111
ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND '395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY.
PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.
724900


8,9991


I 1


[I


$5,999


16,999


ie


-1


I I


I


w ___j


w I


l J


i


i J


I


I


J


FAOA


SI


15,999











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

S F- * Fl
E�c=Sale r^Held


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
URGENT CARE/
FAMILY PRACTICE
Seeking
Exp. Front Office
Personnel FT
Must be cheerful,
good with patients.
Hours. 8am - 5 pm
Call (352) 522-0094
or Fax Resume To:
(352) 522-0098
XRAY TECH
Xray Tech PT/weekends
call 800.557-8787 ext 154




Capital
Improvement
Project
Coordinator
Responsible
professional and
technical work
in project
management.
Coordinates and
monitors renovation
and construction
projects. Assists in
developing,
administering and
monitoring budgets
for projects in
construction,
rehabilitation,
renovations and
maintenance.
Graduation from a
four year college or
university with course
work In related field.
Requires 2 years
experience in water
and wastewater
treatment processes.
Pay range $1,164.52
to $1,793.39 B/W.
Starting pay DOQ.
Apply at or send
resume to the
Citrus County Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461.'
EOE/ADA




Beverage Cart
Attendant
Apply at Black
Diamond HR, 3073 W.
Shadow Creek Loop,
Lecanto EOE DFWP
COOK
Ex p. nec. Apply at
Black Diamond HR,
3073 W. Shadow Creek
Loop, Lecanto
EOE DFWP









SERVERS
BANQUET CHEFS
& LINE COOKS

Needed
Please apply at:
505 E Hartford St.
Hernando or
Call (352) 746-6855
SERVERS
Fine dining exp. a must!
Apply at Black
Diamond HR, 3073 W.
Shadow Creek Loop,
Lecanto EOE DFWP




ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist In the
enrollment of the new
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work in
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance 1st
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an Interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813


$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187



LQik

Do You Have It ?
Do You Want It?
Come & Get It!!!


#1 Best Paid
Commissions
#1 Leading Company
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Call (352) 628-2555,
Monday 10-2 for
appointment
d/f/w/m/f eoe

EXP. SALES PERSON
Needed, company car
& commission + pay
Man- Fri. 9 - 5
Call (352) 795-0949


VILLAGE

SELECT
APPLICANTS
WANTED
Village Cadillac
Toyota/Scion is
looking for
motivated, confident
self-starters with
outstanding work
ethic. Unlimited
Income Potential.
Extensive training
seminar by the #1
Sales School.

* Paid Training
* Best Pay Plan
in Area
* Blue Cross/
Blue Shield
* 401K With Employer
Contribution
* Paid Vacation
* Dental Plan
* Promotion from
within
No experience
necessary,
Please apply In
person at:
Village Cadillac
Toyota/Scion
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
We are a Drug Free
Workplace






AUTO GLASS
INSTALLER
A to glass installer
wanted! Company ve-
hicle, must have own
tools. Excellent pay pro-
gram. At least 5 years
exp. Call CMM Glass
Corp. 1-866-439-5020

BACKHOE/
TRENCHER
OPERATOR
5 yrs, Exp. & a Class A
CDL req. Must pass
drug screen. Top pay
& benefits. Call
Wayne at
(352) 258-5033


ELECTRICAL
HELPER
1 yr. Exp. Necessary
Apply in Person
6938 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.

EXPERIENCED
ASPHALT MAN
SEAL COATING
& STRIPING HELP

CDL Lic.
(352) 563-2122

Immediate Work
EXP'D. ROOFERS
NEEDED
Commercial & Resi-
dential Crews. Must
have valid Driver's lic.
& willing to work.
(352) 341-3921


INSTRUCTORS
WANTED

HEAVY EQUIP.
OPERATOR SCHOOL
Located in Lecanto
Patience, punctuality,
ability to work w/ other
instructors, min. 3 yrs.
exp. in Construction
required,
Training provided.
Fax Resume to
352-628-7686
and or email
atsmary (alyahoo.com


always on the go. And wherever 1
they go, they are likely to encounter
HMSHost. A recognized leader in food and
beverage concessions serving travelers, we strive to
give our customers everything they need to make the
journey just as enjoyable as the destination.

HMSHost at
Okahumpka Travel Plaza
* Mile Marker 299, Florida Turnpike .
(Located in Wildwood, FL 34785,
between Exits 285 & 304)
has
IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES!

SUPERVISORS * CASHIERS
GREETERS
JANITORS * COOKS

DUNKIN'

Please contact Debra Danley,
tel: 352-748-5100 or email resume to
Debra.Danley@hmshost.com



fMS

We are where you travel.
www.hmshost.com
EOE MF/DVN, A Drug-Free Environment
with Pre-employment Screenind.
722243 Criminal background checks required


SERVICE PLUMBER
Min. 5 yrs. experience
Apply in Person @
SUNCOAST PLUMBING
6938 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.
Homosassa





$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187

Appoint. Setter
Will Train, Top Pay
352-726-1002

Construction/
Development
License Inspector
Responsible
enforcement work
in determining that
persons or firms
engaged in building
construction,
development and
related activities are
legally licensed to
perform such work
and are performing
such work In ac-
cordance with
applicable laws and
adopted ordinances.
Investigates cases;
enforces permitting
and licensing
regulations through
the Issuance of civil
citations; prepare
reports and provides
the public with
Information used to
Initiate legal action
against violators, if
necessary. Appears
at court hearings and
testifies during legal
proceedings and/or
administrative
hearings. Graduation
from H.S or GED.
Considerable
knowledge of
construction and
related laws,
ordinances and
regulations. Law
enforcement
background
desirable. Ability
to maintain records
and to prepare and
submit reports. Ability
to express facts,
opinions and
recommendations
clearly and concisely,
orally and in writing.
Ability to exercise
sound judgement
and tact.
Starting Pay
$13.07 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at or submit
resume to the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
EOE/ADA.

Customer Service

Call Center
Consultant,
Sumter Electric
Cooperative, Inc.
has an immediate
opening for an
experienced Call
Center Consultant In
our Call Center at our
headquarters
located at
330 S US Hwy 301
in Sumterville.
The successful
candidate will have a
HS Diploma/GED and
a minimum of two
years experience in a
customer service/ call
center environment,
Excellent telephone
customer service and
computer data entry
skills, with a minimum
of 30wpm required.
The ability to maintain
confidential
information and work
effectively in a
high-pressure work
environment is
essential. Candidate
must be able to work
M-F, 6:00am-7:00pm,
-holidays, scheduled
weekends from
May-October, and
irregular hours upon
short notice.
Credit/collection
experience and
fluency in Spanish
preferred.
Starting salary begins
at $15.00/hour and
includes an excellent
benefit package.
Applications will be
accepted from
9/2/07 through
9/14/07 at the One
Stop Career Center
office in your area,
fax resume to
SECO - Call Center
Consultant at:
352-568-7777, or
email to
secoiobs@seco
enerav.com
SECO is an Equal
Employment
Opportunity
Affirmative Action
Employer.
M/F/D/V


Full Time Lawn
& Maintenance
Caretaker

For large home,
equipment furnished
Send resume to:
Blind Box 1371 P
Citrus County Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450
GRIMALDI'S

Exp. Irrigation and
Landscape Person
FI. Driver Lic. Required
Apply in Person
Mon - Fri., 12-4pm ONLY
KENNEL &
BATHING HELP
Part to full time,
Fax Resume to:
(352) 795-4640

Maintenance
Person
Handyman, electri-
cal, refrigeration,
plumbing, pneumatic
systems exp. a plus
On call 24/7 Work
van/gas included
(352) 629-6917
MAINTENANCE
Person Needed

Apply in Person
TRADE WINDS
10265 W FIshbowl Dr.
Homosassa




OPPORTUNITIES
FOR A NEW
CAREER!
Stanley Steemer
Will train, FT, benefits.
Must have FL Driver's
lic. and be at least
21yrs of age. Drug
Free. Apply at
911 Eden Dr., Inv.

