Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00925
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: June 26, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00925

Full Text











FORECAST:
Partly sunny
Isolated t-storms
by afternoon.
PAGE 4A


> .


Roddick opens with a victory at Wimbledon /1B .


JUNE 26, 2007



S Vote
0 today
Citrus County voters
can cast their votes from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m. today during
the 2007 Special Elec-tion.
On the ballot will be the
State Senate District 3 race
between Democrat Suzan
Franks and Republican
Charlie Dean; and the State
Representative District 43
race between Democrat
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca, No-
Party Affiliate David
Gregory and Republican
Ron Schultz. Crystal River
voters will be able to vote'
for the City Council Seat 3
race between Mike Gudis
and Maureen McNiff.

SURPRISE:
Swindled
Woman falls victim to con
artists who convinced her she
was dating baseball star Pedro
Martinez./Page 3A


Subtle symptoms
Myasthenia gravis is an
autoimmune disease, where
the immune system has
attacked the body./Page 1C
CLEAN BILL OF HEALTH:
Private lockups
A state investigation finds no
evidence of bribery or fraud in
, the awarding of pris on con-
tracts in Florida to private
companies./Page 3A
OPINION;

It should
not b!
consider d a
chore for a city to
support a J ly 4
commemora ion.
It should be an
honor. - -

". -; PAGE 10A.
OUT OF CONTROL:
Tahoe ablaze
A wildfire raged out of control
near Lake Tahoe, forcing hun-
dreds of residents to flee tow-
ering flames. /Page 14A


Healthy advice
Doctors Bennett, Gandhi,
Grillo and Dodge contribute
this week./Page 1C


Annie's Mailbox ........ 8C
Comics .............. 9C
Crossword ............ 8C
Editorial ............ 10A
Entertainment ......... 4B
Horoscope .......... . 9C
Lottery Payouts ........ 4B
Movies .............. 9C
Obituaries ............ 6A
Stocks .............. . 8A
Three Sections


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Yaroslav Denisov, 10, gets doused with water Wednesday by camp counselor Terra Stethens during a game of Drip, Drip, Drop at
the YMCA summer camp at Rock Crusher Canyon. The YMCA would like to establish a presence in the county and if its summer
camp is any indication, it would be well-received by residents.

YMCA waits for feedback from residents as it hosts its summer camp


CRISTY LOFTS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Beaming with pride and dripping with
water, 8-year-old Mary Skorupa has news
for her summer camp director.
"I got DROPPED!" Mary said.
But dropped doesn't mean the child
fell to the ground.
Instead it means that while playing a
version of the classic children's game
duck, duck, goose - drip, drip, drop -
Mary was chosen to chase her playmate
around the circle. She knew she was cho-
sen because rather than a drop of water
on her head, she felt an entire cup of
water dump over her hair.
For a bunch of children spending their
entire day outside at a summer camp, get-
ting dropped on is one of the best parts of
theday.
The.YMCAs first Citrus County pro-
gram isif to a successful start.


SO YOU KNOW..
I To learn more enrolling in the YMCA
summer camp, call 586-4390. The
camp is $85 per week from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m.
The eight-week summer camp began
three weeks ago for children ages 5 to 12
at Rock Crusher Canyon in Crystal River.
The camp offers arts, crafts, games,
sports, swimming and kayaking.
So far, each week's group contains at
least 50 children and some weeks have a
waiting list, camp director Toni Bennett
said.
The success of the first YMCA program
is heartening for people working to bring
an entire YMCA facility to the area.
"We have a feeling that folks in Citrus
County want a YMCA," said Sue Ball,
YMCA district director for Hernando and
Citrus counties.
A local committee has raised $25,000 in


the past few months to pay for a market
feasibility study The study will pay for
about 600 residents to be surveyed about
what they would want out of a local
YMCA such as an indoor pool, gym, ten-
nis courts, etc. It will also gauge how
interested people would be in using a
facility and how often they would use it.
The results of the study should come
before the committee July 11, Balls said.
If a YMCA were approved for Citrus
County, a capital campaign would begin
to raise all funds necessary for the proj-
ect to either build a new facility or reno-
vate an old building.
The YMCA in Hernando County has
been quite popular since it was built in
1989. Three years ago it was renovated -
a project that doubled the facility's size.
Next year it will undergo a second expan-
sion. The building has a fitness center,
teen center, ball fields, locker rooms and
an outdoor pool with a dome to cover it in
the winter months.


0 0 -I *r-~ I


Lourt fight continues over Rtiverside resort


Judge to rule on

issue of 'standing
TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Save the Homosassa
River Alliance went back to
court Monday in hopes of con-
vincing a judge it has the legal
standing to continue its chal-
lenge of a condominium proj-
ect, but the judge didn't rule.


Derrill McAteer, an attorney
for Riverside Resort owner
Gail Oakes, and Chief
Assistant County Attorney
Michele Lieberman said
alliance members don't live
close enough to the resort to
have legal standing to file the
lawsuit
Alliance attorney Denise
Lyn responded that state law
has changed over the years
and given citizens a more lib-
eralized right to file chal-
lenges against projects they
feel violate the local compre-


hensive plan.
Circuit Judge Charles
Harris, who has yet to rule in
favor of the alliance, said he
would provide his ruling with-
in two weeks.
The ruling is key because
without it the alliance has no
grounds for continuing their
legal challenge.
Oakes plans to convert her
longstanding Riverside Resort
motel and condo complex into
four-story condominiums. The
complex would overlook the
Homosassa River. She argues


the comprehensive plan and
other county land use rules
give her the right to build the
complex.
But the alliance said the
county adopted changes to the
comprehensive plan and land
development code three years
ago to prevent this type of
high-rise development in Old
Homosassa.
At the urging of the Florida
Department of Community
Affairs, the county participat-
Please see COURT/Page 5A


6-year-old Afghan boy thwarts Taliban j


Youngster says terrorist organization put him

in suicide vest, sent him to attack Americans


Associated Press


FORWARD OPERATING BASE
:THUNDER, Afghanistan - The story of
a 6-year-old Afghan boy who says he
thwarted an effort by Taliban militants to
trick him into being a suicide bomber
provoked tears and anger at a meeting of
tribal leaders.


The account from Juma Gul, a dirt-
caked child who collects scrap metal for
money, left American soldiers dumb-
founded that a youngster could be sent
on such a mission. Afghan troops crowd-
ed around the boy to call him a hero.
Though the Taliban dismissed the
story as propaganda, at a time when U.S.
and NATO forces are under increasing


criticism about civilian casualties,
both Afghan tribal elders and
U.S. military officers said they
were convinced by his dra-
matic account
Juma said that some-
time last month Taliban
fighters forced him to
wear a vest they said
would spray out flow-
ers when he
touched a button.

Please see BOY/Page 7A


Associated Press
Chief Justice John Roberts, left, and
Justice Samuel Alito wrote three
main opinions In Monday's rulings.


Justices


toughen


stance


Supreme Court shows

conservative shift

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Sup-
reme Court liberated corporate
and union political spending, lim-
ited students' speech and shield-
ed the White House faith-based
program from legal challenge
Monday in 5-4 rulings that pointt-
ed up the court's shift to the right
President Bush's two
appointees, Chief Justice John
Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito,
were front and center. They wrote
the main opinions in those three
decisions - including the "Bong
Hits 4 Jesus" free-speech case -
as well as another ruling that had
been sought by the administra-
tion and business groups in an
environmental case.
Five justices - Roberts, Alito,
Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia
and Clarence Thomas - formed
the majority in each decision.
Please see JUSTICES/Page 5A



Sewage


floods


home


again

Homeowners: It won't

happen anymore
TERRY WITT
terrywitt@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A New Hampshire couple dis-
covered Saturday that a tree root
blocked a sewer pipe in their
yard and caused raw sewage to
fill their vacant home in Beverly
Hills a second time.
But they said it won't happen
again. Arthur and Yvonne
Gosselin said they plan to install
a valve in the pipe that has twice
flooded their home at 29
Roosevelt Blvd. with sewage.
The valve allows sewage to flow
one way through the pipe toward
the street, but won't allow it to
backup into the home. They are
selling the home and will live in
New Hampshire during the warm
months.
"I can't handle this and I don't
expect anyone who buys the
Please see SEWER/Page 4A


Afghan boy
Juma Gul ,6,
allegedly
thwarted an
effort by
Tallban
militants to
trick him
Into
carrying
out a
suicide
bomb-
Ing
against
U.S.
troops.
Associated Press


Tea time


HIGH
91
LOW
73


sow








2A TtJ~DAY tUNE 26. 2007 LOCAL CJTRLL~ COUNTY (FL) CIIRONI';LE


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River firefighter Sam Kunselman works on dousing a small brush fire between Eighth Avenue and U.S. 19 Monday after a line of electrical storms moved
across the area. County firefighters were kept busy with five to six brush fires started by lightning during the afternoon storm.




Chronicle looking for readers' day trip stories


Chronicle
Tell us about it! The Chronicle will
run your reports about recent day trips
to other parts of the state. Follow these
guidelines when submitting your photos
and information, and you'll be credited
when the story runs in our Sunday edi-
tion.


1. Write about a day trip to a town or
attraction within three hours' drive of
Citrus County.
2. Include your name, hometown and
phone number (the phone number will
not be published - it's for our reference).
3. Submit a photo or photos of the
place you visit Drop off copies at the
Chronicle offices in Inverness or


Crystal River, or e-mail the images as
separate, high-resolution jpeg (.jpg)
attachments to community@chroni-
cleonline.com. Include information
about what's in the pictures. Photos
cannot be returned without a stamped,
self-addressed envelope.
4. Include the name of the area, the
county it's in, the major roads leading to


it and its main attractions. You can
include a list'of favorite restaurants, or
upcoming events planned in that area.
5. Limit reports to 350 words. The
Chronicle will edit any reports chosen
for publication.
6. Pay attention to the day trips
reported by other readers - duplicate
reports will be eliminated.


Fighting fires


Help 6-year-old
with cancer
The Family Resource Center is
accepting donations to help the
family of Leea Gardner, the 6-year-
old Forest Ridge Elementary pupil
who was recently diagnosed with
cancer and is undergoing exten-
sive chemotherapy treatment.
To help, make checks payable to
the Family Resource Center and
put in the memo line: For Leea
Gardner family. Mail checks to:
Family Resource Center, 2435 N.
Florida Ave., Hernando, FL 34442.
For information, call the Family
Resource Center at 344-1001.
Governor appoints
Basin Board members
Gov. Charlie Crist recently reap-
pointed four members to the
Withlacoochee River Basin Board
of the Southwest Florida Water.
Management District.
* Janey Baldwin of Brooksville
has been reappointed to the
Withlacoochee River Basin Board.
Baldwin is retired. Her term ends
March 1, 2010.
* Jack Dennis of Dunnellon has
been reappointed to the
Withlacoochee River Basin Board.
Dennis is retired. His term ends
March 1, 2010.
* Patsy Nathe of Dade City has
been reappointed to the
Withlacoochee River Basin Board.
Nathe is secretary and treasurer of
R.J. Nathe & Sons. Her term ends
March 1, 2009.


* Bo Rooks of Floral City has
been reappointed to the
Withlacoochee River Basin Board.
Rooks is a self-employed cattle
rancher. His term ends March 1,
2010.
The Withlacoochee River Basin
Board area includes portions of
Citrus, Hemando, Levy, Marion,
Pasco and Sumter counties.
Juvenile arrested at
Cypress Creek
A 15-year-old inmate at the
Cypress Creek Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center was arrested
after punching and biting a guard
Sunday morning.
According to an arrest report, the
15-year-old refused to put down a
pencil and was holding it as if to
stab someone. When a guard went
to restrain the teenager, the 15-
year-old punched the guard in the
face three times and bit the man's
hand drawing blood.
The 15-year-old was arrested on
a charge of battery on a law
enforcement officer. He was taken
to the Citrus County Detention
Facility and later transferred into
the custody of the Department of
Juvenile Justice.
The 15-year-old's name is being
withheld by the Chronicle because
of his age.
Ministry sponsors
food distribution
EL-Shaddai food ministries will
sponsor a "brown bag of food" dis-
tribution from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,


Dr Jae C are


Wednesday, at the Crystal River
Church God, 2180 W. 12th Ave.,
behind the Lincoln Mercury dealer-
ship.
This food giveaway is the last
Wednesday of every month. For
information, call 795-3079 or 628-
9087. They deliver to the home-
bound. The USDA is an equal
opportunity provider.
Chronicle legal office
moving to Inverness
The Citrus County Chronicle
legal office will be relocating to the
Inverness office beginning Monday,
July 2.
Call Mary Ann at 726-0902 or
fax legal ads to 726-9603.
Local firefighter
attends memorial
The Professional Firefighters of
Citrus County, Local No. 4562, was
represented by one of its members


.at the memorial service for the fall-
en brothers of the Charleston Fire
Department.
The nine firefighters lost their
lives doing what all firefighters do
throughout the nation, day in and
day out protecting their communi-
ties. Driver-engineer Dustin Green
attended the memorial service
Friday, June 22, to remember the
fallen.
The chance to remember the
firefighters was especially moving
for Green.
"To be around so many other
firefighters from around the country
to give respect to them and their
families was very important," Green
said.
Last week's tragic fire came as
firefighters across the nation
marked this year's International
Fire and EMS Safety Stand Down.
The yearly occurrence is a time
when firefighters nationwide stop


and reevaluate operating proce-
dures, trying to make this already
dangerous profession as safe as it
can possibly be.
Each year, an estimated 100
firefighters die in the line of duty,
and to date 47 firefighters have lost
their lives in 2007.
Recycle phone books
through July 15
Residents can recycle old tele-
phone books through Sunday, July
15, at any of the county's 12 recy-
cling dropoff collection centers, by
placing the directory in the rear
opening of the container marked
for "Plastic Bottles."
Phone books can also be recy-
cled at the following locations:
* Home Depot, 70 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
* Crystal River Chamber of
Commerce, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,


Crystal River.
* Homosassa Chamber of
Commerce, 3495 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* Inverness Chamber of
Commerce, 401 Tompkins St.,
Inverness.
Call (352) 527-7670, or e-mail
landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us with
questions.
Young Marines to help
gym damaged by fire
Crystal River Young Marines will,
have a car wash to raise money
for Kelly's Health Club in Crystal
River.
Kelly's gym was severely dam-
aged by fire June15.
The car wash will be from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 30, at the
Wendy's in Crystal River.
- From staff reports.


IONE CALL, ONE PRICE


Reach 82,000
Homes & Businesses


Examples:
Services Transportation
$172.68 $77.95


Real Estate
$97 955


Call for details (352) 563
Classifieds Working For You


705029


LEWY

U'l
-59ER
-5966


709531


~NC~r~ fko~ef


Father's Da

Sale June 11-16


10% OFF
ENTIRE STOCK OF MEN'S SHOES

BUY 2 PAIR GET 20% OFF EACH
Featuring a full line of


Open
Mon.- Sat.
9:00 AM-4:30 PM


244 S.E.
Hwy. 19
Kings Bay Plaza,
Crystal River

795-4057


I


G P-






Clincally Proven Effective
Comprehensive Chiropractic treatment of


Donate


food for


needy


families

CUB urgently

needs your help

Special to the Chronicle
Citrus United Basket is in
immediate need of all types of'
food items. With gasoline;
prices averaging almost $3 per
gallon and jobs associated
with the building industry
almost extinct, CUB has seen a
tremendous increase in,
requests for food assistance. :
Since the beginning of 2007,'
CUB has assisted more than
810 families per month at a,
cost of $8,800 per month. This;
is an increase of 292 families,
per month more than in 2006.
During the same time span, we,
have realized a reduction in
our cash donations.
At the beginning of June,
CUB had enough food to last,
until the last week of the month.
CUB officials had hoped that,
normal donations would last
until the end of June; unfortu-'
nately, this has not happened.
CUB officials are asking that
Citrus County residents once:
again dig deep and assist CUB
with essential food items so
they can provide for those res-1
idents that have even less than
the average citizen.
Some types of items required i
are: nonperishable canned;
meats, noodles, canned vegeta-,
bles, canned fruit, cereal (hot or
cold), tuna, macaroni & cheese,
peanut butter, jelly, soup, rice,
tuna helper, hamburger helper,
baby food. These are just a few
suggestions.
Food donations can be deliv-
ered to CUB at 103 Mill Ave.,,
Inverness, or mail checks to:.
Citrus United Basket, PO. Box
2094, Inverness, FL 34451-'
2094. Call Nola Gravius, direc-
tor of CUB, at 344-2242.


CiTRus CouN7-Y (FL) CHRONICIE


2ATUESDAY, JUNii 26, 2007


LOCAL


County













5 C


'C/'


3A
TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Ocala

GTE Credit Union
robbed Monday
Ocala Police are looking for a
man they believe robbed a cred-
it union Monday. Police
responded to the branch on
Monday afternoon in reference
to an armed robbery.
According to preliminary wit-
ness testimony, a lone white
male entered the GTE Federal
Credit Union, 3033 S.W. College
Road, and handed a teller a
note demanding money. Once
the teller gave the man the
money, the robber fled from the
bank on foot in an easterly
direction. A search for the sus-
pect by officers and helicopter
was unsuccessful.
The suspect is described as
being a white male, early- to
mid-20s, approximately 5'9" to
5'11", 130 to 140 pounds. He
was last seen wearing a ball
cap, horizontally striped polo
style shirt (dark colors), dark
pants and black shoes.
Anyone having information
about this crime or possibly
knowing the identity of the sus-
pect should call the Ocala
Police Major Crimes Division at
(352) 369-7140. To remain
anonymous, call Crime Stoppers
at (352) 368-7867.

Tampa

Man fatally stabbed
after Yahtzee dispute
A dispute over a game of
Yahtzee ended in a fatal stab-
bing, police said. Mark Kelvin
Allen, 49, was playing the dice
game with 47-year-old Edith
Elliott at her home in Tampa's
Ybor City neighborhood on
Saturday night, an arrest report
said. They began to argue and
Elliott went into a bedroom with
her 49-year-old boyfriend.
Allen kicked in the door, scuf-
fled with the boyfriend and then
stabbed him twice, police said.
The man, whose name is not
being released until his relatives
can be notified, later died at a
hospital.
Allen was charged with sec-
ond-degree murder and was
being held without bond Mon-
day. Jail records did not list a
lawyer for him.

West Palm Beach

Jury finds man not
guilty in jeep shooting
A Westgate man who shot into
a Jeep, killing two men and injur-
ing another was acting in self-
defense, a jury ruled Monday.
After a six-day trial, the jury
found Norman Borden, 44, not
guilty of charges that included
two counts of first-degree mur-
der, one count of attempted
murder and one count of shoot-
ing into an occupied vehicle.
Borden shot at three men
who were in the Jeep in October
2006. The shooting happened
after the group confronted
Borden as he walked his dogs.
Christopher Araujo, 19, and
Saul Trejo, 21, were killed in the
shooting. Juan Mendez, 21, was
injured.

Chiefland

Girl's leg broken from
jumping sturgeon
A 6-year-old girl's leg was
broken when she was struck by
a sturgeon while riding on a
boat in the Suwannee River,
wildlife officials said.
Taylor Lane Owen, of Old
Town, was a passenger in the
20-foot vessel, along with her
parents and other family mem-
bers Sunday. The boat was just
north of the Yellow Jacket Boat
Ramp, about nine miles west of
Chiefland, when a 3-foot stur-
geon jumped out of the river.
Taylor received a broken leg
and her aunt sustained bruises
and cuts.
"This is the third confirmed


sturgeon strike on 2007. Four
people have been injured.
That's four too many," said Maj.
Bruce Hamlin, regional com-
mander for the FWC North
Central Region.
- From wire reports


More reinsurance unlikely


being of our state," Sink said in
an interview.
Financial companies have
approached the state about the
extra insurance, which would
reportedly cover about $6 bil-
lion in damages.
"At the current moment it
appears that it would be very,
very expensive for us to pur-
chase this kind of reinsurance
for a storm event that only has
a 2 percent chance of occur-
ring," Sink said. *
Another problem with buy-
ing the extra coverage is that
the so-called CAT fund could
be largely depleted from
claims, but not enough to have


reinsurance kick in, Sink said.
If the fund were to come up
short and be unable to pay
claims, the difference would be
paid for with assessments on
several types of insurance poli-
cies, including homeowners
and auto coverage.
The fund also could be
tapped if it did not have
enough to pay for the backup
coverage it provides to private
companies. Lawmakers earlier
this year expanded the fund to
provide that insurance, which
is expected to cut costs for cus-
tomers.
It was one of several changes
the Legislature made in an


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - The state
catastrophe fund that pays
damage claims when home
insurers cannot is "leaning
against" buying additional
backup coverage for itself,
because the cost would out-
weigh the need, Florida's chief
financial officer said Monday.
The extra reinsurance for
the Hurricane Catastrophe


Fund would cost about $600
million, and buying it would
leave less money available to
pay claims for smaller storms,
Chief Financial Officer Alex
Sink said. She said that is why
the state is unlikely to buy it.
"I think it would be some-
thing that would be, maybe,
nice to have to protect our-
selves against a big, bad one
but ... we don't need it in order
to maintain the financial well-


Official: Cost of adding backup

insurance for fund not practical


Lawmaker's mom paid by biotech firm


Associated Press


MIAMI - A South Florida congress-
man's mother was among the consultants
and lobbyists a Boston developer paid to
support a biotech project that has only
cleared a lot in an impoverished neigh-
borhood for a parking garage, according to
newspaper investigation.
\Dennis Stackhouse first proposed build-
in the $250 million biopharmaceutical
p rk in Miami's Liberty City neighborhood
fo r years ago. As the project stalled,
S ckhouse diverted more than $500,000
fro a Miami-Dade County poverty agency
thr ugh double billing and dubious
exp nses and spent hundreds of thou-
san s more on political insiders, accord-
ing t a Miami Herald investigation.
ong the insiders was former U.S.
Rep. C.arrie Meek, who received at least


$40,000, a leased luxury sport utility vehi-
cle and a 2,600-square-foot rent-free office
for her foundation, the newspaper report-
ed Monday.
Congressional records show that she
was paid while her son, who now holds her
seat in Congress, sought millions of feder-
al dollars for the project.
U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek, D-Fla., said
there was no connection between his
efforts to fund the project and his mother's
involvement with Stackhouse.
"She's never asked me ... to do any
appropriations on behalf of the biotech
park," he said.
Carrie Meek said she was paid as a con-
sultant for the project, and that she never
lobbied her son on Stackhouse's behalf.
Stackhouse also said Meek was not
involved in her son's federal funding
requests.


"I briefly served as a paid consultant for
Dennis Stackhouse, advising him on com-
munity needs and issues, community-
based groups and problems," Meek said.
Her agreement began in 2003 and contin-
ued through 2004, she said.
The SUV was part of an "in-kind contri-
bution" to her Carrie Meek Foundation,
she said. Records obtained by the newspa-
per show Stackhouse made some of the
vehicle payments with money from a $3
million interest-free county loan for the
biotech park
The former congresswoman also lent
her name to a nonprofit created by
Stackhouse called the Carrie Meek
Biopharmaceutical Institute, a partner-
ship between Miami Dade College and
Florida A&M University to train workers
and students to manufacture drugs in the
biotech park


recovering after being stabbed with rod


Associated Press


JUPITER - A man
remained hospitalized Monday
after being found with a metal
rod through his head, and
authorities said they arrested a
suspect.
Patrick James Melehan, 19,


was arrested Monday on
charges including aggravated
battery with a deadly weapon
and burglary, according to the
Jupiter Police Department.
Carlos Parnell Lopez, 19, of
Jupiter Farms, was listed in
critical condition at St. Mary's
Medical Center in West Palm


Beach, police said.
Authorities found Lopez
slumped behind the wheel of
his vehicle at about 8:30 p.m.
Saturday. He had been
impaled with a metal rod that
pierced through his forehead
and protruded from the back of
his skull, police said.


"It went all the way in his
head," said Jupiter police
Officer Kelly Sanders.
Melehan is accused of
attacking Lopez with the rod
during an altercation. The case
is still being investigated.
Authorities did not know if
Melehan had an attorney


FDLE finds no wrongdoing with private prison contracts


'No evidence' of

bribery or faud

investigators say

Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE - Investigators
found no fraud, bribery or other crimi-
nal wrongdoing related to contracts
with two private companies that run
five state prisons in Florida and soon a
sixth, according to a 'report released
Monday
The results were presented to Gov.
Charlie Crist, who had asked the


Florida Department of Law
Enforcement to investigate more than
$4.2 million in alleged overpayments to
GEO Group of Boca Raton and
Nashville, Tenn.-based Corrections
Corporation of America, or CCA.
"The governor concurs with the
report and believes no further action is
necessary," said Crist spokesman
Thomas Philpot.
It noted the Florida Legislature had
reviewed contracts awarded by the
now-defunct Correctional Privatization
Commission and had approved the
agency's budget. The Department of
Management Services inherited the..
contracts when the Legislature abol-
ished the commission in 2004.
"There was no evidence that the budg-


et requests were fraudulent or incom-
plete," the report concluded. "There was
no evidence that any group or individual
ever solicited or accepted any compen-
sation in return for decisions that were
favorable to the vendors."
CCA spokesman Steve Owen said the
company was pleased with the findings
and had cooperated fully with investi-
gators.
"We look forward to continue part-
nering with DMS and the state of
Florida," Owen said.
A GEO spokesman did not immedi-
ately return a telephone call seeking
comment.
Crist asked for the investigation after
audits indicated the state had paid for
vacant jobs and other questionable


expenses. The Department of
Management Services, though, con-
cluded the contracts were so poorly
written and conceived the state had vir-
tually no legal standing to seek refunds.
The department reached a settle-
ment with GEO for $402,501, a fraction
of the alleged overpayments, but has
been unable to come to an agreement
with CCA-
GEO operates the Moore Haven
Correctional Facility in Glades County
and South Bay Correctional Facility in
Palm Beach County. It has a contract for
a third prison that is nearing comple-
tion in the Panhandle at Graceville.
CCA has a prison in Lake City and
two others in the Panhandle at Panama
City and Quincy


U


effort to put a dent in the bur-
geoning cost of insuring a
home against hurricane dam-
age, especially after the active
2004 and 2005 storm seasons.
The fund's exposure before
the law change would have
been from $6 billion to $16 bil-
lion, but now it is up to $28 bil-
lion.
"I'm always looking at deci-
sions we make that won't bank-
rupt our state and at the $28
billion level our experts are
telling us that they can see our
way clear to being able to issue
bonds in the event of a storm so
that we can pay our claims,"
she said.


Con man


posed


as star


pitcher


Woman bilked

out of thousands

Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG - A chi-
ropractor who thought she was
being courted by New York
Mets pitcher Pedro Martinez
was actually the victim of con
artists who took her for hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars,
authorities said.
Rhonda Schroeder, 32, told
prosecutors that she befriend-
ed a patient, Shirley Gordon,
who introduced her to a man
posing as the Mets' ace.
Schroeder said the impostor
continued their romance
through phone calls and text
messages. He urged Schroeder
to spend money on Gordon,
including a $450,000 house,
more than $150,000 in furni-
ture, and lawyers to defend
her against a previous fraud
charge, the St. Petersburg
Times reported Sunday He
always promised to pay back
the money
The fake Martinez always
had an excuse for why he
couldn't visit Schroeder, but he
sent gifts and flowers. In daily
phone calls, he played the dot-
ing boyfriend. Schroeder said
she would do anything to keep
him happy, including helping
his "sister" financially
When Schroeder realized
she was being scammed, she
went to prosecutors and sued
Gordon and a male accom-
plice, accusing them of racket-
eering and seeking restitution.
The case, filed in May 2006, is
pending.
Gordon, 56, who has dozens
of felony convictions, is serv-
ing an 18-month prison term
for violating federal probation.
After that, she will begin serv-
ing a 30-year state prison sen-
tence for using another per-
son's identity to buy a luxury
car in 2004.
Prosecutor Beverly
Andringa said she can't charge
anyone with scamming
Schroeder because the chiro-
practor damaged her credibili-
ty by testifying on Gordon's
behalf at her fraud trial.
Schroeder did not immedi-
ately respond to a message left
at her St. Petersburg chiro-
practic office Monday.










CIrnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County Sheriff --------For the RECORD


Domestic battery
arrests
* Joshua Amin Medina, 19,
Homosassa, at 6:37 p.m. Saturday
on a misdemeanor domestic battery
charge. A 19-year-old woman said
that Friday night Medina pushed her,
punched her, bit her wrist and
smacked her on the ear, according
to an arrest report. She said she did-
n't report what happened right away
because she was still in love with
Medina. The woman was treated at
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center and was found to have dam-
age to her ear drum which resulted
in a loss of hearing in her right ear,
according to the report. No bond.
* Chad Irving Hauser, 27,
Inverness, at 12:45 p.m. Sunday on
a misdemeanor. domestic battery
charge. A 27-year-old woman said
Hauser grabbed her, held her down,
and threw a chair at her, which hit
her arm. No bond.
DUI arrests
* Kenneth F. Keyes, 35, 9035
Thoroughbred, Inverness, at 2:26
a.m. Sunday on charges of driving
under the influence and refusing to
sign a traffic citation. According to an
arrest report Keyes was found
crawling around the inside of an
overturned truck on the side of
County Road 581. Keyes' truck had
rolled down a 30-foot embankment
into a cow pasture. Numerous beer
bottles both open and closed were
inside and just outside the truck,
according to the report. Keyes was-
n't hurt. He failed field sobriety tests
and refused a breath test. In addition
to his arrest charges, Keyes was
cited for careless driving and having
an open container. Bond $1,000.
* Steven Louis Scott, 32, 6956
W. Robert Dunn Court, Homosassa,
at 2:29 a.m. Sunday on a charge of
driving under the influence. Scott
was stopped for running a red ligt,
according to an arrest report. The
deputy noted that he smelled alco-
hol on Scott's breath. Scott failed
field sobriety tests and refused to
have his breath tested. Bond $500.
* Beatrice Reninger West, 53, 3
Asters Court, Homosassa, at 10:15
p.m. Sunday on charges of driving


under the influence with damage
and/or injury, fleeing or attempting to
elude a police officer, driving with a
suspended/revoked license and
leaving the scene of an accident
involving damages to a vehicle or
property. West led police on a low-
speed chase after crashing into a
utility pole and fence on U.S. 19 at
Cypress Boulevard, according to an
arrest report. Deputies followed her
to her home. West failed field sobri-
ety tests and a breath test found her
blood alcohol level at .206 and .200.
The legal limit is .08. Bond $16,250.
Other arrests
* John Michael Maglio, 40,42 N.
Sheltering Oaks Dr., Inverness, at
7:47 p.m. Saturday on a felony fugi-
tive from justice charge. According to
an arrest report Maglio was wanted
by Raleigh Police Department in
North Carolina on a felony grand theft
charge. No bond.
* Michael Charles Worthington,
27, 2414 S. Hull Terrace,
Homosassa, at 9:36 p.m. Saturday
on a charge of possession of 20
grams or less of marijuana.
Worthington was released on his
own recognizance.
* Megan D. Desbiens, 28, 5
Tronu Drive, Inglis, and Mary J.
Sperandeo, 50, 1065 N. Rock
Crusher Road, Crystal River, at about
1 a.m. Sunday. Desbiens was driving
when she was pulled over for driving
41 mph in a 35-mph zone, according
to a police report. Sperandeo was a
passenger in the car. A deputy found
marijuana pipes, rolling papers, mari-
juana, cocaine, a cut straw and a
razor blade with cocaine residue.
Desbiens was charged with posses-
sion of 20 grams or less of marijuana
and possession of drug parapherna-
lia. Her bond was set at $1,000.
Sperandeo was charged with pos-
session of a controlled substance,
possession of 20 grams or less of
marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Sperandeo's bond
was set at $5,500.
* Nicole Louise Bitter, 28,
10906 W. Gem St., Crystal River, at
2:02 a.m. Sunday on a charge of


driving with a suspended/revoked
license. Bond $500..
* Peter Eric Anderson, 38, 5184
N. Mint Point, Beverly Hills, at 6:45
a.m. Sunday on a felony violation of
probation charge. According to an
arrest report, the charge was in ref-
erence to an original charge of alter-
ing a valid sticker on a vehicle tag.
No bond.
* Everett Orsen Dicks, 38, 6179
W. Star Court, Homosassa, at 6:42
p.m. Sunday on charges of posses-
sion of MDMA (a synthetic drug com-
monly associated with the street drug
ecstasy); possession of 20 grams or
less of marijuana, possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession of a
drug without a prescription.
According to an arrest report, a 37-
year-old woman said she was at a
bar when Dicks approached her. The
woman had an injunction for protec-
tion naming Dicks to have no contact
with her and stay at least 100 feet
away from her car. A witness said
they saw Dicks let the air out of the
woman's tires when he left the bar.
When deputies went to Dicks house
they saw a marijuana pipe and mari-
juana on a coffee table. After search-
ing the house deputies found various
prescription drugs including Xanax,
hydrocodone, methadone, clon-
azepam and valium. Bond $26,500.
* Jordan Mark Vogter, 19, 1235
Skip Wells, Tallahassee, at 7:33 p.m.
Sunday on charges of possession of
20 grams or less of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $1,000.
* Robert Lee Nolan Jr., 31, 6375
E. Turkey Trail, Hemando, at 9:03
p.m. Sunday on a charge of driving
with a suspended/revoked license
and having an expired tag. Bond
$750.
* William Ka Girard, 45, 4
Drypetus Drive, Homosassa, at 9:17
p.m. Sunday on charges of driving
with a suspended/revoked license
and obstruction by a disguised per-
son. Girard first gave the deputy a
fake name, saying that he was the
twin brother of William Ka Girard,
according to an arrest report. Bond


$10,500.
* Teneric Duayne Lecom, 27,
6232 E. lona Lane, Inverness, at
12:37 a.m. Monday on a charge of
disorderly intoxication. Bond $150.
* Melissa A. Sullivan, 25, 4118
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa, at 10:09 a.m. Monday
on a felony violation of probation
charge in reference an original
charge of driving with a suspended
license. No bond.
* John Damron, 47, 1115 N.
Bairmont Terrace, Crystal River, at
10:18 a.m. Monday on two Citrus
County warrant charges for worthless
checks. Bond $1,050.
* Christopher M. Gougeon, 32,
311 Citrus Ave., Inverness, at 10:34
a.m. Monday on a felony violation of
probation charge. According to the
report the charge is in reference to a
Citrus County warrant for exploitation
of the elderly/disabled, grand theft
and uttering a forged instrument. No
bond.
* Troy Robert Whitehead, 40,
5815 E. River, Hemando, at 11:29
a.m. Monday on a felony violation of
probation charge in reference to a
Citrus County warrant for driving
under the influence. No bond.
* Brandon R.C. Ellis, 21, 9600 N.
Mitchelle Ave., Citrus Springs, at
12:57 p.m. Monday on a charge of
driving with a suspended/revoked
license. Bond $2,000.
Crystal River Police
Domestic battery
arrest
* Christopher William Tuttle,
44, Crystal River, at 12:42 a.m.
Thursday on a misdemeanor
domestic battery charge. According
to an arrest report, a woman said
she and Tuttle were arguing when
he hit her in the face and choked
her. No bond.
Other arrest
* George Lee Knight, 49, 850
N.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal River, at
8:17 a.m. Monday on charges of
possession of drug paraphernalia
and felony violation of probation in
reference to an original charge of
selling/possessing cocaine. No
bond.


SEWER
Continued from Page 1A

house to handle it," Arthur
Gosselin said.
The Gosselins said a Realtor
discovered the latest spill on
June 14. The Realtor checks on
the house occasionally and
shows it to potential buyers.
The first spill occurred in
March and was one of four this
year on Roosevelt Boulevard.
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
investigated the first spill at
the Gosselin's house and found
tree roots were at fault.
Gosselin hired a plumber to
clean out the pipe, but when it
backed up again on June 14, he
wondered if it was really a tree
root
He. hired a second plumber
who ran a miniature camera
through the lateral line on his
property. The camera found
the line blocked by a root
The other two sewage back-
ups into homes occurred at 23
Roosevelt Blvd. on Feb. 2 and at
11 Roosevelt Blvd. sometime in
April.


DEP said the backup at 11
Roosevelt Blvd. was caused by
a blockage of the main gravity
line owned by Rolling Oaks
Utilities.
The agency said the sewer
backup at 23 Roosevelt Blvd.
resulted from a tree root block-
ing a lateral line on private
property.
The Citrus County Water and
Wastewater Authority will meet
Monday to discuss an interim
rate hike for Rolling Oaks. The
company lost money last year.
Rolling Oaks also plans to
request a larger rate hike later
this year to fund a long-term
maintenance plan aimed at
preventing future problems in
the lines. Rolling Oaks wants a
maintenance plan for its entire
sewer and water system in
Beverly Hills.
WWA requested a mainte-
nance plan for sewer in light of
the many sewage backups.
If WWA were to approve a
long-range maintenance plan,
it would cover only the pipes
owned by Rolling Oaks. The
sewage pipes and water pipes
on private property would still
be the responsibility of the
homeowner


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure: neither too light nor
too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all pho.
tos.
* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to
right.
* If desired, include the name of the photographer for credit.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well; sub-
mit the digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff will color cor-
rect and otherwise "work up" the image to Chronicle publica-
tion standards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum-reso
lution JPEG (.Ipg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call Linda Johnson at 563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


East winds from 5 to 15 knots. Seas 2 o0
3 leel. Bay and inland waters will have a
moderate chop. Partly sunny with a slight
chance of thunderstorms.


Ir "a TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 91 Low: 73
Hot and humid with a chance of
thunderstorms.


lEI~i~


WEDNESDAY
High: 89 Low: 75
Partly sunny with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.

- .THURSDAY
High: 88 Low: 76
Chance of afternoon and evening
thunderstorms.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Monday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


91/68
98/62
71/90
80
-1

0.00 in.
3.32 in.
11.74 in.
22.72 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Monday at 3 p.m. 30.16 in.
DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 70
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 52%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were light and
weeds were absent.
"Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was moderate with
pollutants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
6/26 TUESDAY 2:42 8:54
6/27 WEDNESDAY 3:24 9:37


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
3:06 9:17
3:49 10:02


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
I ,, , - h SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:33 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ......................6:34 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ..................... 5:21 P.M.
JUJIY7 MYl 14 .JII22 MOONSET TODAY..........................3:11 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi
WATERING RULES

The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.
TIDES


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Tuesday Wednesday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
4:20 a/10:51 a 3:00 p/-- 5:19 a/12:22 a 3:46 p/11:46 a
2:41 a/8:13 a 1:21 p/9:44 p 3:40 a/9:08 a 2:07 p/10:30 p
12:28 a/6:01 a 11:08 a/7:32 p 1:27 a/6:56 a 11:54 a/8:18 p
3:30 a/9:50 a 2:10 p/11:21 p 4:29 a/10:45 a 2:56 p/--


Gulf water
temperature



88�
Taken at Egmont Key


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.96 27.92 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.35 34.35 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.17 34.17 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.99 35.99 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 88 61 sunny 94 70
Albuquerque 97 68 ptcldy 97 69
Asheville 83 64 .37 tstrm 85 63
Atlanta 95 74 ptcIldy 90 71
Atlantic City 80 61 .16 ptcldy 87 71
Austin 83 73 .37 tstrm 87 74
Baltimore 87 71 tstrm 90 73
Billings 82 60 sunny 80 50
Birmingham 93 72 ptcldy 90 71
Boise 73 52 sunny 89 51
Boston 89 67 sunny 93 72
Buffalo 85 62 sunny 90 73
Burlington, VT 85 61 .01 sunny 93 72
Charleston, SC 89 75 ptcldy 84 74
Charleston, WV 92 66 tstrm 93 68
Charlotte 91 66 .05 tstrm 88 69
Chicago 89 65 ptcidy 90 70
Cincinnati 89 66 .30 ptcldy 90 65
Cleveland 88 63 ptcldy 88 73
Columbia, SC 92 75 ptcldy 92 70
Columbus, OH 86 67 ptcldy 90 69
Concord, N.H. 87 57 sunny 95 65
Dallas 88 75 .17 tstrm 83 72
Denver 99 64 ptcldy 78 54
Des Moines 89 64 ptcldy 90 69
Detroit 86 66 ptcldy 91 74
El Paso 10269 ptcldy 10373
Evansville, IN 85 71 .08 tstrm 91 69
Harrisburg 84 66 ptcldy 90 70
Hartford 87 62 sunny 96 70
Houston 87 73 .06 tstrm 86 78
Indianapolis 85 67 tstrm 90 70
Jackson 93 72 tstrm 87 70
Las Vegas 10378 sunny 10579
Little Rock 93 72 tstrm 87 72
Los Angeles 71 61 sunny 73 61
Louisville 88 70 .01 ptcldy .91 73
Memphis 94 75 tstrm 91 73
Milwaukee 80 62 ptcldy 88 74
Minneapolis 88 64 tstrm 89 64
Mobile 89 73 tstrm 87 72
Montgomery 90 75 ptcldy 91 70
Nashville 89 70 .83 ptcldy 91 69
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
fftair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=raln/anow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
an=snow; ta=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


"L
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY
Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 91 73 .94 tstrm 88 75
New York City 80 67 sunny 90 75
Norfolk 92 72 tstrm 87 72
Oklahoma City 95 72 .45 tstrm 85 70
Omaha 93 67 ptcldy 90 67
Palm Springs 10971 sunny 10774
Philadelphia 84 66 .06- ptcldy 91 75
Phoenix 10982 sunny 11183
Pittsburgh 84 63 ptcldy 90 67
Portland, ME 75 55 .02 ptcldy 87 65
Portland, Ore 71 50 ptcldy 82 55
Providence, R.I. 88 62 sunny 91 68
Raleigh 91 68 tstrm 91 71
Rapid City 94 63 ptcldy 79 51
Reno 87 53 sunny 92 56
Rochester, NY 88 61 sunny 93 71
Sacramento 94 53 sunny 95 58
St. Louis 89 72 tstrm 90 72
St. Ste. Marie 86 58 ptcldy 85 63
Salt Lake City 86 60 sunny 90 63
San Antonio 90 75 tstrm 88 73
San Diego 72 61 sunny 73 63
San Francisco 78 50 sunny 65 52
Savannah 96 73 ptcldy 88 72
Seattle 69 48 ptcldy 77 54
Spokane 66 42 sunny 81 54
Syracuse 87 57 sunny 93 70
Topeka 91 72 tstrm 86 67
Washington 88 73 tstrm 91 74
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 110 Blythe, Calif. LOW 29 Redmond, Ore.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/78/pc
Amsterdam 58/49/r
Athens 102/76/s
Beijing 97/75/s
Berlin 67/48/sh
Bermuda 81/69/pc
Cairo 103/72/s
Calgary 73/48/s
Havana 89/75/ts
Hong Kong 93/81/ts
Jerusalem 102/74/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


79/56/s
56/49/pc
87/56/s
74/52/ts
90/61/s
78/57/ts
61/45/sh
79/67/pc
85/64/pc
62/43/r
80/61/sh
91/66/pc
72/59/sh


-z- -l a PU S


3 0 U N T Y


LHl ONICLL
Florida's Best Community t .Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Communiity

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: (352) 563-5655 Marion County: 1-888-852-2340
or visit us on the Web at www.shop.naturecoastcentral.com/chronicl
.html to subscribe.
13 wks.: $34.00* - 6 mos.: $59.50* - 1 year: $105.00'
*Plus 6% Florida sales tax
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks - Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks

To contact us regarding your service:

563-5655
Call for redelivery: 6 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday
6:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Call with questions: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday
6:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
CItrus County - 563-6363. Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion
County residents, call toll-free at 1-888-852-2340
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus - 563-5966
Marion - 1-888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 563-5592
To place an online display ad: 563-3206 or e-mail us at
nccsales@chronicleonline.com
I want to send Information to the Chronicle:
MAIL IT TO US The Chronicle, P.O. Box 1899, Inverness, FL 34451
FAX IT TO US Advertising- 563-5665, Newsroom - 563-3280
E-MAIL IT TO US Advertising: advertilsling@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chonicleonlilne.com
Where to find us:
SMeadowcrest
44 4 office
S - Norvell Bran Hwy Meadowcrest
Dunkenfield Blvd., Crystal
! -Cannondale Dr. River, FL 34429
I " Meadowcrest
N Blvd.

* rt Inverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. _ squaruse
~FO . 106 W. Main
SSt., Inverness,
41 44S- FL34450



Who's in charge:
Gerry Mulligan ........ .......................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ..... .............. Operations Manager, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan ........................................ Editor, 563-3225
John Provost ................. Advertising/Marketing Director, 563-3240
Tom Feeney........................ Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart ..... ............. Circulation Director, 563-5655
John Murphy ...... ................ Online Manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan ...... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Jennifer Wall ....................... Classified Manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon .......................... Business Manager, 564-2908
Deborah Kamlot ................. Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .......... ..... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ............. .... Linda Johnson, 563-5660
News and feature- stories .......................... Mike Arnold, 564-2930
Community/wire service content ............... Cheryl Jacob, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... John Coscia, 563-3261
Sound Off ..................................... .......... ... ....... 563-0579
Founded in 1891, The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint.
Please recycle your newspaper.
Visit us on the World Wide Web www.chronicleonllne.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone (352) 563-6363
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
POST OFFICE BOX 1899, INVERNESS, FL 34451-1899
106 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL 34450
S PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
911 SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


le.


MNJE OUTLOOK


An)s


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


4A TuFsDAY, JUNF 26, 2007 ---- - I I


I-l


I


I


- AAA 1-- -?A, 90n*7


r








TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 5A


OTRUS COUNTY fFL) CHRONicle


JUSTICES
Continued from Page 1A

The court's four liberals, Stephen Breyer,
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David Souter and John
Paul Stevens, dissented each time.
Kennedy, the only justice in the majority in
all of the court's 21 5-4 decisions this term, has
voted with his conservative colleagues more
often recently in the close cases.
With its term rapidly nearing an end, the
court has perhaps the
biggest issue of the year still
to decide: whether public
school districts can take
account of race in assigning
students to schools. Many
court watchers are expect-
ing a similar ideological I
split, with conservatives lim- : ..
iting the use of race. '
Democratic presidential
candidate John Edwards
was among those who
bemoaned the court's right-
ward tilt
The court "is moving the
right wing's agenda faster
than we've seen in decades
- slamming the courthouse
doors in the faces of ordi-
nary people, favoring big
businesses over civil rights
and undermining protec-
tions for women and the
environment"
But White House spokes-
woman Dana Perino said
Monday's decisions included
a loss for the administration
in the campaign finance
case.
"The president's position
is that in any case you're
going to have someone who
loses and someone who
wins, but we can all be confi-
dent that we have fantastic Former Juneau, Al
Supreme Court justices. principal Deborah
These are the type of people reporters Mond
that the president wanted to Supreme Court in
have on the bench," Perino
said. "Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Alito
are proving themselves to be ones who have the
intellectual vigor that they can bring to the
bench."
The campaign finance ruling, opening the
way for deep-pocketed interests to broadcast
so-called issue advertising close to elections,
was a clear demonstration that changes in the
court's lineup can alter a case's outcome.
In 2003, the court upheld the landmark
McCain-Feingold campaign finance law, which
included a provision that barred interest
groups from running corporate- or union-fund-
ed radio and TV ads that mention a candidate's
name within 30 days of a primary or 60 days of
a general election.


COURT
Continued from Page 1A

ed in the Waterfronts Florida
program to preserve the tradi-
tional commercial fishing
waterfront in Old Homosassa.
Land use rules were changed to
preserve the general look of Old
Homosassa and retain space on
the waterfront for what was left
of the commercial fishing fleet
The county commission
developed the Old Homosassa
Area Redevelopment Plan and
adopted policies and objectives
for Old Homosassa that became
part of the comprehensive plan.
The Old Homosassa Overlay


9


la
I
la
I


Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was in the
majority four years ago. On Monday, Alito, who
took O'Connor's seat, joined Roberts' opinion
taking a dim view of restrictions on those ads.
"Where the First Amendment is implicated,
the tie goes to the speaker, not the censor,"
Roberts said.
Justice David Souter, who read from his dis-
sent in the courtroom, said, "After today, the
ban on contributions by corporations and
unions and the limitation on their corrosive
spending when they enter the political arena
are open to easy circumvention, and the possi-
bilities for regulating corpo-
rate and union campaign
money are unclear"
Although the court divided
along liberal-conservative
lines, interest groups across
q the political spectrum were
allied in opposition to the
S. advertising restrictions.
Separately, Roberts
endorsed First Amendment
limits in his majority opin-
ion in the "Bong Hits 4
Jesus" case. Schools can reg-
ulate student expression
that advocates the use of ille-
gal drugs, he said.
The principal of a Juneau,
Alaska, high school suspend-
ed student John Frederick
who displayed the banner at
a public event, provoking a
civil rights lawsuit.
The court did not go as far
as the Bush administration
and the school district want-
ed, allowing schools to tamp
down any speech officials
determined ran counter to
their educational mission.
Alito, in a concurring opin-
ion, said, "This argument
can easily be manipulated in
dangerous ways, and I would
reject it before such abuse
Associated Press occurs."
iska, High School Stevens wrote in dissent of
Morse speaks to the ruling that the banner
3y outside the was a nonsensical message.
Washington. "The court does serious vio-
lence to the First
Amendment in upholding - indeed, lauding -
a school's decision to punish Frederick for
expressing a view with which it disagreed," he
said.
Alito wrote the court's opinion that said ordi-
nary taxpayers cannot challenge a White
House initiative that helps religious charities
get a share of federal money.
The decision blocks a lawsuit by a group of
atheists and agnostics that objects to govern-
ment conferences in which administration offi-
cials encourage religious charities to apply for
federal grants.
In dissent, Souter said that the court should
have allowed the taxpayer challenge to pro-
ceed.


District was approved as part of
the land development code to
set standards for development
in Old Homosassa.
Alliance members argue the
redevelopment district and
overlay were intended to pre-
serve the historic character of
Old Homosassa as an old fishing
village. Homes and businesses
should be no more than two sto-
ries, they say, and the communi-
ty should remain low density.
They say the four-story condo
project is too tall and too dense
for the community.
But Oakes is now attacking
the very right of the alliance to
challenge the resort project.
McAteer said none of the
alliance members who filed suit


VASCL WOODWORKING
"Family Tradition" For Over 75 Years - f |
ANTIQUE RESTORATION REMISHING
Custom Furniture and US 19 * Homosassa * 628-9010 rJ ' ]
Cabinetry Made to Order vasciminiwoodworking.com s0








ACCEPTING NEW BEHAVIORAL



ACCEPTING NEW BEHAVIORAL /


HEALTH PATIENTS
INCLUDING NEW
ADD &ADHD EVALUATIONS


Esther


Call Fo ur MoeIfr ai 79S-422 i>J^33m3 B






BLINDS
WE'LL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE*
The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours!
FAST DELIVERY * PROFESSIONAL STAFF
ND FACTORY
Authorized Graber Dealer
AF * In Home Consulting
E * .Valances
F R Installation







LECANTO TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W GULF TO LAKE HWY 527-0012
'muste onwn oen estma teriom pcroa HRS..MON..FRI.8AM4.30PM TOLL FREE 1-877-746-0017
378 M s as 5


live within a mile of the project
and have no standing.
Lyn said cited a long list of
alliance projects that have cen-
tered on the river and that she
said give the group standing in
the case. But McAteer called it
nothing more than a laundry list
that gives them no more right
than any other citizen to file
suit
McAteer said Oakes would be
asking to be reimbursed by the
alliance for attorney's fees if she
wins in court, as he expects she
will.


Double your
FDIC insurance
just ask.


World Savings rates: 1-800-HOT-RATE (1-800-468-7283)


SWorld 2
I Savings
E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.


Inverness
Near Wal-Mart
2437 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
(352) 637-1121


%/
APY .
:
S


State BRIEFS


2 die, 2 injured
after boat capsizes
WEST PALM BEACH - Two
people died after a boat they were
on capsized, and a man and a
young girl rescued from the canal
accident were recovering Monday.
Juan Efraim Reyes, 28, and
Esmelen Rosmery Maldonado, 34,
both of Palm Beach Gardens, were
brought to a hospital at about 10
p.m. Sunday. They died a short
time later, authorities said.
Reyes' young-daughter, Jeni,
and another man who was in the
boat, Carlos Cabajal, were listed in
good condition at St. Mary's
Medical Center in West Palm
Beach, Palm Beach County sher-
iffs spokeswoman Teri Barbera
said Monday. Their ages were not
immediately available.
Authorities said the four were
attending a party when they took
Cabajal's 8-foot aluminum boat into
a canal to go fishing at about 8:15
p.m. The boat capsized when one
of the men caught a fish, sheriffs
offici'al1'�id.
Mario Hernandez, 45, a former
lifeguard from Mexico. who was
attending a nearby party and heard
screams, said he helped pull the
girl from the water.
Rescue divers pulled the two
victims from the water a short time
later. Cabajal swam to shore on his
own.
Boy, 15, charged with
murder in shootings
MIAMI -A 15-year-old boy was


charged with murder after police
said he fatally shot two guests at a
graduation party.
Labron Brown Jr. was arrested
early Saturday and was charged
with two counts of second-degree
murder for the deaths this month of
Samuel Brown, 16, and Michael
Bradshaw, 20.
Samuel Brown and Labron
Brown are not related.
Samuel Brown and Bradshaw
were at the party at the Polish-
American Club-early June 17 when
Labron Brown and a few of his
friends arrived and tried to take
money and jewelry from another
guest, police said.
Samuel Brown was fatally shot
when he intervened, police said.
Labron Brown then sprayed the
crowd with bullets, killing Bradshaw
and wounding four others, police
said.
Brown was being held in juvenile
custody and police did not know if
he had an attorney. Homicide
detectives were still searching for
the other suspects.
Hearing postponed for
man accused in shooting
MIAMI -A handyman accused
of shooting and critically wounding
a prominent Latin music song-
writer is due in court this week.
Francisco Oliveira allegedly
shot Fabio Alonso Salgado last
month. Prosecutors requested a
hearing scheduled for Monday be
postponed until Wednesday morn-
ing.
Police said Salgado was nearly


killed in the attack.
Oliveira worked for the song-
writer for five years and authorities
said he was delivering marijuana
to him at the time of the shooting.
He has been charged with
attempted murder.
Salgado, also known as
Estefano, has worked with Latin
music stars including Gloria
Estefan, Jennifer Lopez, Marc
Anthony, Shakira, Ricky Martin,
Enrique Iglesias and Julio Iglesias.
The songwriter is recovering
after being released from a hospi-
tal.
NASA wants to open
station to outsiders
CAPE CANAVERAL - If all
goes as planned, part of the inter-
national space station will host
research experiments from out-
siders after it's completed in three
years, NASA officials said Monday.
NASA is in talks with several
government agencies, most
notably the National Institutes of
Health, and private businesses that
want to conduct research in the
microgravity laboratory orbiting 220'
miles above Earth.
NASA and its 15 partner nations,
including Russia, Canada, Japan
and European countries, plan to
finish construction of the space sta-
tion in 2010, when the U.S. space
shuttles are grounded and NASA
focuses its manned spaceflight
program on retuming to the moon
in an Orion spacecraft.
-From wire reports


month


$10,000 minimum balance


Short term. Great rate. Don't wait.
Open World's 6-Month Certificate of
e. Deposit (CD) and enjoy a terrific rate
with the financial flexibility of a short
term. Plus, we have a simple way for you


to double your FDIC insurance, so you can
bring even more of your savings to World'
What a great combination: a competition-crushing 5.41%
APY and extra peace of mind. C'mon, get going to a
World_branch today.


For additional offices, see your yellow pages.


Hours:
Mon-Thurs 9-4
Fri 9-6
Closed Saturday


FDIC
INSURED
TO UEo MAXIMUM


07/05A4


* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) and 5.27% interest rate are effective as of date of publication and may change thereafter. Penalty for early withdrawal. $10,000 minimum deposit;
$250,000 maximum per household. Personal accounts only. **APY comparisons based on independent shopping survey of other institutions' term accounts' APYs as of 06/15/07.
� 2007 World Savings N4715-21FW


C'mon, get a great rate.


5.411


WORLD SAVINGS
How may we help you? �
www.worldsavings.com.









O)TUSDAYArJUNEAZ),AZUU/CITRUCOUTY)CHRNICL


AAAlrI Utfl"ll,3 LiN U � .6.J,2007J


William Bruce, 59
CRYSTAL RIVER
William Edward Bruce, 59,
Crystal River, died Sunday,
June 24, 2007, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center in
Crystal River.
Born Sept. 24, 2947, in
Orangeburg, S.C., to William B.
and Dell Bruce, he came here
four years ago from Key Largo,
where he worked as a lab man-
ager for the Mariners Hospital
in Tavernier.
He was a 1973 graduate of
the University of Florida, earn-
ing his Bachelor of Science
degree, and was a member of
Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity.
He was a member of the
Avondale Methodist Church in
Jacksonville.
Survivors include his wife of
32 years, Christine Bruce of
Crystal River; three sons,
William Bruce Jr. of
Gainesville, Jeremy Bruce of
Crystal River and Jeffrey
Bruce of Orlando; two daugh-
ters, Erica and Leah Bruce,
both of Crystal River; and a sis-
ter, Sylvia Stone of
Jacksonville.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Betty Goerke, 75
LEESBURG
Betty Goerke, 75, Leesburg,
formerly of Citrus County, died
Sunday, June 24, 2007.
She was born in Perth
Amboy, N.J., and moved to
Florida in 1997 from
Oldbridge, N.J. She lived in
Citrus County for five years
and moved to Highland Lakes
in Lake County in 2003.
Mrs. Goerke was a former
administrative assistant and
she was very active in her com-
munity.
She was a member of Gloria
Dei Lutheran Church.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Larry Goerke of
Leesburg; son, Jimmy Maloney
and wife Rose of Woodbridge,
N.J.; daughters, Bethann Simon
and Lisa Wagner and husband
Michael all of Hopelawn, N.J.;
three grandchildren; stepson,
Larry Goerke Jr. and wife
Cheryl of San Jose, Calif.; step-
daughter, Charlene Walker and
husband Tim of Edmund, Okla.;
six step grandchildren; and one
step great-grandson.
A memorial service will be
held at Gloria Dei Lutheran
Church, Leesburg, at a later
date.
Beyers Funeral Home and
Crematory, Leesburg.

Madeline
Hertz, 84
HOMOSASSA
Madeline Hertz, 84,
Homosassa, died Sunday, June
24, 2007, in Inverness.
Born July 14, 1922, in
Cologne, Germany to Peter and
Katherine Wagner, she came
here in 1983 from Long Island,
N.Y.
Mrs. Hertz was a homemaker
and had been the president of
the Butter Crust Bakery in
Babylon, N.Y
She was a great mother,
grandmother and a wife to her
husband Alfred for 561/2 years.
She was Jewish.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Alfred Hertz of
Homosassa; and daughter,
Deborah Eininger of Old
Tappan, N.Y. She is also sur-
vived by one son and four
grandchildren.
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Homosassa.

Nancy Kettell, 93
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nancy Jones Kettell, 93,
Crystal River, died Sunday,
June 24, 2007, at her home
under the care of her family
and Hospice of Citrus County.
Born Nov 13, 1913, in St
Paris, Ohio, to Cecil and Mary
Jones, she came to this area 25
years ago from Suffern, N.Y,
where she retired as a school
teacher and librarian with
More than 20 years of service
with the Suffern School System.
Mrs. Kettell was a past presi-
Sdent of the Friends of the
Library Board of Crystal River
and a member of the Seven
SRivers Golf and Country Club.
She was Methodist
Her husband Wilbur preced-


ed her in death June 6, 2005.
Survivors include one son,
Leedom and wife Laura of
Ponte Vedra; one daughter,
Linda K Musial and husband
Bob of New York City, N.Y;
three grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Daisy
Lawrence, 94
HERNANDO
Daisy B. Lawrence, 94,
Hernando, died Sunday, June
24, 2007, in Lecanto.


Born Nov. 12, 1912, in
Oriente, Cuba, to Alfred
Lawrence and Hepzibah Ward,
she came to this area five years
ago from Brooklyn, N.Y.
Miss Lawrence was a retired
seamstress and she was
Catholic.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter, Marylin Wilkins of
Hernando; sister, Vioris Carlos
of North Carolina; one grand-
child; and one great-grand-
child.
Hooper Funeral Home,
Beverly Hills.

Michael
Lazich, 80
BEVERLY HILLS
Michael Lazich, 80, Beverly
Hills, died Sunday, June 24,
2007, under the care of family
at Woodland Terrace in
Hernando.
Mr. Lazich came here 21
years ago from his native
Johnstown, Pa.
He was a superintendent in
the coal mining industry. He
worked his way up at
Bethlehem Steel from miner to
superintendent by attaining his
college degree from Penn
State.
He was the former owner of
"Rose Bud Inn" located in
Johnstown, Pa., with his wife
Mary and daughter Diane,
until he retired and moved to
Beverly Hills.
He enjoyed working in his
yard and loved his wife, daugh-
ter and grandchildren.
He was Serbian Orthodox
Christian and was a deacon at
St. Raphael's Orthodox Church
in Hernando.
His daughter Marlene pre-
ceded him in death in 1963.
Survivors include his wife of
more than 60 years, Mary Lazich
of Beverly Hills; one daughter,
Diane Goldman and husband
Philip of Summerfield; grand-
children, Michael Curtis and
wife Krissy of Johnstown, Pa.,
Brian Curtis of Johnstown, Pa.,
and Jill Meffert and husband
John of Ocala; and great-grand-
children, Brandon Curtis,
Trenten Curtis, Reese Meffert
and Jacob Goldman.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.

Dorothy Lee, 79
FLORAL CITY
Dorothy R. Lee, 79, Floral
City, died Saturday, June 23,
2007, at the Hospice of Citrus
County in Inverness.
Born in Crawford County,
Georgia, she moved to
Inverness from Barnesville,
Ga., in 1954.
Mrs. Lee was a homemaker
and was Baptist.
Survivors include her hus-
band, John Lee of Floral City;
two sons, John Lee Jr. and
Richard D. Lee, both of Floral
City; two sisters, Martha Woods
of Floral City and Margaret
Peacock of Macon, Ga.; seven
grandchildren; and 16 great-
grandchildren.
Turner Funeral Home,
Brooksville.

Elaine Liebelt, 24
HOMOSASSA
Elaine H. Liebelt, 24,
Homosassa, died Friday, June
15, 2007, in an auto accident in
Marion, Ill.
She was a homemaker and
was a graduate of Highlands
High School, Fort Thomas, Ky.
She was preceded in death
by one daughter, Charlotte
Lawson; her father, Howard E.
Liebelt; and maternal grand-
parents, Mitchell and Charlotte
Hall.
Survivors include one
daughter, Alexis Lawson of
Homosassa; her mother,
Christine (Hall) Pope of
Homosassa; stepfather, Larry
Pope of Homosassa; sister,
Donna Letzler of West Chester,
Ohio; and brothers Danny
Liebelt and Howard Liebelt,
both of Sanford.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Alexis Lawson
Memorial Fund, c/o Citizens
Bank of Northern Kentucky,
103 Churchill Drive, Newport,
KY 41071.
AC. Dobbling & Son Funeral
Home, Ft Thomas, Ky.

Henry Orlik, 81
HOMOSASSA


Henry F Orlik, 81,
Homosassa, died Monday, June
25, 2007, in Lecanto..


Born Feb. 2, 1926, in Detroit,
Mich., to Peter and Antoinette
Orlik, he
moved here 30
years ago from
Redford Town-
ship, Mich.
Mr. Orlik
was a World War II Navy veter-
an and former owner of a land-
scaping company.
He was a member of Christ
Lutheran Church, Brooksville.
Survivors include his wife of
43 years, Nancy J. (Vogel) Orlik
of Homosassa; son, William K.
Orlik of Michigan; stepson,
Robert Burr of Talent, Ore.;
stepdaughter, Susan Beemer of
Kansas City, Mo.; nine grand-
children; and six great-grand-
children.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.

Jean
Peplinski, 79
BEVERLY HILLS
Jean D. Peplinski, 79, of Pine
Ridge in Beverly Hills, died
Sunday, June 24, 2007, in
Lecanto.
Born in Nanticoke, Pa., to
Frank and Jennie (Morgan)
Peterson, she came here 21
years ago from Rosedale, Md.
Mrs. Peplinski was a retired
registered nurse who worked in
hospitals and as a school nurse
in the public school system.
She was a member of Pine
Ridge Equestrian Association.
She was Protestant
Survivors include her hus-
band of 57 years, Henry
Peplinski of Pine Ridge in
Beverly Hills; sons, James
Peplinski and wife Kathy of
Stratham, N.H., and Michael
Peplinski and wife Debra of
Clear Spring, Md.; and seven
grandchildren.
Fero Funeral Home, Beverly
Hills.

Elizabeth
Petellat, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Elizabeth P Petellat, 86, died
Saturday, June 23, 2007.
She was born Aug. 26, 1920,
in Washington, D.C., to George
A. and Pearl E. Perzel.
She moved to Sarasota in
1946 from Falls Church, Va. She
worked for Sears & Roebuck
and moved to Citrus County in
1971.
She was an active member of
St. Anne's Episcopal Church,
was past president'"bf the
Episcopal Church Women, a
member of the vestry, head of
the Altar Guild and a home
Eucharistic minister.
Her husband, Ambrose J.
Petellat Jr., preceded her in
death.
She is survived by three
sons, Ambrose J. Petellat III
and wife Katherine of Daytona,
Robert F Petellat and wife
Susan of Tazewell, Tenn., and
Michael W Petellat and wife
Marlene of Beverly Hills; seven
grandchildren; and 23 great-
grandchildren.
National Cremation Society,
Hudson.

Hubert
Skinner Jr., 46
HERNANDO
Hubert Allen Skinner Jr., 46,
Hernando, died Tuesday, June
19, 2007, in
Ocala.
He was born
Aug. 28, 1960,
in Olean, N.Y,
to Hubert A.
Skinner Sr. and Joan
(Anderson) Skinner.
Mr. Skinner was a retired
Navy veteran serving during
the Gulf War.
He worked in the mainte-
nance department with the
Bank of Inverness.
Survivors include his daugh-
ter, Angeline K Skinner of
Ocala; mother, Joan A Skinner,
and maternal grandfather, Al-
fred Anderson, both of Denham
Springs, La.; three brothers,
Thomas B. Skinner of Pine
Grove, La., Patrick M. Skinner of
Livingston, La., and Gregory D.
Skinner of Pine Grove, La.; sis-
ter, Christine R. Broussard of
French Settlement, La.; fiancee,
Carolyn Flynn and son
Jonathan; his favorite aunt,
Karen Barber and husband
Sheldon of Denham Springs,
La.; uncle, Alfred Anderson of


Denham Springs, La.; and many
nieces and nephews.
Hooper Funeral Home,
Inverness.


Ted Slone, 62
WILDWOOD
Ted Slone, 62, Wildwood,
died Monday, June 25, 2007.
Born Jan. 22, 1945, in
Manton, Ky., he moved to
Wildwood in 2003 from Akron,
Ind.
Mr. Slone was self-employed
as a farmer and a truck driver
and worked part time at Ace
Hardware in Wildwood.
Survivors include his wife
Diana of Wildwood; daughters,
Dawn Marie (Dr. Michael
Herron) Goodpaster of Crystal
River and Christina Lee
Schnitz of Huntington, Ind.;
brother, Willie Slone of
Claypool, Ind.; sisters, Hattie
Brown, Marcella Kirk and
Louise Hopkins all of Warsaw,
Ind., and Edna Hughes of
Silver. Lake, Ind.; and four
grandchildren.
Banks/Page-Theus Funeral
Home, Wildwood.

Michael
Thyssen, 46
ROME, ITALY
Michael W Thyssen, 46,
Rome, died in a motorcycle
accident June 9, 2007, in
Piasano, Italy, near Rome.
He was born
in Elizabeth,
N.J., and gradu-
ated with a
Bachelor of
Science degree
in mechanical
engineering
from Lafayette
College in Michael
Easton, Pa., in Thyssen
1982. He
joined the U.S.
Air Force.
While on
active duty, he
earned his
Master of Arts degree in
national security affairs and
was assigned as an agent to the
Air Force's Office of Special
Investigations with service in
Izmir, Turkey; Brindisi, Italy;
and Scott Air Force Base in
Illinois. As OSI vice command-
er at Scott Air Force Base, he
exercised command over
AFOSI field units at U.S. instal-
lations worldwide and provid-
ed investigative, counterintelli-
gence, antiterrorism and
counter drug support to 35
bases.
He retired with the rank of
lieutenant colonel in 2002, but
continued to work as an agent
in Naples, and finally as spe-
cial agent in charge for Italy
attached to the U.S. Embassy in
Rome. He was fluent in three
languages.
He is survived by his wife of
21 years, Nannette, age 43; 14-
year-old son, Matteo; and 8-
year-old daughter Sonja; his
brother, Christopher Thyssen;
his sister, Susan Johnson; his
parents, Dorothy and Bernard
Thyssen of Pine Ridge; and
other relatives here and
abroad.
Click on www.chronicleon-
line.com to view archived local
obituaries.

Funeral

NOTICES

Daisy B. Lawrence. The serv-
ice of remembrance for Miss
Daisy B. Lawrence, age 94, of
Hernando will be conducted at
11 a.m. Thursday, June 28,2007,
at the Beverly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes with
the Rev. Robert Martin officiat-
ing. Interment will follow at
Memorial Gardens Cemetery,
Beverly Hills. Friends may call
10 to 11 a.m., Thursday, June 28,
2007, at the Beverly Hills
Chapel.
Michael Lazich. Funeral
services for Mr. Michael
Lazich, age 80, former superin-
tendent in the mining industry,
will be conducted at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, June 27, 2007, at
Fero Funeral Home, Beverly
Hills Chapel. Fr. Richard
O'Connell Reed of Citrus
County Hospice will preside.
Entombment will be in Fero
Memorial Gardens Cemetery,
Beverly Hills. Visitation will be
on Wednesday, June 27, 2007,
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. with the


Funeral Home
With Crematory
ALFRED WILSON
Services: Wed., 2:30pm - Graveside
Florida National Cemetery
CLIFFORD P. CLARK, Jr.
Service: Tues., 3pm - Graveside
Burial: Hills of Rest Cemetery
DONALD SEBALD
Arrangements Pending
VIRGINA HENRY
Arrangements Pending
CAROLE SMOKER
Mass: Tues., 10am
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church

726-8323 .


service beginning at 1 p.m.
Dorothy R. Lee. There will
be a visitation between 6 and 8
p.m. Tuesday (today), June 26,
2007, at the Turner Funeral
Homes Brooksville Chapel at
504 E. Jefferson St.,
Brooksville. There will be a
graveside service at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, June 27, 2007, at
Lake Lindsey Cemetery with
the Rev. James King officiating.
Arrangements by Turner
Funeral Homes Brooksville
Chapel, (352) 796-3588.
Elizabeth P. Petellat Requi-
em Mass will be held for Eliz-
abeth P Petellat at 10 a.m. Fri-
day, June 29, 2007, at St Anne's
Episcopal Church, 9870 W Fort
Island Trail, Crystal River In
lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to St Anne's ECW
Hubert Allen Skinner Jr. The
service of remembrance for Mr.
Hubert Allen Skinner Jr., age
46, of Hernando, will be held at
11 a.m. Wednesday, June 27,
2007, at Florida National
Cemetery with full military
honors afforded by the United
States Navy and the Florida
National Guard. Friends may
call 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesday (today),
June 26, 2007, at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes.
Ted Slone. Friends may call
from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, June
26, 2007, at Banks/Page-Theus
Funeral Home, 410 N. Webster
St, Wildwood. Funeral services
will be conducted at Titus
Funeral Home, Warsaw, Ind.
Arrangements by Banks/Page-
Theus Funeral Home,
Wildwood, (352) 748-1000.
Michael W. Thyssen. A funer-
al Mass was celebrated June 15
in Rome for Michael W
Thyssen, 46. A memorial Mass
will be celebrated 11 a.m.
Wednesday, June 27, 2007, at
the church of St. Elizabeth A.
Seton, 1401 W Country Club
Blvd., Citrus Springs. He will
be buried in Arlington
National Cemetery on Tuesday,
July 24, 2007.


Deaths

ELSEWHERE

Byron M. Baer, 77
LAWMAKER
TRENTON, N.J. - Byron M.
Baer, a longtime proponent of
open government and a cham-
pion of the underdog who
served in the-New Jersey
Legislature for more than
three decades, died Sunday.
He was 77.
Baer, a Democrat who repre-
sented Bergen County, died
from complications from con-
gestive heart failure at the
Lillian Booth Actor's Fund of
America home in Englewood,
his wife, Linda, said.
Baer served 11 terms in the
Assembly from 1972-1994 and
then was elected to four terms
in the Senate before his declin-
ing health forced him to resign
in September 2005, midway
through his final term. He held
numerous leadership positions
in both houses.
In April 2006, Baer received
national recognition for his
work when he was inducted
into the Open Government Hall
of Fame. Sponsored by the
National Freedom of
Information Coalition and the
Society of Professional
Journalists, the award recog-
nizes individuals' long-term
contributions to open-govern-
ment causes.
Baer was a past president of
the National Association of
Jewish Legislators.

John "Jack"
Flynt Jr., 92
LAWMAKER
GRIFFIN, Ga. - John 'Jack"
Flynt Jr., a 12-term congressman
who in the 1970s twice beat
political newcomer Newt Ging-
rich, died Sunday He was 92.
He died at his home in


Griffin, according to Haisten
McCullough Funeral Home.
A silver-haired, small-town
patrician who was part of the
Democratic establishment
when that party dominated
Southern politics, Flynt served
in Congress from 1954 until his
retirement in 1979.
He served on a variety of
committees, including Defense
and Appropriations, and was
chairman of the House ethics
committee. He defeated
Gingrich in 1974 and 1976
before he retired and his seat
was filled by Gingrich, who
went on to become speaker.
Flynt was also a cavalry offi-
cer, prosecutor and bank
founder. In 2001, the state
Department of Transportation
named- a--1T-mii-e section of
state Highway 16 after him.
During World War II, he
joined the U.S. Army Reserve,
was aide-de-camp to Brig. Gen.
Robert W Grow in France and
was awarded the Bronze Star
medal in 1944.
He was also a longtime mem-
ber of the National Rifle
Association and gave the
keynote address at the group's
annual meeting in 1958.

Robert L.
Kroon, 82
JOURNALIST
GENOLIER, Switzerland -
Robert L. Kroon, a journalist
who covered conflict and other
events in Asia, Africa and
Europe for nearly 60 years,
died Sunday. He was 82.
Kroon, who had pancreatic
cancer, died Sunday afternoon
at a clinic overlooking Lake
Geneva, said friend and fellow
Dutch-born journalist Wibo
van de Linde.
Kroon reported for The
Associated Press from
Indonesia after World War II,
van de Linde said.
Then, for Time magazine,
Kroon was in Budapest for the
1956 Soviet invasion that put
down the Hungarian uprising,
van de Linde said. He also cov-
ered the independence of the
former Belgian Congo in the
early 1960s and the Prague
Spring in 1968.
During the 1990s he con-
tributed to The International
Herald Tribune in Paris.
Kroon interviewed political
leaders and celebrities ranging
from Charles de Gaulle and
Indonesian presidents Suk-
arno and Suharto to Charlie
Chaplin, Frank Sinatra and
Peter Ustinov.
After Kroon's cancer was
diagnosed in January, he
paused his daily reporting and
concentrated on finishing his
memoirs. He proudly told col-
leagues shortly before his
death that he had completed
them under the title "A
Lifetime of News" and sent
them off to be published.
Publishing details for the book,
which Kroon wrote in English,
are incomplete, his family said.

GO ONLINE
* Visit www.Chronicle
Online.com to read
today's headlines, add
your thoughts to the
weekly opinion poll,
search the classified ads,
look up movie times or
play games.
* To see manatees at
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, go to
www.ManateeCam.com.
Have friends visit the cam
era at www.KingsBay
Cam.com while you're out
at Kings Bay.




SECTIOIN
EVER Y TUESDAY


XceW Valeut


Cmus CouN7y (FL) CHRoNicL


, 4


OBITUARIES








TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 7A


COUNTY ,(FL.) CHRONICLE


Judge rules in favor of
dry cleaner in lawsuit
WASHINGTON -A judge ruled
Monday that no pair of pants is
worth $54 million, rejecting a lawsuit
that took a dry cleaner's promise of
"Satisfaction Guaranteed" to its
most litigious extreme.
Roy L. Pearson became a world-
wide symbol of legal abuse by
seeking jackpot justice from a sim-
ple complaint - that a neighbor-
hood dry cleaners lost the pants
from a new suit and tried to give
him a pair that were not his.
His claim, reduced from $67 mil-
lion, was based on a strict interpre-
tation of the city's consumer protec-


tion law - which imposes fines of
$1,500 per violation, per day - as
well as damages for inconvenience,
mental anguish and attorney's fees
for representing himself.
But District of Columbia Superior
Court Judge Judith Bartnoff ruled
that the owners of Custom Cleaners
did not violate the consumer protec-
tion law by failing to live up to
Pearson's expectations of the
"Satisfaction Guaranteed" sign once
displayed in the store window.
"A reasonable consumer would
not interpret 'Satisfaction Guaran-
teed' to mean that a merchant is
required to satisfy a customer's


unreasonable demands," the judge ,
wrote.
Hot dog eating champ
says he's injured
NEW YORK - Takeru
Kobayashi, the hot-dog eating king
who recently lost his world record
to an American upstart, may not
fight to reclaim the title on July 4
because of acute jaw pain.
An epic matchup had been brew-
ing between Kobayashi and the
American, Joey Chestnut, who ear-
lier this month beat Kobayashi's
record by downing 59 1/2 hot dogs
in 12 minutes at a regional contest,


.-.. .... Nation BRIEFS


Associated -ress
A soldier of the Afghan National Army poses for a photo with an Afghan boy Juma Gul, 6, a defused suicide bomber, left, and his broth-
er, Dad Gul, at a joint U.S.-Afghan military command center in Andar district of Ghazni province, west of Kabul, Afghanistan.


