Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00918
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness Fla
Publication Date: June 19, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00918

Full Text














FORECAST:
Partly sunny with
scattered mainly
afternoon t-storms.
PAGE 4A


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I'I .Imperatures soar, so do prices for


C I T R COUNTY



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gasoline. /12A


vchronicleonline!9


LNewspaper Serving Florida's Best Commui


NOTHING BUT THE TOOTH:


Teeth of titanium
Dental implants use metal
fixtures in the jaw for anything
from a single crown to full
dentures./Page 1C
WALL STREET:
Stocks down
* Wall Street edged lower
| after three days of gains
as investors watched
: Treasury bond yields
fluctuate./Page 9A
LOCAL:
Cancellation
School board meeting is
canceled after a printing
goof./Page 2A
TOP SECRET:
Code off limits
Democratic challenger
Christine Jennings is denied
access to the software code
for voting machines in
Sarasota./Page 3A

OPINION;

We are
in the grip
of a coalition
of businessmen
Witout foresight
and politicians
without
scruples.

COLUMN, PAGE OA
GAZA SHUTDOWN.


--

No crossing
Border crossings remained
shut Monday after Hamas
took over Palestinian territory.
/Page 12A
DANGEROUS OBSESSION:


Diabulimia
Diagnosed with type 1
diabetes at 5 years old and
bulimia at 14, Lee Ann Thill
grew obsessed with food and
weight./Page 6C


Annie's Mailbox ........ 9C
Com ics ............ . 10C
Crossword .......... .. 9C
Editorial ............ . 10A
Entertainment ......... 4B
Horoscope ........... 10C
Lottery Payouts ........ 4B
Movies ............. 10C
Obituaries ............ 6A
Stocks ............... 8A
Three Sections

6118415712llll1115
6 *84578 200255 5


U.S.


frees up funds


U.S. ends economic, political embargo on

Palestinian government, helping Abbas


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Bush adminis-
tration is trying to help Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas turn lemons
to lemonade, lifting an economic and
diplomatic embargo to a Palestinian gov-
ernment reconstituted after Abbas lost
control of the Gaza Strip.
Monday's move to resume direct aid
payments to the cash-strapped
Palestinian government in the West Bank
follows expulsion of the militant Hamas
movement from the governing coalition.


It is meant to help Abbas in his political
and military struggle against Hamas,
which has set up a competing govern-
ment in Gaza.
*1 For more As a first step,
about the Secretary of State
crisis in Condoleezza Rice said
Palestine. she will ask Congress to
PAGE 12A rework an existing $86
million aid request for
the Abbas-led government At the same
time, she announced a separate $40 mil-
lion contribution to United Nations relief
for Palestinian' refugees, a gesture to the


1.5 million Palestinians living in increas-
ingly desperate conditions in Gaza.
"We are not going to countenance that
somehow ... the Palestinians are divisi-
ble," Rice told reporters. "We're not
going to abandon the Palestinians who
are living in Gaza."
The cash to Abbas' government will
help him meet his payroll and could
improve his standing with Palestinian
voters, but he remains weak Although
the Bush administration has made a
point of saying that Abbas remains the
leader for all Palestinians, the near-total
division of the two Palestinian territories
means he can fully speak for only about
half his more than 3 million people.
The Bush administration is trying to
Please see " "-:-:' ./Page 4A


Construction is elementary


DAVE SIGLERiCr.ron.ioA
Construction on Elementary School "A," just down the street from Citrus Springs Middle School on West Citrus Springs
Boulevard, is progressing well. The school's exterior walls are up and the roof of the cafeteria is on. When finished, it will be a
two-story, 115,000-square-foot building that will house 810 students in grades pre-K to fifth. If work stays on schedule, sub-
stantial completion of the building will be in spring 2008, with the school opening for students in the fall. The cost of the new
school is S21.7 million.

New Citrus County school scheduled to open in fall of2008


CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Watching the roof trusses go up last
week. Bill Murray was impressed by
construction at the new elementary'
school.
"It looks like a big Erector set," the
Citrus County School Board chairman
said.
After more than six months of work in
Citrus Springs, construction of the
county's eleventh elementary school is
on schedule.
"It was just all trees in December: so
we've come a long w ay," said Andrew
Wellman, project manager for Peter
Brown Construction.
Deemed Elementary School "A' for
now, the school's exterior walls are up


It was just all trees
in December, so we've
come a long way.

Andrew Wellman
Peter Brown Construction
project manager.
and the roof of the cafeteria is on.
The school is just down the street
from Citrus Springs Middle School on
West. Citrus Springs Boulevard. When
finished, it will be a two-story, 115,000-
square-foot building that will house 810
students in grades pre-K to fifth.
If work stays on schedule, substantial
completion of the building will be in
spring 2008, with the school opening for


students in the fall.
The' $21.7-million price tag for con-
struction costs is more than double the
cost of building Forest Ridge
Elementary School in 2000. With similar
square-footage, FRE was built for $8.8
million.
School district support services
director Mike Mullen attributes rising
costs to increases in destructive storms
in the past few years, which have driven
up construction and insurance costs.
By the end of the project, the school
will cost about $24 million to $26 million
once land, furniture and planning work
are factored in, Mullen said. The land
was purchased in 2005 for $6,500 per
acre.
Eventually, the 120-acre site could
house a high school, making the area
similar to the Lecanto School Complex.


U.S.-MIDEAST SUMMARY
* EMBARGO LIFTED: The Bush
administration lifted its eco-
nomic and political embargo
against the Palestinian gov-
ernment.
* RESUMING AID: The move is
meant to strengthen Western-
backed President Mahmoud
Abbas.
* RESETTING POLICY: The
action essentially resets U.S.
policy to the days before
Hamas swept legislative elec-
tions in early 2006 and
upended U.S. and internation-
al peacemaking.



Interest


groups


backing


Schultz

Candidate

hits capitalfor

campaign money
MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Leave it to Ronl Schultz for
presenting his primer on cam-
paign fundraising.
Schultz, the former Citrus
County property appraiser, has
raised about $32,000 in his
campaign for state representa-
tive District 43.
Actually, he didn't raise the
money so much as it came to
him.
Pegged early on as a front-
runner in the June 26 election
to succeed Charlie Dean in the
Florida House, Schultz said he
gained favor immediately with
the types of special interest
groups whose representatives
roam the hallways of the
Capitol trying to get laws
changed.
These groups back candi-
dates who are likely to become
their advocates once elected,
he said.
"They have a sophisticated
system of finding what candi-
date interests are," Schultz
said.
Democrat Sophia Diaz-
Fonseca, a former Inverness
City Councilwoman who faces
Schultz and no-party affilia-
tion candidate David Gregory
in the election, said Schultz's
priorities are not balanced
with the voter's.
"When you're supposed to
represent the district you're
supposed to represent the peo-
ple of the district," she said.
"It's not only who he knows it's
also who he owes. He's going to
owe them his ear."
Schultz said he isn't trying to
raise money in Citrus County
because people know him
Please see SCHULTZ/Page 5A


Eatery eyes September re-opening
"~~~~~ 3. -^R ^^^H


Chicken King closed since February fire


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Chicken King will live to
roost again.
The popular Hernando hang-
out, destroyed by an early morn-
ing fire Feb. 20, might be back in
operation by September, owner
David Hunter said.
"As soon as we get the per-
mits, we're going to build it
back," Hunter said. "I'd hope to
be in operating status by the
first of September I'm saying
hoping, now."


Hunter, who owns the busi-
ness and Johni Mills, who owns
the building, received a demoli-
tion permit in April. Hunter
said the building will be gutted,
but left standing before remod-
eling begins.
About $400,000 in property
and contents were lost in the
fire, according to a Citrus
County Fire Prevention report.
Hunter said the business was
fully insured.
Hunter said the state fire
marshal ruled the fire began in
a fryer. An employee tried to
extinguish the fire, but was


unable to do so.
Chicken King has served
breakfast, lunch and dinner for
about 35 years. Hunter said he
couldn't peg how much he's lost
in business since the fire.
Hunter said he is meeting
with county officials today for a
pre-application conference to
learn what he needs for the
building permit
He said he has heard buzz
since the fire with people want-
ing to know when it might
reopen.
"The response has been
tremendous around the com-
munity," he said.
As for the new Chicken King,
Hunter said it will be just like


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
A fire inspector and police dog exit the Chicken King restaurant
the morning of the Feb. 20 fire. Restaurant owner David Hunter
said he hopes to have the restaurant re-opened by September.
old times - sort of. Chicken King," he said, "with a
"It'll basically be the same new dress."


Hot fuel


HIGH
89
LOW
70


JUNE 19, 2007


No. 170


I L -







2A TUESDAY, JUNIE 19, 2007


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy, right, prepares to address a group of several dozen people attending a ground-breaking ceremony Monday morning at the site of
the new Citrus County Emergency Operations Center in Lecanto. When complete, the facility will be home base for planners coordinating emergency prepared-
ness, response and recovery from natural and man-made disasters.


Poker run to benefit _
Jessie's Place Inverness city council to swear in new member


Citrus Motorsports is sponsoring
a poker run to raise money for the
Citrus County Children's Advocacy
Center. The center, which has
been named Jessie's Place in
remembrance of 9-year-old Jessica
Lunsford, will be a facility for victim-
ized children to receive services
and counseling. The children's
advocacy center would help chil-
dren in situations where there is an
allegation of physical abuse, neg-
lect or sexual abuse. The center is
a nonprofit agency.
The event will begin 9 a.m.
Sunday, at Harley Davidson of
Crystal River and last back will be
3 p.mn, at Citrus Motorsports.
Citrus Motorsports has donated
$2,000 in prize money for the event.
SFor information, call 564-2453.


Ramlow to replace Diaz-Fonseca


DAVE PIEKLIUK
dpieklik@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Tonight's Inverness Council
meeting will feature the swear-
ing in of resident and Catholic
university director Fred
Ramlow to the council.
Ramlow, 44, the Ocala cam-
pus director of Saint Leo
University, was unanimously
picked by the council at its June
5 meeting to replace former
councilwoman Sophia Diaz-
Fonseca. Diaz-Fonseca, who
resigned May 14 to run in the
District 43 House of


Representatives race.
The council had two choices
to fill her seat - try to unani-
mously appoint someone to fill
the remainder of her four-year
term, or if that failed, ask for a
special election. Citing cost
savings of not having an elec-
tion, the council agreed an
appointment was best, before
asking Ramlow, who was sit-
ting in the audience, if he
accepted the appointment
He agreed, saying he . would
be honored to serve.
Ramlow lost his first bid for
the council in November in the
election for two council seats,


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INVERNESS CITY
COUNCIL
. The Inverness City Council
meets 5:30 p.m., in the
council chamber of the
Inverness Government
Center, 212 W. Main
Street.

when Jacquie Hepfer defeated
him. The council members
agreed he would be a great asset
to the city by being appointed.
Ramlow will serve to the end
of Diaz-Fonseca's term, which
expires February 2009. Ani
election for the seat will be
conducted in November 2008.


Also tonight, the council will
be asked to consider approving
$3,500 in contingency funds to
replace an irrigation well at
Whispering Pines Park after
almost 30 years of operation.
The money had not been fac-
tored into the city's proposed
budget for the next fiscal year.
The city will also review a
final plat proposal for the 27-
lot, single-family Southern
Pines subdivision planned for
South Apopka Avenue. The
development will be served
with central water and septic
systems.
The de\ eloper expects to fin-
ish work in three years.


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FLORIDA PUBLIC


I


CIrRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



School


board


meeting


canceled

CRISTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A garbled looking legal
advertisement led to the Citrus
County School Board cancel-
ing a public meeting Monday.'
The Citrus County School
Board had scheduled to meet
for a special meeting and budg-
et workshop at 1 p.m.. Monday
On tap for the meeting was an
update on legislative changes
that affect the school district
and a first look at the 2007-08
budget
As always, school district
officials paid for a legal adver-
tisement in the Chronicle. By
Florida law, government board
meetings must be advertised at
least 48 hours in advance so
that the public has ample time
to learn about meetings.
But Monday morning, a
school district secretary
received a. call from the
Chronicle explaining that there
were problems with'the legal ad.
Only a portion of the ad text that
ran on Page 23C of Saturday's
edition was readable.
According to classified
advertising manager Jennifer
Wall, the mistake was due to a
production error. Without the
meeting being properly adver-
tised, it was illegal for board
members to meet, according to
Board Chairman Bill Murray.
Now the meeting has shifted
to Tuesday, June 26. Regular
school board meetings are the
second Tuesday of each
month. The fourth Tuesday of
the month is. typically when
the board schedules workshop
or special meetings if needed.
The reason the date changed
was because board member
Pat Deutschman will not be
able to attend June 26 because
of a vacation, Murray said.
Board member Lou Miele
said the cancelled .meeting
actually worked in his favor.
Because of thle chance. he 'was
able "to watch his daughter's
first day of soccer camp


?'.*' 1;


4v











3A
TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Daytona Beach

Sentencing delayed for
boy in homeless beating
Sentencing was delayed
Monday for a 10-year-old boy
convicted in the severe beating
and stoning of a homeless Army
veteran.
Circuit Judge John Watson
approved a defense motion to
delay the hearing until next
week because one of the doc-
tors evaluating the boy hadn't
yet filed his report. Prosecutors
did not oppose the motion, say-
ing they wanted the victim pres-
ent but had not been able to
contact him. Two 10-year-old
boys and a teenager were
charged with beating John
D'Amico so badly he required
reconstructive surgery.
The attack happened March
27 in Daytona Beach. D'Amico
said he was walking with a
friend when the group threw
rocks at them. He said the older
boy punched him in the face
and he fell into a wall. The wall
broke and one of the younger
boys slammed a chunk of it into
his face, D'Amico said.
The youth set for sentencing
Monday was found guilty May,
10 of aggravated battery. He
could be held in the juvenile
system until he turns 21 if the
judge considers him a habitual
offender, or he could be given
probation or counseling.

Altamonte Springs

Three killed in apparent
murder-suicide
A 70-year-old man killed his
wife, daughter and himself over
a fight with his children regard-
ing his wife's nursing care,
authorities said.
Police said William Wallace,
70, left behind a tape recording
saying he planned the murders.
The shooting happened
Sunday afternoon in 78-year-old
Barbara Wallace's nursing home
room. She and her daughter,
55-year-old Sandra Leone, of
Myrtle Beach, S.C., were visiting
a relative, The Orlando Sentinel
reported. Police said William
Wallace shot them with a hand-
gun when they returned.
Officer Kristin Kelting said the
family was divided over where
Barbara Wallace should live.
Some children wanted her
moved to a Tennessee nursing
home, while William Wallace
and others wanted her to stay
here.

Panama City

Panama City to receive
radiation detector
The growing port of Panama
City is adding radiation detection
equipment to screen for nuclear
devices, dirty bombs and other
sources of radiation.
The port plans to install a
radiation portal monitor to check
departing containers at a new
gate starting next month. Any
time containers go out of the
port by truck, drivers will pass
through the device, said Judy
McKee, Customs and Border
Protection director for the port.
"If it looks like it's dangerous,
we won't even open it," she told
The News Herald of Panama
City. McKee's agency operates
more than 800 radiation portal
monitors nationwide, including
181 at seaports.

Cocoa Beach

Man drowns off
Cocoa Beach
A 26-year-old man who
drowned off Cocoa Beach over
the weekend was identified
Monday as Mikelson Pressior of
Orlando, authorities said.
Swimmers saw Pressior's
body in the water Sunday after-
noon and called 911. Rescue
workers pulled him out of the
water and performed CPR, but
were not able to revive him.


Rip currents, which were
strong in nearby Volusia County
all weekend, were not consid-
ered bad in Brevard County on
Sunday, Brevard County Chief
Lifeguard Wyatt Wemeth said.
- From wire reports


Court details Cummins claims


Attorney currently

serving six-month

suspension

DAVE PIEKLIK
dpieklik@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
As Inverness attorney Jim Cummins
enters his first week of a six-month sus-
pension for misconduct, records show
why the Florida Supreme Court asked
for that punishment
Cummins, 39, was ordered to close
his office last Friday, not accept new
clients or handle any cases during the
suspension, following several com-
plaints with the Florida Bar. The com-
plaints were filed over the past couple
of years, and included Cummins's han-
dling of appeals and other cases.


As part of the May 31 order from the
Florida Supreme Court asking for
Cummins' suspension, he must serve
two years of probation and pay $4,000 in
restitution to two individuals. He must
also have a bar-approved attorney
review all his post-conviction and
appeal filings during his probation.
Cummins did not contest the order
and negotiated a conditional guilty
plea. According to records from the bar,
he was found guilty of the following:
* Failing to timely provide a man's
file to his new attorney after the man
replaced Cummins on an appeal. He
requested a new attorney after
Cummins didn't appear in court to
argue the man's motion that he should-
n't have to register as a sex offender
Two associates of Cummins argued the
case instead.
* Failing to "timely remit" $3,200 in
fees he was inadvertently paid twice by
the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office
for the same cases.


Splish splash!


* Charging or collecting "an illegal,
prohibited or clearly excessive fee" and
for "engaging in conduct in connection
with the practice of law that is prejudi-
cial to the administration of justice."
S Failing to adequately communicate
with clients or act in their best interests.
Included in the restitution Cummins
must pay is $3,000 to Teresa Hollon of
Inverness. Hollon said Monday she ini-
tially paid Cummins $1,500 to have him
represent her after she was arrested in
December 2004 for driving under the
influence of alcohol.
"He told me this was the easiest case
he could have ever gotten," Hollon said,
adding she was told she wouldn't have
to pay any more money unless she had
to go to court.
However, she said Cummins asked
for $1,500 more a few days later, but he
never appeared in court to represent
her "He just didn't show up at all,"
Hollon said.
Hollon said she ended up going to jail


Associated Press
Nypheria Jefferson, 7, of Tallahassee, enjoys an afternoon of cool fun Monday at a pool in Tallahassee. Afternoon temperatures
in the area hovered around 100 degrees.




Court: No access to voting machine code


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE - A state appellate
court ruled Monday that Christine
Jennings has no right to examine the pro-
gramming source code that runs the elec-
tronic voting machines she says malfunc-
tioned in her southwest Florida congres-
sional race.
The three-judge panel said Monday
Jennings did not meet the "extraordinary
burden" of proving a lower court was
wrong to deny her request last December
Jennings already had shifted focus to a


congressional task force assigned to sort
out her election dispute with Republican
Vern Buchanan, the state-certified winner
of the race by only 369 votes. A spokesman
said she has no immediate plans to appeal
Monday's ruling.
"I think the only important activity right
now is what is going on in Congress, since
they have the ultimate authority in this mat-
ter," Jennings' spokesman David Kochman
said. "They are also moving quicker than
the court ever has. In terms of access to the
source code and machines, the task force
made it clear last week that won't be a hur-


die. They have subpoena power"
The Government Accountability Office
said last week it will not know if a the
information is needed until after an initial
review of other investigations in the case.
The agency is scheduled to give the task
force a progress report on July 27. The
review could take until September. -
"It's devastating to her case. It essentially
ends her lawsuit in the state of Florida,"
Buchanan's legal counsel Hayden Dempsey
said. "She can't win in an objective, inde-
pendent trial court She's now going up to
D.C. where she hopes politics will prevail."


for seven months, though she was out
two days after getting a different attor-
ney She said she wrote letters asking
for the money back, some of which her
mom had paid.
Cummins could not be reached for
comment Monday. A message on his cell
phone voice mail said it was not taking
messages.
A complex that included his office
caught fire June 6, destroying his office
and severely damaging others. The fire
followed an article in the Chronicle
detailing the suspension.
Fire officials said someone broke
into a back door and used an acceler-
ant The fire remains under investiga-
tion.
Cummins said before the fire that he
probably wouldn't come back to prac-
tice law in the county after the suspen-
sion because it wasn't worth the
headache dealing with the bar and oth-
ers. He did say that he could change his
mind, though.

County BRIEFS


Meeting set
to discuss mining
The Citrus County
Commission will have a special
meeting at 9 a.m. today to dis-
cuss potential changes to min-
ing standards. Commissioners
meet on the first floor of the
Citrus County Courthouse in
downtown Invemess.
Candidate to meet,
share dessert
Sophia Diaz-Fonseca,
Democrat for Florida House of
Representatives, District 43,
invites all registered voters to
share dessert and punch with
her at 6 p.m. Thursday at
Tuscany on the Meadows in the
Best Western Citrus Hills Lodge
on County Road 486, in Citrus
Hills. She is also hosting a
question-and-answer forum in
the main ballroom.
Ministry sponsors
food distribution
EL-Shaddai food ministries
will sponsor a "brown bag of
food" distribution from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., Wednesday, June 27, at
the Crystal River Church of
God, 2180 W. 12th Ave., behind
the Lincoln Mercury dealership.
This food giveaway is the last
Wednesday monthly. For infor-
mation, call 795-3079 or 628-
9087. Delivery is available to the
homebound.
Early voting
through Saturday -
Early voting is being conduct-
ed this week for the special June
26 general election for state rep-
resentative, state Senate and
Crystal River City Council.
Voters may cast ballots in the
Inverness or Crystal River elec-
tions office through Saturday.
The deadline to request an
absentee ballot is 5 p.m.
Wednesday. Voters may request
a ballot in person at the elections
office, calling 341-6740 or by e-
mail at www.votecitrus.com.
Ballots must be returned by 7
p.m. Election Day.
For information, call 341-6740.
- From staff reports

Correction

Due to reporter error, an infor-
mational box in a story on page
1A of Monday's edition,
"Building on past successes,"
contained an error. The next
date for potential Habitat homes
recipients to leam more is from
10 a.m. to noon Saturday, July
21, at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church. For infor-
mation, call 563-2744.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.


Hernando County hurricane shelter lineup changes


Special to the Chronicle
The Hernando County Emergency Management
Department has announced a change in one of
Hernando County's hurricane shelters, effective
immediately West Hernando Middle School, the des-
ignated shelter for residents with special medical
needs, will undergo a complete re-roofing this sum-
mer and will be unavailable for use as a shelter. The
new special needs shelter for the 2007 hurricane sea-
son will be the Challenger K-8 School, at 13400 Elgin
Blvd. in Spring Hill.
Below is the complete shelter list for Hernando


County. For more information about hurricane pre-
paredness in Hernando County, visit the Emergency
Management Web site at www.hernando county.us/em
or call (352) 754-4083. The phone number for
Hernando County's pre-recorded emergency infor-
mation line is (352) 754-4111.
2007 Hurricane Shelter List:
* Challenger K-8 School (Shelter for special needs)
- 13400 Elgin Blvd., Spring Hill.
* Deltona Elementary - 2055 Deltona Blvd.,
Spring Hill.
* Nature Coast Technical High School - 4057
California St, Brooksville.


* Fox Chapel Middle School 9412 Fox Chapel Lane,
Spring Hill.
* Moton Elementary School - 7175 Emerson Road,
Brooksville.
* Chocachatti Elementary - 4135 California St.,
Brooksville.
* Hernando High School - 700 Bell Ave.,
Brooksville.
* EW Springstead High School - 3300 Mariner
Blvd., Spring Hill.
* West Hernando Middle School - 14325 Ken
Austin Parkway, Brooksville (may be available by
September).


st-.


loci













(,, ~ ( CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4A TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007


For the RECORD


C #:_ - " : " -

Associated Press
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice speaks during a news conference Monday at the State
Department in Washington, where she announced that the Bush administration lifted its economic
and political embargo against the Palestinian government.


FUNDS
Continued from Page 1A

help Abbas turn his defeat in
Gaza into a stronger bargaining
posture for peace with Israel.
Abbas' U.S.-backed forces crum-
bled and fled the smaller Hamas
brigades in Gaza last week, leav-
ing the tiny seaside territory in
Hamas control.
Abbas is now consolidating his
control in the West Bank Abbas
and some backers in the Bush
administration hope that if
Abbas can deliver better services
and a more normal life for West
Bankers it will make the territory
a laboratory for a future inde-
pendent state.
The future state has long been
envisioned as encompassing
both the West Bank and Gaza,
something both Abbas and his
U.S. backers insist remains the
goal.
Rice would not directly
address the question of whether
Abbas could negotiate for peace
while Hamas holds effective con-
trol over such a large part of
Palestinian population and land.
"We are focusing today and in


the days to come on helping this
new government to find its foot-
ing and to begin the work, the
very difficult work of making life
better for the Palestinian peo-
ple," Rice said.
President Bush spoke with
Abbas by telephone and
endorsed his decision to dissolve
the government, swear in an
emergency cabinet and outlaw
the militia forces of Hamas.
Emboldened by quick and broad
international support over the
weekend, Abbas told Bush that
now is the moment to renew
Mideast peace talks.
The swift changes in the
Palestinian territories are
expected to be a major topic for
Bush's meeting Tuesday with
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert Olmert said Monday he
wants to support Abbas, some-
thing the Bush administration
had been pushing long before the
latest Palestinian government
upheaval.
Rice also spoke on Monday to
the new Palestinian prime minis-
ter Salam Fayyad, an interna-
tional banker with credentials as
a supporter of peace, was
installed Sunday following the
dissolution of the coalition gov-


ernment between Hamas and
Abbas' Fatah Party. Ismail
flaniyeh of Hamas insists he still
holds the top job.
Hamas refuses to recognize
Israel or renounce violence, con-
ditions the world set for diplo-
matic engagement and aid.
Hamas claims responsibility for
the deaths of scores of Israelis in
suicide attacks. Israel, the
European Union and the United
States list it as a terrorist group.
The decision to resume aid
and full government contacts
replaces one awkward situation
with another for the U.S.
The United States had refused
contact with Hamas officials
since the radicals won parlia-
mentary elections in January
2006, ending decades of Fatah
control.
In addition to cutting off direct
aid, and even requesting that
Abbas return some unspent
donations, U.S. officials could not
even speak with some top
Palestinian officials.
Now U.S. officials can meet
freely with the Palestinian gov-
ernment in the West Bank, but
must rely on the United Nations
and other intermediaries to
reach out to Palestinians in Gaza.


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrests
* Timothy D. Stone, 22, Beverly
Hills, at 3:25 a.m. Sunday, on a mis-
demeanor charge of domestic bat-
tery. A 25-year-old woman said
Stone pushed her into a glass door
causing it to shatter, according to an
arrest report. No bond.
* James E. Buzard, 26, and
Barthulmew J. Bisig, 33, both of
Beverly Hills, at 4:28 a.m.
Sunday,on a misdemeanor domes-
tic battery charges.
According to an arrest report the
two had an argument and began
fighting. During the fight Bisig forced
the driver's side door of Buzard's car
open causing the window to break.
He also jumped on the hood of the
car, according to the report.
Because of damages, Bisig was
additionally charged with criminal
mischief with damages being
$1,000 or more. No bond was
offered for either man.
Other arrests
* John Allen Gage, 56, 3138 E.
Vemon Court, Floral City, at 1:43
p.m. Saturday, on a Citrus County
warrant charge of making, issuing or
uttering a worthless check. Bond
$4,000.
* Jose Emilio Vasquez, 26, 31
W. Greenbrier Place, Dunnellon, at
5:42 p.m. Saturday, on a charge of
not having a valid driver license.
Bond $150.
* Kimberly Dee Bennett, 36,
Beverly Hills, at 6:24 p.m. Saturday,
on a charge of aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon. According to
an arrest report, Bennett threw a


pair of gardening shears at a 48-
year-old man during an argument.
The man was taken to Citrus
Memorial hospital for injuries to his
hand. The man said he did not wish
to press charges. No bond.
m Sean Michael Dauria, 21,
8215 W. Fairoak Court, Crystal
River, at 12:48 p.m. Sunday, on a
Citrus County warrant charge of
organized fraud. He was also
charged with felony violation of pro-
bation on Monday. No bond.
* Roy D. Hooten, 23, of an
unknown address, at 2:50 p.m.
Sunday, on a charge of possession
of drug paraphernalia.
According to an arrest report, a
deputy went to check out the woods
to the north of a Homosassa bowling
alley because people had said
homeless people were living there.
When the deputy arrived he saw two
men walking out of the woods.
Originally Hooten gave the deputy a
fake name. When the deputy later
asked if he had anything illegal
Hooten said he had a marijuana
pipe in his tent. Bond $500.
* Virgil Roberts, 38, 4202 E.
Alabama Lane, Hemando, at 2:52
p.m. Sunday, on a charge of driving
with a suspended/revoked license.
Bond $2,000.
* Robert Ryan Garrett, 24, 204
E. Daisy Court, Inverness, at 7:23
p.m. Sunday, on a charge of filing a
false police report.
According to an arrest report,
Garrett told a deputy someone had
stolen his four-wheeler from his yard
while he was at the store. The night
before a different deputy responded
to some woods near Ferris Groves
in Floral City when Garrett got his


four-wheeler stuck. After questioning
Garrett, the deputy leased the four-
wheeler actually disappeared when
he and friends went looking for the
vehicle in the woods after it had got-
ten stuck. Garrett told the deputy the
reason why he lied was because
friends had told him that he needed
to report the vehicle stolen from the
house in order to report the theft on
his homeowner's insurance. Bond
$500.
* Travis David Lorensen, 18,
7410 S. Wanderlust Point,
Homosassa, at 9:14 p.m. Sunday,
on a charge of using/possessing
drug paraphernalia. Lorensen was
released on his own recognizance.
* James Paul Miller, 30, 1576
N.W. 110th, Ocala, at 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, on a charge of driving with
a suspended/revoked license. Bond
$2,000.
* Kimberly Dee Bennett, 36, 1
E. Golden St., Beverly Hills, at 10:15
a.m. Monday, on a felony violation of
probation charge. According to an
arrest report, Bennett violated pro-
bation when she was arrested on a
charge of aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon. No bond.

Crystal River Police
Arrests
* Anthony Wayne Dabney, 22,
81 S. Adams St., Beverly Hills, at
6:39 p.m. Saturday on a Citrus
County warrant charge of misde-
meanor battery. Bond $500.
* Timothy Edward
Worthington, 34, of an unknown
address, at 12:28 p.m. Sunday on a
Pinellas County warrant charge of
felony violation of probation. No
bond.


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send in a photo with a brief description of the trip. Include the names of anyone pictured, and
Include a contact name and phone number on the back.
* Weekly winners will be published in the Sunday Chronicle.
* At the end of the year, a panel of judges will select the best photo during the year and that
photographer will win a prize.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


4rN I-TP, ukF


C r, U N T Y -"-


City H
Daytona Bch. 88
Ft. Lauderdale 86
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 91
Homestead 86
Jacksonville 90
Key West 89
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 86


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas I
to 2. Bay and inland waters will a light chop.
Partly sunny with a chance of thunder-
storms during the afternoon and evening
hours.


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
SHigh: 89 Low: 70
Partly cloudy, chance of afternoon
thunderstorms.


WEDNESDAY
High: 89 Low: 71
Becoming mostly cloudy with afternoon
showers and thunderstorms.

THURSDAY
High: 86 Low: 72
Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.


Gulf water
temperature


84�
Taken at Egmont Key


Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.90 27.89 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.37 34.36 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 34.17 34.17 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 35.99 35.99 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


FRIDAY
High: 87 Low: 71
Partly cloudy, chance of afternoon
thunderstorms.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 92/69
Record 101/62
Normal 71/90
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Monday trace
Total for the month 2.48 in.
Total for the year 10.90 in.
Normal for the year 20.90 in.
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Monday at 3 p.m. 30.10 ir
DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 7
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 52�
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees and grasses were light an
weeds were absent.
"Light - only extreme allergic will show symrp
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


n.

1



d

p-
re
9


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT............................ 8:31 P.M.
-" ' SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:32 A.M.
% J U MOONRISE TODAY.........................10:59A.M.
M JUNE22 l JUNE3 30 JULY7 JIY 14 MOONSET TODAY .................................NONE

BURN CONDITIONS

- -Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES

.The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Tuesday Wednesday
High/Low High/Low High/Low HIgh/L
10:10 a/5:24 a 9:05 p/5:07 p 10:45 a/6:02 a 9:59 p/5:5
8:31 a/2:46 a 7:26 p/2:29 p 9:06 a/3:24 a 8:20 p/3:2
6:18 a/12:34 a 5:13 p/12:17 p 6:53 a/1:12 a 6:07 p/1:(
9:20 a/4:23 a 8:15 p/4:06 p 9:55 a/5:01 a 9:09 p/4:5


ow


i9 p
21 p
09 p
58 p


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Monday
H L Pep.
81 61
93 62
88 56 .10
94 73trace
82 69
91 74
93 70
72 52
93 75
79 50
81 64
89 60
78 52
91 70
97 67
93 61
89 70 .28
95 64
94 66
95 68
95 70
80 50
92 75 .01
80 49
81 71 .06
93 69
98 73
87 64 .12
92 67
83 66
93 75
89 70
95 74
10380
89 74
69 61
89 70
92 74
89 71 .14
81 64 .11
86 71 .69
95 71
89 70 .37


Tuesday
Fcst H L
tstrm 88 66
sunny 95 65
tstrm 83 63
tstrm 84 68
ptcldy 86 68
ptcldy 92 73
ptcldy 91 70
sunny 80 56
tstrm 84 70
sunny 91 55
sunny 81 62
tstrm 86 62
tstrm 88 65
ptcldy 89 76
tstrm 88 65
tstrm 91 68
ptcldy 79 60
tstrm 85 61
tstrm 86 60
tstrm 93 73
tstrm 87 61
ptcldy 86 65
ptcldy 92 75
sunny 88 56
ptcldy 82 60
tstrm 84 61
ptcldy 10171
tstrm 86 60
ptcldy 92 67
ptcldy 86 65
tstrm 91 74
tstrm 85 61
tstrm 86 72
sunny 10378
tstrm 89 69
sunny 72 60
tstrm 85 65
tstrm 88 72
ptcldy 79 58
ptcldy 76 57
tstrm 85 72
tstrm 85 72
tstrm 85 67


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02007 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 86 73 .40 tstrm 87 75
New York City 84 73 ptcldy 87 68
Norfolk 95 70 ptcldy 94 73
Oklahoma City 82 73 .07 ptcldy 87 70
Omaha 82 72 ptcldy 81 60
Palm Springs 10874 sunny 10972
Philadelphia 88 70 ptcldy 90 71
Phoenix 10779 sunny 10880
Pittsburgh 90 63 tstrm 86 61
Portland, ME 81 59 ptcldy 75 60
Portland, Ore 65 53 sunny 82 54
Providence, R.I. 80 66 ptcldy 82 63
Raleigh 95 63 ptcldy 94 70
Rapid City 76 48 ptcldy 83 55
Reno 92 53 sunny 93 58
Rochester, NY 87 60 tstrm 88 62
Sacramento 97 56 sunny 92 57
St. Louis 86 72 .19 ptcldy 87 63
St. Ste. Marie 88 61 .05 ptcldy 70 47
Salt Lake City 80 50 sunny 92 65
San Antonio 92 75 ptcldy 92 74
San Diego 69 62 sunny 73 63
San Francisco 73 51 sunny 62 52
Savannah 89 70 ptcldy 91 73
Seattle 62 48 ptcldy 74 54
Spokane 68 46 ptcldy 81 52
Syracuse 84 59 tstrm 89 63
Topeka 82 70 .45 ptcldy 85 63
Washington 94 72 ptcldy 93 73
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 115 Goodyear, Ariz. LOW 24 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/77/ts
Amsterdam 72/59/pc
Athens 93/73/s
Beijing 87/68/pc
Berlin 81/65/pc
Bermuda 84/73/s
Cairo 99/74/s
Calgary 75/53/pc
Havana 88/73/pc
Hong Kong 89/78/ts
Jerusalem 96/68/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


75/56/sh
70/53/sh
86/62/s
75/55/ts
88/68/s
78/57/pc
79/58/pc
77/67/s
90/67/pc
59/47/sh
82/62/pc
86/65/sh
77/56/sh


ejH *1ONICLL
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le


'I


C C


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


I


r-


I


-- lr -- ! 1


i

41D







TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 5A


CITRUS COUNn (FL) CHRONICLE-


SCHULTZ
Continued from Page 1A
from his 14 years as property appraiser.
Schultz said it's more important to make
his face familiar in Tallahassee. Two days
after qualifying, Schultz said he met with
Gene McGee, a lobbyist who lives in Citrus
County.
McGee said he could line up financial
support for Schultz so long as Schultz could
back his client's causes. Those causes
included the pari-mutuel and gambling
industry, which is trying to expand legal
forms of gambling in racetracks and jai-
alai frontons.
"He said, 'Here are my clients,'" Schultz
recalled. "He asked, 'Do you have prob-
lems with the dog tracks?' His other pri-
mary was Anheuser Busch. I said, no prob-
lem."
Schultz said McGee introduced him to
campaign providers.


Roa Sophni Dia-

DEBATE
E House District 43 candidate'
Diaz Fonseca, David Gregory
Schultz will debate the issue
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. today on \
cable channel 16.
"He went to his clients and sa
the winner Do you want to ge
and support him?' " Schultz sai
McGee, who also contributed
campaign, said he encouraged
back Schultz.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engage-
ment announcements, anniversaries, birth arinouncerrents
and first birthdays.
* Call Linda Johnson at 563-5660 for copies.

ASC ICEJIWOODWORKING
"Family Tradition" For Over 75 Years ~ [
ANTIQUE RESTORATION REHNISHING
Custom Furniture and US 19 * H-omosassa * 628-9010
Cabinetry Made to Order vascim niwoodworking.com A
1)_________11___________693617'


"I'm sure people gave him money on the
basis that I said I was supporting him,"
McGee said.
Schultz said the fundraising isn't a mat-
ter of lobbyists finding favor with potential
lawmakers.
"The sophisticated lobbyist finds legisla-
tors and candidates who already support
Savid their positions," he said.
': ,r y Rather, he said, the connections would
give him the opportunity to make an imme-
diate impact if elected without the learn-
ing curve that freshman legislators often
s Sophia encounter.
and Ron "It is what it is," he said. "That's the way
s from the system works in Tallahassee."
WYKE TV, Diaz-Fonseca has raised about half of
Schultz's amount with nearly all of it com-
ing from within the district.
aid, 'I found "The people putting him in office are not
At on board the people of this district," she said of
d. Schultz. "He is so out of touch with the
to Schultz's local constituents that he truly believes his
d clients to allegiance is to people in Tallahassee. I'll
have to let the voters figure that one out"


Officials look into


failure to report


missing child, 11


Girl located
in Wisconsin
Associated Press
TAMPA - The Florida
Department of Children and
Families is investigating why an
11-year-old girl in state foster
care wasn't reported missing
for four months.
"We've asked the inspector
general to investigate this,"
DCF spokesman Al
Zimmerman said Monday.
"Obviously, something was not
done correctly and we're not
happy. We plan to find out what
went wrong, how it went wrong
and who is responsible."
Wisconsin police found
Courtney Alisa Clark safe in a
home in Portage on Thursday.
The following day police found
a malnourished and scalded 11-
year-old boy in a closet at the
home, and they unearthed from
the backyard the body of a 37-
year-old woman presumed to
be his mother
Lake County Sheriff's
Detective Jim Vachon had been


looking for Courtney since she
was reported missing by a child
custody caseworker on Jan. 25.
Vachon said the state contractor
responsible for the girl's case,
the Safe Children Coalition of
Pinellas County, had known
since Oct. 3 that Courtney's
mother took the girl from a fos-
ter family without court
approval.
"Children that are in state
custody need to be seen at a
minimum once every 30 days,"
said Andy Ritter, a spokesman
for the agency's Suncoast
regional office in Tampa.
Vachon got a tip in the case
last week and his call to author-
ities in Portage triggered the
discovery of the injured boy
and the woman's body.
A spokeswoman for the Safe
Children Coalition did not
immediately return calls
Monday.
"It was upsetting they didn't
notify us sooner," Vachon said
Monday "I never did get a real
clear answer on that They were
a little bit difficult to deal with."
Telephone listings for the for-
mer foster family were discon-
nected Monday. They could not
be reached for comment


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Joseph E.
Francis, 71
HOMOSASSA
Joseph E. Francis, 71,
Homosassa, died Sunday, June
17, 2007, at
Cypress Cove
Care Center in
Crystal River.
Born Dec. 2,
1935, to Ger-
trude and Joseph J. Francis in
Buffalo, N.Y, he came to this
area 15 years ago from North
Tonawanda, N.Y.
Mr. Francis retired as
owner/operator of Francis
Home Bakery in North
Tonawanda, N.Y.
He raised pigeons and was a
member of the Central Florida
Pigeon Club. He was a U.S.
Army veteran.
He was Protestant
Survivors include his wife,
Joanne of Homosassa; three
sons, Joseph Francis of
Homosassa, David Francis of
Crystal River, and Daniel and
wife Colleen of N. Tonawanda,
N.Y; five grandchildren, Erica,
Jessica, Angelica, David J. and
Jaci Francis; and two great-
grandchildren, Cameron and
. Emily Francis. Private crema-
,tion arrangements under the
direction of Strickland Funeral
Home, Crystal River.

Irma Harman, 85
HOMOSASSA
Irma Lou Langley Harman,
85, Homosassa, died Sunday,
June 17, 2007, in Hernando.
Born July 11, 1921, in
Carrollton, Ga., to George J.
and Ruth Gentry Langley, she
moved here in 1939 from
Sylvester, Ga.
Mrs. Harman was a 1962
graduate of Central Florida
Junior College, along with sons
Carlis and Charles. She
enjoyed growing roses, African
violets and daylilies, the out-
doors and visiting North
Carolina.
She was a member of the
Church of Christ in Lecanto
and Homosassa Springs.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Clifford James
Harman, on April 24, 1990.
She is survived by three
sons, C. Carlis Harman and
wife Jeanne of Sugarmill
Woods, Charles Harman and
wife Becky of Macon, Ga., and
Lloyd R. Harman and wife
Esther of Charleston, S.C.; two
brothers, William Langley of
Sylvester, Ga., and Theron
Langley of Rosedale, Ga.; two
sisters, Irelle Lane of Colquitt,
Ga., and Doris Cannon of
Albany, Ga.; four granddaugh-
ters, Regina Herron, Christina
Mann, Carla Cellini and Erika
Cloud; and eight great-grand-
children.
Hooper Funeral Homes with
Crematory, Homosassa.

Bertie
McCranie, 67
OCALA
Bertie Mae McCranie, 67,
Ocala, died Saturday, June 16,
2007, at her home in Apex, N.C.
Born Sept 1, 1939, in Cross
Creek to Dewey M. and Lucille
McCranie, she came to this
area 10 years ago from East
Point.
Ms. McCranie was a retired
CAN. She was Pentecostal and
a member of the Ocala Worship
Center. She enjoyed crochet-
ing, crossword puzzles and
geneaology.
She was preceded in death
by her son, Mark Ammerman,
her father, Dewey McCranie,
and her brother, Eugene
McCranie.
She is survived by two sons,
John Ammerman and wife
Linda of New Port Richey, and
David Lolley Kelly and wife
Myra of Mulberry; two daugh-
ters, Carol McCoy and husband
Joe of Apex, N.C., and Joanne
Richards and husband John of
Sumatra; three brothers,
Barney McCranie of Belleview,
Billie McCranie and wife Sally
of Crystal River and Charles
McCranie of Inglis; seven sis-
ters, Shirley Hicks and hus-
band Wayne of East Point,
Sylvia Tanner and husband
Steve of Mulberry, Cindy Pavia
-and husband Joe of Port
Richey, Lucy Brooks and hus-
band David of Dublin, Ga.,
Rosetta Orlando and husband


Roy of Silver Springs, Bonnie
Louiselle and husband Danny
of New Port Richey and Karla
Kirks and husband David of
Hudson; 16 grandchildren; and
13 great-grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Patricia Miller, 68
INVERNESS
Patricia G. Miller, 68,
Inverness, died Sunday, June 17,
2007, at the Hospice Care Unit at
Citrus Memorial hospital.
Born Feb. 4, 1939, in
Burlington, Vt., the daughter of
Miner and Florence (Dugan)


Milo, she moved here in 2001
from Vergennes, Vt
Mrs. Miller worked as an
assembly person for Goodrich
Aerospace in Vergennes, Vt.,
for 25 years and with the
Department of Corrections for
five years in Vergennes, Vt
She was a member of Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness and the
American Legion Post No. 14
Ladies Auxiliary in Vergennes,
Vt. She liked to bowl, knit, cro-
chet, embroider and play
bingo. She loved visiting with
her friends and her grand-
daughters were the love of her
life.
She was preceded in death
by her father, Miner Milo;
mother, Florence Milo; two
brothers, William and Arthur
Milo; two sons Michael and
Arthur Miller; and a grandson,
Michael Miller II.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 48 years, Gerald Miller
of Inverness; granddaughters,
Jacqueline and Deanna Miller
of Bartlesville, Okla.; daughter-
in-law Lynette Miller of
Bartlesville, Okla.; nephews
Robert Milo of Burlington, Vt.,
and Kenneth and David
Bannister of Vergennes, Vt.;
nieces Laurie Stone of
Middlebury, Vt., and Lisa
Moran of Mantville, Ct.; many
cousins; and best friends
Nancy and Kenneth Ruggles.
Heinz Funeral Home and
Cremation, Inverness.

Walter Nelson, 89
HOMOSASSA
Walter E. Nelson, 89,
Homosassa, died Sunday, June
17, 2007, in
Lecanto.
Born Dec.
10, 1917, to
Fred D. and
Edith Bauer
Nelson, he
moved here in 1987 from
Newark, Del.
Mr. Nelson was an engineer
for DuPont. He was a U.S.
Army veteran, serving during
World War II. He was a mem-
ber of Jackson Lodge No. 19
AF&AM, Delaware City, Del.;
past grand master 1971-72,
Delaware; and a life member
of VFW, Homosassa.
He was Methodist
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Ruth Johnston
Nelson, on Jan. 8, 1998.
He is survived'by two daugh-
ters, Charlotte Vegso of
Jacksonville and Margaret
Dills of New Castle, Del.; and
three grandchildren.
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Homosassa.

Veronica Mary
O'Brien, 95
INVERNESS
Veronica Mary O'Brien, 95,
Inverness, died Sunday, June
17, 2007, in Inverness.
She was born Jan. 1, 1912, to
James Rhatigan and Mary Fox
in Brooklyn, N.Y.
She was a homemaker.
She was a member of Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, Inverness.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Morgan James,
on June 13, 1972, and two sis-
ters, Gertrude Sheridan and
Lillian Rhatigan.
Survivors include several
nieces, nephews, great nieces
and great nephews.
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Inverness.

Mary Smit, 74
INVERNESS
Mary Anne Smit, 74,
Inverness, died Thursday, June
14, 2007, in Inverness.
Born May 5, 1933, in East
Chicago, Ill., to Jacob Melvan
and Mary Habzanski, she
moved here in 2002 from
Tampa.
Mr. Smit was a homemaker.
She enjoyed gardening orchids
and playing cards with her
family.
She was Protestant.
She was preceded in death
by two brothers.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 37 years, Martin Smit of
Inverness; three sons, John See
of Crystal River, Jerry Smit of
Brant Lake, N.Y, and Martin J.
Smit Jr. of Melbourne; two
daughters, Pamela Ruth See of


Chicago, Ill., and Denise Sue
Smit of Geneva, Ill.; and four
grandchildren, Mary K. See,
Roberta See, Patricia Smit and
Jacob Smit
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Inverness.

Jerry Roberts, 75
HOMOSASSA


Jerry Lee
Homosassa,
died Friday,
June 15, 2007,
at Oak Hill
Hospital in
Oak Hill.


Roberts, 75,


Born Nov 2, 1931, to Andrew


M. and Hazel A. Roberts, he
came to this area five years ago
from Elgin, Ill.
Mr. Roberts was a retired
plumber. He was a member of
the Local Plumbers &
Pipefitters Union No. 554. He
was a U.S. Marine Corps veter-
an, having served in the
Korean War. He was a member
of the West Citrus Elks Lodge.
He is survived by his son,
Kim Roberts of Sycamore,
Ohio; his companion, Sandy
Schulz of Homosassa; two
brothers, Charles Roberts of
Homosassa and Theron
Roberts of Toledo, Ohio; three
sisters, Frances Harold of
LaPorte, Mich., Peggy Knapp of
Toledo, Ohio, and Betty
Hollister of Elgin, Ill.; four
grandchildren; three great-
grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Ruby Spikula, 92
INVERNESS
Ruby Bowring Spikula, 92,
Inverness, died Sunday, June
17, 2007, at the Hernando-
Pasco Hospice Care Center of
Citrus County.
Born Feb. 8, 1915, in Green
Bay, Wis., to George and Myrtle
(Veeser) Russell, she moved
her in 1987 from Brooksville.
Mrs. Spikula was a home-
maker and Methodist She was
a member of the Order of
Eastern Star, Martha
Washington Chapter No. 124 of
Green Bay, Wis.
She was preceded in death
by her first husband, William
Bowring, in 1980, and her son,
William Bowring, in 2002.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Joseph "Joe" Spikula;
three grandchildren, Tami
Adams, Kim Sykes and Butch
Bowring; and six great-grand-
children, William, Matthew,
Nick, Heather, Ryan and
Matthew.
Chas E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.

Geraldine 'Gerry'
H. Taylor, 73
CRYSTAL RIVER
Geraldine "Gerry" H. Taylor,
73, Crystal River, died
Saturday, June 16, 2007, at
Hospice House in Lecanto.
Born Nov. 20,1933 to Charles
and Olive A. Felgar in
Scottsdale, Pa. She came to this
area 20 years ago from Miami.
She was a homemaker.
She loved being with her
family.
She was a Baptist
Survivors include her hus-
band of 54 years, Joseph Taylor
of Crystal River; two sons, Phil
H. Taylor of Crystal River; and
Thomas S. and wife Debbie of
Ocala; one daughter, Deborah
E. and husband Andy Roush of
Easley, S.C.; three brothers,
Harold and wife Peggy Felgar,
Charles and wife Maria Felgar
and Dennis Felgar, all of Calif.;
two sisters, Nancy and hus-
band Jim Higginbottom of
Alanta, Ga.; and Maxine and
husband Don Williams of Live
Oak; six grandchildren; and
three great-granchildren.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Llewellyn
White, 92
INVERNESS
Llewellyn Breed White, 92,
Inverness, died Saturday, June
16, 2007, in Inverness.
Born in Ruston, La., she
moved here four years ago
from Cleveland, Miss.
Mrs. White was a member of
St. Luke's Methodist Church in
Cleveland, Miss. She had a
master's degree in English
from the University of
Arkansas. She taught school for
43 years, including serving as
an English professor at
Arkansas State College,
Mississippi Valley State and
Delta State University, where
she retired in 1979. She was a
member of Kappa Delta
Sororiety since 1939, a member
of the Cleveland, Miss.,
Women's Club and the Madame
Hodnett Chapter of the
Daughters of the American
Revolution.
She was preceded in death
by a her son, Pat White Jr.
She is survived by compan-


ion, Decker, of Beverly Hills;
two daughters, Ellen Majestic
and husband Jim of Belton,
Texas, and Anne Finnin and


husband Ron of Beverly Hills;
grandson, Daniel Newbury and
wife Kana of Morioka, Japan;
two granddaughters, Rebecca
Finnin of Sandy Springs, Colo.,
and Melissa Finnin of
Manhattan, N.Y; and daughter-
in-law, Merry Ellen White of
Cleveland, Miss.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.

George 'Pete'
Wilson, 57
DUNNELLON
George "Pete" Wilson, 57,
died Friday June 15, 2007, at
Monroe Regional Medical
Center.
He was born in Langdale,
Ala.
He was a Mason and a
Baptist.
Survivors include his son,
David Wilson; daughter,
Shallon Money; father, George
E. Wilson; and two sisters,
Ashley Wilson and Amanda
Wilson.
Roberts Funeral Home,
Dunnellon.

Funeral

NOTICES

Irma Harman. The Service
of Remembrance for Mrs. Irma
Lou Langley Harman, 85,
Homosassa, will be at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 20, 2007, at
the Homosassa Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes with
Mr. Arlin Chapman officiating.
Interment will follow at
Florida National Cemetery at
Bushnell. Friends may call
from 1 p.m. until the time of
service Wednesday at the
Homosassa Chapel.
Bertie McCranie. Funeral
services for Bertie Mae
McCranie, 67, Ocala, will be at
2 p.m. Wednesday, June 20,
2007, at the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal River
with Pastor and brother
Barney McCranie officiating.
Interment will follow the serv-
ice at Cedars of Lebanon
Cemetery in Levy County
Patricia Miller. Visitation for
Patricia G. Miller, 68,
Inverness, will be from 2 to 4
p.m. Wednesday, June 20, 2007,
at Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, 2507 State Road 44
W, Inverness. The funeral serv-
ice will be at 4 p.m. Wednesday,
June 20, 2007, at Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation, Inverness,
with Father Charles Leke pre-.
siding. In lieu of flowers,
please make contributions to
Hospice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Veronica O'Brien. The
Service of Remembrance for
Mrs. Veronica Mary. O'Brien,
95, Inverness, will be at 2 p.m.,
Tuesday, June 19, 2007, at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes. Friends may
call from 1 to 2 pm, Tuesday at
the chapel.
Jerry Roberts. A memorial
service for Jerry Lee Roberts,
75, Homosassa, will be at 11
a.m. Saturday, June 23, 2007, at
the Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River with
the American Legion Post No.
155 Honor Guard conducting
military honors. Private cre-
mation under the direction of
Strickland Funeral Home. In
lieu of flowers, the family sug-
gest a memorial contribution to
the charity of your choice.
Mary Smit The service of
remembrance for Mrs. Mary
Anne Smit, 74, Inverness, will
be at 1 p.m., Wednesday, June
20, 2007, at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. Family will receive
friends from 11 a.m. until the
time of service, Wednesday,
June 20, 2007, at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. Cremation will be
under the direction of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness. Those
who wish may send memorial
donations to Hernando-Pasco
Hospice, 701 Medical Court
East, Inverness, Fl. 34452.
Ruby Spikula. Funeral serv-
ices for Ruby Bowring Spikula,
92, Inverness, will be at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 20,2007, from
the Chas E. Davis Funeral
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Home of Inverness with the
Rev Leary Willis officiating.
Entombment will follow at the
Brooksville Cemetary
Mausoleum. Friends may call
from 1 p.m. until the hour of
service Wednesday at the
funeral home.

Deaths

ELSEWHERE

Sheik
Jamal al-Din
Abdul Karim
al-Dabban, 68
RELIGIOUS LEADER
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Sheik
Jamal al-Din Abdul Karim al-
Dabban, Iraq's top Sunni Arab
religious leader, has died, an
official said. He was 68.
Al-Dabban suffered a heart
attack Sunday in his hometown
of Tikrit, said Ahmed Khalifa,
the spokesman for the gover-
nor of the northern city.
Al-Dabban, who had been
Iraq's Sunni religious leader
since July 2004, was seen as a
moderate who did not play a
significant role in the insur-
gency that followed the U.S.-
led invasion in 2003.
He was arrested by
American forces in 2006, in
what the U.S. military later
said was a case of mistaken
identity
Huge protests erupted in the
streets of Tikrit after the cleric
and his two sons were
detained. They were released
about seven hours later.

Gianfranco
Ferre, 62
FASHION DESIGNER
MILAN, Italy - Gianfranco
Ferre, the Italian designer
known as the "architect of fash-
ion" for his structured, sculpt-
ed shapes and for his ground-
breaking tenure at Christian
Dior, has died, a hospital said.
He was 62.
Ferre was taken to the San
Raffaele hospital in Milan on
Friday after suffering a mas-
sive brain hemorrhage. The
hospital, in a statement author-
ized by Ferre's family, said he
died Sunday night.
Condolences from Italy's top
designers poured in as word of
his death spread - just days
before the menswear spring-
summer 2008 collections were
to get under way in Milan later
this week
Ferre started his career as
an accessories and jewelry
designer, and then moved on to
clothes. His unofficial title as
Italy's architect of fashion
came thanks to the degree in
architecture he obtained in
1969 from Milan's Polytechnic
Institute that inspired his
designs.
He started his own company
in the mid-1970s, but his major
leap came in 1989, when he
was tapped by Bernard Arnault
to be the top designer for
Christian Dior. At the time, it
was almost unheard of for a
non-French designer to take
the reins of the venerable
Parisian house. Ferre stayed
on at Dior until the fall of 1996,
when he returned to Milan to
tend to his own men's and
women's collections.
Ferre's style was based on
simple and structured lines,
and the white bloifse became
one of his trademarks.

Norman
Hackerman, 95
EDUCATOR
AUSTIN, Texas - Norman
Hackerman, a chemist who
served as president of both the
University of Texas and Rice
University, died Saturday, Rice
said. He was 95.
Hackerman joined UT as an
assistant professor in 1945 and
rose through the ranks, serving
as president from 1967 to 1970.


AIRPORT

-TAXI


Funeral Home
With Crematory
ALFRED WILSON
Services: Wed., 6/27 2:30pm
Florida National Cemetery
FRANK TOMPETRINI
Private Cremation Arrangements
CLIFFORD P. CLARK, Jr.
Arrangements Pending
PAUL K. ANDERSON
Services: Stoneboro, PA
DARRELL W. HECKERT
Private Cremation Arrangements
DAVID MacDONALD
Private Cremation Arrangements
MARY S. WALSH
Services & Burial In Pawling, NY
PAUL KOVAL
Private Cremation Arrangements
RUBY BOWRING
Service: Wed., 2pm - Chapel
Burial: Brooksville Cemetery
726-8323 ,


He then moved to Houston,
where he led Rice from 1970 to
1985.
A recipient of the National
Medal of Science, Hackerman
developed equipment to
homogenize milk and was a
known expert on metal corro-
sion.
After graduating from Johns
Hopkins University with a
Ph.D. in chemistry in 1935, he
taught chemistry at Loyola
College in Baltimore and
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
before joining the Manhattan
Project to develop a nuclear
weapon during World War II.
At Texas, Hackerman helped
build the school's reputation
and research budget He creat-
ed a computer science pro-
gram and increased the
school's libraries while presid-
ing over an era of political tur-
moil related to the Vietnam
War
At Rice, Hackerman helped
stabilize the financially strug-
gling institution and presided
over the opening of a graduate
school of management, a music
school and the reorganization of
other parts of campus. Officials
said the university's endow-
ment increased fourfold during
his tenure, while the school
added 229 faculty members and
increased the number of
endowed chairs from 21 to 60.

Charles Lee
Remington, 85
BIOLOGIST
HARTFORD, Conn. -
Charles Lee Remington, a
leading biologist in the study of
butterflies and moths, has died.
He was 85.
Remington, who taught at
Yale University for more than
four decades, serving most
recently as emeritus professor
of ecology and evolutionary
biology, died May 31, his wife,
Ellen Mahoney, told The
Associated Press on Sunday.
In his research, he suggested
that there were geographic
regions where species tended
to hybridize. He said species of
all different types of plants,
insects and mammals might
conceivably hybridize with
close relatives.
The idea was soon consid-
ered discredited, but has been
recently revived.
As curator at the Peabody
museum, Remington is credit-
ed with establishing a signifi-
cant insect collection. It is
known for its large numbers of
specimens and rare holdings
such as the world's largest col-
lection of insects that are part
male and part female, known
as gynandromorphs.
Remington also established
the first cicada preserve in the
United States, near Sleeping
Giant State Park in Hamden.
During his military service
in World War II, Remington
served as a medical entomolo-
gist in the Pacific, researching
afflictions such as insect-borne
epidemics and centipede bites
on servicemen in the
Philippines.


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CrrRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS CouN'n' (FL) CHRONICLE


Man indicted on 26
counts of animal cruelty
LOS ANGELES -A Los Angeles
man was indicted Monday on 26
counts of animal cruelty and practic-
ing veterinary medicine without a
license for allegedly abusing cats,
dogs and other animals, some of
which were smothered to death or
left to die in trash bins, authorities
said.
Young Sam Park, 52, pleaded
not guilty in Los Angeles County
Superior Court to 23 felony counts
and three misdemeanor counts out-
lined in the grand jury indictment.
Park, who remains in custody on
$451,000 bail, faces a maximum of
22 years in state prison if convicted.
The Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals launched an
investigation of Park in January
2005 after it received numerous
complaints.
The case eventually was turned
over to investigators in the office of
the Los Angeles County district
attorney.
The grand jury indictment alleged
more than a dozen detailed acts of
animal cruelty, including suffocating
a Chihuahua with a rubber glove,
choking a cocker spaniel and throw-
ing a kitten against a pole. Park also
is accused of performing operations
in which he used wire to stitch up a
pit bull, clipped the ears of numer-
ous dogs without anesthesia and
used concrete and plaster to cast
broken limbs of animals.
Fake firefighter given
prison sentence
NEW YORK-A man who
dressed in firefighter's gear to bluff
his way into a co-worker's apartment
on Halloween night and then sexual-
ly tortured her over 13 hours was
sentenced Monday to 20 years to
life in prison.
Peter Braunstein, 43, stood
before the judge and provided his
take about what happened, saying
he had a death wish as he carried
out the attack in Manhattan and


other crimes while on the lam in
Ohio and Tennessee.
Dressed as a firefighter,
Braunstein set fires in the hallway
outside his victim's Manhattan apart-
ment as a ruse to gain access inside
her home on Halloween 2005. He
then drugged her, tied her to a bed,
stripped her naked, and videotaped
her.
Braunstein's attorney argued that
his client was so mentally ill that he
was incapable of forming the intent
to commit the crime and therefore
should not be held criminally respon-
sible. The defense showed jurors
brain scans to prove their point that
Braunstein was mentally ill.
Pregnant woman
missing from Ohio
NORTH CANTON, Ohio--A
pregnant woman vanished from her
home, leaving behind broken fumi-
ture, a pool of bleach on the floor
and just one witness - a 2-year-old
son who told police, "Mommy's cry-
ing ... Mommy's in the rug."
Investigators would not elaborate
on the meaning of the child's state-


ment, but a bed comforter was
missing from Jessie Davis' home.
Authorities said Monday they had
no suspects in the disappearance of
Davis, 26, who is nine months preg-
nant.
Davis' mother, Patricia Porter,
was the last person to have a con-
versation with Davis when she
spoke to her daughter Wednesday
by phone. Police and 60 to 70 vol-
unteers searched over the weekend
but found no leads.
Scientist awarded
World Food Prize
DES MOINES, Iowa -A scien-
tist who developed new ways to
process, transport and store large
amounts of fruits and vegetables
while maintaining their nutritional
value was announced Monday as
winner of the 2007 World Food
Prize.


COOling Off


~ '-3- - .-- . ' - ~ -.. ~ ~ . E
-- ' . - - W .


Shuttle cleared


to undock with


space station


Philip E. Nelson, a professor at
Purdue University in Indiana,
received the $250,000 award that
recognizes people who help
improve the availability and quality
of food throughout the world.
Nelson pioneered technologies
that reduce post-harvest waste and
spoilage and that have allowed the
vegetable and fruit packing industry
to move from a system of packag-
ing fresh items once a year to ship-
ping products year-round. The
technologies include aseptic, or
commercially sterile, storage meth-
ods that kill food-spoiling germs.
He also developed carbon steel
tanks used to store perishable food
at ambient temperatures. The
tanks, which can be up to six sto-
ries high, are coated with an epoxy
resin, a substance that helps keep
them pathogen-free.
Two plead guilty
on eve of mob trial
CHICAGO - Two men accused
of working with the Chicago mob
pleaded guilty on Monday on the
eve of the city's biggest organized
crime trial in years.
The guilty pleas leave five
defendants in the racketeering con-
spiracy case, scheduled to go to
trial today. The case is based on
an FBI investigation of 18 long
unsolved murders that federal
prosecutors tie to the Chicago
Outfit, the city's organized crime
family.
Neither man was among the
most prominent defendants.
Nicholas Ferriola, 32, pleaded
guilty to racketeering, bookmaking
and squeezing extortion payments
from a Chicago restaurant. Joseph
Venezia, 64, pleaded guilty to run-
ning a gambling business and hid-
ing the proceeds from the IRS.
- From wire reports


Associated Press
HOUSTON - Space shuttle
Atlantis was cleared to depart
the international space station
after a test Monday showed
Russian computers that crashed
last week can control the out-
post's orientation.
Officials examined test data
and decided the crucial com-
puters controlled the station's
thrusters properly. Atlantis is
scheduled to undock today with
a planned return to Cape
Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday.
"Everything looked pretty
good," said NASA spokesman
Kyle Herring 'There was noth-
ing that would give them any
level of concern."
During the test, the space
shuttle's thrusters took control
of the joined craft so it could
change positions to.dump waste
and water Afterward, thrusters
on the Russian side of the space
station took over During the
third part of the test, U.S. com-
puters sent commands to the
Russian thrusters before the
station's gyroscopes took over
control.
"That's a big step in our
checkout of the computers to
make sure everything is work-
ing correctly," flight director
Holly Ridings said Monday. "It's
one of those things we want to
see before we undock"
The revived computers had
not commanded the Russian
thrusters since last Tuesday,


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Nation BRIEFS


when six computer processors
in the two systems started crash-
ing. During the computer melt-
down, Atlantis' thrusters helped
maintain the station's orienta-
tion.
The computers were brought
back to life over the weekend,
but NASA and Russian man-
agers wanted to make sure
Atlantis wasn't needed for
another day to give engineers on
the ground more time to figure
out the problem. Some lights,
cameras and computers had
been turned off on the space
shuttle to preserve power in
case the extra day was required.
The computers also control
life support systems such as an
oxygen generator, temperature
and a carbon dioxide scrubber
Except for the oxygen generator,
all the space station systems
were turned back on over the
weekend. Oxygen for the crews
has come from other sources,
such as a cargo ship on the
Russian side of the station.
Atlantis' crew on Monday fin-
ished packing the shuttle for the
return trip to Earth. They were
given some free time Monday
morning to enjoy the view on
their last full day in the space
station.
The shuttle's seven astro-
nauts and the station's three
crew members were set to say
their goodbyes before hatches
between Atlantis and the out-
post are closed in preparation
for today's departure.


Associated Press
Lifeguard Allison Newsom takes a dip in the swimming
pool Monday in Remingsburg, Ky., after clearing the pool
of swimmers for a 10-minute break.


CONGRATULATIONS
MATTHEW:BRYAN KLINE
Matthew was home schooled by his mom from first grade through High School. His
annual testing and evaluations resulted in him carrying straight "A's throughout his
Jr. and Sr. High School years. During his eleventh and twelfth grades, he attended
Central Florida Community College as a dual enrollment student. He earned the
prestigious nomination into the Kappa Nu Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa International
Honor Society, as well as a member of the CFCC Dean's list every semester. He
recently graduated High School with his Associate of Arts degree from CFCC.
Through Matthew's excellence and steadfastness, he will be receiving a full Florida
Bright Futures Scholarship. Matthew works at the Crystal River Walgreen's and plans
to attend University of Florida's School of Pharmacy.
Words cannot e',.:, ri,. .t.ihr, i.�' . f n i b,.j ,IT' ' yIves everyday, .t has
been a . ',1. , 1 .. . i I, -.... r,. . - r . l r i ,c 1' e'... gn of your fe. You
are qa ,i'i l . I.' : 'i ", i ',',' proud otf ILt'i n .icess and d npw even
readerr rewards i4,ri,,r, oln,' .,r (iiGod r, -r " , , ,, control. We love and
adore lou.
IAom. VDaa. Heather I " ,ws2


Citrus Medical Associates is now...


Welcoming Now Pationts!


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Nolan West Main St.

Toth a
a) CITRUS
S--" !M :..J MEMORIAl
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Family Practice HS. A
W. Hi
Suite 216-A
Most Major Med
216-A & B S. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34452


HISTORIC
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W. GraceSt. S
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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 7A


NATION











RA r.7.- 1,,-, 1 Q?00-


STOCKS


&$ Tui-sAY, J UN19 .~, 2007".'