SALES REPS
FOR SPRINT
CINGULAR

Kiosk in Wildwood
Salary + Bonuses/
Benefits.
1-877-424-4737,
ext. 5737
staffing@icrocks.com

SERVICE
COORDINATOR
Local, long
established home
appliance dealer
needs energetic,
consumer oriented,
flexible individual for
multi-role position as
Service Dept.
Coordinator/Parts
Clerk/Receptionist
In fast paced, but
cordial office setting.

computer exp. &
moderate lifting
req'd. Competitive
wages w/benefits.
FAX Resume 726-4618
VENERO & SON INC.,
Inverness. We are a
Drug/Alcohol
Free W.P.
w/Pre-employment
screening &
background checks.
See TOP JOB LISTING
on Chronicle Website


Earn extra
, income after
taking course

Flexible
schedules,
convenient
locations.

Courses start
in Sept.

Call
877-766-1829
Liberty
Tax Service
Fee for books.
CAREGIVER
Paralyzed man. Re-
sumes, ref. to PO Box
1615 Hom. Spgs. 34447
Maintenance
Honest, dependable
Hard worker
needed in Crystal
River PT/flexible hrs.
30 min/day,
$200/month.
Great for retirees.
Vehicle req'd Call M-F
813-888-9222


Serving the Developmentally
Disabled Since 1966.

$ Increased pay rates and $

competitive benefit package for

all F/T employees after 90 days

Positions Available:
Bus Driver - P/T Inverness area
Residential - F/T & P/T
Supported Living Coach - F/T
Transitional Living Coach - F/T
Instructor- F/T

DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Apply at the Key Training Center
Business Office
130 Heights Ave., Inverness
352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347)
722224 *EOE*


Yard/Gen
Part time,
Home Repo
(352) 522-1
7pm Only, C


--































LOCA

I Large na
organize
Avg. Pay
Over $55K c
includin
bene fits &
training, v
1-866-51E
r-N7-A7-









DAYCARE
For Sc
Call (352)
ESTABLISHED
FOR SALE. Exc
352-341-t
352-212-0514
LAWN BUS
EQUIP. FC
Steady ye
income (352
Pool Route,
net $84K +.
train, & gu
accounts
Broker (877)
poolroutesa




COMMERCE
Prime, Sub-Pr
Money,REHA
Also, equity
Mark (352)


CLASSIFIED




i. Maint. ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
Yard & stoves. Service & Parts
air CALL (352) 344-2928
109 after
it. Springs AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
ELECTRIC STOVE
20", 4 BURNER, perfect
Uj*OGY for small mobile, cabin
or camper. $100
(352) 613-3503
Frigidaire Refrigerator
18.5 cu.ft. white, glass
shelves, clean, very
good cond., $275.
Twin wicker headboard,
natural, $45.
S(352) 726-2269
GE MICROWAVE
- Space Maker
XL1400 Like New $100

- ... Kenmore Dishwasher,
like new
$75. obo
(352) 637-2725
KENMORE WASHER &
DRYER, Series 80,
HD, super capacity+
White, works well
2-84 15 $100/pr.
mat/itoal (352) 220-6414
B t REFRIG. & STOVE
i I 2 MATCHING
Y " Ceramic top, almond.
Hwy 19 Freezer on Top,
!cyF. $300/both
(352) 746-0243
IR� G REFRIGERATOR
ILLY A21 Cu. Ft. Fridgidaire;
kLLY � Almond. Runs good $25
I SECTIONAL SOFA
itlonal 4 major pieces $150
action. (352) 726-7421
$20/hr.
annually. REFRIGERATOR
ig full Frigidaire, 18cu.ft. ,w/
OT, paid ice maker excel cond.
action. I $235./obo.
P/T (352) 637-4645
5-1762 �
Side J REFRIGERATOR
SSide By Side, Kenmore
Ice & water in door.
GE Smooth Top RANGE
w/self-cleaning oven
MICROWAVE, GE
BUSINESS Above Stove.
ale $750/all OBO
601-5517 (352) 341-5247
D SALON ROPER BY WHIRLPOOL
c. location. REFRIGERATOR
5043 or Freezer on top.
1/637-5078 White, like new,
INESS & less than yr old. $450
)R SALE (352) 476-9527
ar round
) 628-4500 UPRIGHT FREEZER
Maytag, standard size.
Hernando $150obo; EXERCISE BIKE
year, will DP, Fan Generated
arantee w/monitor. $35
$67K FP $25 (352) 637-1712
766-5757
ales.com Washer & Dryer $265/
set. Great cond. Best
Guarant. Free delivery
& setup (352) 835-1175
WATER SOFTNER
AL LOANS New GE GNSH45E
rime, Hard Water Softner in the box
B,. Private. unit asking $500.00 Call
p. loans, after 3 PM 352-257-1774
422-1284 WHIRLPOOL
E WASHER & DRYER
Lg. capacity, hardly
used, Snowbirds.
$300. (352) 344-3485


ALL STEEL BUILLDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents, ,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-$15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com
FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
Custom Installation,
Up to 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555

LOCALLY MFG.
30 X 30 X 9
Vertical Roof w/(2)
8 X 7 Garage Doors
& (1) 36' Walk Door
& 4" slab.
Installed $14,995
(352) 489-9397




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
BARBER'S CHAIR
"Emil J. Paidar",
Chicago. Over 75 yrs.
old. Access. Good to
Exc. Cond. $1,250 obo
352-746-5077
BLUE MOON
272 NE 3rd St
Crystal River
New Antique Room by
Troy & Alba. Buy & Sell
321-508-1111
352-7952218
China Cabinet, 84" H,
75" L, 16"D, white
w/ gold trim, $225.
Couch 84"L, cream,
wood trim $175.
(352) 228-7670
DRESSER
$50
WRITING DESK
$75
(352) 341-5247
Original Watercolor,
framed by Audrey
Dillard. 50"X 30"
"Bed of Roses" For
details & negotiation,
352-465-0833/484-3118
RADIO/
PHONOGRAPH
$75
ANTIQUE TABLE
$75 OBO
(352) 341-5247
VICTOR FLOOR SAFE
$300;
SEWING CABINET
$35 OBO
(352) 341-5247




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-* 2 Ton $780.00
-* 2-V2ton $814.00
-* 3 Ton $882.00
-Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Deliveryl
Call 746-4394


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
Mww.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877

SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING &
APPRAISAL

AUCTION
Every Monday
Night 7:00 PM

Super nice 1994
Ford Explorer,
Unique German
oak dining table
& hutch, Salt/fresh
water rods, reels,
lures...
Pics at
www.auctionzip.com
#4341
15991 NE Hwy 27 Alt.
Williston, FL
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240
10% BP on all sales


DEAL
I - r I








GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966 I
(352) 726-0902
'Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.