BOY
Continued from Page 1A
He said they told him that when
he saw American soldiers,
"throw your body at them."
� The militants cornered Juma
in a Taliban-controlled district
in southern Afghanistan's
Ghazni province. Their target
was an impoverished youngster
being raised by an older sister
- but also one who proved too
street-smart for their plan: , '
"When they first put the vest
on my body I didn't know what
to think, but then I felt the
bomb," Juma told The
Associated Press as he ate lamb
and rice after being introduced
to the elders at this joint U.S.-
Afghan base in Ghazni. "After I
figured out it was a bomb, I
went to the Afghan soldiers for
help."
While Juma's story could not
be independently verified, local
government leaders backed his
account and the U.S. and NATO
military missions said they
believed his story.
Abdul Rahim Deciwal, the
chief administrator for Juma's
village of Athul, brought the boy
and an older brother, Dad Gul, to
a weekend meeting between
Afghan elders and U.S. Army Col.
Martin P Schweitzer.
Schweitzer called the Taliban's
attempt "a cowardly act"
As Deciwal told Juma's story,
20 Afghan elders repeatedly
clicked their tongues in sadness
and disapproval. When the boy
and his brother were brought in,
several of the turban-wearing
men welled up, wiping their eyes
with handkerchiefs.
"If anybody has a heart, then
how can you control yourself
(before) these kids?" Deciwal
said in broken English.
Wallets quickly opened, and
the boys were handed $60 in
American and Afghan currency


AIRPORT

TAXI

1746-29291


Relating to them as a father
and trying to fathom somebody using
one of my children for that kind of a
purpose, jeez, it just tore me up.

Lt. Col George Graft
father of five and National Guard member.


- a good chunk of money in a
country where teachers and
police earn $70 a month.
Afghan officials described the
boys as extremely poor, and
Juma said he is being raised by
his sister because his father
works in a bakery in Pakistan
and his mother lives and does
domestic work in another vil-
lage.
"I think the boy is intelligent,"
Deciwal said. "When he comes
from the enemy he found a
checkpoint of the ANA (Afghan
National Army), and he asked
the ANA: 'Hey, can you help me?
Somebody gave me this jacket
and I don't know what's inside
but maybe something bad."'
Lt Col. George Graff, a father
of five who attended the meeting,
also teared up.
"Relating to them as a father
and trying to fathom somebody
using one of my children for that
kind of a purpose, jeez, it just
tore me 'up," said Graff, a
National Guard soldier from St
George, Utah. "The depths that
these people will go to get what
they want, which is power for
themselves - it's just disgust-
ing."
A Taliban spokesman, Qari
Yousef Ahmadi, denied the mili-
tant group uses child fighters,


saying it has hundreds of adults
ready for suicide missions.
" 'We ddfft heed to use child,"
Ahmadi told the AP by satellite
phone. "It's against Islamic law,
it's against humanitarian law.
This is just propaganda against
the Taliban."
However, a gory Taliban video
that surfaced in April showed
militants instructing a boy of
about 12 as he beheaded an
alleged traitor with a large knife.
U.N. officials condemned the act
as a war crime.
Fidgety but smiling during all
the attention, Juma told the AP
that he had been scared when he
was surrounded by Taliban fight-
ers. He cupped his hands togeth-
er to show the size of the bomb,
then ran his hands along his
waist to show where it was on his
body.
A fan of soccer, Juma said his
favorite subject in school is
Pashto, his native language, but
he also showed off a little
English, shyly counting "1, 2, 3"
before breaking out in an over-
size smile.
Raised in a country where
birthdays are not always careful-
ly tracked, Juma said he is 4. But
he looks older and Afghan offi-
cials said he is about 6. His broth-
er appears to be a year or so


older.
Their village lies in Ghazni
province's Andar district, a
Taliban stronghold targeted this
month in a joint Afghan-U.S.
operation. The region remains
dangerous and Afghan elders
worry for Juma's safety.
Maj. John Thomas, a
spokesman for NATO's
International Security
Assistance Force, said he was "a
bit skeptical" about Juma's story
at first,, "bt.everything I've
heard makes me more and more
comfortable.",..'
Thomas said the case would
force soldiers to think twice
before assuming children are
safe.
"This is one incident We hope
it doesn't 'repeat itself But it
gives us reason to, pause, to be
extra careful," he said. "We want
to publicize this as much as we
can to the Afghan people so that
they can protect their children
from these killers."
Col. Sayed Waqef Shah, a reli-
gious and cultural affairs officer
for the Afghan army, wiped away
tears after seeing Juma.
"Whenever I see this kind of
action from the Taliban, if I am
able to arrest them, I'll kill them
on the spot," he said.
Haji Niaz Mohammad, one of
the elders at the gathering, said
he hoped "God makes the
Afghan government strong" so it
can defeat the Taliban.
"They are the enemy of
Muslims and the enemy of the
children," he said, shaking his
fists in anger


1 dead, 66 hurt



as bus slams


into overpass


almost six more than the 53 3/4
wieners Kobayashi downed at
Coney Island in New York last year.
"My jaw refused to fight any
more," Takeru "Tsunami" Kobayashi
revealed on his blog Monday,
describing how he cannot open his
mouth any wider than a fingertip.
The slender Kobayashi won six
consecutive July Fourth contests.
The Japanese man is a strapping
160 pounds, and his training
includes vigorous exercise to
ensure no belly fat gets in the way
of eating hot dogs.
"I was continuing my training and
bearing with the pain but finally I
destroyed my jaw," he wrote.
- From wire reports


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
* Call Mike Arnold, managing editor, at 563-5660.
* Be prepared to leave a message with your name, phone
number and brief description of the story idea.


STmauwus Molil RMcycling

11 At the end of Cooper Lane off Hwy. 41 in Floral City



Aluminum Cans * All Aluminum * Radiators * Batteries
' � Steel * Iron
GIVE US A CALL AT (352)637-2100

P77


, CITRUS


Vehicle was

returningfrom

family reunion

Associated Press

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. - A
tour bus carrying members of
an extended Alabama family
home from a reunion veered off
a southern Kentucky highway
early Monday and slammed into
an overpass, killing one person
and injuring 66 others.
State police said the driver
apparently dozed off shortly
before 3 a.m., while most of the
passengers
were asleep. .-
The bus veered I
off Interstate 65,
struck an earth-
en embankment
and rammed a
concrete bridge
pillar about 75
miles north of
Nashville.
At least two of
the injured
were reported
in critical condi-
tion Monday
afternoon,
including an 8-
year-old boy and
the 63-year-old
driver, police
said.
Trooper Steve Kentucky S
Pavey said no Terry Aexandntucky S
charges were Terry Alexandof
pending against Interstate 65
the driver, and Grove, Ky.,
that the woman Grove, Ky.,
who died was ejected from the
bus.
Hours later, as authorities
worked to remove the shattered
bus from the roadside, chil-
dren's pink suitcases, blankets
and other luggage were still
piled along the highway.
The bus had been rented by a
family returning to Alabama
from a reunion in Niagara Falls
in upstate New York
Jaida Goree, 27, said she
woke up just before the crash
and heard a "popping" noise
just before impact The force of
the crash threw her forward
several rows. She called for her
two children in the chaos that
followed. Neither was seriously
hurt.
Two passing truckers stopped
to help the family get off the bus
through the emergency exit,
Goree said, adding she didn't
know what caused the accident
State police said there were
42 adult passengers, 23 children
and two drivers on the bus.
James Jackson, a passenger
on the bus, said some of the chil-
dren were fine, -while others


Hips go. Knees gO. The only question is where w illOU JO?


Citrus Bone and Joint Specialists

R Crane Couch, D.O. Orthopedic Surgery
Bernadette "Berna" Harrelson, PA-C
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
LeCanto 3264 W. Audubon Park Path 746-0654
Ocala 6075 S.W. 73rd St. Road, Ocala 237-9298
- - - 714419


Suffering From Obstructive
Sleep Apnea Or Snoring?

Can't Tolerate CPAP?




* Quiets Snoring * Impro'es CP.-P Compliance
* Decre.ses CP\P pressure and \pnea S mptomsin
0 1 Implants cmered bh Mcdicaie
. FREE CONSULTATION
Richard Weisenburger, D.O., F.O.C.O.O.
Board CCeril ed Ear, Now',, 3 5 ,'L , 1& t ,'a/ Plrss , ." P 'I L r,'u t'Hi
STop 20 Pillar Implant Specialist in IUS

CALL NOW 352-795-0011 / 866-917-6673 Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills


"are not doing so good."
Mary Hill, who said most of
those on the bus were her
cousins, drove five hours from
Alabama after learning that her
brother was among the injured.
"He said everyone was so hys-
terical," she said. "Everyone
was trying to find the kids."
The passengers included
about 40 members of the
Jackson family from Forkland,
Ala., and several town officials,
said Cynthia K Stone, city clerk
in the west Alabama community
of 630 people.
Authorities identified the two
in critical condition as bus driv-
er Abraham Parker, 63, of
Birmingham, Ala.; and Kayalon
Jackson, 8, of Forkland.
The woman
who died was
identified as
Carrie Walton,
71, of Alabama's
Greene County.
Walton was "a
very lovely per-
son," Stone said.
,I','r "She was a won-
oLC.E - derful mother,
grandmother.
Her family was
S. the most impor-
S tant thing to
S her"
Some of the
bus passengers
treated at the
scene wore T-
shirts commem-
Associated Press orating the
ates T Prooe Hamilton Jack-
ar inspectsthe son Hendricks
a tour bus on Family Re-
near Smiths union.
By early
afternoon, a
number of the injured passen-
gers had been released from
four hospitals and were taken
to a shelter the Red Cross set
up at a church. Some had
bandages on their heads and
arms, and some needed wheel-
chairs or crutches.
About 50 of' those injured
had been treated and released
from area hospitals by Monday
afternoon.
Clarence Williams, presi-
dent of C & R Tours confirmed
the company had rented the
bus for the family trip to New
York state. He did not immedi-
ately return a call from The
Associated Press seeking addi-
tional comment after state
police released their prelimi-
nary finding on the cause of
the crash.
The company had a satisfac-
tory safety rating when it was
last reviewed in March,
according to the U.S.
Department of Transportation.
It had not reported any acci-
dents or injuries in the last two
years.


I FREE ]


. ...1- I ..............


t
e












CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
FordM 521649 9.03 -.10
GenElec 476013 38.21 -.03
Pfizer 349363 25.40 +.02
Blackstn n 339751 32.44 -2.62
EMCCp 317825 .17.65 -.30

GAINERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MidwGm 7.22 +.77 +11.9
HrtdPay 29.00 +2.23 +8.3
Mdbklns 10.80 +.60 +5.9
WestwdH 32.05 +1.79 +5.9
HarvNRes 12.75 +.70 +5.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MuellerWat 16.94 -2.41 -12.5
AmOriBio 8.39 -.92 -9.9
TRCCoslf 14.03 -1.17 -7.7
Blackstn n 32.44 -2.62 -7.5
Nortellnv 25.16 -2.03 -7.5

DIARY


Aoa3n.:ed
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1035
2,290
117
3,442
63
.85
3,199,434,374


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 2198640 149.83 -.72
iShR2K nya1014481 82.49 -.43
SP Fnd 327417 38.24 -.29
PrUShQQQ n274188 47.16 +.61
SP Engy 248412 69.19 -.56

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
FrdmAcwt 3.63 +1.62 +80.6
FrdmAcun 14.50 +2.82 +24.1
LehJYen wt 2.29 +.29 +14.5
XELR8 2.15 +.26 +13.8
RetractTc 2.45 +.20 +8.9

LOSERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
IntelliCk 4.76 -1.24 -20.7
EnvirTec 2.56 -.44 -14.6
LadThalFn 2.28 -.33 -12.6
ChShengP n 5.01 -.67 -11.8
IdaGnM n 5.31 -.66 -11.1

DIARY


Advarnced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


396
810
82
1,288
44
32
668,487,786


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ1298953 47.09 -.20
SunMicro 628463 5.02 -.06
Intel 490382 23.48 -.22
Microsoft 472688 29.49
Cisco 428572 27.03 +.11

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
US Xprss 18.94 +4.74 +33.4
DayStar 5.93 +1.40 +30.9
HokuSci 10.74 +2.00 +22.9
Corcept 2.60 +.48 +22.6
NoWesCpwt!9.33 +1.40 +17.7

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CryoCor 2.77 -1.63 -37.0
Copemic .3.17 -.55 -14.8
FuweiF n 6.14 -1.01 -14.1
GrLkDrg wt 3.80 -.62 -14.0
USHmSy 10.47 -1.59 -13.2

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1,036
2,002
133
3,171
81
85
2,020,027,430


Here are the 825 most active s'c.cks on the New York Siock Exchange, 765 most active on the
Nasdaq National Market and 116 most aciive on te American Stock Exchange Stocks in bold
are worth al least 15 ana changed 5 percent or more in price UnfDeuinn for 50 most actve
on NYSE and Nasdaq and 25 most 3actve on Amex. Tables snow name pnce and net change.
and one to two addi.lonal fields rotatea nrougn tne eek. as follows


DIv: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, Dased on latest
quarterly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted Mc
Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by Ihe company's full name C. * M
(not ,Is abbreviation) Names consisting of inihals appear at thme , 1.'
beginning of each letter's list. ,
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day
Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated By .. vi -1 Ca g

Stock Footnotes cc - PE greater mar. 99 oa - issue rLs beeni ,aliad fr ra-ci r uiDiO,, ot io i. C m
company a- New 52-oeek low dd -Lois in la12 rr, c . Corr C .rn; ylornivrertf clhad S I1 . a U i
or. the Aiencer Eschange r Eri.rrglrg Corrpari MarPelplace s ' D.vsle.ds d' d earrn- , . . "
ings In Canadian dollars n amporarpy exrnpi fiom Naisdjaq Capiai anrd surpli r . ' 'r �
qualication n- Strck war . arasw ,6ua In lheIre Ia y.r rme 52.e ". hgir.,1nand to. ur'
Oate only t'rn ihe beginninr ,tg l trading pl - Peierfred slck &.-ue. po . Puelsia nco.6 pp -
Holder, owes lnssalmerais of purcriase priea q - Cjoied-ar.d mu flual urd. no PE calculaf
ad. Pn - Rhi to Iuy secui~r at a pee a-hd price a - Slocik rs spll by i1 least 0 per ai, ,.. n I
wilimin ie last yeai. wi * Tradels .Ill b EA&llied rien, thea .ra ,u e'>ueda wad e* r O..si . .
Intuled t . Wa rrari, blowing a purha. eolf atrock u . Nsew 52.e.k hi..4un. t u UrtL A-. '- ' .
including rr,:ea Hmar, on, saa iiv vi - Conmparry iin baniuc; c ,, r:, rshp o, .Irnr. . . :' "-' " n. i
reorganiua1 under ira banrkrupLCy law Appears in liroa of itS name. . * I
Dividend Footnotes: a - Earrat fOrulnd ere rnlia Dul rt r not Inluld. - Arrual ra
plus alrd. c - LUquidaling dJividend a � Arm:munt des:lared cr pard in ia r 12 monin I -
Current anrural rat ewhicn was iniraaaed rj moat ie,:eri di.,iOed ar runcrerienf I -
Sur of idriv ladends paid aftei 'sac spia, no regular rate i- Sum ofdl didan.l pald thins yi a 'i , = .,
Most recent di,idend as on'itted or deferrea K - Deaiered or paid hl eal a. a icmulalins L. aCEL M2 .1
issue iawin Ohridenda ir. airars n . Current annual rare, nl-r. was di..reasa. l y mostt 'A 5M I .b'-,.
recfnt diMlcnnd announcemrnan p i initial ai/aind, nrnual rnlae .T t .norwn, yield notl -jt ,'t .
sh..-n r - Declared or pald i, preceding 12 months plus atck da,'dend I Paid in soc
Source: the Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


I SOCS F OCA ITEES


AT&T Inc 1.42
BkofAm 2.24
CapCtyBk .70
Citigrp 2.16
Disney .31
EKodak .50
ExxonMbl 1.40
FPL Grp 1.64
FlaRock .60
FordM
GenElec 1.12
GnMotr 1.00
HomeDp .90
Intel .45
IBM 1.60
Lowess .32
McDnlds 1.00


Div YId PE Last


I ~~~INDXS


o5.-weeK
Hiah Low


13,692.00
5,348.47
537.12
10,068.29
2,393.76
2,634.60
1,540.56
856.39
15,578.36


10,683.32
4,134.72
400.80
7,824.41
1,833.92
2,012.78
1,224.54
668.58
12,288.68


20 39.08


20 39.08
10 48.85
18 31.50
12 51.69
16 34.06
28.29
12 82.37
18 57.76
25 67.73
... 9.03
19 38.21
... 36.27
15 39.18
26 23.48
17 105.10
16 31.22
18 51.30


YTD
Chg %Chg


Name


Microsoft .40 __ ------- - 1.2--


Microsoft .40
Motorola .20
Penney .80
ProgrssEn 2.44
RegionsFn1.44
SearsHldgs ...
SprintNex .10
TimeWarn .22
UniFirst .15
VerizonCm1l.62
Wachovia 2.24
WalMart .88
Walgrn .31


Div YId PE Last


YTD
Chg %Chg


... -1.2
-.07 -13.3

-1.02 -7.0
-.05 -7.0
-.27 -11.1
-1.37 +.6
-.03 +16.4
... -1.5
+.04 +6.4
-.13 +11.4
+.07 -8.8
-.01 +3.6
-.72 -3.6


Name


Dow Jones Industrials
Dow Jones Transportation
Dow Jones Utilities
NYSE Composite
Amex Index
Nasdaq Composite
S&P 500
Russell 2000
DJ Wilshire 5000


nit o I i i oaYwK
Last Cho Cha % Cho % Cha


13. -8.2 +7.13 +08


13,352.05
5,124.84
488.49
9,807.21
2,307.04
2,577.08
1,497.74
827.46
15,139.60


-8.21
+16.62
+3.12
-41.76
-9.91
-11.88
-4.82
-7.29
-63.72


+7.13 +20.88
+12.38 +7.39
+6.94 +19.73
+7.31 +23.10
+12.19 +23.05
+6.70 +20.78
+5.60 +19.77
+5.05 +18.44
+6.19 +19.99


NE YRKSOC0ECANG


Div Name Last Chg

.209 ABBLtd 22.11 -.28
1.08f ACELtd 62.39 -.10
... AESCorp 21.80 +.28
.82f AFLAC 51.91 -.77
.. AGCO 44.16 -.06
1.64 AGLRes 39.95 +.11
.. AKSteel u37.41 -1.04
.. AMR 26.00 -.75
1.00e ASALtd 63.74 -1.06
1,42 AT&T In 39.08 +.23
.1.75 AT&T41dd 25.07
. .09r AUOption 17.40 -.15
1.42e AXA 43.18 -.41
1.30 AbtLab 54.05 +1.19
.70 AberFitc 72.77 -.94
.35f Accenture 42.15 -.48
.90e AdamsEx 14.85 -.01
AdvMOpt 33.48 -.17
.. AMD 14.28 -.29
1.80 AdvEngy 14.15 -.45
. Aeropsd 42.26 -.39
.04f. Aetna 486,50 -61
2.06t Agilent 38.48 -.17
.121 Agniosg 35.18 -1.11
.11 Agriumg 44.82 -.97
... Ahold 12.93 -.07
... AlrTran 10.97 -.25
.80 Akcan 81.69 -1.38
.42e AleatelLuc 13.69 -.09
.68 Alcoa 39.41 -.59
1.24f AlescoFnd 8.64 -.18
- . AllgEngy 50.65 +.30
.52 AllegTch 105.70 -1.07
.20 Alleigans 58.00 +.77
1.64 Allete 47.00 +.80
AlliData 77.14 -.42
. AlliancOne 9.81 +.29
1.02a AlliBGIbHi 13.61 +.14
.60 AlliBlnco 8.19 +.05
4.15e AlliBem .84.33 -.97
.51e Allianz u23.73 -.04
... AldWaste 13.78 -.07
1.52 Allstate 61.12 -.06
.50 Alftel . 67.79 +.40
... Alpharma 26.03 -.12
2.76 Alias 68.75 +.55
.72 AmbacF 84.48 -1.49
... Amdocs 39.09 -.16
2.54 Ameren 48.47 -.03
.. Amerigrp 23.84 -.27
.18e AMovilL 61.54 -1.58
.401 AEagleOs 26.11 -.01
1.56 AEP. 44.28 +.79
.60 AmExp 61.80 +.01
.76 AFndRT 10.23 -.11
.401 AGreet 27.59 +.20
3.89e AmHmMtg 22.30 +.08
.801 AmlntGoll 71.11 -.14
.. AmOriBlo 8.39 -.92
.72 AmStand 58.48 -.82
.78a AmSIP3 11.63 -.06
AmTower 41.00 -.45
- .... Americdt 26.50 -21
2.44f Amerigas 35.33 -.68
.36 Anadarko 52.80 -1.23
.72 AnalogDev 37.26 +.17
1 4,,r,.,usr 51.36 -1.09
-e A,',,,'l, 14.25 -.11
.60 AonCorp 41.11 -.12
.60 Apache 83.69-1.25
2.40 Aptlnv 48.98 -.42
.17 ApplBo 29.52 +.13
.46 AquaAm 21.95 +.22
.. Aquila 4.04 -.08.
1.30 ArcelorMit 64.20 -.21


Div Name Last Chg

.. ABXAir 7.00 +.10
. ... ACMoore 20.59 +.01
.. ADCTelr 18.55 +.01
. AMISHId 12.44 -.18
.. ASML HId 27.48 -.43
.. ATPO&G 46.84 +.02
S- ATSMed 1.83 -.12
... AVBio 2.89 -.09
.. AccHmelf 13.92 -.08
20p Acergy 22.13 -.23
.. Activisn 18.64 -.07
.24 Acxiom 26.31 -.17
. AdamsResp 40.47 -.08
. Adaptec 3.78 +.03
. AdobeSy 40.34 -,50
.AdolorCp 3.64 -.03
.36 Adtran 24.67 -.17
... AdvATech 9.35 +.13
.. AdvEnId 21.94 -.31
S... AdvLfSci 2.69 -.31
.. AdvMag 58.70 -.47
.571 AdvantaAs 28.63 -1.04
.681 AdvantaBs 31.49 -1.18
.. Aeroflex 14.11 -.04
.. Affymnerix 24.61 -.21
.. AkamaiT 47.83 +.35
1.61e Akzo 084.77 +.59
.60 Aldila 15.38 -.12
.. Ale)don 44.64 -.69
AlignTech 23.59 -.67
. Akenrm 14.71 -.07
. AlosThera 4.68 -.02
.. Alscripts 25.08 +.04
. AltairNano 3.68 +.28
.16 AlteraColf 22.05 -.45
..Alvarion 8.88 -.23
.10f AmTrFinn u18.70 +.44
. Amarinh .52 -.03
.., Amazon 68.66 -.20
1.08 AFstApt u24.99 +2.45
.. AmerBio 1.13 -.06
3.64f AmCapStr 42.76 -.74
... ACmdLnn 25.11 +.67
.. ArerMed 17.68 -.07
.. AmSupr 18.90 -.34
.41 AmCasino 34.62 -.64
,,, Amaen 55.86 -.10
.. AmkorTIf u14.89 +22
.. Amsurg 24.83 +.10
....Amylin 40.83 -.78
. Anadigc 13.37 -.23
.40 Anlogic 69.65 -.84
.. Analysis 1.65 -.01
.19 Andrsonss 45.98 +.38
S,. Andrew 13.00 +.11
.. AngoDyn 17.94 +.44
. Angiotchg 6.95 -.17
.88 , AngloAm 29.51 -.67
Ansyss 26.06 -.18
.. ApolloGrp 49.98 +.95
2.04 Apollolnv 22.61 -.06
.. AppleIn 122.34 -.66
.22f Applebees 24.01 -.54
,24f ADidMa 19,88 -.37
.. AMCC 2.54 -.08
.. aQuantive 61.25 -.25
.. ArQule 6.92 -.08
.. ArchCap 70.80 +.06
.. ArenaPhm 10.87 -.27
1.64 AresCap 17.40 -.16
.. AriadP 5.57 -.17
.. Aibalnc 9.51 -.17.
.60 ArkBest 40.00 +.80
. Aris 16,91 -.23
... AscentSol 8.07 +A41
. Asialnfo u9.68 +.26
S . .. AspenTech 13.97 +.19
1.24f AssedBanc 32.56 +.02
.. AthrGnc d2.16 -.04
.. Atheros 30.35 -.50
.. Atmelll 5.67 -,03
.. Audvox 12.79 -.04
. Autodesk u46.91 +.25
. Avanex 1.79 -.01


.28f. ArchCoa 34.95 -.55
.46 ArchDan 33.04 -.44
1.81 ArchstnSm 58.23 -.72
.. ArrowB 39.74 +.09
.40 APrMeri 20.95 -.08
.84 AshfordlT- 11.88 -.17
1.10a Ashland 61.80 -.47
.60 Aspenlns u28.19 +.23
.68 AsdEstat 14.23 -.31
1.28 ATMOS 29.81 -.02
.92b AutoData 48.13 -.27
3.40 AvalonBay 119.66 -1.36
Avaya 16.78 -.17
AvIsBudget 27.56 -1.92
Avnet 41.69 -.13
.74 Avon 36.49 -.33
1.68 BB&TCp 41.02 -.13
1.46 BCEgn u38.04 +.37
.77e BHPBilILt 58.90 -.57
.20 BJSvcs 28.26 -.69
BMCSft 29.95 -.40
2.42e BPPLC 70.11 +.35
2.15 BRE 58.76 -.12
2.48 BRT 26.65 -.13
.52 BakrHu 86.98 -1.64
.40 BaxlCp 53.56 -.46
.111 BcBredass 24.24 -.31
2.24 BkofAm 48.85 -.10
.88 BkNY 40.45 -.13
.,60 BamesNob 38.39 -.91
.301 BaSrckG 28.93 -.82
.52 BaLiichL 67.87 -1.03
.67 Baxter 55.06 -.62
2.16 Baytexsg 19.94 -.10
1.28 BearSt 139.10 -4.65
. BeringPIf 729 -.03
.40 BeazrHm 28.37 -1.07
.98 BectDck 74.22 -.97
.30 BernyPet 38.50 -.92
.40 BestBuy 45.07 +.28
BigLots 29.22 -.46
1.36 BIkHillsCp 38.61 -.41
.45a BIkFL08 14.51 +.01
. Blacksln nd32.44 -2.62
.57f BlockHR 22.21 -.33
... Blockbs 4.29 -.14
.57e BlueChp 6.19 +.07
1.40 Boeing 95.57 -.35
.44 Borders 19.47 -.20
... BostBeer 38.83 -.43
2.72a BstProp 100.10 -1.49
... BstonSc 15.48 -.30
1.76 BrandywC d28.87 -.13
.360 Bnkers 28.86 +.04
1.12 BrMnvS 31.56 +.16
.06p BrdrdgFnn 20.12 +.22
.40rn BrkfidAsgs 38.74 -.64
.561 BrkfidPrs 23.58 -.91
.60b Brunswick 33.47 -.31
. BrshEMat 41.05 +1.08
1.00 BurINSF 86.05 -.10
.16 CAInc 25.79 +.03
.. CB Rlis 36.78 -.98
.88 CBSB 32.62 +19
.08 CF Inds 58.83 -1.23
2.16 CHEngy 44.53 -.26
.041 CIGNA s 52.38 -.60
1.00 CIToGp 55.35 -.43
.20 CMSEng 16.86 +.08
.561 CSSInds 38.39 -.23
.00f CSXs 44.62 -.17
.241 CVSCare 36.31 -.24
... CablvsnNY 35.46 -.44
.121 CabotOs 38.94 -1.21
.28 CallGodf 17.70 -.42
.20 Camecogs 51.51 -1.64
.. Cameron 71.61 -2.12


... AvanirP 2.92 -.13
2.00e AvidSys 7.44 -.03
...Avoclp 28.86 -.49
... Aware 5.39 -.13
.. Axcels 6.41 -.15
.. BEAero u40.18 -.51
... BEASvslf 13.12 -.58
..Baidu.com 154.06 -2.42
... BalardPw 5.00
.02 BnkUtd 20.99 -.60
BareEscn 35.52 +.72
.. BeaconPh 1.02 -.07
.. BeacnRfg 17.06 -.18
.25 BeasleyB 8.43 +.08
.20 BebeS'ts 16.30 -.02
... BedBath 37.02 -.12
.. BigBandn 15.20 -.61
.. BoDivrw .04 +.01
.. Blocryst 7.81 +.67
.. Beoevisn 5.61 -.11
. Biocenldc 51.75 +,17
.. BioMarin 17.64 -.13
.30e Biomet 45.51 +.01
.. Biopure .71 +.04
.. Biosite 92.32 -.20
.34 Bdckbaud 22.54 +.03
.. Blkboard 41.00 -.78
... BlueCoat 48.56 -.41
.. BluPhoenx u11.00 +.13
.56 BobEvn 35.84 -.36
... Bookham 2.21 +.03
... Borland 5.82 -.01
.BigExp 5.78 -.11
.. Brightpnt 13.99 -.28
Broadcomrn 29.80 -.72
... BrdeCm 8.40 -.16
.. BroncoDr 16.35 -.10
.34a BridneB 11.78 +.02
... BrooksAuto 18.40 -.07
... BrukBio 8.73 -.05
.20 Bu s 69.10 -.91
...= B s 41.41 -1.33
BusnObj 39.85 +.48
.. C-COR 13.58 -.38
.56 CBRLGrp 41.92 -.15
.. CDCCpA 8.50 -.20
.521 CDWCorp 84.40 -.23
.72 CH Robins 53.09 -.23
... CKXInc 13.92 -.42
,, CMGI 1.83 -.06
... CNET 8.42 -.18
... CTC Media 27.62 +.26
.... CVThera 12.46 -.64
.. Cadence 21.76 -.14
... CaPizzas 21.00 -.35
.70 CapCtyBk 31.50-1.20
... CpstnTrb 1.08 -.02
S... CareerEd 33.58 +.30
... Canizo 44.31 -.75
... Celgene 5625 -.15
... CellGens 3.56 -.19
... CentEuro 34.62 -1.87
... CenGardns 12.54 -.12
... CentAl 54.42 -.47
... Cephin 77.10 -.66
... Cepheid 12.47 -.55
... Ceradyne 72.88 -.67
... CeragonN 10.07 -.26
... Coemer 56.15 +.37
... CerusCp 6.48 +.01
.40 Chaparrals 70.98 +.05
... ChmnSh 10.98 -.65
... ChartCm 3.89 -.04
... ChkPoint 23.17 -.28
.. ChkFree 40.15 -.09
... Cheesecake 24.83 +.02
... ChildPlclf 52.85 -.16
... ChinaMed 32.01 +.46
... ChinaSunn 13.83 +.81
.. ChinaTDvIf 4.15 +.15
. ChipMOS 7.04 -.09
. Chordntrs u15.60 +.26
.50 ChrchllD 50.88 -1.29
... CienaCp rs 35.03 -.68
1.42 CinnRFn 43.33 -.23
.391 Cintas 39.11 -.40
... Cirrus 8.20 -.04


.80 CampSp 38.47 -.11
.84 CdnNRyg 50.18 -.84
.34 CdnNRsg 65.38-1.12
2.28 Caneticg 16.54 -.18
.11 CapOne 79.40 -.63
2.401 CapiSrce 24.30 -.37
1.26 CapMplB 12.84 -.12
.481 CaidrHth 69568 -.06
.. Carelnvn 13.56 +.08
... CarMaxs 25.55 -.42
1.401 Carnival 48.49 -.83
1.44f Caterpillar 80.70 -.20
.16 Celanese u38.09 +.20
.75e Cemexs 38.19 -.48
.. Centene 20.32 -.44
.8 CenterPnt 16.92 +.02
.16 Centex 40.66 -.56
.26 CntyTel 49.21 +.41
Ceridian 35.01 -.44
ChmpE 10.21 -.12
.01 Checkpnt 24.87 -.60
.20 Chemtura 11.09 +.03
.27f ChesEng 35.59 -.63
2.32f Chevron 82.95 +1.40
Chicos 23.908 -.40
.21 ChinaLfes 54.32 -.09
.99e ChinaMble 53.30 -.12
1.16 Chubb 54.25 +.40
1.31e ChungTel 18.90 +.03
... Cnd ll 5.89 -.11
... Cinernarknd17.04 -.38
.16 CircCity 15.74 -11
.72a CitadlBr 6.00 -.24
2.16 Citro 51.69 -.72
1.00 CitzComm 15.11 +.05
.75 CleaiChan 37.20 -.79
.50 ClvCffss 78.05 -1.41
1.01 iorox 62.37 +.03
Coach 46.51 -.61
.24 CocaCE 22.98 -.15
1.36 CocaCi --51.77 +.15
... Coeur 3.63 -.09
1.44f ColgPal 65.41 +.14
.54 Collngln 8.16 -.05
2.56 Comerica 59.82 -.19
.52 CrncBNJ 33.20 +.19
.. ComScop 55.54 -.46
CmtyHt- u41.05 +.35
.61e CVRD 44.32 -.85
.61e CVRDpf 37.25 -.72
... CompSd u58.76 +121
.40 Con-Way 53.21 +.12
.72 ConAgra 25.20 -.26
1.64 ConocPhil 78.04 -.70
Conseco 20.87 +.36
28 ConsolEngy 47.16 -.47
2.32 ConEd 45.17 -.03
ConstellA 23.85 -.30
1.74 ConstellEn 86.67 +.73
... CtiAlr B 33.26 -.71
Cnvngys 24.34 -.12
.84 Coopers u56.99 -.10
... Coming 25.66 +.17
.60 CntwdFn 37.27 +.09
CovantaH 24.57 -1.15
CovenbyH 58.53 +21
1.50 CresRE 22.15 -.09
... CrwnCste 34.43 -.50
.72 Cumminss 100.17 -1.97
CypSem 23.57 -.06

.64 DCTIndIn 10.83 -.29
.78 DNPSelct 10.91 +.01
1.04 DPL 28.26 +.18
.60 DRHorton 20.57 -.28
.. DSTSys 77.02 -1.32
2.12 DTE 48.56 +.10


... Cisco 27.03 +.11
1.16 CizRep 19.10 -.09
... CitrixSylf 32.92 -.53
ClaytonH 11.11 -.49
... CleanEnnd11.83 -.73
... CleanH 47.63 +.38
.. Clearwiren 24.42 +1.02
.. CogentC 27.98 -.51
.. CogTech 75.48 -.45
. Cognosg 38.54 -.56
... Coldwtrrk 23.37 -.58
... ColeyPhm 3.60 +.03
... ColorKlnet 33.37 -.03
.. Colmbus u33.00 +1.85
1.00e C. on,,cm "Aj, -.14
.. Cmm o32 . ,'0 -.06
... Crr7p, :744 -.15
Compuwre 11.50 +.17
... ComtchGr 16.80 +.37
... Comtech 43.60 -.43
... Concepts 18.36 -.33
ConcCm 1,70 -.05
Conexant 1.43 -.04
... Conmed 28.73 -.32
... Copart 29.68 +.24
Copemic 3.17 -.55
.. Corcept 2.60 +.48
... CorinthC 14.77 -.16
1.00a CorusBksh 17.07 +.07
Cosi Inc 4.74
.581 Costco 57.20 +.03
CredSys 3.91
.. Creernc 26.61 -.80
... CritdTher 2.18 -.10
... Crocss 46.12 -.79
... CubistPh 20.74 -.42
CybrSrce 12.21 -.08
Cymer 40.85 -.15
CyprsBlo 13.32 -.15
. CytRx 3.32 -.23
Cytogen 1.95 +.01
.. Cytyclf 41.29 -.97

. DRDGOLDh .75 +.01
.07f Daktnicsas 20.85 -.38
.. Danka 1.09 +.02
.. DayStar 5.93 +1.40
... Dell Inc 27,09 .
... DtaPtr 20.33 -.77
... Dndreon 6.73 -.05
Dennys 4.21 -.05
.16 Dentsplys 37.32 +.33
.. Depomed 4.80 +.03
.DigeneCp 58.87
.. DigRiver 50.11 -.46
. Diodes 39,80 -.50
... DLscHoldA 22.86 -.53
. DiscvLabs 3.09 +.01
. DitEnSy 1.20 +.05
... DivXn 14,80 -.51
.. DobsonCmull.00 +.91
.. DollFn 28.91 +.01
. DllrTree 41.98 -.04
.. DressBam 21.45 -.13
drugstore 2.65 -.10
.80 DryShips 39.51 +.30
... Dynavax 4.16 -.09
... ETrade 22.72 -.37
...eBav 31.95 +.19
. EGLInc 45.91 -.62
... EPIQSyss 15.49 +.25
... eResrh 9.07 -.03
... EZEM 15.83 +.13
2.00m EagleBulk 21.98 -.03
... ErthUnk 7.31 +.06
.40 EstWstBcp 39.16 -.22
.. EchoStar 43.08 -.21
... EdgePet 14.48 -.43
.221 EduDv 7.84 +.07
... ElectSc 21.24 +.19
... EIctrgls 2.11 +.06
... BectArts 47.46 -1.11
... EFII 28.51 -.42
... Emcorefl 5.33 +.12
.08 EncorW 30.75 +.27
... EncysiveP 1.89


2.00e DaimlrC 89.20 -1.13
.12f Danaher 74.13 +.02
.46 Darden 43.15 +.22
DaViat 52.69 -1.04
15.00eDeanFdss 31.35 -.23
1.76 Deere 122.79 -.56
... DeltaArn 19.43 -.32
2.64 DevDv 51.32 -.79
.56 DevonE 78.34-1.70
.50a DiaOffs 103.72 -3.41
.16 Dillards 34.43 -.19
.. DirecTV 23.78 -.21
.31f Dsney 34.06 -.08
.20 DollarG 21,57 -.09
.. DollarTh 40.06 -2.40
2.84 DomRes 81.40 +.85
.48a Dominoss 18.00 -.37
. Domlargif 10.88 -.25


... EndoPhrm 33.91 -.18
...EngyConv 29.78 -.47
Entegris 11.82 -.05
.. EnzonPhar 7.99 -.19
... EpiorSft 14.31 -.01
.74e EricsnTI 38.87 -.33
... Euronet 29.46 -.06
... EwgrSIr 8.60 -.30
.. Exelixis u11.83 -.04
.. ExideTc 8.92 -.15
Expedia 29.22 +.22
.281 Expdlntfs 42.12 +.66
... ExpScdps 49.28 +.17
ExtNetwIf 3.76 -.08
... F5.Netwks 82.38 -.39
... FCStonen 57.42-2.70
... FEICo 33.40 -.09
.. FLIRSys 44.25 +.97
.421 Fastenal 41.68 -.12
. FiberTowrn 4.47 -.28
.83e Reldlnv 3.75 +.02
1.68 FithThird 41.03 -.32
... Finisarlf 3.75 -.05
.10 RnUne 9.83 -.30
1.28 FCmlyBcp 55.98 +.75
.52 FslNiagara d13.17 -.11
.. FstSolarn u86.35 +1,71
1.16 FslMerit 20.70 -.09
... Rserv 56.13 -.82
... RamelT 21.05 -.12
R, Flextm 10.98 -12
. Flowint 12.73 +,24
.. FocusMdas 47.11 -.16
... ForcePron 23.46 -.38
... ForrFac 40.64 -.41
... Fossil Inc 29.91 -,32
.. FosterWh 105.66 +.51
.. Foundryll 16.69 -.15
.08 Fredsinc 13.09 -.49
.. FmlrAIr 5.72
... FuelTech 33.40 -2.50
.. FuelCell 7.75 -.05
.60f FultohnFndc d14.24 -.03
.. FuweiFn 6.14 -1.01

... GSICmmrcu24.12 +.87
.50 Garmins u72.35 +1.52
.. Gemstar 5.00 -.14
... Genelb 2.34 +.02
... GanBlotc 1.89 +09
... GenesMcr 8.92 +,11
... Genta .31 -.01
.38 Gentex 19.40 -.06
.. GenVec 2.48 +.01
... Genzyme 63.50 -.60
... GeronCp 7.04 -.05
.. GigaMed 13.14 -.58
GileadSdcis 38.72 -52
... Gienlm u26.78 +.60
. Globlind u26.30 -.20
.80 GoldTlcm 53.49+2.58
... Goole u527.42 +2.44
... GrLkDrgen 8.78 -.58
.64f GrtrBay 27.66
..GutaC 50.38 -.87
.. GulfportE u19.93 +.26
... Gymbree 39.60 -1.16
... HLTH 13.83 -.10
1.00 HMNFn 35.50 +.13
... Halozyme 8.98 -.68
. HandhEnn 1.95 +.06
... Hansens 43.43 -.93
... Harmonic 8.48 -.08
... HaesLm- 5.45 -.04
.08a H Ex 16.22 +.04
Heelysn d25.06 -.89
... HercOffsh 33.39-1.08
... Hibbett 25.70 -.33
.. HokuScl u10.74 +2.00
.. Hologic 54.04 -1.75
HomeSol 5.95 -.39
... HoriznOff 19.27 -.39
... HotTopic 10.77 -.19
.. HoustWC 28.25 -.24
... HubGroup 35.38 +.07
.32 HudsCitv d12.29 +.10


1.05 EmersnBs 47.61 -.13
1.28 EmpDist 22.18 -.02
... Emulex u22.33 +.02
3.70 EnbrEPtrs 55.17 -.34
.80 EnCana 63.03 -2.47
329e Endesa 53.86 +.12
1.20 EgyEast 22.54 +.17
...EnPro u42.86 -1.18
.10 ENSCO 61.37-1.48
2.16 Entergy 107.13 +1.95
1.00 Eqtylnn 22.76 +.05
1.85 EqtyRsd 45.62 -.51
... EscoTech d34.90 -2.11
1.76 Exelon 71.26 +1.23
1.40f ExxonMbI 82.37 -15
1.64 FPLGrp 57.76 -.22
.. FairchldS 19.22 -.16
.46 FamilyDir 34.83 +.72


... HumGen 9.49 -.12
.36f HuntdB 28.41 +.34
1.06 HuntBnk 21.88 +.08
. IAC Inter 34.60 +.27
.. ICOGIAn 3.77 -.07
.. IDM Phrm 3.01 -.02
.80 IPCHold 31.35 +.01
... IconixBr 22.11 -.30
... Illumina 39.86 +.25
... Imdone 35.96 -.06
... Immersn 13.52 +.09
.. Immucor 27.31 -.53
,, Imunmd 4.31 -.02
.. InPhoniclf d4.85 -.33
. Incyte 6.09 -.11
. IndevusPh 6.33 -.09
.10p IndSvAm 15.77 -.78
... Informal 14.44 -.20
.27e Infosys s 50.48 -.67
.. Insmed .76 +.04
.. IntgDv 15.19 +.07
.45 Intel 23.48 -22
.. IntaclBrkn 26.13 -.28
.. InterDig 32.59 -.20
.08 Intrface 19.18 -.09
,. InterMune 25.13 -.24
... IntrNAPrs 13.38 -.26
.10f IntlSpdw 52.41
.40 Intersil 31.25 -1.40
... Intervoice 7.91 -.10
... Interwvnif 13.68 +.42
... Intevac 21.32 +.43
... Intuits 29.88 +.04
.. IntSurg 136.50 -1.05
... Investools 10.16 -.17
... InvBncp 13.35 -.46
.10 InvFnSv 61.47 +.04
.. IsllonSysn 15.82 +.83
... Isis 9.19 -.34
. Itron u75.18 +1.00
... IvanhoeEn 1.83 -.08

.. j2Gbobal 34.63 +.05
... JA Solar n u30.37 +.64
.. JDASoft 19.30 ...
.. JDSUnirs 13.42 -.15
.26 JackHenry 25.01 -.20
... Jamba 9.54 +.18
... JamesRiv 13.50 -.57
... JetBlue 11.16 -.21
.. JonesSoda 14.74 -.68
... JosphBnk 41.78 -.95
.60 JoyGlbl 59.78 -.22
... JnprNtwk 24.95 -.13
.48 KLATnc 55.35 -.89
... KnghtCap 16.87 -.35
KnotlInc 19.25 -.73
.Komag 27.53 +1.37
KopinCp 4.16 +.04
.... Kulicke 10.23 -.30
... Ky n 48.01 +.43
.72 LCAVis 44.71 -.25
... LIntl 10.94 -.49
... LKQCp 24.42 +.29
.52 LSIInds 17.77 +.07
... Labophmg 2.75 -.10
... LamRsch 52.40 -.71
3.25e LamarAdv 62.46 -.06
.12 Landstar 46.43 +1.08
... Lattice 5.82 -.10
... LawsnSft 9.54 -.21
... LeapWirels 83.30-1.54
.. Level3 5.85 -.04
... LbGIobA 40.15 -.01
L.. ibGlobC 38.49 +.11
Li... btyMintA 23.15 +.05
Li... UbtMCapA 114.95 -.36
... ifecell 29.58 -.59
... UfeFIH 38.77 +.08
2.50e LigandPhm 6.86 -.08
... imelightn d17.77 -.83
...Lincare 39.50 +.22
.72 LinearTch 35.50 -.18
... LodgEnt 32.67 -.25
... Logitechs 27.00 -.42
... LookSmart 3.88 -.03


.48 Fremontlf 11.76 -.26
.20 FriedBR 5.71 -.07
.20f FrontOlls 44.76 -.78
7.55e Frontline 45.82 +.57

.96 GATX 49.77 +.19
.80a GabelliET 10.15 -.02
.72 GabUdil 9.65 +.05
... GameStop s 39.98 -.08
1.24 Gannett 54.25 +.13
.32 Gap 19.12 -.22
. Gateway 1.63
. Genentch d73.95 -.88
. GnCable u76.79 -1.56
1.16 GenDynam 78.57 +.55
1.12 GenElec 38.21 -.03
1.80 GnGrthPrp 51.57 -1.18


... LoopNet 21.13 -.36

1.76 MCGCap 15.93 -.11
1.39 MGE 32.09 +.08
. MGIPhr 22.71 -.30
. MIPSTech 8.87 +.22
. MKSInst 27.60 +.10
. MRVCm 3.07 -.06
. MSCSfwrn 12.97 +.04
.44 MTS 42.57 -.75
.. Macrvsn 28.93 -.72
. Magma 14.55 -.24
. MagnaEnt d2.84 +.01
. MannKd 12.51 -.09
.08 MarchxB 16.47 +1.16
. Martek 24.58 +.61
, MarvellTsli 17.11 -.80
. MatrixSv 25.29 +.33
. Mattson 10.25 -.03
.28 MaxCaptal 27.60 -.33
.62 Maxim I 32.71 -.62
. MaxwlIT 13.46 -.03
. Medarex 14.15 -.19
. MEDedsn 4.80 +.01
. MedicActs 18.37 -.58
. MediCo 17.74 -.26
. MedisTech 13.83 +.30
. Medivation 19.72 +.27
. MelooPBLnd11.67 +.12
.. MentGr 12.91 -.08
.. Mererlntf 9.81 +.10
. MesaAir 6.82 -.13
.12 Micrel 12.59 -.16
1.121 Microchp 37.50 -.30
... MirosSys 50.50 -1.32
... MicroSemi 22.48 -.49
.40 Microsoft 29.49
. Microtune 5.37 +.20
... Micrvlsn 5.16 -.38
MillPhar 10.14 -.02
.35f MillerHer 34.60 +.08
.. Mindspeed 2.23 -.07
.. Misonix 6.01 -.01
.30 Molex 30.34 -.12
... Monogrm 1.71 +,04
.. MonstrWw 40.69 -.65
.. Move Inc 4.47 +.04
.. NABIBio 4.73 +.10
.. NETgear 36.44 -.30
.. NIIHIdg 79.20 -1.05
. Nanogen 1.35
. Nasdaq 29.89
. Nastech 11.22 -.22
. NatAItH 13.90 -.17
... NektarTh d9.32 -.53
.. NetlUEPS 23.97 -.43
.08 NetBank I .29
... NetL.ogic 28.87 -.63
... Netease 16.85 -.11
... Netflx 19.62 -.06
... NtScout 8.75 +.60
... NetwkAp 31.28 +.08
... Neurochg 6.85 -.12
... Neurcine 11.70 -.12
... NexCen 10.75 -.54
.58e Nissan 21.49 +.28
.50f NobityH 20.50 -.01
1.24 NoWestCp 32.20 +1.54
1.00 NorTrst 63.90 -.22
... NthfldLb d1.37 -.05
... NovaMed 5.75 +.08
... Novacea 9.34 -.58
... NvtWris u25.22 +.51
... Novavax 3.00 -.07
... Novell 7.71 -.17
... Novfus 29.68 -.76
.60 nTelos 25.81 +.30
... NuHodz 12.70 -.40
... NuanceCm 15.99 -.66
... NutriSys 66.32 -.49
.. Nuvelo 3.35 +.01
.. Nvidia 42.47-1.15
... OReillyA 36.15 -.02
... OSIPhrm 35.63 +.11
.52 OhioCas u43,33
... Omnicel 20.78 -.10


.91e HanJS 13.93 +.03
.47 HanPtDiv 8.54 -.05
.58a HanPtDv2 10.81 -.16
... Hanesbrdn 26,35 -.26
.30f Hanoverins 47.35 -.06
2.13e Hanson 106.91 +.02
1.00f HarleyD 60.64 -1.91
..HarmonyG 14.54 -.04
1.60 HarrahE 85.00 -.35
2.00 HaritdFn 98.60 +.30
... HarvNRes 12.75 +.70
.64 Hasbro 31.82 +.52
1.24 HawaliEl 22.87 +.06
1.78 HIthCrPr 28.52 -.28
2.64 HIICrREIT 38.98 -.54
10.00e HItMgts 11.39 +.09
2.64a HllhrRIty 27.90 -.88
.. HedaM 8.21 -.05


"I Had Nothing


But Promises To Give Her!'
11 Wheii voit asked hcr to iiiarrv voit, volt diehl'i have dic
world bv the wil. Nol vel. Bill all diese vears ill hard
work hiler. it �v diffi'l-eill. Your lialile is good ill
circle.s. //dIw I I voll call -ehol-liledialliollel
1,011 11'awed to hei�-k lheii.
Collicscc Ils ... because llow voll call.

Dianiond Specialists



wkL&a
MASTER 1.10 JEWELERS
www.whalenjewelers.com
255 E. HIGHLAND BLVD., INVER , NESS, FL 34452 726-4709
Expert Design & Repair on Premises
Fipe Jewelry - Full Service - Watch Repair - Appraisals - Pearl Stringing


1.04 DonlleyRR 41.87 -.62
. DralFnd 1.11 -.49
1.60e DoubleHull 15.17 -.13
.70 DEmmettn 25.13 -.77
.74 Dover 51.08 -.73
1.68f DowChm 45.07 -.01
1.00 DowJns 57.50 -1.30
1.48 DuPont 51.45 -.85
.84 DukeEgys 18.23 -.01
1.90 DukeRlty 35.53 -.58
... Dynegy 9.43 -.24
.EMCpC 17.65 -.30
.36 EOGRes 74.43 -2.19
1.76 EastChm 64.73 -.21
.50 EKodak 28.29 -.48
.46 Ecolab 42.64 -.18
1.16 Edisonlnt 53.83 +.21
.80 Edwards 85.19 -.06
.16 BPasoCp 16.89 -.06
.. EBan 20.99 +.01
.20 EDS 27.22 -.34
2.50f Embarq 62.97 -.34


2.00f FannieMIf 66.24 +.24
.40f FedExCp 111.58 +1.62
.24 FedSignl 15.89 -.06
1.00 FelCor u26.90 +.27
2.00 Ferreligs 23.70 -.20
.58 Ferro 24.72 -.33
1.20 FidlNFin 23.37 -.56
.12 FirstDatas l88. - T
1.63e FstFinFd - i -"i
1.80 FstHorizon .- ..'- '
1.60 FtTrFid 18.44 -.11
2.00 FirstEngy 64.21 +.64
.60 RaRock 67.73 -.07
.80 Fluor 103.08 -2.63
.50 FootLockr 21.98 +.31
... FordM 9.03 -.10
.. ForestLab 44.90 -.40
.35e Fortress n 2325 -1.00
1.56 FortuneBr 82.98 -.23
.60 FrankRes 131.27 -1.33
2.00 FredMac 61,59 -.68
1.25a FMCG 81.25 -1.60


1.48 GenMills 58.79 +.33
1.00 GnMotr 36.27 +.81
1.31 GMdb32B 21.61 -.07
.36 Genworth 34.67 -.45
1.50 GaPw8-44 24.34 -.06
.66e Gerdau 24.61 -.25
1.89e GlaxoSKIn 51.66 -.17
.08 GlobPay 39.50 -.72
.90 GlobalSFe 72.42 -1.28
.28e GoldFLtd 16.23 -.27
.18 Goldcrpg 23.73 -.70
1.40 GoldmanS 216.74 -5.66
.680 Goodrich 58.58 +.07
. Goodyear 33.98 -.69
1.40f Graingr u93.25 +1.31
.. GrantPrde 55.63 -1.45
1.66 GtPlainEn 28.91 +.09
.. Griffon 22.11 -.02
.66e GpTelevisa 26.97 -.48
.52e GuangRy 40.00 -.70
.24 Guess s 47.45 -1.42
.84 HRPTPrp d10.31 -.13
.36f Hallibtns 35.06 -.66


1.521 Heinz 46.79 +.11
... HelixEn 40.39 -.69
... HellnTel 14.95 -.26
.18 HelmPays u36.02 -.09
.80 Herbalife 39.31 -.59
... Hercules 19.00 +.06
... Hertz n 25.01 -.53
.40 Hess 58.42 -1.30
.32 HewlettP 44.94 -.24
... Hexcel 20.74 -.80
1.70 HighwdPrp 38.10 -.45
.16 Hilton 34.23 -.49
.90 HomeDp 39,18 -.18
1.00 Honwllntl 55.68
3.04f HospPT 41.26 -.21
.80a HostHots 22.92 -.10
... HovnanE d17.40 -.80
... Humana 61.63 +.64
.49e ICICIBk 48.45 -1.19
... ICICIBkwi 48.50
.87e iShBrazil 60.50 -.71
.32e IShHK 16.94 -.03


... Omniturenu2239+1.73
.. OmnMsn 17.41 +.03
.. OnAssign 10.77 -.11
OnSmcnd 10.60 -.16
.. OnyxPh 26.74 -.36
OpenTV 2.10 +.02
1.20e OpnwvSy 6.36 -.30
.. Opnextn 13.12 -.22
. Opsware 9.36 -29
.25 optXprs 25.76 -.05
. Orade 19,48 +.09
... Orbcommn 16.19 -.22
.. Orexigenn 15.45 +1.17
Orthfx 43.75 -.48
1.17 OtterTail 30.87 +.01

... PDL Bio 23.36 -.25
... PFChng 34.98 -.20
PMCSra 7.63 -.12
1.00f Paccars 86.18 -1.24
.60 Pacerlnt d24.08 -.86
.88 PacCapB 25.34 -.18
., PacEthan 12.71 -.12
... PacSunwr 21.62 -.31
.PaetecHn 10.40 -.46
..Palm In 16.36 -.44
. PanAS1v 26.84 -.65
. Panacos 3.74 -.06
. PaneraBrd 46.35 -.34
. ParPet 22.36 -.37
. ParamTch 20.29 -.06
.. Pathmrk 13.02 +.09
. Patterson 37.04 -.01
.48f PattUl 26.90 -.76
.84 Paychex 39.42 -.27
. PnnNGm 61.00 -.60
... Penwaest 13.11 +.02
.53f PeopUtdF 18.71 -.30
.. PeopleSup 11.52 -34
Peregrine .93 --.01-
.18 PerNgo 19.24 -.10
PetroDevlf 49.61 +.70
.12 PetsMart 31.27 -.24
.12 PharmPdt 37.38 -.17
PinnadA 18.39 +.02
SPlexus 23.32 +.19
PlugPower 2.95 -.10
Polycom 33.83 -.14
.41 PoolCorp 39.76 -.42
.64 Popular 16.56 -.08
Power-One 4.03 -.09
.14e PwShsQQQ47.09 -.20
Powrwav 6.76 -.04
... Pozen 16.99 -.57
... Presstek 8.15 -.06
.68 PriceTRts 51.03 -.85
... priceline 64.50 -.35
.30f PrivateB 28.26 -.16
ProgPh 22.03 -.35
... ProgGam 6.01 +.10
... PsychSol 36.12 +.11
QIAGEN 17.61 -.19
. QLT 7.43 -.04
Qiogic 16.57 +01
.561 Qualcom 42.53 -.46
... QuanFuel 1.56 -.11
.QuestSfhI 16.20 -.10
... Quldel u1624 +.84
RFMicD 6.26 -.11
. RackSys 12.16 -.11
ROneDIf 7.11 -.04
Rambusif 18.22 -.43
RealNwk 8.13 -.06
Regenm 17.89 -.04
Renovis 3.61 +.06
R... chMo 165.77 -4,88
. ResConn 32.73 +.26
. Riverbedn 44.36 -.01
RosettaR 20.99 -.67
.30 RossSIrs 30.97 -.34
.26 RoyGId 24.16 -.46
... Ryanairs 37.94 -.21

SBACom 3265 -27
... SCOGp 1.37 +.10
. SEIInvs 28.72 +.06


.10e IShJaan 14.35 -.08
.33e iShKor 60,35 -.14
.20e iShMalasia 11.84 -.20
.31e IShSIng 13.70 -.16
.31e IShTalwan 16.04 +.15
1.3le iShChln25 127.68 -.89
2.409 iShSP500 150.78 -.39
1.58e iShEmMki 130.44 -1.00
1.53M 1Sh'EAFE 79.95 -.02
3.05e IShREst 77.01 -1.79
.52e iShSPSml 71.13 -.43
3,30f1 IStar 44.81 -1.04
1.20 Idacorp 31.69 -.21
1.37 Idearcn 35.57 -.03
.84 TW 54.88 -.24
.64f Imation 36.72 -.31
... Infineon 16.45 -.23
.72 IngerRd 54.97 -.76
InputOut 16.05 -.41
2.64 IntegrysE 50.67 +.34
... IntotlEx 149.24 -6.28
1.601 IBM 105.10 +.66
.52 IntlGame 38.87 .+.14
1.00 IntPap 38.51 -.28
.. Interpublic 11.72 +.18
.36e Invesco u26.02 -.01
SIronMtns 25.54 -.18

1.52f JPMOroCh 48.36 -.36
28 Jabil 22.87 -.26
... JacobsEs 57.30 +.59
.04 JanusCap u28.80 - 28
.50 Jefferies 26.04 -.58
1.661 JohnJn 61,11 +.38
1,32 JohnsnCit 114.00
.56 JonesApp 27.98 -.80
1.00 KB Home 40.68 -.63
.48 Kaydon 52.00 -.87
1.24f Kellogg 51.90 +.54
.64 Kellwood 28.34 -.53
.. KemetCp 7.16 -27
1.46 Keycorp 34.83 -.16
1.90 KeySpan 41.74 -.04
2.12 KmbClk -66.68
1.44 Kico 37.99 -1.18
3.32 KindME 55.00 -.15
... KngPhrm 20.37 -.06
Knross g 12.31 -.34
... Kohls 69.63 -.63
1.00 Kraft 35.61 -.64
.. KrispKrm 8.87 -.05
.301 Kroger 29.66 +.56
.. LDKSoln 29.06 +1.26
.03 LLERy 1.51
... LSICorp 8.34 .
1.50 LTCPrp 22.14 -.55
.48 LaZBoy 11.55 -.12
1.46 Laclede 31.20 +.41
.68 Laidlaw 34.27 -.09
... LVSands 74.72 -13
.36 Lazard 44.98 -1.41
.72f LeggPlat d21.73 +.13
.60 LehmanBr 75.05 -1.57
.64 LennarA d38.75 -.98
.. Lexmark d49.28 -.93
.72e LbtyASG 5.63 -.04
1.70 UllyBEi 55.48 -.32
.60 Limited 27.03 -.47
1.58 LincNat 70.55 -.15
.26 Undsay 42.91 +.22
...UonsGtg 10.99 -.10
.23 UzClaib 36.45 -.98
-1.40-LoAkhdM. 94.02 +.63
.25 Loews 52.15 +.08
.321 Lowess 31.22 +.18
1.20 Luminent 9.85 +.43
.90 Lyondel 37.49 -.24


... SMTCCpgu5.74 +.30
... SVBFnGp u53.58 -.11
.48 SanderFm 44.37 +.52
... SanDisk 47.13 -.77
... SangBio 826 -.21
.... Sanmina 3.30 -09
... Santarus 5.16 +.18
... Sapient 7.55 +.12
.. SavientPh 12.14 -59
... Scholaste 34.30-1.04
.20 Schwab 20.56 -.09
... SciGames 34.60 +.35
.. SearsHdgs 169.01 -1.37
SeaitGen 9.51 +01
.. SecureCmp 7.52 +01
... SelCmfrt d16.04 +.02
.48 Selctlnss 25.95 -.14
.. Seritech 17.18 -.19
.. Sepracor d42.14 -.77
.. Shanda 28.47 -.11
... -ShuflMsa 16.75 -.25
.. SiRFTch 21.32 -.91
.. SiaeraWr 25.22 -.61
. SigmaDsg 24.88 -.04
.46 SigmAls 42,00 -,25
.. Sllnlmg 8.64 -.12
.. Sicntab 35.09 +.44
... SilicnMotn 26.30 +.85
.. SSTIf 3.75 -.06
.25r Sicnware 11.01 -.41
... sivStdg 34.89 -.85
Sina 39.95 -.85
.60 Sinclair 14.15 -.02
.. Siroenza 11.58 -.06
.. SiriusS 3,08 +.07
.12 SkyWast 26.52 +.12
.. SkywksS 7.19 -.02
.SmartM 14,39 -.01
.. SmithWes 16.11 -.20
... SmIthMIcro 15.41 +.76
".-SmnurfStne 13.16 -.08
.. Sohu.cm 28.50 -1.37
.. olarunn 9.69 +.44
.. SonicCorp 21.43 -.05
.. SncWall 8.48 -.10
Sons 8.50 -.09
.36 SouMoBc 14.95 +.30
...Sroelntik 5.26 +.07
SourceF 4.13 -.04
.72 SouthFd 22.72 +.49
.. SpanslonA 1138 +.11
.16f SpartMots 28.17 -1.17
.291 Stales 24.03 -.25
. Slatauca d25,66 +,12
.40a StDynas 41.04 -.77
.25 SteinMrt 12.54 -.03
21 Stericss 1125 -.09
.10 StewEnt 7.95 -26
.. SunHthGp 13.96 -.14
SunMoao 5,02 -.06
.. SunPower u3.77 -,41
1.00 SusqBnc 22.33 -.11
.. Sycamore 3.97 -.03
..SykesEnt 1902 +,56
.Sntac 18,71 -20
Synetc 8.51 +.02
.15 Synaoy 3922 -252
... Synapfic 34,41 -,59
.. n 2636 -.56
...Synopsys 269,32 -.27
.Synov 13,95 -45
.Syrn rii 4.80 -.03
. 2,96 +20
S In u2621 +.40
.. TFSFnn 11.4 -.17
.. THQ 31, 9 4
.. TLCVilon 8611 +01o
. MTch 13.7 +,13
... TeTwo 20,65 ,1
. TlAuA u22,36 60
., TASER U13.77 "
.. Te at a 3735-
STokeler llq1 -04
T0v4,WT11 ''. ii4
.. TaoTeci *u ,.' 11
,I Tali n I,"' , ru"
.� TenaT 41+m =1fl


2.40 M&TBk 106.78 -.16
1.36 MBIA 61.77-1.98
.54 MDURess 27.85 -.34
MEMC 58.30 +.54
.48 MCR 8.53 +.12
1.00 MGIC 58.65 -.80
MGMMir. 82.40 +1.17
.52f Macys 40.54 -.89
..Madeco 14.01 -.11
..96f Magnalg 90.74 -1.43
.68 ManorCare 63.44 -1.05
.88f Manulitgs 36.86 +.02
.96f Marathons 62.10 -.02
.301 MarintA 44.69 -.20
.76 MarshM 31.22 -.24
1.24f Marshlls 47.66 -.45
MStewrt 17.43 +.04
.92f Masco 28.13 -21
.16 MasseyEn 26.31 -.88
.60 MasterCrd 161.95 -6.48
.. MaterialSci 12.39 -.10
.865f Mattel 25.14 -.19
.80 McCorm 36.66 -.27
.. McDermlnt 80.44 -.89
1.00f McDnlds 51.30 +.88
.82 McGrwH 67.49 -1.34
.24 McKesson 58.49 +.39
... McAfee 34.20 -.15
.92 MeadWvco 34.57 -.55
.. MedcoHtth 76.50 -1.01
.44 Medtric 51.12 -.49
.88 MaellonFnc 42.83 -.08
1.52 Merck 48.34 -.21
1.40 MemilLvn 83.98 -.50
.591 MetLife 64.02 +.26
... MicronT 12.65 -.18
2.42 MidAApt . d51.17 -1.18
.. Midas u23.13 -.05
... Miipore 74.80 -1.05
.. Mirant 41.72 -1.06
.03e MitsuUFJ 10.86 -.11
.50 Monsanto su67.24 -.31
. 2 Moo 61.12-225
08 = 4.54 -.06
6.84e MSEmMkt 29.49 -.04
... MosaicIf 39.40 -.34
20 Motorola 17.82 -.07
.07 MuellerWat 16.94 -2.41
.24 MylanLab 18.65 -.25
... NBTY 41.15 -.37
... NCRCp 51.16 -.34
NRGEgys 42.22 -.19
.40 NYMEXn 129.90 -5.40
.25p NYSEEur 75.07 -.30
Nabors 34.22 -.87
1.56 NalCity 33.77 +.64
1.24f NatFuGas 44.03 -.53
2.79e NatGrid 72.14 -.12
.. NOilVarco 105.51 -3.42
.16 NatSemi 27.75 -.12
NavigCons 18.38 -.58
.. Navteq 43.91 +.88
.. NeuStar 27.72 +.15
21a NewAm 2.14 -.09
1.52 NJRscs 50.62 +.11
1.00 NYCmtyB 17.25
.26f NewAlliBc 14.93 -.12
.84 NewellRub 29.40 +.29
.. NewfldExp 47.19 -.69
.40 NewmtM 39.13 -.25
.. NwpkRsIf 7.70 -.16
.12 NewsCpA 21.81 +.20
.10 NewsCpB 23.50 +.18
.92 NISouroe 20.63 +.03
1.86 Nior 43.51
.74 NikeBwi 53.81 +.86


A EIA N m 5 XCANG


Div Name Last Chg
.42. AdmRsc 29.75 -.35
... AmO&G 6.33 -.14
.. AntaresP 1.75 -.05
. ApexSilv 19.95 -.81
-BPtEngyg .70 -.07
BPZEgyn 5.78 -.11
...BootsCts 1.73 -.08
. CdnSEng 3.29 -.16
.. CanAngo .73 -.02
.36 CarverBcp 16.00
... CheniereEn 39.90 -.30
1.70 CheniereEnd18.82 -.41


.82 CoinmchA 13.35
... ColumAcqn 7.41 +.01
... ColuAcqwt .86 +.01
.40 ComSysIf 10.42 +.15
.. CourtsAcq d5.61 +.02
.. CovadCm .88 +M01
.. Crvstallxo 4.20 -.16
2.63e DJIADiam 133.62 -.35
.. Darling 8.84 -.18
, ENGlobal 11.79 -.38
.74 EVInMu2 14.77 +.12
... EdorGldg 5.88 -.10
.63e ElswthFd 9.07 -.06


... EvgmEnya 6.11 +.02
.45 FlaPUtil 11.90 +.20
... FrdmAconull.18 +.731
... FrdmAcwt u3.63 +1.62
... GalaxyEn .14 -.01
... GascoEngy 2.66 -.08
.. GoldStrg 3.67 -.07
.. GreyWoll 8.23 -.37
.72 Hersha 12.26 +.21
HooperH 2.85 -.10
.. Hyperdyn 3.24 +.21
1.38a INGGRE 18.92 -.62
1.10e iSAstianya 29.05 +.20


.28e iSCannya 29.57 -.26 ... IdaGnMn 5.31 -.66
.51e iShGernya 32.45 -.30 ,.. InSteVis 1.50 -.08
.46e IShMexmna 61.77 -1.27 ... InterOilg u43.94 +1.44
.76e iShSP100cbo69.35 -.28 ... Invemss 50.20 -.93
4.04e iSh20TB 84.22 +.46 ... KodlakOg 535 -.39
... iShNaBio 77.46 -.64 ... LadThalFn 2.28 -.33
2.10e iShC&SRInya90.30-1.85 ... LundinMs 12.13 +.01
1.75e iSRIKVnya 86.92 -.28 ... MadCatzg 1.35 -.06
.52e iSR1KGnya 59.20 -.23 ... MarathAwt ul.80 +.22
1.26e iSRuslKnya81.63 -.37 .12e MktVGold 37.85 -.94
1.28e iSR2KVnya 82.42 -.29 ... Merrimac 9.68 +.18
.28e iSR2KGnya 85.04 -.54 ... MetroHlth 1.84 -.01
.82e iShR2Knva 82.49 -.43 .. MidwstAir 15.13 +.52


... Miramar 4.3; -.02
... NeonComm 4.97 -.03
... NAGalvs 8.90 +.15
... NOrton g 5.50 -.05
... NthgtMg 2.96 -.08
... OdysMar 5.75 -.38
1.21e OilSvHT 176.60 -3.60
... Oilsandsgn 2.54 +.04
. On2Tech 3.07 +.06
.. PeruCopg 5.99 -.05
2.61e PhmHTr 80.79 -.04
. PolyMetg 3.38 -.13
.05e PwSCInEn 20.38 +.02


.16a IO w b uiO..u i.11 1.43e atKoaRiB 146.5 -04 .6ue SPlIaI 39.05 -.10
1.07e PrUShS&Pn53.26 +.44 .13e SpdrRel 43.10 -.37 21e SPTech 25.44 -.09
1.10e PrUShDown51.08 +,29 .. SMonMdan u7.45 +03 1.,10e SPUI , 38.92 +.21
1.52e PrUShMCn 52.50 +1.06 ... SeabGIdg 18.23 -24 ... Taseko 3.73
5.43e ProUltQQQ 93.25 -.46 .37e SemiHTr 37.84 -.44 ... TmsmrEx 2.00 -.01
.91e PrUShQQQn47.16 +.61 2.60e SPDR 149.83 -.72 ... UltaPtg 54.85 -1.09
4.05e ProUitSP 94.22 -.96 1.98e SPMid 161.81 -1.72 ... USOilFd 51.96 +07
... ProUSR2Kn64.11 +.76 .80e SPMals 40.25 -.64 .. Uranerz 5.46 -.39
5.62e RegBkHT 155.27 -.63 .54e SPHIthC 34.91 -.06 .. VendingDt 3.95 -.06
.. Rentech 2.48 -.05 .56e SPCnSt 26.93 -.12 ... Viragenh .04 -.00
1.23e Retal{HT 104.91 -.45 .35e SPConsum 39.23 -.16 ... Westnind 27.10 -.58
.30e SodrHome 31.12 -.60 .75e SPEnov 69.19 -.56 3.00a WilshrEnt 5.75
.36e sTKbwCM 68.85 -1.13 .82e SPFnd 36.24 -29 ... Xethanol 1,36 -.16


... TetraTc 21.65 -.39
.35e TevaPhrm u4.64 +.16
... TexRdhsA 12.60
.. Thoratec 18.42 -.11
.. 3Com 4.33 -.02
i... bcoSft . 8.80 .+.05
... TWTele 20.10 -.14
... TiVoInc 5,81 -.18
.10 TowerGrp 32.81 +.10
.. TownSports 18.45 -.46
.. TrdeStatn 11.57 -.21
.. Tmsrneth .55 +.02
.. TmSwtc 1.88 +.05
TriZetto 19.13 -28
... TridentMhit 19.37 -.54
. TrimbleNs 31.79 +22
. TriQuint 4.96 -.13
. TrueRellg 21.62 +1.98
... TrumpEnh 14.14 +.26
.64 TrstNY 9.81 -.09
.88 Trustmk d25.27 -.09
.80 TuesMm 12.65 -.55
.. 24/7RealM 11.71 -.03
.. UAL 38.96 -.41
.12 UCBHHId 18.01 -.07
.. USBIoEnn 10.77 -.46
... USCort 8.91 -.43
.. USEnSysil di.27 -1.00
.12 USGlobals 23.61 -.88
.. USHmSy 10A7 -1.59
USXprss 18.94 44.74.
... USANAH 41.35 -.49
.06 UTiWrldwd 27.31 -.30
.. UTStrcm 5.23 -.01
.72 Umpqua 23,54 +.04
.80 UtdOnIn 16.21 -40
,. USEnr 5.28 -22
.10 UStatn 67.16 +1.64
.. UtdThrp 62,46 -.22
.11 UniFor 45.42 +55
.- UranrumRn 10.75 -.35
.. Ulrbanit 23.25 -01

VCAAnt 37.72 +A44
. VueClck 28,66 -18
... VandaPhm 21.11 -.07
SVrianSm s 41.39 +.07
... VascoDa 21.87 +.47
Veecolnst 20.85 -.04
.. VentanaM 51.74 -.21
Verenium d4.23 -.22
,. Vedsign 29.51 +.09
VertxPh d26.05 -.15
.121 VirgnMdah 25.01 -.13
ViroPhrm 13.41 -.52
VistaPrt 37,71 -.61
VIstalSIl 15.97 +.81
,72e Volos 19.87 -.43
Wamrnao 36.09 -.70
WamWerChnul7,83 +.33
i WartnRs 11.86 -.12
.82 WashFed 23.91 -.06
.. WastSvgrsul1.75
. WoermEnt 20.01 +.45
. WetSea 6.01 -.02
,72 WhoteFd d38.28 -.02
. WldOats 16.91 +.08
. WmsSolts 23.80 +.43
., WindRvr 10.91 -.16
... WInnDlxn 28.98 -.40
.. WridFaci 1.58 -.07
6.00o Wynn 89.34 -.21
. XMSat 11.43 +.06
. XOMA 2.94 -.16
,4 Xlu 26.886 -.32
SXlnhF n 8.6 -75 4
YRCWwde 38.21 +.51
Wlv 27,64 +.26
. O IraT 38.94 +.09
, honTch 1.41 -.02
S la 1.10 -.01
1N tonBcp 77A88 -.74
z lik 40.41 -1.24
, oan 19.54 +.27


60Cerrls 12.53 +02


... 99Cents 12.53 +.02
.16 NobleCorp 96.44 -2.31
.481 NobleEn 62.97 -23
.56e NokiaCp 27.59 -.17
.54 Nordstrm 50.64 -.37
.88 NortlkSo 53.35 -.56
.. Nortellfrs 24.16 +.13
.80f NoestUt 27.37 -.23
1.48 NorthropG 76.80 +.14
1.44f NStarit 12.11 -.62
NwstAlirn 23.25 -.01
1.10e Novaris 55.46 +.01
... NovaStar 9.28 -.72
1.30 NSTAR 31.82 +.02
.44a Nucor 59.78 -1.78
.96 Nuveeninv 62.22 -.61
.69 NvFL 13.31 -.03
.74a NvIMO 14.20 -.02
1.14 NvMulSI&G 12.94 -.19
1.09a NuvQP12 13.56 -.09
1.36 OGEEngy 33.81 +11
.88 OcdciPetsa 57.73 -1.07
.. OffcDpt d32.32 -1.17
.60 OfficeMax 39.48 -.07
.. OilStales u41.70 -.25
.80 Olin 19.73 -.38
.09 Omncre 35.95 -.36
1.201 Omnicom 103.97 +2.19
3.96f ONEOKPt 68.33 -.55
.40 OshkoshT 61.94 -.65
... Owenslll 33.48 +27

1.44 PG&ECp 45.27 +.32
2.52f PNC 71.42 -.55
.88 PNMRes 26.95 -.13
2.00 PPG 73.82 +.24
122 PPLCorp 45.94 +29
.. Paciv 32.74 +.35
.. ParkDd 10.95 -.43
.. PaylShoe 31.97 -.01
.24 PeabdyE 47.54 -1.64
3.00 Pengrthg 19.51 +.03
1.64f PennVaRs 29.87 -.45
.80 Penney 71.95 -1.02
.27 PapBoy 20.96 -.61
1.50f Pepo 64.65 -.21
.52 PepsiArmer 24.19 -.14
1.29e Prmian 13.23 -.12
Petrohawk 16.70 +.19
3.46e PetrbrsA 104.66 -.81
3.46e Petrobrs 119.96 -1.54
1.16 Pfizer 25.40 +02
.15 PhlVH 59.48 -.42
1.00 PiedNG 24.73 -.17
.. Pier1 8.61 +.30
.78 PimcoStrat 10.41
2.10 PinWst 40.75 -.49
.26 PioNtl 50.72 -1.27
1.32 PitbyBw 46.49 +.16
1.68 PlumCrk 41.04 -.73
1.36 Polaris 54.61 +.21
1.80 PostPrp 49.80 -.67
.40f Potash s 77.98 +.98
1.20 Praxair 72.67 -.73
S PridelI 'U37.10 -.65


1.401 ProclGam 61.08 +.05
2.44 ProgrssEn 45.62 -.05
.04a ProgsvCp 23.43 +.12
1.84 Prologis 5620 -1.76
.28 ProsSHin 320 +.01
1.35 ProvErg 11.81 -.02
.95f Prudent 97.04 -21
2.34f PSEG 85.25 +.66
4.08 PSEGpfA- 8125.+125
2.00 PubStrg 77.61 -1.44
1.00 PugetEngy 23.82 +.07
.16 PuteH d2328 -.52
.39 PHYM 7.28 +.04
.49 PIGM 9.81 -.11
.36 PPriT 6.51 -.03
.56 Quanex 48.67 -.77
... QuantaSvc 30.00 +.25
.491 Questars. 53.74 -.10
... Quiksilr 13.58 -.17
... QwestCm 9.50 -.05
3,361 RAlT Rn 28.24 -.44
.70 RPM 22.97 +.10
.25 RadioShk 32.57 -.08
Ralcorp 53.16 -.80
.12 RangeRs 37.66 -.95
.40 RJamesFn 30.84 -.45
1.88 Rayonler 44.75 -.39
1.021 Raytheon 54.18 -.32
1.53 RItynmo 24.99 -.34
1.20a RegalEnt 21.21 -.14
1.44 RegionsFn 33.25 -.27
ReflantEn 26.51 +.10
.95e Repsol 38.56 -.02
.. ResMed 41.48 -.35
..-.RetailVent 16.05 -.40
... Revlon 1.36 -.02
3.00 ReynAms 62.01 +1.68
.. RiteAid 6.11 +.02
1.16 RocdklAut 68.22 -.28
1.48f RoHaas 53.28 -.06
.40 Rowan 40.02 -1.08
.60 RylCab 42.66 +.39
2.63e RoyDShllA 78.92 +.16
1.85e Royce 21.37 -.10
1.47 RoyepfB 23.56 -.03
.84 rydr 55.44 +1.26
.48 Ryland 38.15-1.12

.. SAICn 17.77 -.16
,62e SAPAG 50.17 -.33
1.76 SCANA 38.51 -.19
.. SKTIcm 26.98 -.12
2.80 SLGreen 122.78-3.87
1.00 SLMCp 57.35 -.19
.30e STMicro 19.09 -,09
.281 Safeway 35.02 +27
.64 SUoe 46.45 -.19
.. StJude 41.55 -.82
4.00e Saks 21.11 -.30
.. Salesforce 42.20 +1.65
.. SallyBtyn 8.99 +.07
2.30e SJuanS 32.71 -.18
1.15e Sanofi d40.00 -.37
.40 SaraLee 17.36 -.04
:26 SchlaP- 29.87, +.35


The remainder of the New York

Slock Exchange listings can be

found on tne next page





Request stocks or mutual funds by
writing ne Chronicle, Attn- Stock
Requests. 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd.. Crystal River, FL 34429, or
phoning 563-5660. For stocks, include
tr.e name of the stock, its market and
its ticker symbol. For mutual funds, list
the parent company and the exact
name of the fund.




Yesterday Pvs Day
Australia 1.1812 1.1807
Brazil 1.9496 1.9423
Britain 1.9985 1.9994
Canada 1.0702 . T0690
China 7.6238 7.6260
Euro .7426 .7426
Hong Kong 7.8122 7.8137
Hungary 183.69 183.05
India 40.775 40.570
Indnsia 9090.91 9090.91
Israel 4.2569 4.2400
Japan 123.62 123.87
Jordan .7085 .7089
Malaysia 3.4655 3.4530
Mexico 10.8482 10.8393
Pakistan 60.67 60.77
Poland 2.81 2.81
Russia 25.8819 25.8839
Singapore 1.5374 1.5384
Slovak Rep 25.11 25.03
So. Africa 7.1755 7.1525
So. Korea 925.93 927.64
Sweden 6.8695 6.8677
Switzerlnd 1.2278 1.2287
Taiwan 32.84 32.86
U.A.E. 3.6729 3.6727
Venzuel 2145.92 2145.92
British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day


Prime Rate


8.25 8.25


Discount Rate 6.25 6.25
Federal Funds Rate 5.25 5.19
Treasuries
3-month 4.67 4.49
6-month 4.86 4.715
5-year 4.95 5.05
10-year 5.07 5.14
30-year 5.19 5.25


FUTURES

Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug07 69.18 +.04
Corn CBOT Dec 07 374 -7/2
Wheat CBOT Sep07 6041/2 -1/2
Soybeans CBOT Nov07 8381/2 +74
Cattle CME Aug07 89.25 -.40
Pork Bellies CME Jul07 94.45 +1.75
Sugar (world) NYBT Jul07 8.93 -.23
Orange Juice NYBT Sep07 128.90 +1.60

SPOT
Yesterday Pva Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $651.30 $655.80
ilver (troy oz.,spot) $12.866 $13.211

Copper (pound) $3.4UZ $3.4
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT = Chicago
Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Exchange.
NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange.
NCTN =New York Cotton Exchange.


STOCKS


I -N AS AQ ATI N L M R E


CPA-& I UFSDAY, JUNE ZO, ZkJU




THE MARKET IN REVIEW


. I,


IRA Tt uz.,nAy- It TNF 26- 2007












-CITRUS COUNTY (FL


TUESDAYJUNE 26 2007 9A


) CHRONICLE
, ,


MTAL FND


4-wk
Name NAV Chg %Rt
AIM Investments A:
BasValA p 39.22 -.16 -0.6
ChartAp 16.73 -.09 +0.3
Constp 28.50 -.16 -0.6
HYdAp 4.52 -.01 -1.4
IntlGrow 33.21 -.06 +0.8
MuBp 7.89 +.01 -0.9
SelEqtyr 22.24 -.07 -1.2
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 18.87 -.16 +1.1
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 47.37 -.83 +3.1
SummitPp 14.11 -.05 +0.4
Utilities 18.65 +.05 -2.7
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 19.32 -.06 -0.7
Retlnc 9,50 +.02 -0.9
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt6.54 -.05 +1.1
AllianceBernm A:
BalanAp 18.40 -.02 -1.6
GIbTchAp 69.61 -.32 +2.6
IntlValAp 24.50 -.07 +1.4
SmCpGrA 29.73 -.27 +0.6
AllianceBern Adv:
IntValAdv 24.90 -.06 +1.4
LgCpGrAd 22.61 -.13 -0.1
AllianceBernm B:
CorpBdBp11.86+.03 -1.6
GlbTchBIt61.91 -29 +2.5
GrowthB 1t26.88 -20 -0.5
SCpGrBt 24.65 -22 +0.6
USGovtBp6.67 +.01 -0.6
AlllanceBem C:
SCpGrCt 24.74 -.22 +0.6
Allianz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt18.23 -.07 -0.8
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt23.45 -.14 0.0
TargetCt 21.28 -.22 +2.3
Amer Beacon Plan:
LgCpPIn 24.40 -.09 -1.3
Amer Century Adv:
EqGrmpn26.79 -.09 -1.7
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n17.08 -.01 -1.2
Eqlncn 8.85 ... -1.6
FLMuBndn10.44+.02 -0.6
GrowthI n 23.82 -.11 -0.3
Heritagel n19.54 -.17 +3.5
IncGron 34.97 -.14 -1.5
ntDiscr n17.09 -.01 +2.7
IntlGrol n 13.78 +.04 +1.2
UfeScin 5.63 -.02 -2.9
NewOppr n7.71 -.07 +2.0
OneChAg n13.76-.03 +0.1
RealEstl n28.00 -.45 -5.6
Ultra n 28.85 -.16 -0.1
Utiln 17.84 +.02 -3.3
Valuelnv n 7.99 -.03 -1.2
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 21.45 -.07 +0.3
AMutlAp 31.16 -.07 -1.1
BaLAp 19.79 -.01 -0.3
BondAp 13.18 +.02 -0.7
CapWAp 19.20 +.02 -1.1
CapIBA p 64.48 -.06-0.5
CapWGAp45.69-.10 +0.6
EupacAp51.35 -.27 +1.2
FdlnvAp 44.01 -.20 0.0
GwthAp 35.82 -.17 +0.7
HITrAp 12.62 -.03 -1.3
IncoAp 21.14 -.03 -1.2
IntBdAp 13.33 +.02 -0.1
ICAAp 35.68 -.05 -0.1
NEcoAp 28.89 -.15 +0.6
NPerAp 34.78 -.14 +1.0
NwWrldA 55.24 -.19 +1.8
SmCpAp45.18 -.23 +2.0
TxExAp 12.28 +.02 -0.8
WshAp 37.06 -.04 -1.0
American Funds B:
BalBt 19.73 -.01 -0.3
CaplBB t 64.48 -.06 -0.6
CpWGrBt45.48 -.11 +0.6
GrwthBt 34.58 -.16 +0.6
IncoBt 21.02 -.03 -1.3
ICABt 35.53 -.05 -0.2
WashBt 36.86 -.04 -1.1
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 52.60 -.18 -1.3
Ariel 57.43 "-.21 +0:4
Artisan Funds:
Intl 31.77 +.02 +0.9
MidCap 34.57 -23 +0.8
MidCapVal22.78 -.13 +1.4
Baron Funds:
Asset 64.56 -.34 -0.2
Growth 52.78 -.37 -0.2
Partners p 23.48 -.17 -1.1
SmCap 24.92 -.20 +1.6
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 12.97 +.03 -0.7
DivMu 13.81 +.02 -0.4
TxMgIntV 28.64 -.08 +0.3
IntVal2 28.29 -.08 +0.2
EmMkts 45.32 -.24 +4.2
BlackRock A:
AuroraA 29.45 -.28 -0.8
BaVIAp 33.63 -.12 -1.0
GapDevA p 16.27?-.05 +0.4
GIAIAr 19.48 -.03 +0.5
HiYInvA 8.19 -.02 -1.1
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 18.35 -.03 +0.4
BlackRock Instl:
BaVlI 33.81 -.11 -1.0
SGbAllocr 19.56 -.03 +0.5
Bramwell Funds:
Growth p 20.16 -.10 -0.1
Brandywine Fds:
SBmdywn n3826 -.20 +1.7
Brlnson Funds Y:
HiYIdlYn 6.97 -.01 -1.0
CGM Funds:
CapDvn 32.10 -.37 +3.2
Focus n 42.53 -.59 +6.4
Mu tn 31.39 -.41 +4.6
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncAp 32.75 -.11 -0.4
GrwthAp 59.56 -.34 +1.2
GrowthCt56.12 -.33 +1.1
Calvert Group:
Incop 16.65 +.05 -0.4
IntlEqAp 25.38 +.07 +0.8
Munlnt 10.44 +.01 -0.8
SocialAp 31.22 -.06 -1.0
SocBdp 15.69 +.05 -0.3
SocEqAp 38.97 -.23 +0.4
TxFLt 10.29 +.01 -0.3
TxFLgp 16.20 +.03 -1.1
TxFVT 15.43 +.02 -0.8
Causeway IntI:
ilnsftutnlrn21.79 +.11 +0.9
Clipper 94.13 -.50 -0.9
Cohen & Steers:
RityShrs 81.79-1.35 -4.4
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 31.67 -.23 -0.2
21CntryAt 15.49 -.12 +2.0
MarsGrAt21.23 -.11 +0.4
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 32.47 -.24 -0.2
AcomntZ 45.29 -.33 +1.3
I Credit Suisse ABCD:
ValueAt 19.24 -.04 -2.0
DWS Scudder CI A:
; CommAp26.79 -.20 +1.9
SDrHiRA 52.96 -.23 -1.1
OWS Scudder C l S:
CapGrthr54.25 -.31 +0.1
CorPioInc 12.41 +.03 -0.9
EmMkIn 12.30 -.01 -1.6




EmMkGr r25.37 -.17 +5.1
LatAmEuroEq 40.471 -.06 +3-1.1
GIbBdSr 9.4691 +.02 -1.1




MATFS 13.92 +.03 -0.9
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 41.26 -.19 -0.7
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 39.40 -.19 -0.7
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 41.77 -.20 -0.7
NYVen C 39.66 -.19 -0.7
Delaware Invest A:
TrendAp 22.04 -.22 +1.0
TxUSAp 11.38 +.02 -0.9
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.43 -.01 -1.5
_.: SelGrBt 24.98 -.18 -1.2
Dimensional Fds:
EmMktV 40.20 -.05 +3.8
SIntSmVan23.43 -.12 -0.1
USLgVan27.32 -.12 -0.9
US Micro n16.42 -.10 +0.2
USSmalln22.54 -.16 -0.2
SUSSmVa31.38 -25 -0.5
! IntlSmCon21.51 -.10 +0.1
, EmgMktn31.04 -.15 +2.3
SFixdn 10.21 ... +0.4
IntVa n 25.59 -.07 -0.3
GIb5Fxlncn10.75+.01 +0.3


TMUSTgtV26.74-.20-0.5
' TM IntVa 21.84 -.05 -0.4
* TMMktwV 19.33 -.10 -1.2
SDFARIE n29.27 -.46 -4.8
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 90.50 -.02 -0.7
SIncome 12.56 +.03 -0.6
IntlStk 48.42 -.19 +0.2
Stock 162.52 -.24 -0.9
Dreyfus:
Aprec 45.75 -.11 -1.1
Discp 37.95 -.14 -1.1
Dreyf 11.19 -.05 -0.9
Dr500ln t 42.51 -.14 -1.1
EmgLd 36.72 -.24 -1.4
FLIntr 12.72 +.02 -0.7
InsMu t 17.37 .. 0.0
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 12.16 -.06 -0.5
SGrwthFp 12.96 -.06 -0.4
Dreyfus Premier:
SCoreEqAt 17.58 -.04 -1.3
' CorVIvp 33.53 -.10 -2.0
' LtdHYdA p 7.26 -.02 -1.6
StrValAr 34.92 -.14 -1.4
TxMgGC 118.70 -.04 -1.8


TchGroA 26.17 -.09 +2.9
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 45.78 -12 +3.9
Eaton Vance Cl A:
ChinaA p 28.99 -.07+10.6
AMTFMB 10.74 +.02 -1.8
GrwthA 10.56 -.10 +1.5
InBosA 6.55 -.01 -0.6
LgCpVal 22.33 -.07 -1.5
NatlMun 11.59 +.03 -1.7
SpEqtA 15.99 -.12 +1.7
TradGvA 7.09 +.01 +0.2
Eaton Vance CI B:
FLMBt 10.94 +.02 -0.9
HSthSBI 12.27 -.03 -3.5
NatMBt 11.59 +.03 -1.7
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovC p 7.08 +.01 0.0
NatlMCt 11.59 +.03 -1.7
Evergreen A:
AstAlIp 15.26 -.01 +0.4
Evergreen B:
DvrBdBt 14.14 +.03 -0.7
MuBdBt 7.38 +.01 -1.1
Evergreen C:
AstAIICt 14.77 -.01 +0.3
Evergreen I:
CorBdl 10.26 +.03 -0.6
SIMunil 9.84 +.01 -0.2
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 26.47 -.36 +1.7
HiYield p 4.77 -.01 -1.5
ValRestr 59.43 -.42 +02
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 10.94 +.01 +0.2
Fairholme 31.59 -.17 -2.0
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.02 -.12 -1.2
MidGrStA 42.45 -.37 0.0
KaulmAp 6.34 -.03 +1.1
MuSecA 10.44 +.02 -0.9
Federated B:
StFrncB 8.73 -.01 -1.4
Federated Insti:
KaufmnK 6.34 -.03 +1.1
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
EnergyT 49.80 -.79 +2.3
HItCarT 22.97 -.06 -2.8
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivIlnlAr 24.95 -.09 +0.2
Fidelity Advisor I:
Divlntl n 25.34 -.09 +0.3
EqGrIn 59.96 -.42 +1.7
Eqlnin 32.22 -.12 -1.9
IntBdl n 10.71 +.02 -0.5
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 17.73 -.07 -02
DMntTp 24.68 -.08 +0.2
DivGrTp 14.20 -.04 -1.0
DynCATp 19.81 -.13 +0.1
EqGrTp 56.51 -.40 +1.6
EqInT 31.76 -11 -1.9
GrOppT 38.77 -.41 +0.2
HilnAdT p 10.93 -.05 -0.8
IntBdT 10.69 +.02 -0.5
MidCpTp27.17 -.19 0.0
MulncTp 12.62 +.02 -0.9
OvrseaT 24.88 -.06 +0.2
STFT 9.36 +.01 -0.1
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 15.04 -.02 -0.1
FF2015n 12.65 -.02 -0.2
FF2020n 16.10 -.04 -0.1
FF2025n 13.36 -.04 -0.1
FF2030n 16.76 -.06 -0.1
FF2035n 13.90 -.04 -0.1
FF2040n 9.94 -.04 -0.1
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn21.63 -.20 +1.3
AMgr50n 16.83 -.03 -0.4
AMgr70n 17.35 -.05 -0.2
AMgr20rn12.82 ... -0.3
Balancn 20.91 -.09 -0.1
BlueChGr n47.05-.14 +0.1
CAMunn12.06 +.01 -0.9
Canada n 57.59 -.69 -0.1
CapApn 29.45 -.19 +0.2
CapDevOn13.60-.04 +0.5
Cplncrn 9.14 -.03 -0.7
ChinaRg n28.00 -.07 +9.7
CngS n 484.61 -.68 -0.9
CTMunrn11.08 +.02 -0.8
Contra n 69.84 -.34 +0.4
-.CnvScn 28.91 -.17 +1.5
DisEqn 31.76 -.09 -1.1
Divlnlln 40.66 -.14 0.0
DivStkOn 16.77 -.06 +0.2
DivGthn 33.73 -.11 -0.9
EmrMkn 28.95 -.16 +4.4
Eqlncn 61.94 -.22 -1.0
EQIIn 24.92 -.09 -1.7
ECapAp 29.58 -.05 -0.6
Europe 42.73 -.02 -0.9
Exchtn 345.96-1.03 -1.1
Exportn 25.18 -.17 +0.4
Fidel n 38.76 -.21 -0.5
Fiftyrn 25.80 -.18 +1.5
FftRateHir n9.95 -.01 +0.3
FLMurn 11.20 +02 -0.6
FrlnOnen31.32 -.09 -0.6
GNMAn 10.58 +.02 -0.6
Govtlnc 9.91 +.03 -0.3
GroCon 75.37 -.38 ,,4
Grolncn 33.11 -214 ;-+2
Grolnclln 12.00 -.06 -0.6
Highlncrn 9.02 -.03 -1.3
Indepnon 24.74 -.23 +1A.4
'IntBdn 10.14 +.01 -0.4
IntGov n 9.89 +.02 -0.1
IntlDiscn 42.05 -.10 +0.9
lntISCprn29.20 -.17 +3.8
InvGB n 7.24 +.02 -0.7
Japann 17.79 -.05 +1.7
JpnSmn 12.26 -.04 +3.6
LatAmn 54.93 -.66 +3.8
LevCoStkn34.71 -.35 +1.2
LowPrn 47.40 -.20 0.0
Magellnn 93.30 -.50 +0.7
MDMurn10.61 +.01 -0.9"
MAMunn11.63 +.01 -0.9
MI Munn 11.57 +.01 -0.7
MidCap n 31.71 -25 0.0
MN Munn11.13 +.01 -0.8
MtgSecn 10.76 +.02 -1.1
Munilncn 12.48 +.02 -0.9
NJ Munrnl.25 +.01 -1.0
NwMktrn14.61 -.01 -1.8
NwMilln 31.60 -.18 +1.0
NYMunn 12.49 +.01 -0.9
OTC n 45.44 -.26 +2.5
OhMunnll.31 +.01 -0.9
Ovrsean 50.36 -.14 +1.2
PcBasn 32.08 -.18 +4.3
PAMunrnlO.56 +.01 -0.6
Puritn n 20.92 -.04 -0.9
r, i 1 , , ', ., -- -.63 -5.5
l,-,llu ,' ., : '... -0.1
STBFn 8.80 +.01 -0.1
SmCaplnd r 23.87-.17 +0.6
SmllCpS r n19.74-.09 +1.2
SEAsla n 35.66 -.04 +9.9
StkSlcn 29.95 -.15 -0.6
Stratlnc n 10.52 ... -0.8
StrReRtr 10.26 -.02 -0.7
TotalBdn 10,28 +.02 -0.6
Trend n 68.32 -.59 +1.0
USBI n 10.69 +.02 -0.6
Utility n 20,90 +.05 -3.0
ValStratn36.44 -.23 +0.1
Value n 89.40 -.56 -0.4
Wridwn 22.28 -.12 +0.7
Fidelity Selects:
Airm 50.19 -.17 +0.9
Banking n32.30 -.05 -2.7
Blotch n 63.53 -.38 -3.7
Brokr n 73.83 -.87 -3.3
Chem n 77.25 -.41 +3.2
ComEquipn22.63-.09 +2.4
Comp n 43.22 -.30 +2.2
ConDs n 26.35 -.10 -0.9
ConStap n60.66 +.04 -1.7
CstHo n 45.60 -.40 -2.3
DfAern 86.17 -.30 +0.7
Electrn 49.16 -.54 +3.9
Energy n 59.41 -.93 +2.4
EngSv n 86.94-2.00 +6.7
Envirn 17.95 -.22 -0.2
FinSvn 118.27 -.64 -3.1
Goldrn 33.72 -.47 +0.5
Health n 128.58 -.33 -2.9
HomF n 46.98 -.24 -4.4
Insr n 73.64 -.09 -0.8
Leisrn 80.81 ... -0.7
Material n 55.62 -.49 +1.3
MedDIn 52.03 -.15 -3.0
MdEqSys n23.80 -.22 -1.5
Multmnd n 46.45 -.03 -0.1
NtGas n 45.96 -.82 +2.0
Paper 36.11 -.40 +0.7
Pharmn 11.52 ... -3.8
Retailn 54.07 -.27 -0.9
Softwrn 70.42 -.13 +1.0
Techn 76.00 -.58 +4.2
Telcmrn n 55.59 -.07 -0.3
Transn 55.08 -.16 -1.4
UilGrn 60.41 +.31 -4.1
Wireless n 8.17 -.03 +1.2
Fidelity Spartan:
5001nxlnv rn103.79-.33-1.0

TotMktlnvn42.24-.19 -0.8
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAd n53.20 -.18 -1.0
500Adrn103.79 -.33 -1.0
TotMktAd rn42.25-.18 -0.8


First Eagle:
GIblA 48.63 -.16 -0.2
OverseasA 26.85-.11 -0.3
First Investors A
BlChpAp 25.11 -.07 -0.8
GloblAp 8.23 -.02 +0.5
GovtA p 10.51 +.03 -0.7
GrolnAp 17.08 -.08 -0.6
IncoAp 3.08 ... -1.0
InvGrA p 9,33 +,02 -0.6
MATFAp 11.48 +.02 -0.8
MITFAp 11.91 +.02 -0.7
MidCpAp31.89 -.27 -0.4
NJTFAp 12.53 +.01 -0.9
NYTFAp 13.99 +.01 -0.9
PATFAp 12.57 +.01 -0.8
SpSitA p 24.92 -.23 0.0
TxExAp 9.61 +.01 -0.8
TotRtAp 15.97 -.03 -0.6
ValueBp 8.35 -.03 -1.1
Firsthand Funds:
GIbTech 5.03 ... +7.2
TechVal 40.82 -.10 +3,8
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AGEAp 2.12 ... -1.7
AdjUS p 8.85 ... +0.2
ALTFAp 11.24 +.02 -0.7


I OWToRED ' MTUL UN TBES


Here aie TIh 1 000 Drggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. TaDles
snow Ir.e lund name, sell price or Net Assel Value (NfAV) and dali1
net cihari-ge as well as c.n l1ial leiurn figure as follows

Tues: 4 . mitolai ielurn i:)
Wed: 12-mo rTtal return I' i
Thu: 3-, r cumrrulativ 10total return I',"
Fri: 5 yr cumnulatie Total return i"1,1
Name: Name of mutual lund and f3jmily
NAV: Net asset value
Chg: el clianqe in price of NAAV
Total return: Percent charge inr lAV for ne time period Shown, with
diliderndi reinvested II period longer Iian I year return iS cumula-

Data C-ased on NAL's reported to Lipper Dy 6 p m Eastern
Footnotes: e - Ex-capiali gair.s distribution I - Previous days quote
n - No-load tund p - Fund a.:ets used to pay disrinrutlion costs. r -
Redemption tee or contingent deferred sales load may appl'/ -
Stock. dn'icend or spir t - Boin p and r x - Ex-cash divierna NA
No informaTion availdale NE - Dala in querlion NN - Fund does not
wish to be tracked NS - Fund did not exist at start dale Source:
Linner. Inc. and The Associated Press


AZTFAp 10.85 +.01 -1.0
Ballnvp 72.63 -.70 -2.1
CallnsAp 12.45 +.01 -0.8
CAIntAp 11.31 +.01 -0.8
CalTFAp 7.22 +.01 -0.7
CapGrA 12.78 -.08 -0.4
COTFAp 11.79 +.02 -0.9
CTTFAp 10.87 +.01 -0.7
CvtScAp 17.15 -.05 -0.6
DblTFA 11.77 +.01 -0.9
DynTchA 28.96 -.17 +0.3
EqlncAp 23.10 -.13 -1.6
Fedlntp 11.19 +.01 -0.9
FedTFAp11.90 +.02 -0.7
FLTFAp 11.64 +.01 -0.7
FoundAlp 14.68 -.01 -0.7
GATFAp 11.87 +.02 -0.8
GoldPrM A 33.45-.62 +1.4
GrwthAp 44.95 -.11 +0.1
HYTFAp 10.74 +.01 -0.9
IncornAp 2.73 ... -2.1
InsTFAp 12.03 +.01 -0.7
NYITFp 10.68 +.01 -0.7
LATFAp 11.35 +.01 -0.6
LMGvScA 9.85 +.01 0.0
MDTFAp11.51 +.02 -0.9
MATFAp 11.65 +.02 -0.9
MITFAp 11.99 +.02 -0.6
MNInsA 11.85 +.01 -0.9
MOTFAp 12.03 +.01 -0.9
NJTFAp 11.92 +.02 -0.8
NYInsAp 11.30 +.02 -1.2
NYTFAp 11.59 +.02 -0.6
NCTFAp 12.05 +.01 -0.9
OhiolAp 12.31 +.02 -0.9
ORTFAp 11.63 +.02 -0.8
PATFAp 10.23 +.01 -0.8
ReEScA p 23.70 -.37 -6.6
RisDvAp 37.46 -.15 -0.5
SMCpGrA 42.71 -.27 +0.6
USGovA p 6.30 +.02 -0.8
UtilsAp 14.20 +.06 -4.3
VATFAp 11.58 +.01 -0.7
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: -
IncmeAd 2.72 ... -2.1
Frank/Temp Frnk B:
IncomB1 p 2.73 ... -2.1
IncomeBt 2.72 ... -2.2
Frank/remp Frnk C:
FoundAl p 14.43 -.01 -0.8
IncoomCt 2.75 ... -2.1
Frank/Temp MIl A&B:
DiscA 33.66 -.04 0.0
QualfdAt 24.11 +.01 +0.2
SharesA 28.11 -.03 -0.2
Frank/Temp Mil C:
DiscCt 33.33 -.04 0.0
Frank/TempTemp A:
DvMktAp31.34 -.30 +2.8
ForgnAp 14.89 -.08 +0.9
GIBdAp 11.33 -.01--0.5
GrwthAp 27.38 -.07 +0.1
IntxEM p 21.39 ... 0.0
WorldAp 20.87 -.04 +0.4
Frank/TempTmp Adv:
GrthAv 27.44 -.07 +0.2
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMkIC 30.60 -.30 +2.8
ForgnCp 14.63 -.08 +0.9
GrwthC p 26.63 -.07 +0.1.
GE Elfun S&S:
S&SPM 49.41 -.17 -0.6
GMO Trust III:
EmMkr 24.95 -.06 +5.3
For 20.11 -.03 +0.2
InlIntrVI 38.14 -.09 +0.3
GMO Trust IV:
EmrMkt 24.89 -.06 +5.3
,Foreign . 20.12 -.03 .+0.2.
IntIntrVl- 3X.13 -.09 +0:'
GMO Trust VI:
EmgMkts r 24.91 -.06 +5.3
IntlCorEq 42.75 -.10 +0.1
StrFxlnc 25.66 -.01 +0.9
USQItyEq 22.60 +.02 -2.7
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 52.48 -.24 +0.3
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 28.26 +.01 +0.1
Goldman Sachs A:
GrIncA 31.33 -.06 -1.7
HYMuAp11.33 +.01 -1.0
MdCVAp42.18 -.21 -1.4
SmCapA 46.09 -.38 -0.9
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HYMunin11.33 +.01 -1.0
Struint 16.65 -.07 -0.1
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.44 +.03 -0.4
CapApInst 34.66 -.22 -1.0
Int r 69.72 -.33 +1.2
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsAp 18.14 -.04 -0.1
CpAppAp41.35 -.30 +1.1
DivGthAp 22.53 -.06 -0.9
SmICoAp22.86 -.20 +0.1
Hartford Fds C:
CapApC 137.63 -.26 +1.1
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 57.18 -.45 +1.3
Div&Gr 24.37 -.06 -0.9
Advisers 23.78 -.06 -0.1
Stock 56.48 -.30 +0.1
TotRetBd 11.30 +.03 -0.8
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrow 19.85 -.17 +1.1
CorGroll 31.70 -.05 0.0
HollBalFd n16.91 -.03 -0.6
Hotchkls & Wiley:
LgCpVIA p 26.46-.15 -3.0
MidCpVaI 32.04 -.18 -1.7
ICON Fds:
Energy 39.49 -.68 +4.3
Hlthcare 17.35 -.05 -4.4
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.22 +.01 -0.8
IXIS Advisor CI A:
TarEqty 11.60 -.11 +4.3
Ivy Funds:
GINaIRsA p 36.31-.48 +2.7
JPMorgan A Class:
MCpVal p 27.60 -.09 -1.0
JPMorgan Select:
IntEq n 40.74 -.12 +0.1
JPMorgan Sel Cls:
IntrdAmer n29.66 -.07 -2.0
Janus:
Balanced 25.67 -.05 -0.7
Contrarian 19.56 -.13 -0.6
Enterpr 52.95 -.35 -0.2
FedTE 6.79 +.02 -1.5
FIxBnd 9.26 +.02 -0.7
Fund 30.65 -.15 -1.3
FundaEq 28.20 -.19 -1.4
GI LifeSci 21.24 -.13 -4.4
GITechr 14.47 -.06 +3.4
Grinc 41.43 -.27 -0.9
MdCpVal 26.13 -.18 -0.1
Orion 11.12 -.05 +0.3
Ovrseasr52.78 -.16 +1.6
Research 28.52 -.12 -0.7
ShTmBd 2.88 ... 0.0
Twenty 60.34 -.49 0.0
Ventur 70.70 -.22 +2.9
WidWr 56.47 -.14 -0.1
JennisonDryden A:
BlendA 20.75 -.11 -0.3
HiYIdAp 5.77 -.01 -1.4
InsuredA 10.50 +.02 -1.1
UtilityA 15.91 ... -0.4
JennisonDryden B:
GrowthB 15.49 -.09 -1.3
HiYldBt 5.76 -.01 -1.5
John Hancock A:
BondAp 14.59 +.03 -0.8
ClassicVl p 29.32-.08 -1.4
RgBkA 36.32 -.14 -2.5
StIrinAp 6.53 ... -0.8
John Hancock B:
StrincB 6.53 ... -0.8
John Hancock ClI1:
LSAggr 16.01 -.06 +0.1
LSBalanc 15.01 .04 -0.7
LSGrwth 15.69 -.04 -0.3
Julius Baer Funds:
IntEql r 48.64 +.18 +1.4
IntlEqA 47.58 +.17 +1.4
IntEql r 16.84 +.07 +1.0
KeelSmCp p29.47-.33 +0.9
LSWalEq n20.55 -.06 -2.1
Lazard InstI:
EmgMktl 24.11 -.06 +2.9
Legg Mason: Fd
OpporTrt21.66 -20 +0.2
Splnvp 42.41 -.33 -0.1
ValTrp 75.37 -.22 -1.5
Legg Mason InstI:
ValTrlnst 84.36 -.24 -1.4
Legg Mason Ptrs A:
AgGrAp120.91-1.29 +0.2
ApprAp 16.12 -.06 -0.8
HlncA t 6.91 -.02 -1.8
InAJCGAp 15.34 ... +0.1
LgCpGAp24.81 -.06 -0.8
Legg Mason Ptrs B:
CaplncB t 17.68 -.09 -0.2
LgCpGB t 23.07 -.06 -0.8


Longleaf Partners: New Era n56.03 -.69 +2.7
Partners 38.52 ... NA N Hoz n 35.01 -.26 -0.4
Intl 21.70 ... NA Nlncn 8.76 +.01 -0.8
SmCap 33.61 ... NA NYBondn11.11 +.01 -0.8
Loomis Sayles: PSIncn 16.49 -.03 -0.5
LSBondl 14.38 +.04 -1.1 RealEstn 23.27 -.35 -4.4
StrlncC 14.98 +.02 -1.4 R2010n 16.77 -.04 -0.6
LSBondR 14.34 +.04 -1.2 R2020n 18.57 -.07 -0.5
StrlncA 14.91 +.01 -1.3 R2030n 20.07 -.10 -0.4
Lord Abbtt A: SciTec n 23.14 -.17 +2.0
AffilAp 15.95 -.06 -0.8 ShtBd n 4.68 +.01 +0.2
BdDebA p 8.07 -.02 -1.3 SmCpStk n36.39 -.30 -0.8
GllncAp 6.66 +.01 -1.1 SmCapValn44.25-.33-0.4
MidCpAp24.37 -.12 0.0 SpecGrn 22.16 -.12 -0.4
MFS Funds A: Specln n 12.14 ... -0.9
MITA 21.78 -.09 -0.2 TFInc n 9.81 +.01 -0.9
MIGA 14.70 -.04 +0.1 TxFrHn 11.90 +.01 -0.8
GrOpA 10.05 ... NA TxFrSIn 5.28 +.01 -0.3
HiriA 3.88 -.01 -1.9 USTInIn 5.16 +.01 -0.8
InINwDA 30.21 -.16 -0.2 USTLg n 10.91 +.05 -1.8
MFLA 9.91 +.02 -0.7 VABondn11.38 +.02 -1.0
ToItRA 16.86 -.02 -0.9 Valuen 29.55 -.14 -0.2
ValueA 28.67 -.07 -1.4 Principal Inv:
MFS Funds B: DIscLCInst 17.02 -.04 -1.4
MIGBn 13.30 -.04 0.0 LgGrlN 8.55 -.04 +1.1
GvScB n 9.25 +.02 -0.7 Putnam Funds A:
HilnBn 3.89 -.01 -1.9 AmGvAp 8.78 +.03 -0.1
MulnBn 8.41 +.01 -0.9 AZTE 9.02 +.01 -0.6
TotRB 16.85 -.01 -0.9 CiscEqAp 16.09 -.08 -1.7
MainStay Funds A: Convy px 20.75 -25 +0.2
HiYIdBA 6.48 -.01 -1.0 DiscGr 22.61 -.21 +0.1
MainStay Funds B: DvrlnA p 9.96 +.02 -0.2
CapApBt 32.77 -.25 +0.5 EqlnApx 18.81 -.15 -1.7
ConvBt 16.01 -.10 +0.8 EuEq 33.18 -.09 -0.6
GovtBt 8.04 +.02 -0.8 GeoAp 18.51 -.04 -1.6
HYIdBBt 6.45 -.01 -1.0 GIGvApx 12.07 -.02 -0.3
IntlEqB 16.51 ... -1,5 GIbEqtyp 12.56 -.04 +1.1
SmCGBp 16.40 -.19 -1.1 GrinAp 21.10 -.10 -2.0
TotRtBt 19.61 -.07 -0.4 HIthAp 60.16 -.25 -3.1
Mairs & Power: HiYdAp 8.10 -.02 -1.3
Growth 82.34 -.28 -0.5 HYAdAp 6.27 -.01 -1.3
Marsico Funds: IncmA p 6.66 +.02 -0.2
Focusp 19.56 -.10 -0.3 IntlEqp 34.61 -.08 +0.4
Growsp 21.19 -.10 +0.3 IntGrlnp 17.21 -.07 +0.8
Matthews Asian: + nvAp 16.19 -.11 -1:0
India r 18.05 +.09 +2.1 MITxp 8.85 +.01 -0.6
PacTiger 27.42 -.04 +5.3 MNTx p 8.82 +.01 -0.6
Mellon Funds: NJTxA p 9.07 +.01 -0.7
InlFd 18.20 -.02 0.0 NwOpAp52.93 -.39 -0.7
Mellon Inst Funds: OTCAp 10.29 -.11 +0.6
InEty46.29 -.08 0.0 TPA p 8.94 +.01 0.8
Midas Funds: TxExA p 8.60 +.01 -0.7
MidasFd 4.80 -.11 +2.8 TFInAp 14.50 +02 0.9
Masntt 8 Fu.nds. TFHYA 12.87 +.01 -0.6
Meneta n14.43 -.11 +0.7 USGvAp 12.93 +.02 -0.2
MorganStanley A: UtilApx 14.60 -.01 -3.4
M an 08 A: VstaAp 11.98 -.11 -0.6
DGthA 21.21 -.08 -1.2 ayAp 19 -.11 0
Morgan Stanley B: VoyAp 19.00 -.11 -1.0
Morgan Stanley B: Putnam Funds B:
DnvGtB 21.36 -.08 -1.2 CapAprt 22.47 -.16 -1.7
GIbDivB 17.12 +.02 -0.9 C .47 -.16 -1.7
StratB - 20.3 -.04 -0.7 DiscGrEBt20.592 -.20 -0.0
MorganStanley Inst: DvrinB t 9.88 +02 -0.2
GIVaIEqAn22.04+.02 +0.9 Eqlnc is1865 -.11 -1.7
IntlEq n 22.39 +.08 +0.2 EuEq 32.06 -.09 -0.7
Under Funds A: GeoB t 18.33 -.03 -1.6
IntemtA 23.33 -.12 +1.6 GtIncBtx 12.03 -.01 -0.3
MutualZSeries: GIbEqt 11.44 -.04 +1.1
BeacnZ 18.06 -.01 -0.5 GINtRst 33.51 -.38 +3.8
DicZ 34.05 -.04+0.1 GrnBI t 20.78 -.10 -2.0
QualfdZ 24.28 +.01 +0.2 HlthBt 53.21 -.23 -3.1
SharesZ 28.35 -.03 -0.1 HiYIdBt 8.07 -.02 -1.4
Nationwide D: HYAdBt 6.19 -.01 -1.4
GvtBdD 10.08 +.02 -0.3 IncmBt 6.61 +.02 -0.4
TxFrr 10.15 +.01 -1.1 inGrInt 16.89 -.07 +0.8
Neuberger&Berm Inv: IntiNopt 17.75 -.09 0.0
Focus 33.51 -.26 -0.9 InvBt 14.76 -.10 -1.1
Geneslnst51.50 -.35 +1.1 NJTBI 9.06 +.01 -0.7
Intlr 26.66 -.13 +0.8 NwOpBt 46.94 -.35 -0.8
1: -, -*, �,- l... - j- i -1,6 NwValp 20.24 -.11 -2.2.
tinebeiger&Berm Tr: NYTxBt 8.46 +.01 -0.8
Genesis 53.70 -.36 +1.1 OTCBt 8.98 -.10 +0.6
Nicholas Group: TxExBt 8.60 +.01 -0.8
HilnclIn 10.80 -.03 -1.5 TFHYBt 12.89 +.01 -0.7
Nchn 58.24 - -0.1 TFInBt 14.52 +.02 -0.9
Northern Funds: USGvBt 12.87 +.03 -0.2
SmCpldxn11.31 -.10 -0.3 UtilBtx 14.53 +.02 -3.5
Technlyn 13.23 -.06 +1.1 VistaBt 10.32 -0.7
Nuveen CI R: VoyBt 16.44 -.09 -1.1
InMun R 10.55 +.02 -1.1 RS Funds:
Oak Assoc Fds: CoreEqA 42.18 -.29 0.0
WhitOkSG n35.96-.08 +0.9 IntGrA 20.30 +.06 +0.2
Oakmark Funds I: RSNIRs p 36.75 -.53 -1.6
Eqtylncrn27.74 -.08 -0.5 RSPart 38.30 -.40 -0.9
Globalln 27.75 -.16 -0.8 Value 30.69 -.19 -1.4
Intll rn 27.35 -.07 -1.8 Rainier Inv Mgt:
Oakmarkrn48.57-.17-1.2 SmMCap 43.37 -.41 +1.9
Select rn 35.27 -.11 -1.1 RiverSource A:
Old Mutual Adv II: BalanceA x 11.41 -.07 -1.2
Tc&ComZn14.45-.05 +3.8 DEIx 14.23 -.10 +0.2
Oppenheimer A: DvOlppAx 9.55 -.07 -1.6
AMTFMu 10.14 +.02 -1.0 Growth 33.29 -0.3
AMTFrNY13.00 +.03 -1.1 LgCpEqp 6.21 -.01 -1.0
CAMuniAp11.47+.02 -1.2 MCpGrA 11.90 -.11 +0.7
CapApAp50.00 -.30 +0.5 MidCpVIp10.19 -.05 +0.9
CoplncA p 13.69 -.05 -0.6 Royce Funds:
ChmplncAp 9.51-.02 -1.4 LwPrSkSv rd18.43-.16 -0.4
DvMktAp 47.75 -.36 +2.9 MicroCapil19.00 -.10 +1.8
Disc p 52.25 -.46 +1.5 PennMulr 12.63 -.08 0.0
EquityA 12.01 -.05 -0.3 Premierlr 20.17 -.12 0.0
GlobAp 79.10 -.17 -0.6 TotRetlr 14.79 -.10 +0.2
GIbOppA 39.15 -.48 -0.1 Russell Funds S:
Gold p 31.96 -.58 +1.9 DIvEq 52.04 -.26 -0.6
IntBdAp 6.14 -.01 -1.3 IntlSec 82.99 -.29 +0.7
LtdTmMu 15.75 +.01 -0.4 MStratBd 10.19 +.03 -0.6
MnStFdA43.31 -.09 -1.2 QuantEqS 42.98 -.13 -1.5
MSSCAp24.03 -.19 -0.8 Rydex Advisor:
MidCapA 20.09 -.10 +0.1 OTCn 12.13 -.07 +1.4
PAMuniA p 12.84+.02 -0.8 SEI Portfolios:
S&MdCpVI42.58-.37 +0.1 CoreFxAn10.11 +.03 -0.8
StrlnAp 4.35 -.01 -0.9 IntlEqA '15.95 .. NA
USGv p 9.26 +.02 -0.8 LgCGrA 22.51 .. NA
Oppenheimer B: LgCValA 24.22 ... NA
AMTFMu 10.10 +.02-1.1 TxMgLC 14.36 ... NA
AMTFrNY 13.00 +.02 -1.2 SSgA Funds:
CplncBt 13.55 -.04 -0.6 IntlStock 15.00 -.05 +0.5
ChmplncB19.50 -.02 -1.4 STI Classic:
EquityB" 11.37 -.05 -0.4 LCpVIEqA 16.03 -.06 -0.9
SIrlncBt 4.37 ... -1.0 LCGrStkA p 12.89-.06 -0.1
Oppenhelm Quest: LCGrStkCp 11,99-,06 -0.2
QBaIA 19.70 -.05 -1.7 SelLCSIkCIt26.50-.11-0.1
Oppenheimer Roch: SeILCpStkl28.68-.12 0.0
RoMu A p 18.42 +.04 -1.0 Schwab Funds:
RcNtMuA12.55 +.02 -1.0 HIthCare 16.35 -.01 -3.8
PIMCO Admin PIMS: 1000lnv r 43.98 -.16 -1.0
TotRtAd 10.16 +.02 -0.5 100OSel 43.99 -.16-1.0
PIMCO Instl PIMS: S&P Inv 23.24 -.08 -1.1
AlAssel 12.73 +.02 -0.9 S&PSel 23.33 -.07 -1.1
ComodRR14.07 -.01 -1.9 S&PInslS11.91 -.04 -1.1
DevLcMk r 11.00 .02 0.0 SmCplnv 25.25 -.22 -0.4
FItlncr 10.54 -.01 +0.1 YidPIsSI 9.67 ... +0.3
HYId 9.80 -.03 -1.6 Selected Funds:
LowDu 9.81 +.01 +0.1 AmShD 49.29 -.23 -0.5
RealRtnl 10.52 +.03 -0.6 AmShSp 49.21 -.23 -0.6
TotRt 10.16 +.02 -0.5 Seligman Group:
PIMCO Funds A: FrontrAt 14.62 -.15 +0.8
TotRtA 10.16 +.02 -0.5 FrontrDt 12.40 -.13 +0.7
PIMCO Funds D: GIbSmA 19.11 -.12 -0.4
TRtnp 10.16 +.02 -0.5 GIbTchA 17.72 -.13 +2.1
PhoenixFunds A: HYdBAp 3.38 -.01 -1.7
BalanA 15.01 -.01 -1.1 Sentinel Group:
CapGrA 16.97 -.09 +0.1 ComSAp35.23 -.19 -0.6
InilA 15.37 -.06 +1.6 Sequoia n154.91 -.23 +0.2
Pioneer Funds A: Sit Funds:
BondAp 8.94 +.02 -0.8 LrgCpGr 43.83 -.24 -0.1
EqlncAp 33.50 -.09 -2.0 SoundSh 41.56 -.13 -0.5
EurSelEqA 44.88-.07 -2.0 St FarmAssoc:
GrwthAp 14.69 -.06 0.0 GWth 61.04 -.14 -1.0
IntlValA 27.28 -.05 +1.8 Stratton Funds:
MdCpGrA16.95 -.14 +0.6 Dividend 36.14 -.41 -3.6
MdCVAp 25.62 -.13 -0.5 Multi-Cap 4756 -.34 +0.5
PiknFdAp51.52 -.17 -0.9 SmCap 52.31 -.35 +0.5
TxFreAp 11.34 +.01 -1.7 SunAmerica Funds:



Pioneer Funds C: EnSmCp 33.23 -.23 +2.0
HNIdCt 11.44 -.06 -0.9 Value 41.79 -.44 -2.9
PrIce Funds Adv: VTempleton nlsllt:
Growth p n33.94 -.20 -0.2 EMS p 22.93 -.21 +2.8
Price Funds: ForEqS 29.68 -.07 +0.8
Balance n22.18 -.03 -0.8 Third Avenue Fds:-
BIChipn 38.72 -.24 -0.3 Il r 23.95 +02 +27
CABondnlO0.79 +.01 -0.9 RIEstVIr 35.17 -.41 -4.5
CepApp n22.03 -.06 +0.4 Value 63.97 -.36 0.4
DrvGron 27.19 -.08 -0.5 Thrburg Fd, e 4
EmEurp 34.48 -24 +2.6 SIp 32 -.19 +3.1
EmMklSn37.75 -.18 +4.6 IntValuep 32.7 -.19 +3.1
Eqlndexn40.30 -.13 -1.1 HYId 5.1 - -
Europe n 22.40 -.08 -0.9 nicm 58.1 -.01 ~-15.
GNMAn 9.18 ... -0.9 ncom 8.47 v.02 +08
Growth n 34.23 -.21 -0.2 LgCpStk 29.65 -.14 +0.8
Gr&lnn 23.13 -.11 -0.6 TA IDEX A:
HthScin 28.04 -.16 -3.5 JanGrowp . ... 00
HiYieldn 7.10 -.01 -0.9 GCGlobp32.48 -.04 -0.1
ForEq n 21.89 -.09 -0.8 TrCHYBp 9.18 -.02 -1.8
IntlBondn 9.48 +.02 -1.3 TAFIxlnp 9.27 +.02 -1.0
IntDisn 53.88 -.23 +1.1 Turner Funds:
ItlStk n 18.08 -.07 -0.7 SmlCpGr n31.78 -,28 +1.3
Japan n 10.75 -.03+0.3 Twseedy Browne:
LatAmnn 48.79 -.65 +3.8 GlobVal 34.07 -.14 -1.0
MDShrt n 5.09 ... -0.1 UBS Funds Cl A:
MDBond nO10.41 +.02 -0.8 GlobAllo 1 14.73 -.01 -0.9
MidCapn61.14 -.46 0.0 UMB Scout Funds:
MCapValn27.88-.21 -0.4 Intl 36.00 -.01 +1.2
N Amer n 34.04 -.17 -0.3 US Global Investors:
NAsian 17.64 -.04 +6.1 AIIAm 28.37 -.20 +2.8


a .ri, '-a


4.,'
Org Nes.
*M .20
- *i .3+
.5 .33
a .01


* t~




Eu.., *.3. N-Sn
PAL t






.0rr Uh.5...%.


GIbRs 17.61 -.24 +3.0
GIdShr 14.89 -.24 -1.0
USChina 12.56 +.02 +7.5
WIdPrcMn 28.00 -.49 0.0
USAA Group:
AgvGI 35.01 -.18 +0.5
CABd 10.79 +.01 -1.2
CmstStr 28.14 -.06 -0.3
GNMA 9.35 +.02 -0.8
GrTxStr 14.53 -.01-1.0
Grwth 16.17 -.11 +0.1
Gr&lnc 19.81 -.10 +0.1
IncStk 17.55 -.05 -2.3
Inco 11.91 +.04 -0.7
Intl 29.03 -.05 -0.2
NYBd 11.73 +.02-1.1
PrecMM 28.46 -.57 +1.4
SciTech 12.68 -.08 +0.8
ShITBnd 8.84 +.01 +0.2
SmCpStk 16.21 -.14 -0.1
TxEII 12.92 +.02 -0.9
TxELT 13.60 +.02 -1.1
TxESh 10.52 ... -0.2
VABd 11.28 +.02 -1.1
WIdGr 21.26 -.04 -0.6
VALIC:
MdCpldx 25.87 -.18 -0.6
StkIdx 38.98 -.12 -1.1
Value Line Fd:
LevGtn 23.14 -.10 -0.2
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 17.98 +.03 -1.5
CmstAp 20.01 -.05 -2.1
CpBdAp 6.42 +.02 -1.0
EqIncAp 9.46 -.02 -1.1
Exch 462.44-2.77 -0.7
GrInAp 23.39 -.05 -1.5
HarbAp 16.28 -.08 +0.5
HiYIdA 10.60 -.02 -1.2
HYMuAp11.00 +.01 -0.7
InTFAp 18.05 +.02 -1.4
MunlAp 14.42 +.02 -1.1
PATFAp 17.04 +.02 -0.9
StrMunlnc 13.38 +.01 -0.8
US MtgeA 13.08 +.03 -0.5
UtilAp 23.86 +.04 -3.7
Van Kamp Funds B:
EnterpBt 13.91 -.06 -0.9
EqlncBt 9.30 -.01 -1.1
HYMuBt 11.00 +.01 -0.7
Mu[B 14.40 +.02 -1.2
PATFBt 16.99 +.03 -1.0
StrGwth 38.69 -.20 +0.2
StrMuninc 13.38 +.02 -0.8
USMtge 13.02 +.02 -0.5
UNIB 23.75 +.03--3.8
Vanguard Admiral:
CpOpAdln91.22 -.69 +1.9
Energyn141.54-1.49 +3.0
EuroAdml n94.17-.27 -0.7
ExplAdml n76.42 -.54 -0.2
ExtdAdm n42.15 -.35 -0.4
500Admlin137.88-.45 -1.0
GNMA Ad nl.00+.02 -0.8"
GrwAdm n31.87 -.15 -0.2
HlthCrn 63.28 -.06 -4.0
HiYldCpn 6.15 -.01 -1.8
ITBdAdmlin10.03 +.04 -0.9
IntGrAdm n84.08 -.24 +0.5
ITAdmIn 13.08 +.03 -0.7
ITGrAdmn9.53 +.02 -0.7
LtdTrAdn 10.63 +.01 -0.1
MCpAdml n99.05-.72 -0.2
MuHYAdm nlO.65+.02 -0.8
PrmCap r n77.70 -.37 +1.1
ReitAdm r n99.39-1.54-4.9
STsyAdml n10.24+.01 +0.2
ShtTrAd n15.54 ... +0.2
STIGrAdn1O.52 +.01 +0.1
SmCAdm n35.37-.29 -0.3
TxMCap r n72.68-.28 -1.0
TtlBAdmln9.81 +.02 -0.7
TStkAdmn36.19 -.16 -0.9
ValAdml n27.91 -.08 -1.8
WellslAdm n53.03+.09 -1.4
WelitnAdmn58.18-.04 -1.0
Windsorn66.37 -.30 -1.3
WdsrillAd n66.47 -.21 -1.0
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 30.25 -.07 -0.7
CALTn 11.46 +.02 -1.1
CapOppn39.47 -.29 +1.9
Convrtn 14.48 -.07 +1.1
DivdGron 15.33 ... -1.1
Energy n 75.35 -.79 +3.0
Eqlncn 26.43 -.02 -1.8
Expirn 82.03 -.57 -0.2
FLLTn 11.36 +.02 -0.8
GNMAn 10.00 +.02-0.8
GlobEqn 25.77 -.11 +0.5
Grolncn 37.51 -.16 -1.7
GrthEqn 11.89 -.08 +0.3
HYCorpn 6.15 -.01 -1.8
HthCre n149.89 -.14 -4.0
InflaPron 11.56 +.04 -0.4
InllExplrn 23.35 -.13 -1.2
IntlGrn 26.40 -.08 +0.5
IntlVal n 44.72 -.15 +1.0
ITIGrade n 9.53 +.02 -0.7
ITTsryn 10.58 +.03 -0.6
LifeConn 17.02 -.01 -0.5
UfeGro n 25.25 -.08 -0.6
Ufelncn 14.02 +.01 -0.6
LifeMod n21.18 -.04 -0.7
LTIGrade n8.81 +.06 -2.0
LTTsryn 10.62 +.07 -1.7
Morgn 20.54 -.11 +0.1
MuHYn 10.65 +.02 -0.8
MulnsLg n12.30 +.03 -1.0
Mulntn 13.08 +.03 -0.7
MuLtd n 10.63 +.01 -0.1
MuLongn11.01 +.03 -1.1
MuShrtn 15.54 ... +0.2
NJLTn 11.54 +.02 -1.2
NYLTn 10.98 +.02 -1.1
OHLTTEn11.71 +.02 -0.9
PALTn 11.06 +.02 -1.0
PrecMtls srn33.77-.30 +2.6
PrmcpCorn13.70-.09 -0.1
Prmcprn 74.82 -.36 +1.1
SelValu r n22.91 -.04 -0.5
STARn 21.83 -.03 -0.5
STIGrade n10.52 .01 +0.1
STFedn 10.24 +.01 +0.1
StratEq n 26.08 -.20 -0.3
TgtRe2025 n13.86-.04 -0.6
TgtRe2015n13.11-.03-0.6
TgtRe2035 n14.85-.05-0.5
USGron 19.32 -.13 -0.1
USValue n15.54 -.05 -2.0
Wellslyn 21.89 +.04 -1.4
Welltn n 33.69 -.02 -1.0
Wndsrn 19.67 -.09 -1.3
Wndslln 37.45 -.12 -1.0
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 137.88 -.44 -1.1
Balanced n22.01 -.03 -0.8
DevMktn 13.79 -.04 -0.1
EMktn 28.45 -.13 +4.9
Europe n 40.07 -.12 -0.7
Extend n 42.10 -.35 -0.4
Growth n 31.87 -.15 -0.2
ITBndn 10.03 +.04 -0.9
LgCaplx n26.95 -.10 -1.0
MidCapn21.82 -.16 -0.2
Pacific 13.20 -.03 +1.2
REITrn 23.30 -.35 -4.9
SmCap n 35.35 -.28 -0.3
SmlCpVIn17.79 -.14 -1.1
TotBnd n 9.81 +.02 -0.7
Totllntln 19.58 -.07 +0.7
TotStkn 36.19 -.16 -0.9
Value n 27.91 -.08 -1.8
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 22.01 -.03 -0.8
DvMklnstn13.68-.04 -0.1
Eurolnstn40.14 -.11 -0.6
Extilnn 42.16 -.3 -3 .4
Inslldxn 136.83 -.45 -1.0
InsPIn 136.84 -.44 -1.0
TollBdldx n49.46 +.13 -0.6
insTStPlus n32.63-.14-0.9
MidCplstn21.89 -.16 -0.2
SCInst n 35.40 -.28 -0.3
TBIstn 9.81 +.02 -0.7
TSInstn 36.20 -.15 -0.9
Valuelst n27.91 -.08 -1.8
Vantagepoint Fds:
Growth 10.31 -.05 +0.1
Victory Funds:
DvsSIA 19.48 -.12 +0.4
Waddell & Reed Adv:
CorelnvA 6.63 -.03 +0.4
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 38.72 -.12 -0.8
Weiltz Funds:
Value 41.78 -.08 -0.9
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 22.52 -.19 +0.7
Opptylnv 45.91 -.27 +0.7
SCApValZ p35.58-.36 +1.5
Western Asset:
CorePlus 10.22 +.03 -0.9
Core 11.06 +.03 -0.9
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.26 -.09 +0.4
IntlGthN 30.62 -.16 +0.2
Yacktman Funds:
Fund p 16.30 -.03 -1.4


Stocks turn lower


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Wall Street
gave up a big advance and
turned lower Monday as
investors suffered a renewed
case of the jitters ahead of the
Federal Reserve's meeting on
interest rates later this week
The stock market, which has
seen huge swings in recent
weeks, was initially relieved to
hear from the National
Association of Realtors that
existing home sales declined
in May by only 0.3 percent to
5.99 million units. The tepid
reading was expected, and
indicated that the housing sec-
tor is still weak - the pace of
existing home sales was the
slowest in four years; housing
inventories rose by 5 percent
to the highest level since 1992;
and the median home price
fell for a record 10th consecu-
tive month.
The data wasn't enough to
keep the stock market afloat,
so when crude oil prices rose
back above $69 a barrel on
news of U.S. refinery outages,
many investors chose to take
money off the table. High ener-


Market watch
June 25, 2007


Dow Jones
industrials

Nasdaq
composite

Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-8.21
13,352.05

-11.88
2,577.08

-4.82
1,497.74

-7.29
827.46


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,035 New highs
Declined: 2,290 Newws
New lows
Unchanged: 117 85
Volume: 3,199,434,374

Nasdaq diary

Advanced: 1,036 New highs
81
Declined: 2,002 New lows
Unchanged: 133 85
Volume: 2,020,027,430

AP
gy prices could translate to
accelerating inflation - which
investors fear the Fed may use
as a reason to raise interest
rates later in the year. The Fed
is scheduled to meet this


Tuesday


Leave the driving to robots


Los Angeles Times

In Sebastian Thrun's vision
of the future, freeways will be
blissful havens from the
everyday stresses of life. We
will unwind during swift,
smooth commutes free of
aggressive lane changes,
defensive brake-tapping and
road rage. The SigAlert will
be a distant memory.
What will make this utopian
autobahn possible? Robots.
Robots don't get mad; they
don't flip you the bird; they
don't cut you off out of spite;
and they definitely don't crash
into one another. At least
they're not supposed to.
"There is no other way out
of the current disaster that
happens on U.S. highways,"
says Thrun, an associate pro-
fessor of computer science
and electrical engineering at
Stanford University and
leader oRthe Stanford Racing
Team. "There are so many
aspects of society you could
change if you just make cars
drive themselves."
A robotic automotive vehi-
cle - which, Thrun says,
would "combine the conve-
nience of a train with the con-
venience of a car" - is a long
way from commercial viabili-
ty. But the Stanford Racing
Team will put a driverless
Volkswagen Passat wagon
named Junior to the test in
November in the 2007 Urban
Challenge, sponsored by the
Defense Advanced Research
Projects Agency, the
Pentagon's research arm.
Junior's predecessor, a


modified VW Touareg sport
utility vehicle called Stanley,
won the 2005 Grand Challenge
race in the Nevada desert.
This year, Junior and 52 com-
petitors must master far more
than pure speed.
The Urban Challenge will
be a 60-mile test of city dri-
ving, replete with intersec-
tions, rights-of-way, stop signs,
lane changes and that most
annoying variable: traffic.
Thrun and Mike
Montemerlo, a senior
researcher at the Stanford
Artificial Intelligence Lab,
have equipped Junior (named
after the university founder's
son Leland Stanford Jr., for
whom the institution is
named ) with an array of sen-
sors, global positioning sys-
tem devices, video cameras
and laser range finders.
These will tell the car where
it is in relation to other cars,
curbs and the myriad dangers
that lurk in metropolitan
streets. State-of-the-art com-
puters embedded in the rear
of the wagon will use this
information instantaneously
to command Junior to brake,
throttle, shift or turn.
At stake is more than the $2
million in prize money.
The defense agency says its
goal is to encourage "the
development of robotic-vehi-
cle technology that will some-
day save the lives of American
men and women on the battle-
field." But civilian
researchers see unlimited
applications in everyday life.
"This is the point in time
where cars are really ready to


become robotic," says
Montemerlo, who unveiled
Junior this year with Thrun at
the American Association for
the Advancement of Science
meeting in San Francisco.
"We're excited about the
potential this might have for
reducing the number of fatali-
ties on the road. We're adding
more drivers all the time but
we're not adding new high-
ways."
Montemerlo and Thrun
foresee high-occupancy vehi-
cle lanes and eventually
entire highways filled
bumper-to-bumper with fast-
moving robotic cars carrying
commuters reading e-mails
and newspapers, working on
their laptops or snoozing. The
driver/passenger would have
the option of sliding behind
the wheel after exiting the
robot-only zone.
The main problem with
today's highways and byways
isn't that they are overcrowd-
ed, the Stanford engineers
say, but that they're not prop-
erly utilized. While some are
blighted with clogged knots of
cars lunging in spurts, others
are empty.
The U.S. "has paved an
amazing amount of surface
and is not operating it very
efficiently," Thrun says. By
some estimates, only 8 per-
cent of the U.S. highway sur-
face is used at peak hours, he
says.
"What hasn't been done is to
make cars drive closer togeth-
er in a safe way. It is absolute-
ly feasible."


Rates on treasury bills rise


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Interest
rates on short-term Treasury
bills rose in Monday's auction
with six-month bills climbing
to the highest level since
early May.
The Treasury Department
auctioned $14 billion in
three-month bills at a dis-
count rate of 4.685 percent,
up from 4.490 percent last
week. Another $14 billion in
six-month bills was auctioned
at a discount rate of 4.810 per-
cent, up from 4.715 percent
last week.


The three-month rate was
the highest since three-month
bills averaged 4.710 percent
three weeks ago. The six-
month rate was the highest
since 4.815 percent on May 7.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less than
face value. For a $10,000 bill,
the three-month price was
$9,881.57 while a six-month


bill sold for $9,756.83.
Separately, the Federal
Reserve said Monday that the
average yield for one-yea:
Treasury bills, a popular
index for making changes in
adjustable rate mortgages,
edged down slightly to 4.95
percent last week, compared
to 4.98 percent the previous
week


IServing Crystal Rivert
'Ie ^& ^ A..- -. n---


Only O9 5 /mo.
Invoice Billing Available!
* DREE 24/7 I Th-kni l lSunnort


snte e inerc., 1 ,


* Unlimited Hours, No Contracts!.

6 2 w o * 10 E-mail Addresses
All About Baths * FREE Sam Protection


DIv Name Last Chg
.70 Schlrnmbra 87.16 -2.04
.40 SeagaleT 21.83 -.36
.40 SealAirs 31.13 -.12
1.24 SempraEn 59.03 +.18
.64 Sensient 25.55 -11
.48 Svcmsnr 15.30 -.15
. SierrPac 17.50 -.01
... SiltWhg 11.49 -.21
3.38 SimonProp 92.80 -2.15
.. SiSxRags 6.16 -.10
.68 SmihAO 40.11 -.19
.40 SmbIlntl 58.35 -1.59
... Solect 376 -03
.98 SoJerlnd 35.11 -.03
1.61f SouthnCo 33.82 -.13
5.58e SthnCoppsu95.44 +.83
.02 SwstAirl 15.00 -.05
SwslnEgy 47.48 -.96
.320 SovrgnBcp 21.51 -.16
.88 SpectraEn 26.16 -.25
.. SpetBrds 6.88 +.17
... SpintAern 36.11 -.71
.10 SurintNex 21.99 -.03
.16 StdPac d18.30 -.25
.84 Standex 28.81 +.03
1.20 StanlWkI 60.87 +1.37
.42e StarwdHIl 69.24 -1.08
.881 StaleStr 68.18 -.14
.20 Stedris 3021 -.31
... Steriten 14.67 -.13
... sTGold 64.43 -.35


,22f Styker 63.16 -.37
SturmRug 14.59 +.03
2.801 SubPpne 47.19 -39
2.52 SunCmts 29.71 -.21
.401 Suncorg 88.36 -1.42
1.10 Sunoco 83.11 -.64
.. Suntech 33.10 -.65
292 SunTrst 66.89 -50
.681 Supvalu 46.48 +.58
.82 Synovus 31.03 -07
.76 Sysco 33.38 -.29
.97 TCFFncI 27.75 -.26
.781 TECO 16.91 +.10
.36 TJX 26.90 -.44
1.73 TXUCorp 66.58 -.39
.45r TawSemi 10.99 +.01
.52 Talbots 21.79 +.54
.18f TalismEgs 19.24 -.76
.561 Tarsel 64.16 -.11
.24 Tektronx u34.57 +1.39
2.11e TelcNZ 27.75 -.05
.76e TelMexL 37.66 -.46
.956 Tenaris 47,73 -.50
TenerlHth 6.50 -.09
2.74f Teppon 43,78 -.29
... Teradyn 17.38 -.39
. Terra 23.89 +.11
4,486e TewaNitro u126.33 +4.38
.40f Tesorowi 60.97 -.47
T... Te ch 26.40 -.82
.321 Texlnst 37.07 -.04
... Thergen 4.11 -.10
... ThemnnoFis 51.28 -.02


.. ThmBet 58.35 +.01
1,92 3MCo 86.25 -.18
.60 TdwIF 71.16 -.52
.48 TFiffany 51.91 +1.93
TW.Cablen 39,40 -.10
.22 TimeWam 21.45 ...
.64 Timken 34.59 +.10
... TmMet 31.95 -.30
.60 ToddShp 20.41 -24
. TollBros 25,56 -.44
.44A TorchEn 8.21 -.01
.52 Trchmrk 67,48 +.05
2.12 TorOBkig 67.75 -.26
2.40e Total SA 78.20 -.39
28 ToalSys 29.39 +.02
. Transocn 107.20 -2.00
1.16f Travelers 52.53 +.15
.16 Tregar 21.32 -.17
.561 TriConI 25.78 -20
.72 Tribune 29.25 -.25
.. TnaSol n 47.12 +.51
24 Trinity 4.03 -124
.16 Tyson 23.07
1.83e UBSNAGs 59.89 -.76
1.321 UDR d26.42 -.63
1.73 UILHods 31.86 +26
" USAin" 29024 -.10
USEC 21.36 -.31
.15 UniFust 40.88 +.04
127e UntevNV 30.07 -.04
1.40 UnlonPac 114.70 -1.39
... Unisys 8.84 +.11


.06r UtdMkro 3.44 -.09
1.68 UPS8 73.29 +.44
1.60 USBanorp 33.39 -.03
.80 USSteel 111.93 -1.48
1.281 UtdTech 71.27 -.11
.03 UtdhithGp 51.50 +.20
.30 UnumGrp 25,77 -.05

ValeantPh 16.52 -.31
.48 ValeroE 75.94 -.51
1.26 Vectren 26.68 -.06
1.90 Ventas 35.60 -.66
1.42e VeAIaEnv 77.00 -.12
. VeFone 35.30 -1.06
1.62 VerizonCm 41.50 -.13
.. VmonoB 40.99
Vuihay 16.21 -.47
i. Vseon 7.84 -22
.Ole VioPart 4.94 +.04
1.33e Vodafone 31.47 +.22
... Vonage 3.09 +.04
3.40 Vomado 107.37 -1.86
-. WCICmts 17.54 -.99
.18 Wabash 14.58 +.01
224 Wachovia d51.91 +.07
.88f WalMarl 47.82 -.01
.31 Walgm 4425 -.72
.20 Walternds 28.80 -.02
2201 WAMudi 42.63
.96 WsteMinc 38.63 -.3
.. Weathfdint 56.29 -1.81
1.98 WeinRit 41.01 -.38


.08 Wellmnn 3.03 +.03
. WellPoint 80.08 +.57
1.12 WefalFaos 35.08 +.06
.501 Wendyss 37.35 +.42
.. Weso= Int 62.93 -.41
1.08 WestarEn 23.94 -.32
1.04 WAEMInc2 13.24 -.02
.54 WalgHi 6.57
.66 WAstTI2 11.51 -.05
WDigidl 1925 -.06
.01e WstnUnn 20.71 -.26
2.40 Weyerh 79.98 -.59
1.72 WMpl 112.83 -.15
.94e WImCS 10.27 -.29
.401 WmsCos 31.93 -.03
1.00 Windsera 15.00 -.05
.481 Wianbgo 29.76 +.08
1.00 WiscEn 44.11 -.15
.68 Worthgrn 20.50 -.33
1.16 Wrigley 54.29 -.45
1.04 Wyeth 55.76 -.13
1.52 XLCap 83.19 -.12
.48 XTOEngy 60.49 -.96
.921 XcelEngy 20.71 -.09
... Xerox 18.95 -.05
.04 Yamanag 12.29 -.37
.60m YumBrds 64.60 -.23
:.. ZaleCp 24.13 -.64
... nmer 84.04 -1.09
.50 ZweigTi 5.01 -.02


BUSINESS


Wednesday and Thursday.
"Without much of a catalyst
right now, profit-taking from
that big rise earlier this morn-
ing is what we're seeing. The
stock market doesn't like
uncertainty," said Matt
Kelmon, portfolio manager of
the Kelmoore Strategy Funds.
He added that Wall Street is
growing concerned again about
the troubles surrounding sub-
prime lending, or lending to
people with poor credit histo-
ries. Bear Steams Cos. said last
week that two of its hedge funds
nearly collapsed after betting on
complex securities backed by
subprime mortgages; Bear
Stearns' stock fell more than 3
percent Monday
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 8.21, or 0.06 percent,
to 13,352.05, after rising more
than 100 points earlier in the
day, and falling 185 points on
Friday
Broader stock indexes also
declined. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index fell 4.82, or
0.32 percent, to 1,497.74, and
the Nasdaq composite index
lost 11.88, or 0.46 percent, to
2,577.08.


I -















1OA
TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


S "The United States themselves are
essentially the greatest poem."
Walt Whitman


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathle Stewart ...............circulation director
., Mike Arnold ...................... managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............ ............... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris .......... ........ citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

AMERICAN PRIDE




Work of a few



results in a



blast for all


Thanks to donors stepping
up to the plate and the
continuous efforts of a
handful of persevering patriots,
July 4 will again be a blast in
Crystal River.
A month after announcing that
this year's fireworks would not
be a possibility due to a lack of
funds, the Crystal River Special
Events Foundation now has the
necessary $10,000 to ignite the
treasured and. traditional cele-
bration of our nation's independ-
ence.
Members of the foundation
had been single-handedly hold-
ing these festivities
above water for
many years and are THE If
to be admired for July 4 fire
their resolve to King
keep fireworks over
Kings Bay a com- OUR OF
munity tradition. It
should never be Comrrr
joked that their fired up
enthusiasm burned should do
out, but, in reality,
the task just YOUR OP!I
seemed to become chroni:leoi
comment a
too much for a Chroncle
handful of individu-
als to carry on.
While businesses and residents


were always approving of the
mission, the volunteers admit
they felt they were overtaxing
the few big donors and the job
was just too much for them to
accomplish one more year.
But once again, there were
those who sincerely valued the
significance of such a custom,
especially in a year where so
many are fighting to preserve
those very freedoms that our
forefathers fought for in giving
birth to this nation. Everything is
now a go for the fireworks that
will be sent from a barge on
Kings Bay by Dragonworks of
Homosassa. The light show will
begin around 9 p.m. on
Wednesday, July 4.


w
s
P
F

o
N
b
e


YOU CAN STILL HELP
* The Crystal River Special
Events Foundation is still
accepting donations for this
year's July 4 fireworks. Checks
should be made to Crystal
River Special Events Foundation
-Fireworks and sent to Crider
Clardy.Fireworks, PO. Box
2410, Crystal River. FL, 34423.

While Crystal River residents
and visitors are certainly appre-
ciative of those who have made
this possible, it is difficult not to
re-mention the glaring compari-
son of this scenario to the way
fireworks are sup-
ported and funded
SUE: in neighboring coim-
vorks over Inunities For many
Bay. years now, enthusi-
astic Homosassa
'INION: residents and busi-
nesses have been
i'tygets "- - cutting on a day of
- city patriotic celebra-
likewise. tions complete with
fireworks with a
ION: Go to spirit of cooperation
ine.com to that genuinely
)out today 's
editornal, reflects their pride
in celebrating the
red, white and blue.
And in Inverness, the city virtual-
ly embraces this opportunity to
bring families together for its tra-
ditional Patriotic Evening with a
spectacular display of fireworks
after an evening of activities and
entertainment for all ages.
If Crystal River officials do not
find it appropriate to designate
funds for festivities that height-
en the importance of a nation's
celebration of independence as
well as honor those who made
those freedoms a reality, then
perhaps they could offer assis-
tance in the form of facilitating
the efforts necessary to make
these events possible. It should
not be considered a chore for a
city to support a July 4 commem-
oration. It should be an honor.


First clean up
If you are trying to sell
your property, you should
try and clean it up a little
before putting it on the
market.
Agent Orange
This is in regards to
Agent Orange. My son
served in Vietnam and he
signed up to be tested at a
clinic in Detroit. The line
was so long, that he had to le
go to work before being teste
guess what? He received a no
that he was negative!
Knocking on door
I live in Citrus Hills, and I a
tired of people coming in and
iting. This is supposed to be
community with no soliciting
their signs, When you call sei
up here, they say they can't d
thing, You call the committee


you get no answer. What is
the problem with Citrus
Hills?
What to wear
Yes, about the appropri-
ate dress. They tell you on
the back of your letter
what you should be wear-


CALL ing.

563-0579 Healing for dog
I would like to thank the
entire staff at the
leave to Humanitarians of Florida. I have a
�d. And very sick dog, which they treated
itice immediately.
Price per mile
rs For the people who volunteer for
am Meals on Wheels; if they paid more
d solic. than 29 cents a mile, maybe they
a gated would have more people doing
on these pet meals and meals on
curity wheels.
do any- They should pay more than 29
, and cents a mile.


American cynicism hits new low


A recent national poll
indicated that 35
percent of Demo-
crats believe that President
Bush knew in advance i
about Al Qaeda's attack on
New York and Washington
on Sept 11, 2001. What are
we to think about this stag-
gering statistic?
There are those who sim-
ply dismiss the poll as inac- William
curate, and certainly it is OTH
true that plenty of public VOI
opinion polls are sloppily
conducted, misleading or
just plain wrong. We can hope that is
true this time, but it would be a mis-
take to count on it. There are many fac-
tors at work here, and some of them,
suggest that the poll is quite probably
correct
In the first place, the recent notori-
ous polarization of American politics,
generated by Republican successes
and inflamed by the media, has creat-
ed a situation in which the hatred of
George W Bush, if not unprecedented,
is surely rare. We are assured by many
people that this man, having twice
achieved the pinnacle of American
politics, has no higher ambition than
to stuff the pockets of his rich Texas
friends with additional millions of dol-
lars in the form of tax cuts and other
subsidies. It would be interesting to
know what percentage of Americans, if
told that there was evidence that Bush
regularly molests children, would be
willing to entertain the idea.


H4
c


I suspect, however, that
there is another, far more
important dynamic at work
here. If there is one thing
many Americans hate and
fear worse than anything
else, it is being deceived.
This emotion is deeply root-
ed, and at a certain level
positively useful. The leg-
end of the successful horse-
Rusher trader, who always gets the
IER better of a bargain, is one of
DES the oldest in our collective
mythology. And at a higher
level, there is no one any
sensible person distrusts more, or with
more reason, than the typical politi-
cian. If we don't trust what they say
(and often we don't), that is because so
many of them have, historically, lied
themselves blue in the face.
So it's not surprising that, for many
Americans, the default setting for listen-
ing to a politician's words is to disbe-
lieve them. There's a good chance that
we're right to do so, and if it turns out
that this time he or she was telling the
truth - well, fine, but at least we won't
feel like a fool for being suspicious.
Therefore, if some pollster comes
along and asks a confirmed Democrat
whether he thinks Bush knew about
9/11 in advance, there is a primitive
instinct that warns him not to rule the
possibility out. If, as is altogether like-
ly, he despises Bush for a whole set of
different (and, it may be, far better)
reasons, the impulse to believe the
charge about 9/11 will gain added


Endorsement LETTERS


Diaz-Fonseca's the one
Let me share my experiences of
working with Sophia Diaz-Fonseca.
We have worked together in a variety
of different volunteer functions, from
when she was an AmeriCorps volun-
teer and the SAEC at Inverness
Primary, for the Historical Society, as
well as working very closely with her
during the very challenging times of
saving the Historic Hernando School.
I have always found Sophia strong in
her convictions, a committed leader
in the battle - strong, determined,
knowledgeable, and forceful.
She has come to Citrus County and
given many years of work and dedica-
tion, built a strong base of knowledge,
a large network of connections and a
great variety of experiences. She has
worked with groups to help save our
water quality and resources, been dili-
gent in preserving the history of our
county, and always has the children of
the community close to her heart
I am confident in the fact that if she
is faced with an issue in which she has
limited knowledge, she will do her
research. She will study, she will dig
deep and explore, she will ask and will
feel confident that when she makes a
decision, it will be based on fact
For many years we worked together
with the Citrus County Historical
Society, and she was a driving force in
the group for the salvation and


restoration of the Historic Hernando
School. Always with a diverse group
with differing strengths and talents,
Sophia brought skills to the table that
were instrumental in making the
project a success.
She is a great partner to work with
and a formable opponent when sitting
on opposite sides of the fence. And
although we have not always seen eye
to eye on a variety of projects, I have
never questioned her commitment in
her beliefs.
I would suggest that you do the
research, look at her commitment to
working hard for the voters and do as
she would. Cast your very important
vote based on the facts. I am going to.
See you Tuesday
Christine Gendron Dudley,
Inverness

Gudis is the clear choice
Mike Gudis is my choice for the
Crystal River City Council in this spe-
cial election, and I offer the following
as my reasons for this decision.
His chosen profession specializes in
tax reduction and achieving financial
goals for people, and has done so for
many, many years. He has previous
city and county (Montgomery County,
Maryland), council experience. He
deeply cares about the city of Crystal
River, made obvious by his numerous


LETTERS to the


Risking their lives
Recent assaults and murder on law
enforcement and correctional officers
raises the question as to why Florida
does not have a statute like Montana
that allows for "An aggravated assault
by incarcerated, persistent felons or
murderers incarcerated, or not, to be
put to death."
Especially vulnerable to attacks


are the guards who put their lives on
the line every working day attempt-
ing to keep felons in prison with
some degree of order, and risk abuse
and death at the hands of a group of
individuals who seemingly have for-
feited their right to "constitutional
rights."
Also at risk are the many officers on
patrol in Citrus County who protect
citizens risking death every time they


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the


force. If there is any doubt about the
matter, why give him the benefit of it?
I doubt that many of the 35 percent
of Democrats who told the pollsters
they believe that Bush knew about 9/11
in advance would welcome being
cross-examined on the subject, or
defend their contention very strongly
if they were. After all, it would take lit-
tle short of a monster to know in
advance about the attack and yet do
nothing, in order to scare. the
American people into supporting an
American attack on Iraq or some other
political objective. With at least part of
our brain, we know better than that. To
go along with such a suggestion about
Bush is surely better understood as a
sort of reflexive spasm of contempt for
the man, rather than a considered
judgment of his likely behavior.
But it is chilling, nonetheless, to
realize that a significant portion of the
American public is willing to say what
that poll reported them' as saying.
Fortunately, most of us are not I have
an abysmally low opinion of many
politicians, but I can't think of a single
one in either party whom I would sus-
pect for a moment of being willing to
ignore foreknowledge of 9/11 for mere
political advantage.
I would rather have one fool me
than believe that of him.