CITRUS) OU CHRONICLE


MOST ACTIVE ($i oR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
FordM 371391 8.85 -.07
Pfizer 356702 26.26 -.21
EMCCp 288143 17.79 +.44
GenElec 242996 38.07 -.05
AT&TInc 219823 40.01 -.27

GAINERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HarvNRes 13.50 +3.68 +37.5
Fortress n 25.57 +2.10 +8.9
Lennox 34.84 +2.73 +8.5
Gensco 53.75 +4.15 +8.4
Magnetek 5.20 +.38 +7.9

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
LeoEnt 21.48 -2.45 -10.2
C&D Tch 5.19 -.30 -5.5
TOUSA 4.13 -.23 -5.3
*HuttigBId 7.47 -.41 -5.2
KBWIncn 30.16 -1.55 -4.9


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


DIARY

1,737
120
3,436
279
19
2 45B9R6101


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 797995 152.89 -.18
iShR2Knya 536435 84.17 -.16
iSh2OTB 176912 83.52 -.17
PrUShQQQnl38189 45.74 +.05
SPEngy 115683 71.06 +.08

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ATechCer 23.99 +7.18 +42.7
NovaBion 2.41 +.29 +13.7
IdaGnM n 6.15 +.55 +9.8
AMDL hrs 3.87 +.34 +9.6
SeabGldg 19.49 +1.64 +9.2

LOSERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ZionO&G n 6.22 -.71 -10.2
OrsusXel n 3.35 -.35 -9.5
Vicon 9.60 -.90 -8.6
lntrSrch n 2.26 -.21 -8.5
BPZ Egy n 6.00 -.50 -7.7

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


411l
602
124
1,267
98
20
356.798.703


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ627906 47.77 +.04
Intel 554102 24.17 -.07
Yahoo 553554 28.12 +.81
SunMicro 443809 5.05
Cisco 442161 2721 -.18

GAINERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Vical 5.95 +.96 +19.2
InPlay 2.35 +.37 +18.7
LMI Aer 24.02 +3.46 +16.8
CoastFin 3.48 +.48 +16.0
Datawatch 6.07 +.83 +15.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EncysiveP 2.32 -1.78 -43.4
US EnSys If 3.11 -1.05 -25.2
RurlCellA 37.94 -4.30 -10.2
ACmdLn n 24.50 -2.63 -9.7
Devcon 3.09 -.30 -8.8

DIARY


Advanred
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1,597
166
3,175
143
37
1,691,717,857


Here are the 825 most active htock' on ihe Nes Yifork Stock Etcrarigu, 765 most active on 1he
Natdaq Nacrinal Market and 116 mosil a ive or the American SIloXk Exchange Stocks in bold
are *orin ai leait 55 and changed 5 percent or more in prc;e Onderinig for 50 most active-
on NYSE and NasOaq arid 25 mrTost active on Amex. Tables show name, pr.ce and nel change,
and one to two addlionrail ielu rotaated inrougn the aeek as follow


Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock. D3ased on latest
quarterly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise lornoiled.
Name: Stocks appear alphabenctally Dy Irn company lull name
inot its abbrevialion) Names consisting of minials appear at the
beginning of each letter's list
Last: Price stock was trading at whan exchange closedd t.:'r the day
Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by


D. 'a


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Dividend Footnotes. 3b.irra ijidini and, e.6er'sd ta sir nai o..Iu.1 t, Arr,,i..irary-
1,pjl tck L44.r,'3 l,,-den-i A . cmoufc.,n 1'icaA..1or 5r I.n ilest 12 m,,ni,, I .-
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cdsue wirrn, dierO.1; Ir, . iycnsrn ,currE,. crnuei or,, emrich eas. urj,ma &j tOy ml'i I
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app~cdots ;ah val eorait-bllbltir3tJr, ,lctv
up~.ii.3t cch slsa Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


I ~~~STOCS O OA ITRS


YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name


AT&T Inc 1.42
BkofAm 2.24
CapCtyBk .70
Citigrp 2.16
Disney .31
EKodak .50
ExxonMbl 1.40
FPL Grp 1.64
FlaRock .60
FordM
GenElec 1.12
GnMotr 1.00
HomeDp .90
Intel .45
IBM 1.60
Lowes s .32
McDnIds 1.00


-.27 +11.9
-.17 -6.5
+.09 -9.1
-.02 -3.1
+.14 +3.0
+.37 +15.0
+.42 +12.7
-.69 +11.4
-.14 +59.7
-.07 +17.8
-.05 +2.3
-.36 +11.7
+.01 -5.5
-.07 +19.4
+.24 +8.4
+.10 +1.6
+.23 +18.2


YTD
Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg


Microsoft .40


Microsoft .40
Motorola .20
Penney .80
ProgrssEn 2.44
RegionsFnl.44
SearsHldgs ...
SprintNex .10
TimeWarn .22
UniFirst .15
VerizonCmI.62
Wachovia 2.24
WalMart .88
Walgrn .31


+.02 +2.2
-.22 -11.8

-.60 -2.9

-,34 -3.4
-.11 -8.0
+.49 +4.5
+.34 +18.6
-.01 -4.1
+.74 +12.1
-.44 +14.3
+.06 -5.0
-.23 +6.3
+.01 -3.5


52-Week Net % YTD 52-wk
High Low Name Last Chg Chg % Chg % Chg
13,692.00 10,683.32 Dow Jones Industrials 13,612.98 -26.50 -.19 +9.23 +24.41
5,348.47 4,134.72 Dow Jones Transportation 5,135.75 -41.23 -.80 +12.62 +11.37
537.12 400.41 Dow Jones Utilities 502.81 -5.27 -1.04 +10.08 +24.31
10,068.29 7,708.11 NYSE Composite 10,005.47 -8.46 -.08 +9.48 +27.45
2,393.76 1,800.65 Amex Index 2,342.78 +5.53 +.24 +13.92 +27.23
2,630.51 2,012.78 Nasdaq Composite 2,626.60 -.11 ... +8.75 +24.46
1,540.56 1,219.29 S&P 500 1,531.05 -1.86 -.12 +7.95 +23.46
856.39 668.58 Russell 2000 " 846.28 -1.91 -.23 +7.44 +24.31
15,578.36 12,249.90 DJ Wilshire 5000 15,464.40 -17.49 -.11 +8.46 +24.01


em S A


Div Name Last Chg

20e ABB Ltd U22.14 -.11
1.08f ACELtd 62.17 -.20
... AESCplf 21.78 -.30
.821 AFLAC 52.74
AGCO u45.12 +.42
1.64 AGLRes 40.44 -.14
... AKSteel 35.04 -.25
. AMR 25.56 -.35
1.00e ASALtd 65.50 +.20
1.42 AT&TInc 40.01 -.27
1.75 AT&T41dd 25.02 +.02
.09r AUOpton u17.67 +.03
1.42e AXA 43.79 -.03
1.30 AbtLab 54.54 -.18
.70 AberFtc 77.56 -.20
, AbiAiUo 3.06 +.16
.351 Aocenture 41.51 +1.51
.90e AdamsEx u15.08 -.02
... AdvMOpt 33.63 -.72
AMD 13.51 -.12
.. AdvSemi u6.95 +.12
1.80 AdvEngy 13.90 +.42
. AecomTcnu26.00 +129
.041 Aetna 50.50 +.27
2.06t AgLent u38.90 +.18
.121 Agnioog 36.80 +.05
.11 Agriurng u42.31 +.03
... ol 13.18 +.09
.. AirTran 11.36 +.07
.42 Albemrars 38.58-1.29
.80 Alcan 83.55 +70
.42e AlcatelLuc 13.62 +.16
,68 Alcoa 41.88 +.28
.52 AllegTch 109.12 -1.08
..40 .Aergan 118.54 +.33
1.64 Amlete 47.17 -.43
... AiiData 77.57 +27
.. AiancOne" 10.22 -.41
1.02a AIdiBGIbHi 13.59 +.09
.60 AUiBInco 8.14 +.03
4.15e AlliBem 86.53 -1.77
... AldWaste 13.97 +.06
1.52 Allstate 61.62 +.24
.50 Alftel 67.80 +.08
... AlphaNRs 19.28 -.82
. Alphanr 26.29 +.64
2.76 AltrMas 70.16 -.51
.97e AlChinas 41.24 -1.27
.72 AmbacF 88.48 -.01
... Amdocs 38.74 +.39
2.54 Ameren 50.06 -.37
... Ameigrp 25.18 +.92
.18e AMoviL u64.08 +.15
.401 AEagIeOs 26.87 +.86
1.56 AEP 45.37 -.90
.60 AmExp 63.14 -.63
.76 AFridRT 10.49 -.20
4.48f1 AnmHmMtg 22.99 +.53
.801f ArnlnlGplf 72.50 -.04
.72 AmStand 59.72 -.18
.78a AmSlP3 11.70
... AmTower 42.83 -.10
Amn... niodt 27.38 -.35
2.441 Amerigas 36.98 -.33
.20 AmeriBrg 50.42 -.07
.36 Anadarko u54.90 +1.05
.72 AnalogDev 37.68 +.03
.62e AnglogldA 40.70 -.19
S-1.18 Anheusr 54.30 +1.41
... AnnTaylr 37.39 +.67
.66e Annaly 14.12 +.09
S .60 AonCorp 42.69 +.25
S.60 Apache u87.08 -22
2.40 Aptinv 51.10 -.40
.17 ApplBio 28.75 -.31


.46 AquaAm 22.18 -.50
Aquila 4.26
1.30 A meorMit u65.00 +.73
.281 ArchCoal 37.25-1.82
.46 ArchDan 34.75 +.18
1.81 ArchstnSm 59.40 -.32
.84 AshfordHT 11.53 -.13
1.10a Ashland 62.96 +.56
.68 AsdEstat 15.35 +.38
1.28 ATMOS 30.38 -.18
,92b AutoData 48.87 -.29
AutoZone u139.31 +1.92
... Avava 17.06 -.09
Avnet 42.70 -.42
.74 Avon 38.22 -.16
.66 AXIS Cap 39.02 +.13
1.68 BB&TCp 41.76 +.02
.77e BHPBilILt u58.60 +.73
.20 BJSvcs 28.90 -.19
BMCSft 31.66 -.30
2.42e BP PLC 69.27 -.02
2.48 BRT 28.74 -.08
.52 BakrHu u89.36 +1.35
.40 BallCp 54.50 -.20
.83e BcBilVArg 24.67 -.07
.11i BcBradess 25.94 +.11
,M8e Bnootau 45.64 -.06
2.24 BkolAm 49.91 -.17
.88 BkNY 42,03 -.11
.56f Barnes u33.89 -.30
.301 BarrickG 29.05 -.03
.52 BauschLff 68.60 -.43
.67 Baxter 57.80 -.08
2.16 BaytexEg 19.72 +.16
1.28 BearSt 147.95 -2.14
.. BearingPf 7.63 +.06
.40 BeazrHm 30.82 -.96
.260f Berkley 32.20 -.27
.40 BestBuy 48.01 +24
... Bigots 29.91 -.31
1.68 BlackD 88.36 -.09
1.36 B[kHillsCp 40.67 -.08
.45a BIkFL08 14.47 -.01
.571 BlockHR 23.33 +.22
... Blockbslr 4.60 +.02
.57e BlueChp 6.23 -.02
1.40 Boeing 97.40 -.75
.44 Borders 19.40 -.13
... BosBeer u40.21 -.20
2.72a BostProp 107.82 -1.62
... BostonSci 16.35 -.03
.80 Bowat 26.43+1.27
1.76 Brandlyw 29.76 +.03
.36 Boinkers 30.56 +.03
1.12 BrMySq 30.31 -.45
.60b Brunswick 33.77 -.03
... BdBear 22.80 +.08
.681 BongeLt 81.89 +.43
1.00 BurdNSF 87.29 -1.06
.16 CAInc 25.68 -.17
... CBREIs 39.29 -.11
.88 CBSB u33.39 +.16
.08 CFInds u55.77 +.81
2.16 CHEngy 45.47 -.46
.041 CIGNAs 54.62 +16
1.00 CITGp 57.61 -.47
.20 CMSEng 17.32 -.33
.561 CSS Inds 39.76 -1.70
.60f CSXs 44.73 -.33
.241 CVS Care 37.34 -.29
.121 CabotOs u41.88 +.04,
... Calgon u11.73 +.08
.28 CaJllGolf 1824 +.22
.20 Camecogs 54.35-1.25
... Cameron 73.30 -.07
.80 CampSp 39.28 -.10
.34 CdnNRsg9 U69.32 -.47


2.28 Canelicg 16.51 +.23 .50a DiaOffs u10025 +1.03 ... ExooRes u19.48 +.15
.11 CapOne 81.85 +1.10 .16 Dillards 34.90 +.04 1.76 Exelon 73.82 -.66
2.401 CapitlSrce 25.02 -.33 .. DirecTV 23.12 -.24 1,40f ExxonMbl u86.36 +A42
1.26 CapMplB 12.89 -.03 ., Discoverwi 29.93 +.85 1.64 FPLGrp 60.61 -.69
.481 CardnlHth 70,01 +.06 .311 Disney 34,54 +14 ... FairchldS u20.00 +.90
CarMaxs 23.13 -.14 .20 DollarG 21.79 -.01 .46 FamilyDur 35.08 +.02
1.401 Carnival 49.66 -.05 284 DomRes 84.59 -1.04 2.001 FannieMIf u69.49 +.74
1.441 Caterpillar u81.85 +.74 .48a Domninoss 18.63 -.19 .40f FedExCp 109.92 -1.45
.16 Celanese 37.30 -.17 .. Domtarglf ull.29 +.04 .24 FedSignI 15.80 -.23
.75e Cemexs u40.72 -.10 .36 Donldson 34.36 +.05 2.00 Fereligs 23.98 -.09
1.30e Cemigpfs u21.84 +.13 ... DoralFnd 1.61 +01 .58 Ferro u24.96 +.24.
Centene 20.02 -.31 .74 Dover 52.64 -.72 .20 FidNInfo 54.18 +.17
.68 CenterPnt 17.85 -.21 1.681 DowChm 45.06 -.31 .12. FirstDatas 32.72 +.23
.16 Centex 43.13 -.66 ... DresserR U39.15 -.04 1.63e FstRnFd 13.88 -.09
.26 CntryTel 49.21 +.14 1.48 DuPont 51.75 +.28 1.80 FstHorizon 39.02 +.17
ChmpE 10.81 +.31 .84 DukeEgys 18.68 -.30 1.60 FTrFid 18.80 +07
.01 Checkpnt 25.90 -.58 1.90 DukeRIty 36.99 -.58 2.00 FirstEngy 65.72 -1.18
.20 Chemtura 11.01 -.09 .. Dynegy 9.49 -.12 .60 FlaRock 68.73 -.14
.271 ChesEng u37.59 +.27
2.32f Chevron u83.39 +22
.. Chices 25.54 +.13
.271 ChinaLfes 51.84 +1.75
,99e ChinaMble 50.97 +1.60
.23e ChinaUni u16.31 +.63
1.16 Chubb 54.06 +.10
1.31e ChungTel 18.97 -.12
... CinciBell 5.90 +.10
.16 CircCity 16.53 -.17
.72a ItadBr . +.45
2.16 Citar 5396 -.02
1.00 CtComm 15.24 +10
.75 ClearChan 38.30 -.04
.50 CvClfs s 77.90 -2.84
.. Coach 48.63 -.06
.24 CoceCE 23.05
1.36 CocaCi 51.76 +18 l
. Coeur 3.74 +.02
1.44f ColgPal 66.38 -.25
.54 Collntln 8.21
.52 CmcNJ 33.26 -.07
.36 CrmdMds 34.54 +.17
.61e CVRD u47.55 +.60
.61e CVRDpf u39.96 +.69
.,. CompS7 55.23 +.08
.40 Con-Way 54.04 -.78
.72 ConAgra 25.73 -.07 3 .0 ES a Ie ew eIF r sl .37+.09
1.64 ConocPhil 80.69 +.17
.28 ConsolEngy 48.30 +.352 aig HI H :N B D IN aR
2.32 ConEd 46.93 -.44
... ConstellA 24.21 +.20 1.25r MCsg m 8 &2 -5
1.74 ConstellEn 89.04 -.99
CDTAirB 32.90 -.19 Fie w e 56 -4 2 F ried - Watch
Cnvrgys 24.91 +.22
.84 Coopers u57.06 +.01
.. Coming 26.22 -.12
.60 CntwdFn 39.34 +.91 ... EMCCpO 17.79 +.44 .41e FEMSAs 40.35 +1.00
CoventyH 59.00-1.45 .36 EOGRes u80.26 -.23 .50 FootLockr 21.37 +.23
1.50 CresRE 22.25 -.11 1.76 EastChm 65.32 +.67 ... FordM 8.85 -.07
CrwnCstle 36237 +1.02 .50 EKodak 29.68 +.37 3.40e FrdgCCTg 30.70-1.30
.72 Cumminss 96.52 -.97 .46 Enolab 43.63.. .. ForestLab 47.90 -.14
CypSem 22.26 +.25 1.16 Edisonlnt 55.72 -.51 ... ForestOl 44.28 +.30
^__ -__ .80 Edwards 87.47 +24 .12p Forbless n 25.57 +2.10
I= .16 EIPasoCp u17.18 +.10 1.56 FortuneBr 82.83 +2.06
.64 DCTIndIn 10.74 -.24 ... Elan u21,68 +.18 .20 Fdtnoal 40.76 -2.04
.78 DNPSelct 10.99 -.03 .20 EDS 27.85 -.01 .60 FrankRes 133.37 +1.09
1.04 DPL 2924 -.21 1.05 EmersniEsu4900 +.30 2.00 FredMac 64.35 -.65
.60 DRHorton 21.26 -.10 1.28 ErpDist 22.51 -.10 1.25a FMCG u83.52 -.90
.12 DRSTech 55.82 +1.52 ... Emulex u22.52 +.10 .48 Frermonllf 12.46 -.03
2.12 DTE 50.76 -.62 3.70 EnbrEPtrs 55.68 +1.40 .20 FfiedBR 6.41
2.003 DaimlrC 92.15 +.06 .80 EnCana u65.96 +.26 .201 FrontOils u44.27 +.41
.121 Danaher 74.64 +.43 3.29e Endesa 53.53 +.17 7.55e Fronlline 45.50 +.71
.46 Darden u47.08 +.22 ... EnPro 41.75 -1.02 .261 FulleiHBs 27.93 -.81
15.00eDeanFdss 31".58 +.35 .10 ENSCO 62.30 -.45 - -aI_
1.76 Deere 122.02 +.27 2.16 Entergy 110.69 -1.65 1 ---1� 1 -
.16 DelMnte 12.24 +.22 .16 Equifax 44.20 -.03 .96 GATX 49.95 -.29
... DeltaAirn 18.54 -.34 1.00 Eqtylnn 19.82 +.14 .80a GabelliET 10.23 -.02
2.64 DevDv 54,90 -1.04 1.85 EqtyRsd 46.54 -.57 .72 GabUtI 9.80 +.04
.56 DevonE u83,53 +1.17 ... GameStopsu40.18 +.97


1.24 Gannett 57.22 -.55
.32 Gap 19.04 +.07
Gateway 1.72 +.02
, Genenlch 76.83 -.17
1.16 GenDynam 79.56 -.69
1.12 GenElec 38.07 -.05
1.80 GnGrthPrp 54.65 -1.82
1.48 GenMills 59.92 +.32
1,00 OnMoIr 34.30 -.36
1.56 GMdb33 24.71 +.11
.38 GMcv09n 26.77 -.13
.. Gensco u53.75 +4.15
.36 Genworth 35.81 -.15
1.50 GaPw8-44 24.42 +.15
.66e Gerdau u25.25 +.03
1.89e GlaxoSKIn 52.48 -.27
.90 GlobalSFe u72.35 +.68
.59e GolUnhas 33.32 +.84


.28e GoldFLtd 16.34 -.06
.18 Goldcrpg 24,69 -.14
1.40 GoldmanS 226.97 +.78
.80 Goodrich 57.12 -.97
... Goodyear 34.97 -.35
.66 Graco 41.01 +.33
. GrafTech 16.27 -.13
.. GrantPrde u59.44 +.17
1.66 GtPlainEn 29.50 -.07
... Griffon 22.71 -.02
.66e GpTelevisa 28.74 +.19
62e GuangRy 40.32 +.25
.84 HRPTPrp 10.95 -.11
.361 Hallbtn s 35.92 -.45
.91e HanJS 14.40 +.06
.47 HanPtDiv 8.68 -.03
.58a HanPtDv2 10.93 -.11
.. Hanesbrtin 27.42 +.18
.301 Hanoverins 48.52 -.31
2.13e Hanson 106.97 +.27
1.00f HarleyD 60.82 +.01
. HarmonyG 14.26 +.36


1.60 HarrahE 85.33 +.18
.44 HamsCorp u53.14 +.35
2.00 HartfdFn 102.10 -.02
... HarvNRes 1350 +3.68
.64 Hasbro 30.99 -.45
1.24 HawallEl 23,29 -.12
1.78 HIthCrPr 28.96 -.81
2.64 HItCrREIT 40.79 -.53
10.00e HltMgts 11.36
2.64a HlthcrRIty 28.90 -.41
. HtllhSprg 18.61 -.15
HeclaM 8.29 +.08
.. HelixEn 41.01 +.16
. HellnTel 15.31 +.02
.18 HelmPays u35.56 +.34
... Hercules 19.06 -.28
1.08 Hershey 51.17 +.10
... Hertzn u25.03 +.88


.40 Hess 60.41 -.59
.32 HewletP 45.89 +.18
. Hexcel 22.12 -.34
1.70 HighwdPrp 39.91 -.74
.16 Hlton 34.91 -.33
.90 HomeDp 37.96 +.01
1,00 HonwIlInI 57.81 -1.06
3,04f HospPT 42.03 -.49
.80a HostHotis 23.58 -.34
... HovnanE 19.93 -.41
... Humana 62.55 +2.36
.49e ICICI Bk 47.15' +.48
.12 IMSHIlth 32.65 -.08
.87e iShBrazil u62.92 +.26
.47e iShFrance 38.65 +.06
.32e IShHK 17.02 +.04
.10e iShJapan 14.61 -.03
.33e iShKor u62.18 +28
.20e iShMalasia 12.02 +.15
.31e iShSing u13.83 +.01
.31e iShTaiwan u15,51 -.01
.81e iShUK u25.68 +.09


1.31e iShChin25u125.56 +2.83
2.40e iShSP500 153.79 -.08
1.58e iShEmMklu132.54 +.12
1.53e iShEAFE 81.24 +.45
3.05e IShREst 80.78 -1.22
3.301 Star 46.61 -.68
.56 ITTCorp 68.49 -.88
1.20 Idaoorp 32.44 -.20
1.37 Idearcn 36.01 -.06
.84 ITW 55.32 -.04
.64f Imaton 37.88 -.49
.40m ImpacMtg 6.38 +.10
2.00 Indymac 32.27 -.34
... Infineon u16.31 +.21
.72 IngerRd u54.75 +2.39
2.64 IntegrysE 52.88 -.40
.. IntcntlEx 154.43 -2.55
1.60f IBM 105.33 +.24
.. IngCoal 6.20 -.11
.52 IntiGame 39.18
1.03 IntPap 38.62 +.29
t... i flf"35.65 +.10
.. Interpublic 11.74 +.14
.. IronMtns 26.52 +.46

1.521 JPMorCh 50.43 -.13
28 Jabil 20.33 -.25
.04 JanusCap u28.85 +72
1.661 JohnJn 62.33 -.44
1.32 JohnsnCtI 113.42 -.02
... K2Inc u15.43 +.03
1.03 KB Home 43.40 -.27
... KBR Incn 28.063 +.53
.48 Kaydon u53.07 +1.92
1.241 Kellogg 51.92 -25
.64 Kellwood 29.27 +.07
1.46 Keycorp 36.17 +.11
1.90 KeySpan 41.88 -.06
2.12 KimbClk 6927 -.11
1.44 imrco 41.35 -1.21
3.32 KIndME 5420 -.10
... ingPhrm 21.04 -.13
... nrossg 13.16 -.01
... Kohls 70.85 -.58
1.03 Kraft 35.11 -.20
... pKrm -8.51 +.01
.301 Kioger 3029 -.38
.. LG Phiips 23.72 -.31
.03l LLERy 1.55 +.03
... LSI Cor 8.35 +.10
1.50 LTCPkp 23.49 -.26
.48 LaZy 11.64 -.22
1.46 Laclede 32.35 +.11
.. LVSands 75.78 -1.00
.72 LeeEnt d21.48-2.45
.90 LeggMasonl .55 +.36
.60 LehmanBr 80.58 +1.51
.64 LennarA 41.19 -.57
.52 Lennox 34.84 2.73
... Lexmark 51.03 -.62
.72e LbtyASG 5.72 -.01
1.70 UlyEli 57.41 -.31
.60 Limited 26.43 +20
1.58 UncNat 72.20 -.04
26 Lindsay 35,72 +.72
... UonsGtg 11.28 -.07
.23 UzClab 37.64 +59
1.40 LockhdM 95.32 -1.23
.25 Loews 52.90 +.05
.321 Lowess 31.65 +.10
.90 Lyondell 3921 +.06

2.40 M&TBk 108.68 -.07
1.36 MBIA 64.95 +28
.54 MDURess 29.06 -.11
... MEMC '58:11 -.53


.48 MCR 8.33
1.00 MGIC 61.79 -.12
... MGMMir 86.70 +1.00
.52f Macys 38.89 -.06
... Madeco 13.91 -.01
.96f Magnalg 91.62 -.04
.14 Manilowoc u82.75 +2.36
.881 Manulifgs 36.78 -.04
1.92f Marathon u131.37 -1.14
.30f MartntA 46.25 -.35
.76 MarshM 31.81 +.14
1.24f Marshlls 48.33 -.19
'... MStewrt 17.15 -.37
1.10 MartMM u167.55 +2.45
.921 Masoo 2921 -.10
.16 MasseyEn 27.02 -.96
.60 MasterCrdu1l64.62 +6.97
... MaterialSd 12.76 +.02
.651 Mattel 25.91 +.06
... McDermilnt u83.85 +.36
1.00f .'i,'as 52.40 +.23
.82 M-cGmH 71.08 +.08
.24 McKesson 59.87 -.89
... McAfeelf 34.93 -.44
.. MedcoHIth u80.12 -.28
.44 Medtnic 52.37 -.04
.88 MellonFnc 44.58 -.19
.801 Mentor 40.61 +.76
1.52 Merck 50.63 -.10
1.40 MerrillLyn 90.00 -23
.591 Meitfe 86659 -.16
... MetroPCS n 35.62 +.02
... MeronT 12.55 -.03
2.42 MdAApt 54.95 -.95
.. Midas 23.23 +24
. Millipore 76.32 -21
.. Mirant 45.81 -.36
.03e MitsuUFJ 11.53 -.03
.. obleTel 59.30 -.04
128 MolsCoorsB 93.22 +1.29
.50 Monsantos 65.99 +1.13
.32 Moodys 67.03 -.67
1.08 MoroStan 88.50 +.02
5.47e MSEmMkt 29.09 +.17
.. Mosaic If 39.77 +.91
.20 Motorola 18.13 -.22
.60 MurphO 59.94 +.07
.24 MylanLab 18.70 +.15
... NBTY 43.65 -.85
... NCRCp 52.66 +.01
NRGEgys 45.31 -.39
.40 NYMEXn 140.43--1.69
25p NYSEEur 78.41 -1.59
.. Nabors 35.38 +.17
1.56 NatCity 34.13 +.08
1.24 NatFuGas 45.30 -.30
2.79e NatGdd 73.40 +.15
... NOiVar 106.67 -.40
.16 NatSemi 28.45 -.07
.. Navteq 43.61 -.69
.. NeuStar 27.49 -.57
.21a NewAmrn 2.32 -.02
1.52 NJRscs 52.95 -.36
1.03 NYCmtyB 17.73 -.01
.921 NY limes 25.83 -.07
.261 NewAlfiBc 15.36 -.15
.84 NewellRub 29.42 +.11
... NewldExp 50.40 +.:,
.40 NewmrlM 40.01 -.0"
NwpkRsIf 8.10
.12 NewsCpA 22.00 -
.10 NewsCpB 23.62 -.4
.09 Nexengs 31.87 +.u1
.92 NiSource 21.45 -.
1.86 Nicor 44.73 -
.74 NikeB wi 53.63 +2
.. 99Cents 12.83 .-.


.16 NobleCorp u96.07 +.71
.56e NokiaCp 28.65 -.36
.54 Nordstrm 52.12 -.84
.88 NorfkSo 55.24 -.64
... Norfellfrs 25.44 -.04
.80f NoeStUt 28.70 -.18
1.48 NorthropG 76.64 -.76
.. NwstAirn 22.65 -.35
.40 NovaChem 34.64 +.53
1.10e Novaris 55.70 -26
... NovaStar 9.80 +27
1.30 NSTAR 32.99 -.18
.44a Nucor 62.59 -.43
.69 NvFL 13.45 +.07
.74a .NvIMO 14.14 -.01
1.14 NvMulSI&G 13.31 -.15
1.09a NuvQPf2 13.72 -.18
1.36 OGEEngy 34.68 -24
.88 OcaPets u59.38 +07
... OflcDpt 34.13 -.60
.80 Olin 20.43 +33
.0 9 Omnare 36.13 +.12
1.20f Omnicom 102.95 -.97
3.96f ONEOKPt 67.85 -.34
.40 OshkoshT u64.13 +.01
... Owenslll 33.82 -.07


1.44f PG&ECp 46.64 -.48
2.521f PNC 74.55 +.31
.88 PNM Res 28.21 -.05
2.00 PPG 74.81 -.17
1.22 PPLCorp 47.16 +.46
... ParkDd 11.65 +.10
PaylShoe 32.60 -.61
24 PeabdyE 50.29-2.03
3.00 Pengrg 19.11 +.22
1.641 PennVaRs 30.58 -.38
.80 Penney 75.08 -.60
27 PepBoy 22.00 -.26
1.50f PepsiCo 66.59 -.09
.52 PepsiAmer 24.28 +.33
1.30e Prmnian 13.50 +.10
... Petrohawk u17.04 +.18
3.46e PetrbrsA u10727 +.87
3.46e Perobrs u122.34 +.88
1.16 Pfizer 26.26 -21
1.00 PiedNG 2628 -.62-
.09 PilgrimsPr 36.80 +.34
.78 PimcoStrat 10.53 -.12
2.10 PinWst 43.43 -.58
1.32 PitnyBw 46.75 +.76
1.68 PlumCrk 42.71 -.13
1.36 Polaris 53.90 -.15
.20 PoloRL 96.42 +1.62
.94f PortGE 27.32 -.23
1.80 PostPrp 50.83 -.76
.401f Potash s u79.46 +1.84
120 Praxalr u72.25 +.29
.12 PrecCastpt 118.49 -1.02
... Pridelntl 3726 -.28
1.401 ProctGam 61.77 -.80
2.44 ProgrssEn 47.43 -.34
.04a ProsvCp 23.56 -.24
1.84 ProLogis 60.19 -1.46
.28 ProsStHiln 3.26 -.05


1.44 ProvETg 11.91 +.06
.95f Prudent 102.16 +.47
2.34f PSEG 88.33 -.50
2.03 .PubStrg 82.65 -.40
1.03 PugetEngy 24.34 -.25
.16 PulieH 24.80 -.09
.39 PHYM 7.39 +.02
.49 PIGM 10.01 +.07
.36 PPrIT 6.53 -.01
.56 Quanex 49.36 -.62
.. QuantaSvc 31.29 -.33
.40 QstlDiag 51.99 +42
.98 Questar 11028 -.56
... Quiksilvr 14.20 -.04
. OwestCm 9.67 +.06
3.36f RAf Fin 29.92 -.06
... RHDonI 74.76 -.12
.70 RPM 23.06 -.04
.25 RadioShk u34.87 +.55
. Ralcorp 53.34 -.10
.12 RangeRs 40.74 -.54
.40 RJamesFn 32.32 -.24
1.88 Rayonier 44.87 +.03
1.02f Rayheon 55.74 -.80
1.53 Raylnco 25.91 -.52
1.20a RegalEnt 22.13 +21
1.44 RegionsFn 34.39 -.11
... RelantEn 26.57 -.04
.95e Repsol u38.71 +20
. RetailVent 1726 +.42
... Revon 1.41 +.01
3.03 ReynAnrs 62.20 -.48
...ReAid 6.10 -.02
1.48f RoHaas 53.93 -.28
.40 Rowan u40.88 +.10
.60 RylCarb 41.49 -.77
2.63e RoyDShIlAu79.36 +.22
1.85e Royce 21.79 +.06
1.47 Royce pfB 23.75 +.11
.48 Ryland 41.12 -.62

... SAICn 18.00 -.19
.62e SAPAG 50.00 +1.17
1.76 SCANA 39.88 -.03
. SKTlcm u28.02 +29
1.00 SLMCp 57.11 +.08
.330 STMicro 19.41 +.14
.281 Safeway 34.12 -.18
.64 StJoe 47.03 -.32
... SUude 43.59 -.40
4.03e Saks , 21.23 -.08
... Salesforce 44.85 -.74
2.28e SJuanB 33.40 +29
1.15e Sanofi 41.35 -.47
.40 SaraLee 17.76..-.14
.26 SchemrPI 30.56 -.43
.70 Schlmbm u85.45 +.85
.40 SeagaleT 21.01 +.05
.40 SealAirs 31.11 -.07
.64 Sensient 26.09 -21
.48 Svcrstr 15.48 +.01
... ShawGplf u44.68 +,93
... SierrPac 17.98 +.20
... SlivWhtng 11.50 +.13
3.36 SirnonProp. 96.73 -241


AMERIAN TOKEXHAG


DIv Name Last Chg
.42 AbdAsPac 6.40 +.06
.42 AdmRsc 28.46 -.94
.. AmO&G 5.95 +.11
.. ATechCer u23.99 +7.18
ApexSilv 20.99 +.18
... Augustagn 2.78 -.10
.. BPZEgyn 6.00 -.50
... BirchMtg 3.15 +.07
.. BootsCts 1.81 +.01
.. CdnSEng 3.52 -.02
.. CanArgo .77 +.01
.36 CarverBcp 15.75 -.05


... CheniereEn 41.23 +.30
.82 CoinmchA u13.34 +.05
.40 ComSyslI 10.27 -.33
... CovadCm .88
... Crystallxa 4.45 -.02
2.63e DJIADiamn 135.94 -.25
... Darting 8.90 +.03
.74 EVInMu2 14.95 -.04
... EldorGldg 5.80 +.10
.63e BIswthFd 9.12 -.01
... Endvrlnt 1.49 +.01
... EvgmEnya 6.20 -.17
.45f RaPUbl 12.03 +.03


... Friendly 15.13 +.80
... FrontrDg 12.45 +.98
... GascoEngy 2.49 -.10
... GastarEg 2.17
., GoldStrq 3.63 -.06
.. GrevWolf u8.40 +12
.. Hyperdyn 2.89 -.11
1.10e iSAstanyau28.59 +09
.28e iSCannya u30.66 +.08
.51e iShGernya 33,35 +.23
.46e iShMexnya 64.33 .05
.. iShSilver 131.63 +.02
.76e iShSP1003cbou70.84+.12


4.04e iSh2OTB 83.52 -.17
3.66e iSh7-10TB 80.18 -.04
3.42e iShl-3TB 79.81
iShNqBio 80.58 -.71
1.75e iSRIKVnya 89.08 -.20
,52e iSR1 KGnya 60.34 -.05
126e iSRusIKnya83.45 -.18
1.28e iSR2KVnva 84.50 -.61
.28e iSR2KGnvau86.66 -.38
.82e iShR2Knva 84.17 -.16
1.28e iSRus3Knya89.02 -.06
.. IdaGnMn 6.15 +.55
.40 iMergent 25.30 +.30


... InSiteVis
.. InterOil g
LadThalFn
.. LundinM s
., MadCatzg
.12e MklVGold
... Memly
... Merrimac
.. Metretek
. MetroHth
.. Miramar
. NOrion g
. NthgtMg


1.52 +.07
38.90 +1.00
2.58 -.13
12.05 -.15
1.44 +.14
38.98 -.11
1.73 -.12
9.78 -.12
14.94 +.92
1.89 -.02
4.25 -.12
u5.75 +.06
3.08 -.07


... NovaGidg 14.55 -.11
1.21e OilSvHT u178.40 +.75
... Oilsandson 2.76 +.11
. On2Tech 3.13 -.06
. PeruCop a 6.02 -.02
2.61e PhmHTr 82.86 -.46
. PionDril 15.14 +.16
... PSAgrin 28.15 +.28
.05e PwSCInEn 20.08 -.07
.16e PwSWtr u20.69 -.08
1.07e PrUShS&Pn51.19 +.15
1.10e PrUShDown48.83 -.12
5.43e ProUltQQQnu95,65 -.10


.91e PrUShQQQn45.74 +.05
ProUSR2Kn61.26 +.36
.. Onstakeg .16 +.01
... RaeSyst 2.36 +.02
5.62e RegBkHT 160.48 +.09
,, Rentech 2.61 -.04
1.23e RelailHT 105.59 -,31
.30e SpdrHome 32.82 -.29
3.87e SpdrWilRE 83.69 -1.21
.13e SpdrRelln 44.32 +.30
,36e SpdrMeIMn 63,85 -.82
... SeabGldgu19.49 +1.64
,37e SemiHTr u38.25 +.05


2.60e SPDR 152,89 -.18
1.98e SPMid 16510 -.66
.80e SPMaUs u41.10 ..
54e -SP HIhC 35.86 -21
.56e SPCnSt 27,35 -.14
.35e SPConsum 39.66 -.17
.75e SPEnoy u71.06 +.08
.820 SPFnd 3744 -.01
.60 SP Inds u39.40 -.02
.21e SPTech u25,85 +.07
1.10e SPU1i 4000 -.44
, Stonelghun u825 .
, SulphCo 3,94


.. Taseko 3.71 -.)4
.. TmsmrEx 2.22 -63
... Tucowsg u129 +.2.'
... USGoldn 5.46 +.10
.. UlraPtg 56.91 -.tu
.. USOiIFd 52.14 +.I
... VCGHoldh 9.95 -.fi
... VantEnSn 7.40 +.2'
.. VendingDt u3.75 +.li
.. iragen h .04
... WestmWnd 26.68 -3.
3.00e WilshrElf 5.61 -.1
, ZBBEnn 5.80


NSAo N5ATIOAL AKT


DIv Name Last Chg

. ABXAir 7.04 -.04
. ACMoore 21.99 -.04
. ADCTelr 19.02 +.25
.. AMIS HId 12.87 +.05
.. ASMLHId 27.21 +.56
.. ATS Med 1.55 +.01
.. AVIBio 3.06 +.07
.. astro 1.41 +.02
.. AcadiaPh 15.03 -.09
. Accenta 3.21 +.08
.. AccHmelf 14.26 -.06
20p Acergy 22.21 +.32
.. AcmePcktn 12.10 +.52
.. ActionSemi 6.03 -.02
.. Activisn 19.58 +.45
.24 Acxiom 27.09 -.46
.. AdamsResp 42.76 -.44
.. Adaptec 3.76 -.05
.. AdobeSY 42.67 -.08
.36 Adtran 26.47 +.06
.. AdvEnId 23.44 -.70
.. AdvMag 61.41 +.32
.571 AdvantaAs 30.27 -.40
.681 AdvantaB s 33.32 -.21
.. Affymettix 26.61 +.31
.. AgileSoft u8.06 +.01
. AirspanNet 3.43 +.12
.. AkamaiT 47.81 -1.04
1.61e Akzo 81.16 -.79
.60 Aldila 15.48 +.47
.. AlgnTech 24.83 +.33
. Alerm 15.10 -.14
.. AIsipts 26.11 -.33
A... nylamP 16.72 -.17
AlairNano - 3.12 -.05
,16 AlteraCplf 22.88 -.08
... Alvarion 9.06 -.14
... Amazon 71.83 -.57
. AmerBio 1.13 -.02
3.64f AmCapStr 45.05 -1.05
-. ACmclLn nd24.50 -2.63
.. AmerMed 18.19 +.01
.12 AmRallcar u42.73+2.78
-. AmSupr u19.39+138
.41 AmCasino u35.64 +.69
... Amen 58.61 -.42
AmkorTIf 14.97 -.01
... Amylin 42.25 -.73
... Anadigc 12.68 +.17
.40 Anlogic u70.80 +29
... Analysts 1.63 +.01
... Andrew 13.13 -.56
.. AngioDyn 17.79 +.42
.. Angiotchg 7.30 +.04
.88e AngloAm u30.87 -.33
.. Ansyss 27.28 -.24
.. An ignos 3.06
.. ApolloGrp 48.37 -.73
2.04 Apollolnv 24.13 +.34
,, Apole nc 125.09 44.59
-221 Apptebees 25.66 -.38
.24f ApidMat 19.83 -.02
.. AMCC 2.70 -.01
.. aQuanive 63.78 +.18
.. ArQule 7.80 -.15
.. Arbinet F, ...
.. ArchCap 70.69
.. ArenaPhm 11.91 -.36
1.64 AresCap 18.19 +.32
... ArgonSt 24.07 +2.47
.. AriadP 5.71 +.06
.. Aribainc 9.88 -.04
.. ArrayBio 11.04 -.42
.. Arrids 16.37 -.10
.. ArtTech 2.70 -.05
AscentSol 8.02 +.05
... AscnSIwlA 1.33 -.04
. Asialnfo 9.51 -.13
.. AspectMed 15.40 +.03
.. AspenTech 14.61 -.10
1.241 AssodBanc 33,15 +.34
. AthrGnc 2.46 +.02
. Atheros 30.90 -1.25
.. AtieI 5,43 -.05


.. Audvox 13.06 +.13
... AuthorizeNu18.03 +1.30
.. Autodesk 45.50 +.50
. Avanex 1.,72 +.09
.. AvanirP 3.18 -.03
2.00e AvIciSys 7.89 +.43
.. AvoctCp 29.35 +.53
. Aware 5.39 -.01
. Axcelis 6.29 -.02
... BEAero u39.82 -.26
... BEASvsil 13.47 +.37
..BJsRest 19.76 +.03
... Baidu.comul49.05 +5.98
. BallardPw 4.44 +.19
,02 BnkUtd 22.35 +.16
.. Bankrate u50.69 +2.16
... BareEson 36.00 -.09
. BeaconPh .98 +.03
. BeacnRfg 17.98 +.20
.25 BeasleyB 7.75 +.26
20 BebeStrs 16.61 +.40
. BedBath 37.73 -.23
. BioVeris 21.44
... Bioenvsn 5.58 -.01
. Biogenldc 51.63 +.30
..BoMarin 18.01 +.23
.30e Biomet 45.60 +.06
. Biopure .61 -.03
.34 BIckbaud 22.33 +.02
... BuPhoenx 8.76 -.03
.56 BobEvn 37.90 -.39
... Bookhamn 2.00 -.01
.361 BookMill 17.35 +25
.. Borland 5.81
. BgExp 6.11 -.09
Brightpnt 14.37 -.06
Broadcom 30.63 -.69
.. BrodeCm 8.48 -.03
.34a BrklneB 11.95 -.13
BrooksAutou18.55 -.11
B... square u6.79 +21
.20 Bucyms 71.40 -.55
.. BullWWs 41.63 -.92
... BusnObj 40.67 +.03
. C-COR 14.28 -.37
.56 CBRLGrp 45.11 -.64
.. CDCCpA 8.79 -.07
.521 CDWCorp 85.02
.72 CH Robins 53.33 -1.43
... CMGI 1.99 -.02
... CNET 8.66 -.02
... CTCMediau28.39 -.19
... CVThera 12.06 +.69
... Cadence 22.60 -.70
.05 Cal-Maineu15.63 +.83
.70 CapCtyBk 32.10 +.09
. CpsInTrb 1.01 +.02
.. CareerEd 33.90 +.13
... Carrizo u46.80 +.50
.26f Caseys 28.06 -.15
... Caviumn u23.34 +158
. CeOgene 58.79 -1.29
. CellGens 3.82 -.05
... CenGardns 12.94 -.04
... CnGardAn 12.70 +.05
... CentA 55.17 +.67
... Cephln 82.64 -1.22
... Ceradyne u74.05 +1.56
... CeragonN u10.87 +.82
... Cemer 56.32 +.41
.40 Chaparrals 72.32 -.39
.. ChrmSh 11.78 -.08
... Chartndsn 24.66 +.62
.,, ChartCm 4.13 +,08
... ChkPoint 23.32 -.06
... ChkFree 41.06 +.67
... Cheesecake27.14 +.60
... ChildPilc 53.87 -.32
ChinaBAK 3.15 +.01
... ChlnaMed u30.71 43.46
... ChinaSunn 12.88 +27
... ChipMOS 6.77 +.26
.50 ChrchllD u53.49 -.07
... CienaCp rs 34.01 -.35
.39f Cintas 40.16 -.20
... Cirrus 8.07 -.04
Cisco 27.21 -.18


... CyrixSy f 33.94 -.35
... CleanH 47.34 -.23
... Clearwiren 24.22 -.13
... CogentC 27.88 +1.08
Cogent 14.91 -.10
34 Cognex 23.38 -.11
... CogTech 78.07 -.95
Cognosg 39.12 -.70
... ColdwrCrk 24.26 -.25
1.00e Comarco 6.28 +.08
C.. omcasts 27.98 -.01
.. Comcsos 27.75 +.13
.. CompCrd 35.21 +.18
... Compuwre 11.76 -.05
... Comlech 42.58 -.32
... ConcurTch u21.97 +.83
.. ConcCm 1.80 +.07
... Conexant 1.27 +.01
.. Conmed 30.26 -.65
... Copart 29.28 +.21
... CorinthC 15.00 -.05
1.60 CorpExc 66.32 -.56
1.00 CorusBksh 17.00 -.50
.58f Costco 56.00 -.09
.. Crayinc 7.59 +.39
CredSys 3.79 -.05
... Creeinc 24.92 -.64
... CritlTher 2.30 -.12
... Crocss 44.33 -1.25
.26e Ctrip.com 77.82 +4.14
... CubistPh 21.69 -.21
... CurMed 9.26 -.08
CybrSrce 12.21 -.69
Cymer 41.37 -.19
CyprsBio 14.50 -.08
CytRx 3.72 -.21
.. Cytogen 1.98 +.05
Cytokinet 6.51 +.02
. Cytyclf 41.82 -.38

.. DRDGOLDh .74 +.01
.20 DadeBeh 52.98 -.12
.07f Daktmicss 20.90 -.04
. Danka 1.00
. Deckut u96.45 +2.91
.decdGenet 3.83 -.04
. DellInctl 27.85 +.04
. DItaPtr 22.62 +.45
... Dndreon 7.48 -.15
.. Dennys 4.52 +.06
.16 Dentsplys 36.68 -.25
... DigeneCp 57.96 -.68
... DigRiver 48.24 +.20
.. Diodes 40.12 +1.98
.. DiscHoldA 23.82 -.42
. DiscvLabs 3.44 +.04
... Diverse d5.24 +.02
... DobsonCm 10.40 -.13
.. DlrTree 43.54 +.19
. DressBam 22.07 +.02
.80 DryShips 37.58 +.64
.15 DynMat 36.62 -.42
... Dynavax 4.57 -.03
ETrade 23.98 -.20
... eBay 31.64 -.40
.10t ECITel 9.19 +.27
... EZEM 16.61 -.21
2.00m EagleBulk 22.19 +.35
., ErthLink 7.49 -.12
... EchoStar 43.41 -.51
,. EdBauern 13.48 -.50
.22f EduDv 7.95 +.23
B. lectSci 21.34 -.02
... Fctigis 2.11 -.04
.. BectArts 49.71 -.78
... EFII 28.40 +.06
... Emcorellf 5.01 +,11
.EncvsiveP d2,32-1.78
.. EndoPhrm u34.93 +.40
... EngyConv 31,00 -.22
.. Entegis 11.93 -.03
EnzonPhar 8.42 -.12
... EpiCept 2.33 -.08
... EpicorSft 14.01 +.10
.74e EricsnTI 39.37 +1.68
Euronel 29.47 +.01


... EvrgrSIr 9.16 -26
... Exelixis 11.81 +.09
... EddeTc 9.12 +.09
... Expedia 25.50 +.13
28f ExpdIlntls 41.62 -.68
... ExpSoripts 101.00 -.16
., ExtNetwlf 3.84
... F5Netwks 84.68 -.53
... FCStonenu58.24 +3.38
... FEICo 34.06 -.50
... FLIRSys 42.24 -.73
.. FalconStor 11.01 +.25
.421 Fastenal 41.84 -.38
1.681 RFithThird 42.77 +.02
... FRnisarllf 3.95 +.04
.10 FnUne 11.53 -1.10
.52 FslNlagara 13.60 -.09
... FstSolarn u78.28 +.18
1.16 FstMerit 21.65 +.17
.. Fiserv 58.74 +.24
.. FlameTr 24.80 -1.70
... Flexn 11.18 +.10
... FocusMdas 46.19 +.42
... ForcePron 27.06 +.74
... FormFac 42.32 -.48
... FossilInc 31.24
... FosterWh u109.72 +1.55
... Foundrylt 17.32 -.21
... FmtrAir d5.77 -.10
... FuelCell 7.78 +.16
.601 FultonFncl 14.75 -.24

.. GTCBio 1.18 +.02
.50 Garmin s u71.57 +1.80
Gemstar 4.86 -.11
... GeneLgc 1.45 +.03
. Genelb u2.67 +.29
... GenBiotc 1.81 -.02
... GenesMcr 8.89 +.18
... Genta .30 +.0
.38 Gentex 18.40 -.10
... GenVec 2.84 -.05
... Genzyme 65.71 -1.19
... GeronCp 7.70 -.24
... GigaMed 14.16 -.50
... GileadSdc 80.51 -.32
... Globlind u25.50 -.08
.80 GoldTcm 51.24 -.17
.. Google 515.20 +9.31
.641 GrtrBay 27.66 +.01
.. Gymbree 42.33 -.07
.. HLTH 14.11 -.12
1.00 HMNFn 35.20 -.05
.. HainCelest 29.21 +.44
. HansenMn 19.23 +.98
.H Hansnsif 44.29 +.39
... Harmonic 8.31 -.19
.. HayesLmn 5.51 -.02
... HlhTroncs 4.79 +.05
... Healthwys 49.32 +.32
.08a HrtndEx 16.11 -.23
... Heelys n 31.66 +.96
... HercOffsh 35.48 +.08
1.20 HercTGC 13.88 +.36
... Hibbett 26.88 -.82
... HimaxTch 5.86 +.08
.. HokuScl 7.10 +.73
... Hologic 55.11 -.44
.. Home Inns n30.81 -1.70
.. HomeSol 6.05 +.08
.. HoriznOff 19.68 -.09
... HotTopic 11.36 +.13
... HousIWC 28.78 -.17
.32 HudsCity 12.67 -.08
.- HumGen 10.01 -.16
.36f HuntJB 29.17 -.37
1.08 HuntBnk 22.42 +.01
Hythlam 8.33 +.53
... IACInter 34.38 +.03
... ICO Inc u9.82 +.37
.80 IPCHold 31.35 +.36
.. IconixBr 22.42 -.13
-. IdenlxPh 6.48 -.39
.. Illumina 40.56 +.39
... Imclone 37.34 +.40
... Immersn 13.40 +.41


... Immucor 28.54 .+.06
... Imunmd 4.64 -.13
... InPhonicif 7.58 -.03
... Incyte 6.80 .-.01
. IndevusPh 7.17 -.10
.. Infineran u26.60 -.45
6.30e InfoSpces 22.65 -1.09
.. Informat 15.17 -.06
.27e Infosys s 52.40 -.91
., InnerWkn 16.01 +.10
I. nPlay 2.35 +.37
I. nsmed .70
. ItgLfSci 49.46 +.36
.nlgDv 15.27 -.01
.45 Intel u24.17 -.07
. InterDig 33.72 +.37
.08 Intrface u18.55 +.19
. IntrNAPrs 14.13 -.14
.101 IntlSpdw 53.45 +.24
.40 Intersil u32.73 -.29
. Intuits 29.37 -.46
IntSurg 140.84 +.28
.. Investools 10.30 -.15
... InvBncp 13.90 -.15
. Inrtrogn 73.79 -.72
Sonatron 3.97 -.07
. Isis 8.98 -.33
.. IseCaprilf 25.56 +.47
.. Iron u74.38 -.47
.. IvanhoeEn 2.03 +.10

... JASolarn u27.34 -1.06
.. JDASoft 19.78
... JDSUnirs 13.92 +.04
.26 JackHemnry 25.90 -.23
.. JkksPac u28.15 +.41
... Jamba 9.44 -.07
... JamesRiv 13.82 -.11
... JetBlue 10.46 -.05
.. JonesSoda 16.40 +1.56
... JosphBnk 44.81 +.56
.60 JoyGIbl 60.42 -.82
JnorNtwk 25.28 -21
.48 KLATnc 55.86 -.26
,08 KMGCh 25.50 +71
KeryxBlo 10.54 -.95
... KnghtCap 18.06 -.07
Komag 25.29 +.40
... KopinCp 3.92 +.21
... Kulike 10.79 -.11
.. Kyphon 49.00 -.92
.72 LCAVis 45.79 -,69
... In 11.29 -.17
... LKQCp 24.07 +,34
.. LMIAer u24.02 +3.46
.52 LSI IndS 15.19 -.06
Labophrng 3.01 +.12
LamRsch 53.62 -.29
3.25e LamarAdv 63.66 -1.03
.12 Landstar 46.83 -.18
Lattice 5.80 -.10
LawsnSft 10.00 -.01
LeapWirels 82.86 +.61
Level3 5.51 +.06
LexiPhrm 3.32 +.24
... ULbGobA 39.28 +.02
. i UbGlobC 37.41 +.17
. UbtyMntA 24.21 -.52
.UbtMCapA 118.88 -.12
.25f LlfePart u32.18 +2.07
. Ufecell 31.86 -.16
UfePIH 39.08 -.11
2.50e UgandPhm 7.00 +.14
... Umelightn 19.58 -.42
Lincare 39.45 +.62
.72 UnearTch 36.26 -.24
. LodgEnt 33.05 -.20
.. Logechs 26.90 +:25
... LookSmart 3.63 +.13
... LopNet u21.78 -.16
Lumera 4,90 +.21

1.76 MCGCap 17.07 -.03
1.39 MGE 32.76 +.30
,. MGIPhr 23.56 +.51
... MKS Inst 27.97 -.02


. MRVCm 3.24 +.05
.44 MTS 42.93 +.17
... Macrysn 30.15 +.33
... MagelnHI 46.77 -.62
... Magma 14.80 -.06
... MannKd 13.86 -.39
... Martek 24.96
... MavelfTsif 17.09 +.04
... MatrixSv u27,69 +1.19
.28 MaxCapital 28.17 -.05
.62 Maxim If 32.63 -.28
.. MaxwllT 13.63 -.15
.. Medlmun 57.97 +.03
... Medarex 15.09 -.19
... Mediacm 9,67 -.01
... MedicActs 19.19 -.16
... MediCo 20.08 -.08
... MedisTech 14.78 +.13
.. MelcoPBLn 12.41 -.21
... MentGr 13.39 -.04
.. Mesahr 6.81 +.08
.56f Methanx 26.69 +.61
.20 Methode 15.29 -1.34
.12 Micrel 12.33 -.16
1.12f Microchp 41.65 -.41
.. McrosSys 53.03 -.32
. MicroSemi 23.24 -.12
.40 Microsoft 30.51 +.02
.. Microtune 5.22 +.11
.. Micivisn 5.45 +.05
MillPhar 10.59 -.06
.351 MillerHer 35.38 -.04
... Milliomnt 91.54 -1.03
Mindspeed 2.26 -.04
Misonix 5.83 -.13
.30 Molex 30.86 -.67
.30 MolexA 27.38 -.71
Momenta 11.70 -.42
... Monognrm 1.85 +.05
... MonsbtrWNw 43,50 -1.46
... Move inc 4.36 -.09
. MovieGal 2.31 -.11
.. NABIBio 4.92 -.06
.. NETgear 37.15 -.60
NII Hldg u82.02 -.23
.. NPSPhm 4.34 -.01
.. Nanogen 1.39 +.01
.. Nasdaq 31.00 -.61
.. Nastech 11.93 -.02
.. NatAtH 13.69 +.09
.28f Natlnstru u33.50 +1.73
. NektarTh 10.63 -.20
.. Nestor Inch ,32 -.10
.08 NetBanklf .33 -.01
... NetLogic 27.75 -1.52
. Netease 17.40 -.08
.. Netflix 20.02 +.31
, NetwkAp 31.91 +.02
. Neurochg 7.21 -.05
.. Neurcine 12.27 -.16
. Newport 15.66 +.61
. NexMed 1.87 -.03
. NightwkR 18.10 +.66"
.501 NobltyH 20.95 +,28
1,00 NorTrst 65.37
... Novacea 10.81 +.54
. NvtiWrls u24.73 -.25
. Novavax 3.06 -.12
. Novell 7.98 +04
. Novlus 30.82 +.55
. NuHoriz 13.14 -.02
. NuanceCmu17.98 +71
. NutriSys 67.04 -.01
. Nuvelo 3.64 -.04
. Nvidia u39.57 +.02
.24 OChaleys 20.31 -.80
. OReillyA 37.33 +.21
. OSIPhrm 36.82 -.19
.52 OhoCas 43.25 +.01
... OmniEnr 12.32 +.05
... Omniture n u20.97 +.86
... OmniVisn 15.88 -.19
. OnAssign 11.09 +.08
. OnSmcnd 11.18 +.12
... OnstreamM 2.40 +.14
... OnyxPh 29.10 -1.64
120e OpnwvSy 6.76 -12


., OplinkC 16.05 +.83
Opsware u9,.87 -.20
.25 optXprs 27.02 -.47
, Oracle 19,79 -.07
.. Orthfx 46.01 +.19
1.17 OtterTail 32,26 -28

. PDLBio 24.39 -.29
. PFChng 36.22 +.07
. PMCSra 7.51 +.01
. PSSWrld 18.49 -.03
1,00f Paccars 89.15 -1.51
.60 Pacerlni 25.16 +.12
PacEthan 12.76 +.02
...PacSunwr 22.63 +1.03
PaetecHn 11.15 -.42
Palm Inc 17.34 -.16
PanASIv 28.02 +.43.
Panacos 3.89 -.05
PaneraBrd 47.82 -.16
Panty 48.12 -.06
ParamTch 20.52 -.04
.64e PrInrCm 15.91 +.29
. Pathmrk 13.00 -.12
. Patterson 36.79 -.08
.48f PattUTI 26.98 -.37
.84 Paychex 40.11 -.26
, PnnNGm 62.57 +.45
. Penwesl 13.29 -.24
.53f PenpUldF 19.69 +.29
PeopleSup 12.01 -.02
. Peregrine .98 -.02
.18 Perrigo 19.89 +.12
... PeoDevIf 49.02 -.51
.12 PetsMart 32.37 -.18
.12 PharmPdt 36.79 -.30
.. Phoflrin 15.21 -.12
... PinnacdA 18.93 +.08
.. PlugPower 3.03 +.07
PointTher h .14 -.01
... Polycomr 33.73 -.41
.64 Popular 17.05
Power-One 4.26 +21
.14e PwShsQQQ47.77 +.04
Powiwav 6.59 -.08
... Pozen u18.79 +130
. PremExhibu17.84 +.67
... Presstek 8.35 -.03
.68 PriceTRs u53.39 -.04
priceline u64.19 -.76
.301 PrivateB 34.02 -.25
ProgPh 22.79 +.84
. PsychSol 35.85--.13-
... QAGEN 17.48 -.35
.. QLT 7.83 -.07
... Qaong 13.26 -.23
... Qlogic 17.01 -.11
.561 Qualcom 42.33 -.30
1.00 QuaitySys 38.17 +.23
QuanFuel 1.78 +.09
... QuestSfhlf 16.21 -.24
Quidel 15.51 +.94
9.33e RCN 18.58 +.22
RFMcD 6.38 -.02
. RackSys 12.90
. ROneDIf 7.23 +.01
. Rambuslf 18.06 -.13
RealNwk 8.28 +.12
Regenm 18.25 -.56
. Renovis 3.52 +.02
. RentACt 26.94
RschMoti u176.056 +2.30
... Riverbed nu44.55 +2.98
.. RochMeds 1606 -.47
.. RosettaR 24.87 +.01
.30 RossStrs 31.43 +.25
.. RurlCellA 37.94 -4.30
Ryanairs 38.90 -.03

S. Corp 8.00 -.01
. SBACom u33.32 +.12
.28f SEI Inv 58.79 -.54
STEC 6.46 -.03
. SVB FnGp u53.93 +.26
SalixPhm 12.63 -.29
SanDisk 47.31 +.91


... SngBlo &8.19 +.40
.. Snmina 3.47 -.03
.. Sntarms 5,36 -.13
. Sapient 7.66 -.37
Sawis 49,68 -.76
.. ScanSourceu31.60+2899
.20 Schwab 21.79 -.01
. ScielePh 24.47 -.44
. SciGames 35.85 -22
. SearsHIdgs175.47 +.49
SecureCmp 7.51 -.10
.. SelCmfrt 16.68 -.23
.48 Seldcnss 26.33 -.26
.. emtech u17.11 +.13
. Sepracor 45.33 -1.21
. Shanda 27.93 -.57
.22e Shire u72.61 +.27
.. ShufflMstr 18.07 +.42
... Shutterflyn u22.91 +.91
.. SiRFTch 21.60 -.41
... SierraWr u25.82 +.29
... SIfy 8.95 +.55
SigmaDsg 25.96 +.46
.46 SigmAls 42.27 -.41
.64 SilganHId 56.77 -.93
. Silicnimg 8.63 +.13
.. SilcnLab 34.09 +.05
.. SSTIf 3.83 -.14
25r SIcnware 10.99 -.13
.. SilvStdg 37.05 -.08
.. Sina 40.18 +1.06
... Sirenza 11.80 +.55
.. SidusS 2.90 -.02
.. SkillSoft 9.15 -.02
.12 SkyWest 27.59 +.31
...Sk usSol 7.26 +.06
... SmifthWes u16.46 +.31
... SmithMro 12.16 -.30
... SurSte 12.86 +.11
... Sohu.cm ou27.74 +.98
... SonicCorp 24.30 -.01
.. SncWall 8.72 +21
.. Sonus 8.89 +.11
.36 SouMOB .1439 +.29.
.. Srceintk 5.20 +.04
.. SourceFrg 4.31 -.01
.72 SouthFnrd 23.55 -.10
... SpansionA 1124 -.05
.20 SprtnStr 32.61 -.11
.291 Staples 24.99
..Staicks 27.66 -.11
.40a SMtDynas 43.04 -.17
.., SternCels 2.53 +.07
-Stricycless- 44.76 +1.65
21 StedrBcss 11.57 -.02
.10 StewEnt 8.29 -.01
SunMicro 5.05 ...
. SunPower 58.37 +43
. SuperGen 5.94 -.03
. SuperWel 26.17 -.43
1.00 SusqBnc 23.33 -.44
. Sycamore 4.11 -.02
.Smantec 20.17 +,47
Symebic 8.70 +.40
.15e Synaloy u46.55 +1.95
Synaptcs u34.92 +.32
... Synchron u29.70 +1.63
.. Synopss 26.88 -.15
...Synovs 14.74 -.09
... SyntaxBol 5.32 +.09
... TBSIntA 23.50 +.98
.. TDAmerilr 20.73 -.01
... TFSFnn 12.18 -.15
... THQ 33.35 -.25
... TLCVision 5.84 +.02
... TOPTank 6.88 +.15
... TTMTch 12.14 +.04
... TXCORes 11.68 +.18
. TakeTwo 20.51 -.15
TASER 12.12 -.17
. TechData 37.29 -.10
. Tekelec 14.82 -.04
... TICmSys u5.56 -.08
... TeleTech 32.20 -1.03
... Teliklnc 3.39 -.11
... Tellabs 10.80 -.13
... Terremk 6.90 -.19


.. TessraT 43,76 +26
. TetraTc 22.78 +38
.35e TevaPhrn 40.08 +,08
... TexRdhsA 13.71 -,01
,. Th niagen 8.05 +.26
.. Thoratec 19.43 +17
3Com 4.41 -03
..TibcoSIt 8.93 +.07
.. TWTele 19.83 +.11
.. TiVoInc 5.84 -.09
.TonmoThn 20.45 -.20
TractSupp 54.31 +.69
. TrdeSlatn 12.31 +.06
. Tmsmetah .54 +.15
TmSwtc 1.89 +.12
TriZetto 19.01 +.49
.. TridentMhl 19.35
TrimbleNs 30.78 -.42
.. Trimefs 7.22 +21
.. TriQulnt 5.06 -.08
.. TrumpEnh 14.61 -1.30
.64 TrstNY 9.84 -.12
.88 Trustmk 2622 -.17
.80 TuesMm 13.20 -.06
.. TurboChlf 12.14 +.22
.. Tweeterh d.18 -.05
... 24f7RealM 11.72 +.01
... UAL 35.33 -.43
.90f UAPHIdg u29.47 -.04
.12 UCBHHId 18.81 +.03
... USCncrt 9.17 +.14
.. USEnSysf d3.11 -1.05
.12 USGIobals 23.36 +.02
2.60a USAMobi 24.64 +.11
... USANAH 46.14 -1.21
.06 ULiWridwd 27.64 -23
.. UTStrcm 5.53 -.22
UltaClean 14.66 -.06
... UtdNtIF 28.54 +.14
.80 UldOnIn 16.98 -.15
.. USEnr 5.83 +.21
UtdTtrp 64.39 -.46
UnvAmr 20.76 -.53.
.11 UnivFor 46.36 -.34
UraniumRn 11.27 +.39
... UrbanOut 25.35 -.01

ValVisA 11.62 +.01
... ValueClick 29.52 -.44
... VandaPhm 21.39 +.93
... VarianSms'40.64 +.13
... VelotyEx .85 +20
... VentanaM 53.15 +.07
... Verigy 29.95 +.26
Verisin 29.13 -.19
.. VertxPh 27.37 -.32
... Vlcal 5.95 +.96
.121 VirgnMdah 24.47 -.55
... ViroPhrm 14.13 +.16
... VstaPrt 38.85 +226
..Vlmgs 26.22 +.64
.. Volcom u46.72 +.98
... Warnaco 36.84 -.13
... WarrenRs 12.62 +.09
.82 WashFed 24.37
.20f WemerEnt 19.34 -.18
WetSeal 6.05 -.03
.72 WholeFd 39.51 -.15
WindRvr 10.99 +.37
. WinnDxn 3025 -.47
WdssFac l 1.74 +.11
6.00e Wynn 93.86 -1.20
XMSat 11.13
..XOMA 3.39 -.01
.48 Xlinx 27.52
- XInhuaFn 9.35 +.76
..YRCWde 38.67 -.56
... Yahoo 28.12 +.81
... ZhoneTch 1.56 +.07
1.721 ZionBcp 80.44 +.03
. Zoltek u41.71 -1.16
. Zoran 19.85 +.29
ZynoGen 14.92 -.29


Tne remainder ol tre New York

StocK Exchange listings can be

found on iie next page.





Request stocks or mutual lunds by
writing the Chronicle. Atln. Stock
Requests. 1624 N. Meadoweresi
Blvd., Crystal River. FL 34429; or
phoning 563-5660 For stocks, include
the name of ire stock., Is market and
its ticker symbol. For mutual lunds. list
the parenI company and the exact
name ol tie fund




Yesterday Pvs Day
Australia 1.1855 1.1878
Brazil 1.9039 1.9050
Britain 1.9837 1.9751
Canada 1.0725 1.0685
China 7.6310 7.6275
Euro .7456 .7475
Honq Kong 7.8175 7.8177
Hungary 186.46 186.78
India 40.728 40.604
Indnsia 9090.91 9090.91
Israel 4.1512 4.1230
Japan 123.61 123.46
Jordan .7095 .7093
Malaysia 3.4225 3.4575
Mexico 10.7737 10.7793
Pakistan 60.64 60.70
Poland 2.84 2.84
Russia 25.9498 25.9835
Singapore 1.5368 1.5386
Slovak Rep 25.26 25.35
So. Africa 7.0904 7.1178
So. Korea 928.51 928.51
Sweden .0703 7.0381
Switzerind 1.2420 1.2428
Taiwan 33.25 33.25
U.A.E. 3.6727 3.6730
Venzuel 2147.50 2145.92
British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day
Prime Rate 8.25 8.25
Discount Rate 6.25 6.25
Federal Funds Rate 5.19 5.26
Treasuries
3-month 4.49 4.59
6-month 4.715 4.81
5-year 5.05 5.05
10-year 5.14 5.13
30-year 5.25 5.24



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug07 69.62 +1.08
Corn CBOT Dec07 4231/2 -3/4
Wheat CBOT Sep07 6171/2 -3/V4
Soybeans CBOT Nov07 889 +81/4
Cattle CME Aug07 91.25 +.30
Pork Bellies CME Jul07 97.17 -1.28

Sugar (world) NYBT Jul07 9.02 +.46
Orange Juice NYBT Jul07 135.60 -4.30

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $655.80 $654.30
Silver (troy oz., spot) $13211 .$13237

Copper (pound) $3.420U5 $3.3 bl
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT= Chicago
Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Exchange.
NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange.
NCTN =New York Cotton Exchange.


T


- - 1-


I1


I


,

















CITRUIS CCI Nil' (Fl.) CHRcONICI.I,-


BUSINESS


TUES)AY, JUNE 19, 2007 9


A I3


4-wk
Name NAV Chp %Rtn
AIM Investments A:
BasValAp40.01 -.02 +1.6
ChartAp 17.01 -.01 +1.7
Constp 29.20 +.02 +1.7
HYdA p 4.55 ... -0.5
IntlGrow 33.67 +.03 +2.2
MuBp 7.88 ... -1,3
SelEqty r 22.72 -.02 +0.4
AIM Investments B:
CapDvB 11925 -.02 +2.9
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 48.65 +.17 +5.9
SummitP p14.36-.01 +1.8
Utilities 19.25 -.16 -2.6
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 19.63 -.01 +0.4
Retlnc 9.49 +.01 -1.2
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt6.68 ... +3.6
AlllanceBern A:
BalanAp 18.76 -.01 -0.5
GIbTchAp 70.54 +.15 +3.1
IntOValAp 24.87 +.05 +2.8
SmCpGrA30.47 +.11 +4.4
AllianceBern Adv:
InltValAdv 25.26 +.05 +2.8
LgCpGrAd 23.06 +.02 +1.1
AllianceBern B:
CorpBdBp11.85+.02 -2.0
GlbTchBt62.75 +.14 +3.1
GrowthB 27.45 +.02 +1.3
SCpGrB 125.27 +.09 +4.4
USGovtBp6.66 +.01 -1.2
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrC 125.35 +.08 +4.3
Allanz Funds A:
NFJDvV 118.68 ... +0.4
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt23.94 -.03 +1.6
TargelC t 21.76 ... +5.2
Amer Beacon Plan:
LgCpPln 24.95 -.04 +0.3
Amer Century Adv:
EqGro p n27.40 -.01 0.0
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n17.29 +.01 -0.4
Eqlncn 9.00 -.03 -0.6
FLMuBndnl0.42 ... -1.1
Growth n 24.33 +.01 +1.4
Heritagel n19.84 +.02 +4.9
IncGro n 35.80 ... +0.8
IntDiscrn17.16 +.06 +3.8
IntlGrol n 13.89 +.03 +1.8
LifeSci n 5.75 -.01 -1.0
New Opp r n7.90 +.02 +5.1
OneChAg n13.94+.01 +1.1
RealEstl n29.26 -.50 -1.2
Ultra n 29.50 +.03 +2.0
Utin 18.31 -.13 -3.0
Valuelnvn 8.13 -.02 +0.2
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 21.78 +.02 +1.7
AMutlAp 31.80 -.06 +0.5
BalAp 20.01 ... +0.7
BondAp 13.17 +.02 -1.0
CapWAp 19.19 +.03 -1.4
CapIBAp 65.23 ... +0.1
CapWGAp46.26+.05 +1.5
EupacAp52.13 +.08 +2.4
FdlnvAp 44.88 +.01 +1.8
GwthAp 36.38 +.03 +2.2
HITrAp 12.72 +.01 -0.4
IncoAp 21.47 -.02 -0.1
IntBdAp 13.30 +.01 -0.5
ICAAp 36.20 -.03 +1.1
NEcoAp 29.24 +.03 +1.4
N PerAp 35.30 +.04 +2.2
NwWdidA 55.67 +.30 +2.2
SmCpAp45.72 +.17 +3.6
TxExAp 12.26 ... -1.1
WshAp 38.03 -.03 +0.7
American Funds B:
BalBt 19.95 ... +0.7
CaplBBt 65.23 .. 0.0
CpWGrB 146.06 +.05 +1.5
GrwthBt 35.12 +.02 +2.2
IncoBt 21.34 -.03 -0.2
ICABt 36.06 -.03 +1.1
WashBt 37.76 -.03 +0.6
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 53.73 +.22 +1.3
Ariel 58.12 -.04 +1.6
Artisan Funds:
Int 31.96 +.18 +1.3
MidCap 35.28 -.09 +2.9
MidCapVal 23.06+.01 +2.4
Baron Funds:
Asset 65.83 -20 +2.0
Growth 54.05 +.05 +2.7
Partnersp24.07 -.11 +1.6
SmCap 25.38 +.02 +4.6
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 12.95 +.02 -1.1
DivMu 13.78 .. -0.8
TxMglntV29.14 ... +1.5
IntVal2 28.80 +.01 +1.6
EmMkts 45.84 +.31 +5.2
BlackRock A:
AuroraA 30.09 -.06 +0.8
BaVIAp 34.29 -.02 +0.3
CapDevAp 16.53-.01 +1.7
GIAIAr 19.62 +.03 +0.9
HIYInvA 826 +.01 -0.3
BlackRock B&C:
GIAICt 18.49 +.02 +0.8
BlackRock InstI:
BaVII 34.47 -.02 +0.3
GIbAllocr 19.70 +.02 +0.9
Bramwell Funds:
Growth p 20.54 -.03 +1.2
Brandywine Fds:
Bmdywn n38.91 -.01 +3.0
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlYn 7.06 +.01 -0.3
CGM Funds:
CapDv n 32.72 -.02 +3.9
Focus n 43.31 +.27 +8.3
Mutlln 31.78 +.22 +5.4
Calamos Funds: �
Gr&lncAp33.36 -.03 +1.1
GrwthAp 60.57 +.11 +3.4
GrowthCt57.08 +.10 +3.3
Calvert Group:
Incop 16.57 +.03 -0.9
IntlEqA p 25.62 +.07 +1.3
Munlnt 10.42 ... -1.2
SocialAp 31.57 -.04 -0.1
SocBd p 15.62 +.03 -0.9
SocEqAp 39.72 -.07 +2.1
TxFLt 10.28 ... -0.4
TxFLgp 16.16 ... -1.5
TxFVT 15.40 +.01 -1.2
Causeway Intl:
lnstitutnlrn21.94 +.01 +1.5
Clpper 96.24 -.30 +1.2
Cohen & Steers:
RtyShrs 85.69-1.37 +0.1
Columbia Class A:
Acornm t 32.27 ... +2.3
21 CntryAt 15.97+.08 +3.8
MarsGrAt2l.65 +.04 +2.5
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 33.09 ... +2.4
AcornlntZ45.65 +.33 +2.0
Credit Suisse ABCD:
ValueAt 19.71 -.01 -0.2
DWS Scudder Cl A:
CommA p 27.49 -.03 +5.2
DrHiRA 54.55 -.03 +1.3
DWS Scudder Cl S:
CapGrthr55.34 +.12 +1.8
CorPlslnc 12.44 +.02 -1.1
EmMrne 12.56 +.06 -0.9
EmMkGrr25.65 +.19 +6.6
EuroEq 41.36 +.04 +0.1
GIbBdSr 9.45 +.01 -1.8
GIbOpp 46.77 -.11 -0.8
GIblThem37.34 +.06 +2.3
Gold&Prc 21.59 +.16 +1.6
GrolncS 23.20 -.04 +-0.4
HiYIldTx 12.71 ... -1.0
IntTxAMT 10.90 .. -1.0
nolFdS 68.66 +.10 +0.5
LgCoGro 29.63 +.06 +1.9
LaAmrEq 73.16 +.43 +6.1
MgdMuniS 8.90 ... -1.2
MATFS 13.90 ... -1.3
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 42.20 -.02 +1.7
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 40.31 -.02 +1.6
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 42.73 -.02 +1.7
NYVenC 40.57 -.03 +1.6
Delaware Invest A:
TrendAp 22.61 -.05 +4.0
TxUSAp 11.36 ... -1.3
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.46 ... -0.3
SelGrBt 25.47 -.09 +1.5
Dimensional Fds:
lntSmVa n23.77 ... +0.9
USLgVaen27.90 -.03 +0.5
US Micro n16.75 ... +3.3
US Small n23.06 -.01 +2.8
lnllSmCo n21.78 +.03 +1.5
Rxdn 10.20 ... +0.4
Glb5Fxlnc n10.74+.01 +0.3


TM USTgtV 27.33-.02 +2.3
TMIntVa 22.22 +.04 +1.1
TMMktwV 19.79 -.02 +0.9
DFARIE n30.58 -.50 -0.3
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 91.42 -.04 +0.1
Income 12.54 +.02 -0.8
InllStk 49.41 +.20 +2.2
Stock 165.14 -.18 +0.5
Dreyfus:
Aprec 46.72 -.04 +0.8
Discp 38.86 -.09 +0.8
Dreyf 11.45 -.02 +1.1
Dr50OIn 143.45 -.05 +0.6
EmgLd 37.59 -.15 +1.5
FLInI r 12.70 ... -1.1
InsMut 17.37 ... 0.0
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 12.43 -.01 +1.2
GrwthFp 13.25 ... +1.4
Dreyfus Premier:
CoreEqAt 17.96 -.03 +0.6
CorVIvp 34.42 -.06 -0.1
LtdHYdAp7.33 +.01 +0.6
StrValA r 35.90 -.05 +0.7
TxMgGCt 19.13 -.03 +0.2


TchGroA 26.53 +.11 +3.8
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 46.09 +.55 +4.9
Eaton Vance Cl A:
ChinaAp 28.12 +.49 +6.4
AMTFMB1I10.72 -.01 -22
GrwthA 1082 +.01 +4.6
InBosA 6.60 .. +0.1
LgCpVal 22.90 -.05 +0.2
NatlMun 11.57 -.01 -2.0
SpEqtA 16.31 +.01 +4.6
TradGvA 7.07 +.01 -0.4
Eaton Vance Cl B:
FLMBI 10.92 -.01 -1.1
HfthSBl 12.65 -.08 -0.6
NatlMBt 11.56 -.01 -2.1
Eaton Vance Cl C:
GovtC p 7.06 ... -0.5
NalMCI 11.56 -.01 -2.1
Evergreen A:
AstAll p 15.36 ... NA
Evergreen B:
DvrBdBt 14.11 +.01 -1,1
MuBdBt 7.37 .,. -1.5
Evergreen C:
AstAliCt 14.87 ... NA
Evergreen I:
CorBdIl 10.24 +.02 -1.0
SIMunil 9.83 ... -0.4
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 27.16 +.07 +4.5
HiYield p 4.81 ... -0.6
ValRestr 60.81 +.05 +2.7
FPA Funds:
Nwinc 10.92 +.01 0.0
Fairholme 32.34 -.08 +0.9
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.53 -.02 +0.8
MidGrStA 43.58 -.06 +2.7
KaufmAp 6.40 -.01 +2.7
MuSecA 10.42 ... -1.3
Federated B:
StrInc 8.79 +.01 -1.3
Federated Instl:
KaufrnnK 6.41 ... +2.9
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
EnergyT 51.27 +.08 +5.5
HtCarT 23.50 -.10 +0.3
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivlntlAr 25.33 +.05 +1.8
Fidelity Advisor I:
DMivnllt n 25.72 +.05 +1.9
EqGdrn 61.07 +.09 +3.9
EqlnI n 33.04 -.07 +0.5
IntBdIn 10.70 +.02 -0.7
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 17.99 -.01 +0.8
DivIntTp 25.05 +.05 +1.8
DivGrTp 14.45 -.02 +0.7
DynCATp 20.06 +.03 +1.7
EqGrTp 57.56 +.08 +3.9
EqInT 32.57 -.06 +0.5
GrOppT 39.56 +.18 +2.8
HilnAdTp 11.04 ... +0.3
IntBdT 10.68 +.01 -0.8
MidCpTp 27.76 -.02 +1.8
MulncTp 12.60 ... -1.3
OvrseaT 25.19 +.01 +1.4
STFiT 9.37 +.01 0.0
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 15.18 ... +0.7
FF2015n 12.78 ... +0.7
FF2020n 16.31 +.01 +1.0
FF2025n 13.54 +.01 +1.0
FF2030n 17.02 +.01 +1.3
FF2035n 14.11 .. +1.3
FF2040 n 10.10 ... +1.4
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn21.99 -.02 +2.9
AMgrSOn 16.99 +.01 +0.4
AMgr70n 17.58 +.01 +1.0
AMgr2Orn12.86 +.01 -0.1
Balancn 21.23 -.01 +1.0
BlueChGrn47.93-.05 +1.5
CAMun n 12.04 ... -1.4
Canadan 59.14 +.06 +32
CapApn 29.82 +.04 +1.8
CapDevOn13.82-.01 +2.1
Cplncrn 9.21 ... -0.1
ChinaRg n27.22 +.59 +6.1
CngSn 494.14 -.17 +1.1
CTMunrn11.06 ... -1.3
Contran 71.20 +.08 +2.2
CnvScn 29.30 -.02+3.4
DisEq n 32.52 -.01 +0.8
Divlntln 41.27 +.03 +1.2
DivStkOn17.05 -.01 +1.9
DivGth n 34.31 -.05 +0.7
EmrMkn 29.31 +.26 +5.5
Eql Incn 63.37 -.04 +0.9
EQII n 25.55 -.05 +0.7
ECapAp 30.00 ... +0.5
Europe 43.32 -.05 +0.6
Exchn 352.72 -.42 +1.0
Export n 25.70 +.12 +2.6
Fideln 39.57 +.01 +1.0
Fifty rn 26.17 +.03 +2.7
FtRateHirn9.96 ... +0.4
FLMurn 11.18 .. -1.1
FrInne n31.84 -.02 +0.7
GNMAn 10.57 +.01 -0.9
Govolnc 9.88 +.01 -0.8
GroCon 76.56 +.03 +1.9
Grolnc n 33.67 -.03 +1.9
Grolncll n 12.24 -.01 +1.2
Highlnc r n 9.08 ... -0.7
Indepnn 25.37 +.06 +3.5
IntBdn 10.13 +.01 -0.7
IntGovn 9.86 +.01 -0.6
IntoDiscn 42.57 +.08 +2.1
IntSCp r n29.22 +.20 +5.1
InvGBn 7.23 +.01 -1.1
Japan n 18.05 +.02 +3.7
JpnSmn 12.33 ... +5.0
LatAmnn 56.70 +.32 +6.0
LevCoSk n35.38-.03 +3.2
LowPrn 48.15 +.08 +2.0
Magelln n 95.22 -.05 +2.3
MD Murn10.60 ... -1.3
MAMunn11.62 ... -1.4
MI Munn 11.55 ... -1.1
MidCapn 32.29 -.03 +1.7
MNMun n11.12 ... -1.1
MtgSecn 10.82 +.01 -0.8
Munilnon 12.46 ... -1.3
NJMunrn11.23 ... -1.4
NwMktrn14.68 +.04 -1.7
NwMill n 32.20 +.01 +3.0
NYMun n 12.47 ... -1.3
OTCn 45.98 +.13 +3.5
OhMunn11.29 ... -1.3
Ovrsea n 50.85 +.22 +2.3
PcBas n 32.31 +.30 +5.6
PAMunrnlO.55 ... -1.0
Puritn 21.24 ... +0.4
RealE n 34.91 -.57 -1.6
StlntMun 10.11 ... -0.3
STBF n 8.81 ... 0.0
SmCaplnd r24.46+.03 +4.1
Sm]lCpS r n20.12+.03 +3.9
SEAsian 35.50 +.57+10.4
StkSlc n 30.55 -.02 +1.2
Stratlncn 10.53 +.01 -0.9
StrReRtr 10.37 -.01 +0.3
TotalBdn 10.27 +.01 -0.9
Trend n 69.34 +.08 +2.3
USBIn 10.67 +.01 -1.1
Utilityn 21.42 -.14 -2.4
ValStratn37.24 -.02 +2.1
Valuen 91.40 -.08 +1.3
Wridw n 22.62 +.02 +2.2
Fidelity Selects:
Airn 50.13 -.60 +0.1
Banking n 33.29 +.09 -0.6
Blotch n 66.20 -.54 +1.4
Brokrn 77.19 +.12 +0.4
Chemn 77.10 +.09 +2.1
ComEquip n22.90-.03 +3.4
Compn 43.88 +.41 +4.0
ConDis n 26.80 -.04 +0.6
CalHon 46.52 -.19 +0.4
DfAern 87.61 -.45 +1.7
Electrn 49.70 -.10 +2.7
Eorgyn 61.14 +.10 +5.5
EngSvn 87.46 +.31 +6.4
Envirn 18.26 +.05 +1.8
FinSvn 122.09 +.06 -1.0
Gold r n 34.39 -.01 +0.4
Health n 131.63 -.49 +0.3
HomF n 48.85 +.26 -0.7
onsurn 74.86 +.05 -0.1
Lesr n 82.91 -.20 +1.8
Material n 56.32 +.03 +2.0
MedDIn 53.30 -.03 +0.9
MdEqSys n24.41 -.09 +3.0
NiGasn 47.37 +.01 +5.0
Paper n 36.73 +.07 +2.9
Pharmn 11.79 -.06 -1.3
Retail n 55.02 ... +0.1
Softwr n 71.47 +.35 +2.3
Tech n 76.28 +.25 +4.3
Telcm n 56.70 +.26 +3.3
Transn 55.46 -.58 -1.9
UtilGrn 62.26 -.60 -4.9
Wireless n 8.39 +.05 +5.9
Fidelity Spartan:
Eqldxlnvn54.37 -.06 +0.7
500lnxlnvrn106.07-.12+0.7
lntllnxlnv n48.89 +.03 +1.3
TotMktlnv n43.16-.05 +1.0
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAd n54.37 -.06 +0.7
500Adrnl06.07 -.12 +0.7
TotMktAd rn43.16-.05+1.0
First Eagle:


GIblA 49.32 +.03 +1.1
OverseasA 27.20+.06 +0.7
First Investors A
BIChpA p 25.62 -.02 +1.0
GloblAp 8.40 +.02 +2.3
GovtAp 10.50 +.01 -1.2
GrolnAp 17.46 -.03 +1.5
IncoAp 3.10 ... -0.4
InvGrAp 9.31 +.01 -1.2
MATFA p 11.46 ... -1.2
MfrFAp 11.89 ... -1.2
MidCpA p 32.55 -.08 +1.4
NJTFAp 12.51 -.01 -1.3
NYTFAp 13.98 ... -1.2
PATFAp 12.56 .. -1.1
SpSitA p 25.44 ... +2.3
TxExA p 9.59 ... -1.3
TotRtAp 16.17 -.01 +0.5
ValueBp 8.51 -.02 +0.5
Firsthand Funds:
GIbTech 4.98 ... +7.3
TechVal 40.73 +.10 +2.9
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AGEAp 2.13 ...-1.3
AdjUS p 8.85 ... +0.2
ALTFAp 11.23 ... -1.0


Here are nra 1.000 biggest mutual tunds listed on Nasdaq Tables


:ho* Ihe fund name, sell price or Net Assel Value (NAV) ano daiy
net change, as well as one foral return figure as follows

Tues: 4 wk tolal return (%)
Wed: 12-mo total return 1()
Thu: 3-yr cumulative total return (%)
Fri: 5 yr cumulativea total return j')
Name: Name of mutual fund arid family
NAV: Nei asser value
Chg: Ner change In price of NAV
Total return: Percent change in NAV for Ihe time period sro*r.wn, with
dividends remnvesiea if period longer than 1 year. return is cumuia-
Live.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper oy 6 p rr, Eastern.
Footnotes: e - Ex-capital gainsdistnbution I - Previous day's quote
n - No-load fund p - Fund assets used to pay dslributoron cosis. r -
Redemption lee or contingent deterred sales load may apply s -
SIck dividend or spit. I - BGlh p and r x - Ex-cash dividend NA -
No inlormaton available NE - Data in question NN - Fund does not
wish 1o be tracKed NS - Fund did not exist at start dale Source:
Lipper, Inc. and The Associated Press


AZTFAp 10.84 ... -1.2 Longleaf Partners:
Ballnvp 74.67 -.13 +0.4 Partners 38.93 -.01 +3.5
CallnsAp 12.44 ... -1.1 Inll 22.14 +.05 +3.0
CAIntAp 11.30 ... -1.1 SmCap 34.01 -.14 +1.7
CaITFAp 7.20 ... -1.1 Loomis Sayles:
CapGrA 13.08 -.02 +1.6 LSBondl 14.60 +.02 -1.0
COTFAp 11.78 ... -1.2 StrIncC 15.02 +.01 -1.1
CTFITFAp 10.86 ... -1.0 LSBondR 14.55 +.02 -1.1
CvtScAp 17.40 -.01 +0.7 StrlncA 14.96 +.01 -1.1
DblTFA 11.76 ... -1.1 Lord Abbett A:
DynTchA 29.51 +.01 +1.9 AffiAp 1628 -.01 +0.7
EqlncAp 23.80 -.01 +1.1 BdDebAp 8.14 +.01 -0.4
Fedlntp 11.17 ... -1.3 GllncAp 6.63 ... -2.2
FedTFAp11.88 ... -1.0 MidCpA pd24.81 -.01 +1.1
FLTFAp 11.64 ... -1.0 MFS Funds A:
FoundAl p 14.87 .. +0.5 MITA 22.23 ... +1.4
GATFAp 11.86 ... -1.1 MIGA 14.97 -.02 +1.8
GoldPrMA34.26+.23 +2.9 GrOpA 10.22 -.01 +1.5
GrwthAp 45.57 +.01 +1.5 HilnA 3.92 .. . -0.9
HYTFAp 10.73 -.01 -1.2 IntNwDA 30.73 +.04 +1.2
InoomAp 2.77 ... -1.4 MFLA 9.89 .. -1.2
InsTFAp 12.03 ... -0.9 ToIRA 17.09 ... +0.3
NYITFp 10.66 ... -1.2 ValueA 29.35 -.03 +0.5
LATF Ap 11.34 ... -0.9 MFS Funds B:
LMGvScA 9.83 ... -0.3 MIGBn 13.54 -.03 +1.8
MDTFAp11.50 ... -1.2 GvScBn 9.23 +.01 -1.2
MATFAp 11.64 ... -1.2 HilnBn 3.93 ... -0.9
MITFAp 11.97 ... -0.8 MulnBn 8.40 ... -1.2
MNInsA 11.85 +.01 -1.1 TotRB 17.08 ... +0.2
MOTFAp 12.02 ... -12 MainStay Funds A:
NJTFAp 11.91 .. -1.0 HiYIdBA 6.51 ... -0.4
NYInsAp 11.29 .. -1.4 MainStay Funds B:
NYTFAp 11.57 ... -0.8 CapApB33.40 -.06 +1.4
NTFAp 12.04 ... -1.2 ConvBt 16.20 ... +2.3
OhiolAp 12.30 .. -1.2 GovtBt 8.02 +.01 -1.3
ORTFAp 11.62 ... -1.1 HYIdBBt 6.47 ... -0.6
PATFAp 10.22 ... -1.0 lnflEqB 16.80 +.07 -0.2
ReEScAp 24.73 -28 -1.7 SmCGBp16.91 ... +2.5
RisDvAp 38.11 -.10 +1.5 ToIRtBt 19.88 ... +0.4
SMCpGrA 43.60 -.11 +3.1 Mairs & Power:
USGovAp 6.29 +.01 -1.1 Growth 83.89 -.15 +1.7
UtilsA p 14.59 -.12 -5.2 Marsico Funds:
VATFAp 11.57 ... -1.0 Focusp 19.94 +.03 +1.7
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: Grow p 21.65 +.04 +2.7
IncrneAd 2.76 .. -1.3 Matthews Asian:
Frank/Temp Frnk B: India r 17.59 -.16 +0.6
IncomB1 p2.77 -.01 -1.4 PacTiger 27.62 +.35 +5.8
IncomeBt 2.76 ... -1.4 Mellon Funds:
Frank/Temp Frnk C: IntlFd 18.42 +.04 +1.2
FoundAl p 14.61 -.01 +0.3 Mellon Inst Funds:
IncomCt 2.79 ... -1.4 lnflEqty 47.02 +.01 +1.1
Frank/Temp Mil A&B: Midas Funds:
DiscA 34.10 +.05 +1.9 MidasFd 4.92 +.01 +3.6,
QualfdAt 24.40 +.02 +2.1 Monetta Funds:
SharesA 28.44 -.03 +1.3 Monettan14.70 ... +2.5
Frank/Temp Mil C: Morgan Stanley A:
DiscCt 33.76 +.04 +1.8 DivGthA 22.62 -.01 +0.6
Frank/Temp Temp A: Morgan Stanley B:
DvMktAp31.74 +.21 +3.6 DivGIB 22.78 -.01 +0.6
ForgnAp 15.02 +.05 +1.7 GIbDivB 17.94 +.01 +0.3
GIBdAp 11.40 +.05 -0.1 StratB 21.19 -.02 +0.3
GrwthAp 27.73 +.01 +1.4 MorganStanley Inst:
InbxEMp 21.39 ... 0.0 GIValEqA n22.44+.01 +0.4
WordA p 21.05 +.02 +1.0 IntlEq n 22.66 +.04 +1.0
Frank/TempTmp Adv: Munder Funds A:
GrthAv 27.78 +.01 +1.4 IntemtA 23.44 +.12 +2.6
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: Mutual Series:
DevMktC 31.00 +.21 +3.5 BeacnZ 18.28 -.01 +1.1
ForgnCp 14.76 +.05 +1.7 DiscZ 34.40 +.04 +1.9
GrwthCrp 26.97 +.01 +1.4 QualdZ 24.57 +.02 +2.2
GE Elfun S&S: SharesZ 28.68 -.03 +1.3
S&S PM 50.46 -.08 +1.0 Nationwide D:
GMO Trust III: GvtEBD 10.06 +.01 -0.7
EmMkr 25.09 +.15 +6.5 TxFrr 10.14 ... -1.5
For 20.39 +.02 +1.3 Neuberger&Berm Inv:
IntlntrVI 38.62 +.03 +1.0 Focus 34.47 -.05 +2.3
GMO Trust IV: Geneslnst52.28 -.01 +3.3
EmrMkt 25.,03 +.15 +6.5 Intlr 27.17 +.11 +2.5
Foreign 20.40 +.02 +1.3 Partner 35.24 -.05 +1.8
IntlltrVI 3.61 +.03 +1.0 Neuberger&Berm Tr: .
GMOTrust VI: Genesis 54.51 '-.02 +3.3
EmrgMkts r 25.05 +.15 +6.5 Nicholas Group:
IntlCorEq 43.34 .. NA HilncIn 10.88 +.02 -0.6
StrFxInc 25.66 +.01 +1.2 Nichn 59.18 -.05 +2.3
USQtyEq 23.12 -.04 -0.9 Northern Funds:
Gabelli Funds: SmCpldx n11.57 -.02 +2.8
Asset 53.35 -.01 +1.9 Technlyn 13.42 -.03 +2.2
Gateway Funds: Nuveen Cl R:
Gateway 28.40 +.01 +0.9 InMunR 10.53 ... -1.5
Goldman Sachs A: Oak Assoc Fds:
GrIncA 32.13 -.01 +0.2 WhftOkSG n36.73-.03 +3.6
HYMuAp 11.33 ... -1.2 Oakmark Funds I:
MdCVAp43.15 -.12 -0.1 Eqtylncrn28.11 -.03 +0.2
SmCapA 47.30 -.09 +1.7 Globall n 28.40 -.02 +1.1
Goldman Sachs Inst: IntlI r n 27.96 +.04 -0.4
HYMunin11.33 ... -1.2 Oakmarkr n49.56+.01 +0.4
Struint 16.88 +.04 +0.8 Select rn 36.18 +.04 +1.7
Harbor Funds: Old Mutual Adv II:
Bond 11.39 +.02 -1.1 Tc&ComZn14.55+.02 +4.5
CapApinst 35.41 -.01 +0.8 Oppenheimer A:
Ingtr 70.66 +.20 +2.3 AMTFMu 10.13 ... -1.2
Hartford Fds A: AMTFrNY 12.97 -.01 -1.6
AdvrsAp 18.37 +.02 +1.5 CAMuniAp11.46+.01 -1.5
CpAppAp 42.05 -.01 +2.8 CapApAp50.98 +.06 +2.1
DivGthA p 22.97 ... +0.3 CaplncAp 13.93 +.02 +0.5
SmICoA p 23.32 -.03 +2.4 ChmplncAp9.61 -0.3
Hartford Fds C: DvMklAp 48.35 +.40+4.7
CapApCt 38.26 -.02 +2.7 Discp 53.40 +.10 +4.4
Hartford HLS IA: EquityA 12.24 ... +1.1
CapApp 60.26 -.01 +3.1 GlobAp 80.22 +.05 +1.0
Dv&Gr 25.14 ... +0.4 GIbOppA 39.53 -.19 +0.5
Advisemrs 24.47 +.04 +1.5 Goldp 32.80 +.15 +3.1
Stock 58.91 +.08 +2.7 IntBdAp 6.17 +.01 -1.3
TolRetBd 11.28 +.02 -1.2 LtdTrmMu 15.75 ... -0.6
Hennessy Funds: MnSiFdA 44.27 -.03 +0.6
CorGrow 20.00 +.06 +2.0 MSSCAp24.58 -.05 +1.7
CorGroll 32.23 +.06 +1.8 MidCapA 20.45 -.02 +1.4
HollBalFd 17.09 NA PAMunaAp12.83 ... -1.0
Hotchkis &Wiley: S&MdCpV1I43.62-.08 +2.4
LgCpVIAp27.11 -.10 -1.2 StrlnAp 4.38 +.01 -0.5
MidCpVal32.69 -.06 0.0 USGv p 9.24 ... -1.3
ICON Fds: Oppenheimer B:
Energy 40.21 +.06 +5.7 AMTFM10.09 .. -1.4
Hlthcare 17.82 -.04 -1.8 AMTFrNY 12.98 ... -1.6
ISI Funds: CpIncBt 13.75 +.01 +0.4
NoAm 720 ...-12 ChmplncB 19.60 +.01 -0.3
IXS Advisor CA: EuyB 11.59 +1.0
TarEqty 11.82 +.07 +5.0 hlncB u 4.39 0 -0.8
ivy Funds: Oppenheilm Quest:
Ivy Funds: BaA 20,07 -.03 +0.5
GNatRsA p 36.89+.12 +3.9 Oppe meRo3
MCpValp28.15 -.06 +0.6 RoMuAp18.36 -.01 -1.4
r . RcNtMuA 12.54 -.01 -1.3
JPMorgan Select: PIMCO Admin PIMS:
IntEn 4147 +.09 +1.6 TotRtAd 10.14 +.02-1.1
nJPMorgan Se -: -. PIMCO Instl PIMS:
IntrdAmern30.38-.05 -0.2 AllAsst 12.94 +.03 -0.5
Janus : ComodRR 14.64 -.02 +0.1
Balanced 2600 +.04 +0.4 DevcMk r 11.06 +.04 +0.2
Contran G19.87-.01 +0.6 FtIlncr 10.60 +.01 +0.6
Enterpr 54.33 -.08 +2.0 HiYId 9.90 +.01 -0.6
FedTE 6.78 ... -1.9 LowDu 9.79 +01 -0.2
Fxmnd 9.25 +.01 -1.1 RealRtn 10.46 +01 -1.5
Fund 31.39 -.03 +0.8 TotRI 10.14 +.02 -1.0
FundaEq 28.95 -.02 +1.3 PIMCO Funds A:
G a z a di 1t .8 9M1 0 9 1 . 7 A.1 8 . .. -1.ns A
GlUtegS 21.8 -.10 -1.7 TotRtA 10.14 +.02 -1.1
Gfrechr 14.54 +.05 +3.9 PIMCO Funds D:
Grinc 42.22 -.01 +1.1 TRtnp 10.14 +.02 -1.1
MdCpVal 26.67 -.04 +1.6 Phoen xFunds A:
Orion 11.33 +02 +2.4 PhoenloFndn A .
Overseas r 53.59 +.62 +3.0 BalanA 1527 ... -0.2
Researchs29.12 -.04 +1.2 cpGrA 1726 .. +2.1
ShTmd 2.88 0.0 IntlA 15.65 +.04 +2.4
Tweny 62.04 +25+27 Pioneer Funds A:
Ventur 71.95 +.48 +6.7 BondAp 8.93 +.01 -1.2
WridWr 57.53 +.20 +2.1 EqIncAp 34.53 -.07 -01f
JenpsonDrydA0n A: EurSeIEqA45.73-.04 -0.6
Jennisontryden A: MrwatAp1n8.31 .05+14
BlencdA 21.19 ...+1.5 NGrwhAp 15.01 -.05 +1.8
HiY dAp 5.2 +.01 -0.6 MdNCpGrA1728 -.03 +2.4
InsuredA 10.48 ... -1.6 M/CVAp281-.02 �1.4
UtilityA 16.18 -.07 +0.8 MdCVAp26.16 -.02 +1.0
Jnniny dn B:.1 PionFdAp 52.58-.09 +0.6
JernnlsonDryden B: TxFreAp 11.32 -.01 -2.2
GrowdthB 15.84 .. +01.6 ValueAp 18.35 -.08 -0.3
HiY]dB 5.81 +.01 0.6 Pioneer Funds B:
InsuredB 10.50 ... -1.5 HWIdBt 11.48 -.02 +0.5

Cla^sacVIp29.94-.02 +0.1 HiYI/Ct 11.59 -.02 +0.5
SlnA p 6.54 ... -0.8 Price Funds Adv:
Jh Hnc6.k -0. Growth pn34.58 +.05 +1.5
StncB 654 ... Price Funds:
John Hancock ClI: Balance n22.44 .. 0.0

SrEtanch 15.92 +01 . CAB/nd nl0.78 ... -1.3
LSGiuts 15r92 +.01 +1.0 CapApp22.30 +.0.1 +0.8
Julius Ber Funds: DvGron 27.66 -.02 +1.0
it/Eqlr 48.69 +.10 +0.7 EmEurp 34.87 +.17 +2.2
Inl/EqA 47.64 +.10 +0.7 EmMktSn37.90 +.23 +5.3
IntEqlllr 16.93 +.02 +0.7 Eqlncn 31.94 ... +0.4
KeelSmCpp30.27+.02 +42 Eqlndexn41.19 -.05 +0.7
LSWalEq n21.07 -.04 -0.4 Europe n 22.74 +.04 +0.6
Lazardlnstil: GNMAn 9.18 ... -1.2
EmgMktl 2425 +.19 +4.1 Growth n 34.88 +.05 +1.5
Legg Mason: Fd Gr&lnn 23.60 -.02 +1.0
OpporTr 121.94 -.07 +3.2 HlthSci n 28.93 -.09 +0.2
Splnvp 44.69 -.01 +1.4 HiYieldn 7.14 ... -0.5
ValTrp 77.76 +.13 +0.8 ForEqn 22.34 +.02 +1.1
Legg Mason InstIh IntlBondn 9.44 +.01 -2.3
VafTrlnsI 86.86 +.14 +0.9 IntDlsn 54.16 +.13 +2.2
Legg Mason Ptrs A: IntlSlkn 18.45 +.02 +1.3
AgGrAp124.65 +.22 +3.0 Japan n 10.92 -.02 +2.6
ApprAp 16.56 -.01 +0.7 LatAmn 48.48 +.39 +6.9
HilncAl 6.98 .. -0.8 MDShrtn 5.09 ... -0.3
InAICGAp 15.60 +.04 +1.6 MDBondnlO.39 ... -1.2
LgCpGAp 25.35 -.08 +1.5 MidCap n 62.24 -.16 +2.0
Legg Mason Ptrs B: MCapVal n28.36 ... +1.4
CaplncBt17.91 ... +1.1 NAmern 34.83 -.06 +1.8
LgCpGBt23.58 -.07 +1.5 NAsian 17.43 +.15 +5.7


NewEran57.12 +.04 +4.5
NHorizn 35.77 -.02 +2.6
N Inc n 8.75 +.01 -1.2
NYBondnl.10 ... -1.1
PSIncn 16.62 +.01 +0.2
RealEst n 24.20 -.36 -0.7
R2010n 16.98 +.01 +0.5
R2020n 18.85 +.01 +0.9
R2030n 20.42 +.01 +1.1
SciTecn 23.43 -.01 +2.4
ShtBd n 4.67 ... 0.0
SmCpStk n37.26-.03 +2.2
SmCapVal n45.17 ... +1.7
SpecGrn 22.60 +.02 +1.5
Speclnn 12.18 ... -0.9
TFIncn 9.80 ... -1.2
TxFrHn 11.89 ... -1.0
TxFrSIn 5.27 ... -0.7
USTInIn 5.14 +.01 -1.3
USTLgn 10.85 ... -2.9
VABond n11.36 ... -1.4
Value n 30.08 .. +1.3
Principal Inv:
DiscLCInst 17.40 -.03 0.0
LgGdN 8.71 +.02 +2.2
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 8.72 +.01 -0.9
AZTE 9.01 ... -0.9
ClscEqAp 16.48 -.03 +0.4
Convp 21.16 -.01 +1.9
DiscGr 23.18 ... +2.7
DvrlnA p 9.96 +.02 -0.3
EqInAp 19.36 -.04 +0.5
EuEq 33.84 +.03 +0.7
GeoAp 18.75 -.02 -0.5
GIGvAp 12.08 +.03 -0.9
GIbEqtyp 12.77 +.04 +2.8
GrInAp 21.62 -.04 +0.1
HIthAp 61.77 -.26 -0.7
HiYdAp 8.21 ... -0.5
HYAdAp 6.35 +.01 -0.5
IncmAp 6.66 +.01 -0.7
IntEq p 35.26 +.12 +1.9
IntGrlnp 17.53 +.07 +2.3
InvAp 16.60 +.01 +1.1
MITxp 8,84 ... -0.9
MNTxp 8.81 ... -0.9
NJTxAp 9.06 ... -1.1
NwOpAp 54.07 +.03 +1.2
OTCAp 10.56 .. +3.6
PATE 8.93 .. -1.1
TxExAp 8.59 ... -1.1
TFInAp 14.48 ...-1.3
TFHYA 12.86 ... -0.9
USGvAp 12.90 +.02 -0.6
UilAp 15.01 -.12 -3.6
VstaAp 12.17 -.02 +0.7
VoyAp 19.45 ... +0.8
Putnam Funds B:
CapAprt 22.99 ... +0.5
CIscEqB 16.30 -.04 +0.4
DiscGr 21.11 -.01 +2.6
DrlnBt 9.88 +.02 -0.4
Eqlnct 19.16 -.04 +0.4
EuEq 32.71 +.03 +0.7
GeoBt 18.56 -.02 -0.6
GllncBt 12.03 +.03 -1.0
GIbEqt 11.63 +.04 +2.8
GINtRst 34.25 +.09 +6.1
GrInBt 21.29 -.04 +0.1
HIhB t 54.64 -.24 -0.8
HiYidBt 8.18 +.01 -0.5
HYAdBt 6.26 ... -0.6
ncmB t 6.61 +.01 -0.9
IntGrInt 17.20 +.07 +2.2
IntlNopt 18.04 +.08 +1.3
InvBt 15.14 +.01 +1.1
NJTxBt 9.05 ... -1.2
NwOpBt 47.96 +.03 +1.1
NwValp 20.77 -.03 +0.1
NYTxBt 8.44- ... -1.2
OTCBt 9.21 ... +3.5
TxEB t 8.59 ... -1.1
TFHYBt 12.88 ... -1.0
TFInBt 14.50 ... -1.4
USGvBt 12.83 +.01 -0.7
UtIBt 14.92 -.12 -3.6
VistaBt 10.49 -.01 +0.8
VoyBt 16.83 ... +0.7
RS Funds:
CoreEqA 42.93 +.11 +1.6
IntGrA 20.48 +.12 +0.8
RSNRsp 37.96 ... +1.1
RSPartl 39.15 -.10 +1.0
Value 31.26 -.02 0.0
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 44.12 -.07 +3.9
RiverSource A:
BalanceA11.64 ... -0.1
DEI 14.53 ... +1.8
DvOppA 9.79 -.02 -0.5
Growth 33.73 -.02 +1.6
LgCpEq p 6.33 ... +1.0
MCpGrA 12.16 -.03 +3.1
MidCpVl p 10.35 +.01 +1.8
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSv r 18.83+.01 +2.1
MicroCapl 19.15 +.04 +2.7
PennMulIr 12.86 ... +2.3
Premier r20.59 +.03 +2.1
TotRellr 15.00 -.03 +1.8
Russell Funds S:
DivEq 53.14 -.02 +1.1
IntlSec 84.19 +.28 +1.7
MStratBd 10,15 +.01 -1.0
QuantEqS 43.98 -.03 +0.2
Rydex Advisor:
OTCn 12.32 +.01 +2.8
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAnlO.09 +.01 -1.2
IntlEqAn 16.15 +.05 +1.7
LgCGroAn22.85 -.02 +1.4
LgCValAn24.78 -.04 -0.2
TxMgLCnl4.64 -.01 +0.8
SSgA Funds:
IntlStock 15.19 +.06 +1.3
STI Classic:
LCpVIEqA 16.41 -.03 +1.0
LCGrStkAp 13.16+.01 +1.5
LCGrStkC p 12.24 ... +1.5
SelLCStkC t 26.99-.01 +1.5
SelLCpStkI29.21 -.01 +1.5
Schwab Funds:
HIlhCare 16.73 -.06 -1.6
1000l1nvr 44.93 -.06 +0,8
l00tSel 44.94 -.06 +0.8
S&P Inv 23.75 -.03+0.6
S&PSel 23.84 -.03 +0.7
S&PlnsaSI 12.17 -.02 +0.7
SmCplnv 25.83 -.06 +2.5
YIdPIsSI 9.68 +.01 +0.4
Selected Funds:
AmShD 50.37 ... +1.7
AmShSp 50.29 -.01 +1.7
Seligman Group:
FrontrAt 15.03 -.02 +5.1
FrontrDt 12.76 -.01 +5.1
GIbSmA 19.48 -.01 +2.0
GIbTchA 17.90 ... +3.1
HYdBA p 3.42 ... -0.6
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp36.12 -.04 +1.1
Sequoia n156.94 -.30 +1.6
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 44.75 +.03 +1.4
SoundSh 42.08 +.04 +0.6
St FarmAssoc:
Gwlh 62.34 -.04 +0.9
Stratton Funds:
Diidend 37.25 -.45 -0.3
Multi-Cap 48.94 +.03 +3.4
SmCap 53.14 -.04 +2.5
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.00 +.01 -1.6
SunAmerica Focus:
FLgCpAp 19.29 -.05 -0.4
Tamarack Funds:
EntSmCp 33.64 -.04 +5.0
Value 43.30 -.08 +0.4
Templeton Instil:
EmMSp 23.21 +.15 +3.6
ForEqS 29.94 +.06 +1.7
Third Avenue Fds:
Intl r 24.00 +.08 +2.8
RIEstVIr 36.10 -.20 -2.2
Value 64.98 +.06 +0.1
Thornburg Fds:
IntValA p 32.94 +.23 +3.8
IntValue I 33.62 +.24 +3.9
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.16 +.01 -0.8
Incom 8.45 +.01 -1.3
LgCpStk 30.33 -.02 +1.1
TA IDEX A:
JanGrowp ... ... 0.0
GCGIobp 33.05 ... +1.3
TrCHYBp 9.25 +.01 -1.0
TAFlxInp 9.27 +.02 -1.2
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn32.30-.02 +3.4
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 34.61 +.09 +0.1
UBS Funds Cl A:
GlobAliot 14.91 ... -0.1
UMB Scout Funds:
Intl " 36,67 +.12 +1.8
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 28.74 +.11 +3.6


Extin n 43.12 -.09 +2.3
Instldxn 140.45 -.17 +0.7
InsPIn 140.46 -.17 +0.7
TotBdldx n49.34 +.05 -1.1
nsTStPIus n33.48-.04+1.0
MidCplst n22.35 -.05 +1.6
SCInstn 36.17 -.05 +2.3
TBIstn 9.79 +.01 -1.1
TSInstn 37.13 -.05 +1.0
Valuelstn 28.78 -.03 +0.3
Vantagepoint Fds:
Growth 10.50 ... +1.8
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 19.77 -.01 +1.6
Waddell & Reed Adv:
CorelnvA 6.77 +.01 +1.6
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 39.18 -21 +1.4
Weitz Funds:
Value 42.60 -.01 +1.2
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 22.92 +.01 +2.6
Opptylnv 46.66 -.04 +2.2
SCApValZp 36.15+.08+3.9
Western Asset:
CorePlus 10.21 ... -1.4
Core 11.04 +.01 -1.4
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.52 ... +2.0
IntlGthN 31.17 +.08 +1.6


Stocks little changed


Associated Press


I


I


Market watch
June 18, 2007

Dow Jones -26.50
industrials 13,612.98


Nasdaq .0.11
composite 2,626.60


I


:-




USChina 12.53 +30 +7'4
WIPrcMn28.64 +'12 +1.0
' .












..B 10.78 ... -1.5







GNMA 9 34 +.01 -1.2



GrTxStr 14.66 -.01 -0.5
GUSha 16.52 +.02 +1.7
Gr&lnc 2021 -.03 +1.6
Wnco 11586 +.01 -1.3
In 29.48 +.114 +0.5
NYBd 11 .7 ... -1.5







PrecMM 29.16 +.10 +2.0


TxElt 12.89 ... -1.3
TxELT 13.58 ... -1.4
TxESh 10.52 ... -0.3
VA Bd 11.26 ... -1.6
WIdGhr 21.4 +.04 +0.7
VALIC :
MdCpdxc 26.45 -.06 +1.04
StkAdx 39.84 -.05 +0.7
CLevmGt 23.49 +.03 +1.5

Van Kamp Funds A:
GNMA 9.34 +-.01 -1.
CrstA p 20.41 -.01 -0.5










CpBdA p 6.41+.01-1.4
EqGrwlncAph 16.52 +.02 +1.7
ExGr&lnc 20473.21 -.03 +1.6
GIncSAp 23.84 -.03 -0.2
InHarbAp 116.44 -.01 -1.3










HYMuAIn 2910.9948 ...11 +0.
InTFAp 18.04-.02 -1.6
MunlApYB 14.40 ... -1.5
hPATFA p 17.02 ... -01.3
StMult 1.38 ... -1.3
US MtgeA 13.506 +.01 -1.4

Van Kamp Funds B:
HYMuTxESBt 10.9952 ... -0.3











MulVAB 11.238 ... -1.6
WldGr 21.84 +.04 +0.7





















MdpdATFBt 16.45 -.06 +-1.3
StGwth 39.84 -.05 +0.7
StrMunn 23.49 +.03 + ... -1.
UATFAp 17.98 -.01 -1.8
StAp 20.41 -.1904 -0.
CpBAdp 6.41 +.01 -1.1
CpOpAdm n92.31 +.03 +3.6
EqlncAp 9ergyn144.56 -.0238 +0.1











EuroAdml n95.77+,07 +0.6
ExchAdm n77.85 -.1 +1.6
rExtdAdm n43.104 -.09 +0.3
50Admp 16.44 -.17 +0.7
YGNMA Ad n910.99 ... -0.8










GwnTFAp 18.04 -.03 -1.6
MndCApn 1.41 ... -1.5
PATFAp 17n9.99 +.01 -1.6
IntGrAdm n85.68 +.29 +1.8
ITAdmlnc 13.6 -.01 -1.1
UEilAp 24.57 -.18 -0.0










ITEnGerpBt 14.20 +.01 +1.1










ncUdTrAd10 9.42 -.02 0.
MuHYAMB 10.99 ... -1.2
PrGCap r n78.96 +.05 +2.8
MeiAdmrB 14.96 ... -1.73 -










0.5rGwth 9.50 +02 +1.7
STyAdMtge 13.01 +.01 -0.
Vanguard n15.54Admiral:+0.1
CATGrAd n10.79 ... -1.3
ppAdI n92.36.14 -.0 +3.6
MEnergy n144.56 +.38 +5.1
EuroBAdml n95.7+.07 +0.61
TStkAdm n37.12 -.05 +1.0
ExplAdml n28.77 -.012 +02.2
ExtAdm n53.197+0-.09 +2.3
50AWindsorn8.1412 -.0517 +0.7
GNMAA/ n9.99 ... -1.2



















WdsrAd mn3268.54 -.031 +1.3
Vanguard Fds:
HAssethCr n 3164.54 -.30 -2.5
AHiYLTCpn 6.91.44 ... -12.










ITBdCap ln9.99 +.02 -1.6
IvdGrA/m n15.78 +.29 +1.8
TAEnergyn 7613.05 +... -1+51
EqInTGrAmn 27n9.50 +-.02 -1.3











FLLTrdn 10.62 +01 -.3

Pip r n7n38.96 +.0 +2.8

thCremrn104.896-1.73 -
STsynflaPro n 11.77 +.01 -0.2
ShInTrAdprn 23.54 ... +0.1
InSmCAGrmn326.14-+.06 +1.8
InTMCVa rn74.33-44 +.08 +0.9
ITBGradem n 9.5079 +.012 -1.1
TSrykAdmn37.120.53 +.05 +21.0
VLfeCon n 17.31 -.04 +0.3
WelslAfeGro n253.917+-.01 -1.3
WfelncAd n59.38+.03 -0.3
WineMod n 21.70 -.05 +0.4
WLTsrA/n810.596 -.15 +0.5
MorAssegAn 31.09 -.03 +0.6
YCALTn 11.4463 ... -1.5
CapppMulnsLg n12.27 01 +3.6
MuContn 14.73.05 ... +2.3
MuLtdiGron 10.62.78 +.01 +0.4
MuoEnergy n 176.96 +.21 +5.1.6
EplMuShrtn 15.546 -.12 +2.2
NJFLLTn 11.5134 ... -1.3
GNMAYTn 910.99 ... -1.6
Groln'n 36.69 -.7 +0.1
HYPoApn 6.19 ... -1.2
HPhCrenls2.87 -.73 -2.5
InPmaPron 11.77 +.01 -1.1
InllEupIrn23.74 +.09 +0.4
InSVaR n 45.44 +.0. +2.3
TIGrade n9.50 +.02 -1.3
STaiyen 10.53 +.02 -I.2
S/etrEn 29.91 -.01 +0.8
UTelnc2n 14.23 +.01 -0.4
LifeMod0n21.70 ... +0.4
LTIGrae n8.76 +.01 -3.2
Morgn 20.90 -.01 +1.6
MulnsLgn1227 ... -1.5
MWLtd n 10.02 +.01 -0.3
MWShrtn 15.54 ... +0.1
NJLTn 11.51 ... -1.8
NYLTn 10.96 ... -1.6
PALTn 11.04 ... -1.4
PrecMkltn 34.19+.28 +4.3
PrEcpCorn13.96 ... +1.8
Prmcp rn 76.03 +.04 +2.7
SelVal rn2325 -.04 +0.4
STARn 22.29 ... +0.3
STPedcn 10.22 +.01 -0.2
SmapEq n 26.61 -.03 +1.7
TglRe2015n13.27 ... +0.4
TglRe2o35n15.12 ... +1.0
USTron 19.69 +.01 +1.2


WTosrn 20.18 -.01 +0.3
Waslu n 38.62 -.08 +0.5
Vanguard Ida Fds:
Balanced n22.43 ... +0.2
DevMktn 14.01 +.01 +1.1
Europea n40.75 +.02 +0.6













Eurolnstna40.82 +.03 +0.6


Yahoo chairman bubble burst suffered a Supreme nation's third-largest hamburger
ends his tenure Court setback Monday, and the chain said Monday, as it warned
justices are poised to issue yet that profits for the year would fall
SAN FRANCISCO - Yahoo Inc. another important decision that short of Wall Street expectations.
Chairman Terry Semel ended his could restrict shareholder lawsuits. The company formed a commit-
six-year tenure as chief executive The court sided with Wall Street tee in April to determine how to
officer Monday and will hand over banks that were alleged to have boost its stock price, including, a
the reins to co-founder Jerry Yang conspired to drive up prices on possible sale. JP Morgan, as lead
in the Internet icons latest attempt about 900 newly issued stocks in adviser, and Lehman Brothers
to regain investor confidence. the late 1990s. Inc., as co-adviser, will conduct a
Semel, 64, will remain chairman riw in nntin with th
in a non-executive role. The justices reversed a federal review in conjunction with the
Besides naming Yang as its new appeals court decision that would committee.
CEO, Yahoo appointed Susan have enabled investors to pursue A sale would cap a whirlwind
Decker as its president. Decker had their case for anticompetitive prac- year for the company, which has
widely been seen as Semel's heir tices. spun off its Tim Hortons coffee-
apparent. Possible sale and-doughnut chain, dumped its
Do-cr i r m tsame e oney-losing Baja Fresh Mexican
Dot-com investors might save Wendy'S Grill and laid off employees at its

suffer a setback COLUMBUS, Ohio - Wendy's corporate office.

WASHINGTON - Investors International Inc. is exploring a
who lost money when the dot-com possible sale of the company; the - From wire reports





Rates on Treasury bills fall


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Interest
rates on short-term Treasury
bills fell in Monday's auction to
the lowest levels in more than a
year.
The Treasury Department
auctioned $14 billion in three-
month bills at a discount rate of
4490 percent, down from 4.640
percent last week Another $14


billion in six-month bills was
auctioned at a discount rate of
4.715 percent, down from 4.765
percent last week.
The three-month rate was
the lowest since the 4.450 per-
cent of Feb. 21, 2006. The six-
month rate was the lowest
since 4.700 percent on April 10,
2006.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less than


face value. For a $10,000 bill,
the three-month price was
$9,886.50, while a six-month
bill sold for $9,761.63.
Separately, the Federal
Reserve said Monday that the
average yield for one-year
Treasury bills, a popular index
for making changes in
adjustable rate mortgages, was
unchanged at 4.98 percent last
week


SHearing Test ~~*PIEN1 MCEI ATERES : HEARING HD REPAIRS:

I I ,,,
89�IFREE
: leaning--est54,,




Replacement ..... Lj,,.. .. , -RFST.


Inside Sears 5l r

Crystal River Mall * 795-1484 E .i-r:t,
Paddock Mall (Ocalat * (352) 237-1665 ' ' ,* I'o


em S a

Div Name Last Chg TWCablen 39.10 �49 160 USBencro 34.20 +06 1.12 Welt/Peon 36.14 +17


DIv Name Last Chg
.68 SmithAO 40.70 -.06
.40 Smithlntl u59.78 -.47
.. SmithfF 32.20 +.16
.. Solectm 3.80 +.01
.21e SonyCp 54.15 -.38
.98 SeJerInd 35.64 -.34
1.61f SouthnCo 35.16 -.45
5.58e SthnCoppsu94.28 +.76
.02 SwstAiri 14.51 -.03
.SwstnEngy 50.17 +.60
.32b SovrgnBcp 22.63 -.01
.88 SpectraEn 26.49 -.04
... SpiritAern 36.90 -1.00
.10 SorintNex 22.41 +.34
.16 StdPac d18.65 -.46
.84 Standex 29.67 -.15
.42e SLtarnWH 70.81 -.85
.84 StateSt 70.25 +.41
.20 Steds 30.44 +.15
... sTGold 64.95 +.10
.221 Stryker 66.47 +.11
... SturmRug u14.92 +.01
2.801 SubPpne 47.88 -.45
2.52 SunCmts 29.55 -.20
.401 Suncorg u92.24 +.78
1.10 Sunoco u85.84 +.92
,. Sunlech 34.01 -.19
2.92 SunTrst 90.14 -.19
.681 Supvalu 46.92 -.45
.82 Synovus 32.05 +.12
.76 Sysco 34.00 +.62


.87e TAMSA u35.33 +1.73
.97 TCF Fnd 28.21 -.21
.78f TECO 17.10 -.06
.36 TJX 28.36 -.31
1.73 TXUCorp 67.39 -.47
.495 TalwSemi 10.67 -.15
.181 TalisnEgs 21.04 +.28
.5f6 Taroet 3.8 +.19
.37e TataMotors 16.19 -.06
.24 Tektronx u33.54 +1.49
.40e TelNorL 19.00 -.16
2.11e TelcNZ 27.95 +.12
.76e TelMexL 39.64 -.30
.321 TempurP 26.85 +.18
.95e Tenaris 47.83 -.27
... TenetHI 6.75 +.03
2.74f Teppco 43.28 -.02
... Teradyn 17.60 +.24
... Terexs 84.84 -.06
.50p Tenmium 29.43 +1.17
... Terra u21.71 -.03
4.46e TernaNoul 16.70 +5.20
.401 Tesorowi 63.55 +.79
... TetraTech 27.68 +.53
.32f TexInst 37.50 +.64
... Theragen 4.19 -.16
... ThemirroFs 53.53 -.30
... ThmBet 57.55 -.17
2.72 Thombg 27.20 +.40
1.92 3MCo 87.62 -.05
.60 Tdy t r u70.28 +.20
.48f1 Trffany 48.90 -.28
.28 THortong 31.00 -.59


... TWCablen 39.10 +.49
.22 TineWam 20.89 -.01
.64 Timnken 35.13 -.49
... TitanMet 33.69 -.30
.60 ToddShp 19.90 -.20
... TollBros 26.67 -.55
.44e TorchEn 8.20 -.01
.52 Trchmrk 68.77 -.18
2.12 TorDBkg 68.32 -.17
2.46e Total SA u79.03 +.28
.28 TotalSys 30.72 +.25
... Transoc u104.06 +122
1.161 Travelers 53.41 -.51
.16 Tredgar 21.70 -.49
.561 TriConU 26,36 +.09
.72 Tribune 30.43 +.03
..TycoEwi 37.15 -1.65
.40 TvoIln 34.09 -.23
.16 Tyson u23.08 +.55
1.83e UBSAGs 62.47
1.321 UDR 27.63 -.46
1.73 UIL Holds 32.30 -.43
US Airn d27.29 -.32
USEC 19.96 +.16 .
2.40 USTInc 52.10 -1.02
... UndrAr 46.06 +.87
3.43e UUnao 112.84 +.23
.15 UniFirst 43.04 +.74
1.27e UnievNV 30.14 +.07
1.40 UnionPac 119.49 -.77
... Unisys 8.24 -.12
.06r UtdMcro 3.57 -.01
1.68 UPSB 73.32 -.73


1.60 USBancr 34.20 +.08
80 USSteel 114.06 -2`06
1.28f UtdTech u72.19 +.18
.03 UldhlthGp 52.87 -.03
.30 UnumGrp 26.25 -.08

... ValeantPh 1728 -.11
.48 ValeroE u77.30 +.80
1.26 Vectren 27.45 -.17
1.90 Ventas 37.35 -.92
1.42e VeoliaEnv 780 -1.05
... VeraSun d14.07 -.33
.. eone 36.68 +.27
1.62 VerizonCm 42.55 -.44
.. VIacomB 42.91 -.63
... Vishay 17.92 +.15
... Visteon 8.22 -.03
.Ole VirvoPart 5.10 -.07
1.33e Vodalone 32.31 +.12
3.40 Vomado 115.20 -1.35
.18 Wabash 14.70 -.18
2.24 Wachovia 54.11 +.06
.88 WalMart 49.11 -.23
.31 Walgm 44.27 +.01
2.201 WAMull 43.92 +.85
.96 WsteMInc 39.35 -.12
1321 Watsco 59.00 +.38
... Weathlfdnt u58.06 +.28
1.98 WeinRIt 42.67 -.71
.. Wellcare 91.64 +2.87
.08 Wellmn 3.18 +.22
. WellPoint 81.00 -.04


1.12 WellsFoos 36.14 +.17
.501 Wendyss 3826-1.47
... Wescolntl 65.12 -.77
1.08 WestarEn 25.47 -28
1.04 WAEMInc2 13.51 +.03
.54 WslAMgdHi 6.82 -.04
.66 WAstrmP2 11.57 +.07
... WDigilf 18.97 -.81
.241 WsRefin u55.10 +2.40
.01e WstnUnn 22.69 -.20
2.40 Weyerh 81.53 -.52
1.72 Whpl uI116.66 +1.96
.94e WilmCS 10.65 +.06
.401 WmsCos 31.72 -.06
.461 WmsSon 33.66 -.02
1.00 Windstm 15.11 +21
.40 Winnbgo 29.61 -.34
1.00 WIscEn 45.08 -.50
.68 Woehg 6 20.84 -.01
1.16 Wigley 56.80 +.24
1.04 Wyeth 58.10 -.06
1.52 XLCap 83.61 +.19
1.75 XLCap7un 29.14
.48 XTOEngy u63.15 -.3
.921 XcelEngy 21.54 -.31
Xerox u19.40 +.51
.04 Yamanag 12.95 -.04
Yigin 12.89 -.56
.60m YurnmBds 6727 -.95
... Zmmer 86.90 +.78
.50 ZweigTl 5.04


Standard &
Poor's 500


Russell
2000


-1.e86

1,531.05

-1.91

846.28


iOW OPEN



Monday - Thursday 7:00am - 6:00pm
-EMISL j42 Friday & Saturday 7:00am - 8:00pm
Salads. Soups.

Sarndwv ich e&s (Conveniently Located Behind Citrus Memorial Hospital)

DA ILY SPECIALS

e C leato P Call Ahead-Take-Out Available (352) 37 0151


percent, just below Friday's
5.16 percent
"There's a very strong corre-
lation between yields and the
stock market these days, and
that will likely be the case
until investors get more com-
fortable," said Mike Malone,
trading analyst at Cowen & Co.
Investors were somewhat
encouraged by a fresh round of
acquisition news in a year that
so far is on a record-setting
pace. Alcoa Inc., the world's
second-biggest aluminum pro-
ducer, jumped on talk it might
again be the target of a
takeover bid by Australian
mining company BHP Billiton
Ltd. Meanwhile, General
Electric Co. and Pearson PLC
is said to be mulling a joint $5
billion bid for Dow Jones & Co.
The Dow fell 26.50, or 0.19
percent, to 13,612.98.
Broader stock indicators
were also slightly lower. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
fell 1.86, or 0.12 percent, to
1,531.05, and the Nasdaq com-
posite index fell 0.11, or less
than 0.01 percent, to 2,626.60.


NEW YORK - Wall Street
edged lower Monday after
three days of solid gains as
investors watched Treasury
bond yields fluctuate amid lin-
gering questions about infla-
tion.
The market appeared to be
taking a break after last week's
sharp rally, when tame infla-
tion data pushed the Dow
Jones industrial average to its
biggest three-day point gain
since November 2004. With lit-
tle significant economic data
due at the start of the week,
investors were left searching
for a catalyst to extend the
rally.
Treasury yields have moved
higher over the past few weeks
on concerns that inflation is
stubbornly high and the econo-
my is rebounding, trends that
make it unlikely the Federal
Reserve will lower interest
rates. The yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury note
traded as high as 5.18 percent
Monday before closing at 5.15


NYSE diary

Advanced: 1,579 New highs
279
Declined: 1,737 Ne
SNew lows
Unchanged: 120 19

Volume: 2,459,596,101

Nasdaq diary

Advanced: 1,412 New highs
143
Declined: 1,597 New lows

Unchanged: 166 37
Volume: 1,691,717,857

AP


Business BRIEFS










10A
TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


S "The people's good is the
highest law."
Cicero


ENDORSEMENT


McNiff has



know-how to



help guide city


A demonstrated concern
about the future of Crystal
River, professional ex-
pertise that would benefit the
city and a fresh perspective com-
bine to make Maureen McNiff
the best choice for Crystal River
City Council.
McNiff is squaring off against
former Crystal River council-
man Mike Gudis, who served
from 1997 to 2001. Gudis' experi-
ence on the council
gives him a working THE I
familiarity with
issues confronting Crystal F
the city. His back- Council
ground as an
accountant, past OUR OI
experience as an Maureei
elected county offi- deserves
cial in Maryland
and local civic YOUR OPII
involvement reflect chronicleor
a resume of some- comment a
one who would Chro:ncie
serve the city well .. , . .
However, McNiff's qualifica-
tions are impressive as well -
and it's time to break from the
Crystal River City Council's past.
Maureen McNiff's experience
as an executive with Verizon
Communications included man-
aging a $150 million budget.
Having to wade through millions
of dollars in competing requests
to work within that budget indi-
-cates she has the financial skills
to see the city through fiscal
challenges. Her current employ-
ment with the Southwest Florida
Water Management District adds
to her skill set, as she has expo-
sure to the many water quality
issues the community faces, as
well expertise in the area of cus-
*tomer relations.
McNiff began attending city
council meetings five years ago,
after moving here from the Tam-
pa Bay area. McNiff, who moved
to Florida from New Jersey, has
,studied the progression of the

Doubled over C o
I'm sure distributing
telephone books is a major
undertaking. However,
hauling a plastic bag with
the books in it at my mail-
box is one thing. I'm still
able to carry them inside. I
was given two of every- CALL
thing. This also happened 5
last year and it was pretty 563-
heavy. This is a residential
address. Why do I need
two copies of the telephone book?
Who should pay?
Why should the residents pay for
two increases for Beverly Hills
.because Rolling Oaks did not main-
tain it properly, the sewer system,
but did take the profits all year
round? And how did they lose
$92,000 operating the system?
Explain that to the residents, Gerry
Mulligan, please.
Waste of time
With great amusement I read let-
ters to the Chronicle from people
saying the government should pass
laws to help us reduce our depend-
ency on oil and to save the environ-
ment. All you've got to do is look at
Citrus County. It's a one-day-a-week
watering, and nobody goes by it. So
why pass laws? Nobody's going to go
by the rules. They're going to ignore
it totally. I live in Sugarmill Woods.


S
R
e

P
n

N
b


council, researched its budget
and determined there are chan-
ges that need to be made. She
seems to have the knowledge and
courage to assist in making them.
What McNiff doesn't have is a
long-term sense of the communi-
ty of Crystal River and where it
is going. However, she recog-
nizes that a long-term plan is
needed and that the plan needs
to be focused on what the people
of the community
;SUE: want Crystal River
to become. Her idea
iver City of taking a survey
election. and creating a plan
for the future
'INION: makes good sense.
McNiff While she is prag-
support. matic about the
nuts-and-bolts oper-
ION: Go to nations of city gov-
hne.com to ernment, we hope
out today's she would be sup-
editorna portive of city
involvement , in
efforts that build community
pride, such as the annual
Christmas parade. As much as
the city needs a balanced budget
and a plan for the future, it also
needs a sense of spirit and iden-
tity.
McNiff has strong feelings and
opinions, most of which are well
founded and thought out. She is
articulate and confident. She
will do her homework and bring
that analytical thought process
to her role as a council member.
While Mike Gudis brings val-
ued skills to the race, it is
Maureen McNiff who would best
steer the city into the future.

Correction
Because of writer error, the
editorial in Monday's edition
contained an inaccuracy. Ron
Schultz served 14 years as Citrus
County property appraiser.
The Chronicle regrets the error.

The front entrance has now
been watered 21 straight
days. Call them up and
they get mad at you. Half
. the homes I pass in this
community water three
and four times a week. So
to pass laws to save the
environment would just be
a waste of time.


0579 Unknown statutes
This shout-out is for all
of us who drive a car.
Florida has a list of statutes regard-
ing driving that we can get a ticket
for if we violate them. These
statutes are not in the DMV hand-
book. The one I learned about most
recently is the frame you put around
your license plate. If the word
"Florida" is in any way obscured,
you can be stopped by a police offi-
cer and be given a ticket. The police
officer will also look around your car
to see what else he can get you for.
Insurance rates
Hearing all about tax exemption,
lowering of our taxes, which sounds
nice, but what about our homeown-
ers insurance? The prices are sky
high. Gov. Crist and county commis-
sioners, why don't you work on that?
I hear very little about that, but all
about homestead exemption. I think
$25,000 exemption is a very nice
deduction. Leave it at that and let's
get down to homeowners insurance.


Immigration: Who's winning?


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ............................publisher
Charlie Brennan .............................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart .................circulation director
.. Mike Arnold .........................managing editor
Founded in 1891 Curt Ebitz ............................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


m
*
(
ri
H


T he defeat of the so-
called immigration
"reform" bill in the
Senate last week was a
stunning blow to the power-
ful coalition backing it, but
opponents had better not
break out the champagne
just yet. The odds are better
than even that the coalition
will simply regroup, try
again, and this time roll William
over the opposition like a OTH
Sherman tank VOK
The coalition is simply
too powerful for anything as
unfocused as mere American public
opinion to resist for long. For one
thing, it includes the entire
Democratic Party, minus only a leftist
fringe that cannot stand even small
and temporary concessions. The
Democratic strategists realize that if
they can only put the 12 million or
more illegal aliens already here on a
track to eventual citizenship, two-
thirds of them can be depended to vote
Democratic when they get there. (That
is the record to date of the Hispanics
who are already citizens.) That's a net
gain of 4 million votes in every nation-
al election after roughly 2020, and that
figure will only grow as more
Hispanics flood in under the other
provisions of the "reform."
The other wing of the coalition con-
sists, paradoxically, of people who
mostly vote Republican. But they are
businessmen who depend on cheap
immigrant labor to fatten their profits,
and who are willing to do whatever it
takes to keep the current influx of
Mexican laborers coming. Their spiri-
tual ancestors were the pre-Civil War
slaveowners, who really knew about


LETTERS to


Price of blessings
Funny how when property value
,was rising, with no end in sight, and
low interest mortgages were being
thrown, around, no one was worried
about the consequences of rising real
estate prices on taxes and insurance.
Taxes increase with growth for sev-
eral reasons. One is the long lag in
the cost of development Another is a
change in expectations as persons
from many disparate areas move in.
Many impacts of growth don't show
themselves for a long time. We are
paying now for damage done to our
environment 20, 30 50, 100-plus years
ago.
The death of our waterways began
in the 1800s, when the first drainage
ditches were dug bypassing the natu-
ral water treatment plants nature pro-
vided. We are struggling, unsuccess-
fully at this point and at great cost, to
reverse the negative impacts of the
dredge and fill operations of the 1950-
70s. Profits made from development,
from ignorance or greed, were loans
from the future, with no plans for
repayment.
Early settlers had to adapt to the
conditions. The expectations of most
were basic shelter and enough food to
get by. Resources were great on a per-
person basis. Now most expect the
comforts and amenities afforded pre-
viously only to those of great wealth.
Each new person shares a smaller
piece of the pie and reduces the pie
available to the existing residences.
At the same time, each person's


OPINIONS INVITED
M The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily
represent the opinion of the editorial
board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
" All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
" Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonllne.com.

expectations are that they deserve a
larger piece of pie. Impact fees are an
acknowledgement of this, but they are
only just touching the real cost of
added development
Any industry not sustainable is a
loan from the future. Our government
representatives should focus on
encouraging sustainability, covering
real cost in real time and doing it effi-
ciently. We should be realistic in our
demands and willing to pay the price
of our blessings.
We can believe anything we want
We can act if our beliefs are reality.
Consequences, however, always fol-


cheap labor. The business-
men in question are hugely
influential in the
Republican Party, and have
persuaded a surprising
chunk of it (including the
current president) to sup-
port the "reform" bill, even
though every sensible
Republican strategist real-
izes that in the long run they
Rusher are risking party suicide.
IER Now, there is nothing
CES inherently wrong with
immigration, or with
Hispanic immigration. It is
perfectly true that America has always
welcomed immigrants, and has pros-
pered hugely from their contributions.
But the flood of Hispanic immigration
in the past three decades, both legal
and illegal, has simply overwhelmed
the normal assimilative capacities of
American society, and if continued
much longer (as you can bet it will be,
as long the aforementioned coalition
has a breath left in its body) it will
transform the United States into a
bilingual, bicultural hodgepodge with
quite possibly fatal internal divisions.
The result would be no different if we
were suddenly inundated with 20 or 30
million Poles or Turks.
The supporters of the "reform" bill
are fond of pointing to various provi-
sions (e.g., the pitiful fines illegals
would have to pay) that are supposed-
ly tough, and of challenging its oppo-
nents to come up with something bet-
ter. But the truth is that their "solu-
tion" is so bad that even the status quo
is better. Far better to have 12 million
illegals doing cheap labor for busi-
nessmen willing to defy the law than
giving them all citizenship and wel-


the Editor


low reality. And someone has to deal
with those consequences. Are we
holding ourselves accountable or are
we stealing from the future?
Steve Kingery
Crystal River

Suitable for hunting
RE: '"Assault rifles not for hunting."
I find only one phrase I can agree
with - "so-called assault rifles."
True assault rifles are those capa-
ble of fully automatic fire, that is,
machine guns and submachine guns.
The guns our left-wing friends have
.mislabeled as assault rifles are no dif-
ferent in function than any other
semi-automatic rifle legally available
today. They differ only in appearance,
and have been mislabeled in an
attempt by the anti-Second Amend-
ment leftists to vilify a certain class of
firearms.
As for not being suitable for hunt-
ing, every time I am in the field, I see
several hunters with AR-15's. A friend
of mine hunted the Florida deer with
an AR-15; he loved its light weight
and mild recoil. One of my sons, when
younger, hunted with an SKS. The
7.62 caliber round is an excellent
deer round (in my humble opinion).
Mr. Adams thinks the NRA goes too
far. How far have the anti-gunners
gone to disarm us? Without the NRA,
we'd most likely be hunting with
sticks and rocks by now.
Don Francisco
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


coming the next twelve million.
"Border enforcement" has been a
standing joke for 20 years.
And bear in mind that when the
"reform" bill is finally passed (as it very
probably will be), its enforcement will
be in the hands of the Democratic party,
which seems likely to sweep the 2008
elections to spank George Bush for Iraq.
How much of that "fence," do you sup-
pose, will actually be built on the
Democrats' watch? How long will it take
Nancy Pelosi to reinstate the current
preference for admitting the distant rel-
atives of Hispanics already here, as she
has already called for doing in the high
name of "family values"? How hard will
the immigration enforcers be told to
look for, and deport, the new workers
brought in for two years, if they don't go
home for a year (as required by the
"reform" bill) after that?
Above all, who - if anybody - is
looking out for the long-range future of
this country? In a column published in
April 2006,1 I warned those who wanted
true immigration reform that "We are
at least 20 years too late." We have put
up a mighty fight this year, but if the
current "reform" bill is ultimately
passed, that gloomy assessment will be
vindicated. We are in the grip of a coali-
tion of businessmen without foresight
and politicians without scruples. And
anyone who lives through the next fifty
years will see the United States trans-
formed from a proud English-speaking
nation in the West European tradition
into a polyglot multicultural mess.

William Rusher is a Distinguished
Fellow of the Claremont Institute for
the Study of Statesmanship and
Political Philosophy


rl-m
�?Jnw- ,
-W wivaris 'PISFAT4at


THE WORD FROM BACK
HOME 15 THAT PARRIS SEJ)PMS
6.5 SEEMS
"M ""
TO BE COVPPAIINN6.


I









Ci ous CoLjTvY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters tothe E 0 k T :


Watering rules
In a letter written to the edi-
tor last week, a resident ex-
pressed his surprise at receiv-
ing a visit from a sheriff's dep-
uty due to daily lawn irrigation.
The resident requested some-
thing in writing to explain how
long he can water a new lawn.
I would like to respond to
the request and clarify that the
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District (SWFWMD)
restricts the watering of new
grass (sod, seed, plugs, etc.) for
up to 60 days, beginning the
day of installation. During this
time, the new grass may be
watered on any day of the
week, but the hours of watering
are still limited to allowable
watering hours (before 8 a.m.
or after 6 p.m. for properties
under two acres in size.)
Newly planted trees, shrubs,
potted plants and flower beds
may be watered without res-
triction when using a low-vol-
ume technology, such as hand-
watering and micro-irrigation.
Instead of viewing enforcing
the watering restrictions as
being "harassed," I would
hope that residents would rec-
ognize that Citrus County is
under a severe water shortage
restriction. Our most precious
resource is at risk and some
residents and businesses con-
tinue to irrigate excessively!
While nice lawns in the yard
and along the roadways are
nice t.o have, sufficient water for
drinking, hygiene and health is
must-have for survival.
When landscaping the yard,
the first consideration should
be given to native, drought-tol-
erant vegetation to minimize
the need for watering, fertiliz-
ers and pesticides.
If residents want more in-


formation and tools regarding
water conservation in Citrus
County, please call 527-7650.
Bernadine Flood-Nichols
Water Conservation &
Outreach Coordinator

Good soldier
I was deeply saddened at the
recent loss of Sgt Robert Sur-
ber; he was a fine young man
and a good soldier, to be sure.
Having never lost a son, I
cannot comprehend the pain
and feelings of separation the
Surbers must be experiencing.
May they find comfort know-
ing Robert did not die in vain.
Some things are hard to
understand, there is no right,
no wrong, no political ideology
- Robert is a proven warrior,
he died fighting for what was
in his heart, what he believed
in, and that is all that matters.
Dennis Morris
Pine Ridge Estates

Impeach them
Impeachment resolutions
against President Bush and
Vice President Dick Cheney
already have been introduced
in the legislatures of Vermont,
New Mexico and Washington.
Grassroots impeachment
efforts also are under way in
at least 20 other states across
the country. Due to the contin-
uing deterioration in the
health of our nation's democ-
racy and violations within the
Constitution, it is imperative
that these grassroots move-
ments continue to push for-
ward. If not, this administra-
tion will undoubtedly lead us
into a war with Iran and con-
tinue to usurp more of our
individual rights.


4ZOPIN IOIN


Lies told to the American
people and the Congress by
the president and the vice
president are being exposed
daily Two well-publicized
examples are the "outing" of
Valerie Plame, a CIA opera-
tive, where Cheney's right-
hand man, Scooter Libby
became the "fall-guy" for his
boss. And now, former CIA
director George Tenet is
claiming that he was set up in
a similar fashion by the presi-
dent. What is the remedy for
his Washington nightmare?
Article II, Section 4 of our
Constitution clearly gives testi-
mony that high crimes and mis-
demeanors have been commit-
ted. (1.) The president was
knowingly deceitful with
Congress and the nation
regarding the imminent threat
posed by Iraq; (2.) the warrant
less domestic wiretapping of
Americans; and (3.) the unlaw-
ful treatment of prisoners,
including but not limited to tor-
ture, suspension of habeas cor-
pus, and denial of due process.
Because the raw abuse of
power by Bush and Cheney
clearly threatens the bedrock
principles of checks and bal-
ances, and the separation of
powers so carefully guarded
by our nation's architects,
removal through remedy of
impeachment is not only
appropriate but necessary. '


L.M. E


Eastman
Lecanto


No one listens C
Listen, I'm a veter-
an and also a
Democrat. I have
about almost 250 vet-
erans and Democrats
who are not voting
this year. We are not
voting unless they CALL
pull the troops out of
Iraq, and this is final. 563.
I'm campaigning
myself. I've got 200
so far and I don't want them to
vote anyway because I feel that
if the Democrats don't listen to
their people, or the Repub-
licans, why should I waste my
time?
They're supposed to repre-
sent the people...If it's going to
pot, let it go. I don't care who
gets in now. As far as I'm con-
cerned, I'm trying to get at
least 1,000 to 2,000 veterans.
So far I only got -_ actually I
don't have 200 I have 189...I
am a disgusted American
because the politicians,
Democrats or Republicans, no
one listens to the American
people and I'm very disgusted
with the leadership of this
country.
Dogs, owners filthy
Reading in the Sound Off.
about the issue of dogs being
in restaurants where people are
eating. Supposedly in Portland,
Ore., they're all happy they eat
with dogs outside. Come on.
Dogs lick their private, parts,
they sniff other dogs' butts,
they're dirty animals. They
smell bad because, well,
.they're not people and they


I

c


t' don't take showers
and baths. Of course,
maybe a lot of these
dog owners probably
B - don't take showers or
baths very often,
either, so the smell
doesn't bother them.
t But why people like to
listen to barking, yap-
f57Q9 ping dogs that are
057 I smelly and pooping
all over the place, I
don't get the attraction. But if
you want to do it in your own
home, I won't visit them. But
not at restaurants. That's filthy,
disgusting.
And if dogs are allowed to
be there, then people should
be able to bring potbellied
pigs, goats, cats, a horse,
squirrels, an alligator. It's dis-
crimination just to allow dogs
and not other animals to go to
restaurants.
Spearmint leaves
A Sound Off caller requested
spearmint leaves. I have tons.
If you would like to put this in
the paper it's fine with me: Al
at 860-1017.
U.N.'s bias
When Hamas and Fatah
fight, an "X" amount of civil-
ians are killed. The U.N. does
not say a word. When Israel or
the United States kill "X"
amount of civilians by acci-
dent, the U.N. condemns them.
Pardon me, I think the U.N.'s
bias is showing.
Foxy move
Having County Attorney
Battista preside over Tom
- '. .. . .-- ... ..- - �w -


Lose eigt9utSmoig
Stres Mangemet Prgram
w - it Pyscin uprvsion

r t '


r eaboi etno


ACCEPTING NEW BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH PATIENTS
INCLUDING NEW
ADD &ADHD EVALUATIONS


Esther


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at 9:30 am * Wednesday, June 20, 2007
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Complimentary meal will be served
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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 11A

Dick's hearing is like putting
the fox in charge of the hen-
house. How can he be unbi-
ased when his office came up
with the charges in the first
place?
Why does Fisher refuse to
give this man a fair hearing?
The commissioners have to do
something about this.
Try some talcum
To remove grease stains
from an article of clothing,
sprinkle talcum powder on the,
stain, let it stand for three to
four hours, then brush off. The
talcum powder will absorb the
grease.
Who gets 'support?'
I notice all these people who
ride around with these bows on:
the back of their cars saying
"We support our troops." Does
the money from these bows go,
for the troops or does it just go
to the person that prints these
bows? I mean, is it just a scam
that somebody's making
money on these bows or does
the money or a certain per-
centage of the money go to
support the troops?
I'd like to know where the
money goes that people pay for
all these bows that we put on
the back of our cars.
If the money is going to the
person that just makes the
stickers, I'd just as soon find a
place where we could donate
the money to put the money
for the troops.
I want to support my troops,
but I don't want to just sup-
port somebody for making
.decals.














12A
TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Cool off


Gaza's border crossings closed


Associated Press
Katelyn Hardy, 2; her sister
Anna, 5; and Duncan McNeill,
5, from left, take an ice cream
break Monday while playing at
the Village Park Splash Pad in
Kannapolis, N.C., as the tem-
perature reached 96 degrees,
according to the National
Weather Service.

Officer admits to not
being a U.S. citizen
MILWAUKEE -A police offi-
cer has agreed to plead guilty to
falsely claiming to be a U.S. citi-
zen for taking his dead cousin's
identity as a teenager, according
to the U.S. attorney's office.
A plea agreement released
last week says prosecutors will
recommend a sentence of six to
12 months for Oscar Ayala-
Comejo, 24. The maximum sen-
tence is three years in prison
and a $250,000 fine.
Ayala-Cornejo also agreed to
be deported after his prison sen-
tence and resign from the
Milwaukee police department,
Assistant U.S. Attorney Mel
Johnson said. The officer, who
authorities said was not involved
in any major cases, had been
taken off the department's pay-
roll earlier this month.

Boy attacked and
killed by black bear
AMERICAN FORK, Utah -
Wildlife officers wounded a bear
Monday as they hunted the ani-
mal that snatched an 11-year-
old boy from his family's tent
and.killed the youngster..
Authorities were confident
that the wounded bear was the
same one that ripped through
the tent late Sunday in the
Wasatch Mountains, said Scott
Root, conservation outreach
manager at the Utah Division of
Wildlife Resources.
"We want this bear," he said.
The boy, sleeping alone in
one section of the family's large
tent, screamed before he was
dragged away in his sleeping
bag in a canyon about 30 miles
southeast of Salt Lake City, said
sheriff's Lt. Dennis Harris.


World BRIEFS

Flooded


1 im- , , '"M. l
Associated Press
People sit atop their vehicles
Monday as one of the busy
roads was flooded after a
heavy downpour in Gauhati,
India.

Sunken cruise
ship creates fines
ATHENS, Greece - The
owners, operator and captain of
a cruise ship that hit the rocks
off the island Santorini and sank
were fined a total of $1.57 mil-,
lign Monday for polluting the
Aegean Sea.
,.The Sea Diamond leaked an
estimated 300 tons of fuel into
tlte sea since sinking off the
island two months ago.
: Nearly 1,600 people, most of
them Americans, including two
dozen students from North
Carolina, were evacuated from
the Cypriot-owned ship on April
5, but two French tourists are
missing and presumed
drowned. The Sea Diamond
sank the next day, with some
450 tons of fuel and lubricants in
its tanks.
- From wire reports


Human rights

groups fear a

humanitarian crisis

Associated Press

RAFAH, Gaza Strip - Border cross-
ings crucial to the impoverished Gaza
Strip's economic survival remained shut
Monday, three days after the Hamas m i I i-
tant movement routed Fatah security
forces and took over the densely populat-
ed Palestinian territory. ..
Militants have taken over Gaza's Rafah
border crossing into Egypt, and no one
knows when Karni, the territory's only
cargo crossing, will function again
because it would require cooperation
between Israel and Hamas.
Already at the Erez terminal, the
Palestinians' passage to Israel and the
West Bank, the situation has turned vio-


lent On Monday, Palestinian militants at
Erez fired at Israeli soldiers on the other
side, triggering an exchange that left at
least one Palestinian dead and 15 wound-
ed.
Hundreds of people, including many
Fatah loyalists, have camped in the tun-
nel leading to the terminal hoping to be
allowed through closed gates.
Human rights groups fear that with no
products coming into Gaza, the territory
will plunge into humanitarian crisis.,
'One day of a crossing not working is not
going to create a crisis. But a sustained
closure will, of course," said John Ging,
the head of U.N. aid operations in Gaza.
Hamas leaders insist the situation will
be resolved, but offered no details of how
they would make that happen. "We will
work to make commerce flourish by
reopening the crossings," said Mahmoud
Zahar, a top Hamas leader.
Israeli officials said they would find a
way to get aid to Gaza Israel's deputy
defense minister, Ephraim Sneh, said
Israel would allow aid supplied by inter-
national groups to enter Gaza, but he did


not give details.
"No one, including Israel, wants to
accentuate hardship that already exists
in Gaza as a result of the internal con-
flict," said Mark Regev, Israel's Foreign
Ministry spokesman.
Even before Monday's shootout at Erez,
gunmen have on several occasions run
into the tunnel and opened fire, only to be
driven off by Israeli fire and tear gas, wit-
nesses said.
"The problem today is because we
don't have policemen on the other side,"
said Shlomo Dror, an Israeli military
spokesman. "The people who come, we
don't know if they are terrorists or who
they are."
After the Hamas takeover, the Karni
cargo crossing was looted by militants
and thieves who stole the furniture, goods
waiting to cross and machines used to
move the goods over the border, Dror
said.
"All the people we have connections
with are not there anymore. We don't
know if they are alive, if they are arrested
or if they ran away," he said.


'Hot fuel'may be costing motorists


A.,X'5Xkid Irett.
Jim Rohrer of Tucker, Ga., pumps gas at a filling station Sunday in Clarkesville, Ga. As the temperature rises, liquid gasoline
expands and the amount of energy in each gallon drops. Since gas is priced at a 60-degree standard and gas pumps don't adjust
for any temperature changes, motorists often get less bangfor their buck in warmer weather.

Warm temperatures may cause drivers to pay more for less


Associated Press

ATLANTA - It's not just
increased demand that sends
summertime gasoline prices
soaring. It's also the increased
temperature.
As the temperature rises,
liquid gasoline expands and
the amount of energy in each
gallon drops. Since gas is
priced at a 60-degree standard
and gas pumps don't adjust for
any temperature changes,
motorists often get less bang
for their buck in warmer
weather
Consumer watchdog groups
warn that the temperature
hike could end up costing con-
sumers between 3 and 9 cents
a gallon at the pump.
The effect could cost U.S.
drivers more than $1.5 billion
in the summertime, including
$228 million to drivers in
California alone, according to


Warming trend
Gasoline expands when
temperatures rise, making each
gallon slightly less potent. This
effect could cost motorists an
estimated $1.5 billion this summer.
Projected total cost of warming
effect on gas this summer.
State Millions of dollars
california
Florida i3
Arizona - 70.0
Georgia 1- 65 9
New York 52.1
North Carolina = 48.3
Tennessee 41.3
Louisiana ! 40.1,
Virginia i 39.7
SOURCE: House Subcommittee AP
on Domestic Policy
the House Subcommittee on
Domestic Policy.
Gas retailers oppose forcing
stations to adjust their pumps


as costly, and asked to call off
the hearings and wait for more
studies.
The issue has driven trial
lawyers to fire off as many as
20 federal lawsuits accusing
retailers of using simple
physics to take advantage of
consumers. Challenges have
been filed in Alabama,
Arkansas, California, Florida,
Kansas, Missouri and .New
Jersey
The latest lawsuit claims
that distributors have been
"unjustly enriched" by tens of
millions of dollars. They did so
by paying taxes on the fuel
based on the colder industry'
standard but pocketing the
taxes collected from customers
when the temperature soars.
"I don't believe gas retailers
should collect more in pur-
ported taxes than they pay the
government," said Bryan
Vroon, one of the attorneys in


the Georgia suit.
The "hot fuel" effect is a
matter of simple physics.
Almost a century ago, the
industry and regulators
agreed to define a gallon of
gasoline as 231 cubic inches at
60 degrees. But as the mercury
rises and gasoline expands, it
takes more than a gallon of gas,
to produce the same amount of
energy as a regular gallon in
colder weather
U.S. gas retailers ignore the
temperature swings and'
always dispense fuel as if it's
60 degrees. As a result, gas is
an average of about five
degrees warmer than the fed-
eral standard, according to a
study analyzed by Dick Suiter
of the National Institute of
Standards and Technology.
But it's worst in southern and
western states where the tem-
peratures are the most consis-
tently warm.


Police smash global pedophile ring


Associated Press


LONDON - A team of inter-
national investigators infil-
trated an Internet chat room
used by pedophiles who
streamed live videos of chil-
dren being raped, rescuing 31
children and identifying more
than 700 suspects worldwide.
Undercover officers in
Britain, the U.S., Canada and
Australia busted up the
pedophile ring using surveil-
lance techniques more com-
monly associated with fighting
terrorism and organized
crime.
The chat room, which was


called "Kids
the Light of
Our Lives,"
featured
images, includ-
ing live videos, '
of children -'+
some only
months old - Timothy
being subject- David
ed to horrific Martyn
sexual abuse, Cox
said Jim was the
Gamble, chief ringleader
executive of
Britain's Child
Exploitation and Online Prot-
ection Center.
"You could go and if you


were in the club, arrange a
time and a place when online
you could view a child being
raped and brutalized in real
time," he said.
Police analyzed images and
videos traded by the chat room's
members for the smallest clues
that could help them identify,
locate and rescue the victims.
More than 15 children were
found in Britain, Gamble said,
declining to give further
details. A Canadian official
said authorities there arrested
24 Canadians and rescued
seven Canadian children as
part of the probe since late
2005.


Describing it as "a massive
leap forward," Gamble said the
investigation involved agencies
from 35 countries. Investigators
made the case public after the
sentencing of ringleader
Timothy David Martyn Cox on
Monday.
Cox, 27, was given an indeter-
minate jail sentence, meaning
he will remain in prison until
authorities decide he is no
longer a threat to children. One
of his accomplices, Gordon
Mackintosh, has pleaded guilty
to 27 charges of making, possess-
ing and distributing indecent
images and videos. He is await-
ing sentencing.


Vital lifelines closed
Without giving details, Israel said
it would allow aid to enter Gaza
after the three main crossings were
closed following the Hamas
takeover.


SOURCE: ESRI A
I


Iraq


second


most


unstable


country

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON - Iraq now
ranks as the second-most
unstable country in the world,
ahead of war-ravaged-- or
povierty-stricken countries
such as Somalia, Zimbabwe,
lvory . Coast, Congo,
Afghanistan, Haiti and North
Korea, according to the 2007
Failed. State index issued
Monday by Foreign Policy
magazine and the Fund for
Peace.
Despite billions of dollars in
foreign aid, and the presence
of more than 150,000
American troops, Iraq has
been on a steady decline over
the past three years, according
to the. index. It ranked fourth
last year, but its score dropped
in almost all of the 12 political,
economic, security and social
indicators on which the index
is based.
"The report tells us that Iraq
is sinking fast," said Fund for
Peace President Pauline
Baker. "We believe it's
reached the point of no return.
We have recommended -
based on studies done every
six months since the U.S. inva-
sion - that the administration
face up to the reality that the
. only choices for Iraq are how
and how violently it will break
up."
In a parallel series of
reports, the Fund for Peace, a
research and advocacy group,
suggests a policy of managed
partition for Iraq.
Sudan, largely because of
the humanitarian catastrophe
in Darfur, is the world's most
unstable country, the group
concluded. More than 200,000
Sudanese have died, and
another 2 million to 3 million
have been displaced.
"There were only marginal
differences between Iraq and
Sudan, and Iraq is worse then
Somalia, which is already a
failed state," Baker said.
There are two basic driving
forces behind Iraq's escalating
problems, Baker said. The
first is fragmentation internal-
ly, marked by the proliferation
of militias and other groups
-.tthat the United States and
Iraqis have been unable to
control. The second is inter-
fererice of external forces in
the country.
"Both are filling the vacuum
at the center created by a
weak government and a failing
state," Baker said.
The organization reported
that Africa is the continent
with the most significant
downward slide. Eight of the
10 most unstable countries are
now in Africa, the report con-
cludes.
In addition to Iraq, the other
is Afghanistan.


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Game goes
Associated Pr
OMAHA, Neb. - Br�
ended the longest gam
World Series history wit
ing single in the bottorn
inning, giving UC Irvine
over Cal State Fullerton
nation game Monday.
The 5 hour, 40 minute g
old CWS mark - set
Oklahoma State and Ari
by 40 minutes.
Petersen's winning hi
Fullerton left fielder Jo
had gunned down Taylc
home plate.
The Anteaters (46-1
their first CWS appearan


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Irvine gets fi


13 innings, record time of5 hours, 40 minutes
*ess Tuesday game against the loser of Irvine came into the CWS four
Monday night's Arizona State-Oregon nationally in fielding (.976) and cor
yan Petersen State game. mitted just one error in winning i
e in College Fullerton (38-25) went two games first five NCAA tournament games.
th a run-scor- and out at the CWS for the first time in Fullerton and Irvine also tied
a of the 13th nine appearances since 1990. The CWS record by combining for eight h
a 5-4 victory Titans are 0-6 all-time in extra innings batsmen.
in an elimi- in Omaha. Holiday appeared to lean into
The 97th meeting of the neighbor- Bryan Harris pitch leading off the bc
game beat the hood rivals came more than 1,500 tom of the 13th and was awarded fir
in 1981 by miles away from their Orange County base by home-plate umpire Davi
zona State - campuses, on the game's biggest Buck. A steamed Horton argued an
stage. was tossed.
it came after Despite committing a season-high Holiday tried to score from secor
)sh Fellhauer six errors, UC Irvine came back three on Matt Morris' single. Fellhau(
or Holiday at times to tie the Titans before overtak- came charging in, picked up the ba
ing them in a tense 13th inning that and threw it on a line to catcher Joh
6-1), making had Fullerton coach George Horton
ice, move to a ejected for arguing a hit batsman call. Please see CWS/Page 3


rst CWS win


th
m-
ts
a
lit
a
>t-
st
id
nd
nd
er
all
in
3B


Associated Press
Cal State Fullerton's Nick Mahin (44) Is safe at first base as UC Irvine first baseman
Taylor Holiday can't make the catch In the second Inning on Monday In Omaha, Neb.


B
TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


BRIGHT FUTURE AHEAD


Associated Press
Nascar drivers Kyle Busch, left, and Dale Eamhardt Jr., talk at New Hampshire International Speedway In Loudon, N.H., In this Sept. 15, 2006 file photo.

Bounced out at Hendrick, Busch becomes NASCAR'S newest talented fee agent


Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - For a kid
who just lost his job, Kyle Busch is
certainly on top of the NASCAR
world.
Busch became NASCAR's newest
free agent when he was pushed out
of Hendrick Motorsports so the
team could make room for Dale
Earnhardt Jr. It's opened a ton of
opportunities for the talented but
temperamental driver, as at least six
of the top Nextel Cup owners are on
record as being interested in sign-
ing him.
And, believe it or not, Busch has
far more opportunities than


Earnhardt did.
Earnhardt had very firm criteria
during his job search, which was
limited to only the top Chevrolet
teams in NASCAR. He wants to win
a championship, and at age 32, the
clock is ticking on his career. He
couldn't gamble with his choice, and
realistically only had three teams to
choose from.
Busch doesn't have the same
restrictions. He can drive a Chevy,
Ford, or Dodge - maybe even a
Toyota - and at 10 years younger
than Junior, Busch has a much big-
ger window to find success. Busch
can take a risk, perhaps sign with a
smaller team, and become the cor-


nerstone of a long-term plan.
"I'm interested in talking to any-
body who wants to talk," Busch said.
"Whether it's DEI, whether it's
Gibbs, RCR, Evernham, Yates, who-
ever's got an open seat Whatever,
lets go, let's sit down. Let's have din-
ner."
Busch's appointment book should
be full by the end of the week
Richard Childress, Ray
Evernham, Chip Ganassi, Bobby
Ginn, Robert Yates, Michael Waltrip
and Dale Earnhardt Inc. have all
said they want to talk to him. Joe
Gibbs Racing declined to comment,
and Jack Roush, who had Busch
under contract when he was 16, said


he won't be revisiting the relation-
ship.
Armed with a new agent - he
fired his previous representation
last week when his job at Hendrick
fell apart - Busch spent the week-
end at Michigan International
Speedway laying the groundwork
for what should be a lucrative new
deal.
He was matter-of-fact when dis-
cussing his impending split from
Hendrick, where he signed shortly
before his 18th birthday. He had
nothing but praise for Rick
Hendrick, and insisted the split was
Please see FUTURE/Page 3B


'Pacman'


sought


by police

Titans' CB wanted

for questioning after

shooting in Atlanta

Associated Press
ATLANTA - Suspended NFL play-
er Adam "Pacman" Jones was being
sought by police for questioning about
a shooting early Monday involving
members of his entourage after a fight
at an Atlanta strip club.
The Tennessee Titans cornerback,
is currently on suspension.following a
melee and shooting at a Las Vegas
strip club.
Jones, his group and, three other.
people got into a fight, apparently
over a woman, at a club around 4 a.m.,
officer Ariel Toledo said. Someone
from Jones' group threatened the'
three men, who told a security officer;
at the club about it.
.After everyone involved left the
strip club - the three people in one'
car, and Jones and his entourage in
three other cars - someone in Jones'
group shot several times into the car
as it waited at a red light, police said..
The driver returned fire toward the:
shooter.
Toledo said Jones was not present
when the shots were fired and no,
charges have been filed against him. �
"We believe he knows some of his
entourage who were involved in the
shooting," Toledo said. "On himself,
we do not have any charges on him.
He wasn't there when the shooting
occurred."
One person in the car that was shot
at received a minor injury from'
debris scattered by the shooting and,
was treated by emergency medical technicians, Toledo said.
Manny Arora, Jones' attorney, said
he expects Jones will give the police,
whatever help he can.
"I've got to sit down with him and sit.
down with the police and figure out':
what we're looking at or if in fact he"
can even help them," Arora said.
"Once we agree to do that, I will do it
very privately and we'll take care of
it."
He said that may be in person, by,
phone or even by e-mail.
'"Adam was not involved, they'll tell.
Please see PACMAN/Page 3B


Sports BRIEFS


Last-place Orioles
fire manager Perlozzo
BALTIMORE - Sam Perlozzo was fired
as manager of the Baltimore Orioles on
Monday with the last-place team in the
midst of an eight-game
losing streak.
Perlozzo was told of
the decision during a 20-
minute discussion with
executive vice president
Mike Flanagan and vice '
president Jim Duquette.
"He said how disap- Sam
pointed he was that he Perlozzo
wasn't going to be here to Fired by
turn it around," Flanagan the Orioles
said. "He felt he made the
right decisions but had the wrong reaction
at the end. He understood we had to make
a change and go off in different direction."
Bullpen coach Dave Trembley will be
the interim manager when the Orioles
begin a six-game trip on Tuesday.


Tiger's wife gives birth
to a daughter, Sam Alexis
Tiger Woods is a daddy.
Less than 24 hours after Woods finished
second at the U.S. Open on Father's Day,
his wife gave birth to a daughter. Woods
announced on his Web site - www.tiger-
woods.com - that Sam Alexis Woods
was born early Monday morning.
"Both Elin and Sam are doing well and
resting peacefully," Woods wrote. "We want
to thank our doctors and the hospital staff
for all their dedicated and hard work. This
is truly a special time in our lives and we
look forward to introducing Sam to our fam-
ily and friends over the next few weeks.
We thank everyone for their well wishes
and continued respect of our privacy."
Woods said he would miss a major if it
meant seeing the birth of his child. Now he
won't have to, but it's not clear how his
upcoming schedule with be effected.
He's scheduled to host a tournament in
Washington, D.C., from July 5-8.


Lee, Young suspended five
games each; Smith gets 3
NEW YORK - Chicago Cubs first
baseman Derrek Lee and San Diego
pitcher Chris Young were suspended for
five games each Monday
following a bench-clear-
ing brawl last weekend.
Cubs hitting coach
Gerald Perry was sus-
pended for three games
for his role in Saturday's
fight at Wrigley Field.
Philadelphia third-base Derrek Lee
coach Steve Smith was
suspended for three games and catcher
Carlos Ruiz for one following an argument
in Sunday's game against Detroit. The play-
ers' union appealed Ruiz's suspension,
meaning it can't start until after the case is
heard and decided.
Chicago and San Diego were off
Monday, giving Lee time to decide whether
to contest the discipline.


Mickelson withdraws from
Travelers Championship
CROMWELL, Conn. - Phil Mickelson
withdrew from this week's Travelers
Championship to rest his inflamed left wrist
that he injured while preparing for the U.S.
Open, a spokesman for his management
company said Monday.
Mickelson, who injured his wrist while
chipping from rough at Oakmont (Pa.)
Country Club on Memorial Day weekend,
has been told not to play golf for at least two
weeks, according to T.R. Reinman, a
spokesman for the sports management
company that represents him. Reinman said
he is not sure when Mickelson will play next.
"He'll continue his therapy. He'll contin-
ue to be monitored by his specialist, and
there will be a determination after that,"
Reinman said.
Mickelson failed to make the cut at last
week's U.S. Open, ending a streak of 30
consecutive majors in which he made the
cut.


LB Arrington hurt
in motorcycle crash
LANHAM, Md. - Former Redskins and
Giants linebacker LaVar Arrington was
hospitalized with serious
but not life-threatening
injuries after his motorcy-
cle crashed on a high-
way ramp Monday,
police said.
Arrington lost control
and hit a guardrail,
Maryland State Police
Sgt. Russell Newell said. LaVar
He said police did not Arrington
know how fast Arrington Hurt in motor-
was traveling, cycle crash
Arrington, who turns
29 Wednesday, was wearing a helmet and
alcohol was not involved in the accident,
Newell said. Arrington was issued two cita-
tions - one for operating the motorcycle
without a proper license and the other for
the crash itself. - From wire reports














Z I u~DAI, JUINE .I.7, ZU7lxa~cxk." x EU r"-x


Braves chop Red Sox


Indianspound

Phillies, 10-1

Associated Press

ATLANTA - Curt Schilling
was missing his overpowering
stuff. Brian McCann and the
Braves sure took advantage of
it
McCann homered and drove
in four runs off Schilling, who
endured his first strikeout-
free start since 1993 in
Atlanta's 9-4 victory over the
Boston Red Sox on Monday
night.
Schilling was rocked for 10
hits and six rfins in 4 1-3
innings, his second-shortest
outing of the season. More
telling, the 40-year-old right-
hander failed to strike out
anyone - the first time that's
happened in one of his starts
since July 1, 1993.
Coco Crisp homered twice
for the Red Sox, and J.D. Drew
went deep for Boston's other
run. But McCann outdid them
both, putting the Braves ahead
for good with an RBI double in
the fourth and chasing
Schilling (6-4) the next inning.
With one out, Edgar Renteria
and Chipper Jones hit consecu-
tive singles to bring up
Atlanta's young catcher.
McCann worked the count in
his favor, then drove a 2-1 pitch
into the seats just to the right of
the 400-foot sign.
The three-run homer put
Atlanta ahead 6-1 and offset a
trio of solo homers by the Red
Sox, who sat one of their
biggest offensive stars. With no
designated hitter in the NL
park, David Ortiz was limited
to a pinch-hitting role.
Crisp had the first multi-
homer game of his career, the
second of which ended the
night for Atlanta starter Chuck
James (6-6). But the left-hander
lasted long enough for the win,
giving up five hits and two runs
in 5 1-3 innings.
James snapped a two-game
skid and won for the first time
in four starts.
Schilling has endured a lin-
gering hangover from his near
no-hitter at Oakland on June 7,
which was broken up with two
outs in the ninth. In his last two
starts, he's given up 19 hits and
11 earned runs in 9 1-3 innings.
The six runs allowed to the
Braves were a season high for
Schilling, while the stint of 4 1-
3 innings was his shortest since
opening day. In that one, he
lasted only four innings at
Kansas City for his briefest
start since 2001.
Boston jumped ahead in the
second on Crisp's first homer
of the night, a drive just inside
the left-field pole. Atlanta tied
it on Kelly Johnson's sacrifice
fly in the third and took control
with two more runs in the
fourth.
Tigers 9, Nationals 8
WASHINGTON - Carlos
Guillen and Marcus Thames home-
red, Detroit scored six times in the
fifth and the Tigers held on to beat
the Washington Nationals 9-8 on


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves' Scott Thorman slides into home plate safe to score against Boston Red Sox catch-
er Jason Varitek on a sacrifice off the bat of Braves' Kelly Johnson during the third inning of a Major
League Baseball game on Monday at Turner Field in Atlanta.


Monday night.
Guillen drove in three runs and
Gary Sheffield had two RBIs for
the Tigers, who have won three of
four and are 9-4 in interleague play
this season.
Mike Maroth (5-2) won despite
giving up five runs - four earned
- on six hits over five-plus innings.
The left-hander, who doubled in the
fifth for his first career extra-base
hit, walked two and struck out four.
The Tigers had to-withstand a
three-run ninth-inning rally against
Todd Jones, who got Ronnie
Belliard to ground out to short with
runners on the corners for the final
out.
Leading 3-1 in the fifth, the
Tigers sent nine batters to , the
plate. Maroth doubled, Curtis
Granderson walked and Placido
Polanco singled to load the bases,
before Sheffield's two-run single to
left-center. After Magglio Ordonez
walked to load the bases, Guillen
lined a two-run single to short right.
Ivan Rodriguez hit into a run-
scoring double play, and Thames
drove a 3-2 pitch down the left-field
line and into the upper deck for a
9-1 lead.
Matt Chico (3-5), trying for his
first victory since May 17 after five
consecutive no-decisions, gave up
eight runs on nine hits in four
innings. He walked two and struck
out one.
The Nationals scored four times
in the sixth. Felipe Lopez tripled
home Cristian Guzman, then
scored when Guillen booted Ryan
Zimmerman's grounder. Maroth
departed after allowing Dmitri


Young's single and walking Austin
Keams to load the bases.
Ryan Church greeted Bobby
Seay with an RBI single to right,
and Brian Schneider hit his second
sacrifice fly to make it 9-5.
Detroit took a 2-0 lead in the
second. Ordonez singled and went,
to third on a double by Guillen.
After Rodriguez struck out,
-Thames singled in a run and
Brandon Inge hit a sacrifice fly.
Schneider's sacrifice fly in the
bottom of the inning cut the lead in
half.
'.. Guillen made it 3-1 in the fourth,
hammering Chico's fastball off the
mezzanine facade in left-center for
his 10th homer.
Pinch-hitter RyanLangerhans
opened the ninth with a double
down the right-field line off Jones.
After Robert Fick singled to left,
Guzman sliced a triple into the
right-field comer, making it 9-7.
Lopez singled Guzman home and
Zimmerman followed with a'single
to right.
Jones fanned Young, and a field-
er's choice grounder by Kearns left
runners at the comers with two
down. Belliard grounded out to short
to end it.
Mets 8, Twins 1
NEW YORK - John Maine took
a three-hit shutout into the eighth
inning to earn his second win in
eight starts, pitching the New York
Mets to an 8-1 victory over the
Minnesota Twins on Monday night.
Carlos Delgado homered and
Maine (7-4) limited Minnesota to
four hits over 7 1-3 innings as the


NL East leaders won for only the
fourth time in 16 games this month.
Delgado, who batted just .189 on
the Mets' 2-7 road trip, gave New
York the lead with his 11th home
run in the second inning. He con-
nected on a 1-1 pitch from starter
� Carlos Silva (4-8).
Two innings later, Delgado sin-
gled and reached third on a double
by Shawn Green, who went 3-for-
22 on the road trip. Delgado was
thrown out trying to score on Jose
Valentin's grounder to shortstop, but
Ricky Ledee delivered a two-out
single, scoring Green to make it 2-0.
In the sixth, the-Mets loaded the
bases with two outs on a single by
Valentin and walks to Ledee and
Jose Reyes. Paul Lo Duca then hit,.,
a two-strike pitch from Silva for a
two-run single, making it 4-0.
The Mets broke it open in the
eighth. Ledee hit his first home run
of the season off reliever Juan
Rincon. Reyes then singled and
stole his 38th base. After shortstop
Jason Bartlett booted Lo Duca's
grounder, Carlos Beltran doubled
for one run and David Wright fol-
lowed with another double, his third
straight hit, to make it 7-1. Carlos
Gomez, a late defensive replace-
ment, added a sacrifice fly.
Maine had gone 1-4 with two no-
decisions since winning five of his
first six starts this season. He lost
his last start at Los Angeles on June
12, when he allowed home runs on
three straight pitches in a 4-1
defeat,
. This time, he gave up just four
singles before leaving with one out
in the eighth.


Brewers bottle up Giants, 5-4


Associated Press

MILWAUKEE - Prince
Fielder hit his NL-leading 26th
home run, Yovani Gallardo
dazzled in his major league
debut and the Milwaukee
Brewers held off the struggling
San Francisco Giants 5-4 on
Monday night.
Barry Bonds, with 748 career
home runs, went 1-for-2 with a
double in the sixth and two
walks as San Francisco lost its
fifth game in a row. The Giants
have lost 17 of 23 overall.
Mixing a 94 mph fastball with
changeups 15 mph slower, the
21-year-old Gallardo (1-0)
silenced the rest of the Giants'
sputtering offense and allowed
just the one hit to Bonds from
the second through the sixth
inning.
The Giants finally came alive
after Gallardo was pulled, and
pinch hitter Ray Durham hit a
two-run homer down the right
field line off reliever Carlos
Villanueva to cut the Brewers'
lead to 54 in the seventh.
Derrick Turnbow pitched
the eighth and got Bonds out on
a bouncer to Fielder.
Francisco Cordero walked
Omar Vizquel to start the ninth,
and after Luis Figueroa failed
to advance the runner on a
bunt, Durham singled and
Dave Roberts walked to load


Associated Press
Milwaukee Brewers starting pitcher Yovani Gallardo pitches to the
San Francisco Giants in the first inning of a baseball game on
Monday in Milwaukee.


the bases. But Cordero got
Randy Winn swinging and
Ryan Klesko to ground out for
his 26th save in 28 chances.
Indians 10, Phillies 1
CLEVELAND - Cliff Lee beat
another NL team and Kelly
Shoppach hit a three-run homer off
Cole Hamels, leading the
Cleveland Indians to a 10-1 rout of
the Philadelphia Phillies on
Monday night.
Lee (4-4), injured and inconsis-
tent most of this season, improved
to 10-1 in interleague play. He won
for just the second time in six
starts, allowing one run and five


hits in seven innings - his longest
start since May 8.
Shoppach, batting .552 (16-for-
29) in his last eight games, con-
nected in the second inning off
Hamels (9-3), the NL's only nine-
game winner. The left-hander was
roughed up for six runs and eight
hits in five innings - his shortest
outing of 2007.
Shoppach added an RBI double
in the sixth, Jason Michaels home-
red in the seventh and Grady
Sizemore had two hits, two steals
and scored twice as the Indians
improved to 8-9 in June.
About the only thing that didn't
go Cleveland's way was Casey


Blake's hitting streak. Blake went
0-for-3 and was hit by a pitch. He
was on deck when Josh Barfield
flied out to end the eighth.
Ryan Howard hit his 15th homer
for Philadelphia in the sixth.
Royals 5, Cardinals 3
ST. LOUIS - Odalis Perez won
for only the second time in 10
starts and the Kansas City Royals
took advantage of mistakes by
Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright
in a 5-3 victory over St. Louis on
Monday night.
John Buck homered and Mark
Teahen had two hits and an RBI
for the Royals, starting a 10-game
road trip after a season-best 6-3
homestand during which they took
two of three from the Cardinals
while outscoring them 28-16.
Wainwright (5-6) gave up five
runs - four earned - in seven
innings, five days after limiting the
Royals to one hit in eight scoreless
innings in Kansas City. He hurt
himself considerably in the field,
committing his first two errors of
the season in the first and then
making a mental error while trying
for a spectacular play.
Scott Rolen homered and So
Taguchi had three hits for the
Cardinals, 4-9 in interleague play.
Perez (4-7) benefited from two
bases-loaded, inning-ending dou-
ble-play balls by Juan


Boston
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Baltimore

Cleveland
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle
Texas


New York
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Florida
Washington

Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Houston
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


San Diego 40 28 .588
Arizona 40 30 .571
Los Angeles 39 30 .565
Colorado 35 34 .507
San Francisco 30 39 .435
z-first game was a win
INTERLEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Cleveland 5, Atlanta 2
Washington 4, .Toronto 2
Texas 11, Cincinnati 4
Detroit 7, Philadelphia 4
Pittsburgh 8, Chicago White Sox 7
Arizona 6, Baltimore 4
Houston 10, Seattle 3
Boston 9, San Francisco 5
Kansas City 5, Florida 4
Minnesota 10, Milwaukee 9
San Diego 11, Chicago Cubs 3
Tampa Bay 7, Colorado 4
St. Louis 10, Oakland 6
L.A. Angels 10, L.A. Dodgers 4
N.Y. Yankees 8, N.Y. Mets 2
Monday's Games
Atlanta 9, Boston 4
Detroit 9, Washington 8
Cleveland 10, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets 8, Minnesota 1
Milwaukee 5, San Francisco 4
Kansas City 5, St. Louis 3
Florida at Chicago White Sox, late
Tampa Bay at Arizona, late
Cincinnati at Oakland, late
Houston at L.A. Angels, late
Tuesday's Games


Braves 9, Red Sox 4
BOSTON ATLANTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
JDrew rf 5 11 1 Jhnson 2b 4 00 1
Pedroia 2b 3 11 0 Harris If 4 02 0
Yukilis lb 4 01 0 Rnteria ss 5 2 3 1
MRmrz If 301 0 CJones 3b 5 2 3 0
WPena If 1 000 McCnn c 4 1 24
,-Varitek c . 4 ,0 0,Prnto p; 0 00 4~.
Mrbelli c 0 00 0 McBrid p 0 0 0 0
Lowell 3b 5000 Wckmn p 0 000
Crispcf 4242AJonescf 40000
JLugo ss 3 00 0 Fmcur rf 4 1 1 0
Schllngp 201 0Thrmnlb 3 222
Snyder p 0 00 0 James p 1 0 1 1
Hinske ph 1000 Moylan p 0 000
Lopezp 0000 Wdwrdph 1 100
Timlin p 0 00 0 Yates p 0 000
DOrtiz ph 1 00 0 SItmca c 1 0 1 0
Dlcrmn p 0000
Totals 364 9 3 Totals 36 915 9
Boston 010 001 101- 4
Atlanta 001 231 20x- 9
E-Pedroia (3). DP-Boston 1. LOB-
Boston 11, Atlanta 7. 2B-McCann (17),
Thorman (13). HR-JDrew (5), Crisp 2 (3),
McCann (5), Thorman (9). CS-Harris (3).
S-James. SF-Johnson.


Boston
Schilling L,6-4
Snyder
Lopez
Timlin
Delcarmen
Atlanta
James W,6-6
Moylan
Yates
Paronto
McBrde
Wickman
WP-McBnde


IP H RERBBSO


41-3 10 6 6
2-3 00 0
2-3 1 1 0
11-3 4 2 2
1 0 0 0
51-3 5 2 2
2-3 0 0 0
1 1 1 1
1 1 0 0
2-3 2 1 1
1-3 00 0


Tigers 9, Nationals 8
DETROIT WASHINGTON
ab rhbi at) r hbi
Grndsn cf 4 110 CGzmn ss 5 2 32
Planco2b 5 11 0 FLopez2b 4 1 22
Shffield If 4 122 Zmrmn 3b 5 1 1 1
MOrdz rf 321 0 DYor.g Ib 5 2 20
CGillen ss 423 3 Kearnsrf 4 0 1 0
IRdrgz c 4 000 Church If 3 0 2 1
Thmeslb 3 12 2 Rauch p 0 0 0 0
Casey lb 1 00 0 Blliard ph 1 0 0 0
Inge3b 3 00 1 Schndrc 2 002
Maroth p 3 11 0 Logan cf 3 0 0 0
Seay p 0000 Lngrhn ph 1 1 1 0
Grilli p 0 00 0 Chico p 1 0 0 0
De La Cruz p000 0 Abreu p 1 000
Infante ph 1 00 0 Batista ph 1 0 0 0
TJones p 0000 Rivera p 0 0 0 0
Fick If 1 1 1 0
Totals 35911 8 Totals 37 813 8
Detroit 020 160 000- 9
Washington . 010 004 003- 8
E-CGuillen (12), DYoung (7). DP-
Detroit 2, Washington 3. LOB-Detroit 2,
Washington 7. 2B-CGuillen (16), Maroth
(1), CGuzman (6), DYoung (17),
Langerhans (5). 3B-CGuzman (6),
FLopez (4). HR-CGuillen (10), Thames
(5). SF-Inge, Schneider 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Maroth W,5-2 5 6 5 4 2 4
Seay 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Grilli 11-3 0 0 0 1 0
DeLaCruz 1 1 0 0 0 0
TJones 1 5 3 3 0 1
Washington
Chico L,3-5 4 9 8 8 2 1
Abreu 2 2 1 1 0 1
Rivera 2 0 0 0 0 0
Rauch 1 0 0 0 0 1
Maroth pitched to 5 batters in the 6th,
Chico pitched to 5 batters in the 5th.
WP-De La Cruz.
Indians 10, Phillies 1
PHILA CLEVELAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Rollins ss 2000 Szmore cf 3 22h0
Bourn If 2 01 0 Brfield 2b 4 0 2 3
Vctrno rf 4 01 0 Blake 3b 3 1 0 1
Utley2b 301 0 VMrtnzlb 4 0 1 0
Dobbs2b 1 000 JhPlta ss 4 0 1 1
Howard dh 4 12 1 Rouse ss 0 0 00
Rwand cf 400 0 Mchels If 3 32 1


- z-5-5
1 4-6
1% 5-5
5Y2 z-7-3
10% 2-8


Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
44 25 .638 - z-6-4
35 32 .522 8 z-9-1
33 35 .48510% 5-5
30 37 .448 13 z-5-5
29 40 .420 15 z-2-8
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
41 28 .594 - z-5-5
40 29 .580 1 6-4
34 34 .500 6% 5-5
28 37 .431 11 2-8
29 42 .408 13 z-7-3
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
44 26 .629 - 6-4
37 31 .544 6 6-4
35 31 .530 7 z-5-5
26 43 .377 17Y 5-5
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
38 30 .559 - z-3-7
38 33 .535 1% 5-5
36 34 .514 3 5-5
33 37 .471 6 z-4-6
30 40 .429 9 z-6-4
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
39 31 .557 - 6-4
31 37 .456 7 z-5-5
30 37 .448 7% 4-6
30 39 .435 8% z-6-4
30 39 .435 8% z-5-5
27 43 .386 12 z-5-5
West Division
W L Pct GB L10


Away Intr
20-17 9-3
18-14 8-4
18-18 5-7
12-25 7-5

Away Intr
20-14 5-5
19-17 4-6
17-17 7-6
19-18 6-6
16-20 7-6


Home
23-12
20-14
20-16
17-19
16-19

Home
23-10
18-14
20-18
14-16
15-24
Home
24-9
19-17
17-13
14-18

Home
18-16
19-16
19-17
14-19
14-20
Home
23-12
15-20
14-17
17-18
15-21
14-23

Home
20-12
20-14
22-14
18-18
16-17


Philadelphia (Kendrick 0-0) at Cleveland
(Stanford 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Durbin 5-3) at Washington
(Simontacchi 4-4), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Penny 8-1) at Toronto
(McGowan 3-2), 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota (J.Santana 8-6) at N.Y. Mets
(JSosa 6-2), 7:10 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 9-1) at Atlanta (T.Hudson
6-4), 7:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 2-1) at
Milwaukee (Sheets 7-3), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Elarton 2-2) at St. Louis
(Thompson 4-2), 8:10 p.m.
Florida (Willis 7-6) at Chicago White Sox
(Danks 3-6), 8:11 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Marshall 3-2) at Texas
(Tejeda 5-7), 8:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Mussina 3-3) at Colorado
(Fogg 2-5), 9:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Howell 1-1) at Arizona (Davis
4-8), 9:40 p.m.
Baltimore (Trachsel 5-4) at San Diego
(Peavy 8-1), 10:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Bailey 1-0) at Oakland (Gaudin
6-1), 10:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Gorzelanny 6-4) at Seattle
(Batista 7-5), 10:05 p.m.
Houston (Jennings 0-1) at L.A. Angels
(Colon 6-2), 10:05 p.m.

Werth If 4020 Garko dh - 3 1 00
Helms lb 301 0 Gutirrzrf 4 1 1 0
Nunez 3b 4010 Shppchc 4 224
Ruiz c 4 0 0
Totals 351 9 1 Totals 321011 10
Philadelphia 000 001 000- 1
Cleveland 230 013 10x-10
DP-Philadelphia 1, Cleveland 1. LOB-
Philadelphia 10, Cleveland 4. 2B-
Sizemore: (13),vJhPeralta,(12),i Shoppach
(8). HR-Howard (15), Michaels (5),
Shoppach (3). SB-Sizemore 2 (22). SF-
Barfield.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Hamels L,9-3 5 8 6 6 0 4
Geary 1 2 3 3 2 1
Sanches 2 1 1 1 1 2
Cleveland
CILeeW,4-4 7 5 1 1 0 5
Fultz 1 1 0 0 0 1
FCabrera 1 3 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Fultz (Victorino), by Geary
(Garko), by Hamels (Blake), by CILee
(Rollins), by CILee (Helms).
Brewers 5, Giants 4
SAN FRAN MILWAUKEE
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DRbrts cf 4120 CHart rf 4 1 1 1
Winnrf 5000 Hardy ss 3 0 1 0
Klesko 1b 5000 Braun 3b 3 1 1 0
Bonds If 2 01 0 Fildri b 4 1 1 2
BMolnac 401 1 BHallcf 4 1 1 0
Feliz 3b 4 11 1 JEstda c 4 01 0
Vizquel ss 3000 Mench If 4 0 1 0
Frndsn 2b 2 100 Weeks2b 4 1 2 1
Mssngrp 0 00 0OGlIrdo p 2 0 1 1
Crreia p 0000 Vllneva p 0 0 0 0
Figra ph 1 000 Turnbw p 0 000
Lowry p 2000 Jenkins ph 0 00 0
Chulk p 0 00 0 FCdero p 0 00 0
Drham2b 2 122


Totals 344 7 4 Totals 32 510 5
San Francisco 100 000 300- 4
Milwaukee 210 110 OOx- 5
E-BHall (6). DP-San Francisco 2.
LOB-San Francisco 8, Milwaukee 8.
2B-Bonds (8), Weeks 2 (11), Gallardo (1).
HR-Feliz (10), Durham (7), CHart (8),
Fielder (26).
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
LowryL,6-6 52-3 9 5 5 3 3
Chulk 1-3 00 0 1 0
Messenger 1 0 0 0 0 0
Correia 1 1 0 0 1 0
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,1-0 61-3 4 3 3 3 4
Villanueva 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Turnbow 1 0 0 0 0 1
FCorderoS,26 1 1 0 0 2 1
WP-Lowry.
Royals 5, Cardinals 3
KANSAS CITY ST. LOUIS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DJesuscf 401 1Tguchicf 5 1 3 0
EGrmn 2b 410 1 Spiezio 2b 4 02 1
Teahen rf 5 02 1 Pujols lb 2 0 0 0
Brown If 4 02 1 JEcrcn rf 4 0 1 0
Gordon 3b 4 00 0 Rolen 3b 4 1 1 1
Buck c 3 11 1 Ludwck If 4 0 0 0
Shealy lb 4120 Miles ss 4 0 1 0
TPenass 4 110 GBnnttc 3 0 0 0
OPerez p 3 11 0 AKndy ph 1 000
Riske p 0000 Wnwrgt p 1 1 1 0
Costa ph 1 000 Schmkr ph 1 0 00
Soria p 0000 Sprgerp 0000
Dotel p 0000 TJhnsn p 0 0 0 0
Duncan ph 1 000
Totals 36510 5 Totals 34 3 9 2
Kansas City 120 200 000- 5
St. Louis 100 110 000- 3
E-Rolen (1), Wainwright 2 (2). DP-
Kansas City 2, St. Louis 2. LOB-Kansas
City 7, St. Louis 7. 2B-Shealy (5), Spiezio
2 (12). HR-Buck (13), Rolen (4). SB-
DeJesus (3), Brown (7). S-DeJesus.
IP H RERBBSO


Kansas City
OPerez W,4-7
Riske
Soria
Dotel S,6
St. Louis
Wnwrgt L,5-6
Springer
TJohnson


9 5 4 1 0
0 0 0 0 2


HBP-by Wainwright (Buck).


MLB SCOREBOARD


Away
16-19
16-17
16-20
13-21
15-18
13-20

Away
20-16
20-16
17-16
17-16
14-22


10111RM


CiTRus Comy (FL) CHRoNicLE


O.PIM 'r--- T-P IQ ?607


NIA-irnn -EEAc-uE BASEIBA-LL










RTIC lUS OAUaTY (L.] ).At' SHROT UEDY UE 9 073


BOWLING
PARKVIEW LANES
Parkview Lanes League Results
SUMMER GOLFBOW
Cheryl Lovely and Michael Parker shot a
three-under par 33, and the teams of John
Saltmarsh-Greg Shaw and Jim Randle-C.
H. Crockett had two-under par 34's.
Closest-to-pin awards weie won oy Cheryl
Lovely and Greg Shaw, and the high
bowlers were Ace Briggs 241,636; Jim
Randle 236,623; Lenny Oakeson 227,667
and Dennis Brinker 227,614.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS
Handicap: Doc Andrews 271; Tom
Longnecher 263,760; Michael Tenhoe 749;
Shirley Davey 285,723; Betty Wood
263,730.
Scratch: Chris Jones 230,632; Doc
Andrews 217; Eddie Corbitt 572; Melissa
Simons 208,510; Sandy LePree 186,511;
Shirley Davey 186.
SUMMER OWLS
Handicap: Jim Cheff 299,826; Dave Norris
296; Andy Megret 774; June Williams
290,722; Diana White 286,773.
Scratch: Jim Cheff 279,766; Tony
Thompson 236,658: June Williams 209;
Debbe Chung 190,511; Saad Bouve 493.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK
Diana White, 110 pins over her average,
and Jim Cheff, 166 pins over his average.
JUNE MIXED DOUBLES
7-8-9 NOTAP TOURNEY RESULTS
The June Mixed Doubles NoTap tourney
was won by Dee Smith and Chuck Clouse
who rolled 550 in the money round, includ-
ing a 300 by Dee. Finishing second was
Judy Timmons and Dan Taylor (536), with
Saad Bouve and.Ted Rafanan (532) in
third place. Individual money winners were
Buddy Bardot, Kyle Merritt and Janie
Oakeson. Dan Taylor won the series with
1196 pins. The next 7-8-9 Mixed Doubles
NoTap will be Sunday, July 22.
Parkview Lanes News
1ST ANNUAL GREATER CITRUS USBC
BOWL & GOLF TOURNEY: All proceeds
h,-. will be donated to Hospice of Citrus County
and the Citrus County Youth Bowling
;o Scholarship Fund. The tournament will be
held Saturday and Sunday, June 23-24.
c The golfing portion will be at Lakeside
Country Club, with shotgun starts at 9am
each day. The bowling will be at Parkview


For the record

On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE WORLD SERIES
2 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina vs. Louisville
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Game 10 - UC Irvine vs. Arizona State
MLB
9:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Arizona Diamondbacks
GOLF
4 p.m. (GOLF) CVS Charity Classic - Day Two


Lanes, with squads at 10am, 1pm and 4pm
each day. The format is a four-person
scramble in golf (18 holes), and three
games of "best-frame" bowling. The cost is
$60/person, which includes 18 holes of
golf, 3 games of bowling, and lunch.
Sponsorships are available at $100/hole
and/or $100/lane. Contact Ken Smith, tour-
nament director, at 352-220-2958 to regis-
ter or for more information.
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY SPE-
CIALS: There are special Summer prices
for bowling and rental shoes on Tuesdays
from 6pm until 10pm, and Wednesdays
from 1pm until 10pm. The cost for bowling
is $1.50 per game; and rental shoes are
$1.00 per pair.
NEFFER'S BOWL
Neffer's League Results
WILD HOGS (06/04/07)
Men: Tom Buske 235;609 Mike Barnwell
210 Richard Hoist 218 Stephen
McCullough 205,236,247;688
Women: Judy Baxton 179;441 Valri
Warren 157,166;443
WILD HOGS (06111/07)
Men: Tom Krug 236;584 Henry Thacker
210,253;641 Stephen McCullough
208,214,266;688 Pete Hommen 204 Sal
Fricano 215 Chris Williams 238
ODD BALLS (05/29/07)
Men: Bobby Ridge 202,223;615 Stephen
McCullough 226,246,649 Dutch Sweigert


240,248;681 Matt Ivkovic 236,259,280;775
Women: Deloris Morey 192;496 Kim Mullts
210,211;577 Kim Shatney 496
ODD BALLS (06/5/07)
Men Mark Wallen 248 640 Dan Dav'id.dn
207 215 225 647 Matt Il ovc 235.258 662
Dutch Sweigert 203 221 300""
Women Linda Sanborn 193.486 Tammy
Aiier, 193506 Jessica Lancaster 215
Marca Cobb 519
GENERATION GAP '
Adult/Youth (05/30107)
Boys: Justin Dey 167 444 Cody Mullis
152,169;466 Christopher Grono 382
Girls: Angelica Matella 256 series
Kayleigh Williams 102,105,105;312
GENERATION GAP
Adult/Youth (06/061207)
,Boys: Tyler Dey 152 Cody Mulls'410
Justin Dey 148,214;485 Bub Shackelford
353
Girls: Pickles 92,100;279 series Abby
Skinner 93,215 series
Neffer's News .
** Dutch Sweigert bowled his.first 300
,game on Tues. 6/5 on lanes 15/16.
Sweigert an avid bowler with a 213 aver-
age, has been bowling at Neffers for Ir.e
past 6 years.
Neffers General Manager Stephen.
McCullough won his first Amateur Bowlers
Tour title this past Sunday 6/10/2007 bowl-
ing at AMF Leesburg Lanes in Leesburg,
FL The Prize for his win was $1000.00.


Gun, battery charges filed


against Florida lineman


Associated Press

, GAINESVILLE -
Prosecutors have filed two
charges against suspended
Florida player Ronnie Wilson
in an early April shooting inci-
dent.
Wilson, 19, allegedly fired a
semiautomatic weapon into the
air after being chased following
a nightclub incident He was
charged with battery and dis-
charging a firearms in public.
Arraignment was set for July 3.
The alleged victim claimed
Wilson spat on him and slapped
him in the face at a nightclub.
Wilson told police he did spit
on the victim but denied hitting
him. Wilson allegedly left the
club, pulled a rifle from his
tru nk and fired a shot in the air.
Florida coach Urban Meyer
called the incident a "major
concern" following the arrest in
April. and suspended Wilson
indefinitely from team activi-
ties. Meyer declined comment
on the charges through sports
information director Steve
McClain.
"Nothing has changed in his
status." McClain said.
Wilson was a member of the
Gators national title team as a
redshirt freshman offensive
lineman.


Fan releases poll on
Arkansas football
LITTLE ROCK - An Arkansas
football fan commissioned a poll
asking Razorbacks supporters if
they're satisfied with coach
Houston Nutt.
Some public-opinion sampling
experts are dissatisfied with the
methodology.
"Be very careful overreading this
thing," said Robert Eisinger, chair
of Lewis and Clark College's politi-
cal science department.
"Sometimes no data are better
than bad data."
Roger Wooley, a longtime
Razorbacks fan living near
Birmingham, Ala., was hoping to
measure public opinion on several
topics facing Arkansas' athletic pro-
gram. He released the poll results
Monday at a news conference in
downtown Little Rock: 63 percent
of those surveyed are either very
satisfied or somewhat satisfied with
Nutt, and 28 percent are either
somewhat dissatisfied or very dis-
satisfied.
The survey of 600 Arkansans -
500 of whom were regular viewers
of Arkansas sports - by
Campaigns and Communications
Plus Inc. of Sherwood had a mar-
gin of error of plus or minus 5 per-


cent, Wooley said.
Eisinger was one of two public
opinion analysts who cautioned
against drawing too many conclu-
sions from the survey. Adam
Berinsky, an associate professor of
political science at the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, warned about the
order in which questions were
asked.
Respondents were first asked
about some topics from recent
months, such as an infamous e-
mail sent by booster Teresa
Prewett to former Arkansas quar-
terback Mitch Mustain. Later,
respondents were asked their
views on the leadership of athletic
director Frank Broyles, Chancellor
John White and "the current
University of Arkansas football
coach."
Berinsky said asking for
approval ratings after several ques-
tions about negative topics can be
problematic.
"By the end, when you're asking
how satisfied are you with the lead-
ership ... you've just basically got-
ten people to think about negative
things and told them negative infor-
mation," Berinsky said.
Wooley stood by the poll, saying
he worked with the polling firm to
ensure the survey was objective.


: Brooks focused on opening charter school, helping Bucs rebound


Associated Press �

TAMPA - Derrick Brooks
o recalled the day he told his
mother about an off-the-field
endeavor he planned to pur-
o,'. sue with the same passion
that's helped him become one
' of the best linebackers in the
07, -NFL.
Opening a high school with a
rigorous curriculum to pre-
pare students for college
would be as challenging as
0 anything the 10-time Pro Bowl
C r selection has accomplished on
the field. But the Tampa Bay
c- Buccaneers star was confident
t he could make it a reality.
r" "When I first told her I was
_. ' going after this, she being my
ri-mother, she warnedme about
having too much on my plate
already," said Brooks, now 34.
"But at the same time, she
knew my compassion for edu-
cation. She heard me talk
about it more and more and
she really stepped up and
challenged me. It's kind of like


:FUTURE

Continued from Page 1B

;1. mutual after talks on an exten-
Sson had stalled right about the
, 'time.Junior hit the market.
Busch chatted with fans,
o ' signed autographs on pit road.
l' and hung out with University
of Michigan hlotball players in
front ort hs haulel: And his per-
o formance on the track was stel-
o lar. He nearly\ won the Truck
( Series race, finishing second.
and was sixth in the Nextel
Cup eent.
It was a major spin at a tune
\when Bu- ch has never had
S more at stake -lhe controls his
destiny, and his worth has
never been greater But after
.listening to the interested car
owners. Busch didn't need to
do anN damage control
"I'i interested because he's
a talented driver'" Ganassi
snarked. "It lie was a no-talent
driver: nobody would be inter-
ested in him."
Racing is no different than
any other spoil in that per-
formnnance and potential go a
long way toward masking per-
sonalit3 issues, and there's no
o ' denying that Busch has a mix
of both.
He's got four Cup wins and
, - made the Chase for the cham-
pionship last season, but it's
S never been a smooth ride.
Busch has been criticized for
his driving style - even older
, brother, Kurt, accused him last
O month of being too aggressive
0 1 - and many veterans have
fumed over his arrogance.
He's had some eyebrow-rais-
ing behavior, such as storming
out of a news conference,
a,: throwing a safety device at
Casey Mears and launching an
ungracious rant against
NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow
after winning its debut race.
Immature? Sure.
The worst human being
alive? Most certainly not.
Busch isn't even on the radar
of the most poorly behaved ath-
letes, past and present. At a
time when NBA and NFL play-
ers are constantly falling on the
wrong side of the law, Busch


she went from warning me to
now she wanted to make sure I
was in it for the right reasons
and that I was going to finish
the job."
Geraldine Brooks-Mitchell,
who instilled the importance
of education in her son while
he was growing up in
Pensacola, died last month
after a lengthy fight with
breast cancer.
The Brooks-DeBartolo
Collegiate High School, a joint
venture with the family that
built the San Francisco 49ers
into Super Bowl champions,
will open in August for 300 stu-
dents in grades nine to 11. The
12th grade will be added to the
charter school next year.
For Brooks, a high, school
honor student who graduated
from Florida State in 3 1/2
years and later returned to
earn a master's degree, it's a
dream come true.
"My mother first and fore-
most let me know academics
was ahead of athletics. I've


Associated Press
NFC Tampa Bay Buccaneers linebacker Derrick Brooks holds up
the Pro Bowl MVP trophy following the NFC's 23-17 win over the
AFC in the NFL football Pro Bowl at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, in


this Feb. 12, 2006 file photo.
told the story many times
about getting whipped in the
fifth grade and taken off the
football team," said Brooks,
who was appointed to FSU's


Associated Press
NASCAR driver Kyle Busch exits his car after qualifying for the
Citizens Bank 400 at Michigan International Speedway on Friday
in Brooklyn, Mich. For a kid who just lost his job, Busch is cer-
tainly on top of the NASCAR world. Busch became NASCAR's
newest free agent when he was pushed out of Hendrick
Motorsports so the team could make room for Dale Earnhardt Jr.


looks like an angel.
"If you make a simple com-
parison, it's not like the kid's
Mike Tyson," Evernham said.
"He's not out grabbing women
and doing drugs. He has a tem-
per, and he says things once in
a while. To me, that's not really
a bad thing.
"It's hard to take a guy you
want to be total fire and drive
that thing on the line every
minute, and then expect him
not to be emotional. You've just
got to try to help somebody like
that control his emotions."
Roger Penske has spent the
past two seasons doing it with
Kurt Busch, with seemingly
positive results. Before he
almost ran over one of Tony
Stewart's crew members two


weeks ago, Kurt Busch had
made tremendous progress in
remaking his bratty image.
Rick Hendrick patiently
tried to the do the same with
Kyle Busch, and recognized
that it was a work in progress.
And before May 10, when
Earnhardt became a free
agent, Hendrick had no plans
to walk away from the project
But when the urge to align
with NASCAR's biggest star
was too overwhelming, Busch
became expendable and
Hendrick cut him loose.
So his next car owner will
pick up where Hendrick left
off, and there's no shortage of
suitors who believe they can be
the one to tame NASCAR's
wild child.


board of trustees in 2003.
"That message was given to
me then about it's more impor-
tant how you treat people than
what you do in sports. ... I


cws
Continued from Page 1B

Curtis, who blocked the plate
and easily put the tag on
Holiday.
Petersen followed with his
hit to center, which scored
Cody Cipriano from third.
After Petersen touched first
base, his teammates rushed
out of the dugout and mobbed
him in a dogpile.
Dylan Axelrod (6-4) pitched 4
2-3 innings of relief to get the
win, allowing one hit and strik-
ing out seven.
Harris (2-3) worked the last
five innings, giving up three
hits and the winning.run.
UC Irvine had a chance to
end it in the ninth when
Petersen doubled and went to
third when Ollie Linton, hitless
in six of seven CWS at-bats,
successfully executed coach
Dave Serrano's gutsy call for a
two-out bunt But the inning
ended when Larson grounded
out.
Holiday's first home run


PACMAN

Continued from Page 1B

you, in the shooting," Arora
said. "His car wasn't there or
anywhere near the scene. They
simply are just asking him ...
much like any other witness, if
anything happened inside that
might help them figure out who
was involved."
Authorities have also been
investigating what role Jones
had in a February shooting out-
side a Las Vegas club that left a
bar employee paralyzed and
two other people wounded.
Attorney Robert Langford
said no evidence tied Jones to
the shooting, but an aide to
Clark County District Attorney
David Roger said it could take
several days to decide if there
is enough information to file
charges against Jones and two
friends.
The Titans, busy with their
annual golf fundraiser Monday,
did not immediately return a


remember making a 2.8 my
freshman year and she threat-
ened to take my scholarship,
even though she couldn't She
was not happy with me having
a C-plus average because she
knew that wasn't me. That's the
last time, to be honest with
you, that my mother said any-
thing to me about my grades
because I got the message."
Brooks-DeBartolo's core
curriculum, will include
advanced placement courses
and dual enrollment classes
students will take at
Hillsborough Community
College and the University of
South Florida.
One thing the school won't
have is an athletic program.
.Brooks, president ,of the
school's governing board,
stressed he is interested in
educating children - not cre-
ating a sports academy.
"That's one message I want
to get across to the kids," he
said, adding that 15 or 20 years
ago he essentially was the

since April 1 pulled UC Irvine
into a 3-all tie in the sixth. As
Holiday watched his opposite-
field drive land deep in the
seats in right, he raised his
right fist and pumped it before
speeding up his home-run trot
while rounding second.
Fullerton regained the lead
in the seventh without getting a
hit.
After Anteater starter Wes
Etheridge walked Nick Mahin,
Tom Calahan came on and
walked John Curtis and inten-
tionally walked Matt Wallach
to load the bases. Calahan hit
Jones on the right hand to
force in a run.
Cipriano hit his school-
record 13th home run leading
off the bottom half to tie it 4-4.
The game matched longtime
friends in Horton and Serrano.
Serrano pitched for Horton at
Cerritos College and later
served under him there as
pitching coach. Serrano later
coached under Horton at
Fullerton before taking the UC
Irvine head coaching job in
2004.

message Monday. But team
officials have declined to com-
ment on Jones since his sus-
pension.
The Las Vegas allegations
were the 10th time Jones had
been questioned by police,
which included an incident in
April 2006 when police identi-
fied him from surveillance
video diving for cover after
shots were fired at a Nashville
gas station.
Jones has been arrested five
times. Two arrests he did not
report to the Titans or the
NFL, leading NFL commis-
sioner Roger Goodell to sus-
pend Jones in April for one
season. But Jones has not been
convicted of any crimes since
being drafted in 2005.
He was the Titans' best
defensive player in 2006 with
four interceptions. Two of
those came in their stunning
rally from a 21-0 deficit for a 24-
21 victory over the New York
Giants in the final 10 minutes.
He also led the NFL in punt
return average and tied a team


same person as most of the stu-
dents who will attend Brooks-
DeBartolo this fall.
'Just wanted to go to college
and be an insurance man.
Insurance men back then col-
lected money and wore nice
suits and drove a nice car. So,
that's all I wanted to be. I share
that with them. Obviously, the
Lord's plan was bigger with me
participating in the NFL."
Although Brooks has been
actively involved in putting the
high school together, his role
will diminish in coming weeks
as he begins to focus on trying
to help Tampa Bay rebound
from a 4-12 finish last season.
The Bucs begin a three-day
mandatory mini-camp
Tuesday and report to training
camp on July 26.
"I've been blessed to have
my priorities in order. The
school opening won't be a dis-
traction for me whatsoever. It
should be an exciting time, to
be honest with you," Brooks
said.


College World Series
At Rosenblatt Stadium
Omaha, Neb.
Double Elimination
Friday, June 15
Bracket 1
Rice 15, Louisville 10
North Carolna 8, Miss State 5
Saturday, June 16
Bracket 2
Anzona State 5, UC Irvne 4
Oregon Slate 3. Cal State-
Fullerton 2
Sunday, June 17
Louisville 12 Mississippi State 4
Missssipp St. eliminated
Rice 14 North Carolina 4
Monday, June 18
Game 7- UC Irvine (45-16-11 vs
Cal State-Fullenon 138-241 2 pm r
Game 8 - Arizona State (49-131
vs Oregon Stale (45-18). 7 pm
Tuesday, June 19
Game 9 - Louisville 47-23) vs
North Carolina 154-14). 2 pm
Game 10 - UC Irvine vs Loser
Game 8. 7 p m
Wednesday, June 20
Game 11 - Rice (56-12) vs
Winner Game 9 2 p m
Game 12 - Winner Game 8 vs
Winner Game 10, 7 pm
Thursday, June 21
Game 13 - if necessary, 2 pm
Game 14 - if necessary 7pm
Note If ttlere is only one ' if nec-
essary game it will be played at 7
pm


record by returning three
punts for touchdowns.
But Jones has done little to
help his case since being sus-
pended.
The cornerback agreed last
week not to appeal the suspen-
sion. The 23-year-old player
could be reinstated after 10
games for good behavior if he
adheres to conditions set by
Goodell and is not arrested
again. Missing the entire sea-
son would cost him his salary
of nearly $1.3 million.
Jones' suspension requires
him to "have no further
adverse involvement with law
enforcement" and to adhere to
restrictions on his activities
that have been agreed to by
himself and the Titans.
Whether being questioned
by police about a fight and
shooting violates the terms of
his suspension remains to be
seen.
"We are looking into it," NFL
spokesman Greg Aiello said
Monday when asked about the
incident


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 3B


SPORTS


C FL C lWCLE
















4B


TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS ,COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Julia Roberts gives
birth to 3rd child
NEW YORK - Julia
Roberts has welcomed her
third child, a boy named
Henry Daniel Moder.
Henry was born Monday
in Los Angeles. He weighed
8 1/2 pounds, said Roberts'
publicist,
Engelman.
'All of the
Moders are
doing great,"
Engelman
said in a
statement
Julia Roberts,
Roberts 39, and her
husband, 38-
year-old cinematographer
Danny Moder, have 2-year-
old twins, Hazel and
Phinnaeus.

Ringo Starr releases
song catalog online
LOS ANGELES - Ringo
Starr has signed a deal to
release his Capitol/EMI cat-
alog online.
Downloads of his hit 1970
album, "Beacoups of Blues,"
and 1973's
"Ringo" will
be available
Aug. 28,
along with Don't
compilationC
"album,
as a collector's edi"Photograph:
The Very
Ringo Starr Best of Ringo
Starr," hiso
publicist said.
The best-of collection,

Come Easy" and
"Sentimental Journey," will
also be released on CD and
as a collector's edition
CD/DVD package featuring a
film and video clips.s
Six Ringo Starr rings tones
will also be offered.
"Liverpool 8," a solo
album by the 66-year-old ex-
Beatle, is planned for a
January 2008 released

Kristy Swanson
arrested in Canada








KrOsty scuffle with
Swanson pressed assault
charges Sunday against the
ex-wife of her companion
and former "Skating With
Celebrities" partner, Lloyd
Eisler, the actress' represen-
tative said. Swanson
Police took pictures ofa

bruises onw-
magazine sher was arresteof
Saturday night for bollegedlto
document
assaulting O'Buries






Swanson, 37, said she was
released afterclaimed she
Kingston, got during a
Krist scuffle with
Swanson Eisler's ex-
MANCHESTwife, Marcia
OBrien, on Friday in
Canada, said Swanson
spokesman Michael Sands.
O'Brien filed a complaint
against Swanson first, how-
ever Swanson told People
magazine she was arrested
Saturday night for allegedly
assaulting O'Brien.
Swanson, 37, said she was
released after posting bail in
Kingston, Ontario.





Coleman treated forthis


dH opdrhonist,

ed for heat-relatdredra-
tOette pion after he collapsed dur- of


was taeeken td.o

ysaid publicist Kenar-old sax-
Weinsteophonist,.

Coleman won"fre the 2007jazz,"

Coleman won the 2007


Pulitzer Prize for music for
his 2006 album, "Sound
Grammar," his first live
recording in 20 years.
He received a lifetime
achievement award at this
year's Grammy Awards.
- From wire reports


Brad Bird puts the 'rat' in 'Ratatouille' LoERIES


Associated Press


LAS VEGAS - Brad Bird has become one
of the "Incredibles" of movie animation as
part of the pioneering outfit behind such
cartoon hits as "Finding Nemo," "Monsters,
Inc." and the "'Toy Story" flicks.
With 2004's superhero saga "The
Incredibles," Bird won Pixar Animation's
second Academy Award for feature-length
animation, following the company's Oscar
triumph the previous year for "Finding
Nemo."
Writer-director Bird, 49, should be back in
Oscar contention with "Ratatouille," the tale
of gourmet rodent Remy (voiced by Patton
Oswalt), who teams with a human kitchen
hand to whip up fabulous meals in a French
restaurant
Opening June 29, "Ratatouille" also fea-
tures the voices of Peter O'Toole, Janeane
Garofalo, Ian Holm, Brad Garrett and Brian
Dennehy
"Ratatouille" could have been the first
movie Pixar released with a studio partner
other than the Walt Disney Co., whose deal
to distribute Pixar films was set to expire
after last year's "Cars."
Bird sat down with The Associated Press
after a 12-minute "Ratatouille" preview for
theater owners in Las Vegas, discussing the
Pixar touch, the movie's tongue-twisting title
and how the company built itself on the pre-
cepts of animation pioneer Walt Disney.

AP: The advertising materials for
"Ratatouille" cleverly work in its pronuncia-
tion (rat-a-TOO-ee). Was the title ever consid-
ered too much of a mouthful?
Bird: It was a challenge, because we knew
that a lot of people couldn't pronounce it In
fact, there were months where they tried to
come up with another title, but no other title,
was as good as "Ratatouille." It's one word,
it's French, it's about food and it has the
word "raft" in it So rather than view it as a
weakness, we started going, "What if we
view it as a strength and make the pronunci-
ation part of the sales?"
AP: Pixar has a perfect track record:
seven movies, seven hits. Do you get the
night sweats worrying that your movie will
be the one to tank?
Bird: Sure, all the way through the pro-
duction, you have night sweats. Especially
in the early part, when questions, aren't
answered yet. I think if you ask any
Broadway veteran, the ones who.survive
the best are the ones who still get butter-
flies. If you start getting smug and start
thinking, hey, I've got this thing licked,
then they're bound to stumble. So I view
the feeling of fear as a respect for the audi-


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Tuesday
in the Florida
Lottery:


mAssociated Pres
This Image, provided by Disney and Pixar Animation, shows a scene from "Ratatouille,"
the story of a rat that loves to cook and gets his chance by teaming with the klutzy human
garbage boy in the kitchen of a fancy French restaurant.


ence, because I don't want to serve up the
same old refried meal.
AP: Some critics say there's an overload
of animated movies.
Bird: It's kind of like saying, "Is there a
movie overload?" There's only a movie
overload if they're bad. If they're good, it's
just like, "Yeehaw!" The problem with ani-
mation is too many people are making the
same movie. There's nothing wrong with
the medium. The medium is as big-as the
sky, but you have to go to different places
in the sky. You can't just go to the same
cloud and expect people. to get excited
about it, with the jabbering sidekicks and
the pop references and the hit pop songs.
Everybody is kind of emulating that for-
mula, because it's easier to emulate.
People in Hollywood. the press always fix-
ates on technology because it's easier to
quantify. The truth of the matter is the
technology has never been the answer
The same answers to making a good movie
are the answers that were around 80 years
ago. You've got to have characters people
care about and stories that are both sur-
prising and sat isfyi ng.
AP: Was it gratifying for you to have
Pixar brought in under the Disney fold for.
good?
Bird: I don't think we would have been
happy with just any manifestation of
Disney. That was always on the table. It
was, is Disney going to embrace the things,
many of the principles that we had? And I
feel that Bob Iger has totally done that


The ironic thing for us is most of the val-
ues that are at the core of Pixar's success
are old Disney values. Everybody studies
the Old Testament from Walt's mouth him-
self, and that has guided us, even though
we've been doing new technology, anc
instead of retelling only fairy tales, we tell
original stories. But other than that, the
rule book is the Disney rule book, which is
all about character empathy and the plau
sible impossible and understanding
where characters stand. Technical innova
tion and all of that, that's all old Walt stuff
We feel.that Iger is very much in tha
school. He understands the reason the
Disney name became so treasured, so we
couldn'thbe happier. We had always gotten
along with so many people at Disney real
ly, really well. It was just some fundamen
tal differences at the top that were causing
the friction. With Iger in there now, every
body I think is really looking forward t<
the future.
AP: What are the odds of a sequel to "Th<
Incredibles"?
Bird: L; love the world. I love the charac
ters, and if I could come with a story that waE
as good or better than the original, I'd gi
there in a second. I have pieces of things tha
I would love to see in a sequel, but I haven'
got them all together yet, and I certain;
wouldn't want to come out there with some
thing that is less than the original.... Sequel
are not part of the business plan at Pixar It':
all about the filmmakers being passionate
abouiit going somewhere.


Carell takes another step with 'Evan'


Special to Newsday

HOLLYWOOD - The original
Noah had a job of what might be
called biblical proportions -
cubits this way, cubits that way,
animal uprisings, cat dander
But at least he didn't have to fol-
low Jim Carrey
Steve Carell doth. "Evan
Almighty," the Old Testament-
derived comedy opening Friday
and starring Carell as God's
handmaiden, is director Tom
Shadyac's quasi-sequel to his
ridiculously successful "Bruce
Almighty." For "Evan," Shaydac
admits, he wanted Carrey He got
Carell.
Even a cursory study suggests
that the current movie scene can
be parted, like the Red Sea,
between the "Knocked Ups" of
the world and the "Evan
Almightys." One is vulgar, rude,
obnoxious and hilarious. The
other is, well, something else.
What they have in common is
Carell, who over the last half-
decade has been establishing
himself as Mr. Ubiquitous: "The


Associated Press
In this undated photo released by Universal Studios, actor Steve
Carell, as Evan Baxter, Is shown in a scene from "Evan Almighty."


Daily Show." '"Anchorman."
"Melinda and Melinda."
"Bewitched" (as Uncle Arthur).
'"The 40 Year Old Virgin" (which
he co-wrote with "Knocked
Up's" Judd Apatow). "Over the
Hedge." "Little Miss Sunshine."
"The Office." And, next year,
Maxwell Smart in the big-screen
version of NBC's "Get Smart"
Meanwhile, seagulls are poop-
ing on his nice blue suit.


"That's what they do," Carell
says. He's recalling a scene in
'Evan" where his character is
engulfed in feathers, which are
still attached to birds.
The perspectives on "Evan
Almighty" vary from cast mem-
ber to cast member, filmmaker to
filmmaker. According to'
Shadyac, God wanted the movie
to be made.
Somewhere in the middle is


Carell, who takes what seems to
be a perhaps slightly too serious
attitude about public reaction to
a movie that takes the Lord's
name in vain, profanes Holy
Word and commits blasphemy
with every frame.
"It's really not about religion,"
he protests, dressed in a non-
bird-spattered dark blue suit
"I'll tell you, I know in the first
one" - meaning "Bruce
Almighty," the film that got
Carell's big-screen career rolling
- "Morgan Freeman really did-
n't want to do much press for it
because he would just get ques-
tions about, 'Well, if you really
were God, what would you do?'
And they're impossible ques-
tions to answer I think he want-
ed to keep what he believes in to
himself.
"People do, and should feel
free to, believe what they do and
worship what they do, or not, but
for me to single out what I do, I
don't know, it seems to put a spin
on the movie it doesn't need. I
want it to be available to any-
body. And I think it is."


Hasbro banking on 'Transformers' to be a hit


. Associated Press

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -
Hasbro Inc. struggled when the
toy company tied its fortunes
too closely to toys based on
movies.
But a movie based on its
toys? That could be a different
story.
Hasbro is banking that the
July 4 release of the
DreamWorks/Paramount
movie "Transformers" -based
on Hasbro's "robots in dis-
guise" toys introduced in the
1980s - will herald a new era
for the company that in the
past few years has been remak-
ing itself from a toy maker to an
entertainment company.
"'Transformers' sort of opens
another chapter for us," said
Brian Goldner, Hasbro's chief
operating officer, who is listed
as an executive producer on
the movie. "In the past, I think
that the company may have
thought too narrowly about its


brands as forms of entertain-
ment" I.
In 2000. the Pawtucket, R.I.-
based company was struggling.
The toy maker lost $144.million
after fads for Pokemon trading
cards and the electronic pet
Flirby faltered. It cut hundreds
of jobs. Then-chief executive
Alan Hassenfeld called it "a
very painful year"
Part of the problem was an
over-reliance on movie-related
toys, like tie-ins to the "Star
Wars" franchise, said. Sean
McGowan, an analyst %with
Wedbush Morgan Securities.
'They would be hot for a
while, then not hot," McGowan
said.
So Hasbro's executives went
back to basics. They turned
their focus to time-tested "core
brands," names consumers
knew and trusted: Playskool,
Monopoly, My Little Pony,
Transformers and others. They
looked at the brand's core idea
and thought of ways to contem-


Associated Press
In this photo provided by DreamWorks-Paramount a still Image
from the movie "Transformers" Is seen. Hasbro is banking that the
upcoming release of the movie "Transformers" - based on
Hasbro's "robots in disguise" toys introduced in the 1980s - will
herald a new era for the company that in the past few years has
remade Itself from a toy maker to an entertainment company.


prize it and parlay it into new
products that would turn the
company around and keep it
growing
Since then, they've devel-
oped new versions of
Monopoly, released a line of
Playskool products for CVS
drugstores, including diapers


and baby bottles, created a "My
Little Pony" live stage show to
name a few.
While Hasbro still does its
share of movie tie-ins -
"Spider-Man 3" and "Star
Wars," for example - it still
has a treasure trove of stable
properties, McGowan said.


CASH 3
x - x - x
PLAY 4
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MEGA MONEY
X-X-X-X
MEGA BALL
X
FANTASY 5
X - X - X - X -
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
Cash 3: 8-2-2
Play 4: 2 - 6 - 7 - 9
Fantasy 5: 9 - 11 -21 -23 - 33
5-of-5 2 winners $91,818.28
4-of-5 318 $93
3-of-5 9,343 $8.50
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Cash 3: 2-7-6
Play 4:7 -1 - 6 - 7
Lotto: 7 - 10- 13 - 16-22 -24
6-of-6 No winners
5-of-6 236 $2,075.50
4-of-6 8,775 $45
3-of-6 150,079 $3.50
Fantasy 5: 9 - 19 - 20 -29 - 30
5-of-5 3 winners $90,732.97
4-of-5 353 $124
3-of-5 11,592 $10.50
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
Cash 3: 0-2-5 -
Play 4:6 -3 - 8 - 4


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
N To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double.check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.comr; by telephone, call (850)
487 7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, June 19, the
170th day of 2007. There are 195
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 19, 1865, Union troops
commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon
Granger arrived in Galveston,
Texas, with news that the Civil War
was over, and that all slaves were
free. (This event is celebrated as
"Juneteenth.")
On this date:
In 1862, slavery was outlawed
in U.S. territories.
In 1910, Father's Day was cele-
brated for the first time, in
Spokane, Wash.
In 1934, the Federal
Communications Commission was
created; it replaced the Federal
Radio Commission.
In 1952, the celebrity-panel
game show "I've Got A Secret"
made its debut on CBS TV with
Garry Moore as host.
In 1964, the Civil Rights Act of
1964 was approved by the
Senate, 73-27, after surviving a
lengthy filibuster.
In 1982, in a case that galva-
nized the Asian-American commu-
nity, Vincent Chin, a Chinese-
American, was beaten to death in
Highland Park, Mich., by two auto
workers who later received proba-
tion for manslaughter in state
court, and won acquittals in subse-
quent federal trials.
Ten years ago: President
Clinton welcomed world leaders to
Denver on the eve of an economic
summit.
Five years ago: A suicide
bomber killed seven Israelis on a
Jerusalem bus in the second
deadly attack in the city in two
days.
One year ago: Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice warned
North Korea it would face conse-
quences if it test-fired a missile
thought to be powerful enough to
reach the West Coast of the
United States.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Gena Rowlands is 77. Singer Al
Wilson is 68. Singer Spanky
MacFarlane (Spanky and Our
Gang) is 65. Nobel peace laureate
Aung San Suu Kyi is 62. Actress
Phylicia Rashad is 59. Actress
Kathleen Turner is 53. Country
singer Doug Stone is 51. Singer-
dancer-"American Idol" judge
Paula Abdul is 45. Actor Andy
Lauer is 42. Actress Robin Tunney
is 35. Actor Bumper Robinson is
33. Actress Poppy Montgomery is
32. Actress Zoe Saldana is 29.
Thought for Today: "Our igno-
rance of history causes us to slan-
der our own times." - Gustave
Flaubert, French author (1821-
1880).


p *, ~


",,,rta',,mment


I dL.U.W"%











C
TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


This procedure has teeth


DAVE SIGLERCnronic:le
Dr. Gary Padgett talks to Debbie Denham about what he was going to do with her dental implants. Denham has already had the posts implanted and the
dentist was going to screw in the abutments. After the procedure the teeth are glued to the abutments.

An alternative to removable dentures, dental implants can vary in cost, time


JoY GALLON
For the Chronicle
F ourtleen years ago. Debbie Denham lost
all her top teeth., and for most of that
time, she hasn't worn her upper den-
tures.
Seven years ago, I came here and had an
upper denture, which I couldn't wear because it
made me gag," says Denham. 51, of Inverness. "I
couldn't wear anything on the top of my mouth.
When I talked, I didn't open my mouth real
wide because I didn't want people to know I
didn't have the top teeth."
Last year. Denham went to talk with a dentist
about dental implants. Today, she sports a beau-
tiful smile se can wear comfortably - upper
and lower - with the help of Dr. Gary Padgert,
a local dentist. "They feel like regular teeth
now." says Denham.
Dental implants are actually titanium posts
that are inserted into the jaw to hold in place
anytlhmg from one crown, a bridge, dentures or
an arch of teeth instead of a denture.
Abutments (a screw within a screw) hold the
new teeth to the post.
Padgett is enthusiastic about dental implants,
and a new concept that he calls "Teeth-in-an-
Hour," using "guided implant surgery."
All tests, tissue and bone grafts and tempo-
rary crowns are made in the months before the
implants are placed.
This includes CT scans of the patient's jaw,
and using a computer program from Nobel


This photo shows the abutments on a mold of
Debbie Denham's mouth. The teeth are molded in
ceramic from the model pictured in Dr. Padgentt's
right hand.
Biocare Inc., the fabrication of a surgical guide
- a bridge or denture with holes in it where the
implants will go.
Please see TEETH/Page 7C


COST OF DENTAL IMPLANTS
Costs are averagess or this area.
To replace one tooth: -
E 1 titanium implant "post" placed by a sur
geon into the jaw: $1,500 to $2,200.
* 1 abutment to hold crown to implant: $500
to $1,000.
* 1 porcelain crown: $900 to $1,200.
* Total cost: $2,900 to $4,400.
* Overdentures, complete set of upper and
lower dentures secured by 4 or more
implants: $15,000 to $35,000.
* Complete arch of permanent teeth secured
by multiple implants: $35,000 to $50,000.
* Cost for bridges vary based on number of
teeth needed.
Note:
* Bone and tissue grafts are expensive and
one or both are usually needed before
implants can be placed.
* Most dental insurance plans do not cover
any procedure connected with dental
implants.
* Time frame for dental implant work: Nine
months to more than a year, depending on a
patient's needs.
* Success rates: More than 98 percent.


Cope with loss of taste, smell More nutrition options


Sensory disorders, such as taste or
smell disturbances, can be frus-
trating for all concerned.
Typically, there are few physical find-
ings, yet the individual may
be very distressed. A careful F
inquiry into the nature and
the history of the symptoms 3
is essential to determining
the cause and developing a
rational plan for treatment
The doctor must sort out
taste from smell. People "
commonly confuse the sens-
es of taste and smell. The fla- Dr. De
vor gained from food is actu-
ally the summation of both EAR,
taste and smell information. & TH
When the person loses the
ability to smell, they often
complain of loss of taste; a typical
example is what happens during the
common cold.
To determine whether the problem is
in the nose or the taste buds, the doctor
needs to begin with questions and a
good patient history. This will explore
the four basic tastes: salty, sour, bitter
and sweet An example question might
be whether the person can distinguish
between coffee with or without sugar.
The ability to distinguish suggests a


II


problem with the sense of smell and not
taste.
It is important to distinguish loss
from distortion. The vast majority of
people experience a loss of
function rather than distor-
tion. This impaired ability to
detect smells and tastes is
less disabling than the expe-
rience of phantom sensa-
tions in the nose and mouth.
,, An example of this would be
a metallic, burned or
decayed smell sensation.
is Grillo How the nose actually
works is still not clearly
NOSE known. It is theorized that
ROAT the nose distinguishes the
difference among several
thousand odors by odor mol-
ecules interacting with receptors in the
lining of the roof of the nose and these
receptors have a process that electri-
cally transmits to the brain.
Olfactory (smell function) involves
transport and binding of odor mole-
cules, transmission of the stimulus and
central processing in the brain. Most
smell and taste disturbances can be
traced to three possible causes: an
Please see GRILLO/Page 7C


Editor's note: This is part of a weekly
series of condensed excerpts from Dr.
Ed Dodge's new book, "Dan's Story:
One Man's Discovery of Personal
Health Power."
The book is about a fic-
tional character whose
lifestyle and medical prob-
lems typify those of
America's health and its "
health care system.


Dan is meeting with
Mrs. Hartwell, his
nutritional adviser
Last week, she told him about
three top nutritious food
groups. Today, she will
address some problem food
groups.


Dr. Ed I
'DAI
STOF


Glancing at Mrs. Hartwell, Dan said,
"OK, I guess I should eat more fruits, veg-
etables and whole grains. How do I go
about doing that?"
"We'll talk about how to include more
of them in your eating plan later," replied
Mrs. Hartwell. "First, though, it's also
important for you to know about foods
you should avoid as much as possible.
Our single most problematic food is
sugar Aside from calories, it adds nothing
of value to health. Yet, for many people it


makes up 10 to 30 percent of their caloric
intake - levels that block out better foods
and may be hazardous to health."
"I know it is a problem in diabetes, but
is it for others?" asked Dan.
"It is OK as an occasional
condiment, but not as a major
supplier of calories," replied
Mrs. Hartwell. "The trouble is
that it is often hidden under
other names like corn syrup or
high fructose corn syrup
(HFCS). These sugars are
leading ingredients in many
Dodge soft drinks and processed
Dg foods.
i'S "Tvo other problem foods
RY' are white flour and white rice.
Even though they are plant-
based carbohydrate foods with
some protein remaining in them, their
most nutritious parts are stripped away
during processing."
"So, why is white flour often labeled
'Enriched'?" asked Dan.
"Some vitamins and minerals are
added back to both flour and rice to
improve their value and appeal," replied
Mrs. Hartwell, "but the value of what is
lost during processing is greater than the
Please see DODGE/Page 7C


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Prone


to sun


damage?
everyone's skin and
eyes can be damaged
by the sun and other
ultraviolet, rays. Although
people with light skin are
more likely to have sun dam-
age, darker-skinned people,
including African Ameri-
cans and Hispanic Ameri-
cans, also can be affected.
People with darker skin tan
more easily than others. But
tanning is still a form of skin
damage.
Tanning occurs when UV
radiation is absorbed .by the
skin, causing an increase in
the activity and number of
melanocytes, the cells that
make the pigment melanin.
Melanin helps to block out
damaging rays up to a point,
which is why darker-skinned
people burn less easily.
Those with lighter skin
are more likely to burn. Sun-
burns are thought to in-
crease your risk of skin can-
cer, especially melanoma.
But UV exposure can raise
skin cancer risk even with-
out causing a sunburn. What

Please see BENNETT/Page 7C


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE


Genetics

and lung

cancer

Mr. Smith noticed that
he had a cold that is
not going away even
after taking different treat-
ment, including a course of
antibiotics. A chest X-ray
showed a lung mass. The
biopsy showed lung cancer.
The patient was referred to
me for further management
Lung cancer is the most
lethal cancer in the United
States. It is of two broad
types: small-cell lung cancer
and non-small-cell lung can-
cer. Roughly three out of
four patients have non-
small-cell lung cancer
(NSCLC).
In the early stage, NSCLC
is highly curable with sur-
gery. This is when cancer is
localized to the lung and
might have spread to region-
al lymph nodes. The cure
rate can be increased in
most of these patients by giv-
ing chemotherapy after sur-
gery to kill microscopic can-
cer cells.
Unfortunately, in my
patient the cancer had
already spread outside the
lung. Now it is stage 4 (out of
4 stages) and is incurable.
Fortunately, with the latest
advances, more and more
different chemotherapy
drugs are available. These
drugs help patients signifi-
cantly by not only making
them live longer, but also

Please see GANDHI/Page 7C


--------------- --- ---


----------- - --------


:ji,:': : �










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


420 TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 HEALTH IFE



Amount of investment in dental care shows


This past week was business as
usual in the office except for a
couple's new patient exam and
a consultation on a gentleman.
Let's talk about the cou-
ple's new patient exams
first They recently moved
to Citrus County and made
their appointments to con-
tinue regular dental care
with me. Unlike most new
patient exams that I do,
both of these people pre-
sented as fully restored
and in very sound dental Dr. Frank
health.
They had crowns placed SOU
during the past 40 years, BIT
all of which were in good
shape, without decay and very stable.
They had seen the periodontist (gum
specialist) and had the necessary pro-
cedures completed, they saw their
general dentist twice a year and had
recalls every three months with the


U


hygienist It is very refreshing to do as
thorough an exam as I do and find two
people in such good shape. They have
invested their time and money in
high-quality dental and
home care and it has obvi-
ously paid off.
The gentleman I saw for
a consultation is quite a dif-
ferent story. This man has
gone regularly to the den-
tist and ended up getting a
very long fixed bridge
placed by a dentist about
Vascimini one year ago. He came to
me and presented two
IND problems unrelated to the
ES bridge I just mentioned.
While talking with him,
he casually mentioned a problem he
was having with his bridge. That is
when he mentioned it was done about
a year ago and that he had experi-
enced problems with it several times
after placement. He said he went


back to the dentist a number of times
without resolution of his problems.
I told him I would take a look at it
and let him know what I thought
Once I looked at it, I told him that we
should probably redirect our efforts
to the bridge since funds were limited
and the bridge was clearly the more
urgent issue.
You may be wondering why I men-
tion this. It is simple. I would much
rather see you end up like the first
couple rather than this gentleman.
Here are some tips on how to make
this happen:
Choose your dentist very carefully.
Ask for a tour of the office in order to
get a gut feeling about how things are
done. Does the staff seem rushed or
hurried?
Ask for an appointed time with the
dentist to meet him or her so you' can
get a feeling about the philosophies of
care. Do they even have the time to
spend with you and do you get the


feeling like you are the only thing on
their mind at that moment?
Remember that you do not really
know the quality of the care you
receive. Do you really know what
makes a crown a good crown or a fill-
ing a good filling?
In choosing dental care you have to
evaluate other things - and hope that
if the dentist cares enough about
these things they care enough to take
the time to do things right, use the
right materials, hire the right staff
and use the right labs.
If you are a price shopper, remem-
ber that it costs money to do things the
right way and that, more often than
not, doing things the wrong way often
leads to things being done again and
ultimately costing more than doing it
right in the first place.
This reminds me of the saying "Do
not shop for bargains when shopping
for parachutes."
I could go on and on with this topic


but let's let it rest here. You know
about opposite ends of a spectrum.
These two scenarios are truly at
both ends of the spectrum. When I
saw the couple, I felt myself celebrat-
ing with them about their past dental
care. I was truly excited.
Yet, when I saw the other gentle-
man, I felt very frustrated for him and
felt badly that he had spent a lot of
time and money to restore his teeth,
yet he continues to have problems.
Consider your decisions very care-
fully, not only with dentistry, but all
through life, for your decisions cer-
tainly affect the outcome of any situa-
tion.

Dr. Frank Vascimini is a Homosassa
dentist Send your questions to 4805
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 34446
or e-mail them to him at info@
masterpiecedentalstudio.com.


-....... .: ... -:-- --Health NOTES


* BROOKSVILLE - "Advances
in Peripheral Vascular Surgery"
seminar by Arthur Flatau III, M.D.,
from 9 to 11 a.m. today at the
Sugarmill Woods Country Club at 1
Douglas St. in Sugarmill Woods.
The seminar will be followed by
health screenings to include: glu-
cose, cholesterol, blood pressure,
blood oxygen levels and heel scan
for osteoporosis.
Complementary refreshments
will be served and seating is limit-
ed. For reservations, call 628-6060
in Citrus and (352) 597-6333 in
Hernando.
* Free seminar, "Natural Food
and Nutrition to Support Healthy
Bowel Function," by Dr. McFarland-
Bryant from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 26, at Better Health
Chiropractic, 6166 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
N BROOKSVILLE- "New
Perspectives in Open Heart
Surgery" seminar by Ravi Sharma,
M.D., from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
June 26, in the fourth floor class-
room of Hernando Medical Center,
adjacent to Oak Hill Hospital at
entrance C, 11375 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville. Seating is limited and
reservations are advised. Call 628-
6060 in Citrus or (352) 597-6333 in
Hernando.
* Look Good ..._Feel Better,
fgr.women undergoing radiation or
chemotherapy, will be at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, June 27, at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute.
Call the American Cancer Society
at (800) 395-LOOK (5665) for a
reservation.
* BROOKSVILLE - Florida
Cancer Institute to host the
American Cancer Society's Look
Good ... Feel Better from 3 to 5
p.m. Thursday, June 28. Free. Call
Mary Capo at (352) 596-1926, ext.
150.
* Diabetes classes are offered
from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Health Department
in Lecanto. Classes are free. No
registration is required.
* Meal planning, Monday.
* More about meal plans, July
2.
* Medications and monitoring,
July 9.
* Sick days, July 16.
. *Avoiding complications, July
23.
::Fasting blood sugars are offered
,frdm 8 to 9 a.m. Monday through
:Friday in all three Citrus County
'Health Department sites. There is
a $10 fee for this service. No
appointment is necessary. Every
Monday before the Lecanto class,
anyone who would like to have a
blood sugar test should come fast-
ing.
For more information, call
Lynece Hand, R.N., 795-6233, ext.
:240 or Carol Burke, R.D., 726-
'5222.
S Free diabetes screening will
be offered from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday to Saturday at Kmart,


1801 N.W. U.S. 19, in Crystal
River. For more information, call
(800) 713-330. No appointment is
necessary.
E Free spinal scan and facility
tour, utilizing the Pro-Adjuster, lat-
est technology in chiropractic care.
Dr. Russell Lewandowski, Wellness
advisor, 3348 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness. Call Barbara
at 726-0888. Visit www.proad
justerbyrussellchiro.com.
B Free movie and popcorn
night featuring The Secret, by
Rhonda Byre, at 7 p.m. Friday,
June 29, at The Russell Chiroprac-
tic and Wellness Center, 3348 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
Seating is limited. RSVP by June
26. Call Barbara at 726-0888.
B Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center's Web site is
www.srrmc.com.
B American Cancer Society's
"Road to Recovery" program
needs volunteer drivers. Call Cindi
Crisci, area patient services repre-
sentative at the American Cancer
Society, at (727) 812-7028.
B The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Wanderers
Identification Program provides
an identifying bracelet or pendant
with a code number and direct tele-
phone number to the participating
sheriff's office. Call toll free at
(888) 496-8004.
B The Alzheimer's Family
Organization's Respite
Assistance Program is available
to all residents of Citrus, Pasco,
Hemando, Sumter and Lake coun-


l 1 I'rnial imri cini ' & I'rildiatlris


Carlene A.P. Wilson, MD
Board Certifled Internal Medicine * Board Certified Pediatrics
* Pap Test, Breast Exams and HRT
* Patient directed care
* Treatment of Diabetes, Hypertension, & Asthma
* Traditi,-.nl & Herbil Medi'ine 4
*Totil t-aJr ' i. r.e i'dlirc lmI ,
934 N. Suncoast Blvd. (South Square Plaza)
:70977 Crystal River 352-563-5070


Accepting
New Patients
Mon-Tue-Thu .am - bpm
Wed & Fri Samrr- pm


ties caring for an individual with
dementia or Alzheimer's disease.
Call (727) 848-8888 or toll free at


(888) 496-8004.
B Citrus County Community
Support Services and Catholic


"The StomaphyX allows me, as a
surgeon, to offer patients the most
comprehensive weight loss options
in the country. This is the most
affordable weight loss surgery
available, the least invasive, and has
the lowest risk of complications.
There is essentially limited recovery
time for the patient, which allows
the patient to return to their daily
activities and work environment,


Charities offers a Respite Care
Program for people with early
onset Alzheimer's disease or other
dementia-related illnesses, from
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Our Lady of Grace Church, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Bobbie J. Sharp at 527-5940,
Citrus County Community Support
Services.
* The Doctor Ride program
helps with medical appointment
transportation in Citrus County for
those age 65 and older. Three or
four days' notice is required, and
only one ride per week is available.
To volunteer or ride, call John at
746-3796.
* Skillbank's volunteer pool of
drivers will chauffeur residents of
Beverly Hills who need a ride to
the doctor, pharmacy or grocery
store. Residents get one trip a
week and should call several days
in advance: 746-5001 from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
* Telephone Friends service
confirms safety and imparts care
and concern, available at no cost.
Call Nature Coast Volunteer Center
at 527-5950 or e-mail ncvc@
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
* The Citrus County Health
Department (CCHD) has a toll-
free information line, (877) 746-
3248. The CCHD Web address is
www.citruscountyhealth.org and
the Community-Resource number
is 211.
* The Beverly Hills Lions Club
Inc. has a loan closet for wheel-


chairs, walkers, canes, bath chairs,
etc. Call Lion Warren Adams, 746-
1984.
* The Center For Independent
Living of North Central Florida
(CILNCF) provides four core serv-
ices in: information and referral,
peer support, independent living
skills education and advocacy.
It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. at 3774 State Road 44,
across from Cowboy Junction.
Please see NOTES/Page 3C


Board certified, Florida licensed
pedorthist on staff.
IF YOU'RE DIAREIC, MEDICARE WILL
COVER SHOES AND INSERTS AT UTRLE
OR NO COST TO YOU.

Quality Mobility Nc
We Carry All Home Medical Equipment
599 SE Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
(352)564-1414,
*Deductibles & co-pays may apply.


StomaphyX" - State-of-the-art endoscopic weight
loss procedure now offered by Dr. Todd Overcash and
Munroe Regional Medical Center. Dr. Overcash is one
of only four surgeons in the United States trained to
perform this procedure and the first in the Southeast.


This revolutionary procedure is now available for
individuals who have had previous gastric bypass
surgery and who are regaining weight and those who
want an alternative to invasive weight loss surgery.


StomaphyX" benefits:


* In most cases, the StomaphyXVm procedure is
performed on an outpatient basis.


* No need for surgical incisions.


* Enables the surgeon to reduce the size of the
stomach.


* Preserves future treatment options.


* Essentially painless.


*' Faster recovery than with open/laparoscopic


typically on the same day." procedures.
-Dr. Todd Overcash


- ' - - -


SRRMC supports OC5K Run/Walk

=- -SEVEN r
RIVERS










- --- . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




.. .............. .... . ... ..




Special to the Chronicle
From left, Joyce Brancato, CEO of Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, presents a spon-
sorship check for $500 to Judy Baker and Claudia Brockett. SRRMC will sponsor the second
annual Ovarian Cancer 5K Run and 1M Walk to benefit the Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Florida.
As members of the steering committee for the run/walk, Baker and Brockett are working
hard to promote the event and ultimately help educate women about ovarian cancer. The
event will be Saturday, Aug. 18, at Black Diamond Ranch in Lecanto. Proceeds will be used
to help educate women about the subtle symptoms of ovarian cancer.


t-At- V -- t








CIYRUS COUNrI (FL) CHRONICLE l-_AJL'.L 451 kl.,_........________________ --



Oral contraceptive Lybrel stops monthly periods


TTFSrAY. JUNEF 19, 200723C


* control product was ap-
* proved that stops your
periods. What can you tell me
about it?
A The FDA recently approved
Lybrel (to symbolize "liberty"), a
new low-dose combination oral
contraceptive. Unlike most other
oral contraceptives, which are
taken for 21 days followed by seven
days off, Lybrel is taken every day
or 365 days a year Studies have


shown that Lybrel is just as effec-
tive in preventing pregnancy as
other oral contraceptives, but
because there is no drug-free inter-
val, monthly periods are stopped.
Lybrel is intended for women who
are seeking contraception and who
are interested in putting their men-
strual cycle on hold.
During clinical study, 59 per-
cent of women taking Lybrel
achieved amenorrhea (absence of
all bleeding and spotting), 20 per-


cent experienced spotting only -
not requiring any sanitary protec-
tion, and 21 percent required san-
itary protection because of break-
through bleeding. In view of this,
women considering using Lybrel
must weigh the convenience of
having no periods against the
inconvenience of unscheduled
bleeding or spotting. The occur-
rence of unscheduled bleeding
decreases through time in most
women who continue to take


Lybrel for a full year.
The risks of using Lybrel are
similar to the risks of other oral
contraceptives and include an
increased risk of blood clots,
heart attacks, and strokes, espe-
cially in cigarette smokers.
Because Lybrel users will elim-
inate their regular periods, it
may be difficult for women to rec-
ognize if they become pregnant
and they should take a pregnancy
test if they think they are preg-


nant. Some people have also ex-
pressed concerns about whether
blocking periods is safe or natu-
ral, but many doctors appear to
think otherwise. Lybrel is expect-
ed to be available in July 2007..

Richard Hoffmann has practiced
pharmacy for more than 20 .
years. Send questions to him at
1135 N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness, FL 34453.


NOTES
Continued from Page 2C

* The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety
seat checks by appointment at the
Inverness office, 120 N. Mont-
gomery Ave. Call Sue Littnan at
726-1731, ext. 242.
* Florida Elks Children's
Therapy Services provides free in-
home physical and occupational
therapy to Florida children in need.
Applicants for consideration may
call Walt Mabie at Inverness Elks
Lodge 2522 in Hemando at 726-
2027 before noon Monday through
Friday, West Citrus Elks 2693 at
628-1221 or the Florida program
administrator toll free at (800) 523-
1673.
* Citrus County Health
Department offers birth control
services to women of childbearing
age. These confidential services
are available at all health depart-
ment locations from a female
provider who specializes in
women's health. Call the office
nearest you: Inverness 726-1731;
Crystal River 795-6233; Lecanto
527-0068.
* A+ Healthcare Home Health
will be at the following locations to
offer free blood pressure screen-
ing. Call Mary Pearsall at 564-
2700.
* East Citrus Community
Center: 9 to. 11 a.m. first
Wednesday monthly.
* Brentwood Health Center: 10
to 11 a.m. second Tuesday month-
ly.
* West Citrus Community
Center: 9 to 11 a.m. third
Wednesday monthly.
* Inverness Community Center:
9 to 11 a.m. third Tuesday monthly.
* Inverness Sports & Orthopedic
Rehab Team (SPORT) offers free
screening, by appointment, for
individuals with neck/back pain,
headaches, orthopedic injuries,
carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, osteo-
porosis and general fitness. Call
341-3740,
* Free HIV testing is available
at the Citrus County Health
Department: Inverness, 726-1731;
Crystal River, 795-6233; Lecanto,
527-0068. Walk-ins accepted,
appointments preferred.
* Free hearing screenings
offered by All Children's Sertoma
Therapy Center from 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays by ap-
pointment only at 760 W. Hamp-
shire Blvd., Suite 9, Citrus Springs.
Call 746-3300.
* Telecommunication equip-
ment is available to any Florida
resident who has a hearing or
speech impairment. Call Citrus
Hearing Impaired Program
Services at 795-5000 (voice) or
795-7243 (TTY). Visit the Web site
at www.ftri.org.
* SHINE (Serving Health


Insurance Needs of Elders) coun-
selors offer information and assis-
tance on Medicare (figuring out the
paperwork, bills and filing appeals),
Medicare Supplemental Insurance,
Medicare prescription drug cover-
age and long-term care planning.
For an appointment at Citrus
Memorial Health System's SHARE
Club from 9 a.m. to noon Monday,
call 344-6513, SHARE Club affilia-
tion is not required.
For appointments at other sites
throughout the county or informa-
tion, call the Elder Help Line at
(800) 262-2243 or leave your
name and telephone number with
the Citrus County Senior Care
Services at 527-5930. A SHINE
counselor will return your call.
SHINE Walk-In Sites with no
appointment necessary:
* Citrus County Resource
Center - noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays - 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center - 9 a.m. to noon
the first and third Fridays monthly
- check in at the volunteer desk in
the hospital lobby at 6201 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
* "Medically Speaking," a 30-
minute health awareness program,
airs at 5 p.m. Monday on WYKE
TV, channel 16, hosted byApril
Saxer, marketing director for
Gulfcoast Aquatic and
Rehabilitation.
* Professional counseling
services are available to individu-
als, couples, families and children
experiencing a broad range of per-
sonal, relationship and family prob-
lems.Call Marty at Catholic
Charities at (800) 242-9012.
* Citrus Memorial Health
System has speakers. Mail
requests to Debi Shields in Public
Relations, Citrus Memorial hospital,
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness,
FL 34452, or call her at 344-6501.
* Diane White of Hero
Assistance Dogs is available as a
guest speaker. Call at 560-3785.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center maintains an active
group of speakers. Call Jennifer
Hall, community relations coordina-
tor, at 795-8344 or (352) 489-2022,
ext. 8344.
* LifeLink of Florida, the agency
which coordinates organ and tissue
donations for the Tampa Bay area,
has speakers available. Call
Jennifer Krouse at (800) 262-5775
or (813) 253-2640.
* The Citrus County Health
Department will provide speakers
to groups interested in health top-
ics. Call Judi Tear at 527-0068, ext.
271.
* Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center offers a way to
send e-mail messages to loved
ones who have been admitted to
the hospital. Log onto
www.srrmc.com, and go to
Quickfind, or Patient and Visitor
Info. Choose Email a Patient, com-


Special to the Chronicle
From left are: Iva Puckett, president; Jackie Reeves, gift shop chairwoman; Hamp, Volunteer
of the Month; and Ryan Beaty, CEO and president of Citrus Memorial Health System.


Hamp chosen volunteer of month


Special to the Chronicle


Ethel Hamp was nominated by Jackie
Reeves for her dedicated service in the gift
shop. Hamp has also served at the informa-
tion desk in the Medical Office Building and
in the lab as a hostess.
Jackie Reeves said, "Ethel's attitude is
one of responsibility and caring for her posi-
tions an auxilian. She substitutes several
times a week and fills a very important role
as the gift shop clerk on Sundays. She is


plete the form and hit send.
* Senior Companion Program
volunteers serve 20 hours per
week, providing companionship,
respite care, escorted transporta-
tion and other services to clients
who are at risk of placement in
long-term care facilities.
Prospective SCP volunteers do
not need medical or technical
skills, just the ability to be a friend.
Call Sue Carscadden, SCP assis-
tant, at 527-5959.
* Barrier Free America as
advocates will work with persons
who have disabilities and the entity
involved in complying with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990 (ADA).
To file a grievance (the service is
free), call for an appointment at
628-5401. Barrier Free America is
at the Golden Eagle Plaza, 3269 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* Florida Alliance for Assist-
ive Services and Technology
(FAAST) will exhibit and demon-
strate adaptive and assistive
devices for people with disabilities
and the elderly. A FAAST


always pleasant and dependable."
Hamp has accumulated 2,200 hours in
three years of volunteer service at CMHS.
But she doesn't only volunteer at the hospi-
tal. She is also very busy with Meals on
Wheels and assists at the Share Club when
needed.
Hamp has been known to take gifts up to
the rooms of the patients when family mem-
bers call in from out of town.
Hamp does'all this with a pleasant and
kind smile for everyone.


Demonstration Center is at the
Center for Independent Living's
Lecanto office. FAAST is at 3774
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461. The center is open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
� through Friday. Call 527-8399.
*- Agency for Persons with
I Disabilities toll-free number is
(866) APD-CARES or (866) 273-
2273, staffed from 8 a.m. until 5.
p.m. Monday through Friday. The
agency currently serves more than
35,000 Floridians with the develop-,
mental disabilities of mental retar-
dation, autism, cerebral palsy,
spina bifida and Prader-Willi syn-
drome. Visit www.apd.myflorida
.com.
* Yoga at the Historic Crystal
River Train Depot, 109 Crystal
Ave., is scheduled as follows:
* 9 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m.
Wednesday.
* 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
* 9 to 10 a.m. Saturday.
Cost is $5 per class. Bring a mat
or towel and wear clothes that
allow for easy physical movement.
Classes are appropriate for 8 years


and older and are multi-level. All
certified instructors. Call 795-3710,
795-3662, 795-1645 or 563-6535.

Support GROUPS

* Alzheimer's Family
Organization:
0 2 p.m. today, Highland
Terrace, 700 Medical Court E.,
Inverness. Call Ellen Mallon at
860-2525.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, June 28,
Woodland Terrace, 124 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando. Call
Pam Pepitone at 249-3100.
* Sumter County Brain Injury
Support Group will meet 2 to 4
p.m. Thursday at LSCC/Sumter
Campus in Sumterville. The speak-
er will be Janice Starling, a well
known artist of murals and decora-
tive art in Webster. Call Margie
Sovercool, (352) 793-7841.
* Celiac disease and dermati-
tis herpetiformis support meeting
from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday in
the community room at Coastal
Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal
St., Crystal River. The meetings will


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be on the fourth Saturday monthly-
until further notice. Everyone is
welcome and is asked to bring
friends or relatives who also may
be gluten intolerant. Call Mary Lou-
Thomas at 628-9559.
* Pain Management Support
Group meeting at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, June 27, at Cancer
Treatment Center, 3406 N. Lecantb
Highway, Beverly Hills (next to
bowling alley). Dr. Murali
Angirekula will speak about pain
management. Refreshments will be
served. Call 746-1100 for any
questions.
N BROOKSVILLE - Man to -
Man prostate cancer support group
at 6 p.m. Monday, July 2, at the
Florida Cancer Institute's
Brooksville Center at 7154 Medical
Center Drive, just behind Johnny
Carino's. Call Betty Lawrence,
R.T.(T.), support group facilitator, at
(352) 596-1926.
* BROOKSVILLE - Women's
breast cancer support group
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July
3, at the Florida Cancer Institute's
Brooksville Center at 7154 Medical,
Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call
Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at (352)
592-8128.
* Support group meetings are
in the CMHS Administration
Building unless otherwise indicat-
ed.
* Bariatric Support Group: 6:30
p.m. every three months, Cypress
Room. Call Claudia Blotz at 697-
0051 or Bette Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support Group:
noon the second Friday, Robert
Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call
June O'Donnell at 527-8371.
* Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 .
p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria
meeting room. Call Carol at 726-
1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday,
Cypress Room. Call Carol McHugh
at 341-6110.
* Dystonia Support Group: 10
a.m. the third Saturday of every
other month, Cypress Room. Call
Anna DiPleco at 726-8489. Next
meeting in November.
* Fibromyalgia Support: Will not
meet until further notice.
* Citrus Country Ostomy
Support: 2 p.m. the third Sunday,
Cypress Room. Call Bob at 746-
6693, Sally at 637-2055, Betty at .
726-3802 or Frank at 341-0005.
*Parkinson's Support Group: 1
p.m. first Tuesday, Cypress Room.
Call Catherine Clark at 344-9630.
OACS Man-to-Man Prostate
Cancer Support and Education
Program: 11:30 a.m. first
Wednesday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute, Allen Ridge
Please see GROUPS/Page 4C


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4C TusDATIJUNEP19, 2007


, I 1(1 ,\n'Y (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


United Spinal plans new consumer conference, expo


Special to the Chronicle

ORLANDO - In conjunction with
its annual North American Spinal
Cord Injury Conference and
Disability Expo (NASCICDE), Aug. 27
to 29 in Orlando, United Spinal
Association is hosting an exclusive
new forum addressing the specific
needs and concerns of all individuals
with disabilities.
Creating Your Future: Living with a
Disability is a two-day consumer con-
ference and expo taking place at
NASCICDE.
Conference participants will have
their pick of 18 informative sessions
such as "Assistive Technology Meets


the Computer," "It's a Family Affair-
Family Issues and Disability,"
"Spasticity," "Let's Talk About Sex -
Ask the Experts," "I've Got to Work,"
and "Caregivers 101."
Expo goers will have more than 100
nationally-known vendors showcasing
the latest in products and services for
people with disabilities; hands-on
experience with state-of-the-art assis-
tive technology; the latest in durable
medical equipment, rehabilitation
supplies, and accessibility gear; and
the answers they need from knowl-
edgeable professionals about pain
management, bowel and bladder
issues, research updates, pharmaceu-
tical solutions and more.


Conference exhibitors include:
Acorda Therapeutics, Kinetech,
Advanced Aeromedical, Stratus
Pharmaceuticals Inc., Astra Tech,
Invacare, Permobil, Alliance Labs,
Uromed Inc., ABLE to Travel, Bard
Medical, Microtel Inns & Suites (a
sponsor of the event) and many more.
"With a distinguished faculty from
some of the most respected institu-
tions in the country, this is a can't-miss
opportunity to discover the most
effective strategies for living with a
disability, networking with colleagues
and getting a firsthand look at the lat-
est in products and services for indi-
viduals with disabilities," said Paul J.
Tobin, president and CEO of United


Spinal Association.
Demonstrations, events and special
offers will also highlight "Creating
Your Future." Children and adults
will have the option of playing adap-
tive sports such as wheelchair tennis
and football, power soccer and quad
rugby with United Spinal's Sports and
Recreation Department, and witness
live demonstrations of the remark-
able skills of service animals and
their trainers.
Admission to Creating Your Future:
Living with a Disability is free when
individuals preregister. Individuals
can register online at www.sciconfer-
ence.org or call (800) 404-2898 for a
conference/expo brochure. A com-


plete listing of the workshops is avail-
able at www.sciconference.org.
NASCICDE will be at the luxurious
Gaylord Palms Resort and
Convention Center in Orlando. To reg-
ister, visit www.sciconference.org or
call (800) 404-2898 for a conference
and expo brochure.
United Spinal Association is a
national membership organization
committed to enhancing the lives of
people with spinal cord injuries or
disorders.
Membership in United Spinal is
free and open to any individual with
these disabilities, regardless of age.
For more information, visit www.unit
edspinal.org.


OUPl www.nar-anon.org. Church, 550 U.S. 41 S.,
SU Depression and Bipolar Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday
Support Alliance of Citrus County monthly. Call Wendy Hall at 527-
Continued from Page 3C at 7 p.m. Thursday in Bailey Hall, 4600.
First Lutheran Church, 1900 State N The Hepatitis C Support
Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Road 44 W., Inverness. Doors Group from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. the
Highway, Lecanto. Call 527-0106. open at 6 p.m. Call 621-0165. The fourth Monday monthly at the
* Respiratory Support Group: National DBSA Association's num- Lecanto Health Department, 3700
Will not meet until further notice. ber is (800) 826-3632. W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Call
* Overeaters Anonymous: 0 The Area 13 Family Care 527-0068, ext. 253.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the senior Council from 10 a.m. to noon the 0 Homosassa Springs Area
center on County Road 491, second Monday monthly at the Cancer Survivors' Support
Lecanto. Call 746-5018. Wildwood DCF/APD office, 1601 Group at 1 p.m. monthly at First
* 1 p.m. Thursday at Our Lady W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State United Methodist Church. Call
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt Road 44). Call Dominic Anna Cooley, 382-4132, or Earl
Blvd, Beverly Hills. Christofaro, (352) 489-6279. Cadaret, 382-1923.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of 0 Alzheimer's Association � E Hospice of Citrus County
Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roosevelt Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups for 2007:
Blvd., Beverly Hills. meets at 11 a.m. the first Tuesday * Newly Bereaved Support
Call 746-7749 or 341-0777. monthly at Our Lady of Fatima Group at 1 p.m. Thursday at the
* Narcotics Anonymous: Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Hospice of Citrus County Clinical
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday Inverness. Call Wendy Hall, 527- Office, 326 S. Line Ave., Inverness.
and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41, 4600. * Grief support group at 11 a.m.
Floral City. Friends of the Blind meets Tuesdays at Our Lady of Grace
* It Works How and Why, 7 p.m. from 9 a.m. to noon the second Catholic Church in Beverly Hills.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- Friday monthly at the Church of the 0 Grief support group at 10 a.m.
urday and noon Sunday, YANA Nazarene in Hemando. Call Butch Tuesdays at the Hospice of Citrus
Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Shultz at 344-2693 or Bob County Clinical Office, 326 S. Line
Crystal River. Johnson at 563-1890. Ave., Inverness
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m. 0 FFRA (Families and Friends Ave., Invemess.
Thursday, First Christian Church, of Retarded Adults) at 9 a.m. the * Grief support group at 1:30
Grover Cleveland Boulevard, second Friday monthly at the Key p.m. Thursday at St. Thomas the
Homosassa. Training Center in Lecanto, in the Apostle Church in Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8 p.m. Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center. 0 Grief support group at 10:30
Monday and Friday, Lecanto Call Stephanie at 344-0288, or a.m. Saturday at First United
Church of Christ, State Road 44 leave a message at 563-0536. Methodist Church in Homosassa.
and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8 0 Better Breathers Support * Spouse support group at 7
p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Group at 1:30 p.m. the third Friday p.m. Tuesday at Unity Church of
Lecanto, east of County Road 491 monthly at the Citrus County Citrus County in Lecanto.
and State Road 44. Health Department Lecanto Office; * Spouse support group at 4
Narcotics Anonymous is not affil- 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. p.m. Thursday at First United
iated with any of the meeting facili- Call Doris Kames at 860-1355. ,.,! , Methodist Church Homosassa.
ties listed. Information line: 382- N Alzheimer's Association- 0 Social "Moving On" support
0851. Florida Gulf Coast Chapter sup- group at 10 a.m. Tuesday at
* Narconon Need help with port groups: Crystal Paradise Restaurant in
Addiction? Call (800) 556-8885. 0 Surrey Place of Lecanto, Crystal River.
* Nar-Anon: a support group 2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, . Social "Moving On" support ,
for the families and friends.oi ; Lecarto, 2, p.m. secondlTueday . group at,4p.m,.Fridays at,
addicts, at 8 p.m. Wednesday at monthly. Call Paula Hum at 746- Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant in
Act II, 1065 N. Paul Drive, 9500. Inverness.
Inverness. Call 344-5963 or visit 0 Our Lady of Fatima Catholic 0 Parents support group, a


chapter of Bereaved Parents of the
USA, at 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church in Crystal
River.
* Emotions Anonymous of
Beverly Hills at noon second and,
fourth Thursdays at Central Ridge"
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt. Call Meg at 527-
2443.
* Celebrate Recovery at 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays at the
Christian Recovery Fellowship
Church, 2242 W. State Road 44.
Call 726-2800.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 112 N. Pine
Ave., Inverness, offers three free
weekly women's domestic abuse
support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday (free child care avail-
able).
* 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days (no child care available).
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Transitions Grief Support
Group - 3 and 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center offices building community
room. Registration required. Call
(800) 486-8784.
* Look Good ... Feel Better
workshop for women undergoing
radiation, chemotherapy or are
within six months post-treatment, at
3 p.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at the Cancer & Blood
Disease Center, 521 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call the Ameri-
can Cancer Society at (800) 395-
LOOK (5665) for a reservation.
* Overcomers Group for peo-
ple recovering from addictions to
drugs, alcohol or other out-of-con-
trol habits meets at 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary.,7463;.
Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul
at 628-2874.


HIGH FIELD 1.7 T MRI
OPEN M.R.I.
CARDIAC NUCLEAR MEDICINE
16-SLICE CTANGIOGRAPHY
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MAMMOGRAPHY

KAMALESH A. AMIN, M.D.
CERTIFIED, AMERICAN BOARD OF RADIOLOGY


* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addiction,
compulsion and co-dependency
issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m.
Monday at Rainbow Springs
Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd
St. Road Dunnellon. Call Char at
(352) 465-1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet regular-
ly in Citrus County. Call (352) 697-
0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41.
0 Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict Catholic
Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 2149 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N.
Osceola Ave., Inverness.
* Courage AFG. 8 p.m. Thurs-
days, First United Methodist
Church, 8831 West Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. Room 102. Open
meeting. Call 270-3827.
* Al-Anon Family Group for
family or friends living with or con-
cerned about another's drinking
problem meets from 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. Monday at St. Lawrence
Catholic Church, 320 E. Dade
Ave., Bushnell. May bring bag
lunch. Call 793-5738 or 568-1708.
* Alcoholics Anonymous: If
you drink, and want to stop, call
Alcoholics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 621-0599. Web
site; www.ncintergrqup com, , ,-..
* A.C. Ministries Recovery
Group 12-Step Recovery


t mm
l^l^u, ^^^^


Workbook meeting (scripturally
based), 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at
Church Without Walls, nondenomi-
national, nonprofit Christian
Fellowship. The group ministers to
alcoholics or substance abusers,
family of substance abusers,
adults, children and individuals who
were raised in alcoholic or sub-
stance abuse or dysfunctional fami-
lies. Donations accepted. 3962
North Roscoe Road, Hemando.
Call Laveme at 637-4563.
* CEA-H.O.W. for people who
have an eating disorder, at noon
Wednesday at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness. Call
Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Amputee Support Group
meets the last Thursday monthly at
Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant on
State Road 44 West, Inverness.
Call Donna at 344-1988 or Perry at
Sonlife Prosthetics, 344-8200.
* Reiki clinic meets from 7 to 9
p.m. most Wednesdays at the
Beverly Hills Community Center, 1
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call Ann
Thonen at 795-5116 or Kristi
Kobler at 628-5537.

SO YOU KNOW
* Obituaries must be sub-
mitted by licensed funeral
homes.
* Obituaries and funeral
notices are subject to
editing.
* Recent photos are wel-
come. E-mail JPEG to
newsdesk@chronicleon
line.com or bring photo
to office to be scanned
during regular business
hours.
SCGall.Linda Johnsop at 563-
5660 for details.


16-SLICE PET/CT SCAN
COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY
ULTRASOUND
VASCULAR DOPPLER STUDIES
ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY
OSTEOPOROSIS SCANNING


SCOTT R. FISHER, M.D.


922 N. CITRUS AVENUE * CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428 * PHONE (352) 795-9200
7M,8 www.citrusdiagnosticcenter.com


Have you been told you need, a hysterectomy? There's a
gynecologist in your area who offers an approach you can feel
better about. It's called a minimally invasive hysterectomy. It's
just as effective as conventional surgery, but uses smaller
incisions. That means less pain and a shorter hospital stay.
You'll be back to your life, back to what's important faster. To
learn more about minimally invasive hysterectomy, call for a
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CIrrus CouNTY (FL) CHROICU'~LE



Time to plan for life lessons before baby arrives


H ere's two absolute
truths I've learned -
during the past
week:
My wife's husband is a
slob, leaving trails of dirty
clothes, socks, shoes, jeans
and T-shirts scattered
across the corners of our
house.
Secondly, how truly Jeff
blessed I am to have THE �
Tabetha by my side on a GI
day-to-day basis.
Because for most of the
past week, I played bachelor again,
though to a much smaller extent The
wife, almost 36 weeks pregnant, hit a
small bump in the road last Tuesday.
She was a little overheated, a bit
dilated at 2 1/2 centimeters and 80
percent effaced, which by labor stan-
dards is pretty darn good. It's a little


Bryan
THEIRR
UY


earlier than we anticipat-
ed. Jackson's due date isn't
slated until July 15. I think
he's just a bit eager to get a
look at what the world has
to offer.
His mother is really
ready for him to stop using
her rib cage as a soccer
ball. Perhaps after all is
said and done, we should
take her for X-rays,
because as much as Jack
kicks I'm thinking he's bro-
ken a couple of her ribs.


So for all of the excitement of my
wife's trip to the hospital, all she
gained was a week of rest and relax-
ation. So eight days of bed rest might
not exactly be a vacation, but when
she considers she has her mother dot-
ing over her during the evenings I
work and me doting over during my


Thank goodness I have a mother who taught me
the value of doing laundry and folding clothes.
Thank goodness for my father who taught me the
value of a gas grill and a dishwasher.


off days, it came really close to a vaca-
tion.
She got to do three of her favorite
things during the eight-day stint on
the disabled list - sleep, eat, watch
TV, eat, sleep, watch TV, eat, watch TV
and sleep.
Thank goodness I have a mother
who taught me the value of doing
laundry and folding clothes. Thank
goodness for my father who taught me
the value of a gas grill and a dish-
washer. That's four valuable life les-
sons I plan to teach my son as soon as


he's old enough. Most likely, the first
three will be laundry, folding clothes
and cleaning pots, pans and plates.
While I've done a little good-nature
ribbing with the wife, I'm glad she and
the pregnancy are moving along as
smoothly as possible. We expected
her to have Jackson early, but not as
early as five weeks.
She was born three months early, so
that automatically made her a candi-
date to have a premature birth. I'm
also glad that nothing serious has
occurred and that all she needed was


a little R&R and some pampering
from her family
I've told her to enjoy it while it lasts,
that in a few short weeks, it'll all be
over with. She won't be the center of
attention, no one doting on her. It will
all be about our Baby Jack.
Granted, I do know that the one
holding the baby usually is the center
of attention. Now it's just a matter of
being able to wrestle him away from
his Grandma, and I think I can take
her.
Now where's the apron, the mop
and duster? The wife will be up in a
few hours.

Chronicle copy editor Jeff Bryan and
his wife Tabetha are expecting their
first child in July. Jeff is periodically
chronicling the experiences of what
it's like preparing for their first child.


Oak Hill Hospital debuts


Orthopaedic Institute


Special to the Chronicle
BROOKSVILLE - Oak Hill
Hospital has announced the
establishment of the Ortho-
paedic Institute focusing on
patients who undergo total
knee or hip replacement The
Orthopaedic Institute is on the
hospital's fourth floor, which is
primarily devoted to patients
who undergo surgery.
The Orthopaedic Institute is
characterized by its dedication
to pre-operative education.
The Orthopaedic Institute ini-
tially welcomes their guests
when they come in for pre-
admission testing approxi-
mately three to seven days
prior to their scheduled sur-
gery. After the testing and
assessment are completed,
they are escorted to the fourth
floor for a tour of the
Orthopaedic Institute and pre-
operative teaching.
The guest receives informa-
tion and education and gets an
opportunity to be introduced to
staff members that they might
be seeing in the near future.
Part of the tour includes seeing


the Physical Therapy Facility
located right in the Institute
and a separate dining room for
Institute guests.
The main objectives of pre-
operative teaching are to help
educate, alleviate fears, an-
swer questions and promote a
positive recovery for the
patient and significant otherss.
The teaching focuses on
reviewing common ortho-
paedic equipment, physical
therapy, pain control meas-
ures, preventing post-opera-
tive complications and prepar-
ing the home for discharge.
The normal duration of a
guest's stay is three to five days.
A detailed explanation of what
to expect in the Recovery
Room is also reviewed so that
when a patient awakes from
anesthesia they are not as over-
whelmed with all the drains,
tubes, IVs and equipment that.
they will be hooked to. A folder
packet with relative informa-
tion is also provided.
Once the patient undergoes
surgery, they are an active
Institute member. They are pro-
vided with a private suite that


can accommodate telemetry
monitoring if ordered. The staff
encourages active participation
by the significant other Guests
receive nursing care by a spe-
cial group of nurses dedicated
to and highly competent with
the orthopaedic population.
Physical therapy is aggressive
and some patients have begun
to utilize the exercise equip-
ment in the Physical Therapy
Room. The patients are encour-
aged to have lunch and dinner
in the dining room to promote
positive socialization with other
Institute members.
The physicians associated
with the Hernando Ortho-
paedic Institute are: Craig R.
Bennett, M.D.; Jose Gomez,
M.D.; Dolfi Herschovici Jr.,
D.O.; Michael H. Higgins, D.O.;
Richard Katz, M.D.; John
Lozano, M.D.; Steven H. Moss,
M.D.; Jared Salinsky, D.O.;
Richard Springstead, M.D.;
Imad Tarabishy, M.D.; and
Fady Zeidan, M.D.
Oak Hill Hospital is at 11375
Cortez Blvd., Brooksville, 1.9
miles east of U.S. 19 on State
Road 50.


Extension service to offer camp 'Parks to offer radKIDS program


Teens can learn at Reality

Check Money Camp

Special to the Chronicle
Reality Check Money Camp for youths, 14 to
18, will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 9 to 12 at
the Citrus County Canning Center at 3405 W
Southern St, Lecanto, which is off of County
Road 491 just north of State Road 44.
The cost of the workshop is $30 per partici-
pant and is limited to 20 teens. Pre-paid regis-
tration is required and no refunds or transfers
to other classes will be given. Preregistration is


now open and ends Monday. To register, call
Cris at 527-5700.
All programs and related activities sponsored
for, or assisted by, the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences are open to all persons
with non-discrimination with respect to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual
orientation, marital status, national origin,
political opinions or affiliations.
For persons with disabilities requiring spe-
cial accommodations, please contact our office
at least five working days prior to the program
so that proper consideration may be given to the
request Call 527-5700.
For hearing impaired, call the Florida Relay
Center at (800) 955-8770 (voice)-or (800) 955-8771
(TDD).


Are you taking metformin/glucophage, exercising and
eating healthy?
If you are doing everything right to control your diabetes...
And your blood sugar level is still too high, we may have
an option for you.
Local physicians are conducting a
research study of an
investigational medication f
Type 2 diabetes.
If you qualify, you will
receive all-study-related
care and medication
(at no cost).


Special to the Chronicle


Citrus County Parks and Recreation along
with certified instructor Debbie Brown will
offer the radKIDS program.
RadKIDS provides children with the skills
they need to escape danger and abduction
The program will be offered from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. Wednesday for children 8 to 12 and
Friday for children 5 to 7 beginning Aug. 1 and


Aug. 3 for five consecutive weeks at the Citrus
Springs Community Center.
Cost is $45 per child with classes limited to 10
students each.
Any persons requiring reasonable accommo-
dations at this or any other program because of
a disability or physical impairment should con-
tact the staff of the Citrus County Parks and
Recreation office 72 hours prior to the activity
at 527-7677.


Foundation donation


N ~ j~lfl


Tally Ho Vacations presented the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation with a check from a
fundraiser for a recent Bermuda cruise. Citrus Memorial Share Club and Tally Ho coordinated
this effort for the capital campaign for the Family Care Health & Education Center. Pat Muller
said doing this for the hospital "was a labor of love." Pictured in front, from left, are: Ryan
Beaty, president/CEO of Citrus Memorial Health System; Barb Whittemore, Citrus Memorial
Share Club coordinator; and Ed Lattin, owner of Tally Ho Vacations. Back row, from left, are:
Chris Pool, Foundation development director; and Pat Muller of Tally Ho Vacations.


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 SC


HEALTH & LIFE


�.-. 11 --. 117T 1 �









Diabetic girls skip insulin in dangerous effort to diet



Diabetic girls skip insulin in dangerous effort to diet


. Associated Press

' Like many teenage girls, Lee Ann
Thill was obsessed with her appear-
ance. A diabetic, she was already suf-
fering from bulimia - forcing herself
to throw up to lose weight But it was-
n't enough, and she'd recently put on
20 pounds.
Then one day at a camp for diabetic
teens, she heard counselors chew out
two girls for practicing "diabulimia"
- not taking their insulin so they
could lose weight, one of the conse-
quences of uncontrolled diabetes.
Don't you realize you could die if
you skip your insulin? the counselor
scolded. Don't you know you could fall
into a coma or damage your kidneys
or your eyes?
* But that's not what registered with
Thill, who has Type 1, or juvenile dia-
betes. Instead, she focused on this:
Skipping insulin equals weight loss.
For the next 17 years, diabulimia was
her compulsion.
"I took just enough insulin to func-
tion," said Thill, now 34, of Magnolia,
N.J.
Today, she worries about the long-
term damage that may have come
from her weight obsession. At 25, a
blood vessel hemorrhage in her eye
required surgery.
At 28, doctors told her she had dam-
aged kidneys.
"I'm fearful for the future," Thill
said. "I feel very strongly that had I
taken care of myself, I could have
lived as long as anyone without dia-
betes. I don't think that's going to hap-
pen now."
Diabulimia is usually practiced by
teenage girls and young women, and it
may be growing more common as the
secret is exchanged on Internet bul-
letin boards for diabetics and those
with eating disorders.
One expert who has studied the
phenomenon estimates that 450,000
Type 1 diabetic women in the United
States - one-third of the total - have
skipped or shortchanged their insulin
to lose weight and are risking a coma
and an early death.
"People who do this behavior wind
up with severe diabetic complications
much earlier," said Ann Goebel-
Fabbri, a clinical psychologist at the
Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.
The American Diabetes Association
has long known about insulin omis-
sion as a tactic to lose weight. But
"diabulimia" is a term that has only
cropped up in recent years and is not
a recognized medical condition, said
Barbara Anderson, a pediatrics pro-


Associated Press
Diabetes sufferer Lee Ann Thill, 34, sits at her home June 11 in Magnolia, N.J., holding her glucose meter as she gets
ready, one of the numerous times each day, to check her blood sugar. Diagnosed with type i diabetes at 5 years old and
bulimia at 14, Thill grew obsessed with food and weight. The warnings from doctors and therapists did nothing to slow
her compulsion to shortchange her insulin dosage for more than a decade.


fessor at Baylor College of Medicine
in Houston.
Type 1 diabetes is a disorder in
which the body's own immune system
attacks insulin-producing cells in the
pancreas.
People with this disease produce
little or no insulin, so they take shots
of the hormone daily
It differs from Type 2, the form asso-
ciated with obesity and which
accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of
all diabetes.
Insulin is vital for delivering glu-
cose from the bloodstream to the
body's cells. Without insulin, cells
starve even while the bloodstream
becomes burdened with too much glu-
cose.
When Type 1 diabetics skip or
reduce their insulin, they risk falling
into a coma or even dying. Blindness,
amputations and kidney failure are
some of the long-term complications
that can develop.
Warning signs for diabulimia
include a change in eating habits -
typically someone who eats more but
still loses weight - low energy and


high blood-sugar levels, Goebel-
Fabbri said.
Frequent urination is another sig-
nal. When sugars are high, the kid-
neys work overtime to filter the excess
glucose from the blood.
This purging of sugar from the body
through the kidneys is similar to
someone with bulimia, who binges
and then purges, or vomits, Anderson
said.
Studies show that women with Type
1 diabetes are twice as likely to devel-
op an eating disorder. Ironically, good
diabetes management, which
requires a preoccupation with food,
counting carbohydrates and following
a diet, may lead some to form an
unhealthy association with food,
Goebel-Fabbri said.
Jacq Allan, 26, of London is a diabu-
limic. When recently interviewed, she
said she had not taken her insulin
shots for two weeks and rarely takes
them regularly She weighs 42 pounds
less than she did a year ago.
Allan is stuck between two fears:
taking insulin, which may lead to
weight gain, and the damage her


destructive compulsion is doing to
her body.
"I'm terrified of insulin," Allan said.
"Every morning I wake up and think
maybe I should go to the hospital."
Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes
nearly three years ago, Allan said she
can feel the constant, sky-high sugar
in her blood. Her list of ailments -
chest pain, heart palpitations, muscle
cramps, bacterial infections and
lower back pain - are not the usual
health problems of a twenty-some-
thing.
"I'm constantly worried that my
eyes are going to go, but they seem rel-
atively OK for the moment," she said.
"I always wonder if this will be the
day that some major organ fails. I kind
of want something to happen because
then maybe I'll stop."
Gwen Malnassy, 21, of Santa
Monica, Calif., detailed her struggle
with diabulimia for three years in a
diary she posted on the Internet.
"If you don't think it will happen to
you, don't fool yourself," writes
Malnassy, diagnosed with diabetes at
9, in her final entry 11 months ago. "I


DIABUUMIA
Nearly 21 million people in the
United States, or 7 percent of
the population, have some form
of the diabetes. Here are the
basics:
* Diabulimia - The practice of
people with Type 1 diabetes who
intentionally withhold or short-
change insulin doses as a weight
loss method.
* Insulin - vital hormone pro-
duced by the pancreas that trans-
ports glucose, or calories, from
the bloodstream to the body's
cells. Without insulin, cells starve
even while the bloodstream
becomes saddled with too much
glucose.
* Type 1 diabetes - disorder in
which the body's own immune
system attacks insulin producing
cells in the pancreas. People with
this disease produce little or no
insulin, so they take shots of the
hormone daily. It is often diag.
nosed in children, which is why it
is commonly called juvenile dia-
betes. Before the invention of
artificial insulin in the 1920s, it
was a terminal disease.
* Type 2 diabetes - accounts for
about 95 percent of all diabetes.
Type 2, generally diagnosed in
overweight or obese adults,
begins when the body develops a
resistance and no longer properly
uses the insulin the pancreas
produces. Some take insulin, but
many are treated with diet and
other drugs.
* Gestational diabetes - About
135,000 women each year in the
United State show high blood
sugar levels during pregnancy.
Associated Press

believed the same."
Doctors diagnosed Malnassy with
both anorexia and bulimia at 13, she
said.
"I would look at magazines and
think that if I looked like the models,
I would have more friends and be
more popular," Malnassy said in a
recent interview.
She began withholding insulin at 17
after learning of the practice during a
doctor's visit and continued withhold-
ing insulin off and on until last year.
Malnassy continues in her online
diary: "I will say it again. Reach out;
get help. Do not fall; do not let the dis-
order consume you. It's a miserable
way to exist."


5620707 TUCRN
NOTICE OF ESTABLISHMENT OR CHANGE
OF A REGULATION AFFECTING THE USE OF
LAND,
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CHANGE AND/OR
CHANGE OF LAND USE

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC) proposes to adopt or change: A regulation affecting the
use of land; the comprehensive plan; and/or the use of land within and for the area shown on the map in this
advertisement. The overall impact of these proposals may be significant.
The Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) will review and discuss the proposed Small Scale
Amendments to the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan (Ord. No. 89-04) and Land Development Code Atlas (Ord.
No. 90-14).
CPA/AA-07-06 (Robitaille for Robitaille/Laxton)
Redesignation from CLR, Coastal and Lakes Residential District to CLC, Coastal Lake Commercial District on the
LDC Atlas and MHP, Mobile Home Parks, to CLC, Coastal Lake Commercial District on the GFLUM for Parcel
12231, in Section 04, Township 19S, Range 17E, W. Ozello Trail, Citrus County. The subject property is intended
to be used as a professional office. The total acreage for this application is approximately 0.55 acres (23,983.73
SF). Applicant is Sylvain R. Robitaille for Deborah Robitaille, Richard W. Laxton. Jr., and Kathie A Laxton.
Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard regarding the proposed amendment. The PDRB will
hold public meetings on the following dates:
Public Hearing: Thursday, July 05, 2007, 9:00 AM
Both meetings will be held in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto,
Florida, 34461. Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00AM. The actual time that a particular item is
discussed will vary depending on how fast the Board moves through the agenda.

LOCATOR MAP
4> PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT
REVIEWBOARD






















All persons desiring to make a "request to intervene" pursuant to proceedings established in the Citrus County
Quasi-judicial Ordinance #2002-A18, shall provide written notice to the Department of Development Services at
least five (5) business days prior to the hearing on the matter. Forms for "request to intervene" may be obtained by
calling (352) 527-5239 or on-line at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commdev/community development.htm., and click on
"Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".
Persons are advised that any individual who might wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting/hearing
regarding any matter is hereby advised that they will need a record of the proceedings for such purpose and that
they may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made Which record shall include the testimony
and evidence upon which such appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment
should contact the County Administrators Office, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6565.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Copies of the proposed amendments will be available for inspection and/or purchase between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday in the Department of Development Services, Citrus County Division
Community Development, Lecanto Government Center, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 140, Lecanto, FL 34461.
For more information regarding the proposals discussed herein, contact the Department of Development Services
at (352) 527-5239.
Chairman
Citrus County Planning and Development Review Board 710409


562-0707-TUCRN
NOTICE OF ESTABLISHMENT OR-CHANGE
OF A REGULATION AFFECTING
THE USE OF LAND

An Application for Amendment to the Land Development Code Text has been received by the Citrus County
Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) for their review and recommendation to the Board of
County Commissioners to adopt or change a regulation affecting the use of land of the area shown in the map
in this advertisement. The Application was submitted by the Department of Development Services,
Community Development Division.

A public workshop on the proposed regulation, affecting the use of land will be held on July 05. 2007 at 9:00
AM, and a public hearing on July 19, 2007 at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.




-'- 4




---~
,- . .-
� * .. -", * '






All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or against, may be heard on the proposed amendment to
Ordinance No. 90-14, the Land Development Code, as described below and other items as necessary:

OA-07-05 Department of Development Services is requesting:

AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 90-14, THE
CITRUS COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE BY DEFINING AFFORDABLE HOUSING; BY
CREATING STANDARDS FOR ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS; BY ALLOWING A RESIDENTIAL
DENSITY INCREASE WITH AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND BY PROVIDING FOR
CODIFICATION, SEVERABILITY, AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Copies of the proposed amendments will be available for inspection and/or purchase between the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00 PM., Monday through Friday in the Department of Development Services, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461. For more information regarding the proposals discussed herein,
contact the Community Development Division at (352) 527-5239.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or Comprehensive Plan is available on the internet at
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on the Community Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to intervene" pursuant to procedures set forth in Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Such request shall be submitted to Department of
Development Services at least five (5) working days (excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hearing
on the matter. A "request to intervene" may be obtained on-line; click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need
to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450, (352) 341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. if you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
710105


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


At! TITFZlnAV TITNF 19 2007


I


I-IEALTH & LIFE








TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 7C


H IHEAJLTH & LIFE


CiRLus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TEETH
Continued from Page lC

On the big day, the patient
comes in and goes under anes-
thesia, and a surgeon places
the implants into the jaw.
Abutments screwed into the
implant posts hold the over-
denture, bridge, arch or
crowns, and the patient wakes
up with teeth she can use
immediately
Actually, the surgery may last
more than an hour, but it is a
quick way to go from no teeth
to a complete set of usable
chompers.
"There are several things
going on in implants that are
changing," says Padgett
"We get better tissue control
if we put the post and tempo-
rary crown in right away. Good
crown and bridge is really
dependent on good tissue con-
trol. It's not just patching up a
tooth.
"It's so nice to see the fihal
results, and the patient says,
'This is how my teeth were 40
years ago.'"
Traditional implant place-
ment calls for surgery to open
the tissue on the jaw, to place
the implant, and to sew the tis-
sue back up to prevent infec-
tion so that the bone will grow
to the implant (osseointegra-
tion).


Good crown and bridge is really
dependent on good tissue control.
It's not just patching up a tooth.

Dr. Gary Padgett
dentist.


Later on, surgery is per-
formed to uncover the post,
and add the crown and the rest
of the restorative work
Dr. John Darby has been per-
forming dental implants for the
past 12 years in Citrus County.
"The thing for patients to
understand is a lot can be done
for them," says Darby, "but it is
extremely variable and it also
is very dependent on the edu-
cation and experience of the
dentist providing the treat-
ment"
The jawbone must be of suf-
ficient width and depth so that
the implant will not impinge
upon nerves (causing perma-
nent numbness) or sinuses
(actually moving into a sinus
cavity), and actually hold the
implant against the forces of
chewing.
Most people who have lost
teeth have also lost some bone
and quality gum.
"What's possible today," says
Darby, "is sinus bone grafting
- build up the sinus and put
the implant in, or build up the


bone to protect the nerve.
Usually, you address tissue
deficiencies first and bone sec-
ond, but that could be
reversed."
Darby says bone grafting can
be done with bone from sever-
al different sources, using the
patient's own bone from inside
the mouth or from the hip or
shin, human donor bone, or
animal bone.
"An implant," says Darby, "if
done properly and under the
right circumstances, can be the
gold standard. It is the most
costly dentistry that there is
today."
Denham is very pleased with
the outcome of her dental
implants.
"I've always wanted to do it
but couldn't afford it," she says.
"Then my mom passed away
and left me a little money I fig-
ured what better way than to
use the money on something
that would benefit my health.
"I think my mom would be
proud of what I did with what
she left me. If I had to do it
again, I would."


Special the Chronicle
Inverness Thrift & Gift Shoppe coordinator Denise Velez-Sliney, right, creates work schedules with
new high school Thrift & Gift Shoppe volunteers Julissa Perez-Cruz, center, and Melodie Moff, left.
Both students attend Citrus High School in Inverness.

Volunteer at Hospice of Citrus County


Special to the Chronicle


Hospice of Citrus County's Volunteer
Program provides opportunities for anyone of
any age. Volunteers gain workforce experience,
develop leadership skills and participate in
their community. Volunteers have fun and make
a real difference at Hospice of Citrus County.


Volunteer efforts allow Hospice of Citrus
County to fulfill its mission. Call Volunteer .
Program Manager Judy Knowlton at 527-6613 to
find out how to get involved.
Hospice of Citrus County, licensed in 1985 and
accredited by the Joint Commission, can be
reached at 527-2020 or on the Web at www.hos
piceofcitruscounty.org


BENNETT
Continued from Page 1C

many people don't understand
is that aside from skin tone,
other factors can also affect
your risk of damage from UV
light You need to be especially
careful in the sun if you meet
any of the following criteria.
Do you have lots of moles,
irregular moles or large moles?
Do you have freckles and burn
before tanning or have fair skin
or blond, red or light brown


GRILLO
Continued from Page 1C

episode of viral infection, head
trauma and obstructive nasal
disease (allergies, deviated
nasal septum and sinusitis).
Other causes can be diabetes,
thyroid disease, liver prob-
lems, nutritional deficiencies,
psychiatric problems, kidney
failure, certain medications
and chemotherapy, and work-
related exposure to com-
pounds and metals.
Because loss of these senses
can be gradual, tying memories
of these problems to a place or
time can be helpful but diffi-
cult, as well. One has to be sure
that a previous sense of smell
or taste did exist to rule out a
congenital problem. This can
be accomplished by asking the
individual if he or she remem-
bers smelling turkey roasting
at Thanksgiving.


DODGE
Continued from Page 1C

value of the added nutrients.
Another problem with white
flour is that it is often bleached
chemically. I personally think of
it as being impoverished rather
than enriched.
"White flour and sugar are so
common in commercial foods
that it is impossible to underes-
timate their negative impact on
health. Sometimes they are
called the 'bad carbs' because of
the nutritional problems they
pose."
Dan looked perplexed. "But
how can I possibly remember all
these problem commercial
foods if there are so many of
them?" he asked.
Mrs. Hartwell laughed.
'"That's a good question," she
said, "but here's a clue. The
more highly processed a food
product is, the less wholesome it
is likely to be. Here are two
books that are can help answer
many of your questions."
Dan examined the books. One
was "Eat, Drink, and Be
Healthy," by Walter C. Willett,
M.D. The other was "What to
Eat," by Marion Nestle, PhD.
These books by top nutritional
authorities are well written.
Walter Willett is chairman of the
Department of Nutrition at
Harvard School of Public
Health, while Marion Nestle is
professor of nutrition at New
York University.

Dr. Ed Dodge is a retired
Inverness physician. Visit his
Web site, www.passionfor
health.info. Reach Dr. Dodge
through his Web blog, Passion
for Health, on the Chronicle
Web site.


hair? All of these factors
increase the risk of sun dam-
age.
Were you previously treated
for skin cancer or do you have a
family history of skin cancer,
especially melanoma? If so,
genetics is known to also play a
role in the risk of skin cancer,
and those with a positive family
history should take extra pre-
caution regarding sun expo-
sure.
While not a problem for those
of us who live in Florida, peo-
ple who live or vacation at high
altitudes must be careful,


because UV radiation exposure
increases 4 percent to 5 percent
for every 1,000 feet you travel
above sea level. This must be
taken into account when going
to a higher altitude. In Florida,
we do live or vacation in tropi-
cal or subtropical climates a lot,
and must be aware of the high-
er intensity of the UV exposure.
We also tend to work indoors all
week and then get a tan on
weekends, then spend a lot of
time outdoors for those week-
end getaways.
Another risk factor that must
be taken into account is one


Because loss of GANDHI
-- a - - - --


these senses can
be gradual, tying
memories of these
problems to a
place or time can
be helpful, but
difficult, as well.

Work-up and evaluation can
include physical examination,
smell and taste tests, X-rays,
and blood tests. Treatment is
wide and varied due to the
many causes. Despite the com-
plexity of this problem, a good
evaluation will get to the root
of the problem.

Denis Grillo, D.0., is an ear,
nose and throat specialist
in Crystal River. Call 795-0011.


Continued from Page 1C

live better
He was started on a
chemotherapy regimen of taxol
and carboplatin. He tolerated it
well. Two months later, the CT
scan showed that cancer had
responded very well. It has
shrunk by almost 75 percent
This is excellent news for my
patient
Unfortunately, many of my
patients are not this lucky. When
I see a patient, after taking a
detailed history and examina-
tion, I discuss with the patient
various available options of
chemotherapy. There are three
to four options, all with a similar
response rate when you follow
100 patients or more. We also
know in a given patient, one
chemotherapy regimen works
while another may not.
Unfortunately, at present, there


SS Annual Celebrity Dinner Auction
to benefit the KHe Troaning Center
F;-idcy. Jul M 20O, 2007
SSilent Aucton 6 Social Hour at 5:30 p.m.
oay Charles Dinner Show at 6:30 p.m.


Urology Center of Florida
in conjunction with the Cancer Treatment Center
is pleased to announce a


New Office

in Citrus County


LMMEIATEAPPINNs AVIAL


associated with other disease
processes or medications.
People who have certain
autoimmune diseases, such as
systemic lupus erythematosus
(SLE, or "lupus"), must be espe-
cially careful when looking at
sun exposure. Also, those who
have had an organ transplant
or take medicines that lower
your immunity must exercise
caution. Anyone who takes oral
contraceptives (birth control
pills), tetracycline, sulfa drugs
or certain other antibiotics, as
well as naproxen sodium or
certain other nonsteroidal anti-


is no definite way to know which
treatment will work in which
patient and what treatment will
not work If we can figure this
out, more patients will get treat-
ment that works and will avoid
treatment that does not work
There were two studies dis-
cussed in this conference that is
.taking genetic analysis of the
patient to decide appropriate
'chemotherapy regimen. One
study used two genes, ERCC1
and RRM1 genes help us find
out which chemotherapy is less
likely to work and so we can give
different treatment
In another study from Duke
University, the researchers test-
ed multiple genes by a micro-
array technique to detect genet-
ic expression of particular
patients. Depending on the
genes of that patient, the tech-
nique may help to predict sensi-
tivity of chemotherapy.
Both studies are extremely
encouraging and highly provoca-
tive. Unfortunately, they are very


inflammatory drugs must also
realize that these drugs can
worsen the damage experi-
enced from sun exposure.
Other drugs which require cau-
tion include phenothiazines
(major tranquilizers and anti-
nausea drugs), tricyclic antide-
pressants, thiazide diuretics
(medicines used for high blood
pressure and some heart condi-
tions) and sulfonylureas (a form
of oral anti-diabetic medica-
tion).
Ask your doctor, nurse or
pharmacist about the risk of
any medicines you may be tak-


early and not yet available for
widespread use. They need to be
validated with bigger study. At
the same time, I am very hopeful
that such genetic markers for
treatment and prognosis of lung
cancer will definitely help
change future treatment of lung
cancer.
At present, we use in selected.
breast cancer patients, genetic
testing to determine whether
they need chemotherapy or not
In the future, we will be using
genetic or other testing to deter-
mine treatment of many other
cancers, including lung cancer

Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematol-
ogist and oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser of
the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or comments
to 521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com or
call 746-0707.


. teAmerican College o /
Foot and Ankle Surgeons .
* Certified by the Amencan Academy
of Wound Management SUgely

Are you a diabetic? Are you tired of wearing ugly diabetic shoes?
Shouldn't you be wearing SAS shoes?

CITRUS


PODIATRY CENTER, PA
LECANTO 746-0077 HOMOSASSA 621.-9200
2385 N. Lecanto Hwy. 4359 Suncoast Blvd. !


ing that could be harmful to you
if you are exposed to sunlight

Dr. Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president of
the Citrus County Unit of the
American Cancer Society and
a member of the Board of
Directors and Executive
Committee of the Florida
Division of the American
Cancer Society. If you have
any suggestions for topics, or
have any questions, e-mail him
at cjbennett@rboi.com.


y "" of ^
'ia Central
S Florida

, . ---*.' . "


MARY F. BARBER M.D. Practice Limited To:
In practice since 1988racice LimTo:
-----Air Force Tralmnd Sn.m Cancer Surg.jry
* Board Certified In Dermatology * Mohs Micrographic Surgery
* Certified By American Society Over 10,000 Cases Performed
Of Mohs Surgery
Medicare, BC/BS FL BC FL PPC PPO

873-7788
visit us at www.skincancersurgery.net
Near The Paddock Mail * 3210 SW 33rd Rd Suite 101 * Ocala FLt. 34474


. .
Participants

Sought for

Hearing Aid

Field Study
My audiology clinics have
received a generous grant
from Magnatone to conduct
an important field study on
a new model of open ear
hearing aid. It is smaller
and more comfortable than
traditional hearing aids. We
are seeking people with mild
to moderate hearing loss to
participate in the study. Both
current hearing aid users and
non-users are needed.
In exchange for completing
a pre-and post-fitting ques-
tionnaire, the participants
will earn the free use of this
hearing aid for thirty days. My
audiologists will provide the
exams and lab services at
no charge through the grant.
At the end of this thirty day
trial, participants will return
the aids to one of my clinics
or purchase the aids at a
discounted price.
For information or to
schedule a free candidate
screening, call us at
795-5700 or visit our
Latest News Link at
www.gardneraudiology.com
Thank You
Dan Gardner, M.S.
35 years experience
President









Gardner Audiology
700 S.E. 5th Ter.
Crystal River












8C


,. / \.


TUESDAY
JUNE 19, 2007
www.chronicleonline.com '


,) . I '~ *, _ - ___
____ ________ - .-....i.--.-------.,.---


ii CITR~US C()UN CHRiI)NICLE


News NOTES

Separation group
to meet today
Americans United for Separa-
tion of Church and State Nature
Coast Chapter will meet at 4
p.m. today at Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness. Call 726-9112.
Citrus 20/20 board
to meet in Lecanto
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Room 117, Le-
canto Govemment Center, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto (off
of County Road 491).
Interested persons or organi-
zations are cordially invited. For
information about Citrus 20/20
Inc., visit its Web site at www.cit
rus2020.org or call 527-0800.
Celebrate solstice
at Wilderness Circle
The public is invited to the
Summer Solstice Ceremony at
11 a.m. Saturday at the Wilder-
ness Circle near Inglis. The
Homosassa Boy Scouts will
raise the colors (flags). Indian
blood is not required, but only
that you come in a good way.
Pot luck dinner follows the
ceremony. Music in the after-
noon. Mackie Sanford of Chero-
kee descent is in charge. He
honors Native American tradition,
and also Jesus Christ is invited.
Call Betty Berger at (352) 447-
2736 or bberger@bellsouth.net.
Homosassa plans
celebration Saturday
More than a week before
most of America celebrates
Independence Day, participants
in the Homosassa River Fire-
works Festival & Poker Run will
be cruising up and down the
river, stopping at official "dealer
stations" to draw a total of five
cards.
Sponsored jointly by dozens
of local businesses and organi-
zations, registration for the
event will begin at 7:30 a.m.,
and the last card will be dealt at
7 p.m. at The Shed at MacRae's
of Homosassa. Each hand will
cost $10. A portion of the pro-
ceeds benefits the Homosassa
Civic Club Food Pantry.
The Citrus County Visitors
and Convention Bureau is at
9225 W. Fishbowl Drive, Hom-
osassa. Call (352) 628-9305. or
visit www.visitcitrus.com.
Civic center set to
mark independence
Fourth of July celebration at
Highlands Civic Center, Little Al
Point, Inverness, will be Sunday,
July 1. Open to the public. Hot
dogs, etc., served at 1 p.m.
Tickets are $8. Call Flo at 344-
1563, Joyce at 637-3371 or Joy
at 726-7476.
Celebrate America
luncheon set July 10
The public is invited to attend
the Celebrate America Lunch-
eon, sponsored by the Crystal
River Christian Women, at noon
; on Tuesday, July 10, in the
* Plantation Inn's Magnolia Room.
Frank Roberts of the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office will be
the special feature presenter
* about "Hurricane Prepared-
ness."
The deadline for reservations
is Thursday, July 5. Call Bonnie
- at 341-2375.


SPet SPOTLIGHT

Happy home


Special to the Chronicle
Freddie is a fortunate Brindle
Boston terrier, recently
adopted by Mr. and Mrs.
Jamie Barn of Sugarmill
Woods from Adopt A Rescued
Pet Inc.


Donate blood for holiday


LifeSouth celebrates July 4 with LifeSouth s

'Red White & Blue Collar blood drive'


Special to the Chronicle

July 4 represents wonderful tradi-
tions like barbecues, fireworks, fami-
lies and American flags. For blood cen-
ters, however, it marks the beginning of
annual summer blood shortages.
Local residents can help ensure a
safe and ample supply of blood during
the July Fourth holiday week by donat-
ing during a special blood drive honor-


ing "blue collar blood donors and recip-
ients."
Donors at all LifeSouth centers and
drives from Monday, July 2, through
Sunday, July 8 receive a "Red, White
and Blue Collar" T-shirt and a chance
to win a weekend getaway to the
Redneck Riviera (Panama City Beach).
"Every day this summer, someone in
our community will need a blood trans-
fusion for an unexpected accident, a


much-needed surgery or regular med-
ical treatment," said LifeSouth Chief
Operating Officer Bill Gair "We are ask-
ing everyone in the community to just
take one hour out of the 2,090 hours this
summer to help save a life."
Blood donors must be at least 17
years old, weigh 110 pounds or more,
and show a photo I.D.
Please call toll free at (888) 795-2707
to make an appointment to donate at
one of LifeSouth's 22 donor centers in
Alabama, Florida and Georgia. For
more information about donation loca-
tions and times, visit www.lifesouth.org.
LifeSouth is a nonprofit, volunteer


blood center supplying more than 120
medical centers in Florida, Alabama
and Georgia.
Hot dog Wednesdays
Looking for an easy way to make a
contribution to your community?
LifeSouth will host its Hot Dog
Wednesday blood drives from 9 a.m. to 7
p.m. the last Wednesday of the month at
their Inverness donor center at 220 S.
Pine St, and Lecanto donor center at
1241 S. Lecanto Highway.
Hot dogs and other lunch items will
be served for all donors. Call LifeSouth
at (888) 795-2707.


Citrus Memorial honors employees


Special to the Chronicle

A highlight of Citrus Mem-
orial's Hospital Week activi-
ties is the Service Awards
ceremony at which employ-
ees with significant years-of-
service anniversaries are rec-
ognized. This year, 135
employees received service
awards. President/CEO Ryan
Beaty officiated the ceremo-
ny honoring the employees
for their years of dedicated
service as a member of the
CMHS family
* Four employees 4wbe
recognized for 30 years of
service to Citrus Memorial.
They are Dorothy Albritton.
Valerie Fedor, Marguerite
Hadley and Maryland
Peterson.
* Seven employees were
recognized for 25 years of
service: Jan Bertine, Gregory
Clark, Jacqueline Cook, Lettie
Graham, Kathleen Harley,
Susan Lange and Betty Mann.
* Ten employees were rec-
ognized for 20 years of service:
Mille Barker, Karen Cummins,
Carolyn Hart, Angela Hensley,
Josephine Kise, Kenneth
Korte, Henry Landrum, Karen
Nodine, Kerri Surber and
Henry Wright
* Twenty-five employees
were recognized for 15 years
of service: Gladys Ackroyd,
Irene Brugh, Patricia Bruner,
John Comiskey, Linda Cook,
Kelly Darling, Denna Denney,
Donna Holden, Linda Kemp,
John Larkin, Catherine
Livermore, Elaine McGun-
nigle, Linda Mitchell,
Deborah Morris, Sheryl
Pleacher, James Ressler,
Vickie Ressler, Paul Roden-
baugh, Gerrie Selby, Wanda
Sierra, Stephanie Steele, Lori
Sutherland, Lynn Tran,
Kristen Tuite and Mary
Weiser.
* There were 33 members
achieving 10 years of serve ice:
Rosemarie Antonoff, Rose-
mary Barker, Lewis Bradham,
Mary Brunzie, Thelma Cali,
Melanie Calloway, Anesia
Carter, Robin Cronin, Sandra
Dunlap, Diane Farber,
Virginia Fitch, John Gelin,
Joan Heckman, Willette
Helscel, Brenda Hermanson,
Wendy Johnson, Cherity


Employees honored for 5 to .0 years of service with Citrus Memorial; Health System.


Employees honored for 15 to 20 years of service with CMHS. Employees honored for 25 to 30 years of service with CMHS.


Juergensmeyer, Jennifer
Landrum, Carlene LePointe,
Frances McGrath, Susan
Mcmanama, Lena Murphy,
Nancy Nero, Mitzi Patrick,
John Popp, Joan Reinhart,
Theresa Rice, Mary Scott,
Francine Smith, Carol
Teiranova, Paula Underhill,
Beverly Wellbrock and
Jacqueline White.
N The 56 staff members rec-
ognized for 5 years of service:


Justin Accardi, Shirley
Barnes, Denise Bocker, Betty
Brady, Beverly Brodersen,
Rebecca Casto, Sheila
Chapman, Bonnie Cleaveland,
Claire Costa, Kathleen Darcy,
Cynda Dimmer, Pearlie
Downer, Elizabeth Dykes,
Tana Ellis, Angela Failla,
Karen Fisher, Janice Fulton,
Lisa Gamble, Carolyn Gates,
Chong Gavin, Dorothy Gould,
Karen Hall, Brianne Hannie,


Trudy Hermann, Victorio
Herrera, Heather Hess,
Suzanne Holst, Kym
Householder, John Indelli-
cate, Lorraine Jackzentis,
Gregory Kane, Karen Kanter,;
Sharon, Lee, Patricia Light-
cap, John Lunceford, William
Martin, Kimberly Mattingly,
Celene Melton, Philip
Minneci, Joanne Ollenborger,
Kelinda O'Neal, Donna
Palmyra, Robert Pastor,


Steven Poole, Lorraine Rym-
szewicz, Mary Singleton,
Melissa Slaght, Lisa Smith,
Stacey Styer, Deborah Vier-
ling, Dina Villanueva, Cari
Warax, Monica Williams,
Tracy Wilson, Betty Witters-
heim, Rodney Worthington, Jr
Citrus Memorial Health
System, a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital, is
currently celebrating 50 years
of service to the community.


Quilts show love of makers, concert an inspiration


E exciting happenings in and
around the community - out-
reach-oriented Crystal River
United Methodist Church has the mem-
bers humming with activities.
The United Methodist
Women hosted a community
wide quilt tea in the church
education wing. Carol
McConnuaghey and her com-
mittee of volunteers hosted
the event. A variety of delec-
table pastries were served, as
tea was served from a silver
service in delicate collector
china teacups. Antique table- Ruth
cloths were spread upon the AROU!
tables, decorated with pastel COMM
tissue flowers created by
Lynne Ann Penfold.
A lovely quilt poem written by Teri
Johnson was read and each quilt had a
story that its owner proudly told.
There was a butterfly quilt and a
grandmother's flower garden one.
Another quilt was made from fabric
saved from dresses the maker's chil-
dren had worn. One quilt was shown at


L
NI


the Chicago World's Fair.
Even a slobber quilt for babies to lie
on was shown. We admired a nosegay
quilt and a double-wedding ring quilt
There was a watermelon
quilt, a teddy bear one, and a
sunbonnet one.
One loving grandmother
fashioned a quilt with super-
imposed photographs of her
- granddaughter through the
years, for the occasion of her
18th birthday
At the age of 80, one lady
created a quilt celebrating
,evins the state birds of the many
ID THE states she and her husband
UNITY had toured over the years.
We admired a rail quilt
and a horse quilt and a
bowtie one. There was a 1900s feed sack
quilt, an exquisite cathedral window
one and a log cabin quilt
Each one held a special place in the
heart of its owner - a legacy that is left
behind for generations to treasure.
i i
The Grimes and Himes concert held


in the church was a benefit for the his-
toric Bethel Chapel restoration.
Mandy Lee (Eschen) Grimes, having
grown up in the church periodically
vocalizing with her mother Carla, and
more recently appearing in Palatka
with the Colgate Country Show, sang
hauntingly beautiful country songs with
an inspired warmth that endeared her
to the audience.
Songs like "Don't Forget to
Remember Me," "A Long Way From
Getting Over You" and "Born to Fly,"
which was inspired by the writer, Sara
Evans' graduation from high school,
when those schooldays are at an end
and one must venture out into the
world of the unknown.
Her style intensified with "You'll
Always Be My Baby." My personal
favorites from her set were Faith Hill's
hit, "There Will Come a Day" and "I
Hope You Dance."
Michael Himes joined Grimes for an
audience-pleasing version of the Judds'
hit "Grandpa." I especially enjoyed his
guitar artistry throughout his set.
As a church worship leader-musi-


cian, Grimes challenged us with "The
World Revolving" and the beautiful
lyrics of "Unforgettable Masterpiece."
From Psalm 96, we heard "Touch Me
0 Lord," and my favorite, "Thank You
Lord."
He also performed "Remind Me" and
"For You My King" - amazing inspira-
tional songs.
The highlight of his set was his guitar
solo, "Parcel of Daybreak"
The concert was concluded with "To
You" and "Little Things," inspired from
Isaiah Chapter 60, the chapter on hope,
and "Shine The Everlasting Light of the
World."
Thank you, Michael Himes and
Mandy Grimes, for an inspiring concert
in celebration of these three: faith,
hope and love, from I Corinthians
Chapter 13.

Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community. Let
her know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to P.O. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit informationn at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but mul-
tiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal
River; by fax at 563-3280; or by e-mail to community@
chronicleonline.com.


* News notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day cannot be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than twice.










FNTTFUTATNN'IENT TUESDAY. JUNE 19. 2007 9C


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 19, 2007 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcasit Inglis
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FOX 13 13 Mac Show Hill 'PG, L,V' Live)'PG' cc 22635 'PG, L' 39971 8282093 'PG'
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TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 19, 2007 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast,Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis
SBD I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

N 46 40 46 46 That's So That's So Hannah Zack & Cody Movie: "Up Up and Away" (2000) That's So Thats So Life With Zack & Cody Hannah
J 46 0 46 46 Raven 'G' Raven 'G' Montana Michael J. Pagan. 'G' 163884 IRaven'G' Raven'G' - Derek'G' Montana
HALL 39 68 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Walker, Texas Ranger'14, Walker, Texas Ranger'14, Movie: "Falling in Love With the Girl Next Door" Murder, She Wrote 'G' c
) 39 68 39 39'PG' 8928677 'PG' 1972447 V' cc 5784890 V B9 5700838 ((2006, Comedy) Patty Duke. 'PG' Sc 5607797 3861884
Movie: **'4 "Nanny McPhee" (2005, Comedy) Movie: ** "Ice Age: The Meltdown" Licenseto Big Love "The Writing on Entourage **"Phat
Emma Thompson. [l 22229093 (2006, Comedy) 30806364 Wed theWall"MA'487513 'MA'756155 Gilk"[a
X - Movie: ** "Fantastic Four" (2005, Action) loan Movie: ** "House of Wax" (2005, Horror) Elisha Movie: ** "Poseidon" (2006) Josh Sin City
_ Gruffudd, Chris Evans. 9 94595221 Cuthbert, Brian Van Holt. B9 271529 Lucas. 391336646 Diares'MA'
Mf 97 66 97 7 Exposed Yo Momma Wild 'n Out Wild'n Out Nick Cannon Nick Cannon Nick Cannon Real World- Real World- Rob &Big Rob & Big Wild 'n Out
1_97 97 97 939906 '14, D,L. '14,D,L' 114, D,L' Rd Rd (N)912364 463068 '14, D,L'
S 71 The Final Report: Lockdown Valley State Explorer "Inside North Critical Situation (N) Where's Amelia Earhart? Explorer "Inside North
1 , Columbine '14, L,V Prison. '14, L,V' 5559906 Korea" '14' 5462426 5548890 'PG'5558277 Korea" '14' 5771258
PLEX - -2 Movie: ** "Millennium" Movie: ** '"The Man in the Moon"(1991, Drama) Movie: ***" The Preacher's Wife" (1996, Fantasy) Movie: 'Wide Awake" 9
94397161 Sam Waterston. 3 55590987 Denzel Washington. 9 16079513 4127703

CIBC 43 42 43 43 Mad Money 3737109 On the Money 1727884 Fast Money 1809432 Deal or No Deal (In The Big Idea With Donny Mad Money 7156074
____43 42 43 43 Stereo) '14 cc 1723068 Deutsch __________
S 40 29 40 40 Lou Dobbs Tonight B[ The Situation Room Paula Zahn Now 9] Larry King Live 'PG' c Anderson Cooper 360'PG' c 931884
T Forensic Forensic Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Forensic Forensic Murder by the Book'14' LA Forensics North
U ) F25 5 5 25 Files '14, V Files '14' 6249971 2804155 6338819 6244426 Files'PG' Files'14, V 1817451M'14'AMission
441 37 44 44 Special Report (Live) 9B The Fox Report With The O'Reilly Factor (Live) Hannity & Colmes (Live) On the Record With Greta The O'Reilly Factor
,[FNJ , 6231722 Shepard Smith 3B B 5289258 [ 5292722 Van Susteren _511180
MB -42 A41 42 42 Tucker 6148068 Hardball 9] 5103894 Countdown With Keith Scarborough Country MSNBC Investigates MSNBC Investigates: The
S42 41 42 42 lbermann 5285432 (Live) 5109068 5102155 VampireKillings

ESPN i 33 27 33 33 SportsCenter (Live) c 531548 NFL Live U.S. Poker Championship U.S. Poker Championship Baseball Tonight (Live) SportsCenter (Live) 3S
[i 33 27 ____ _135513 ] 568432 M 482068 485155 166258
EP 34 28 34 34 Motorcycle NASCAR College Baseball NCAA World Series Game 10 - Teams TBA. From Omaha, Neb. Boxing: 1995 Bowe vs. Boxing: 1995 Holyfeld vs.
S34 2Build-Off Now [ (Live) cc 8665664 Holyfield III s9Mercer
35 39 35 35 The Sports Destination Ship Shape The Sports Inside the Inside the Rays on MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Arizona Diamondbacks.
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GOF '67 The Turn Spirit of Golf Golf Central Inside the Golf CVS Charity Classic - Day Two. From British Open Highlights The Golf Central
02904109 (Live) PGATour Barrington, R.I. 1812906 120001728513 Approach1
UN 36 31 3636 In My Own In My Own 2 Xtreem Around NASCAR Classics 316426 Tampa Bay Lghtning
,Wrd 361 36 36 Words I Track Posfseason Special


he PlusCode nun
gram is for use w
tem. If you have
ture (identified by the
all you need to do to


nber printed next to each pro- PlusCode number, cable channels with the guide ch.
ith the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys- If you have cable service, please make sure that the convenient chart printed in
a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea- your cable channel numbers are the same as the procedure is described in your
VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR), channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to Should you have questions about
record a program is enter its perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the tern, please contact your VCR ma
The channel lineup for KLiP Interactive cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.


annel numbers using
the Viewfinder. This
VCR user's manual.
your VCR Plus+ sys-
inufacturer.


Friendship of convenience not a good deal


Dear Annie: Five years ago, I
became friends with one of the
teachers at my daughter's
school. "Sara" and I hit it off instantly,
and my husband and I often met her
and her husband for dinner. At the time,
Sara was in the middle of
purchasing a home and com- . q
plained that money was tight, !
so I usually picked up the sK
dinner tab. After they pur-
chased the house, she still
complained about money, so
when I could, I did the driv-
ing or paid the dinner bill.
Last year, Sara was up for a
prestigious teaching award,
and the ceremony was in
another town. She'd recently
had a baby and said she ANN
couldn't attend unless some-
one could come along and MAIL
baby-sit, so I promised her
that my husband and I would stay
overnight at a hotel and watch the baby
so she could go.
In the meantime, my husband unex-
pectedly lost his job. When I told Sara,
she asked if she could take me out to
dinner to cheer me up. When the wait-
ress came with the bill, Sara pushed it
in my direction. I was shocked but paid
it. Later, I told Sara my husband and I
couldn't afford an overnight hotel stay
to watch her baby, but she became so
agitated that we ended up spending a
fortune to do her this favor. As it turned
out, the school district picked up all the


L


expenses for Sara and her husband.
She didn't even offer to buy us a cup of
coffee.
My husband says I'm being a sucker.
Sara and her husband probably make
twice as much as we do. I assured my
husband that Sara's a good
friend and I could ask her
for anything, but when I
called her yesterday to see if
she would pick up my mail
this weekend, she said gas
was too expensive and she'd
rather not I truly like Sara,
but I'm wondering if she's
using me. - Can't Figure It
Out
Dear Can't Figure: Sara
finds your friendship very
IE'S convenient and financially
endearing. Beyond that,
.BOX however, there doesn't seem
to be much. Your husband is
right. It's time to ditch this one-sided
relationship before you start kicking
yourself.
Dear Annie: My dad's cousin, "Peter,"
is coming to this country to visit Peter is
about the same age as my dad and
speaks no English. I met him when I
traveled with my father, so he and I are
not total strangers, but we have difficul-
ty communicating.
The problem is, Dad wants Cousin
Peter to stay at my house. I think it
would be more comfortable for him to
stay with Dad, since they speak the
same language, but Dad says he doesn't


have space. I offered to move his junk
from the spare room, clean it, paint it
and give him my extra bed, but Dad
won't hear of it.
So, now what? If Dad won't put forth
the effort to accommodate his cousin,
why is it my job? - Stuck in the Middle
Dear Stuck: We think Cousin Peter
should stay with Dad, but if Dad refus-
es, we hope you will step up to the plate.
Perhaps you and Dad could split the
visit, or maybe Cousin Peter could sleep
at your place and Dad could take him
during the day. Or, if you have space,
you could invite Dad and Peter both to
stay with you. A first-time visit is spe-
cial. Please try to work something out
Dear Annie: I saw your response to
'"Addict's Wife," and was disappointed
that you didn't tell her that the choice of
drug isn't as important as the fact that
drug usage prevents a person from
dealing with relationships, responsibil-
ities and reality.
Please let future friends and families
know that Nar-Anon Family Groups
(www.nar-anon.org) are here for their
support and we have an online chat
forum, too. People don't have to keep
riding their roller coasters. They can
get off whenever they choose. - Connie
in Santa Cruz
Dear Connie: We have recommended
Nar-Anon in the past and are pleased to
do so again. Thanks for writing.
Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime edi-
tors of the Ann Landers column.


WJUF-FM 90.1
WHGN-FM 91.9
WXCV-FM 95.3
WXOF-FM 96.3
WRGO-FM 102.7


National Public Radio
Religious
Adult Contemporary
Adult Mix
Oldies


WIFL-FM 104.3
WJQB-FM 106.3
WFJV-FM 103.3
WRZN-AM 720


Adult Mix
Oldies
'50s, '60s, '70s
Adult Standards


Bridge


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Yesterday, we started to look at
how to investigate the viability of
three no-trump when we have
uncovered game-going values with
a minor-suit, not a major-suit, fit
After you have agreed on a minor
suit, bidding a new suit at the
three-level shows a stopper in that
suit and implies weakness in an
unbid suit. Partner is being
encouraged, if he knows your
weak suit, to bid three no-trump
with that suit covered; or to show
values in another unbid suit if he
is not sure of your weakness. This
deal complements yesterday's
because the South hands are iden-
tical.
South opens one club. Partner
responds three clubs, a limit raise
indicatinging at least five-card
club support, some 10-12 points
(eight losers), and no four-card or
longer major. South rebids three
diamonds to show his stopper in
that suit and to imply a major-suit
weakness. And when North con-
tinues with three spades, promis-
ing values in that suit and denying
anything in hearts, South knows
that three no-trump is probably
going down. So, not quite kicking
and screaming, he takes a shot at
five clubs.
West leads the heart six. East


ACROSS
1 Sen. Kennedy
4 Vitamin amts.
8 - a ride
11 Half a bikini
12 Type
of eagle
13 Goddess of
victory
14 Adorn
16 Pharaoh's god
17 Later!
(2 wds.)
18 Cached
20 Vertical
21 Swedish Import
24 Recluse
28 Ostrich
look-alike
30 The Banana
Boat Song
(hyph.)
33 Many years
34 Chalky
mineral
35 Finished
36 Rapper Tone-
37 Joyful shout


38 Senorita's aunt
39 Generator
41 Loafer, e.g.
43 Blazing up
47 "Shogun"
apparel
49 Venues
50 Stadium walk-
way
53 Hockey buffs
(2 wds.)
55 Piccadilly
statue
56 Smith or
Jackson
57 Maiden-name
indicator
58 Brief swim
59 Nasty mood
60 Mag execs
DOWN
1 Juicy steak
(hyph.)
2 Mistake
3 Florentine poet
4 Distant
5 Took a straw


North 06-19-07
4 A J 4
V 73
+ Q 10 8
4 K 7 5 3 2
West East
4 8652 4 1097
VKJ964 VAQ 10 8
+ 7532 * 964
. - 4 Q 10 6
South
4 K Q 3
V 52
* AK J
A A J 9 8 4

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
1 4 Pass 3 4 Pass
3 * Pass 3 A Pass
5 4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V 6

wins with his ace and returns the
heart eight, his original fourth-
highest When East's eight holds,
he shifts to the diamond nine (high
to deny an honor in the suit).
South has to play the trump suit
without loss. That will not be a
problem if trumps are breaking 2-
1, but just in case they are 3-0,
declarer should start with
dummy's club king. Then he can
finesse East out of his queen. Note
that if West had all three clubs, he
must take a trick in the suit


Answer to Previous Puzzle
IEDERU G SCOW
ELlA UNA TOLE
TERNI PILLAGES
SECRET IMSO
ICE UMlpP
AIANNASFROSTS
ALEGESEIAISOOH
TO E REEL SUF1I
EDDIED SPRAT
OOP U E
CHAT OUNCES
CLRUBSODA INTO

IDLE ENS LYRE


6 Abby's
sister
7 Thomas of
clocks
8 Harness part
9 Mini-guitar


GET MORE in the new "Just Right Crossword Puzzles"
series from Quill Driver. Call 800-605-7176.


6-19


� 2007 by NEA, Inc.


10 Hubbies
13 Zilch
15 Popeye's
tattoo
19 Hobby ender
22 Far East
nanny
23 Tree trunk
25 Count on
26 Sky light
27 Andes
empire
29 Winning serve
30 Round mark'.
31 Car rental
name
32 Slangy okay.
34 Ticket
bargain (hyph.)
39 Society
newbie
40 Food source
42 Excuse me!
44 Foolish plus
45 Evaluated
46 Slalom runs
48 Annoys
49 Not for
50 Bright color
51 Onassis
nickname
52 Thick mass of
hair
54 Scottish for
John


Local RADIO


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I ROHAB I


CANOBE

wm m ]L
www.jumble.com
GEEREM

0 1=


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: L
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: OPIUM BARGE PANTRY UNSEAT
Answer: How the harpist felt when the recital
ended - "STRUNG" OUT


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,
Today's clue: B equals K


"MCPXPMGTX FN UCPG ARV PXT FJ
GCT LPXB." - LUFECG IRRLA
"P IPJ'N MCPXPMGTX FN CFN
WPGT." - CTXPMKFGVN

PREVIOUS SOLUTION - "Winning has always meant much to me, but
winning friends has meant the most." - Golfer Babe Didrikson Zaharias
(c) 2007 by NEA, Inc. 6-19


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 9C


ENTERTAINMENT









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MUG TIuEsDAY, JUNE 19), 207LUU/jq-I


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


rl 79
IA\ECXi R-AgE.'-OU SUME \=O
WOWT tNEZD k kP -
TO FINtT>RE�'
KACU


Kit 'N' Carlyle


tbOKT wV40R,- irs OtL''
F-W bLOCK5 PkWAk(! 00'M'
TRIN O Bt'M>
WIT1.ER ~ $
AC


Rubes


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury
INM JOr.144NY
� './I j~N~'~1- 'I


"'OUR CAR LOOKS A LOT OFTT1R
WIT14 RACIN'STR1PFS, MR. WILSON."


Betty


145VU p I 6(-T,44- PAMMMIX=1!YEH.IT11A
cl2b'. -t4 itf CH~fU-AROUNP NO06 K4Y Gpyf'-

-t~iAI.



..., =-~= �5


"Am I doing anything cute,
Grandma?"


NOT l~eAW. ALThOUt3H,


WH4EN I'OU BUYN 114GM YU

'~. OUNCE


Frank & Ernest


Today'MOVIES


Arlo and Janis


S Today's HOROSCOPE


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Fantastic Four: Silver
Surfer" (PG) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:50, 10;25 p.m. Digital. No
passes or super savers.
I"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 12:45
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20,10:15 p.m.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:45 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Knocked Up" (R) 12:40 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) 12:30
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Shrek the Third" (PG) 12:10
p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Nancy Drew" (PG) 12:10
p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10 p.m. Digital.


"Fantastic Four: Silver
Surfer" (PG) 12:20 p.m., 2:40
p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10
p.m. Digital. No passes or super
savers.
"Hostel 2" (R) 12:15 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Ocean's 13" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10, 7:30, 10:30 p.m. Digital.
"Surf's Up" (PG) 12:40 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. Digital.
"Mr. Brooks" (R) 12:50 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Knocked Up" (R) 12:45 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. Digital.
"Pirates of the Caribbean:
World's End" (PG-13) Noon,
3:40 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Shrek the Third" (PG) 12:30
p.m., 2:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:55 p.m. Digital.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


N1AT "ROcKY'�IW
�WJAE.IS ~REACHE-) 114E,1OPl


Your Birthday: Fresh Opportunities will awaken the
best in you, and this forward thinking could bring you
many fun involvements with new friends. Take an active
interest in all things and be a joiner.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Someone you think of
as always being fortunate can be lucky for you. When in
his or her company, look for ways to join forces with
whatever it is this person presently does.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Larger-than-usual
opportunities are hovering all about where your work or
career are concerned, and one or more could stick to
you. Be ready to move on things once they break.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Sometimes it is not a wise
policy to socialize with business contacts, although the
opposite may be true now. One dynamic person in par-
ticular could hold out a hand of friendship. Take it.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) - You'll be exceptionally
resourceful, even when placed under stressful condi-
tions. What others may consider as being in a bind,
you'll see as a springboard to use your ingenuity.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Instead of following a
tightly written script, be as spontaneous as you can,
especially if you have a topic of importance to discuss
with others. Some ad-libbed ideas will prove your best.


Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Once again, Lady Luck
will be hanging around to help improve your financial
position. You can facilitate things by doing all you can.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Should circum-
stances warrant it, you'll rely on your inventive and
resourceful genes to carry the day for you. Onlookers
who never saw you in action before will marvel.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Conditions in gener-
al continue to be extraordinarily favorable for you.
However, it might take a day or two more to appreciate
the impact these events are having on you.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Several friends could
be playing a far more beneficial role in your affairs than
they might have previously. A pal who'll help you the
most may be someone you just met recently.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Concerning an
endeavor that's important to you, your continued suc-
cess will be evident once again.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - It might be a good idea
to get in touch with a few of your long-distance contacts,
especially someone who's always productive.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - If a co-worker is as
ambitious as you are, your chances for attaining sub-
stantial rewards from a joint venture are excellent.


Peanuts


Garfield


Sally Forth


Dilbert


DOGBERT THE GREEN
CONSULTANT


OR DO
YOU
ADMIT
* YOU
HATE AITTL
EARTH? LITTLE.


3: CAN'pT 961-1V6 X b:PN'T 66T
K~11Ji '~~/ T*H6JoVt? *ActiN6NG mATH! L,
MA~EYOU SH4OULDN'T M
Ilk% HAW SAID YOU'D61Wit'!
ONt HUJNpgOpAND
TfN FORCENT!

- 6-19E5


< o'l-� mli


-Ing - - An "In ...











CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIF.IEDS TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 11.



To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


1 u, A- - - IM -M = 'IkV-bU ,f -pw-,.p.

Fa:(5)5356 5 1 Toll55Free: (888) 852-30 1 m i:clsiidscrnclo *n cm Iwbsie : w w hroi beonlneco

CI ven Gnerl ' Emloye_


Gay White Female,
5'10", 180 Ibs,
Auburn Hair, blue eyes,
looking for same for
friendship, movies,
conversation.
N/S preferred.
(352) 795-0309
Looking For
Companion
to Share Cost,
Traveling to Michigan,
End of June
(352) 476-6192
SWM, Semi-retired.
Italian, 5'8" 155lbs.
seeks female friend
or companion.
Age, color, race
unimportant.
(352) 746-6159
WWM in Search WF, 65,
to enjoy country music,
flea markets, traveling
USA, in Class A Motor
Home. Send Response
To: Blind Bdx 1329P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River Fl.
34429




RENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
cm O�ffe rs il li



$$CASH WE BUY TODAY
Cars, Trucks, Vans - rt
FREE Removal Metal,
Junk Vehicles, No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receiat
$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive,
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
$$ CASH PAID $$
Having Code
Enforcement problems
w/ Junk vehicles in your
yard? (352) 860-2545
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 560-6163 or
(352) 746-9084
Leave Message


















Disappear..
Washer


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966
0l l k(-)N14l: 1,


$ CASH $ PAID FOR
Unwanted Vehicles
CALL (352) 220-0687
Free KITTENS
& PARENTS, litter trained.
Farm raised.
(352) 586-2590
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars. jet skis
mowers,jacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
FREE REMOVAL OF
BOATS/RVS
(352) 628-6605
FREE REMOVAL
Of unwanted household
& Garage Sale Items.
Call (352) 726-9500
The Path Shelter
will pick up your
unwanted vehicle
Tax deductible
receipt given
(352) 746-9084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
(888) 480-1170
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans
No ritle OK, Call J.W.
(352) 228-9645



RED CHOW, Male, lost
Mini Forms area,
friendly, Collar, tumor
under tail., "Bubba"


MED. SIZE DOG
Female, Dominent
Black mark above nose
on forehead, speckled
gray & white, chain
collar. Vic. Arlington PI.
Homosassa, Approx.
6/1 (352)628-4432





BANKRUPTCY
I* .Name Change I
S Child Support
I Wills
We Come To You
637-4022 795-5999










Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
in our Mobile Clinic.
Appointments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFernale $50,
Dog Male $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail Wed,Thurs,
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
, appt. 352-726-8801


DRUM LESSONS
Prof, drurmei Music
field 504 yrs. 794-0265
Glory Recording Studios



---- --



I M NTiArLFIDER =|
| www.chronicle
L rentalfinder.com

* SOD * SOD * SOD*
BANG'S LANDSCAPING
Sod, Trees, Shrubs
(352) 341-3032


www.adoota
rescued oe.com
View available pets
on our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Need help rehoming
a pet - call us
Adoptive homes
available for small
dogs
Reauested donations
are tax deductible

Pet Adoptions
Thursday,
June 28th
12 -2 pm
Mercantile Bank
Rt. 44, Inverness

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open 8:00 A
M till 4:00 P M
Monday-Friday.
Week-end and
evenings by
appointment.
All Cats and Kittens
are altered, tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date on vac-
cines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant
Ave. Corner of 44
and Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.





FULL BODY DEEP TISSUE
MASSAGE &
AROMATHERAPY by
Terri (352) 628-1036


Sudoku 4puz.com

15





73 8 5- 112


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6 4 9 3


9 5 3 4


419 1 8 6 3


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Fill in the squares so that each row. column, and,
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


s and read


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srODM tlpr.&IMEOMMIeli


LPN & RN
(3:45pm-12:15am)
Second Shift
(1 1:45pm-8:15am)
Third Shift
(Full Time)
GREAT BENEFITSIII
Paid Vacation,
Holidays, Health
Insurance & 401 K


1 ,000 s of lien is sold
everyday using the
Chronicle classified.
Call today and we'll
help you gel rid of
your unwanted stuff.

I( H ,IpNIK ;i.
(352) 563-5966
(352) 726-1441




Fountains Merm Park,
Homosassa Lots 1,2,3
& 4 in Peace 114
Garden $6995 for all
four. (352) 799-2970-
Brooksville







Chronicle Webslte
Directory in print
and online.
Our search engine
will link customers
directly to your site.
In Print

= One Price
$51.95
(3 lines of copy
for 30 days)
Header and
Website Address
Call Today:
(352) 563-5966

-CAR-SALES
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

Get the value of Your
Home
www.naturecoastlivinm.n
at

Hurricane Info
www.chronicleonline
.camo

NEWSPAPERS
www.chronlcle
online.com

Political News
www.chronicleonline]
.cornm
Real Estate Information
www.FreeCitrusCounty
Homelnfo.com

www.chroniclehome
finder.com

REAL ESTATE
www.naturecoast
hpmefront.coin

www.chronicle
rentaifirder.corTn




COOK FT/PT
Experience Required
Tadpoles Early Learning
Center (352) 560-4222




BILINGUAL
RECEPTIONIST
Needed part time for edu-
cational foundation. Must
be fluent in Spanish. Fax
resume to 352/795-1970,
CITRUS COUNTY
Clerk of Courts
Is accepting
applications at this
time. For the
positions of
*SYSTEMS
ANALYST
*SWiTCH BOARD
OPERATOR
For additional
information please
view our website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us
or contact
Human Resources at
'(352) 341-6483


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuiuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/LPN

For busy Orthopedic
practice. Immediate
opening please fax
resume to: Nettle
352-746-0333

NURSE P/T
11-7

JOIN OUR TEAMI
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832


NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable

CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE


RN
w/BSN or MSN
OB/Peds Exp.
Adjuncent, flexible
schedule.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 245-0276 or
Call (352) 245-4119

RN, LPN, CNA,
CMA NEEDED
SALL STAR "
Professional
Staffing Services
352-560-6210

RN/LPN
CNA/HHA'S

New competitive, pay.
rates. Call
Interim Health Care
(352) 637-3111

SOCIAL SERVICES
DIRECTOR
Avante at Inverness
seeks a qualified
professional to act as
liaison and
representative for
residents' social
interests. Will plan,
organize and direct
overall operation of
Social Services Dept.
to ensure that
medically related
social and emotional
needs of residents are
met. Must be a
licensed social worker
with BSW or Masters
degree. Must possess
excellent comm. and
org. skills.
Please apply In
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness or
fax resume to
352-637-0333
or email to
tcypret@







CC1
avanlearouo.coma










CORRECTIONAL
OFFICER
(Full Time)

GREAT BENEFITS
Paid Vacations,
Holidays, Health
Insurance & 401 K
Qual: H.S./GED, A
valid Florida Drivers
license Is required.
Must be at least 19yrs.
of age.
Applications are
available at
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Lecanto, Fl 34461
www.corrections
corD.com
M/F/VET/HP
E.O.E. Drug Free
Workplace

EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER

For 114 Room Resort
Hotel in Crystal River.
3 years prior
experience in position
required. Health
Insurance, 401,
Vacation & Holidays
Fax resume with
salary requirements
to 352-795-3179

EXPERIENCED
/ Software
Developers
/ Graphic
Designers
/ Marketing Mngr
/ Software Tester
www.moblform.com
Send Resume To:
Info@moblform.com


FACILITATOR
Shared Service
Alliance of Citrus Co.
Is seeking a
Professional Facilitator
that provides,
administrative
support and reports
to the SSA Board. This
Is a Part time annual
contract position,
min. AA degree req.,
Bachelors preferred
Salary $15,000-$20,000
based on exp./
education. No Bene-
fits. Send Resumes
for consideration to:
Brad Thorpe
3600 W. Sovereign
Path suite 202
Lecanto Fl. 34461

FRONT DESK &
BOOKKEEPER
F/T, Apply In person
Port Hotel & Marina
Crystal River, FL.

SUBSTANCE
ABUSE
COUNSELOR
Provides in-home sub-
stance abuse assess-
ment and counseling
svcs. to at-risk families
in Hernando County;
possesses knowledge
of chemical depend-
ency, AAINA 12-step
philosophy, community
CD resources and
Marchman Act; 2 yrs.
relevant substance
abuse treatment exp.
req. MA in Human
Svcs. req. and licensed
in mental health and/or
CAP preferred.
DFWP/EOE

Substance ;
Abuse/Mental
Health Technician

Under direction of a
mental health or
substance abuse
professional,
manages. the general
conduct and
behavior of juvenile
residents, assists
therapists with the
provision of
behavioral health
overlay services,
maintains discipline,
participates in
training residentsIn
life and social skills
training, leads
recreational
activities, and; does
related work as
required.
Education:
Graduation from an
accredited college
with a Bachelor's
degree in Behavioral
Science or related
field
Apply In person at:
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offenders
Correctional Center
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or fax resume to
352-527-2235
Drug Free Workplace
/ EEO




*COOKS
*SERVERS
Exp. preferred. High
volume environment.
COACH'S Pub&Eaterv
114W. Main St., Inv.
11582 N. Williams St..
Dunnellon EOE
SCHIANO'S
NOW HIRING

Exp. waitstaff. Inverness
(352) 344-0024
*SOUS CHEF
*SERVERS
*DISHWASHER/
PREP
We will train.
Please Apply before
11am or after 2pm
Cafe on the Ave.
631 N. Citrus Ave.
(352) 795-3656




$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
WRITE YOUR OWN
PAYCHECK

Exp. phone Sales
Reps Needed.
Call 352-628-0187

CASHIERS
Travel Store, Hiring for
all shifts. Full benefits
& 401K. Contact:
Dave Short
(352)748-2501 ext. 119
or Apply in person
TRAVEL CENTER OF
AMERICA
556 St. Rd. 44
Wildwood
Exit 329 off 1-75
LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER

Seeking Inside
Salesperson. Must have
knowledge of
plumbing & office
procedures. Insurance,
401K, (352)795-2999


Exp. Appt. Setter
& Installer

Top Pay 352-726-1002
352-597-4002

Realtors Wanted

Small productive
non franchise office.
Pleasant working
cond., Good comm.
spilt. Interviews
confidential.
(352) 795-9123
SALES PERSON
Needed, $350 wkly,
Citrus Cournty District,
$350 wkly, monthly
commissions-on
produce sales. $450
mo. on monthly
car use allowance.
Call APM Produce.
(352) 732-1191
7am-Noon
STATE FARM
INSURANCE

Sales Position.
Customer Service or
Sales exp. req.
Call (352) 489-8900




AIC INSTALLER/
SERVICE TECH
Expereinced.
TopPay & Benefits
Call 352-628-5700
CUSTODIAN/
FACILITY MONITOR

Apply In person:
Spruce Creek
Preserve, St. Rd. 200
Dunnellon, see Steve,
Julie or Diane.
DRILLER'S ASST.

Needed. Long hours.
Clean Class D license &
driving record. Paid
holidays & vacations
352-400-0398 before 9p
ELECTRICIAN
Must have exp. In
commercial, residen-
tial, and service. Must
be a team player
Insurance Benefits
Call Mon-Thurs.
(352) 341-2004
EXP'D ROOF
COATING
APPLICATOR
& ALSO LABORERS
Must have valid D.L., be
drug free & able to do
some out of town work.
(352) 489-5900
GREENBRIAR
ENTERPRISES
LOOKING FOR
LAWN &
MAINTENANCE

Clean Driver's lic. req.
(352) 302-7509
Masons & Mason
Laborers
(352) 302-7566
MOTORCYCLE &
PWC TECH
WANTED
Citrus Kawasaki Is
seeking an
experienced &
responsible person to
join our team. Top
pay and benefits In
the business if you are
looking for a career
position call Paul @
352-527-0129 or
Email your
confidential resume
to:suby@adelphla.net

POOL TECHS
WANTED
In Wildwood. Exp.
preferred. Will train.
(352) 748-3987

PROPERTY
MANAGER
NEEDED
59 Unit property.
Exp.required.
Brooksville area.
352-396-0295. 9am- 4
pm, Mon. - Fri.
or resume to
352-787-1912
Benefits offered.
EOE DFWP
r i i l = N1
QUALIFIED
SERVICE TECH

Must have
experience and
current FL
Driver's License
Apply in person:
Daniel's Heating &
4581 S. Florida Ave.
Inverness

Sc'

Looking for
Experienced
ASPHALT PLANT
OPERATOR &
* WELDER
FABRICATOR
APPRENTICE
No Phone Calls
Apply In Person:
3601 SW 38th Ave.
Ocala


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
WRITE YOUR OWN
PAYCHECK!
Exp. phone Sales
Reps Needed.
Call 352-628-0187
COOK, FT/PT
Experience Required
Tadpoles Early Learning
Center (352) 560-4222


CHRpNICLE

DELIVERY ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER.

* Earn $200 a week 2-3
early morning hours,
7 days a week.
There are currently
several newspaper
delivery routes
available In the
Crystal River area.
Call 563-3201
and leave your name,
telephone number
and the best time to
call. Back-up vehicle
required.




.LANDFILL
OPERATOR &
*GENERAL
LABORERS
Send Resume To:
Sumter Recycling
352-568-0110
LAWN &
LANDSCAPE
TECHNICIAN

Exp. pref'd. 25-30 hrs.
per wk. (352)726-9481
LAWN SERVICE
HELP
352-425-8703
LAWN
TECHNICIAN

FULL TIME clean
Dri. Lic., Lawn experi-
ence preferred.
Will train, benefits
Apply in person
CITRUS PEST MGT.
5 N. Melbourne
Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
* FIREWORKS STAND*
OPERATORS

M/F, no experience
necessary. Exc. Pay.
*une 20-Jul 5*
(813) 677-1874

TIRE INSTALLER
For busy repair shop;
Must be able to
hustle, have good
D.L. & exp. needed.
Hard work good pay
8 benefits
Apply In person @
LKQ Auto Service
4950 W. Hwy 486.
Crystal River
See John Wood

WILL TRAIN

Willing to work long
hours, for position in
well drilling operation
& pump repair. Must
have clean driving
record. Benefits;
Apply @
Citrus Well Drilling
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando





CLERICAL
Provides clerical sup-
port to a Crisis Re-
sponse Team program
in Hernando County;
answers phones, files,
screens visitors, gener-
ates reports; requisi-
tions supplies, faxes,
photocopies and exe-
cutes word processing;
knowledge of Microsoft
Office essential; min. of
1 yr. in an administra-
tive support capacity
and a High School Di-
ploma or GED req. Ap-
ply LifeStream Behav-
ioral Ctr. 515 W Main
St. Leesburg or online
at www.lsbc.net
DFWP/EOE




DELIVERY ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER.

Earn $200 a weekly 2-3
early morning hours,.
7 days a week.
There are currently
several newspaper
delivery routes
available in the
Crystal River area.
Call 563-3201
and leave your
name, telephone
number and the best
time to call. Back-up
vehicle required.

CiapfitiE


ELIMINATE YOUR
MORTGAGE
Own your home Free
and Clear In 1/2 to
1/3 of the time & save
thousands of $$$
in inte est For info.
Call 1-866-754-7832




Diana's Flower &
Wedding Shop-Offering
"Basic Floral Design"
classes (352) 400-4912
Home Health Agency
Exclusive Territory
(561) 347-0440 www.
championhome.com




GREAT LOCATION
*Just remodeled,
turnkey operation
Cellular Store. $20,000o
352-726-7444/228-1197
Restaurant For Sale
B & L For 12 yrs. In good
location, steady
clientele $125,000.
Call (352) 527-1945
THRIVING PIZZA & SUB
Take-out BIZI $144.900
Lg. cust. base. Growth
oppor. for Hands-on
Owner. PROFITABLEII
Owner will train. Doris
Miner at C-21 JWMorton
RE 344-1515/726-6668




ALL STEEL BUILDINGS



25x25x7 (2:12r Pich)
1- 9x7 garage door, 0
2 vents,
4" concrete slab
INSTALLED-$15.995
25x30x9 (3:12 Pitch)
Roof Overhang ,
2-9x7 garage doors,
2 vents, entry door,
4" concrete slab,
INSTALLED- $16.495
Many Sizes Avail. .
We Custom Build -
We Are The Factory' -
Fl. Engineered Plans
Meets or Exceeds
Florida Wind Code.
METAL STRUCTURES -
LLQC.COM
1-866-624-9100 .9
metalstructuresllc.corb
SWE MOVE SHEDS '
352-637-6607:




"LIVE AUCTIONS" r
www.charliefudge.com'
For Upcoming Auctions'
1-800-542-3877
LIBRARY TABLE S
Victorian, mahogany
53V4" X 33 2*
Restored! $650
(352) 860-1536
-4







A+SPAS.COM




*FREE REMOVAL OF*
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's. We ,,
sell AT parts 628-208s 4




A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. 13th SEER
& UP. New Units at
Wholesale Prices
-* 2 Ton $780.00
-. 2-'A ton $814.00
-* 3 Ton $882.00
*Installation kits;
*Prof. Installation;
*Pool Heat Pumps
Also Available
Free Delivery!
Call 746-4394
ABC Briscoe Appliance
Refrigerators, washers,
stoves. Service & Parts
(352) 344-2928
AC SYSTEMS
Heat Pumps, MH Units
All sizes, New 13 SEE
352-400-4945


Ready for a change?
The best kept secret
in nursing is in
Correctional Nursing.
Current FL LPN or RN
license & valid Drivers
license is required
To apply foit anew
challenging career
visit our facility
M-F 8:30am - 4:30pmrn
2604 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive
Leconto. F1 34461
To apply via internet
www.corrections
corp.com
M/F/VET/HP
E.O.E. Drug Free
Workplace


ARNP
Exp'd. F/T for Busy
Doctors office and
Nursing Home.
Send Resume To:
(352)795-7898


BILLING/
RECEPTIONIST
Medical billing and/or
reception exp.
Fax: (352) 746-2236


BRENTWOOD
Retirement/
Assisted Living
Has the following
Openings
* LPN's for PRN
* FT CNA's 3-11
& 11-7

All positions -
Insurance after
60 days. Vacation
After 90 days.

Sign on bonus &
paid by exp.
Apply in Person:
Breniwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE


CNA's NEEDED
I F/T 3-11
I Shift differential.
JOIN OUR TEAM
I . Cypress Cove
S Care Center
(352) 795-8832









































EXPERIENCED
PHLEBOTOMIST
SW/ Front Office
experience.
FT or busy Dr's office
$$ Good benefits $$
Fax resume to
352-746-6333
Or mail t: lV'











3L2C TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007
S
.L Ofic


GE REFRIGERATOR
27 CuFT. Side by Side
Filtered Ice/Water In dr.
Energy Saver. Designer
white. Exc. Cond. $500.
(352) 220-6820
Hotpoint Range
white, self cleaning
Oven $50.
(352) 228-0000
KENMORE
Gas range double
oven self cleaning
Never Installedl
Great value $375
(352) 860-1308_
Kenmore Refrig.
21 cuft. almond,
w/Icemaker, $75.
Maytag Dryer, Lrg.
capacity, white, good
cond., $75. 344-9141
Washer & Dryer
works good
$125 for both
(352) 628-4994
SWasher & Dryer, like
new, $295/set Satlsf.
guar. Free Del. & set up
(352) 293-2529
' economyappl.com
SWhirlpool dryer,
works & looks
good. $75.
(352)344-1521
Whirlpool Washer
6 cycl. 3 spd., H/D $75.
Kenmore Dryer,
propane gas, 3 temps.,
HD, $75. Both $125.
(352) 795-4596


SOLID MAHOGANY
OFFICE FURNITURE
Exc. Cond. 2 mahog-
any office sets, 9 Phone
systems w/phones, 6
Confer. Chairs, 65 Gal.


10" TABLE SAW
W/Stand. $125;
ELECTRIC TILE CUTTER
$25
(352) 257-3261
10" BAND SAW
$75.
3/4 hp. Air Compressor
40 PSI $75
(352) 257-3261
Automatic Saw Filing
equipment for hand
saws and up to 30"
circular saws, $350.
(352) 344-1939
Chain Saw
14" 2 yrs old
$40.
(352) 212-7806
Drill Press
1/2 Inch,
$100.
(352) 533-3331
TRUCK TOOL BOX
Diamond plate tool
box 63 inches, almost
new $100.00 firm call
560 7802, Inverness.


36" JDC TV
4 yrs. old. w/stand,
$400/obo
(352) 220-6347
46" Sony Large screen
TV, looks & works,
perfect cond,, with
receiver & surround
sound, $450
(352) 344-1521
52" Panasonic
Cinema vision, plays
great, $625;
(352) 628-1722
61" RCA
Rear Projection TV,
PIP, works excellent
$600. obo
Call (352) 601-3237
SONY 30" WEGA
HD ready. $450
(352) 634-1860




16' PIne Fence Board,
$5.50@; Cherry lumber,
$2.00/ft. Rough sawn,
air dried, 352-212-4122



Citrus County
Computer Doctors
Prof. Repairs-in Home
Fast & affordable.
Free Quote. 344-4839


Get Results
I# The Hoamefrnt
Classifieds!


DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service. New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdeell.com
PANASONIC
Electronic typewriter
new in box never used
$200 firm
(352) 341-1714




PATIO SWING
W/CANOPY $95
2 concrete pedestals,
$75 ea
. 352-860-0444




2 BERKLINE ROCKER
RECLINERS, 1 I s swivel,
Seafoam green, very
good cond. $100 ea.
(352) 527-1810
PRE OWNED FURNITURE
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homasassa 621-7788
ANTIQUE GOLD
DAYBED
Mattress, coverlet &
skirt, used twice. $400
(352) 527-3863
BARSTOOLS
blonde wood (2)
$25/both,
352- 489-3770


Bed
King sz., w/ headboard
plus matching lamps,
excel. cond. $150.
(352) 533-3331
BEDS o BEDS * BEDS
The factory outlet store
For TOP National Brands
Fr.50%/70% off Retail
Twin $119 * Full $159
Queen $199 / King $249
Please call 795-6006
Broyhill Liv. Room Set
Leather sofa, lounge
chair, ottomans, & ta-
bles, $800. Like New
Will Separate
352-726-0040,212-3571
CITRUS HOME DECOR @
Homosassa Sprgs. Plaza
Conslanment, like new
furniture (352) 621-3326
CURIO / BABY BED
ULighted Curio Cabinet
$500. Jenny Und style
baby bed, no mattress
$25. 352-382-7992
Daybed
no mattress, black
w/gold trim,
$25;
.352-489-3770
DINING / BEDROOM
9 piece dining set $700.
5 piece queen
bedroom set $700.
352-382-7992
Dining Room Table
64" ext. to 88", beige 6
upholst. chairs. $125.
SET-GLASS TOP COFFEE
Table Beige/gold, &
2 matching end tables,
Two -3 way lamps $95.
(352) 382-0091


DINING TABLE,
6 CHAIRS, I leaf, new
solid wood. Creme,
Was $1500, Sell $375.
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11 am
Dinning Rm. Table,
& 6 chairs, Black
Shellac $100
Adjustable Twin Bed
$250.
(352) 793-5803
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Solid Oak, Glass Doors,
Storage, Ughted, TV
opening 35W X 37.5D.
Exc. Cond. $600
(352) 527-0239
FLOOR LAMP,
Wrought Iron, white
shade.
$20.
(352) 726-8912, call af-
ter 10 a.m.
FLORAL SOFA 80" L
$199.
MARBLE TOP COFFEE
TABLE, $99.
(352) 726-8912, call
after 10a.m.
FURNITURE SET
Sofa, Loveseat, off
white w/gold leaves,
Queen & full pillowtop
beds, w/box & frames,
all newer & great
shape. $1400/obo
(352) 422-5927
LAMPS, DESIGNER PAIR
New - $800,
Sell - $100
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DROP LEAF TABLE
w/2 chairs, brand new,
$200.
(352) 726-3716
LEATHER COUCH &
LOVESEAT, exc. cond.
both items recline,
$500; GLASS TOP KIT.
TABLE w/ 4 castor chairs
$150. (352) 489-4934
LONG DRESSER W/ TWO
MIRRORS & NIGHTSTAND
$80, (2) 19" COLOR TV'S
W/ REMOTE $50/EA
(352) 795-5444
PINE CUPBOARD
Hutch, Quebec, old.
$250.
Call (352) 382-7223,
after 11am
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN SIZE
Simmons Beauty rest
Box Spring Mattress and
Frame. Like new $150
ANTIQUE BUREAU $100
(352) 560-3048

RETNTA`L FINMDERE 0
www.chronlcle
rentalflinder.com

SLEEPER SOFA &
LOVESEAT
Wicker, white wash,
floral. Good Cond. $275
(352) 628-5011
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Floral Print, Pastel
Perfect Condition I
Includes 3 Tables
& Lamps $550.
(352) 746-1447


@ LaughingStock International Inc.Idist by United IVledia, 2007


"Who's having the raw herring?"


The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers &
beds are needed.
Call (352) 746-9084


52" HUSTLER MOWER &
60" HUSTLER MOWER
700 hrs. $3,500 obo/ea.
(352) 621-4777


Cl .ard
o L avvnSup le


BUSH HOG
4ft, $350 obo
(352) 628-0824


A/C Tune up w/ Free
permanent filter +
Termite/Pest Control
Insp. Lic & Boned Only
$44.95 for both.
(352) 628-5700
caco36870




ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
TODAY!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Its Less than
Pennies per day
per household.
$$$$$$$MS$$$$$S$
IF WE DON'T HAVE
YOUR BUSINESS
CATEGORY.
S JUSTASK.
WE CAN GET
IT FOR YOUIII

CALL TODAY
(352) 563-5966

MARY'S
PRECIOUS PETS
� Pet Sitting Service
(352) 503-5414


AFFORDABLE,
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
S-Appl. Furn, Const.
1 Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126

All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
" Bushhog, Driveways
I & Hauling 302-6955
COLEMAN TREE SERVICE
Removal & trim. Lic. Ins.
FREE EST. Lowest rates
guaranteed 726-8010
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Haullng.Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272

HAULING, TREE
SERVICES,
DEMOLITION &
MISC CLEANUP, ETC.
'352.447-3713/232-2898
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, lns.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827







A TREE SURGEON
Uic. & Ins. Exp'd friendly
serv. Lowest rates Free
estimates;352-860-1452


All Computer Repairs
We come to your home
or office, 21 yrs. exp.
7 days (352) 212-1165




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home
REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch * Installation
Call tor Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-I.28




We Install YOUR Floord
Carpet, vinyl, & tile
All jobs welcome We
travel. (813) 843-4059


B----u

1= Pa in ting
7 #1 A� Mr. Fix-7it m
I Prof. painting, Pres- I
sure washing, Home
repairs, Gutter cing
I & Screen repair. I
| 220-9326/382-3647
* Lic#99990255609

VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Uc#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Uc. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
George Swedllge
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Uc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
* RUDY'S PAINTING *
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Cleaning
FREE EST. (352) 476-9013




Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
DOCKS, SEAWALLS,
Boat Lifts, Boat Houses,
New, Re decks, Repair
& Styrofoam Replace.
LIc.CBC060275. Ins.
(352) 302-1236
MORRILL MARINE
Outboard Repairs,
Dockside Service. Elec.
Installed (352) 628-3331




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244


tnc #2776 C Licensd & ns1 e
,,4otr C04


HOME REPAIR & MAINTENANCE, INC.
"Caring for Your Home is Our Business"
- Offering A Full Range of Services -
Residential --
'G Commercial Mq5
S 628-4282 Chamber
fi 628-4282 Member


BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




Upholstery Cleaning
Free est. Formal Caroet


CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY
Modern & antique.
Denny, 628-5595
or 464-2738



*PRIVATE.
Adult Family Care
Home. Licensed.
Get one on one care.
Semi-private & private
rooms available


vrlnns Sarcnell painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




Clean Breeze Cleaning
Service INC.
Owners DO the work
Lic/Ins.(352)476-8979
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 18 years. Kathy
(352)465-7334
PARTNERS IN GRIME
Commer/Res. 20 yrs
exp.. Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
Call (352) 628-4898
Paula's Independent
Cleaning Service
29 yrs. exp. Excel. Ref.
Resid./Comm. 793-6599
PHYLLIS' CLEANING SVC
Homes/Offices/Condos
20+ yrs exp.* ref's avail
352-795-1443
Touch of Class Cleaning
Service, 15 Yrs. Exp.
Also If you Need Help?
With Errands, Things
Around the House. Ref.
Nancy (352) 628-2774




Splffy Window Cleaners
Superb service at
a reasonable Rate
Ilc. & Ins, (352) 503-3558
* The Window Man *
Beats any Est. by 10%
Com./resld., Uc, & Ins.
(352) 228-7295




AFFORDABLE
CABINETS &
COUNTERTOPS
(352) 586-8415




Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620


DOTSON Construction
25 yrs..in, Central.FL. Our
own crews! Specializing
in additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
Install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Uc#CBC1250751 Ins.
No job too small
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
CC.C.Acc. 352-628-4211
ROGERS Construction
New Homes.Additions
Florida Rooms.
637-4373 CRC1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-563-0104/257-1011
1 panel or camp cage
Family owned &
operated. Also avail
super screen w/10vr
manufacturer warr.
Screen rms,Carports,
vinyl & acrylic windows,
roof overs & storm
panels, garage screen
doors, siding,
soffit fascia, Lic#2708
(352) 628-0562
SOFFITS, SCREEN RMS,
REPAIRS- Free Est.
Montalto Alum. Uc.
#2807 (352)503-4924




CALL STELLAR BLUE
for all Int/ Ext. painting
needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning - Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
Henry's Painting Press.
wash, roof clean. Ins.
Accept Cr. cards. Lic#
30555 (352) 302-4928
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 341-3300



K----- m

#1 A+TMr Fix- Iti1
I Prof. painting, Pres- I
sure washing, Home |
repairs, Gutter cing
I & Screen repair. I
| 220-9326/382-3647
SUic#99990255609 �

#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's Installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Uc.5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, Reliable,
#0169757 344-4409
1 Call does it AlII No lob
too sm. Remod., Home
Repairs, Press. Clean.,
etc. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small| Reliable. Ins
02562Z1352-465-9201


3 J's HOME
IMPROVEMENT, INC.
General maint. Painting
Int & Ext, landscaping
Free est Lic2951
352-527-3341/302-5994
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lc
#99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658

AFFORDABLE""
I HAULING CLEANUP, I
| PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
SDebris & Garages |
352-697-1126
ARTISAN HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
General Maintenance
& Repairs. Lic # 34064
(352) 228-7823"
FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs.
Free Est. LIc # 0256374
(352) 257-9508
Handyman Wayne
Lic 34151, 352-795-9708
Cell 352-257-3514
Handyman.
If its broke Jerry can.
fix it. Llc#189620
(352) 726-0762
HOME REPAIR, You
need it done, we'll do
it. 30 yrs. exp. Uc., ins.
#73490256935,489-9051
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




STAYLER AC & HEATING,
Inc. FREE Service call
w/reaILr this mo. Ins.
628-6300. CACO 58704




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All home repairs. Also
Phone, Cable, Lan &
Plasma TV's Installed.
Pressure wash & Gutters
Lic.5863 (352) 746-0141
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC INC.
Elec. Serv./Repalrs. New
const. Remodel Free Est
726-2907 EC13002699
FULL ELECTRIC SERVICE
odmnr ou.s LIahtina.


AFFORDABLE,
HAULING CLEANUP, I
PROMPT SERVICE
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126 .









All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
C.J.'S TRUCK/TRAILERS
Furn., apple, trash, brush,
Low $$$/Professional
Prompt 7 day service
726-2264 /201-1422


Fum. Moving / Hauling
Dependable & Exp.
CALL LARRY
352-270-3589, 726-7022
Got Trash-Brush? You/
We load 20-40yard
dumpsters Mulch, fill
topsoil Pick up/delivery
352-726-1875 302-8382
HAULING, TREE
SERVICES,
DEMOLITION &
MISC CLEANUP, ETC.
352.447-3713/232-2898
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch deliv-
ery & hauling. 302-7100
WE MOVE SHEDS
352-637-6607



CARPET FACTORY Direc
Restretch,clean, repair
Vinyl, Tile, Wood, (352)
341-0909 Shop at home
FRANK TILE, INC.
Tile, Marble, Pavers,
Remodel/Repair spec.
20+ yrs. Ins. Uc#2665
352-634-0761/598-3901




Viglione Asphalt Paving
Driveways, Sidewalks,
Patios, Etc., Free Est.,
I1 /In (352) 726309Ano3


All kinds of fences
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431
ROCKY'S FENCING
Working In
Citrus County for 25 yrs.
Free Estimate, Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
25 Years In County
Free Est., Res./Comm.
FENCES BY DALLAS
Lic./Ins (352) 795-1110
3rd GENERATION SERV
All types of fencing,
General home repairs,
Int/Ext. painting FREE
Est., 10% off any job. lic
# 99990257151 & Ins.
(352) 201-0658
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All types.Free estimates
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BARNYARD II FENCING
Serving Citrus Co. Since
1973, Free Estimates
(352) 726-9260
BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell




--IRRIGATION--
New Systems &
Repairs. Ins. Uc.3000
*S~QD-- ALL VARIETIES
Cut outs & New
Homes. Installed &
Rolled. A.L. EVANS
(352) 637-5825




#1 in Service
Hise Roofing
New const. reroofs &
repairs. 25 yrs. exp. leak
spec. #CCC1327059
(352) 344-2442


J. Vauahn Roofing. Inc.
New Roofs, Re-Roofs &
Repairs; C.C. accepted
Ins/Uc CCC 1327365
(352) 795-6659
John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
795-7003/800-233-5358




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. FREE EST.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
Concrete Slabs, Pavers
Remove & Haul Debris
Demolit. 352-746-9613
Uc# CRC1326431
CONCRETE WORK.
Sldewca, Driveways Polios,
Free est. Lic. 2000. Ins.
795-4798
Decorative concrete,
River rock, curbing &
concrete, Fuston's River
Rock (352) 344-4209
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
driveways & tear outs
Uc. 1476 726-6554


E--

A+ QUALITY WORK
SPAFFORD's CONST.
Specializing in room
additions, remodeling,
bathrooms, windows,
garages. Lic. RR0066831
352-726-7855
Additions-Kitchens
Bathrooms - Decks,
Woodfloors - Ceramic
DJM Constructors Inc.
tic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DOTSON Construction
25 yrs. In Central FL. Our
own crews Specializing
In additions, framing,
trim, & decks.
Lic. #CRC1326910
(352) 726-1708
HOME or COMM.
Renovations. We sell &
Install ICF's (Insulated
Concrete Wall Forms)
30 yrs. exp.
Uc#CBC1250751 Ins.
No job too smallll
Affordable rates. Ron
Whitehead Bldr. Major
C.C. Acc. 352-628-4211







W. F. GILLESPIE
Room Additions, New
Home Construction,
Baths & Kitchens
St. Uc. CRC 1327902
(352) 465-2177
www.wfgillesple.com
We do it ALLI Big or Sm.l
Additions, BA & Kitch.,
Drywall.Crown molding,
Demo. CRC1326431
(352) 746-9613



CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
LUc/Ins. #2441 795-7241


I Soe.


ROCKMONSTERS, INC.
St. Cert. Metal/Drywall
Contractor. Repairs,
Texture, Additions,
Homeowners, Builders
Free est. (352) 220-9016
Uc.#SCC131149747
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Tile Work,
Framing. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263



FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All types of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
AFFORDABLE Top soil,
fill, mulch,rock. Tractor
work. No job too small.
352-302-7325 341-2019
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
FLIPS TRUCK & TRACTOR,
Landclearing, Truck &
Tractor work. House
Pads, Rock, Sand, Clay,
Mulch & Topsoil.
(352) 382-2253
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
352-302-3523/628-3924




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Land Clear, Tree Serv.,
Bushhog, Driveways
& Hauling 302-6955
DONALD KERNZ'S
M.H. demolition, red
tag cleanup, land
clearing (352) 634-0329
TREE REMOVAL,
Landclearing, Fill Dirt,
Bush hogging,
(352) 563-1873
TURTLE ACRES
BUSHHOG SERVICE
Boxblade, Front Loader
& Stump Grindina


BILL'S LANDSCAPING
& Lawn Service, Flower
Beds, Mulch, Plants,
Sod, Trees, Clean-ups,
FREE Est. (352) 628-4258
Cell 352-453-6292
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Stump Grinding
& Bobcat work. Fill/rock
& Sod: 352-563-0272
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RAM Landscaping &
Lawn care, Specializing
In Pruning. Call Me
(352) 637-6588


Roof Cleaning Specialist
The Only Company that can Keep Mold & Mildew Off
Siding - Stucco - Vinyl Concrete Tile & Asphalt Roofs

GUARANTEED!
Restore * Protect * Beautify - Residential & Commercial


W Suncoast
P Exterior
Restoration Service Inc.


877-601-5050 * 352-489-5265


"El Cheapo" cuts $10 up
Beat any Price. We do
it All. Call 352-563-9824
Or 352-228-7320
#1Yard Dogz Lawncare
quality cuts starting $10.
Reliable & dependable
Free Est. (352) 382-1504
A TROPICAL LAWN
Family owned & oper.
Satisfaction Guaran.
352-257-9132/257-1930
Advanced Lawncare &
More, Pressure Wash.,
No Job too small,
Res./Comm., c./Ins.
352-220-6325/220-9533
All Seasons Lawncare
Residential/ Commerc.
Complete lawn care.
Second to none.
Guaranteed best rates.
LIC. INS. (352) 302-0420
BARKER'S LAWN
SERVICE & MORE
(352) 228-2231
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality work
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Frankenfield Lawncare
& Pressure Washing
Res./Comm. No Job
too Big or Small, Uc./Ins.
(352) 726-8533
J & S LAWN CARE
Landscape & Design
Reasonable Rates!! Res-
idential & Commercial.
25 Years Experience.
(352)465-0818
LAWN SERVICE
We do re-sodding
and patching.
Free Estimate 795-4798.
Lawncare-N-More LLC
Bushes, Beds, Leaves,
Pres. Washing, Debris
Removal. 726-9570
RITTER LAWN CARE
Lawn Maint., Press.
Clean., Sm Tree Remov.
Free Est.(352) 257-6001
ROB'S LAWN CARE
Free Estimates
(352) 563-0376
Steve's Lawn Service
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Uce. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166



AQUA AZURE
Total Pool System Care
Personalized Service &
Great Prices 344-4796
DANIAL COLE POOL
CLEANING SERVICES
Reliable, Wkly Cleaning
Uic. Ins. 352-465-3985
EVERCLEAR POOL SERV.
10 yrs exp., We offer
Reliable and Quality
Service (352) 344-5122
George Fisher Pools
PleaseCleanMvPool.
com WEEKLY POOL
SERVICE 422-6123
NEED POOL REPAIRS?
Filters, Pumps, Heaters,
Remodeling, & Leak
detection, lIc. 2819
503-3778/352-302-9963
POOL BOY SERVICES
Aqua guard, Epoxy,
Coatings, Acrylic
Decking. Uic./Ins.
i 352-464-3967 u
POOL DOCTOR
Wkly. & Monthly Malnt.
Repairs & Acrylic
Decking. 352-212-7272


R.C. (GATOR) EDSON
Pump Service-All Types
Ins'd, Uc. 17110191517
352-637-2519/302-6217
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




Bill's Mobile Welding
Nights & Weekends
Visa & Master Card Acc
352-257-2240/726-6122




HAULING, TREE
SERVICES,
DEMOLITION &
MISC CLEANUP, ETC.
352.447-3713/232-2898
Here Come The Stormsl
Plywood Cut & Install
To fit windows/doors
LIc./ lns.(352)634-0171
Nature Coast Contain-
ers, Comm./ Res. 12 yd.
dumpsters, mulch deliv-
ery & hauling. 302-7100
* PROFILE T SHIRTS*
Custom Screen Printing
Hats, Shirts, Jackets &
morel 352-344-1978
[ MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY


C"


9 KAINIDUAIL.CK
6" Seamless Gutter
Best Job Availablell
Uc. & Ins. 352-860-0714
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Pricel
6" Seamless Gutters
Uc & Ins 621-0881





PRO EXTERIOR SYSTEMS
Safe & Effective Low
Pressure Roof Cleaning
Syr. warr 352-400-5028


> -- I-

STONE DRIVEWAYS
Professionally done at
an Affordable price.
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572 or
Chuck 352-220-9559


ALUMINUM


6-19


New & Re-Roofs * Flat & Low Pitch
* Roof Repairs Commercial * Residential
Shingle - Metal - Built Up Roof
Torchdown - Shakes






Intallat iions


(352) 628-2557
Lucksroof.com
Roof Inspections Available Drug Free Workplace
State Certified Lic. #CCC1327843










CImus CouNin (FL) CHRONICLE


-
Chipper/Shredder
Craftsman, 6.5 HP
$250.
(352) 533-3331
Craftsman 42" cut,
rider, mower, w/17HP
Kohler, ready to cut,
$450 (352) 628-2769
Dixie Chopper, 50" Cut,
$700.Yard Man Rider.
42" cut, $500.
(352) 628-3736
FIELD & BRUSH CUTTER
11.5HP. New! Never
used similar to a DR
brand. $1200
(352) 746-3988
-FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
JOHN DEERE
LAWNMOWER
LX 176 w/bagger, Plus
gas powered edger &
trimmer, $750/obo
(352) 746-1440
MOWER 4/SALE
Riding Lawn Tractor
11 H.P.36" Cut. Owners
Manual Included
$375.00 Call - 560-3700
OUTDOOR
BBQ GRILL
Exc. Cond.
Seldom used. $50
(352) 746-3971
Sears Rider
19.5 HP Briggs & Strat.
Engine, 461nch cut
$550.
(352) 302-6069,
SPRING MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, Pick up &
Delivery, Quick Service,
Don Mead 400-1483




FLORAL CITY
Moving Sale 6/19 -6/25
8-4 everything must go
9081 S. Watervlew dr.
Floral city
352-464-1571
INVERNESS
Moving Sale Tues.
Everything must go!
2929 S. Rose Ave.


n"ILUKDEN IUJinc O
Size 12 mo. to 6 2.00
each also a comp.
crib set 15.00
Call Donna
352-422-2570


2007

SPECIALS
6 lines - 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$I50..........$7.95
$151-$400......$12.95
$401-$800.......$17.95
$801-$1,500....$22.95
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
16' JON BOAT
RV & Trailer
and Much More
Call (352) 637-0209
ARTIST SUPPLIES
Lots of paints, brushes,
canvases, frames,
& BOB ROSS paints.
(352) 560-7383
BOY'S CLOTHING
Size 8/10. 60 shirts, 17 pr
pnts/jeans & 29 pr
shorts includes designer
. brands-$100 all.
637-3055 .
* BURN BARRELS *
$10 Each
Call Mon-Fri 8-5
860-2545
For Sale
Large Wall Mirror
Appx. 7ft. x 3,/2 ft.
$50. obe
(352) 746-2946
GENERATOR. New
6300 Watts, 9100 Start-
ing Watts, 11 HP B&S,
OHV Eng., elec. start,
12V battery included,
(4) 120 V, (20 amp)
standard hshId. outlets
and one 120/240V
(30amp) locking plug
outlet, all w/ protective
rubber covers.
$850. (352) 489-3440
GOODYEAR TIRES
4 Wrangler AT/S LT
275/65R18 tires in very
good condition. $200.
OBO Call 352-344-4639
HURRICANE PKG.
Propane stove w/2
tanks, AC/DC TV. all
new, $100; 9" AC/DC
V/VCR Combo, $100
(352) 382-3895

New Systems &
Repairs. Ins. lc.3000



(352) 637-5825
JANITORIAL/
RESTAURANT
CLEANING
Immediate openings
FT, professional
sub-contractors. Night
work. Inverness area.
Call M-F 9-4pm
1-800-577-1318
KENMORE 18000BTU
Window Unit Air Cond.
Remote, exc. cond.
$175.
(352) 637-2838
Keyboard
Kawai FS610, $100.
Women's Bike
24" 3 spd, manual.
Huffy $30.
(352) 527-8884
LARGE COLLECTION OF
BOYD BEARS &
accessoires., $200;
15' DIam. Pool, new
pump, $50.
(352) 628-1722
Microwave, Kenmore,
very good cond. $25.
(352) 382-0091
MUST SELL
Large Trampoline full
enclosure $125.00
Window AC unit $75.00
OBO 352-560-3480
OLD JACUZZI
$100;
New Whirlpool Tub
Never Usedl
New $4,900/Sell $700
(352) 621-3135


Refrigerator, 20 cu.ft.
icemaker, exc. cond.,
$150. Queen BR set,
chest of drawers,
dresser & desk, $75
OBO (352) 341-7757
Sears Elec. Blade
Edger, $30;
Rattan Queen
Headboard, $40;
Gaming Table, $75.
(352) 860-0158
Sliding Glass Door
8' H, x 12'W, 3 panel
like new
$300. obo
(352) 527-3086

Bahia, $80 pallet,
St Augustine, $150
pallet. Install & Del.
Avail. 352-302-3363
The Spot Family Center
Needs Donations
For Community
Family/Youth Events
Land, Storage Racks,
Containers, Folding
Tables, Event Tents, Bus,
Box Truck. Please call:
Brian (352) 220-0576
WEDDING DRESS
Sz. 5-6, Floor Length for
5'9", Long Train, Off
Shoulder, Wht. w/pale
pink flowers. Must Seell
$350 (352) 382-4734
Wheel Barrel
rubber tires good
shape, $15.
(352) 382-5657
Wood Chipper,
Shredder, Mulcher,
like new $250.
Amigo Scooter
$50.
(352) 621-5328




10" tile saw model
60010,2 hp on stand,
$250.00; Robo Lazer
with remote $150.00.
Call 352-445-1488.
TOOLS
Delta 10" contractors
grade table saw
$225.00; Craftsman 4"
joiner with table $50.00
352-445-1488
TOOLS
Tapco Aluminum
break, 10'6" like new
$800.00352-445-1488


For Sale
Celebrity Electric
Scooter
Used 3 times
Asking $600.
(352) 746-4627
JAZZY 1143 ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR like new,
new battery, a good
buy at $800. LIFT
CHAIR, green, $300
exc. (352) 257-1584
JAZZY TYPE
ELECTRIC CART
4 mos. old. $3,500 new/
Asking $500 OBO
(352) 628-7381
Lift Chair
cranberry
new condition
$450.
(352) 527-8884
PRIDE Z CHAIR
8mos. old. Used once.
Portable, fits in trunk.
Asking $500
(352) 503-3885
Wheel Chair, power.
Jazzy 1100, Like new,
$300.
(352) 382-0091



BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676


Kustom Mixer &
2 Speakers Behringer
Amp, Fender Tele Tex
Mex, Tenor Banjo
Call Jim 352-422-2187
PIANO
Piano for sale $150
(352) 382-7992
TURNKEY
PROFESSIONAL
DJ SET UP
$1200.00 OBO
Reasonable Offers only
352-220-3452



WASHER /DRYER
$100 for set. Also tram-
poline, good condition
$75.00352-613-5599

-U

2 elec. treadmills,
1 exercise bike, all in
good working cond.
$75 obo for all 3
Call eves, 6pm-9pm
(352) 344-1310



COLT 22 Caliber
Revolver Official
police, $575;
COLT 38
Caliber Revolver
Police Positive $495
(352) 344-9502
GOLF CLUBS $75 Firm &
SCHWINN BIKE Good
Condition $35 firm
(352)341-1714
GOLF CLUBS
Tommy Armour, 845 Sil-
ver Scoff, like new Irons
3-PW $275. Taylor Made
Irons 3-PW, Driver, bag
& putter, bubble shaft
grafite $195.
352-860-0288, 634-4592
Tree Stand,
Excellent condition,
$50 (352) 527-6709
WE BUY GUNS
On site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
Weider Home Gym
& Treadmill
Uke new! $250 obo
(352) 560-7848
Weight Machine
WelderPro, Power Stack
Up to 5501b press
$50.obo
(352) 628-5011
YAMAHA CLUB
CAR
36V -2 Seat Golf Cart
With Charger
$895.00/OBO
Ph.# 352-804-1812



4 x 6 ft. Custom Box
Trailer w/ removable,
canvas covered over-
head frame 16" wheels,
like new tires, w/ spare,
$325.(352) 382-4004


16' BIG TEX
Open trir, tandem axel.
lightly used. Electric
brakes. $1,700
(352) 212-0882
5X8 w/gate, w/ad $650
5X10 w/gate w/ad $699
EZ PULL TRAILERS 6532 W
Gulf to Lake Hwy. CR
TANDEM AXEL TRLR
2005, 8 x 16 Enclosed.
Fold down gate &
swing out door. $3,500
352-465-7635/228-0751













ACCOUSTIC
& ELECTRIC GUITARS
Bass, Banjo, Uke,
Mandolin, Amps,
Effects. Any
age/cond. We get
you top dollar. Do not
sell anywhere else.
M-F 10-6 563-1779.
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ PaId
(352) 228-7676
Trading Card Collection
Wanted to Buy
"Maglc, The Gathering"


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
20 gal. aquarium,
fully stocked &
decorated
$75. (352) 560-3048
AKC REG. SEAL & WHITE
Italian Greyhound
Male. 1 1/2yrs., old. 12Lbs.
Sweet & loving, must
sell. $475/obo.
(352) 212-9125
BLOODHOUND PUPPIES
Purebred, 2 Females.
I Red, I Black & Tan
$350
352-628-5432/302-8726
Bull Mastiff, Female,
sweet, lovable,
showmanship
bloodline. $1500.
(352) 586-2590
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
Showmanship
bloodline, 3 males,
$500, (352) 586-2590
DOG OBEDIENCE
HUMAN TRAINER
SMW area.
(352) 382-1273
Humane Society
of Inverness
offers Low Cost
Spay & Neuter
Service
in oui Mobile Clinic
Appoinmlments avail.
Cat Male $40,
CatFemale $50,
Dog Mole $60,
Dog Female $70.
Prices Including spay
or Neuter, 3 Yr. Rabies
shot Annual Vaccines
Nail Clipping, Micro
chipping & Micro
chip reg.
Appt. avail WedThurs.
Sat. Inverness &
Crystal River. Call for
appt. 352-726-8801

Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
CatSpayed $25
Doa Neutered &
Sprayed start at $35
Low cost shot clinic
Tues, Weds & Thurs
1 st & 3rd Saturdays
I0am-4pm
(352) 563-2370
Miniature Dachshunds
3 females, 6 wks old,
ready July 5, $400. ea
taking deposits.
(352) 563-1479
Miniature Schnauzer,
male, 16 wks old, AKC
cert.sait & pepper color
$350.
352-302-2270 after 5
Umbrella, Molluscan,
Cockatoos, Sun con-
jure, Nanday, Quaker,
2 cockatiels, w/cages
$1,300. for all Will Sepa-
rate (352) 746-4590
Yorkle, Male 7 mos.
AKC $800. obo
Two Lhasa Apso 5 yrs.
$100 ea.obo
352-746-9536,613-2422


[-ISJa^
2 Thoroughbred Horses
I Is an exc, rider, other
needs TLC. Exc. Cond.
$1,000/both
(352) 795-9633
3 Horse S/L w/12'
Living quarters, AC,
furnace, stove, oven,
refrig. bath, $25,000.
Call (352) 637-4943
for more info.
ARABIAN STRAIGHT
EGYTIAN COLTS
For sale, starting at $500
(352) 472-7462
Yearling Colt, Black
white markings, UTD
shots & coggins, kind,
gentle, easy to handle,
Straight and correct.
$650. (Must Sell)
(352) 400-1620


E-1Emm"


IBR unfurn $400; 1BR RV
Park Model, furn., $325;
IBR, scr.rm, crprt $525
NoPets/Smoke628-4441
FLORAL CITY 2/1
$450/mo. No Pets
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO
1/1, like new, no smok-
ing/ pets, $550./mo.,1st.
Ist. sec. (352) 746-6477
HERNANDO
4/2, fenced, quiet
area, 1st, last sec. $600
mo. (352) 344-2335
HOMOSASSA
2/1, convenient to US19
$450 mo. 1st, last, sec.
(352) 634-2368
HOMOSASSA
2/1 '/ $450/mo. Quiet
area. 352-795-6862


A-

HOMOSASSA 3/2
2 mi. S. of Home Depot,
No pets, $750. mo. .
352-637-1142 220-1341
INGLIS
1.2.3 BR from $350 Nice
park W pool. Play area.
pets O.K. Northwood
Estates. 447-2759
INVERNESS 2/1
Furn., crnr lot. $550/mo.
352-201-1222
INVERNESS
3 Vacancies. Starting @
$450./mo. Ist/last/sec.
352-302-8210
INVERNESS
3/1, $550, 1st, last,
sec. No Pets
(352) 287-9268
LECANTO 4/2
New Carpet, Flooring &
Paint. $800/month +
deposit. 352-613-7670


-E
14 X 70 Ply Floors,
Copp. pipes, REDUCEDI
Must Sell! $3.000 OBO
352-344-4899/637-0817
Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE.com
RelIance Realty
HOME ON 1/2 ACRE
Must sell 3/2, 28x52
on end of road,
quite, home has
deck. Sacrifice
$3,000 down,
$745/mo.
Call 352-621-9182
INVERNESS
55+ Lakefront park
Exciting opportunltyl 1
or 2BR Mobiles for sale.
Scr. porches, appl.,
water Inc. Fishing piers.
Community center.
Leeson's 352-476-4964
NEW 3BR /2BA
Nicely treedprivate
lot. With driveway
carport, shed and
covered deck with
sun room. Located in
55+ park just walking
distance from pool
and clubhouse.
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
(352) 794-7308
Singlewide mobile
home, like new & road
worthy. New carpets,
counter tops, paint,
A/C, 12'x35'-$5,500 obo
(352) 628-2769
Small Park 55+, 2/1,
completely furnished
Leaving Country
Just Bring Your Tooth-
brush & clothes
(352) 228-2239
WHOLESALE TO
THE PUBLIC

Repo's, Trade-Ins,
All Makes Models and
Sizes, Prices Starting
at $14,000. Call
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
(352) 794-7308


f RENTAL FINDER E
S. www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com
='-n,-- J



6301 W Beaumont
Off Rosedale
Sm. Lot $39,900
352-382-0722/423-9221
3/2 DW on 7.6 acres
joins Sweetwater Pt. on
the western boundary
then south to the
waters of Lake Tsala
Apopka.4300 S. Owens
Trail, (352) 637-3207
3/2 MH on 1/4 Ac.
Handyman Special.
$55K OBO
(352) 746-4596
3/2 Huge DW 27vX52
Garden Tub. Sky Li ght, 2
Decks, Citrus Trees, New
Root & AC Maint. free.
$78,900 Neg.
352-563-6591
4/2 Palm Harbor Triple
Wide. Loaded w/tile &
all appli's. Huge cvr'd
porch. New in-ground
pool. Lg. site built block
3 car grg. Fenced 2.45
ac. lot w/solar pwr'd
gate. Many extras.
Asking $189,900. Poss.
Owner fin. Call
Crawford 352-212-7613
60x27 DW 1600 sq.ft.
3/2, built in 2001 on 3.86
acres, paved roads
80x80 fenced back
yard, 16x12 workshop
2-car carport, fleplace.
Asking $169,900
(352) 726-2286
BEST OF BEST
5 yrs. In a row
TAYLOR MADE HOMES
Clearance sale- all
models on sale
2008 models are
arriving. All 2007's
must gol Come by and
save, homes starting
@ $32,900.
Used-New- Repo's
Call 352-621-9181
CRYSTAL RIVER SAC.
3/2 1600sqft. w/off ice
Very private, paved Rd
Deck, shed, workshop
Call for e-mail pictures
352-795-3026 $169K
HARD TO GET
FINANCED?
2007 FACTORY CLOSE
OUT!
Give us a try
5 new homes 2,3 & 4
bedrooms.
All sizes All prices
SUN COUNTRY
HOMES
352-794-7308
HERNANDO-$39,90011
Nice 2/2 on 1/3 Ac.,
Won't LastI Great Rental
aOpportunly! Beautiful
Areal 352- 400-5367
HOMOSASSA -
NEW HOME
3/2 1550 sq. ft. on 1/2
acre. Garage, fenced
yard, nice trees,
grassed yard. Don't
miss out! $119,900,
financing available.
Call 352-621-3807
HOMOSASSA 3/2.5
On Gorgeous 1ac.
Seller will provide yr
Home Warr.$136,500
Sharon Levins. Rhema
Realty (352) 228-1301
INVERNESS 2/1
10x 50w/shed on
Canal. Priced for quick
sale $29K Owner
Finance 352-344-8138


INVERNES
Newly Renovated.
Ready for Occupancy!
2/1 onA / Ac. 0% Down
14J4lmg. 352-746-5912
LECANTO 2/1
Wonderful wooded
area in Cinnamon
Ridge. $45,000 Sharon
Levins. Rhema Realty
(352) 228-1301
LECANTO 2/2 SW
$56,000. 2 porches,
Fenced yard. (352)
564-0856/ 628-3090
MOVE IN NOW!
Beautiful homes
ready for you now.
$500 down or no
closing cost or
as low as
5.75% Interest rates.
Call for a free credit
approval and come
see your new home.
352-621-9183




14x56, 2/11/
w/10 x 17 addition.
Carport, roofover, cor-
ner lot, senior park,
C/H/A $21,500.
352-302-2824
Lecanto FL. 14' x 70' MH
Patio & Shed,
Remodeled , 55+
$25,000. (352) 628-1171
NEW & USED DW's & SW's
Starting at $15,000
Quiet 55+ Homosassa
Park. 352-628-5977
NEW HOMES
ARRIVING IN JUNE
$79K-$128K
Resales Available
$30K-$]I15K
Excellent AmenitlesIl
5 * .,55+
Gated Community
Phone 352-795-7161
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, apple's, new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
clubhouse & activities
5405 S. Stonerldge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805


U.
--1-----
cm r Rentm

r ENTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfinder.com





Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
> Property.& Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
>* Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Robble Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
Infoforoperty
managmentgrouo.
cogm
r --- - .
RENTAL FINDER
| A .*,.**rrihr r.i- 1
, -r.'ia .r..I i r * :. rr.
kmm.........1


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $600/month
(352) 228-7328
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Renovated
1 bedrm efficiencies w/
fully equip kitchens.
No contracts
necessary. Next to
park/ Kings Bay
Starting @ $40
a day for a week or
more.(includes all
utilities & Full Service
Housekeeping)
(352) 586-1813
FLORAL CITY
Lakefront IBR, Wkly/Mo
No Pets. (352) 344-1025
SUMTERVILLE
Small efficiency
1-person apt, sat TV,
pool, patio, quiet,
private, secure,
lst/last/ sec
(352) 793-8298




3/2/2 BRAND NEW
Rent-to-Own Homel
Low Down, $1,095/mo.
$$1st MONTH FREEII $$
Call 1352) 875-5645
CANDLEWOOD E
COURT
APARTMENTS
2 BR Apartments
now available. I
Starting @ $530/mo.
Please call
(352) 344-1010
307 Washington Ave.
S Wed., & Frt.
8am to 5pm
Equal Housing
Opportunity



--- --- J
Crystal Palms Apts.
I & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595
--- --- Mm
CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS
ONE MONTH FREE
1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studlo
(352) 795-2626 I
L i -i-- l

CRYSTAL RIVER
Seven Rivers Apts.
1 & 2 bedrooms,
clean, quiet. Close to
mall & hospital.
Complete laundry
facilities.
No application fees.
(352) 795-1588
Equal Housing
Opportunity

KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOUSES
Comer of Druid Rd.
&581. 1 &2BR
available starting
@ $485. For more
information call
(352) 344-1010
Or apply @ I
307 Washington Ave.
Wed. & Fri. 8 to 5
Equal Housing
Opportunity


oiQ--s i-J
Iocsaonwiucat
oe'oenuern


-U Apa
cc ,lmelsfffili


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2.5, $650 mo.
(352) 563-1588
HERNANDO
2/1 Very clean,
$550/mo. Sec. dep.
352-527-0033
LECANTO
1 Bedroom Apartment
352-613-2989/746-5238
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS
Accepting
\applications for 1
Bedroom Wheelchair
accessible units
Rental Assistance
Available.
to those who qualify
Laundry facility and
on-slte management.
(352) 795-8024
TDD 1-800-955-8771





Ventura Village
Apartments
1 & 2 bedrooms
Elderly,
Handicapped or
disabled.
Rent starting at
$381mo.
(800) 342-3552
(352) 637-6349









Crystal Palms Apts.
r & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 634-0595
CRYSTAL RIVER
2BR & I BR, all areasUtil. + HBO
In. 800./at700. No dogs

(352) 422-3261











-U
LANDMARK
REALTY

We have rentals
ranging from $500 a
month and up.
All types available.
In all areas.
Call for more
Information.
Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311,50Main St.
Inverness




2700+ sq ft Bldg.
Can divide Into
Med/Prof/Retall Pine
Ridge. Your floor plan.
(352) 527-9013
CRYSTAL RIVER
Zoned Comm.-
Approx. 400 sq ft.
$600.moContact Lisa
(Broker/Owner) @
(352) 422-7925
HERNANDO
ALESCI'S CORNER
Office 1,500 Sq. Ft.
1-800-557-4088-5184
INVERNESS
1,000 sf. Office/Retail.
Rent negotiable. ample
parking. Busy corners.
Appt. (352) 726-6640
INVERNESS
Plaza West Stores,
Busy corners, 1.000 sf.
suitable for pizzeria
Appt. (352) 726-6640



$$ SUMMER RATE $$
2/2/1 pI WF dock From
$850 River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
2/2, Villa, Inverness
$750.mo. .unfurnished
(352) 746-4611
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Furn. Short/Long Term
352-527-8002/476-4242
CITRUS HILLS 2/2.5
W/D, CHA, Pool, Quiet
$880/mo, 1st/last/sec.
(352) 697-1883


Services


$172.68


m


CRYS. RIVER 2/2/2
Wtrfrnt, turn. htd pool
Jacuzzi, dock, priv pat.
FP, beau. decor. Bike td,
tennis, all amenities.
$1,600. mo.
joannlrwinmsn.com
(352) 875-4427
INVERNESS
3/2, exc. location.
Comm. pool, $750, 1st,
$800 sec. 352-220-4082
SUGARMILL WOODS
Villa, near golf course.
2/2/1 No pets. $800 mo.
1st & last, sec., Lawn
Maint. Included
(352) 382-0741




CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, all apple ,
W/D $650.-$700.
(954) 557-6211
Cry Rvr/Homosassa
2/1 Nice, W/D h.up,
CHA, water/garb Incl.
$200 refund @ move-in
$550/mo. 352-464-0897
r CRYSTAL RIVER
& INVERNESS
SONE MONTH FREE
S1, 2 & 3 Bdrm/Studlo
(352) 795-2626

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1, util. Included
$600. mo.
Broker/Owner:
352-634-0129
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Beach Ln. $650/mo.
(352) 634-4336
HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent or w/
opt. to buy, fans, blinds,
refr., stove, microwave,
tile carpet. $750. mo.
(352) 592-0893
INVERNESS 2/1
Carport, C/H/A, W&D
hk-ups. Ig. scm prch,
$600/mo, $500. sec
404-226-2940
INVERNESS
Canal Front 1/1,
W/D, Carport $490. mo.
(301) 785-9996




CRYSTAL RIVER
Mini MH $425 rent incl's
ele, cable, quiet 55+
park, bingo, card night,
pot luck dinners, walk
to bank, church &
stores. 352-795-9049
CRYSTALRIVER
LANDINGS.COM
8- 1BR Suites, 795-1795
VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Efficiencies,
Phone, Pool, fish pond
AC, $50. daily, $300. wk
Trailers $225 wk.
(352) 726-4744




2/2/1 $650/mo. + last &
sec. No pets/smoking.
1960 Splvey Ter,
Inverness.
(352) 220-4355
County Wide
View ALL at:
www.choosegar.com
*Luxury homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*.Citrus Hills: 3 bdrm
*Beverly Hills: 3Bdrm
*Inverness: 2&3 Bdrm
-Inverness: 2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129
INVERNESS
2/1, Gospel Is1. $650, 1st,
last, sec. (352) 726-5338
r i;E-- Eu
RENTAL FINDER
Swww.chronle





$600.352-634-1764


CY. RIE //
rensta inderncotims
NEW PAINT/CARPET
2/1, BLK hm, Lg. Uiv. Lg.
fam. Scm prch. 1lac.
fenced. Sm. pet ok.




$1,600. mo.32-634-1764
CRYS. RIVER 2/2/2
Wtrfrnt, furn. htd pool
Jacuzzi, dock. prlv pat.
FPR beau. decor. Bike td,
tennis, all amenities.
$1,600. ma.
joannlrwin@msn.com
(352) 875-4427


Transportation Real Estate


$77.95 $97.95




Callfor details




(352) 563-5966



Classifieds Working For You


Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word. To win
$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
newspaper. All entries become
the property OfUFS, Inc.
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to this newspaper.
2)


ONIHSIaff ONIHSflH L Ha OUHH ZHaMOa' 9 S9TEHnll SWTIlD*'S
SaWIVa SHBIV "' I a TIEAMS " HiODO aOH ' O(UEafI 'I1
6-19-07 samswN
710208


"Better Than Rent" Or
"Rent To Own" 352-
484-0866 No Cred Chk
visit jademlsslon.com
3/2/2 BRAND NEW
Rent-to-Own Homel
Low Down, $1,095/mo.
$$ IST MONTH FREEII $$
(352) 875-5645
BEV/ HILLS 1/1/1
Fam. Rm.2 E. Golden St.
$600/mo IST/LAST/SEC.
(352) 795-8888
BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
Furn/Unfrun., W/D $650.
mo. (239) 776-6800
BEVERLY HILLS 2/2
2 to choose, From $700
mo. (352) 201-0658
BEVERLY HILLS 3/2
Laurel Ridge, oversized
garage, pool & spa
$1,300mo.352-527-1051

Beverly Hills
3/2/Carport new
everything $800./mo
Hernando
3/2/Carport big yard
remodeled $750./mo
Inverness
2/2/Carport fenced
yard $750./mo
352-637-2973







Brentwood
2/2/2 w/den
$950.00
Please Call:
(352)341-3330
For more info. or
visit the web at:
citrusvillages
rentals.com
CITRUS HILLS
Unfurnished Homes &
Furnished Condos
www.greenbriar
rental.com
Greenbriar Rentals, Inc.
(352) 746-5921
CITRUS HILLS 2/2/2
Caged Pool, 1 ac, Mint!
$975/mo. Option or sale
352-564-1436/586-1255
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, 1571 W. Datura,
$650/mo. 352-697-1907
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Brand new, dogs
ok 2000 sqft under air.
$1000/mo. lease option
to buy. (352) 522-0247
CITRUS SPRINGS
Lovely 3/2/1 w/large
screen porch, terrazzo
floors, large closets.
$850 rent. 1st, last and
security to move in.
Avail now. Call
352-489-1411.

County Wide
View ALL at:
www.chooseaar.com
*Luxury Homes &
Townhomes For Rent
*Citrus Hills 3 bdrm
-Beverlv Hills: 3Bdrm
*Inverness 2&3 Bdrm
*Inverness:.2/2 Apts
Great American
Realty (352) 422-6129


CR/Hom 3/2/1$695;
2/2, /2-AC, $550; 2/1
$475 CH/A 212-8273
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/11/2. 2ac. w/barn,
15 mln. to Inglis. $850/
mo. 352-563-1033
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
Nice, clean, $800 mo
352-795-6299/697-1240
Dunn./Goldie Pt.
River Garden Subdv. 2/1
could be a 3/1 Conc.
Block Home, Lg. Yrd,
Red. to $599/mo.
(352)669-2253
OTHER HOMES AVAIL.
FLORAL CITY 1/1
Lakefro Beautiful
wooded acre, scm.
patio, No smoking. Util.
Inc. $675,1st/last/sec.
(813) 241-7117 Kristi
FLORAL CITY 3/1
Remodeled. All util. incl
City water. $850/mo
352-422-3670/860-0899
HOMOSASSA 3/2
Rent to Own, $950/mo.
The Meadows Subd.
(813) 956-3563
HOMOSASSA
MEADOWS 3/2/2 From
$750 River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
INVERNESS
2/1-'2, newly reno-
vated, new CH/A, $750
+ sec. (352) 637-0704
407-427-4800 anytime
before 11pm
INVERNESS
2/1/1 w/ large yard,
S. Apopka $700.1st,&
last, (352) 726-9593
INVERNESS 2/1 V2
Canal front, DW, LR, DR,
office. C/H/A, W &D H.U.
quiet area, very nice,
$600/mo, 1st, last Sec.
Ref. (352) 212-2022
INVERNESS 3/2
Dwntn, No Pets. $750 +
sec. (727)514-8358
INVERNESS POOL
Lovely 3/2/2, 3,000 sf.
Golf crs. loc. $875./mo.
No pets 908-322-6529

LANDMARK
REALTY

We have rentals
ranging from $500 a
month and up.
All types available.
In all areas.
Call for more
Information.
Ask for Kathy
or Janet
352-726-9136
311W Main St.
Inverness
* CITRUS SPRGS *
Why RentI? Lease
w/option to buy. New
3/2/2 DREAM HOUSE
on Elkcam Blvd.
Move in w/$2.150.
2nd & Last Mo.
are FREE with a
2 yr. lease.
Dave Kaiser, C21
Naturecoast Realy
* (352) 220-8967 *
PINE RIDGE 2/2/2
Newly remod., brand
new apple, $900/mo. 1st,
last, sec.(352) 302-1466


PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Apple's , scm prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213
RAINBOW SPRGS.
County Club Est. 3/2,
garage, yard. $825/mo.
For info:
(352) 489-5928



SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2 OR 4/3, Poss. Ls.
Opt. Gorgeous; Brand
Newl(352) 613-6943
SUGARMILL WOODS
New 2,665 sqft 4/2/2+
%ac-3 min Sncst Pkwy.
$1195/mo. 1st+sec, Incis
lawn svc. 813-748-5206




CRYS. RIVER 2/2/2
Wtrfmt,dfurn. hid pool
Jacuzzi, dock, priv pat.
FP, beau. decor. Bike tri,
tennis, all amenities.
$1,600. mo.
joannlrwin@msn.com .
(352) 875-4427
CRYSTAL RIVER .
Ozello Key single wide
2 bdrm 1 bath mobile
home on water.
Covered boat ramp.
Comp. furn, PERFECT for
a fish camp! $500.00
per month + utilities.
(813)972-1562 or
(678)485-6638.
HOMOSASSA
2/2 Stilt, CHA, D/W, -
treed secl. w/wrap
around scrn. porch &
prvt. dock. $850/mo.
(407)908-1553
HOMOSASSA
3/2 On Mason Creek
Dep., 1st. mo., 2 ref.'s ,
$1,200. (352) 628-5358
HOMOSASSA Canal
1 BR w/boat dock, scrn.
porch, util. incl. $700/
mo.+ sec.(352)628-6537
INVERNESS 1/1
NICE & QUIET Util. incl.
$495/mo. $200 refund @
move-in 352-464-0897
INVERNESS 2/1/2
LKFRNT, $750/Mo+
(612) 392-7520
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Appl's., scrn prch. more'
352-237-7436/812-3213

Cu

WIDOW will share my
home with another.
352- 527-3531




MEADOWCREST'.'
3/2/2 Fairmont Village'.
fully furn., (all new - '
furniture) $1,500/moi.
+ elec., phone, wate't.-'
Poss. partial ownr finqn.,
(352) 746-1792


693257


CILASSIIFIIEDS


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 13C



WORD GUARD l BY TRICKY RICKYKANE


o iiCou!nty Chronic . ie *Sumter Cu nt yi m es





. i a.- .- - AS A
S,, , - i -i� , ,, -









ONE PRICE



Reach 82,000 on


Homes & Businesses 'POI





Examples: .


1. S-colored coiflike Marge Simpson's (1)


2. Hair-parting toolat one's house (1)


3. Terrific hair mousse (1)


4. Staffer's hair plaits (1)


5. Flingers of hair-winding tubes (2)


6. Flinger of a hair dryer (2)


7. Too quickly using a hair-stroldng tool (










14C TUES DAY, JUN 9, 2007

lcm oom


BEVERLY HILLS
House Privi. $100/wk.
John (352) 601-3212
HOMOSASSA
Mobile to share. $75 Wk
352-628-9412
HOMOSASSA
Priv. Bdrm & bath, new
home. Credit check-
pars. ref. 352-503-3819
INVERNESS
Near Super Walmart,
w/priv. bath. Nice
-$100/wk. 352-464-4641



EN A.IM ENmg
RENTAL FINDER
I I.
www.chronicle
rentalfinder com

VALUE INN HERNANDO
Renovated Effilclencies,
Phone, Pool, fish pond
AC, $50. daily, $300. wk
Trailers $225wk.
(352) 726-4744

-U

BEVERLY HILLS
Diplomat 2 bedroom, 1
and 1/2 bath ,Florida
room, eat in kitchen,
must see. $139,500
neg. 352-527-1259





PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper Is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise 'any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status
includes children un-
der the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is In
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings
advertised in this
newspaper are avail-
able on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800 927 9275,






MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM



-a
OPEN. SUNDAY 2-4
$$$32,900.$$$
LOVELY 2/1, Open Fl.
plan, master walk in,
AC, apple's. new rf. 55+
gated comm. w/ pool
,clubhouse & activities
5405 S. Stoneridge Dr.
Inverness 352-344-5805




HOM./ Would make
perfect office! Near
town, zoned GNC, 1.3
SAc. Poss. owner fin.
'$189,900 Ron McEvoy,
SEXIT(352) 586-2663
S LECANTO
*Office Space, Retail &
Warehouse for rent.
(352) 795-0800




Builder
Liquidation Sale!
Must sell nowl All new
- homes, only $995
* down. 352-694-2900
"INVESTORS PROPERTIES
for Sale, MH, Duplexes,
,Quadplexes, Sin. Fain.
Vac. Lots, 352-795-0367



-U
2005 4/2/2 $156K
New on marketiI
For info go to:
www.mvfsbo.com/
2349n or call
352-601-2585 btwn 8-8
3/2/2 BRAND NEW
Rent-to-Own Homel
,Low Down, $1,.095/mo.
D$$Ist MONT FORE9 o$$
(352) 875-5645


'4/2/2, New, Split Plan,
'Fam. Rm,, ,Cathedral
Ceilings 1800 sq. ft. liv.
$142,900. 352-489-8415
BEAUTIFUL NEW 4/2/2
2235 SFLA, Spit plan, CT,
1g. Lanai, must sell
$197,000. 407-468-2179
BY OWNER
2/2/3 All apple , 1400 sf.
$134,900. Extra
RV lot available,.
www.9572travis.com
352-489-0386/208-0714



-4
3+- BEAUTIFUL ACRES
Close to equestrian
center, tall oaks & pine.
$157K FSBO 527-8739


Adj. to Golf Course
FSBO 3/2.5/2 , Corner
Lot, Pool, Gas FPR Well,
Granite, Huge Shed,
Updated Everythinal
myhome4sale.net
$299K (352) 746-1175
BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME
3/2/2 On 1 acre
Sell/lease opt,
$249,900. Must see!
352-302-5535
Best Priced 4/3 Pool
Home on 1.11 Acresl
10' Cell., Corian, S.S.
Appl, Home Sec., 2,740
sf. under AC. $399,900
(352) 746-6161
BETTY MORTON


Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

R Iect

(352) 795-1555
Equestrian Trail Home
New, 2004,3/2/3 Pool
home w/fenced yard.
on Equestrian Trail,
4577W PINTO LOOP
$279,000/OBO
(352) 746-9813

FIXER
UPPER
These homes
need work.
Free Computerized
list of properties
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www,freecitruscoun-
tvhomeinfo,com
ID# 1048
ERA American
Realty &
Investments







PINE RIDGE
1/V2 story. 4BR/3BA
pool home on
landscaped 1.25 ac.
corner lot. $299,900
(352) 634-2373
PINERIDGE 3/2/2
Pool Hm. w/ FP
$247K Obo. Must Sell!
MLS #314040
352-302-7045
407-566-8637



"Better Than Rent" Or
"Rent To Own" 352-
484-0866 No Cred Chk
visit jademission.com




LEASE OPTION
Sale $108,00 Rent 100O
mo. 2/l, 1.- . :-o er
ceramic tile, corner lot,
67 Beverly Hills Blvd.
(352) 613-4050
Oakwood Village
2/2, split, too many
improvements to list.
$159,900.
(352) 527-6866
Oakwood Village 3/2/2
Florida living, near golf.
$25K below apprasiall
$149,900 Greg Younger
Coldwell Banker Ist
Choice. (352) 220-9188


UPDATED 2/1
Updated Kit., Bath,
Roof, and more. CHA
,Dishwasher and
upgraded
ec.$103,500.
352-270-3075




PINE RIDGE
4BR/2BA
2802 W. Goldenrod
Dr, 1.18 acre corner
lot, beaut landscape,
LR/DR/BR/FR, ofc in
mstr. Many custom
features! 2700 SF of
A/C space. Open
house Sunday 2-5.
MUST SEEII $295,000.
Call 527-9769


Lecnt


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is My Future!!
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC
BY OWNER 3/2/2, .5 Ac.
Over 1,600 sf. I.a., fncd.,
w/work shed w/elec.
Built 2000, quiet
cul-de-sac off 486.
Great family home
w/playroomsl $165K
(352) 422-3137










CITRUS HILLS ON
GOLF COURSE
Beautiful 3-way split
w/2642 living sq ft
3BR/3bath/Den, New
A/C+ Roof Gourmet
Kitchen w/granite
wood & tile upgrades
galore & Standby
power Generator.
Large caged pool
overlooks 13th water
hole green of
Meadow golf course.
$424K. 352-560-6130


CUSTOM 2002
3/2/3 Pool, Over 5000
sq ft / roof. Huge
outdoor living,
granite/maple
+ $370K +
352-527-2749/212-7534

















NEW LISTING
Tastefully furnished
Meadowview Villa with
Country Club Mem.
2BR/2BA, Lanai and
Pool In perfect cond.
$179,000.
Tom @ 302-423-0541
TERRA VISTA 2/2/2+Den
40K in upgrdsl Wooded
view! With Expanded
lanai, master bdrm &
garage. $257,900
(352) 746-1673
TERRA VISTA/HILLSIDE
SOUTH - 1800sq ft. 3/2/2
10,000sf lot. Brand new.
$289,900.617 -816-1230




CHARMING COTTAGE
1BR Cottage w/Water
views. /4 AC. $62K
(631) 334-8444




100% Flnan. Reduced,
must relocate 2100
sq.ft. 3/2 2 car garage
new roof, firepl., corner
lot, Buyowner 61665
352-586-7685
2/2/1 OWNER FINANCE
6006 E Wingate $130K
New roof, AC & carpet
(352) 746-3932
Affordable Mobile
Great 1.25 Acre
$91,500
352-726-7533
www.Rellance-RE-.com
Reliance Realty
BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 Gospel
island home. Block
Stucco, immaculate
cond. $149K. Open
House Saturday's &
Sunday's 1-4 637-6105

BETTY MORTON


Lt.. Real EsItate'0Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %/
Commission

R;se4lect

(352) 795-1555

CHARMING 2BR/2BATH
HIGHLANDS, corner lot,
circular driveway,
prequailified only
Must See. $124,900
(352) 201-1663
CUSTOM BUILT 2/2/2
Energy efficient, new
roof & appli's, Open fir.
plan, close to shopping
& hospital, $129,000.
Must seel 352-344-8519





FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq,ff.t, on 1,25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613

Furnished Villa, 2/2, ca-
thedral ceiling in LR
Newly tiled including
screen rm., $130,000
elkurz@yahoo.de
(352) 613-6496
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685

How to Sell
Your House
By Yourself
Free Report Reveal.
10 inside tips to
Selling Your House
By Yourself.
Free Recorded
Message
1-800-597-5259
www.freecitruscoun-
tvhominfo.com
ID# 1017
ERA American
Realty &
Investments

INVERNESS LOT
80 x 120, surveyed,
house plans, 1,500 sq ft
LA, Total 2,750 sq ft.
3/2/2 Bldg. cost
$123,000. Lot cost
$30,000. 352-382-7888
Move Right In
Fbxwood Estates
Immaculate 3/2/2,
fenced overszd Lot Lg.
lanai, everything new,
$152,000 firm
417-273-0020
352-400-5906

SELL YOUR HOME!
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95'
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
S . , : .',r i
.la, .ppl e.,i


WINDERMERE!!
2/2, Immaculate!
Ceiling Fans, Screen
Lanai, W/D, Plant
shelves, Vaulted
Ceilings, Blinds,
Remarkable
Community Amenities!
$180K,(352)726-4763
or 344-3567
WW 11100% Disabled
Veteran, Must Sell
House and furniture
because of Health.
3/2/2, Upgraded,
many extras., water,
sewer, lawncare &
garb. pickup Included
for small fee. Ideal for
Retired Couple,
RV Free Storage, Serious
Buyers Only, Call
(352) 637-0321 for appt.




3/2 with Florida Room
on 3/4 acre,
Fenced Yard
On Spanish Trail
$119,000.
(352) 400-0847
GREAT HOME ON 1 AC.I
2/2/2, new roof, renov.
in 2004. Open floor,
w/split plan $179,900
Terri Harman Crossland
Realty (352)726-6644



3/1 CRACKER, 1/2 ac.
Crnr lot. Comgpletely
Reovatea1 Must See!
$109Kobo 352-209-2118
3/2 ON 10.8 ACRESII
Detached 14 X 28
office, pool, fncd.
$295K (352)621-3135
$50K BELOW
APPRAISAL Like new
3500 sf, Country Ranch
Near Hospital. 2.4 acre
corner lot, w/ attached
2 story garage apt.
Reduced to $360K.
Contact owner
352-220-8310
BETTY MORTON









Lic. Real Estate Agent
20 Years Experience
2.8 %
Commission

Re3- I 79 ect

(352) 795-1555


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is My FuturelI
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC







SPRING RUN
10080 Pamondeho Cir
3/2 split floor plan, triple
carport, sunroom,
completely. renovated
in last 2i yrs. New ap-
pliances, tile, carpet,
lights, fans, counter-
tops, sinks, nicely land
escaped 1/2 acre lot,
12X16 workshop with air
cond. & attic. Com-
pare with other homes
in neighborhood get a
bigger and better
house for $20,000 -
$30,000 less. Quick sale,
$140,000. 352-220-6663




2/1 on /2 Ac. Fenced
Great Loca W/Alum.
Crprt, Wood Frame Hm.
Famn. Rm, Eat-In Kitch,
New AC & draintield.
i 100(35t2)628-1669
A MUST SEEI 2/2/2
Split floor plan.
Beautifully maintained.
$124,900 Ron Egnot 1st
Choice Coldwell
Banker 352-287-9219
BY OWNER
3/2 singlewide On 2 half
acre lots $46K firm 1592
S Lookout Pt 2 blacks off
US19 362-503-4142
d 0-










DISTRESS SALE
3/2/2 NEW Block
Home Deed Rest., I
115,500, Own, Fin.
For(Sale By Owner I
L,7)27-0196_ J
LlQ----(32)2-1669










HOMOSASSA 3/2,5/2
Must see home on 5
AcresiPlenty of Land &
Privacy. $279K Alex
Chotoc Fl. Realty &
Auction. (352) 628-0968


SWEET POOL HOME
Great Community.
3/2/2 Many Upgrades!
Fenced yard, $184,900
Harley Hough, EXIT
Realty 352-400-0051




KEY WEST Style Cottage
3BR, Fully Upgraded.
Cony. Locat. Must Seel
352-621-9227 or
hotlocalproperties.com


CSnus CouN'Ty (FL) CHRONICLE


3/2/2 Cul-de-sac
Sweetwater Elegance
Open Plan $199,000
Charlene & Peggy,
EXIT REALTY
(352) 464-4179







100% FINANCING
EZ qualify. 3/2 & 2/1
avail. Call Gerry
Owner/Realtor
(352) 816-0010


BONNIE PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
Is Mv Futorel!
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

BUYING OR
SELLING? CALL ME
FOR RESULTS!


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
Keller Williams
Realty
CRYSTAL RIVER 5/2.5/2.5
BEAUTIFUL New Cape
Cod on /2 Ac. Over
2,800 SF. MUST SEEI
$249K or $1,600/mo.
352-746-5912




FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
.directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft. on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $110,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBCO59685
INVERNESS 3/2
1300sq ft split plan.
Remodeled block
home. CHA. New roof,
windows & floors. Poss.
Owner Finance. $108K
(727) 399-9533



5;


Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'1l Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.net
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726- 1515

MUST SELL
QUICKLY
3/2mh on 5 acres. land
Is cleared and fenced
for horses has two
barns, asking $120,000.
lets make a deal.
352-422-4536
NEED TO SEE!!!
Cinnamon Ridge $89K
2/2 MH. Lg. treed lot
5408 W Cinnamon Rdo
Dr. View most any time.
352-249-1130/201-1670
NEW! 2 Story Cape Cod
5/3, 2,850 SF. w/8' X 32'
Covered Porch, Opt.
Garage. Come see us
@ Impressive Home
BuildLers (352)746-5912
Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

Vic McDonald
(352) 637 6200



. . .





Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

RFEALTY ONE 'l
SIi lilh nl I i ill
(352) 637-6200

MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.COM


Deb Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046

FSBO Riverfront home
with panoramic view
directly on
Withlacoochee 1,850
sq.ft on 1.25 acres with
boat house & separate
dock. Best view on River
and fishing's great!
$399,000 For virtual tour
visit ByownerCitrus.com
or call Don at
(352) 344-1613
HOMOSASSA 3/2/2
Home has Upgrades
Galore! Peaceful &
Serene. $349K
John Maisel III Exit
(352)794-0888
INVERNESS 3000 sf.
Beautiful Country Home
4/3, FP, fish pond,
1'/ Ac. Adj. 3/4 Ac.
Lot avail. Prvt. Nature
Preserve. $339K
631-334-8444
INVERNESS
Pritchard Island 2/2
condo, 2 story end unit.
Open waler by dock
$185,000 352-400-0053
LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOU!








Plantation Realty. Inc.
1352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner
See all of the listings in
Citrus County at
wwolantation


PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2.5 $180K, $950/mo.
2/2 $165K, $800/mo.
Dock, Comun. Pool, all
Apple's , scrn prch. more
352-237-7436/812-3213
Spacious HER-
NANDO
3/2/2, 3100 sq ft under
roof. Appt only.
$279,900 (352) 341-5611




1-15 HOUSES WANTED
Cash or Terms
John (352) 228-7523
www.FastFloridaHouse
Buvercom


SELL YOUR HOME!
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$51.95*
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
'65 per additional ine
rS.me restric hoba'
Sla, appl)




RIDE GOETHEII
10.08 Ac. Fully fncd, 3
paddocks, 30 X 30 barn
w/overhang & 2 Ig.
12X12 stalls, riding ring,
wash rack. Sep, 12X12
Shed/Tack Rm. 2/2 MH
w/ranch style porch &
gorgeous hill-top views!
$229,900
Well < mkt. value!
352-239-7788/465-2427












Cypress on 1 acre w/
canopy of hardwoods,
1 mi. to boat ramp
$165,000. (352)542-1182



4/3.5/2 In YANKEETOWN
3,514 sf. Formal areas,
French Drs. gazebo &
guesthouse,$1,285,000
Nancy Lewis, EXIT
REALTY(352) 302-6082

CRYSTAL
RIVER
3/3/2, 2600 sq.
ft. Loaded with
upgrades. Just
off Kings Bay. 2
fresh water spgs,
10k boat lift.
$479,000
(302-6924)

Dianna McNally


LAKEFRONT
Crystal River $45K
www.JohnsFIorida
Lots. comi 352-228-7523
Agent Owned
WITHLACOOCHEE
21/4 AC. 230' on main
river/ very priv. beautiful
bldg. site w/eZ access.
Below Market. $275,000
(352) 422-0199

- * Sl


r -RE - - "I
r RENTAL FINDER
wwwchronicle
rentalfinder.com
L .--- - .1




Yamaha
2000, 25HP High thrust,
4 stroke, 66 hrs., $2,200.
(352) 249-0860
Cell (352) 476-1113




Jet Ski
06, Yamaha, GP 1300R,
w. trailer, exc cond,
$7800. OBO.
(352) 464-4868
SEA DOO Ltd/Set
'03 & '03 GTX 3 Seaters
Low hrs Grg kept & serve.
Dual galv. trlr. Mint!
$12,900 (352) 382-1623




2 SUNFISH
w/Trailer. Garage Kept.
Very Good Cond.
$1,500/all
(352) 201-0142
16 ft. Fiberglass
Boat,.
Center Console,
w/ trailer $1,500. abo
(352) 637-3934

14'-28'
Let us sell your
clean used boat.
THREE RIVERS
MARINE



(352) 563-5510
17ft . PATHFINDER
'99, Tunnel Hull,
Yamaha 50HP, trim
tabs, power pole, 85 lb
trolling mtr, much more
$8,500. (352) 628-5418
AEROCRAFT 19.7'
Boat w/trlr. 4.3 Ltr., V-6
Marc, OD, Trim Tabs,
Runs Good. $1,750
352-628-3969/205-029T
ALUM. BOAT 17'
19 hp Go Devil, Trlr.,
Spare tire, Floral City
$3,000 aba
(352) 341-0292


AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF PONTOONS
& DECK BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(362) 795-2597
CAROLINA SKIFF
'01 17DLX, '04 Yamaha
60HP 2 strk. I yr. warr.
GPS, DF, LOADED
$11,495. (352) 422-1412
CAROLINA SKIFF 21'
'00, frnt/rear casting
decks, CC, 115HP Yam,
ack pit. Many extras.
11,500. (352) 726-0939


*Home Finder* *Home Finder* *Home Finder*




Citrus Ridge Realty 3521 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
70742 1-888-789-7100


I BUY HOUSES
ANY CONDITION!
(352) 503-3245

WE BUY HOUSES
CaSh........Fast I
352-637-2973
lhomesold.com
WE BUY HOUSES
CaSh. Fast !
352-637-2973
1homesold.com



10 AC. MOL S.E. Citrus
660 X 660 Fncd, Paved
Rd.,May split $189K/
Qffer (813) 620-1188
GOOD LAND
IS HARD TO FIND!







IT'S OUR SPECIALTY

www. crossland
rea fv cam
Crossland
Realty Inc.
(352) 726-6644




3 Lots Rainbow Est.
75x140 Must sell!
352-601-4582

BEST
LOCATIONS

High Profile 1+
Acre Corner Lots
Emaill
cr.bankson@era.com
for details
Or call Direct
352-464-1136
ERA American Realty
795-3144
CRYSTAL RIVER
Derosa Estates. Lot 15
Blk B. Aprrox 1/2 acre.
No Reasoffer refused
8743 N. Buscetta Loop.
(561) 762-8467
INVERNESS HIGHLANDS
Maxwell PI. & Savary
Ave. 8 parcels for
$44,900. (727) 457-6595


CLASSIEFITEDS


New Boat Trailers
GALV. & ALUM.
All at Far Below
Dealers Pricing
SUMMER CLEARANCE
* MONROE SALES �
9am-5pm Man-Fri
352-527-3555
** ** * * *




2005 KW 2020CC
150 Yam4Strk 180 hrs
T-Top Custom Dodger
Tandem Trailer
Asking $33,500
352-586-6717
PONTOON '87
All fiberglass.
Good Cond. Runs
Good, $2,500 aba
(352) 793-7996
PRALINE
'04, 24 ff., 225 Honda,
Donzi Hull, black, low
hrs. lift kept, NICE

Goode, akig$22,500 ob
$35,000. (352) 586-9349
PROLINE
'06, 19ft., '06 Mercury
Optimax, 115 H out-
board, T-Top, color
electronics, still under
fact, warranty, many,
many options w/boat &
trailer, asking $22,500.
(352) 628-4668
PRALINE 17'
'85, T-Top, 88 hp
Johnson P/T, w/trlr.
$3,995 -
352-795-9229/400-1251
PROLINE 18'
'95, Flats, 150 Mariner,
electronics, trlr. _-
Must Sell! $9K ,:L:,:
352-341-0336/586-8946

r 7E � �mm
RNTAL FINDER
www.chronicle
rentalfindercom

REPOWER SALE
NEW MOTORS
70-4s Suzuki $5,295
60-4s Mercury $5,430
50 Evinrude E-TEC
$4,900
Other Brands and HP
available
Nature Coast Marine
352-794-0094

AAA
BOAT DONATIONS
Tax Deductible @
appraised value
when donated to a
43 year old
non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
A (352) 795-9621 A
SABRE
16FT center console,
70HP Johnson, bimini
top, Performance trailer
$2,000 (352) 726-5329
SEA ARK 16',Tunnel
'06 Evinrude E-Tech 40
hp. console, jack plate,
54 lb. trllng mtr. $8,200
Reduced 628-3331
SLIPPER SAILBOAT
17' in exc. cond. w/2
sets of sails, $2,500
Call (352) 795-7777
STAMAS 1982 24'
Cuddy cabin, new eng.
new outdrive in 1996.
Low hrs. Fly bridge,
outriggers, fishing ma-
chine. See at Aqua
Power in Inglis. $9000.
STUMPKNOCKER 14'
Fiberglass, Boat, Mtr,
& Trlr.
Exc. Cond. 1,800obo
(352) 302-6082
Wanted: Boats in Need
of Repair, also motors
and trailers, Cash Paid
(352) 212-6497




A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.95!*
*2 weeks in the
*2 weeks Onlineli
*Featured in Tues.
"Wheels" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
GEORGIA BOY
1979, 27FT, Perfect
cond. $4,200
(352) 637-4938,
GULFSTREAM 32'
'94, 62K, Sleeps 6, new
AC, flooring, tires. Exc.
Cond. $10,000
352-270-3162/257-2387


F16 SEARAYDER
'96, Jet Boat, bimini top,
radio, 92 hrs., exc. cond
garage kept, $5,000
0b0 (352) 465-5796
FIBERGLASS 14'
9HP Evinrude w/trailer
life jackets, trolling mtr.
Etc. $700, runs great.
(352) 277-4528
GODFREY 22'
HURRICANE Deck Boat
'91, 115 hp Merc, many
new parts w/Trlr. $8,000
(352) 726-2408
GRADY WHITE 22.6'
W/A Cuddy, 200 hp
Mariner, 0/B, Alum. Top
W/Top Gun Outriggers.
Garmin Chart plotter.
$12K obo 352-302-8266
GRADY WHITE '87
115 Yamaha Outboard
$2000.
(352) 476-9013
HURRICANE
23ft. Deck Boat, 150
Mariner, new rebuilt
'03, trailer. $6,500.
(352) 212-7500
JON BOAT
10 ft., w/ trolling motor,
& accessories $225.
Deep cycle Battery $45.
(352) 746-7992
Lowes 22' Pontoon
2001, BlmIni top, A.M.
cover, Toilet, depth/F.F.
4 fish seats & tandem
trlr. 90 HP $13,945; 70hrs.
502-345-0285 (IN FL)
MUST SELL!! *
25' Aqua Sport
Walk Arnd Cuddy
$4,200 aba
" (352) 795-9621 *


ULike NEWI
#7060610A Citrus Kil
(352) 564-8668
KIA SPECTRA
2003,.22,600 mi.,
Blue Book is $7,900.
Asking $7,000.
(352) 533-3069
LINCOLN
2000, Signature Series,
Exc. cond. 72k mi.
hardly driven.
$10,000 Negotiable I
(352) 489-0122


#1@AM #2 @11 AM
InvernessM Floral City
4/3 on 1 Acre 3 7 5 3- 3/2 MH on 1 Acre (imn)
2 adjoining Lots Available "Your Favolte Auctioneers" bI Great LocationI
Ed Masser'$ R'liance Rel y,
Some PersonalI Property d Across from Park
Registration begins @ 7AM .. Registration,begins @ 10AM


JAMBOREE 29'
2005, V-10 Class C
13K, Loadedl Perfect
Conditon! Ready to go!
$48,500 (352)465-2138
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/slide, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457
ROADTREK 190
'95, Camper van,
queen bed, refrig.
microwave, TV, VCR,
toilet, shower, perfect
in and out, all books
& manuals, $13,900
(727) 430-2379

31', Sleeps up to 7,
Loaded! Just bring your
clothes & toad! $800wk
(352) 422-7794
WE NEED RVSII
We wil buy or consign
your clean RV@ k
EEE! Bobby Clark RV
(352) 726-5999

a - , 11 , *

I RV DONATIONS T
Tax Deductible for
Appraised Value
Maritime Ministries
T (352) 795-9621 T
4 Tires 255-70R-15 on
ICW alum 15x7 5lug,
Chevy truck $525
(352) 422-3821
Mon-Thurs. 7am-7pm
5TH WHEEL 30'
Super slide 2000
Meadowbrook. Exc.
cond. $18,200
(352) 746-0348
AIRSTREAM 31'
1979, Great Shape!
New AC, carpet, tires,
uphol , $8,900 abo
(352) 257-4260
CASITA 17' TT
'99, All options,new tires
& bearings, equal.htch.
Garagedl Exc. Cond.
$9,950 (352)465-2142
COLEMAN POPUP
'89, Air, refrig, stereo,
exc. cond. $3200/abe
(352) 489-9736 or
(352) 422-2874
I BUY RV'S
Travel Trailers, 5th
wheels ect.Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO 36', '04
5th Wheel, Toy Hauler,
4,000W Gen, 15,000 AC,
16" Wheels, Fuel Station
$26,950 (502) 345-0285
Kodiac
'03 Skamper 190, 25ft,
AC, heat, full Bath, 2
showers, like new,
many extras, all manu-
als, clean, $8,000. abo
503-5487, 313-477-3125
LAYTON 26' 1993
Micro, AC, Fr/bk drs. 23'
awning, new tires, refrig.
Exc. cond. w/'98 Dodge
Durango. 4X4, V-8, tow
pkg. 6 pass, RrpAC,
both/!$12,900
Call (352) 628-3376
POP UP CAMPER
'00 Hunter Coachman,
good cond, sleeps 6,
cold AC, easy setup,
$2500 (352) 697-0243
PROWLER
'03, 30ft, 12ff slide out,
loaded, sleeps 6,
refrig. , micro, stove,
$12,000. (352) 564-4170
PROWLER
? 7.5FT, 5th wheel,
Quo n bed, 13FT slide
out, full kitchen, clean,
$7,000 (352) 80-1C56



3 Tires
255-70-16
$7. ea.
(352) 212-7806
4 NEW TIRES W/WHEELS
245X45/R 17 '99 Cobra
wheels, $700;
JACK ROUSH WHEELS
w/4 Goodrich Tires
245X45/R17 some tread
$300, (352) 382-7001
CHEVY SUBURBAN
'79, NEW ENGINE
350 4 BOLT MAIN w/
d800 miles on It. Vehicle
needs work. $1,000/obo
(352)489-3770
Corsa Exhaust System-
has 4 chrome tail pipe
tips. For 06/07Chevy
Silverado or GMC Sierra
with 5.3L V-8, paid
$1,100, sell for $400
Paul, hm.(352) 560-3210
cell 813-323-7813
One Tire, 195-75-14, on
4 lug mustang Rim $15.
Four other Tires
255-65-17, Michelin,
like new $15. ea.
(352) 212-7806
Two TIres, 215-70-14
$5. ea.
One Tire, 225-75-15,
like new $15.
(352) 212-7806




$$CASH PAID$$
Wanted Vehicles
Dead or Alive.
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
CASH BUYER-No Junk
for Trucks, Vans & Cars
Larry's Auto Sales
Hwy 19S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333
* FREE REMOVAL OF,
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowersjacuzzi's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084

WE PAY CASH
FOR
JUNK CARS
Top $$ paid $$
Toll Free
(888) 480-1170
$ $ CASH PAID $ $
Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans


'00o, Nissan Altima
GXE, #H09676B, '
Awesome Shape *
I Only 59Kmi. Must U
See $6,998. or $138 I
@ mo. 866-838-4376

1980 DATSUN 280
Body in good shape.
Good mechanical
cond. but needs trans.
$650 (352) 201-9018

'02 OLDS AURORA
I #H10247A Loaded I
With Leather, CD
Sand More $8,677. I
Sor $162. me.
S866-838-4376
r -�-2,-c7I-mp-t



2 ma
102, ChevyImA
I LS,#H10088A. Big
* Car For Less, Need
* More Space Call I
S$8,944.or$167. @,
m. 866-838-4376 J



--- --- a
L J�
02o, 8Honda Civic,
I #H01025B, Here Is I
S How You BuyA
I Honda $10A70. or U
I $182. @ moI
.. 866-838-43

'04, Ford Focus SE,
#H09689A, Want Low
Payments and Save
Gas,$9,988 or $179
@ m 866-838-4376

IF 0~o5 7FordMustan�g
#H09947A More Car I
for Less Money, Auto
and More, $17,770.d 4
or $288 @mo.
866-838-4376 =












' 1798ForDC297@URG
116 Lod d 5K iles mill




A0YUDlmostANRew OnLS K
06 Chrysler Sebring
I Convertible, #P5533, I
SumrimIs Here,
LtteTpDown
$17,988or $297 @


m866-838-4376









L mm ---m mm u



AL EA
I 07, MitsubIshI
Eclipse GS #H10144B
Almost New Only 3K
Imi. Save Lots, Call

$5001 Police lmpounds,
For sale!Ci.:















*21111111:110
$500 For listings call3
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374;







Sedan, Low i., Loaded- $6,995

'97 Saturn SLI Sedanm
SAuto, A/C, great I

Student Car $2,997.7
866-838-41761

-0 18, Buick Lesobre,
#H10131A, Luxury for
Less, Wonderful Ride
$4,988,
" 866-838-4376
















w/ b.kcover. b .:.
A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
.2 weeks In the
-2 weeks OnlinIe
-Featured In Tues.
"WheelsSecfion[
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
�$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply
ACURA RSX-S '04!rI
6sp man., mnrf, 54K, H
leather, 6cd pampered ,
$14,900/obo
352-344-4505
BUICK
1995, For sale $1,500
Call 352-795-8634
CADILLAC DEVILLE
1989 White 4 dr, Blue
Leather, non smoker
great condition.
(352) 447-4425
$1,500 Inglis
CADILLAC DEVILLE'
'99 73,800 mi. Air Cond.
Leather, Mother of PaT,
w/ blk convertibl- , I.:
Dual Power Seats,
Premium Sound, AM/FM,
Stereo, Cassette,
Premium Wheels,
$10,500. (352) 860-0444.
CHRYSLER Crossfire,
2005, 18K Miles,
#6149823B Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668





DODGE INTREPID
'99. 2.7L, 30MPG HWY,..
48K ml. All power. CD, !
tinted windows. non-'
smoker, women driven,.,
garaged, exc. cond.
$5200. (352) 795-6151 �
FORD
'95, Cougar, burgundy,
clean, full pwr,,- cold
AC, auto, asking $1,895.
(352) 726-4267
FORD
'97 Explorer. One owner
188K, $1,500 as-is
795-6850
FORD FOCUS
2002
Clean & EconomIcal
#7056199B C i trnK ia
(352) 564-8668
FORD MUSTANG GT
'89, 347 Shaoker, 5 spd.
Munci trans, SVT rims.
Fast Car, Needs wk,
$4,500 352-257-6001
HYUNDAI
2006. Arera, 25k ml.,
excel, cand, ,Asking
$19,000. (352) 382-0148:
(352) 422-7884
KIA OPTIMA EX


I I


I


No Title OK, Call J.W,
(352) 228-9645





We wish to give @
least 30 Cars to
BATTERED
WOMEN'S SHELTER
this year,
Tax Deduct Avail.
PLEASE HELP US.
MARITIME MINISTRIES
? (352) 795-9621 1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


III


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'r.
� I , * " , , '
. . -
f o:


p.


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For Tickets:


Fancy's Pets - 669 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, 352-563-5100
Wishful Thinking
Western World
(Ocala, Gainesville, Leesburg)
352-629-7676


Gates open at 3 p.m.
Log onto Ticketmaster.com
or call


1-800-370-8669


MIKE HAMPTON CIT.R-.-,UST 4
PITCHING-IN FOUNDATION
352-527-3297 cor
www.chronicleonline.com


I


I I


>1i


I


A


I.'


C'T AccTrT7


I I


jj










16C TUESDAY UNE 19 2007
Classic
[m^^ Crs Primaehis I


LINCOLN
'99, Towncar Signature
series, 107k mi., excel
cond. non smoker,
$6,500. SMW, 382-1905
LINCOLN TownCar
2003, Signature Series,
Showroom Cond.
Carriage Roof. $17,500
OBO (352) 489-1639
LINCOLN Towncar
'93, SIg. Series, leather,
123K ml., Great Shapel
Everything worksI Cold
AC. $2,500 341-0718
MERCEDES 230SLK
'98, Hard-top/convert..
auto, immaculate, all
options, Ice cold AC,
63K miles, $13,000,
(240) 994-8765
MITSUBISHI
'97, Eclipse, silver, new
motor, transm. & tires
$4,000 ab o (352)
637-3659 or 302-0119





TOYOTA
'94, Camry Sedan,
clean inside/out, excel.
running cond., auto
137k ml $3,200 obo
352-465-4801
TOYOTA CAMRY LE '96
Exc. Cond/All pwr.
Mntc. Recds. Grgd
$3,500 352-422-5685
TOYOTA CELICA
'93, GT, 150K. Good
Cond. $1,600
(352) 634-5301

Your Donation of
A Vehicle
Supports Single,
Homeless Mothers
& Is Tax
Deductible
Donate your vehicle
TO THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500


1972 BUICK
ELECTRA 2DR
$1200 OBO Mechani-
cally Sound. Some rust.
352-212-8951
$5001 Police Impounds
For sale! Cars from
$500! For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
'82 CADILLAC Biarritz
Pristine, classic,
collectible. 9,137 orig.
miles. Black w/red
leather Int. S.S. roof,
custom made spoke
wheels, new Redline
tires. All rec. incl. orig.
invoice. $15.000 firm
352-586-9663/795-8634
BARACUDA 1969
Restorable $2,500 Firm
(727) 919-2022 cell
Lv. Message
CAMARO
'72, Real Z28, orig. eng.
auto w/ console, cortez
silver, w/ bik, stripes,
$20k (352) 422-7233
EL CAMINO '85
Needs mnr body work.
$4,500 OBO Proceeds
to harity 352-795-9621
FORD 1940
New paint, Chevy
350 motor & trans. drive
It home. Very clean.
(352) 212-7500
FORD
1956 T-Bird, Red, new
restoration, rebuilt eng.,
new paint, both tops,
Pwr. Steer. $29,500.
(352) 628-1734
FORD
1965 Thunderbird
landau, goodcond.,
all orig. $2,500
(352) 637-3333
FORD THUNDERBIRD
'89 Super Coupe. 5 spd.
Super Charged Eng.
$1800/obo
(352) 382-7001
MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 125K,
White, Both tops, New
Mich. tires, $10,500
(352) 586-6805


CTRus COUNTY (FL)


MGB
1977, good shape, new
tires, new roof, $4,000
obo, Moving
(352) 400-1068
VOLTSWAGON
1965, Custom Baha.
Solid floors, glass body.
Many extras. $3,400
(352) 560-3222





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951*
*2 weeks In the
*2 weeks Qnllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Whees" SectlonI
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
May Apply

CHEVY
'99, Sllverado, 36k mil,
long bed, V6, auto,
rhino liner, new tires,
tool box, $8,500. obo
352-382-1073, 422-1834
CHEVY P/U '00
71k ml, 2 8ft toolboxes
/roof rack. 1 owner,
Well malnt. 5495.00
OBO (352) 613-5869
CHEVY S-10
'02, Exc. Cond. Bed liner
& Tonneau Cover,
Tint, 69K, $6,300
(352) 344-2331





DODGE DAKOTA
'90 V-6, 3.9, all new un-
der hood. New motor &
brakes. Rebuilt Tranny
$2,900 352-353-5116


$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
DODGE RAM
2004
READY TO
GO TO WORKII
#7051944A Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
FORD F-150
1986, 6 cyl. $500
Needs Work!
(352) 533-3049
GMC
1993 Pickup step side.
V8, AUTO Runs great,
looks great $2,990 OBO
(352) 726-2894
GMC 2500 1977
87k ml., $6000.00,
HD,TOWER OR HAULER.
AS iS. FLORDA TRUCK.
CELL 910-797-4871.
LEAVE MESSAGE.
INTERNATIONAL
2000 Semi w/Sleeper
9200 Model series,
60 Detroit, 10 spd. trans.
air ride, tandem rear
end 273, w/ wetline, PC
set up, $20,500. obo
(352) 726-1373
ISUZU
'06, 14ft Box Truck w/ lift
gate, PW, PL,AC, 17k
ml., excel cond,, asking
$26,000. (352) 613-4891
NISSAN
'99, Frontier XE, 99k ml,
new tires, runs great,
Asking $4,800.
(352) 527-8706








$5001 Police Impounds
For salel Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
ISUZU AXIUM
2002,
Sharp Looking SUVI
#7042529A Citrus Kia
(352) 564-8668


JEEP
'04, Grande Cherokee
Laredo, white w/ grey
Int., 6 cyl, 40k ml. 2W/D
$13,500. (352) 249-1196
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 4x4, gd. tires, mint
engine, cold air, runs
great, 140K ml. $2500.
(352) 382-4142
KIA SORENO
2006, 4 X 4, Low miles
2 to Choose From
Citrus Kla
(352) 564-8668
SATURN V6 AWD
VUE 2003 60k mi, Blue,
Loaded, Moon Roof,
Cargo Racks, etc., 28
MPG Hwy, graphics re-
movable $10,500 OBO
352 628 5957
SUBURBAN 4x4 '88
Navy/grey, front & rear
air, tow pkg. Clean &
solid machine.S2,200.
obo (352) 795-3970
TOYOTA
'90, 4Runner, V6, 4 x 4,
2 door, low ml. runs
great $2,500.
352-302-3803




$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374

A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951"
*2 weeks In the
*2 weeks Onlinel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectlonl
Cal Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
For details.
"$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
M/an Annlv


JEEP WRANGLER
1994, 4x4. Fair cond.
Great for the woods.
Runs good $4,000 OBO
352-527-2822




$5001 Police Impounds
For sale Cars from
$5001 For listings call
1-800-366-9813 ext 7374
CHEVY 1997
Conversion Van. All
pwr, leather, sofa bed,
V8, tow pkg. Runs
Great $3,700 586-2664
CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van, TV,
tape player, new tires,
completely tuned,
(352) 228-2239
CHEVY CARGO
VAN 2002, 8600LB. 5.7L,
bin pkg, tow pkg.
Roof racks, $7800.
(352) 628-6300
CHEVY LUMINA
'95, Looks good, runs
good. New tires,
battery & brake pads.
$2,500 (352) 726-7262
CHEVY VENTURE
2001, pristine condition
mobility express lift on
bumper, 94K ml, $4,500
(352) 613-0078
DODGE
'89 Conversion Van, V8,
auto, TV, runs great,
$1,900. cash
(352)637-1257
DODGE RAM 350
'91, 15 passenger van,
dual AC, PS,PB, AM/FM
Stereo Radio/CD, tow
pkg. $2,900 341-0292'

FORD AEROSTAR
'92, 150k, $999.
352-527-6500
FORD WINDSTAR
LX
2000, Cruise, P/S, P/B,
Cold AC. Well kept!
Non-Smoker. 100K


MR CITRUS
COUNTY REALTY








ALAN NUSSO
3.9% Listings
INVESTORS
BUYERS AGENT
COMMERCIAL SALES
(352) 422-6956
ANUSSO.CQM




*FREE REMOVAL OF-
ATV's, bikes, cars, Jet skis
mowers,jacuzzl's, We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HONDA TRX 250 EX
2005, Exc. Cond.
Inc. 2 extra tires.
$2,500 obo
(352) 527-9020
POLARIS ATV
'05, Kid's 50cc, bought
new In summer, 2006.
Mint Cond. $950
(352) 527-4529





A WHEEL OF
A DEAL
5 lines for only
$37.951-
*2 weeks In the
.2 weeks Onllnel
*Featured In Tues.
"Wheels" Sectionl
Call Today
(352) 726-1441
or (352) 563-5966
SFor details.
*$5 per additional line
Some Restrictions
Mayv Apolv


bI(, UULe
'98, Chromed Out,
board & stroked,
12k mi. Sacrifice. Please
Call. (352) 228-2239
BIKE TRAILER
Open, factory built for
2 Harleys. 3200 lb.
capacity. Ramp.
Exc. Cond. $900
(352) 382-5296
*FREE REMOVAL OF.
ATV's, bikes, cars, jet skis
mowerssjacuzzi's. We
sell ATV parts 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Ultra Classic,
Voyager kit, (like trike)
reverse kit, cust. paint,
10.300 ml. $19,000.
(352) 302-6200
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05, 1200 Sportster Cus-
tom, many extras, well
-maintained, $7,895.
(352) 637-6284
HARLEY DAVIDSON
1997 Sportster, 1200cc,
21K mi., Great
running bikel $4,950
(352) 746-3789
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000 Elec. Glide Classic
1450 cc, Vance N Heins
pipes, sport windshield,
lots of chrome, only
15,800 ml. Like new
$11,995 (352) 467-0872
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006, Street Glide.
1450CC, Uke Newl 2,200
ml, bik, $13,500 OBO
(352) 400-0360
HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA2005
6200ml, $12,500 wind-
shield, bags, 4000 miles
of warr. (352) 697-0243
HONDA
'03, CR250R, like new,
never riden, $800. of ex-
tra new parts Incl.
$2,500. (352) 572-6023
HONDA '07
Aero 750, Mint Cond.,
Showroom new, Less
than 1,500 ml. $6,600.,
Includes Windshield
and 2 Helmets. New
house forces sale.


I

U ' -


~*
~T~~Pws-~


I.,
4: i
- I,
'ml.;.,
~ '5


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(352) 563.5966


HONDA 2003 VTX
1300, well maintained,
garage kept, lots of
xtras, Exc. cond. $6500.
(352) 527-6639

Kawasaki
'00, Ninja, 250 motor,
runs good, needs
windshield, $1,000. obo
(352) 795-1411

KAWASAKI 1200 '01
Voyager Trike. Exc.
cond. (MUST SEE)
$10,000. (352) 628-6461

SUZUKI 2002 GSX
R600. Telefonica
Edition 12651 miles.
Garage kept. $4500/
obo (352) 527-2822

SUZUKI SV650S
2004,5800 miles, Great
Condition, Very Fastill
Asking $4,500 obo.
Call 464-4183,
Ask for Donny.


565-0626 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
Betty J, Emmons
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
DIVISION PROBATE
File No. 2007-CP-426
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY J. EMMONS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of
the estate of BETTY J.
EMMONS deceased,
whose date of death was
September 2, 2006, is
pending In the Circuit
Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is


CLASSI


564-0619 TUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Crystal River Community Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) will hold a special public meeting g on Wednes-
day, June 27th, 2007 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter
as possible In the CRA Offices located of, 668 N.W. 1st
Ave, Crystal River, Florida, to discuss Agency business
and the upcoming charrette process.
Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Stat-
utes, Section 286.0105, If a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Community Redevelop-
ment Agency with respect to the matters considered
at this public hearing, he or she may need a record of
the proceedings, and that, for such purpose he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made which record may Include testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the City of Crystal River, City
Manager's Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River,
Florida, 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two days before
the meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired,
please use the TDD telephone.
The Agency encourages public attendance and par-
ticipation in the form of written or verbal comments.
For more Information, please call (352) 794-0072.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 19th, 2007.

566-0619 TUCRN
City of Crystal River Public Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City
of Crystal River, Florida that a PUBLIC HEARING will be
held to consider, on final reading, the following pro-
posed Ordinances at 7:00 p.m., on Wednesday, June
27, 2007 In the Council Chamber at City Hall, 123 NW
Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida. These Ordinances,
in their entirety, may be Inspected at the office of the
City Clerk during regular working hours..
Consideration of Approval for Ordinance 07-0-19,
Land Use Designation of Highway Commercial for 8740
W. Mayo Dr., owner Mellzza Ramo Hatchik
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER AMEND-
ING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PER APPLICATION
CP#07-007 FOR PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1,
PURSUANT TO SECTION 163.3187, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO
HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL; PROVIDING A LEGAL DE-
SCRIPTION; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Consideration of Approval for Ordinance 07-0-20,
Zoning Designation of (CH) High Intensity Commercial
for 8740 W. Mayo Dr., owner Melizza Ramo Hatchik
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, DESIGNATING ZON-
ING OF MEUZZA RAMO HATCHIK TO HIGH INTENSITY
COMMERCIAL (CH) AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1; PRO-
VIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
Consideration of Approval for Ordinance 07-0-21,
Land Use Designation of Highway Commercial for 1103
N. Suncoast Blvd., owner Crystal Place, LLC.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER AMEND-
ING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PER APPLICATION
CP#07-006 FOR PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1,
PURSUANT TO SECTION 163.3187, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO
HIGH INTENSITY COMMERCIAL; PROVIDING A LEGAL DE-
SCRIPTION; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Consideration of Approval for Ordinance 07-0-22,
Zoning Designation of (CH) High Intensity Commercial
for 1103 N. Suncoast Blvd., owner Crystal Place, LLC
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, DESIGNATION ZON-
ING OF CRYSTAL PLACE, LLC TO HIGH INTENSITY COM-
MERCIAL, (CH) AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1; PROVIDING
FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Consideration of Approval for Ordinance 07-0-27.
Land Use Designation of Office/Service for Ralph W.
Rand 3980 N. Tallahassee Rd.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER AMEND-
ING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PER APPLICATION
CP#07-002 FOR PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1,
PURSUANT TO SECTION 163.3187, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO
OFFICE SERVICE /COMMERCIAL; PROVIDING A LEGAL
DESCRIPTION; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Consideration of Approval for Ordinance 07-0-28,
Zoning Designation of (CG) General Commercial for
Ralph W. Rand 3980 N. Tallahassee Rd.
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, DESIDGNATING ZON-
ING OF PROPERTY OWNED BY RALPH L RAND IV TO GEN-
ERAL COMMERCIAL (CG) AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1;
PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
Consideration of Ordinance No. 07-0-34, Notifica-
tion Process to Affected Home Owners
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLOR-
IDA, AMENDING THE LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, PRO-
VIDING FOR AMENDED NOTICE REQUIREMENTS TO AF-
FECTED PARTIES, PROVIDING FOR LEGAL STANDING FOR
PERSONS NOT PROVIDED WITH NOTICE, PROVIDING
POSTING OF PROPERTIES FOR GENERAL NOTICE RE-
QUIREMENTS AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at.
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the City of Crystal River, City
Manager's Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River.
Florida, 34428, (352) 795-4216, at least two days before
the meeting.
By: Carol A. Harrington
City Clerk
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 19, 2007.


Chronicle




Classifieds




In Print




& Online


CI T R US C0U N IY


m


;=


-E-
110 N. Apopka Ave., In-
verness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this no-
tice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice Is June
19, 2007.
Personal Representative:
/s/ GWYNNE CHEESEMAN
1102 Hancock Ct.
Deptford, NJ 08096
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
GLEN C. ABBOTT
Florida Bar No. 235911
P.O. Box 2019
Crystal River, Florida
34423-2019
Telephone: (352) 795-5699
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 19 and 26, 2007.










N


A weekly advertising supplement of The Citrus


C


County Chronicle


June 19, 2007


INSIDE


Kawasaki's
Concours 14,
Page 2D


Let's go
RVing!
Page 3D


Parts Dept.
Page 3D

Crossword
Puzzle
Page 3D








The Sleuth
Page 4D







Dial A Deal
Auto Mart
Page 6D
&7D




L ipnt ,,


MGB
Page 90

Classifieds
Page 9D


By MALCOLM GUNN
Wheelbase Communications
A Buick that can really
move is always wel-
come, especially if it
can move plenty of.
passengers and a boxcar load of
cargo in all sorts of weather and
driving conditions.
That's the essence of the 2008
Enclave, a meaty and mighty
four-door wagon that's one of a
trio of new vehicles being intro-
duced by General Motors that
includes the platform-shared
Saturn Outlook and GMC Acadia.
The Enclave, however, stakes
out the luxury-class end of the
spectrum, replacing the minivan-
based Buick Rendezvous and
eventually the Rainier sport-ute.
Expect the Enclave to arrive by
summer.
Unlike a number of more com-
pact competitors claiming full-
size status, the size-large Enclave
won't cram or crowd its passenger
contingent. It's"nearly as long as a
Chevrolet Tahoe sport-ute, is
equal to the Chevy in width and
actually has more distance
between the front 4d rear wheels.
The Enclave also enjoys a dis-
tinct advantage in weight, or
rather, a lack of it. At 4,780
pounds, it's nearly 500 pounds
lighter than the body-on-frame
Tahoe (the Enclave has a unitized
body construction with no dedi-
cated frame).
By any measure, the Enclave


also holds the advantage in the
looks department. The traditional
stylized Buick chrome grille,
neatly integrated headlights and
deftly rounded nose are classy
touches that set this wagon apart
from the crowd, aided and abetted
b. the tri-porthole trim (a Buick
signature item) attached to each
side of the hood.
The Enclave's impressive utili-
t) becomes apparent inside where
you're greeted by three rows of
seats %\ ith room for up to eight, or
seyveA,,.4f you choose the two sec-
ond-row captain's chairs instead
of the three-person bench.
Selecting this configuration also
gets you a deep-dish floor console
that folds. into the load floor along
with the seats to extend the cargo
area.
Regardless of seat selection, the
second row slides forward to pro-
vide access to the back row and
serves to give rear riders more leg
room.
Speaking of stowage, the
Enclave also beats the Tahoe in
the cargo-hold department when
all seats are in use and offers plen-
ty of cubbies, cup holders and
bins to secure everyone's personal
effects.
A twist of the key fires up a 3.6-
liter V6, an engine developed
through the combined efforts of
several General Motors engineer-
ing facilities around the globe.
The engine will eventually be
used by most of GM's North
American brands. In the


Enclave's case, the double-o\ er-
head-cam powerplant, which
operates through a six-speed
automatic transmission, develops
275 horsepower..
The Enclave begins as a front-
wheel-driver, but the all-wheel-
drive option will likely be a pop-
ular choice. With it, drivers will
be able to more safely navigate
slick or snow-covered thorough-
fares or traverse backwoods cot-
tage trails. It won't be adept at
true off-roading, a task better left
to vehicles such as the Tahoe,
with its generous ground clear-
ance and dual-range transfer case.
As befits a Buick-branded
vehicle, the Enclave is all about
luxury as well as practicality.
Although the marketing types
remain coy concerning exact con-
tent, you can expect the base CX
to include climate control, power
tilt and telescoping steering
wheel, power-folding outside
mirrors, remote starting system,
xenon headlamps, six airbags,
traction and stability control and


a year's worth of OnStar, GM's
satellite-based live-voice assis-
tance center.
Moving on up to the CXL adds
perforated leather seats (heated in
front), 19-inch wheels, a power-
operated liftgate and fancier trim.
A wide assortment of available
features can be ladled on, such as
a rear backup camera, DVD navi-
gation, skylight-style sunroof,


Bose 10-speaker audio package
and a DVD entertainment system.
The Enclave's tack-sharp
styling, powerful V6 and room
aplenty for everyone and every-
thing will be tough, if not impos-
sible, to ignore and will no doubt
lure converts from traditional big-
utes into more glamorous sur-
roundings.


I ~t


GET INTO THE






AGLE 18 YOUR DALR PR
POT1AC ALE MAD BE


I


352-795-6800 IUUUIKPAia WM

1-888-745-2599 SHOP ONI INE Al THE TIME!


Buick's first luxury crossover SUV
The Enclave creates its own niche in the fast-growing
crossover market by melding elegant interior and exterior
design and a confident ride in a quiet, well-crafted roomy cabin
capable of carrying up to eight passengers with space for gear.
Available in front-wheel or all-wheel drive. Enclave employs a
new 275-horsepower V-6 powertrain with variable valve timing
(VVT) that is mated to Buick's first six-speed automatic trans-
mission. The 3.6L V-6 VVT is a sophisticated dual-overhead
camshaft engine that uses four-cam phasing, rapid data pro-
cessing and torque-based engine management to optimize
power, economy and emissions performance.
A host of innovative features that are uncommon or unavail-
able in competitors' vehicles add to the Enclave's standout sta-
tus in the segment, including a second-row seat console that
unfolds to contribute to a flat load floor when the seats are fold-
ed.
"Enclave is the new face of Buick and everything we want in
future Buicks," said Buick General Manager Steve Shannon.
"It's an absolutely stunning, high-quality crossover SUV that
delivers all the product attributes that define the new Buick: a
confident ride, relevant technologies, more luxury features, ele-
gant design and a quiet, comfortable and well-crafted interior.
These are the hallmark traits of future Buicks."
Peace-of-mind features such as Ultrasonic Rear Park Assist
and a rear back-up camera, StabiliTrak electronic stability con-
trol system and OnStar Turn-by-Turn Navigation are also avail-
able.
The Buick Enclave is the last of three new crossovers intro-
duced by General Motors. Crossover entries accounted for
about 2.5 million industry sales in 2005 and the segment is pro-
jected to grow to 3.5 million units by 2010. GM currently has
seven entries in the segment including the Pontiac Torrent and
Vib and the Buick Rendezvous - and expects to double the
number of crossover entries by 2010.
""' 'n


V a~i


:<1QIJI- I~7~ _ I


1275 S. Suncoast Blvd., (U.S. Hwy. 19) Homosassa


p







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*D TUInSAvY, JUNE. 19, 2007


Long-distanc
The new ConcoursTM 14 and feel. The confidence-enhancing when wind cu
Concours 14 ABS combine ABS brake system (ConcoursTM that simply
breathtaking engine perform- 14 ABS) features radial-mount Additionally,
ance, impeccable handling and front calipers operated by a chores on lc
a comfortable riding position radial-pump master cylinder, are minimize
with clean, convenient shaft for the superb control and pow- and reliable
drive, locking hard luggage, an erful, reliable braking perform- Featuring a
electrically adjustable wind- ance that continent-crossing design, the
screen and a host of other fea- sport riders expect. Belying its drive system
tures to create the most impres- tourer-like appearance, the reduces drivi
sive long-distance, high-speed Concours 14's phenomenally sport riding
machine on the market today. responsive handling character-
An aluminum monocoque istics make the other bikes in its
chassis, radial-mount brake category seem like transports
calipers, inverted fork, and ram by comparison. This provides
air induction are all features the Concours 14 rider with a
riders expect to find on top-of- feeling of complete control for
the-line supersport machines. spirited, confident journeys.
However, instead of riding a In addition to an incredible
high-strung racetrack missile, level of sporting performance,
they can enjoy these high-per- the new Concours 14 has the r -
formance features on functional touches of a Grand
Kawasaki's new Concours 14 Touring machine. Features
sport touring motorcycles, include KI-PASS (Kawasaki's
They are the first representa- Intelligent Proximity Activation
tives of an entirely new genre of Start System), the first electron-
high-performance motorcycle: ic authorization system in its
the Transcontinental Supersport class, and an accessory power
Tourer. outlet located near the cockpit /
Because it's a Kawasaki, the for powering portable electron-
Concours 14 is naturally ics, grip heaters and other
designed to do much more than accessories. There's also an
just take a rider from point A to electrically adjustable wind-
point B. Thanks to its sporting screen, shaft drive and detach-
heritage, the new Concours 14 able, locking side cases, so the
is not only an awe-inspiring Concours 14 is always ready for
road burner, it can also carve up a high-speed ride to the local
mountain roads like a true hangout or that favorite spot...
supersport bike. For those rid- fifteen hundred miles away.
ers who cross state lines the The Concours 14 is much
way others cross town, this more than a sportbike with 'i
machine offers more excite- tacked-on touring features; it's
ment than anything else in its an integrated high-speed tour-
category. ., ing system. Wind protection for
The Concours 14 may be a rider and passenger is based on
physically impressive machine, a supersport-style design phi-
but as soon as riders flip the losophy, aerodynamically curv- .l .
side stand up, they'll be aston- ing wind around the riders to
ished at the bike's lightweight reduce buffeting that occurs


e touring comfort


urls around screens
'block" the wind.
maintenance
)ng-distance trips
d thanks to quiet
e shaft drive.
special four-link
Tetra-Lever shaft
m significantly
line lash during
and helps ensure

SPONSORED BY: BO




Help support 1


smooth acceleration when
exploiting the engine's incredi-
ble power output. In fact, power
delivery to the rear wheel is so
smooth and so direct 'that it
gives the same natural ride
quality as a chain.
The Concours 14's touring
prowess doesn't stop there. The
included hard luggage features
a slim, integrated design which


mounts the cases closer to the
machine's centerline for excel-
lent mass centralization.
Sensors in the front and rear
wheels monitor tire pressure
and display this information on
the instrument panel, giving
riders peace of mind during
two-up high-speed riding or
when carving up a mountain
road.


With all the equipment need-
ed for safe and exciting long-
distance riding mated to a
decidedly supersport core, the
new Concours 14 amplifies all
the best riding features that
motorcycling has to offer.
Motorcyclists carry a driver's
license, but Concours 14 riders
should bring their passports,
too.


YS 4 GIRLS CLUBS OF CITRUS COUNTY, BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS, THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE AND
CRYSTAL MOTOR CAR COMPANY


the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County and Big Brothers Big Sisters.
Call today to get your 2007 Car Raffle ticket.


YOU COULD WIN A 2007 CORVETTE
Drawing at 2 p.m. on July 14 at
Crystal Chevrolet in Only 2,000 tickets available!
Homosassa


TICKET OUTLETS:
* Any Crystal Motor Car Company dealership
* Boys & Girls Clubs or Big Brothers Big Sisters
* Any Citrus County Chamber office
TO PURCHASE TICKETS, PLEASE CONTACT:
Lori: 621-9225 or loripender@hotmail.com ( B&G Club)
Beth: 344-0400 or beth@bbbspc.org (BBBS Citrus)
Lee: 684-7904 or lee@bbbspc.org (BBBS Hernando)
Sally: 727-518-8860 or sally@bbbspc.org (BBBS Pinellas)
Winner need no the present Winner of automobile must pay all '
applicable taxes, tags and fees. Crystal Motor Car Company employees,
Big Brothers Big Sisters and Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County's board
members, employees and their Immediate families are not eligible to
win. All proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters and the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County, both licensed chantable organizations under the
Internal Revenue Service 501 (c)3. No purchase necessary. Drawing to
be held July 14, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Crystal Chevrolet 1035 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, Florida, For more details contact the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County at 352-621-9225 or Big Brothers Big Sisters
Citrus County office at 352-344-0400.
AMGET YOURS TODAY WiNN


Get your tickets today!


$100 donation


OF CITRUS COUNTY


CRYSTAL


NEE


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
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SUVS


2007 FOCUS S11,477 2007 TACOMA
2005 500 S20,777 2007 FRONTIER
2007 CALIBER $ 11,777 2007 RAM QUAD
2007 OPTIMA $12,777 2007 RANGER

2007 GRAND PRIX $14,777 2007 COLORADO


$15,777 2007 GRAND CHEROKEE $19,777
$14,777 2007 WRANGLER $20,777
$17,777 2007 XTERRA $17,777
s14,777 2007 DURANGO $18,777

*14,777 2007 TAHOE $29,777


OCALA NISSAN o

2200 SR 200 OCALA 10 pM
TONIGHTr
(800) 342-3008 (352) 622-4111 '
ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND $395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


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TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 3D


Crrnus COUNv' (FL) CHRONICLE


-e' go U~*13RIAill el


Guides for selling
1 * T "[ T


or purcna

Most common question
among RV-ers to be is what is
the value of a used RV!
If you are interested in pur-
chasing a used motor home or
have a used RV you want to sell
there are some things you need
to know about the Kelley Blue
Book and N.A.D.A. guides.
Unlike the guides for automo-
biles which are based on analy-
ses of actual car prices, the Blue
Book and NADA guides are
based primarily on a percentage
of the manufacturer's suggested
retail price ( M.S.R.P. ). These
guides may be nowhere near the
actual current resale value. The
guides include many options in
the M.S.R.P. so it is hard to
know which, if any, options you
should include. This makes it
easy for options to be charged
twice.
A better way to find the resale
value of RV's is to look at other
mobile homes of the same class,
make and model. Check for sim-
ilar amenities and base your
price on that. If you are looking
to buy a used RV, these compar-
isons can help you determine if
the price quoted to you is a fair
and reasonable price.
Motor home RV values should
be based on actual selling prices
of similar mobile homes, taking
into consideration factors" like
age and overall condition. Are
there dents or leaks? Has the unit
been properly maintained on a
regular basis? Do all of the
appliances work?
If this is a motorized rig, what
is the mileage? Is it above or
below the average? Does it run
well for the mileage? Check all
accessories that came with or
were added, such as the air con-
ditioner, satellite dishes, back up
mirrors, awnings, solar panels
and kitchen appliances. Does it


sing KV s
all work?
If you are selling your rig,
making sure all of these items
are in good condition can greatly
increase your selling price. Use
the Blue Book and NADA val-
ues as a starting point and then
adjust your price, or offer if you
are buying, up or down accord-
ing to the condition !of the RV.
You can increase the value of
your motor home by sprucing it
up. There are many variables in
motor homes to be considered. Is
it a towable or motorized? How
many can it sleep? What appli-
ances are included? What does
the maintenance record tell you?
If you have a late model motor
home to sell, you may want to
have an appraisal done to insure
that you bet the best price possi-
ble. Some large RV dealers pro-
vide this service and will even
broker a deal for you for a small
fee. The type of RV you want to
sell or buy also has an influence
on your profit or cost.
As a potential buyer you need
to just decide how much you can
spend for an RV, what type of
motor home you want and what
amenities you consider neces-
sary, than with all of this in mind
start looking around. There are
dozens of online sites you can
browse and check out the class
of mobile home ybu'want
Of course you will want to
find a dealer in your area so that
you can physically inspect the
used rig yourself before you buy.
Ask to see the maintenance
record if available. If you are
buying from a dealer ask about a
warranty.
The Blue Book and NADA
guide are useful tools as a start-
ing point. You need to take into
consideration the age and condi-
tion of the unit, as well as ameni-
ties available.


01LCHANGE


$1 95! I'
UP TO
5 QTS. ilCneoB
WITH COUPON ONLY EXPIRES JUNE 30,2007

TRANSMISSION FLAGMSHN



$ 5995 A

WITH COUPON ONLY EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2007


Altermarket aUciCT


Stop kicking the bucket
Lets face it, for most of
us, the ritual of washing
and waxing the family
bus can quite literally be
a pain. All that bending
and stooping for the
bucket, not to mention
accidentally stepping
into it - or kicking it
over - can be murder
on the back, unless you
have the Bucket Taxi in
your possession. The
product keeps the soapy
contents of your bucket
within easy reach and
because it's on wheels
you can move it exactly
where it's needed.
What's more, there are
four large pockets that
surround the bucket
holder (designed to accommodate a five-gallon bucket) that are just
the thing for holding your soap, wax, tools, or what-have-you. The
easy-to-assemble Bucket Taxi is made from powder-coated (a
tough baked-on coating) steel for maximum durability. When not
being used for automotive purposes, the Bucket Taxi also makes an
ideal assistant in the garden. A number of on-line shopping sites,
including gifts.corn and shop.com, sell the Bucket Taxi for $60 plus
shipping. You can also get more info from the manufacturer's site,
dashdesigns.com.


A great way
There are times
when a full car cover
is a handy item,
especially when stor-
ing a vehicle for
extended periods.
But what about for
those times when all
you really want is to
protect just your
car's interior from the


to cover up


summer sun and heat, or cover up the glass area from frost, sleet
and snow? One solution is the California PopTop, a cover designed
for the most vulnerable area of your car. Made from sturdy, water-
resistant, yet breathable Dupont Tyvek (yes, the same material
used by new-home builders), the PopTop quickly and securely blan-
kets your car and protects it from the elements, including 99.8 per-
cent of the sun's UV rays, not to mention resistance from those
dreaded bird droppings. Easy to install, the PopTop simply rolls up
when not in use (it weighs less than a pound). In addition the draw-
string mechanism fits below the trunk lid, making it virtually theft-
proof. The California PopTop is available in all sizes to fit most pop-
ular vehicles with prices beginning at $50 (plus shipping). To order
yours, go to capoptop.com or contact the manufacturer at 1-866-
461-2141.


Safe storage for keys
Once you've arrived at your destination, off-loaded your boat, bike
or other gear and are ready to head into the wild or water, wouldn't
it be great to have a place to stash your keys and other personal
effects you don't want to take with you and risk getting wet, dam-
aged or hopelessly lost?
You could leave most of it
in the vehicle, but what
about the keys?
SportsStash is a clever and
practical personal vault,
designed to fit any stan-
dard two-inch hitch recep-
tacle and was developed
by Nevada-based Miaba
Billet Inc. SportsStash
comes with a resettable
combination-lock pin and a
choice of faceplate design.
Place your keys or other small objects in the SportsStash, slide it
into the hitch receptacle and lock it in place. Easily removed when
you return to allow towing, the machined-aluminum cover is even
backlit and plugs into a standard four-pole wiring harness to pro-
vide an extra brake and running light. Prices range form $65-$98
depending on model and design. Check it out at
www.sportsstash.com or call 1-775-580-8822.


Screening your vehicle
Just like the house, you can use screens to turn your vehicle into a
bug-free space. Shade-Eez window screens have been designed
so they can be placed in a window and kept in place when the
glass is either open or closed.
With the window open you get a
bug-free breeze. You can even
use them to keep the kids from
tossing stuff out of the vehicle.
According to the manufacturer,
in addition to blocking the sun,
the screens help prevent the
dreaded wind buffeting that
occurs at higher speeds in
some vehicles when the win- s,
dows are rolled down. Made of
washable polyester, they can be "
cleaned in the home laundry
(they'll apparently even with- . . .. - -- -
stand a car wash) and come in
a zippered carrying case. The
screens slide on or off with no suction cups or Velcro. For an appli-
cation chart and current pricing, call 1-303-698-9800 or visit
http://www.kasnat.com.
Do you have an auto-related product the world should know about?
Please send your information/press kit via email to:
partsdept@wheelbase.ws.


% V LIA IVILUPI L'Ii I rN I'JI clnn i tAULi ..JIUncz


a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enthusiast!

AutoCross will test your I N T E R N ft T I - .. .,v .

knowledge of cars, brand names and

auto-related people from all over the world. Good luck!







13Mt 2 '50s Chevy pickup model
4. Tires work without air
B 5. RDX,CSX, MDX,NSX
- 6. US-built mid-engine exotic
10. Suits have these, too
l 11. Frame and suspension
12. Italian design studio
-B2 13 Mitsubishi rally Lancer
- 14. Tranny control lever
15. Suspension pivot point
19. Top fuel grade
21. Patrician or Caribbean
22. '32 Ford coupe (slang)
26. Front-engine Ferrari
29. "ecnalubma"
30. Cooling-system regulator
32. These headlights are element
No. 54
33. Plymouth's K-car
34. "R" in DRL
37. "Police" on a CB radio
38. Cleans up on ice
42. Riding " "
44. Steering
48. Prinz or Ro80

... .....


ACROSS
S1, Aura, Outlook or Sky
3. A Subaru with a New York
accent
7. Oil reservoir
8. Basic Kaiser
9. This turn is more than 180
degrees
16. Doc's ride
17. '60s FWD Austin
18. Fortwo-branded car
20. '50s racy Porsche
23. Wheel
24. "Winged" Plymouth
25. "Moons" are one style of these
27. 18-wheeler


28. Gas-pedal slang
29. Sir David Brown's company
31. "Big" Nissan sedan
35. Put up with this, or put this up
36.12
39. a.k.a. inline
40. Pontiac's Chevette
41. "Cadillac Man" Star
43. Scissors, bottle or hydraulic
45. Show featured Nomad
46. Wash and wax to perfection
47. Starred with Maharis in Route 66
49. Illegal selling of used cars (slang)
50. Tempest model
51. Nissan supercar


COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS


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CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


An -i- I ~fl fIiir-ii1 9 00


* Chrysler contemplates
Challenger cousin: Just in time
for a full-on revival of rear-wheel
drive, Chrysler is moving ahead
with plans to produce a rear-
wheel-drive coupe, the Sleuth
has learned. It seems Chrysler
has approved plans for such a
vehicle, which would be the sis-
ter vehicle to the Dodge
Challenger coming in 2008.
Chrysler will show hints of a
rear-drive coupe at the Detroit
auto show this January when it
unveils its Nassau concept, a V8
four-door with a roof designed to
give it a coupe-like appearance.
* H4 in the pipeline to compete
with Jeep Wrangler: Well, the
Sleuth gave you the head's up
about a year ago and now the
rumor appears to be coming
true. General Motors will unveil a
Hummer H4 concept vehicle in
January at the Detroit auto show.
This smallest of all Hummers
would be intended to compete
with the Jeep Wrangler. A pro-
duction version would likely see
the light of day for the 2010
model year. The Sleuth also
hears that GM is also working on
an H3 pickup that would be
available in the 2009 model year.
The H3 is built on the small-pick-
up architecture used by the
Chevrolet Colorado and GMC
Canyon.
* A Mini sport-ute in your future:
BMW, which owns the Mini
brand, is considering offering a
rugged crossover version of the
forthcoming Mini Clubman five-


door wagon, the Sleuth hears.
This new all-wheel-drive vehicle
will likely hit showrooms for the
2010 model year, if production is
approved, and would be a cross
between a station wagon and a
sport-utility vehicle. A BMW,
insider told the sleuth that thre'res
a strong business case for the
compact sport-ute, especially
considering the high demand,
driven by gas prices, for suchK,,.
vehicles in North America.
* No Chery/Bricklin in North
America?: For the past two
years, Malcolm Bricklin, who
built a short run of sports cars in
Canada during the 1970s, has
talked about his idea of bringing
ultra-affordable cars made by
China's Chery Automobile to the
United States. After delays and
plenty of talk, it now appears that
the whole deal is off. The Sleuth
hears that DaimlerChrysler's
involvement with Chery -
including the possible manufac-
turing of the Dodge Hornet
Concept - could be the reason
behind the apparent unraveling.
DaimlerChrysler might have con-
vinced Chery to break off talks
with Bricklin to do a small car for
Dodge. An announcement is
expected by the end of
SDecember, but the Sleuth hears
it's a done deal with
DaimlerChrysler and Chery.
I Less plastic inside your
Malibu: Talk about sprucing up a
key product. Over the past year,
General Motors has talked about
making the interiors of its vehi-


cles better and the first case will
come with the 2008 Malibu. The
car will officially be unveiled in
January at the Detroit auto show.
The Sleuth has even heard talk
that the next Malibu will offer an
interior similar to that of the
Chevrolet Corvette (but with
more seats, obviously) or some
Audi models. "The next-genera-
tion Chevrolet Malibu's interior
showcases the precision and
detailed execution that will differ-
entiate it among the mid-size car
segment," said Ed Peper,
Chevrolet General Manager.
Look for high-quality leathers
and grains and no more plastic.
* Hemisfear by Foose: The
yearly Specialty Equipment
Market Association's (SEMA)
show in Las Vegas, Nev., is the
place to be when it comes to
finding out about all the hot
trends in aftermarket parts and
accessories. It's also used as a
platform to launch vehicles with
sporting flair. The most spectacu-
lar was a car that wasn't built by
a major manufacturer, but one
created by the nation's most
popular get-it-done designer and
car builder. According to Chip
Foose, who you might have
seen on the weekly TV show
Overhaulin' (TLC, Tuesday
nights), there will be a small run
of 50 Hemisfear open-wheel hot
rods built for public consumption.
Most unique is the see-through
roof, mid-mounted 392-cubic-
inch new-style Chrysler "Hemi"
V8 and carbon-fiber body pan-
els. Of course, the wheels are by
Foose, wrapped with Pirelli rub-
ber, which is the supplier to
Foose Design's vehicles. This
isn't the first Foose "production"
vehicle as there have been a
number of heavily worked over
Ford Mustangs and Chevrolet
Camaros from the 1960s built to
Foose's specifications as mod-
ern muscle cars. In fact, you
might even see a Foose bou-
tique open its doors.
E Avanti name brought into the
21st century: Although the
details are hush-hush, the Sleuth
has been told that the Avanti,


fully modernized from its 1960s
Studebaker counterpart, is on
the verge of a major rollout.
Insiders tell the Sleuth that the
grand touring car will be built on
an existing chassis by an inde-
pendent company in a new
$300-million facility in Cancun,
Mexico, that's apparently already
up and running. The Sleuth also
hears that test cars have be pro-
vided to select media with favor-
able feedback. It appears to be
full steam ahead and work is
concentrated on establishing a
dealer network. Insiders promise
that the Sleuth will get his shot
behind the wheel, so stay tuned
for a full report. As you might
recall, the original V8-powered
Studebaker Avanti was the cre-
ation of industrial designer
Raymond Loewy. The Sleuth
hears that the new Avanti will be
priced in the $80,000 range and
be initially built in very limited
numbers.
* Honda hints at a new sports
sedan: It might seem like an odd
location to be showing a vehicle
for the first time, but Honda has
picked the Australian
International Motor Show in
Sydney to display its Honda
Sports 4 concept. Why does that
matter? The Sports 4 indicates
the look of the next-generation
Accord and future Honda sports
sedans. It is notable because it
has a low-slung body and an
ultra-modern cockpit featuring
metal, wood and leather. It has
for individual bucket seats and
personal "skyroofs" for each pas-
senger.
* Hyundai caters safety to older
drivers: The Sleuth has an inter-
esting tip this week about the
Korean manufacturer. It seems
Hyundai wants to offer a safety
package aimed at the needs of
older drivers. A so-called "Silver
Package" will include seatbelt
load limiters and four-point belts
instead of.the standard.three-
point belts. Hyundai has con-
cluded that elderly people are up
to 80 percent less tolerant of
pressure from seat belts than
younger people. Hyundai could


offer the package on its Accent
beginning in two years and could
be a new way in which manufac-
turers begin thinking of demo-
graphics.
* We bid farewell to the Taurus:
After 7.5 million units and 21
years of production, the final
Ford Taurus rolled off the assem-
bly line in Atlanta, Ga., Friday,
Oct. 27, at 7 a.m. From 1992-
'96, the Taurus was the best-sell-
ing car in the United States. Its
peak year was 1992 with more
than 400,000 units. But Ford
now only uses its Chicago plant
to produce the Five Hundred, the
successor to the Taurus. Ford
will be closing the Atlanta plant
as it tries to recover from losses
in North America.

Market Indicators
Flat paint, the "Deuce" and
wire wheels: This year's SEMA
show in Las Vegas revealed sev-
eral interesting trends in the
aftermarket. American muscle is
as popular as ever, thanks to a
number of companies that have
taken on the task of re-engineer-
ing everything from suspensions
to engine packages. Numerous
show cars appeared with a flat
wall-paint look, which has the
Sleuth wondering what all the
wax-makers think of the trend.
Wire wheels also appear to be
making a comeback and in sizes
that mirror current automotive
trends (large diameter and wide).
And whether is has to do with 75
anniversary of the 1932 Ford,
versions of this iconic hotrod
were as hot as ever and featured
at some of the show's most
prominent exhibits. In fact, Ford
will make 100 reproduction
"Deuce Highboy" roadsters.
Minivan popularity: Whatever
happened to the days when
minivans ruled the family roost?
Well, some of Detroit's automak-
ers are losing faith in the family
hauler. Word out of Detroit is that
General Motors has joined Ford
in the decision to axe its mini-
vans, including the Chevrolet
Uplander, Buick Terraza and


Saturn Relay. GM is canceling its
next-generation minivan sched-
uled for 2010 and is abandoning
the segment. Instead, it is focus-
ing on its crossovers, vehicles
that blend the traits of more than
one vehicle category. Chevrolet
will get a crossover as well as
Buick and Saturn in the future.
Ford insiders recently told the
Sleuth that the automaker was
giving up on the segment, can-
celing its Freestar. Chrysler,
meanwhile, continues to virtually
own the segment. For how long
is anyone's guess.
GM's roadster prices: Stop the
presses, it seems the Pontiac
Solstice and Saturn Sky road-
sters are actually coming back
down to earth in terms of price.
Word out of trade newspaper
Automotive News is that both
vehicles are readily available
and selling for about sticker
price, a big change from last
summer when stock was low
and demand and price were
high. General Motors, which
owns the Saturn and Pontiac
brands, reported a 74-day supply
of Solstices as of Nov. 1, up from
34 days on Oct. 1. About 3,500
Solstices are in inventory. The
Saturn Sky has a 33-day supply
this month, up from 19 days last
month. GM says it has about
1,100 Sky models in inventory.
Earlier this year, GM had warned
dealers about asking for premi-
ums above sticker price and/or
ordering only fully loaded, high-
dollar cars to make the most
profit possible.
Asian manufacturing in North
America: The Sleuth has heard
that Toyota is planning to build
two new assembly plants in
North America by the end of the
decade. The first will be up and
running in 2009 with a capacity
of roughly 200,000 units per
year. It will produce compact
cars such as the Yaris. The sec-
ond will build sport-utility vehi-
cles in 2010. With Hyundai,
Nissan and now Toyota building
locally, it's a stark contrast to
their North American competitors
which are closing plants.


FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT YOUR CAR IS WORTH,

NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE

INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE

mac-ai -ucc


,FREE 24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE ABOUT THESE VEHICLES

1 - -800-325-1 41 5 EXT.


2007 CAMRY


. FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701

$17,777

2007 GRAND MARQUIS


SAVE
'6,000


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701


*15,777


CARS,


2007 CADILLAC





FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702

$26,777

2007 TOWN & COUNTRY


SAVE
*7,000


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702


$18,777


r I


2007 TOWNCAR
- SAVE
_ ,4,200


r FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701

$27,777

2007 F-250


SAVE
-11,500


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2701


$24,777


2007 TRAILBLAZER
Zv SAVE
i -- �6,500



FREE 24 HOUR
F . RECORDED MESSAGE
( p ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702

219,777

2007 EXPEDITION


SAVE
912,500


I- .,.]


FREE 24 HOUR
RECORDED MESSAGE
ABOUT THIS VEHICLE
800-325-1415 EXT 2702


$26,777


SUVS


2007 FOCUS $11,477 2007 TACOMA

oo00 oo00 20,777 2007 FRONTIER

2607 CALIBER $ 1,777 2007 RAM QUAD

2007 OPTIMA $12,777 2007 RANGER

2007 GRAND PRIX $14,777 ' 2007 COLORADO


$15,777 2007 GRAND CHEROKEE $19,777

14,777 2007 WRANGLER *20,777

S17,777 2007 XTERRA $17,777

$14,777 2007 DURANGO $18,777

$14,777 2007 TAHOE $29,777


1ONIifiwn


(800) 342-3008 (352) 622-4111 "
ALL PRICES WITH '1,000 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY PLUS SALES TAX, LICENSE FEE AND *395 DEALER FEE. ALL INVENTORY PRE-OWNED AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. PICTURES RE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


NEWS, TRENDS AND GOSSIP


TRUCKS


OCALA NISSAN


2200 SR 200 OCALA


dfRA TUESDAY, JUNE 150, ZUILJ


I


I


(


a








RTI US ( )


2007 MUSTANG
- . . . ,, ,6 ,


2007 EDGE


I Rebates could be determined by Ford Financing. Interest may vary W.A.C. See dealer for details. Pictures are for illustration ourooses oniV'
SE O RENIE NVNOR T:nckicoasod* o


TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 5D


C COUNTY FL CHRONIC E










CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


60 TIuEsDAY, JUNE 19, 207 -- -k /


2003 BUICK RENDEZVOUS 2005 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CX ONLY 41,000 MILES, ONSTAR, CX ONLY 19,000 MILES, CD,
HOMELINK, VENT VISORS, BUG HOMELINK, VENT VISORS,
SHIELD, PARKAID. - CRUISE, P/W, P/L.
795-6800 "12,59 795-6800 '17.495


1998 CADILLAC DEVILLE 1998 CADILLAC DEVILLE
LEATHER, WOODGRAIN, FULL POWER, LEATHER
POLISHED ALUMINUM WHEELS, INTERIOR, LOCAL CAR, LOW
DUAL CLIMATE CONTROL. MILAGE.
795-6800 7,250 795-9338 '5,995


1999 CADILLAC DEVILLE
LEATHER, POWER DRIVER &
PASSENGER, DUAL CLIMATE
ZONE.
795-6800 '8,995


2001 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
4 DOOR, AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR,
GREAT MPG, RUNS PERFECT

563-2003 JUST '3,795


2002 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR, SPORTY.
FINANCING AVAILABLE.


563-2003


JUST '4995


ONLY 47,000 MILES, CD, TAPE,
CRUISE, ICE COLD A/C.

795-6800 '6,995


2005 CHEVROLET COBALT
AUTOMATIC, AIR, ONE OWNER,
GREAT ECONOMY.


795-7371


'12,995


2006 CHEVROLET MALIBU -1sU4 .cHEvRUL.T,
ONLY 17K MILES, WOODGRAIN, SILVERADO XCAB CHROME
PW, PL, CRUISE, CD. WHEELS, BEDLINER, P/W, P/L,
CRUISE, TOW PACKAGE.
795-6800 '13500 795-6800 '5,995


--�F. -


2000 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2002 CHEVROLET
STEP SIDE 4X4 EXTENDED CAB SILVERADO 1500 CREW CAB
REAL CLEAN, GREAT FOR FAMILY 6.0 V8, AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR,
OR WORK, BEDLINER., VERY CLEAN, LOW MILEAGE.
527-0129 '13,900 563-2003 JUST '11,500


2004 CHEVROLET TRACKER
ONLY 34,000 MILES, BUGSHIELD,
VENTVISORS, CD, P/W, P/L,
CRUISE.
795-6800 '10.995


2005 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
HD 2500 4X4 EXTENDED CAB
ONLY 19,000 MILES, EXTRA
CLEAN, BEDLINER.
527-0129 '24,900


zUU.0 unVKULEC I AT EE 2 0Ua ECnnaYLEn G
HIGH END WHEEL & TIRE ONLY 18,000 MILES
PACKAGE, STEREO SYSTEM. STK #6149823B.

527-0129 '10.900 564-8668


2000 DODGE 1500 4X4 1999.DODGE 2500 SLT
EXCELLENT CONDITION, BED CUMMINGS TURBO DIESEL, 5
LINER, TOOL BOX, AUTOMATIC., SPEED, LEATHER, CDiTAPE,
CRUISE, TOW PACKAGE.
564-8333 '4800 795-6800 '8.995


2004 DODGE DAKOTA SXT
EXT. CAB ONLY 40,000 MILES,
CD, BEDLINER.


795-6800


'11,995'


....................


4DR QUAD CAB, AUTOMATIC.


628-5100 '9.999


1998 FORD ESCORT LX
AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR, LIKE
NEW IN AND OUTI

563-2003 REDUCED '2,750


2002 DODGE RAM 1500
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION,
READY FOR WORK OR PLAY.

628-5100 '10,900









2000 FOR X OR R
4X4


795-7371 '8,995


.~


2004 DODGE RAM
CLEAN!
STK# 7051944A


I 564-8668 '12,995|










2002 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT


795-7371 $6.995


1999 DODGE RAM 2500 3/4 TON
QUAD CAB CUMMINGS DIESEL,
AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR, RUNS
GREAT, TOW PACKAGE.
563-2003 ONLY '8,550


VICTORIA LEATHER INTERIOR,
LIKE NEW, DUAL POWER SEATS,
LOADED!
564-8333 '2,90


a l J..V . . rIxU . rLY
ECONOMICAL
STK #7056199B.

'8.995 564-8668


795-9338


2000 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
LARAMIE 5.2 V8, AUTOMATIC,
COLD AIR, RUNS GREAT. FREE 4
MONTH, 4,000 MILE WARRANTY.
563-2003 REDUCED '5,450










2002 FORD ECONOLINE
CARGO VAN
AUTOMATIC.

628-5100 '7.999


SU r.. ru. .rw .-.n.v- ,. -r
DOOR, AUTOMATIC, POWER
WINDOWS, ONLY 21,000 MILES.

'8,995 795-4981 '8,995


SSFIRE



'26.400


b I


I I


| �


I - - I


I


.. M 7 - 0 'I-n.-,


4


114M


I















UTRU UC MY r L) Lv -H7 K U~IrmrrI( USAY UE.1,207


1 r1f 1 b hm ----- 1oo


0I4


TRITON, AUTOMATIC, ALLOY
WHEELS, DIAMOND PLATE
TOOLBOX, BEDLINER.
527-0129 '8.950


1996 FORD F250 4X4 XLT
EXTENDED CAB, 5.4 V8,
AUTOMATIC, TOW PACKAGE,
LOW MILES.
563-2003 REDUCED '3,795


2003 FORD F250 SUPER
DUTY 4X4 XL EXTENDED
QUAD CAB, 5.4 TRITON V8,
AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR.
563-2003 REDUCED '8,695


2uUJ ruF u rFDu UUmLLY zuu4 IUKD FOCUS WAGON
LARIAT EDITION, DIESEL, 31,000 ALUMINUM WHEELS, P/W, P/L,
MILES. ROOF RACK.

795-9338 '30,000 795-4981 '11.995


2006 FORD FOCUS SES
WAGON ZXW ONE OWNER,
LOADED GREAT ECONOMY.

795-7371 '12.995


1996 FORD MUSTANG LX
3.8 V6, AUTOMATIC, COLD AIR,
NICE CLOTH INTERIOR,
PERFECT BODY, RUNS GREAT!
563-2003 ONLY 12,675


2000 HONDA ACCORD
AUTOMATIC, LEATHER, 3.0L
VTEC V6 ENGINE.

628-5100 '8.999


zuu2 ruKU Mnu arnm
3.8L V6 ENGINE, 4 SPEED
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION,
GOOD GAS MILEAGE.
628-5100 '10,900









2006 HONDA CBR1000 RR
BLACK, 2,400 MILES.


527-0129 ONLY '9,999


795-7371


2004 HONDA GOI
ILLUSION RED WIl
STRIPING, 18,000

527-0129


. 199 7 i F r -nu I
ONE OWNER.


'9,995 795-7371


LD WING 1800 2005 HONDA INTERCEPTOR 2002 ISUZU AX
TH CUSTOM 800 ONLY 5,200 MILES, LIKE LIKE NEW!
MILES. BRAND NEW! STK #70425529A.

ONLY 14,900 527-0129 ONLY 7.,999 564-8668


EXTRA CLEAN, 4 CYLINDER, GAS
SAVER!

564-8333 '2,695









2006 KIA SPECTRA


795-7371 $9,995









1999 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS LS LEATHER, ONLY
23,000 MILES.

795-9338 $7,995









2004 NISSAN FRONTIER
EXTENDED CAB.
STK #7077762B.

564-8668 '12,995


2uu0 r4IA AMAN11 m2uuJ RIO ur TIMAM
LUXURY SHARP!
STK# 5069693A. STK #5121850B

564-8668 '12.995 564-8668 '8.995


1996 LINCOLN] TOWNCAR
LEATHER, TINT, POWER SEATS,
HOMELINK, POWER LOCKS &
WINDOWS, CRUISE.
795-6800 '6,995


2001 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS LS CLOTH SEATS,
59,000 MILES.

795-9338 '7.995


1996 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
SIGNATURE V8 AUTOMATIC, ICE
COLD AIR, LEATHER, EXTRA
CLEAN, LOW MILES.
563-2003 ONLY '5,950









2001 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS LS LEATHER,
69,000 MILES.

795-9338 '7,995


2000 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
PRESIDENTIAL ONLY 57,000
MILES, ALLTHE OPTIONS.

795-4981 .='10,995


...-....--............ 1
MARQUIS ONLY 20,300 MILES,
NICE FAMILY CAR.

527-0129 '10.900



/i


2000 OLDSMOBILE INTRIGUE
V6, EXTRA CLEAN, LOADED,
ONLY 74,000 MILES.

564-8333 '4,995


2003 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
PEWTER WITH MATCHING
LEATHER, LOCAL CAR, ONLY
40,000 MILES.
795-9338 -'13,995


MOUNTAINEER 4X4
LEATHER INTERIOR, CD PLAYER,
ONE OWNER.
795-4981 '7,995


1999 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE
V6, AUTOMATIC, COLD, AIR,
LEATHER, SUNROOF,
EXCELLENT CONDITION
563-2003 ONLY '5,495


1998 MAZDA MPV ALL
SPORT 4WD, V6, AUTOMATIC,,
DUALAIR. FREE 4 MONTH 4,000
MILE WARRANTY.
563-2003 REDUCED '4,475


2002 MERCURY VILLAGER
VAN GREEN/SILVER, ONE
OWNER, DUALAIR.

795-4981 '7,995


1998 PONTIAC FIREBIRD
FORMULA 2DR COUPE,
AUTOMATIC.


628-5100


'9,9


99


2007 PONTIAC G5
ONLY 6,000 MILES, CD, SPOILER,
WINDOWTINT, CRUISE,
ALUMINUM WHEELS, XM RApIO.
795-6800 '15495


2003 SATURN SL200
FULL POWER, 4 DOOR,
AUTOMATIC, AIR, 48,000 MILES.

795-9338 '8,995


1999 SATURN SW
ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED
AUTOMATIC.

628-5100 '6,999


2004 SUBARUFORESTERAWD 2005 SUZUKI GSX R1300 2001 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
ONLY 25,000 MILES, SUNROOF, HAYABUSA SHOW BIKE 4DR SEDAN LE, AUTOMATIC.
LEATHER INTERIOR. CHROME EVERYTHING,.THIS
BIKE IS ONE QOFA KIND.
527-0129'15.900 527-0129 ONLY '10900 628-5100 '10.900


2000 TOYOTA COROLLA
4 SPEED AUTOMATIC, GREAT
ECONOMY

628-5100 '6,999


UU01 iUTUIOY TAENNiAM LE
SILVER, V6 ENGINE, 4 SPEED
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION.

628-5100 '8,900


Get two more feet of bed out of your pickup truck


Hauling around eight-foot
long building materials in a truck
with a six-foot bed (as is the case
with most four-door pickups)
means the tailgate has to be
down, which means stuff can fall


out the back if you're not care- (thick) diamond-plate aluminum
ful. Get that extra two feet of that won't rust, the extender is
secured storage with the $400 also great for eight-foot beds
Hide-A-Bed Truck Bed Extender with a toolbox in the back or just
from American Truck Products anytime you need the extra stor-
(ATP). Made from heavy-gauge age. The unit flips down for easy


loading, folds into two inches
when not in use and neatly inte-
grates with the tailgate, which
means you don't have to remove
it from the vehicle and store it
when it's not in use. The exten-


der stays with the truck at all
times until you need it, which
makes sense to us. ATP says the
extender takes about 40 seconds
to fold/unfold, weighs about 45-
50 pounds depending on the


application and is compatible
with most bed caps and covers.
For more information, call 1-
866-832-2874 or visit
www.americantruckprod-
uctsinc.com.


1IRD 2004 FORD THUNDERBIRD
PREMIUM ONE OWNER, ONLY
17,000 MILES.

'4,995 795-7371 '28,995


'11,995


2000 NISSAN QUEST LE
DUAL DOORS, VCR, REAR AIR,
LOW MILAGE.


795-9338 '6.9 95


1997 OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS
V6, AUTOMATIC, FULL POWER,
ONLY 75,000 MILES, GOOD
ECONOMY.
795-9338 '3,995


Buy a Great Pre-Owned Vehicle



Right Here in Dial a Deal!


7076Q2 -


---7


& d


1. .. - a "


1 -, � -. - - -


I " I


i -- +I


TUESDAY, JUNE- 19, 2007 7D


rtTwis roumy (FL) CHRoNiCLE


16.9


95


795-9338



















*0-year'1O0.000.mie bir.mted powert~a.n warrant j
* ,*year'.60 000-mil limited asic warran~ty
6- ear/I00.0OC rmile ,Mtted ar.t' *,rforaMjon warran~ty
5-e r60 000*mn~le 24-r~our riacdE.Je &as5.sK.r.:e*


a, i M-1/


h.O, 1. PROECIO


*M)KA MOORS
ID e AmN tV rw C;
f, J,(~ C


2007 Kia Rio
Automatic
transmission, highest
safety rating in its
class


4.0,-
MPG


2007 Kia Optima
Automatic transmission,
fully loaded, safer than
Camry or Accord


2007 Ka Sorentfo
Automatic, 262
horsepower, 5000 lb.
r m.@- wing capacity, safest in
its class


2007 Kia Spectra
Automatic transmission,
pw, pi, cd player...
LOADED



MPG


2007 Kia Sportage
Automatic transmission,
loaded w/more standard
features than any
vehicle in its class


2007 Kia Rondo
Best valued crossover
available anywhere!!
0000


,.- . . , ' .'-)


K 9


KI


Visit us on the web @ www.citn.uskia.comn


8D TIUESDAY, JUNE 19~, 2007 1--


CIRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[ //}/)M//If


* ,' .. .., " .? " , " -_


* ~Li
t~


40Mma , An-,


El


(-Y, 2 0 1


.1 j
















TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 9D


CIrRus CoIr N (FL) CHRONICLE;


British Motor Corporation's -
the MGB's maker - stable of
sports cars that included
Triumph Spitfire and TR4.
The Mark II versions of the
MGB arrived in 1967. Although
there were few exterior changes,
the engine was upgraded for
smoother operation and greater
durability.
The four-
speed trans-
mission
received an .
additional .
synchroniz- -'
er for first .
gear, and a ....
seldom-seen ",
automatic
was added to .
the options
list.
Sadly, the
decline and l
fall of the
MGB began
in 1969
w hen
mandatory
emissions
equipment
began cutting into the car's per-
formance. By 1974, further
indignities were foisted on the
'B' in the form of hideous-look-
ing crash bumpers. Instead of
redesigning a new front end,
British Leyland, the MG's newly
amalgamated parent, tacked on a
black rubbery-looking nose and
rear bumper cover, then hiked
the car a couple of inches to
meet the mandated bumper
height.
What was once an elegant
swan had been turned into an
ugly duckling. Devotees of the
marque became disillusioned
that the company would take
such quick-fix shortcuts that
basically ruined the car's good
looks.
British Leyland experimented
with the MGB's emissions-sti-
fled power supply, installing an
inline six-cylinder in place of the


four-banger and rebadging it the
MGC. The result, however,
proved less than satisfying in the
handling department and it was
abandoned after two years.
The emasculated - and out-
gunned MGB soldiered on until
1980 when it was finally retired
from battle after an 18-year run.
By that time,
more than
half a mil-
lion cars,
including
150,000 GTs
had been
S'produced,
outselling
S the MGA by
more than
400,000.
wIn its
prime, the
M G B
proved to be.
an excellent
introduction
into the
world of
sports cars.
Its wide
stance and
low center of gravity gave it
excellent handling, and its mod-
estly powered, but sturdy engine
earned numerous accolades for
reliability. The car's lengthy pro-
duction cycle not only ensures a
good supply of spare parts, but
has helped to keep it within
affordable reach of the average
hobbyist.
For unabashed driving pleas-
ure, the MGB was much more
than a transportation device. It
was the embodiment of a
lifestyle that focused on spirited,
wind-in-the-face driving that left
the owners of more mundane
sedans and station wagons green
with envy.
0 Malcolm Gunn is
Wheelbase Communications'
chief road tester and historic
writer. Wheelbase is a world-
wide supplier of automobile
news, reviews and features.


BW MALCOLM GU'NN
Wheelbase Communications


cycle, driving - or
riding - in an MGB
with the top down is
the closest you'll come to auto-
motive nirvana.
The heady mix of leather,
gasoline and motor oil, com-
bined with whatever natural or
man-made odors waft by your
nostrils is a seductive automo-
tive opiate. In this age of syn-
thetic-laden interiors, bank vault
passenger compartments and
well dampened road/engine
noises, cars such as the MGB are
as out of step with the times as
dancing the jitterbug at a rave
concert.
However in its day, the MGB
was considered so advanced as
to cause much consternation
among the sports-car 'purists'.
When the first car rolled off its
Abingdon, England assembly
line in 1962, the public was
shocked to find a car with sever-
al new features. Real. doors, for
example. That is to say doors
with inside and outside handles .
. . and glass that rolled up and
down. There was also a padded
dash and a roomy, comfortable
cockpit. All of these 'features'
were firsts for the venerable MG
series of roadsters that can trace
their roots back to the late 1920s
(the name MG stands for Morris
Garages, where the cars were
first built).
The MGB's unit-body con-
struction was also a departure
from' tradition of separate lad-


der-type frames. The
Pininfarina-influenced (the
Italian design studio that puts
forth creations for Ferrari)
styling was more nondescript
than earlier MGs, but was nicely
proportioned and honest in a
conservative sort of way.
Though non-traditional in`
content and structure, the MGB
still carried over some key ele-
ments from its MGA predeces-
sor. The standard-issue 98-
horsepower 1.8-liter OHV four
cylinder engine was a bored-out
carry-over from the MGA pow-
erplant first developed in 1955.
The suspension - independent
coil springs in front with leaf
springs supporting a solid rear
axle - was also derived from
the earlier car.
Although improved over the
MGA, not all was perfect for the
MGB, in fact, far from it in some
cases. The most cantankerous
'feature' was the difficult-to-
operate top. The process of
securing the snug-fitting snaps
while wrestling with the frame
supports was an unpleasant
experience at best. Many MGB
owners opted for the available
fiberglass hardtop for off-season
protection, while die-hard driv-
ers employed the standard ton-
neau cover, even during mon-
soon-strength downpours.
And with the old MGA's sus-
pension, there was little to brag
about in the ride department.
The first MGBs imported to
North America sold for around
$2,500. Besides the removable


harrd-
l pl ~top.
GB we x t r a -
BBB .B , opions ,,gsiIud-


La) cock de Norman\ ille
overdrive and an AM radio.
It didn't take long for the word
to spread that the inexpensive
MGB was not only a blast to
drive, but out-handled and out-
braked (front discs were stan-
dard) just about anything else


around. True, the car "\as no
rocket sled, but witht 0-60 m.p.h.
tirnmes in le-ss, than 12 seconds, it
\as no earIl - I1 fls slouch
either
The ioadster minodel \a, tol-
lo\%ed min 1905 b3 MIGBGT, a
gracefully-styled 2+2 hatchback
that added a measure of practi-
cality to the car's sporting
nature. Both models were eager-
ly snapped up by an increasing
number of fans, earning it the
number-one position in the


Chroncle


- "

2~ILI


To place an ad, call 563-5966


" iClassifieds

InPrint

J and

Online

All
The Time


Fa: 32)53-66 Tl.Fe: 88)82-34 E al:casifes ho .ceolne 3o wbit:ww crnilonie3 o


Yamaha
2000, 25HP High thrust,
4 stroke, 66 hrs., $2,200.
(352) 249-0860
Cell (352) 476-1113



SEA DOO Ltd/Set
'03 & '03 GTX 3 Seaters
Low hrs Grg kept & serv.
Dual galv. trir. MintI
$12,900 (352) 382-1623



17ft. PATHFINDER
'99, Tunnel Hull,
Yamaha 50HP, trim
tabs, power pole, 85 lb
trolling mtr, much more
$8,500. (352) 628-5418
AEROCRAFT 19.7'
Boat w/trir. 4.3 Ltr., V-6
Merc, OD, Trim Tabs,
Runs Good. $1,750
352-628-3969/205-0291
ALUM. BOAT 17'
19 hp Go Devil, Trlr,,
Spare tire, Floral City
$3,000 obo
(352) 341-0292
CAROLINA SKIFF
'01 17DLX, '04 Yamaha
60HP 2 strk. 1 yr. warr.
GPS, DF, LOADED
$11.495, (352) 422-1412
CAROLINA SKIFF 21'
S'00,ftht/rear casting
deck; CC, 115HP Yam,
ack pit. Many extras.
111,500. (352) 726-0939
F16,.SEARAYDER
'96, 1-owner. bimini top,
radio,.92 hrs., exc. cond
garage kept, $5,000
obo (352) 465-5796


Our world first.
Every Doiv


Cl.; .; t


-o


GODFREY 22'
HURRICANE Deck Boat
'91, 115 hp Merc, many
new parts w/Trlr. $8,000
S (352) 726-2408
GRADY WHITE 22.6'
W/A Cuddy, 200 hp
Mariner, 0/B. Alum. Top
W/Top Gun Outriggers.
Garmin Chart plotter.
$12K obo 352-302-8266.
HURRICANE
23ft. Deck Boat, 150
Marinne w rebuilt
'03, trailer. $6,500.
(352) 212-7500
Lowes 22' Pontoon
2001, Blmini top, A.M.
cover, Toilet, depth/F.F.
4 fish seats & tandem
trlr. 90 HP$13,945; 70hrs.
502-345-0285 (IN FL)
PROLINE
'06, 19ft.. '06 Mercury
Optimax. 115 H out-
board, T-Top, color
electronics, still under
fact. warranty, many,
many options w/boat &
trailer, asking $22,500.
(352) 628-4668
SABRE
16FT center console,
70HP Johnson, bimini
top, Performance trailer
$2,000 (352) 726-5329
STAMAS 1982 24'
Cuddy cabin, new eng,
new outdrive in 1996.
Low hrs. Fly bridge,
outriggers, fishing ma-
chine. See at Aqua
Power in Inglis. $9000.



GEORGIA BOY
1979, 27FT,. Perfect
cond. $4,200
(352) 637-4938,
GULFSTREAM 32'
'94, 62K, Sleeps 6, new
AC, flooring, tires. Exc,
Cond. $10,000
352-270-3162/257-2387


- m. at
Vehcls]


JAMBOREE 29'
2005, V-10 Class C
13K, Loadedl Perfect
Condltonl Ready to gol
$48,500 (352)465-2138
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/slide, 30K, V-10,.
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457
MONACO
'00, Monarch, 34', Class
A w/sllde, 30K, V-10,
spotless. Just serviced.
$47,000 (352)746-9457



5TH WHEEL 30'
Super slide 2000
Meadowbrook. Exc.
cond. $18,200
(352) 746-0348
AIRSTREAM 31'
1979, Great Shapel
New AC, carpet, tires,
uphol., $8,900 obo
(352) 257-4260
CASITA 17' TT
'99, All options,new tires
& bearings, equal.htch.
Garaged! Exc. Cond.
$9,950 (352)465-2142
COLEMAN POPUP
'89, Air, refrig, stereo,
exc. cond. $3200/ obo
S(352) 489-9736 or
(352) 422-2874
JAYCO 36', '04
Toy Hauler. 4,000 watt
Gen., 15,000 AC. 16"
Wheels, Fuel Station
$26,950 (502) 345-0285
Kodiac
'03 Skamper 190,25ft,
AC, heat. full Bath, 2
showers, like new,
many extras, all manu-
als, clean, $8,000. obo
503-5487, 313-477-3125
LAYTON 26' 1993
Micro, AC. Fr/bkdrs. 23'
awning, new tires, refrig.
Exc. cond. w/'98 Dodge
Durango. 4X4, V-8, tow
pkg. 6 pass, Rr AC,
both/ $12,900
Call (352) 628-3376


ACURA RSX-S '04
6sp man., mnrf, 54K,
leather, 6cd pampered
$14,900/obo
352-344-4505
DODGE INTREPID
'99. 2.7L. 30MPG HWY,
48K mi. All power, CD,
tinted windows, non
smoker, women driven,
garaged, exc. cond.
$5200. (352) 795-6151
FORD
'95, Cougar, burgundy,
clean, full pwr., cold
AC, auto. asking $1,895.
(352) 726-4267
HYUNDAI
2006 Azera. 25k iMi.
$19.000 (352) 382-0148
(352) 422-7884
LINCOLN
2000, Signature Series,
Exc. cond. 72k mi.
hardly driven.
$10,000 Negotiable
(352) 489-0122
LINCOLN
'99, Towncar Signature
series. 107k mi., excel
cond. non smoker,
$6,500. SMW, 382-1905
LINCOLN TownCar
2003, Signature Series,
Showroom Cond.
Carriage Roof. $17,500
OBO (352) 489-1639
LINCOLN Towncar
'93, SIg. Series, leather.
123K ml., Great Shapel
Everything worksl Cold
AC. $2,500 341-0718
TOYOTA
'94, Camry Sedan,
clean inside/out, excel.
running cond., auto
137k ml $3,200 obo
352-465-4801
TOYOTA CELICA
'93, GT, 150K, Good
Cond, $1,600
(352) 634-5301


CAMARO
'72, Real Z28, orig. eng.
auto w/ console, cortez
silver, w/ blk, stripes,
$20k (352) 422-7233
FORD 1940
New paint, Chevy
350 motor & trans. drive
it home. Very clean.
(352) 212-7500
FORD
1956 T-Bird, Red, new
restoration, rebuilt eng.,
new paint, both tops,
Pwr. Steer. $29,500.
(352) 628-1734
FORD
1965 Thunderbird
landau, goodcond.,
all orig. $2,500
(352) 637-3333
FORD THUNDERBIRD
'89 Super Coupe. 5 spd.
Super Charged Eng.
$1800/obo
(352) 382-7001
MERCEDES
1987, 560 SL, 125K,
White. Both tops, New
Mich. tires, $10,500
(352) 586-6805
- - -MGB-
1977, good shape, new
tires, new roof, $4,000
obo. Moving
(352) 400-1068



CHEVY
'99, Silverado, 36k mil,
long bed, V6, auto,
rhino liner, new tires,
tool box, $8,500. obo
352-382-1073, 422-1834
CHEVY S-10
'02, Exc. Cond. Bed liner
& Tonneau Cover,
Tint, 69K, $6,300
(352) 344-2331
INTERNATIONAL
2000 Semi w/Sleeper
9200 Model series,
60 Detroit, 10 spd. trans.
air ride, tandem rear
end 273, w/ wetline, PC
set up, $20,500. obo
(352) 726-1373


ISUZU
'06, 14ft Box Truck w/lift
gate, PW, PL, AC, 17k
mi., excel cond., asking
$26,000. (352) 613-4891
NISSAN
'99, Frontier XE, 99k mi,
new tires, runs great,
Asking $4,800.
(352) 527-8706



JEEP
'04, Grande Cherokee
Laredo, white w/ grey
Int., 6 cyl, 40k ml. 2W/D
$14,900. (352) 249-1196
JEEP CHEROKEE
'96 4x4, gd. tires, mint
engine, cold air, runs
great, 140K mi. $2500.
(352) 382-4142
SUBURBAN 4x4 '88
Navy/grey. front & rear
air, tow pkg. Clean &
solid machine.$2,200.
obo (352) 795-3970



CHEVY
'94, Conversion Van,. TV,
tape player, new tires,
completely tuned,
(352) 228-2239
CHEVY CARGO
VAN 2002, 8600LB. 5.7L,
bin pkg, tow pkg.
Roof racks, $7800.
(352) 628-6300
CHEVY LUMINA
'95, Looks good, runs
good. New tires,
battery & brake pads.
$2,500 (352) 726-7262
CHEVY VENTURE
2001, pristine condition
mobility express lift on
bumper. 94K ml, $4,500
(352) 613-0078
DODGE
'89 Conversion Van, V8,
auto. TV. runs great,
$1,900. cash
(352) 637-1257


DODGE RAM 350
'91, 15 passenger van,
dual AC, PS,PB, AM/FM
Stereo Radio/CD, tow
pkg. $2,900 341-0292



BIG DOG
'98, Chromed Out,
board & stroked,
12k mi. Sacrifice. Please
Call. (352) 228-2239
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Ultra Classic,
Voyager kit, (like trike)
reverse kit, cust. paint,
10,300 ml. $19,000.
(352) 302-6200
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05, 1200 Sportster Cus-
tom, many extras, well
maintained, $7,895.
(352) 637-6284
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2000 Elec. Glide Classic
1450 cc, Vance N Heins
pipes, sport windshield,
lots of chrome, only
15,800 mi. Uke new
$11,995 (352) 467-0872
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006, Street Glide.
1450CC, Like Newl 2,200
mi, blk, $13,500 OBO
(352) 400-0360
HARLEY DAVIDSON.;
'93, Softail, customized,-,
1340, lots of chrome, ,
$6,000 (352)341-2019 ,
HONDA Z
'03, CR250R, like new,,. :
never riden, $800. of ex-,
tra new parts Incl.
$2,500. (352) 572-6023
HONDA '07
Aero 750, Mint Cond.,
Showroom new, Less
than 1.500 mi. $6,600.,
Includes Windshield
and 2 Helmets. New
house forces sale.
352-400-2277
HONDA 2003 VTX
1300, well maintained,
garage kept, lots of
xtras, Exc. cond. $6500.
(352) 527-6639


Call 563-5592




to advertise



your business




here!


m







10D TU i sAY, .I[NE- 19, 2007


Suiwt LINCOLN MERCURY


rrirnnri~+,Fn xr R�-,


s U UUr) JL r U

In 2008, Town Car will
celebrate its 27'" year as
the premier vehicle in the
traditional Large Luxury
Sedan segment. Customer
loyalty is at the heart of
\ this vehicle's staying
power. In fact, the Lincoln
Town Car has been
recognized for having the
highest model loyalty in
the Luxury Car segment.
Town Car is indeed
returning for 2008!

MCIJ8)JZA JlAt


'07LINCOLN MKX


L ijI~/J;'~j1~ ~ I' - I


Satellite radio, moon roof, leather interior.


'07 MONTEREY DEMO
Dune pearl, po,.'jr door ani rear lift gale leather four
captains 'eals heated & cooled seats
LIST: s31,760S2 3 61 8


S'08 GRAND MARQUIS GS
#1 Selling Luxury
Car in Florida 16
years running


5 STAR CRASH RATING
ONLY _ R.





Keyless entry system, keyless remote, cruise control,
power windows/locks, AM/FM stereo w/CD player,
8 way power driver seat, Michelin tires, tilt steering wheel


. w '07 GRAND MARQUIS GS


LAST ONE! "


$17,995,
Keyless entry system, keyless remote, cruise control,
power windows/locks, AM/FM stereo w/CD player,
8 way power driver seat, Michelin tires, tilt steering wheel


'07 MILAN


'07 MONTEGO
Most ideal car, over all


UU MEIVKLUKY
MOUNTAINEER 4X4
Leather L L' player
or, ou fier
$7,995.


JiI


03 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
Lt hite leather
#P320'
$12,995.


04 FORD
F150 XLT
Ped 26- miles
45R3205
$21,995.


02 MERCURY
VILLAGER VAN
Green �Sil er orec
inter dual . ar
$7p9950


# .'R.:


02 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
uOne Otl ner le,,ther


$89995* 1599995*


02 MERCURY
SABLE -
'ili er 34 000 m(, e, -
#P3,'13-1
$9,995.


UU LINUULN
TOWNCAR
Presderntial onl 5 l.
miles all the options
S10,995.


04 FORD FOCUS
WAGON
ShIL er Icad -d

$11,995.


SABLE LS
'It ier r 9 .'0 ril ,
F ,9 9-
$11,995.


p- I a, I F F F I F F F .1


04 GRAND
MARQUIS
Gold leather orn)
35 000 males #8'034
*13,995.


04 TOWN CAR
LIMITED
il-.r o rnl| .-4 mle: m.:,n ro:t'f
#9066-4
*22,995.


06 FORD TAURUS
SEL
A loonroof leather
tR322-1
$14,995.


05 FORD
F150 XLT
- hitte supercreit
trailer toil #P3229
$22,995.


05 GRAND
MARQUIS LS
Silver only 25 00C'
miesleather
114.995.


04 MONTEREY
VAN
Poti er side doors
leather #R3216
$15.995.


04 SABLE
WAGON
Leather sdlver
20 000 miles #R3126
S115.995.


I I ~ H


04 SABLE
WAGON
Leather 37 seat
#R3243
115.995.


ii Im


04 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
ULTIMATE
hi les their .'. i.fii m./i6
# 2,995.
122,995.


05 LINCOLN
TOWNCAR
Onli 2 000 miles
#/899
*23.995.


I GENUINE MOTORCRAF" '"
I PREMIUM WEAR A/C CHECK
INDICATOR WIPER BLADES ' -


1 Genume Nloircralt!-,qpFcr bldei :aI ear inacdir.per
limre of sen.ice Oide-i Etc eUP See Sen. ice /Ad,.i.or for
I ~ details Eipires '64.11:007CCC


1 5$ 995
I ^
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
S FREON AVAILABLE
134A & R-12
Coupon must tbe presented at ime fl �er.i C- order .vite up
See Ser.,ice Ad isor for details E

05 TOWN CAR
LIMITED
Ior) .9b . miles
#/8959
124.995.


06LINCOLN
TOWN CAR
Limited sIt er moonroof
#P3-J42
*28.995.


FUEL SAVER VV "
S PACKAGE v t '
SGenuine Mt.lorcr,:aM Premium lnIpel bia.e yte I
I SnthetrJ Blend oil 3nd filer ,:hang * Test batted'
SRot'te anid inspect tcjr tires Check bellts; and hoesi
SChreck air and Cabin air filters * Top off all fluids
I Up to sEw quarts of MolorcrartE oil Taxes and diesel ehi.;les
exyla Disposal Iees nol included in sonie localiorns Coupon I
must be presented at time of service order ~ate-.up See
Ser.iceAd,'isoi for details. Eypires 6.2,".)'7 COCC


05 FORD
RANGER XLT
Black 16 auto 1~ ;
miles ttP3205
116,995.


07 LINCOLN
TOWNCAR
Gold 2- 000 miles
moonroof #P33249
*29,995.


MARQUIS
Falm Beacht Edtion
gold half top #h3190
$13,995.


05 MERCURY
MARINER
Silter . V6
leather #88564
*16.995.


04 FORD T-BIRD
AIarooir, one ouner tao
tops Ihard soft) #R3740

*29,995.


MMTRCMRA;fBRAKSINI AUD
I Engineered for your vehicle. I


89ORLESS
L'ewleri~n-jlaled retatt tilrclorrratrl�, or Ge-nuine Poid'bral~e pads or
MaI Jiajim ipirrbai l oi 11) p,-l sue bn mailPads or sirices only o
rolit4 , hum- 4TaieE Ill Pads -:-I Shoes pulcnlaie must b
Mad mait.E-. en :,1'it i(C r i''G!24!nl3 Rdemrptin ~forms mnust
I ~e'pi-. for rrail r, rueierptiorn civratic~le ,ahiicle applications
ird retail; tttouoiq 6i 'j~l, l7CCC


LINOLNMERUR

SALE HOURS:


CmIRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L !


'07 LINCOLN MKZ


I


-j


1..


)Tof


AMOW















TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2007 11D


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC


- - - -


11 F





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ILF TinEh ky- TNE 19. 200l7


4clIIY ~ I


E0 0 00s EE


Jeep


vM %I!0 Wo
REDESIGNED
JOT SEBRING CONVERTIBLE


mo


CR=m S A,


mw~


AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY


07 DODGE CAlBER


DODGE GRAND


CARAI


07 OIRYSIE
PruimER
!4 r
.R ,..U-


AN DODGE RAM 1500


,D, m *


Sow LM
P�TRU


V


JEEP WRANGLER


2006 CHRYSLER 300
DO-3418A
$ 20,490t
I 2004 DODGE DURANGO LIMITED 4X4


~TIzz=~


wRloo


MONTH


* All payments are based on 8.49% APR for 84 months. $2,500 cash or trade equity. Price and payments include all
incentives to dealer. Plus tax, tag, title and dealer fee of $399.50 W.A.C. Pictures are for illustration purposes only.


Price and pa


7T1


DO-3587P
$20,495t
2006 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED
3594P
$26,495t
2006 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT


HD70055A
$29,995t
x, tag, title and dealer fee of $399.50 and includes $1,000 down (Cash or trade equy).WA. C


1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA
14358 CORTEZ BLVD., BROOKSVILLE
2077 HIGHWAY 44 WEST, INVERNESS
1-866-434-3064

1 -877-MY-CRYSTAL
CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


* A


Open 24 hours a day at Free CARFAX
www.crystalautos.com Vehicle History

C S RYS R ~ oo Jeep


CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE
VISIT US 24/7 @ CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


411


:ILP I LIESDAY, JUNE 1�,P, ZkJkJ /


,JLIC


c: vi re -e !!i-L ra m


kvkt--- Ad


CarPlex

Certified
Pre-Owne
1995 CHEVROLET LUMINA
S%$5,988t


1995 JEEP WRANGLER SE 4X4
CR-27075B
$8,988t

2000 MERCURY SABLE GS
CR-J60569A
$8,988t
2004 DODGE NEON SE
3589P
$9,988t
2002 FORD FOCUS ZX3 PREMIUM
CR-J70023A
$9,988t
1998 GMC SUBURBAN 1500 SLT
CR-27141A
$9,988t
2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA
CR-9932P
$9,998t
2001 CHEVROLET BLAZER LT 4X4
CR-27300A
$9,998t
2004 SATURN L300 2
CR-N7058B
$9,998t
2005 DODGE CARAVAN SXT
DO-J70056A
$11,495t
2003 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE GLS
CR-J70306A
$l 1 997t
2006 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS 2.7
D70216A
*17,995t
2004 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
DO-3267A
$18,490t
2004 DODGE RAM 1500 LARAMIE
DO-3564P
$18,995t




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