55" HITACHI
Projection TV
Oak Cabinet w/doors.
$400 (352) 527-0032




FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type w/ 18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai.
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811




Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799


-EH-
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeell.com




FORKLIFT
Air Tire, Diesel.
In Homosassa. $4,500.
Phone (813) 478-5270




8 PC. PATIO SET
w/Tea Cart $550
Like New!
(352) 613-4891
9 PC. PATIO SET
45" Rd. Table, 4 cush.
chairs, Chaise, Chair
w/ottoman, sm. table
$400 (352) 795-2906
PVC Love Seat
sling is off white w/ 2
mauve cushions,
$50.
(352) 257-1478




5 PC. BEDROOM SET
$375. DESK $50:
(352) 628-5924
9 PC. LIVING RM. SET
Good Cond. $250;
YOUTH BED
White Heavy Plastic.
Good Cond. $40
(352) 628-4210
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
Bassett Sofa Sleeper,
green black, new
cond. $250. obo
8 Pc. Patio Set,
neutral $250. obo
(352) 382-4757
BEDS :. BEDS -:o BEDS
The factory outlet store
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 .:* Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006
BUREAU W/MIRROR
6 Drawers. 5'W.
Green & tan, $40;
RD. OAK TABLE
3' diameter, Bind. Oak
$50 (352) 527-2769
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Regional,
Consignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Comp. TWIN BDRM. SET
W/LINENS $200;
ROCK MARBLE DINING
TABLE W/6 CHAIRS
(W/Pad) $200
(352) 795-7744
Console table, w/2
drawers, 58" x 30" x 16",
$75.
Glide rocker,
w/ maroon cushions,
$100. (352) 527-4634
Couch & matching
chair & ottoman, $350
Antique Grandfather
clock, solid walnut,
$700 (352) 637-1321
Couch,
blue contemporary,
$200 obo
Entertainment Center
Black, w/ lights
$200. obo
(352) 302-7985
COUCH, Flexsteel, like
new, mauve & cream
must see! $485;
SWIVEL ROCKER Mauve,
round low back, like
new. $85 352-382-3269
CURIO CABINET
$75;
TWIN DAYBED
W/MATTRESS $35
(352) 795-7744
DINING RM. SET
8 upholstered chairs, 7'
table w/leaf & glass
top. $200.
(352) 527-9876
DINING ROOM SET
6 upholstered chairs
(includes 7 yards
matching fabric) table
& hutch, Whitewash.
$475; 352-382-7553
401-474-0089
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
78" HX 34"W Oak.
Exc. Cond. $85;
SLEEPER SOFA Comfy,
Like New $195
(352) 422-3190
King Sz. Sealy
Posturedepic mattress,
& box spring only 4 yrs.
old. pillow top. $200.
Kitchen set, 6 chairs,
ivory w/ acrylic top
$200 must see to appre-
ciate (352) 476-6406
Kitchen Rectangle
Table antique white, w/
darker pine color top
38 x 54, w/ leaf 66", 6
matching upholstered
chairs, less than 2 yrs.
old excel. cond. $400.
Jelly Jar Cabinet,
matches kitchen set,
sold separately $200.
(352) 527-4634
Large Dining Table
w/ 6 chairs, $125. obo,
836 Great Pine Pine Pt.
Inverness Sat. & Sun.
Only (352) 220-9011
Leaders Rattan Dinette
42" tbl. 4 Chrs w/ cast-
ers, 2 matching bar stis,
soft med. blue cush.
Orig. $1,400/Sell $650
Like New Cond.
(352) 527-2327
Leather Chair and
Ottoman, Ashley, paid
$1,500. will sacrifice
$650. Coffee & end
tables wood w/ stone
top $500. for both,
new, excel, cond.
(352) 422-1909
MOVING SALE
Furn, Toshiba 36" TV,
Camp. desk, stereo sys,
Workbench, Router,
Porch turn 352-726-7159
New TIki Bar
All Bamboo w/ 2 bar
stools, must sell
$150.
(352) 621-0300
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Open for New Season


Beginning Tues Sept 11
Shop while it's cooler
In the mornings.
Tues-Sat. 9a-I1p
Turn at Paul's sign on
Grover Cleveland
to Holiday St.
Homosassa 628-2306
Portable L-Shqped Bar
for Kitchen or Patio
Solid Oak, formica top,
$300.
(352) 465-2823
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen Serta Bedding
Set, very clean, w/
frame linens, skirt,
matching comforter &
curtains, $400.
(352) 212-0013
SLEEPER SOFA
Blue Cloth $150;
TILE Mural Kitchen Table
(Beach/Shells) w/4 Wh.
Chairs $195
(352) 637-0440


SUNDAY, SEPTI-MBIRa 9, 2007 9D


r RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
----m - J
Sofa, 90" Multi Color,
leaf print, w/ 7 pillows,
$115.
Recllner, teal, $125.
Both New Condition
(352) 527-0424
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
Twin Bed Set
Complete w/ bolsters &
bedding $75.
Computer Desk Chair
Burgundy $30.
(352) 746-0563
Twin Bed, solid maple
headboards, mattress's
etc. like new
$225. obo
S.M.Woods
(352) 382-4912
WALL UNIT, 4 pieces,
glass door, light oak,
good cond, can hold
19" TV, $400.
(352) 527-2304
Wh. WICKER/RATTAN
Loveseat, 2 Choirs &
Table. $175; WROUGHT
IRON CHAIRS (4) White
w/cushions. $100/set
(352) 637-0440




2 Hustler commercial
mowers and 18Ft utility
trailer, 6 mo old, must
be sold (352) 726-7393
Craftsman ZTR, 40" cut,
15H, All attach., $1,200.
Murray, 42" 17H, $400.
(352) 362-7832
CRAFTSMEN ELECTRIC
LAWN MOWER
19" cut, 3-3
Very few hours, $95.
(352) 637-0560
CRAFTSMEN RIDING
MOWER 10HP, new bat-
tery, points &cndnsr. Sp
Plug- Carb. Kit. Engine
in rear. $250. 352-
344-1310, eve. 5-10
D.R. CHIPPER, 18HP,
towable, excellent
2007, low hrs.
(352) 637-6588
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Mower & Equipment
Repair Quick Service.
Pick up & Delivery,
Don Mead 400-1483
MTD Riding Lawn
Mower, 18.5 Briggs
& strat. 42" cut.
runs good $350.
(352) 302-6069,
MULCH 5-6 Yrd. Loads
$95 Deliv'd. Citrus Co.
Gravel $75 + Materials.
352-563-9979/400-0150
SCOTTS TRACTOR
MOWER
20HP Kohler, 50"
Cut - Extra Blades - Very
Nice $950 382-4572
SEARS CRAFTSMAN
2001 riding mower,,
19HP, 42" cut $450
(352) 628-2769