William Rusher is a Distinguished
Fellow of the Claremont Institute for
the Study of Statesmanship and
Political Philosophy.
1.'


civic involvements, and realizes the
implications and great loss that would
be suffered as a result of a dissolution
action. His supporters also have a
record of loyalty to the city. He under-
stands how critical public safety is,
and has taken a positive stance on
preservation of our police and fire
services. He has the time to devote to
the role, as he sets his own working
hours, and can be readily available.
To be effective, a councilmember
must have available time to attend the
many workshops and meetings(includ-
ing emergency ones), as well as fulfill-
ing other council appointment obliga-
tions, such as Suncoast League of "
Cities, Library Board, Economic .
Development Council, Heart of I
Florida League, Tourist Development
Council, Waterfronts Board, Keep 1
Citrus County Beautiful, and the
Withlacoochee Regional Planning
Council. Preparation for each council
meeting requires hours of study of the
council packet of information, often
necessitating site visits, and meetings 1
with the city manager This cuts into '
valuable family time (I should know!), %
but this is necessary to do the job well. ^
Whoever is elected will have a lit-
tle more than a year to demonstrate
their effectiveness before the 2008 "
election.
Gail Kostelnick.
Crystal River
S


e Editor "

approach a lawbreaker in a car or at
a domestic violence call, etc.
Floridians should put on notice to
everyone that assaults on correctional �
guards and/or law enforcement offi- 2
cials will not be tolerated, and anyone ^
attempting to hurt them will put their
own lives at risk!
William C. Young
Crystal R ?ier

record.
callers.


'1


ENDORSEMENTS
The Chronicle Editorial Board has endorsed the following candidates for
the upcoming special general election.
* State Senate District 3 - Charlie Dean.
* State House District 43 - Ron Schultz.
* Crystal River City Council Seat 3 - Maureen McNiff.


I 1AW









INATscN/~X~cRL.n TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 hA


Nation/World BRIEFS


Brazil's president says
air traffic safe
RIO DE JANEIRO;Brazi*-- -
Brazil's president declared his
nation's air traffic control system to
be safe on Monday, hours after two
planes clipped each other on a
Sao Paulo runway.
It was the latest is a series of
accidents, near-collisions and
equipment failures in Brazil and
Argentina that have prompted
international safety warnings to
pilots and walkouts and slowdowns
by air traffic controllers. Hundreds
of flights have been delayed or
cancelled, frustrating travelers
across South America.
The planes operated by Gol
Lineas Aereas Intelligentes SA and
TAM Lineas Aereas SA clipped
wings as they were maneuvering
for takeoff at Congonhas airport


late Sunday night, the airport
authority said. Passengers on both
domestic flights had to be trans-
- ferred toother planes:
Americans are more
charitable than before
NEW YORK -Americans gave
nearly $300 billion to charitable
causes last year, setting a new
record and besting the 2005 total
that had been boosted by a surge
in aid to victims of hurricanes
Katrina, Rita and Wilma and the
Asian tsunami.
Donors contributed an estimated
$295.02 billion in 2006, a 1 percent
increase when adjusted for infla-
tion, up from $283.05 billion in
2005. Excluding donations for dis-
aster relief, the total rose 3.2 per-
cent, inflation-adjusted, according
to an annual report released
Monday by the Giving USA


Foundation in Glenview, Ill. The
report is researched and written by
the Center on Philanthropy at
Indiana University.
Giving historically tracks the
health of the overall economy, with
the rise amounting to about one-
third the rise in the stock market,
according to Giving USA. Last year
was right on target, with a 3.2 per-
cent rise as stocks rose more than
10 percent on an inflation-adjusted
basis.
"What people find especially
interesting about this, and it's true
year after year, that such a high
percentage comes from individual
donors," Giving USA Chairman
Richard Jolly said.
Individuals gave a combined
75.6 percent of the total. With
bequests, that rises to 83.4 per-
cent.
- From wire reports


DNA tests to determine


how shark got pregnant


Associated Press

NORFOLK, Va. -
Veterinarian Bob George sliced
open the dead shark and saw the
outline of a fish.
No surprise there, since
sharks digest their food slowly.
Then George realized he was-
n't looking at the stomach of the
blacktip reef shark, but at her
uterus. In it was a perfectly
formed, 10-inch-long shark pup
that was almost ready to be born.
George was dumbfounded.
He had been examining the
shark, Tidbit, to figure out why
she reacted badly to routine
sedatives during a physical and
died, hours after biting an
aquarium curator on the shin.
Now there was a bigger mystery:
How did Tidbit get pregnant?
"We must have had hanky
panky" in the shark tank, he
thought
But sharks only breed with
sharks of the same species, and
there were no male blacktip reef
sharks at the Virginia Aquarium
& Marine Science Center in
Virginia Beach.
Could Tidbit have defied
nature, resulting in the first
known shark hybrid?
The other possibility was that
Tidbit had conceived without
needing a male at all.
A recent study had document-
ed the first confirmed case of
-asxuial reproduction, - or-
parthenogenesis, among sharks:
a pup born at a Nebraska zoo
came from an egg that devel-
oped in a female shark without
sperm from a male.
One of the scientists who
worked on that study contacted
the aquarium, which sent him
tissue samples from Tidbit and
her pup for testing. If the pup's
DNAturns outto contain no con-
tribution from a male shark, this
would be the second known case
of shark parthenogenesis.
Tidbit had lived at the aquari-
um for most of her 10 years,
swimming with other sharks in a
300,000-gallon tank.
The sharks get yearly check-
ups. On May 24, workers guided
the 5-foot, 94-pound Tidbit from


the main aquarium into a small-
er corral to be examined out of
public view.
Blacktip reef sharks are sensi-
tive to change, so it was standard
procedure to give Tidbit a seda-
tive. This time, Tidbit went
under the sedation too deeply -
maybe because of a combination
of the unknown pregnancy and
the stress of being handled and
of having recently been bitten by
another shark, George said.
George and Beth Firchau, the
curator of fishes, massaged
Tidbit's tail to get her blood flow-
ing and gave her a stimulant to
help her breathe.
The shark swam away,
bumped into a wall, headed
back toward Firchau and
clamped onto her left shin.
Whether Tidbit meant to attack
Firchau or just collided into her
and snapped reflexively is hard
to know.
The pain didn't hit Firchau
right away.
Members of the shark physi-
cals team pulled Firchau out of
the tank and began administer-
ing first aid. She credits their
swift reaction with saving her
life.
Firchau was taken to a hospi-
tal to get stitches while George
and other team members tried
to revive Tidbit The shark ral-
lied a couple times but died
about 12 hours later _ ....
SGeorge initially was
depressed by the events. But
something positive emerged out
of the negative.
Since Tidbit hadn't looked
pregnant - and there was no
reason to think she was pregnant
- the pup likely would have
been born and immediately
eaten by another shark, without
aquarium employees ever know-
ing it had existed.
But Tidbit's death led to
George stumbling upon a mys-
tery of nature.
In normal reproduction, an
egg is fertilized by sperm, pro-
ducing an embryo that contains
a set of chromosomes with half
coming from the mother and
half from the father
In asexual reproduction, an


egg splits in two and DNA con-
tributed from the mother dou-
bles, so each resulting egg has a
full complement of chromo-
somes from the female. The eggs
then fuse, producing a single
embryo with no DNA from a
father
Asexual reproduction is com-
mon in some insect species,
rarer in reptiles and fish, and
has never been documented in-
mammals. Until now, sharks
were not considered likely can-
didates.
But with sharks, "this is prob-
ably something that does hap-
pen in aquariums, more often
than we realize," said Bob
Hueter, director of the Center for
Shark Research at the Mote
Marine Laboratory in Sarasota,
Fla.
He said the phenomenon is
coming to light with the joint
Northern Ireland-U.S. research
that analyzed the DNA of a ham-
merhead shark born in 2001 in
the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha,
Neb.
Asexual reproduction among
sharks is more likely to happen
in captivity, when there is no
other option for reproduction,
� than in the wild, Hueter said.
Crossbreeding, on the other
hand, is not known to happen at
all among sharks, said Heather
Thomas, aquarist at the John G.
. Shedd Aquarium inChicago._
"It's not natural," Thomas
said. "If you've got a shark that
needs to swim to breathe and
cross it with a shark that can lay
on the bottom to breathe, what
are you going to get? Are you
going to get these weird muta-
tions?"
If the pup indeed turns out to
be a hybrid, DNA testing should
be able to identify the species of
the father The most likely candi-
date would be a sandbar shark,
the most similar shark to a black-
tip reef in the aquarium, George
said.
While parthenogenesis "is
certainly kind of a spiffy, inter-
esting thing," George hopes the
tests confirm crossbreeding,
. since that w6uld be a first among
sharks.


Still going strong


Associated Press
Ted Friedman of Lexington, Ky., concentrates on the ball Monday as he plays a table tennis
match in Louisville, Ky. The 86-year-old Friedman is one of hundreds of seniors competing in
the Summer National Senior Games.


TUESDAY, JUNr- 26, 2007 IIA


P4ATI40N/W0,RILI:)













12A
TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Hotel bomber kills U.S.-allied sheiks


Associated Press
Grace Holland, left, and Erica
Santos, classmates from
kindergarten, walk Monday
through Piedmont Park in
Atlanta.

Prisoner kills officer
at medical center
SALT LAKE CITY-An
inmate with tattoos covering his
face and head stole a gun from
a corrections officer and shot
him to death Monday when the
prisoner was at a doctor's
appointment, authorities said.
Curtis Allgier fled the
University of Utah medical cen-
ter on foot, carjacked a Ford
Explorer and was captured
miles away at an Arby's restau-
rant after a high-speed chase.
Allgier, who has a swastika
and the words "skin head" tat-
tooed on his forehead, was in
an examination room at the
campus orthopedic center
around 7:45 a.m., university
Police Chief Scott Folsom said.
"There was some sort of
altercation. The inmate got hold
of the weapon and shot the offi-
cer," he said.
Stephen Anderson, 60, a 22-
year-veteran, was shot in the
head, authorities said.

World BRIEFS

Odd


Associated Press
A woman examines square
watermelons Monday before
shipment at Zentsuji, west-
ern Japan. Wrapped with rib-
bons, about 80 dice-sized
fruits were sent out from the
local agricultural cooperative
branch to big cities like
Tokyo and Osaka. They carry
a price tag of between $137
and $202.

Police question teen
surgeon's parents
NEW DELHI - Police have
questioned the parents - both
doctors - of a 15-year-old boy
who allegedly carried out a
Caesarean section birth under
their watch in southern India, a
government official said Monday.
An Indian Medical Association
chapter in the southern state of
Tamil Nadu said last week that
Dr. K. Murugesan showed them
a video recording of his son,
Dhileepan Raj, performing a
Caesarean section in an appar-
ent bid to gain a spot in the
Guinness Book of World
Records as the youngest sur-
geon.
Since then, unconfirmed
media reports have said that the
parents have denied that any
such surgery took place.
Dispute over frozen
accounts resolved
BEIJING - North Korea
announced Monday that a pro-
longed dispute over $25 million
frozen in Macau bank accounts
has finally been resolved, open-
ing the way for closure of its
main nuclear reactor.
The declaration, by a Foreign
Ministry spokesman on the offi-
cial Korean Central News
Agency, said North Korea is now
ready to carry out an agreement
reached in Beijing on Feb. 13 to
shut down the reactor and allow
inspections by the International
Atomic Energy Agency to make
sure it does not resume opera-
tion.
- From wire reports


Associated Press


BAGHDAD - A stealthy suicide
bomber slipped into a busy Baghdad
hotel Monday and blew himself up in the
midst of a gathering of U.S.-allied tribal
sheiks, undermining efforts to forge a
front against the extremists of al-Qaida in
Iraq. Four of the tribal chiefs were among
the 13 victims, police said.
Iraq's prime minister quickly vowed
renewed support for Anbar province's
tribal leaders after the noontime explo-
sion, which also wounded 27 people and
devastated the ground-floor lobby of the
high-rise Mansour Hotel.
"We are sure that this crime will not
weaken the will of Anbar sheiks," Nouri
al-Maliki said in a statement
The stunning terror strike in the heart
of Baghdad, by a killer penetrating layers
of security, was one of a wave of suicide


and other bombings that killed at least 46
people across Iraq on Monday.
In northern Iraq, 13 Iraqi policemen
died in what the U.S. military described
as a furious bomb and small-arms attack
by insurgents on a security post shared by
police and U.S. paratroopers.
In Baqouba, north of Baghdad, mean-
while, a week-old U.S.-Iraqi offensive
pressed on, street by street, to drive al-
Qaida-linked insurgents from the city's
western side.
"It's going to get harder before it gets
easier duringthe search," Brig. Gen. Mick
Bednarek U.S. commander of the opera-
tion, told reporters.
The U.S. command reported that two
U.S. soldiers were killed Monday in sepa-
rate attacks in the Baghdad area.
The bomber at the Mansour Hotel
struck as the lobby bustled with members
of news media organizations headquar-


tered at the hotel and other guests, wit-
nesses said.
Among them were a group of sheiks
associated with the Anbar Salvation
Council, an alliance of Sunni Muslim
tribes that have turned against the al-
Qaida in Iraq extremists in a bid to drive
them from the western province ofAnbar
Police and security officials said a man
wearing traditional Arab garb, complete
with headdress, entered the lobby He
also was wearing a belt of explosives,
packed'with nails and metal pellets, said
these officials, speaking on condition of
anonymity. He approached the sheiks
and detonated the bomb.
A police officer based at the hotel iden-
tified four tribal leaders killed as former
Anbar governor Fassal al-Guood, sheik of
the Albu Nimr tribe and a Mansour Hotel
resident; Sheik Abdul-Azizi al-Fahdawi of
the Fahad tribe; and Sheik Tariq Saleh al-


Lake Tahoe fire burns out of control


Associated F
The Angora Fire bums near a home Monday in South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

More than 200 buildings destroyed lake hit with falling as


Associated Press

MEYERS, Calif - A wild-
fire raged out of control near
Lake Tahoe on Monday, forc-
ing hundreds of residents to
flee towering flames that
destroyed more than 200
buildings, turned the sky
orange and fouled the lake's
famously clear waters with
falling ash.
Many hotels offered free
rooms as families clung to one
bit of good news: Despite the
destruction, there were no
reports of injuries.
'All the memories are gone,"
said Matt Laster, a legal assis-
tant forced to flee his rented
home of five years with his
wife, two young children and
cat
The blaze, which authorities
believe was caused by some
kind of human activity, had
scorched almost 2,500 acres


and was about 5 percent con-
tained. About 1,000 people had
evacuated from the path of the
flames, and authorities feared
up to 500 other houses could
be threatened in this resort
area along the California-
Nevada state line.
More than 700 firefighters
were on hand, but plans to
send up airborne tankers and
helicopters to drop water and
retardant over the heavily
wooded, parched terrain were
scrapped because of low visi-
bility from the thick smoke.
Firefighters hoped to bring
the blaze under control ahead
of high winds and low humidi-
ty forecast for the middle ofthe
week Dozens took up defen-
sive positions around South
Lake Tahoe High School as
flames came within a quarter
mile of the 1,500-student
school.
"We have a window right


now where we're really trying
to aggressively attack this fire,"
said Daniel Berlant, a
spokesman for the California
Department of Forestry and
Fire Protection in
Sacramento.
El Dorado County Sheriff's
Lt Kevin House said there
were no reports of missing per-
sons.
Along the lake's southern
shore, a layer of black, mushy
ash lapped along boat docks,
raising fears the fire also could
have disastrous long-term eco-
nomic consequences for a
community heavily dependent
on the lake's recreational
tourism.
California officials declared
a state of emergency, meaning
the state would cover all fire-
fighting costs. The National
Weather Service issued a
dense smoke advisory warning
people from South Lake Tahoe


to Carson City, Nev., that he
ash was making it difficult
see and breathe.
The fire began Sunday af
noon on a ridge separating
resort community of So
Lake Tahoe from Fallen L
Lake.
Firefighters were ai
Monday by winds that I
slowed to 12 mph after gust
to about 35 mph the d
before. Forecasters warn
that if high winds and 1
humidity returned, the f
could threaten more than
homes bordering the lake.
By early afternoon Mond
173 homes had been lost
flames and many others w
damaged, along with dozen
outbuildings, authorities sa
All that remained of ent
neighborhoods in Mey
were the smoldering silh
ettes of stone and conci
chimneys.


Illegal immigrants targeted by stat(


The Washington Post

Frustrated with Congress's
inability to pass an immigra-
tion overhaul bill, state legisla-
tures are considering or enact-
ing a record number of strong-
ly worded proposals targeting
illegal immigrants.
By the time most legislatures
adjourned in May, at least
1,100 immigration bills had
been submitted by lawmakers,
more than double last year's
record total, according to the
National Conference of State
Legislatures. This year's total
is expected to grow as the
issue continues to dominate
debate in statehouses still in
session.
These laws limit illegal
immigrants' ability to obtain
jobs, find housing, get driver's
licenses and receive many gov-


ernment services. They also
empower state law enforce-
ment agencies to inquire into
an immigrant's legal status
and hold for deportation those
deemed to be here illegally.
The idea is to make life so dif-
ficult for illegal immigrants
that they will leave the state -
if not the country.
"Illegal immigrants will not
come to Oklahoma if there are
no jobs waiting for them," said
state Rep. Randy Terrill, R,
who wrote his state's law, one
of the most sweeping in the
country.
At least 18 states have enact-
ed laws concerning illegal
immigrants. Most of the legis-
lation is seen as punitive, and
it reflects legislators' anger at
the federal government's
inability to seal the southern
border and at provisions in the


Senate bill that would allow
the 12 million illegal immi-
grants already here a path to
citizenship.
Those provisions have
raised the prospect that the
Senate bill will not get past a
series of procedural votes this
week. After President Bush
urged lawmakers to "summon
the political courage" to pass a
bill, the Senate is expected to
take up the bipartisan legisla-
tion as early as Tuesday. A sim-
ilar proposal was sidelined
two weeks ago, and many state
legislators and other oppo-
nents are lobbying against the
new proposal.
Supporters of the Senate
measure have added tougher
enforcement provisions to try
to woo more lawmakers to
their side. In the House,
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-


Calif., has yet to intro
immigration legislation
point person on the issu
Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif.,
man of the Judiciary si
mittee on immigration,
ues to hold hearings
hope of putting together
As the federal govern
ponders without taking
many states are incre
frustrated at having to p
expensive services for
immigrants. "The feder
ernment has authority
who comes in this cou
but the people wh
responsible for helping
integrate and acclima
state and local govern
Ann Morse, a policy ana
the National Confere
State Legislatures, sai
statement on the group
site.


SOURCE: ESRI AP
Assafi and Col. Fadil al-Nimrawi, both of
the Albu Nimr tribe. Three of al-Guood's
guards also were killed, the police officer
said.



i Tapes of


Al-Qaida


captives


released

, Associated Press

RAMALLAH, West Bank -
Al-Qaida was looming increas-
ingly large in Hamas-ruled
.Gaza on Monday: The al-
Qaida-inspired kidnappers of
a BBC journalist released
their captive's anguished plea,
while the terror network's
deputy chief urged Muslims
everywhere to back Hamas
with weapons, money and
attacks on Israeli and U.S. tar-
gets.
Al-Qaida's clearest overture
yet put Hamas in a: bind.
Hamas is in urgent need of
outside help to provide for
Gaza's 1.4 million
Palestinians,' following its
mid-June takeover of the terri-
tory. Yet Hamas would deepen
its international isolation,
burn bridges to much of the
Arab world and lose more
Press popular support at home if it
forms an open alliance with
al-Qaida.
h Hamas leaders suggested
h they will steer clear of al-
Qaida, in line with the move-
avy ment's long-standing position
Savy to focus on the conflict with
t to Israel and not to join an inter-
ter- national jihad, or holy war. Al-
the Qaida "is not the frame of ref-
uth erence for Hamas," said a sen-
ueaf ior Hamas official, Ahmed
Yousef. "We have our own
ded Muslim scholars, political
had leaders and military com-
ing manders who give us a strate-
day gy on how to deal with the
nied (Israeli) occupation."
low Al-Qaida's presence in the
fire Palestinian territories has
500 been a subject of intense spec-
ulation since the Sept. 11
day, attacks on the United States.
dyto Palestinian intelligence offi-
er cials believe the group has
s of formed some sleeper cells in
s id Gaza and suspect possible al-
aid. Qaida involvement in several
tiers spectacular attacks on
Lou- Palestinian security chiefs
ete since 2004.
As early as 2003, an Israeli
military court sentenced a
Gaza man to 27 years in prison
on charges he was recruited
by al-Qaida in Afghanistan to
form a network in the
Palestinian territories.
Several al-Qaida-inspired
groups have sprung up,
produce including the so-called Army
n. Her of Islam, which seized BBC
e, Rep. journalist Alan Johnston in
chair- March and was also involved
ubcom- in the capture of Israeli sol-
contin- dier Gilad Shalit a year ago.
in the Another group, the Sword of
r a bill. Islamic Justice, has bombed
rnment dozens of Internet and music
action, shops to halt what it said was
asingly the spread of corrupt Western
providee culture.
illegal It appears these local
ral gov- groups, which have adopted
y over al-Qaida jargon and symbols,
rntry ... are angling for support from
o are al-Qaida, rather than being
g them directed by it "Most of the
.te are fighters (in Gaza) are local
ments," people who identify with al-
lyst for Qaida, as opposed to real al-
nce of Qaida operatives, like we see
d in a in Iraq," said Hillel Frisch, an
's Web Israeli counterterrorism
expert.


I Suicide a












0ENLE. 2B
M Il.4S'CAR3B
NS'critc'drd 3BJ
0 Erij�erl~i~rim�-rit 4B


CI T I


B
TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


IN1


.RUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Conduct stressed with NFL draft class


Associated Press


Roger Goodell briefed all 255 mem-
bers of this year's draft class Monday
on the NFEs stricter conduct rules.
Hours later, the Chicago Bears
released troubled defensive tackle
Tank Johnson in a move that most
likely underscored the commission-
er's message.
"We're concerned about them as
men," Goodell said at the league's
rookie symposium in Palm Beach
Gardens, Fla., shortly before
- Johnson's release was announced.


"How do they become not only
great NFL players, but how do
they become great men? How
do they conduct themselves
appropriately for the remain-
der of their life, not just when
they're in the National Football
League?"
Goodell spent about 20 min- R
utes with this season's draftees Gc
on that topic, mostly in a ques-
tion-and-answer session.
"I'd be naive to think everyone
would be able to understand it,"
Goodell said. "But I think we're mak-


ing players more aware of
the standards of behavior.
We're giving them more tools
and resources to make sure
they can make those deci-
sions."
Goodell released his
stricter policy in April, an
attempt to quell-a rash of off-
odell the-field episodes involving
NFL players, notably cases
involving three suspended players -
Tennessee Titans cornerback Adam
"Pacman" Jones, Cincinnati Bengals
receiver Chris Henry and Johnson,


who was cut by the reigning NFC
champions Monday.
Johnson spent time in jail this off-
season after violating probation and
was stopped in Arizona last week
when police said he was speeding. He
had blood drawn to determine if he
was driving while impaired.
"He compromised the credibility of
our organization," Bears general
manager Jerry Angelo said. "We made
it clear to him that he had no room for
error. Our goal was to help someone
through a difficult period in his life,
but the effort needs to come from both


THE QUEST BEGINS


Associated Press
Switzerland's defending champion Roger Federer returns to Russia's Teimuraz Gabashvili, during their Men's Singles, first round match on Monday on Centre
Court of the All England Tennis Championships at Wimbledon.

Federer, looking for a record-tying 5th straight Wimbledon title, begins tournament


Associated Press


WIMBLEDON, England - In his
five-piece, tailor-made Gatsby
getup, Roger Federer looked like a
tennis player from a bygone era,
one seen only in black-and-white
photos.
As Federer warmed up Monday
for what would become his 29th con-
secutive victory at Wimbledon, and
49th in a row on grass, he wore long
trousers, replete with belt loops, and
a sweater vest, all white with gold
trim. An accompanying jacket, cus-
tomized "RF" logo on the left breast
pocket, was neatly draped over his
changeover chair, completing the
throwback ensemble.
His game, as usual, was as mod-
ern and colorful as they come, filled
with grace and power. It was all too


much for Teimuraz Gabashvili, a
Russian who is ranked 86th and lost
his first career match at Wimbledon
6-3, 6-2, 6-4 on a wet and windy Day
1 at the grass-court Grand Slam,
where winners included Andy
Roddick, a slightly hobbled
Serena Williams and - in
a brilliant escape act -
Martina Hingis.
For Federer, it was his
first match since losing
the French Open final to
Rafael Nadal; the Swiss
star skipped his usual grass-
court tuneup tournament to rest a
beat-up body.
"I was, of course, a bit worried,
maybe, before the first round," said
Federer, trying to equal Bjorn
Borg's modern-era record of five
straight Wimbledon titles. "Look,


I've got so much confidence, so
much experience on this surface,
that I always expect myself to play
good matches on grass. That's what
happened today."
If Federer's result was famil-
* , iar, Centre Court certainly
was not: Its partial roof is
completely gone as part
of the project to build a
retractable one by 2009,
temporarily making for a
less-intimate atmosphere
s - and the open-air setting
is more susceptible to rain-
drops and breezes.
"It definitely does look and play a
bit different this year," said Federer,
whose match began 21/2 hours late
because of rain.
Plus, the hallowed arena now fea-
tures two video screens for the


debut of instant replay at the oldest
Grand Slam tournament Federer
didn't challenge any calls.
Gabashvili did, questioning
whether Federer's forehand was in
- and the replay showed it barely
caught a line.
The history books will reflect that
the first use of the new technology at
the All England Club came at Court
1, during the No. 3-seeded
Roddick's 6-1,7-5,7-6 (3) victory over
Justin Gimelstob.
In the first set, Gimelstob chal-
lenged a fault call but the ruling was
upheld.
"So," Roddick pointed out, "he
has the first miss with 'Hawk-Eye' in
Wimbledon history, as well."
Said Gimelstob, a 30-year-old
Please see '"U.?-.7i!.L./Page 3B


sides. It didn't, and we have decided
to move on."
It's a situation the NFL clearly
doesn't like, which is where the
emphasis on educating players comes
in.
The rookie symposium teaches
incoming NFL players - attendance
is mandatory for draftees - about
how to handle finances and relation-
ships and how to prepare for life after
football. But the conduct issue is one
of Goodell's priorities, and it's taking
Please see CONDUCT/Page 3B


Lakers


attempting


to acquire


Garnett

Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The owners of
the Los Angeles Lakers and
Minnesota Timberwolves have begun
talks for a trade that would involve
sending Kevin Garnett to the Lakers,
NBA sources said Monday.
The talks turned into discussions
about a four-way deal among the
Lakers, Timberwolves, Indiana
Pacers and Boston Celtics, in which
the Lakers would have gotten Garnett.
However, the deal broke down,
reportedly because the Celtics did not
like what they would have gotten,
ending the four-way negotiations.
The Lakers are now back to direct
two-team talks with the
Timberwolves. However, sources say,
Minnesota General Manager Kevin
McHale wants young players and high
draft choices and isn't keen on the
Lakers' offer of Andrew Bynum, who
is young (19), and Lamar Odom (27),
who isn't.
Jerry Buss and Timberwolves
owner Glen Taylor spoke by phone for
20 minutes Friday Buss reportedly
ended the conversation by suggesting
that Lakers General Manager Mitch
Kupchak and McHale continue the
discussion Monday. Acquiring Garnett
could address the concerns of Lakers
star Kobe Bryant, who has demanded
to be traded for more than four weeks.
Bryant met with Kupchak for about
an hour Friday, a day after Garnett
rejected a trade that would have sent
him to Boston.
Bryant did not step down from his
desire to be traded. However,
Kupchak, Buss and Lakers Coach Phil
Jackson met later that day to discuss
options based on the assumption they
would still have Bryant, the Los
Angeles Times has learned.
Garnett, 31, has never formally
asked for a trade while signaling his
distress in recent years as the
Timberwolves fell from top-notch sta-
tus. Minnesota, the No. 1-seeded team
in the Western Conference in 2004,
lost to the Lakers in the West finals
and hasn't made the playoffs since
then.
The Timberwolves finished 3349 in
2005-06 and 32-50 last season, tied for
12th in the West with the Portland
Trail Blazers.
Garnett can opt out of his contract
after next season. He wants an exten-
sion, which Buss reportedly told
Taylor he was willing to offer. Garnett
is due to earn $22 million next season
and $23 million in 2008-09, the last
year of his contract
Garnett, a 10-time All-Star, aver

Please see LAKERS/Page 3B


Sports BRIEFS


'Embarrassed' Bears cut
tackle Tank Johnson
LAKE FOREST, III. -Tank Johnson
was released Monday by the Chicago
.Bears, who are "upset and embarrassed"
by the defensive tackle's legal troubles.
Johnson was waived
three days after he was
pulled over by police in
Arizona. He already had
been suspended for the -
first eight games of the -
2007 season for violating
probation on a gun
charge. He spent two Tank
months in jail and was Johnson
released in May. Released by
"We are upset and the Bears.
embarrassed by Tank's
actions last week," general manager Jerry
Angelo said in a statement. "He compro-
mised the credibility of our organization.
We made it clear to him that he had no
room for error.


Panthers sign Anderson to
complete goalie tandem
SUNRISE - The Florida Panthers
signed goaltender Craig Anderson to a
two-year contract Monday, meaning he'll
likely enter the season as the primary
backup to the newly acquired Tomas
Vokoun.
Anderson went 23-10-1 with a 2.56
GAA with the AHL's Rochester Americans
last year, and went 1-1-1 with a 2.21 GAA
in five appearances with the Panthers.
"Craig played very well in his backup
role for our club during the later part of last
season and we felt that he was most
deserving of an NHL contract," said
Florida coach and general manager
Jacques Martin, who pulled off a trade
with the Nashville Predators last week for
Vokoun - who won 27 of his 44 starts last
season.
The Panthers relied on the goaltending
duo of Alex Auld and Ed Belfour last year,
neither of whom will likely be back.


Pro wrestler Chris Benoit,
wife and son found dead
FAYETTEVILLE, Ga. - WWE wrestler
Chris Benoit, his wife and son were found
dead Monday and police said they were
investigating the deaths as a homicide.
Lt. Tommy Pope of the
Fayette County Sheriffs
Department said the
three were found at their
home about 2:30 p.m.,
but refused to release
details.
Pope said results of
autopsies on Benoit, his Chris
wife Nancy, and 7-year- Benoit
old son Daniel were
expected Tuesday.
Benoit, 40, was scheduled to perform at
the "Vengeance" pay-per-view event
Sunday night in Houston, but was
replaced at the last minute because of
what announcer Jim Ross called "personal
reasons."


Congressman concerned
about access to Big Ten
WASHINGTON - House Energy and
Commerce Committee Chairman John
Dingell said Monday he was concerned
about the ability of fans to watch Big Ten
sporting events on a new television net-
work debuting this summer.
Dingell, D-Mich., wrote Big Ten
Commissioner Jim Delany with questions
about the Big Ten Network, which is
expected to launch sometime in August.
The congressman said many constituents
have expressed worries about being able to
watch University of Michigan football games
this season because none of the state's
cable systems carry the network.
"While I understand the motivation on
the part of the Big Ten Conference and its
member schools to create a new all-Big
Ten cable channel, I am increasingly con-
cemed about the migration of previously
free, over the air content to a pay televi-
sion tier," Dingell wrote.


Three Razorbacks on
Maxwell Award watch list
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - Darren
McFadden is one of three Arkansas play-
ers on the watch list for the Maxwell
Award, given since 1937 to the nation's
outstanding college football player.
McFadden was joined on the list
Monday by fellow running back Felix
Jones and wide receiver Marcus Monk.
Arkansas is one of five schools with three
players listed. Florida, Louisville, Michigan
and Texas are the others.
McFadden is considered a Heisman
Trophy favorite after finishing second last
season, when he rushed for 1,647 yards.
Jones also rushed for over 1,000 yards.
Monk enters his senior season with 24
career touchdown receptions, seven
behind former Florida receiver Chris
Doering for the Southeastern Conference
record.
- From wire reports


'I;





-If




lpw � -IWW - --


MIATOR LEAGUE BASEBALL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE 1


Central Division
Pct GB L10 Sti
.600 - z-8-2 L-1
.587 1 5-5 W-1
.514 6% 5-5 L-1
.417 13% 3-7 W-1
.395 15% z-5-5 W-1

Central Division
Pct GB L10 Str
.579 - z-8-2 W-1
.480 7% z-6-4 W-4
.452 9% 5-5 L-2
.421 12 z-5-5 L-1
.413 121% 3-7 L-5
.382 15 3-7 L-2


Home
18-15
25-11
20-19
15-21
15-24


Home
28-13
16-20
17-19
17-18
15-21
14-23


Away
27-15
19-20
18-17
15-21
15-22


Away
16-19
20-19
16-21
15-26
16-23
15-24


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
Texas


W
Arizona 44
San Diego 42
Los Angeles 42
Colorado 38
San Francisco32


West Division
Pct GB L10
.645 - z-8-2
.542 8 4-6
.520 9% z-3-7
.408 18 z-7-3


West Division
t GB L10
9 - 7-3
8 1 z-5-5
) 1% z-5-5
) 6 z-5-5
2 11 2-8


INTERLEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay 9, L.A. Dodgers 4
Kansas City 4, Milwaukee 3, 11 innings
Chicago Cubs 3. Chicago White Sox 0
L.A. Angels 4, Pittsburgh 3. 10 innings
Boston 4, San Diego 2
Seattle 3, Cincinnati 2
San Francisco 7, N.Y. Yankees 2
Arizona 8, Baltimore 3
Detroit 5, Atlanta 0
Houston 12 Texas 9, 10 innings
AM2RICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Texas 8, Detroit 3
Cleveland 5, Oakland 2
Chicago White Sox 5, Tampa Bay 4
Toronto 8, Minnesota 5
Boston at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Texas (Padilla 3-8) at Detroit (Robertson
4-6), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Haren 9-2) at Cleveland (Lee 4-
4), 7:05 p.m.
N Y. Yankees (Pettitte 4-5) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 4-1), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Garland 4-5) at
Tampa Bay (Shields 6-2), 7:10 p.m.
.Toronto (Marcum 4-2) at Minnesota
(Baker 2-2), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (Gabbard 1-0) at Seattle
(Hernandez 4-4), 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Meche 4-6) at L.A. Angels
(E.Santana 5-7), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Texas at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Boston at Seattle, 4:35 p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox atTB, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Atlanta 4, Washington 1
N.Y. Mets 2, St. Louis 1, 11 innings
Milwaukee 6, Houston 1
Chicago Cubs 10, Colorado 9
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Pittsburgh (Maholm 3-10) at Florida (Willis
7-6), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Bailey 2-0) at Philadelphia
(Kendrick 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Wellemeyer 2-0) at N.Y. Mets
(O.Perez 7-6), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Bacsik 1-4) at Atlanta
(Carlyle 1-2), 7:35 p.m.
Colorado (Lopez 4-0) at Chicago Cubs
(Lilly 5-4), 8:05 p.m.
Houston (Rodriguez 4-6) at Milwaukee
(Vargas 6-1), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 4-0) at Arizona
(Gonzalez 3-2), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (D.Wells 3-5) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 2-2), 10:15 p.m.
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MOrdonez, Detroit, .379;
ISuzuki, Seattle, .364; Willits, Los
Angeles, .343; Jeter, New York, .342;
Posada, New York, .341; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, .336; ARodriguez, New York,
.333.
RUNS-ARodriguez, New York, 72;
Sheffield, Detroit, 66; MOrdonez, Detroit,
64; Sizemore, Cleveland, 62; Rios,
Toronto, 55; DeJesus, Kansas City, 55;
Granderson, Detroit, 54; BAbreu, New
York, 54.
RBI--ARodriguez, New York, 77;
VGuerrero, Los Angeles, 69; MOrdonez,
Detroit, 68; VMartinez, Cleveland, 62;
Sosa, Texas, 59; Morneau, Minnesota,
57; THunter, Minnesota, 57.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 110;
MOrdonez, Detroit, 105; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, 102; Jeter, New York, 100;
BRoberts, Baltimore, 95; Polanco, Detroit,
95; MYoung, Texas, 93.
DOUBLES-MOrdonez, Detroit, 34;
DOrtiz, Boston, 27; OCabrera, Los
Angeles, 23; Posada, New York, 23;
Cano, New York, 22; AHill, Toronto, 22;
Granderson, Detroit, 22; MYoung, Texas,
22.
TRIPLES-Granderson, Detroit, 14;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 8; TPena, Kansas
City, 5; Teahen, Kansas City, 5; DeJesus,
Kansas City, 5.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
28; Morneau, Minnesota, 20; Rios,
Toronto, 17; CPena, Tampa Bay, 17;
Sheffield, Detroit, 17; THunter, Minnesota,
15; Kinsler, Texas, 14; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 14; Sexson, Seattle, 14;
VGuerrero, Los Angeles, 14.
STOLEN BASES-BRoberts,
Baltimore, 24; Sizemore, Cleveland, 22;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 22; Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 20; JLugo, Boston, 19; Willits, Los
Angeles, 18; Figgins, Los Angeles, 18.
PITCHING (8 Decisions)-Beckett,
Boston, 11-1, .917, 3.07; Bonderman,
Detroit, 8-1, .889, 3.90; Sabathia,
Cleveland, 11-2, .846, 3.24; Verlander,
Detroit, 9-2, .818, 2.78; Haren, Oakland,
9-2, .818, 1.78; Halladay, Toronto, 9-2,
.818, 4.25; KEscobar, Los Angeles, 9-3,
.750, 2.81; Shields, Tampa Bay, 6-2, .750,
3.64.
STRIKEOUTS-Bedard, Baltimore,
121; JoSantana, Minnesota, 114;
Sabathia, Cleveland, 108; Matsuzaka,
Boston, 102; Burnett, Toronto, 100;
Kazmir, Tampa Bay, 96; Shields, Tampa
Bay, 89; Haren, Oakland, 89.
SAVES-FrRodriguez, Los Angeles,
22; Putz, Seattle, 21; Borowski,
Cleveland, 21; Jenks, Chicago, 19;
Papelbon, Boston, 18; TJones, Detroit,
18; Reyes, Tampa Bay, 17.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Holliday, Colorado, .355;
DeLee, Chicago, .346; DYoung,
Washington, .337; MiCabrera, Florida,
.330; Helton, Colorado, .326; Renteria,
Atlanta, .323; HaRamirez, Florida, .320;
Utley, Philadelphia, .320.
RUNS-HaRamirez, Florida, 62;
Rollins, Philadelphia, 60; Uggla, Florida,
59; Utley, Philadelphia, 52; JBReyes, New
York, 52; Fielder, Milwaukee, 51; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 49; ASoriano, Chicago, 49;
Renteria, Atlanta, 49.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 61; Holliday,
Colorado, 59; CaLee, Houston, 59; Utley,
Philadelphia, 58; MiCabrera, Florida, 54;
Howard, Philadelphia, 51; Hawpe,
Colorado, i51; AdGonzalez, San Diego,
51.
HITS-Holliday, Colorado, 108;
HaRamirez, Florida, 97; Byrnes, Arizona,
97; JBReyes, New York, 96; Utley,
Philadelphia, 93; Rollins, Philadelphia, 93;
DeLee, Chicago, 93.
DOUBLES-Utley, Philadelphia, 30;
Uggla, Florida, 29; Holliday, Colorado, 27;
DeLee, Chicago, 26; Church,
Washington, 22.
TRIPLES-Rollins, Philadelphia, 9;
JBReyes, New York, 8; Johnson, Atlanta,
6; CGuzman, Washington, 6; Pence,
Houston, 5; Byrnes, Arizona, 5.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 26;
Griffey Jr., Cincinnati, 21; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 20; Hardy, Milwaukee, 17;
MiCabrera, Florida, 17; Howard,
Philadelphia, 16; Pujols, St. Louis, 16.
STOLEN BASES-JBReyes, New
York, 38; Pierre, Los Angeles, 23;
HaRamirez, Florida, 22; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 22; Taveras, Colorado, 18;
Wright, New York, 16; BPhillips,
Cincinnati, 15.
PITCHING (8 Decisions)-Penny, Los
Angeles, 9-1, .900, 2.12; Peavy, San
Diego, 9-2, .818, 2.14; Harang, Cincinnati,
8-2, .800, 3.59; Hamels, Philadelphia, 9-3,
.750, 3.80; BSheets, Milwaukee, 8-3,
.727, 3.19; CYoung, San Diego, 7-3, .700,
2.08; Maine, New York, 8-4, .667, 2.87;
Smoltz, Atlanta, 8-4, .667, 3.14; Heilman,
New York, 6-3, .667, 3.86; JSosa, New
York, 6-3, .667, 3.79.


STRIKEOUTS-Peavy, San Diego,
113; Hamels, Philadelphia, 111; Webb,
Arizona, 97; Harang, Cincinnati, 97; Wolf,
Los Angeles, 89; CZambrano, Chicago,
86; RHill, Chicago, 85.


Indians 5,
Athletics 2
CLEVELAND - C.C. Sabathia
joined Boston's Josh Beckett as the
majors' only 11-game winners and
finally beat his hometown team
again, leading the Cleveland Indians
to a 5-2 victory over the Oakland
Athletics on Monday night.
Sabathia (11-2) allowed nine hits
in his second complete game this
month to improve to 2-5 in 12
career starts against the A's, the
team he pulled for as a kid growing
up in Vallejo, Calif.
The left-hander had been 0-4 vs.
Oakland since last beating the A's
on July 30, 2003.
Sabathia struck out eight and did-
n't walk a batter, continuing an
impressive run of great control and
command of his pitches. In his last
14 starts, Sabathia has walked only
11 and not more than one in any
outing. He has 89 strikeouts over
the same span.
Ryan Garko drove in two runs with
a fourth-inning double off Chad Gaudin
(6-3), and Travis Hafner homered for
Cleveland, just 11-12 in June.
Oakland has lost a season-high
four straight, and seven of nine
overall.


OAKLAND

ShStwrt If
Scutaro 2b
Swisher rf
EChavz 3b
Cust dh
Crosby ss
DJnson lb
Kotsay cf
Kendall c


ab rhbi


CLEVELAND
ab


4 02 0 Szmore cf
4 01 0 Blake 3b
4 01 0 VMrtnz c
4 00 0 Hafner dh
3 11 0 JhPIta ss
4 11 0 Garko lb
4 02 1 Nixon rf
4 01 1 Mchels If
3 00 0 Gutirrz If
Brfield 2b


r h bi
000
0 1 0
1 1 0
22 1
2 1 1
0 1 2
0 1 0
0 1 1

0 1 0


Totals 342 9 2 Totals 32 5 9 5
Oakland 020 000 000- 2
Cleveland 010 200 02x- 5
E-Barfield (10). DP-Oakland 1,
Cleveland 3. LOB-Oakland 6, Cleveland
7. 2B-Crosby (14), DJohnson (12),
VMartinez (15), Garko (8), Michaels (6),
Barfield (12). HR-Hafner (11). SB-
JhPeralta (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Gaudin L,6-3 6 6 3 3 3 4
Harden 1 0 0 0 0 2
Embree 1 3 2 2 1 1
Cleveland
Sabathia W,11-2 9 9 2 2 0 8
HBP-by Sabathia (Cust).
Umpires-Home, Mike Everitt; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Brian
Gorman.
T-2:23. A-17,737 (43,415).


Rangers 8,
Tigers 3

DETROIT - Marion Byrd drove
in three runs and the Texas
Rangers ended Jeremy
Bonderman's unbeaten streak at 17
starts, beating the Detroit Tigers 8-3
on Monday night.
Bonderman (8-1) allowed four
runs - two earned - and seven
hits over six innings. He struck out a
season-high nine, but walked four,
matching the total in his last five
starts combined, and made a key
third-inning error.
Bonderman's last loss came in
Minnesota on Sept. 10. His unbeat-
en streak ended one short of Bobo
Newsom's 67-year-old team record.
Kameron Loe (4-6) had his third
straight strong outing since giving
up nine runs in 2 2-3 innings
against Detroit on June 7. Loe
allowed two runs and seven hits in
seven innings to record his third win
in a row. He walked two and struck
out one.
The Tigers took a 1-0 lead on
Carlos Guillen's bases-loaded sacri-
fice fly with one out in the first, but
could have built a much bigger lead.


TEXAS


DETROIT


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Lofton cf 5 11 0 Grndsn cf 4 1 2 1
Kinsler2b 3 21 0 Planco 2b 4 00 0
MYong ss 4 13 1 Shffield dh 4 00 0
Sosa dh 4 11 0 MOrdz rf 4 0 1 0
MBrd rf 5 223 CGillen ss 3 0 1 1
Ctlnotto If 3 00 0 IRdrgz c 4 0 0 0
Hrst Jr If 2 11 2 Rabelo pr 0 1 0 0
Mlhuse c 5 02 1 Casey lb 3 0 2 0
Wlkrsn lb 4 01 0 Monroe If 3 0 00
Vzquez3b 3 00 0 nge3b 3 1 2 1
Totals 38812 7 Totals 32 3 8 3
Texas 004 000 004- 8
Detroit 100 000 101- 3
E-Wilkerson (3), Bonderman (2). DP-
Texas 2, Detroit 1. LOB-Texas 8, Detroit 8.
2B-Wilkerson (7), Inge (12). 3B-
Granderson (14). HR-Hairston Jr. (3). S-
Inge. SF-CGuillen.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
LoeW,4-6 7 7 2 2 2 1
Otsuka 1 0 0 0 0 0
Francisco 1 1 1 0 1 1
Detroit
Bndrm L,8-1 7 7 4 2 4 9
McBride 1 2 1 1 0 1
De La Cruz 1 3 3 3 1- -4 -
MrrPrde pirch-d, to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by Loe (Polanco).WIP-- Francisco,
De La Cruz. PB-IRodriguez.
Umpires-Home, Gary Darling; First,
Jerry Meals; Second, Larry Poncino; Third,
Bruce Dreckman.
T-2:55. A-36,330 (41,070).


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves' Brian McCann, center, celebrates with Edgar
Renteria, left, and Andruw Jones after hitting a three-run home run.


Braves 4,
Nationals 1
ATLANTA-- Brian McCann deliv-
ered the slump-busting big hits the
Atlanta Braves desperately needed.
McCann's run-scoring single gave
the Braves their first lead in a week, and
he added a three-run homer to lift
Atlanta to a 4-1 victory over the
Washington Nationals on Monday night.
The Braves snapped a five-game
losing streak, their longest of the
season. The streak included four
shutout losses.
In the only game in that stretch
they were not shut out, the Braves
managed only one run - on a
Chipper Jones homer - in a 2-1
loss to Detroit on Saturday.
The Braves ended a streak of 48
innings without holding a lead when
McCann's fourth-inning single drove
in Edgar Renteria for a 1-0 lead.
The Braves had not led a game
since beating the Boston Red Sox
9-4 last Monday.
McCann's second four-RBI game
of the season helped Tim Hudson (7-
5) win for the first time since May 30.
Hudson gave up seven hits no
walks and struck out seven.


WASHINGTON ATLANTA


Watson cf
FLopez ss
Zmrmn 3b
DYong lb
Kearns rf
Church If
Biliard 2b
Schndr c
Brgmn p
Lngrhn ph
Traber p
Jimnz ph
Ayala p
Schroder p


ab rhbi
4 00 0 Harris If
4 01 0 Rnteria ss
4 01 0 C ones 3b
4 01 0 YEscbr 3b
4 11 0 AJones cf
4010 McCnnc
4 01 0 Frncur rf
4 03 1 Jhnson 2b
1 00 0 Thrmn lb
1 00 0 THudsn p
0 00 0 Orr ph
1 00 0 RSrano p
0 00 0 Wckmn p
0 00 0


r h bi
020
2 1 0
020
000
1 0 0
124
000
000
000
000
000
000
000


Batista ph 1 00 0
Totals 361 9 1 Totals 30 4 7 4
Washington 000 000 100- 1
Atlanta 000 103 00x- 4
DP-Washington 1. LOB-Washington 8,
Atlanta 3. 2B-Zimmerman (17), Belliard
(9), Schneider (9), Renteria (19), CJones
(16). HR-McCann (6). SB-FLopez (9).
CS-Harris (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Bergmann L,1-4 4 4 1 1 0 4
Traber 2 2 3 3 1 3
Ayala 1 0 0 0 0 0
Schroder 1 1 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
THudson W,7-5 7 7 1 1 0 9
RSoriano 1 1 0 0 0 3
WickmanS,13 1 1 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First,
Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Tim McClelland;
Third, Paul Schrieber.
T-2:29. A-25,375 (49,583).


Blue Jays 8,
Twins 5

MINNEAPOLIS - Matt Stairs hit
Toronto's third homer of the game in
the eighth inning, a two-run shot
that broke a tie and sent the Blue
Jays to an 8-5 victory over the
Minnesota Twins on Monday night.
Roy Halladay won his fifth straight
decision and the Blue Jays got consec-
utive homers from Vemrnon Wells and
Alex Rios in extending their winning
streak to a season-high four games.
Stairs' drive slammed off the
scoreboard high above the big bag-
gie in right field, ending reliever Matt
Guerrier's scoreless innings streak
at 14 and giving Toronto a 7-5 lead.
Adam Lind added a sacrifice fly later
in the inning.
Guerrier (1-3) had not allowed a
run in his previous 10 appearances,
but gave up three runs and four hits
in 1 1-3 innings.
Frank Thomas just missed hitting
No. 500 of his career when center
fielder Torii Hunter caught his fly ball
before slamming into the wall.


TORONTO


ab rhbi


MINNESOTA


ab r h bi


VWells cf 5 133 LCstillo2b 4 1 1 0
Riosrf 4232 LRdrgzph 1 000
Stairs lb 5 11 2 Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0
Glaus 3b 5 00 0 Mauer dh 4 0 1 0
Thmasdh 3 00 0 Cddyer rf 2 1 0 0
Thgpen dh 0 100 THnter cf 3 2 1 0
Zaun c 401 0 Kubel If 4 0 0 1
AHill 2b 401 0 Rdmnd c 4 022
Lind If 3 11 1 Cirillo lb 3 0 o 0
JMcDId ss 421 0 Tyner ph 1 0 1 0
Punto 3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 37811 8 Totals 33 5 8 3
Toronto 003 020 030- 8
Minnesota 010 220 000- 5
E-Zaun (1), Cuddyer (2), Cirillo (1).
DP-Toronto 2. LOB-Toronto 5, Minnesota
5. 2B-VWells (19), Rios (18), THunter (21).
HR-VWells (9), Rios (17), Stairs (12).
SB-Rios (7), Bartlett (12), THunter (11),
Punto (13). SF-Rios, Lind.
IP. H RERBBSO
Toronto
Halladay W,9-2 7 6 5 5 3 4
Downs 0 1 0 0 0 0
Janssen 1 0 0 0 0 0
AccardoS,9 1 1 0 0 1 0
Minnesota
Slowey 5 6 5 4 0 5
JRincon 1 0 0 0 0 1
Guerrier L,1-3 11-3 4 3 3 0 1
DReyes 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
ROrtiz 1 1 0 0 0 0
Downs pitched to 1 batter in the' 8th.
HBP-by Guerrier (Thomas). WP-
Halladay.
Umpires-Home, Bruce Froemming;
First, Mike Winters; Second, Brian Runge;
Third, Mark Wegner.
T-2:53. A-24,240 (46,632).


Brewers 6,
Astros 1

MILWAUKEE - Ben Sheets won
his fifth consecutive decision, Prince
Fielder hit his NL-leading 27th
homer and the Milwaukee Brewers
beat the Houston Astros 6-1 on
Monday night.
The NL Central-leading Brewers
have won 10 of 12 since being no-
hit by the Tigers' Justin Verlander on
June 12. The Astros, on the last leg
of a nine-game road trip, have lost
five of their last seven.
Sheets (9-3) allowed five hits and
three walks in six innings. He's
allowed three runs or fewer in each
of his last 13 starts and has won
five straight decisions for the first
time since 2001, his rookie year.
The two-time All-Star is 4-0 with a
1.66 ERA in five June starts.
Fielder led off the eighth with a
434-foot shot to deep center field to
give Milwaukee a 4-1 lead. It was
Fielder's first home run in a week,
and his eighth in June.


HOUSTON


MILWAUKEE


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Loretta 3b 5 00 0 CHart rf 5 1 1 1
Pence cf 3 01 0 Hardy ss 3 1 1 1
Brkmn rf 4 00 0 Braun 3b 4 0 2 1
CaLeel f 3 11 1 Fildr lb 4 1 1 1
Lamb lb 4 00 0 BHall cf 3 1 1 0
Burke 2b 401 0 JEstda c 4 1 1 1
Munsn c 401 0 Jenkins If 3 .0 1 0
Brntlttss 3 00 0 Cunsell 2b 4 1 1 0
OPImro ph 1 01 0 BShets p 1 00 0
JJnngs p 2 01 0 Vllneva p 0 0 0 0
Rndlph p 0 00 0 Gross ph 0 0 0 0
Brkski p 0 00 0 Turnbw p 0 0 0 0
Scott ph 0 00 0 Grffnno ph 0 0 0 1
Spurlng p 0 0 0 0
Totals 331 6 1 Totals 31 6 9 6
Houston 000 001 000- 1
Milwaukee 102 000 03x- 6
E-Lamb (6). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-
Houston 9, Milwaukee 7. 2B-Braun (9),
BHall (20), JEstrada (16), Jenkins (10).
HR-CaLee (13), Hardy (18), Fielder (27).
SB-Pence (6), CHart (15), Braun (5),
Counsell (4). CS-Jenkins (1). S-
BSheets. SF-Graffanino.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
JJennings L,1-2 7 5 3 3 4 5
Randolph 1-3 4 3 3 0 1
Borkowski 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
BSheets W,9-3 6 5 1 1 3 5
Villanueva 1 0 0 0 0 2
Turnbow 1 0 0 0 0 2
Spurling 1 1 0 0 1 1
WP-JJennings 2, Turnbow, Spurling.
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Bill
Welke; Second,. Laz Diaz; Third, John
Hirschbeck.
T-2:47. A-28,786 (41,900).


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Devil Rays pitcher J.P. Howell delivers to the Chicago.
White Sox during the first inning of a baseball game Monday night.


White Sox 5,
Devil Rays 4
ST. PETERSBURG - Rookie
Andy Gonzalez went 4-for-5 and
drove in two runs to help the strug-
gling Chicago White Sox snap a
five-game losing streak Monday
night with a 5-4 victory over the
Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
Jim Thome, Paul Konerko and
Josh Fields also drove in runs for
the White Sox, who finished with 12
hits - two shy of their season high
- after being limited to two runs
and two extra-base hits while losing
three straight to the crosstown Cubs
over the weekend.
Gonzalez had an RBI double and
three singles after going 6-for-33
with one RBI in his first 15 games.
His run-scoring single off Casey
Fossum (5-7) erased a 4-3 deficit in
the sixth, but his bid for a perfect
night at the plate ended when he
struck out in the eighth.
Left-hander John Danks (4-6)
allowed four runs and four hits in
five innings to win for the time in
more than a month.


Mets 2,
Cardinals 1, (11)

NEW YORK - Shawn Green hit a
leadoff home run in the 11th inning
and the New York Mets beat St.
Louis 2-1 Monday night in the
Cardinals' first visit to Shea Stadium
since winning Game 7 of the NL
championship series last October.
The Mets won their fourth in a row
despite getting only three hits. The
NL East leaders have won seven
straight regular-season games
against St. Louis overall.
Green connected for his seventh
homer, sending a full-count pitch
from Russ Springer (3-1) off the
scoreboard in right-center field. It
was the Mets' first hit since Carlos
Gomez homered in the third inning.
Aaron Heilman (6-3) pitched one
inning for the win. Last fall, he allowed
Yadier Molina's ninth-inning homer
that gave the Cardinals a 3-1 win and
sent them to the World Series.
Minus the playoff drama and much
action, the crowd of 40,075 had little
to cheer for most of the night.


ST. LOUIS


NEW YORK


ab rh'bi ab r hbi
Tguchi cf 501 1 JBRyesss 4 000
Miles ss 501 0 JoVlntn 2b 3 000
Pujols Ib 4 01 0 Beltran cf 4 000
Spiezio 3b 4 000 Wright 3b 3 0 0 0
Duncanl If 301 0 CDIgdolb 4 0 10
RFrkln p 0 00 0 L Ducac 4 0 0 0
Schmkrph 1 00 0 ShGren rf 4 1 1 1
Sprger p 0 00 0 Gomez If 3 1 1 1
JEcrcn rf 5 01 0 JSosa p 2 0 0 0
AKndy2b 511 0 Smithp 0 000
GBnntt c 4 01 0 Felicno p 0 0 0 0
Maroth p 2 01 0 Ledee ph 1 0 0 0
Ludwck If 1 00 0 BWgnr p 0 0 0 0
Heilmnp 0 000
Totals 391 8 1 Totals 32 2 3 2
St. Louis 000 010 000 00- 1
New York 001 000 000 01- 2
No outs when winning run scored.
E-Pujols 2 (6). DP-St. Louis 1, New
York 1. LOB-St. Louis 10, New York 2.
2B-Taguchi (10). HR-ShGreen (7),
Gomez (2). SB-GBennett (1), Maroth (1).
CS-JoValentin (1), Wright (1). S-Maroth.
IP H- RERBBSO


St. Louis
Maroth
RFranklin
Springer L,3-1
New York
JSosa
Smith
Feliciano
BWagner
Heilman W,6-3


71-3 2
22-3 0
0 1


1 2 4
0 0 1
1 0 0


6 1 1
1 0 0
0 00
0 00
1 0 0


Springer pitched to 1 batter in the 11th.
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First,
Ted Barrett; Second, Mark Carlson; Third,
Larry Young.
T-3:19. A-40,075 (57,343).


White Sox 5, Devil Rays 4, ,


CHICAGO
ab rhbi


Pdsdnk If
AGnzlz rf
Thome dh
Knerko lb
Iguchi 2b
Fids 3b
Terrero cf
Uribe ss
THall c


522 0
5 142
5 01 1
5 02 1
4 00 0
4 00 1
4 00 0
4120
4 11 0


TAMPA BAY
ab rh bi
Iwmra 3b 3 1 0 0
BHarrs ss 2 00 0
Crwfrd If 4 0 0 0
Wggntn dh 3 00 1
.DYong cf 4 0 1 0'
Gomes rf 4 1 1 1
CPena lb 2 1 0 0
Nvarro c 4 1 2 0
JoWlsn 2b 2 0 1 2
Norton ph 1 0 0 0


Chicago
Danks W.4-6
Masset
Thornton
Bukvich
Jenks S,19
Tampa Bay
Howell
Fossum L,5-7
Camp
Witasick


IP H RERBBSO '-j

5 4 4 4 4 3 -
1 1 0 0 1 0
1 0 00 0 1 ',0
1 0 0 0 0 1 ;
1 0 0 0 0 0 /'!

5 8 3 3 3 7
1-3 3 2 2 0 1 '
22-3 1 0 0 0 7 ,1
1 0 0 0 0 0


Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First, Bill,
Miller; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Ed
Montague.
T-3:19. A-10,514 (43,772).


CUBS 10,
ROCKIES 9


COLORADO


CHICAGO


ab rhbi ab r'hbi
Tveras cf 4 00 0 ASrano If 6 0 1 2
TMartn p 0 00 0 Fontnt 2b 5 2 5 2
Baker ph 1 00 0 DeLee lb 5 1 3 0
Juliop 0 00 0 ARmrz3b 5 1 1 0
Sllivan cf 1 00 0 DeRosa rf 5 1 3 3
KMtsui 2b 5 22 0 Pie pr 0 0 0 0
Holiday If 4 11 1 Pagan cf 4 1 1 3
Helton lb 3 11 1 Bowen c 4 0 0 0
Atkins3b 4 22 1 JJones pr 0 1 00
Hawpe rf 4 22 1 Izturis ss 3 0 1 0
Tlowzki ss 5 123 Wuertz p 0 000
Trralba c 3 02 0 Eyre p 1 0 0 0
Francis p 2 00 0 Howry p 0 0 0 0
Spbrgh cf 301 2 KHillph 1 1 1 0
Fentes p 0000 Mrquis p 2 000
Theriot ss 3 2 2 0
Totals 39913 9 Totals 44101810
Colorado 100 002 006- 9
Chicago 401 011 012-10
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-KMatsui (1), Izturis (7). DP-Chicago
2. LOB-Colorado 10, Chicago 10. 2B-
Helton (18), Tulowitzki (12), Fontenot 2 (6),
Theriot (11). HR-Tulowitzki (7), Pagan (3).
SB-KMatsui (15), Theriot (13). CS-
Fontenot (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Francis 5 10 6 6 2 4
TMartin 2 ,3 1 1 0 0
Julio 1 2 1 1 0 1
Fuentes L,0-2 2-3 3 2 0 0 1
Chicago
Marquis 52-3 7 3 3 2 5.
Wuertz 1 0 0 0 2 0
Eyre' 11-3 3 3 3 2 2
Howry W,4-4 1 3 3 3 0 1
Eyre pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Marquis (Torrealba). Balk-
TMartin.
Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Dale
Scott; Second, Dan lassogna; Third, Adam
Dowdy.
T-3:34. A-40,269 (41,160).


SOUND OFF

* Call the anonymous Sound
Off line at 563-0579.

* Be prepared to leave a
brief message - write it -
out before calling to make
sure you remember every-
thing you want to say.

* After the beep, speak loud-
ly, slowly and clearly.

* Or try the online Sound Off
forum available at
www.ChronicleOnline.com.

* The Chronicle reserves the
right to edit Sound Oft
messages.


Boston
Toronto
New York
Tampa Bay
Baltimore



New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Florida
Washington


East Division
t GB LIO
3 - 7-3
r 10% z-7-3
3 11% z-4-6
3 15 4-6
T 16% 3-7


East Division
GB L10
- z-6-4
3% z-5-5
4% z-4-6
7 4-6
11 3-7


Home
23-12
24-18
20-14
19-21
16-19


Home
22-18
19-17
20-21
15-21
16-23


Away
25-14
14-19
16-23
14-20
16-24


Away
20-14
20-19
19-17
21-19
16-21


Detroit
Cleveland
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City



Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Houston
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


Home
29-10
21-15
21-18
18-20



Home
24-16
22-16
22-14
21-18
18-18


Away
20-17
18-18
18-18
13-25


Away I
20-16
20-16 I
20-19 E
17-20 1
14-24


Totals 40512 5 Totals 29 4 5 4
Chicago 001 202 000- 5
Tampa Bay 110 200 000- 4
E-JoWilson (4). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-
Chicago 11, Tampa Bay 5. 2B-Podsednik
(3), Gonzalez (3), Navarro (9), JoWilson (3).
HR-Gomes (6). SB-lwamura (6),
DYoung (6), Navarro (1). SF-Wigginton,
JoWilson.


d16� I UhtilJAYI j UlNt� - U, �uu /


ymerev rrun


DR Gr r 24 2007


a










TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 3B


CITws CouNTY (FL) CHRONIce _


BOWLING
Bowling League Results
PARKVIEW LANES
Parkview Lanes League Results
SUMMER GOLFBOWL
Ken Smith and Greg Shaw shot a three-
under par 33, and three other teams shot
even par, Closest-to-pin awards were won
by Cheryl Lovely and C. H. Crockett. The
high bowlers were Jim Randle
268,235,695; Lenny Oakeson
259,232,693; Ace Briggs 241; George
Marks 238,248; C. H. Crockett 236; and
Marvin Brigner 227.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS
Handicap: Justin Simpkins 312,778; Chris
Jones 305,738; Holly Williams 293,759;
Judie Andrews 283; Judy Ditzel 721.
Scratch: Chris Jones 279,660; Justin
:.,mpkin., 254,604; Judie Andrews 204;
V.A-i. . Simmonsw 200,481; Judy Ditzel
484.
SUMMER OWLS
Handicap: Chuck Hindbaugh 266; Scott
Howell 265,743; Eddie Stromberg 737;
Judy, Hindbaugh 252; Mona Rosado
245,697; Erica Jackson 682.
Scratch: Jim Cheff 255; Eddie Stromberg
245,686; Tony Thompson 650; Debbe
Churg 184,543; Judy Hindbaugh 177,421;
Z-ny VWood 421.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK: Holly
'Vilams 99 pins over her average, and
Justin Simpkins, 118 pins over his aver-
age.
Parkview Lanes News
1ST ANNUAL GREATER CITRUS USBC
BOWL & GOLF TOURNEY: The tourney
has been rescheduled for August 11-12. All
proceeds will be donated to Hospice of
Citrus County and the Citrus County Youth
Bowing Scholarship Fund. The golfing por-
tion Will be at Lakeside Country Club, with
shotgun starts at. 9am each day. The bowl-
ing will be at Parkview Lanes, with squads
at 10am, 1pm and 4pm each day. The for-
mat is a four-person scramble in golf (18
holes), and three games of "best-frame"
bowling. The cost is $60/person, which
includes 18 holes of golf, 3 games of bowl-
ing, and lunch. Sponsorships are available
at $100/hole and/or $100/lane. Contact Ken
Smith, tournament director, at 352-220-
2958 to register or for more information.
INDEPENDENCE DAY: Parkview Lanes
will be closed July 4, to celebrate
Independence Day.
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY SPE-
CIALS: There are special Summer prices
for bowling and rental shoes on Tuesdays
from 6pm until 10pm, and Wednesdays
from 1pm until 10pm. The cost for bowling
is $1.50 per game, and rental shoes are
$1.00 per pair.
" ~VES
Monday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended New York Mets C Paul
Lo Duca for two games and fined him an
undisclosed amount for his actions after
being ejected in a June 23 game against
Oakland.
American League
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Assigned OF
Greg Porter from Arkansas (Texas) to Salt
Lake (PCL) and LHP Brad Beck from
Arkansas to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Placed RHP
Kiko Calero on the 15-day DL. Optioned
INF Kevin Melillo to Sacramento (PCL).
Recalled LHP Dallas Braden and RHP
Ruddy Lugo from Sacramento.
TEXAS RANGERS-Recalled RHP Scott
Feldman from Oklahoma (PCL). Placed
RHP Vicente Padilla on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to June 22.
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Agreed to
terms with LF-1B Matt LaPorta.
NEW YORK METS-Signed INF Tyler
Vaughn and INF Jose Alvarez.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES-Signed INF
Tyler Mach, SS Jesus-Villegas-Andino and
LHP Jacob Diekman.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Activated RHP
John Wasdin from the 15-day DL.
ST LOUIS CARDINALS-Placed LHP
Tyler Johnson on the 15-day DL.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Signed OF Daniel
Payne, RHP Jeremy Hefner, C Emmanuel
Quiles, 3B Justin Baum, OF Angel
Mercado and RHP Dylan Axelrod.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Purchased
the contract of INF D'Angelo Jimenez from
Columbus (IL).
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES SWING-Announced 1B
Tim Dorn has been assigned to the team.
American Association
COASTAL BEND AVIATORS-Signed
RHP Juan Jimenez.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS-Signed LHP John
Kaminski.
PENSACOLA PELICANS-Signed RHP
Jarrod Matthews. Released LHP Matthew
Creighton.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS-Released C
Zach Goldberg, C Mike Richardson and
RHP Ryan Dupic.
Can-Am League
BROCKTON ROX-Signed INF Steve
Wyland.
NORTH SHORE SPIRIT-Traded C Wally
Rosa to Atlantic City for a player to be
named later. Signed INF Robert
Tewksbary.
QUEBEC CAPITALES-Released RHP


LAKERS
Continued from Page 1B

aged 22.4 points, 12.8 rebounds,
4.1 assists and 1.7 blocked shots
last season while showing few
signs of slowing down, other
than spending the last five
games of the season in Los
Angeles - he has a home in
Malibu - to rest a sore right
quadriceps.
Bynum started his second


CONDUCT
Continued from Page 1B

center stage this year.
"You could see the players
were engaged," Goodell said.
"They asked very good ques-
tions, very responsive ques-
tions to things that I said."
This offseason has been
dominated by news of players
getting into trouble, including
Atlanta quarterback Michael
Vick's alleged involvement
with dogfighting and this past
weekend's arrest of Miami
Dolphins defensive tackle Fred
Evans on South Beach after he


r7rth,, E CrOrd


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB
7 p.m. (66 PAX) Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay Devil Rays
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Pittsburgh Pirates at Florida Marlins
8 p.m. (WGN) Colorado Rockies at Chicago Cubs
WNBA
10 p.m. (ESPN2) New York Liberty at Sacramento Monarchs
BOATING
8:30 a.m. (VERSUS) Yachting America's Cup - Race 3
J TENNIS
8 a.m. (ESPN2) Tennis Wimbledon - Early Rounds
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Tennis Wimbledon - Early Rounds


Mathieu Demontigny and Tonm Curkovic.
Golden Baseball Lqague
LONG BEACH ARMADA--Signed, RHP
Andrew Layfield.
ORANGE COUNTY FLYEFS-Released
INF Gabriel Mayorga.
ST GEORGE ROADRUNNERS-Signed
C Dustin Hicks.
Northern League
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS-
Released LHP Cole Stipovich.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES-Released C
Jeremy Mclntire.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES-Released RHP
Greg Bicknell.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball ABsociation
DETROIT PISTONS-Announced G
Chauncey Billups opted out of the final
year of his contract, making him an unre-
stricted free agent.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS-Released DT Tank
Johnson. Signed DB Nathan Vasher to a
five-year contract extension through the
2012 season.
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS-Signed DL
Stevie Baggs. Released SB Deitan Dubuc,
SB Mookie Mitchell, OLTim O'Neill and RB
Jarred Winkel.
Arena Football League
GRAND RAPIDS RAMPAGE-Fired
Sparky McEwen, coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DALLAS STARS-Made qualifying offers
to RW Marius Holtet, LW Jussi Jokinen, D
Vadim Khomitski, RW Junior Lessard, C
Joel Lundqvist, RW Antti Miettinen and C
Mike Ribeiro.
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Signed G Craig
Anderson to a two-year contract. Made
qualifying offers to RW Rob Globke, D
Steve Montador, D Noah Welch, C
Stephen Weiss, C Kamil Kreps and C
Janis Sprukts.
NASHVILLE PREDATORS-Signed G
Pekka Rinne to a two-year contract.
Traded F Brandon Segal to Anaheim for
future considerations.
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS-Signed F
Simon Gamache to a two-year contract.
Re-signed D Jay Harrison.
Central Hockey League
YOUNGSTOWN STEELHOUNDS-Re-
signed D Jeff Alcombrack to a one-year
contract.
, ECHL , _
VICTORIA SALMON KINGS-Agreed to
terms with C Kiel McLeod.
HORSE RACING
NTRA-Named Vicki Baumgardner chief
financial officer.
PHILADELPHIA PARK-Suspended jock-
ey Victor Molina for 30 days, retroactive to
June 19, and fined him $1,000 for kicking
his horse in the stomach before a June 18
race.
SWIMMING
USA SWIMMING-Named Karen Linhart
media specialist.
COLLEGE
CALIFORNIA-Promoted Lindsay Gottlieb
to women's associate basketball coach.
CHARLOTTE-Named Donald Edwards
director of women's basketball operations.
COLGATE-Named Andrea Gross,
Colleen Kelly and Michele Van Gorp
women's assistant basketball coaches,
and John Field assistant strength and con-
ditioning coach.
ELON-Named Scott Browne football
recruiting coordinator and running backs
coach.
GEORGIA TECH-Named Dean Buchan
assistant athletic director for media rela-
tions.
MANSFIELD-Named Christopher
Francis assistant baseball coach.
MERCHANT MARINE-Named Cassie
Arroyo senior woman administrator-soft-
ball coach.
PRINCETON-Promoted Erin McDermott
to senior women's administrator.
RICE-Named Brent Scott men's assistant
basketball coach.
SIENA-Named Ellen Howe women's
water polo coach.
SOUTH FLORIDA-Promdted Jeff
Osterman to women's associate head bas-
ketball coach.
SMU-Named Lauren Longbotham
women's tennis coach.

NBA season with a flurry,
including a memorable game
against Minnesota in
November in which he had 20
points,14 rebounds and three
blocked shots.
But Bynum struggled during
the second half of the season
and finished with averages of
7.8 points and 5.9 rebounds a
game.
The Lakers have been criti-
cized by Bryant for not trading
Bynum at the February trade
deadline to get Jason Kidd from

allegedly fought with police
officers when he refused to
leave a taxi.
Then there is the ongoing
Jones saga. He faces two
charges in a Las Vegas strip
club melee that preceded a
triple shooting, and was sought
by Atlanta-area police last
week for questioning in a
shooting after a fight at anoth-
er strip club.
Goodell said fans have been -
"quite supportive, quite posi-
tive" about the tougher poli-
cies, and he still believes most
players understand - and
abide - by the rules.
"The vast majority of our
players do," Goodell said.


TENNIS
Wimbledon Results
Monday
At The All England Lawn Tennis
& Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Purse: $22.56 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
First Round
Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def.
Teimuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, def. Sam
Querrey, United States, 7-6 (5), 6-1, 6-4.
Andy Roddick (3), United States, def.
Justin Gimelstob, United States, 6-1, 7-5,
7-6 (3).
Tommy Haas (13), Germany, def. Zack
Fleishman, United States, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2.
Florent Serra, France, def. Philipp
Kohlschreiber (27), Germany, 7-6 (4), 6-4,
6-4.
Fernando Gonzalez (5), Chile, def.
Robby Ginepri, United States, 3-6, 7-6 (4),
6-2, 6-2.
Tomas Zib, Czech Republic, def. Diego
Hartfield, Argentina, 6-7, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3,
6-4.
Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, def. Alexander
Peya, Austria, 4-6, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3.
SDanai Udomchoke, Thailand, def. Carlos
Berlocq, Argentina, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3.
Michael Berrer, Germany, def. Albert
Montanes, Spain, 6-3, 6-3, 6-2.
David Ferrer (17), Spain, def. Sergio
Roitman, Argentina, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1.
Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, def. Radek
Stepanek, Czech Republic, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-2.
Juan Carlos Ferrero (20), Spain, vs. Jan
Hajek, Czech Republic, 7-6 (5), 6-4, 3-6, 2-
6, susp., darkness.
Feliciano Lopez, Spain, leads Joshua
Goodall, Britain, 6-1, 6-4, susp., darkness.
Dmitry Tursunov (21), Russia, leads
Nicolas Almagro, Spain, 6-5, susp., dark-
ness.
Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, leads
Davide Sanguinetti, Italy, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 3-3,
susp., darkness.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, leads Oscar
Hernandez, Spain, 6-2, 1-0, susp., dark-
ness.
Benjamin Becker, Germany, leads Juan
Ignacio Chela (24), Argentina, 6-3, 6-4, 4-
6, 3-3, susp., darkness.
Tim Henman, Britain, vs. Carlos Moya
(25), Spain, 6-3, 1-6, 5-7, 6-2, 5-5, susp.,
darkness.
Women
First Round
Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, def. Tatjana
Malek, Germany, 6-1, 6-4.
Roberta Vinci, Italy, def. Ashley
Harkleroad, United States, 6-2, 6-1.
Lucie Safarova (25), Czech Republic,
def. Zuzana Ondraskova, Czech Republic,
7-5, 6-2.
Shahar Peer (16), Israel, def. Tamarine
Tanasugarn, Thailand, 7-5, 6-2.
Laura Granville, United States, def.
Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Aiko Nakamura, Japan, def. Martina
Sucha, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-2.
Martina Hingis (9), Switzerland, def.
Naomi Cavaday, Britain, 6-7 (1), 7-5, 6-0.
Sybille Bammer (20), Austria, def.
Varvara Lepchenko, Uzbekistan, 6-2, 6-2.
Patty Schnyder (15), Switzerland, def.
Camille Pin, France, 6-1, 4-6, 8-6.
Justine Henin (1), Belgium, def.
Jorgelina Cravero, Argentina, 6-3, 6-0.
Serena Williams (7), United States, def.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, 7-5, 6-0.
Alicia Molik, Australia, def. Anastasia
Rodionova, Russia, 6-3, 6-2.
Vera Dushevina, Russia, def. Timea
Bacsinszky, Switzerland, 6-4, 7-5.
Marion Bartoli (18), France, def. Flavia
Pennetta, Italy, 6-3, 6-1.
Eleni Daniilidcu, Greece, leads Gisela
Dulko, Argentina, 5-7, 6-3, 0-0 (30-15),
susp., wet ground.
Michaella Krajicek (31), Netherlands, vs.
Tzipi Obziler, Israel, 6-2, 6-7 (6), susp.,
darkness.
Greta Arn, Germany, leads Olga
Govortsova, Belarus, 7-6 (5), susp., dark-
ness.
Katie O'Brien, Britain, leads Sandra
Kloesel, Germany, 5-3, susp., darkness.

the New Jersey Nets.
Odom was acquired three
years ago as part of the trade
that sent Shaquille O'Neal to
the Miami Heat
Odom averaged 15.9 points,
9.8 rebounds and 4.8 assists last
season and missed 26 games
because of knee and shoulder
injuries.
He had a torn labrum in his
left shoulder repaired last
month and is expected to
return in time for training
camp in October.

"There's a select few that don't.
And they get a lot of focus ...
and have a negative impact on
the other players in our league
and the NFL in general."
The symposium, which also
includes current and former
players talking to the rookies
about life in the NFL, a youth
clinic and other events, contin-
ues through Wednesday.
Speakers include current NFL
players Vince Young, Reggie
Bush, Jonathan Vilma and Jeff
Saturday; Cleveland Browns
coach Romeo Crennel; NFL
Hall of Famer and Baltimore
Ravens general manager Ozzie
Newsome; and NFLPA presi-
dent Troy Vincent


Associated Press
Jeff Gordon's car spits flames around Turn 11 during the Toyota/Save Mart 350 NASCAR Nextel Cup
race at Infineon Raceway on Sunday in Sonoma, Calif.



Want to stop cheating?



Send the driver home


Associated Press

When six crew members
were thrown out of the
Daytona 500 for cheating it
was suggested that NASCAR
start suspending drivers as
part of the penalty process.
Jimmie Johnson was aghast
at the idea.
The defending Nextel Cup
champion said he has no idea
what crew chief Chad Knaus
does while building his race
cars. And even if Johnson
were privy, to such informa-
tion, he has no control in how
his Chevrolets are construct-
ed.
Johnson's defense is at the
very core of why NASCAR
should start suspending its
drivers. Benching the star of
the team would force him to
take responsibility for his
crew.
Nothing else is working.
Johnson and teammate Jeff
Gordon both showed up in
Sonoma, Calif., with cars that
failed initial inspection, and
NASCAR refused to let them
on the track Friday. But they
still were allowed to race
Sunday, and crew chiefs
Knaus and Steve Letarte were
both on site to guide their
drivers to decent finishes.
Gordon finished seventh and
Johnson 17th.
Now they wait and wonder
what further punishment
NASCAR,'" will impose.
Penalties are traditionally
issued on Tuesdays.
"All of us are blown away
and we don't know what's
coming next," Gordon said.
"We are at the mercy of
NASCAR and I hope they are
light on us, but \who knows?"
That there's any doubt in
what the penalties will be
stems from decades of incon-
sistency when it comes to
enforcing the rules and doling
out the punishment.
Cheating has long been cel-
ebrated as a quaint piece of
NASCAR culture that even
has its own slogan - "If you


TENNIS
Continued from Page 1B

American: "I'd like to have a
few more important records,
but I'll take what I can get"
He and Roddick are pals,
and they spoke afterward
about making some all-in-good-
fun gentlemen's bets about how
many times Gimelstob would
launch his body into the air to
dive for shots. They also tried
to set up a dive during their
warmup session, but that didn't
work out.
The match was rather lop-
sided, but Gimelstob did his
best to entertain the crowd and
enjoy himself in his eighth and
possibly final Wimbledon
appearance. After one flop-
and-roll resulted in a
Gimelstob volley followed by
Roddick's passing winner, a
fan cried out: "Come on,
Gimelstob!"
To which he responded:
"You want more effort than
that?"
With Roddick's coach, two-
time Wimbledon champion
Jimmy Connors, looking on, the
2003 U.S. Open champion's
serve was clicking, to the tune
of 16 aces. That skill is a big
part of why Roddick is consid-
ered someone who could give
Federer a test if they meet in
the semifinals.
Then again, Roddick lost to
Federer at Wimbledon in the
2003 semifinals and the 2004
and 2005 finals, and the
American was asked Monday
how many times he thinks he
might have won the title
where they not contempo-
raries.
"At least one," Roddick said,
"possibly two."
Williams (2002, 2003) and
Hingis (1997) have won the


ain't cheatin', you ain't trying" '
There's long been a blurry ter-
ritory of what is flagrant, what
is working the margins of the
rule book and what is a simple
mistake.
Hendrick Motorsports is
using that defense following
this latest infraction, with
team owner Rick Hendrick
contending his crew chiefs
were working within a "gray
area" of the rule book.
"I don't necessarily say they
bent the rules - I think they
thought they were working
inside an area in which they
could," Hendrick said. "It's
going to be tough, as we go for-
ward, on what's intentional
and what's accidental and
how they handle it, so you're
definitely going to have to
show up with these things
measured up."
Here's the issue the
Hendrick guys aren't under-
standing: There is no "gray
area" anymore.
NASCAR is pretty serious
about its new Car of
Tomorrow, and has made it
clear it won't tolerate any
alterations in its design. In
fact, series officials distrib-
uted a memo before the car
debuted in March that out-
lined the penalties teams
would be subjected to if they
were caught messing with the
COT.
So it was no surprise to any-
one, Hendrick teams includ-
ed, when Dale Earnhardt Jr.
was docked 100 points and
crew chief Tony Eury Jr. was
suspended six weeks and
fined $100,000 when their
COT failed a May inspection.
The Hendrick teams most
likely will get the same pun-
ishment - although some
argue Knaus' past infractions
should warrant a much stiffer
penalty because anything
short of what Earnhardt and
Eury received would seem
unfair.
Problem is, it's probably not
enough to even dent the
Hendrick juggernaut.


Even after a 100-point
penalty, Gordon would still be
leading the Nextel Cup stand-
ings by 171 points. Johnson
would drop from third to fifth.
The monetary fines are irrele-
vant, and Hendrick proved
last year it can overcome the
absence of a crew chief when
Johnson won twice during
Knaus' four-race suspension.
And, don't think for a
minute that Knaus and
Letarte won't spend their free
weekends back at the
Hendrick compound making
sure their program is locked
and loaded for when the
Chase for the championship
begins in September.
What kind of message
would it send if Knaus and
Letarte, who have combined
to win eight races this season,
return after a suspension
more dominant than they
already are?
If NASCAR is serious about
taking a stand, and chairman
Brian France said Sunday
officials "have to lay down the
law," then it's time to suspend
the driver.
The driver is the most high-
profile member of the team,
and if he's at risk for going
home, chances are he'd keep
a very close eye on those
charged with building his car.
And the fans don't care if
Knaus or Eury or any other
crew chief isn't on top of the
pit, box come race day. But
they certainly wouldn't be
pleased if Earnhardt, Johnson
and Gordon weren't on the
track.
NASCAR believes suspend-
ing drivers punishes the fans.
Even better, because it would
create more pressure on the
driver to keep his team from
breaking the rules.
There's no gray anymore,
not according to NASCAR,
which insists it's all black and
white these days. But that mes-
sage will never be delivered
until NASCAR proves it with a
penalty system that officially
frightens its competitors.


Associated Press
Serena Williams returns a shot on her way to defeating Spain's
Lourdes Dominguez-Lino, during their Women's Singles, first round
match on Monday at Wimbledon.


championship at the All
England Club, but there were
moments when things didn't
look so good for them Monday.
Williams double-faulted six
times, made 20 unforced errors
and got broken at 4-4, allowing
the 57th-ranked Lourdes
Dominguez Lino to serve for
the first set. But Williams broke
right back to start an eight-
game run for a 7-5, 6-0 victory.
Afterward, Williams' father
said she's injured and should-
n't be playing at all. She
acknowledged she has a tight
hamstring and said, "I did feel
a little limited," but added:
"It's gotten better since I've
been getting treatment on it"
Hingis, back after missing 1V/2
months with hip and back
injuries, was in far more trou-
ble against 18-year-old Naomi
Cavaday of Britain, facing two
match points at 5-4 in the sec-
ond set But Cavaday wasted the
first by dumping a return into
the net, and Hingis saved the
second with a forehand winner.
And that was it: Hingis took that
game, followed by the next


eight, and won 6-7 (1), 7-5, 6-0.
"I found it tough mentally,
because she does come back at
you and back at you and back at
you," the 232nd-ranked
Cavaday said. "It's relentless."
The same might be said of
Federer, who compiled an
impressive ratio of 33 winners
to 13 unforced errors and hit
nine aces, some that kicked up
puffs of white chalk as they
kissed lines. He mixed in the
occasional serve-and-volley,
saved the only break point he
faced, and generally reduced
Gabashvili to a frustrated foil
who muttered at himself after
some lost points, stomped his
sneakers and rolled his eyes
after others.
To hear Federer tell it,
though, the task was tougher
than it appeared.
"He also played a decent
match," said Federer, aiming
for an 11th Grand Slam title,
which would move him three
away from Pete Sampras'
career record. "I had to come
up with some shots once in a
while."


S9ptoTurs


(












4B


'' :.. *".


TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Aguilera looking for
acting debut
SHANGHAI, China -
Christina Aguilera says she's
reading scripts in search of
the right role to launch an act-
ing career
"I am looking forward to
moving into another form of
what I feel is
e another cre-
. ative outlet
for me and
that would be
acting," the
26-year-old
singer told
reporters
Christina Monday in
Aguilera Shanghai,
where she
was to hold her first mainland
China concert
Aguilera said she was tak-
ing her time reading and
understanding the film indus-
try.
"It is something that, when
I attempt to do it, I want to do
it right so it's important for
me that I do choose the right
first role for myself," said
Aguilera.

Sizemore gets 16
months in prison
LOS ANGELES - Tom
Sizemore was sentenced
Monday to 16 months in
prison for violating his proba-
tion in a drug
case.
Superior
S ..- Court Judge
CynthiaRa-
yvis ordered
the sentence
after authori-
ties said they
found metha-
Tom mphetamine
Sizemore in the actor's
car on May 8
in Bakersfield.
Sizemore, 45, was on proba-
tion for a previous drug con-
viction.

Victoria Beckham
wins libel damages
LONDON - Victoria
Beckham accepted undis-
closed damages Monday
from a celebrity magazine
that claimed the crew of her
U.S. TV show considered
her "picky, demanding and
rude."
The former
Spice Girl
sued Star
magazine
over an April
article that
claimed staff
working on
the NBC
Victoria show had
Beckham also
described
her as "full of herself and
not very nice."
Beckham's lawyer,
Gerrard Tyrrell, told
Britain's High Court that
filming hadn't started at the
time the story was pub-
lished.
Beckham wasn't in court
for.Monday's hearing.

Diaz apologizes for
offensive bag
LIMA, Peru - Cameron
Diaz apologized Sunday for
carrying a bag with a politi-
cal slogan that evoked
painful memories in Peru.
The voice
of Princess
Fiona in the
animated
"Shrek" films
Visited the
Incan city of
Machu
Picchu in
Cameron Peru's Andes
Diaz on Friday
carrying an
olive green bag emblazoned
with a red star and the
words "Serve the People"
printed in Chinese, perhaps
Chinese Communist leader
Mao Zedong's most famous
political slogan.
The bags are marketed as
fashion accessories in some
world capitals, but in Peru
the slogan evokes memories


of the Maoist Shining Path
insurgency that fought the
government in the 1980s and
early 1990s in a bloody con-
flict that left nearly 70,000
people dead.

- From wire reports


'Harry Potter' takes a dark turn


Associated Press

LONDON - Storm clouds are gathering
over the world's most famous wizard in
"Harry Potter and the Order of the
Phoenix." the fifth film to be adapted from
J.K Rowling's magical saga.
Daniel Radcliffe's teenage Harry has
acquired stubble on his chin and angst in his
soul, facing a sense of isolation, a showdown
with his evil nemesis, Lord Voldemort and -
just as scary - his first screen kiss.
"He is very troubled," Radcliffe, 17, told
The Associated Press recently, a few weeks
ahead of the film's opening. "He's troubled
by the fact that he doesn't think anybody is
believing in him, his friends don't-seem to
understand him... He lets that out in various
ways. He lashes out"
"Order of the Phoenix," which opens in
the United States July 11 and Britain the
next day, is directed by David Yates, a Briton
best known for the multilayered TV thrillers
"State of Play" and "Sex Traffic."
Yates brings a touch of grittiness to
Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and
Wizardry, which as the film opens is under-
going a creeping takeover by the bureau-
cratic Ministry of Magic and its emissary, the
deceptively rosy Defense Against the Dark
Arts teacher Dolores Umbridge (Imelda
Staunton).
That, combined with nightmares that link
Harry ever more closely to the dastardly
Voldemort, bring a sense of impending doom
to the wizarding world as Rowling's saga
takes a turn for the darker
Yates said his goal was "to introduce a
real sense of emotional and spiritual angst
and danger. The series is ready for that"
"I wanted to push (the actors) - and
they really wanted to push themselves," he
added.
The actors, in turn, say they loved the
challenge.
"David got us at a time when we were
ready to be pushed, we all knew that, and


Actor Daniel Radcliffe, right, actor Rupert Grint, left, and actress Emma Watson pose
Friday during a media Introduction of the new Harry Potter film "Harry Potter and the Order
of the Phoenix" in London, England.
he knew it and he was damn well going to kiss with fellow student Cho Chang (Katie
push us," Radcliffe said. "I couldn't thank Leung) that will likely attract attention
him enough for that." from moviegoers.
The result, Radcliffe says, is a more Radcliffe - who earlier this year
mature and complex Harry Potter - a appeared nude onstage in the play
hero with magic powers but human frail- "Equus" in London's West End - admitted
ties. to some trepidation about the kiss.
"It's nice to know that he's real and he "I was a bit nervous about doing it
experiences real anger and rage and frus- because I've known the crew and every-
tration and loneliness," Radcliffe said. one for so long," he said. "It was a little bit
"That's what makes him a proper hero as strange. But it was Katie, and we were
opposed to the Superman perfect-at- both very professional about it
everything sort of hero. Harry's a genuine "This isn't a particularly sexy or exciting
hero because he's flawed." kiss - it'svery sweet and very clumsy, like
Apart from the angst, it's Harry's first all first kisses are."


The Washington Post

In "A Mighty Heart," we've got
Angelina Jolie, American, pale
of skin and plump of lip, playing
the part of the real-life Mariane
Pearl, a French-born, brown-
skinned, kinky-curly-haired
woman of Afro-Cuban and
Dutch heritage. Ponder the soci-
etal implications of Jolie sport-
ing a spray tan and a corkscrew
wig. Is this the latest entry in the
American canon of blackface,
21st-century style?
Or does Jolie's color-bending
turn as the wife of slain journal-
ist Daniel Pearl herald a sea
change in our racial conscious-
ness? Is it a signal that, kumbaya,
we really are the world,
Hollywood truly is colorblind,
may the best actress win? Does it
matter if a visibly white actress
plays a historical figure of (par-
tial) African descent? If so, does
it matter that Halle Berry is slat-
ed to play a real-life white politi-
cian?
In the blogosphere, photos
and video clips of Jolie as Pearl
serve as a sort of racial
Rorschach test There are those
who use the B-word -blackface
- in decrying Jolie's casting as
the height of racial insensitivity.


"It irks me to see (Jolie) in
the makeup and the hair," says
Lauren Williams, who wrote
about the controversy in her
blog, Stereohyped.com. "Every
fall, you hear about how on
some college campus, white
kids are having a pimps-and-
hos party and painting their
faces. People are ignoring that
this is a very painful part of
America's past."
But others argue that the


Prime-time


puberty

Trying to keep kids just

kids no smallU featfor

young stars

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Tyler James Williams
is at work on the set of "Everybody Hates
Chris." He's between takes, resting his head
on a classroom desk, as the crew hustles to
prepare the next shot
This would be like any other day for any
other TV show. Except that it's the summer
hiatus season and the soundstages of most
every other broadcast series are completely
dark
But those shows don't star a 14-year-old
boy who is getting taller - and whose voice
is growing deeper - by the day.
So instead of lazy afternoons on the beach
or hanging out at the mall, everybody on
"Chris" is filling their summer trying to lock
in the third season of the CW comedy before
Williams hits puberty.
"I know... This is all my fault All my fault,"
says Williams during a break
If this were a scene from the show now
would be the point where Williams would
look into the camera and the voice-over cho-
rus would sing, "Every-body ha-ya-tes Chr-i-
i-i-s."


Jolie naysayers are practicing
reverse racism. Said a contrib-
utor on TheZeroBoss.com:
"Mariane Pearl is mostly white
... what are you practicing here,
the one drop rule?"
The debate is cast against
the backdrop of the United
States' troubled legacy of min-
strel shows, in which white
actors slapped on burnt cork or
shoe polish, the better to mock
African Americans. Film stars


Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and
Eddie Cantor performed in
blackface, as did actors in D.W
Griffith's "Birth of a Nation,"
using greasepaint and murder-
ous stereotypes to reinforce
America's worst fears about
black men.
White actors including
Mickey Rooney, Katharine
Hepburn and Shirley
MacLaine have donned the
brown-, red- and yellow-face,
too, playing Native Americans,
Latinos and Asians, usually to
stereotypical effect. Then con-
sider that Forest Whitaker
darkened his skin to play
Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in
"The Last King of Scotland,"
and the issue gets complicated:
Does that count as blackface,
or is it akin to Nicole Kidman's
donning a prosthetic nose to
play Virginia Woolf in "The
Hours"?
"Ultimately I believe this is
about acting and finding the
right person for the role,
regardless 'of color," says
Charles Michael Byrd, a mul-
tiracial rights, activist and
author of "The Bhagavad-gita
in Black and White: From
Mulatto Pride to Krishna
Consciousness."


SMAssuciateu rires
Tyler James Williams, left, who plays the role of Chris in the TV series "Everybody Hates
Chris," and co-star Vincent Martella, rehearse Monday onthe comedy show's set at
Paramount Studios in Los Angeles.
But in reality, that wouldn't be quite fair. tor" by adding 3-year-old Raven-Symone
Williams isn't the only one in the cast to the cast
who's showing signs of aging. "Malcolm in the Middle" went through
Co-stars Vincent Martella (who plays its awkward stage early. It was an instant
Chris's best friend, Greg) and Tequan hit for Fox when it premiered in January
Richmond (Chris's younger brother, 2000. However, its 14-year-old star, Frankie
Drew), both 14, are also going through Muniz, who was 13 when he shot the first
changes. And the French-tip manicure season as an 11-year-old whiz kid, had
that Imani Hakim (little sister Tanya) is grown eight inches and his voice had
wearing isn't the only sign of the 13-year- dropped at least an octave before the show
old's maturity. came back for a second season that fall.
Trying to keep kids just kids has been no But these are challenges that "are the
small feat for other series, too. same challenges with any actor, to keep
As the adorable youngest daughter on them engaged, to keep them focused, to
"The Cosby Show," Keshia Knight Pulliam keep them interested," says Tom Lynch,
moved into her 'tween years in 1989, when who has produced numerous kid-centric
the series was showing a slide in the rat- series, including the N's "South of
ings. Producers opted to up the "cute fac- Nowhere."


. WhL�


Actor Sean Hayes is 37. Actor
Chris O'Donnell is 37. Actress
Rebecca Budig is 34. Country
singer Gretchen Wilson is 33.
Actor-musician Jason
Schwartzman is 27.
Thought for Today: "One is
easily fooled by that which one
loves." - Moliere, French actor-
playwright (1622-1673).


'Mighty Heart' casting causes debate


Associated Press
In this photo released by Paramount Vantage actress Angelina
Jolie appears as Mariane Pearl in a scene from Michael
Winterbottom's film, "A Mighty Heart."


Florida
LOTTERIES
T Here are the
winning numbers
selected Monday in
the Florida
nRousd,L Lottery:
CASH 3
3-5-9
PLAY 4
5-4-4-0
FANTASY 5
5-10-11-27-33
SUNDAY, JUNE 24
Cash 3:9 - 0 - 3
Play 4:7 - 2 - 5 - 9
Fantasy 5: 8 - 12 - 13-16 - 31
5-of-5 winner $186,546.53
4-of-5 235 $128
3-of-5 8,483 $9.50
SATURDAY, JUNE 23
Cash 3: 3-6-5
Play 4:8 - 9 - 1 - 9
Lotto: 4-8-21 -22 -44-49
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 68 $5,096.50
4-of-6 4,472 $63
3-of-6 88,635 . $4.50
Fantasy 5:12 - 21 - 24- 26 - 28
5-of-5 No winners
4-of-5 388 $792
3-of-5 11,982 $9.50
FRIDAY, JUNE 22
Cash 3: 6- 9- 9
Play 4: 1- 4- 3- 2
Mega Money: 16 - 18 - 23 - 43
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 7 $1,309.50


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
: To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.corn; by telephone, call (850)
487.-7777.



Today in
HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, June 26, the
177th day of 2007. There are 188
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 26, 1963, President
Kennedy visited West Berlin,
where he made his famous decla-
ration: "Ich bin ein Berliner" (I am a
Berliner).
On this date:
In 1870, the first section of the
boardwalk at Atlantic City, N.J.,
was opened to the public.
In 1925, Charlie Chaplin's clas-
sic comedy 'The Gold Rush" pre-
miered at Grauman's Egyptian
Theatre in Hollywood, Calif.
In 1950, President Truman
authorized the Air Force and Navy
to enter the Korean conflict.
In 1973, former White House
counsel John W. Dean told the
Senate Watergate Committee
about an "enemies list" kept by the
Nixon White House.
In 1987, Supreme Court Justice
Lewis F. Powell Jr. announced his
retirement, leaving a vacancy that
was filled by Anthony M. Kennedy.
Ten years ago: In a series of
decisions, the Supreme Court
ruled that terminally ill Americans
had no constitutional right to doc-
tor-assisted suicide, but did noth-
ing to bar states from legalizing the
process.
Five years ago: The 9th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that
reciting the Pledge of Allegiance in
public schools was unconstitution-
al because the words "under God"
had been inserted by Congress in
1954.
One year ago: President Bush
said it was "disgraceful" that news-
papers had disclosed a secret
CIA-Treasury program to track mil-
lions of financial records in search
of terrorist suspects.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Eleanor Parker is 85. Jazz musi-
cian-film composer Dave Grusin is
73. Actor Josef Sommer is 73.
Singer Billy Davis Jr. (The Fifth
Dimension) is 67. Rock singer
Georgie Fame is 64. Actor Clive
Francis is 61. Actor Robert Davi is
53. Singer-musician Mick Jones is
52. Actor Gedde Watanabe is 52.
Rock singer Chris Isaak is 51.
Rock singer Patty Smyth is 50.
Rock musician Colin Greenwood
(Radiohead) is 38. Writer-director
Paul Thomas Anderson is 37.











C
TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


oer


al


attack


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Joe Warner, diagnosed eight years ago with myasthenla gravis, keeps it under control with medication. Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune neu-
romuscular disease. The main symptom is weakness of the voluntary (skeletal) muscles. June is myasthenia gravis awareness month.


Myasthenia gravis symptoms can be tough to diagnose as


Joy GALLON
For the Chronicle
I t came on without warning.
That weekend in 1999, 66-
year-old Joe Warner was in
Webster, setting up his table
to sell antiques at the flea
market.
'"All of a sudden," he says,
"I couldn't talk. My jaw would work
up and down, but my tongue and
my lips would not work; I had no
strength. When I opened my mouth,
out came baby talk" He immedi-
ately packed up his goods and
returned home, to Crystal River.
A few days later, he went to see
his regular doctor. "He thought I'd
had a mini-stroke," says Warner,
"because it wasn't that bad that
morning. But by the afternoon I
couldn't even suck water through a
straw. That is what tricked me; it
was better in the morning and
worse as the day wore on. I went to
five doctors before I found out
what was wrong."
An emergency room doctor diag-
nosed Warner with an allergy, and
gave him pills that made the condi-
tion worse. Warner said he went to
an ENT (ear, nose and throat) doc-


body


FACTS ABOUT MYASTHENIA GRAVIS
* June is Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Month. "Mya.therni grav;is"
comes from the Greek and Latin words meaning "grave mus:'cular
weakness."
I MG is not contagious or inherited, and occurs in all races, genders
and ages.
0 Although estimates show as many as 60,000 cases in the United
States, it is probably under-diagnosed.
* Common symptoms of myasthenia gravis (MG) can include:


* A drooping eyelid.
* Blurred or double vision.
* Slurred speech.


* Weakness in the arms and legs.
* Chronic muscle fatigue.
* Difficulty breathing.


* Difficulty chewing and swallowing.
Source: Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America Inc.


tor who, after three visits, told him,
"the only thing I can find wrong
with you is that you can't talk
plain." However, this doctor did
refer Warner to a neurologist. That
neurologist immediately recog-
nized the symptoms of myasthenia
gravis (MG).
Myasthenia gravis is a chronic
autoimmune neuromuscular dis-
ease. The main symptom is weak-
ness of the voluntary (skeletal)
muscles. Muscle weakness increas-
es during periods of activity and


Hearing loss has many causes
Hearing loss is any alteration of activities, including loud music, noisy
hearing capacity. Hearing loss events, shooting of guns, rather than
can be of various degrees, genetic make-up. Treatment varies due
It can be mild, moderate, severe, pro- to severity and underlying causes. It is
found or total. Hearing loss best treated with hearing
can be classified as either F aids. Medications including
conductive, sensorineural, or steroids can be used in lim-
mixed hearing loss. ited cases. The surgical
Conductive hearing loss implanting of sophisticated
can be characterized by the ' hearing devices is used in
loss of sound conduction to some cases of
the inner ear (cochlea). This . profound/total hearing loss.
means that there could be a Nerve deafness can
blockage in the ear canal, . include problems with vol-
such as wax or fluid behind D . ume of sound as well as
the eardrum (many children Dr. Denis Grillo clarity of what one hears. A
have this problem but it can EAR, NOSE typical example would be a
affect adults, too) or the & THROAT 7 couple having dinner in a
eardrum and/or the ear noisy restaurant and having
bones are not working prop- difficulty understanding
early It can be either temporary or per- what each other is saying.
manent and is treatable with medica- Similar-sounding words can easily
tion and/or surgery. become confused, such as "show" for
Sensorineural hearing loss (nerve "snow" or "go." It may seem like a triv-
deafness) is a loss of hearing sensitivity, ial matter but when dealing with
usually more in the high frequencies important issues it is to everyone's ben-
(pitches) than the lower frequencies. efit to hear the details clearly
Sensorineural hearing loss usually Mixed hearing loss is any combina-
affects the ability to understand con- tion of the above. More than 28 million
versations, especially in difficult listen- Americans suffer from some degree of
ing situations. hearing loss. More than 12 million peo-
It usually affects men more than
women, and may be due to job noise or Please see GRILLO/Page 4C


improves after periods of rest,
causing the symptoms to improve
in the morning and worsen in the
afternoon. Patients can also suffer
a medical emergency called "myas-
thenic crisis" in which the muscles
that control breathing are so weak-
ened that a respirator is needed.
MG is caused by a lack of acetyl-
choline receptors at the junction
between the nerve ending and the
muscle. Acetylcholine is a sub-
stance necessary to make the con-
nection between the nerve and the


battles it own tissues
muscle so that the nerve impulse
will travel down the nerve and into
the muscle, making it contract
Acetylcholine is produced by the
nerve ending and moves to recep-
tors on the muscle. With MG, the
body has blocked, altered or
destroyed up to 80 percent of the
receptors for acetylcholine at the
neuromuscular junction. Because
the immune system has attacked its
own body, MG is called an "autoim-
mune disease." "Chronic" means
"recurring" or "constant."
Dr. Meena Stanley, an Inverness
neurologist, sees two or three
patients a year who have MG.
"Usually, they come in with droopi-
ness of the eye," Stanley says, "and
problems with swallowing and
chewing. MG is often difficult to
diagnose. The symptoms can some-
times come with subtlety and may
not be that obvious to the primary
care physician. If it is very subtle,
you might need the help of a neu-
rologist, and a neurologist has a
better chance of making a diagno-
sis."
There are several tests for the
presence of MG.
Please see INTERNAL/Page 4C


Dan learns more

about wise food choices


Editor's note: This is part of a weekly
series of condensed excerpts from Dr.
Dodge's new book, "Dan's Story: One
Man's Discovery of Personal Health
Power."
The book is about a fic-
tional character whose
lifestyle and medical prob-
lems typify those of
America's health and its
health care system.
D an is learning about
his nutritional
options from Mrs.
Hartwell, his nutritional Dr. Ed
advisor. At the end of last
week's installment, she fec- 'DA
ommended two good books STO
on nutrition.
After quickly glancing at
the books, Dan asked, "What do these
books say about meat and protein in the
diet? I really enjoy my meat."
"That's a fair question," replied Carol
Hartwell. "Both books make the point
that meat is a good source of protein,
but that the subject is more complex
than most people realize. Here are
some key points to keep in mind.


"One hundred years ago, many
Americans did not get enough protein
in their diet Today, the opposite is true,
but the meat industry still pushes the
idea that you must eat lots of
meat to be sure you get ade-
quate protein.
"The problem with this is
that we know meat carries
some serious disadvantages.
Dr. Willett says in his book,
'What matters is the protein
package.' Beef is a good
source of complete protein,
Dodge but the beef package is also
a major source of saturated
N'S fat"
RY' Carol Hartwell paused to
ask Dan, "What do you know
about fat?"
"I guess fat is bad for you," he
replied.
"Some fat is bad for health, but some
kinds of fat are good for us, " said Carol.
"The problem is that saturated fat,
which comes mainly from animal and
dairy sources, is indeed bad for health.
Please see DODGE/Page 4C


Being


free of


smoke
Editor's note: This is the
first of a two-part series
about giving up smoking.
very day, I encourage
patients to stop smok-
ing. Quitting is not
easy, but it can be done. To
have the best chance of quit-
ting successfully, you need to
know what you're up
against, what your options
are, and where to go for
help. Over the next few
weeks, I hope to provide
information that will help
those of you wanting to quit
achieve success.
Mark Twain said, "Quit-
ting smoking is easy. I've
done it a thousand times."
Maybe you've tried to quit
too. Why is quitting and stay-
ing quit hard for so many
people? The answer is nico-
tine.
Nicotine is a drug found
naturally in tobacco. It is
highly addictive, as addic-
tive as heroin or cocaine.
Over time, the body becomes
both physically and psycho-
Please see BENNETT/Page 4C


. Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE



Advance


in rare


cancer
I recently saw a 45-year-
old white female
patient She had abdom-
inal pain and nausea, so she
saw her physician. The
patient was referred for
upper endoscopy (passing a
lighted tube into the stom-
ach under sedation to exam-
ine stomach and food pipe).
It showed a large stomach
mass. She underwent sur-
gery to remove it It was a
gastrointestinal stromal
tumor (GIST).
GISTs are tumors that
occur in the digestive tract
(GI). Ninety-five percent of
them are found in the stom-
ach or small intestine. These
are rare tumors that differ
from other types of tumors
because of the type of tissues
in which they start and their
prognosis (chance of recov-
ery).
GIST starts from cells in
the walls of the digestive
tract. GISTs belong to a
group of cancers called soft
tissue sarcomas. Sarcomas
occur in connective tissues
such as muscle, fat, nerves,
blood vessels, cartilage and
bone.
Every year, about 5,000
cases of GIST are diagnosed
in the United States. It is
associated with genetic
abnormality in a gene called
Please see GANDHI/Page 4C


I


........... . ....... ....


]

f









ACAIIII& I FEDAR U S OUNTY(FL)CRONC I/


It takes a village to raise a dancer


Every summer, I take my competitive
dance students to a dance convention in
July called Dance Caravan. The four-day
convention has classes from fantastic instruc-
tors during the day and competition at night It
is one of the oldest programs around, as my
mother went to their convention as a child, and
I went growing up as well.
Anyway, the convention travels
throughout the summer to seven dif-
ferent cities with world-class dance
teachers. For example, one of my ;
teachers when I went as a student
was a very young Savion Glover
(Mumble the penguin's motion-cap-
ture dancer/choreographer in the
movie "Happy Feet").
They also bring with them Shalyn
"Caravan Kids." These are students
who attended their conventions from FU
last summer and passed a very tough PL
audition. They travel with these
teachers, help in the classrooms, and perform in
the faculty show on the last night in every city.
And it just so happens that one of my students
made it last summer.
When I was 14, I made it - and the cost was
about $5,000 then. My mom, being a protective
single parent didn't think I was ready to go.
When I started teaching and realized that they
still had the program, I knew if one of my stu-
dents made it and was old enough, I wanted to
help them go.
So LaTisha Howell (who is my student) got the
audition last summer- and then we got the bill
in the mail: $7,000! Of course, this covers travel,
lodging, classes and costumes for six weeks, but
that was a lot of money. I knew that her mother
(a retired disabled military veteran and a single
mother of three) couldn't afford the bill. So we
began to fundraise last August - and fundraise
and fundraise.
Her mother began to pay little by little on the
bill and Miss Vicky and I began a checking
account for money she would need for food and
spending.
We sent off a video of her dancing to the


I]


Dance Caravan office - they said they would
pick a few scholarships, but not until April.
Anyway, April came and went, and we heard
nothing of a scholarship for LaTisha. Her moth-
er had only paid half of the trip so far. There was
no way she could come up with the rest of the
money for the May deadline. I called the Dance
Caravan office to ask if there was
anything we could do.
The lady on the phone told me they
hadn't picked any scholarships yet
and the best thing we could do was
write a letter.
So that's what we did.
I (as well as a few parents from my
studio) wrote letters. We told them
about LaTisha's financial situation,
Barker about what a great dancer she was,
and how genuinely nice she was -
LL she's that kind of teenager who is too
WTE nice and you wonder "Is this chick
for real?"
A few weeks passed, and Dance Caravan
called the studio. LaTisha had gotten a scholar-
ship! We all cried with excitement and gave a
sigh of relief.
Last Saturday she left - and we all cried
again. We are all just so proud of her. Many of
my studio parents helped her raise money, get
her ready, and buy her plane ticket to the first
destination. It does take a village to raise a
child.
She will start in Anaheim, Calif., then travel to
Las Vegas; Cincinnati, Ohio; Myrtle Beach, S.C.;
Pigeon Forge, Tenn.; New York City; and finally
to Orlando, where she will meet us for our annu-
al summer convention. What a homecoming
party it will be!
For more information about Dance Caravan,
visit www.hoctordance.com.
-m -

Shalyn Barker resides with her husband,
Patrick, and daughter, Emmy, in the Beverly
Hills area. All three are lifelong residents of
Citrus County. She can be reached at
citrusamom@yahoo.com.


Sores at corners of mouth


could be fungal infection


Q My husband is 64 years old and was
* told about 13 years ago that growths in
* the corners of his mouth were a pre-
cancer. You should also know that he wears den-
tures.
Here it is 13 years later, and the
sores are still there - and he is a
pipe smoker, to boot. I convinced him -
to go to the skin doctor, who said it
was nothing to worry about and pro-
ceeded to tell him about a number of
growths on the rest of his body
They also prescribed some sort of
ointment for his mouth that he is to
use. Can you offer us any insight?
Thanks. Dr. Frank
A The first thing that comes to SOL
mind when I hear sores in the cor- BIT
ners of the mouth of a denture wear-
er is a type of fungal infection.
There are many times that the distance
between the nose and chin of a denture wearer
is not enough, which can lead to a folding of the
tissue in the corners of the mouth. This, com-
bined with the moist environment that is there,
can lead to a fungal infection.
The treatment of choice for such an infection
is the application of an antifungal ointment
With your husband's history of a pre-malignant
growth in the past, I would probably first try a
course of antifungal medication and, if there is
no resolution, have the area biopsied.
I , hope this information is helpful.
Incidentally, making a new set of dentures can
help with the loss of height in the face and prob-
ably help with a fungal infection, if one is pres-
ent.
Since the topic of loss of height has come up,
let's talk about it for a while. Some of the prob-
lems that you can see with old dentures are as
follows:
1. Poor fit due to a change in the bone and tis-
sue that supports the denture.


I


IJ
ri


2. Improper alignment of the teeth and there-
fore an improper jaw position.
3. Wear of the teeth over years of use.
4. Poor cosmetics due to facial changes and no
change in the denture.
5. Deterioration of the denture
materials due to the types of materi-
als used in the past and the length of
time they have been in use. :
There are many solutions for the
above situations. I would encou-rag
you to talk these over with your deft-
tist He or she can offer you some sug-
gestions that are specific to your cir-
Vni-,ini cumstances.


vcsa m n!
SND When there is a loss of height to the
face because of dentures, there is
_ES usually a progression of the chiA
upward and out It is the outward
movement that I will talk about for a while.
When the chin moves out, it is taking the jaw
with it and, as a result, there is a migration of
the jaw joint out of its socket (which is in the
skull). This can lead to problems with the joiqir
and pain upon chewing.
In addition, the appearance while at rest, 4s
well as while chewing, is impaired. This cat
usually be helped with a new set of dentures
built to the proper jaw position.
This is easier said than done, and should only
be done by a dentist who is comfortable with tlX
principles that apply, r.
When accomplished properly, you can end up
with a result that not only looks considerably
better, but functions better as well. \'!
3
Dr. Frank Vascimini is a Homosassa dentist n
Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa 34446 or e-mail them to him at a
info@masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


Health NOTES


0 BROOKSVILLE - "New
Perspectives in Open Heart
Surgery" seminar by Ravi Sharma,
M.D., from 3:30 to 5 p.m. today in
the fourth floor classroom of Her-
nando Medical Center, adjacent to
Oak Hill Hospital at entrance C,
11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville.
Seating is limited and reservations
are advised. Call 628-6060 in Cit-
rus or (352) 597-6333 in Hemando.
* Free seminar, "Natural Food
and Nutrition to Support Healthy
Bowel Function," by Dr. McFarland-
Bryant from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. to-
day at Better Health Chiropractic,
6166 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
.Crystal River.
* Look Good ... Feel Better, for
women undergoing radiation or
chemotherapy, will be at 3 p.m.
Wednesday at the Robert Boisson-
'eault Oncology Institute. Call the
American Cancer Society at (800)
395-LOOK (5665) for a reserva-
tion.
* BROOKSVILLE - Florida
Cancer Institute to host the
American Cancer Society's Look
Good ... Feel Better from 3 to 5
p.m. Thursday. Free. Call Mary
Capo at (352) 596-1926, ext. 150.
* Diabetes classes are offered
from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Health Department
in Lecanto. Classes are free. No
registration is required.
* 0 More about meal plans,
Monday.
* Medications and monitoring,
July 9.
* Sick days, July 16.
* Avoiding complications, July
23.
Fasting blood sugars are offered
from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday through
Friday in all three Citrus County
Health Department sites. There is
a $10 fee for this service. No
appointment is necessary. Every
Monday before the Lecanto class,
anyone who would like to have a
blood sugar test should come fast-
ing.


For information, call Lynece
Hand, R.N., 795-6233, ext. 240 or
Carol Burke, R.D., 726-5222.
* Free spinal scan and facility
tour, utilizing the Pro-Adjuster, lat-
est technology in chiropractic care.
Dr. Russell Lewandowski, wellness
advisor, 3348 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness. Call Barbara
at 726-0888. Visit www.proad-
justerbyrussellchiro.com.
* Free movie and popcorn
night featuring The Secret, by
Rhonda Byrne, at 7 p.m. Friday at
The Russell Chiropractic and
Wellness Center, 3348 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness. Seating
is limited. RSVP by June 26. Call,
Barbara at 726-0888.
* Free seminar, "Outsmarting
Osteoporosis," by Dr. McFarland-
Bryant from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 3, at Better Health
Chiropractic, 6166 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
* Free vision, cataract and
glaucoma screening Wednesday,
July 11, at Crystal Eye Center on
U.S. 19 South, Crystal River. Call
795-0212.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center's Web site is
www.srrmc.com.
* American Cancer Society's
"Road to Recovery" program
needs volunteer drivers. Call Cindi
Crisci, area patient services repre-
sentative at the American Cancer
Society, at (727) 812-7028.
* The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Wanderers
Identification Program provides
an identifying bracelet or pendant
with a code number and direct tele-
phone number to the participating
sheriff's office. Call toll free at
(888) 496-8004.
* The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Respite
Assistance Program is available
to all residents of Citrus, Pasco,
Hernando, Sumter and Lake coun-
ties caring for an individual with
dementia or Alzheimqr's disease.


Call (727) 848-8888 or toll free at
(888) 496-8004.
* Citrus County Community
Support Services and Catholic
Charities offers a Respite Care
Program for people with early
onset Alzheimer's disease or other
dementia-related illnesses, from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Our Lady of Grace Church, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Bobbie J. Sharp at 527-5940,
Citrus County Community Support
Services.
* The Doctor Ride program
helps with medical appointment
transportation in Citrus County for
those age 65 and older. Three or
four days' notice is required, and
only one ride per week is available.
To volunteer or ride, call John at
746-3796.


709710
Sot for you..


then for your grandchildren.

Health... there's nothing more important. It's for your friends, your family, yourself - it's for life.
From wellness visits and cholesterol control to diabetic management and testing, our board certified
physician and his caring and friendly healthcare team is by your side every step of the way.


DIABETES & HYPERTENSION ARE OUR SPECIALTIES
Advanced Medication Management (including inhaled insulin) * Blood Sugar Testing
Insulin Pump Education/Management * Nerve & Circulation Testing
Diabetic Wound Care * EKGs * Free Glucose Checks & Glucometers for Active Patients





WEST COAST MEDICAL CARE


~E~iawbTawfik MD


Advanced Healthcare Techniques... Old Fashioned Values
WOUND Two Convenient Locations
CAER 3591 N. Lecanto Hwy.
NOW OPEN WVVinn Dixie Plaza
Beverly Hills


700 S.E. 5th
Crys
(352)5


Terrace, Suite 2
tal River
564-0444


* Skillbank's volunteer pool of
drivers will chauffeur residents of


Beverly Hills who need a ride to
the doctor, pharmacy or grocery
store. Residents get one trip a
week and should call several days
in advance: 746-5001 from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
* Telephone Friends service
confirms safety and imparts care
and concern, available at no cost.
Call Nature Coast Volunteer Center
at 527-5950 or e-mail ncvc
@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
* The Citrus County Health
Department (CCHD) has a toll-
free information line, (877) 746-
3248. The CCHD Web address is
www.citruscountyhealth.org and
the Community Resource number
is 211.
* The Beverly Hills Lions Club
Inc. has a loan closet for wheel-
chairs, walkers, canes, bath chairs,
etc. Call Lion Warren Adams, 746-
1984.
* The Center For Independent
Living of North Central Florida
(CILNCF) provides four core serv-
ices in: information and referral,
peer support, independent living
skills education and advocacy.
It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. at 3774 State Road 44,
across from Cowboy Junction.
* The Citrus County Health


Department offers child safety '
seat checks by appointment at th@
Inverness office, 120 N. Mont-
gomery Ave. Call Sue Littnan at o
726-1731, ext. 242. f
* Florida Elks Children's F
Therapy Services provides free in-q
home physical and occupational'
therapy to Florida children in need.
Applicants for consideration may
call Walt Mabie at Inverness Elks nT
Lodge 2522 in Hernando at 726- 1
2027 before noon Monday throughK
Friday, West Citrus Elks 2693 at '
628-1221 or the Florida program 2
administrator toll free at (800) 523Y'
1673. i
* Citrus County Health Depart-
ment offers birth control seWicei
to women of childbearing age. ,
These confidential services are
available at all health department '
locations from a female provider
who specializes in women's healtlht
Call the office nearest you: ,'
Inverness 726-1731; Crystal River
795-6233; Lecanto 527-0068. A
* Inverness Sports & Orthopedi,
Rehab Team (SPORT) offers free 0
screening, by appointment, for it
individuals with neck/back pain,
headaches, orthopedic injuries, ai


Please see NOTES/Page 3t
n


Adopt a dog











. . . ... .......




Special to the Chronicle
Brandy is dark fawn and white collared, chest and socks,
a purebred, neutered male boxer and is a "lovie-dovie." He
is only about 3 to 4 years old and was previously rescued
about a year ago, in a severely starving condition. Adopt A
Rescued Pet Inc, does a home visit prior to adopting. Call
Donna at 527-9050 or 795-9550, leave your name, num-
ber, pet's name, loudly and clearly, for a callback later.
Check www.adoptarescuedpet.com to see our pets, for
our adoption calendar with locations, dates and times.


--


OTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICII,


2C -]-[Ii,.qt-)AV IIINT-t 26. 2007


"F-Aimria Sk ILxFiE


Cori nie Davis, APOV 'I I I IN DATI I IN
A.,d(�YW
Imly N,, I �alxolwrlj I I' udi'm Speioru I








TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 3C


,QTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Many skin irritants can cause diaper rash


Q What can I do for
my baby's diaper
* rash?
SA: A rash in the diaper
area is not an unusual ,
problem in very young ,
'children and is usually not
serious. It is estimated that "
4wo-thirds of all infants
-bave symptoms of diaper
*yash at some time in their Richard H
infancy ASK"
The most common cause pHAM
Sf diaper rash is skin irri-
fation from contact with
iurine or feces in a soiled diaper. The
adin of an infant in the diaper area is
about one-half to one-third the thick-
ness of adult skin. Because this area is


typically enclosed by a dia-
per and has little exposure
to the outside air, it tends
to hold moisture and wet-
. ness, predisposing it to irri-
tation or infection.
Diarrhea is a common
-"' cause of uncomplicated
diaper rash, because feces
are even more irritating
[offmann than urine to the skin. It is
THE interesting that breast-fed
ACIST infants have less diaper
rash than bottle-fed
infants. This may be be-
cause the feces of breast-fed infants
are less irritating to the skin.
Tight-fitting diapers, plastic pants
over the diaper, baby wipes, soaps or


fabric softeners used to clean re-
usable diapers may also irritate ten-
der skin and cause diaper rash. The
best treatment for diaper rash is pre-
vention. However, it is impractical to
change diapers every time a child
defecates or urinates. Increasing the
number of daily diaper changes and
allowing the baby to sleep with an
open diaper can help clear a mild dia-
per rash more quickly.
Gently cleaning the skin with warm
water and mild soap if necessary after
each diaper change is preferred over
the use of disposable wipes, which
may contain irritants and perfumes.
Patting the area dry with a towel and
loosely fastening the diaper will also
help prevent moisture buildup.


Babies who wear cloth diapers and
plastic pants may benefit from a
switch to diaper liners, breathable
diaper covers, or disposable diapers
until the rash clears up or to prevent
future diaper rashes. In addition, the
use of a diaper rash medication with a
skin protectant can provide a mois-
ture barrier and help to protect skin
from irritants as the rash heals.
Some useful skin protectants in-
clude zinc oxide or petroleum jelly.
Many doctors do not recommend tal-
cum powder for babies, because it can
be inhaled into the baby's lungs. Ask
the pharmacist if you have any ques-
tions regarding diaper rash and to
recommend a nonprescription prod-
uct for its treatment.


Please read all product labeling
carefully before use. It should be
noted that diaper rashes caused by
bacteria, yeast, or allergic conditions
will not improve with simple changes
in diapering or with use of over-the-
counter skin protectants.
A doctor should be consulted if a
diaper rash doesn't begin to improve
within three days of treatment at
home; if the baby develops a fever; if
the rash has pimples, blisters or leads
to broken skin; or if it spreads beyond
the diaper area.

Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20 years.
Send questions to him at 1135 N.
Timucuan Trail, Inverness 34453.


NOTES
Continued from Page 2C

',arpal tunnel, tennis elbow, osteo-
porosis and general fitness. Call
41-3740.
* A+ Healthcare Home Health
Will be at the following locations to
offer free blood pressure screen-
Ing. Call Mary Pearsall at 564-
2700.
0' * East Citrus Community
'Center: 9 to 11 a.m. first Wed-
nesday monthly.
q. * Brentwood Health Center: 10
to 11 a.m. second Tuesday month-
ly.
* West Citrus Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. third Wed-
nesday monthly.
- * Inverness Community Center:
9 to 11 a.m. third Tuesday monthly.
* Free HIV testing is available
at the Citrus County Health
Department: Inverness, 726-1731;
Crystal River, 795-6233; Lecanto,
527-0068. Walk-ins accepted,
appointments preferred.
* Free hearing screenings
offered by All Children's Sertoma
Therapy Center from 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays by ap-
pointment only at 760 W. Hamp-
shire Blvd., Suite 9, Citrus Springs.
Call 746-3300.
* Telecommunication equip-
ment is available to any Florida
resident who has a hearing or
speech impairment. Call Citrus
Hearing Impaired Program
Services at 795-5000 (voice) or
795-7243 (TTY). Visit the Web site
at www.ftri.org.
* .SHINE (Serving Health
lpsurance:Needs ofElders) coun--
selors offer information and assis-
tance on Medicare (figuring out the
paperwork, bills and filing appeals),
Medicare Supplemental Insurance,
Medicare prescription drug cover-
age and long-term care planning.
For an appointment at Citrus
Memorial Health System's SHARE
Club from 9 a.m. to noon Monday,
call 344-6513, SHARE Club affilia-
tion is not required.
For appointments at other sites
throughout the county or informa-
tion, call the Elder Help Line at
k00) 262-2243 or leave your
name and telephone number with
4the Citrus County Senior Care
�Services at 527-5930. A SHINE
Counselor will return your call.
4 SHINE Walk-In Sites with no
,appointment necessary:
* Citrus County Resource
dCenter - noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
iand Thursdays - 2804 W. Marc
XiKnighton Court, Lecanto.
* Seven Rivers Regional
�Medical Center - 9 a.m. to noon
,the first and third Fridays monthly
L- check in at the volunteer desk in
the hospital lobby at 6201 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
i "Medically Speaking," a 30-
4minute health awareness program,
|airs at 5 p.m. Monday on WYKE
'TV, channel 16, hosted byApril
'Saxer, marketing director for
VGulfcoast Aquatic and
Rehabilitation.
S Professional counseling
services are available to individu-
als, couples, families and children
experiencing a broad rage of per-
.�xeinigabra ag fpr


sonal, relationship and family prob-
lems.Call Marty at Catholic
Charities at (800) 242-9012.
* Citrus Memorial Health
System has speakers. Mail
requests to Debi Shields in Public
Relations, Citrus Memorial hospital,
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness,
FL 34452, or call her at 344-6501.
* Diane White of Hero
Assistance Dogs is available as a
guest speaker. Call at 560-3785.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center maintains an active
group of speakers. Call Jennifer
Hall, community relations coordina-
tor, at 795-8344 or (352) 489-2022,
ext. 8344.
* LifeLink of Florida, the agency
which coordinates organ and tissue
donations for the Tampa Bay area,
has speakers available. Call
Jennifer Krouse at (800) 262-5775
or (813) 253-2640.
* The Citrus County Health
Department will provide speakers
to groups interested in health top-
ics. Call Judi Tear at 527-0068, ext.
271.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center offers a way to
send e-mail messages to loved
ones who have been admitted to
the hospital. Log onto
www.srrmc.com, and go to
Quickfind, or Patient and Visitor
Info. Choose Email a Patient, com-
plete the form and hit send.
* Senior Companion Program
volunteers serve 20 hours per
week, providing companionship,
respite care, escorted transporta-
tion and other services to clients
who are at risk of placement in
long-term care facilities.
Prospective SCP volunteers do
not need medical or technical
skills, just the ability to be a friend.
Call Sue Carscadden, SCP assis-
tant, at 527-5959.
* Barrier Free America as
advocates will work with persons
who have disabilities and the entity
involved in complying with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990 (ADA).
To file a grievance (the service is
free), call for an appointment at
628-5401. Barrier Free America is
at the Golden Eagle Plaza, 3269 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* Florida Alliance for
Assistive Services and
Technology (FAAST) will exhibit
and demonstrate adaptive and
assistive devices for people with
disabilities and the elderly. A
FAAST Demonstration Center is at
the Center for Independent Living's
Lecanto office. FAAST is at 3774
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461. The center is open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Call 527-8399.
* Agency for Persons with
Disabilities toll-free number is
(866) APD-CARES or (866) 273-
2273, staffed from 8 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday through Friday. The
agency currently serves more than
35,000 Floridians with the develop-
mental disabilities of mental retar-
dation, autism, cerebral palsy,
spina bifida and Prader-Willi syn-
drome. Visit www.apd.myflorida
.com.
* Yoga at the Historic Crystal
River Train Depot, 109 Crystal
Ave., is scheduled as follows:


Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a


New Office

in Citrus County


0 9 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m.
Wednesday.
* 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
* 9 to 10 a.m. Saturday.
Cost is $5 per class. Bring a mat
or towel and wear clothes that
allow for easy physical movement.
Classes are appropriate for 8 years
and older and are multi-level. All
certified instructors. Call 795-3710,
795-3662, 795-1645 or 563-6535.

Support GROUPS

* Alzheimer's Family Organi-
zation:


0 10 a.m. Thursday, June 28,
Woodland Terrace, 124 W. Norvell


Bryant Highway, Hernando. Call
Pam Pepitone at 249-3100.
* Pain Management Support
Group meeting at 3 p.m.
Wednesday at Cancer Treatment
Center, 3406 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills (next to bowling alley).
Dr. Murali Angirekula will speak
about pain management.
Refreshments will be served. Call
746-1100 for any questions.
* BROOKSVILLE - Man to
Man prostate cancer support group
at 6 p.m. Monday at the Florida
Cancer Institute's Brooksville
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, just behind Johnny Carino's.
Call Betty Lawrence, R.T.(T.), sup-
port group facilitator, at (352) 596-
1926.
* BROOKSVILLE - Women's
breast cancer support group
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July
3, at the Florida Cancer Institute's
Brooksville Center at 7154 Medical
Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call
Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at (352)
592-8128.
* Support group meetings are
in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indicat-
ed.
* Bariatric Support Group: 6:30
p.m. every three months, Cypress
Room. Call Claudia Blotz at 697-
0051 or Bette Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support Group:
noon the second Friday, Robert
Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call
June O'Donnell at 527-8371.
* Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30
p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria
meeting room. Call Carol at 726-
1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11.:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday,
Cypress Room. Call Carol McHugh
at 341-6110.
* Dystonia Support Group: 10
a.m. the third Saturday of every
other month, Cypress Room. Call
Anna DiPleco at 726-8489. Next
meeting in November.
* Fibromyalgia Support: Will not


meet until further notice.


meet until further notice.
* Citrus Country Ostomy
Support: 2 p.m. the third Sunday,
Cypress Room. Call Bob at 746-
6693, Sally at 637-2055, Betty at
726-3802 or Frank at 341-0005.
0 Parkinson's Support Group: 1
p.m. first Tuesday, Cypress Room.
Call Catherine Clark at 344-9630.
OACS Man-to-Man Prostate
Cancer Support and Education
Program: 11:30 a.m. first
Wednesday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute, Allen Ridge
Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call 527-0106.
* Respiratory Support Group:
Will not meet until further notice.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
* 3 p.m. Monday at the senior
center on County Road 491,
Lecanto. Call 746-5018.
* 1 p.m. Thursday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd, Beverly Hills.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday
and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41,
Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday, YANA
Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St.,
Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Please see GROUPS/Page 5C


} AAccepting
SInti'rnINew Padents
_I __ ......... ..........._ Mon-Tue-Thu 8arnm - pm

Carlene A.P. Wilson, MD
Board Certified Internal Medicine * Board Certified Pediatrics
SPap Test, Breast Exams and HRT
* Patient directed care
* Treatment of Diabetes, Hypertension, & Asthma
o Traditional & Herbal Medicine
STo.:,l Cr.- lcr Im e erIlre r3fril
934 N. Suncoast Blvd. (South Square Plaza)
Crystal River 352-563-5070


Because your eyes are worth it!


optands You i-mart
Brands You Like...Prices You'll Love


s50 OFF iC S


Your Complete Pair of Eyeglasses
From our Premium Lens & Frame Collections I

Includes all Varilux', Transitions" and Kodak Lenses | F m & a r C r n
and all frames in our Gold, Platinum & Diamond Collections eypt e
Expires 7/31/07 Redeemable at all Opt-Mart Locations Must Present Coupon








352-563-1666 FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE WE HONOR:
HUMANA, WELLCARE, MEDICAID, MEDICARE
TREATNIWHCHIS AO W7' W IIF.Mt .F.'i 1 , .(INCLUDING CHOICE AND UNIVERSAL)
UNES I NOTED.POWEROVERSANDARDANDPRSMATAND MANY MORE!
ANDIIIIII


Call746500


State gymnasts















S*






S~,


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Gymnastics recently sent four gymnasts to the AAU
State Meet in Lakeland. From left are: Lauren Caffee,
Katessa Rosengrant, Alexis Ulseth and Megan Jervis.
Alexis Ulseth and Lauren Caffee competed at level 4.
Megan Jervis and Katessa Rosengrant competed at level
3. Alexis received 7.9 on bars 7.65 on beam, placing fifth
7.85 on floor and a 7.25 on vault and placed 12th All
Around with a score of 30.65. Lauren received 7.7 on bars
8.0 on beam, placing second 8.825 on vault and placed
sixth with an All Around score of 33.325. Megan received
a 8.3 on bars 8.175 on beam 9.05 on floor, placing fourth
9.325 on vault placing 2nd and placed 6th with an All
Around score of 34.85. Katessa received 8.25 on bars
7.55 on beam 9.325 on floor placing first7.7 on vault and
placed ninth with an All Around score of 32.825. Katessa
has also recently qualified to compete at the upcoming
AAU National Competition in Tampa as a part of Team
Florida. Call Citrus Gymnastics at 746-7700.


kl]E�Vkl 4M - - - . --


T-' A -rVwr' RE - T TI


t

|








*4I TUESDAY, JUNE 2O, 2U0/ E .


Special to the Chronicle
Reality Check Money Camp for youths, 14 to
18, will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 9 to 12 at
the Citrus County Canning Center at 3405 W
Southern St, Lecanto, which is off of County
Road 491 just north of State Road 44.
The cost of the workshop is $30 per partici-
pant and is limited to 20 teens. Prepaid regis-
tration is required and no refunds or transfers
to other classes will be given
An anonymous donor has contacted the office


GANDHI
Continued from Page 1C

KIT The most common present-
ing symptoms are abdominal
pain, nausea or vomiting. -
Initial treatment of choice is
surgery if we can completely
remove the cancer. Until now,
there was no good treatment in
metastatic GIST Now a new
drug called Gleevec really
works very well in even
advanced cancer It is a pill that
you take once a day with rela-
tively few side effects.
In my patient, the surgeori
could completely remove the
cancer Her tumor was 5.5 cen-
timeters (more than 2 inches). It
was completely removed but it
carries a high risk of recurrence
due to its large size.


BENNETT
Continued from Page 1C

logically dependent on nico-
tine. Studies have shown that
smokers must overcome both
of these addictions to be suc-
cessful at quitting for good.
When smoke is inhaled,
nicotine is carried deep into
the lungs, where it is absorbed
quickly into the bloodstream
and carried throughout the
body Nicotine affects many
parts of the body, including
your heart and blood vessels,
your hormonal system, your
metabolism and your brain.
Nicotine can be found in
breast milk and even in cervix
mucous .secretions of smokers.
During pregnancy, nicotine
freely crosses the placenta and
has been found in amniotic
fluid and the umbilical cord
blood of newborn infants.
Several factors can affect the
rate of metabolism and excre-
tion related to nicotine. In gen-
eral, a regular smoker will
have nicotine or its by-prod-
ucts present in the body for
about three to four days after
stopping.
Nicotine produces pleasant
feelings that make the smoker
want to smoke more. It also
acts as a kind of depressant by
interfering with the flow of
information between nerve
cells.
As the nervous system
adapts to nicotine, smokers
tend to increase the number of
cigarettes they smoke, and
therefore the amount of nico-
tine in their blood. After a
while, the smoker develops a
tolerance to the drug, which
leads to an increase in smok-
ing.
Over time, the smoker reach-
es a certain nicotine level and
then smokes to maintain this
level of nicotine. In fact, nico-
tine, when inhaled in cigarette
smoke, reaches the brain faster
than drugs that enter the body
intravenously.
Now we know how bad it is
for us. Then why is it so hard to
quit? When smokers try to cut
back or quit, the absence of
nicotine leads to withdrawal
symptoms. Withdrawal is both
physical and mental.
Physically, the body reacts to


and is interested in providing a limited number
of scholarships for those who wish to partici-
pate in Reality Check Money Camp but need
assistance with the registration fee. Since the
opportunity just presented itself, the registra-
tion deadline has been extended to Monday.
The first five completed Reality Check Money
Camp packets and scholarship application will
be given consideration.
Call 527-5700 or come by the Extension office
at 3650 W Sovereign Path, Suite 1, Lecanto, for
more information.


Recently, an excellent study
was presented in our largest
oncology meeting in Chicago.
The study enrolled 644 patients
who had been diagnosed with
GIST and were considered at
higher risk for recurrence.
Half the patients received
Gleevec and half received a
placebo. Neither the patients
nor the researchers knew who
got the placebo and who got the
drug. This avoids any bias. This
is called randomized double
blind placebo controlled trial, a
gold standard study.
The difference in outcomes
was significant after one year
After 12 months, 97 percent of
Gleevec patients were disease-
free and alive, compared with
83 percent of patients in the
placebo group. That difference
translated to an 82 percent
reduction in the risk of disease


the absence of nicotine.
Psychologically, the smoker is
faced with giving up a habit,
which requires a major change
in behavior. Both must be
addressed in order for the quit-
ting process to work
Withdrawal symptoms can
include dizziness which may
only last one or two days in the
beginning, depression, feelings
of. frustration and anger, irri-
tability, sleep disturbances,
including having trouble
falling asleep, staying asleep
and having bad dreams or even
nightmares, trouble concen-
trating, , restlessness, head-
aches, tiredness and an
increased appetite.
These symptoms can lead
the smoker to again start smok-
ing cigarettes again to boost
blood levels of nicotine back to
a level where there are no
symptoms.
If a person has smoked regu-
larly for a few weeks or longer
and abruptly stops using tobac-
co or greatly reduces the
amount smoked, withdrawal
symptoms will occur. Symp-
toms usually start within a few
hours of the last cigarette and
peak about two to three days
later. Withdrawal symptoms
can last for a few days to sever-
al weeks.
Health concerns usually top
the list of reasons people give
for quitting smoking. About
half of all smokers who contin-
ue to smoke will end up dying
from a smoking-related illness.
Nearly everyone knows that
smoking can cause lung cancer,
but few people realize it is also
a risk factor for many other
kinds of cancer as well, includ-
ing cancer of the mouth, voice
box, throat, esophagus, blad-
der, kidney, pancreas, cervix,
stomach and some leukemias.
For the first time, the Surgeon
General includes pneumonia
in the list of diseases caused by
smoking.
Smoking increases the risk
of lung diseases such as
emphysema and chronic bron-
chitis. These progressive lung
diseases, grouped under the
term COPD, are usually diag-
nosed in current or former
smokers in their 60s and 70s.
COPD causes chronic illness
and disability and is eventually
fatal.
Smokers are twice as likely


recurrence. The benefit persist-
ed for two years.
Gleevec was well tolerated
overall. The study results
prompted the researchers to
halt the study and offer the drug
to all and placebo to none.
This is a remarkable study,
and I am offering this drug to my
patient She is getting the latest
care. I guess it helps to attend
the conference and learn the
latest advances in cancer care.

Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematol-
ogist and oncologist. He is the
volunteer medical adviser of
the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or comments
to 521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com or
call 746-0707.


to die from heart attacks as
nonsmokers. And smoking is a
major risk factor for peripher-
al vascular disease, a narrow-
ing of the blood vessels that
carry blood to the leg and arm
muscles, as well as cerebrovas-
cular disease that can cause
strokes.
Smoking also causes prema-
ture wrinkling of the skin, bad
breath, bad smelling clothes
and hair, yellow fingernails
and hair, and an increased risk
of macular degeneration, one
of the most common causes of
blindness in the elderly.
For women, there are unique
risks. Women older than 35
who smoke and use birth con-
trol pills are in a high-risk
group for heart attack, stroke,
and blood clots of the legs.
Women who smoke are more
likely to have a miscarriage or
a lower birth-weight baby Low
birth-weight babies are more
likely to die or to be impaired.
Based on data collected in
the late 1990s, the U.S. Centers
for Disease Control (CDC) esti-
mated that adult male smokers
lost an average of 13.2 years of
life and female smokers lost
14.5 years of life because of
smoking.
No matter what your age or
how long you've smoked, quit-
ting will help you live longer.
People who stop smoking
before age 50 cut their risk of
dying in the next 15 years in
half compared with those who
continue to smoke.
Ex-smokers also enjoy a
higher quality of life with
fewer illnesses from cold and
flu viruses, better self-reported
health, and reduced rates of
bronchitis and pneumonia.
Next week, I will discuss all
of the advantages associated
with quitting smoking.

Dr. Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president of
the Citrus County Unit of the
American Cancer Society and
a member of the Board of
Directors and Executive
Committee of the Florida
Division of the American
Cancer Society. If you have
any suggestions for topics, or
have any questions, e-mail
him at cjbennett@rboi.com.


.ML


GRILLO
Continued from Page 1C

ple older than 65 (29 percent)
have a hearing disorder.
Hearing loss is the third most
prevalent condition - only
arthritis and hypertension are
more common.
The majority of people with
hearing loss are diagnosed
with sensorineural hearing
loss. Don't be embarrassed
about it. Hearing difficulties
are common and ignoring them


DODGE
Continued from Page 1C

Trans fat is man-made and is
even worse, but unsaturated
fats in judicious amounts are
good for us. These good fats
come mainly from vegetable
sources.
"Unfortunately, there is still
another problem with the beef
package. Dr. Willett says that
the more protein you eat, the
more calcium you excrete.
That calcium is mostly pulled
from bone, the body's calcium
storehouse. This subject needs
more research, but enough is
known today to suggest that
excess meat consumption is
related to our national osteo-
porosis problem.
"For all these reasons, Dr.
Willett suggests choosing


AS



THE



DOC


Scholarships offered for money camp INTERNAL


There are many
different types of
hearing aids to
suit your needs.

can make them worse.
A visit to an ear, nose and
throat doctor is the first step in
determining what type of hear-
ing loss a person has. Often, an
examination of the ears uncov-
ers the problem. Your doctor
may refer you to an audiologist,

healthier sources of protein.
He advises 'eating more pro-
tein from fish, chicken, and
vegetable sources like beans
and nuts, and less from red
meat and dairy products.'"
"Less dairy products!"
exclaimed Dan, looking
stunned. "I don't drink milk,
but I eat lots of ice cream and
cheese," he said. "I thought we
were supposed to drink milk
and eat dairy products for the
sake of our bones. What gives?"
"I don't blame you for being
confused," Mrs. Hartwell said.
"Milk and dairy products have
been pushed as the answer for
osteoporosis for so long that it
is an article of faith for most
Americans.
"Yet, the fact is that there are
many concerns about dairy
products. Drinking milk to
improve bone health sounds
logical, but it is a concept that


S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
0


Continued from Page 1C

"One easy thing," says
Stanley "is (a blood test for)
acetylcholine receptor anti-
bodies. There are also particu-
lar nerve studies, like repeti-
tive nerve stimulation (RNS) or
single fiber electromyography
(EMG). There is also the
'Mestinon test' You just give
the short-acting form of
Mestinon (a pill) and you see
immediate improvement" IV
administration of edrophoni-
um chloride (Tensilon test) can
be given in the hospital and
also causes immediate
improvement of muscle weak-
ness.
Once MG is diagnosed, neu-
rologists usually prescribe
medication in pill form; a
cholinesterase inhibitor such
as Mestifion, prednisone and
an immunosuppressant such
as Imuran. There is a clear
association of abnormalities of


who is a trained professional
specializing in hearing assess-
ment
After what kind of hearir
loss a person has is detei-
mined, a hearing aid may be
dispensed and custom-fitted to
the ear. There are many differ-
ent types of hearing aids to suit
your needs; let your docto-
guide you in your decision.


Denis Grillo, D.O., is an ear,.
nose and throat specialist in'
Crystal River. Contact him at:
795-0011.

has never been proven scientif-
ically.
"Dr. Willett, one of the top
nutritional authorities in the
world, says this about milk:
'there are more reasons not tb
drink milk in large amounts
than there are to drink it. I
don't recommend it as a bever-
age for adults...' Instead, hb
advises vitamin D and lots 6f
physical activity to strengthen
our bones. For selected
patients, such as middle-aged
women, he suggests a calcium
supplement of 500 milligrams
to 1,000 milligrams per day."

Dr. Ed Dodge is a retired j
Inverness physician. Visit his
Web site, www.
passionforhealth.info. Reach
Dr. Dodge through his Web:,
blog, Passion for Health, on.,
the Chronicle Web site. .


RECENT



Auto


.Accident



I U


Don't let your auto insurance benefits run out
before you get the permanent relief that you deserve

Call today and get permanent, lasting relief
Without seeking the advice and treatment that we can provide, you are at risk of
exhausting your benefits before you have been treated effectively. On a regular
basis we see patients that have done so. Don't become one of these statistics.
The sooner that your treatment begins the more positive the outcome, so don't put
off effective treatment.
There is good news for sufferers of cervical compression or neck injury from an
auto accident. With new medical technology, Florida DRX has had extremely
effective results in treating neck pain caused by whiplash, herniated or degenerative
discs in the neck with the breakthrough technology of the DRX9000C.
The DRX9000C is 91% effective permanent relief from neck and back pain. This
is a non surgical, non invasive procedure and is available to you now.
Call today for a consultation.
Specializing in:
* Herniated or Bulging Discs * Degenerative Discs
* Sciatica * Pre/Post Surgery Patients
* Acute & Chronic Low Back Pain Relief

SMark Fallows, D.O.

Mark Hashim, MD.

Sl Located in the Naturecoast Pain Associates
office at Allen Ridge Medical Mall


520 N Lecanto Hwy., Suite 200, Lecanto, FL 34461 (352) 527-9444
www.floridadrx com Covered by most Workman's Comp & Auto Insurance


ON THE NET
* www.myasthenia.org
* www.ninds.nih.gov/disor
ders/myasthenia.gravis

the thymus glad with MG, but it
is not yet understood. Some
neurologists recommend
removal of the gland. Although
MG cannot be cured, it can be
managed.
"I thought I was dying," says
Warner "I had double vision
bad. I was walking with a cane
and that wasn't easy I'd go to
yard sales and not be able to
drive back. My eyelid would
droop and I would have to
strain to keep it open. I finally
used a Band-Aid, but nobody
liked that idea. Sometimes I
still have trouble eating. It is
such a mystery - that's what
got me. The immune system
breaks down - I thought,
'That's a symptom of AIDS.' It's
kind of like having cancer -
you think of every thing bad
that could happen to you."


Cimus CouNTY (FL) CHRONIdE


IT ALTH S LIFE


I-- W- '>")-


Warner, a veteran of the
Korean War, says he did every-
thing before he got MG. Now
that his condition has been
diagnosed and under treat-
ment, he is back to doing every-
thing again, but with a few
changes.
"I plan anything that I do of a
morning, and if I do anything in
the afternoon, I carry my chair.
I also sleep a lot" He recently
got a player piano for Father's
Day and is ready to learn how
to play it
Warner wants others to know
about this disease that tricked
him for so long. "My grandson
and I went on the Internet -t
the library and learned therb
were programs that you should
be on and that there was no
cure for it When you first get ft,
you want to talk to everybody
you can - that's why support
groups are good."
For more information about
myasthenia gravis, go online to
www.myasthenia.org, o0r
www.ninds.nih.gov/disordeN
myastheniaa_ gravis.








TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 SC


CirRus CouNm' (FL) CHRoP'ucfE IIFALTH & LIFE


Extension service has Kidney, heart disease spur each other on


food safety training


Class slatedfor Thursday

Special to the Chronicle

UF/IFAS-Citrus County Extension Office pro-
vides up-to-date food safety training for food-
service workers.
rJ, You don't have to travel to Tampa or Orlando
t9o get your ServSafe Food Protection Manager's
-Certification. The University of Florida/IFAS
i itrus County Extension Service is providing
training to enable food managers and staff to
pffer Florida's consumers the safest food pre-
pared in a clean environment.
�, This is comprehensive training that provides
the most up-to-date information and current
regulations. The ServSafe Manager's exam is
given at the end of the training which provides
,a National Certification that is good for five
.ears. Certification is required in Florida for
'food managers of all establishments licensed by
the Department of Business and Professional
Regulation, the Department of Ag.and
'Consumer Services and selected licenses of the


GROUPS
q, Continued from Page 3C

Thursday, First Christian Church,
Grover Cleveland Boulevard,
'omosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8 p.m.
Monday and Friday, Lecanto
Church of Christ, State Road 44
and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8
q.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Uecanto, east of County Road 491
and State Road 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not affil-
iated with any of the meeting facili-
ties listed. Information line: 382-
0851.
' Narconon Need help with
'Addiction? Call (800) 556-8885.
, Nar-Anon: a support group
,6r the families and friends of
addicts, at 8 p.m. Wednesday at
,Act II, 1065 N. Paul Drive,
*,Inverness. Call 344-5963 or visit
,www.nar-anon.org.
b U Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus County
tat 7 p.m. Thursday in Bailey Hall,
,First Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 W., Inverness. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Call 621-0165. The
National DBSAAssociation's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632.
' 0 The Area 13 Family Care
Council from 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly at the
Wildwood DCF/APD office, 1601
W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State
Road 44). Call Dominic
.hristofaro, (352) 489-6279.
*a 0 Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
meets at 11 a.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at Our Lady of Fatima
atholic Church, 550 U.S.
ghway 41 South, Inverness. Call
endy Hall, 527-4600.
* Friends of the Blind meets
om 9 a.m. to noon the second
Friday monthly at the Church of the
lazarene in Hernando. Call Butch
hultz at 344-2693 or Bob
I ohnson at 563-1890.
S eFFRA (Families and Friends
f Retarded Adults) at 9 a.m. the
Second Friday monthly at the Key
'raining Center in Lecanto, in the
het Cole Life Enrichment Center.
|all Stephanie at 344-0288, or
1ave a message at 563-0536.
0 U Better Breathers Support
iroup at 1:30 p.m. the third Friday
monthly at the Citrus County
health Department Lecanto Office,
,700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
,all Doris Kames at 860-1355.
U Alzheimer's Association-
�lorida Gulf Coast Chapter sup-
crt groups:
* Surrey Place of Lecanto,
730 W. Marc Knighton Court,
9ecanto, 2 p.m. second Tuesday

00.
* Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
church, 550 U.S. 41 S.,
Pverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday
I'onthly. Call Wendy Hall at 527-
600.
* The Hepatitis C Support
group from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. the
urth Monday monthly at the
ecanto Health Department, 3700
Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Call
7-0068, ext. 253.
* Homosassa Springs Area
cancer Survivors' Support
group at 1 p.m. monthly at First
united Methodist Church. Call
nna Cooley, 382-4132, or Earl
adaret, 382-1923.


Department of Health.
The next class is Thursday at the Citrus
County Extension office at 3650 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 1, Lecanto (from State Road 44, go
south on County Road 491, turn west on
Saunders Way, go one block, turn left onto
Sovereign Path at entrance to Lecanto
Government Building. The UF/IFAS Extension
Building is first building on the right).
The brochure/registration form can be down-
loaded from foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu or call the
toll-free hotline (888) 232-8723 to register by
credit card. Preregistration is required.
Cost for the course and test is $100. Manuals
may be purchased in English or Spanish for $40.
For more information, call Katherine or Gloria
at the University of Florida/IFAS-Citrus County
Extension office in Inverness at 527-5700.
All programs and related activities sponsored
for, or assisted by, the institute of Food and
Agriculture Sciences are open to all persons
with nondiscrimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex or sex-
ual orientation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.


* Hospice of Citrus County
support groups for 2007:
* Newly Bereaved Support
Group at 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clinical
Office, 326 S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group at 11 a.m.
Tuesday at Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills.
* Grief support group at 10 a.m.
Tuesday at the Hospice of Citrus
County Clinical Office, 326 S. Line
Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group at 1:30
p.m. Thursday at St. Thomas the
Apostle Church in Homosassa.
* Grief support group at 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church in Homosassa.
* Spouse support group at 7
p.m. Tuesday at Unity Church of
Citrus County in Lecanto.
* Spouse support group at 4
p.m. Thursday at First United
Methodist Church Homosassa.
* Social "Moving On" support
group at 10 a.m. Tuesday at
Crystal Paradise Restaurant in
Crystal River.
* Social "Moving On" support
group at 4 p.m. Friday at
Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant in
Inverness.
* Parents support group, a
chapter of Bereaved Parents of the
USA, at 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church in Crystal
River.
* Emotions Anonymous of
Beverly Hills at noon second and
fourth Thursdays at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt. Call Meg at 527-
2443.
* Celebrate Recovery at 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays at the
Christian Recovery Fellowship
Church, 2242 W. State Road 44.
Call 726-2800.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 112 N. Pine
Ave., Inverness, offers three free
weekly women's domestic abuse
support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday (free child care avail-
able).
* 10:30 a.m. to noon Wed-
nesdays (no child care available).
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Transitions Grief Support
Group - 3 and 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center offices building community
room. Registration required. Call
(800) 486-8784.
* Look Gdod ... Feel Better
workshop for women undergoing
radiation, chemotherapy or are
within six months post-treatment,
at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at the Cancer & Blood
Disease Center, 521 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Call the American Cancer
Society at (800) 395-LOOK (5665)
for a reservation.
* Overcomers Group for peo-
ple recovering from addictions to
drugs, alcohol or other out-of-con-
trol habits meets at 8 p.m. Mon-
days at the Sanctuary, 7463
Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul
at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addiction,
compulsion and co-dependency
issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m.
Monday at Rainbow Springs
Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd
St. Road Dunnellon. Call Char at


(352) 465-1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet regular-
ly in Citrus County. Call (352) 697-
0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict Catholic
Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 2149 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N.
Osceola Ave., Inverness.
* Courage AFG. 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United Methodist
Church, 8831 West Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. Room 102. Open
meeting. Call 270-3827.
* Al-Anon Family Group for
family or friends living with or con-
cerned about another's drinking
problem meets from 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Monday at St. Lawrence
Catholic Church, 320 E. Dade
Ave., Bushnell. May bring bag
lunch. Call 793-5738 or 568-1708.
* Alcoholics Anonymous: If
you drink, and want to stop, call
Alcoholics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 621-0599.
Web site: www.ncintergroup.com.
* A.C. Ministries Recovery
Group 12-Step Recovery
Workbook meeting (scripturally
based), 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at
Church Without Walls, nondenomi-
national, nonprofit Christian
Fellowship. The group ministers to
alcoholics or substance abusers,
family of substance abusers,
adults, children and individuals
who were raised in alcoholic or
substance abuse or dysfunctional
families. Donations accepted. 3962
North Roscoe Road, Hernando.
Call Laverne at 637-4563.
* CEA-H.O.W. for people who
have an eating disorder, at noon
Wednesday at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness. Call
Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Amputee Support Group
meets the last Thursday monthly at
Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant on
State Road 44 West, Inverness.
Call Donna at 344-1988 or Perry at
Sonlife Prosthetics, 344-8200.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7 to 9
p.m. most Wednesdays at the
Beverly Hills Community Center, 1
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call Ann
Thonen at 795-5116 or Kristi
Kobler at 628-5537.

SO YOU KNOW
* News notes tend to runr
one week prior to the
date of an event.
* During the busy season,
expect notes to run no:
more than twice.
* Submit information at
least two weeks before
the event.


* Submit material at
Chronicle offices in Inver-
ness or Crystal River; by
fax at 563-3280; or by
e-mail to newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com.


HIGH FIELD 1.7 T MRI 16-SLICE PET/CT SCAN
OPEN M.R.I. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY
CARDIAC NUCLEAR MEDICINE VA A DP ULTRASOUND
116-SLICE CTANGIOGRAPHY I1 VASCULAR DOPPLER STUDIES
GENERAL RADIOLOGY ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY
MAMMOGRAPHY OSTEOPOROSIS SCANNING
KAMALESH A. AMIN, M.D. SCOTT R. FISHER, M.D.
CERTIFIED. AMERICAN BOARD OF RADIOLOGY CERTIFIED. AMERICAN BOARD OF RADIOLOGY
922 N. CITRUS AVENUE * CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428 * PHONE (352) 795-9200
7 ,o7 www.citrusdiagnosticcenter.com


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Hearts
and kidneys: If one's diseased,
better keep a close eye on the
other.
Surprising new research
shows kidney disease some-
how speeds up heart disease
well before it has ravaged the
kidneys. And perhaps not so
surprising, doctors have finally
proven that heart disease can
trigger kidney destruction, too.
The work, from two studies
involving over 50,000 patients,
promises to boost efforts to
diagnose simmering kidney
disease earlier. All it takes are
urine and blood tests that cost
less than $25, something propo-
nents want to become as rou-
tine as cholesterol checks.
"The average patient knows
their cholesterol," says Dr.
Peter McCullough, preventive
medicine chief at Michigan's
William Beaumont Hospital.
"The average patient has no
idea of their kidney function."
Chronic kidney disease, or
CKD, is a quiet epidemic:
Many of the 19 million
Americans estimated to have it
don't know they do.
The kidneys lose their ability
to filter waste out of the blood-
stream so slowly that symp-
toms aren't obvious until the
organs are very damaged. End-
stage kidney failure is rising
fast, with 400,000 people
requiring dialysis or a trans-
plant to survive, a toll that has
doubled in each of the last two
decades.
And while CKD patients
often are terrified of having to
go on dialysis, the hard truth is
that most will die of heart dis-
ease before their kidneys dis-
integrate to that point, some-
thing kidney specialists have
recognized for several years
but isn't widely known.
Indeed, the new research is
highlighted in this month's
Archives of Internal Medicine
with a call for doctors who care
for heart patients to start rigor-
ously checking out the kidneys
- and for better care of early
kidney disease.
The link sounds logical.
After all, high blood pressure
and diabetes are chief risk fac-
tors for both chronic kidney
disease and heart attacks.
But the link goes beyond


Kidney treatments
on the rise
The number of patients with end-
stage kidney failure who had dialysis
or a kidney trlant have more
than doubled from 1991 to 2004.
Kidney treatments
350 thousand ......................................
300 ................... Dialysis.. .
250 ................................. ............
200 ......................... Kidney
150 ...................... transplants


'80 '8 '85 '90 '95 '00
SOURCE: U.S. Renal Data System AP
those risk factors, stresses
McCullough: Once the kidneys
begin to fail, something in turn
accelerates heart disease, not
just in the obviously sick or
very old, but at what he calls "a
shockingly early age."
McCullough and colleagues
tracked more than 37,000 rela-
tively young people - average
age 53 - who volunteered for a
kidney screening. Three mark-
ers of kidney function were
checked: The rate at which
kidneys filter blood, called the
GFR or glomerular filtration
rate; levels of the protein albu-
min in the urine; and if they
were anemic. They also were
asked about previously diag-
nosed heart disease.
The odds of having heart dis-
ease rose steadily as each of
the kidney markers worsened.
More striking was the death
data. At this age, few deaths
are expected, and indeed just
191 people died during the
study period. But those who
had both CKD and known
heart disease had a threefold
increased risk of death in a
mere 2 1/2 years, mostly from
heart problems.
"This study is very much a
wake-up call," McCullough
says.
What about the heart's effect
on the kidneys? Researchers at
Tufts-New England Medical
Center in Boston evaluated
more than 13,000 people who
had participated in two large
heart-health studies.
People diagnosed with heart
disease at the studies' start had
twice the risk of declining kid-
ney function in the next nine
years.


ON THE NET
* National Kidney
Foundation:
www.kidney.org

That makes sense. Heart dis-
ease narrows arteries all over
the body, kidneys included.
Also, some heart imaging tests
use compounds that may harm
kidneys.
But McCullough suspects a
more complex culprit: Both the
heart and kidneys send various
signals to the bone marrow,
which produces a type of stem
cell that keeps those organs in
good repair. When either starts
to fail, this key repair mecha-
nism falters, too, he explains.
Cause aside, what does the
research mean for patients
today?
* Cardiologists and primary
care physicians should careful-
ly monitor heart disease
patients for declining kidney
function, Wake Forest Uni-
versity physicians urge in an
editorial accompanying the
two studies.
* Anyone with kidney risk
factors - a relative with kid-
ney disease, or someone with
diabetes, high blood pressure
or a relative with either -
should get their GFR tested,
advises Dr. Leslie Spry of the
National Kidney Foundation.
McCullough goes further, and
says every adult should know
that number. Surveys suggest
such routine screening even of
the high-risk is rare today.
A normal GFR is 120. If it
slips below 60, they have kid-
ney disease.
* Treat kidney disease
aggressively. Fewer than a
third of CKD patients are pre-
scribed pills proven to protect
their damaged kidneys from
getting worse - pills such as
ACE inhibitors or "angiotensin
II receptor blockers" that also
lower blood pressure and thus
are good for the heart,-too.
McCullough adds that CKD
patients should have other
heart-related risk factors con-
trolled even more tightly than
doctors often recommend.
Systolic blood pressure - the
top number - should never be
above 130, and the so-called
"bad" or LDL cholesterol
should be below 70.


.,�, PAID ADVERTISEMENT



"U ly, cracked,




ye low nails?"


Revolutionary new nail treatment helps kill deeply-rooted fungus,
giving you clear, healthy, attractive new nails


Are you embarrassed by the way your
nails look? Are they discolored,
cracked, chipped, and brittle? Do they have
an unpleasant odor, cause shoe pain, or have
debris underneath them? Wouldn't you love
to have clear, healthy, sexy new nails you're
proud to show off? Good news! Introducing
all-new MIRACLE PLUS!

Helps target, kill, and eliminate
deeply-rooted nail fungus
Miracle Plus is specially formulated to target
and destroy your unhealthy nail fungus infec-
tion-a live fungus that lives, feeds, and
grows deep inside your nail bed, causing
symptoms such as cracking, yellowing, and a
foul smell-and can get rid of your embar-
rassing nail problems for good.

More effective and unlike anything else, the
unique Miracle Plus formulation is specially
designed to target and attack the infection in
two powerful ways: through the bloodstream
and by penetrating deep below the nail bed.
With this powerful, two-fold action, Miracle
Plus effectively targets, attacks, and destroys
the deeply-rooted fungus at its source, and
keeps it from coming back.

That means, with Miracle Plus you can get rid
of your embarrassing nail problems and
finally grow healthy, clear, attractive new nails
you're proud to show off!

Is Miracle Plus right for you?
Miracle Plus is an all-natural, fast-acting for-
mula that requires no prescription, so it's
totally private. It's the all-natural formula
men and women like you are raving about
because it provides so many exciting benefits:


* Targets, attacks, and destroys nail fungus
infections that cause embarrassing nail
problems

* Gives you good-looking, healthy, clear new
nails without side effects

* Helps restore cracked, chipped, brittle, or
flaking nails

* Gets rid of nail odor, nail debris, shoe pain
and other uncomfortable symptoms

* Eliminates yellowing, white, or dark discol-
orations in the nail

* Promotes healthy nail growth by preventing
future nail fungus infections

* It's fast and easy to use

* No prescription or doctor's visit means it's
totally private and hassle-free

If you want to finally put an end to your
embarrassing nail problems and have dear,
healthy, sexy new nails, Miracle Plus is per-
fect for you!





Call toll-free now for your risk-
free trial of Miracle Plus!
Contact your doctor or call the company
directly toll-free now and you can get a risk-
free trial of Miracle Plus (sent to you in plain,
discreet packaging). That way you can see for
yourself how effective and powerful the
Miracle Plus formula really is! Call toll-free
now at 1-800-340-0143.

Call now for your risk-free trial:

1-800-340-0143


14F-AL-r]E-1 & ]LIFIE


CITRUS COUNIY(FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


t5% TUSDJAY, JUiNE'26, 207%"iUvx-j.Nx


Worth NOTING

Skillbank expands
service to haircuts
Skillbank of Beverly Hills
announces that volunteers who
provide rides to doctor's appoint-
ments, grocery shopping and for
prescriptions will take those resi-
dents who are older than 60 and
cannot drive to the barbershop or
beauty salon, providing the salon
or shop is in Beverly Hills. If you
would like to take advantage of
this service, phone 746-5001 from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Call at least five days
before your desired date, so that a
volunteer can be found.
Effective immediately, the new
summer hours for the Skillbank
office will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Regular hours will resume Oct. 1.
SAR meets second
Saturday
The Withlacoochee Chapter of
the Sons of the American Revolu-
tion meets at 11 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly, at the Inverness
Golf and Country Club. The SAR
is an educational, historical, patri-
otic and benevolent organization
focusing its activities on young
people, veterans and persons that
have performed extraordinary
service to their community.
The Withlacoochee chapter's
membership is comprised of men
who are direct lineal descendants
of patriots of the American Revolu-
tion and reside in Citrus or Her-
nando County.
Call John Camillo at 382-7383
in Citrus County or Richard
Sumner at 754-8928 in Hernando
County. The chapter also has a
Web site at www.flssarwith.org.
Cruise to benefit
Hospice of Citrus
Singer Don Cherry will be the
featured entertainer on a Carib-
bean cruise to support Hospice of
Citrus County.
Cherry, who is known for his mil-
lion-selling song "Band of Gold,"
will sail from Port Canaveral on
Dec. 9 for an eight-day voyage. He
also will do a book signing.
A minimum of $150 for each
cabin booked will be donated to
hospice, according to cruise
organizers.
For cruise information, pricing
and reservations, call (800) 334-
8838. For details about hospice
care and services, call 527-2020.
Choir slates
summer concerts
"I Like a Gershwin Tune ... How
About You?" is the title of the
Citrus Community Concert Choir's
fourth annual summer series of
concerts.
Performances will be 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 27, at First Baptist
Church of Inverness, 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness; 2 p.m.
Sunday, July 29, at Faith Lutheran
Church, 935 Crystal Glen Drive,
Lecanto; and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 31, at First Baptist Church of
Crystal River, 700 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. General admission
is $10; children 12 and younger
admitted free.
Need more information? Call
382-7071 or 628-3492.


MARY F. BARBER
In practice lcj i19
Air Forae Trained
* Board Certified In Derm
* Certified By American S
Of Mohs Surgery


Community centers set events


Special to the Chronicle

Call the centers for more
information about events.
COMPUTER CLASSES
These are conducted using
the Microsoft Operating
System, XP edition.
Introduction to the Com-
puter- A class for the beginner.
$25 for a six-week session.
WCCC: 2 p.m. Monday and
at 10 a.m. Tuesday. Instructor
is Dick Bromley.
ECCC: 10 a.m. Wednesday.
Instructor is John Warnken.
CCCC: 9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Friday. Instructor is Dick
Bromley.
Intermediate Computer: For
those who know the basics. $25
for a six-week session.
ECCC: 10 a.m. Thursday.
Instructor is John Warnken.
Advanced Computer:
CCCC: 2 p.m. Wednesday.
$25 for a five-week session.
Instructor is Dick Bromley.
Beyond Advanced
Computer: Learn to use your
computer as a telephone and
much more. $40 for a six-week
session.
ECCC: 1 p.m. Wednesday.
Instructor is John Warnken.
New Windows Vista
Program: If you are new to
Windows Vista, this class will
help you learn all the ins and
outs of the program. If you have
a laptop computer, bring it to
the class.
ECCC: 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Instructor John
Warnken. Cost is $25 for six
weeks, call 344-9666.
GAMES
Bingo: No cost to play and
great prizes to win.
CCCC: noon Tuesdays and
Friday.
ECCC: 12:30 p.m. Thursday.
WCCC: noon Wednesdays
and Fridays.
ICC: noon Fridays.
Bridge:
WCCC: Lessons at 1:45 p.m.
Wednesday with Sandra
Brown. $4 per lesson.
ECCC: Snowbird Bridge
Group meets at noon Fridays.
Funcomers Bridge Group
meets at noon' second
Thursday monthly.
CCCC: Lessons at 2:45 p.m.
Tuesday with Sandra Brown.
$4 per lesson. Citrus Fun
Bridge meets at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Beverly Hills Bridge
Club meets at noon Thursdays.
Pinochle:
WCCC: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
Skip Bo:
WCCC: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
ECCC: 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
daily. Tournament every other
Tuesday.
Hand and Foot card game:
ICC: 12:00 p.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursdays.
Dominoes:
CCCC: 9:30 a.m. daily.
Crazy Rummy:
ICC: noon to 2 p.m. daily.
Mah-jongg:
CCCC: Lessons at 2:45 p.m.
Tuesday with Sandra Brown.
$4 per lesson.
WCCC: Sandra Brown
instructs all experience levels,


; of
Central -
Florida


IM.D. Practice Limited To:
. Skin Cancei Surqery
latology * Mohs Micrographic Surgery
Society Over 10,000 Cases Performed


Medicare, BC/BS FL BC FL PPC PPO

873-7788
visit us at www.skincancersurgery.net
| Near The Paddock Mall * 3210 SW 33rd Rd Suite 101 * Ocala FL 34474



17 WEEKS=


69 1/ LBS. LOST!


Elizabeth lost 781bs
and 87112 inches.
"Off my blood pressure
medication and no longer
have sleep Apnea!"

Call today
start losing
tomorrow!


I


Ocala
352.237.8787
Satellites Now Open:
IrE AL 3OL;C 859 S. Hwy. 271441 Lady Lake
350 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
RESEARCH CENTER Hernando
WEIGHT LOSS SPECIALISTS Call for Details


ii


ADDRESSES OF CENTERS
* (CCCC) Central Citrus Community Center at 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto; phone 527-5993.
* (ECCC) East Citrus Community Center at 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness; phone 344-9666.
* (ICC) Inverness Community Center at 1081 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness; phone 726-1009.
* (WCCC) West Citrus Community Center at 8940 W. Veterans
Drive, Homosassa; phone 795-3831.


all ages, at 2:45 p.m, Wed-
nesdays. $4 class cost.
ECCC: 1 p.m. Wednesday.
Pool:
WCCC: Pool lessons with
Ron at 2 p.m. Monday. Wo-
men's pool lessons at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday.
CCCC: Room available from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
Table Tennis:
WCCC: 3 p.m. Tuesday.
ECCC: 10 a.m. Friday.
CCCC : Call center for avail-
able times.
DANCING & MUSIC
Musical entertainment and
social dances:
WCCC: Dances at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday and 10:30 a.m.
Thursday (Jersey Jim Band).
Cost: $1.
. ECCC: Entertainment at
noon Mondays and Wed-
nesdays and at 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays.
CCCC: Social dance at 1:30
p.m. Tuesday, July 24, (no June
dance) with Bob and Gladys
Arthur. Refreshments provid-
ed. Donation: $1. Karaoke with
Alvin Johnson, 10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. - Fridays, June 1, 15
and 29 and Thursdays, June 7
and 21.
Ballroom lessons: Vince and
June Queripel lead partici-
pants through step-by-step
instruction. Bring a partner or
meet one at the class.
CCCC: Wednesdays 1:30 p.m.
(beginner) and 2:45 p.m.
(advanced). $4 per person per
class.
Line dancing:
ECCC: Beginners lessons at 1
p.m. and intermediate lessons
at 2:15 p.m. Tuesday with
Kathy Reynolds. $3 per person
per class. Beginners at 1 p.m.
Wednesday with Ben
VanderGeld. Donation: $1.
WCCC: 2:15 p.m. Monday


with Tom Carscadden. Begin-
ners lessons at 9 a.m. Tuesday
with Kathy Barnes and at 2
p.m. Wednesday with Sara
Bendel. Intermediate lessons
at 1 p.m. Monday with Irene
Grbich and at 10 a.m. Tuesday
with Kathy Barnes. Advanced
lessons at noon Thursdays with
Pia Martin. $2 per class.
CCCC: Beginners lessons at 2
p.m. and intermediate lessons
at 3 p.m. Monday and
Thursday with Sara Bendel.
$2 per class.
Tap dancing lessons: Sandra
Brown instructs all experience
levels, all ages.
CCCC: 4 p.m. Wednesday. $3
per class.
WCCC: 3:45 p.m.
Wednesday. $3 per class.
Israeli-Hebrew dance:
CCCC: 3 p.m. Thursday.
Instructor is Leslie Wilson. No
charge.
Dance for fun:
WCCC: Musical Theater
dance, tap dance, and "move to
the music" at 2:30 p.m. Friday.
Instructor is Joyce Lang. $4 per
class.
EXERCISE PROGRAMS
Walking programs:
ECCC: 10:30 a.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesdays and
Thursday. Instructor Mary
Hamilton.
CCCC: 3 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays
(Indoor Walking video). Hilltop
Walkers (walking the halls) 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
WCCC: 8 a.m. Wednesday
and Fridays.
ICC: 9 a.m. Tuesday,
Wednesday and Fridays (out-
doors).
Yoga for seniors:
WCCC: noon Tuesdays with
Lola Thomas and at 1 p.m.
Thursday with Ann
Sandstrom. $7 per class.
CCCC: 10 a.m. Tuesday with


Lace Blue-McLean. $7 per
class.
Chair exercises:
CCCC: 10:30 a.m. Thursday
and Fridays.
ECCC: 10 a.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesdays and
Thursday. Instructor Mary
Hamilton.
WCCC: Chair Yoga 1 p.m.
Wednesday. Instructor Ann
Sandstrom. $7 per class.
Tai Chi:
CCCC: 10 a.m. Tuesday with
Connie
ARTS & CRAFTS
Crafts:
ECCC: 9 a.m. Monday
through Friday.
Ceramic basic hand building
sculpturing class:
ECCC: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday. Instructor Cindy
Jacks, cost is $10 per class,
material fees are from $5 to
$10.
Macrame classes:
ECCC: 1 to 3 p.m. Friday.
Instructor Cindy Jacks, cost is
$10 per class, material fees are
from $5 to $10.
Beginners Drawing:
ECCC: 9 to 11 a.m. Friday.
$10 per class. Instructor Arnold
Lopes. Supply list available at
ECCC in advance of class.
Limited class space, register in
advance at 344-9666.
Beginning Oil Pastel:
ECCC: 1 p.m. Friday. $10 per
class. Instructor Arnold Lopes.
Supply list available at ECCC
in advance of class. Limited
class space, register in advance
at 726-9666.
WCCC: 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday. $10 per class.
Instructor Arnold Lopes.
Limited class space, register in
advance at 795-3831.
Stamping:
CCCC: Stamp 'n Up Class at"

SO YOU KNOW
* Obituaries must be sub-
rmitted by licensed funeral
homes.
* Obituaries and funeral
notices are subject to
editing.
* Recent photos are wel
corner.
* Call Linda Johnson at 563
5660 for details.


LAWYER ADVERTISEMENT


FOSAMAX HEALTH ALERT
Fos -max lgenenc njme - Alendronate.i is a ty'pe of drug known used it ireat osteoporosts in post
menop.ntali '.*omen Fo_:,m.lx has been hnked to a serious hone disease kno,,wn as osteonecrosis of the the
jaw (ONJ) or "dead jaw."
Symptomn of osteunecrosLis of the law o ONJ'i ,r 'dead ja include
a Loosening of Teeth * Severe Infections * Swelling
11 ou or a loved one has s uttered any ul the serious side effecis listed above call Ennis & Ennis toll free
at 1-800-619-3310 or vi- ll orlirne at w'Ax eririisl.awcm for1 a FREE CONSULLTATION
m a
PlaviX linked to Severe Bleeding
Recent studies showed that patients that take Plavix with aspirin are at a significantly increased risk
of bleeding including:
* Gastrointestinal Bleeding (Stomach) * TTP Blood Disorder * Bleeding Ulcers
* Subdural Hematoma (Head Bleeds) * Heart Attack * Death
* Bleeding From Ears, Eyes & Nose
If you or a loved one suffered any of the side effects above after taking Plavix, call Ennis & Ennis
toll free at 1-800-619-3310 or visit online at www.ennislaw.com for a FREE CONSULTATION.




A recent medical study has linked the diabetes drug Avandia� to an increased risk of
HEART ATTACK, STROKE, and SUDDEN DEATH.
A New England Journal of Medicine study revealed that Avandia� is associated with a significant
increase in the risk of heart attack. If you or a loved one have suffered serious side effects or died after
using Avandia�, call Ennis & Ennis toll free at 1-800-619-3310 for a FREE CONSULTATION.












RENu WITH MOISTURELOC & COMPLETE MOISTUREPLUS
MULTI PURPOSE SOLUTION LINKED TO INFECTIONS, BLINDNESS
The FDA is investigating an increased number of eye infections in consumers cleaning their contact lens
with ReNu solution with MoistureLoc and/or Complete MoisturePlus Multi Purpose Solution. Symptoms
of fungal eye infection include:
* Blurry Vision * Sensitivity to Light * Discharge
* Eye Pain * Eye Redness
If you or a loved one suffered a er rious eye infection or blindness after using ReNu solution with
MoistureLoc or Complete MoisturePlus Multi Purpose Solution, visit online at www.ennislaw.com or call
Ennis & Ennis toll free at 1-800-619-3310 for a FREE CONSULTATION.
The lawyers t Ennis & Innis are licensed to practice law in Florida and Washington, D.C. with principal offices in Fort louderdole, FL. Co EnnisEnnis, PA.
Attorneys at Law
Te 110 E. Broward Blvd., Suite 1700, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301.


illlM Lc M


I visit us online at www.ennislaw.com I


10 a.m. Monday. $3 per class.
Barbara Harmon and Trish
Diesotell, instructors.
Watercolor painting:
ECCC: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday. $10 per class. In-
structor Arnold Lopes. Supply
list available at ECCC in
advance of class. Limited class
space, register in advance at
344-9666.
Woodcarving: with Nature
Coast Carving Club. Bring your
projects to the group, or pick
up some valuable lessons.
ECCC: noon Tuesdays.
CCCC: 12:30 on Thursdays. "
Jewelry-making class:
ECCC: 9 to 11 a.m. Friday.
Instructor Cindy Jacks, cost is
$10 per class, material fees ark
from $5 to $10.
SIGN LANGUAGE
Instructor for all classes i�
Sue Paulus. Cost is $35 for eight
weeks. Call individual centers
to register. Classes will resume
in September at West Citrusi,
East Citrus and Central Citrus!
PIANO LESSONS ,
ECCC: 2:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Instructor is Ginny Coe. $5 per
lesson. Call center to sign up.

TO BUY A PHOTO
* Photos shot by Chronicle
staff photographers are
available for sale as 8.by- ,
10 color prints.
* To order reprints, go to
www.ChronicleOnline.com "
and click on the ad for
dotPhoto. Follow the
instructions to choose the
images and place your
order.
* If you do not have access
to the Internet, orders
can be placed from the
Chronicle office with a
credit card.
* Photos submitted to the
Chronicle are not avail
able for reprint.


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


l~llllllllll~lll~ll.[l~l�M~~l...n[l~,^n[.lll~mllllllllml~ll.lllllllllll*^-- *"


I


I


L-


CALL 1 =800=619=3310�1


C4IMIf TNTT-V


gtllk r- - -- W . , '>00-7


I


I










7(C
TUESDAY
JUNE 26, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


News NOTES

Auditions set
for musical
Playhouse 19 will have audi-
.tions for the "The Three Penney
Opera," its first musical of the
2007-08 season, at 7 p.m.
Sunday and Monday at the
'Playhouse, 871 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. This classic
show by Kurt Weil features the
adventures of the dashing Capt.
MacHeath, a character made
;famous by the song "Mack the
Knife." Music director for the
show is Jacki Doxey and stage
director, Jeri Augustine. The
show opens Sept. 13 and con-
'inues weekends through Oct. 7.
The large cast requires four
principal females and five
males. There are many smaller
roles for both males and
females and for the chorus.
When auditioning, a prepared
song is required along with the
sheet music provided for the
piano accompaniment.
For information, call Jacki
Doxey at 212-1746 or Jeri
Augustine at 422-0738.
Nursing education
scholarship available
The Penny Duteau
Scholarship Fund Committee is
accepting applications through
July 15. The scholarships are
presented to interested individu-
als who are pursuing an educa-
tion in nursing.
The applicant must be a resi-
dent of Citrus County and have
acceptance into a qualified nurs-
ing program.
Applications may be secured
by calling 344-4460.
Businesses invited
to breakfast
: All business owners/man-
agers/independent contractors
are invited to attend the Fran
Tarkenton Breakfast Club
Networking Event that will be
Thursday at the offices of
franklin Realty Consultants,
2965 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway.
,(Croft Plaza), in Inverness.
This is a monthly networking
tvent to which business people
are invited. A continental break-
'fast will be served at 7:30 a.m.,
and the meeting will adjourn by
t:30. This event is hosted by the
GoSmallBiz Associates of Citrus
County. This month's Breakfast
with Fran speaker is Bill Wort-
man, one of the top consultants
of GoSmallBiz.com. There is no
Charge for this breakfast meet-
)ng, but your RSVP will be
appreciated. To RSVP or for
more information, call Bud
(oehlinger at 527-9790.
NYC Retiress take
the summer off
New York City Transit
Retiree's of Florida, Chapter 9,
'Citrus County, will not meet dur-
ing June, July and August. The
)iext meeting will take be at 1
p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, in the.
Beverly Hills Community
Building, One Civic Circle.
| Joan Kohler is organizing an
puttingg to The Capone Dinner
Theater. Call Joan at 527-2439
if you wish to attend. We are
looking at an October date.
Reminder that the Annual
State Convention will take place
tNov. 9, 10 and 11 this year. Call
Arnold Pride at 527-2477 for
more information and to reserve
a suite.

Pet SPOTLIGHT
Senior


Special to the Chronicle
ET, adopted by Jean Johnson
at 5 years old, turned 17 in
April, and is still a loving and
active companion.


Flotilla 15-04 graduates eight


Special to the Chronicle
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
Homosassa Flotilla 15-04 com-
pleted the American Safety
Boating course on June 9. The
sessions were conducted dur-
ing a two-week period at the
West Citrus Community Center,
and all eight participants grad-
uated with Honors. Topics cov-
ered included boat types, and
equipment, Federal and State
laws, trailer and ramp courtesy
and a host of other Boating
Safety topics. All the graduates
received a Certificate of
Completion, and will receive
their Florida Boater ID card to
be sent from Tallahassee.
Persons interested in attend-
ing future Safe Boating pro-
grams are encouraged to call
Jack Sparling at 476-8271 or e-
mail to Sparkman3664@earth
link.net
The next meeting of the
Homosassa Auxiliary 15-04 will
be Tuesday, July 3, at the West
Citrus Community Center, 8940


W Veterans Drive, Homosassa.
The Auxiliary is very active
in assisting the US Cast Guard
with promoting homeland
security, public instruction of
safe boating, vessel safety
exams, safety patrols, and
many other activities. Flotilla
15-04 is always looking for ded-
icated persons with interest in
the above endeavors. Anyone
interest in joining Homosassa
Flotilla 15-04 is encouraged to
contact Ned Barry at 249-1042
or e-mail nedberry@tampabay
.com.


Recent graduates of the
American Safety Boating
course, from left, front row,
are: Lee Leffingwell, Thelma
Mendez, Sherrie Benson and
Judith Biston. Back row, from
left, are: Staff Officer Bart
Bryan, James Leffingwell,
Kenneth Deschamps, Kenneth
Malerhofer, Clyde Biston and
Staff Officer Jack Sparling.
Special to the Chronicle


Parks add to


summer schedule


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation have added the fol-
lowing programs to its summer
line up:
* Hip hop
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation, along with instruc-
tor Chandra Haimbaugh, will
offer the hottest new hip hop
dance class. Classes will be
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
evenings beginning July 3, at
the Citrus County Auditorium
and Wednesday evenings at the
Citrus Springs Community
Center beginning July 11. Cost
of the class is $36 for four class-
es. All ages are welcome.
Students will learn the latest
hip hop moves, fundamentals,
as well as choreography to the
hottest new pop, hip hop and
R&B songs. To preregister for
either of these classes, call 527-
7677.
* Card workshop
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation, along with instruc-
tor Diana Salo, would like the
opportunity to assist you in
preparing up to 10 "Make-n-
Take" cards during a one-day
workshop from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
The workshop will be Friday,
July 26, at the Beverly Hills
Community Building.
Preregistration is required.
Cost of the class is $120 per
person. You will have two
hours to make up to 10 cards.
Instructor supplies markers,
inkpads, embossing powder,
chalk, punches, coluzzles, etc.
Students are asked to bring
scissors, favorite paper adhe-
sives, and a paper trimmer.
Visit www.everydaycards4u.
com to see the July cards. The
theme will be Christmas in


July If you are interested in
this workshop, contact the
Parks and Recreation office at
527-7677.
* Floral design
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation, along with instruc-
tor Debbie Wells, will offer a
one-day workshop in floral
design. This workshop will
focus on basic to intermediate
design skills, tools of the trade,
design styles and techniques,
types of flowers, foliage and
names, wire wrapping, bow
making, corsage techniques,
symmetrical designs and con-
temporary designs. The work-
shop will be from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, July 14, at the
Beverly Hills Community
Building. There will be a one-
hour lunch break The cost of
the class is $90 per person. Pre-
registration and prepayment is
required. Deadline to sign up
for this workshop is
Wednesday, July 11. Each stu-
dent will be provided with a
list of materials to bring to the
workshop when calling to pre-
register. The instructor will
provide all flowers for the
arrangements. 'Finished proj-
ects will include one mini car-
nation corsage, one bud vase of
flowers and bow, one dozen
carnations in a vase, one round
centerpiece and one contem-
porary tropical arrangement
Call to preregister at 527-7677.
Class size is limited to 12 stu-
dents.
Any persons requiring rea-
sonable accommodations at
these programs or any other
program because of a disabili-
ty or physical impairment
should contact the Parks and
Recreation office 72 hours
prior to the activity at 527-7677.


Dance will have


big-band sounds


Special to the Chronicle
Big band music has returned
to Citrus County. On Friday
night once a month, at the
Italian Social Club, a 13-piece
dance band called Encore
made their debut
Those who participated
since April have danced to the
sounds made by big bands of
the '40s, '50s and '60s. Encore,
made up of professional musi-
cians, music teachers and big
band aficionados, bring back
the music of Glenn Miller and
other bands of the that era.
If you were not able to expe-
rience this great time, you can
still join this wonderful sound.
We will bring this group to play
again Friday, July 20. Come and
dance or listen to "Sentimental
Journey" "In the Mood" and
other big band favorites,


* WHAT: Italian Social Club
dance.
* WHEN: 7 to 10 p.m.'
Friday, July 20.
* WHERE: Italian Social
Club, County Road 486,
Hernando.
* GET INFO: Call Tom at
746-7835 or 422.0046.
-0 COST: $7.50.


including the jitter bug.
Hours are from 7 to 10 p.m. at
the club on County Road 486 in
Hernando. The cost is $7.50.
Coffee and soda are served, as
well as ice to accompany your
choice of beverage. Bring your
own snacks and things, which
is the policy of the club.
For more information call,
Tom at 746-7835 or 422-0046.


he Senior Prom at the
Beverly Hills Recreation
Center was a sell-out
success.
Dancing from 7:30 to 10:30
p.m. to the music of Ocala-
based Center Stage, a 19-piece
big band of profes- m i
sional musicians,
was thoroughly
enjoyed by the
crowd of seniors,
who were dressed in
their prom finery.
Joe's Deli, of
Inverness provided
the evening's delec-
table buffet.
We saw familiar Ruth
tuxedos, wrist cor- AROUI
sages, glittering COMPM
gowns reminiscent


of our high school prom.
Soloist Liz Anthony was a
tremendous hit with the gath-
ering of seniors on this very
special night.
Celebrating special anniver-
saries were; Fred and Stella
Gallito, their 60th anniversary;
Bob and Alice Wright, their
51st; and Earl and Alice Green,
their 55th.
Bob Wright and Pat Havey
were crowned king and queen
of the prom, as they posed for
treasured memory photos.
The dance floor was crowd-
ed throughout the evening as
we danced to the music we


L
N
I


revere, including "Fly Me to
the Moon," made famous by
Frank Sinatra, the peppy "Ja
Da," the immortal "Begin the
Beguine" and, a personal
favorite, "Misty," made famous
by Johnny Mathis.
The hauntingly
beautiful 'All of Me"
and "All the Way"
kept the couples
close together in lov-
S ing embraces.
Swing swinging
along to "Besame
Mucho" and "Her-
nando's Hideaway"
and thrilling to the
Levins lyrics of "The Girl
ID THE from Ipanema"
UNITY brought out the best
of the ballroom
dancing techniques perfected
through the years.
The Glen Miller set brought
appreciative applause as we
danced to "String of Pearls"
and "In the Mood."
Dreamily, we circled the
floor time and again with clas-
sic hits like "Moonlight
Serenade," "Body and Soul"
and "Our Love is Here to Stay"
At intermission, we enjoyed
a fabulous buffet, then
returned 'to the ballroom
where a flower-decked arch-
way was provided for those
who wanted to take a prom pic-
ture. One by one, the starry-;


eyed couples posed for their
memory photo of this lovely
evening.
The selections all were
danceable from the waltz,
swing, jitterbug (sometimes
referred to as rock and roll),
cha cha, the romantic tango,
fox trot and the easy, simple
two-step.
To contact this versatile
band, call John Durbin at 795-
1863 for your next dance.
Upcoming events sponsored
by the Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Center include a per-
formance of the Rick Dah-
linger Trio, the Patriotic Dance
with Marty and the Nice Guys
on July 21 and Sunday in the
Hills with Mr. and Mrs. Banjos
Sing-A-Long on July 29. Call
746-4882 for reservations.
As the band played their
closing selection "Show Me the
Way to Go Home," we gave the
band and the committee a
standing ovation with the
anticipation of yet another sen-
ior prom next year.

Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community. Let her know
about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to P.O.
Box 803, Crystal River,
FL 34423.


Life to have festival


Special to the Chronicle
Life Care Center of Citrus
County is having a summer fun
festival from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. Friday, with proceeds
going to benefit Operation
Christmas Child.
There will be carnival-style
games with prizes and a giant
wet slide - The Big Kahuna -
so bring your swimsuits.
Cuppy's coffee and smoothies,
cotton candy, clowns with face
painting, a flush tank and a
food and drink concession.
WOW 104.3 Radio will have
live remote broadcast.
Life Care invites the commu-
nity to bring their children out
to enjoy the summer fun. There


, Operation
Christmas Child
provides gift-filled
shoeboxes
to children
in war-torn and
poverty-stricken
areas.

address is 3325 Jerwayne
Lane, Lecanto. They are next
door to Suncoast Dermatology
on County Road 491. Call 746-
4434.


Life Care supports Opera-
tion Christmas Child annually
Operation Christmas Child is
conducted by Samaritans
Purse, a world relief organiza-
tion headed by Franklin
Graham, son of evangelist Billy
Graham. Operation Christmas
Child provides gift-filled shoe-
boxes to children in war torn
and poverty-stricken areas
throughout the world.
Last year, Life Care, with the
support of community, church-
es and schools, donated 1,000
boxes to these needy children.
This year we hope to exceed
that amount
Come cool off and enjoy
some summer fun with us.
Don't forget the swimsuits.


Drawing to benefit children


Winner to be

picked July 14
Special to the Chronicle
Steve and Jewel Lamb, own-
ers of Crystal Chevrolet in
Homosassa, have donated a
new 2007 victory red Corvette
to be given to one lucky ticket
holder during the annual


Corvette drawing to benefit Big
Brothers Big Sisters of
Pinellas, Hernando and Citrus
Counties and Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
Only 2,000 tickets are avail-
able for a $100 donation each.
The official drawing will take
place July 14 at Crystal
Chevrolet Winner need not be
present. All proceeds will go
directly to Big Brothers Big
Sisters and Boys & Girls Clubs


Only 2,000 tickets
are available for a
$100 donation
each.

in support of their programs.
For tickets and more infor-
mation, contact Lori at 621-
9225 or Beth at 344-0400.


' 0 Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
i * Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but mul-
| tiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


I Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 563-3280; or by e-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com.


* News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day cannot be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than twice.


Senior Prom ends


with standing ovation








Fi. TUESDAY,u J o U, CUNE COU 20 - - - NTY (FL)CHRONICL


SC i upTlj.q, J UITMfl9(1' 200


TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 26, 2007 c: ComcastCitrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis
C B D I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
WESH News (N) NBC News Entertainme Access America's Got Talent Hopeful stars audition for the Law & Order: Special News (N) Tonight
BC 19 19 19 171 nt Hollywood judges in New York. (N) '14' B9 1997 Victims Unit '14, L,V' 4684 8514775 Show
WED - BBC World Business The NewsHour With Jim Nova "The Great Inca The Life of Birds by David Frontline/World "After the PO.V. (N Subtitled-
P 3 3 News 'G' Rpt. Lehrer c 5959 Rebellion" (N) 'PG V Attenborough 'PG' Wave" (N) 7930 English) '14, V' [ 43404
WUFT BBC News Business The NewsHour With Jim Nova "The Great Inca The Life of Birds by David Frontline/World "After the Monty Tavis Smiley
S 5 5 5 8201 Rpt. Lehrer (N) 61978 Rebellion" (N) 'PG, V Attenborough 'PG' Wave" (N) 60249 Python 56751
WFNews (N) NBC News Entertainme Extra (N) America's Got Talent Hopeful stars audition for the Law & Order: Special News (N) Tonight
NBC 8 8 8 8 1539 nt 'PG' judges in New York. (N)'14' [] 67152 Victims Unit '14, L,V 5844442 Show
IWFT'V News (N) ABC WId Jeopardy! Wheel of Safety According to Shaq's Big Challenge (N) Primetime "Family News (N) Nightline
A R0 20 20 20 20 ] 5133 News 'G' SB 3046 Fortune 'G' Report Jim 'PQ D' 'PG, L' [S 90404 Secrets" (N) [ 93591 8153539 83199442
WTSP News (N) Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! NCIS "Sharif Returns" (In The Unit "The Water Is 48 Hours Mystery (In News (N) Late Show
BS 10 10 10 10 3775 News Fortune 'G' 'G' 7 3539 Stereo) 'PqG L,V B Wide" 'PQ DL,V B Stereo) 'PG' cc 91133 8144881
FWTVX _ News (N) B9 62268 The Bemie King of the On the Lot (In Stereo House "Finding Judas" (In News (N) cl 57713 News (N) M*A*S*H
FOX E 13 13 1Mac Show Hill 'PG' Live) 'PG' 34862 Stereo) 'PG, L' S 54626 8955997 'PG'
lWCJB News (N) ABC WId Entertainme Inside According to According to Shaq's Big Challenge (N) Primetime "Family News (N) Nightline
ABC 11 11 92881 News nt Edition 'PG' Jim 'PG, Jim 'PG D' 'PG, L' 92404 Secrets" (N) c9 95591 4161171 67917268
WLRichard and Lindsay Kenneth Fresh FresHope Pastor Life Today Bay Focus The 700 Club 'PG' 9B Pure Omega XL
IND * 2 2 2 2 Roberts'G' [ 1132959 Hagin Jr. Manna 8389881 Dayna 'G'9303881 1137404 5461997 Passion 'G' 4683220
w sNews (N) ABC WId Inside The Insider According to According to Shaq's Big Challenge (N) Primetime "Family News (N) Nightline
ABC 11 11 65775 News Edition 'PG' 85539 Jim 'PG, Jim 'PG, D' 'PG, L' B 89978 Secrets" (N) E 82065 6010065 59937733
WWMOR_____ - Will & Grace Frasier 'PG' Still Access Movie: ** "Highwaymen" (2004) Jim Caviezel, Will & Grace Frasier 'PG' Still Access
M 12 12 'PG1 S' 76442 Standing Hollywood Rhona Mitra, Frankie Faison. Oc 29510 'PG' 86152 Standing Hollywood
Judge Mathis (In Stereo) Every- Seinfeld Movie: **s "The Distinguished Gentleman" Every- Scrubs '14' Seinfeld Sex and the
MNT 6 6 6 6 'PG' cc 6522626 Raymond 'PG' (1992) Eddie Murphy. RE 1115688 Raymond 5845046 'PG, D' City'14,
WTOGThe Malcolm in The Friends 'PG' Gilmore Girls "The Great Veronica Mars "Of Vice The King of The King of According to According to
CW N 4 4 4 4 Simpsons the Middle Simpsons 9[ 6881 Stink" 'PG' 32404 and Men" '14, D,L' 52268 Queens Queens Jim 'PG, D' Jim 'PG'
NWYKE ews Live Mike County Every Day Full Throttle 32084 Motorcycle Racing FIM World Championship News 83387 County
16 16 16 16 276404 50404 Court is a Gift Motocross. From Sevlievo, Bulgaria. 35171 Court
WOGX 1 Seinfeld King of the The The On the Lot (In Stereo House "Finding Judas" (In News (N) (In Stereo) S9 Seinfeld That'70s
FOX 13 13 'PG' Hill'PG' Simpsons Simpsons Live'PG Stereo'PG L' 85572 95959 PG, D Show '4,
WACX Assembly- The 700 Club 'PG' B Bishop T.D. The Power Manna-Fest Faith Show Variety Andrew Claud Bowers 24794
IND 21 21 21 God 304171 M Jakes of Praise 'G'9065 30510 16404 WommackI
1WVEA Noticias 62 Noticiero Duelo de Pasiones La Fea Mas Yo Amo a Destilando Amor 140387 Ver Para Creer 990864 Noticias 62 Noticiero
S 15 15 15 15 (N) 360084 Univisi6n 540323 Bella 'PG' Juan (N)341084 UnivisiOn
WXPX Diagnosis Murder 'PG' [9 MLB Baseball Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay Devil Rays. From Tropicana The Wonder The Wonder BodogFight (In Stereo)
- 17 46084 Field in St. Petersburg. FPl. (Live) 854572 Years 'PG' Years 'G' cc 54404
54 48 54 54 Cold Case Files '14, V CS: Miami "Shock" (n CSI: Miami "Rampage" Bounty Bounty riss Angel Criss Angel Criss Angel Criss Angel
9] 384423 Stereo) '14, SV 5 '14. V B9 681713 Hunter Hunter
i 55 64 55 55 Movie: ** s "The Ninth Gate" (1999, Suspense) Movie: * * * "The Last of the Mohicans" (1992, Adventure) Movie: **** "Dances With
Johnny Depp, Frank Langella. 387607 Daniel Day-Lewis, Madeleine Stowe. 975591 Wolves" (1990, Western) 225539
52 35 52 52 The Crocodile Hunter The Most Fooled by The Most Extreme Wildlife on Animal Animal Cops Houston The Most Fooled by
Diaries 'G' S 1134317 Extreme 'G' Nature (N) Hoarders. 'G'5440404 One (N) 'G' Battle. 'PG' B 5463355 Extreme 'G' Nature 'G'
RAVO 74 Top Chef Fruit.'14' 9 Kathy Griffin: My Life on Kathy Griffin: My Life on Kathy Griffin: My Life on Kathy Griffin: My Life on Kathy Griffin: My Life on
1 1A_ 74_ 230404 the D-List '14 DL' the D-List '14, D,L the D-List '14, DL' the D-List '14, D,L' 881152 the D-List '14, DL'
( 27 61 27 27 Reno 911! Reno 9111 Scrubs '14' Scrubs '14' Daily Show Colbert Mind of South Park Gary Gulman: Boyish Daily Show Colbert
'14' 54220 '14'45572 22133 74084 Report Mencia'14' 'MA'90143 Man'14' c[ 17775 � Report
98 45 98 98 Crossroads (In Stereo) Greatest Moments Reba Dukes of Hazzard (In Dukes of Hazzard (In Crossroads (In Stereo) Bon Jovi Unplugged on
1L1JJ 98 45 98 98 40602 McEntire. 21978 Stereo) 'G' 30626 Stereo) 'G' 10862 20249 CMT (In Stereo) 864978
EWN 95 65 95 95 Choices We Bishop Daily Mass: Our Lady of Mother Angelica Live Religious The Holy Threshold of Hope 'G' Christ in the Catholic
_WI__ 95 65 95 95 Face Javier the Angels 'G' 9108152 Classic Episodes Catalogue Rosary 9107423 City 'G' Church
A 29 52 29 29 8 Simple 8 Simple Grounded Grounded Movie: ** "The Prince & Me"(2004) Julia Stiles. A collegian Whose The 700 Club 'PG' B
SRules 'PG, Rules 'P for Life 'PG' for Life 'PQ and a Danish prince fall in love. X 369210 Line? 278423
Fr 30 60 30 30 Movie: ***"Friday Night Lights"(2004) Billy Movie: * * s "Kiss of the Dragon" (2001, Action) That'70s That '70s "Universal Soldier: The
Bob Thornton, Derek Luke. 2981220 Jet Li, Bridget Fonda. 9102978 Show '14, Show '14, Return" (1999) 5445539
lG-ItVL23 57 23 23 Look What I What's- If Walls House Designed to Buy Me 'G' Decorating 24 Hour House Spice Up House Hidden
D_____ 23 57 23 23 Did!'G' House? Could Hunters 'G' Sell'G' 5281065 Cents (N) Design'G' Hunters 'G' My Kitchen Worth? Potential'G'
T 51 25 51 5 ) Modern Marvels "The Modern Marvels Engineering an Empire The Universe "The Moon" Ice Road Truckers 'PG' Engineering an Empire
HS 1 2 _ Supermarket" 'PG' "Distilleries"'G'0 9 "China" 'PG' B 9199404 'PG' c9 91192688 c 9112355 "Greece" 'PG' 2445249
fi 24 38 24 24 Reba 'PQ Reba 'PQ, Still Still Reba 'PG' Reba 'PG' Movie: "Abducted" (2007, Drama) Sarah Wynter, Will & Grace Will & Grace
D' 494249 D,L' 478201 Standing Standing 764510 750317 Andrew Walker. '14, S'B 191775 'PG' 'PG'
28 36 28 28 Ned's Zoey 101 Fairly Jimmy SpongeBob Drake & Home Fresh Fresh Fresh Fresh Fresh
S School 'Y7' 958862 OddParents Neutron Josh'Y7'B T Videos Prince Prince Prince Prince Prince
SCiFI 31 59 31 31 Eureka Fargo invents a Eureka "Purple Haze" c9 Eureka "H.O.U.S.E. Eureka "Once in a ECW (Live) '14, L,V' Painkiller Jane (In Stereo)
mental mouse. 6979930 5941046 Rules'" 9 5950794 Lifetime" cc 5930930 5940317 c9 9266688
37 43 37 37 CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Movie: ** * "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972, Adventure) Robert CSI: Crime
investigation'14, L,S,V investigation '14' 904442 Investigation'14, DLS,V Redford, Will Geer. Premiere. 213978 Scn
49 23 49 49 Seinfeld Seinfeld Every- Every- Evevery - ery- Sex and the Sex and the Friends '14' Friends 'PG, Sex and the Sex and the
S 4 'PG' 850881 , D' Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond City '14, City '14, 202355 S' 288775 City '14, City '14,
Movie: *** "The Facts of Life" Cartoon Movie: **A "The Bigamist"(1953) Movie: ** "Outrage" (1950, Drama) Movie: *** "The
-__ - - 53 (1960) Bob Hope. 24248862 Alley Joan Fontaine. 7238591 Mala Powers. 9201442 Hitch-Hiker" 7925442
TDC 53 34 53 53 Dirty Jobs "Skull Cleaner" Dirty Jobs "100th Dirty Dirty Jobs "100th Dirty Dirty Jobs "Billboard Deadliest Catch: Behind Dirty Jobs "100th Dirty
___ 53 34 53 53, '14, L' c9 399355 Jobs Special"'14, L' Job Special" '14, ' Installer" (N) '14, L' Jobs Special" '14, L'
50 46 50 50 Property Ladder 'G' I Overhaulin' Truck 'G' 9 American Chopper 'PG' Miami Ink More staff Miami Ink "Old Friends" Miami Ink "Family Values
S 56 46 5 94688 999510 c 975930 needed. 'PG, D' 995794 (N) 'PG, D' 998881 Tour" 'PG, D' 322084
48 33 48 48 Law & Order "Dazzled" Law & Order "Nowhere Law & Order "License to Law & Order "Gov Love" Without a Trace "John Without a Trace
'14' 685930 Man" '14'997152 Kill" '14' 973572 '14' c9 993336 Michaels" '14, LV "Showdown" '14, V
TRAV 54 Ice Cream Palaces 'PG' Taste of Taste of Inside Grand Canyon The Colorado: River of Made in Made in Inside Grand Canyon
I ] c c 7059423 America America National Park 'G' 3203107 Wonders 'G' 3308751 America America National Park 'G' 4918775
32 75 32 32 Little House on the Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Good Times Good Times Sanford and Sanford and M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Movie: *** * "Arthur'
I I fPrairie 'G' c 1152713 'PG' 'PG' Son 'PG' Son 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 9988713
USA 47 32 47 47 Law & Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Special Movie: ** * "The Bourne Identity" (2002, Suspense) Matt Law & Order: Special
I Order: SVU Intent '14' 9 645882 Victims Unit '14' 368152 Damon, Franka Potente, Chris Cooper. cc 427539 Victims Unit '14' 645171
f118 18 18 RHome Funniest America's Funniest Home MLB Baseball Colorado Rockies at Chicago Cubs. From Wrigley Field in WGN News Scrubs '14'
_ improvementn Pets Videos 'PG' 886607 Chicago. (In Stereo Live) 9 503959 208930
TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 26, 2007 c: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis
C BD I T6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

D N 40 46 46 That's So That's So Hannah Zack & Cody Movie: "Zenon: Girofe 2st Century" (1999) Thats So Life With Zack & Cody Hannah
S 4 4 4 4 Raven 'G' Raven 'Y7' Montana 'G' Kirsten Storms. 'G' [ 871775 Raven'G' Derek 'G' Montana 'G'
HAL 39 68 39 39 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Walker, Texas Ranger '14, Walker, Texas Ranger '14, Movie: "Hard Ground"(2003, Western) Burt Murder, She Wrote (In
13 8 93 'PG'9075161 'PG' 1075341 V EB 5457794 V c9 5466442 Reynolds, Bruce Dern. 'P V cE 5436201 Stereo) 'G' c9 3607688
Movie: ** "Firewall" (2006) Harrison Big Love- REAL Sports With Bryant Movie: ** 'he Sentinel" (2006, Suspense) Michael Entourage Big Love,
_______Ford. 90 7103220 Begin Gumbel 'PG' 173715 Douglas. B 923292 __ _____'MA' 308978 Big
Movie: ***A "Excalibur"(1981) Nicol Williamson, Movie: **s "HomeAlone2: Lostin New-York" Movie: **. "Land of the Dead" Sin City
Nigel Terry. (In Stereo) [E 315220 (1992) Macaulay Culkin. [9 194862 (2005) Simon Baker. 980881 Diaries 'MA'
T 7 66 97 97 Exposed (N) Yo Momma Real World- Real World- Real World RealWorld Rob & Big Rob & Big Real World- Rob-& Big Rob & Big Nick Cannon
S7489317 14, D R R Rd Vegas Vegas 'PG'465862 PG' 567794 Rd (N) 840539 PG' 477607
71 Where'sAmelia Earhart? Explorer"Inside North Conspiracy Moon Landing Critical Situation "Apollo Air Emergency "Mystery Conspiracy Moon Landing
'PG'8894978 Korea" '14' 5215510 'G' 5291930 13" 'PG' 5211794 Crashes 'PG'5214881 'G'5437862
p -) 6 "Come On Get Happy- Movie: *** 'WarGames" (1983) Matthew Movie: *** "Simon Birch" (1998, Comedy-Drama) Movie: ** 'TheScout"
62 1 Partridge Family" Broderick, Dabney Coleman. 9 48847084 lan Michael Smith. 9 2141268 (1994) 9182201

C l 43 42 43 43 Mad Money 3493713 On the Money 1563688 Fast Money 1572336 Deal or No Deal (In The Big Idea With Donny Mad Money 7829978
Stereo) '14' 1552572 Deutsch
40 29 40 40 40Lou Dobbs Tonight c[ The Situation Room Paula Zahn Now B Larry King Live 'PG' 9B Anderson Cooper 360 'PG' cc 581249
IUNJ 4937539 218881 294201 214065
C R 25 55 25 25Forensic Forensic Cops 'P, V Cops 'PG, Cops'PQ V Cops'PQ, V Forensic Forensic Murder by the Book '14' Haunting Haunting
_____2 Files'14' Files'14' 6085775 L,V 2640959 6094423 6073930 Files'14' Files '14' 1580355 Evidence Evidence
- 44 37 44 44 Special Report (Live) BB The Fox Report With The O'Reilly Factor (Live) Hannity & Colmes (Live) On the Record With Greta The O'Reilly Factor
6904626 Shepard Smith [ ' 1 5945862 9B 5965626 Van Susteren 9264084
S42 41 42 42 Tucker 6977572 Hardball 9 5949688 Countdown With Keith Scarborough Country MSNBC Investigates MSNBC Investigates: To
Olbermann 5958336 (Live) 5938572 5948959 Love and to Kill

FE _ i 33 27 33 33 SportsCenter (Live) [ 2007 ESPY Nomination U.S. Poker Championship U.S. Poker Championship Baseball Tonight (Live) SportsCenter (Live) B
7 33 27 33 33775 Special [c 278189 R 973797 1 290481 123030 454881
34 28 34 34 Gearz NASCAR Who's Number 1? I9 College Basketball 2007 Slam Dunk and 3-Point WNBA Basketball New York Liberty at Sacramento
4275607 Now ] 9708797 Contest. From Atlanta. (Taped) X 9803341 Monarchs. (Live) 9 9280775
FQ 35 3 35 35 The Sports Madins on MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Florida Marlins. From Dolphin Stadium in Inside the Final Score Best Damn Sports Show
List Deck (Live) Miami. (Uve) 428794 Martins Period 586220
GLF - 67 The Tum Quest for the Golf Central Inside the Best Ever (N) 1574794 Tiger's Prowl 1554930 British Open Highlights The Golf Central
_____ ___2660713 Card (Live) PGATour 1564317 Approach
36 31 36 36 InMyOwn InMy Own 2Xtreem Around NASCAR Classics 559191 Countdown to NBA Draft
Wrs36 31 36 36 Words Track. Day 69336


he PlusCode number printed next to each pro-
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys-
tem. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea-
ture (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR),
all you need to do to record a program is enter its


PlusCode number.
If you have cable service, please make sure that
your cable channel numbers are the same as the
channel numbers in this guide. If not, youwwill need to
perform a 'simple one-time procedure to match up the


cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys-
tem, please contact your VCR manufacturer.


The channel lineup for KLiP Interactive cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.


Other woman wants to stick by engaged man


Dear Annie: I'm in love with an
engaged man, but unfortunately,
he isn't engaged to me. He
knows how I feel and has told me he has
similar feelings. We know we aren't
doing the smartest thing, but we both
believe a little bit is better
than nothing at all.
The problem arises with
his fiance. I don't dislike
her, but I am concerned
about her effect on him.
There have been times when
I believe she's hacked into
his e-mail account because
letters of mine were sent to
everyone in his address
book. She also spread
rumors around that he beat
her, which I find completely ANNI
absurd, and I think at one MA||
point, she might have staged
a near rape to earn sympathy.
I feel he should be told, but if it comes
from me, I'm afraid I'll just come off as
jealous and spiteful. So far, I've tried to
let him notice things on his own, but I
think he may purposely be blinding
himself to certain of her actions to avoid
being hurt. Should I tell him my con-
cerns or just leave things as they are? -
Fearful in Love
Dear Fearful: This guy is engaged to
someone else and fooling around with
you, and you're worried his fiancee is
taking advantage of him? Open your
eyes and take a closer look If the two of
you are so in love, he should have the


L


decency to break off the engagement. If
he won't, you can be sure it's because he
doesn't care for you as much as you
think, and it won't matter if you spill the
beans or not. Get out of this relationship
before you become the Other Woman in
his marriage, writing us that
you're a wreck because he
won't leave his wife.
Dear Annie: My daughter
is 22 and has made a choice
to remain a virgin until mar-
riage. The problem? Her
doctor.
The last two times "Chloe"
went to her gynecologist, the
female doctor asked if she
was on birth control. When
my daughter explained she
IE'S was a virgin, the doctor did-
,BOX n't believe her and kept say-
_ ing, "You can tell me the
truth." Chloe repeated that she had
decided to remain a virgin until mar-
riage. The doctor kept insisting that
Chloe be "honest" with her.
Today, Chloe told me she went to the
same doctor to ask if birth control pills
would help regulate her menstrual
cycle. The doctor told her she had to get
a pregnancy test first, even though
Chloe reiterated that she was not sexu-
ally active. Chloe was so humiliated,
she has decided to change physicians.
What is wrong with doctors these
days? Is it so inconceivable that a young
woman would be a virgin? - Mother of
a Virgin


Dear Mother. Doctors who have often
been on the receiving end of less-than-
truthful patients can become cynical
and, when prescribing birth control
pills, feel safer requiring a pregnancy
test. But it is unconscionable to repeat-
edly imply that a patient is a liar. Chloe
is right to find someone more suitable.
Dear Annie: I'd like to tell
"Cautiously Optimistic" that some
anger problems cannot be fixed by
anger management. Sometimes it's a
chemical imbalance.
My brother and I both had anger
issues all our lives and only recently
discovered, in our 50s, that we need
medical help. I used to be angry at other
people for not getting upset at things
that upset me. After I had been on med-
ication for a while, I realized this must
be what normal people feel like. It was
enlightening.
My brother had a horrible breakdown
before he got proper medical help. I
hope "Optimistic's" boyfriend can
receive help without being judged, and
at an earlier age than we did. - Finally
Feeling Better
Dear Finally: How unfortunate it took
so long for you and your brother to get
help. We hope "Optimistic's" boyfriend
and others like him will call their doc-
tors today.
Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar. E-mail
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190,
Chicago, IL 60611.


6-26


Local RADIO ======


WJUF-FM 90.1
WHGN-FM 91.9
WXCV-FM 95.3
WXOF-FM 96.3
WRGO-FM 102.7


National Public Radio
Religious
Adult Contemporary
Adult Mix
Oldies


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

RAPPE


wiww.jumbie.com

REDOAFL


Answer: A


Yesterday's


WIFL-FM 104.3
WJQB-FM 106.3
WFJV-FM 103.3
WRZN-AM 720


Adult Mix
Oldies
'50s, '60s, '70s
Adult Standards


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: SOOTY PHONY ASYLUM MEDLEY
Answer: What the dairy farmer milked when he was
kicked by old Betsy - SYMPATHY


Bridge


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

We are studying how to avoid
losers in suit contracts. There are
two common ways to do this. The
first is to ruff a loser in the shorter
trump hand.
Suppose you have a trump suit of
9-8-7 on the board and A-K-Q-J-10 in
your hand. You have five trump
tricks for sure. But if you can ruff a
loser on the board, that gets you up
to a sixth trump trick In contrast,
taking a ruff in your hand does not
generate an extra trick;. it con-
sumes one of your five winners.
So, if you can arrange to ruff a
loser in the shorter trump hand,
that will almost always be the right
line of play. But even then, you
must occasionally be careful - as
in this deal. Against your four-
heart contract, West leads the
spade five: six, queen, ace. How
would you continue?
You have four losers: two clubs,
one diamond and one spade.
Why one spade? Well, in one of
my classes, a man, seeing that he
could ruff his spade loser on the
board, counted only three losers.
Then he recalled I had said that
when your loser count is not more
than you can afford, immediately
draw trumps - and that is exactly
what he did. But drawing the


1
p
4 E
7 L
11 S
12 T
14 R
15 t
e
16 FR
17 G
18 S
te
20 R
o22
22 N


ACROSS 36 "- cost you"
37 Darts away
Cells' 39 Domineering
predecessors 40 To date
Exercise place 41 Happy shout
littlee pieces 42 Vital fluid
Sum total 45 Marbles
Thunder 49 Right,
Raucous diver on a map
Most of the 50 Japanese clog
earth 52 Grain
Run in neutral 53 Issue a sum-
3overness in mons
Siam 54 Constantly
pace 55 Victorian, e.g.
telescope 56 Mix it up
Rumors, 57 Wall
iften hanging
lot in the pink 58 CIA agent


23 Kitchen pest
24 Pass around
27 Defoe
castaway
30 Wrestler's grip
31 Cows' mouth-
fuls-
32 Vitality
34 Before
35 Explodes


DOWN
1 Currency
2 Moldy cheese
3 Thick slice
4 Radiator
covering
5 Matterhorn
echo


West
A J 9 7 5 3
V 72
* A 8 2
4 Q 7


North 06-26-0'
4 8 6
V Q 4 3
* QJ5
4 J 9 8 6 3
East
2 4 Q 10
V 8 6 5
+ 7 6 4 3
4 AK 10 5
South
4 AK 4
V A K J 10 9
* K 10 9
4 4 2


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both


South
1
4 V


Opening lead: A 5

opposing trumps left dummy with-
out any. When it came time to rufP
the spade four on the board, he'
could not do it and went down one.
Count all of those losers.
At trick two, cash the spade king,
Then, lead your last spade and ruff
it with dummy's heart queen. Do
not send a girl, the heart three, to
do a woman's job.
After ruffing the spade, draw
trumps, knock out the diamond'
ace, and claim 10 tricks.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
MIAR BA E LO
E VIL UTES ORO
R ECIONINECT F
ECIHIOED EXO
FIT TEX
J APAN AlI M ING
ALESHUES EOS,

TS IRT HIEIDG E
NINK LOW
COV N AR U ED!
RG OR INANC E


6 - de mer
7 Wild parties
8 Free
electrons
9 Cager
- Kukoc


10 Break
13 Letter
signoff
19 Egg layer
21 Responsibility i
24 Yon maiden
25 - d'oeuvres
26 Obi-Wan
portrayer
27 Tea holders
28 Decides
29 Morays and
congers
31 Modest home
33 Wield, as oars
35 Ode, e.g.
36 Missouri
neighbor
38 Off-white
39 He married
Bacall
41 Restaurant
freebie
42 Torso muscles
43 Cafe au -
44 Italian wine
city
46 Boot parts
47 Legendary
marshal
48 Command to
Rover
51 A Gabor sister


� 2007 by NEA, Inc.


West
Pass
Pass


North
2 V
Pass


East
Pass
Pass


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals G


"J B PIG NJ L XPMEZI ZA BPL, TKZ
EG PI ZBPSG J XAAC BEA EJI LA
FCJL XAD FAIIPTCG YGXGJZ."
- CAKPI C'JNAKD


PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "Some guys are inwardly outgoing." - Ralph Kiner
"Why buy good luggage? You only use it when you travel." -Yogi Berra
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 6-26


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


CifRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


ENTERTAINMENT


7









TUESDAYJUNE 26 2007 9C


ounty (FL) CanoNICLE OOM
ICS , ,


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser
at RR-NNREF, kOUNR)
;RF-FFLLj\- T k>OE� 15 Jt R


15 RF-F-~E 5CE.TWEER 5UMM NOf4 WN.RJZK!
TR-OTIAEK EE5EP .SONS 7,


1 '' 1I 1 1 17 -7 -


Kit'N


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


6-26>;
CD 2007 Bil Kane. Inc.
Dist. by King Features Synd.
www.famltycircus.com

"No fair,


Jeffy! You can't call dibs
on Grandma!"


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"1408" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 5, 7:50, 10:10 p.m.
"Evan Almighty" (PG) Noon,
2:30 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10 p.m. Digital. No passes or
super savers.
"Fantastic Four: Silver
Surfer" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 2:40,
4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 12:40
p.m., 3:50, 7:15 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:20 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 5:05, 7:40, 9:50 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) 12:30
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"1408" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m.,
* 2:55 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Evan Almighty" (PG) Noon,


2:20 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m. Digital. No passes or
super savers.
"Nancy Drew" (PG) 12:10
p.m., .2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10 p.m. Digital.
"Fantastic Four: Silver
Surfer" (PG) 12:20 p.m., 2:40
p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10
p.m. Digital.
"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10, 7:45, 10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:45 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. Digital.
"Knocked Up" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) 12:15
p.m., 3:45, 7:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Shrek the Third" (PG) 12:30
p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:55 p.m. Digital.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Arlo and Janis


Your Birthday: Goals based on realistic possibilities
have a much better chance for success than those
established for you by others. Be your own person, and
depend on your talent and knowledge to get you by.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - There's a possibility
you could be far too much of a dreamer or too negative
to be a good gambler. Either extreme could cause
unsound investment practices.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Normally, you're pretty
good at handling family affairs. But failing to see your
kin's point of view - because you're far too stuck on
your own - could render you totally ineffective.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Usually, being a detail
person serves you well. But you could be so stuck on
details that you fail to see the larger picture, which
includes the human element.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - When buying a large-
ticket item, whether it is a practical necessity for the
household or a luxury purchase, keep your budget in
mind at all times. Your desire could exceed your means.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If you have not treated
someone with consideration in the past, it is payback
time, This person will find a way to reciprocate in kind.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Take special care


about what you say to colleagues. If you talk to the wrong
people, it'll become common knowledge in no time.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Examine your
motives in your behavior toward others. If you snub a
pal in order to concentrate on someone you want to
impress, the only impression you'll make is a bad one.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Afailure to take a firm
position on an important issue could prove to be disap-
pointing and a harmful compromise to those involved.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Good looks alone.
won't accomplish your purposes. You're going to have
to possess both the knowledge and the ability to deal
diplomatically with people to get where you want to go.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - You could demand
greater control over a joint situation, and then, if things
don't go perfectly for you, blame the other person
involved as if it's his or her fault.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - You or your mate may
be at your best when it comes to making a decision con-
cerning a family matter. One could be too emotional
about it, while the other is too harsh.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - If you fail to plan'prop-
erly or let an emotional problem overwhelm you, you
could exhaust yourself and accomplish little.


CITRUS C


Peanuts


Iilbert
I


NANCY, THE EMPLOYEE
WITH SERIAL PERSONAL
PROBLEMS
I'M IN LOVE WITH
A MEDICAL SCHOOL
CADAVER.


DO YOU EVER THINK
THAT MAAYBE YOUR
PERSONAL PROBLEMS
ARE CAUSED BY YOUR
OWN BAD DECISIONS?


HOW'S IT hMY FAULT
THAT lMY BOYFRIEND
IS ACTING COLD?


Betty


Today's MOVIES


Today's HOROSCOPE


;1_ ,


ir "' d-P


< "'~' �.! jtd w









EDS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


-' ,u~-. , ~*iI wU.V KAI V. W,Amm ~f

Fa: 35)56-56 1TolFre:(88.82-30.malmcasiies honclolie om Iwesie w w 6honclolie ao

Tra es Gener_


-I^H
HELLO, SWM 61, 5'9";
150 Ibs. financially OK,
But lonely, seeks SWF,
slender, for companion
and friend, who likes
dancing, beach & din-
ing out to a share a sin-
cere and honest rela-
tionship. Smoker and
casual drinker OK, but
no drugs, Thanks
Dennis (352) 628-1775
SWF Attractive, F/T .
seeks trim gentleman,
58-68 who is
affectionate, with
sense of humor to enjoy
Inside/outside activities
with for LTR.
(262) 745-1150 Local




RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.cm
- �--^- --



$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Recelot
3 Cedar Trees
You Remove
(352) 796-6773
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles In your
yard? (352) 860-2545






*13)o


How

To Make

Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966
, - ai' " " i '
Cli l).iii.E
www.chronicleonline.com


$ CASH $ PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
CALL (352) 220-0687
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service,
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
FREE REMOVAL
Of unwanted househid
& Garage Sale Items.
Call (352) 726-9500
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
(888) 480-1170
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



* YOU PICK PEAS *
* $8 a bucket *
220-8109 or 302-3687
Located In Lecanto





BANKRUPTCY I
* Name Change |
* .Child Support
*Wills
We Come To You
637-4022. 795-5999









DRUM LESSONS
Prof. drummer, Music
field 50+ yrs. 794-0265
Glory Recording Studios






Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
in our Mobile Clinic.
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices Including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail Wed,Thurs,
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
appt. 352-726-8801


WEn8 L C :3916VI S IL

-E- I T t",16,z 8
.8 6T /-sI1LE ;.
iwE6 E tz--ri

7 z 8 S,/ T;E 6 9

T E 9? Z6't 7 5S
6SL19�s T z


* PROFILE T SHIRTS *
Custom Screen Printina
Hats, Shirts, Jackets &
morel 352-344-1978

r RENTAL FINDER 1
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
----m - J
* SOD * SOD SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032






www.adoota
rescued pet.com
View available pets
on our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Need help rehoming
a pet - call us
Adoptive homes
available for small
dogs
Reauested donations
are tax deductible

Pet Adoptions
Thursday,
June 28th
12-2 pm
Mercantile Bank
Rt. 44, Inverness

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO

BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.CQM

CAT ADOPTIONS










Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.org.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.





t and read

1,000's of Items sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you get rid of
your unwanted stuff.

CHi pNiCLE
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441


LPN
Needed For Busy
Urology Office
Fax Resume to:
352-726-8763 or Mail
609 W. Highland
Blvd. Inverness 34452


Your Website
Chronicle Webslte
Directory In print
and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print
+ Online
= One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
S Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966

-CAR SAL ES
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

Get The Value of Your
Home
www.naturecoastlivina.n
et

Hurricane Info
www.chronicleonline
.com

NEWSPAPERS
www.chronicle
online.com
Real Estate Information
www.FreeCitrusCounty
Homelnfo.com
| Real Estate.
www.chronclehome
finder.com


www.naturecoast
homefront.com


www.chronicle.
rentalflnder.com




BRIGHT BEGINNINGS
PRESCHOOL
Is Accepting
Applications For:,
EXP. TEACHERS'
ASSISTANTS
(352) 795-1240




BILINGUAL
RECEPTIONIST
Needed part time for edu-
cational foundation. Must
be fluent in Spanish. Fax
resume to 352/795-1970.
P/T
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Immediate openingI
Must have excellent
phone skills & general
office knowledge
with computer
experience.
20 hrs/wk. M-F.
Please fax resume to:
(352) 344-0067 or
email bbussardG
edtfours-us.com
TITLE INSURANCE
CLOSING AGENTS,
MANAGERS AND
SALES REPS.
New office locations to
open in Citrus, Hernando
and Marion County. Sal-
ary plus commission
available. Must be expe-
rienced and motivated
with current customer
base. Fax resume for
confidential interview to:
Southern Security
Title-Nancy Sloan@
352-527-6413.




























Hair Stylists & Nail
Tech- Lease Option
Jun. l\ 7om.nolo


$$$$$$$$$$
$1500.00
Sign on Bonus!
Licensed Nurses
11-7
If you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044 HR/
Connie DFWP/ EOE





LPN & RN
(3:45pm-12:15am)
Second Shift
(1 1:45pm-8:15am)
Third Shift
(Full Time)
GREAT BENEFITS!!!
Paid Vacation,
Holidays, Health
Insurance & 401K

Ready for a change?
The best kept secret
in nursing is in
Correctional Nursing.
Current FL LPN or RN
license & valid Drivers
license Is required

To.apply for a new
challenging career
visit our facility
M-F 8:30am - 4:30pmr
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Lecanto, Fl 34461
To apply via internet
www.corrections
carp.com
M/FfVL/HP
E.O.E.. Drug Free
- Workplace

ARNP
Exp'd, F/T for Busy
Doctors office and
Nursing Home.,
Send Resume To:
(352)795-7898
ARNP
Needed for busy
medical office.
Competitive
salary & benefits.
Please fax resume to:
(352) 746-7767
BRENTWOOD
Retirement/
Assisted Living
Has the following
Openings
* LPN's for PRN
*FT CNA's 3-11
& 11-7

All positions -
Insurance after
60 days. Vacation
After 90 days.

Sign on bonus &
paid by exp.
Apply In Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE









DENTAL ASSISTANT

Exp'd only. 28-30 hrs/wk.
Please send resume to:
Blind Box 1338M 1624 N.
Meadowcredt Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
EXPERIENCED
PHLEBOTOMIST
W/ Front Office
experience.
FT for busy Dr's office
$$ Good benefits $$
Fax resume to
352-746-6333

HOME HEALTH
AGENCY

SEEKING
RN Case Mgr.
& LPN
Competitive Salary.
(352) 746-2549
Fax Resume:
(352) 746-2952
ADVOCATE HOME
HEALTHCARE
Lic# HHA299991842
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT &
RECEPTIONIST
Front & Back Exp.,
F/T, computer &
phlebotomy. For busy
primary care MD Off.
Fax Resume To:
352-489-5786


TMC is seeking an
Exp'd
PAYROLL
ADMINISTRATOR

Responsible for all
aspects of multi-site/
multi-state payroll
processing for 6
companies/1000+
employees. Exp. in
ADP software and
Report Smith
preferred. Ability to
work independently,
maintain confidenti-
ality, high attention
to detail, analytical
& problem solving
skills. Must be
computer & Excel
proficient. We offer
a competitive
salary & benefits.
Submit your resume
and salary
requirements to:
TMC
8477 S. Suncoast
Blvd Homosossa, FL
34446
Fax (352) 382-8024
mprzepasniak@
therapymgmtcom
16 . . . .


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Full-time, for busy
Gastro Enterology
practice.
Excellent pay and
benefits package.
Mail Resumes to:
Blind Box 895-P
c/o,Citrus County
Chronicle,
106 W. Main St.,
Inverness, FL 34450
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/LPN
For busy Orthopedic
practice. Immediate
opening please fax
resume to: Nettle
352-746-0333

Medical Front Office
COORDINATOR/
REHAB TECH
Citrus County
Floater
Prominent out
patient physical
therapy operator
In Citrus County
is seeking
an independent,
energetic medical
front office
coordinator/rehab
tech. Qualified
candidates will
have 1-2+ yrs
medical front office
exp., data entry
and good
communication/
customer service
skills. Full time,
excellent salary
and benefits.
Reply with resume:
FAX (352) 382-02121
tmcrecrultlng@
therapymgmt.com

MEDICAL HELP
Seeking two Individu-
als to work In Clerical
& Medical Positions.
Must be energetic,
self motivated &
Interested In pursuing -
an excellent '
opportunity for career
growth. The selected
Individual should be
able to work In a fast
paced environment
and easily handle
multiple medical tasks
efficiently with a
willingness to
learn surgery.
Please Fax resume to:
352-746-2635
No phone calls
please. References
required

NURSE P/T
11-7

JOIN OUR TEAMI
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832
L --3 --- J
**Nurses**
3-11

if you possess above
average skills, are
dedicated to the
higher standards of
elder care, good
documentation and
a genuine caring
attitude;we have a
place for you. We
offer a salary range
comparable to your
experience and
great benefits.
Crystal River Health
and Rehab Center
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-5044 HR/
Connie DFWP/EOE


RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
ALL STAR *
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S

New competitive pay
rates. Call
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111

RN/LPN
Rewarding position
working with adults re-
covering from mental ill-
ness as part of an As-
sertive Treatment Team
providing psychiatric re-
habilitation in the com-
munity. Active FL
RN/LPN license req.
Must have clean driving
record. Apply
LifeStream Behavioral
Ctr. 515 W. Main St.
Leesburg or online at
www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE




DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
Barrington Place, part
of Emeritus Assisted
Living, a dynamic,
rapidly expanding
company committed
to providing quality
care for seniors, is
seeking a motivated,
self-directed
Individual to
coordinate resident
care activity
including resident
assessments,
medication
management &
overall resident
satisfaction & staffing.
Requires strong
'- r. .r.-, ,.: :i t., hr a
documented history
of working with the
elderly, the ability to
problem solve &
Implement resident
focused systems,
experience in an
assisted living, nursing
home or home
health environment,
and a thorough
understanding of
state requirements,
LPN a must.

We provide
comprehensive
benefits, including
competitive pay,
medical, dental,
vision & 401(k) plans
and paid vacation,
holiday & sick
time. Interested
candidates please
forward a resume to:
Barrington Place
Fax: (352) 746-4166
EOE
The Start of
Something Wonderful





SUZUil.',
* IRIN




TODAY1-1 :u
-[criti CariS ,
lPPORUinI NITitfY^
EIn esbSHSurg B












CLERK/^ ^I^
ACCOUNTING5] CLERK^


Auto Detailer CAREGIVERS
CAREGIVERS
p. & Dependable
awson's Detailing S & S Resource &
(352) 302-0063 Services is seeking
Exp'd persons to work with
RE-ENGINEERED developmentally
IETAL BUILDING disabled.
ERECTORS Call (352) 637-3635
local work. Good
arffting salary. Paid - ON C
ildays & vacation. THOMo
Must have transp. E
Mon.-Fri., 8AM-2PM
Free: 877-447-3632 DELIVERY ROUTES
EXP'D ROOF AVAILABLE IN
COATING CRYSTAL RIVER.
APPLICATOR
ALSO LABORERS Earn $200 a week 2-3
early morning hours,
t have valid D.L., be 7 days a week.
g free & able to do There are currently
e out of town work. several newspaper
(352) 489-5900 delivery routes
VAC INSTALLER available In the
yrs exp in residen- Crystal River area.
change outs, new Call 563-3201
tallations and duct and leave your name,
work, own tools, telephone number
,an DL, DFWP, ben- and the best time to
s call 352-344-0636. call. Back-up vehicle
required.
IRRIGATION
INSTALLER CikKo iE
WANTED NK 1
p. pref'd. Clean FL
'er's lic. req'd, Drug * FIREWORKS STAND *r
e. Apply in person: OPERATORS
CLOVERLAWN
23 N.Lecanto Hwy. M/F, no experience
(352)'746-4451 necessary. Exc. Pay.

1OTORCYCLE & (813) 677-1874
PWC TECH
WANTED FRONT DESK
Citrus Kawasaki is Hotel experience
seeking an Hotel experience
experienced & required. Great
ponsible person to benefits. Fulltime.
oin our team. Top Apply in person:
ay and benefits in BEST WESTERN
business if you are 614 NW Hwy 19,
king for a career Crystal River.
position call Paul @
352-527-0129 or GROOMER
Email your ASSISTANT
onfidentlal resume
suby@adelphia.net countryside Animal
POO, ' TC Cliniclooking fof-
POOLTECHS Groomer assistant/ ,
WANTED bather. Exp. preferred,
(352) 746-7171 ,
n Wildwood. Exp.
referred. Will train. .LANDFILL
(352) 748-3987 OPERATOR &
*GENERAL
PROPERTY LABORERS
MANAGER
NEEDED Send Resume To:
Sumter Recycling
59 Unit property. 352-568-0110
Exp. required.
Brooksville area.
2-396-0295. 9am- 4 MAINTENANCE/
pm. Mon. - Fri. HANDY PERSON
or resume to
352-787-1912 Handy person
Benefits offered. needed for multi-site
EOE DFWP office repairs and
= - general mainte-
QUALIFIED nance. Must have a
SERVICE TECH clean driver's license
SERVICE TECH � and be able to pass
a complete back-
Must have ground check.
experience and Excellent starting
current FL I salary and benefits
Driver's License including company
Apply in person: vehicle. Please
'aniel's Heating & email resume to:
Air resumes4227@
581 S, Florida Ave. I hoo.cor
Inverness OrFax to: a
J I I 1 I(904) 212-1419
UrB r/%IIIr D ANk


STRUCTURAL STEEL
DETAILER/
DRAFTSMAN

Exc. Pay. Work @ home
or office w/Auto Cad or
on drawing board.
(352) 628-1700






DRIVERS
Apply in person at:
PIZZA HUT
of CRYSTAL RIVER
or HOMOSASSA
COCKADOODLES
We Are Adding
To Our Familyl
HIRING:
*EXP. MANAGERS
*P/T BREAKFAST
COOKS &
*FRIENDLY SERVERS
Competitive Pay
& Great Hours
Crystal River 563-0594
Inverness 637-0335
EXP. LINE COOK
Apply in person
INVERNESS
Golf & Country Club
(352) 726-2583
SUBWAY
INVERNESS
Is hiring Sandwich
Artists, Smiling faces &
team players only
needapply. FT & PT
avail. Please call.
637-0800





$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
WRITE YOUR OWN
PAYCHECK

Exp. phone Sales
Reps Needed.
Call 352-628-0187

OUTSIDE SALES
Auto Shopper is looking
for a self motivated
Outside Sales Rep. Paid
Training with above aver-
age income after training.
Health and 401K. Call
800-367-1723
Realtors Wanted

Small productive
non franchise office.
Pleasant working
cond., Good comm.
split. Interviews
confidential.
(352) 795-9123




AC
TECHNICIAN/
INSTALLER

Must have own tools,
clear driving record.
Fax Resume to
(352) 522-0831 DFWP
BLOCK MASONS &
TENDERS WANTED

(352) 302-4776

CONCRETE
WORKERS

F/T. Experienced in
FDOT Curb & Gutter.

Qualified applicants
Call 352-726-3940

ELECTRICIAN
Must have exp. In
commercial, residen-
tial, and service. Must
be a team player
Insurance Benefits
Call Mon-Thurs.
(352) 341-2004

EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
Now accepting
applications for
EXPERIENCED
DOZER, EXCAVATOR,
BACKHOE & LOADER
WORK REQUIRED
for road construction.
Full Time w/
benefit package.
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE




Your'world first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

CH ONICO E
Classifiest


-A

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
WRITE YOUR OWN
PAYCHECK!
Exp. phone Sales
Reps Needed.
Call 352-628-0187
ATrENTION!!!
Career
Opportunity
In RV Sales
FLAGSHIP RV'S
Is currently looking
to hire and train,
sales persons In
each of our conven-
ient locations. If your
looking for a new
career in sales,
come take of
advantage of paid
training and high
commissions. With 10
successful yrs. in Flor-
ida we can supply
you with a 15 million
dollar inventory.
Fun Environment 5
day 40 hr. wk. no
exp. needed. Good
attitude a must.
Apply in person.
Ask for Buddy
At FLAGSHIP RV'S
17736 US HWY 27 N.
Clermont FlI, 34715
Accepting Applica-
tions Through 6/ 30.


Ex
La


PR
M

L
sti
ho
Il
Call
Toll



&
Must
drug
som

H\
5+
tial
inst
cle
efit




Exp
drive
fre
172







res
jc
pa
the
Io
P
















35








1




4i
L-
S


e


on




Ky


/min. 5 yrs. exp. to
work w/diesel,
paving & general
construction
equipment. Person
needs excellent
ganlzatlonal skills &
managerial skills,
352-267-3702
EOE/DFWP

STUCCO
PLASTERERS
LATHERS
LABORERS

NEEDED
352-621-1283


SU Cl k U ****- 4puz.comrn


. ' ,- 1

5 9
-- I . I ,



_ 38 i


1 7 6 9 92





821 41 3 716


2


616




135


Fill In the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


I z C) fwA i -E . -W, cz; i 17, SZ2 !P- I -- I


RESTORATIVE THERAPY
*F/T, P/T & PRN*
ST, OT, & PT
Positions Available
ONLY Fax Resume to:
(352) 795-2796


NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & ULive-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE


OPTICAL TECH

Don't miss out on
great opportunity
Send resume to
Box 1331P c/o
Citrus Publishing
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, Fl.
34429
PHLEBOTOMIST/
MEDICAL ASST.
Needed for Family
Practice Office,
Inverness. Work exp.
necessary. Fax resume
to 352-726-5818

RN

For Endoscopy center.
No endoscopy exp.
necessary.
For Part time &
PRN Position
Hours 7-3:30
Fax resume to:
(352) 637-2525


CHlpaimE

DELIVERY ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER.

Earn $200 a week! 2-3
early morning hours,
7 days a week.
There are currently
several newspaper
delivery routes
available In the
Crystal River area.
Call 563-3201
and leave your
name, telephone
number and the best,
time to call. Back-up
vehicle required.























cSkin&H N Siaiwlty


(727) 848-8415W^

School ofBe7auty,^^^











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ELIMINATE YOUR
MORTGAGE
Own your home Free
and Clear In 1/2 to
1/3 of the time & save
thousands of S$S
in interest For Info.
Call 1-866-754-7832




6 Station Beauty Salon
US Hwy 41 S., Inverness
$25K John Hoffmelster,
Franklin RE Consult.
352-476-7236/341-1365
Diana's Flower &
Wedding Shop-Offering
"Basic Floral Deslan"
5classe (352) 400-4912


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds
....... ..i -


GREAT LOCATION
Just remodeled,
turnkey operation.
Cellular Store. $30,000
352-726-7444/228-1197

Landscape Curb Co.
Est. 1990,PEfitable,
Citrus/Marion Co.
Sm. Investment. Big
Rewards! 352-302-4375

THRIVING P & SUB
Take-out BIZI$144.900
Lg. cust. base. Growth
oppor. for Hands-on
Owner. PROFITABLEII
Owner will train. Doris
Miner at C-21 JWMorton
RE 344-1515/ 726-6668





ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12 Pitch)
1- 9x7 garage door,
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-$15.995
25X30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail.
We Custom Build
We Are The Factory
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code
METAL STRUCTURES
LLC.COM
1-866-624-9100
metalstructuresllc.com


WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.chorliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
40's Mahogany Bed.
Rm Set, 4 Poster bed,
Chest, Vanity w/ mirror,
Mahogany Din. Rm
Table, 6 chairs, Iron Bed
40's Wooden High Chair
& much more. No
Checks (352) 212-9783
BEST OF BEST
ANTIQUE STORE FOR
'07 IS MOVING.
JUNE 30TH 50% or
more offl Heritage
House Antiques
657 N. Citrus Ave.




2 COLLECTIONS
(75)BARBIES (1989-2002)
$700/set;
BEANIES (1,270+)
$1,600 (352) 795-7192


-ps

A+SPAS.COM
Authorized Hydro
SPA DEALER
5 Person, 15 Jets $1,950
6 Person. 40jets $3,650
(352) 572-7940
*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers.jacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084


A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
S 2 Ton $780.00
-* 2-V2 ton $814.00
-- 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394

ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
HEAT PUMPS, MH UNITS
ALL SIZES, 13 SEER, FROM
$475. 352-400-4945
Dryer for Sale
runs good, extra Ig.
capacity very clean
$100.
(352) 628-1044
FREEZER, UPRIGHT,
11cu.ft. $75;
Great for garage use.
(352) 726-4052
GE Artica Profile
Refrigerator, 25 cu. ft.
side by side, bisque,
color new condition
$400.
(352) 220-2542
GE REFRIGERATOR
27 CuFT. Side by Side
Filtered Ice/Water In dr.
Energy Saver. Designer
white. Exc. Cond. $500.
(352) 220-6820

REFRIGERATOR
G.E., 20.6 cu. ft. with
Icemaker. White on
White. Exc. Cond,
$175. (352) 726-2330


Washer & Dryer, like
new, $295/set Satisf.
guar. Free Del. & set up
(352) 293-2529
economyappl.com
WASHER/DRYER
Maytag White,
Deluxe. Uke New!
$395
352-843-7777/861-0823
Westinghouse heavy
duty washer & dryer
set, $400. 1 yr old
(352) 228-1820 or
228-1819




EARLY SUMMER
ANTIQUE & ESTATE
AUCTION
THURS. JUNE 28
SALE: 5 PM
Tools & wide array of
estate merchandise
SALE: 6 PM
Antique, collectible,
life long coin collect.
china, furn., bottles
and quality estate
furnishings
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
Hwy. 41-S, Inverness
dudleysauction.com
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12%BP 2%Disc ca/ck




ELECTRIC WELDER
like newl $150
(352) 860-1156
PRESSURE CLEANER
Electric, 1750 TSI,
10 mos. old. Exc. Cond.
$100 (352) 586-2996


57" High Definition TV
Hitachi Ultravislon wide
screen, High Def. tuner,
2 memory card slots,
See the picture,
Cost $2899. Sell $950.
(352) 563-5921
COLOR TV w/remote
Exc. Condition $75
MICROWAVE White.
Uke new $25
(352) 382-0010
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER W/2 TOWERS &
bridges fits any size big
screen TVM! $200/obo
(352) 464-3711




16' Pine Fence Board,
$5.50@; Cherry lumber,
$2.00/ft. Rough sawn,
air dried, 352-212-4122




DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeeii.com
PENTIUM 3 17" color
CRT, Internet ready,
complete, $100
(352) 726-3856




SCHWING CONCRETE
PUMP 250hrs. Exc.
Cond. Hoses & water
tank included. $12,800
(352)302-0345


TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 L"L3C
7r II


3 pc. Wicker Set $125.
9 Pc. Metal set, dining
table w/ 4 chairs, sofa,
2 chairs & coffee table
$250. set (352) 628-4031
11 PC. PVC SET
Pool Furniture. 3 Chaise
Lounges, Table
w/chairs, serving cart
& towel rack.
$500 (352) 613-6799
PATIO SET
48" Rnd. Table, 4 chairs,
Bar & 2 Bar Stools.
$225
(352) 220-2253
Patio Set, White
Aluminum, 48" round
Scratch resident glass
top, 4 sling back chair,
2 fixed, 2 swivel, white &
teal stripped material
$125. (352) 527-3286




2 BERKLINE ROCKER
RECLINERS, I Is swivel,
Seafoam green, very
good cond. $100 ea.
(352) 527-1810


6-26 � LaughingStock Intematbopal Inc./dist by United Media, 2007

"Don't tell me that's not the best
speech I've ever written."
710207


2 Antique Brass Beds,
Vanity, Dresser, $300.
(352) 628-6790
4 DRAWER
DRESSER
$40 .(352) 726-3716
5 Pc. Bedrooms set
twin beds, excel cond.
$250.
(352) 637-2838


5pc. BEDROOM SET
King size bed with
headboard, dresser
with mirror, chest and
(2) nlghtstands. $625
(352) 302-0889
5' Athol mfg. Kitchen
set, solid, natural oak,
w/4 chairs, table has
ebony legs, paid $750,
asking $500.
(352) 726-1083


7-pc. King BR set plus
mattresses, $1,000
3-pc. Living rm set,
coffee & 2 end tables,
$250 (352) 726-9239
Bedroom Set
Double Bed w/ lighted
headbrd, dbl. dresser
w/ mirror, chest & 1
night stand, like new
$275. 352-564-0823


A/C Tune up w/ Free WEST LANDSCAPERS
permanent filter + Tree trimming and lawn
Termfie/Pest Control service. 352-422-6917
-Insp. Uc & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870
- 1 - All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office. 21 yrs. exp.
* Lk 7 days (352) 212-1165
ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY CARPET FACTORY Direct
TODAY! Restretch,clean, repair
VinylTile. Wood. (352)


I $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
I Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.
$8$$S$$$$$$$$$$$$$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
I JUSTASK.
S WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUIII

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966

MARY'S
PRECIOUS PETS
Pet Sitting Service
(352) 503-5414














. AFFORDABLE ,
. HAULING CLEANUP, I
I PROMPT SERVICE I
" Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl. Furn, Const, I
S Debris & Garages I
352-697-1127


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
COLEMAN TREE SERVICE
Removal & trim. Uc. Ins.
guaranteed! 726-8010
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852

D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, lns.& Lic
#?0256879 352-341-6827







SA TREE SURGEON
LUc. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
Fserv. Lowest rates Free
M estimates.352-860-1452


341-0909 Shop at home
REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728


We Install YOUR Floorl
Carpet, vinyl, & tile
All jobs welcome! We
travel. (813) 843-4059



0--------
r I
1 A+ Mr. Fix - It
Prof. painting, Pres- I
Assure washing, Home
repairs, Gutter cIng
& Screen repair.
220-9326/382-3647
Lic#99990255609
VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Uc. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured, 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est,, 10% off any job. IlI
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# I L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
LIc3008 352-341-1440
All Phaze Construction
Quality painting & re-
pairs. Faux fin. #0255709
352-586-1026 637-3632
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Uc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
SRUDY'S PAINTING *
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Cleaning
FREE EST. (352) 476-9013




MOBILE DETAILING.
"We'll Come To you"
Res/Com, Us
Chris 352-422-4342


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl - Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect * Beautify - Residential & Commercial

Suncoast
zp Exterior

Restoration Service Inc.

877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
Lic.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236
MORRILL MARINE
Outboard Repairs,
Dockside Service. Elec.
installed (352) 628-3331


-U.rnn^H


AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)



Carpet, Tile Grout &
Upholstery Cleaning
Free est. Formal Carpet
Cleaners. 352-628-0112
MR. TILE CLEANER
Cleaning & Sealing
Floors, showers, lanai
Res./Commercial
352-586-1816, 746-9868




*PRIVATE*
Adult Family Care
Home. ULicensed.
Get one on one care.
Semi-private & private
rooms available
Come see us at Floral
City, (352) 637-3253




Chlldcare In Our Dunn.
Homel Mon.-Fri.
Call for Rates
352-522-1183/615-1669


VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 18 years. Kathy
(352)465-7334
MAID 2 CLEAN
Res/Comm Cleaning.
Uc, Ins & bonded
Call Liz (352) 302-5468
PARTNERS IN GRIME
Senior disc. 20 yrs exp.
Lic. & Ins. Free Estimates
Call (352) 628-4898
Touch of Class Cleaning
Service, 15 Yrs. Exp.
Also If you Need Help?
With Errands, Things
Around the House. Ref.
Nancy (352) 628-2774


PHYLLIS' CLEANING SVC
Homes/Offices/Condos
20+ yrs exp. �ref's avail
352-795-1443




Spiffy Window Cleaners
Superb service at
a reasonable Rate
lic. & Ins. (352) 503-3558
* The Window Man
Beats any Est. by 10%
Com./resid., Lic. & Ins.
A(352)228-7295 A




AFFORDABLE
CABINETS &
COUNTERTOPS
(352) 586-8415




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Uc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
Install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Lic#CBC1250751 Ins.
No Job too smalill
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
C.C. Acc. 352-628-4211
ROGERS Construction
New Homes.Additions


352-563-UIU4/257-/IUI
I panel or comp cage
Family owned &
operated. Also avall
super screen w/10vr
manufacturer warr.
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Uc#2708
(352) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs, Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
A# I1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
housesdriveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./ins. 341-3300


INFRMTIN


Pressure Cleaning
Work Contact Keith,
Available any time
$100. (352) 621-0168



E----
rmmmBmm I
#1 A+ Mr Fix-lt Il
I Prof. painting, Pres- I
Assure washing, Home
repairs, Gutter clng
I & Screen repair, I
1 220-9326/382-3647
Lic#f99990255609
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, Reliable,
#0169757 344-4409
1 Call does it AillI No lob
too sm.! Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
3 J's HOME
IMPROVEMENT, INC.
General maint. Painting
Int & Ext, landscaping
Free est Llc2951
352-527-3341/302-5994
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A# 1 L&L HOUSEHOLD
REPAIRS & PAINTING
No job too small 24/7
Lic3008 352-341-1440

AFFORDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE I
STrash Trees Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
Debris &Garages
352-697-1126
ARTISAN HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
General Maintenance
& Repairs. Lic # 34064
(352) 228-7823
FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est. LIc # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Handyman.
If its broke Jerry can
fix it. LIc#189620
(352) 726-0762
HOME REPAIR, You
need it done, we'll do
It. 30 yrs. exp. Lic., Ins.
#73490256935,489-9051
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




STAYLER AC & HEATING,
Inc. FREE Service call
w/repair this mo. Ins.
628-6300. CACO 58704


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Uc.5863 (352) 746-0141
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC INC.
Elec. Serv./Repairs. New
const. Remodel Free Est
726-2907 EC13002699
FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Remodeling, Lighting,
Spa, Sheds LUc. & Insur.
#2767 (352)257-2276




AFFORDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP,
1 PROMPT SERVICE
= Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126










All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professlonal
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264/201,-1422
Furn. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch dellv-
ery & hauling: 302-7100
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home




Viglione Asphalt Paving
Driveways, Sidewalks,
Patios, Etc., Free Est.,
lic./Ins (352) 726-3093




All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431

ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658


25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-,1110
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All tvNes.Free estimates


1 In SerIVIce
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442
J. Vaughn Roofing. Inc.
New Roofs, Re-Roofs &
Repairs; C.C. accepted
Ins/Uc CCC1327365
(352) 795-6659
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Lic# CRC1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sdewdks, Driveways Palos,
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbing &
concrete, Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209


A+ tUALII T WUKI'
SPAFFORD's CONST.
Specializing in room
additions, remodeling,
bathrooms, windows,
garages. Lic. RR0066831
352-726-7855
Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. in Central FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Uc#CBC1250751 Ins.
No job too smallll
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
C.C. Acc. 352-628-4211


Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263
We do it ALLI Big or Sm.!
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
DrywallCrown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
LIc/ns. #2441 795-7241
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. IUc. #2713, Insured.
Showers, Frs, Counters
Etc. (352) 422-2019
FREE ESTIMATES
Honest & Dependable
Bath Remodeling.
LIC. #2551 352-266-1600




JD Drywall
Top Quality Work!
Lic#99990257292
Free Est. (352)476-2342
ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Lic.#SCC 131149747




FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All taes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch.rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearlng, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
352-302-3523/628-3924




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog. Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DONALD KERNZ'S
M.H. demolition, red
tag cleanup, land
clearing (352) 634-0329
TREE REMOVAL,
Landclearing, Fill Dirt,
Bush hogging,
(352)563-1873
TURTLE ACRES
BUSHHOG SERVICE
Boxblade, Front Loader
& Stump Grinding
Lic. (352) 422-2114


INFORATIO


BILL'S LANDSCAPING
& Lawn Service, Flower
Beds, Mulch, Plants,
Sod, Trees, Clean-ups,.
FREE Est. (352) 628-4258
Cell 352-453-6292
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
-.& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RAM Landscaping &
Lawn care, Specializing
in Pruning. Call Me
(352) 637-6588
* SOD * SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032




"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
, #1Yard Dogz Lawncare
quality cuts starting $10.
Reliable & dependable
Free Est. (352) 382-1504
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
Advanced Lawncare &
More, Pressure Wash.,
No job too small,
Res./Comm., Lic./Ins.
352-220-6325/220-9533
BARKER'S LAWN
SERVICE & MORE
(352) 228-2231
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality work
Residential / Comm,
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250

C & R LANDSCAPING
Lawn Maintenance
clean ups Mulching,
We Show Up
352-503-5295,
503-5082
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RITTER LAWN CARE
Lawn Maint., Press,
Clean., Sm Tree Remov.
Free Est.(352) 257-6001
ROB'S LAWN CARE
Free Estimates
(352) 563-0376
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Uce, & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




AQUA AZURE
Total Pool System Care
Personalized Service &
Great Prices 344-4796


EVERCLEAR POOL SERV.
10 yrs exp., We offer
Reliable and Quality
Service (352) 344-5122
George Fisher Pools
PleaseCleanMvPool.
com WEEKLY POOL
SERVICE 422-6123
POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Lic./Ins.
v 352-464-3967 v
POOL DOCTOR
Wkly. & Monthly Maint.
Repairs & Acrylic
Decking. 352-212-7272
POOL REPAIRS?
Commercial & Residen-
tial, & Leak detection,
lic. 2819, 352-503-3778
352-302-6060




R.C. (GATOR) EDSON
Pump Serv. Well Drilling
Ins'd, Lic. 9397
352-637-2519/302-6217
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
,344-2556, Richard




Bill's Mobile Welding
Nights & Weekends
Visa & Master Card Acc
352-257-2240/726-6122




Here Come The Stormsi
Plywood Cut & Install
To fit windows/doors
Uc./i ns.(352)634-0171
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd,
dumpsters, mulch deir-
ery & hauling. 302-7100
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM




0 RAINDANCER *
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Avalaoblell
Uc. & Ins 352-M-0714
, ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Pricel
6" Seamless Gutters
Uc & Ins 621-0881




PRO EXTERIOR SYSTEMS
Safe & Effective Low
Pressure Roof Cleaning
5yr. wart 352-400-5028


HO E EPI
IL~c.*5776 I cE m m & i� = nI


HOME REPAIR & MAINTENANCE, INC.
"Caring for Your Home is Our Business"
- Offering A Full Range of Services -
Residential
Commercial -

S 628-4282 Chamber


CL.ASSI[F]EIEDIS


I _L TVs
ca/Stereos


Dump Trailer
Tandem axle $5,800.
Kawasaki Mule 2001,
3010, $4,000.
PTO Generator 25 KW,
w/ manual, transfer
switch $2,500.
(352) 303-0967
MASSEY FERGUSON
1125 Front Loader
w/fork. Shuttle shift,
finish mower, 4 X 4
$9,500 (352) 212-6067


I ALUMINUM I










312C TUESDAY JUNE 26 2007
Cl--'COGra
C 4s .


PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
BEDS * BEDS -4 BEDS
The factory outlet storel
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% oft Retail
Twin $119 4 Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Sprgs. Plaza
Consaignment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
COCKTAIL TABLE - NEW
Marble topped,
antique ornate carved
light color wooden legs,
48"X36", Cost $500, Ask-
ing $200. (352) 527-9446
DAYBED, METAL, CREAM
COLOR W/GOLD TRIM,
Includes mattress &
comforter set. $150
(352) 249-0851
DINING ROOM SET
Stanley, Bleached Oak.
Table w/6 chairs, 2
leaves, China Hutch, &
table pad. $350 OBO
(352) 637-3009
DINING ROOM SET
W/CHINA CABINET
Solid Oak. Exc. Cond
$550 Call for size.
(352) 563-6314
Dining Room Table
64" ext. to 88", beige 6
upholst. chairs. $125.
SET-GLASS TOP COFFEE
Table Beige/gold, &
2 matching end tables,
Two -3 way lamps $95.
(352) 382-0091
DINING ROOM TABLE,
Maple, leaf & 6 chairs,
exc. cond, $100.
(352)344-0172
Dining table, 2 leafs,
4 chairs, solid wood,
$150. (352) 726-2428
Dinning Rm. Table,
& 6 chairs, Black
Shellac $100
Adjustable Twin Bed
$250.
(352) 793-5803
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Solid Oak, Glass Doors,
Storage, Lighted, TV
opening 35W X 37.5D,
Exc. Cond. $600
(352) 527-0239
GLASS TABLE TOP
54", heavy w/beveled
edge. No base. $100.
Call 422-7176
KING SZ. MATT. Only
Simmonds Beauty Rest,
plush,firm, Lk. Nw $300.
3 BAR STOOLS 29" Bik
Iron & Rattan.$40 No
Checks. 352-249-3299
Living Room Set
Blue/Gray $325,
Excellent cond.
(352) 637-2258
(352) 634-4657
LIVING ROOM SET
Includes Sofa, Loveseat,
Chair, Ottoman $375
obo. light colored
GREAT DEAL
352-615-7055
Loveseat & Matching
chaise chair, neutral
colors. $395. Ent. center
& floor lamp, $1 10/both
(407) 716-3193, cell
MOVING SALE. House
full of furniture. Ent.
center, wall unit BR, etc.
(989) 225-2911 cell
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN SIZE LA-Z-BOY
SLEEPER SOFA NEUTRAL
COLOR LIKE NEW $200
(352) 382-7043
QUEEN SIZE
Simmons Beauty rest
Box Spring Mattress and
Frame. Like new $150
ANTIQUE BUREAU $100
(352) 560-3048
QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER
SOFA, slate blue
w/wood trim. $250.
(352) 746-1058
RECLINER
Not too big and not too
small. Tan tweed, good
condition, clean. $90.
(352) 527-2456

RENTAL FINDER
www.chronlcle
rentalflnder.com

SINGER Sewing
Machine
w/Cablnet. Older
Model, Good Cond.
$50 (352) 628-2119
SOFA Lg. floral print,
LOVE SEAT Sleeper,
$50/each Both
excellent condition.
(352) 270-3641
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers &
beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084
TWIN HOT WHEELS BED
Childs bed, $75/obo
(352) 794-0809



2 Riding Lawn Mowers.
Muray, 17hp, 42" cut,
$450.
Craftsman, 16hp, 42"
cut, $400.
(352) 628-0662
42" 12.HP, master cut,
Riding Lawn Mower
runs good cuts grass,
$275. (352) 527-4191
52" HUSTLER MOWER &
60" HUSTLER MOWER
700 hrs, $3,500 obo/ea.
(352) 621-4777
BUSH HOG
4ft, $350 obo
(352) 628-0824
DIXON ZTR 50" CUT
22HP Briggs & Stratton
$1800. (352) 628-9848
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersJacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
MOWER 4/SALE
Riding Lawn Tractor
11 H.P.36" Cut. Owners
Manual Included
$375.00 Call - 560-3700
SEARS SELF PROPELLED
LAWN MOWER
$140.00
(352) 860-0158


SPRING MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, Pick up &
Delivery, Quick Service,
Don Mead 400-1483
TORO TRACTOR 0 TURN
20HP, 2 cyl. Kohler, runs
great, needs elec.
clutch for blades. $395/
obo, (352) 341-4449
Yard Man Rider
42" cut, $400.
(352) 628-3736




ROYAL OAKS, INV.
Elderly Couple Moving
Fine turn, DR set w/htch
+6chrs., Klt. set 4/chrs,
wicker turn, Ig. comp.
desk, king sz. bdrm set
Incl matt/springs, misc.
lamps & end tables, etc
By appt. (352) 637-0321


APACHE SHORES
HUGE IST TIME 2 FAMILY
YARD SALE THURS - SAT
8-? Corner of Pony Expr.
& Custer, Follow signs




1 Patio Table $10.
4 PVC chairs $20.ea
obo
(352) 628-4031
5 PC. DRUM SET
Collectors item. With
hardware. $1100/abo
WATER TANK, 155 gal.
brand new. $200/obo
(352) 422-2028
5 TON NORDYNE
Single package heat
pump $1,500 6 yrs, old
(352) 860-1230

2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
Blue Queen Comforter
Set, with matching
picture & 5 throw
pillows, $125.
(352) 382-7510
BOOKS
Diabetes, Cooking, As-
trology, Movie Stars,
Foreign Dictionaries, Fa-
mous Diets, misc.
(352) 527-2869
* BURN BARRELS *
$10 Each
Call Mon-Fri 8-5
860-2545
Computer desk w/
hutch top by Hooker,
cherry, w/ high back
green leather chair,
$375. (352) 527-0557
DRAFTING TABLE,
w/chair & lamp, $175;
ARMOIRE room for 32"
TV, DVD, & storage,
closed looks like chest
$225. (352) 746-3522
Flea Market dealer
retiring complete load
excellent, no junk all
$75. (352) 341-0003
GOODYEAR TIRES
4 Wrangler AT/S LT
275/65R18 tires in very
good condition. $200,
OBO Call 352-344-4639
Gun Safe for Sale
Fort Knox, 5', 21/2'W,
2' Deep, fully carpeted
$1,000.
(352) 341-4433
King Sz. Mattress & Box
Spring good cond.
Wedding Dress, sz. 6
$85. (352) 628-4031
Moving Boxes
Various sizes; used
once. $40 for 50
(352) 746-4160
MUST SELL
Baly pinball machine
1982 speakeasy $800.
Pool table + acc
$150.00
(352) 422-4495
REFRIGERATOR
10 Cu. Ft.
&
Beginner's MANDOLIN
Great Shapel $35 ea.
(352) 746-4063
SOD. AL VARIETIES
Bahla, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
Vita Master
Air Exercise Bike
Slightly used
$100.
Roll Top Desk
$50. (352) 527-2610



JAZZY 1143 ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR like new,
new battery, a good
buy at $800. LIFT
CHAIR, green, $300
exc, (352) 257-1584
Jazzy Motorchair,
cost $5,000. Like new
Asking $500 obo
(352) 650-0333
PRIDE JET 3 Power
Wheelchair, new
$5,500/ asking $700.
Hardly used SHOWER
CHAIR- New $35


EARLY SUMMER
ANTIQUE & ESTATE
AUCTION
THURS. JUNE 28
SALE: 5 PM
Tools & wide array of
estate merchandise
SALE: 6 PM
Antique, collectible,
life long coin collect.
chlna, furn., bottles
and quality estate
furnishings
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
Hwy. 41-S, Inverness
dudleysauctlon.com
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12%BP 2%Dlsc ca/ck




Hammond organ,
good condition
$400 (352) 344-0968
or 637-7105




WASHER /DRYER
$100 for set, Also tram-
poline, good condition
$75.00352-613-5599



BOW FLEX
Power Pro w/Leg
Attachment.
Exc. Cond. Pd. Over
$800; Sell for $399 OBO
(352) 527-9625


SCHWINN EXERCISE
BIKE, good cond.
$100
(352) 746-1464



3 WHEEL BICYCLE
w/basket In back.
S50/obo
(352) 860-2090
GOLF CLUBS
Tommy Armour,
845 Silver Scott, like
new Irons 3-PW $175.
352-860-0288, 634-4592
Pool Table, 9FT,
3 pc. 1" slate, 2,000 Ihs,
Solid oak, like new
$1,500. (352) 341-0645
RECUMBENT BICYCLE
Like Newt "Trek"
Pd. $1,395/
Asking $800
(352) 302-5875
TURBO HOCKEY TABLE
Sportcraft,
38Wx 66Lx 31"T,
Exc,. Cond. $50
(352) 746-6303
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
Welder Home Gym
& Treadmill
Like newly $250 obo
(352) 560-7848
YAMAHA CLUB
CAR
36V -2 Seat Golf Cart
With Charger
$895.00/OBO
Ph.# 352-804-1812



4 x 6 ft. Custom Box
Trailer w/ removable,
canvas covered over-
head frame 16" wheels,
like new tires, w/ spare,
$325.(352) 382-4004
2005, 6 X 12 Encl Tr.
Side Door &
Barn Doors on rear.
$2,150. Good Cond.
(352) 533-3130
23FT flatbed
utility trailer
tandem axle,
new floor $600
(352) 400-5342
5X8 w/gate, w/ad $650
5X10 w/gate w/ad $699
EZ PULL TRAILERS 6532 W
Gulf to Lake Hwy. CR
DUMP TRAILER
6x12', Tandem axle, roll
out brush cover, $2,200.
(352) 344-0236
Enclosed 4 /2 X 7 V2
Maint. Traller
w/16" Tires $450 obo.
See on Hwy 19
By Dallas Fence
Call (352) 464-0779
FLATBED TRAILER
12'X 5.5' Dual Axel
Good Cond. $700
(352) 628-4306









UTILITY TRAILER
needs box, $150/ obo
(352) 220-6473



Boys Baby Clothes
0-12mos. $200/all or will
divide. Baby Items; sw-
Ing, bouncer, saucer,
walker, pack-n-play,
etc. $150 or will divide.
(352) 249-0851
MATERNITY CLOTHES,
Sm. Med. Lg. $300 or will
sell separately.
(352) 249-0851




ACOUSTIC
& ELECTRIC GUITARS
Boss, Banjo, Uke,
Mandolin, Amps,
Effects. Any
age/cond. We get
you top dollar. Do not
sell anywhere else.
M-F 10-6 563-1779.
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676




NOTICE
Pets for Sale

per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
BABY COCKATIELS
$35
(352) 726-7971
BICHON FRISE
Neutered male, 10mos,
All shots, $350/obo
(352) 382-5915
BLOODHOUND PUPPIES
Purebred, 2 Females.
1 Red, 1 Black & Tan
$350
352-628-5432/302-8726
Blue American Pitbull
Terriers. ADBA Reg.
Great tempermentl
Short & Wide $600-$800
352-613-0263
Bull Mastiff, Female,
sweet, lovable,
showmanship
bloodline, $900.
(352) 586-2590
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
Showmanship
bloodline, 3 males,
$350, (352) 586-2590


FERRET DUO
two females, one white
and one sable.
Includes large cage.
$150.00 please call
352-341-0948
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
In our Mobile Clinic.
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices Includlng spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rables
shot Annual Vaccines
Nal Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail Wed,Thurs,
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
appt. 352-726-8801


Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Spayed $25
Dog Neutered &
Spaveyed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1st & 3rd Saturdays
10am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
Miniature Dachshunds
3 females, 6 wks old,
ready July 5, $400. ea
taking deposits.
(352) 563-1479
SPECIAL SOMEONE
NEEDS COMPANION
Got 2, (1) great loving
Lab and a Chihuahua
$200/ea 613-2822 8-12P
YORKIE PUP FOR FREE
ADOPTION
she as all her shots
given up to date
(904) 252-7864




Yearling Colt, Black
white markings, UTD
shots & coggins, kind,
gentle, easy to handle,
Straight and correct.
$6S0. (Must Sell)
(352) 400-1620



BABY GOATS FOR SALE
$125 EACH
Call 352-634-1205



1BR unfurn $400; 1BR RV
Park Model, turn., $325;
1BR, scr.rm, crprt $525
NoPets/Smoke628-4441
CR Riv./HERNANDO
1,2, & 3BR, $350-$575.
No Pets (352) 795-5410
FLORAL CITY 2/1
$450/mo. No Pets
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO
1/1, like new, no smok-
Ing/ pets, $550./mo.,1st.
1st. sec. (352) 746-6477
HERNANDO 2/11/2
Lg. mobile, w/FP, $495,
Ist/lst/sec Day 344-3444
Eves 344-3084
HOMOSASSA
2/1, convenient to US19
$450 mo. 1st, last, sec.
(352) 634-2368
HOMOSASSA 3/2
DW sits on 1.5 priv.ac.
Quiet, nice neighbors,
$600, 1st, last, sec.
Walter, (561) 248-4200
HOMOSASSA
Nice, 3/1, new cabi-
nets, $600 mo. 1st, last
& Sec. (305) 896-3375
HWY 488/Dunnellon
2/1, 1g. prvt. lot.$425. No
pets. (352) 795-6970
LECANTO 2/1
Clean, New Appl., spa,
carport, fncd yrd. $575
1st/Ist/sec 352-628-9106



Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE.com
Reliance Realty
Floral City - 2005 MH on
Canal 2/3 acre many
upgrades $199,000, For
more Info. Call Patti
Prudential Tropical
Realty, 1-800-682-8767
Cell (727) 858-5992
HOME ON 1/2 ACRE
Must sell 3/2, 28x52
on end of road,
quite, home has
deck. Sacrifice
$3,000 down,
$745/mo,
Call 352-621-9182
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting opportunltyl 1
or 2BR Mobiles for sale.
Scr. porches, apple ,
water Incl. Fishing piers.
Community center.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
NEW 3BR /2BA
Nicely treed,private
lot. With driveway
carport, shed and
covered deck with
sun room. Located In
55+ park just walking
distance from pool
and clubhouse.
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
(352) 794-7308
RARE OPPORTUNITY 200
ft. Frontage w/ mobile
on Homosassa Trail
zoned MDRM Ron Egnot
Ist Choice Coldwell
Banker. 352-287-9219
Small Park 55+, 2/1,
completely furnished
Leaving Country
Just Bring Your Tooth-
brush & clothes
(352) 228-2239
UNBELIEVABLE
2/2 w/ 9'x18' screen
room.Adult Park In
Homosassa 2004
Shed * Waterfall i
Washer & Dryer * All
Appliances * Sprinkler
System $49,900
Call 352-794-7308
All Sizes All Prices
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES





RENTAL FINDER






jolns Sweetwater Pt. on


the western boundary
then south to the
waters of Lake Tsala
Apopka.4300 S. Owens
Trail, (352) 637-3207
4/2 Palm Harbor Triple
Wide. Loaded w/tile &
all appll's. Huge cvr'd
porch. New In-ground
pool. Lg. site built block
3 car grg, Fenced 2.45
ac, lot w/solar pwr'd
gate. Many extras.
Asking $189,900. Poss.
Owner fin. Call
Crawford 352-212-7613
60x27 DW 1600 sq.ft.
3/2, built in 2001 on 3.86
acres, paved roads
80x80 fenced back
yard, 16x12 workshop
2-car carport, fleplace.
Asking $159,900
(352) 726-2286


Handyman Special.
$55K OBO
(352) 746-4596
Beautiful Lake
Panasofkkee, 1998,
DW.3/2 on dbl lots,
master suite has walk In
closet w/ dressing area,
garden tub & shower,
spacious vaulted
ceilings, eat in kit w/
Indoor utility rm, near
boat launch & lake, 2
decks & fenced yard,
$240,000
(352) 793-2586
BEST OF BEST
5 yrs. In a row
TAYLOR MADE HOMES
Clearance sale- all
models on sale
2008 models are
arriving. All 2007's
must gol Come by and
save, homes starting
@ $32,900.
Used-New- Repo's
Call 352-621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Huge DW 27 X 52
Garden Tub, Sky Light, 2
Decks, Citrus Trees, New
Roof & AC Malnt. free.
$78,900 352-563-6591
CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2
Bonus room, FP, wood
floors & tile, /2" drywall
thruout, 9x42 scrn.
country prch. on lac.
$125,000 (352) 442-9603
CRYSTAL RIVER SAC,
3/2 1600sqft, w/office
Very private, paved Rd.
Deck, shed, workshop
Call for email pictures
352-795-3026$169K
HARD TO GET
FINANCED?
2007 FACTORY CLOSE
OUTI
Give us a try
5 new homes 2,3 & 4
bedrooms.

All sizes All prices
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
352-794-7308
HERNANDO-$39,90011
Nice 2/2 on 1/3 Ac.,
Won't LastI Great Rental
Opportunitll Beautiful
Areal 352- 400-5367
HERNANDO, 2/1'/2
2 scrn. porches, I wood
deck. all new inside,
quick sale $43,900.
at 3199 E. Buffalo Ln.
West side of Hwy 200,
Daytime 352-344-3444
Evening 352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA -
NEW HOME
3/2 1550 sq. ft. on 1/2
acre. Garage, fenced
yard, nice trees,
grassed yard. Don't
miss outl $119,900,
financing available.
Call 352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA 3/2.5
On Gorgeous lac.
Pool/huge kitchen.
Home Warr.$136,500
Sharon Levins. Rhema
Realty (352) 228-1301
INVERNESS
Newly Renovated.
Ready for Occupancyl
2/1 on V' Ac. 0% Down
1415/rln. 352-746-5912
MOVE IN NOW!
Beautiful homes
ready for you now.
$500 down or no
closing cost or

Call T.zI a Tiree .i'lt
approval and come
see your new home.
352-621-9183




14 x 56, 2/112A
w/ 10x 17 addition,
Carport, roofover, cor-
ner lot, senior park,
C/H/A $21,500.
352-302-2824
Crystal River, 2/1,
14x48 1985, close to all
convenience. Sm. Park
Low lot rent. $8,900
(352) 795-0640
9am-3pm
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-In ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair. acc.shed
& sprklr. $55,900. (352)
563-6428/ 352-563-1297
FORESTVIEW
DW 2/2/carport, semi
furn, new water heater,
all appliances, lots of
extras. $37,500.
(352) 795-3549
Lecanto FL. 14' x 70' MH
Patio & Shed,
Remodeled, 55+
$25,000. (352) 628-1171
Melody Mobile Pk. 55+
2/1, Lg. Laundry, Scrnd
Prch, Carport. Part.
Furn. 1l0K 352-726-0018
NEW & USED DW's & SW's
Starting at $15,000
Quiet 55+ Homosassa
Park. 352-628-5977
NEW HOMES
ARRIVING IN JUNE
$79K- $128K
Resales Available
$30K-$115K
Excellent Amenitiesi
5 * , 55+
Gated Community
Phone 352-795-7161
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, apple's, new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
clubhouse & activities
5405S . Stoneridge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805
SPACIOUS 2/2
Utility Shed. Own
your own land.
$40K (352) 422-4496


U.M|


----- q
r RENTAL FINDER
| www.chronicle |
rentalfinder.com





Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
)> Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. Is our
only Business
>- Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Robble Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
Info@oroperlv
manaamentgroup.


Lc"eulE t


HOMOSASSA
Prime comm. office
space directly across
Hwy. 19 frm, Sugarmlll
Woods. $15/st. No CAM
(352) 302-0764
INVERNESS 3/2/2
House,Scrn Rm No Pets
$ 1,050/mo + Sec.& App
Don Crlgger Real Estate
(352) 746-4056
r q � � I
RENTAL FINDER I
www.chronlcle
rentalflnder.com




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $600/month
(352) 228-7328
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Renovated
1 bedrm efficiencies w/
fully equip kitchens,
No contracts
necessary. Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $40
a day for a week or
more.(includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront 1BR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets. (352) 344-1025




Apts./Studlos Inglls
$350-$600 All utilities.
(352) 447-2240
SCANDLEWOOD
COURT
APARTMENTS
2 BR Apartments
now available.
Starting @ $530/mo.
Please call
(352) 344-1010
307 Washington Ave.
Wed., & Frl.
8am to 5pm
Equal Housing
Opportunity


L &

Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS
ONE MONTH FREE
1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studlo
(352) 795-2626
I-- ii- J

CRYSTAL RIVER
1 BR, special rate,
laundry on premises
LAKE LUCY
APARTMENTS
(352) 489-5075
leave message and
phone number

CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities.
No application fees.
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity

FLORAL CITY
I BR cabin, just 150
yards from fishing dock,
$275 + $200 dep. Quiet
forested area, near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness. Trails End
Camp 352-726-3699
HERNANDO
2/1 Very clean,
$550/mo. Sec. dep.
352,527-0033
HOMOSASSA
Studio, Full Kit. Ig. bath,
priv. entr., pool,no pets
Immd, Occ$550mo/all.
ref./sec. (631) 745-4624
KNOLLWOOD
I TOWNHOUSES I
I Cornerof Druid Rd.
&581. 1&&2BR
available starting |
@ $485. For more
Information call
S (352) 344-1010
Or apply,@
307 Washngton Ave.
Wed. & Fri. 8 to 5
Equal Housing
Opportunity



L is B . . . o n l
0-M--- I
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS
Accepting
\applications for 1
Bedroom Wheelchair
accessible units
Rental Assistance
Available.
to those who qualify
Laundry facility and
on-slte management.
(352) 795-8024
TDD 1-800-955-8771








Crystal Palms Apts.
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595




LANDMARK
REALTY

We have different
type rentals for
different situa-
tions. Some with


pets allowed.

Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311W Main St.
Inverness




2700+ sq ft Bldg.
Can divide Into
Med/Prof/Retall Pine
Ridge, Your floor plan.
(352) 527-9013
CRYSTAL RIVER
REDUCEDII
Newly remodeled
OFFICE & RETAIL UNITS
VARIOUS SIZES ,Hwy 19.
Waybright Real Estate
Inc.352-795-1600


Business
L-lcatUions


CRYSTAL RIVER
Zoned Comm.-
Approx. 400 sq ft.
$600.moContact Lisa
(Broker/Owner) @
(352) 422-7925
INVERNESS
1,000 sf. Office/Retail.
Rent negotiable, ample
parking, Busy corners.
Appt. (352) 726-6640
INVERNESS
Plaza West Stores,
Busy corners, 1,000 sf.
suitable for pizzeria
Appt. (352) 726-6640
INVERNESS
Proffesslonal
Office Space for rent.
approx. 1120sf. $1050/
mo. (352) 302-2726




$$ SUMMER RATE $$
2/2/1 pl WF, dock From
$850 River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
CITRUS HILLS
Greenbrlar Condo, new
carpet & tile, 2BR, 2BA,
Fl. Rm. Pool, Tennis Only
$695. mo. 352 527-0593
Immaculate 2/2 Condo
Furn., upstairs. Newer
AC, $850/mo. or Poss.
Purch. (352)726-7543
Inv. Townhouse
2/2-V2, waterfront,
community pool & boat
ramp, All appliances,
$750 mo, (352) 400-0731
INVERNESS 2/2
Unfurn., Upstairs, scrn.
balc., W/D, nice. No
smoke/pets, $750, mo.
1st. last $350. sec.
352-302-8231
INVERNESS 2/2
W/D, New carpet,
appl.'s, comm. pool.
garb. Incl. $750.mo.
1st, 1st. $500. sec.
352-746-4611




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, $660/mo + dep
9187 Mendoza Way
(352) 726-4058
CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all apple ,
W/D $650.-$700.
(954) 557-6211

CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS
SONE MONTH FREE i
1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studlo
I (352) 795-2626

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, utll. Included
$600. mo.
Broker/Owner:
352-634-0129
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Beach.Ln. $650/mo.
(352) 634-4336
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent or w/
opt. to buy, fans, blinds,
refr., stove, microwave,
tile carpet. $750. mo.
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D, garb. Incl.
$575.mo. 1st,, last $300
sec. (352) 746-4611
INVERNESS
Brand New 2/2, w/ W/D
$725.mo, 352-563-5165
INVERNESS
Canal Front 1/1,
W/D, Carport $490. mo.
(301) 785-9996
Inverness/Lecanto
2/2/1 New Clean Quiet
$675/mo (352) 527-9733




CRYSTALRIVER
LANDINGS.COM
8 - 1BR Suites, 795-1795
FLORAL CITY 1/1
$450/mo. $600 sec.
Cable, City water. No
pets. (352) 344-5628
VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Efficlencles,
Phone, Pool, fishpond
AC, $50. daily, $300. wk
Trailers $225 wk.
(352) 726-4744




County Wide
View ALL at:
www.choosegar.com
*Luxury homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*Citrus Hillsi 3 bdrm
Beverlyv Hills: 3Bdrm
Inverness 2&3 Bdrm
In verness 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129

INVERNESS
3/2, $700/mo, $700 1st.
last. $300 sec. dep.
(352) 860-2055
.- NO CREDIT CHECKII
Rent to Own 1-2-3 BR's
352-484-0866
visit Jademlsslon.com

R RENTAL FINDER �
= rentalfinder.com




SUGARMILL WOODS
2/2/2 +Lanai, cul de
sac. turn. 1600 sq.ft.
$,100omo + util. Owner/
agent Seas or Annual
(727) 804-9772




BEV/ HILLS 1/1/1
Fam. Rm.2 E. Golden St.
$600/mo 1ST/LAST/SEC,
(352) 795-8888
BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
$550/mo Fl. Rm. appr's,,
Carport, Remodeledl
352-563-0447/678-8874


BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
Furn/Unfrun., W/D $650.
mo. (239) 776-6800
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 & carport
352-746-0689,464-2514
Beverly Hills 2/1/2
Remodeled on crnr lot.
$800/mo, 352-527-8352
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2, no pets, $650mo
+ Sec. Ref. Check,
11 N. Harrison St
352-489-3584
Beverly Hills
3/2/Carport new
everything $800./mo
Hernando
3/2/Carport big yard
remodeled $756./mo
Inverness
2/2/Carport fenced
yard $750,/mo
352-637-2973


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WNOR1iDY GUJ1IBY TRICKY RICKY KANE


1. FedEx a cat-'o-nine-tails (1)


2. Singer Domino swings at home plate (1)


3. Supermodel Kate's failures to win (2)


4. Cavalry sword toil (2)


5. Cause discoloration in shellac (2)


6. Friends actor Matthew's small fruits (2)
IIIIII I=i


Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word. To win
$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
newspaper. All entries become
the property of UFS, Inc.
@� 2007 United Feature Syndicate, Inc
]Z Thanks and $10 to
Ronald Berkenblit of
Long Beach, NY for
S #4. Send your entry
to this newspaper.


7. Lawyer who sues one who lessens the severity (4)


IOIVOIIl HOIVDOIW'L SfIarH SAIiHHd'9 HSINUVA HSINaVI
HIOUV'I 1SVS '.' SHSSOI SSSOWH ' SLV8 SIVI '5 diMdfi
6-26-07 BaaSNY


BEVERLY HILLS 2/2
2 to choose, From $700
mo. (352) 201-0658
BEVERLY HILLS 3/2
Laurel Ridge, oversized
garage, pool & spa
$1,300mo.352-527-1051
BEVERLY HILLS
455. Monroe, 2+1
$685/mo Sec. neg,
352-726-9046
BEVERLY HILLS
Great Homes for Rent
or Sale (954) 536-0353
BEVERLY HILLS
Lease or Sale 2/1/1,
$675/mo1st/last/Sec.
Avail 7/1(727) 540-9436
BEVERLY HILLS
Oakwood Village
Beautiful 2/2/2 on
cul-de-sac, Immacu-
late w/ spacious rms.,
$850. mo. 352-476-4687
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2, like new,
Immaculate, all
appliances. 24hr gate
guarded community.
Deluxe cable TV & lawn
maintenance included
In rent. $1500 mo. Call
Paul (352) 746-9585






Brentwood
2/2/2 w/den
$950.00
Please Call:
(352) 341-3330
For more into. or
visit the web at:
litrusvlllaaes
mntaDsILoIM
CITRUS HILLS
Unfurnished Homes &
Furnished Condos
www.areenbriar
Greenbrlar Rentals, Inc.
(352) 746-5921
Citrus Hills 3/2/2
Lg. scrn. porch, No Pets
$995. 352-726-5863
CITRUS SPRGS 3/2/2
New; W/D, Pet friendly,
$925/mo.352-812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Brand new, dogs
ok 2000 sqft under air.
$1000/mo. lease option
to buy. (352) 522-0247
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New Home, All.
amenities, Lawn service
Incl.. $895. mo., 1st, last.,
sec. (954) 415-2056
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2/2, W/D $975/mo.
Inc. lawn & pest serv.
No pets (352) 697-1525
CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely 3/2/1 w/large
screen porch, terrazzo
floors, large closets.
$850 rent. 1st, last and
security to move In.
Avail now. Call
352-489-1411.

County Wide
View ALL at:
www.choosegar.com
*Luxury Homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*Citrus Hillsa 3 bdrm
*Beverlv Hills: 3Bdrm
*Inverness: 2&3 Bdrm
*Inverness 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/1
$775 Near hospital.
(727) 631-2680
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1'2. bring horses, 2ac,
Ig. barn,15 mln. to Pwr.
Plant $850/ mo.
352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 + Bonus Rm., CHA,
new kit., carpet, paint.
Fncd. yrd. Pets negot.
$825/mo. (240)994-8765
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
Nice, clean, $800 mo
352-795-6299/697-1240
Dunn./Goldle Pt.
River Garden Subdv. 2/1
could be a 3/1 Conc.
Block Home, Lg. Yrd,
Red, to $599/mo.
(352)669-2253
OTHER HOMES AVAIL
HOMOSASSA 4/3/2
Free 1st mo. rent to
qualified applicants
Pool, $1,000/mo.
(561) 790-5621


HOMOSASSA
2/1 $600. mo. Call
Robin (239) 530-0418
HOMOSASSA
MEADOWS 3/2/2 From
$750; SMW 2/2/1 Villa,
$725. River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
INVERNESS 2/1
Canal front F&R deck,
new kitchen, DW, MW.
Jacuzzi tub, W/D, gas
flrepl., new Heat & Air,
$775 moo., st, + 2 mo,,
352-637-1441 or
727-510-0210
INVERNESS 2/1
Pet OK $700. mo 1st,
last, sec. (352) 344-0505
INVERNESS 2/11/2
Office, LR, DR. Kit., glass
top stove, C/H/A very
nice, $600/mo, 1st, last
Sec. Ref. (352) 212-2022
(305) 294-6584
INVERNESS 2/2
Very Nice $750/mo +
352-726-7486/726-5588
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Lake Area, $860/mo.
(352) 341-1142
INVERNESS Wtrfrnt.
Pritchard Is. Townhouse
3/2, Pool, boat dock,
$895/ mo. No dogs.
(352) 697-1907
(508) 672-8413
Land Contract Wanted?
A unique way to buy
my home. 3/2 OR 4/2
(352) 613-6943
LANDMARK

REALTY

We have different
type rentals for
different situa-
tions. Some with
pets allowed.


Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311 W Main St.
Inverness
LECANTO 2/2
w/Den or 3rd BR, scrn
prch, Ig. 2 stry shed on I
fncd acr. $1,000/mo.+
dep. (352) 302-0586
* CITRUS SPRGS *
Why Rent?i? Lease
w/optlon to buy. New
3/2/2 DREAM HOUSE
on Elkcam Blvd.
Move In w/$2.150.
2nd & Last Mo.
are FREE with a
2 yr. lease.
Dave Kaiser, M21
Naturecoast Realty
* (352) 220-8967 *
PINE RIDGE 2/2/2
Newly remod., brand
new appi, $900/mo. 7st,
last, sec.(32) 302-1466
R.L.E. Dunnellon
3/2, Inside laund,
$950/mo.. 1st, Ist, sec.
(352) 347-5161
RAINBOW SPRGS.
County Club Est. 3/2,
garage,yard. $825/mo.
For Into:
(352) 489-5928
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645




SUGARMILL WOODS
New 2,665 sqft 4/2/2+
lac-3 min Sncst Pkwy.
$1195/mo. Ist+sec, Incis
lawn svc. 813-748-5206




3/2/1 LAKEHOUSE
Tsala Apk. Lake, comp.
remodeled. $995/mo.
$195K (727) 277-3713
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, priv. dock. $1500.
Mo.t lastlast sec., For
details (352) 795-1988
CRYSTAL RIVER
4bd/3ba Indian River
deep canal/dock
$1 600/mo 352-422-3698
FLORAL CITY 1/1
Lakefront Beautiful
wooded acre, scrn.
patio, No smoking. Util.
Inc. $625.1st/last/sec.
(813) 241-7117 KristI


FLORAL CITY
Newer 3/2/2, No pets or
smoking. $1000 mo.
(352) 344-2500
HERNANDO
3/2/2 Open Lake Front
garb. pickup, lawn
maint & homeowner
Ins. Incid. 352-400-2079
HOMOSASSA
3/2 On Mason Creek
Dep,, 1st. mo., 2 ref.'s
$1,200. (352) 628-5358
HOMOSASSA Canal
1 BR w/boat dock, scrn.
porch, utfl. Incl. $700/
mo.+ sec.(352)628-6537'
INVERNESS 2/1/2
LKFRNT, $750/Mo+
(612) 392-7520







CITRUS SPRINGS



Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down. Easy Termc
Danny (352)875-5645.
CRYSTAL SPRIVERNGS
New 2-story home, A







Prv Bdrm & b ath. ne
home. Credit check- 3/2/2'
persD rea. 352)875-503-3819




Furn. roo. A Internetd
phone, cable, incl. Po&
& kitch Bdprivileges $50m & bath. ne
home. Credit check-
perst ref. 352-503-38W,














Renovated Effan iences $40
Phone, Pool, flash pondo
AC, $50. daily, $300. w
Trailers $225wk. $
(352) 726-4744
ENTAPUBLISHNDER'S






NOTICE:
All real estaterc
advert INN HERNANDis

to Fair Housing Act p
which makes It Illegal.
to advertise "any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race colors,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
natona overtisgin, or an this
intention, to make .,g
such preference, llmi-
tation or discrimina-


living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant womenl-
and people secuisng
custody of children
under the age of 18.
Thliving with paper willo


notowngly accept



all dwellings
adverople sed In thgs
newspaper are ill-
ablenot knowingl an equal



opany adveportuising fty baor s.
Tvolaon of the mplawn of.



dlscrimlnation call
Our HUD tol-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone -
number Infor the
hearing Impalred is
1-800-927-9275.
newspaper are avail-






op complain ofry


Cte C


GILASSICFTlEDS


r-.














MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY




Ti" . is


ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.CQM


--y.



Yourwofld first

SNeed a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


BEVERLY HILLS
Diplomat 2 bedroom, 1
and 1/2 bath, Florida
room, eat In kitchen,
must see. $139,500
neg. 352-527-1259







OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC. appl's, new rf. 55+

-5405 S.Sloneridge-Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805



HOM./ Would make
perfect offlcel re.3r
Io.vr, :.:r.ea CrG C. i 3
P.: P,; o, wrnr lir
I18 900 1'on IMcEfo
E.xIT (352) 586-2663
r' '-]


TERI PADUANO
REALTOR
,Hal'Io E r.,O ,,:,'l
FLRealEstateSale.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.
(352) 212-1446
COMMERCIAL
& RESIDENTIAL


LECANTO
Office Space, Retail &
Warehouse for rent.
(352) 795-0800




INVESTORS PROPERTIES
for Sale, MH, Duplexes,
Quadplexes, Sin. Fam.
Vac. Lots, 352-795-0367




2005 4/2/2 $156K
New on marketll
For Info go to:
www.mvfsbo.com/
2349n or call
- 352-601-2585 btwn 8-8
3/2, Block Home,
newly remodeled kit.,
new appl's, Ig. Fam.
Rm. w/ FP, must sell
Asking $109,900.
(352) 322-0615
3/2/2 REDUCED $43,5001
New const. Ascot 3
Model! 1.995 SF.
$189,500 Greg Younger,
Coldwell Banker 1st
Choice. (352)220-9188
4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
Fam. Rm. , Cathedral
Ceilings 1800 sq. ft. liv,
$142,900. 352-489-8415
BEAUTIFUL NEW 4/2/2
2235 SFLA, Spit plan, CT,
Ig. Lanai, must sell
$197.000. 407-468-2179
BY OWNER'
2005 Home 3/2/2 Nice
area In Citrus Springs
Reduced to $151,000.
(352)257-1355
Rent-to-Own
Brand New Home 3/2/2
Low Down, Easy Terms
Danny (352)875-5645


3.9%
LISTING
Full service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
25+Yrs. Experience
$150+Mlllion SOLDIIl
Please Call for Details
& Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060

3+- BEAUTIFUL ACRES
Close to equestrian
center, tall oaks & pine,
$157K FSBO 527-8739

Adj. to Golf Course
FSBO 3/2.5/2 , Corner
Lot, Pool, Gas FP, Well,
Granite, Huge Shed,
Updated Evervthingal
myhome4sale.net
$299K (352) 746-1175

BETTY MORTON |


20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

R(ea 7Slect

(352) 795-1555


Ic Pin Ridge]


BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME
3/2/2 On 1 acre
Sell/lease opt.
$249,900. Must seel
352-302-5535
Equestrian Trail Home
New, 2004,3/2/3 Pool
home w/fenced yard.
on Equestrian Trail,
4577 W PINTO LOOP
$279,000/ OBO
(352) 746-9813

FIXER
UPPER
These homes
need work.
Free Computerized
list of properties
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
tvhomeinfocom
ID# 1048
ERA American
Realty &
Investments
NEW 4/3/2+ Pool Home
Over 1 Acrel 3,600 sf.
Awesomell $399,900
(352) 746-6161






PINE RIDGE
1'/2 story. 4BR/3BA
pool home on
landscaped 1.25 ac.
corner lot. $299,900
(352) 634-2373
PINERIDGE 3/2/2
Pool Hm. w/ FP
$247K Obo. Must Sell!
MLS #314040
352-302-7045
407-566-8637


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
IsMyvFuturell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
BY OWNER 3/2/2, .5 Ac.
Over 1,600 sf. l.a., fncd.,
w/work shed w/elec.
Built 2000, quiet
cul-de-sac off 486.
Great family home
w/playrooms! $165K
(352) 422-3137
Over 3000 Homes
and PIroperties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


C iS -Hi


CLASSIFIED


TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 13C


IvIv re


BETTY MORTON


BEVERLY HILLS
Great Homes for Sale
or Rent (954) 536-0353



LEASE OPTION
Sale $108,00 Rent $700.
mo. 2/1, New carpet,
ceramic tile, corner lot,
67 Beverly Hills Blvd.
(352) 613-4050
* NO CREDIT CHECKII
Rent to Own 1-2-3 BR's
352-484-0866
visit jademission.com


NEW LISTING
Tastefully furnished
Meadowview Villa with
Country Club Mem.
2BR/2BA, Lanai and
Pool In perfect cond.
$179,000.
Tom @ 302-423-0541
TERRA VISTA/HILLSIDE
SOUTH - 1800sq ft. 3/2/2
10,000sf lot. Brand new.
$289,900. 617-816-1230



CHARMING COTTAGE
1BR Cottage w/Water
views. /4 AC. $62K
(631) 334-8444
Lg. 4/4/2 Pool Home
370 E. Cumberland Ct.
on 9th hole; Meadows
$285K (352) 201-0917



100% Finan. Reduced,
must relocate 2100
sq.ft. 3/2 2 car garage
new roof, firep, corner
lot, Buyowner 61665
352-586-7685
3/2 Renovated
New paint, carpet,
landscaping, fncd yrd.
$126,500 (352)362-1555
Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE.com
Reliance Realty


CITRUS HILLS ON
GOLF COURSE
Beautiful 3-way split
w/2642 living sq ft
3BR/3bath/Den. New
A/C+ Roof Gourmet
Kitchen w/granite
wood & tile upgrades
galore & Standby
power Generator.
Large caged pool
overlooks 13th water
hole green of
Meadow golf course.
$424K. 352-560-6130

CUSTOM 2002
3/2/3 Pool, Over 5000
sq ft / roof. Huge
outdoor living,
granite/maple
+ $370K +
352-527-2749/212-7534
Immaculate New 3/2+
Den on 1 Ac. Reduced
to $291KI By Owner
352-726-7543/201-0991










"atoliotive
Your vorld first.
Everv Day

CilikONi(ici.,E


1wwwATAAIIe �j ei1 y 41 TP'R ] I


Citrus Ridge Realty
1707420


3521 N. Lecanto Hwy.
1-888-789-7100


* -. *,~*,


BM W'


,: l : b


I.
:3':


Chronicle



Classifieds


In Print



& Online


H T R U


CiIR(


F:


4 ". ')g


(352) 563-5


uc. Keal EsitlU ,te ll
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

RealityiSelect
(352) 795-1555
CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
circular driveway,
prequaillfled only
Must See. $124,900
(352) 201-1663
CUSTOM BUILT 2/2/2
Energy efficient, new
roof & appli's. Open fir.
plan, close to shopping
& hospital. $129,000.
Must seel 352-344-8519
FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613


S
..~ ,#.5'
S.
*. ~4*

.Ii
..w.f >~.


,1
I.
.1


/


I

I,


..... &


I *Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder* I


Furnished Villa, 2/2. ca-
thedral ceiling in LR
Newly tiled including
screen rm., $130,000
elkurz@yahoo.de
(352) 613-6496
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Uc.# CBC059685

How to Sell
Your House
By Yourself
Free Report Reveal.
10 inside tips to
Selling Your House
By Yourself.
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
tyhominfo.com
ID# 1017
ERA American
Realty &
Investments
Move Right In
Foxwood Estates
Immaculate 3/2/2,
fenced overszd Lot Lg.
lanail, everything new,
$152,000 firm
417-273-0020
352-400-5906


Beverly Hills, FL 34465


^TJ *' 1 I < -< J - . |


i


I I









.4 d~ ~ -CLASIEEDSCfl'RIJs Co~wrYT(FL) CH


:ILCE UEDAY UNE 26200


SELL YOUR HOME Gulf Hammock Retreat 3/2/1 LAKEHOUSE
5aPlace a Chronicle c on River in preserve Tsala Apk. Lake, camp.
Place a hnlcle 5/3/4 Cedar, bunk house remodeled. $995/mo.
6 lInes 30 days RV grg. (352) 597-5109 $195K (727) 277-3713
$6n5.095 SE RHOMEI INVERNESS 3000 esf.
$51.95 SELL YOUR HO Beautiful Country Home
Place a Chronicle- 4/3, FP, fish pond,
CallW f GClassified ad 11/2 Ac. Adj. 3/4 Ac.
726-116 lines, 30 days Lot avail. Prvt. Nature
563-5966 $51.95 Preserve. $332K
Non-Refundable 631-334-8444
Private Party Only H aCall
� s per additffonln35 726-1441 INVERNESS
(Some Restrictions 5 5966Pritchard Island 2/2
(Some s 563-5 condo, 2 story end unit.
May apply) Non-Refundable Open water by dock
"eetHepyuOpen water by dock
VeteranMustSellh r " Private Party Only $185,000 352-400-0053
Veteran, Must Sell "s6 or- aadlllonal line
House because of rSome Re strcttons Spacious
Health. 3/2/2, May apply) HERNANDO
Upgraded, . mn ~ pl)HRAD
Upgraded, manyt3/2/2, 3100 sq ft under
extras., watre & sewgerb MR CITRUS roof. Appt only.
pickup Included for KEY WEST Style Cottage COUNTY REALTY $279,900 (352) 341-5611
small fee. Ideal for 3BR, Fully Upgraded.
Retired Couple, Conv. Locat. Must Seel
RV Free Storage. 352-621-9227 or
Call (352) 637-0321 hotlocalproperties.com
For appointment )1-15 HOUSES WANTED
WINDERMERE!! 4'1, ,fl.ICash or Terms
2/2, Immaculate! John (352) 228-7523
Ceiling Fans, Screen WWW.FastFlorldaHouse
Lanai, W/D, Plant 3/2/2 Cul-de-sac
shelves, Vaulted Sweetwater Elegance ALAN NUSSO WE BUY HOUSES
Ceilings, Blinds, Open Plan $199,000 3.9% Listings Ca$Sh........ Fast I
Remarkable Charlene & Peggy INVESTORS 352-637-2973
Community Amenities! EXIT REALTY BUYERS AGENT 1homesold.com
$180K,(352)726-4763 (352) 464-4179 COMMERCIAL SALES WE BUY HOUSES
or 344-3567D ,,V (352) 422-6956 CaSh........Fast I
A~Q.~QM352-637-2973
(3 5 2) 6 2 1 - 2 2 0lh o m e so ld .c o m

moigcoa AUS .CO mi2.m

CAITLE/HORSE FARM- u W
FSBO Custom Ceda r ONE OF A KIND
Home 2/2/2 on 1 lacs Bring your horse 3/2/2 on HILLSIDE IN TERRA VISTA
Barn/Workshop,Tools. 2 ac. 2 paddocks, FP Ig. Skyvlew CC, $88,500
IN FLORAL CITY cgd pool, fiberoptic lights, Call (352) 638-0905
$425K Call 344-1558 3.9% spa, many extrasI $255K -
GREAT HOME ON 1 AC.1 LISTING (352) 726-8348
2/2/2, new roof, renov. RIDE GOETHEII
in 2004. Open floor, Full service/MLS 10.08 Ac. Fully fncd, 3
w/split plan $179,900 Why Pay More??? paddocks, 30 X 30 barn (2) Pine Ridge 1 Ac. Lots
Terri Hartman Crossland No Hidden Fees w/overhang & 2 Ig. Buy now, build later
Realty (352)726-6644 25+Yrs. Experience 12X12 stalls, riding ring, G great Investment!
wash rack. Sep, 12X12 $59.900(352)746-6161
$150+Million SOLDIII Shed/Tack Rm. 2/2 MH INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
Please Call for Details w/ranch style porch & Maxwell PI. & Savary
& Market Analysis gorgeous hill-top v ews Ave. 8 parcels for
$229,900 $44,900. (727) 457-6595
775 N. Lyle Ave f=BO RON & KARNA NEITZ Well < mkt. value
3/2/2,1 850 sf. w/den BROKERS/REALTORS 352-239-7788/465- 2427
$160K For details: CITRUS REALTY GROUP
205-746-9812/901-5246 (352)795-0060
3/1 CRACKER, 1/2 ac. HOT SPRINGS, AR
Crnr lot. Cmed1tely11/4 acre lot $20,000
SMust See! CITRUS HILLS (352) 344-1215
$ 109Kobo 352-209-2118 Greenbrlar Condo, new
3/2 ON 10.8 ACRESII carpet & tile, 2BR, 2BA,
Detached 14 X 28 Fl. Rm. Pool, Tennis Only
office, pool, fncd. $114,900. 352 527-0593 g
$295K (352)621-3135
4/22, 10SF $14HERNANDO LAKE
4/2/2, 2,100 SF.$ 154K 1 Beautiful Acrel Lg.
Beautifully remodeled.
New oak cabs, wood BONNIE PETERSON Oaks & Sunsets $150K
floors, timberline roof, Realtor, GRI 1LKFO
fireplace, 2 mln. from LAKEFRONT
wate. (52) 88-040Crystal River $45K
water. (352) 688-8040 Your SATISFACTION www.JohnsFlorida
$50K BELOW Is My Futurell Lots. cam 352-228-7523
APPRAISALI Like new 3 BR/2BA Old Town Agent Owned
3500 st, Country Ranch (352) 586-6921 w/double garage, All
Near Hospital. 2.4 acre or (352)795-9123 Cypress on I acre w/
corner lot, w/ attached canopy of hardwoods, [-cSale
2 story garage apt. Charlotte G Realty 1 mi. to boat ramp or Rent
Reduced to $360K. & Investments LLC $165,000. (352)542 -1182
Contact owner NORTH CAROLINA A I
352-220-8310 BUYING OR Mountain Log Cabin, I www.chronicle
BETTY MORTON SELLING? CALL ME $99,900. New on Shell rentalfinder.com
FOR RESULTSI on private I acre sight. L m....i.l
828-652-8700

- p

1979 MERCURY
S ' i4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN 65H, OUTBOARD,
S" I 3,514 sf Formal areas, Runs good. $450/obo
S ,,,L French Drs. gazebo & (352) 795-9187,
qi guesthouse. $1,285,000 ask for Bob
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
LIc. Real Estate Agent REALTY(352) 302 6082
20 Years ExperienceI'W.e
2.8 0% CRYSTAL
Commission Call Me RIVER Canoe
t PHYLLIS STRICKLAND 1 t iegas
RPH (352) 613-3503 3/3/2, 2600 sq. 16 ft. Fiberglass,
Na6i..Ie Keller Williams ft. Loaded with jacket, & cushions Incl.
(352) 795-1555 Realty upgrades. Just $225. (352) 382-7875
CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2.5/2.5 off Kings Bay. 2 Inflatable Dingy
BEAUTIFUL New Cape fresh water spgs, 12' W/fiberglass bottom
Cod on 1/2 Ac. Over reswaterspgS, Holds air, Selling as is.
2,800 SF. MUST SEEI 10k boat lift. $400/obo. Crys. Rvr.
$249K or $1,600/mo. $479,000 (216) 346-1070
352-746-5912 3 KAYAKS
(302-6924) WILDERNESS
Dianna McNally TARPON 120 & 140
REALTOR 140 used once, In ex-
mExit Realty . cellent cond. $700, 120
BONNIE PETERSON ENJOY NATURE AT IT'S 352-302-6924 707s good cond., $550
Realtor, GRI BEST CRYSTAL MANOR
Beautiful setting. Private BETTY MORTON SEA DOO Ltd/Set
Your SATISFACTION w/ mature trees. 2002 03 & '03 GTX 3 Seaters
Is M Futurell home, with all the Low hrs Grg kept & serve.
extras, on 5.9 acres Dual galv. trlr. Mint!
(352) 586-6921 (5 lots). $360K $12,900 (352) 382-1623
or (352)795-9123 Wonderful home
and great investment.
Charlotte G Realty (352) 795-1454
& Investments LLC FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view 2 WILDERNESS
Directly on KAYAKS Sit Inside
L,& Q K Withlacoochee 1,850 Pongo, hardly used.
sq.t on 1.25 acres with Lic. Real Estate Agent $325 ea. 352-621-3103
REDUCED boat house & separate 20 Years Experience or 352-634-4793
dock. Best view on River 2.81
and fishing's great! Commission 16 ft. Fiberglass
$399,000 For virtual tour Boat,
visit ByownerCitrus.com w/ Center Console,
or call Don at Ra ledc w/trailer $1000. abe
OPEN HOUSE (352) 344-1613 w ,,ws (352) 637-3934
1470NW 21st St HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900. (352) 795-1555 14'-28'
Crystal River 3/2/1 w/ Laundry Let us sell your
June 30 & July 1 Atkinson Construction BUY NOW clean used boat.
1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 352-637-4138 Bargains THREE RIVERS
352-628-1062 or Lic.# CBCO59685 Everywherel MARINE

SPRING RUN
10080 Pamondeho Cir - .
3/2 split floor plan, trlpie
carport, sunroom, (352) 563-5510
completely, renovated .
in last 212 yrs. New ap- .. 17ftf. PATHFINDER
pliances, file, carpet, '99, Tunnel Hull,
lights, fans, counter- Yamaha 50HP, trim
tops, sinks, nicely land- tabs, power pole, 85 Ib
scraped 1/2 acre lot. Deb Infantne trolling mtr, much more
12X16 workshop with air EXIT REALTY LEADERS $8,500. (352) 628-5418
condo. & attic. Cam- MIchele Rose (352) 302-8046 22ff. HURRICANE
pare with other homes REALTOR '03 Deck Boat w/GPS,
In neighborhood get 0 "Simply Put- CRYSTAL RIVER Fish/ Depth finder, 115
bigger and better Iill Work Harder" 4/3/1 split-plan on HP Yamaha outboard,
house far $20,000- 352-212-5097 deep water canal. Gulf rigged up far fishing
$30,000 less. Quick sale. thorn@atlantic.net access. Many updates. and/ar pleasure. Mint
$140,000. 352-220-6663 Craven Realty, Inc. $299,500. 352-422-1550. cond. less than 100 hrs.
352-726-1515 FSBO Riverfront home $17,500., 352-795-2270
NEWI 2 Story Cape Cod with panoramic view AEROCRAFT 19.7'
IE5/3,.2,850 SF. w/8' X 32' directly on Boat w/trlr. 4.3 Ltr., V-6
Covered Porch, Opt. Wlthiacoochee 1,.850 Merc, OD, Trim Tabs,
2/1 on V/s Ac. Fenced Garage. Came see us sqi.ft on 1.25 acres with Runs Good, $1,750
Great Ladi W/Alum. @ ImrsleHm boat house & separate 352-628-3969/205-0291
Crprt, Wood Frame Hm. Builders (352)746-5912 dock. Best view on River
Fam. Rm, Eat-In Kitch. -_and fishing's greatly F * **


New AC & drainfleld. Over 3,000 $399,000 For virtual tour
11.0M (352)628-1669 Homes and visit ByownerCitrus.com AREAS LARGEST
A GREAT STARTER or call Don at SELECTION
HOMEI 3/2/1 Nice lot w/ Properties (352) 344-1613 OF PONTOONS
Fenced back yard. listed at HOMOSASSA 3/2/2 & DECK BOATS
Priced Right $134,900 www.naturecoast Home has Upgrades
Harley Hough, EXIT homefront.com Galorel Peaceful & Crystal River
Realty 352-400-0051 Serene. $349K Marine
BY OWNER Vic McDonald John Maisel Ill Exit (352) 795-2597
BOWEViMco ld(352)794-0888 __________
3/2 slnglewide On 2 half (352) 637-6200 CAROLINA SKIFF
15925 looouts Pt6 2 35) 67-600AOINA SKIFF
acre lots $46K LET OUR OFFICE 01 17DLX, '04 Yamaha
blocks off US19 GUIDE YOUI 60HP 2 strk. 1 yr. warr.
1592S LokoutPt 2GPS, DF, LOADED
352-503-4142 G DFL0ODED
$9,995. (352) 422-1412
.2CENTURY 1801 '05
" " "w'"c115HP Yamaha 4strk.
m i CC, radio, fishfinder.,
Iivewells, rod holders.
FOR SALE BY OWNER New cond. Low, low hrs
High & Dry-Homes Only $18,000bo 352-563-0202
Quaint 3/2/2 with Pool Realtor CREST 21'
extra lot & workshop My Goal s Satisfied Plantation Realtyv. Inc. 1993, 200HP Ocean Pro
Must Seel $158,500. Customers i1352) 795-0784 Motor, w/trailer. $7500
(352) 621-0802 omers Cell 422-7925 Call Sean 352-794-0809
HOMOSASSA 3/2.5/2 Lisa VanDeboe evenings.
Must see home on 5 REALTY ONEl Broker (R)/Owner EXCEL 21'
AcreslPlenty of Land & hainAgeSee alot the listings In Bowrider, 4.3 Liter V-6
Privacy, $279K Alex Oul andinAgResults Citrus County at Mercruiser I/O,
Choto, Fl. Realty & Os di Rs www.lantation Asking $3,200
Auction. (352) 628-0968 (352) 637-6200 reatvinc.com (352) 257-3635


I


F16 SEARAYDER
'96, Jet Boat, bimlni top.,
radio, 92 hrs., exc. cond
garage kept, $5,000
obo (352) 465-5796
GLASSTRON 16'
150HP Mariner, motor &
trailer like new. Boat
needs some intr, work.
$2500/bo 352-220-9476,
GODFREY 22'
HURRICANE Deck Boat
'91, 115hpMerc, many
new parts w/Trlr. $8,000
(352) 726-2408
GRADY WHITE 22.6'
W/A Cuddy, 200 hp
Mariner, O/B, Alum. Top
W/Top Gun Outriggers.
Garmin Chart plotter.
$12K abo 352-302-8266
GRADY WHITE '78
115 Yamaha Outboard
$2000.
(352) 476-9013
HURRICANE
23ff. Deck Boat, 150
Mariner, new rebuilt
'03, trailer. $8,500.
(352) 212-7500
KAYAK
Eddy Line Merlin XT 15'
w/ Swift paddle cockpit
cover great shape
$1,500 352-586-1248
KW 196 BAY REEF
Low hrs. Well maint, by
Sr. owner, loaded w/
features, set-up for gulf
& flats w/Jackplate, 130
Honda, Great white &
full electronics. Asking
$17,500. Call for details.
(352) 697-0199







