Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00993
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: September 2, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00993

Full Text





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PAGE 4A


SEPTEMBER 2, 2007 Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 75S VOLUME 119 No. 245



TSenator resigns after sting


Sen. Larry Craig will leave office Sept. 30


Mortgage crunch
Rise in home foreclosures
leaves many on shaky
ground./Page ID
FLIPPER'S FLU:
'Super bugs'
Scientists report that one in five
dolphins living in the Indian
River Lagoon harbors antibotic-
resistant 'super bugs.'/Page 3A


Surge in killings
Violence against Iraqi civilians
increased in August, raising
questions about the effective-
ness of the U.S. troop
surge./Page 10A
IN THE LINE OF DUTY:
A life cut short
A 20-year-old police appren-
tice dies from a gunshot
wound he received attempting
to stop a robbery./Page 3A

PAKISTAN'S FUTURE:







Stalled.
Former Pakistani prime minis-
ter says talks with President
Musharraf have broken down,
but she vows to return from
exile./Page 10A
COMMENTARY:

Citrus
County taxpayers
should be angry
because an
injustice has been
done in their
e names.
t
2C.

ONLINE POLL:
Share your view
Should the federal govern-
ment adopt Crystal
@ River Council's
suggestion to
approve year-
round slow speed
zones in the bay
and to keep people
from touching manatees?
A. Yes. It's the best way to
protect manatees.
B. No. The rules are too
restrictive.
iC. They should adopt the slow
!speed zone only.
D. They should adopt the no
touching manatees policy
,only.
To vote. simply access the
Chir'oncle Web site,
lwww.chronicleonline.com.

'Annie's Mailbox ....... 16A
Classified ........ . . . 6D
[Crossword .......... .16A
'Entertainment ........ .8B
Horoscope .......... 16A
Lottery Payouts .... . . . . 8B
Movies ........ . . . . . 16A
Obituaries .......... . 6A
Together ............ 15A
Eight Sections


6 1845Ill1


Associated Press
BOISE, Idaho - In a subdued ending
to a week of startling political theater,
Sen. Larry Craig announced his resig-
nation Saturday, bowing to pressure
from fellow Republicans worried about
damage from his arrest and guilty plea
in a gay sex sting.
"I apologize for what I have caused,"
Craig said, his wife Suzanne and two of
their three children at his side with a


historic Boise train station as backdrop.
"I am deeply sorry."
Craig, 62, said he would resign effec-
tive Sept. 30, ending a career in
Congress spanning a quarter-century.
Making no specific mention of the
incident that triggered his disgrace in
his remarks, he spoke for under six
minutes and took no questions. ,
Among those attending was
Republican Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter,
who will appoint a successor for the


remaining 15 months of
Craig's term.
It was a relatively .... '
quick end to a drama
that began Monday with
the stunning disclosure
that Craig had pleaded
guilty to a reduced
charge following his Larry Craig
arrest June 11 in a arrested
Minneapolis airport June 11.
men's room.
Craig at first tried to
hold on to his position, contending in a
public appearance on Tuesday that he


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Progress Energy has started construction (lower right) to improve pollution control at two of its Crystal River coal-fired plants.

Progress Energy targets improvements at Crystal River site


TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Progress Energy confirmed plans
this week to invest more than $1.6
billion in new technology at the
Crystal River Energy Complex to
improve air quality at two of its four
coal-fired plants and upgrade the
Crystal River nuclear power plant.
The Raleigh-based company will
spend in excess of $1 billion adding
pollution-control.. equipment to the
two largest coal-fired plants and
more than $600,000 modernizing and
increasing power generation at the
nuclear power plant The improve-
ments will occur in the next four
years.
Company officials said the nuclear
plant's power output will be
increased from 900 megawatts to
1,080 megawatts and its instruments
will be converted from 1960s and
'70s' technology to digital controls.
The plant's steam generators will be
replaced and an elevated dry storage
area for spent fuel rods will be con-
structed.
The coal-fired plants, Units 4 and
5, are being equipped with "selective


The Raleigh-based company will spend in
excess of $1 billion adding pollution-control
equipment to the two largest coal-fired plants
and more than $600,000 modernizing and
increasing power generation at the nuclear
power plant.


catalytic converters," a technology
similar to the catalytic converters
used for pollution control on cars,
and with scrubbers. The converters
will remove about 90 percent of the
nitrogen oxide, while the scrubbers
take out 90 percent of the sulfur diox-
ide. Preliminary site work has begun
for the clean air project
The company says it hasn't decid-
ed what to do about reducing emis-
sions from the two smallest coal-
fired plants.
Danny Roderick, vice president of
nuclear projects and construction,
said increasing power output by 180
megawatts at the nuclear power
plant is expected to save customers
$2.6 billion in gross fuel costs


through 2036 by reducing the need to
purchase more expensive fossil fuels
like coal and gas.
"There are not many things you
can do for $382 million that can gen-
erate $2.6 billion in
savings,"Roderick said. "I think we
are positioning ourselves very well.
We intend to run the plant an addi-
tional 30 years."
' Progress Energy will begin prepar-
ing next year to file for a 20-year
renewal of the nuclear plant's
license. Ten years remain on the cur-
rent license.
If approved by the Florida Public
Service Commission, the $382 mil-
Please see P .- /Page 5A


had done nothing inappropriate and
that his only mistake was pleading
guilty Aug. 1 to the misdemeanor
charge. But a growing chorus of leading
GOP leaders called for him to step
down to spare the party further embar-
rassment and possible harm in next
year's elections.
Otter said Saturday he has not chosen
a replacement, although several
Republicans familiar with internal
deliberations said he favored
Republican Lt Gov. Jim Risch.

Please see CRAIG/Page 4A



Baseball



star's local


property


on market

Hamptons'

restaurant plans fade
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
When the plans were unveiled in
November 2005, it seemed like Mike
and Kautia. Hampton were again onto
something special.
It was a
100-seat waterfront
restaurant/sports bar on
Kings Bay. The restau-
rant, named Mike
Hampton's on the Bay
would include memora-
bilia from Hampton's
major league baseball Mike
career and a wall dedi- Hampton
cated to some of Citrus had planned
County's biggest sports to open eatery
stars. on King's Bay.
Hampton's represen-
tatives presented the plan to members
of the Crystal River Community
Redevelopment Agency, who were
thrilled. A restaurant of this caliber, sit-
uated near Cracker's Bar and Grill,
would fit in perfectly with the agency's
vision of a waterfront boardwalk
On paper, it was a hit
However, that's where it stayed.
. The property, bought by the
Hamptons for $1.25 million, is on the
market The Hamptons also are selling
their Homosassa homes and have
moved to Arizona.
The Hamptons' Realtor, Kathy Tolle,
said the waterfront property and an
adjacent lot are being packaged at $2.5
million. The properties combined com-
prise about 1.5 acres, she said, and went
up for sale in June.
Plans apparently never made it much
past the paper stage.
"They came in with some conceptual
site plans, some architectural render-
ings, then it just stopped," said Kurt
Woerner, Crystal River's director of
development. "Now it's just one of those
great pieces of property with a for-sale
sign on it."
Richard Laxton Jr., a designer with
Synergy Architecture LLP of Crystal
Please see :, ' 7.:/Page 5A


Teen mothers form bonds, get help through new program


KERI LYNN MCHALE
kmchale@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Some teenagers in Citrus County
have to deal with pimples, prom ... and
pregnancy.
On Saturday, Aug. 25, young mothers
brought their tiny tots to Stay 'N Play in
Inverness for snacks and social time.
The teenagers are part of a support and
encouragement group called Citrus
Teen Mothers of Preschoolers, MOPS.
Members of the Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church began the group
in September 2006 to provide a place
where teen mothers have the opportu-
nity to learn about parenting and form
relationships with other mothers. Teen
MOPS is under MOPS International
and the Teen MOPS in Citrus County is
one of only three groups in Florida,
said founding team leader Rebecca
Schmalstig.


* WHAT: Teen MOPS meeting.
* WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 11.
1i WHERE: Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church, 4221 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Hwy., Lecanto.
N INFORMATION: Call 726-6200.

"We just feel it's been great to watch
them grow and their kids grow,"
Schmalstig said. At the first open house
in September 2006, six mothers attend-
ed. By the end of the year, 19 moms
were part of the program, Schmalstig
Please see ,4tr/_,/Page 2A
Rebecca Schmalstig, a Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church MOPS founding
team leader, plays with her 18-month-old
son Koen and MOPS participant Danielle
Jones' 18-month-old daughter Serenity.
WALTER CARLSONIFor the Chronicle


HIGH
89
LO V
74








CriRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC.


Little cars are nothing to toy with Local firefighters


Low-tech equipment

has high value

in traffic court

BY JAY STAPLETON
The Daytona Beach News-Journal
DAYTONA BEACH - Emotions run
high. Deciding who's right or wrong in a
traffic crash pits one person's word
against the other.
But when the going gets tough in local
traffic court, there's a secret weapon to
find the truth.
"Get out the cars," Hearing Officer
Charles Cino says.
Cino and another traffic court hearing
officer in the Volusia County administra-
tion building keep a drawer full of toy
cars for a dose of low-tech accident
reconstruction.
In an age of high-tech courthouse
recording devices and other equipment,
the cars, trucks and motorcycles give
hearing officers and those appearing
before them a simple way to illustrate
what happened.
"We've got a motorcycle, we've got nice


MOPS
Continued from Page 1A

said.
"Everyone needs a great
community instead of just
being all
alone," said
founding team
leader Tanya Ei
Wood. The
leaders are needs a
not teen moth-
ers, but all communul
have children
and are mem- Of just
bers of Seven
Rivers all alone
Presbyterian
Church. They T;
are the men- about the M
tors and
organizers of
the program. Wood, Schmalstig
and Drenda Stack were the ini-
tial leaders at the start of
MOPS and remain active. Wood
said she lends a helping hand
whenever possible, since she is
juggling four young children


cars," Cino said at a traffic court hear-
ing. "There's a Lamborghini, if you want
to dream a little bit."
Cino said he came up with the idea
when he was appointed to the position
in 1999. At that time, traffic cases not
involving injury were assigned to hear-
ing officers to free up county court
judges.
Cino, who is also the attorney for the
city of Flagler Beach and other local
entities, said toy cars were often given
away at seminars for traffic court offi-
cials.
"I wasn't going to give them to my
kids," Cino said. "They've got enough
cars."
Daytona Beach isn't the only place
where little cars are used in traffic
court. In San Diego, the cars are mag-
netized to stick on display boards. Toy
cars placed on diagrams are used in
Oklahoma and other states.
In court recently, two Daytona Beach
women faced citations for backing into
each other. Cino used the toy cars to
show how the women described exiting
their driveways. Based on the recon-
struction, and the testimony of an offi-
cer, Cino decided both were equally
responsible.
"The cars really help," he said later.


while Schmalstig and Stack
take the reins.
The Teen MOPS is a faith-
based group, but non-
Christians are welcome and
encouraged to come,
Schmalstig said. Mothers are
allowed to attend from the
moment they
discover they
are pregnant
everyone until their
children reach
I great five years of
. i age.
:y instead The meet-
ings usually
being take place on
the second
0* Tuesday of
each month
anya Wood and childcare
loPS community. is provided so
the mothers
have a chance
to eat, do activities and discuss
topics. In the past, mothers
learned infant massage tech-
niques, enjoyed a spa day of
relaxation and tea party,
learned conflict resolution
skills and focused on goal set-


"I do think it's helpful," said Daytona
Beach lawyer Karen Foxman, who
recently got a citation dismissed for a
client in which the cars were utilized
during the hearing.
The toy cars were used in court to
show how Foxman's client was driving
past a police car. Considering the testi-
mony, Hearing Officer John Pascucci
dismissed a citation for an improper
pass.
"You can actually see how things hap-
pen," Pascucci said. "I make everyone
come up and we all look together. I like
to keep it as friendly and open as possi-
ble."
Attorneys say the cars are especially
useful in a court setting where many
people do not use attorneys. Because
those representing themselves are not
schooled in the rules of evidence, the toy
cars allow them to easily explain their
side.
Pascucci said he thinks letting drivers
use the cars gives an advantage over dia-
grams and drawings when trying to learn
the truth.
"We have cars with trailers, we have
just about everything," he said. "A lot of
times people draw a picture, but you can
show them (with the little cars) it doesn't
work that way Or sometimes, it does."


ting.
The program is funded
through Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church dona-
tions, which allow the leaders
to set up the MOPS mall. MOPS
dollars are given to mothers
who regularly attend meetings
and actively participate or
exhibit good parenting skills
such as making sure their chil-
dren receive immunization
shots. The leaders set up a
makeshift mall full of essential
items for the moms and their
children. The dollars are an
incentive to consistently attend
meetings, but the support ben-
efits of the program is incen-
tive alone for many partici-
pants.
"It's a good escape ... some-
thing you know will always be
there for you," 18-year-old
Peggy Jamieson said. She start-
ed coming to the meetings
when she found out she was
pregnant, around the same


time Teen MOPS began in
Citrus County. Now she attends
with her son, Timmothy, who is
12 months old.
When Jamieson arrived at
Stay 'N Play, she found
Danielle Jones, a fellow 18-
year-old Teen MOPS partici-
pant. The women met and
became friends before they
became mothers, when they
were students at
Withlachoochee Technical
Institute. Jones said she went
into labor at WTI and her
teacher took her to the obste-
trician. It was a situation only
teen mothers, who juggle
school and pregnancy, could
understand.
Now Jamieson and Jones
remain friends through the
Teen MOPS program. Their
children, Jones' 18-month-old
daughter Serenity and
Timmothy play during MOPS
meetings.
Unlike Jamieson, Jones


90DAYS -NO AMET N NTRS


join international


association

Group links localfirefighters

with 280,000 around the nation


Special to the Chronicle

On May 1, the firefighters of
Citrus County joined the
International Association of
Firefighters and were certi-
fied as a Bargaining Unit by
the State of Florida. The newly
formed Professional
Firefighters of Citrus County
Local No. 4562 is one of more
than 3,000 locals in the United
States and Canada.
Since becoming apart of the
official organi-
zation they The goa
have formed a
contract com- ProfeS
mittee, which is
in the process Firefig]
of researching
material for a Citrus
contract that
will begin to be Local No
negotiated with
Citrus County to deliver
in October. service p
The goal
of the the citi
Professional
Firefighters of Citrus I
Citrus County
Local No. 4562
is to deliver the
best service possible to the cit-
izens of Citrus County.
The International
Association of Firefighters,
headquartered in Washington,
DC, represents more than
280,000 fire fighters and emer-
gency medical personnel, who
protect 85 percent of the
nation's population. The IAFF
includes more than 3,000
locals in more than 3,500 com-
munities in the United States
and Canada.
In addition to city and coun-
ty fire fighters and emergency
medical personnel, IAFF
members include state
employees, federal workers
and fire and emergency med-
ical personnel employed at
certain industrial facilities.
The IAFF is the driving force
behind nearly every advance
in the fire and emergency
services in the 20th century -


planned her pregnancy. She
said she tried to conceive since
she was 16 years old with her
former boyfriend of five years.
They were high school sweet-
hearts and Trinity's father is an
active part of her and her
daughter's lives, Jones said.
Both teenagers and mothers


al










C
C


from the introduction of shift
schedules early in the last cen-
tury to the enactment of
SAFER in 2003. With extreme-
ly active political and legisla-
tive programs, and with recog-
nized experts in the fields of
occupational health and safe-
ty, fire-based emergency med-
ical services and hazardous
materials training, the IAFF
has established professional
standards for the North
American fire service.
Today, the
I of the IAFF is the pri-
mary advocate
signal for providing
fire fighters and
ters of paramedics
with the tools
County they need to
perform their
4562 is jobs. The IAFF
provides a
Ithe best strong voice in
cssible to the develop-
ment and
zens of implementa-
tion of new
county , training and
equipment, and
has worked
hard to ensure
the proper staffing of fire and
EMS departments. The IAFF
is a member driven organiza-
tion-for fire fighters, by fire
fighters.
The IAFF and its affiliates
support numerous charitable
activities at the local and
international levels. Each of
these funds holds tax-exempt
status and operates for the
benefit of the members the
IAFF is privileged to serve.
The IAFF administers several
charitable funds that focus on
helping its members and their
families when they are in a
time of need. Those funds
include the IAFF Burn
Foundation, the Counseling
Support Foundation, IAFF
Disaster Relief Fund, IAFF
Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial
Foundation, IAFF McClennan
Scholarship Fund; and IAFF
Redmond Foundation.


face obstacles in life and
whether the pregnancies were
planned or unexpected, the
teens need support, which is
why the team leaders actively
recruit and welcome new-com-
ers into the "non-judgmental,
loving environment,"
Schmalstig said.


� Fi7ac.ialWOorkshopo







A 5-week course is being offered
to assist individuals in setting
financial and investment goals.
This class also will provide a
summary of the most common investments used
by individuals in reaching their objectives.
Classes meet one night per week.


Place: Central Florida Community College, CFCC


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4 Days/3 Nights
Call For Available Dates
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Book Ealiy
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X-umlpano jeacn, 1t c
Isle of Capri
Oct 3 * 1 nite, 2 meals
$109 ...


Octoberfest
Helen, GA
4 days
1022/07
$379


SQualitone 0/o0% DIGoffAL
HEARING AID SPECIALS $9 9 AAS'
01 $ ITEECO


TI ri county Hearing Aid
wmw.en.counry.neonrg comr Beverly Hills 746-1133 Dunnellon 489-6565


2A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


Good game, coach


Associated Press
Florida head basketball coach Billy Donovan, left, shakes hands with Florida Gov. Charlie Crist in Donovan's office Friday in
Gainesville. Crist was on campus to talk with University of Florida researchers about ethanol and alternative fuels and stopped
to visit with both of Florida's National Championship coaches.


Memory Problems?
Has your memory worsened beyond simply
forgetting names, losing your keys or finding that
elusive word? Meridien Research is looking for
healthy volunteers age 55 to 85 to participate in a
research study of an investigational medication for
individuals with mild cognitive impairment. Study
participants receive memory testing, study related
medical evaluation and up to $700 in
compensation for time and travel. Call Meridien
Research at 352-59-STUDY, that's 352-597-8839.
Our office is located on Cortez Blvd. (Route 50)
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l .. S For more information about this research study,
Meri.diC' I * please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
V 1 IRB Approved Participation is completely voluntary
e "c fict 5/29107 V.1 www.newstudyinfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613
713931


Imperial Palace Every Sunday
2 meals, $25 slot play - 2 casinos
or
4 meals, $25 slot play , no casinos
Staring O. 2.d.
Tn.. . Depi Trtyin , 1 5
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t




ml











1 '1


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Ii


3A
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


County

BRIEFS

Citrus County

Inverness City Council
holding budget hearings
Public hearings will be held
by the City Council of the city of
Inverness in the council cham-
bers at 212 W. Main St., regard-
ing the 2007/2008 budget and
millage levy as follows:
* Thursday, 5:01 p.m. (tenta-
tive public hearing).
* Sept. 20, 5:01 p.m. (final
public hearing).
Any person who decides to
appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any
matter considered at this meet-
ing will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and for such purpose
may need to provide that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding
is made, which record includes
testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based
(Florida Statutes 286.0105).
Strifler guest at NCRC
meeting Saturday
The Nature Coast Republican
Club will meet Saturday at the
American Legion Post 155,
6585 State Road 44, Crystal
River.
Breakfast is $5.50 and begins
at 8:30 a.m.
Guest speaker Betty Strifler,
Clerk of the Citrus County
Circuit Court, will give a Power-
Point presentation of her duties
and responsibilities with a ques-
tion-and-answer period to follow.
All registered Republicans are
eligible for membership.
Citrus County establishes
pet-friendly shelter
Citrus County Department of
Public Safety Animal Services
Division, in cooperation with
Citrus County Emergency
Management, established a pet
friendly shelter in the event of a
disaster.
The, pet friendly shelter will be
at the Lecanto Primary School,
3790 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto. Citrus County Animal
Services will coordinate the
housing of pets at this shelter.
The shelter will provide housing
for animals for dogs up to 80
pounds; domestic cats, and
birds. No exotics, reptiles or
aggressive animals will be
accepted.
Pet owners will be responsi-
ble for providing food, any pet
medications and care for their
I animals while housed at the
shelter. Pet owners must remain
housed at the Lecanto Middle
School shelter throughout the
event. Animals must be tame
and be current on their rabies
vaccination. Animals must be
removed immediately upon clos-
ing of the pet and human shelter
(which will be at the end of the
emergency).
For information, or to be a
volunteer, call 726-7660.
Labor Day closings
The following businesses will
close or work holiday hours
today:
* City and county govern-
ment offices will be closed,
including the city of Crystal
River and the city of Inverness.
* Most banks and the stock
markets will be closed. Call your
personal bank to confirm hours.
* The Chronicle Circulation
Department will be open from 7
to 10 a.m. The Chronicle
Business Department will be
closed.
* All Citrus County public
schools are closed.
* All Citrus County.
Community Centers will be
closed.
* The Citrus County Central
Landfill will be closed.
* F.D.S. Disposal Inc. will be
closed. All Monday customers
will be picked up Thursday,
Sept. 6.
* NCRS Disposal customers
who have Monday service will
be rescheduled for Saturday,
Sept. 1. Riverhaven and Walden
Woods will be rescheduled
Thursday, Sept. 6.
* Beverly Hills Waste


Management (Rolling Oaks
Utilities Inc.) will be closed. All
Monday customers will be
picked up Thursday, Sept. 6.
Both yard waste and household
garbage trucks will be running.
- From staff reports


Dems skipping Florida


Clinton, Obama, Edwards join others in saying they'll avoid states holding early primaries


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Hillary
Rodham Clinton, Barack Obama
and John Edwards on Saturday
joined three other Democrats
who say they will skip states that
break party rules by holding
early primaries.
Their decision is a major
boost to the primacy of four
early voting states - Iowa, New
Hampshire, Nevada and South
Carolina - and a welcome
development to the Democratic
National Committee.
"We believe Iowa, New
Hampshire, Nevada and South
Carolina play a unique and
special role in the nominating
process," Clinton campaign
manager Patti Solis Doyle said.


"And we
believe the
DNC's rules
and its calen-
dar provide the
necessary stru-
cture to respect
and honor that
role." Barack
The DNC has Oba a
tried to impose
discipline on a handful of
unruly states determined to
vote before Feb. 5 and gain
influence in the election cycle.
"Iowa, New Hampshire,
Nevada and South Carolina
need to be first because in
these states ideas count, not
just money," Edwards said.
"This tried-and-true nominat-
ing system is the only way for


voters to judge
the field based .,1 ,
on the quality .
of the candi- .f -
date, riot the
depth of their - - J
war chest." -r
Obama said .
the DNC's Hillary
nominating Clinton
process is "in
the best interests of our party
and our nation."
Their pledges came a day
after rivals Chris Dodd, Bill
Richardson and Joe Biden
endorsed the plan, which was
promoted by Democratic lead-
ers of the four states that have
party approval to hold early
contests.
They have now agreed that


they won't com-
pete in any
other states
that vote before
Feb. 5, as
Florida plans
to do and
Michigan is
poised to do. John
Their deci- Edwards
sion is a blow to
Florida, which had moved its
primary to Jan. 29, and
Michigan, where the legisla-
ture this week voted to push its
primary to Jan. 15. Michigan
acted despite the DNC's threat
to punish Florida by stripping
it of its 210 delegates unless it
comes up with another plan in
the next four weeks.
The prospect of five candi-


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
Seven-year-old Rebeca Mason, who attends Inverness Primary School, enjoys the wreaths at the Eighteenth Annual Harvest
Moon Craft Show on Sunday. Members of the Citrus County Craft Council held the show at the National Guard Armory in Crystal
River. Proceeds went to the Citrus United Basket in Inverness.




Dolphins may harbor 'super bugs'


Associated Press
MELBOURNE - Dolphins
swimming in the Indian River
Lagoon carry bacteria in their
intestines resistant to many
antibiotics, including peni-
cillin, researchers said.
The so-called "super bugs"
grow in one of every five bot-
tlenose dolphins in the Indian
River Lagoon, scientists from
SHarbor Branch Oceanographic
Institution in Fort Pierce
reported. The bacteria appear
harmless to dolphins at this


There is no evidence to date that the
antibiotic-resistant bacteria has caused
human illness in the lagoon region.


point, but could trigger disease
in any of the mammals with
weakened immune systems.
There is no evidence to date
that the antibiotic-resistant
bacteria has caused human ill-
ness in the lagoon region. But
researchers caution people
exposed to higher concentra-
tions of the "super" E. coli bac-


teria could face an increased
risk of potentially deadly diges-
tive or skin infections by eating
the same seafood or swimming
in the same lagoon waters as
the dolphins.
The resistant bacteria could
be seeping into the lagoon from
sewage treatment plants, sep-
tic tanks and farm runoff,


* QUESTION: Is the sheriff's $2.4 million helicopter a wise investment?

* YOUR ANSWERS:
A. Yes. Versatility is critical for modern crime-fighting and rescue work.
(171 votes, 44 percent.)
B. No. Ground patrol resources are more practical. (16 votes, 4 percent.)
C. Yes. Selling the old helicopters and 10-year financing keeps the cost reasonable.
(60 votes, 16 percent.)
D. No. It's an example of where tax dollars could be saved. (138 votes, 36 percent.)
* To vote in this week's Online Poll, simply access the Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
i


researchers noted.
"What I think we're seeing
right now is sort of the tip of the
iceberg," said Greg Bossart, a
marine mammal pathologist at
Harbor Branch, told Florida
Today.
The report also noted signifi-
cantly higher findings of the
resistant bacteria in the
Charleston Harbor area in
South Carolina.
The research was part of a
study funded mostly through
the "Protect Wild Dolphin"
license plates and state grants.


dates bypassing Florida and
Michigan would essentially
turn those contests into non-
binding beauty contests, with
no delegates at stake if the
DNC imposed its punishment.
Florida Democratic Party
executive director Leonard
Joseph said Saturday: "No
matter which cards we're
dealt, Florida Democrats are
going to win the state's 27 elec-
toral votes and elect a
Democratic president in 2008.
The country needs us."
The Florida party chair-
woman, Karen Thurman, has
criticized the pledge, calling it
"a pact to ignore tens of mil-
lions of diverse Americans by a
selfish, four-state alliance of
party insiders."



Youth


dies in


the line


of duty


20-year-old was

participating in

Explorer program

Associated Press
FORT MYERS - A 20-year-
old participant in a police
apprenticeship program has
died from- a gunshot wound he
suffered while trying to stop a
robbery.
Gerald Rabon, who was a
Lee Sheriff's Department
Explorer, was shot in the head
while struggling with two rob-
bery suspects at a gas station
last week. He died Friday
while receiving treatment at
Lee Memorial Hospital.
"My son was a good kid. He
should not have died the way
he did," said Gail Rabon, chok-
ing back tears. She and her
late husband adopted Rabon
when he was 10. Gail Rabon
described her son's biological
father as a career criminal and
said her son decided to take a
different path.
"He made the right choices
in his life," Gail Rabon said.
The sheriff's department
planned to seek a murder
charge against the suspects,
Iris Moreland, 27, and Chad
Moreland, 24, who is accused
of firing the shot that hit
Rabon. They currently face a
robbery charge.
The Explorer program, like
many across the country, seeks
to teach teenagers and young
adults about law enforcement
"I just felt a pit in my stom-
ach when I saw that (sheriff's)
star and his identification card
at the hospital that night," said
Sheriff Mike Scott. "He was a
good kid. He really seemed to
gravitate toward law enforce-
ment. I think he just liked the
whole idea of being there for
others."
Neighbor Rudy Lampron
said he wasn't surprised
Rabon would struggle with a
gunman.
"He was that kind of kid,"
Lampron said. "He was always
looking to do the right thing."


Allen wants evidence out


Associated Press
TITUSVILLE - A jury will
be allowed to hear a statement
made by state Rep. Bob Allen
as he was placed into a patrol
car during his arrest on a
charge of soliciting prostitu-
tion, a judge ruled.
Judge Oscar Hotusing ruled
earlier this week that Allen
was not responding to a ques-
tion when the lawmaker asked
an officer, "I don't suppose it
would help if I said I was a
state legislator, would it?"


Allen's attorney, Greg
Eisenmenger, said he would
continue to try to bar the state-
ment from trial by arguing it is
more prejudicial than relevant
Hotusing said the statement
was spontaneous and could be
presented to a jury. He also
ruled that a taped statement
Allen made to the deputy chief
while in a holding cell could
not be used because Allen had
not been read his Miranda
rights.
The case is scheduled for
trial Sept. 19.


Ring around Rebeca









4 ...S....Y SEPTEMBE 2. 207C-ru ONY(L HOIL


CRAIG
Continued from Page 1A

Otter called speculation that
he has made a choice "dead
wrong" and declined to say
when he would fill the seat
Craig said he would remain
in the Senate until Sept 30 in
hopes of providing a smooth
transition for his staff and who-
ever is chosen as his successor.
President Bush called Craig
from the White House after the
senator's announcement and
told him he knew it was a diffi-
cult decision to make, said
White House spokesman Scott
Stanzel.
"Senator Craig made the
right decision for himself, for
his family, his constituents and
the United States Senate,"
Stanzel said.
Craig was arrested June 11 in
a police undercover vice opera-
tion. The arresting officer, Sgt
Dave Karsnia, said in his report
that the restroom where he
encountered Craig is a known
location for homosexual activi-
ty.
Craig has faced rumors about
his sexuality since the 1980s.
He has called assertions that he
has engaged in gay sex ridicu-
lous.
"I am not gay. I never have
been gay," Craig said defiantly
after a news conference
Tuesday. He said he had kept
the incident from aides, friends
and family and pleaded guilty
"in hopes of making it go away."
Other lawmakers embroiled
in sex scandals also have
resigned from Congress, albeit
usually at the end of scenarios
that took longer to play out than
the one that claimed Craig.
Former Rep. Mark Foley, R-
Fla., quit last fall over sexually
explicit Internet communica-
tions with male pages who had
worked on Capitol Hill.
Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore.,


|%m5�4r 11 ' 14 V









s ba; In i.rb9.
S r 1




, - -.


Boise, Idaho, residents Cassandra White, left, and her mother Kristy White, hold up sign
conference where Sen. Larry Craig announced his plans to resign from the Senate on Sati
old Boise Depot train station overlooking downtown.


resigned in 1995 amid allega-
tions he had made unwanted
sexual advances to 17 female
employees and colleagues and
altered his personal diaries to
obstruct an ethics investigation.
On Saturday, Craig said he
would pursue legal options to
clear his name. He has retained
Billy Martin, a Washington
lawyer who represented
Atlanta Falcons quarterback
Michael Vick in his dogfighting
case, to pursue his legal
options. Washington lawyer
Stan Brand will represent Craig
before the Senate ethics com-
mittee, said spokesman Dan
Whiting.
"The people of Idaho deserve
a senator who can devote 100
percent of his time and effort to
the critical issues of our state
and of our nation," Craig said. "I
have little control over what
people choose to believe. But


clearly my name is important to
me, and my family is so very
important also."
Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said
Craig "made a difficult deci-
sion, but the right one."
"It is my hope he will be
remembered not for this, but
for his three decades of dedi-
cated public service,"
McConnell said. McConnell
had been one of Craig's harsh-
est critics, calling his actions
"unforgivable."
Some Idaho residents who
attended Craig's public resig-
nation said it felt like a "politi-
cal funeral."
,Bayard Gregory, from Boise,
said Craig should have been
more forthright after his arrest
"It's a horribly embarrassing
experience to go through,"
Gregory said. "But if it were me,
and I had done nothing wrong, I


wouldn't have plead
Craig spokesm,
Smith said he did
whether Craig wou
Washington on Ti
start of the post-Lab
gressional session.
"We haven't deci&
whether he's going
not," Smith said.
Craig represent
Congress for more t
ter-century, include
in the Senate. He w
election next year.
Republicans, wo
the scandal's effe
year's election, suf
their setback Friday
an Republican
Warner of Virginia
he will retire rather
sixth term. Demi
tured Virginia's ot
seat from the GOP
election.


S- Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrests
0 Kellie A. Miller, 21, Hemando,
at 7:43 p.m. Tuesday on a domestic
battery charge. A 32-year-old man
said he was cleaning the bathroom
when Miller came home and began
yelling at him. She said she wanted
the man to leave and then hit him in
the head with a shoe and poked him
in the eye, according to an arrest
report. He also said he pushed her
and punched her in the lip. Miller said
they were arguing and that he hit her
in the face and forced her onto the
bed. No bond.
0 Todd Jacob Sherman, 35,
It |1 Dunnellon, at 8:32 a.m. Wednesday
1 ..- a on a domestic battery charge. A 50-
* '^ year-old woman said Sherman
grabbed her around the neck and
started to choke her when they ran
out of crack cocaine. She said
Sherman thought she was holding
Associated Press out on him, according to the report.
is at a news Sherman denied the incident and
urday at the said instead that she attacked him
with a wooden hammer. No bond.
led guilty" E June Anne Hinds, 43,
an Sidney Hemando, at 10:08 a.m. Wednesday
d not know on domestic-related charges of
ld return to aggravated assault. A 46-year-old
.esday, the man said Hinds had been drinking
or Day con- large quantities of vodka when she
started to yell at him. He said she
ded that yet, broke things like an ash try, some
Svases and dishes and later threw
to return or glass mugs, pots and pans. At one
point he said she hit him in the head
d Idaho inwith a pot and then chased him
than a quar- around the house with a butcher
ng 17 years knife. When a deputy interviewed
as up for re- her, Hinds denied chasing him with
the knife or hitting him with the pot.
rried about She said he had beat her up, but
!ct on next couldn't give specific details except
fered a fur- that he had put her cell phone in a
when veter- safe and stepped on her toe, break-
Sen. John ing it. No bond.
announced 0 Robert J. Custer, 44,
than seek a Homosassa, at 8:41 p.m. Thursday
ocrats cap- on charges of domestic-related
other Senate aggravated assault and violation of
in the 2006 an injunction for protection.
According to an arrest report, Custer


threatened a 44-year-old woman and
17-year-old boy with a butcher knife
and rifle. No bond.
Other arrests
* Madeline Ann Baron, 50,
Dunnellon, at 8:52 a.m. Wednesday
on a charge of possession of drug
paraphernalia. Baron called law
enforcement in reference to a
domestic battery incident. When
deputies arrived, they saw items
used to smoke crack cocaine in
Baron's house. She told deputies that
the drug paraphernalia was hers.
Bond $500.
* Aaron L. Kerschner, 20,11199
N. Edna Terrace, at 11:06 a.m. Friday
on charges of burglary of a resi-
dence, possession of 20 grams or
less of marijuana and grand theft with
a value between $100 and $300.
According to an arrest report, a man
said he went for a walk and came
home to find someone had broken a
window and stolen his wallet and a
black leather bag with pills inside
such as Oxycotin and Toprol. There
was a footprint outside the house that
deputies were examining. The man
said he figured Kerschner, who he
knew as an acquaintance, may have
done it because he had asked him
earlier what prescriptions he took.
During the investigation, Kerschner
stopped by the man's house to see if
anyone had any clues about who
may have broken into the house. The
man thought it was odd because he
hadn't told anyone about the break-
in. When deputies questioned
Kerschner, they said he became
extremely nervous. After Kerschner
changed his story several times and
deputies had matched the footprint to
Kerschner's shoe, which also had
glass pieces stuck in the sole, they
arrested him and also found him car-
rying two small bags of marijuana.
Bond $7,500.
* Tommie Alexander, 21, 1141
N. Carol Drive, Citrus Springs, at
12:37 p.m. Friday on a Citrus County
warrant charge for violation of proba-
tion in reference to a felony charge of
fraud/illegal use of a credit card. No
bond.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


City H
Daytona Bch. 89
Ft. Lauderdale 91
Fort Myers 92
Gainesville 90
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 88
Key West 91
Lakeland 92
Melbourne 89


THREE DAY OUTLOOK


TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 90 Low: 74
Variable clouds; 60% Chance of
Storms.
MONDAY
High: 91 Low: 74
Variable clouds; 50%o Chance of Storms.


TUESDAY
High: 91 Low: 74
Partly Cloudy: 50r0 Chance ot Storms.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
istr m
tstrm
tstrm


MARINE OUTLOOK
Southwest winds around 5 knots. Seas 1 Gulf water
to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a temperature
light chop. A chance of showers and thun-
derstorms. 87 0


Taken at Egmont Key
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.56 28.63 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.55 34.52 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34 76 34.76 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35 95 35.95 42.40
Li'.n.i1 report^, wr , f1 ab,:,t 5.a I;EI Ri.3 l ,r I dI- , for i!S - ]rf. ra,, -_j o, u 3 .'D y af ncir - E. r n- r,-
arnu aJ lod Arii . r, 4�- r,. a 4-p ce- ,:nance o tr, ,i qu ia oLl ' erj .rn,3 . Ir, ' na y.3 Ta-l, d3T a 16
I- taini-1 ,,',r. r n 5. ,ij] I.a V'" r-E 1. v.sin-.^r1nn L'i Urd 'U aut'led 1" r.iUipn Ir. O,! 'U 5'.
ill the Di ni"-i,, 'o ) ,u e 'Jnid Slr.?' G):,h,,:a.- Sur..,v :tCa e Fo r Ia.n, ,arJ 1 , 'i.".n e.Jra .q n-i uJ M ,6 :. 1
this data..1 ,t-u ; , ,a r,, Quja tor, C.u houlj w , t �T Ir, H ,d ,l.: .: a ' a "e Con aI ! . 743'% - 1 1

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/74
Record 96/68
Normal 72/90
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.32 in.
Total for the month 0.32 in.
Total for the year 34.62 in.
Normal for the year 39.64 in.
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.97 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 77
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 80%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were moder-
ate and weeds were absent.
**Ught - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
9/2 SUNDAY 10:39 4:24
9/3 MONDAY 11:41 5:26


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
11:07 4:53
- 5:55


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ........................... 7:51 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .................7:09 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY .......................1121 P.M.
Ma MFI11 8 ilt 18 IE MOONSET TODAY ..........................12:47P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more Information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
Information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/flreweather/kbdl
The -WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending In 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending In 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday: addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending In 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.
,TIDES ."


City
Chassahowltzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
9:10 a/5:07 a 10:44 p/6:08 p 9:50 a/5:42 a --- /7:13 p
7:31 a/2:29 a 9:05 p/3:30 p 8:11 a/3:04 a 10:28 p14:35 p
5:18 a/12:17a 6:52 p/1:18 p 5:58 a/12:52a 8:15 p/2:23 p
8:20 a/4:06 a 9:54 p/5:07 p 9:00 a/4:41 a 11:17 p/6:12 p


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 74 53
Albuquerque 85 65
Asheville 79 63
Atlanta 86 70 .89
Atlantic City 82 59
Austin 92 71
Baltimore 83 60
Billings 93 64
Birmingham 89 71 .05
Boise 96 62
Boston 79 62
Buffalo 74 55
Burlington, VT 70 55
Charleston, SC 80 72 .34
Charleston, WV 83 60
Charlotte 84 70 .07
Chicago 81 57
Cincinnati 87 57
Cleveland 77 54
Columbia, SC 88 72
Columbus, OH 81 56
Concord, N.H. 74 47
Dallas 95 76
Denver 86 60
Des Moines 80 61
Detroit 79 59
El Paso 90 70
Evansville, IN 90 57
Harrisburg 80 54
Hartford 79 57
Houston 92 73
Indianapolis 83 59
Jackson 91 73
Las Vegas 10686
Little Rock 93 68
Los Angeles 80 71
Louisville 89 62
Memphis 94 71
Milwaukee 76 56
Minneapolis 82 61
Mobile 90 722.26
Montgomery 85 75 .01
Nashville 92 70


Sunday
Fcst H L
sunny 79 55
ptcildy 87 63
tstrm 79 58
tstrm 84 68
sunny 81 60
tstrm 88 68
sunny 83 62
sunny 96 59
tstrm 86 71
sunny 93 62
sunny 78 61
sunny 82 59
sunny 78 56
tastrm 83 75
sunny 88 60
ptcldy 85 64
sunny 85 61
sunny 89 63
sunny 81 58
tstrm 85 68
sunny 86 62
sunny 77 51
ptlcldy 95 72
sunny 90 59
sunny 86 63
sunny 84 61
sunny 90 71
sunny 89 63
sunny 82 60
sunny 79 58
tstrm 88 75
sunny 86 62
tstrm 93 69
sunny 10785
sunny 94 67
sunny 80 67
sunny 89 65
ptcldy 93 72
sunny 85 65
sunny 85 63
tstrm 88 72
tstrm 86 72
pt0ldy 91 68


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pep. Fcst H L
New Orleans 91 76 .01 tstrm 91 76
New York City 79 64 sunny 80 65
Norfolk 81 72 sunny 81 65
Oklahoma City 90 67 sunny 90 64
Omaha 82 62 sunny 86 62
Palm Springs 11587 ptcldy 11290
Philadelphia 81 62 sunny 82 63
Phoenix 11092 sunny 10889
Pittsburgh 79 52 sunny 82 56
Portland, ME - 74 57 sunny 75 56
Portland, Ore 81 54 sunny 80 60
Providence, R.I. 81 63 sunny 76 59
Raleigh 87 69 ptcldy 85 63
Rapid City 93 66 sunny 94 66
Reno 94 62 sunny 96 60
Rochester, NY 71 54 sunny 82 59
Sacramento 10066 sunny 10266
St. Louis 86 61 sunny 87 65
St. Ste. Made 76 55 ptcldy 79 56
Salt Lake City 94 65 ptcldy 97 71
San Antonio 87 71 tstrm 87 71
San Diego 85 72 sunny 84 72
San Francisco 81 57 sunny 75 56
Savannah 80 741.24 tstrm 84 73
Seattle 74 56 ptcldy 75 56
Spokane 79 50 sunny 82 55
Syracuse 73 53 sunny 80 56
Topeka 90 55 sunny 90 60
Washington 82 63 sunny 86 63
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
HIGH 117 Thermal, Calif. LOW 36 Fraser, Colo.
WORLD CITIE$

SUNDAY Lisbon 93/69/s
CITY H/L/SKY London 70/53/c
Acapulco 89/77/ts Madrid 91/54/s
Amsterdam 66/53/sh Mexico City 68/53/ts
Athens 91/73/s Montreal 75/61/s
Belling 80/67/c Moscow 67/44/r
Berlin 65/49/pc Paris 74/54/s
Bermuda 87/75/pc Rio 77/68/ts
Cairo 98/67/s Rome 76/57/pc
Calgary 70/45/sh Sydney 75/57/s
Havana 91/79/ts Tokyo 80/73/c
Hong Kong 89/80/ts Toronto 79/61/s
Jerusalem 87/69/s Warsaw 64/50/r


Citrus DANCES


L : "

_ . '.


� r"


(H1ONICLL
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Ci-iius CouNTY (FL) Ci-iRoNicLE


4ASUNDAY, SEPTFM13ER 2, 2007







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, SEPITIMBfiR 2, 2007 5A


PROGRESS
Continued from Page 1A

lion power upgrade at the
nuclear plant will occur in
two stages. The company will
add 40 megawatts through
equipment modifications dur-
ing the 2009 refueling outage.
The new equipment will
allow the, plant to use steam
more efficiently. An addition-
al 140 megawatts will be
added after upgrades to the
reactor in the 2011 refueling
outage.
Digital controls at the plant
will be added this fall during
a planned outage. The
replacement of the steam
generators, a project worth
$230 million, and construc-
tion of an elevated dry stor-
age area for spent fuel rods
worth $50 million will take
place during scheduled out-
ages at the plant. He said con-
struction of the dry storage
area will begin in 2012 and
will be completed in 2013.
Roderick said each of the
new steam generators will be
60 feet tall and weigh 15,600
tons each.
"These steam generators
are like having your lungs
replaced," he
said. Roderik
Adding 180
megawatts of each of
power to the
nuclear plant steam ge
will allow
Pro gress will be 6
Energy to serve
an additional and weig
110,700 homes
with electricity. tons
The Crystal
River nuclear
power plant "uprate project,"
as the company calls it, is
unrelated to Progress
Energy's proposal to add two
more nuclear power plants
north of Inglis, in south Levy
County. However, Roderick
said the improvements to the
three Crystal River plants
and the decision to build two
new nuclear power plants in
south Levy County are an
indication of the company's
strong relationship with both
counties and its commitment
to power generation in this
area of Florida.
Under Progress Energy's
proposal for Levy County,
construction of both nuclear
plants would occur at about
the same time. The two plants
would generate a combined
2,500 megawatts of power.
The discharge of warm water
from the plants would be
'through a pipeline that cross-
i.es the Withlacoochee River
and extends five miles out
'into the Gulf of Mexico. The
first plant would begin oper-
ating in 2016, the second
plant a year later.
Roderick said 5,000 to 7,000
' workers would be used to
construct the two nuclear
Power plants. He said
SProgress Energy is working to
develop partnerships with
Schools in Levy County in par-
'ticular, but also Gilchrist
County and Dixie County, and
with area technical schools,
to train its future work force
for the two nuclear power
plants. He said the company
believes workers with strong
local ties will be'more likely
'to remain with the company


Clean Air Equipment


Scrubber


Progress Energy/Special to the Chronicle
The above graphic Illustrates new air pollution control equipment
that is being installed at the Crystal River plant. It will removes sul-
fur dioxide and nitrogen in the air created when coal is burned.


for the long haul. He said
their target age group is
ninth-graders. They will be in
their mid 20s when the plants
are activated.
Levy County has rezoned
the land for the 3,000-acre
nuclear plant site. The zoning
is being reviewed by the
Florida Department of
Community Affairs for consis-
tency with the county's com-
prehensive plan.
Roderick said the power
upgrades at the Crystal River
nuclear power plant will
bring 400 to 500 workers to
Citrus County.


ck said
the new
generators
0 feet tall
h 15,600
each.


Company
spokeswoman
Carla Groleau
said the
improvements
to the Crystal
River facilities
and the pro-
posed addition
of two nuclear
power plants in
Levy County
complement
the company's


plan to diversify and improve
the efficiency of its generating
facilities. She said the compa-
ny's use of oil, natural gas,
nuclear power and coal sup-
ports Progress Energy's "bal-
anced approach" to meeting
customer growth and rising
demand for electricity.
Mike Olive, manager of
major projects integration,
said the addition of scrubbers
to the two coal-fired plants at
the Crystal River Energy
Complex will produce syn-
thetic gypsum as a byproduct.
Gypsum is used in the produc-
tion of concrete and wall
boards. Progress Energy is
negotiating with several com-
panies interested in buying
the gypsum.
Olive said he doesn't know
at this point whether the syn-
thetic gypsum would be
shipped to a manufacturer or
if the manufacturing would
occur on-site or somewhere in
Citrus County. He said the
quality of the synthetic gyp-
sum will determine how it will
be used.
He said Progress Energy
views the addition of the pol-
lution control devices as a
double win.
"The result of cleaning tip
the air will be a product that
can be used to make wall
board or concrete," he said.
Olive said the new technolo-
gy also will remove mercury,
but he said the industry is
continuing to research ways
to remove carbon.
Progress Energy anticipates
completing installation of the
pollution-control devices on
the first coal-fired unit in 2009


and the second in 2010 to
meet upcoming air quality
standards.
Residents won't see any
major physical changes at the
Crystal River Energy
Complex as they drive past it
on U.S. 19. However, Olive
said the two big smokestacks


that have never given off any
visible plume of smoke would
be retired and possibly torn
down. Those stacks will be
replaced by a single, shorter
stack that emits a white
plume.
He said no one can see the
sulfur dioxide and nitrogen
oxide being emitted from the
two old smokestacks, but they
will be able to see the white
plume rising into the sky from
the new stack.
"We will have a media cam-
paign to educate the public
that the plume is cleaner," he
said.
Olive said the addition of
pollution control equipment
will provide a hidden benefit
beyond better air quality and
generating gypsum as a
byproduct. He said adding
clean air equipment will
allow the company to buy
higher sulfur coal, which is'
cheaper than low-sulfur vari-
ety, saving customers money


Poker room profit rises
TALLAHASSEE - Florida's econ-
omy may be slumping, but revenue
from poker rooms is growing.
The amount of money received at
18 state-regulated card rooms
increased nearly 60 percent from
June to July, hitting what is believed
to be an all-time high of $7.7 million,
according to preliminary state figures.
WVVith the state taxing card rooms at


HAMPTON
Continued from Page 1A

River, said the Hamptons had
great plans. but decided
instead to focus on Mike
Hampton's baseball career.
"He was getting ready to
get back into baseball, so they


10 percent, the new poker laws could
generate an extra $3 million if
receipts stay at their current level, the
South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported
Saturday.
Lawmakers headed to Tallahassee
for a special session beginning Sept.
18 to deal with budget cuts are sure
to notice the record takes in the card
rooms since a new law allowed
increased betting limits and seven
day-a-week openings.

put their future plans on
hold," Laxton said.
Tolle said the property is
attracting some interest.
"We haven't got an offer,
but we've gotten tons of
calls," she said. "Someone
was interested in vacation
condos, someone had a
restaurant idea. Nothing
solid yet."


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Betty
Behnken, 79
BEVERLY HILLS
Betty M. Behnken, 79,
Beverly Hills, died Friday, Aug.
31, 2007, at Diamond Ridge
Health and Rehabilitation
Center, Lecanto.
Born April 20, 1928, in
Dayton, Ohio, she was the
daughter of Fred and Minnie
(Wysong) Kuck, and came to
this area in 1995 from
Brookville, Ohio. She and her
late husband, Donald, owned
and operated the Somers-
Behnken Hardware Store in
Brookville for many years.
An avid gardener, she was a
member of the Garden Club of
Brookville and enjoyed grow-
ing and judging roses in shows
in Ohio and Florida.
She was an active member of
the Chamber of Commerce in
Brookville.
She was active in the works
of the Kingdom of God through
many different church min-
istries and missions.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 59 years,
Donald, on Feb. 8, 2007, and
one brother, Gerald Kuck.
Survivors include four sons,
Bruce Behnken and his wife,
Emma of the Philippines, Dean
Behnken of Brookville, Ohio,
David Behnken and his wife,
Sharon of Choctaw, Okla., and
Lt. Col. Dixey Behnken and his
wife, Julianne of Germany;
three brothers, Kenneth Kuck
of Sunnyvale, Calif., Fred Kuck
of Dayton, Ohio, and Dick Kuck
of Ramona, Calif.; 13 grand-
children; and 13 great-grand-
children.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Pauline Davis, 87
HERNANDO
Pauline T. Davis, 87,
Hernando, died Friday, Aug. 31,
2007, at the Arbor Trail
Nursing and Rehabilitation
Center, Inverness.
Born July 17, 1920, in Perry,
she was the daughter of
Charles and Pearl (Roundtree)
Tidwell. She moved here in
1985 from Tallahassee.
She retired from the State of
Florida Department of
Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles as a clerk with 10
years of service.
She was a member of the
House of Power Church,
Hernando.


HEINZ
FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation






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341-1288
Inverness, Florida


She was preceded in death
by her husband Woot "Red"
Davis Jr., who died July 17,
1990, and her son, James L.
Walker, who died in 1994. ,
Survivors include her son,
Tillman B. Walker and wife,
Diane of Hernando; her daugh-
ter, Mildred. Moss of Floral
City; eight grandchildren; sev-
eral great-grandchildren; and
several great-great-grandchil-
dren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Ricci 'Rick'
Hawhee, 72
FLORAL CITY
Ricci Leroy "Rick" Hawhee,
72, Floral City, died
Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2007, at the
Hospice Care Unit at Citrus
Memorial Hospital, Inverness.
Born Oct. 20,
1934, in
Indianapolis,
Ind., he was
the son of
Leroy and
Gladys (Wagner) Hawhee. He
moved here several years ago
from Deltona.
He was the former owner
and operator of the Brown
County Hotel and the Little
Nashville Opry, both of Little
Nashville, Ind.
He served in the U.S. Marine
Corps. He was a personal
guard for the late President
Richard Nixon during his term
in office.
He enjoyed music, traveling,
dancing, automobiles, being a
proud Marine and spending
time with his dog, Grizzly.
He attended the Inverness
Church of God.
Survivors include: two sons,
Robbie Hawhee of
Indianapolis, Ind., and Brett
Hawhee of Summerville, S.C.;
two daughters, Sarah Jane
Warwick of Franklin, Ind., and
Cristi Hawhee of Indianapolis,
Ind.; a stepdaughter, Amber
Perry of Los Angeles, Calif.; a
sister, Ann Stanbrough of
Lapel, Ind.; a brother-in-law,
Charles Laughner of
Indianapolis, Ind.; four grand-
children, Ryan, Kelagn, Ricci
Lee and Riley; a nephew, chip
Laughner of Indianapolis, Ind.;



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close friend, Hap Hapner of
Pensacola; and former wife
and companion, Brenda Kaye
Davis of Floral City.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Linda
Telschow, 56
INVERNESS
Linda Diane Telschow, 56,
Inverness, died Friday, Aug. 24,
2007, in Inverness.
Born Jan. 28, 1951, in Buffalo,
N.Y, she was the daughter of
the late George Rymal and
Sydnia Andsworth. She came
to this area one year ago from
Tennessee. She was a home-
maker.
She was Christian.
Survivors include: two sons,
John P Telschow and George
Telschow, both of Inverness; a
daughter, Joyce Robey of
Hernando; two sisters, Judy
Beck of Sarasota and Mary
Palmer of Golden Dale, Wash.;
and three grandchildren.
Hooper Funeral Homes and
Crematory, Inverness.

John
Woodstuff, 80
INVERNESS
John Franklin Woodstuff, 80,
Inverness, died Saturday, Sept.
1, 2007, at Hospice of Citrus
County Care Unit at Citrus
Memorial Hospital.
Born July 31,
1927, in
Moundsville,
W.V, he was
the son of John
P and Bertha
Woodstuff, and
came to this
area in 1972 ..
from Pitts- John
burgh, Pa. He 'wo.(-..tis
was the retired
owner of
Woodstuff
Auto Sales and
Service in
Wexford, Pa.
He served in the U.S. Army
during World War II in the 11th
Airborne Division.
He was a member and Past


Commander of Inverness VFW
Post 4337, a member of North
Hills Masonic Lodge 716 in
Pittsburgh, Scottish Rite-Valley
of Ocala, Egypt Shrine Temple,
American Legion Post 77, for-
mer member of Inverness
Eagles Aerie 3992, Lake
Panasoffkee Moose Lodge 1179
and The First Christian
Church of Pittsburgh.
He was preceded in death by
his brother, Albert, and sister,
Jean Humbertson.
Survivors include: his wife of
58 years, Martha Clark
Woodstuff of Inverness; broth-
er Edward Woodstuff of
Zephyrhills; sister Lillian
Jurksaitis of Pittsburgh, Pa.;
and several nieces and
nephews.

Funeral

NOTICES

Ricci Leroy "Rick" Hawhee.
A celebration of life memorial
service will be at 10 a.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2007, from
the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, with
the Rev. Larry Powers of the
Inverness Church of God offi-
ciating, followed by full mili-
tary honors provided by the
Floral City VFW Post 7122
Honor Guard. There will be
no viewing hours at the funer-
al home. In lieu of flowers,
memorials are suggested to
Hospice bf Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. The Chas E. Davis
Funeral Home of Inverness is
in charge of arrangements.
Linda Telschow. A gather-
ing for Mrs. Linda Diane
Telschow, 56, of Inverness,
will be from 6 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2007, at
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
Cremation will be under the
direction of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness.
John Woodstuff. A funeral
service will be conducted at 7
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6, 2007
from the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home, with VFW Post


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4337 and Floral City Masonic
Lodge co-officiating. Burial
will follow at a later date in
Oak Ridge Cemetery The fam-
ily will receive friends at the
funeral home from 6 PM. until
the hour of service on
Thursday. In lieu of flowers,
memorials are requested to
Hospice of Citrus.

Deaths

ELSEWHERE

Pamela
Minzner, 63
JUDGE
SANTA FE, N.M. - New
Mexico Supreme Court
Justice Pamela Minzner, the
state's first female chief jus-
tice, died Friday after a battle
with cancer, the court said.
She was 63.
Minzner had been on the
state's highest court since
1994, the second woman ever
to. serve on the five-member
panel.
"Justice Minzner enjoyed
unconditional respect and
admiration from the legal
community because she was
hard working, articulate and
an excellent writer," Chief
Justice Edward Chavez said
in a statement.
Soft-spoken and unfailingly
courteous on the bench,
Minzner asked incisive ques-
tions that cut to the heart of
complicated legal issues in
cases that were argued before
the court.
Minzner was appointed to
the Supreme Court in 1994 to
fill a vacancy and was elected
to the seat in 2002 for an eight-
year term. She served as chief
justice in 1999-2000.
Minzner received her law
degree in 1968 from Harvard
University, where she was one
of just 22 women in a class of
more than 500.
It was "exciting to have the
chance to be at the forefront
of that era," Minzner said in a
1999 interview. ,


Michael
Jackson, 65
EPICURE
LONDON - Michael
Jackson, a leading beer critic
who praised the brews of
Belgium and acknowledged he
would never be as famous as
"that Michael Jackson," died
Thursday. He was 65.
Jackson, known as "the beer
hunter," died of a heart attack at
his home in London. His body
was found by his house cleaner,
said Paddy Gunningham, his
partner, on Friday
She said that he had kept
writing and traveling despite
Parkinson's disease, and that
he planned to write a book
about the ailment.
Jackson especially loved
Belgian brews. His books "The
Great Beers of Belgium" and
"World Guide to Beer" intro-
duced them to many export
markets, including the United
States.
By identifying beers by their
flavors and styles, and by pair-
ing them with particular foods
and dishes, Jackson helped
give birth to a renaissance of
interest in beer and breweries
worldwide that began in the
1970s, including the North
American microbrewery move-
ment
His TV documentary series,
"The Beer Hunter," was filmed
around the world and shown in
15 countries.
He worked as a. beer critic
for more than 30 years, writing
in newspapers and gastronom-
ic magazines, holding seminars
and giving speeches, appearing
on U.S. talk shows and writing
books about beer and whiskeys
published in 18 languages.
Jackson knew he would
,never be as famous as Michael
Jackson, the rock star, and that
was reflected on the beer crit-
ic's Web site. "Hello, my name
is Michael Jackson. No, not
that Michael Jackson, but I am
on a world tour. My tour is in
pursuit of exceptional beer.
That's why they call me the
Beer Hunter," it says.
- From wire reports


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Chicken farmers skeptical recruits in terror war


The Washington Post

In 28 years of raising chick-
ens, Virgil Shockley has had his
share of worries, from bird dis-
ease to pollution. But nothing
prepared him for the latest
concern sweeping the poultry
industry: Local farms could be
deemed terrorist targets by the
U.S. government.
"Out here?" Shockley
exclaimed, gesturing across a
rutted dirt road from his home
on Maryland's Eastern Shore,
toward six long metal sheds
filled with birds.
But nestled in the grass
between his sheds are rows of
large propane tanks, used to
heat the chicken houses. They
fall under regulations recently
proposed by the Department of
Homeland Security for the
chemical industry. Like many
others in the $1.6 billion
Delmarva poultry industry,
Shockley can't imagine that a
propane tank could pose a
threat in that rural area.
"Hell, if it blows, you've got
barbecued chicken!" he said.
Shockley is part of an unlike-
ly group of people who have
been swept up in Homeland
Security's quest to protect the
chemical industry from terror-
ist attacks.
The proposed regulations,


country ... please explain why
this initiative is a good use of
federal dollars," Sens. Barbara
Mikulski, D-Md.,
Benjamin Car-
din, D-Md., and
Thomas Carper,
D-Del., wrote last pinft,
month to Home-
land Security a pOSt
Secretary
Michael Chertoff, world.
complaining of
the effect on are basic
chicken farms.
Homeland Sec- ures tl
urity officials are
promising to incumb
respond to the
furor - hinting US as
that the regula- citizenr
tions will be
adjusted. "A there a
small percentage
of farmers that inconve
use or store
propane in agri-
cultural facilities
will be covered," Laura
spokeswoman spo
Laura Keehner Departme
said recently
But the contro-
versy illustrates a continuing
dilemma for the government:
how to strike the right balance
between safety and the free-
dom to conduct one's business.
"There's got to be some sani-


drafted after years of debate, ty here, c
would require
thousands of
chemical-using
businesses to fill There's
out extensive
questionnaires in got to be some
coming months.
Homeland Sec- sanity here, or
urity would then
require the high- people will
est-risk compa- stand back anc
nies to draw up
detailed security gO, 'Exactly
plans.
Industry grou- who's winning
ps and politicians
are complaining here?'"
that Homeland
Security is cast-
ing too wide a . Tri
net. In recent Agricultural Retailer
net. In recent Associatio
months, they
have bombarded
the agency with concerns that chemical
the regulations could affect not that volu
only chemical giants but also industry \
mom-and-pop dry cleaners, But for
universityIlabs. doctors' offices the Bushli
And even camper parks. ' n't agree c
"Given the serious threats industry.
that are currently facing our when Ho:


or people will stand
back and go,
'Exactly who's
winning here?'"
said Jim Thrift of
the Agricultural
Retailers Associ-
ation, a trade
group.
Homeland Sec-
urity officials,
politicians and
analysts say the
regulations are a
long-overdue
effort to address
a serious prob-
lem. The Govern-
ment Accoun-
tability Office
t has repeatedly
rs called for federal
anti-terrorism
requirements for
facilities, warning
untary steps by the
weren't enough.
years, Congress and
administration t could -
ii hio,\ to regulate the
That changed last fall,
meland Security was


I
t

i


r
b


n!
I





a
I
en


put in charge of setting securi-
ty standards for businesses that
manufacture, use, store or dis-
tribute certain
chemicals. The
At this agency drew up a
t th proposed list of
e live in more than 300
chemicals that
-9/11 would trigger rep-
orting require-
There ments - includ-
ing propane.
c meas- PJ. Crowley,
director of home-
hat are land security at
the Center for
lent on American
Progress, a liber-
SU.S. al think tank,
s. And said the Home-
land Security
re small survey will
undoubtedly
niences. sweep in compa-
nies that are not
high-risk terror-
ism targets. But
K�eehner he said the exer-
keswoman, the cise would pro-
nt of Homeland duce numerous
Security. benefits, such as
giving the agency
a broad perspective of chemi-
cal use across the country.
"The fact that DHS is, in
essence, making its presence
known does send a very impor-
tant signal here," he said.
Keehner said such chemi-
cals as propane and chlorine
have been used in terrorist
plots in London and Iraq.
'"At this point, we live in a
post-9/11 world," the Homeland
Security spokeswoman said.
"There are basic measures that
are incumbent on us as U.S. cit-
izens. And there are small
inconveniences."
To the affected businesses,
though, the inconveniences are
anything but small.
Keehner said it will take a
few hours, at most, to complete
the Web-based questionnaire,
but industry groups said it
could take much longer. That's
particularly true in rural areas
with limited high-speed
Internet access - such as
Maryland's chicken-farm belt.
"Hell, I go on 10 rhinutes
checking my e-mail, and I get
bumped off," Shockley said.
The questionnaire could also
pose problems for colleges and
un.ersities. Ara Tahmassian, a


Boston University administra-
tor, told a congressional sub-
committee last month that some
universities have more than
1,000 laboratories scattered
across their campuses. Some
may have a mere test-tube full
of a chemical on the list, she
said, adding that it would be
"challenging" to quickly track
down all the substances.
Richard Roldan, head of the
National Propane Gas
Association, said more than
100,000 propane users would
probably have to fill out the
questionnaire under the pro-
posed rules, which apply to
anyone with more than 7,500
pounds of the substance -
about 1,750 gallons.
Congressional and industry







EVER Y TUESDAY
SAVEL$

IAL-A-D


officials say the situation high-
lights the inexperience of the
four-year-old Department of
Homeland Security. Unlike
environmental protection offi-
cials, who have regulated
chemicals for years, Homeland
Security personnel are new to
the area. Many are former mil-
itary officers with little indus-
try experience, Thrift said.
He offered an example of the
head-scratching inconsisten-
cies: For some chemicals, even
the tiniest amount triggers a
reporting requirement. But for
trinitrotoluene, the threshold
is 2,000 pounds.
"That's TNT," Thrift said.
"Somebody missed that one."
Shockley, the chicken farmer,
estimated that three-quarters

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of the poultry growers in the
Delmarva area could be affect-
ed by the proposed regulations.
Shockley said he understands
Homeland Security's desire to
reduce any terrorism vulnera-
bility. In addition to running his
chicken farm, he is a Worcester
County commissioner and sits
on the local emergency plan-
ning committee.
"I appreciate the fact that
they have a job to do," he said.
"Having said that, I don't know
who in the world thought this
was a good idea."





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Nlkki Khan/The Washington Post
Virgil Shockley demonstrates how difficult it would be to move, let alone make off with, one of the
500-gallon propane tanks on his Eastern Shore chicken farm.





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Feds to create 'disaster IDs'


Badges would

restrict access

to critical areas

Associated Press
NEW YORK - Retiree Gene
O'Brien hurried to the World
Trade Center site after Sept 11,
2001, as a volunteer helping to
shuttle supplies to police and
fire workers. Some days, his
only ID to get into the disaster
site was a tattoo on his forearm.
"A couple times I showed
them my Marine tattoo, and
they said go ahead," recalled
O'Brien, adding that he and
other volunteers also came up
with their own makeshift iden-
tification cards.
"We didn't forge anything, we
just made them up with our
own pictures and at one point
we copied a UPC code off a
Pepsi can and they were as
good as gold," said the
Scarsdale resident
It might not be so easy the
next time disaster strikes.
In an effort to provide better


Associated Press
VeriSign Media Relations shows examples of IDs being developed
as part of the new federal effort to create nationwide system of IDs
for disaster workers.


control and coordination, the
federal government is launching
an ambitious ID program for res-
cue workers to keep everyday
people from swarming to a dis-
aster scene. A prototype of the
new first responder identifica-
tion card is already being issued
to fire and police personnel in


the Washington, D.C., area.
Proponents say the system
will get professionals on scene
quicker and keep untrained
volunteers from making tough
work more difficult.
But they also know it is a
touchy subject, particularly for
those devoted to helping in


moments of crisis.
"Wow, how in the world do we
say this without love and respect
in our hearts?" said deputy
assistant U.S. Fire Admin-
istrator Charlie Dickinson.
"Everybody wants to come to
the fight, so to speak, and no one
wants to step back and say 'No,
I can't do this.' The final coup de
grace was the World Trade
Center. Hundreds came that
were never asked," Dickinson
said. "Good intentions, good
hearts, and it was extremely dif-
ficult for the fire department
and the other departments to
deal with them."
The Federal Emergency
Management Agency came up
with the idea after the World
Trade Center attack and
Hurricane Katrina in 2005, when
countless Americans rushed to
help - unasked, undirected,
and sometimes unwanted.
Many of those volunteers
angrily dispute the notion they
were a burden. They insist that
in many instances they were
able to deliver respirators,
hard hats, and protective boots
to workers when no one else
seemed able.


Army's $20,000 signing bonus boosts recruitment


Associated Press
LEXINGTON, S.C. - Bored
with life on his family's South
Carolina horse farm, Willard
McCormick decided that mili-
tary service was the right plan
for his future. And when the
Army dangled its new, $20,000
recruiting bonus in front of him,
the decision got a lot easier.
S"I wasn't going to go right
away, but I heard about the
bonus and decided to jump on
it," McCormick, 19, said a cou-
ple of days after signing up.
The new bonus comes with a


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"Quick Ship" provision that
cuts the average 40-day wait
time between sign-up and
departure for basic training.
McCormick, who leaves for
basic and infantry training at
Fort Benning, Ga., on Sept 6.,
said the accelerated departure
doesn't bother him or his family.
"My three brothers are ready
for me to go," he said, smiling.
Since the bonus was
unveiled in July, more than
6,200 recruits have signed up to


r,.


begin basic training before Oct.
1, a move that boosts end-of-fis-
cal year recruiting numbers,
Army officials said.
"People are calling here say-
ing $20,000 is more than they've
made in the past two years,"
said Staff Sgt Brent Feltner, 27,
commander of a strip-mall
recruiting station in this cen-
tral South Carolina town.
Feltner said most recruits
are happy to leave early
"Maybe they want to get out of


South Carolina, get away from
Mom and Dad," he said.
The Army's offer stands out
to many in a state where the
unemployment level is fourth
highest in the country, at 5.9
percent in July, up from 5.5 per-
cent in June. It was 6.2 percent
in July a year ago.
Plus, the bonus comes on top
of other benefits, such college
tuition assistance, and medical
and dental care.
"There's not a job out there


that they can enter with zero
experience, that will help them
pay for college," Feltner said.
Half the bonus is paid out on
completion of basic training
and training in individual spe-
cialties, some of which can
take at least a year, Feltner
said. The remainder is to be
doled out over the course of
active-duty enlistment, which
must be for at least two years,
although some specialties
require longer enlistments.


The accelerated sign-up pro-
gram does not shortentraining
time or send soldiers into the
field before they've had their
specialized training, said
Douglas Smith, spokesman for
the Army Recruiting Command
at Fort Knox, Ky.,
The Army has offered bonus-
es before - some ranging from
about $10,000 to $15,000 - but
$20,000 is the largest amount
Smith said he's seen in his 26
years with the military.


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Conversation piece?


Associated Press
Burning Man festival participants enjoy the playa Friday
near an art installation in the Black Rock Desert in
Gerlach, Nev.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Mourning


Iraq civilian deaths climb again


Associated Press
Jeff and Peggy Hubbard, left
and center, are presented
Friday with a posthumous
Bronze Star for their son, U.S.
Army Cpl. Nathan Hubbard,
during their son's funeral
service at St. Anthony of
Padua Catholic Church, in
Fresno, Calif. Hubbard, 21,
died Aug. 22 in a helicopter
crash in Iraq and is the sec-
ond son his parents have lost
to the Iraq war.

Ruling could affect
water in California
LOS ANGELES - A federal
judge late Friday ordered protec-
tive measures for a tiny endan-
gered fish in the Sacramento-
San Joaquin River Delta, a man-
date state water officials warned
could cut Northern California
water exports to Southem
California by a third or more.
Environmental lawyers disput-
ed the officials' draconian
assessment of U.S. District
Judge Oliver W. Wanger's deci-
sion to protect the delta smelt, a
creature biologists say is facing
extinction, in large part because
of increased pumping from the
delta. The fish are weak swim-
mers and tend to be sucked into
the water system's massive
pumps and killed.
Water officials said the
judge's decision could be the
most significant ever on the
state's ability to deliver water
through the delta, the key cross-
roads for the movement of sup-
plies to Southern California.
In a normal water year, they
said, deliveries could be cut by
up to 37 percent - a loss of
enough water to supply upward
of 4 million households.

World BRIEFS

Go, donkey!


Associated Press
A competitor controls his
donkey and cart Saturday dur-
ing a race in the town of
Gurkovo, Bulgaria. Every
year, competitors from all
over the country gather to
race as part of the celebra-
tion of Donkey Day.

Pope decries
collapse of marriage
LORETO, Italy - Pope Ben-
edict XVI decried the collapse of
marriages, telling tens of thou-
sands of young Catholics Sat-
urday that he was praying that a
crisis in traditional family values
doesn't become an "irreversible
failure."
Benedict urged an estimated
300,000 young pilgrims who
trekked to Loreto for a weekend
rally to have faith that they can
succeed in marriage even though
so many others had failed.
The weekend festival,
designed to reinvigorate Italian
Catholic youth, coincides with
the Catholic Church's "Save
Creation Day."
Benedict has often bemoaned
the collapse of family values
and has spoken of the need to
support "traditional" marriage
between a man and a woman.
- From wire reports


Figures raise

questions about

effectiveness of'surge'

Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Civilian deaths rose in
August to their second-highest monthly
level this year, according to figures
compiled Saturday by The Associated
Press. That raises questions about
whether U.S. strategy is working days
before Congress receives landmark
reports that will decide the course of
the war.
At least 81 American service mem-
bers also died in Iraq during August -
an increase of two over the previous
month but well below the year's month-
ly high of 126 in May. American deaths
surpassed the 80 mark during only two
months of 2006.
U.S. military officials have insisted
that the security plan launched early
this year have brought a decrease in
attacks on civilians and sectarian
killings, especially in the Baghdad
area, which was the focus of the new
strategy.
The top American commander, Gen.
David Petraeus, is expected to cite
security improvements when he and
Ambassador Ryan Crocker submit
reports on progress toward stability
and national reconciliation to Congress
during the week of Sept. 10.
However, figures compiled by the AP


Associated Press
A young boy watches Saturday as a man displays leaflets that were dropped by the
U.S. military during a raid in the Shiite enclave of Sadr City in Baghdad, Iraq. The
leaflets read: "The criminal Iraqis who work with the Iranian revolutionary guards (al
Quds forces) are toys under Persian control. Iranian revolutionary guards are inter-
fering in Iraq's affairs while Iraqis are dying," and "Al Quds forces are using violence
to increase Iranian interests and enforce its control on Iraq."


from police reports nationwide show,
that at least 1,809 civilians were killed
across the country last month com-
pared with 1,760 in July That brings to
27,564 the number of Iraqi civilians
killed since AP began collecting data on
April 28, 2005.
According to the AP count, civilian
deaths reached a high point during the
wave of sectarian bombings, kidnap-
pings and killings at the end of last year
- 2,172 in December and 1,967 in the


previous month.
Crocker predicted Saturday there
will be no "fundamental or quick
change" in the American policy on Iraq
and appealed for patience as Congress
prepares to receive the reports.
Speaking in Arabic on Iraqi state tel-
evision, he said the U.S. administration
believes Iraqis have made tangible
progress - which Congress has
demanded as a condition for continued
U.S. support.


Troops clash with Talibar


Associated F
An Afghan man is seen Saturday near the wreckage of a vehicle that was destroyed by U.S and Afghan forces in Chak dist
of Wardak province, west of Kabul, Afghanistan. The car was full of explosives, Afghan defense ministry officials said.

About 70 militants killed in wave of violence across Afghanistan


Associated Press


KABUL, Afghanistan - U.S.-led
coalition and Afghan security forces
killed about 70 suspected militants in
Afghanistan, where violence is running
at its highest level since the ouster of
the Taliban regime six years ago,
authorities said Saturday.
The surge in militant attacks comes
despite the presence of more than
50,000 foreign troops and 110,000
Afghan police and military officers, as
well as a multimillion dollar recon-
struction effort to rebuild the shattered
nation.
Late Friday, Afghan security forces
backed by U.S.-led troops raided com-
pounds in three villages in the remote
Pitigal Valley border region, where the


coalition said intelligence showed that
top militant leaders take refuge as they
travel between Pakistan and
Afghanistan.
Afghanistan has accused Pakistan of
failing to do enough to prevent the
movement of militants and weapons
across the frontier. Pakistan - which
before 2001 had close ties with the
Taliban - denies the charge, saying it
has deployed tens of thousands of
troops.
The troops killed more than 20 insur-
gents and detained 11 others in the
raids, which were just 3 miles from the
border. They discovered a bomb-making
factory and. seized weapons and com-
munication gear, the statement said.
One coalition solider was wounded in
the raids, it said.


Meanwhile, a bomb attached tc
bicycle in a commercial district of
northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif wou
ed nine people, two seriously, s
police spokesman Sher Jan Durani.
In the central province of Gha2
where the Taliban last week release
South Koreans they had held host
for six weeks, Afghan police attack
group of Taliban planning to str
security forces, killing 18 and arrest
six others, said provincial police G
Ali Shah Ahmadai.
"It was a successful operation,"
said.
A coalition statement said the r
resulted in the seizure of mortar
artillery rounds, numerous ha
grenades, rocket-propelled grena,
and other ammunition.


Ex-Pakistan PM: Power-sharing talks stall


Bhutto vows to return anyway


Associated Press
LONDON - Pakistan's exiled
former Prime Minister Benazir
Bhutto said Saturday that
power-sharing talks with
President Gen. Pervez Mushar-
raf had stalled but she planned
to return even without a deal.
The liberal opposition
leader told a news conference


in London that talks were at a
"standstill" because members
of the ruling party objected to
working with her Pakistan
People's Party, the country's
main opposition group.
"We understand that there is
severe reaction within the pres-
ent ruling party to any under-
standing with the Pakistan
People's Party," she said. "Due


to that reaction, no understand-
ing has been arrived at and we
are making our own plans to
return to the country."
The two camps had been
negotiating an agreement for
Musharraf to resign as army
chief, ending military rule of
Pakistan amid growing pres-
sure at home and abroad to
restore democracy Bhutto also
wanted the president to give up
the power to dismiss the gov-
ernment and parliament.


However, she has failed
a public commitment
Musharraf on those two c
points.
A total collapse of th
would likely alarm Pak
Western backers, include
United States, which is
the next government wil
tain Pakistan's fight agai
Taliban and al-Qaida.
In Pakistan's capital,
abad, Musharraf's spok
declined to comment.


"Since 2003, there has been a stable
policy by the American administration
and I don't think there will be a funda-
mental or quick change in the American
policy or stand on Iraq," he said.
Crocker also said Iraqis "and the
friends of Iraq" should show patience
as the country grapples with its. politi-
cal and security crisis.
'After 35 years of injustice under
Saddam Hussein, there are some prob-
lems since liberation and the problems
of 40 years cannot be solved in a year or
two. What is important is that there is
progress," he said.
President Bush ordered nearly
30,000 additional troops to Iraq, and
monthly death tolls began to decline
after the new security plan was
launched Feb. 14. But civilian death
tolls have been creeping back toward
levels approaching those during the
worst of the sectarian slaughter.
AP figures show May was the dead-
liest month for Iraqi civilians this year,
with 1,901 people killed in political or
sectarian violence.
The August total included 520 people
killed in quadruple suicide bombings
on communities of Yazidis, a Kurdish-
speaking religious minority, near the
Syrian border. The horrific attacks
made Aug. 14 the deadliest day since
the war began in March 2003.
Despite the high nationwide totals,
Petraeus was quoted Friday as saying
the troop increase has sharply reduced
sectarian killings in Baghdad, which
accounted for most of the deaths during
the wave of Sunni-Shiite slaughter at
the end of last year.


Felix


I menaces


SAruba


Storm upgraded

to hurricane

AssociatedPress
ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada -
Hurricane Felix gathered
strength Saturday as it pound-
ed Grenada with heavy rains
and winds, snapped small
boats loose from their moor-
ings and toppled utility poles
on its route toward the
Caribbean island of Aruba.
The storm was upgraded
from a tropical storm to a
Category 1 hurricane Saturday
evening, with sustained maxi-
mum winds near 75 mph. It
was expected to strengthen
*. even further as it passed near
the islands of Aruba, Bonaire
and Curacao late Saturday or
early Sunday
Tropical Storm Henriette,
meanwhile, was moving out to
sea after dumping rain on
Press Mexico's Pacific coastline. In
Lrict Acapulco, the storm loosened
a hillside in one of the resort's
poor neighborhoods, causing
landslides Saturday that killed
six people and prompted evac-
uations.
o a Felix became the sixth
the named storm of the 2007
nd- Atlantic hurricane season
aid early Saturday, spawning thun-
derstorms and downing trees
zni, in Barbados, St. Vincent and
d 19 the Grenadines, and the twin-
age island nation of Trinidad and
d a Tobago. The Caribbean islands
'ike reported only minor damage.
ting Forecasters said satellite
ren. loops show the storm is steadi-
he ly expanding in size.
he In Aruba, about 18 miles off
the coast of Venezuela, resi-
aid dents stocked up on groceries,
and flashlights and window-rein-
and forcements. The airport was
des reported busy with departing
tourists but calm.
A long line of customers
snaked through the Wema
1ed Home and Hardware Center
e in Aruba's capital, which was
doing a brisk business selling
plywood and boards as jittery
to win residents and employees of
from gleaming tourist hotels pre-
critical pared to safeguard windows
and doors.
e talks "This kind of weather does-
dstan's n't usually make it to Aruba, so
ing the people are definitely worried,"
hoping said store cashier Mark
l main- Werleman.
nst the The government of the
islands of Netherlands Antilles
Islam- and Aruba issued a tropical


;esman storm warning for the islands of
Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao.


10A
SUNDAY
AUGUST 2, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


7,
















SEPTEMBkR 2, '-007


i L I


in Ram


CITRUS COuk.TY CHRONICLE


Land of breathtaking vistas


Conservation authorities in

New Zealand are visitor-conscious


NAOMI KOPPEL
Associated Press
WAINUI, New Zealand -
Something keeps drawing me
back to New Zealand. I suspect
something always will.
Part of it is how easy it is to
vacation here for a woman
traveling alone. It's safe,
tourist-friendly and compara-
tively cheap for anyone coming
from North America or
Western Europe.
But mostly it's for moments
like these: watching the bright
turquoise sea wash up on the
pure sand beach that fringes
dark green rainforest. The
soundtrack is the insistent
chirping of crickets. I'm alone
in the world, and I'm only 20
minutes' walk from where I left
'my car.
It's no overstatement: The


coast of the Abel Tasman
National Park has to be one of
the most beautiful places in the
world.
Then again, New Zealand's
South Island is one breathtak-
ing vista after another, and in
southern hemisphere summer
- winter in the northern hemi-
sphere - it's a mecca for walk-
ing, or "tramping" as it's known
'round there. The warm weath-
er season begins there in late
November and early
December, but you'll want to
plan way ahead for your trip. (I
visited in February, and the
cheap airfares were gone by
October).
Though there were plenty of
serious hikers around, loaded
down with tents and sleeping
bags, I chose a few creature
comforts - I mostly stuck to
walks I could complete in a day,


and I had a rental car and
motel accommodation. Every
motel unit in New Zealand
comes with a kitchen, so I
cooked for myself.
Water taxis take day-trippers
to points along the Abel
Tasman coast, where they can
walk part of the coastal track or
simply relax on the beach. For
a one-day taste of paradise,
park in Marahau and take a
water taxi to Anchorage Beach;
the walk back will take about 3
1/2 hours, leaving plenty of
time for swimming, sunbathing
and lots of photography along
the way.
New Zealand conservation
authorities are visitor-con-
scious. Paths, from 20-minute
nature walks to multi-day slogs,
are well-marked and well-
maintained.
Driving in New Zealand is
easy. It's hard to get lost and
there's no danger of traffic
jams. But distances are decep-
tive, as roads can be twisty and
steep. To get to all corners of


Associated Press
Vacationers enjoy the sunshine Feb. 18 in the French-accented
town of Akaroa, on the Banks Peninsula near Christchurch in New
Zealand's South Island. New Zealand's South Island is one breath-
taking vista after another, and in southern hemisphere summer -
winter in the northern hemisphere - it's a mecca for walking, or
"tramping" as it's known 'round there.


the South Island, allow three to
four weeks, but the main sights
can easily be seen in a week or
10 days.


High on most travelers' lists
is Queenstown, "Lord of the
Rings" territory and the winter
skiing center. It's a lakeside


town surrounded by stunning
mountains, with a host of activ-
ities for both the intrepid and
the less adventurous, and plen-
ty of souvenir shopping if you
happen to arrive there on one
of the many rainy days.
It's also the gateway to the
southwestern Fiordland
region, where lush tree-cov-
ered mountains rise straight
up out of the smooth waters.
Author Rudyard Kipling called
Milford Sound the eighth won-
der of the world, and it's well
worth the long detour to take a
two-hour boat trip there. For a
more complete experience,
take a longer bus-and-boat trip
to Doubtful or Dusky Sound
from the regional center at Te
Anau. Many companies also
run kayaking trips into the
sounds, and the Milford Track,
one of New Zealand's great
tramps, starts from nearby.
New Zealand's highest
mountain, Mount Cook
Please see LAND/Page 14A


Special to the Chronicle
In Old City Istanbul, a mother and child were often
parked on the front steps at a small market near the
hotel.



Residential



setting adds



to experience

i., S haring my experiences
and love for Turkey in
. last week's column felt
' ' ' like unfinished business -
'i there's so much more to tell.
Today, we will visit Istanbul -
Old City Istanbul - where we
,t stayed several nights, at the
beginning and the end of our
tour of Turkey, at the Arena
Neil Sawyer Hotel. The hotel is a three-
SPONTANEOUS story nineteenth century
TOUR GUIDE Ottoman stone house, and
family home, where the pres-
ent owner, Gul, grew up. The home was totally, and
elegantly, refurbished into a hotel in the 1990's, and
retains many of the antiques and heirlooms of the
original home. (Google '"Arena Hotel Istanbul" for a
look-see.) It is positioned on a hill that overlooks the
Bosphorus, the narrow strait between the Black Sea
and the Sea of Marmara, and from our room, we
could see the ocean-going ships lined up for miles
waiting their turn to pass
through the narrows.
A walk to the There are no American
Hippodrome is brand-named hotels in
the area as the Arena is in
almost an an old residential neigh-
borhood, which adds
adventure greatly to the experience
of visiting a foreign city
in itself, such as this, and the hotel
is ideally situated for vis-
iting many of the out-
standing attractions of Istanbul. Many major attrac-
tions, the Hagia Sophia, Blue Mosque, Grand Bazaar
(more than 4,000 shops), the spice market and
Topkapi Palace, are within a half-mile of the hotel.
Another major attraction is the Hippodrome, the his-
toric heart of Constantinople's political and sporting
life for more than 500 years, which today is a city
park ringed by cafes, smoke shops and gift shops.
A walk to the Hippodrome is almost an adventure
0n itself. The streets are narrow, with switchbacks,
pnd cut from the hillside, exposing layers of ruins of
bygone eras. It was not unusual in ancient societies
io build on top of an existing village or town, and this
process is easily visible. It was a temptation to dig
nto the exposed ruins to make our own discoveries
t- verboten, of course - and it was amazing that the
sites seem never to have been tampered with.
SMuch of the attractiveness in staying at the Arena
J-otel was the neighborhood, where we became
friends with Urgur, a 7-year-old boy who lived across
�he street and always watched for us to come and go.
Please see ' . '-Page 14A


Tourist friendly


Special to the Chronicle
Dean Hagen thought the reconstruction to accommodate visitors to the Colosseum in Rome was noteworthy. Dean and Irene Hagen visited Rome
in 2001 with friends Vic and Annie Gerano. Dean, Irene and Annie are in the foreground of the photo.


DREAM
VACATIONS
- - - - . . ... .. .. . 2 -... .... . .. ..... .. . .. .. . . . ... .. .


The Chronicle and The Accent
Travel Group are sponsoring a .
photo contest for readers of the
newspaper.
Readers are invited to send a
photograph from their Dream
Vacation with a brief description of
the trip.


If it's selected as a winner, it will
be published in the Sunday Chron-
icle.
At the end of the year, a panel
of judges will select the best photo
during the year and that photogra-
pher will win a prize.
Please avoid photos with com-


puterized dates on the print.
Please make sure photographs
are in sharp focus.
Photos should be sent to the
Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or
dropped off at any Chronicle office
or any Accent Travel office.


Polk County: The other Central Florida


J.G.NASH
Special to the Chronicle
I was blessed with a mother
who believed in providing her
children with the best and widest
education possible. Toward that
end, she convinced her husband
to move the young family from
rural, upstate New York to subur-
ban New York City. As part of our
education, she took us into the
city once or twice a month, work-
ing to ensure that we were
exposed to every monument,
museum, garden, building and
other attraction of consequence. I,
therefore, was one of those rare
New Yorkers who had been to
Grant's Tomb, strolled the corri-
dors of the Cloister and climbed
into the torch held by Lady
Liberty.
Yes, it's true: Folks who live
near attractions all too often put
off visiting them, usually never


getting there. They'll plan their first theme park. Many of our par-
vacations to far-off places, such as ents -- even grandparents -
France or Mexico, rather than tar- strolled the lush gardens, pho-
geting places closer to home. I've tographed the lovely ladies in
found that, for classic Southern,
example, those of Folks who live hoop-skirted
us living within a gowns, and
relatively short . ear attractions thrilled to the
drive from some world's greatest
great attractions all too often put exhibition of
in Central Florida, skiers skimming
don't even know off visiting them, across Lake
that they exist Oh Eloise. If you're
yes, we usually usually never old enough to
take the children remember those
to Wally World, in getting there. black and white
Orlando, but that's newsreels that
about the extent of once preceded
our experience in that region. movies, you can probably still see
Well, here are just a few of the that famous image of water skiers
many worthwhile things to experi- performing at Cypress Gardens.
ence in and around Polk County, Apparently hurt by competition
which is an easy 90-minute drive from Wally World, the Gardens
from places such as Brooksville. closed, but were reopened in
Winter Haven's Cypress Gar- 2005, with all of the classic fea-
dens is believed to be Florida's tures, along with the significant


addition of thrill rides, and an
expansive children's play area.
Food vendors, gift shops and
other features demanded by
today's families make it a pleas-
ant place to spend an entire day
Be sure to bring your camera.
The Historic Bok Sanctuary, in
Lake Wales, has been familiar to
me since about 1936, which is
when I clearly recall seeing a
hand-tinted photo of its unique
tower hanging in my parents' New
York home. Even before moving to
Florida some 25 years back, my
wife and I visited that enchanting
place; I have been back several
times since, and enjoy each expe-
rience almost as much as the first
There are three fundamental parts
to the Sanctuary: 'the gardens
themselves; the magnificent, 1930s
home of Charles Buck; and, of

Please see POLK/Page 14A


A2








I A sTTNAIAY SEPTEMBER 2. 2007


m The Marine Corps League
No. 819 Citrus Detachment cele-
brated its 15th anniversary Aug. 14.
We are an active group as we
do the county's Military Ball in
November, Toys for Tots program
(with over 15,000 toys given to chil-
dren in our county last year), one
or two scholarships to high school
students, and our honor guard for
any military burial. We also have
several family get-togethers
throughout the year. Our next get-
together will be at 5 p.m. Sept. 19
at the Beverly Hills VFW.
For more information on becom-
ing a member, call Commandant
Robert Deck at 527-1557 or Senior
Vice Commandant Fred Lightell at
726-4415.
* A Labor Day picnic sponsored
by the Men's Auxiliary of VFW
Post 10087 will be from noon to 3
p.m. Monday at VFW Post 10087
of Beverly Hills. The menu will
include hot dogs, hamburgers,
Italian sausage and salads. Get
your tickets at the post canteen for
a donation of $5.
* Dunnellon VFW Post 7991
on West Dunnellon Road invites
the public to a Labor Day picnic
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hot dogs
and hamburgers with all the fixings
will be served.
* VFW Post 7122 Sept 2 to 8.
Monday: Labor Day celebration
with music by the Gold River Band
from 1 to 5 p.m. Bubba's burgers,
hot dogs, or Italian sausage with
baked beans, potato salad and
com on the cob will be served for
$3.00 per plate. The Ladies
Auxiliary will hold a unique sale
table to benefit the VFW National
Children's Home. The Men's
Auxiliary will have a dunk tank and
a turkey shoot.
Tuesday: The House Committee
meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday: The VFW and the
Ladies Auxiliary meet at 7:30 p.m.
Friday: AUCE fish dinner or
three-piece chicken dinner is
served from 3 to 7:00 p.m. for
$6.75. Jannie Faye's Karaoke
starts at 7 p.m.
Saturday: Steak and Crab Leg
Dinner from 3 to 7 p.m. for $9.00
Post 7122 has adopted 1st Sgt.
Dale LaSonda and his Marine
Corps unit now stationed in Iraq.
The goal is to send two good pack-
ages to them each week. Call the
post at 637-0100 to find out how
you can contribute.
Post 7122 is accepting nonper-
ishable food items to refurbish
CUB's food bank. Please donate to
this worthy cause.
Now is the time to join or renew
you VFW, Ladies Auxiliary or Men's
Auxiliary memberships. Call or
come by the post for details.
Post 7122 has tickets for the
District 7 picnic Oct. 6 at Post
10084. For a donation of $7, you
are entitled to food, door prizes,
entertainment and games. This will
be a fun day dedicated to all mem-
bers of the VFW and auxiliaries.
* The Korean War Veterans
Association, Citrus Chapter 192
meets at 1 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly, except July and August, at
VFW Post 10087, 2170 W. Vet
Lane, Beverly Hills.
All military veterans who honor-
ably served within Korea, including
territorial waters and airspace
(Sept. 3,1945, to June 25, 1950)
and within or without Korea (June
25, 1950, to Jan. 31, 1955) or who
served honorably in Korea from
Feb. 1, 1955, until present, are eli-
gible for membership in the KWVA.
Any Medal of Honor recipient for
: service during the Korean War is
Eligible for free life membership.
SAny prisoner of war by the North
Koreans, Chinese of Russian
forces during or after hostilities
from June 25, 1950, forward is eli-
gible for free life membership.
Call Cmdr. Hank Butler at 563-
2496; Vice Cmdr. Paul Salyer at
637-1161; or Director Neville
Anderson at 344-2529.
* The Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 will host a food
fundraiser for Citrus United Basket
from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at
the post at 906 E. State Road 44


VETERANS NOTES


BOB SCOTT/Special to the Chronicle
From left are: Jay Conti Post 77 finance officer; Sheila Densmore; Trish Nicholas; Deborah Davis; Pattie Smith; Fabio Sanservino,
commander Post 77; and Frank Mead, past commander Post 77.



Post 77 honors Inverness employees


Special to the Chronicle


Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77
conducted an award Ceremony on Aug.
23 at the city of Inverness Government
Building (City Hall to honor city of
Inverness employees who continue to
display patriotism in the community.
During the past 10-plus years,
American Legion Post 77 has partnered
with the city during the Flag Day cere-
mony. It would not have been a success
without the dedication and support of
city employees who have scheduled this


(across from the lake), Inverness.
Sundown will perform for your lis-
tening and dancing pleasure.
Snacks and finger foods will be
provided and drinks are available.
Entry fee is canned goods or a
cash donation of your choosing. All
entry fees will then be donated to
CUB to help fill its empty food
pantry and help to feed the needy
in Citrus County. Come join in the
fun and do a good deed at the
same time.
* The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World War II
meets at 11:30 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at the Boston
Cooker, 5375 Spring Hill Drive,
Spring Hill. The next meeting is
scheduled for Sept. 8.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet at 6 p.m. the first
Thursday monthly behind the Key
Training Center in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. We kick off our meet-
ings with a potluck dinner, then
meet at 7:30, with the auxiliary
breaking off to its separate meeting
room. Bring a covered dish if you
can. Interested in being member,
call Post Commander Fabio
Sanservino at 637-9285 or
Auxiliary President Sandy Scott at
860-2090. Visit the Web site at
www.ALPost77.org.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776, Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) will conduct its
bimonthly meeting at 1:15 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 18, in the Citrus
County Veterans Service Office
classroom, Citrus County
Resources CenterNA Clinic, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
(off of County Road 491 north of
C.R. 486).
Chapter 776 is comprised of
combat-wounded veterans. All
combat wounded veterans are
invited to attend and to learn more
about Chapter 776. Visit the
Chapter 776 Web site at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call 382-3847
or 527-2460.
* The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its monthly
planning meeting for the 15th
Annual Veterans Appreciation
Week activities at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the
Conference Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle building, 1624 N.


event with out a hitch year after year.
The American Legion Citation of
Appreciation was awarded in apprecia-
tion for exhibiting outstanding citizen-
ship by the display of the U.S. flag. The
American Legion citations were award-
ed to: Deborah Davis, city clerk; Sheila
Densmore, Trish Nicholas and Pattie
Smith of Inverness Parks and
Recreation.
Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77
is honored to participate in this special
Flag Day ceremony annually
The post also will be honored to par-


Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River.
Contact Chairman Chris Gregoriou
by e-mail at allpres@infi.net or by
phone at 795-7000.
The committee will conduct its
annual Veterans-in-the-Classroom
program, Oct. 29 to Nov. 9.
Call Gary Runyon at 563-5727,
Mac McLeod.at 746-1384 or Bob
Truax at 860-1630.
* Island X-18 Sea Bee
Veterans of America Upcoming
Events are:
Sept. 12:11 a.m. Meeting: VA
Office 2804 Marc Knighton Courtt,
Lecanto.
Sept. 19:1:30 p.m. Luncheon:
Stumpknockers on The Square 110
W Main St., Inverness.
Oct. 12:11:00 a.m. Meeting: VA
office 2804 Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. -
Oct. 19: 1:30 p.m. Luncheon:
Joe's Family Restaurant 911 W
Main St., Inverness.
Please note the change of meet-
ing date and place. As always all
Sea Bees, Honey Bees, relatives,
and friends are welcome to our
events. The meetings are 11 a.m.
the second Wednesday and lunch-


ticipate in the 9/11 display and freedom
walk on Sept 11.
The display starts in the afternoon
and the Freedom Walk Ceremony will
start at 5:30 p.m. at the Inverness
Government Center, around the court-
house square then, back
This walk is in remembrance of the
lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001. For more
information, visit the post's Web site at
www.ALPost77.org or the city of
Inverness Web site at www.cityofinver-
nessonline.com.


eons are at 1:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday. We have a short
meeting, about one hour, at the VA
office in Lecanto, then we will eat
lunch at a local restaurant decided
at the meeting. Luncheons are
picked by Charley Rhodes; if you
have an idea of a place to go, let
Charley know. Come to our lunch-
eon for some goodwill and fellow-
ship. If you have any questions call
Cmdr. David Puffer at 746-9327.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, 906 E.
State Road 44, Inverness; tele-
phone 344-3495; fax 344-3514,
announce daily activities schedule
for the week of Sept. 2 to 8:
Today: Pool tourney 2 p.m.; Wild
Willy karaoke 5 p.m.
Monday: Labor Day picnic from
1 to 4 p.m. Entertainment by
Karaoke on the Fly. No bingo.
Tuesday: Chicken wings four for
$1, 9 flavors 4:30 to 7 p.m.; Mark
B. karaoke 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Ladies Auxiliary bar
bingo 6 p.m.
Thursday: Bar bingo 3 p.m.
Friday: Fish fry (southern fried
chicken available) $6.50 4:30 to 7


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p.m.; Mark B. karaoke 6 p.m.
Saturday: Fundraiser for Citrus
United Basket, from noon to 4 p.m.
Entertainment is Sundown and
snacks will be provided. Entrance
fee is canned goods or cash dona-
tion - your choice.
* VFW Post 4252 and The
Ladies Auxiliary in Hernando on
State Road 200 Serves dinner
every Friday from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
This week's menu is fish or meat-
loaf. Music by Katie Lynn from 6
to 10 p.m. $6.50 donation.
Ladies Auxiliary hosts bingo
every Saturday at 10:30 a.m. with
food available.
Post 4252 has bar bingo every
Sunday at 2 to 5 p.m.
Ladies Auxiliary has Show Me
The Money card game every
Monday at 5 to 7:30 p.m. Lots of
fun and chances to win. Food is
available.
Ladies Auxiliary has bar bingo
every Tuesday at 2 to 5 p.m.
Profits go to local charities. This
Month is for CREST School.
Post 4252 has chicken wings
every Wednesday from 2 to 6 p.m.
Ladies Auxiliary goes to nursing


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= Sunday's PUZZLER ANSWER=

Puzzle is on Page 16A.
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9-2 � 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

homes four times a month to play
bingo with the residents. Everyone
is welcome.
Post 4252 is having a Labor Day
picnic at 2 p.m. Monday. Music by
Country Swing. Covered dishes
appreciated. Only 150 tickets avail-
able please buy your tickets early.
Tickets cost $6. You must have a
ticket to get in. You can buy your
tickets at the post at any time.
Ladies Auxiliary is having a flea
market on Sunday, Oct. 21. Flea
market items will include biker
apparel, household items, clothes,
books, movies, odds and ends and
a whole lot more. Inside tables are
$10. Outside tables are $5.
Donations are also accepted.
Post 4252 is having a service on
Tuesday, Sept. 11, at 11 a.m. for
the memory of 9/11 and the POW
MIA.
The Post 4252 winter hours of
operation will be in effect Oct. 1.
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxiliary
announces a $10,000 Youth Essay
Contest and a $30,000 High
School Scholarship Competition.
Call Judy at 726-3339 for details.
All eligible persons are invited to
join our Post or Ladies Auxiliary.
Stop by the post or call for further
information.
Send e-mails to
VFW4252@tampabay.rr.com.
2008 Dues can be paid now. We
are over 80 percent. Send pay-
ments as soon as possible. Life
Members Cancer Insurance of
$4.95 can be paid now for 2008.
Post Honor Guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and nurs-
ing homes. Call Post Cmdr. Bob
Prive at 212-3393 or Ladies
Auxiliary President Judy Prive at
726-3339 for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hemando.
* VFW Edward W. Penno Post
4864, 10199 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. (352) 465-
4864. Labor Day picnic will be at
noon Monday. Hot dogs, hamburg-
ers, sausages and peppers. There
will be karaoke from 3 to 7 p.m. by
Greg from G and G.
Tuesday: Cards at noon, and
bingo at 1 p.m. General meeting at
7 p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard at 7
p.m.
Thursday: Cards at noon and
darts at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m.
Saturday: Shuffleboard at 7.p.m.
Sept. 14: 7 p.m. live entertain-
ment with Earl, the one-man band.
Oct. 27, 8 a.m. rent-a-space
yard sale, blood drive, pancake
breakfast and bake sale. Free pan-
cake breakfast to anyone who
donates blood.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 will meet at 7 p.m. Monday,

Please see VETS/Page 13A








ulCua % LS (?nr om(Ft) Cr-n~ulycrF- S.UN--- , - ...M - a 2,20011


VETS
Continued from Page 12A

Sept. 10, at its facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, west of U.S.
19. Turn on to Veterans Drive from
U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley Davidson.
All members are strongly
encouraged to attend, and post
officers are requested to be in
proper uniform for the meeting. All
veterans are treated with respect,
with everyone having an opportuni-
ty to be heard as we work as a
team to benefit the post. Veterans
interested in joining VFW Post
8189 should bring a copy of their
DD 214 or a Transfer Request.
Call Commander Ron Houlihan
at 628-3160 or VFW Post 8189 at
795-5012 during its canteen hours
from 1 to 10 p.m.
* Floral City American Legion
Auxiliary Unit No. 225 (also
known as Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225) would like to
invite the women in Citrus County
to feel free to join us. We meet at
7:30 p.m. every Thursday at the
Floral City VFW Post on U.S. 41,
Floral City. We are very proud to
belong to this organization. Hope
the following info will help you to
decide to join us. Contact Pat
Whitman, membership chairman at
(352) 793-9091 if you have any
questions.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357, or
pass along this phone number to
the veteran.


* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI) Sturgeon Base meets at
11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at American Legion Post 155, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal
River.
Visitors and interested parties
are always welcome. For more
information, call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* The Disabled American
Veterans and the Auxiliary,
Chapter 70 in Inverness at the cor-
ner of North Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North, will
not meet during the month of
August. We will, however, continue
to be open from 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursday to service
our veterans.
One of our service officers will
be on vacation for an extended
period of time, but we will still have
at least two service officers avail-
able to serve our veterans. We
look forward to sending out our
next newsletter when our adjutant
returns from.vacation the end of
August and will see everyone at
the next meeting on Sept. 11
(Patriot Day).
* Ladies Auxiliary to Harry F.
Nesbitt VFW Post 10087 meeting
will be conducted at 2 p.m. Thurs-
day, Sept. 13, at the post home.
* Dan Campbell Airborne
Association will not have any
meetings during the summer
months. Starting in September the
meetings will resume on the third
Wednesday of the month at Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, Crystal River.
The meetings start at 6:30 pm. Call
Steve Leonard at 726-3693.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 County Road 40
E., Inglis (one mile east of U.S.
19). Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30
p.m. the third Wednesday monthly
at the post. Men's Auxiliary meets


at 7 p.m. the second Monday
monthly. Call Randy Sutton, (352)
447-3495.
* The Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will conduct its regular meeting at 7
p.m. on the third Wednesday
monthly at DAV Post 70 in
Inverness at the intersection of
Independence Avenue and U.S. 41
North. All former Marines are wel-
come. Call Tom Heron at 637-2724
or Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Fleet Reserve Association,
Branch 186 will meet at 3 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the DAV
Building, Independence Highway
and U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* The Marine Corps League,
Department of Florida under the
sponsorship of Holiday
Detachment 567 will hold their Fall
Conference at the Quality Inn and
Suites at 5316 U.S. Highway 19,
New Port Richey. The dates will
be: Oct. 11, 12 and 13. Room rates
are $69 for a regular room.
Reservations may be made by call-
ing (727) 847-9005 or (800)
4CHOICE. Ask for the MCL confer-
ence rate. For further information
and dinner selections, go to the
Department Web site.
* The Fleet Reserve
Association Branch 186 and its
Ladies Auxiliary hosts a "Pearl
Harbor Remembrance" luncheon
each year on Dec. 7 to honor those
who served at Pearl Harbor during
the attack in 1941.
A few years ago, Citrus County
awarded a Proclamation that
reads: "Whereby, commemorating
the attack on Pearl Harbor will
instill in all people of Citrus County
a greater understanding and
appreciation of the selfless sacri-
fice of the individuals who served


in the Armed Forces of the United
States during World War II," and
furthermore "The Board hereby
recognizes Dec. 7 of each year as
Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day"
in Citrus County.
The Fleet Reserve and Auxiliary
are proud to host an annual lunch-
eon in their honor.

In SER


Staten graduates
from USAF Academy
Air Force Cadet Charles E.
Staten has graduated from the
U.S. Air Force Academy in
Colorado Springs, Colo. The grad-


uate received a bachelor of sci-
ence degree and was commis-
sioned as a second lieutenant.
The academy offers a four-year
educational program of instruction
and experience designed to pro-
vide cadets the knowledge and
character essential for air and
space leaders, and the motivation
to serve as Air Force career offi-
cers. The curriculum provides a
balanced program of military train-
ing, academics, physical training,
athletic conditioning, and character
and ethical development. The
courses of study allow cadets to
acquire a broad education in the
basic and engineering sciences,
social sciences, the humanities,
including additional elective cours-


es needed to complete require-
ments for one of 25 major areas of
study.
The new lieutenants go on to
serve as pilots, navigators, engi-
neers, maintenance officers, pro-
fessionals in various management
and technical fields, and some
attend medical or graduate school
with special scholarships, while
others go directly to non-rated Air
Force-wide assignments.
The officer is scheduled to
attend undergraduate pilot training
at Columbus Air Force Base,
Columbus, Miss.
He is the son of Edward and
Cindy Staten of Inverness.
Staten is a 2002 graduate of
Citrus High School, Inverness.


Sept. 3-7 r


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday: Labor Day
Tuesday: Breakfast - Cheese
grits, ham slice, seasonal fruit,
applesauce, toast/jelly, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Tacos, chicken and rice, vege-
tarian plate, garden salad, carrots,
broccoli, apple slices, fresh fruit,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Waffle sticks, chicken breakfast
biscuit, seasonal fruit, pineapple,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Quesadilla, ravioli, salad shaker,
garden salad, crackers, vegetable
blend (Normandy), baked french
fries, fresh fruit, cookie, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Scrambled eggs with cheese, oat-
meal, seasonal fruit, mixed fruit,
toast/jelly, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Baked
chicken, barbecued pork sandwich,
vegetarian plate, garden salad,
green beans, fresh fruit, cornbread,
rice with gravy, peaches, milk,
juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
sausage pizza, bagelers (assort-
ed), seasonal fruit, apple slices,
grits, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Beef-a-roni, hot ham and
cheese sandwich, salad shaker,
garden salad, peas, roll, baked
beans, crackers, fresh fruit, apple-
sauce, milk, juice.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday: Labor Day
Tuesday: Breakfast - Waffle
sticks, bagelers (assorted), cereal


(variety), seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, toast/jelly, tater tots, milk
variety, orange juice. Lunch -
Chicken patty on bun, meatball
hoagie, turkey combo salad plate,
garden salad, mixed vegetables,
scalloped potatoes, fresh fruit,
apple slices, milk, juice.
Wednesday: Breakfast-
Scrambled eggs with cheese,
cheese grits, cereal (variety), sea-
sonal fruit, pineapple, muffin,
peaches, tater tots, milk variety,
orange juice.
Lunch - Spaghetti with meat
sauce, combo hoagie, tuna combo
salad plate, garden salad, green
beans, corn on cob, spice bar,
fresh fruit, mixed fruit, milk, juice.
Thursday: Breakfast -
Breakfast sausage pizza, cereal
(variety), seasonal fruit, toast/jelly,
tater tots, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Chicken nuggets, burrito,
chef salad plate, garden salad,
baked beans, baked french fries,
cake, spinach, crackers, fresh fruit,
pears, milk, juice.
Friday: Breakfast - Country
ham and potato, ham and cheese
toast, cereal (variety), apple muffin,
seasonal fruit, pineapple, tater tots,
milk variety, orange juice. Lunch
- Tacos, barbecued pork on bun,
breaded chicken combo plate, gar-
den salad, winter mix, Spanish rice,
coleslaw, refried beans, fresh fruit,
peaches, milk, juice.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday: Labor Day
Tuesday: Breakfast -


Sausage biscuit, cheese grits,
cereal, scrambled eggs with
cheese, doughnut, tater tots,
toast/jelly, mixed fruit, seasonal
fruit, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Chicken stir fry, ham-
burger and hoagie bars, salad
plate, pizza bar, chili, garden salad,
corn, peas and carrots, green
beans, rice, pineapple, crackers,
fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Wednesday: Breakfast -
Ham, egg and cheese bagel, bis-
cuits and gravy, cereal, doughnut,
toast/jelly, grits, apple muffin, tater
tots, seasonal fruit, peaches, milk
variety,'orange juice. Lunch -
Country fried steak, chicken and
hoagie bars, pizza bar, chili, sal-


ads, garden salad, island vegeta-
bles, baked beans, peas, corn,
rice, peaches, roll, crackers, fresh
fruit, fries, milk.
Thursday: Breakfast - Ham
and cheese toast, scrambled eggs
with cheese, cereal, doughnut,
toast/jelly, tater tots, pineapple muf-
fin, grits, seasonal fruit, apple-
sauce, milk variety, orange juice.
Lunch - Spaghetti and meatballs,
hamburger and hoagie bars, pizza
bar, chili, salads, garden salad,
Italian vegetables, corn, crackers,
gelatin, mixed fruit, pretzel rod,
fresh fruit, fries, milk.
Friday: Breakfast - Breakfast
wrap, biscuit and gravy, cereal,
doughnut, toast/jelly, tater tots,


sweet potato muffin, grits, seasonal
fruit, sliced apples, milk variety,
orange juice. Lunch - Burrito,
salad plate, hamburger and hoagie
bars, pizza bar, chili, crackers,
corn, refried beans, winter mix,
Spanish rice, pasta salad, salad,
pears, spice bar, fresh fruit, fries,
milk.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Labor Day. All sites are
closed.
Tuesday: Oven broiled ham-
burger with ketchup, baked beans,
coleslaw, whole wheat hamburger
bun, strawberry yogurt, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Krab meat salad,


tossed garden salad with French
dressing, carrot raisin salad, whole
wheat bread, banana, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Beef burgundy over
noodles, broccoli cuts, mixed veg-
etables, whole wheat bread with
margarine, black forest cake, low-
fat milk.
Friday: Oven baked chicken
quarter, stewed tomatoes, mashed
potatoes, whole wheat bread with
margarine, peaches and pears,
low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 795-
6264.


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Alltel Retail Stores Shop at a participating retailer: Homosassa Weeki Wachee
* These Retail Stores Now Open Sunday. Equipment & promotional offers at these Charles Pope Cellular I (352) 628-2891 Concept Cellular 1 (352) 597-7770
Brooksville locations may vary. Inverness WAL*MART
Brooksville Corner 1 (352) 544-0114 Crystal River Charles Pope Cellular 11 (352) 341-4244


Chuarles Pope Cellular (352z) 795-70/4B
Charles Pope Cellular (352) 795-4447
Krystal Clear Cellular (352) 563-6333


Inverness
* Citrus Shop Ctr. 1 (352) 860-2241

For Business & Government Accounts call 1-866-WLS-BIZZ or visit alltelbusiness.com


Lecanto
Charles Pope Cellular 1 (352) 564-2355


Way to Go Gatorsi AlItel Wireless is the
Official Telecommunications Sponsor
of the National Champion Florida Gators


Federal, state & local taxes apply. In addition, AlItel charges a monthly connectivity, regulatory & administrative surcharge up to $1.70; federal & state Universal Service Fund fees (both very by customer usage);
& a 911 fee of up to $1.94 (where 911 service is available). These additional fees may not be taxes or government-required charges & are subject to change. Phone Promotions: Phones at sale prices & applicable
rebates available to new customers & eligible eyistng customers.for a limited,time, while supplies last, with activation of a qualifying rate plan. Contact Alltel to determine if you are eligible. Limit 1 rebate per qualifying
purchase. Customer pays applicable taxes. See rebate form for details. Blue and red faceplates included with purchase of the Hue. Pink and green available for purchase. Largest Network Claim: Based upon analysis
by an independent research company in April 2007, which compared marketed coverage patterns at the time of their creation of each wireless carrier without allowance for variations due to electrical
interference, customer equipment, topography & each carrier's translation & defined preferences of their own internal engineering data. Risk Free: If you're not completely satisfied with your postpaid ".-4,r
service within the first 15 consecutive days of purchase, you can and your agreement with no disconnect penalty & pay only for the service used. Undamaged equipment can also be returned or --" .
exchanged. Activation & phonebook transfer fees are non-refundable. See shopalltel.com for complete details. Additional Information: This offer may be limited due to time, supplies, coverage or I Consumer
participating locations. $25 non-refundable activation fee & possible $200 early termination fee applies per line. Service is according to the Terms & Conditions for Communications Services & other Information
information available at any Alltel store or alltel.com. All product & service marks referenced are the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their respective owners. Screen images are simulated. \ ", .
�2007 Alltel. All rights reserved. PonA,'


Crystal River
North West Hwy. 19, inside Kmart I (352) 563-5340


Blue Star Banner Salute


Special to the Chronicle
Allen-Rawls American Legion Post 77 had a Blue Star Banner Salute Award Ceremony on July
21 with Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite as the guest speaker. Mr. and Mrs. Densmore were unable
to attend the ceremony, so Post 77 marched into city hall to present the award to the
Densmores for the service of their son, Sgt 1st Class Christopher Blanchard, stationed at
Fort Eustis, Va. From left are: Jay Conti, Post 77 finance officer; Fabio Sanservino, Post 77
commander; and Tom and Sheila Densmore.


Be the envy of your school


with the cool new Hue"


I


Exactlywhat level of

spectacularwould youprefer?


SUNDAY, Si-vrf-mmiii 2, 2007 13A


(CmrrIns CmouNry /T ) CHRNICrInE







Cr'nuis CouN-ry (FL) CHeRONICLE


14A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


blend of
'A few years ago, there was
LI\ a news story about a guy
LIk who started selling bot-
tled water for dogs. I told my
friends that dogs loved it
because the water probably
came from his toilet
They say man is
the only animal that
can laugh. I say man
is the only animal
Pat won't drink out
If a toilet, unless
khat man is pledging
a fraternity ,
Actually, the only'
animals I know for jl
sure that like to
drink from toilets MUL
are cats and dogs,
but I'm sure it goes for lots of
animals - and lots of pledges.
Now, we find out that most of
the billions of dollars we
humans spent on bottled water
last year was for plain, old tap
Water that we could have got-
ten free from the kitchen sink
Apparently a lot of people
find tap water tastes better
after they put it in a plastic bot-
tle, put a picture of a mountain
on it, fly it halfway across the
world and charge you a $1.29
for it It's not plain old tap
water then. It's imported, stick-
ered tap water You know it's
good because it comes from a
country where they can't drink
the tap water. They're water
connoisseurs.
"This bottle is a marvelous
blend of hydrogen and oxygen
- is that calcium I smell?
Perhaps a bouquet of minerals?
Robert Parker rates it a 92."
I was surprised to find out
that most bottled water doesn't
come from a pristine, babbling
mountain brook. It doesn't
come from a picturesque
stream flowing through a beau-
tiful meadow, but from the
municipal water system.
Then I remembered why.
Long ago, while planning a
camping trip in Montana, one
of our major discussions was
how to purify any water we
might need. It was decided that
we'd be pretty safe drinking
water from the Missouri River
if we boiled it, filtered it, boiled
it again and then dropped a few
iodine tablets into it Yummy.
The day I saw a bloated, dead


POLK
Continued from Page A2

course, the 205-foot, Gothic
"Singing Tower," with its 60-
bell carillon. Buck, who was.
then vice president of
Bethlehem Steel, built his win-
ter home in a rambling version
of Mediterranean Revival
architecture; a style that draws
heavily from Romanesque and
Moorish periods. Guided tours
are offered. I've been in
uncounted hundreds of his-
toric homes, and this is one of
the more memorable and
unusual. The famous Tower,
which cabs the highest point of
land in peninsular Florida, is
constructed from coquina
stone quarried in St. Augus-
tine, along with pink and gray
marble from Georgia. A small
reflecting lake, at its front, is
graced by gliding swans.
Carillon music rings out
through the gardens at various
times. Live performances are
featured twice each day. In
addition to the gardens in and
around the tower, there's a 3/4-
mile nature trail available,
where strollers can see plant


GUIDE
Continued from Page A2

Across the street is an ancient
mosque that we visited, and
from which the morning and
evening prayers were sung
over loudspeakers. A small
Market on the corner, where a
mother and her child were
more often than not parked on
the front steps, offered a con-
stant flow of interesting locals.
An uptown Hyatt or Hilton
area it was not, but the Arena
Hotel offered many redemp-
tive qualities.


A few days of living in the
neighborhood taught us to
appreciate the daily routines
of its citizens. On a side street
to the hotel, a bread-cart ven-
dor winding up his business for
the day would be surrounded
by young children on their way
home from school, begging for
the remnants of his daily sup-
ply He would shoo them away,
and like so many birds they
would flock back to the cart
taunting him for a scrap - a
treat to be sure if they were
successful. A few steps away, a


H and 0


If
Ll


A marvelous


porcupine float downriver was
the day I decided even iodine
wasn't going to get the taste of
corpse out of my mouth. I
hydrated myself with gin and
rainwater for the rest of the trip
and haven't been
camping since I dis-
covered I'm more of
"", ]a luxury-cruise per-
i'V son than a camper
4, For years after
that, when I heard a
brewery brag that
A their beer was made
with "crystal-clear
v mountain stream
water," all I could
.LEN think about was the
dead porcupine and
all the other murky stuff that's
in crystal-clear mountain
stream water
Still think it's crystal clear?
Let me ask you - where do you
think frogs go when they die?
Right into. that crystal-clear
mountain stream along with
fish eggs, otter hair and a cor-
nucopia of insects, dead and
alive. Crystal-clear streams are
where deer go to wash the mud
off their hooves. Crystal-clear
streams are what Canadian
geese, ducks and fish, and
some campers, use as a toilet.
So why would you say your
beer is made with mountain
stream water? Because it
sounds healthy. It's not calorie-
laden, alcohol-filled beer-- it's
healthy, good-for-you mountain
water! I think I'd rather drink a
beer that bragged it was made
with tap water than from a
mountain stream.
What really puzzles me is
how did we go from almost
never drinking bottled water to
drinking billions of dollars
worth of it in 30 or so years?
I could understand it if water
was bad for us, if it was
unhealthy, if it caused cancer,
if it dehydrated you, if it stunt-
ed your growth, if it made you
act like a lunatic. You'd expect
something like that to sell like
hot cakes. But something that's
actually good for you? That's a
tough sell.-


Reach author Jim Mullen
at jimmullen@myway.com.

species found nowhere else on
earth. There's also a restau-
rant, and a classy gift shop.
While in Lake Wales, don't
miss Chalet Suzanne, which is
both a fascinatingly unique
hostelry and a world-class
restaurant; for many, it is a
vacation destination in and of
itself. The accommodations
defy description or categoriza-
tion: The architecture seems to
be part Alpine, Disneyland and
Oriental. The one and two-
story buildings appear to have
simply grown sideways, much
like a meandering squash vine,
with little evident plan. Each
comfortable unit is furnished
in differing original and
unique styles. My favorite has
its own small balcony, whereon
the occupants may, if desired,
have their gourmet dinner
served from the main dining
room, seen below. And that din-
ing room is at least as good as
the best in the state - perhaps
in the Southeast. It's not inex-
pensive, but then such extraor-
dinary quality and selection
seldom is. Incidentally, they
have a private airstrip, where
you can fly in, rather than
drive, should you so desire.
I'm weary of wandering

street cleaner was sweeping
the gutter with a straw broom,
piling up the residue of the
daily traffic and burning it -
all free entertainment.
Booking your stay in a his-
toric or "local" hotel doesn't
necessarily mean sacrificing
quality or amenities, and per-
haps you'll come away with a
story to tell.


LAND
Continued from Page A2

("Aoraki" or "cloud-piercer" to
indigenous Maori), is visible
from locations on the west
coast But to get close to it also
requires a detour, from the
eastern side of the island. The
South Island's central regions
are continually surprising - by
turns wide plateaus and river
valleys, arid moonscapes and
rolling green hills.
Though the village of Mount
Cook itself is something of a
manufactured tourist trap, the
journey is worth it for the mul-
titude of walks that start there,
and for the very beautiful Lake
Pukaki that reflects the peaks
of the Southern Alps in its still,
pale blue waters.
Less visited but no less beau-
tiful is the Catlins region, in the
south of the island, between
Dunedin and Invercargill,
where lush green hills and
fern-filled forests rise over
deserted golden beaches.
According to Maori legend,
the South Island was formed
from an upturned canoe. The
anchor stone of that canoe
became Stewart Island, an
hour's ferry ride across the
Fouveaux Strait from the
southern tip of the mainland to
Oban, the only community on
the island. The rest of Stewart
Island is wilderness, a haven
for wildlife and walkers. The
entire island forms the
Rakiura National Park
Stewart Island is the one
place in New Zealand where
visitors may get a daytime
glimpse of the country's elu-
sive national icon, the kiwi,
which elsewhere is a nocturnal
bird. At night here, it is possi-
ble to see the aurora australis,
a phenomenon otherwise
reserved for much more
southerly latitudes.
Wildlife viewing is a popular
activity for New Zealand visi-
tors, and one that doesn't nec-
essarily require much effort.
The Ohau Point seal colony is a
roadside stop on the main east
coast road north ofKaikoura; a
five-minute walk to a hide in
the early evening allows visi-
tors to watch endangered yel-
low-eyed penguins coming in
from the sea near Kaka Point,
in the Catlins; and sea lions
lounge on the beach at nearby
Cannibal Bay.
Kaikoura, between Christ-
church and Picton, was a quiet

through museums around the
world, but am excited by each
visit to Fantasy of Flight in Polk
City. Pony-tailed and person-
able Kermit Weeks, an extraor-
dinarily accomplished aviator,
began collecting and restoring
antique aircraft in the late
1970s; today, at his 300-acre
facility in Polk City, he proudly
displays "the world's largest pri-
vately held collection of vintage
aircraft" - more than 70 on
display at any one time. There,
you can wander amidst and
photograph World War I fight-
ers, Lindberg's historic Spirit of
St Louis, colorful racers such
as unique Bee Gee, and World
War II aircraft, including the
huge British flying boat, Short
Sunderland. There also, visi-
tors can experience aerial com-
bat in World War II, by strapping
into a computer driven simula-
tor of a Navy fighter, the F4-U
Corsair. As an extra-special
treat, you may soar over the
area in a hot-air balloon, or per-
haps thrill to a ride in the open
cockpit of a biplane used to
train military aviators at the
start of World War II. Their
diner will satisfy the hungriest
family, which also won't want to
leave with at least a few avia-


fishing village until Maori
entrepreneurs set up a whale-
watching tour there less than
20 years ago. It's now a mecca
for viewing - or swimming
with - a wide variety of
marine life.
The Otago Peninsula, on the
edge of Dunedin, also offers
the chance to see royal alba-
trosses and many other forms
of wildlife.
The city of Dunedin fancies
itself Scottish, while Christ-
church, the biggest city on the
South Island, has a decidedly
English feel, right down to the
men in straw boaters navigat-
ing punts down the River Avon.
The beautiful Banks Penin-
sula, just outside Christchurch,
is the day-trip of choice for res-
idents of that city, with most
heading for Akaroa, a town that
plays heavily on its short-lived
French colonial past
But undiluted Kiwi urban
life, such as it is, well, that's
best experienced in the laid-
back, affluent town of Nelson,
in the north of the island.
What's more, from here, it's an
hour's drive west to the won-
ders of the Abel Tasman park,
or south to the peaceful Nelson
Lakes National Park
And if all those day walks
make you think you could take

tion-related items available in
the irresistible gift shop.
It may be difficult to accept,
but there's even a resort-class
dude ranch here in Central
Florida. The Westgate River
Ranch, about 25 miles east of
Lake Wales, on State Road 60,
offers a wide variety of com-
fortable accommodations, sur-
rounded by forests, open fields,
herds of livestock, including -
even - bison, a marina with
access to the Atlantic Intra-
coastal Waterway, tennis, golf,
skeet, horseback riding,
archery, hay rides, western
BBQs, a Saturday night, ama-
teur rodeo with dancing in the'
saloon afterward and more.


Homosassa resident John G.
Nash is a seasoned traveler.


on something a little more
adventurous, two hours from
Nelson gets you to Picton, at
the northern tip of the island
(the ferry leaves for the North
Island from here), the start


point for the most accessible of
the multi-day tramps.
Something keeps drawing
me back to New Zealand, and
I'm not over it yet The North
Island is calling....


TO SUBMIT A DAY TRIP:


1. Wnte about a day trip to a
town or attraction within three
hours' drive of Citrus County.
2. Include your name, home-
town and phone number (the
phone number will not be pub-
lished - it's for our reference).
3. Submit a photo or photos
of the place you visit. Drop off
copies at the Chronicle offices
in Inverness or Crystal River, or
e-mail the images as separate,
high-resolution jpeg (.jpg)
attachments to
community@chronicleonline.co
m. Include information about
what's in the pictures. Photos


cannot be returned without a
stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope
4. Include the name of the
area, the county it's in, the
major roads leading to it, its
main attractions and prices. You
can include a list of favonte
restaurants, or upcoming events
planned in that area.
5. Limit reports to 350 words.
The Chronicle will edit any
reports chosen for publication.
6. Pay attention to the day
trips reported by other readers
- duplicate reports will be elim-
inated.


*SOLATUBE.


dark room in ii' 'ii2hours,


� " ", " - �" . , - � ^ST 35415
. . . , . ,- �lE'; .pEl ..i :,1>
* -'g F"m Becky's 'f'avel Store
" L eful
P. jnr,.irg� ir
\.I ice CELEBRATE
E. lu-.%e SPRING IN
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Date: Monday, October 8,2007 Don't Miss Great May Values On 7-Day Cruises
Place&Time: CitrusHills at4:30pnm. From $649 -
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A . 1Fust - 1-Ifnd om m |
As ^ _ 713267 n tn


Associated Press
On March 1, walkers cross the Buller Gorge bridge, New Zealand's longest at 120 yards near
Murchison in the north of New Zealand's South Island. New Zealand conservation authorities are vis-
itor-conscious. Paths, from 20-minute nature walks to multi-day slogs, are well-marked and well-main-
tained.


DEPRESSED?
Not Having Fun Anymore?
Feeling Hopeless?
Tired?
Overwhelmed?
Feeling Down?
Difficulty Sleeping?
Call today if you have been suffering from these or other
symptoms of depression. You may be eligible for a
research study of an investigational medication for
depression for women who are postmenopausal and
between the ages of 40 and 70. Qualified participants will
receive study medication, laboratory tests, study related
physical examination, and compensation for time and
travel.
F or more Information about this research study,
Meridien please call 352-597-8839 (352-59-STUDY)
e2earc3h RAA yV2 www.newatudylnfo.net
Mildred V. Farmer, MD, 12144 Cortez Blvd. (Route 50) Between US 19 & Mariner Blvd., Brooksvlle, FL 34613
--------------- _____ ____ ;--------------------: -- ""


2 Da.y Bus Trip
to visit & explore
TALLAHASSE &
WAKULLA SPRINGS
Sept. 21-22, 2007
Includes: Guided Tours of Historic $6
Sites, Lodging, Breakfast, I Lunch,
Glassbottom B oat Tour, Admissions, P
Taxes & Gratuities T . 137240
The Travel Shoppe
4/ Crl hd 9& , - r
Call for more details or to request a flyer.
Contact Joan sweety
352-564-8773
.ww.lhctravIlslhopppiofcryslairiverAmydeals.com


JLJ. J ./ . WJLAJVIV l,,j


advertise here in the


Great Getaways


call 563-5592

-a - ;. ** ________________- --______*


R TP, T9AT n' AWAYS


Neil Sawyer is a
22-year Crystal River
resident and businessman.
He and his wife, Karyn, are
extensive travelers, venturing
to foreign countries two to
three times a year in addition
to taking several domestic
excursions annually.
They prefer independent trav-
el or with small-group
guided tours.








CITUS OIJIY FL, CH )NU2I UTGTHRSNDY i-rLEtR2 20


William A "Bill" and Jean
Wollangk Thacher celebrated
their 60th wedding anniver-
sary on Aug. 16 surrounded by
their children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
Married in Woodruff, Wis., on
Aug. 16,1947, they moved to Fort
Lauderdale in 1954. After retire-
ment, they moved to Inverness.
Bill served in the U.S. Army
and retired as the administra-
tor of a private nonprofit foun-
dation. He was active in
Kiwanis Clubs, serving as sec-
retary, vice president and pres-
ident of local clubs as well as
secretary and lieutenant gov-
ernor for the state of Florida.
Jean retired as a licensed prac-


tical nurse and has been active
in the First Christian Church
of Inverness.
The weekend celebration
included children Bill Thacher
and wife Jody of Pine Island;
Bob Thacher of Fort Lauder-
dale; Jill Thacher and husband
Tony Conti of Inverness; grand-
children, Joshua Mincey and
wife Jennifer of Knoxville,
Tenn.; Danielle Porter and
husband Brian of Cortland,
N.Y.; Nicole Thacher of
Westin; Jenna Miranda and
husband Mike of Clermont;
and Casey Thacher of
Tamarac; and great-grandchil-
dren, Matthew and Meghan
Porter of Cortland, N.Y.


-===-===Wedding


Mahler/Castillo


Philip L. Castillo and
Leydienne D. Mahler were
united in marriage Saturday,
May 5, 2007, at Casa Feliz,
Winter Park Judge Mark
Yerman performed the service.
The bride is the daughter of
Archie and Iris Mahler of
Flagler Beach.
The groom is the son of
Louis and Nilza Castillo of
Inverness.
Given in marriage by her
father, the bride wore a strap-
less ivory, English tulle and
lace gown embroidered with
fine silver thread with pearl
and crystal accents and a
Spanish Mantilla veil. She car-
ried a botanical bouquet of
antique hydrangeas accented
with red tulips, red anemones,
orchids and grape vine.
Maid of honor was
Lauryenne Kraeft, sister of the
bride. Bridesmaids were
Lusette Lilley, sister of the
bride, and Angie Echeverria.
Jr. bridesmaids were Helen
and Sophie Price, bride's
nieces. Flower girl was
Brooklyn Lilley, bride's niece.
The bridesmaids' dresses were
black floor length and they car-
ried bouquets the same as the
bride's on a smaller scale.
Best man was Glenn Castillo,
brother of the groom. Ushers
were Layrd Mahler and Ladd


Mahler, brothers of bride, and
Alex Echeverria. Ring bearer
was Harlem Lilley, bride's
nephew.
The reception was held
immediately following the cer-
emony at Casa Feliz. Guests
were greeted with an outdoor
champagne reception.
Ceremony was held on the
lawn. The newlyweds invited
guests inside the Casa Feliz for
dinner and dancing.
The bride is a marketing
coordinator for a mortgage
company and the groom is a
teaching tennis pro.
The couple went on a road
trip with main destination
Niagara Falls and Niagara on
the Lake. Canada to do the
Wine Trail.
They will li\e in Inverness.


====50th ANNIVERSARY . ====50th ANNIVa


The Baums The Schmids

Mr. and Mrs. Hans and Louise and Tony Schmid eel-
Ursula Baum of Hernando will ebrated their 50th wedding 9 .
celebrate their 50th anniver- anniversary Aug. 31, 2007.
sary Sept. 7. They were mar- This occasion was made pos-
ried in 1957 in Schweinfurt, sible thanks to good friends in
Germany. Hans worked for 1953 in Chicago, who set up the
G.E., Ursula was a homemaker. blind date in which they met.
They have two daughters, Earlier in August, their five
Connie White of Ohio and children, spouses and their
Margarete Baum of Iowa. In children came to Homosassa
1997 they moved from Ohio to and Sugarmill Woods for the
Hernando. They will celebrate occasion.
their anniversary with a cruise
to the West Indies.


== --60th ANNIVERSARY ....


Congratulations to the Ibl-


lo\ ing nevw parents
* To A.nie Adams-Spooner
and Gabe Spooner.Gaines\tille.
a daughter, Hannah Madelyin
Spooner, born at 8.34-1 p i
Monday, July 16. 2007, at North
Florida Regional Medical
Center Maternal grandparents
Share Tom and Judye Adams.
Paternal grandmotlder is Suzi
Spooner-lard.
: To Loran and Frank
Capulo. Gloucester: a son. Jack


David Pierce Caputo, born on ..
Thursday. AuA 9. 2007. in
Gloucester: w eighing 6 pounds,
11 ounces and 19'. inches in
length He joins his siste:. Aria
Caputo. 2 years old. Grand-
parents are Jack "Brad" and
Maril.ln Pierce. Gloucester; -
David and Bettl Burke.
Gloucester: Bonnie and Steve
Murphy. Goshen. Frank Caputo
and Roseann DiCato. Everett.
Great-grandparents Leo and
Gloria Nolan. Homosassa


GET THE WORD OUT
* [Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news release
es about upcoming community events.
* Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and other details
* Include a contact name and phone number to be printed
in the paper
* News releases are subject t, editing
* Call 563-5660 for details


WE WANT YOUR
PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in
sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in prop-
er exposure: neither too
light nor too dark.
* Include name, address
and phone number on all
photos.
* When identifying persons
in your photo, do so from
left to right.
* We do not accept Polaroid
prints.
* Photos printed on plain
paper do not reproduce
well.
* Photos submitted elec-
tronically should be in
maximum-resolution JPEG
( Ipg) format.
0 Photos cannot be returned
without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call
* Linda Johnson, newsroom
coordinator, at 563-5660.


Ir INSIDE coC
SEARS I Free
Hearing Aid Repirs
H. A I all makes and models
Crystal River Mall ino.c..rir.nly.. u...n- . upon -
795-1484 Battery Sale I
- 2Paddock Mall, Ocala 89
237-1665 I ce (Limt2 packs)


Visit Our NEW "PINK HOUSE" SHOWROOM!




INDU RAM JIT
2968 W. Gulf to Lake Highway 44, Lecanto, FL 34461

3528-746-1998
SToll Free877-808-1991 It" .


All Types of Window Treatments
713233 Family Owned and Serving the Area Since 1980
/*^J'^^ ^^/^flelre.�Irlelle����eeelezJ, ee e e e F .1,F-1


PACKAGE INCLUDES:

$30�� FREE PLAY
Plus $5 Meal Voucher &
Roundtrip Transportation


YOU PAY:


$2500


Call Lamers Bus Lines For More Information
1.888.315.8687 ext.3
Monday-Friday, 9AM-5PM

PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES
Service from Crystal River/Inverness Areas

TUSAY TUSDY


WINN DIXIE
Crystal River
Meadowcrest Blvd. and
HWY. 44


MCDONALD'S
Inverness
Croft Rd. and
HWY. 44


BURGER KING
Inverness
HWY. 41 and
HWY. 44


For group charter information,, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino


877.529.7653


~am&nei


COME OUT & PLAY.


If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT.
1-4 at North Orient Road
813.627.ROCK (7625) I SEMINOLEHARDROCK.COM


*Will be required to join our Players Club in order to receive the free play. Must have a valid picture ID
and be 18 or older to join. Offer is for the Gaming Machine of your choice ONLY (not valid for Poker).
�2007 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. All rights reserved.


The Thachers


First " a: " i:''2.

Joseph Michael Domino cel-
ebrates his first birthday on R
Sept 8. Joseph is the son of
Michael and Kelly Domino of
Washington, D.C. Maternal
grandparents are Tom and
Shari Huey of Citrus Springs.
Paternal grandmother is Kathy
Keane of Yaphank, N.Y.










Graysen Layne Stokes cele-
brated her first birthday Aug.
4. Graysen is the daughter of
Richard and Trista Stokes of
Dunnellon. She has a big sis-
ter, Brailey Stokes. Maternal --
grandparents are Mark
Barfield of Conyers, Ga., and
the late Debra Barfield.
Paternal grandparents are
Sybil and Harvey Stokes of
Hernando.





* -C -New :'' " ....


Green rocks weddings

.. m iiI-t- ..�; ;


Associated Press
Labeled stones serve as place cards at the Wilmore-Thornton wedding April 14 in Mill Valley,
Calif. Guests used the stones, labeled with table names such as peace, grow and embrace,
to find their seats at the reception. Going green is a growing trend in the wedding industry.


2-
*.Y

�" ..'. .



- - -" '

'-- S.
"*:;3;.,


".' .
'.-* - �


TAMPA


SUNDAY, Si--wrFmm--At 2, 2007 151k


TOGETHER


)NICLE "


CITRus CouNy (FL) CHRc








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


16A SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


Your Birthday: In the year ahead, it would be wise
to work on reviving a relationship which has always
been of immense importance to you but is now experi-
encing some difficult times. Don't let false pride keep
you from putting forth the effort to reconstruct the union.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Don't misinterpret your
self-doubts as the result of an inquiring mind. The for-
mer only invites ways to fail.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Your compensation and
acknowledgement will be in proportion to your achieve-
ments. Avoid negative associates.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If you suspect that
your plans are, in reality, not as good as you are pre-
tending them to be, take stock of your thinking and
make revisions in favor of something that'll really work.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - It might take a lot
more than you thought to figure out a solution to a crit-
ical problem. Don't be so fast to accept a quick answer.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Be extremely care-
ful that you do not rush to judge anything of signifi-
cance. Take time to correctly weigh all the aspects
before you act on anything dangerous or important.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - This might be one of
those rare days when it could be wiser to listen to your


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Halloween" (R) 1 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:30
p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25
p.m. Digital.
"The Invasion" (PG-13) 1:40
p.m.,4:20 p.m., 7:450 p.m., 10:15
p.m.
"Superbad" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 1:45
p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.


The Citrus County Animal,
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.u
s/ and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.
To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group


'NAME: (none)
AGE: Chicken
-SEX: F
.ID #: 83142


1


NAME: Nixon
AGE: Infant
SEX: M
ID #: 79035


sentiments than to what your logic is telling you, espe-
cially when dealing with others.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Sometimes when we
try exceptionally hard not to make a mistake, we actu-
ally outthink ourselves and overwork solutions. Relax
and accept the results.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -To effectively complete
a project or assignment, let the job dictate the course of
action instead of following a preconceived plan that
may not work when put to practice.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Think for yourself instead
of listening to everyone else's solutions and getting so
caught up in them you don't know which end is up.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - There are always a
number of things you can do for yourself without calling
in expensive experts. Know both your abilities and lim-
itations before making that decision.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you get involved in a
highly competitive activity that is supposed to be fun,
don't make winning all-important.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - If you insist on moaning
about the hand you've been dealt, you will make sure it
is a bad one instead of the opportune one it could be.
Take your mind off yourself.


"The Bourne Ultimatum" (PG-
13) 1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Halloween" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:35 p.m., 10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Balls of Fury" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m, 4:10 p.m., 7:55 p.m, 10:05 p.m.
"War" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"The Nanny Diaries" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 945
p.m.
"The Invasion" (PG-13) 10:25


and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet.
The shelter is in Inverness
near the airport. The shelter
is open for adoptions from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m' Monday
through Friday and from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Call the Citrus County


NAME: Cindy
AGE: Adult
SEX: SF
ID #: 84307


NAME: (none)
AGE: YA
SEX: F
ID #: 84729


p.m.
"Superbad" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:35 p.m. Digital.
"Rush Hour 3" (PG-13) 2 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:35 p.m.
Digital.
"Underdog" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"The Bourne Ultimatum" (PG-
13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Transformers" (PG-13) 1:05
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:10
p.m.


Animal Shelter at 726-7660
for more information.
Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida at 563-.
2370, or from the Humane
Society of Citrus County at
341-2222.


NAME: (none)
AGE: YA
SEX: F
ID #: 84731


NAME: (none)
AGE: Adult
SEX: F
ID #: 84649


NTGOMERY TRACE





GENTRY AIDKINS


For Tickets:
Fancy's Pets - 669 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, 352-563-5100

Wishful Thinking
Western World
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg)
352-629-7676


Diner wants to eat her



dessert without sharing


Dear Annie: Once a month, my husband
and I get together for dinner with anoth-
er couple. We take turns buying. The
other three always order after-dinner drinks or
espresso, but I prefer dessert. I rarely eat
sweets and really look forward to the
exceptional desserts at the restau-
rants we go to.
Each time, I glance around the
table and say, "Are you sure you don't
want to try the desserts? They're fan-
tastic here." Everyone always says
no. The problem? I have noticed that
at every place we have dined, the
server arrives with their drinks, then
places my dessert in the middle of
the table with four dessert forks. Of
course, they all begin chatting and
start digging in. I have yet to enjoy a ANN
dessert by myself.
Recently, trying to be nice, I MAIL
ordered my dessert and whispered to
the server to bring another "for the table." As
usual, he placed the dessert in the middle with
three forks, and then placed the second one in
front of me. Our friends started laughing and said,
"I guess we always eat your desserts, don't we?"
My husband was silent the rest of the evening
In the car, he angrily said, "I didn't think you
were such a selfish person." I was dumbstruck.
I told him I wanted to have my own dessert and
I'm also not too keen on the germ thing. He
pointed out that since it was their turn to pay, it
was rude to order an extra dessert. My cake was
$8. They ordered $14 cognacs.
Why would my server, without asking, assume
my dessert was for everyone? And why in the
world would this make my husband so upset?
Who's right? - Deprived Chocoholic
Dear Deprived: You are, although you should
have made your move when you were paying
the bill. Your husband is upset because he does-
n't want to appear greedy, but your friends
should have asked permission to share your
dessert. And although many diners put a single
dessert in the middle of the table, the waitstaff
should never make that assumption. Next time
you are hosting, say loudly that you are ordering
a dessert for the table and also one for yourself.
Dear Annie: I have been dating a wonderful


man who is very special, but has absolutely no
table etiquette. I know I should try to overlook
it, but I can't.
"Jed" talks with his mouth full, chows down as
if he hasn't eaten in a month, uses his fingers to
push food onto his fork, holds his
fork upright as if he's about to carve
a turkey and cuts all his meat into
pieces before he starts to eat
This is starting to affect the roman-
tic side of our relationship. One
evening, I actually got nauseous. I
hate to hurt him. What can I do? -
Dating a Caveman
Dear Dating: Breaking up over this
would also hurt, so you may as well
say something. Tell Jed you think he
is wonderful and you want others to
I|E'S think so, too, but his table manners
might give a negative impression,
.BOX especially to business associates.
Ask if he would mind if you gave him
a few pointers.
Dear Annie: This is in response to "Need a
Handyman in Dallas." My husband also left jobs
unfinished. One day I'd had enough. He was
supposed to paint the front of our two-story
home. I hired painters from our local fire
department (a sideline for many), and they were
there when he arrived home from work. At first,
he was stunned and angry. I told him, "I'm put-
ting you on the two-year plan. If-it's not done in
two years, I hire it out." It's amazing how many
jobs he finishes now, but he's willing to hire out
just as many. It only stung for a minute. -
Michigan
Dear Michigan: Good for you, although you
are very tolerant to put him on a two-year plan;
We think six months is more than enough.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. E-mail questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


Sunday PUZZLER


Puzzle answer is on Page 12A.


ACROSS
1 Put up with
6 Country near Bolivia
11 Sellers or Fonda
16 Rascal
21 Insert mark
22 Of a grain
23 SoAp plant
24 Fleihy plant part
25 Doglike animal
26 Casserole topping
28 Fine violin
29 Age
30 Injure
31 "... man - -
mouse?"
32 Plunder
34 Marquee notice
35 Club charge
37 England's Isle of -
38 "Lord of the Rings"
hero
40 Sardonic
41 That girl
42 Wilson's predecessor
44 Likely wrongdoer
46 Mine car
49 Facet
52 River in France
53 Schoolyard game
55 Nail polish
59 Cooking device
60 Eagles
61 City on the Danube
64 Betel palm
65 Domesticated
66 Cry of sadness
67 Desire
68 Priestly vestment
70 Season
71 Wrath
72 Indigo dye
73 Musical group
74 Alexander the -
76 Calendar abbr.
77 Series of boat races
79 - Angeles
80 Graven image
82 Good name
84 Coolidge or Hayworth
85 Money
86 Cooper or Kasparov
87 Grizzly
88 Style of type
90 Costa -
91 Before
92 Soldier's water flask


95 Sine qua -
96 Fruity drink
98 Twisted
100 Prohibits
101 Actress - Farrow
102 Periods
104 Failure
105 Apartment, British
style
106 Bubbly drink
107 Cots
108 Boca -
110 - -doux (love letter)
112 Lofty
113 Jackson or Leigh
114 Dissertation
116 Chinese "way"
117 Liquid measure
118 Measly
119 Fall birthstone
121 Night club
124 Dwelling
125 Branch
128 Fish paddle
130 Dry ink for copiers
131 Plant fluid
132 Let it stand!
136 Legume
137 Leg bone
139 Get spliced
140 Location
141 Cut down with an ax
142 Wonderland girl
144 Lucky contestant
147 Boutique
149 Artificial waterway
150 Chemical compound
151 Long for
152 O'Donnell of TV
153 Put forth effort
154 Acts
155 Recorded
156 Short and -


DOWN
1 Was painful
2 Marshy lake
3 Peace goddess
4 Private room
5 Greek letter
6 Metallic element
7 "When - Met Sally..."
8 Particular
9 Pasture
10 Give support to
11 Procession
12 Flightless bird
13 Sepulcher
14 Body joint
15 Vacation destination
16 Remain
17 Summa - laude
18 Disconcert
19 British length
20 Previous
27 Cut short
30 Heaviness
33 British car part
36 Jobs or Martin
38 To-do
39 Group of eight
43 Playing card
44 Transgressions
45 Sunbather's goal
47 Literary collection
48 War god
49 Moving about
50 Fixed gaze
51 Many-seeded fruit
52 Spoken
54 Full of knots
56 Meter reading
57 Brilliance
58 Coffee drink
60 Essays of -
61 Movers' truck
62 Very poor
63 Pub order
66 Bicarbonate of soda
67 Like some garments
69 Walters or Mandrell
72 Garret
73 Variety of pear
74 Wound with the tusks
75 Time of life
78 Trouble
79 Hiding place
81 Flit
83 Butter serving
85 Accounting entry
88 Sluggish


89 The Pentateuch
92 Phone
93 Sea duck
94 Very unpleasant
97 Confer knighthood or
99 Consume
100 Lock part
103 Not very good and
not very bad (hyph.)
105 Waft
106 Jargon
107 Hay bundles
109 Pinch
111 Fond du -
112 Row
113 Traffic problem
115 Strongbox
117 Foretell
118 The bishop of Rome
120 Walked with difficulty
122 Arbors
123 Freshly
124 Detestation
125 Swiftly
126 Take it easy
127 Potato state
129 Worker in a hospital
131 Strainer
133 The ones there
134 Strange
135 Whistle sound
137 Touched
138 Ceremony
140 Break unexpectedly
143 Auto
145 Last British letter
146 Gun gp.
147 Upperclassmen
(abbr.)
148 Pull


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* College football/2B, 3B
* Crystal River Triathlon/3B
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* Sc:,re.:-.rJ 4B
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11


B
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007
www chronicleonline.com
____________f __,


E )~j) 1~
.'-~ /


Gators not slowed by bad weather


Associated Press
Florida running back Kestahn Moore (33) goes for a short gain
Saturday after taking a handoff from quarterback Tim Tebow (15)
as he is tackled by Western Kentucky's Andre Lewis (13), during
the first half in Gainesville.


Florida chomps W. Kentucky, 49-3


Associated Press
GAINESVILLE - Tim
Tebow and Florida had an
even easier day than expected
against Western Kentucky. The
Gators didn't even have to play
60 minutes.
Tebow threw for 300 yards
and three touchdowns and ran
for another score, and the sixth-
ranked Gators opened defense
of their national championship
with a 49-3 victory over Western
Kentucky on Saturday that was
called with 8:23 left in the fourth
quarter because of lightning.
The weather was about the
only thing that stopped the
Gators.


Tebow, making his first
career start, led Florida (1-0) to
touchdowns in its first four pos-
sessions. He completed his
first six passes for 156 yards
and two TDs, proving he can be
as dynamic with his arm as he
can his legs.
With his first throw, Tebow
hit Andre Caldwell in stride
down the sideline for a 48-yard
gain. Later in the first, he faked
a step toward the line of scrim-
mage, then dropped back and
connected with Riley Cooper
for a 59-yard score.
He added a perfect strike for
Percy Harvin to make it 21-0 in
the second quarter.
The left-handed sophomore


wasn't done, either.
He had two equally impres-
sive throws on consecutive
plays in the third. He hooked
up with Caldwell for a 43-yard
gain, then found Cooper for a
42-yard score.
Tebow and coach Urban
Meyer fielded countless ques-
tions about the quarterback's
throwing ability leading up to
the season. Can he be accu-
rate? Can he throw deep? Will
he run too much or too often?
So far, so good. Then again,
the real test comes in two
weeks when Florida hosts No.
15 Tennessee.
The Hilltoppers (0-1) didn't
provide much of a challenge in
the first game of their two-year
transition from the Football
Championship Subdivision


(formerly Division I-AA) to the
Football Bowl Subdivision (for-
merly Division I-A).
The Gators were bigger and
stronger on both lines and
faster and more skilled every-
where else.
Florida defense, however,
had some struggles despite giv-
ing up just a field goal. Those
were anticipated, though, after
losing nine starters and replac-
ing them several underclass-
men.
Western Kentucky put
together a 62-yard drive to
open the game, then failed to
convert a fourth-and-1 at the
10. Making matters worse,
quarterback David Wolke suf-
fered a concussion during the
Please see '-./Page 4B


2nd-tier? Says who?


Associated Press
Appalachian State coach Jerry Moore is carried off the field Saturday at Michigan Stadium by players Tony Robertson, right, and Brad Coley, left, after
upsetting No. 5 Michigan, 34-32, in Ann Arbor, Mich.


Division I-AA Appalachian State beats No. 5 Michigan, 34-32,


Associated Press
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Chances are, most of
the 110,000 fans at the Big House had no idea
exactly where Appalachian State is located.
By the time they saw a blocked field goal in
final seconds, this much was certain: The lit-
tle Mountaineers pulled off one of the greatest
upsets in college football history.
Appalachian State 34, No. 5 Michigan 32.
The team from Boone, N.C., took the lead
with 26 seconds left when Julian Rauch
kicked a 24-yard field goal. Corey Lynch
blocked a 37-yard try on the final play, and the
Mountaineers sealed a jaw-dropping upset
that might have no equal.
"It was David versus Goliath," Appalachian
State receiver Dexter Jackson said.
Michigan's three stars on offense and its
coach came back this season, putting the NFL
and retirement on hold, with high hopes.
Big Ten title. National championship.
Looks like it might be time for Plan B.
Mike Hart, Chad Henne and Jake Long
never envisioned stumbling this early in what
was a promising year.
Neither did coach Lloyd Carr, who looked
ashen as the upset unfolded.
It didn't take long to notice the second-tier


in stellar upset


power belonged on the same field because it
made up for a slight size disadvantage with
superior speed and, perhaps, more passion.
The two-time defending champions from for-
mer Division I-AA were ahead of the nation's
winningest program 28-14 late in the second
quarter, before their storybook afternoon
seemed to unravel late in the fourth quarter.
Hart's 54-yard run with 4:36 left put the
Wolverines ahead for the first time since early
in the second quarter.
One snap after the go-ahead touchdown,
Michigan's Brandent Englemon intercepted
an errant pass, but the Wolverines couldn't
capitalize and had their first of two field goals
blocked.
Then Appalachian State drove 69 yards
without a timeout in 1:11 to set up the go-
ahead field goal.
"I've been dreaming about that kick every
day," Rauch said.
Please see TIER/Page 4B
Michigan kicker Jason Gingell reacts Saturday
as his field goal attempt is blocked by
Appalachian State defensive back Corey Lynch,
not shown, in the closing seconds of the fourth
quarter. Lynch recovered the ball and returned it
62 yards as time ran out.


Boston's Buchholz tosses no-hitter against O's


Associated Press


BOSTON - Clay Buchholz
threw a no-hitter in his second
major league start, just hours
after being called up by the
Boston Red Sox.
The lanky Texan baffled
Clay Baltimore with an assortment of
Buchholz curves, changeups and fastballs


in the Red Sox's 10-0 victory
Saturday night. He struck out
nine, walked three and hit one
batter before the 371st straight
sellout crowd at Fenway Park.
"It's amazing. That's all I can
say," he said. "I'm in a blur right
now."
The crowd stood through the
entire ninth inning, cheering


every pitch and taking pictures
of the young righty in his windup
and as he paced around the
mound between pitches. A groan
rose from the stands when Corey
Patterson hit a line drive to cen-
ter with one out, but Coco Crisp
easily moved over to catch it.
Buchholz started Nick
Markakis with a ball, then went


ahead 1-2 when the batter fouled
one off with a check swing. The
crowd grew even louder, the
flashes were constant, and
Buchholz threw a 77 mph curve-
ball that Markakis watched go by.
No one stopped cheering
until Buchholz appeared on the
Please see ' ', ."i./Page 4B


Associated Press
Maria Sharapova reacts Saturday dur-
ing her match against Agnieszka
Radwanska at the U.S. Open tennis
tournament in New York. Radwanska
defeated Sharapova in three sets.



Polish



teenager:



So long,



superstar


Sharapova chased

out of U.S. Open

Associated Press
NEW YORK - Pay no attention to
what Maria Sharapova said after her
U.S. Open title defense came to an
end Saturday
This was a case of actions speaking
far louder than words, and the way
things slipped away, so suddenly and
stunningly, Sharapova
clearly was flustered
- by the swirling
wind and bright sun,
by her errant strokes
and, most of all, by the
Krakow Kid across
the net who kept mov-
ing way up to receive
serves. Agnieszka
Sharapova reeled Radwanska
off eight consecutive defeated
games to go up a break Sharapova in
in the third set, then three sets.
dropped the final six
games and lost 6-4, 1-6, 6-2 to 18-year-
old Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland
in the third round, the earliest exit by
a No. 2-seeded woman at the U.S.
Open since 1981.
"I don't know if it was a combination
of the circumstance or the wind or the
opponent playing well. I don't know
what it was," said Sharapova, who dou-
ble-faulted a whopping 12 times. "I just
didn't quite feel like me out there."
The braces-wearing, big-hitting
Radwanska isn't exactly a nobody
She won junior championships at the
French Open in 2005 and Wimbledon
in 2006, took home her first tour title
this month and came to New York
seeded 30th. Still, she understood the
circumstances Saturday
"I had nothing to lose. She was the
favorite - and I think she was more
nervous," said Radwanska, who will
fulfill a prematch promise to her
younger sister, this year's Wimbledon
junior champion, by buying them
Please see OPEN/Page 4B









COLLEGE FOOTBALL


2B SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


Emotions high in Va.


Tech win


Associated Press

BLACKSBURG, Va. -
Virginia Tech charged onto the
field with an enormous burden.
Barely adults, these guys were
playing for themselves, playing
for their school, playing for all
those maroon-clad fans.
Most important, they were
playing for 32 Hokies who
weren't at Lane Stadium.
On an extraordinary after-
noon of healing and remem-
brance, the football game was
almost an afterthought No. 9
Virginia Tech managed to con-
trol its emotions just enough
Saturday to pull out a 17-7 vic-
tory over East Carolina.
"I know I was overanxious,"
linebacker Vince Hall said.
"Coach warned us about it, but
how can you be ready for that?
It was so emotional."
Indeed, the Hokies appeared
a bit overwhelmed by the bur-
den of what they'll face all
year: rallying a school that is
desperate to move on from the
worst mass shooting in modern
American history. The 32 vic-
tims of April's campus mas-
sacre were honored in a heart-
tugging pregame ceremony,
which was followed by a slug-
gish performance on the field.
"We're not magical healers
or anything," quarterback Sean
Glennon said. "The most we
can do is go out and show that
we're giving every ounce of
effort for thefans, for the fami-
lies, for this community."
The running game struggled.
Glennon threw an intercep-
tion, lost a fumble, was sacked
four times and continually
missed open receivers with
errant passes. The Hokies
offense even heard boos from a
home crowd that honored a
plea not to jeer the Pirates.
The defense helped turn
things around.
East Carolina, a 271/2-point
underdog that didn't have its
No. 1 quarterback, was leading
when Victor Harris returned an
interception 17 yards for a
touchdown with just over 3 min-
utes remaining in the first half,
pushing the Holdkies ahead 10-7.
The crowd breathed a sigh of
relief when Virginia Tech final-
ly put it away early in the fourth
quarter. Glennon hooked up
with Sam Wheeler on a 21-yard
touchdown with just over 13
minutes remaining, the Hokies'
only offensive TD.
Wheeler, a sophomore tight
end, was Virginia Tech's most
effective weapon. He caught a
career-best seven passes for
81 yards.
"We fought through it and
found a way to win, even when
things were not perfect," coach
Frank Beamer said.
But just getting through the
game may have been Virginia
Tech's most significant accom-
plishment After all, they've
heard all summer how they'll
provide a much-needed cathar-
sis for a campus that still has
fresh memories of that awful day
"It's going to be a continuous
process," Beamer said. "As long
as you're at Virginia Tech, you're
going to remember April 16th."
East Carolina played well but
didn't ruin the script When it
was over, both teams kneeled at
the 50-yard line for a prayer.
Then the Hokies turned toward
the band in the north end zone,
singing along while they played
the school's alma mater.
"That was kind of a nice
touch, to have our fans and our
players all together at the end,"
Beamer said, though he had to
fake it - he forgot the words.
"I'll know the words next
time," the coach said sheepishly
The Pirates played a sup-
porting but important role. One
of the biggest cheers went up
when East Carolina officials
presented a $100,000 check to
Virginia Tech's memorial fund
during the pregame ceremony
"It was a special day," coach
Skip Holtz said. "It was neat for
us to have an opportunity to be
a part of it."
Outside Lane Stadium, it
looked like any other football
Saturday beforehand as fans
fired up the grills, turned up
plenty of beers and got into a
Hokies state of mind.
There was one major differ-
ence, however.
The handful of East Carolina
fans, easily identifiable in their
purple and yellow attire, were


invited to join the Virginia
Tech party. At one Hokies tent,
they flew the Pirates flag right
underneath the U.S. and
Virginia Tech banners. An SUV
decorated in Virginia Tech's
distinctive maroon and orange
colors had a huge sign draped
across its windshield: "Thank


Associated Press
Virginia Tech head football coach Frank Beamer stands with his team Saturday as they sing the school anthem after their 17-7 win over
East Carolina at Lane stadium in Blacksburg, Va.


You ECU For Your Support"
"We're here for our team and
to support our team," said
Alexis Zell, a Virginia Tech
sophomore, "but we're here to
support everybody else that
has been there for us."
East Carolina had to go with-
out quarterback Rob Kass, who
was scheduled to make his first
career start He was suspended
Tuesday after being charged
with driving while impaired.
Sophomore Brett Clay, who
had not thrown a pass in a
game since high school, started
in place of Kass but didn't last
He was lifted after completing
only 2-of-6 throws, including a
horribly thrown pass from his
own end zone.
The ball went straight to
Harris, who took off the corner,
dove for the pylon and just got
across before losing the ball.
After a video review, the touch-
down stood and East Carolina's
7-3 lead was gone.
Third-stringer Patrick Pinkney
went the rest of the way at quar-
terback for the Pirates.
East Carolina scored its lone
touchdown after Branden Ore
lost a fumble near midfield.
Chris Johnson capped the 52-
yard drive with a 2-yard plunge
over left tackle.
The Hokies know they'll
have to play much better next
weekend, when they travel to
Baton Rouge to face No. 2 LSU.
But at least they have this
one behind them.
"There was so much riding on
this game, outside of the game
itself," Glennon said. "There
was so much attention and
emphasis on things that were
not-related to football. Our
heads were somewhere else."
No. 3 West Virginia 62,
Western Michigan 24
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Pat
White threw two touchdown passes
and ran for two more scores, and
Steve Slaton scored four times in
No. 3 West Virginia's 62-24 rout of
Western Michigan on Saturday.
It was the Mountaineers' highest
scoring game since an 80-7 win
over Rutgers in 2001, WVU coach
Rich Rodriguez's first season.
West Virginia improved to 5-0
against Mid-American Conference
schools under Rodriguez.
Western Michigan's defense,
sixth in the nation against the run
last season, couldn't corral one of
the nation's top rushing tandems,
and that emphasis also allowed
White to thrive through the air. The
junior went 10-of-18 for 192 yards.
He also ran for 97 yards in improv-
ing to 16-2 as a starter.
Slaton, the nation's fourth-leading
rusher a year ago, ran for 109
yards as the Mountaineers broke
the game open with two scores in a
1:15 span early in the third quarter.
Held to 21 yards in the first half,
Slaton went 58 yards untouched
up the middle on West Virginia's
second possession after halftime.
No. 4 Texas 21,
Arkansas St.
AUSTIN, Texas - Colt McCoy
threw two first-quarter touchdown


passes and No. 4 Texas stumbled
through a sloppy 21-13 season-
opening win over Arkansas State
on Saturday night, narrowly avoid-
ing yet another huge upset on the
day.
Most considered the Longhorns
overwhelming favorites but they
didn't have this one wrapped up
until Brandon Foster recovered an
onside kick with less than a minute
to play, and that came after the
Indians were forced to re-kick
because of a penalty that negated
an consider they recovered.
Texas hopes to contend for the
Big 12 and national titles, but will
first have to shore up a defense
that allowed Arkansas State (0-1)
to grind out long drives and break
off big plays. The Longhorns' short-
yardage running game that all but
disappeared last season is still
missing.
About the only thing that looked
solid for Texas was the normally
reliable pass-catch combination of
McCoy to Limas Sweed. But even
they cooled off after a 35-yard TD
pass on Texas' first drive.
No. 7 Wisconsin 42,
Washington State 21
MADISON, Wis. - New starting
quarterback Tyler Donovan threw
for three touchdowns and ran for
another to help No. 7 Wisconsin
shake off a mediocre defensive per-
formance in a 42-21 victory over
Washington State in Saturday's
season opener for both teams.
With Washington State focused
on stopping running back P.J. Hill,
the Badgers tumed to Donovan, a
fifth-year senior who was given the
starting job by coach Bret Bielema
only 10 days ago.
Wisconsin trailed 14-7 late in the
first quarter but scored 21 unan-
swered points before halftime as
Donovan got hot and the defense
began to contain Cougars quarter-
back Alex Brink.
Washington State tried to rally
early in the third quarter after a spe-
cial-teams miscue by Wisconsin.
The Badgers' Ken DeBauche hit a
short punt, then was flagged for ille-
gally batting the ball forward, giving
the ball to Washington State at the
Wisconsin 42.
Brink drove the Cougars deep
into Badgers territory, then found
wide receiver Brandon Gibson on a
7-yard slant pattern for a touch-
. down, cutting the score to 28-21.
No. 11 Ohio St. 38,
Youngstown St. 6
COLUMBUS, Ohio - No. 11
Ohio State took its first step toward
forgetting the end of last season.
Todd Boeckman played well in his
first start replacing Heisman Trophy-
winning quarterback Troy Smith and
the Buckeyes made just about all
the big plays in beating Youngstown
State 38-6 on Saturday.
The Buckeyes welcomed the
game as a way to put some dis-
tance between themselves and the
painful memories of a humiliating
41-14 defeat to Florida in the BCS
national championship game Jan. 8.
It was the first time the schools
met, with Youngstown State now


playing in the new Football
Championship Subdivision, for-
merly I-AA.
Ohio State's Jim Tressel was the
coach at Youngstown State for 15
years and led the Penguins to four
I-AA championships before taking
over the Buckeyes in 2001.
Boeckman, a tall, rangy junior,
directed the first four touchdown
drives as the Buckeyes steadily
pulled away. He completed 17-of-
23 passes for 225 yards and two 1-
yard TDs.
Dane Sanzenbacher and Taurian
Washington, a pair of prized fresh-
men wide-outs, each scored on
their first career receptions,
Sanzenbacher's coming on a 3-
yard toss from Boeckman and
Washington's covering 37 yards
from Antonio Henton.
No. 13 Georgia 35,
Oklahoma St. 14
ATHENS, Ga. - Thomas Brown
ran for two first-quarter touch-
downs, Matthew Stafford threw two
second-half scoring passes and
No. 13 Georgia shut out Oklahoma
State in the second half to beat the
Cowboys 35-14 on Saturday.
Stafford, a sophomore beginning
his first full season as the starting
quarterback, was 18-of-24 for 234
yards and two touchdowns with no
interceptions.
Georgia (1-0) led 21-14 at half-
time and Stafford put the game out
of reach with touchdown passes to
Bruce Figgins, a freshman tight
end, and Michael Moore.
Oklahoma State's Bobby Reid
was 16-of-30 for 191 yards with
one touchdown and one intercep-
tion. Reid completed a 20-yard
scoring pass to Adarius Bowman in
the first quarter.
Mikey Henderson's 63-yard punt
return set up Stafford's 9-yard
touchdown pass to Moore in the
fourth quarter.
There were no turnovers for
either team until less than 10 min-
utes left in the game, when
Georgia safety Kelin Johnson inter-
cepted a fourth-down pass by
Reid.
No. 14 UCLA 45,
Stanford 17
STANFORD, Calif. - Ben Olson
helped UCLA spoil Jim Harbaugh's
debut at Stanford.
Olson threw five touchdown
passes and Kahlil Bell ran for a
career-high 195 yards to lead the
14th-ranked Bruins to a 45-17 vic-
tory Saturday in Harbaugh's first
game as the Cardinal coach.
Olson's cool efficiency in his
return to the starting lineup and 20
retuming starters for the Bruins (1-0,
1-0 Pac-10) were too much for the
emotion-fueled Cardinal (0-1, 0-1),
who tried to match the high energy
level of their new head coach.
Coaching across the street from
where he went to high school,
Harbaugh's imprint on Stanford's
offense was evident as the Cardinal
moved the ball much better than
they did in a 1-11 season a year
ago that led to Walt Harris' firing.
But Harbaugh still has a long
way to go to make Stanford a win-


ner as the defense still struggled
with missed tackles and gave up
624 total yards.
After being outscored 165-33 in
losing all five games at its remod-
eled stadium in 2006, Stanford was
competitive for a little more than a
half this game. The Cardinal trailed
14-7 at halftime and were within
21-10 late in the third quarter.
No. 17 Penn St 59,
Fla. International 0
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Penn
State welcomed Joe Paterno back
to the sidelines with a suffocating
show of defense.
Linebacker Sean Lee led a furious
defense with seven tackles, a forced
fumble and a sack, and Anthony
Morelli threw for three touchdowns
and a career-high 295 yards as the
17th-ranked Nittany Lions routed
Florida International, 59-0.
It was a happy homecoming for
the 80-year-old Paterno in his first
appearance back on the sidelines
since breaking his left leg last year
at Wisconsin.
Wearing his trademark black
sneakers and rolled-up khakis,
Paterno jogged out of the tunnel to
lead his team on the field with his
face plastered on the giant stadium
video screens. The 107,000-plus
packed into Beaver Stadium
cheered them on.
FlU hasn't won a game since
2005 after going 0-12 last season.
No. 20 Nebraska 52,
Nevada 10
LINCOLN, Neb. - Marion Lucky
upstaged the debut of quarterback
Sam Keller by running for a career-
high 233 yards and three touch-
downs and catching a pass for
another score as No. 20 Nebraska
routed Nevada 52-10 on Saturday.
The Cornhuskers found immedi-
ate success running at the out-
manned Wolf Pack. They rushed
for 413 of their 625 total yards,
held a 35-9 advantage in first
downs and won their nation-lead-
ing 22nd straight season opener.
Nebraska led 21-10 at the half
and broke open the game with
three touchdowns and a field goal
in the third quarter.
Lucky, whose previous high was
156 yards against Troy last year,
turned in the biggest rushing per-
formance for Nebraska since
Jammal Lord ran for 234 against
Texas in 2002. Lucky didn't play
after the third quarter. He carried
30 times and also caught three
passes for 33 yards.
No. 21 Arkansas 46,
Troy 26
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - Darren
McFadden started his Heisman
Trophy campaign in style, running
for 151 yards and a touchdown
and also throwing for a score in
No. 21 Arkansas' 46-26 victory
over Troy on Saturday night.
McFadden, last year's Heisman
runner-up, helped the Razorbacks
pull away in the third quarter.
Arkansas led only 23-17 at half-
time, but Felix Jones scored on a
44-yard run and McFadden tossed
a 42-yard touchdown pass to


Crosby Tuck to make it 37-17.
Freshman Alex Tejada added
four field goals for Arkansas, the
most by a Razorback since 2003.
He did miss an extra point after
Michael Smith's 2-yard touchdown
run in the fourth quarter.
Arkansas went 10-4 last season,
but the Razorbacks had a tumul-
tuous offseason that included the
departures of offensive coordinator
Gus Malzahn and quarterback
Mitch Mustain. Casey Dick strug-
gled at times against Troy, going
11-of-20 for 108 yards.
The Razorbacks didn't complete
a pass to a wide receiver until
Reggie Fish caught one midway
through the third quarter. Marcus
Monk, Arkansas' career leader in
touchdown catches, is out with a
knee injury.
McFadden, though, had no trou-
ble finding an open receiver. Like
last year, he took several snaps at
quarterback out of the shotgun.
On his touchdown pass, he
faked a run toward the right side,
then threw deep to Tuck behind the
defense. McFadden, an occasional
quarterback in high school, has
four touchdown passes as a
Razorback - this was the junior's
longest completion.

No. 22 TCU 27, Baylor 0
FORT WORTH, Texas -- Even
without standout defensive end
Tommy Blake on the field, TCU's
dominating defense pitched a sea-
son-opening shutout.
The No. 22 Horned Frogs gave
up some yards before halftime, but
not any points in a 27-0 victory
Saturday over Baylor - the first of
three former instate Southwest
Conference rivals TCU plays in the
opening month of the season.
Andy Dalton threw for 205 yards
and a touchdown in his first college
start, and Justin Watts and Ryan
Christian ran for scores as the
Frogs won their ninth straight game.
Chris Manfredini kicked two field
goals after missing wide right on a
29-yard attempt the opening drive.
Blake was held after two extend,
ed absences from the team. The
two-time All-Mountain West
Conference selection and top NFL
prospect was away on a medical
leave with an undisclosed illness
last week before rejoining the
Frogs for their walkthrough Friday.,
He has practiced only three times
since leaving campus and going
home for a week for personal rea-*
sons in mid-August.
No. 25 Texas A&M 38,
Montana St. 7
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Stephen McGee had 112 yards
passing and added 121 yards
rushing and two touchdowns to
lead No. 25 Texas A&M to a 38-7
win over Montana State on
Saturday night.
The Bobcats scored first but the:
Aggies scored 38 straight points to
improve to 5-0 in home openers
under coach Dennis Franchione.
The Bobcats, of the Football
Championship Subdivision, former-
ly known as Division I-AA, out-
gained the Aggies and controlled
the clock, but couldn't finish drives,.
missing three field goals and losing
a fumble deep in Aggies territory.
McGee scored on a 65-yard run,
in the first quarter and made it 31-7
on a 3-yard run early in the fourth.
He was replaced by backup Jerrod
Johnson midway through the fourth
quarter.
The Aggies passing game was
shaky early with McGee going 4-of
7 for 47 yards in the first half. He
was flagged for intentional ground-
ing, sacked once and hurried a
number of times.
Georgia Tech 33,
Notre Dame 3
SOUTH BEND, Ind. - Georgia
Tech didn't need a secret weapon.
It had Tashard Choice.
Choice rushed for a career-high
196 yards and two touchdowns
and the Georgia Tech defense had
little trouble with any of Notre
Dame's replacements for Brady
Quinn, shutting down the running
of Demetrius Jones and the pass-
ing of Evan Sharpley and Jimmy
Clausen in beating Notre Dame
33-3 on Saturday.
Fighting Irish coach Charlie Weis
kept his choice of starting quarter-
back secret until game time, hop-


ing that preparing for three quarter-
backs would make it tough on
Georgia Tech's defense.
The only score for Notre Dame
(0-1) came on a 24-yard field goal
by Brandon Walker in the third
quarter. The Irish were held to
minus-8 yards rushing.


Uums CotjNjy (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS CouNIY (FL) CHRONICLE SPcRTS SUNDAY, SI~r'1,.Mn, i~ 2, 2007 3B


Shannon's Miami debut a breeze


Associated Press

MIAMI - Randy Shannon's
debut as coach of the Miami
Hurricanes was a breeze.
Javarris James ran for two
touchdowns, Tavares Gooden
and Calais Campbell had inter-
ceptions to set up easy scoring
drives, and the Hurricanes
recorded six sacks while beat-
ing Marshall 31-3 Saturday
Graig Cooper ran 12 times
for 116 yards in his first college
game, James rushed for 99
more and Kirby Freeman com-
pleted 9 of 21 passes for 81
yards and a touchdown as
Miami (1-0) won its final sea-
son-opener at the Orange
Bowl.
Bernard Morris completed
16 of 27 passes for 162 yards for
Marshall (0-1), but was inter-
cepted three times.
Unranked entering a season
for the first time since 1998,
Miami looked at the opener as
its first chance to prove this
isn't the same sort of team that
stumbled its way to a 7-6 record
.last season.
The Hurricanes didn't waste
time suggesting their new
coach will change things
around.
Shannon is a Miami native,
was a star linebacker at the
school and spent 14 years as a
Hurricanes assistant. He was
defensive coordinator the past
six seasons under Larry Coker,
who was fired in November
and watched Saturday from
the Orange Bowl's third floor
- as a TV analyst.
Shannon probably liked


Associated Press

CLEMSON, S.C. - The Bowden
Bowl used to be a can't-miss affair for
all members of college football's
famous family. These days, the once
joyous father-and-son matchup has
turned into a game to get past - and
much easier for some Bowdens to
miss.
"I don't know if my mother's com-
ing," Clemson coach Tommy Bowden
said during his weekly news confer-
ence.
She isn't, Florida State's athletic
department said Friday.
And Ann, the woman who famously
wore a half Clemson, half Florida State
sweater in the Death Valley stands the
first time her husband, Bobby, took on
her son's Tigers in 1999, might not be
the only Bowden absent Monday night
for the ninth Bowden Bowl.
Also unlikely to attend is Tommy's
brother, Jeff, who resigned as Florida
State's offensive coordinator under
harsh criticism for the team's play.
"We don't like it anymore," Florida
State coach Bobby Bowden said. "To
me, Tommy does the same thing I do,
keep it in the confines of Florida State
vs. Clemson."
That's certainly not the way the
series began eight years back.
Then Bobby's team was ranked No. 1
and headed for its second national title
of the decade heading into the series'
inaugural father-son game. Tommy was
an up-and-comer, hired to turn Clemson
back into winners after he led Tulane
to an undefeated season a year ago.
To top it off, a Seminoles victory
would be Bobby's historic 300th.
College football couldn't get enough
of the Bowdens that week, following
their every move. A caravan of TV
trucks trailed the family to northern
South Carolina as Bobby watched
Tommy's boy, grandson Ryan, play high
school football.
The nationally televised game lived
up to expectations. Son Tommy .used


most of what he saw, too.
Gooden caught Morris' UCF 25, N.C. State 23
deflected pass midway through - Kevin Smith
the opening quarter and ran it RALEIGH, N.C. - Kevin Smith
back 35 yards to the Marshall 1 rushed for a career-high 217 yards
- not scoring only because with two touchdowns, and Central
Morris hopped on his back Florida held on to beat North
inside the 5 and eventually Carolina State 25-23 on Saturday
wrestled him down. On the night, spoiling Tom O'Brien's debut
next play, Freeman hit as the Wolfpack's coach.
DajLeon Farr with a scoring Smith had a school-record 80-
pass that put Miami up 10-0.. yard touchdown run on the first play
Campbell's interception from scrimmage, and had 177
came with 3/2 minutes left in yards by halftime for the Knights (1-
the second. The 6-foot-8 defer- 0), who led 25-3 at the break and
sive end released from a block- claimed their first win over a BCS
er and made a one-handed conference team in seven years.
snare of Morris' pass, getting N.C. State made it a two-point
taken down at the Marshall 24. game on two fourth-quarter touch-
James scored on a 5-yard run down passes by Harrison Beck -
three plays later for a 17-0', a6-yarder to Pat Bedics and a 14-
edge. yarder to Donald Bowens midway
James pushed the lead to 24- through the quarter.
0 with 7:06 left in the third with The Wolfpack had the ball at
a 5-yard score. His 50-yard run their 20-yard line with 6 minutes left
on that drive was nullified by a but were stopped on a fourth-and-
holding penalty, but Cooper, 6, allowing UCF to bleed the clock.
took off on a 56-yard scamper N.C. State (0-1) had one last
one play later to set up the chance after the Knights turned it
Hurricanes' third touchdown. over on downs with 55 seconds left,
Anthony Binswanger's 37- and Beck led the Wolfpack to the
yard field goal with 13:37 JCF 41 with about 10 seconds left.
remaining ensured Marshall But on the next play they were
would avoid the shutout. penalized for having 12 men on the
Tight end Chris Zellner field with 4.5 seconds left, and Joe
recovered a fumble in the end Burnett intercepted Beck's desper-
zone with 1:51 left for Miami's aurnett rcepted Becks desper-
final touchdown. action attempt at about the 20.
Marshall has dropped eight That sealed the Knights' second
straight games against teams victory over a team from a BCS
from BCS conferences, getting conference since their 1996 move
outscored 228-84 in those to the Football Bowl Subdivision,
matchups. It doesn't get any and their first since shocking
easier next week for the Alabama 40-38 in 2000 in a win
Thundering Herd; they host that helped lead to Mike DuBose's
No. 3 West Virginia. exit in Tuscaloosa.


some of his dad's trickery to take a 14-3
lead against the much more powerful
Seminoles. But then Bobby's team
showed their skill, rallying for two late
touchdowns and a 17-14 win.
Father and son met at midfield when
it was over, Bobby joking that Tommy
"out-tricked me 3-0."
Both sides left smiling, anticipating
more thrills as Tommy's program grew
to challenge Bobby's supremacy in the
Atlantic Coast Conference.
Instead, big time college football got
in the way.
Tommy's Tigers lost the next three
games against his dad by a combined
score of 143-65, each defeat bringing
increased fan scrutiny whether the
younger Bowden was the right man for
the Clemson job.
When Tommy arguably saved his job


Smith surpassed his previous
best of 202 yards, set against
Nevada in the 2005 Hawaii Bowl,
and became the first player with
more than 200 yards rushing
against N.C. State since
Minnesota's Tellis Redmon had 246
in the Micron PC Bowl in 2000.
Andre Brown had a 33-yard
touchdown run one play after Darrell
Blackman's 57-yard punt return for
the Wolfpack. Beck relieved starter
Daniel Evans and completed 17-of-
28 passes for 217 yards.
It wasn't enough to keep O'Brien
from getting off to a tough start in
Raleigh. The former Boston
College coach made a rare intra-
conference switch last December
to replace Chuck Amato, who was
fired after a 3-9 finish.
Smith burst untouched through
the right side and down the sideline
on the season's first snap, and the
Knights intercepted Evans' pass on
N.C. State's opening series to set
up Michael Torres' 40-yard field
goal that put UCF up 10-0 about
3Y2 minutes into the season.
N.C. State was outgainedby
nearly 200 yards in the first half
and had minus-14 yards rushing at
the break. At one point, UCF had
140 total yards to the Wolfpack's 4.
Torres finished with three field
goals, also converting from 39 and
19 yards out, and defensive end
Bruce Miller recorded a safety
when he sacked Evans in the end
zone.


with his first win over Bobby, 26-10, in
2003, it left Seminoles fans angry about
their team's lost chance at the national
title.
The Tigers have won three of the
past four games with Florida State,
those defeats increasing pressure on
Tommy's brother Jeff, who eventually
resigned despite his dad's urgings not
to.
Tommy, the third of six children,
understands Jeff's reluctance at
watching the team he helped coach for
13 years move on without him. Like
most older brothers, though, the Tiger
coach couldn't pass up a dig at his
younger sibling.
"He's cleaned the garage out a whole
bunch, done landscaping and paint-
ing," Tommy said. "He got yard of the
month twice."


.1
.1
..3.


I


Associated Press
Miami head coach Randy Shannon implores the band to play the
alma mater Saturday after Miami defeated Marshall, 31-3, at the
Orange Bowl in Miami.



Simms makes the cut


Bucs keep 4

quarterbacks

Associated Press

TAMPA - There's a running
joke that Jon Gruden never feels
like he has enough quarterbacks
on his roster
The Tampa Bay coach took
four to training camp five weeks
ago and emerged Saturday with
the same quartet after deciding
to keep Chris Simms, who has
struggled to regain his throwing
form after missing most of last
season with a spleen injury.
How long the Buccaneers,
who are hoping to rebound from
a 4-12 finish, reasonably can
expect to go with four quarter-
backs is a question Gruden was
not available to answer after the
squad was trimmed to the sea-
son-opening limit of 53 players.
Jeff Garcia was signed as a
free agent in March and given
the starting job. Luke McCown
and Bruce Gradkowski, who
started 11 games as a rookie last
year, both had solid preseasons
and are ahead of Simms on the
depth chart
Defensive tackle Ellis Wyms,
linebacker Jamie Winborn,
rookie running back Kenneth
Darby and second-year corner-
back Alan Zemaitis were among
21 players released Saturday.
Tackle Chris Denman, corner-
back Carlos Hendricks and
receivers Paris Warren and
Chas Gessner were waived
injured.
Simms led the Bucs to the
playoffs in 2005, but played poor-
ly and was 0-3 last year before
having his spleen removed after
taking several hard hits during a
loss to Carolina last Sept 24. He
missed the 13 weeks of the sea-
son.
The fifth-year pro signed a
two-year, $7 million contract


extension and began throwing
again in December. But he's
struggled with his accuracy, was
limited in practice during train-
ing camp and quickly dropped
behind McCown and
Gradkowski on the depth chart
Simms played one series dur-
ing the reason, taking six snaps
against Miami. He scratched
himself from last Thursday
night's game against Houston
because of a strained hip, an
injury Gruden said he was
unaware of until the quarter-
back said he couldn't play
against the Texans.
Dolphins cut
Schlesinger, Hakim
MIAMI - Thirteen rookies made
the Miami Dolphins' final 53-man ros-
ter Saturday, including sixth-round
draft pick Reagan Mauia, who
became the likely starter for the sea-
son opener when fullback Cory
Schlesinger's contract was terminat-
ed.
Schlesinger, one of 22 players cut,
had been expected to start after
being acquired as a free agent in the
offseason. But coach Cam Cameron
praised the 270-pound Mauia
throughout training camp and said
the rookie might even be used as a
tailback.
Rookies making the roster includ-
ed all 10 draft choices and three col-
lege free agents.
The Dolphins terminated the con-
tract of veteran receiver Az-Zahir
Hakim, who had no receptions in
their four exhibition games.
Those waived were tight end
Courtney Anderson, defensive ends
Mkristo Bruce and Jorge Cordova,
fullback Kyle Eckel, guard Tala
Esera, tight ends Aaron Halterman
and Tim Massaquoi, quarterback
Gibran Hamdan, safety Tuff Harris,
cornerback Geoff Pope and Derrick
Johnson, guard Marquay Love and
Stephen Parker, receiver Michael
Malone, defensive tackle Brian Soi
and tackle Julius Wilson.


Jeffrey Hill wins delayed Crystal River Triathlon


LARRY BUGG
For the Chronicle

Normally, triathletes com-
pete and then take their show-
ers. Saturday morning, the
triathletes showered first and
raced second.
A heavy storm passed over
Fort Island Gulf Beach and
almost forced the cancellation
of the Cry tal River Labor Day
Sprint 3 race.
Race director Chris Moling
debated calling off the race,
which was delayed an hour
and 15 minutes by the storm.
The triathletes waited out
weather and many were left
soaking wet.
Some simply left, assuming
the race would be cancelled.
In the end, the remaining
triathletes competed on a cool,
overcast morning. Many of the
competitors felt conditions


were perfect
Jeffrey Hill, of Tampa, won
both the Saturday race (47:12)
and took the series with a time
of 2:50:19 for all the three of
the races.
"I took the lead during the
run," Hill said. "I feel good. It's
the first time I have won a
race."
The female overall winner
was a ranked, All-American tria-
thete. Fifteen-year-old Alyssa
Burkert won the race with a
time of 53:27. The Winter
Garden resident was ranked
fifth nationally in the 15-and-
under age class among triath-
letes.
"It felt nice," said Burkert.
"The swim was the toughest
(portion of the race)."
Courtney White, Dunnellon,
was the third female finisher.
The 20-year-old had a time of
1:00:39.


Sheryl Rubin, Crystal River,
won the overall women's series
with a time of 3:57:19.
Frank Ledda, Lutz, won the
men's masters in the race with
a 52:51.
Crystal River's Thom Neal
was the series master winner,
with a clocking of 3:11:32.
Tampa's Kim Peeler was the
women's masters winner. She
had a time of 1:01.22.
"It was my first time to win
the women's masters," said
Peeler. "It wasn't hot. I did my
best in the run."
Roberta Page of Crystal
River didn't think she was in
the running for the series
women's masters title. She
won it with a time of four
hours, eight minutes and 30
seconds.
Her son, Jimmy, also ran and
finished sixth overall with a
time of 51:23.


"This is unexpected,"
Roberta Page said. "It's great. I
didn't come here with the idea
of winning the series title. The
swim was terrible. The bike
was great. It was nice."
One of the triathalon's
founders and sponsor Bob
Brockett, 52, took 17th place
with a time of 55:07.
"This was a great day, a great
day," Brockett said. "Perfect
conditions."
Homosassa resident Sam
Nall ran on his repaired right
hip. Nall, 64, enjoyed the race.
"This turned out to be per-
fect," Nall said. "This is cool."
Moling was grateful he didn't
cancel the race despite the
early showers.
"In the past few years, we
have been truly lucky as far as
weather goes," Moling said.
"The Sheriff's Office deputies
had computers and were able


to see that the storm was clear-
ing. We were able to get up-to-
the-minute reports because of
this technology.
"We were able to be patient
and wait out the storm. A num-
ber of people thanked me for-
putting on the race. It was the
third race and it would have
been hard to reschedule. Some
key players were missing today
and some people ended up
winning the series because of
those absences."
Crystal River Triathlon
Series winners:
* Men's Overall Winner:
Jeffrey Hill, Tampa, 2:50.19.
* Women's Overall Winner:
Sheryl Rubin, Crystal River,
3:57:19.
* Men's Masters Winner:
Thom Neal, Crystal River,
3:11:32.
* Women's Masters Winner:
Roberta Page, Crystal River,


4:08:30.
Crystal River Labor Day
Sprint 3 results:
* Men's Overall winner:
Jeffrey Hill, Tampa, 47:12.
* Women's Overall winner:
Alyssa Burkert, Winter Garden,
53:27.
* Men's Masters winner:
Frank Ledda, Lutz, 52:51.
* Women's Masters winner:
Kim Peeler, Tampa, 1:01:22.
Top 10 Finishers
1. Jeffrey Hill, Tampa, 47:12;
2. Andrew Munera, Tampa,
47:42; 3. Kevin Grogan,
Mineola, 48:08; 4. Adam
Hasebroock, Tampa, 49:13; 5.
Lucas Caron, Palm Harbor,
50:16; 6. Jimmy Page, Crystal
River, 51:23; 7. Ethan Copping,
Tampa, 51:28; 8. Joel Rich,
Gainesville, 52:06; 9. Ken
Vida, Lithia, 52:16; 10. Frank
Ledda, Lutz, 52:51.


Bowdens: Dad vs. son not fun


Clemson football coach Tommy Bowden, left, talks with his father, Florida State
coach Bobby Bowden, before a college football game between their teams in this
Nov. 2005 file photo, at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C. The Bowden Bowl used
to be a can't-miss affair for all members of college football's famous family. These
days, the once joyous father-and-son match up has turned into a game to get past.


i


SUNDAY, Si-.Prfi.mm--.iz 2, 2007 38


CaRus CouNn, (FL) CHRoNiciE


SPORTS










4B SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 2, 2007 SPORTS Cnius COUN'IY (FL) ChRoNICLE


GOLF

PGA Deutsche Bank
Par Scores


Saturday
Second Round


Aaron Baddeley
Rich Beem
Mike Weir
Sean O'Hair
Phil Mickelson
Brett Wetterich
Ryan Moore
Arron Oberholser
Camilo Villegas
Ryuji Imada
Craig Kanada
Rory Sabbatini
Steve Elkington
Tiger Woods
Steve Stricker
Heath Slocum
Bo Van Pelt
Troy Matteson
Sergio Garcia
Charles'Howell III
John Senden
Robert Allenby
Luke Donald
Fredrik Jacobson
Tommy Armour III
Angel Cabrera
Lucas Glover
Henrik Stenson
John Rollins
Jonathan Byrd
Woody Austin
Kenny Perry
Joe Ogilvie
Bart Bryant
Briny Baird
Brian Davis
Charlie Wi
Tom Pernice, Jr.
Vijay Singh
George McNeill
Daniel Chopra
Matt Kuchar
Geoff Ogilvy
Zach Johnson
Adam Scott
Cliff Kresge
Chad Campbell
Robert Garrigus
Jason Gore
Brian Bateman
Stephen Ames
Rod Pampling
Mark Wilson
Trevor Immelman
Jim Furyk
Vaughn Taylor
Dean Wilson
Doug LaBelle II
John Mallinger
Boo Weekley
Mark Calcavecchia
Nathan Green
Jeff Maggert
Kevin Na
Will MacKenzie
Ken Duke
Paul Goydos
Justin Leonard
Steve Flesch
Charles Warren
Tim Herron
Rocco Mediate
Brandt Snedeker
Jerry Kelly
Brian Gay


67-66
67-66
65-68
68-66
70-64
66-68
65-69
69-66
63-72
69-66
67-68
68-67
66-70
72-64
67-69
66-70
68-69
71-66
67-71
69-69
67-71
69-69
72-66
66-72
68-70
70-69
69-70
66-73
70-69
69-70
71-68
68-71
70-69
72-67
71-68
68-71
67-72
75-65
74-66
71-69
70-70
68-72
70-70
68-72
68-72
69-71
70-70
69-72
70-71
69-72
68-73
74-67
73-68
67-74
68-73
68-73
70-71
73-69
73-69
73-69
72-70
72-70
69-73
71-71
70-72
70-72
75-67
72-70
71-72
69-74
71-72
71-72
71-72
71-72
74-69


Failed to qualify
Carl Pettersson 72-72 -
Anthony Kim 73-71 -
Padraig Harrington 72-72 -
Tim Petrovic 71-73 -
D.J. Trahan 71-73 -
Steve Marino 70-74 -
Retief Goosen 73-71 -
Benr urtis 72-72 -
Charley Hoffman 73-72 -
lan Poulter 73-72 -
Davis Love III 75-70 -
Brett Quigley 71-74 -
Chris DiMarco 73-72 -
Kevin Sutherland 68-77 -
Hunter Mahan 71-74 -
Tim Clark 69-76 -
Stuart Appleby 69-76 -
Jeff Overton 72-73 -
Harrison Frazar 74-72 -
Peter Lonard 72-74 -
Jeff Quinney 71-75 -
Nick Watney 75-71 -
J.J. Henry 72-74 -
Jose Coceres 73-73 -
Justin Rose 71-76 -
Billy Mayfair 73-74 -
Bubba Watson 78-69 -
Bob Estes 70-77 -
Stewart Cink 72-76 -
Nick O'Hern 78-70 -
Ted Purdy 77-71 -
Shaun Micheel 77-71 -
J.B. Holmes 72-80 -
Kevin Stadler 74-80 -


133 -9
133 -9
133 -9
134 -8
134 -8
134 -8
134 -8
135 -7
135 -7
135 -7
135 -7
135 -7
136 -6
136 -6
136 -6
136 -6
137 -5
137 -5
138 -4
138 -4
138 -4
138 -4
138 -4
138 -4
138 -4
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
139 -3
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
140 -2
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
141 -1
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
142 E
143 +1
143 +1
143 +1
143 +1
143 +1
143 +1
143 +1

144 +2
144 +2
144 +2
144 +2
144 +2
144 +2
144. +27
144 +2
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
145 +3
146 +4
146 +4
146 +4
146 +4
146 +4
146 +4
147 +5
147 +5
147 +5
147 +5
148 +6
148 +6
148 +6
148 +6
152 +10
154+12


LPGA State Farm
Classic Par Scores


Saturday
Third Round
S. Steinhauer 67-66-71
R. Hetherington 69-69-67
Michele Redman 73-69-64
Christina Kim 69-66-71
Becky Morgan 71-67-69
A. Sorenstam 71-65-71
Angela Park 69-70-69
Marcy Hart 68-69-71
Joo Mi Kim 70-70-69
Pat Hurst 72-71-67
Diana D'Alessio 73-69-68
C. Matthew 71-69-70
Jin Joo Hong 70-70-70
Sun Young Yoo 71-68-71
S. Gustafson 70-69-71
Mi Hyun Kim 70-67-73
a-Stacy Lewis 71-71-69
Gloria Park 70-71-70
Jane Park 73-66-72
Ai Miyazato 68-70-73
Sung Ah Yim 73-70-69
Jeong Jang 72-69-71
L. Walker-Cooper70-71-71
Leanna Wicks 73-67-72
Giulia Sergas 73-66-73
Janice Moodie 69-69-74
Reilley Rankin 77-67-69
Kelli Kuehne 73-71-69
Angela Stanford 72-71-70
Yu Ping Lin 70-73-70
II Mi Chung 71-71-71
Lisa Fernandes 70-72-71
Beth Bader 70-72-71
Morgan Pressel 69-73-71
Yeon Joo Lee 72-69-72
Moira Dunn 70-70-73
Johanna Head 72-72-70
D. Ammacc. 72-71-71
Seon Hwa Lee 70-73-71
Clarissa Childs 74-68-72
Carri Wood 72-70-72
Karrie Webb 72-70-72
Na On Min 72-70-72
V. Nirapath. 72-69-73
Kate Golden 69-71-74
Young Kim 74-70-71
Sophie Giquel 73-71-71
J. Cho-Hunicke 72-72-71
Kim Hall 71-71-73
Veronica Zorzi 71-71-73


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K In H (1i




On the AIRWAVES =


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- Mac Tools U.S. Nationals Qualifying.
3:30 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Detroit IndyCar Grand Prix.
8 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Nextel Cup - Sharp AQUOS 500.
12 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA- Mac Tools U.S. Nationals Qualifying.
(Same-day Tape) (CC)
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Nextel Cup - Sharp AQUOS 500.
(Same-day Tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Tampa Bay Devil Rays at New York Yankees.
1 p.m. (TBS) New York Mets at Atlanta Braves.
2 p.m. (WGN) Houston Astros at Chicago Cubs.
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Texas Rangers at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.
WNBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) Eastern Conference Final Game 2 -
Indiana Fever at Detroit Shock.
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Western Conference Final Game 3 - San
Antonio Silver Stars at Phoenix Mercury. If necessary.
INTERNATIONAL BASKETBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) FIBAAmericas Championship Bronze Medal -
Teams TBA.
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Basketball FlBAAmericas Championship Gold
Medal - Teams TBA.'
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN) Dematha (Md.) vs. St. Xavier (Ohio).
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) Western Kentucky at Florida. (Taped)
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
4 p.m. (47 FAM) Winnipeg Blue Bombers at Saskatchewan
Roughriders.
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Johnnie Walker Championship at
Gleneagles - Final. Round.
1 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA State Farm Classic - Final Round.
3 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) PGA Deutsche Bank Championship - Third
Round.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Champions Tour Wal-Mart First Tee Open
- Final Round.
SOCCER
1 p.m. (62 UNI) Futbol de la Liga Mexicana Torneo de Apertura:
Toluca vs. Necaxa.
COLLEGE SOCCER
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Women's - Ndtre Dame at Florida.
TENNIS
11 a.m. (6, 10 CBS) U.S. Open - Men's Third Round & Women's
Fourth Round.
7 p.m. (USA) U.S. Open - Men's Third Round & Women's Round
of 16.
TRACK AND FIELD
1 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) IAAF World Championships.


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Blue Jays 2, Mariners 1


SEATTLE

ISuzuki cf
Vidro dh
JGillen rf
Blmqist pr
Ibanez If
Beltre 3b
Brssrd lb
JoLpez 2b
Burke c


TORONTO
ab rhbi
4 02 1 VWells cf
3 00 0 Jhnson If
3 00 0 Rios rf
0 00 0 Thmas dh
4 010 Adams dh
4 00 0 Glaus 3b
3 02 0 AHill2b
3 00 0 Ovrbay lb
3 01 0 Zaun c


Jimerson pr 0 10 0 JMcDId ss
Jhjima c 0 00 0
YBtcrt ss 3 00 0


ab r h bi
4 01 0
3 000
3 100
4 030
0000
3 021
3000
4000
3 1 1 1
3 0 0 0


Totals 301 6 1 Totals 30 2 7 2
Seattle 000 000 010- 1
Toronto 000 000 11x- 2
E-Beltre (16), Zaun (6). DP-Toronto 3.
LOB-Seattle 4, Toronto 8. 2B-Broussard
(6). HR-Zaun (7). SB-ISuzuki (37),
Jimerson (1). CS-VWells (4), Adams (1).


Seattle
MBatista 7
Green L,5-2 2
Sherrill
Toronto
McGowan W,9-8 8
Accardo S,27 1


H RERBBSO

5 1 1 3 7
2-3 21 1 1 0
1-3 0 0 0 0 1

6 1 1 1 3
0 0 0 0 0


HBP-by Accardo (JGuillen).
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First,
Tim McClelland; Second, Paul Schrieber;
Third, Fieldin Culbreth.
T-2:35. A-30,672 (48,900).
Twins 6, Royals 4
KANSAS CITY MINNESOTA


ab rhbi


Gthrght cf
Grdzln 2b
MiSwy dh
Gordon 3b
Butler lb
Costa rf
Brown If
TPena ss
Gload ph
EGrmn 2b
LaRue c
DJesus ph
Buck c


5 00 0 Tynercf
5 00 0 Bartlett ss
5 02 0 THnter dh
4 11 1 Mrneau lb
4 22 0 Cddyer rf
4 12 2 Kubel If
4 01 0 Rdmnd c
3 02 1 LRdrgz 3b
1 00 0 Punto 2b
0 00 0
3 01 0
1 00 0
0 00 0


ab r h bi
4000
4 1 1 0
4 0 1 1
3 1 00
4 1 1 0
3 2 1 1
3 022
4 1 2 1
3 0 1 0


Totals 39411 4 Totals 32 6 9 5
Kansas City 000 210 010- 4
Minnesota 010 140 00x- 6
E-Gathright (2), TPena (21), Bartlett 2
(23). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-Kansas
City 8, Minnesota 8. 2B-MiSweeney (11),
Butler 2 (19), Costa 2 (4), LaRue (8),
THunter (39), Redmond (13), LRodriguez
(4). HR-Gordon (12). CS-Brown (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Kansas City
Duckworth L,2-4
Musser
Riske
Minnesota
CSilva W,11-13
JRincon
Neshek
Nathan S,29


41-3 8 6 5 2 2
12-3 1 0 0 1 3
2 0 0 0 2 0

6 8 3 3 0 4
1 1 0 0 0 0
2-3 2 1 1 0 0
11-3 0 0 0 0 2


HBP-by Duckworth (Bartlett).
Umpires-Home, Tim Tschida; First, Jim
Joyce; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Jim
Wolf.
T-2:44. A-21,738 (46,632).


K. Saiki-Maloney 72-69-74


Karen Stupples
In-Kyung Kim
Meena Lee
Alena Sharp
S. Young Moon
A. Hanna-Will.
Mikaela Parmlid
Beth Allen
Jin Young Pak.
Jill McGill
Kris Tamulis
Leta Lindley
Aram Cho
M. Francella
K. McPherson
V. Goetze-Ack.
Amy Hung
Sarah Huarte
Kristina Tucker


71-69-75
74-70-72
71-73-72
72-70-74
71-71-74
72-69-75
71-70-75
70-71-75
71-67-78
72-72-73
73-70-74
69-71-77
74-70-74
73-71-74
73-71-74
73-69-76
72-70-76
73-70-76
72-72-76


H. Daly-Donofrio 73-70-77
Silvia Cavalleri 73-69-78
Karine Icher 72-70-78
Erica Blasberg 73-71-77
S. Lynn Sargent 70-73-81


--RACING

NEXTEL Cup Sharp
AQUOS 500 Lineup
Race today at California Speedway,
Fontana, Calif.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 182.399 mph
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
182.394
3. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 182.020
4. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 181.415
5. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 181.342
6. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 181.333
7. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
181.132
8. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 180.818
9. (11) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet, 180.805
10. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 180.605
11. (43) Bobby Labonte, Dodge, 180.596
12. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 180.542
13. (25) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 180.542
14. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 180.533
15. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 180.338
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 180.185
17. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 180.144
18. (84) AJ Alimendinger, Toyota, 180.086
19. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 179.937
20. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 179.856
21. (40) David Stremme, Dodge, 179.721
22. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 179.502
23. (18) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 179.497
24. (07) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 179.417
25. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 179.332
26. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 179.305
27. (36) Jeremy Mayfield, Toyota, 179.207
28. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 179.203
29. (78) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
179.024
30. (22) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 178.904
31. (41) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 178.824
32. (66) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 178.594
33. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 178.576
34. (96) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 178.545
35. (7) Robby Gordon, Ford, 178.372
36. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 178.297
37. (88) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 178.258
38. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 178.024
39. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, Owner Points
40. (01) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, Owner
Points
41. (70) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, Owner
Points
42. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge,
Owner Points
43. (49) John Andretti, Dodge, 178.722
Failed to qualify
44. (10) Scott Riggs, Dodge, 178.709
45. (4) Ward Burton, Chevrolet, 177.993
46. (44) Dale Jarrett, Toyota, 177.405


GATORS
Continued from Page 1B

drive and never returned.
Backup K.J. Black also left
the game in the third quarter-
back because of a foot injury
He later returned, but was
obviously slowed by the injury.
The Hilltoppers finished
with 204 yards - considerably
more than the Gators allowed
(82 yards) in the national cham-
pionship game against Ohio
State.
Florida was much more pro-
ductive behind Tebow, who
was hand-picked by Meyer to
run his spread-option offense.
Tebow played mostly in
short-yardage and goal-line sit-
uations last season, subbing for
starter Chris Leak and provid-
ing an offensive spark when
needed.
His role changed significant-
ly this season, as did the
offense.
Meyer said Florida's offense
would look much more like
those at Utah and Bowling
Green, Meyer's previous two



TIER

Continued from Page 1B

Still, it wasn't over.
Henne threw a 46-yard pass
to Mario Manningham, giving
Michigan the ball at
Appalachian State's 20 with 6
seconds left and putting the
Wolverines in position to win it
with a field goal.
Lynch blocked the kick and
almost returned 52 yards to the
18 as the final seconds ticked
off. His teammates rushed
across the field to pile on as the
coaching staff and cheerlead-
ers jumped with joy.
"We're still sort of shocked,"
coach Jerry Moore said after
being carried off the field by
his players.
Appalachian State has won
15 straight games, the longest



OPEN

Continued from Page 1B

matching Louis Vuitton hand-
bags to celebrate the upset.
She wasn't the only 18-year-
old from Eastern Europe who
pulled off a big win Saturday:
Victoria Azarenka of Belarus
'beat 1997 champion Martina
Hingis 3-6, 6-1, 6-0, and Agnes
Szavay of Hungary eliminated
No. 7 Nadia Petrova 6-2, 6-3.
Plus, 16-year-old Tamira
Paszek of Austria knocked off
No. 11 Patty Schnyder 4-6, 6-4,
7-6 (1). All of which means
2004 U.S. Open champion
Svetlana Kuznetsova has to
like her chances in the bottom
half of the draw.
"You can see the new gener-
ation coming up," Hingis said.
"They're very dangerous. I
knew it's not going to be easy
My mom texted me. She said,
'Watch out.'"
Sharapova had lost a com-
bined two games in her first
two matches, but could have
used some similar advice
before facing Radwanska. If
that was the most surprising
result of the tournament so
far, what happened later in
Arthur Ashe Stadium almost
would qualify: Three-time




HITTER

Continued from Page 1B

centerfield scoreboard for a
television interview, and the
fans hushed to try to hear him.
But when "Clay Buchholz, No-
hitter" appeared on the mes-
sage board, the ballpark erupt-
ed anew.
Buchholz, who turned 23 on
Aug. 14, pitched the third no-
hitter of the season - follow-


WEEKLY LINEUP

* 'Jearly a dozen medical
prolessiorials contribute
their expert use to
columns in Health &
Life. Tuesday
* Read up on all things
school related in the


Criomnile's Education sec-
tion Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week
from the tempting recipes
in the Flair for Food sec-
tion.. Thursday
* Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of
worship plan to do for the
week in the Religion sec-
tion./Saturdays
* Read about area business-
es in the Business sec-
tion./Sundays


No. 6 FLORIDA 49, W. KENTUCKY 3
W. Kentucky 0 3 0 0 - 3
Florida 14 14 7 14 - 49
First Quarter
Fla-Tebow 1 run (Ijjas kick), 8:49.
Fla-Cooper 59 pass from Tebow
(Ijjas kick), 2:03.
Second Quarter
Fla-Harvin 19 pass from Tebow
(Ijjas kick), 13:36.
Fla-Moore 3 run (Ijjas kick), 8:11.
WKen-FG James 26, :00.
Third Quarter
Fla-Cooper 42 pass from Tebc.o
(Iljas kick), 4:08.
Fourth Quarter
Fla-Moore 1 run (!jjas kicki 14 57
Fla-NeiAlon 4 run Uilas Kickl 8 23
.A-90,086.


WKy
First downs 12
Rushes-yards 32-48
Passing 156
Comp-Att-Int 15-21-0
Return 'a-ds 0
Punti.Avg 8-44 1
FuTbles-Losi 3-0
Penallies-Yards 5-45
Time of Posse'sson 29 01


Fla
21
33.185
325
16-21-0

3-33 3
2-0
8-51
3059


coaching stops. The Gators fit
the part Saturday
Tebow completed 13 of 17
passes before giving way to
backup Cameron Newton in
the fourth quarter. Tebow ran
with similar ease, showing the
same moves and speed that

streak in the nation. The
Mountaineers are favored to
win the Football Championship
Subdivision, but they weren't
expected to put up much of a
fight against a team picked to
win the Big Ten and contend
for the national title.
That's the beauty of college
football.
No Division I-AA team had
beaten a team ranked in The
Associated Press poll from
1989-2006, and it's unlikely that
it had ever happened before.
The Division I subdivisions
were created in 1978.
"It is one of the biggest losses
ever, but give all the credit to
Appalachian State," Hart said.
The Mountaineers are not
eligible to receive votes in the
AP Top 25 poll because they're
not in the Football Bowl
Subdivision.
Appalachian State's win does

reigning men's champion
Roger Federer lost a set
against 6-foot-9 American
wild-card John Isner, who
only a few months ago was
leading Georgia to the NCAA
team title.
For one glorious set, the
184th-ranked Isner stayed
right with the man who's been
at No. 1 for a record 187
straight weeks. And when
Isner ended a 13-stroke
exchange with a big forehand
approach shot, then smacked
service winners at 134 mph
and 124 mph, he took that first
set in a tiebreaker.
Isner punched the air and
strutted to the sideline
chomping on his white towel,
while his supporters, some in
Georgia Bulldogs regalia,
jumped and yelled and
barked their approval. The
partisan home crowd rose,
too; pretty much the only peo-
ple in their seats at the ensu-
ing changeover were the fam-
ily and friends in Federer's
guest box.
Remember: Federer has
won 11 Grand Slam titles,
while Isner has played in
three Grand Slam matches, all
this week.
"Four months ago, I was
unranked," Isner said. "To go
from that to beating Roger


ing Mark Buehrle of the
Chicago White Sox against
Texas on April 18 and Justin
Verlander of Detroit against
Milwaukee on June 12.
Buchholz became the 17th
rookie to throw a no-hitter. The
last one to do it was Florida's
Anibal Sanchez against
Arizona last Sept. 6.
The Boston newcomer
became the third pitcher since
1900 to throw a no-hitter ini his
first or second major league
start, according to the Elias


made him a fan favorite as a
freshman.
On Florida's second play of
the game, Tebow dropped back
to pass, then took off up the
middle for an 18-yard gain. He
stepped over one defender,
juked another and eventually
ran out of bounds - a subtle
sign that he's learned how
important his health is to the
team.
Tebow finished with 38 yards
on eight carries.
Kestahn Moore ran 16 times
for 91 yards and scored twice.
Caldwell had three catches for
103 yards. Cooper, a sopho-
more who caught just four
passes last season, was the
game's biggest surprise. He
had four receptions for 122
yards. Florida finished with'.
510 yards of offense.
Play was suspended because
of the weather before 1 hour, 2 '
minutes before the game was
called.
The Gators played without
backup running back Brandon'.
James and defensive lineman
Lawrence Marsh. Both players
were suspended for violating
team rules.

seem to trump the game sec-
ond-tier programs used to.
regard as their crowning
achievement - The Citadel's
season-opening win in 19923
over Arkansas that led to the,
firing of Razorbacks coach Jack ,
Crowe following the game. 3
Carr will not get fired after,
this upset, but he might be
wishing he had retired after
last season when the Wolver-
ines won 11 games before clos-
ing with losses to Ohio State
and USC.
When it was over, he didn't
second-guess decisions to go ,
for 2-point conversions twice in v
the final 15-plus minutes, but
did lament many mistakes,'
penalties and missed opportu-
nities.
"We were not a well-pre-
pared football team," Carr e
said. "That is my job, and I take :
full responsibility."

Federer in a set is pretty
cool."
And was going through
Federer's mind at that
moment?
"I'm thinking, 'This could be.
a really difficult match from
now on. I knew it from 'the'
start, but now I have proof.' I .
was worried," Federer ,',
acknowledged.
And then, nearly as quickly
as Sharapova came unrav-
eled, Federer came together.
Remarkably, he did not make
an unforced error - not a sin-' -
gle one! - during a 105-point
stretch that included the
entire second and third sets in :
his 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-4, 6-2 victory.
Federer even conjured up a
lob that curled over the sec-.
ond-tallest man on tour and.
landed in a corner.
"Doesn't happen every day,"
said Federer, trying to',,
become the first man since
the 1920s to win this tourna- "',
ment four years running.
He set up a fourth-round -
meeting against Feliciano-,
Lopez, who ended the run of -
18-year-old Donald Young of,
the United States by winning'
in four sets. The Federer- -
Lopez winner will take on the ..
winner of No. 5 Andy Roddick
vs. No. 9 Tomas Berdych in,
the quarterfinals.


Sports Bureau. Bobo Hollomon '
did it in his first start on May 6,.
1953, for the St Louis Browns-
at home against the
Philadelphia Athletics, and
Wilson Alvarez did it in his sec-
ond start on Aug. 11, 1991, for
the Chicago White Sox at,
Baltimore.
Buchholtz nailed down his .
no-hitter a night after
Minnesota's Scott Baker came
within three outs of a perfect
game and two outs of a no-hit-
ter against Kansas City.


Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a



New Office

in Citrus County


Cal 746500


Ciiius Coumy (FL) Cimomcix, )


4BSUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


SPORTS


E










NDAY, SIrPTEIMBiR 2, 2007 5B


East Division
GB L10
- 5-5
5 z-6-4
11%; 6-4
21 1-9
26 7-3


East Division
Pct GB L10
.556 - 4-6
.533 3 6-4
.507 6% 3-7
.434 16% 3-7
.434 16% 2-8


Home
41-24
45-25
41-27
30-37
31-38


Home
35-30
39-29
34-33
29-41
32-35


Away
40-31
31-35
28-39
29-38
24-43



Away
40-30
33-34
35-34
30-36
27-42


Intr
12-6 Cleveland
10-8 Detroit
10-8 Minnesota
6-12 Kansas City
7-11 Chicago


Chicago
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.578 - z-9-1 W-8
.537 5% 5-5 W-1
.507 9% z-6-4 W-2
.444 18 z-5-5 L-2
.419 21' 1-9 L-5


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.515 - z-5-5 W-1
.504 1% z-4-6 W-2
.500 2 z-6-4 W-2
.456 8 z-6-4 L-2
.449 9 z-5-5 L-1
.437 10% z-5-5 L-4


Home
44-26
34-31
37-31
31-37
29-37



Home
36-33
42-25
36-29
33-33
36-33
31-38


Away
34-31
39-32
32-36
29-38
28-42



Away
33-32
26-42
30-37
29-41
25-42
28-38


Intr
9-9 Los Angeles
14-4 Seattle
11-7 Oakland
10-8 Texas
4-14



Intr
8-4 San Diego
8-7 Arizona
6-9 Los Angeles
7-11 Colorado
9-9 San Francisco
5-10


West Division
V L Pct GB L10
) 55 .593 - 6-4
3 61 .545 6% z-2-8
7 70 .489 14 z-4-6
2 73 .459 18 z-7-3


West Division
W L Pct GB L10
74 60 .552 - z-8-2
75 61 .551 - 4-6
70 64 .522 4 6-4
69 65 .515 5 z-6-4
62 74 .456 13 7-3


WILD CARD RACE
American League
W L Pct GB
New York 76 60 .559 -
Seattle 73 61 .545 2
Detroit 73 63 .537 3
National League
W L Pct GB
Arizona 75 61 .551 -
Philadelphia 72 63 .533 2%
Los Angeles 70 64 .522 4

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 6, Kansas City 4
N.Y. Yankees 9, Tampa Bay 6
Toronto 2, Seattle 1
Detroit 6, Oakland 1
Texas 7, L.A. Angels 6
Boston 10, Baltimore 0
Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 0
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Hammel 1-4) at N.Y. Yankees
(Pettitte 12-7), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Contreras 7-16) at
Cleveland (Westbrook 5-7), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Weaver 6-10) at Toronto (Burnett
7-7), 1:07 p.m.
Baltimore (D.Cabrera 9-13) at Boston
(Lester 2-0), 2:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Bannister 11-7) at Minnesota
(Bonser 6-11), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Robertson 7-11) at Oakland
(Braden 1-7), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (Gabbard 6-1) at L.A. Angels
(Lackey 16-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at LA. Angels, 9:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 3
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 1
Florida 12, Philadelphia 6
Milwaukee 12, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 4, San Francisco 1
St. Louis 11, Cincinnati 3
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Glavine 11-6) at Atlanta (Smoltz
12-6), 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Eaton 9-8) at Florida (Olsen
9-12), 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 9-11) at Washington
(Chico 5-7), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Gorzelanny 13-7) at Milwaukee
(Suppan 8-11), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-13) at St. Louis
(Looper 11-10), 2:15 p.m.
Houston (W.Williams 8-13) at Chicago
Cubs (Hill 8-7), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 9-4) at San Diego
(Germano 7-7), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Fogg 7-9) at Arizona (Webb 14-
9), 4:40 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 1:15 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 4:40 p.m.

LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .357;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .353; Polanco, Detroit,
.343; Figgins, Los Angeles, .335; Lowell,
Boston, .329; VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
.329; Posada, New York, .328.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 123;
Granderson, Detroit, 104; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 102; MOrdonez, Detroit, 101;
BAbreu, New York, 101; DOrtiz, Boston,
98; Rios, Toronto, 97; ISuzuki, Seattle, 97;
Sheffield, Detroit, 97.
RBI-ARodriguez, New York, 129;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 120; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 109; Morneau, Minnesota, 96;
VMartinez, Cleveland, 96; THunter,
Minnesota, 96; Lowell, Boston, 95.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 198;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 182; Jeter, New York,
175; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 167; Polanco,
Detroit, 167; OCabrera, Los Angeles, 167;
Rios, Toronto, 165; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, 165.
DOUBLES-VGuerrero, Los Angeles,
45; MOrdonez, Detroit, 44; DOrtiz, Boston,
41; THunter, Minnesota, 39; BRoberts,
Baltimore, 38; AHill, Toronto, 37.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 21;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9; CGuillen, Detroit,
9; Iwamura, Tampa Bay, 8; MeCabrera,
New York, 8; Cano, New York, 7; Teahen,
Kansas City, 7; Crisp, Boston, 7; MByrd,
Texas, 7; ISuzuki, Seattle, 7.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
45; CPena, Tampa Bay, 33; Morneau,
Minnesota, 29; Konerko, Chicago, 27;
THunter, Minnesota, 27; DOrtiz, Boston,
26; MOrdonez, Detroit, 26; Dye, Chicago,
26.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 45; BRoberts, Baltimore, 39; ISuzuki,
Seattle, 37; CPatterson, Baltimore, 36;
Figgins, Los Angeles, 34; Sizemore,
Cleveland, 29; JLugo, Boston, 28.
PITCHING (14 Decisions)-Verlander,
Detroit, 15-5, .750, 3.67; Byrd, Cleveland,
14-5, .737, 4.19; Wang, New York, 16-6,
.727, 3.79; Beckett, Boston, 16-6, .727,
3.29; Bedard, Baltimore, 13-5, .722, 3.16;
Marcum, Toronto, 12-5, .706, 3.75; Haren,
Oakland, 14-6, .700, 2.87; Halladay,
Toronto, 14-6, .700, 3.87.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Utley, Philadelphia, .336;
DYoung, Washington, .336; Renteria,
Atlanta, .336; Holliday, Colorado, .335;
HaRamirez, Florida, .333; CJones, Atlanta,
.327; ARamirez, Chicago, .318.
RUNS-Rollins, Philadelphia, 118;
SHaRamirez, Florida, 105; JBReyes, New
York, 101; Uggla, Florida, 93; Wright, New
York, 92; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 92; Holliday,
Colorado, 90.
RBI-Howard, Philadelphia, 110;
Holiday, Colorado, 105; CaLee, Houston,
104, Fielder, Milwaukee, 97; MiCabrera,
Florida, 93; Atkins, Colorado, 93; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 93.
HITS-HaRamirez, Florida, 178;
Holliday, Colorado, 178; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 177; JBReyes, New York,
168;. Francoeur, Atlanta, 161; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 161; Pierre, Los Angeles, 161.
DOUBLES-Holliday, Colorado, 44;
Uggla, Florida, 43; Utley, Philadelphia, 42;
HaRamirez, Florida, 40; AdGonzalez, San
Diego, 38; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 38;
CaLee, Houston, 38.
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 15;
JBReyes, New York, 11; Johnson, Atlanta,
* 10;Amezaga, Florida, 9; Harris, Atlanta, 8;
6 are tied with 7.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 39;
Hoviard, Philadelphia, 36; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 36; MiCabrera, Florida, 30;
Pujols, St. Louis, 30; Griffey Jr., Cincinnati,
29; CBYoung, Arizona, 28.
STOLEN BASES--JBReyes, New York,
74; Pierre, Los Angeles, 52; HaRamirez,
Florida, 43; Bymes, Arizona, 38; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 34; Wright, New York, 30;
Tavdras, Colorado, 29; KMatsui, Colorado, 29.
SPITCHING (14 Decisions)-Harang,
Cincinnati, 14-3, .824, 3.51; Penny, Los
Angeles, 14-4, .778, 2.88; Peavy, San


Diego, 15-5, .750, 2.18; Hamels,
Philadelphia, 14-5, .737, 3.50; BSheets,
Milwaukee, 11-4, .733, 3.30; CVargas,
Milwaukee, 10-4, .714, 5.13; Francis,
Colorado, 14-6, .700, 4.10; Oswalt,
Houston, 14-6, .700, 3.21.


Associated
New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez follows through
a two-run home run Saturday during the first against the Tampa
Devil Rays Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York.


Yankees 9, Devil Rays 6
NEW YORK - Undaunted by a
bizarre bat flap, Alex Rodriguez
homered and drove in four runs to
back lan Kennedy's impressive
major league debut and lead the
New York Yankees past the Tampa
Bay Devil Rays 9-6 on Saturday.
Tampa Bay had Rodriguez's bat
confiscated in a classic case of
gamesmanship - one inning after
umpires took away Akinori
Iwamura's unusual model following
an apparent request from Yankees
manager Joe Torre.
Kennedy (1-0) kept his poise
throughout the aftemoon ruckus and
allowed only one earned run in
seven innings, helping New York
extend its wild-card lead to two
games over Seattle. Pitching in place
of struggling Mike Mussina, the 22-
year-old right-hander gave up five
hits, struck out six and walked two.
Rodriguez hit his major league-
leading 45th homer in the first
inning, a two-run shot off Edwin
Jackson (4-13).


Cubs 4, Astros 3
CHICAGO -Aramis Ramirez hit
a tie-breaking two-run homer in the
sixth inning to help Jason Marquis
get his 11th victory Saturday as the
Chicago Cubs beat the Houston
Astros 4-3.
Ramirez's 19th homer, his first
since Aug. 15, followed a single by
Derrek Lee as the Cubs took a 3-1
lead against rookie lefty Troy
Patton, who was making in his sec-
ond major league start.
Lee also homered, hitting his
16th in the eighth inning off reliever
Chris Sampson to put the Cubs up
4-2.
The Cubs started the day leading
the NL Central by 1� games. The
Astros, now nine games back, had
a three-game winning streak
snapped.
Marquis (11-8) went 6 2-3
innings, giving up two runs and five
hits. Relievers Carlos Marmol and
Bob Howry combined for 1 1-3
innings of perfect relief, and Ryan
Dempster pitched around a home
run by Carlos Lee in the ninth for
his 24th save in 26 chances.


HOUSTON

Pence cf
Burke 2b
Brkmn lb
CaLee If
Loretta ss
Scott rf
Wggntn 3b
Asmus c
Lamb ph
Sampsn p
Patton p
Munsn c


CHICAGO


ab rh bi ab r h
3 00 0 ASranolf 3 1 1
4 00 0 Theriotss 4 0 1
4 00 0 DeLee lb 4 2 2
4 22 1 ARmrz3b 4 1 2
4 00 0 Monroe rf 3 0 0
4 11 2 Ward ph 1 0 1
3 02 0 Piecf 0 0 0
2 00 0 DeRosa2b 3 00
1 00 0 Kendall c 3 0 0
0 00 0 JJones cf 3 0 0
2 01 0 Mrquis p 1 0 0
1 00 0 Mrmlp 0 0 0
Fontnt ph 1 0 0
Howry p 0 0 0
Dmpstr p 0 0 0


Totals 323 6 3 Totals 30 4 7 3
Houston 010 000 101- 3
Chicago 001 002 01x- 4
E-Pence (3), Berkman (9). DP-Chicago
1. LOB-Houston 3, Chicago 6. 2B-CaLee
(38), Theriot (27). HR-CaLee (27), Scott
(16), DeLee (16), ARamirez (19). S-
Marquis.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Patton L,0-2 6 3 3 2 1 3
Sampson 2 4 1 1 0 2
Chicago
Marquis W,11-8 62-3 5 2 2 1 5
Marmol 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Howry 1 0 0 0 0 0
Dempster S,24 1 1 1 1 0 0
HBP-by Patton (DeRosa), by Patton
(Kendall).
Umpires-Home, Larry Vanover; First,
Tony Randazzo; Second, Gerry Davis; Third,
Greg Gibson.
T-2:28. A-40,606 (41,160).


TAMPA BAY
ab rhbi


Iwmra 3b
Crwfrd If
CPena lb
Upton cf
DYong rf
BHarrs 2b
Gomes dh
Norton dh
JoWlsn ss
Paul c
Nvarro ph


NEW YORK


4 10 0 MeCbr cf
4 12 1 Jeter ss
3 00 1 Gnzalez ss
3 22 1 BAbreu rf
4 12 0 ARod 3b
3 11 1 Btemit 3b
3 00 0 Matsui If
1 00 0 Giambi dh
4 01 2 Duncan dh
2 000 Cano 2b
1 00 0 APhllps lb
JMolna c


ab r
5 1
31
0 0
3 2
4 1
�1 n


Indians 7, White Sox 0
CLEVELAND - Paul Byrd
pitched a four-hit shutout, and
Cleveland beat the Chicago White
Sox 7-0 Saturday night for the
Indians' eighth straight win.
,Cj Byrd (14-5) has won his last four
starts and seven of his last eight
decisions. It was his fifth career
shutout.
- j Casey Blake and Travis Hafner
drove in two runs apiece while
* Franklin Gutierrez and Kelly
Shoppach homered, helping
Cleveland maintain its 51/-game
lead over Detroit in the AL Central.
The winning streak is the Indians'
longest since they won nine straight
in 2005. Cleveland is also a season-
high 21 games over .500 (78-57).
Thanks to a double play in the
second and a caught stealing in the
fourth, Byrd had faced the minimum
number of hitters before walking A.J.
Pierzynski with one out in the
eighth, one of two walks he allowed
with in the game. The right-hander struck
Bay out two.
Paul Konerko singled to lead off
the second but was erased when
* h bi Pierzynski bounced into a double
2 1 play. Jerry Owens beat out an infield

0 0 hit to start the fourth, but was thrown
o 1 out trying to steal second by catcher
3 4 Shoppach.


I u0 u u
4000
4 0 1 1
1 1 00
4000
2220
4 1 1 1


Totals 326 8 6 Totals 35 910 8
Tampa Bay 020 001 030- 6
New York 202 300 20x- 9
E-JoWilson 3 (13), MeCabrera (3),
ARodriguez (11). DP-New York 1. LOB-
Tampa Bay 4, New York 9. 2B-Crawford
(34), Upton (22), JoWilson (11), ARodriguez
(28), Giambi (7). HR-Upton (22),
ARodriguez (45). SB--Crawford (45). CS-
APhillips (3). SF-CPena, BHarris.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
EJacksonL,4-13 31-3 5 7 6 5 2
Switzer 12-3 2 0 0 0 2
Salas 11-3 3 2 2 1 0
Stokes 12-3 0 0 0 0 1
New York
Kennedy W,1-0 7 5 3 1. 2 6
LVizcaino 2-3 3 3 3 1 0
MRivera S,23 11-3 0 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Salas (Jeter). WP-EJackson.
Umpires-Home, Kerwin Danley; First,
Doug Eddings; Second, Mike Everitt; Third,
Dana DeMuth.
T-3:36. A-53,637 (56,937).


Mets 5, Braves 1
ATLANTA-- Mike Pelfrey
allowed one hit in six innings to win
his first game of the season after
seven losses and Carlos Delgado,
Lastings Milledge and Carlos
Delgado each hit solo home runs to
help the New York Mets beat the
Atlanta Braves 4-1 on Saturday.
The Mets won their second in a
row in Atlanta after getting swept in
four games at Philadelphia. The
Braves lost for the eighth time in
their last 11 games to fall 6% behind
the Mets in the NL East. Atlanta
began the day 5� back in the wild-
card race.
Pelfrey (1-7), recalled from Triple-A
New Orleans prior to the game, struck
out seven, a career high for the sec-
ond-year pitcher. He walked three,
and the only hit was a clean single to
right in the fourth by Mark Teixeira.
Pelfrey ended an eight-game los-
ing streak. He was 2-1 with the
Mets last season, won his first two
games - the last on July 18 -
before losing on July 23 to Houston.
He pitched only 22 innings for New
York in 2006.


NEW YORK ATLANTA
ab rhbi ab


3 01 0 Harris If
3 00 0 Diazlf
4 00 0 Jhnson 2b
4 33 1 CJones 3b
4 01 0 Txeira lb
0 00 0 McCnn c
3 11 2 Frncur rf
4 01 0 AJones cf
3 11 1 Wdwrd ss
2 00 0 James p
0 00 0 Thrmn ph
1 01 0 Acosta p
0 00 0 Moylan p
JuFrco ph
Yates p
Ring p


JBRyes ss
LCstillo 2b
Wright 3b
Beltran cf
Alou If
Chavez If
CDIgdo lb
L Duca c
Mlldge rf
Pelfrey p
Mota p
Gotay ph
Felicno p


r h bi
0 0 1
000
000
000
0 0 0









000
1 1 0





000
000
000


Totals 315 9 4 Totals 27 1 2 1
New York 010 020 101- 5
Atlanta 000 010 000- 1
DP-New York 1, Atlanta 1. LOB-New
York 2, Atlanta 4. 3B-Beltran (3). HR-
Beltran (26), CDelgado (21), Milledge (4).
SB-JBReyes (74). SF--CDelgado, Harris.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Pelfrey W,1-7 6 1 1 1 3 7
Mota 1 1 0 0 0 1
Feliciano S,2 2 0 0 0 0 5
Atlanta
James L,9-10 5 5 3 3 0 1
Acosta 2 2 1 1 0 1
Moylan 1 1 0 0 1 2
Yates 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
Ring 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Moylan (JBReyes), by Pelfrey
(Francoeur).
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Eric
Cooper; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Mike
Reilly.
T-2:29. A-45,611 (49,583).


CHICAGO CLEVELAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Owens cf 4 02 0 Szmore cf 4 0 0 0
Flds If 3 000 ACbera 2b 3 1 2 0
Thomedh 4 00 0 Hafner dh 4 0 1 2
Knerkolb 401 0 Garkolb 4 0 0 0
Przyns c 2 00 0 JhPlta ss 4 1 1 0
Dye rf 3 00 0 Gutirrz rf 4 1 2 1
AGnzlz 3b 3 00 0 Lofton If 3 2 1 0
Richar 2b 3 00 0 Blake 3b 4 0 2 2
Uribe ss 3 01 0 Shppch c 4 2 2 2
Totals 290 4 0 Totals 34 711 7
Chicago 000 000 000- 0
Cleveland 001 201 12x- 7
DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Chicago 4,
Cleveland 6. 2B-ACabrera 2 (4), Hafner
(18), Lofton (22). HR-Gutierrez (10),
Shoppach (6). CS-Owens (5). S-
ACabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
JVazquez L,11-8 6 8 4 3 1 6
Thornton 1 2 1 1 0 1
Bukvich 1 1 2 2 1 1
Cleveland
Byrd W,14-5 9 4 0 0 2 3
WP-Thornton. PB-Pierzynski.
Umpires-Home, Laz Diaz; First, Mike
DiMuro; Second, Chris Guccione; Third,
Wally Bell.
T-2:37. A-41,131 (43,415).


Brewers 12, Pirates 3
MILWAUKEE - Dave Bush
pitched six sharp innings and Bill Hall
broke out of a hitting slump with four
RBIs, leading the Milwaukee
Brewers to a 12-3 victory over the
Pittsburgh Pirates on Saturday night.
The Brewers remained 1�
games behind the Chicago Cubs in
the NL Central, and have won three
of four after a five-game skid. The
Cubs beat the Houston Astros 4-3
earlier in the day.
Bush (11-9) gave up one run and
four hits to win for only the second
time in six starts. Prince Fielder
added three hits, and Corey Hart
and Kevin Mench hit back-to-back
home runs for the Brewers, who
pounded out 15 hits against the
lowly Pirates.
Shane Youman (3-5) lasted only
two-plus innings. After retiring the
side in the first, he gave up five runs
in the second and three in the third.


PITTSBURGH


MILWAUKEE


ab rhbi ab r hbi
McLth cf 2 100 Weeks 2b 5 0 1 0
JBtsta 3b 5 00 1 Hardy ss 5 0 2 1
FSnchz 2b 4022 Braun 3b 4 000
Mldndo c 1 00 0 Wise p 0 00 0
LaRche lb 3 00 0 Stockerrf 1 0 0 0
Phelps lb 1 00 0 Fildr Ib 3 2 3 0
Bay If 1 01 0 Dillon lb 1 1 0 0
Perez p 0 00 0 CHartrf 2 3 1 2
Castillo ph 1 00 0 Rttno If 1 0 0 0
Grabow p 0 00 0 Mench If 3 4 3 3
Prce rf 4 02 0 McCIng p 0 0 0 0
Palino c 3 00 0 Gross ph 1 0 0 0
Kata 2b 1 00 0 Stetter p 0 0 0 0
JWIson ss 3 10 0 JEstda c 4 1 3 2
Yuman p 1 00 0 BHallcf 3 1 24
Snchez p 1 00 0 Bush p 2 0 0 0
Mrgn cf 1 11 0 Cunsell 3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 323 6 3 Totals 36121512
Pittsburgh 100 000 101- 3
Milwaukee 053 010 30x-12
E-McLouth (3), JWilson (10). DP-
Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 1. LOB-
Pittsburgh 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B-FSanchez
(38), Bay (24), Fielder (33), Mench (19),
BHall (34). HR-CHart (19), Mench (7).
SB-McLouth (17). S-Bush. SF-BHall.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Youman L,3-5 2 7 8 8 3 2
Sanchez 3 3 1 1 1 1
Perez 2 4 3 3 0 3
Grabow 1 1 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
BushW,11-9 6 4 1 1 3 5
Wise 1 2 1 1 1 2
McClung 1 0 0 0 0 2
Stetter 1 0 1 1 1 0
Youman pitched to 3 batters in the 3rd.
HBP-by Stetter (McLouth), by Stetter
(JWilson). WP-Stetter.
Umpires-Home, Derryl Cousins; First,
Mark Carlson; Second, Angel Hernandez;
Third, Ted Barrett.
T-2:52. A-34,190 (41,900).


Tigers 6, Athletics 1
OAKLAND, Calif. - Justin
Verlander struck out 10 and out-
pitched Dan Haren in their third
matchup of 2007 and Curtis
Granderson homered, doubled and
scored three runs to lead the Detroit
Tigers past the Oakland Athletics 6-
1 on Saturday.
Detroit tagged Haren (14-6) for 11
hits, the most he's given up this
year, and Verlander's big day
helped the Tigers hold ground in
their chase for the AL Central and
wild card.
Granderson went 4-for-5 with two
RBIs and Magglio Ordonez and
Ryan Raburn each doubled in runs
for the Tigers, who had lost three of
four and started the day a season-
high 5� games behind the first-
place Indians. They stayed three
games behind the wild card-leading
New York Yankees.
Verlander (15-5) and Haren, a
pair of aces and first-time All-Stars
who began the day with identical
records, both had won in their home
stadium in their previous matchups
this season.


DETROIT

Grndsn cf
Planco 2b
Raburn 3b
Inge 3b
MOrdz dh
CGillen ss
IRdrgz c
Casey lb
RSntgo ss
Maybin If
TPerez rf


OAKLAND
ab rhbi
5 34 2 ShStwrt If
5 13 1 Swishercf
4 01 1 Cust rf
1 00 0 Piazza dh
4 01 1 DJnson lb
3 00 1 Ellis 2b
4 00 0 Hnnhn 3b
3 01 0 Scutaro ss
1 00 0 Suzuki c
4 00 0
4 23 0


ab r hbi
5020
4010
4000
4 1 2 1
4 000
4 01 0
2 000
4 000
4020


Totals 38613 6 Totals 35 1 8 1
Detroit 102 000 210- 6
Oakland 000 100 000- 1
DP-Oakland 1. LOB-Detroit 8, Oakland
10. 2B-Granderson (35), Raburn (9),
MOrdonez (44), Casey (28), Swisher (30),
Suzuki (10). HR-Granderson (19), Piazza
(6). SB-TPerez (1). SF-CGuillen.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VrinderW,15-5 62-3 6 1 1 3 10
Seay 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Miner 1 1 0 0 0 1
TJones 1 1 0 0 0 0
Oakland
Haren L,14-6 6 11 5 5 1 4
Casilla 1 0 0 0 1 2
ABrown 1 2 1 1 0 1
RLugo 1 0 0 0 0 01
Haren pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
WP-Casilla. PB-Suzuki.
Umpires-Home, Gary Darling; First,
Larry, Poncino; Second, Bruce Dreckman;
Third, Jerry Meals.
T-3:07. A-21,336 (34,077).


Nationals 4, Giants 1
WASHINGTON - Joel Hanrahan
threw six innings of one-hit ball,
Jesus Flores homered and had two
RBIs, and the Washington Nationals
snapped a seven-game losing streak
with a 4-1 victory over the San
Francisco Giants on Saturday night.
Hanrahan (4-2) had surrendered
nine runs in 2 2-3 innings - the
shortest outing of his rookie season
- in his last start Aug. 26 at
Colorado. Against the Giants, he
allowed only Pedro Feliz's 17th
homer of the season, walked one
and struck out two.
Ray King and Jesus Colome
worked the seventh, Jon Rauch
pitched the eighth and Chad
Cordero got the final three outs for
his 29th save in 37 opportunities.
San Francisco's Barry Bonds,
making his first appearance at RFK
Stadium since hitting his 756th
home run off Washington's Mike
Bacsik on Aug. 7 at AT&T Park,
went 0-for-4. A chorus of boos from
the crowd of 30,221 - and a smat-
tering of cheers - greeted Bonds
each time he batted.


SAN FRAN

DRbrts cf
Drham 2b
Winn rf
Bonds If
Klesko lb
BMolna c
Feliz 3b
Vizquel ss
JSnchz p
Atchsn p
Schrhlt ph
Kline p


WASHINGTON
ib rhbi ab r hbi


4 00 0 Logan cf
4 00 0 FLopez ss
3 00 0 Zmrmn 3b
4 00 0 DYong lb
3 00 0 Rauch p
3 00 0 CCrdro p
3 11 1 Kearns rf
2 00 0 WPena If
2 00 0 Blliard 2b
0 00 0 Flores c
1 01 0 Hnrhn p
0 00 0 Church ph
King p
Colome p
Fick lb


4 01 0
3 1 1 0
4 0 1 1
4 01 0
0000
0000
3 1 00
3 1 1 0
4020
4 1 22
1 000
0 00 1
0000
0000
1 000


Totals 291 2 1 Totals 31 4 9 4
San Francisco 000 010 000- 1
Washington 000 012 10x- 4
E-Vizquel (8). LOB-San Francisco 3,
Washington 8. 2B-Zimmerman (34). HR-
Feliz (17), Flores (4). SB-Vizquel (12).
CS-Zimmerman (1). S-Hanrahan. SF-
Church.
IP H RERBBSO


San Francisco
JSanchez L,1-3 51-3
Atchison 12-3
Kline 1
Washington
Hanrahan W,4-2 6
King 2-3
Colome 1-3
Rauch 1
CCordero S,29 1
HBP-by JSanchez
Atchison.


6 3 3 1 7
3 1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 1 2
00 0 1 1
00 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0W
0 0 0 0 1
(WPena). WP-


Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First,
Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Sam
Holbrook; Third, Randy Marsh.
T-2:33. A-30,221 (46,382).


Rangers 7, Angels 6
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Marion Byrd
broke out of a rut with three hits
including a solo homer, David
Murphy and Brad Wilkerson hit two-
run doubles against Kelvim Escobar,
and the Texas Rangers beat the Los
Angeles Angels 7-6 on Saturday.
Edinson Volquez (1-0) was
recalled from Triple-A Oklahoma to
make his season debut for the
Rangers, and the 24-year-old right-
hander allowed three runs and
seven hits over five innings after
getting staked to a 6-1 lead. He
struck out four and walked two.
Volquez was a combined 14-1
with a 2.55 ERA this season for
Oklahoma and Double-A Frisco. He
entered this game 1-10 with a 9.20
ERA in 14 big-league appearances,
including 11 starts, and was 0-3 with
an 11.57 ERA against the Angels.
Garret Anderson homered and
drove in four runs for Los Angeles,
which remained 6% games ahead
of Seattle in the AL West following
the Mariners' eighth straight loss.
Howie Kendrick had three hits and
two RBIs.

TEXAS LOS ANGELES
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Kinsler2b 3 02 1 Mathws cf 5 0 0 0
Vzquez 3b 5000 OCbera ss 4 2 1 0
MYongss 511 0 VGrerorf 4 120
MBrd cf 5 33 1 GAndsn If 3 1 1 4
WIkrsn lb 4 11 2 Izturis 3b 5 0 20
Cruz rf 4 10 0 Morles dh 5 2 1 0
DaMpy If 301 2 Ktchm lb 2 000
Botts dh 2 000 Kndrck 2b 4 0 32
Sltmca c 4 12 1 Mathis c 4 0 00
Totals 35710 7 Totals 36 610 6
Texas 023 101 000- 7
Los Angeles 010 110 003- 6
E-DaMurphy (1). LOB-Texas 8, Los
Angeles 9. 2B-Kinsler (19), MByrd (15),
Wilkerson (15), DaMurphy (6), OCabrera
(33), VGuerrero (45), Kendrick (17). 3B-
Kinsler (1). HR-MByrd (7), GAnderson
(12). CS-Kinsler (1). SF-GAnderson.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Volquez W,1-0 5 7 3 3 2 4
Wright 3 1 0 0 1 2
Benoit 1-3 1 2 2 1 1
CJWilson S,9 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Los Angeles
KEscobarL,15-7 22-3 6 5 5 4 6
Moseley 21-3 3 2 2 1 2
Bootcheck 2 0 0 0 0 3
Thompson 1 1 0 0 0 2
Bulger 1 0 0 0 1 1
Moseley pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Volquez (OCabrera), by
KEscobar (Botts).
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First,
Lance Barksdale; Second, Bill Hohn; Third,
Jim Reynolds.
T-3:28. A-38,342 (45,257).


Marlins 12, Phillies 6
MIAMI - Mike Jacobs and
Hanley Ramirez had three hits each
and the Florida Marlins defeated
Philadelphia 12-6, snapping the
Phillies' six-game winning streak
Saturday night.
Philadelphia starter J.D. Durbin
failed to retire a batter as the
Marlins scored seven runs in the
first inning.
The Phillies dropped three games
behind Eastern Division leader New
York, which defeated Atlanta, 5-1.
Philadelphia began the night two
games back in the wild-card race.
Jimmy Rollins' two-out single in
the eighth scored Jayson Werth,
reducing Florida's lead 9-6. But
reliever Kevin Gregg replaced Matt
Lindstrom and retired Chase Utley
on a pop out to third baseman
Miguel Cabrera, and pitched a per-
fect ninth to earn his 27th save in
29 opportunities.


PHILA

Rollins ss
Utley 2b
Burrell If
Howard lb
Rwand cf
Dobbs 3b
Werth rf
Coste c
Durbin p
Cndry p
Brajas ph
Mesa p
Nunez ph
Rosario p
Vctrno ph
Alfnsca p


FLORIDA
ab rhbi
5 14 3 HaRmz ss
5 00 0 Uggla 2b
5 00 0 Hrmida rf
4 01 0 MiCbr3b
5 11 1 Jacobs lb
3 23 0 Benitez p
3 21 0 Lndstr p
4 01 1 CRoss cf
0 00 0 Linden If
1 000 Tranor c
1 01 0 Amzga cf
0 00 0 Gregg p
1 00 0 BKim p
0 00 0 De aza ph
1 00 1 Grdner p
0 00 0 Tnkrsly p
Wood lb


ab r h bi
5231
4 1 00
5222
5220
4 1 32
0000
0000
1 1 1 2
4201
4 1 2 1
0001
0000
2000
1 00 1
0000
0000
1 000


Totals 38612 6 Totals 36121311
Philadelphia 130 000 020- 6
Florida 700 020 03x- 12
DP-Florida 1. LOB-Philadelphia 8,
Florida 6. 2B-Howard (23), Werth (8),
HaRamirez (40), Jacobs (19). HR-Rollins
(25), Rowand (23), CRoss (8). SB-Rollins
(28), Dobbs (3), Linden (3). SF-Amezaga.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Durbin L,6-4 0 5 7 7 1 0
Condrey 3 1 0 0 0 0
Mesa 2 3 2 2 1 1
Rosario 2 1 0 0 1 4
Alfonseca 1 3 3 3 0 0
Florida
BKimW,8-6 5 10 4 4 1 4
Gardner 11-3 1 0 0 0 2
Tankersley 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Benitez 0 0 2 2 2 0
Lindstrom 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
GreggS,27 11-3 0 0 0 0 2
Durbin pitched to 7 batters in the 1st,
Benitez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Condrey (Amezaga), by Durbin
(Uggla). WP-Condrey, BKim.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First,
Rob Drake; Second, Brian Gorman; Third,
Paul Nauert..
T-3:19. A-24,651 (36,331).


Boston
New York
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay




New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


Home
45-21
41-27
35-35
37-31




Home
39-30
40-27
37-32
39-26
33-35


Away
35-34
32-34
32-35
25-42




Away
35-30
35-34
33-32
30-39
29-39


UTRUS UOUNIY (PL) CHRONICLE lyl�"kt


SUN


MAII"R LYKAC.TTIE IRASEB-A-ILII-


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GB SUN)AY, SIPTI:NBiMBR 2, 2007


SPORTS


Beem them up: 3-way tie al


Associated Press


NORTON, Mass. - Rich "I
Beem isn't going quietly from
these PGA Tour Playoffs. "
One week after he narrowly . 4
avoided elimination, Beem
kept alive his improbable run - - ..
Saturday at the Deutsche Bank )
Championship with birdies on i-
his last four holes for a 5-under
66, leaving him in a three-way
tie with Mike Weir and Aaron
Baddeley.
Beem cannot finish lower
than second if he wants to .
advance to the third tourna- *.,
ment next week, and a crowd- . �
ed leaderboard with 36 holes
remaining includes Phil.
Mickelson and Tiger Woods,
who each shot 64 to get within l . F
three of the lead. % L,
But it was another impres- "
sive performance by Beem, . F p 4
who is slowly becoming the "- :
poster boy that even long shots '
are allowed to dream of a $10
million prize for the winner of - - 9
the FedEx Cup. Rich Beem tips his c
"Of all the things I could be ing the second roun
the poster child for, this is not g the second rouni
the one that I would have ings and advance ti
picked," said Beem, who went Championship outsi
from 134th to 113th in the This is the first ti
standings with his tie for sev- year ago at Pebble
enth last week at The Barclays. Weir has been atop
"It's kind of crazy how it's all board through 36 ho
coming together, but I sure am Canadian has gone
having fun. This is certainly without winning.
interesting. I've just got to keep That weighs mo
trying to make some putts, and than the FedEx Cup
who knows?" "I just want to pl
Beem isn't the only player myself," Weir said.
desperate for a good week while since I've ho
Weir, the former Masters phy, and more thai
champion and recent captain's that's what I'm
pick for the Presidents Cup, about That would
needs to finish in the top five to next week."
have any chance of moving into Weir built a two-s
the top 70 in the playoff stand- swirling wind at T


W- .


-~ ~








I


i-.- L.. -


cap to the gallery Saturday after his birdie on the 18th hole to go 9-ui
d of the Deutsche Bank Championship golf tournament in Norton, M


o the BMW
de Chicago.
ime since a
Beach that
the leader-
les, and the
three years

re on him
P.
.ay well for
"It's been a
isted a tro-
n anything,
concerned
get me into

shot lead in
PC Boston,


losing his grip on the lead over
his last two holes. His tee shot
on the par-3 eighth missed to
the green to the right and led to
bogey, and his approach on the
ninth went just over the green,
leaving him a downhill look at
the hole that took him three
shots to get down. He still shot
a 68 and had few complaints.
Baddeley birdied his final
hole for a 66, in contention for
the second straight year at the
Deutsche Bank.
They were at 9-under 133, one
shot clear of Mickelson, Sean
O'Hair (66), Brett Wetterich (68)
and Ryan Moore (69).
In round two with the Big


finishing a torrid eight-hole
stretch with a flop shot that
skipped hard past the flag,
stopped, then spun back to 3 feet
-- for birdie on the par-5 second.
* That seemed to wake up
Woods, who was six shots
behind Mickelson at that point.
On the 298-yard fourth hole
where he took three shots out of
a bunker and made double
bogey in the opening round, he
got his revenge. Woods hit a driv-
er that the wind held up and
deposited on the green some 35
feet right of the flag, and he
holed it for eagle. That turned
out to be a four-shot swing from
Friday, and it came in the mid-
die of a six-hole stretch in which
Woods was 6 under.
He wound up at 6-under 136,
along with playoff points
leader Steve Stricker (69)
"I knew that 3 or 4 under
would put me right back in the
tournament," Woods said.
"Now I'm back in the tourna-
Associated Press ment."
rnder par dur- Steinhauer tops State


lass.


Three, Woods, Mickelson and
Vijay Singh finally delivered
the golf everyone expected to
see. Another large crowd
chased them around the course
in morning sunshine and
rarely had a muted moment.
There were only six holes on
which no one in this glamor
group made a birdie, and they
were a combined 19 under par.
In the opening round, they
were a combined 3 over.
"This is what we were hop-
ing for and kind of expecting
yesterday," Mickelson said.
Lefty was the first to get going,
chipping in for birdie on the
15th, for eagle on the 18th and


Farm leaderboard
SPRINGFIELD, III. - Sherri
Steinhauer birdied three of her last
six holes Saturday to hold onto the
lead in the LPGA State Farm
Classic, with defending champion
Annika Sorenstam three strokes
back with one rounds left.
Steinhauer, who also led after
the first two rounds, had three
birdies and two bogeys during an
up-and-down round of 1-under
71 that left her at 12-under 204
on the Panther Creek Country
Club course.
"I feel real fortunate with the fin-
ish," the 44-year-old Steinhauer
said. "I got off to a very slow start
today. Actually, I feel like I hit the ball


Maddux still master of control in 22nd big league season


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO - Greg Maddux
had just extended his consecu-
tive innings streak without a
walk to 42 and, true to form, he'd
much rather be discussing a
forthcoming fantasy football
draft.
"Believe it Are you kidding
me?" Maddux said.
There's nothing imaginary
about the way Mad Dog is pitch-
ing at age 41. Still a master of con-
trol, even if he often can't go as
deep into games as he used to, he
hasn't walked a batter in his last
six starts. The last time he
walked a batter was seven starts
ago, when Astros starter Roy
Oswalt drew ball four in the sec-
ond inning on July 28.
Everyone with the San Diego
Padres is impressed, except
the seemingly ageless pitcher
himself.
"I don't worry about it, you
know?" Maddux said. "Strike-
outs and walks are overrated. I
think I've just been fortunate
enough to be in a position where
I haven't had to walk anybody
"The last thing you want to do
is have a meaningless walk
streak affect how you go about
hitters," Maddux said. "I'm not
good enough to just lay it in there
and save a walk streak I think my
last one ended when I intention-
ally walked somebody."
His memory certainly hasn't
faded.
In August 2001, Maddux's NL-
record streak of consecutive
innings without a walked ended
at 72 1-3 innings when he pur-
posely threw four balls to
Arizona's Steve Finley.


Then again, Maddux (10-9,
3.79 ERA) has long been known
for his control, his ability to
paint the black on the corners of
the plate.
Maddux, 3-2 with a 2.45 ERA
in his last eight starts, still
doesn't bite.
"You know what's cool about
it, is at least you make them earn
their way on," he said. "You
don't give them nothing. You
make them beat you. I'm kind of
big on that I'm big on not beat-
ing myself. If it's a reflection of
that, it's a nice compliment But
it's not something you pitch for
or worry about You beat line-
ups, not hitters. There are cer-
tain times you have to go with
the lineup and not necessarily
the hitter."
The Padres are enjoying
watching Maddux pad his Hall of
Fame credentials, which include
343 victories, four Cy Young
Awards and a World Series
championship with the Atlanta
Braves in 1995. Last weekend, he
became the first pitcher to earn
10 victories in 20 consecutive
seasons.
They even have a little fun at
the expense of one of the game's
elder statesmen.
"Forty-two innings or 42
years?" quipped closer Trevor
Hoffmnan, who's saved a record
517 games.
Padres leadoff batter Brian
Giles knows something about
walks, having drawn 269 of them
in three seasons.
"He's just a machine out
there," Giles said. "Throws
strikes. The amazing thing about
him is he doesn't miss over the
middle of the plate very much.


That's hard to do.
"I think you talk to any pitcher,
you can't just hit corners all day
and' he seems to do that He's
done that for 63 years now, so it's
amazing," said Giles, whose droll
sense of humor almost matches
Maddux's deceptive wit
Maddux also went 51 innings
without issuing a walk in 1995.
"Sooner or later there's going
to be a situation where you have
to pitch around a guy or walk
him," Maddux said. 'To me, it's
not something I worry about It's
not something like if I get behind
in the count, I think about it it's
not an issue. It's just a coinci-
dence, if anything."
Maddux does many things for
the Padres, who are trying to
win their third straight NL West
title. He's always the first one
out for pitchers' batting practice
and remains one of the best
bunters around. He looks every
bit the record-tying, 16-time
Gold Glove winner he is, field-
ing his position with remark-
able skill and: saving himself
several runs a season. He pays
attention to every detail.
Maddux seems a long way
from even pondering retirement
Making $10 million this year, he's
got a $6 million player option for
2008, the price of which would
increase incrementally up to $10
million if he pitches 200 innings.
He's thrown 168 2-3 innings in 28
starts.
And he loves being with the
Padres.
"I like the atmosphere. I like
the team, I like the personality on
the team, I like living down here.
I like the ballpark," he said.
The Padres don't scrimp on


providing the players everything
they need to be comfortable. The
huge clubhouse has leather
couches and numerous TVs.
"I mean, this is as good as any
country club you're going to see
in the United States," Maddux
said. "The only thing that's miss-
ing is a fireplace."

San Diego Padres pitcher Greg
Maddux puts his bat away
after practice Thursday prior to
the Padres' game against the
Arizona Diamondbacks in San
Diego. The ageless Maddux
extended his no walk streak to
42 innings and has not
allowed more than three runs
in any of his last nine starts
Associated Press


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PGA

, as well as the first two days, but
through the first 10 holes, nothing. I
didn't have any putts fall and just
wasn't feeling quite as comfortable.
"I'm going to have to shoot a low
round tomorrow, depending on the
wind conditions, and I'm assuming
it's going to blow but it's not going to
howl or anything. I would assume
that the scores are going to be low.
... It's up for grabs tomorrow."
Australia's Rachel Hetherington
was a stroke back after a 67.
"It wasn't easy. The wind was up
again today," Hetherington said.
"And especially on the second nine:
holes. There are a lot of pin posi-
tions that are kind of tucked on the
greens, and you really couldn't hit it
at the pin or close to the pin."
Christina Kim, coming off a sec-
ond-place finish last week in the
Safeway Classic, had a 71 to join
Michele Redman at 10 under.
"So it was kind of tough out
there," Kim said. "The greens were
firmer. The pins were in some very
difficult spots. But you know, I still
went out and had a great time, had
a great group, so it was a lot of fun."
Sorenstam, defending the last of
her 69 career LPGA Tour titles, had
a 71. She was at 9 under along
with Becky Morgan (69).
Sorenstam is playing her seventh
tournament since returning from a
ruptured disk in her neck.
"I hit the ball solid," Sorenstam
said. "I had one three-putt there buti
other than that, I think the greens
are firming up and tougher pin
placements. I thought it was a little
more difficult. If you were on the
edge you didn't know if it would
take a big bounce or little bounce.
Sometimes coming out of the cor-
ner it was difficult, and the pins
were tucked today."









('JIRUS COUNlY (FL) CHRONIC) F E1%JTU~TITATNN1ENT S1JNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007 7B


Celebrities for hire


Stars paid big bucks

to add buzz to

Las Vegas nightclubs

Associated Press
LAS VEGAS - Three years ago, as
Paris Hilton was about to turn 24, the
celebutante got a sense of her worth to
the nightclub industry in Las Vegas.
She had celebrated her previous
three birthdays at Light, the Bellagio
hotel-casino nightclub run by the Light
Group. But for her 24th, another compa-
ny swooped in with an offer that
trumped the standard private jet to and
from L.A., a free stay at a luxury suite, a
sumptuous dinner and, of course, free
booze.
The hotel heiress would get a big pay-
check - Light was told $200,000 - just
to party, but it had to be at PURE, a rival
nightclub at Caesars Palace run by the
PURE Management Group.
Her people let the Light Group know
that their former deal was off.
"We said, 'OK, well listen, we're not
here to tell you not to make money,'"
said a former Light executive, who did
not want to be identified talking about
industry specifics.
Celebrities often make appearances
and walk the red carpet as part of the
deal for coming to a nightclub. In return
for generating media coverage, they
i receive all sorts of free goodies, if not
cash. For nightclub operators, it has
become the standard way of getting
their establishments known.
Besides buzz, it generates more
patrons, more people willing to pay a
$30 cover charge, $15 for a cocktail and
$500 for a bottle of name-brand vodka or
champagne.
"If you quantify that in terms of the
amount of press they got off it, the press
they got off it was priceless," the former
executive said.
This weekend, PURE is looking to re-
create its formula with the opening of
LAX and Noir nightclubs at the Luxor
hotel-casino, with a grand-opening
party Friday night hosted by Britney
Spears. The company would not say
how much it is paying her or whether
Spears would perform.
A revamped club, Blush at the Wynn
hotel-casino, also is hoping to cash in by.
opening Friday


Associated Press
A photo of Britney Spears is shown in a poster promoting the opening of LAX night-
club Friday at Luxor hotel-casino in Las Vegas. Celebrities often make appearances
and walk the red carpet as part of the deal for coming to a nightclub. In return for
generating media coverage, they receive all sorts of free goodies, if not cash. For
nightclub operators, it has become the standard way of getting their establishments


known.
It's the start of a raucous couple of
weeks that include Labor Day weekend
and the MTV Video Music Awards -
events that will attract plenty of partiers
and paparazzi.
PURE managing partner Steve
Davidovici said rumors of celebrity pay-
ments are exaggerated, and pointed to
reports the group paid $250,000 to
Spears eight months ago to host PURE's
New Year's Eve countdown.
"That's a lot of sour grapes from other
nightclubs, I guess," Davidovici said,
while giving a tour of LAX, a plush club
that resembles a chic 1920s opera
house. "It's a third of those prices."
Even at that, the appearance fee,
which works out to about $83,000, was
money well spent, he said. The club sold
a table next to Spears that night for
$50,000, and some 3,000 revelers spent
$250 on tickets.
"If you look at (the celeb fee) from a
monetary standpoint, it's significant,
but not if you're taking in half a million
dollars," he said.
PURE nightclub alone will generate
about $53 million in revenue this year,
while the company plans to gross more
than $120 million from its 12 venues in
Las Vegas and the Bahamas, he said.
On Tuesday, PURE nightclub hosted
Paris Hilton and her sister, Nicky, as-


they unveiled new products from
Nicky's clothing line. The club later
gushed in a release that the sisters
"danced their hearts out for the admir-
ing onlookers" as "the two socialites
stuck to the main VIP stage."
At LAX, the central focus of the the-
ater-like layout is a raised dais of booths
in front of the dance floor for "super
VIPs and celebrities," Davidovici said.
"Britney will definitely be up there
opening night," he said.
Industry observers say such celebrity-
spotting is worth the price of admission.
"It's fun to be famous and rich. That's
why people pay to get in and watch,"
said Lori Levine, the president of
Flying Television, a talent-booking firm
in New York.
"If you go to a club to see one of the 'It'
girls, you take a photo on your phone
and you'll have a story to tell for the rest
of the summer," she said.
The pay scale for celebrity ranges
from free drinks to thousands of dollars.
NBA stars command appearance fees
from $5,000 to $30,000 and models can
broker $2,500 to $25,000 "depending on
whether she's been in Victoria's Secret
or Sports Illustrated's swimsuit issue,"
said Ryanr Schinman, president of the
entertainment consulting firm Platinum
Rye Entertainment.


Photographer


offers unique view
vx Wasbin, t -n Post: . ..-


WASHINGTON - You're an
artist, and you want to make
images that change the world,
or at least point a finger at its
troubles. For a decade or
more, the way to do that has
been to avoid a distracting,
obviously arty look. Instead,
there's been an almost docu-
mentary approach: Think Nan
Goldin's influential snapshots
of down-and-outers in New
York. Of course, if your images
succeed, before too long they
become the model for a whole
new look in art, and beyond:
Think how Goldin's images
resonated through the art
world in the *1990s, then out
into the worlds of fashion and
advertising.
You could call this the "ugly-
is-beautiful" approach to get-
ting your point across.
The eco-themed images of
David Maisel, a 46-year-old
photographer
based in
Sausalito,
Calif., carve
space out for
themselves by
resisting that
now standard
way of mak-
ing pictures
talk. Sixteen
of them, all nr'.
four foot
square, go on
di splay I ,.
Tuesday at An image from
the National "Terminal Mi
Academy of explores the G
Sciences region. Maisel's
here. looking down fro
Maisel' s or helicopter ont
photos also made degradation
start out with
the most straightforward doc-
umentary viewpoint: They're
shot looking down from a
small plane or helicopter onto
sites of man-made degrada-
tion, using standard equip-
ment and film. They show
dying lakes, clear-cut forests
and the tailing ponds and
leaching fields of mines, laid
out flat and clear before our
eyes. But the crucial thing is
that the images Maisel ends


r
r
p
to
)o


National Academy of Sciences
Good looks only matter when
they're used to speak of things
beyond themselves, especially
when they're talking about ugli-
ness.
up with also look like appeal-
ing, time-honored abstract art.
A picture of the bacterial
bloom on a slick of poisoned
water in Owens Lake, drained
almost a centu-
ry ago to sup-
ply Los
Angeles, has
the throbbing
black-tinged
reds of a
Rothko .one
painted not
long, maybe,
before the
artist's suicide
in 1970. A pic-
ture of the
edge of Great
David Maisel's Salt Lake has
age" series the desiccated
eat Salt Lake browns and
photos are shot blacks of a
n a small plane 1950s abstrac-
o sites of man- tion by Franz
n. Kline. A
cheerier-look-
ing Utah picture, in fact show-
ing massive evaporation
ponds, defines a yellow
chevron that could almost be
by Kenneth Noland, maybe
from just after he left
Washington in 1961.
You could call this the
"beautiful-is-ugly" move. The
photos attract us with their
tried-and-true ideas of beauty
- then hit us with their sub-
ject's ugliness.


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SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007
www.chronicleonline.comr


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Seeger takes stand
against Stalin
ALBANY, N.Y - Pete
Seeger has the Joe Stalin
blues.
Decades after drifting
away from the Communist
Party, the 88-
year-old
banjo-picker
has written a
song about
SJ the Soviet
leader that's
as scathing
as any tune
Pete in the folk
Seeger legend's long
career.
"I'm singing about old Joe,
cruel Joe. He ruled with an
iron hand. He put an end to
the dreams of so many in
every land," Seeger wrote in
"The Big Joe Blues."
Seeger said he left the
Communist Party around
1950 and apologized years
ago for not recognizing that
Josef Stalin was a "very
cruel misleader." But he told
The Associated Press on
Friday that the song he final-
ly finished this year is a first
for him, despite three visits
to the Soviet Union begin-
ning in the '60s.
"It's the first overt song
about the Soviet Union,"
Seeger said during a phone
interview from his Hudson
Valley home in Beacon. "I
think I should have though,
when I was in the Soviet
Union - I should have
asked, 'Can I see one of the
old gulags?"'

Clooney: Obama
has 'rock star' aura
VENICE, Italy - Barack
Obama has the aura of a
rock star, says George
Clooney.
"You've been in a room
once in a
while with a
rock star He
walks into
the world,
and he takes
your breath
away I'd love
him to be
George president,
Clooney quite honest-
ly," the actor
told reporters Friday at the
Venice Film Festival, where
his legal thriller "Michael
Clayton" was premiering.

Bonsall gets two
years' probation
BOULDER, Colo. - Brian
Bonsall, who played Andy
Keaton in "Family Ties,"
pleaded guilty to third-
degree assault in a case
involving his girlfriend and
was sentenced to two years'
probation, prosecutors said.
Three other charges
against Bonsall, 25, were dis-
missed under a plea agree-
ment entered on Friday. He
was arrested in March after
his girlfriend told police he
poured an alcoholic drink
on her face while she slept,
put her in a choke hold and
threw her onto a bed when
she tried to leave.
Bonsall appeared in three
seasons of "Family Ties,"
the NBC sitcom that helped
launch Michael J. Fox's
career in the 1980s.

Bollywood actor
released from jail
JAIPUR, India - A court
in Jodhpur released popular
Bollywood actor Salman
Khan on bail Friday in a
poaching case, his lawyer
said.
S He had
I been held at
- the Jodhpur
Central Jail
since his
S- ' -, arrest last
L Saturday,
^-' \ said his
Salman lawyer,
Khan Dipesh
Mehta.
Khan, who has played
many macho roles in Hindi-
language films, was arrested


after a Jodhpur appeals
court upheld an earlier
judgment and ordered him
to begin serving a five-year
prison term.
He had been out on bail
since April 2006.

- From wire reports


ABC pushes 'Daisies' hard


Florida
L4B C. __


k6~d


Associated Press
This was the scene Aug. 16 at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, Calif., where ABC screened the first episode of its new
drama "Pushing Daisies." Part of the network's fall schedule, the show has received a big marketing push from the network that
includes screenings and other events.

Network hopes innovative marketing approach will give show a boost


LYNN ELBER
AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES - ABC has
cultivated a marketing cam-
paign for "Pushing Daisies"
that could make producers of
other new shows green with
envy. .
A hybrid drama-romantic
comedy about a man who can
reverse death, "Pushing
Daisies" has been heaped with
critical praise based on "its
beautifully executed pilot
episode. ABC, sensing the
potential for a hit that could
bolster its schedule, is lavish-
ing the series with promotion.
The "Daisies" pushing start-
ed early with summertime
spots running in movie the-
aters. Then came the public
screenings, including one at
the Hollywood Forever
Cemetery here, at the increas-.
ingly influential Comic-Con
pop culture convention in San
Diego and one planned for the
New York Television Festival
this Saturday
Thousands of daisies, with
tags attached touting the show,
are being handed out to the
public in big cities. Some mag-
azine readers will see glossy,


eye-catching ad that reveals a
pop-up paper daisy.
Then, of course, there's the
on-air radio and TV promotion
, as well as billboards.
The goal is to create early
enthusiasts who will talk up
the series before its Oct 3 pre-
miere, said Michael Benson,
ABC's executive vice president
of marketing.
"The most important
resource is our on-air promo-
tion, and No. 2 is word of
mouth," he said.
Only time and Nielsen ratings
will tell if the chatter counts,
but there is a discernible buzz.
After the cemetery screening, a
rave review from one '"Jenn P"'
popped up onUSA Today's Pop
Candy blog.
"It was fabulous!" she wrote.
"The show is soooo vibrant and
charming, it is impossible not
to fall under its spell. Plus, they
gave us daisies and free pie!
What's not to love?"
Pop Candy also invited read-
ers to watch an extended pre-
view of the show on YouTube.
But don't look for the full
episode online - that's not in
Benson's marketing playbook
for "Pushing Daisies" or other
ABC contenders, he said.


"I have the same approach
that Coca-Cola might have
when they're launching a prod-
uct," Benson said. "The idea is
to get people to sample a prod-
uct, then come in and buy
more. You don't give a six-pack;
you give a sample and hope
they'll buy a six-pack if they
like it"
He's concerned that if the
show were made available
online that Nielsen-measured
viewers might watch it and
skip the on-air premiere,
diminishing the crucial early
ratings.
Bryan Fuller, creator and an
executive producer of
"Pushing Daisies," is more
than happy with ABC's market-
ing plan. He's reveling in it,
deeming it an "an honor" to be
singled out among the net-
work's heavy load of eight new
fall shows.
As a TV veteran with credits
including the hit "Heroes" and
acclaimed but quickly shelved
"Wonderfalls," he knows what
it's like to have or lack network
support.
'"Heroes' got a great market-
ing push from NBC and that
was a fantastic experience, to
have people be aware of (it),"


Fuller said. "With 'Wonder-
falls,' friends said, 'Hey, when
is the show coming on?' I said,
'It was canceled a month ago."'
It's hard to express, he said,
what it's like "being the pro-
ducer wondering why there's
not more money" to promote a
show.
Some TV producers likely
are thinking similar dark
thoughts. With so many shows
to promote, equal treatment is
impossible, ABC's Benson said.
It's up to Stephen McPherson,
ABC's entertainment presi-
dent, to weigh what the net-
work and its schedule needs
and act accordingly
"We pick and choose what
we think has the greatest shot
of being really accessible,"
Benson said. "Hopefully, the
audience will sample those
and cross over and sample
other shows we have."
"Pushing Daisies," which
will air 8 p.m. Wednesday, has
a special burden because it
anchors the night for two other
newcomers. It needs enough
heft to bring viewers in and
then keep them around for
"Private Practice" (the "Grey's
Anatomy" spinoff) and "Dirty
Sexy Money."


Irwin tribute tops TV offerings


Associated Press

A year after Steve Irwin's
death, Animal Planet is airing
a weeklong celebration of the
exuberant "Crocodile Hunter"
whose forays among wildlife
were a staple of the channel.
Irwin, who died in
September 2006 at 44 when his
heart was pierced by a stingray,
is featured in new and previ-
ously aired specials that
recount his work and show-
manship that carried a conser-
vation message.
"Secrets of the Crocodile,"
debuting 8 p.m. Tuesday, is the
centerpiece. The program
details Irwin's final crocodile
research expedition to illumi-
nate the reptiles that have
scarcely changed in their thou-
sands of years on Earth.
"There's relatively little that
we know about these animals
and in the documentary we see
Steve unraveling their myster-
ies," his widow, Terri Irwin, said
in an Animal Planet release.
She recently completed her
own crocodile expedition in
Australia. Her daughter with
Irwin, Bindi, 8, has her own
show, "Bindi the Jungle Girl,"
on the Discovery Kids Channel.
Other programs airing during
Animal Planet's "Crocs Rule!"
week include "Search for the
Super Croc," 8 p.m. Sunday;


Associated Press
This undated promotional photo
provided by the Discovery
Networks shows "Crocodile
Hunter" star Steve Irwin with
one of the huge reptiles. Animal
Planet will honor the wildly pop-
ular and exuberant wildlife con-
servationist this week during
"Crocs Rule!"
"The Crocodile Hunter 3:
Steve's Story," 8 p.m. Monday;
"They Shoot Crocs, Don't They,"
9 p.m. Monday; "Ocean's
Deadliest," 9 p.m. Tuesday and
"My Daddy the Crocodile
Hunter," 9 p.m. Wednesday.


Other shows to look out for:
* For those who want to
escape on Labor Day without a
car trip, AMC is offering a time
warp to office and family life
circa 1960 with a "Mad Men"
marathon. The drama centers
on hotshot creative director
Don Draper and those in his
orbit at the Sterling Cooper
Advertising Agency and at
home. "Mad Men" recreates a
period when people could
smoke when and wherever they
wanted but faced suffocating
restrictions and risks depend-
ing on who they were and
where they were from. But
"Mad Men" is more than a
chance to see that not-so-long-
ago era through a contempo-
rary prism. It's also stocked
with emotionally involving
characters and a breakout star
in Jon Hamm, who makes the
most of the tightly wound,
flawed Draper and is, to boot,
drop-dead handsome. Bonus
casting: Robert Morse ("How to
Succeed in Business Without
Really Trying") dropping in as
the agency's autocratic and
eccentric leader. The show's
first seven episodes (of the 13-
episode run), will show nonstop
beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday.
* Pierce Brosnan, so dashing
in TV's "Remington Steele"
and later on the big screen as
James Bond, stirs (or make that


shakes) up his image in
"Shattered," debuting 9 p.m.
Sunday on TNT In the film
released theatrically as
"Butterfly on a Wheel,"
Brosnan is a bad, bad man. He
kidnaps a couple's young
daughter and the proceeds to
issue demands that aren't about
money: He wants to wreck the
family's perfect life. Gerard
Butler ("300") and Maria Bello
("A History of Violence") co-star
as the once-happy husband and
wife who end up facing a crush-
ing moral dilemma.
* "Lincoln Heights," the
rare TV drama that makes a
black family its focus, returns 8
p.m. Tuesday on ABC Family
for its second season. Dad
Eddie Sutton (Russell
Hornsby), a lawman, has been
injured in the line of duty and
finds himself playing house-
husband, cooking and setting
down new rules for the kids.
Mom Jenn (Nicki Micheaux)
leaves the hospital to work in a
local clinic, an adjustment that
has to be balanced with her
home life. As children will, the
Sutton offspring are living
their own lives: Cassie's (Erica
Hubbard) romantic life heats
up when she meets an artist
and preteens Tay (Mishon
Ratliff) and Lizzie (Rhyon
Brown) are experiencing their
own brushes with young love.


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
3-8-4
PLAY 4
9-7-1-6
LOTTO
4 - 5 - 16 - 25 - 27 - 37
FANTASY 5
1 - 6 - 26 - 28 - 32
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31
Cash 3:0-9-2
Play 4:6 - 5 - 3 - 8
Fantasy 5:4 - 18 - 28 - 33 - 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 330 $907
3-of-5 9,911 $11.50
Mega Money: 17 - 22 - 27 - 31
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB 2 winners $2 million
4-of-4 10 $2,728.50
3-of-4 MB 104 $573.50
3-of-4 1,872 $95
2-of-4 MB 2,957 $42
2-of-4 52,123 $3.50
1-of-4 MB 23,031 $5.50
THURSDAY, AUGUST 30
Cash 3:0 - 9 - 3
Play 4:0 - 9 - 8 - 5
Fantasy 5: 6 -7 - 15 - 27 - 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 288 $897
3-of-5 8,899 $811
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29
Cash 3:0-2-2

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
I To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 2, the -
245th day of 2007. There are 120
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 2, 1945, Japan formal-
ly surrendered in ceremonies
aboard the USS Missouri, ending
World War II.
On this date:
In 1666, the Great Fire of
London broke out, claiming thou-
sands of homes.
In 1789, the U.S. Treasury
Department was established.
In 1864, during the Civil War,
Union Gen. William T. Sherman's
forces occupied Atlanta.
In 1901, Vice President
Theodore Roosevelt offered the
advice, "Speak softly and carry a
big stick" in a speech at the
Minnesota State Fair.
In 1945, Ho Chi Minh declared
Vietnam an independent republic.
In 1969, North Vietnamese
President Ho Chi Minh died.
Ten years ago: In London, a
grieving human tide engulfed St.
James's Palace, where Princess
Diana's body lay in a chapel
closed to the public, as the British
monarchy and government pre-
pared for her funeral.
Five years ago: Negotiators at
the World Summit in Johan-
nesburg, South Africa, put the fin-
ishing touches on a global plan to
improve the lives of the poor while
preserving the environment.
One year ago: Afghan and
NATO forces launched Operation
Medusa, aimed at flushing out
Taliban fighters in southern
Afghanistan.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Meinhardt Raabe (the Munchkin
coroner in "The Wizard of Oz") is
92. Rhythm-and-blues singer Sam
Gooden is 68. Football Hall-of-
Famer Terry Bradshaw is 59. Actor
Mark Harmon is 56. Tennis Hall-of-
Famer Jimmy Connors is 55. Actor
Keanu Reeves is 43. Actress
Salma Hayek is 41. Rock musician
Sam Rivers (Limp Bizkit) is 30.
Rock musician Spencer Smith
(Panic! at the Disco) is 20.
Thought for Today: "The read-
ings of history and anthropology in
general give us no reason to
believe that societies have built-in
self-preservative systems. And
therefore we can't say that man
will be sensible enough not to
destroy himself." - Margaret
Mead, American anthropologist
(1901-1978).

REMEMBER WHEN
� For more local history, visit
the Remember When page
of ChronicleOnline.com.











C
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Lessons unlearned


Javier Tobar sits last week in front of his home in New Orleans, where he covered the mark left by post-Katrina body searchers with a fleur-de-lis. The fleur-
de-lis is a symbol of the city, stricken by Hurricane Katrina two years ago.

Even two years later, Katrina amplifies troubles that exist in cities across the nation


' - ;' , ' ; , '": . "'.'-. !. - .;'
.LAsocia h'd Pret's
NEW ORLEANS - Katrina is old
net s. right? Newl Orleans - who
cares' Its just another big city within
big problems. bad luck and bad
weather. Get over it.
Actually, please don't.
Don't ever get o\er the tragedy \ of
Newi Orleans. It's your tragedy too.
What happened to this Ihistoric
cit two years ago is more than the
obvious cautionary tale of 1%hat
mighlt befall your community after a
natural disaster or a terrorist strike
It's also a sad reflection of what's
happening now - today, in your
hometom n and across an anxious
and ailing nation.
0 Inadequate health care
MA housing crisis.
SCnimbling infrastructure.
* Racial division
* Poor schools.
* Rising crime
And at the core ofthese and other
problems threatening our i\ay oft
life- a pernicious failure of leader-
ship
Katrina did more than claim hlies
and property It ripped alay the
glitzy veneer that made New
Orleans' reputation and exposed a
festering brew\ of problems ImI nerieng
beneath - problems endemic to the
rest of the nation, begging for atten-
tion, if v.e only had the le ts to look.


It' thmi country can't help New
Orleans rebound - it' we and our
leaders break the promises made to
its citizens - \what are the odds
your health care %\ill ever get
cheaper.' You' bridges safer? Your
schools better?
-"New Orleans is an incubator for
all our nation's ills." said historian
Douglas Brinkley: author of "'The
Great Deluge." a book about
Katrina.
"'If you study what's going on ini
New Orleans. it's just an exaggerat-
ed version of what's hitting us inI
many areas of the country" he said.
'Just pick your topic "
OK. let's stallrt from the top
For your health
Katrina made a bleak health care
system worse in New )Orleans The
death rate jumped 47 percent after
Katrina as a city of 270,0001 mostl.N
poor and middle-class people lost
seen oft22 hospitals and more than
half of its hospital beds. Nearly
4,500 doctors were displaced from
three Ne%% Orleans parishes.
The lack of space for mental
patients has caused problems for
police departments, who have com-
plained of having to use officers'
ti me to drive from hospital to hospi-
tal looking for vacant beds.
Dr. Atul Gav\ande, a local irnieon
and author. said the city's medical
sv-_tem is in a "death spiral" that is


niore rapid - but no less ceilain --
than the crash course the rest of the
nation is on.
It goes like this.
People rely on employers for
health insurance. They lose their
jobs The.v lose their insurance
They can't afford their pills. They
put oilt doctors' visits. Minor illness-
es become major. They go to the
emergency Irooimi. The emergency
I'oo011 overflows w ith uninsured
patients The hospital loses mone.:
Insurance rates skyrocket The hos-
pital shuts its emergency room.
Uninsured patients cro\md other
ERs. Doctors leave to~ in
Businesses leave town. Jobs are
lost. Repeat.
New% Orleans is just one cit) in a
county \with more than 43 million
uninsured., a figure that increased 2
million from 2005 to 2006. according
to the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention Nearly 20 percent
of working-age Anlericans did not
have health insurance in 2006
The percentage of uninsured
among the 20 largest states ranged
from 7 7 percent in Michigan to 23 8
percent in Texas.
"What you see in New Orleans is
the extreme of what happens when
you live in a tlawedl health care sys-
tem. And all of urs do." said
Gawande. author of "Better" a book
about the system's failures "It's a
slow-motion train wreck."


No roads home
The homeless population of New%
Orleans has nearly. doubled since
before Hurricane Katrina. Many o
the poor. mentally ill and drug-
addicted are squatting in the city's
estimated 80.000 acant dwellings
Tens of thousands o'f other people
are a bit luckier, living in badl.,
damaged homes. government trail-
ers and out-of-state apartments.
The state and federal govern-
ments are in a petty fight about how
to fund the Road Home program.
Shich is supposed to help people
repair and rebuild houses
With 183.000 people applying for
the aid. the Road Home program's
needs exceed its budget b. about $5
billion.
Nationally, ill innds are stirring
iup a crisis that sharp eyes saw com-
ing The combination of higher
interest rates and weaker home val-
ues has clobbered homeow ners,
especially those with higher-risk
subpnme mortgages.
Hundreds of thousands, niam be
miillions of borrowers, stand to lose
their homes %while Washington and
the media obsess over the impact on
\\all Street.
Bridges falling down
The New\ Orleans levees were not
built to withstand a sizable hurri-
Powe, -:see ... -" � /Page 3C


Homelessness causes universal suffering


As I have mentioned
before, when one
political party seems
to have an advantage over
the other they search des-
perately for a way to level
the playing field. Just recent-
ly, the Democratic National
Committee decided to take
all, that's correct, all
Florida's delegates away if
the Florida primary was
held on Jan. 29.
The Democratic Party has


Lou
OTH
VOIS


been working hard in the state to
rebuild an effective political force and
has been making significant progress.
This takes them totally out of the presi-
dential race. It is going to be hard to
convince the candidates to spend a lot
of time in Florida when their win does-
n't count. It is going to be hard to get the
Democratic voters excited when their
vote doesn't count.
A good friend of mine, a major
Democratic fundraiser, said, "They


want me to give money and
have no input on who wins
- they are crazy."
The Republican National
Committee was a bit more
practical. It has indicated it
will take away up to 50 per-
cent of the Florida delegates
at the convention. This is a
good compromise and is one
Frey that will force the
IER Republican candidates to
CES come to Florida to campaign
and allow the Republican
Party to grow its base, a much-needed
activity.
Below, find the second in a series of
presentations made at the Lou Frey
Institute Civics Leadership Academy I
might add that all, the students, after
visiting the homeless center in Orlando,
put money from their own pockets into
a fund to help the center. There is hope
for the future.
There is a universal suffering found
in every nation around the world. It is


the issue of homelessness. It is seen
from the streets of downtown Detroit to
our very own capital of Tallahassee. It
is a plague that causes economic dis-
turbances in cities, residential districts,
health concerns and a myriad of social
concerns. Homelessness is not all about


stereotypes and
deranged narcotics
abusers. The homeless
of today are not all
panhandlers, but
women, children, fam-
ily and regular men
out of work and with-
out a home.
Homelessness has


ON THI
* www.dcf.stat
lessness/doc
web.pdf.
* www.cypress.
uct/Research


become a very dire problem in society,
and yet it is generally neglected in the
nightly news. It is estimated that 744,000
American citizens are homeless every
night in this great and lucrative nation.
Nearly 83,391 Floridians make up that
amount Our own Orange County has
about 6,500 homeless citizens. Many of
these citizens do not have a sufficient


place to turn to for a warm meal and
dry bed to lay their heads on.
Local shelters, even large ones wil
more than 200 beds, are not meeting th
demands for the increasing homele
population in our cities and unincorp
rated districts. They also are affectii
our economy. Th(
E NET and their shelters an
receiving minor fun(
e.fl.us/home from government we
s/2005report fare programs. F(
example, the Live th
com/prod Dream License Pla
er-Online.html. foundation gives
percent of their prc
its to the Coalition fi
the Homeless after their first $60,00
These funds are not sufficient enough
and act as a crutch to the homeless
They do not provide enough to fun
proper education and job training
These funds are a drain on government
resources because the homeless arer
Please see .-' - .:-. /Page !


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Just another

stupid

American

As a man, I have been
blessed with the gene that'
gives me the ability to drive an
automobile better than, well,:
anyone else on the planet.
Most men have this gene,
which is why from the begin-
ning of the automobile age,
most men drive the cars. This
same gene helps us always be
right when we're having a dis-
agreement with our spouses.
(This may also be the gene
responsible for the high
divorce rate in the United
States.)
Which brings me to my
recent trip to Ireland and the
fact that the English - back
when they ruled the world -
insisted that the Irish also
drive on the 'wrong side of the
road. If we had lost the
Revolutionary War, we
Americans also would now be
driving on the wrong side of
the road, drinking tea and
saluting the Queen Mum
instead of Queen Latifah.
When you're forced to drive
on the wrong side of the road,
the X and Y chromosomes get
. mixed up and one's ability to
be the best driver in the world
gets scrambled. Very scram-
bled.
On my very first evening in
Ireland, I managed to do a
swift U-turn in the middle of
Main Street in Glengarriff. I
was proud of my driving
Please see WINDOW/Page 4C









Mike Wright
WRIGHT
. 0 TARGET


Only Mark

Lunsford

has right to

say Couey

should die!

Interesting editorial in the
Chronicle on Friday about
., John Couey, who was sen-
tenced to death a week earlier
- for his brutal murder of
Jessica Lunsford.
The editorial essentially
Said Couey should accept his:
punishment so that Jessica's:
family can move on with their;
lives. Forget the appeals, the:
a editorial stated. In other
words, die like a man.
kb Boy, that's a rather up-front'
ie position. It's probably hap-
ss opened before, but I've never
o- heard of a newspaper outright
ng calling for someone to give up
ey the will to live.
re The editorial wasn't that
ls simple, though. It noted that
Couey, in a taped discussion
or with an aunt that was released
ie to the public just before sen-
te tencing, said that something
10 good had come from Jessica's
f- death because the state passed
or laws to protect children from
0. monsters like him.
h, Incredible that Couey would
s. talk about himself in such an
d abstract way, as if he's just
g. another John at the coffee
nt shop discussing news of the
Sday
1C Please see "' /Page4C


AV,


m


ar y











2C


/':


"We always carry out by committee
anything in which any one of us alone
would be too reasonable to persist."


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007
W a . .: r. .:.rn. l... .- li ,: .,- T=


Frank Moore Colby


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ............................... publisher
^l Charlie Brennan .................................editor
Neale Brennan ......promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ................circulation director
i Mike Arnold ........................... managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
"You may difer with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus



Nicholas Sarkozy


to the rescue

Other VOICES


BY DouGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
It's not exactly a secret, but
hearing it from the Iraqi leader
that U.S. troops helped install
must gall the White House.
American power is collapsing in
Iraq and Iran is moving to fill the
vacuum, according to Iraqi Prime
Minister Maliki, who is under fire
from political leaders in
Washington for failing to move his
government toward reconciliation
with the minority Sunni population.
Maliki spent years in exile in Iran
before returning to lead Iraq's unity
government, and it's becoming
clearer by the day that his agenda is
for a Shiite-led Iraq. He either can-
not or will not make the power-shar-
ing accommodations necessary to
end the ethnic violence.
President Bush's military surge
has made some progress in tamping
down the violence, but without
political compromise, the military
gains are transitory.
It's become almost a parlor game
in Washington to call for Maliki's
ouster, but toppling a freely elected
official is not easy, given Bush's
proclamations about democracy.
New elections could be called, but
the results could be worse in the
sense of producing an even harder-
line Shiite leader given the ethnic
balance in the country.
After being dominated by the
minority Sunnis under Saddam
Hussein, the Shiites are asserting
themselves as the majority, and
majority rules in a democracy What
they refuse to understand is what
James Madison so eloquently
explained in the Federalist Papers:
majority rule only if minority rights
are protected. This is further com-
plicated by the Sunni refusal to
relinquish power and accept minor-
ity status.
The Iraqi government is dysfunc-
tional with 17 of the 40 Cabinet min-
isters walking out while Maliki,
under heavy guard, tells reporters
from McClatchy Newspapers he
won't resign and can't be deposed.
Democrats Sen. Hillary Clinton
and Sen. Carl Levin, who chairs the
Armed Services Committee, are
calling on the Iraqi Parliament to
replace Maliki. President Bush has
been more circumspect, reminding
those demanding Maliki's head that
there is no heir apparent in the
strife-torn country who could step
Sin and make the tough choices that
have eluded Maliki. Too bad Bush
didn't give more thought to the
power vacuum in Iraq and the


region before he took the battle to
Baghdad and removed Saddam
Hussein.
Even so, help may be on the way
from a most unlikely source. Newly
elected French President Nicholas
Sarkozy has said publicly that a
nuclear-armed Iran is unaccept-
able, and he seems willing to put his
power and prestige behind an inter-
national settlement in Iraq, if not to
save Iraq, but to thwart Iran's ambi-
tions. This gives the Bush adminis-
tration an opening if they're smart
enough to take it to put an interna-
tional face on Iraq. Sarkozy won on
a platform of doing things different-
ly than his predecessor, Jacques
Chirac, even though they're both
from the same center-right political
party.
Chirac was the most opposed of
the Europeans to the invasion of
Iraq. He did not hide his contempt
for Bush, and his anti-Americanism
spawned a movement in this coun-
try, however silly, for Freedom Fries.
Chirac had a laissez-faire attitude
toward Iran, not wanting to jeopard-
ize trade relations between the two
countries, and treating U.S. fears
about Iran's nuclear program as
overblown. Sarkozy, by raising alarm
bells about Iran, has taken the oppo-
site approach, which puts him firm-
ly in Bush's camp when it comes to
curbing Ahmadinejad's Iran.
Exactly what form this newfound
French connection will take is
uncertain. The French are not going
to send troops, but Sarkozy is in a
position to push hard on the diplo-
matic front He could bring along
the other European nations and
stage an international rescue effort.
The French president has some-
thing that Bush lost a long time ago,
and that's credibility on the world
stage. He could rescue Bush if Bush
will let him, with the result that a
French-led international coalition
replaces Maliki with a temporary
regent along the order of Gen.
Douglas MacArthur, who ruled
Japan in the immediate aftermath
of World War II. America is no
longer in a position to pull this off,
having tried it after the invasion
with Paul L. Bremmer, who botched
the job as administrator of the
Coalition Provisional Authority.
Sarkozy's France, however, might
be able to do it

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-Go-
Round column, founded in 1932 by
Drew Pearson.


Taxed from town
Property taxes in the little town
of Chassahowitzka are too high,
especially for people who live out
of the area and own vacant lots.
*Our taxes will be double this year.
'Noticed a lot of others have dou-
bled, also.
The appraiser's office says they
go by the sales in the area. How
many people sold their homes or
property last year?
Think our lots will be among the
ones put up for sale. Between the
taxes and the sewer and water
assessment, this town is too high to
live in, even though we combined
our lots. Something tells me the
meetings this year are going to be
lively.
Diana Gleaton
LaPlace, La.

Get a job
I'd like to offer a few words to
Tom Dick. First, get over it! You
were fired and while you think you
were screwed, the boss who fired


you thought she was justified.
Your continuing to wallow in self-
pity doesn't reflect executive abili-
ty or attitude.
Had you not decided to make a
federal case of this situation, you
probably would now be working in
some new position and all this
nonsense would be behind you.
But you've chosen to paint your-
self as some kind of martyr and,
unfortunately, the Chronicle is
right there beside you making your
dismissal the biggest disaster to
occur in Citrus County since the
"no-name" storm that flooded
Crystal River a few years ago. Your
story just doesn't justify the head-
lines the paper has given you.
Do the citizens of Citrus County
a favor. Quit telling everybody how
badly you were mistreated and
find a new job before you have
ruined your reputation to the point
that nobody will touch you. You
may have already reached that
point.
Burl Keys
Homosassa


AN ERROR OF COMMISSION


An injustice in the



name of the taxpayers


Citrus County taxpayers should be angry
because an injustice has been done in their
names.
The termination of 25-year employee
Tom Dick was upheld by the county attor- THE 1I
ney on Tuesday in a mismanaged boon-
doggle that clouds the integrity of the cur- The ter
rent county legal staff and calls into ques- of To
tion whether the five members of the coun-
ty commission have the ability to lead local OUR O0
government through a controversy without Politics, re,
getting us involved in a major lawsuit ends the c
The new county administrator - June good en
Fisher - made a mess of the termination
and has let herself get dragged into the YOUR OPIN
petty politics of the elected members of crr,,ro-,.ieon
the board. . comirient
Dick, who served as the acting county errore
administrator while the search for Fisher
was conducted, was terminated from his position as
assistant county administrator for two major reasons.
First, he allegedly violated the state's sunshine laws by
calling up county commissioners about a bid proce-
dure; and second, because Fisher alleged Dick came to
work under the influence of alcohol.
But here's the problem. First, the state attorney's
office reviewed the sunshine allegation and said
absolutely no violation took place.
And second, there is absolutely no evidence that
Dick came to work under the influence. During sworn
testimony, Fisher said she didn't confront Dick during
a morning staff meeting and instead let him drive away
in a county vehicle, even though she believed he was
under the influence of alcohol.
The actions - or the allegations - were reckless.
Dick vehemently denies the drinking allegation and
claims the county administrator held it over his head to
force him to resign. Instead of resigning, Dick chal-
lenged his termination and it now seems the entire
issue is headed to court
Without any evidence, the county administrator has
made damaging accusations against the character of a
25-year employee. She had the administrative respon-
sibility - if she believed a county employee was under
the influence of alcohol - to immediately have him
tested and to get him off the job.
Making character accusations without evidence puts
all the taxpayers of Citrus County at risk.
One of those little issues that seem to escape every-
one involves the testimony of Cathy Taylor, the county's
Finance Director. Taylor testified that Dick never had
to make the telephone calls to the county commission-
ers that eventually got him in trouble.
The county commissioners had already approved -
in a 3 to 2 vote - to proceed with the controversial
Emergency Operation Center. Dick was going to
release the bid documents to try to save the taxpayers
some money. He was calling commissioners because he
didn't want them to read about the actions in the. news-
paper; he was not looking for their vote on anything
because they had already voted.


Thanks for kindness
I would like to publicly thank the kind gentle-
man and his wife in Pine Ridge for returning my
father's ATM bank card after finding it in the ATM
machine still in transaction mode on Saturday
afternoon, Aug. 25. Their honesty and exceptional
kindness are so appreciated by my family. We
thank you so very much.
Another Wal-Mart?
Does anyone know if there's a Super Wal-Mart
supposed to go in with the new Publix on (U.S.) 19
and (U.S.) 98? If anybody does, I'd like you to put
it in the Sound Off and when can we expect it.
Workman's comp


I'm calling about the Sound Off in Sunday's paper that is
titled "From Comp to caring." This person obviously does
not have a good grasp on what workman's comp is. Not
only does it help to pay for medical bills, but it also pays


CA563LL-
563-1


Taylor knows the intent of the regulation because she
wrote the rule.


But truth got lost in the witch-hunt to drive Tom Dick
out of county government Dick's true mis-
;SUE: takes were that he stayed friendly with
former county administrator Richard
nination Wesch - an action that some commis-
Dick. sioners and the new administrator appar-
ently found to be disloyal.
'INION: The new county administrator was
:klessness working Dick out of the chain of command
career of a and it was obvious that she wanted him
iployee. removed from her leadership team. But
using trumped-up charges of breaking the
I/ON: Go to law and coming to work under the influ-
line.: orn to ence go far beyond not working well with
.out today 's a member of your staff. Such personal
eC tiO,,. attacks on the integrity of a once-valued
employee have created an unnecessary
legal risk for the taxpayers.
The final indignity of this process was that county
attorney Robert Battista was supposed to offer an inde-
pendent review of the administrative effort against
Tom Dick. It was impossible for Battista to be inde-
pendent because he and his assistant were involved in
the effort to remove Dick from the very beginning. It's
the county attorney's office that stands by its interpre-
tation of the sunshine laws even though state prosecu-
tors have said they are wrong.
The county commissioners lost an opportunity for a
truly independent finding by not assigning a hearing
officer from outside of county government.
Commissioners have sat back and acted like this isn't
their problem - but it is.
They did nothing while a reckless injustice was done
in their names. They will have to defend that lack of
leadership in the upcoming elections and in a court of
law.
Their lack of action sends a clear message to all
county employees - "you are on your own."
Now the final hearing officer will be in a court of law.
And the taxpayers of Citrus County will most likely
have to pay for the missteps of the county attorney and
the county administrator. The legal bills alone will
inevitably be large enough to build a nice commuflity
park
Our suggestion is that if Tom Dick prevails in an
independent court of law and the county has to pay a
settlement, the county attorney's office should be
cleaned out We shouldn't be paying for this type of
legal advice.
The termination of Tom Dick was truly one of the
saddest days in the history of county government. No
one let the facts stand in the way of saving the career -
or at least the reputation - of an employee who dedi-
cated 25 years of his life to this community.
Just one year ago, Tom Dick was being praised for his
interim leadership of the county. Today, he has been
railroaded from his career and his reputation has been
savaged.
Who will be held accountable for that?


the person who has been injured a portion of
their paycheck if they are unable to work. No
health care that I know of, no health insurance
that I know of, or any work company, pays for
missed time at work. All they do is pay for the
health care.
Sports questions


Would someone please tell me what is a walk-
Son home run? Also, is Mike Hampton back playing
or is he still recuperating from surgery?
0U579 Tax collector's pay
I have a question for the Chronicle editorial
staff: Can you tell me if the Citrus County Tax Collector
and/or the tax assessor is salaried or do they get a com-
mission on what taxes are collected, or a combination of
the two? I would really like to know.
Editor's note: According to the Chronicle's 2000 archives,
the tax collector's salary was $95,567 and the position gets no
commission.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


= LETTERS to the Editor =


s

T1



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U
11
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LL"







CITRUS COUNn' Y(FL) CHRONICLEC M ET R SNASPEB i22 O3


Subprime lending? Ouch! Subsmooth wooing? Ouch again!


S ubprime lending, which
has become increasing-
ly common during the
past few years, is now making
the headlines. Briefly, sub-
prime lending is used to place
buyers in homes which are
otherwise beyond their reach
financially.
As a young bank examiner, I
was taught certain criteria
should be considered when
evaluating credit: Character
- will the borrower pay?
Capacity - can the borrower
pay? Collateral - what
recourse is available if the
borrower doesn't pay?
Subprime lending generally
fails on at least one, and some-
times all, of these counts.
Character has been displaced


by charging more
interest for lower
credit ratings;
capacity has been
kicked in the shins
with low initial
interest rates and
reverse amortiza-
tions - borrowers
are given loans on
which they can't
even afford to pay
the interest; and,
while the collateral


Fred Br
A SLIC
LIF


issue is a bit more complex, in
a nutshell, once foreclosures
begin, property values drop,
leaving buyers "upside down"
- owing more than the prop-
erty's worth.
The specter of subprime
lending has begun to plague


the financial servic-
es industry, as well
as the stock market.
I believe in the over-
i all scheme of things,
fear of what might
happen is worse
than what will hap-
- pen, but fear causes
market fluctuations.
annen Ouch!
'E OF On a -recent
FE Saturday morning,
driving to Orlando to
visit our children and grand-
children, I pondered sub-
prime lending and its effect
on the economy. I glanced at
my sweetheart and suddenly
it lost its importance. My mind
ran to the summer of 1966 and
the exciting days leading up to


our wedding. I corralled a
memory and blurted out, "The
orchid I bought you for your
prom was pretty, but it paled
in comparison to you."
I pride myself on being
smooth. I try to make up for
what I lack in machismo by
flashing an engaging smile
and saying the right words. I
waited for Cheryl's response.
I expected an appreciative
giggle, but it didn't happen.
She pleasantly, but firmly
replied, "I didn't get an
orchid. You bought me roses.
You said orchids were only for
very special occasions." Ouch!
In a few short words I'd con-
fessed to buying an orchid for
someone else, but even worse,
I'd implied there'd been an


occasion which was more spe-
cial to me than being with her.
I felt a rush of adrenaline,
then my instincts kicked in
and gave me instructions:
Don't panic. Don't argue.
Apologize. Eat crow.
I awkwardly said I was
sorry, that I must have been
suffering from an attack of
temporary insanity at the time
and if I had a chance to do it
over again, I'd buy her a bou-
quet of orchids. I wasn't
smooth. Ouch, again.
We dropped the subject, but
I didn't forget it. The next day,
while my sweetheart took her
Sunday afternoon nap, I went
shopping. I bought a card
which helped me verbalize
that every minute of every


hour of every day of every one
of the 41 years we've been
together has been a very, very
special occasion - and, I
bought her an orchid!
When she awoke and saw
what I'd done, the gleam in
her eyes and the glow on her
face made me know all was
forgiven. I'd righted a faux pas
from 4 decades ago and I'd
lived down a moment of sub-
smooth wooing.
Would that the folks who
have flooded the market with
subprime lending could find
such a simple solution.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist.


Sound OFF


Legitimate question
The person wanting to know
the highest point in Citrus
County has a legitimate ques-
tion for several reasons. The
person who responded in a stu-
pid manner has a mental prob-
lem.
Not immigrants
I'm reading the Sunday, Aug.
26 newspaper and I'm calling
to make a comment about Lou
Frey's article about the Civic
Leadership Academy. I'd like to
find out where these people go
to school. Puerto Rico does not
have immigrants coming to the
United States. Puerto Rico is
part of the United States. They


are not Mexico, they are not
Canada; they are part of the
United States. How can people
say that? They need to look
back in their history because ...
it is not considered part of the
50 states, but it is part of the
United States.
How much longer?
Responding to Aug. 26 Sound
Off "War is nasty." Absolutely
right - war is nasty. How long
are the Americans going to
stand for this nastiness that we
perpetuate? There were no
weapons of mass destruction.
Iraq had no nuclear capabilities
and al-Qaida was not involved
with Saddam Hussein until
after he was captured, after this


war started, and it was only an
attempt to get back at America
for things we should not be
doing...
Boat ramp permits
Boaters in Citrus County: You
will lose your free access to the
boat ramp, but what they ought
to do is give homeowners that
are actual residents of Citrus
County - full time, not part-time
residents - a permit at a cut
rate to use the boat ramps for
the year. Volusia County took
free access to the ocean away
to the people who put boats in
and use water-skis. But for the
residents of Volusia County, I
think it's a $50 permit they
have to buy, then they get


access all year. But if you come
from out of town or something,
you've got to pay every time to
go in the water with your jet-ski
or your boat. I think that's what
they need to do here. If they're
going to charge the residents,
give them a cut rate for a yearly
fee..Then, everybody from out
of town ought to pay, you know,
a good fee, like $10, each time
you use the ramp or something.
Then they could build more
ramps with that money in the
future.
Turn lights on
How come when.it's raining,
no one ever turns their lights
on anymore? You could have a
,downpour and every car that


you pass, you can't even see
them because their lights aren't
on. I think people should turn
their lights on when it rains. If
they don't, they should lose
their license.
Off boomers' list
The Citrus County commis-
sioners need to wake up. The
mandate was to lower property
taxes. Technically, they did that
for me by $3, which is disgust-
ing. Florida is no longer on the
baby boomers' short list of
desirable places to retire. Even
ordering a satellite TV service
or wireless phone is more
expensive here. Florida taxes
these services at over 13 per-
cent. The voters of Florida at


the state and local level have
the say as to how this crisis
plays out ... People need to pay
attention starting at the local
level. Vote out each and every
commissioner. They aren't
doing the job.
Seeking elevation
I have a life, but I would real-
ly like to know what is the high-
est peak or the highest point in
Citrus County. I don't think it's
a stupid question. If you guys
could find out, please print it in
Sound Off.
Editor's note: Possibly, it is
Pine Ridge at 90 feet. Elevation
is important to know for flood
plains, wind currents and ease of
playing a golf course.


LESSONS
Continued from Page 1C

cane, a historic lapse of judgment and
competence topped only by this: The
levees are still not ready for the next
serious storm.
The city's 3,200-mile system of
water and sewer lines were old, leaky
and in need of repair long before the
hurricane. The crush of pipe-corrod-
ing salt water made things worse.
Miles of New Orleans streets were
destroyed or damaged by the storm,
and remain in disrepair because the
city failed to give the federal govern-
ment a to-do list.
This can't be much comfort to the
people of Minnesota, where the col-
lapse of an Interstate 35W bridge
killed at least 13. President Bush
toured the site, promising to cut red
tape and rebuild.
Just as he toured New Orleans,
making promises to be broken.
From New York to California, cities
are raising utility rates and issuing
bonds in hopes of modernizing public
works systems straining under
increasing populations. The
American Society of Civil Engineers
estimates that $1.6 trillion is needed
during a five-year period to bring the
nation's water systems, runways,
dams and roads and bridges to a good
condition.
Government agencies have set
aside just $1 trillion for infrastructure
improvements in the next five years,
and those budgets are historically
raided for other purposes.
Black and white
For many blacks, Katrina is their
generation's epic reminder of how far
the nation is from true racial equality.
The hurricane had a predominantly
black toll, and many blacks felt the
fatally inept response was tinged by
racism.
Whites were less likely to think so.
"You have to go back to slavery, or
� the burning of black towns, to find a
comparable event that has affected
black people this way," Darnell M.
Hunt, a sociologist and head of the
African American studies department
at UCLA, said days after the storm.
ABCs
Of the students in New Orleans high
schools taken over by the state after
Katrina, two-thirds flunked the state
graduation exam. At least 40 percent
of the city's fourth-graders and one-
third of the eighth-graders in those
schools failed promotion exams.
Many flood-ravaged schools remain
closed.
Most New Orleans schools per-
formed poorly long before Katrina,
and the school system was riddled-
with corruption, mismanagement and
poor bookkeeping.


Sound familiar?
Nationally, nearly 40 percent of
high school seniors score below the
basic level on national math tests.
More than a quarter of seniors fail to
reach the basic level on the reading
test.
Three decades ago, the U.S. had 30
percent of the world's population of
college students. That has fallen to 14
percent
'"A strong school system is providing
a variety of community functions that
are primarily unseen," said Phil
Schlechty, a leading advocate of
school reform. "In New Orleans,
where the schools are not a part of the
community, they couldn't even get the
buses out of the parking lots."
It's a crime
Military police in their Humvees
still patrol New Orleans streets,
where the murder rate has doubled,
the number of police has declined
and crime suspects walk free because
of a legal system that was at the brink
of collapse before Katrina.
Nationally, a lull in violent crime
has come to an abrupt halt. The mur-
der rate jumped by more than.10 per-
cent in large cities since 2004.
Robberies also spiked, as did felony
assaults and attacks with guns.
Who's in charge?
Nobody At least that's the prevail-
ing view of most Americans.
Katrina showed governments fail-
ing to prevent a crisis, moving slug-
gishly to respond to it and refusing to
be accountable. Charities, churches
and other institutions couldn't fill the
vacuum.
We live in an era of failed leader-
ship. Corrupt and incompetent politi-
cians. Thieving CEOs. Priests as
pedophiles. Media monopolies. A
president's unpopular, intractable
war. Steroid-enhanced sluggers.
Where have you gone, Joe
DiMaggio? Or Harry Truman?
A recent Gallup Poll shows that the
public is losing confidence with the
institutions that make up the fragile
fabric of society. The military, police,
churches, banks, the U.S. Supreme
Court, public .schools, the medical sys-
tem, the presidency, TV news, news-
papers, the criminal justice system,
organized labor and Congress - all
lost ground from 2006 to 2007 in terms
of the public's confidence.
More than 7 of 10 Americans think
their country is headed in the wrong
direction.
Katrina is old news, right? New
Orleans - who cares?
You should.


Ron Fournier, formerly the nation-
al political writer at The Associated
Press, is editor-in-chief of HOT
SOUP.com, an online community of
people who influence other people.


"- .- - - z - -'-






Associated Press
An excavator works Wednesday, the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, to clear the debris of a hurricane-damaged
home that was demolished in the Lakeview section of New Orleans.


HOMELESS
Continued from Page 1C

providing a profit. If they were
educated and properly treated
in these facilities, then surely
they could give back to the
community and workforce.
The solution to this problem
is to raise the taxes on the ciga-
rettes from 25 percent to 40
percent of the sale price. With
this increase, we would be able
to more effectively treat and


rehabilitate the homeless pop-
ulation of Florida. The tax
would bring in an estimated
$720.5 million a year. That's
$48,033,333 annually, and
$4,002,777 per month per dis-
trict These funds will be given
to each of the districts in
Florida and distributed by the
local government.
We felt that the local govern-
ments would be able to more
efficiently distribute the funds
in their community. These funds
will have some requirements,
though. They must first be used


for homelessness and given to
local shelters. These funds must
go to development of the shelter,
health care, education, rehabili-
tation programs and govern-
ment jobs. We want the local
governments to establish reme-
dial jobs like basic road cleanup
and construction or service jobs.
We feel that if they are having
trouble finding a job in the pri-
vate sector, then the government
needs to offer some basic jobs
that the homeless can do and
begin rebuilding their lives.
The homeless shelters also


must make sure that their
clients are looking for jobs or
getting an education during
their stay at the shelter, or else
they may lose funds. Local and
state governments are going to
have to distribute and regulate
the funds for this program. The
local groups like the homeless
coalition and local shelters
must coordinate with their
local governments in distribut-
ing and regulating the funds.
The taxpayers will be the
largest supporters of our pro-
gram, since they will be fund-


ing'it for us. Since the number
of cigarette smokers is declin-
ing, we have established a
backup plan. We will establish
a system where the people col-
lect aluminum products and
trade them in for cash or cred-
it for the homeless program.
In the public school system,
we will set up stations where
students can turn in the tabs on
the top of soda cans. It will be
recommended that the school
also have a place to recycle the
whole can, but it will not be
mandated. We hope that this


will help increase the recycling
rate and create a closer knit
community. This also gives the
homeless more of a chance to
help themselves out. Counting
of the tabs will be done by vol-
unteers in exchange for com-
munity service hours.


Lou Frey Jr. is a political
analyst, commentator and
newspaper columnist and for-
mer Florida rep-resentative in
Congress. Send e-mail to
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBi.-iz 2, 2007 3C


COMMENTARY









4C SuNDAY SFPTEMBIR 2. 2007 COMMENTARY C riws CouNn' (FL) CHRONICLE


New taxes are all about the money


A ll property owners
recently received a list
of proposed taxes to be
paid this year to the county.
Compared with the taxes
demanded just a few years ago,
these new taxes shock the con-
science! The dramatic rise in
home prices in the county,
which began in 2002 and ended
in 2005 enabled the county to
appraise all of our homes at a
much higher rate. The huge
increase in the tax base result-
ed in money flooding into coun-
ty coffers with no increase in
the millage rates. Where did all
that money go? What did we,
the taxpayers, get for that
money?
Did we get more government
services? Or were the services
provided in a better and more
efficient manner? I know "we"
got some new office space and


Negating glory 0
You know, it's unfor-
tunate that Gen. Peter
Pace has pretty much
wiped out all his
accomplishments by. f
his sucking up to the
present administra-
tion and Rumsfeld. cAn
Only now, when he is 563
not going to be reap- 563'
pointed chief of staff,
is he beginning to
speak out with the truth of his
opinions on what's happening
in Iraq. That pretty well
negates all his glorious accom-
plishments, as far as I'm con-
cerned.
Time to react
Just read Sunday's Chronicle.
You must be joking. Dawsy
bought a $2 million-plus heli-
copter? We have that bad of
problems here in Citrus
County? Fisher accuses and
fires Tom because he was
drunk and yet she doesn't go
and check it? And what? The





THEML ISPATC~H. 2 "7














EE

A I


.(


the sheriff's office
bought more equip-
ment to keep us safe '
from a crime wave,
which might arise in
this sedate retire-
ment community. We
did pay dearly for
advice from consult-
ants to help the coun- Willia
ty collect more rev- Willia
enues from entrepre- OTI
neurs and new home VOI
builders in the form
of impact fees. (Impact fees
slow economic growth in the
county, but we did give money
to an economic development
committee to try to induce
more entrepreneurs and busi-
nesses to locate in the county!)
Still, I have a time trying to
determine who gained from
the increased tax revenues and
how much might have been

j FBI and the CIA came
down and checked up
on a homeless men-
tally retarded man
because - and he's
in a free country - he
said he was going to
kill the president? I
s respect the presiden-
cy, but come on now.
)579 nWhat is important
0579 here? They're destroy-
ing Citrus County.
You're paying all this money.
You're allowing the parkway to
come in. You're putting the
nature, trail, the rails to trails,
and-you're bringing in prob-
lems. And now the sheriff is
spending $2 million on a heli-
copter? Oh, please. Come on.
No wonder our taxes are going
up and the illegals are coming
in and we're not doing any-
thing. Help! Where's the FBI
and the CIA?
Talk to neighbor
To the person who called
about loose dogs: Why don't
you talk to your neighbor? That


I
Lm
I.
14


spent needlessly
Benefits might
have gone to some
county employees
who received wage
increases beyond
what comparable
private employees
received this year
and to those who
Dixon were hired for new
HER positions. To be fair,
CES employee wages
ought to keep up
with inflation. But any wage
increases beyond that percent-
age ought to reflect increased
productivity or increased value
to the employer based on expe-
rience and time in grade. Not
so for government employees.
The Chronicle just published
proposed raises for county
schools employees averaging 5
percent to 7 percent across the

way maybe you can help out.
Might be better if you just
spoke with them. Try that first.
Call daily meeting
The issue: county commis-
sion meetings. My opinion is
that they should meet every
day, with the money they earn
or are paid.
Poll workers
Many people will run away
from being poll workers when
they put in that you had to have
computer knowledge and put
some of the stuff in on com-
puters. Otherwise they were
getting a lot of poll workers.
More heinous
This is in regard to "War is
nasty," a Sound Off on Aug.
25. The caller's talking about
civilians die in war, and the
problem with the civilians
dying in a war. It's a war that
didn't need to be waged and
was completely unnecessary,
which makes the killing of civil-
ians even more heinous.


board, while the inflation rate
has averaged 2 percent to 3
percent for the past several
years. I don't know the details,
but it makes me wonder.
The problem of "wage
creep" and waste is inherent
in any organization that
receives income via grants or
has taxing authority and is
"nonprofit." So long as the
money is available, there is no
incentive and no will to make
the hard decisions about hold-
ing the line on salaries and
avoiding wasteful spending.
Simply speaking, these organi-
zations are spending someone
else's money, not their own.
There is no financial disci-
pline, no "bottom line" against
which they must measure their
performance. So they spend
and waste whatever revenues
they receive and always ask for


more. Across America, most
county, state and federal gov-
ernments reflect this sort of
behavior.
Any attempt to right this situ-
ation faces an uphill battle and
a stacked deck. The unions
representing state and federal
employees and the teachers
union wield enormous political
clout. They leave little room for
reductions in staff positions,
changes in job descriptions
and anything less than "across
the board" wage increases.
Politicians at all levels have
pet projects and favors to deliv-
er to friends and supporters
and no incentive not to spend. I
have little doubt that, given a
free hand, any good adminis-
trator could easily reduce this
year's county spending plan by
5 percent or more without cut-
ting "vital services."


Best we can do, as concerned
taxpayers, is tell our county
commissioners and elected
constitutional officers that
spending is getting out of con-
trol and that we have reached
the point where we refuse to be
taxed at ever-higher rates.
Apparently, of late, many of us
have done just that.


Dr. William Dixon is an
Inverness resident and retired
surgeon. He earned his M.D.
degree from New York
Medical College, an MBA from
University of South Florida
and his bachelor's from
Columbia College. He served
11 years in the U.S. Army,
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. He can be
e-mailed at dixonbill
@chronicleonline.com.


.to the Editor


Watering conflict
After reading the editorial
regarding water conservation, I
feel compelled to comment as
a resident of Sugarmill Woods
Oak Village. (I noticed that
Pine Ridge, Citrus Springs and
Sugarmill Woods have not
taken water conservation seri-
ously Does this mean that
everyone else has? Like Black
Diamond, etc.?)
This issue is not new and I
agree that some action must be
taken to protect our water sup-
ply. Enforcement is absolutely
necessary and there should be
an enforcement officer who
has the power to issue warn-
ings and fines for those who
choose to abuse the guidelines
(and those guidelines should
be per household and include
a reasonable amount of water
to maintain lawns as required


by legal deed restrictions).
Sugarmill Woods Country
Club is allowed to pump 1.1
million gallons a month. Does
anyone follow up on this
usage? Is this included in our
permit guidelines?
Public officials are quick to
protect the rights of an individ-
ual developer/property owner
without consideration of the
right of citizens to have confi-
dence that they will continue to
have water available for exist-
ing needs. Does the right of one
outweigh the rights of all?
And what about all these pri-
vate wells? How will they be
monitored? Does this mean
that if we all install a private
well, we will be OK with the
guidelines on pumping with
SFWMD? And how the heck
will this improve conservation?
Consideration must be given


to residents who have to com-
ply with deed restrictions
regarding lawns. We are
between a rock and a hard
place when it comes to water
usage as can be seen in our
proposed deed restrictions.
Alfred R. St. Jean
Sugarmill Woods,

Milestone year
On Aug. 18, the Citrus
Springs Community Center
hosted its fifth anniversary.
The community center has
come a long way in those five
years, along with some nice
improvements.
I want to thank the citizens
of Citrus Springs who con-
tributed so much money
toward our signature place.
Richard L. Hamel'
Citrus Springs-


WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

maneuver until my right front
tire touched the curb and
immediately exploded.
In Ireland, they apparently
make their curbs out of a lime-
stone that has a sharpened
edge. If you just bump it, your
tire is rendered useless. The
edge sharpening is sponsored
by the Irish Tire Manufactur-
ers Association.
Some very helpful Irish lads
were on hand right after my
mishap to point their fingers
and say "Ha! Another stupid
American."
It's a great country where
the 12-year-olds drink
Guinness with lunch.



'TARGET
Continued from Page 1C

The editorial really got me to
thinking. I'm not sure how I
feel about an editorial position
that encourages a man to will-
ingly accept death.
In one way, it does seem like
the easy stand to take. You're
not going to find many people
in Citrus County who don't
think Couey deserves to die for
murdering a little girl. I'm
:morally opposed to the death
penalty, but even I won't go
-against that grain. Some peo-


On that same day, in the pic-
turesque city of Kenmare, I
managed a little fender-ben-
der in a parking lot during a
rainstorm. While you drive on
the left-hand side of the road
in Ireland, their parking lots
are just like any Kmart shop-
ping center at Christmas time.
It's every man for himself.
There was group of boys on
bikes nearby and they
watched the incident with
knowing smirks.
Later that week, I was
attempting to be a nice guy
and go fetch the car during a
rainstorm. Our group was lis-
tening to music in one of the
pubs and I didn't want to make
them get wet going to the car.
So I got in my vehicle and
pulled out into the Main
Street of the same Glengarriff


ple in this world - Couey, Ted
Bundy, Aileen Wuornos -
deserve the ultimate punish-
ment for their crimes.
So in that respect, the edito-
rial does reflect the outrage of
the community.
But the editorial goes fur-
ther. It wants Couey to accept
responsibility for his crime and
not blame it on his childhood
or circumstances of the day In
other words, Couey should say
he's sorry for what he did.
Maybe one day Couey will do
that. But then what?
Will Mark Lunsford, Jessica's
father, forgive him? Would I do
that under the same circum-


when a motorist in front of me
started to back up. I started to
back up to avoid the oncoming
vehicle and banged on my
horn.
The problem with Irish
vehicles is that none of the
mirrors are in the right place.
Foreign motorists always look
above their right shoulders to
see what's behind them. In
Ireland the rearview mirror is
really to your left.
So I saw nothing in my
rearview mirror as I backed
up in the rainstorm because
the rearview mirror wasn't
where it was supposed to be.
In fact, there was no mirror, so
I didn't see the big traffic sign
that somehow jumped out and
got behind my car.
I banged the pole and man-
aged to break one of the lights.


stances? My daughter, Erin,
was also 9 when Couey killed
Jessica. Don't believe for a
moment I haven't thought
about that How would I, as a
death penalty opponent, feel if
someone did to my child what
Couey did to Mark Lunsford's?
Would I cry out for blood or
would I forgive? God willing, I
won't have to make that choice.
As a community, we are sad-
dened and outraged by what
happened to this small child.
We are appalled that Couey has
the audacity to suggest some-
thing good happened from his
brutal act.
But here's the thing: Only


The dent - in my opinion -
was only minor.
As I got out of the car into
the rain to inspect the dam-
age, the same Guinness-
inspired 12-year-olds miracu-
lously appeared to point and
say "Ha! Another stupid
American."
"No," I replied, "I'm the
same stupid American from
yesterday."
The very next day, I took a
full carload of relatives on a
ride around the Ring of Kerry
when we pulled into the pic-
turesque town of Waterville.
Daughter Jessica pointed out
a restaurant and gave the
command to stop.
Did I mention that it was
raining?
I immediately pulled into a
parking spot, hit the curb and


three people in Citrus County
truly have the right to demand
Couey's life: Jessie's father and
her grandparents, Archie and
Ruth Lunsford. They are the
ones whose grief is closest to
the heart, closest to the soul.
I realize that doesn't make
me a popular fellow because
the popular choice is to
demand justice and in this
case, justice is the needle. The
truth is, though, that it's really
none of my business. Nor is it
yours, unless your last name is
Lunsford.
The death penalty causes me
concern because it turns the
public into blood-thirsty


heard a loud bang.
Yet another tire fell victim
to the fine work of the Irish
Tire Manufacturers
Association curb-sharpening
program. And you guessed it,
when I got out of the car to
examine my handiwork, there
was a very similar looking
group of fine Irish lads riding
their bikes, pointing at me
with glee and saying "Ha!
Another stupid American."
I felt like I spent more time
on my vacation looking under-
neath my rental car than I did
looking at the beautiful
scenery.
When we finally arrived
back at Tampa International
Airport after a full 24 hours of
traveling, we took our little
bus to the long-term parking
lot. It was midnight when we


killers, yet at an arm's length.
We, hopefully, will never know
or even understand the pain
that Mark Lunsford feels every
day that his daughter is not
alive. We cannot imagine what
these last few years have been
like for him, dealing with such
a public tragedy
Yet we scream for death as if
it really counts.
Whether Lunsford feels any
sense of inner peace when
Couey finally dies is between
Lunsford and God - and no
one else.
We watch this tragedy on the
evening news or read about it
in the newspaper, then go


took the elevator to the top-
floor of the parking garage.
and lugged our bags over to,
my car.
And sure enough, there wasg
my fine American car, with
the steering wheel on the side
where it belongs.
The only problem was that
the car had a flat tire.
I looked behind me expect-
ing to see a group of 12-year-
olds on bikes.
But my wife and I were
alone. At midnight. In the:
dark. With a flat tire.
Did I mention it was about
to rain?

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


about our lives mowing the
lawn or going to the grocery
store. Mark Lunsford and his
parents live it every day
Couey's death won't change
that. But if it's what Mark
Lunsford wants, he deserves
that right
For the sake of hi� little
Jessie, he definitely deserves
that right

Mike Wright is a senior
reporter and assistant editor
for the Citrus County
Chronicle. He can be reached
at 563-3228; or wright
@chronicleonline. com.


O'nals CouNvy (FI) CHRONICLE


4CSUNDAY, SEPTFMBFR 2, 2007


m W ........ .......... 7


COMMENTARY










~LfThA1~NTVA flY SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007 5C


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE_


Spending gas tax
This is for the "Shoddy work
again" caller and everybody
else who complains about the
highway and the 6-cent gas tax
to pay for repair of
the highway: Well, S
(U.S.) 19 is not a s
county road - the
state does that. That
(U.S.) 19 is a state
road. The state takes
care of that road. I
Your 6-cent tax that
you pay for your gas
in Citrus County does CAL--
not go toward that, 563
but you've got to 563
question where does
our 6-cent (tax) go?
It's not on (U.S.) 19, because
that is a state road.
Helicopter limits
Just in reference to your
front-page headline on
Sunday's Chronicle, Aug. 26 ...
The county can't afford any-
thing, but yet they can get a
$2.4 million helicopter. Isn't
that something? They can't
even chase speeders on
Dunklin and they can't even
chase speeders on Citrus
Springs Boulevard, but give
them a new helicopter? Get
real.
Seeking puppies


.4


. I'm looking for a couple of
free puppies. So if anyone has
any puppies, please call the
paper and maybe they can let
me know.
Editor's note: Please don't call
Sound Off about puppies,
because phone numbers should
not be published in this column.


Please look in the Chronicle's
classified advertising. Category
020 lists free offers, including
pets to good homes. Citrus
County Animal Shelter and the
county's many animal charities
always have puppies for
I a fee to-cover necessary
inoculations. Free pup-
pies also are available
at flea markets. No pets
are completely "free."
You must have your
pets spayed or
neutered, given rabies
shots and licensed.
Turn lights on
0579 How come when it's
raining, no one ever
turns their lights on
anymore? You could have a
downpour and every car that
you pass, you can't even see
them because their lights
aren't on. I think people should
turn their lights on when it
rains. If they don't, they should
lose their license.
Dried-up pond
Just finished reading the
Sunday paper and Charlie
Brennan's article about the
four-wheeling. I live in Floral
City; got a small dried-up pond
across the street from me. I
wonder if he can hear these
people. There have been eight
trucks in there since about 8
o'clock this morning. It's about
5:30 now. I don't know. Think
law enforcement around here
might find something they
could do about that. Or do they
have to have a helicopter or
something to do that? And it's
daytime, so no one needs that I
guess. You know, whatever.


City hall space
What is the nice, new big city
hall that we built in the middle
of town used for? Couldn't our
supervisor of elections find a
little space in there so we don't
have to read about her prob-
lems every day?
Long wait at red
We need the light fixed across
from the airport. You sit with


the red light with nobody com- thing. But there are still people
ing. Please, somebody fix it. who, no matter what, they're
Save water going to do what they want,
when they want and nobody's
I don't think that many of going to stop them.


the people in Citrus County
understand how important it is
to conserve water. Whether it's
well water or water provided by
the utility company, it's still
water. If they could enforce the
rules and regulations, it's one


Gaffs stolen
This is to the one I want to
thank for stealing two gaffs out
of my boat in the front yard: I
hope the crack you buy gets
you down and I hope you gaff


a kingfish and he turns around
and bites you.
Right to resign
In the defense of Alberto
Gonzales, I would like to say
he finally did one thing right in
his administration: He
resigned. I wish the president
and the vice president would
follow him right on out of
office.


Sertoma 50s and
60s Sock Hop


Sell Your Own
Treasures

Veterans Golf
Tournament


9 10 11 12 13 14 ,15
Playhouse 19 Save Our Waters AKC
Playhouse 19- Week Begins
Threepenny Opera Week Begins Responsible Dog
CCH Fundraising Ownership Day
Banquet Playhouse 19 -
Playhouse 19 - Threepenny Opera
Threepenny Opera


16


Playhouse 19 - Three
Penny Opera


* Citrus Springs Concert Series -
* Playhouse 19-Assassins
* Salute to our Community
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Manatee Festival
* Sports/Celebrity Auction/Dinner Dance
* Flanagan Memorial Golf Tournament
* Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
* Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade
* CFCC Performing Arts -Mac Frampton
* Cattle Barons' Ball
* West Citrus Elks Parade of Fashions
* Tractor Pull & Show
* ACT - Pygmalion
* Parade of Fashions
* Galaxy of Stars
* Gulf-Island Theater-Knock Em Dead


* ACT - Pygmalion
* Altrusa Monte Carlo Night
* Junior Achievement Bowl-a-thon
* Crusin' At The Hop
* Light Shine-A Social History of Florida
* Fitness in Citrus begins
* Citrus County Jazz Society Jam
* NAMI - Walk of Hope
* Citrus Springs Conceit Series -Rich Natole
* Barbershoppers Singing Valentines
* CFCC Performing Arts-
* Playhouse 19 - Assassins
* Beverly Hills International Festival
* Celebration Fashion Show
*'School'astic Golf Tournamnet
* CCBA Parade of Homes
* Grand Ole Opry
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* African-American History Month
* Spring Fling
* Savor The Art
* GCUSBCA Women's Bowling


* Playhouse 19 - Songs for a New World
* Strawberry Festival
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* WCE Card Party
* CR Historic Home Tours
* Citrus County Jazz Society Jam
* Fourth Annual Car & Truck Show
* Italian Street Festival
* Steak & Steak
* Charity Ball
* Irish Variety Show
* CFCC Performing Arts
* Plant & Garden Expo
* Citrus Memorial Health Systems Salute to
Our Community
* CS Concert Series


18


19


Srashioun uare
* Homosassa Rotary - New Odyssey
" St. Pat's Golf Tournament
* Citrus County Fair
* Crazy For Quilting
* Mickey Finn Show
* Fort Cooper Days
* Springs Fashion Show
* Luminary Art Night
* Corvettes In The Sunshine
* Walk For Life
* Marble Expo
* Captivating Styles
* Clean Air Ride
* Wood Wind & Water
* SCORE Golf Classic
* ACT - Wife Begins at Forty
* Fitness in Citrus
* Inverness Relay For Life
* United Way Awards Luncheon
* Power Boat Races
* Black Tie & Blue Jeans
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Citrus Community Concert Choir
* Sugamill Chorale Concert


* Power Boat Races
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Citrus Community Concert Choir
* Engaging Mature Workers Week
* Friends of the Library Book Sale
* Swing For A Cure
* Christians United In Christ Golf
* Citrus Springs Concert Series
* Dinner and a Song
* Nature Coast Dog Walk
* Zeke Lapinski Golf Tournament
* Playhouse 19 - Proof
* Market Days and Garden Show
* Run With The Mayor
* Am Irish Club Golf Tournament
* Friends of Dunnellon Library Book Sale
* Bowl For Kids Sake
* Me and My SK8 Contest
* Week of the Young Child
* Citrus County Bass Challenge


* Superintendent's Golf
* Volunteer Fair
* Earth Day Bird-A-Thon
* ACT- Curtain Up On Murder
* Car Wash and Bazaar
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Swing Into Spring
* CCBA Fishing Tournament
* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Central Ridge Relay For Life


20


Manatee Master
Golf Tournament
Playhouse 19 -
Threepenny Opera


21


ACT-The Mouse
Trap
Playhouse 19 -
Threepenny Opera


-. I.


* Panther Golf Tournament
* Casting For Kids
* Goods and Services Dinner/Auction
* Citrus County Bass Challenge
* Playhouse 19 - Godspell
* Nereids Cards & Games Party
* Cool Springs Ranch Balloon Classic
* Sheriff's Summer Safety Expo
* Gospel Jubilee
* Greater Gas Association Fishing Tourn.
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* Informational Fiesta
* Flag Day
* A Day of Fine Arts
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Rotoract Kickball Tournament
* Swing With The Breez
* Mother's Tea
* ACT - Curtain Up On Murder
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
Citrus Memorial Ball
* Spring Greek Festival
* Fly-In
* LHS Project Graduation
* CHS Project Graduation
* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Comedy Show


* Hurricane/Disaster Expo
* Fiesta Tropicale
* An Affair To Remember
* Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
* Homosassa Fireworks Show
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Hernando Heritage Yard Sale
* Gulf Island Civic Theater-Look, No Hans
* Rolling Thunder Golf Tournament
* ACT- Music Man


* Patriotic Evening
* See It My Way Exhibit
* Crystal River Fireworks
* ACT- Music Man
* Run For The Money Auction
* Key Run For the Money
* Key Center Telethon
* Boys & Girls Club Car Raffle Drawing
* Stuff The Bus
* Citrus Community Concert Choir


* Stuff The Bus
* Kids Take Me Fishing Clinic
* Business Women's Luncheon
* Ovarian Cancer 5K Run
* CRHS Pirates Golf Tournament
* United Way Kickoff
* Back To School Workshop


Big Yard
22 Sale
ACT-The Mouse Trap
Sunset Festival
Christmas in Sept.
Spanish Amer. Golf
What A Day To Be A Scout
Threepenny Opera


September 8
.. , Hernando United
" 'I Methodist Church

" 2125 E.Norvel BryantHwy.
8 a.m. to 2 p.m.


CnI~oNIaE


* Senior Foundation Devil Rays Trip
* Citrus Radiology Golf Tournament
* Gulf Island Theater - One Hundred Years
* CHS Reunion


* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Sell Your Own Treasures
* Veterans Golf Tournament
* Save our Waters Week
* CCH Annual Fundraiser Banquet
* AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day
* Manatee Masters Golf Tournament
* Sertoma Sock Hop
* ACT- The Mouse Trap
* Sunset Festival
* Playhouse 19 - Threepenny Opera
* Spanish American Golf Tournament
* What A Day To Be A Scout!
* Beat The Sheriff 5K Run
* Christmas in September
* Sweet Adelines Beyond The Music
* Senior Foundation Devil Rays Trip
* Knights of Columbus Card Party
* German Club Oktoberfest
* Women's Health & Fitness Expo
. Big Yard Sale
* E-Nini-Hassee Spaghetti Dinner
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog


* ACT- The Mouse Trap
* Rails to Trails Bike Ride
* Playhouse 19 - Three Penny Opera
* West Citrus Elks Annual Card Party
Realtors Benefit Golf Tournament
Night of the Heron
* Arts De Fall
* Knights of Coumbus Craft Fair
* West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Sertoma Oktoberfest
* Day of Caring/Make a Difference Day
* Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
* St. Scholastica Men's Club Craft Show
* ACT-The Mouse Trap
* E-Nini-Hassee Pumkin Patch
* Columbus Day Memorial Service
* National Wildlife Refuge Week
* Southwest Regional Chili Cook Off
* CCBA Parade of Homes
* Nature Coast Fine Arts Show
* 2007-2008 Jazz Concert Series
* Artisans Boutique
* Cattle Drive
* Taste of Citrus
* CRWC Arts and Crafts Festival
* Great American Cooter Fest
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Cooterween
* Cooter Triathalon


Reserve your spot for $5
"A Flea Market with a
Carnival Atmosphere"
SChild iD's - Food Music -Prizes


For more information call 726-7245 or 726-0135








* Playhouse 19 - Rumors
* WomHealthy Living Fair
* Dodge For Dollars
* FesACTival of the Gingerbread Lady
SCMH Concert Series - One-Man Variety
St. Scholastica CCW Fall Fashion Show
* CCBA Home and Outdoors Show
* Women of Sugarmill Fashion Show
SFestival of the Arts
* St. Scholastica Golf
* Continuity of Care Wine Auction
* Veterans Fair
* Homosassa Lions Christmas Square
* Rotary Radio/TV Auction
* Knights of Columbus Nickle Social
* Citrus Springs Concert Series
- Veterans Day ParadelMemorial Service
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Homosassa Book Sale
* Humane Society Ride For Rescue
* Caruth Camp Challenge
* Citrus Stampede Rodeo
* Parade of Trees
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
* Winter Wonderland Craft Show
* Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
* West Citrus Elks Annual Craft Show
* Dunnellon Library Book Sale


* CMH Concert Series-The Amazing Crooner
* CRWC Silver BElls
* Floral City Heritage Days
* Playhouse 19 - Rumors
* CCCC Handels' Messiah
* Father Christmas Ball
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* CFCC Performing Arts
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* BH Holiday Parade
* Sugarmill Chorale Concert
* Playhouse 19 - Variety
* Celebration of Lights
* Chronicle/Pines Tennis Tournament
* Country Rocks the Canyon
* Inverness Christmas Parade
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Beverly Hills Parade
* Citrus Springs Parade
* Homosassa Boat Parade
* Night of Lights


3


17


SUNDAY, SFPTEM13FR 2, 2007 SC


COMMENTARY









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OWN FOR OR LEASE FOR
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* B


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CHAMBER CONNECTION 2D
'BANK RATE CHART 4D
BUSINESS DIGEST 5D
CLASSIFlEDS 6D


D
SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Homeowner nightmare


Stephanie Nelson
COUPON
MOM


If you've been grocery shop-
ping lately, you've probably
noticed that prices are rising.
In fact, the Labor Department
reported in July that U.S. food
prices rose by 4.2 percent during
the last 12 months ending in July
The prices of all goods and servic-
es rose an average of only 2.4 per-


cent during the same time frame.
The price of milk, eggs and other
basic items actually rose by dou-
ble digits, pushing the average
increase higher.
For example, according to the
report, the price of eggs went up
by 33.7 percent, whole milk was
up by 31.1 percent and navel


oranges were up by 13.6 percent.
Other dramatic increases includ-
ed fresh chicken up by 8.4 per-
cent, apples up by 8.7 percent and
dried beans up by 11.5 percent.
Experts report that the price
increases are partly due to the
congressional mandates to
increase ethanol production. This


JOHN RAOUX/Associated Press


Gwendolyn Walkley stands on the balcony of her condominium Aug. 16 in Daytona Beach Shores.

Mortgage crunch impact spreading far and wide, leaving many on


; -.' C. CARPENTER
AND J.W. ELPHINSTONE
Associated Press
The walls are bare, the closets are
empty, and Connie and Timothy Pent
and their two teenage children are
living out of boxes as they wait for a
dreaded knock at the door of their
three-bedroom house in Ocala.
They've fallen behind in payments
on their home loan, and their lender
told them in July that foreclosure was
imminent.
"We thought we were fine," said
Connie regretfully "You never know."
An increasing number of homeown-
ers and prospective homeowners are
getting caught up Nearly $1
in the fast-spread-
ing mortgage crisis worth of 1
that is claiming vic-
tims from all traditional
income levels and
demographic rate mortg
groups. Like the
Pents, many are originated I
trying desperately
to get their loan 2006, while
terms reworked
but are finding it's billion of ir
not possible in a ARMs wer
tightened market.
For five years, that D(
the housing boom
put money in the
pockets of lenders, brokers, Realtors
and investors, and granted easy mort-
gages to homeowners with both good
and blemished credit. But as home
prices decline and interest rates


1
h

I


l

e
ei
I,
E


Hor
fi
the
to in
or

sal
origin


shaky ground


nebuyers borrow Borrowers Lenders Borrowers Lenders Investors
rom lenders who Obtain Loan Hold mortgag- Can't make Don't have Pull money
n sell mortgages home loans, money and es or sell them their loan money out of
vestors as bonds and agree collect to Wall Street payment from mortgage
other securities, to pay payments where they're because investors to market
Cash from these interest and interest sold as securi- interest rates fund new
es helps lenders ties increased mortgages
ie tanq more loans SOUR(CE Fredde PMaC AIA


climb, the cracks in the housing mar-
ket's foundation are widening.
Exotic mortgages, once hailed for
12 trillion helping to increase
U.S. homeowner-
ybrid and ship to its highest
level at 68.9 per-
adjustable- cent, have become
the undoing of an
ages were entire industry
and, most heart-
1 2005 and wrenching, mil-
- lions of homeown-
e $779.13 ers.
erest-only Loans with
terest-ony adjustable rates,
D issued in payment choices
and loose require-
riod ments have
od ..trapped borrowers
in too-high pay-
ments with few options for escape.
Some have taken on second and third
jobs, depleted savings, retirement
and college funds and wrestled with
lenders to stave off foreclosure. Those


who fail see their homes sell to the
highest bidder at an auction.
"The increasing availability of
mortgages has been an important and
positive long-term trend," said Doug
Elmendorf, a Brookings Institution
economist. "But like many positive
developments, this one was taken to
an unjustifiable extreme."
Many of the victims are subprime
borrowers - those like the Pents who
don't qualify for market interest rates
because of blemishes on their credit
record. The Center for Responsible
Lending estimates that 2.2 million
subprime home loans made in recent
years have or soon will end in fore-
closure.
But there are many other ways to be
hurt in the mortgage crunch.
Many prospective homebuyers,
through little fault of their own, are
having trouble getting mortgages
because of the changing market.
Others were sold on too much
house, piled up huge ,loans based on


the inflated value of their property,
and didn't fully understand the inter-
est rates they would have to pay Now,
they are struggling to keep up with
the payments.
The bloodletting won't slow any-
time soon as more of these exotic
loans reach the tipping point in the
next year.
Nearly $1.12 trillion worth of hybrid
and traditional adjustable-rate mort-
gages were originated in 2005 and
2006, while $779.13 billion of interest-
only ARMs were issued in that period,
according to a survey from the
Mortgage Bankers Association.
Many of these loans offered low
"teaser" interest rates that will reset
through 2009, slamming borrowers
with higher: rates that could send
them into delinquency if they can't
refinance.
Attempts to rework troubled loans
will become increasingly common as
Please see ' . /Page 4D


Cable company has no plans to retire analog


ROB PEGORARO
The Washington Post
Q. Comcast sent me a mailing telling
'me to trade in my analog cable box for
a digital box. But I don't want to pay
extra for digital, and I thought Comcast
"had said it still supports analog TVs.
A. The Comcast fliers forwarded by
this resident do, indeed, read as if ana-
,log service is ending. But Comcast
:spokeswoman Lisa Altman wrote earli-
ler this month that the company is only


Help FILE


retiring analog cable boxes, not analog
service itself.
Anybody with a cable-ready TV or
VCR, she said, should still be able to
plug it into the thick "coax" cable that
would otherwise connect to a cable
box.
Opting out of digital-cable service
(which, just to make things even more
confusing, is not the same as the digital
technology behind high-definition tele-


vision) does mean giving up such con-
venience as an on-screen programming
guide that you can navigate with a
remote control.
But plain old analog cable service is
a lot cheaper - and if you can tune into
it without putting a clunky cable box on
top of the TV, so much the better.
. Q. You said the AOL Service
Assistant program would copy my AOL
address book and e-mail into my Mac's


built-in software. But when I ran that
software, it said my copy had expired.
A. AOL spokesman Derick Mains
blamed the error message on a techni-
cal glitch that he said would be cor-
rected within a day - which it was.
But this episode should be a
reminder to AOL users that as long as
their data are stuck inside that ser-
vice's proprietary software, they don't
own it. Use this program
(discover.aol.com/downloads) to solve
that problem for good.


has reduced the amount of corn
available for animal feed which
has effectively doubled the price
of corn as compared to two years
ago.
None of these factors is likely to
change anytime soon, so we can
Please see MOM/Page 4D


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Rules of


the game


have


changed
DEAR BRUCE: I am
retired, and my hus-
band will retire in the
next three years. He has a
401(k) with $120,000, and I have
a 403(b) worth $140,000, mostly
in stock. We each have $30,000
in separate Roth IRAs. We'd
like to put off drawing from
these funds as long as possible
to ensure enough money for
retirement. Our home has
increased in value. We now
have $230,000 in equity, and
the home will be paid off in
seven years. We would like to
supplement our Social
Security and have some avail-
able money for an occasional
trip and will shortly need a
new car. We've been told it
would be better to refinance
the house to fund such pur-
chases and invest the balance
safely The financial adviser
pointed out that we could have
the money now instead of wait-
ing until we sell. What do you
think? -J.F., via e-mail
DEAR J.F.: Even though this
letter was written just a short
Time ago, things have changed
radically While the idea of
refinancing sometimes makes
sense, refinancing for an occa-
sional trip, in my opinion,
makes no sense. Getting a sec-
ond mortgage for a car - not a
refinance - makes more
sense, because you would like-
ly give up a low interest rate
and the interest on a second
mortgage would be tax-
deductible. You have to figure
the cost of the money versus
the teaser rates that many of
the manufacturers offer.
Today, all bets are off. The
interest rates are rising, and
only the most creditworthy will
be allowed to borrow against
their houses in the immediate
future. Until the dust settles,
tread very carefully.
You also mention you have
$230,000 in home equity; this
may have changed dramatical-
ly downward, albeit temporar-
ily Until you sell, you've lost
nothing.
DEAR BRUCE: A friend of
mine has a double-wide
mobile home, with a perma-
nent foundation on four acres
of land. She would like to refi-
nance and get the cash out
Can you help? - D.S., via e-
mail
DEAR D.S.: I am answering
a number of letters such as
yours to reinforce the obvious
fact that the rules have
changed. The notion of "cash-
ing out" on a "re-fl" to finance
other things has been pushed.
Irresponsible lenders and irre-
sponsible borrowers are now
paying the piper. It's unlikely a
"re-fi" on the double-wide is
going to happen. You didn't say
why she wants the money, but
it's usually not for good rea-
sons.
DEAR BRUCE: Over the
past few months, my husband
and I were dealt a blow when
he lost his job and, because of
denial of unemployment bene-
fits, we had no choice but to
pay the mortgage with cash
advances through credit cards.
Our debt is $50,000. We just
refinanced our home in
November 2006, so we can't
consider a debt consolidation.
Do you have any suggestions
(we won't consider bankruptcy,
nor can we borrow from family
members) on how we can intel-
ligently handle this situation
and get back on the road to
Please see MONEY/Page 5D


k Beware: Higher prices come in smaller packages


III Id~u I I l(_t lllt1 1i la.


bj -i IL~r_. i irea iie iqac:


SS'










21D

SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


[hAmber


* . . * . ,:^ .\ .. -: .. .
. " ?? : -: . .


Connection


Chamber, EDC


plan event


Annual appreciation week on tap


The Citrus County Economic
Development Council (EDC) in
conjunction with the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
announces the 25th annual
Industry Appreciation Week.
The Awards Luncheon, spon-
sored by Progress Energy, will
be at Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Sept 19. Cost is $15
per person. Reservations are
required. Awards will be given
to the Outstanding Small
Business, Outstanding
Employer or Corporate Citizen
and to the Person of the Year.
The date set for the annual


C & C Carpet Cleaning


Bar-B-Que is Thursday, Sept.
20. The event will take place
from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. at
Holcim Ranch in Crystal River.
Cost for this event is $30 per
person in advance or $35 per
person after Sept. 7 and at the
gate. The evening promises
entertainment, great food and
beverages. Come in your best
western wear, dress casual and
be comfortable. Get ready to
kick up those boots and have a
great time!
For more information or to
purchase tickets to either of
these events, call the EDC
office at 795-2000.


Chamber plans


special election

Ballots should be returned by Sept. 28


In September, members of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce will be asked to
vote for nine candidates to fill
positions on the Board of
Directors. These Directors
will be selected by the
Chamber's nomination com-
mittee and will serve a term of
three years beginning Jan. 1,
2008.
Any member of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
may submit their name along
with signatures from 25 other
Chamber members in good
standing to the nomination
committee. All names should


be submitted to the attention
of Kitty Barnes at any one of
the three Chamber offices in
Crystal River, Inverness or
Homosassa.
A list of candidates for the
final ballot will go before the
Board for approval at the regu-
lar Board of Directors meeting
in September. After approval,
the ballot will be mailed out to
all members by Sept. 14.
All ballots must be returned
to the Inverness Chamber
office by Friday, Sept. 28.
Signature forms for interest-
ed candidates can be picked
up at any Chamber office.


Boys & Girls Club


can help after school


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for C & C Carpet Cleaning. Pictured above are: Chamber Ambassadors
Nancy Coffey, Jennifer Duca, Lou Martone, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes, and Chris Martone - owner; Chamber
Ambassadors Lillian Smith, Wendy Hall, Reyna Bell, Crystal Jefferson and David Heinz. Are you looking for a carpet cleaning service
that can accommodate "your" schedule? C & C Carpet Cleaning offers on call services 24/7. If you have an emergency they will do
their best to accommodate your needs. C & C Carpet Cleaning is family owned and operated since 1970. Call (352) 726-4052 for more
information or to make an appointment.


Bryan Melhado Home Repair


Summer is ending and
school is beginning - Boys &
Girls Club is here to help
families during their after
school needs. We have three
clubs to serve school age chil-
dren: Westside Unit in
Homosassa, the Crystal River
Unit and the Inverness Unit
- We offer before school
care programs at the
Westside Unit and the
Inverness Unit, and youth
development programming
after school at all three units.
Activities include: Our
Triple Play fitness and nutri-


tion program, our Target
Practice (which is FCAT
practice); Computers, sports
and recreation, arts and
crafts just to name a few.
Cost for members for after
care is $50 per month; Before
care is $20 a week.
This year the Club is
adding a fitness and health
component for members and
their families, as well as con-
tinuing to assist our kids with
FCAT scores.
For information about
enrollment, call BGC of
Citrus County at 621-9225.


A VERY BIG THANK-YOU


TO OUR CLIENTS.
WHEN YOU'RE HAPPY, WE'RE HAPPY.

We're pleased to announce that
Edward Jones has been ranked
"Highest in Investor Satisfaction
With Full Service Brokerage Firms,
Three Years in a Row." We've always
believed our way of doing business
made sense for our clients.
It's nice to know they agree. i

To see how we can make sense of Investing for you,
contact one of our financial advisors today.
Edward Jones received the highest numerical score three years in a row among full service bro-
kerage firms in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2005-2007 Full Service Investor
Satisfaction Studys. 2007 study based on 3,043 total responses measuring 16 brokerage firms
and measures opinions of investors who used full-service investment institutions. Proprietary
study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed from March-
May 2007. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.


Stephen Kara Purcell John Wann Van Jason
Kuhn Williams Breese Robinson Worley
Ctyrtah . FL Homo.., FL m.1. " ftmG inv,.
795-1811 628-3466 527-0606 344.8189 344-8189


www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


Scott L. Craig
Lee O'Dell
1OW.Riln3L 23aS.Smunct Blvd.
Invern Cryt. Rwr. FL
860-2839 795-1811


F~~g r aJne
MAKIG SESE O INVSTIN


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for Bryan Melhado Home Repair. Pictured front row: Chamber
Ambassador Nancy Coffey, Bryan Melhado, Chamber Ambassadors Lillian Smith, Wendy Hall, Rhonda Lestinsky and Reyna Bell.
Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassador Jennifer Duca, Chamber Executive Director Kitty Barnes and Chamber Ambassador David
Heinz. Bryan Melhado has 15 years experience in home maintenance and cleaning and has been in business since 2003. Bryan lives
in Inverness with his family and offers services throughout Citrus County. His work comes from a variety of clients such as, realtors,
property managers and home owners. Bryan offers repair assistance with everything from blinds, tile and grout, plumbing, moldings,
mica, and even preparing homes for sale or rent. Look for his ad in the Inverness Pioneer in the services section, which is distributed
on Thursday's. No job is too small! He is offering a 15 percent discount to seniors and is fully licensed and insured. Call Bryan for more
information at (352) 586-3777.


Member News


Birding expert Dick Blewett will be
offering his popular Birding Basics
class in the Florida Room at the
Visitor Center of the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park. The six-
week course begins on Tuesday,
September 25, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Besides the classroom work, students
will have opportunities to put their new
birding skills to work on Saturday
morning field trips to a variety of bird-
ing trails around Citrus County.
Blewett will provide bird watching
basics on Florida bird life and explain
the basic tools of the trade.
If students already have binoculars,
they should bring them to the first
class. If not, Blewett will give advice
on purchasing the most suitable
binoculars for birding. National
Geographic Field Guide to the Birds
of North America, Fifth Edition is the
required text that will be used for the
course. Students will also need a
small spiral-bound notebook (similar
in size to the field guide). If you are
interested in attending the Birding


Basics class, please contact Susan
Strawbridge at (352) 628-5343, ext.
1002, as soon as possible since
space is limited.
"Save Our Waters" Fundraiser din-
ner is slated for September 14, 2007
location is the West Citrus Elks in
Homosassa.
Times:
S Doors open 6 p.m.
* Dinner 7 p.m.
* Show at 8:00 p.m.
* Tickets: $35
* Tables seat 8.
Please call at Cheryl Phillips at
(352) 527-0800 for more information.
Betty Brown with the firm Price &
Company, PA., recently attended a
seminar in Gainesville, Florida pre-
sented by the National Seminars
Group. The seminar was titled,
"Understanding and Managing Sales
& Use Tax, Save Your Company Big
Bucks...While Staying Our of Legal
Hot Water!" This seminar highlighted


such topics as "Fully Understand Your
Real Sales and Use Tax Obligations,
Are you Over - or Underpaying?,
and Discovering the Most Common
Tax Mistakes and learning How to
Avoid Them". Attendance of courses
such as these will insure a continued
high level of service to the firm's
clients in assisting in sales tax report-
ing. If you have any questions, call us
at 795-6118.
MEN
Dr. Cheryl McFariand-Bryant of
Better Health Chiropractic just
returned from her continuing educa-
tion in Orlando. She studied active
stretching and strengthening with
Aaron Mattes Active. Isolated stretch-
ing allows the body to repair itself via
the nervous system, improve circula-
tion and increase elasticity of muscles
and joints. This course in stretching
and resisted strength training was a
hands on learning experience pre-
sented by the Florida Chiropractic
Association. Dr. McFarland-Bryant is
a member of the Florida Chiropractic


Association Council on Orthopedics.
It's Black & White & Coming on
Saturday, October 13 at 7 pm. The
fourth annual Night of the Heron,
Citrus County's most elegant affair
and Hospice of Citrus County's flag-
ship special event, will be held at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club.
Treat yourself to a truly elegant
evening and enjoy fine food, great
live music and dancing. Your gener-
ous support of this event allows
Hospice of Citrus County to provide
care and services to everyone at no
cost. Sponsorship packages are
available. Contact Joe Foster at 527-
2020 for more information.
Established in 1983, licensed in 1985
and accredited by the Joint
Commission, Hospice of Citrus
County is preserving the integrity of
the hospice philosophy in the finest
traditions of serving you. For informa-
tion on the many services that
Hospice of Citrus County offers, call
(352) 527-2020.








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


(hbmber


(onneti[on


SUNDAY
SEPTEMBER 9, 2007


Beverly Hills Cleaners


Chamber Ambassadors


JIM SHIELDS/Special to the Chronicle
Beverly Hills Cleaners. Pictured front row: Chamber Ambassadors Kandy Kremnetz, Rhonda Lestinsky; Garfield Banton, Kenton Banton
and Alvira Banton, Chamber Ambassadors Reyna Bell and Wendy Hall. Pictured back row: Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, David
Heinz, Janet Mayo, Lillian Smith and Wendy Hall. Your Hometown Cleaner - Beverly Hills Cleaners offers professional dry cleaning and
laundry with all work done on the premises with affordable prices! They are family owned and operated and opened on Mon - Fri 7 am
to 6 pm and on Sat from 8 am to 1 pm for your convenience. Please visit them at their new location at "Island Plaza" 3993 N. Lecanto
Hwy. in Lecanto or call for more information (352) 527-3140.

i' __________________________ __a---------


Health

The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
Business Women's Alliance is
proud to announce its plans
for the first annual Women's
i Health & Fitness Expo 2007,
h presented by Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center.
. After surveying over 200 local
:business women, it was con-
ecluded that women want to
know more about health and
fitness! So, we are answering
Sthe call!
2 With the ultimate goal in
Sight, the next step was to
Find out what our mission
.was in creating this event.
Mission Statement: Women
, fulfill many roles in their life-
time-from student to career


STake Stoc.
, Take Stock In Children
. (www.takestockinchildren.com)
.1i is an award-winning school-
.i based mentoring program that
,. low-income families by provid-
, ing the opportunity for a better
0: education and a brighter future.
*' Founded in 1995, the mission
of Take Stock in Children is to
-provide deserving qualified
children in our community with
scholarships to college and
guidance from caring mentors.
Since 1995, Take Stock in
-'Children has provided over
12,000 children with scholar-


md fitness expo planned


woman to friend to mother to
wife to caregiver. The Citrus
County Chamber of
Commerce Business
Women's Alliance Women's
Health & Fitness Expo was
created to be all about YOU!
Goals: Our goals for YOU
are for a healthier and happi-
er living through:
* Appreciating the impor-
tance of women taking time
for themselves.
* Proactively pursuing
prevention techniques and
education opportunities.
* Improving your fitness
for life.
* Eating healthy and
enjoying every bite.
* Recognizing the value of


the mind, body and spirit
connection.
* Supporting friends and
family in pursuing a healthi-
er lifestyle.
Men, don't feel left out!
This Expo will have some-
thing for everyone! There
will be key-note speakers,
demonstrations, exercise
demonstrations, vendors and
information galore aimed at
making your decisions easier
when it comes to your health
& fitness! Your entire family
is welcome and encouraged
to attend.
Thank you to those who
have sponsored this "first of
its kind" event!
Thank you to: Seven Rivers


Regional Center (our pre-
senting sponsor),
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute, Citrus County
Chronicle, Citrus Memorial
Health System and Sweetbay
Supermarket. Each of our
sponsors has shown that they
care about our community
and the health and well-
being of everyone in it. Each
sponsor plays an important
role in making this event a
great success!
Look inside for a flier
about this event which lists
the featured key-note speak-
ers. Help us get the word out
by posting your flier where
your customers and/or
employees can see it.


in Children seeks volunteers


ships (totaling over 90 million
dollars) and mentors in the
state of Florida. All money
raised in Citrus County is used
to provide scholarships and stu-
dent-mentor services to Citrus
County middle and high school
students.
All scholarship contributions
are raised locally through com-
munity partnerships and are
used to purchase Florida
Prepaid 2+2 scholarships (2
years at a community
college/two years at a universi-
ty) through the Florida Prepaid
College Foundation.


Scholarship contributions are
matched dollar for dollar by the
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation. Community part-
nerships and local area busi-
nesses make it possible to be
able to provide scholarships
and "the promise of hope" to
middle and high school stu-
dents. All monies raised in
Citrus County are used to pro-
vide scholarships and student-
mentor services to Citrus
County students.
Take Stock in Children of
Citrus County is seeking indi-
viduals interested in becoming


a positive influence in a young
person's life by becoming a
mentor for the Take Stock in
Children Program. Mentors
meet one hour per week in a
school-based setting only at
local Citrus County middle or
high schools
For further information on
how you can make the differ-
ence in the life of a Citrus
County child by providing
"scholarships, mentors, and
hope," please call Janet E.
Clymer, Program Coordinator
(352) 746-6721, ext. 6148 jcly-
mer@clmworkforce.com.


Storage center
offers new feature
Windmill Self Storage is
now offering brand new cli-
mate controlled units.
Windmill Self Storage is
conveniently located
between Inverness and
Crystal River on Hwy. 44.
The facility also offers non-
climate controlled units.
This is a safe, affordable,
and clean place to store
those belongings that have
moved you out of your
garage! Or, just to give you
that "extra space" you
need. There are a variety
of sizes to choose from.
Come in or call (352) 746-
3633 for prices and special
offers.


Reyna Bell - Associate Member
Pete Burrell -
Citrus County Chronicle
Nancy Coffey - Associate Member
Jennifer Duca-
Citrus Land Title
Wendy Hall -
Hemando-Pasco Hospice Inc.
Bonnie Hardiman -
Weekenders Fashions
David Heinz -
Heinz Funeral Home
Crystal Jefferson -
Nature Coast Title Co. Inc.
Kandy Kremnentz -
OSO Pure Shaklee Products
Rhonda Lestinsky -
Nature Coast Bank
Jackie Marx - Capital City Bank
W. Scott Mason -
Coldwell Banker Realty'


Janey Mayo -
Plantation Inn
Chuck Morgan -
Chuck Morgan Inc./Raymond James
Betty Murphy -
Manatee Office Supplies
Curtis Peters - Holcim Inc.
John Porter -
Porter's Locksmithing
Charles Richer -
Canadian Meds
James Segovia -
Capital City Bank
Lillian Smith - Mary Kay
Cosmetics
Rosann Strawn -
Associate Member
Julie Vaughan -
Coldwell Banker First Choice


Chamber Staff

Kitty Barnes ...................... . . . . Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ........... .Office Manager (Inverness) and
Special Events Coordinator
Tomarra Post ............. Office Manager (Crystal River) and
Membership Coordinator
Marion Elson ..................Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Joyce Greene ................. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally .......................Office Assistant (Inverness)
Kelly Marker .................... Office Assistant (Inverness)

Inverness .............................. . . . . . 726-2801
H om osassa .................................... 628-2666
Crystal River ............... ................ 795-3149




www.citruscountychamber.com




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About a million Americans suffer from whiplash
injuries every year, mostly due to motor vehicle
accidents or collisions in contact sports. When an
unexpected force lerks the head backward then
forward, the bones of the neck snap out of position,
putting pressure on the nerves of the cervical
vertebrae The irritated nerves can interfere with
the flow of blood and transmission of nerve
impulses Pinched nerves can damage or destroy
thfunction of body parts whose actions they

Properly worn seatbelts provide
good protection, but injuries can still occur.
Three-point lap/sash seatbelts have proven very
effective in many crashes However they are not
alwayss installed in the, center rear seat position,
lch often has an inferior two-point seatbelt.
|fllovements to the effectiveness of seatbelts
uhlde webbing clamps that prevent more of the
belt reeling out as it tightens on the spool; pre-
,loners that pull the seatbelt tight before the
occupant starts to move; and load limiters. Most
vehicle manufacturers let consumers know if these
features are standard equipment.
If you are concerned that an accident has caused
a whiplash injury, be aware that the problem can
worsen with time
Let the caring professionals at
Neck and Back Care Center help you
regain the joy's of living life, pain freely


Neck atBack
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563-5055
Crystal River
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Jeffery S. Kinnard DC
527-5433
Beverly Hills
to the Winn Diie Slhopping Center


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Baker earns award
Leslie R. Baker, CPA, President and CEO of
The Baker Financial Group LLC, In Inverness
has won yet another award for outstanding
achievement In Financial Planning. She was
the recipient of the Millionaires Club, Eagles
i M B club, and Professionals Club, for 2006, that
was awarded to her by Money Concepts
Capital Corp. at their International Rnanclal
Planning Congress in San Francisco in July.
Mrs. Baker has won this award every year
since 2004, Including the Financial Planner
of the year for the entire state of Georgia In
2005, and Mrs. Baker has now been Induct-
ed Into their Special Honors Club. Mrs. Baker
Is an Independent contractor for Money
Concepts Capital Corp., with its World
Headquarters located In Palm Beach Gardens
Fl. The Baker Financial Group LLC has
offices in Georgia and at 205 West Dampler
St. in Inverness.
Special to the Chronicle


I


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4D SUNDAY. SEP I'FMBER 2, 2007 Bus INES S CriRus COuNfY (FL) CIfRoracLc


Japan's Internet speeds ahead Buyers, sellers confront

The Washington Post "For now and for at least the in the United States. But fiber lines - roughly nine times tangle of wveb-based ads
ht---------- _ ------- _-- ----f b t tp h h b.,rJ ui u, 1h+nL-r,.th. UO it J d CSt O.


TOKYO - Americans invent-
ed the Internet, but the Japanese
are running away with it .
Broadband service here is
eight to 30 times as fast as in the
United States - and consider-
ably cheaper. Japan has the
world's fastest Internet connec-
tions, delivering more data at a
lower cost than anywhere else,
recent studies show.
Accelerating broadband
speed in this country -, as well
as in South Korea and much of
Europe - is pushing open doors
to Internet innovation that are
likely to remain closed for years
to come in much of the United
States.
The speed advantage allows
the Japanese to watch broad-
cast-quality, full-screen televi-
sion over the Internet, an expe-
rience that mocks the grainy,
wallet-size images Americans
endure.
Ultra-high-speed applications
are being rolled out for low-cost,
high-definition teleconferenc-
ing, for telemedicine - which
allows urban doctors to diagnose
diseases from a distance - and
for advanced telecommuting to
help Japan meet its goal of dou-
bling the number of people who
work from home by 2010.


SIIorL Lerml, these applications
will be cheaper and probably
better in Japan," said Robert
Pepper, senior managing direc-
tor of global technology policy at
Cisco Systems, the networking
giant
Japan has surged ahead of the
United States on the wings of
better wire and more aggressive
government regulation, industry
analysts say.
The copper wire used to hook
up Japanese homes is newer
and runs in shorter loops to tele-
phone exchanges than in the
United States. This is partly a
matter of geography and demo-
graphics: Japan is relatively
small, highly urbanized and
densely populated. But better
wire is also a legacy of American
bombs, which razed much of
urban Japan during World War
II and led to a wholesale
rewiring of the country.
In 2000, the Japanese govern-
ment seized its advantage in.
wire. In sharp contrast to the
Bush administration over the
same time period, regulators
here compelled big phone com-
panies to open up wires to
upstart Internet providers.
In short order, broadband
exploded. At first, it used the
same DSL technology that exists


because LUo ~ e UCLer, s ora LC
wire in Japan, DSL service here
is much faster Ten to 20 times as
fast, according to Pepper, one of
the world's leading experts on
broadband infrastructure.
Indeed, DSL in Japan is often
five to 10 times as fast as what is
widely offered by U.S. cable
providers, generally viewed as
the fastest American carriers.
(Cable has not been much of a
player in Japan.)
Perhaps more important,
competition in Japan gave a kick
in the pants to Nippon
Telegraph and Telephone Corp.
(NTT), once a government-con-
trolled enterprise and still
Japan's largest phone company.
With the help of government
subsidies and tax breaks, NTT
launched a nationwide build-out
of fiber-optic lines to homes,
making the lower-capacity cop-
per wires obsolete.
"Obviously, without the com-
petition, we would not have
done all this at this pace," said
Hideki Ohmichi, NTT's senior
manager for public relations.
His company now offers
speeds on fiber of up to 100
megabits per second - 17 times
as fast as the top speed generally
available from U.S. cable. About
8.8 million Japanese homes have


C.D.


LAe IIInumIIII 11n L/IU .en LCleaLes.
The burgeoning optical fiber
system is hurtling Japan into an
Internet future that experts say
Americans are unlikely to expe-
rience for at least several years.
Shoji Matsuya, director of
diagnostic pathology at Kanto
Medical Center in Tokyo, has
tested an NTT telepathology sys-
tem scheduled for nationwide
use next spring.
It allows pathologists - using
high-definition video and
remote-controlled microscopes
- to examine tissue samples
from patients living in areas
without access to major hospi-
tals. Those patients need only
find a clinic with the right micro-
scope and an NTT fiber connec-
tion.
"Before, we did not have the
richness of image detail,"
Matsuya said, noting that Japan
has a severe shortage of patholo-
gists. "With this equipment, I
think it is possible to make a
definitive remote diagnosis of
cancer"
Japan's leap forward, as the
United States has lost ground
among major industrialized
countries in providing high-
speed broadband connections,
has frustrated many American
high-tech innovators.


C.D.


C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

EDWARD JONES 4.33 4.42 5.05 5.05 5.15 5.15 5.10 5.10 5.05 5.05 N/A N/A 5.10 5.10 5.10 5.10
(352)527-3700 - -

STATE FARM N/A N/A 4.55 4.65 4.88 5.00 4.88 5.00 5.16 5.30 N/A N/A 5.02 5.15 4.88 5.00
Call your local agent
RAYMOND JAMES N/A 4.73 4.62 4.73 4.62 4.73 4.78 4.90 4.88 5.00 N/A N/A 4.88 5.00 5.02 5.15
(352) 527-3700 11_ _00
Please note: Banks and other financial institutions offer a wide variety of investment opportunities. Each institution has its own set of
requirements to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact these financial institutions directly for up-to-date information on the
options listed above, or inquire at your bank for other investment opportunities. Financial institutions interested in listing their rates
can call the Citrus County Chronicle at 563-5660.


MORTGAGE
Continued from Page 1D

the crisis picks up speed, said
James Gaines, a research econ-
omist with The Real Estate
Center at Texas A&M
University. After all, foreclo-
sure benefits neither lender
nor borrower.
The problem, he said, is that
the lender may not have any
authority to redo them because
of the way loans are now bun-
dled and resold, with repay-
ment risk changing hands sev-
eral times.
"It's unlike the old days
where the bank you borrowed
from just kept your loan on the
books," he said.
David Downs, a professor of
real estate at Virginia
Commonwealth University,
believes blame for the current
quagmire falls on all involved.
But he says the consumer
should be held accountable
first and foremost for failed
loans.
"If somebody takes on finan-
cial risk, it's incumbent on the
consumer to understand that,"
Downs said.
MEN
The Pents grieve losing their
three-acre property in the mid-
dle of horse country, with its
swimming pool and fishpond.
"It was my dad's house," said
Connie, 39, an elementary
schools receptionist. "It's
quiet, it's open - we love it"
Their troubles began in April
2006, when they refinanced the
remaining $207,000 on a 30-
year fixed loan to a two-year
adjustable rate mortgage so
they could pay down hefty obli-
gations on their SUV and pick-
up truck
A mortgage broker informed
them just before the closing
that the remaining debt would
be $3,500 more than expected,
but they signed anyway.
"We didn't have time to
change the terms so we just
signed them," Connie said.
About the time the first pay-
ment on the new loan came
due, a sequence of events left
them unable to keep up. First
Connie's mother moved out
and stopped helping out with
mortgage payments. Then her
husband Timothy lost his job at
a mobile home factory because
of the housing industry slump.
Their loan servicing compa-
ny first demanded payments,
then stopped returning their
calls.
Connie wishes the lender
and servicing company would
have been easier to reach, eas-
ier to talk to. But she knows she
and Timothy shoulder some of
the blame.
"We probably should have
been better prepared for it,"


she said. "When the job goes,
unfortunately, so does every-
thing else."
ME N
Jeanna and Vernon Marshall
were renting a home for them-
selves and their seven children
when the owner decided to sell
and gave them 30 days to move.
So in January last year, they
hurriedly signed what they
thought was a $365,000, 30-year
fixed mortgage on a four-bed-
room home in the upscale city
of Henderson, Nev.
After the closing, they real-
ized they had signed onto a
two-year interest-only adjusted
rate mortgage that they could
barely afford, with a payment
of $2,923 a month.
"What they do in escrow is
they shove papers two differ-
ent ways, to both people, like a
crisscross," said Jeanna
Marshall, 36. "You're signing so
many documents so fast. I don't
know how the ARM slipped
past us." ,
Marshall, who is disabled,
receives $1,500 in Social
Security payments a month,
while her husband Vernon, 41,
is a driver for UPS netting
about $3,000 a month. Last
year, however, Vernon's work
slowed down and they fell
seven months behind on their
payments. They tried renegoti-
ating, but the mortgage compa-
nies only wanted more every
month. No other company
would refinance the loan
because it carried a $20,000
early payment penalty.
The house went into foreclo-
sure in May, and the Marshalls
are looking for a place to rent.
With their oldest now 17,
Jeanna is worried about col-
lege.
"We're hoping and praying
on scholarships," she said. "We
hope they can learn so they
don't get caught up in the mess
that we did."
ME
After her mother died four
years ago, Gwendolyn Walkley
retired and moved from
California to a three-bedroom
condominium in Daytona
Beach Shores.
She originally bought the
$299,000 condo with a $100,000
down payment and an
adjustable-rate loan with inter-
est rates that would reset after
two years. At the end of last
year, she wanted to refinance
into a fixed-rate loan to avoid
the higher interest rates on the
ARM, but her broker sold her
on a "great loan that very few
people qualify for," she said.
Walkley, 56, had a high credit
score in the 730s, she said, and
carries no debt, except for her
mortgage.
She thought the loan had an
interest rate slightly above 6
percent, making her monthly
payment less than her $1,600


monthly retirement check But
it turned out that was a "mini-
mum" payment that didn't
cover the full monthly interest
or any principal on the loan. If
she wants to pay off the princi-
pal and interest on the loan
each month, her interest rate
bumps to around 8 percent and
her payment to around $1,800.
Otherwise, the difference is
tacked onto the amount she
owes, ballooning her debt.
Walkley knew the mortgage
smelled funny from the begin-
ning when she turned away a
notary the day before
Christmas last year, refusing to
sign documents that showed an
8 percent interest rate. But the
broker reassured her that the
interest rate was 6 percent and
referred her to tiny writing on
one of the document pages.
When the notary returned,
Walkley' signed, trusting the
mortgage broker when he told
her not to worry.
To avoid a swelling princi-
pal, Walkley has used all her
savings and is now working
through her stock investments
to pay the full interest and
principal payment each month.
She hopes her investments last
until the prepayment penalty
period expires, two-and-a-half
years from now, and then refi-
nance into a 30-year fixed loan.
Walkley hasn't spoken to her
mortgage broker since signing
the documents, but she remem-
bers his promise.
"He said 'You're gonna love
this loan, trust me,' " Walkley
said. "What a line."
EI I
Sharon Reuss of the Center
for Responsible Lending, a
nonprofit organization that
works to eliminate abusive
practices in home mortgages,
says loans that give borrowers
a fixed payment for the first
two or three years before the
monthly obligations adjust
sharply upward - dubbed
"exploding ARMs" - have
been particularly troublesome.
"What has happened in the
market has been very reckless
- the kind of loans that in no
way take account of people's
ability to repay them," she said.
That's what happened to the
Fanfan family
The three-bedroom bunga-
low that Milca and Josy Fanfan
bought in 2002 in Brockton,
Mass., a blue-collar suburb of
Boston, wasn't their dream
house. But at $215,000 it was
what they could afford for
themselves and their 3-year-
old son Nathaniel.
With subpar credit scores,
the Fanfans were able to
secure a loan from Ameriquest
Mortgage Co. with a hefty fixed
interest rate of 9.5 percent. The
problems began when their
mortgage broker called at the
last minute to say they needed


to come up with an extra $8,000
in fees. Then at the closing,
they were told the loan would
be adjustable-rate, not fixed.
Milca tried to read every-
thing she signed at the closing
to learn how high the rate
would go, but she found it
impossible as sheet after sheet
of paper was thrust at her.
"I had a gut feeling that this
was not good," the 48-year-old
information technology profes-
sional recalled. "They said,
'Don't worry about it, just keep
your credit clean. In two years,
you can refinance.'"
But Josy, a self-employed
remodeling contractor, lost a
finger in an on-the-job accident
and was out of work for
months. That put the couple
behind in payments, and refi-
nancing was out of the ques-
tion. Meanwhile, the mortgage
rate kept climbing.
Milca asked that the loan be
reworked, to no avail.
Meanwhile, monthly payments
on the adjustable-rate mort-
gage have ballooned from
$1,700 to $3,000.
"I've heard on TV where the
lenders want to work with
you," she said bitterly.
"Bullcrap. ... These people are
not out to help you, they're out
to take your home."
Milca called her lender
almost daily without response
and piled up attorneys' bills
and late fees. She had prob-
lems sleeping from all the anx-
iety, and her hair started falling
out
"Every month it was like 'Is
this nightmare going to be
over?' " she said. "How could
somebody be asked to pay
$3,000 a month on a mortgage
that's $193,000? That's highway
robbery."
Ameriquest spokesman
Chris Orlando said the loan
was made through an inde-
pendent broker and that his
company had worked with the
Fanfans for some time to keep
them in their home.
After foreclosure proceed-
ings began in February, Milca
was referred by her state bank
commissioner's office to a
state-funded agency (Jamaica
Plain, Mass.-based ESAC) that
fights unscrupulous mortgage
lenders and brokers.
Through ESAC, the Fanfans
negotiated a rate of 9.5 per-
cent and the right to refinance
in two years. The monthly bat-
tle to make payments isn't
over, but Milca is working sev-
eral jobs to make sure it is
won.
"I want people to know they
can fight," she said. "Don't be
ashamed to cry out for help."


Associated Press Ryan
Nakashima in Las Vegas con-
tributed to this report


The Washington Post


WASHINGTON - A few
years ago, a classified ad for
Andrew Davis' 2001 Mitsubishi
Montero SUV might have been
limited to two lines of descrip-
tive shorthand: A/C, pwr pkg,
6cyl AT, 2wd, $9k firm.
Today, in ads on the Internet,
Davis is posting pictures of his
car in an off-road setting and
sharing such details as the
replacement of the timing belt
and water pump 5,000 miles
ago. He has even included a
link to a feature article about
his car's model in Popular
Mechanics.
Davis, a Clemson University
graduate who moved to the
Washington area recently, post-
ed free classified ads on
Craigslist and the Marketplace
area on Facebook, the social-
networking site. He also paid
for an ad in The Washington
Post, a bundled deal that also
put his listing on Cars.com and
other Web sites.
His approach of putting his
vehicle in front of as many
potential buyers as possible
illustrates how dynamic the
process of classified advertis-
ing has become. For sellers,
the options have moved
beyond newspaper ads and
fliers on coffee-shop bulletin
boards. And for buyers looking
for a car, an apartment, a job or
a new puppy, it means better
chances of seeing relevant ads
on a variety of sites.
This push into online classi-
fieds - a business dominated
by newspapers for more than a
century - is still very much in
flux, said Greg Sterling, princi-
pal analyst with Sterling
Market Intelligence in
Oakland, Calif. While classi-
fied revenue has been shrink-
ing at newspapers across the
country, a growing number of
Web companies, both estab-



MOM
Continued from Page 1D

expect prices to continue to
stay at high levels or increase
even more.
Dramatic price increases
like these require shoppers to
be more strategic than ever.
Fortunately, eggs and dried
beans are fairly inexpensive
food choices and are still
affordable options for shop-
pers. Smart shoppers can
stock up on chicken when it is
on sale for half price by freez-
ing it. With. increased milk
prices, shoppers may need to
stock up on two weeks' worth
of milk when it is on sale at a
nearby store in order to fight
the price increases. Look at
the back of the shelf for the
milk with the longest sell-by
date. Buying seasonal pro-
duce on sale or local produce
may be a smarter approach
than buying higher-priced
apples and oranges out of sea-
son.
You can also try to reduce
the price you pay for other
grocery items to allow for
higher prices on grocery
necessities. Pay attention to
prices and compare before
you buy the same items you
always buy. By combining
store promotions, coupons
and sales shoppers can save
50 percent or more on non-
perishable items like cereals,
crackers, snacks, canned
items and personal care prod-
ucts. Consider being more
brand-flexible, and try anoth-
er name brand if it is on sale
or has an attractive coupon. If
you don't have the time to clip
coupons, take the easy
approach of switching to store
brands if you haven't before


Newspaper classified revenues
Yearly, in billions of dollars
$20 - -
$17 billion-

15 .

10

5



'95'96'97'98'99'00'01'02'03'04'05'06
Online classified revenues
Yearly, in billions of dollars
$3.5 .... .. .....-. -...-........--- ..
$3.1 billion
3.0
2.5 - - - -
2.0 ........ . ..........


1.0
0.5

'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06
SOURCES: Newspaper Association of America,
Interactive Advertising Bureau, Price-
Waterhouse Coopers

lished and new, are moving
into the business, although not
necessarily dominating the
market.
Newspapers have lost their
grip on classified in recent
years. Once a steady source of
revenue, classified advertising
at some of the larger chains
has dropped 14 to 20 percent
over the past year, notably in
once-lucrative segments such
as automotive, real estate and
employment ads, according to
Fitch Ratings. Fitch, a credit
ratings agency in New York,
said this week that newspaper
performance has been weaker
than it originally forecast for
the year.

and take advantage of store-
brand guarantees if you are
not satisfied with the product.
Pay attention to special store
promotions that give extra
savings automatically when
you buy multiple items.
Another key to saving
money on groceries is to pay
attention to unit costs when
comparing prices. Contrary to
popular belief, the larger size
does not always offer the low-
est cost per unit. Use a calcu-
lator when you shop if your
store's price tags do not show
the cost per ounce or pound.
You have probably noticed,
as I have, that some food man-
ufacturers are choosing to
shrink their product sizes to
hide their price increases.
The 1-pound can of coffee is
now 13 ounces, which is
equivalent to a $3 pound of
coffee raising its price to $3.69
(a 23 percent price increase).
The half-gallon of many ice
cream brands is now 56
ounces. That would be equiv-
alent to a $5 1/2 gallon of ice
cream raising its price to
$5.71 (a 14 percent price
increase). And just this week I
noticed that the 32-ounce jar
of mayonnaise shrunk to 30
ounces. At this rate, I wouldn't
be surprised if the next carton
of eggs I buy has only 11 eggs!


Stephanie Nelson shares
her savings tips as a regular
contributor on ABC News'
"Good Morning America."
You can find more of her say-
ings tips in her book "The
Greatest Secrets of the
Coupon Mom" and on her
Web site at www.coupon-
mom.com.
She can be reached at shop-
pingmom@unitedmedia.com.


S'. September 8
, I Hernando United


i Methodist Church
.125 E. Norvell BryantHwy.
8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Reserve your spot for $5
"A Flea Mirket with a
Carnila Atmosphere"
- Cld ID's - Food - MNusii -Pries


MARKET C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D.


MONEY 3-MONTH I6-MONTH I12-MONTH 24-MONTH 30-MONTHI 36-MONTH 60-MONTH


MME9


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) Cimomcm,,


4DSUNDAY, SEPTI-Mimi 2, 2007


3
d









Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BUSINESS SUNDAY SIiPTEMBI.R 2, 2007 5D


Film gets chilly reception


Los Angeles Times
A sign at a Starbucks shop in Irvine, Calif., promotes the environmental documentary "Arctic Tale." The coffee chain has had
success marketing music and books but its film promotions have not produced extraordinary word of mouth.

Starbucks' initial movie efforts disappoint bean counters


JOSH FRIEDMAN
JOSH FRIEDMAN
AND LORENZA MUNOZ
Los Angeles Times

The polar bears of "Arctic Tale" have
gotten a chilly reception in movie the-
aters despite Starbucks Corp.'s serving
up promotional materials in thousands
of stores.
The Paramount Classics documen-
tary, co-financed by National
Geographic Films, has failed to draw
the crowds that flocked to other recent
environmental movies such as Oscar-
winners "March of the Penguins" and
'An Inconvenient Truth."
Costing less than $5 million to pro-
duce, the film has grossed roughly
$600,000 domestically since its release
July 25.
Although the coffee giant has broad-
ened its reach as a cultural tastemaker
through music and book sales, '"Arctic
Tale" is another example of the green
mermaid's golden touch failing to trans-
fer to movies. Starbucks' first move into
film promotion, Lions Gate's '"Akeelah
and the Bee," did not live up to expec-
tations.
"I question the company's ability to
get people into theaters," said Jim
Romenesko, an online media watchdog
who also runs the starbucksgossip.com
blog. "When people go to Starbucks they
can easily miss the movie marketing
materials strewn among the clutter of
items for sale."
But Ken Lombard, president of
Starbucks Entertainment, said he was
proud of the "Arctic Tale" campaign,
noting that it was aimed at spreading a
social message rather than driving tick-
et sales.
"Our measurement of success was not
the box office," Lombard said. "Our
measurement of success was to do as
much as we could to encourage discus-
sion around the critical issue of today-
global warming."
With "Akeelah," the company and
---- Lions Gate established box-office


AND LORENZA MUNOZ
benchmarks and encouraged behind-
the-counter baristas to attend special
screenings. This time, he said, the com-
pany focused on events such as a
National Day of Discussion on climate
change, held at various Starbucks
stores.
Lombard said it was "still early in the
game" and that Starbucks would con-
sider new approaches with future col-
laborations.
The Seattle-based coffee chain,
which has 6,800 North American out-
lets, has been careful not to jam its
stores with movie posters and promo-
tional paraphernalia that could annoy
customers. Harvey Shotz, a regular cus-
tomer sipping a coffee recently at a
Starbucks in Los Angeles, said he
thought the blue-and-white color
scheme promoting '"Arctic Tale" was a
tribute to Israel because its flag shares
those colors.
"I haven't a clue about the movie,"
Shotz said.
Others say the company might have
picked projects that lacked wide appeal
or freshness.
'Akeelah and the Bee" grossed $18.9
million theatrically, but Lions Gate
spent about $25 million to make and
market the movie. The studio also
signed a generous profit-participation
deal with the coffee company.
"We made a movie that basically
broke even," said Jon Feltheimer, chief
executive of Lions Gate, noting that
DVD and television deals added to the
bottom line. "But we are proud of the
movie, and if you ask me if I would work
with Starbucks again, I would say
absolutely yes but perhaps with -a dif-
ferent financial arrangement."
Executives at Paramount's specialty
division confirmed this week that they
would work with Starbucks to market
the screen adaptation of the bestselling
novel "The Kite Runner," to be
released in November.
Starbucks was a very good partner on
'"Arctic Tale," said John Lesher, presi-


Los Angeles Times
dent of the division, now called
Paramount Vantage. "Unfortunately we
made a movie that didn't get great
reviews. When the movie comes out on
DVD, I'm sure their involvement will
have made a positive impact on our bot-
tom line."
Narrated by Queen Latifah, '"Arctic
Tale" follows a mother walrus and her
calf and a polar bear and her cubs
through the frozen wilderness that's
melting away beneath them. But the
animals-fighting-the-elements theme
might be too reminiscent of 2005's
"March of the Penguins," which
grossed $127 million worldwide.
As Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-
Times wrote: "It lives in the shadow of
'March of the Penguins,' "which was a
National Geographic project as well.
'Arctic Tale" also lacks the name
recognition of "An Inconvenient
.Truth," which starred former Vice
President Al Gore, or the recently
released climate change documentary
"The 11th Hour," backed by Leonardo
DiCaprio, which is off to a stronger
start at the box office.
Buoyed by success in music,
Starbucks announced its entry into
movie marketing last year by saying it
could serve as a "very effective model
for the studios."
In 2004, it co-produced the late Ray
Charles' Grammy-winning duet compi-
lation "Genius Loves Company," which
sold 5.5 million CDs worldwide.
Starbucks' new CD label, Hear Music,
debuted with Paul McCartney's
"Memory Almost Full" album, and its
North American stores alone sold more
than 231,000 copies.
In the p ast year, the retailer has mar-
keted two bestselling books: 'A Long
Way Gone," the memoir of Ishmael
Beah, a former child soldier in Sierra
Leone, and "For One More Day," a tear-
jerker novel from "Tuesdays With
Morrie" author Mitch Albom. Its U.S.
stores alone sold more than 100,000
copies of each.


MONEY
Continued from Page ID

recovery? - KA, via e-mail
DEAR KA: You haven't told
me the value of your home,
which leaves me a bit handi-
capped. It occurs to me you
might wish to consider selling
your home. I realize this is one of
the worst times to do that, but on
the other hand, with $50,000 in
credit-card debt, unless you can
materially increase your
income, you're going to be up to
your eyes in debt forever In the
event there is no equity in your
home, unfortunately, the only
thing I can recommend is that
you both find extra jobs and
apply that money to your obliga-
tions. Not an easy suggestion,
but one that probably has merit
DEAR BRUCE: My mother
just passed way. She was very
good to me and my other family
members. She left me $28,000 in
cash. I gave my wife $4,000 for
support until I return home from
my incarceration for a parole
violation. I gave my sister
$15,000 to invest in real estate. I
have $9,000 left over for myself. I
had my wife put $7,000 in a five-
year term and $2,000 in a two-
year term at the credit union.
Did I do the right thing to make
some easy money from the inter-
est? What should I have done
with the money? - T.W., via e-
mail
DEAR T.W.: I have no prob-
lem with the gift to your wife;
however, in my opinion, other
things should wait You have a
lot more trust in your sister than
I would, giving her such a broad
brush. If she hasn't done so, I
would ask her to deposit the
money in your name so it's avail-
able when you leave prison.
Investment decisions are impor-
tant and should be done in a
more considered fashion. Good
luck with your future and stay on
the straight and narrow.
DEAR BRUCE: I am divorced
after 22 years of marriage. My
ex-husband claimed bankruptcy,
but I was able to pay off the cred-
it cards awarded to me in the
divorce, with some help from my
dad. We had four joint credit
cards. Why is it that my ex-hus-
band's bankruptcy is on my cred-
it report? I cannot get a credit
card. I use my debit card for
everything. How do I remove the
bankruptcy off my credit report?
- Debbie, via e-mail
DEAR DEBBIE: If your hus-
band declared bankruptcy after
you were divorced, I see no rea-
son why it should be on your
credit report, particularly since
all of the obligations have been
met I assume the credit cards
have been canceled or, alterna-
tively, your name has been
removed. At the very least, I
would write to the credit-report-
ing agencies and ask them to
reaffirm the information in
regard to the bankruptcy and
your connection to it
DEAR BRUCE: I need to get
another vehicle. What do you
think about financing the pur-
chase with a 0 percent interest
loan instead of paying cash? I
am currently getting 12 percent
to 15 percent on my mutual
funds. - LS., via e-mail
DEAR LS.: If, in fact, you are
truly getting a 0 percent interest
loan, I have no problem whatso-
ever You realize, of course, that
if you pay cash, you will get a


substantial discount and that
must be factored in against the
interest earnings of your mutual
funds. There is another facet to
be considered: The 0 percent is
locked in, while the 12 percent
to 15 percent income is not You
have to make a judgment call as
to whether you believe this type
of income will continue. If you
feel the volatility in the market
might affect the income, you
may want to go with a "sure"
thing and take the $2,000 dis-
count Another variable is the
cost of the automobile.
DEAR BRUCE: I recently
remarried after being a single
mom for 12 years. My kids are 20
and 17 years old. The oldest is
finishing her second year in col-
lege. I make $65,000 a year, and
we have taken out loans for her
studies, receiving some Stafford
subsidized and unsubsidized
loans.
This year, my new husband
does not want me to take on
more debt because he is debt-
free. I want to make sure my
children get educated. We now
have a combined income of
$300,000 a year. I don't want my
new husband to pay for their
education. What are my options
for the best loans for my chil-
dren? Am I missing some oppor-
tunity for them to obtain
monies? If I pay cash for their
tuition, do we have tax benefits?
If not, what is the best thing for
me to do for the kids? I do have
my other home in my name only,
in case I need to sell for their
security - D.K, via e-mail
DEAR D.K: You guys don't
have any financial problems,
only some disagreement as to
how your funds should be han-
dled. Why not follow the tradi-
tional path of the husband sup-
porting the family? That would
mean you would have his
income of $235,000 to support
the family and, with your
$65,000, you should be able to
put your children through
school comfortably. I still believe
the kids ought to take out some
loans. This education is for
them, so why make it totally
painless?
DEAR BRUCE: My father
worked in real estate and bought
several pieces of land, including
the house I've been living in for
the past 30 years. He had a cor-
poration in which we were all
members. He intended to do
something that would leave a
piece of property to each of his
children in a way that we would
not be burdened with a lot of
taxes. But he had Alzheimer's
and didn't get this done before
he died. What would he have
been planning to do? I hope to
get this completed before my
mother dies, too. - S.H., via e-
mail
DEAR S.H.: You mentioned
he had a corporation in which
you were all members. I think
you mean shareholders. Until
such time as the corporation has
been examined, and the distri-
bution of shares and any restric-
tions on their sale have all been
examined, no one can answer
your question. Was your dad a
stockholder, or was it in some
kind of trust? You need to hire
an attorney to spell out the alter-
natives open to you and your
family members.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, P.O. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680.


Business DIGEST


Attend EDC barbecue,
win Buc's tickets
The county's biggest barbecue
blast is planned Thursday, Sept.
20, and attendees have the added
opportunity to win four tickets to a
Tampa Bay Buccaneer football
game.
The Citrus County Economic
Development Council will host the
25th annual Industry Appreciation
Barbecue on Thursday, Sept. 20 at
6:30 p.m. at the Holcim Ranch just
north of Crystal River. The barbe-
cue will include good food and live
entertainment from "The Mick
Sharp Band."
At the barbecue, one individual
will win four tickets to an upcoming
Tampa Bay Buc's game. The win-
ner will have the opportunity to
select which group of tickets they
want from five of the upcoming
Buc's games.
Tickets to the barbecue are $30
per person and can be obtained by
calling 795-2000.
Sears to celebrate,
move in November
This November the local Sears
Hometown Dealer Store will cele-
brate 10 years in Inverness at the
Citrus Center, and at the same time
pack its bags and move across town
to the Inverness Regional Shopping
Center to be positioned inside
Kmart.
As part of a prototype being
employed across the country
(including the Zephyrhills Kmart), the


local Sears Authorized Dealer Store
will maintain all of it current staff and
add some to meet the demands of
the Kmart customer, too.
Except for hardware, which is
now carried in Kmart, Sears will
continue to offer most of the same
merchandise mix that we now
have, which includes Kenmore
appliances and the other national
brands such as Whirlpool, GE,
Amana, Frigidaire, LG and Bosch.
Sears will also continue to offer
Craftsman lawn and garden trac-
tors, mowers and other gas and
electric yard and garden goods.
Residents reappointed
to CFCC board
OCALA- On Aug. 18, Gov.
Charlie Crist has reappointed
Carol-Runnels Sullivan and Betty
Strifler as representatives of the
Central Florida Community College
Board of Trustees.
"I am pleased that the governor
has reappointed these community
members who have demonstrated
their commitment to college
through their service to our Board
of Trustees," said Dr. Charles
Dassance, CFCC president.
Sullivan, 56, of Inglis, is a vice
president of Capital City Bank and
will serve a term beginning Aug. 16
and ending May 31, 2010. Strifler,
58, of Pine Ridge, is Citrus County
Clerk of the Circuit Court and will
serve a term beginning Aug. 16
and ending May 31, 2011.
The CFCC District Board of
Trustees is made up of seven


members. Marion County is repre-
sented by Bernie Little Jr., Cory
Pool and Frank Stafford. Sullivan
and Robert Hastings represent
Levy County, and Strifler and Mari-
Elain Ebitz represent Citrus
County.
Trustee responsibilities include
appointing, supporting and assess-
ing the performance of the college
president, approving long-range
plans and educational programs
for the college and ensuring the
well-being of faculty, students and
staff.
Salon's staff of
hairstylists grows
Georgieo's is proud to
announce and introduce Rose
Murphy who has joined our pro-
fessional staff of hairstylists.
Originally from New Jersey,
Ms. Murphy is a graduate of
Withlacoochee Technical Institute
with 12 years experience. She
specializes in color and Redken
Products.
Suncoast Bicycles
attends Trek conference
Charlie Wade, Mike Layo and
Bob Wisehart attended the Trek
bicycle dealers conference in
Madison, Wis. Suncoast Bicycles
was awarded the coveted
Platinum Dealer designation
based on volume commitment,
customer satisfaction and profes-
sionalism within the retail bicycle
industry. Wade states, "The show
highlighted the 2008 line of Trek


Bicycles and accessories with
emphasis on "WSD," (women spe-
cific design) bicycles and cloth-
ing."
Suncoast Bicycles carries a full
line of women's bicycles and
clothing, including helmets,
gloves, shoes, shorts and jerseys.
Betty Kolar is the "WSD" specialist
and will be most happy to assist
our customers in this department.
Younger joins Butler
Financial Group
John J. Butler is proud to
announce the addition of Janet
Younger as a Licensed Mortgage
Broker for Butler Financial Group
LLC., Mortgage & Loan
Specialists. Younger is a dedicat-
ed professional with more than 30
years experience in the fields of
real estate, accounting, marketing
and law. Her significant experi-
ence will be an excellent addition
to the companies overall capabili-
ties and will provide tremendous
benefit and insight to our commer-
cial and residential borrowers.
Butler Financial Group LLC
works with lenders around the
country to provide both residential
and commercial borrowers with
creative financing options specifi-
cally tailored to meet their financial
goals and objectives. The compa-
ny specializes in 100 percent
financing and can serve the needs
of most borrowers including those
recently out of bankruptcy. The
company is located at 7655 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Suite 8 in


Crystal River and can be reached
at 564-7000. Its Web site is
www.butlerfinancialgroup.com.
Florida notary course
at CFCC Citrus
Central Florida Community
College will accept registration for
its Florida Notary Course. The
training will be from 12:30 to 3:30
p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, in Building
L3, Room 107 at the Citrus
Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
The course fee is $89 and
includes the Florida Notary
Handbook. Students will receive a
class completion certificate that
must accompany the application
for a new notary commission. The
course is also recommended as a
refresher for veteran notaries.
For additional information or to
register, call 249-1210 or visit
www.CFCCtraining.com.
Tax prep course
offered soon
Due to an increasing need for
qualified tax professionals, H&R
Block plans to hire for the 2008
tax season and again will offer an
introductory income tax course.
The course begins Sept. 27 and
ends in mid December, includes
69 hours of instruction and gener-
ally meets for three hours twice a
week. Multiple classes are offered,
and course schedules are flexible
so it is possible to take the course
without sacrificing existing work or
school schedules.


"This course really appeals to a
wide range of people, from those
with finance and accounting back-
grounds to people just wanting to
make sure they're getting all the
deductions they can," said
Katherine Smith, H&R Block dis-
trict manager. "Whether you're
interested in preparing your own
taxes or becoming an H&R Block
tax professional, this course offers
something for everyone."
To learn more about enrolling in
the H&R Block Income Tax
Course, call 726-5349.
3D ultrasound comes
to Citrus County
Genesis Women's Center
announced that it has acquired
the 3D ultrasound system from
Philips Medical Systems, provid-
ing multiple scanning configura-
tions to support their broad patient
imaging needs. The system's
high-end diagnostic imaging sup-
ports a variety of common applica-
tions, including OB 3D imaging,
the first in Citrus County. Genesis
Women's Center is offering OB 3D
Keepsake imaging for patients of
their practice and outside as well.
Genesis Women's Center is
pleased to be able to offer this
important improvement in health-
care to its patients. Genesis
Women's Center has been provid-
ing quality healthcare services to
Citrus County since 1990. For
more information, contact Carrie
Bertine or Stacey Barnes at 795-
3232 or 726-7667.


SUNDAY, Sf-.PTFMBI-'R 2, 2007 5D


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRPNICLE


BUSINESS









EDS CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICvL



To place an ad, call 563-5966


-77,


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


x:(5)56-65 1.olFee 88.8224 1E al.casfes hoalenieco esie w0crnceoln-o
1!2 9 1:*j * * 0 0


ATTRACTIVE LADY
Caring, sense of humor
seeks a gentleman
friend 60+ Reply Blind
Box 1367-P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 106
W. Main St., Inverness,
FL 34450
HELLO, SWM Gentleman
62, 5'9" 150LBS.
financially OK, But lone-
some, seeks SWF, slen-
der & attractive who
likes dancing, dining &
beach, to share a
honest & sincere
relationship & friend-
ship. Smoker and
casual drinker okay,
No drugs. Please Call
Dennis, (352) 628-1775
Homosassa
Seeking to meet a tall
active gentleman in
late 60's to enjoy good
times & have fun.
No smoking or drinking.
Please send letter to:
Blind Box 1368P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl'
34429
SWCF blonde, loves art
& outdoors. Like to find
a Christian gentleman
friend. 30+ Reply Blind
Box 1366-P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 106
W. Main St., Inverness,
FL 34450
WM BIKER 54, 6'1" 190
LBS. Blonde hair, blue
eyes, not bad looking.
Seeks attractive biker
lady 40 to 54 years old.
100 to 120lbs.
(352) 817-5833


CO aato


OAK FIREWOOD
Free for the pick up
Cut to size.
(352) 794-0070
PITBULL PUPPIES
(352) 246-2914
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084
Wanted: Riding & push
mowers, other sm. eng.
Quick free removal
352-601-5277/726-4290
WATER HEATER
30 GAL. 220V elec. exc.
cond. (352) 341-0612
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645




Dog, small English
Dachshund,
1000 SW 196 Ct., reward
(352) 465-6604
LOST CAT
Grey & white male.
Declawed
Last seen in Pine Ridge
(352) 464-1401 cell
(352) 464-1399




2 DOGS - Golden
Retriever/ Irish Setter??
Blk & Wht. Pit/Hound
Mix. Lecanto area.
(352) 628-3623


N=RENTAL FINDER rD FORCES
Swww.chronicle BANKRUPTCY
rentalfinder.com Ch
I -iM--- l Name Change
* Child Support
SI -Wills
l FWe Come To You
C=Offe, L,"'.


$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receilt
1 Rooster & Bantam Hen
with 2 week old baby
Bring your own
container to pick up.
(352) 447-3022


TOP DOLLAR
S For Junk Cars |
$ (352) 201-1052$

$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545

IC$ CASH $~^
* PAID FOR l
I Unwanted

I 352-220-0687 I
L ,- -- -N

COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message

FREE
Horse Manure
(352) 527-2911
Free Kittens
1 male, 2 females
10 weeks old
(352) 229-2400
(352) 362-5700
FREE KITTENS
To inside homes only.
(352) 220-9960
FREE MALE PIT MIX
9 WK OLD PLEASE CALL
352-854-9663
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
FREE REMOVAL
Of unwanted hsehold.
& Garage Sale Items.
Call (352) 476-8949
Free Removal - Scrap
Metal, Appl, 's. A/C,
Mowers, motors, etc.
Brian (352) 302-9480
FREE STACKABLE SM.
BOXES w/lds;
3 Dining Rm. CHAIRS
(352) 527-2769
KIMBALL TEMPTATION
ORGAN/ The
Entertainer III w/bench
& books. Good cond,
(352) 527-6898
KITTENS FREE TO
Good home.
(352) 560-3275
LIONEL ELECTRIC TRAIN
BOXES, FREE
(352) 465-0749
SUPPORT CITRUS
COUNTY PUBLIC
SCHOOLS
Please send Campbell
Soup Labels and Box
Top for Education tops
to Inverness Middle
School, Make them to
the attention of
"W.Scofftt".
Thank You.


BANK OWNED
AUCTION
121 Homes
All thru-out FL
Props. in your area
Fin. Avail, on many of
these properties.
Sun., Sept. 23rd, 1 PM
Held in Orlando, FL
Broker Cooperation
For terms/info/more
bidding sites visit
fisherauction.com
L. Fisher AU220;AB106
(800) 331-6620
Sale subject to terms.

BUY or SELL!
Receive Quality
Customer Care!
FLRealEstateSale.Com






TERI PADUANO,
REALTOR
C21 JW Morton
(352) 212-1446
Hablo Espanol
FREE Home Warranty
& Visual Tour
ON ALL MY LISTINGS






35-.1o

a Act Now $

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over Items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week ofter your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail,
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices Including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nall Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Mlcro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207


r-------

RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronicle
rentaflinder.com

- SOD * SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM

CAT ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment,
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsohaorg.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant,
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.




FULL BODY DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE &
AROMATHERAPY
by Terry Lic. MM17442
(352) 628-1036
HAIRCARE in your home
by Licensed Hairdresser
Curts/Perms/Wash/Style
Call Gall 352-422-6315





a and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff,



(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441




4 DAY Carribbean
Cruise, June 2008
Call Now for Group
Rates (352) 476-1973
R sN 2 7 7


. Chronicle Webslte
Directory In print
and online,
Our search engine
I will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
--I
= One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
I for 30 days)
Header and
WebsIte Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966


www.naturecoast
wheels.comr
NEWSPAPERS
www.chronlcle
onllne.com
Real Estate Information
www.FreeCltrus
CountyHomelnfo.comrn

www.naturecoast
homefront.com

RiENTALS
www.chronicle
rentalfindercom


www.etfitsamole.com
SOUND OFF NOW
hushaboom.com
YOUR voice heard!




r ...- . -
ACCOUNTS
PAYABLE CLERK

Seeking energetic
Individual w/exp. in
Accounts Payable,
Excel & Lotus. Needs
to be dependable
& willing to learn, F/T
w/benefits. Apply
In person.
Pro-Line Boats
1520S. Suncst Blvd.
HOMOSASSA
DFWP/EOE

CLERK TYPIST
Full-time position
performing routine
clerical work in
Central Ridge Library.
Performs data entry,
mail scanning, filing,
typing, filling out
forms, working with
templates, taking
messages,
laminating,
newspaper clipping
and greeting walk in
customers. Working
knowledge of the
Microsoft Office Suite
of Products. Must
possess a current
valid Florida driver
license. -
$8.45 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the Citrus
County Office of
Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 7, 2007.
EOE/ADA

Contractor
Services/
Inspection
Specialist
Moderately difficult
work performing
general clerical
duties such as
creating and
maintaining
electronic files
and processing
documents. Interacts
with customers to
resolve questions and
problems regarding
permitting, licensing,
inspections, and
other Issues. Must
have basic
knowledge of
construction
terminology. Working
knowledge of the
Microsoft Office Suite
of Products. Must
possess a current
valid Florida driver
license.
Starting pay
$11.53 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 7, 2007
EOE/ADA

Crystal Chrysler
of Inverness

Full Time Evening
Receptionist position
available, Hrs 1-8 M-F,
9-5 Sat. Multiline
phone and computer
experience preferred.
Please fax resume' to
Melody Garnett at
352-564-1952.

FT OFFICE
POSITION

Receptionist/Payroll
administrator w/at
least 2 years exp,
Microsoft Word, Excel,
Outlook and access
skills are preferred,
Starting pay com-
mensurate w/exp,
Fax resume to
352-564-8835
or apply at
Hillghts Inc.
4177 N Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
352-564-8830
OFFICE PERSON
Auto Parts exp. a must,
Office exp, necessary.
Apply All Prestige Auto
(352) 795-7000
SECRETARY
Full Time Position
for a last paced
Insurance Office.
Looking for Someone
who has computer
skills and knowledge
with Spread Sheets,
Must be able to
multl task and must
have Customer
Service Skills,
Please call Heather at
1-352-726-7722
for Interview or fax
resume to
352-726-6813


RECEPTIONIST/
COORDINATOR
Good phone, office,
computer skills req,
Must be dependable
& professional
Fax Resume to:
(352) 726-3490
SENIOR
SECRETARY
Advanced secretarial
work performing
specialized clerical
duties in Animal
Services. Sets up
files, schedules
appointments, keeps
records, prepares
reports, assists
-Director in budget
preparation.
Knowledge of
business English,
spelling, punctuation
and office practices
and procedures.
Graduation from HS
or GED certificate.
Computer
experience Including
working knowledge
of the Microsoft
Office Suite of
Products.
$10.77 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Send resume or
apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 7, 2007.
EOE/ADA.






















Camf
COSMETOLOGY
BARBER �

ESTHETBl.' IlCS/
SPA TRAININGl


CNA's
If you are ready
to brighten up
your career,
join our caring,
dedicated team.
*Full-time
*Competitive wages
*Pay for experience
*Shift differential
*Bonuses
*Tuition
Reimbursement
*401K/Health/Dental/
Vision
*Free CEU's
Apply in person
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL EOE


CNAs
F/T- 3-11

Wildwood SNF
seek caring CNAs to
provide quality
care & service to
our residents
Great Salary &
Benefits
SUPER WORK
ENVIRONMENT
Call 800-442-1353
Fax 877-571-1952
Arbor Village Nursing
490 S. Old Wire Rd,

COME GROW
WITH US!





1 ' I,

Join our team
of caring
professionals.

FT Registered
Nurses
Hospice House
3-11 shift
11-7 shift
CMH Unit
3-11 shift
Admissions
Sat/Sun/Mon/Tues
Field Staff

Social Worker
PRN

PRN Staff
RN, LPN, CNA

Apply Today
Telephone:
352.527.2020 �
Fax: 352.527.9366
ithacher@hosoice
ofcitruscountv.ora
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
hosoiceofcitrus

dwf/eoe

EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656

Environmental
Services
Arbor Trail Rehab has
immediate openings
for experienced
Housekeepers.
Day and evening
shifts available.
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL EOE

Licensed
Practical
Nurse/Certified
Medical Assistant
Seeking a LPN/CMA
for a fast-paced
medical practice
located in Crystal
River. Ideal
candidate must have
previous physician
office experience to
be responsible for
performing EKGs,
PFTs, vital signs and
phlebotomy. Will also
assist the physician
and be responsible
for front desk duties.
Please apply online
at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an equal
opportunity employer


RNs:

� Clinical Educator

Critical Care

MedSurg

Telemetry

Super Pool Opportunities
For select RN
and LPN positions!!

Other Opportunities:
Blood Bank Supervisor
Medical Technologist
Physical Therapist (FT and Per Diem)
Physical Therapy Assistant
Radiology Technologist
Respiratory Therapist
Coder
Director of Rehab Services
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select FT positions!
SRRMC is part of the HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email:
Llnda.Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com
Web Site: www.srrmc.com m
BOE/DRUO FREE WORKPLACE iooiis.ait,

*SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


LPN

For Dr's ofc. Hom
Sprngs. Gd. sal. & ben,
Fax resume to
1-866-277-8462 or
call 1-800-573-0123
S-m- --
LPN/RN
11-7 Shift
Looking for
Experienced Nurse
Leaders to Join our
Great Teaml I
We offer excellent I
benefits:
*401K/Health/Dental/l
Vision
*Vacation/Sick Time
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab I
611 Turner Camp Rd
* Inverness, FL EOE,

MEDICAL OFFICE/
ASSISTANT

Front & back office,
patient care, P/T or F/T.
Medical experience
req'd. Transcription
experience a plus.
Competitive pay/
benefits for the
right person.
Mail resume to:
108 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST
Busy medical practice
Exp. med. terminology,
65-75 wpm w/1-2 yrs
medical exp. Excellent
written & oral commu-
nication skills needed.
Excellent benefits.
Mon thru Fri. Fax
Resume to Gwen
352-637-4510
*******II
NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352)860-0885

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
A ALL STAR *-
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S

New competitive
pay rates. Call
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111

Teaching is rewarding

w/BSN or MSN
Previous exp. in
nursing instruction.
Evening schedule
w/some days.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 245-0276 or
Call (352) 245-4119

r-,'--r


F/T for Busy Drs. Office.
Exp'd w/Medical Mgr.
& accounts receivable.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333
URGENT CARE/
FAMILY PRACTICE
Seeking
Exp. Front Office
Personnel FT
Must be cheerful,
good with patients.
Hours. 8am - 5 pm
Call (352) 522-0094
or Fax Resume To:
(35 )52-nnoA


Central Florida
Community
College
Director-
Institutional
Effectiveness:
Ocala Campus:
Master's degree
required. Doctorate
preferred. Minimum
of two years full-time
experience In
planning, research, or
assessment related
activities required.
Open until filled.
Screening begins
9/28/07.
For additional
information visit
www.GoCFCC.com
or call 352-873-5819.
Mail application and
transcripts to: CFCC,
Att: H.R. Dept, P.O.
Box 1388, Ocala, FL
34478-1388. CFCC is
an EEO/AA/DFW
employer.

Enthusiastic
and Innovative
Graphic
Designer wanted:
Rapidly growing
Citrus County
company seeking
graphic designer with
strong understanding
' of color theory,
design best practices
for creating visual
designs and layouts
for web pages,
print marketing,
e-mail, and sales
materials. PHP and
MySql knowledge
a plus. Competitive
salary and benefits.
To join our team in
a fun, creative
environment please
e-mail links to your
online portfolio
and resume to
careers@smartphone-
experts.com


PT WAITRESS &
PT COOKS
Open at 5:30am
Sablna's Diner & Ice
Cream (352) 637-1308
Riverside Crabhouse
Now Hiring
FOOD &
BEVERAGE MGR

Ap1ly In Person
5297 S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa
or E-MAIL
maoriarverside
resorts, coam

SERVERS
BANQUET CHEFS
& LINE COOKS
Needed
Please apply at:
505 E Hartford St.
Hernando or
Call (352) 746-6855




$$ GOT CASH $$
Earn great money by
setting appts, for busy
local company.
Call Steve:
352-628-0187

ATTENTION
Real Estate Agents,
Brokers, and
Salesmen of all fields.
Are you tired of long
hours with no
compensation?
My agents make
$5,000 to $7,000
a month. We have
joined a national
effort to assist in the
enrollment of the new
Medicare Advantage
plans for Retirees on
Medicare
You will work In
Pharmacies,
Senior Centers and
Local area.
My Agents enjoy
* Monthly Bonuses
* We take trips all
over the world
* We advance 1st
commissions
* Vested Renewals
* We have Preset
appointments
* TV Leads
* Seminars
* Pre approach letters
Please call Mr. Buck
at 1-352-726-7722
for an interview or
Fax Resume to
1-352-726-6813



Your World







C C/r,,pN i rLE


CITRUS MEMORIAL 0


FURNITURE
RETAIL SALES
Apply in person
Easy Living Furniture
4100 W. Gulf to Lk. Hwy,
Lecanto
National Electrical
Wholesale Distributor
Located in Wildwood
Has Opening For ag-
gressive inside/outside
SALES REPS
Full Benefit package
avail., Exp. preferred
but not required.
866-748-0505
Realtors Wanted i

Small productive
office. Pleasant
working cond., Good
commission split In-
terviews confidential.
(352) 795-9123

Sales
Professionals
Fast growing National
Corporation is ac-
cepting applications
from confident sales
professionals to add
to its staff of account
executives. We
'provide a structured,.
successful sales train-
ing program which
will aid in taking your
sales career to the
next level. We also
consider entry level
sales candidates
who survive our
interview process.
Call 352-569-9402
for appointment


AUTO GLASS
INSTALLER
Auto glass installer
wanted! Company ve-
hicle, must have own
tools. Excellent pay pro-
gram. At least 5 yearS
exp. Call CMM Glass_
Corp. 1-866-439-5020i
Block Masons, _
Mason Tender & i
General Laborers.

Must have own
transportation,
Call (352) 302-8999

ELECTRICIAN

Commercial &
residential. 5 + Yrs.
Exp. & resume
required. Must pass
drug screen &
physical, Over-time
avail. MIDAS Const.
(352) 465-7267


AT THE I-iEART OF OUIR COMMUNITY



6ARING... FOR MANY YEARS,

IN MANY WAYS.






RNs:
*Critical Care Unit- NurseC Recruiter -Neuroi Telemetry -C%'/PCU- Orthopedics
*Optiatine Room and Find A-i.imant- CVOR- Home Health F Emergeocv Rourm

LPNs:
- Elverna~l Clink;z.- Neuro 'Ickifeirv Home Health

Care Coordinator - PRN

I. .1.. Ii- I ~L .. J.0- ri ' * Jqpt Ii-it'iiriiflI prouirol N I i riCI L ih L '-0 lit.-ami. n Re, (LrtI -Ir
liirag nei.'ifI r,rlj kT i ~l~ l % i-N.J! ,.'A hIiCII-.1 i-Cl~'~d 1-hia~w . , -ndir ~if l i h ni inl.iui,.oi~nii
FIOLW Ilr % -:.. II. I IIin,tC101.1
Rehabiltation - Clinicall Coordinator
14L'ircn ILI, h i.hr , gRt i Jinr rs . , cI r - . II F I,'iL r I k n .1rUIL'Ir,.11Ii Im y1, 0 1' LibII.l ier1 1111 II I.* Lit :Ip-cill .Ifujbx Il'ihoIl..g. li,,i all 0-I.',I~id iifl iiiii ml5 ' i ar, lit II Lte -reIS,'qvrlmlitnlL- HcAth
I ,- iw .'i- .1 Q u ifsW oi-t.c Nliiil~ nl %-I ." W r' %L~IrICr~ nII ll .1 1-o* , tiia~ ' iI w Liti CI
Speech Language Pathologist
W l-mI ll..qLn , I.ter% dq wc it .., I- N i,.ti .iJ I - iiiiie I ihr-hoIiv (r. an i,r ofi in lbtlintcrsit.i t wrvi i ril II[Il,~,, nrc.
Di~qn himiifliliof licah Doi, itii iuf Quml.I, l .. iraoine l.,ro~infln Of I vye Irl*~rlL~niLVin a I IoPliI dl '1illi.and.
in-ifiielli d r him ri alo-In. ilii.)ciI.:r~cn,, 'rhirrrul
Staff Pharmacist - Part Time
K iL,,orr, imat It. It.ci. nun I 'ltrori,, 'itn- -I lhrlih h n it m-i.q.mIn .ii.me, i d 'ii ,LeI. or 'hanrdS

Physical Therapist
LNII'lln, LI, 1lcLuir'i ,,.1,11)- tIticti - ll% flin an aJ. rcdoe in,d 'I i i I Mi-icr, ;.errnn-di nd cdim-il
FIIhr'l . iiM. D'iortnICnrl l II H at ,% iiuw i -,I Qw qA-ui !ujr.,
COM oiL.In 1ll u iInmnrin,s. ,urki isc nii: lo.11 ii -Ii'. Nsiurc i.,oa. i.uu t ior'lh ll.Idi, Tamitp a 11.1an
If ii' mme k~iningfr,itirk-n..h ndvu orimkl,1i0.l ,ut . C' p~o p�inruI1' ine iaidke vi 'i sellat Imin here


beedflt.p~ilon.n sickgu d utmiun ,inmmit..n.
Pleabe spplu nriinc ait W�,,arumnh iam.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FACILITIES
& SUPPLIES
This position is
A responsible for the
' activities related to
the dally cleaning,
maintenance &
upkeep of the
facilities and
grounds and the
activities related to
ordering, receiving,
and expensing
supplies. Make
scheduled, periodic
checks of facility
ventilation and
security systems,
generators & other
equipment. Will
maintain vehicles &
vehicle logs, handle
biohazard totes,
respond to security
alarms & faciltiy
emergencies, as
well as, coordinated
and monitor vendor
work at facility, Two
Year's facilities
experience
Preferred and
commercial driver
License desired.
Background check
required.
Please submit
' application to:
1241 S. Lecanto
Hwy. Lecanto, FL
' 34461 EOE/DFWPJ
{*-----
HANDYMAN/POOL
MECHANIC


Full time, salary,
benefits Call between,
S10a-4p (352) 344-4861

JOURNEYMAN
TRADES WORKER
Lead worker position
in a crew assigned to
perform skilled work in
the construction and
maintenance of
County facilities and
structures.
Responsibilities
Include performing
skilled and
specialized tasks in
accordance with
standard practices
of the building trades.
Trouble shoots and
repairs electrical,
heating, refrigeration
Sand air conditioning.
Limited experience
with repairing HVAC
and chiller systems is
helpful. Work requires
some independent
judgement and
decisions. Graduation
from H.S or G.E.D
certificate.
Considerable
knowledge of use
and care of tools,
equipment and
materials of building
trades. Physical
dexterity, strength
and stamina
necessary to perform
required tasks.
Starting pay
$13.07 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at or send
resume to the Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 7 2007.
EOE/ADA.

PT MAINTENANCE
15-20/hr./wk.$10-13/hr.
Requires some knowl-
edge of electric,
plumbing, painting,
- carpentry and A/C.
Call 352-344-8853





Animal. Services
Technician
Manual labor work
taking care of
impounded animals
at the County animal
shelter. Cleans and
maintains the
kennels, feeds and
waters animals.
Some experience in
the care and
handling of animals
and knowledge of
animal breeds.
Experience in basic
building/grounds
maintenance.
Experience dealing
with the general
public desirable. Must
have sufficient
physical strength and
agility to handle or
restrain large or
potentially dangerous
animals. Must possess
a current valid Florida
driver license.
Working knowledge
of the Microsoft
Office Suite of
Products.
$8.45 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 7, 2007.
EOE/ADA


$$ GOT CASH $$

Earn great money by
setting appts. for busy
local company.
Call Steve @
352-628-0187

Customer Service

Call Center
Consultant
Sumter Electric
Cooperative, Inc.
has an immediate
opening for an
experienced Call
Center Consultant in
our Call Center at our
headquarters
located at
330 S US Hwy 301
in Sumterville.
The successful
candidate will have a
HS Diploma/GED and
a minimum of two
years experience In a
customer service/ call
center environment.
Excellent telephone
customer service and
computer data entry
skills, with a minimum
of 30wpm required.
The ability to maintain
confidential
Information and work
effectively in a
high-pressure work
environment is
essential. Candidate
must be able to work
M-F, 6:00am-7:00pm,
holidays, scheduled
weekends from
May-October, and
irregular hours upon
short notice.
Credit/collection
experience and
fluency in Spanish
preferred.
Starting salary begins
at $15.00/hour and
includes an excellent
benefit package.
Applications will be
accepted from
9/2/07 through
9/14/07 at the One
Stop Career Center
office in your area,
fax resume to
SECO - Call Center
Consultant at:
352-568-7777, or
email to
secoiobs@seco
eneravy.com
SECO is an Equal
Employment
Opportunity
Affirmative Action
Employer,
M/F/D/V

DELI PERSON &
CASHIER
Experienced only.
352-527-9013

DURACLEAN
FRANCHISE
Looking for Exp'd
CARPET/
FURNITURE/
TILE CLEANERS

But will train. Salary,
comm., Bonus &
Benefits for right
person. (352)726-1099


Floor Technician
Semi skilled janitorial
duties stripping,
waxing, buifing and
cleaning floors at
various county
facilities. May assist
custodians with
cleaning of county
facilities. May require
use of personal
vehicle with mileage
reimbursement.
HS diploma or GED.
Must have had some
janitorial experience
and/or specialized
training in field of floor
maintenance, use of
rotary machines,
products and
procedures.
Starting pay
$8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

Apply at or send
resume to the Citrus
County Office of
Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461
by Friday, September
7, 2007. EOE/ADA
THIS JOB IS PENDING
FINAL BOARD
APPROVAL



I9toOfI lSlti

Your world first.

Every Day




Ch*N'df';


Serving the Developmentally
Disabled Since 1966.

$ Increased pay rates and $
competitive benefit package for

all F/T employees after 90 days

Positions Available:
Bus Driver - P/T Inverness area
Residential - F/T & P/T
Supported Living Coach - F/T
Garden Center Clerk - P/T
Instructor- F/T

DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Apply at the Key Training Center
Business Office
130 Heights Ave., Inverness
352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833 ext. 347)
=3 *EOE*


DETAIL HELPER


DL a must with a
clean record.
Call Roy @ 302-3089
EXPERIENCED
WRECKER DRIVER
Weekends a must.
Must live in area.
Apply in person at:
Ed's Auto & Towing
4610 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness
> NO CRYBABIESI
F/T POOL
CLEANING
Medical, vac. & benefits
avail. (352) 637-1904
KEY PINE VILLAGE

Training Instructor
II - P/T
Primary duty is to
enter data Into
standardized
computer program.
Must be able to
perform Direct Care
duties in absence of
staff, Saturday and
Sunday nights,
11:15pn - 7:15am.
Apply within the
HR Dept.
1-352-341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833
ext 347) *EOE*

LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Exp'd ONLY need
apply. (352)257-1070
MAINTENANCE
Exp. Maintenance
person needed, must
be hard working
dependable and have
a valid dri. lic. 40 hr.
work wk. benefits, pd.
vac. pay based on
exp. Apply In Person @
SUN COUNTRY HOMES
1710 S Suncoast Blvd
MAINTENANCE/
HANDYMAN
POOL TECH
HOUSEKEEPING
LAUNDRY PERSON

Able to handle
multi-task, in upscale
Country Club Comm.
Apply in Person:
240 W. Fenway Drive
Hernando
Must have at least 5
Yrs. Recent Exp.
In Florida Lawncare
Desire to work & valid
Dri, Lic. Good starting
Pay. Paid Vacations
(352) 228-7472
P/T SECURITY
OFFICERS
Class D Security License
required. Local.
Starting Rate $7,60/hr.
352-726-1551 Ext. 1313,
call between 7a-2:30p
Mon-Frl.
Small Boat
Manufacturing Co
Inglis Area. Fiberglass
lamination, gelcoat &
grinding. Exp. pref'd.
352-447-1330
WALLY'S QP
Looking For
EXPERIENCED
AUTO DETAILER

Apply In Person:
806 NE US HWY 19
Crystal River

_11116 irS
IC."Par-tim


Earn extra
income after
taking course

Flexible
schedules,
convenient
locations.

Courses start
in Sept.

Call
877-766-1829
Liberty
Tax Service
Fee for books.

McCall
Communications
Of Crystal River

Needs a full-time cell
phone service tech-
nician. We will train!
Must be dependable,
able to get along
well with others, and
willing to learn.
Contact
chotchkiss@mccall
EOE/DFWP

Transit Van Driver
(2 positions)
Part time (30 hours)
position driving
a County van
transporting
passengers to and
from residence and
designated locations
in Citrus County.
Secures passengers
in wheelchairs, assists
elderly, frail and
disabled with
boarding and
departing bus. Gives
change, collects
monies, provides
information. Must
possess a valid Florida
Driver Ucense.
Must obtain within
6 months of
employment
certification in First
Aid and CPR. Must
pass a drug test and
criminal background
check prior to
employment.
Starting pay
$8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
September 7, 2007.
EOE/ADA


CTrU NT ) RN
ades-


ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-$15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com


1938 GIBSON GUITAR
Good Condition.
Make me an offer I
can't refuse. Nothing
under $1,500 consid-
ered. (352) 344-5168

ANTIQUE VICTROLA
Exc. Working Cond.
Includes some records,
$300
(352) 628-4210






















WANTED QUALITY
ANTIQUE French
German, Bisque Dolls
for 9/15 Doll Auction.
637-9588 www.
dudleysauction.com











0 0
Fen 1 Ii [.
Glas, ChIina,


General
c.n
= Hell


S LOCALLY

Large national
S Avg. Pay $20/hr.
Over $55K annually.
Including full
benefits & OT, paid
training, vacation.
O F/T & P/T
1-866-515-1762






Established Lawn
Service 23 yrs.
1990 Dump Truck,
All lawn equip, make
your money back in less
2 than Incls. 70 ac-
count too Much equip
to list. Established 1984
Asking $ 100k (352)
637-6718

Food Vending Unit
14ft x 8 ft., fully equip,,
grill, french fryer, soft
ice cream, micro. 2
refrig., sinks, AC, inven-
tory incl. also truck avail
will sell together & sep.
352-270-8126


CRAFTSMAN 8'/4"
Radial Saw +
3 DRAWER Cabinet
Exc. Cond. $400
(352) 637-2838
HITACHI Miter saw, like
new, $100;
(352) 726-9183

WHEEL OF A
DEAL
I I








GUARANTEED
RESULTS FOR
I ONLY $63.95
Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
day ad and we will
I continue to run your
ad every month until
you sell the car.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
automatically
scheduled. The
customer must call
each month to
reschedule.


52" HD RCA TV, with en-
tertainment center and
DVD player. $600/OBO
COFFEE TBL
& 2 END TBLS. It. oak
$40. (352) 527-4122
55" HITACHI
Projection TV
Oak Cabinet w/doors.
$400 (352) 527-0032
Sanyo 26" Color TV
excel cond. $100.
1 Component 20"
Color TV/VCR $75.
or both for $150.
(352) 341-1576




FIREPLACE
New Adobolite Chimenea
type w/ 18' chimney pipe
kit. Use inside or on lanai.
Paid $4500 will sell for
$2800. 352-344-4811


I


MASSEY FERGUSON
1540, 2007,Tractor &
Box Blade w/top tilt.
< than 200 hrs. $15,900
(352) 795-9010




5 PC. WICKER PATIO SET
36" Glass top table w/4
cushioned chairs. $100;
9 PC. PATIO SET
45" Rd. Table, 4 cush.
chairs, Chaise, Chair
w/ottoman, sm. table
$400 (352) 795-2906
OVAL GLASSTOP TABLE
W/2 swivel/rocker
chairs, 2 reg, chairs,
new cond. Paid $1050
Asking $500. (352)
A A i inj -- Aj i/n


3-ton A/C
$350
(352) 564-0578
A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
- 2 Ton $780.00
- 2-V2 ton $814.00
- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Dellveryl
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
CARRIER
HEAT PUMP/AC
21/2 Ton; New blower
mtr. Good Cond. $200
(352) 628-4210
DISHWASHER, STOVE
& REFRIGERATOR
Almond. Good Cond.
$250/all
(352) 382-1866
GE REFRIGERATOR
White. Top freezer,
$150. Beverly Hills
(501) 920-9428
REFRIGERATOR
$140
(352) 382-5661
REFRIGERATOR
18cu.ftf. white, A-1
condition, $175
(352) 637-2111
REFRIGERATOR
Black & S.S. 25.5 Cu. Ft.
Side by Side Whirlpool
Gold Conquest
w/crushed & cubed
ice & water purifica-
tion syst. 16 mos. old.
Purchased for $1,200/
Sell $800 (352)628-3539
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore 27 cu. ft.
Side by Side. White.
W/Refreshment door.
Water & Ice. $400
(352) 637-6310 Iv. mess.
UPRIGHT FREEZER
Maytag, standard size.
$150obo; EXERCISE BIKE
DP, Fan Generated
w/monitor. $35
$25 (352) 637-1712
Washer & Dryer $265/
set. Great cond. Best
Guarant. Free delivery
& setup (352) 835-1175
WASHER
Kenmore, Almond
Good Cond. $125
DRYER, Whirlpool White
8 mos. old $225
Both/S300 382-3494


SPOON COLLECTION
1933 Chicago World's
Fair w/3 row spoon
rack. (18 spoons)
Will break up or sell for
$1500. (352) 860-1649




Hot tub 2 yrs.old, soft
tub, 4 seater, 110 V,
steps & drink holder, hy-
drd therapy jets, $1,500.
Joe (347) 512-6126
NEVER USED! SEATS 51
3 hp,, extra jets.
Light, lounger. Under
warranty. New
$4,395/Sacrifice $2.195


Craftsman 15i2 HP
Riding Mower
46" cut, starts & runs
good. $350.
(352) 613-4702
D.R. CHIPPER, 18HP,
towable, excellent
2007, low hrs.
(352) 637-6588
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV-parts 628-2084
Mower & Equipment
Repair Quick Service.
Pick up & Delivery,
Don Mead 400-1483
MULCH
5-6 yd. loads. $95
Delivered anywhere
Citrus Co. Also gravel
hauled. $75 + Materials,
352-563-9979/400-0150
SCOTTS TRACTOR
MOWER
20HP Kohler, 50"
Cut - Extra Blades - Very
Nice $950 382-4572
SEARS CRAFTSMAN
2001 riding mower,,
19HP, 42" cut $450
(352) 628-2769


-U �


3 Pc Sectional
w/ 4 recliners, abstract,
beige/green/brown
print. $800.
(352) 465-6002
3 PC. SECTIONAL SOFA
w/Recliners $295;
TWIN BEDROOM SET
w/dresser & head-
board. $95
(352) 422-3190
4 Pc. Bedroom Set
Pickled white, oak
queen/dbl $250.
9 Pc. Bedroom
Little girls, painted incl.
bed bread & curtains
$175. (352) 637-6046
5 PC. BEDROOM SET
$375. DESK $50:
(352) 628-5924
9 PC. LIVING RM. SET
Good Cond. $250;
YOUTH BED
White Heavy Plastic.
Good'Cond, $40
(352) 628-4210
9 PC.
WHITE WICKER
BEDROOM SET
Exc. Cond. $675
(352) 634-0977
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
All Leather Sofa,
as new, top quality,
chestnut brown,
basset, 89" Long,
perf. cond. for office or
home must sell $1,250.
abo (352) 212-3508
Antique Armoire
unique carved,
Rosewood? w/3 doors
center door has original
glass excel cond.
$1,500. (352) 344-4811
Antiques
Collectibles &
Estate Auction
Ist & 3rd Tues. 6pm
(previews 10-5:45)
Starting Sept. 4th
Huge Furniture
Liquidation
Fenton/Dep/EAPG
Glass, China,
Antiques Art
Collectibles, Silver,
Coins + 2much21ist
Details on Web or call
PROF APP & LIQ
10%bp 6% tax
MC/VI/Cash/App Ck
AU1593/AB1131
811 HWY 19/CR RIVER
charliefudae.com
352-795-2061
BEDS *: BEDS + BEDS
The factory outlet store!
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 .: Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006
BROYHILL
SOFA & CHAIR
$350
(352) 527-4910
BUREAU W/MIRROR
6 Drawers. 5'W.
Green & tan. $40;
RD. OAK TABLE
3' diameter, Bind. Oak
$50 (352) 527-2769
China Cabinet,
Thomasville, lighted,
cherry wood, great
cond. $700. Curio Cab.
lighted, cherry wood,
great cond. $200.
(352) 628-5949
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Regional,
Conslanment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
Comp. TWIN BDRM. SET
W/LINENS $200;
ROCK MARBLE DINING
TABLE W/6 CHAIRS
(W/Pad) $200
(352) 795-7744
COUCH & LOVESEAT
navy blue leather, wall
hugger w/2 recliners on
each. $600; RECLINER
Maroon, wall hugger,
$100. (352) 527-4122
CURIO CABINET
$75;
TWIN DAYBED
W/MATTRESS $35
(352) 795-7744
DINETTE SET - French
Prov. Antique wht. 48"
Round table, w 24" leaf
pedestal table, 4 chairs
like new $195. obo
352-382-7865,
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
78" HX 34"W Oak.
Exc. Cond. $85;
SLEEPER SOFA Comfy,
Like New $195
(352) 422-3190


2 CORNER COMPUTER
STATIONS
Large $55.
Small $30. Never used.
(352) 637-1894
15" LCD MONITOR
NEC, built in stereo
speakers & 4 port USB
Hub, $99.
(352) 795-0098, days
(352) 795-2820, eve
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & more!
352-794-3114/586-7799
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeell.com
GATEWAY PENTIUM Ill
windows 2000/office
17" monitor, keyboard
and mouse $150.
(352) 228-2745




FORKLIFT
Air Tire, Diesel.
In Homosassa. $4,500,
Phone (A 1 3 A78A.70


TOSHIBA PDR 3310
DIGITAL CAMERA
2 mp, 3X Zoom. Movie
function avail.
All Accessories. $75
Orlg. Owner 527-9860


E�


ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
Incl. battery & charger,
$550. GEL MATTRESS,
hospital size. $100.
(352) 628-1408
GO GO BY PRIDE
SCOOTER $370.00.
SONIC SCOOTER
By Pride. $400.00.
Both easy trunk load,
(352) 628-9625
WALKER W/BRAKES,
Seat, & Basket
Brand Newl $100;
TV STAND
$15
(352) 795-7744


" Computers

i C03
c=/Video


ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for Big Scrn TV 6ft. H
$200. DINING RM. 8 up-
holstered chairs, table
extends to 7' $250.
both Wht wash wood.
(352) 527-9876
Entertainment Center
ULight wood. 102"L
Glass Doors on Side
Must See!
$395 Negotiable
(352) 746-5168
Ethan Allen - Dream
Rocker, overstuffed
cream, brocade, so
comfortable, $950.
new. sacrifice $200.
(352) 634-0196
FURNITURE
Leather reclining taupe
loveseat $250, Iron King
head & foot board
$300 352-586-4650
GIRL'S DRESSER
& DESK, $100 both,
Multi Color Comforter
for Full size girl's bed, &
purple bed skirt. $50.
(352) 341-1963
KINGSIZE BED, Sims
Restonic, (Patricia
model) memory foam
mattress, boxsprings &
frame, exc. cond $650
obo (352) 341-6920
Large burgundy sofa &
matching chair, $400
Also country style oak
dining table, 6 chairs,
like new, Orig. $1,900
sell for $800
352-560-3743
Leather Recliner Chair,
deep blue, excel.
cond. 6 mos. old
$850. obo, Must Sell.
(352) 212-3508
LG. COUCH
Multi-Colored
Good Cond. $75
(352) 621-7916
LIVING ROOM SET
Gorgeous Like New
Coordinating SOFA,
Uphol. CHAIR & FLOOR
LAMP. $300/all
Or Split. (352)746-3277
Liviving Room. Set
sofa, chair, 2 end
tables, 1 coffee table,
good cond.
$300.
(352) 746-7098
Mattress-King
Spring-Air, deluxe plow
top, gently used,
$400. obo
(352) 382-5030
Portable L-Shqped Bar
for Kitchen or Patio
Solid Oak, formica top,
$300.
(352) 465-2823
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen Serta Bedding
Set, very clean, w/
frame linens, skirt,
matching comforter &
curtains, $400.
(352) 212-0013
0---i -
RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
ROCKER RECLINER
Multi-Neutral Color
Very Good Cond. $35;
OAK END TABLE/
COFFEE TABLE SET $75
(352) 422-3190
ROLL TOP DESK
28"Wx45"H, 3 drawers,
good cond. $85.
(352) 382-4651
Single Platform Bed
$50.
Air Hockey Table
$150
(352) 637-6046
Solid Wood Ashley
Coffee & End Tables,
like new, $350.
(352) 270-3573
SYLVANIA 13" TV,
hardly used, $45
Wall mirror, 30"x63"
$20 (352) 726-2269
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084


12 NtW MtlAL I.C.
CRATES, use for tool
transp/decor/strg/furn
or ? $80/all or $8 ea.
(352) 795-5929 Iv. msg.

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400....$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-3983 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

280' CHAIN LINK FENCE
Post & Gates.
Cash & Carry $750.
(352) 527-4910
Approx 140 COOK-
BOOKS, $100. CRAFT
PATTERNS & BOOKS $50.
FOR SALE. CALL (352)
746-6687 or 302-1449
BEAUTIFUL GARDEN TUB
complete with faucets
and base, sacrifice,
$150. (352) 637-5656
(352) 201-0696
BROTHERS 1227
fax machine, $75
(352) 527-3348
BURIAL PLOTS
In Fountains Memorial
Park - Fountains of Life:
Two spaces
$1050.00 - 628-1062
Carpet, Heavy Cut Pile
Used, In great cond.
Beige, 33sq. yds.
Installation avail.
$195. (352) 341-4449
China set, Johann
Havlland Bavaria
Germany Sweetheart
Rose, service for 8,
complete set, plus
serving pieces, $250
(352) 637-5903
Christmas dinnerware,
service for 8. in box,
never used, $100
Train phone, whistles like
train, $50
(352) 527-3348
Flag Set, 20f 21/2" steel
telescopic, org. $365.
Now $200
Also 20ft. 2" Alum Set,
w/ out Flag $45.
(352) 382-1191
FLORAL CITY
Out of Business,
antiques, collectibles,
general merchandise,
displays, exc. All or part.
Fri. Sat. Sun. 9a-2? 8618
E.Orange Ave 341-0003
FRIDGE
Clean & Cold $60;
CORNER
Entertainment Center
Drk. Wood $30
(352) 634-0893
Frigidaire Refrigerator
18.5 cu.ft. white, glass
shelves, clean, very
good cond., $275.
Twin wicker headboard,
natural, $45.
(352) 726-2269'
HEAVY DUTY
Sewing machine In
carrying case. $50/obo
(352) 527-0424
LABOR DAY SALE
THE BATTERY MEDICS
Golf cart battery sets
6V &8V $200 Rea. $245.
Incl. del Installation & 1
yr Free Replacement
Warranty Contact Mark
@ 727-375-6111
LOG SPLITTER
27 Ton, Vert./Horizontal
New in 12/06, Home
Depot. $1,250. Used
twice. Will sell for $900.
Will deliver.
WINE BOTTLE OPENER
Deluxe Countertop
Stand. New, in org. box
$140; Will sell for $75
Call Don352-231-0160
MANATEE ART
& CARVINGS
$250
(352) 563-0022
METAL DETECTOR
Garrett GTAX 1000
Top of the Linel Detects
all metals & more. $300
(352) 527-9498
OFFICE FILE CABINETS
(6) 4 Drawer w/hangers
& folders. $35/ea.
or $200/all
(352) 563-0022
PARROT CAGE, $25;
SCROLL SAW & SOLDER
GUN, w/accessories,
$45. Beverly Hills
352-257-3793
Pine Dinette Set.
w/4 Chairs
27" Manavox TV
(352) 270-3641
PROPANE TANK
250 GAL. $275.00
352-795-6693
RADIO CONTROLLED
HELICOPTER
Comes w/radio &
instruction book. $750
(352) 560-4289
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Craftsman 42". Kohler
15.5, automatic. $225;
GE MICROWAVE Space
Aaker XL1400 Like New
$100 (352) 382-5973

Bahia, $80 pallet
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
he Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
ables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576


Air Boat
13 ft. fiberglass,
Rivermaster, hull, S/S,
cage, 403 Buick runs
good. Bilge pumps etc.
trir. needs paint $4,995. .
(352) 637-2319
Area's Largest
Selection of
Clean Used Boats
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597

AUTO, BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621


BUYING US CUINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




DRUMS
5 pc. black, with throne
and cymbals, good
starter kit. $150.
(352) 628-2244
Lowery Organ
Excellent Sound, fine
pc. of furniture, storage
bench, manual $500.
(352) 628-5186
Lowery Piano
1964, w/ Dehumidifier,
med. wood tone,
storage bench incl,
good cond. $650. obo
(352) 621-5588




Pro-Form
515 S, Crosswalk
Tread mill, Like new.
$500.
(321) 273-0412




*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
LABOR DAY SALE
THE BATTERY MEDICS
Golf cart battery sets
6V &8V $200 Reg,. $245,
Incl, del installation & I
yr Free Replacement
Warranty Contact Mark
@ 727-375-6111
POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
SIG SAUER P220
45Cal. with nightsites,
4 clips, holster and 2
mag. carriers. $800
(352) 447-1447
TURKEY HUNTERS
Beautiful Display Case
for your BIRD. Oak
frame on wheels
w/glass dome.
28.5D X 34.5W X 36H.
$250 (352)464-4710
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




6 x 12 V Nose Enclosed
Dual Axle w/brakes.
LED lights, more.
2006 Carry On. $3,500
(352) 382-1804
4X8 '05 UTILITY WORK
TRAILER, all metal, w/HD
Werner Ladders, all in
exc, cond. $575.
(352) 726-3010
6'XIO' HEAVY DUTY
UTILITY TRAILER '04
35001b axle
Good condition
$525.
(352) 422-0201


CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8-12N
9157 N. Golfview Dr.
CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE SALE Fri. - Sun. 8-4
4451 N. Tallahassee Rd.
NO EARLY BIRDS
FLORAL CITY
Sat. & Sun. 7a-4p
Cash Only
12907 S. Oakvlew Ave.
FLR. CTY, OLD OAKS
Multiple Family Yard
Sale, Old Oaks Comm.
Trail End Rd. & E Walton
Dr. Sat. Sun. Mon. 8-4




GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week ofter your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902


Utility Trailer
4X10, good tires, new
lights. Asking $250.
(352) 637-1894




Certified Bassett Crib,
beautiful, white wood.
sleigh style, practically
new used 2 times, crib
maffress free w/ crib
$200. Also Amy Coe
vintage girl bedding
$35. (352) 634-0196




19" 14kt Vigaro link,
gold chain, 6 months
old, paid $800. Sell for
$300 (352) 637-7125




BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676
Replace Your Home
Nowl We pay CASH for
your old home. Call
NOW!(727) 967-4230
WANTED: QUALITY
ANTIQUE French,
German, Bisque Dolls
for Sept. 15 Doll
Auction. Call
637-9588 ASAP
For info www.
dudleysauction.com


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
AKC BOXER PUPS
READY - Fawn w/white
markings tails & dew
claws done. w/
Health Certificates,
$500 & up 352-637-3599
AKC LAB PUPS
1, yellow female,
Health Certs & shots
$250. .352-422-4675


Act5Now]

GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVERS AD

Did you ever wonder
what to do with those
left over items from
your Garage sale?
We have the
Answer for Only
$12.95
The week after your
Garage Sale just give
us a call and we will
run a 6 line ad
for 5 days.

(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
* * * *** *


C LASSIFIEDS


GREAT PYRENEES
Male, DOB 2/14/07,
CKC Reg., Pure bred.
Good w/sm. children .
& other sm. animals.
Needs room to run.$400
(352) 341-1964
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service

Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices Including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping &
Micro chip reg.
Call for appt.
(352) 344-5207
IRISH SETTER PUP
AKC, 1 male left,
beautiful, love
children. HC. First $275.
(352) 726-0133
LAB PUPPIES, Registered
Choc. & Black, Health
Cert. & Shots. Parents
on Premises $200
(352) 746-0221
MALTI-POO tiny liffle
furballs, sweet & love
able, home raised, HC,
1st shot, $350/400
(352) 564-2775
MASTIFF, English
Male, AKC, 15 mos. Big
Boned Beauty! Pick of
the litter MUST ELL!
$800 (352)621-0848
MINIATURE PONY
Part ARABIAN, mare,
7mo. old. very gentle.
& sweet $450. obo
(352) 795-7513
PUG PUPPIES
AKC & CKC Cert.,
Health Cert. 1 male, 1
female. Starting @ $500
(352) 464-1109
ROTTWEILER
Male, 14 mos. AKC, in
tact, beautiful dog.
Pick of litter. MUSTSELL!
$500 (352) 621-0848
SCOTTISH TERRIER
AKC REG. Gorgeous,
Male. 22wks old. Mov-
ing, must sell. 1st $450
firm. 352-422-5685
SIAMESE KITTENS
Seal Pt., blue Pt,,
chocolate, pure bred,
consumers warranty
shots, $200-$250
(352) 228-1906




15 YR. OLD TENN.
WALKER MARE
Very dark Bay, $600/
(352) 628-3456




3 mo. old Boar female
goats, pure bred, no
papers. 2-yr old Black
male Jerrsy Wooly, $20.
Red female rex rabit,
$10. (352) 563-1643,
leave message


1962, IFR equipped,
ur';' Ti;.. Strobes, Cus-
,-, ,, . Cover, New
Paint & Interior 2002.
Total time 3740. Engine
since remanufacture
1323. Runs & Flies as
smooth as silk. $35,000
(352) 637-5073
Skybabes@
netsiania.net




PONTOON BOAT
TRAILER
Tandem axle, 13" tires,
galv, 31 ft.adjustable.
1,400. (352) 447-0572




2, 1996 SeaDoos,
w/ trailer, runs good,
minor work w/ Fuel lines
on both, $2000.OBO,
(352) 464-3246
CENTURY 2280
1996 Bay with 150
Yamaha. Exc. Cond.,
VHF, FFinder, GPS,
Stereo, Custom Seat,
Alum Trailer. $12,000.
Call 407-376-4269









8D SUNDAY, SEPT



- CAROLINA SKIFF
"1989, 16', 7'6" beam, 50
- hp. Nissan, trlr. $1,600
(352) 302-8231
Carolina Skiff '95
CC 17' w/newly rebuilt
55HP Suzuki, gd, trailer
$4500 (352) 212-7651
CRESTLINER 16'
25HP Elect. Start,
trolling mtr, lites,
bilge, live well, galv trir,
2 yrs old, like new. Paid
6000 sell $3,950 call
302-5784
KEYWEST 1520
A "REEL" STEAL
2005 15' w/trailer
ALL THE UPGRADESIIIlI
(too many to mention).
Has less than 100 hours.
Just asking what Is
owed. call 400-5520
Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BoatSuper
Center.com
352 794-0094

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nature Coast Marine
New, Used &
Brokerage
We Pay Cash for
Clean Used Boats
www.BootSuoer
352 794-0094

Nature Coast Marine
Sales & ServIce |
Present this Ad for
10% Off on all I
Parts & ServIce
1590 US 19,
Homosassa
352-794-0094
--- -0 ml









NEW T-TOPS &
CUDDY CABIN
TOPS
Super Closeout Salel
Won't Last Longl
Call for Pricing
Mon-Frl, 9am-5pm
(352) 527-3555


HURRICANE 22'
'94, Fun Deck, fishing,
changing rm. 115 hp
Johnson. New bottom
paint. $7,500 obo
(352) 563-1327
NITRO 18'
1994, 150 Mercury
w/Trailer. Ready to fish!
$6,500 OBO
(352) 465-7209
PONTOON 16'
2003 Sylvan 16' w/02
40hp 4-stroke and 02
galv trailer. Bimini
top,trolling motor,
livewell, depth finder,
much more. VERY NICE
$8950. 212-5179
PONTOON 18'
With trailer. '00 40HP
motor, All in great
shape. 53500/ obo,
(352) 564-8941
PONTOON BOAT
25', 85 HP Yamaha,
New tandem axle trir.
$5,300 obo.
813-695-8428
352-634-4021 EVE
Pontoon Boat
30 ft. Party Hut, 93
Evinrude, 95H, T/T, runs
great, head, stove
frige, etc,. etc, 2001 Tan-
dem trlr,, new firs. car-
pet, seats $9,500 abo
(352) 860-0513


SAILBOAT 17'
Com-Pac, Sm. safe
family cruiser. Shoal
Draft (18") Keel. Trlr,,
extras. Asking $1,750
Needs TLC
(352) 563-0022
SEA PRO 21'
1998, Center Console,
150hp Yamaha, $10,000
(352) 795-2537 Iv. mess.
SEA RAY 18'
'99 Bowrlder w/ trailer,
115 Merc, OB, Tilt &
Trim, Extras, $8,900 OBO.
(352) 628-9056
SEARS HD
14' Aluminum
$400 or trade for a
Ghenoe,
(352) 795-3764
SPORTCRAFT
'86, 20 ',CC, 140 OMC,
Sea drive, rebuilt '05,
boat/mtr/trlr, $2,900
obo (352) 795-4204
STARCRAFT
'98, Bowrlder, 18'10", V-6
I/O, used In fresh water
only, $11,500 abo.
(352) 206-5894
SUNDANCE SKIFF
16', Center Console,
FF, LIvewell, 40 hp
Merc, mtr., blmlnl top,
trir. Mint Cond.l $6,500
(352) 382-5404


THUNDERCRAFT
16FT, '89 Bowrider, OMC
I/O, new carpet & seats
like new, garage kept
$2800obo 352-270-3641
Vectra Deck Boat
'06, Like new, seats 8,
90HP, loaded, $22k
Sell $16K abo
(352) 795-6895
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
Chronlclel
*2 weeks Onllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectilonl
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


i t-

BIG

RV SALE

BY
COMO RV
at
Crystal
Chevrolet

Hwy. 19-
Crystal River
Aug. 31

to

Sept 9
352-422-1282


t lOlOlive

Your world first.
Every Day


CHKONIJLE
c I 41LA iitt/


AUTO. BOAT. & RV
DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity,
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621
DAMON 32' 1997
w/SLIDE, new tires/
brakes $23,500/obo
(352) 628-0699, after 6
or (352) 344-4400
FOUR WINDS 31'
'04, Duct AC, Pwr.,
lev., Bckup camera,
gen., Loadedl 14K ml.,
$40,00 (352) 422-7794
HR ADMIRAL 36'
'02,2 slides, 1.5 baths,
11,500 miles, Exc. Cond.
$57,500
(352) 382-0017
PACE ARROW 34'
Sips 7, 2 roof airs, 56,600
ml, 454 Chev. eng, new
tires, awning, exhaust.
=950Q (352) 344-8409
ROCKWOOD
'94, 23 V1 ft., class A,
generator, roof AC,
Chevy, 19k ml, $16,900.
(352) 564-7935


AIRSTREAM 20'
1965 MODEL, 80%
refinished. $3500
(352) 422-7907
Catalina
'99, 31 ft., Coachman
super clean, everything
In good running cond.,
lots of upgrades. $9,500
Call (352) 527-8444
COACHMAN
Slide In 10FT camper,
new A/C, fridge, $900.
(352) 476-2149
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels etc. Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
KEYSTONE 32'
Bunkhouse
2005, 32 ft. Bunkhouse
with master. Sleeps 8,
microwave, Very nice
and clean, Value $20K
Sell for S15K OBO
Call 941-626-3951
PROWLER REGAL
'05, 39', alum. frame
const. fully loaded, 2 Ig
sldouts. 2 qu. sz, bdrms,
$17,500 (352) 634-4439

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


..,Auto P
wAcces


Lambo door hinges
fits Honda & Acura,
$300 obo
(352) 422-0792
LEER TOPPER,
fullsize truck forest
green, $250,
(352) 476-2149
LIFT GATE For Truck
12 Volt, Hydraulic
Exc. Cond. $1,000
(352) 621-0982
Tire Rims, 18" TSW
6 spoke rims w/tires,
lug nuts & wheel locks
Incl. recently
balanced. $600.obo
(352) 621-5588





TOP DOLLAR
For Junk Cars
$ (352) 201-1052 $
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skip
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645

$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W,
(352) 228-9645





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951'
*2 weeks In the
Chronlel
:2 weeks 0nllnal
*Featured In Tues.
"Wohel " SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrlctlons
May Apply


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870
|------ q
r I


ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY I
TODAY!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.1
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
JUST ASK.
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUIl
CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966


"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898
55' BUCKET TRUCK
20% off, mention of
this ad. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 344-2696
r AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE
I Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Apple. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126 g
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work, Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272



Your World








CHPrNICLE



*w chrnicleonlins rPOmr


FREE CONSULTATION
To hurricane ready your
trees. Prof. Arborist,
Action Tree 726-9724
Joseys Landscaping
Lawns, Trees, Pavers
Clean-up, Sod, dump
truck. (352) 556-8553
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serve. Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452




All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165
Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Repairs In-Home or
Pick-Up, Delivery, avail.
Free quote, 344-4839
Computer Pro, Lw Fit Rt.
In-House Networking,
virus, Spyware & morel
352-794-3114/586-7799



CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. LIc#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
'All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
All Phaze Construction
Quality painting &
repairs. Faux fin.
#0255709 352-586-1026
637-3632
S H


FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
* Roof Repairs * Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes








(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
, Sate Certled Lic #CCC1327843


INFRMAIOEN


George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
POPCORN CEILINGS
PAINTED
Free Estimates
(800) 942-3738
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Int./Ext., Free Estimate
Pressure Washing, Lic.
24/7, (352) 476-9013
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Rates! Lic. & Ins.
527-9b88 or 634-2407


M a r i n e

Affondalte Boat Macnt. &
Mechanical, Elecrcal,
Custom
Rig. John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236




TOP HAT AIRPORT SERVE.
.- Aug-Sept. Special
Tampa Int. $75 max. 2
people. (352) 628-4927




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




FREE ESTIMATES
FREE P.U. & DELIVERY
Furniture & Cornices
628-5595




COMPASSIONATE
PERSONAL CAREGIVER
With References. Call
(352) 613-0078




-Windows & Doors
-Storm Shutters
-Board-Up Service
-Resident./Commercial
CRC 1326431
. (352) 746-9613




6 REG HOME DAY CARE
Openings NOW FT/PT
0 Infants Welcome f
- 352-726-5163 a


VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
fully coated. 30 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Ins. Lic#001721
352-795-6533/464-1397




EXP. HOUSEKEEPER
Call for est. Will clean
any day of wk. Monica
352-795-7905
Hauler & Clark
Handyman & More
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
SOTO'S CLEANING
SERVICE
Lic. & Ins.
352-489-5893/216-2800




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Special Introductory
offer 20% Discount
IIc. & Ins. (352) 503-3558




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391
PRICE Finish Carpentry
Wood moldings & doors
30+ yrs. Lic.17510184057
352-860-0675/302-4389
ROGERS Construction
New Homes,Additions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC1326872


C4

FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
1 panel or comp cage
Family owned & oper'd
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996


IN-ORATIO


Ultra Seal Coatings
Specializing in roof and
concrete sealing
* Vinyl & Stucco Sealing
* Pressure Washing
* Designer Driveways
* Pool Decks
, Summer Special ',

Roof cleaned 14500 -'

- 713926 352-628-1027
....352-628-1027


A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913






PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
housesdriveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lc./Ins. 341-3300
* ROLAND'S *
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mobiles, houses & roofs
Driveways w/surface
cleaner. No streaks
24 yrs. Liec. 352-726-3878
Willie's Painting &
Pressure Cleaning
Great Ratesl Uc. & Ins.
527-9088 or 634-2407




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
1 Call does It AIII No lob.
too sml Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc, CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
fPessure & cleaning,
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
#99990257151 & Ins,
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
r AFFORDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE I
I Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
1 Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126
In -- -- mi
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est.
Affordable & Reliable
Llc.34770 (352)427-2588






FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEi Most repairs.
Free Est., Lic # 0256374
(352) 257-9508,


rINDelYMIAN
If its Broke , Jerry
Can Fix It. Llc#189620
352-201-0116,726-0762
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Hauter & Clark
Handyman & More
Home, Office & Floor
Cleaning, Lawn Serv.
Pressure Washing,
(352) 860-0911
NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services. Lic.2776/lns.
(352) 628-4282 VIsa/MC


Poe's Sewer & Drain
Cleaning, We unstop
4talles+. silni Imi 5cit.


i.um., n-, Wiiw
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

H AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE I
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Apple. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126
A-1 Hauling cleanup,
garage clean outs,
trash turn. & appl. Misc.
Mark (352) 344-2094
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264/201-1422
Furn. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
WE MOVE SHEDS
266-5903



CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431


IC---N-C E EI-- -------II


ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
LIc./Ins (352) 795-1110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. IIc
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD 11FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973. Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
GARY JOE ROSEBERRY
Fence Company
Specializing In vinyl
(3o\ A62-nooo


#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC 1327059
(352) 344-2442
John Gordon Roofing
Rem Rates. Free est. Proud to
Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358
RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates!!
Exp'd, Lic. CCC1327843
Erik (352) 628-2557




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Llc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demollt. 352-746-9613
Llc# CRC1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sdewdks, Driveways Patios,
.Free est. LIc. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Llc.1476 726-6554



Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inco
Uc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
ALL AMERICAN
HANDYMAN Free Est,
Affordable & Reliable
Lic.34770 (352)427-2588


HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
Lic. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391






We do It ALL BIg or Sm.I
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
DrywallCrown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613



CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
LIc/Ins. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic. #2713, Insured.
Showers, Firs. Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019




ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Llc.#SCC131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing, Tile
Painting, Framing. 35yrs
344-1952 CBC058263




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All typvoes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
ALL AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 795-5755
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
A TOP SOIL SPECIAL *
Screened, no stones.
10 Yards $150; 20 Yards
$250 @ 352-302-6436




ALL AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 795-5755


ISIFORATI _


tyn Uo .,x'alm C.suI


Boulerice^"^

CCC025464 0BOO21B0 r UA
& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned & Operated
NEW ROOFS - REROOFS - REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES



COMPLTE ROF 1


ig(5)di-628fi79- (52) 628-445


SARD VAC



Dethatching Lawns
Vacuum Leaves & Thatch,
Tree Trimming
(352) 637-3810 or (352) 287-0393
FREE ESTIMATE Licensed & insured


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
M.H. Demolition &
Salvage. Land clearing,
tree brush removal
(352) 634-0329
*SUNSHINE OF CITRUS*
Clearing/Stone Drvwys
/Top Soil/ Fill Dirt.
(352) 302-6436
YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE
TRACTOR SERVICE
Tree/Debris Removal
Driveways/Demolition
Une Rock/Fill Dirt
Sr. Disc. 352-302-4686
TURTLE ACRES
Bushhog, Grading,
Stumpgrlndlng,
Removal No job too
small. (352) 422-2114




D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design, Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Joseys Landscaping
Lawns. Trees, Pavers
Clean-up, Sod, dump
truck. (352) 556-8553
+ SOD * SOD � SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295, 503-5082
Coon, Robert
Lawn Service
FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 563-0376
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Llc./Ins.
* 352-464-3967 *
SPOOL LINERSI *
* 15 Yrs. Exp..*
Call for free estimate
v (352) 591-3641 i.
POOL REPAIRS?
Comm. & Res., & Leak
detection, lic. 2819,
352-503-3778, 302-6060


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




"DEBRIS HAULING"
& Misc. Clean-Up,
Tree Service & Demos
352.447-3713/232-2898

HARBOR KEY DEV. LLC
LIc. CGC 004432 Ins
Custom Luxury Homes
Add-on & Remodeling
Res. & Commercial
Industrial - Warehouse
New Steel Buildings
Steel Bldg. Repairs
Thermal Roof Coatings
Area Rep (352)628-4391
METAL BUILDINGS
Pump houses, carports,
etc. Very reasonable
Fred (352) 464-3146
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM




0 RAINDANCER 0
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Availablell
Lie. & Ins. 352-860-0714

ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Pricel
6" Seamless Gutters
LUc&lIns 621-0881





NEED A NEW DOOR?
Pre-Hung Door units
New Const. or remod.
ENTRY POINT by Perry's
Lic. 2598(352)726-6125






Gopher Gully Sod Inc.
Form Direct Rolls
Sod Installation
Seeding & Mulching
352-812-4345/817-4887


ALUMINUM


END OP SUMMER
SPECIAL

ANY ROOF CLEANED

303003,0 sq.ft.

iSuncoast
Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.
www.roofcleaningnopressure.com
877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


I T Vehicles
4bi. Wanted I


a


r--l


CILASSIFIEDS


I


I


--------------------


PI


p










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) C













DONATIONS
Tax Deductible
Maritime Ministries
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Proceeds Benefit
Local Battered
Women's Shelter
(352) 795-9621
BUICK CENTURY '02
Custom Sedan, 1 owner
65K, meticulous cond.
Loaded. Non-smoking.
$9400. (352) 726-3520
BUICK CENTURY '92
2.5, 4cyl, all pwr, no
leaks, uses no oil. Very
clean, orig. paint. Must
see $1500/obo 344-5448
BUICK LESABRE
2004, Sr. owned, 67K mi.
good cond., $8,500
Call before 9pm
(352) 382-2420
BUICK LESABRE
LIMITED 2003
23,500 mi., $12900 Ex.
cond. 352-795-5675
BUICK PARK AVE
1996, Loaded! Runs
& drives great! 232K
All Hwy mi. $1,995 obo
352-637-3550/228-1420
CADILLAC 2001
DEVILLE
Must be seen.
One ofakindl $10,200
obo. (352) 527-6553
Cadillac EIDorado
'92, custom paint, new
tires/rims, keyless entry.
AC, Ithr, Nice audio sys.
$3600/bo 352-746-6370
CAVALIER 1999
Good Gas Mileage.
4 door, Good cond.
Well maintained.
$2,000. (352) 746-6439
CHEVY CORVETTE
'99, 76K mi, heads up
display, 2 roof panels,
white, It gray leather
$19,700
352-382-3094
CHRYSLER
'02, PT Cruiser, Lmtd.,
edition, only 49k ml,
Pwr, everything, loaded
$8,500bo. 352-601-5111





COUNTRY SIDE MOTORS
Extra Clean Used Cars,
Trucks & Motorcycles.
RV's, Boats. Jetskiis.
Consignment Wanted.
Detailing avail
www.countryvside
motorscorp.com
(352) 746-7883
FORD Crown Vic LX
Low miles. 56K.
Immaculatel See NOW
@ www.citrushills.
shutterfly.com
Password: crownvic
$6,590 obo 637-6046
FORD ESCORT
'98, Gas Miserl 110K,
New tires, Frosty AC,
CD, 4 spd., Exc. Cond.
$.1,900(352) 563-0022,
FORD TAURUS 1993
Very clean inside & out.
Runs good. 107K, Asking
$975 352-628-5378
I FORD Taurus
'99, pwr. everything,
new tires, battery/
brakes $2,300. Floral
City (305)304-1096
Lincoln Towncar '96
Cold AC, new tires.
garaged, runs like new,
S $1900/obo. 795-4770
Lincoln Towncar'98
Signature Series, 74K ml,
loaded, beautiful. Wht.
tthr. all pwr, CD plyr.
$6900/bo 352-445-0507
MERC. COUGAR
'01, black, V-6, full pwr,
63,000 mi. $6995/obo
352-212-7168
MITSUBISHI Spyder
Eclipse '01, Convt., 5
spd. Tint, Wht/Tan Top,
60K, Immaculate! Grgd
$14,500 (352) 382-0005
MUSTANG - RED '01
15,000 mi. 1 owner,
loaded, $9,900.
(352) 212-5628
NISSAN SENTRA
'05, auto, AC, PW, PL,
CC, CD, 35K mi. Very
11 clean, garaged, $9,850
352-634-3921
NISSAN SENTRA
2004, Rebuilt. 27K mi,,
auto, AC $7,500
(352) 527-2464
SATURN SCI '99
3 dr, 4 cyl, auto, 127K
mi. Cold AC, Runs/drives
perfect. $2550
i (352) 453-6870
TOYOTA
PRIUS
2007 Silver, NEW
1,300 miles $24,999
(352)422-0294
WHEEL OF A
DEAL



;t t I




GUARANTEED
I RESULTS FOR
I ONLY $63.95


Sell your car today
with a Wheel of a
Deal Ad. Run a 30
Sday ad and we will
continue to run your
i ad every month until
you sell the car.

i (352) 563-5966
(352) 726-0902
*Ad will not be
I automatically
Scheduled. The
Customer must call
Each month to
reschedule.

Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500


CHRONICLEE


I M41-
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96,
Exc. Cond./AII pwr.,
Mntc. Rcds., Grgd.
$3,500 (352) 422-5685
$500 Pocelpounds For
sde!
Cas from S500! ForIsngscd
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374



A Classic Car WANTED
American or Foreign
Will travel, Cash waiting
(407) 957-6957
AUTO/SWAP/CAR
CORRAL SHOW
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
Florida Swap Meets
September 2,
1-800-438-8559
CHEVY CHEVELLE
1965
31,000, $8,500 4 door
Malibu, 99% original
car, white, mint
condition 352-586-9113
MUSTANG '87
Red Convertible. 86K ml.
Sharp I See to
appreciate. $4200 firm.
(352) 341-4313
VW BEETLE 1973
Partly restored; This car
WILL Be Sold to the best
offer. (352) 527-1269
(352) 400-5369
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$500! For listings call
1 on .AAt ,3L . 1 ,4-. - 7.17A


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2.weeks Qnlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" SectionI
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVROLET
1980, 4x4, step side,
built 350, 9" lift, 35
swampers, 1 ton
running gear, runs &
drives great,$1900.OBO
(352) 795-0848
CHEVY 1/2 TON PU
'71, short wheel base,
great shape, 350 auto.
Edelbrock carb. Intake
headers, 17" whls & tires
Illness forces sale.$5850.
352-726-1711 Days
637-6519 after 6




DODGE
'96,RAM SLT 1500,
custom paint, too much
.too list. Excel. shape to
pretty for words, $5,995
obo (352) 860-0513
. DODGE
'97, SLT, Laramie
ext. cab., diesel,70k mi.,
$12,000.
(352) 795-9339
DODGE DAKOTA
'96, w/topper.
Good Cond.
$2,700 obo
(352) 527-4590
DODGE RAM
'96 1500 Club Cab,
$3,800/obo Rebuilt
Engine & Trans.Runs gd.
352-465-2087/697-2357
FORD F150 1984
150,826. $600,00 work
truck; runs great strght
6cyl. nds work has bed
topper 352-634-1597
FORD F-150 XL '95
Ext. cab,300, 6cyl. 5spd,
Air, clean, $2500 obo.
(352) 795-7757 or
(352) 697-9563
FORD F-350 '99
V-10, gas, 4X2 Super
Cab, loaded!!
137,000 mi. $6,500
(352) 503-3571
FORD RANGER
2004,27K mi., Auto, AC,
V-6.'Exc. Cond. $10K
obo (352) 527-2464
MAZDA B4000
2000, Ext. Cab, pwr, AC,
79K, Asking $6,500
(352) 302-0586
NISSAN FRONTIER
'04 88,000 mi, Original
Owner, Very Clean &
dependable, 26+ mpg
$9,200. (352) 697-0147
TOYOTA
'94, Pickup, 4 cyl., 5 spd.
looks & runs good,
$2,200. (352) 302-2258
After 5, weekdays
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374



CHEVY TRAIL
BLAZER 2003
42000K, One owner
,V6. Dark Green
W/Grey cloth interior. &
towing pkg $12,000
OBO. 352-726-9881
FORD EXPLORER '98
XLT, V8, all pwr, extras,
tow pkg. New tires, 1
owner, 97K, Runs great.
$4950. (352) 628-5341
GMC SUBURBAN
'99, leather, all options,
full chrome pkg, cust,
wheels/tires, hi ml, perf.
maint, exc. cond.
$7,000 (352) 422-3661
MERCURY
03, MOUNTAINEER, 4dr
83,500 ml, new tires, like
new, $11,700. OBO
(352) 503-6076
(352)464-3322
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-8nn0AA-OR-91 et 737A


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951"
.2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" SectlonI
Caf Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
'$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


CHEVROLET 2500
'04, LT Silverado HD,
XCab, Long Bed, 4 X 4
Duramax Diesel, 46K,
Loaded! $21,900
(352) 489-7689
DODGE RAM 1500
2003, Hemi. Quad cab,
75K mi., $11,900
(352) 228-7033
FORD EXPLORER
1995 4x4 Limited,
223,000 miles, White,
gray interior. $2,745.
352-382-3094
FORD F-150
'94, 4WD, runs & looks
good, 300 6Cyl., 5spd.
00D, $2,250 obo
(352) 795-4204
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1 AnnO AAMQ1 o . p 7.74


CMI*VMULtI
'93 G-20 van, Mark 111,
V-6 auto., AC PW PL
new parts tires, $2,250
(352) 344-5003
CHEVY
'01, Astro, LS, 4.3L eng.,
wheelchair lift, in the
side door, 36k mi.,
$8,000. (352) 527-4247
CHEVY
'77, 1-Ton, Box Van
V8, automatic, AC
good tires, $1,800. or
trade for boat & motor.
228-2745


�1 , IItlO ifIt \e
Your' world first.
Ever Dayv


CHO NICE


CHEVY STEP VAN
'73, Good Cond.
$1,995
(352) 621-0982
CHEVY STEP VAN
'78, C30 Series. Good
Work Truck $500
(352) 621-0982
CHRYSLER
2000 Town & Country
LX, one owner, great
shape, 151K, all power
$3,995. (352) 341-3711
DODGE
'96 Caravan, V-6 149K
clean, runs real good,
$1,800 (352) 489-6072
(239) 450-8153
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY




^-



ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS ,
RESIDENTIAL SALES
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374



*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA TRX 200
ATV, runs & drives, with
high and low transm.
$600obo 352-628-2769


POLARIS 800
Low hours '06, $4500
(352) 302-1861
4 WHEELER
(TWO) 2001 Kawasaki
220 4wheelers. Good
condition. $1100.00
each. 352-748-5005


law-----


2 HARLEY'S
'97 Road King 28K mi.
burgundy/silver stocked
'01 1200 Sportster
custom, 18,250 mi,
Burgundy & dark
burgundyLowered
w/forward controls
(352) 583-4338

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlinel
.Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectioni
Call Today
(352) 726-3983
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"'5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
*FREE REMOVAL OF'
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers, golf carts. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
GOLDWING SE
1990, Honda, 72K mi. like
new, Pearl white, $6,000
a must see. Crystal River
cell 772-528-6130
HARLEY CHOPPER
'71 Old School Iron
Head. Everything
redone A steal @
$5,500
352-308-2570/586-19.17


HONDA Goldwing
'76, GL 1000
Exc. Cond.
Many extras, $2,995
(352) 621-0982
HONDA VTX 1300
2006, Custom, Black,
Wndshld. Saddlebags,
Back Rest, Like Newl
$7,000obo 220-2374
HONDA
VTX 1800 R, black, 2003,
15k ml. adult driven,
absolute perf. cond.
windshield, light bar,
hyper charger, engine
guards etc. etc, call for
full list of accessories
$7,500 . 352-228-9514
LONGBO SCOOTER
'05, 6 mos, old. 150CC,
Up to 65 Mph
Showroom Cond,
$1,295 obo 436-4132
PAGSTA MOTOR
SCOOTER, auto, street
legal. Like new, only
60mi. $695/obo
(352) 628-4276
SCOOTER 2005
150miles,$ 1700
Daielm scooter brand
New; hardly used.
Very sharp Scooter 50cc
call 352-249-0815
not after 8:00 pm
SUZUKI BLVD C50
2005. 6000 miles,
windshield, factory
custom paint, saddle
bags, gel seat,light
bar, 50 M.P.G..
Beautiful cruiser
$6,200
352-634-0430
YAMAHA
1989, 1100, cc, good
cond.,.mellow yellow
color, $1,600 firm
(352) 560-3883
YAMAHA
'85, Venture Royal, exc.
cond., new tires, 37K ml.
Asking $2,200 obo
(352) 621-0927


736-0905 W-TUCRN
Citrus County
Fleet Management
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment


via the Internet at
govdeals.com from
August 15, 2007 to
September 5, 2007.
Published seven (7) times,
consecutively, starting
August 15 through Sep-
tember 5,2007.


329-0902 SUCRN
CITRUS COUNTY OMB
PUBLIC NOTICE
Invitation to Bid
ITB No. 129-07
HOME REPAIRS
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites in-
terested parties to submit sealed bids for residential
home repairs..
To obtain Information concerning this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Board of County Commis-
sioners' Website at www.bocc.cltrus.flus, and select
the link titled "Bid Information" at the bottom of the
Home Page, or, call Citrus County's Office of Manage-
ment & Budget / Purchasing Section at (352) 527-5457.
A mandatory Pre-BId Conference and walk through will
be held on.September 10, 2007 at 9:00 AM at the resi-
dential site located In Dunnellon, FL to answer ques-
tions and review the Scope of Work.
SEALED Bids are due on or before September 19, 2007
at 2:00 PM and are to be submitted to Jill Epperson, Of-
fice of Management & Budget, Purchasing Section at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids Is scheduled for
September 19, 2007 at 2:30 PM at the Lecanto
Government Building located at 3600 West Sovereign
Path - Room 226, Lecanto, Florida.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to at-
tend the Conference or Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Of-
fice of Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at
least two days before the scheduled date. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Dennis Damato, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 2, 2007.


SUNDAY, SEI'TEMBM13 2, 2007 9D





324-0902 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
MORTGAGE FOR SALE
BY SEALED BID
Due 9/10/2007, $82,817. Face Value
7.75% interest 25 year schedule.
Call 352-621-9225
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle
August 26 and September 2, 2007.

328-0902 SUCRN
CITRUS COUNTY OMB
PUBLIC NOTICE
Invitation to Bid
ITB No. 128-07
Specimen Tree Removal, Trimming,
and Stump Grinding
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners In-
vites Interested parties to provide services for Removal,
Trimming, and Stump Grinding of Specimen Trees
throughout the County and provide arborist evaluation
as necessary.
To obtain Information concerning this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Board of County Commis-
sioners' Webslte at www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us. and select
the link titled "Bid Information" at the bottom of the
Home Page, or, call Citrus County's Office of Manage-
ment & Budget / Purchasing Section at (352) 527-5457.
SEALED Bids are due on or before September 19, 2007
at 2:00 PM and are to be submitted to Jill Epperson. Of-
fice of Management & Budget, Purchasing Section at
3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids Is scheduled for Septem-
ber 19, 2007 at 2:15 PM at the Lecanto Government
Building located at 3600 West Sovereign Path - Room
226, Lecanto, Florida.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to at-
tend the Conference or Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Of-
fice of Management & Budget at (352) 527-5457 at
least two days before the scheduled date. If you are
hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Dennis Damato, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
on September 2, 2007.


AR


in The Citrus County Chronicle Classifieds


Only the Citrus County Chronicle can give you all


these benefits


* Your ad will be scheduled thirty days and appear in the Citrus"

County Chronicle and online each and every day.


* Your person-to-person ad will reach the largest audience


* Your ad goes online to the largest database of vehicles for sale


* Change the price of your car as often as you like


* Our Automotive Classifieds are categorized by make for ease of

readership


* Your ad consists of the make and four lines of description for $63.95


* Get your ad in right away!









563-5966


CIlTRUS - " COUNTYlU




Swww.chronicleonline.corn


YOUR






CITRUS COUNTrY (FL) CuHtONICI.I?


01 , iviiii


WM


0,+2 0 0 7 ONEVERY
APR TRUCK AND SUV"
- CASH BACK


07 F-150 07 Escape 07 Explorer 07 Ranger

O,, FINANCING*o3.000 REBATE*


07 Edge 07 Focus 07 Fusion 07 Mustang
**Available on 2007 models. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing. Finance terms may vary by vehicle. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 9/3/07.
See dealer for qualifications and complete details.*Available on 2007 models. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit limited-term financing. Finance terms may vary by vehicle. $1,500
Cash Back on 2007 Mustang V6 and Mustang GT. $1,000 Cash back on 2007 Fusion. $3,000 Total Cash Back on 2007 Focus $500 Ford Credit Bonus Cash. Ford Credit Bonus Cash
requires Ford Credit financing. Not all buyers will qualify. $1,000 Cash Back on 2007 Edge. Take new retail delivery from dealer from dealer stock by 9/3/07. See dealer for
qualifications and complete details. '


NEW '07 SHELBY GT 500 CONVERTIBLE
s59,590


Ford Focus cc
100,000 mile
W
* 5-year/100,000-mile Powertrain
transferable from one owner to the nex
Plan
_W O WI '- ' - .


DI ID YOU

I KNOW
homes with a five year
? Power Train limited
warranty *
Limited Warranty includes roadside assistance and is
xt. Deductible applies in Florida for the Extended Service
. See dealer for details.
- :.' .:>|-- .^^ - J if "


NEW '07 SHELBY GT
$45,339


'04 HONDA CIVIC LX
01I2,995
S49QQA


S -Ca w. *" --'"- * ' . -, . -".

06 HRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LX '02 CHEVY SIO CREW CAB LS 4X4 '05 FORD F350 4X4 KING RANCH CREWC.M
, 9 'i -- i4- l 3 t ' * ,r-iiiP : iht:ls?
$ 17,995 14,995 $31,995


'05 FORD EXPLORER
1 9- 9,95- E-it,


,07 FORD E350 CLUB WAGON XLT '98 CHEVY.
$19,995 $2,9
I- I .I";


05 CHRYSLER SEBRING '07 FORD TAURUS SE
Convertible.
$11,995 14,995
* * ~y~yj * T * y ^Mob>


00 FORD F150 SUPER CAB 4X4 '05 FORD EXPEDITION LIMITED 4X4
Tool box, mag wheels One owner
$9,995 126,995


'99 GMC SAFARI SLE '06 FORD FREESTAR SE '04 FORD F150 4X,
Automatic, dual air seven passenger Loaded Super Cab Lariat Edition.
$5,999 $14,995 $22,995


'96 FORD TAURUS WAGON LX
$4.995


14' box, one owner.
$5.995


'05 FORD F250 LARIAT 4X4 CREW CAB
Power stroke turbo diesel
- $33995


150 STX '05 FORD 500 SEL '02 FORD RANGER XL
Loaded!
195 *12,995 $8,995


'00 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4X4


Salesperson of tre Month
JULY

[M1I


Ana Cruz
10 years . Sales


$89995


'01 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB XLT '04 FORD RANGER XLT SUPER i
I $9,995 14,995


COME MEET

YOUR FRIENDS
Ron Tesar Rick Petro Scott Parker C
25 year -Sales 1Syea5 m -Sales. years -Sales 5:

.g FREE LIFETIME TIRE
ROTATION & BALANCE


14 A R.'EFLOIO


0
NW


S 'Rick Canady
5 years - Sales
- i


. Genuine Moiorcraft Premium
Synthetic Blend oil and
filter change
Rotate and inspect four tires
ChecK air and cabin air filters


,wK E4W inspect brake system
With Purchase of FUELSAVER , Testbattery
SPAC A GE Check belts and hoses
Any Four Tires U . Topooffallfluids
Offer Expires 9/30/07 r,:.,:,u. n . .-,-Tr,; . :.- I :.: - . I r1. L. . Is


\CRYSTAL RIVER MALL


'05 FORD "500" LIMITED
$14,995
--* Tq-". "


MARQUIS LS


I


Al6


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SUNDAY, SEIPTIMBjER 2, 2007 11D


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�.... I"_- W W \,


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-4-,nHXME^B.- ~ l~f


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2002 DAKOTA


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2003 SONATA


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2002 SILVERADO

mu.iJSSa


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U ll -i~ uriiiL.^^, ^ - UMf f


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2006 CADILLAC
Jmr^B^^f?^ _


123,888

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2005 CANYON


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2004 MAZDA 3


'11,888

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2003 MALIBU


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800-325-1415 EXT. 8305


2002 M/B SLK320


121,888

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II I



OCALA NISSAN 1ILM

(800) 342-3008 2200 SR 200 OCALA (352) 622-4111
ALL PRICES WITH $1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND '395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY.
PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I I I I


/


Ilk , ,






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


12D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


TORY Si


LES E.


Make
FORD
PONTIAC
MERCURY
FORD
PONTIAC
MERCURY
MERCURY
KIA
CHEVY
JEEP
TOYOTA
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
FORD
DODGE
PONTIAC
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
FORD
FORD


SUZUKI
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
DODGE
FORD
CHEVY
CHEVY
NISSAN
DODGE
KIA
CHRYSLER
KIA
KIA
MAZDA
CHEVY
KIA
BUICK
PONTIAC
PONTIAC
MITSU
FORD


Model
TEMPO GL
FIREB T-
GD MARQ.
CRWON VI
GRAM GT
GD MARQ
GD MARQ
SEDONA/L
SILVE 25
LIBERTY
SIENNA X
VERONA L
VERONA E
EXPLORE XL
NEON SXT
GD AM SE
XL7 EX/I
XL7 EX/I
ESCORT L
ESCAPE X


XL7 EX/L
XL7 LXII
XL7 EX/L
VERONA S
XL7 EX11
FORENZA
RAM
EXPLORER
S10
2500
MAXIMA
RAM 1500
SORENTO
PT CRUISER
SEDONA E
SORENTO
TRIBUTE
AVALANCHE
SORENTO
REGAL
FIREBIRD
VIBE
LANCER
ESCORT


Body
SEDAN
3DR
4DR
SEDAN
2DR
4DR
4DR
VAN
P/UP
SUV
VAN
SEDAN
SEDAN
SUV-
4DR
4DR
SUV
SUV
SUV
4DR


SUV
SUV
SUv
4DR
SUV
4DR
PK
SUV
PK
PK
4DR
PK
SUV
4DR
VAN
SUV
SUV
SUV
SUV
4DR
2DR
4DR
4DR
2DR


Stock.
U0056A
U0067A
U0071
$7065A
S7022A
U0070A
S7078A
S7085A
U0050A
U0072
U0073
U0074
U0012A
S7088A
U0076
U0077
U0078
U0080
U0081
U0075


Yr
94
06
06
02
98
99
06
01
04
04
04
04
94
05
93
94,
94
94
95
96


S8001A
S7025B
U0060A
U0088
U0087
U0089
S7082A
S7081A
U0020A
U0094
U0090
U0092
U0093
U0069A
S7029A
S7014A
S7042A
S7032A
U0095
U0091A
S7060B
U0096A
U0047A
S7088M
U0100


Make
TOYOTA
FORD
FORD
BUICK
SUZUKI
TOYOTA
JEEP
PONTIAC
FORD
MITSUB
SUZUKI
FORD
BUICK
CHRYSLER
CHRYSLER
PONTIAC
FORD
DODGE
CHRYSLER
MERCURY


CHEVY
OLDS
ISUZU
MITSUB
HYUNDAI
HYUNDAI
NISSAN
FORD
ISUZU
KIA
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
NISSAN
MERCED
NISSAN
FORD
SUZUKI
SUZUKI
GMC
LINCOLN
MERCURY
KIA
SUZUKI
CHEVY


Model


COROLLA
F350
TAURUS S
RENDEZVO
SIDEKICK
CAMRY
GR CHER
GRAM
FOCUS
ECLIPSE
AERIO SX
MUSTANG
LESABRE
PT CRUISER
CONCORDE
FIREBIRD
CROWN VI
RAM
LEBARON
MYSTIQUE


LUMINA
BRAVADA
VEHICROSS
ENDEAVOR
ACCENT G
TIBURON
SENTRA
F150
AXIOM
OPTIMA L
SZ4AWD
XL7
GRAND VI
ALTIMA
E420
ALTIMA
BRONCO
FORENZA
FORENZA
DENALI
TOWN CAR
COUGAR
SEPHIA
VZR1800
C1500 TA


BROS. SUZUKI

915 N. SUNCOAST BLVD.* CRYSTAL RIVER, FL


Way of Life!


T


94
97
00
01
02
02
02
03
03
03
03
04
04
05
05
05
05
05
97
03


Stock
U0021
U0013
U0029
U0026
U0023
U0027
U0030
U0003
U0007
U0008
U0031
U0034
U0035
U0009
U0019
U0022
U0036
U0037
U0049
U0044


U0041
U0042
U0043
U0046
U0040
U0045
U0005A
U0053
U0055
U0001A
U0032A
U0059
U0057
U0061
U0063
U0064
U0066
U0065
S7063A
S7048A
U0018B
U0068
U0033A
U0052B


Body
4DR
PK
4DR
4DR
4DR
4DR
4DR
2DR
4DR
HATCH
4DR
CONV
4DR
CONV
4DR
2DR
4DR
VAN
CONV
4DR


4DR
4DR
SUV
Suv
4DR
2DR
4DR
TRUCK
4DR
SEDAN
HATCH
WAGON
WAGON
4DR
4DR
4DR
SUV
4DR
SEDAN
4DR
4DR
2DR
4DR
MC
WAGON


04
04
04
04
05
06
05
03
03
03
89
02
04
06
06
06
03
04
06
96
98
04
04
98


0()Oli





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUZUKI

* SUMMER

SELL-DOWN


w^fll


DRIVE YOUR
NEXT VEHICLE
FOR ONLY1
OUER 200 CARS. TRUCKS. ANS &
SUU's for PENNIES ON THE DOLARI
R- nS ;YW


OSSOU * em ip .* baaaaa


SPECIAL
NOW THRU LABOR
Citrus Residents can
select from ouer 50
*nw SUZUMi Forenza's
and Reno's for onHi
fUJgJ WU IiJUUii


BUV
DAY ONLY


-f . .t


-~ ..g ~ '-2 jr4Lb~fl4~*~fl,*


DBDRC CS 171 i


.AL. * � 1, N7,"
"915 N. SUNCOAST BLVD.* CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
K.%;,':? ;- - '; ; " . : ".. . ' . . . % L ,. . ; . . .


F'OFFERSYNO E CB INED f'TH ANY OTHER OFFER ORINTERNETqPJCE 6 FO FRFCJOIGUAL MS RP WHEN NEW SSPER I MNH PAvIhEN I TH. L PHKEP T OUNT W OWSMO'N CAfW VEHICLE FINCf E CON ACT SUSSBIOET m BfTHE DEALERFOR TH F IT3Q4NTI NW1 IN E FORMOFAAC DISCOUNTAFTERmTAT ITE K itThL PAYMENT IS EAJAL TO THE AMUNJT Sn wN
N ThE rfA .E CONTRACT FOR THE REMAINDER O THE 1ERM A PR AMOUNT F LANCED. A TERM OF LOAN WILL V'AY Bi THE VE CLPURCHASED CRE11 CORE AND OTHER FACTORS PREI APPROVAL CERTIFICATE LENDER WILL DETERMIE FINAL PREAPPROVAL AMOJWT SEE DEALER FOR DETAS LOAN APPROVAL SuECT TO PIMNUM INCOME RE AEENTSA REW FUED
CAEHR DOWNIPAfENT SWIPER u0NTH PARENT BASED ON EELEC r VEHICLEWIT AM 12 CASH DOWNMOk, TRADE EQUiTY PLUS LG TAG AJD DEALER FEE ALL REBATES AND INCENTrvES TO DEALER PURASER- MUST QUALIFY FOR ALLIEBATES PROGRAMS SUILIECT TO CAN WfTHOuT NOTICE NDvPAvmNTS1UTIL, i YEAP WITH APPRaOVE CRPEDT SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS


@4,
'41.4,
.4

6;
.44
44'
4> '4
4 .4'
64
.44' j
44%.' -
K.
4,


4-


Wayof Life!


&tiw


SUNDAY, Sri-rFmBrR 2, 200713M


vmo.





14D SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2007


FLORIDA'S FASTEST GROWING MITSUBISHI DEALER


/I


07 OUTLANDER


SAWE!
gg






$1

fk..


I


Ak 268
I80 yW PER MONTH*
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT, 2806


07 RAIDER


SAVII


19 1888 $288
I a-V8 PER MONTH*


,1-i~i-
F If ag ~
a it IT:.-, I


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 2807


07 SPYDER 07


* ii
U,


ENDEAVOR




19,888 388
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUI THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT, 2809


2008 LANCER
SAVEi * POWER WINDOWS
S* POWER MIRRORS
�140 WATT AM/FM/CD PLAYER
* TILT STEERING
* ADVANCED FRONT AIR BAGS


11 888'168
PER MONTH*
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE ABOUT THIS
800-325-1415 EXT. 2801


VEHICLE


2008 ECLIPSE
SSAYSl * POWER WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS
S#* ANTI-THEFT
* CRUISE
* KEYLESS ENTRY
* 17" ALLOY WHEELS
* FRONT, SIDE, CURTAIN AIRBAGS
*16 888 $288
188 PER MONTH*
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 2802


OCA


2200 SR 200


A


MITSUBISH


(352)622-4111 * (800)342-3008


0%FINANCINGFRV UP TO 72 MONTS IN EUOA A EHICLESNIS ON SELECT MODELS W.C. PFRCES NET 28E TRAD E EOr TAXO. MCEE FSE RELSFORTTAX , T CDESTIATION, A E WS, E ST O FE ES MLOYALTFOR FEMONES ADRTAE LOAN (T4O EACONREEL D C.POTO$ FORII TIAONPURPOSESONLY. ALL
VEHICLES USJECT TO PRIOR SALE, OFFERS CANNOT 8E COMBINED. SALES TAX. LICENSE FEE, REWiSTATION FEE, FINANCE ONARO, EMISSION TESTINGI FEES AND COMPLIANCE FEES ARiE ADDITIONAL TO ADVERTISED PRICES.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CuHRONICLE


N.
~ SAKT


$21,888
FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 2803


07 GALANT


*14,888
', - FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
( Ji ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT. 2805


I w-e


so
iiev,


i


SAW".




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