Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00995
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 4, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00995

Full Text




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Hurricane Felix nears Honduras /10A


FORECAST:
Partly cloudy with
isolated thunder-
storms.
PAGE 4A


SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


10,000 PAGES RELEASED-
Crimes tracked
Newly released courts-martial
documents show a pattern of
disregard by U.S. troops for
the rules of war./Page 10A
YEP, IT'S PROBABLY TRUE:
Look of love
A study confirms: When given
the choice for a mate, men go
for good looks./Page 10A
FRIGHTFUL FINISH:
Top scare
"Halloween" came early and
closed Hollywood's strong
summer season with a record-
breaking Labor Day weekend
debut./Page 4B


Blood pressure
Supplies at critical low,
donors needed to replenish
inventory./Page 1C


RELPA3IO:


Free at last
Iran agrees to release an
Iranian-American scholar,
allowing her to leave the
country and rejoin her
family./Page 7A

OPINION:

One way or
another, it seems
clear that a
month from
now, it will be
possible to see
far more clearly
the direction of
American policy
in Iraq.

COLUMN. PAGE 8A


DOC SQUAWK:


Healthy advice
Doctors Bennett, Gandhi,
Dodge and Grillo contribute


Com ics .............. 9C
Crossword ............ 8C
Editorial ............. 8A
Entertainment ......... 4B
Horoscope ........ . . . . 8C
Lottery Payouts ........ 4B
M ovies .............. 9C
Obituaries ............ 6A
Community ........... 7C
Three Sections


6 I845 lll l i20l0 5


President travels to Iraq


Bush hints at troop

reduction during

surprise Labor Day visit

Associated Press
AL-ASAD AIR BASE, Iraq - President
Bush raised the possibility Monday of U.S.
troop cuts in Iraq if security continues to
improve, traveling here secretly to assess
the war before a showdown with Congress.
The president was joined by his war cabi-
net and military commanders at an
unprecedented meeting in Iraq over eight
hours at this dusty military base in the heart
of Anbar province, 120 miles west of
Baghdad.
Bush did not say how large a troop with-
drawal might be possible or whether it
might occur before next spring when the
first of the additional 30,000 troops he
ordered to Iraq this year are to start coming
home anyway He emphasized that any cut


would depend upon progress.
After talks with Gen. David Petraeus, the
U.S. commandeer in Iraq, and Ambassador
Ryan Crocker, Bush said they "tell me if the
kind of success we are now seeing contin-
ues, it will be possible to maintain the same
level of security with fewer American
forces."
Bush's trip was a dramatic move to steal
the thunder from the Democratic Congress
as it returns to Washington with fresh hopes
of ending the unpopular war, now in its fifth
year. Petraeus and Crocker will testify
before lawmakers next week, and then Bush
will announce how he intends to proceed in
Iraq.
On Air Force One after leaving Iraq, Bush
acknowledged that his comment about troop
reductions had piqued interest. "Maybe I
was intending to do that," the president
said, sitting around a table with reporters in
his plane's conference room as he flew to
Australia to meet with Asia-Pacific leaders.
"If you look at my comments over the past
eight months, it's gone from a security situa-
Please see . /Page 4A


Associated Press
lent Bush, right, poses with troops Monday at AI-Asad Airbase in
province, Iraq. The president made an unannounced visit to Iraq to
with Gen. David Petraeus, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker,
leaders and U.S. troops.


gam County:

game Tiki



bar not


allowed


Neighbors upset

about addition
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The future operation of a
tiki bar at a Homosassa fish
house may be in doubt after a
county official said the proper-
ty isn't properly zoned.
The Cedar Key Fish House
began operating the tiki bar in
June after the county changed
the future land use map on its
property from residential to
commercial. For years, it was a
grandfathered fish house in
what became a residential
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle community.
o Christiansen leaving for dial- Gary Maidhof, director of
ansplant. Despite the disease, development services for
h Sweetbay Supermarket. Citrus County, said the tiki bar
is not in compliance because
Ssthe future land-use map must
-out e r match the zoning map, which
still has the property as resi-
ACTS dential.
ACTSn The Cedar Key property and
for Organ Sharing (UNOS) about 100 others are sched-
Florida: uled for amendments to the
ng transplants and fewerzoning atlas map. Maidhof said
ng transplants and fewer in most cases, those zoning
changes are a formality
e surviving one year after because the land-use change
fits how the property is now
can be the source of two being used.
Georgeanna Phelps, whose
majority of intes- property abuts the back of the
2003. The majority of intes- Cedar Key Fish House where
Iren. the tiki bar was added, is lead-
year. ing a neighborhood charge
, so that one deceased against the bar. She said noise
and traffic from the bar is a
ch year. Just over one third disturbance.officials reportedly
County officials reportedly
sent a notice of violation to
se medical status is most Cedar Key Fish House owner
atus is not as urgent. John Lawson, saying the tiki
irtment of Health and bar is not permitted. Lawson
ww.organdonor.gov or was unavailable for comment
Phelps said she learned the
county signed off on an alco-
holic beverage license that
Lawson applied for early this
year.
The permit, which allows
1 Consumption of alcohol on the
Sfrom Iraq premises, was issued in
February and expires in
goodies and a big cake. September 2008, according to
"I'm still trying to finish it," state records.
he said with a smile. Maidhof said his office does
He was overwhelmed, but review alcohol licenses to
also pleased to see just how ensure the establishments fit
supportive his community is. rules for 500-foot setbacks
"It makes me proud to know from churches and schools. He
that people are behind the mil- also said that stores that sell
itary" package alcohol routinely
Now that he is no longer in request on-premise consump-
the Navy the ne the next thing on his tion permits for those occa-
agenda is to find a job in Citrus sions when a customer pops

Please see ,Page 7A Please see �,BAR/Page 7A


Needing a new organ
NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Three nights a week, Tom
Christensen packs his pillow and a blan-
ket, grabs a bottle of water and his
earplugs, kisses his wife, Dotti, good-bye
and heads to the Inverness Dialysis
Center.
From 8 p.m. to about 4:30 a.m., he
watches TV or sleeps when he can in a
wide recliner chair in a room with
about 16 other people, hooked up to a
machine that filters the toxins from his
failing kidneys.
He'll do this for as many months or
years as it takes, until a donor kidney
can be found. He's 48.
"We've always known we were going
to come to this point," said Dotti
Christensen. "We tried to avoid (dialy-
sis) for as long as we could. But when
the doctor said it was time, it was almost
Please see ORGANS/Page 4A


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
After spending the past three
months in Iraq, Greg Haight is
happy to be home.
At- the age of 24, Haight is
already done serving in the
Navy.
He graduated from Citrus
High in 2001 and immediately
joined the Navy that August.
Currently, he is doing two years


can be a frustrating drawn-

ORGAN TRANSPLANT FA
According to information from the United Network
and the Agency for Health Care Administration for
* Each year, about 2,000 heart transplants, 1,000 lu
than 50 heart-lung transplants are performed.
* About 85 percent of heart transplant recipients are
transplantation
I A single lung can save a life. One deceased donor (
lung transplants.
* About 100 intestine transplants were performed in
tinal transplants are performed in infants and child
* About 5,000 people receive liver transplants each y
* A donated liver can be split between two recipients
donor can be the source of two liver transplants.
* About 14,000 kidney transplants are performed ea
of transplanted kidneys are from living donors.
* For heart, liver and intestinal organs, patients who.
urgent receive priority over those whose medical st
* To become an organ donor, log on to the U.S. Depa
Human Services Web site for Organ Donation at wv
www.hsmv.state.fl.us/html/organdonor.html


in the reserves. While
in Iraq, he spent most
of his time in the
Persian Gulf at ports in
Dubai and Bahrain. His
job was to operate cer-


the Navy. However,
enlisting in the Navy
was a move he made
completely on his own
with great support from
his family.


tain types of weapons ,_i After driving through
systems. Inverness and seeing
Joining the Navy Greg the signs that wel-
seemed like a natural Haight corned him home,
route for Haight since Haight made his first
he had a r.,.,ili,. .-'' pi I stop at the VFW post in
their and cousin who either Inverness. There, he received
have served or are serving in a warm welcome, a basket of


HIGH
93
LOW
71


'*


Playing the waiting


Tom Christensen and his wife Dotti play a round of pool Wednesday at their Inverness home prior t
ysis treatment. Diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease, Christiansen is in need of a kidney tra
he leads a full, active life that includes raising two teens and a career of more than 30 years witl


this week./Page IC

AMa Navy man glad to be back home
Annie's Mailbox . . . . . . . . 8C








2A TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


Cuban exile


to auction


Guevara's hair


Lock was cut

before he was

buried

Associated Press

MIAMI - A former CIA
operative and Cuban exile
plans to auction a lock of
Che Guevara's hair, snipped
before the Argentinian revo-
lutionary was buried in 1967.
G usta vo
Villoldo, 71, was
involved in
Guevara's cap- I
ture in the jun- for me t
gles of Bolivia,
according to past be
unclassified
U.S. records pass the
and other docu-
ments. He plans SOm
to auction the
strands of hair else.
and other items
kept in a scrap-
book since the Gusti
j CIA-i the man auct
joint CIA-
Bolivian army
mission 40
years ago.
"It's time for me to put the
past behind and pass these on
to someone else," said Villoldo,
also a veteran of the ill-fated
Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba.
Heritage Auction Galleries
of Dallas will hold the auc-
tion Oct. 25-26. The scrap-
book also includes the map
Villoldo used to track down
Guevara in Bolivia, photo-
graphs of Guevara's body,


t
o0
h


ie


tio


messages intercepted
between Guevara and his
rebels and a set of Guevara's
fingerprifits taken before his
burial.
It's hard to predict how
much the items will net at auc-
tion because there is nothing
comparable on the market,
said Tom Slater, director of
Heritage Auctions' Americana
department.
"We cannot recall ever
having seen artifacts relat-
ing to Che's dramatic career
and death appearing on the
auction mar-
ket, and we
expect this
s time offering to
put the excite broad
bidder inter-
lind and est," Slater
said, noting
se on to that Guevara
has become an
Done icon in popu-
lar culture
around the
world.
"Some will
o* ' come for the
zoning Guevara's
hair. historical value
of the items;
others may sim-
ply collect the hair of famous
people," he said.
The Cuban government
announced in 1995 that its
anthropologists had uncov-
ered Guevara's remains
from Bolivia, and re-
interred them in Cuba with-
out doing any DNA testing.
Villoldo and other exiles and
experts say the body of one
of Fidel Castro's closest
friends is still in Bolivia.


SO YOU KNOW
* News notes tend to run one week prior to the datek),t an
event.,
* During the busy season, expect notes to run no rTmre than
twice.
* Submit information at least two e,,K re th vent.
* Early submission of timely material is ar_,pp,' ._d, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices
River; by fax at 563-3280; or by
desk@ chronicleonline.com.


in Inverness or Crystal
e-mail to news-


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Aleiza Rome, 4, is fascinated with a puppet Saturday while playing at the Boys & Girls Club in Crystal River.



County, *


Citrus Co. establishes
pet friendly shelter
Citrus County Department of
Public Safety Animal Services
Division, in cooperation with Citrus
County Emergency Management,
established a pet friendly shelter in
the event of a disaster.
The pet friendly shelter will be at
the Lecanto Primary School, 3790
W. Educational Path, Lecanto.
Citrus County Animal Services will
coordinate the housing of pets at
this shelter. The shelter will provide
housing for animals for dogs up to
80 pounds; domestic cats, and
birds. No exotics, reptiles or
aggressive animals will be accept-
ed.
Pet owners will be responsible
for providing food, any pet medica-
tions and care for their animals


while housed at the shelter. Pet
owners must remain housed at the
Lecanto Middle School shelter
throughout the event. Animals must
be tame and be current on their
rabies vaccination. Animals must
be removed immediately upon
closing of the pet and human shel-
ter (which will be at the end of the
emergency).
For information, or to be a volun-
teer, call 726-7660.
Attend EDC barbecue,
win Bucs tickets
The county's biggest barbecue
blast is planned for Thursday, Sept.
20, and attendees have the added
opportunity to win four tickets to a
Tampa Bay Buccaneer football
game.
The Citrus County Economic
Development Council will host the


25th Annual Industry Appreciation
Barbecue 6:30 p.m. at the Holcim
Ranch just north of Crystal River.
The barbecue will include live
entertainment from "The Mick
Sharp Band."
At the barbecue, one individual
will win four tickets to an upcoming
Tampa Bay Bucs game. The win-
ner will have the opportunity to
select which group of tickets they
want from one five of the upcoming
Bucs games.
Tickets to the barbecue are $30
per person and can be obtained by
calling 795-2000.
Strifler guest at NCRC
Sept. 8 meeting
The Nature Coast Republican
Club will meet Saturday at the
American Legion Post 155, 6585
State Road 44, Crystal River.


Breakfast is $5.50 and begins at
8:30 a.m.
Guest speaker Betty Strifler,
Clerk of the Citrus County Circuit
Court, will give a PowerPoint pres-
entation of her duties and responsi-
bilities with a question-and-answer
period to follow.
All registered Republicans are
eligible for membership.
Citrus 20/20 hosting
dinner, show
Citrus 20/20 is sponsoring a
"Save Our Waters" fundraiser din-
ner Sept. 14 at the West Citrus
Elks Club in Homosassa.
Doors open at 6 p.m, dinner is at
7 and the show begins at 8.
Tickets are $35 and tables seat
eight. For tickets or information,
call Cheryl Phillips, 527-0800.
- From staff reports


Puppet master


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SEPTEMBER 4, 2007
www chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE


Fort Lauderdale

Man sent to hospital
after possible shark bite
A 58-year-old man is recov-
ering after being sent to a Fort
Lauderdale hospital with what
he believed was a shark bite.
The man was taken to the
hospital by Fire Rescue offi-
cials just before 10 a.m. He
had been swimming just north
of Hugh Taylor Birch State Park
when he was injured. Fire offi-
cials say a cut on his arm was
about three inches long and
half an inch deep.
Officials were not able to
confirm the source of the
man's injuries but said he
believed he was bitten by a
spinner shark feeding on bait
fish. The beach remained
open.
The man's name was not
released.

Tavares

Historic Florida home
burns in fire
One of Central Florida's old-
est homes has burned in a fire.
The 1871 Woodlea House
was thought to be the oldest in
Lake County before it burned
to the ground Sunday night. No
one lived in the house.
Civil War captain Melton
Haynes built the house on a
citrus grove near the eastern
shore of Lake Harris. The city
moved the home in 2005 to
save it from demolition by a
new development.
Officials were investigating
the cause of the fire. There
was no electricity in the house,
so an electrical fire has been
ruled out.

Pembroke Pines
2 pedestrians killed
by policeman
A police officer struck and
killed two pedestrians Monday
while responding to a call,
authorities said.
The two male victims were
crossing Pines Boulevard,
apparently in the crosswalk,
when they were hit, said
Pembroke Pines police Sgt.
Bryan Davis.
One of the victims was iden-
tified as Jesus Danilo Rosales,
38, of Miami Beach. The other
was not immediately identified.
Both men were pronounced
dead at the scene.
Davis said there was one
witness to the accident, who
told police the officer had his
emergency lights on.

Lehigh Acres

3 men found dead
in parked car
The murders of three men
whose bodies were found in a
parked car are likely drug relat-
ed, authorities said Monday:
The murders appear to be
the result of criminal activity on
the part of the victims, Lee
County Sheriff Mike Scott told
the News-Press of Fort Myers.
The bodies were found by a
passer-by Sunday morning in a
wooded area of Lee County,
sheriff's office spokesman
Larry King said. Their names
were withheld, pending family
notifications.
The car was pulled from the
secluded area with the bodies
still inside for crime scene tech-
nicians and the medical examin-
er to inspect. Neighbors said the
area is more likely to be fre-
quented by dog walkers and all-
terrain vehicles than cars.
Autopsies were expected.
"These men all died as the
result of a homicidal act," King
said. "We'll wait for the medical
examiner's report for specifics."

- From wire reports

Correction


A headline on Page 2A of
Monday's edition contained an
error. The headline for the story
about the animal cruelty case
should have read, "Man faces
animal cruelty charges." The
Chronicle regrets the error.


Time-share sales soar


Despite boom, home

sales continue to sag

Orlando Sentinel
ORLANDO - For-sale signs are nearly
as common as mailboxes in many neigh-
borhoods, but there is one type of real
estate that buyers are snatching up at a
,record pace: time shares.
Industry experts say time shares might
look like real estate, but most people
don't think of them that way.
"Time shares are about vacations, and
the real-estate market is about homes,"
said David Siegel, chief executive officer
of Central Florida Investments, which
owns the Westgate Resorts time-share
group. "People always want vacations,
and we're booming."


Siegel said Westgate's sales have
increased 25 percent this year over last,
reflecting the performance of other com-
panies in the sector
"What other industry can you name
that is having that kind of year?" Siegel
asked. "We have 28 resorts and not one
slow one. People know that for 10 percent
down, they can live the dream."
The time-share industry, largely based
in Central Florida, is growing wealthy
selling real estate in the fourth dimen-
sion. A newly released
PricewaterhouseCoopers study reports
that sales of new time shares in Florida
rose from $1.6 billion in 2002 to $2.6 bil-
lion in 2005. There are now 378 time-
share resorts in Florida with 47,400 units.
"Customers coming through our doors
today are more educated about the prod-
uct and the industry than they used to be,"
said Ed Kinney, spokesman for Orlando-
based Marriott Vacation Club. "Years ago,


they would come to us for promotions, like
inexpensive vacations. Now they have
friends recommend that they call."
Bill Sherman, a contracts manager
with Boeing at Kennedy Space Center,
owns two Marriott units and loves to talk
about them. Sherman and his wife,
Denise, bought their first time share in
1992.
Like other owners, Sherman ticks off
the advantages. The Shermans spend a
week at his unit in Hilton Head, S.C.,
annually, and invite his children to use an
Orlando unit at Marriott Vacation Club's
Grande Vista.
"In our minds, it's a great value,"
Sherman said. "When you buy one, you
are getting an annual vacation for the rest
of your life."
Time-share buyers typically purchase
use of a unit in one-week increments.
Marriott charges $7,900 to $137,000 for a
one-week-a-year interest in a unit and,


MATTHEW BECK/Chro
Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association cowboys Tony Smart, left, of Newton Miss. and Drew Walters, of Montrose Miss., p
and meditate Sunday afternoon at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion prior to the bull riding competition. The Ocala Shi
Rodeo was held this past Friday through Sunday and featured a wide variety of competitions for professional cowboys and c
girls. For more on David Cash, a Homosassa cowboy competing in the event, see Sports, IB.



Doctors hope to save injured brains by cooling the


Associated Press

MIAMI -Andy Nelson's heart
had stopped, his pupils were
fixed and dilated, and he was in
a deep coma.
Things weren't looking hope-
ful. Even if the staff Florida
Hospital staff could get his heart
pumping again, chances were
good that his brain would be
damaged from the oxygen depri-
vation.
So the doctors put him on ice.
Growing number of hospitals
around the country are using
hypothermia as a way to protect
a patient's brain during times of
stress, decreasing its demand for
oxygen by slowing down its sys-
tems. This, in turn, can prevent
damage from occurring.
Miami's Jackson Memorial
Hospital is part of the budding
trend - this summer, it began
using cooling pads and IV lines
on patients like Nelson. For the
past couple of years, it has used
cooling helmets on babies who
were oxygen-deprived during
birth and other cooling methods
on stroke patients.
In Nelson's case, his brain did-
n't escape totally scot-free from
the episode - his wife describes
him as having had a warped
sense of time and finding him
cooking grits at 3 a.m. - but over
time, he healed and returned to
normal.
His wife couldn't expect such
a positive outcome when she
found him face-down in the front
yard one morning last year, and
later in the emergency room
where it took 10 minutes to
restart his heart
Usually if doctors can get a
patient's heart to start pumping
again, the patient immediately
wakes up. If they don't, their
chances of recovering diminish.
"I've seen patients, when they
look this bad, there usually not
a happy ending," said Tonya
Nelson, a respiratory therapist
like her husband, recalling his


Associated Press
Dr. John Kuluz checks a cooling helmet on co-worker Manuel
Gonzalez-Brito on Friday at the Miller School of Medicine in Miami.


Induced hypothermia, where
patient's body several degrees,
dard procedure.
prognosis.
It's in these cases that hospi-
tals use hypothermia.
"It changed our thinking that
maybe not all was lost," said
Walter Severyn, a critical care
specialist at Memorial Regional
Hospital in Hollywood, which
has been using hypothermia on
cardiac arrest patients for
almost two years.
The procedure isn't used
widely enough to have solid sta-
tistics, but anecdotal evidence
from hospitals like Severyn's is
so far positive.
Of the 16 cardiac arrest
patients his hospital has used
hypothermia on - patients
who were comatose, unrespon-
sive and, in the past, who
would have been written off-
eight came out of it neurologi-
cally intact.
Tonya Nelson figured she had
nothing to lose by consenting to
the procedure. Only the week
before had Florida Hospital in
Orlando gotten the equipment.
Andy Nelson was to be their


hospitals intentionally cool a
is increasingly becoming a stan-

guinea pig.
In order to cool his brain, cool-
ing pads were applied to his legs,
arms and torso. A humming
machine circulated ice water
through them, bringing Nelson's
body temperature down to about
92 degrees, from the normal 98.6
degrees. Tonya Nelson remem-
bers her husband's body looking
pale and feeling "like he was on
ice."
Nelson was kept that way for
24 hours. He remained in a coma
for a few days after that, but
when he woke up, his wife asked
him who the president was - he
first said Reagan, then grinned
and said "President Bush."
"Thats when I thought. Oh my
goodness, his brain is going to be
OK," Tonya Nelson said.
Andy Nelson has no recollec-
tion of any of this.
What he does remember is
waking up in a hospital and ini-
tially having difficulty express-
ing himself. "I would go to
explain something and it would
come out wrong." Nelson said, a


phenomenon familiar to
patients.
But after about two mon
his brain swelling sub
Nelson recovered.
"Something worked," I
said of the procedure, "be
I'm here, I can drive, I ca
work and do all the n
things of life."
Researchers are still try
figure out exactly how an
hypothermia works.
Decreasing the b
demand for oxygen is oni
only cited reason. Man
believe that cooling the
slows its natural process
death, which can be ove
vated during stressful e
like a cardiac
Hypothermia can also r
brain swelling.
The potential side effect
few and rare, which is wh
procedure is gaining popi
and received an endorse
from the American
Association a few years ag
complications can include
tions and clotting problem
"The beauty of this equa
the risk is very, very low an
benefit is huge," said
Myers, the medical direct
the Wake County EMS syst
Raleigh, which was amor
first to adopt hypothermia
standard procedure for ca
patients.
Because of its pote
Kathleen Schrank, the chi
emergency medicine a
University of Miami, h
spearhead the effort to i
ment the practice at Ja
Memorial Hospital.
describes hypothermia a
first promising procedu
help brains recover
"Our whole goal is to
back a fully functional p
and in the past, all too often
didn't happen," Schrank
noting that many patients v
leave the hospital with n
mental disabilities.


like other companies in the industry,
tacks on an annual maintenance fee -
typically less than $700 a year
There is no single explanation for the
nearly uninterrupted growth of industry
sales.
The industry says its own marketing
efforts, which rely heavily on referrals
from current owners, reach more and
more prospects. Another factor is the big
run-up in real-estate prices, which put
second homes out of the reach of many
middle-income vacationers.
Roland and Mary Jack are new buyers
who say it is worth owning vacation prop-
erty, even for a short interval each year
"We like the idea that you can pass a
time share on to your kids," said Roland
Jack, a retired South Carolina corrections
officer The Jacks settled on a Westgate
Resorts development in Kissimmee,
where they bought an annual week in a
two-bedroom unit for $15,000.


3 killed,


1 injured


in crash


Cause unknown
Associated Press
Cantonment - Investig-
ators were trying to deter-
mine Monday what caused a
head on collision that killed
'three people and critically
injured a teenager.
Patrick K. Hynes, 49, of
East Brewton, Ala., was driv-
ing the wrong way on the
southbound lane of U.S. 29
on Sunday night when his
Lincoln crashed.into a 1997
Nissan driven by Michael
Odom, 44, of Pensacola,
-. according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
. Hynes, Odom and Odom's
passenger, Kenneth Lynn
Odom, 49, of Cantonment,
were pronounced dead at the
onie scene, authorities said.
ray Another passenger in
rineay Odom's vehicle, Ricky Cook,
row 17, of Cantonment, was listed
in serious condition at West
Florida Hospital.
Test are being conducted
to see if alcohol played a role
in the crash. The results will
km take several weeks, FHP Lt.
.iLL Steve Preston said.

stroke pl
ths, as 1 sextuplet
sided, * * *
Nside in critical
Nelson
because *
cause condition
normal

ying to 5 others serious
d why
brain's or stable
e com-
ty also Associated Press
brain
of cell ST. PETERSBURG - A
'r-acti- newborn boy was in critical
events condition Monday and three
arrest. of his five newborn siblings
educee were in serious condition, as
doctors closely monitored
cts are the state's first sets of sextu-
hy this plets.
clarity The five boys and one girl
ement were born Saturday night to
Heart Karoline and Ben Byler of
o. The Wesley Chapel, more than
infec- two months early. The babies
s- all weighed between 2 and 3
tion is pounds each.
nd the Ryan Patrick was in criti-
Brent cal condition, while one
or for brother, Jackson Robert, was
tern in upgraded Monday from criti-
ig the cal to serious condition,
a as a according to All Children's
cardiac Hospital in St. Petersburg.
Another boy, Charlie Craig,
ential, and the girl, MacKenzie
chief of Margaret, remained in seri-
t the ous condition, officials said.
helped Two other boys, Brady
mple- Christopher and Eli
ckson Benjamin, remained in sta-
She ble condition.
.s the The babies will likely
re to remain in the hospital
through November. Doctors
bring said their birth weights were
erson normal for their stage of
n, that development.
said, The Bylers said they used
would fertility drugs after their 4-
major year-old daughter asked for a


sibling.


Ride 'em cowboy








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSH
Continued from Page 1A

tion in the sense that we're
either going to get out and
there will be chaos, or more
troops," the president said.
"Now the situation has
changed where I'm able to
speculate on the hypothetical."
Still, Bush struck a defiant
note about demands for bring-
_ing troops home.
Standing before troops
cheering "hooah," Bush said
decisions on force levels "will
be based on a calm assessment
by our military commanders on
the conditions on the ground -
.hot a nervous reaction by
.Washington politicians to poll
results in the media.
"In other words," Bush said,
"when we begin to draw down
troops from Iraq, it will be from
a position of strength and suc-
cess, not from a position of fear
and failure."
Once the stronghold of the
Sunni Arab insurgency, Anbar
province now is cited as a
model for the rest of Iraq.
Violence abated after Sunni
tribal leaders and former
insurgents broke with al-Qaida
and teamed up with U.S. troops
to hunt down extremists.
"Anbar is a huge province,"
Bush said. "It was once written
off as lost It is now one of the
safest places in Iraq."
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates said it will take several
months to assess whether secu-
rity improvements across Iraq
are sufficient to enable Bush to
start withdrawing troops. He
provided no details on Bush's
thinking about the timing and
scope of any reductions.
"I am more optimistic than I
have been at any time since I
took this job," said Gates.
Bush met with Iraqi Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki and


Associated Press
President Bush, right, shakes hands Monday with with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, left, as
President Jalal Talabani, second from left, looks on at AI-Asad Airbase in Anbar province, Iraq.


other top government officials
from Baghdad. He urged the gov-
ernment to respond to progress
inAnbar He also met with Sunni
tribal sheiks and members of
Anbar's governing body.
Bush spoke warmly about al-
Maliki even while expressing
frustration over the slow pace
of political progress.
"My message to Maliki is:
'You've got a lot of work to do
and whatever decision is made
in Washington, D.C., is all
aimed at helping you achieve
what is necessary to get the
work done.'"
He said he addressed his
comments to all the Iraqi lead-
ers at the table but took al-Malki
aside. "You're my friend and ...
you've made progress in your
recent meeting and now's the
time to get these laws passed,"
Bush said he told al-Maliki,


referring to a national oil rev-
enue sharing measure and
other legislation. "You've got
hard work to do and you know
what? He understands that"
Al-Maliki, speaking before
Bush's visit, said he expected
Petraeus and Crocker to give
his government a favorable
assessment when they report
to Congress.
Virtually all of his war advis-
ers joined Bush in Iraq, the
first such meeting here. They
included Gates, Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice, Gen.
Peter Pace, chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm.
William Fallon, the top U.S.
commander in the Middle East,
National Security Adviser
Stephen Hadley and Lt Gen.
Douglas Lute, Bush's "war czar."
It was Bush's third secret
trip to Iraq in four years. He


slipped unnoticed out of the
White House on Sunday
evening and was driven to
Andrews Air Force Base to
board his plane. Only one other
car accompanied him. Bush
was to have left Monday morn-
ing for Australia.
Bush urged Congress to wait
until they hear from Crocker
and Petraeus before judging
the result of his decision to
send 30,000 more troops to Iraq.
"I urge members of both par-
ties in Congress to listen to
what they have to say," he said.
"We shouldn't jump to conclu-
sions until the general and the
ambassador report."
Bush. said Monday's visit
would have no impact on the
mood in Congress. "I don't
think a presidential visit will
cause people to vote one way
or another."


Iraqi PM hopes for



favorable assessment


Al-Maliki says

country has

madeprogress

Associated Press

BAGHDAD - Iraq's prime
minister said Monday he
expects the U.S. ambassador
and military commander to
give his government favorable
marks when they report to
Congress next week and pre-
dicted passage of a law soon
that could return more Sunnis
to government jobs.
To the south, Basra was
reported calm Monday after
British soldiers abandoned
their last outpost there, leaving
the country's second largest
city largely in the hands of
Iranian-backed Shiite militias.
Also Monday, the U.S. com-
mand said an American soldier
was killed and three others
injured when a roadside bomb
blew up next to their patrol on
Sunday outside of Baghdad. No
further details were released.
The latest casualties occurred
a week before U.S. Ambassador
Ryan Crocker and Gen. David
Petraeus are to report to
Congress on political and securi-
ty progress since President Bush
ordered about 30,000 additional
troops to Iraq early this year
Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki told reporters Monday
that his government was mak-
ing progress toward national
reconciliation and that both
Crocker and Petraeus "are wit-
nessing this progress."


"I expect that the positive
developments will be, for sure,
reflected in the report to
Congress on Sept. 15," al-
Maliki said.
The prime minister spoke
before leaving for al-Asad Air
Base to confer with Bush, who
flew to the remote air base for
a firsthand assessment of the
war before the coming debate
over the U.S. troop buildup.
U.S. officials are expected to
tell lawmakers that the troop
increase has brought some
improvements in security but
that progress toward power-
sharing deals among Sunnis,
Shiites and Kurds has lagged
behind.
Sen. Hillary Clinton and
Sen. Carl Levin, chairman of
the Senate Armed Services
Committee, have blamed al-
Maliki and called for him to be
replaced.
Stung by those calls, al-
Maliki said his critics have
overlooked the achievements
of his government, including a
reduction "to a large extent" in
sectarian reprisal killings.
At least 35 people were
killed or found dead across the
country Monday, including a
total of five people who died in
a pair of car bombings in the
Iraqi capital.
It is unclear, however,
whether next week's reports
will ease congressional calls
for substantial troop cuts and
or change U.S. critics' impres-
sions of al-Maliki.
A draft report still under
review at the U.S. Embassy in
Baghdad includes allegations
that the al-Maliki government
is riddled with corruption.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


City H
Daytona Bch, 87
Ft. Lauderdale 90
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 90
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 90
Key West 89
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 89


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrmn
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Ta Ijla,.-'. t-:
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


strm
ptcldy
strm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


er
:ure

O0

nt Key


ull
5.52
9.25
0.60
2.40
Srmean-
his data is
no event
f the use of
796-7211




703


S"'i
0- PM
....








0 P.M.


North winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas 1 to
2 feet. Bay and inland waters a light chop.
Partly cloudy with a few afternoon thunder-
storms,


THREE DAY OUTLOOK
1 TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
.' High: 93 Low: 71
Sun and clouds with a 30% chance of
a thunderstorm. ..................
WEDNESDAY
High: 93 Low: 72
Sun and clouds with a 30% chance of a
thunderstorm.
THURSDAY
High: 93 Low: 73'
+:r . Sun and clouds with a 40% chance of a
thunderstorm.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 92/71
Record 97/65
Normal 72/90
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +1
* PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.21 in.
Total for the month 0,92 in.
Total for the year 35.22 in.
Normal for the year 40.14 in.
As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
SOLUNA
DATE DAY MINOR


(I
9/4 TUESDAY 12:17
9/5 WEDNESDAY 1:09


Monday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.
DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
r. 1-,. at 3 p.m. 61%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moder-
ate and weeds were absent.
"Light - only extrrene allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate .. most allergic will experience
symptoms. heavy - all allergic vall experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with
pollutants mainly particulates.


LR TABLES


MAJOR


MORNING)
6:26
7:24


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
12:41 6:56
1:39 7:54


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
SEPT. Zo


OE L3


SUNSET TONIGHr
SUNRISE TOMORROW
MOONRISE TODAY
MOONSET TOOAY


BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. XXXX.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
- http://flame.fl-dof.coin/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county. Crystal River and Inverness residents.
addresses ending in 0 or 1. or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3.
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5. or K through 0 can water
" Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P Ihrough U can water Thursdays: addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a m. or after 4 p m. on their day.
TIDES


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Wilthlacoocheo
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Tuesday Wednesday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
12:07 a/6:23 a 10:43 a/8:38 p 2 11 d7i30 a 12:00 pi10 17p
9:04 a&3:45 a -- /6.00 p 12:32 a/4:52 a 1021 a7 39 p
6:51 a1l:33 a 10:19 p/3:48 p 8.08 a/2:40 a -- /527 p
9:53 a/5:22 a -- 7:37 p 1:21 a/6-29 a 11 10 a/9 16 p


Gulf watt
temperate


88
Taken at Egmo


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. F
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.65 28.66 35
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.45 34.44 39
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.79 34.85 40
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.95 35.95 42
Levels reported in feet above sea leave l Hood stage 1fo lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled of exceeded in any one year. Ti
obtained fon the Soulhwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. I i
will tie District or tha United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrologica! Data Section at (352)

THE NATION


LOL

El.p , '13


*D , 60* .... ..


Monday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 84 58
Albuquerque 86 63
Asheville 85 59
Atlanta 82 70
Atlantic City 84 55
Austin 83 71 .04
Baltimore 87 60
Billings 93 64
Birmingham 90 73
Boise 10163
Boston 87 60
Buffalo 79 59
Burlington, VT 86 60
Charleston, SC 90 71
Charleslon. WV 90 64
Charlotte 91 60
Chicago 88 6F
Cincinnati 96 58
Cleveland 83 55
Columbia, SC 92 64
Columbus, OH 88 59
Concord. N.H 86 43
Dallas 90 76
Denver 90 5
Des Moines 88 60
Detro:i 86 59-
El Paso 90 64
Evansvilie, IN 97 65
Harrisburg 84 58
Hartford 85 58
Houston 91 75 .78
Indianapolis 91 61
Jackson 88 7? 27
Las Vegas 105 85
Little Rock 93 73
Los Angeles 88 74
Louisville 97 71
Memphis 95 76
Milwaukee 82 69
Minneapolis 89 63
Mobile 89 73
Montgomery 89 74
Nashville 93 71


Tuesday
Fcst H L
plcidy 77 48
tstrm 88 65
sunny 87 56
sunny 92 70
sunny 86 66
tstrm 87 71
sunny 88 61
ptcidy 96 57
ptcldy 93 69
Istrm 85 52
ptcidy 78 58
pticdy 76 55
ptcldy 70 43
plcldy 90 09
vunny 91 62
sunny 93 64
sunny 87 65
sunny 94 61
sunny 8-i 61
sunnriy 95 66
sunny 90 63
plcidy 75 42
strrm 86 73
oIlcdy -2 60
sunny 80 63'
sn by 1) 6.'
sunnrmy 985 62
sunny, 65 5
p cldy 80 53
tstrrn 86 76
suLnny 90 65
tstrm 90 69
picidy 10784
tstrr S3 70
sunny 78 66
bunny 95 69
ptcidy 93 7:3
sunny 86 67
sunny 88 67
otcidy 92 71
pli:dy 93 70
sunny 9 4 71


LI'S It,

BOB ht~~~ a~


FORECAST FOR 3:0
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pep. Fcst H L
New Orleans 93 74 tstrm 89 76
New York City 82 64 ptcldy 184 63
Norfolk 84 64 sunny 88 70
Oklahoma City 90 67 tstrm 87 67
Omaha 88 64 sunny 90 66
Palm Springs 11489 picldy 11083
Philadelphia 85 64 sunny 87 64
Phoenix 10988 ptcidy 10665
Pi'lsburgh 84 59 ptcidy 83 58
Portland, ME 85 54 ptcidy 75 49
Portland, Ore 85 57 shwrs 74 56
FProvidence. R.I. 84 58 ptcidy 81 55
Raleinh 91 59 sunny 95 6A/
Rapid City 98 6'1 sunny 98 64
Reno 98 58 sunny 88 51
Focheoster, NY 84 55 picidy 74 52
Sacrarmemno 96 61 sunny 88 568
St. Louis 95 6r. sunny 95 69
St Ste Marie 74 55 tsirm 63 57
Sail Lakv City 95 67 Islrm ', 7 G6
San Anlonrio 81 73 Istrm 85 73
San Diego 90 74 sunny 78 69
an Francisco 66 57 -,ny 8 553
Savanna ? 8- 71 4? pC;rdy q0 71
Seali7e 7 57u shwrs 69 55
Spokan 85 56 p;c:dy 81 53
Syracuse 84 56 -'c;d/ 74 49
Topeka 94 57 p'cdy 90 66
Wa,.shington 84 64 sunny 89 66
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH .11a !I Sp.-g. Caid LOW "', 5�iney da-o
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/IL/SKY
Acapuco 88/78/pc
Amsterdam 581/4 i/sli
Athens 85/67/s
Beij'ng 85/64is
Berlin 6'-40 sh
Bermuda 88 '79/ts
Cairo 96:66''
CalgarI 7 '49pc
Havana 91/764ts
long Komn 89/80'lts
Jerusalem 86'/69's


Listen
Lu il a
M" d ril
MexiicaCity
Montreal
NMsco�
F itis
NO

P aonti'

i//tsav.,


i,') 541ts
71 i4v3s
1' a2,sh


6231�: s

69j.48,h


'00" -:; 7R L I 1,


_ U- m.--1-


EH ONICLL
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37. .0 -1: IN � , "I


MARINE OUTLOOK


*PC
oT isi' n ~ ~is


Inverness
office

106 W. Main
St., Inverness,
FL 34450


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pcspartly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain-snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


4A TuEsDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


I


t


t

t


, ,, , ,
,u-, r -





CrITRUS (COUN'I (Fl.) CHRONICLE


ORGANS
Continued from Page 1A
a relief, because I knew we
weren't going to have any more
hospital episodes.
"Even if it was once a year, it
was huge every time we went
through that," she said. "I'd
worry that maybe this time he
was too sick to even go on dial-
ysis, that not even that would
help him."
Christensen has polycystic
kidney disease, a hereditary
condition passed down from his
mother He was tested shortly
after his mother was diagnosed.
His two sisters do not have it
Because the condition doesn't
skip generations, if his two chil-
dren test negative - they can't
be tested until they're 21 or fully
grown - then the disease will
cease in the Christensen family
Eight years ago, because the
kidney disease elevated his
cholesterol and caused heart
disease, Christiansen had
triple bypass surgery.
Both he and his wife have the
same blood type, 0 positive, and
Mrs. Christensen can donate
one of her kidneys to her hus-
band, but they have decided
that if one of their children
have the disease, she would
wait and donate to one of them.
As of Aug. 17, 72,942 people
nationwide were waiting for a
donor kidney In Florida, 2,742
are on the waiting list for a life-
saving kidney transplant.
According to the United
Network for Organ Sharing
(UNOS), other organs needed
include:
* Heart - 2,640 nationally,
76 statewide
* Lung - 2,402 nationally,
139 statewide
* Liver - 16,717 nationally,
434 statewide
* Pancreas - 1,645 national-
ly, 10 statewide
* Heart and lung - 120
nationally, 2 statewide
* Intestines - 207 national-
ly, 10 statewide
In Florida, about the same
number of men as women are
www.allaboutbaths.com


T'UFSDAY, SEPTEIMBE- 4, 2007 5A


I just take each day as it gets
here. My kidneys are still functioning;
they haven't shut down completely, and
at least we have dialysis to keep us
going and we're grateful for that - and I
still feel good.

Tom Chr stiansen
dialysis patient who is awaiting a kidney transplant.


waiting for a kidney, liver or
intestines. More women than
men need a lung; more men
than women need a heart.
The waiting list for donor
kidneys is longer than for those
of other organs because many
who are waiting for other
organs - hearts and lungs,
especially - die before they
can receive a transplant, Mrs.
Christiansen said.
People who are waiting for
kidneys can be on dialysis
while they wait. Also, kidneys
can be donated by someone
who is living, as opposed to
other organs that can only
come from cadavers.
To be placed on the national
organ donor list, a person first
needs to contact a transplant
hospital. There are more than
200 to choose from. Christiansen
chose Translife at the Florida
Hospital in Orlando.
The hospital's transplant team
evaluates the person (based on
medical history, current condi-


tion of health and other factors)
to determine if he or she is a
good candidate for a transplant
If so, the hospital's transplant
team will add the person to the
UNOS national waiting list
Organ matching criteria gen-
erally include: blood type and
size of the organ(s) needed,
time spent awaiting a trans-
plant, distance between donor
and recipient, the medical
urgency of the recipient, the
degree of immune-system
match between donor and
recipient and whether the
recipient is a child or an adult.
At 48, Christiansen is fortu-
nate to be able to be on dialysis
at night, which he started in
January. This allows him to be
as normal as he can be while
he waits. During the week he
works for Sweetbay supermar-
ket in Inverness as a deli and
bakery merchandiser.
Still, life is anything but nor-
mal for Christiansen and his
family.


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"Life pretty much revolves
around dialysis," he said.
He can take a vacation, as
long as he plans a trip with a
nearby dialysis center. Trips to
deserted islands or that
Alaskan cruise that he's want-
ed to go on are out of the ques-
tion, at least for now.
The other restriction
revolves around food. He has
to be careful of foods high in
potassium and phosphorus. He
has charts and lists of things he
can and cannot eat and tends to
eat the same things every day:
bagel and juice for breakfast, a
turkey on white sandwich for
lunch. Dinner has a bit more
variety, but not much.
"I miss pizza!" he said. Tom-
atoes and cheese are no-nos.
Best-case scenario: If he gets
a transplant, the first thing
Christiansen plans to do is eat
pizza. Then he wants to go on a
cruise to Alaska.
"This definitely gives you a
whole new perspective on life,"
he said. "I just take each day as
it gets here. My kidneys are still
functioning; they haven't shut
down completely, and at least
we have dialysis to keep us
going and we're grateful for
that - and I still feel good."
For more information about
organ donation, log on to the
U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services Web site for
Organ Donation at www.organ-
donor.gov.








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For the
Citrus County
Sheriff
Arrests
N Manuel Jorge Barreto, 26, 42
S. Osceola St., Beverly Hills, at
10:34 a.m. Saturday on a charge of
not having a valid driver license.
Bond $150.
* Christopher Adam Worsham,
23, 2843 Main Ave., Lakeland, at
11:08 p.m. Saturday on charges of
assault/battery on a law enforce-
ment officer, resisting arrest with vio-
lence, assault and disorderly intoxi-
cation. According to an arrest report,
a deputy said Worsham and anoth-
er person were causing a distur-
bance at a campground at a boat
loading dock. Worsham was yelling
obscenities and went after a man
with closed fists until a deputy
stepped in. He was arrested for dis-
orderly intoxication and when he
was handcuffed he tried to kick law
enforcement officials while twisting
and pulling his body. Later he spit
into a deputy's face. Bond $10,400.
* Kevin Scott Roof, 45, 10092
N. Janice Ave., Dunnellon, at 2:10
a.m. Sunday on a charge of driving
under the influence. According to an


ON THE NET
* For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org and-
click on the link to Daily
Reports, then Arrest
Reports.

arrest report Roof was pulled over
for speeding and the deputy said he
smelled alcohol on Roofs breath.
The deputy said Roof did not satis-
factorily complete field sobriety
tests. Roof later refused a breath'
test. Bond $500.
* Joshua Leroy Ducommon,
25, 1636 Chalcedonyst 2, San
Diego, Calif., at 2:59 a.m. Sunday
on a charge of driving with a sus-
pended/revoked license from out of
state. Bond $500.
* Brian John Murphy, 27, 5920
E. Aloha S., Inverness, at 4:13 a.m.
Sunday on a Citrus County warrant
charge for failure to appear in refer-
ence to felony charges of posses-
sion and selling cocaine. No bond.


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Obituaries


Linda Cotten, 58
HOMOSASSA
Linda A. Cotten, 58,
Homosassa, died Wednesday,
Aug. 29, 2007, at her home
under the care of her family
and Hernando-Pasco Hospice.
She was born March 15, 1949,
in Rochester, N.H., to
Randolph and Helen Dudley
She came to this area 30 years
ago from St. Petersburg.
She owned and operated
Linda's Hair Salon in Crystal
River.
Mrs. Cotten enjoyed sewing,
crafts, dancing and horses.
She was Protestant.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Thomas E. Cotten of
Homosassa; son, Michael
Belmont of Dubuque, Iowa;
daughter, Linda Breedlove of
Savannah, Ga.; brothers,
Reginald Dudley and wife Jean
of Concord, N.H., Ronald
Dudley and wife Sissy of
Charlotte, N.C., Randy Dudley
and wife Carrie of San Jose,
Calif., and Kenneth Dudley of
California; sisters, Frances
Garland and husband
Raymond of Rochester, N.H.,
and Diane Junkins of,
Homosassa; three grandchil-
dren; and several nieces and
nephews. Private cremation
under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Michael
McGurn, 58
CRYSTAL RIVER
Michael Anthony McGurn,
58, Crystal Rivei, died Sunday,
Sept. 2, 2007, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
He was born
March 17,
1949, in Erie,
Pa., and came
here more
than 25 years ago.
He was disabled and a veter-
an of the U.S. Army during the
Vietnam War.
He was a member of the
American Legion Post No. 155
in Crystal River.
He enjoyed riding bikes and
reading.
He was Protestant.
Survivors include his moth-
er, Josephine. Myers of Crystal
River; brothers, Dale Munsee
and wife Patsy of Wattsburg,
Pa., Chuck Munsee and wife
Christine of Crystal River, and
James Munsee and wife
Dorothy of Appomattox, Va.;
and several nieces and
nephews and great nieces and
nephews.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Harry
Mellett Jr., 84
CRYSTAL RIVER
Harry Winthrop Mellett Jr.,
84, Crystal River, formerly of
Inverness, died Sept. 1, 2007, in
the Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center of Crystal
River.
He was born
May 30, 1923,
to Harry W
and Ivy (Hay-
mand) Mellett
Sr.
Mr. Mellett was a native of
North Woodstock, N.H., and
moved to Florida in 1984 from
Andover, Mass.
- During World War II, he
served in the 86th Infantry,
1pth Mountain Division of the
U.S. Army
- He was the former owner
and operator of the H.W.
Mellett & Son upholstering
business in Stoneham, Mass.,
for more than 35 years.
SHe was very active in Rotary
International, having had per-
fect attendance for more than
25 years. He served as a district
governor in Massachusetts,
received the Paul Harris
Fellowship and was a faithful
attendee of the Inverness
Rotary Club prior to his illness.
: Other affiliations include the
King Cyrus Masonic Lodge
where he was a 32nd-degree
mason.
SHe loved to ski and play golf.



Funeral Home


He was preceded in death by
his first wife, Lillian Mellett,
his second wife, Dorothy
Mellett and his parents.
Survivors include his wife,
Marilyn Mellett of Crystal
River; sons, Robert Mellett of
Plaistow, N.H., and Paul
Starrett and wife Matina of
Middletown, Del.; daughters,
Donna Schaffer of Chatham,
N.Y, Harriet "Deedie" Kriebel
and husband Charles, of
Peabody, Maine, Deborah
Mellett and husband Harry
King of Londonberry, N.H.,
Dorothy Mellett of Sandown,
N.H., and Caryn Vaccaro and
husband Frank of Floral City;
brother, William Mellett of
New Jersey; 16 grandchildren;
seven great-grandchildren;
and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Following cremation, servic-
es and burial will be at a later
date.
Chas. 'E. Davis Funeral
Home, Inverness.

Randall
Spencer, 42
INGLIS
Randall Thomas Spencer, 42,
Inglis, died Saturday, Sept. 1,
2007, at the Hospice House in
Lecanto.
He was born June 5, 1965, in
Greenville, S.C. He moved to
Inglis one year ago from
Jacksonville, Ala.
He worked for The Shaw
Group in Baton Rouge, La.
He was a member of the
First Pentecostal Church in
Inglis.
Survivors include his wife,
Mattie Spencer of Inglis; moth-
er, Joyce Thibodeaux of
Beaumont, Miss.; children,
Thomas Thibodeaux of
Beaumont, Miss., and Crystal
Oasis Hammond of Greenville,
S.C.; stepchildren, Luther
Sanders of Plant City and
Bobby S. Sanders of Largo; sis-
ter, Tina Tucker of Beaumont,
Miss.; and brothers, Tim
Spencer of Lucedale, Miss.,
and Earl Spencer of
Beaumont, Miss.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Lecanto.

Howard
Terrian Jr., 68
INVERNESS
Howard Louis Terrian Jr., 68,
Inverness, died Friday, Aug. 24,
2007, at his home.
He was born
June 29, 1939,
to Howard Sr.
and Martha
Terrian.
He was a
native of Saginaw, Mich. and
came to this area in 1982 from
there.
He served in the U.S. Air
Force.
Mr. Terrian worked as a serv-
ice manager for Ford Motor Co.
for more than 20 years.
He was past president of the
Parts and Service Club of Ford
Motor Co. and past president of
the Men's Auxiliary for VFW
Post 7122 of Floral City. He was
also a member of the American
Legion Post No. 10 in
Kissimmee and a life member
of the Fraternal Aerie of
Eagles No. 4048 of Kissimmee.
He enjoyed shooting pool,
playing cards and used to race
cars.
He was Catholic.
He was preceded in death by
his father, Howard L. Terrian
Sr. in 1994.
Survivors include his wife of
38 years, Mary Ann Terrian of
Inverness; sons, Robert James
and wife Kristin Terrian of St.
Cloud, Jason Charles and wife
Sandra Terrian of St. Cloud,


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and Aaron Michael Terrian of
Kissimmee; mother, Martha
Terrian of Saginaw, Mich.;
brother, Charles Terrian of
Saginaw, Mich.; sister, Beverly
Kellogg of Saginaw, Mich; and
10 grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Funeral : -:

Michael Anthony McGurn. A
memorial service for Michael
Anthony McGurn, 58, Crystal
River, will be at 1 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 7, 2007, from the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel with the Rev. Bobby
Thompson of the First Baptist
Church of Inglis officiating.
Inurnment will follow at the
Florida National Cemetery in
Bushnell, with military honors
conducted by the American
Legion Post No. 155. Strickland
Funeral Home, Crystal River.
Randall Thomas Spencer.
Funeral services for Randall
Thomas Spencer, 42, Inglis,
will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
4, 2007, at the First Pentecostal
Church of Inglis. Interment
will be in the Stage Stand
Cemetery, Homosassa. Brown
Funeral Home and Crematory,
Lecanto.
Howard Louis Terrian Jr. A
celebration of life memorial
service will be at 3 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 6, 2007, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Father Charles Leke of
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church officiating. Military
honors will be accorded by the
VFW Post 7122 of Floral City.
Inurnment will be at a later
date at the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell. If family
and friends desire, in lieu of
flowers memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
American Lung Association,
6160 Central Ave., St.
Petersburg.
Death
ELSEWHERE

Nancy
Littlefield, 77
AUTHOR
NEW YORK - Nancy
Littlefield, who headed New
York City's Office of Motion
Pictures and Television for five
years under Mayor Edward
Koch, has died. She was 77.
Littlefield died Thursday of
lung cancer in Deliray Beach,
Fla., said her daughter-in-law,
Kate Littlefield. She had
homes in Delray Beach, Man-
hattan and Ocean Beach, N.Y.
As director of the city film
office from 1978 to 1983,
Littlefield was responsible for
bringing film production to
New York by making it easier
for producers to obtain per-
mits.
After leaving her city post,
she served as president of a
Queens film studio and then
joined Queens Public Tele-
vision, where she served as
executive director for 20 years.
She was the author of
"Movies and Television:
Getting In," published in 2003
by Xlibris Corp.


Appeals court finds ugly


implications in ban on trucks


PETER WHORISKEY
The Washington Post

CORAL GABLES - Founded in the 1920s as a
fantasyland of Mediterranean architecture, this
affluent Miami suburb, one of the nation's first
planned communities, has a long-standing repu-
tation for zealous aesthetic policing, ruling over
everything from hedge heights to what colors
residents may paint their homes.
Now a guy in a pickup truck is threatening the
social order.
Lowell Kuvin, 44, wound up on the wrong side
of the local code one night four years ago when
he parked his forest green 1993 Ford F-150 out-
side the house he was renting.
The city defines pickup trucks, even those for
personal use, as "out of character," and forbids
parking them overnight within city limits. He got
a $50 ticket.
"I thought, 'Now how silly is this?'" he
recalled.
Now the fight over that citation, which Kuvin
stubbornly pursued to a state appellate court, is
raising ticklish questions about whether some of
the city's longtime interest in municipal decor
stems more from snobbery than aesthetics.
The central question in the ticket case has
become: Are the city ordinances targeting pick-
up trucks, or are they, more sinisterly, trying to
exclude the people who drive them?
City officials say it's merely a matter of com-
munity appearance, and the City Commission
voted unanimously last week to pursue enforc-
ing Kuvin's ticket.
"We are trying to regulate the look of the
neighborhoods," Mayor Don Slesnick said.
But Kuvin, now backed by an appellate court,
disagrees.
"This has to do with a certain class of people
they don't want in the city - people they see as
being inferior - the blue-collar guy, the laborer
- those people," Kuvin said.
For years, the city's focus on appearances has
put it at the forefront nationally of suburbs that
have taken extraordinary measures to control
local aesthetics. Its founder, George Merrick,
was inspired by the City Beautiful movement
around the beginning of the 20th century.
But while the aesthetic efforts have drawn
cheers from many in this city of 42,000, they have
also inspired ridicule of a libertarian cast
"Coral Gables has a legendary group of code-
enforcement personnel who, for strict adher-


ence to The Rules, make the Nazi party look like
a Grateful Dead tour," Miami Herald columnist
Dave Barry wrote.
In response, Slesnick notes that enforcement
of such ordinances "keeps Dave Barry's street
looking beautiful."
Now, though, comes the legal assault from
Kuvin and his brother Spencer, an attorney
The flap began in February 2003, when Kuvin
was working as a waiter at Joe's Stone Crab
restaurant and living in a rented home without
a garage. He'd bought the pickup because he
liked to sail, and the sails fit better in a truck
bed.
Kuvin, who was then preparing to attend law
school at St. Thomas University in Miami,
turned to his brother to fight the ticket.
The brothers argued that while local govern-
ments can regulate zoning and other aesthetic
matters, this time the city went too far. It did not
simply ban commercial trucks from residential
neighborhoods, it banned all trucks, even pick-
ups solely for personal use. A separate ordi-
nance bans pickups from parking anywhere
from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.
The trouble with the ordinances, according to
the state's Third District Court of Appeal, arises
because, in part, pickups are not inordinately
uglier or even larger than other vehicles that
are permitted to park on city streets. The Ford
F-150 is about the same length as luxury sedans
such as the Lincoln Town Car and a Ford Crown
Victoria, a judge noted.
"Could Coral Gables forbid the parking of mil-
itary-looking, right-angled vehicles, or any car
which has not been washed and polished with-
in the previous 24 hours?" the judges asked
rhetorically.
Like Kuvin, the court suggested that the city
may be targeting the people who drive pickups,
not just the vehicles.
In rendering their opinion, the judges cited a
study published by the Institute for
Transportation Studies at the University of
California at Davis showing that buyers of pick-
up trucks are more likely to have less education,
to be middle-income and to be full-time employ-
ees in service-related jobs.
Two of the three judges from the appeals
court found the city's reasoning "frightening."
They wrote: "Perhaps Coral Gables can
require that all its houses be made ofticky-tacky
and that they all look just the same, but it can-
not mandate that its people are, or do."


Army looks into private medical contractor


The Washington Post

WASHINGTON - Whom do
you turn to when the enormous
number of military contract
employees in Iraq creates
problems for the U.S. Army as
it tries to fight there?
Another contractor, of
course.
Military medical treatment
facilities in Iraq have been
overwhelmed trying to handle
routine health care problems
for some of the more than
129,000 people working for U.S.
and coalition force contractors.
As a result, the U.S. Army is try-
ing to determine whether a pri-
vate medical contractor is will-
ing to take over the job.
Last week, Joint Contracting
Command-Iraq provided
details on its July 27 Request




AIR-PORT

746-2929]


for Information (RFI W91GDW
-07-R-4024), titled "Civilian
Contractor Hospital Services
throughout Iraq." It asks
whether private health care
providers might be interested
in establishing "medical treat-
ment facilities at Forward
Operating Bases throughout
Iraq that would provide med-
ical treatment to contractors
working with the coalition
forces."
The purpose of any contract
was bluntly stated: "This con-
cept would free up military
hospitals to concentrate on


military casualties."
The military's problem is
obvious. As explained in addi-
tional information supplied
Aug. 28, most contractors don't
provide health care for their
employees, and care is not
authorized at military facilities
except when a life is at stake.
"Nonetheless," the Army
said, "military treatment facili-
ties have been rendering rou-
tine health care to civilians,
with civilian care making up
approximately 17 per cent of
the outpatient healthcare vis-
its."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Iran releases detained American BAR
Continued from Page 1A


Scholar had
been in jail for

three months

Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran-An Iranian-
American academic who was
held in a notoriously harsh
Tehran prison before being
released and allowed to leave
Iran said Monday she was "elat-
ed" to be heading home after
eight months of detention.
Haleh Esfandiari flew to
Austria late Sunday to reunite
with her family one day after
Iranian authorities returned
her passport Family and col-
leagues said they felt great relief
at the end of a crisis that caused
sharp new tensions between
Iran and the United States.
'After a long and difficult
ordeal, I am elated to be on my
way back to my home and my
family These last eight months,
that included 105 days in soli-
tary confinement in Evin
Prison, have not been easy,"


Esfandiari said in a statement
issued by her employer, the
Woodrow Wilson International
Center for Scholars.
"But I wish to put this
episode behind me and to look
to the future, not to the past,"
she said.
Esfandiari, 67, who was
released on bail earlier in
August, picked up her passport
and flew from Iran to Austria,
where her sister lives, said her
daughter, Haleh Bakhash. She
was reunited with her husband
and plans to spend about a
week there before heading
home to the United States,
Bakhash said.
"She had some indication
that she would get her passport
back but she didn't know when.
It was a complete surprise to
all of us, and a relief," Bakhash
told The Associated Press from
her home in Washington.
The unexpected develop-
ment came after President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said
last week that his government
was not opposed to
Esfandiari's departure, but the
Iranian judiciary would have
to sort out the issue.


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Middle East program at the
Woodrow Wilson International
Center for Scholars. Esfandiari
was permitted to leave Iran and
rejoin her family in Austria, her
lawyer and family said Monday.


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open a beverage on site.
He said his staff did not
review the alcohol license as if
it were for anything other than
package sales.
"We're not signing off for
someone to open a tavern or
bar," he said.
Cedar Key asked the county
to include its property when it
brought the future land-use
map up .to date. Because the
changes numbered about 100,
the county was not required to
notify adjacent property own-


HOME
Continued from Page 1A
County. However, the job hunt
is proving to be a difficult one.
He admits that he would be
happy to find a job doing any-
thing right about now, but he
does have a dream job in
mind.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 7A


ers of the change.
Though the same rule holds
true for the atlas map change,
Maidhof is notifying Phelps of
all upcoming meetings and cor-
respondence.
The planning and develop-
ment review board will consid-
er the Cedar Key atlas change,
along with about 100 others, at
its Oct. 4 meeting in Lecanto.
The meeting begins at 9 a.m.
Maidhof said the PDRB
might remove Cedar Key from
the amendments; however, the
county commission, which has
final say, may add Cedar Key
back to the list.
The commission had
planned to hear those cases in

"I would like to become a
(deputy) sheriff," he said.
Reflecting back on his expe-
rience in the Navy, he makes it
clear that he is glad that he was
able to serve his country. Even
with medals in the global war
on terrorism and national
defense, nothing can outshine
his sense of accomplishment.
"I feel proud to have given
something back."


November, but postponed
them because the commission
is in the process of adding a
third meeting each month for
zoning cases. The new dates
haven't yet been set.
Phelps said noise from the
bar is still annoying, but she's
pleased to see progress.
"It doesn't help the noise I'm
listening to right now," she
said, "but at least somebody's
looking into it."



M il..' .' .i





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8A
TUESDA V
SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


C CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ........................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .................. .......... editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathle Stewart ...............circulation director
Mike Arnold ...................... managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebltz ............................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ...... .............. citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

REVENUE DILEMMA




Tax exemption



ruling a cause



for concern


Citrus County Property Ap-
praiser Melanie Hensley
this year audited all coun-
ty properties with institutional
exemptions and determined 56
community clubhouses did not
meet those exemptions.
The exemption
reads something
like this: "The THE I!
Florida Legislature Noni
has provided an comn
exemption for com- clubhou
munity centers tax
owned by a private,
nonprofit organiza- OUR OP
tion and used pre-
dominantly for edu- Statute
national, literary, clarifi
scientific, religious
or charitable pur- YOUR OtPI
chroncleor
poses. No alcoholic comment a.
beverages may be Chronicle
served or consumed
on the premises.
The exemption is not available
to condominium common ele-
ments and the property must be
generally open and available for
use by the general public."
Former county property
appraiser and current State
Rep. Ron Schultz believes those
nonprofit community centers
qualify for the exemption.
Hensley, who is not doing this
maliciously, interprets the
statute to mean those organiza-
tions do not qualify.
Clearly, the statute needs clar-
ification if two experts on prop-
erty appraisal differ so drastical-
ly on the issue.
If Hensley's interpretation
stands, the unfortunate outcome


Bad contractors S o
I am a resident of Citrus
County. Beware ... I hired a
contractor to remodel. I
gave a check for half of
the job, as she requested.
She cashed the check the
next day. She delivered the
material 10 days later and CALL
told me that she had prob-
lems getting enough mate- 563
rial for the job. She then
told me that this "ware-
house" that she was ordering this
material from had to send a truck to
Georgia to their main warehouse to
get the material. When I looked at all
the material, every one was stamped
with the (store) logo, and just where
do you think their main plant is, but
in Georgia. I was promised that work
would be commenced the first week
of August, and here it is Aug. 27
and all I have to show for it is lame
excuses, material that is still sitting
in my den, work that has not even
been started, and a check cashed
that should have never been. My
gosh, what is this world coming too?
People like this need to be punished.
They need to be put on a Web site
just like these sex offenders are. It's
really too bad that these types of
people exist. It really makes the
good contractors out there look bad.
You know who you are. I wonder how
you sleep at night!
Lemon law
I'm calling in reference to used
car lots in the state of Florida. I'm
wondering why the state of Florida
doesn't have any regulations on
their licensed used car lots, as far
as warranty on vehicles. I see a lot
of them have vehicles and they're
getting top dollar for them if you go


is taxpayers will be the ones
affected most by the decision.
Here's why:
Currently, the 56 community
centers affected by this ruling
maintain their property and
buildings. They mow, pull weeds,
paint, make repairs
and pay for the util-
SSUE: ities at these sites.
profit If those neighbor-
nlunity hoods cannot afford
ises now to pay the taxes on
ed. their properties,
then the county
PINION: would be asked to
take over the prop-
needs erties and buildings
cation. and taxpayers
would eventually
WNON: Go t,: foot the bill for their
Sline COmTI to
brout today ' upkeep.
e-dia.rtal Even if the county
didn't take over the
specific meeting
halls, there would be greater
demand on county resources to
provide facilities for retirees to
meet. The end result would be
the same - a higher cost to the
taxpayer. Florida has developed
differently than most states. We
have many retirees who come
here and create their own parks
and community centers. This
takes a tremendous burden off
local government because they
don't have to provide these out-
lets for them. The county and
state should not legislate those
opportunities out of reach.
The current statute needs clar-
ification and legislators should
keep in mind how that clarifica-
tion could affect taxpayers.

II into NADA or Kelly Blue
Book and look and see
what they get, what they're
going for, and a lot of
them are selling them as
is. I recently had a neigh-
bor of mine (who) got
stuck with a vehicle that
was as is, and he's been
going through hell trying
9 to get this vehicle to run
0579 correctly. It only lasted 10
minutes outside of the lot.
I personally looked at a couple of
vehicles over the weekend "as is,"
and they were asking $5,000 or
$6,000 for them. I moved down
here two years ago and where I
come from, if the car lot is licensed
by the state, which they are, they
had to give a minimum of 30 days
or $1,000. And if you leave the car
lot and 10 or 15 minutes later, the
car breaks down and you turn
around and go back with it, they tell
you, "Too bad, try again." Can
somebody please shed some light
on that and let me know how that
can be corrected? Whom do I need
to write to or call to find out if they
can get some kind of legislation
together that if your business is
licensed by the state, they must give
a minimum of a warranty of either
30 days or $1,000, whichever
comes first.
Editor's note: Florida has a lemon
law. Call (800) 321-5366.
Blood money
Again, Sound-offers complain that
we spend billions to foreign coun-
tries and scraps for the American
people. I agree that money should
be spent to help our own people, but
the amount we spend to help for-
eigners is minuscule compared to
the amount we spend to kill them.


-1Ri l1 4 ,C L T CH14 NI


September will set the tone


S eptember is shaping
up to be a major
month for American
foreign policy. President
Bush, having quite respon-
sibly (in my opinion) taken
America into Iraq in 2003 to
cope with what appeared to
just about everyone to be a
serious nuclear danger,
quickly discovered that the
danger was in fact nonexist- William
ent. He then spent four OTI
years trying futilely to cope VOI
with various foreign and
domestic insurgencies in
that badly sundered country, eventual-
ly wearing out the patience of the
American people with stubborn
appeals to "stay the course." He
deserves high credit for refusing to cut
and run, as some Democrats soon
began urging him to do - a course that
would not only abandon Iraq to untold
civil bloodshed but destabilize the
entire Western position in the Middle
East. But only recently has he shaken
up his military staff and committed
our forces to the "surge" that circum-
stances so clearly dictated.
Now, in mid-September, we are to
hear from our commander in Iraq, the
highly respected Gen. David Petraeus,
and our ambassador there, Ryan
Crocker, on how things are going, both
militarily and politically. A tremendous
amount will hinge on their reports, and
both President Bush and the Democrats
who control Congress will be forced to
shape their policies accordingly
The general expectation is that
Petraeus will describe the "surge" as
at least a modest success, and recom-
mend that it be allowed to continue
until about April of next year (beyond


H


which it might impose
unsustainable re-
quirements on the Pent-
agon). Crocker, in address-
ing the political aspects of
the situation in Iraq, is
almost certain to have to
paint a gloomier picture,
since it is generally agreed
that Prime Minister Nouri
al-Maliki's government has
Rusher failed dismally to achieve
IER any of the goals set for it -
DES perhaps most notably nego-
tiating an agreement for
sharing the nation's oil rev-
enues among its Sunni, Shiite and
Kurdish factions.
President Bush will no doubt hail
the Petraeus and Crocker reports as
justifying a decision to continue the
military "surge" - and perhaps to
force salutary changes in the makeup
of the Iraqi government. But the con-
gressional Democrats face a rather
sticky problem. They are pretty well
committed, as a party, to the proposi-
tion that the Iraq war is a total failure,
which can only be remedied by our
withdrawal, whether swift or slow.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
has publicly declared the war "lost."
No matter how optimistic Petraeus
sounds, therefore (and his opinion is
likely to be received with high respect
by the American people in general),
Reid and his allies are simply in no
position to take "yes" for an answer.
The Democrats' likely solution
therefore - and it has already been
foreshadowed in various comments -
will be to announce that the real issue
in Iraq is not military success but polit-
ical success. In other words, never
mind what Petraeus may say, the near-


total failure of the al-Maliki govern-
ment to stabilize the country political-
ly compels us to give up the effort.
Just how well that will fly with the
American people is an open question.
They certainly have grave reserva-
tions about the whole Iraq enterprise,
but they may not be willing to give up
all hope if Petraeus insists that he sees
light at the end of the military tunnel.
That will be the point at which Bush
may be able to pull a rabbit, if only a
small one, out of his hat. If he can
achieve a visible success on some
aspect of Iraq's political front - an
agreement on oil revenues, for exam-
ple - he would be able to claim that
this warrants continuing the American
involvement there. If the al-Maliki gov-
ernment succeeded in pulling off this,
or even some much smaller political
triumph, you can bet that the Bush
administration would urge it to with-
hold the news until it is badly needed
- which is to say in the latter half of
September, when the congressional
debate is at its most furious.
One way or another, it seems clear
that a month from now it will be possi-
ble to see far more clearly the direction
of American policy in Iraq. President
Bush may well sweeten the pot with
some token withdrawal of American
forces, such as Sen. John Warner's pro-
posal to bring 5,000 troops home by
Christmas. But the basic decision - to
quit or stay - is likely to hinge on the
occurrence of some favorable political
development in Baghdad.

William Rusher is a Distinguished
Fellow of the Claremont Institute for
the Study of Statesmanship and
Political Philosophy.


LETTERS /5"> \ to the Editor


Explaining treaty
John Adams did not originate the
Treaty of Tripoli, which purposed to
free trade vessels while protecting
trade with countries concerned with
religious assumptions. Therefore,
other countries posed interesting his-
torical questions about our
Christianity and government even in
1796, didn't they?
Since our Constitution reflects
words of, "The year of our Lord,"
above signatures of its makers and
our first right is not that of civil, but
belongs to religion, other countries
would question our intentions of war
to religious factors. Since John Adams
didn't create or sign the Constitution
either, was he really a good source of
Constitutional roots or rationalization
of this agreement with Tripoli?
Essentially, two years after the sign-
ing of the Constitution, on Christmas
day 1789 Americans celebrated this
holiday, so it is a historical reality
writers of the federal and state consti-
tutions tried to establish a statute that
clearly suited cultural assumptions
and political realities of American
expectation/life. Since before the
Constitution many were fined
because they observed Christianity, it.
was apparent our founders reached
the commonsense conclusion that a
constitution must be adapted to the
character and customs of its people in
order to survive as a community
fusion.
Since 1870, Christmas was declared
a federal holiday, and is still being
observed today However, in 1804 the
expression of non-Christian founda-
tions, or Article 11, was dropped from
the Treaty of Tripoli and has since
been unchanged. This commerce
partnership with America was a tool


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
M Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonllne.com.

or agreement of trade and never
accumulated representation of histor-
ical religious facts.
Sandra Brasmeister
Inverness

Manatee conspiracy
Thursday morning, Aug. 23, a dying
manatee was found in a basin behind
Pete's Pier. The verdict came swiftly:
death by boat propeller. Or was it?
Around 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Aug.
22, I was at Hunter Springs where a
group of kayakers were launching for
an outing on the bay As you look out
at the bay from the springs, you're
looking directly at Pete's Pier and the
basin. I did not see or hear any power
boats operating on Kings Bay while I
was at the springs, except for the
weed harvesting machine. The har-


vester is a barge-type craft with sub-
mersible rotating combine blades.
These blades are about 10 feet wide
and capable of inflicting multiple
gashes much like a boat propeller.
The harvester manicured the shal-
lows habitat, then came into Hunter
Springs, passing kayaks on the way.
Let's reflect on some things: Was it
the harvester blades that actually ,
struck the manatee? Did the spread
of kayaks "herd" the manatee into the
harvester's path? Did the taking of
the "food" by the harvester force the
manatee to seek food in the boat
channels? Did the kayaks flush the
manatee from the shallows into
harms' way? Kayakers claim they do
not disturb, but only observe mana-
tees. It is impossible to "observe" a
submerged manatee beyond 12 to 15
feet. The low profile of the boater and
light refraction prevent it. If you can
see a submerged manatee from a
kayak, you have already invaded their
space.
Power boaters are now confronted
with a bias and an agenda. Here's
another example: Around 1988, "Dr.
Manatee" and his entourage took two
manatees from the Homosassa
Aquarium and released them into the
Rainbow River. The manatees were
photographed and then returned to
the aquarium. These photos were pre-
sented to the Marion County commis-
sioners and "Slow - Manatees" signs
were placed on the river, where they
still remain today There are no mana-
tees in that river - not now, not in the
55-plus years I have enjoyed that river
This was a conspiracy by public
employees, some waterfront property
residents and special interests.
Joe D. Gilbreath,
Dunnellon


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


"The bow cannot always stand'
bent, nor can human frailty
subsist w it/hot some law fidu
recreretion. "


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Lock in rates for long-term CDs European,


I OM rFETRUNO
Los Angeles Times


People with money in the bank soon
might help foot the bill to stabilize Wall
Street
Many investment pros are convinced
that the Federal Reserve will cut its
benchmark short-term interest rate
next month to ease the worrisome cred-
it crunch rooted in the housing slump.
If that happens, rates on bank savings
accounts and certificates of deposit also
could see their first significant fall in
more than three years.
Historically, banks and savings insti-
tutions haven't wasted much time in
paring deposit rates once the Fed trims
-its key rate, said Ray Montague, manag-
er of deposit customer services for
Calabasas, Calif-based Informa
Research Services Inc., which tracks
savings rates.
"Banks usually are really fast to cut
rates and slow to raise," he said.
Some experts are advising people to
lock in longer-term certificates of de-
posit soon, at least with a portion of their
savings, in case rates begin to slide.
"Locking in a CD is particularly
attractive now," said Greg McBride, sen-
ior analyst at Bankrate.com in North
Palm Beach, Fla. "The yields haven't yet
reflected the idea of a Fed rate cut"
There's a lot at stake. Savers have
more than $5 trillion in bank savings
accounts and CDs nationwide, up from
$2.7 trillion at the start of the decade.
Many older Americans, in particular,
live partly off the interest they earn on


Some experts are advising people to lock in
longer-term certificates of deposit soon ... in case
rates begin to slide.


bank deposits.
Those deposits have risen faster than
assets in stock mutual funds since 1999,
which might demonstrate that many
Americans have been relatively conser-
vative with their nest eggs.
Savers suffered from 2001 through
mid-2003 as the Fed slashed its bench-
mark rate, the so-called federal funds
rate, from 6.5 percent to a generational
low of 1 percent, in an effort to bolster
the economy
It was a great time for borrowers, but
at savers' expense. The average annual-
ized yield on one-year CDs nationwide
was just slightly above 1 percent four
years ago this month, according to
Informa Research.
Beginning in mid-2004, the Fed began
to tighten credit, but slowly. Policy-
makers raised their key rate by a quar-
ter of a percentage point every six
weeks or so, to 5.25 percent by June
2006. The Fed then went on hold.
The average yield on one-year CDs
now is 4.17 percent, Informa Research
says. That yield mostly has held steady
for the last 12 months.
The Fed faces a difficult decision with
interest rates, because policymakers
aren't sure whether the summer turmoil
in financial markets will have a lasting
effect on the economy.


Since June, rising home loan delin-
quencies have caused investors to flee
mortgage-backed bonds, fearing huge
losses on those securities. That has
fueled a general aversion to risk-taking
that has caused many banks and
investors to pull back from lending
money - sparking a credit crunch.
The stock market has been roiled as
well. Major indexes are down 5 percent
to 10 percent from their record highs of
recent months.
By cutting its main short-term rate,
the Fed could bolster the financial sys-
tem and give banks more confidence to
lend.
Given the level of fear in the market-
place, "Banks are not going to do much
lending without a reduction in their cost
of funds," said Brian Bethune, an econ-
omist at Global Insight Inc. in
Lexington, Mass.
But Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
S. Bernanke also is reluctant to bail out
stock and bond investors, Fed-watchers
say. On Friday, in his first public com-
ments in six weeks, Bernanke told an
annual symposium in Jackson Hole,
Wyo., that the U.S. central bank will take
the necessary steps to protect the econ-
omy from market turmoil, but he also
made it clear that the Fed will not bail
out investors who made bad decisions.


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDEUNES
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to take photos of community events. Call
563-5660 for details.
* Be prepared to give information about the time, date and location of the event, and list a
contact name and phone number.
* Submit photos of successful community events to be published in the Chronicle. Also call
563-5660 for details.


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Citrus Bone and Joint Specialists

R Crane Couch, D.O. Orhopedic Surgery
Bernadette "Berna" Harrelson, PA-C
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
LeCanto 3264 W. Audubon Park Path 746-0654
Ocala 6075 S.W. 73rd St. Road, Ocala 237-9298
713870


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Children attending public school
in Citrus County, employees
of schools and many local businesses,
hospitals, cities and counties and
people age 55 and over. Immediate
family members can join too.


In 1934, teachers chartered our credit union

to help one another. Since then, we've

expanded the criteria for membership

beyond school employees, which means it's

possible you can join too. When you do,

buying a car, saving for a home and planning

retirement will become a lot easier. See,

when your money's in a bank, the profits

on that money go to stockholders. But at a

credit union, profits go to members. That's

why you'll get lower rates on loans, higher

earnings on deposits and more free services


like free checking, free online banking and

free bill pay. Call 800-999-5887 or visit

joinsuncoast.org to learn more. And find out

just how different from a bank we really are.



Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union
WHERE SMART PEOPLE KEEP THEIR MONEY.
www.joinsuncoast.org

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CITRUS COUNTy (FL) CHRONICLE


TUFSDAY, SEIITFMBFR 4, 2007 9A


BUSINESS


m


Reason #33 to join Suncoast.


For now, many economists expect the
Fed to drop its key rate from 5.25 per-
cent to 5 percent when policymakers
meet Sept. 18 and that one or two addi-
tional quarter-point cuts are probable
by year-end if the credit crunch doesn't
show signs of abating quickly
Any drop in the central bank's rate
almost certainly would translate into
lower rates on bank deposits. Interest
yields on money market mutual funds,
which invest in short-term corporate
and government IOUs, also would be
expected to decline.
Indeed, investors in money market
funds that buy only government IOUs
have seen a sharp decline in their
yields. That's because the credit crunch
has caused some investors to rush into
short-term U.S. Treasury securities as a
haven. As demand has surged for those
IOUs, the Treasury has had to pay less
in interest to attract buyers.
The seven-day average annualized
yield on government-only money mar-
ket funds for individual investors
slumped to 4.01 percent this week,
down from 4.48 percent two weeks ago,
according to rate-tracker IMoneyNet
Inc.
Still, it isn't certain that the Fed will
cut rates at all, some analysts warn. And
even if the central bank does act, the
decline could be temporary.
Even so, McBride at Bankrate.com
said savers should consider shifting at
least some of their cash in short-term
accounts into longer-term CDs, such as
one-year issues, on the chance that
rates have peaked for the time being.


markets


mixed

Associated Press
LONDON - European and
Asian stock markets finished
narrowly mixed Monday in
mostly light trading, while the
U.S. financial markets were
closed for the Labor Day holi-
day.
"It's a quiet day today large-
ly because of the U.S. holiday."
said Philip Shaw, a strategist at
Investec Securities.
The U.S. holiday dried up
liquidity, and brokers said they
expect trade to remain muted
for the early part of the week.
"The reality is, there's only
one market that moves the oth-
ers along," said Stuart Eaves, a
Wellington-based broker at
Waddell Johnston McCarthy.
Chinese stocks touched a
record,while Japanese stocks
declined.

GO ONLINE
* Visit the Chronicle site
www.ChronicleOnhlne.com











10A
TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 4, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


N,.
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*1* ~'
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'I- - \ / - - -


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


, Nation BRIEFS

SAhhhh


Associated Press
Using his shoes on his hands,
Michael Cusmano propels
himself downstream Monday
In the Delaware River on an
inflatable inner tube in
Easton, Pa.


SoCal homes still
without power
LOS ANGELES - Parts of
Southern California sweltered in
triple-digit temperatures Monday
as a heat wave stretched into
the seventh day and contributed
to power outages that left thou-
sands without air conditioning.
Temperatures soared in the
San Fernando Valley with
Woodland Hills reporting 102
degrees and Van Nuys at 99,
according to the National Wea-
ther Service. Downtown Los An-
geles also was expected to see
temperatures climb above 100.
Southern California Edison
said 20,000 customers in Los
Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Riv-
erside and San Bernardino
counties had no electricity,
spokesman Steve Conroy said.


World BRIEFS

Expanding


Associated Press
People hold Panama's nation-
al flag Monday at a ceremony
marking the beginning of the
Panama Canal expansion
project in Paraiso on the out-
skirts of Panama City.

Panama Canal
begins expansion
PANAMA CITY, Panama -.
Panama blasted away part of a
hillside next to the canal on
Monday, marking the start of the
waterway's biggest expansion
since it opened 93 years ago.
In the presence of former
President Carter, who signed
the 1977 treaty that gave Pan-
ama control of the waterway,
Panamanian President Martin
Torrijos celebrated the start of
construction on two wider sets
of locks being added to both
sides of the canal.
The $5.25 billion expansion is
,expected to double the 50-mile
:canal's capacity and lower the
:price of consumer goods on the
,East Coast of the United States
,by allowing wider vessels to
:squeeze through with more
:cargo.
London's subway
shuts down in strike
LONDON - Large swathes
of London's sprawling transport
network shut down Monday
after maintenance workers
walked out in a dispute over job
cuts, transfers and pensions.
About 2,300 members of the
National Union of Rail, Maritime
and Transport Workers left their
jobs at 6 p.m. in a dispute stem-
ming from the collapse of their
employer, maintenance consor-
tium Metronet.
* Metronet's workers maintain
,tracks, trains and signals on
.some of the subway system's
:busiest routes, and have de-
manded assurances that their
jobs would be protected under
the arrangements being made
to try to rescue the company,
which has been unable to pay
'its debts.
London Underground said
two-thirds of London's subway
system would be inoperative for
three days unless the strike was
called off.
- From wire reports


Soldiers' cri


Newly released courts-martial documents

show pattern of disregard for rules of war


Associated Press


Newly released documents regarding
crimes committed by U.S. soldiers
against civilians in Iraq and
Afghanistan detail a troubling pattern
of troops failing to understand and fol-
low the rules that govern interrogations
and deadly actions.
The documents, released Tuesday by
the American Civil Liberties Union
ahead of a lawsuit, total nearly 10,000
pages of courts-martial summaries,
transcripts and military investigative
reports about 22 incidents. They show
repeated examples of soldiers believ-
ing they were within the law when they
killed local citizens.
The killings include the drowning of
a man soldiers pushed from a bridge


Tourists



flee



Felix


Hurricane

nears Honduras

Associated Press

SAN PEDRO SULA, Honduras -
Planes shuttled tourists from island
resorts in a desperate airlift Monday
as Hurricane Felix bore down on
Honduras and Belize. But thousands
of Miskito Indians were stranded
along a swampy coastline where the
Category 4 sto1n was expected to
make landfall.
Grupo Taca Airlines provided spe-
cial free flights to the mainland,
quickly touching down and taking off
again to scoop up more tourists. Some
1,000 people were evacuated from the
Honduran island of Roatan, popular
for its pristine reefs and diving
resorts. Another 1,000 were removed
from low-lying coastal areas and
smaller islands.
Felix's top winds weakened slightly
to 135 mph as it headed west, but fore-
casters warned that it could strength-
en again before landfall along the
Miskito Coast early Tuesday. From
there, it was projected to rake north-
ern Honduras, slam into southern
Belize on Wednesday and then cut
across northern Guatemala and
southern Mexico, well south of Texas.
A storm surge of more than 18 feet
above normal tides could devastate
Indian communities along the Miskito
Coast, a swampy, isolated region
straddling the Honduras-Nicaragua
border where thousands live in wood-
en shacks, get around on canoes and
subsist on fish, beans, rice, cassava
and plantains.
"There's nowhere to go here," said
teacher Sodeida Rodriguez, 26, who
was hunkering down in a concrete
shelter.
The only path to safety is up rivers
and across lakes that are too shallow
for regular boats, but many lack gaso-
line for long journeys. Provincial
health official Efrain Burgos said
shelters were being prepared, and
medicine and sanitation kits were
being brought in, but that 18,000 peo-


into the Tigris River as punishment for
breaking curfew, and the suffocation
during interrogation of a former Iraqi
general believed to be helping insur-
gents.
In the suffocation, soldiers covered
the man's head with a sleeping bag,
then wrapped his neck with an electri-
cal cord for a "stress position" they
insisted was an approved technique.
Chief Warrant Officer Lewis Wels-
hofer was convicted of negligent homi-
cide in the death of Maj. Gen. Abed
Hamed Mowhoush following a January
2006 court-martial that received wide
media attention due to possible CIA
involvement in the interrogation.
But even after his conviction,
Welshofer insisted his actions were
appropriate and standard, documents


times tracked


show.
"The simple fact of the matter is
interrogation is supposed to be stress-
ful or you will get no information,"
Welshofer wrote in a letter to the court
asking for clemency "To put it another
way, an interrogation without stress is
not an interrogation - it is a conversa-
tion."
Welshofer said in the same letter that
he was "within the appropriate con-
straints that both the rules of law, and
just as importantly - duty, imposed on
me."
The documents were obtained
through a federal Freedom of Infor-
mation Act request the ACLU filed with
the military more than a year ago ask-
ing for all documents relevant to U.S.
military involvement in the deaths of
civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan. Only
the Army responded.
Considered against recent cases,
including soldiers from the 101st
Airborne Division convicted of killing
detainees in Samarra, Iraq, last year


and the ongoing courts-martial of
Marines accused of killing 24 civilians
in Haditha, these new examples shed
light on the frequency soldiers and
Marines may disregard the rules of war.
Nasrina Bargzie, an attorney with the
ACLU's National Security Project, said
the documents also show that there's an
abundance of information being with-
held from public scrutiny.
"The government has gone out of its
way to hide the human cost of this war,"
Bargzie said. Releasing the documents
now "paints at least a part of that pic-
ture so people at least know what's
going on," she said.
The lawsuit seeks to compel the mili-
tary to produce all documents related
to all incidents of civilian deaths at the
hands of U.S. troops in Iraq and
Afghanistan since January 2005. The
ACLU contends the materials are
releasable under federal law.
The Defense Department declined to
comment on the lawsuit until it could
review its claims.


Associated Press
Nicaragua's Army Colonel Mario Perezcasar points out on a map of Nicaragua the route Hurricane Felix will possibly take,
during a news conference Monday in Managua. The country's government prepares a plan to assist around 10,000 pos-
sible affected people in Nicaragua's Caribbean north coast after the passage of Hurricane Felix. On top of the map is Writ-
ten In Spanish, "2007 Emergency plan for heavy rains." Planes shuttled hundreds of tourists from the island resorts of
Honduras and Belize in a desperate airlift Monday as Hurricane Felix's pounding rain and punishing winds bore down on
the Central American coast.


ple must find their own way to higher
ground.
"We're asking the people who are
on the coasts to find a way to safer
areas, because we don't have the
capability to transport so many peo-
ple," he said. "The houses are made
of wood. They're going to be com-
pletely swept away. They're not safe."
The storm was following the same
path as 1998's Hurricane Mitch, a
sluggish storm that stalled for a week
over Central America, killing nearly
11,000 people. But Felix was expected
to maintain a much more rapid pace.
By Monday afternoon, crashing
waves reached 15 feet higher than
normal on Honduras' coast, but there
was no rain yet.
"We are ready to face an eventual
tragedy," said Roatan fire chief
Douglas Fajardo.
Most tourists took the free flights
out, but locals prepared to ride out
the storm.
"We know it's a tremendous hurri-
cane that's coming," said real estate
worker Estella Marazzito.
The U.S. National Hurricane
Center said Felix could dump up to 12
inches of rain in isolated areas. In the
highland capital of Tegucigalpa, more


This infrared satellite image provided by NOAA and taken at 4:15 p.m. Monday
shows Hurricane Felix as it approaches the Central American coast.


than 100 miles inland, authorities
cleared vendors from markets prone
to flooding.
Across the border in Belize City,
skies grew increasingly cloudy and
winds kicked up as residents boarded
windows and lined up for gas.
Tourists competed for the last seats
on flights to Atlanta and Miami.


Police went door-to-door forcing
evacuations. Liquor sales were
banned, and stores were running out
supplies.
"I just wish they had more air-
planes to take care of everyone who
has to leave," said Atlanta, Ga., resi-
dent Mitzi Carr, 48, who cut short her
weeklong vacation on Hatchet Caye.


Study: Men date who they see, not who they say


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Science is
confirming what most women
know: When given the choice for
a mate, men go for good looks.
And guys won't be surprised
to learn that women are much
choosier about partners than
they are.
"Just because people say
they're looking for a particular
set of characteristics in a mate,
someone like themselves, does-
n't mean that is what they'll end
up choosing," Peter M. Todd, of
the cognitive science program
at Indiana University, Bloom-
ington, said in a telephone
interview.
Researchers led by Todd


report in Tuesday's edition of
Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences that their
study found humans were simi-
lar to most other mammals, "fol-
lowing Darwin's principle of
choosy females and competitive
males, even if humans say
something different"
Their study involved 26 men
and 20 women in Munich,
Germany.
Participants ranged in age
from 26 to their early 40s and
took part in "speed dating,"
short meetings of three to seven
minutes in which people chat,
then move on to meet another
dater. Afterward, participants
check off the people they'd like
to meet again, and dates can be


ON THE NET
* PNAS: www.pnas.org

arranged between pairs who
select one another.
Speed dating let researchers
look at a lot of mate choices in a
short time, Todd said.
In the study, participants
were asked before the session
to fill out a questionnaire about
what they were looking for in a
mate, listing such categories as
wealth and status, family com-
mitment, physical appearance,
healthiness and attractiveness.
After the session, the re-
searchers compared what the
participants said they were
looking for with the people they


actually chose to ask for anoth-
er date.
Men's choices did not reflect
their stated preferences, the re-
searchers concluded. Instead,
men appeared to base their de-
cisions mostly on the women's
physical attractiveness.
The men also appeared to be
much less choosy Men tended
to select nearly every woman
above a certain minimum at-
tractiveness threshold, Todd
said.
Women's actual choices, like
men's, did not reflect their stat-
ed preferences, but they made
more discriminating choices,
the researchers found.
The scientists said women
were aware of the importance


of their own attractiveness to
men, and adjusted their expec-
tations to select the more desir-
able guys.
"Women made offers to men
who had overall qualities that
were on a par with the women's
self-rated attractiveness. They
didn't greatly overshoot their
attractiveness," Todd said,
"because part of the goal for
women is to choose men who
would stay with them"
But, he added, "they didn't go
lower They knew what they
could get and aimed for that
level."
So, it turns out, the women's
attractiveness influenced the
choices of the men and the
women.


i


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SEPTEMBER 4, 2007
www chronicleonline.com


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CI RUs COUNTY CHRONICLE


'Noles fall to Tigers ;

Associated Press father Bobby's Seminoles. He connected with freshman tight
Florida State rallied from 24-3 end Brian Linthicum on an 11-yard
CLEMSON, S.C. - Florida State's down in the second half of the season scoring pass and Aaron Kelly for a 41- ' .-
3ffense still needs a lot of work. It's opener for both teams. When Drew yard TD connection as the Tigers took
.3-P .. .. . j�]A~~~~~~ -a TT. I - - i--.-- _P+-U .i-4 -- n 9n ark l . +lh 1I7 Ii nutpq iUL'I.) l


aerense couia use a tuneup, too, after
first-time starter Cullen Harper threw
two touchdown passes in Clemson's
24-18 victory over the No. 19
Seminoles on Monday night.
This was supposed to be a retooled
Florida State attack with first-year
offensive coordinator Jimbo Fisher
bringing the flash back to the
Seminoles in the latest version of the
father-son Bowden Bowl.
Instead, it was Harper and the
Tigers who came out throwing to take
a 21-0 lead before the game was 17
minutes old - and bring their coach,
Tommy, his third straight win over


weatherford hit ruchardu oodmana
for a 15-yard TD pass with 11:40 left,
the Seminoles trailed by 6.
Weatherford and the Seminoles got
the ball back three more times after
that, but could not score.
Clemson fans rushed the field and
the collapsible goal posts came down
after Weatherford's final pass fell to
the ground. But officials chose to
review the play, moving orange-clad
fans out of the way.
Finally, they were told the play
stood and the game was indeed over.
Harper, a junior, was a big reason
for the celebration.


a z2i-u ita iea Isua -L I IL minuLtes into
the game. In between, tailback James
Davis scored on a 29-yard run.
Florida State stumbled through a
miserable first half where it managed
only one first down and 62 yards.
Weatherford was under constant
pressure and looked lost when he
wasn't. Florida State only crossed
midfield once in the first half after
Roosevelt Lawson's blocked punt
The Seminoles found their rhythm
in the second half.
Antone Smith had a 49-yard run to
Clemson's 1, then followed with the
score that drew them to 24-11.


Associated Press
Clemson's James Davis (1) runs in for the touchdown against Florida State's
Myron Rolle (3) as he tries to hold onto his jersey during the first quarter on
Monday at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C.


Local bullrider

from ommassassa

has high aspirations

ALAN FESTO
afesto@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
During the past eight months,
Homassassa's David Casch has had
his shoulder and pinky finger dislo-
cated, bones in his face broken and
has even been pronounced dead.
Not bad for a pro bull rider, con-
sidering the alternative.
What could possibly keep the 23-
year-old Georgia native tempting
fate?
"The adrenaline," Casch said.
"Just trying to stay on that 2,000-
pound bull for eight seconds."
Casch joined the Southern States
Bull Riding Association (SSBRA)
after winning tickets to a rodeo last
November and his life as been a
wild ride ever since.
Casch began learning all he could
from mentor and veteran bull rider
Steve Bryant. Bryant, 44, has been
riding for 16 years and sees a lot of
potential in Casch.
"I see him going somewhere with
his skill," Bryant said. "He's aggres-
sive and he don't back off of nothing."
Casch, just like other bull riders,
has all ready developed a lot of
superstitions.
Before every ride, Casch goes
through a series of stretches and
also joins the other bull riders for a
prayer. He makes it a point to look
his bull square in the eyes. One of
his stranger traditions is keeping $3
in his shirt pocket, the amount he
had when he first completed an
eight-second ride.
"We've all got our superstitions
Please see ' ", /Page 3B


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Professional bull rider and Homosassa resident David Casch strains to hold onto this 2,000-pound bull Sunday after-
noon at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion in Ocala. Casch suffered a dislocated shoulder moments into the ride
and was thrown off the animals back.


Blake loses, Roddick lone American man left


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Roger Federer was
scuffling against a Spanish lefty - no,
not that one - at the U.S. Open on
Monday night He lost the first set to
Feliciano Lopez, barely won the sec-
ond, then trailed love-40 to start the
third.
And then Federer did the sort of
remarkable thing that only Federer
does: He won the next 35 points he
served.
Answering every question Lopez
posed with an exclamation point,
Federer took control of the third set
and the match, coming back to win 3-6,
6-4, 6-1, 64 in the fourth round at
Flushing Meadows.
Next up for the No. 1-ranked
Federer, bidding to become the first
man to win four consecutive U.S. Open
titles since the 1920s: a quarterfinal
against No. 5 Andy Roddick, the 2003
champion and runner-up last year.
Federer is 13-1 against Roddick.
"It's a great record, but it doesn't
help me," Federer said. "We'll see how
it goes. Andy's always tough at the U.S.
Open."
With No. 6 James Blake losing to No.
10 Tommy Haas in five sets earlier


Associated Press
James Blake chases down a volley from Tommy Haas at the US Open tennis tour-
nament on Monday in New York.


Monday, Roddick is the only American
man left - making this the first U.S.
Open since 1998 without at least two in
the quarterfinals.
Several hours before Federer took
to the court in his all-black night
ensemble, Roddick was leading 7-6
(6), 2-0 when his fourth-round oppo-
nent, No. 9 Tomas Berdych, stopped


playing because he had trouble
breathing.
So two of Roddick's four foes have
quit on him. And both of Roddick's
matches that were completed, against
men ranked 475th and 68th. were over
in three sets.
Now things get a lot more daunting.
"You feel the extra weight of most


big matches. That's just the way it is.
But I'm excited. I expect a lot of
myself," Roddick said. "I don't think
anybody else really expects much
from me."
Certainly, no one expected all that
much from Lopez, who went into
Monday with an 0-4 mark against
Federer and only one Grand Slam
quarterfinal appearance on his
resume.
Federer, meanwhile, not only has
won 11 Grand Slam titles - he has
reached a record 14 consecutive
major semifinals and nine straight
major finals. And that latter stat might
have been nine straight major titles
but for No. 2 Rafael Nadal, the left-
hander from Spain who beat Federer
in the past two French Open champi-
onship matches.
Doing a pretty fair impersonation of
his better-known countryman. Lopez
was spectacular at the start. He hit
well-angled serves that caught
Federer flat-footed and volleyed bril-
liantly. including one right to a corner
to earn a quick break and a 3-1 lead.
Lopez blew a set point by missing a
backhand on a 25-stroke exchange,
but then used a 118 mph service win-
ner to take the opening set.


Mickelson


holds off


Tiger by 2


Lefty wins Deutsche

Bank Championship
Associated 1Press
NORTON, Mass. - Phil Mickelson
is back on his game, and it was good
enough to take down Tiger Woods.
Going head-to-head with Woods for
the first time in 18 months, Mickelson
buried the world's No. 1 player on the
front nine and held him off down the
stretch Monday to close with a 5-
under 66 and win the Deutsche Bank
Championship by two shots.
It was the first victory for Mickelson
since The Players Championship in
May, when he looked ready to make
another run at Woods. Then came a
wrist injury that cost him his summer,
and only recently has Mickelson been
able to swing without flinching.
The pain on this Labor Day
belonged to Woods..
He co uldn't make a putt on the front
nine, and couldn't make enough when
he was trying to make up ground.
Woods had four putts for eagle on the
TPC Boston, and picked up only three
shots. He wound up with a 67 -
despite taking 32 putts - and tied for
second with Arron Oberholser (69)
and Brett Wetterich (70), who were
afterthoughts while playing in the
final group.
The buzz outside Beantown was
clearly on the two biggest names in
golf, and Mickelson relished this vic-
tory.
"For 10 years I've struggled against
Tiger," Mickelson said. "This sure
feels great to go head-to-head ... and
over the last five or six holes when
he's making a run, it was fun to match
him with birdies."
Mickelson finished at 16-under 268
and earned $1.26 million, moving him
atop the standings in the PGA Tour
Playoffs.
But after dispatching of Woods,
Mickelson picked his next battle with
PGA Tour commissioner Tim
Please see PGA/Page 3B

MICKELSON

OBERHOLSER

WOODS_,

WETTERICH �

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Associated Press
Phil Mickelson won the Deutsche Bank
Championship golf tournament on
Monday in Norton, Mass.


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*^









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Intr W
12-6 Cleveland 79
10-8 Detroit 73
10-8 Minnesota 69
6-12 Kansas City 62
7-11 Chicago 58


Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay




New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
Florida


Central Division
Pct GB L10
.577 - z-9-1
.533 6 z-5-5
.500 10% z-4-6
.453 17 5-5


79 .423 21


Home
44-27
34-31
37-33
31-37


2-8 W-1 29-37


East Division
GB L10
- z-6-4
7 z-5-5
12% 6-4
23 1-9
26 z-8-2


East Division
t GB L10
! - z-5-5
5 5 6-4
' 7% z-4-6
2 16% 3-7
5 17% 3-7


Home
43-24
45-27
42-27
30-37
32-38


Home
35-30
39-29
35-34
34-35
30-41


Away
35-31
39-33
32-36
31-38
29-42



Away
33-32
26-42
30-37
29-42
26-43
29-39


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas





San Diego
Arizona
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Francisco


West Division
Pct GB L10
.588 - 6-4
.544 6 1-9
.493 13 z-4-6
.460 17% 7-3


West Division


Wild Card Glance
American League
W L Pct GB
New York 76 62 .551 -
Seattle 74 62 .544 1
Detroit 73 64 .533 2%2
National League
W L Pct GB
Arizona 76 63 .547 -
Los Angeles 72 65 .526 3
Philadelphia 72 65 .526 3
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Seattle 7, N.Y. Yankees 1
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 0
Boston 13, Toronto 10
Tampa Bay 9, Baltimore 7
Kansas City 8, Texas 1
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Toronto (Halladay 14-6) at Boston (Beckett
16-6), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Ramirez 8-4) at N.Y. Yankees
(Wang 16-6), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Garland 8-10) at
Detroit (Bonderman 11-7), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 7-5) at Tampa Bay
(Kazmir 11-8), 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Buckner 0-0) at Texas
(Millwood 9-11), 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Laffey 2-1) at Minnesota
(Slowey 3-0), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (DiNardo 8-7) at L.A. Angels
(Jer.Weaver 10-6), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 1
Washington 6, Florida 3
N.Y. Mets 10, Cincinnati 4'
Houston 9, Milwaukee 7
Pittsburgh 11, St. Louis 0
Colorado 7, San Francisco 4
L.A. Dodgers 11, Chicago Cubs 3
San Diego 10, Arizona 2
Tuesday's Games
Florida (Willis 8-14) at Washington (Hill 3-
3), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (O.Perez 12-9) at Cincinnati
(Belisle 7-8), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lohse 7-14) at Atlanta
(Cariyle 8-5), 7:35 p.m.
Houston (Backe 0-0) at Milwaukee
(Villanueva 6-3), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Penny 14-4) at Chicago
Cubs (Trachsel 6-8), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Snell 8-11) at St. Louis (Pineiro
4-3), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 7-4) at Colorado
(Morales 0-2), 8:35 p.m.
San Diego (Young 9-5) at Arizona (Davis
12-11), 9:40 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.:
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:35 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
LEAGUE LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .355;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .353; Polanco, Detroit,
.343; Figgins, Los Angeles, .335; Lowell,
Boston, .333; Posada, New York, .331;
Pedrola, Boston, .327; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, .327.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 123;
Granderson, Detroit, 104; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 102; MOrdonez, Detroit, 102;
BAbreu, New York, 101; Rios, Toronto, 99;
DOrtiz, Boston, 99.
RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 130;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 120; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 110; Lowell, Boston, 101; CPena,
Tampa Bay, 98; VMartinez, Cleveland, 97;
Morneau, Minnesota, 96; THunter,
Minnesota, 96.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 201;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 182; Jeter, New York,
176; Rios, Toronto, 169; Polanco, Detroit,
169; OCabrera, Los Angeles, 169;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 168; MYoung,
Texas, 168.
. DOUBLES-VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
45; MOrdonez, Detroit, 44; DOrtiz, Boston,
41; THunter, Minnesota, 39; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 38; Markakis, Baltimore, 37;
AHill, Toronto, 37.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 21;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit,
9; Iwamura, Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera,
New York, 8; Cano, New York, 7; Teahen,
Kansas City, 7; Crisp, Boston; 7; MByrd,
Texas, 7; ISuzuki, Seattle, 7.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
45; CPena, Tampa Bay, 35; Morneau,
Minnesota, 29; Konerko, Chicago, 27;
THunter, Minnesota, 27; DOrtiz, Boston,
26; MOrdonez, Detroit, 26; Dye, Chicago,
26.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 46; BRoberts, Baltimore, 40; ISuzuki,
Seattle, 37; CPatterson, Baltimore, 37;
Figgins, Los Angeles, 34; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 29; JLugo, Boston, 28.
PITCHING (14 Decisions)-Verlander,
Detroit, 15-5, .750, 3.67; Byrd, Cleveland,
14-5, .737, 4.19; Wang, New York, 16-6,
.727, 3.79; Beckett, Boston, 16-6, .727,
3.29; Bedard, Baltimore, 13-5, .722, 3.16;
Marcum, Toronto, 12-5, .706, 3.75; Haren,
Oakland, 14-6, .700, 2.87; Halladay,
Toronto, 14-6, .700, 3.87.
STRIKEOUTS-Bedard, Baltimore,
221; JoSantana, Minnesota, 203; Kazmir,
Tampa Bay, 194; Sabathia, Cleveland,
182; Matsuzaka, Boston, 177; Shields,
Tampa Bay, 174; JVazquez, Chicago, 163.
SAVES---Borowski, Cleveland, 39; Putz,
Seattle, 37; Jenks, Chicago, 36;
FrRodriguez, Los Angeles, 33; TJones,
Detroit, 33; Papelbon, Boston, 32; Nathan,
Minnesota, 29.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Utley, Philadelphia, .340;
Renteria, Atlanta, .336; Holliday, Colorado,
.335; HaRamirez, Florida, .333
RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 119;
HaRamirez, Florida, 106; JBReyes, New
York, 103; Uggla, Florida, 95; Wright, New
York, 94; Holliday, Colorado, 92
RBI-Howard, Philadelphia, 111;
Holliday, Colorado, 109; CaLee, Houston,
104; Fielder, Milwaukee, 99
HITS-Holliday, Colorado, 182;
HaRamirez, Florida, 181; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 178; JBReyes, New York,
170; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 167
DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 44;
Uggla, Florida, 43; Utiey, Philadelphia, 43;
HaRamirez, Florida, 42
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 16;
JBReyes, New York, 11; Johnson, Atlanta,
10; Amezaga, Florida, 9; Pence, Houston,
8; OHudson, Arizona, 8; Harris, Atlanta. 8;
Bymes, Arizona, 8.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 40;
Howard, Philadelphia, 36; Dunn.
Cincinnati, 36; MiCabrera, Florida, 31;
Pujols, St. Louis, 30; Griffey Jr., Cincinnati,
29; CBYoung, Arizona, 28
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New York.,
74; Pierre, Los Angeles, 53; HaRamirez,
Florida, 43; Bymes, Arizona, 39; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 34; Wright, New York, 30;
Taveras, Colorado, 30.
PITCHING (15 Decisions)-Harang,
Cincinnati, 14-4, .778, 368; Penny, Los
Angeles, 14-4, .778, 2.88;
STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego, 206;
Harang, Cincinnati, 180; Webb, Arizona,
177; RHiII, Chicago, 159


SAVES-Valverde, Arizona, 41:
FCordero, Milwaukee, 39; Saito. Los
Angeles, 36; Hoffman, San Diego, 36


Associated Press
New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez tosses his bat after striking out
during fourth inning on Monday against the Seattle Mariners at
Yankee Stadium in New York. The Mariners won 7-1.


Mariners 7, Yankees 1
NEW YORK - Ichiro Suzuki and
the Seattle Mariners put an emphatic
end to their nine-game losing streak.
Suzuki had three hits to equal
another record, Felix Hemandez out-
pitched a gimpy Roger Clemens and
the Mariners beat the New York
Yankees 7-1 on Monday in the open-
er of a crucial series.
Seattle trimmed New York's wild-
card lead to one game, winning for
the first time since it beat Texas 4-2
on Aug. 24.
Suzuki homered in the third inning
to reach 200 hits for the seventh
consecutive season, tying the AL
mark. He also singled twice against
Clemens to raise his career average
against the right-hander to .217 (5-
for-23).
Alex Rodriguez had a broken-bat
RBI single in the first for New York,
which has lost three of its last four.
Mike Mussina pitched 3 2-3 innings
in his first relief appearance in 499
games, setting the major league
record for most starts to begin a
career before first relief appearance.


Mets 10, Reds 4

CINCINNATI - Pedro Martinez's
comeback was vintage - a victory
and a little history, too.
Back on the mound for the first
time in almost a year, the right-han-
der got his 3,000th career strikeout
Monday and led the resurgent New
York Mets to a 10-4 win over the
Cincinnati Reds.
Martinez (1-0), who had major
shoulder surgery last Oct. 5,
returned after just four rehabilitation
appearances in the minors, leaving
some questions about his readiness.
The NL East leaders increased
their lead to five games over the
Phillies. The Mets saw their lead
shrink to only two games over
Philadelphia last week, and the
allure of a. pitcher with playoff expe-
rience was too much to resist.

NEW YORK CINCINNATI
ab rhbi ab r hbi


JBRyes ss
LCstillo 2b
Wright 3b
Beltran cf
Sele p
CDIgdo lb
Alou If
Felicno p
Mota p
MrAnd If
ShGren rf
L Duca c
PMrtnz p
Gotay ph
Schnws p
Chavez If


5 11 0 Hmlton cf
4 23 1 Hopper cf
5 13 2 AIGnzlz ss
5 12 1 Grf Jr. rf
0 00 0 BPhllps 2b
5 12 1 Dunn If
3 33 1 JaVItin c
0 00 0 Httberg lb
0 00 0 EEcrcn 3b
1 00 0 Harang p
5 11 2 Mjwski p
3 00 1 Ellison ph
2 00 0 Ctlngus p
1 01 1 Mcbth p
0 00 0 Stanton p
2 00 0 Wthers p
Cantu ph


3 1 20
2 01 0
4 1 2 1
3 0 1 1
5 02 1
3 1 00
3000
4 01 0
3 01 0
2 000
0000
1 000
0000
0 000
01 000
0000

1 1 1 0


Totals 41101610 Totals 34 411 3
New York 012 102 211- 10
Cincinnati 200 100 001- 4
E-Beltran (3). DP-New York 2,
Cincinnati 1. LOB-New York 8, Cincinnati
9. 2B-LCastillo 2 (4), Alou 2 (13), ShGreen
(27), AIGonzalez (25), EEncarnacion (19).
HR-Wright (26), CDelgado (22), Alou (10).
SB-Beltran (20), CDelgado (4), BPhillips
(26). SF-Lo Duca, AIGonzalez, Griffey Jr.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
PMartinezW,1-0 5 5 3 2 3 4
Schoeneweis 1 1 0 0 1 0
Feliciano 1 2 0 0 0 0
Mota 1 0 0 0 0 0
Sele 1 3 1 1 0 0
Cincinnati
Harang L,14-4 52-3 10 6 6 1 6
Majewski 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Coutlangus 1-3 3 2 2 0 0
McBeth 0 0 0 0 1 0
Stanton 12-3 2 1 1 0 1
Weathers 1 1 1 1 0 0
McBeth pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Weathers (Lo Duca).
Umpires-Home, Sam Holbrook; First,
Randy Marsh; Second, Bob Davidson; Third,
Hunter Wendelstedt.
T-3:07. A-29,290 (42,271).


SEATTLE

ISuzuki cf
Vidro dh
Jmrsn dh
JGillen rf
Ibanez If
AJones If
Beltre 3b
Brssrd lb
Jhjima c
JoLpez 2b
YBtcrt ss


NEW YORK


ab rhbi
5 13 2 Damon If
5 01 0 Jeter ss
0 00 0 BAbreu rf
5 03 0 ARod 3b
5 11 0 Matsui dh
0 00 0 Posada c
5 11 0 Giambi lb
3 12 0 Cano 2b
4 11 0 MeCbr cf
3122
4 123


ab r hbi
2 000
3 1 1 0
4000
4 021
3000
4020
3 000
4 01 0
4 000


Totals 39716 7 Totals 31 1 6 1
Seattle 011 301 010- 7
New York 100 000 000- 1
DP-Seattle 2, New York 3. LOB-Seattle
7, New York 8. 2B-JGuillen (22), JoLopez
(17), YBetancourt 2 (34). HR-ISuzuki (6).
SB-Beltre (14), Damon (22), Jeter (13),
ARodriguez (22).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
FHrndzW,11-7 7 5 1 1 4 5
Green 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Sherrill 1-3 00 0 1 0
Putz 1 0 0 0 0 1
New York
Clemens L,6-6 4 8 5 5 1 2
Mussina 32-3 7 2 2 0 1
Britton 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Clemens (JoLopez). WP-
Sherrill, Clemens.
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Greg
Gibson; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Tony
Randazzo.
T-3:02. A-54,522 (56,937).


Astros 9, Brewers 7

MILWAUKEE - The Milwaukee
Brewers' bullpen coughed up a
three-run lead in the eighth inning,
allowing the Houston Astros to steal
an 8-7 victory on Monday.
Astros rookie Hunter Pence hit a
key two-run triple during the rally,
and the Brewers, who came in to
the game 1% games behind the
Chicago Cubs in the NL Central,
had a three-game winning streak
snapped.
With Milwaukee leading 7-4,
Brewers manager Ned Yost brought
in right-handed setup man Derrick
Turnbow to pitch the eighth.


HOUSTON

Pence cf
Burke 2b
Lidge p
Andrsn If
Brkmn lb
CaLee If
TreMllIr p
Quails p
Loretta ss
Scott rf
Wggntn 3b
Asmus c
Lamb ph
Backe pr
Brntitt ss
Oswalt p
Sampsn p
Brkski p
OPImro ph
BRigin nh


MILWAUKEE


ab rhbi
4 23 2 Gross rf
3 01 0 Mench If
0 00 0 Hardy ss
0 00 0 Braun 3b
4 11 1 Turnbw p
4 11 0 BShse p
0 00 0 Aquino p
0 00 0 Rttno ph
5 11 1 Spuring p
3 20 0 Fildr lb
3 11 0 CHart cf
2 01 2 Jenkins If
0 00 0 BHall cf
0 10 0 JEstda c
0 00 0 Cunsell 2b
3 00 0 BShets p
0 00 0 Dillon ph
0 00 0 McCIng p
0 00 0 Lnbrnk p
0 00 1 Weeks 2h


ab r h bi
3 1 20
1 0 1 0
4 000
3 22 1
0 0'O 0
0000
0000
1 000
0000
4 01 0
5 221
2 0 1 1
2 1 1 1
4 1 20
4023
2 000
1 000
0000
0000
1 0 1 0


Munsn c 0 00 0
Totals 319 9 7 Totals 37 715 7
Houston 000 300 141- 9
Milwaukee 000 203 200- 7
E-Counsell (2). DP-Houston 2,
Milwaukee 2. LOB-Houston 6, Milwaukee
9. 2B-Pence (28), CaLee (39), Mench
(20), Braun (21), CHart (24). 3B-Pence
(8), Ausmus (3), Counsell (2). HR-
Berkman (28). SB-CHart (22). S-Burke,
Hardy. SF-Biggio, BHall.


IP
Houston
Oswalt 52-3
Sampson 2-3
Borkowski W,4-3 2-3


H RERBBSO

10 5 5 2 3
22 2 2 0
00 0 0 0


Lidge 1 2 0 0 0 0
TreMiller 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Qualls S,4 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Milwaukee
BSheets 6 5 3 3 6 5
McClung 0 1 1 0 1 0
Linebrink 1 0 0 0 0 0
Turnbow 1-3 1 3 3 2 0
BShouse 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Aquino L,0-1 1-3 1 1 0 0 0
Spurling 1 1 1 1 0 0
McClung pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP-Sampson, BSheets, Aquino. PB-
JEstrada.
Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First,
Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Tim McClelland;
Third, Marty Foster.
T-3:50. A-31,226 (41,900).


Indians 5, Twins 0

MINNEAPOLIS - Racing toward
the AL Central title, the Cleveland
Indians stopped in Minnesota to
beat Johan Santana yet once more.
C.C. Sabathia threw eight shutout
innings to lead the Indians past the
Twins 5-0 on Monday and extend
their lead over the defending divi-
sion champs to 10% games.
That's the biggest deficit for third-
place Minnesota during this disap-
pointing year in which Santana (14-
11) dropped all five starts against
Cleveland. The last time a Twins
pitcher went 0-5 in one season
against the same opponent was
1974, when Joe Decker lost five
straight to the Oakland Athletics.
Ryan Garko homered, and each
of the three batters walked by
Santana scored. The left-hander
gave up six hits and four runs in six
innings, and he struck out three.
Sabathia (16-7) bested Santana
for the second time in a week. He
gave up six hits and one walk while
striking out six. Sabathia allowed
two runs or fewer for the ninth
straight start.
He improved to 4-1 against the
Twins this year.
Rafael Perez pitched the ninth for
Cleveland to complete the six-hitter.

CLEVELAND MINNESOTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Lofton cf 4 120 Casilla 2b 4 04 0
ACbera ss 4 11 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 0 0
Hafner dh 5 01 1 THnter cf 4 0 0 0
VMrtnzc 2101 Mrneau lb 2 010
Garko ib 4 12 1 Cddyer rf 4 0 0 0
Gutirrz If 3 00 1 Rdmnd c 4 0 1 0
Gomez2b 3 01 0 RoWhte dh 4 0 0 0
Szmore cf 1 01 0 Tyner If 3 0 0 0
Blake 3b 3 10 0 Punto 3b 3 0 0 0
Frnciso rf 3 01 1
JhPlta ss 1 00 0
Totals 335 9 5 Totals '32 0 6 0
Cleveland 111 010 100- 5
Minnesota 000 000 000- 0
E-Bartlett (24). DP-Cleveland 1,
Minnesota 2. LOB-Cleveland 7, Minnesota
7. 2B-Hafner (19), Sizemore (29),
Francisco (4), Casilla (5). HR-Garko (15).
SF-VMartinez, Gutierrez.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Sabathia W,16-7 8 6 0 0 1 6
RPerez 1 0 0 0 1 2
Minnesota
JoSantana L,14-116 6 4 4 3 3
Guerrer 1 . 1 1 1 1 1
JRincon 1 1 0 0 0 0
Blackburn 1 1 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First,
Ted Barrett; Second, James Hoye; Third,
Mark Carlson.
T-2:40. A-24,105 (46,632).


Braves 5, Phillies 1
ATLANTA-- Lance Cormier kept
the ball in the park, and the Atlanta
Braves kept their record over .500.
Corimer did not give up a home
run for the first time in seven starts,
Brian McCann hit a two-run double
in the Braves' three-run fourth
inning and Atlanta beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 5-1 on Monday.
Cormier had given up 13 homers
in 32 innings before Monday's start.
The Phillies are 1-3 since sweep-
ing a four-game series from the
New York Mets last week. They
began the day four games behind
the Mets in the NL East.
The Braves snapped a three-
game losing streak and avoided
falling to .500 for the first time since
June 24.
Cormier (2-4) earned his second
straight win, giving up four hits -
including three to Chase Utley -
and one run in 5 2-3 innings. He
struck out five with one walk. Peter
Moylan, Manny Acosta, Tyler Yates
and Rafael Soriano combined to
pitch 3 1-3 hitless innings for Atlanta.


PHILA

Rollins ss
Utley 2b
Burrell If
Howard lb
Rwand cf
Werth rf
Ruiz c
Nunez 3b
Dobbs 3b
Moyer p
Alfnsca p
Gordon p
Iguchi ph
FCstro p


ab rhbi


ATLANTA


4 00 0 YEscbr ss
4 13 0 Diaz If
4 01 1 Yates p
4 00 0 RSrano p
3 00 0 CJones 3b
2 00 0 Txeira lb
3 00 0 Frncur rf
2 00 0 AJones cf
1 00 0 McCnn c
1 00 0 Jhnson 2b
0 00 0 Crmer p
0 00 0 Moylan p
1 00 0 BPena ph
0 00 0 Acosta p
Harris If


ab r h bi
5 01 0
2 1 00
0000
0000
4020
3 1 20
3 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
4 1 22
3 0 1 1
2 000
0000
1 0 1 1
0000
1 000


Totals 291 4 1 Totals 32 511 5
Philadelphia 000 100 000- 1
Atlanta 000 301 10x- 5
DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Philadelphia 3,
Atlanta 8 2B-Utley (43), YEscobar (18),
CJones (36), McCann (35). CS-McCann
(1) SF-Francoeur, Johnson.
IP H RERBBSO


Philadelphia
Moyer L,12-11
Alfonseca
Gordon
FCastro
Atlanta
Cormier W,2-4
Moylan
Acosta
Yates
RSoriano


52-3 9 4 4
1-3 0 0 0
1 2 1 1
1 0 0 0

52-3 4 1 1
1-3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


Umpires-Home, Chuck Meriwether;
First, Rick Reed; Second, Alfonso Marquez,
Third, Adam Dowdy
T-2:51. A-31.592 (49,583).


Devil Rays 9, Orioles 7 Red Sox 13, Blue Jays 10


ST. PETERSBURG - Carlos
Pena hit his team-record 35th homer,
a tiebreaking two-run drive in a three-
run seventh inning that helped the
Tampa Bay Devil Rays overcome a
four-run deficit and beat the
Baltimore Orioles 9-7 Monday night.
Pena's drive off Jim Hoey (1-4)
struck an overhanging catwalk and
gave Tampa Bay a 6-4 lead. Pena's
home-run total is one more than
Jose Canseco (1999) and current
Orioles designated hitter Aubrey Huff
(2003) hit for the Devil Rays.
James Shields (11-8) gave up four
runs - one earned - and seven
hits in seven innings for the Devil
Rays, who have won nine of 11.
Delmon Young had three RBIs,
including a run-scoring double in the
seventh. Akinori Iwamura added a
two-run homer in the eighth off Brian
Burres that made it 9-4.
Ramon Hemandez hit a three-run
homer in the ninth offAl Reyes.
Baltimore has lost 12 of 13- get-
ting outscored 128-56 - and is just
three games ahead of the Devil Rays
for fourth place in the AL East.
Tampa Bay has finished last in all but
one of its first nine years.


BALTIMORE


BRbrts 2b
CPttson cf
Mrkkis rf
Tejada ss
Millar lb
Huff dh
Mora 3b
RaHrdz c
Redmn If


ab rhbi


TAMPA BAY


5 11 0 Iwmra 3b
5 11 2 Crwfrd If
3 00 0 Gomes If
3 01 1 CPena lb
4 02 0 Upton cf
3 10 0 DYong rf
4 22 0 BHarrs 2b
4 11 3 Norton dh
4 11 0 JoWlsn ss
Nvarro c


ab r hbi
5232
2 001
2 1 00
4 1 22
2 1 00
5023
4000
5 0 2 100

4 1 1 0
3 2 2 1


Totals 357 9 6 Totals 33 910 9
Baltimore 004 000 003- 7
Tampa Bay 003 100 32x- 9
E-JoWilson (15), Navarro (8). DP-
Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Baltimore 4, Tampa
Bay 8. 2B-Millar (21), DYoung (34),
Navarro (15). HR-RaHernandez (8),
Iwamura (7), CPena (35). SB-BRoberts
(40), CPatterson (37), Iwamura (11), Upton
(15). SF-Tejada.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Birkins 4 6 4 4 2 3
Cherry 2 0 0 0 1 4
Hoey L,1-4 1 2 3 3 3 2
Burres 1 2 2 2 1 2
Tampa Bay
Shields W,11-8 7 7 4 1 1 6
Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 1
Reyes 1 2 3 3 1 1
HBP-by Cherry (CPena). WP-Shields.
Umpires-Home, Brian Gorman; First,
Paul Nauert; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third,
Rob Drake.
T-2:49. A-10,350 (43,772).


Pirates 11, Cardinals 0

ST. LOUIS - lan Snell threw
seven scoreless innings to win for
only the second time in 11 starts
and the Pittsburgh Pirates ended a
five-game losing streak, routing Kip
Wells and the St. Louis Cardinals
11-0 on Monday.
Jack Wilson matched a career
high with four hits, including a two-
run home run, and had three RBIs
as the Pirates emerged from a skid
in which they were outscored 35-13.
Ronny Paulino and Freddy Sanchez
both went 3-for-4 with two RBIs.
The Cardinals, coming off a
three-game sweep over the Reds,
entered the day two games back of
the Cubs in the NL Central.
The Pirates had 15 hits in 25 at-
bats when reliever Andy Cavazos
was chased in a five-run fifth that
made it 11-0. They scored in each
of the first five innings.
Cardinals pitchers gave up a dou-
ble-digit run total for the 17th time
this season.

PITTSBURGH ST. LOUIS
hd h iii r huhi iu


ab rh bi ab r h bi U
Mrgn cf 3 12 0 Eckstin ss 2 0 2 0
JBtsta 3b 3 22 2 Brnyan 3b 2 0 1 0
FSnchz 2b 4 032 Ankiel rf 2 0 0 0
Phelps lb 1 00 0 Pujols lb 2 0 1 0
Nady rf 2 00 0 Ludwck rf 1 0 0 0
McLth rf 1 10 0 Edmnd cf 3 0 0 0
Bay If 3 100 Schmkr If 1 0 1 0
Kata 2b 1 00 0 Duncan If 3 0 0 0
Prce lb 5 11 1 YMolna c 1 00 0
Palino c 4 33 2 KJimnz p 1 0 0 0
Mldndo c 0 00 0 Miles 2b 2 0 1 0
JWIson ss 5 24 3 Cairo 2b 2 0 0 0
Snell p 4 01 1 KWells p 1 0 0 0
Perez p 0 00 0 Cvos p 0 0 0 0
Castilloph 1 00 0 GBnnttc 2 0 0 0
Snchez p 0 00 0 Ryan 3b 3 0 0 0
Tguchi ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 37111611 Totals 29 0 6 0
Pittsburgh 121 250 000- 11
St. Louis 000 000 000- 0
E-Edmonds (4). DP-Pittsburgh 4, St.
Louis 3. LOB-Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 9.
2B-FSanchez 2 (41), Paulino 2 (23),
JWilson (22). 3B-Pearce (1). HR-
JBautista (14), JWilson (8) SB-Bay (4),
Eckstein (9). S-Morgan. SF-JBautista.
IP H RERBBSO


Pittsburgh
Snell W,9-11
Perez
Sanchez
St. Louis


BOSTON - The Red Sox sur-
vived another shaky outing by
Daisuke Matsuzaka.
Matsuzaka nearly gave away a
nine-run lead, but Mike Lowell hit a
three-run homer and drove in four
runs to lead the Red Sox over the
Toronto Blue Jays 13-10 Monday
night.
Boston, which opened a seven-
game lead over the second-place
Yankees, was ahead 10-1 before
Toronto scored eight runs in the sixth
and knocked out Matsuzaka (14-11),
who had lost his previous three
starts. The Japanese star has
allowed 20 runs in his last 23 2-3
innings and gave up seven runs and
10 hits in 5 1-3 innings against the
Blue Jays. The seven runs matched
the most he's allowed in his 28 major
league starts, and his ERA has risen
to 4.11 from 3.59 on Aug. 10.
Lowell went 3-for-4 with a three-
run homer and two singles.


TORONTO

VWells cf
Stairs If
Rios rf
Thmas dh
Glaus 3b
Ovrbay lb
AHill 2b
Zaun c
JMcDId ss
Lind ph
Olmedo ss
Adams ph


BOSTON


ab rhbi .
4 10 0 Ellsbry If
4 24 2 Pedroia 2b
5 12 2 DOrtiz dh
5 11 1 Lowell 3b
4 23 3 JDrewrf
5 11 0 Varitek c
5 02 0 Crisp cf
5 12 1 Hinske lb
2 00 0 Yukilis lb
1 11 1 JLugo ss
1 00 0
1 00 0


ab r h bi
5320
5332
4 1 1 1
4234

5 1 2 1
4 0 1 1
2 1 1 0
1 000
4 1 20


Totals 42101610 Totals 361316 11
Toronto 100 008 100- 10
Boston 302 503 00x- 13
E-Glaus (8). DP-Toronto 1, Boston 1.
LOB-Toronto 8, Boston 9. 2B-Stairs 2
(26), Zaun (20), JDrew (24), Crisp (24),
Hinske (9). HR--Glaus (19), Lowell (18).
SB-Lowell (3). S-Crisp. SF-DOrtiz,
JDrew 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Litsch L,5-7 31-3 7 7 7 1 2
JKennedy 2-3 2 3 1 1 0
Towers 1 5 3 3 0 1
Frasor 12-3 1 0 0 1 1
Tallet 11-3 1 0 0 2 0
Boston
MtszkaW,14-11 51-3 10 7 7 1 3
Lopez 0 2 2 2 1 0
Delcarmen 1 1 1 1 1 0
Okajima 1 2 0 0 0 2
Timlin 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Papelbon S,32 1 0 0 0 0 2
Towers pitched to 3 batters in the 6th,
Lopez pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Towers (Hinske). Balk-Frasor.
Umpires-Home, Mike Everitt; First,
Dana DeMuth; Second, Kerwin Danley;
Third, Doug Eddings.
T-3:59. A-36,639 (36,525).


Dodgers 11, Cubs 3
CHICAGO - Esteban Loaiza out-
pitched Carlos Zambrano in his
Dodgers' debut, helping Los Angeles
stay within four games of the NL
West lead.
Loaiza allowed three runs in seven
innings and James Loney backed
him with three RBIs, leading the
Dodgers over the Chicago Cubs 11-3
Monday.
Los Angeles is four games back of
San Diego and three behind Arizona
in the NL West.
NL Central-leading Chicago main-
tained a 1/-game lead over
Milwaukee and a two-game margin
over St. Louis.
Loaiza (1-0) was claimed off
waivers from Oakland on
Wednesday, with the Dodgers
assuming more than $8 million in
guaranteed salary this year and next.

LOS ANGELES CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Furcal ss 5 01 0 ASrano If 3 2 2 1
Hu ss 0 00 0 Monroe If 2 0 0 0
Pierre cf 4 21 0 Theriot ss 2 0 1 1
Ethier rf 5 12 0 Fontnt 2b 2 0 0 0
JKent 2b 3 11 2 DeLee lb 3 0 0 0
RMrtnz2b 1 00 0 Cedeno ss 0 000
LGnzlz If 3 320 ARmrz 3b 3 0 0 0
Kemp rf 1 000 Ward lb 1 0 0 0
Martin c 2 22 2 Murton rf 4 1 1 0
Lbrthal c 1 00 0 DeRosa 2b 4 0 2 1
Loney lb 4 12 3 JJones cf 3 0 1 0
LaRche 3b 5 11 2 Eyre p 0 0 0 0
Loaiza p 3 01 2 Wuertz p 0 0 0 0
Prctr p 0 000 Sotoph 0 0 0 0
Saenz ph 1 00 0 HBInco c 4 0 0 0
Houlton p 0 00 0 CZmro p 1 0 1 0
Ohman p 0 0 0 0
Pttrsn ph 1 0 1 0
Gllgher p 0 0 0 0
Pie cf 2 0 1 0
Totals 38111311 Totals 35 310 3
Los Angeles 010 343 000- 11
Chicago 101 001 000- 3
E-Furcal (18), Hu (1), DeLee (4),
ARamirez (8). DP-Los Angeles 3, Chicago
1. LOB-Los Angeles 7, Chicago 8. 2B-
Pierre (19), LGonzalez (23), Loney (14), La
Roche (3), ASoriano (33), Patterson (1).
HR-ASoriano (20). SB-Cedeno (2) CS-
JKent (3). S-Loaiza SF-Martin.
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles


Loaiza W,1-0
5 0 0 5 4 Proctor
1 0 0 0 2 Houlton
0 0 0 1 0 Chicago
CZmro L,14-12


KWells L,6-16 31-3 10 6 6 0 2
Cavazos 11-3 5 5 5 2 1
Jimenez 41-3 1 0 0 2 1
HBP-by Cavazos (Nady), by Snell
(YMolina), by KWells (Bay)
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First,
Bruce Froemming, Second, Mark Wegner,
Third, Brian Knight.
T-2:50. A-42,238 (43,975).


Ohman
Gallagher
Eyre
Wuertz


9 3 3
0 0 0
1 0 0

7 8 8
1 0 0
5 3 3
0 0 0
0 0 0


Balk-Loaiza.
Umpires-Home, Ed Hickox; First, C.B
Bucknor; Second, Joe West; Third, Ed
Rapuano.
T-300. A-41,070 (41,160)


Away
40-31
31-35
28-40
29-40
25-43


Away
42-30
33-36
35-34
27-42
30-37


Central Division
t GB L10
i - z-5-5 I
S1/2% 4-6 I
) 2 6-4 I
9 9 z-4-6 I
9 9 5-5 V
I 10% z-4-6 V


Home
37-34
43-26
37-30
33-34
36-33
31-38


Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Home
45-22
41-27
36-35
37-32




Home
40-31
41-29
37-32
40-26
33-35


Away
36-30
35-34
35-33
31-40
29-41


I


2B TuEsDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


MAJOOIR ILEAC3UE IRASEBAILL


i


a


q


E









Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SPORTS TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 4. 2007 3B


Tennis leagues starting soon


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Washington Nationals
U.S. OPEN TENNIS
11 a.m. (USA) Men's Round of 16 & Women's Quarterfinals
7 p.m. (USA) Men's Round of 16 & Women's Quarterfinals


Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS GOLF
3:30 p.m. West Port at Lecanto
3:30 p.m. Citrus at The Villages
3:30 p.m. Springstead at Crystal River
SWIMMING
5 p.m. Crystal River at Buchholz/St. Francis
VOLLEYBALL
6:30 p.m. Cedar Key at Seven Rivers
7 p.m. Lecanto at Dunnellon
7 p.m. South Sumter at Crystal River
7 p.m. Belleview at Citrus


This will enable all these play-
ers to participate in the local
tournaments, like the Fall Fest
Compass tournament on
October 20-21 at Crystal River.
Monday Night Ladies
Doubles League
Starting date is set for early
October A new team is in the


Labor day weekend; the
end of the summer but
not yet the end of the
heat. None the less, time to
start gearing up for the new
tennis season. There are some
changes in the new season,
some good and some bad. The
good is that more teams have
been added to some
of the ladies
leagues, plus a new
league is being
formed as we speak
The bad is that the
Thursday night "-
men's league will
cease to exist if
nobody steps up to
take on its organiza-
tion. Eric v
The new league Hoc
we just mentioned ON TE
is a new ladies_ sin-
gles league. It is
open to women of all playing
levels (3.0 and above), and will
start approximately mid-
October. Match times will be
flexible so that those who can-
not play on the designated
mornings (work may interfere!)
can set their match time for
evenings or weekends of the
scheduled match week Sign up
today and enjoy some good sin-
gles competition! Please con-
tact Margie McLellan before
September 15 at margiemclel-
lan@tampabay.rr.com or (352)
476-5617.
The USTA leagues are start-
ing their new season now; this
weekend. We are referring to
the combo teams. The USTA
league coordinator Cathy
Priest has honored the request
from Citrus County to leave cer-
tain dates open in the playing
schedules of the combo teams.


works in the Citrus
Springs area. So if
you live in that area
or close to it or if you
are a sub but like to
play for a team
please contact
Linda Sousa at (352)
207-8251 or e-mail
Linzzl013@aol.com.
Players are
encouraged to find a
team and contact the
captain to get ready
for the fall or start up
their own team.


Following are the captains and
their contact numbers:
Judy Jeanette for Brooksville
Kick Butt, (352) 232-0322;
Kooky Lucas for Black
Diamond, 527-3654; Vivien
Amabile for Brooksville Aces,
(352) 688-1571; Susan Garrick
for Bicentennial Babes, 795-
1450; Antoinette van den
Hoogen for Sugarmill
Woodsies, 382-3138; Mary Jane
Martin for Pine Ridge
Racqueteers, 527-3754; Mary St.
Clair for Love Inverness, 726-
8716.
For more information and to
sign up, contact Antoinette van
den Hoogen at 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
Citrus County Tuesday
Womens Tennis Leagues
USA Women Team Tennis
This league is geared
towards the 3.0 and 3.5 level


players. Each team consists of
four players. New players, reg-
ulars or subs, are always wel-
come.
To sign up or for information
about this league, contact the
chairperson, Candace Charles,
at 563-5859 or can-
dacecharles_06@hotmail.com.
Senior Ladies Tuesday 3.0
League.
This league exists for the sen-
ior, 3.0 ladies of Citrus County.
For information or to sign up as
a team, a player or a sub, con-
tact Sue Price 628-5620.
Thursday Morning Citrus
Area Doubles League
The league will start a full
schedule of play on October 4.
This is a little earlier than in
the past, but it is a result from
adding an eleventh team
Sherri Stitzel for
Bicentennial Babes at
jstitzel@tampabay.rr.com;Suzy
Carney for Bicentennial TNT at
sscarney@mindspring.com;
Jannice Lance for Citrus Hills
Aces at glance@tampabayrr.com;
Claudia Williams for Citrus
Hills Swingers at
cfw4u@yahoo.com;Barbara
Shook for Crystal River
Racqueteers at dshook@tam-
pabayrr.com;Joyce Shiver for
Crystal River Yoyo's at jjshiv-
er@atlantic.net;Marilyn Butler
for Pine Ridge Fillies at
halb418@earthlink.net;Mary
Jane Martin for Pine Ridge
Mavericks at
tennis99111@earthlinknet;
Leah Stringer for Skyview at
leahstringer@yahoo.com;
Willy Pouderoyen for
Sugarmill Woods at 352-382-
3157. Antoinette van den
Hoogen for Sugarmill Woods
Oakies at hoera@juno.com.


New co-chairpersons for the
2007/2008 season are Maureen
Caruso at 352-270-9172, cell 678-
520-9366, e-mail mau-
reenl894@aol.com or Joyce
Smith at 527-4239.
Citrus County Men's Doubles
League
At this point in time the
league is in need of somebody
who will run it before it can
start play again. Anybody who
is interested to take the job or if
you have any ideas about what
kind of format could be used to
make it work again let me know.
I will gladly promote any ideas
through this article to get things
going. The Friday Senior
Ladies Doubles 3.0 - 3.5 League.
This league will start play
again in the fall.
For more information or to
sign up contact Jo Santo at 563-
5848.
Tournaments
October 20-21, Fall Fest
Compass Tournament at
Crystal River.
December 1-2, Chronicle
Pines at Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness.
January 19-20, Crystal River
Open at Crystal River.
One-on-One Doubles has
been added to this year's Men's
35 and over National Clay
Court Championship Nov. 3-8
at the Florida Tennis Center in
Daytona Beach that will take
place the day before the main
event begins - Thursday, Nov. 2
from 3-8 p.m.


Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis columnist,
can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


Shock win, return to WNBA finals


GOLF
Deutsche Bank
Par Scores
Monday
At TPC Boston
Norton, Mass.
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,207 Par: 71
Final Round
(FedExCup points in parentheses)
Phil Mickelson (9000), $1,260,000
70-64-68-66 - 268 -16
Tiger Woods (3733), $522,667
72-64-67-67 - 270 -14
Brett Wetterich (3733), $522,667
66-68-66-70 - 270 -14
Arron Oberholser (3733), $522,667
69-66-66-69 - 270 -14
Aaron Baddeley (2000), $280,000
67-66-70-70 - 273 -11
Geoff Ogilvy (1738), $243,250
70-70-67-67 - 274 -10
Rory Sabbatini (1738), $243,250
68-67-70-69 - - 274 -10
Robert Allenby (1550), $217,000
69-69-70-67 - 275 -9
Sean O'Hair (1250), $175,000
68-66-74-68 - 276 -8
Fredrik Jacobson (1250), $175,000
66-72-70-68 - 276 -8
Troy Matteson (1250), $175,000
71-66-69-70 - 276 -8
Steve Stricker (1250), $175,000
67-69-69-71 - 276 -8
Camilo Villegas (1250), $175,000
63-72-69-72 - 276 -8
John Mallinger (900), $126,000
73-69-67-68 - 277 -7
Charlie Wi (900), $126,000
67-72-69-69 - 277 -7
Lucas Glover (900), $126,000
69-70-66-72 - 277 -7
George McNeill (677), $94,733
71-69-70-68 - 278 -6
Nathan Green (677), $94,733
72-70-67-69 ..- - - 278 -6
Ryuji Imada (677), $94,733
69-66-72-71 - 278 -6
Cliff Kresge (677), $94,733
69-71-67-71 - 278 -6
Sergio Garcia (677), $94,733
67-71-68-72 - 278 -6
Adam Scott (677), $94,733
68-72-66-72 - 278 -6
Jonathan Byrd (421), $59,000
69-70-70-70 - 279 -5
Trevbr Immelman (421), $59,000
67-74-68-70 - 279 -5
Heath Slocum (421), $59,000
66-70-72-71 - 279 -5
Steve Elkington (421), $59,000
.66-70-70-73 - 279 -5
John Senden (421), $59,000
67-71-67-74 - 279 -5
Jason Gore (421), $59,000
70-71-64-74 - 279 -5
Angel Cabrera (421), $59,000
70-69-65-75 - 279 -5
Paul Goydos (273), $38,182
75-67-71-67 - 280 -4
Mark Wilson (273), $38,182
73-68-72-67 - 280 -4
Dean Wilson (273), $38,182
70-71-71-68 - 280 -4
Charles Howell III (273), $38,182
69-69-72-70 - 280 -4
Woody Austin (273), $38,182
71-68-70-71 - 280 -4
Zach Johnson (273), $38,182
68-72-68-72 - 280 -4
Mike Weir (273), $38,182
65-68-74-73 - 280 -4
Will MacKenzie (273), $38,182
70-72-65-73 - 280 -4
Rich Beem (273), $38,182
67-66-73-74 - 280 -4
Bo Van Pelt (273), $38,182
68-69-69-74 - 280 -4
Briny Baird (273), $38,182
71-68-67-74 - 280 -4
Ryan Moore (180), $25,200
65-69-77-70 - 281 -3
Rod Pampling (180), $25,200
74-67-68-72 - 281 -3
Vaughn Taylor (180), $25,200
68-73-68-72 - 281 -3
Matt Kuchar (180), $25,200
68-72-68-73 - 281 -3
Boo Weekley (180), $25,200
73-69-66-73 - 281 -3 -
Bart Bryant (180), $25,200
72-67-66-76 - 281 -3
Brandt Snedeker (132), $18,508
71-72-73-66 - 282 -2
Kenny Perry (132), $18,508
68-71-73-70 - 282 -2
John Rollins (132), $18,508
70-69-72-71 - 282 -2
Doug LaBelle II (132), $18,508
73-69-69-71 - 282 -2
Brian Bateman (132), $18,508
69-72-70-71 - 282 -2
Joe Ogilvie (118), $16,520
70-69-72-72 - 283 -1
Rocco Mediate (118), $16,520
71-72-66-74 - 283 -1
Tom Pemice, Jr. (118), $16,520
75-65-67-76 - 283 -1
Justin Leonard (113), $15,820
72-70-75-67 - 284 E
Henrik Stenson (113), $15,820
66-73-75-70 - 284 E
Stephen Ames (113), $15,820
68-73-69-74 - 284 E
Jim Furyk (113), $15,820
68-73-69-74 . - 284 E
Craig Kanada (113), $15,820
67-68-72-77 - 284 E
tim Herron (108), $15,120
71-72-74-68 - 285 +1
Vijay Singh (108), $15,120
74-66-73-72 - 285 +1
Luke Donald (108), $15,120
72-66-73-74 - 285 +1
Chad Campbell (108), $15,120
70-70-71-74 - 285 +1


PGA
Co


.ntinued from Page 1B


Finchem. He said he might
not play next week outside
Chicago at the BMW
Championship, saying he
owed it to the tour but that
Finchem had not fulfilled
some requests that Mickelson
has made.
If Mickelson were to play at
Cog Hill. he again would be
paired with Woods the first
two days. That might be
incentive enough the way he
handled Woods at the TPC
Boston, staying ahead of him
the first two rounds and play-
ing his best when it mattered.
Mickelson, who moved back
to No. 2 in the world with his


starting Wednesday night as
they go for their second
straight title and third in five
years. Detroit has won both
postseason series this year 2-1
after losing Game 1 on the
road, and is now 7-0 when fac-
ing elimination the last two
seasons.
Indiana led by 13 points in
the opening minutes, but lost
both the lead and All-Star for-
ward Tamika Catchings in the
second quarter. Catchings, who


missed the final 13 regular-sea-
son games with a left-foot
injury, strained her right
Achilles' tendon in the last
minute of the first half and did
not return.
Cheryl Ford, playing her
third game in four days on a
bad knee, had 15 rebounds in
just 18 minutes. Swin Cash
scored 12 points and Katie
Feenstra added 11, matching
her total in Detroit's first five
playoff games.


Indiana was going for its first
conference title, but Tammy
Sutton-Brown (17) and Tully
Bevilaqua (14) were the only
Fever players to reach double
figures. Tamika Whitmore, who
had a league-record 41 points
against Detroit in a first-round
game last year, finished with
nine on 3-for-10 shooting.
The Shock, known for their
slow starts, trailed 16-3 with
Ford on the bench in foul
trouble.


MAI THEW BECK/Chronicle
David Casch stares into the eyes of "Puffy," the bull he will later climb onto during the Ocala Shrine
Rodeo on Sunday afternoon. On this day the bull will win the battle.


Tommy Armour III (108), $15,120
68-70-72-75 - 285 +1
Jerry Kelly (104), $14,490
71-72-73-70 .- 286 +2
Robert Garrigus (104), $14,490
69-72-72-73 - 286 +2
Jeff Maggert (104), $14,490
69-73-70-74 - 286 +2
Ken Duke (104), $14,490
70-72-69-75 - 286 +2
Kevin Na (101), $14,140
71-71-69-76 - 287 +3
Brian Gay (100), $13,930
74-69-72-73 - 288 +4
Daniel Chopra (100), $13,930
70-70-74-74 - 288 +4
Mark Calcavecchia (97), $13,580
72-70-77-71 - 290 +6
Charles Warren (97), $13,580
69-74-73-74 - 290 +6
Brian Davis (97), $13,580
68-71-75-76 - 290 +6
Steve Flesch (95), $13,300
71-72-71-78 - 292 +8

MLB
Nationals 6, Marlins 3
FLORIDA WASHINGTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
HaRmz ss 5020 Logan cf 4 000
Uggla2b 4100 FLopezss 3 1 20
Hrmida rf 4 01 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 1 1 1
MiCbr3b 3 00 1 DYong 1b 4 0 1 0
Wlnhm If 3000 Colome p 0 000
Jacobs 1lb 4 11 1 Rauch p 0 0 0 0
CRoss cf 4 02 0 CCrdro p 0 0 00
Olivo c 400 0 Kearns rf 4 2 3 1
VndHrk p 2000 WPena If 4222
Garcia p 0000 Blliard 2b 3 000
Linden ph 1 11 0 Schndr c 4 02 2
Seddon p 0 000 Brgmnp 2 000
Amzgaph 1000 Pick lb 0 000
Totals 353 7 2 Totals 32 611 6
Florida 010 000 020- 3
Washington 020 004 00x- 6
E-Hermida (9), Belliard (6). DP-Florida
1. LOB-Florida 8, Washington 5. 2B-
HaRamirez 2 (42), CRoss 2 (12),
Zimmerman (35), DYoung (36), Schneider
(19). 3B-FLopez (5). HR-Jacobs (13),
WPena (5). CS-FLopez (9). S-Bergmann.
IP H RERBBSO


to learn so much so quickly.
Bryant estimated Casch's tech-
nical skill at about 75 percent
and said the young rider was
still trying to learn all he could
from him.
"You might get a nice calm
bull or you might get one that's
like a twisting tornado," Bryant
said. "It doesn't matter. You get
on there and you give it 110
percent and you give it all you
got and you don't quit until


your head hits the ground."
Casch has definitely taken
Bryant's advice to heart, which
has already paid dividends.
Of his 25 career rides, five
have gone the full eight sec-
onds - and he will no doubt be
looking for more.
"It's indescribable," Casch
said of having an eight-second
ride. "You just feel so happy
that you accomplished some-
thing that big."


Spanish American Club


of Citrus County


6th Annual Golf Tournament

Saturday, September 22


Proceeds from this event benefit Citrus County High School Graduates via our
Spanish American Club of Citrus County (SAC) Scholarship Fund.
In Honor of Alice Gibilaro


For further information, please contact Jannice Lance at
341-8480/613-0019 or Elise Aponte at 637-5929.


ciikq IJ


Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Deanna Nolan scored 20 of her
franchise playoff-record 30
points in the first half to help
the defending champion
Detroit Shock advance to the
WNBA finals with an 81-65 vic-
tory over the Indiana Fever in
Game 3 of the Eastern
Conference finals Monday
night.
The Shock will face Phoenix


RIDER
Continued from Page 1B

and we stick to them," Casch
said while wearing his "bull-
riding pants" and usual black
shirt and hat.
Casch had just completed a
ride at the 25th Annual Shrine
Rodeo in Ocala on Sun'day
where he was bucked off by
"Puffy" and consequently dis-
located his shoulder.
Of course that's just a minor
injury when compared to some
of his others.
During a ride in Mississippi,
Casch was kicked in the face by
a bull - which broke his eye
socket, cheek bone and nose;
he also had to get 18-stitches.
Mississippi had more bad
luck for the young thrill seeker
when he had his left ear ripped
off by a bull's horn.
Casch lost all his vital signs
for about five to 10 minutes
according to his father, Mac
Casch.
"I thought I lost my son," the
elder Casch said. "They said he
was dead in the arena."
His ear was reattatched with
48 stitches.
For all his injuries and
brushes with death, David
Casch, unlike his father, says
he still never gets scared.
"I don't like seeing him get
on them (bulls), but it's what he
wants to be and what he wants
to do and I'm proud of him," his
father said.


Mentor Bryant believes
David Casch's determination
and hard work will allow him
to one day join the
Professional Bull Riders Inc.
"I'm hoping he'll make it to
the PBR and knowing him he
will," Bryant said. "He doesn't
know the word quit and that's a
good bull rider."
Bryant noted Casch's ability
to listen and remain humble as
a prime reason for his ability

32nd career victory, took only
23 putts in the final round
and built a five-shot lead
after 10 holes. Woods had
ample opportunity to close
the gap, especially when
Mickelson took double bogey
on the 12th hole, but he never
got closer than two shots.
Mickelson matched his
birdie on the 16th to stay two
ahead, Woods missed from 10
feet on the 17th, and Lefty
effectively locked up the vic-
tory with his chip from
behind the 18th green to 4
feet for his final birdie.
"Unfortunately, I just didn't
make enough putts to really
push him," Woods said.
Wetterich started the final
round with a one-shot lead
and didn't make a birdie until
the 16th hole.


Florida
VndHrk L,4-5 51-3
Garcia 12-3
Seddon 1
Washington
Bergmann W,3-5 7
Colome 1-3
Rauch 2-3
CCordero S,30 1


8 6 6 1 6
2 0 0 1 2
1 0 0 0 2
4 1 1 1 9
22 1 1 0
00 0 1 2
1 0 0 0 1


Rockies 7, Giants 4
SAN FRAN COLORADO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
RDavis cf 5 02 0 Tveras cf 5 1 30
Vizquel ss 5 00 0 KMtsui 2b 3 1 1 1
Winnl f 4 22 1 Hiliday If 3 0 0 1
BMolnac 3 11 1 Helton lb 3 1 2 0
Aurilia lb 3 11 0 Atkins 3b 2 1 1 0
Feliz 3b 4 01 1-Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Schrhlt rf 3 02 0 Baker ph 1 0 0 0
Frndsn 2b 4 01 1 Hwkins p 0 0 0 0
Cain p 1 000 Corpas p 0 0 0 0
Mischp 1 000 Hawperf 4 1 12
Drhamph 1 000 Tlowzki ss 4 1 1 1
Mntr p 0 00 0 Innetta c 4 0 2 2
Tschnr p 0 00 0 Francis p 2 1 1 0
DRbrts ph 1 00 0 Stewart 3b 2 000
Carroll 3b 0 0 0 0
Totals 35410 4 Totals 33 712 7
San Francisco 010 002 100- 4
Colorado 007 000 00x- 7
DP-San Francisco 2, Colorado 1. LOB-
San Francisco 7, Colorado 6. 2B-Winn
(36), Helton (32), Francis (3). 3B-lannetta
(3). HR-Winn (9), BMolina (15). SB-
RDavis (18). CS-RDavis (5). SF-Holliday.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Cain L,7-14 22-3 5 6 6 2 5
Misch 21-3 4 1 1 0 2
Munter 1 2 0 0 1 1
Taschner 2 1 0 0 0 1
Colorado
Francis W,15-6 52-3 9 3 3 2 4
Affeldt 11-3 1 1 1 0 1
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 1 0
Corpas S,13 1 0 0 0 0 0
Padres 10, Diamondbacks 2
SAN DIEGO ARIZONA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
BGiles rf 4 32 2 CBYng cf 4 0 0 0
MCmrncf 5 110 OHudsn2b 3 0 0 0
Brdley If 4 111 Ojeda 2b 1 000
AdGnIz lb 5 12 3 Byrnes If 4 1 2 1
KGreen ss 5 01 1 CJcksn lb 4 0 0 0
Kzmnff3b 422 1 Drew ss 3 0 1 0
Bard c 400 0 Bnfacio ph 0 0 0 0
Blum2b 3 11 2 Rynlds 3b 4 1 1 0
Mdduxp 311 0 CSnydrc 2 0 0 0
Brocail p 0 00 0 Mdders p 0 0 0 0
Ensbrg ph 0 00 0 Quentin ph 1 0 1 1
Merdth p 0 00 0 Murphy p 0 0 00
Pguero p 0 0 0 0
Salazar ph 1 0 0 0
Uptonrf 3 000
Owingsp 1 0 1 0
Petit p 0 0 0 0
Mnteroc 2 000
Totals 37101110 Totals 33 2 6 2
San Diego 122 011 003-10
Arizona 000 100 100- 2
LOB-San Diego 5, Arizona 5. 213-
Maddux (2), Reynolds (17), Quentin (15),
Owings (3). 3B-Byrnes (8). HR-BGiles 2
(10), AdGonzalez (25), Kouzmanoff (15),
Blum (4), Byrnes (20). SB-Drew (7).
IP H RERBBSO


San Diego
Maddux W,11-9 61-3
Brocail 12-3
Meredith 1
Arizona
Owings L,6-8 3
Petit 2
Medders 2
Murphy 12-3
Peguero 1-3
WP-Meredith.


an den
igen
ENNIS


CITRus Comy (FL) CHRoNicLE


SPORTS


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 3B � -. - "


I


Ilh. i, 3 H,- ; . ,








0


4B


TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 4, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Cooper meets with
fans at restaurant
HOMER, Mich. - It was a
haunted house, which meant
Alice Cooper
was right at
home.
The shock
rocker min-
gled with
more than 150
fans Saturday
at the Homer
Alice Mill, a haunt-
Cooper ed house-

restaurant in
south central Michigan The
59-year-old Detroit native sat
atop a black throne lined with
skulls while he signed auto-
graphs.
"I'm a very accessible star,"
Cooper said. "I never say no to
an autograph. I never say no
to a photograph. If it's the
public who made you, why
hide from them?"
Cooper wore black leather*
from head to toe, but only
after changing out of the
orange T-shirt and jeans he'd
worn during a morning round
of golf in nearby Battle Creek

Foster sees parallels
between movies
NEW YORK - Parallels to
Martin Scorsese's dark classic
'Taxi Driver" led Jodie Foster
to take a role in her new
movie, 'The Brave One."
The 1976 film portrays a
cabby driven
to madness
W.amid a crime-
debt-filled
New York
City climate.
The newer
film is a story
Jodie about living
Foster with fear in
New York
after Sept 11.
"When I first read the
script, honestly, it didn't
remind me enough of 'Taxi
Driver,"' Foster said in an
interview published in this
week's Newsweek. "That was
one of my issues with it There
was all this room for some-
thing more beautiful."

Stars attend Sean
Comb's White Party
EAST HAMPTON, N.Y -
White was the dress code at a
star-saturated party thrown by
Sean '"Diddy" Combs at his
Long Island
home, and the
dress code
was strictly
enforced.
The hip-
hop mogul's
annual White
Party, which
Sean he has held in
" Diddy StTropez in
Combs recent years,
featured a
white carpet
to go along with the white
dress code.
"This party is up there with
the top three that I've
thrown," Combs said, "It's a
party that has legendary sta-
tus. It's hard to throw a party
that lives up to its legend."
Mariah Carey, Busta
Rhymes, Donna Karan,
Ashley Olsen, Star Jones and
Tommy Lee were among the
guests.

Director: Owen
Wilson doing better
VENICE, Italy - Owen
Wilson is doing well as he
recovers from an apparent
suicide attempt, and is even
making col-
leagues laugh,
t the director of
his latest film
said Monday
S"Obviously
he has been
through a lot
this week,"
said Wes
Owen Anderson,
Wilson who directed
Wilson in


'The Darjeeling Limited," one
of the films in competition for
the Venice Film Festival's top
award.
"I can tell you he has been
doing very well,,he has been
making us laugh," Anderson
told a news conference to pro-
mote the film.
- From wire reports


'Halloween' scares up record debut


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - "Halloween" came
early and closed Hollywood's strong sum-
mer season with a record-breaking Labor
Day weekend debut.
Rob Zombie's new take on John
Carpenter's 1978 horror sensation
"Halloween" slashed its way to a $31 mil-
lion haul over the four-day weekend, sur-
passing the $20.1 million gross for 2005's
"Transporter 2," which had held the
record for best Labor Day opening.
Released by the Weinstein Co. and
MGM, "Halloween" also topped the $29
million Labor Day gross for 1999's "The
Sixth Sense," which had been the biggest-
grossing movie over the holiday. That
blockbuster ghost story was in its fifth
weekend when Labor Day came around.
Sony's comedy "Superbad," the No. 1
movie the previous two weekends, slipped
to second place with $15.6 million, raising
its total to $92.4 million.
Focus Features' "Balls of Fury," a come-
dy about a washed-up pingpong player
recruited by the feds to help bring down a
criminal mastermind (Christopher
Walken), opened at No. 3 with $13.8 mil-
lion.
"Death Sentence," 20th Century Fox's
revenge thriller starring Kevin Bacon,
debuted at No. 8 with $5.2 million.


TOP MOVIES
1. "Halloween," $31 million.
2. "Superbad," $15.6 million.
3. "Balls of Fury," $13.8 million.
4. "The Bourne Ultimatum," $13.2 mil-
lion.
5. "Rush Hour 3," $10.4 million.
6. "Mr. Bean's Holiday," $8.1 million.
7. "The Nanny Diaries," $6.4 million.
8. "Death Sentence," $5.2 million.
9. "War," $5.1 million.
10. "Stardust," $3.9 million.

Led by "Halloween," Hollywood set a
new overall record for Labor Day, with the
top 12 movies taking in $119.6 million, sur-
passing the previous high of $106.1 million
in 2003.
'"Halloween' was far beyond anything
we've seen on Labor Day," said Paul
Dergarabedian, president of box-office
tracker Media By Numbers. "It was just a
perfect ending to a perfect summer.
Hopefully, we can do this every year."
The industry finished the summer sea-
son with record receipts of $4.18 billion
since the first weekend in May
Factoring in higher ticket prices,


though, movie attendance did not set a
record. Media By Numbers estimates 610
million tickets were sold, the fifth-best
admissions figure for modern Hollywood.
Unlike Carpenter's original, Zombie's
"Halloween" delved into the childhood of
unstoppable slasher Michael Myers to
explain why the masked madman wages
his own personal war of terror.
"Carpenter's genius was in not giving the
back story, so you had this force of evil unto
itself," said Bob Weinstein, co-founder of the
Weinstein Co. "Rob was more like, what's
behind the evil? I think the fan base loved
the idea that there'd be a new version that
would also add something to it"
"Halloween" will turn a tidy profit even
if it follows the pattern of most horror
films and drops off quickly in subsequent
weekends. The movie was shot on a mod-
est $15 million budget, meaning it took in
twice its production costs in just four days.
The movie was a renewed success for
the horror genre, which had hit hard times
with a few underperforming releases ear-
lier this year, among them "Hostel II."
"It's funny how Hollywood keeps writing
things off," said Weinstein, whose compa-
ny also scored a summer success with the
supernatural tale "1408." "After 'Hostel II,'
they said horror's done. Horror's not done.
If there's something unique in the story,
nothing's done."


Museum houses Three Stooges treasures


Associated Press

SPRING HOUSE, Pa. -
Posing for a picture with life-
size replicas of the Three
Stooges, Gary Lassin smiled
but didn't say "cheese."
"Woob-woob-woob-woob-
woob!" he trilled in a Curly-like
falsetto before breaking into a
grin.
The statues of Larry, Moe
and Curly are near the
entrance to the Stoogeum,
home of Lassin's large and
priceless collection of Stooges
memorabilia.
The Stoogeum (think
"Stooges" plus "museum") has
about 3,500 items on display,
from Stooges bowling balls and
cereal boxes to Shemp
Howard's Army discharge,
Larry Fine's driver's license
and the flying submarine from
"The Three Stooges in Orbit."
"This is as good as it gets,"
Lassin said.
Lassin, 52, opened the
Stoogeum three years ago in a
renovated architect's office
that looks like a large house.
It's a gold mine for fans of the
old-time knucklehead movie
and TV trio, but its off-the-beat-
en-path location in Spring
House - about 25 miles north
of Philadelphia - has made it
a fairly well-kept secret.
"People sort of have to work
to find me," Lassin said. "I do
want people to see it, but I want
them to see it on my terms."
Those terms include no pho-
tographs of the memorabilia,
as he fears too much exposure
will cheapen it. And admission
is by appointment only because
Lassin, who has a day job as an
executive with a mail-order
catalog company, is the
Stoogeum's sole employee.
The museum-quality
exhibits occupy three stories
totaling 10,000 square feet,
including an 85-seat theater.
Rooms are filled with movie
props, posters, toys, artwork,
figurines, scripts and even a
video game, while TV screens
replay all the eye-poking, pie-
throwing and general mayhem
that made the Stooges famous.
The act started out in vaude-
ville in the 1920s as support for
comic Ted Healy. The first
Stooges film, alongside Healy,
was 1930's "Soup to Nuts." The
last one released was "The


Life-size replicas of the Three Stooges are displayed with a photo Tuesday from the 1944 film Idle
Roomers at the Stoogeum in Spring House, Pa. The Stoogeum is home of Gary Lassin's priceless col-
lection of Stooges memorabilia and what might be the world's only museum dedicated to the knuck-
leheaded trio.


Outlaws Is Coming.," in 1965 ''included
Brothers Shemp and Moe Feinberg
Howard and Fine were the ear- his brother
liest Stooges. Curley Howard As th(
then replaced brother Shemp Lassin k
for many years. Later Stooges drawers, 1
included Joe Besser and Curly file cabin.
Joe DeRita. He opened
The Stoogeum has "more stuff 2004, sell
than I even imagined existed," undisclosE
said Peter Seely, editor of the part real
book "Stoogeology: Essays on part tax sI
the Three Stooges." "Going plete wast
through there is sort of like a trip It's likely
through the history of pop cul- its kind,
ture in the 20th century" California-
Yet, what visitors see is only ment Inc.,
a sampling of Lassin's estimat- ny create(
ed 100,000 items. His collection still owns t
is both historical and personal, "Gary's
documenting the slapstick per- mous," sai
former' indelible place in Fine's el
entertainment but also pre- would th.
serving a family legacy: largest"
Lassin's wife's grandfather, Lamonc
Morris Feinberg, was the Entertainr
brother of Stooge Larry (born building i
Louis Feinberg). has no imr
Lassin was already a Stooges For nc
fan - "Soitenly!" he said - Stoogeum
when he married into the fam- 2,500 peo
ily in 1981. He later became a many dur
sort of self-appointed guardian ering of th
of Stooges keepsakes, which Club. Othe


had
er.
e c
ept
boxes
ets
ed 1
f-fin
ed c
l-esi
helte
:e of
y th
said
-bas
ap
d by
the b
col
dLa
desi
ink


mer
ts o
med
ow,
. La
ple
ing
he T
ers s


items Morris on their own. just because they
d received trom have a soft spot tIr three goof-
balls they've loved since child-
collection grew, hood.
it in countless Lassin recalled a couple
es, notebooks and from Richmond, Va., who
above his garage. recently trekked to the
the Stoogeum in Stoogeum and afterward asked
dancing it at an him offhandedly how to get to
cost; he called it Philadelphia - they might as
tate investment, well see the Liberty Bell.
er, and part "com- Eventually, said Lassin, the
f money." I museum might have employ-
.e first museum of ees and regular business hours
Eric Lamond of a few days a week He would
ed C3 Entertain- seem to be guaranteed a steady
reductionn compa- stream of visitors since the
the Stooges that Stooges' zany antics, even
brand. though decades old, continue
election is enor- to win them admirers.
imond, who is also "Their comedy is timeless,"
t grandchild. "I said Seely, the editor. "They
that his is the were misfits wherever they
were. ... You can plop them
noted C3 down in just about any time or
it is considering place and they'll struggle with
)wn museum, but their environment. They could
late plans to do so. still do films today"
fans have the For Lassin, their appeal is
assin said about even easier to explain.
visit each year, "They were funny It's as sim-
the annual gath- ple as that," he said. "Laughter
hree Stooges Fan makes you feel good."
seek out the place Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk!


Medical experiences gave Woodruff an edge


DAVID BAUDER
AP Television Writer

NEW YORK-While it's hard
to think of positives to come out
a severe brain injury, here's one:
it just helped ABC News' Bob
Woodruff score a scoop.
South Dakota Sen. Tim
Johnson turned to Woodruff for a
"N,,.riiv" report on his recov-
ery and return to public life this
week following a brain hemor-
rhage. The Democrat probably
figured no other reporter would
better understand what he went
through.
Woodruff has quietly returned
to work full time at ABC follow-
ing the January 2006 bombing in
Iraq that nearly killed him,


already traveling to Cuba, Syria
and throughout the United
States to report stories.
His report on Johnson was
overshadowed last week by sto-
ries of Sen. Larry Craig's arrest
for seeking sex in a bathroom,
but was still a significant "get"
Johnson's health was a mystery
and of great interest because
Democratic control of the
Senate was at stake if he couldn't
continue.
ABC said Woodruff and
Johnson reached out to each
other about the same time late
last winter Johnson's wife had
read the book Woodruff and wife
Lee had written about the bomb-
ing and its aftermath.
"When you're talking publicly


about what's going on, you won-
der how much you have to
explain about what you're going
through," Woodruff told The
Associated Press. "I think they
knew they didn't have to do that
with me."
Johnson became disoriented
last Dec. 13 while on a confer-
ence call with reporters and was
taken immediately to the hospi-
tal. He had emergency surgery
for arteriovenous malformation,
a condition that causes arteries
and veins in the brain to become
tangled and sometimes burst
Woodruff visited Johnson in
April and June to check on the
senator's progress in learning
how to walk and talk again. He
was able to point out, to


Johnson's knowing smile, how
difficulty and slowness in speak-
ing doesn't necessarily mean the
brain is processing thoughts
slowly
In the "Nightline" report,
Woodruff noted how two years
was once considered the typical
recovery time from severe brain
injuries. "Everyone says that it's
an absolute lie," he said.
At some point with most
patients, recovery slows to the
point where there is little fur-
ther improvement, he explained
later. Insurers fixated on two
years. But when that point is
reached can vary dramatically,
he said.
Woodruff's own recovery is
continuing.


Florida


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Monday in
the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
8-0-4
PLAY 4
3-7-9-7
FANTASY 5
7-9-12-13-33
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2
Cash 3:0 - 3 - 5
Play 4: 4 - 8 - 1 - 7
Fantasy 5: 14 - 16 - 19 - 23 - 25
5-of-5 2 winners $96,328.31
4-of-5 310 $100
3-of-5 8,640 $10
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
Cash 3:3-8-4
Play 4:9 - 7 - 1 - 6
Lotto: 4 - 5 - 16 - 25 - 27 - 37
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 172 $2,441.50
4-of-6 5,719 $59.50
3-of-6 109,692 $4
Fantasy 5: 1 - 6 - 26 - 28 - 32
5-of-5 1 winner $277,762.17
4-of-5 310 $144.50
3-of-5 10,667 $11.50
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31
Cash 3:0-9-2
Play 4: 6-5-3-8
Fantasy 5:4 - 18 - 28 - 33 - 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 330 $907
3-of-5 9,911 $11.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
E To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY
Today .is Tuesday, Sept. 4, the
247th day of 2007. There are 118
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
Fifty years ago, on Sept. 4, 1957,
Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus used
Arkansas National Guardsmen to
prevent nine black students from
entering all-white Central High
School in Little Rock. (The situation
escalated in the coming weeks,
with President Dwight D.
Eisenhower finally ordering U.S.
Army troops to escort the black stu-
dents into the school and protect
them.)
On this date:
In 1907, 100 years ago, compos-
er Edvard Grieg died in Bergen,
Norway, at age 64.
In 1917, the American
Expeditionary Forces in France suf-
fered their first fatalities during
World War I when a German plane
attacked a British-run base hospital.
In 1957, Ford Motor Co. began
selling its ill-fated Edsel.
In 1971, an Alaska Airlines jet
crashed near Juneau, killing 111
people.
Ten years ago: A triple suicide
bombing in the heart of Jerusalem
claimed the lives of seven people,
including the three assailants.
Five years ago: President Bush
promised to seek congressional
approval for "whatever is neces-
sary" to oust Saddam Hussein,
including using military force.
One year ago: "Crocodile
Hunter" Steve Irwin, 44, died after a
stingray's barb pierced his chest.
Today's Birthdays: ABC Radio
commentator Paul Harvey is 89.
Actress Mitzi Gaynor is 76. Singer
Merald "Bubba" Knight (Gladys
Knight & The Pips) is 65. Actress
Jennifer Salt is 63. Golfer Tom
Watson is 58. Actress Judith Ivey is
56. Actress Khandi Alexander is 50.
Actor-comedian Damon Wayans is
47. Actor Noah Taylor is 38. Actress
lone Skye is 36. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Richard Wingo (Jagged
Edge) is 32. Actor Wes Bentley is
29. Singer Beyonce Knowles is 26.
Thought for Today: "One
should respect public opinion inso-
far as is necessary to avoid starva-
tion and to keep out of prison, but
anything that goes beyond this is
voluntary submission to an unnec-
essary tyranny, and is likely to inter-
fere with happiness in all kinds of
ways."- Bertrand Russell, English
mathematician-philosopher (1872-
1970).


REMEMBER WHEN
* For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


k&





CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
LifeSouth's LaToya Johnson waits for blood donors Wednesday in Crystal River. LifeSouth branch manager Samantha Brown says the blood shortage is to the
point where there is only a one-day supply stored.


Supplies at critical low, donors needed to replenish inventory


KERI LYNN MCHALAE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

itrus County citizens
have the solution to the
shortage pumping
through their veins.
Officials at LifeSouth
Community Blood
Centers in Lecanto and
Inverness said they
have only a one-day
supply of blood.
"We have an emergency short-
age. When we put that word out,
we're not kidding," LifeSouth
Branch Manager Samantha
Brown said.
LifeSouth donors are the sole
suppliers of blood for Citrus
Memorial Health System, Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
and kidney dialysis centers in
Citrus County, she added.
"There's always a need," said
Katie Lucas, public relations
manager for Citrus Memorial
Health System.
A short blood supply puts lives
in jeopardy, she said. When
there is no available blood,
sometimes scheduled surgeries
have to be canceled or post-
poned.
"That's how desperate it really
gets," Brown said.
She "holds her breath" and
hopes nothing critical happens
during emergency shortages,


BLOOD CENTERS
* Lecanto Office, 527-3061
* Inverness Office, 344-5332
* Donors must be at least 17
years of age but there is no
upper age limit. They must
weight at least 110 pounds.
Photo identification is also
required.

which normally occur during the
summer months, Brown said.
Fewer people donate in the sum-
mertime because many tem-
porarily move North and go on
vacation, she added. The heat
and rain are other factors con-
tributing to the shortage,
LifeSouth District Director
Edward Downey said.
Right now there are critical
shortages for A+, A- and B-, but
all types of blood are needed,
Brown said. In order to maintain
an adequate supply, 215 pints
per week are needed. The blood
can be stored up to 42 days.
The LifeSouth Lecanto office
is open daily and the Inverness
Center is open Tuesday through
Saturday. In addition to the cen-
ter's open door policy, blood
drives are held frequently at var-
ious locations via the
Bloodmobile.
Last Wednesday, the
Bloodmobile was parked outside
Pizza Hut on U.S. 19 in Crystal


River. No donors wer46 inside, so
Brown decided to donate and
demonstrate the process. First
she presented photo identifica-
tion and registered as a donor
Then, nurses interviewed Brown
and conducted a short physical
exam.
During the miniature physical
before donating blood, nurses
check the donors' blood pres-
sures, temperatures, pulses and
iron levels to ensure they are
healthy enough to give blood.
Before donating blood, people
should drink plenty of fluids and
eat iron-enriched foods, Brown
said. Caffeine should be avoided
because it lowers iron levels, she
added.
Brown said many people with
chronic illnesses, such as those
with diabetes, think they are
ineligible. However, if diabetics
take medication orally and their
blood sugar levels stay consis-
tent, they are eligible, she said.
More specific donation eligibility
guidelines are listed on the
American Red Cross Web site,
www.redcross.org.
After the nurses checked
Brown's veins and swabbed her
arm with iodine, they prepared
the bag and needle needed to
collect the donation. The actual
donation time takes between
four to eight minutes and 500
Please see - . /Page 5C


BLOOD DRIVES
N 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. today, Progress
Energy, 15760 West Power Line St.,
Crystal River.
* 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday,
Homosassa Elementary School, 10935
W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa.
* 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto
High School, 3810 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto.
* 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Citrus
County Solid Waste, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto.
* 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Hernando
United Methodist Church, 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando.
N 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park, 4150 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, First
Presbyterian Church of Inverness, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness.
a 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Wal-Mart
Homosassa, 3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
a 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11,
Central Florida Community College,
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto.
* 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12,
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center,
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
* Noon to 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, Lowe's,
2301 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness.
* 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15,
Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15,
Harley-Davidson of Crystal River, 1785
U.S. 19, Homosassa.


Napping - not just for kids Relaxing helpful in health


N
States,u
or you
Resear
short na
actually
ductive.
Resa
scans 1
activity
on. Afte
minutes
increase
if you h
good n
from na
minutes
For s
* hours. I
which t
scenario
and a h


apping is a way of life in other much.
parts of the world and not so Great men of the past, such as Leonardo
much in the United Da Vinci, Napoleon and
unless you are an infant , . Einstein were all known to
ing child at home. nap during the day. Edison
ch has suggested that took it to extreme in that he
aps during the day can napped more than he slept
make you more pro- regularly. He frequently spent
days in his lab without going to
arch done with MRI bed at night and recharged
has shown that brain purely with naps. Athletes
declines as the day goes who typically have a very long
r a briefnap of about20 Dr. Denis Grillo day training frequently nap
s, brain activity will because of rising early in the
e once again, almost as EAR, NOSE morning and training late into
have gotten up from a & T :..T the day. Some commercial air-
ight's sleep. Benefits lines even allow their pilots to
dipping can occur in as little as five sleep briefly during long haul flights so
s. that they are fresh and alert when it comes
ome people, it takes as much as two time to land the plane.
ft is true that a full cycle of sleep, The ideal place to nap is one that is free
akes about 90 minutes, is the best from interference like phones, business


o, but sometimes taking an hour
alf off during the day is a little bit


Please see


/Page 5C


Editor's note: This is part of a weekly
series of condensed excerpts from Dr.
Ed Dodge's new book, "Dan's Story:
One Man's Discovery of Personal
Health Pwer "


' ' r. Herbert
Benson of
Harvard Medical
School wrote 'The
Relaxation Response' in
1975," commented Tim ' i
Davis at one of Dan's group
support meetings.
"Essentially, he studied the Dr. E(
effects of meditation-like �-.
techniques on health. To
give his health-adapted
process a non-religious
name, he called it the 'relaxation
response.' His book became a best-sell-
er, breaking new ground in document-
ing related health benefits."
"What kind of benefits did he find?"


jj
ff


(
*i|
?
ri
*
*a
1


asked Dan.
"His basic findings were that the
relaxation response slowed the breath-
ing and heart rates while reducing mus-
cular tension and lowering
blood pressure. It also
induced slower brain waves
S. and resulted in slower
metabolism. To put it in a
. nutshell, it reduced stress,
. \ which proved to be a great
benefit both mentally and
Physically"
"That sounds good," com-
Dodge mented Joe, "but how long
do those benefits last?"
"Good question," said
Tim. "Dr. Benson recom-
mends practicing the relax-
ation response for 10 to 20 minutes
once or twice a day To quote him, the
result can be 'of enormous benefit to


Please see


-/Page 5C


Diet key


in colon


cancer


battle
P people treated for
colon cancer might
want to watch what
they eat A diet heavy with
red meat, fatty foods and
desserts may put these sur-
vivors at greater risk of hav-
ing their disease return.
Colon cancer often can be
treated successfully with
surgery, chemotherapy, radi-
ation or some combination
of these. If diet also has an
impact on whether the colon
cancer comes back, sur-
vivors may be able to
improve their odds by
watching what they eat.
Many studies have shown
that what people eat can
influence whether they
develop colon cancer later
in life. A high-fat diet, espe-
cially one that includes a lot
of animal fat and red or
processed meat, can raise a
person's risk of developing
colon cancer. However, less
is known about how diet
impacts people who have
already had colon cancer.
The few studies that have
looked at this issue so far
have had mixed findings.
What has been shown to
have an impact? Body
Please see , '. --/Page 5C


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE


Cartilage

from sharks

doesn't help

fight cancer
I saw a 75-year-old patient
with cancer She should
have taken chemothera-
py after her surgery for can-
cer to reduce the chance of
cancer coming back Her son
is a strong believer in alterna-
tive medicine. He prevented
her from taking chemothera-
py. Instead, the patient start-
ed taking unproven therapy
She is not coming for any fol-
low-up either Use of such
unproven cancer therapy is
very common in the U.S.
Shark cartilage is a popu-
lar dietary supplement that is
claimed to combat and/or
prevent cancer. It is easily
available in many health food
stores. The benefits of this
supplement have not been
scientifically proven, nor has
shark cartilage been
reviewed by the FDA
The idea has become popu-
lar due to the incorrect notion
that sharks do not get cancer.
It is true that cancer is
uncommon in sharks, but
they do get cancer: This idea
became popular with the
best-selling book "Sharks
Don't Get Cancer," by Dr.
William Lane, published in
1992. This assertion even


Please see


/Page 5C


' /" '
I, . ' ', I :


~1 I

L


I -j -


T ': % -DAY
SEPTEMBER 4, 2007
www.chronicleonline corn













Picnics a treat, finding right spot is a trick


B because I just started
college (again) to
earn another
degree, my mother and I
are trying to get into a plan
for the commute. For one
thing, we wanted to save
money by not going out to
eat so much. We decided
the best way to do that was
to picnic. halyn
Picnicking has always FU
been a favorite of my family. | ,
We picnic when we go out
on the boat We picnic when we take
road trips. We picnic at dance conven-
tions - and we picnic quite well. I am
the professional picnicker, thanks to
my grandmother who taught me some
very important picnicking rules.
First, picnickers must never put any-
thing soggy on their sandwich until


I
II
ti


they have arrived at the pic-
nic destination. These
items would include tuna
fish and mayonnaise, let-
tuce, etc. Otherwise, your
bread could become mushy
(unless you like it toasted,
and I don't).
Secondly, picnickers
must always pack some-
Barker thing salty and something
LL sweet. You never really
17E know what you are going to
be in the mood for on a pic-
nic, so prepare for the sweet tooth and
for a little salty craving.
Finally, the extras are always a nice
touch. My picnic basket (which was a
wedding present from my grandmoth-
er) includes plates, napkins, silver-
ware, condiment packets and gum. I
never said just because we were pic-


nicking, we were roughing it, did I?
So, my first day of school my mother
and I had our picnic baskets packed
and ready to find a spot to eat after my
classes. Unfortunately, in a semi-for-
eign town, we didn't know where to go.
We decided that we would head back
home; find a place on the way cute
enough to picnic at. Oh yes, that's the
last rule: You have to picnic in a pret-
ty location and it must be outdoors.
Anyway, on the way back, we passed
through the little town of Williston,
with one of our favorite restaurants,
The Ivy House. Mind you, its way past
noon and we haven't eaten yet "Saving
money" never looked liked the worst
idea until we passed that restaurant
with hunger headaches. Still, we
pressed on looking for a nice spot
We made it all the way back to
Dunnellon and decided to eat at the


Rainbow Springs State Park. It is
beautiful there and we ending up
shoving down our food, not even con-
templating our favorite picnic-game-
pastime called "What's in your bas-
ket?"
The next trip up to school, my moth-
er had asked one of our studio moms
who lives in Williston where their
park was. She surprised me on the
way home by stopping there for us to
eat. It was so pretty and had a lovely
gazebo for us to sit under. When we
walked up to it, it very clearly had
nasty pictures and sayings all over left
with markers. Even though this broke
the last rule of picnicking, we tried to
make the best of it.
My mom broke out the bug spray
and began to spray it on Emmy. I
looked down and right where Emmy
was planning to sit on the gazebo


benches, two bionic hornets came out
from underneath the bench. My mom
had squirted some of the bug spray in
their house and they were a little
angry. We picked up our picnic things
in a hurry and found another spot in
Dunnellon to eat our lunches. Even
though where we ended up was nice, it
had a ton of ants and the garbage smelt
bad.
My mom, disgusted by our picnics
this week but too sweet to show it,
said, "Shalyn, maybe next week, we'll
go out for lunch."

Shalyn Barker resides with her hus-
band, Patrick, and daughter, Emmy,
in the Beverly Hills area. All three
are lifelong residents of Citrus
County. She can be reached at
citrusamom@yahoo. com.


* Free blood pressure and
other health screenings by the
Citrus County Health Department
from 9 to 11 a.m. at dates and
Locations below. Screenings avail-
ible include fasting blood sugar, a
test for anemia, kits to test for
blood in stool (fee of $5 each), and
Tree blood pressure.
Pneumonia vaccine is recom-
jnended for anyone age 65 and
older. Pneumonia vaccine will be
available for a fee of $25 or
Medicare, Part B, will cover the
cost. A copy of your Medicare card
is required. If you have
Medicaid/HMO or HMO coverage,
you will need to receive your vac-
cine from your health care provider
or pay for the vaccine upon receipt.
* Monday: East Citrus
,Community Center, 9907 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
* Sept. 17: West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 S.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa.
* Sept. 24: Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Web address: www.citruscounty
health.org.
* Free vision, cataract and
glaucoma screening Wednesday,
Sept. 12, at the Crystal Eye
Center, U.S. 19 South, Crystal
River. Call 795-0212.
* Free memory screenings
from Alzheimer's Family
Organization, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 14 and 28, in The
Villages. Appointments only. Call
(727) 848-8888 or toll free at (888)
496-8004.
* Diabetes classes are offered
from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Health Department


in Lecanto. Classes are free. No
registration is required.
* What is diabetes? Sept. 17.
* Meal planning, Sept. 24.
* More about meal plans, Oct.
1.
* Medications and monitoring,
Oct. 8.
* Sick days, Oct. 15.
* Avoiding complications, Oct.
22.
Fasting blood sugars are offered
from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday through
Friday in all three Citrus County
Health Department sites. There is
a $10 fee for this service. No
appointment is necessary. Every
Monday before the Lecanto class,
anyone who would like to have a
blood sugar test should come fast-
ing. Call Lynece Hand, R.N., 795-
6233, ext. 240, or Carol Burke,
R.D., 726-5222.
* Hospice of Citrus County
will provide orientation training for
individuals who are interested in
learning more about Hospice vol-
unteer opportunities. The class will
be from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
11, at our Lady of Grace Roman
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. To register for
this class or to request training for
your group, contact Judy Knowlton,
Hospice of Citrus County Volunteer
Program manager, at 527-6613.
* Alzheimer's Caregiver Day
- information and training from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, at
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court E., Inverness. Caregivers,
$10 and $15. Free respite care
available. Call to make arrange-
ments. Seating is limited; register
Please see NOTES/Page 3C


Drugs can exacerbate necrosis of jawbone


Editor's note: This is the con-
clusion of a two-part series
about bisphosphonate-associ-
ated necrosis of the jaw (BON).
To follow is a second column
written by Dr. Brockett, an oral
surgeon in Crystal River:
There is a wonderful
class of drugs available
today called bisphos-
phonates, which are given for
osteoporosis. Originally devel-
oped for bone cancers, such as
multiple myeloma and
metastatic bone extension
from prostate and breast can-
cer, these drugs have greatly
increased the quality of life of
those taking them. Common
drugs are Fosamax, Actonel
and the longer-acting Boniva.
You may be appropriately
taking these drugs to stave off
the effects of osteoporosis, but
there is a huge word of caution
regarding these drugs, particu-
larly the long-acting Boniva.
Extensive dental work, with
particular attention to any-


thing being done under the to close follow-up with your
gum tissue (deep cleaning, dentist if these drugs are insti-
extractions, implants, etc.) tuted.
should not be done unless I am now treating several
these drugs are patients with
held or discontin- exposed bone,
ued for a period of which will not heal
time. The drug and we have no
Boniva is very simi- modalities to get
lar to Aredia or these areas of
Zometa in that it exposed bone to
has a much longer , heal. The crux of
effect within the the matter is pre-
bone of the body, - vention of this
and may limit heal- Dr. Frank Vascinni largely preventable
ing after an extrac- SOUND side effect.
tion or a deep SO ND I think that the
cleaning to the BITES above columns
point where address the ques-


osteonecrosis of the bone may
occur. This is a serious sequel-
la, resulting in exposed bone
that never heals.
Before beginning any of
these drugs, consult with your
dentist and be certain that
your oral condition is free of
disease and, if not, get whatev-
er treatment recommended
completed and submit yourself


tion for you. I would suggest
that before coming off of any
drug you discuss it with all of
the doctors involved. Your
overall dental health will be
an important factor in the
decision.
If you are in good dental
health and there is a good rea-
son to stay on the medication,
your doctors may encourage


you to stay on the medication.
If there are dental needs that
can be affected by these drugs,
you will want to decide along
with your doctors how long you
should be off of the medication
before things are addressed
and brought into health.
As for coming off of the med-
ication for scaling, I would
have to say that it is, again,
something that has to be
reviewed by your doctors for
you specifically. Scaling is very
rarely needed urgently. My
thought would be that it might
not be too harmful to have you
off of the drug for a specified
amount of time to decrease the
likelihood of getting BON. I
hope this has helped both of
you.


Dr. Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist Send your
questions to 4805 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa 34446 or
e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio. com.


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. Help Support

Newspapers In Education aa


Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a


New Office

in Citrus County


Call 746-5000

IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE





Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center proudly presents the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce Business Women's Alliance...

Women's Health &

Fitness Expo


This expo ill help you and your family to
proactively pursue the man) ways to a
healthier and happier hfestyle.
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
9:15 a.m.: Dr. Roy Horn, DC, FAIMAand
Laura Horn, RN - "How to Look Better,
Be Better and Feel Better in a Toxic
World"
11 a.m.: Carlene Wilson, MD, Board
Certified, Internal Medicine &
Pediatncs 'Taking Care of You, So You
Can Take Care of Them"
12 p.m.: Hanoch Talmor, MD, Board
Certified 'The Principles of Good
Health, Healing and Wellness"
1:15 p.m.: Ed Dodge, MD, Board
Certified, Family Practice (retired)
"Passion for Health / Integrating Mind,
Body and Spirit"


A'" September 29
\% l riiic ,.-,,-_c ee

""y qi ', 2,:, ? pm.


rfp

.-SEVEN RIVERS

-..... .leer, ~c-c~


Tickets Availabl(

Be The First To Get Yours A


H health -% ,-;-- ,-i. ';., "'.~~;


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2C TiiF.srAy- lrtp-rFmBFR 4- 2007


IIEAiuirm & LxIFE







TUESDAY, SEPT.IMB ER 4, 2007 3C


New spray will help cool down hot flashes


Q: I heard about a new skin spray for
hot flashes due to menopause. What
can you tell me about it?
A: The FDA recently approved
Evamist (estradiol transdermal spray)
for the treatment of moderate to severe
vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes) due
to menopause. It is the first approved
transdermal spray containing an estro-
gen hormone. Approximately 2 million
American women naturally enter into
menopause between the ages of 45 and
55. Menopausal symptoms occur when a
woman's ovaries stop producing estro-


gen and may include hot flashes, dis-
comfort or pain during sexual inter-
course due to vaginal atrophy (thinning
of the vagina), and changes in skin and
hair.
Evamist contains the estrogen estra-
diol in a metered-dose spray pump that
is designed to deliver estradiol into the
bloodstream following topical applica-
tion. The starting dose of Evamist is one
spray daily to the inner surface of the
arm between the elbow and the wrist.
This dosage can be increased to two or
three sprays daily depending upon the


patient's clinical response.
During clinical study, Evamist
reduced the number of hot flashes in
postmenopausal women by about two to
three per day and also reduced their
severity. The most common side effects
of Evamist were headache, breast ten-
derness and nipple pain, nausea, back
pain, and inflammation of the nose and
throat. However, as I've noted before,
the use of estrogens may increase the
risk of getting heart attacks, strokes,
breast cancer, uterine cancer, endome-
trial cancer, blood clots and dementia.


Because of this, the use of estrogens
should always be at the lowest dose and
for the shortest duration consistent
with treatment goals and a woman's
individual risks. Your physician can
determine if the use of Evamist or
another estrogen product is right for
you.

Richard Hoffmann has practiced
pharmacy for more than 20 years.
Send questions to him at 1135 N.
Timucuan Trail, Inverness, FL 34453.


NOTES
Continued from Page 2C

by calling (888) 496-8004 or
(727) 848-8888.
* Catholic Charities DOSP has
openings in its respite program
for people in the early stages of
dementia due to Alzheimer's or
other illnesses such as stroke,
Parkinson's and the like. The pro-
gram is offered at Our Lady of
Grace Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
in Beverly Hills. It meets from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday
and the cost is $20 for the four
hours. The program is also in need
of male volunteers. Call Marie
Monahan at (800) 242-9012, ext.
22.
* "Good Grief" workshops on
four consecutive Monday evenings
beginning Monday, Sept. 17, from
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Central
Florida Community College
Lecanto Campus at 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, sponsored by
Hospice of Citrus County and mod-
erated by Jonathan Beard, Wings
grief support manager with
Hospice of Citrus County. To regis-
ter, call Beard at 527-2020 or (866)
642-0962.
For information about Hospice,
call 527-2020 or visit the Web at
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
* INGLIS - Hospice of the
Nature Coast seeks volunteers
who live in Inglis and Yankeetown.
Call Judy Knowlton, volunteer
program manager, at 527-6613 or
(866) 463-1385.
Hospice of the Nature Coast is a
program of Hospice of Citrus
County. www.hospiceofthenature-
coast.org.
* Donations of soft, relaxing
music or books on CD or cassette
sought for the Citrus team of
Hernando-Pasco Hospice (HPH)
for an audio library for patients and
family members. Drop off at the
HPH office between 8:30 a.m. and
4:30 p.m. weekdays at 3545 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, in
the Park Plaza. Call 527-4600.
* "Five Wishes" program from
5:30 to 7 p.m. on three consecutive
Monday beginning Oct. 22 at the
Central Florida Community College
Lecanto Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, by Wings Grief Support
Team of Hospice of Citrus County.
To register, call Jonathan Beard at
527-2020 or (866) 642-0962. For
information about Hospice, call
527-2020 or visit the Web at
www.hospiceofcitfuscounty.org.
* LifeSouth hosts Hot Dog
Wednesday blood drives from 9
a.'rfto 7 p.m. the last Wednesday


monthly at the Inverness donor
center, 220 S. Pine St., and
Lecanto donor center, 1241 S.
Lecanto Highway. Hotdogs and
other lunch items will be' served for
all donors. Donors will receive a
recognition item, and a cholesterol
screening. Call (888) 795-2707 or
visit www.lifesouth.org. Donors
must be at least 17 years old,
weigh 110 pounds or more and
have a valid photo I.D.
* Russell Chiropractic and
Wellness Center is available to do
school and sports physical
Monday, Tuesdays and -
Thursdays. Call Barbara at 726-
0888.
* Free hearing evaluations
open to the Citrus County commu-
nity at the Crystal River Health and
Rehab Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave.,
Crystal River, first and third
Thursday of each month 10:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Sponsored by
Quality Hearing Centers of
Leesburg, Ocala and Inverness.
Call 228-0918 to make an appoint-
ment.
* Free spinal scan and facility
tour with Dr. Russell
Lewandowski, who is also avail-
able to speak at community organi-
zations. Call Barbara at 726-0888.
Visit proadjusterbyrussellchiro.com.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center's Web site is
www.srrmc.com.


* American Cancer Society's
"Road to Recovery" program
needs volunteer drivers. Call Cindi
Crisci, area patient services repre-
sentative at the American Cancer
Society, at (727) 812-7028.
* The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Wanderers
Identification Program provides
an identifying bracelet or pendant
with a code number and direct tele-
phone number to the participating
sheriffs office. Call toll free at
(888) 496-8004.
* The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Respite
Assistance Program is available
to all residents of Citrus, Pasco,
Hernando, Sumter and Lake coun-
ties caring for an individual with
dementia or Alzheimer's disease.
Call (727) 848-8888 or toll free at
(888) 496-8004.
* Citrus County Community
Support Services and Catholic
Charities offers a Respite Care
Program for people with early
onset Alzheimer's disease or other
dementia-related illnesses, from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Our Lady of Grace Church, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Donna Atwell at 527-5932, Citrus
County Community Support
Services or Catholic Charities at
(800) 242-9012, ext. 22.
* The Doctor Ride program


Sl


helps with medical appointment
transportation in Citrus County for
those age 65 and older. Three or
four days' notice is required, and
only one ride per week is available.
To volunteer or ride, call John at
746-3796.
* Skillbank's volunteer pool of
drivers will chauffeur residents of
Beverly Hills who need a ride to
the doctor, pharmacy or grocery
store. Residents get one trip a
week and should call several days
in advance: 746-5001 from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
* Telephone Friends service
confirms safety and imparts care
and concern, is available at no
cost. Call Nature Coast Volunteer
Center at 527-5950 or e-mail
ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
* The Citrus County Health
Department (CCHD) has a toll-
free information line, (877) 746-
3248. The CCHD Web address is
www.citruscountyhealth.org and
the Community Resource number
is 211.
* The Beverly Hills Lions Club
Inc. has a loan closet for wheel-
chairs, walkers, canes, bath chairs,
etc. Call Lion Warren Adams, 746-
1984.
* The Center For Independent
Living of North Central Florida
(CILNCF) provides four core serv-
ices in: information and referral,
Please see NOTES/Page 4C


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the
Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include
the names of anyone pictured, and include a contact name
and phone number on the back.
* Weekly winners will be published in the Sunday Chronicle.
* At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best
photo during the year and that photographer will win a prize.
* Make sure photographs are in sharp focus.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


Transitions Grief Support Groups
Tuesday, 3 and 6 pm
Hernando-Pasco Hospice presents ongoing grief
programs every Tuesday for anyone who has
experienced the sudden loss of a loved one. A
trained bereavement counselor conducts the
support group. Participants are provided a
workbook. Registration required. Call
800.486.8784. FREE

Childbirth Education
Thursday, September 6, 13, 20, 27,
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
A four-class series designed to prepare the
pregnant woman and her partner for labor,
delivery and birth. Relaxation, breathing,
solutions for pregnancy discomforts, proper
nutrition, the three stages of labor and after
delivery changes are emphasized. Expectant
mothers should schedule attendance in the sixth
to seventh month of pregnancy. $30

FREE Balance Screenings
At Seven Rivers Rehab
Monday, September 10, 12:30 pm-1:30 pm
Seven Rivers Rehab & \Wound Center,
conveniently located in the Cr \stail River
Shopping Center next to Skeetba\ i ai 1675 SE.
US Hwy. 19. No appointment necessar-,. Call
352.795.0534 for additional information.

Good News About Knee and Hip Pain
Wednesday, September 19, 1 pm
If Nou are over 55 and have knee or hip pain.
siiftness or %wellng. chances are uou lihve
arthritis of the knee or hip. The good neivs is
many treatments are a\ailable.allowing \ou to
nmoe easily\ and without pain once again. FREE

Diet Therapy for Diabetes
Tuesday, September 25, 6 pm
Hadin.n diabetes doesn't mean \ou can't enji
tasty foods and meet all your diabetic dietary
needs Join Kelly Niblen,dietitian,to learn tip,
on meal planning FREE

One in Every Six Men Will Get
Prostate Cancer
Friday, September 28, 1 pm
Thanks to early detection nearly 60% of the
230,000 newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer
are localized and potentially curable. Join Jayanth
G. Rao, MD, board certified in radiation
oncology, to learn about the signs, symptoms and
treatment options for prostate cancer. Now is not
the time to be embarrassed to learn more. FREE

Childbirth-Related Education
Women's & Family Center
The Women's & Family Center offers a variety of
additional free or low cost childbirth-related
education programs throughout the year
including Early Pregnancy, Sibling Preparation,
Infant Care and Childbirth Refresher. Please call
the Women's and Family Center directly to make
an appointment, 352.795 .BABY (2229).

Health Information Resource
On Demand
Looking for the latest health information? Visit
www.srrmc.com for a complete health library
available 24/7.


,*SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
www.srrmc.com


Richard Hoffmann
ASK THE
PHARMACIST


CNAs graduate from home health aide program


Special to the Chronicle
Hospice of Citrus County has recently initiated a 75-hour Home Health Aide Training Program
specifically for Certified Nurses Assistants (CNAs). A lunchtime ceremony for the first three
Hospice of Citrus County CNA Home Health Aide Training Program graduates was held Aug.
24 at Wine & Cheese in Crystal River. From left are: Anthony Palumbo, Hospice of Citrus
County chief executive officer; Jill Thacher, recruitment and education manager; Dawn
Jensen, CNA; Markeeta Sumerlin, CNA, and Karen Getz, CNA.


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40 TUESDAY. SEI~fI~M~FI~ 4. 2007 HEALTH & LIFE C,' ri~r;~ Couivir (FL) CHRONICLE


Characteristic signs of tendonitis


T endonitis, fascitis and tenosyn-
ovitis are terms used to
describe painful inflammatory
conditions of tendons and
or their coverings. Fascia is
a- specialized type of con-
nective tissue related to a
ligament that when F lo
inflamed is termed fascitis
or fasciitis. The medical
suffix that describes
inflammation in a tissue is
"itis"; thus tendonitis
describes an inflammation Dr. David
of a tendon, etc.
Tendons, ligaments and BEST
fascia are exposed to FORV
severe forces and chronic
repetitive stresses throughout one's
lifetime and can become injured.
Forces generated by walking or run-
ning during a lifetime accepted by the
foot and ankle are remarkable. Direct
or indirect trauma, such as a fall or


twist, or chronic repetitive stresses,
such as years of stair-stepper exercis-
ing, can produce an injury to these tis-


d B. Raynor
FOOT
WARD


sues producing pain and
inflammation regardless
of age, race or gender.
The Achilles tendon, the
tendons about the ankle
and the strong plantar fas-
cia along the bottom of the
foot and ankle are suscep-
tible to injury during one's
lifetime and have a rather
similar presentation
regardless of the forces
that produced the injury.
Pain produced or felt in
a tissue when first stressed


after inactivity preceded by activity is
a phrase used by physicians that is
termed "post-static-dyskinesia." Pain
upon first arising or when using the
foot or ankle after rest is the layman's
translation for post-static dyskinesia


and is an overwhelming indication of provider.
a tendon or fascia pathology. Fascititis, tendonitis and tenosyn-
Persons with tendonitis or fascitis ovitis can present rapidly, gradually
almost universally describe their or intermittently. Deep, penetrating
worst moments of pain when they first aching, soreness, heat and burning,
arise and use the foot or ankle after a dull aching and stabbing pains can be
period of inactivity. Getting out of the associated with either condition. I
car, getting up to go to the bathroom at recommend that if someone has pain
night and getting out of bed in the when arising from rest after strenu-
morning are typically the. hallmark ous activity that they cease the activi-
times tendonitis or fascitis peaks with ty and use rest, ice and over-the-
regards to symptoms. counter anti-inflammatory medicines
The consistency of description I like Ibuprofen if they can tolerate it
have noticed in more than 13 years of for two weeks before resuming activi-
practice is really incredible. Aching ty. Symptoms that persist greater than
when trying to sleep also may be two weeks should be evaluated by a
described, but the pain upon arising physician in my opinion. Neglect and
is the hallmark. Patients from many denial of tendon problems can lead to
different backgrounds, races, activity a chronic, irreversible and perma-
levels, weights, genders and body nent inflammatory condition for
types tend to universally relate post- which there really is no cure.
static-dyskinesia when describing Eighty percent of fascial problems
tendonitis, tenosynovitis or fascitis to tend to improve without treatment,
their physician or healthcare but that also means that 20 percent do


not. Tendon issues are much, much
less forgiving. Tendonitis that is diag-
nosed 8 months after onset has a
much poorer prognosis than one that
is diagnosed and treatment is initiat-
ed within days or weeks of presenta-
tion.
Fascitis, tendonitis and tenosynovi-
tis tend to present with similar symp-
toms. One lends itself to self-limitation
with time regardless of treatment; the
other can be a chronic and potentially
debilitating problem where true solu-
tions are few if neglected. Tenderness
upon arising in the foot and ankle,
lasting for greater than two weeks
should be evaluated by a medical pro-
fessional in my opinion.

David B. Raynor, DPM, is a podiatrist
in Inverness. He can be reached
at 726-3668 with questions or
suggestions for future columns.


NOTES
Continued from Page 3C

peer support, independent living
skills education and advocacy.
It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. at 3774 State Road 44,
across from Cowboy Junction.
* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at the
Inverness office, 120 N.
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Littnan
at 726-1731, ext. 242.
* Florida Elks Children's
Therapy Services provides free in-
home physical and occupational
therapy to Florida children in
need. Applicants for consideration
may call Walt Mabie at Inverness
Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando at
726-2027 before noon Monday
through Friday, West Citrus Elks
2693 at 628-1221 or the Florida
program administrator toll free at
(800) 523-1673.
* Citrus County Health
Department offers birth control
services to women of childbearing
age. These confidential services
are available at all health depart-
ment locations from a female
provider who specializes in
women's health. Call the office
nearest you: Inverness 726-1731;
Crystal River 795-6233; Lecanto
527-0068.
* A+ Healthcare Home Health
will be at the following locations to
offer free blood pressure screen-
ing. Call Mary Pearsall at 564-
2700.
* East Citrus Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. first
Wednesday monthly.
* Brentwood Health Center: 10
to 11 a.m. second Tuesday month-
ly.
* West Citrus Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. third
Wednesday monthly.
* Inverness Community Center:
9 to 11 a.m. third Tuesday monthly.
* Inverness Sports &
Orthopedic Rehab Team (SPORT)
offers free screening, by appoint-
ment, for individuals with
neck/back pain, headaches, ortho-
pedic injuries, carpal tunnel, tennis
elbow, osteoporosis and general
fitness. Call 341-3740.
* Free HIV testing is available
at the Citrus County Health
Department: Inverness, 726-1731;
Crystal River, 795-6233; Lecanto,
527-0068. Walk-ins accepted,
appointments preferred.
* Free hearing screenings
offered by All Children's Sertoma
Therapy Center from 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays by
appointment only at 760 W.
Hampshire Blvd., Suite 9, Citrus
Springs. Call 746-3300.
* Telecommunication equip-
ment is available to any Florida
resident who has a hearing or
speech impairment. Call Citrus
Hearing Impaired Program


Services at 795-5000 (voice) or
795-7243 (TTY). Visit the Web site
at www.ftri.org.
* SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders) coun-
selors offer information and assis-
tance on Medicare (figuring out the
paperwork, bills and filing appeals),
Medicare Supplemental Insurance,
Medicare prescription drug cover-
age and long-term care planning.
For an appointment at Citrus
Memorial Health System's SHARE
Club from 9 a.m. to noon Monday,
call 344-6513, SHARE Club affilia-
tion is not required.
For appointments at other sites
throughout the county or informa-
tion, call the Elder Help Line at
(800) 262-2243 or leave your name
and telephone number with the
Citrus County Senior Care Services
at 527-5930. A SHINE counselor
will return your call.
SHINE Walk-In Sites with no
appointment necessary:
* Citrus County Resource
Center - noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays - 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center - 9 a.m. to noon
the first and third Fridays monthly
- check in at the volunteer desk in.
the hospital lobby at 6201 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
* "Medically Speaking," a 30-
minute health awareness program,
airs at 5 p.m. Monday on WYKE
TV, channel 16, hosted by April
Saxer, marketing director for
Gulfcoast Aquatic and
Rehabilitation.
* Professional counseling
services are available to individu-
als, couples, families and children
experiencing a broad range of per-
sonal, relationship and family prob-
lems.Call Marty at Catholic
Charities at (800) 242-9012.
* Citrus Memorial Health
System has speakers. Mail
requests to Debi Shields in Public
Relations, Citrus Memorial hospital,
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness,
FL 34452, or call her at 344-6501.
* Diane White of Hero
Assistance Dogs is available as a
guest speaker. Call at 560-3785.
Please see NOTES/Page 6C


Support A: ,:


* Alzheimer's Family
Organization, serving Central
Florida, announces the following
monthly support group meetings.
Public is invited.
* 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18,
Highland Terrace, 700 Medical
Court East, Inverness. Call Ellen
Mallon at 860-2525.
0 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 27,
Woodland Terrace, 124 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando. Call
Pam Pepitone at 249-3100.
* Free support group for care-
givers whose loved ones have
dementia or Alzheimer's disease,
by the Citrus team of Hernando-
Pasco Hospice (HPH) and the
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter of the
Alzheimer's Association, 3 p.m. the
first Thursday monthly at Cedar
Creek Assisted Living Facility, 231
N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River. Call
HPH Citrus at 527-4600.
* The Better Breathers
Respiratory Support Group
meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 21, in the Lecanto meeting
room at the Health Department at
3700 W. Sovereign Path.
Maureen Guthke, MPH, commu-
nity health education coordinator
from Gulfcoast North Area Health
Education Center, will be the
speaker this month. Her topic is an
overview of living wills, health care
power of attorney and advanced
directives. This information is
important so healthcare wishes are
respected in case someone
becomes unable to communicate
them during an illness.
Lung Disease patients and their
caregivers meet monthly to learn
tips and techniques to better man-
age their disease. People can


I .

h n F, Saint, MD
* copi Surgery
'. : . fer * Hetnla * Colon
e .emorrhold * Breast
-. .Other General Surgery


(352) 63-991
Acepin NePtint


share stories of support and help
while connecting with others in our
community with chronic lung dis-
ease.
The American Lung
Association's Better Breathers
Support Group is sponsored by the
Citrus County Health Department.
For information, call Anne Black at
527-5561.
* Celiac Support Meeting -
There will be a support meeting for
all people who have celiac disease
or dermatitis herpetiformis from 10
a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept.
22, in the community room at the
Coastal Region Library, 8619 W.
Crystal St., Crystal River. The
meetings will be on the fourth
Saturday monthly until further
notice. Call Mary Lou Thomas at
628-9559.
* Support group meetings are
in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indicat-
ed.
* Bariatric Support Group: 6:30
p.m. every three months, Cypress
Room. Call Claudia Blotz at 697-
0051 or Bette Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support Group:
noon the second Friday, Robert
Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call
June O'Donnell at 527-8371.
* Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30
p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria
meeting room. Call Carol at 726-
'1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday,
Cypress Room. Call Carol McHugh
at 341-6110.
* Fibromyalgia Support: Will
not meet until further notice.
*Parkinson's Support Group: 1
p.m. first Tuesday, Cypress Room.






i , l


i
~c.


Medical Degree
University of Alabama Scho.:. of Medi.:.rne
Residency
..Baptist Health System, Birmingram Alatarma

Emerald Qaks Dr.. Crystal River
#.^t^�ext it , , ', i ,tA r R. er,' i, .11, J i, i/ ( Hit, i
- .


Call Catherine Clark at 344-9630.
*ACS Man-to-Man Prostate
Cancer Support and Education
Program: 11:30 a.m. first
Wednesday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute, Allen Ridge
Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call 527-0106.
* Respiratory Support Group:
Will not meet until further notice.
* Women's Breast Cancer
Support Group at noon the sec-
ond Friday monthly at the Robert
Boisonneault Oncology Institute,
522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
sponsored by Dr. Joseph Bennett
Jr. Lunch included, donations
appreciated. Call Judy Bonard at
527-4389 or June O'Donnell at
527-8371.
* Beverly Hills Gay and
Lesbian Support Group at 7 p.m.
Tuesday at 10 N. Jackson St.,
Beverly Hills. Free, open to every-
one. Group organizer is
PamelaRae and co-organizer is
Wayne Thomas. Call PamelaRae
at 746-9839.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 112 N. Pine
Ave., Inverness, offers three free
weekly women's domestic abuse
support groups:


* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday (free child care avail-
able).
* 10:30 a.m. to noon
Wednesday (no child care avail-
able).
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Transitions Grief Support
Group - 3 and 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center offices building community
room. Registration required. Call
(800) 486-8784.
* Overcomers Group for peo-
ple recovering from addictions to
drugs, alcohol or other out-of-con-
trol habits meets at 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary, 7463
Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul
at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addiction,
compulsion and co-dependency
issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m.
Monday at Rainbow Springs
Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd
St. Road Dunnellon. Call Char at
(352) 465-1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet regular-
ly in Citrus County. Call (352) 697-
0497.
Please see SUPPORT/Page 5C


Advanced Medication Management (including inhaled insulin)* Blood Sugar Testing* Nerve & Circulation Testing
Insulin Pump Education/Management Diabetic Wound Care * EKGs ,
Free Glucose Checks & Glucometers for Active Patients
Eihab Tawfik, MD
Board Ce'ifea. nwema lr i
WOUND CARE CENTER
S564-0444 NOW OPEN

WEST COAST MEDICAL CARE


Advanced Healthcare Techniques... Old Fashioned Values


Partner in Care


Special to the Chronicle
On Aug. 24, Mike Shier, left, development manager for
Hospice of Citrus County, presents a plaque to Lee
Hoogerheide, owner/operator of Ice Cold Air Discount
Auto Repair, in Crystal River in appreciation of Ice Cold
Air's unselfish service in assisting with the needs of
patients of Hospice of Citrus County.


You've



never looked


better.

What It Means
To You
0*S /b' //4.'j



SRi dI . ,n;C
k,/,' ,







Superior, high-resolution CT images for a more
accurate diagnosis.
In diagnostic medicine, better images can lead to better
outcomes. To provide your doctor with clear, accurate
images, our new multislice CT scanner produces high-
resolution images of any part of the body - in just
seconds. See us when you need a CT scan, and we'll see
you better.
Call ONE CALL Scheduling to learn more, 352.795.8394
or 352.489.2022, x8394.

SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
www.srrmc.com


A Patient Approach to Healb/hare


A4C Tui-.SDAY, SFPTI-MBFit 4, 2007


m v ........ ................. 7 ....


Crmus Coumy (FL) CH RONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


I DIABETES,?. HYPERTENSION








CfTRUS OUNTY ( ) H _ -------


* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 2149 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N.
Osceola Ave., Inverness.
* Courage AFG. 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United Methodist
Church, 8831 West Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. Room 102. Open
meeting. Call 270-3827.
* A.C. Ministries Recovery


patients were randomized to
receive placebo or liquid shark-
cartilage extract, 120 ml orally
twice daily.
After a median follow-up of 3.7
years, there was no significant
difference in the overall survival
between the two groups.
The shark cartilage used in
this trial was AE-941
(Neovastat), which was donated
by the manufacturer, Aeterna
Zenartis. This product is
unusual in that it was never
sold over the counter, unlike
other shark-cartilage supple-
ments. It was being developed
by Aeterna Zenartis as a phar-
maceutical for use in cancer,
but the company announced
recently that this project has
been dropped.
This is an excellent study that


SUPPORT
Continued from Page 4C
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict Catholic
Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness.


GANDHI
Continued from Page 1C

appears in the film on sharks at
the Monterey Bay Aquarium
(although the aquarium does not
endorse the use of shark carti-
lage).
The other theory behind the
use of cartilage is that it doesn't
have blood vessels and so it may
contain a substance that blocks
the development of blood ves-
sels.
The study was conducted in
384 patients with stage 3 lung
cancer at 53 sites in the United
States and Canada. Patients
received both induction
chemotherapy and then radia-
tion therapy In addition,


BENNETT


Continued from Page 1C


weight and exercise are proven important fac-
tors. There is evidence that people who weigh
too much have shorter survival
than people at a healthy weight, People
while 'people who get more
physical activity seem to do bet- the most
ter than sedentary survivors.
To get a better idea of the "bad" f(
relationship between diet and
colon . cancer survival, almost
researchers from several insti-
tutions studied people with times thi
stage III disease (colon cancer
that has spread to the lymph their coil
nodes, but not distant parts of
the body). All the participants return
had been treated with surgery


and were taking part in a separate clinical trial
testing two different types of chemotherapy given
after surgery. During chemo and six months
afterward, the participants answered question-
naires about their eating habits. They were fol-
lowed on average for more than five years.
The researchers looked at the effects of two
main eating patterns, a "good" diet high in fish,
poultry, fruits and vegetables, and a "bad" diet
high in red meat, fat, processed grains, French
fries and dessert People who ate the most of
these "bad" foods had almost three times the risk


t





o
n!


Group 12-Step Recovery
Workbook meeting (scripturally
based), 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at
Church Without Walls nondenomi-
national, nonprofit Christian fellow-
ship. The group ministers to: alco-
holics or substance abusers, family
of substance abusers, adults, chil-
dren and individuals who were
raised in alcoholic or substance
abuse or dysfunctional families.
Donations accepted. 3962 N.

Please see SUPPORT/Page 6C


was done at multiple centers in
the USA. This study conclusive-
ly proves that shark cartilage
does not help cancer patients.
In the USA, there are thou-
sands of such unproven thera-
pies. Patients need to realize
that until the effectiveness of
any treatment is proven by a
good study, it is best to avoid
these therapies.
-m--

Dr. Sunil Gandhi is:a hematol-
ogist and oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser of
the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or comments
to 521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto FL 34461 or e-mail
to sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com
or call 746-0707.


of their colon cancer returning compared to peo-
ple whose diets were more favorable. They also
had a higher risk of dying from any cause. Their
risk remained high even after the researchers
controlled for factors like age, body mass index,
exercise, number of lymph nodes affected by can-
cer and what type of chemotherapy they
received.
vho ate There are many good reasons
for colon cancer survivors to eat
of these a healthy diet A diet rich in
fruits, vegetables, and whole
ods had grains that also limits refined
grains, saturated fat and sugars
tthree can help reduce their risk of
heart disease and other types of
e risk of cancer. Colon cancer survivors
should try to maintain a healthy
in cancer weight and get regular exercise.
More information is available in
"in ... the latest American Cancer
Society guide for nutrition and
physical activity during and after cancer treat-
ment

Dr. Bennett is a board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president of the Citrus County
Unit of the American Cancer Society and a
member of the Board of Directors and
Executive Committee of the Florida Division
of the American Cancer Society. If you have
any suggestions for topics, or have any ques-
tions, e-mail him at cjbennett@rboi.com.


GRILLO
Continued from Page 1C
machines and other disruptive
noise. Avoid napping late in the
afternoon so it doesn't interfere
with your nighttime sleep. And
once you get done with your nap,
get up and walk around and do
some stretching exercise and, if
possible, get outside into the sun-
light for a short period of time, as
that seems to help as well.
I think napping sounds like a
great option for that 15-minute
morning and afternoon work
break instead of a cigarette or a
cup of coffee. I will be willing to
bet that you are going to feel a lot
better I would like to thank the
Web MD magazine for informa-
tion that was used in this article.

Denis Grillo, D.O., is an ear, nose
and throat specialist, can be
reached at 7950011.


__ � *.. .: ~ -. -
r~ ~ . .1


BLOOD
Continued from Page 1C

milliliters of blood is typically
collected.
"That didn't hurt a bit," Brown
said.
Then, she rested for several
minutes. Juice, water and snacks
were available. Donors are
advised to avoid strenuous activ-
ities immediately after giving
blood.
"We tell the women, 'Well, now
you don't have to cook dinner
tonight,' " Brown said, adding it



DODGE
Continued from Page 1C
your body' Summing up, if you
keep the practice up faithfully,
you can expect to gain many
long-term benefits, mentally, as
well as physically."
"Have other researchers con-
firmed those kinds of results?"
asked Steve.
"Yes, many other researchers
have published reports that con-
firm Dr Benson's basic findings.
Such research has now been
done in patients with a wide
variety of health problems.
Since 60 to 90 percent of doctor
office visits are stress-related, it
is not surprising that an effective
stress reduction program is so
helpful in so many conditions."
"OK," said Dan. "If we want to
try this relaxation response, how
do we start?"
"Dr. Benson uses anc4 teaches
a nine-step relaxation tech-
nique, which I'm condensing in
the following guidelines:
"Step 1. Decide on a focus
word, such as 'Peace,' or a short
phrase that's rooted in your
belief system. For example, 'The
Lord is my shepherd,' is a
favorite phrase.
"Step 2. Sit quietly in a com-
fortable position.
"Step 3. Close your eyes.
"Step 4. Relax your muscles,
from your toes to the top of your


usually takes 24
hours for the
body to recover
the fluid content trying i
lost.
Meanwhile, finallI
Sue Hanley of
Crystal River sat enough
and waited in the
small mobile
blood donation S
center to find out about he
if she was eligible
to donate. She tries to donate
every three to four months, she
said. After giving blood, donors
must wait eight weeks before
donating again.


head.
"Step 5. Breathing slowly,
repeat your phrase to yourself
with each exhalation.
"Step 6. Assume a passive atti-
tude. If any other thoughts come
to mind, simply let them go.
Return your attention to your
breathing and the repetition of
your phrase.
"Step 7. Continue this process
for 10 to 20 minutes.
"Step 8. Sit quietly for another
minute or so before opening
your eyes.
"Step 9. Repeat this practice
once or twice daily."
"That sounds like a medita-
tion technique I heard of a few
years ago," said Steve. "Is there
any relationship between faith
and the benefits of the relax-
ation response?"
"Excellent question," said
Tim. "Dr Benson explored the
same question in a book entitled,
'Timeless Healing,' published in


I





h.i
r


Hanley was
il not able to give
11 keep blood because
ntil I'm her iron level
was too low.
high Brown said
Sometimes peo-
ple think they-
are ineligible for-
ever if they are
ie Hanley denied once, but
low iron levels, that is not true.
"I keep trying-
until I'm finally high enough,"
Hanley said.
Brown encourages Citrus
County residents to share
Hanley's persistence.

1996. In it, he looked at faith
from many angles. He concluded
that what he called the 'faith fac-
tor' was important, but trust in a
higher power is what seemed
important rather than any spe-
cific religion. Regardless of their
professed religious faith, people,
who said they trusted a power
beyond themselves were those
who had the greatest medical
benefits as they elicited the
relaxation response."
After a brief reflective silence,
Dan said, "There is a lot of food
for thought in what you have told
us today. I think I will give the
relaxation response a good try!"

Dr. Ed Dodge is a retired
Inverness physician. Visit his
Web site, www.passion-
forhealth.info. Reach Dr.
Dodge through his Web blog,
Passion for Health, on the
Chronicle Web site.


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352.237.8787
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CHLkoNIc!IE -~


"Saluting Our Wounded Warriors"


Mail your registration form to
Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week
1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429

For more information call Chris Gregoriou 795-7000 or the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-6363
-~I
Deadline to
Registration Form regi ter:
I Friday, [
Yes, we would like to participate in the following Veterans October 19
Appreciation Week 2007 Events.


O Veterans Fair, November 3
O Post Office Dedication, November 5
E Veterans Flea Market, November 7
O IPS Veterans Program, November 9
0 Veterans Fish Fry, November 9
0 Veterans Day Parade, November 10


L Veterans Day Service, November 10
0 Veterans Day Luncheon, November 10
0 Military Ball, November 11
($30 per person Call 382-0462 or 527-1557)
Q Massing of Colors, November 11
0 Commemorative Flowers (list dates and locations)


rgLt g aalianull.
Mailing Address.
Description of participation for (Parade, Fair, Massing of Colors) Please attach separate
sheet if necessary



Contact Name (Print) Phone
We, the above, release Citrus Publishing Inc. and the Veterans Appreciation Ad Hoc
Coordinating Committee from any liability that may be associated with Veterans
Appreciation Week events.


Authorized Signature


Date


Mail this form to: Citrus County Chronicle, c/o Veterans Appreciation Week 1624
North Meadowcrest Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429 I
I- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


CYNDIE FORD PURDY
LMHC, NCC, MAC
- Licensed Mental Health Counselor
-~ National Certified Counselor
- Master Addictions Counselor
Adults * Adolescents * Couples
Clinical & Substance Abuse Assmts.
480 Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness, FL (352) 344-2320
P.O. Box 3356 * Dunnelon, FL Fax: (352) 344-4849
Office Hours By Appointment * FL Lic. # MH-5401 NPI#1528115599
S., Email" cyndiepurdy@bellsouttdh:4 www.fordpurdy.com


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 SC_


URAILY11 & ILIEFE


C FL CRONFCH








6C TUSDAY SEPTEMBER, 207 HELTH LIF CITRS Coiv'n (F)CHOIL


Beating bipolar


Associated Press
Maura Furey, Ph.D, a researcher with the National Institute of Mental Health, demonstrates
the application of a scopolamine patch behind the ear at the institute in Bethesda, Md. The
patch is used to help treat both bipolar depression and ordinary depression.


More talk therapy needed fo
Associated Press
NEW YORK - Psychological therapy can
greatly boost the effectiveness of drugs in treat-
ing bipolar disorder, but these specialized talk
therapies aren't as widely available as they
should be, experts say.
'"There are probably several dozen places in
the country where you can get these treat-
ments," said Dr. Holly Swartz, an assistant pro-
fessor of psychiatry at the University of
Pittsburgh. "It's not available in the majority of
the country."
Much of the problem is lack of training in the
specialized techniques for psychologists, psy-
chiatrists and social workers, said David
Miklowitz, a professor of psychology and psy-
chiatry at the University of Colorado at
Boulder. The techniques should become part of
the regular curriculum for them, he said.
And just as drug companies trumpet the
effectiveness of their drugs, advocates for talk
therapy have to advertise the impact of their
techniques, Miklowitz said.
"There's a lot of work that needs to be done
to get these treatments into day-to-day use in
community practice," he said.
Basically, the talk therapies work by helping


Are


Are


r bipolar patients, experts say
patients deal with stress, function socially and
stick with their medications, he said.
They come in three styles:
* Family-focused therapy includes the
patient's family and deals with their relation-
ships. Goals include improving communication
and problem-solving and providing for family
intervention at the earliest signs of relapse.
* Cognitive-behavioral therapy is done with
the patient alone. It helps patients change
harmful thinking patterns of depression and
mania, and teaches them to recognize their
early warning signs of relapse to either
extreme of the illness.
* Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy
addresses ways to deal with interpersonal
issues like marriage problems, and promotes a
regular daily schedule of sleeping, waking, eat-
ing and other activities. Sticking to a regular
schedule is thought to help stabilize and pre-
vent bipolar symptoms.
Miklowitz is studying whether family-
focused therapy can delay the first appearance
of bipolar disorder or reduce its severity in
children at risk Those children have sugges-
tive symptoms and a family history of bipolar
disorder but do not yet have the full-blown con-
dition.


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Ci li ,xic(ILE I


-----


NOTES
Continued from Page 4C

* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center maintains an active
group of speakers. Call Jennifer
Hall, community relations coordina-
tor, at 795-8344 or (352) 489-2022,
ext. 8344.
* LifeLink of Florida, the agency
which coordinates organ and tis-
sue donations for the Tampa Bay
area, has speakers available. Call
Jennifer Krouse at (800) 262-5775
or (813) 253-2640.
* The Citrus County Health
Department will provide speakers
to groups interested in health top-
ics. Call Judi Tear at 527-0068, ext.
271.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center offers a way to
send e-mail messages to loved
ones who have been admitted to
the hospital. Log onto
www.srrmc.com, and go to
Quickfind, or Patient and Visitor
Info. Choose Email a Patient, com-
plete the form and hit send.



SUPPORT
Continued from Page 5C
Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call
Laverne at 637-4563.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
* 3 p.m. Monday at the senior
center on County Road 491,
Lecanto. Call 746-5018.
* 1 p.m. Thursday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd, Beverly Hills.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* CEA-H.O.W. for people who
have an eating disorder, at noon
Wednesday at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness. Call
Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Amputee Support Group
meets the last Thursday monthly at
Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant on
State Road 44 West, Inverness.


* Senior Companion Program
serve 20 hours per week, providing
companionship, respite care,
escorted transportation and other
services to clients who are at risk
of placement in long-term care
facilities.
Prospective SCP volunteers do
not need medical or technical
skills, just the ability to be a friend.
Call Sue Carscadden, SCP assis-
tant, at 527-5959.
* Barrier Free America as
advocates will work with persons
who have disabilities and the entity
involved in complying with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990 (ADA).
To file a grievance (the service is
free), call for an appointment at
628-5401. Barrier Free America is
at the Golden Eagle Plaza, 3269
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* Florida Alliance for
Assistive Services and
Technology (FAAST) will exhibit
and demonstrate adaptive and
assistive devices for people with
disabilities and the elderly. A
FAAST Demonstration Center is at
the Center for Independent Living's


Call Donna at 344-1988 or Perry at
Sonlife Prosthetics, 344-8200.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7 to 9
p.m. most Wednesdays at the
Beverly Hills Community Center, 1
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call Ann
Thonen at 795-5116 or Kristi Kobler
at 628-5537.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday
and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41,
Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday
and noon Sunday, YANA Club, 147
N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian Church,
Grover Cleveland Boulevard,
Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8 p.m.
Monday and Friday, Lecanto
Church of Christ, State Road 44
and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8
p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Lecanto, east of County Road 491
and State Road 44.


Lecanto office. FAAST is at 3774
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461. The center is open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Call 527-8399.
* Agency for Persons with
Disabilities toll-free number is
(866) APD-CARES or (866) 273-
2273, staffed from 8 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. The
agency currently serves more than
35,000 Floridians with the develop-
mental disabilities of mental retar-
dation, autism, cerebral palsy,
spina bifida and Prader-Willi syn-
drome. Visit
www.apd.myflorida.com.
* Yoga at the Historic Crystal
River Train Depot, 109 Crystal
Ave., is scheduled as follows:
* 9 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m.
Wednesday.
* 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
* 9 to 10 a.m. Saturday.
Cost is $5 per class. Bring a mat
or towel and wear clothes that
allow for easy physical movement.
Classes are appropriate for 8 years
and older and are multi-level. All
certified instructors. Call 795-3710,
795-3662, 795-1645 or 563-6535.


Narcotics Anonymous is not affili-
ated with any of the meeting facili-
ties listed. Information line: 382-
0851.
M Narconon Need help with
Addiction? Call (800) 556-8885.
* Nar-Anon: a support group for
the families and friends of addicts,
at 8 p.m. Wednesday at Act II,
1065 N. Paul Drive, Inverness. Call
344-5963 or visit www.nar-
anon.org.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus County
at 7 p.m. Thursday in Bailey Hall,
First Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 W., Inverness. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Call 621-0165. The
National DBSAAssociation's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
* The Area 13 Family Care
Council from 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly at the
Wildwood DCF/APD office, 1601
W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State
Road 44). Call Dominic Christofaro,
(352) 489-6279.


926-0923 TU/F/SUCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND IN
YANKEETOWN, FLORIDA
TOWN OF YANKEETOWN, FLORIDA
ORDINANCE NO. 2007- 10
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT (CPA
2007-01)

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF YANKEETOWN AMENDING TOWN
OF YANKEETOWN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; AMENDING THE
YANKEETOWN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXT, GOALS, OBJECTIVES,
POLICES AND MAPS, INCLUDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
AMENDING FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT, TRAFFIC CIRCULATION /
TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT, HOUSING ELEMENT, PUBLIC FACILITIES
(SANITARY SEWER, SOLID WASTE,DRAINAGE, POTABLE WATER, AND
NATURAL GROUNDWATER AQUIFER RECHARGE) ELEMENT,
CONSERVATION AND COASTAL MANAGEMENT ELEMENT
RECREATION/OPEN SPACE MANAGEMENT ELEMENT,
INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION ELEMENT, CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENT, CAPITOL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN,
MONITORING AND EVALUATION PROGRAM OF THE YANKEETOWN
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR TRANSMITTAL TO THE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE AND LEGAL
STATUS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT.
The Town of Yankeetown is preparing amendments to its Comprehensive Plan affecting the Town of
Yankeetown in its entirely and will hold a public hearing to be conducted by the Yankeetown Planning and
Zoning Commission, acting as the local planning agency, on Tuesday, September 11, 2007 at 10:00am at the
Inglis-Yankeetown Lion's Club located at 22 59th Street in Yankeetown, Florida. This public hearing will be
followed by the first public hearing by the Yankeetown Town Council on Friday, September 28, 2007 at 7:00
p.m., or soon after, at the Inglis-Yankeetown Lion's Club located at 22 59th Street in Yankeetown, Florida for
the purpose of transmitting the proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendments to the Florida Department of
Community Affairs and other state and regional agencies for any objections, recommendations and comments.
Once convened, the Public Hearing(s) may be continued to one or more future dates: any interested party shall
be advised that the dates, times and places of any continuation of the Public Hearing shall be announced during
the Public Hearing and that no further notices regarding these matters will be published.
The purpose of the hearings is to conduct a public hearing to consider and take public comment on
amendments to the Town of Yankeetown Comprehensive Plan, including the Future Land Use Map affecting the
entire Town of Yankeetown in its entirety:



_- - -
\ : " " " "-6'^ - " -"-












All interested parties may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance and Comprehensive
Plan Amendments at each of the public hearingss. A copy of the proposed Ordinance and Comprehensive Plan
Amendments is available for public inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk, located at Yankeetown Town
Hall, 6241 Harmony Lane, Yankeetown, Florida, Monday through Friday, during regular Town Hall business
hours (9:00 am till 12 noon).
All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing,
they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based, pursuant to Fla. Stat. Section 286.0105. There will also be a sign up sheet available at the Town Council's
public hearing by which members of the public who sign and provide contact information on the sheet can stay
informed during the adoption process.
Any handicapped or person with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodation to participate in this
meeting are encouraged to attend and should contact the Town Clerk at (352) 447-2511 at least 48 hours (if
possible) prior to the meeting so arrangements can be made pursuant to Fla. Stat. Section 286.26 and the
Americans with Disabilities Act.
\ ''^T' Y'*tl""*
\a 'S- r
\_4-


'6C TUESDAY, SErrEmBER 4, 2007


IRF-Arfia Sk ]LIFE


OTRus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I










I.. i .1
ii' I II li ii
I ~.
-, .


SEPTEMBER 4, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CIi RU"- C(.)LN rN C(HRH0N 14 1L


News " ..

Book sale to benefit
Relay for Life
Citrus Memorial's Relay for
Life team will host a used book
sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 14, in the Magnolia
Room. All books being sold are
in excellent condition and both
hardcover and paperback books
will be available.
New Jersey and
Friends will meet
The New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County will meet
at 1 p.m. Monday at the VFW
Post 4252, on State Road 200,
in Hernando.
Our favorite annual "Ice
Cream Sundae" social will be
held for our members following
the meeting.
Our activities for September
will be a trip to the Show
Palace in Hudson to see the
comedy, "The Greater Tuna"
starring Matthew McGee, on
Sept. 15; on Sept. 26, we will
meet at Crackers Restaurant
for a cruise on the Crystal River
followed by lunch. For informa-
tion, call Frank Sasse' at (352)
489-0053 or visit njclubfl.tri-,
pod.com/.
There will be a bus trip to the
Beau Rivage Casino from Jan.
27 to 30 in Biloxi. For reserva-
tions, call Mary Anne at 746-
3386.
Don't forget about our
Thursday at the Beverly Hills
Bowl at 10 a.m.. Good bowlers
are welcome, so-so bowlers will
feel right at home.
For more information about
the club, call Joe Morse at 746-
7782.
Butterfly Club invites
public to attend
The public is invited to attend
the Beverly Hills Butterfly Club.
Meetings resume at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday at the Beverly Hills
Recreation Center, 77 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. The
speaker will be Lenny Altavilla
and Linda Moran. They will
present "Gingers in the
Butterfly Garden" and will have
gingers available for sale. Once
you see these gingers, you will
be amazed. For more informa-
tion, call Christine Small at 527-
8629 or Peggy Seward at 527-
2686.
Pet Meals Program
needs volunteers
The Citrus County Pet Meals
Program needs volunteers to
assist with packaging the pet
food that has been donated for
the program. The packaged pet
food is then delivered to home-
bound seniors with pets.
You can help pack the pet
food at the Humanitarians of
Florida Inc. at 1149 Conant
Ave., Crystal River, on the cor-
ner of State Road 44 and
Conant across from the Bow
Wow Boutique. The packaging
is done from about 8 to 10 a.m.
the second and fourth Fridays
monthly.
The Citrus County Pet Meals
Program partnered with the
Humanitarians of Florida Inc. to
provide pet meals to home-
bound seniors with pets. The
Pet Meals program began in
June 2003 and approximately
75 homebound seniors receive
the pet food on a monthly
basis.
For more information or to
sign up, call Nancy Lietz at
527-5975.

Pet -' -'OT

Loved


Special to the Chronicle
Shadow is a happy 4-year-old
American Eskimo. Her recent-
ly adoptive parents, Jeanne
and Gordan Weiss of
Homosassa, love and appreci-
ate her.


Feline fun to come this month


Humanitarians of Florida to host fair, show


Special to the Chronicle

The Humanitarians of Florida will
host its second annual Feline Fun Fair
and Cat Show at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept.
15, at the National Guard Armory on
Venable Avenue in Crystal River.
Registration is at 8.
Household pets have their own
unique standard and titles which are
comparable to pedigreed cats.
Household pets are judged primarily
on condition, beauty and show pres-


ence. Remember, beauty is in the eye of
the beholder, and colors and patterns
are often a whim of Mother Nature.
There will be categories for both kit-
tens and adult cats, domestic short hair
and long hair, solid colors, calicos, tab-
bies, point, etc. There will also be some
fun classes to let your pet's personality
shine.
Entry fee is $7 per class or $5 if enter-
ing more than three classes. Winners of
first and second place in any class are
automatically qualified for Best of


Show Class (no entry fee required).
Ribbons are awarded to first through
eighth place.
All cats entered in this show must be
in good health and proof of a current
rabies certificate must be presented to
the show steward at time of entry or to
a Humanitarian staff member if prereg-
istering your pet at the Humanitarians
Manchester House Clinic on State
Road 44 and Conant Avenue in Crystal
River.
Information booths will be manned
by our dedicated staff to distribute
information on early spay and neuter
procedures, flea and parasite control,


how the microchip may help you recov-
er a lost pet and answer general
health/wellness/behavioral questions.'
There will be a silent auction with
items to tempt every pet lover. The live
auction bidding will be for one of 12
centerfolds for the Humanitarians 2008
rescued pets calendar. Each of the 12
months will feature pictures of the win-
ning bidder's pet and their story. These
beautiful color calendars are not only
collector's items but make perfect
Christmas stocking stuffers.
For more information or entry forms,
contact the Humanitarians of Florida
at 563-2370.


Workshop


about grief


in four


sessions

Program to start

Sept. 17

Special to the Chronicle

Hospice of Citrus County, in
association with Central
Florida Community College,
will present "Good Grief,"
which will be from 5:30 to 7
p.m. on four consecutive
Monday evenings beginning
Sept 17, at the Central Florida
Community College Lecanto
Campus at 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway.
This workshop will offer
information that will assist
grievers about how to cope with
the array of emotions commonly
experienced. The program will
be moderated by Jonathan
Beard, Wings Grief Support
Manager with Hospice of Citrus
County. "Together we will see
our grief from a fresh perspec-
tive, allowing us to be strength-
ened by our experiences," said
Beard.
To register, call Beard at 527-
2020 or (866) 642-0962.
Established in 1983,
licensed in 1985 and accredit-
ed by the Joint Commission,
Hospice of Citrus County is
preserving the integrity of the
hospice philosophy in the
finest traditions of serving
you. For information about
the many services that
Hospice of Citrus County
offers, call 527-2020 or visit
the Web at www.hospiceof
citruscounty.org.


Bicentennial Park Pool has lap club Play horseshoes in B.H.


Special to the Chronicle

Bicentennial Park Pool
(BPP) now offers an aquatics
lap club for people who walk or
swim laps on a regular basis.
The objective of the club is to
spark interest in and motivate
patrons toward personal
health and wellness. All you
need to do is fill in your total
lap tally on your personal chart


each time you walk or swim
and have a BPP staff member
initial it. It's that simple.
Participation in the lap club is
free. Fill out a short form at the
pool office to register and you
will be given instructions on
how to track progress on your
personal chart. Although the
BPP changed over to the fall
schedule Aug. 6, patrons may
sign-up anytime and are


encouraged to participate. For
more information, call
Bicentennial Park Pool at 795-
1478.
Any person requiring rea-
sonable accommodation at
any program because of a dis-
ability or physical impair-
ment should contact the
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation office 72 hours
prior to the activity.


Special to the Chronicle


A new season opens
Saturday at the Beverly Hills
Horseshoe club in Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills.
The NHPA Tournament
dates on the second Saturday
monthly run from 9 a.m. until
done pitching. All NHPA
members are welcome. Call
Lou Robison at 746-4058 to


register; pitching fee due by
today.
A group from Zachry
Construction plan a horse-
shoe tournament for charity
from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday,
anticipating 20 to 40 people,
with proceeds going to the
Crystal River Fire House.
For information about the
club, visit www.horsshoe
pitching.com.


Fraternal Order of Eagles has interesting history


t was an honor to be invit-
ed to meet the Grand
Worthy North American
President John and his wife
Zuby Potter of the Fraternal
Order of Eagles as they made
their official visit at the new
Crystal River Aerie 4272 club-
house at 5340 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd. in
Homosassa last week.
The Potters, of Ontario
Canada, were warmly wel-
comed to our area in grand
style. D.J. music flowed


m- m
Ruth Levins
AROUND THE
h -.pr ,_-* .;.


through the hall. The buffet was
catered by Fred's Kitchens of
Homosassa, served by the auxiliary.
I learned that the Fraternal Order of
Eagles has an impressive 100 years of
humanitarian service and the Aeries
designation of the order means "eagles
nest"
The group was founded in 1898 by six
theater owners while sitting in a pile of
lumber in Morans shipyard in Seattle,
Wash., discussing a musicians' strike.
When the competitors had decided what


to do about the issue, they
bonded and formed an organ-
ization they dubbed: "The
Order of Things."
Meetings were held on the
stages of theaters and after-
ward they would enjoy a few
hours of social activities. As
they grew in number, they
chose the bald eagle as their
official emblem and
changed their name to The
Fraternal Order of Eagles.
Numbering more than 1
million members in 1,700


cities across the United States and
Canada, seven U.S. presidents have
been members.
The Eagles are on a mission to raise
millions of dollars to aid the less fortu-
nate, help cure diseases and give disas-
ter relief wherever needed. They are
people helping people. Some of their
charities include: Eagles Max Baer
Heart Fund. Eagles Jimmy Durante
Children's Fund. Eagles Robert Hansen
Dunlap Kidney Fund. Eagles Memorial
Foundation and Eagles Golden Eagle


Alzheimer's Fund.
Other causes they have proudly spon-
sored include the initial emphasis on
establishing Mother's Day as a national
holiday, the sponsorship of our first
Workmen's Compensation law, the
impetus for Social Security, and the
inauguration nationwide for the 'Jobs
After 40" program to end job discrimi-
nation based on age.
The Crystal River Order was char-
tered on March 3, 1991, and has more
than 300 members and 200 auxiliary
members. Having met in several sites
over the years, they are now in their
newly built home. Last week, the auxil-
iary loaded a trunk of school supplies
and delivered them to the Homosassa
and Crystal River Primary Schools.
The 2007-08 officers are: Bill Hunter,
president: Mary Clark, worthy past
president: Bill McCaskey, past presi-
dent: Dan Rosenberger, chaplain;
Larry Boatright. secretary; Rick
Gilbert, treasurer: John Norup, guard;
Lou Whitten. bulletin editor; Joyce
Trice, auditor: and worthy trustees
Fred Capelleri, Joe Francis, Judy


Boatright, Chuck Baily, Tim Holsworth
and Bruce Mack
Auxiliary officers for 2007-08 are:
Diane Neumann, past president;
Bonnie Rosenberger, president;
Deborah Wiggins, vice president;
Marlene Gross, chaplain; Sharon
DeFrancisco, secretary; Juanita
Spruytte, conductress; Mary Langione
and Dee Capelleri, guards; Connie
Deering, auditor; Lois Hall, member-
ship chairwoman; Jan Ryan, bulletin;
and trustees Joyce Hunter, Joan Norup,
Greta Kleyn and Lois Hall.
Recently the group traveled to
Okahumpka for the District Five meet-
ing and brought back three traveling
trophies that are proudly displayed in
their social hall.
For membership information, con-
tact Judy Boatright at (352) 503-3162.

Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community. Let
her know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to P.O. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but mul-
tiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 563-3280: or by e-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com.


* News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day cannot be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than twice.









SC ~ IP~f~AV SI~P"r~eAflT'I5 4 2007 ENTERTAINMENT Omus CouNn' (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 c: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon 1: Comcast, Inglis
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S'PG' 758013 PG D' Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond ___ Raymond Raymond Raymond I _ City 14,
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50 4 50 50 Property Ladder 'G' 9[ Mostly True Stories: Overhaulin' "Chip & Chris LA Ink Kat considers LA Ink Cleanse. (N) 'PG, LA Ink Cleanse. 'PG, D,L'
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TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 C: ComcastCitrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis
I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

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168075 Kentucky at Florida. _


he PlusCode number printed next to each pro-
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys-
tem. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea-
ture (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR),
all you need to do to record a program is enter its


PlusCode number.
If you have cable service, please make sure that
your cable channel numbers are the same as the
channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to
perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the


cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys-
tem, please contact your VCR manufacturer.


The channel lineup for KLiP Interactive cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.


Dealing with parents' favoritism


Dear Annie: My parents, who are
in their 80s, decided to sell my
nephew a piece of property for
much less than its value. They chose to
bypass their children and other grand-
children. The "chosen grand-
child" then harvested re-
sources from the property so
it ended up costing him next
to nothing. It was a huge gift
When we asked my par-
ents about the fairness of
this, we were told that the
daughters didn't count
because they didn't carry the
family name, although this
didn't explain skipping over
my brother and his other
sons. My parents could have ANN
sold the property on the open
market and given all their MAIL
grandchildren a gift, while
still having enough money to help them
in their later years. Now we have to lis-
ten to them crying about the high cost of
medicine and health care.
It has been over a year, and I am still
struggling with this. I realize the prop-
erty was theirs to do with as they
pleased, but how could they not realize
how much this would hurt the rest of
us? They really don't think they did any-
thing wrong. Did they? How can I get
past this? - Ignored
Dear Ignored: Parents often don't
understand that children equate such


gifts with how much they are valued
within the family Those who are over-
looked feel unloved, and ignoring the
female members makes them feel like
second-class children. This is hurtful
and thoughtless, not to men-
tion sexist and biased. You
can do nothing about this gift
now, but you can explain to
-. your parents how it makes
you feel when they so bla-
tantly favor one grandchild.
They do not owe anyone an
inheritance, however, so try
to forgive them.
Dear Annie: My boss has a
constant habit of chewing
gum with her mouth open.
IE'S She also pops the gum with
every chomp. When I'm
.BOX around her, I can't seem to
focus on anything else.
I can't really avoid her, especially
since I'm relatively new and need her
guidance. She's a great person to work
for, but I just can't get past the gum pop-
ping. It's like nails on a chalkboard.
Other than this, the job is great. I
don't know how to say anything without
offending her. Can you help? - Close
Your Mouth, Please
Dear Close: Your boss may be using
gum to give up another bad habit, such
as smoking. You can say, "Carol, I'm
sure you don't realize how loud the
gum-popping is." Otherwise, you're just


going to have to put up with it. If it's not
against company policy, try headphones
or a desk fan to dampen the sound.
Dear Annie: You left out a piece of
information in your response about
Habitat for Humanity donations.
Habitat is a "hand up, not a handout"
organization.
Habitat builds the houses for the low-
est cost by using donated building sup-
plies and donated labor. The homes are
sold to partner families through a selec-
tion process, and these families must
complete sweat-equity hours. Our affili-
ate requires 400 hours to be spent build-
ing their own home, working on other
Habitat projects and on someone else's
Habitat home. They must be able to
repay a no-interest mortgage, generally
set between 20 and 25 years. They must
be willing to partner, meaning keeping
track of hours, credit counseling, etc.
There are projects available for all ages
to get involved with Habitat for Humanity.
Readers can find their local affiliate in
the phone book or on habitatorg. God
bless you for mentioning this wonderful
organization. - Renee Durham, Board
President, Autauga County Habitat for
Humanity, Prattville, Ala.
Dear Renee Durham: Thanks for the
additional information. Sometimes we
don't have the space to say everything
we'd like, so we are delighted you've
given us the opportunity to clarify the
work Habitat does.


==I== Today's HOROSCOPE


Your Birthday: The possibilities for
strengthening your material position, as
well as your personal affairs look quite
encouraging in the year ahead.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Even if
someone you're working with is trying to
use some devious tactics, don't follow his or
her lead.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Don't let
your ego get in the way and cause you to
pretend to be knowledgeable about some-
thing you are not.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - That need
for instant gratification could rear its ugly
head again and induce you to buy some-
thing you can't afford. Don't give in.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Although you don't mean to be, others
could find you too domineering and
assertive.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Your
eating potential is actually quite good, but
nothing will be handed to you on a silver
platter.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Uncomfortable feelings while participating


in a large group activity are manufactured
by your own mind. Get over it.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Unless
an objective is well-defined, there is a pos-
sibility you might go to a lot of trouble to
achieve something you don't actually want.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Unfortun-
ately, you may have to deal with someone
who has a surly disposition. Don't let this
person start to push you around.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - It might be
quite constructive for you to take some time
and analyze your financial position, espe-
cially if it's been a bit shaky lately.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Guard
against inclinations to place too much
importance on your self-interests while
ignoring those of others.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Allow your
compassionate instincts to influence your
treatment of co-workers so that you don't
become unduly frustrated.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Tact and diplo-
macy will achieve that which you desire in
ways that flexing your muscles or raising
your voice won't.


Briidqe


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

When an opponent opens with
one of a suit, if you make a single
jump overcall in a suit (for exam-
ple, one club - two hearts), you are
showing a weak hand with 5-10
high-card points and a decent six-
card suit But if an opponent has
opened with a pre-empt, a jump
overcall is intermediate, promising
a good six-card or longer suit and
some 14-16 high-card points. You do
not pre-empt against a pre-empt
That applied in this deal. First,
though, how should South plan the
play in four spades? The defend-
ers take two heart tricks and cast
adrift with a trump.
After East opened with a text-
book weak two, South made a
three-spade overcall, accurately
describing his hand. And North
raised to game.
West led the heart ace, under
which his partner signaled with
the king. West continued with his
heart five (the higher of two
remaining cards), East winning
with his jack and shifting safely to
a trump.
South removed the missing
trumps, ending on the board, then
played a low club toward his king.
If East had been of a nervous dis-
position and won with his ace,
declarer would have claimed, his

ACROSS 38 Metal in bronze
39 Dark blue
1 Units of 40 Get even for
resistance 43 Before
5 Heel marriage
8 Like, stupid! 44 San Francisco
11 Tarry hill
12 Tint 47 Joule
13 Cow-headed fraction
goddess 48 Type of cheese
15 Disregard 50 Misprints
(2 wds.) 52 Mineral spring
17 superman, 53 Wading bird
incognito 54 Cape Canaveral
18 House buzzer events
19 Surface 59 Wrinkle
21 UFO movie 60 Caustic
(hyph.) substance
24 Monastic 61 Metric pound
title 62 Asian
25 Stitch up export
26 Go-ahead 63 To date
27 Fuzzy 64 Bellow


30 Hotcakes
acronym
32 "How - -
doing?"
33 Canal of song
37 Skier's need


DOWN
I Startled cries
2 Derisive snort
3 First space lab


North 09-04-07
A K 10 9 5
V 72
SK J 9 6
SQ 4 3


West East
A 4 A 8 3
VA 5 4 � KQ J
* Q843 * 72
4 J 9 7 6 5 4 A 10
South
A A Q J 7 6 2
S10 3
* A 10 5
. K 8


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
2
3 A Pass 4 A All pass
Opening lead: V A


third diamond disappearing on
dummy's club queen. But when
East played low, South won with
his club king and played a second
club, ducking on the board. East
won with his 10 and continued
with the club ace, South ruffing.
Now declarer knew West held the
diamond queen. Why? Because
East had produced 10 high-card
points - the heart K-Q-J and club
ace. With the diamond queen
extra, he would have opened one
heart, not two.

Answer to Previous Puzzle















W E D GAS PPSEAT


4 Eat too much
5 Bok-
6 - Wiedersehen
7 Postponing
8 Levee
9 Exploiters


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


10 Depend on
14 Simmer
16 Insincere
20 Damage
superficially
21 Lop off
22 Salmon
variety
23 Superstar
24 Hopping mad
28 Sideways
29 Kyoto cash
31 Green
veggie
34 Hindu
royalty
35 Currier's part-
ner
36 Looks over
41 Fido's doc
42 Sports
network
44 Playwright -
Simon
45 Shuttle course
46 Pickle juice
49 Zany
51 Between ports
52 Bird-feeder
treat
55 Vote in
favor
56 Hurry along
57 Building wing
58 Earth's star


� 2007 by NEA, Inc.


1 9

2


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DUJEG


@2007 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
YOHBB



DEAGAN/

www.jumble.com
FRYLUR
T^^ ~ ~
1 ^ A _ _ _


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: "
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: MANGY PUPPY PAYING JINGLE
Answer: When he lost the case, the handsome lawyer
was - "APPEALING"


I


CITRus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


SC TuEsDAY. SEFITEM13ER 4. 2007


ENYEEMAINMENT


7


I
*









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Peanuts


CcOMICS


TrI u-miAv Sr3prlP1-K -*J'nzi 9A/A7w~


Garfield


Cathy


SI1F MOV�PF~wMF-H R Ot-14 HftWAS IN ceTALGUScLHoo6 l
N 'J4ANCOUVFP,&OoTAI4JAPF~1- GwHF2N O4CAMPuS, AJPI
mpN4NT*4oizoN~b AH~ iwp~s &236,ss5 om61rit.JS' 1Z'wHim
e-rurYINC& EN&eLIS H-N SHE. WAS P5AL
G44E. ME.:- M\/EAVFRl I,1 11


Sally Forth.
WHY SHOULD I CALL MY MOM ANM SIS? AND, MOM WILL BE,
I ALREADY KNOW WHAT THEY'LL SAY! LIKE, "DISAPPOINTED,
IJACKIE WILL BE, LIKE, "WHINE, WHINE, I SAPPOINTED,
UA PkIi DblSrADnDIMT'if"


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Y$ROOP FWIAE-~cEM Ou'YOU TOLD)'MOU-

FEEL CY ,tC�7 I tN �CR-OOL!


Kit 'N' Carlyle


Rubes


wz^


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"SOON l4IST�AClRE ZWULL55l -lINKlNC&
H5R~CI40IC9OF'ROFFSslON5."


"I know how to count to one
in Spanish."


Betty


Big Nat<


Frank & Ernest


THEY'RE ,ASSIGNImN W O SHE ...AN SHE'S WELL,
US LOCKER. PARTNEgRS -MUST/ YOUR CHANGE
THIS YEAR? WHAT/ E LOCKER DO F
WAS WRONG WITH NEW. PARTNER, TO THI
LETTING - -.-ACCORDING
PICK OULR4 |' NATE, To THE .
OWN LOC)CKBe YOU'RE - 7 RULES. AH,
I>ARTNEg5?",: WITH AMAND
WOODCOCK's





Today 'sMOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Halloween".(R) 1 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:30
p.m., 4:15 p.r , 7:50 p.m.Digital.
"The Invasion" (PG-13) 1:40
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:450 p.m.
"Superbad" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4
p.m., 7:20 p.m.',
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 1:45
p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:45 p.m..
"The Bourne Ultimatum"
(PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Halloween" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m, 4:10 p.m., 7:55 p.m, 10:05
p.m.
"War" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:45


p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"The Nanny Diaries" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
945 p.m.
"The Invasion" (PG-13) 10:25
p.m.
"Superbad" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
Digita[
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 2
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:35
p.m. Digital.
"Underdog" (PG) 1 p.m., 4
p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Bourne Ultimatum"
(PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Transformers" (PG-13) 1:05
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:10
p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and enter-
tainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Doonesbury


Arlo and Janis


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Y equals U



" LB FDL K DR TETJ KHRT VM

UADLUT." - RTLTUD

"XAT SY LUXH BL BS KHRGB F HR

G HRU JHFH LDXH LN VTXKTTL NBBG

DLG TEHZ." - U HUTJ B


PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "...in labor news, longshoremen walked off the piers
today; rescue operations are continuing." - George Carlin


(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 9-4


TuFsDAY. SFPTFzM]3FR 4. 2007 9


I











LOC TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007










Classifieds


To place an ad, call 5635966





Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35) 635650 TllFr e: s S A ~ (88082240 1E ai:cl - escroilonie.0 wbi:w w*hoicenin 0o


MIDDLE AGED MAN
would like to meet lady
for dining & dancing.
Call (352) 382-5661




R ENTALFIEN " D i
| www.chronlcle |
rentalfnder.com




$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Recelot
1 Rooster & Bantam Hen
with 2 week old baby
Bring your own
container to pick up.
(352) 447-3022
T $$ $ $ $ $ $
I TOP DOLLAR
| For Junk Cars |
$ (352) 201-1052 $
I- - -- - J
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles In your
yard? (352) 860-2545

$ CASH $
PAID FOR
* Unwanted

I 352-220-0687 I
--- --- J
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
FREE MALE PIT MIX
9 WK OLD PLEASE CALL
352-854-9663
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084


I 0 *0 -


Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl.'s, A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
SUPPORT CITRUS
COUNTY PUBLIC
SCHOOLS
Please send Campbell
Soup Labels and Box
Top for Education tops
to Inverness Middle
School. Make them to
the attention of
"W.Scott".
Thank You.
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
Wanted: Riding & push
mowers, other sm. eng.
Quick free removal
352-601-5277/726-4290
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.


Dog, small English
Dachshund,
1000 SW 196 Ct., reward
(352) 465-6604
LOST CAT
Grey & white male.
Declawed ..
Last seen in Pine Ridge
(352) 464-1401 cell
(352) 464-1399
Purse,
Brown Prada
West Amman Rd. Mini
Farms. (352) 795-5893
(239) 913-7294
cp

Anoucmet


emlI'
TRUST
DIVORC


GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sole just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines.
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207

RENTAL FINDER
|, www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
L ----- Jmil

# SOD * SOD - SOD-
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032


I CAT ADOPTIONS I


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsDha.org.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints,




FULL BODY DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE &
AROMATHERAPY
by Terri Lic. MM 17442
(352) 628-1036
HAIRCARE in your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gall 352-422-6315





2 and ad

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.


4 DAY Carribbean
Cruise, June 2008
Call Now for Group
Rates (352) 476-1973


Clercal


E: s 9 -rt'.Iz 8 6
IT'1 /L�z 6 8 s E C-
Z S'Z'6 T 91� ,s







651398v6S i z


OFFICE PERSON
Auto Parts exp. a must.
Office exp. necessary.
Apply All Prestige Auto
(352) 795-7000

RECEPTIONIST/
COORDINATOR
Good phone, office,
computer skills req.
Must be dependable
& professional
Fax Resume to:
(352) 726-3490

SECRETARY
Full Time Position
for a fast paced
Insurance Office.
Looking for Someone
who has computer
skills and knowledge
with Spread Sheets,
Must be able to
multi task and must
have Customer
Service Skills.
Please call Heather at
1-352-726-7722
for Interview or fax
resume to
352-726-6813





































Licensed
Practical
Nurse/Certified
Medical Assistant
Seeking a LPN/CMA
for a fast-paced
medical practice
located in Crystal
River. Ideal
candidate must have
previous physician
office experience to
be responsible for
performing EKGs,
PFTs, vital signs and
phlebotomy. Will also
assist the physician
and be responsible
for front desk duties.
Please apply online
at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer

MEDICAL OFFICE/
ASSISTANT

Front & back office,
patient cdre, P/T or F/T.
Medical experience
req'd. Transcription
experience a plus.
Competitive pay/
benefits for the
right person.
Mail resume to:
108 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452

MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST
Busy medical practice
Exp. med. terminology,
65-75 wpm w/1-2 yrs
medical exp. Excellent
written & oral commu-
nication skills needed.
Excellent benefits.
Mon thru Fri. Fax
Resume to Gwen
352-637-4510


NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE


RECEPTIONIST
F/T for Busy Drs. Office.
Exp'd w/Medical Mgr.
& accounts receivable.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
� ALL STAR AT
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S

New competitive
pay rates. Call
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111
URGENT CARE/
FAMILY PRACTICE
Seeking
Exp. Front Office
Personnel FT
Must be cheerful,
good with patients.
Hours. 8am - 5 pm
Call (352) 522-0094
or Fax Resume To:
(352) 522-0098




Enthusiastic
and Innovative
Graphic
Designer wanted:
Rapidly growing
Citrus County
company seeking
graphic designer with
strong understanding
of color theory,
design best practices
for creating visual
designs and layouts
for web pages,
print marketing,
e-mail, and sales
materials. PHP and
MySql knowledge
a plus. Competitive
salary and benefits.
To Join our team In
a fun, creative
environment please
e-mail links to your
online portfolio
and resume to
careers@smartphone-
experts.com




SERVERS
BANQUET CHEFS
& LINE COOKS

Needed
Please apply at:
505 E Hartford St.
Hemando or
Call (352) 746-6855




$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts, for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187

ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist In the
enrollment of the new-
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work in
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance 1st
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an Interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813
National Electrical
Wholesale Distributor
Located in Wildwood
Has Opening For ag-
gressive inside/outside
SALES REPS
Full Benefit package
avail., Exp. preferred
but not required.
866-748-0505
Realtors Wanted

Small productive
office. Pleasant
working cond., Good
commission split In-
terviews confidential.
(352) 795-9123
Sales
Professionals
Fast growing National
Corporation is ac-
cepting applications
from confident sales
professionals to add
to its staff of account
executives. We
provide a structured,
successful sales train-
ing program which
will aid in taking your
sales career to the
next level. We also
consider entry level
sales candidates
who survive our
interview process.
Call 352-569-9402
for appointment.


-E
DETAIL HELPER
DL a must with a
clean record.
Call Roy @ 302-3089

-" ar-tme^
C."~aB


AUTO GLASS
INSTALLER
Auto glass installer
wanted Company ve-
hicle, must have own
tools. Excellent pay pro-
gram. At least 5 years
exp. Call CMM Glass
Corp. 1-866-439-5020

Block Masons,
Mason Tender &
General Laborers

Must have own
transportation.
Call (352) 302-8999

ELECTRICIAN

Commercial &
residential. 5 + Yrs.
Exp. & resume
required. Must pass
drug screen &
physical. Over-time
avail. MIDAS Const.
(352) 465-7267
---- E"
FACILITIES
& SUPPLIES
This position is
responsible for the
activities related to
the daily cleaning,
maintenance &
upkeep of the
facilities and
grounds and the
activities related to
ordering, receiving,
and expensing
supplies. Make
scheduled,periodic
checks of facility
ventilation and
security systems,
generators & other
equipment. Will ,
maintain vehicles &
vehicle logs, handle
biohazard totes,
respond to security
alarms & faciltiy
emergencies, as
well as, coordinate
and monitor vendor
work at facility, Two
year's facilities
experience
preferred and
commercial driver
license desired.
Background check
required
Please submit
application to:
1241 S. Lecanto
Hwy. Lecanto, FL
34461 EOE/DFWP

HANDYMAN/POOL
MECHANIC
Full time, salary,
benefits Call between,
10a-4p (352) 344-4861





$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187

DELI PERSON &
CASHIER
Experienced only.
352-527-9013

DURACLEAN
FRANCHISE
Looking for Exp'd
CARPET/
FURNITURE/
TILE CLEANERS

But will train. Salary,
comm., Bonus &
Benefits for right
person. (352)726-1099










EXPERIENCED
WRECKER DRIVER
Weekends a must.
Must live in area.
Apply In person at:
Ed's Auto & Towing
4610 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness
> NO CRYBABIES!
MAINTENANCE

Exp. Maintenance
person needed, must
be hard working
dependable and have
a valid dri. lic. 40 hr.
work wk, benefits, pd.
vac. pay based on
exp. Apply in Person @
SUN COUNTRY HOMES
1710 S Suncoast Blvd
P/T SECURITY
OFFICERS
Class D Securit License
required, Local.
Starting Rate $7.60/hr.
352-726-1551 Ext. 1313,
call between 7a-2:30p
Mon-Fri.

WALLY'S QP
Looking For
EXPERIENCED
AUTO DETAILER
Apply In Person:
806 NE US HWY 19
Crystal River


LOCALLY MFG.
30 X 30 X 9
Vertical Roof w/(2)
8 X 7 Garage Doors
& (1) 36" Walk Door
& 4" slab.
Installed $14,995
(352) 489-9397


1938 GIBSON GUITAR
Good Condition.
Make me an offer I
can't refuse. Nothing
under $1,500 consid-
ered. (352) 344-5168
ANTIQUE VICTROLA
Exc. Working Cond.
Includes some records.
$300
(352) 628-4210








































SPOON COLLECTION
1933 Chicago World's
Fair w/3 row spoon
rack. (18 spoons)
Will break up or sell for
$1500. (352) 860-1649



Hot tub 2 yrs.old, soft
tub, 4 sweater, 110 V,
steps & drink holder, hy-
dro therapy jets, $1,500.
Joe (347) 512-6126
NEVER USED SEATS 51
3 hp., extra jets.
Light, lounger. Under
warranty. New
$4,395/Sacrifice $2.195
(352) 287-9266



3-ton A/C
$350
(352) 564-0578
A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
- 2 Ton $780.00
2-V2 ton $814.00
-- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
* Prof. Installation:
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER. FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
CARRIER
HEAT PUMP/AC
2V2 Ton; New blower
mtr. Good Cond. $200
(352) 628-4210
DISHWASHER, STOVE
& REFRIGERATOR
Almond. Good Cond.
$250/all
(352) 382-1866
GE REFRIGERATOR
White, Top freezer,
$150. Beverly Hills
(501) 920-9428
REFRIGERATOR
$140
(352) 382-5661
REFRIGERATOR
18cu.ft. white, A-1
condition, $175
(352) 637-2111
REFRIGERATOR
Block & S S. 25.5 Cu. Ft.
Side by Side Whirlpool
Gold Conquest
w/crushed & cubed
ice & water purifica-
tion syst.16 mos. old.
Purchased for $1,200/
Sell $800 (352)628-3539
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore 27 cu. ft.
Side by Side. White.
W/Refreshment door.
Water & Ice. $400
(352) 637-6310 Iv. mess.
ROPER BY WHIRLPOOL
REFRIGERATOR
White, like new.
less than yr old. $450
(352) 476-9527


E-B-
UPRIGHT FREEZER
Maytag, standard size.
$150obo; EXERCISE BIKE J
DP, Fan Generated
w/monitor. $35 -
$25 (352) 637-1712
Washer & Dryer $265/
set. Great cond. Best
Guarant. Free delivery
& setup (352) 835-1175


























CRAFTSMAN 81/4"
Radial Saw +
3 DRAWER Cabinet
Exc. Cond. $400
(352) 637-2838
HITACHI Miter saw, like
new, $100; '
(352) 726-9183
SHEELOFA

S DEAL

Ii






GUARANTEED 1 4
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95 I
Sell your car today .
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.
I (352)563-5966 Ii
I (352)726-0902
Ad will not be
automatically |
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.




52" HD RCA TV, with en-,
tertainment center and
DVD player. $600/OBO
COFFEE TBL
& 2 END TBLS. It. oak
$40. (352) 527-4122
55" HITACHI
Projection TV
Oak Cabinet w/doors.
$400 (352) 527-0032
Sanyo 26" Color TV
excel cond. $100.
1 Component 20"
Color TV/VCR $75.
or both for $150.
(352) 341-1576




FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type wl 18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai.
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811





Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery. avail.,
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service. New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeeil.com




FORKLIFT
Air Tire, Diesel.
In Homosossa. $4,500.
Phone (813) 478-5270



MASSEY FERGUSON
1540, 2007,Tractor &
Box Blade w/top tilt.
< than 200 hrs. $15,900
(352) 795-9010




5 PC. WICKER PATIO SET
36" Glass top table w/4
cushioned choirs. $100;
9 PC. PATIO SET
45" Rd. Table, 4 cush
chairs, Chaise, Chair
w/ottoman, sm. table
$400 (352) 795-2906 R,


I Earn extra
income after
taking course



convenient
locations.

Courses start
in Sept.
Call
877-766-1829
Liberty
Tax Service
Fee for books.
CAREGIVER
Paralyzed man. Re-
sumes, ref. to PO Box
1615 Hornm. Spgs. 34447
PERMANENT
POSITION

16-20hrs/wk, 9-1
Mattress delivery
heavy lifting, clean
driver's license a must.
Call (352) 628-0808
































NOW HIRIG
LOCALLY

Large national
organization.
Avg. Pay $20/hr.
SOver $55K annually.
Including full 3
benefits & OT, paid
I training, vacation. I
1-866-515-1762 I




Established Lawn
Service 23 yrs.
1990 Dump Truck,
All lawn equip. make
your money back in less
2 than incls. 70 ac-
count too Much equip
to list. Established 1984
Asking $100k (352)
637-6718
Food Vending Unit
14ft x 8 ft., fully equip.,
grill, french fryer, soft
ice cream, micro. 2
refrig., sinks,. AC, inven-
tory inc. also truck avail
will sell together & sep.
352-270-8126




ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,.
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-S15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
FI. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.comg
FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
custom Installation,
Up to 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555


SFill in the squares so that each row, column, and
-3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


CLASSIFIED


Cinus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OVAL GLASSTOP TABLE
W/2 swivel/rocker
chairs, 2 reg. chairs,
new cond. Paid $1050
Asking $500. (352)


S3 Pc ectional
'w/ 4 recliners, abstract,
beige/green/brown
S print. $800.
(352) 465-6002
3 PC. SECTIONAL SOFA
w/Recliners $295;
TWIN BEDROOM SET
w/dresser & head-
board. $95
(352) 422-3190
4 Pc. Bedroom Set
Pickled white, oak
queen/dbl $250.
9 Pc. Bedroom
Little girls, painted Incl.
bed bread & curtains
$175. (352) 637-6046
5 PC. BEDROOM SET
$375. DESK $50:
(352) 628-5924
9 PC. LIVING RM. SET
Good Cond, $250;
YOUTH BED
White Heavy Plastic.
Good Cond. $40
(352) 628-4210
SOver 3'000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


All Leather Sofa,
as new, top quality,
chestnut brown,
basset, 89" Long,
perf. cond. for office or
home must sell $1,250.
obo (352) 212-3508
Antique Armoire
unique carved,
Rosewood? w/3 doors
center door has original
glass excel cond.
$1,500. (352) 344-4811

Antiques
Collectibles &
Estate Auction
1st & 3rd Tues. 6pm
(previews 10-5:45)
Starting Sept. 4th
Huge Furniture
Liquidation
Fenton/Dep/EAPG
Glass, China,
Antiques Art
Collectibles, Silver,
Coins + 2much211ist
Details on Web or call
PROF APP & LIQ
10%bp 6% tax
MC/VI/Cash/App Ck
AU1593/AB1131
811 HWY 19/CR RIVER
charllefudge.com
352-795-2061
BEDS <, BEDS 4 BEDS
The factory outlet store
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $1194 Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006


PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
BROYHILL
SOFA & CHAIR
$350 "
(352) 527-4910
BUREAU W/MIRROR
6 Drawers. 5'W.
Green & tan. $40;
RD. OAK TABLE
3' diameter, Bind. Oak
$50 (352) 527-2769
China Cabinet,
Thomasville, lighted,
cherry wood, great
cond. $700. Curio Cab.
lighted, cherry wood,
great cond. $200.
(352) 628-5949
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
SHomosassa Regional,
Consignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Comp. TWIN BDRM. SET
W/LINENS $200;
ROCK MARBLE DINING
TABLE W/6 CHAIRS
(W/Pad) $200
(352) 795-7744
COUCH & LOVESEAT
navy blue leather, wall
hugger w/2 recliners on
each. $600; RECLINER
Maroon, wdll hugger,
$100. (352) 527-4122
CURIO CABINET
$75;
TWIN DAYBED
W/MATTRESS $35
(352) 795-7744


DINETTE SET - French
Prov. Antique wht. 48"
Round table, w 24" leaf
pedestal table, 4 chairs
like new $195. obo
352-382-7865,
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
78" HX 34"W Oak.
Exc. Cond. $85;
SLEEPER SOFA Comfy,
Like New $195
(352) 422-3190
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for Big Scrn TV 6ft. H
$200. DINING RM. 8 up-
holstered chairs, table
extends to 7' $250.
both Wht wash wood.
(352) 527-9876
FURNITURE
Leather reclining taupe
loveseat $250, Iron King
head & foot board
$300 352-586-4650
GIRL'S DRESSER
& DESK, $100 both.
Multi Color Comforter
for Full size girl's bed, &
purple bed skirt. $50.
(352) 341-1963
Large burgundy sofa &
matching chair, $400
Also country style oak
dining table, 6 chairs,
like new, Orig. $1,900
sell for $800
352-560-3743
Leather Recliner Chair,
deep blue, excel.
cond. 6 mos, old
$850. obo, Must Sell.
(352) 212-3508


LIviving Room. Set
sofa, chair, 2 end
tables, 1 coffee table,
good cond.
$300.
(352) 746-7098
Maftress-King
Spring-Air, deluxe pillow
top, gently used,
$400. obo
(352) 382-5030
Portable L-Shqped Bar
for Kitchen or Patio
Solid Oak, formica top,
$300.
(352) 465-2823
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen Serta Bedding
Set, very clean, w/
frame linens, skirt,
matching comforter &
curtains, $400.
(352) 212-0013

RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentalfinder.com

ROCKER RECLINER
Multi-Neutral Color
Very Good Cond. $35;
OAK END TABLE/
COFFEE TABLE SET $75
(352) 422-3190
ROLL TOP DESK
28"Wx45"H, 3 drawers,
good cond. $85.
(352) 382-4651


Single Platform Bed
$50.
Air Hockey Table
$150
(352) 637-6046
Solid Wood Ashley
Coffee & End Tables,
like new, $350.
(352) 270-3573
SYLVANIA 13" TV,
hardly used, $45
Wall mirror, 30"x63"
$20 (352) 726-2269
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084




D.R. CHIPPER, 18HP,
towable, excellent
2007, low hrs.
(352) 637-6588
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Mower & Equipment
Repair Quick Service.
Pick up & Delivery,
Don Mead 400-1483
MULCH
5-6 yd. loads. $95
Delivered anywhere
Citrus Co. Also gravel
hauled. $75 + Materials.
352-563-9979/400-0150


C4 GBin
co /Lw uple


SCOTTS TRACTOR
MOWER
20HP Kohler, 50"
Cut - Extra Blades - Very
Nice $950 382-4572

SEARS CRAFTSMAN
2001 riding mower,,
19HP, 42" cut $450
(352) 628-2769







Act Nosi

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
4 4 * 4 4 *


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 11C

I .I I


19-4 @LaughingStock Intematonal Inc.dist. by United Media, 20071


"That's guaranteed waterproof if you
go down to 100 meters."

720915


/I./ sune up w/ rree
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
.Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870
r------ U



-ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
. DIRECTORY
TODAY
i $$$$$sss $$$sss$$$ I
its Less than
I' Pennies per day I
- per household.I
$$$ssss$ ss$$$$ I$

IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
JUSTASK..
- WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUIll

CALL TODAY
M 52 ACXoAX


"DEBRIS HAULING"
[ & Misc. Clean-Up,
STree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
55' BUCKET TRUCK
20% off. mention of
this ad. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 344-2696

AFFORDABLE,
HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE I
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
Debris & Garages
352-697-1126 !
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
, trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
Joseys Landscaping
Lawns, Trees, Pavers
Clean-up, Sod, dump
truck. (352) 556-8553
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
SA TREE SURGEON
Uc. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452


All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
in-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & morel
352-794-3114/586-7799




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home



VChris Salchell Painllng
& Wallcovering All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Uc. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
Husband & Wife DP
Press.Cleaning & Paint-
ing. Lic.&Ins. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any Job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
LIc3008 352-341-1440
All Phaze Construction
Quality painting &
repairs. Faux fin.
#0255709 352-586-1026
637-3632







George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400/628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
POPCORN CEILINGS
PAINTED
Free Estimates
(800) 942-3738
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext., Free Estimate
Pressure Washing, Lic.
24/7, (352) 476-9013
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Uc. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
* Roof Repairs * Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes







Ixst allations
(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
SState Certifled Lic. #CCC1I327843





Ultra Seal Coatings
Specializing in roof and
concrete sealing
* Vinyl & Stucco Sealing
* Pressure Washing
* Designer Driveways
* Pool Decks

e?"W'Summer Special
gof cleaned *14500'

.3.. 352-628-1027


Aflordace Boot Mant. &
Repa,
Mechorlcd, Bedcld,c
Cuslom
Rig. John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236




TOP HAT AIRPORT SERV.
w Aug-Sept. Special
Tampa Int. $75 max. 2
people. (352) 628-4927




BATHTUB REGLAZING
-.Old tbs &.ugly ,
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




FREE ESTIMATES
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
628-5595




COMPASSIONATE
PERSONAL CAREGIVER
With References. Call
(352) 613-0078




1 Call does It All No lob
too sm,. Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
-Windows & Doors
-Storm Shutters
-Board-Up Service
-Resldent./Commercial
CRC 7326431
(352) 746-9613




6 REG HOME DAY CARE
Openings NOW FT/PT
3 Infants Welcome f
- 352-726-5163 �




VChrls Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Uc#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397


Hauter & Clark
Handyman & More
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
SOTO'S CLEANING
SERVICE
Uc. & Ins,
352-489-5893/216-2800




Splffy Window Cleaners
Special Introductory
offer 20% Discount
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Uc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391
PRICE Finish Carpentry
Wood molding & doors
30+ yrs. Lic. 17510184057
352-860-0675/302-4389
ROGERS Construction
New HomesAdditions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
1 panel or camp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
LIc3008 352-341-1440

#740502


CONRET DEORAIN


AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Uc./Ins. 341-3300
* ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner. No streaks!
24 yrs. Uc. 352-726-3878
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Lic. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone,,Cable, Lan &
Plasmd TV's installed.
Pressure wash &Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) Z46-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No Job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271352-465-9201
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No Job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440

P AFFORDABLE, a
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
SDebris & Garages |
352-697-1126
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)427-2588






FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs,
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
HANDYMAN
If its Broke , Jerry
Can Fix It. Lic#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Hauter & Clark
Handyman & More
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,


NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services. Lic.2776/Ins,
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC




STAYLER AC & HEATING,
INC. Lic. & Ins.
CACO 58704
352-628-6300




Poe's Sewer & Drain
Cleaning, We unstop
toilets, sinks, bathtubs,
24/hr serve 352-302-7189




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush
I Appl. Furn, Const. ,
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126
L -- -- J
A-1 Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash turn. & apple. Misc.
Mark (352)344-2094
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $ $$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264/201-1422
Fum. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903





Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431
ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
324 A9.-79709


YARD VAC




Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming
(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & Insured


ROOIN


=Bo ler ie 5enring All of Citrus Counr
Boulerice

CCCO25464 080002180 0gP|Ii
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated

NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES

$0it0irFF 1:


COMPETEOOF


(352) 628-5079 * (352) 628-7445


25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any Job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352)201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
SDeclalizina in vinyl


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const, reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rat es. Free est. Froud to
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358
RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Ratesil
Exp'd, Lic. CCC1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patlos-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Uc# CRC1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
SkdewalG, Driveways Patios,
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs, Stamp
concrete Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
LIc. 1476 726-6554




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620


g---

ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
LIc.34770 (352)427-2588
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391






We do it ALLI Big or Sm.l
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall,Crown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Uc. #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019






Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Uc.#SCC131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing, Tile
Painting, Framing. 35yrs
344-1952 CBC058263



SBushowrDrivewaysutr




AFFORDABLE Top soil,
till, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No Job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
A TOP SOIL SPECIAL *r
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 � 352-302-6436


Installations by
Brian CBC1253853
?.6e �e -4 &W" 44 o' * "WiA is~



Fr AA_


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Une Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrlnding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114



D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Joseys Landscaping
Lawns, Trees, Pavers
Clean-up, Sod, dump
truck. (352) 556-8553
- SOD * SOD . SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
Coon, Robert
Lawn Service
FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 563-0376
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clear, up. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Lic./Ins.
u 352-464-3967 *
- POOL LINERS *
* 15 Yrs. Exp. *
Call for free estimate
a (352) 591-3641
POOL REPAIRS?
Comm, & Res., & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778, 302-6060


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391
METAL BUILDINGS
Pump houses, carports,
etc. Very reasonable!
Fred (352) 464-3146
WE MOVE SHEDS


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
A MII� CC O IM


9 KAINUANL.tE 9
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Avallablell
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714
r A EXTERIOR -
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters |
Lic & Ins 621-0881




NEED A NEW DOOR?
Pre-Hung Door units
New Const. or remod.
ENTRY POINT by Perry's
Lic. 2598(352)726-6125





Gopher Gully Sod Inc.
Farm Direct Rolls
Sod Installation
Seeding & Mulching
352-812-4345/817-4887


END OF SUMMER

SPECIAL

ANY ROOF CLEANED
Ot Up no
30 3,000 sq .ft.

. j Suncoast

S Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.
wwwroofcleaningnopressure.com
S877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


CILASSICIEIEDS


I IFORATINS


S - S


11


F


1:










312C TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007

- -
C4e~Ht~~f~


- 12 NEW METAL I.C.
CRATES, use for tool
transp/decor/strg/furn
or ? $80/all or $8 ea.
(352) 795-5929 Iv. msg.

2007

,SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
'Items totalling
$1-$150 ...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800 .......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
280' CHAIN LINK FENCE
Post & Gates.
Cash & Carry $750.
(352) 527-4910
Approx 140 COOK-
BOOKS, $100. CRAFT
PATTERNS & BOOKS $50.
FOR SALE. CALL (352)
746-6687 or 302-1449
BEAUTIFUL GARDEN TUB
complete with faucets
and base, sacrifice,
$150. (352) 637-5656
(352) 201-0696
BROTHERS 1227
fax machine, $75
(352) 527-3348
BURIAL PLOTS
In Fountains Memorial
Park - Fountains of Life:
Two spaces
$1050.00 - 628-1062
China set, Johann
Haviland Bavaria
- Germany Sweetheart
Rose, service for 8,
complete set, plus
serving pieces, $250
(352) 637-5903
Christmas dinnerware,
service for 8, in box,
never used, $100
Train phone, whistles like
train, $50
(352) 527-3348
Flag Set, 20ft 2V2" steel
telescopic, org. $365.
Now $200
Also 20ft. 2" Alum Set,
w/ out Flag $45.
(352) 382-1191
FRIDGE
Clean & Cold $60;
CORNER
Entertainment Center
Drk. Wood $30
(352) 634-0893
* Frigidaire Refrigerator
18.5 cu.ft. white, glass
shelves, clean, very
good cond., $275.
-Twin wicker headboard,
natural, $45.
(352) 726-2269
HEAVY DUTY
Sewing machine in
.carrying case. $50/obo
(352) 527-0424
LABOR DAY SALE
THE BATTERY MEDICS
Golf cart battery sets
*6V &8V $200 Reg. $245.
Incl. del installation & 1
. yr Free Replacement
Warranty Contact Mark
@ 727-375-6111
LOG SPLITTER
.27 Ton, Vert./Horizontal
New in 12/06, Home
Depot. $1,250. Used
twice. Will sell for $900.
Will deliver.
WINE-BOTTLE OPENER
SDeluxe Countertop
.Stand. New, in org. box
$140; Will sell for $75
Call Don352-231-0160
MANATEE ART
& CARVINGS
$250
(352) 563-0022
METAL DETECTOR
Garrett GTAX 1000
Top of the ULine! Detects
dl metals & more. $300
(352) 527-9498
-OFFICE FILE CABINETS
.0) 4 Drawer w/hangers
& folders. $35/ea.
or $200/all
(352) 563-0022
PARROT CAGE, $25;
SCROLL SAW & SOLDER
GUN, w/accessories,
$45. Beverly Hills
352-257-3793
PROPANE TANK
250 GAL. $275.00
352-795-6693
RADIO CONTROLLED
HELICOPTER
Comes w/radio &
instruction book. $750
(352) 560-4289
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Craftsman 42". Kohler
15.5, automatic. $225;
GE MICROWAVE Space
'Maker XL1400 Like New
$100(352) 382-5973
SOD, ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576




ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
Incl. baftery & charger,
$550. GEL MATTRESS,
hospital size. $100.
(352) 628-1408
GO GO BY PRIDE
SCOOTER $370.00.
SONIC SCOOTER
By Pride. $400.00.
Both easy trunk load.
(352) 628-9625
WALKER W/BRAKES,
Seat, & Basket
Brand Newl $100;
TV STAND
$15
(352) 795-7744



BUYING US COINS


Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




Your World

I-9a--


CHrONCI.E



ww.cnronicLtonilne caom


DRUMS
5 pc. black, with throne
and cymbals, good
starter kit. $150.
(352) 628-2244
Lowery Organ
Excellent Sound, fine
pc. of furniture, storage
bench, manual $500.
(352) 628-5186




Pro-Form
515 S, Crosswalk
Tread mill, Like new.
$500.
(321)273-0412




*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
LABOR DAY SALE
THE BATTERY MEDICS
Golf cart battffery sets
6V &8V $200 Reg. $245.
Incl. del Installation & 1
yr Free Replacement
Warranty Contact Mark
@1727-375-6111
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
SIG SAUER P220
45Cal. with nightsites,
4 clips, holster and 2
mag. carriers. $800
(352)447-1447 �
TURKEY HUNTERS
Beautiful Display Case
for your BIRD. Oak
frame on wheels
w/glass dome.
28.5D X 34.5W X 36H,
$250 (352)464-4710
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238







(352) 382-1804






$300 (352) 637-7125Nose Enclosed















Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Replace Your Home
Nowl We pay CASH for
your old home. Call
NOWI(727) 967-4230




NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
AKC LAB PUPS
1 yellow female,
Health Certs & shots
$250. .352-422-4675




GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?

We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

GREAT PYRENEES
Male, DOB 2/14/07,
CKC Reg., Pure bred.
Good w/sm. children
& other sm. animals.
Needs room to run.$400
(352)341-1964
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.

Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207
IRISH SETTER PUP
AKC, 1 male left,
beautiful, love
children. HC. First $275.
(352) 726-0133


LAB PUPPIES, Registered
Choc. & Black. Health
Cert, & Shots. Parents
on Premises $200
(352) 746-0221
MALTI-POO tiny little
furballs, sweet & love
able, home raised, HC,
1st shot, $350/400
(352) 564-2775
MASTIFF, English
Male, AKC, 15 mos, Big
Boned Beauty! Pick of
the lifter! MUST SELL!
$800 (352) 621-0848
PUG PUPPIES
AKC & CKC Cert,,
Health Cert. I male, 1
female. Starting @ $500
(352) 464-1109
ROTTWEILER
Male, 14 mos. AKC, in
tact, beautiful dog.
Pick of litter. MUST SELL!
$500 (352) 621-0848


SCOTTISH TERRIER
AKC REG. Gorgeous,
Male. 22wks old, Mov-
ing, must sell. 1st $450
firm. 352-422-5685
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt.,
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906


Horses
15 YR. OLD TENN.
WALKER MARE
Very dark Bay, $600/
(352) 628-3456




3 mo. old Boar female
goats, pure bred, no
papers. 2-yr old Black
male Jerrsy Wooly, $20.
Red female rex rabbit,
$10. (352) 563-1643,
leave message




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
CR/HERNANDO
2/1 CH/A, $400-$500
1st, last, sec. No pets
(352) 564-0578
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Scrn prch. $475; NO
PETSII (352) 563-2293
DUNNELLON 1/1
on 1 Ac. $425/mo.
No dogs/smoking.
(352) 860-2397
East Lecanto 2/1
$500. mo. 1st, Ist. sec.
no pets 352-634-5581
HERNANDO
'07, DW,,3/2, carport,
fenced, yd. maint. Incl.
no pets/smoking, $735.
mo. + $1,000 sec.
(352) 344-3864
HOMOSASSA
2 BR, CHA, no dogs
$550 mo. 1st, last, sec.
(352) 628-4002
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Like New, Lg. gated lot.
Rm. for RV/Boat. CHA,
carpet, nice kitch., split
plan, city water. $600
lst/last/sec. Ref. Req'd
352-621-0931/212-2022
HOMOSASSA 2/1.5
Private lot. No pets.
$525/mo + 1st, last, sec
(352) 628-5696
INVERNESS 2/1
On Water, 5 mi. from
town $500. 1st last
$200 sec. credit check
(352) 697-1359
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees
$350 and up.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
Non-Smoking 1BR Furn.
Scrn rm. Crprt $500: I1BR
turn. Park model, $325
No pets. 628-4441
RENTALS $400-550/MO
Newly dec, Hernando/
Inverness area.
DW 2/1, SW 2/2, SW 1/1
1st, 1st, sec 813-468-0049




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
ADULT PARKS
RENT OR OWN LOT
New 3BR, 2BA Skyline
Home, 1/2" Drywall
Porch, Carport
MOVE IN TODAY
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
1710 S Suncoast blvd.
352-794-7308
BUY AT
INVOICE
New Jacobsen
triple wide 2100 sq. ft.
Must sell, was $119,900,
Now only $103A426
only at
Taylor Made
Homes
Call 352-621-9182
Great Financing
5BR 3BA- Designer
Kitchen, Delivered
and set up $73,900.
�2 and 1 Acre Land
& Home Packages
MOVE IN NOW!
6 Homes Set Up
All Sizes- All Prices
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
1710 S Suncoast blvd.
352-794-7308
INVERNESS 2/2 66'X14'
LR, DR, KIT, W/D $6,500
OBO 352-287-1887
Ask for Mechelle
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles. Scr. porches,
apple , water incl. Fishing
piers. $7.000-$15,000.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
NEW CONDITION 4BR,
Paved, Rd. Rockcrusher
area, sacrifice $81,900.
(352) 621-9181
Cell (352) 302-7332
NEW JACOBSEN
32 X68 Game Room
House, 2085 sq. ft.
stone fireplace, wet
bar, 18" x 18" ceramic
tile floors. island kitchen,
appliance pkg. Home


was $79,900 buy at
Invoice $69,749. only at
Taylor Made Home
352-621-9181




RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
L. a



"FIXER-UPPERI"
2-Mobiles for $75K
Both 2/1 Single wides.
Nice half acre lots-
S-needs work- -ready
to go. May separate?
Owner/Agent
352-302-8046


2/2 SW On 1/2 Acre
Totally Renovatedl
Walton Dr., Old Oaks,
Floral City $64,500
Myrlam, Keller Williams
Realty (352) 613-2644'
2/2/Crpt. SW Exc. Cond.
CHA, ceiling fans, scrnd
12 X 20 porch, Dbl.
corner lot on paved
street. $53K obo
352-503-6061/628-7480
2/2 ON 1 ACRE
Lg. oaks, NIcel Newer
appl., AC, roof over
mobile, 14X24 wrkshp.
$67,500, Bend Cove,
Floral City 352-302-7817
3/2 SW on Two 1/2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US19
352-503-4142
3/2, 1/4 AC. Crystal Rvr
Near BIc. Prk, New roof,
well, septic, Handyman
Spec. S49K CASH. Con-
tract negot. No owner
flnan.(352) 302-5535
FLORAL CITY 1.2 acres
Lake Magnolia Estate.
DW 1978 1400 sq.ft. 2BR
2BA roof over 10x12
alum. shed, 12x24 Cook
Barn, screen room
$55,000 firm.
(352) 697-2993
HOMOSASSA 27'X 68'
3/2 Over 1,836 SF, on
1/2 Ac. All new well,
Septic, Power & Impact
Fee Pd. Owner Fin.
Avail. (352) 746-5918
LAND & HOME
2 Acre Lot
with 2000 sq. ft.,
3/2 Home
Garage, concrete
driveway & walkways,
carport. Beautiful
Must See 10% down
No closing cost
$948.90/mo WAC
Call 352-621-9182
LEISURE ACRES 3/2,
'05 On fncd. 1/2 Ac,
scrnd prch. carport.
20X20 garage, many
extras, great buy!
$135,000 (352) 628-4216
MUST SEEI!
2,200 Sq. Ft. of Living,
2.85 Acres, Paved
Road, Fenced,
2 Car Carport, Pool.
(352) 746-5912
or (352)400-6357
No Money Downi
FHA
Land & Home
3/2 on fenced 1/2 Acre
Deck, nice trees
and quiet
only $769.90 mo. P & I
WAC
Call 352-621-9183




4 NEW MODELS
Excellent Amenities
Gated Community
5 * , 55+
RESALES
$64,900.-$100,000.
Phone 352-795-7161
BIG PINE ACRES, 55+
2/1/Carport Screened
Porch, Shed, 2 ACs,
W/D, Sm. Pet OK,
Part turn. $9,800 obo
(352) 270-9323
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs,
& more, Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair. acc,shed
& sprklr, $53,900. (352)
563-6428/ 352-563-1297
FORREST VIEW EST. 55+
2/2, LR, DR, open kitch.
w/great room to scrnd
prch. Shed. Part. furn.
$64,550 TOO MANY
NEWSitoIstI 563-2526
Lecanto Hills M.H.P.
2/1/crpt. Fully furnished.
Big Screen Porch, shed.
New heat pump.
Clean Asking $19,500
(352) 257-1853
WALDEN WOODS
2003 DW, 3/2, vinyl
Fl. Rm., new berber
carpet. $62,500
(352) 382-2356




CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 Dixie Crt $155,000
2/2 Bounty Crt $159,000
2/2 Peacock $165,000.
3/2 McClung Lp$169900
Houses
2/1 Tropical Ln, $89,500
3/1 Tropical Ln, $99,000
Owner Finan.10% Down
Or Rent 2/2's @ $600 mo
Onr/Agnt 352-382-1000

r MENTAL FINDER
| www.�hronicle |
rentalfindercom




INVERNESS
2bd/2 1/2ba
F/L/Sec $725 Jon
786-525-6515
Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed RE. Broker
> Property & Comm,
Assoc. Mgmt. is our,
only Business
> Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
owner Assoc, Mgmt.
Robble Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
Info@orooeriv
manaamentarouo.


RENTAL FINDER
wwwchronlcle |
rentalflnder.com
i-niii.. 1


CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 BR, W/S/G Incl.
$600 (352) 212-7740
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Renovated
1 bedroom efficiencies
w/fully equip. kitchens.
No contracts
necessary, Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $35
a day for a week or
more, (Includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
CRYSTAL RIVER
NICELY FURNISHED 1/1
Great neighborhood.
No pets. 7 months
minimum. 352-795-7261
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront 1BR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets. (352) 344-1025


3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Ist Mo. FREEI
Crystal River. 634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR, laundry/premises,
$500 mo.+ sec. deposit,
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/I/2 828 5th NE Ave.
Nice, CHA, $600/mo +
Sec. 352-586-5335
727-341-2955
CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities,
No application fees,
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity
HERNANDO
2/1 Very clean,
$525/mo. Sec. dep.
352-527-7842
Invern./Homosassa
Apartments Available
352-628-4282
INVERNESS 2/1
$575mo. $862 sec. Call
9am-6pm 352-341-4379
INVERNESS
2/1, After renovation,
water, trash, Incl. $625.,
1st & Sec. Dep. Req.
(352) 266-1916, Steve
INVERNESS Lg. 2/2
W/D hkup, $600/mo
352-341-2182/586-2205




Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Ist Mo. FREEI
Crystal River. 634-0595




CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Office Space
with high profile estab-
lished Real Estate Co.
Great Location. To in-
quire call broker/owner
352-422-7925
Industrial Bldg/Property
on 4/2 Acrs 29 Michigan
St. Inglis, 3,000 total sq.
ft. 727-647-2596
INVERNESS AREA
1,000 sf. Office/Retail.
Ample parking, Busy
corners. (352) 726-6640
PROFESSIONAL Office
1690 sq. ft.
GREAT LOCATION
Call Mon - Fri. 8 - 4:30
(352) 795-2283
REPAIR SHOP
Floral City - Established
location, For sale or
lease. 813-388-3313




2/2 CITRUS HILLS
Greenbriar ,1st fir. turn.
Near pool. $114,500
$1,000mo 352-249-3155
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Furnished, Short
Seasonal/Long Term
352-527-8002/476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2BR, 2'2 BA Townhouse
Furnished $800/mo.
352-697-0801
CITRUS HILLS
Meadow View Villa
2/2/1 Fully turn, Pool,
(352) 586-0427
HOMOSASSA UNFURN
$815- Sugarmill Woods
2/2/1 2 Atrium Villa, Ig.
lanal; 2/2 End Condo
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
INVERNESS
3/2/I, Moorings, $900.
2/2/1, Landings $800.
Judy B Spake, LLC
Shawn (727) 204-5912
PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 $150K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comm, Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213




FLORAL CITY 1/1
No smoke/Pet,
$575/mo. + Sec.
(352) 397-6591
HOMOSASSA 2/1
$550/mo. 1st & Sec.
(352) 795-5268
INVERNESS 1/1
Furnished,Water & gas.
$650 mo, Dep. & 1st mo
rent. (352) 726-6515
INVERNESS
2/1, $550. mo.,
No pets, 1st, last + sec.
352-344-8389, 860-2418
LECANTO 2/2
Large. NEWI No pets
$675/mo. 352-228-0525




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs, at 8%, For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
6 BDRM HUD $54,000l
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs, at 8%, For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 For Rent/Lease
Option. LR, DR, FR,
HUGE eat in kitchen, 2
CG, covered porch and
shed. Walking distance
to Newly built Elem and
Middle School. $1,000
mo. plus 1st, last
and security. Call
352-489-8847.


CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS, MONTHLY Furn &
Unfurn. Heated pool.
All newli 352-302-1370
DUNN./CIT. SPRGS
REDUCED $100111
2 HOMES. Both are
3/2/carport
Totally refurbished I
Spotless! Imm Occ.
Reduced to $695/mo.
527-3953
or (352) 427-7644
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, sun. rm.. $1,300.
mo. (352) 628-7120
HOMOSASSA
Upgraded 3/2 Enjoy
Access to Comm.
Amen. & Pool. 55+
$950/mo.
2/2/1 Furn. Villa SMW
$900/mo.
3/2/2 Fully Furnished
w/Pool.SMW, $1,350
Coldwell Banker, Next
Generation Realty
(352) 382-2700


r ENTAL FINDER 1
www.chronlcle
rentalflndercom
--- - - I I
Rentals COUNTYWIDEI
GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Call:352-422-6129
or see ALL at
www.choosegar.com
Sugarmill Woods
Large New Home 3/2/2
$1,000/mo 352-601-3627
SUGARMILL WOODS
RENTALII Lovely Home,
4/2/2 No smoking; Small
pet okay, Ref,, $1,100./
mo, Avail. Oct. 1st
(386) 569-6777




3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1
Sep. Gar. $650/mo+
dep/util (352) 795-6282
CITRUS HILLS
Meadow View Villa
2/2/1 Fully furn. Pool,
(352) 586-0427
HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park, short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759
INVERNESS
Lakefront 2/2, DW
1600 sq.ft fully furn.,,
44-E, East Cove $625
352-476-4964




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/crpt. Glass Rm.
Clean & Cony. Area
$550 (352) 746-3700
BEVERLY HILLS
10 N.Desoto 2/1
$650.mo
8 N.Fillmore 1/1
$625,mo
CRYSTAL RIVER
9 N.Candle 2/1
$550.mo
INVERNESS
237 N.Croft 2/2
$750.mo
352-637-2973
BEVERLY HILLS
18 N. Osceola, 2/11/2/1
& carport, New Inside
$725 mo. 1st., Ist, dep.
& 33 Murray St. 2/11/2.
Ig shed & fence
$600. mo. 1st, last. dep.
352-795-3000
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 First Mo. FREE. C/A,
$700 (239) 776-6800
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1.5 & 2/1 $700 Neg.
Ist/lst/sec 352-427-2173
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1
90 S J Kellner No S/P
Yard Care $775/mo
352-422-1024
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1
Cleanly $695/mo. +
Ownr/Agt 352-228-3731
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Remodeled, AC
Fl. Rm. (352) 382-3525
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1V2/1 Lg. FR. Immacu-
latel 430 S. Washington.
$665 mo. 1st, last, sec.
No Pets. (863) 647-2950.
Beverly Hills 2/2/1
Lg. fl. rm. $725./mo. +
C/H/A 23 S. Harrison St.
727-463-1804
BEVERLY HILLS 3/1
WOWI Scrn Rm., strg.
rm. Lawn care Incl.
Ref. Req'd $650/mo.
352-302-3319
BEVERLY HILLS
35 S Desoto
3 N Jackson
40 & 68 S Harrison
Rents betw. $650-700
(352) 302-8104
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 2/2/1 Fam. Rm,,
Scrn. Rm. Appl. Good
Area. Move-In Cond.
$725 (352) 746-3700
BEVERLY HILS
2 Bed w/FI, Rm. $750
2 Bed Remod. $675, 1
Bed $625. 352-422-7794
CIT SPRINGS 2/11/2/1
Cute & CleanI Scrnm.
patio, sm pet ok, CHA
$625mo. 352-302-9053
Cit. Hills, President.
3/2/2,1 ac, $850/mo.
(352) 212-5812
CIT. SPRGS 4/2/2
$1,000. MOVES YOU IN
$1,000. MO. ALL FEES
WAVED (352) 597-3693
CITRUS SPRINGS 2/2
New '06, $650/mo. Inc.
(352) 362-7543
CITRUS SPRINGS
Many Available
$825.- $875. mo. 2 -4 wks
FREE Rent if Qualify.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Lease Option.
4/2/2, 2,200 sf.
(352) 746-1636
CRYSTAL RIVER
/22/1, tam. rm., water,
gar. & pest, incl. $850. +
sec. (352)464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER 4/2
Spoc. $825/ mo. + util.
Avail. 9/8 352-795-6282
FLORAL CITY
New 2/1, FP, W/D,
Dock, Canal Front,
Near park. $800/mo.
Owner. (352) 422-0294


$o2.0uu
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more Info. or
visit the web at:
citrusvlllaaes
rentals.com
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Pool E. Getty Ln. $1,100
Ist + SD 352-697-1907
HOMOSASSA 2/2
Near Rive.r $700+ dep.
(352) 628-0919
HOMOSASSA 3/2
1 Acre,C/A, W/D, nice
neighborhood,
$750/mo, $1,500
Move-in (954) 294-0531
INGLIS 4/2 +DEN
10.59 acres, wrkshp.
$1800/mo.
Broker/owner
352-422-7925
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Clean, fenced yard.
$750 mo. 352-637-0765
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Lake Area, $820/mo.
(352) 341-1142


INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees, $350
and up, Leeson's
352-476-4964
INVERNESS POOL
Golf Course Home.
Large 3/2/2, No Pets,
$800. mo. 908-322-6529
- NO CREDIT CHECKII
RENT TO OWN
352-484-0866
visit lademlsslon.com
PINE RIDGE
2/2/2 sec. 1+ac
w/fenced yard,
Screen Florida room,
Short Term Lease Poss.
$1k per/mth,
352-266-2814 or
352-634-4304
PINE RIDGE
4/3 Pool on 1.25 acres.
$1500 mo. 1st & secu-
rity. (352) 634-2373



SMW
UPSCALE 2/2/2
SALE/ LEASE, scrn. lanail
$900. mo 352-592-9811




CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/2 condo.
Beautiful waterfront
view w/dock. Recently
updated, partially
furnished. Pool, tennis
cts., cable TV, $900/mo
(414) 690-6337
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfrond Home 3 /2
Deep water, Dock,
$950.00 Per mo.
Call after 2 p.m.
352-795-2558
FLORAL CITY 3/2/2
OPEN LAKE FRONT
$1,000 mo. No smok/
pets (352)344-2500
INGLIS
2/2, House, CHA, W/D
hookup $750 mo+ 1st,
last &dep.water & garb.
14185 W. River Rd
352-447-5244
Cell 352-613-0103
PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 $150K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comm. Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213




INVERNESS
Pool, $150 wkly. incl. util,
(352) 726-6156 after 7




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Lease Option.
4/2/2, 2,200 sft.
(352) 746-1636
Owner Finance,
Citrus Springs 3/2/1 Easy
terms. Low down pay-
ment (352) 201-0658
SALE OR RENT
SMW OAK VLG. SOUTH
Very Nice, near new.
3BR+ Den or 4 BR
$186K or $1000-1500/mo
Furnished or Unfurn.
(813)781-1341




CRYSTAL RIVER
$350/$450, share elec.
No smoking/drugs.
(352) 634-0708
HOMOSASSA
Room for Rent $100/wk.
Incl all utll 352-586-3441




CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS, MONTHLY Furn &
Unfurn. Heated pool.
All newll 352-302-1370
HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
Incl. Nice clean, quiet
park, short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 home w/d, inc water
elec garb tv $975/mth pet
ok, long term-$750/mth
(352) 434-1235




SEAS, MONTHLY Furn &
Unfurn. Heated pool. All
newll 352-302-1370
Kings Bay Crystal River
1 ma. at a time Rentals
Furn. 1/1 Apt. Sleeps 4.
$1000/mo. Includes
boat slip. 386-462-3486

r RENTAL FINDER .
I www.chronicle |
Srentalfinder, com





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status


includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which Is in
violation of the low.
Our readers are
hereby Informed that
all dwellings
advertised in this
newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
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toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
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i


CLASSIFIED


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY
-ES












(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM




Every Sunday 11-2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/4V2/3
3645 W. Brazllnut Road
Go to www.lcpi.com\fl



AVOID FORECLOSURE



352-601-3734




GREAT COMMERCIAL
Big. on Hwy 44, INV.
w/1800 SF, 4 Lease
@ $12SF; $890K w/lot
T. Paduano C21 JW
Morton (352) 212-1446
LARGE Office Facility
Turnkey. 4165 SF $667K
or Lease @ $12/SF
#315744 T. Paduano
C21 JW Morton
(352) 212-1446
Medical Turnkey Office
Zoned RO; 2820 SF.
$527K or Lease @ $12/SF
T. Paduano C21, JW
Morton (352)212-1446




INVESTORS
Palm Harbor Modular
Homes from $53 sf.
Finished on your lot,
3 Color brochures.
Call John Lyons
863-860-3062
THRIVING FEED STORE
GNC Comm. Property,
5,000 sf, metal big. Main
rd. crnr Ioc., Loading
Dock. $675K Don
Crlgger Real Estate





$112,000 NEW
CONSTRUCTION
3/2/2 1,404 sq. ft. Living.
+ $1,500 In CC.
Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker 1st
Choice. (352)220-9188
3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
3/2/2, 1.23 Ac.
REDUCED TO $282,000
'07 New, Upgrades
2,372 Liv./3,269 Tot. SF.
(352) 302-0744
A REAL GEM! 2/2/2
Hardwood firs thru-out,
Fl. rm. Appli's like new.
Custom cabinets,
oversized lot near Gulf
Crs. Anxious to sell at
$149,900. 352-464-2094
BEAUTIFUL 2/2/2
New roof 2003, Call for
updated details.
5119K #317870
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885
BEAUTIFUL NEW 4/2/2
2,235 SFLA, CT, Ig.
Lanal, SALE OR RENT
$1200 mo 407-468-2179
STILT HOMES
Molular Stilt Homes
140 mph. zoning.
We build, sell, deliver
We do It all1
Eliminate builder
mark-up, Call the
factory. John Lyons
800-622-2832 xt. 210


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
.^~ ^ T' . F*-* -**


5248 N BRONCO
4/3 pool home on 1.25
acres. $3,000 towards
closing costs. $273,500
(352) 634-2375
3/2.5/2 POOL HOME
UPDATED EVERYTHING
FSBO, Adj. to Golf
Course, Crnr Lot, Gas
FP, Irr. Well, Granite,
Huge Shed. Must Seel
myhome4sale.net
$299K (352) 746-1175
3/2/2 POOL HOME
2237 sq.ft living space.
Backs to Black Diamond
3186 W Birds Nest Dr.
MLS#315839
352-586-1558 CALL
NOW! $289,700
3/2�2/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma
$259,900.
(352) 302-6025
BETTY MORTON









Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Realt *ect

(352) 795-1555
ELEGANT & GORGEOUS
4/4/2, 3.200+ Uv. SF Pool
Home on 51/2+ Ac.
$595K #318216
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885
Every Sunday 11-2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/41//3
3645 W. Brazlinut Road
Go to www.lcoi.com\fl

FIXER

UPPER
These homes
need work.
Free Computerized
list of. properties
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecltruscoun-
tvhomelnfo.com
ID# 1048
ERA American
Realty &
Investments
NEW & CLASSY
4/3/3, Pool on > 1 Ac.
Kitchen has Corlan,
pull-outs, pendant
lights, tiled backsplash,
& S.S. appl. 10' ceilings
throughout, 18" tile,
raised vanities & Ro-
man Tub. Mother-in-law
suite w/Cabana bath,
Over 3,800 sf. for
$429,900
(352) 746-6161





$279,900
(352) 464-3383




305 S Tyler St
Lovely Home, totally
remodeled 2/2/2 w/
large rms, family Rm w/
FP, Dining Rm, eat in Kit.
all new tile, paint, CHA,
& Roof. Custom kit
cabinets, new
bathrooms, hot tub,
landscaping w/
sprinkler system &
more...MUST SEE,
$169,500.
(352) 746-9103
$79,900
2/1/Carport, w/Fam
Rm. 1126 SF Liv. ALL
BRAND NEW & beautiful
(352) 464-2160
$99,900112/1; 1,100sf.
9 Polk Lease Opt. or
Owner Financing Avail.
Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker 1st
Choice. (352)220-9188
ADORABLE 2/1/1 HOME
W/Caged Ingrd. Pool
$109,900 #315434
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885













HOME FOR SALE"









2/1.5/1 Large FR. New






visit Jademission.com


3/2/2 CRYSTAL GLEN
Elegant Home 2,577 sf.
Orig.$224,900/NOW
$179,900 Ron Egnot Ist
Choice Coldwell Bnkr.
352-287-9219









BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION

(352) 586-6921
or(352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

NICE MINI FARM 2/2 on
3.69ac. Barn and Out :
buildings Incl. just bring4�
your horses. $229K
Alex Choto, FI. Realty &
Auction. (352) 628-09681
NO EXPENSE WAS
SPARED on this beautiful
3/2 custom built home,
featuring stacked stone
In/out, gas FP, gourmet
kit, granite & all wood
cabinets, 10' ceilings,
alarm & sprinkler sys.
2 built-in 220 gal saltwtr
fish aquariums. 2 story
barn, 2 car detached
garage. Too many
extras to list!! $449,000
Owner/Agent call for
appt. 352-302-2300




Brentwood @Terra Vista'
REDUCEDI Beautiful,
contemporary Town Hs,
2/2.5/1 + loft. View of
waterfall. Furn. Negot.
$190K(352) 560-0229
CAMBRIDGE GREENS
3/2/2 New Constr.
For Sale by Owner
Go to www.cltru
hillshome.com
CUSTOM BUILT
2005
5/4/3-3400 living
4700 overall
Great for large family
Pool/spa. No brokers
440k - Citrus Hills
352-302-4200
FOR SALE BY OWNER
1049 W PEARSON ST.
3/2/2 Pool Home, well
maintained & land
escaped, 2158sf under
air. $299,000. For appt.
Call (352) 527-4225
FSBO 3/2/2 on 1 Acre
in Citrus Hills
(Infotube.net) ad
#180976 for more
details, or call
352-249-3299
Redueduced $26,000. II
$230,000 Large
Citrus Hills Beauty
1 ac 3/2/4 granite
B. Malz, (352) 212-2439
Keller Williams Realty
REDUCED TO $200,000
BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 Golf
Crs. Home, New AC,
roof & carpet. Nicely
landscaped, clean,
updated. 954-309-4262





















3/2/2Canterbry Lk.Est.
NEWI Den, MB Suite,
Hg. W.I. Closet, Scrnd.
Lanai. 7 fans,$332,900
(847) 612-2388
(508) 558-9790 Robert

ARBOR LAKES 3/2/2
1580 sf., ingrnd jacuzzi,
Gated 55+ comm.
Reduced Owner wants
offers $174,900 Norm
Overfleld 352-586-8620
Keller Williams Realty

North, Newer 1 Lg
Bedroom 1000 sq. ft., on
1 acres, very good
cond. must see, Lookl
Make offer
(352) 344-5448
REDUCED PRICEIII
3/2, New construction
Many Upgrades,
$159,900. Jim Moran
(352) 726-5855
Era American Realty

SPOTLESS 2 BDRM.
2BA HOME 2 car gar,
Caged In-ground
pool, situated on 2.5
ac. landscaped
estate. Fenced for
horses and spotted
w/mature oaks.
Everything new.
If you are looking this
is a must seel
(VACANT -
MOVE TODAY)
Asking $269K
Contact D Crawford
for details.
(352) 212-7613


ChIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



WORDY V i BYTRICKYRICKYKAE
1. Fabric fluff in a coin-making building (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
1111ML L 11 and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Temporarily relieve a Southern gal (1) they will fit in the letter
_li _ilil_ squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. "Monkey Trial" defendant manages (1) syllables in each word. To win
---11 1 -- l __I $10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
4. More strange metal-fusing alloy (2) newspaper. All entries become
__I II__I_ 1 --111 the property of UFS, Inc.

5. Publisher William Randolph 's sausages (1) @2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
|--1 [ Thanks and $10 to
S I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 Daniel Prieato of
6. Alluding to an author's activity (2) Sag Harbor, NY for
#1. Send your entry
to this newspaper.
7. Steve Allen show singer Kaye's wild ducks (2)


SaHVTIVn S HVTIV *L DMINIHMA ONI0 '9 S1SHaUA SiSHuvH'Q
-HaG'IOS a[Ql0 I' SadOo SadO0 S' H'iaH TIadS ' i9IM NINi M
9-4-07 ' 1 SHHSNV










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 DOWN TO BUYII
$720/mo. + taxes &
insurance. 3/2/2
located in Highlands
Large home, very clean
Needs nothing.
(352) 601-5600
1006 Princeton Ln
$119,900 3/2/2, IHW,
2.000 sq.ft. under roof,
upgraded kitchen &
S bath, minor TLC
352-563-4169
6463 E. Morley St.
3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage
built 2004 exceptionally
clean, adjacent lot
avail $140,000
(352) 341-3940
'2/1/1iCHARMER 1600 sf.
ULiv. Rm. & Fam. Rm., FP,
New metal roof &
windows. 12 X 20
Wrkshp w/strg. $114,900
352-726-4838/220-1863
2/2 Villa Downtown,
Ready to Move In.
Furnished, TJile, Carpet,
Laundry ,Low mint.
$110,000.(352) 476-6192
3/1/1 @ $129,900
New roof, paint, kitch.,
lamin:. firs. Shed, fncd.
\yd. FLRm(352)302-7778
. 3/2/1 Beautifully Treed
Great Starter Home!
Priced for Quick Sale!
$134,900 Harley Hough,
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-400-0051
3/2/lGospl Is. $169,900
->1,800 s.f. Fl. Rm., Scrnd
SPorch, Uti. Big, on
approx. 3/4 Ac. Room
to build pool or add.
home on inc. adj. lot.
. (352) 726-3481
3/2/2 Foxwood Home
I New paint & carpet.
1620 S. Windmere Pt.
J.168K 352-257-2646
BANK
FORECLOSURES

. FREE list of
Foreclosure
properties
Receive a FREE
computerized
print out.
Fjr.e,,Reorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
ID# 1042
ERA American
-,' ' . Realty &
,Investments
Beautiful Bargain 3/2/2
New roof, fireplace, tile,
25X2525 LR; Immac. cond.
2100SF. 100% FIN.
$176K, (352) 586-7685
BUY OWNER T.P.A.61665
BETTY MORTON









[Ic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Reit ect
* .- . ...f-t�YtxfwWf,
(352) 795-1555
CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
prequaiied on
Must See; $124,900
(352) 201-1663




FOR SALE BY OWNER
2BD, 2BA, LR, DR,
Kitchen range with ex-
haust hood, disposal,
dishwasher, washer
dryer hookup 1 car gar,
with opener, screen/
vinyl enclosed porch.
(352) 341-2771 for Info
FSBO 3/2 CARPORT
CBS with alum. siding,
new roof '07, new tile,
throughout '07 Irg.
corner lot, city water,
- sewer, 418 Hunting
Lodge Dr. $115,000
(352) 341-0583
(352) 613-0937
HIGHLANDS 2/2/1
Split plan, oversized
wooded corner lot.
-4Yrs old. Farm. rm. w/FP,
all seas Lanal, by owner
$145,900 (352) 637-1357
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1'w/Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
bc - CbC, , .'.5
Lakefront Stilt Home
Dra-tlcally Reduced
$204k Now $160,000
-Barb Malz, 212-2439
Keller Williams Realty
:' LOVELY 2/2 ON
reed o 1ie... iC:.i ,C,
c roiT., ihlc , carpet
.xtra lot also avail. Must
" See to appreciate!
152,900 (352) 220-3401
SELL YOUR HOME!
SPlace a Chronicle
Classifaed
S6 lines, 30 days


S 726-3983
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
"5 pel ardititrtf lava
(Some Restrlctions
M'Jy appiyi
WiNDERMERE VILLA
Pristine/original model
2/2/1, $155K
FSBO (352)726-8503
YOU GET MORE HERE
$169,000
Brand new 2100 SQ.FT
3/2 custom home ,
Many Upgrades. You
Will Want To Look
Here 1st 917-804-4300


3/2/1 Zan Mar Village
Charming & Peaceful!
Lots of upgrades, FP,
hardwood. $115.925
John Maisel III Exit
Realty(352) 302-5351
Beautiful 3BR, 2BA
home on 1 acre, corner
lot overlooking Floral
City lake. asking
$250,000 For details
(352) 464-5433
GREAT HOME ON I AC.I
2/2/2. new roof, renov.
in 2004. Open floor,
w/split plan $179,900
Terri Hartman Crossland
SRealty (352)726-6644


I AC MOL 3/2
20 X 30 det. Garage.
Close to Power Plant.
$89,900 (352) 302-9351
3/2/11/2 Screen Room
6224 W. Pinedale Cir.
Connell Hghts. $139,900
(352) 302-6025
4/2/2, 2,100 SF. $154K
Beautifully remodeled.
New oak cabs, wood
floors, timberline roof,
fireplace, 2 min. from
water. (352) 688-8040

BETTY MORTON









Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Rea(352) 795-15e55

(352) 795-1555


Now" - -"
BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is MvyFuturell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

KINGS BAY DRIVE
4/2/2 on canal, immac.
Pool home, separate
suite, gated, $825,000
(352) 634-1805
Must Sell 4/2/2,
2,700 sq. ft. Home,
w/ Pool on golf course.
Completely remodeled
$40k in upgrades. Only
$299,999, (813)299-9959




3/2 SW on Two /2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US19
352-503-4142
3/2/2 on 2 LOTS
OLD HOMOSASSA
CB, bonus rm., FP,
Sunroom, $185K
Jack Randall
(352) 212-7740


new 3DKI/DA1 I4UO S..
tile floors, gar. 560 s.f.
9'6" elevation, city
water, paved St.
Corner lot, room for RV,
Owner fin. $189,000
628-2703




3/2/2 New
Many Upgrades
Over 2400 sq ft Liv
$239,900 Dan Hoffman,
Keller Williams
352-601-3627

BRAND NEW &
STUNNING
FSBO 4/3/3+ Bonus
3238 sq. ft. All the
upgrades, Ig. gour-
met kitchen, granite,
center island & stain-
less apple. Lg. screen
pool. Selling under
apprasided value at.
$414,900 view at
greafflhomes.com
or call 813967-7192
Great deal,
won't last!





SALE OR RENT
SMW OAK VLG. SOUTH
Very Nice, near new.
3BR+ Den or 4 BR
$186K or $1000-1500/mo
Furnished or Unfurn.
(813)781-1341


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is My Future!!
(352) 586-6921
or(352)795-9123

Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

BUYING OR
SELLING? CALL ME
FOR RESULTS!


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
Keller Williams
Realty


-""j Inverness
Homes


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
NEW 2/1, FP, Lg. Deck
Dock, Canal front, $18K
below appraisal.
$162,500 352-422-0294
NEW Model, Cypress
Log Cabin 3/2, EP,
Award Winner 1 Ac.
$34.500 352-422-0294
SELL YOUR HOME
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95*
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
*"5 per addi1tiroal line
(Some Restrichons
MNta aoppi I

Vic McDonald
(352) 637-6200









Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE
O()ubtnding Agents
Outstanding Results
(352) 637-6200

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM




6 BDRM HUD $54,0001
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
RIDE GOETHE 10.9 Ac.J
Fully fncd, barn12 X 12
stalls + paddock 2/2 MH
Gorgeous hill-top views!
$215K Well < mkt.
352-239-7788/465-2427




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704




2/2 CITRUS HILLS
Greenbrier //1st fir. furn.
Near pool. $114,500,
$1 ,000mo 352-249-3155
PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 $150K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comm. Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213


"*4Crystal River
"Homes


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 Percent
Commission

Reag Select

(352) 795-1555

BUY NOW
Bargains
Everywhere!


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046

CRYSTAL RIVER
WATERFRONT
Spacious 4/3/1 on deep
water canal with Gulf ac-
cess, many updates in-
cluding new electric, roof,
central alc, insulated win-
dows, appliances, hot
water heater, gorgeous
tiled shower in master,
and so much more FSBO
$285,000 352-795-4932
CRYSTAL SHORES 2/3
den. Dock, boat slip, on
2 lots, porch w/ vinyl
windows, overlook gor-
geous lagoon min. to
gulf, excel, cond.
REDUCED 352-795-7593
KINGS BAY DRIVE
4/2/2 on canal, immac.
Pool home, separate
suite, gated, $825,000
(352) 634-1805

LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!








Plantation Realty. Inc.
1352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the listings
in Citrus County at
www.lantgjaonI
realtvinc.com


2/2 $ bUK, 5sUU/mo.
Dock, Comm. Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213
REDUCED to $299KI
'05, 3/3/3+ w/boat dock
& 2.33 Ac. MUST SEEII
#308410 T. Paduano
C21, JWMorton
(352) 212-1446




1-15 HOUSES WANTED
Cash or Terms
John (352) 228-7523
www.FastFloridaHouse
Buver.com
Im A Private Investor,
Looking to Buy, Res. or
Commercial Properties
for CASH (305)542-4650
WE BUY HOUSES
CaSh........Fast I
352-637-2973
1Ihomesold.com



ACREAGE FOR SALE
0.5 - 2.5 Zoned for MH
or home. Priced to sell!
By Owner, Ownr fin.
avail. Low dwn, flex
terms.Se Habla Espanol
(800) 466-0460


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


m e. Ctu C ut


r--l


Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE


-1-
(352) 563-5510


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597


I


6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
7102 Smith Ter., HOLDER
3/2/2 on 1.3 ACRES
Borders State Park
ForSaleByOwner.com
Listing # 21030419
$229,900, 352-465-5233
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
CRYSTAL RIVER, V2 Ac.
Beautiful New 2 Story
Cape CodI 5/2'/2/2/V2
Wood Floors, Great
Neighborhood. Over
2,800 Sf.(352) 746-5918




HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic,# CBC059685
Lk Rousseau Area, 3/2
FP, w/ 2 garages,
carport, shed, 2/2ac,
beautiful parklike sett-
ing w/lg. oak trees.
9701 Northcutt Ave.
$190,000 352-795-4770


REDUCED TO $200,000
BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 Golf
Crs. Home, New AC,
roof & carpet. Nicely
landscaped, clean,
updated. 954-309-4262




Hiawassee, Georgia
Nestled into the edge
of Chattahoochee
National Forest.
Stacked Stone Cabin &
Lot packages starting
as low as $199,000. For
more information call
(866)429-4703
www.soapstonep
reserve.com
Fcan
NORTH CAROLINA
Extraordinary Riverfront
& River Access sites on
the Broad River
Starting at $39,900.
828-652-8700




2004 BEAUTY
2/2/2 w/1,606 LivSF
Maint. Free! #311064
$179,900, T. Paduano
C21 JW Morton
(352) 212-1446
4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN
3,514 sf. Formal areas,
French Drs. gazebo &
guesthouse. $1,285,000
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
REALTY(352) 302-6082
BETTY MORTON


Acreaae Priced To Selll
$149K; Seller says sell!
#315342, T. Paduano,
C21 JW Morton
352- 212-1446
5.63 Majestic Acreagel
By Duval Is. public boat
ramp w/pub water &
barn stall. Elite New
Home Site! $S249K
#313843, T. Paduano,
C21 352- 212-1446
3/2 SW on Two /2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks of f US19
352-503-4142
Beautiful 5 Wooded Ac.
Homes Only Area.
Awaiting your home &
horsesl$135,000 Sharon
Levins. Rhema Realty
(352) 228-1301
FARMS
&
WATER FRONT




-U-

www.crossland

Crossland
Realty Inc.
Since 1989
(352) 726-6644
Lecanto, Centrally
Located, 2 cleared
.52 ac. lots. Desirable
neighborhood, paved
roads, city water, huge
oak trees, corner lot,
$35,000. Interior lot,
$32,500. W Laurel St.
Owner Agent
352-302-2300
TERRA VISTA HILLSIDE
GOLF COURSE LOT #9
Skyview CC, $77,000
Call (352) 638-0905



1 V4 ACRE in Crystal
Manor, Lot 23, Block 15,
Unit 1, Surveyed, Asking
$69,900. (352) 795-1531
2 PR Beautiful LOTSIIII
Maverick Ct. & Gorge
Lane $59,900 each,
#315012/#315015
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885
4 CITRUS SPRINGS
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
Adjacent Lots
0.23 Acres each
3028, 3038, &
3046 Marie Dr.
& 9516 N. Emellia Ave.
1/4 ml. from Citrus
Springs Golf
& Country Club.
$9K ea.; $40K/all
For Details: Edward
(561) 337-4266

CHEAP CHEAP!
PINE RIDGE
1 Ac. Treed Lot in
area of beautiful
homes! $59.900
352-746-6161
CITRUS LOTS BELOW
MARKET
letsaolandllc.com
800-840-4310
PRISTINE Emerald Hills
2 Ac., CC 581,
Pleasant Grove, Inv.
Surveyed & Cleared.
$62K Eo. Acre
Agent Owned,
(352) 212-1446
REDUCED TO $24K
Inverness 0.46 Ac.,Oaks!
MUST SELL! Bring all
offersJ 305-219-8247
Terra Vista Golf Course
.53 Ac. on Redsox.
Prime for new home!
#313888, $99K
T. Paduano, C21
352-212-1446



BEST DEAL ON WATER
Halls River, 2 WF Lots,
side by side, deep
canal. Parklike setting.
Cleared & ready to
build. $89,900. ea.
Owner/agent
(352) 302-2300



r-;----i
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder com
L M. I
--- --- E




1962, IFR equipped,
Super Tips, Strobes, Cus-
tom Cabin Cover, New
Paint & Interior 2002.
Total time 3740. Engine
since remanufacture
1323. Runs & Flies as
smooth as silk, $35,000
(352) 637-5073
netsignia.net




PONTOON BOAT
TRAILER
Tandem axle, 13" tires,
galV, 31 ft.adjustable.
$1,400. (352) 447-0572




2, 1996 SeaDoos,
w/ trailer, runs good,
minor work w/ Fuel lines
on both, $2000.OBO,
(352) 464-3246
CENTURY 2280
1996 Bay with 150
Yamaha. Exc. Cond.,
VHF, FFinder, GPS,
Stereo, Custom Seat,
Alum Trailer. $12,000
Call 407-376-4269


F--l


CILASSIEFI]EIDS


Air Boat
13 ft. fiberglass,
Rivermaster, hull, S/S,
cage, 403 Buick runs
good. Bilge pumps etc.
trlr. needs paint $4,995.
(352) 637-2319
AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621
CAROLINA SKIFF
1989, 16',7'6" beam, 50
hp. Nissan, trlr. $1,600
(352) 302-8231
Carolina Skiff '95
CC 17' w/newly rebuilt
55HP Suzuki, gd. trailer
$4500. (352) 212-7651
CRESTLINER 16'
25HP Elect. Start,
trolling mtr, lites,
bilge, live well, galv trir,
2 yrs old, like new. Paid
6000 sell $3,950 call
302-5784
HURRICANE 22'
'94, Fun Deck, fishing,
changing rm. 115 hp
Johnson. New bottom
paint. $7,500 obo
(352) 563-1327
KEYWEST 1520
A "REEL" STEAL
2005 15' w/trailer
ALL THE UPGRADES!!!!!
(too many to mention).
Has less than 100 hours.
Just asking what Is
owed. call 400-5520
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuer
352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper
Center.com
352 794-0094
g.--- - -- qg
r Nature Coast Marine
Sales & Service 1
I Present this Ad for
10% Off on all r
I Parts & Service i
1590 US 19,
1 Homosassa
= 352-794-0094 .









NEW T-TOPS &
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last LongI
Call for Pricing
Mon-Frl. 9am-5pm
(352) 527-3555
NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Trailer. Ready to fis!
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209
PONTOON 16'
2003 Sylvan 16' w/02
40hp 4-stroke and 02
golv trailer. Bimini
top.trolling motor,
livewell, depth finder,
much more. VERY NICE
$8950. 212-5179
PONTOON 18'
With trailer. '00 40HP
motor. All in great
shape, $3500/ obo.
(352) 564-8941
Pontoon Boat
30 ft. Party Hut, 93
Evinrude, 95H, T/T, runs
great, head, stove
frige, etc. etc. 2001 Tan-
dem trir., new firs. car-
pet, seats $9,500 obo
(352) 860-0513


PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trlr.
$5,300 obo.
813-695-8428
352-634-4021 EVE
SAILBOAT 17'
Com-Pac, Sm. safe
family cruiser. Shoal
Draft (18") Keel. Trir.,
extras. Asking $1,750
Needs TLC
(352) 563-0022
SEA PRO 21'
1998, Center Console,
150hp Yamaha, $10,000
(352) 795-2537 Iv. mess.
SEA RAY 18'
'99 Bowrider w/ trailer,
115 Merc, OB, Tilt &
Trim, Extras. $8,900 OBO.
(352) 628-9056
SEARS HD
14' Aluminum
$400 or trade for a
Ghenoe.
(352) 795-3764
SPORTCRAFT
'86, 20 ',CC, 140 OMC,
Sea drive, rebuilt '05,
boat/mtr/trlr. $2,900
obo (352) 795-4204
STARCRAFT
'98, Bowrider, 18'10", V-6
I/O, used In fresh water
only. $11,500 obo.
(352) 206-5894
SUNDANCE SKIFF
16', Center Console,
F.F., Livewell, 40 hp
Merc. mtr., bimini top,
trir. Mint Cond.! $6,500
(352) 382-5404
THUNDERCRAFT
16FT, '89 Bowrider, OMC
I/O, new carpet & seats
like new, garage kept
$2800obo 352-270-3641
Vectra Deck Boat
'06, Like new, seats 8,
90HP, loaded, $22k
Sell $16K obo
(352) 795-6895
Wanted: Boats In Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497




A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"85 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621


BIG

RV SALE

BY

COMO RV
at
Crystal
Chevrolet

Hwy.19-
Crystal River
Aug. 31

to

Sept 9
352-422-1282


Citrus Ridge Realty
720955


35213 N. Lecanto H-wy. Beverly H-ills, FL 34465I
1-888-789-7100 I


(orupsry


-St:__ Zip:-_


Tclcphonc: ( )


Note: If you plan to enter into the golf tournament, please complete the Golfer's Entry Form.
If you don't have a Golfer's Entry Form call Bill at 352-563-2480.
f Check here if you DO NOT plan to use your complimentary golf entry fees.


Name:


Friends of Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Ist Annual



Manatee Masters



- Colf Tournament





Select Your Choice of Sponsorships: 0

1l jVianatee 3ull Sponsor /\
($500 and above) To be played at:
* Full page advertisement in the Golf Program O
* Inclusion in all sponsorship drive advertising
* 4 complimentary player 1':i-'0i fees : *it1 per player value) 0 PIANTATON INN
* Special prize/appreciation package for each player aL // A' '

1 ,Manatee Cow Sponsor
.($250)
* Half page advertisement in the Golf Pi'lr .i..
* Inclusion in all sponsorship drive advertising
* 2 complimentary player entry fees ($50 per player value)
* Special prize/appreciation package for each player


SMlanatee Calf - Hole Sponsor
� ($100)
* Printed sign at tee of sponsored hole 0 0
* ".'. 'u. * i in the Golf Program n
www.fcnwr.org

'Support 1e K/\epte thai StUppor1 te %//lanatee6



SPONSORSHIP ACKNOWLEDGMENT

r YES, I wish to become a sponsor as indicated below: Make checks payable to: FCNWt'R
lCheck one: F Manatee Bull Sponsor ($500 or more) and ate GolfTournament

D Manatee Cow Sponsor ($250) 682 . Afterglow Circle
F Manatee Calf -Hole Sponsor (5100) crrstal Rier, FL 34429
D Donation Only (Any Amount)
TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED $


TUESDAY, SEVITMBER
1 cc
.,.& Vehicles
4h. Wanted-


DAMON 32', 1992
454 Chevy eng, 27K mi,
2 ACs, queen bed.Non
Smoking. No pets, Lots
of extras & Exc. Cond!
k18.90Q (352) 527-8247
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Duct AC, Pwr.
lev., Bckup camera,
gen., Loaded! 14K mi.,
40,000 (352) 422-7794
HR ADMIRAL 36'
'02, 2 slides, 1.5 baths,
11,500 miles. Exc. Cond.
$57,500
(352) 382-0017
PACE ARROW 34'
Sips 7,2 roof airs, 56,600
mi. 454 Chev. eng. new
tires, awning, exhaust.
9500. (352) 344-8409
ROCKWOOD
'94, 23 /2 ft., class A,
generator, roof AC,
Chevy, 19k mi. $16,900.
(352) 564-7935




AIRSTREAM 20'
1965 MODEL, 80%
refinished. $3500
(352) 422-7907
Catalina
'99, 31 ft., Coachman
super clean, everything
in good running cond.,
lots of upgrades. $9,500
Call (352) 527-8444
COACHMAN
Slide in 10FT camper,
new A/C, fridge, $900.
(352) 476-2149
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
KEYSTONE 32'
Bunkhouse
2005,32 ft. Bunkhouse
with master. Sleeps 8,
microwave. Very nice
and clean. Value $20K
Sell for $15K OBO
Call 941-626-3951
PROWLER REGAL
'05, 39', alum. frame
const. fully loaded, 2 Ig
sldouts. 2 qu. sz. bdrms.
$17,500 (352) 634-4439
TRAIL LITE
'05 27FT, self contained,
8FT slide out w/20ft
awning, must see
$10,800 (352) 584-2491




Lambo door hinges
fits Honda & Acura,
$300 obo
(352) 422-0792
LEER TOPPER,
fullsize truck forest
green, $250.
(352) 476-2149
LIFT GATE For Truck
12 Volt, Hydraulic
Exc. Cond. $1,000
(352) 621-0982


TOP DOLLAR I
I For Junk Cars |
$ (352)201-1052 $

CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chronicle!
S2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621
BUICK CENTURY '02
Custom Sedan, 1 owner
65K, meticulous cond.
Loaded. Non-smoking.
$9400. (352) 726-3520
BUICK CENTURY '92
2.5, 4cyl, all pwr, no
leaks, uses no oil. Very
clean, odrg. paint. Must
see $1500/obo 344-5448
BUICK LESABRE
2004, Sr. owned, 67K mi,
good cond., $8,500
Call before 9pm
(352) 382-2420
BUICK LESABRE
LIMITED 2003
23,500 mi,. $12900 Ex.
cond. 352-795-5675
CADILLAC 2001
DEVILLE
Must be seen.
One of a kind $10,200
obo. (352) 527-6553
Cadillac ElDorado
'92, custom paint, new
tires/rims, keyless entry.
AC, Ithr, Nice audio sys.
$3600/bo 352-746-6370
CAVALIER 1999
Good Gas Mileage.
4 door, Good cond.
Well maintained.
$2,000. (352) 746-6439
CHEVY CORVETTE
'99,76K mi, heads up
display, 2 roof panels,
white, It gray leather
$19,700
352-382-3094
CHRYSLER
'02, PT Cruiser. Lmtd,,
edition, only 49k mi.
Pwr, everything, loaded
$8,500bo. 352-601-5111


*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645





02DODGE NEON SXT
lg ChromCDe c xd $59951
,ASunro, Loaded.$7,9951
02TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
V6,DualAiLoaded .......... $7,995


COUNTRY SIDE MOTORS
Extra Clean Used Cars,
Trucks & Motorcycles.
RV's, Boats. Jefsklls.
Consignment Wanted.
Detailing avail
www.countrvslde
motorscoro.com
(352) 746-7883
FORD Crown Vic LX.
Low miles. 56K.
Immaculatel See NOW'
@ www.citrushills.
shutterfly.com
Password: crownvic
$6,590 obo 637-6046 -
FORD ESCORT
'98. Gas MIserI 110K,
New tires, Frosty AC, -
CD, 4 spd,, Exc. Cond.'
$1.900(352) 563-0022
FORD Taurus
'99, pwr. everything,
new tires, battery/
brakes $2,300. Floral
City (305)304-1096
Lincoln Towncar '96
Cold AC. new tires.
garaged, runs like new,
$1900/obo. 795-4770
Lincoln Towncar'98
Signature Series, 74K mi,
loaded, beautiful. Wht.
Ithr. all pwr, CD plyr.
$6900/bo 352-445-0507
MERC. COUGAR
'01, black. V-6, full pwr,
63,000 mi. $6995/obo
352-212-7168
MERCURY SABLE
'96 Wagon. 3.0, V-6,
Clean, good cond.
$600 AS IS
(352) 746-3837
MITSUBISHI Spyder
Eclipse '01, Convt., 5
spd. Tint, Wht/Tan Top,
60K, Immaculate! Grgd
$14,500 (352) 382-0005
MUSTANG - RED '01
15,000 mi. 1 owner,
loaded, $9,900.
(352) 212-5628
NISSAN SENTRA
'05, auto, AC, PW, PL,
CC, CD, 35K mi. Very
clean, garaged, $9,850
352-634-3921
NISSAN SENTRA
2004, Rebuilt. 27K ml.,
auto, AC $7,500
(352) 527-2464
SATURN SCI '99
3 dr, 4 cyl, auto, 127K
mi. Cold AC, Runs/drives
perfect. $2550
(352) 453-6870
TOYOTA
PRIUS
2007 Silver, NEW
1,300 miles. $24,999
(352)422-0294
WHEEL OF A
DEAL









GUARANTEED
S RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95 I
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.
L - - - 1


*Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder*


51N.j TLaHiy. eilsJ 4ib
















IVJTJI/ ,PVIMKY LC YO,
Exc. Cond./All pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
$5001 Pokce mounds For
sdel
Cas fram $5001 For isthgscd
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




A Classic Car WANTED
American or Foreign
Will travel. Cash waiting
(407) 957-6957
CHEVY CHEVELLE
1965
31,000, $8,500 4 door
Mallbu, 99% original
car, white, mint
condition 352-586-9113
MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 126K,
White, Both tops,
New tires, $10,500
352-586-6805/586-6805
VW BEETLE 1973
Partly restored: This car
WILL Be Sold to the best
offer. (352) 527-1269
(352) 400-5369
$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$500! For listings call


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!1
*2 weeks in the

*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"WhpIes Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
�S5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVROLET
1980, 4x4, step side,
built 350, 9 lift, 35
swampers, 1 ton
running gear, runs &
drives great,$1900.OBO
(352) 795-0848
CHEVY 1h TON PU
'71, short wheel base,
great shape, 350 auto.
Edelbrock carb. Intake
headers, 17" whis & tires
Illness forces sale.$5850.
352-726-1711 Days
637-6519 after 6


DODGE
'96,RAM SLT 1500,
custom paint, too much
too list. Excel. shape to
pretty for words, $5,995
obo (352) 860-0513
DODGE
'97, SLT, Laramie
ext. cab., diesel,70k ml.,
$12,000.
(352) 795-9339
DODGE DAKOTA
'96, w/topper.
Good Cond.
$2,700 obo
(352) 527-4590
DODGE RAM
'96 1500 Club Cab,
$3,800/obo Rebuilt
Engine & Trans.Runs gd.
352-465-2087/697-2357
FORD F150 1984
150,826. $600.00 work
truck, runs great strght
6cyl. nds work has bed
topper 352-634-1597
FORD F-150 XL '95
Ext. cab,300, 6cyl. 5spd,
Air, clean, $2500 obo.
(352) 795-7757 or
(352) 697-9563
FORD F-350 '99
V-10, gas, 4X2 Super
Cab, loaded!l
137,000 mi. $6,500
(352) 503-3571
FORD RANGER
2004, 27K mi., Auto, AC,
V-6. Exc. Cond. $10K
obo (352) 527-2464
MAZDA B4000
2000, Ext. Cab, pwr, AC,
79K, Asking $6,500
(352) 302-0586
NISSAN FRONTIER
'04 88,000 mi, Original
Owner, Very Clean &
dependable, 26+ mpg
$9,200. (352) 697-0147
TOYOTA
'94, Pickup, 4 cyl., 5 spd.
looks & runs good,
$2,200. (352) 302-2258
After 5, weekdays
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




FORD EXPLORER '98
XLT, V8, all pwr, extras,
tow pkg. New tires, 1
owner, 97K, Runs great.
$4950. (352) 628-5341
GMC SUBURBAN
'99, leather, all options,
full chrome pkg, cust.
wheels/tires, hi mi. perf.
maint. exc. cond.
$7,000 (352) 422-3661
MERCURY
03, MOUNTAINEER, 4dr
83,500 ml, new tires, like
new, $11,700. OBO
(352) 503-6076
(352) 464-3322
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Whe" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


CHEVROLET 2500
'04, LT Silverado HD,
XCab, Long Bed, 4 X 4
Duramax Diesel, 46K,
Loaded! $21,900
(352) 489-7689
DODGE RAM 1500
2003, Heml. Quad cab,
75K mi., $11,900
(352) 228-7033
FORD EXPLORER
1995 4x4 Limited,
223,000 miles, White,
gray interior. $2,745.
352-382-3094
FORD F-150
'94, 4WD, runs & looks
good, 300 6Cyl., 5spd.
OD, $2,250 obo
(352) 795-4204
$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




CHEVROLET
'93 G-20 van, Mark Ill,
V-6 auto., AC PW PL
new parts tires, $2,250
(352) 344-5003
CHEVY
'01, Astro, IS, 4.3L eng.,
wheelchair lift, in the
side door, 36k ml.,
$8,000. (352) 527-4247
CHEVY
'77, 1-Ton, Box Van
V8, automatic, AC
good tires, $1,800. or
trade for boat & motor.
228-2745
CHEVY STEP VAN
'73, Good Cond.
$1,995
(352) 621-0982
CHEVY STEP VAN
'78, C30 Series. Good
Work Truck $500
(352) 621-0982
CHRYSLER
2000 Town & Country
LX, one owner, great
shape, 151K, all power
$3,995. (352) 341-3711

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY









ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1_one n_.;A01 main 717A,


*FREE REMOVAL OF
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA TRX 200
ATV, runs & drives, with
high and low transm.
$600obo 352-628-2769
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
4 WHEELER
(TWO) 2001 Kawasaki
220 4wheelers. Good
ndition.i C S1inn1 n


2 HAKLIY'S
'97 Road King 28K ml.
burgundy/silver stocked
'01 1200 Sportster
custom, 18,250 ml.
Burgundy & dark
burgundy.Lowered
w/forward controls
(352) 583-4338

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the

*2 weeksQOnlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLDWING SE
1990, Honda, 72K ml. like
new, Pearl white, $6,000
a must see. Crystal River
cell 772-528-6130
HARLEY CHOPPER
'71 Old School Iron
Head. Everything
redone! A steal @
$5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HONDA Goldwing
'76, GL 1000
Exc. Cond.
Many extras. $2,995
(352) 621-0982
HONDA VTX 1300
2006, Custom, Black,
Wndshld, Saddlebags.
Back Rest, Like Newl
$7,000obo 220-2374
HONDA
VTX 1800 R, black, 2003,
15k mi. adult driven,
absolute perf. cond.
windshield, light bar.
hyper charger, engine
guards etc. etc. call for
full list of accessories
$7,500. 352-228-9514
LONGBO SCOOTER
'05,6 mos. old. 150CC,
Up to 65 Mph
Showroom Cond.
$1,295 obo 436-4132
PAGSTA MOTOR
SCOOTER, auto, street
legal. Like new, only
60mi. $695/obo
(352) 628-4276
SCOOTER 2005
150miles,$ 1700
Daielm scooter brand
New; hardly used.
Very sharp Scooter 50cc
call 352-249-0815
not after 8:00 pm

SUZUKI BLVD C50
2005, 6000 miles,
windshield, factory
custom paint, saddle
bags, gel seat.light
bar, 50 M.P.G..
Beautiful cruiser!
$6,200
352-634-0430

YAMAHA
'85, Venture Royal, exc.
cond., new tires, 37K ml.
Asking $2,200 obo
(352) 621-0927


503-0904 TUCRN
2007-CP-748 Estate
Jerry Lee Roberts
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2007-CP-748
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JERRY LEE ROBERTS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of
the estate of Jerry Lee
Roberts, deceased,
whose date of death was
June 15, 2007 and whose
social security number is
XXX-XX-4711, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice has been served must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this Notice is
August 28. 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ KIm Lee Roberts
418 John Marshall Lane
Sycamore, IL 60178
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
My Florida Probate, P.A.
/s/ Dawn Ellis, for the firm
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Florida Bar No. 0091979
P.O. Box 952
Floral City, Florida
34436-0952
Telephone: (352) 726-5444
Published two (2) times in
Citrus County Chronicle,
August 28 and September
4,2007.
504-0911 TUCRN
Clerk of Court
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to Section
121.055, Florida Statutes,
the positions of Informa-
tion Systems Director and
Operations Director of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court
will be designated as Sen-
ior Management Service
Class with the Florida Divi-
sion of Retirement.
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September 4 and 11, 2007
507-0911 TUCRN
2006-CP-996 Estate of
Rowland C. Doblneft, Sr.
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS
COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Fire No.: 2006CP
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROWLAND C. DABINETT,
SR,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of ROWLAND
C. DABINETT, SR., de-
ceased, whose date of
death was August 13,
2006, Is pending In the Cir-
cult Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34453. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is
September 4, 2007.

Personal Representatrive:
/s/ Denise A. Dabinett


PO. Box 359
Allamuchy, NJ 07820
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker
Esquire
Attorney for Denise A.
Dablnett
Florida Bar No. 398535
Slaymaker and
Nelson, P.A.
2218 Highway 44 West
nverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726-6129
publishedd two (2) times in I
Citrus County Chronicle, I
september 4 and 11, 2007
508-0911 TUCRN
2007-CP-573 Estate
Sophie M. Thomson
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA f
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007-CP-573


IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIE M. THOMSON,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The adminstratlon ol
the estate of SOPHIE M.
THOMSON, deceased,
whose date of death was
FEBRUARY 5, 2007, Is
pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must tile their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this Notice
Is September 4, 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Michael Thomson
41 Tanners Lane
Rensselaer, NY 12144
Attorney for Personal
Representative
BRADSHAW &
MOUNTJOY, P.A,
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq.
209 Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar No.: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in
Citrus County Chronicle
September 4 and 11,2007
509-0911 TUCRN
2007-CP-647 Estate
Iris M. Swazey
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2007-CP-647
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRIS M. SWAZEY A/K/A
IRIS MARGARET SWAZEY
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of Iris M.
Swazey a/k/a Iris
Margaret Swazey, de-
ceased, whose date of
death was May 12, 2007,
Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 North Apopka Ave.,
Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses
of the personal represent-
ative and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM,
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this Notice
is September 4, 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Laura D'Alessandro
3105 Brandywine Lane
Melbourne, FL 32904
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
/s/ John J. Nelson, Esq.
Florida Bar No.: 0727032
Slaymaker and Nelson,
P.A.
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352) 726-6129
Fax: (352) 726-0223
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle
September 4 and 11,2007
510-0911 TUCRN
2007-CP-752 Estate of
Irene S. Call
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2007-CP-752
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRENE S. CALL
DECEASED,

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the Estate of Irene S. Call,
deceased, whose date of
death was July 25, 2007. is


pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and
addresses of those to
whom it has been as-
signed by such order are
set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
ice has been served must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
'IME OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
fie their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS


7--
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
f 733,702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
s NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this notice Is
September 4, 2007.

Personal Representative:
/s/ Christine Barbara Cook
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove
Road
Inverness, FL 34452
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
HAAG, HAAG &
FRIEDRICH, P.A.
452 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida 34452
(352) 726-0901
(352) 726-3345 (Fascimlle)
Florida Bar Number:
0196529
/s/ JEANNETTE M. HAAG
Attorney for Estate
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 4 and 11, 2007
511-0911 TUCRN
2007-CP-763 Estate of
William J. Priver
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007-CP-763
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM J. PRIVER,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of
the estate of WILLIAM J.
PRIVER, deceased, whose
date of death was
MARCH 19, 2007, Is pend-
Ing In the Circuit Court for
Citrus County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the ad-
dresss of which Is 110
North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first
publication of this Notice
is September 4, 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Rita Weckesser
10 N. Melbourne St.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Attorney for Personal
Representative
BRADSHAW &
MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael MountJoy, Esq.
209 Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar No.: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in
Citrus County Chronicle
September 4 and 11, 2007
512-0911 TUCRN
2007-CP-766 Estate of
Jack Patrick Robinson
Notice to Creditors
Summary Admin,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007-CP-766
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK PATRICK ROBINSON
a/k/a JACK P. ROBINSON,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered In the Estate of
JACK PATRICK ROBINSON
a/k/a JACK P. ROBINSON,
deceased. File No.
2007-CP-766, by the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450; that the
decedent's date of death
was December 26, 2005;
that the total cash value
of the estate Is $5,000.00
and that the names and
address of those to whom
It has been assigned by


such order are:
JOHN MAURICE
ROBINSON and MATTHEW
NICKOLAS ROBINSON
1864 Camino De Pabilo,
Santa Fe, NM 87505
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the es-
tate of the decedent and
persons having claims or
demands against the
estate of the decedent
other than those for
whom provision for full
payment was made in
the Order of Summary Ad-
ministration must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED
The date of first
publication of this Notice
Is September 4, 2007,
Person Giving Notice:
-s- John Maurice Robinson
1864 Camino De Pabllo
Santa Fe, NM 87505
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
DONALD F. PERRIN, P.A.
By: /s/ Donald F. Perrin
FL Bar No. 164338
Post Office Box 250
Inverness. FL 34451-0250
(352) 726-6767
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 4 and 11, 2007
513-0911 TUCRN
2007-CP-756 Estate of
Lucllle W Coburn
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2007-CP-756
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LUCILLE W. COBURN a/k/a
MABLE LUCILLE COBURN
a/k/a LUCILLE WINN
COBURN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of LUCILLE W.
COBURN, deceased,
whose date of death was
May 27. 2007, Is pending
in the Circuit Court for
CITRUS County, Florida,
Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names
and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and
the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
,the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733,702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first
publication of this Notice
Is September 4, 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Sally Long, V.P.
SUNTRUST BANK
P.O. Box 578
Brooksvllle, FL 34605
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
GLEN C. ABBOTT
Florida Bar No. 235911
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River, Florida
34423-2019
Telephone: (352) 795-5699
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,
September 4 and 11, 2007







736-0905 W-TUCRN
Citrus County
Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the Internet at
govdeals.com from
August 15, 2007 to
September 5,2007.
Published seven (7) times,
consecutively, starting
August 15 through Sep-
tember 5. 2007.


501-0904 TUCRN
City of Inverness
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The City of Inverness invites established
Contractor/Firms to submit sealed bids for the Land-
scape Enhancement Project described below. Four (4)
originals of the bid proposals must either be hand deliv-
ered or mailed to Debbie Davis, City Clerk, City of In-
verness, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450,
no later than 2:00 P.M. on Monday, October 1, 2007.
Sealed envelopes containing proposals must bear the
name of the contractor/firm making the proposal, and
clearly state "Proposal for Landscape Enhancement
Project" written on the face of the envelope. A bid se-
curity In the amount of 5% of the bid price is requried.
In addition a Payment and Performance Bond will be
required of the successful bidder. Sealed bids will be
opened in a public meeting and read aloud, beginn-
ing at 2:15 P.M., Monday, October 1, 2007, in the Inver-
ness Government Center, Ist Floor Conference Room
105.212 West Main Street, inverness, Florida.
BID NO: 070-05
DEPARTMENT: DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
ITEM: Construction of the CITY OF INVERNESS:
LANDSCAPE ENHANCEMENT PROJECT consisting
of the following major components:
1. Landscaping
2. Electrical connections
3 Earthwork, and surface restoration activities
All sealed bids are to be submitted on the City Bid
Form/Bid Schedule and envelope marked to indicate
bid number and vendor name. Proposals submitted via
facsimile will be considered non-responsive and will not
be accepted.
Drawings and specifications may be examined in the
offices of:
City of Inverness Development Services
212 West Main Street
Inverness. Florida 34450


A copy of the Documents may be obtained from City
of Inverness Development Services Office, 212 West
Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450 upon payment of
$175.00 for each set of bid documents (Florida sales tax
Is Included). Return of the documents is not required,
and the amount paid for the documents Is
non-refundable.
A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 1:30
P.M. on September 13, 2007 by the City of Inverness In
the Inverness Government Center Council Chambers
(1st Floor).
To inspect the site, contact Kenneth Koch,
Development Services Office, between the hours of
8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
(352) 726-3401.
The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formali-
ties, waive any technical defects, reject any and all
bids, and accept any bid which represents the lowest
best offer to the City.

Frank DiGiovannl, City Manager
City of Inverness, Florida
Bid documents may be examined at the following
locations:
F.W. Dodge Company F.W. Dodge Company
410 S. Ware Blvd., 320 E. South Street
Suite 210 Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33619 Orlando, FL 32801
Published (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
August 28 and September 4, 2007.



500-0911 TUCRN
2007-DR-2299 Notice of Action
Termination of Parental Rights
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY

CASE NO. 2007-DR-2299
IN THE INTEREST OF:
B.M.H.
(Male - D/O/B - 01/07/03),
A Minor Child.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING
TO: QUINTON MEREDITH HEDRICK
PO Box 434
Floral City, FL 34436
QUINTON MEREDITH HEDRICK
8901 South Florida Avenue
Floral City, FL 34436
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of
Parental Rights under oath has been filed in this Court
regarding the above-referenced child; you are hereby
commanded to appear before JUDGE BARBARA
GURROLA, at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, on October
2, 2007. at 9:00 a.m., for an Advisory Hearing on the,
Petition for Termination of Parental Rights. You must
appear on the date and at the time specified.

FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS HEARING
CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR
ON THE DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE
PETITION.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact John D. Sullivan,
Court Administrator and Courthouse ADA Coordinator,
at 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
Phone (352) 341-6700, within two working days of your
receipt of this notice. If hearing or voice Impaired call
711.

Witness my hand and seal of this Court, at Inverness,
Citrus County, Florida, this 14 day of August. 2007.

BETTY STRIFLER,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ M.A. Michel
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
on August 21,28, September 4 and 11,2007,


502-0904 TUCRN
City of Inverness
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The City of Inverness invites established
Contractor/Firms to submit sealed bids for the Land-
scape Enhancement Project described below. Four (4)
originals of the bid proposals must either be hand deliv-
ered or mailed to Debbie Davis, City Clerk. City of In-
verness, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450,
no later than 2:00 P.M. on Monday, October 1, 2007.
Sealed envelopes containing proposals must bear the
name of the contractor/firm making the proposal, and
clearly state "Proposal for Landscape Enhancement
Project" written on the face of the envelope. A bid se-
curity In the amount of 5% of the bid price Is requried.
In addition a Payment and Performance Bond will be
required of the successful bidder. Sealed bids will be
opened In a public meeting and read aloud, beginn-
Ing at 2:15 P.M., Monday, October 1, 2007, In the Inver-
ness Government Center, 1st Floor Conference Room
105,212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.

BID NO: 070-06
DEPARTMENT: DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
ITEM: Construction of the CITY OF INVERNESS:
WITHLACOOCHEE TRAILHEAD Project consisting of
the following major components:
1, Pre-cast building - Bathroom Facility
2. Sewer, water, electrical connections
3. Earthwork, paving, grading, and surface restoration
activities.
All sealed bids are to be submitted on the City Bid
Form/Bid Schedule and envelope marked to Indicate
bid number and vendor name. Proposals submitted via
facsimile will be considered non-responsive and willnot
be accepted.
Drawings and specifications may be examined In the
offices of:
City of Inverness Development Services
212 West Main Street
Inverness, Florida 34450
A copy of the Documents may be obtained from City
of Inverness Development Services Office, 212 West
Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450 upon payment of
$175.00 for each set of bid documents (Florida sales tax
Is Included). Return of the documents is not required,
and the amount paid for the documents Is
non-refundable.
A mandatory Pre-BId Conference will be held at 1:30
P.M. on September 13, 2007 by the Clty of Inverness In
the Inverness Government Center Council Chambers
(1st Floor).
To inspect the site, contact Kenneth Koch,
Development Services Office, between the hours of
8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
(352) 726-3401.
The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formali-
ties, waive any technical defects, reject any and all
bids, and accept any bid which represents the lowest
best offer to the City.

Frank DIGlovannl, City Manager
City of Inverness, Florida
Bid documents may be examined at the following
locations:
F.W. Dodge Company F.W. Dodge Company
410 S. Ware Blvd., 320 E, South Street
Suite 210 Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33619 Orlando, FL 32801
Published (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
August 28 and September 4, 2007.


925-0912 TU/WCRN
Citrus County PDRB
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-


ing will be held by:
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on Seotember 20. 2007. at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular item is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.


1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.
CU-07-11 Dolores H. Clark is requesting a
Conditional Use from the Citrus County Land Develop-
ment Code (LDC) to allow for a Community Learning
Center for a House of Worship, Unity Church of Citrus
County, pursuant to Section 4624 of the Land Develop-
ment Code (LDC). Land Use Designation LDR/Low
Density Residential The property is located in Section
22. Township 18 South. Range 18 East Lots 60, 61, and
62, more specifically, 2534 West WoodvJew Lane,
Lecanto. Flonda (Leconto Area) (A complete legal
description is on file with the Community Development
Division)
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a


CLASSIFIED


party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II, Di-
vision 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Such
request shall be submitted to Department of Develop-
ment Services at least five (5) working days (excluding
Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hearing on the
matter. A "request to Intervene" may be obtained
on-line; click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings Is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
For more information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 4 and 12. 2007.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





party to the proceedings may submit a "request to in-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth in Article II. DI-
vision 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Such
request shall be submitted to Department of Develop-
ment Services at least five (5) working days (excluding
Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hearing on the
matter. A "request to intervene" may be obtained
on-line; click on "Quasi-Judlclal-FAQ".
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
OCitrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 4 and 12, 2007.


506-0911 TUCRN
Citrus County Community Development
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PETITION TO VACATE PLAT
The Petitioner, Citrus County Community Development
Division, on behalf of Citrus County Department of Pub-
Ic Works and Olsen Family Partnership, Ltd., hereby
give notice of their Intention to petition the Citrus
County Board of County Commissioners to vacate a
portion of that certain plat of Pine Ridge Unit 3, as de-
scribed in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part
hereof.

EXHIBIT A
"Drainage Retention Area" designation from Pine Ridge
Unit 3, Drainage Retention Area lying between Lots 2
and 3, Block 311, as recorded In Plat Book 8, Pages
51-67, public records of Citrus County, Florida;
AND
"Lot" and/or "single family residential" designation of Lot
2. Block 312, Pine Ridge Unit 3, as recorded in Plat Book
8. Pages 51-67, public records of Citrus County, Florida.

By: Kevin A. Smith, AICP, Director
Community Development Division
PETITIONER
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 4 and 11,2007.


924-0912 TU/WCRN
Citrus County PDRB
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on September 20. 2007. at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.
1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.
CU-07-10 D. & A. Heuchan are requesting a
Conditional Use from the Citrus County Land Develop-
ment Code (LDC) to allow for an accessory structure
incidental to a principal structure In CLR, Coastal and
Lakes Residential zoning exceeding the side yard build-
ing setback requirements, pursuant to Section 4420.
General Standards (Accessory Uses and Structures), of
the Land Development Code (LDC). Land Use Desig-
nation: CLR, Coastal and Lakes Residential. The prop-
erty Is located In Section 08. Township 17 South. Range
17 East: more specifically, Riverwood Shores Lots 61,62,
63, and 64 which address Is 10063 West Riverwood
Drive, Crystal River, Florida. (Crystal River Area) (A
complete legal description Is on file with the
Community Development Division.)
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Internet at
httpD://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II, Di-
vision 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Such
request shall be submitted to Department of Develop-
ment Services at least five (5) working days (excluding
Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hearing on the
matter. A "request to Intervene" may be obtained
on-line; click on "Quasl-Judlclal-FAQ'.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue.
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565. at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 4 and 12,2007.


923-0912 TU/WCRN
Citrus County PDRB
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
Ing will be held by:
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on September 20. 2007. at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Soverelgn
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular item is discussed will vary depending on
how last the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Varianc request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.
V-07-13 L. Norman Adams Home Builders. Inc.. for
Andrew J. Palluca & Sandubom LLC is requesting a
Variance from the Citrus County Land Development
Code (LDC). This request is to allow for the construction
of a single-family residence, having less than the re-
quired 50-foot minimum building setback from the cen-
ter line of a local street (minimum 25 feet from the
property line) pursuant to Sectlon 4245. Building
Setback Reauirements of the LDC. Land Use Deslgna-
tion: LDR, Low Density Resldential. The property Is lo-
cated In Section 15. Township 19 South. Range 17 East:
more specifically, lots 38, 29, & 40 block 4C000, of Kings
Harbor Homesites unrecorded subdivision, which ad-
dress is known as 2273 South Dana Polnt, Homosassa FL
34448. (Homosassa Area) (A complete legal descrip-
tion is on file with the Community Development Divi-
sion.)
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Intemrnet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a









R


O


N


C


L


A weekly advertising supplement of The Citrus County Chronicle


E


September 4, 2007


Yes, there's more to life on the

road than video games

... much more


INSIDE
Automotive
Map
Page 2D

Q&A with
Sharon Peters
Page 2D


Crossword
Page 3D


Sportscoach's
Pathfinder
Page 3D


AutoM.mt

Dial A Deal
Auto Mart
Page 4D
& 5D

Austin Healey
Page 5D

i Classifieds
Page 6D

Chuck Jordan
Page 6D


Woman's
intuition
Page 7D

Gizmo
overload
Page 7D


Dodge Dart
Page 9D

Ford gains
quality
Page 12D

Auto Quiz
Page 12D

Amphibious
vehicle
Page 14D

RV 101
Page 14D

Flaminio
Bertoni
Page 15D


crammed % nh \ video games
Da\ -care director Anita Good
says games definitely help pass
the time '%hen she hits the road
with her ti\e-\ear-old daughtluer.
She often uses \ versions of games
played by the day care's kids.
"We always have a letter of the
week and a number of the week at
the day care," she says. "For
example, if the letter is A and the
number is five, we'll have the
kids look for five things that start
with the letter A. I do the same
types of things in the car with my
daughter"
Old-fashioned car games like "I
Spy" and "20 Questions" can
keep the kids entertained during
short road trips, but parents
should consider a few new travel
toys to complement the more tra-
ditional fare.
Look for toys that are compact,
lightweight and self-storing.
Depending on your child's inter-
ests, choose everything from
whimsical games or educational
toys that vary in nature from indi-
vidual to shared play.
To make playthings easily
accessible for infants, attach soft,
chewy and interesting toys to the
car seat with plastic links. This
makes for easy retrieval and pre-
vents toys from being thrown.
Older children can keep their toys
together in a backpack, tote bag or
large pocketed slipcover that fits
over the headrest of the front seat
and holds toys, books, games and


tons include:
* Anything magnetic, such as
travel checkers (Fairy Checkers)
* Magnetic Travel Picture
Bingo by Imaginetics or anything


in the Imaginetics product line.
* Nick Jr. activity books with
no-mess magic marker that
uncovers surprises.


* Award-winning Brain Quest
question and answer game, avail-
able in different themes.
* Quizmo question and answer


game.
+ Don't Quote Me game, trav-
el version.
* Little activity books by
Dover.
* Travel Lite Brite.
* Crossword, maze and word
search books by Teacher Created
Resources.
* Intriguing puzzle books by
Mindware.
* A wide variety of DVDs and
audio CDs, including those fea-
turing Bob the Builder, Arthur,
Sesame Street characters and
many others, such as those featur-
ing storyteller Jim Weiss.
please see ROAD page 3D


Don't lose your mind
BY WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS
The following is a quick list of fun family games to try out on your next road trip, gleaned from a number of online sources.
* If your kids have a tendency to fight in the car come up with creative ways to minimize conflict. Bring a stopwatch so that they can time each other's turns with a toy that
they have a tough time sharing. Give them 'car miles points' for every 15 minutes of fight-free travel and allow them to redeem these "points" for special treats and privi-
leges.
* Bring along a "surprise bag" full of long-forgotten toys and other treasures. (Hint: start saving those gimmicky plastic toys that show up in birthday party treat bags.)
* Try a cookie sheet covered with magnetic letters and numbers a peel-and-stick sticker book, an Etch-A-Sketch drawing toy, a kaleidoscope, a puzzle book, a felt board.
Don't forget to bring music
Old-fashioned car games are a terrific way to entertain children.
* Geography: Another classic game, best for children ages 8 and up. Although the fine points of the game may vary, this is how the basic game is played: someone
begins by naming a city, state or country lets say Japan The next person must name a country whose name begins with the last letter of the previously named country. In
this case, Japan ends in "n so a country that begins With N must be named, say Nigeria. Since Nigeria ends in an "a," the next person's country must start with an "A."
The game continues until someone can't answer. *
* The name game: A simple, yet fun game, perfect for children of all ages. Just think of a name. Then tell the group whether it's a boy or girl's name, and tell them the first
letter of the name. The group then tries to guess the name by calling out all the names they can think of which start with the appropriate letter.
* Tall tales: Making up stories and having everyone add a line to make a tall tale can create a lot of laughter.
* Odd or even: In this game for two players, have each child guess if there are more license plates that end in an odd or even numbers. (Plates that end in a letter don't
count.) Give each child a blank sheet of paper and a pencil, or something to mark with. Set a time limit, usually 10-15 minutes. Have one child look for plates that end in an
odd number and the other look for an even number. A tick mark or dash should be marked for each car they find. (For extra learning, have them group the marks in sets of
5.) At the end of the time limit, have the children add up their marks.
* Math can be fun: Keep those young (and older) brains sharp with license plate math mastermind. One person calls out the number from a car license plate that has just
passed them. The idea of this game is for players to quickly multiply numbers together. The winner is the first with the correct answer. It might be wise to have an adult be
the judge. Here's an example of how it works: for KEZ 942, multiply 9 x 4 = 36, 36 x 2 = 72. A simpler version of the game is to see who can add up the numbers correctly.
+ Padiddle: In this game, all players look for the same thing, vans, station wagons, police cars..., whatever you all decide on. When you spot the chosen item, call out
"padiddle!" Keep track of how many "padiddles" each person has. The highest score wins.
* See the world: Binoculars to view the landscape or portable toy telephones to have imaginary conversations are also popular.
* Try some travel sentences: Each player takes a turn forming a sentence by picking a place or destination, a form of transportation and an activity that begins with a let-
ter. For example: I'm going to London on a Llama to look for Larry.


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2D TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRoNICIJE


I0 From
Studebakers to Shelby
Mustang's, for some
there's just not anything
better than restoring a
classic car.
A '54 Corvette, '67
GTO, '63 Chevy Impala
409, the Road Runner,
Dodge Charger, Ford
"Duce" Coupes. These are
but a few of the thousands
of vehicles that might bring
back memories from the
past.
The interiors
restored to better than
original, the paint job as
shiny as the day it was
driven out of the
dealership. The engine
roaring as deep and loud as
ever and the memories and
stories racing back faster
than going from 0 to 120
mph in the quarter mile.
The other day while
on my way to an auto
dealership, I just happened
to see a '64 Impala Super


Sport 327. It was yellow
and I think I actually said,
"Wow" out loud. Looking
around to see if anyone
had heard me I said,
"wow" again, but this time
under my breath. It
brought back memories.
If you've never had
the opportunity to drive a
1963 Chevy Impala 409,
four speed that was
floored, pedal to the metal
through its gears, let me
tell you. It is something
else. It's a memory that
most haven't experienced.
This is what has inspired
the creation of Memory
Lane to become a part of
our Wheels section. The
idea of Memory Lane is to
bring back memories to
those who have
experienced them, and to
try to bring the experience
to those who have never -
had the opportunity.
I certainly do not
profess to be an expert
when it comes to classic


vehicles, muscle cars, or
vintage automobiles,
but, I know when I see a
hot-rod of any sort
driving down the
highway or country road
it makes me want to
catch up just to check it
out. Don't you ever find
yourself thinking, "What
kind of car is that up
ahead?" Maybe you
catch yourself, like I do,
speeding up just a little
to get a tad closer for a
better glimpse and hear
yourself saying "Wow!
It's a '55 Chevy!"
Citrus County is
home to hundreds of
classic and vintage
vehicles. You have
probably noticed them
in your travels around
the county. Maybe
you've even seen one of


the local car clubs set up
for their weekend shows at
a local spot. Well, we hope
to bring those vehicles and
some of those memories to
you up close, each week,
so that you too can take a
trip down Memory Lane.
Maybe you're a
restoration enthusiast and
have some memories to
share. Perhaps you own a
muscle car that is your
pride and joy. Are you a
car club member who
would like to share your
story? Feel free to e-mail
Brian Bisson at
bbisson @ chronicleonline.
com" We would love to
get some great pictures
and stories to use in our
Wheels section.
So sit back and
enjoy and the ride down
Memory Lane.


Hypermotard is ready to take on every road


Ducati Hypermotard
The Hypermotard 1100 takes
on urban canyons and attacks
mountain curves with total aban-
don. Its purpose is single-mind-
ed - to thrill.
Its 'motard' styling and stance
combine with Ducati's 'sports-
bike' smooth and powerful L-
Twin engine to deliver the best
of both these two motorcycling
worlds. With a riding position to
dominate, the exceptionally
slim, compact and incredibly
light Hypermotard is ready to
take on every road with big-bore
acceleration.
High performance starts with
attitude and the Hypermotard
packs the most aggressive atti-
tude of the entire Ducati range.
Reduced to its essentials, it's an
extreme performance, over-the-
top motorcycle that's just look-


ing for action.
This bike offers what no
supermotard can: speeds exceed-
ing 200kph (125mphi) on the
race track, fuel injection, and
over 95hp - all combined with
Ducati's unmistakable passion
for engineering a motorcycle
that stands apart.

Hypermotard 1100
Riding the Hypermotard is
road domination. Wide, tapered
section handlebars transfer con-
trol of the tarmac to the rider and
a full length seat design enables
easy fore and aft movement -
slide up front when entering the
turns and then slide back for
maximum traction on exit.
A rigidly triangulated Trellis
frame and track-tested chassis
geometry is matched with state-
of-the-art suspension. Start off


with the road-holding abilities of
huge 50mm Marzocchi forks,
gripped by a triple screw lower
fork crown, then add a fully
adjustable Sachs shock mounted
to a stout single-sided swingarm.
Light Marchesini wheels com-
bine with twin radially mounted
Brembo four piston callipers,
gripping new lightweight
305mm twin discs up front, and
a 245mm disc at the rear to add
control to the thrilling package.
The new 1100 Desmo engine
pumps out potent torque and
horsepower that is smooth and
linear. The lightweight, power-
ful engine is the result of more
than three decades of Desmo
two-valve development. One
ride with the 1100 explains how
it has charmed journalists world-
wide into claiming it to be the
perfect motorcycle engine. In


keeping with its aggressive
image, the Hypermotard engine
sports a racing-style dry clutch.

Hypermotard 1100 S
The 1100 S is the ultimate in
extreme performance. The 'S'
takes Hypermotard thrills to an
even higher level using
Marzocchi 50mm forks with
trick, low friction, Titanium
Nitride (TiN) coating on the slid-
ers and a race-spec Ohlins fully
adjustable shock at the rear for
fantastic road holding. The
incredible stopping force of
Brembo Monobloc calipers and
lightweight machine finished
forged-aluminium wheels com-
plete the awesome chassis set-
up, while carbon fibre fork pro-
tectors, timing belt covers and
fenders front and rear show off
its 'S' status.


With SHARON PETERS


His left foot


Q I'm totally
freaked out
by my
father's
*i driving. He
uses his rig t foot to work the
gas pedal and his left foot for
the brake. He's in his 50s,
and he says that's the way
he was taught, and it's a lot
safer than using the right foot
for both, since the left foot is
closer to the brake. I doubt
that argument. It seems to
me that the potential for feet
getting tangled is high. What
do you think?

A. I'm not sure how likely it
is that the tangled-foot sce-
nario would play out,
although anything is possi-
ble, that's for sure. But I'm
totally with you on all the
rest: It is much safer for all
foot maneuvers to be execut-
ed by one foot - the right
one. And that's not just me
talking. All the experts,
including traffic officers,
agree.
First, using the right foot
only demands only one-step
mental processing. Your
brain has to process only
one thing: where should that
foot be at this precise
moment? That's one side of
the body with one foot doing
something on one of two dif-
ferent pedals at a time.
Muscle memory usually will
keep your aim true.
Now think of what kind of
processing must take place if
you use both feet. Remove
the foot on one side of your
body from one location at
precisely the same time
you're moving another foot
from one place to another.
That's a bit more compli-
cated. Not impossible, of
course, but complex enough
that in a tense situation the
wrong things can happen.
Many accident reports show
that the driver slammed both
pedals to the
floor at the same
time, or, in some Many
cases, slammed report
on the wrong
pedal altogether, tha
I'm in my 50s, driver !
too, but I was both
told the opposite
of what your dad to th
was told. We at th
were instructed
in driver's ed time
that the left foot some
was to be used
only for depress- slamI
ing the clutch the
pedal on cars pe
with a manual
transmission. alto(
Everything else
was to be per-
formed with the right foot.
Maybe since so few cars
now come with a manual
transmission, he's feeling the
need to come up with an
activity for his poor, neglect-
ed left foot.
Anyhow, the incidence of
confused pedal pumping
seems to grow a bit with
age. So it'd be great if he
could retrain himself now
into a different driving style.
By the way, racecar drivers
use the two-foot approach.


ac
ts
it
sl
p
e
e
?,
D c
m
w
ed
ge


Fine for them. Every single
bit of their attention is
focused on the activity of
driving. They do not allow
themselves distractions, and
they usually drive more miles
on a Saturday afternoon than
many drivers cover in a
week. So they're practiced,
they're focused and they're
athletes.

Q. One of the cars we
have now is a 2004 Honda
Element EX with all-wheel-
drive and a manual transmisL
sion, which I enjoy driving
very much. I would like to
buy another in 2008.
However, Honda is about a
decade behind the times in
providing things like an exte-;
rior air-temperature gauge *.
and a compass. If I could find
out that they will have at
least the outside temperature
gauge, I would buy a new
2008 model. If not, I will
begin to research other
makes, such as the Hyundai
Santa Fe or Subaru Forester.
A. I'm afraid it's time to
begin researching the other
models.
The folks at Honda tell me
that they will not be upgrad-"
ing 2008 Element dashboard
features, so no temperatures;
gauge and no compass.
Some people might think it
odd that you're so devoted to
an outside temperature
gauge. I'm not one of them. f
actually regard it as a safety
feature.
When you're driving
around in winter on a wet, -
slushy day, how would you
know about a sudden tem- ;
perature dip that freezes all
that mush into a sheet of
slick road hazard?
Seeing that the tempera-
ture was plummeting rather ,
unexpectedly has saved my,;
body parts more than once,
because I knew to drop back,
in speed, and a
few miles later "
accident those without
SshOW warning (or with-
out the sense to
the pay attention)
ammed had skidded off'
medals the road.
That's obvi-
floor ously not an
same issue in some
parts of the
or, in country. But I
cases, see you live in
California, and '
led On those mountains
rong can get treach-
lail erous really fast
in January.
Father. I won't harp
on this much '
longer, but it
seems to me that such a fea-
ture can be every bit as vital'
to preventing accidents as
windshield wipers. I'm hoping
all carmakers will recognize
that at some point.

� CTW Features

Whats your question? Sharon
Peters would like to hear about '
whats on your mind when it
comes to caring for, driving and
repairing your vehicle. E-mail
Sharon@ctwfeatures.com.


Take A Ride Down

Memory Lane
If you have memories of a classic,
vintage, or muscle car that you would
like to share, we want to hear from you.
Contact us at:
bbisson@chronicleonline.com or
cbonanno@chronicleonline.com


9 MORY LANFA
- - -I--. - ,








CITIUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NASCAR Racing at




Talladega, Alabama


Talladega, Alabama is a pic-
ture-perfect Southern town
known for its antique shops and
sits silk-stocking district lined
with antebellum and Victorian
homes. But the hundreds of
thousands of people who pass
through this sleepy little burg
every year don't come for the
history. They come for the stock-
car racing at Talladega Super
Speedway.
Car racing is the fastest grow-
ing spectator sport in the coun-
try. Jim Dunn, a NASCAR fan
says, "I just think Talladega is
the biggest. I was at Daytona last
year and Talladega is just that
much more impressive."
Talladega was built in 1969
and is considered the fastest and
most competitive motor-sports
facility in the world. It is one of
two-dozen tracks on the
NASCAR circuit, the National
Association for Stock Car Auto
Racing.
Instant RV Community
Experience America reporter
Pat McConahay made the trek to
Talladega because it's an RV
haven. An entire mini-communi-
ty crops up overnight, offering
all the comforts of home. During
the race, the best seats in the
h.,


ROAD

from page ID

i * A tube of 12 Wild Republic
nature-themed play figures.
* 20Q, the popular handheld
question and answer game.
You might also want to pack
a few separate toys or activities
for your destination, such as
arts and crafts supplies.
Coloring books, crayons and
basic activity books are great to
bring and be sure to include
washable markers.
P Steeves says parents often
forget the importance of pack-
ing items for kids to use when
they arrive at the destination.
. "Once you get there, kids
need diversity, especially after
the first or second day," he


house are on top of RVs. Ten to
15,000 RV rooftops are spread
throughout the infield.
NASCAR Fan Melanie
Hudgins exclaims, "RVs on the
infield are like a huge family. It's
fantastic!" Ronnie Edgens and
his family follow the circuit and
love having their home base at
the track. His wife Liz says,
"What I enjoy about the RV is
that you don't have to leave and
fight the traffic coming in and
out."
Reserving the Best View
Each year the Edgens reserve
a spot through the racetrack at
least six months in advance. The
coveted spots are in the track's
gated community, which is
known as the Front-runners club
because the spaces literally hug
the track. They cost $500 for a
weekend. The spaces may seem
pricey, but they are less expen-
sive than even modest motel
rooms on race weekend.
Fans aren't the only ones who
bring their homes on wheels to
the race. So do the drivers, who
stay in their own private com-
pound. The compounds are set
up like mini-cities, complete
with daycare facilities, exercise
rooms and church services. Their


says, adding that games such as
Bananagrams and Rush Hour as
well as fun items such as the
Bug Vacuum are excellent
choices.
Another key way to make
your holiday more enjoyable is
to ensure that the travelling
portion of the journey becomes
an integral part of the actual
holiday, rather than the "Let's-
get-there-as- fast-as-we-can"
scenario.
Encourage family members
to get involved in the planning
process and contribute their
ideas, giving children a sense
of pride and responsibility.
If time permits, older chil-
dren can send away to a tourist
information office for pam-
phlets and maps related to the
destination and can tell younger
siblings about the excursion.


schedule is so hectic, the com-
pounds allow the drivers to bring
their families on the road with
them. "Otherwise, drivers
wouldn't see them," says Digger
Shook, who drives and main-
tains NASCAR driver Dale
Jarrett's luxury RV.
Meeting the Drivers
On race day, VIP fans can tour
the "hospitality" village and
catch a quick visit with their
favorite driver. Then they can
tour the pit stops where the cars
are maintained throughout the
race. Drivers go up to 200 miles
an hour around the nearly three-
mile track. Fans can listen on
scanners to the conversations
going on during the race
between drivers and their crews.
When we attended the Diehard
500 (April 2000), Jeff Gordon
was the winner. The 2001 winner
was Bobby Hamilton.
The Diehard 500 is one of 34
races in NASCAR's Winston
Cup- Series. NASCAR sponsors
2,200 races at more than three
dozen tracks in 40 states. A
NASCAR race is an unforget-
table experience.
Millions of Americans can't be
wrong - certainly not these
"Diehard" RVers.


Consider outlining your route
on a map and add an education-
al element to the journey by
having kids calculate the total
miles you'll be travelling.
If it's going to be a long trek,
you might want to develop
some special activities in
advance for your stops.
Above all else, keep a posi-
tive attitude.
It can be stressful travelling
with kids, but if you take fre-
quent breaks and remind your-
self that they can't be expected
to clock the same number of
miles in a day as an adult,
you'll be well on your way to
enjoying your next road trip.

* Wheelbase Communi-
cations is a world-wide suppli-
er of automobile news, reviews
and features.


Old-school rims, new 'Stang


What's a retro-looking Ford
Mustang Without retro-looking
wheels? Classic Design Concepts,
based in Novi, Mich., has a solu-
tion with its line of NXT
Generation Wheels. Specifically
built for 2005 and newer Ford
Mustangs, NXT wheels closely
emulate the 14-inch styled steel
wheels available on the first
Mustangs from the mid 1960s.
This time around, however,
they're chrome-plated cast alu-
minum and come in 20x9 and
20x10 sizes to give a retro (but
modern) look to new-generation
Mustangs. As with the originals,
the "cove" area of the spokes is
painted black. Cost is a reasonable
$375 per wheel, no matter the
size, which includes styled lug
nuts, although center caps are
extia-cost items and come in
1.965-'66 or 1967 style.

The final touch
under foot
No doubt that classic cars have
the style, but the way they drive?
Well, they certainly pale in com-
parison to the newer car sitting in
your driveway. There are a variety
of brake, suspension and steering
upgrades that can be performed,
but one of the finishing touches is
a new set of pedals from Lokar
Performance products based in
Knoxville, Tenn. It's new direct
replacement throttle pedal for
1962-'67 Chevy II and Nova
models eliminates the factory rod
linkage. Lokar carries a plethora
of very high-quality custom good-
ies mostly aimed at bringing your
classic machine to a higher level
of fit, finish and drivability.
Basically, if you've modified your
vehicle, Lokar provides the small
detail pieces that make it work
and look better.

Sure shifts
are at hand
There are shift knobs and then
there's the patented Sureshifter
i from TVK Industries that's based
in Gualala, Calif. This nifty new
gadget (so new that it's not yet
widely available), with a hevy of
SLight Emitting Diodes, lights the
Lway to precise gear changes by


showing you the shift pattern and
the gear selected. Certainly it's
true that most people don't look
down to shift, but on more than
one occasion you've probably be
caught in the wrong gear and
spent a couple of shifts looking
for the right one. Maybe you've
even found reverse by accident?
The green LEDs light up the gear


pattern and remain lit any time the
ignition is turned on. When a gear
is engaged, the corresponding
LED lights up red while the
reverse indicator blinks red.
According to the company, the
Sureshifter can easily be installed
at home, but it's probably a good
idea to set up an appointment at
the local shop.


Sportscoach's Pathfinder sas it all:


looks, power, personality - attitude


MIDDLEBURY, Ind. -
Regardless of whether it has a
traditional full-body paint
scheme or the edgier motor
sports paint, the 2008
Sportscoach PathfinderTM
shouts out, "You have arrived."
And, its exterior flash is
matched by its interior luxury.
Yet, under all those good
looks lies raw power.
Pathfinder incorporates the
ISB 340 horsepower Cummins
engine into its Freightliner
chassis.
This 6.7-liter rear diesel
engine coupled with the
Allison 2500 MH 6-speed
transmission delivers 660 lb.-ft
of torque. That is more than
enough to climb the Rockies or
cruise to Branson. The
Cummins engine is also com-
pliant with new 2007 emission
standards.
Pathfinder's air suspension
and air brakes combined with
the 55-degree wheel cut mean
coach maneuverability. To
illustrate that Sportscoach
designers thought of every-
thing, look for fuel fills on
both sides of the coach. No
more maneuvering around a
filling station's lot to get the
fuel fill next to the pump.
Designed for function, the
exterior storage offers plenty,
with pass through storage bays
that are easily accessible by
the handy insulated aluminum
side-swing storage doors.
Pathfinder also boasts a pow-
erful 6.0 kw diesel generator
and a 1,200-watt inverter as
standard equipment.
Pathfinder will more than
stand out from the crowd with
its eight exciting body paint
options - five traditional and
three motor-sports - and its
chrome wheel inserts.
Stepping inside Pathfinder is
like walking into a well-
appointed penthouse apart-




RV LINGO
Boondocking is the
practice of pulling off
the highway to stay
at free locations.
Some of the more
popular spots include
Wal-Mart parking
lots, Bureau of Land
Management facili-
ties, and national for-
est land. For many
RVers boondocking
is a way of life.


WELCOME to Internaitonal AuloCross ": i
a puzzle dedicated to the automobile
enthusiast' AuloCross will test your
knowledge of cars, Drand names and
auto-related people from all over lhe world. Good luck'



*A CACRO0 SS
2. High-performance Taurus
0 I 3. Freeway interchange
5. Oversteer term (slang)
IB J6. Pedestrian pathway
7. Car brand or NY. river
9. Not a leaf
11 . Once part of Kelvinator
13. Was a Plymouth, then a Chrysler
16. Austin
17. Mercury's crown Victoria
20. Public-road event
2 21. Caster, camber, toe-in make up
this
23, Buick bird model
:24 . system
28. Closed-highway advisory
29. Take a free ride
30 Pistonless powerplant
,31 .Trunk, doors and hood have this
33. a.k.a. ECU
34. Company makes body filler
S35. Bio-fuel component
37. Once Ford's comedic
spokesman
38. Half-, quarter- and one-ton
variations
39. Dodge Wagon
42. Flat changer made of "iron"


ACR O SS
1. Suspenion uses bars for springs
3. '60s Ford "Squire" wagon
4. Overhead safety feature
7. Bugatti radiator shape
8. "Wide Track" brand
10. Cylinder volume
12. a.k.a.hack
14. Isuzu sport-ute
15. Holds the brake pads
18. Pull over to use this
19. Water transport for autos
22. Spot for tots
23. '70s "Vee-Dub" hatch


25. The left pedal
26. High-speed U-turn
27. Old-car slang
32. Caped Crusader's ride
34. a.k.a. signal light
36. BMW-made "bubble" car
37. A victorious Studebaker?
40. a.k.a. the hatch
41. Spark-plug maker
43. Start vehicle without key
44. "My-Mother-the-Car" brand
45. New-for-71 Chevy small car
46. Fold-out passenger seat


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ment. Sportscoach decorators
developed five different
designer decors, including two
motor-sport interiors - Vitality
Red and Renegade Raven.
Three wood color options,
including the new Lakeside
Maple, are available to per-
fectly complement the decors.
Whether it's an extended
vacation or a weekend camp-
ing trip, Sportscoach designed
the cockpit of Pathfinder to
make traveling comfortable. A
telescoping tilt steering wheel,
cruise control, defroster fans,
deluxe sun visors and a rear
vision camera are just a few of
the amenities. To give you
extra confidence and safety,
Sportscoach designed the
coach with a large, one-piece
windshield plus the excusive
Site RiteTM dash that angles 20
degrees downward to provide a
clear unobstructed view of the
road.
In the living room, there's
plenty of space to relax or
entertain family and friends.
Each of the four models of
Pathfinder makes exceptional
use of slide outs to expand the
space. New for 2008 is the 386
QS with four space expanding
slide outs.
The residential style furni-
ture makes the living area
more like home. The plush.
sleeper sofa, the decorator
accents, the designer carpet in
the bedroom and ceramic tile
flooring from entry way to
bath area, all add to the charm
of this coach. An innovative
flip down 26-inch LCD televi-
sion hangs over the cockpit.
And when it's time to drive
away, the TV flips up out of
the way.
The galley is perfect for fix-
ing a romantic meal or a quick
midnight snack. The large,
double door refrigerator fea-
tures glossy black insert panels


and an optional ice maker,
making it as attractive as it is
functional. The three-burner
range with oven and the
optional convection
microwave make meal prepa-
ration easy. And, the raised
panel cabinet doors provide
access to a huge amount of
interior storage.
The bath is a room of luxury
with its rain glass textured
shower door, the skylight over
the shower, the premium
faucets and the porcelain toi-
let.
In the bedroom, a true flat
floor, gives spacious head-
room. The queen bed is
designed for comfort, whether
sleeping or watching the 20-
inch television. The wardrobe
is cedar lined to ensure cloth-
ing stays fresh.
The manufacturer's suggest-
ed retail price on Pathfinder
starts at $181,000. Sportscoach
designed Pathfinder for maxi-
mum quality and RV pleasure.
Coachmen Industries, Inc.,
through its prominent industry
subsidiaries, is one of
America's leading manufactur-
ers of recreational vehicles,
systems-built homes and com-
mercial buildings. The
Company's well-known RV
brand names include COACH-
MEN�, GEORGIE BOY�,
SPORTSCOACH�, VIKING�
and ADRENALINETM.
Coachmen's ALL AMERI-
CAN HOMES� subsidiary is
one of the nation's largest pro-
ducers of systems-built homes,
and also a major builder of
multi-family residential and
commercial structures with its
ALL AMERICAN BUILDING
SYSTEMSTM products.
Coachmen Industries, Inc. is
a publicly held company with
stock listed on the New York
Stock Exchange (NYSE) under
the ticker COA.


A roof with style
Over the years, we have been blessed with diverse automotive
design largely highlighted by the style of the roof. Thirty years ago,
the emphasis was not on ergonomics, fuel efficiency or coefficient
of drag, but on style. Here are some of the landmark roof styles that
have influenced automotive design over the decades.


*B'pillar


*C'pillar


Fastback /
H 1-) 111hq ri,.' I. ,' Ib.d L3b " ,Ir.I . -'l ,r ol - , r.- 1 'I , ' l- .l-nlu , ..iIh .11 1 I
T,,",1.-. I , t. i u l. ,1T6". F l-i, a 'r 1 o ,i 1 d ,i' I hr
. ; Trtm Ia' 6n.. I;.- m - i.-, h ,. rl, 0 0 : ,. , ,,r: ; , ,i &
ir . q .,I
Notchback
rqj -nti -,A. . i h r..,2", "," :* i) .1 : r', ,t rr ,,1,,,h1.. '1, I, ,-t. i i' r,,iV.en
out the 'C' pillar The 'notch' allows the roof to be taller at the rear than
in an equivalent fastback, thereby
providing more ,
head roorn.


Slantback
The 'C' pillar was often at an angle similar to. or steeper than, the windshield. Not
a popular roof style, the design allowed the rear glass to stay dry in the rain. A
power up/down feature for the rear glass was an option in the '63-'64 Mercurys.
Mid-1990 Mercury Cougars mimicked the styling. but the rear glass was perpendicular
to the body, not slanted



Coupe
Regardless of roof type, if the car had two doors and a body-mounted 'post' ('B'
pillar) separating the front window from the rear, the car was considered a coupe.
Like modern-day coupes, the rear-passenger windows were often fixed or hinge
mounted allowing them to pop out.
In the 1950s, the style ..r
was referred to 'Post.a

Hardtop
Hardtop cars do not have a fixed post dividing the front and rear passenger windows.
The roof is mounted to the body only at the base of the windshield and the base of
the ree -i. -- - '



"Flying buttress" A' pilarl . -. i -
Roof is highlighted by an
inset rear window and 'C'pillar
sweeping 'C' pillar. Made
popular by the 1968-74
Corvette, 68- 70 Dodge
Charger and the mid-'60s - -
Chevrolet Chevelle and I "
Malibu as well as
the XJS Jaguar



COPYRiGHT WHIEFLASE COMMUNiCA I B pillar


ICOPYRIGHT WHEEL.BASE COMMUNICAr IONS


-Tuysimy, SEVIT-IM131--it 4, 2007 3D


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527-0129 REDUCED '6,999


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ONLY 6,000 MILES, CD, SPOILER,
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X.2,






By MALCOLM GUNN
Wheelbase Communications
The dream had finally become
reality, an idea transferred to
pavement from paper.
There, parked behind the
ropes at the 1952 London Motor
show was Donald Healey's very
own Healey Hundred sports car.
The sleek prototype - made
even sleeker with its rakish fold-
--down windscreen - stunned


goers with its
sheer beauty. Also impressive
was the fact that the roadster had
been tested by Donald Healey
himself at speeds above 100
m.p.h. (hence the Healey
Hundred name).
Healey's creation also caught
the attention of Leonard Lord,
chairman of the then recently
formed British Motor
Corporation (BMC). The com-
pany supplied the Healey's 90-
horsepower 2.7-liter four-cylin-


MMM",- d e r
engine, four--peed
manual transmission and other
mechanical components Both
Lord. and Healey saw the huge
export-market potential for the
car, and a deal was soon struck
between the two men. BMC
would manufacture the car since
it was clear that Healey's cot-
tage-industry plant could never
keep up with the expected
demand.
Before the London Motor
Show ended, the Healey
Hundred was renamed the
Austin-Healey 100. With a list
price of around S1,500, it was


pricier than an MG TD or
Triumph TR2, but far more
affordable than Jaguar's exotic
XK120.
With their eyes firmly fixed on
the lucrative North American
market, Lord and Healey
(Healey then had the role of
chief designer and consultant)
set about generating prototypes
to be shipped to the United
States.
At first sight, American audi-
ences reacted with the same
enthusiasm as those in Britain.
The Austin Healey captured the
Grand Premier Award at the
1953 Miami World's Fair and
was also named International
Show Car of the Year at the
International Motor Sports Show
in New York. Donald Healey
personally drove his creation
throughout the country, helping
build interest with the public, the
press and BMC dealers.
With such an audacious debut,
orders were soon flooding
BMC's Longbridge, England
plant. The company was chum-
ing out more than 100 Healeys a
week, with 80 percent of produc-
tion destined for overseas deliv-
ery.
Those early 100s showed their
versatility as daily drivers as
well as weekend warriors on
race tracks and rally courses.
Although well suited for both
tasks, the Healey wasn't without
its faults. Excessive engine heat
tended to fill the cockpit and
more than one exhaust system
was destroyed due to ground-
clearance problems. However,
considering the car's impressive
performance (0-60 m.p.h. in a
little more than 10 seconds),
superb handling and great looks,
these remained minor quibbles.
As the Austin-Healey's popu-
larity and reputation grew, its
founder remained active as its
chief ambassador. As a former
First World War aviator, automo-
tive engineer and successful
competition driver (winning the
1931 Monte Carlo rally), Healey
was perfectly suited to the role.
In 1954 at age 56, he piloted a


streamlined-bodied super-
charged Austin-Healey 100 to a
number of speed and endurance
records at the Bonneville (Utah)
salt flats.
In 1956, after four years and
more than 14,000 copies (includ-
ing 55 ahuminum-bodied,racing
versions equipped with more
powerful engines and four-wheel
disc brakes), the original 100
series gave way to the 100-6.
The car had a slightly longer
wheelbase, redesigned grille and
power-bulge hood, along with
the availability of "occasional"
rear seats that could give even
the tiniest toddler a bad case of
leg cramps. A 102-horsepower
2.6-liter inline six-cylinder was
standard, although the car was
actually slower than the previous
model due to its added weight.
That condition was corrected
after the first year with an extra
15 horsepower.
Despite higher prices and a
bulkier size, Austin-Healey sales
remained strong. By then,
Healeys were being successfully
campaigned at race courses the
world over, including France's
24 Hours of Le Mans, Sebring,
Fla. and Nassau (Bahamas)
Speed Weeks events.
The last major upgrade
occurred in 1959. Branded the
Austin-Healey 3000, the list of
improvements included a more
powerful 2.9-liter OHV straight-
six (which would ultimately
break through the 10-second 0-


60-m.p.h. barrier), front disc
brakes, roll-up windows and a
retractable convertible top. At
long last, the dangerously-
exposed exhaust system was
rerouted to a more protected
location. And, for the first time
in the Healey's history, a remov-
able hardtop became optional.
However, success would not
continue. BMC was totally
unprepared to properly adapt to
the United States government's
looming safety and environmen-
tal regulations. By the end of
1967, after sales of more than
72,000 copies, Donald Healey's
dream reached the end of the
line.
The Healey name would live
.on for another few years in the
form of the pint-sized Austin-
Healey Sprite as well as the low-
volume Lotus-powered Jensen-
Healey roadster available from
1972-'77.
Since Donald Healey's death
in 1988 at age 89, interest in his
cars, as well as their resale val-
ues continues to climb.
After more than 50 years, the
Austin Healey's attractive
styling and its race-proven stur-
diness have helped keep this leg-
endary sports car from growing
old.
* Malcolm Gunn is
Wheelbase Communications'
chief road tester and historic
writer. Wheelbase is a world-
wide supplier of automobile
news, reviews and features.


2007 GMC ENVOY
6 CYL., POWER WINDOWS,
POWER DOOR LOCKS, MEMORY
SEATS.
795-6800 '26,364


"- ' I


-Tur--,sDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007 5D


-iXmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


LL









CITRUSmCOUNn '(FL.) C1-IRONICLI,;-


6D TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


By Jason Stein
For Wheelbase Communications
Palm Springs, Calif.

T he sun has a certain
glow as it rises over
the edge of the
desert. As its rays
lick the soft sand, it glows with
a red hue the color of a freshly
cut rose. Its warmth releases a
soft breath on the dew of the
green grass where Chuck
Jordan stands, quickly drying
the wet stains on his dark shoes.
In front of him, resting on the
lawn of the Vicery Hotel, sits a
lime-green 1965 Opel GT, a
vehicle with a radiance just as
deep and bright as its designer's
personality.
"Forty years later," Jordan
says, brushing back his silver
hair, "I am still just
as passionate about
this car. It's still Critics
something else."
There are no and ca
arguments here.
Forty-two years the E
later, the GT still Corv
looks as good as its
79-year-old father.
They are both icons standing
out here in the desert morning.
They are both reborn.
"I look at the current Opel
GT and Saturn Sky and I can't
help but be proud," Jordan says.
"Something still makes them
shine."
Jordan should know a little
something about star power and
shine.
As only the fourth man in 78
years to run General Motor,s'
massive design studio, Jordan
is a living legend.
Bill Mitchell shared his desk
once. So did Harley Earl. That's
not exactly small company in
the world of automotive design.
"It was an awesome responsi-
bility."
And it seemed to be one he
was destined for from the time
a six-year-old boy from
Whittier, Calif., began sketch-
ing cars at his bedside table. He
would sketch so late into the
night his mother would bring
his dinner to his room. By the
time he was a teenager, Jordan
was making scale car models.
By the time he had graduated
from Fullerton High School
with honors, enrolled 'at the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology in engineering and
design, he was already thinking
ahead.
In his sophomore year at MIT
Jordan, with the encouragement
of an understanding and patient
mother, entered the GM Fisher
Body Craftsman's Guild
model-car competition. lie not
only competed. He won.
That led to a $4,000 scholar-
ship - not small change in the


late 1940s - and the attention
of Earl, GM's legendary design
guru. By 1949, at 22, Jordan
had a job as a junior designer
with GM where he remade the
automaker's truck designs.
He was interesting, charis-
matic and a little quirky, which
was good for a designer in ihe
1950s when things were chang-
ing quickly in car world.
Jordan's impact was a lightning
rod in the industry.
Within four years, Earl
appointed him chief designer of
GM's special product studio
and four years after that he was
named chief designer for
Cadillac. He was 30.
"I never tried to do what
Harley Earl wanted. I tried to
do what I thought was right,"
he said.
What wasn't to
like? In the 1950s

raved he helped pen the
first-ever concept
lled it for a minivan as
well as the 1959
3aby Cadillac Eldorado

ette. with enormous tail
fins.
In 1962, with the
idea for the Opel GT already
brewing in his head and on the
occasional sketch pad, Jordan
was named to Life magazine's
"100 most important young
men and women in the United
States."
But he was bound for Europe
where Jordan worked in Opel's
design studios and created the
GT, a two-seat sports car that
would sell more cars in the
United States than Europe.
Critics raved and called it the
Baby Corvette.
"It was a wonderful experi-
ence and was really the right
time for Opel in America," he
said. "Opel needed that image.
And it rubbed off like nothing
else."
Jordan's career took the same
vertical trajectory.
After three years in Germany
as design director for Opel, he
returned to the United States in
the late 1960s and served as the
Number Two man in the organ-
ization until 1986 when he took
the top spot as vice president of
design until mandatory retire-
ment in 1992.
His mantra was "no dull
cars" and, as the top GM
designer, he influenced the
Camaro/Firebird, the 1992
Cadillac STS and Eldorado and
Oldsmobile Aurora.
It was 43 years at GM with an
unmistakable impression.
Today it lives on with the
Opel GT and its sister car, the
Saturn Sky.
"I love the new cars," Jordan
says with a smile. "This is the
way to go in the future. We're
moving on."


And so is Jordan, who is still
an active part of the design
community, teaching his craft
at his local high school, work-
ing with his Ferraris and pro-
moting automobile design at
every possible opportunity.
"It's the best life you can
have. Does anything really beat
it'?"
* Jason Stein is a feature
writer with Wheelbase
Communications. You can drop
him a line on the Web at:
www.wheelbase.ws/mailbag.ht
ml. Wheelbase Communi-
cations supplies automotive


news and features to newspa-
pers across North America.


*Chroicle
I IN


a


2, 1996 SeaDoos,
w/ trailer, runs good,
minor work w/ Fuel lines
on both, $2000.0BO0.
(352) 464-3246


Air Boat
13 ft, fiberglass,
Rivermaster, hull, S/S,
cage, 403 Buick runs
good. Bilge pumps etc.
trir needs paint $4,995.
(352) 637-2319
CAROLINA SKIFF
1989, 16', 7'6" beam, 50
hp. Nissan, trlr $1,600
(352) 302-8231
FISHER
14' Jon Boat, 2000,
2514 Yamaha, trilr., elec,
motor, depth recorder,
$2,600. (352) 408-1271
HURRICANE 22'
'94, Fun Deck, fishing,
changing rm 115hp
Johnson New bottom
paint. $7,500 obo
(352) 563-1327
NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Trailer. Ready to fishL
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209
PONTOON 18'
With trailer. '00 40HP
motor. All in great
shape. $3500/ oboa
(352) 564-8941
PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trlr
S5.300 obo
813-695-8428
352-634-4021 EVE
Pontoon Boat
30 ft. Party Hut, 93
Evinrude 95H,T/T, runs
great, head, stove
frge, etc etc 2001 Tan-
aern Irn nnew firs car-
pet, seats $9,500 obo
(352) 860-0513
SAILBOAT 17'
Com-Pac.Sm safe
family cruiser Shoal
Driat ;8') i eel Tri,
exRias A skg 3S1,750
Needs LC
(352) 563-0022


Carolina Skiff '95
CC 17' w/newly rebuilt
55HP Suzuki, gd. trailer
$4500. (352) 212-7651
SEA PRO 21'
1998, Center Console,
150hp Yamaha, $10,000
(352) 795-2537 Iv. mess.
SEA RAY 18'
'99 Bowrider w/ trailer,
115 Mere, OB, Tilt &
Trim, Extras, $8,900 OBO.
(352) 628-9056
STARCRAFT
'98, Bowrider, 18'10", V-6
I/0, used in fresh water
only. $11,500 obo.
(352) 206-5894
SUNDANCE SKIFF
16', Center Console,
FF., Livewell, 40 hp
Mere. mtr., bimini top,
trtr. Mint Cond. $6,500
(352) 382-5404
THUNDERCRAFT
16FT, '89 Bowrider, OMC
I/O, new carpet & seats
like new, garage kept
$2800obo 352-270-3641
Vectra Deck Boat
'06, Like new, seats 8,
90HP, loaded, $22k
Sell $16K obo
(352) 795-6895



DAMON 32' 1997
w/SLIDE, new tires/
brakes $23,500/obo
(352) 628-0699, after 6
or (352) 344-4400
DAMON 32', 1992
454 Chevy eng, 27K mi,
2 ACs, queen bed Non
Smoking, No pets, Lots
of extras & Exc. Cond'
$18200 (352) 527-8247
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Duct AC, Pwr
lev , Bckup camera,
r ' aded! 14K mi
. (352) 422-7794
HR ADMIRAL 36'
02, 2 slides, 1 5 baths,
11,500 miles Exc Cond
$57,500
(352) 382-0017
PACE ARROW 34'
Sips 7 2 roof airs. 56,600
rni 154 Cnrev -ng new
ires, awning, exhaust.
$9500. (352) 344-8409


ROCKWOOD
'94, 23 V2 ft., class A.
generator, roof AC,
Chevy, 19k mi. $16,900.
(352) 564-7935



AIRSTREAM 20'
1965 MODEL, 80%
refinished. $3500
(352) 422-7907
Catalina
'99, 31 ft., Coachman
super clean, everything
in good running cond.,
lots of upgrades. $9,500
Call (352) 527-8444
PROWLER REGAL
'05, 39'. alum. frame
const. fully loaded, 2 Ig
sldouts. 2 qu. sz. bdrms.
$17,500 (352) 634-4439



r 31m
LL SAVE AUTO
AFFORDABLE CARS
100+ Clean
Dependable Cars
FROM $450- DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US HWY 19
HOMOSASSA
352-563-2003
--m- --- J
BUICK CENTURY '02
Custom Sedan, 1 owner
65K, meticulous cond.
Loaded. Non-smoking,
$9400. (352) 726-3520
BUICK LESABRE
2004, Sr. ownedA 67K mi.
good cond $8,500
Call before 9pm
(352) 382-2420
BUICK PARK AVE
1996, Loaded! Runs
& drives great' 232K
All Hwy mi $1,995 obo
352-637-3550/228-1420
CADILLAC 2001
DEVILLE
Must be seen.
One of a kind $S 10,200
obo (352) 527-6553
Cadillac EIDorado
'92 custom paint new
tires/nmr , keyless entry
AC, Ithr, Nice audio sys
S3600/bo 352-746-6370


COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS


To place an ad, call 5635966J


- Classified

In Print

Sand

.Online

All

The Time


Fa 32 6-65 olFe:(88 5-301Eai:cases hoiloln~om Iwbi w .choicenin. o


CAVALIER 1999
Good Gas Mileage.
4 door, Good cond.
Well maintained,
$2,000. (352) 746-6439
CHRYSLER
'02, PT Cruiser, Lmtd.,
edition, only 49k mi.
Pwr, everything, loaded
$8,500bo. 352-601-5111
COUNTRY SIDE MOTORS
Extra Clean Used Cars,
Trucks & Motorcycles.
RV's, Boats. Jetskiis.
Consignment Wanted.
Detailing avail
www.countrvslde
motorscora.com
(352) 746-7883
FORD Crown Vic LX
Low miles. 56K.
Immoculatel See NOW
@ www.citrushills.
shutterfly.com
Password: crownvic
$6,590 obo 637-6046
FORD ESCORT
'98, Gas Miser! 110K,
New tires, Frosty AC,
CD, 4 spd., Exc. Cond,
$1,900(352) 563-0022
FORD Taurus
'99, pwr. everything,
new tires, battery/
brakes $2,300. Floral
City (305)304-1096
Lincoln Towncar'98
Signature Series, 74K mi,
loaded, beautiful. Wht
lthr all pwr, CD plyr.
$6900/bo 352-445-0507
MERC. COUGAR
'01, black, V-6, full pwr,
63,000 mi. $6995/obo
352-212-7168
MITSUBICHI Spyder
Eclipse '01, Convt., 5
spd Tint, Wht/Ton Top,
60K. Immaculate ' Grgd
S14,500 (352) 382-0005
MUSTANG - RED '01
15,000 mi 1 owner,
loaded, $9.900
(352) 212-5628
NISSAN SENTRA
'05, auto, AC, PW, PL,
CC, CD, 35K mi Very
clean, garaged. $9,850
352-634-3921
NISSAN SENTRA
2004, Rebuilt 27'r mn,
auto, AC $7,500
(352) 527-2464


SATURN SC1 '99
3 dr 4 cyl, auto, 127K
mi. Cold AC, Runs/drives
perfect. $2550
(352) 453-6870
TOYOTA
PRIUS
2007 Silver, NEW
1,300 miles. $24,999
(352)422-0294



1973 VW BEETLE
Partly restored; This car
WILL Be Sold to the best
offer. (352) 527-1269
(352) 400-5369
MUSTANG '87
Red Convertible. 86K mi.
Sharply See to
appreciate, $4200 firm
(352) 341-4313



CHEVY 1/2 TON PU
'71, short wheel base,
great shape. 350 auto.
Edelbrock carb, intake
headers, 17" whls & tires
Illness forces sale.S5850.
352-726-1711 Days
637-6519 after 6
DODGE
'96,RAM SLT 1500,
custom paint, too much
too list Excel shape to
pretty for words, S5,995
obo (352) 860-0513
DODGE
'97. SLT, Laramime,
ext. cab, diesel,70k mi,
$12,000.
(352) 795-9339
DODGE DAKOTA
96, w/topper
Good Cond
S2,700 obo
(352) 527-4590
DODGE RAM
'96 1500 Club Cab,
$3,800/obo Rebuilt
Engine & Trans Runs gd
352-465-2087/697-2357
FORD F-150 XL '95
Ext cab,300. 6cyl 5spd,
Ar cl5an, 27EOOobo
(352) 795-7757 or
(352) 697-9563


FORD F-350 '99
V-10, gas.,4X2 Super
Cab, loaded!!
137,000 mi. $6,500
(352) 503-3571
FORD RANGER
2004. 27K mi, Auto, AC,
V-6. Exc. Cond. $10K
obo (352) 527-2464
MAZDA B4000
2000, Ext. Cab, pwr, AC,
79K, Asking S6,500
(352) 302-0586
TOYOTA
'94, Pickup, 4cyl. 5 spd
looks & runs good.
$2,200. (352) 302-2258
After 5, weekdays



FORD EXPLORER '98
XLT, V8, all pwr, extras.
tow pkg. New tires, 1
owner, 971K, Runs great
$4950. (352) 628-5341
GMC SUBURBAN
'99, leather, o0l options,
full chrome pkg, cust
whee!s/tires, hi mi perf
main', exc. cond
$7,000 (352) 422-3661
MERCURY
030, MOUNTAINEER, 4dr
83 500 mr, new tires, like
new, $11,700 OBO
(352) 503-6076
(352) 464-3322



CHEVROLET 2500
04, L Silverado HD,
X - ' .--,-; 4X4
: . 46K,
Loaded! $21 900
(352) 489-7689



CHEVY
'01, Astro, LS, 4 3L eng
wheelchair lift, in the
side door, 36k m! ,
$8,000. (352) 527-4247
CHEVY
'77, 1-Ton, Box Van
V8, automatic, AC
good ltires, $1,800. or
trade for boat & motor.
228-2745


CHEVY STEP VAN
'73, Good Cond
$1,995
(352) 621-0982
CHRYSLER
2000 Town & Country
LX, one owner, great
shape. 151K all power
$3,995. (352) 341-3711



2 HARLEY'S
'97 Road King 28K mi
burgundy/slver stocked
'01 1200 Sportster cus-
tom, 18,250 mi. Bur-
gundy & dark
burgundy Lowered
w/forward controls
(352) 583-4338
GOLDWING SE
1990, Hondo 72K mi ke
new, Pearl white, S6 CO
a must see Crystal River
cell 772-528-6130
HARLEY CHOPPER
'71 Old School Iron
Head. Everything
redone, A steal @
$5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917
HONDA Goldwing
'76, GL 1000
Exc Cond
Many extras $2,995
(352) 621-0982
HONDA VTX 1300
2006. Custom Black,
Wndshrld Saddlebags.
Bock Rest Like New!
$ 7 000obo 220-2374
HONDA
VTX 1800 R, black, 2003
15k mi adult driven,
absolute pert cond
windshield, light bar
hyper charger, engine
guards etc etc coll for
full list of accessories
$7,500. 352-228-9514
YAMAHA
1989, 1100 cc, good
cond, mellow veslow
color. $1,600 firm
(352) 560-3883
YAMAHA
'85, Venture Royal e\c
cond , new tires 37K mi
Asking $2,200 obo
(352) 621-0927


I
]

1








uTR Ic rNrY, (PL ) CuD4


By Teresa Odle
CTW FEATURES

: Women already depend on
Iheir five senses to tell them
_'hen their children are ill, to
detect danger ahead and the
'weather conditions outside. As
if turns out, they also can use
them to maintain their cars' per-
formance.
' "When you hear the brakes
.squeak, it's an indication that
.you should take them in for
service and have them looked
at. The pads may just need
cleaning or you might need new


brake pads," says Lea George
with AC Delco marketing in
Grand Blanc, Mich. The prob-
lem is that many women don't
trust their senses and their own
intuition when it comes to their
cars and trucks.
The National Institute for
Automotive Service Excellence
reports that women now repre-
sent more than 65 percent of all
customers who take their vehi-
cles in for service and repair. To
help them make more informed
choices when they do so, AC
Delco has begun their
"Knowledge is Power" cam-


paign, which offers seminars to
independent automotive-service
providers and an information
booklet for the public that helps
women use their five senses to
recognize possible problems
with their vehicles.
The program aims to help
women feel less intimidated by
their vehicles' operation and
better prepared when they go in
for service. Mark Hyde of Hyde
Auto Service, which is a 48-
year-old family business in
Oklahoma City, recently held a
Knowledge is Power clinic for
some of his regular female cus-


tomers. He showed slides from
AC Delco that covered basics of
how car engines and other func-
tions work. And he addressed
how to use the five senses to
spot trouble.
The only problem with the
clinic was trying to wrap it up
after his customers had stuck
around more than an hour past
the scheduled time. "They were
just starving for more," Hyde
says.
With more than 33 years in
the repair business, Hyde has
noticed women are better at
using their senses to stay in tune


with their vehicles. "For exam-
ple, they'll be driving and notice
a rotten-egg smell or something
burning," says Hyde. The rot-
ten-egg smell might indicate an
emission problem, while a
burnt-toast smell could signal a
short in the electrical system,
and a burning-rubber smell
could mean that your clutch or
brakes have overheated.
Women can use their senses
to spot problems visually, too.
Various fluid leaks will show up
as drippings in the garage or
driveway under the car and are a
sign you need to have your car
checked out. "Let's say the stain
is red - then it's coming from
your transmission," George
says. Stains that are yellow,
green, pink or orange and
lighter and thinner than oil like-
ly indicate coolant leaks.
You also can pay attention to
how your car feels while you
drive. If it shakes, make a men-
tal note of what causes the
vibration. Does it occur only at
certain speeds, for example?
Write down the symptoms, tak-
ing detailed notes. Tape these
notes onto the steering wheel,
since the service writer you


Women should

rely on their

senses - and

trust their

instincts -

when they

bring their cars

in for service


meet with may not be the same
person who actually works on
your vehicle.
"It's very important for the
technician to know exactly what
the customer was doing in her
vehicle when the particular con-
cern happened," says George.
. When you take your car in for
service, describe, but don't
diagnose. Much like going to
the doctor, you want to relate
the symptoms but not prescribe
treatment; leave that to the serv-
ice professional. That's one rea-
son why Hyde likes working
with women. "Men will call and
diagnose the problem over the
phone, but most ladies want
information," he says.
Still, Hyde says that having
some basic automotive knowl-
edge can help improve the serv-
ice experience, as does estab-
lishing a trusting relationship
with the service provider.
George says that any woman
who feels skeptical about the
work being done on her car
should take action.
The best strategy is to ask the
technician or shop owner to
show you the work they plan to
do or have done. George gave
an example from a past experi-
ence involving a nonexistent
axle leak. As soon as the woman
who brought her car in asked to
go back into the service bay and
see the leak, it was no longer an
issue.
"Another thing women can do
is to ask to see the old part when
a part is replaced on your vehi-
cle," says George. In some
areas, state law says the shop
has to give you the option of
taking the replaced part with
you. This proves the work
you're being charged for was
really done.
And if you don't feel comfort-
able talking with a particular
technician or service writer, ask
to speak to someone else.
"Remember this is your vehicle
and you have every right to ask
to deal with somebody you're
comfortable with," says George.

� CTW Features


Gizmo overload


By Jay Koblenz
CTW FEATURES

Without doubt, modern tech-
nology has brought many bene-
ficial features to today's cars
and trucks. Our vehicles are
safer than ever before, pack
more-powerful engines and get
better fuel economy. New mate-
rials quiet the ride, modern sus-
pensions can tune a car's ride
according to the road surface,
the latest transmissions ease the
transition between gears and
advanced materials even con-
tour the seating to our varied
sizes and shapes.
Although technological
advancements have always been
an important aspect of the car
business, the concept has esca-
lated into an all-out war in
recent years. This is particularly
true among models in the
$50,000 to $100,000 range.
Luxury-car makers are trying to
throw in every possible gadget
these days, and each brand
seeks to be the first with at least
one attention-grabbing electron-
ic gizmo. All too often, though,
the result is added complexity
without discernable benefit.
While many of these devices
have potential, some of them
have been rushed to market too
soon, are impacted by design
compromises or just create
more problems than they solve.
What's more, vehicle electron-
ics have become - by far -
among the biggest headaches in
terms of reliability for several
top luxury brands.
Here's a quick look at some
of today's hottest new-car fea-
tures and whether they're ready
for prime-time:

GPS Navigation
Having a navigation system


that displays maps and gives
you driving directions can be
handy if you often travel
beyond your immediate area,
but many are difficult to pro-
gram and can be distracting to
operate while a vehicle is in
motion. Often a $300 handheld
system is easier to use than
many original-equipment
$2,000 versions. In large part
because the technology is
improving at such a rapid rate,
navigation systems tend to
deliver the worst resale values
among new-vehicle options.

Keyless Entry/Start
With this worthwhile feature,
the electronic "key" stays in
your pocket or purse; a button
or touch of the handle unlocks
the door or trunk and another
button starts the engine. With
some, the car locks automatical-
ly when you walk away from it.
Most can be programmed to
operate according to customiz-
able preferences.

Intelligent Cruise Control
Here, radar or lasers maintain
both a set highway speed and
distance between your car and
the traffic ahead. All can apply
moderate braking and govern
acceleration to make cruise con-
trol useful in moderate traffic.
All you need do is steer until
traffic slows to a certain speed.
The biggest downside is price -
the system adds $1,500 or more
to a vehicle's cost.

Crash Mitigation
First introduced by Acura and
Mercedes-Benz on their top
sedans, this is essentially intelli-
gent cruise control with added
safety features, and it works
regardless of whether the cruise
fiction is engaged. Crash miti-


Lane Departure Warning
These systems let you know if
your vehicle is wandering out-
side the lane markers, either
because of driver fatigue or inat-
tention. There are different vari-
eties, from the Infiniti system
that beeps if you wander out of
your lane, to the Audi system
that tells you if someone's in the
way only when you signal (good
training to use your turn signal
regularly) and the Volvo system
that constantly (and annoyingly)


vehicle alongside. The next gen-
eration of the technology will
even be able to tug on the steer-
ing wheel to help nudge your car
back into the lane.

Voice Recognition
Introduced as a way to make
operating complex menu-driven
automotive multimedia inter-
faces easier, none yet work per-
fectly and require careful pro-
nunciation of specific words.
Some people get along fine by
mastering a few commands, but
most cars don't listen any better


than a teenager. Yelling doesn't
help and it takes longer to voice-
engage most tasks than it does to
just press a button.

Park Assist
The high-tech version of the
old curb feelers, this is either a
sonar or optical system that
senses objects behind the vehi-
cle at low speeds to help avoid
hitting obstacles or, more impor-
tantly, small children. Helpful
for parallel parking, some sys-
tems add proximity indicators to
the front and comers of the vehi-
cle. Some cars offer backup


Automatic Parking
Thus far, only the top Lexus
LS sedan offers this feature that
purports to parallel park your car
for you; it works the steering,
while you modulate the brake
pedal. Unfortunately, you'll
need to find a very large parking
space and the sort of patience
required to train a 16-year-old to
make it work.

c CTW Features


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8 D TUESDAY. SLPTFMBER 4, 2007 Ci IJU5 CouNm' (FL) Ci IRONICLE


..A..LBNUS..IYALTY A

MEANS AN EXTRA


'07 Ml it i '07 . 0 ' : T I Offer .tui:, S '.inhor' 3. on '08 Super Duty
*Must currently own or lease a '98 or newer Ford Car, SUV or Truck, and finance or lease through Ford Credit to receive Owner Loyalty Cash. 07 F-150 Regular or Supercab only. **Must
currently own or lease a '98 or newer Ford Super Duty and finance or lease a new'08 Super Duty through Ford Credit to receive Owner Loyalty Cash. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit
financing. Owner Loyalty Cash excludes 2008 Taurus X, 2007 Mustang Shelby and Shelby GT, and 2008 Super Duty Harley-Davidson models. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 9/3/
07. See dealer for residency restrictions, qualifications and complete details.


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GREG
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICLF


SD TUESDAY, S.EPTEMBFR 4, 2007


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T i-,srexY, SFVI'iiIBIliR 4, 200 S D


WV itLfSECTION 2


FINE LINES
1967-1973 DODGE DART


For big-block fans, a 300-
horse 383 cubic-inch V8 could
also be had in the baby Dodge,
but the lighter weight of the 340
cars made for a better-balanced
package. In fact, equipped with a
stout 3.91:1 rear gear and a four-
speed manual transmission, the
light-weight unitized (frameless)
340 Dart was an even match for
most bigger-engined competitors
whose extra horsepower was off-
set with plenty of extra heft.
The GTS trim package fea-
tured a unique hood with dual
chrome-trimmed "340 Four
Barrel" humps, bucket seats,
rallyy" wheels, red-line side-
wall tires, dual exhaust with
chrome tips, sport suspension,
15-inch wheels and an optional
Hurst-shifted four-speed gear-
box. A special "Scat" stripe was
wrapped around the tail to signi-
fy membership in Dodge's elite
"Scat Pack", granted only to
Dodge cars that could cut a 14-
second or better (less time) quar-
ter-mile time.
A fully loaded GTS cost
around $3,200, a little more than
the no-frills 383-powered
Plymouth Road Runner, which
was a runaway sales smash. So,
for 1969, Dodge brought out the
Swinger 340, its own no-frills
street stormer that sold for about
$400 less than the previous
year's GTS. It was performance
that just about anyone could
afford and performance that flew
well below the radar screens of
insurance companies that began
clamping down on premiums for
high-horsepower equipment. The
440 and Hemi were in sharp
decline after 1971 and the Dart
became a recluse for buyers
seeking hassle-free speed.
In fact, by the early 1970s, the
compact Dart line had become
Dodge's bread-and-butter brand
and was split into two distinct


series: Dart Swinger coupes and
Custom sedans; plus a shorter-
wheelbase Demon fastback, the
mate to Plymouth's Duster. Most
came with the fuel-sipping 225-
cubic-inch six-cylinder (called a
"Slant Six" because of its angle
in the engine bay), but the 340
V8 remained a popular option.
After receiving sufficient flack
for the Demon name from vocal
groups who saw little humor in
the devilish cartoon character
planted on the Dodge's fenders,
the car was renamed the Dart
Sport for 1973.
At mid-decade, the Dart
enjoyed unprecedented sales suc-
cess even though the era of high
performance was by then only a
fond memory. Stringent govern-
ment smog controls all but killed
the hot little 340 and subsequent
360 V8.
The once-proud and popular
Dart name eventually disap-
peared in 1976, replaced by the
frumpy Dodge Aspen.
For more than a decade, the
Dart served the needs of young
and old alike, who, strangely.
enough, appreciated it for entire-
ly different reasons.


t's easy to remember the
car stars of the musclecar
era, but it's also easy to for-
get where they came from:
usually much less glamorous
modes of transportation.
In the case of the Dodge Dart,
the number of famous GTS and
340 Swinger models that were
built pales in comparison to the
thousands upon thousands of six-
cylinder and 318-V8 powered
four-door grocery getters parked
in suburban driveways.
Today, it's the high-perform-
ance cars that everyone remem-
bers, but, then again, that's why
car companies built them: brand
image. And it worked like a
charm.
I Dodge was, and is, Chrysler's
performance brand. It was the
Dart, the Charger and the Super
Bee then, and the Viper, Magnumn
SRT8 and Charger SRT8 today.
But the Dart didn't start out
that way. As part of the low-cost
group of 1960s compacts, it was
intended to compete with Ford's
Falcon and Fairlane as well the
Chevrolet Corvair, Chevy II and
Pontiac Tempest. All were
innocuous automobiles that
stressed interior and trunk space


while holding p,,%er and
price to a mmimunmi.
But change ws .in the air. The
1964 GTO rocked Deroit like
meteor and the shockwave rip-
pled right across the country.
Based on the mid-sized
Tempest chassis, the GTO's phi-
losophy was surprisingly simple:
small car; big engine; and jazzy
looks. Pontiac figured on 5,000
first-year sales. Shockingly, the
division sold more than 32,000
before running out of time and
production capacity.
Competing manufacturers
struggled to come up with their
own version of GTO, which is
consider to be the first "muscle-
car".
Dodge was tackling this new
and untapped market from two
angles with hardware it had at its
disposal. A fastback roof was
grafted to a Coronet body and,
voila, the 1966 Charger was born
with one significant advantage
over the 389-V8 powered GTO.
You could pick your engine: any
engine, whether a 383, 440 or the
426-cubic-inch Hemi.
Dodge was also fiddling with
the Dart, but it wasn't until the
second-generation model was
unveiled for 1967, and the injec-
tion of real image and horsepow-
er in 1968, that Dodge could


l in j l l . ,: \ 0*"*.i-; lK,, ' -, i
we re reddy. al number). Most
Success and Dodge's importantly, with the high-flow-
image hinged on one particular ing cylinder heads, 350-375
version: the GTS hardtop fitted horsepower was within easy
with a high-revving 340 cubic- reach after a few simple upgrades
inch V8, underrated at 275 horse- to the intake and exhaust systems
power (315 was closer to the were made.


.4.-.


JAIJ,4b i ' D-111--fil : I m-I-Xel Ll U A q tei 14 PIVIel to] laill q t-IF11 : I PM





CirRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.LOD TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


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ALL PRICs WiTHw 'it000 CAsN O TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX. LICENSE FEE AND *395 DEALER PE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE POR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


2006 TAHOE


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800-325-105 EXT. 855


$1 3F888







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2007 MERCURY MILAN 2007 LINCOLN MKX 2007 LINCOLN MARK LT 2007 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
2007 cash back on .1007 Mark LT Navigator Mountaineer and Mariner
REBATES I


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5 STAR CRASH RATING
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N .Keyless entry system, keyless remote, cruise control, power windows/locks, AM/FM
NAVIGATOR :'... , stereo w/CD player, 8 way power driver seat, Michelin tires, tilt steering wheel


04FORDFOCUS .02JUlERCURY 0IER4 ..04 MERCURY- Q7 EORDFGeUS- - 04 MERCURY 03 D 04 GRAND -Q0-.INCO4N
.siher ,nhs : Ce00mies iARi LFAIAGAON SABLE SABLE c., ,,,,,,,,,, , SABLE LS ARQUIS LS' MARQUIS GS TOWN CAR


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Burgundy leather Gold 14 000 miles White 35 000 miles Blue 26 000 miles Gold monroof 3rd feaf
#R3261 #R3260 #R3245 #P3248 onli 26 000 melos #P3226
$19,995. $I9,995. $19,995.$ 19,995. 0 20,995.


LIMiTEIDu CAR M
Ivory, 29k miles. Moon roof, silver, White, moonroof, leather,
#X895 22,000 miles. #9130A 5,000 miles. #R3267
124,995. 24,995. 26,995.


I PKu.E PROPER VEHICLE I FACTORY AUTHORIZED
MAINTENANCE IS KEY I A CSYSTEM
,IUB.VER TO MAXIMUM FUEL | A/C SYSTEM
Um PACKAGE EFFICIENCY! A /SUYIS E


V Motorcraftf Premium Synthetic Blend I
oil and filter change
I /Rotate and I
inspect four tires
I " Check air I
and cabin air filters m9 i
I "Inspect brake system ! |
a Top off all fluids
VI Test battery
/ Check belts and hoses
Up to six quarts of Motorcraftoil . Taxes and diesel
vehicles extra. Hybrid high voltage battery test not
included. Disposal fees not included in some locabons
See Senaice Advisor for vehicle applications and details. |


,Crn r
/ Inspect system components


COOLING SYSTEM
SERVICE


iMOTORCRAFT PREMIUM WEAR INDICATOR
I WIPER BLADES


Analyze refrigerant S 9 $39 95
SMeasure pressure
" ILeak tBest system ^ r I^ ^


with Ford -
with Ford - I Part of Ford Motor Company-required maintenance I
authorized service equipment. Inspect radiator leaks Check hoses, clamps and
I belts. Pressure test system for leaks Drain and refill
radiator. Includes up to one gallon of coolant Taxes and
diesel vehicles extra. Disposal fees not included in some
Refrigerant extra See Service Advisor for vehicle locations See Service Advisor for vehicle applicat aons
applications and details. Offer valid with coupon. | and details Offer valid with coupon Expires 9130/07


$19"5
WITH WEAR INDICATOR THAT
SIGNALS WHEN TO REPLACE
Motorcraft' wiper blades with wear indicator per parr.
installed See Service Advisor for vehicle applications
and details Offer vaid wrth coupon
E-....er 9/30/01, C�C


I WHEEL BALANCE,
TIRE ROTATION AND
BRAKE INSPECTION

I95

Computer balance four wheels Inspect brake fricton
materiaali caper operation rotors, drums, hoses and
connections Inspect parking brake for damage and
proper operation Rotate and inspect four tires Dual
rear-wheel vehicles extra Taxes extra See Service
Advisor for vehicle applications and details. Offer valid
,ith mconpn pcirs 9/n3o/07 CCC


MOTORCRAFT�
BRAKES, INSTALLED!
Engineered for
your vehicle.
$8995


Dealer-installed retail Motorcraft-, or Genuine Ford
brake pads or shoes only limit one redemption per axle
Pads or shoes only on most cars and light trucks Front
or rear axle E ' [ - -:- - - ' drums Taxes


Offer valid with coupon. Expires 9/30/07 CCC Exp�res 9130107. GCC CCC Expires 9n01017 CCC witm coupon txores
VA

LINCOLN MERCURY
SALE HOURS:
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 9-5 lllllllllllllt 001
Sun. Closed 0
SERVICE PARTS: 1-800-524-0373
L I N C 0 L N Mon.-Fri. 8-5:30 MERCURY
Sat. & Sun. Closed 2121 NW Hwy 19, CRYSTAL RIVER
MV5242. 'Discount may include MFG incentive which may not be available with MFG special financing or leasing which also may apply. Dealer retains all factory rebates& incentives. See store for det2ft. Vehicle quantities are approximated& may vary. Vehicles
I subject to prior sale. All prices plus tax, tog and delivery fee with approved credit. Not responsible for typographical and printing errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. See Dealer for Details.


I N CON,


-. ' ,
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Tui:sDAY, SFI"ITMI31-R 4, 2007 11D


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STSAY.SEP.EMBER.4. 2007 CITRUSCOUN


Ford gains quality in sec


DEARBORN, July 19, 2007 -
- Ford Motor Company vehicles
continue making dramatic
strides in quality, outstripping
the industry's rate of improve-
ment in "things gone wrong"
(TGWs) in the second quarter
U.S. Global Quality Research
System (GQRS) study.
The company improved by 10
percent versus last year, while
the report's average industry-
wide ,improvement rate hit 4
percent. In addition, 19 Ford
Motor Company models ranked
in the report's top three places
for customer satisfaction, TGW
performance -- or both -- after
three months in service.
Mustang Shelby GT500, Ford
Explorer and Lincoln Mark LT
pickup won top honors for TGW
performance, while Ford Edge,
Ford E-series vans and Mazda
MX-5 Miata topped their seg-
ments in customer satisfaction.
Ford's newest vehicles, includ-
ing Ford Edge, Lincoln MKX
and Lincoln Navigator L, were
strong customer satisfaction
performers - and each launched
with considerably fewer TGWs
than the industry average.
Meanwhile, Ford Fusion,
Mercury Milan and Lincoln


MKZ are sustaining their high
quality levels since their launch-
es in late 2004.
"We're launching new prod-
ucts with quality, and our team
is working hard to consistently
build quality into the vehicles
we're delivering for customers,"
said Mark Fields, president of
The Americas, Ford Motor
Company. "We've redoubled our
commitment to deliver more
products customers really want -
- with quality that rivals the best
in the industry."
The 2007 second quarter U.S.
Global Quality Research
System study, conducted for
Ford by RDA Group of
Bloomfield Hills, Mich., asks
customers of all major makes
and models to comment on trou-
bles and rate their overall satis-
faction with their three-month-
old vehicles.
Second-place winners for
TGW performance and cus-
tomer satisfaction include:
* Ford Freestyle: TGW per-
formance, Crossover utility.
* Ford Expedition: TGW per-
formance, Large traditional util-
ity,
* Ford Expedition EL:
Customer satisfaction perform-


ance, Large traditional utility.
* Ford E-Series: TGW per-
formance, Full-size van passen-
ger/cargo.
* Mercury Milan: TGW per-
formance, CD car segment.
+ Mercury Mountaineer:
TGW performance, Medium
traditional utility.
* Lincoln Navigator L: TGW
performance and customer satis-
faction performance, Large pre-
mium utility.
* Mazda MX-5 Miata: cus-
tomer satisfaction, Sports car
segment.
* Volvo S60: TGW perform-
ance, CD Premium car segment.


* Volvo S80: TGW perform-
ance, D Premium car segment.
Third-place winners include:
* Ford Fusion: TGW per-
formance, CD car segment.
* Ford F-150: TGW perform-
ance, Fullsize light truck seg-
ment.
* Lincoln MKZ: TGW per-
formance, CD Premium car seg-
ment.
* Lincoln Navigator: TGW
performance and customer satis-
faction performance, Large pre-
mium utility segment.
* Mazda MX-5 Miata: TGW
performance, Sports car seg-
ment.


"ond quarter

In the report, Ford Motor vehicles are at 1,798 TGWs
Company vehicles are at 1,427 representing an improvement o
TGWs, representing 159 fewer 107 TGWs, and a customer sat
TGWs since last year. The com- isfaction rate of 73 percent.
pany's lineup achieved an over- The survey average for TGV
all customer satisfaction rating performance is 1,447 and fe
of 75 percent, up by 1 percent- customer satisfaction level is 7
age point. percent.
"We've been employing the The GQRS report is the late,
most disciplined processes of several recent third-part
around the world to improve the quality assessments showing
quality of all of our brands," Ford's continued improvement
said Bennie Fowler, vice presi- Ford received 14 total vehicle
dent, Quality, Ford Motor ranked in the top three in the:
Company. "The results show respective segments, including
that the processes work. And we five highest-ranked segmer
will not let up." awards, in J.D. Power an
Ford, Lincoln, Mercury Associates IQS study release
brands had an impressive per- on June 6. Many of those veh
formance with 1,419 TGWs, an cles were recently launched.
improvement of 144 TGWs; and On June 28, J.D. Power an
a customer satisfaction rate of Associates APEAL study ranke
75 percent, up by 2 percentage Ford Edge the industry's to
points, performing all-new vehicle an
Volvo vehicles are at 1,433 Ford Mustang won its segmnei
TGWs, an improvement of 114 for the third straight year.
TGWs, and a customer satisfac- "We're encouraged by thes
tion rate of 79 percent. Jaguar sustained quality gains, but w
vehicles are at 1,603 TGWs, a also know we have more woi
deterioration of 46 TGWs, and a to do," Fields said. "The quality
customer satisfaction rate of 82 race never ends, and we have t
percent. Land Rover is at 1,794 make sure customers know ho
TGWs, an improvement of 411 much progress and momentum
TGWs, and a customer satisfac- we're gaining on the quality
tion rate of 73 percent. Mazda front."


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Yes Virginia, you can drive an RV


Have you ever wondered what
it would be like to slide behind
the wheel of a motorhome, or
hitch your van to a travel trailer
and set off to discover North
America?

Your local RV dealer can open
the door to a whole new lifestyle,
filled with the freedom to ramble
wherever your dreams may lead.
Whether you lease, rent, or pur-
chase an RV, there really is a
model to suit the needs of every
family, and every budget.

Today's RV models are as sim-
ple to drive as the family car.
Every motorhome is equipped
with power steering, brakes, and
automatic transmission, result-
ingi fa driving'xpe`ience simi-
lar in many respects to driving a
van. You don't have to have the
muscles of a truck driver to steer
the vehicle, or the legs of a
marathon runner to bring it to a
stop ... everything is adjusted to
provide controls that feel just
about the same as your typical
family car ... it's just bigger!

Novice RV drivers only need a
few minutes behind the wheel to
become accustomed to the size
and clearance requirements of a
motorhome. Many new RV driv-


the road today.


ers
are surprised at
the enhanced vis-
ibility you' enjoy
when driving
a big rig.
Large
wind-
shields,
mirrors,:
a n "d ,d
optional
rear-vision
TV monitor
systems give
you a view of the highway that
exceeds anything you are likely
to find in a passenger car or van.
Sitting in the captain's chair,
above the majority of the vehi-
cles on the road, you can see
what's happening all around you
much better than the average
motorist can - and that's a safety
plus that makes motorhomes one
of the most relaxing vehicles on


downtown traffic, you can too!
Just remember that a vehicle
with a tag axle (two sets of rear
wheels) will turn in a tighter cir-
cle that you might expect - so
leave extra room to make what
the truckers call "wide right
turns".

Towing an RV requires similar
preparation, but it doesn't take


very long to get used to the feel
of the rig. Keep in mind that
your acceleration will be
reduced because you will be
moving more weight than the
tow vehicle alone. Your trailer
brakes, if properly adjusted, will
provide stopping performance
close to the tow vehicle alone -
but never exceed the speed limit
with a towed RV, the combined
vehicle handling is engineered
for cruising at the recommended
speed, it's an RV - not a race car.

Are you still nervous about
your first RV expedition?
Everyone is. Take the time to
practice your driving skills in
an empty parking lot, and
then take a ride down a
nice quiet road. Check
B out where the white
lines fall in your rear
view mirrors when
your rig is centred in the lane,
and take note of a spot on your
windshield that lines up with the
curb when your vehicle is parked
just right.
Remember' the tips you
learned when you first took driv-
ing lessons, and apply them to
the RV, and you'll discover that
driving a recreational vehicle
can be a relaxing and enjoyable
experience!


How to Save Money on Fuel Costs


By Cheri Sicard
FabulousTravel.comrn

The price of gas has risen to
phenomenal highs and there's no
end in site. This can put a serious
crimp in your wallet, whether
you're traveling across the coun-
try or across town. Now more
than ever, it makes sense to get
the most miles out of your fuel
purchases that you possibly can.
Not only will you save money,
you'll also help clean the envi-
ronment. So next time you turn
on the ignition, keep these valu-


able tips in mind:
* Don't top off your tank. -
Gas that drips onto the ground or
evaporates into the air as fumes
can't help get you down the road.
Don't pay for fuel that will only
be wasted, stop filling your tank
before it overflows.
* Turn off the air conditioner.
- Air conditioners bum through
significant amounts of fuel.
Open the windows instead and
you'll save money.
* Slow Down. -- The faster
you drive, the more fuel you'll
use, stick to the speed limit and


you'll not only save on fuel,
you'll save on tickets too. If you
have cruise control, use it!
* Stay off the breaks. - You'll
use more fuel in stop and go traf-
fic. Try to plan trips when you're
not likely to hit rush hour traffic
and you'll save time as well as
money.
* Lighten your load. - Don't
carry unnecessary weight in your
vehicle (or in any trailers you
may be towing). The heavier the
load, the more fuel consumed.
* Tune it up. - To keep your
vehicle running at maximum


efficiency, always get regular
tune-ups and change dirty filters
regularly. An ounce of preven-
tion is worth a pound of cure.
* Check the tires. - Check that
your tires are properly inflated
and rotate them on a regular
basis, not only to extend the life
of your tires, but to help achieve
maximum fuel efficiency.
* Multi-task. - It takes more
gas to start up a cold car as
opposed to a warm one, plan all
your small trips and errands
together to get the most out of
your gas tank.


Michelin tires that regenerate themselves


DALLAS -- Imagine a tire with
a tread that regenerates itself as it
wears. It's not science fiction or a
scene from the "Transformers"
movie, it's reality at Michelin.
Today at the Great American
Truck Show (GATS) in Dallas,
Michelin is unveiling the latest
innovation from its Michelin
Durable Technologies research -
the new XDA5 drive tire for Class
8 rigs.
� Michelin uses patented design
and manufacturing techniques to
,mold the tread of the XDA5 in
three dimensions. As the tire
wears, the tread reveals new
grooves and tread blocks, effec-
tively giving the tire a second life-
-self-regenerating to improve wet,
worn traction. This regenerating
tread design keeps the tire in serv-
ice longer before retreading, an
impressive 30 percent improve-
ment in tread life over other drive
tires that are commercially avail-


able. That translates into
improved safety and lower costs
for fleets and owner operators
across North America.
"Incorporating three dimen-
sional features into the tire tread
that must interact with each other
as the tire rolls down the highway
required Michelin to develop
additional innovations in our
manufacturing processes," said
Jean-Michel Guillon, chief oper-
ating officer, Michelin Americas
Truck Tires. "The result is a
sophisticated tread design that
works to preserve itself as it per-
forms. We are very excited to
bring this technology to the mar-
ketplace as it dramatically raises
the bar for high mileage tires."
Through innovative design and
manufacturing, double-wave
MatrixTM sipes give the Michelin
XDA5 tire's 30/32 deep tread
blocks the ability to lock together
in all directions, delivering amaz-


ing rigidity, resistance to scrub,
and minimizing irregular wear
normally associated with deep
tread block designs. At the base of
the Matrix siping, a raindrop
groove is molded into the tread
block that reveals a new groove
when the tread has 10/32 remain-
ing, a feature of self-regenerating
tread. Due to this self-regenerat-
ing mechanism, the XDA5 tire
offers renewed grip, enhanced
worn traction, as well as more
usable tread, which ultimately
results in longer life.
In addition to outlasting other
tires, the Michelin XDA5 tire also
boasts a footprint that is more than
10 percent wider than its prede-
cessor, delivering a larger contact
patch and, in turn, superior stabil-
ity and handling throughout the
life of the tire. Michelin Durable
Technologies research has truly
succeeded in delivering top per-
formance that lasts longer.


The Michelin XDA5 tire will-
soon be available in four sizes,
275/80R22.5, 11R22.5,
275/80R24.5 and 11R24.5. Next
year it will be offered in a
305/75R24.5 LRJ version, created
expressly to accommodate
Mexico's higher load-carrying
demands.
Dedicated to the improvement
of sustainable mobility, Michelin
(www.michelin.com) designs,
manufactures and sells tires for
every type of vehicle, including
airplanes, automobiles, bicycles,
earthmovers, farm equipment,
heavy-duty trucks, motorcycles
and the space shuttle. The compa-
ny also publishes travel guides,
hotel and restaurant guides, maps
and road atlases. Headquartered
in Greenville, S.C., Michelin
North America employs more
than 22,000 and operates 19
major manufacturing plants in 17
locations.


Kyle Busch looking


for creative minds


Kyle Busch is looking for a
little assistance from young, cre-
ative minds all over the world to
help design his new helmet. To
enter the helmet design contest,
visit www.kylebusch.com to
download a helmet template and
mail it in. The contest runs
through Sept. 30 with Busch
picking the winning helmet dur-
ing the month of October. The
lucky winner will receive a full-
size replica helmet of their win-


ning design. Children ages 18
and under are eligible.


Automotive Quiz

Test your General Automotive Knowledge
General Automotive Knowledge Quiz

Which car company introduced the laminated wind-
shield?
Q Ford
0 Chrysler
O GM

The camshaft operates the:
O water pump
0 valve train
0 cams

A gallon of gasoline has as much energy as:
O 100 lb. of black powder
Q 19 sticks of Dynamite
Q 2 lb. of rocket fuel

The first cars ran on:
0 kerosene
0 gasoline
0 crude oil

Henry Ford invented the:
0l assembly line
0 charcoal briquette
0 8-hour work day
0 all of the above

To what automobile does the term It's a Deusy
refer?
0 Cord
O Auburn Speedster
0 Duesenberg

Chevrolet has produced how many small block
engines to date?
0 20 million
0 50 million
Q over 100 million

What do Hydraulic lifters operate?
0 valves
0 floor jacks
0 oil pump

Sugar added to the gas tank does what?
Q ruins the engine
0 dramatically reduces power
0 nothing

Paint was applied to the first cars with:
0 brushes
0 spray guns
0 ink rollers

See answers page 14D


I - - - I


12D TuiHsDAY, SFP-rEMBFR 4, 2007


I.


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Way


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2007 Suzuki Reno


2007 Suzuki XU


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2007 Suzuki SX4


2007 Suzuki Grand Vitara
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2007 Suzuki Forenza

SUZUKI

SUMMER

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BROS. SUZUKI
5 N. Suncoast Blvd. * Crystal River, FL 34429


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AMERICAS #1 WARRANTY
100,000 MILES/7 YR * NO DEDUCTIBLE * FULLY TRANSFERABLE


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The new am


ious vehicle


New Hamburg, Ontario,
Canada - Ontario Drive & Gear
Limited (ODG), the world leader
in off-road amphibious vehicles
is pleased to announce new addi-
tions to its already exciting vehi-
cle line-up. ODG
(www.odg.com ) continues to
lead the way in versatility for
off-road enthusiasts around the
globe with their 6x6 and 8x8
vehicles, which are used for
*recreational and commercial
-applications.
The New ARGO 6x6 Frontier
:480 is just what the UTV market
:has been waiting for; an attrac-
:tively priced, all season,
Amphibious off-road vehicle that
is capable of performing in near-
ly every condition and terrain
imaginable. Whether it be sand,


mud, water, snow or rocky hills,
the new 2008 ARGO 6x6
Frontier 480 will get you where
you need to go. Built with fami-
lies in mind, the 6x6 Frontier
480 will allow you to carry up to
four passengers on land and is
the perfect vehicle for work
assistance around the property. If
you want to stand out in the
crowd, then the new ARGO 6x6
Frontier 480 is the suitable
choice. Off-road enthusiasts
agree, the 6x6 Frontier 480 is an
affordable UTV giving you the
best possible value.
With its great design and dura-
bility, the New 2008 ARGO 6x6
Frontier 480 is turning the w world
of utility terrain vehicles inside
out with a new sense of style and
adventure. With its innovative


body design and outstanding
technological features, the
Frontier is a must-see. The all-
wheel drive ARGO 6x6 Frontier
480 is equipped with a 4-cycle
overhead valve V-Twin air
cooled 480 cc 14 hp Briggs &
Stratton engine, has a load
capacity of up to 700 lbs. and
can tow 1,200 lbs.
Its new dashboard is ergonom-
ically designed and includes a
one-piece handle bar steering
system, cup holders and two
dash mounted grab handles. In
addition, the new ARGO 6x6
Frontier 480 comes with
hydraulic vented disc brakes, a
new emergency/parking brake, a
20 amp electrical charging sys-
tem and a new state-of-the-art
automatic continuously variable
transmission complete with high
& low range, and reverse. The
battery is conveniently located
under the hinged bench seat that
has a deep storage compartment
/ toolbox for easy access.

The all season 6x6 Frontier
480 upper body and hood design
features stylish dual hood latches
for added security as well as a
low step-over for ease of
entry/exit. The seating has extra
padding and provides lots of
legroom. Custom designed 24"
ARGO tires sport a special


ARGO tread for excellent per-
formance on both land and
water, and provide increased
ground clearance. These exclu-
sive low-weight tires, featuring
increased tread thickness for
longer tread life even through
rough terrain. Their low ground
pressure minimizes the environ-
mental footprint of the vehicle
and protects the outdoors that
Frontier owners care about.
The new ARGO 6x6 Frontier
480 is a-ailable in a range of
attractive colours: tundra, blue,
yellow, red, and black, as well as
Mossy Oak Shadow Branch
Camog and Jordan Wetlands
Advantage Camo�.
For stronger performance,
ODG is launching the 2008
ARGO 6x6 Frontier 580, 650
and ARGO 8x8 Frontier 650. For
top-of-the-line enthusiasts ODG
offers the commanding 2008
ARGO 8x8 Avenger 700 and the
ARGO 8x8 Avenger 750 EFI. If
you require a vehicle that must
go into the most challenging of
environments then these are the
only sensible choice.
The ARGO product line is
designed for recreational and
light commercial use, including
hunting and fishing, family fun,
utility construction and mainte-
nance, resource exploration,
agriculture, and forestry, as well


as firefighting and search and
rescue operations. This versatile
all-season workhorse can also be
adapted to suit a remarkably
wide range of custom applica-
tions.
Every ARGO is backed by
decades of experience in the
design and manufacture of off-
road vehicles. Ontario Drive &


Gear introduced the world-
famous amphibious ARGO in
1967. Since then, ODG has pro-
duced more lightweight
amphibious vehicles than any
other manufacturer in the world.
For more information about
ARGO off-road vehicles, please
visit www.argoatv.com or con-
tact marketing@odg.com.


RV 101


: So you want to buy an RV?


Bob Carter
FabulousTravel.com
Buying a Recreational Vehicle
is a big decision. There are so
many options. Should you get a
motorhome, or tow a trailer or
fifth wheel? Should you buy new
or used? How can you be sure
you are buying the right RV for
your family's needs.
The most important bit of
advice is to take your time. Look
at lots of RVs and research your
options. Above all, don't be pres-
sured into making a quick choice
: you may regret later.
The following article is the
first in a series of informative
articles designed to help you
make an educated decision when
it comes to buying an RV.

SWHY THE RV LIFESTYLE?
The Recreation Vehicle
Industry Association (RVIA) is a
national association composed
of RV manufacturers and com-


ponent parts suppliers from
throughout the United States.
The following is adapted from
material provided to me by
RVIA.
A recreational vehicle (com-
monly abbreviated RV) is a vehi-
cle that combines transportation
and temporary living quarters.
RVs are commonly used for trav-
el, recreation, and camping. RVs
are either motorized or towable
units that offer a wide range of
amenities to suit different budg-
ets, needs, and tastes.

CHOOSING AND USING
FAMILY APPEAL:
RVing is fun for adults and
children alike. In fact, families
who frequently vacation by RV
report that it fosters an increased
sense of togetherness and helps
improve family communication.
AFFORDABILITY:
RV vacations are considered
the most economical way to


vacation. Nearly 90% of RV
owners surveyed recently agreed
"for low cost vacations, there's
little to beat an RV."

FLEXIBILITY &
CONVENIENCE:
For families, an RV can make
every weekend a mini-vacation.
RVs are ready to travel at a
moment's notice, and they elimi-
nate the need to pack and unpack
bulky suitcases.

COMFORT:
RV options mficludedcmplete
living, cooking, dining, sleeping,
and bathroom facilities to pro-
vide travelers with the amenities
of home while traveling on the
road.

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES:.
RVs take travelers everywhere
they want to go. They can be
taken to the mountains, beaches,
state and national public lands,


popular tourist attractions, cities,
and small towns.

VERSATILITY:
RVs are being used year-round
for a variety of uses, including
fishing and hunting, commuting
and general transportation, serv-
ing as a spare bedroom for
guests, shopping, attending
sporting events, and visiting
family and friends.
Introducing
Bob Carter
Bob Carter, author, travel jour-
nalist, book reviewer, and editor,
writes about destinations, attrac-
tions, publications, and festi-
vals/events. He served on the
faculty of several colleges and
universities. His credits include
hospitality and tourism consult-
ing, promotion, and writing. He
received the 1996 National
Special Book award by the
North American Travel
Journalists Association and an


Innovative electric scooters



combat high gas prices


With the phenomenon of high
gas prices, alternative trans-
portation solutions such as elec-
tric scooters and mopeds are ris-
ing in popularity. Quality-
Discount-Scooters.com is an
online retailer of electric scoot-
ers that has seen nearly a 50%
increase in electric scooter sales
* in April and May, as opposed to
February and March. Traffic
activity is also rising as more
and more consumers are looking
for ways to save money on gas.
(PRWEB) May 28, 2007 --
With the phenomenon of high
gas prices, alternative trans-
* portation solutions such as elec-
tric scooters and mopeds are ris-
Sing in popularity. Quality-
'Discount-Scooters.com is an


online retailer of electric scoot- college students, and even senior
ers that has seen nearly a 50% citizens.
increase in electric scooter sales The average-sized adult,
in April and May, as opposed to between 150-175 lbs, needs an
February and March. Traffic electric scooter that outputs at
activity is also rising as more least 500 watts. A typical 500
and more consumers are looking watt scooter achieves speeds of
for ways to save 18-20 miles per
money on gas. hour on smooth, flat
A hot Christmas Typical range terrain. Rough, hilly
seller for over a of a 500 watt terrain can severely
decade, electric lower operating
scooters have now scooter is speeds, in which
evolved from toys case a scooter above
to transportation 15 to 20 500 watts may be
solutions. Models miles. needed.
with high power It is generally rec-
motors and greater ommended that
load capacity have recently adults over 200 lbs opt for gas-
flooded the market in an attempt powered mopeds that are 49cc
to fill the demand of commuters, and higher. Most electric scoot-


Creature comforts in today'


Creature Comforts
With fully equipped kitchens
and baths, central air and heat,
TVs, VCRs and surround-sound
speakers, today's RVs provide
travelers with all the amenities
of home. Many units also come
equipped with slideout sections
expanding the living, bedroom,
kitchen and/or dining space at
'the touch of a button
Another plus: There's no set-
tling for second-rate restau-
rants, or paying top dollar. You
can dine in or out as you please
What's more, you can gradu-
.ally add the small touches that
'turn your rolling house into a


home. Touches such as your
favorite pillow. Your favorite
coffee. Your kayak. Your bike.
Your family pet.
First-time RV travelers may
be surprised at all the modern
conveniences and creature
comforts available in many of
today's RVs, including:
* Choice of twin, double,
queen, and king-sized beds -
even bunkbeds for the kids
* Full bath and shower or
tub
* Refrigerator and freezer
with ice maker
* Microwave
* Dishwasher


* Full range with oven
* Trash compactor
* Satellite dish
* Internet-ready computer
station
* Closed-circuit rear-view
camera for backing up
* Washer and dryer
* Whirlpool bath
* Outdoor entertainment
center
* Patio/awning
* Basement storage
* CD and DVD systems with
headphones
* Video game system
* Direct broadcast satellite
antennas


ers cannot output enough power
to carry an adult over 200 lbs at
decent speeds.
Range, or the distance that an
electric scooter can travel, is
another consideration for adults.
Many models are now equipped
with 3 batteries instead of 2 bat-
teries, in order to provide a
longer traveling range. Typical
range of a 500 watt scooter is 15-
20 miles.
Recent innovations have
helped in combating high gas
prices, while fueling the growth
of the alternative transportation
industry. Some of these innova-
tions include the high-powered
electric bicycle, the mobility
scooter, and the street-legal elec-
tric moped.


RVs


* Global positioning systems
* Driver's seat with built in
heat and massage
"Did you ever spend the sum-
mer driving to the Grand
Canyon in a minivan with no
DVD player in it? Now imagine
the same family vacation in an
RV that has a queen-sized bed,
two phone lines and three
TVs!"
-Elizabeth Chang, reporter,
Washington Post's KidsPost,
July 14, 2004
In an RV, you may be miles
away from home, but not from
the convenience and comforts
of home.


Outdoor Writers Association of Creator of FabulousTravel.com.


California "1993 Best Series"
award. Carter served on the
national Board of Directors,
North American Travel
Journalists Association.

On a side note, Mr. Bob
Carter's articles are being
reprinted with permission from
Cheri Sicard, Editor and Co-


Sadly, Mr. Carter passed away in
early 2001. We would like to
take an opportunity to thank
Cheri for extending her permis-
sion for us to reprint Mr. Carter's
stories in Wheels. Check back
weekly for more great stories in
the RV 101 series as well as
other fabulous stories from
FabulousTravel.com.


QIZ Answers


Which car company introduced the laminated wind-
shield?
Q Ford
Q Chrysler
*"GM

The camshaft operates the:
Q water pump
9(valve train
LQ cams

A gallon of gasoline has as much energy as:
Q 100 lb. of black powder
V(19 sticks of Dynamite
L 2 lb. of rocket fuel

The first cars ran on:
Kerosene
Q gasoline
Q crude oil

Henry Ford invented the:
E assembly line
Q charcoal briquette
O 8-hour work day
diall of the above

To what automobile does the term It's a Deusy
refer?
El Cord
El Auburn Speedster
W(Duesenberg

Chevrolet has produced how many small block
engines to date?
El 20 million
Q 50 million
idover 100 million

What do Hydraulic lifters operate?
Wavalves
El floor jacks
El oil pump

Sugar added to the gas tank does what?
E ruins the engine
" dramatically reduces power
M nothing

Paint was applied to the first cars with:
Brushes
I spray guns
E ink rollers


`14D TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2007


Cmwus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









- ,us-oUNTY k� ."I) CHRONICLE TU.SDAY,-SEPT-MB-R-4,-2007 , 5


NEWS, TRENDS AND GOSSIP


Since rear-wheel-drive seems to be where it's at these days, especial-
ly when it comes to full-size sedans, the current Pontiac Grand Prix,
pictured, isn't long for this world. According to GM's Bob Lutz, expect
a new G8 that's based on, what else, an Australian rear-drive platform.

n GM boss confirms rear-wheel-drive Pontiac Grand
Prix successor, the G8: As General Motors' reliance on its
Australian rear-wheel-drive facilities
grows, so does its rear-drive product line-
up in North America. Next up? The
Pontiac G8. GM product chief Bob Lutz
recently told media in Detroit covering the
recent auto show that his company will
import a rebadged version of the Holden
Commodore from Australia as the Pontiac G8, a vehicle
that would replace the Grand Prix. GM will display the car in
Chicago, Ill., at the upcoming auto show and will eventually
build it in Canada.
N Ford shares the Fairlane platform with Lincoln to bolster
upscale roster: The Ford brass promises it won't just be "badge engi-
neering" (the simple act of placing a
different logo on the same vehicle
with few notable changes) but
Lincoln is getting a version of the
forthcoming Ford Fairlane
"crossover." Since crossover can
mean just about anything, the Sleuth
These days, manufacturers just doesn't exactly know what the new
don't build vehicles that can't be Lincoln will look like, but he
shared among related brands. assumes it will be a larger car-based
Thus, the Ford Fairlane (concept wagon with available all-wheel-drive.
shown) will get a Lincoln sibling. The Fairlane, which was shown as a
concept on last year's auto-show cir-
cuit, is one of many vehicles meant to replace Ford's minivans. The
Fairlane is supposed to arrive as a production version next year with
the Lincoln coming in 2009 or 2010. Look for different sheetmetal, a
new grille but a similar idea.
N New Camaro can fit 24-inch wheels, will get standard V6:
Normally, a concept car is fitted with large wheels that will never see
production, thus something is usually lost in the visual translation once
the vehicle
hits the street.
Not in the
case of the
new Camaro.
The Sleuth's
spies report
that the real
car, set to
debut in late
2008, will The new Camir tily released con-
have a front vertible concept guise, can house wheels that are a
axle centerline whopping 10 inches larger in diameter than the wheels
ableounte0 ine that came with the car back in 1967.
about 50 mil-
limeters (about two inches) further forward than any other rear-wheel-
drive General Motors car. What does that mean? At least 20-inch
wheels (cool looks and sharper steering) without compromising steer-
ing lock and turning radius. The Sleuth hears the car can even handle
24-inch wheels. It will arrive with a 3.9-liter V6 with a six-speed manual
transmission or optional automatic. Look for a starting price in the low-
$20,000 range.
I Bernhard out after just nine months as
VW CEO: So much for stability at Volkswagen.
After the recent ousting of Bernd Pischetsrieder
as VW group's chief executive officer in
November, the German automaker is at it again.
This time it's Wolfgang Bernhard, VW brand's
CEO. Bernhard will leave the automaker at the
end of January in what is considered by many to
be a political move. Bernhard was not on great
terms with new Group CEO Martin Winterkorn,
the former head of Audi, or Ferdinand Piech,
the former VW group CEO who is still a board
Wolfgang Bernhard member at the company. You might remember
was installed as that Bernhard also lost his job at Mercedes-
May of 2006. Benz about three years ago, apparently over a
political maneuver with the Mercedes board.
Where will he land next? Stay tuned to this column.
0 BMW works on three new "X" models, all two-doors: The
Sleuth has told you about BMW's plans to pro-
duce a coupe version of the X5 sport-utility-vehi-
cle called the X6. Now get ready for the X4 and
maybe the X1, both of which would be two-door
models. The X4 would be the "coupe" version of
the X3 sport-ute and the X1 would be a similar
vehicle, only smaller. This is all part of what A new strain of "X"
BMW believes is an exploding market segment the two-doorvariety.
where "Sport Activity Vehicles" are taking over. The X6 will be based
The X1, X4 and X6 are under development right on the current X5
now. The X1 and X4 will most likely land right in (pictured).
the heart of the mid-priced sport-ute market.

Market indicators
Toyota production: In a refreshing contrast to plant closures,
cutbacks and job losses in North America, it seems Toyota will build as
many as five new assembly plants here over the next 10 years. One
will go in the southeastern United States and another in Mexico.
Despite red ink all over the boardroom floors of Detroit's traditional "Big
Three," Toyota appears to be picking up at least some of the
market/job slack. Toyota certainly seems like a good bet for job securi-
ty.
' Horsepower wars: So Dodge thinks its new 600-horse-
power Viper SRT 10 is hotter than the Chevrolet Corvette ZO6.
Perhaps, but maybe only for the time being. General Motors' head
Bob Lutz said last week at the Detroit Auto Show that Corvette will
not stand still in the race for the crown of King of Horsepower. "It is
very important for Corvette to be the most powerful, most capable,
best handling sports car in the United States," he said. GM is rumored
to be working on a new 'Vette called
' either the Blue Devil, Sting Ray,
Z07 or SS with at least 600
horsepower, but expect more when the
new model arrives in less than two
years. The current ZO6 makes 505
horsepower and has routinely outper-
formed the Viper in many popular inched upward for two
magazine road tests. With 600 horse- decades, are now skyrocketing.
power, a fresh new round is on the How about a 600 horsepower
way. Dodge Viper to outpace the
Corvette?


Pocket Bikes Website Launched


A Pocket bike is a miniature
version of the larger motor-
bikes available today. These
mini bikes are becoming ever
more popular with more and
more people looking to pur-
chase one of these and get into
the pocket bike craze.

(PRWEB) June 1, 2007 --
Minimotosgo.com is a great
website with information
about pocket bikes and the
pocket bike world, covering


everything you could wish to
know about these little pocket
rockets, including pocket bike
news and reviews so you are
always kept up to date with the
growing world of pocket
bikes.
Pocket bikes come in a
range of different sized
engines, ranging from 49cc
pocket bikes to your more
extreme 125cc pocket bikes,
find details of all of these on
the site, including details of


where these can be purchased.
The site has details of pock-
et bike parts and accessories
available and details of where
these can be bought. It also
has information about main-
taining and customizing your
pocket bike to ensure that you
have the coolest 2 wheeled
vehicle about.
Pocket bikes can be raced in
leagues, with many leagues
now set up all around the
world.


Take a look to see where
your nearest league is and
details of how to get involved
in pocket bike racing with tips
and tricks which will help
even the worst riders to
become the best on the track.
Not only this but the site
also has great pocket bike pic-
tures, pocket bike videos and
any other information you
could possibly need regarding
pocket bikes so why not take a
look for yourself.


One o~f the 20th centurys' 1most

gifted automobile designers,
Flumini,,o Bertiw pimal ina i worked /1i/k htFrik 11 LflanlliaA LIf

Cess. Wil'a. 1a1d dc'adlB,.-),, i Jan I/0, 1903.ill ',northow .nha/i. &r.
disoi'ert'd car (lei'I 1Ih. I ILL Iad.4170. iic/11i L1:. Ia/i de ~ai/iinllyI WN
Berioni ii a', Io,,ctdi'o ka'v,. ciitchm, L 01001 a. a ali7UIiaL Wyi l ,id ip-
/)Lrlt Us.. /lini* h- Vaitv a 'kil/od1,' 7 &iMIt7Iaa. lit I(i-0ildIh ,. iIA ci,

his s:pa'it-,? imi. Be'Ii it',iimlditJi~I rimpnmt. ,nid ,I,. fL . r I i L is oli'li
art Oc'p -lllo'a hartrI:ii u/i ah iti~t ',iit n. B,.'i,. uit hCOL7 it~',mi.il-
il' ig h.:'(m ,n bod'hit.1 toiad GoIll (umi'ani &BtI/a ,.a1L Mlt i-I,.ah
hi / 931/ Bo iuiainurridI ,.Ban,.l:0Ii aiib.nItA,. /It-),Wr.IOS1171/1ijli
a .1VL. ,ht L uimpk had aLI in Tit -I /I .,'/Lal,.IfiL 1 1 '/11. Bo i tr

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n~iht L 0 M aIIi a1 ,ii , ,h 10 As l it'im af'L ' Ii.'l 11 '10 Li iw iaL'cI il
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PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
01 Chevy Malibu 05 Suzuki Verona 04 Chrysler Sebring
4 door, low miles...................................$5,995 LX, 4 door............................................$10,995 Touring convertible.................... ...... ..... $14,995
02 Chevy Cavalier 02 Buick Lesabre 05 Chevy Equinox
Only 46k miles...............................................$6995 Only 34k miles.............................................$11,900 Sporty, SUV................ ..................... 15995
02 Kia Sedona 05 Kia Sedona 05 Chevy Colorado
inivan............................................... $6,995 7 passenger, LX.......................... $11,995 Crew cab.......................................... 15,995
00 Toyota Camry 06 Hyundai Azera 06 Pontiac Vibe
4 Doors.................................................$7,995 Top of the line...............................$...... 18,395 Power package...............................$...... 16,295
03 Kia Sedona 04 Pontiac Montana 05 Nissan Xterra
Family transportation....................................$7,995 Extended, loaded.................................. $12,995 Sporty fun...........................................$16,500
03 Mitsubishi Galant 06 Kia Spectra 05 Ford F-150
Low, low miles............ ........... .... ............ $8,795 4 door, SX...... ..................... ............. $13,780 Ex. cab, 2WD........... ........................... $16,995
02 Mercury Grand Marquis 04 Kia Amanti 07 Kia Sedona
W ow! ................................................... $9 ,295 Leather, loaded.......... ........................... $ 13 ,995 7 passenger............... ........................... $ 18 ,995
02 Nissan Altima 04 Ford Ranger 07 Kia Sedona
4 door sedan........ ...................................$9,695 Super cab, Edge.....................................$14,350 LX, one owner................................... $18,995
03 Ford Focus 05 Pontiac Aztek 07 Chevy Trailblazer
Station wagon.................................... ....... $9,995 All wheel drive............................................$14,730 8,000 tender miles......... ......................$22 ,9 95
05 Hyundai Accent 06 Mercury Grand Marquis 05 Lincoln Town Car$23
Automatic, 2 door................................$10,995 13k miles. * ....... ............ ............$14,995 Signature Limited........ ...... 23,999


(^ KIA MOTORS
The Power to Surprise"
i - II i 'S CL L
0) ( ) ( .


1850 SE HWY. 9, C- -TAL ,VER, FL
Cit s KiA (3s52)S64
HOURS: Mon - Sat 8:00am- 7:00pm
www.citruskia.com .___.


(x
LU
100,000 mlt-u-
WARRANTY-
.MMMMMMJ


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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40




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