New Boat Trailers
GALV. & ALUM.
All at Far Below
Dealers Pricing
SUMMER CLEARANCE
L MONROE SALES
9am-5pm Man-Fri
352-527-3555

NOVA PROWELD
'00, Jon Boat 16rf.. 4OHP
Johnson, PT & tilt, trail,.
mtr., FF, seat & trlr. runs
perfect, more Info.
$3,700. (352) 527-4191
PONTOON BOAT
'95, 20' Partycraft w/ trir,
Bath, sink, 50HP, $6,000
(352) 586-0386
PRALINE
'04, 24 ft., 225 Honda,
Donzi Hull, black, low
hrs. lIft kept, NICE
$35,000. (352) 586-9349
PROLINE
'06, 19otff., '06 Mercury
Optimax, 115 H out-
board, T-Topi, color
electronics, ,still under
fact. warranty, many.
many options w/b5at &
trailer, asking $22,500.
(352) 628-4668
PROLINE 17' SPORT
'87 W/115 HP Johnson,
w/trailer, $3500/obo
(352) 628-3617

RANGER
'88 18FT BassMaster
boat, 150HP, trailer,
extras, $6,000 aba
(989) 225-2911
RENTAL FINDER
' www/chroniclesn



,AAA
BOAT DONATIONS
Tax Deductible @
appraised value
when donated to a
43 year aid
non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity,
Maritime Ministries
A (352) 795-9621 A
SLEEK CRAFT
Jet Boat. 400 cu in, short
block, w/ hlgh lift cam,
edeabrock manifold & 4
barrel carburetor, new
aluminum perf. trailer,
new power wince, HD,
$10,000. (352) 503-5071
SLIPPER SAILBOAT
17' in Exc. cond. w/2
sets f sails $2,5000OBO
Call (352) 795-7777
STAMAS 1982 24'
Cuddy cabin, new eng.
new outdrive in 1996.
Law hrs. Fly bridge,
out riggers, fishing ma-
chine. See at Aqua
Power in inglis. $9000.
SUNRAY
'81. 21fft. 40HP, 95 en-
gine, great cond. ncl.
traIler, ready tfor water
$4,700. (352) 422-0058
Wanted: Boats in Need
at Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Pald
(352) 212-6497
WELLCRAFT 19'
1986, Cuddy, I/O,
Good Cond. w/trlr.
$3,000
(352) 527-8150




A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951"
*2 weeks In the

*2 weeks Onlin!
SFeatured in Tues.
" el"Sectlonl
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

GEORGIA BOY
1979, 27Ft., Perfect
cond. $4,200
(352) 637-4938,
JAMBOREE 29'


2005, V-10 Class C
13K, Loadedl Perfect
Conditoni Ready to gol
$48,500 (352)465-2138
KZ JAG '06
Slps 8, full length awn-
ing, load distributing
hitch, refrig, micro,
range, shower, bath.
Operates off Gas or
elec. Very clean, used
very little. Must sell
$13,000/aba.
(352) 201-0649
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/slide, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457
RV FOR RENT
31', Sleeps up to 7.
Loaded Just bring your
clothes & food $800wk
(352) 422-7794
WE NEED RVSII
We will buy or consign
your clean RV @ NOQ
EE! Bobby Clark RV
(352) 726-5999


I


#P5331, Here Is Your
Chance For A
Honda $16,942 or
I $289 @ mo. I
S 866-838-4376

S'07, Chevy Impala
LT, #P5391 Only Ilk
Smi, excellent cond,
$17,946 or $297. @
mo. 866-838-4376
L & minimm i
S '07, Ford Fusion
#H09689A, Lots of
Car for the Money
Only 8K mi. $16,770
or $286. @ mo.
866-838-4376

'97 BUICK LeSABRE CUSTOM
70K X-Chean, Loaded..$.4,995
4 DR, Loaded, 3K Tjs0$4,95
'01 HYUNDAI ELANTRE GLS
Sedan, Low Mi., Loaded..$6,995


I O-C% I


Car 173K, 33 MPG.
Almost everything new.
$4500 Invested. $2600
352-795-2894/586-6611
MITSUBISHI '03
Galant GTZ, 3.0, V6, 54K
auto, extrmly well kept,
many upgrades,
$15,000 (352) 464-0433
MITSUBISHI
'97, Eclipse, silver, new
motor, transm. & fires
$4,000 abo (352)
637-3659 or 302-0119
Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500


VOLVO
1987 4-dr. sedan, runs
good, $700 or best offer
(352) 726-0887
(352) 476-8329


T RV DONATIONS T
Tax Deductible for
Appraised Value
Maritime Ministries
T (352) 795-9621 _
5TH WHEEL 30'
Super slide 2000
Meadowbrook. Exc.
cond. $18,200
(352) 746-0348
ADVANTAGE 2004
5th whi. 36' 3 slides,
Asking
$24,900/obo.
(352) 270-3349
AIRSTREAM 31'
1979, Great Shape!
New AC, carpet, tires,
uphol., $8,900 abo
(352) 257-4260
COLEMAN POPUP
'89, Air, refrig, stereo,
exc. cond. $2800/oabo
(352) 489-9736 or
(352) 422-2874
FLEETWOOD
TERRY 9826 ft. travel
trailer/ must see/
loaded 352-220-0214
or 352-228-3456
Handyman Spec.
'78 COACHMAN, 26'
5TH WHEEL, $1,200/
OBO (352) 503-5381
leave message.
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels ect.Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO 36', '04
5th Wheel Toy Hauler
4,000W Gen, 15,000 AC,
Fuel Stat., Slide $26,950
(502) 345-0285 (IN FL)
POP UP CAMPER
'00 Hunter Coachman,
good cond, sleeps 6,
cold AC, easy setup,
$2500 (352) 697-0243
PROWLER
'03. 30ft, 12ff slide out,
loaded, sleeps 6,
refrig. , micro, stove,
$12,000. (352) 564-4170
SLIDE IN CAB OVER
CAMPER, for 8' bed.
$400.
(352) 746-2271
Starcraft
'85, Pop up, refrig., hot
water, new tires, excel.
cond. $1,800. aba
(352) 341-1019
TERRY 5TH WHEEL
1995, Great shape,
loaded, sips 6, $7,000
(352) 344-0324



'94 LINCOLN
for parts only,
$900/ aba
(352) 220-6473
FORD F-150 1996
for parts, 4.9 motor, M50
D trans, 2dr. dash/trim,
front end; wiring
harness, 70K mi. $500
the lot or will separate.
352-274-5522/274-5523
SET OF 4 WHEELS
20x9 Dodge Ram Hemi
Sport Wheels, high
polished aluminum,
Like New $400,
(352) 613-3095
TINTED REAR SLIDE
WINDOW w/moldingfor
Ford F-150
'88-'96, lyr. old. exc.
cond. $100,.
(352) 726-4052
TRUCK TOPPER
From 6' bed.
Exc. Cond. $250
(352) 220-3273
TRUCK TOPPER
Fu. Sz. Fiberglass
�$150
(352) 628-6335



$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
1-800-DONATE-CARS
(1-800-366-2832)
Fast Free Towing, Tax
deductible, Free
vacation to donors.
heritage for the Blind
IRS Recognized 501c3.
#1 Rated Car Donation
Program www.hftb.org
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333




*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowers,jacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
WE PAY CASH I
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
TolFree
(888) 480-1170

$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No Title OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



pm i- -mi-l-
F '03 Nissan Altma
I 3.5LVS6#H08966A I
ISporty, Law MIlesi
iand Extra Clean
I $14,890. or $249.@
ma. 866-838-4376
I=-i -- -= J=I

S'06 Cadllac Sedan
I Seville DTS, #P5363, |
Loaded with the
I Works, Like New
$28,970.


r'06 Honda Accord
I LX #P5330 and


$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374


C- --4111111


A - - - - -- I I


1980 NISSAN 280Z
Body in good shape.
Good mechanical
cond. but needs trans.
$400 (352) 201-9018
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
-2 weeks In the
*2 weeks QOliel
*Featured in Tues.
"Whee" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACURA RSX-S'04
6sp man., mnrf, 54K,
leather, 6cd pampered
$14,900/obo
352-344-4505























2003 Century, 5,000
miles $8,000
(352) 795-7210
BUICK LESABRE
'00 CUSTOM, very
clean, low mileage.
$5,950 (352) 746-7128
BUICK LESABRE
'94, Low Miles. No AC,
Good Cond,
$2,000 obo
(352) 726-5844
CADILLAC DEVILLE
'99 73,800 ml. Air Cond.
Leather, Mother of Pearl
w/ bik converlible top
Dual Power Seats,
Premium Sound, AM/FM
Stereo, Cassette,
Premium Wheels,
$9,500. (352) 860-0444
Cadillac ElDorado
1995, Beautiful Car,
best offer over $5,000.
(352) 527-6553
CHEVY CAPRICE
CLASSIC 1986
Loaded needs TLC
$700.O0obo
352-796-0941
CHRYSLER Crossfire
2005, 18K Miles,
YOU GOTeA SEE IT
#6149823B Citrus Kba
(352) 564-8668

DESPERATELY NEEDED
CAR DONATIONS
For Battered Women
in our County.
PLEASE HELP US.
MARITIME MINISTRIES
(352) 795-9621
(352) 795-0324
DODGE INTREPID
99. 2.7L, 30MPG HWY,
48K ml. All power, CD,
tinted windows, non
smoker, women driven,
garaged, exc. cond.
$5200. (352) 795-6151
FORD
'97 Explorer. One owner
188K, $1,500.as-is
795-6850
FORD FOCUS
2002
Clean & Economical
#70561998 Citrus Kla
(352)T564-8668
FORD T- BIRD '94
V8,gd. cond.,runs but
needs work,$2100/OBO
Call 7.46-1332
Honda Accord
2001, 88K mi, very
good cond. All service
records. $6900
(352) 621-0828
INFINITI J-30
'93, Pearl White.
Good Cond. garage
kept. All records.
$4,300 (352) 726-1138
KIA OPTIMA EX
2004, V-6, 18K ml,
LIke NEW!
#7060610A Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
LEXUS ES 300 '97
84,300 ml, Loaded, Ex-

352-425-1518.
LINCOLN
2000, SIgnature SerIes,
Exc. condo. 72k mow,
hardly drIven.
1880,000 Negotiable
(352) 489-0122
LINCOLN TownCar
2003, Signature Series,
Showroom Cond.m
Carriage Roof. $17,500
OBO (352) 489-1639
LINOLN T-BIRcar9
'93,Sgd. condrus leathr















Everything works Colde
AC. $2200 341-0718
MERCEDES 450 SL1
1978. 81K w/ both tops
(352) 625-5213
Sunoo, Dealx Whteels
Lowd Miles. grgedc

















V-C. Cert. Technician


$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
'82 CADILLAC Biarritz
Pristine, classic,
collectible. 9,137 orig.
miles. Black w/red
leather int. S.S. roof,
custom made spoke
wheels, new Redline
tires. All rec. incl. orig.
invoice. $15,000 firm
352-586-9663/795-8634
'83 Monte Carlo SS
Ltd Edition. Good
condition.
All original$4,000
(352) 563-0340
CHEVY EL CAMINO
'65 $8,900.00 worked
350, turbo 350 tranny
Just needs to be fin-
Ished 352-489-8633
FORD 1940
New paint, Chevy
350 motor & trans. drive
It home. Very clean.
(352) 212-7500
FORD
1956 T-Bird, Red, new
restoration, rebuilt eng.,
new paint, both tops,
Pwr. Steer. $29,500.
(352) 628-1734
FORD
1965 Thunderbird
landau, goodcond.,
all orig. $2,500
(352) 637-3333
FORD THUNDERBIRD
'89 Super Coupe. 5 spd.
Super Charged Eng.
$1800/obo
(352) 382-7001
MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 125K,
White, Both tops, New
Mich, tires, $10,500
(352) 586-6805
VOLKSWAGON
1965, Custom Baha.
Solid floors, glass body.
Many extras. $3,400
(352) 560-3222
VOLKSWAGON
'77 BEETLE, needs some
work, runs/drives great.
$2000/obo


I





I





I










i



I


i


S'02, Kla Sportage
#H09374A, SUV Style
For Less, Great
Student Car $5,766.
or $119. @ mo.
866-838-4376

'04, Ford Ranger
Edge #P5437
X-Cab and Lots of
Style, great Student
Car $11,770. or $196.
@ 866-838-4376
L =man'==== = I
S '04, Mercury
Mountaineer #P5431
SUIV and Space For a
Less Only $16,880 or
$281. @ me.
866-838-4376
---m== -, i i-
r
06, Ford Expedition
XLT, #P5359, 7 Pass,
Only 28k mi., Must
See $21,794 or $362
@ moe. 866-838-4376

'07 Chevy Trailblazer
1S, #P5389
SUV For Less, Only
13k mi. $20,980.
Sor $349 @ mo.
866-831-1376




FORD EXPLORER
1991 Air Condition,
Rear Wheel Drive,
$1500 Good Condition
(352)464-3671
ISUZU AXIUM
2002,
Sharp Looking SUVI
#7042529A Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 4x4, gd. tires, mint
engine, cold air, runs
great, 140K ml. $2500.
(352) 382-4142
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 85700 orig miles,
$4500. firm, A/C, AM/
FM/CD, alarm syst, blk
leather seats, front/rear
bumpers, tow pkg, roof
rack, 2 dr, 5 speed. exc
cond. 352-476-5604
KIA SORENO
2006, 4 X 4, Low miles
2 to Choose From
Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668
SATURN V6 AWD
VUE 2003 60k mi, Blue,
Loaded, Moon Roof,.
Cargo Racks, etc., 28
MPG Hwy, graphics re-
movable $10,500 OBO
352 628 5957
SUBURBAN 4x4 '88
Navy/grey, front & rear
air, tow pkg. Clean &
solid machine.$2,200.
abo (352) 795-3970
TOYOTA
'90, 4Runner, V6, 4 x 4,
2 door, low mi. runs


$500! Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
Chroniclel
.2 weeks QOninel
* Featured in Tues.
"Whel " Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply


� � � 7
'03, Chevy Tahoe LT
#P5421, DVD,
Leather, sunroof,and
more $22,760.
or $383. @ mo.
866-838-4376
L-iii-mill
'05, Chevy Silverado
SIS, #P5351,Need I
STowingPower and
Space Call $18,944
or $324 @mo.
866-838-4376

S06, Dodge Ram
1500 #P5348
Quad Cab, V8,
fullsize for less 0
$19,776or $339.@
mo. 866-838-4376
L mu mm. m.mm il
r i--, =--g- i mi
07, Dodge Caliber
| #P5392 and #P5363 S
* Factory Warranty,
Carfax, Save Lots, U
S$14,770:or$249. @
mo. 866-838-4376
L- -- --- i
A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
S2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Section!
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
CHEVY
'02, Silverado 2500 HD,
4 x 4, black, crew cab,
fully loaded, leather,
tow, pkg., $19,000 aba
(352) 344-5323
CHEVY
'92, Silverado 1500, Ext
cab, Lng bd., w/ topper
350 eng., new trans.,
$2,500.obo
(352) 220-7273
CHEVY COLORADO
'06 Crew Cab,
16K miles, Brand new
tires. $16,800
(352) 504-1752
CHEVY P/U '00
71k ml, 2 8ff toolboxes
/roof rack. 1 owner,
Well malnt. 5495.00
OBO (352) 613-5869
CHEVY S-10
'02, Exc. Cond. Bed liner
& Tonneau Cover.,
Tint. 69K, $6,300
(352) 344-2331




DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB '01.
Drives, runs like new.
$8500.
Call (352) 794-0123
DODGE RAM
2004
READYTJQO
GO TO WORKII
#7051944A Citrus Klb
(352) 564-8668
FORD
'90, F350. 460 engine,
w/overdrive trans,.
crew cab, runs excel.
$3,000. (352) 201-9018
FORD F250 1999
175300, $16500.00 080,
7.3 diesel, tuner, new
tires, xtra cab, 8ft bed,
4" exhaust, goose neck
hitch, call Rick
954-732-0830
FORD F250
'96 Power Stroke 7.3
Liter Diesel. Gd Cond
Rebuilt Title, DOT Cert
$6500.00 352-302-0456
GMC 2500 1977
87k mi., $6000.00,
HDTOWER OR HAULER.
AS IS. FLORDA TRUCK.
CELL 910-797-4871.
LEAVE MESSAGE.
INTERNATIONAL
2000 Semi w/Sleeper
9200 Model series,
60 Detroit, 10 spd. trans.
air ride, tandem rear
end 273, w/ wetilne, PC
set up, $20,500. abo
(352) 726-1373
NISSAN
'99, Frontier XE, 99k ml,
new tires, runs great.,
Reduced to $3,900.
(352) 527-8706


*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, blkes, cars, Jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
Kawasaki KX250,.,
'06 < 6 ma. old, < 20 hs�
over $4K worth of extr'
serve. contract incl. Best
Offer. (352) 697-2395
MUST SELL
2006 Kawasaki Prairie
360 4x4 100hrs $4000.00
o.b.o 352-422-4495
SUZUKI LT-R450
2006 Quad racer $4,500
YAMAHA Y2 426 F
2001 Dirtr bike $2,700
352-422-2339
YAMAHA
'99 Warrior 350,
Asking $1,400
(352) 257-3635
Yamaha Blaster '00
200cc, Runs like a
Bansheel After market
upgrades[ $1,650obo'


d o r
#P5396 Vacation
Time, Lots of space
$15,840. or $269. @
mo. 866-838-4376
i- m mm m m= m mi =
$500! Police impounds
For sale! Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van, TV,
tape player, new tires,
completely tuned,
(352) 228-2239
CHEVY CARGO
VAN 2002, 8600LB. 5.7L,
bin pkg, tow pkg.
Roof racks, $7800.
(352) 628-6300
CHEVY LUMINA
'95, Looks good, runs
good. New tires,
battery & brake pads.
$2,100 (352) 726-7262
DODGE
98, Caravan, 4 cyl.,
7 pass, auto, cold AC,
154k mil., excel. cond.
$2,300. 352-341-0718
DODGE VAN 1997
exempt mileage, ask-
Ing $3500.00
V-6 auto, a/c, good
condition, cargo van
call 352-621-1248
FORD
'97, Aerostar, New tires
Asking $1,500. abo
(352) 628-9548
(352) 464-1633
FORD AEROSTAR
'95, Cold AC, 4.0 V-6,
Looks & Runs Goodl
$1,800 080
(352) 527-1285
FORD WINDSTAR
LX
2000, Cruise, P/S. P/B,
Cold AC. Well kept!
Non-Smoker. 100K
$3,500 (352) 466-3539
Town & Country
'94, Mini Van, 25 MPG,
leather. AC, all elect.
options, dependable
$2,400. (719) 660-6686
MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY







ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


11 lEae% ---


A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only-
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
.2 weeks Onlnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Weels"Secfloni
Call Today ,,
(352) 726-1441.
or (352) 563-5966,
For details.
5 per additional line.
Some Restrictions,,
May Apply '
BIG DOG
'98, Chromed Out,
board & stroked.','
12k ml Sacrifice. Please
Call. (352) 228-2239<'
*FREE REMOVAL OFl"'
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet sils
mowers jacuzzr's, We,
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSQN
'05, 1200 Sportster Cu�-
tom, many extras, wel
maintained, $7,895',,,
(352) 637-6284 " j,
HARLEY DAVIDSQN
2006, Street Glide."
1450CC, Uke New! 2,200
mi, blk, $13,500 OBO,
(352) 400-0360 -
HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA2005:,
6200ml, $12,500 wind-
shield, bags, 4000 miles
of warr. (352) 697-0243
HONDA /"
'03, CR250R, like newF
never riden, $800. ofb'
tra new parts Incl.
$2,500. (352) 572-6023
HONDA '07
Aero 750, Mint Cond.,
Showroom new, Less
than 1,500 mi. $6,600.,
includes Windshield,
and 2 Helmets. New
house forces sale..
352-400-2277
HONDA 2003 VTX
1300, well maintained,
Garage kept. lots of
xtras, Exc. cond. $6500.
(352) 527-6639
HONDA
'83 SlIverwing, 2cyl.,
shaft drive, full dress,
runs good,. ,M
$1,550. (352) 586-4671
KAWASAKI 1200 '01
Voyager Trlke. Exc.
cond. (MUST SEEi.._;
$10,000. (352) 628-64Q
TRIUMPH '
2002 Bonneville -!'.
America, 8600 miles N
new, $4,700 OBO
(352) 586-1248


CLASSIC FIELDS


565-0626 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
Betty J. Emmons '
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FQR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
DIVISION PROBATE
File No. 2007-CP426
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY J. EMMONS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of BETTY J.
EMMONS deceased,
whose date of death
September 2, 2004*:
pending in the Co thde
Court for CITRUS Couns
Florida, Probate DIvlAt,r
the address of which. Is
110 N. Apopka Ave.,Qnt
verness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses aot
the personal reprdesenta
five and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de,
cedent and other persons
having claims or deo
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no'
tIce Is required to bd
served must file thelt
claims with this cou
WITHIN THE LATER OFI
MONTHS AFTER THE TIM5
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE-OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having calm 6or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONtHS
AFTER THE DATE OF ,qjE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF TRIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FI2D
A THIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOOIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. ,,
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS -SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE .F
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tlon of this Notice Is June
19, 2007. ,
Personal Representative:
/s/ GWYNNE CHEESEMAN
1102 HancockCt.
Deptford, NJ 08096
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
GLEN C. ABBOTT
Florida Bar No. 235911
PO. Box 2019
Crystal River, Florida
34423-2019
Telephone: (352) 795-5699
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 19 and 26, 2007(


- - --


I











N


C


A weekly advertising supplement of The Citrus County Chronicle


June 26, 2007


AUTO KNOW
SAAB E A R N S I T S W I N G S


How a group

of aircraft engineers

got into the car business


New 2008
motor homes
introduced
Page 2D


2007 Suzuki
Bandit 1250S
Page 3D
















1934 Chrysler
Desota Airflow
Page 5D


Crossword
Puzzle
Page 5D

Classifieds
Page 5D


SDial A Deal
Auto Mart
Page 8D
& 9D

Power
Sidekick
.. Page 9D


By Jason Stein
Wheelbase Communications


unique bunch, especially for a
company that would be
formed out of their pure
ambition.
When they got together one day long
ago to form Svenska Aeroplan
Aktiebolaget, or the Swedish Aircraft
Company, those engineers couldn't have
realized that an idea for an aircraft man-
ufacturer would lead to such a strong
marketing statement some 70 years later
for a car company.
After all,. only two of those engineers
even had a driver's license.
But maybe that's what makes Saab so
unique.
What does the marketing phrase
"Born From Jets" really mean for Saab?
And how does a car company se\l itself
as being the byproduct of aircraft\engi-
neering?
It's all about Saab's history.
It means everything about what those
16 aircraft engineers began and what the
company still stands for today. And it
means everything for Trollhittan,
Sweden, an industrial town of 50,000.
The mills and sawmills of earlier times
have now given place to enterprise and
engineering, the kind of thoughtful,
safety-minded engineering that built
,Saab from the ground up.
Founded in 1937 by those engineers,
the idea for Saab was to produce high-
performance aircraft before the Second
World War. And Saab successfully did
that for the better part of a decade.
But after the war, Saab took a more
interesting turn. In 1946, the company's
main market for military aircraft
declined and after considering other
options Saab decided to move into the
passenger-car market with Gunnar
Ljungstrom in charge of design.
Design, both inside and out, would be
the hallmark of the Saab revolution.
Saab used its vast experience acquired
from airplane design and applied it to
auto engineering.
The first prototype in 1947, the Saab
92001 featured an aerodynamic wing
shape and a two-stroke engine. It was a
streamlined steel-bodied car that was
already a unique piece of work.
With a special nod to Saab's aviation
background, the car had the best drag
coefficient (aerodynamics) of any pro-
duction car in the world at the time.
The 92 name was used as it was the
92nd Saab design, the previous 91 had
been a aircraft. It would set the tone for
a new company.
Saab engineers used a sturdy safety
cage in the first car and followed it up
with more aircraft-inspired details.
The cockpit-like interior featured


ergonomic control and aerodynamic lines and
even some quirky features that were unique
only to Saab.
Future models, for example, featured a
floor-mounted ignition. Saab believed it was
a safer position in case of an accident and, in
Saab airplanes, the throttle controls were all


located on the floor.
Saab also used turbochargers to make its
vehicles more dynamic and applied its
knowledge of keeping pilots alive to make its
cars safer.
In 1958, the GT 750 was the first car fitted
with standard headrests. In the 1970s, Saab
introduced headlamp %%ipers and %washers - a


world first - and followed that with
heated front seats.
On safety, Saab developed the impact-
absorbing, self-repairing bumper and the
concept of side-impact protection bars.
In 1977, Saab was the first manufac-
turer to put turbochargers in mass-pro-
duction cars, followed by the passenger
compartment air filter.
In 1986, the Saab 9000 became the
first front-wheel drive car to offer anti-
lock brakes.
Saab would continue producing air-
planes and the Saab Viggen, an aircraft
manufactured between 1970 and 1990,
would become the best known fighter
jet, ultimately sharing its badge with the
9-3 automobile.
But those original engineers couldn't
have foreseen the competitive pressures
of the auto industry at the end of the cen-
tury.
By the late 1980s Saab was producing
more cars than it could sell. Plants were
closed but heavy financial losses contin-
ued. Talks were opened with Fiat,
Mazda and Ford and in 1990 General
Motors bought half of Saab Automobile
for $600 million with an option to
acquire the entire company within a
decade.
Today, GM owns Saab outright and is
applying the history of the company to
its marketing campaign.
Saab said the objective of the "Born
From Jets" advertisements is to raise
awareness of the carmaker as a premium
brand that offered aircraft-inspired
design and performance.
"Jets are inherently cool. They repre-
sent speed, control, safety, quality and
reliability," said Jay Spenchian, general
manager for Saab Cars USA. "Saab is
the only car company that can claim
such a heritage."
F9 Jason Stein is a feature writer %%ith
Wheelbase Communications. Wheel-
base is a %\orld-wide supplier of auto-
mobile news, reviews and features.


GET INTO THE


US'.


- m e~s^^
ii f^MW ^^^^^W IB^^^)^^^^^


i PONTIAC A/CTIONJ


NWEAGLE 18 YOUR DEALERFOR

1275 S. Suncoast Blvd., (U.S. Hwy. 19) Homosassa PO MTIAC 8ALIS AND SERVICE From

352-795-6800 WoEBUiCKPONTmm MC.eM

1-888-745-2599 S.OP tIJON E /I iE IMI/ aFrot T Month
*Prices Include all a3 il3ble ir.enilve b r ib Mes ce n fiertii t h l 3vi I3ble and S;''.U),cati or trade equiry. Ponti ac Loaltyfor Poniac price in lock vehicles only Al vehicle prices aie plus rM . tag title dealer intilled Op ions and de icf fee eo 549 5O0 5750 Buick ano F onrac Rebate and SE ReDate where applicable e 48 closed end lease. $2.995 down cash or
trade equlir lease pi u l . r ag & dealer fee 12 000 mi'year 51 i0 ile'oiverage ,enicles .ubjeCl to prior iale due to aggr:slve pricing and a rly print deadline prices subject to change due to rm.nurjcturer % incentives. Pictures re for iiludrtaor. purposes only Dealer Pot responsible for typographical errors Sorry, all prior sales etduded. See dealer for details.


INSIDE








CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONILTE


Winnebago Industries introduces new motor homes


FOREST CITY, Iowa, May 21,
2007 (BUSINESS WIRE) --
Winnebago Industries, Inc.
(NYSE:WGO), unveiled its
exciting, new 2008
Winnebago(R) and Itasca(R)
brand motor homes during the
Company's Dealer Days event
held May 14-16, 2007, at The
Mirage in Las Vegas, Nev. With a
theme of "Dialed In," Winnebago
Industries introduced a lineup
featuring 25 model lines and 93
floorplans, 49 percent of which
are new or redesigned for 2008.
"Winnebago Industries was
able to demonstrate to our dealers
how we're "dialed in" to RVers
wants and needs with our 2008
motor home lineup," said
Winnebago Industries Chairman
of the Board and CEO Bruce
Hertzke. "We listened to what our
RV owners and customers are
looking for in a motor home and
responded with a terrific 2008
lineup, particularly strengthening
our diesel motor home offerings."
"I am very impressed with the
new Winnebago Vectra and Itasca
Horizon, as well as the
Winnebago. Tour and Itasca
Ellipse on the new Maxum chas-
sis," said Sharon Padley, Product
Manager of Lazy Days RV
Center, Seffnher, Fla. "I was even
more impressed with the beauti-
ful interiors throughout the entire
product line; it's the best I've seen
in years."
Winnebago Industries' Class A
diesel models, the Winnebago
Vectra and Tour, and Itasca
Horizon and Ellipse, feature a
new Maxum(TM) chassis.
Winnebago Industries' engineers
worked closely with Freightliner
Custom Chassis to develop this
revolutionary new XCL chassis
and further enhanced it with
Winnebago Industries'


SuperStructure(TM) to form a
true semi-monocoque design.
The chassis features a lowered
rail design that creates a stronger
chassis configuration, a lower
center of gravity, and incorpo-
rates an industry-leading 60
degree wheel cut for improved
handling and performance. The
new Maxum chassis also features
unparalleled storage with pass-
through storage accessibility and
up to 220 cubic feet of storage
available.
The Winnebago Tour and
Itasca Ellipse feature the 32,350-
lb. GVWR Maxum chassis with a
400 hp ISL Cummins diesel
engine and a new 40WD floor-
plan. The new 40WD joins the
40TD, 40FD and 40KD models
for a spectacular lineup of this
innovative diesel product.
The premium Winnebago
Vectra and Itasca Horizon are
built on the 34,320-lb. GVWR
Maxum chassis with a 425 hp ISL
Cummins diesel engine and fea-
ture three luxurious floorplans for
2008. New features include an
optional 60-inch slideout tray in
the basement storage area with
built-in drawers that extend with
the tray, side-hinged compart-
ment doors, high definition LCD
TVs and optional dining and liv-
ing modules so you can cus-
tomize the RV to your specifica-
tions.
The Winnebago Journey and
Itasca Meridian were totally
redesigned and also include a
new 29,410-lb. GVWR
Freightliner chassis that features a
350 hp Cummins engine and six-
speed transmission for 2008. Two
new floorplans were also
unveiled - the 37H and 39Z.
The Winnebago Destination
and Itasca Latitude are brand new
for 2008 and are available in two


chassis configurations - a stan-
dard Workhorse UFO rear engine
gas chassis or an optional
Freightliner rear engine diesel
chassis. The Destination and
Latitude feature beautiful curved
cabinetry, innovative interior
styling, a new automotive-styled
dash, an integrated entertainment
center with a 30-inch high defini-
tion TV, deluxe full-body paint
and a one-piece windshield with
radial arm wiper system.
Highlighting Winnebago
Industries' Class A gas offerings
is a redesigned Winnebago
Voyage and Itasca Sunrise. The
new 32H model features a new
full-wall slide measuring 23 feet,
8 inches and extends the lounge,
galley and wardrobe with chest of
drawers in the bedroom. The 32H
also features new basement con-
struction with rotocast compart-
ments and a thicker floor with
integrated furnace plenum.
Available in five floorplans, the
Winnebago Sightseer and Itasca
Sunova were also redesigned for
2008 and feature significant
upgrades including new front and
rear cap designs and beautiful
curved cabinetry.
The 2008 Winnebago Vista and
Itasca Sunstar unveiled a family-
friendly 32K model with bunk


beds opposite the bathroom, a
rear queen bed and a new wrap-
around style dinette opposite a
sofa/bed in the front of the motor
home.
The highly popular Winnebago
View and Itasca Navion feature a
new, heavier GVWR Dodge
Sprinter chassis in 2008 - 11,030
lb. versus 10,200 lb. in 2007 - and


a more powerful 3.0L V6
Mercedes Benz diesel engine - up
from a 2.7-liter 5-cylinder diesel
engine in 2007. A new 3.5L V6
gasoline powered engine is also
optional for 2008.
Also at the Dealer Days event,
Winnebago Industries honored
162 of its dealers who achieved
the prestigious Circle of
Excellence status. Since 1986, the
Circle of Excellence award has
been given to select Winnebago
Industries dealers in recognition
of their excellence in buyer satis-
faction. In addition, the Company
recognized its top-selling dealers
by brand and region of the coun-
try, as well as those with the high-
est market share for Winnebago
Industries' products.
About Winnebago Industries
Winnebago Industries, Inc. is
the leading United States manu-
facturer of motor homes, self-


contained recreation vehicles
used primarily in leisure travel
and outdoor recreation activities.
The Company builds quality
motor homes under the
Winnebago and Itasca brand
names with state-of-the-art com-
puter-aided design and manufac-
turing systems on automotive-
styled assembly lines. The
Company's common stock is list
ed on the New York and Chicago
Stock Exchanges and traded
under the symbol WGO. Options
for the Company's common stock
are traded on the Chicago Board
Options Exchange. For access to
Winnebago Industries investor
relations material, to add your
name to an automatic email list
for Company news releases or for
information on a dollar-based
stock investment service for the
Company's stock, visit,
http://www.winnebagoind.com/fr
amesets/investors.php


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE
INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE

800-342-3008O


$299 07 TITAN
Month*


07 ALTIMA








FREE 24 HOUR RECORD ED MESSAGE
:- ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-14 i EXT 2010


*17,777

SAVE $3,150


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
/'.ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
b100-325-1415 rFX 2018

$18,777

SAVE *6,750


$249 07 FRONTIER
Month*


07 VERSA


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDEDMESSAC
's' ABOUT IHIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2012


$11,777

SAVE s3,150


FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
- - 00..325-1415 EXT 20116


$15,777

SAVE 4,250


OCALA NISSAN

2200 SR 200 OCALA


(800) 342-3008


(352) 622-4111


OPEN


10 PM
TONIGHTr!


ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND $395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.
t 39 MONTH LEASE, 39,000 MILES, '3000 DUE AT SIGNING, '12,800 OPTION TO PURCHASE, W.A.C.* PAYMENTS AT 72 MONTHS AT 6.9% APR, W.A.C.


SOURCE: Winnebago Industries, Inc.
Winnebago Industries, Inc.
Sheila Davis, PR/IR Manager, 641-585-6803
sdavis@winnebagoind corn


!
f
!



!
'I
)



IE


2D TursDAY, JUNF 26, 2007


r


�-L


WAS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 3D


Introducing the 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250S


' The Suzuki Bandit became a
favorite of a ride range of riders
worldwide by delivering and
unmatched package of perform-
ance, style and value.
With an all-new liquid cooled
engine and advanced digital fuel
injection. Combining heavy-
weight power with distinctive
styling and the quality of an all-
new, technologically-advanced
liquid-cooled engine and an
advanced digital fuel injection
system.
I The new Bandit 1250's bal-
'ance of power, style and technol-
'ogy is a combination developed
by a team of dedicated Suzuki
engineers, working together to
produce a street machine of
unmatched quality.
It is a demonstration of
Refined Total Balance, with
Complete Quality, or in other
words, the new Bandit 1250.
You'll call it a motorcycle like
-no other.
:Features:
New Engine
* All new, liquid-cooled, fuel
!injected, DOHC engine featuring
a bore and stroke of 79.0mm x
!64.0mm for a full 1254.8cc's of
torque producing performance
* New Suzuki Dual Throttle
IValve fuel injection system fea-
ituring 36mm throttle bodies for
!optimum performance and
smooth accelerations
* All new engine compact
engine design with a central cam
chain, staggered transmission
!shafts, tighter spacing between
'the pairs of cylinders and a sec-
Iondary balancer shaft for
reduced vibration
1* A new catalyzer equipped
high volume muffler combined
,with an effective engine manage-


FIND O
NC

I


ment system, Suzuki PAIR sys-
tem, and oxygen sensor for
reduced emissions meeting
tough Euro 3 standards
* Suzuki Idle Speed Control
(ISC) system for improved cold
starting, consistent idle control
and reduced emissions
* A new slick shifting six
speed transmission improves
acceleration while reducing top
gear rpm at highway speeds
* New hydraulic clutch with
coil springs for improved lever
feel and control
* New liquid cooled oil cool-
er for reduced oil temperatures
* All new cylinder head fea-
turing 31mm exhaust valves and
27mm intake valves set at a nar-
row 16 degree valve angle with
updated intake and exhaust ports
for maximum flow
New Chassis
* New Anti-Lock Braking
(ABS) monitors wheel speed and
matches braking power to avail-
able traction.
* New tube frame chassis fea-
turing larger diameter down
tubes for improved torsional
rigidity designed for excellent
balance of sporty handling and
comfortable highway cruising
* Innovative seat height
adjustment system can be adjust-
ed up or down by 20mm with a
simple spacer seat mounting sys-
tem.
* 43mm front forks combined
with a single rear shock with pre-
load adjustability for riding with
or without passengers
* Full floating 310mm dual
front disc brakes with four piston
calipers along with a 240mm
rear disc and single piston
caliper. Anti-Lock Braking
(ABS) is also available and mon-


2007 CAMRY




FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701

a47,777

2007 GRAND MARQUIS


6,000


CL/,'


$15,777


CARS


itors wheel speed and matches
braking power to available trac-
tion.
* Cast three spoke aluminum
wheels carrying radial tires and a
standard easy-to-use centerstand
* The Bandit 1250S features a
sleek half fairing, with built in
line-beam headlights, an effec-
tive windscreen and fairing
mounted mirrors
* Wide, comfortable seat with
low seat height
* Large capacity fuel tank for
long operating range
* Easy-to-operate centerstand
with high leverage ratio to
reduce effort
The Suzuki Bandit has
become a hugely popular
machine worldwide by deliver-
ing the perfect balance of per-
formance, style and value for
many years, now it's even better.
Introducing the new 2007
Suzuki Bandit 1250S. Boasting a
combination of an all-new liquid
cooled engine, a sporting chassis
and distinctive styling, the new
Bandit 1250S provides the per-
fect balance of qualities that


2007 CADILLAC

/ SAVE
10,200

FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702

$26,777

2007 TOWN & COUNTRY


SAVE
$7,000


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702


$18,777


today's motorcycle rider is look-
ing for.
The new Bandit 1250S's bal-
ance of power, style, and tech-
nology is a combination devel-
oped by a team of highly dedi-
cated Suzuki engineers, working
to produce a street machine of
unmatched quality and style.
Torque is what really counts
when riding on the street and the
Bandit 1250S will not disap-
point. Featuring an all-new, liq-
uid-cooled, fuel-injected, DOHC
engine, the '07 Bandit 1250 uti-
lizes a bore and stroke of
79.0mm x 64.0mm displacing a
full 1254.8cc's and Suzuki's leg-
endary Suzuki Dual Throttle
Valve fuel injection for optimum
throttle response, smooth power
delivery, improved mileage and
reduced emissions.
The engine is built specifically
for the Bandit with a symmetri-
cal layout, centralized cam
chain, and four valves per cylin-
der. Intake and exhaust valves
are set at a narrow valve angle in
a compact high-compression
combustion chamber with updat-
ed intake and exhaust ports. The


2007 TOWNCAR
SAVE
24,200


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701

$27,777

2007 F-250


SAVE
$11,500


~3 FREE 24 HOUR
I RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
- 800-325-1415 EXT 2701


$24,777


new powerplant is also signifi-
cantly more compact with verti-
cally staggered transmission
shafts for a shorter engine front
to rear and tighter spacing
between the two pairs of cylin-
ders makes the cylinder head and
throttle bodies significantly nar-
rower.
The hydraulic clutch utilizes
coil springs for improved lever
feel and a new six-speed trans-
mission improves acceleration,
reduces top gear rpm and a sec-
ondary balancer shaft further
quells engine vibrations. A new
large exhaust catalyzer is built
into the high-volume muffler and
when combined with the Suzuki
Pulsed AIR system and the oxy-
gen feed back closed loop engine
management system make this
the cleanest running Bandit ever
built meeting tough Euro3 and
Tier 2 emission standards.
The Bandit 1250S's classic
tube frame chassis is built using
larger diameter downtubes,
improving torsional rigidity with
rake and trail measurements
remaining at 25.3 degrees of
rake and 104mm of trail.
Front forks are 43mm units
and like the single rear shock is
preload adjustable to accommo-
date riding with a passenger.
Seat height is adjustable up or
down by 20mm by flipping over
and re-installing clever mount-
ing spacers between the seat and
frame rails.
Braking duties are handled by
dual full floating 310mm front
disc brakes with four piston
calipers, along with a 240mm
rear disc and single piston
caliper.
Additionally the Bandit 1250S
is also available with a digital
ABS (Anti-lock Braking


UT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
SMATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE

INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE

0O0-3 42- 3008


System) that monitors wheel
speed and matches braking
power to available traction.
A sleek half fairing with a
built-in line beam headlight and
effective windscreen and fairing
mounted mirrors clothe the
Bandit 1250S and in combina-
tion with the color coordinated
frames, powerful exposed
engine, and three spoke cast alu-
minum wheels create a stunning
new look for the Bandit 1250.
The all-new Bandit 1250S;
more torque, more performance,
more style and most importantly
more fun!
Ride the new Bandit 1250S
and experience what we call
Total Balance.


2007 TRAILBLAZER




FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702

$19,777

2007 EXPEDITION


SAVE
$12,500


(~&J


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702


$26,777


SUVS


2007 FOCUS $11,477 2007 TACOMA

2005 500 $20,777 2007 FRONTIER

2007 CALIBER ,11,777 2007 RAM QUAD

2007 OPTIMA $12,777 2007 RANGER

2007 GRAND PRIX $14,777 2007 COLORADO


$15,777 2007 GRAND CHEROKEE $19,777

$14,777 2007 WRANGLER $20,777

$17,777 2007 XTERRA $17,777

$14,777 2007 DURANGO $18,777

$14,777 2007 TAHOE $29,777


"rIL
10 PM
1ONOukinim


I (800) 342-3008 (352) 622-4111
ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND $395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


!FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE ABOUT THESE VEHICLES
1 --80r0-325-1415 EXT.m_

1 1


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701


TRUCKS


OCALA NISSAN

2200 SR 200 OCALA


I I


I IV -- I


I


o1wi-n-









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4D TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007_---


4[[ TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007
















CST____s_ (______FL___fNITUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 5D


FINE LINES

1934 CHRYSLER/DESOTO AIRFLOW


anticipated surge in sales failed
to materialize, design changes
were quickly implemented for
the following year. In a major
about-face, the Airflow's round-
ed nose was replaced by a more
traditional looking pointed grille
in an upright position.
Despite these 'fixes', sales
continued to tumble as loyal
buyers began switching to other
brands. Fortunately, Chrysler
continued to make conventional-
ly styled models that continued
to sell in decent numbers.
Unfortunately for DeSoto, the
Airflow was the only car avail-
able and brand sales dropped by
nearly 40 per cent.


By 1937, the company finally
threw in the towel and the car
that was designed to be ahead of
its time quietly went out of pro-
duction.
Given its high expectations,
the Chrysler/DeSoto Airflow
four-year sales total of around
55,000 was considered a failure.
Only a few years later, the public
would come to embrace many of
the engineering and styling
advances pioneered by these
exceptionally sturdy and surpris-
ingly quick automobiles.
For Chrysler and its Airflow,
the future, it seemed, would just
have to wait.
* Malcolm Gunn is


Wheelbase Communications'
historic writer. Wheelbase is a
world-wide supplier of automo-
bile news, reviews and features.


By Malcolm Gunn
Wheelbase Communications


C
cars.


controversy can be
stimulating, except
when it comes to
building and selling


Walter P. Chrysler found out
the hard way in 1934 when he
introduced his radically styled
Chr)sler and DeSoto Airflow
coupes and sedans. In so doing,
he broke with established design
convenoion and injured the bot-
tom line of his company.
Today. these quaint museum-
quality antiques don't appear
particularly exceptional or
avant-garde, they just look, well,
old. However, compared to other
vehicles built during the same
era, the Airflow was as ground-
breaking as they come.
It was Chrysler's chief design-
er, Carl Breer, who came up with
the ideareafreducing wind resist-
ance in automobiles after
observing birds and aircraft in
flight. The result, he believed,
would be a car that would look
smarter, go faster and consume
less fuel than 'normal' looking
vehicles. Chrysler also hoped
that the Airflow would be the
kind of breakthrough machine
needed to vault his company out
of the middle of the pack and
into a much stronger sales posi-
tion.
After consulting with no less a
luminary as Orville Wright, who,
with his brother Wilbur, had
been the first to successfully
achieve powered flight, Breer
and a small group of associates
began secretly testing different
shapes in a full-scale wind tun-
nel that Chrysler had constructed
at his company's research center.
One of the revelations gar-
nered in the wind tunnel was that
automobiles of the late 1920s
and early 1930s were far more


aerodynamic backing up than
moving forward. This ultimately
led to a smoother front-end
design containing a rounded
(instead of upright) grille and
headlights slotted into the fend-
ers instead of the traditional
method of perching them on top.
At the rear, full fender skirts and
a tapered back-end helped
reduce drag, adding to the car's
slippery silhouette.
Engineering advancements
that went into the Airflow's
development included reversing
the weight distribution - tradi-
tionally around 45/55 front/rear
at the time - by shifting part of
the engine over the front wheels
and moving the rear seat ahead
of the rear axle. This adjustment
kept the front of the car more
firmly planted at highway
speeds, significantly improved
ride quality and resulted in more
spacious seating.
-The -methods developed to
construct the Airflow were also
ahead of their time. Traditional
body-on-frame construction was
abandoned in favor of a space
frame upon which the body pan-
els were welded in place. This
system didn't reduce weight, but
it made the body significantly
more rigid than previous models.
All Airflows were originally
destined to carry the DeSoto
label, but company founder
Walter P. not only insisted the
Chrysler brand name be used,
but that the Airflow be fitted
with a more powerful eight-
cylinder engine. As well,
Chrysler ordered that the cars be
sold in a variety of wheelbases
and that a line of opulently
dressed Chrysler Custom
Imperial limousine versions be
built.
Meanwhile, the mid-priced
DeSoto Airflow was offered in
one standard wheelbase and was
powered by a more modest six-


cylinder motor.
After a six-year development
period and rigorous testing
(including speed and durability
runs at the Bonneville Salt Flats
in Utah), the Airflow was finally
unveiled at the 1934 New York
Auto Show. Prices ranged from
$1,000 for the base DeSoto ver-
sion, all the way up to $5,000 for
the stretched Imperial limousine.
Initially, the public response
was extremely favorable, even
though reviews in the press were
lukewarm at best. But when the


VVWELCOME toUV Inler Inalionl AulLtoU"ross, " l
a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enthusiasts '

AuloCross will lesT your I I E R N A T I 0 I L"

knowledge ol cars brand names and

auto-relaled people from all over the wolId Good luck'






ACROSS
1 COmml.n spring
-1 Better ihan a shoe
9 NASCAR 'King"
11 Chey/'s Musiang response
12 Taurus kin
17. A bigger version of the Mustan
18 a k a anti.rolil ar
22 Italian marque
23 Controls air.luel flow
24 Limnred-access road
26. Crankcase buildup
32 '60s Ply-mouth compact
34. The only racer 10 be "kniqghled
in Italy
35 Always in 3 jamb
38 Rear hp. or chin
39 CanAm.Flcarmaker
41 Horsepow er a function of r.p.rr
ando
45 1930s Chrysler or Desoto
S46 FendeF


DOWN
2. Braking system
3 -_ position
5. Combustion necessity
6. Small"-Toyota division
7.24-hour endurance race
8. Late rans-Am champ
10. East German two-stroke car
13. Supercharged Studebaker
classic
14. The "premium' in premium
gasoline
15. Controlled crash "victim"
16. Drag-racing warmup
19. Talk-show car buff
20. Funny-car crlamp
21. Critical to wheel fitmet


25 Kia sub-compaci
27. Lexus stereo partner
28. Mr. Coddinglon
29 Window blood
30. Drove No. 43
31. One-stop car shopping
33. Chrysler sedan
36. C5, Z06, LS2 refer to this
37. Saltum's deri-t-'.Islant
substance
39. Sienna, Caravan, Entourage, etal
40. John modified the Mini
42. Not bias ply
43. Chear, wagon
44, Chapman's brand
45. Steeririg heel's safety/ feature
47. Spiri of Ecstasy car
48. Mr. lacocca (formal)


COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE COtMMUNICATIONlS


*1Choncl


FIMVNSWES

Or fiklm4 I~l






13i In l



'I * - .


g.










n.


To place an ad, call 5635966


Automotive ..
uaomoived Classifieds

Classifieds IIn Print


and

S....Online
All


The Th ne
Fax- 35) 63565 TllFre:(88)85-2401 mal:clssfidschonclonin~cm wbste w w~hrnilenlneco


Yamaha
2000, 25HP High thrust,
4 stroke, 66 hrs., $2,200.
(352) 249-0860
Cell (352) 476-1113



SEA DOO Ltd/Set
'03 & '03 GTX 3 Seaters
Low hrs Grg kept & serve.
Dual galv. trir. Mint!
$12,900 (352) 382-1623



17ft. PATHFINDER
'99, Tunnel Hull,
Yamaha 50HP, trim
tabs, power pole, 85 lb
trolling mtr, much more
$8,500. (352) 628-5418
AEROCRAFT 19.7'
Boat w/trir. 4,3 Ltr., V-6
Merc, OD, Trim Tabs,
Runs Good. $1,750
352-628-3969/205-0291
ALUM. BOAT 17'
19 hp Go Devil, Trir.,
Spare tire, Floral City
$3,000 obo
(352) 341-0292
CAROLINA SKIFF
'01 17DLX, '04 Yamaha
60HP 2 strk. 1 yr. warr.
GPS, DF, LOADED
$11,495. (352) 422-1412
CAROLINA SKIFF 21'
'00, frnt/rear casting
decks, CC, 115HP Yam,
jack pit. Many extras,
$11,500. (352) 726-0939
F16 SEARAYDER
'96, 1-owner, bimini top,
radio, 92 hrs., exc. cond
garage kept, $5,000
obo (352) 465-5796


Your world first.
E�rn Day


Cllil)NI(.l.i
Classified


GODFREY 22'
HURRICANE Deck Boat
'91, 115 hp Merc, many
new parts w/Trlr. $8,000
(352) 726-2408
GRADY WHITE 22.6'
W/A Cuddy, 200 hp
Mariner, 0/B, Alum, Top
W/Top Gun Outriggers.
Garmin Chart plotter.
$12K obo 352-302-8266
HURRICANE
23ft. Deck Boat, 150
Mariner, new rebuilt
'03, trailer. $6,500.
(352) 212-7500
Lowes 22' Pontoon
2001, Blminl top, A.M.
cover, Toilet, depth/F.F
4 fish seats & tandem
trir. 90 HP $13,945; 70hrs.
502-345-0285 (IN FL)
PROLINE
'06, 19ft., '06 Mercury
Optimax, 115 H out-
board, T-Top. color
electronics, still under
fact. warranty, many,
many options w/boat &
trailer, asking $22,500.
(352) 628-4668
SABRE
16FT center console,
70HP Johnson, bimini
top, Performance trailer
$2,000 (352) 726-5329
STAMAS 1982 24'
Cuddy cabin, new eng.
new outdrive in 1996.
Low hrs. Fly bridge,
outriggers, fishing ma-
chine. See at Aqua
Power in Inglis. $9000.



GEORGIA BOY
1979,27FT., Perfect
cond. $4,200
(352) 637-4938,
GULFSTREAM 32'
'94, 62K, Sleeps 6, new
AC, flooring, tires. Exc.
Cond. $10,000
352-270-3162/257-2387


JAMBOREE 29'
2005, V-10 Class C
13K, Loadedl Perfect
Conditonl Ready to gol
$48,500 (352)465-2138
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/slide, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/slide, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457



5TH WHEEL 30'
Super slide 2000
Meadowbrook. Exc,
cond. $18,200
(352) 746-0348
AIRSTREAM 31'
1979, Great Shapel
New AC, carpet, tires,
uphol., $8,900 obo
(352) 257-4260
CASITA 17' TT
'99, All options.new tires
& bearings, equal.htch.
Garagedl Exc. Cond.
$9,950 (352)465-2142
COLEMAN POPUP
'89, Air. refrig, stereo,
exc. cond. $3200/ obo
(352) 489-9736 or
(352) 422-2874
JAYCO 36', '04
Toy Hauler, 4.000 watt
Gen., 15,000 AC, 16"
Wheels, Fuel Station
$26,950 (502) 345-0285
Kodiac
'03 Skamper 190, 25ft,
AC, heat, full Bath, 2
showers, like new,
many extras, all manu-
als, clean, $8,000. obo
503-5487, 313-477-3125
LAYTON 26' 1993
Micro, AC, Fr/bk drs. 23'
awning, new tires, refrig.
Exc. cond. w/'98 Dodge
Durango. 4X4, V-8, tow
pkg, 6 pass, Rr AC,
both/ $12,900
Call (352) 628-3376


ACURA RSX-S '04
6sp man., mnrf, 54K,
leather, 6cd pampered
$14,900/obo
352-344-4505
DODGE INTREPID
'99. 2.7L, 30MPG HWY,
48K ml. All power, CD,
tinted windows, non
smoker, women driven,
garaged, exc. cond.
$5200. (352) 795-6151
FORD
'95, Cougar, burgundy,
clean, full pwr., cold
AC, auto, asking $1,895.
(352) 726-4267
HYUNDAI
2006, Azera, 25k mi.,
excel. cond., Asking
$19,000. (352) 382-0148
(352) 422-7884
LINCOLN
2000, Signature Series,
Exc. cond. 72k mi,
hardly driven,
$10,000 Negotiable
(352) 489-0122
LINCOLN
'99, Towncar Signature
series, 107k mi., excel
cond. non smoker,
$6,500. SMW, 382-1905
LINCOLN TownCar
2003, Signature Series,
Showroom Cond,
Carriage Roof. $17,500
OBO (352) 489-1639
LINCOLN Towncar
'93, Sig. Series, leather,
123K mi,. Great Shape!
Everything works! Cold
AC. $2,500 341-0718
TOYOTA
'94, Camry Sedan,
clean inside/out, excel.
running cond., auto
137k mi $3,200 obo
352-465-4801
TOYOTA CELICA
'93, GT, 150K, Good
Cond $S.600
(352) 634-5301


CAMARO
'72, Real Z28, orig. eng.
auto w/ console, cortez
silver, w/ blk, stripes,
$20k (352) 422-7233
FORD 1940
New paint. Chevy
350 motor & trans. drive
It home. Very clean.
(352) 212-7500
FORD
1956 T-BIrd, Red, new
restoration, rebuilt eng.,
new paint, both tops,
Pwr. Steer. $29,500.
(352) 628-1734
FORD
1965 Thunderbird
landau, goodcond.,
all orig. $2,500
(352) 637-3333
FORD THUNDERBIRD
'89 Super Coupe. 5 spd.
Super Charged Eng.
$1800/obo
(352) 382-7001
MERCEDES
1987, 560SL, 125K.
White, Both tops, New
Mich. tires, $10,500
(352) 586-6805
MGB
1977, good shape, new
tires, new roof, $4,000
obo. Moving
(352) 400-1068



CHEVY
'99, Sllverado. 36k mil,
long bed, V6, auto,
rhino liner, new tires,
tool box, $8,500. obo
352-382-1073, 422-1834
CHEVY S-10
'02, Exc. Cond. Bed liner
& Tonneau Cover,
Tint, 69K, $6,300
(352) 344-2331
INTERNATIONAL
2000 Semi w/Sleeper
9200 Model series,
60 Detroit, 10 spd. trans.
air ride, tandem rear
end 273, w/ wetline. PC
set up. $20,500. obo
(352) 726-1373


ISUZU
'06, 14ft Box Truck w/ lift
gate, PW. PL. AC, 17k
ml., excel cond., asking
$26,000. (352) 613-4891
NISSAN
'99, Frontier XE, 99k mi,
new tires, runs great,
Asking $4,800.
(352) 527-8706



JEEP
'04, Grande Cherokee
Laredo, e w/ grey
Int., 6 cyl, 40k mi. 2W/D
$14,900. (352) 249-1196
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 4x4, gd. tires, mint
engine, cold air, runs
great, 140K mi. $2500.
(352) 382-4142
SUBURBAN 4x4 '88
Navy/grey, front & rear
air, tow pkg. Clean &
solid machine.$2,200.
obo (352) 795-3970



CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van, TV,
tape player, new tires,
completely tuned,
(352) 228-2239
CHEVY CARGO
VAN 2002, 8600LB. 5.7L,
bin pkg, tow pkg.
Roof racks. $7800.
(352) 628-6300
CHEVY LUMINA
'95, Looks good, runs
good. New tires,
battery & brake pads.
$2,500 (352) 726-7262
CHEVY VENTURE
2001, pristine condition
mobility express lift on
bumper, 94K mi, $4,500
(352) 613-0078
DODGE
'89 Conversion Van, V8,
auto, TV, runs great,
$1,900. cash
(352) 637-1257


DODGE RAM 350
'91, 15 passenger van.
dual AC, PSPB, AM/FM
Stereo Radio/CD, tow


DIG LJOG
'98, Chromed Out,
board & stroked.
12k mi. Sacrifice. Please
Call. (352) 228-2239
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Ultra Classic,
Voyager kit, (like trike)
reverse kit, cust. paint.
10,300 mi. $19,000.
(352) 302-6200
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05, 1200 Sportster Cus-
tom, many extras, well
maintained, $7,895.
(352) 637-6284
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000 Elec. Glide Classic
1450 cc, Vance N Heins
pipes, sport windshield,
lots of chrome, only
15,800 mi. Like new
$11,995 (352) 467-0872
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006, Street Glide.
1450CC, Like New] 2,200
mi, bik, $13,500 OBO
(352) 400-0360
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'93, Softail, customized,
1340, lots of chrome,
$6,000 (352) 341-2019
HONDA
'03, CR250R, like new,
never riden, $800. of ex-
tra new parts incl.
$2,500. (352) 572-6023
HONDA '07
Aero 750, Mint Cond.,
Showroom new, Less
than 1,500 ml. $6,600.,
Includes Windshield
and 2 Helmets, New
house forces sale.
352-400-2277
HONDA 2003 VTX
1300, well maintained,
garage kept, lots of
xtras, Exc. cond. $6500.
(352) 527-6639


I


.1 I_ ,
- CITRUS COLINll- (FI) CIIRONICLI,


PI I ^Ir'A" Z i^ I--A.... -1 A. ,,.r",..-..







6D TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007


uws LINCOLN MERCURY


In 2008, Town Car will celebrate its 27h' year as the premier vehicle in
,,the traditional Large Luxury Sedan segment. Customer loyalty is at
the heart of this vehicle's staying power. In fact, the Lincoln Town Car
has been recognized for having the
S highest model loyalty in
the Luxury Car segment.
Town Car is
indeed returning
for 2008!


'07 LINCOLN MKZ


Satellite radio, moon roof, leather interior.


'07 LINCOLN NKX


1 '08 GRAND MARQUIS GS
#1 Selling Luxury
Car in Florida 16
years running


5 STAR CRASHRAT


SONLY



A Keyless entry system, keyless remote, cruise control,
7 A power windows/locks, AM/FM stereo w/CD player,
8 way power driver seat, Michelin tires, tilt steering vhe,
.: . .-,----.-i-----


'07 MILAN
Best in class for vehicle satisfaction


'07 MONEGO
Most ideal car, over all


4 *I- .1 ___________________


'07 MONTEREY DEMO
Dune pearl. po.'.,er door and rear lihtgale. lealrier four
captains seats heated & cool-d seats
LIST: 31,760S2 3,6 8


'07 GRAND MAR ISLS



7, 000 Off
Keyless entry system, keyless remote, cruise control,
power windows/locks, AM/FM stereo w/CD player,
power driver & passenger seat with lumbar support, leather interior,
Michelin tires, tilt steering wheel


U0 IVIM ,UfTr VILLAGIR vAMl
Green sliver, cne otnrier dual air
*7,995.


04 FORD FOCUS
condition, # -'O69

'8,995.


02 MERCURY
SABLE
t8P329139
*8.995.


02 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
nie oiuner leather
HP32464-
*9.995.


02 MERCURY
VILLAGER ESTATE
Green one onner only
40 000 miles #X8914
111.995.


-~ ,~.


I-'


04 MERCURY
SABLE LS
Sihler 24 000 miles
#1R3247


04 GRAND
MARQUIS
Palm Beach Edition
gold half top #P3190
13,995.


$11,995.


04 GRAND 06 FORD TAURUS
MARQUIS SEL
Gold leather only Illoorroof leather
35 000 miles P#8034 #F3224
S13,995. 0 14,995.


05 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
SlL er orn, -55 000 mdles
leather #R3235-1
114,995


04 MONTEREY 04 SABLE
VAN WAGON
Porter side doors Leather silver,
leather #P3216 20 000 miles #R3126
$15.995. 15.995.


04 SABLE
WAGON
Leather 3' seat
#R3243
$15.995.


05 FORD
RANGER XLT
Black V6 auto 17k
miles #R3208
$16.995.


leather 0885b6-APP32,38 #P3-743al iheld te#'(ii
1169995o 1179995o $179995o 11799959 $1799950


06 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
Gold 78 C000 miles
tPP3240
$17,995.


06 GRAND MARQUIS
LS
L-'hite moonroof.
leather #R3214
$17,995.


04 FORD F150 06 MILAN
XLT PREMIER
One oaner Blue V6 leather 13k
#R3198A miles #R3173
118,995. 18 995.


#R374' 4MP325 1P2
06FORD904 I9,95. 04LINCOLN


07 MONTEREY
VAN
\hilte po\er door
dual chmate #P3239
. 19 995.


$


07 GRAND 07 GRAND 05 MOUNTAINEER
MARQUIS LS MARQUIS LS AWD
Silver only 11 000 Light blue leather interior A ltoon roof leather
miles #R3252 onl ) 10 000 miles #P3253 20 000 miles #R3225A
19,995.o 19,995. o21,995.


07 GRAND 06 MERCUI
MARQUIS LS MONTEG(
Silver leather Gold only 12 0
#PF'3236 miles #3228
19,995. 0 19,99,


RY
O
O0
)00
85
5.


04 MERCURY 04 TOWN CAR 04 FORD 04 TOWN CAR 05 FORD 04 LINCOLN TOWN CAR 05 LINCOLN 05 TOWN CAR 06LINCOLN
MOUNTAINEER ULTIMATE F150 XLT LIMITED F150XLT ULTIMATE TOWNCAR LIMITED TOWN CAR
Gold moonroof 'rd eat 28 000 miles Red 26P miles hr ,r, ". r',. n,.:.n root ti hite supercre\ hi:.ri I; fhr 36 'imles Only 20 000 miles hIory 29r miles Limited silver moonroof
only 26 000 miles #P -'6 #P3~: #P3205 #9086 traderto, #P3229 #P.' #X899 #X895 #R3742
21,995. =21,995. =21,995. $22,995. $22,995. 022,995. e23,995. *24,995. 128,995.
...------- - --- --- ---- -- --- -- g""---""-"n--I
~ GENUINE MOTORCRAFT1 E I/ J MRCRMii
PREMIUM WEAR AA/C C ECKK Engineered for your vehicle.
INDICATOR WIPER BLADES FUEL SAVER 3 195
1 1^ 9 5 - 1n Genuine Mol,:,,cT.Premium 'Ispect brake system 1 189 OR �SSi
SSynthetic Blend oil and fille change Test batter Dealer- installed retail Motornratl or Genuine Ford brake pads or
SIi rale and inspect four ies Chec Dells and hoeshoes only, lmit one demption per e. per customer
BnI Maximum rebate of S$11) per axle, by mail. Pads or shoes only. on
SBY APPOINTMENTONL C ,r ard cabin air fillers Top off all fluds I most cars and Igrt trucks Front or rear ale Excludes machining
Genuine Motorcraft ',imper blades .t llh ...ear indicator. pear FREON AVAILABLE Up 1o Si' qurt- of Molorcraa oil Taxes and diesel vehicles made between 0.3/30/10 and 06247. Redemption forms mus
pair. installed Taesextrha Coupon must be presented at 134A & R-12 eytra Dipoai lees nol included in some locatons Coupon be postmarked no later than 07131/07. See particlpafig
time of ser.'ice order wrile up. See Ser.ice Ad.'isor for Coupon must be presented at rime of sr. ice order virile up must be presented at lime of service order wrlte-up. See Dealership for mail-in redemption certificate. vehicle applicati .-iS




Su. C l
SEVC0AT:18 05 40 7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I


I


I


m-1


-j


. .


1


- - - - - I


B


)TOf


I - FI





TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 7D


:, CITRUS COUNTY (FL)


#49 ts/ lC

I U E :9-e
;- Elim


~K.

*1,-o10 Oom~ile I.m.,P,-deorfro-n*r. .raoIy
' 0 6 " 0 C O - . .'i . ~ I, 1 t ',j 6 r.E i p r F r aI Cr. [n w .r r '- fl y
*5 l eC,.OOO mie l, .t.,..,ro.A�-Cde si~sarce'


I-)KIA MOTORS
lrhe Fo�frn, o ,4rprJwte


SL U ]


I19N/)mm^1


X

X

X
X


X

x
X

X

x


2007 Kia Rio
Automatic
transmission, highest
safety rating in its
An class


40-
MPG


2007 KWa Spectra
Automatic transmission,
pw, pl, cd player...
WADED -


38
MPG


'-'I-'


2007 Kia Optima W 2007 Kia Sportage
Automatic transmission, Automatic transmission,
fully loaded, safer than loaded w/more standard
Camry or Accord features than any
vehicle in its class


MPG-


5~um~


. , .. . j. bA f ab . . J . . ;. . ...... .....
2007 Kia Sorento 2007 Kia Rondo
Automatic, 262 Best valued crossover
horsepower, 5000 lb. available anywhere!!
-towing capacity, safest in
.. its class


MP25
MPG


MPG
MPG


KIA


Citru'


Visit us on the web @ (www.citrislda.com


------- . 1 1...


,'%-..'t-
frv
4`4



1'" ': .


-1.


4..


V
I


$
PjQ


) CHRONICLE


) rF"R)NICL


�i*u4b>aid ,.&.'.i ..4am


,wow
-d"











8D TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007


5. Eagle Buick 7. Joe's Auto Service 9. Love Honda
795-6800 795-2244 628-4444
6. All Save Auto 8. Larrys Auto Sales .10.Citrus Cycle Center
563-2003 564-8333 527-0129 6


ZUUU DUICK CEN I URY ZUU 1 BUICIK EN I UKT
CUSTOM CD/TAPE, CRUISE, P/ LIMITED LOW MILES, ONE
W, P/L, POWER DRIVER SEAT. OWNER, DUAL CLIMATE,
LEATHER, ONSTAR, CRUISE.
795-6800 '6,995 7QR-6800a 7995


2001 BUICK LESABRE 2001 BUICK RE
CUSTOM ONLY 46K MILES, P/W, P/L, CRUISE
WOODGRAIN, TAPE, CRUISE,
P7N, P/L.
795-6800 '8,750 795-6800


2003 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CX ONLY 41,000 MILES, ONSTAR,
HOMELINK, VENT VISORS, BUG
SHIELD, PARK AID.
795-6800 . $12,595


2005 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CX ONLY 19,000 MILES, CD,
HOMELINK, VENT VISORS,
CRUISE, P/W, P/L
795-6800 '17.495


1998 CADILLAC DEVILLE
LEATHER, WOODGRAIN,
POLISHED ALUMINUM WHEELS,
DUAL CLIMATE CONTROL.
795-6800 $7,250


2002 CHEVY CAVALIER
STK #P087089A

564-8668 "6,65d


'mal


i


2002 CHEVY CAVALIER
ONLY 47,000 MILES, CD, TAPE,
CRUISE, ICE COLD A/C.

795-6800 '6,995
an I


2005 CHEVY COBALT
AUTOMATIC, AIR, ONE OWNER,
GREAT ECONOMY.

795-7371 '12,995


II

I


SIDE 4X4 EXTENDED CAB REAL
CLEAN, GREAT FOR FAMILY OR
WORK, BEDLINER.
527-0129 '13,900


2005 CHEVY SILVERADO HD
2500 4X4 EXTENDED CAB
ONLY 19,000 MILES, EXTRA
CLEAN, BEDLINER.
527-0129 '23,900


1999 CHEVY MALIBU
LOW MILES, AM/FM/CASS,
SECURITY ALARM, ELEC.
EVERYTHING, CRUISE
563-2003 SPECIAL '2,975 CASH


2006 CHEVY MALIBU 2001 CHEVY S-10
ONLY 17K MILES, WOODGRAIN, LS PKG, AUTO TRANS
PW, PL, CRUISE, CD.

795-8800 '13.500 795-1210


2002 CHEVY VENTURE
56,000 MILES


795-1210 *5,995


1999 CHRYSLER 3001
LOADED, AUTO/STICK
MINT CONDITION


564-8333


'4,795


1994* CHEVY I1VEV w
XCAB CHROME WHEELS, '
BEDLINER, PN/W, P/L, CRUISE, '
TOW PACKAGE.
795-6800 '5,995


EXCELLENT CONDITION, BED
LINER, TOOL BOX, AUTOMATIC.

'5.500 564-8333 '4.800


STK #7301304B

564-8668


VAN



$11,488


2004 DODGE DAKOTA SXT
EXT. CAB ONLY 40,000 MILES,
CD, BEDLINER.

795-6800 '11,995


179 UUUUUE UU 5MU n ,
LEATHER, 3RD SEAT, REAR AC


795-1210 '5,7


1998 DODGE INTREPID
ES PKG., LOW MILES


95 795-1210 '3,495


2000 DODGE INTREPID 20P2 DODGE NEON
AC, CASS., NICE INTER. AND POWER WINDOWS, LOCKS, CD,
OUTSIDE, AIR BAGS, ELEC. TILT, CRUISE, AUTO
EVERYTHING, CRUISE, AUTO
563-2003 CASH '2,995 795-1210 $4,995


UU3) UWUUO E D muEn a
5 SPEED, ALUMUNIUM WH
CD, TINT, P/W, P/L, SPOILE


Lz2~00


r 12004 DODGE RAM
EELS,I CLEAN!
R. STK# 7051944A


'8.995


2000 FORD EXPLORER
4 DOOR, XLT, EMERALD GREEN,
TAN LEATHER

79&-1210 '5,250


1564-8668 '12,995










2000 FORD EXPLORER XLT
4X4


795-7371 '8,995


2006 DODGE RAM QUAD CAB
ONLY 33,000 MILES, BEDLINER,
STEP RAIL, TOW PACKAGE, CD,
WOOD GRAIN, CRUISE.
795-6800 '19,495










2002 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT


795-7371 '6,995


1999 FORD F150 EXT CAB
BLUE, AC, CLOTH INTR, AM/FM/
CASS, AIR BAGS, 8 FT BED, 4X4,
CRUISE, BED LINER.
563-2003 CASH '8.99


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MA., LS



$8,90


1999 CADILLAC SEVILLE
COMPLETELY LOADED, CD
PLAYER, ELEC. SUNROOF, 4 DR,
SPOKE WHEELS, VERY NICE
563-2003 *5,450


1999 FUKOU KUVVnW
VICTORIA LX VERY CLEAN,
FULL POWER, LOCAL CAR.

795-7371 '4,


995


I


.


I ......... I


I


........ JI


1 - . .i . -


'


Ll-


|I









TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007 9D


2001 FORD F150 XL 2001 FORD F15U ALT I4
AUTOMATIC WITH AIR, V6, ALLOY TRITON, AUTOMATIC, ALLOY
WHEELS, BEDLINER, TANNEAU WHEELS, DIAMOND PLATE
COVER. TOOLBOX, BEDLINER.
527-0129 REDUCED '5,999 527-0129 '7,999


'ER, 4 2004 FuR FUCUS WAuUN
ER ALUMINUM WHEELS, P/W, P/L,
IILES. ROOF RACK.
'8995 795-4981 '11,995


95-4981


2006 FORD FOCUS SES
WAGON ZXW ONE OWNER,
LOADED GREAT ECONOMY.
795-7371 '12,995


2003 FORD F250 SUPER
DUTY 4X4 XL EXTENDED
QUAD CAB, 5.4 TRITON V8,
AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR.
563-2003 REDUCED '8,695









2000 FORD MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE
RED WITH WHITE TOP, V6,
AUTOMATIC
64-8333 $ 295


2004 FORD F250 EXT CAB 2002 FORD FOCUS
SUPER DUTY, 4X4, LIKE NEW, ECONOMICAL
$8,000 UNDER BOOK STK #7056199B.

564-8333 $11,500 564-8668 '8,995


1993 FORD RANGER EXT.
CAB
V6, AUTO TRANS. COLD AC


795-1210


'3.300


2001 FORD RANGER QUAD
CAB
POWER WINDOWS, LOCKS,
CRUISE, V6, AUTO
795-1210 '6,495


3_iFORD RANGER EXT-CAB 2005 FORD RANGER XLT
,LOW MILES, AM/FM/CD, ELEC, ONE OWNER.
VERY CLEAN, AC, AUTO

563-2003 FIN. AVAILABLE '5950 795-7371 '9,995


�uut runu i rnunuMEnMim
PREMIUM ONE OWNER, ONLY
17,000 MILES.
795-7371 . . . '28,995


2003 HONDA VTX 1800R
CUSTOM PAINT, CHROME, PIPES,
ROAD READY

527-0129 - -ONLY '7,999


ZUU4 JEEr wKAnuLcr zuu KIAm OPTIMA
SPORT 4X4 ONLY 43,000 MILES, SHARP!
5 SPEED, CD, A/C, TOW STK #5121850B
PACKAGE.
795-6800 '18.450 564-8668 '7,995


LOW MILES POWER PACKAGE
STK #5705150A. STK# 5712389A

564-8668 '19,995 564-8668


2006 KIA SPECTRA


11.995 795-7371 '9,995


1996 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
LEATHER, TINT, POWER SEATS,
HOMELINK, POWER LOCKS &
-WINDOWS, CRUISE.
795-6800 - -. - ---- -26995 -


2000 LINCOLN TOWNCAR ZUUJ MEKGUKT KARn U
PRESIDENTIAL ONLY 57,000 MARQUIS ONLY 20,300 MILES,
MILES, ALL THE OPTIONS. NICE FAMILY CAR.
-795-4981 -- -. - - '10995 527-0129 .. '9.999


1998 MERCURY SABL
COLD AC, RUNS GREAT


795-1210


E joo.


.995


2002 MERCURY SABLE 2002 MERCURY VILLAGER
SILVER, ONLY 34,000 MILES, LIKE VAN GREEN/SILVER, ONE
NEW! OWNER, DUAL AIR.

795-4981 8,995 795-4981 '799
� e, I . _


2004 NISSAN FRONTIER 2000 NISSAN MAXIMA
EXTENDED CAB. EXTRA CLEAN, ALL THE OPTIONS
STK #7077762B.

564-8668 .'11,995 564-8333 $5,995


2003 OLDS ALERO GL
45000K, POWER SEATS, CD
PLAYER, REAR SPOILER, ALLOY
WHEELS
527-0129 REDUCED '7,999


1996 OLDSMOBILE CIERA SL
ONLY 71,000 MILES, CD, P/W, P/L,
CRUISE.

795-6800 '2,995


2007 PONTIAC GT
ONLY 6,000 MILES, CD, SPOILER,
WINDOW TINT, CRUISE,
ALUMINUM WHEELS, XM RADIO.
95-6800 '15,495


1999 SATURN 3DR
ALLOY WHEELS, AC, AUTO,
SPORTY, CD PLAYER, GREAT
MPG
563-2003 FIN. AVAIL '3,950


1998 5UBARU LEGACY
OUTBACK
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, ALL THE
OPTIONS
564-8333 '4,495


A-w� 7 umn - wn--. . -- - -- -----
ONLY 25,000 MILES, SUNROOF,
LEATHER INTERIOR.

527-0129 '15,900


2002 YAMAHA ROADSTAR
SILVERADO
MIDNIGHT BLUE AND BLACK, ALL
THE EXTRAS, ONLY 11,000K
527-0129 ONLY '7,999


2005 YAMAHA ROADSTAR
SILVERADO 1700 PUSHROD
LIQUID SILVER PAINT, CUSTOM
PIPES, TOO MUCH TO LIST~
627-0129 SPECIAL '8,999


The power to wash





is at your fingertips


Is it possible to wash, vacuum, polish and
wax your vehicle with one power tool? Sort
,of. How about one tool with four attach-
ments? Meet the Power Sidekick
Automobile Care System, the winner,
:according to its maker Viaworld, of three
;international new-product awards. The
'chief advantage to the $130 Power Sidekick
'is that all functions are powered by an
onboard 15-Volt battery pack, wbhih.should_..


give you piece when mind when working cle. The 30-inch neck allows you to reach
around the puddles associated with the high and low places without bending over
washing/waxing/buffing/vacuuming or standing on a ladder. Not only does the
process. It definitely beats a power cord job go more quickly, but there's less wear
loaded with 120 volts that's laying in a pool and tear on your body and clothing. The
of water, not to mention the pain of dealing two-pound battery pack takes about an hour
with tangles and random unplugging when and a half to completely charge. The main
you least expect it. Without a cord, you're power unit weights an additional 3.3
free to quickly manoeuvre the rotating pounds. Visit powersidekick.com for a
.power.washer-attachment around the vehi- video demonstration and to purchase. -


2005 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB
17K MILES
|TK #5751011A
564-8668 *18,995


2002 HONDA ACCORD EX
MOONROOF, LEATHER.

795-7371 -49.995


1999 ULDS INTRKIUE
ADULT OWNED AND DRIVEN
BRAND NEW CONDITION.-.,..

527-0129 ONLY '4,999


2005 SUZUKI USA R13 UU
HAYABUSA SHOW BIKE
CHROME EVERYTHING, THIS
BIKE IS ONE OF A KIND.
527-0129 ONLY '10,900


Buy a Great Pre-Owned Vehicle




Right Here in Dial a Deal!


7. -Z.


~


| " I


sp or


- .


d


I ... ......... !


77.7. ZZ
�ik�


r











IOD TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 2007


r I2.9 terss for 60 Months 0r 19 Interest r 60 months


Net after rebate of '1,000. et after rebate 6f '2,500.


S -S a .S S'N


CrrRus COuNTY (FL) CHRONiC.E


* 1.


2004 Ford� F150 Super Crewl
Only 31,000 miles, NM32A
$2 . 29680


All




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs