Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00994
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 3, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00994

Full Text





On the p


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Tiger within striking distance at Deutsch Bank /1B


S CITRUS COU N T Y


FORECAST:
Mostly cloudy with
scattered storms
in the afternoon
PAGE 4A


SEPTEMBER 3, 2007


Florida s Best Communit'


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I&Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 250 VOLUME 119 No. 246


LITTLE HAVANA:
Death watch
Little Havana enjoys renais-
sance and

Fidel
L Castro,
but
some
uncertain
what will happen to the com-
munity when he dies./Page 3A
LOCAL CRIME SCENE:
Under investigation
A Floral City woman faces
animal cruelty charges after
calling authorities and telling
them she had not heard from
her grown daughter in a week.
/Page 2A
SIEGE OVER:


Militants fall
Lebanon's army crushed the
last remnants of a militant
group in a ferocious gunbattle
Sunday that killed 39 of the
fighters./Page 12A
BYLER'S BUNCH:
Family six-pack
The Byler's added six more
children to their f:irnii,, the
state's first se- tupl-t- on
record born. Page 3A
OPINION:


The plan
has languished
on the shelf,
collecting dust
for more than
a year.


ATOMIC SHUTDOWN:
First timetable
North Korea agreed to
account for and disable its
atomic programs by the end
of the year./Page 12A
WEIRD WIRE:


Too low, too long
Two cities in Louisiana ban
saggy pants. Offenders could
face up to a $500 fine. /Page 7A
BOWDEN BOWL:
On the offensive
Florida State's new offensive
coordinator begins
work./Page 1B
WHAT'S ONLINE:
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Annie's Mailbox ........ 8B
Com ics .............. 9B
Crossword .......... . 8B
Editorial ............ 10A
Entertainment ......... 7B.
Horoscope .. . . . . . . . .. 8B
Lottery Payouts ........ 7B
M ovies .............. 9B
Obituaries ........ . . . . 6A
Weird Wire .......... . 7A
Two Sections


6 1845111178 20025 5


Felix reaches Cat 5 status


Hurricane will likely hit CentralAmerica


Associated Press
ORANJESTAD, Aruba - Hurricane
Felix strengthened into a dangerous
Category 5 storm Sunday and churned
its way into the open waters of the
Caribbean Sea after toppling trees and
flooding some homes on a cluster of


Dutch islands.
The National Hurricane Center in
Miami said Felix was packing maxi-
mum sustained winds of 165 mph as it
plowed westward toward Central
America, where it was expected to skirt
Honduras' coastline Tuesday before
slamming into Belize on Wednesday as


a hurricane capable of massive destruc-
tion.
On Sunday, Felix lashed Aruba,
Curacao and Bonaire with rains and
winds, causing scattered power outages
and forcing thousands of tourists to take
refuge in hotels. But residents
expressed relief it did far less damage
than feared as the storm's outer bands
just grazed the tiny islands.
"Thankfully we didn't get a very bad


pkwlace.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Zachary Cunningham, left, and Ritchie Pollard, of Schipper's Marine, work recently on the boardwalk on Cooter Pond in
Inverness. The city sees Cooter Pond Park as a stopping off place near the city's redeveloped business district, where people
can eat lunch at a picnic table while watching the wildlife or just take in some quiet time.

Cooter Pond Park continues taking on new look as Inverness gateway


TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
For many years, Cooter Pond was easy
to ignore behind the tall weeds that grew
along its shores in east Inverness. Yet, it
was the first thing many visitors saw when
they arrived from State Road 44 East
The pond remains the gateway to
Inverness, but its image is rapidly improv-
ing.
Cooter Pond Park, a 25-acre recreation-
al area built around the water body, has a
new boardwalk that curves around half of
the pond.
The city sees Cooter Pond Park as a
stopping off place near the city's redevel-
oped business district, where people can
eat lunch at a picnic table while watching
the wildlife or just take in some quiet
time.
The park is the product of years of plan-


The original idea to clean
up the pond and make
it an attraction for
downtown Inverness
came from City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni.
ning and isn't quite finished. The biggest
enhancement, the boardwalk, will be
completed soon. Picnic tables and bench-
es are being added.
City Parks and Recreation Director Pati
Smith said the city plans to add interpre-
tive signs to the boardwalk identifying
species of birds and fish that call the pond
home. She said the city also has grant
money to purchase two more pieces of
property that will give residents a better


view of the pond from land.
A majority of the $972,050 park project
was funded by state grants, with the city
chipping in $225,000 of its own funds. The
money funded construction of the board-
walk and purchase of a small amount of
land needed for other park improve-
ments.
The original idea to clean up the pond
and make it an attraction for downtown
Inverness came from City Manager Frank
DiGiovanni, Smith said. In the 1990s,
DiGiovanni saw the pond's potential.
Since that time, the city has redeveloped
the park as part of the downtown redevel-
opment effort
Cooter Pond Park is connected by the
Withlacoochee State Trail to Wallace
Brooks Park and Liberty Park, but resi-
dents also can park downtown and reach
it through the sheriff's office parking lot
The sheriff's administrative building
overlooks the pond.


Tracking tainted food, not an easy process


Outsourcing can

make trail hard

to follow in recalls
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Try
searching for a culprit in the 90
brands caught up in the recent
recall of canned chili, stew and
other products, and you weave


back to a single manu-
facturer.
That also was the
case in recalls of
spinach, pet food and
frozen meat.
Companies increas-
ingly are paying others
to make the foods we
eat - or the ingredi-
ents in them - and
then: selling it under
multiple brand names.
And that has prompt-
ed a growing debate


Dr. David
Acheson
leads FDA's
food safety
efforts.
about But


food safety.
"If people cannot
trace a product back to
a supplier, the supplier
has no incentives to
keep their processes as
clean and effective, in
terms of food safety, as
possible," said Caroline
Smith DeWaal, director
of food safety for the
Center for Science in
the Public Interest, a
consumer group.
the food industry and


regulators chalk up to coinci-
dence the rash of recent major
food safety recalls and the con-
solidation of food production
"One reason we are seeing
this is because it's becoming a
common industry practice,"
said Dr. David Acheson, who
leads the Food and Drug
Administration's food safety
efforts. Acheson said he knew
of no evidence that outsourcing
production is inherently less
Please see TAINTED/Page 5A


storm. My dog slept peacefully through
the night," said Bonaire medical
administrator Siomara Albertus, who
waited out the storm in her home.
The storm forced tens of thousands of
tourists and residents on the three
islands to remain in their homes and
hotels, stocked with water, flashlights
and emergency provisions.
In Curacao, about a dozen homes in a
Please see i/Page 4A


1P.Owil4c,


Myrna Wirthman: Beautiful inside and out [


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Some people are genuinely kind
and truly caring. Some people have
a way of making you feel comfort-
able and welcome.
Some people, like Myrna
Wirthman, make a difference in
the lives of others.
"I remember the first time I met
her," recalled Patsy Dilbert, who
married Myrna's nephew. "I had a


plant nursery and she drove up.
She had long blond hair, and she
was gorgeous - and the friendliest
person! I'd never met anybody so
friendly We talked for about two
hours about plants."
Myrna Loy Wirthman died Aug.
26 at age 71.
Most people who knew Myrna


knew she could and would talk to
anyone about anything. She had a
way of striking up conversations
wherever she went and whomever
she was talking with at the moment
was the most important person
there was.
"The first time I met her was at a
Please see WIRTHMAN/Page 5A
George and Myrna Wirthman on
their wedding day, Aug. 13, 1960.
Special to the Chronicle


HIGH
92
LOW
73


T" \. *?*'.;....-


June Fisher, left, will begin the
process to replace former assis-
tant county administrator Tom
Dick after his firing was upheld.


Fisher


begins


hiring


process

Administrator

seeking assistant
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
With Tom Dick's firing now
official, Citrus County
Administrator June Fisher is
ready to move on.
Fisher has begun reviewing
the job duties of assistant
county administrator before
posting the job to find Dick's
replacement.
Fisher fired Dick, a 25-year
county employee, in June for
insubordination and placing
county commissioners at risk of
violating the state Sunshine
Law for a decision Dick made
while Fisher was out of town.
Last week, County Attorney
Robert "Butch" Battista
upheld the firing. Dick said he
plans to sue.
The county has operated
without its No. 2 person for
nearly three months. Fisher
said recently the duties Dick
had were divided among
department heads.
Fisher planned to review
the job description and then
research the function of assis-
tant county administrator in
other counties, Citrus County
spokeswoman Jessica
Lambert said.
Dick was earning $102,007
when he was fired. The salary
range for assistant county
administrator, as it now stands,
is $75,564 to $109,568.
County Commission
Chairman Dennis Damato said
replacing Dick will be difficult
"Tom ran so many functions
of the public government -
aquatics, the landfill, public
works. He'll be a tough act to
follow," Damato said. "He had
a lot of hands-on experience.
He knew the staff, knew the
people in the community. The
guy knows the lay of the land."
Damato said he worked
closely with Dick in identifying
land for possible government
Please see FISHER/Page 5A








2A MONDAY SEPTEMBER 3. 2007 LccAL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) GHRONICLE


County BRIEFS


Public input sought
for naming school
Those interested in submitting a
name to be considered for the new
elementary school can provide a
nomination and reason why the
name should be considered, in 50
words or less. There are three
ways in which nominations and
rationale can be sent. These
include:
* Online at www.citrus.k12.fl.us.
Find link under New Elementary
School Name or e-mail directly to
suggestname@citrus.kl2.fl.us
* Mail to the Citrus County
School Board, Namihg of the New
Elementary School, 1007 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450.
* Drop off nominations at the
receptionist desk at the Citrus
County District Services Center,
1007 W. Main St., Inverness. All
nominations must be received by
4:30 p.m. Friday.
Poll workers sought
for 2008 election
The Supervisor of Elections
office is seeking enthusiastic voters
to join the Election Team, to serve
as poll workers for the upcoming
2008 election cycle.
Applicants must be registered
voters in Citrus County, able to


read and write the English lan-
guage, complete online computer
training, attend mandatory training
classes in addition to the online
training, pass a written exam, be
able to work at least 14 hours on
Election Day, be a responsible
team player and be able to deal
pleasantly with the public. Poll
Workers are paid according to the
position for which they are hired.
If you are interested in joining
the team, visit www.votecitrus.com,
select Poll Worker Information and
complete the online application. If
you have any questions, call
MaryAnn Boline, poll worker coor-
dinator, at 341-6747.
Citrus 20/20 hosting
dinner, show
Citrus 20/20 is sponsoring a
"Save Our Waters" fundraiser din-
ner Sept. 14, at the West Citrus
Elks Club in Homosassa.
Doors open at 6 p.m, dinner is at
7 and the show begins at 8.
Tickets are $35 and tables seat
eight. For tickets or information,
call Cheryl Phillips at 527-0800.
Kings Bay group
to meet Sept. 20
The Kings Bay Working Group
will meet from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 20, at the


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Crystal River State Buffer
Preserve, 3266 N. Sailboat Ave.,
Crystal River.
The intent of the group is to
enhance coordination between
federal, state and local govern-
mental agencies involved in the
stewardship of Kings Bay.
For information, call 563-1136.
Offices, business
closed for Labor Day
The following businesses will
close or work holiday hours today:
* City and county government'
offices will be closed, including
the city of Crystal River and the
city of Inverness.
* Most banks and the stock
markets will be closed. Call your
personal bank to confirm hours.
* The Chronicle Circulation
Department will be open from 7 to
10 a.m. The Chronicle Business
Department will be closed.
* All Citrus County public
schools are closed.
* All Citrus County Community
Centers will be closed.
* The Citrus County Central
Landfill will be closed.
* F.D.S. Disposal Inc. will be
closed. All Monday customers will
be picked up Thursday, Sept. 6.
* NCRS Disposal customers
who have Monday service will be

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Riverhaven and Walden Woods
will be rescheduled Thursday,
Sept. 6.
N Beverly Hills Waste
Management (Rolling Oaks
Utilities Inc.) will be closed. All
Monday customers will be picked
up Thursday, Sept. 6. Both yard
waste and household garbage
trucks will be running.
- From staff reports


Woman faces



animal cruelty



charges


Pets found in

unsanitary

conditions
CRUSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
What began as a call from a
worried mother looking for her
grown daughter turned into an
investigation of animal cruelty
this weekend.
According to Citrus County
Sheriff's Office arrest report
here's what happened:
A woman called the sheriff's
office Saturday because she had
not seen or heard from her
daughter in more than a week
The woman said her daughter
had missed work and didn't
return phone calls.
At about 1 p.m. Saturday, a
deputy went to the missing
woman's house at 12150 S. Rural
Terrace in Floral City. According
to the Property Appraiser's Web
site, the house is owned by Sarah
Greenberg.
The deputy knocked loudly on
doors and called out that he was
from the sheriff's office to no
avail. The deputy went to the
back door and found a deck cov-
ered in animal feces and urine
and a small dog in a pen with no
food or water. He tried knocking
and yelling at the backdoor and
became alarmed at a foul odor
coming from the house, which he
described as smelling like "rot-
ting flesh."
That's when he entered the
house and came across several
more animals in cages with no
food or water He said the entire
house was ransacked with trash
and animal feces.
The rotting flesh smell was
from trash that had been left in
the house for months, according
to the arrest report. When the
deputy left the house, the
woman/homeowner he had been
looking for pulled into the drive-
way. He told the woman he went


into the house because he
thought someone had died and
that he was contacting Animal
Control about the state of the
pets. The deputy noted that the
woman seemed ill because she
was pale and had difficulty
speaking.
The woman said she has been
sick for about two weeks and has
been throwing up non-stop. She
also had a prior head injury. She
didn't know how many animals
she had total and agreed to allow
the deputy to search the five-acre
property while waiting for
Animal Control officials to
arrive.
During his investigation of the
property, the deputy came across
a small goat in a pen with no food
or water and a 6-foot tall mari-
juana plant The woman said she
had not been out to that part of
the property in years. She added
that her ex-boyfriend, Timothy
O'Callaghan, 31,- who still lived
with her - goes out to that area
of the property often to smoke
cigarettes.
The deputy caught up with
O'Callaghan at a bar and found
a glass pipe with marijuana
residue in O'Callaghan's pocket.
The deputy explained how he
found the animals in unsanitary
conditions and that Animal
Control was seizing the animals.
O'Callaghan admitted to owning
the marijuana plant, according
to the arrest report.
Citrus County firefighters and
a Hazardous Materials
(Hazmat) team went to the
house to check the air quality
for safety. When Animal Control
officers arrived they said they
would be pressing animal cruel-
ty charges against O'Callaghan,
according to an arrest report
The identity of the woman liv-
ing with O'Callaghan was
unavailable Sunday, as was
information about Animal
Control's investigation.
O'Callaghan was taken to the
Citrus County Detention
Facility on possession of mari-
juana and drug paraphernalia
charges. His bond was set at
$2,500.


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He's got 'em eating out of his hands


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
Seventy-nine-year-old Hubert Odell of Inverness feeds nuts to a squirrel recently at Wallace Brook Park in Inverness. Odell said
that he enjoys feeding the squirrels because it gives him something to do. He feeds them twice a day. He has learned to simu-
late the call of a squirrel, which brings four, or more out of the trees at a time to be feed.


-CiTRus CouN7y (FL) CHRoNicu


2AMONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007


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MONDAY
SEPTEMBER 3, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY


CHRONICLE


Around



Tavernier

Two snorkelers die
in Florida Keys
Two snorkelers died in sepa-
rate accidents during the busy
Labor Day holiday weekend in
the Florida Keys, officials said
Sunday.
Omar J. Viera, 31, of Orlando,
died Saturday after he was run
over by a 25-foot vessel while
snorkeling off a boat in the
Atlantic Ocean near Bahia
Honda State Park, said Officer
Bobby Dube, spokesman for the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.
The operator of the 25-foot
boat told officials he didn't see
Viera's dive flag until it was too
late and tried to veer away
before feeling a thump under-
neath, Dube said.
Also Saturday, another man
from Orlando died while snorkel-
ing for lobster on a vacation to
celebrate his wedding anniver-
sary.
Matthew Kleber, 37, was
found on the ocean bottom less
than two miles off Islamorada,
Dube said. He was holding on
to a rope tied to a 24-foot boat
being driven by his wife when
he disappeared, Dube said.

Port Orange

Homeowner strangles
intruder, no charges filed
An intruder who tried to force
his way into a home died during
a violent struggle with the resi-
dent, police said.
Randy Lee Miller, 38, tried to
push his way into 40-year-old
Andrew Merritt's home about
2:15 a.m. Saturday, Port Orange
police said. It was the second
time that morning Miller had
pounded on the door demand-
ing to speak with someone who
no longer lived at the rental
home.
Miller grabbed Merritt and
they struggled, police said.
Merritt's girlfriend called 911.
Merritt told Miller to stop
because the police were com-
ing, but Miller kept fighting
aggressively, police said. The
two men fell over the porch rail
and landed in the yard.
When officers arrived, Merritt
had Miller pinned in the yard,
police said. The officers deter-
mined Miller was dead. An
autopsy has been scheduled to
determine the cause of death.
Merritt was not arrested.

Miami

Warships participate
in military exercise
U.S. Navy warships held
maneuvers Sunday near the
Panama Canal in an exercise
being billed as one of the largest
multinational military training
events of the year.
More than 30 ships began
exercises Wednesday in the
waters near the canal, to prac-
tice defending the economically
and strategically crucial water-
way.
The exercise is scheduled to
continue through Friday in the
Caribbean and Pacific
approaches to the canal, and
involve about 7,500 people from
19 countries.
A dozen Latin American and
Caribbean countries were partic-
ipating, as were Canada,
France, the Netherlands and
United States.

Tallahassee

No ticket matches six
numbers in Lotto
No ticket matched all six
Florida Lotto numbers, produc-
ing an estimated
$10 million jackpot
for the next draw-
ing, lottery officials
s,,�- ,.r said Sunday.
A total of 172
tickets matched five numbers to
win $2,441.50 each; 5,719 tick-
ets matched four numbers for


$59.50 each; and 109,692 tick-
ets matched three numbers for
$4 each.
The winning Florida Lotto
numbers selected Saturday: 4-
5-16-25-27-37.
- From wire reports


Death


atch


Associated Press
ABOVE: Local residents walk by a mural in the Little Havana section of Miami. Travel guides list Little Havana as the heart of
the Cuban exile community, ground zero for anti-Fidel Castro activists and a must-see for its row of galleries, cigar shops and
espresso stands. BELOW: Cuban-Americans play dominos at Domino Park in the Little Havana section of Miami

Little Havana, in midst of resurgence, unsure of life after Castro


Associated Press
MIAMI - Travel guides list Little
Havana as the heart of the Cuban exile
community, ground zero for anti-Fidel
Castro activists and a must-see for its row of
galleries, cigar shops and espresso stands.
But with so much of its identity wrapped
into its role as the symbolic hub of opposi-
tion to Fidel Castro, the question remains
whether this stretch of Miami can survive
the eventual death of the very man whose
existence helped define it
Handful of shopkeepers, artists and city
officials are betting it can. Over the last
eight years, this group has slowly breathed
life into a neighborhood once awash in
"Miami Vice" crime. They, rather than the
activists or even the bearded leader him-
self, are responsible for Little Havana's bur-
geoning renaissance. And they must walk a
delicate line as they seek to bring back the
neighborhood while staving off the plastic
surgery ofgentrification that has erased the
wrinkles of history in so many other down-
town Miami neighborhoods.
"I don't have a crystal ball of what will
happen when Fidel and Raul Castro go, but
I believe the exchange will only increase,"
said painter and former Cuban political
prisoner Augustin Gainza, one of the first
artists to return to the neighborhood in
2000. 'After Fidel there will be Havana -
and Havana del Norte."
The neighborhood that became Little
Havana wasn't always a slice of the
Caribbean. It was a thriving Jewish com-
munity in the 1930s, until the Jews began
moving to the suburbs and the beach. Then,
in 1959, Castro and his rebels ousted dicta-
tor Fulgencio Batista and established a
communist government Exiles from Cuba
poured in.
Miami's Little Havana outreach coordi-
nator Pablo Canton was among them. His
family settled in the area in 1961 when he
was a teen. But like the Jews before them,
Canton and other Cubans moved to the sub-
urbs in the 1970s and '80s as their families
and income expanded. Poorer immigrants
from Cuba and Central America took their
place, drawn by the neighborhood's central
location, public transportation and cheap
rentals.
It was years before Canton returned to


Little Havana
Miam'mi. Little Havan'a I
oc the Cuban exile comn

staged a -,
rCena isa nce
a once come-tidden
reqhbIofhood o'.er ?ne
fla. PCIgh? years
-NW bGh St



SW 2n :
uttre Havana
Ca.xc Oc!o.
Onm PAr,

*,0. , C .. l '.. -.
Little Havana, but he was dra
ing a job in the city's code
office in the 1980s, demolishin
es, one block at time.
"Everybody has a piece of I
Little Havana," he said rec
sipped cafe con leche at a loca
owned by Cubans but now by G
He compared Little Hava
rebirth to what has happen
Beach.
"We're seeing the same th
opened in South Beach beginni
in Little Havana. South Beach
years ago and look how it is i
incredible," he said.
As bad as things got in Little
ing the 1980s and 1990s, one
went away: Domino Park, th
where old Cuban men in gua
came to play their favorite
cigars and trade gossip. And it
ner that continued to attract t
as the rest of the neighbor
decay.
Cuban native Jackie Sarr
ered this phenomenon almost
Her family settled in New


moved to Miami to be closer to relatives
who came during the 1980 Mariel boatlift,
I when Castro allowed 125,000 Cubans to flee
he heart the island. One afternoon in 1999, she drove
mu y to Little Havana on a whim.
"I found absolutely nothing except for a
tour bus in front of Domino Park, and
there's all these German tourists with cam-
eras hanging from their neck looking at the
flies," she said. "They left Another bus
stopped. I'm going, 'What is the attraction
here?' But in my New York capitalist men-
tality, I thought maybe I can make a dollar"
A week later, she signed a lease for her
first store on Calle Ocho, the neighbor-
hood's main drag. At first people thought
she was crazy.
"It was probably one of the scariest
ISt "* places I'd ever been to: the prostitution, the
0 drugs, the homeless, the streets were dirty,"
she recalled from her upscale Cuban mem-
orabilia shop. "'Across the street there was a
n, r.. store that sold funeral equipment with a
funeral casket in the window."
. J� .." But Sarracino, who soon lost her father,
A *' was determined to celebrate the history of
his country. She sold nostalgia prints and
wn back, tak- later added items for her clients' grandchil-
enforcement dren, such as the popular "Made in the
g crack hous- U.SA with Cuban parts" T-shirts. Unlike
some shopowners, she refuses to sell any-
heir heart in thing referencing Castro, even with anti-
cently as he Castro slogans.
l bakery once 'Any publicity is good publicity," she said.
Guatemalans. "Little Havana is not about him."
ana's recent Eight years later, more than a dozen art
ed in Miami galleries dot the street New restaurants are
opening. More cigar shops are moving in,
ing that hap- and a multi-use office building plagued by
.ng to happen mismanagement is finally home to a hand-
deteriorated ful of businesses. Along with the Cuban
right now. It's food, Nicaraguan, Peruvian and Spanish
tapas eateries have opened their doors.
Havana dur- "It has changed, but the history behind
thing never Little Havana will never go away," Canton
te comer lot said.
yabera shirts Still, Little Havana has a long way to go
game, smoke before it ever draws the crowds of South
t was this cor- Beach. The current strip of galleries covers
tourists, even only a few blocks, and it provides little
ood fell into nightlife. Many of the neighboring streets
are zoned for low-rent apartments, and it
acino discov- must compete with other up-and-coming
tby accident downtown Miami neighborhoods such as
York but later the hip Design District


gators, but the situation keeps
getting worse.
"They want us to say what they
want to hear," the father said.
'They want the stories they have,'
in mind. It's all in their imagine;
tion."
The men were indicted by a
grand jury in Tampa.


Byler's



bunch


Floridas first

sextuplets on

record born

Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG - It was
a Labor Day weekend for the
record books at a Florida hos-
pital, where a woman gave
birth to the state's first set of
sextuplets.
The five boys and one girl,:
weighing between 2 and 3
pounds each, were born:
Saturday night to Karoline
Byler, 29, of Wesley Chapel.
Five of the babies, who were
born more than two months:
early, were listed in stable con-
dition Sunday at neighboring
All Children's Hospital in St!
Petersburg, Dr. Roberto Sosa
said at a news conference. He
said a medical team was still:
trying to stabilize one of the:
boys.
"The babies are still develop-
ing," Sosa said. "We are just try-
ing to do what Mother Nature
would do ... We are cautiously
optimistic that everything will
turn out all right"
The proud father, Ben Byler,
described the birth as "amaz-
ing."
"Thanks to the Lord above,"
he said. "If everyone could just
keep us in their prayers."
The boys were named Brady
Christopher, Eli Benjamin,
Ryan Patrick, Jackson Robert
and Charlie Craig. The girl is
MacKenzie Margaret
"We saw them all and it's
quite an experience," said
grandfather Jack Kiewra. "I'm
very pleased everything went
well. We have six new healthy
grandbabies and my daughter
is fine."
The babies were transported
from Bayfront Medical Center
to All Children's Hospital short-
ly after their birth.
The babies will likely remain
in the hospital through
Karoline Byler's November
due date. Doctors said their
birth weights were normal for
that stage of development
"Things could not have gone
better than they did," said Dr
Karen Raimer, who led a med-
ical team through Saturday's
Caesarean section delivery of
the sextuplets.
The Bylers said they used
fertility drugs after their
daughter, Zoe, 4, asked for a sib-
ling.
Florida's Department of Vital
Statistics said the births of the
sextuplets were the first on
record in the state.


Family defends:

USF students
Associated Press
TAMPA - Two University of
South Florida students were
shocked to learn a grand jury had
indicted them on federal explo-
sives charges and were expecting
instead to be exonerated at an
upcoming South Carolina court
hearing on state charges, rela-
tives said.
Ahmed Abdellatif Sherif
Mohamed, 24, an engineering
graduate student and teaching
assistant at the Tampa-based uni-
versity, and engineering student
YoussefSamir Megahed, 21, were;
indicted Friday on federal explo-
sives charges.
The students, both born in:
Egypt, have been held since Aug.
4, when they were stopped with-
what authorities described as:
pipe bombs in their car in Goose
Creek, S.C. They were near a
Navy base where enemy combat-
ants have been held.
Megahed's father, 60-year-old
Samir Megahed of Tampa, said
Saturday that the family was
expecting an upcoming hearing
on state charges would clear the
men. He said he and his son have
cooperated with federal investi-










4A MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 3, 2007 CITRUS LOUNJY ('FL.) CwioNfa.F


.. - ... . .
� . - - - - -- *-*
7. --
Associated Press
Water floods a street Sunday after the heavy rains of Hurricane Felix passed over Oranjestad, Aruba.
Felix lashed a cluster of Dutch Caribbean islands, forcing residents and tourists to hunker down in
homes and hotels but doing little damage as the Category 5 storm chugged into open waters of the
Caribbean Sea.


County/State BRIEFS


--1- 1-_ ----- -- I

Underage girls crash
in motorcycle wreck
A 12-year-old and 15-year-old on
an off-road motorcycle crashed in
Hernando on Sunday afternoon,
according to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office.
At about 12:15, the 12-year-old
was driving and the 15-year-old
was riding on the back of the vehi-
cle. They were going west on
Marsh Lake Road when the 12-
year-old turned onto Nature Trail,
but was on the wrong side of the
road, according to a Florida traffic
crash report.


A 17-year-old boy from St.
Petersburg was on Nature Trail and
tried to avoid the girls, but the front
of his vehicle hit the side of the
motorcycle. The girls were thrown
from the motorcycle and the 15-
year-old's knee hit the rear end of
the boy's vehicle.
Neither of the girls was wearing
safety equipment and neither was
old enough to operate a vehicle on
a roadway without adult supervi-
sion.
Nature Coast EMS took the 15-
year-old to Citrus Memorial hospital
in Inverness.
The Chronicle is withholding the


names of all three people involved
because of their ages.
Cruise ship
delayed for hours
MIAMI -A child's grenade-
shaped belt buckle caused a
lengthy delay for passengers who
were trying to leave a cruise ship
Sunday morning, a Royal
Caribbean spokeswoman said.
Thousands of cruise passengers
aboard the Freedom of Seas ves-
sel waited several hours as a
Miami-Dade police bomb squad
investigated the scene.
- From staff, wire reports


FELIX
Continued from Page 1A

low-lying area were flooded. In
Aruba, there was little visible
damage, although at least one
catamaran snapped off its
mooring and a house was dam-
aged by a downed tree. A north-
ern settlement had a temporary
power outage.
Many Bonaire residents had
prepared for the worst,
installing storm shutters and
hauling their boats ashore, but
the storm's winds left little
damage.
Felix became the second
Atlantic hurricane of the sea-
son on Saturday evening, fol-
lowing Hurricane Dean, which
left at least 20 dead in the
Caribbean and carved out a
destructive swath that
stretched from St. Lucia to
Mexico.
At 8 p.m., the storm was cen-
tered about 390 miles southeast
of Jamaica and was moving
west-northwest at about 18
mph, the hurricane center said.
On Saturday, Felix brought
heavy rains and strong winds to
Grenada as a tropical storm,


ripping roofs off at least two
homes and destroying a popu-
lar concert venue. No injuries
were reported and the
Grenadian government was
still assessing the damage
Sunday.
The government of the
Cayman Islands issued a tropi-
cal storm watch for Grand
Cayman, the wealthy British
territory's main island. A watch
means that tropical storm con-
ditions could begin affecting
the island within 36 hours.
Jamaica's government also
issued a tropical storm watch.
The island was battered by
Hurricane Dean on Aug. 19.
In Belize, residents stocked
up on water and food, and
nailed boards over their win-
dows to protect against the hur-
ricane's howling winds. Many
in low-lying areas sought high-
er ground.
Things were more calm in
Honduras, where authorities
were keeping a close eye on the
storm but hadn't started evacu-
ations. Along the country's
northern coastline, tourists
were still lounging by the pool
and enjoying the sun.
On Honduras' Roatan Island,
home to luxury resorts and


pristine reefs, the weather was
normal and guests were simply
enjoying their vacations,
Mayan Princess Beach Resort
& Spa employee Arturo Rich
said.
Rebecca Waddington, a
meteorologist at the hurricane
center, advised employees of
oil platforms in the Gulf of
Mexico to monitor Felix's
progress and said the storm
could reach the area in four to
five days.
Along the Pacific coast of
Mexico, meanwhile, authori-
ties discontinued storm warn-
ings as Tropical Storm
Henriette moved out to sea.
Henriette dumped heavy
rain on western Mexico earlier,
loosening a giant boulder that
smashed into a home in
Acapulco, killing an adult and
two children and injuring two
other people. A teenager and
her two brothers were also
killed when a landslide
slammed into their house in a
poor neighborhood of the
resort city.
Forecasters put it on a path
that would not threaten land
until Thursday, when it could
hit a remote section of the Baja
California peninsula.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Jessica Debra Carrabotta, 23,
5514 S. Woodside Terrace,
Homosassa, at 11:20 p.m. Friday on
charges of burglary of a vehicle,
auto theft and petty theft. Carrabotta
was arrested in reference to three
car burglaries and a vehicle theft in
Homosassa on Aug. 4. When the
incidents occurred, a van was found
nearby next to a wooded area
where the property taken from the
cars was in plain site, according to
an arrest report. The van was regis-
tered to a man who was incarcerat-
ed, but is an acquaintance to
Carrabotta. The truck that was
stolen was found abandoned and
stuck in the sand. Carrabotta's fin-
gerprints were on both the van and
the truck with the CDs and change
taken from the three burglarized
cars inside the van. Carrabotta said
she was driving the van when it ran
out of gas then she walked to a
friend's house. She couldn't explain
why her fingerprints were on the
truck. Bond $14,750.
* Dustin Dwight Coulter, 20,
478 N. Turkey Pine Loop, Lecanto,
at 2:37 a.m. Saturday on a Citrus
County warrant charge for battery.


For the RECORD---


ON THE NET
* For more information
about arrests made bv
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Otfice, go to
www.sherificitrus.org and
click or the link to Public
Informriation, then Arrest
Reports.

Bond $500.
* Santos Torres Fernandez, 18,
7471 S. Old Floral City Road, at
3:54 .am. Saturday on a charge of
obstruction by a disguised person.
Fernandez was arrested the day
before on a charge of driving without
a license. At the time, he said his
name was Santos Torres and gave
a fake birthday. Bond $500.
* Arnold J. Odom Jr., 54, 20101
Somerset Acres Lane, Spring Hill, at
11:29 a.m. Saturday on charges of
possession of 20 grams or less of
marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia. According to an
arrest report, Odom was pulled over
for swerving across lanes. The
deputy saw a torn cigarette box in
his shirt and inside was a marijuana
cigarette and rolling papers. Bond
$1,000.
* Carlos M. Ayavaca, 22, 42 S.


Osceloa St., Beverly Hills, at 10:34
a.m. Saturday on a charge of not
having a valid driver license. Bond
$150.

State probation
* Bobby Chester, 57, 228
Pleasant Grove Road 1, Inverness,
at 11:30 a.m. Saturday on a violation
of probation charge in reference to
original felony charges of driving
under the influence and driving with
a permanently revoked license.
According to an arrest report,
Chester was serving two years of
community control and was only
allowed to leave his house for work
or with prior approval from state pro-
bation. An.officer said he was away
from his house and not at work. No
bond.

Crystal River Police
Arrest
* Tara Stephanie Reeves, 23,
4930 Steve Reeves Lane, Plant
City, at 7:21 p.m. Saturday on a
Hillsborough County warrant charge
for failure to appear in reference to
felony charges of driving under the
influence with property damage and
possession of a controlled sub-
stance. She turned herself into the
police department. No bond.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


City H
Daytona Bch. 90
Ft. Lauderdale 91
Fort Myers 92
Gainesville 90
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 90
Key West 90
Lakeland 92
Melbourne 92


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


UH ONICL
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Report a news tip:
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2-2340
chronicle

05.00*


3 weeks





ay
day
Friday
nday


Marion






om

34451
80
m



crest

,crest
Crystal
L 34429




ess

I. Main
verness,
450




3-3222
3-3232
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3-3240
3-3275
3-5655
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4-2917
[-2908
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1-0579
print.

e.com


West winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas 1 to
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Scattered showers and thunder-
storms.



LAKE LEVELS


TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 92 Low: 73
Partly cloudy with a 40% chance of a
thunderstorm.


7)~p


S.-.-- TUESDAY
S..- High: 93 Low: 72
Sun and clouds with a 30% chance of a
thunderstorm.

MFWEDNESDAY
* High: 93 Low: 71
Sun and clouds with a 30% chance of a
thunderstorm.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


90/74
97/67
72/90
82
+1

0.39 in.
0.71 in.
35.01 in.
39.89 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Sunday at 3 p.m. 30.05 in.
DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 87%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moder-
ate and weeds were absent.
"Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly articulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR M
(MORNING) (AFTERNO
MONDAY 11:41 5:26 5:'
TUESDAY 12:17 6:26 12:41 6:l

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW..
MOONRISE TODAY........
SEPT. 28 MO0NSET TODAY.


AJOR
ON)
55
56


.7:50 P.M.
7:10 A.M.
.....NONE
1:57 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low
9:50 a/5:42 a -- /7:13 p 12:07 a/6:23
8:11 a/3:04 a 10:28 p/4:35 p 9:04 a/3:45
5:58 a/12:52 a 8:15 p/2:23 p 6:51 a/1:33
9:00 a/4:41 a 11:17 p/6:12 p 9:53 a/5:22


Tuesday
N High/Low
3 a 10:43 a/8:38 p
a --/6:00 p
a 10:19 p/3:48 p
a --/7:37 p


Gulf water
temperature

87�

Taken at Egmont Key


Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.63 28.65 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.52 34.45 . 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.76 34.79 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.95 35.95 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


S ea~ttle--


San 100S L808~7 ~
(Fru�,isco 90 Tlnir9s~ .
-r 9s 60S BUM~..Cr



100s (El Paso 80. s~pi
I.," %E-F93M73


. irpn


i os








MiIami


1101.01 Ulu


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Sunday Monday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
77 46 sunny 83 58
83 63 tstrm 87 64
77 63 sunny 83 58
84 71trace sunny 85 63
77 53 sunny 83 65
88 68 .02 tstrm 87 69
81 57 sunny 86 63
94 55 sunny 96 60
89 74 ptcldy 92 67
97 64 sunny 95 61
73 56 sunny 89 66
80 49 sunny 79 56
77 44 sunny 83 52
83 721.75 tstrm 85 73
88 60 sunny 87 58
86 68 sunny 89 64
85 61 sunny 85 63
93 55 sunny 90 60
78 53 ptcldy 83 60
89 73 sunny 89 65
86 60 sunny 88 62
78 40 sunny 86 57
94 71 tstrm 93 73
89 61 ptcldy 93 59
85 59 sunny 88 65
78 59 ptcldy 85 61
89 66 sunny 90 66
94 60 sunny 92 61
79 52 sunny 83 61
78 48 sunny 84 60.
85 73 .14 tstrm 87 74
88 60 sunny 89 60
86 72 .10 tstrm 91 68
10784 ptcldy 10684
95 70 ptcldy 92 66
91 73 sunny 79 67
93 66 sunny 93 65
97 76 ptcldy 94 72
84 60 ptcldy 80 61
85 64 ptcldy 85 66
90 73 tstrm 88 71
84 74 ptcldy 93 65
92 73 sunny 92 69


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
MONDAY
Sunday Monday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 90 74 .10 tstrm 89 76
New York City 78 58 sunny 85 67
Norfolk 79 66 sunny 85 68
Oklahoma City 90 64 ptcldy 91 67
Omaha 87 60 sunny 88 63
Palm Springs 10985 .09 tstrm 11087
Philadelphia 81 60 sunny 85 67
Phoenix 10987 ptcldy 10887
Pittsburgh 83 55 sunny 84 56
Portland, ME 72 47 sunny 83 58
Portland, Ore 83 55 cldy 80 60
Providence, R.I. 77 55 sunny 86 63
Raleigh 88 61 sunny 89 65
Rapid City 93 60 sunny 99 63
Reno 97 57 sunny 96 62
Rochester, NY 79 46 sunny 85 56
Sacramento 99 62 sunny 10063
St. Louis 91 60 sunny 92 64
St. Ste. Marie 80 57 .03 ptcldy 73 52
Salt Lake City 95 75 sunny 99 72
San Antonio 87 71 .09 tstrm 86 72
San Diego 89 73 sunny 80 70
San Francisco 82 59 sunny 72 56
Savannah 80 742.31 tstrm 87 71
Seattle 77 56 cldy 75 57
Spokane 83 54 sunny 91 57
Syracuse 79 47 sunny 83 57
Topeka 93 54 sunny 91 62
Washington 83 64 sunny 89 67
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 115 Indio, Calif. LOW 32 Whitefield, N.H.

WORLD CITIES


MONDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 68/59/sh
Athens 97/71/s
Beijing 82/63/pc
Berlin 64/48/sh
Bermuda 82/75/ts
Cairo 95/65/s
Calgary 73/46/s
Havana 90/74/ts
Hong Kong 88/79/ts
Jerusalem 88/68/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


95/68/pc
74/57/pc
89/59/pc
73/55/ts
74/59/s
70/51/pc
72/50/sh
78/68/ts
83/60/s
64/52/sh
82/75/ts
75/61/s
61/45/pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


DATE

9/3
9/4


3 . 11 S . 1
8BT.3 SEPT. 11 SBPT.1B


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2007 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


�Z-l - 0-1�


.................

......................


...u.... . .... ~ . .. .. 6. *. 1 ...0. d .4 .*..4 .a .0 .


4AMONDAY, SrPTEMBER 3, 2007


_ _ , .


CITRUS COUNIY (F'I,) CHRONICLE'


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MONDAY, SirIJEMIniM.t 3, 2007 5A


CriRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WIRTHMAN
Continued from Page 1A

diner," said George, her hus-
band of 47 years. "She was wear-
ing a red sweater - wow!"
The diner was in Freeport,
N.Y. Myrna worked at a grocery
store nearby and went there for
lunch one day. George said their
eyes met and he told the guy he
was with, "You see that lady
over there? She's going to be my
wife."
Later, he learned that Myrna
had told her friend, "See that
tall, good-looking guy? He's
going to be my husband."
It was winter and she was
wearing a pillbox hat that had
an opening for her long ponytail.
They married Aug. 13, 1960.
Myrna was born in Cayman
Brac in the Cayman Islands.
Although it's a resort area now,
back then island living was
hard. People were poor and
Myrna's father had died when
she was only about 2 or 3. She
and her siblings lived with their
mother in a house without elec-
tricity. They grew their own
fruits and vegetables and lived
on fish and rice.
Myrna left the island when
she was about 18 to go to New
York where she lived with older
sister Flo. She worked at a
supermarket and later at a
bank
She liked to dance and go to
parties. She dressed to the
nines. She once won a beauty
contest in Point Lookout, N.Y.
Her macaroni salad and deviled
eggs were in great demand at
family gatherings.
She had a way with people
and a way with plants. After she
and George moved to Florida in
1972, Myrna bought a yellow
hibiscus from Dilbert's nursery
shortly after they met and it's
still flowering outside of the
Wirthman's Inverness home.
Myrna loved her home. She
loved being at home. She loved
her poodles, she loved her
"knick-knacks, what-nots and
doo-dads," she loved George
and she loved Elvis.
"She was an Elvis fanatic!"
Dilbert said. "She always said
that besides George, Elvis was
the most handsome man she


FISHER
Continued from Page 1A

expansion in downtown
Inverness. When Dick was
fired, that staff presence on
space needs faded, Damato
said.
"No one really picked up the
ball and ran with that," he said.
"When he wasn't there any-
more, no one else was assigned
to it That's why we're at a stale-
mate position."
One applicant for Dick's
replacement may be a familiar
name. Former County
Administrator Gary Kuhl, who
now is administrator in
Hernando County, reportedly is
interested in the Citrus open-
ing.'
Damato said he believes the


Special to the Chronicle
George and Myrna Wirthman celebrated their 47th wedding on
Aug. 13, 2007. Myrna Wirthman passed away 13 days later, on
Aug. 26. The last thing she said was, "I love you," said George
Wirthman.


ever laid eyes on."
Dilbert said she knew
Christmas was coming when
Myrna put on her Elvis music
and turned it up loud so she
could hear it from every room in
the house.
Christmas was one of Myrna's
favorite times of the year She
never had children of her own,
but she had lots of nieces and
nephews and she enjoyed buy-
ing each of them several gifts -
so many that you couldn't walk
through the Florida room in the
back of the house without trip-
ping over the piles of gifts. She
loved watching people open
gifts.
"She was generous," George
said. "She was always thinking
of someone else and not her-
self."
For many years, George paint-
ed houses, and once, when some
of his crew didn't show up for
work, he fired them and brought
Myrna with him on his jobs.
"She came to work with me


assistant county administrator
should have an active role in
government.
"That person should work
with the staff on a day-to-day
basis to make sure things get


Drive to School
Clean


and two days later she was
telling me how to do it," he said.
"But she was good, better than
most painters around here, a
good trimmer with a steady
hand."
The past few years were diffi-
cult for Myrna and George. She
cared for him through dozens of
trips in and out of the hospital. It
was just recently that she got
sick and never recovered. The
last thing she said was, "I love
you.",
Scattered throughout the
house are dozens of dried, faded
roses. For every birthday, every
anniversary, George gave the
beautiful Myrna a bouquet of
roses, which she never threw
out.
"George gave them to me -
how can I throw them away?"
she would tell people.
Their 47th anniversary was
Aug. 13.
"I always signed my cards to
her 'Love always,'" George said.
"I can't believe she's gone."


done in a timely fashion," he
said. "That person knows the
ebb and flow of what's going on.
A real good second-in-com-
mand is a big asset in helping
with the day-to-day functions."


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TAINTED
Continued from Page 1A

safe than traditional arrange-
ments in which companies make
what they sell.
Outsourcing makes financial
sense for companies unwilling or
unable to establish or expand
manufacturing operations.
Established manufacturers can
use excess capacity to fill orders
for others.
For some specialty products
that require expensive machin-
ery - like pet food - a limited
number of contract manufactur-
ers, such as Menu Foods, make
products that are sold under
dozens of brands.
"Being able to develop a prod-
uct without having to sink a lot of
money into fixed, tangible capital
is every entrepreneur's dream,"
said Michael Sykuta, director of
the Contracting and
Organizations Research Institute
at the University of Missouri-
Columbia.
Store-brand or private-label
products account for much of the
growth in the food outsourcing
business. Supermarkets, drug
stores and mass merchandisers
ring up more than $65 billion in
store brand sales annually
That amounts to one in every
five items they sell, according to
the Private Label Manufacturers
Association.
But critics of the outsourcing of
production warn that it creates
increased vulnerability of the
food supply The manufacturer no
longer is directly accountable to
consumers, but to other compa-
nies, they maintain, they main-
tain.
That makes for a long supply
chain with several stops before a
product reaches consumers, said
Jean Kinsey, co-director of the
Food Industry Center at the
University of Minnesota. "And not
everyone along the way has the
same vested interest in its safety."
The Grocery Manufacturers
Association counters that there
would be no reason for co-manu-
facturers or co-packers to skimp


CONSOLIDATED
RECALL ITEMS
* Fresh spinach, recalled
last September because of
E.coli contamination was
processed and packaged
by Natural -Selection Foods
LLC, but sold under more
than two dozen brand
names.
* Pet food recalled last
spring was made by Menu
Foods Income Fund and
other companies using
chemically spiked ingredi-
ents, but sold under nearly
200 brands.
* About 5.7 million pounds
of meat was recalled in
June by United Food
Group LLC because of
possible E.coli contamina-
tion, but was sold under
six brands.

on food safety.
"If we use the classic term,
'barking up the wrong tree,' that
would be the case here," said
Craig Henry, who helps oversee
scientific and regulatory activi-
ties at the industry group.
But some food safety advocates
say that when problems arise
with foods made under contract,
sorting out who made what can
delay recalls or public health
warnings.
Last month, the FDA for hours
delayed issuing a consumer
warning about botulism contami-
nation in canned food products,-
until it could sort out the brands
under which the Castleberry's
Food Co. product was sold. The
recall was further hampered by
confusion over which brands
were involved.
This spring's rolling series of
recalls of cat and dog food made
with chemically tainted ingredi-
ents from China began in mid-
March and stretched to late May.
"I'm not telling you it is a sys-
tem that is optimal for con-
sumers. What we are trying to do
is make the response part faster,"
says the FDAs Acheson.
He expressed concern about a
recall "dribbling on for two


months" but said that's better'
"than not saying anything and:
waiting for two months."
Generally, the identities of con-
tract manufacturers remain.'
secret for reasons of commercial:
confidentiality So how can con-
sumers learn where their food
comes from?
"The truth of the matter is
today, to a large degree, you can't
... and efforts to improve on it
have been beaten back," said
Jean Halloran, director of food
policy initiatives for Consumers
Union.
For example, she said, there
has been a long delay in requiring
that imported fruits and vegeta-
bles be labeled with their country
of origin.
The difficulty of linking a prod-
uct back to a particular lot or
manufacturer has been a major
problem in some food safety
cases, say consumer advocates.
When salmonella contamina-
tion led ConAgra Foods Inc. to
recall Peter Pan-brand peanut
butter earlier this year, it also
recalled Great Value peanut but-
ter it. made for Wal-Mart Stores
Inc. The FDA said at the time that
other Great Value peanut butter,.
made by other manufacturers,
wasn't affected by the recall.
In the peanut butter case, the:
lids of the jars - regardless of.
brand - were consistently
marked in a way that made it
easy to find the specific product
code being recalled, DeWaal
said.
That's not always the case.
"Traceability is critical to
ensuring processors use the high-
est standards of care," DeWaal
said. "When their identities are
hidden behind multiple labels
and poor traceability informa-
tion, they can use whatever prac-
tices they want because they're
probably not going to get caught"
For the companies that put
their names on products made
for them, the inevitable spate of
lawsuits that have followed
recent outbreaks likely will force
them to more closely scrutinize
suppliers, said Cornell University
professor of food science Robert
Gravani.


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OA MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007


SObituaries


Earl 'Mr. E.'
Echstenkamper,
84
EATON, OHIO
Earl "Mr. E" Robert
Echstenkamper, 84, of Eaton,
Ohio, died Saturday, Sept. 1,
2007, at his residence after a
four-year battle with kidney
failure.
Born March 27, 1923, in
Glouster, Ohio, to Henry and
Anna Echstenkamper, he.was a
graduate of Glouster High
School.
Mr. Echstenkamper was a
World War II
Army AirCorp
staff sergeant
veteran, who
flew with the
351st Bomb
Group as a left
waste gunner on a B-17
bomber. He was once interned
in Switzerland for 10 months
after being shot down. He
escaped on Christmas Eve
1944. He retired from NATCO,
Richmond, Ind., after 27 1/2
years of employment. He then
moved to Florida and at the
age of 75, retired again from
QPS Machine Shop in
Inverness. In 1999, he moved
back to Ohio.
He was a member of the
351st Bomb Group Association,
member of the Swiss Internee's
Association, member of the
American Legion Post No. 215,
Eaton, Ohio, Life Member of
VFW Post No. 4337, Inverness
and a member of the First
Presbyterian Church of Eaton,
Ohio.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; wife, Verla Mae
Echstenkamper, on Oct. 8,1999;
four brothers, Henry, Ralph,
Bernard and Marlin; and one
sister, Anna Marie.
He is survived by his daugh-
ters, Ruthann Lincoln and hus-
band Dave of Naples, and


Sandy Favorite and husband
Steve of Eaton, Ohio; son, Gary
Echstenkamper and wife
Donna of Palm Harbor; broth-
er, Tom Echstenkamper and
wife Carol of Glouster, Ohio;
grandchildren, Kevin, Troy,
Chris and Kristi; five step-
grandchildren, Echo, Steve,
Jay, Lori and Tammy; eight
great-grandchildren, Kaycee,
Bailey, Daniel, Alex, Dylan,
Drew, Devin and Nathan; 10
step-great grandchildren,
Jaimee, Carlee, Kristen,
Nicole, Brittni, Alexis, Alyssa,
Taylor, Camron, Gracie, Carrie
and Brittney; two step-great-
great grandchildren, Alyssa
and Jack; and his very special
'Angel" Kay and his .special
singing '"Angel" Jenny.
Girton-Schmidt-Boucher
Funeral Home, Eaton, Ohio.

Judith 'Judy'
Lamy, 60
BEVERLY HILLS
Judith Rae "Judy" Ledwell
Lamy, 60, Beverly Hills, died
Thursday, Aug. 30, 2007, at
Citrus Memorial hospital
under Hospice care.
She was born Aug. 6, 1947,
in St. Petersburg.
Mrs. Lamy moved to
Beverly Hills from St.
Petersburg in 1982 and was
co-owner and operator of
Lamy's Radiator and Auto Air
in Beverly Hills for the past
25 years with her husband,
Dudley Lamy
She was a member of St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton's Catholic
Church of Citrus Springs.
She was part of the gradu-
ating class of 1965 from Notre
Dame High School in St.
Petersburg and attended
Notre Dame College in
Baltimore, Md.
She was previously
employed and retired from the
GTE telephone company in St.
Petersburg and also worked at


Lamy's Radiator Service in St.
Petersburg from 1972 to 1982.
At that time, she was the only
radiator bench repairwoman
in the six southeastern United
States.
She was an avid bas fisher-
woman and was widely
known to out fish her hus-
band. She and her husband
co-produced the only Citrus
County fishing map of Lake
Rousseau, Rainbow River,
Lake Panasoffkee and the
entire length of the
Withlacoochee River from
Dunnellon to Nobelton.
Mrs. Lamy was an accom-
plished photojournalist.
She loved gardening and
spending as much time in the
Florida sun as possible. She
loved all animals and was also
known for her Boxer dogs. She
was an artist and an accom-
plished wood carver. She
could also sing a complete
song, jingle or hymn from
memory She loved things as
simple as hot showers and the
smell of fresh cut grass.
She was also an avid foot-
ball fan.
She was preceded in death
by her mother, Margaret Mary
Browning Ledwell of St.
Petersburg, formally of St.
Mary, Ky., and her father,
William Newell Ledwell of
St. Petersburg, formally of
North Carolina.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 34 years, Dudley
Lamy; brothers, Robert
Newell Ledwell of St.
Petersburg, and Richard
Ledwell of Erie, Pa.; mother-
in-law, Theresa Doris Lamy;
sisters-in-law, JoAnn Daniels
and husband Lloyd of
Crawfordville, Debra Diligio
and husband Lorenzo of
Spring Hill, and Blanche
Jarvis of Dunedin; and broth-
ers-in-law, David Lamy and
wife Norma and Joseph Lamy
of St. Petersburg.


Harvey-Young Funeral
Home, Crawfordville.

Mike
Popovich, 83
LECANTO
Mike Popovich, 83,
Lecanto, died Thursday, Aug.
30, 2007, at Citrus Memorial
hospital in Inverness.
A native of New Castle, Pa.,
he was born Jan. 29, 1924, to
Mike and Eva Chuturilo. He
came to this area from St.
Clair Shores, Mich.
He worked as a journey-
man millwright located at the
Warren Tech Center in
Warren, Mich.
Survivors include his wife
of 58 years, Jennie Popovich
of Inverness; son, Mark
Popovich of Sacramento,
Calif.; daughter, Cathy St.
Aubin and husband Edwin of
Clarkston, Mich.; sister,
Mildred Popovich of Sterling
Heights, Mich.; grandchil-
dren, Rachel Simpson and
Scott M. Jankovic; and great-
grandchildren, Jalena
Jankovic and Owen Simpson.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

John
Woodstuff, 80
INVERNESS
John Franklin Woodstuff,
80, Inverness, died Saturday,
Sept. 1, 2007, at Hospice of
Citrus County
Care Unit at
Ci t r u s
Memorial hos- -
pital.
A native of
Moundsville,
W.Va., he was A
born July 31, _:
1927, to John P John
and Bertha Woodstuff
Woodstuff.
He came to this area in


1972 from
Pittsburgh,.
Pa.
He was the
retired owner
of Woodstuff Auto Sales &
Service in Wexford, Pa.
He served in the U.S. Army
during World War II in the
11th Airborne Division.
Mr. Woodstuff was a mem-
ber and past commander of
Inverness VFW Post No. 4337,
a member of North Hills
Masonic Lodge No. 716 in
Pittsburgh, Scottish Rite-
Valley of Ocala, Egypt Shrine
Temple and American Legion
Post No. 77. He was also a for-
mer member of Inverness
Eagles Aerie No. 3992, Lake
Panasoffkee. Moose Lodge
No. 1179 and the First
Christian Church of
Pittsburgh.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; brother,
Albert Woodstuff; and sisters,
Jean Humbertson and Anna
Holland.
Survivors include his wife
of 58 years, Martha Clark
Woodstuff of Inverness;
brother, Edward Woodstuff of
Zephryhills; sister, Lillian
Jurksaitis of Pittsburgh, Pa.;
and several nieces and
nephews.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als are requested to Hospice
of Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Funeral :;' :'
Earl "Mr. E." Robert
Echstenkamper. A memorial
service for Earl "Mr. E." Robert
Echstenkamper, 84, will be at 3
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2007, at
the First Presbyterian Church,
123 W Decatur St., Eaton, Ohio,
with the Rev. Wayne D.


Morrison officiating. Burial
will take place at Mound Hill
Union Cemetery, Eaton, Ohio,
at a later date with full military
honors being provided by the
Preble County Honor Guard. In
lieu of flowers Mr. E would like
donations to be sent to the
Eaton Senior Center
Transportation Department or
the First Presbyterian Churc-
"Logos" c/o Rev. Morrison, 121,
W Decatur St., Eaton, OH"\
45320. Girton-Schmidt-
Boucher Funeral Home, Eaton,
OH assisting the family with
arrangements. Online condo-
lences and other remem-
brances may be sent to the fam-
ily by visiting www.gsbfuneral-
home.com.
Judith Rae "Judy" Ledwell
Lamy. The service for Judith
Rae '"Judy" Ledwell Lamy, 60,
Beverly Hills, will be at 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2007, at St
Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic
Church, Crawfordville, with
burial- at St. Elizabeth
Cemetery in Crawfordville.
Family will receive friends
from 2 to 4 p.m. today at
Harvey-Young Funeral Home,
Crawforville. Memorial contri-
butions may be made to Judy
Lamy Memorial Fund, c/o
Wakulla Bank, PO. Box 610
Crawfordville, FL 32326. A
Memorial Mass at St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton Catholic Church in
Citrus Springs will be
announced at a later date.

SO YOU KNOW
* Obituaries must be sub
rnitted by licensed funeral
homes.
* Obituaries and funeral
notices are subject to
editing.
* Recent photos are wel-
coIme
* Call Linda Johnson at 563-
5660 for details.


Schools change traditional calendars


Goal is to stop kids from forgetting

what they learned during the year


Associated Press
" ARLINGTON, Va. - While
:it's the start of the school year
:for most U.S. students, chil-
dren at Barcroft Elementary
have been at their desks for
nearly a month - and they're
fine with that.
The suburban Washington
'school is among 3,000 across
the nation that have tossed
,aside the traditional calendar
'for one with a shorter summer
break and more time off during
'the rest of the year. The goal:
.preventing kids from forgetting
:what they have learned.
Barcroft's principal, Miriam
*Hughey-Guy, pushed for the
:new calendar in hopes of
,boosting student achievement
-She had read studies showing
'the toll a long summer break
takes on what students remem-
ber, and she figured that short-
er breaks also would help the
school's many immigrants
:keep up their English skills.
Tests given to kids in the
*spring and fall show children
:generally slide in math and
reading during the traditional
summer break lasting 10 to 12
weeks, says Harris Cooper,
director of the education pro-
gram at Duke University. Both
poor students and their
wealthier counterparts lose
math skills, and kids from low-
income families also decline
in reading. More than half of
Barcroft's students are poor.
There hasn't been rigorous
research into whether stu-
dents at schools where sum-
mer breaks are short do better
than kids attending other
schools. But existing compar-
isons suggest the modified cal-
endars have a small positive
effect on student achievement.
The impact appears to be


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somewhat bigger for low-
income children.
Ron Fairchild, executive
director of the Center for
Summer Learning at Johns
Hopkins University, says
reconfiguring the school calen-
dar simply makes sense.
"You would expect .an ath-
lete or a musician's perform-
ance to suffer if they didn't
practice," said Fairchild,
whose organization advocates
for educational summertime
opportunities for kids.
There are about 3,000 U.S.
schools using alternate calen-
dars like the one at Barcroft,
where July is the only full
month off, according to the
National Association For Year-
Round Education.
The number of schools on
modified calendars with short-
er summer breaks more than
doubled in the last 15 years.
Today, 46 states have schools
operating on these calendars.
The entire Hawaiian school
system recently moved to a
nontraditional calendar.
A goal of the federal No
Child Left Behind law is to get
all students reading and doing
math at their grade level by
2014. That has placed enor-
mous pressure on schools to try
new things, including reconfig-


Citrus County Courier

Airport Transportation

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Associated Press
Students work on their art projects Friday, June 15, 2007, at Marel Sitrom-Crumm's Art class at
Barcroft Elementary in Arlington, Va. Barcroft Elementary has year-long school calendar.


during calendars and schedules.
Teachers typically spend
time at the beginning of each
year reviewing the previous
year's lessons. Schools that
have fewer weeks off in the
summer may need to do less of
that.


It's mostly elementary
schools using the modified cal-
endars. For older students,
that could make it hard to get
summer jobs or participate in
competitive sports programs.
In Auburn, Ala., a push to
move to a year-round calendar


created an outcry and ulti-
mately failed, partly because
of high-school athletics.
"It would have put a vaca-
tion in the middle of the foot-


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ball season," said Chris
Newland, a father of two who
fought the change and a psy-
chology professor at Auburn
University. "You don't touch
football here."
Newland said parents didn't
like the idea of putting the
younger kids on a modified
schedule and leaving the older
ones on the traditional calen-
dar. That would make it hard to
take family vacations and
would be especially problemat-
ic in a university town, where
families often spend entire
summers off together, he said.
Schools that have a calendar
like Barcroft's typically offer
educational programs during
the fall, winter and spring
breaks. At Barcroft, about 80
percent of kids participate.
The courses offered are often
aimed at giving remedial help
to those who need it, a com-
mon purpose of traditional
summer school.
Many teachers at year-round
schools believe providing
remedial help after nine
weeks of coursework is an
improvement over the tradi-
tional model in which kids
wait until summer school to
get extensive help, says Duke
University's Cooper.


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Weird WIRE


Emu's outing
WEST BEND, Wis. -Attention,
Wal-Mart shoppers: The emu in the
parking lot is not for sale.
Employees of a Wal-Mart
Supercenter used shopping carts
to corral a wayward emu outside
the store Monday about 6 a.m.,
West Bend police said.
A manager fed the emu grapes
and apples in an attempt to calm
the bird inside the makeshift enclo-
sure.
Richard Takacs, the owner of 3-
year-old Myron, speculated the bird
had been chased from his nearby
farm by a coyote.
Emus can't fly, but Takacs said
he wasn't surprised when police
contacted him from the store,
about two miles north of his
Meadowbrook Market and
Pumpkin Farm.
"They can run 40 miles an hour,
so that was just a quick sprint for
Myron," Takacs said.
Two other emus from the farm
also bolted from their pen but were
found unharmed in a nearby pump-
kin field.
Takacs retrieved the apparently
frightened Myron from the 24-hour
Wal-Mart and placed the bird by
itself in a pasture so it could feel
safe and relax.
Emus can grow up to six feet tall
and weigh as much as 100
pounds.
West Bend is in southeastern
Wisconsin, about 35 miles north-
west of Milwaukee.
Hug it out
PROVO, Utah - Kneeling for
children and stretching to embrace
taller people, a college student
believes she's hugged her way into
the record books.
Jordan Pearce, 18, said she
hugged 765 people in less than an
hour Saturday and plans to send
the results to Guinness World
Records.
"I feel like I'm on cloud nine,"
Pearce said after the last hug
Saturday.
The hugs took months of plan-
ning. Pearce and her family had to
apply to Guinness World Records
with detailed plans. The event had
to be supervised by two prominent
members of the community and
covered by the news media.
District Judge Lynn Davis and
state Sen. Curt Bramble counted
the hugs, which required arms and
hands wrapped around the person.
... I'1 was getting pretty glistening,"
Pearce said of hugging - and


sweating - in the hot sun.
A new record will not be
approved until Guinness gets pho-
tographs, video and written state-
ments from witnesses. The record
is 612 hugs in an hour, the Daily
Herald of Provo reported.
One man spilled a drink on
Pearce. A little girl refused to let go
of her blue sucker, and a little boy
kicked and screamed, not wanting
to hug a stranger, the newspaper
said.
Hike up those drawers
NEW ORLEANS - Hike up
those pants. Droopy drawers that
bare skin or underwear might soon
be forbidden fashion on the streets
of Alexandria and Shreveport, and
violators could be forced to part
with some cash.
"I'm tired (of) looking at behinds,"
Shreveport Councilwoman Joyce
Bowman said after Tuesday's 4-3
vote to ban fanny-flaunting
trousers.
Nobody can be arrested just for
violating the ordinance, but they
could be fined or required to per-
form community service. The maxi-
mum fine for a first offense is $100.
Alexandria's City Council voted
unanimously Tuesday to ban the
baring. Its ordinance allows some
sag, but 3 inches or more can
bring a fine of $25 to $200 and a
requirement for community service.
If the mayors of Shreveport and
Alexandria sign the ordinances,
they will bring Louisiana's total to at
least six, with at least two more
cities considering bans.
Elsewhere, Atlanta's City Council
has held a hearing on a measure
to outlaw saggy pants that reveal
shorts or thongs.
A similar proposal in Stratford,
Conn., was soundly rejected this
week after critics argued it would
be unconstitutional and unfairly tar-
get minorities. .
Some opponents cite other
objections.
"Are you going to have a 'sag-
ging' court?" Michael Williams
asked Shreveport's council. "The
police have more important things
to do than chase young boys and
girls and say 'pull your pants up."'
Pricey pants
WAUKESHA, Wis. - It was
embarrassing enough that Mark
Stahnke woke up in a neighbor's
yard without his pants. Then he
remembered they contained a
cashier's check for $41,093, meant
for his son, and several hundred
dollars in cash.


Associated Press
Sam Anderson, 17 , shows the waist line of his shorts as Varry
Richardson, right, looks on while the two stand outside a corner
grocery store on Pierre Ave in Shreveport, La. Droopy drawers that
bare skin or underwear might soon be forbidden fashion on the
streets of Alexandria and Shreveport, and violators could be forced
to part with some cash.


But he got it all back Friday,
including the pants, thanks to a
man and his dog.
Stahnke said he doesn't know
what happened between when he
left the bar and when he woke up
the next morning, and police were
skeptical when he filed a report on
Monday.
"We're used to hearing weird
stories, but with his intoxication we
figured this one would be different,
that the amount of money wouldn't
be exact," Police Lt. William
Graham said. "How do you get so
intoxicated that you lose your
pants?"
Stahnke said he had met his son
at a bar and doesn't remember
much afterward.
"I woke up cold not knowing
where the heck I was, and I didn't


realize it at first because I still had
my shoes and socks on," he said.
"When I got up, I realized, my God,
I don't have any pants."
Tim Curzan's dog, Joe, found
the pants at an intersection,
according to a police report. He
found the cashier's check and tried
twice, unsuccessfully, to deliver it
and the cash to where he thought
the owner lived.
On Wednesday, the pants were
still at the intersection, so Curzan
took them to the police, who con-
tacted Stahnke to claim his belong-
ings.
Tag, you're out
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.
-An elementary school has
banned tag on its playground after
some children complained they


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were harassed or chased against
their will.
"It causes a lot of conflict on the
playground," said Cindy Fesgen,
assistant principal of the Discovery
Canyon Campus school.
Running games are still allowed
as long as students don't chase
each other, she said.
Fesgen said two parents com-
plained to her about the ban but
most parents and children didn't
object.
In 2005, two elementary schools
in the nearby Falcon School
District did away with tag and simi-
lar games in favor of alternatives
with less physical contact. School
officials said the move encouraged
more students to play games and
helped reduce playground squab-
bles.
300 diapers a week
CINCINNATI -Already the
proud parents of triplets, Victoria
and Tim Lasita had decided they
wanted to have "one more."
"I guess we should have been
more specific and said one more
child, not one more set," said
Victoria, 39, who delivered the cou-
ple's second set of triplets
Wednesday after 34 weeks of
pregnancy.
The Lasitas conceived both sets
of triplets naturally, without fertility
treatments.
"Holy smokes. Do you know
what the odds of that are?" said Dr.
Glen E. Hofmann, medical director
of the Bethesda Center for
Reproductive Health and Fertility.
The answer: about one in 8,000
for a woman to have triplets natu-
rally, and about one in 64 million of
her repeating the feat, according to
Hofmann and Dr. Sherif G.
Awadalla, medical director of the
Institute for Reproductive Health in
Cincinnati.
The Lasitas welcomed 4-pound,
2 1/2-ounce Casey Alexander into
the world at 1:57 p.m. Wednesday,
followed seconds later by 4-pound,
13 1/2-ounce Caden Bradley, and
2 minutes later by 4-pound, 91%-
ounce Carson Charles. All were
between 17 1/2 and 18 inches
long.
"Everybody seems to be doing
well," said the father, 48, who
watched the Caesarean-section
births in a delivery room filled with
18 medical personnel.
It's still unclear when the triplets
will go home to live with Jessica,


Jillian and Brian, who will turn 4 in
December.
Those three were born at 28
weeks, and all weighed less than 3
pounds at birth. Lung problems
contributed to "a little rocky start,"
Victoria Lasita said, but overall,
they're healthy.
The Lasitas said the new triplets
will mean about 300 diaper
changes a week, and about 168
bottles.
"You take what God gives you,"'
she said. "And this is what he's
decided we can handle."
The Lasitas have been married
six years and have three grown
children from previous marriages.
A New Brunswick, N.J., woman
gave birth to her second set of nat-
urally conceived triplets in May
2006.
Keep the change
GREENBURGH, N.Y. - A knife-
wielding robber needed only $4, so
he refused to take a $10 bill from
his victim and waited while the
man made change at a pizza par-,
lor, police said Tuesday.
He then took the $4 and ran off,,
only to be captured a few blocks
away, police said.
The suspect, James Mitchell, 48,
was arraigned Tuesday on robbery
and weapon charges. His lawyer,
Arlene Popkin, refused to com-
ment.
Police Capt. Joseph DeCarlo
said it "really is an odd case, but it
is a robbery."
The confrontation began over an
artificial rose that the 18-year-old "
victim had just bought, police said:
"He came out of the store and �
was approached by the suspect,
who said, 'Give me the rose,"'
DeCarlo said. "The kid told him,'
'Go in there and get one.' But the
suspect says, 'I want that one, and
your money, too,' and pulls out a
knife.
When the teen said all he had
was $10, the suspect said he want-
ed only $4, DeCarlo said.
"He tells the kid to go into the
pizza parlor and get change,"
DeCarlo said. "Then the kid comes
out, he takes his $4 and he
leaves."
The teenager and his mother,
who was across the street, called
police and led officers to Mitchell,
DeCarlo said.
He couldn't say why Mitchell
wanted only $4.
- From wire reports


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KI(iw Where It Flows"
Scheduled Activities
7r;rday, September 14, Dvor.% open at 6:00 p.m.
SAVE OUR WATERS WEEK FUNDRAISER SPONSORED BY CITRUS 20/20 INC.
West Citrus Elk Lodge
Dinner at 7pm followed by "Know Where It Flows" play created by Mac Harris
and vocal & dance music provided by Debi-G. Cost: $35 per person. For ticket
purchase and more information call 527-0800 or 344-5955.
Saturday, September 15, 8 a.m.-12 noon
ADOPT-A-SHORE AND PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DIVING INSTRUCTORS
CLEANUP
Countywide, Call County Aquatic Services at 527-7620 for information.
Saturday, September 15, post-deanup
APPRECIATION COOKOUTS FOR VOLUNTEERS
East side - Lake Hernando Beach; sponsored by Apopka Marine.
West side - American Pro Diving Center; sponsored by American Pro Diving
Center.
Saturday, September 15, 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.
CRYSTAL RIVER PRESERVE STATE PARK REDFISH THEATRE REVUE
Visitors Center, N Sailboat Ave, Crystal River (off W State Park Rd).
Films: Springs Eternal. ..Florida's Fountain of Youth and Wes Skiles' Waters
Journey... The St. Johns River. Both films deal with important Florida water
issues. Call 563-0540 for information. Free.
Sunday, September 16, 1:30-6 p.m.
NATURE COAST VOLKSSPORT GUIDE HIKES. 5/10 KM HIKES.
Starting point is Fort Cooper State Park. $1 per person/S2 carload.
Call 628-4543 for information.
Monday, September 17
KAYAKING WITH MATT CLEMONS
County Boat Ramp at Pirates' Cove, Ozello.
Call 795-5650 for times and registration, or visit
http://floridakayakcompany.com/eregistration.html. $10 per person.


Tuesday, September 18, 9 a.m.-1 2 noon
HOMOSASSA RIVER SPRINGS TOUR
Start point: River Safaris; 10823 W. Yulee Dr. Homosassa Springs.
Call 628-5222 for reservations. Capacity: 30 persons. Free.
Wednesday, September 19, 6 p.m.
"OUR WATERS IN JEOPARDY"
Interactive game with local high schools competing on water issues using the
Jeopardy game format.
Jerome Multi-Purpose Room, Central Room, Central Florida Community College,
Citrus Campus, Lecanto. Public invited.
Call 527-7648 for information.
Thursday, September 20, 8 a.m.-1 2 noon
CRYSTAL RIVER SPRINGS TOUR
Start point: Fort Island Trail Park.
Call 795-4393 for reservations. Capacity- 40 persons per tour. Free.
Thursday, September 20, 8:30 a.m. and 10 a.m.
CRYSTAL RIVER ECO WATER TAXI TOUR
Start point: 3rd St. Pier (267 NW 3rd St, Crystal River).
Call 564-9197 for reservations. Capacity: 40 persons per tour. Free.
Friday, September 21, 8 a.m.
KAYAKING WITH KAYAKS & BEYOND
Launch from Hunter Springs. Kayaks will be available to use for the clean up.
Call 795-2255 for directions and registration. Free.
Saturday, September 22, 9-11 a.m. and 12 noon-2 p.m.
FORT COOPER STATE PARK AND FLORIDA PARK SERVICE - "MUCK ABOUT"
in cooperation with Academy of Environmental Science students.
Start point: Fort Cooper State Park, Inverness.
Call 726-0315 for information. Public invited.
Saturday, September 22, 4-9 p.m.
SUNSET FESTIVAL
Fort Island Trail Pier at Fort Island Trail Beach
For more information call Parrot Heads of Citrus: Jimmy Brown, 795-9090 or
422-7910. Free.


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8A MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007


Nation ' :


Shark panics NYC
beachgoers, then dies
NEW YORK - A 5-foot-long
shark scared hundreds of swim-
mers out of the water, but on
Sunday its lifeless body washed
ashore.
The thresher shark frightened
crowds at Rockaway Beach on
Saturday as it splashed along the


Long Island shore.
Although it wasn't believed to
be a threat, hundreds of swim-
mers left the water and authori-
ties closed a 10-block stretch of
beach for hours.
The fish even came ashore at
one point and several beachgo-
ers pushed it back into the water.
"It was like freaking out. Its tail
was flopping everywhere," 10-


year-old McKenzie Pontieri told
the Daily News. "It looked sick."
On Sunday morning, the dead
shark washed ashore, and
beaches in the area were
reopened.
"It is now safe to go back into
the water," said Parks
Commissioner Adrian Benepe.

- From wire reports


Afghan, U.S.-led troops


kill 25 suspected Taliban


No soldiers were

injured during

raid
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
U.S.-led coalition and Afghan
security forces aided by
airstrikes killed about 25 sus-
pected militants during raids
on a Taliban command center
in southern Afghanistan, the
coalition said Sunday
The joint force targeted
two compounds southwest of
Kandahar city late Saturday
after weeks of observing the
area, it said.
"Local residents had been
seen leaving the area for the
last few weeks and intelli-
gence has suggested that
insurgent commanders were
attempting to re-establish
their control in the area," it
said.
The clashes left 25 suspect-
ed militants dead, the coali-
tion said. No coalition or
Afghan soldiers were
injured, it added.
More than 4,200 people -
most of them insurgents -
have been killed so far this
year, according to an
Associated Press count. This
year the southern and east-
ern provinces have seen the


Associated Press
An Afghan man is seen near the wreckage of the vehicle, which
was exploded Saturday by U.S and Afghan forces in Chak district
of Wardak province, west of Kabul, Afghanistan.


worst bout of violence since
the Taliban were ousted from
power by a U.S.-led invasion
in 2001.
The surge in violence
comes despite the presence
of more than 50,000 foreign
troops and 110,000 Afghan
police and military officers.
Saturday's raid followed a
similar operation a day earli-
er in the east, where troops
killed more than 20 suspect-
ed insurgents and detained
11 others in three villages in
the remote Pitigal Valley,


close to the border with
Pakistan. They discovered a
bomb-making factory and
seized various weapons and
communication gear, the
coalition said. One coalition
soldier was injured in the
operation, it said.
A bomb attached to a bicy-
cle exploded Saturday in a
commercial district in the
northern city of Mazar-e-.
Sharif, wounding nine peo-
ple, two seriously, police
spokesman Sher Jan Durani
said.


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hospitals, homes and other facilities there may be mold spores multiplying,
and contaminating surfaces and air systems.
HEALTH COMPROMISED Ongoing sinus infections, asthma, respiratory
irritations and recurring skin rashes are some of the ways our health is put at risk
when we're exposed to unsanitary indoor environments. Absenteeism. Productivity
losses, costly structural repairs or lawsuits are a risk of destructive contaminants.
Air quality is impossible to diagnose without proper investigation, equipment,
and expertise. Often you can't see, smell or otherwise tell if anything has
compromised indoor air quality.
EFFICIENT, EFFECTIVE & ECONOMICAL Protection from these
microscopic threats doesn't have to be expensive, time-consuming or intrusive.
Inspections and treatment can be implemented with minimal disruption to the
home or facility, depending on the level of contamination.
DETECTION Samples are collected by certified mold investigation specialists
and examined by a third party laboratory for identification and analysis of signs of
mold propagation.
REMEDIATION, POST TREATMENT TESTING After remediation and
treatment, post decontamination verification tests are conducted to confirm that
the decontamination process was successful.
Lynn Associates (Mold Inspections)* Beverly Hills FL 352 746-7930 .
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additional environmental and allergen organizations.



Ray's Painting
Raymond E. Kaiser has been serving customers on the west coast
of Florida for over 30 years providing quality workmanship at a fair
price.
I meet with you to find out what your needs are and provide a
FREE written estimate of the work to be performed with NO
OBLIGATION. Customers know up front
what work will be done with no fine print
to worry about.
I offer low rates on interior painting' ' '-
whether its one room or the whole "'' '
house. We offer low rates on pressure
washing, starting at $50. I pressure wash
houses, mobile homes, pool decks, pool .
enclosures and driveways.
I offer exterior painting, pool deck .
painting, texture spraying, mobile home
painting and minor home repairs.
Next time you have a need for painting
or pressure cleaning, why not call a professional. All painting
comes with a written guarantee. Licensed and insured.
References are available upon request.
To get your FREE estimate call 621-3165.
725658


Shelly's K-9 Designs
Shelly Mileti owner of Shelly's K-9 Designs I i .
got her start from her family. As a little girl she was .
born into the business. She began her career at -
the age of 6, became a professional A.K.C.
handler at the age of 12. Since then she has - __
blossomed greatly into a profession that she ,
greatly loves. Dogs!! * -
Shelly's schooling and education includes ' >if "
many merits in complete A.K.C. Purebred and ..
all breed grooming and showing titles. . " "
Shelly is certified in complete A.K.C. purebred
grooming of all breeds. In her lifetime she has had
the honors of assisting some of the countries
biggest and best All Breed Handlers. Shelly -.
received the Prestige Honor in 1989 with Kal-Kan
Pedigree Dog Food honorable mention of top
breeder of English Springer Spaniels and did a
commercial with 18 English Springer Spaniels. Shelly also had the honor of
managing the grooming dept. of one of Northwest Michigan's biggest indoor/
outdoor kennel facilities. From there she also had the honors of an apprentice
and highly respected talk show host for a period of 18 months. From Chicago
she made her way to Citrus County and worked with some local dog grooming
businesses but hence decided what people and pets need is one-on-one
relationships with pet owners and their dog's groomer. Which is exactly what
you receive at Shelly's K-9 Designs, located at 1328 U.S. Hwy. 19, Crystal
River between SouthTrust & SunTrust banks, on the west side of the highway.
Shelly's is strictly an appointment only business. You may drop off your pet
and relax at her business or simply leave your pet in her doggie loving care for 1
1/2 to 2 hours. She believes in total quality professional care and that is exactly
what you and your pet will receive. GUARANTEED! Boutique HOURS:
Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday (Due to Dog Shows) Shelly's K-9 Design
is owner operated. 725655




Frame Designs
Known For Quality Framing & Art
Gail is getting ready to celebrate her 15th
year in Citrus County. Gail Dyer, accomplished
artist and certified picture framer, provides residents
of Citrus County with some of the most beautiful
original oils and water colors painted by herself and
other local artists. These depiction's of Florida's
natural wildlife and landscapes must be seen to be appreciated. Gail also
carries other art of different themes in her showroom and specializes in
preservation framing for your art or needlework. Come see our large
.' contemporary. New collections arriving soon. We
offer fashionable photo frames, and choose prints
from numerous catalogs, Florida prints and sports.
Featuring Florida Gators and their back to back
championships. We also carry a large selection of
prints in our gallery.
Also in stock is a selection of signed & numbered
prints of Florida artists - ex. Charles Rowe, Ben
A, Essenburg & Phil Capen. Call Frame Designs at
795-5131 for store hours and information.
Tim Tebow Located in Sweetbay Plaza in Crystal River.


PLAZA HEALTH FOODS
Hope everyone has had a -.
wonderful summer, I know it
has been a very hot one, but
it is Florida so most of us
have come to accept it.
I hope everyone remem- "
bered to take along your
Acidophilus to keep your
tummy happy & healthy . .
while traveling, especially on -
cruises.
For those of you with "Special Needs" check us out, we
have some new products you might be interested in trying.
For a nice cool treat on a hot summer day an ice cream bar
can be refreshing, try one for a Special Treat.
See you soon at the Plaza Health Foods!
Plaza Health Foods is located at
8022 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL 34429
in Pine View Plaza (Directly across from Bay Area Heating & A/C)
352-795-0911
Business Hours: 9:30-5:00 M-F * 9:30-2:00 Sat.

River Safaris & Gulf Charters, Inc.
10823 West Yulee Drive
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-5222 Fax 352-628-0122.
Voted Best of the Best for 2007!
River Safaris & Gulf Charters is
locally owned and operated by Florida
natives and Eco-Heritage Guides.
Historically narrated backwater,
Springs and Gulf of Mexico tours on
pontoon boats are available daily at n
9am, 11am, 1pm, 3pm & 5pm.
Airboats depart at the same times and
are an exciting way to view the
Homosassa backwaters and the Gulf of Mexico. There are five trips to
choose from on our six, fourteen and twenty passenger boats. Large
groups are always welcome, we offer discounts for ten or more people.
Tours for special occasions can be arranged and designed to your
requests. Pontoon & new 17 ft. Jon boats with 15 HP motors are
available for rentals either full or half days seven days a week. Our
Gallery and Gift shop displays works from many local and Florida artists.
Manatee encounters coming soon. Call us for details.
Art Event Dates: Nov. 10 & 11 - Homosassa Seafood Festival.
Nov. 16 &17 - Open House at our Gallery & Surrounding Shops.
Oct. 13 & 14 - Nature Coast Fine Art & True Craft Show.
Call us for boat tour and rental reservations and information at
(352) 628-5222, 1-800-758-FISH (3474), visit us personally
or check out our website at www.riversafaris.com. Free Alligator Exhlbit


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CITRUSS Courvry (FL) CtutONICLL NATION MONDAY. SEPrEMBFR 3, 2007 9A


Nation


Idaho wildfire
nearly surrounded
BOISE, Idaho - A wildfire that
forced the evacuation of hundreds
of expensive homes and earlier
threatened the Sun Valley ski area
was nearly 80 percent contained, a
fire manager said.
The mandatory evacuation order
was lifted Saturday for the final 100


homes, but they remained under a
voluntary evacuation order. At one
point, 2,500 homes had been under
the orders.
Democrat accuses GOP
of double standards
WASHINGTON -A GOP
leader Sunday denied a double
standard in pushing Sen. Larry
Craig to resign after a sex sting


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guilty plea, while remaining silent
over GOP Sen. David Vitter's
involvement with an escort service.
A senior Democrat said a dou-
ble standard by Republican leaders
is exactly what occurred.
Sen. John Ensign said Craig
"admitted guilt. That is a big differ-
ence between being accused of
something and actually admitting
guilt."
- From wire reports


Air traffic controllers,


FAA have a bitter dispute


Purrfect performance





























- -




Associated Press
Brianna Marciniak, of Kenmore, N.Y., competes Saturday in competition at the Talent
Showcase at the New York State Fair in Geddes, N.Y. The 6-year-old was dancing to a song
from the "Lion King".


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1 61M541


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The next
time you board an airliner and
buckle your seat belt, you are
about to fly through a bitter labor
dispute between some of the
people most responsible for
your safety in the skies.
The nation's air traffic con-
trollers and the Federal Aviation
Administration that employs
them cannot agree whether
enough qualified people are
guiding air traffic or how safe
the air space is today.
With airline travel rebounding
almost to the volume before the
Sept 11, 2001, terrorist attacks,
delays on scheduled U.S. flights
have reached a record high.
Nearly one-third of domestic
flights on major carriers were
late in June. And air traffic is
growing.
At the same time, the FAA and
the National Air Traffic
Controllers Association been
unable to agree on a new con-
tract. A year ago, the FAA
declared an impasse and
imposed a contract Since then,
the retirement of experienced
controllers has soared beyond
the agency's forecasts.
"In several places, it has creat-
ed a safety problem where con-
trollers are working 10-hour
days, 6-day weeks and working
combined positions because
they don't have enough fully
trained bodies," union
President Patrick Forrey said.
FAA figures show the number
of fully certified controllers
dropped to 11,467 in May - the
lowest in a decade the union
says. Beside them in control cen-
ters are 3,300 so-called "develop-
mental controllers" who are
being trained on the job by other
controllers. The trainees are not
yet qualified for all work assign-
ments required of fully certified
controllers.
"They are pushing the enve-
lope and somebody is going to
snap," Forrey warned. "Unless


the agency slows down the traf-
fic, someone may make a mis-
take and then are they going to
blame it on the controller?"
By contrast, FAA spokes-
woman Laura Brown said, 'This
is the safest period in aviation
history" She said the contract
allowed the agency to more eas-
ily move staff to meet the needs
of a changing airline industry.
FAA Administrator Marion
Blakey says the imposed con-
tract "is saving taxpayers $1.9 bil-
lion over five years ... to invest in
21st Century air traffic systems."
The three-year average of
fatal accidents on commercial
flights has dropped to a record
low .017 per 100,000 departures.
Fatal accidents on private
planes dropped from 354 in 2005
to a record low of 299 in 2006,
and Brown says this year is
below last year's pace.
The union says these national
figures conceal risky situations
in towers, terminal approach
and at regional control centers
where its members scan glowing
radar screens with blips repre-
senting planes loaded with pas-
sengers they need to keep mov-
ing - and keep apart.
Some of the union's examples:
* At the Cleveland en route
center, the nation's fourth
busiest facility, 29 fully certified
controllers have retired since
the contract was imposed.
Nineteen others have been pro-
moted to management and 7
have transferred, leaving 366
certified controllers.
Operational errors - in which
planes fly closer than they are
supposed to - soared to 34 this
fiscal year, with a month left,
compared to 16 in fiscal 2006.
* The Chicago en route center,
the fifth busiest facility, has lost


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40 certified controllers by retire-
ment and other reasons, leaving
360. So far, the center has record-
ed 21 operation errors for the fis-
cal year, compared to 12 the pre-
vious year
* In New York, southern
California and Charlotte, N.C.,
on-the-job training of controllers
was temporarily suspended this
summer to evaluate a rash of
errors.
* At New York's LaGuardia
airport on July 5, a trainee mis-
takenly cleared a 50-seat Comair
jet to cross a runway on which a
Delta 737 was landing at 150
mph. They missed each other by
a few hundred feet. The trainee,
supervised by a trainer, was han-
dling more than 24 planes on the
ground. A previous controller
had complained the heavy load
should be divided into two sepa-
rate positions.
The National Transportation
Safety Board is investigating the
LaGuardia incident and five
other near-misses at airports
this year. So-called runway
incursions were so frequent that
Blakey called a daylong industry
brainstorming session at the
FAA this month.
"These errors are the calling
cards of mental fatigue," said
Chicago Center controller Bryan
Zilonis, a union vice president
"The FAA is slowly burning out
their most experienced con-
trollers due to their inability to
properly staff positions at many
facilities."
At the FAA, Brown paints a
rosier picture of operational
errors. The 12 months ending
last Oct 1 saw the first drop in.
operational errors in seven
years, she said. "We're on target
to continue the reduction in
operational errors this year."


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MONDAY, SFPri-m]3FtR 3, 2007 9A.


NATION


CiTRus Coumy (FL.) CHRONICLE


wAb-














SEPF1~EMBER 3. 2007


N
~l...-.---.. -. ~ -

* 7~ - ..~


0 "The longest part of the journey is
said to be the passing of the gate."
,".' ,.* ": :. .* "* . :. :,.. -.. , V a rffo


CITRUS COUNTYY CHRONICLE


County must




move address




space needs


recently, a frustrated
Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections best summed
up the Board of County
Commissioners' inexplicable
and unpardonable dawdling
over space needs - "this is
ridiculous."
As evidenced by the county
commissioners, indecision has
adversely impacted something
as important as the efficacy and
integrity of the electoral process.
Early last year, the board of
county commissioners appoint-
ed Commissioner Dennis
Damato to address the pressing
space needs of the
county's constitu- THE I1
tional officers. A 38-
year county resi- Space
dent and respected courity
general contractor
since 1972, Com- OUR OP
missioner Damato Indecisi
diligently applied er
his recognized pro-
fessional knowl- YOUR OPII
edge and experi- .:hr,r.,: .-,:-n
once to the task. comme tt a
:Working for four ..-,ron.
months in close
cooperation with the county's
constitutional officers,
Commissioner Damato crafted a
comprehensive plan that they
have endorsed. Nonetheless, the
plan has languished on the shelf,
collecting dust for more than a
year.
-:With each passing week, coun-
it commissioners have been con-
font to endlessly engage in broad
pace needs discussions without
closely weighing the merits of
Commissioner Damato's plan or
offering any concrete alterna-
tives. As a consequence, action
on the constitutional officers'
space needs is being held
hostage to costly indecision.
: This indecision has resulted in
the Supervisor of Elections'
Space needs for the 2008 elec-
tions being addressed with a


Faster up North
The utility companies ...
When I built my house a
few years back, we
had...the only one we
could get to get. It's like a
monopoly here. I explained
to them how my wife had a
heart and diabetic condi- CALL
tion, that she needed to be P6
in contact with her doctor. 00
They didn't care. It took
almost eight weeks to
install our phone. Now we're trying
to switch over (to another company,
which) takes all our information.
The day of the installation comes to
a head and nobody shows up and
no call. Come to find out, the order
form was never put in. When I
Worked for the phone company up
North ... If I had no show, no call, I
would have been fired. Have a good
day.
Unsynched signals
Who can we talk to to get the traf-
fic signals synchronized between
Forest Ridge and Croft? Every signal
there, not only is it aggravating driv-
ing there and waiting for these
lights to change, we're sitting there
wasting gas. Cars (are) stopped in
four directions and nobody's moving
anywhere. Who can we talk to to get
that straightened out?


Band-Aid, despite specific needs
being made known in early 2006.
With their indecision exacerbat-
ing space needs concerns, coun-
ty commissioners are making it
more difficult for the county's
constitutional officers to carry
out their duties and responsibil-
ities.
Time is of the essence; the
recent calls by Commissioners
Vicki Phillips and John
Thrumston to hire a consultant
to conduct another space needs
study would only compound
problems by delaying action fur-
ther. County commissioners,
therefore, need to
SSUE: closely study and
seriously discuss
eeds of Commissioner
officials. Damato's plan and
either adopt it or
NINION: modify it.
on must In reviewing Com-
Id. missioner Damato's
plan, some perti-
ION: G.. t nent factors must be
i-..: .-r, ,., fully considered.
ut tC.,,Ji, Inverness is the
r -il'l131 county seat and the
county's constitu-


tional officers have made it clear
they want their main offices to
remain there. As a functioning
city, Inverness has the physical
infrastructure and business sup-
port network in place. Sufficient
land is available to expand local
government's existing one-stop
service capability. Infill is
preferable to the urban sprawl
that relocation would spawn.
And the city's pleasing aesthet-
ics and small town charm sym-
bolize what we are as a commu-
nity.
County commissioners need to
stop the dawdling. Decisive
action must be taken to resolve
the immediate and future space
needs of the county's constitu-
tional officers by moving for-
ward with Commissioner
Damato's plan.


Please slide door
J Regarding the Aug. 24
Sound Off call, "Holes too
small" on Boy Scout news-
paper receptacles: Shall
we waste paint to state
"Side door to open" rather
&"" than pushing those papers
through the air vent holes
579 in the doors? If holes were
07 big enough for newspa-
pers, has it occurred to
you the rain could get in?
No recyclable value at all in wet
newspapers. And this person drives
a vehicle to get there? Geez.
Get it? Hunting trip?
Gee, George Bush almost has the
White House all to himself. Rumsfeld
is gone. Karl Rove has retired. Rem-
ember "Katrina Brownie"? He got
fired. We never hear from Condi any-
more, and Alberto Gonzales has re-
signed. Even some of the Republican
senators want nothing to do with you.
Not to worry, though, George. You still
have Cheney. Just don't let him invite
you to go on a hunting trip.
Meeting schedule
In regard to the three meetings a
month: I think that makes a lot of
sense as long as the price doesn't
go up and the commissioners all
get a raise.


A conversation with God


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
FEDBI'Or RIlo B 0> * R D
i.. L . Gerry M ulligan ...............................publisher
Charlie Brennan ........................... editor
Neale Brennan ......promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart .................circulation director
" Mike Arnold .... ................. managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ......... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ............................citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthtuts publisher emeritus


Leonar
CA.


times.
"Now I know how Mother Teresa
felt," I groused, laughing to show Him
I was just kidding. Might as well have
been laughing at the moon.
I picked up the copy of Time maga-
zine from where it had fallen during
my nap, held it up so He could see the
Mother's portrait on the cover. "You
should read this," I said. "It's fascinat-
ing."
The article was about a new book,
"Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light,"
based on 66 years of her correspon-
dence. The letters reveal a startling
fact: For the last 50 years of her life,
this iconic, holy woman felt spiritually
abandoned, cut off from God. She felt
no Presence. She felt alone.
"...The silence and emptiness is so
great," she wrote in 1979, "that I look
and do not see, -Listen and do not
hear..."
"...I am told God loves me," she wrote
in an undated letter, - "and yet the
reality of darkness and coldness and


S emptiness is so great that
*\ nothing touches my soul."
"You know," I said, "you
could have given her a sign.
. r Would that have killed you?"
Nothing.
i "Answer me when I'm
talking to you!" I was morti-
fled to hear myself yelling
at Him, but I couldn't make
myself stop. "Do you have
d Pitts any idea how much easier
'ii." you make it for atheists
S::- when you act like this? It
makes their argument so
much simpler. If a woman
who had given her very life over to this
'God' couldn't get a word out of Him for
years, isn't the logical conclusion that
He does not exist? Is that really what
you want people to think?"
God drifted in the pool, silent.
"Is this a faith thing?" I asked. "Is
that it? Even though she had doubt,
she continued to minister to people in
one of the poorest places on Earth. Is
that your point? Have faith?"
The sound of a breeze playing
among the trees drew me around
sharply "Was that You?" I said.
Silence. I said, "You know you're
making me crazy here, right? I feel like
the conflicted priest from that TV
show, 'Nothing Sacred.' There was this
one episode where he gave a homily
and asked, 'Which. man is crazy, the
one who hears thunder and thinks it's
the voice of God, or the one who hears
the voice of God and thinks it's only
thunder?'"
I sighed my frustration. For a


moment, the only sound was the water
lapping in the pool. Then I said softly,
"You know, sometimes, I think atheists
have a point. When you see nothing,
when you feel nothing, isn't it logical to
conclude it's because there is noth-
ing?" I couldn't bear to look at Him as
I said this.
"I think the only reason I don't go with
them," I whispered, "is because of all
those other times when you do see ...
something. When you feel connected to
something so vast it defies comprehen-
sion. It fills you. It settles you. It gives
you peace. And you say to yourself,
'Lord, where did that come from? It
couldn't be my imagination, because I
couldn't imagine anything so... perfect"'
Still He was silent. I looked up.
"You know, this mysterious ways
thing gets a little..."
I froze. God wasn't there. God was
gone. Sitting alone under the blind
white cataract of the moon, I shivered.
Then I saw Him. He had climbed out
of the pool and was drying himself
with a towel. He had been there all
along. "Thank God," I breathed.
"I used to like that show," He said
thoughtfully.
"Huh? What show?"
"That 'Nothing Sacred.' That was a
good show. I hated when they canceled
it."
God finished drying Himself and
went into the house. It started to rain.

Write to Leonard Pitts Jr. at 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132 via e-mail at
1pitts@herald. com.


LETT" to the Editor


Founded on Christianity
I seriously doubt many readers are
interested in the Treaty of Tripoli, but
it would appear M.J. Day has run out
of options in her continuous research
with regard to our country's founda-
tion and the Christian influence there-
on (Aug. 14). At least she's dedicated.
Was there ever a question as to our
"government" not being founded on
Christianity, as referred to in Article
II of said treaty? Our country's foun-
dation is another story.
Our calendar year is based on the
birth of Christ, we live in the 21st cen-
tury after Jesus' birth, and we refer to
AD. annoo Domini or "in the year of
our Lord") and B.C. ("before Christ").
To Jamestown, Va., began the influx
of frustrated Protestants (1607) from
England; the Pilgrims at Plymouth,
Mass. (1620). Follow the Quakers to
Pennsylvania, Catholics to Maryland,
Reformed Dutch to New York,
Scottish Presbyterians, Baptists of
England, French Huguenots, Swedish
Lutherans - all escaping religious
persecution to the New World. Thus,
colonization, our Founding Fathers,
the Puritan movement that soon had
governors, general assemblies and
laws that included religious beliefs,
moral codes and an established
order.
People gathered in towns believing
uniformly - no choice of religion was
tolerated and all of the'aforemen-
tioned groups were Christian. Before
the American Revolution, there was
no such thing as atheism.
George Washington, a devout mem-
ber of the Church of England, was able
to separate his spirituality from his
political convictions. Other founding
fathers, such as John Adams and
Benjamin Franklin, were more outspo-
ken regarding separation of church
and state despite personal beliefs.
From the time the first English


'OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
M Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
" Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
" All letters must be signed and include a
rhone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
" We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonline.com.

colonists set foot on our American
soil in 1607 and through the American
Civil War (1861-1865), Christianity has
been at the forefront. Placement of
the Ten Commandments, swearing an
oath upon the Bible ("so help you
God") and marital vows speak of our
religious history even within our gov-
ernment, though now deleted through
protest.
No matter how many times and in
how many ways an opinion is stated,
facts remain just that, never to
change. Ms. Day's letters are actually
entertaining, though not necessarily
relevant to the founding of our nation
through Christianity
Joanie Welch
Inverness

Crowded bay
In response to Gene Christie of
. Beverly Hills: Mr Christie's letter
stated Kings Bay would become a


manatee museum due to the over-
whelming opposition at the Crystal
River City Council meeting to allow a
25- or 35-mph speed limit in the Bay
during the summer months.
I was at that same city council meet-
ing, and what Mr. Christie neglected to
mention was the fact that most people
favoring slow speed in Kings Bay year-
round did so for human safety as well
as manatee safety.
I was one of the proponents for a
year-round slow speed. With the many
waterways that converge into the bay
and the many watercrafts that also
converge into the bay, it is an accident
waiting to happen.
There are very few locals who even
venture out on the weekends because
it's a zoo on the bay There are boats,
Sea-Doos, tubers, skiers coming from
- all different directions into the bay
and a boater's head has to be on a
swivel to watch who's coming from
where.
If there were adequate patrolling
for recklessness, speeding, negligence
and all the other infractions that are
happening out there, maybe there
would be more opposition to year-
round slow speed on the bay. There is
no such thing in Kings Bay.
Occasionally, on a holiday weekend,
there may be a patrol boat in the bay
and on the river, but it's the excep-
tion, not the norm.
I wonder what Mr. Christie's
remarks will be when someone gets
seriously injured or, worse, killed
because of the heavy, irresponsible
traffic on the bay If things continue
the way they are going currently, it's
only a matter of time. I would hope
people with any integrity would
rather have a manatee museum
rather than the alternative - a killing
field.
Dee Atkins
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I was sitting on the deck
in a chaise lounge. God
was floating on His
back in the pool.
I pointed to the night sky,
a white disk of moon rising
magisterially into an infini-
ty of black "Nice work," I
said. God didn't answer.
'And hey, thanks for the
weather today," I said. "75
degrees, low humidity, a
nice breeze. Well done."
Still no answer. He gets in
these quiet moods some-


I


I


STOP Ll G


n



c


N

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MPINIxNo- CA.I N 313,20...07.A-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


Wallet returned
I would like to thank the per-
son who found my wallet and
returned it to the ABC Liquor in
Crystal River. Thank you. Also
thank the helpful workers at
ABC.
Raiford resident
I see in today's Chronicle that
John Couey is now a Raiford
resident of death row, and that
Couey's lawyers have already
begun the appeals process to
the Florida Supreme Court.
From what I've read in the
Chronicle, this process will take
about 10 to 12 years. Who will
pay for all this legal assistance?
Who has paid? John Q. Public.
What this really amounts to is a
lawyers' raid on the State
Treasury. The system has
already milked John Couey to
an extreme and now they're
going to milk Couey for another
10 years - or, rather, milk the
State Treasury. It's a wonderful
system if you're one of the
good-ol'-boys on public dole.
Check for gophers
I just went by those high-
lands on (U.S.) 19 where
they're clearing all that land. I
just wonder if anybody had to
check for gopher turtles in
there. There's a lot of them
around in that area...But we'd
better quit worrying about the
Amazon rainforest and worry
about the Florida trees.
Vick hearing
I don't understand why the
hearing for Michael Vick has to
be put off until December. Is
this another case of a crooked
celebrity getting a chance to
hide illegal money before he's
sentenced to jail? Boy, what a
system we have. This country
gets worse and worse all the
time.
Skip raises
Lawmakers figured out a
budget and then they're over

Airport

Transportation
637-5909


$1 billion short because they
didn't wait to see what kind of
money they were going to have
to spend, unlike the household
where you know what you've
got and you've got to live by
your means because you can't
borrow, borrow, borrow like our
government does from China.
But my suggestion is...Why not
for, like, two or three years skip
giving raises to everybody in
state government, county gov-
ernment, the teachers and
everything except the low end?
Anybody making, like, under
$12 an hour still deserves a
raise. But no matter what the
budget is, they still keep giving
everybody raises and cut every-
thing else that people needed.
So for a change they could, you
know, forgo raises for a year or


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two or maybe three until the
budget gets back right. I don't
see why they don't do that. I
mean if you're making over
$12 an hour, you're doing pret-
ty good in this state.
Subsidize drugs
In response to the editorial
on the community pharmacy
being a good idea in the
Thursday, Aug. 30 paper: I'd
like to comment that I would
think that the $300,000 neces-
sary to build a community
pharmacy - plus the cost of
maintenance, etc., in the future
- the money would be better
spent to subsidize the cost of
the drugs that can be picked
up at any pharmacy in the


I


county rather than putting that
money, and money in the
future, into maintaining anoth-
er bureaucratic building.
Hardly American
I love AT&T. I had a technical
issue yesterday with their land-
line phone and I spent two
hours on the phone with a guy
named Bob from India. Then I
spent a half an hour with a girl
named April from the
Philippines. American
Telephone & Telegraph. Gotta
love it.
Call classified
I'm looking for anyone who
would be interested in teaching
guitar lessons ...


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Editor's note: Sound Off is a
column for opinions. If you have a
job to offer, please call classified
advertising at 563-5966.
Enough pharmacies
In reference to your editorial
today on the community phar-
macy: I think we have
Walgreens and we have what
used to be an Eckerds, and
Brashears. I don't think they
need any more pharmacies in
Inverness.
Card returned
I would like to thank the per-
son who found my credit card
and turned it in to the Wal-
Mart SunTrust Bank. It's
refreshing to see this kind of
honesty, and you know who you
are. Thank you so very much.
Weekly photo
Sunday, for quite some
time, the chamber of com-
merce is pictured in the
Chronicle. When do they get
time to work? They will need
sunscreen usage to pose in the
sun weekly.
Local columns
I was wondering what hap-
pened to Dr. Gandhi's column.
I haven't seen it in several
weeks. Also, Mr. Rohan's col-
umn, who was the senior advo-
cate, I haven't seen his column.
What has happened to these
local columns? Please put a lit-
tle note in the newspaper.
Editor's note: Dr. Gandhi has
been on vacation. Dan Rohan
stopped writing for the Chronicle
several months ago.


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Letter to the
EDITOR
Delightful delivery
We had a wonderful experi-
ence at Citrus Memorial
Hospital.
I'm telling you about the
maternity ward. All of my
nurses were great! They were
very caring, knowledgeable
and family orientated. My
delivery nurse, Kathleen, was
right at my side and informa-
tive the whole time. I never
needed her because she was
always right there.
After our baby was born, it
didn't stop! Of course, I wasn't
so needy, but I was checked on
often enough. I never had to
push the "call nurse" button.
My husband and I had a
wonderful experience with all
the nurses and it was nice to
deal with people who loved
and took their jobs seriously!
Thank you to all!
Addam and Paula Miller
Inverness
Enjoyable dinner
On Aug. 11, Harry F Nesbitt-
VFW Post 10087 and the
Ladies Auxiliary hosted a very;
successful District Seven meet-
ing. Our homemade pork din-
ner was enjoyed by all. We
want to thank everyone for
their help and cooperation in
making this meeting a great
success. A good time was had
by all.
Lorraine Bleier
Beverly Hills


I


Ir


MONDAY, SFIII-1'1-'MB17R 3, 2007 IIA


OnTITiA;r-


I .


I











12A
MONDAY
SEPTEMBER 3, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Nation BRIEFS

Kisses


^ ~ ~ ~ ~ A inf^ ^7TI


NatioL p&wori


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


North Korea offers timeline


Associated 'ress
USS John C. Stennis sailor
Richard Gonzales gets a wel-
come home kiss from his dog,
Glitch, on Friday on the Delta
Pier at Naval Base Kitsap In
Bremerton, Wash.
Missing girl found
dead in mine
PHOENIX, Ariz. -A 13-year-
old girl who fell into an unmarked
mine shaft while riding an all-ter-
rain vehicle was found dead at
the bottom Sunday, and her 10-
year old sister was rescued with
serious injuries, authorities said.
The girls, 13-year-old Rikki
Howard and 10-year-old Casie
Hicks, were riding around 7 p.m.,
Saturday when their father, who
was riding ahead of them on a
dirt bike, noticed the girls were
missing.
"They were driving along and
they went into the mine. It was a
total accident," Mohave County
Sheriff's Department spokes-
woman Sandy Edwards said.
Trade, foreign policy.
top Bush's stay
WASHINGTON - President
Bush is cutting short his stay at
this year's Asia-Pacific summit,
but the fact that he's going is
meant to show he's not neglect-
ing the neighborhood.
Iraq, however, will weigh
heavily on his mind during the
Asia-Pacific Economic
Cooperation forum being held in
Sydney, Australia.
It will shadow his talks about
global warming, trade and thorny
foreign policy challenges like
North Korea with the leaders of
China, Australia, South Korea,
Japan and possibly others.
Bush will spend Tuesday
night through Saturday in
Sydney. But he is leaving a day
before the summit ends to rush
back to the White House where
advisers are scripting a report
assessing his decision earlier
this year to send 30,000 more
troops to Iraq.

World BRIEFS

Peace


Associated Press
A protestor gestures as he
climbs on a pole to which a
flag of the imprisoned Kurdish
rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan
flies, during a demonstration
Sunday In Istanbul, Turkey.
Iran reaches goal of
3,000 centrifuges
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's presi-
dent claimed Sunday that his
country is now running 3,000
centrifuges to enrich uranium for
its nuclear program, reaching an
Iranian goal that could add
momentum to efforts to impose
new U.N. sanctions on the
Islamic Republic.
The claim appeared at odds
with a report by the U.N. nuclear
watchdog on Thursday that put
the number much lower - at
close to 2,000. The International
Atomic Energy Agency said
enrichment had slowed and Iran
was cooperating with its nuclear
probe, which could fend off calls
for a third round of sanctions.
- From wire reports


Associated Press
GENEVA - North Korea
agreed Sunday to account for
and disable its atomic programs
by the end of the year, offering its
first timeline for a process long
sought by nuclear negotiators,
the chief U.S. envoy said.
Kim Gye Gwan, head of the
North Korean delegation, said
separately his country's willing-
'ness to cooperate was clear but


he mentioned no dates.
Christopher Hill, a U.S. assis-
tant secretary of state, said two
days of talks between the United
States and North Korea in
Geneva had been "very good and
very substantive" and would
help improve chances of a suc-
cessful meeting later this month
with Japan, Russia, South Korea
and China in six-nation talks
aimed at ending the North's
nuclear weapons program and


improving rela-
tions between
North Korea
and other coun-
tries.
"One thing
that we agreed
on is that the
DPRK will pro- Christopher
vide a full dec- Hill
laration of all said talks were
of their nuclear "very good".
programs and
will disable their nuclear pro-
grams by the end of this year,
2007," Hill told reporters, using
the initials for the Democratic
People's Republic of Korea.
Hill said the declaration will


also include uranium enrich-
ment programs, which the
United States fears could be
used to make nuclear weapons'.
"When we say all nuclear pro-
grams, we mean all," he said. -
He said later in response to a
question from The Associated
Press that it was the first time
that North Korea had ever
offered a timeline for declaring
and disabling its nuclear pro-
gram.
Kim said, "We agreed a lot of
things between the United
States and the DPRK We are
happy with the way the peace
talks went."
"We made it clear, we


Army crushes last of militant group
RIMi~'sr', ~ ~ .~=.E~


Assoc'aiea rres5
Lebanese residents wave the national flag as they celebrate the end of fighting Sunday in the Nahr el-Bared Palestinian refugee
camp in the northern city of Tripoli, Lebanon. Resistance by al-Qaida-inspired militants in a northern Palestinian refugee camp
collapsed Sunday, hours after a mass breakout left 39 militants dead, Lebanese security officials said, signaling an end to three
months of fighting..

Collapse ofal-Qaida-inspired fighters ends three-month siege at camp


Associated Press


MOHAMMARA, Lebanon - Lebanon's
army crushed the last remnants of a mili-
tant group in a ferocious gunbattle
Sunday that killed 39 of the fighters, end-
ing a bloody three-month siege at a
Palestinian refugee camp that was the
country's worst internal violence in years.
Nearby villages celebrated with fire-
works, drumming and dancing after the
government declared victory.
The Qaida-inspired Fatah Islam fight-
ers made their last stand by trying to
stage a dawn breakout from the Nahr el-
Bared camp, triggering the final gunbat-
tles.
The militants sneaked out through a
tunnel to an area of the camp under army
control and fought with troops. At the
same time, another group of militants
struck elsewhere to try to escape. They
were aided by outside fighters arriving in
cars, said security officials and state-run
television.
Troop reinforcements deployed close
to the camp on Lebanon's northern
Mediterranean coastline. They blocked
roads to prevent fighters from sneaking
out, residents said. Helicopters provided
aerial reconnaissance, and checkpoints


were erected as far as Beirut and south-
ern'Lebanon.
Troops hunted the militants down in
buildings, fields and roads around the
camp, residents said, and the army
launched dragnets to capture any still at
large.
Residents of nearby villages, armed
with guns and sticks, fanned out to protect
their houses and prevent the fighters
from seeking refuge and melting into the
local population, state TV reported.
Smoke billowed from fields where the
army set fires to deny militants a hiding
place.
Mohammed Khodor Najib, 65, boasted
about how he captured a militant in
Mohammara, a farming community near
the camp.
"I found one of them hiding in my gar-
den," he said. Using a hunting rifle, he
opened fire. "I hit him and handed him
over to the army."
Officials said the army killed 39 mili-
tants and captured at least 15 others. It
was not immediately known how many
militants managed to escape. By late
afternoon, only the occasional gunfire
and could be heard from Nahr el-Bared.
The army said three soldiers were
killed in Sunday's fighting and two on


LEBANON <
a/ SYRIA
1 Palestinian
,P refugee
(' / camp
/ ' U.N. zone
S.... ..... ... U N. Interim
S. .* Force in Lebanon
'ISRAEL . -"Golan Heights
SOURCE: U.N. Relief and AP
Works Agency; ESRI
Saturday, raising to 158 the number of
troops who have died in the conflict -
Lebanon's worst internal fighting since
the 1975-90 civil war. More than 20 civil-
ians and more than 60 militants have
also been killed.


Country to account for, disable

nuclear programs by end ofyear


Number of U.S. hunters steadily declines


State wildlife agencies

are worried
Associated Press

Hunters remain a powerful force in
American society, as evidenced by the
presidential candidates who routinely
pay them homage, but their ranks are
shrinking dramatically and wildlife agen-
cies worry increasingly about the loss of
sorely needed license-fee revenue.
New figures from the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service show that the number of
hunters 16 and older declined by 10 per-
cent between 1996 and 2006 - from 14
million to about 12.5 million. The drop
was most acute in New England, the
Rocky Mountains, and the Pacific states,


which lost 400,000 hunters in that span.
The primary reasons, experts say, are
the loss of hunting land to urbanization
plus a perception by many families that
they can't afford the time or costs that
hunting entails.
'To recruit new hunters, it takes hunt-
ing families," said Gregg Patterson of
Ducks Unlimited. "I was introduced to it
by my father, he was introduced to it by
his father When you have boys and girls
without a hunter in the household, it's
tough to give them the experience."
Some animal-welfare activists wel-
come the trend, noting that it coincides
with a 13 percent increase in wildlife
watching since 1996. But hunters and
state wildlife agencies, as they prepare
for the fall hunting season, say the drop is
worrisome.
"It's hunters who are the most willing


to give their own dollar for wildlife con-
servation," Patterson said.
Compounding the problem, the num-
ber of Americans who fish also has
dropped sharply - down 15 percent,
from 35.2 million in 1996 to 30 million in
2006, according to the latest version of a
national survey that the Fish and Wildlife
Service conducts every five years.
Of the 50 state wildlife agencies, most
rely on hunting and fishing license fees
for the bulk of their revenue, and only a
handful receive significant infusions
from their state's general fund.
In New Hampshire, only multiple fee
increases have enabled the Fish and
Game Department to keep revenues
robust Its ranks of registered hunters has
dropped from 83,292 in 1996 to 61,076 last
year, according to department spokes-
woman Judy Stokes.


Fewer hunters
The number of U.S. hunters
age 16 and older declined by
1.5 million from 1998 to 2006.
Hunters, age 16 and older
15 million


12

9 ..
6 -


SOURCE: U.S. Fish AP
and Wildlife Service


showed clear
willingness to
declare and
dismantle all"
nuclear faciti
'ties;" he said.
The agreed
ment is "very
significant, for Kim Gye
sure," said Gwan
Patricia Lewis, said his
director of the country's
U.N. Institute willingness to
for Disarmam- cooperate was
ent Research in clear.
Geneva, noting
that North Korea had allowed
U.N. inspectors back into the
country.


Iraqi leader

says U.S.

criticism

'signals to

terrorists'

Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq's embat-
tled prime minister defended
his government Sunday against
American critics, saying they
underestimate the problems
facing this country and fail to
appreciate his achievements
"such as stopping the civil and
sectarian war"
Criticism of Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki's leadership
has been growing in the run-
up to this month's series of
reports to, Congress on politi-
cal and security progress since
President Bush dispatched
nearly 30,000 more American,
troops to Iraq.
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton
and Sen. Carl Levin, chairman
of the Senate Armed Services
Committee, have called for al-
Maliki to be replaced.
"Regrettably these state-
ments made by U.S. officials
sometimes exceed reasonable
limits and at the same time
send regrettable messages
which help terrorists think
that the security situation in
the country is weak and the
political forces are not cohe-
sive," al-Maliki told reporters.
He added that critics are
sending "negative messages
that encourage terrorism."
During an interview broad-
cast Sunday by Iraqi state tele-
vision, U.S. Ambassador Ryan
Crocker also urged patience
with the Iraqis as they try to
reach power-sharing agree-
ments among Sunnis, Shiites
and Kurds.
'After 35 years of injustice
under Saddam Hussein, there
are some problems since libera-
tion and the problems of 40
years cannot be solved in a year
or two," Crocker said, speaking
in Arabic. "What is important is
that there is progress."
A draft report still under
review at the U.S. Embassy in
Baghdad includes allegations
that the al-Maliki government
is riddled with corruption and
has, in some cases, sought to
derail or prevent investiga-
tions into alleged graft by
Shiite-controlled agencies or
allied officials, according to
two U.S. officials familiar with
the findings.


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4d


B
gMONIDAY
SEPTEMBER 3, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Another surprise leader in PGA


Wetterich leads pack

after three rounds

at Deutsche Bank
Associated Press
NORTON, Mass. - Brett Wetterich
emerged from the pack with a 15-foot
eagle Sunday and held on for a 6-
under 66, giving him a one-shot lead
in the Deutsche Bank Championship
but no room for error.
The second straight week of these
PGA Tour Playoffs delivered a sur-
prising leader in Wetterich, who has
not been in serious contention since
March. And it looks as if it will be the


second straight week of a final round
up for grabs among an All-Star cast of
contenders.
Wetterich was at 13-under 200 and
will play in the final pairing on Labor
Day with Arron Oberholser, who had
to scramble for par after hitting into
the hazard on the 18th to shoot 66.
But of all the errors on the closing
holes, perhaps the most significant
belonged to Aaron Baddeley. He went
for the green out of the bunker and
wound up with a bogey, a shot that
enabled Tiger Woods and Phil
Mickelson to be paired in the second-
to-last group.
Woods and Mickelson played
together the first two days, and Lefty
needled him again by noting that
Butch Harmon pointed out a few
habits by the world's No. 1 player that


made Mickelson chuckle.
Mickelson scrambled brilliantly
throughout the sunny day, six times
saving par with putts in the 6-foot
range that kept his round together. He
finished with a birdie on the 18th for a
68, putting him two shots behind at
202.
Another shot behind was Woods,
the defending champion at Deutsche
Bank who is making his first start in
these playoffs. Woods was fuming as
he left the 18th green with a 67, after
three-putting the last two holes to
spoil an otherwise solid day.
But with mistakes by Wetterich,
Baddeley and Oberholser down the
stretch, he wasn't as bad off as he
thought A year ago, Woods turned a

Please see PGA/Page 5B


Associated Press
Tiger Woods watches his bunker shot sail toward the 14th green during the third
round of the Deutsche Bank Championship golf tournament on Sunday in Norton,
Mass. Woods finished 10 under par heading into today's final round.


fGators


04uFOR#v4v 0R64MS have their


bite back
She Florida Gators have some-
thing this season that I haven't
seen since the days of the '01
Ball Coach, and no, I'm not talking
about a defending national champi-
onship football team, though that
might have something to do with it.
Steve Spurriner called it a swagger.
The Gators, and their fans for that
matter, used to
walk into a stadi-
um knowing and
. - believing they
we're going to
win.
The day Urban
Meyer got hired
at Florida I
believed he was
dthe kind of coach Alan Festo
that could bring
that swagger GATOR
back, and now, in BITES
-,Ahis third year, I
believe it is.
Now I know what you're thinking...
.. they destroyed an easily overmatched
Western Kentucky team, of course
they were confident
It wasn't how they beat them that
. .- changed my opinion on how good this
team can be. It was the attitude that
4%f they did it with.
,...... .. . ... ,Meyer has recruited such great tal-
ent during the past threat years that
Associated Press even with only 10 seniors and 11 jun-
, .,E Jimmie Johnson's pit crew changes tires in an early pit stop in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Sharp Aquos 500 at the California Speedway on Sunday in Fontana, iors under scholarship this season
Calif. Johnson was leading with 50 laps remaining at press time. _- ' Michael Waltrip's car burns in turn four on the infield at the Sharp Aquos 500. (SEC average is 34 total upperclass-
"man) that I think they all come in with
. . . . a bit of a chip on their shoulders.
- Many of Florida's recruits naturally
come from some of the top high
schools in the country and are used to
competing for state championships.
Of the 25 true freshmen on Florida's
b team, 14 played for a state champi-
onship last season.
That statistic alone can change the
attitude of the team. Throw in the
, Gators' 2006 National Championship
: 4and you'll be hard pressed to find
another team as confident as Florida.
"We feel we work harder then any
team in the country," senior Andre
Caldwell said. "We have very athletic
and talented guys and we'll back
Please see . /Page 5B



Florida State's new offensive coordinator begins work


Florida
State's Drew
Weatherford
will start at
quarterback
against
Clemson and
attempt to
run new
coordinator
Jimbo
Fisher's
offense. The
two hope to
resurrect a
Seminole
football team
that has
struggled
that past
several
years.
Associated Press


Seminoles take on

Clemson at 8 p.m.
Associated Press
CLEMSON, S.C. - It's time to see
just how far Jimbo Fisher has come in
restoring Florida State's offense.
Fisher's attack gets put to the test in
one of the toughest settings imaginable
- on national TV, in sold-out Death
Valley against his boss' son's team, the
Clemson Tigers, who are equally des-
perate for victory Monday night
Fisher, the former LSU offensive
coordinator, was hired to bring the
buzz back to the 19th-ranked
Seminoles after five somewhat slug-
gish seasons under Jeff Bowden, son
of head coach Bobby
The bottom came last season when
Florida State finished 7-6 with its first
losing mark (3-5) in the Atlantic Coast
Conference. Bowden resigned and
Fisher got the call to find the old
Florida State spark.
And, oh yeah, do it by week one so
Bobby can win his first Bowden Bowl
since 2004.


"There is no pressure," Fisher
insisted. "We just have go and do what
we're supposed to do and that is play
hard, play with toughness, effort and
discipline and let the other things
take care of them."
Even the Seminole players have
bought into the idea that with Fisher
on board, the offense will return
to its same dominating ways.
"I think that's something
we've had to correct,"
Florida State quarter-
back Drew Weatherford
said. "Ultimately, it really
comes down to us and our
hard work and our effort."
Fisher is "not going to be
able to go on the field making
plays himself," Weatherford said.
But he can draw them up like few
others.
He helped LSU to the national title
in the 2003 season and molded last
spring's No. 1 NFL draft pick, quar-
terback JaMarcus Russell. The Tigers
twice won the Southeastern
Conference title with Fisher on staff.
Fisher was among four new offen-
sive coaches - offensive line coach
Rick Tricket. wideouts coach


Lawrence Dawsey and running backs
coach Dexter Carter.
For Bobby Bowden, hiring Fisher
was like adding another family
member.
Fisher, who was born in Clarksburg,
WVa., grew up watching Bobby coach
West Virginia and followed the family
his whole life.
Fisher played quarterback
for Bobby's son, Terry, at
then Salem College and
Samford.
S Fisher then joined
Terry's staff, first at
Samford and then at
Auburn, where he coached
alongside current Clemson
coach - and Terry's brother -
Tommy
Fisher "could tell you more about
Florida State than I can," Bobby said.
Weatherford says Fisher has been
more vocal and intense on the prac-
tice field so far than Jeff Bowden.
Fisher has drilled his players relent-
lessly on the tiniest details, which
Weatherford thinks will bring crisper
performances this fall.
"Little things like receivers blocking
Please see ,i." --/Page 58N





2B MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 3, 2007 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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,2BMONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007











Crn ~vr t � kr (L) HRNILE- .A-R LE GU--A EB-WMO-AY SP-EMER.,-00 3


Central Division
:t GB L10
4 - 8-2
3 5% z-5-5
4 9% z-5-5
9 17 z-5-5 '
3 20% 2-8 '


East Division
GB L10
- z-6-4
6 5-5
11% z-7-3
22 1-9
26 z-8-2

East Division
GB L10
- z-5-5
4 6-4
7% 3-7
16% z-4-6
16% z-3-7


Home
44-27
34-31
37-32
31-37
29-37


Home
37-33
43-25
37-29
33-33
36-33
31-38


Away
34-31
39-33
32-36
30-38
29-42


Away
33-32
26-42
30-37
29-42
25-43
28-39


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas




Arizona
San Diego
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Francisco


West Division
L Pct GB L10
5 .593 - 6-4
2 .541 7 z-1-9
0 .493 13% z-4-6
3 .459 18 z-7-3


West Division
L Pct GB L10
62 .551 - 4-6
61 .551 - z-7-3
65 .522 4 z-6-4
66 .515 5 6-4
75 .453 13% z-7-3


Wild Card Glance


4Amerlcani League
S Wi L Pct GB
Newv York' 76 61.555 -
Seattle 73 62.541 2
Detroit 73 64.533 3
S National Leaguec,
'', i W IL Pct GB
x-San'Diego 75 ,'61.551 -
x-Arizona 76 62.551 -
Philadelphiq 72 64.529 j
Los Angeles 71 65.522 4
x-Arizon and San Diego are tiec for
the NL West lead..

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay 8, N.Y. Yankees 2
Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 0
Toronto 6, Seattle 4
Boston 3, Baltlmore 2
Kansas City 8, Minnesota 1
Oakland 8, Ddtrot 7, 10 innings
Texas at LA. Anmels,-tate
M o'pnday's Games
Seated (F.Heriandez 10-7) at N v
Yank es6(ClImens 6-5), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland '(Sabathia 15-7) at MinnesoLa
(J.Santa.a 14-10), 2:10 p.m.
Toront (Litsch 5-6) at Boston (MatsuzaWa
13-11), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Birkins 1-1) at Tampa Bae
(Shields 10-8), 7:10 p.m.
Kajpsas City (Greinke 5-5) at Texas (Loe 6-
10), 8:05 p.m.
Oakland (Gaudin 10-9) at L.A. Angels
(Santana 5-12), 9:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Toronto at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at LA. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 2
Florida 7, Philadelphia 6
Washington 2, San Francisco 1
Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 3, Cincinnati 2 . -.
Chicago Cubs 6, Houston 5
L.A. Dodgers 5, San Diego 0
Colorado 4, Arizona 3 .
Monday's Games
Philadelphia ('Joye, 12-10 .at Aiania
(Cormier 1-4), ' -5 p m
Florida (VandenHurk 4") at Washington
(Bergmann 2-5), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Martinez 0-6) at C.ncirnali
(Harang 14-3), 1:15 p.m.
Houston (Oswalt 14-6) at M.'iauKee
(Sheets 11-4), 2;05 p.m.
Pittsburgh '(Snell 8-11) at St Louis
(K.Wells 6-15), 2:15 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 7-13) at Colorado
(Francis 14-6), 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Loaiza 1-0) at ,:r..cago
Cubs (Zambrano 14-11), 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (Maddux 10-9) at Arizona
(Owings 6-7), 4:40 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:35 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
LEAGUE LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .357;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .350; Polanc3, Detroit,
.343; Figgins, Los Angeles, .335; Lowell,
Boston, .329; VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
.329; Posada, New York, .329.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 123;
Granderson, Detroit, 104; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 102; MOrdonez, Detroit, 101;
BAbreu, New York, 101; Rios, Toronto, 98;
DOrtiz, Boston, 98.
RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 129;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 120; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 109; Lowell, Boston, 97;
Morneau, Minhesota, 96; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 96;: CPena,.'Tampa Bay, 96;
THunter, Minnesota, 96.
HITS-ISuzuki, .Seattle, 198;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 182; Jeter, New York,
175; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 168; Rios,
Toronto, 167; Polanco, Detroit, 167;
OCabrera, Los Angeles, 167.
' DOUBLES-VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
45; MOrdonez, Detroit, 44; DOrtiz, Boston,
41, THunter, Minnesota, 39; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 38; Markakis, Baltimore, 37;
AHill, To'oplo 37 ,
TRIPLELL'GCarndrson, Detroit, 21;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit,
9; Iwamura, Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera,
New York- 8- Cano New York 7; Teahen,
Kasrsas*lf ,',Z ..p;tBp.,si.rn. 7; MByrd,
lew3s - iSuzuk, Searlie. 7
HOME RUA (Relgu.' New York,
45 CPena Tampa Bay .'- Morneau,
Minnesota, 29; Konerko, Chicago, 27;
THunter, Minnesota, 27; DOrtiz, Boston, 26;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 26; Dye, Chicago, 26.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 46; BRoberts, Baltimore, 39; ISuzuki,
Seattle, 37; CPatterson, Baltimore, 36;
Figgins, Los Angeles, 34; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 29; JLugo, Boston, 28.
PITCHING (14 Decisions)-Verlander,
Detroit, 15-5, .750, 3.67; Byrd, Cleveland,
14-5, .737, 4.19; Wang, New York, 16-6,
.727, 3.79; Beckett, Boston, 16-6, .727,
3.29; Bedard, Baltimore, 13-5, .722, 3.16
STRIKEOUTS-Bedard, Baltimore,
221; JoSantana, Minnesota, 200; Kazmir,
Tampa Bay, 194; Sabathia, Cleveland,
176; Matsuzaka, Boston, 174; Shields,
Tampa Bay, 168; JVazquez, Chicago, 163.
SAVES-Borowski, Cleveland, 39; Putz,
Seattle, 37; Jenks, Chicago, 36;
FrRodriguez, Los Angeles, 33
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Holliday, Colorado, .336;
Utley, Philadelphia, .336; Renteria, Atlanta,
.336; HaRamirez, Florida, .333; DYoung,
Washington, .333; CJones, Atlanta, .326
RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 119;
HaRamirez, Florida, 106; JBReyes, New


RBI-Howard, Philadelphia, 111;
Holliday, Colorado, 106; CaLee, Houston,
104; Fielder, Milwaukee, 99; Atkins,
Colorado, 95; MiCabrera, Florida, 94
HITS-Holliday, Colorado, 180;
HaRamirez, Florida, 179; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 178; JBReyes, New York,
169; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 164
DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 44;
Uggla, Florida, 43; Utley, Philadelphia, 42;
HaRamirez, Florida, 40; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 39; AdGonzalez, San Diego,
38; CaLee, Houston, 38.
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 16;
JBReyes, New York, 11; Johnson, Atlanta,
10; Amezaga, Florida, 9; Harris, Atlanta, 8.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 40;
Howard, Philadelphia, 36; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 36; MiCabrera, Florida, 31;
Pujols, St. Louis, 30; Griffey Jr., Cincinnati,
29; CBYoung, Arizona, 28; Uggla, Florida,
28.
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New York,
74; Pierre, Los Angeles, 53; HaRamirez,
Florida, 43; Byrnes, Arizona, 39
PITCHING (14 Decisions)-Harang,
Cincinnati, 14-3, 824, 351; Penny, Los
Angeles, 14-4, .778, 2.88; Peavy, San
Diego, 16-5, .762, 2.10; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 14-5, .737, 3.50; BSheets,
Milwaukee, 11-4, .733, 3.30
STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego, 206.
Harang, Cincinnati, 174; Webb, Arizona,
170; RHill, Chicago. 159; Smoltz, Atlanta,.


159; Hamels, Philadelphia, 156,; Snell,
Pittsburgh, 151.
SAVES-Valverde, Arizona, 41;.
FCordero, Milwaukee, 39; Saito, Los
Angeles, 36; Hoffman, San Diego, 36;
BWagner, New York, 30; CCordero,
Washington, 29; Weathers, Cincinnati, 29.


Red Sox 3, Orioles 2
BOSTON - The Red Sox out-
standing rookie class has more than
just Clay Buchholz.
One day after the 23-year-old
v right-hander pitched a no-hitter in his
second major league game, Jon
Lester threw six strong innings,
Jacoby Ellsbury hit his first career
homer and Dustin Pedroia made
..another outstanding defensive play in
Boston's 3-2 win over the Baltimore
Orioles on Sunday..
"" ,, : And Hideki Okajima, a major
league rookie after 12 seasons in
. - Japan, escaped a one-out jam with
~",- .... . . - the tying run at third in the eighth by
S . striking out Kevin Millar and Aubrey
- � . -- Huff.
Jonathan Papelbon pitched the
S. - - - ninth for his 31st save in 33 chances.
, --,. -. Boston increased its lead in the AL
... -- . . -_ . , East to six games over the New York
- . - � - - .. .. Yankees, who lost to Tampa Bay.
Associated Press Pedroia went 2-for-4 Sunday and
New York Yankees' Andy Phillips, top, slides into Tampa Bay Devil 8-for-14 in the series. On Saturday,
Rays catcher Dioner Navarro, right, as he scores during fifth-inning on he made a diving stop behind sec-
Sunday at Yankee Stadium in New York. . ond base and threw out Miguel
Devil Rays 8, Yankees 2 TAMPA BAY NEW YORK Tejada for the first out in the seventh
ab rh bi ab r h bi of Buchholz's no-hitter, the first by a
NEW YORK - Carlos Pena hit a Iwmra 3b 5 12 2 Damon If 4 1 0 0 Red Sox rookie.
three-run homer to tie Tampa Bay's Crwfrd If 4 21 0 Jeter ss 5 00 0 On Sunday, he made a similar
CPenalb 4 12 3 BAbreurf 5021
single-season record and the Devil Upton cf 3 00 1 ARod 3b 3 0 0 0 play against Tike Redman for the
Rays beat New York 8-2 Sunday to DYong rf 4 02 0 Matsui dh 4 0 1 0 second out of the fifth.


send the Yankees into a pivotal
series on a sour note.
. Tampa Bay beat Andy Pettitte for
only the second time in 20 career
starts and won a series at Yankee
Stadium for the first time since
2005. It's only the Devil Rays' fourth
series win in 27 trips to the Bronx.
Bobby Abreu went 2-for-5 with an
RBI for the Yankees, who entered
.play trailing AL East-leading Boston
by five games. New York is two,
games ahead of Seattle in the wild-
card race with the Mariners coming
to town for a three-game set begin-
ning Monday.
Akinori Iwamura hit a two-run
homer one day after his bat was
confiscated, and Dioner Navarro
and Josh Wilson had solo drives for
the Devil Rays.
Pettitte was coming off a typically
brilliant August and had won 12
straight decisions against the Rays.
But Tampa Bay went in front on
B.J. Upton's sacrifice fly in the sixth,
and Pena hit his 34th homer in the
seventh to make it 5-1.


Cubs 6, Astros 5
CHICAGO - Derrek Lee drove
in three runs, including a go-ahead
two-run homer in the eighth inning,
and the NL East-leading Chicago
Cubs rallied to beat the Houston
Astros 6-5 on Sunday.
Trailing 5-4, Alfonso Soriano sin-
gled off Astros reliever Chad Quails
(6-4) and with two outs, Lee home-
red on an 0-1 pitch to left-center
field Io cap a four-run comeback by
the Cubs.
Carlos Marmol (5-1) got one out
it the.eighth inning and Ryan
Dempster pitched a perfect ninth
inning for his 25th save for the
Cubs, who remained 1�/ games
ahead of the Milwaukee Brewers in
the division.
Lance Berkman homered for the
Astros, who lost two of three to the
Cubs.


HOUSTON


ab r
Pence cf 3 1
Biggio 2b 4 0
McLmr p 0 0
Brkski p 0 0
TreMlr p 0 0
Scott rf 1 0
Brkmn lb 3 2
CaLee If 4 0
Wggntn 3b 4 1
Burke rf 3 0
Brntltt ss 3 0
Munsn c 4 0
WWIms p 2 1
Andrsn rf 1 0
Loretta ph 1 0
Qualls p 0 0



Totals 335 6
Houston
Chicago
E-Bruntlett
Houston 7, Chic
Wigginton (5), B
HR-Berkman (2
SB-Pence (9),
Theriot (24). SF-

Houston


CHICAGO
h bi ab r h bi
1 1 ASrano If 4 1 2 1
0 Theriot ss 4 1 1 1


BHarrs 2b 5 02 0 Posada c 4 0 2 0
Gomesdh 4 00 0Cano 2b 3 0 1 0
Norton dh 1 000 APhilps lb 1 1 0 0
JoWIsn ss 4 12 1 Btemitl b 1 00 0
Nvarro c 4 33 1 Giambi lb 1 0 0 0
MeCbrcf 4 02 1
Totals 38814 8 Totals ' 35 2 8 2
Tampa Bay 001 001 330- 8
New York 000 010 100- 2
E-JoWilson (14), Pettitte (1). DP-
Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 8, New
York 10. 2B-JoWilson (12), BAbreu (26),
MeCablrera (21). 3B-CPena (1), BAbreu
(5). HR-lwamura (6), CPena (34),
JoWilson (2), Navarro (7). SB-Crawford
(46), Damon (21), ARodriguez (21),
MeCabrera (12). SF-Upton.
IP H RERBBSO


5 1 1
0 1 1
3 0 0
00 0
0 00


61-3 11 5 5


Tampa Bay
Hammel W,2-4
Dohmann
Balfour
Wheeler
Glover
New York
Pettitte L,12-8


Ramirez 11-3 3 3 3 0 3
Veras 11-3 0 0 0 2 1
Hammel pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Hammel (ARodriguez), by
Hammel (APhillips).
Umpires-Home, Doug Eddings; First,
Mike Everitt; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third,
Kerwin Danley.
T-3:44. A-53,957 (56,937).


Brewers 7, Pirates 4
MILWAUKEE - Prince Fielder hit
his National League-leading 40th
home run of the season, Ryan Braun
had three hits including a homer and
the Milwaukee Brewers completed a
three-game sweep of the Pittsburgh
Pirates with a 7-4 victory on Sunday.
With the sweep, the struggling
Brewers regained momentum in the
NL Central after a recent 3-6 road
trip that included a three-game
sweep by lowly San Francisco and
two losses in three games against
division rival Chicago. It is
Milwaukee's longest winning streak
since winning four straight games
July 14-17.
Brewers starter Jeff Suppan (9-11)
won his first game since June 22
despite giving up a 4-2 lead in the fifth
inning. Francisco Cordero pitched the
ninth for his 39th save in 45 tries.
Milwaukee's Bill Hall broke a 4-4
tie in the fifth inning with an RBI
single.


0 0 DeLee lb 4 1 3 3 PITTSBURGH MILWAUKEE
0 0 ARmrz 3b 3 0 1 0 ab rh bi ab r hbi
0 0 Fontnt 2b 1 0 0 0 Morgan cf 5 11 0 Weeks 2b 4 1 0 0
0 0 CFloyd rf 2 0 0 0 McLth If 5 22 1 Hardy ss 5 2 2 0
1 2 Murton rf 1 1 1 1 FSnchz2b 5 03 0 Braun 3b 4 233
0 0 Pie cf 0 0 0 0 LaRche lb 3 00 0 Lnbrnk p 0 0 0 0
2 1 DeRosa2b 4 0 0 0 Phelps lb 2 00 0 Jenkins If 0 0 0 0
0 0 JJones cf 3 1 0 0 Nady rf 4 02 0 Fildr lb 4 1 1 2
1 1 Kendall c 3 1 0 0 JBtsta 3b 4 01 2 CHart rf 3 0 0 0
0 0 RHill p 2 0 0 0 Palino c 4 11 0 Mench If 3 1 0 1
1 0 Wuertz p 0 000 Izturis ss 4 03 1 Turnbw p 0 0 0 0
0 0 Monroe ph 0 0 0 0 Grzlny p 1 00 0 FCdero p 0 0 0 0
0 0 Wood p 0 000 Osoria p 1 00 0 DMillerc 2 000
0 0 Eyre p 0 0 0 0 Chaconp 0 00 0 JEstda c 1 0 0 0
Mrmlp 0 0 0 0 Pearce ph 1 00 0 BHall cf 3 0 1 1
Pttrsn ph 1 0 0 0 Martep 0 00 0 Suppan p 2 0 2 0
Dmpstr p 0 0 0 0 Gross ph 1 0 0 0
5 Totals 32 6 8 6 BShse p 0 0 0 0
210 020 000- 5 Cunsell 3b 1 0 0 0
001 002 12x- 6 Totals 39413 4 Totals 33 7 9 7
(7), Munson (2). LOB- Pittsburgh 110 020 000- 4
cago 10. 2B-Pence (27), Milwaukee 101 212 00x- 7
lruntlett (5), ASoriano (32). E-Gorzelanny (1), Fielder (13). DP-
27), DeLee (17), Murton (6). Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Pittsburgh 10,
Wigginton (2), Bruntlett (6), Milwaukee 7. 2B-FSanchez (39), Nady
-ASoriano. (23), Paulino (21), Izturis (12). HR-
IP H RERBBSO McLouth (11), Braun (26), Fielder (40).
SB-Weeks (16), Braun (14), Mench (3).


WWilliams 5 4 1 1 3 4
McLemore 0 0 2 1 2 0
Borkowski 1 1 0 0 0 1
TreMiller 1 1 1 1 0 1
QuallsL,6-4 1 2 2 2 0 1
Chicago
RHill 5 6 5 5 4 5
Wuertz 1 0 0 0 0 2
Wood 11-3 0 0 0 1 0
Eyre 1-3 00 0 0 0
MarmolW,5-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Dempster S,25 1 0 0 0 0 2
McLemore pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by RHill (Berkman), by WWilliams
(Kendall), by WWilliams (DeLee).
Umpires-Home, Tony Randazzo; First,
Gerry Davis; Second, Greg Gibson; Third,
Larry Vanover.
T-3:05. A-41,415 (41,160).


S-Gorzelanny.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Gorzelanny 4 6 4 3 3 5
Osoria L,0-1 2 3 3 3 1 1
Chacon 1 0 0 0 0 1
Marte 1 0 0 0 0 1
Milwaukee
SuppanW,9-11 5 9 4 2 0 4
BShouse 1 1 0 0 0 2
Linebrink 1 1 0 0 0 1
Turnbow 1 0 0 0 0 1
FCordero S,39 1 2 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Suppan (Nady), by Gorzelanny
(CHart).
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First,
Angel Hernandez; Second, Ted Barrett;
Third, James Hoye.
T-2:58. A-39,339 (41,900).


BALTIMORE


BOSTON


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Redmn cf 3 00 0 Pedroia 2b 4 2 2 0
Payton If 3 00 0 Cora ss 3 0 0 0
Mrkkis rf 4 01 0 DOrtiz dh 2 0 0 0
Tejada ss 3 11 0 Lowell 3b 2 0 1 2
Millar lb 3 01 0 JDrew rf 3 0 0 0
Huffdh 4 02 0 Yukilis lb 4 0 0 0
Mora 3b 4 01 1 Moss If 3 0 0 0
RaHrdz c 4 11 1 Crisp cf 6 0 0 0
Bynum 2b 3 00 0 Ellsbry cf 3 1 2 1
BRbrtsph 1 00 0 Cash c 3 0 0 0
Totals 322 7 2 Totals 27 3 5 3
Baltimore 000 001 100- 2
Boston 100 110 00x- 3
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Baltimore 7, Boston
6. 2B-Markakis (37), Pedroia (32). HR-
RaHernandez (7), Ellsbury (1). SB-DOrtiz
(3), Ellsbury (2). S-Cora. SF-Lowell.
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
DCabrera L,9-14 6
Leicester 11-3
JWalker 2-3
Boston
Lester W,3-0 6
Lopez 1
Okajima 1
Papelbon S,31 1


5 3 3
0 00
00 0


Lester pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Ed Rapuano; First, Ed
Hickox; Second, C.B. Bucknor; Third, Joe
West.
T-2:35. A-36,340 (36,109).


Mets 3, Braves 2
ATLANTA - Tom Glavine finally
beat his buddy John Smoltz.
'Backed by David Wright's two-run
homer, Glavine won for the first time
in four tries this season against his
longtime teammate, beating Atlanta
3-2 on Sunday as the Mets com-
pleted a three-game sweep.
New York, which dropped four
straight in Philadelphia and led the
Phillies by only two games before
this series, recovered by holding the
Braves to four runs in three games.
The Mets began the day with a
three-game lead over the Phillies in
the NL East.
The sweep dropped the Braves
7� games behind the Mets, their
largest deficit of the season. The
Braves have lost nine,of 12and and are
only 22-26 since the All-Star break.
Atlanta began the day 6% back in
the wild-card race.
Brian McCann's ninth-inning dou-
ble was the Braves' first extra-base
hit of the series.
Glavine (1-2-6) gave up five hits
and one run in six innings, with
three walks and two strikeouts.
The left-hander was 0-2 despite a
2.96 ERA in four career matchups
with Smoltz.

NEW YORK ATLANTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
JBRyesss 5 11 0 YEscbrss 4 1 1 0
LCstillo 2b 3 01 0 Diaz If 5 0 2 0
Wright 3b 4 12 2 CJones 3b 4 0 1 0
Beltran cf 3 01 0 Txeira lb 3 0 1 0
CDIgdo lb 3 00 0 Frncur rf 4 0 0 1
Alou If 3 120 AJones cf 3 0 0 0
Heilmn p 0 00 0 McCnn c 4 0 1 0
BWgnrp 0 00 0 Wdwrd pr 0 1 00
ShGren rf 4 01 0 Jhnson 2b 4 0 2 1
L Duca c 4 01 0 Smoltz p 2 0 0 0
TGIvin p 2 00 1 JuFrco ph 1 0 0 0
JSosa p 0 00 0 Mahay p 0 0 0 0
Chavez If 1 00 0 Moylan p 0 0 0 0
Orr ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 323 9 3 Totals 35 2 8 2
New York 010 020 000- 3
Atlanta 100 000 001- 2
E-Wright (18). DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-
.New York 7, Atlanta 9. 2B-Beltran (30),
McCann (34). HR-Wright (25). SB-
Beltran (19). CS-LCastillo (1). S-
LCastillo. SF-TGlavine.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
TGlavine W,12-6 6 5 1 1 3 2
JSosa 1 0 0 0 0 2
Heilman 1 1 0 0 0 1
BWagnerS,30 1 2 1 1 0 0
Atlanta
Smoltz L,12-7 7 9 3 3 2 4
Mahay 1 0 0 0 1 2
Moylan 1 0 0 0 0 0
TGlavine pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Eric Cooper; First, Andy
Fletcher, Second, Mike Reilly; Third, Jeff
Kellogg.
T-2:47. A-46,242 (49,583)


Blue Jays 6, Mariners 4
TORONTO - Matt Stairs and
Gregg Zaun each hit two-run
homers, A.J. Burnett pitched seven
sharp innings and the Toronto Blue
Jays beat slumping Seattle 6-4 on
Sunday, sending the Mariners to their
season-high ninth consecutive loss.
Seattle, which begins a three-
game series with considerable play-
off implications at the New York
Yankees on Monday, has not won
since Aug. 24 at Texas, a victory that
put the Mariners a season-high 20
games over .500.
The Mariners began the day 61%
games back of the Los Angeles
Angels in the AL West and two
games back of the Yankees in the
wild-card race.
The nine-game losing streak is
Seattle's longest since an 11-game
skid from Aug. 10-20, 2006.
Toronto has won seven of its past
10 and, at 70-66, is a season-high
four games over .500.
Burnett (8-7) retired the first ten
batters in order and struck out five
of the first six.


SEATTLE

ISuzuki cf
Vidro dh
JGillen rf
Ibanez If
Beltre 3b
Brssrd 1lb
Jhjima c
JoLpez 2b
YBtcrt ss


TORONTO
ab rhbi ab
4 000VWells cf 3
3 210 Adams 3b 3
4 11 0 Jhnson If 1
4 02 2 Rios rf 5
3 10 1 Thmasdh 3
4 01 0Thgpendh 1
3 00 1 Stairs If 3
4 01 0 Glaus 3b 0
3 00 0 Ovrbay lb 4
AHill 2b 4
Zaun c 4
JMcDId ss 4


r hbi
000
1 2 0
000
1 2 0
0 1 0
000
222
000
0 0 0
1 3 2
1 3 2
0 0 0


Totals 324 6 4 Totals 35 614 6
Seattle 000 200 110- 4
Toronto 032 000 10x- 6
DP-Seattle 2. LOB-Seattle 4, Toronto
10. 2B-Vidro (20), Stairs (24). HR-Stairs
(18), Zaun (8). SF-Johjima.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
JfWeaver L,6-11 3 8 5 5 1 1
Feierabend 3 3 0 0 1 3
RiWhite 0 1 1 1 1 0
O'Flaherty 1 1 0 0 1 1
Morrow 1 1 0 0 1 1
Toronto
Burnett W,8-7 7 4 3 3 1 7
Downs 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
Wolfe 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Janssen S,5 1 0 0 0 0 1
JfWeaver pitched to 2 batters in the 4th,
RiWhite pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Burnett (Vidro). WP-
O'Flaherty.
Umpires-Home, Tim McClelland; First,
Paul Schrieber; Second, Fieldin Culbreth;
Third, Marty Foster.
T-2:41. A-32,166 (48,900).


Marlins 7, Phillies 6
MIAMI - One thing the Florida
Marlins can do is hit home runs,
and that's how they beat the
Philadelphia Phillies on Sunday.
Florida tied a team record with
five home runs, including two by
Cody Ross and a go-ahead homer
by Hanley Ramirez, and overcame
a five-run deficit to win 7-6.
Jimmy Rollins flied out on a 3-2
pitch with the bases loaded to end
the game.
The Phillies lost their second
game in a row after winning six
straight, and fell four games behind
the first-place New York Mets in the
NL East.
The score was 5-all before
Ramirez and Dan Uggla hit back-to-
back homers off Kane Davis (0-1) to
start the seventh.
Florida's other five-homer game
was Sept. 11, 2006, against the
Mets.


PHILA FLORIDA
ab rhbi
Rollins ss 5 11 0 HaRmz ss
Iguchi 2b 5 02 0 Uggla 2b
Rosario p 0 00 0 Hrmida rf
Rmero p 0 00 0 MiCbr 3b
Burrell If 3 10 0 Jacobs lb
Howard lb 5 12 1 CRoss If
Rwand cf 5 23 1 Olivo c
Werth rf 3 01 2 Gregg p
Helms 3b 3 00 0 De aza cf
Dobbs 3b 1 00 0 Olsen p
Ruiz c 3 01 1 Barone p
Robrsn pr 0 00 0 Willis ph
Eaton p 3 11 1 Knsng p
KDavis p 0 00 0 Linden ph
Utley 2b 1 00 0 JuMIr p
Tnkrsly p
Tranor c


r h bi
1 1 1
1 1 2

110
1 2 1
1 1 0
233
000
000
000
000
000
0 0 0




000
000
000
000
0 0 0








0 1 0


Totals 37611 6 Totals 34 710 7
Philadelphia 004 100 001- 6
Florida 000 311 20x- 7
E-Howard (10), Dobbs (7), Barone (1).
DP-Florida 1. LOB-Philadelphia 13,
Florida 10. 2B-lguchi (9), Rowand (37),
Werth (9), Jacobs (20), Willis (1), Treanor
(6). 3B-Rollins (16). HR-Eaton (1),
HaRamirez (24), Uggla (28), MiCabrera
(31), CRoss 2 (10). CS-Rowand (3). S-
HaRamirez 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Eaton 6 6 5 5 1 5
KDavis L,0-1 1 3 2 2 1 0
Rosario 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Romero 2-3 0 0 0 2 0
Florida
Olsen 31-3 7 5 5 3 3
Barone 12-3 0 0 0 2 1
Kensing 1 0 0 0 1 1
JuMillerW,5-0 11-3 1 0 0 0 2
Tankersley 1-3 1 0 0 1 1
Gregg S,28 11-3 2 1 1 2 2
HBP-by Eaton (Hermida). WP-Gregg.
Umpires-Home, Rob Drake; First, Brian
Gorman; Second, Paul Nauert, Third, Chad
Fairchild.
T-3:21. A-12,334 (36,331).


White Sox 8, Indians 0
CLEVELAND - Jose Contreras
held Cleveland to four singles
pitching into the seventh inning,
and A.J. Pierzynski tied a career
high with four hits as the Chicago.
White Sox snapped the Indians'
eight-game winning streak, 8-0
Sunday.
Contreras (8-16) won consecu-
tive starts for the first time since
last September as the White Sox
broke a five-game losing streak
and won for the first time in their
last 12 road games, snapping their,
longest road losing streak since
1962.
Cleveland, which opened a 5%-
game lead over the Detroit Tigers
in the AL Central during its streak,"
fell to 13-4 since Aug. 15. On
Monday in Minnesota, the Indians
start a 10-game trip that continues.
to Los Angeles and Chicago.
Pierzynski broke an 0-for-17
slump by going 4-for-5 for the
White Sox, who tied a season-high,
with 18 hits - 17 singles and a
solo homer by Darin Erstad.
A questionable call by second-
base umpire Laz Diaz helped
Chicago take a 3-0 lead in the sec-
ond inning against Jake Westbrook.


CHICAGO

Owens cf
Pdsdnk If
Thome dh
Knerko 1lb
Erstad rf
Przyns c
AGnzlz 3b
Richar 2b


CLEVELAND


ab rhbi
4 03 2 Szmore cf
6 12 0 ACbera 2b
6 01 2 Hafner dh
4 01 0VMrtnz c
5 12 1 Garkolb.
5 14 1 JhPlta ss
4 11 0 Lofton If
4 22 0 Nixon rf


ab r hbi
3 0 0 0
3 01 0
3 01 0
3 000.
3000
4 01 0
3 01 0
3 01 0


Uribe ss 5 22 0 Blake 3b 4 00 0
Totals 43818 6 Totals 29 0 5 0
Chicago 030 101 012- 8
Cleveland 000 000 000- 0
E-Konerko (5), ACabrera (1). DP-
Chicago 2, Cleveland 1. LOB-Chicago 13,
Cleveland 9. HR-Erstad (3). SB-Owens
(23), Podsednik (10). CS-Owens (6),
Gonzalez (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
CntrrasW,8-16 62-3 4 0 0 6 5
Logan 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
Wassermann 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Jenks 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cleveland
Westbrook L,5-8 5 11 4 3 3 6
CILee 1 2 1 1 1 1
Mastny 2 3 1 1 0 2
Koplove 1 2 2 2 1 0
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First,-Chris
Guccione; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, John
Hirschbeck.
T-3:19. A-37,718 (43,415).


Cardinals 3, Reds 2
ST. LOUIS - Rick Ankiel home-
red for the second time in three
days to snap a sixth-inning tie, cap-
ping a huge weekend series by the
former pitcher in the St. Louis
Cardinals' 3-2 victory over the
Cincinnati Reds on Sunday.
Braden Looper allowed four hits
in seven scoreless innings and
Aaron Miles added an RBI double in
the sixth as the Cardinals finally
broke through against Bronson
Arroyo. Looper (12-10) is 7-1 with
an NL-best 1.74 ERA in day games
and 4-9 with a 6.52 ERA at night.
The Cardinals are 15-4 in their
last 19 games at home and swept
the Reds in St. Louis for the first
time since 2005, when they closed
the final regular season at old
Busch Stadium with three straight
from Sept. 30-Oct. 2.
. The defending World Series
champions (67-66) are above .500
for the first time since April 15, when
they were 6-5.
Jeff Keppinger's RBI single in the
eighth off Ryan Franklin, the third
straight hit by the Reds, cut the gap
to 3-1. With runners on first and
third, Franklin recovered to strike
out Ken Griffey Jr. and cleanup hit-
ter Brandon Phillips to end the
inning.
CINCINNATI ST. LOUIS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Hmiton cf 4 02 0 Eckstin ss 4 0 1 0,
Kppngrss 4 02 1 Ankiel rf 3 1 1 2.
GrfJr.rf 4 00 0 Ludwck If 3 1 20:
BPhllps 2b 4 00 0 Edmnd cf 4 0 0 0,
Dunn If 4 11 0 Duncan lb 4 0 0 0'
Httberg lb 4 030 YMolna c 0 0 0 0
Ellison pr 0 00 0 Miles 2b 4 0 1 1
EEcrcn 3b 3 00 0 GBnntt c 2 0 1 0:
Bray p 0 00 0 Cairo lb 0 0 0 0
Hopper ph 0 00 1 Looper p 3 00 0'
Ross c 2 00 0 RFrkln p 0 0 0 0
JaVItin c 2 00 0 Isrnghs p 0 0 0 0
Arroyo p 2 00 0 Ryan 3b 3 1 2 0
AIGnzlz ss 2 11 0
Totals 352 9 2 Totals 30 3 8 3.
Cincinnati 000 000 011- 2
St. Louis 000 002 10x- 3
LOB-Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 6. 2B-
Hamilton 2 (15), Hatteberg (27), Ludwick 2
(18), Miles (16). HR-Ankiel (6). SB-Ryan
(4). SF-Hopper, Ankiel.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Arroyo L,7-14 61-3 8 3 3 2 7
Bray 12-3 0 0 0 0 3
St. Louis
Looper W,12-10 7 4 0 0 0 3
RFranklin 1 3 1 1 0 2
Isrnghs S,28 1 2 1 1 0 0
WP-Arroyo.
Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First,
Chuck Meriwether; Second, Tim Timmons;
Third, Rick Reed
T-2:33 A-44,223 (43,975).


Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


Intr
12-6
10-8
10-8
6-12
7-11


Home
42-24
45-26
42-27
30-37
31-38


Home
35-30
39-29
34-34
30-41
33-35


Cleveland
Detroit
Minnesota
Kansas City
Chicago


Away
40-31
31-35
28-39
29-39
25-43


Away
41-30
33-35
35-34
30-36
27-42


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.519 - 5-5 W-2
.507 1% 4-6 W-3
.504 2 6-4 W-3
.453 9 z-5-5 L-3
.445 10 4-6 L-2
.434 11% z-4-6 L-5


Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Home
45-21
41-27
36-35
37-31



Home
41-28
40-31
37-32
39-26
33-35


Away
35-34
35-30
34-33
31-40
29-40


. MONDAY, SEPrrMBER 3, 2007 3B


CITRUS COUNY (FL) CHRONRLE


LIIK3 UU


AlAjcon ILF-kc-uE BAsiEBAi-L


a


F


I









4B MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007


U_______m_ siS. Open ter---srh q-





Williams sisters reach quarters


Associated Press

. NEW YORK - When you
.-hear about SerenaandVenus
-Williams overpowering oppo-
nents, as happened Sunday at
-,;the U.S. Open to two recent
, Grand Slam finalists, it's easy
,-to forget that the sisters are,
indeed, individuals.
And as similar as their on-
court styles might seem, all
stinging serves and gargantuan
groundstrokes, they are not
quite carbon copies.
That point was driven home
by their father and coach,
Richard, who sat courtside for
:the final game of Serena's 6-3,
.6-4 victory over Wimbledon
runner-up Marion Bartoli, then
watched Venus' 6-4, 6-2 win
.against French Open runner-
up Ana Ivanovic.
S"Serena reminds me of a pit
,'bull dog and a young Mike
..Tyson, all in one," Dad said
,'Sunday. "Venus reminds me of
a gazelle that's able to move,
prance and jump. Venus looks
as if she is really enjoying her-
self out there more than
Serena is right now. If they get
by everyone and meet each
other, it will be an interesting
match."
Another all-Williams show-
- down is indeed nearing at
.Flushing Meadows, although
unlike six previous meetings
for major titles - Serena leads
5-1 in those finals, Venus leads
7-6 overall - this one would be
a semifinal.
"That would be awesome
-because it would mean that
there is a Williams in the final,"
Venus said. She also noted:
"We have one more step."
For Serena, it's a familiar
one. She will face No. 1 Justine
Henin in the quarterfinals at a
third consecutive major, having
lost to her at the French Open
and Wimbledon.
"Yeah, we know each other
pretty well," Henin said after
beating No. 15 Dinara Safina 6-
0, 6-2 at night "I know every-
one was waiting for that match,
and here we are."
The older Williams' quarter-
final opponent will be No. 5


Venus Williams returns a volley to Ana Ivanovic at the US Open tennis tournament on Sunday in New York.


Jelena Jankovic or No. 19
Sybille Bammer.
Men's matches Sunday were
in the third round, and No. 2
Rafael Nadal advanced with-
out a hitch in his step - his
taped-up knees have been
bothering him - or his game,
beating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 7-6
(3), 6-2, 6-1.
Next up for Nadal is a fellow
Spaniard, No. 15 David Ferrer,
who was one point from defeat
before coming back to elimi-
nate 2002 Wimbledon finalist
David Nalbandian 6-3, 3-6, 4-6,
7-6 (5), 7-5 in a match that
included a 24-point game.
Nalbandian held a match
point while ahead 5-4 in the
fifth set with Ferrer serving,
but the Argentine dumped a
backhand into the net.
"I couldn't nail it down,"


Nalbandian said. "It's a pity."
Winners included No. 3
Novak Djokovic, No. 17 Carlos
Moya, No. 20 Juan Ignacio
Chela, No. 23 Juan Monaco and
unseeded Stanislas Wawrinka,
who followed up his victory
over Marat Safin by defeating
Robby Ginepri of the United
States 5-7, 6-4, 4-6,6-4, 6-3. Moya
also won in five sets, edging
Philipp Kohlschreiber 4-6, 7-5,
7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-4, while Djokovic
got past Juan Martin del Potro
6-1, 6-3, 6-4 at night.
"Hopefully I play even better
the next round," Djokovic said.
Both Williams sisters are
two-time U.S. Open champions
and both are getting in a groove
as this Grand Slam goes on, just
as Serena did en route to her
eighth major title at the
Australian Open in January,


and Venus did en route to her
sixth major title at Wimbledon
in July.
"I'm still not where I want to
be - or near," Serena said.
"But I feel like I'm doing better,
which is important."
Who needs tuneup tourna-
ments?
She pulled out of every event
in the 1V2 months since sprain-'
ing a ligament in her left
thumb at Wimbledon, and
while that hand is fine now, her
father indicated something
else is wrong.
"Serena has a few problems
that we haven't talked to no one
about," Richard Williams said,
but wouldn't elaborate. "I think
she's done a marvelous job of
hiding it. Extremely mar-
velous."
When Serena is on the court,


there's no protect
her left thumb or
else, although th
Band-Aid wrapped
toe when she walk
news conference in
Asked whether
was affecting her
Serena replied: "I v
last person to tell
case Justine or Saf
and they're like, '
what to do."'
Her two-fisted ba
off and her footwo:
at the start against
seeded Bartoli, wl
the first game and
with two aces. TI
snapped-to, break]
2, and again for a 5-
she sprinted to re
shot and swatted a
backhand winner.


"She just elevates her game
when she needs to," Bartoli
said. "She's not obviously try-
ing to play the hardest on every
point."
't , Bartoli is a tad, well, quirky.
Consider: This is the woman
' * who explained that she was
able to stun Henin in the
Wimbledon semifinals because
James Bond portrayer Pierce
Brosnan was sitting in the
stands.
She hits two-fisted forehands
and backhands, and her father-
slash-coach, a doctor by trade,
devises all sorts of original
training methods, including
taping tennis balls to the heels
of her shoes so she's forced to
stay on her toes.
That helped develop her
unusual service motion, which
actually doesn't involve much
motion at all - Bartoli stands
on her tippy-toes, feet together,
and doesn't bounce the ball
even once before tossing it.
It apparently works, though
not nearly as well as Serena's
more orthodox serve, which
produced 10 aces Sunday,
including at 120 mph and 113
mph on the final two points,
while her father clicked away
with his camera.
Associated Press "When you play against
somebody who serves like this,
ve tape on it's really hard to win the
r anywhere match," Bartoli said. "It's com-
ere was a ing really fast"
I around a Not as fast as Venus' serves,
d out of her which reached 126 mph against
[ flip-flops. the No. 5 Ivanovic.
something Venus also started somewhat
physically, slowly Sunday, facing three
vould be the break points in her opening
you, just in service game. But she saved all
ina reads it, three, and never faced another,
Uh, I know while dominating baseline
exchanges by pushing her 6-
ickhand was foot-1 frame all over the place
rk was slow as her kid sister watched in the
st the 10th- stands.
ho broke in "Obviously I want nothing
went up 2-0 but the best for her, and she
hen Serena wants nothing but the best for
ng back to 2- me - unless, of course, we're
3 lead when playing each other," Serena
*ach a drop said. "Then it's like, 'OK, I
* cross-court want to win.' That's how we
look at it."


-Ste__nhauer holes long putt to win State Farm Cla



Steinhauer holes long putt to win State Farm Classic


Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, I1. - Sherri
Steinhauer was resigned to a
playoff after her bunker shot
rolled off the green on the 72nd
hole of the LPGA State Farm
Classic.
Instead, her 23-foot par putt
from the first cut of rough fell
into the cup, capping a wild fin-
ish that handed the 44-year-old
Steinhauer her eighth career
Title and just the fifth wire-to-
wire win on the LPGA Tour this
- year
*""I was just thinking two-putt
and go for a playoff. Give it a
chance, but just two-putt and
go in the playoff and see what
will happen. It went in. It was
amazing," Steinhauer said
after her first win since the
2006 Women's British Open.
The four-time U.S. Solheim
Cup player shot a 5-under 67 to
finish at 17-under 271, holding
off a late charge by Christina
Kim at Panther Creek Country
Club.
The 23-year-old Kim closed
with a 66. She tied for the lead
briefly after holing the last of
three closing birdies, a 28-foot
"putt from the fringe on the
18th.
Playing a hole behind Kim,
:Steinhauer answered, sinking
:a 25-foot birdie putt on the par-
* 3 17th to get to 17 under.
. Steinhauer needed just a par
-on 18 to win the $195,000 top
Prize, but had to scramble after
":her second shot found the
'bunker and her sand shot went
long.
lo Kim, also second last week in
-the Safeway Classic, said she
Never doubted Steinhauer
. 'would put the victory away in
Regulation.
# "Sherri has one of the best
short games out here. I knew
,she was going to get up and
.�down. And she's made so few
*bogeys all week long, I didn't
think she would want to add
,-one on the 72nd hole," said
;Kim, also second in the 2004
'State Farm Classic.
, Steinhauer held off a pack of
-players who started the final
.'round within three strokes of
,the lead, including 2006 cham-
Spion Annika Sorenstam. The
:36-year-old Swede came from
[five shots back a year ago to
post the last of her 69 career


Associated Press
Sherri Steinhauer reacts after sinking a putt for par on the 18th green to win the LPGA State Farm
Classic golf tournament on Sunday in Springfield, III. It was her first tour title since the 2006
Women's British Open


wins.
Sorenstam pulled within a
stroke of Steinhauer after a
chip-in eagle on the par-5 13th
and a birdie on the par-4 16th,
but got no closer. Playing in her
seventh tournament since an
April neck injury, she shot a 67
Sunday to tie for third with
Rachel Hetherington (69) at 14
under.
"I played pretty good this
week," Sorenstam said. "I'm
feeling better every day and
the more I play the better I feel.
So I think overall I have a lot of
positive things to take from this
week"
Steinhauer says putting
landed her on top of the leader-
board each day of the tourna-
ment, and kept her on top to
collect the winner's trophy as
her parents watched after mak-
ing a four-hour drive from
Wisconsin.


"I tell you, there's nothing
like winning and it was just
amazing to be back on top
again. I can't describe it. I'm
just - boy, thank goodness for
my putter or I wouldn't be
here," Steinhauer said.
Angela Park (68) finished five
strokes back at 12 under.
Top-ranked Lorena Ochoa
skipped the tournament after
winning three straight events
to push her tour-leading total
to six.
Gil Morgan holds off
Hale Irwin at Pebble
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. - Gil
Morgan won his 25th career
Champions Tour title Sunday, clos-
ing with a 5-under 67 for a two-
stroke victory over Hale Irwin in the
Wal-Mart First Tee Open.
The 60-year-old Morgan won at
Pebble Beach 15 years after a dis-


appointing finish in the U.S. Open
on the historic course. In 1992,
Morgan was 12 under after seven
holes of the third round, the lowest
anyone had been in a U.S. Open,
but played the next seven holes in
9 over and ended up tying for 13th.
"Pebble Beach is finally going to
let me survive," Morgan said. "I
kept thinking, 'It's going to give me
a reprieve."'
Morgan finished with a 14-under
202 total, birdieing four of the first
six holes Sunday and adding
another on No. 16. He opened with
a 70 at Pebble Beach and shot a
65 on Saturday at Del Monte.
"I was able salvage some par
putts and I think that was the differ-
ence today," Morgan said.
The 62-year-old Irwin closed
with a 69. Irwin who began the
round tied for the lead with Morgan
and Smyth, opened with a double


bogey and missed a 3�2-foot birdie
put on the 15th hole.
"It's a long way to come back.
You just can't come back from.dou-
ble bogeys, particularly when it's
right out of the box," Irwin said. "It
was such a reverse momentum, I
knew I was in a big, big hole."
With the victory, Morgan broke a
tie with Miller Barber for third place
on the 50-and-over tour's career
list. Irwin is the leader with 45, and
Lee Trevino has 29 wins.
Tom Watson shot a 69 to finish
third at 10 under. Scott Simpson,
the 2006 winner, had a 67 to join
Des Smyth (73) and Don Pooley
(67) at 8 under. Bernhard Langer
shot a 71 to tie for 10th at 6 under
in his Champions Tour debut.
Morgan earned $300,000 from
the $2 million purse.
Champions Tour
First Tee Open Par Scores
Sunday
At Pebble Beach, Calif.
Purse: $2 million
Pebble Beach Golf Links,
6,837 yards, par: 72
Del Monte Golf Course, 6,365, par: 72
Final
Gil Morgan, $300,000
70-65-67 - 202 -14
Hale Irwin, $176,000
70-65-69 - 204 -12
Tom Watson, $144,000
67-70-69 - 206 -10
Don Pooley, $98,667
70-71-67 - 208 -8
Scott Simpson, $98,667
72-69-67 - 208 -8
Des Smyth, $98,667
71-64-73 - 208 -8
D A Weibring, $64,000
72-67-70 - 209 -7
Jay Haas, $64,000
73-65-71 - 209 -7
Joe Ozaki, $64,000
72-65-72 - 209 -7
Peter Jacobsen, $46,000
68-74-68 - 210 -6
Hugh Baiocchi, $46,000
71-70-69 - 210 -6
Bernhard Langer, $46,000
69-70-71 - 210 -6
Morris Hatalsky, $46,000
65-72-73 - 210 -6
Fuzzy Zoeller, $35,000
73-69-69 - 211 -5
Ben Crenshaw, $35,000
70-70-71 - 211 -5
Andy Bean, $35,000
75-65-71 - 211 -5
Tom Purtzer, $35,000
68-71-72 - 211 -5
Mark McNulty, $28,200
68-73-71 - 212 -4
Larry Nelson, $28,200
73-68-71 - 212 -4
Lonnie Nielsen, $28,200
68-69-75 - 212 -4
Jerry Pate, $20,700
71-72-70 - 213 -3
Tom Jenkins, $20,700
72-70-71 - 213 -3
Mark O'Meara, $20,700
73-68-72 - 213 -3


Nick Price, $20,700
71-70-72 - 213 -3
Bruce Fleisher, $20,700
70-71-72 - 213 -3
Bruce Vaughan, $20,700
65-76-72 - 213 -3
Tom Kite, $20,700
69-71-73 - 213 -3
Kirk Hanefeld, $20,700
67-73-73 - 213 -3
James Mason, $15,450
72-72-70 - 214 -2
Jim Blair, $15,450
72-69-73 - 214 -2
Craig Stadler, $15,450
68-71-75 - 214 -2
Bruce Lietzke, $15,450
73-66-75 - 214 -2
Mike Reid, $12,333
70-73-72 - 215 -1
Eduardo Romero, $12,333
69-76-70 - 215 -1
Tim Simpson, $12,333
70-73-72 - 215 -1
Dana Quigley, $12,333
68-73-74 - 215 -1
John Harris, $12,333
70-71-74 - 215 -1
Bob Gilder, $12,333
66-75-74 - 215 -1
Jay Sigel, $10,000
74-73-69 - 216 E
Kenny Knox, $10,000
76-70-70 - 216 E
Gary McCord, $10,000
71-72-73 - 216 E
Brad Bryant, $10,000
70-71-75 - 216 E
Dave Eichelberger, $8,400
73-73-71 - 217 +1
Reed Hughes, $8,400
70-76-71 - 217 +1
Keith Fergus, $8,400
73-69-75 - 217 +1
David Eger, $8,400
69-72-76 - 217 +1
Bobby Wadkins, $6,200
73-73-72 - 218 +2
Bruce Summerhays, $6,200
71-75-72 - 218 +2
Dave Stockton, $6,200
73-72-73 - 218 +2
Chip Beck, $6,200
70-73-75 - 218 +2
Danny Edwards, $6,200
72-71-75 - 218 +2
Graham Marsh, $6,200
72-70-76 - 218 +2
Wayne Grady, $6,200
69-73-76 - 218 +2
Walter Hall, $4,400
72-75-72 - 219 +3
Donnie Hammond, $4,400
71-75-73 - 219 +3
Jim Thorpe, $4,400
69-75-75 - 219 +3
Larry Rinker, $4,400
70-73-76 - 219 +3
Ed Dougherty, $4,400
73-70-76 - 219 +3
Jim Colbert, $3,600
70-76-74 - 220 +4
Denis Watson, $3,600
73-73-74 - 220 +4
John Jacobs, $3,600
72-72-76 - 220 +4
Mike McCullough, $2,900
76-73-72 - 221 +5
Wayne Levi, $2,900
73-75-73 - 221 +5
Tom Wargo, $2,900
76-70-75 - 221 +5
Mark Johnson, $2,900
70-73-78 - 221 +5


SPORTS


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE









CimusCOUNT (FL)CHRONCLE SSPOcRTSMDF B327


GOLF
Deutsche Bank
Par Scores
Sunday
At TPC Boston
Norton, Mass.
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,207 Par
Third Round


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r: 71


Brett Wetterich 66-68-66 - 200 -13
\rron Oberholser 69-66-66 - 201 -12
Phil Mickelson 70-64-68 - 202 -11
riger Woods 72-64-67 - 203 -10
Aaron Baddeley 67-66-70 - 203 -10
Angel Cabrera 70-69-65 - 204 -9
Camilo Villegas 63-72-69 - 204 -9
lason Gore 70-71-64 - 205 -8
3art Bryant 72-67-66 - 205 -8
Lucas Glover 69-70-66 - 205 -8
lohn Senden 67-71-67 - 205 -8
Steve Stricker 67-69-69 - 205 -8
Rory Sabbatini 68-67-70 - 205 -8
\dam Scott 68-72-66 - 206 -7
Briny Baird 71-68-67 - 206 -7
Sergio Garcia 67-71-68 - 206 -7
Bo Van Pelt 68-69-69 - 206 -7
Troy Matteson 71-66-69 - 206 -7
Steve Elkington 66-70-70 - 206 -7
Rich Beem 67-66-73 - 206 -7
Will MacKenzie 70-72-65 - 207 -6
Cliff Kresge 69-71-67 - 207 -6
Geoff Ogilvy 70-70-67 - 207 -6
Tom Pernice, Jr. 75-65-67 - 207 -6
Craig Kanada 67-68-72 - 207 -6
Ryuji Imada 69-66-72 - 207 -6
Mike Weir 65-68-74 - 207 -6
Boo Weekley 73-69-66 - 208 -5
Zach Johnson 68-72-68 - 208 -5
Matt Kuchar 68-72-68 - 208 -5
Charlie Wi 67-72-69 - 208 -5
Fredrik Jacobson 66-72-70 - 208 -5
Robert Allenby 69-69-70 - 208 -5
Heath Slocum 66-70-72 - 208 -5
Sean O'Hair 68-66-74 - 208 -5
Rocco Mediate 71-72-66 - 209 -4
Nathan Green 72-70-67 - 209 -4
John Mallinger 73-69-67 - 209 -4
/aughn Taylor 68-73-68 - 209 -4
rrevor Immelman 67-74-68 - 209 -4
Rod Pampling 74-67-68 - 209 -4
Woody Austin 71-68-70 - 209 -4
lonathan Byrd 69-70-70 - 209 -4
lim Furyk 68-73-69 - 210 -3
Stephen Ames 68-73-69 - 210 -3
George McNeill 71-69-70 - 210 -3
rommy Armour III 68-70-72 - 210 -3
Charles Howell III 69-69-72 - 210 -3
Ken Duke 70-72-69 - 211 -2
Kevin Na 71-71-69 - 211 -2
Doug LaBelle II 73-69-69 - 211 -2
Brian Bateman 69-72-70 - 211 -2
^had Campbell 70-70-71 - 211 -2
Joe Ogilvie 70-69-72 - 211 -2
lohn Rollins 70-69-72 - 211 -2
.uke Donald 72-66-73 - 211 -2
Ryan Moore 65-69-77 - 211 -2
leff Maggert 69-73-70 - 212 -1
Dean Wilson 70-71-71 - 212 -1
Kenny Perry 68-71-73 - 212 -1
Paul Goydos 75-67-71 - 213 E
Mark Wilson 73-68-72 - 213 E
Robert Garrigus 69-72-72 - 213 E
/ijay Singh 74-66-73 - 213 E
Steve Flesch 71-72-71 - 214 +1
Daniel Chopra 70-70-74 - 214 +1
Brian Davis 68-71-75 - 214 +1
Henrik Stenson 66-73-75 - 214 +1
3rian Gay 74-69-72 - 215 +2
Brandt Snedeker 71-72-73 - 216 +3
Jerry Kelly 71-72-73 - 216 +3
Charles Warren 69-74-73 - 216 +3
rim Herron 71-72-74 - 217 +4
lustin Leonard 72-70-75 - 217 +4
Mark Calcavecchia 72-70-77 - 219 +6
LPGA-State Farm Classic
Par Scores
Sunday
At Panther Creek Country Club


Sprinfield, Ill.
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,608 Pa
Final
(a-amateur)
Sherri Steinhauer, $195,000
67-66-71-67 - 271 -17
Christina Kim, $119,296
69-66-71-66 - 272 -16
Annika Sorenstam, $76,744
71-65-71-67 - 274 -14
Rachel Hetherington, $76,744
69-69-67-69 - 274 -14
Angela Park, $53,884
69-70-69-68 - 276 -12
Jeong Jang, $44,087
72-69-71-65 - 277 -11
Joo Mi Kim, $34,616
70-70-69-69 - 278 -10
Michele Redman, $34,616
73-69-64-72 - 278 -10
Morgan Pressel, $25,718
69-73-71-66 - 279 -9
Janice Moodie, $25,718
69-69-74-67 - 279 -9
Pat Hurst, $25,718
72-71-67-69 - 279 -9
Sophie Gustafson, $25,718
70-69-71-69 - 279 -9
Angela Stanford, $19,072
72-71-70-67 - 280 -8
Sung Ah Yim, $19,072
73-70-69-68 - 280 -8
Giulia Sergas, $19,072
73-66-73-68 - 280 -8
Catriona Matthew, $19,072
71-69-70-70 - 280 -8
Mi Hyun Kim, $19,072
70-67-73-70 - 280 -8
Jeanne Cho-Hunicke, $15,588
72-72-71-66 - 281 -7
Jin Joo Hong, $15,588
70-70-70-71 - 281 -7
Marcy Hart, $15,588
68-69-71-73 - 281 -7
Carri Wood, $13,468
72-70-72-68 - 282 -6
Lisa Fernandes, $13,468
70-72-71-69 - 282 -6
Gloria Park, $13,468
70-71-70-71 - 282 -6
Diana D'Alessio, $13,468
73-69-68-72 - 282 -6
Becky Morgan, $13,468
71-67-69-75 - 282 -6
Mikaela Parmlid, $11,116
71-70-75-67 - 283 -5
Clarissa Childs, $11,116
74-68-72-69 - 283 -5
Kate Golden, $11,116
69-71-74-69 - 283 -5
Yeon Joo Lee, $11,116
72-69-72-70 - 283 -5
Moira Dunn, $11,116
70-70-73-70 - 283 -5
a-Stacy Lewis
71-71-69-72 - 283 -5
Dina Ammaccapane, $9,275
72-71-71-70 - 284 -4
Reilley Rankin, $9,275
77-67-69-71 - 284 -4
Yu Ping Lin, $9,275
70-73-70-71 - 284 -4
II Mi Chung, $9,275
71-71-71-71 - 284 -4
Meaghan Francella, $7,408
73-71-74-67 - 285 -3
Young Kim, $7,408
74-70-71-70 - 285 -3
Karen Stupples, $7,408
71-69-75-70 - 285 -3
Seon Hwa Lee, $7,408
70-73-71-71 - 285 -3
Na On Min, $7,408
72-70-72-71 - 285 -3
Lee Ann Walker-Cooper, $7,408
70-71-71-73 - 285 -3
* Leanna Wicks, $7,408
73-67-72-73 - 285 -3


ar: 72


l(.o if I iIthe


il>
- S. 'K.


Is


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Washington Nationals
1 p.m. (TBS) Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta Braves
4 p.m. (WGN) Los Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Devil Rays
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
1 p.m. (47 FAM) Edmonton Eskimos at Calgary Stampeders
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Texas Tech at Southern Methodist
8 p.m. (ESPN) Florida State at Clemson
GOLF
2 p.m. (2,8 NBC) Deutsche Bank Championship - Final Round
U.S. OPEN TENNIS
11 a.m. (6,10 CBS) Men's & Women's Fourth Rd.
12:30 p.m. (10 CBS) Men's & Women's Fourth Rd.
7 p.m. (USA) U.S. Open Tennis Round of 16
9 p.m. (CNBC) U.S. Open Tennis Round of 16
10 p.m. (CNBC) U.S. Open Tennis Round of 16


In-Kyung Kim, $5,787
74-70-72-70 - 286 -2
Soo Young Moon, $5,787
71-71-74-70 - 286 -2
Johanna Head, $5,787
72-72-70-72 - 286 -2
Beth Bader, $5,787
70-72-71-73 - 286 -2
Jane Park, $5,787
73-66-72-75 - 286 -2
Karine Icher, $4,781
72-70-78-67 - 287 -1
Jill McGill, $4,781
72-72-73-70 - 287 -1
Leta Lindley, $4,781
69-71-77-70 - 287 -1
Meena Lee, $4,781
71-73-72-71 - 287 -1
Sun Young Yoo, $4,781
71-68-71-77 - 287 -1
Kristy McPherson, $3,854
73-71-74-70 - 288 E
Amy Hung, $3,854
72-70-76-70 - 288 E
Sophie Giquel, $3,854
73-71-71-73 - 288 E
Veronica Zorzi, $3,854
71-71-73-73 - 288 E
Kim Saiki-Maloney, $3,854
72-69-74-73 - 288 E
Karrie Webb, $3,854
72-70-72-74 - 288 E
Virada Nirapathpongporn, $3,854
72-69-73-74 - 288 E
Kelli Kuehne, $3,854
73-71-69-75 - 288 E
Allison Hanna-Williams, $3,233
72-69-75-73 - 289 +1
Kim Hall, $3,233
71-71-73-74 - 289 +1
Kristina Tucker, $3,037
72-72-76-70 - 290 +2
Aram Cho, $3,037
74-70-74-72 - 290 +2
Kris Tamulis, $3,037
73-70-74-73 - 290 +2
Beth Allen, $3,037
70-71-75-74 - 290 +2
Heather Daly-Donofrio, $2,809
73-70-77-71 - 291 +3
Silvia Cavalleri, $2,809
73-69-78-71 - 291 +3
Sarah Huarte, $2,809
73-70-76-72 - 291 +3
Sarah Lynn Sargent, $2,646
70-73-81-68 - 292 +4
Alena Sharp, $2,646
72-70-74-76 - 292 +4
Erica Blasberg, $2,563
73-71-77-72 - 293 +5
Jin Young Pak, $2,563
71-67-78-77 - 293 +5
Vicki Goetze-Ackerman, $2,514
73-69-76-76 - 294 +6

MLB

Athletics 8, Tigers 7,
10 Innings
DETROIT OAKLAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Maybin cf 4 00 0 ShStwrt If 5 0 1 0
TPerezlf 1 00 0 Swishercf 4 0 1 1
Planco 2b 5 22 0 Cust rf 3 0 0 0
Raburn rf 5 11 1 Piazza dh 5 0 1 0
MOrdzdh 3100 DJnson lb 5 1 1 0
Thmes If 4 133 Ellis 2b 3 3 1 0
Grndsn If 1 01 0 Hnnhn 3b 5 1 3 3
Hssmn lb 4 00 0 Scutaro ss 4 2 2 0
CGillen lb 0 00 0 Suzuki c 4 1 2 4
Rabelo c 5 11 1
IRdrgzc 0 00 0
Inge 3b 4 10 0
RSntgo ss 5 03 2
Totals 41711 7 Totals 38 812 8
Detroit 200 050 000 0- 7
Oakland 000 020 302 1- 8
DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 10,
Oakland 8. 2B-Raburn (10), Thames 2
(12), Granderson (36), RSantiago 2 (2),
Hannahan (5). 3B-RSantiago (1). HR-
Suzuki (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Robertson 6 4 2 2 1 5
Rodney 1-3 4 3 3 1 0
Byrdak 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Zumaya 11-3 0 0 0 0 0
TJones 1 3 2 2 2 0
Bazardo L,0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0
Oakland
Braden 42-3 9 6 6 2 3
RLugo 11-3 1 1 1 2 2
Lewis 1 0 0 0 0 2
ABrown 11-3 0 0 0 1 2
Marshall 0 1 0 0 0 0
Casilla 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Street W,4-2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Bazardo pitched to 2 batters in the 10th,
Marshall pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-TJones, Braden.
Umpires-Home, Larry Poncino; First,
Bruce Dreckman; Second, Jerry Meals;
Royals 8, Twins 1


KANSAS CITY MINNESOTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DJesus cf 4 11 2 Tyner If 4 0 0 0
GrdzIn 2b 4 01 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 1 0
Gload lb - 5 02 1 THnter cf 4 0 0 0
MiSwy dh 501 0 Mrneau dh 4 000
Gordon 3b 5222 Cddyerrf 2 000
Costa rf 5 230 Rdmnd c 3 1 1 0
Buck c 5 23 2 GJones lb 3 0 3 0
Gthrght lf 5 11 1 LRdrgz 3b 2 0 0 1
TPena ss 4020 Punto 2b 2 01 0
Bscher3b 1 000
Totals 42816 8 Totals 29 1 6 1
Kansas City 051 000 002- 8
Minnesota 000 0 000 010- 1
E-DePaula (1). DP-Kansas City 2,
Minnesota 1. LOB-Kansas City 9,
Minnesota 3. 2B-DeJesus (29), Costa
(5), TPena (21). HR-Gordon 2 (14), Buck
(17). CS-Bartlett (3). SF-LRodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Bnnster W,12-7 8 6 1 1 0 1
Soria 1 0 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
BonserL,6-12 12-3 7 5 5 0 0
DePaula 31-3 4 1 1 0 1
Cali 21-3 3 0 0 2 1
Neshek 12-3 2 2 2 0 0


HBP-by Bannister (Cuddyer).
Umpires-Home, Jim Joyce; First,
James Hoye; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Tim
Tschida.
Nationals 2, Giants 1
SAN FRAN WASHINGTON


RDavis cf
Vizquel ss
Winn rf
Feliz 3b
Aurilia lb
DRbrts pr
BWilsn p
Ortmr If
Rdrgez c
Frndsn 2b
Zito p
Bonds ph
Walker p
Klesko lb


ab rhbi
4 01 0 Logan cf
4 00 0 FLopez ss
3 00 0 Zmrmn 3b
4 00 0 DYong lb
4 12 1 Kearns rf
0 00 0 WPenaIlf
0 00 0 Blliard 2b
4 01 0 Schndrc
3 00 0 Chico p
3 02 0 Rivera p
2 00 0 Church ph
1 00 0 CCrdro p
0 00 0
0 00 0


ab r h bi
4 0 1 1
4 1 1 0
3 0 1 1
3 0000


3 000
3 0000
3 1 1 0
2 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 000
0 0 0 0


Totals 321 6 1 Totals 28 2 4 2
San Francisco 000 010 000- 1
Washington 001 000 001- 2
One out when winning run scored.
E-Feliz (11). DP-San Francisco 2.
LOB-San Francisco 5, Washington 3.
2B-Aurilia (17), FLopez (23). 3B-Logan
(3). HR-Aurilia (5). SB-RDavis (17).
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Zito 7 2 1 1 1 5
Walker 1 0 0 0 1 2
BWilson L,1-1 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
Washington
Chico 7 4 1 1 1 3
Rivera 1 1 0 0 0 0
CCordero W,3-3 1 1 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Hunter Wendelstedt;
First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Randy
Marsh; Third, Bob Davidson.
Dodgers 5, Padres 0
LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Furcal ss 4 13 0 BGiles rf 4 0 1 0
Pierre cf 4 11 0 Blum 2b 3 0 1 0
Kemp rf 5 23 1 MCmrn cf 3 0 0 0
JKent2b 4 01 1 AdGnIz lb 4 0 1 0
RMrtnz 2b 1 10 0 KGreen ss 4 0 2 0
Ethier If 4 01 1 Ensbrg 3b 4 0 0 0
Martin c 5 00 0 Sledge If 4 0 00
Loney lb 3022 Barrett c 3 0 1 0
LaRche3b 2000 0Grmnop 2 000
Blngsly p 4 00 0 KCmrn p 0 0 0 0
Prctr p 0 00 0 Thtcher p 0 0 0 0
Beimel p 0 00 0 Hmpsn p 0 0 0 0
Brxtn p 000 0 Mckwk ph 0 000
RoHrdz p 0000 Ldzma p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36511 5 Totals 31 0 6 0
Los Angeles 000 001 400- 5
San Diego 000 000 000- 0
E-KCameron (2). DP-Los Angeles 2,
San Diego 2. LOB-Los Angeles 10, San
Diego 7. 2B-Loney 2 (13), AdGonzalez (39).
SB-Furcal 3 (16), Kemp (8): S-Pierre.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Blngsly W,10-4 7 4 0 0 1 9
Proctor 0 1 0 0 1 0
Beimel 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
Broxton 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
RoHernandez 1 1 0 0 0 0
San Diego
Germano L,7-8 6 8 1 1 3 5
KCameron 0 2 4 1 1 0
Thatcher 1 1 0 0 1 0
Hampson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ledezma 1 0 0 0 0 1
Proctor pitched to 2 batters in the 8th,
KCameron pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Rockies 4, Diamondbacks 3
COLORADO ARIZONA
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Tveras cf
KMtsui 2b
Holiday If
Helton lb
Hawpe rf
Tlowzki ss
Stewart 3b
Corpas p
Trralba c
Fogg p
Sllivan ph
Hwkins p
Fentes p
Carroll 3b


4 11 0 CBYng cf
3 100 OHudsn 2b
4 22 2 Byrnes If
3 00 0 TClark lb
200 1 Drew ss
4 00 0 Rynlds3b
4 02 1 CSnydr c
0 00 0 Bnfacio pr
4 00 0 Pena p
2 00 0 Upton rf
1 00 0 Webb p
0 00 0 Pguero p
0 00 0 Slaten p
0 00 0 CJcksn ph
Hmck c


4010
4 220
5 001
5 1 2 1
4 02 1
4000
1 000
0 000
0000
4 020
3000
0000
0000
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0


Totals 314 5 4 Totals 35 310 3
Colorado 301 000 000- 4
Arizona 200 000 100- 3
DP-Colorado 1. LOB-Colorado 4,
Arizona 10. 2B-Stewart (3), Upton (5).
3B-OHudson (8), TClark (1). HR-Holliday
(25). SB-Taveras (30). SF-Hawpe.
IP H RERBBSO


Colorado
Fogg W,8-9
Hawkins
Fuentes
Corpas S,12
Arizona
Webb L,14-10
Peguero
Slaten
Pena


7 5 4 4 2
1-3 0 0 0 0
2-3 00 0 0
1 0 0 0 0


BITE
Continued from Page 1B

down from no challenge."
Now just because they have
confidence, doesn't mean they
won't lose a game, maybe even
two. In fact, if they defense
plays like it did against the
Hilltoppers you can almost
guarantee a couple of loses.
The pass rush was almost
non-existent without blitzing
and there must have been half
a dozen missed tackles. That
being said, with nine new
starters on defense there is
bound to be a small learning
curve; they have until Sept. 15
to get it fixed.
Defensive problems aside,
the team played with the atti-
tude, energy and flare of all the


STATE
Continued from Page 1B

down field, runners running
much harder, quarterbacks
making better decisions,"
Weatherford said. "I feel like
we're capable of making a lot
more big plays."
That's something that's been
absent from Florida. State's
repertoire the past few seasons
against Clemson.
After Bobby's Seminoles
took the first four meetings of
the father-son matchup,
Tommy's Tigers have rallied
back to win three of the past
four. A season ago, it was
Clemson making the biggest
plays with James Davis follow-



PGA

Continued from Page 1B

three-shot deficit into a two-
shot victory over Vijay Singh.
This one doesn't figure to be
a duel, not with a dozen play-
ers within five shots of
Wetterich's lead.
The playoffs got off to a
rousing start last week at The
Barclays, which featured 10
players within three shots of
the lead along the back nine of
Westchester until Steve
Stricker birdied the last three
holes for the victory.
This could be more of the
same.
U.S. Open champion Angel
Cabrera eagled the last hole
for a 65 to reach 9-under 204,
while Stricker made a 60-foot
eagle on the 18th hole that
swirled all the way around the
cup and gave him a 69, putting
him in the group at 205.
Wetterich, one of the most
powerful players in golf,
made the Ryder Cup last
year as a rookie and turned
heads recently when he
earned a spot in the Skins
Game. But he is capable of
explosive stretches, and he
showed that Sunday by twice
giving himself eagle putts,
one on the 298-yard fourth
hole. He only made one, at
the par-5 seventh, but it pro-
pelled him into the lead and
he never gave it back.
"If I go out and shoot 5
under like I did today, it's


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great Florida teams of the mid-
90s that Meyer said he loved to
watch.
When the Gators go on the
road this season expect the
insults to fly, the crowds to be
loud and if they should fall, the
goal posts to come down.
Even at home, the Gators
cocky play caused Western
Kentucky to lose their heads.
Twice quarterback Tim Tebow
took cheap shots while running
out of bounds.
"He got a piece of me, I think
that was the hardest hit of the
game," Tebow joked of the
shove he received from the
Hilltoppers' Cody Hughes on
the sideline.
It wasn't because they were
down by four touchdowns;
rather they got tired of seeing
Florida show off. The Gators
averaged almost 10 yards a

ing up a 47-yard run with a 1-
yard TD plunge with 8 seconds
left in the Tigers 27-20 win.
It was Clemson's first win in
Tallahassee in 17 years.
The Seminoles managed
only 44 points in their three
losses to Clemson since 2003.
The Tigers defense is a "real
sound scheme," Bobby
Bowden said. "They've got
enough variation to it that it's
hard to predict what they're
going to do. That last couple of
years, they've whipped us up
front pretty good."
A big reason, Clemson defen-
sive coordinator Vic Koenning
says, was all-American and
first-round NFL draft choice
Gaines Adams.
This group will look to Ricky
Sapp and Kevin Alexander, two


going to be hard to beat me,
unless someone really plays a
good round of golf,"
Wetterich said. "I'm going to
go out and try to make the
best score that I can. And if
someone catches me and
beats me, then they did."
His biggest shot might have
been for a par.
Wetterich drove into the
trees right of the fairway on
No. 5 and had to drop a half-
dozen times, from the hazard
line, then the cart path, then a
rubber mat covering some tel-
evision cables. The ball finally
back in play, he hit 5-iron from
220 yards to 5 feet and made
the putt.
"I got myself out of a pretty
big jam there," he said. "From
there on, I got myself out of
trouble and didn't get in any
more trouble, and made a few
birdie putts. And it resulted in
a good score."
There's a big jam behind
him, however, and there's
probably where the largest
crowds will be.
Mickelson finished two
shots better than Woods over
the first two rounds, when
Vijay Singh joined them based
on playoff rankings.
He later revealed that he
found the secret to playing
better against his longtime
nemesis.
Lefty now works with
Harmon - Woods' first swing
coach - and says Harmon told
him to look for nuances about
Woods. Mickelson didn't say
what they were, only that they
made him laugh.


snap and over 20 yards per
pass completion.
Tebow wasn't visually enthu-
siastic after big plays, but don't
think for one minute that the
other SEC teams forgot about
Tebow's emotional celebra-
tions from last season.
Everyone will be looking to get
a shot on Florida's poster boy
So even though Meyer's
Gators probably won't repeat
like Billy Donovan's 2007
squad, expect them to have
something else in common.
An arrogance that will make
them not only one of the best
teams in the country, but also
one of the most hated.


Alan Festo,
a Chronicle sportswriter,
can be reached at
afesto@chronicleonline. com.

sophomores, to get the same
push off the corner that Adams
did. They'll also have to deal
with Fisher's complex forma-
tions.
"He has a package with
every personnel grouping
there is," Koenning said of
Fisher "I just hope he doesn't
have the full ensemble of plays
we've seen LSU run. That will
really make a hard night out of
it."
Weatherford expects
Fisher's fluctuating formations
will keep opponents guessing
- and crank up the Seminoles.
"He's got great vision and
great instinct for what defenses
are going to do," Weatherford
said.
"He takes the tendencies
and attacks them."


"He (Harmon) told me a cou-
ple things that he likes to do,
and I was kind of watching for
it, and I chuckled throughout
the round when I'd pick up on
it," Mickelson said after the
second round. "I think that
working with Butch has really
helped me understand how to
get my best golf when I play in
the same group as Tiger. And
I'm hoping I have a chance to
do that on Monday."
He gets that chance, even
though both have chasing to
do.
Woods was tied for the lead
for about two minutes after
jump-starting his round with a
30-foot birdie putt on No. 8,
followed by two straight
birdies from about 20 feet to
reach 10 under. About that
time, Wetterich reached the
600-yard seventh hole in two
shots and made the 15-foot
eagle to take command.
Woods added another birdie
on the 12th, but his work was
undone with a three-putt
bogey from about 50 feet on
the 17th, and having to settle
for par after three-putting the
18th from the other side of the
green.
"Instead of being two or
three back, I'll be five or six
back," Woods said. "I'm going
to have to actually shoot a
really low round tomorrow,
and hopefully, it will be
enough."
A few mistakes by the guys
behind him might have helped
him out. But like everyone
else, it figures to be a mad
scramble on Monday.


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MONDAY, SrPTFMBI-R 3, 2007 513


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6B MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007


-~ ~Basketball Rc-:..


Americans win


FIBA title


James scores U.S.

record 31 points
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS - LeBron
James and Carmelo Anthony
finally earned the reward that
used to await U.S. players.
James scored 31 points, most
by an American player in an
Olympic qualifier, and the
United States capped its domi-
nance in the desert by beating
Argentina 118-81 on Sunday to
win the FIBA Americas cham-
pionship.
Then James and Anthony
climbed the podium and were
given gold medals - a first for
the two players whose interna-
tional careers had consisted of
nothing but bronze.
"I'm tired of bronze,"
Anthony said. "I'm speechless
right now. This is my first time
ever winning the gold medal."
Dwight Howard made all
seven of his shots and scored 20
points, and Anthony added 16
points for the Americans, who
were never challenged while
winning 10 games in 12 days
and will head to Beijing next
summer as one of the favorites.
The Americans averaged
116.7 points in the tournament
The game was largely mean-
ingless, because both teams
had already clinched spots in
the Beijing field by winning
semifinal games Saturday. But
the Americans didn't let up,


Associated Press
United States' LeBron James goes up for a dunk against Argentina during the first quarter of a
FIBA Americas Championship gold medal basketball game on Sunday at the Thomas & Mack
Center in Las Vegas.


remaining perfect in four
Olympic qualifiers, including
7-0 against Argentina.
James and Anthony played
on teams that finished third in
the 2004 Olympics and '06
world championships. The lat-
ter disappointment forced the
Americans to play in the qual-
ifying tournament this sum-


mer, but it proved to be just a
minor roadblock.
"I learned that players can
throw their egos and personal
accolades out the window,"
James said. "We came here for
one reason and that was to get
the gold medal."
James finished the tourna-
ment shooting 76 percent from


the field - his percentage
actually dropped from 76.5
after he made 11 of 15 shots.
He was 8-of-ll from 3-point
range - another U.S. record
- and also led the tourna-
ment in that category, hitting
62 percent.
"You don't like to single guys
out, but LeBron's performance


today was one of the best ones
in an international game that
a U.S. player has had," U.S.
coach Mike Krzyzewski said.
"He was big-time today."
The game was close for 6
minutes before the United
States blew it open with an 18-
0 run. The Americans scored
the final 15 points of the first
quarter, then Chauncey
Billups opened the second
with a 3-pointer for a 38-14
lead.
At one point in the second,
the Americans scored five con-
secutive baskets on dunks -
three by Howard and two by
James, with each having one
set up by Kobe Bryant, who
had a quiet scoring night but
had eight assists. When
Howard dunked with 4:58
remaining to push the lead to
51-21, the United States had 16
assists on 18 field goals.
The Americans led 59-34 at
halftime after shooting 57 per-
cent. They averaged 59.7
points in the first half during
the tournament, and their
closest lead at the break was
14 points.
"We have the depth, we have
the talent to be able to keep
that foot on the gas the entire
game and just not turn it on
and off," Bryant said.
James then hit four 3-point-
ers in the third on his way to
passing Anthony and Allen
Iverson, who had both scored
28 points in an Olympic quali-
fying game.
Tournament MVP Luis


Scola had 23 points for
Argentina (8-2), which lost
twice to the Americans. He led
a team lacking its normal fire-
power to a spot in the
Olympics, and now turns his
attention to making his NBA
debut next month for the
Houston Rockets.
Without Manu Ginobili,
Fabricio Oberto, Andres
Nocioni and Walter
Herrmann, the defending
Olympic champions didn't
have nearly enough to keep up
with the Americans here. The
United States won 91-76 on
Thursday in a second-round
game that was never close
after the opening minutes.
But the Argentina players
didn't seem to disappointed,
smiling and waving to their
fans who sang and danced
throughout the awards cere-
mony.
"This team for the USA is
one of the best USA teams,"
Argentina coach Sergio
Hernandez said. "Of course
nobody forgets the first Dream
Team with Michael Jordan,
Magic Johnson and Larry
Bird, but I like this USA team
so much.
"They play so hard. They
have great players like
LeBron James and Kobe
Bryant, but they play together
so well and they play great
defense. It is a pleasure to
play against them."
Puerto Rico beat Brazil 111-
107 earlier Sunday in the
third-place game.


Shock beat Fever, 77-63, tie series at one


Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
The Detroit Shock always
make things hard on them-
selves.
Luckily for Bill Laimbeer's
team, they have the talent to
pull it off.
The defending WNBA
champs got 24 points from
Deanna Nolan and evened the
Eastern Conference finals at 1-
1 with a 77-63 win over the
Indiana Fever on Sunday.
The Shock are 6-0 when fac-
ing elimination in the past two
postseasons, and will look to
make it 7-0 in the series finale
at home Monday night
"We love playing with our
backs against the wall," said
Nolan, who had 15 points in the
second quarter. "That's when
our energy gets going."
Detroit won its second-round
series in three games last sea-
son, then won the last two


games of the finals to beat
Sacramento. This year, they lost
Game 1 iri New York by 20
before winning the next two
games at home.
"We played all year to make
sure that we'd get to play tomor-
row's game at home," Laimbeer
said. "This team has heart and
a strong will, and they're also a
pretty good basketball team.
We've done what we've sup-
posed to do - win our home
games."
Detroit had five players in
double figures, including Swin
Cash, who had 12 points and
nine rebounds after being
benched for a poor effort in
Game 1.
"Swin knows that when she's
not at the right mental level, I'm
not going to play her, and that's
what happened in Game 1,"
Laimbeer said. "Tonight, she
set the tone with her energy
and focus."
Laimbeer also benched Cash


Detroit Shock's Katie Smith, left, tries to draw a
Indiana Fever's Tamika Whitmore (91) during the first
WNBA playoff basketball game on Sunday in Auburn H


last year in the WNBA finals,
and she responded that time as
well.
"Some games are better than


others, but my team
really supportive,"
"They just kept tell
aggressive, and th


did."
Most importantly for Detroit,
facing two must-win games in
29 hours, All-Star Cheryl Ford
was only forced to play 22 min-
utes on a bad knee.
"That was big," Laimbeer
said. "I wanted to buy her as
much time for tomorrow as pos-
sible."
Anna DeForge led Indiana,
scoring 13 points against her
former team. Tamika Whitmo'e
' had 12, but only two in the sec-
ond half, and Tamika Catchings
finished with just seven.
"We knew this wasn't going to
be easy," Indiana coach Brian
Winters said. "They are the
champions until someone beats
Associated Press them, and we knew they would
foul against play a much better game today
half of their than Game 1."
Hills, Mich. Indiana led 20-16 after one
mates were quarter, but had no answers for
Cash said. Nolan or Detroit's zone defense
ing me to be in the second.
at's what I Nolan hit all five of her shots


in the quarter, and the Fever
managed just four field goals
while looking confused by the
Shock's defense.
"We have to play better
against the zone in Game 3,"
Winters said.
"When we miss shots against
that zone, it lets them get out
and run, and when Nolan gets
space, she's so fast that she's
going to hurt you."
That let Detroit"take a 41-32'
lead into intermission despite
13 turnovers.
Cash didn't score in the first
half, but had three baskets
early in the third quarter as
Detroit opened an 18-point lead
midway through the period.
Detroit led 68-47 going into
the fourth quarter, but Indiana
got within 71-59 before their
rally stalled.
Catchings was called for a
flagrant foul for knocking
down Pierson late in the third
quarter.


Kanaan wins Detroit Grand Prix, Danica finishes second


Associated Press

DETROIT - Tony Kanaan
was doubly lucky, Danica
Patrick had her best finish and
the IndyCar Series is headed
for a wild finale after Sunday's
Detroit Indy Grand Prix.
Kanaan stayed on the track
during a late series of pit stops
and remained ahead of a last-
lap melee to claim his series-
best sixth victory of the season
and 12th of his career
The Brazilian, who has won
three of the last four series
races, kept his championship
hopes alive heading into next
Sunday's series finale at
Chicagoland Speedway in
Joliet, Ill.
"It was a weird race," Kanaan
said. "The yellow came out at
the right time, so it was good to
stay in the front"
The crash, which started
when Buddy Rice ran out of
fuel with seconds to go, collect-
ed series points leader Scott
Dixon and Kanaan's Andretti
Green Racing teammate, Dario
Franchitti.
AGR co-owner Michael
Andretti told a TV crew he
thought Dixon intentionally
collected Franchitti, a charge
the Scot dismissed.
"How would that be inten-
tional?" Dixon said. "If I'd have
kept going I would've picked
up five points on the guy
"I had no control of the car. It
was spun out"
Rice took responsibility for
the crash after the race and
Franchitti didn't seem to think
Dixon was trying to keep him
from getting ahead.
"Some people think it was
intentional," the Indianapolis


-... I,.


Associated Press
Danica Patrick, left, and Tony Kanaan spray each other with champagne on the podium after the Detroit Grand Prix on Belle Isle auto
race on Sunday in Detroit. Patrick earned her first career second-place finish and Kanaan won the race.


500 champion said. "Scott has
raced me clean all year and I
have raced him cleanly"
Despite the crash, which
dropped Franchitti from fourth
to sixth, he ended the day three
points ahead of Dixon. Kanaan,
39 points behind his teammate,
remains mathematically alive
in the championship hunt
Dixon, who won Aug. 26 at
Sonoma, Calif., and had the
points lead after a dominant
Franchitti collied with Marco
Andretti, was eighth. This is the


second consecutive year and
third time in series history that
the points lead has changed
hands with both two and one
race left on the schedule.
Kanaan chose to stay on the
track while most of the field
pitted after a late-race caution
and was in front when IndyCar
officials declared the race
would be a timed event.
Officials set the time limit of
the race at 2 hours, 10 minutes
or 90 laps and informed crews
at the race's 2-hour mark that


the timing rules were in place.
The race ended a lap short of
the scheduled 90 and the final-
lap crash came seconds before
the scheduled end.
It was the first time a race
was ended by the clock since
June 4. 2006. in Watkins Glen.
N.Y.
Kanaan said his crew
assured him he would make it.
"They gave me a number and
I was making better fuel
mileage than they asked me,"
he said. "I trust my guys and I


knew I had the fuel to make it."
Polesitter Helio Castroneves
and Tomas Scheckter struck
the turn 1 wall on lap 67 to
bring out a full-course yellow
and bunch the field.
Franchitti, who assumed the
lead after Castroneves' pit stop
on lap 25, led Kanaan for most
of the middle stretch of the
race, but lost the lead during a
lap-49 stop.
The first yellow flag came on
lap 27 when Ed Carpenter
stalled near turn eight.


Patrick, Vitor Meira, Sam
Hornish and Sarah Fisher tan-
gled during a lap-31 incident
that knocked the latter thfee
cars out of the race. Hornish
was hit by Fisher and
appeared to injure his wrist
His hand was covered with
an ice bag after he got out of
the damaged car.
Scott Sharp, who ran into
Darren Manning early in the
race, struck Patrick and hit a
turn-eight tire barrier on lap 47
to bring out a third caution.
Carpenter stalled again on lap
55 to bring out a brief yellow.
Patrick stayed on the track
and led briefly before .a round
of stops dropped her back into
the middle of the pack. She was
far behind the lead quartet
when Rice, Dixon and
Franchitti crashed and got past
the wreckage to claim the sec-
ond spot.
"Sometimes you think you're
in and sometimes you think
you're out of it, and that's how
it was today," Patrick said. "To
be able to take home a second
when it looked like a fifth - it
just justifies all those moments
when you say, 'Why me?'"
Castroneves, who won the
last two races held here before
the event took a six-year hiatus,
led the first 25 laps but pitted
five laps after most of the field.
He ended the day 12th with his
fifth DNF of the season.
He had words with
Scheckter as he made his way
back to his trailer from the
course medical center
The track was shortened
since the last time the series ran
here and widened in areas to
allow more passing - a gripe of
fans and teams.


SPORTS


-- Onus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE










MONDAY
SEPTEMBER 3, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


Entertain in ti


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE===

Pitt says he, Jolie are
ready for fifth child
VENICE, Italy - Brad Pitt
and his partner Angelina
Jolie are ready for another
child, the
actor said
Sunday as he
was promot-
ing his new
film.
Pitt and
Jolie, with
children in
Brad Pitt tow, were in
Venice to talk
about his film on Western out-
law Jesse James. The movie is
competing for the top Golden
Lion award at the city's film
festival.
Pitt and Jolie already have
four children including a 15-
month-old girl, Shiloh, born to
the couple. Jolie has also
adopted three children close
in age from Cambodia,
Ethiopia and Vietnam.

Usher, Foster hold
wedding ceremony
ATLANTA- Usher and
Tameka Foster wed in a
large, glitzy ceremony
Saturday after exchanging
vows a few weeks ago in a
civil ceremony, a magazine
reported.
About 200
people
attended the
dream wed-
ding of the
i Grammy-win-
SningR&B
singer and his
Usher new wife,
she heldat a 16th-
century-style
French chateau resort on
3,500 hilly acres outside
Atlanta, People.com reported.
Guests dined in the ball-
room and ate from a five-
tiered white-chocolate-cov-
ered wedding cake created by
the same bakery that recently
did actress Eva Longoria's
confection.

Woody Allen feels he
is not influential
VENICE, Italy - Oscar-
winning director Woody Allen
does not believe he has influ-
enced other filmmakers.
Asked Sunday if his
decades of
work had left
a mark, the
71-year-old
New Yorker
S insisted that
as far as he
could tell, it
has not
Woody "Oddly
Allen enough, over
the years I've
never felt that
I have influenced anyone," he
said.
"I don't mean that to sound
like false modesty, but I could
always feel the influence of
my contemporaries - Martin
Scorsese, Francis Ford
Coppola, Robert Altman,
Steven Spielberg - but I
have never seen my influence
on anyone."

Bobby Brown seeks
custody of daughter
SANTA ANA, Calif. -
Bobby Brown went to court
Friday to seek custody of his
and Whitney
Houston's
teenage
daughter.
Brown and
his attorney
asked Orange
Superior
Bobby Court to dis-
Brown miss a default
judgment
issued in December that
granted Houston sole custody
of 14-year-old Bobbi Kristina.
Brown wasn't given enough
time to
Houston's
divorce fil-
ings, his attor-
ney StacyD.
Phillips said.


U, Judge
_L _M Claudia
Whitney Silbar
Houston ordered
Brown and
Houston to argue their case at
an Oct 22 hearing before she
decides who will get custody


- From wire reports


Studios enjoy blockbuster summer


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Hollywood lived its
own second-chance "Rocky" story this
summer as a business that looked to be
going down for the count two years ago
rebounded with record revenue and an
unparalleled string of blockbuster hits.
The movie industry had its first $4 bil-
lion summer and will finish with a haul of
about $4.15 billion from the first weekend
in May through Labor Day, according to
box-office tracker Media By Numbers.
That was up 8 percent from last summer
and surpassed the previous high of $3.95
billion in summer 2004.
Hollywood did not set a movie atten-
dance record, though. Factoring in annual
rises in admission prices, about 606 mil-
lion tickets were sold this summer, up 3
percent from 2006. But the season was
only the sixth-best for modern Hollywood,
whose biggest summer for attendance
since the golden age of the 1930s, '40s and
'50s came in 2002, when 653.4 million tick-
ets were sold, according to Media By
Numbers.
Still, it was a sharp turnaround from
summer 2005, when attendance plunged
11.5 percent compared to the previous
summer and critics predicted the movie
industry would continue to decline as con-
sumers turned to home theaters, video
games and other entertainment choices.
"Everyone should be very happy with
the result The movie industry is alive and
well, in comparison to maybe what was
being said a few years ago," said Rory
Bruer, head of distribution for Sony, which
started the summer with a record-break-
ing $151.1 million opening weekend for
"Spider-Man 3" and also, released
"Superbad," which is on its way to becom-
ing a $100 million hit
"Spider-Man 3" was quickly followed by


DreamWorks Animation's "Shrek the
Third" and Disney's "Pirates of the
Caribbean: At World's End," the third
installments in those three franchises all
shooting past $300 million domestically.
It was the first summer ever to start with
three such huge blockbusters, yet
Hollywood lost momentum in June. The
month had hits with Universal's "Knocked
Up'.' and 20th Century Fox's "Live Free or
Die Hard" and "Fantastic Four: Rise of
the Silver Surfer."
Though packing in solid audiences, the
star-studded Warner Bros. sequel "Ocean's
Thirteen" and Universal's "Evan
Almighty," a follow-up to the blockbuster
"Bruce Almighty," failed to live up to their
predecessors, contributing to a soft box-
office month.
Then Disney's "Ratatouille,"
Paramount's "Transformers" and
Warner's "Harry Potter and the Order of
the Phoenix" reignited movie fever.
Quickly following were hits such as
Universal's "The Bourne Ultimatum,"
New Line's "Hairspray" and "Rush Hour
3" and 20th Century Fox's "The Simpsons
Movie," providing a surge to the second
half of summer, when the movie business
usually slows down as fall approaches.
While there were a couple of box-office
underachievers, Hollywood was conspicu-
ously free of outright bombs this summer,
unlike two years ago, when the season was
littered with flops such as "The Island,"
"Stealth" and "The Bad News Bears."
"It's a tribute to the fact that we as a col-
lective group paid attention to the audi-
ence and made sure that what we put out
was satisfying," said Chris Aronson, senior
vice president of distribution for 20th
Century Fox. "At the end of the day, it says
that if it's good, they're going to come. The
demise of the movie business is very pre-
mature. It's a healthy business as long as


the quality of the movies is there."
For the full year, movie revenues are up
7 percent and attendance has risen 2.5
percent compared to last year.
But the movie business is fickle, and
that momentum could falter through the
fall and holidays, when the film schedule
is unusually barren of big franchise flicks.
The one major sequel is "National
Treasure: Book of Secrets," but that does
not come out until late December. If
Hollywood hopes to maintain its strong
year, audiences will have to turn out in big
numbers for such original films as Johnny
Depp's musical "Sweeney Todd," Nicole
Kidman and Daniel Craig's fantasy "The
Golden Compass" and Denzel Washington
and Russell Crowe's crime drama
'"American Gangster."
"Look how important sequels were to
summer of 2007. If we're counting on that
for the fall and holiday season, we're going
to be out of luck," said Paul
Dergarabedian, president of Media By
Numbers. "It's going to be about originali-
ty having to win out over franchise films."
Originality certainly had its place over
the summer, with such R-rated comedies
as "Knocked Up" and "Superbad." Both
came from the same creative team, with
Judd Apatow ("The 40-Year-Old Virgin")
directing "Knocked Up" and producing
"Superbad."
Apatow has found big-screen success
with the sort of smart comedy that failed
on television, as networks quickly pulled
the plug on his critically acclaimed shows
"Freaks and Geeks" and "Undeclared."
"It makes me feel like I was not crazy for
yelling and crying at everybody when
those shows got canceled," Apatow said.
"I'm always happy to have these films do
well enough that they'll just let me make
another one. So everything else is gravy."


MATT SLAGLE
Associated Press

"BioShock" is indeed shock-
ing, just not in the way you might
expect It's a rare first-person
shooter that transcends the
genre's action and forces players
to think about what they're
doing, and why.
Taking down foes like a "Big
Daddy" is hard enough; dealing
with this game's moral dilemma
can be an even greater chal-
lenge.
"BioShock" (Rated M, $59.99
for Xbox 360, $49.99 for
Windows) begins with a jolt as
you find yourself the sole sur-
vivor of a plane crash in the mid-
dle of the ocean. Flaming wreck-
age burns in all but one direc-
tion, and it's here you see a
gleaming tower in the midst of
the floating destruction.
The sheen of this game's art-
deco magnificence quickly gives
way to dread upon entering the
tower and riding a bathysphere
into the depths of a grand under-
sea city called Rapture.
This is no mythical Atlantis,
however Rapture is a devastat-
ed place, an anarchist's social
scientific experiment turned
into a seeping urban dystopia.
And it's filled with rival packs
of genetically mutated freaks
and all other sorts of horrors.
The denizens are split
between Splicers, vile former
humans who've amped them-
selves up on too many gene-
altering chemicals; and Little
Sisters and Big Daddies.
It's the former foe who you'll
encounter the most, almost to a
fault by the game's conclusion.
The latter duo, however, share
a special bond that represents


Rockstar's
'Manhunt 2' returns
When the Entertainment Software
Rating Board slapped an AO (adults
only) rating on Rockstar Games'
"Manhunt 2" in June, it meant that
we'd never see the game in all its
gory glory. Console makers won't
approve AO-rated titles, and most
national retail chains won't sell them.
But Rockstar, reeling from the
decision to move its "Grand Theft
Auto IV" to next spring, needed
something on the shelves this holi-
day season, so "Manhunt 2" has
been edited and resubmitted to the
rating board. And this time it
escaped with an M (for mature) -
still raunchy but not likely to be
banned. It will be out in November.
"'Manhunt 2' is important to us,
and we're glad it can finally be
appreciated as a gaming experi-
ence," said Rockstar founder Sam
Houser. He wouldn't say how the


. - * .:
Associated Press
This image, provided by publisher Take-Two Interactive Software Inc., shows a player fighting Little
Sister and Big Daddy characters in the new video game "Bioshork."


some of the game's most thrilling
moments. Big Daddies are clad
in metal diving suits that shake
Rapture's infrastructure as they
plod around. They are extreme-
ly difficult to eliminate and given
to quick bursts of speed.
Little Sisters, meanwhile, are
young girls with a bioengineered
curse: within them is a sub-
stance called Adam, and it's the
lifeblood of a growing arsenal of
genetic powers you'll obtain.
So the question becomes, do
you kill the girl and harvest
more Adam, or do let her live
and extract far less? It may not
seem like a huge philosophical
dilemma, but these are heady
issues for a video game.
Regardless of your decision,
"BioShock" is loaded with com-


bat and opportunities for cre-
ative decision making. You could
kill that pack of Splicers stand-
ing in a pool of water with a pis-
tol, but then again, it's far more
efficient to shoot electricity from
your left hand and zap them all
at once.
Likewise, you could ignore the
broken robots lying around, or
you could hack them, turning
them into powerful allies that fly
around and shoot enemies on
sight
So what will you do in
Rapture? It all boils down to
how you want to play. There's
ample flexibility in the game's
linear story line that makes a
second run through Rapture's
unique brand of madness an
exciting prospect


- - - - -
Associated Press
This image from the game "Manhunt 2" was provided by its pub-
lisher, Rockstar Games. "Manhunt 2" will make it to stores in an
edited, presumably less gory version.


game was edited to get the rating.
Arm wrestling
arcade game removed
I've broken a few controllers in my
day, but I've never had a video
game send me to the hospital. But in
Japan, three people broke their


arms while playing "Arm Spirit," an
arcade game in which the player
arm-wrestles with a mechanical
appendage. Distributor Atlus Co.
withdrew 150 machines after the
incidents became known.
"The machine isn't that strong,
much less so than a muscular man.


And you'll find yourself pon-
dering the notion of "self-
improvement" with genetic
mutations that give you electric-
ity, fire and other super powers
through the ingestion of "Gene
Tonics" and "Plasmids."
"BioShock" is a gamer's
dream, but it's not particularly
hard. The lack of any real death
penalty exacerbates the issue:
losing your life simply means
you respawn nearby and contin-
ue fighting.
But so rare is a quality title
like "BioShock," so compelling
is its story, that you'll hardly
notice. It's been a while now
since I solved the mystery that is
"BioShock," but I still can't get it
out of my mind.
Four stars out of four



Even women should be able to beat
it," said Atlus spokeswoman Ayano
Sakiyama.
New in stores
Each of the three console makers
has an A-list title coming out:
Nintendo's "Metroid Prime 3:
Corruption" (for the Wii), Microsoft's
"Blue Dragon" (for the Xbox 360)
and Sony's "Warhawk" (for the
PlayStation 3). ... Still, EA Sports
could outsell them with "Tiger
Woods PGA Tour 08" (most plat-
forms). ... THQ appeals to speed
freaks with "Stuntman Ignition" (for
the 360, PS2) and "MotoGP '07"
(for the 360), while Namco Bandai
chases anime fans with "Naruto:
Ultimate Ninja Heroes" (for the
PSP) and "Dynasty Warriors:
Gundam" (for the 360 and PS3)....
And D3 reaches out to the zombie
audience with "Dead Head Fred"
(for the PSP).


Florida
-, e,',& ,= ....*. -.--* ,\ ... . = " ei
f� ;. . * ..�: :*'~ h' " I. __ ,,�.�.�


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Sunday in
the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
0-3-5
PLAY 4
4-8-1-7
FANTASY 5
14 - 16 - 19 - 23 - 25.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
Cash 3: 3-8- 4
Play 4: 9 - 7 - 1 - 6
Lotto: 4 - 5 - 16 - 25 - 27 - 37
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 172 $2,441.50
4-of-6 5,719 $59.50
3-of-6 109,692 $4
Fantasy 5: 1 - 6 - 26 - 28 - 32
5-of-5 1 winner $277,762.17
4-of-5 310 $144.50
3-of-5 10,667 $11.50
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31
Cash 3:0-9-2
Play 4: 6 - 5- 3 - 8
Fantasy 5: 4 - 18 - 28 - 33 - 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 330 $907
3-of-5 9,911 $11.50
Mega Money: 17 - 22 - 27 - 31
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB 2 winners $2 million
4-of-4 10 $2,728.50
3-of-4 MB 104 $573.50
3-of-4 1,872 $95
2-of-4 MB 2,957 $42

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
E To verity the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.corn; by telephone, call (850)
487.7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Monday, Sept. 3, the
246th day of 2007. There are 119
days left in the year. This is Labor
Day.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 3, 1783, the Treaty of
Paris between the United States
and Great Britain officially ended
the Revolutionary War.
On this date:
In 1939, Britain, France, Australia
and New Zealand declared war on
Germany, two days after the Nazi
invasion of Poland.
'In 1943, the British 8th Army
invaded Italy during World War II,
the same day Italy signed a secret,
armistice with the Allies.
In 1967, motorists in Sweden
began driving on the right-hand
side of the road instead of the left.
In 1967, the original version of
the television game show "What's
My Line?" broadcast its final
episode after more than 17 years
on CBS.
Ten years ago: Arizona Gov.
Fife Symington was convicted of
lying to get millions in loans to
shore up his collapsing real estate
empire.
Five years ago: Defense
Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld
said the Bush administration had
secret information supporting its
claims that Saddam Hussein was
close to developing nuclear
weapons.
One year ago: Authorities
announced the capture of al-Qaida
in Iraq's No. 2 leader, Hamed
Jumaa Farid al-Saeedi, accusing
him of "brutal and merciless" terror
operations.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Helen Wagner ("As the World
Turns") is 89. "Beetle Bailey" car-
toonist Mort Walker is 84. Country
singer Hank Thompson is 82.
Actress Anne Jackson is 81.
Country singer Tompall Glaser is
74. Actress Pauline Collins is 67.
Rock singer-musician Al Jardine is.
65. Actress Valerie Perrine is 64.
Rock musician Donald Brewer
(Grand Funk Railroad) is 59. Rock
guitarist Steve Jones (The Sex
Pistols) is 52. Rock singer-musi-
cian Todd Lewis is 42. Actor
Costas Mandylor is 42. Actor
Charlie Sheen is 42. Singer
Jennifer Paige is 34. Actor Nick
Wechsler is 29.
Thought for Today: "Nothing is
so useless as a general maxim." -
Thomas Macaulay, English histori-
an (1800-1859).


REMEMBER WHEN
* For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.


- From wire reports


B


SVideo Game REVIEW-


'BioShock' shocks the senses in surprising way


w


Short


16









MONDAY, SEPTEMmER 3, 2007 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 3, 2007 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon 1: Comcast, Inglis
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c B D I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

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4 4,(2003)3227932Raven'Y7' Raven'G' Derek'G' _ Montana 'G'
AL 39 68 39 39 Murder, She Wrote (In Murder, She Wrote (In Murder, She Wrote (In Murder, She Wrote (In Murder, She Wrote (In Murder, She Wrote "Night
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____ _ ____ Robin Williams. 9 7535951 Conchords cI 53382628' Madison Square Garden. (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' 451796
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"Bandidas" (2005) 9 981501 Wilson. c 111280 389512 Harold Ramis. 1E 1942280
) 97 6697 97 Life of Ryan The Real The Real Newport The Hills The Hills The Hills The Hills The Hills (N) Life of Ryan The Real IThe Real
7 6- 9- 97 WorldT'PG Wor'P d'PG Harb. 'PG'595086 'PG'574593 'PG'.294970 'PG'372222 646319 (N) World'PG' World'PG'
71 Dog Whisperer'G' Dog Whisperer'G' Dog Whisperer'G' Dog Whisperer 'G' Dog Whisperer Aggressive Dog Whisperer'G'
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PLEX 62 Movie: "AuthorlAuthorl" Movie: **"TheVey Thoughtof Movie: ** "Splitting Heirs" (1993) Movie: *** "The Truth About Cats "While-
(1982)64666661 You"(1999) 2748319 Rick Moranis. 2104048 and Dogs" (1996) 3318262 Sleeping"

S 43 42 43 43 Mad Money 3850845 Big Mac: Inside the Fast Money 3205749 U.S. Open Tennis Round U.S. Open Tennis Round Mad Money 6985951
- - __McDonald's Empire of 16.3300393 of 16.2827770
(CN 40 29 40 40 Lou Dobbs Tonight 9 The Situation Room To Be Announced 513339 Larry King Live 'PG' c Anderson Cooper 360 'PG' 310357
U 25 55 25 25 World's Wildest Police Cps'PL'Cops'14 VOcean Ocean Speeders Speeders Inside"Prison Code" '14, The Investigators '14'
______ Videos 'PG' 3878241 2100951 3471932 Force Force 3973067 3880086 V' 8350898 6987319
44 37 44 44 Special Report (Live) B9 The Fox Report With The O'Reilly Factor (Live) Hannity & Colmes (Live) On the Record With Greta The O'Reilly Factor
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SNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Investigates Lockup: Inside Iowa State MSNBC: Lockup: Inside MSNBC Investigates "Lockup: Inside L.A. County" MSNBC Investigates
1 7675898 PenitentiaryI San Quentin 1764951 8449609

EPN 33 27 33 33 College Football: Texas College Football Live College Football Florida State at Clemson. (Live) 30 448222 SportsCenter (Live) 30
___ Tech at SMU (Live) 841777 1 250661
SPN2 34 28 34 34 NASCAR Football Live NHRA Drag Racing Mac Tools U.S. Nationals - Final Eliminations. From Baseball Tonight (Live) BB Out of the Blue: Boise
8 3 3 Now 3 ) Indianapolis. (Same-day Tape) cc 6799864 5019067 State's Perfect Season
FSNFL 35 39 Final Score Inside the MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field Around the Final Score Boxing Best Damn
3 Rays in St. Petersburg, Fla. (Live) 233222 Track Toughman. 315338
[GOLF] 67 Post Game Playing Learning Top 10 Personal Golf Central Natalie My World The Tum Learning Personal Golf Central
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Ui 361 31 36 36 Sp Olympics Seminole Seminole Pregame 2007 NASCAR Classics 320609 Around Seminole
S _____ Foot (Live) 14086 Track Post.


he PlusCode number printed next to each pro- PlusCode number, cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys- If you have cable service, please make sure that the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
tern. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea- your cable channel numbers are the same as the procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
,uare (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR), channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys-
.alJ.you need to do to record a program is enter its perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the tem, please contact your VCR manufacturer.
The channel lineup for KLiP Interactive cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.



Husband needs to rethink marriage


earAnnie: I've been married over
25 years and have three terrific
children. Three years ago, my
wife found out she has cancer She went
through all the treatments, and although
the doctors say her original
:cancer is gone, she still needs
to come in for more tests to see
if cancer has since developed
elsewhere. She won't go.
, * She seems better mentally
and physically, but I'm at my
wits' end. There is no sex drive
from her whatsoever, and if I
mention it or try to initiate sex,
she's cooperative, but there is
no emotion or sensuality. It's
like a chore to her
I'm a well-known citizen in
my town, but it's getting hard- ANN.
er to stay married. I'm afraid it M AIL
will look bad to leave her, and
'I'm not sure my children will understand.
I've met other women and enjoyed the
attention. I know I can find someone to
satisfy me emotionally and physically.
Our house is clean, there is food on the
table, bills are paid, but I'm not happy.
;There is no time for counseling, plus
,we're long past talking about her lack of
libido. How can I walk away on good
terms? - Dilemma in the Midwest
Dear Dilemma: Your wife of 25 years
'develops cancer, is probably going
through menopause, and although you
are intimate, she isn't as gung-ho about it
as you'd like. You decide to leave because


you can't make time for counseling.
You're right - it will look bad, and your
children will never forgive you.
If you really wanted to save your mar-
riage, you'd make time for counseling, but
it's obvious you are only look-
ing for a way out that will not
wreck your stellar reputation.
So you need to give the
impression that you're mak-
ing an effort Go for counsel-
ing. Allow your wife the
opportunity to work on this.
Marriage is not all about you.
Dear Annie: My mother, 74,
lives in another city and
delights in criticizing family
members, friends and every-
one except strangers.
IE'S Yesterday, while chatting on
.BOX the phone, she told me my
nephew's girlfriend answered
questions with "Naw," instead of the
proper "No," so she rudely and sarcasti-
cally corrected her. Mom said this while
laughing and expected me to laugh along.
She has always been like this. No one
measures up. We were raised to never
criticize her, since the consequence is
days of sulking and revenge. Even my
long-suffering, spineless father follows
this policy How do we handle her? -
Disgusted
Dear Disgusted: People like your moth-
er need to constantly prove their superi-
ority because they are secretly afraid they
don't measure up. It's probably too late to


change her, but at the very least, when she
behaves rudely, you can express your dis-
agreement If she sulks for a week, so be
it
Dear Annie: I usually love your advice,
but the response to "Shutter Shy" was out
of line. She said her parents were always
pestering her to "show her teeth."
How that woman smiles is nobody's
business, and her family is wrong to try
and force a change. It would be nice if
everyone had a great smile, but spending
several thousand dollars on one's appear-
ance isn't always a viable option.
Please rethink this one, Annie. - Lisa
in Tennessee
Dear Lisa: We agree that no one should
be forced to smile. It looks unnatural.
However, we also know that if you are
embarrassed by your smile, it can affect
everything in your life - including your
relationships, your work, your attitude
and your emotional health. For those who
are content with their smile, it's fine with
us. But for those who spend a good por-
tion of their lives wishing it were other-
wise, they should know there are options.
Annie's Snippet for Labor Day (credit
Bill Dodds): "Labor Day is a glorious hol-
iday because your child will be going back
to school the next day It would have been
called Independence Day, but that name
was already taken."


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar.


_----_ Today's HOROSCoPE =pE


Your Birthday: A number of different
alliances you make in the year ahead could all
come together into a group that will be of value
in many constructive ways. You'll learn lessons
from the others that will serve you well.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) - Only virtuous
behavior will stand up to your opposition.
Libra (Sept 23-Oct. 23) -Take care not to
say anything in front of others that you wouldn't
want repeated to an audience of your peers.
Scorpio (Oct 24-Nov. 22) - Adopting an
attitude of expecting more for yourself than is
fair, especially where money is involved, will not
sit well with associates.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Be
extremely careful about hastily committing your-
self to an activity or agreement that would not
serve your best interests.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Unless
you're careful, you could thoughtlessly brush
aside a matter of an urgent nature and, in the
process, create a new series of problems that
further compounds what you neglected.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - If you are a
bit of a risk taker, it could make you susceptible
to participating in something that has slim


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I GYNAM I


chances for success. Take care not to apply this
to dangerous activities.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - If you feel
intimidated by someone, be on your toes and
don't allow this person to coerce you into doing
something against your better judgment
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You might be
able to make your points, but how you go about
it will depend on whether or not you make an
enemy in the process.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Be extremely
considerate when engaging in a joint venture
with someone with whom you enjoying doing
business.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Do not under-
estimate your opposition when you find yourself
caught up in a competitive development
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you have to
deal with a few responsibilities that aren't to your
liking but cannot be ignored under any circum-
stance, don't make a big fanfare over it
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - If you're not dis-
criminating about the company you keep, you
could find yourself caught up in a situation that
might damage your image and reputation.
Select your pals wisely.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


--pi m - -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:


Saturday's Jumbles:
I Answer:


(Answers tomorrow)
PIECE BEIGE ENJOIN PRIMER
To many, when marriage is mentioned, it has
a - NICE "RING"TO IT


Bridge


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Last week, we looked at opening
pre-emptive bids. But if your oppo-
nents are going to use these
weapons, you must have some way
to defend yourself - this week's
topic.
The first key point is that if you
come into the auction, you assume
your partner has six or seven high-
card points and base your actions
on that. If he is weaker, it is hisi
fault if you get too high! Similarly,
if your partner enters the auction,
since he will assume you have six
or seven points, you must not leap
around like the lambs in spring-
time unless you have a trick more
than that - 10 or 11 points.
The primary weapon is a take-
out double. If an opponent opens
at the two- or three-level, double
says that you have at least open-
ing-bid strength, that you are short
in the opener's suit, and that you
have length (usually at least three
cards) in all three unbid suits.
Partner picks one of those suits, or
bids no-trump if he has stoppers in
the opener's suit and a desire to
play in that strain, or passes with
several decent trumps.
In this deal, after East's three-
club opening and two passes,
North makes a takeout double,

ACROSS 41 Become frayed
43 Wine cask
1 Impulse 44 Trinkets
5 Sign before 46 Feeds the kitty
Virgo 49 Lawyer's thing
8 Fall guy 50 News article
11 Colosseum, 52 Aphrodite's son
now 54 Mine yield
12 Heavy-metal 55 Field
band protector
14 Cinemax 56 Take the bus.
rival 57 Wk. day
15 Techie 58 Vapor
16 Piqlet's friend 59 Ticket info


17 Deli loaf
18 Avalanche
20 Vigorous
22 Nothing at all
23 Cries
24 Stops up
27 Made the most
of
29 Travel choice
30 Nonunion work-
place (2 wds.)
34 Shipping ban
37 Leather punch
38 Goose egg
39 Listlessly


DOWN
1 Subject for
Keats
2 Weeps over
3 Bobbysoxer
4 Concluding
5 Jacket
feature
6 Kind of
system
7 Skunk's
defense
8 Yard planting


North 09-03-07
A AKQJ
S9 7 6
SA K J 10 3
4 Q
West East
A 8 3 2 4 5
V A Q 84 10 3 2
* 652 * 74
S 94 2 * AKJ10763
South
4 10 9 7 6 4
V K J 5
* Q9 8
S. 8 5
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
34
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
3 Pass 4 A All pass
Opening lead: 4 2

South advances with three spades,
and North raises to game because
that is where he wishes to play
opposite six or seven points and
four-plus spades.
West leads the club two to East's
ace. What should East do now?
Since East must try for three fast
heart tricks, he should lead his
heart 10, hoping his partner has
the A-Q-J. Here, East's luck is out,
but he has the satisfaction of hav-
ing made a good play.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

ERA SLOE OUT
TOOTHIER ABLE
ASLEEP BABES


AID ASEIA ABS

WENT RANGY

DONUT ALKALI
AVID UNFLA WED
TffL REFIS LIL
ELSE K E QY SA Y


Chasm
Keats or Byron
Selected
Put down
Physiques
Engineer's


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


place
25 Rapper - Kim
26 Incan treasure
27 Passe hair
style
28 Get the
picture
30 hole filler
31 Actor-
Linden
32 Nocturnal
predator
33 Thickness
35 Movie mogul
36 "Muppet
Show" host
39 Karate level
40 Says aloud
41 Stranger's
query
42 Inched
forward
43 Shoe uppers
44 Cornfield
menace
45 Fawn's
parent
47 A Great Lake
48 Pop-top bever-
age
51 Victorian, e.g.
53 Fix the table


]


OB MONDAY, SEPTFMBFR 3 2007


ENrEmrAi1NMIFN-F


CHWUS COUNTY (FL) CHR I' -


II








MONDAY, SEPTEMII'MB 3, 2007 9B


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


PAcDY, witds TlIS?
\ I~fi~sefti^-~ -t,
TPA CJIM,-=~
\\ 6RAT4- ^7T
Gp-AID- ' I








Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


I HIRED ALL OF YOU
BECAUSE THE PROJECT
WILL TAKE 300 MAN
DAYS TO COMPLETE.


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Dennis the Menace


The Family Circus


TI-�5,1 OUCHT I GOTA SUN7rAN7 our11-
MU6TA .5�N TIIST PI Ru"
Betty


"Daddy's trying to make a hole in one
... hundred."


Frank & Ernest


The Monday known as Labor Day How is this day devoted to I say to yoi
Is cause for celebration; The "WVorkg Man" observed? And seized
A tributeto theefforts of We leave our Jobs behind and take For when to
All those who've built this nation. A rest most well-deserved.









Today's MOVIES
Citrus Cinemas 6 - 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
Inverness "The Nanny Diaries" (PG-13)
Box Office 637-3377 1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
"Halloween" (R) 1 p.m., 3:50 945 p.m.
p.m., 7:25 p.m. "The Invasion" (PG-13) 10:25
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.
p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m.Digital. "Superbad" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
"The Invasion" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:35 p.m. Digital.
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:450 p.m. "Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
"Superbad" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4 4:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:35 p.m.
p.m., 7:20 p.m. Digital.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 1:45 "Underdog" (PG) 1 p.m., 4
* p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:45 p.m.. p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Boume Ultimatum" (PG- "The Boume Ultimatum" (PG-
13) 1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. 13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Halloween" (R) 1:45 p.m., "Transformers" (PG-13) 1:05
4:25 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:15 p.m. p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:10
Digital. p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m, 4:10 p.m., 7:55 p.m, 10:05 Visit www.chronicleonline.com
* p.m. for area movie listings and enter-
"War" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:45 p.m., tainment information.
Times subject to change; call ahead.


Arlo and Janis


Cathy


A~ND WHds� tstAFi? IM JwGW Her? WHY vipl-4CY Ho'J
~wri-ti rIA~erJ NO-PNP I t)IDIT'T 60 F'AR A9WAY?

m W~Q~ ~MOVED HERF 0
_:n.WERSIDEOF ME� ao 10 SCHOOL.


THERE ARE 300 OF YOU,
SO I JANT YOU TO
FINISH BY FIVE O'CLOCK
AND CLEAN OUT YOUR
DESKS. YOU'RE ALL
FIRED.


IF IT TAKES MORE
THAN ONE MEETING
TO MANAGE A PROJECT,
I LOSE INTEREST.


Blondle


Doonesbury


Big Nate


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals P



" . . .SX WN PB M XY FJ , WBXDJTB MYIYX -

FNWUYZ BEE KTY LSYMJ KBZNA;

MYJOCY BLY MN KSBXJ NMY

OBX KSXCSXD." - DYB MDOY ONMWSX

PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "Science has not yet found a cure for the pun."
- Robert Byrne
"A witty saying proves nothing." - Voltaire



(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 9-3


I


C17RUS COUNIY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS










EDS _ _ _ .. CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563=5966





Classifieds









. Online



.. . .- A ll


The Tin e


I I6 Iseft.1. .--0-il, ,*6,-5 .6w


RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder com
-cM�-- -- a


$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
'Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
I Rooster & Bantam Hen
with 2 week old baby
Bring your own
container to pick up.
(352) 447-3022

TOP DOLLAR
| For Junk Cars
L $(352) 201-1052 $
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545

$ CASH$
PAID FOR
Unwanted
Vehicles
I 352-220-0687 I

COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community '
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
FREE KITTENS
To inside homes only.
(352) 220-9960
FREE MALE PIT MIX
9 WK OLD PLEASE CALL
352-854-9663
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
FREE REMOVAL
Of unwanted hsehold.
& Garage Sale Items.
Call (352) 476-8949
Free Removal - Scrap
.Metal, Appl.'s, A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
KITTENS FREE TO
Good home.
(352) 560-3275
SUPPORT CITRUS
COUNTY PUBLIC
SCHOOLS
Please send Campbell
Soup Labels and Box
Top for Education tops
to Inverness Middle
School. Make them to
. the attention of
"W.Scott".
" Thank You.




Your World


0o4f4e m4


CH RpNIdI




ww chronicleonline coam


OAK FIREWOOD
Free for the pick up
Cut to size.
(352) 794-0070
PITBULL PUPPIES
(352) 246-2914

The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
Wanted: Riding & push
mowers, other sm. eng.
Quick free removal
352-601-5277/726-4290
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645




Dog, small English
Dachshund,
1000 SW 196 Ct., reward
(352) 465-6604
LOST CAT
Grey & white male.
Declawed
Last seen in Pine Ridge
(352) 464-1401 cell
(352) 464-1399
Purse,
Brown Prada
West Amman Rd. Mini
Forms, (352) 795-5893
t2O3 O913-7'0o


2 DOGS - Lg. Yellow
Dog red dog/red saftle
BIk & Wht. Pit/Hound
Mix. Lecanto area.
(352) 628-3623




"Can You Dig It?" Heavy
Equipment School. 3wk
training program. Back-
hoes, Bulldozers,
Trackhoes. Local job
placement asst. Start
digging dirt Now.
(866)362-6497 or
(888)707-6886
FCAN
DIVORCES
I BANKRUPTCY I
* .Name Change |
*Child Support
I Wills I
SWe Come To You
I 637-4022. 795-5999
=--- -- - l


- ActNow )

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902



Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207


Come see


our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
795 -available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
BUY or SELL! M till 4:00 PM
Receive Quality Monday-Friday.
Customer Care! Week-end and
Customer 4 Corelevenings by
FLReolEstateSale.Com appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
. Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
TERI PADUANO, www.hofsohaori.
REALTOR or stop by our offices
C21 JW Morton at 1149 N Conant
(352) 212-1446 Ave. Corner of 44
Hablo Espanol and Conant.
FREE Home Warranty Look for the big
& Visual Tour white building with
ON ALL MY LISTINGS the bright paw prints.


Sudoku


3i7
-=; i ..


2


25


6


9


71


1


5


4puz.corm


94



1 2









8


28


Fill in the squares so that each row, columrnn, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9


RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
--- --- .. J
SSOD . SOD * SODN
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




FULL BODY DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE &
AROMATHERAPY
by Terri Lic, MM17442
(352) 628-1036
HAIRCARE in your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gail 352-422-6315


and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.



(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441




4 DAY Carribbean
Cruise, June 2008
Call Now for Group
Rates (352) 476-1973




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least 2 years exp.
Microsoft Word, Excel,
Outlook and access
skills are preferred.
Starting pay com-
mensurate w/exp.
Fax resume to
352-564-8835
or apply at
Hilights Inc.
4177 N Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
352-564-8830
OFFICE PERSON
Auto Parts exp. a must.
Office exp. necessary.
Apply All Prestige Auto
(352) 795-7000
RECEPTIONIST/
COORDINATOR
Good phone, office,
computer skills req.
Must be dependable
& professional
Fax Resume to'
(352) 726-3490

SECRETARY
Full Time Position
for a fast paced
Insurance Office.
Looking for Someone
who has computer
skills and knowledge
with Spread Sheets.
Must be able to
muiti task and must
have Customer
Service Skills
Please call Heather at
1-352-726-7722
for interview or fax
resume to
352-726-6813


,m aI Persna


cm /eautyEl~
COSMETOLeOG


BABER%,


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656

Environmental
Services
Arbor Trail Rehab has
immediate openings
for experienced
Housekeepers.
Day and evening
shifts available.
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL EOE

Licensed
Practical
Nurse/Certified
Medical Assistant
Seeking a LPN/CMA
for a fast-paced
medical practice
located in Crystal
River. Ideal
candidate must have
previous physician
office experience to
be responsible for
performing EKGs,
PFTs, vital signs and
phlebotomy. Will also
assist the physician
and be responsible
for front desk duties.
Please apply online
at
www.citrusmh.com,
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer

MEDICAL OFFICE/
ASSISTANT

Front & back office,
patient care, P/T or F/T.
Medical experience
req'd. Transcription
experience a plus.
Competitive pay/
benefits for the
right person.
Mail resume to:
108 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST
Busy medical practice
Exp. med. terminology,
65-75 wpm w/1-2 yrs
medical exp. Excellent
written & oral commu-
nication skills needed.
Excellent benefits.
Mon thru Fri. Fax
Resume to Gwen
352-637-4510

NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
4352) 860-0885

RECEPTIONIST

F/T for Busy Drs. Office,
Exp'd w/Medical Mgr.
& accounts receivable,
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
* ALL STAR A
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S

New competitive
pay rates Call
Interim Health Care
(352)637-3111_

URGENT CARE/
FAMILY PRACTICE
Seeking
Exp. Front Office
personnel FT
Must be cheerful
good with patients
Hours 8cam 5 pm
Call (352) 522-0094
or Fax Resume To:
(352) 522-0098


8 Z 6:E 9 5$7 I /L

T 9'Tt7C: 9



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6 9 E�8 S t, Z Z T
9 F SIS z T 6 17z


t, 6 S 'L9--8 ZI/-E


AUTO GLASS
INSTALLER
Auto glass installer
wanted! Company ve
hicle, must have own
tools. Excellent pay pro-
gram At least 5 years
exp. Call CMM Glass
Corp 1-866-439-5020

Block Masons,
Mason Tender &
General Laborers

Must have own
transportation.
Call (352) 302-8999


Enthusiastic
and Innovative
Graphic
Designer wanted:
Rapidly growing
Citrus County
company seeking
graphic designer with
strong understanding
of color theory,
design best practices
for creating visual
designs and layouts
for web pages,
print marketing,
e-mail, and sales
materials, PHP and
MySql knowledge
a plus. Competitive
salary and benefits.
To join our team in
a fun, creative
environment please
e-mail links to your
online portfolio
and resume to
careers@smartphone-
experts.com





SERVERS
BANQUET CHEFS
& LINE COOKS
Needed
Please apply at:
505 E Hartford St.
Hernando or
Call (352) 746-6855





$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company,
Call Steve:
352-628-0187


ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist in the
enrollment of the new
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work in
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance 1st
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813

National Electrical
Wholesale Distributor
Located in Wildwood
Has Opening For ag-
gressive inside/outside
SALES REPS
Full Benefit package
avail., Exp. preferred
but not required.
866-748-0505

Realtors Wanted

Small productive
office. Pleasant
working cond., Good
commission split In-
terviews confidential.
(352) 795-9123

Sales
Professionals
Fast growing National
Corporation is ac-
cepting applications
from confident sales
professionals to add
to its staff of account
executives, We
provide a structured,
successful sales train-
ing program which
will aid in taking your
sales career to the
next level. We also
consider entry level
sales candidates
who survive our
interview process
Call 352-569-9402
for appointment


WALLY'S QP
Looking For
EXPERIENCED
AUTO DETAILER

Apply In Person:
806 NE US HWY 19
Crystal River

Part-time
bIBI-


ELECTRICIAN

Commercial &
residential. 5 + Yrs.
Exp. & resume
hired. Must pass
drug screen &
physical. Over-time
avail. MIDAS Const.
(352) 465-7267

FACILITIES
& SUPPLIES
This position is
responsible for the
activities related to
the daily cleaning,
maintenance &
upkeep of the
facilities and
grounds and the
activities related to
ordering, receiving,
and expensing
supplies. Make
scheduled, periodic
checks of facility
ventilation and
security systems,
generators & other
equipment. Will
maintain vehicles &
vehicle logs, handle
biohazard totes,
respond to security
alarms & faciltly
emergencies, as
well as, coordinate
and monitor vendor
work at facility. Two
year's facilities
experience
preferred and
commercial driver
license desired.
Background check
required.
Please submit
application to:
1241 S. Lecanto
Hwy, Lecanto, FL
34461 EOE/DFWP

HANDYMAN/POOL
MECHANIC
Full time, salary,
benefits Call between,
10a-4p (352) 344-4861




$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187

DELI PERSON &
CASHIER
Experienced only.
352-527-9013
DETAIL HELPER
DL a must with a
clean record.
Call Roy @ 302-3089
DURACLEAN
FRANCHISE
Looking for Exp'd
CARPET/
FURNITURE/
TILE CLEANERS

But will train. Salary,
comm., Bonus &
Benefits for right
person. (352)726-1099









EXPERIENCED
WRECKER DRIVER
Weekends a must.
Must live In area.
Apply in person at:
Ed's Auto & Towing
4610 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness
> NO CRYBABIES!
F/T POOL
CLEANING
Medical, vac. & benefits
avail. (352) 637-1904
MAINTENANCE
Exp. Maintenance
person needed, must
be hard working
dependable and have
a valid dri. lic. 40 hr.
work wk, benefits, pd.
vac. pay based on
exp. Apply in Person @
SUN COUNTRY HOMES
1710 S Suncoast Blvd
MAINTENANCE/
HANDYMAN
POOL TECH
HOUSEKEEPING
LAUNDRY PERSON

Able to handle
multi-task, in upscale
Country Club Comm
Apply in Person:
240 W. Fenway Drive
Hernando
Must have at least 5
Yrs. Recent Exp.
In Florida Lawncare
Desire to work & valid
Dn. Lic Good starting
Pay. Paid Vacations
(352) 228-7472
P/T SECURITY
OFFICERS
Class D Security Lcense I
required Local.
STarting Rate $7 .60/hr
352-726-1551 Ext. 1313,
call between 7a-2:300
Mon-Fri.


I NOW HIRING
LOCALLY
Large national
organization.
Avg. Pay $20/hr.
Over $55K annually.
. Including full
benefits & OT, paid
training, vacation.
F/T & P/T
1-866-515-1762




Established Lawn
Service 23 yrs.
1990 Dump Truck,
All lawn equip. make
your money back in less
2 than incls. 70 ac-
count too Much equip
to list. Established 1984
Asking $100k (352)
637-6718
Food Vending Unit
14ft x 8 ft., fully equip.,
grill, french fryer, soft
ice cream, micro. 2
refrig., sinks, AC, inven-
tory incl. also truck avail
will sell together & sep.
352-270-8126




ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4 concrete slab
INSTALLED-$ 15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16 495
Many Sizes Avail
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com
FACTORY DIRECT
METAL BUILDINGS
CARPORTS, SHEDS
Custom Installation,
Up to 140MPH
Wind Rating
Gulf to Lake Sales
(352) 527-0555

LOCALLY MFG.
30 X 30 X 9
Verical Roof w/(2)
8 X7 Garage Doors
& (1) 36 Walk Door
& 4' slab
Installed $14,995
(352) 489-9397


1938 GIBSON GUITAR
Good Condition.
Make me an offer I
can't refuse. Nothing
under $1,500 consid-
ered. (352) 344-5168
ANTIQUE VICTROLA
Exc. Working Cond.
Includes some records.
$300
(352) 628-4210










































I POON COLLECTION
Fair w/3 row spoon
rack, (18 spoons)m
Will break up or sell for
$1500. (352) 860-1649
Hat tub 2 yrs.oid, soft




tub, sweater, 1o0V.
steps & drink holder, hy-
dro therapy jets, $1,500.
Joe (347) 512-6126
NEVER USED SEATS 51
3 hp., extra jets.
Light, lounger. Under
warranty. New
$4,395/Sacrifice $2.195
(3521 287-9266


3-ton A/C
$350
(352) 564-0578

A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
- 2 Ton $780.00
-+ 2-/2 ton $814.00
- 3 Ton $882.00
* Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
CARRIER
HEAT PUMP/AC
2/2 Ton; New blower
mtr, Good Cond. $200
(352) 628-4210
DISHWASHER, STOVE
& REFRIGERATOR
Almond. Good Cond.
$250/all
(352) 382-1866
GE REFRIGERATOR
White, Top freezer,
$150. Beverly Hills
(501) 920-9428
REFRIGERATOR
$140
(352) 382-5661
REFRIGERATOR
18cu.ft. white, A-1
condition, $175
(352) 637-2111
REFRIGERATOR
Black & S.S. 25.5 Cu. Ft.
Side by Side Whirlpool
Gold Conquest
w/crushed & cubed
ice & water purifica-
tion syst.16 mos. old.
Purchased for $1,200/
Sell $800 (352)628-3539
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore 27 cu. ft.
Side by Side. White,
W/Refreshment door.
Water & Ice. $400
(352) 637-6310 Iv. mess.
UPRIGHT FREEZER
Maytag, standard size.
$150obo; EXERCISE BIKE
DP, Fan Generated
w/monitor $35
$25 (352) 637-1712
Washer & Dryer $265/
set Great cond Best
Guarant Free delivery
& setup (352) 835-1175
WASHER
Kenmore, Almond
Good Cond $125
DRYER, Whirlpool White
8 mos old $225
Both$S300 382-3494


HITACHI Miter saw, li'ke






S DEAL
Exc. Condo. $400

new, $100;













GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95

Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
I day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
I you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.




52" HD RCA TV, with en-
tertainment center and
DVD player. $600/OBO
COFFEE TBL
& 2 END TBLS. It. oak
$40. (352) 527-4122
55" HITACHI
Projection TV
Oak Cabinet w/doors.
$400 (352) 527-0032
Sanyo 26" Color TV
excel cond. $100.
1 Component 20"
or both for $150.
(352) 341-1576




FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type w/18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai.
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811




15" LCD MONITOR
NEC, built in stereo
speakers & 4 port USB
Hub, $99.
(352) 795-0098, days
(352) 795-2820, eve
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus. Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service. New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
http://www.rdeeii.com




FORKLIFT
Air Tire, Diesel.
In Homosassa. $4,500.
Phone (813) 478-5270




MASSEY FERGUSON
1540, 2007Tractor &
Box Blade w/top tilt.
< than 200 hrs. $!5,900






cushioned chairs. $100;
9 PC. PATIO SET
45 Rd Table, 4 cush.
chairs, Chaise, Chair
w/oltoman, sm table
$400 (352) 795-2906
OVAL GLASSTOP TABLE
W/2 swivel/rocker
chairs, 2 reg. chairs,
new cond Paid $1050
Asking $500 (352)
464-1104 or 464-1660


Earn extra
income after
taking course

Flexible
schedules,
convenient
Locations.
Courses start
in Sept.

Call
877-766-1829
SLiberty
Tax Service
SFee for books.|















c= I fi 1L


I










CHRONICLE (i QTZTIS


3 Pc Sectional
w/ 4 recllners, abstract,
beige/green/brown
print. $800.
(352) 465-6002
3 PC. SECTIONAL SOFA
w/Recllners $295;
TWIN BEDROOM SET
w/dresser & head-
S board. $95
(352) 422-3190
4 Pc. Bedroom Set
Pickled white, oak
queen/dbl $250.
9 Pc. Bedroom
Little girls, painted incl,
bed bread & curtains
$175. (352) 637-6046
9 PC. LIVING RM. SET
Good Cond. $250;
YOUTH BED
White Heavy Plastic.
Good Cond. $40
(352) 628-4210
9 PC.
WHITE WICKER
BEDROOM SET
Exc. Cond. $675
(352) 634-0977
'PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
All Leather Sofa,
as new, top quality,
chestnut brown.
basset, 89" Long,
perf. cond. for office or
home must sell $1,250.
obo (352) 212-3508


5 PC. BEDROOM SET
$375. DESK $50:
(352) 628-5924
Antique Armoire
unique carved,
Rosewood'/ w/3 doors
center door has original
glass excel cond.
$1,500. (352) 344-4811
Antiques
Collectibles &
Estate Auction
1st & 3rd Tues. 6pm
(previews 10-5:45)
Starting Sept. 4th
Huge Furniture
Liquidation
Fenton/Dep/EAPG
Glass, China,
Antiques Art
Collectibles, Silver,
Coins + 2much21ist
Details on Web or call
PROF APP & LIQ
10%bp 6% tax
MC/VI/Cash/App Ck
AU1593/AB1131
811 HWY 19/CR RIVER
charliefudge.com
352-795-2061
BEDS .> BEDS o:- BEDS
The factory outlet store!
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 -' Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006
BROYHILL
SOFA & CHAIR
$350
(352) 527-4910


BUREAU W/MIRROR
6 Drawers. 5'W
Green & tan. $40,
RD. OAK TABLE
3' diameter, Bind. Oak
$50 (352) 527-2769
China Cabinet,
Thomasville, lighted,
cherry wood, great
cond. $700. Curio Cab.
lighted, cherry wood,
great cond. $200.
(352) 628-5949
Comp. TWIN BDRM. SET
W/LINENS $200;
ROCK MARBLE DINING
TABLE W/6 CHAIRS
(W/Pad) $200
(352) 795-7744
COUCH & LOVESEAT
navy blue leather, wall
hugger w/2 recliners on
each. $600; RECLINER
Maroon, wall hugger,
$100. (352) 527-4122
CURIO CABINET
$75;
TWIN DAYBED
W/MATTRESS $35
(352) 795-7744
DINETTE SET - French
Prov. Antique wht. 48"
Round table, w 24" leaf
pedestal table, 4 chairs
like new $195. obo
352-382-7865,
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
78" HX 34"W Oak.
Exc. Cond. $85;
SLEEPER SOFA Comfy,
Like New $195
(352) 422-3190


ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for Big Scrn TV 6ft. H
$200. DINING RM. 8 up
holstered chairs, table
extends to 7' $250.
both Wht wash wood,
(352) 527-9876
FURNITURE
Leather reclining taupe
loveseat $250, Iron King
head & foot board
$300 352-586-4650
GIRL'S DRESSER
& DESK, $100 both.
Multi Color Comforter
for Full size girl's bed, &
purple bed skirt. $50.
(352) 341-1963
Large burgundy sofa &
matching chair, $400
Also country style oak
dining table, 6 chairs,
like new, Orig. $1,900
sell for $800
352-560-3743
Leather Recliner Chair,
deep blue, excel.
cond. 6 mos, old
$850. obo, Must Sell.
(352) 212-3508
Liviving Room. Set
sofa, chair, 2 end
tables, 1 coffee table,
good cond.
$300.
(352) 746-7098
Mafttress-King
Spring-Air, deluxe pillow
top, gently used,
$400. obo
(352) 382-5030


CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Regional,
Consianment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Portable L-Shqped Bar
for Kitchen or Patio
Solid Oak, formica top,
$300.
(352) 465-2823
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50: Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen Serta Bedding
Set, very clean, w/
frame linens, skirt,
matching comforter &
curtains, $400.
(352) 212-0013
r ENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
ROCKER RECLINER
Multi-Neutral Color
Very Good Cond. $35;
OAK END TABLE/
COFFEE TABLE SET $75
(352) 422-3190
ROLL TOP DESK
28"Wx45"H, 3 drawers,
good cond. $85.
(352) 382-4651
Single Platform Bed
$50.
Air Hockey Table
$150
(352) 637-6046
Solid Wood Ashley
Coffee & End Tables,
like new, $350.
(352) 270-3573


SYLVANIA 13" TV,
hardly used, $45
Wall mirror, 30"x63"
$20 (352) 726-2269
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084




Craftsman 15'/ HP
Riding Mower
46" cut, starts & runs
good. $350.
(352) 613-4702
D.R. CHIPPER, 18HP.
towable, excellent
2007, low hrs,
(352) 637-6588
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Mower & Equipment
Repair Quick Service.
Pick up & Delivery,
Don Mead 400-1483
MULCH
5-6 yd. loads. $95
Delivered anywhere
Citrus Co. Also gravel
hauled. $75 + Materials,
352-563-9979/400-0150
SCOUTS TRACTOR
MOWER
20HP Kohler. 50"
Cut - Extra Blades - Very
Nice $950 382-4572


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2007 118B

l J,


SEARS CRAFTSMAN
2001 riding mower,,
19HP, 42" cut $450
(352) 628-2769





CITRUS HILLS
Moving In Yard Sale
Labor Day7:30-1:30
80 S Bauer Rd.
Off SR 44, west of Ldnfl.


5. "Now-

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 6 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
AA* AA* ****


9-4 @ LaughingStock Intermatonal Inc.dist. by United Media, 20071


"That's guaranteed waterproof if you

go down to 100 meters."

720915


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termlte/Pest Control
Insp. Uc & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870




ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
$$$$$SSS$$$SS$$$s $
Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.
$$$$$$$$$$SS$$$$$$$

IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
JUSTASK.
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOU!!!

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966


S& Misc. Clean-Up,
'Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
55' BUCKET TRUCK
20% off, mention of
this ad. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 344-2696
r AFFORDABLE,
HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE I
- Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const,
Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
Joseys Landscaping
Lawns, Trees, Pavers
Clean-up, Sod, dump
truck. (352) 556-8553
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
A TREE SURGEON
Uc. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
estimates.352-860-1452


Anll ompuer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery. avail,
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




V'Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small! 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
All Phaze Construction
Quality painting &
repairs, Faux fin.
#0255709 352-586-1026
637-3632







George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
POPCORN CEILINGS
PAINTED
Free Estimates
(800) 942-3738
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext., Free Estimate
Pressure Washing, Lic.
24/7, (352) 476-9013
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Lic. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407


B o � * Serin..g Ail oj Cianr Contv
Bou. erice.. U F i I'"

cco264 asO8 o 0001
& S SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated

NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES





(352) 628-5079 ----(352) 628-7445----
S(352) 628-5079 - (352) 628-7445


Affordable Boat Mint. &
Repair,
Mechanical, E Bectricd,
Custom
Rig. John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236




TOP HAT AIRPORT SERV.
*- Aug-Sept. Special
Tampa Int. $75 max. 2
people. (352) 628-4927




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Ci.j i.t: . ugly ,
.:.:-. : : restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




FREE ESTIMATES
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
628-5595




COMPASSIONATE
PERSONAL CAREGIVER
With References. Call
(352) 613-0078




1 Call does it All! Noi ob
too sm.! Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
-Windows & Doors
-Storm Shutters
-Board-Up Service
-Resident./Commercial
CRC 1326431
(352) 746-9613





0 REG HOME DAY CARE
Openings NOW FF/PT
* Infants Welcome 0
- 352-726-5163 v




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397


EXP. HOUSEKEEPER
Call for est. Will clean
any day of wk. Monica
352-795-7905
Hauter & Clark
Handyman & More
Home, Office & Floor'
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
SOTO'S CLEANING
SERVICE
Lic. & Ins.
352-489-5893/216-2800




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Special Introductory
offer 20% Discount
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558



Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391
PRICE Finish Carpentry
Wood moldings & doors
30+ yrs. Lic. 17510184057
352-860-0675/302-4389
ROGERS Construction
New Homes,Additions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC 1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
I panel or camp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs: Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440





#734025092


AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 341-3300
* ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner. No streaks!
24 yrs. Lic. 352-726-3878
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Lic. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressureo"vash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing.
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
S99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
A AFFORDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP,
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)427-2588






FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
HANDYMAN
If its Broke , Jerry
Can Fix It. Lic#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Hauter & Clark
Handyman & More
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911


NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services. Lic.2776/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC




STAYLER AC & HEATING,
INC. Lic. & Ins.
CACO 58704
352-628-6300




Poe's Sewer & Drain
Cleaning, We unstop
toilets, sinks, bathtubs,
24/hr serv 352-302-7189




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
r AFFORDABLEn,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush
Apple. Furn, Const I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126

A-I Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash furn. & apple. Misc.
Mark (352) 344-2094
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., a pp, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264 /201-1422
Furn. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903


-gB

CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431

ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279


SYARD VAC

S ..... .- ... . * -


Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming

(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & Insured




New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
SRoof Repairs . Commercial Residential

Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes









(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
State Certified Lic CCC 1327843


25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing in vinyl


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs, 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates Free est, Proud to
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358
RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates!!
Exp'd, Lic. CCC1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC 1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sdewalks, Driveways Patios,
bats.
Free est, Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbs. Stamp
concrete Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Lic. 1476 726-6554




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins, CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620


ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)427-2588
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391







We do it ALL! Big or Sm.1
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall,Crown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic. #2713, Insured.
Showers. Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019




ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Llc.#SCC131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing, Tile
Painting, Framing. 35yrs
344-1952 CBC058263




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tvoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
A TOP SOIL SPECIAL A
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 � 352-302-6436


Ultra Seal Coatings
Specializing in roof and
concrete sealing
* Vinyl & Stucco Sealing
* Pressure Washing
* Designer Driveways
* Pool Decks
, Summer Special

SRoof cleaned 145)00,
---- ---------- ---- -

1 352-628-1027






Existing
Concrete

Drivewa yS
Pool Decks 'l ",, -
Lanais, Etc.
Maintenance-Free
Acrylic, Designs, Patterns, Colors

352-220-8630
Licensed/Insured/Dependable 7,.


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
.Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Line Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc, 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrinding,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114




D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work, Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Joseys Landscaping
Lawns, Trees, Pavers
Clean-up, Sod, dump
truck. (352) 556-8553
* SOD � SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran,
352-257-9132/257-1930
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
Coon, Robert
Lawn Service
FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 563-0376
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lic. & Ins,
(352) 797-3166




POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Lic./Ins.
I 352-464-3967 i
P POOL LINERS! A
* 15 Yrs. Exp. *
Call for free estimate
v (352) 591-3641 �
POOL REPAIRS?
Comm. & Res., & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778, 302-6060


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391
METAL BUILDINGS
Pump houses, carports,
etc. Very reasonable!
Fred (352) 464-3146
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES.
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM-


0 RAINDANCER 0
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Available!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714
ALL EXTERIOR
S ALUMINUM
Quality Price! _
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic &Ins 621-0881




NEED A NEW DOOR?, -
Pre-Hung Door units -
New Const. or remod.'
ENTRY POINT by Perry's
Lic. 2598(352)726-6125





Gopher Gully Sod Inc.
Farm Direct Rolls
Sod Installation
Seeding & Mulching
352-812-4345/817-4887


/4dv"ced ,4t6m"um
Installations by '
Brian CBC1253853
-' -ty limited *y yoc ilmagi nate-
352-628-7519 lW
.a. a ar.:edalurnminurrm info


Screenii Roos, Decks, Windows. Doors, Additions


END OP SUMMER

SPECIAL

ANY ROOF CLEANED
$3OO


Suncoast

Exterior
- Restoration service Inc.
www.roofcleaningnopressure.com
S877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


CIRCLE

SOD FARMS INC.
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL INSTALLATIONS





Travis Leturno * Larry Leturno
Fax 352-628-5552
352-400-2222
Lic. & Ins. Larry 352-400-2221


What's Missi-ng --


. - - - - --..- -


r"AT A S CTIT1-T " rS













12 agy


FLR. CTY, OLD OAKS
Multiple Family Yard
Sale, Old Oaks Comm.
"Trail End Rd. & E Walton
Dr. Sat. Sun. Man. 8-4




12 NEW METAL I.C.
CRATES, use for tool
transp/decor/strg/furn
Sor ? $80/all or $8 ea.
(352) 795-5929 lv. msg.

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
280' CHAIN LINK FENCE
Post & Gates.
Cash & Carry $750.
(352) 527-4910
Approx 140 COOK-
BOOKS, $100. CRAFT
PATTERNS & BOOKS $50.
FOR SALE. CALL (352)
746-6687 or 302-1449
BEAUTIFUL GARDEN TUB
complete with faucets
and base, sacrifice,
$150. (352) 637-5656
(352) 201-0696
BROTHERS 1227
fax machine, $75
(352) 527-3348
BURIAL PLOTS
in Fountains Memorial
Park - Fountains of Life:
Two spaces
$1050.00 - 628-1062
China set, Johann
Haviland Bavaria
Germany Sweetheart
Rose, service for 8,
complete set, plus
serving pieces, $250
(352) 637-5903
Christmas dinnerware,
service for 8, in box.
never used, $100
' Train phone, whistles like
train, $50
(352) 527-3348
Flag Set, 20ft 2'h" steel
telescopic, org. $365.
Now $200
Also 20ft. 2" Alum Set,
w/ out Flag $45.
(352) 382-1191
FRIDGE
Clean & Cold $60;
CORNER
Entertainment Center
Drk. Wood $30
(352) 634-0893
Frigidaire Refrigerator
18.5 cu.ft. white, glass
shelves, clean, very
good cond., $275.
Twin wicker headboard,
natural, $45.
(352) 726-2269
HEAVY DUTY
Sewing machine in
carrying case. $50/obo
(352) 527-0424
LABOR DAY SALE
THE BATTERY MEDICS
Golf cart battery sets
6V &8V $200 Reg. $245.
Incl. del installation & I
yr Free Replacement
Warranty Contact Mark
@ 727-375-6111
LOG SPLITTER
27 Ton, Vert./Horizontal
New in 12/06, Home
Depot. $1,250. Used
twice. Will sell for $900.
Will deliver.
WINE BOTTLE OPENER
Deluxe Countertop
Stand. New, in org. box
$140; Will sell for $75
Call Don352-231-0160
MANATEE ART
& CARVINGS
$250,
(352) 563-0022
METAL DETECTOR
Garrett GTAX 1000
Top of the Une! Detects
all metals & more. $300
(352) 527-9498
OFFICE FILE CABINETS
(6) 4 Drawer w/hangers
& folders. $35/ea.
or $200/all
(352) 563-0022
PARROT CAGE, $25;
SCROLL SAW & SOLDER
GUN, w/accessories,
$45. Beverly Hills
352-257-3793
PROPANE TANK
250 GAL. $275,00
352-795-6693
RADIO CONTROLLED
HELICOPTER
Comes w/radio &
instruction book, $750
(352) 560-4289
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Craftsman 42". Kohler
15.5, automatic. S225;
GE MICROWAVE Space
Maker XL1400 Like New
$100(352) 382-5973
The Spot Family Center
leed Donarotior,'
for Cornrrur.ily
Farmily/youth Fmernh
land, ,Storarge IPackis,
Corikoir',. Foeding
fables, Erent Tels, liu,
Bra Truck Please call:
Brian (352) 220-076


SOD. ALL VARIETIES
Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363




ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
Incl. battery & charger,
$550. GEL MATTRESS,
hospital size. $100.
(352) 628-1408
GO GO BY PRIDE
SCOOTER $370.00.
SONIC SCOOTER
By Pride. $400.00.
Both easy trunk load.
(352) 628-9625
WALKER W/BRAKES,
Seat, & Basket
Brand Newl $100;
TV STAND
$15


DRUMS
5 pc. black, with throne
and cymbals, good
starter kit. $150.
(352) 628-2244
Lowery Organ
Excellent Sound, fine
pc. of furniture, storage
bench, manual $500.
(352) 628-5186
Lowery Piano
1964, w/Dehumidifier,
med. wood tone,
storage bench incl,
good cond. $650. obo
(352) 621-5588




Pro-Form
515 S, Crosswalk
Tread mill, Like new.
$500.
(321) 273-0412

-4

*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
LABOR DAY SALE
THE BATTERY MEDICS
Golf cart battery sets
6V &8V $200 Rega. $245.
Incl. del Installation & 1
yr Free Replacement
Warranty Contact Mark
@727-375-6111
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
SIG SAUER P220
45Cal. with nightsites,
4 clips, holster and 2
mag. carriers. $800
(352) 447-1447
TURKEY HUNTERS
Beautiful Display Case
for your BIRD. Oak
frame on wheels
w/glass dome.
28.5D X 34.5W X 36H.
$250 (352)464-4710
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



6 x 12 V Nose Enclosed
Dual Axle w/brakes.
LED lights, more.
2006 Carry On. $3,500
(352) 382-1804
4X8 '05 UTILITY WORK
TRAILER, all metal, w/HD
Werner Ladders, all in
exc. cond. $575.
(352) 726-3010













19" 14ktVlgaro link,
gold chain, 6 months
old, paid $800. Sell for
$300 (352) 637-7125




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Replace Your Home
Now! We pay CASH for
your old home. Call
NOWI(727) 967-4230





NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certifcate per
Florida Statute.


1 yellow female,
Health Certs & shots
$250 .352-422-4675


SActNoWE

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sole?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902

GREAT PYRENEES
Male, DOB 2/14/07,
CKC Reg., Pure bred.
Good w/sm. children
& other sm. animals.
Needs room to run.$400
(352) 341-1964
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207
IRISH SETTER PUP
AKC, 1 male left,
beautiful, love
children. HC. First $275.
(352) 726-0133
LAB PUPPIES, Registered
Choc. & Black. Health
Cert. & Shots. Parents
on Premises $200
(352) 746-0221
MALTI-POO tiny little
furballs, sweet & love
able, home raised, HC,
1st shot, $350/400
(352) 564-2775
MASTIFF, English
Male, AKC, 15 mos. Big
Boned Beauty! Pick of
the lifter! MUSTSELL!
$800 (352) 621-0848
PUG PUPPIES
AKC & CKC Cert.,
Health Cert. 1 male, 1
female. Starting @ $500
(352)464-1109
ROTTWEILER
Male, 14 mos. AKC, in
tact, beautiful dog.
Pick of litter. MUST SELL!
$500 (352) 621-0848
SCOTTISH TERRIER
AKC REG. Gorgeous,
Male. 22wks old. Mov-
ing, must sell. 1st $450
firm. 352-422-5685
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt.,
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906




15 YR. OLD TENN.
WALKER MARE
Very dark Bay, $600/
(352) 628-3456




3 mo. old Boar female
goats, pure bred, no
papers. 2-yr old Black
male Jerrsy Wooly, $20.
Red female rex rabit,
$10. (352) 563-1643,
leave message




6 BDRM HUD $54,0001
Only $429/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
CR/HERNANDO
2/1 CH/A, $400-$500
1st, last, sec. No pets
(352) 564-0578
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Scrn prch. $475; NO
PETSII (352) 563-2293
DUNNELLON 1/1
on 1 Ac. $425/mo.
No dogs/smoking.
(352) 860-2397
HERNANDO
'07, DW, 3/2, carport,
fenced, yd. mint, incl,
no pets/srnoking, 5735.
mr. + S 1.000 serc,
(352) 344-3864
HOMOSASSA
2 BR, CIIA, ino dois
$550 mo. I'.1l l,1, sec,
(352) 628-4002


East Lecanto 2/1
$500. mo. 1st, Ist. sec.
no pets 352-634-5581
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Like Ner I , ,I .- II t.
Rm. for i , i ,
carpet, nc e kitch. split
plan, city water. $600
1st/last/sec. Ref. Req'd
352-621-0931/212-2022
HOMOSASSA 2/1.5
Private lot, No pets.
$525/mo + 1st, last. soc
(352) 628-5696
INVERNESS 2/1
On Waler, 5 ml, from
town $500. 1st last
$200 sec. credit check
(352) 697-1359
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, 1or 2BR
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees
$350 and up.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
Non-Smoking IBR Furn.
Scrn rm. Crprt $500: 1BR
turn. Park model, $325
No pets. 628-4441
RENTALS $400-550/MO
Newly dec, Hernando/
Inverness area.
DW 2/1,SW2/2,SW 1/1
1st, Ist, sec 813-468-0049


-U
6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
4/2 HERNANDO DW '00.
Exc. cond. wrkshp.
$100,000
Keller Williams Realty
Call Debbie Fields
(352) 637-1500
ADULT PARKS
RENT OR OWN LOT
New 3BR, 2BA Skyline
Home, V2" Drywall
Porch, Carport
MOVE IN TODAY
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
1710S Suncoast blvd.
352-794-7308

BUY AT
INVOICE
New Jacobsen
triple wide 2100 sq. ft.
Must sell, was $119,900.
Now only $103,426
only at
Taylor Made
Homes
Call 352-621-9182
Great Financing
5BR 3BA- Designer
Kitchen, Delivered
and set up $73,900.
/2 and 1 Acre Land
& Home Packages
MOVE IN NOW!
6 Homes Set Up
All Sizes- All Prices
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
1710 S Suncoast blvd.
352-794-7308
INVERNESS 2/2 66'X14'
LR, DR, KIT, W/D $6,500
OBO 352-287-1887
Ask for Mechelle
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt y, lor 2BR
Mobiles, Scr. porches,
apple , water incl. Fishing
piers. $7,000-$15,000.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
NEW CONDITION 4BR,
Paved, Rd. Rockcrusher
area, sacrifice $81,900.
(352) 621-9181
Cell (352) 302-7332
NEW JACOBSEN
32 X68 Game Room
House, 2085 sq, ft.
stone fireplace, wet
bar, 18" x 18" ceramic
tile floors, island kitchen,
appliance pkg. Home
was $79,900 buy at
,invoice $69.749. only at
Taylor Made Home
352-621-9181




r ENTAL FINER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
L--- ---. . o 1




2-Mobiles for $75K
Both 2/1 Single wides.
Nice half acre lots-
1-needs work-1 -ready
to go. May separate?
Owner/Agent
352-302-8046
2/2 SW On 1/2 Acre
Totally Renovatedl
Walton Dr., Old Oaks,
Floral City $64,500
Myrlam, Keller Williams
Realty (352) 613-2644
2/2/Crpt. SW Exc. Cond.
CHA, ceiling fans, scrnd
12 X 20 porch. Dbl.
corner lot on paved
street. $53K obo
352-503-6061/628-7480
2/2 ON 1 ACRE
Lg. oaks, Nice! Newer
apple , AC, roof over
mobile, 14X24 wrkshp.
$67,500, Bend Cove,
Floral City 352-302-7817


3/2 SW on Two V2 AC
Lots. Scm porch,
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US19
352-503-4142
3/2, 1/4 AC. Crystal Rvr
Near Bic, Prk, New roof,
well, septic, HFandyran
Spec .49KCA , Con
tract neqgol, No owner
tinan,(352) 302-5535
FLORAL CITY 1,2 acres
Lake Magnolia Eslate.
DW 1978 1400 sq.fl, 2BR
2BA roof over 10x12
alum. shed, 12x24 Cook
Barn, screen room
$55,000 firm,
(352) 697-2993
HOMOSASSA 27'X 68'
3/2 Over 1,836 SF, on
1/2 Ac, All new well,
Septic, Power & Impact
Fee Pd. Owner Fin.
Avail. (352) 746-5918
LAND & HOME
2 Acre Lot
with 2000 sq. ft.,
3/2 Home
Garage, concrete
driveway & walkways,
carport. Beautiful
Must See 10% down
No closing cost
$948.90/mo WAC
Call 352-621-9182
LEISURE ACRES 3/2,
'05 On fncd. 1/2 Ac,
scrnd prch. carport.
20X20 garage, many
extras, great buy!
$135,000 (352) 628j4216
MUST SEE!!
2,200 Sq. Ft. of Living,
2.85 Acres, Paved
Road, Fenced,
2 Car Carport, Pool.
(352) 746-5912
or (352)400-6357
No Money Down!
FHA
Land & Home
3/2 on fenced 1/2 Acre
Deck, nice trees
and quiet
only $769.90 mo. P & I
WAC
Call 352-621-9183




4 NEW MODELS
Excellent Amenities
Gated Community
5 * , 55+
RESALES
$64,900.-$100,000.
Phone 352-795-7161
2/1.5 Nicely Furnished
in 55+ Park, Exc. Cond.
W/D, Dw, Fl. Rm. + Scrn.
Rm, laundry, shed
+ carport. $22,500
(603) 491-0431
55+ Pk. ALL LIKE NEW
1700sq. ft. Price
dropped 10K to $57,900
352-697-1788/563-6695
BIG PINE ACRES, 55+
2/1/Carport Screened
Porch, Shed, 2 ACs,
W/D, Sm. Pet OK,
Part furn. $9,800 obo
(352) 270-9323
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc, Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
camp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair. acc.shed
& sprklr. $53,900. (352)
563-6428/ 352-563-1297
FORREST VIEW EST. 55+
2/2, LR, DR, open kitch.
w/great room to scrnd
prch. Shed, Part, turn.
$64,550 TOO MANY
NEWS to istfl 563-2526
Lecanto Hills M.H.P.
2/1/crpt. Fully furnished.
Big Screen Porch, shed.
New heat pump.
Clean! Asking $19,500
(352) 257-1853
WALDEN WOODS
2003 DW, 3/2, vinyl
Fl. Rm., new berber
carpet. $62,500
(352) 382-2356




CHASSAHOWITZKA
Waterfront Doublewides
2/2 Dixie Crt $155,000
2/2 Bounty Crt $159,000
2/2 Peacock $165,000,
3/2 McClung Lp$169900
Houses
2/1 Tropical Ln, $89,500
3/1 Tropical Ln, $99,000
Owner Finan.10% Down
Or Rent 2/2's @ $600 mo
Onr/Agnt 352-382-1000

RENLhFINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com





Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
>) Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
> Res.& Vac,
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
manaamrenlarouo.
corn


IriVl:1111 *',1
2bd/2 1/?hin
F/l/Sr.., S/0 iJun
786-525 6515
r RENTAL I)rl r I
I, I l .-i- J




CRYSTAL RIVER
1 & 2 BR, W//I h lii, I
'6nO (352) 212 7740
CRYSTAI Rivrr.-
Nowly lh6i rlovot I
1'bedroom i lI to Ii i
W/fully clqulp lkll t".,
No crcnirr rI
nce-;suay. Noxl Io
park/ ,, ,. r" y
Starling (3a
a day for a wv/',
more. (Inclucdu's all
utilities & Full Servlwa
Housekeepling)
(352) 586-1813
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront 1BR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets, (352) 344-1025




3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm 1st Mo. FREE!
Crystal River. 634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR, laundry/premises,
$500 mo.+ sec, deposit.
352-465-2985
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/112 828 5th NE Ave.
Nice, CHA, $600/mo +
Sec. 352-586-5335
727-341-2955
CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities.
No application fees,
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity
HERNANDO
S2/1 Very clean,
$525/mo. Sec. dep.
352-527-7842
Invern./Homosassa
Apartments Available
352-628-4282
INVERNESS 2/1
$575mo. $862 sec. Call
9am-6pm 352-341-4379
INVERNESS
2/1, After renovation,
water, trash, incl. $625.,
1st & Sec. Dep. Req.
(352) 266-1916, Steve
INVERNESS Lg. 2/2
W/D hkup, $600/mo
352-341-2182/586-2205


a --II --I1

Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm 1stMo.FREEl
Crystal River. 634-0595




CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Office Space
with high profile estab-
lished Real Estate Co.
Great Location. To in-
quire call broker/owner
352-422-7925
Industrial Bldg/Property
on 41/2 Acrs 29 Michigan
St. Inglls, 3,000 total sq.
ft. 727-647-2596
INVERNESS AREA
1,000 sf, Office/Retail.
Ample parking, Busy
corners. (352) 726-6640
PROFESSIONAL Office
1690 sq. ft.
GREAT LOCATION
Call Mon - Fri. 8 - 4:30
(352) 795-2283
REPAIR SHOP
Floral City - Established
location. For sale or
lease. 813-388-3313




2/2 CITRUS HILLS
Greenbriar //,1st fir. turn.
Near pool. $114,500
$1,000mo 352-249-3155
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Furnished, Short
Seasonal/Long Term
352-527-8002/476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2BR, 2/2 BA Townhouse
Furnished $800/mo.
352-697-0801
CITRUS HILLS
Meadow View Villa
2/2/1 Fully turn. Pool,
(352) 586-0427
HOMOSASSA UNFURN
$815- Sugarmill Woods
/22/12 Atrium Villa, Ig.
lanai; 2/2 End Condo
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
INVERNESS 2/2
Unfurn, W/D, no smoke/
pets, $750. mo. 1st. last
$350. sec, 352-302-8231
352-621-4973
INVERNESS
3/2/1, Moorings, $900.
2/2/1, Landings $800.
Judy B Spake, LLC
Shown (727) 204-5912


PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 's IU , ',.ti/nrrc
h| r I(, r ri Poo I
362 '237 7436/812=3213




FLORAL CITY 1/1
ih/'i/m,,k/'aif,
(352) WI /6i'/1
lftr MO'.A'.'.A 2/1
I'I,'i /, !l, h . /t ,-d ,

(362) 796 5268
INVERNESS 1/1
"0 i1i, a tn'j o r I// - '
tail (3652)726-6515

I Il', ll, .1 K l,
52-:344-8389, 860-2418
ICANtO 2, 2
I ,, , l i I I I i
. ii... r..2- '/7 7525




6 BDRM HUD 554,0001
Only $429/rnol 5% dwn.
20yrs, at 8%, For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
6 BDRM HUD $54.0001
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrst 8%. at8%For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr, For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 For Rent/Lease
Option. LR, DR, FR,
HUGE eat in kitchen, 2
CG, covered porch and
shed. Walking distance
to Newly built Elem and
Middle School. $1,000
mo. plus 1st, last
and security. Call
352-489-8847.
CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS, MONTHLY Furn &
Unfurn. Heated pool.
All newill 352-302-1370
DUNN./CIT. SPRGS
REDUCED $100111
2 HOMES. Both are
3/2/carport
Totally refurbished!
Spotless! Imm. Occ.
Reduced to $695/mo.
527-3953
or (352) 427-7644
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, sun. rm., $1,300.
mo. (352) 628-7120
HOMOSASSA
Upgraded 3/2 Enjoy
Access to Comm.
Amen. & Pool. 55+
$950/mo.
2/2/1 Furn. Villa SMW
$900/mo.
3/2/2 Fully Furnished
w/Pool. SMW, $1,350
Coldwell Banker, Next
Generation Realty
(352) 382-2700

r MENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle |
rentalfinder.com

Rentals COUNTYWIDEI
GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Call:352-422-6129
or see ALL at
www.choosegaar.com
Sugarmill Woods
Large New Home 3/2/2
$1,000/mo 352-601-3627
SUGARMILL WOODS
RENTALII Lovely Home,
4/2/2 No smoking; Small
pet okay. Ref., $1,100./
mo. Avail. Oct. 1st
(386) 569-6777




3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1
Sep. Gar. $650/mo+
dep/util (352) 795-6282
CITRUS HILLS
Meadow View Villa
2/2/1 Fully turn. Pool,
(352) 586-0427
HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park. short/long term.
$695 (352) 628-9759
INVERNESS
Lakefront 2/2, DW
1600 sq.ft fully turn.,
44-E, East Cove $625
352-476-4964


1-11111111


3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
BEV. HILLS 2/1.5/1
Fl. rm. Fncd bkyrd, Strg,
shed.$650+dep.
352-795-8770/563-0964
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1/crpt. Glass Rm.
Clean & Conv, Area
$550 (352) 746-3700
BEVERLY HILLS
10 N.Desoto 2/1
$650.mo
8 N.Fillmore 1/1
$625.mo
CRYSTAL RIVER
9 N.Candle 2/1
$550.mo
INVERNESS
237 N.Croft 2/2
$750.mo
352-637-2973


CLASSIFiIUI)S


BEVERLY HILLS
18 N. Osceola, 2/11V2/1
& carport. New inside
$725 mo. 1st., Ist, dep.
& 33 Murray St. 2/1 /2.
Ig shed & fence
$600. mo. 1st. last. dep,
352-795-3000
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 First Mo. FREE. C/A.
$700 (239) 776-6800
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1.5 & 2/1 $700 Neg.
Ist/lst/sec 352-427-2173
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1
90 S J Kellner No S/P
Yard Care $775/mo
352-422-1024
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1/1
Clean! $695/mo. +
Ownr/Agt 352-228-3731
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/2/1 Lg. FR. Immacu-
late! 430 S. Washington.
$665 mo. 1st, last, sec.
No Pets. (863) 647-2950.
Beverly Hills 2/2/1
Lg. fl. rm. $725./mo. +
C/H/A 23 S. Harrison St.
727-463-1804
BEVERLY HILLS 3/1
WOWI ScrnRm., strg.
rm. Lawn care incl.
Ref. Req'd $650/mo.
352-302-3319
BEVERLY HILLS
35 S Desoto
3 N Jackson
40 & 68 S Harrison
Rents betw. $650-700
(352) 302-8104
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg. 2/2/1 Fam. Rm.,
Scrn. Rm. Appl. Good
Area. Move-In Cond.
$725 (352) 746-3700
BEVERLY HILS
2 Bed w/FI. Rm. $750
2 Bed Remod. $675. 1
Bed $625. 352-422-7794
CIT SPRNGS2/11/2/1
Cute & Clean! Scrn.
patio, sm pet ok, CHA
$625mo. 352-302-9053
Cit. Hills, President.
3/2/2,1 ac, $850/mo.
(352) 212-5812
CIT. SPRGS 4/2/2
$1,000. MOVES YOU IN
$1,000. MO. ALL FEES
WAVED (352) 597-3693
CITRUS SPRINGS 2/2
New '06, $650/mo. Inc.
(352) 362-7543
CITRUS SPRINGS
Many Available
$825.- $875. mo. 2 -4 wks
FREE Rent if Qualify.
(352) 795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investment LLC
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Lease Option.
4/2/2, 2,200 sft.
(352) 746-1636
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, tam. rm., water,
'gar. & pest, incl. $850. +
sec. (352)464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER 4/2
Spac. $825/ mo. + util.
Avail. 9/8 352-795-6282
FLORAL CITY
New 2/1, FP, W/D,
Dock, Canal Front,
Near park. $800/mo.
Owner. (352) 422-0294





Forest Ridge Village
2/2/2
$825.00
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more into. or
visit the web at:
citrusvillages
rentals]com
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Pool E. GettyLn. $1,100
1st + SD 352-697-1907
HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, No pets $575.
Ist/lost/sec 628-4210
HOMOSASSA 2/2
Near Rive,r $700+ dep.
(352) 628-0919
HOMOSASSA 3/2
1 Acre,C/AW/D, nice
neighborhood,
$750/mo., $1,500
Move- In (954) 294-0531
INGLIS 4/2 +DEN
10.59 acres, wrkshp.
$1800/mo.
Broker/owner
352-422-7925


INVERNESS 3/2/2
Clean, fenced yard.
$750 mo,. 352-637-0765
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Lake Area, $820/mo.
(352) 341-1142
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting oppt'y, lot12r
Mobiles for rent. Screen
porches, appl., water
incl. Fishing piers.
Beautiful trees. $350
and up. Leeson's
352-476-4964
INVERNESS POOL
Golf Course Home.
Large 3/2/2, No Pets.
$800. mo. 908-322-6529
* NO CREDIT CHECK!
RENT TO OWN
352-484-0866
visit jademission.com
PINE RIDGE
2/2/2 sec. l+ac
w/fenced yard.
Screen Florida room.
Short Term Lease Poss.
$1k per/mth.
352-266-2814 or
352-634-4304
PINE RIDGE
4/3 Pool on 1.25 acres.
$1500 mo. 1st&secu-
rity. (352) 634-2373



SMW
UPSCALE 2/2/2
SALE/ LEASE, scrn. lanai
$900. mo 352-592-9811
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 + Den. New
home. $1,250 + Util.
Ownr/Agt352-382-2800




CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 2/2 condo.
Beautiful waterfront
view w/dock. Recently
updated, partially
furnished, Pool, tennis
cts., cable TV. $900/mo
(414) 690-6337
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfrond Home 3 /2
Deep water, Dock,
$950.00 Per mo,
Call after 2 p.m.
352-795-2558
FLORAL CITY 3/2/2
OPEN LAKE FRONT
$1,000 mo. No smok/
pets (352)344-2500
INGLIS
2/2, House, CHA, W/D
hookup $750 mo+ 1st,
last &dep.water & garb.
14185 W. River Rd
352-447-5244
Cell 352-613-0103
INVERNESS 2/2
Wffrnt Gospel Is. w/shd.
$650/mo. 352-201-1222
PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 $150K, $800/mo,
Dock, Comm. Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213




INVERNESS
Pool, $150 wkly. incl. util.
(352) 726-6156 after 7


-"Rn
Pik


3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Lease Option.
4/2/2, 2,200 sft.
(352) 746-1636
Owner Finance,
Citrus Springs 3/2/1 Easy
terms. Low down pay-
ment (352) 201-0658
SALE OR RENT
SMW OAK VLG. SOUTH
Very Nice, near new.
3BR+ Den or 4 BR
$186K or $1000-1500/mo
Furnished or Unfurn.
(813)781-1341




CRYSTAL RIVER
$350/$450, share elec.
No smoking/drugs.
(352) 634-0708


HOMOSASSA
Room for Rent $100/wk.
incl all util 352-586-3441




CONDOS, HOUSES
SEAS, MONTHLY Furn &
Unfurn. Heated pool.
All newll 352-302-1370
HOMAS. 2/1, MH Util.
incl. Nice clean, quiet
park. short/long term,
$695 (352) 628-9759
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1 home w/d, inc water
elec garb tv $975/mth pea
ok, long term-$750/mth
(352) 434-1235




SEAS, MONTHLY Furn &
Unfurn. Heated pool. All
newly! 352-302-1370
Kings Bay Crystal River
1 mo. at a time Rentals
Furn. 1/1 Apt. Sleeps 4.
$1000/mo. Includes
boat slip. 386-462-3486
r7-- - - - m
I RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com








Im A Private Investor,
Looking to Buy, Res. or
Commercial Properties
for CASH 305-542-4650
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status
includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings
advertised in this
newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275,


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


Why Settle For Just A Piece


When You Can Have The Whole Pie?



When You Use The Advertising Power Of The Chronicle


And Add Chronicle Direct Mail, You Will Reach Over






68,000 Households!




For more information call 352-563-5592.


c I TRUS COUNTY




www.chronicleonline.comrn


-.


5474M


CITrRu COUNTY (FL) CHRONICIF


WORDY GUR DYTRICKYRICKYIKANE
1. Fabric fluff in a coin-making building (1) Every answer is a rhyming
- _[ -\- | I I - pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2, im ni iil\ relieve a Southern gal (1) they will fit in the letter
S Isquares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. 1..,', Trial" defendant manages (1) syllables in each word. To win
I 1 I $10,sendyour''originalrhymes
. . .... with your definitions to this
4. M re i 1 r i .l-l i i ll\ (21 newspaper. All entries become
SIj[ --j " * ' the property of UFS, Inc.
CO 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc
6,. I'lh .il l l'h.ii liandlLAI � sausliges (1)
L j.... Thanks and $10 to
_JJ L _____ _ Daniel Prieato of
( \|llilii]l ,,, . . , SagHarbor, NY for
- ... I---r- #1. Send your entry
_L _ L .LL . l to this newspaper.
7. Steve Alien show singer Kuyr's wild ducks (2)


SHIiVT''IVW t(HlVIVIVI 'L IDNIMM 9N11 SNIJAD'S L8flM SSIH *'
1'1l,'IO 1 ;Sl(IO *1 ;(10' . hl,1i)OD i(JDS ; T '2111dI S Ti, N'l .I NITJIA
04.07 M S S IASMV


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HC ... i I N u " - N I Y L
CffliRNh











SEPTEMBER 3 2007 18


oUp
Hou^Mse^


Every Sunday 11-2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/4/2/3
3645 W. Brazllnut Road
Go to www.lcpl.com\fl




AVOID FORECLOSURE
FREE INFORMATION
HELP LINE 24/7
1-800-675-3393,
ext. 7892 or call
352-601-3734




GREAT COMMERCIAL
Big. on Hwy 44, INV.
w/1800 SF, 4 Lease
@ $12SF; $890K w/lot
T. Paduano C21 JW
Morton (352) 212-1446
LARGE Office Facility
Turnkey. 4165 SF $667K
or Lease @ $12/SF
#315744T. Paduano
C21 JW Morton
(352) 212-1446
Medical Turnkey Office
Zoned RO; 2820 SF.
$527K or Lease @$12/SF
T. Paduano C21. JW
Morton (352)212-1446




INVESTORS
Palm Harbor Modular
Homes from $53 sf.
Finished on your lot.
3 Color brochures.
Call John Lyons
863-860-3062
THRIVING FEED STORE
GNC Comm. Property,
5,000 sf, metal big. Main
rd. crnr loc., Loading
Dock. $675K Don
Crigger Real Estate
(352) 746-4056




$112,000 NEW
CONSTRUCTION
3/2/2 1,404 sq. ft. Living.
+ $1,500 in CC.
Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker 1st
Choice. (352)220-9188
3/2/2 Rent-to-Own
New Home Citrus Spgs.
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
3/2/2, 1.23 Ac.
REDUCED TO $282,000
'07 New, Upgrades
2,372 Liv./3,269 Tot. SF.
(352) 302-0744
A REAL GEM! 2/2/2
Hardwood firs thru-out,
Fl. rm. Appli's like new.
Custom cabinets,
oversized lot near Gulf
Crs. Anxious to sell at
$149,900. 352-464-2094
BEAUTIFUL 2/2/2
New roof 2003, Call for
updated details.
S119K #317870
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885
BEAUTIFUL NEW 4/2/2
2,235 SFLA, CT, Ig.
Lanai, SALE OR RENT
$1200 mo 407-468-2179
GREAT LOCATION
Nice 3/2/2 home, split
fir plan. Off Golfview Dr.
$139K Cridland &
Cridland GMAC, Don
Verity (352) 804-7836
STILT HOMES
Molular Stilt Homes
140 mph. zoning.
We build, sell, deliver
We do it all!
Eliminate builder
mark-up. Call the
factory. John Lyons
800-622-2832 xt. 210


-=
5248 N BRONCO
4/3 pool home on 1,25
acres. $3,000 towards
closing costs. $273,500
(352) 634-2375
3/2.5/2 POOL HOME
UPDATED EVERYTHING
FSBO, Adj, to Golf
Course, Crnr Lot, Gas
FP, Irr. Well, Granite,
Huge Shed. Must See!
myhome4sale.net
$299K (352) 746-1175
3/2/2 POOL HOME
2237 sq.ft living space.
Backs to Black Diamond
3186 W Birds Nest Dr.
MLS#315839
352-586-1558 CALL
NOW! $289,700
3/2V1/2, Screen Pool
5310 Yuma
$259,900.
(352) 302-6025
BETTY MORTON


LIu. K Ieu lEtteAgen
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Reai lect


(352) 795-1555
ELEGANT & GORGEOUS
4/4/2, 3,200+ Liv. SF Pool
Home on 51/2+ Ac.
$595K #318216
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885
Every Sunday 11 -2
Price Reduced Again
$485k 5/4'V/3
3645 W. Brazilnut Road
Go to www.lcoi.com\fl

FIXER
UPPER
These homes
need work.
Free Computerized
list of properties
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
tvhomelnfo.com
ID# 1048

ERA American
Realty &
Investments

NEW & CLASSYI
4/3/3, Pool on > 1 Ac.
Kitchen has Corlan,
pull-outs, pendant
lights, tiled backsplash,
& S.S. appl, 10' ceilings
throughout, 18" tile,
raised vanities & Ro-
man Tub. Mother-in-law
suite w/Cabana bath.
Over 3,800 sf. for
$429,900
(352) 746-6161


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is M Future"
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
NICE MINI FARM 2/2 on
3.69ac. Barn and Out
buildings Incl. just bring
your horses. $229K
Alex Choto, Fl. Realty &
Auction. (352) 628-0968
NO EXPENSE WAS
SPARED on this beautiful
3/2 custom built home,
featuring stacked stone
in/out, gas FP, gourmet
kit, granite & all wood
cabinets, 10' ceilings,
alarm & sprinkler sys.
2 built-in 220 gal saltwtr
fish aquariums. 2 story
barn, 2 car detached
garage. Too many
extras to list!! $449,000
Owner/Agent call for
appt. 352-302-2300




Brentwood @Terra Vista
REDUCEDI Beautiful,
contemporary Town Hs,
2/2.5/1 + loft. View of
waterfall. Furn. Negot.
$190K(352) 560-0229
CAMBRIDGE GREENS
3/2/2 New Constr.
For Sale by Owner
Go to www.citrus
hillshome.com
CUSTOM BUILT
2005
5/4/3-3400 living
4700 overall
Great for large family
Pool/spa. No brokers
440k - Citrus Hills
352-302-4200
FOR SALE BY OWNER
1049 W PEARSON ST.
3/2/2 Pool Home, well
maintained & land
escaped, 2158sf under
air. $299,000. For appt.
Call (352) 527-4225
FSBO 3/2/2 on I Acre
in Citrus Hills
(infotube.net) ad
#180976 for more
details, or call
352-249-3299
Reduced $26,000. !!
$230,000 Large
Citrus Hills Beauty
1 ac 3/2/4 granite
B. Malz, (352) 212-2439
Keller Williams Realty
REDUCED TO $200,000
BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 Golf
Crs, Home, New AC,
roof & carpet. Nicely
landscaped, clean,
updated. 954-309-4262












- enad


3/2/2Canterbry Lk.Est.
NEWI Den. MB Suite,
Hg, W.I, Closet, Scrnd
Lanai, 7 fans,$332,900
(847) 612-2388
(508) 558-9790 Robert


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Rea iIelect

(352) 795-1555

CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
circular driveway,
prequailified only
Must See, $124,900
(352) 201-1663





FOR SALE BY OWNER
2BD, 2BA. LR, DR,
Kitchen range with ex-
haust hood, disposal,
dishwasher, washer
dryer hookup 1 car gar,
with opener, screen/
vinyl enclosed porch.
(352) 341-2771 for info


2 2h
$279,900
(352) 464-3383




305 S Tyler St
Lovely Home, totally
remodeled 2/2/2 w/
large rms, family Rm w/
FPR Dining Rm, eat in Kit,
all new tile, paint, CHA,
& Roof. Custom kit
cabinets, new
bathrooms, hot tub,
landscaping w/
sprinkler system &
more...MUST SEE,
$169,500.
(352) 746-9103
$79,900
2/1/Carport, w/Fam
Rm.1126 SF Liv. ALL
BRAND NEW & beautiful
(352) 464-2160
$99,900112/1; 1,100 sf.
9 Polk Lease Opt. or
Owner Financing Avail.
Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker Ist
Choice. (352)220-9188
ADORABLE 2/1/1 HOME
W/Caged Ingrd. Pool
$109,900 #315434
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885






















HOME FOR SALE
2/1.5/1 Large FR. New
appliances, central, tile.
Immaculate! Nice Lot!
430 S. Washington St.
$99,900. (863) 647-2950
** NO CREDIT CHECK!!
RENT TO OWN
352-484-0866
visit jademission.comrn




3/2/2 CRYSTAL GLEN
Elegant Home 2,577 sf.
Orig.$224,900/NOW
$179,900 Ron Egnot 1st
Choice Coldwell Bnkr.
352-287-9219


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is My.Eutuall
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
KINGS BAY DRIVE
4/2/2 on canal, immac.
Pool home, separate
suite, gated, $825,000
(352) 634-1805


m -4 , -

"Cytl6 ie


ARBOR LAKES 3/2/2
1580 sf., ingrnd jacuzzi,
Gated 55+ comm.
Reduced! Owner wants
offers! $174,900 Norm
Overfield 352-586-8620
Keller Williams Realty
Hernando Forest Lake
North, Newer 1 Lg
Bedroom 1000 sq. ft., on
1 acres, very good
cond. must see. Look!
Make offer
(352) 344-5448
REDUCED PRICE!!!
3/2, New construction
Many Upgrades,
$159,900. Jim Moran
(352) 726-5855
Era American Realty

SPOTLESS 2 BDRM.
2BA HOME 2 car gar,
Caged in-ground
pool, situated on 2.5
ac. landscaped
estate. Fenced for
horses and spotted
w/mature oaks.
Everything new.
If you are looking this
is a must see!
(VACANT -
MOVE TODAY)
Asking $269K
Contact D Crawford
for details.
(352) 212-7613





1006 Princeton Ln
$119,900 3/2/2, IHW,
2,000 sq.ft. under roof,
upgraded kitchen &
bath, minor TLC
352-563-4169
6463 E. Morley St.
3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage
built 2004 exceptionally
clean, adjacent lot
avail $140,000
(352) 341-3940
2/1/1 CHARMER 1600 sf.
Liv. Rm. & Fam. Rm., FP,
New metal roof &
windows. 12 X 20
Wrkshp w/strg. $114,900
352-726-4838/220-1863
2/2 Villa Downtown,
Ready to Move In.
Furnished, Tile, Carpet,
Laundry, Low maint.
$110,000.(352) 476-6192
3/1/1 @ $129,900
New roof, paint, kitch.,
lamin. firs. Shed, fncd.
yd. FLRm(352)302-7778
3/2/1 Beautifully Treed
Great Starter Home!
Priced for Quick Sale!
$134,900 Harley Hough,
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-400-0051
3/2/1Gospl Is. $169,900
>1,800 s.f. FI. Rm., Scrnd
Porch, Util. Big. on
approx. 3/4 Ac. Room
to build pool or add.
home on inc. adj. lot.
(352) 726-3481
3/2/2 Foxwood Home
New paint & carpet.
1620 S. Windmere Pt.
$168K 352-257-2646

BANK
FORECLOSURES

FREE list of
Foreclosure
properties
Receive a FREE
computerized
print out.
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www,freecitruscoun-
tvhominfo.com
ID# 1042
ERA American
Realty &
Investments

Beautiful Bargain 3/2/2
New roof, fireplace, tile,
25X25 LR, Immac. cond.
2100SF. 100% FIN.
$176K, (352) 586-7685
BUY OWNER T.P.A.61665

BETTY MORTON


FSBO 3/2 CARPORT
CBS with alum, siding,
new roof '07, new tile,
throughout '07 Irg.
corner lot, city water,
sewer, 418 Hunting
Lodge Dr. $115,000
(352) 341-0583
(352) 613-0937
HIGHLANDS 2/2/1
Split plan, oversized
wooded corner lot.
4Yrs old. Fam. rm. w/FP,
all seas Lanai, by owner
$145,900 (352) 637-1357
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
Lakefront Stilt Home
Drastically Reduced
3/2/2 car carport, was
$204k Now $160,000
Barb Malz, 212-2439
Keller Williams Realty
LOVELY 2/2 ON
treed lot. New roof, AC,
ceramic tile & carpet,
Extra lot also avail. Mi st
See to appreciate!
$152,900 (352) 220-3401
SELL YOUR HOME
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95"
Call
726-3983
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
".5 pu r aniorlnao line
rSc.mr rr'--a1 ch..li,-.-,
r.l.j, jia 'l.. ,
WINDERMERE VILLA
Pristine/original model
2/2/1, $155K
FSBO (352)726-8503
YOU GET MORE HERE
$169,000
Brand new 2100 SQ.FT
3/2 custom home ,
Many Upgrades. You
Will Want To Look
Here 1st 917-804-4300




4989 S Hummingbird




2/2 CHAIN OF LAKES
Entire house refinished!
Newly remod. kitch.,
dock, & covered
boat slip. $175K
352-726-4775/563-1848
3/2/1 Zan Mar Village
Charming & Peaceful!
Lots of upgrades, FP,
hardwood. $115.925
John Maisel III Exit
Realty(352) 302-5351
Beautiful 3BR, 2BA
home on 1 acre, corner
lot overlooking Floral
City lake, asking
$250,000 For details
(352) 464-5433
GREAT HOME ON 1 AC.I
2/2/2, new roof, renov.
in 2004. Open floor,
w/split plan $179,900
Terri Hartman Crossland
Realty (352)726-6644




1 AC MOL 3/2
20 X 30 det. Garage.
Close to Power Plant.
$89,900 (352) 302-9351
3/2/1 '2 Screen Room
6224 W. Pinedale Cir.
Connell Hghts. $139,900
(352) 302-6025
4/2/2, 2,100 SF. $154K
Beautifully remodeled.
New oak cabs, wood
floors, timberline roof,
fireplace, 2 min. from
water. (352) 688-8040
BETTY MORTON









Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission
Rea lect


(352) 795-1555


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
Keller Williams
Realty
CRYSTAL RIVER, 1/2 Ac.
Beautiful New 2 Story
Cape Cod! 5/2V2/21/i
Wood Floors, Great
Neighborhood, Over
2,800 Sf.(352) 746-5918
DICK OVN
(32 2-122


*Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder*


I iq$


Citrus Ridge Realty
720955


3521 N. Lecanto Hwy.
1-888-789-7100


Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1


bedrooms, 2baths, 1740 sq. ft. - split plan.
Deluxe window treatments, security system,
sprinkler system. Furnished or unfurnished.
Newer Citrus Springs neighborhood.


Calf352-465-0220 for appt.


HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
Lk Rousseau Area, 3/2
FP, w/ 2 garages,
carport, shed, 2'/ac,
beautiful parklike sett-
ing w/Ig. oak trees.
9701 Northcutt Ave.
$190,000 352-795-4770


Must Sell 4/2/2,
2,700 sq. ft. Home,
w/ Pool on golf course.
Completely remodeled
$40k in upgrades. Only
$299,999, (813)299-9959




3/2 SW on Two 1/2 AC
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt
2 blocks off US19
352-503-4142
3/2/2 on 2 LOTS
OLD HOMOSASSA
CB, bonus rm., FP,
Sunroom, $185K
Jack Randall
(352) 212-7740


DIKSMOIN


6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704
RIDE GOETHE 10.9 Ac.!
Fully fncd, barn12 X 12
stalls + paddock 2/2 MH
Gorgeous hill-top views!
$215K Well 352-239-7788/465-2427




6 BDRM HUD $54,0001
Only $429/mo!l 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mol 5% dwn.
20yrs, at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704




6 BDRM HUD $54,0001
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704




2/2 CITRUS HILLS
Greenbrier 1,11st fir. turn.
Near pool. $114,500,
$1,000mo 352-249-3155
PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 $150K, $800/mo,
Dock, Comm. Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213








REDUCED TO $200,000
BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 Golf
Crs. Home, New AC,
roof & carpet. Nicely
landscaped, clean,
updated . 954-309-4262




Hiawassee, Georgia
Nestled into the edge
of Chattahoochee
National Forest.
Stacked Stone Cabin &
Lot packages starting
as low as $199,000. For
more information call
(866)429-4703
www soapslonep
reserve.com
Fcan


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
NEW 2/1, FP, Lg. Deck
Dock, Canal front, $18K
below appraisal.
$162,500 352-422-0294
NEW Model, Cypress
Log Cabin 3/2, FP,
Award WinneI 1 Ac,
5364.500 352-422-0294
SELL YOUR HOME!
Place a Chronicle
Class,fied ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95'
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
* i, _ !r i .3"i1, :.1 1 l l" i -1
I 1, - . .|: pl ,

Vic McDonald
(352) 637-6200









Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE
Oukl'lringd , Ag ',iI
O ut-ilanding Agesul
(352) 637-6200

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


-U.l.atrrn


Move to the Smoky
Mountains 3/4-3 acre
tracts starting at
$79,900. 15min from
Pigeon Forge
Gatlinburg. Low taxes
Low crime. Majestic
Mountain Views.
(888)215-5611 x101
www.mountainhigh
tn.com.

NORTH CAROLINA
Extraordinary Riverfront
& River Access sites on
the Broad River
Starting at $39,900.
828-652-8700





2004 BEAUTY
2/2/2 w/1,606 LivSF
Maint. Free! #311064
$179,900, T. Paduano
C21 JW Morton
(352)212-1446

4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN
3,514 sf. Formal areas.
French Drs. gazebo &
guesthouse.$1,285,000
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
REALTY(352) 302-6082

BETTY MORTON


-I
CIO Citrus out
==LanduH~


KINGS BAY DRIVE
4/2/2 on canal, immac.
Pool home, separate
suite, gated, $825,000
(352)634-1805

LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!





PRT R IAI

Plantation Realty. Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the listings
in Citrus County at
www.plantation
realtvinc.com















PRITCHARD ISLAND
2/2 $150K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comm. Pool
352-237-7436/812-3213
REDUCED to $299K!
'05,3/3/3+ w/boat dock
& 2.33 Ac. MUST SEE!!
#308410 T. Paduano
C21, JW Morton
(352) 212-1446




1-15 HOUSES WANTED
Cash or Terms
John (352) 228-7523
www.FastFloridaHouse
Buyercam
Im A Private Investor,
Looking to Buy, Res. or
Commercial Properties
for CASH (305)542-4650
WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast I
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com




ACREAGE FOR SALE
0.5 - 2.5 Zoned for MH
or home. Priced to sell!
By Owner, Ownr fin.
avail. Low dwn, flex
terms.Se Habla Espanol
(800) 466-0460


www,crossland

Crossland
Realty Inc.
Since 1989
(352) 726-6644

' Lecanto, Centrally
Located, 2 cleared
.52 ac. lots. Desirable
neighborhood, paved
roads, city water, huge
oak trees, corner lot,
$35,000. Interior lot,
$32,500. W Laurel St.
Owner Agent
352-302-2300
TERRA VISTA HILLSIDE
GOLF COURSE LOT #9
Skyview CC, $77,000
Call (352) 638-0905




2 PR Beautiful LOTSIIII!
Maverick Ct. & Gorge
Lane $59,900 each.
#315012/#315015
Fran Perez, ERA Amer.,
BH (352)586-8885

4 CITRUS SPRINGS
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
Adjacent Lots
0.23 Acres each
3028, 3038, &
3046 Marie Dr.
& 9516 N. Emellia Ave.
1/4 mi. from Citrus
Springs Golf
& Count Club.
$9K ea.; $40K/all
For Details: Edward
(561) 337-4266


tile floors, gar. 560 s.f.
9'6" elevation, city
water, paved St.
Corner lot, room for RV,
Owner fin. $189,000
628-2703




3/2/2 New
Many Upgrades
Over 2400 sq ft Liv
$239,900 Dan Hoffman,
Keller Williams
352-601-3627
BRAND NEW &
STUNNING
FSBO 4/3/3+ Bonus
3238 sq, ft. All the
upgrades, Ig. gour-
met kitchen, granite,
center island & stain-
less appl. Lg. screen
pool. Selling under
apprasided value at.
$414,900 view at
greafflhomes.com
or call 813 967-7192
Great deal,
won't last!




SALE OR RENT
SMW OAK VLG. SOUTH
Very Nice, near new.
3BR+ Den or 4 BR
$186K or $1000-1500/mo
Furnished or Unfurn.
(813)781-1341




6 BDRM HUD $54,000!
Only $429/mo! 5% dwn.
20yrs. at 8%. For listings
800-366-9783 Ext 9845
7102 Smith Ter., HOLDER
3/2/2 on 1.3 ACRES
Borders State Park
ForSoleByOwner.com
Listing # 21030419
$229,900, 352-465-5233
3/2 $214/mo HUD
Home
5% down 20yrs at
8%apr. For listings call
800-366-9783 Ext 5704








BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is My Future!!

(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

BUYING OR
SELLING? CALL ME
FOR RESULTS!


A
14
;)~ .95.-
'I..


1 , . . I


,1<


-f


-s '5


y4si


Our monthly fee includes:


* Functional Webpage


* Domain Name


* Web Hosting


* E-mail


* FREE monthly chance


* Much more


't





" .


Let our trained

professionals help

you launch your

business onto the

world wide web.


C C I a R U R C OU NTY Y' ,






To get started or for more information call

.. __ (352) 564-2939


1 -1- . - 1-1 1 - I I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046

CRYSTAL RIVER
WATERFRONT
Spacious 4/3/1 on deep
water canal with Gulf ac-
cess, many updates in-
cluding new electric, roof,
central a/c, insulated win-
dows, appliances, hot
water heater, gorgeous
tiled shower in master,
and so much more FSBO
$285,000 352-795-4932

CRYSTAL SHORES 2/3
den. Dock, boat slip. on
2 lots, porch w/ vinyl
windows, overlook gor-
geous lagoon min. to
gulf, excel. cond.
REDUCED 352-795-7593


Does your business need a






website?


CII-ASSIEFI-E-"S


3.7 PINE RIDGE CORNER
Acreaae Priced To Selll
$149K; Seller says sell!
#315342, T. Paduano,
C21 JWMorton
352- 212-1446
5.63 Majestic Acreagel
By Duval Is. public bdat
ramp w/pub water &
barn stall. Elite New
Home Site! $249K
#313843, T. Paduano,
C21 352-212-1446
3/2 SW on Two 1/V2 At
Lots. Scrn porch.
BY OWNER, $44,500
1592 S Lookout Pt1
2 blocks off US19'
352-503-4142 ,
Beautiful 5 Wooded Ac.
Homes Only Area.'
Awaiting your home '&
horses]l$135,000 Sharon
Levins. Rhema Realty
(352) 228-1301

BEAUTIFUL PINE:
RIDGE ESTATES'
6 acres mol corner Iot
$300,000
621-3471 or 302-7351

FARMS
&
WATER FRONT













CIhLot
c= nfoir ~ Sale


1 1/4 ACRE In Crystal
Manor, Lot 23, Block 15,
Unit 1, Surveyed, Asking
$69,900. (352) 795-1531
CITRUS LOTS BELOW
MARKET
letsaolandllc.com
800-840-4310
PRISTINE Emerald Hills
2 Ac., CC 581,
Pleasant Grove, Inv,
Surveyed & Cleared.
$62K Ea. Acre
Agent Owned,
(352) 212-1446
REDUCED TO $24K
Inverness 0.46 Ac.,Oaks!
MUST SELL Bring all
offers 305-219-8247
Terra Vista Golf Course
,53 Ac. on Redsox.
Prime for new home!
#313888, $99K
T. Paduano, C21
352- 212-1446




BEST DEAL ON WATER
Halls River, 2 WF Lots,
side by side, deep
canal. Parklike setting.
Cleared & ready to
build. $89,900. ea.
Owner/aenn.t


RENTAL FINDER
www,chronicle
rentalfinder.com





1962, IFR equipped,
-Super Tips, Strobes, Cus-
tom Cabin Cover, New
Paint & Interior 2002.
Total time 3740. Engine
since remanufacture
1323. Runs & Flies as
smooth as silk. $35,000
(352) 637-5073
netsiania.net




PONTOON BOAT
TRAILER
Tandem axle, 13" tires,
galv, 31 ft.adjustable.
$1,400. (352) 447-0572




2, 1996 SeaDoos,
w/ trailer, runs good,
minor work w/ Fuel lines
on both, $2000.OB0.
(352) 464-3246
CENTURY 2280
1996 Bay with 150
Yamaha. Exc. Cond.,
VHF, FFinder, GPS,
Stereo, Custom Seat,
Alum Trailer. $12,000.
Call 407-376-4269






All 2007 Century Boat Packages
Receive A FREE Trailer
Stop In and SAVE! SAVE!
'07 2001 CENTURY
F150 & Trailer, T-Top & many
extras $28,292
'07 18 ft. PONTOON BOAT
with 50 HP $12,675
'07 OUTER BANKS
160 Skiff, 50HP Yamaha & Trailer
$13,595
'03 CHAPARRAL 215
SS Cuddy Mercruser & Trailer,
Z Fast & Clean $23,990



Air Boat
13 ft. fiberglass,
Rivermaster, hull, S/S,
cage, 403 Buick runs
good. Bilge pumps etc.
trir. needs paint $4,995.
(352) 637-2319
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510



AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597

AUTO, BOAT, & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621
CAROLINA SKIFF
1989, 16', 7'6" beam, 50
hp. Nissan, trlr. $1,600
(352) 302-8231
Carolina Skiff '95
CC 17' w/newly rebuilt
55HP Suzuki, gd. trailer
$4500. (352) 212-7651
CRESTLINER 16'
25HP Elect. Start,
trolling mtr, lites,
bilge, live well, galv trlr,
2 yrs old, like new. Paid
6000 sell $3,950 call
302-5784
KEYWEST 1520
A "REEL" STEAL
2005 15' w/ trailer
ALL THE UPGRADES!!!!!
(too many to mention).
Has less than 100 hours.
Just asking what is
owed. call 400-5520
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuoer
Centercom
352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuaer

352 794-0094

SNature Coast Marine _
1 Sales & Service |
Present this Ad for
10% Off on all I
I Parts & Service i
1590 US 19,
Homosassa
Lammmm aI


CLASSIC


HURRICANE 22'
'94, Fun Deck, fishing.
changing rm. 115 hp
Johnson, New bottom
paint. $7,500 obo
(352) 563-1327









NEW T-TOPS &
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last Longl
Call for Pricing
Mon-Fri. 9am-5pim
(352) 527-3555

NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Traller. Ready to fish
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209
PONTOON 16'
2003 Sylvan 16' w/02
40hp 4-stroke and 02
galv trailer. Bimini
toptrolling motor,
lIvewell, depth finder,
much more. VERY NICE
$8950, 212-5179
PONTOON 18'
With trailer. '00 40HP
motor. All in great
shape. $3500/ obo.
(352) 564-8941
PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trir.
$5,300 obo.
813-695-8428
352-634-4021 EVE
Pontoon Boat
30 ft. Party Hut, 93
Evinrude, 95H, T/T, runs
, great, head, stove
frige, etc. etc. 2001 Tan-
dem trlr., new firs. car-
pet, seats $9,500 obo
(352) 860-0513
SAILBOAT 17'
Com-Pac, Sm. safe
family cruiser. Shoal
Draft (18") Keel. Trlr.,
extras. Asking $1,750
Needs TLC
(352) 563-0022
SEA PRO 21'
1998, Center Console,
150hp Yamaha, $10,000
(352) 795-2537 Iv. mess.
SEA RAY 18'
'99 Bowrider w/ trailer,
115 Merc, OB, Tilt &
Trim, Extras, $8,900 OBO.
(352) 628-9056
SEARS HD
14' Aluminum
$400 or trade for a
Ghenoe.
(352) 795-3764
SPORTCRAFT
'86,20', CC, 140 OMC,
Sea drive, rebuilt '05,
boat/mtr/trlr. $2,900
obo (352) 795-4204
STARCRAFT
'98, Bowrider, 18'10", V-6
I/O, used in fresh water
only. $11,500 obo.
(352) 206-5894
SUNDANCE SKIFF
16', Center Console,
FF., Livewell, 40 hp
Mer. mtr., bimini top,
trlr. Mint Cond.! $6,500
(352) 382-5404
THUNDERCRAFT
16FT, '89 Bowrider, OMC
I/O, new carpet & seats
like new, garage kept
$2800obo 352-270-3641
Vectra Deck Boat
'06, Like new, seats 8,
90HP, loaded, $22k
Sell $16K obo
(352) 795-6895
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497



-U

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Whee " Sectioni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621


BIG

RV SALE

BY

COMO RV
at
Crystal
Chevrolet


Hwy.19-
Crystal River
Aug. 31

to

Sept 9
352-422-1282

DAMON 32' 1997
w/SLIDE, new tires/
brakes $23,500/obo
(352) 628-0699, after 6
or (352) 344-4400
DAMON 32', 1992
454 Chevy eng, 27K mi,


2 ACs, queen bed.Non
Smoking, No pets, Lots
of extras & Exc. Cond!
.M18.00 (352) 527-8247
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Duct AC, Pwr.
lev., Bckup camera,
gen., Loaded! 14K mi.,
$40,000 (352) 422-7794
HR ADMIRAL 36'
'02, 2 slides, 1.5 baths,
11,500 miles. Exc. Cond.
$57,500
(352) 382-0017
PACE ARROW 34'
Sips 7, 2 roof airs, 56,600
mi. 454 Chev. eng. new
tires, awning, exhaust.
$9500. (352) 344-8409
ROCKWOOD
'94, 23 2 ft., class A,
generator roof AC,
Chevy, 19kmi $16,900.
(352) 564-7935


co
-.L
c= Boats


92, custom paint, new
tires/rims, keyless entry.
AC, Ithr, Nice audio sys,
$3600/bo 352-746-6370
CAVALIER 1999
Good Gas Mileage.
4 door, Good cond.
Well maintained.
$2,000. (352) 746-6439
CHEVY CORVETTE
'99, 76K mi, heads up
display, 2 roof panels,
white, It gray leather
$19,700
352-382-3094





COUNTRY SIDE MOTORS
Extra Clean Used Cars,
Trucks & Motorcycles.
RV's, Boats. Jetskiis.
Consignment Wanted.
Detailing avail
www.countrvside
motorscoro.com
(352) 746-7883


m


AIRSTREAM 20'
1965 MODEL, 80%
refinished. $3500
(352) 422-7907
Catalina
'99, 31 ft., Coachman
super clean, everything
In good running cond.,
lots of upgrades. $9,500
Call (352) 527-8444
COACHMAN
Slide in 10FT camper,
new A/C, fridge, $900.
(352) 476-2149
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
KEYSTONE 32'
Bunkhouse
2005, 32 ft. Bunkhouse
with master. Sleeps 8,
microwave. Very nice
and clean. Value $20K
Sell for $15K OBO
Call 941-626-3951
PROWLER REGAL
'05, 39', alum, frame
const. fully loaded, 2 Ig
sldouts. 2 qu. sz, bdrms.
$17,500 (352) 634-4439
TRAIL LITE
'05 27FT, self contained,
8FT slide out w/20ft
awning, must see
$10,800 (352) 584-2491




Lambo door hinges
fits Honda & Acura,
$300 obo
(352) 422-0792
LEER TOPPER,
fullsize truck forest
green, $250.
(352) 476-2149
LIFT GATE For Truck
12 Volt, Hydraulic
Exc, Cond. $1,000
(352) 621-0982
Tire Rims, 18" TSW
6 spoke rims w/tires,
lug nuts & wheel locks
incl. recently
balanced. $600.obo
(352) 621-5588





TOP DOLLAR
For Junk Cars
$(352) 201-1052 $ J

CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333





*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645








Auto, Sunroof Loaded.....$7,995
'02 TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
V6, 0ual i rLoaded..........$7,9951




A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks In the
Chronicle
*2 weeks Qnlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Whees" Sectioni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621

BUICK CENTURY '02
Custom Sedan, 1 owner
65K, meticulous cond.
Loaded. Non-smoking.
$9400. (352) 726-3520
BUICK CENTURY '92
2.5, 4cyl, all pwr, no
leaks, uses no oil. Very
clean, orig. paint. Must
see $1500/obo 344-5448
BUICK LESABRE
2004, Sr. owned, 67K mi.
good cond., $8,500
Call before 9pm
(352) 382-2420
BUICK LESABRE
LIMITED 2003
23,500 mi., $12900 Ex,
cond. 352-795-5675
BUICK PARK AVE
1996, Loaded! Runs
& drives great! 232K
All Hwy mi. $1,995 obo
352-637-3550/228-1420
CADILLAC 2001
DEVILLE
Must be seen.
One of a kind $10,200
obo. (352) 527-6553
Cadillac EIDorado


CHRYSLER
'02, PT Cruiser, Lmtd.,
edition, only 49k mi.
Pwr, everything, loaded
$8,500bo. 352-601-5111
FORD Crown Vic LX
Low miles. 56K.
Immaculate! See NOW
@ www. citrushills.
shutterfly.com
Password: crownvic
$6,590 obo 637-6046
FORD ESCORT
'98, Gas Miser! 110K,
New tires, Frosty AC,
CD, 4 spd., Exc. Cond.
$1,900(352) 563-0022
FORD TAURUS 1993
Very clean Inside & out,
Runs good, 107K, Asking
$975 352-628-5378
FORD Taurus
'99, pwr, everything,
new tires, battery/
brakes $2,300. Floral
City (305)304-1096
Lincoln Towncar '96
Cold AC, new tires.
garaged, runs like new,
$1900/obo. 795-4770
Lincoln Towncar'98
Signature Series, 74K ml,
loaded, beautiful. Wht.
Ithr. all pwr, CD plyr.
$6900/bo 352-445-0507
MERC. COUGAR
'01, black, V-6, full pwr,
63,000 mi. $6995/obo
352-212-7168
MERCURY SABLE
'96 Wagon. 3.0, V-6,
Clean, good cond.
$600 AS IS
(352) 746-3837
MITSUBISHI Spyder
Eclipse '01, Convt., 5
spd. Tint, Wht/Tan Top,
60K, Immaculate! Grgd
$14,500 (352) 382-0005
MUSTANG - RED '01
15,000 mi. 1 owner,
loaded, $9,900.
(352) 212-5628
NISSAN SENTRA
'05, auto, AC, PW, PL,
CC, CD, 35K mi. Very,
clean, garaged, $9,850
352-634-3921
NISSAN SENTRA
2004, Rebuilt. 27K mi.,
auto, AC $7,500
(352) 527-2464
SATURN SCI '99
3 dr, 4 cyl, auto, 127K
mi. Cold AC, Runs/drives
perfect. $2550
(352) 453-6870
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./All pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
TOYOTA
PRIUS
2007 Silver, NEW
1,300 miles. $24,999
(352)422-0294
WHEEL OF A
DEAL










GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car,

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.

Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for "
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
$5001 Police Impounds For
sde!
Cas from $50 For shgs cdall
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




A Classic Car WANTED
American or Foreign
Will travel, Cash waiting
(407) 957-6957
CHEVY CHEVELLE
1965
31,000, $8,500 4 door
Malibu, 99% original
car, white, mint
condition 352-586-9113
MUSTANG '87
Red Convertible. 86K mi.
Sharpll See to
appreciate. $4200 firm.
(352) 341-4313
VW BEETLE 1973
Partly restored: This car
WILL Be Sold to the best
offer. (352) 527-1269
(352) 400-5369
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the


DODGE
'96,RAM SLT 1500,
custom paint, too much
too list. Excel. shape to
pretty for words, $5,995
obo (352) 860-0513
DODGE
'97, SLT, Laramie
ext. cab., diesel,70k mi.,
$12,000.
(352) 795-9339
DODGE DAKOTA
'96, w/topper,
Good Cond,
$2,700 obo
(352) 527-4590
DODGE RAM
'96 1500 Club Cab,
$3,.800/obo Rebuilt
Engine & TransRuns gd.
352-465-2087/697-2357
FORD F150 1984
150,826, $600.00 work
truck, runs great strght
6cyl, nds work has bed
topper 352-634-1597
FORD F-150 XL '95
Ext. cab,300, 6cyl. 5spd.
Air, clean, $2500 obo.
(352) 795-7757 or
(352) 697-9563
FORD F-350 '99
V-10, gas. 4X2 Super
Cab, loaded!
137,000 ml. $6,500
(352) 503-3571
FORD RANGER
2004, 27K ml., Auto, AC,
V-6. Exc. Cond. $10K
obo (352) 527-2464
MAZDA B4000
2000, Ext. Cab, pwr, AC,
79K, Asking $6,500
(352) 302-0586
NISSAN FRONTIER
'04 88,000 mi, Original
Owner, Very Clean &
dependable, 26+ mpg
$9,200. (352) 697-0147
TOYOTA
'94, Pickup, 4 cyl., 5 spd.
looks & runs good,
$2,200. (352) 302-2258
After 5, weekdays
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




FORD EXPLORER '98
XLT, V8, all pwr, extras,
tow pkg. New tires, 1
owner, 97K, Runs great.
$4950. (352) 628-5341
GMC SUBURBAN
'99, leather, all options,
full chrome pkg, cust.
wheels/tires, hi mi. perf,
maint. exc. cond.
$7,000 (352) 422-3661
MERCURY
03, MOUNTAINEER, 4dr
83,500 mi, new tires, like
new, $11,700. OBO
(352) 503-6076
(352) 464-3322
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlnel
,Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectilonl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVROLET 2500
'04, LT Silverado HD,
XCab, Long Bed, 4 X 4
Duramax Diesel, 46K,
Loaded! $21,900
(352) 489-7689
DODGE RAM 1500
2003, Heml. Quad cab,
75K mi., $11,900
(352) 228-7033
FORD EXPLORER
1995 4x4 Limited,
223,000 miles, White,
gray interior. $2,745.
352-382-3094


FORD F-150
'94, 4WD, runs & looks
good, 300 6Cyl., 5spd.
OD, $2,250 obo
(352) 795-4204
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




CHEVROLET
'93 G-20 van, Mark Ill,
V-6 auto., AC PW PL
new parts tires, $2,250
(352) 344-5003
CHEVY
'01, Astro, LS, 4.3L eng.,
wheelchair lift. in the
side door, 36k mi,,
$8,000. (352) 527-4247
CHEVY
'77, 1-Ton , Box Van
V8, automatic, AC
good tires, $1,800. or
trade for boat & motor.
228-2745
CHEVY STEP VAN
'73, Good Cond.
$1,995
(352) 621-0982
CHEVY STEP VAN
'78, C30 Series. Good
Work Truck $500
(352) 621-0982
CHRYSLER
2000 Town & Country
LX, one owner, great
shape, 151K, all power
$3,995, (352)341-3711
DODGE
'96 Caravan, V-6 149K
clean, runs real good,
$1,800 (352) 489-6072
(239) 450-8153
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374




*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA TRX 200
ATV, runs & drives, with
high and low transm.
$600obo 352-628-2769
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
4 WHEELER
(TWO) 2001 Kawasaki
220 4wheelers. Good
condition, $1100.00
each. 352-748-5005




2 HARLEY'S
'97 Road King 28K mi.
burgundy/silver stocked
'01 1200 Sportster
custom, 18,250 mi.
Burgundy & dark
burgundy. Lowered
w/forward controls
(352) 583-4338

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
*2 weeksQnlinel
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"Wheels" Sectlonl
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*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


443-0903 MCRN
Beverly Hills Advisory Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Beverly Hills Advisory
Council will meet on Monday, September 10, 2007 at
10:00 o'clock A.M. at the Beverly Hills Civic Center, One
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida, 34465, to conduct
business of the Beverly Hills Municipal Service Benefit
Unit,
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352)
341-6560, at least two (2) days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Advisory Council with respect to any matter con-
sidered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record shall Include the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal Is to be based.
By: Mike Colbert, Chairman
BEVERLY HILLS MSBU

Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 3, 2007.

444-0903 MCRN
State of Florida Dept. of Community Affairs
PUBLIC NOTICE
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND THE
CITRUS COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 07-1-N01-0901-(A)-(I)
The Department gives notice of Its intent to find the
Amendment(s) to the Comprehensive Plan for Citrus
County, adopted by Ordinance No, 2007-AT9 on July
10, 2007, IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to Sections
163.3184, 163.3187 and 163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Citrus County Comprehensive Plan
Amendment(s) and the Department's Objections, Rec-
ommendations and Comments Report, (if any), are
available for public inspection Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, during normal business hours, at
the Citrus County Community Development Division,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 140, Lecanto, Florida
34461-8070.
Any affected person, as defined in Section 163.3184,
F.S,, has a right to petition for an administrative hearing
to challenge the proposed agency determination that
the Amendment(s) to the Citrus County Comprehen-
sive Plan are In Compliance, as defined in Subsection
163,3184(1), F.S. The petition must be filed within
twenty-one (21) days after publication of this notice,
and must include all of the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C. The peti-
tion must be filed with the Agency Clerk, Department
of Community Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahossee, Florida 32399-2100, and a copy mailed or
delivered to the local government Failure to timely file
a petition shall constitute a waiver of any right to re-
quest an administrative proceeding as a petitioner un-
der Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS If a petition is filed,
the purpose of the administrative hearing will be to
present evidence and testimony and forward a recom-
mended order to the Department. If no petition is filed,
this Notice of Intent shall become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected persons may peti-
tion for leave to intervene in the proceeding. A petition
for intervention must be filed at least twenty (20) days
before the final hearing and must include all of the in-
formation and contents described in Uniform Rule
28-106 205, FA.C A petition for leave to Intervene shall
be filed at the Division of Administrative Hearings, De-
poartment of Management Services, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060, Failure to pe-
tition to intervene within the allowed time frame consti-
tutes a waiver of any right such a person has to request
a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS , or to
participate in the administrative hearing,
After an administrative hearing petition is timely filed,
mediation is available pursuant to Subsection
163 3189(3)(a), FS , to any affected person who is
made a party to the proceeding by filing that request
with the administrative law judge assigned by the Divi-
sion of Administrative Hearings. The choice of media-
tion shall not affect a party's right to an administrative
hearing
/s/ Mike McDaniel, Chief
Office of Comprehensive Planning
Department of Community Affairs
2555 Shumord Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
September 3, 2007


-1R4B SEPTEMBER 3. 27


'FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLDWING SE
1990, Honda,.72K mi. like
new. Pearl white, $6,000
a must see. Crystal River
cell 772-528-6130
HARLEY CHOPPER
'71 Old School Iron
Head. Everything
redone! A steal @
$5,500
352-308-2570/586-1917

HONDA Goldwing
'76, GL 1000
Exc. Cond.
Many extras, $2,995
(352) 621-0982

HONDA VTX 1300
2006, Custom, Black,
Wndshld, Saddlebags,
Back Rest, Like Newl
$7,000obo 220-2374
HONDA
VTX 1800 R, black, 2003,
15k ml, adult driven,
absolute pert. cond.
windshield, light bar,
hyper charger, engine
guards etc. etc, call for
full list of accessories
$7,500 . 352-228-9514
LONGBO SCOOTER
'05, 6 mos. old. 150CC,
Up to 65 Mph
Showroom Cond.
$1,295 obo 436-4132
PAGSTA MOTOR
SCOOTER, auto, street
legal. Like new, only
60mi. $695/obo
(352) 628-4276

SCOOTER 2005
150miles,$ 1700
Daielm scooter brand
New; hardly used.
Very sharp Scooter 50cc
call 352-249-0815
not after 8:00 pm

SUZUKI BLVD C50
2005, 6000 miles,
windshield, factory
custom paint, saddle
bags, gel seat,light
bar, 50 M.P.G..
Beautiful cruiser
$6,200
352-634-0430

YAMAHA
'85, Venture Royal, exc.
cond., new tires, 37K mi.
Asking $2,200 obo
(352) 621-0927





438-0903 MCRN
Homosassoa Storage, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
By reason of default,
Homosassa Storage, Inc.,
8787 S. Suncqast Blvd.,
Homosassa, Florida 34446,
will sell the personal prop-
erty stored in:
Unit B03
a 10'X10' unit
household goods
of Carter "Jay"
Shackelford.

This public auction sale
shall take place Tuesday,
Sept. 18, 2007 at 9 am.
Published two (2) times In
Citrus County Chronicle,
August 27 and September
3, 2007.
439-0903 MCRN
2007-CP-714 Estate


Bertna i., Galloway
Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE
CASE NO, 2007-CP-714
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
BERTHA H. GALLOWAY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the Estate of Bertha H.
Galloway, deceased,
whose date of death was
July 22, 2007, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, File Number
2007-CP-714; the address
of which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450. The names
and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and
the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate, on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must tile their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publi-
cation of this Notice Is
August 27, 2007
Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNessJr.
1205 N.Meeting Tree Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Attorney for
Personal Representatives:
Thomas M.
VanNess, Jr,, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 0857750
VanNess & VanNess, P.A.
1205 N. Meeting Tree Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
1-352-795-1444
Published two (2) times in
Citrus County Chronicle,
August 27 and September
3, 2007.

736-0905 W-TUCRN
Citrus County
Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the Internet at
govdeals.com from
August 15, 2007 to
September 5, 2007.
Published seven (7) times,
consecutively, starting
August 15 through Sep-
tember 5. 2007.


You've Got It!





Somebody






Wants





It!


...C f . .. � . ....... 1-T





(352)563-5966

www.chronicleonline.com
_sgeaoa


F


PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Michael Vangelder
L/K/A 2512 East North Street
Inverness, FL


5EVIEMBER --, ZV


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






425-0903 MCRN
Michael Vangelder, Termination of
Parental Rights Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2004-DP-112
IN THE INTEREST OF:
T.V. DOB: (01/13/1997)
Minor Chlld(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND
NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF


Chroniclel
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
p5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVROLET
1980, 4x4, step side,
built 350, 9" lift, 35
swompers, 1 ton
running gear, runs &
drives great,S 1900 OBO
(352) 795-0848
CHEVY /2 TON PU
'71, short wheei base,
great shape, 350 auto
Edelbrock carb. intake
headers, 17" whisk & tires
Illness forces sale.S5850
352-726-1711 Days
637-6519 after 6


You are hereby notified that a petition under oath
has been tiled In the above-styled court for the termi-
nation of your parental rights as to TV, a male child
born on 13th day of January, 1997 In Citrus County,
Florida, and for placement of the child with the Florida
Department of Children and Families for subsequent
adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and
appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck, of
the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the
above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on September
24, 2007 at 1:30 PM at the Citrus County Courthouse,
110 N, Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor. Inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION
OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD, IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE
ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO
REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN AT-
TORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE
WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE AP-
POINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation In order to participate In this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please contact John Sulli-
van at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450 or phone (352) 341-6700
within two working days of your receipt of Notice of
Advisory Hearing for Termination of Parental Rights, If
you are hearing impaired or voice Impaired, call
1-800-955-8771.
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four
consecutive weeks in the Citrus County Chronicle's
Classified Section,
Dated this 7th day of August, 2007 at Inverness,
Citrus County, Florida.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Jennifer Sosnicki
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
on August 13, 20. 27, and September 3, 2007.

428-0910 MCRN
2007-DR-3526 Martha E. McKeehan Vs.
Richard H. Underswod Dissolution of Marriage
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaseNo.:2007-DR-3526
Division: FAMILY
MARTHA E. McKEEHAN,
Petitioner
and
RICHARD H. UNDERWOOD.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Richard H. Underwood.
(Respondent's last known address): Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to If on Martha E.
McKeehan., whose address is PO. Box 3897, Homosassa
Springs. FL 34447 on or before 9/19/2007, and file the
original with the clerk of this Court at The Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450, before service on Petitioner or Immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.
Copies of all court documents in this case, Includ-
Ing orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's of-
fice notified of your current address. (You may file No-
tice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Ap-
proved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers In this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the
clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Pro-
cedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and Information. Failure to comply can result In
sanctions, Including dismissal or striking of pleadings,
Dated: August 3, 2007
BETTY STRIFLER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ L. Johnson
Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
August 20, 27, and September'3 and 10. 2007.

426-0903 MCRN
Lee Vangelder, Termination of
Parental Rights Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2004-DP-112
IN THE INTEREST OF:
T.V. DOB: (01/13/1997)
Minor Child(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION. SUMMONS AND
NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Lee Vangelder
L/K/A 2512 East North Street
Inverness, FL
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath
has been tiled in the above-styled court for the termi-
nation of your parental rights as to T.V. a male child
born on 13th day of January, 1997 in Citrus County,
Florida, and for placement of the child with the Florida
Department of Children and Families for subsequent
adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and
appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck, of
the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the
above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on September
24, 2007 at 1:30 PM at the Citrus County Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor. Inverness, FL 34450
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME
SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION
OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD, IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE
ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO. HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO
REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN AT-
TORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE
WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE AP-
POINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance Please contact John Sulli-
van at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka
Avenue, Inverness. FL 34450 or phone (352) 341-6700
within two working days of your receipt of Notice of
Advisory Hearing for Termination of Parental Rights. If
you are hearing impaired or voice impaired, call
1-800-955-8771
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four
consecutive weeks in the Citrus County Chronicles
Classified Section
Dated this 7th day of August, 2007 at Inverness,
Citrus County, Florida
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By /s/ Jennifer Sosnicki
Deputy Clerk
Pushed four (4) times n the Citrus county Chronicle
on August 13. 20 27, and September 3, 2007.





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