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
BLUE MOON RETAIL
272 NE 3rd St
Crystal River. Now
accepting High End
Fashions & Accessories,
home decor items,
unique & trendy home
furnishings.
Buy/Sell/Consign.
(352) 795-2218
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 8 & 9, 9-4
Professional
Gas Services
4280 N. Suncoast Blvd.
1 mi. N. of Mall on US19
Bargains Galorellll
F/P's, log sets, cook
tops, space heaters,
Too many items to list.
DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat & Sun. Tools,
electrical & plumbing
supplies, furniture, 1998,
Mini Van, Jet Skis, boat
tri & misc items.
4422 W. Dunnellon Rd


-s-Act Non -

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
* * * * * *


Ociruu ITip sul r nulunl
Care Workers, Like new
large & X large,
5 for $25.
352-621-3697 ,


5 PC. PATIO SET
Table w/4 swivel rockers
& rug. $250;
PET WINDOW 8 mo. old.
Fits MOST windows $100
(352) 382-2076
12 NEW METAL I.C.
CRATES, use for tool
transp/decor/strg/furn
or ? $80/all or $8 ea.
(352) 795-5929 Iv. msg.

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply


AIR CONDITIONER
For Mobile Home 2/21/2
ton. $300/obo
POWER POLE 200/250
amp serve. for Mobile
Home. $300/obo
(352) 400-1424
Approximately
300 Concrete Blocks
8 x 8 x 16
$250 for All
(352) 726-3093
BEER MAKING EQUIP.
Everything you need to
make & bottle your
own beer. $100.
(352) 746-3508
BURIAL PLOTS
in Fountains Memorial
Park - Fountains of Life:
Two spaces
$1050.00 - 628-1062
BURN BARRELS
Heavy duty wl out tops
$7.50 EA (352) 344-9752
Flag Set, 20ft 2/2" steel
telescopic, org. $365.
Now $200
Also 20ft. 2" Alum Set,
w/ out Flag $45.
(352) 382-1191
GENERATOR
6250 Watt. $400
Used for 6 days.
Like Newl
(352) 637-7150
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
HEAVY DUTY
Sewing machine In
carrying case. $50/obo
(352) 527-0424
HIDE-A BED SOFA
Floral Print, Exc. Cond.
$175; Lg. Husky Toolbox
w/Craftsman Tools
$350 OBO
(352) 613-4891
LOG SPLITTER
27 Ton, Vert./Horizontal
New in 12/06, Home
Depot. $1,250. Used
twice. Will sell for $900.
Will deliver.
WINE BOTTLE OPENER
Deluxe Countertop
Stand. New, in org. box
$140; Will sell for $75
Call Don352-231-0160
MANATEE ART
& CARVINGS
$250
(352) 563-0022
MASSAGE TABLE
Professional &
Stationary;
Good Cond.
$150 (352)746-5077
Mattress Set, Simmons,
queen, clean $125.
Computer Monitor, flat
scrnm., NEC, 19" Analog,
$45. (352) 465-2853
OFFICE FILE CABINETS
(6) 4 Drawer w/hangers
& folders. $35/ea.
or $200/all
(352) 563-0022
PARROT CAGE, $25;
SCROLL SAW & SOLDER
GUN, w/accessories,
$45. Beverly Hills
352-257-3793
Patio Furniture, includes
square glass table & 8
padded chairs, $200.
BBQ Grill $50.
(352) 344-4127
Pool Cover,
16 x 32, plastic, like
new, 1 yr. old
$80.
- (352) 563-1406
Power Tower - Abs,
Dips, Pull ups, workout
Machine, $79.
Out Door Plant, 5 ft tall,
umbrella Tree $19.
(352) 422-3190
PROPANE TANK
250 GAL. $275.00
352-795-6693
REAL CLOWN ITEMS
Hats, Shoes, Wigs,
Jackets, Clothes.
$150 all or will sell
separately.
(352) 382-1191
SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Thompson Mini Walking
foot Commercial
Sewing Machine,
Perfect condition
$300.
(352) 628-4527
TOTAL GYM , $75, OBO.
JOGGING STROLLER,
Baby Trend, $65 OBO
(352) 220-8434
TOTAL GYM,
used little, $75.
TABLETOP JEWELRY
DISPLAY CASE, 24X36
new, $40.
(352) 341-3000
Vacuum Cleaner
w/ attachments
$50.
(352) 344-4127
Vinyl rack, holds 8 rolls,
Island type, on rollers,
$100. Slot machine,
needs repair, $50
(352) 341-0787




2 Port A Pottey
$22. ea.
(352) 382-1628
2 Wheel Chairs
$65. & $90.
(352) 382-1628
ASTHMA/POLLEN/DUST
Breathing problems?
Cloud 9 Sterile HEPA
Filter Air Purifiers, exc.
cond. 3.Cost $1485.00
Sell (3) w/filters $300
cash (352) 344-9073
GO GO BY PRIDE


SCOOTER $370.00.
SONIC SCOOTER
By Pride. $400.00.
Both easy trunk load.
(352) 628-9625
Hospital Bed
Like New
$850.
(352) 212-2733
Hoveround Power
wheelchair, 2 yrs old,
elec., exc. cond., $600
Handicap ramp, fold-
ing, for van never used,
$250. (352) 344-3032
WALKER W/BRAKES,
Seat, & Basket
Brand New! $100;
TV STAND
$15
(352) 795-7744


BUYING us CUOIINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676


Flute, Bundy/case,
$65.
excel. cond.
for info/see
(352) 795-0636
Lowery Organ
Excellent Sound, fine
pc. of furniture, storage
bench, manual $500.
(352) 628-5186
Piano, Wurlipzer $850,
Guitar, Honer/Case
$250.
All in excel. cond.
for info/see
(352) 795-0636
Wurliltzer Piano
$500.
(352) 344-4204
Leave Message




Health Rider, Elliptical
Machine, $80.
Power 90 advanced
sculpt circuit DVD $10.
(352) 746-3615
PRO-FORM 520X
TREADMILL, sell as is
$100/obo Working
condition. Will need
console board.
(352) 249-1118
SEARS FORM J-6
Space saver, $125;
(352) 637-0560




ANTIQUE COLT
Pocket Revolver
22 Cal. Brass Frame
$600
(352) 628-7818
BERETTA
22 Semi-Auto.
Exc. Cond. $375
(352) 637-7150
ELLIPTICAL TRAINER
Pro Form 160
Almost Newl
$300 OBO
(352) 201-9538
EVERLAST
BOXING GYM
HEAW & SPEED BAGS
$125 352- 287-9847
Folding Bicycles,
like new $75. ea. or
$100 for pair
$250. ea. new,
great for travel & RV's
(352) 208-4428
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLF CART BATTERIES
THE BATTERY MEDICS
36V & 48V Sets were
$245 Now $200 Pricing
Extended till 9/30.
Contact Mark @
727-375-6111
Golf Cart, 2001 EZ -Go,
4 seats, Exc cond,
$3500,
(352) 249-1031 L/M
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
WEIGHT SET
Bar, numerous weights
& bench. Also separate
slant board for
crunches. $100/all
(352)621-0848




6 x 12 V Nose Enclosed
Dual Axle w/brakes.
LED lights, more,
2006 Carry On. $3,500
(352) 382-1804
8 X 14 Single Axle
HD Utility Trailer
w/ramp gate & 3' sides,
Bed is 6 X 10.
$700 OBO
(352) 634-1674
'02 ENCLOSED Trir 5x10,
New tires, $1200: 4X8
UTILITY TRLR 15" tires.
$200. 795-4770
CAR HAULER
Dbl Axle, Steel Deck,
ramps. Spare tire and
winch. $1495.
352-228-2608.
Equipment Trailer
$800. Sell or Trade
(352) 382-3642














19" 14kt Vlgaro link,
gold chain, 6 months
old, paid $800, Sell for
$300 (352) 637-7125




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676





NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
55 GALLON FISH TANK
Full set up w/fish $250;
(2) 10 GAL FISH TANKS


w/wrought Iron Stands.
$100/both.
(352) 382-0612


Act Now

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over Items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95

The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.


(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
* * * -k -i -







OD

A,


-U
S, Boat
cm ccssores


- r - Bot


Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207


Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat SDaved $25
Doa Neutered &
Spayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370


All 2007 Century Boat Packages
Receive A FREE Trailer
Stop In and SAVE SAVE!
'07 2001 CENTURY
F150 & Trailer, T-Top & many
extras $28,292
'0718 ft. PONTOON BOAT
with 50 HP $12,675
'07 OUTER BANKS
160 Skiff, 50HP Yamaha & Trailer
$13,595
'03 CHAPARRAL 215
SS Cuddy Mercruser & Trailer,
Fast & Clean $23,990


Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE


(352) 563-5510


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597


Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuoer
352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuer
352 794-0094


* . - 5- . -






NEW T-TOPS & :
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last LongI
Call for Pricing
Mon-Fri. 9am-5pm
(352) 527-3555


"Clenin
c- om/Ofie


1-----.

DI0 c O c
I I

I o
I I
I I


0 0



00




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898


- O--
--0


C" andClerin
3 6homn


W. F. GILLESPIE
Room Additions, New
Home Construction,
Baths & Kitchens
St. Lic. CRC 1327902
(352) 465-2177
www.wfgillespie.com


*a~ndo


3I" h
5L'
cc Reinsh


CU-Kirp


Andrew Joehl- -
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
0256271-352-465-9201


Du
* /ermi


N--















"DEBRIS HAUL NG"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898


"DEBRIS HAULING" -
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos,
352.447-3713/232-2898

a 000
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY






ALAN NUSSO j
3.9% Listings -
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM



BUYING OR
SELLING? CALL ME
FOR RESULTS!


-----------------------------------------------


I Q i


I 0 0 -


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
Keller Williams
Realty


I.------------


0 0


----------------------------------------------------


pr '*3 I*sLi
#74055092,


Al phaesof o*
reai.I lcwor


I I
I I
S.----------- J


pries. InsLi
#740553092,


0 0

aOO







All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431


I I

_-------


* POOL LINERS *
* 15 Yrs. Exp.
Call for free estimate
(352) 591-3641 I
S00


I I
I I
S__ _ _


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
*Roof Repairs* Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes




Insras l rSt latio as

(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
zState Certified Lic. #CCC1327843




Whats Missing?






T -1-
Call (32 56-30 or ^
(352) 563-326T lc Yourd'


I - C rpors , '


Ideal Carports
Custom Build Your Dream
* Carport
�. Garage
SBoat
* Barn
'.Any Metal Bldg.
N'% hateer 3uu need,
we've got you covered"
352-795-6568
7958 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., (Hwy. 44) Crystal River


6.. * caro~rs. S'



a too Oo* 0
0- 00 0) C


000 C Q L


o 0.


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs
GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect* Beautify - Residential & Commercial

Suncoast
Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.
1877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


I ;has Missing.




-,-


WARD VA C


.;.'.._7c--R D
Your
( Business II Q.---'
US - I uDethatching Lawns
Ad! Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming
r (352) 637-3810 or (352)287-0393
32)63206ToPlace Yrt Ad! FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & insured


* lSen'ing All of Citrus Coun

CCC025464 QB0002180O a OPINm
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated
NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS,
FREE ESTIMATES


$10 OFF0


|-' - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(352) 628-5079 * (352) 628-7445

INFOR MATI O


- al -32 6-29o


co
MML
C= Boats


Boats


Boats


WE NEED
BOUSH
SOLD at NO FrE
Selling them as fast
as they come in I
[ArcuryAuth Parts& Sep ice


19


Horses :]


C4 Press
" Clean


4�b
4 Remodelij


I " Tree
L Service


lc= Paintint


M a r i n e


C= arpet
I " C
co Repair


14;9b Lawn Care


Care fo'r
-M the Elderly


c" Dirt
A
= Service


IC" C o n c rete:]


Icil Windo


C4 Pressure
" Cleanino


I " Chilo Care
c" Services I


4Remodelinel


So


7


-I


-0


!


A


cm
WLandscaminl


-c= Paintin2


!3Wallqajj











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.E


Carolina Skiff '95
CC 17' w/newly rebuilt
55HP Suzuki, gd. trailer
$4500. (352) 212-7651
PONTOON 16'
, 2003 Sylvan 16' w/02
J' 40hp 4-stroke and 02
galv trailer. Bimini
top,trolling motor,
livewell, depth finder,
much more. VERY NICE
S$8950.212-5179
. PONTOON 18'
' With trailer '00 40HP
0 motor. All in great
shape. $3500/ obo.
S (352)564-8941
PONTOON
21 ' Party Barge 40 HP
Evinrude--lots of Extras
Like New $6,000.00
352-634-2360
PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trir.
$5,300 abo.
813-695-8428
352-634-4021 EVE
Pontoon Boat
30 ft. Party Hut, 93
Evinrude, 95H, T/T, runs
great, head, stove
frige, etc. etc. 2001 Tan-
dem trlr., new firs. car-
pet. seats $9,500 obo
(352) 860-0513
" SEA PRO 21'
1998, Center Console,
150hp Yamaha, $10,000
(352) 795-2537 Iv. mess.
SEA RAY 18'
'99 Bowrider w/ trailer,
115 Merc, OB, Tilt &
f Trim, Extras, $8,900 OBO.
F (352) 628-9056
SEAPRO 1999 21'
V2100cc bay series.150
SYamaha w/trailer,
bimini, radio, trolling
mtr. 13,000.
(352)748-5005
SPORTCRAFT '86
20 ', CC, 140 OMC,
Sea drive, rebuilt '05,
F boat/mtr/trlr. $2,500
1 obo (352) 795-4204
STARCRAFT
3'98, Bowrider, 18'10", V-6
,1 I/O, used in fresh water
F, only. $11,500 obo.
(352) 206-5894
C: SUNDANCE
0- 14', Skiff, 25hp, Exc
'. ond, Many extras,
$3700 OBO.
(352) 628-1653
THUNDERCRAFT
16FT, '89 Bowrider, OMC
I/O, new carpet & seats
like new, garage kept
$2800obo 352-270-3641
TREMBLAY 17'
Fiberglass, live-well,
center console, 60 hp
Evinrude, Runs great!
Swivel seats, front cast-
ing deck, Exc. Cond.
$5,500 (352) 795-1411
Vectra Deck Boat
'06, Like new, seats 8,
90HP, loaded, $22k
Sell $16K obo
(352) 795-6895
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497
Well Boat
30 ft., & trailer
$3,800. Sell or Trade
(352) 382-3642


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chronicle!
.2 weeks ollo.e!
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621

Beaver Monterey
38ft. 2005, C-9 Cat eng.
3 slides, fully loaded,
l- 10k mi. $185,000.
(352) 795-9873
DAMON 32', 1992
454 Chevy eng, 27K mi,
2 ACs, queen bed.Non
Smoking, No pets, Lots
of extras & Exc. Cond!
$18.900 (352) 527-8247
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Duct AC, Pwr.
lev,, Bckup camera,
gen., Loaded! 14K mi.,
$40,000 (352) 422-7794
GULF STREAM '04
Ford BT Cruiser, 28' Tow
pkg. 13K ml 1 slide, walk
arnd qn. bd, very clean
$44,000. (352) 344-5634
ROCKWOOD
'94, 23 /V2 ft., class A,
generator, roof AC,
Chevy, 19k mi. $16,900.
(352) 564-7935




AIRSTREAM 20'
,1965 MODEL, 80%
refinished, $3500
(352) 422-7907
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
LANCE
'03 8.6 slide in camper
full upper queen, 3 way
fridge, A/C, outside
shower, port potty
bath, fits short or long
bed, 1pc. SS roof $6,500
(352) 726-6485
LAYTON Skyline
'93, 25' 5th Wheel,
slide out room, Priced
to sell @ $3,500
(352) 422-7222
PROWLER REGAL
'05, 39', alum. frame
const. fully loaded, 2 Ig
sidouts, 2 qu. sz. bdrms.
$17,500 (352) 634-4439


TRAIL LITE
'05 27FT, self contained,
8F1 slide out w/20ft
awning, must see
$10,800 (352) 584-2491




350 CHEVY ENG. &
TRANSMISSION
$1,450 00B
(352)746-5077
454 CHEVY ENG. &
TRANSMISSION
$1,050 080
(352)746-5077
FLAT TOPPER
Red, Ig wheel base,
xtra hvy. duty, Ford 250
like new $800 sell or
trade (352) 382-3642
Lambo door hinges
fits Honda & Acura,
$300 obo
(352) 422-0792
Leer Pick up Cap, Fits
2000 GMC Sonoma Ext
Cab, very good cond.
$300. (352) 726-9267
LEER TOPPER,
fullsize truck forest
green, $250.
(352) 476-2149





TOP DOLLAR
S For Junk Cars
L $(352) 201-1052 $
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645




'01 Honda Accord
I LX, Auto A/C Save I
on Gas, Only $6,988. |
866-838-4376
r-- --- ni
'1, FordTaurus SEL,
Low Miles, |
Leather Sunroof,
ONLY $5,995, |
866-838-4376

r,-3 -- 7---i
'03 HUNDAI SONOTA
1 Low miles, fully I
Loaded Only $7,988.
866-838-4376

r m - - = l
'05, Kia Rio,
S Save Gas
and Money At
S $129. a month
S 866-838-4376
--= m- .=I


'02 DODGE NEON SXT
E,_ Che CD MLdv $5,995
'99 HONDA CIVIC EX
Auto Sniroof Loaded. $7,995
02 TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
V6, D0iuja!Acded . $7,995



A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*

. 2 weeks Online!
SFeatured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
-Cal Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details. '
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

ACURA MDX '04
Sport w/ navigation,
59K mi. Exc. cond.
Garage kept. $24,800
352-746-7402, Iv msg.
r 7- --
ALL SAVE AUTO
AFFORDABLE CARS I
100+ Clean |
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN 1
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675USHWY19 I
HOMOSASSA I
352-563-2003

AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621






BUICK CENTURY '02
Custom Sedan, 1 owner
65K, meticulous, Ithr, Int.
Loaded. Non-smoking.
$8,995 (352) 726-3520
BUICK LASABRE '92
Blue, 4dr, runs great
$1400
(352) 563-0642, eve.
BUICK LESABRE
2004, Sr. owned, 67K ml.
good cond,, $8,500
Call before 9pm
(352) 382-2420
BUICK PARK AVE. '86,
4dr, V-6, auto, 30+mpg
AC, loaded, Sr. owned.
Gd. cond. $1500.
(352) 249-8059
CADILLAC 2001
DEVILLE
Must be seen.
One of a kind! $10,200
abo. (352) 527-6553
CADILLAC Deville
'92, 145K mi., Cold AC,
Runs & Drives Great!
$1,500 OBO
Maria (352) 795-4718


Cadillac ElDorado
'92, custom point, new
tres/rims, keyless entry.
AC, Ithr, Nice audio sys.
$2900/bo 352-746-6370
CHEVY CAVALIER
1998
$1850 Cold A/C, Clean int
& ext, New Tires Call
352-613-5869
CHEVY COBALT '06
31k mi. 4dr. metallic
sand. Air, CD plyr. Exc.
cond. PS. $10.200
(352) 746-5802
CHRYSLER
'96, LHS, 134k mi., runs
good, ice cold air, fully
loaded $1,500. obo
(352) 601-5116
CHRYSLER
SEBRING1998
$3295. Convertible, A/C
Cold, Excellent Condition.
New Tires. 352-613-5869
FORD ESCORT
'98, Gas Miser! 110 OK,
New tires, Frosty AC,
CD. 4 spd., Exc. Cond.
$1,900(352) 563-0022
FORD TAURUS
'94, Everything works!
$1,800
(352) 726-6116
FORD Taurus
'99, pwr. everything,
new tires, battery/
brakes $2,300. Floral
City (305)304-1096
INFINITY G35 '06
Coupe, 10K mi. Blue/
creme, beautiful &
perfect! $30,800
(352) 860-1239
MERCURY
'93, Topaz,
Ice Cold AC
$1,200. obo
(352) 563-5916
MERCURY Marquis
LS, 2006, Ultimate
Edition, 12,900mi,
under warr, $16,100.
(352) 795-5554
MUSTANG - RED '01
15,000 mi. 1 owner,
loaded, $9,900.
(352) 212-5628
NISSAN SENTRA
2004, Rebuilt, 27K mi.,
auto, AC $7,500
(352) 527-2464
OLDS AURORA
2001, V-6 Sedan, 48K,
Exc. Cond. Leather,
Dual Pwr Seats/Wndws/
Drs., Radio/Cass./CD,
Chrome Wheels,
Pearl White. $10,995
(352) 746-2001
PLY. ACCLAIM
'94, 4 DR, AC, auto, very
depend. 35mpg, cruise
control 100k + miclean,
$1,350. (352) 586-3854
SATURN SCI '99
3 dr, 4 cyl, auto, 127K
mi. Cold AC, Runs/drives
perfect. $2550
(352) 453-6870
TOYOTA
'01, Corolla, auto, AC,
P/S. P/B, 114k hwy. mi.
1 owner, well maint.,
all records $5,995.
(352) 628-9984
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./All pwr.,
Mntc. Reds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685


Your Donaicior of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
$500! Police Impourds For
sole!
Cars from S50r For rcs call
1-800-366-9813 ext 73/4




A Classic Car WANTED
American or Foreign
Will travel, Cash waiting
(407) 957-6957
CHEVY CHEVELLE
1965
31,000, $8,500 4 door
Malibu, 99% original
car, white, mint
condition 352-586-9113
LINCOLN LIMO
1988 vintage 6 pass. all
works, cold AC, garage
kept. $2,800
(352) 422-1675





MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 126K,
White, Both tops,
New tires, $10,500
352-586-6805/382-1204
TRIUMPH SPITFIRE
'80. Very low miles, runs
great, perfect project
car, $4,000
(352) 503-6263
VOLKSWAGON '70
7 pass bus. Rebuilt mtr
runs great, new brakes,
needs body wrk, $1975
352-637-1894, after 9am
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





'05 Nissan Crew Cab
4 x 4, LOADED, I
ONLY $16,988. |
866-838-4376


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chronicle!
*2 weeks Online!
-Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'S5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


'07, Chevy Crew
Cab, Z71,
B Like A Rock Call
866-838-4376






CHEVY
'91, S10, short bed, 6
cyl. 5 spd.,, AC, bdliner,
runs good need some
work $800. 423-3002
DODGE
'96,RAM SLT 1500,
custom paint, too much
too list. Excel. shape to
pretty for words, $5,995
obo (352) 860-0513
DODGE
'98, Dakota, w/ topper
& sun visor, 45,520 mi.,
$5,500.
(352) 621-7647
DODGE RAM
'96 1500 Club Cab,
$3,800/obo Rebuilt
Engine & Trans.Runs gd.
352-465-2087/697-2357
FORD
'04,F150 XL, Super Cab
V8, Auto, A/C, P/S, 34k
well malnt.. 1 owner,
$14,300. (352) 628-9984
FORD EXPLORER
SPORT '02, AC, runs
great. 57K mi., exc.
cond. $10,000/obo
(352) 637-2582
FORD F250 '99
Quad Cab Long Bed, 7.3
Diesel, 4" New exhaust,
Tuner, cold air filter, 177K
mi $12950.00 OBO, Alloy
Wheels, Power Seating,
AM/FM Stereo, Goose
neck hitch, Power Door
Locks, Power Windows,
Air Condition New tires,
New shocks, Like new in
and out. (352) 465-2761
FORD F-350 '99
V-10, gas, 4X2 Super
Cab, loaded!
137,000 mi. $6,500
(352) 503-3571
FORD RANGER
2004, 27K mi., Auto, AC,
V-6. Exc. Cond. $10K
obo (352) 527-2464
SUBARU BAJA
2005 24K mi. AWD,
standard, cruise, CD,
bed ext., extras, $18,000
obo (352) 560-7696
TOYOTA
'94, Pickup, 4 cyl., 5 spd.
looks & runs good,
$2,200. (352) 302-2258
After 5, weekdays
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




'01 Nissan Pathfinder9
1 LOADED, N
with Everything
Only 9,899.
866-838-4376
- M m ,,,= s i=i


/NOVEMBER 24
7NOVEMBER 24, 2007


-4 p.m.


DIRECTIONS:


From US 19 turn west on CR 494 (Ozello


Trail) go 6.2 miles. Watch for signs.









SOHFUN! FOOD



SOMETHING FOR ALL!


02 Buick Rendez-
vous Perfect, SUV |
For Family Don't Miss
At I
$8,495,
866-838-4376
L----il
ri-- - -- -
02 HONDA CRV
Auto, All Power
A steal at
| Only S 10,988.
S 866-838-4376
L .l.l m .m m m m |
'98 SATURN SL II,
Leather Sunroof 32K I
ONLY $4,990. 1
866-838-4376
L - l= - l
CHEVY Blazer S10
'88,4.3, Low miles, A/C
Sr. owned, very sharp,
$2,700.00 (352)
465-0721
GMC SUBURBAN
'99, leather, all options,
full chrome pkg, cust.
wheels/tires, hi mi. pert.
maint. exc. cond.
$7,000 (352) 422-3661
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVROLET 2500
'04, LT Silverado HD,
XCab, Long Bed, 4 X 4
Duramax Diesel, 46K,
Loaded! $21,900
(352) 489-7689
FORD F-150
'94, 4WD, runs & looks
good, 300 6Cyl., 5spd.
OD, $2,250 obo
(352) 795-4204
NISSAN FRONTIER
'99, w/cap, 75K,
Ice Cold AC; 4 X4
$7,500
352-564-8476/422-5081
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




CHEVY STEP VAN
'73, Good Cond.
$1,995
(352) 621-0982
Dodge Conv. Van
'95, 318, Auto, cold AC,
Capt, seats, bck bnch
seat/bed, Gd cond.
$3,000 (352) 344-2999
DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 1994
$1650 Dual A/C, 7 pass,
clean & out, Good Tire,
352-613-5869
FORD E-150
'94, 7 Passenger, White,
All pwr., AC, tow pkg.
$2,500 (352) 344-1413
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY




. -



ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$500! Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA TRX 200
ATV, runs & drives, with
high and low transm.
$600obo 352-628-2769
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
SUZUKI DRZ 125
2006 DRZ 125, Excel-
lent condition, have
only been riden very
little Asking $1200.00
(C) 352-257-2051
4 WHEELER
(TWO) 2001 Kawasaki
220 4wheelers. Good
condition. $1100.00


2 HARLEY'S
'97 Road King 28K mi.
burgundy/silver stocked
'01 1200 Sportster
custom, 18,250 mi.
Burgundy & dark
burgundy.Lowered
w/forward controls
(352) 583-4338

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
.2 weeks In the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectlonl
al Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"S5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLDWING SE
1990, Honda, 72K mi. like
new, Pearl white, $6,000
a must see. Crystal River
cell 772-528-6130
HARLEY CHOPPER
'71 Old School Iron
Head. Everything
redonel A steal @
$5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917


SIINi)AY, SIJ'JI'M5IIi 9, 2007 1 D




HELIX SCOOTER HONDA Goldwing
/76, GI. 1000
250 cc, 70MPH 3500 mi, Ec, Cnd
New tires loaded, real Manyr exra, $2,995
nice cond, $2,500 firm (352) 621-0982
(352) 726-6485
__________ PAGSTA MOTOR
HONDA SCOOTER, auto, street
HONaDl. klo new, only
VTX 1800 R, black, 2003, 60rl, L n95/ob l
15k mi. adult driven, (352) 628-4276
absolute pert, cond. -
windshield, light bar. YAMAHA
hyper charger, engine '85, Venture Royal, o/c,
guards etc. etc. call for cond., new tires, 37K ml,
full list of accessories Asking $2,200 obo
$7,500 . 352-228-9514 (352) 621-0927

-Ic-

333-0916 SUCRN THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
2007CP585 Estate of All other credit of the
Sarah R. Giles decedent and other per-
Notice to Creditors sons having claims or de-
PUBLIC NOTICE mands
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT decedent's * . ... 1
FOR CITRUS COUNTY, file their claims with ttifs
FLORIDA court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
PROBATE DIVISION AFTER THE DATE OF THE
File No. 2007CP585 FIRST PUBLICATION OF THtS
Division NOTICE.
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
SARAH R. GILES FILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
Deceased. RIODS SET FORTH IlN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
NOTICE TO CREDITORS IDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The administration of the NOTWITHSTANDING THE
estate of Sarah R. Giles, TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
deceased, whose date of ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
death was April 28, 2007, TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
is pending In the Circuit AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
Court. for Citrus County, DATE OF DEATH IS
Florida, Probate Division, BARRED,
the address of which is The dote of first
110 N. Apopka Ave., publication of this notice
Room 101, Inverness, FL is September 9, 2007.
34450. The names and
addresses of the personal Personal Representative:
representative and the Jose A. LeGrand
personal representative's PO Box 2626
attorney are set forth be- Winter Park, FL 32790-2626
low.
All creditors of the de- Attorney for Personal
cedent and other persons Representative:
having claims or de- Jule W. Kronhaus
mands against Attorney for Jose A,
decedent's estate on LeGrand
whom a copy of this no- Florida Bar No. 0994243
twice is required to be 1330 Palmetto Avenue
served must file their Winter Park, FL 32789
claims with this court Telephone: (407) 539-3939
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 Fax: (407) 539-6111
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION Published two (2) times in
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 Citrus County Chronicle
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF September 9 and 16,2007
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
331-0909 SUCRN
Academy of Environmental Science
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Board of Directors for the Academy of Environ-
mental Science will hold a regular monthly meeting at
2:30 pm on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 at the
Academy of Environmental Science, a Charter School
sponsored by the Citrus County School District, located
at 12695 West Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, Florida. The
purpose of the meeting Is to discuss and act upon any
business that needs to come before the Board of Di-
rectors. A copy of the Agenda Is available for public
review at the Academy office.
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board of Directors with respect to any matter con-
sidered at this meeting, that person may need to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record should include testimony and evidence
upon which that person's appeal is based.
Steve Farnsworth
Chair, Board of Directors
Academy of Environmental Science, Inc.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 9, 2007.

332-0909 SUCRN
Smitty's Auto Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described below under Florida Statutes
713.78. The undersigned will sell at public sale by com-
petitive bidding on Thursday, September 20, 2007 at
9:00 am on the premises where said vehicle has been
stored and which are located at Smtlfty's Auto, Inc.,
4631 W. Cardinal St., Homosassa, Citrus County, Florida,
the following:
Year: Make: Model: VIN#
1992 Ford Conversion Van 1FDEE14Y8NHB36703
Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in
cash only, Vehicles sold as is and must be removed at
the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the
event of settlement, between owner and obligated
party.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
on August 25, 2007.

334-0909 SUCRN
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public Is hereby notified that the Board of
County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, Intends
to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMEND-
ING ARTICLE II OF CHAPTER 90 OF THE CITRUS COUNTY
CODE PERTAINING TO THE FIRE PROTECTION TAXING DIS-
TRICT BY AMENDING SECTION 90-31, CREATED, EFFECT
ON MUNICIPALITIES; GOVERNING BODY; POWERS; BY
DELETING IN ITS ENTIRETY SECTION 90-32, NEW VOLUN-
TEER FIRE DEPARTMENTS-FUNDING; SUBSTATIONS;
STANDARDS; EMERGENCIES; ADMINISTRATION; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN
THE CODE; PERTAINING TO MODIFICATIONS THAT MAY
ARISE FROM CONSIDERATION AT PUBLIC HEARING; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness. Florida on the 25th day of September, 2007,
at 3:15 P.M., at which time and place any and all per-
sons interested may present any matter for or against
the proposed ordinance for consideration of the
County Commission. Copies of the proposed ordi-
nance may be reviewed in the Leconto Government
Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue.
Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made
by the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing, he will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings Is made which record shall include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation
at this meeting because of a disability or physical im-
pairment should contact the County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

DENNIS DAMATO
CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 9, 2007.

335-0909 SUCRN
Citrus County Aviation Advisory
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY


AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will meet at 3:00 p.m. on
Thursday, September 13, 2007 in Room 166 of the
Lecanto Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path. Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446.
DENNIS DAMATO
CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the Governing body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding Is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
(Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes).
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path. Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call
(352) 527-5446, at least two days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 9, 2007.


10 a.m.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


12D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


20(08 TAURUS


Concerned about
' Ford Motor Company recalls?
Call the service
department with your
ID # and see what your
recall status is with any

n Ford, Mercury or Lincoln.

726-1231.


F
44.


~-~2


K





.12 61'~


-h d -,. "--*".'
" . ,, , ' .. -


4. 6 ' 1
.1 ~4 I &
~j2I.& L>...


..4, .




.-.' . ..� �' -. . .- ..; .. . ..-. . - F' .. , - ,
,y. "l�^ t ~ ^ h "r " ,l <. , "l


4z,


64
.4 .4 .4~9 -~


. .... ....
. .. ...
*~~V' '4 '4 PMJL


First Annual North Central Florida Mustangs All Ford Powered
Car and Truck Show
Presented by Lhe North Central Florida Mustangs.


Saturday September 29th * Nick Nicholas For
2901 Highway 44 West * Inverness
Awards for "Best of Show", "Best Proceeds toBeneit
S --. Paint", "Best ihterior, "Best .- _-. Local Charities
' Engine", and a Special Award w " -,'Food, Fun, Prizes,
"Dealership Choice" Live Music, 50/50 Raffie
I "4 W ET . ai t 444*dA -a - ____aiiuB8Sif __ii____________aH

4----^ 11Ea~ : ^l gl^


AM~
...................


* . . , 4-4
414~'
.


k:l - I


~aL.sar ~~t~Ia6~4mm


V4.Pig


.4 '4
* ., .1.~.


WN-


4'. 6,~
, -,, ,, . ~464V. ..VV E&A'.-y.. .,


OF THE M1'ONr4


GARY GIBBS


'6'-.6
46.4,~,~.
- *...A I


ADRIAN
KNIGHT


,..',i "'' V O L ',





TIM PAr C
PELESHOK PEARSON -,S T


KIMBERLY
WILLIAMS


?~-~-'V-Am


GREG
LAND


Li IL


- RU


6.64t 4X~. S


----- . .... - i " ' '


.,~
64.... -.


BiKa !', * .- , -.
.. r -S

9 -^S^9,W


U,


WILL
DEXTER


BRAD
HILL


EBurCmJCerI
I- 4MIMb


L��


WAVAA.


ma


ip� im
: taw


I =*� L, 11




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs