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Citrus County chronicle
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00212
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: July 31, 2005
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00212

Full Text





Professional soccer
,TA 'ai Former
Crystal Rive
standout
shines at
SL 4E MLS all-star
MR P 5 game.
wAomn Me focai PAGE 11


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CITRUS


7C 0 U NT Y


HIG6 H
89
LOW
75


FORECAST: Partly
cloudy and warm with
scattered showers and
thunderstorms
PAGE 2A


Graham defense marks details


Court records: Attorney probing for investigation inconsistencies


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Gary Graham's defense is going on
the offense.
Since mid-April, the former county
judge's attorney, Stephen Romine,
has taken a half-dozen depositions
with investigators and other witness-
es in his client's court case.
Graham, who served as county
judge from 1986 to 1993 before being
removed by the state Supreme Court,
faces up to life in prison if convicted
of sexual battery He pleaded not
guilty and is free on bond.


Graham is accused of fondling two
10-year-old girls, including the daugh-
ter of a former girlfriend, who stayed
one night at his Dunnellon home.
The case came to authorities' atten-
tion in late April 2004. A friend of the
woman's daughter reportedly told her
mother about it while the two were
watching a television movie.
Those depositions, encased in five
thick volumes at the Citrus County
Clerk of Courts Office, contain hun-
dreds of pages of detailed testimony
that Romine hopes will prove the alle-
gations untrue.
Romine's depositions with two
investigators and a Citrus County


sheriff's deputy include:
One girl insisted the acts took
place in February 2004, about a week
after Valentine's Day. That child's
mother recently told prosecutors the
incidents actually occurred in
December 2003. When Romine told
Deputy Mike Tackett this during his
deposition, Tackett said he was con-
cerned the girl had waited so long to
report it
The investigator for the
Department of Children and
Families, Holly Capps, told Romine it
didn't matter when the incident hap-
pened. She also said her job was sole-
ly to make sure the children were


safe, and not to determine whether was asked whether he thought local
what they were saying was truthful. law enforcement wanted to embar-
Still, a June 2004 DCF report conclud- rass Graham. He said, "Let me put it
ed one of the girls was molest- this way: Obviously he has a
ed, and that conclusion was very prominent name in that
based solely on Capps' inter- community There are people
view of the girl. who like him and people who
Tim Pope, a special agent g don't. You'll be able to get a
with the Florida Department & . better idea of what I think
of Law Enforcement, admitted when the case comes to
to Romine that he and other court."
FDLE agents removed items Assistant state attorney
from Graham's home that were Gary Rich Buxman declined to
not specified in a search war- Graham comment.
rant Pope also said that items facing sexual Graham's trial is set for
sought for in the warrant, battery charges. Nov. 28. His next status con-
including a robe the girls ference before Circuit Court
described as one Graham wore, were Judge Ric Howard is Aug. 15.
not found in his home.
In an interview Thursday, Romine Please see GRAHAM/Page 4A


right at home













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NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Let7s get one thing straight. Anastasia
O'Grady may have been born in
Russia, she may have spent most of
her life in Russia, but this 12-year-old
adopted daughter of Mike and Kelli
O'Grady, of Lecanto. is 100 percent
American girl.
Today she celebrates one year as a
United States citizen
Anastasia is one of five Russian orphans
adopted by Citrus County families last year
through Hand In Hand International
Adoptions
Her first American word? "FRnky."
"These jeans are funky," she would say.
"That shirt is funky"
She learned much of her English watch-
ing television. She %would say Chill out,
Bubba." "Take a chill pill "Eight'seven
Central." "'Mom, that paper towel is so
absorbent"'
It's been both a good and a difficult year,


her mother. Kelli, said. -I took her to Lecanto Primary School and
For the first few months. Anastasia was dropped off this child who didn't speak


shy, childlike, a bit
to find an angle
to do the mini-
mum required.
which was stan-
dard operating
procedure living
in an institution-
al orphanage,
Kelli said.
WV h ee e r
someone talked
to her, she %would
hide behind her
mother or her
father. Kelli
homeschooled


stubborn, always trying


She's
element to ou
we would nevw
didn't have


talking abi


both of her daughters, w ith local Russian-
born friend Lana Moes coming to the house
to translate. But even after a few months,
Anastasia wasn't progressing with English
and didn't seem to want to try to speak it
"The hardest decision \we had to make
was to put her in public school," Kelli said.


English, didn't know the culture, and I
couldn't stay with
her all day."
A n as t as i a
brought an remembers being
scared that first
ir family that day. but after
.school she said -
er have if we loudly in English
"I love school!"
her. Lana was invit-
ed to come to the
I-Oith C'GOracy classroom to help
out her daughter Anastasia her with lan-
guage, but after
two times Anas-
tasia announced
that she %wanted to figure it out herself.
Academically, she's caught up, and she
speaks English fluently. Socially, she's mak-
ing progress.
"She has friends, goes to birthday par-


Please see HOME/Page 5A


Trade pact


hurts sugar


producers


But consumers to do well
Associated Press
WASHINGTON U.S. shoppers should get
a price break on shirts and pants made in
Central America. American farmers and man-
ufacturers are hoping to gain new sales in the
region.
U.S. sugar growers, however, are fretting
about increased competition now that
Congress has passed and sent to the president
a trade deal that eliminates barriers between
the United States and Costa Rica, the
Dominican Republic. El Salvador, Guatemala,
Honduras and Nicaragua.
Most analysts predict that the political fall-
out from the Central American Free Trade
Agreement, which President Bush plans to
Please see PACT/Page 7A






Local family


remembers


role model
CRUSTY LOFTS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Outsiders may have considered George
McCaffrey an average sports junkie, but his
family knows better.
To them, he was a role model who taught
them about respect and life.
George, 76, died.
Saturday, July 23,
2005.
He was born in 1929,
in Astoria, N.Y
That's where his
passion for the New
York Giants and the
New York Jets devel-
oped, where he was
also a wide receiver
for the Flushing
Eagles, a semi-pro
New York football
team.
Throughout his life,
George enjoyed play- Special to the Chronicle
ing softball, bowling George McCaffrey died
and golf, as well as Saturday, July 23, at
coaching, the age of 76.
"Super Bowl Sun-
day and the U.S.
Open," George's son Tom Heaney said. "Those
were his holidays."
George and his wife met at a wedding. He

Please see MODEL/Page 5A


Annie's Mailbox . 14A
Classified ....... 8D
Crossword ... .. 14A
Horoscope ...... 11A
Movies ... . . . 11A
Obituaries ....... 6A
Stocks .......... 2D
Together ....... 12A
Eight Sections


IJIl|84578 2007511 o1


Learning from hurricanes
*B& ^-.. '*a


Building boats
ME, !:


A recent conference in Orlando showcased
a number of innovative products./22E


Anatomy
of a
batterer
Twenty
percent of
all violent
crimes in
Florida in
2003 were
domestic
violence
offenses.
/1C


Boating In
Yankeetown
* Boaters now have
a new ramp
open in
Yankeetown./3A
* Astronomers
claim discovery of
a 10th planet
in our solar
system./7A
* Astronauts take a
walk in space./8A


- '. .~ ~ .~ *..


Fe


DAVE SIGLERiCnroncie
Anastasia O'Grady and her adoptive mom, Kelli O'Grady, went shopping for back-to-school accessories Friday at Claire's Boutique in the
Crystal River Mall. Anastasia is one of five Russian orphans adopted by Citrus County families. Today marks the one-year anniversary of
her arrival in the United Sates.

Adopted Russian youngster celebrates one year with her American family









2A SUNDAYJULY 31 2005


Florida
LOTTERI ES___


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
1-5-2
PLAY 4
8-9-6-8
LOTTO
19-22-24-29-30-34
FANTASY S
5-7-18-22-27


FRIDAY, JULY 29
Cash 3:9-8-9
Play 4:1 3 7 1
Fantasy 5: 5 16 19 20 34
5-of-5 1 winner $233,598.33
4-of-5 278 $135.50
3-of-5 9,671 $10.50
Mega Money: 13 24 29 31
Mega Ball: 16
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 12 $871.50
3-of-4 MB 62 $369.50
3-of-4 1,572 $43.50
2-of-4 MB 2,006 $23.50
2-of-4 44,416 $2
1-of-4 MB 16,083 $3
THURSDAY, JULY 28
Cash 3:8 1 -4
Play 4:5 4 5 9
Fantasy 5: 3 13 16 31 35
5-of-5 3 winners $68,223.56
4-of-5 256 $128.50
3-of-5 7,861 $11.50
WEDNESDAY, JULY 27
Cash 3:1 5 8
Play 4: 0 6- 0 0
Fantasy 5:3 8 16 29 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 276 $949
3-of-5 9,238 $11
Lotto: 7-9-26-32-40-51
6-of-6 3 winners $16 million
5-of-6 63 $6,723.81
4-of-6 4,246 $81
3-of-6 91,184 $5
TUESDAY, JULY 26
Cash 3:7 8 4
Play 4:2 0 2 0
Fantasy 5: 7 11 -18 23 26
5-of-5 5 winners $41,093.53
4-of-5 487 $68
3-of-5 12,649 $7
Mega Money: 1 29 30 39
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 11 $873

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


ONLINE POLL
(1 cernus Couwryp



Do you believe the space
shuttle program is worth the
money it costs?


A. Yes. We can't abandon
space exploration.
B. No. The shuttles are get-
ting too old.
C. Yes. The program has led
to numerous new technologies.
D. No. We haven't gone to the
center of the earth yet.
To vote, simply access the


Associated Press

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. -
Michael Moore says his next
documentary already has
HMOs quaking
in their boots.
Moore has
not yet begun
shooting the
film, "Sicko,"
but his
planned cri-
tique of the
nation's health fjic. "-..
care system, F.iv .
he says, is
making "freaked-out" HMOs
warn employees what to do if
approached by the filmmaker
'At this point we haven't
shot anything yet and they're
totally discombobulated,"
Moore said at the inaugural
Traverse CityFilm Festival.
Moore, who lives near.
Traverse City, founded the
film festival with local movie
buffs to showcase excellent
films.
Though the festival is show-
ing films like "Casablanca"
and the upcoming Bill Murray


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.
us/ and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.


movie "Broken Flowers,"
Moore's involvement sparked
a conservative Texas group to
sponsor a rival festival show-
ing Hollywood classics and
conservative-themed movies.
That festival was to begin
Saturday.

Charles goes postal
LOS ANGELES Ray
Charles put his stamp on
music. Now folks can buy
stamps from the Ray Charles
Post Office Building.
Earlier this month,
President Bush signed a bill
into law that will change the
name of a building near down-
town to honor the musician,
who died last year at age 73.
An official renaming ceremo-
ny is scheduled next month.
"Ray Charles was a giant
among artistic giants," Rep.
Diane E. Watson, D-Calif.,
author of the post office bill,
said in a statement. "It is my
hope that the Ray Charles
Post Office will be only the
first of many posthumous hon-
ors for this great American


To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group
and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet. The
shelter is in Inverness near


NAME: Lexus N; Nina Mina NAME: (none)
AGE: adult AGE: yng adit AGE: kitten
SEX: F SEX: SF SEX: M
ID #: 54590 ID #: 54829 ID #: 54535


NAME: (none)
AGE: kitten
SEX: F
ID #: 53950


Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the
August 7 edition, along with a
new question.
Last week's results:
Are you happy junk food had
been banned from school cafe-
terias?


treasure."
The post office is near the
business office and recording
studio where Charles pro-
duced "Georgia on My Mind"


the airport. It is open for
adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday
and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 726-7660 for more
information.


NAME: Gypsey
AGE: yng adult
SEX: SF
ID #: 54963


A Yes. Children need to eat
healthier foods. 69.6% (268)
B. No. The school district
will lose income. 4.2% (16)
C. Yes. Junk food has no
place in the educational
process. 11.2% (43)
D. No. First the FCAT, now
this. 15.1% (58)


and his final album, the
Grammy-winning "Genius
Loves Company." The building
was declared a city historic
landmark last year.


Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida, 563-2370,
or from the Humane Society
of Citrus County, 341-2222.


NAME: Wolf NAME: (none)
AGE: puppy AGE: puppy
SEX: M SEX: M
ID #: 54815 ID #: 54747


NAME: Lucky
AGE: yng adit
SEX: NM
ID #: 31466


ENTERTAINMENT


The weather REPORT


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


.19tivl


City H
Daytona Bch. 89
Ft. Lauderdale 90
Fort Myers 92
Gainesville 91
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 89
Key West 90
Lakeland 92
Melbourne 89


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


Southeast winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas Gulf water
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters a light tem perature
chop. Partly cloudy with scattered showers
and thunderstorms. 9 3 0

Taken at Egmont Key

Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 34.22 34.33 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.30 38.33 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 39.79 39.89 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.17 41.24 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based.on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this
.1l I_ .:I. r... . .. ,-- -[.:.r ,cu ..l .: .- :.ria.: v- H y.r. . .:I OQ L',.I a-nI .. ..I. ~ ,

Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka 4:18 a/10:06 a 2:25 p/- 5:18 a/12:11 a 3:27 p/11:20 a
Crystal River 2:39 a/7:28 a 12:46 p/9:33 p 3:39 a/8:42 a 1:48 p/10:24 p
Withlacoochee 12:26 a/5:16 a 10:33 a/7:21 p 1:26 a/6:30 a 11:35 a/8:12 p
Homosassa 3:30 a/9:05 a 1:37 p/11:10 p 4:30 a/10:19 a 2:39 p/--


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
F TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 89 Low: 75
-.-.- Partly cloudy with scattered
showers and thunderstorms.


0B


MONDAY
High: 92 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with afternoon thunderstorms.

TUESDAY
High: 91 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with afternoon thunderstorms.

WEDNESDAY
High: 90 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with afternoon thunderstorms.


TEMPERATURE* Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.05 in.
Saturday 92/72 DEW POINT
Record 95/67 Saturday at 3 p.m. 72
Normal 72/90 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +1 Saturday at 3 p.m. 56%
PRECIPITATION* POLLEN COUNT**
Saturday 0.33 in. Trees and weeds were light and
Total for the month 7.26 in. grasses were moderate.
Total for the year 29.02 in. "Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
Normal for the year 30.90 in. toms, moderate most allergic will experience
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 8 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder- AIR QUALITY
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high Saturday was moderate with pol-
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE lutants mainly particulates.

SSUNSET TONIGHT 8:22 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:51 A.M.
S.. .,- MOONRISE TODAY...........................2:42 A.M.
AU.4 A. U12 AUG.19 A. 28 MOONSET TODAY.................... 5:24 PM.


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/31 SUNDAY 2:30 8:43 2:56 9:09
8/1 MONDAY 3:16 9:29 3:42 9:55


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0, 1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. New plant material may
be irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Inverness can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending in even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 84 59 .tstrm 82 63
Albuquerque 89. 67 tstrm 94 67
Anchorage 58 55 .01 shwrs 65 54
Asheville 79 66 tstrm 78 65
Atlanta 83 71 .16 tstrm 84 71
Atlantic City 81 66 .74 ptcldy 82 67
Austin 94 70 ptcldy 96 69
Baltimore 82 70 ptcldy 83 65
Billings 92 66 ptcldy 95 64
Birmingham 84 73 tstrm 90 72
Boise 97 68 tstrm 99 69
Boston 76 68 ptcldy 76 62
Brownsville 94 73 .01 ptcldy 95 75
Buffalo 80 62 ptcldy 82 65
Burlington, VT 79 57 tstrm 81 61
Charleston, SC 88 75 .18 tstrm 88 76
Charleston, WV 86 66 ptcldy 88 66
Charlotte 78 701.01 tstrm 80 69
Chicago 85 59 ptcldy 90 68
Cincinnati 87 59 .01 sunny 89 65
Cleveland 80 59 ptcldy 84 66
Columbia, SC 85 721.55 tstrm 87 73
Columbus, OH 86 64 ptcldy 88 67
Concord 83 56 tstrm 79 57
Corpus Christi 96 74 ptcldy 99 72
Dallas 96 73 sunny 97 73
Denver 97 72 tstrm 90 62
Des Moines 88 66 tstrm 88 68
Detroit 81 61 ptcldy 85 67
El Paso 89 72 .28 ptcldy 95 71
Evansville 88 63 sunny 90 64
Harrisburg 85 66 ptcldy 85 66
Hartford 84 67 ptcldy 82 61
Honolulu 88 76 shwrs 83 71
Houston 93 73 ptcldy 96 72
Indianapolis 86 65 sunny 87 67
Jackson 92 73 .52 ptcldy 92 72
Kansas City 93 65 ptcldy 92 68
Lab Vegas 10080 tstrm 10282
Little Rock 91 66 sunny 93 68
Los Angeles 74 64 tstrm 75 65
Louisville 90 65 sunny 90 70
Memphis 90 70 ptcldy 92 73
Milwaukee 79 62 ptcldy 88 69
Minneapolis 90 67 ptcldy 91 69
Mobile 87 722.08 tstrm 91 75
Montgomery 87 73 tstrm 90 72
Nashville 92 70 ptcldy 91 69


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 90 79 .07 tstrm 91 76
New York City 88 73 ptcldy 80 67
Norfolk 83 73 .11 tstrm 83 73
Oklahoma City 94 64 sunny 94 68
Omaha 91 68 tstrm 89 69
Palm Springs 99 86 tstrm 10784
Philadelphia 85 72 ptcldy 84 69
Phoenix 10485 tstrm 10586
Pittsburgh 86 62 ptcldy 84 60
Portland, ME 77 64 ptcldy 74 57
Portland, Ore 89 60 sunny 87 62
Providence 85 69 ptcldy 79 62
Raleigh 83 72 .12 tstrm 83 68
Rapid City 95 68 sunny 95 65
Reno 93 63 tstrm 95 63
Rochester 76 60 tstrm 83 64
Sacramento 98 62 tstrm 10163
St. Louis 88 67 sunny 92 71
St. Ste. Marie 74 45 .08 tstrm 86 62
Salt Lake City 88 69 tstrm 93 70
San Antonio 95 73 ptcldy 95 73
San Diego 77 69 sunny 75 68
San Francisco 71 57 sunny 71 57
Savannah 91 72 tstrm 89 75
Seattle 83 57 sunny 80 59
Spokane 91 62 sunny 96 63
Syracuse 82 63 tstrm 81 63
Topeka 92 62 fair 92 67
Washington 84 73 .02 ptcldy 83 68
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Thermal, Calif. LOW 38 Stanley, Idaho


SUNDAY Lisbon 78/65/pc
CITY H/L/SKY London 68/51/sh
Acapulco 89/78/pc Madrid 85/64/sh
Amsterdam 69/54/ts Mexico City 88/59/ts
Athens 96/73/pc Montreal 79/61/ts
Beijing 92/71/sh Moscow 77/56/pc
Berlin 74/54/sh Paris 70/54/pc
Bermuda 87/79/pc Rio 81/65/pc
Cairo 97/72/pc Rome 92/71/pc
Calgary 85/52/s Sydney 67/50/s
Havana 89/76/ts Tokyo 88/67/ts
Hong Kong 89/76/r Toronto 81/59/pc
Jerusalem 95/71/s Warsaw 88/66/pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair, h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2005 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Spotlight on ...E. .' E iE



Moore plotting


next documentary I


Das Bug


a 3 uA ,_j IT Y -


Associated Press
U.S. actor Michael Keaton, left, and U.S. director Angela
Robinson stand Saturday with Herbie The Car at the start of
a Beetle Parade in Berlin prior to the German premiere of
their latest film, "Herbie: Fully Loaded." Around 1,500
Beetles and New-Beetles take part in the parade through the
city of the German capital.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


THE NATION


k&


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY--=

Today is Sunday, July 31, the
212th day of 2005. There are 153
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 31, 1777, the Marquis
de Lafayette, a 19-year-old French
nobleman, was made a major-gen-
eral in the American Continental
Army.
On this date:
In 1875, the 17th president of
the United States, Andrew
Johnson, died in Carter Station,
Tenn., at age 66.
In 1964, the American space
probe Ranger 7 transmitted pic-
tures of the moon's surface.
In 1991, President Bush and
Soviet President Mikhail S.
Gorbachev signed the Strategic
Arms Reduction Treaty in Moscow.
Ten years ago: The Walt
Disney Co. agreed to acquire
Capital Cities-ABC Inc. in a $19
billion deal.
Five years ago: The
Republican National Convention
opened in Philadelphia, with
George W. Bush's name put into
nomination for president.
One year ago: The Vatican
issued a document denouncing
feminism for trying to blur differ-
ences between men and women
and threatening the institution of
families based on a mother and a
father.
Today's Birthdays: Nobel
Prize-winning economist Milton
Friedman is 93. Sportscaster Curt
Gowdy is 86. Record executive
Ahmet Ertegun is 82. Actor Don
Murray is 76. Jazz composer-
musician Kenny Burrell is 74. Actor
Geoffrey Lewis is 70. Actress
France Nuyen is 66. Actress
Susan Flannery is 62. Singer Lobo
is 62. Actress Geraldine Chaplin is
61. Movie studio executive Sherry
Lansing is 61. Singer Gary Lewis
is 59. Rock singer Bob Welch is
59. Tennis player Evonne
Goolagong Cawley is 54. Actor
Barry Van Dyke is 54. Actor Alan
Autry is 53. Actor James Read is
52. Actor Michael Biehn is 49.
Rock singer-musician Daniel Ash
-(Love and Rockets) is 48. Rock
musician Bill Berry is 47. Actor
Wesley Snipes is 43. Country
singer Chad Brock is 42. Musician
Fatboy Slim is 42. Rock musician
Jim Corr is 41. Author J.K. Rowling
is 40. Actor Dean Cain is 39. Actor
Ben Chaplin is 36. Actor Loren
Dean is 36. Actress Annie Parisse
("Law & Order") is 30.
Thought for Today: "Living is a
constant process of deciding what
we are going to do." Jose
Ortega Y Gasset, Spanish philoso-
pher (1883-1955).














SUNDAY
JULY 31, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Rep. aims for state office


Associated Press

WASHINGTON U.S. Rep. Jim
Davis walked to the wall of his con-
gressional office, took down a framed
photo of President Clinton signing a
bill and pointed at a man peering over
the president's shoulder.
The man is Nelson Mongiovi, who
had come to Davis a year earlier and
said his 93-year-old mother was being
kicked out of a Tampa nursing home
because her money had run out and
she was relying on Medicaid.
Mongiovi told him there ought to be a
law against the practice. Davis agreed
and the Democrat worked with a
Republican colleague to get the bill to


Clinton's desk.
"Because of Nelson Mongiovi, who
traveled up here on his own nickel in
his car three or four times to testify,
what happened to his mother can
never happen to your mother or to
mine," Davis said after rehanging the
photo next to his desk "It's a good
example of how the system can work."
Davis tells the story when school
children visit as a lesson on how laws
are enacted. It's also inspirational to
him as he runs for governor. Davis,
who served as a lawmaker in
Tallahassee before coming to
Washington in 1997, isn't happy with
the way the state Capitol has been run
under Republican rule.


"I'm like most Floridians.
I'm an outsider in Tallahassee.
I've had to watch most of this
stuff and I've just had
enough," said Davis, a Tampa
lawyer who's one of seven
Democrats and 18 Repub-
licans representing Florida in
the U.S. House.
While he can have a voice in
federal education funding, he runni
doesn't have a say on how the gove
Florida Comprehensive As- prir
sessment Test is used to pun-
ish and reward Florida's schools.
While he can fight for federal high-
way money, he wasn't part of the
debate when Florida lawmakers
passed a law to control sprawl. And
while Medicaid is a state/federal
partnership for the poor and elderly,
he has no vote on Gov. Jeb Bush's
plans to overhaul the system by mak-
ing it more like private managed


D

rr


health care.
"Medicaid does need
reform, but there's a right way
.H and a wrong way to do that.
What Gov. Bush was proposing
was to balance the Medicaid
budget on the backs of people
who depend on Medicaid to
V stay out of hospitals, stay out
of nursing homes, stay in nurs-
npa, ing homes like Nelson
nor in Mongiovi's mother," Davis
ary. said. "I don't think that's the
way you reform Medicaid."
Tallahassee has changed a lot since
Davis served there. When he was
elected to the state House in 1988,
Democrats firmly controlled both
chambers. During his final year in the
Legislature in 1996, Republicans had
a slim majority in the Senate, but
Democrats still held the governor's
office and the House. Now, Repub-
licans dominate both chambers by


ON THE NET
U.S. Rep. Jim Davis:
http://www.house.gov/jimdavis/

about a 2-1 ratio and Bush is Florida's
first Republican governor to win re-
election.
Yet, for last fall's elections,
Democrats outnumbered Repub-
licans 4.3 million to 3.9 million among
Florida's registered voters. Davis
complains the state GOP-led govern-
ment has not served the interests of
everyday Floridians.
Bush can't seek re-election because
of term limits. Davis is facing former
Tallahassee Mayor Scott Maddox and
state Sen. Rod Smith in the primary.
Republicans seeking the seat include
state Chief Financial Officer Tom
Gallagher and Attorney General
Charlie Crist.


Probe


finds no


double


votes

Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE Investi-
gators found no evidence that
anyone-cast more than one bal-
lot in the November election
in Duval County, although a
probe into fraud allegations
from early voting in the county
continues.
County Elections Supervisor
Jerry Holland said the FBI
investigation didn't turn up
any evidence that voters cast
more than one ballot in the
county either on Nov. 2 or in
absentee voting.
Officials said in January that
a review of voting records
uncovered more than 50 cases
in which it appeared the same
person had cast an absentee
ballot and voted on election
day or otherwise voted twice
in some way, such as voting in
two places, leading U.S.
Attorney Paul Perez to launch
a federal investigation.
But Holland said each
apparent case of double-voting
was attributed to a clerical
error, such as someone signing
the voter rolls at one polling
place before being told they
had to go to another location to
vote. One case involved a
father and son with the same
name who signed in the wrong
place.
About 380,000 people voted
in the November election in
Duval County, so the votes in
question represented less than
1/50th of one percent.
"These results show voters
that they can have confidence
in the elections office,"
Holland said.
Double voting is punishable
by up to five years in prison
and a $10,000 fine.
The FBI will continue to
look into some allegations of
potential voter fraud that
stemmed from early voting in
the county, Holland said.


Associated Press
MANATEE Safeco Insurance said it will
stop writing homeowners policies in Florida,
the sixth insurance company to announce its
departure from the market since last year's
rough hurricane season.
Seattle-based Safeco notified the state Office
of Insurance Regulation that it won't write new
policies and, starting in 2006, won't renew exist-
ing ones. It stopped writing new homeowner
policies this week
Safeco has 30,000 personal property cus-
tomers in Florida, with the most more than
2,600 in Hillsborough County. Duval County is
its second biggest homeowner policy market.
'After months of careful consideration, we
came to the decision that we cannot effectively
compete in Florida's personal property mar-
ket," said company spokesman Eric Trott.


spruces up boat ramp


" "- -. .' f li f* "
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Yankeetown officials gathered to cut the ribbon Saturday for the Yacht Basin Park dedication. Pictured from left, during the cer-
emony, are: Joe Mittauer, president, Mittauer & Associates; Jimmie Wall, mayor; Mary Pate, council member; Tom Strahan,
council member; and Glen Spetz, council member. The construction of the park was paid for by a grant from the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection Recreational Assistance Program.

Ceremony dedicates community park, boat ramp in Yankeetown.


ASHLEY SORRELL
asorrell@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The bright red ribbon decorated with
an elaborate, patriotic bow fell limply to
the ground as a small crowd cheered
during a park and boat dock dedication
in Yankeetown.
"This is a really good thing for the
town," Yankeetown Mayor Jimmie Wall
said. "It's just very, very pretty."
The town recently reconstructed a
boat dock at Yacht Basin Park on 56th
Avenue. Town officials held a ribbon
cutting and dedication ceremony at 10
a.m. Saturday.
Joe Mittauer, Yankeetown engineer,
supervised the project and said it is the
biggest project Yankeetown has had in
20 years.
Mittauer said the old boat dock was in


The project really
came out well.

'.'- '..
Yankeetown mayor.

bad condition and many people had dif-
ficulties launching their boats in the
Withlacoochee River.
Mittauer also added a boarding pier,
picnic area, a fishing pier and new light
fixtures to the park
"It's going to be a great asset to the
town," he said. "The project came out
better than we expected."
Residents of Yankeetown who attend-
ed the dedication ceremony were
pleased with the outcome of the recon-
structed park and boat ramp.


"The wonderful picnic arda will help
to bring the community together," Diane
Blomgren said. "It will give us a place to
gather in the town and hold events."
Avid boaters at the ceremony were
excited about the new boat ramp.
"People will be happy they can
launch their boats safely without drop-
ping in a hole," Ken Blomgren said.
Mittauer said the project cost
$360,000, funded through two $150,000
grants and one $60,000 grant.
The boat ramp and park was complet-
ed July 1 after four months of work
"It was a very elaborate process, and
we are very happy with it," Mittauer
said.
Wall said the town has plans to build
a parking lot near the park to prevent
congestion on the street.
"The project really came out well,"
Wall said. "I am very pleased."


We cannot effectively
compete in Florida's personal
property market.

Eric Trott
Safeco Insurance spokesman.
The decision applies to homeowners,
dwelling fire, renters and condominium insur-
ance. The company will continue to sell com-
mercial and auto policies in Florida.
The decision follows similar announcements
by other insurers, including Allstate, the state's
third-largest insurer, which told the state in May
that it will drop about 16,000 commercial poli-
cies and not renew about 95,000 Florida home-
owner policies.


Assoczarea Iress
FORT MYERS Al Hoff-
man, one of the top fund-rais-
ers for President Bush and Gov.
Jeb Bush, has been nominated
by the president to be the U.S.
ambassador to Portugal.
Hoffman, 71, is chairman of
Bonita Springs home-building
firm WCI Communities and a
longtime Bush family friend.
His nomination must be
approved by the Senate.
The West Point graduate was
finance chairman for the
Republican National
Committee, headed President
Bush's fund-raising effort in
2000 in Florida and Gov. Jeb
Bush's in 2002. In all, he's
raised about $300,000 for


Bush's presidential campaigns.
He also chaired Jeb Bush's
inaugural committee.
Portugal was one of the first
nations to establish diplomatic
relations with the United
States in 1791 and is a member
of the European Union.
Hoffman, who served four
years in the Air Force and has
a master's degree from
Harvard, would replace John
N. Palmer, who left the post
last year.
Hoffman was one of two men
from southwest Florida nomi-
nated this week to head
embassies. Bush also has
tapped Naples businessman
and Republican fund-raiser
Laurence Francis Rooney to be
ambassador of the Vatican.


.211


)


Jim Davis unhappy with changes in

Tallahassee as he runs for governor


Safeco plans to stop writing Bush fund-raiser Hoffinan


Florida homeowner policies tapped for Portugal post
FloL'dA h o m eo w ner p olicies 1--4 D--, T-W I-_'


County

Corrections facility
to honor employees
National Correctional Em-
ployees' Week, sponsored by
the American Correctional Asso-
ciation, will start today through
Aug. 7.
"The corrections profession
includes a variety of profession-
al capacities, and each one Js
an essential part of our operat-
ing team. However, because
corrections industry employees
aren't typically high profile, they
sometimes don't get the recog-
nition they deserve," said Citrus
County Warden Carlos Melen-
dez.
Corrections Corporations of
America manages the 406-bed,
multilevel-security facility for
Citrus County.
Federal waters set
to open for 10 days
The commercial fishery for
red snapper in the Gulf of
Mexico federal waters will open
at noon Monday and will close
at noon Aug. 10. The quota is
4.65 million pounds. The mini-
mum size for the commercial
fishery is 15 inches.
Service offers fraud
alerts for public
The attorney general's office
unveiled a new consumer alert
service that customers can sub-
scribe to and obtain immediate
updates on fraud protection
measures.
Consumers can subscribe by
visiting myfloridalegal.com and
clicking on the red consumer
updates link. The toll-free fraud
hotline is (866) 966-7226.
Freshmen invited to
learn of high school
Citrus High School Freshmen
Orientation will be from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 9. Stu-
dents should meet in the gym at
.9 a.m. Lunch will be provided
around noon. This orientation is
for students only. Open House
for parents will be Aug. 23.
Elementary school
slates open house
Hernando Elementary School
will have its open house Mon-
day, Aug. 8. The hours are:
Pre-kindergarten and
kindergarten 3 p.m.
Visitations for all grades are
4 to 6 p.m.
If new to school, register
before open house. Bring stu-
dents to open house to meet
their teachers. Class lists will be
posted in the main hallway.
The new school hours are
9:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
From staff reports

State BRIEF

Pinellas County man
gets West Nile
ST. PETERSBURG -A man
in Pinellas County has contract-
ed the West Nile virus, the.first
reported human case of the
mosquito-borne disease in
Florida this year.
The Pinellas County Health
Department said the 27-year-old
unidentified victim is recovering
at home and wasn't hospital-
ized.
From wire reports


I









4A SUNDAY.~~~~~~~~~ fux3,20 risCUT F, HOIL


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrests
Ronald E. Alphonse, 64,
Hernando, at 11:52 p.m. Friday on a
charge of domestic battery.
According to an arrest report,
Alphonse called deputies because
he had a physical altercation with a
woman.
According to the report, Alphonse
said the woman hit him in the back
of the head.
A witness observed Alphonse and
the woman wrestling with each other
in the bathroom of the residence and
Alphonse pulled the woman's hair
and struck her, according to the
report.
Deputies observed a large chunk
of hair on the woman's back and she


GRAHAM
Continued from Page 1A

Deputy: Reporting
delay a 'concern'
When Romine, a Tampa
attorney who has practiced
criminal defense since 1992,
met with Deputy Tackett for
their three-hour deposition
March 4, he asked whether the
officer knew anything about
Graham, who made headlines
during his time on the bench
for what some considered out-
rageous sentences.
The Florida Supreme Court,
following a recommendation
from the Judicial
Qualifications Commission,
removed Graham for judicial
misconduct.
Tackett said he hadn't met
Graham, but he knew of him.
"I was told he was a' neat
judge," Tackett said. "He did
things that were kind of shock-
ing, so far as making people cut
trucks up and stuff or killing
rattlesnakes; but other than
that, nothing, nothing nega-
tive."
Romine asked how that
knowledge may impact
Tackett's handling of the case.
The deputy replied, "Great
I'm going to be sitting in front
of people with recorders for a
long time. But other than that, I
... could care less. If some little
girl, if something bad hap-
pened to her, then that's what
I'm here for."
The complaint to the abuse
hotline regarding Graham's
girlfriend's daughter's friend
came on April 29, 2004. Tackett
was the first official to respond.
He said the girl told him that
she was watching a cable TV
movie with her mom that con-
tained sensitive sexual content
involving children. Her mother
asked -if one of her former
boyfriends had ever touched
her where she shouldn't be
touched.
Tackett said the girl told her
mother that the boyfriend had-
n't, but Graham did.
Her mother thought her
daughter was confused and
instead referring to an incident
five years earlier when the girl
said her grandfather fondled
her
The girl told Tackett .that
about a week after Valentine's
Day 2004 she and her friend
stayed at Graham's home. It
was a Friday and they stayed
up past midnight. She said
Graham entered a guest room
they were in, pulled the blan-
ket and sheet off her and
placed his hands inside her
pajamas and her panties,
according to the deposition
transcript.
The girl said Graham then
did the same thing to her
friend who was asleep, records
state.
Tackett said he established
the approximate timeline by
helping the girl associate it
with holidays or special days.


said she wanted to press charges,
according to the report.
Alphonse was placed under
arrest and transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility.
He is being held without bond.
Thomas J. Winger, 34, Crystal
River, at 4:33 p.m. Friday on a
charge of domestic battery.
According to an arrest report,
deputies responded to a disturbance
at Winger's residence.
A woman told deputies Winger
came home from work, started
yelling at her and moving her items
out of the residence, according to
the report.
The woman said Winger grabbed
her by the back of her hair, lifted her
off the couch and smacked her with
an open hand on the back of her

"The girl said it was some-
time in February, a week or
somewhere around Valentine's
Day, a week after," Tackett said.
"She didn't know."
When Romine told him that
the girls spent the night at
Graham's house in December
2003, and not February, Tackett
laughed, according to the tran-
script. Romine asked why he
had that reaction and Tackett
said he believed the girl was
certain about the incident hap-
pening in February.
(Buxman said Friday the
time frame changed from
February 2004 to December
2003 when the girl's mother
checked her cell phone
records. The mother had called
her daughter at Graham's
house.)
Romine asked if it was
unusual for a victim to wait sev-
eral months before telling
someone.
"Suspicious, but it's com-
mon," Tackett said.
Romine: "OK, did it bother
you at all as an investigator?"
Tackett: "Yeah. Yeah. The
more time that passes, it's
harder and harder."
He explained that long
delays in reporting a crime
make it more difficult to prove.
Romine then asked if such a
delay would give him more
concern or less concern about
the truth of the allegation.
Tackett: "If they take a
longer and longer and longer
time before they report it, yes,
definitely more concern."
He added this caveat: "From
a 10-year-old girl, that kind of,
you know *- if it's traumatic
and she was really scared. Kids
lock things human beings
lock things up and act pecu-
liar."
FDLE agents searched
Graham's home
FDLE Special Agent Pope
didn't lead the Graham investi-
gation, Special Agent Edith
Neal did. Her deposition is set
for Aug. 30.
Pope said he is Neal's super-
visor and he led the warrant
search of Graham's home. The
warrant sought, among other
things, the robe that the girls
said Graham wore over his
clothing, and children's dress-
up accessories.
Graham knew nothing of the
warrant, Pope said, and wasn't
home when the search was
conducted.
Agents arrived at his home
accompanied by a locksmith so
they wouldn't have to break the
door down. A side door was
unlocked and that's how they
got in, according to Pope's dep-
osition.
One agent took photographs
of evidence while Pope, Neal
and another agent searched.
Pope said he retrieved bar-
rettes, wigs and a Halloween
costume from the home.
With each item, Romine
asked how it fit into the catego-
ry of a child's dress accessory
or within the confines of the
warrant


neck, according to the report.
In the report, Winger denied
touching the woman.
The deputy did observe red
marks on the woman's neck, placed
Winger under arrest and transported
him to the Citrus County Detention
facility, according to the report.
He is being held without bond.
DUI arrest
Charlie T. Wells Jr., 25, 2562
N. Treasure Point, Hernando, at
6:24 p.m. Friday on charges of driv-
ing under the influence and pos-

Pope also confiscated photo-
graphs of Graham with the girl-
friend that he admitted were
outside the scope of the war-
rant, according to the deposi-
tion transcript.
"So you, the FDLE, made an
exception to what the warrant
permitted. Is that fair to say?"
Romine asked.
Pope: "If we yes. If we
seized the photographs of
that."
Pope said he couldn't
remember if they found the
robe. Romnine noted that the
FDLE inventory of items taken
from Graham's home doesn't
include a robe.
"Well, your receipt doesn't
mention any robes," Romine
said. "It mentions a witch's cos-
tume, but no robes."
DCF investigator
spoke to girls
DCF investigator Holly
Capps' involvement in the
Graham criminal case was lim-
ited, but her May 26 deposition
with Romine is one of the
longest and most intense.
Capps said the DCF child
abuse hotline received an,
anonymous call April 29 that
alleged abuse to the friend of
Graham's girlfriend's daughter.
She visited the girl's house the
next day and either showed a
report with the allegations to
the girl's mother or read it to
her.
"Mother advised that the
allegations in the narrative
were correct," according to
Romine's reading from the
report during the deposition.

Personal .
,Jewelry t -1






GEMS
(I Established 1985
795-5900
600 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


sess/buy/sel! a harmful chemical
substance.
His bond was set at $500.
Other arrests
M William C. Baxter, 36, 2375 S.
Palm Beach Loop, Homosassa at
11:03 a.m. Friday on charges of bur-
glary of a structure, grand theft and
contributing to the delinquency or
dependency of a child.
His bond was set at $7,500.
Also related to this case, deputies
arrested Jyenna C. Baxter at 11:14
a.m. Friday on charges of burglary

Capps said the girl told her
Graham placed his hand down
her pajamas, and then did the
same thing to the other girl as
she was sleeping.
(Names of the children, their
parents and siblings are
blacked out in court records.)
Capps said she spoke to the
mother, who related how her
daughter told her this during
the TV program. Romine asked
if it would be important for
Capps' investigation to know
that the girl had made a simi-
lar claim several years earlier
about her grandfather that was
unfounded.
Capps said it would, but she
also said the mother didn't
mention that. Later, the girl
told Capps that her grandfa-
ther, now deceased, had fon-
dled her in the same manner. A
sheriff's investigation found
no truth to the claim, court
records show.
According to the anonymous
complaint, the Graham inci-
dent occurred in February but
Capps suggested the time
frame didn't matter to her.
Romine: "As the investigator
on the case, was it important to
you to know when this hap-
pened?"
Capps: "What was important
for me to know was that the
children were with their
respective caregivers and the





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ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the link to. Daily Reports, then Arrest Reports.


,C F ,


of a structure, grand theft, contribut-
ing to the delinquency or dependen-
cy of a child and resisting/obstruct-
ing officer without violence.
Her bond was set at $8,000.
Troyanna L. Bray, 37, 1000 S.
Bunting Way, Inverness, at 5:18
p.m. Friday on charges of acquir-
ing/attempting to acquire a con-
trolled substance by fraud.
She was released on her own
recognizance.
Holly N. Davies, 18, 9581 E.
Lazy Oak Dr., Floral City, at 4:20
a.m. Saturday on charges of pos-
session of a controlled substance
and possession of drug paraphema-
lia.
Her bond was set at $5,500.
Russell W. Fleming, 58, 3525
E. Louise Dr., Hemando, at 2:04

someone being accused did
not reside with those chil-
dren."
Romine: "So your job as an
investigator is not to investi-
gate the truthfulness of the
statement by the child, is that
correct?"
Capps: "My job is to ensure
the safety of those two chil-
dren."
In the Thursday interview,
Romine said he was dumb-
founded by Capps' response
that her priority was not to
investigate the allegations.
"She went so far to say at one
point her job is just to listen,"
he said. "Pretty incredible,
when you think about it."
Capps said that same day
she spoke with the other girl,
who was Graham's girlfriend's
daughter. That girl said her
friend told her at school one
day that Graham had molested
both of them, but the girl said
she didn't remember it and
thought it may have been a


l'~ ~1 ~


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a.m. Saturday on a charge of driving
while license is suspended/revoked.
His bond was set at $10,000.
Bryan D. James, 28, 7030
Village Dr., Homosassa, at 10:35
a.m. Friday on a charge of driving
while license is suspended/revoked.
His bond was set at $500.
Lisa J. Peters, 32, 1164 E.
McKinley St., Hemando, at 11:42
p.m. Friday on charges of two
counts of possession of a controlled
substance and one count posses-
sion of marijuana.
Her bond was set at $10,500.
Vincent N. Sanchez, 20, 2910
W. Monroe St., Inverness, at 4:20
a.m. Saturday on a charge of pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
His bond was set at $500.

dream.
Based on discussions with
the two girls, the DCF conclud-
ed in June 2004 that at least
one of them had been abused.
Romine zeroed in on that
report, asking how Capps
reached that conclusion.
"That means as far as the
DCF is concerned, the allega-
tions of sexual molestation in
reference to ... has been veri-
fied," Capps said, adding she
didn't write the final report.
Romine: "By what means?"
Capps: "By this investiga-
tion."
Romine then asked Capps
whether she thought the girls
were telling the truth.
"I believe the girls are of the
age to be 100 percent honest,"
she replied.
Romine: OK. And when you
say that you believe them to be
of age to be honest, do you
think they're being honest in
this case?"
Capps: "I hope they are."


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Crrnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


For the







SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 5A


Man gets life sentence for Florida murders


Two accused of killing Subway clerks
Associated Press Dennis Bryan, 24, of Fair
Haven, Mich., was convicted
ST. AUGUSTINE One of Tuesday by a jury that then
two Michigan men accused of heard sentencing testimony
killing fast-food clerks in The jury recommended Friday
Florida and Michigan and a that he get life and Circuit
gun-shop clerk in Virginia was Judge William A. Parsons
sentenced Friday to life in agreed.
prison on a first-degree murder The jury had found him
conviction in the Florida case. guilty of felony murder, pre-


MODEL
Continued from Page 1A
was the best man, and she was
the maid of honor. The bride
was her sister the groom was
his brother.
In New York, it was typical
for George to work three jobs to
support his family. He saw that
crime was going up dramatical-
ly where they lived and also
that he was spending hours
commuting to work each day.
When he came to the area one
year on vacation, he was
hooked.
"He just loved the area," his
wife, Barbara McCaffrey, said.
George, Barbara, and their
four children all ended up
moving to Citrus County in the
1970s, where he continued
working for telephone compa-
nies.
"He worked hard and he
played hard," daughter Pat
Coles said.
The McCaffreys live on the
Crystal River, and George
loved taking his family boating.
In 1978, George went to
Saudi Arabia for three years to
work establishing a private
telephone system. From there,


HOME
Continued from Page 1A
ties, gets invited places," Kelli
said. "She loves her friends."
Lately, Anastasia has been
acting as a translator via tele-
phone between families in
Citrus County waiting to adopt
and the children still in
Russian orphanages, including
some of her friends she left
behind last year.
'Not fair'
If anyone in the O'Grady
household deserves to say, "not
fair," it would be older sister
Katie. It's her life that has been
the most disrupted, from shar-
ing a room to sharing her par-
ents. This week the family
moved from a two-bedroom,
one-bathroom house into a
four-bedroom, two bathroom
house. Katie gets her privacy
back and Anastasia gets her
own room for the first time in
her life.
"It's way different having
two daughters," Kelli said. "It's
been a challenge to figure out
how to not treat them like
twins, how to not buy two of
everything and how to not
lump them together. But every-
thing about them is different,
and with one older than the
other, we treat them different-
ly, like giving them separate
bedtimes."
But to Anastasia, unless it's'
exactly the same, it's "not fair."
In the orphanage, everyone got
the same thing. It's taken a
year for Anastasia to begin to
understand that families oper-
ate differently than institu-
tions.
In a year, Anastasia has
grown about 4 inches and
gained 22 pounds. She took
tennis lessons (didn't like
those), went to Disney World
and Busch Gardens and sum-
mer camp.
"I love America!" she said. "I
got my ears pierced, and Mama
said maybe I can get a second
hole (pierced) this summer.
And I love American food -
hamburgers. I didn't used to


he and his wife traveled the
world to places including
Japan, Australia, France,
Egypt, Greece and Scotland.
His favorite was Singapore.
"He always told me no mat-
ter what job you do, you've got
to give it your best shot," Coles
said.
George was the kind of man
who loved having company
over and kept in touch with
many childhood friends 'and
people from overseas.
He taught his children to be
on time and read instructions
before starting a project.
He enjoyed gardening and
his daughter Joanne Cacyuk
said he could grow a tomato
plant 5 feet tall.
George subscribed to several
newspapers because he loved
finishing the crossword puzzles
and spent hours each day
working them out
He was a pack rat and kept
radios, broken coffee pots,
drills, telephones and jars of
mismatched screws. His wife
said he believed he would
eventually get around to fixing
his garage filled with small
appliances.
"He was his own person,"
Mrs. McCaffrey said.
One of George's favorite

like them, but now I do.
"And once I ate cake for
breakfast and one day I had ice
cream for breakfast," she said.
"And I asked my mom if I could
get highlights in my hair before
school starts."
She's looking forward to get-
ting braces and wants "bright,
shiny teeth like all
Americans."
She's definitely an American
girl, her mom said. Last year
she packed a Fluffernutter
sandwich every day for her
school lunch. She rolls her
eyes like a typical preteen and
says, "I don't sink so."
She loves shopping at the
mall. Her favorite stores are
Claire's Boutique, Limited Too
and Aeropostle and
Starbucks. However, she can't
quite grasp the concept of a
credit card.
"I don't get it," she said. "You
just go to the store and get what
you want and give (the clerk) a
plastic card. Where can I get
one of those?"
"She's brought an element to
our family that we would never
have if we didn't have her,"
Kelli said. We're always,
'Hurry up, hurry up, we're
leaving in five minutes!' and
she takes her time. She cro-
chets and invests in relation-
ships. She's very much, 'Can I
help you?' and 'How are you?'
She's slowed our pace."
And that's something that
amazes Kelli, as she considers
all that Anastasia has packed
into one short year: going from
institutional living to being
part of a family, learning a for-
eign language, plus learning all
the cultural things most people
her age have taken 12 years to
learn. For example, when you
go to someone's house and it
smells bad, you don't say so.
For the longest time she
thought Americans were fake
that way, and that made her
angry. But she's catching on
that it's not fake, it's polite.
"Every day it gets better,"
Kelli said. "Some days when I
see her laying and watching
TV, it's like she's always been
here."


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meditated murder and robbery
with a firearm in the shooting
death of Subway sandwich
clerk Charles Pennington, 22,
on Aug. 14, 2000. Parsons sen-
tenced Bryan to two life terms
without parole.
Bryan has already been sen-
tenced to a 50-year term for the
robbery-murder in Bristol, Va.,
on Aug. 10, 2000. His co-defen-
dant in the Subway slaying,
David Baumann, pleaded

things was playing golf at
Seven Rivers Golf and Country
Club. Years ago he played with
a group called the Bandits, but
as George got older, he and
three men, formed their own
group: the Sick, Lame 'and
Lazy


hur


sa


guilty to stabbing Bristol gun-
shop clerk Norman Pelfrey to
death and is serving life in
prison. Bryan was convicted of
murder for assisting in
Pelfrey's killing.
Baumann, of New Baltimore,
Mich., faces trial next month.
In Michigan, the two are
wanted for trial in the Oct. 21,
2000 shooting death of Justin
Mello, 16, killed while working
at Mancino's Pizza and

"He had a good sense of
humor," Coles said, chuckling.
Adjusting to life without the
man they all respected so
deeply will be difficult, Heaney
said.
"He will be missed," Heaney
said.


Grinders in Detroit, where both
suspects also had worked.
The pair wore gloves and
masks when they carried 9mm
pistols into the Florida sand-
wich shop. Pennington was
alone, Assistant State Attorney
Maureen Sullivan Christine


said at trial, according to The
St Augustine Record.
The masks were simply to
hide their faces from surveil-
lance cameras, and not from
Pennington, Christine said.
"They knew they were going to
kill" him.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHIRONICL


6A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


.... Obituaries


Frank
Hallock Jr., 74
FLORAL CITY
Frank Darrow Hallock Jr, 74,
Keating Park, Floral City, died
Friday, July 29, 2005, at the
Hospice Care Unit at Citrus
Memorial Hospital in Inverness
under the care of the staff and
Hospice of Citrus County.
Born in Danbury, Conn., on
Aug. 29, 1930, he was the son of
Frank D. Hallock Sr. and
Teresa (Sparks) Hallock. He
came here in 1994 from New
Fairfield, Conn.
He served in the United
States Army
during the
Korean War.
Mr. Hallock
was a retired '
master car-
penter and a lifetime member
of Floral City Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 7122. He
was Episcopalian.
He enjoyed woodworking,
fishing, World Wrestling
Entertainment and was an avid
NASCAR fan.
Mr. Hallock was preceded in
death by his son, Frank Darrow
0. Hallock, in 1959.
Survivors include his wife of
46 years, Caprice (Watson)
Hallock; three sons, Mark
Hallock of Floral City, Jeffrey
Hallock and wife, Lisa, of
Sherman, Conn., and Frank D.
Hallock III and wife, Connie, of
Lecanto; a daughter, Doreen
McDonnell and husband,,
Daniel, of Naugatuck, Conn.;
nine grandchildren; two great-
grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Susan Drotar, 83
HASLETT, MICH.
Susan Drotar, 83, of Haslett,
Mich., formerly of Beverly
Hills, died Monday, July 25,
2005.
Born March 10, 1922, in
South Fork, Penn., she was the
daughter of John and Anna
(Cikos) Marhevka.
She graduated from
Hamtramck High School and
worked at J.L. Hudson's in
Detroit, Mich. After vocal
training, she had the opportu-
nity to sing on live radio in
Detroit. Her love of performing
continued and she later was a
"Happy Hoofer" senior dancer
and entertained at many sen-
ior centers.
Mrs. Drotar was a member of
St. Nicholas Byzantine
Catholic Church in Detroit,
where she sang in the choir
and met her late husband,
Thomas. She later became
involved in the Altar Society at
that church, but moved to St.
Helen, Mich., and joined the
St. Helen Catholic Church.
She enjoyed bingo and cards,
reading, taking casino trips and
playing in a women's golf league
in Florida for many years.
Survivors include her daugh-
ters, Deanna Ayres and hus-
band, John, of Columbus, Ohio,
and Shannon Fineout and hus-
band, William, of East Lansing,
Mich.; four grandchildren,
John, Dawn and Jill Ayres, and
Kassy Fineout; six great-grand-
children, Danielle, Alexis,
Johnny, Isaac, Isabella and
Jasmine Ayres; and a sister,
Ann Wilson, of Ferndale, Mich.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Visiting Nurses
Services of Michigan Hospice,
825 E. Michigan, Lansing, MI
48912.
Holihan-Atkin Funeral
Home, GrandLedge, Mich.

Shirley
Hooper, 73
DUNNELLON
Shirley D. Hooper, 73,
Dunnellon, died Friday, July
29, 2005, in Ocala.
Born in Miami, she came to
Dunnellon from Hialeah in
1980.
She was a homemaker.
Survivors include her hus-
band, George W "Bill" Hooper,
Dunnellon; two sons, Mark
Hooper and wife, Cyndi, of West
Palm and Chris Hooper and
wife, Holly, of Tallahassee; two
grandsons, Gary Hooper and
Zachary Hooper; and one
granddaughter, Morgan Hooper.
Roberts Funeral Home,


Dunnellon.


Herman
Waterstone, 77
INVERNESS
Herman Evans Waterstone,
77, Inverness, died Friday, July
29, 2005, in Citrus Health and
Rehab Center under the care
of Hospice.
A native of Charleston, W.Va.,
he was born Feb. 19, 1928, to
Bernard C. and Charlotte
Waterstone. He moved to
Inverness in
1975 from
Miami.
He was a
United States
Army veteran
of the Korean
War.
Mr. Waterstone attended
RETS Electronic School in
Miami and was employed by
Pearce Simpson Electronics of
Miami and Sonatrol
Engineering in Orlando. He
was also employed by the West
Virginia State Road
Commission.
He was preceded in death by
a brother, Melvin Waterstone,
and one sister, Marilyn Simon.
He is survived by his wife of
48 years, Margaret "Margo"
Waterstone, Inverness; three
brothers, Don Waterston and
wife, JoAnn, of Chandler, Ariz.,
Robert Waterstone of Ft.
Lauderdale, and Leonard
Waterstone of Huntington,
WVa.; two sisters, Doris Zagon
of Pembroke Pines and Pat
Holstein of Wilmington, Del.;
his mother-in-law, Bernice
Suck of Inverness; and his
nieces and nephews.
Services and burial were to
be in Charleston, WVa.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Funeral
NOTICE

Frank D. Hallock Jr.
Graveside memorial services
for Frank D. Hallock Jr. will be
conducted at 2:30 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 4, 2005, from
the Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, with the Floral
City VFW Post 7122 honor
guard officiating. There will be
no viewing hours. In lieu of
flowers, memorials are sug-
gested to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL34464 .

Deaths
ELSEWHERE


Eddie
Crook Jr., 76
OLYMPIC BOXER
COLUMBUS, Ga. Eddie
Crook Jr., who won an Olympic
boxing gold medal as a team-
mate of Muhammad Ali and,
served two tours in Vietnam
with the Army, died Monday.
He was 76.
Crook was a command ser-
geant major in the Army who
won a Silver Star, a Bronze
Star and tw6 Purple Hearts, in
addition to being on the 1960
Olympic team along with the
fighter then known as Cassius
Clay.
Crook had been a sure bet
for the 1956 Olympics but
broke his hand in an early
fight.

Charles
Young, 110
CENTENARIAN
ALBANY, Minn. Charles
Young, believed to be the
fourth-oldest man in the
United States, died Wed-
nesday He was 110.
The Gerontology Research
Group tracks "supercentenari-
ans" who reach the age of 110
and listed Young as the fourth-
oldest man in the United
States, the sixth-oldest man in
the world and 57th-oldest per-
son in the world.
Young lived in Minnesota
most of his life, working for the
Standard Oil Company hauling
fuel to farmers. His wife of 59
years, Gertrude, died when she
was 80.
As of December, Young had
seven children, 30 grandchil-
dren, 31 great-grandchildren
and 17 great-great grandchil-
dren, the St. Cloud Times


reported.


Private prisons staying course


Though no longer

government-funded,

for-profit entities face

surge in business

Associated Press

NEW YORK Though state govern-
ments are no longer fueling a private
prison boom, the industry's major compa-
nies are upbeat-thanks in large measure
to a surge of business from federal agen-
cies seeking to house fast-rising numbers
of criminals and detained aliens.
Since 2000, the number of federal
inmates in private facilities prisons and
halfway houses has increased by two-
thirds to more than 24,000. Thousands
more detainees not convicted of crimes
are confined in for-profit facilities, which
now hold roughly 14 percent of all federal
prisoners, compared to less than 6 percent
of state inmates.
Critics, including prisoners rights
groups and unionized corrections officers,
contend the policy amounts to a federal
bailout of an industry that would other-
wise be struggling with a checkered
record. The companies and the govern-
ment say they provide a flexible, economi-
cal alternative to building new federal
prisons as get-tough policies boost
demand for space in an overcrowded sys-
tem.
"If the Bureau of Prisons is going to
build capacity for themselves, they have to
plan eight years in advance," said John


drug w
been
main c
of prof
the pr
prisons


crimin(
Univer


Ferguson, chief
executive of the
The Corrections Cor-
poration of Amer-
ar has ica, the biggest
company in the
the field. "It takes a
lot longer in the
cause public sector than
private sector to
its for get things done."
The industry
private expanded rapidly
in the 1990s on the
". assumption that
business in a
VIlchael tough-on-crime
.-'. .:. -. era would grow
ologist at the indefinitely But
rsity of North escapes and vio-
Florida. lence at a few pri-
vate prisons, along


with questions about cost savings, tem-
pered enthusiasm.
Saddled with thousands of empty beds,
CCA teetered near bankruptcy before new
federal contracts helped it rebound. Since .
2000, the Nashville, Tenn.-based company
has doubled its number of federal prison-
ers to 18,200 29 percent of its overall
inmate population.
"The federal government smiled on
them just in time," said Judith Greene, a
New York-based prison policy analyst.
Business is certain to grow. Bureau of
Prisons spokeswoman Traci Billingsley
said the number of federal inmates is
expected to rise from 185,000 to 226,000 by
2010, with private companies likely to be
relied on for housing non-citizen immi-
grants convicted of federal crimes.
The number of people detained by U.S.


Associated Press
Chaplain Ron Day, upper right, of the Wheeler Correctional Facility, speaks to a group of
inmates in this Feb. 7, 2005, file photo. "Faith pod," an Alamo, Ga. Reason Foundation
research group favoring privatization, predicted private companies would do increasingly
varied business with the states offering more health and rehabilitation programs as
well as beds, like the "faith pod" program shown here run by Corrections Corporation of
America.


immigration officials also is increasing
rapidly up three-fold in the past 10
years to more than 21,000 at a given time.
In December, Congress passed a terrorism
prevention bill calling for 40,000 addition-
al beds by 2010 for aliens awaiting depor-
tation.
Many of the detainees are housed at
facilities run by CCA and its main rival,
GEO Group formerly Wackenhut. Both
companies anticipate their detention
business will grow.
"Those two are huge beneficiaries of,
overincarceration in the immigration sys-
tem," said Lucas Guttentag of the
American Civil Liberties Union's
Immigrants Rights Project.
The private facilities are required to
meet "rigorous federal standards," said
Immigration and Customs Enforcement
spokeswoman Jamie Zuieback Yet critics
insist privatization will lead to cost-cutting
and accountability problems affecting
detainees' welfare.
"They're putting in a system where it's
easier to pass the buck," said lawyer Dan
Kesselbrenner of the Boston-based
National Immigration Project
Rep. Ted Strickland, D-Ohio, a former
prison psychologist, tried unsuccessfully
to block privatization approval in
Congress. "When the primary goal is prof-
it, that can and probably does lead to a
variety of abuse," Strickland said. "I don't
see any end in sight."
On the state level, there is no compara-
ble boom for private prisons, but neither is
there the bust some industry critics antic-
ipated. As of mid-2004, private prisons
housed 74,285 state inmates, compared to
76,763 in mid-2001.
About 30 states use private prisons,
notably in the South and West Texas has
the most inmates in private facilities -
more than 16,000; New Mexico has the
highest portion of inmates in them 43
percent


Bush's checkup results: A-OK


Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. Pres-
ident Bush was pronounced
"fit for duty" after an annual
checkup Saturday that showed
that the 59-year-old command-
er in chief, an avid mountain
bike rider, has lost 8 pounds
since his last physical exam in
December.
"I'm feeling pretty good,"
Bush said as he left the
National Naval Medical Center
in suburban Washington.
In December, Bush weighed
199.6 pounds, six pounds more
than in the summer of 2003. He
attributed the weight-gain to
munching too many doughnuts
during his re-election cam-
paign.
A four-page medical summa-
ry issued by the White House
said Bush remains in the
"superior" fitness category for
a man of his age.
A separate statement signed
by nine doctors who conducted
the physical said there is "every
reasonable expectation that he


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will remain fit for duty for the
duration of his presidency."
Bush's overall cholesterol
count remains at a healthy
level, despite a slight rise to
178 from 170 seven months ago.
There was a small drop in his
high-density lipoprotein (HDL)
count, or "good" cholesterol,
and a small rise in his low-den-
sity lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad"
cholesterol. Still, both levels
were within healthy ranges.
Doctors said cholesterol-low-
ering drugs were not neces-
sary. The president was
advised to continue healthy


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eating and exercise habits.
"He's in superior health,"
White House spokesman Dana
Perino told reporters after
Bush returned to the White
House. "I think you all know
he's got a terrific fitness rou-
tine. It's a good example for
Americans."


Most states' policies remain unchanged
since the 1990s and the bottom line is that
overcrowding remains a stubborn prob-
lem.
Still, arguments persist over the pros
and cons of private prisons, which pay
lower average wages than government
agencies. Whether this undermines per-
formance is hotly debated, although feder-
al researchers concluded in 2001 that high
staff turnover did aggravate security prob-
lems at many private facilities.
Industry officials insist they have
addressed such concerns.
"For those who think the public employ-
ee monopoly should be maintained, and
sentencing advocates who believe we send
too many people to prison, we're an easy
target," said CCA's Ferguson. "But if I'm
chief executive of a state, I'd see a value to
having competition in my prison system."
The industry's future is bright enough
that GEO Group is buying rival
Correctional Services Corp., but prospects.
hinge largely on incarceration trends.
Many states have balked at funding new
prisons, and now face crowding problems
they could ease by using private prisons or
diverting some offenders to alternatives
like drug-treatment programs.
I "The drug war has been the main cause
of profits for private prisons," said
University of North Florida criminologist
Michael Hallett. "We've gotten so extreme
in overusing incarceration that we have
for-profit industries with an interest in
high crime rates."
Geoff Segal of the pro-privatization
Reason Foundation predicted private
companies will diversify their state busi-
ness offering more health and rehabili-
tation programs, for example.
"States with private prisons aren't going
to get rid of them," Segal said. "It's a tough
sell for a state to say it's going to spend
more money on corrections rather than on
Medicaid."


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Astronomers claim discovery of new planet


Object labeled 10th planet in solar system


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES It's icy, rocky and
bigger than Pluto. And according to
scientists who found it orbiting the
sun, it's the newest planet on our solar
system's block.
The planet the farthest-known
object in the solar system is cur-
'rently 9 billion miles away from the
sun, or about three times Pluto's cur-
rent distance from the sun.
fK.


"This is the first object to be con-
firmed to be larger than Pluto in the
outer solar system," Michael Brown, a
planetary scientist at the California
Institute of Technology, said Friday in
a telephone briefing announcing the
discovery.
Brown labeled the object as a 10th
planet, but there are scientists who
dispute the classification of Pluto as
such.
Astronomers do not know the new


planet's exact size, but its brightness
shows that it is at least as large as
Pluto and could be up to 1 1/2 times
bigger The research was funded by
NASA.
Brown has submitted a name for
the new planet to the International
Astronomical Union, which has yet to
act on the proposal, but he did not
release the proposed name Friday.
The briefing was hastily arranged
after Brown received word that a
secure Web site containing the discov-
ery was hacked and the hacker threat-
ened to release the information.


Brown and colleagues Chad
Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory
and David Rabinowitz of Yale
University first photographed the
object in 2003 using a 48-inch tele-
scope at the Palomar Observatory.
But it was so far away that its
motion was not detected until data
was analyzed again this past January.
It will take at least six months before
astronomers can determine its exact
size.
It has taken scientists this long to
find the planet because its orbit is at
an angle compared to the orbits of


most planets. The new planet is rocky
and icy, similar to Pluto, Brown said.
Alan Stern of the Southwestern
Research Institute in Boulder, Colo.,
said he was not surprised by the dis-
covery since other objects around the
size of Pluto have been found in the
Kuiper belt, a disc of icy debris
beyond the orbit of Neptune.
What's unique about the latest find-
ing is that the object appears to be big-
ger than Pluto, he said.
"Unless they've made a grave mis-
take, this is for real," said Stern.


,.PACT
Continued from Page 1A

sign on Tuesday, will outweigh
*,the economic impact. They
,.note that the six CAFTA coun-
tries have economies that are
very small in comparison with
,.the U.S. economy
^ The debate about the pact
'was the most contentious free-
- trade fight in Congress in more
.than a decade.
- The U.S. International Trade
,-Commission, which did the
'most extensive study of the
-agreement, found that it will
have a tiny but positive impact
on the U.S. economy a gain
of 0.01 percent in output in an
$11 trillion economy
Overall price breaks for U.S.
consumers will be small
because 80 percent of goods
from the six nations already
come into the U.S. duty-free
under federal programs to help
poor nations.
Yet the effect on some indus-
'tries will be significant.
The commission estimated
that after full phase-in of the
agreement, U.S. exports of tex-
tiles and clothing to the six
,countries will increase by
$802.8 million. Machinery
exports will rise by $400.6 mil-
lion. Auto shipments will go up.


Trade agreement would benefit industry
A study on the impact of the U.S.-Central American-Dominican
Republic Free Trade Agreement shows that several industries
would benefit from the agreement.
Estimated increase of U.S. exports after full tariff elimination.


Textiles, Petroleum, Machinery, Other Motor
apparel coal, etc. equipment manufacture vehicles


Grains


SOURCE: U.S. International Trade Commission AP


by $180.4 million. Sales of
wheat and other grains will
climb by $157.3 million.
Total U.S. exports to the
CAFTA nations will rise by $2.7
billion, or 14.8 percent, accord-
ing to the study
The value of goods sent from
those countries to the U.S. will
jump by $3.1 billion for textile
and clothing shipments, while
shipments of processed sugar
will increase by $113.2 million.
The total increase in imports
will come to $2.8 billion at the
time of full phase-in. The study
estimated that imports in some
categories will decline in
future years.
"The biggest winners from
the passage of CAFTA will be


the people of Central America.
This will solidify the tremen-


dous gains they have made.in
economic and political
reforms," said Dan Griswold,
head of trade studies at the
Cato Institute, a libertarian
think tank in Washington.
In addition to promoting the
pact on foreign policy grounds,
the Bush administration and
Republican leaders participat-.
ed in a frenzy of dealmaking to
win votes.
One deal meant passage of


House legislation to make it
easier to impose penalty tariffs
on China in trade disputes.
Also, there were agreements
sought by textile state lawmak-
ers to ensure that U.S. plants
now shipping yarn and fabric
to Latin America, where it is
made into finished clothing,
will not lose out to competition
from China and other low-cost
suppliers.
Despite all the horse-trading,


the legislation passed by only
two votes, 217-215, on Thursday
night after House leaders held
the normal 15-minute vote
open for an hour to allow more
arm-twisting.





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Notice of Public Workshop
The Florida Governmental Utility Authority (FGUA) announces a Public Information
Workshop for all interested persons. The public workshop will be held at 10:00
a.m. on Tuesday, August 9,2005 In Building A at the Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 West Citrus Springs Blvd, Citrus Springs FL, 34434. This is a
workshop to disseminate information and answer questions regarding the proposed
water line extension maintenance assessment program for the Citrus Springs and
Pine Ridge areas. No decision nas orn.i made regardrrn tnis roprari a.; ir will be
presented to the Citrus County Regulatory AuLi.hril, o.n Auguit 1 2005 for their
consideration and approval. If a decision is made to explore this program, you will
receive a mailed -,oice .JuiringR trre wer. of August 25-31, ONLY if your property will
be included in the proposed program.
The FGUA is a legal entity and public body created pursuant to the provisions
of Section 163.01, Florida Statutes, and an Interlocal Agreement among Citrus
County, Florida, Osceola County, Florida and Polk County,
Florida.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing special accommodations or an interpreter
to p ,,.'ir a' m in his mrr.iin should call 866-347-1897 at
least three business days prior to the meeting date. If you
have any questions, please call 866-347-1897.









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on August 11, 2005
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London attacks suggest global reach


Investigators draw comparisons with other recent terrorist attacks


Associated Press


LONDON When the bomb he
tried to detonate aboard a London
Tube train failed to explode, police
say Osman Hussain jumped
out of a carriage window, ran
along the track, then hopped
through back yards before
melting into the city's bustle.
After going underground for
five days, Hussain boarded a
train at Waterloo station -
possibly walking past his pic-
ture and those of three other Osr
suspected July 21 attackers on Hus
posters that blanketed the city. suspe
Then he slipped away, travel- failed I
ing from London through bombi
France to Rome. July
His ability to escape a mas-
sive British dragnet, coupled with the
arrest of another suspect in Zambia
with al-Qaida ties, raised fears about
the global reach of today's terrorists
and the depth of their networks.
Hussain, an Ethiopian-born Briton,
was captured Friday at his brother
Remzi Isaac's house in Rome, where


police traced him through his use of a
relative's cell phone. Italian newspa-
pers said investigators suspected
Hussain's real name was Hamdi Isaac.


nan
sain
cted in
London
ngs on
'21.


arrest sparked more than a
dozen follow-up raids across
the country, as Italian authori-
ties tried to determine if any
attacks on Italy were being
plotted.
In addition to Hussain, at
least two of the other July 21
suspects were of East African
origin, and Italian Interior
Minister Giuseppe Pisanu said
the country was watching the
area closely
Though officials have not yet
said they found links between
the deadly July 7 attacks and
the failed attacks exactly two


weeks later both of which targeted
three subway trains and a bus -
police chief Sir Ian Blair said there
was a "resonance" between the two.
Britain was seeking Hussain's extra-
dition and said it was seeking the
return of one of its citizens detained in
Zambia.


Though the Foreign Office has not
released the person's name, it is wide-
ly reported to be Haroon Rashid
Aswat, who Zambian officials have
said was being questioned about 20
phone calls he allegedly made to some
of the men involved in the July 7
attacks, which killed 56 people,
including four suicide bombers.
Aswat is implicated in a 1999 plot to
establish a terrorist training camp in
the United States and has told
Zambian investigators he once was a
bodyguard for al-Qaida leader Osama
bin Laden, Zambian officials said.
Before he was detained in Zambia,
Aswat had been hiding in
Johannesburg, South Africa, and was
followed after entering the country
from Botswana, the Zambian officials
said.
"Every single terrorist event we've
had, and the failed ones we've had,
there usually are foreign connections,
even though the cannon fodder may
be home grown," said Magnus
Ranstorp, director of the Center for
the Study of Terrorism and Political
Violence at the University of St.


Associated Press
A member of a mixed faith delegation from the Beeston community in Leeds,
Yorkshire, lays flowers and holds a sign Saturday at St. Pancras Old Church, near
Kings Cross Station in London, in memory of the victims of the London terrorist
bombings.


Andrews in Scotland.
"The Bouyeri network in the killing
of (filmmaker Theo) van Gogh in the
Netherlands, the Madrid bombings -
all of these investigations have a for-
eign component to them, which makes
them extremely complex."
If the attacks of July 7 and July 21
are linked, they show a worrying
degree of preparation by a person or


people making use of homegrown rad-
icals from two distinct ethnic groups
- with three of the four July 7
bombers of Pakistani origin, and at
least three of the July 21 suspects with
East African roots, Standish said.
That ensured that when police
focus was on the Pakistani communi-
ty after the July 7 attacks, the East
African group could still move freely.


Associated Press
Navy Commander Thomas Graves, dressed in a replica 1813 period uniform, salutes the city of Boston Saturday at the entrance
to Boston harbor during a 19-gun salute following a changing of the guard ceremony aboard the U.S.S. Constitution. The 207-
year-old warship is the oldest commissioned ship afloat in the world. Graves replaced Commander Lewin Wright, who served as
commander of "Old Ironsides" for two years.




Event planners: Scouts unprepared


Associated Press
A map of the United States is covered
Saturday by thousands of patches donat-
ed by scouts at Fort A.P. Hill near
Bowling Green, Va. The National Guard
hopes to auction off the board and
donate the proceeds to the surviving fam-
ily members of the Alaska troop mem-
bers killed Monday during the National
Boy Scout Jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill.


Associated Press
BOWLING GREEN, Va. -
Their motto is: "Be pre-
pared."
But as the disaster-rid-
dled National Boy Scout
Jamboree carries on follow-
ing five deaths and hun-
dreds of heat-related ill-
nesses, event planners from
across the country are won-
dering just how prepared
the Scouts were.
"That's the part that
breaks my heart there are
things you can avoid and
things you can't," said
Phyllis Cambria, an event
planner from Boca Raton,
Fla., who has written sever-
al books on the subject.
"This one sounds like it was
an avoidable one."
On Monday, four Scout
leaders were electrocuted
in front of several Scouts
after they lost control of the


towering metal pole at the
center of a large, white din-
ing tent, sending it toppling
into nearby power lines.
The day before, a volunteer
was taken to a hospital
where he died of an appar-
ent heart attack
On Wednesday, 40,000
Scouting enthusiasts waited
hours in the stifling heat for
an appearance by President
Bush, who ended up post-
poning his visit due to the
threat of severe thunder-
storms. Sun-sick Scouts
began collapsing and more
than 300 people were treat-
ed for heat-related illnesses.
The troops involved in the
electrocution accident
hired a contractor to set up
the dining tent The contrac-
tors asked the Scout leaders
for assistance in erecting
the structure directly
below a set of power lines.
Sam Waltz Jr., a crisis


management specialist from
Wilmington, Del., said
organizers should have laid
out a grid map in advance
that clearly identified dan-
ger areas where power lines
hang and planned for tents
to be set up far away.
Scouting teachings dictate
that tents not be erected
under trees or power lines,
a Jamboree spokesman
said. And potential Scout
leaders go through rigorous
safety training before they
join the organization, said
Scout leader Kevin Rudden,
51, of Mendon, Mass.
"It's the most safety-con-
scious, risk-averse organiza-
tion I've ever met in my life
- there's a policy for every-
thing," Rudden said. "That's
why it's just surprising that
this happened. I mean, it's
just counterintuitive to all
that you're trained. You
can't explain it"


Iraq's constitution may be based on Islam


Associated Press
CAIRO, Egypt The framers of Iraq's
constitution appear likely to enshrine
Islam as the main basis of law in the coun-
try a stronger role than the United
States had hoped for and one some Iraqis
fear will mean a more fundamentalist
regime.


A draft of the constitution published last
week in the government Al-Sabah newspa-
per put Islam as "the main basis" of law.
But the constitutional committee made
up of Shiites, Kurds and some Sunnis is
still haggling over the language.
Already, Shiite leaders in some south-
ern cities have tried imposing Islamic-
based rules, pressuring women to wear


headscarves and forcing liquor stores and
music shops to close.
Fouad Massoum, the Kurdish deputy.
head of the committee, said it will. discuss.
the role of Islam in meetings Sunday
"We, in the Kurdish coalition, want
Islam to be one of the sources of legisla-
tion," he said.


Astronauts



engage in



spacewalk


Equipment repair

methods tested

in open space

Associated Press
SPACE CENTER, Houston
- Two astronauts floated out
of shuttle Discovery for the
mission's first spacewalk
Saturday and tested repair
techniques developed after the
Columbia tragedy more than
two years ago.
"What a view," said Soichi
Noguchi as he emerged from
the linked shuttle and interna-
tional space station about 222
miles over central Asia. :
The astronauts worked side-
by-side in Discovery's open
cargo bay, testing the repair
methods on a variety of delib-
erately damaged tile and car-
bon samples brought to space.
It took up nearly half of the six-
hour, 50-minute spacewalk
Robinson and
Noguchi, a Japanese
astronaut, worked
with tools similar to an
oversized caulk gun Wh
and large putty knives
to apply an experi- VKie
mental material to the
sample tiles that
NASA hopes can be
used in future mis-
sions to repair cracks No
in the delicate carbon
panels lining the shut- astronaut
tale's wings. space
The experimental
material can be used
to repair cracks or coating loss
up to four inches long, but
won't work on holes such as the
one blown into Columbia's left
wing by a 1.67 pound chunk of
foam in 2003. All seven astro-
nauts aboard that shuttle died.
During their first spacewalk
ever, Robinson and Noguchi
also coated thermal tile sam-


Associated Press
Space shuttle Discovery
Mission Specialist Steve Rob-
inson is suspended Saturday
from Discovery's robotic arm
during a space walk.
ples with a caulk-like material
in hopes of restoring the tiles'
heat-rejecting ability neces-
sary for the shuttle to safely re-


at a
w.


Soichi
guchi
lapanese
ut aboard
ce shuttle
Discovery.


enter the Earth's
atmosphere.
Before going back
inside, the spacewalk-
ers performed some
space station repairs.
They did a little
rewiring to restore
power to a gyroscope
that stopped working
four months ago
because of a popped
circuit breaker, re-
placed a broken global
positioning antenna,
and carried in a pair
of experiment pack-


ages that had been mounted on
the outpost's exterior.
"Great job. Everything was
just perfect. Extra stuff got
done," Mission Control
radioed. "You guys get some
rest."
Two more spacewalks are
planned during the coming
week


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Central Asian nation of
Uzbekistan has ended its agree-
ment allowing U.S. military air-
craft and personnel to use an air
base that has been an important
hub for American military oper-
ations in Afghanistan, adminis-
tration officials said Saturday.
No reason Uzbekistan was
evicting U.S. forces from Karshi-
Khanabad air base, commonly
referred to as K2, was offered by


either the State Department or
the Defense Department The
Washington Post, which first
reported the eviction notice,
said no reason was given by
Uzbekistan and that U.S. forces
would have six months to leave.
The New York Times report-
ed Saturday on its Web site that
a State Department official
cited the abrupt action as a
response to a United Nations
operation to.take hundreds of
Uzbek refugees from the
region.


Old Ironsides stays afloat


-.. ...,' ..' -.'.

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*i--.,.-..- :- *'*- ....... '..'.-:- a . -.*-.'v .J^-' s^ -f^" '^'-W


Uzbekistan to U.S.:,


Find new place to park












JUL1 31, 2005
.....................................................................................................,.,'


Group gets fun all sewn up


Special to the Chronicle

The next meeting of the "Snippits," a
neighborhood group of the American
Sewing Guild, will be at 10 a.m.
Thursday at A White Sew & Vac in
Crystal River. The program will be cro-
cheted button-trimmed socks.
The American Sewing Guild will
sponsor a "sit & sew" class from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Monday at the VFW Hall in
Beverly Hills. There will be a limit of 30
participants and preference will be
given to ASG members. The cost of $25
will include lunch (but bring your own
drink) and a kit for the projects to be
made. You will take home a stylish
Ultrasuede clutch. Bring your sewing
'machine and basic sewing tools.


There are still some openings for this
fun and ififormative day. Sign up at "A
Stitching Place."
The Monday meeting will be
"Christmas in September" with a show
and tell of quick and easy Christmas
gifts which will then be exchanged after
the program.
Another fabric shopping spree is
being planned for Oct 6.
It will be to Jay's Fabric Center in St.
Petersburg with a stop at Hancock
Fabrics or Rainbow's End in Dunedin
after lunch. The cost of the bus is $15
and must be paid at the time of regis-
tration. Sign up at "A Stitching Place."
Preference will be given to members,
but others may get on a waiting list The
bus will leave at 8 a.m. from Kings Bay


Plaza.
An exciting program presented by
Susan Henshaw will be the highlight of
the annual meeting at 10 a.m. on Oct 15
at the VFW Hall in Beverly Hills.
More details will be given at a later
date.
On Nov. 3 we will have a demonstra-
tion of bags and purses made from
placemats.
Guests are welcome at all meetings.
The American Sewing Guild is a
national organization for people who
think sewing is a creative and reward-
ing activity, people who feel that shar-
ing the benefits and joys of sewing is
almost as much fun as sewing itself.
The guild provides up-to-date sewing
information and a friendly support sys-


tem for sewers at all levels of experi-
ence and is open to anyone interested
in sewing. Annual dues are $40. The
Crystal River area neighborhood group,
the Snippits, began in June 1999 and
has grown over the years to include
women of many interests and talents
who enjoy sewing for fun and pleasure.
In addition to personal sewing, the
organization is interested in communi-
ty involvement, and has an ongoing
project of sewing clothes for children,
which are donated to the Salvation
Army to be distributed as needed at
Christmas time.
Regular meetings are at 10 a.m. the
first Thursday monthly at A-White Sew,
Fan, Vac in the Airport Plaza on U.S. 19
in Crystal River Call Jean at 746-2621.


Special to the Chronicle
Betty Behnken's, Beverly Hills, dream vacation consists of a trip with the Jefferson Township School "Class of 48" from Brooksville, Ohio, to Canada and back.
The July2004 trip included this view, taken in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, across Lake Claire toward Detroit, Michigan.


The Chronicle and The Vacation with a brief description select the best photo during the Photos should be sent to the
S Accent Travel Group are spon- of the trip. year and that photographer will Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadow-
D R E A M scoring a photo contest for read- If it's selected as a winner, it win a prize. Please avoid photos crest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
V A CA- ers of the newspaper. will be published in the Sunday with computerized dates on the 34429 or dropped off at any
SReaders are invited to send a Chronicle. At the end of the S print. Please make sure photo- Chronicle office or any Accent
photograph from their Dreamri year, a panel of judges will graphs are in sharp focus. Travel office.






Hospice to offer six-week loss workshop


Citrus County organization session to begin Tuesday in Inverness for all experiencing grief


Special to the Chronicle


Hospice of Citrus County will host a
six-week workshop for those who have
recently experienced the death of a
close friend or family member.
The sessions will be from 4 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday, starting Aug. 2 at the Hospice
of Citrus County's Inverness office at


326 South Line Ave. This workshop will offer information
The presenters will cover informa- that will assist grievers in. coping-with--
tion on the grieving process; ways to the array of emotions commonly expe-
reduce stress affiliated with coping, rienced.
and adjustment, and provide informa- Those interested in the workshop
tion on community resources. may register by calling Hospice of
Individuals are often surprised at the Citrus County at 527-2020 or (866) 642-
physical and emotional effects of grief. 0962.


Hospice of Citrus. County also offers
-additioriar siipjort programs for those
who have suffered a loss due to death.
All programs are free and open to the
community.
For more information, visit the
Hospice Web site at www.hospiceofcitr-
uscounty.org.


News NOTES

Local student
earns scholarship
Three local students have
earned Progress Energy Merit
Award Scholarships. Progress
Energy awards the scholarships
annually to qualifying college-
bound children of company
employees and retirees. The
awards are worth $1,500 per
year and are renewable annual-
ly for up to four years.
Melinda Biggs earned one of
30 merit scholarships. Biggs, the
daughter of Norman and Martee
Biggs, graduated from Crystal
River High School. Biggs plans
to attend the University of South
Florida.
Nicholas Peterson earned
one of 30 merit scholarships.
Peterson, the son of Patrick and
Marcie Peterson, graduated
from Crystal River High School.
Nichqlas plans to attend the
University of Central Florida and
study computer engineering.
Kevin Spellicy earned one of
30 merit scholarships. Spellicy,
the son of Dennis and Cindy
Spellicy, graduated from Citrus
High School. Spellicy plans to
attend the University of Florida
at Gainesville and study
mechanical engineering.
Benefit dance
deadline Monday
Yankee Air Force Inc. is proud
to have a "Commemorative End
of World War II" dance. It is
also in conjunction with VJ Day
on Saturday, Aug. 6, at
American Legion Post 58 on
U.S. 41 next to Carolina Dental
Clinic in Dunnellon. There will
be live big band music, hors
d'oeuvres and A cash bar. The
social hour is from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m., with music from 7:30 to 11
p.m. Wear your uniform proudly
- if you still have it.
Tickets are $15 per person or
$25 a couple. Make checks
payable to Yankee Air Force,
Fla. Div., and mail with a SASE
to P.O. Box 773364, Ocala, FL
34477. Deadline for tickets is
Monday The proceeds will go to
support the Yankee Air Force
Museum. For information, call
Carolyn at (352) 489-3120 or
the airport at (352) 465-0727.
CCCC slates-
monthly meeting
The Citrus County Computer
Club (CCCC) will host its first
Friday of the month meeting at 7
p.m. Friday at The Shepherd of
the Hills Church in Lecanto, on
County Road 486 just one-fourth
mile east of County Road 491.
Doors open earlier. There will
be a roundtable discussion of
your computer problems. Bring
your questions. As always, there
will be computers available at the
meeting to help with problem
solving. Guests are welcome.
The club meets twice month-
ly. The next meeting will be at 7
p.m. Aug. 19, the third Friday in
August. Call Lee Nowicke at
746-5974.
Purple Heart drive
set for local stores
In conjunction with the 223rd
anniversary of the Purple Heart,
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776,
Military Order of the Purple
Heart will host a viola fund-rais-
ing drive Aug. 5 to 7 at the
Homosassa and Inverness Wal-
Mart stores.
Proceeds will go to the Citrus
County Veterans Foundation,
which provides urgent financial
aid to local veterans in need and
Chapter 776's Central Florida
Community College scholarship
endowment fund for children
and grandchildren of Citrus
County veterans.

Pet SPOTLIGHT

Blackie


Special to the Chronicle
Blackle lives In Floral City
with his mother cat and
brother. They share their
home with Jean and Mel
Frank.


Lakeside view


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Mark Pickett (at right), the new president of the
Rotary Club of Crystal River, congratulates outgoing president
Dr. K.C. Nayfield at the organization's recent annual banquet.
LEFT: Five members of the Rotary Club of Crystal River were
recently recognized with Paul Harris Fellowship Awards for
their outstanding service to the community. For each award,
the club contributes $1,000 to the Rotary Foundation. The
foundation uses the funds for to complete international proj-
S-. ects in developing countries around the world. Recipients pic-
tured are (from left to right) Rob Johnson, Avis Craig, Terry
lMartin and Fancy Taylor. Not pictured, but receiving the
award, was Keith Taylor.


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UNDAY, JULY ,


Veterans N


The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Transitional House
Benefit and Veterans Assistance
Program Barbecue is scheduled for
10 am to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6.
Everyone is invited to this family
get-together that has lots of food
and fun. Every penny of your tax-
deductible contribution will be used
to help disadvantaged veterans get
the help they need to get back on
track and into the mainstream of
life in Citrus County.
Cost will be $5 for members and
$10 for nonmembers. The barbe-
cue will be at the main shelter at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River,
and the swimming pool will be
open, with tickets available through
the coalition. This will be the first of
many benefit activities in the mak-
ing to raise funds for the
Transitional House.
Tickets for the "Cruise for a
Cause" will also be available with
the drawing scheduled for Sept. 11
for a seven-day Western
Caribbean Cruise for two, depart-
ing St. Petersburg on Dec. 11 and
returning Dec. 18. Only 1,500 tick-
ets will be sold. It's a veterans'
reunion cruise, with special events
scheduled onboard and in ports of
call that will give veterans an
opportunity to re-establish friend-
ships made while in the service to
their country.
Interested new members will
also have the opportunity to join
this growing organization dedicated
to helping veterans in and around
Citrus County. Membership is $5
per year for veterans and associate
members. Veterans organization
and nonprofit organization life
membership is $50. Corporate
membership and life membership
are $100.
For information and to contact
members for officers and directors
of the coalition, check the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition Web
site at ccvcfl.org. There is also a
complete list of Veterans
.Administration offices for informa-
tion and assistance on the Web
site.
Yankee Air Force Inc. is
proud to have a "Commemorative
End of World War II" dance, also in
conjunction with VJ Day, on Aug. 6
at American Legion Post 58 on
U.S. 41 next to Carolina Dental
Clinic in Dunnellon. There will be
live big band music, hors d'oeu-
vres, cash bar, social hour from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Live music from
7:30 to 11 p.m. Wear your uniform
proudly if you still have it.
Tickets are $15 per person or
$25 a couple. Make checks
payable to Yankee Air Force, Fla.
Div., and mail with a SASE to P.O.
Box 773364, Ocala, 34477.
Deadline for tickets is Aug. 1.
Proceeds to support Yankee Air
Force Museum.. For information,
call Carolyn at (352) 489-3120 or
the airport at (352) 465-0727.
The VFW Post 7122, Floral
City, and the Ladies' and Men's
Auxiliaries announce the following
events.
Notice: All of our top quality
meals are open to the public.
Today: Membership Appreciation
Day starts at 2 p.m. with music by
Country Swing. Bring a covered
dish. The post opens at 1 p.m. The
Post House Committee meets at 7
p.m.
Tuesday: Early bird bingo starts
at 6:30 p.m. and regular bingo at 7.
Shareen's Kitchen opens at 5 p.m.
with sandwiches, salads and
wings.


Wednesday: Shareen's kitchen -
offers beef or vegetable lasagna
dinners for $6 from 4:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Thursday: VFW and Ladies
Auxiliary meet at 7:30 p.m.
Friday: All you can eat grouper
fixed the way you like or three-
piece fried chicken served from
4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Karaoke by
Jannie Faye starts at 7.
Saturday: Char-grilled New York
strip or filet steak with all the trim-
mings served from 5 to 7:30 p.m.
A new year is just beginning for
the VFW and the Ladies' and
Men's Auxiliaries. We welcome all
new and returning members.
Returnees from Iraq and
Afghanistan are especially wel-
come. Call the post at 637-0100 for
eligibility.
The Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando will serve
burgers, chicken 'or grouper for din-
ner from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday
for $5.50. Free music for dancing
by Katie Lynn from 6:30 to 10:30.
You do not have to be a post or
VFW member and the public is
invited.
The post has bar bingo at 2 p.m.
Sunday. The Ladies Auxiliary
hosts bingo games at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday and doors open at 9.
Hot food and snacks available. The
auxiliary also sponsors bar bingo at
2 p.m. Tuesday.
Dues for 2006 are now due. Life
members' cancer $4.95 insurance
premium is also due.
Our post Web page can be
viewed by clicking on the VFW
logo at www.debbiefields.com. You
can e-mail us at usavets@nature-
coast.net.
Beginning Aug. 5, all Friday night
dinners will cost $6. Grouper will
now be available with weekly
menu.
We host the VFW Post 4252
Young Marines, and their Web
page can be viewed by clicking on
their logo at www.debbiefields.com.
If you have a child interested in this
wonderful program, take a look at
the Web page. We are recruiting at
the post from 6 to 7 p.m. Aug. 2
and from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 9. For
information, call Tammy Grant at
746-4590.
The post Honor guard is avail-
able for funeral services at
Bushnell National Cemetery, local
cemeteries or any house of wor-
ship. Upon request, the Honor
Guard will provide school visits,
flag ceremonies, visit rest homes
or support any patriotic-related
affair. Call John Stewart, Honor
Guard commander, at 634-5568.
An open house to meet Bob
Shepherd, the new Florida VFW
State Commander, will be from 6 to
9 p.m. Aug. 5 at VFW Post 4684 in
Citrus Springs. On Aug 6, the State
Commander Homecoming will be
at VFW State Headquarters in
Ocala. There will be a cocktail hour
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. For reserva-
tions to theseevents, call Judy
Prive at 726-3339.
The post will host a Jam Session
featuring the band Country Swing
at 5 p.m. on Aug. 7.
Singles Nights are 6:30 p.m. the
first and third Thursdays monthly.
Music is provided by Katie Lynn for
a $2 donation. Come out, enjoy
some great music, meet some
wonderful single people and have
a great time.
Come out and see our renovat-
ed facility. Halls are now available
to the public for weddings; club
meetings, private parties, etc. Food


-------------------

= Sunday's PUZZLER ANSWER =

Puzzle is on Page 14A.

CLAMP SALSA SPACE BOARS


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7-31 @ 2005 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


and entertainment can be provid-
ed. Call us for details.
Mark your calendar for the annu-
al Labor Day picnic set for Sept. 4.
Tickets on sale at the post canteen.
Limited seating.
The Dart League meets and
competes at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.
The post and Ladies Auxiliary
regularly visit several local nursing
homes. They encourage anyone to
join them and spread some cheer
to veterans who served this coun-
try, and who now need our support.
Call for details.
We need help with our bingo
operations, which is a very impor-
tant part of your post revenue.
Callers and floor coordinators are
needed immediately. Donate a few
hours and receive a lifetime of sat-
isfaction.
The next post and Ladies
Auxiliary meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
Aug. 11. For information, contact
Bob Prive, VFW Post 4252
Commander, at 726-3339.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 of Citrus Springs will have its
general meeting at 7 p.m. on the
first Tuesday monthly; the Ladies
Auxiliary will meet at 7 p.m. on the
second Tuesday, the Men's
Auxiliary will meet at 7:30 p.m. on
the third Monday and the monthly
staff meeting will be at 7 p.m. on
the third Tuesday.
The usual Friday (5 to 7 p.m.)
dinner will not be served on Aug. 5,
as the post will be honoring Bob
Shepherd, the new State
Commander, with a Homecoming
Party from 6 to 9 p.m.
Refreshments'will be served. On
Friday, Aug. 12, the post will be
serving roast turkey dinner from 5
to 7 p.m. Fried chicken will be
served on Aug. 19 and on Aug. 26
chicken fried steak. Also, on Aug.
26, "Katman Karaoke" will be
entertaining from 7 to 11 p.m. The
post also serves a complete break-
fast every Saturday from 8 to 10
a.m.
Don't forget the weekly activities
- Bingo at 1 p.m. every Tuesday,
shuffleboard at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday and dart tournament
at 7 p.m. every Thursday.
E The H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills has set its
schedule.
Sunday: Bingo at 1 p.m. in the
main hall, open to the public. Doors
open at noon. No snacks and
sandwiches available until further
notice. The post serves 25-cent
wings, hot dogs, hamburgers and
fries from 4 to 7 p.m.
Monday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament at 2


p.m.
Wednesday: Lounge bingo 2
p.m. Grill out at 5 p.m. for hot
dogs, hamburgers and sausages.
Mike on the keyboard, ladies night
5 to 8.
Thursday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m. Pool tournament at 7 p.m.
Friday: Lounge bingo 2 p.m.
Fish or chicken dinner served from
5 to 7 p.m. for $6. Open to the
public. Mike on keyboard 6 to 9
p.m. On Aug. 19, there will be a
special stuffed pork chop dinner by
the Ladies Auxiliary from 5 to 7
p.m. for $6. Open to the public.
Tickets in advance only. Call the
post for information at 746-0440.
Saturday: DJ/karaoke starting
at 7 p.m. with snacks at 8:30. Aug.
6: Mark; Aug. 13: Debbie G; Aug.
20: Sheila; Aug. 27: Dick and Neil.
Golf tournaments at 8 a.m.
Monday and Thursdays.
The VFW Post Men's meeting is
at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
monthly, the Ladies Auxiliary meets
at 1 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly and the Men's Auxiliary
meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second
Wednesday monthly at the post
home. Rolling Thunder meets at 11
a.m. the second Saturday monthly
at VFW Post 10087.
For more information, call the
post at 746-0440. The post is locat-
ed at 2170 W. Vet Lane on County
Road 491 behind the AmSouth
Bank and across from Haywire's.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, Inverness:
Today: Pool tourney at 2 p.m.
Karaoke by Wild Willy from 5 to 9
p.m.
Monday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Chicken wings four for $1
from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Karaoke from 6
to 9.
Wednesday: Free pool from 9
a.m. to noon.
Thursday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Friday: Free pool from 9 a.m. to
noon. AYCE fried or baked grouper
(chicken available) $6 from 4:30 to
7 p.m. Karaoke from 7 to 11.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,
Inglis (one mile east of U.S. 19).
Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
the Post. Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday month-
ly. Call Skeeter Fizz, (352) 447-
3495.
The Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,
Inglis, will have a dinner and music
on Saturday, Aug. 6. Dinner will be
from 5 to 7 p.m. and music from 7


* .. .. .- . . "-.

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& Walk-ins Welcome S

DAVID W. POWERS, M.D.
310 S. Line Ave., Inverness 726-8660
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JUnflnCO T DERMTOLOGY
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Surgery and Diseases of the Skin, Hair and Nails
Board Certified American Board of Dermatology
Allen Ridge Professional Village
525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461
352-746-2200 352-873-1500
www.dermatologyonline.com


to 10:30. Dinner will include fried
fish, baked beans, hush puppies
and coleslaw for a $6 donation.
Smoke free dining. Public wel-
come. To-go orders or information,
call (352) 447-3495.
All LST Veterans and wives
are invited to monthly breakfast
meetings at 9 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the Golden
Corral Restaurant in Brooksville.
For information, call (352) 799-
1957.0 Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors of Citrus County meets at 2
p.m. on the fourth Thursday month-
ly at Ray's Bar-B-Q in Crystal
River. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.1
Rolling Thunder, Inc., Fla.
Chapter 7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, has moved.
Meetings are on the second
Saturday monthly at the Harry S.
Nesbitt VFW Post 10087, 2170 Vet
Lane, Beverly Hills. The next
scheduled meeting is at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 13.
Florida Chapter 7 encouraging
new members to join us in promot-
ing public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and helping veter-
ans in need. Many combat veter-
ans are still unaccounted for from
all wars.
Rolling Thunder is not a veter-
an's group or a motorcycle club,
although many support us.
Full membership is open to all
individuals 18 years or older who
wish to dedicate time to helping
educate the public of the fact that
many American veterans have
been left behind after all past wars.
We are committed to helping to
correct the past, protect all future
veterans from being left behind and
helping all veteran's from all wars.
You can reach the president,
Ray Thompson, if you have any
questions at (813) 230-9750 or Jim
Stepanek, chapter secretary at


(352) 489-1644 or e-mail Jim at
ImCrazyJim@aol.com.
The Marine Corps League
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will have its regular meeting at 7:30
p.m. on the third Thursday monthly
at VFW Post 7122 in Floral City. All
members are encouraged to
attend. Former Marines as new
members are also welcomed. Call
Tom Heron at 637-2724 or Bob
Hines at 746-6908.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Marine Corps League meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly'at the VFW 7122 in Floral
City.
The Military Order of Devil
Dogs Meeting: call Chris at 795-
7000.
The Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 is now
getting settled in its new meeting
hall at the VFW in Beverly Hills
located behind the AmSouth Bank
on County Road 491.
The meetings are at 7 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. All
Marines are invited to attend.
The detachment has an Honor
Guard of Marine League members
available who take pride in con-
ducting a memorial service for the
deceased member of all branches
of the military not only at local
cemeteries but also at the Florida
National Cemetery in Bushnell. If
you would like more information or
to join the league, call Bob at 527-
1577 or Ralph at 726-7836.
1 The Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 of Inverness
invites all veterans of Inverness
and Lecanto to join them. Meetings
are at 7:30 p.m. the first Thursday

Please see .'. /Page 11A


I 9









In the August 4th issue of The Citrus County
Chronicle you'll find great money-saving coupons
from these area businesses:

Al's TV Antenna & S tellite
Amerigas
Angus Meats
Best Buy Water.com
Bill Brewn Air Conditioning Service
Bray's Pest Control
Bush Carpet Cleaning
Carolina Georgia Carpet & Interiors
Chilson's Garage
Cino's Car Care & Taxi Service
Consumer Car Care
Crystal Chevrolet/Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep
Crystal River Amoco I
Eagle Buick GMC Truck, Inc.
Furniture Depot
Gulf Coast Ford
Horizon Cleaning Service
Jazzercise
Joe's Carpet
Kelly's Health Club
Kimberly's Ice Cream
Michaels Floor Covering
NetSignia On Line
Powell Square Auto Repair
Remax Realty One / Barbara Mills
Robin's Cuts & Colors/Nails by Gina
Roy Brown Lincoln Mercury
Thea's Skin Care
Tires Plus '
U-Kill-'Em Do-it-yourself Pest Control
Village Cadillac Toyota
Wally's Amoco Detail Shop

I Find it in the,








Inside the
I ICrIIt U IY
I IA


hammm inmmMM


CITRUS CoUNmY (FL) CHRONICLE


10A s 31 2005


VETERANS







SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 11A


VETERANS
Continued from Page 10A


monthly except July and August at
the Key Training Center building,
"' 130 Heights Ave., Inverness. The
executive board meets the third
; Thursday monthly. Call the com-
mander at 341-2276.
S Gerald A. Shonk DAV
Chapter 70 of Inverness will have
its general meeting at 2 p.m. the
second Tuesday monthly except
July and August. The chapter hall
is at 1039 N. Paul Drive near the
intersection of U.S. 41 North and
Independence Highway, phone
344-3464.
Phone Cards for the Armed
Forces Help our U.S. soldiers
phone home. Simply purchase a
first class phone card and deposit
it in the special box at the Lecanto
post office.
The U.S. Postal Service, in con-
y junction with the U.S. Armed
Forces, will make sure that our
Smen and women in Iraq receive
these cards as a gift from the car-
ing people of Citrus County.
While at the post office, you can
?, also honor our heroes by purchas-
ing a patriotic piece of framed art.
Each 12-by-14-inch piece has a
military collage with a collectable
enamel pin and an actual
"Honoring Veterans" stamp.
a Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows
"' of a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call
John Young at the Hunger and
.: Homeless Coalition at 628-4357,
or pass along this phone number
to the veteran.
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will have its annual
Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
. :* gram, Oct. 31 to Nov. 10 as part of
its 13th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week activities.
Coordinated by the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA), Citrus County Chapter,
the Veterans-in-the-Classroom
program brings living history to the
classrooms of the county's public
and private schools, as well as
home-school groups. Veterans
share with students their first-hand
military experiences and travels
... while serving our country in uni-
' form during peace'and war.
g, The program's success has
Generated the need for additional
.,veterans to participate as guest
Classroom speakers. Men and
women veterans who served in
the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq,
; Air Force and National Guard are
especially needed as:participants.
All interested veterans are
encouraged to call Mac McLeod,
746-1384, Gary Runyon, 563-5727
or Bob Truax, 860-1630.
; The USS Chilton (APA 38)
Navy reunion will be Oct. 6-9 in
^ San Antonio, Texas. Any veteran
of the Chilton is invited. For infor-
^ mation, call Joseph Doherty at
N 341-5959.


C. A. Toumbis MD, PhD
Fellowship Trained In Spine
SMinimally Invasive Surgery
*Artificial Disc Replacement
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* Cervical & Lumbar Spine


Your Birthday: Overall conditions look quite hope-
ful for you in the year ahead and seem to offer sub-
stantial promise. However, you must have staying
power when you hit any bumps in the road, and
adhere to sensible solutions.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Unfortunately, your social
behavior will be closely scrutinized today by someone
who is less than an admirer. This person is hoping to
get the goods on you to undermine you in some way.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have all the
requirements necessary today to be successful if and
when confronted by challenge, yet instead of stiffening
your back and digging in, you may ease off and do
nothing.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The greatest challenge
you may have to face today is to be able to recognize
what and who you really are, and what you can do
about it without being overwhelmed by imaginary
inner fears.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Instead of attempting
to force yourself into the picture with a person or
group who you believe has something good going for
them, wait until you're invited in. Don't embarrass
yourself.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) The ambiguity
that you may feel about yourself at this time makes it
difficult for you to deal with others today. One part of
you is holding back, while the other wants to move
forward.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You must perse-
vere today without being reluctant or hesitant about


what you're doing if you want to see success. Once
you fall behind, it'll be difficult to revive momentum.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Persons who lack
substance or who treat serious matters frivolously
should be avoided today. Their attitude and ideas
could influence your thinking and lead you totally off
course.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Your ambitions are
easily aroused today, but the trouble is that this may
only be momentary. Instead of pursuing them, you
may look for plenty of excuses to postpone what
needs to doing.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Your inner energies
may be struggling to assert themselves today without
much success, and consequently you could end up
engaging in unproductive acts merely for the sake of
expediency.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Financial matters
must not be treated in a careless fashion today. If you
are negligent or slovenly in the handling of your funds,
you could end up losing a lot of money instead of
making gains.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) This could be some-
what of an irritating or frustrating day for you, because
it may seem to you that all that you try to do is
blocked not by others, but by your own feelings of
inadequacy.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Steer clear of getting
involved in do-it-yourself projects about which you
have little training or knowledge, whether it's for your-
self or for another. You could really mess up the job.


Congregate Dining .' --


CONGREGATE DINING MENUS
Monday: Hot sliced turkey with gravy, mashed
potatoes, green peas, cranberry-orange relish
mold, whole wheat bread with margarine, low-
fat milk.
Tuesday: Spaghetti with meatballs and
parmesan cheese, garlic spinach (HD: squash
medley with onions), tossed salad with Italian
dressing, two slices whole wheat bread with
margarine, sugar cookie, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Pork cutlet, garlic mashed pota-
toes, mixed vegetables, whole wheat bread with

Todays-
*'s:KB:;ia';;:''B'!. -io a ayf y '" ""*


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Stealth" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
Digital.
"Sky High" (PG) 1 p.m., 4
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Bad News Bears" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10 p.m. Digital.
"Charlie & the Chocolate
Factory" (PG) 12:40 p.m., 3:40
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Wedding Crashers" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9 -
564-6864
"Must Love Dogs" (PG-13)
12:10 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"Sky High" (PG) Noon, 2:20
p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10
p.m. Digital.
"Stealth" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
Digital.
"Bad News Bears" (PG-13)
12:25 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"The Devil's Rejects" (R)
12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Island" (PG-13) 12:30


margarine, chocolate pudding, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken Caesar salad, three bean
salad, whole wheat bread with margarine,
mixed fruit cup, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken patty on hamburger bun,
mayonnaise packet, mashed potatoes, broccoli,
oatmeal raisin cookie, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include: East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness,
and South Dunnellon.
For information, call Support Services at 795-
6264.


p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20
p.m. Digital.
"Charlie & the Chocolate
Factory" (PG) 12:35 p.m., 4:05
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Wedding Crashers" (R)
12:15 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. Digital.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
12:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:40 p.m.
V i s i t
www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and enter-
tainment information.


GO ONLINE
Visit
www.Chroriicl ieOnline.comrn
to read today's headlines,
add your thoughts to the
weekly opinion poll,
search the classified ads,
look up movie times or
play games.
To see manatees at
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, go to
www.ManateeCam com.
Have friends visit the cam-
era at
www.KingsBayCam corn
while you're out at the
springs in King's Bay.


ORTHOPAEDIIC


NOW SEEING NECK AND BACK PATIENTS

Dr. Andrew J. Petrella is pleased to
announce that C. A. Toumbis. MD, PhD
is joining him. Dr. Toumbis has recently
relocated from the Cleveland Clinic
Hospital and received his orthopaedic
training at Shands Hospital. He is
currently accepting new patients.


Andrew J. Petrella MD
Board Certified
* Joint Replacement
* Sports Medicine
* Pediatric Orthopaedics
SFracture Care
*Hand Surgery


Call the friendly office staff at 352-563-9959 for an appointment or
visit www.citrusortho.net for more information 582 S.E. 7th Ave



MEDICAL CENTER





A C C E S
HEALTHCARE, LLC B

Vincent Alia, MED. OPQ"i
Family Medicine

Mark Barnhurst, PA-C
Physicians Assistant

6 27Hr n
35252 -00401 1je6-93-87-
WALKISWLCMjOS NU ANCE ACETE
Opl odSt-ia


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval tcjr story ideas
must be granted by the
Chir.jncle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.
* Call Charlie Brennan ed,
tor, at 563.5660.
* Or call Mike Arnold.
managing editor, at 563
5660.
* Leave your name, phone
number and brief
description of the story.


Senate clears


emergency vet


budget increase


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Senate sent President Bush a
$1.5 billion increase to the
budget for veterans health care
programs Friday as it cleared
the first spending bill for the
fiscal year, beginning Oct. 1.
The move ends an embar-
rassing episode for the admin-
istration, which repeatedly
miscalculated the needs of vet-
erans and used outdated budg-
et models when fashioning
estimates for Congress.
The funds,
which close a The me
gap for the cur-
rent budget passed
year, were
added to a $26.3 99-1 V
billion bill for
next year's
budget for the
Interior Department.
The measure passed by a 99-
1 vote. The underlying budget
bill generally fits within Bush's
budget outlines as it cuts
almost $700 million from cur-
rent levels.
But when Congress returns
from its summer recess in
September, lawmakers are
sure to test the president's
resolve to cut almost 1 percent
from domestic agencies whose
budgets Congress funds each
year. The extra veterans funds
were needed after the
Veterans Affairs Department
underestimated the number of
veterans who would seek care
as well as increased costs of
treatment and long-term care.
Initially, the VA said it faced
about a $1 billion shortfall that
could be managed by tapping
reserve funds and its budget for
infrastructure improvements.
That did not fly with law-
makers, who insisted on
adding emergency funds on top
of the $28 billion appropriated
last year for veterans' medical
needs. The House originally


i

V
v


passed legislation accepting
the $1 billion estimate, but the
ink on that bill was barely dry
before the VA upped its esti-
mate to $1.3 billion.
The Senate twice unani-
mously voted for the $1.5 bil-
lion figure. The House decided
to go along.
The VA's estimating models
for the original budget submis-
sion did not take into account
the additional cost of caring for
veterans injured in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Demand for health care serv-
ices has increased
sure by more than 5
percent over last
by a year. The VA origi-
nally predicted
tote. growth of about 2
percent.
The $1.5 billion
is for the budget
year ending Sept. 30. Bush has
asked for an additional $2 bil-
lion, for next year on top of his
February budget request.
In passing the Interior bill,
lawmakers approved a signifi-
cant cut to the budget for the
Environmental Protection
Agency, mostly from an EPA
clean-water fund that gives
grants to states.
The agency was also given
instructions regarding upcom-
ing rules on human tests used
to consider permits for pesti-
cides. Pregnant women,
infants and children could not
be intentionally dosed with
pesticides when judging pesti-
cide permit applications.
The underlying Interior
measure also contains $10 mil-
lion to subsidize a memorial to
Martin Luther King Jr. on the
National Mall on a 4-acre site
next to the Franklin D.
Roosevelt Memorial.
The funds were sought by
Sen. Robert Byrd, D-WVa., and
Senate Appropriations
Committee Chairman Thad
Cochran, R-Miss.


ENROLL NOW FOR



VOLUNTARY PRE-K



IN YOUR AREA!


Below is a list of approved Voluntary
.. Pre-Kindergarten Providers in your area:
CITRUS -
Bright B.-, rr,mr,-_ 4 tru t, (. j o r,/ ;..:. i .,.jrcj
SC(;,jntr) .d.. Pes -n, -.ci 'rt rai t Ri er PrIecr, c'l
W Gutdi.jnr Ar, /.i .;d ge
S. Noah's A 'i~,;'e ire .;.Anlri .0rish an J.aern

Precious C'a'o Prss..Ho C'thld Core
;/ sm 4ol s.,ri ed.j Beat or Ci'rus
TinSy Treaure. T p:les Learnian Center
Provisionally Approved St Paul Lutriearn., Preocic'u Laom

This message brought to you by:
THE EARLY LEARNING COALITION OF THE NATURE COAST


To--y'.s- i....


VETERANS


Crrnus CouwNn (FL.) CHRONICLE







.2 SUDY JUY3.20 c E H /R VLC'~sCUT F)C'o~


-= Anniversaries

The Nordykes
Ed and Norma Nordyke of
Crystal River celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary.
They were married July 8,
1955, in Fort Wayne, Ind.
The Nordykes had their own
business and lived in
Gainesville 29 years prior to
retiring to Crystal River nine
years ago.
They have four children,
Curtis of St Augustine, Kevin
of Dahlonaga, Ga., Christine of ,
Middletown, Del., and Craig of
Orlando, five grandchildren
and one great-grandchild.

The Hills


Beverly Hills celebrated their
52nd wedding anniversary.
They were married July 25,
1953, at the Presbyterian
Church in Paterson, N.J. .
They are the parents of three
children, David (deceased),
Gerald and Stephanie of
Florida, and they have seven
grandchildren.
The Hills are retired and
moved here 11 years ago from
New Jersey



The Farrells

Robert and Joan Farrell of
Inverness were married July
23, 1955 in Coral Gables. A
party was recently given by
their children, George Farrell, .
R. Giegory Farrell and Judy .
Esposito, at the home of R.
Gregory and Jean Farrell, to
honor them on their 50th wed-
ding anniversary. They also
have seven grandchildren and
Robert is retired from U.S.
Customs. The couple's married
life has been in the Gables,
then to St. Petersburg, retiring
to Inverness 20 years ago.


Trps & TOURS


Auto events
PONTIAC, Mich. Vintage cars
will be celebrated at a number of
events and races around the coun-
try this summer and fall.
The Woodward Dream Cruise is
back for the 11th year, with more
than a million spectators and
40,000 cars stretching for 16 miles
along Woodward Avenue, from
Ferndale to Pontiac, Mich. The
event is scheduled for Aug. 20
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. In addition to
classics and hot rods, there will be
children's activities, food and live
music and plenty of nostalgia
for Doo Wop and whitewall tires.
Details at www.woodwarddream-
cruise.com
The Rolex Vintage Festival,
Sept. 2 to 5 in Lakeville, Conn.,
features a car show and races.
Models will include pre-World War
II classics and race cars from '40s
to the '70s, with manufacturers like
Alfa Romeo, Bentley, BMW,
Ferrari, Jaguar, Maserati, MG and
Porsche represented. Tickets
range from $15 to $75. Details at
www.limerock.com or (800) 722-

edl's ,
"-3ridal A|| .

Tkadnk You,
for Vo Us
#1 Brid.z dS

BEST
(352) 564-0124 _.
alBfraJ Fd.,c. Pits lfon1 Pr1i "


3577.
From Aug. 19 to 21 in Monterey,
Calif., 400 vintage cars will com-
pete in 14 races at the Rolex
Monterey Historics, using the
Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca.
Exhibits will include Chaparral cars
- considered among the most
innovative cars in the sport of rac-
ing brought from the Petroleum
Museum in Midland, Texas, where
they are on permanent display. Jim
Hall, who designed the Chaparrals
and was himself a race car driver,
will also make an appearance.
From wire reports
Please see :./Page 13A




I-
1 .
% ; '*ww*











mnneth harnes

89 V. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
next to Smart Interiors
527-2556 4
Hour'. 1015 Mon thru Fin rir 12 -


TTY- I 1'


Silcott-Rodd


Larry Rodd and Billie Jean ,
Silcott of Fort Myers were unit-" -
ed in marriage Saturday, June
25, 2005. The Rev. Dan Oaks
performed the service at the
First Church of God on Rock
Crusher Road in Crystal River.
The maid of honor was
Wanda Thurston of
Victorsville, Calif. Best man
was Randy Glass from Fort
Myers.
A reception was held at the
home of Jewell Dixon, the -
bride's mother, following the
ceremony. ,
The couple left for a short
wedding trip.



_First ,i: ,, ,..:, "


Brayden Robert Boardman
celebrated his first birthday on
June 28. He is the son of SSG
Bruce and Christine
Boardman Jr. of Spring Lake,
N.C. His father, Bruce, was
able to be home from Iraq to
celebrate his birthday with
him, which made it even more
special. Brayden's grandpar-
ents are Bob and Patty Rock,
Bruce and Carolyn Boardman
Sr., of Inverness.


e sM


Vedtlinfs -


Tarpley-Brunner


Brendan Lawrence Brunner
and Brooke Elizabeth Tarpley
were united in marriage
Saturday, June 18, 2005, at the
Ballantrae Golf and Yacht Club
in Port St. Lucie. Dr. Gary
Durham performed the serv-
ice.
The bride is the daughter of
Barry and Beth Tarpley of
Palm City.
The groom is the son of Mark
and Barbara Brunner of
Inverness.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her parents. The bride
wore a strapless ivory gown
with beaded sweetheart
bodice. Flowers were a tropi-
cal mix of coral anthurium and
ivory orchids.
Maid of honor was Jackie
Yancey of Port St. Lucie and
best man was Colin Brunner,
brother of the groom, of
Inverness. Bridesmaids were
Amanda Adams, Debbie
Daniele and Megan Efinger, all
of Stuart, Lindsey Loudakis of
Delray Beach, Stormi Riva of
Indiantown and Melissa Wolfe
of Tampa. Groomsmen were
Mike Doolittle and Jake
Morgan of Inverness, Forrest
Stillwell and Robert Vitter of
Atlanta, Ga., Scott Turner of
Tallahassee and Brandon
Tarpley, brother of the bride of
Boca Raton. Flower girl was
Savannah White, niece of the
bride of Panama City.
The bridal attendants wore
coral strapless dresses and
their flowers complemented
the bridal bouquet
A reception at Ballantrae,


given by the bride's parents,
immediately followed the serv-
ice.
Out-of-town guests included
grandparents of the groom,
Larry and Annette Brunner
and Matt and Margaret Chopp,
and grandparents of the bride,
Ralph and Kathleen White and
Betty Tarpley
The bride is a graduate of
Florida State University with a
Master's degree in elementary
and special education. She is
currently an exceptional stu-
dent education teacher for
fourth- and fifth-grade stu-
dents in the Leon County
Schools.
The groom is a graduate of
FSU with a Bachelor's degree
in criminology. He is currently
employed as a deputy with the
Leon County Sheriff's Office.
The newlyweds honey-
mooned in Ocho Rios, Jamaica.


VanDenHout-North


Bruce Douglas North Jr. and
Sylvia Francis VanDenHout
were united in marriage at 3:30
p.m. Saturday, June 25, 2005, at
the couple's home in Crystal
River. Donna Viglione from
The Wedding Chapel in
Inverness officiated.


Stus the Bus

The Citrus County Chronicle along with Fun Oldies 102.7 presents "Stuff the Bus".
School bells will be ringing soon. Children in our area will be returning to school
without the proper school supplies. Please help us fill our buses with school supplies
for needy children.

r.hrnII Ft qDrop off locations


I I


Bus locations:
Saturday, July 23 K-Mart, Crystal River -10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Saturday, July 30 -Wal-Mart, Inverness -10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Saturday, August 6 Wal-Mart, Homosassa 10 a.m 2 p.m.

Sponsored by: Citrus County Chronicle, Bay News ., .. .,,
9, Crystal River Mall, McRae's of Homosassa, Era jHR ] CLEI
American Realty and Boulerice Roofing \ .,-P.


For more information call 795-1027


Perkins
State Bank
Inglis


All Children's
Sertoma
Therapy Center
Citrus Springs


Music
Madness
Inverness


Dr. Richard
Swanson
Family Dental
Center
Crystal River


Crystal
River
Music
Crystal River


Riverside
Antiques
and Gallery
Yankeetown


American Pro
Diving Center
Crystal River


Precious Cargo
Pre-School
Homosassa



Birds
Underwater
Dive Center
Crystal River


Nick
Nicholas
Ford
Inverness


The Wright Family


special to the Chronicle
Lillian Wright of Floral City ceJebrated her 87th birthday in
Daytona Beach with her daughter, two granddaughters and
two great-grandchildren.


L. CATARACT &
LASER INSTITUTE
S "Excellence... with love"
considering

CATARACT
SURGERY?
Appointments are available for cataract evaluations with:

James P. Gills, MD
Thursday, August 4th & 18

Seven Hills Center
1180 Mariner Blvd. Spring Hill
1-800-282-7785 StLukesEye.com
We Accept Medicare Assignment and Most Insurances
St. Luke's also offers all possible surgical treatments for astigmatism.


I


'fc3c-r,,jr"iEF-rRAviEiL


CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


22A sUNDAYJULY 31, 2005


- A-UReu I








CITRUS CouN'n' (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press

MOUNT RUSHMORE
NATIONAL MEMORIAL, S.D.
You may not be able to tell
the difference, but the presi-
dents depicted on Mount
Rushmore have had their
faces washed for the first time
since they were carved in
stone more than 65 years ago.
Workers removed decades of
dirt, grime and invasive
lichens, which had begun dig-
ging roots into the stone
images of Washington,
Jefferson, Lincoln and Teddy
Roosevelt.
The three-week-long project
was expected to end Thursday
or Friday, according to Duane
Bubac, Mount Rushmore facil-
ities manager.
The faces were designed by
sculptor Gutzon Borglum, who
began working on them in
.1927. Roosevelt's image, the
last one to be carved, was ded-
icated in 1939.
This was the first scrubbing
the monument has ever gotten.
The power-washing was donat-
ed by a German manufacturer
of cleaning machines, Alfred
Karcher GmbH & Co. KG.
The company has carried
out complimentary cleaning
on 80 projects around the
world, including washing the
base of the Statue of Liberty
two years ago.
While the washing will stabi-
lize and preserve the monu-
ment, "I don't think the aver-
age visitor will be able to tell
the difference," said Bubac.
The technicians were har-
nessed to ropes anchored on
the monument as they climbed
past eye sockets as tall as they
are and tucked themselves
e lX beneath enormous nostrils to
spray and blast the dirt away.
No chemicals were used,
just pressurized water of more
than 200 degrees that ran in
dark wet streaks down the
famous heads before drying.


TRIPS
Continued from Page 12A

Tickets are $35 to $95. Details at
(800) 327-7322 or www.laguna-
seca.com.
On Oct. 8 and 9, on Naval Air
Station North Island in Coronado,
Calif., 200 vintage race cars will
compete on a 1.6 mile course.
Tickets are $20 to $25. Details at
(800) 722-3577 or www.corona-
dospeedfestival.com.
Vegas guide
LAS VEGAS Sure, you could
empty your bank account in Las
Vegas on slot machines, $300 bot-
tles of booze, and hotel rooms that
cost more in a weekend than your
rent for a month.
Or you could take your cue from


Workers dot the heads of presidents George Washington, left, Thomas Jefferson, center, and
Theodore Roosevelt as they pressure-wash Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota, July
21. Results of the cleaning are subtle but evident, as workers had nearly completed Washington,
somewhat completed Jefferson and barely started on Roosevelt, right, in this photo. The granite
sculptures hadn't been washed since they were completed 65 years ago by sculptor Gutzon Borglum.


Jens Kranhold,
of Germany, is
shrouded in
mist as he
pressure-
washes
Abraham
Lincoln's nose
at Mount
Rushmore
National
Memorial in
South Dakota,
July 18. A
crew from
Germany,
along with
National Park
Service work-
ers are work-
ing on a proj-
ect to clean
the monument
for the first
time since it
was complet-
ed 65 years
ago by sculp-
tor Gutzon
Borglum.
Associated Press


the cool rock band The Killers,
which is offering a "Cheapskate
Guide to Sin City" the group's
hometown in the August issue
of Blender magazine.
First on the list of recommenda-
tions from the quartet: Find the
restaurant in the back of the poker
room at high-end casinos, a freebie
intended to keep players near the
tables. "I used to go back there
with my poker-playing friends and
eat really good food," drummer
Ronnie Vannucci told the maga-
zine.
No. 2, "ask for the $7.77 Special
at Mr. Lucky's in the Hard Rock
Hotel," says bassist Mark
Stoermer. It's not on the menu, but
it will get you a plate of steak and
shrimp.
Third, head away from the Strip
to a good, simple Mexican restau-


rant called Chapala's at 3335 East
Tropicana Ave.
Finally, if you run out of clean
clothes, you may be interested in
guitarist Dave Keuning's claim that
,he does his laundry for free at The
Stratosphere hotel.
The Killers' album, "Hot Fuss,"
which earned a Grammy nomina-
tion earlier this year, is still riding
high on the Billboard charts more
than a year after its release. The
band recently played at the Live 8,
benefit for Africa.
Hotel childcare
NEW YORK When you check
into a family resort and leave your
children with the resident baby sit-
ter or kids' club, how do you know
if the caregiver can be trusted?
The August issue of Conde Nast
Traveler asks that question in a


piece called "Who Is Minding the
Kids?" The article features a
checklist of things to ask about
when booking a hotel or resort
where childcare is offered.
A phone call to the director of
children's activities at the property
should answer many of your ques-
tions.
First, ask how the staff is
screened and trained. Ideally, all
staff working with children will have
undergone background checks.
They should also be trained in first
aid and CPR, and where appropri-
ate, as lifeguards, according to the
magazine.
At least one staff member
should be formally trained in early
childhood education or develop-
ment. If you're going outside the
U.S., make sure at least one per-
son on the staff is fluent in English.


Happy traveling


requires planning


Rushmore faces





finally washed


Visas You may need a visa
in some of the countries, so be
certain before you leave that
you have it. On a fam trip to
Tangier, which was a side-trip
from Spain, one of the travel
agents didn't have a visa and
was refused entrance. She and
the bus driver sat for those
hours while the rest of us
enjoyed the visit Thank good-
ness it was only a day trip with
half the time spent traveling
there.


My article, this week,
will be informative for
those planning a trip
now or in the near future.
The world has changed and
so we also have to change to
meet the needs of the day, and
to satisfy the newly established
guidelines set by the State
Department by the specified
dates. They apply to all passen-
gers, adult and child, so here
goes...
Until Dec. 30, 2005, all U.S.
citizens traveling by
air or sea to or from
the Caribbean,
Bermuda, Central
America and South
America, must
show identification
their original
birth certificate or a
certified copy with .
a raised seal, along
with a driver's Anne
license or state ..
issued photo I.D. '
Come Dec. 31, OF A r.
2005, a valid United COUNE
States passport will
be required for
all U.S. citizens I
traveling by air It' a go
or sea to the
countries listed leave
above.
By Dec. 31, your itinc
2007, a valid U.S.
passport will be your fan
required for all
air and sea trav-
el to or from friend or
-Mexico and
Canada. Shou
By Dec. 31,
2007, a valid emerged
United States
passport will be
required for all
air, sea and land border cross-
ings.
Further information can be
received by phoning the
Passports located under U.S.
Government offices in the
phone book or go on line
http://travel.state.gov to get
more information, and you can
always check with your friend-
ly travel agent. The cost of the
passport is about $95, depend-
ing on a few things.
I remember my first passport
application in 1966, the cost
was $25, then $40, $60, and now
about $95. However, passports
are good for 10 years, and are
the best identification.
However, it is as valuable as a
piece of costly jewelry so
always keep it in a safe place.
Frank and I always recom-
mended our people to Xerox
the face page of the passport.
In case you lose the passport,
at least you'll have the infor-
mation required for reissuing
another. I cannot stress enough
how valuable and necessary
your passport is.


On all of the trips
planned for our
travelers, we gave
them a sheet listing
the items needed
for their trip, called
Equip for Your
Trip, which was
invaluable to them
as they packed and
checked the items
required. I would
research the weath-
er, the events
planned, what to
look for, purchase,
etc. All appreciated
this informa-
to tion, which
to made the trip
more exciting
f yet comfort-
able.
th It's a good
idea to leave a
)d copy of your
itinerary with
your family,
or, good friend or
neighbor
should an
emergency.
e. arise.
Time was
when we used
traveler's


checks, and sometimes still do;
however, ATMs are so wonder-
ful since they seem to be every-
where. Do be careful when you
use them, because there are
unscrupulous people watch-
ing, including young teenagers
who are very good at pick -
pocketing. And, of course,
credit cards are a great big
help on your trip. However,
keep track of your purchases
so that upon your return you
can check them with your
incoming statements.
Overseas, I always mark'in
pencil what the cost comes to
in American dollars. I like to
know how much theJtem cost
me in U.S. dollars for compari-
son.
More, next week.


Anne Fusillo and her hus-
band, Frank, owned a travel
agency in Wheaton, Ill.,
for 17years. Questions or
comments? Give her a
call at 564-9552.


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For more information and reservations
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To place your ads,
call us today (352) 563-3231.
PuC.ci.r:arn:.n e.er, Sunday In the Citrus
',:nr,, Crri.:r i. .nd all week on
www.chronicleonline.com


[TTIIWAY















I."


Fusillo


SELOR


od idea

copy o

erary wi

nily, goc

neighbi

uld an

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I I


SUNDAY, JUI.Y 31, 2005 13A


TRAVEL








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) ClI-ONICIm,


14A SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


Buy in bulk, save bucks


I just spent $122.37 at the local big-box store. I
bought a 5-gallon drum of olives, a 16-pound box
of pretzels, 10 pounds of Parmesan cheese, a keg
of mustard, 300 bagels and a little pasta. I could-
n't fit it all in the car, so I had to make a second
trip to pick up the pasta. I'm kind of
glad they were out of that ice cream
Sue likes because it only comes in
two sizes tanker truck or container
ship. We used to have a hard time get-
ting it all in the freezer. Until I went to _
an even bigger big-box store and
bought a couple of extra freezers.
Why they call them big-box stores ,
I'll never know. They don't put any-
thing in a box for you. You have to do .
it yourself. You have to check the stuff J Ij
out yourself, you have to lug it to the
.car yourself they even want you to
bring the empty cart back by yourself.
I'm saving a ton of money, but my back is
killing me. What's that going to cost to fix? I'll
have to wait until they have big box emergency
rooms to find out. They'll have a self-service X-
ray machine and a do-it-yourself traction bed.
You'll cook your own food and do your own nurs-
ing. The good news is that it will cut your med-
ical costs by a third. Not that you will live long
enough to run up a very big bill.
Do-it-yourself shopping has become a huge
trend. They opened a big discount supermarket
near my house called "U-Bag It, U Save." Just by
bagging my own groceries I could look forward
to huge savings on my weekly grocery bill. I
assumed they would cut corners in other ways,
too. One day I was standing in aisle No. 6 look-
ing for the nutrition label on a bag of turkey
jerky. I couldn't find the nutrition information,
but I did find the price tag. For all the hype,
their stuff wasn't that much cheaper than the
place that puts your stuff in bags for you. "U-Bag
It" probably saved more money by not having to
buy the giant neon letters "Y" and "0" in their
logo than they did by not hiring baggers.
Imagine how cheap "U-Bag It's" food would be


if they got rid of the manager instead of the bag-
gers? Still, I'll keep shopping here until some-
one opens a place called "U-Price It, U-Save."
So I'm looking and I'm looking and I'm turn-
ing the bag of turkey jerky over and over and I
can't find that little box that says how
much fat is in it, how many calories it
has per serving, how much soluble
"S fiber there is, how much riboflavin it
contains. Nothing. I can't find it any-
where. I am very worried about my
soluble fiber and my riboflavin I
worry because I'm 55 years old and I
.. j haven't got a clue as to what they are.
r I was just about to rip it open and
taste some when I see a kid with a
label gun hanging from his belt and
ask him where is the nutrition infor-
mation.
"There's no nutrition label on it
because it's for dogs."
"Well, of course it's for dogs," I lied, "But I'm
worried about Fido's trans-fatty acid. I'm not.
sure he gets enough." Label gun kid gives me
one of those "anything-you-say, grandpa" looks
and keeps walking. '"Animal hater," I stage whis-
per after him. When he was out of sight I put it
back. We don't have a dog. We have a cat.
The cat loves tuna. Where on earth would a
10-pound cat ever acquire a taste for tuna?
Tunas are huge fish. And you have to go out in a
boat to catch them. When would my cat have
gone deep-sea fishing? Even if she had, she'd
sleep right through it.
Yesterday Sue was going to the big-box store
for more supplies. I told her to put kitty litter on
the list. She said, "Do you' want a pallet full or
the giant size? I don't think I can lift the big one
by myself."

Jim Mullen is the author of "It Takes a Village
Idiot: Complicating the Simple Life" and
"Baby's First Tattoo." Reach him at
jim mullen@myway.com.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
M Photos need to be in sharp focus.
M Photos need to be in proper exposure. neither too light nor too dark
0 Include your name, address and phone number on all photos.
E When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to right.
0 If desired, include the name of the photographer for credit.
0 We discourage the use of Polaroid prints.
0 Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well. submit the digital image via disk or e.
mail Staff will color correct and otherwise "work up" the image to Chronicle publication stan-
dards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum-resolution JPEG (.Ipg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
* For more information, call Linda Johnson, newsroom coordinator, at 563.5660.










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Choosing guardians for kids


requires careful thinking


r


Dear Annie: I have three children under
the age of 10. When our oldest two were
very young, my husband and I asked my
brother, "Ned," and his wife to be the guardians
of our children, even though they lived in anoth-
er state. We chose them over my sis-
ter, "Dotty," because at the time,
Dotty was engaged to a man no one !
in the family liked. Their engage- l
ment was subsequently called off,
and she met and married another .
man we liked much better.
When my husband and I redid our
wills five years ago, we decided to
switch guardianship to Dotty to
spare our children the possibility of
a move in the event of our deaths.
Plus, my in-laws live in the same gen-
eral area, and we felt they could A
keep close ties with our kids and AN
help my sister. MAUL
Now, five years later, Dotty has
children of her own, and my husband and I no
longer think she and her husband are the best
guardians for ours. Ned and his wife have chil-
dren, too, now, and are doing a fine job raising
them. And we have since moved across the
country and are equally far from everyone. As
you may have guessed, we would like to switch
guardianship back to my-brother and his wife.
The question is, how do I do this without hurt-
ing Dotty's feelings? Any ideas on how to have
this delicate conversation? Wanting To Hurt
No One
Dear Wanting: Is Ned's situation more finan-
cially stable than Dotty's? Are the ages of your
brother's children more compatible with yours?
Their gender? Your brother's views on school-
ing? Religion? Discipline? Any of these are
valid, and perfectly understandable, reasons for
switching.
Find something logical and inoffensive, and
then tell Dotty about your decision, adding that
it's possible you will change your mind again
when the kids are older. Then let's hope the
guardianship is never needed.
Dear Annie: I am married to a nail-biter, and


Sunday PUZZLER


Puzzle answer is

ACROSS
1 Device that grips
6 Latin dance music
11 Room
16 Wild pigs
21 Kitchen gadget
22 Standing wide open
23 Zenana
24 "- showers "
... ,25 Mui-cal composition
26 Body oi lawmakers
28 Range
29 Teacher's favor.ie -
30 Sweet potato
32 Stole
33 Combine
35 Road or relief
36 Woody plant
38 Stem joint
41 Writer of verse
43 Always
44 Keep for later
(with "away")
45 Courtroom figure
48 Wall painting
50 Mauna -
52 Grievous
55 Mimic
57 Seed vessel
58 Horn with no valves
62 They exist
63 Indigo dye
65 Triumph
67 Period of time
69 Measured
lengthwise
70 Panel truck
71 Terminate
72 Joke
74 Hari
76 Part of AD
77 Klemperer or
Preminger ,
79 Priest's vestment
81 Sound reasoning
83 and kin
85 Wee bit
86 Circular
88 Avid
90 Seize
92 Chaplin or Parker
94 Destroy
96 Showy performer
97 Winged insect
99 Cleveland's lake
100 Urged
103 Youngster
105 Do the waltz or
polka
107 Bounded roofs
110 -Vegas
111 Attention
113 Stair post


on Page 10A.

115 Elderly
117 Bakery item
118 Smell
120 Judge
122 Cul-de- -
123 Nest egg letters
125 Compass pt.
126 Done at the right
S -moment -, ,
128 Brook.s or Gibson
1-30 Norma -
132 Secular
133 Fb
134 Meshed utensil
135 King Cole
137 Floating ice mass
139 Worn away
141 Neighbor of Mex.
143 Raw fish dish
145 Add sugar to
147 American Indian
150 Marquee notice
152 Strikes
154 Serf
155 The basics
159 Butt
160 Evil spirit
-162 Soaks flax
164 Attempt
166 Urban pest
167 Old Roman official
169 Broadcasting device
173 Chicago's airport
175 Auctions
176 Musical group
177 Actress
Witherspoon
178 Scope
179 Special pleasure
180 Tall and slender
181 Outpouring
182 Bar legally


DOWN
1 Went furtively
2 Metric measure
3 Sharp
4 Garment size (abbr.)
5 Victim
6 Food fish
7 Period
8 Fall behind
9 Rod for roasting,,
10 Noted author of
fables
11 Drastic
reorganization
12 Butter square
13 Old World plant
14 Breakfast fare
15 Abrasive material
16 Ignoble
17 Choose
18 Pleasant smell
19 Competitor
20 Snoozed
27 Machine for weaving
31 Feeler
34 Hair goo
37 Female sheep
39 Distribute cards
40 Psychic's gift (abbr.)
42 Stepped on
44 Steam bath
46 Dies -
47 Baste
49 First man
51 Kimono sash
52 Enjoy the taste of
53 A Muse
54 Like a risk taker
56 Strictness
59 Well-mannered
60 Hawaiian porch
61 Destroy slowly
64 Lazy
66 Pester
68 Wild ox of Tibet
69 Turner's machine
73 and tonic
75 A twitching
78 Burden
80 Contemptuous cry
81 Dud of a car
82 Secret group
of plotters
84 Stony
87 Platter
89 Chat
91 Stiller or Affleck
93 Street disorder
95 Poor
98 Environment (prefix)
100 Story lines
101 Wheel spokes
102 Poor grade


104 Indeedl
105 Type of cotfee.
tor shon
106 Essays of -
108 Tennessee Ford
109 Horse
112 Certain voter (abbr 'I
114 Armed conflicl
116 Wandering one
119 Song ano dance
show
121 Bill oft fare
124 Land measure
.2" Brown
ihe Dandleader
-"9 Wrip
131 Raised railways
132 Dregs
136 Parched
138 Have bills to pay
140 Literary collection
142 Hard wood
143 Origin
144 Particular
146 Main course
147 Wave top
148 Speeder's undoing
149 Work by Rousseau
151 Machine part
153 Moves a little
156 Wild goose
157 Goods on board
158 Precipitous
160 Adventure tale
161 Tardy
163 Pace
165 Time gone by
168 Pasture
170 Beatty or Rorem
171 Reception
172 Superlative suffix
174 Possesses


*


FORMS AVAILABLE
* Call Linda Johnson at 563 5660 for copies.


I


sometimes it just drives me crazy to watch him
bite and spit until his fingers bleed.
"Andy" is out of work right now, and I think a
potential employer would be put off by the look
of his hands. Why doq people do this? And how
can I live with it without reacting? -
Big Knot in My Stomach
Dear Big Knot: It's possible your
husband's nail-biting is due to stress,'
F in which case, stress-management
techniques would probably help.
Experts say it also can help to keep
one's nails neatly trimmed, put
something bitter-tasting on them,
snap a rubber band on the wrist
when feeling the urge to bite, substi-
tute another stress-relieving activity
when feeling anxious or bored, wear,
IE tips. Some nail-biting is connected to
.BOX Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, in:
- which case, you should contact the,
Obsessive-Compulsive Foundation (ocfounda-
tion.org) for tips and information.
Of course, all this presupposes that your hus-i
band is willing to work on the problem. You can
point out that other people do notice ragged,
bleeding nails and cuticles, and it would be in
his best interest to take it seriously, but other-
wise, there's not much you can do. When he
starts chewing, leave the room or put your face
in a good book.
Dear Annie: I loved the letter from "M.N.
from Kansas," who suggested a folding walker
for those who have trouble while shopping. If it'
comes with a cup holder for a beer, my husband
needs one. Tricia in Tallahassee
Dear Tricia: We bet that would come in handy
for a lot of folks. (Not the beer. The cup holder.)


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please e-mail your questions
to anniesmailbox@comcastnet or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. Visit the Web page at www.creators.com.








Record setting


SDevil Rays
ni -r, ,ii r,

PA CE
2 E


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~ ~


,,- ( j

"' '\ ;


IF.-.. ~



'* )'" ) ( -( \ ** -

.\' /


. ."_ ~r 'r .."... . . '. "


Sports ..,

Local racing
gets washed out
Late afternoon rain showers
forced Citrus County Speedway
track officials to cancel Saturday
night's race program.
Despite several breaks in the
showers, attempts to dry the
rain-soaked racetrack were
wasted when an additional rain
band moved into the area.
Although not as heavy as ear-
lier showers, the rain came and
track officials made the decision
to call the night off anyway. Rain
checks will be honored for the
next two weeks.
Next week's program includes
the PGB Legends Cars, Outlaw
Modified Series, Late Models,
Super Stock 50, Hobby Stocks,
Thunder Stocks and 4-cylinder
Bombers.
The USA Sprints return on
August 13 with the Modifieds,
Sportsman, Mini Stock, Hobby
Stock, Thunder Stock, 4-cylinder
Bombers and Figure 8.
Crocker beats
Phelps in butterfly
MONTREAL lan Crocker
put the Athens Olympics behind
him and Michael Phelps, too.
Crocker broke his own world
record in the 100-meter butterfly
Saturday and turned a much-
anticipated rematch with Phelps
into a rout.
The two Americans were vir-
tually even off the blocks, but
Crocker already had a sizable
lead when their heads emerged
from the water. He was about a
half-body length ahead at the
turn, and didn't have to worry
about Phelps making one of his
patented charges in the final 50
Smeters..
With arms pumping furiously,
Crocker stretched out his
:advantage all the way to the
wall. He touched in 50.40 sec-
onds easily eclipsing the
record of 50.76 that he set in
beating Phelps at last year's
U.S Olympic trials.
Cameron upset
by trade talk
With Boston still discussing a
three-team trade that would
send Manny Ramirez to the
New York Mets, the Red Sox
removed theAll-Star outfielder
from their game against the
Minnesota Twins on Saturday
night.
An official involved in the talks
said Saturday evening that the
sides were still far apart in the
much-discussed, three-team
trade, which also involved the
Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
"After meeting with Manny
Ramirez, manager Terry
Francona made the decision
shortly before game time that,
under the circumstances, it was
in the best interests of the club
and of Manny that he not be in
the starting lineup tonight," the
Red Sox said in a statement.
New York Mets outfielder
Mike Cameron said he was
upset by talk that he could be
included in a trade for the Red
Sox All-Star slugger. The Mets
would also include outfielder
Lastings Milledge, the 12th
overall pick in the 2003 amateur
draft.
Devil Rays general manager
Chuck LaMar said he expected
talks could continue until
Sunday afternoon's 4 p.m.
deadline for trades without
waivers.
"We have had discussions
with both teams, not only in a
Combined deal, but separate
deals with each one of those
teams," he said in Tampa.
From staff, wire reports


Cunningham scores 2


- 4


CR grad leads

MLS all-stars

Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio A for-
mer Columbus Crew striker ran
wild in Major League Soccer's
All-Star game, but it wasn't the
one everyone expected.
Jeff Cunningham scored
twice in the final five minutes
Saturday to help the MLS All-
Stars defeat England's Fulham
FC 4-1.
Cunningham came on as a
Fulham's Steed Malbranque,
right, falls to the ground as
Colorado Rapids' Jeff
Cunningham dribbles the ball
away from him during the sec-
ond half of the MLS All-Star
Game Saturday.
Associated Press


substitute in the 68th minute
and scored from 8 yards off a
header to his foot from D.C.
United midfielder Christian
Gomez with 5 minutes left.
Four minutes later, New
England's Shalrie Joseph
passed to Cunningham, who
dribbled in and beat goalkeep-
er Jaroslav Drobny.
The crowd of 23,309 roared at
the late goals from
Cunningham, a longtime Crew
standout who went to Colorado
in the offseason.
"The fans deserved it.
They've been supportive of me
over the years. They came out
and showed me some love
today," he said.
By contrast, the much-hyped
return of former Crew striker
Brian McBride didn't pan out.
McBride started as Fulham's
captain but wasn't a factor. He
and Fulham's other American,


Carlos Bocanegra, came out 15
minutes into the second half.
The MLS All-Stars struck 23
minutes in, when Landon
Donovan wound up with the
ball following a Fulham
turnover. Donovan slipped a
pass into the box past U.S.
national team teammate
Bocanegra to New England for-
ward Taylor Twellman, who
slid to put a foot on it and beat
goalkeeper Mark Crossley.
. Drobny entered the game
when Crossley left with a knee
injury a few minutes later.
Donovan and Twellman
nearly connected again four
minutes after the goal, but
Twellman's shot from the right
side flew wide left Twellman,
whose shot in the second half
hit the near post, was named
MVP
Please see ',/Page 3B


No surprise here


Crosby top pick

in NHL draft

Associated Press

OTTAWA Welcome to the
NHL, Sidney Crosby
As expected, the Pittsburgh
Penguins took the teenage phe-
nom from Canada with the No.
1 pick on Saturday
"This is amazing," Crosby
said. "I'm just really relieved.


It's unbelievable. I'm so happy
right now."
The arrival of the young
superstar, who's already been
compared to Wayne Gretzky
and Mario Lemieux, is just
what the NHL needed after the
lockout that erased the 2004-05
season. For Crosby, the waiting
is finally over.
Crosby, who turns 18 next
week, is a 5-foot-ll, 193-pound
forward with surprising
strength and masterful vision

Please see HOCKEY/Page 3B


-| Cooperstown bound


Boggs, Sandberg

to enter Hall
Associated Press


Ai COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. --
Growing up, Wade Boggs and
Ryne Sandberg were just like
-. any other kids in love with
baseball, playing imaginary
games and dreaming.
Associated Press "In the backyard, when you
Ryne Sandberg, left, and Wade Boggs discuss their impending were playing whiffle ball, you
Baseball Hall of Fame inductions Saturday in Cooperstown. N.Y. always imitated all the great


players," Boggs said. "I was
always Reggie Jackson and
Pete Rose. All those guys."
"I had a rope line for the
home run on top of the garage,
off the garage was a double,
trees and picnic tables were
the fielders," Sandberg said.
"I played with a solid plastic
golf ball. I remember putting
my arms up in the air on a
game-winning hit, 'Is it out of
here? Yes!' And I was by
myself."
Four decades later, those
Please see BASEBALL/Page 3B


. ~, .


JLIL 3 I, 22005


Galloway, Baize elevate their games


Former high school

stars pursue hoop
dreams in college

STEVE WATERS
swaters@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
For two former Citrus County bas-
ketball stars, the transition to college
has been enormous.
They are playing in a faster game,
against bigger players, and have
trained harder than ever before to
keep up with the game they love.
This was the next step for Jamnaal
Galloway and Landon Baize, and
after their freshman years with their
new teams, the similarities of their
experiences have helped them see
each other's games improve dramati-
cally.
Galloway was a phenom at Citrus.
averaging more than 20 points a game
in his prep career and leading the
Hurricanes to four straight winning
seasons. Baize was a standout point
guard at Lecanto who led the
Panthers in assists for three straight
years, including 23 assists in a single
game his senior year.
In his freshman year at Armstrong
Atlantic State in Georgia, Galloway
played in 28 games, starting four. He
shot.420 from 3-point range and aver-
aged 6.7 points a game. He totaled 21
assists and ten steals in the 04-05 cam- .
paign. Overall, his team finished 15-
14.
For him, the season was a resound-
ing success.
"It went well," Galloway said. "It Chronicle
was a fun experience, a big change all Former Citrus County high school
at once, but it was fun." standouts Jamaal Galloway (above)
After playing at the top with the and Landon Baize (right) both had
Hurricanes, Galloway had to adjust to exciting, eye-opening experiences
a lesser role with his new team. He competing as college freshmen.
said that playing in a new role wasn't Galloway is a guard for Armstrong
a problem, and he just wanted to do Atlantic State (Ga.), while Baize plays
what was necessary to excel in col- for Lagrange College (Ga.).
lege. He has seen lots of improvement in
"I accepted my role and did what I Galloway, calling him a "great kid to
had to do," he said. "I just had to work coach."
to get better I have to prove to the Baize's freshman year at Lagrange
team and the coach what I can do, and College in Georgia was more of a
then they'll put me in. You have to learning experience. His team fin-
earn that playing time." ished 7-19 overall, and struggled a bit,
JeffBurkhammer, Galloway's coach he said, because they were young.
at Armstrong Atlantic, called But Baize was happy with first col-
Galloway a solid freshman guard who lege season. Because of his team's
has plenty of time to reach his poten- youth he got to see quite a bit of
tial. action, playing in 25 games while
"He can shoot the ball so well he's starting three. In 9.3 minutes a game,
going to be outstanding," Burk- Baize averaged 0.9 points a game,
hammer said. "I liked him from the
first time I saw him." Please see COLLEGE/Page 3B


I ............


railail>Mrs.rn









2i6 u..... PI2.... 0-- -OR SC us..N.. .


Gomes hits 3 for Rays,


Homer barrage

lifts Tampa Bay

to 3rd-straight win

Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG Jonny
Gomes had the first three-
homer game in the Tampa Bay
Devil Rays' franchise history
on Saturday night, a 7-3 victo-
ry over the Kansas City
Royals.
Gomes hit solo shots off
Zack Greinke (3-13) in the
third and fifth innings and
another solo homer off Mike
MacDougal in the eighth. The
rookie has 12 homers in 44
games. Between the majors
and Triple-A Durham this sea-
son, Gomes has gone deep 26
times.
Tampa Bay began play in
the major leagues in 1998 and
have played 1,236 games.
Doug Waechter (4-6) won for
the first time since June 13 -
a span of five starts, allowing


three runs and seven hits in 5
1-3 innings. Chad Orvella,
Trever Miller, Joe Borowski
and Jesus Colome combined
for 3 2-3 scoreless innings.
The victory tied Tampa Bay
manager Lou Piniella (1,491-
1,391) with Hall of Famer
Clark Griffith for 18th place in
career wins as a manager. The
Devil Rays are 11-5 since the
All-Star break, including three
consecutive wins. over the
Royals.
Terrence Long homered for
Kansas City. Greinke gave up
five runs and eight hits in 5 2-
3 innings.
Toby Hall had an RBI dou-
ble and Joey Gathright drove
in a run with an infield single
in the second to put Tampa
Bay up 2-0.
Gomes' third and fifth
innings shots, and an RBI
triple by Julio Lugo in the
fourth gave the Devil Rays a 5-
0 lead.
Long homered, Matt Stairs
hit an RBI double and Angel
Berroa had a sacrifice fly that
pulled the Royals to 5-3 in the
sixth.


Associated hress
Jonny Gomes strolls back to the dugout after slugging his third
solo home run of the night, a Devil Rrays' record.


MLB: Marlins' Burnett blanks Nats


Associated Press

MIAMI Making his final start
before Sunday's trade deadline,
AJ. Burnett pitched seven domi-
nant innings to win his third start
in a row and the Florida Marlins
extended their winning streak to
four games by beating the slump-
ing Washington Nationals 3-0.
The Nationals have lost a sea-
son-high six consecutive games
and 18 of 23.
Burnett (8-6) becomes a free
agent after this season and has
been the subject of trade specula-
tion for more than a month. But
with the Marlins in the thick of
the playoff race, they may decide
to keep the right-hander
Burnett allowed four hits,
including two infield singles, and
struck out eight
National League
Diamondbacks 3, Cubs 2
CHICAGO -Arizona rookie
Conor Jackson got his first two major
league hits, induding a go-ahead dou-
ble in the eighth inning. .
Making his first start in the majors,
at first base, Jackson hit an RBI dou-
ble to left in the eighth inning off
Roberto Novoa (3-4) to score Troy
Glaus and break a 2-all tie. He singled
in the second inning for his first hit in
his second at-bat. I,

Cardinals 9, Dodgers 4
LOS ANGELES Jim Edmonds
and John Mabry hit two-run homers
early and David Eckstein added a


three-run shot, late, powering St. Louis
over the Dodgers.
Jeff Suppan (10-7) won his fourth
straight road start, allowing four runs
and seven hits in five innings.
Derek Lowe (7-11) lost for the sev-
enth time in nine decisions, allowing
five runs and eight hits over five
innings.
Braves 9, Pirates 6
ATLANTA-- Rookie Jeff
Francoeur homered and drove in four
runs, and Atlanta used a seven-run
sixth inning for its fifth straight victory.
Francoeur's two-run double started
the scoring in the sixth and gave the
Braves their first lead at 4-3. Johnny
Estrada and Kelly Johnson followed
with RBI doubles to chase Mark
Redman (5-11) with none out.

Astros2,Mets0
HOUSTON -Andy Pettitte baffled
the New York Mets for eight shutout
innings and Jason Lane spoiled an
equally strong outing by Tom Glavine
with a towering home run in the sev-
enth inning, sending Houston 10
games over .500.
The Astros have won a season-
best seven straight games and 13 of
14. They're also on a 25-5 roll and are
42-17 since bottoming out at 15
games under .500 in late May.
Pettitte (9-7) won his sixth straight
decision, scattering three hits and two
walks, striking out six.

Brewers 7, Giants 1
MILWAUKEE- Ben Sheets


pitched a six-hitter and Geoff Jenkins
hit a tiebreaking three-run double in
the sixth inning.
Sheets (7-7) struck out eight in his
ninth career complete game and first
since Oct. 2 against St. Louis.
Pinch-hitter Wes Helms hit a three-
run homer in the eighth for the
Brewers, who snapped a three-game
losing streak and won for the first time
in 12 home games against the Giants.
American League
White Sox 9, Orioles 6
BALTIMORE -A.J. Pierzynski
and Jermaine Dye hit successive
homers in a four-run eighth inning,
and Chicago rallied to beat Baltimore.
Joe Crede also connected for the
White Sox, who made up deficits of 4-
2 and 6-4 in handing the Orioles their
12th loss in 14 games. The defeat
dropped Baltimore (51-52) under .500
for the first time since April 9.

Red Sox 6, Twins 2
BOSTON Wth trade rumors
swirling around Fenway Park after
Manny Ramirez was scratched just
before the game, David Wells allowed
two runs in seven-plus innings as the
Boston Red Sox beat the Minnesota
Twins on Saturday night.
Ramirez was removed from
Boston's lineup just five minutes
before the game. John Olerud drove
in three runs and Gabe Kapler had
two hits and scored twice as
Ramirez's replacement.
Athletics 9, Tigers 5
OAKLAND Calif. -When the


Oakland Athletics play well, it's usually
their pitching that gets the credit.
During this two-month stretch of domi-
nance, the A's are winning even when
their top pitchers struggle.
Jay Payton hit a grand slam and
drove in five runs to help Barry Zito
win his seventh straight start and the
Oakland Athletics win for the 10th
time in 11 games, 9-5 over the Detroit
Tigers on Saturday.
Rangers 3, Blue Jays 2
TORONTO Gary Matthews Jr.
did not even know his play allowed
the go-ahead run to score.
Kevin Mench scored the winning
run on a bizarre play in the sixth
inning, and the Texas Rangers won
their fourth straight with 3-2 victory
over the Toronto Blue Jays on
Saturday.
After Mench singled in the sixth,
Matthews hit a comebacker to reliever
Jason Frasor, whose throw to first hit
Matthews on the back of the helmet.
The ball ricocheted near the stands
and Matthews collided with Shea
Hillenbrand at first, allowing Mench to
score all the way from first.
Madiners 3, Indians 2
SEATTLE Ichiro Suzuki is ready
for another run at a batting title.
The nine-time batting champion -
seven in Japan; two in the majors -
hit a pair of solo home runs Saturday
to help the Seattle Mariners beat the
Cleveland Indians 3-2.
Hitting .385 in July, he has raised
his batting average 22 points this
month to .316.


double in ninth wins it

Associated Press

NEW YORK Francisco Rodriguez
looked tired, and he was having trouble
throwing strikes. The New York Yankees'
patient hitters only made things harder on
him.
Hideki Matsui's two-run double in the
ninth inning capped a big comeback, and
New York took advantage of four walks by
Rodriguez to beat the Los Angeles Angels 8-
7 Saturday.
'That's what we do best We take our
walks, and eventually somebody's got to be
pitched to," Jason Giambi said.
Bernie Williams and Giambi homered for
the Yankees, who got a stellar debut from
starter Shawn Chacon and defeated the
Angels for only the third time in nine meet-
ings this season.
Juan Rivera connected for the AL West
leaders and Paul Byrd threw seven solid
innings, but Los Angeles' normally depend-
able bullpen blew a 7-3 lead in the last two
innings perhaps Thursday's 18-inning
loss in Toronto took a toll.
Giambi's two-run shot off Jake Woods in
the eighth cut it to 7-5, and Angels manager
Mike Scioscia brought in Rodriguez with
one out
"We were a little bit short today Frankie
was a little bit extended, and you've got to
give them credit, it just got away from him,"
Scioscia said. "He's our guy, and he had
enough in him to get through that inning."
Pitching for the third straight day,
Rodriguez got out of the eighth with no trou-
ble but began to fade in the ninth. The hard-
throwing right-hander walked his first two
batters before striking out Robinson Cano.
Gary Sheffield then walked, and another
free pass to Alex Rodriguez made it 7-6.
Francisco Rodriguez (2-2) threw his 36th
pitch of the game to Matsui, who lined it into
left-center. It was Rodriguez's fourth blown
save in 29 chances this season.


':


Associated Press

Hideki Matsui is mobbed by fans after his game-winning two-run double in the bottom of
the ninth inning allowed the Yankees to overtake the Angels.


Boston


New YorK
Toronto
Baltimore
I Tampa Bay

Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Oakland
Texas
Seattle


Atlanta
Washington
Florida
Philadelphia
New York

St. Louis
Houston
Chicago
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh


San Diego 51 52 .49
Arizona 51 55 .48
Los Angeles 47 57 .45
San Francisco 45 58 .43
Colorado 36 66 .35
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 8, L.A. Angels 7
Chicago White Sox 9, Baltimore 6
Oakland 9, Detroit 5
Seattle 3, Cleveland 2
Texas 3, Toronto 2
Tampa Bay 7, Kansas City 3
Boston 6, Minnesota 2
Sunday's Games
L.A. Angels (Bootcheck 0-0) at N.Y.
Yankees (R.Johnson 11-6), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (Wilson 0-2) at Toronto (Chacin 10-
5), 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota (Radke 6-10) at Boston
(J.Gonzalez 1-1 or Papelbon 0-0), 2:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Lima 4-8) at Tampa Bay,
(Hendrickson 4-7), 2:15 p.m.
Detroit (Bonderman 13-6) at Oakland
(Saarloos 6-6), 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Westbrook 8-12) at Seattle
(Pineiro 3-6), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Garcia 10-4) at
Baltimore (Lopez 9-5), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 12:35
p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.



Devil Rays 7, Royals 3
KANSAS CITY TAMPA BAY
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DJesus cf 5 02 0 Lugo ss 4 0 1 1
Long If 4 1 1 Crwfrd If 4 0 0 0
MiSwydh 411 0 Cantu3b 4 000
Stairs lb 4 11 1 ASGzlz3b 0 0 0 0
Brown rf 3 00 0 Huffdh 4 1 1 0
Teahen 3b 3 01 0 Gomes rf 4 3 3 3
Berroass 3 01 1 TLee 1b 4 1 1 0
Gotay 2b 4 00 0 NGreen 2b 3 1 0 0
ACstillo c 2 000 THall c 3 1 22
Ambres ph 0 00 0 Gthrght cf 4 0 3 1
Totals 323 7 3 Totals 34 711 7
Kansas City 000 003 000- 3
Tampa Bay 021 110 02x- 7
E-Teahen (16), Cantu (15). DP-
Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Kansas City 7, Tampa
Bay
6. 2B-DeJesus (25), Stairs (16), THall
(13). 3B-Lugo (4), TLee (2), Gathright (2).
HR-Long (5), Gomes 3 (12). SF-Berroa,
,THalI.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Greinke L,3-13 52-3 8 5 5 2 4
Burgos 11-3 0 0 0 0 2
MacDougal 1 3 2 2 0 1
Tampa Bay
WaechterW,4-6 51-3 7 3 3 2 2
Orvella 1 0 0 0 0 1
TreMiller 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Borowski 1 0 0 0 1 2
Colome 1 0 0 0 1 1
T-2:34. A-11,940 (41,315).
Marlins 3, Nationals 0


WASHINGTON FLORIDA
ab rhbi


Wlkrsn cf
Carroll 2b
NJhnsn lb
Castilla 3b
Church rf
PrWIsn If
Schndr c
CGzmn ss
JoPttsn p
Eschen p
Mjwski p
Byrd ph
CCrdro p


3 01 0 Pierre cf
3 00 0 LCstillo 2b
4 01 0 Conine lb
4 00 0 MiCbra If
4 01 0 LDuca c
3 00 0 JEcrcn rf
3 01 0 Lowell 3b
3 00 0 Easley ss
2 00 0,Burnett p
0 00 0 Mota p
0 000 TJones p
1 00 0
0 00 0


ab r h bi
4000
3 1 1 0
4000
3 0 1 1
4 21 0
4020
4020
.3000
34 000
03 000
0000
0 0 0 0


Totals 300 4 0 Totals 32 3 7 1
Washington 000 0 000--- 0
Florida 010 001 10x- 3
E-Schneider (5), Conine (3). LOB-
Washington 5, Florida 8. 2B-MiCabrera
(30), Lo Duca (19), Lowell (29). SB-
Pierre (35). CS-Wilkerson (9).
IP H RERBBSO


Washington
JoPatterson L,4-36
Eischen 1-3
Majewski 2-3
CCordero 1
Florida
Bumett W,8-6 7
Mota 1
TJones S,20 1
T-2:40. A-25,308 (:


5 2 2
11 1
1 0 0
0 0 0


4 0 0 1 8
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
36,331).


Yankees 8, Angels 7
LOS ANGELES NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Figgins 3b 4 21 0 Jeter ss 4 1 1 2
OCbera ss 5 11 2 Cano2b 5 0 0 0
Erstad lb 4 01 0 Shffield rf 4 1 1 0
VGrero dh 5 00 1 ARod 3b 3 0 1 1
GAndsnIf 501 0 Matsui dh 5 1 22
SFinleycf 3 11 0 JaGbilb 3 1 32
JRivra rf 4 12 2 Posada c 4 0 0 0
JMolna c 2 00 0 BWIIms cf 4 22 1
DVnon ph 0 100 Wmack If 3 2 2 0
Paul c 1 01 0
AKndy 2b 2 11 0
Totals 357 9 5 Totals 35 812 8
Los Angeles 001 000 420- 7
New York 020 001 023- 8
One out when winning run scored.
E-Embree (1). DP-Los Angeles 1.
LOB-Los Angeles 7, New York 8. 2B-
Paul (1), Jeter (15), Matsui (28), BWilliams
(13). HR-JRivera (8), JaGiambi (17),
BWilliams (7). SB-Figgins (36), SFinley
(8), AKennedy (10), Womack 3 (23). S-
Figgins, AKennedy.


5 1-9
1 1% 5-5
2 4% z-5-5
7 6 4-6
314% z-4-6


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L110
58 45 .563 z-7-3
55 47 .539 2% z-5-5
52 51 .505 6 z-6-4
51 52 .495 7 1-9
39 66 .371 20 7-3
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
67 35 .657 5-5
54 49 .52413% z-3-7
54 51 .514 14% z-6-4
50 53 .48517/2 4-6
38 66 .365 30 4-6
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
60 44 .577 4-6
57 46 .553 2% z-9-1
53 50 .515 6% 5-5
45 58 .43714% 4-6
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
60 44 .577 7-3
55 49 .529 5 1-9
53 48 .525 5% z-8-2
54 50 .519 6 5-5
52 52 .500 8 z-4-6
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
65 38 .631 z-5-5
57 47 .548 8% z-9-1
53 51 .51012% 5-5
51 54 .486 15 z-5-5
45 58 .437 20 z-7-3
44 60 .42321% 4-6
West Division
W L Pct GB L10


Home
29-18
32-21
29-22
28-25
27-28

Home
33-19
29-22
25-26
24-26
23-29

Home
30-22
34-18
28-24
25-27

Home
34-14
32-18
29-23
33-22
32-21

Home
33-20
36-14
27-25
29-20
31-25
24-27

Home
30-21
25-28
26-26
22-30
26-26


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Florida 3, Washington 0
Arizona 3, Chicago Cubs 2
St. Louis 9, L.A. Dodgers 4
Houston 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Milwaukee 7, San Francisco 1
Atlanta 9, Pittsburgh 6
Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh (Fogg 5-6) at Atlanta (Smoltz
11-5), 1:05 p.m.
Washington (L.Hernandez 12-4) at Florida
(Moehler 6-7), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Ishii 3-9) at Houston (Oswalt
14-8), 2:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lowry 6-10) at Milwaukee
(Capuano 11-6), 2:05 p.m.
Arizona (Webb 8-8) at Chicago Cubs
(Maddux 8-7), 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lieber 9-9) at Colorado
(Francis 9-7), 3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Milton 4-11) at San Diego
(W.Williams 5-7), 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Mulder 12-5) at L.A. Dodgers
(Od.Perez 6-5), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Florida at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.


IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Byrd 7 9 3 3 1 4
JoPeralta 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Woods 0 2 2 2 0 0
FrRodriguez L,2-21 1 3 3 4 .2
New York
Chacon 6 4 1 0 3 4
.FeRodriguez 0 0 1 1 1 0
Embree 0 1 2 1 0 0
Gordon 1 4 3 3 ..0 1
WFranklin 1 0 0 0 0 1
MRiveraW,5-2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Woods pitched to 2 batters in the 8th,
FeRodriguez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th,
Embree pitched to 2 batters in the 7th,
Gordon pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
T-3:43. A-54,220 (57,478).
Diamondbacks 3, Cubs 2


ARIZONA CHICAGO
ab rhbi
'Clayton ss 5 02 0 Hrst Jr cf
Cintron 2b 5 01 0 TWalkr 2b
LGnzlz If 4 01 0 DeLee lb
Glaus3b 422 1 ARmrz 3b
ShGren rf 3 100 Burnitzrf
CJcksn lb 4 02 1 Barrett c
Aquino p 0 00 0 NPerez ss
Terrero cf 3 00 0 Murton If
Crmerp 0 00 0 Novoa p
TCIark lb 0 00 0 Hlndsw If
Hill c 3 01 1 Hill p
Gosling p 2 00 0 Rmlngr p
McCkn cf 2 00 0 Gerut If
Rusch p
Macias ph


r h bi
000
0 1 0
000
0 1 0
0 1 0
1 1 0
1 2 1-
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000


Totals 353 9 3 Totals 34 2 6 1
Arizona 000 101 010- 3
Chicago 010 010 000- 2
E-Clayton (9), Cintron (5), CJcksn (1).
DP-Arizona 1, Chicago 2. LOB-Arizona
11, Chicago 7. 2B-LGonzalez (24), Glaus
(22), CJcksn (1), Hill (3), Burnitz (24),
Barrett (20), NPerez 2 (18). HR-Glaus
(21). CS-Hill (1), DeLee (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
Gosling 51-3 5 2 1 1 2
Cormier W,7-1 12-3 1 0 0 1 3
AquinoS,1 2 0 0 0 0 3
Chicago
CHill 6 5 2 2 2 4
Remlinger 1 1 0 0 1 1
Novoa L,3-4 1-3 2 1 1 1 0
Rusch 12-3 1 0 0 2 2
T-2:47. A-39,726 (39,538).
Cardinals 9, Dodgers 4
ST. LOUIS LOS ANGELES
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Eckstin ss
Nunez 3b
Pujols lb
Edmnd cf
Rdrgez If
King p
Tvarez p
GrdzIn 2b
Mabry rf
Mhony c
Suppan p
Luna ph ,
AReyes p
Gall ph
Thmps p
Tguchi If


6 22 3 Izturis ss
3 12 0 Robles 3b
5 13 1 Brdley cf
4 11 2 JKent2b
5 02 1 Ledee If
0 00 0 JPhllps lb
0 00 0 Nvarro c
4 11 0 Repko rf
3 222 DLowe p
4 00 0 Choi ph
2 01 0 Carrar p
0 10 0 WAIvrz p
0 00 0 Perez ph
1 00 0 Brxton p
000 0 Dssens p
1 00 0


4000
4 01 0
4 001
2 2 1 1

4020
4 0 2 0
4 0 1 1
1 000

0000
00000
1 0 1 0
00000
0 00,0


Totals 38914 9 Totals 33 4 9 4
St. Louis 300 203 010- 9
Los Angeles 010 210 000- 4
DP---St. Louis 3. LOB-St. Louis 10, Los
Angeles 4. 2B-Eckstein (13), Pujols (25),
Mabry (9), Suppan (2), Choi (12). HR-
Eckstein (3), Edmonds (19), Mabry (6),
JKent (19), JPhillips (8). S-Nunez, Mabry,
Mahoney.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Suppan W,10-7 5 7 4 4 2 0
Al Reyes 1 0 0 0 0 1
Thompson 1 1 0 0 0 0
King 1 0 0 0 0 1
Tavarez 1 1 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
DLoweL,7-11 5 8 5 5 0 3
Carrara 2-3 3 3 3 2 1
WAlvarez 11-3 1 0 0 1 2
Broxton 1 1 1 1 2 2
Dessens 1 1 0 0 0 0
T-3:00. A-47,805 (56,000).


Away Intr
29-27 12-6
23-26 11-7
23-29 8-10
23-27 8-10
12-38 3-15

Away Intr
34-16 12-6
25-27 8-10
29-25 15-3
26-27 9-9
15-37 9-9

Away Intr
30-22 12-6
23-28 10-8
25-26 9-9
20-31 10-8

Away Intr
26-30 7-8
23-31 12-6
24-25 10-5
21-28 7-8
20-31 5-10

Away Intr
32-18 10-5
21-33 7-8
26-26 6-9
22-34 8-7
14-33 7-8
20-33 5-7

Away Intr
21-31 7-11
26-27 8-10
21-31 5-13
02?.0 6.-1
10-1 AA-C


Yanks overtake Angels in 9th


Matsui's bases-loaded I_: _.- .J


2B sUNDAYJUIx 31 2005


SPORTS


CIrRUS COUNTY (FL) CIHRONICuL








CI' U i COUNnI (FI.) CHRONICLE




Red Sox 6, Twins 2
MINNESOTA BOSTON
ab rhbi ab rh bi
ShStwrt If 401 0 Damon cf 51 30
Cddyer 3b 301 0 Rnteria ss 4 1 2 1
Tiffe 3b 1 00 0 DOrtiz dh 1 1 0 0
LFord cf 4 000 Olerud lb 5 0 2 3
LeCroy dh 3 00 0 Millar If 4 0 2 0
MRyan ph 1 00 0 Stern rf 0 0 0 0
JJones rf 401 0 Varitek c 4 0 1 1
BBoone2b 3 01 0 Grffnno2b 5 1 1 0
Mrneau lb 3 11 0 Mueller 3b 4 0 1 1
Rdmnd c 3 11 1 Kapler rf 4 2 2 0
JCastro ss 3 01 1
Totals 322 7 2 Totals 36 614 6
Minnesota 000 000 020- 2
Boston 111 003 00x- 6
DP-Boston 2. LOB-Minnesota 3,
Boston 13. 2B-Morneau (14), Redmond
(5), Damon (29). 3B8-Mueller (3). CS-
Stern (1). S-Renteria.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Lohse L,7-10 5 7 3 3 4 2
Mulholland 1-3 3 3 3 1 0
Guerrier 12-3 3 0 0 1 1
JRincon 1 1 0 0 0 2
Boston
DWells W,9-5 7 7 2 2 0 3
Bradford 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
MMyers 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
DWells pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Bruce Dreckman;
First, Bill Hohn; Second, Gerry Davis;
Third, Doug Eddings.
T-2:58. A-35,167 (35,095).
Athletics 9, Tigers 5
DETROIT OAKLAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Planco 2b 4 12 0 Kendall c 4 0 1 0
CGillen ss 5 11 2 MEllis 2b 4 2 1 0
Shltn lb 501 0 Crosbyss 5 1 20
MOrdz rf 501 1 EChavz 3b 4 1 1 0
RoWhte dh 3 00 0 Payton cf 4 2 3 5
IRdrgzc 2 11 0 DJnson lb 4 1 1 0
VWilsn c 2 11 1 Swisher rf 4 1 1 1
DYong If 401 1 Httbergdh 4 1 22
Inge 3b 3000 Scutaro If 3 0 1 1
Logan cf 3 12 0
Totals 36510 5 Totals 36 913 9
Detroit 210 011 000- 5
Oakland 000 610 02x- 9
LOB-Detroit 8, Oakland 6. 2B-Shelton
(11), Logan (12), Payton (9), DJohnson
(12), Scutaro (14). HR-CGuillen (4),
VWilson (1), Payton (9), Hatteberg (5).
SB-IRodriguez (6). S-Inge. SF-
Scutaro.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Robertson L,5-9 6
Spurling 1
JWalker
German 2
Oakland
Zito W,10-8 7
Witasick S,1 2


9 7 7 1 2
1 1 1 0 1
1-3 2 1 1 0 0
2-3 1 0 0 1 1
10 5 5 2 2
'0 00 1 2


Spurling pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Ted Barrett; First,
Alfonso Marquez; Second, Rick Reed;
Third, Terry Craft.
T-2:36. A-25,265 (43,662).
White Sox 9, Orioles 6
CHICAGO BALTIMORE
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Pdsdnklf 3 00 0 BRbrts 2b 5 1 1 2
Iguchi 2b 4232 Byrnes If 5 0 1 1
CEvrtt dh 4001 Mora 3b 3 000
Knerko lb 401 0 Tejada ss 2 1 00
Gloadlb 1 10 0 RPImolb 4 1 1 2
Przyns c 4 23 3 JvLopzdh 4 0 1 0
Dyerf 4 122 Gbbons rf 3 120
Rwand cf 4 00 0 Surhoff rf 1 000
Crede 3b 4 12 1 Fasano c 4 1 2 0
Uribe-ss 4 22 0 Newhn cf 1 1 0 0
Matoscf 2 0 0 0
Totals 36913 9 Totals 34 6 8 5
Chicago 011 020 041- 9
Baltimore 004 002 000- 6
DP-Baltimore 2. LOB-Chicago 4,
Baltimore 5. 2B-Pierzynski (13), Uribe
(13), BRoberts (29), Byrnes (16). 3B-
Iguchi (4). HR-Pierzynski (15), Dye (21),
Crede (15), RPalmeiro (18). CS-
Podsednik (15). S-Podsednik. SF-
CEverett.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Contreras 6 6 6 6 3 3
Cotts W,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Jenks 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Marte 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Hermanson S,24 1 1 0 0 0 0
Baltimore
DCabrera 12-3 3 1 1 1 3
Grimsley 21-3 1 1 1 0 0
BChen 11-3 4 2 2 0 0
Julio 12-3 0 0 0 0 1
RayL,0-3 1 3 4 4 1 1
Kline 1 2 1 1 0 0
WP-Contreras.
Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First,
Joe West; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third,
Mark Carlson.



HOCKEY
Continued from Page 1B

on the ice. A prolific scorer,
Crosby won nearly every trophy
the last two seasons in the
Quebec Major Junior Hockey
League.
He had 66 goals and 102
assists in 62 games, after a rook-
ie campaign that featured 54
goals and 81 assists in 59 games,
and was the Canadian major
junior player of the year both
seasons.
"He creates a lot of excite-
ment," said Lemieux, Crosby's
boss and possible linemate with
the Penguins. "He has all the
tools to be a great player He
sees the ice well, he's a great
skater. He says he needs to work
on his shot, but it looks pretty
good to me."
Crosby will share the spot-
light in Pittsburgh with
Lemieux, the No. 1 pick in 1984,
and will be looked upon to res-
cue the franchise that hasn't
made the playoffs since 2001
and desperately needs a new
arena in which to play
Pittsburgh's luck is already
changing as the Penguins won
last week's draft lottery that
determined the picking order of
the first round.
"I'm not really thinking about
it right now," Crosby said of the
expectations. "I want to come
and play in the NHL next year
That's my goal, that's my focus
right now. I'm going to put
everything into that and try to
move on from there."
The Anaheim Mighty Ducks


SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 3B


-I __ -


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN2)Auto Racing Lucas Oil Dirt Track Series. (Taped)
3 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) IndyCar Racing Firestone Indy
400. From Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich.
(Live) (CC)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Fram Autolite Nationals -
Final Eliminations. From Sonoma, Calif. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Sportsman
Series. From Seattle. (Taped) (CC)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (TBS) MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Atlanta Braves.
From Turner Field in Atlanta. (Live) (CC)
2 p.m. (FSNFL) MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay
Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg (Live)
(WGN) MLB Baseball Arizona Diamondbacks at Chicago Cubs.
From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Live) (CC)
3 p.m. (ESPN) Baseball Tonight Coverage of Major League
Baseball's trade deadline. (Live) (CC)
8 p.m. (ESPN) MLB Baseball Chicago White Sox at Baltimore
Orioles. From Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore. (Live) (CC)
BOXING
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Boxing Sunday Night Fights. Sam Soliman bat-
tles Fernando Zuniga in a middleweight bout. From Lemoore, Calif.
(Taped)
EQUESTRIAN
4 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Equestrian Budweiser Showjumping. (Taped)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Golf Scandinavian Masters -
Final Round. From Sweden. (Live)
1:30 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) Golf Weetabix Women's
British Open Final Round. From Royal Birkdale Golf Club in
Merceyside, England. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
3 p.m. (2 NBC) Golf U.S. Senior Open Final Round. From
NCR Country Club in Kettering, Ohio. (Live) (CC)
(6 CBS) PGA Golf Buick Open Final Round. From Warwick
Hills Golf and Country Club in Grand Blanc, Mich. (Live) (CC)
(8 NBC) Golf U.S. Senior Open Final Round. From NCR
Country Club in Kettering, Ohio. (Live) (CC)
(10 CBS) PGA Golf Buick Open Final Round. From Warwick
Hills Golf and Country Club in Grand Blanc, Mich. (Live) (CC)
MARTIAL ARTS
9 p.m. (IND1) Martial Arts K-1 Fighting: World Grand Prix 2005.
From Honolulu. (Taped)
OUTDOORS
8 a.m. (ESPN2) Fishing 2005 Bassmaster Classic. From
Pittsburgh. (Live) (CC)
RODEO
8 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Bull Riding Tulsa Express PBR Classic. From
Tulsa, Okla. (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
1 p.m. (62 UNI) F'"utbol de la Liga Mexicana San Luis vs. UA de
G (En Vivo)
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA Tennis U.S. Open Series Bank of the
West Classic Final. From Stanford, Calif. (Live)
5 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP Tennis U.S. Open Series Mercedes-Benz
Cup Final. From Los Angeles. (Live)


T-3:15. A-40,100 (48,290).
Braves 9, Pirates 6


PITTSBURGH


Duffy cf
Mckwk 3b
Lawton rf
Bay If
Ward lb
Mdows p
Snchez ss
Castillo 2b
Cota c
JWilsn ss
Snell p ,
TRdmn ph
MRdm p
Eldred lb


ATLANTA


ab rhbi
3 22 0 Furcal ss
3 10 0 MGiles 2b
2 21 1 CJones 3b
4 12 4 Boyer p
3 00 0 Kolb p
0 00 0 Ritsma p
1 00 1 AJones cf
4 00 0 Lngrhn cf
4 00 0 JuFrco lb
3 00 0 Frncur rf
0 00 0 JEstda c
1 00 0 Jhnson If
2 00 0 Davies p
2 00 0 Btemit 3b


ab r h bi
4 021
5 1 2 1
3 0 1 1
0000
0000
0000
3 21 0
0000
3120
4224
4 1 1 1
3 1 1 1

1 1 1 0


Totals 326 5 6 Totals 32 913 9
Pittsburgh 300 000 030- 6
Atlanta 000 207 00x- 9
E-Castillo (10), Furcal (9). DP-
Pittsburgh 3. LOB-Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta
5. 2B-CJones (18), JuFranco (8),
Francoeur (4), JEstrada (22), Johnson (8).
3B-MGiles (2). HR-Bay (19), Francoeur
(6). CS-Ward (2). SF-Furcal, CJones.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh,
MRedman L,5-11 5 10 7 7 3 3
Meadows 1 2 2 2 0 0

picked Bobby Ryan with the No.
2 pick The rugged forward
from Cherry Hill, N.J., had 37
goals and 52 assists for 89 points
in 62 OHL games last season.
The Carolina Hurricanes
drafted third and took Jack
Johnson, a defenseman in the
U.S. national program. Scouts
have compared him to a young
Scott Stevens.
Johnson, who
played prep
school hockey
in Minnesota
with Crosby,
plans to enroll
at Michigan.
Ryan and .
Johnson are the
first American Sidney
duo to go in the Crosby
top three picks drafted by
since 1983, Pittsburgh.
when Brian
Lawton went No. 1 to the
Minnesota North Stars and Pat
LaFontaine was taken third by
the New York Islanders.
There were eight U.S.-born
players chosen in the first
round, topping the American
record of seven set in 1986 and
matched in 2003.
The Minnesota Wild chose
fourth Saturday and selected
left winger Benoit Pouliot The
6-foot-3 Pouliot had 67 points -
including 29 goals in the OHL
last season.
With the fifth pick, the
Montreal Canadiens took goalie
Carey Price, and the Columbus
Blue Jackets followed by choos-
ing center Gilbert Brule.
The Chicago Blackhawks
took forward Jack Skille with
the seventh pick Skille, of


Snell 2 1 0 0, 1 2
Atlanta
Davies W,5-3 6 2 3 3 3 8
Boyer 11-3 1 2 2 1 3
Kolb 2-3 2 1 1 0 1
Reitsma.S,13 1 0 0 0 0 0
MRedman pitched to 5 batters in the 6th.
WP-Snell. PB-Cota.
Umpires-Home, C.B. Bucknor; First,
Phil Cuzzi; Second, Troy Fullwood; Third,
Jerry Crawford.
T-2:40. A-47,441 (50,091).
Brewers 7, Giants 1


SAN FRAN
Vizquel ss
Tucker rf
Snow 1 b
Alou If
Niekro ph
Drham 2b
Feliz 3b
Mtheny c
Ellison cf
Schmdt p
Alfonzo ph
Chrstns p
Fssero p


MILWAUKEE


ab rhbi
4 12 0 BClark cf
3 00 1 Weeks 2b
4 00 0 Ovrbay lb
3 00 0 CaLee If
1 000 Jenkins rf
4 02 0 BHall ss
3 00 0 Bmyan 3b
4 01 0 Helms ph.
3 01 0 Hardy ss
2 00 0 Moeller c
1 00 0 BShets p
0 00 0
0000


Totals 321 6 1 Totals 30 7 6 7
San Francisco 100 000 000- 1
Milwaukee 001 003 03x- 7

Faribault. Minn., was a team-
mate of Johnson's on the U.S.
squad.
Atlanta swapped the No. 8
spot with San Jose, getting the
12th, 49th and 207th picks from
the Sharks. San Jose used the
pick on right winger Devin
Setoguchi.
Minnesota high school
defenseman Brian Lee was
selected by the Ottawa Senators
in the ninth spot, and the
Vancouver Canucks took
defenseman Luc Bourdon to
round out the top 10.
The Los Angeles Kings used
the 11th pick to grab Slovenian
center Anze Kopitar, the first
European selected. It was the
first time since 1987 that the top
10 didn't feature a player from
Europe.
Atlanta, moving down for the
second time in the first hour,
traded the No. 12 pick to the
New York Rangers for the No,
16 and No. 41 picks.
The Rangers took 6-foot-3
defenseman Marc Staal, the
younger brother of Carolina
center Eric Staal who was
expected to be gone earlier
"To have this guy available to
us at this position was pretty
lucky," New York general man-
ager Glen Sather said. 'And we
need some luck"
The Buffalo Sabres next took
Slovakian center Marek
Zagrapan, and the Washington
Capitals pulled off a surprise by
selecting Cornell defenseman
Sasha Pokulok, who wasn't
among first-round prospects
listed by the league's Central
Scouting Service.
The New York Islanders fol-


LOB-San Francisco 6, Milwaukee 4.
2B--Durham (23), BClark (24), Jenkins
(25). 3B-Vizquel (4). HR-Helms (3).
SF-Tucker.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Schmidt L,7-6 7 5 4 4 2 8
Christiansen 2-3 0 2 2 2 0
Fassero 1-3 1 1 1 0 1
Milwaukee
BSheetsW,7-7 9 6 1 1 0 8
HBP-by BSheets (Feliz), by Schmidt
(Weeks). WP-BSheets.
Umpires-Home, Hunter Wendelstedt;
First, Mike Winters; Second, Bruce
Froemming; Third, Jerry Meals.
T-2:34. A-38,462 (41,900).
Astros 2, Mets 0
NEW YORK HOUSTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Reyes ss 4 02 0 Tveras cf 3 0 0 0
Cairo 2b 3 00 0 Biggio 2b 4 0 1 0
Cmeron rf 4 00 0 Lidge p 0 0 0 0
Beltran cf 4000 Brkmn lb 3 000
Wright3b 2 00 0 Ensbrg3b 4 01 1
Piazza c 3 00 0 Lane rf 4 1 2 1
Wdwrd If 2 00 0 AEvrtt ss 3 0 2 0
Looper p 0 00 0 Burke If 3 0 0 0
Offrmn lb 2 000 Asmusc 3 000
TGlvin p 2 01 0 Pettitte p 2 000
Floyd If 1 000 OPImro ph 1 0 1 0
Brntlett 2b 0 1 0 0
Totals 270 3 0 Totals 30 2 7 2
NewYork 000 000 000- 0
Houston 000 000 11x- 2
E-Looper (1), AEverett (8). DP-New
York 2, Houston 1. LOB-New York 4,
Houston 6. HR-Lane (16). SB-Wright
(9). CS-Reyes (9). S-Cairo, Offerman.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
TGlavine L,7-9 7 5 1 1 0 3
Looper 1 2 1 1 1 0
Houston
Pettitte W,9-7 8 3 0 .0 2 6
LidgeS,26 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by TGlavine (Taveras).
Umpires-Home, Rob Drake; First, Bob
Davidson; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third,
Andy Fletcher.
T-2:19. A-43,596 (40,950).

HOCKEY

2005 NHL Draft Selections
At Ottawa
First Round
1. Pittsburgh, Sidney Crosby, f, Rimouski
(QMJHL).
2. Anaheim, Bobby Ryan, rw, Owen
Sound (OHL).
3. Carolina, Jack Johnson, d, USA
National Under-18.
4. Minnesota, Benoit Pouliot, Iw, Sudbury
(OHL).
5. Montreal, Carey Price, g, Tri-City
(WHL).
6. Columbus, Gilbert Brule, c, Vancouver
(WHL).
7. Chicago, Jack Skille, rw, U.S. National
Under-18.
8. San Jose (from Atlanta), Devin
Setoguchi, rw, Saskatoon (WHL).
9. Ottawa, Brian Lee, d, Moorhead H.S.
(Minnesota).
10. Vancouver, Luc Bourdon, d, Val d'Or
(QMJHL)
11. Los Angeles, Anze Kopitar, d,
Sodertalje Jr. (Sweden).
12. New York Rangers (from Atlanta
through San Jose), Marc Staal, d, Sudbury
(OHL).
13. Buffalo, Marek Zagrapan, c,
Chicoutimi (QMJHL).
14. Washington, Sasha Pokulok, d,
Cornell.
15. New York Islanders, Ryan O'Marra,
c, Erie (OHL)
16. Atlanta (from New York Rangers),
Alex Bourret, rw, Lewiston (QMJHL).
17. Phoenix, Martin Hanzal, c,
Budejovice Jr. (Czech Republic).
18. Nashville, Ryan Parent, d, Guelph
(OHL).
19. Detroit, Jakub Kindl, d, Kitchener
(OHL).
20. Florida (from Philadelphia), Kendal
McArdle, Iw, Moose Jaw (WHL).
21. Toronto, Tuukka Rask, g, lives Jr.
(Finland)..
22. Boston, Matt Lashoff, d, Kitchener
(OHL).
23. New Jersey, Niclas Bergfors, Iw,
Sodertalje Jr. (Sweden).
24. St. Louis, T.J. Oshie, c, Warrord H.S.
(Minnesota).
25. Edmonton, Andrew Cogliano, c, St.
Michael's (Ontario Province A).
26. Calgary, Matt Pelech, d, Sarnia
(OHL).
27. Washington (from Colorado), Joe
Finley, d, Sioux Falls (LJSHL).
28. Dallas, Matt Niskanen, d, Virgina
H.S. (Minnesota).
29. Philadelphia (from Florida), Steve
Downie, rw, Windsor (OHL).
30. Tampa Bay, Vladimir Mihalik, D,
Presov (Slovakia).

lowed' by picking center Ryan
O'Marra, and Atlanta finally
used their No. 16 pick on for-
ward Alex Bourret. The
Phoenix Coyotes took center
Martin Hanzal, and Nashville
picked up defenseman Ryan
Parent.
Detroit, with a first-round
pick for the first time in five
years, chose Czech defenseman
Jakub Kindl at No. 19.
Philadelphia traded the No.
20 pick to Florida for No. 29,
plus a second-round choice
next year when the draft will be
in Vancouver, NHL commis-
sioner Gary Bettman said.
The Florida Panthers select-
ed forward Kenndal McArdle,
and the Toronto Maple Leafs
took goaltender Tuukka Rask
with the 21st pick
Boston next took defenseman
Matt Lashoff, and New Jersey,
picked Swedish forward
Nicklas Bergfors, who intends
to play in juniors next season.
St Louis drafted Minnesota


prep TJ. Oshie, Edmonton took
forward Andrew Cogliano and
Calgary. selected defenseman
Matt Pelech.
Colorado traded the 27th pick
to Washington for 47 and 52, and
the Capitals took Minnesota
defenseman Joe Finley. Dallas
followed with another defense-
man from the same state, Matt
Niskanen.
Philadelphia took forward
Steve Downie, and the Stanley
Cup champion Tampa Bay
Lightning wrapped up the first
round with Slovakian defense-
man Vladimir Mihalik
No Russians were taken in
the opening round.


COLLEGE
Continued from Page 1B

with 33 total assists and 13
steals.
"As a freshman you usually
don't get a lot of playing time,
so it was great to get in there,"
Baize said.
Usually confident before
games, Baize said that he
became nervous before his
first college contest. His par-
ents and his high school coach
were in the crowd, and after
the first tip-off, he was just in
awe of college basketball.
But-he took to the court early
as a reserve and drained his
first college shot, a three-point-
er, which took care of the but-
terflies, he said.
For both players, the biggest
part of adjusting to the college
game was the conditioning.
Training for the season is a
year-round process that could
wear out the unprepared.
Baize played for a team that
placed an emphasis on a fast
game that wore down the com-
petition. Galloway started
practice almost immediately
after arriving at the school,
beginning a regimen that
sometimes involved waking up
at 5 a.m., and running several
miles on the track But all the
work was fine with both play-
ers.
"It wasn't that big a deal,"
Galloway said. "It was still bas-
ketball, which I love."
So they spent much of their
first year learning. Baize


MLS
Continued from Page 1B

Fulham tied the game in the
36th minute when Chris
Albright was whistled for
knocking down Luis Boa Morte
in the penalty box as Boa Morte
dribbled toward goal.
."I know I touched him. I don't
think I fouled him," said
Albright, an L.A. Galaxy
defender.
Claus Jensen's ensuing
penalty kick caught keeper
Matt Reis moving the wrong
way.
That was Fulham's lone good
chance of the first half, howev-
er, as the MLS side owned the
midfield with Donovan and
New England teammates Clint
Dempsey and Joseph control-
ling possession. .....



BASEBALL
Continued from Page 1B

childhood dreams will culmi-
nate with the greatest of hon-
ors induction Sunday into
the Hall of Fame. Also being
enshrined are San. Diego
Padres announcer and former
New York Yankees second
baseman Jerry Coleman, and
longtime writer and broadcast-
er Peter Gammons.
". _The Hall of Fame is not
something an athlete can set
as a goal," said Boggs, a five-
time AL batting champion for
the Boston Red Sox who
became just the 41st player
elected on his first chance.
"It's something that evolves."
For both Boggs and
Sandberg, it evolved slowly at
first.
Boggs, who batted left-hand-
ed, was a scrawny kid who did-
n't attract much attention even
though he finished his senior
year at Plant High in Tampa,
on a 26-for-33. tear. He was
drafted in the seventh round
_by the Red Sox and then spent
five-plus seasons in the
minors.
Although he won one batting
title and finished among the
top four hitters four other
times, the Sox didn't even
invite him to spring training
after he barely missed winning
the batting title while playing
third base for Triple-A
Pawtucket in 1980.
"The only thing that I was
told by the Red Sox was that I
don't hit for power and that I
play in a power position and
,that I wasn't going to be able to
play in the big leagues if I don't
hit for power," said Boggs, who
also played for the Yankees
and Tampa Bay, retiring with
3,010 hits. "I forced their hand
in 1981 when I led the league
in hitting and wasn't called up
in September. They had to
make a decision on me there."
The Sox chose to keep him.
Boggs learned his inside-out
swing from his father,
Winfield, a fast-pitch softball
star. He went on to hit .300 or
higher 15 times, finished with
a .328 career average and was
the only player in the 20th cen-
tury with seven straight 200-hit
seasons.
"It was just one of those
things, when someone tells
you can't do something, you go
out and work twice as hard
and try to hone your craft,"


attended basketball camps at
the University of Florida this
summer, playing with some of
Florida's elite. Galloway has
continued his training, and
both players expect to do much
better next season.
"It showed me what I have to
do to get better," Baize said of
his Florida camps. "They're a
lot bigger at UF, (playing
against them) is like climbing a
tree."
"I'm working hard, just like I
was last year," Galloway said.
"I want to contribute a little
more. It's going to be a battle in
practice, and I want to earn my
playing time. You're open to so
much more in college. There
are just so many people who
know the game of basketball."
Both players still keep in
touch when they can, even
occasionally meeting at CFCC
to play basketball with friends.
They both see the differences
in each other's games, but have
also seen how much each play-
er has grown.
"I saw some of his stuff in his
game that I would really like to
have in my game," Galloway
said of Baize.
"He can jump a lot higher
and shoot a lot better, but if I
get the ball in my hands, it's
going to be about me," Baize
said.
Galloway is more of a pure
shooter, while Baize's
strengths include ball control
and guiding his team down the
court. Oddly, they have never
played each other one-on one.
"That would be a pretty good
game," Baize laughed.


MLS took back the lead in
the 56th minute when Dallas'
Ronnie O'Brien deflected a
shot from Dempsey just inside
the left post for the score.
"The defender cleared it out
and my eyes just lit up when I
saw it falling down (at my feet),"
Dempsey said.
"Certainly in the second half,
you could see we were
nowhere near as fit as the MLS
boys," Fulham coach Chris
Coleman said, "They're a good
team, and I think they got
stronger and stronger as the
game went on, and we got
weaker and weaker."
Dempsey nearly put the MLS
on the board in the 3rd minute,
controlling a high ball with his
back to the goal, then turning
and firing from about 8 yards
out Bocanegra stepped into an
open goal mouth and cleared it
for Fulham.


said Boggs, a notorious crea-
ture of habit who believed his
game-day rituals, such as eat-
ing chicken before every
game, contributed to his suc-
cess. "Honing my craft was the
ability to get on base, hit for
high average, and score runs.
That was my game. I knew I
could hit a line drive the
majority of the time when I
swung."
Still, for all his hitting
accomplishments, Boggs treas-
ures the two Gold Gloves he
won with the Yankees.
"I always hated hearing,
'Well, he can't play third. He's
a good hitter, but he's not a
very good third baseman,"'
Boggs said. '"And the only way
you can get a label as a com-
plete ballplayer is to go out
and win a Gold Glove. It took a
lot of hard work When Don
Mattingly called me that night
at 12:30 in the morning and
congratulated me on winning
the Gold Glove, I just started
crying right in the middle of
the bed. I never cried after
winning a batting title."
While Boggs was a star kick-
er in high school and could
have played college football,
Sandberg was all but signed,
sealed and delivered to be the
starting quarterback at
Washington State instead of a
minor league shortstop.
"I signed a letter of intent I
had all my classes picked, and
I had a roommate," Sandberg
said. "All of my college trips
my senior year were college
trips for football. I was highly
recruited. I think I even had a
backpack and a bathrobe that
said Washington State on it, so
I was ready to go."
Apparently, big league exec-
utives figured the same he
wasn't picked until the 20th
round of the 1978 amateur
draft by the Philadelphia
Phillies. Although the 6-foot-2
Sandberg began at short, he
eventually was. switched to
second and like Boggs, had to
endure a label of his own.
"I heard a lot of talk about
being too tall to play the posi-
tion how can you move
around, turn the double play?
- because I wasn't the proto-
type that everybody was used
to as a second baseman," said
Sandberg, who was traded in
January 1982 by the Phillies
with Larry Bowa to the
Chicago Cubs for Ivan
DeJesus. "It felt like I was
fighting that a little bit"


SPORTS


I









4B SUNDAY.~~~~~~~~~~~~ Ji3.205ScTSCrwCoNI(F)HRNJI


Injury troubles plague


Taylor


Matt Jones is

Jags'only holdout

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars opened
training camp Saturday without
first-round draft pick Matt
Jones and with running back
Fred Taylor nursing his surgi-
cally repaired left knee.
The first problem could be
fixed soon. The second might
take a while.
Jones, a quarterback at
Arkansas who is making the
transition to receiver, was the
team's lone no-show when play-
ers reported to camp Friday.
A lengthy holdout could hin-
der his progress, especially
since Jones is switching posi-
tions and learning a new
offense. Jones, the 21st overall
selection, also missed most of
mini-camp and several summer
workouts with a sprained left
hamstring.
"I think any time a rookie is
not here, it's not to his benefit,"
coach Jack Del Rio said. "But
you know it happens every-
where every year There is no
sense in getting bent out of
shape about it I think it's to his
advantage to be here, and we
hope to get him here soon."
Negotiations have been slow,
mostly because none of the six


players taken ahead of Jones
has signed and neither has the.
pick below him. Jones' contract
will be based primarily on what
other players drafted around
him get
"Everybody on this team has
been through a contract thing,
so you understand the process,"
said quarterback Byron
Leftwich, who had a 19-day
holdout before reporting to
camp in 2003. "Hopefully, he
can get out here soon. But I
understand that sometimes
(holdouts) are long. Hopefully
it's not long."
Taylor's rehab might take
more time.
The eighth-year pro had sur-
gery in January to repair two
partially torn ligaments in his
left knee and was limited
Saturday.
He cut gingerly, ran with a
noticeable limp and wore a pro-
tective knee brace. He partici-
pated in most team drills, but
was admittedly tentative during
them.
"I thought I made some pretty
good strides," Taylor said. "Of
course, I need to get better in
order to be where I'm used to or
where I left off. I had a pretty
severe injury, but I'm making
strides and hopefully this thing
will turn around soon.
"I'm upbeat and I'm doing
everything I can to get back and
be the best I can be to help this
team. I'll be fine. I just need to
work"


Taylor, who will practice just
once to start training camp,
insisted he will be ready for the
season opener Sept 11 against
Seattle. But he declined to offer
a date for his return to full
speed.
"I don't have a timetable," he
said. "I won't put a certain
amount of days or weeks or
whatever on it I'm not doing
that"
Taylor injured his knee Dec.
19 against Green Bay and
missed the final two games of
the season. He had started 46
consecutive games before the
injury.
Del Rio said he would like to
get Taylor some carries in the
preseason, something he hasn't
done the last two years because
of other injuries. Taylor missed
two preseason games in 2003
and carried just seven times for
33 yards. He missed another
two preseason games last year
and ran six times for 57 yards.
"The reason we tune up any-
body that's a proven star is to
knock the rust off, play at game
speed, those types of things,"
Del Rio said. "Obviously, the
last two years he's been very
limited (in the preseason) ... If
we can get him healthy enough
to get him a little action in
camp, that would be ideal."
Darius signs 3-year deal
JACKSONVILLE Donovin
Darius finally got a long-term deal.
The hard-hitting safety signed a


three-year contract extension with
the Jacksonville Jaguars on Friday,
giving him the deal he desperately
sought while being designated the
team's franchise player for three
consecutive years.
Darius will get the same $4.97
million he was due this year as a
franchise player, and without going
into specifics, indicated he will take
less the next three years. Phone
messages left with his agent, Tom
Condon, were not immediately
returned.
"I'm excited about it because I
have the opportunity to play my
career here where it all began,"
Darius wrote on the team's Web site
message board Friday. "The two
sides sat down and expressed their
desire and what they needed for it
to be done and that was it. The deal
that is great for me and fair for the
organization."
Darius' desire to stay in
Jacksonville through the 2008 sea-
son is a big turnaround from his
feelings when the Jags gave him
the franchise tag again in February.
The franchise rule allows teams
to keep one player off the free-
agent market in exchange for a
one-year tender worth the average
of the top five players at his posi-
tion. If a player doesn't sign, the
only way he can leave is if another
team is willing to part with two first-
round draft picks.
Darius signed the tender despite
his displeasure with the franchise
tag.


Redskins have work to do


Gibbs revises

offense after

tough first year

Associated Press

ASHBURN, Va. Ouch!
What a stinger Joe Gibbs got
when he looked up at the tel-
evision during the NFL draft
There was one of his most
trusted players, tackle Jon
Jansen, telling a national
audience that the
Washington Redskins last
year had a "1992 offense."
"Oh, I had a reaction to it,"
said Gibbs, letting out one of
his trademark high-pitched
chuckles. "I never said any-
thing to Jon, but if he winds
up second-string, he'll know
why."
Gibbs didn't need anyone
to remind him that his first
season back in the NFL after
a 12-yeir retirement was a
flop, that the offense ranked
30th and the record was a
career-worst 6-10 for Gibbs.
He has spent the offseason
meticulously adjusting not
overhauling, mind you the
offense, looking to add 21st
century excitement worthy of
his Hall of Fame legacy.
"That stung all of us who
work on it, the fact that we
were unproductive," Gibbs
said. "You can't kid the facts.
We were at the bottom of the
league on offense. And as
much as anybody, I'm respon-
sible for that."
The public gets its first
look at Gibbs' tinkerings
when the Redskins open
training camp on Monday, the
welcome start of real football
after a drama-filled and
sometimes embarrassing off-
season. For the first time
since Dan Snyder bought the
team in 1999, there is little
hype about the team and
even less expectation of con-
tending for the NFC East
title.
Instead, everyone wants to
know about Sean Taylor's
legal troubles, LaVar
Arrington's state of mind,
how "core Redskins" Fred
Smoot and Antonio Pierce
were allowed to get away in
free agency, the health of
first-round draft pick Carlos
Rogers, Gibbs' apparent
undermining of his starting
quarterback and whether the
64-year-old coach can still
rally players like the savior
he was billed to be.
As for the last question, the
players have no choice right
now but to say, "Yes."
"Coach Gibbs took that per-
sonally, to have our offense
ranked as low as it was," run-
ning back Clinton Portis said.
"He knew he was a much bet-
ter strategizer than that, a
much better planner than
that He wanted to put this
thing together structurally to


Joe Gibbs, Hall of Fame coach and NASCAR
regrouped for hopefully a better second season wit


suit him and us, so I think
we're going to be much more
exciting."
Gibbs' comeback last year
was an eye opener for those
who had only seen him from
afar. He operates in a very
narrow circle. He treats like
gold those inside that circle
- close friends, assistant
coaches and family members
- but can be oblivious and
even unintentionally disre-
spectful to everyone else.
Fans, reporters and even
Redskins Park employees
learned the hard way that
snubs from Gibbs are just
part of the package from a
man who is so narrowly
focused.
"I'll come into the house,
and there'd be something
like that on the wall," said
Gibbs, pointing to a large dec-
orative rug hanging in his
office. "And I'll go for a day,
and (wife) Pat'll go 'I don't
believe this. You didn't even
notice that.'
"To a certain extent I am
that way. Sometimes I think
I'm simple minded, but I
guess different people are
different ways. I think I prob-
ably have a way of getting
stuck on one thing, I guess


you could say."
To that end, G
been swayed by t
the game has pas
He is determined
the long haul, or a
he gets the Redsl
the winning trad
enjoyed when h
coach in the 1980
1990s.
His stock respi
offseason contr(
that every team
What's slipped
radar, he points ou
overwhelming ma
players have
attended offseaso
and have bought:
tem.
"In today's foot
going to have si
that are going t
every offseason,"
"The thing that'
make you most si
how you handle
lems."
Still, Taylor's e
next week, ass
shows up, will be
owed by the posse
three-year prison
for two felony gun
second-year safety
Florida. Arringtc


assuming he speaks, will be
scrutinized following his off-
season tirade at Gibbs over
the way the linebacker's knee
injury was handled.
No. 9 overall pick Rogers
won't be able to practice
much early on because he
hurt his ankle recently work-
ing out at Auburn. Anointed
quarterback Patrick Ramsey
will be looking over his shoul-
der at another first-round
pick, quarterback Jason
Campbell, even though Gibbs
claims Campbell's presence
"does not affect Patrick in any
way."
'"Patrick's been up here for
i a while now ... I -would say
- that he needs to take this
thing and go with it now,"
Gibbs said.
But what about the
offense? That's supposed to
be where Gibbs really shines.
Gibbs says the changes will
be subtle. He will still focus
first on protecting the quar-
terback, but he hopes to com-
plete more downfield passes
with a new receiving corps.
that includes speedsters
Santana Moss, David Patten
and Antonio Brown.
SRunning plays have been
redesigned to give Portis
more room to run, treating
him as the agile back he is
rather than a bruiser Gibbs
s,, also will use the shotgun for
the first time.
But Gibbs said the "1992
." :,. offense" comparison isn't fair.
He said other teams, such as
: New England employ a more
... conservative offensive philos-
ophy it's just that no one
Associated Press complains because the
Patriots win all the time.
owner, has Gibbs even remembered a
:h the Skins, big argument he once had
with former owner Jack Kent
xibbs hasn't Cooke after a loss against the
he talk that Giants. Gibbs had to -get out
ssed him by. the tapes to prove to Cooke
I to stay for that the Redskins' attack was
at least until actually the more creative
kins back to one and that the Giants
edition they simply played better.
le was the "I think it's more if you're
Is and early not productive on offense, it's
just doesn't look good," Gibbs
onse to the said. "And people will say,
oversies is 'Gosh, that looks so bland so
has them. plain' and whatever"
below the As for Jansen, he, actually
ut, is that an was trying to say something
majority of his positive when the "1992"
regularly comment slipped out during
in workouts his draft-day appearance as
into his sys- an analyst for ESPN. But no
one's letting him forget it.
ball, you're "I've never pulled any
ome things punches when I talk," Jansen
to crop up said. "All I'm going to say now
Gibbs said. is that we've made a lot of
's going to changes that aren't major
successful is changes, but we've tweaked
the prob- things here and there that are
going to be very beneficial for
every move our team and our personnel."
suming he Small changes? Maybe, but
e overshad- a Hall of Fame coach's repu-
sibility of a station is riding on them.
n sentence "We weren't very good last
charges the year, that's a fact," Gibbs said.
y is facing in "We've tried to address those
on's words, things."


Associated Press
Jacksonville running back Fred Taylor gets help from a trainer
stretching his knee, which he had surgery on last January to repair
two partially torn ligaments.



Colts' kicker has


experienced camp


competition before


Associated Press


Forgive Mike Vande
he's heard this story
The Indianapolis Colts
kicker and bring him t
ing camp, hoping he c
opponents farther ba
kickoffs.
"I've read the first
chapters of that one
know how the story
Vanderjagt said.
Vanderjagt is the mos
rate field goal kicker in
NFL history, having
made 87 percent of his
attempts, but has not
taken kindly to chal-
lengers.
He was outspoken
about last year's "com-
petition" with seventh-
round pick David K
The Colts then trotted
myriad of kickoff spec
again drawing Vande
ire.
Coach Tony Dungy an
president Bill Polian
tently have felt the Colt
deeper kickoffs. So wh
Colts selected Dave Ra;
the sixth round, Polian
made it clear he did no
to hear Vanderjagt's
plaints.
"We will carry a kick
and there will be no con
tion about that," Polian
April. "After we made th
off change last year, Mi
an 85 percent field goal
Prior to that, he was in t
70s. Mike's feelings al
are not an issue for me.
Will Rayner be accei
Vanderjagt?
"We drafted a kicke
ly?" Vanderjagt said. "W
must need one then. I'm
for him. Congratulati
Dave Raymer. Rayn
thought I'd heard i
Raymer one time."
Welcome to camp, roc
Corner competition
With Donnie Abraham re
the Jets have their left corn
spot to fill. Though it would
veteran Ray Mickens would
front-runner to win the start
coach Herman Edwards sa
competition is wide open.
"The best guy is going to
Edwards said. "If it's a rook
be it. We don't know who th
going to be."
Among the candidates, a
from Mickens: Pete Hunter,
Miller and Derrick Strait.
Hunter was acquired in a
with the Cowboys last weel
the Jets learned Abraham v
hanging up his helmet. He
ing off ACL surgery, but has
tial after starting several gar
Dallas.
Strait was a third-round p
year, got hurt early and was
ed for a big part of the seas
When he came back, he wa
nickel back, a role he should


again play in 2005. 1
Edwards said he expects
rjagt if Mickens and Strait to be able to
before: play left cornerback and nickel
draft a back.
o train- Miller was the Jets'"second-
can pin round draft pick out of Clemson.
ack on The biggest thing he has going for
him is his speed.
seven The Jets aren't afraid to start
ends," rookies, either. Last year, Erik
Coleman started at safety and
st accu- Jonathan Vilma took over at mid-
.defensive rookie of the
year honors.
Mickens, going into his
10th season, sat out all
of 2004 with a torn ACL.
He started 14 games in
2003 when Abraham
injured his shoulder. He
imball. clearly is capable, but it remains to
d in a be seen how well he will do with a
cialists, surgically repaired knee at his age.
erjagt's Mickens also is the Jets' top nickel
d team back, but that should have no
consis- bearing on whether he wins the

ts'need job.
ten the Then there is the Ty Law ques-
yner in tion. Though the Jets have been in
quickly contact with his agent, they haven't
ot want brought him in for a Workout.
com- General manager Terry Bradway
said it was up to Law to decide
off man where he wants to play, though the
nversa- Jets would want to see him work
said in out and take him through a full bat-
te kick- tery of tests to make sure his foot
ke was is completely healed:
kicker.
the low Costas returns
bout it It's hardly surprising that Bob
Costas will host NBC's coverage of
pted by the NFL when the network takes
over Sunday night football tele-
r, real- casts in the 2006 season. Certainly
Tell, we Costas expected the assignment
happy when he signed with NBC through
ons to 2012
ler? I 2012.
ert was "It seemed a very natural fit
it was
once NBC got football that I would
)kie. have a role in our coverage and
that would ducktail with me contin-
n uing through the Olympics of 2012,
tiring, since the football deal also goes
lerback through 2012," Costas said. "So at
seem a time when the rights to programs
d be the and sports broadcasts and leagues
ting job, move from network to network, and
iys the the broadcasters sometime hop
from network to network, it's kind of
play," a comforting thing to be a lifer, in a
ie, so sense, with NBC, and that's what I
hat is have been."
Costas will team with Cris
side Collinsworth, who also works with
Justin Costas on HBO's "Inside the NFL."
It should be a good match, because
trade both are insightful, often humorous
k once and not long-winded. Unlike some
vas of the other pregame show partici-
is cornm- pants, Costas and Collinsworth
poten- seem to take the job seriously.
mes for "Cris is an uncommonly good
broadcaster, period," Costas said.
>ick last "He's just an excellent broadcaster,
s limit- let alone for someone who did not
son. begin his career as a broadcaster,
as the who came out of the playing or
d once coaching ranks."


Crinus COUNmY (FL) CHROmCICL


4$ SUNDAYJULY 31, 2005


SPORTS









SUNDAY, Jui.Y 31, 2005 5B


Singh matches mark


Associated Press

GRAND BLANC, Mich. Vijay Singh
quickly turned a showdown between the
world's top two golfers into a rout.
Singh started the third round of the
Buick Open one stroke ahead of Tiger
Woods, then birdied the first three holes
while Woods bogeyed Nos. 2-4. Singh
matched the tournament record of 7 under
on the front nine and closed with a 63
Saturday, matching the event's 54-hole
record of 22-under 194.
If Singh holds onto his five-shot lead
he'll be the first three-time champion at
the Buick Open, a tournament that started
in 1958, and the first champion to repeat
since Tony Lema in 1965.
As great as Singh's round was, it
could've been better if his putting was
more consistent. He missed short putts for
birdie at Nos. 7 and 14 and another for par
at the 16th. It still was good enough, how-
ever, to tie Kenny Perry's 54-hole tourna-
ment record set in 2001.
Woods is the top-ranked player in the
world, and Singh is No. 2. They have alter-
nated positions atop the world ranking for
nearly a year.
Woods had three straight bogeys -
falling seven strokes behind after four
holes before finishing 2 under for the
round and 14 under for the. tournament,
eight shots behind Singh. His 22-foot par
putt at the 18th spun around the cup, giv-
ing him a fourth bogey."


Associated Press
Vijay Singh tied the Buick Open's record for 54 holes at 22-under par, shooting a 63 in
the third round to take a five-stroke lead into Sunday's final round.


Zach Johnson (65) is at 17 under, alone in
second place. Johnson won a tournament
last year as a 28-year-old rookie and he's
42nd on the money list this year with three
top-10 finishes. Chris DiMarco (66) will
begin Sunday's final round seven shots
back.
Singh began the week with three victo-
ries, the same total he had entering the
2004 Buick Open. His last victory here
started a run of six wins, including the
PGA Championship, in eight events en


route to player of the year honors.
Woods opened at Warwick Hills with a
71 snapping a tournament-record tying
streak of eight straight rounds in the 60s -
then vaulted into contention on Friday
with an 11 under, his best round in rela-
tion to par.
Woods is playing for the first time since
winning the British Open two weeks ago,
and two weeks before the PGA
Championship, where he'll shoot for his
11th major title.


Jang, Sorenstam battle in Britain


Associated Press
Six-year veteran Jeong Jang is
searching for her first tour win.


Jang holds onto

five-stroke lead

Associated Press

SOUTHPORT, England-
Jeong Jang has played with
Annika Sorenstam before but
never with this much at stake.
The South Korean will be
paired with Sorenstam for the
final round of the Women's
British Open on Sunday, as she
tries to protect a five-stroke
lead and win the first tourna-
ment of her six-year LPGA
career.
"I am going to be nervous but
not because of being with
Annika, just being the leader,"
said Jang, who shot a 3-under 69


Saturday to move to 13-under
203 for the tournament at Royal
Birkdale.
"I will think about my golf, not
think about Annika."
But like it or not, Sorenstam
will be there, and she'll be trying
for her third major title of the
year and 10th overall. She made
sure of that by shooting a third-
round 66 and pulling into a tie
for second with Cristie Kerr (69)
at 8 under
"We will see what happens,"
said the Swede, who hasn't had
a bogey since the 13th hole in
the opening round. "There's a
lot of golf holes out there left to
be played and birdie opportuni-
ties. I am very happy with my
round today and it was my best
golf of the week"
Sorenstam and Jang were
paired together at the ShopRite


LPGA Classic in June.
'"Annika won that event,"
Jang said. "I finished tied for
fifth."
Jang, who began the day with
a four-stroke lead, provided a
few chances for those chasing
her to make up some ground.
She bogeyed the opening hole
before recovering with five
birdies. She just missed anoth-
er birdie on the 18th when her
10-foot putt stopped inches
short of the cup.
She has the best score
through 54 holes since the tour-
nament became a major five
years ago.
Behind Sorenstam and Kerr
are five players at 7-under 209.
One of them is Michelle Wie,
the 15-yeaf-old amateur who is
playing her last tournament
before returning to high school.


Stadler, Roberts tied at Senior Open


Associated Press

KETTERING, Ohio Craig
Stadler made a spectacular
bunker shot on the final, hdle
and went on to make a birdie,
moving into a tie for the lead
with Loren Roberts on Saturday
after three rounds of the U.S.
Senior Open.
Stadler had pulled his drive
into the bunker left of the fair-
way on the dogleg par-4, but was
able to muscle 7-iron a shot out
of the sand from 153 yards that
ended up just 4 feet from the
pin. He made the birdie putt to
cap a 2-under 69.
Roberts also shot a 69 to share


the top spot at 11-under 202,
highlighting his round by spin-
ning in a wedge at the 10th hole
for an eagle.
The co-leaders were three
shots clear of the field, with
Raymond Floyd winner of the
last major event at NCR
Country Club, the 1969 PGA
Championship at 205 along
with D.A. Weibring. The 62-year-
old Floyd turned back the clock
with a 69 that included four
birdies and two bogeys.
Weibring had a 68.
There were numerous ster-
ling shots and as many pratfalls
for most of the contenders.
None was more dramatic than


the disaster Tom Watson had at
the sixth green.
Alone in the lead, Watson hit
his second shot on the par-5, 549-
yard hole through the green and
into a back trap. He blasted out
to 12 feet and seemed to have a
good shot at birdie. But he rolled
his birdie putt 2 feet past, then
missed the comebacker badly,
rolling it some 6 feet past the
hole and near where his original
putt had been. He also missed
the bogey putt, tapping in for a
double-bogey 6 that dropped
him two shots back of playing
partner Roberts, who made a
birdie putt on the same green.
After starting the day tied for


the lead -with Stadler and
Roberts, Watson sagged to a 73
that left him four shots back at
202 along with Des Smyth, whom
Watson beat in a playoff last
weekend to win the Senior
British Open.
Roberts, playing in just his
second event for the 50-and-over
crowd, bogeyed the first hole but
made the turn in even-par as he
came to the signature hole at
NCR Country Club, the par-5,
546-yard 10th. Roberts' drive was
in the deep rough right of the
fairway on the dogleg right hole,
which has a green tilted severely
from back to front and surround-
ed by deep bunkers.


PGA Tour
Buick Open
At Warwick Hills Golf & Country Club
Grand Blanc, Mich.
Third Round
Vijay Singh 65-66-63 194 -22
Zach Johnson 68-66-65 199 -17
Chris DiMarco 70-65-66 201 -15
GeoffOgilvy 66-71-65 202 -14
Sean O'Hair 706-66 202 -14
Tiger Woods 71-61-70 202 -14
Olin Browne 66-73-64 203 -13
Steve Lowery 69-66-68 203 -13
Jason Bohn 65-69-69 203 -13
Briny Baird 69-69-66 204 -12
Larry Mize 69-68-67 204 -12
Jim Furyk 66-71-67 204 -12
Jeff Brehaut 68-67-69 204 -12
Fred Funk 68-66-70 204 -12
Craig Barlow 66-67-71 204 -12
Paul Claxton 71-69-65 205 -11
R.S. Johnson 69-69-67 205 -11
Steve Elkington 69-68-68 205 -11
Daniel Chopra 71-66-68 205 -11
Robert Allenby 70-65-70 205 -11
Dudley Hart 68-66-71 205 -11
Stephen Leaney71-68-67 206 -10
F.Langham 73-66-67 206 -10
Brendan Jones 70-68-68 206 -10


Heath Slocum
Hunter Haas
H.Tanaka
M.Gronberg
Omar Uresti
lan Leggatt
John Daly
Darron Stiles
Ted Purdy
J.P. Hayes ,
John Cook
Billy Mayfair
Nick Watney
Steve Stricker


70-68-68
72-66-68
69-69-68
69-71-67
68-72-67
71-69-67
70-70-67
71-68-68
70-68-69
69-69-69
69-68-70
71-66-70
64-71-72
68-66-73


C.M. Anderson 72-68-68 208
Charles Warren 72-68-68 208
Bob Tway 70-70-68 208
Rod Pampling 67-73-68 208
John Rollins 68-71-69 208
Ryan Palmer 69-70-69 208
Paul Goydos 67-71-70 208
Lee Janzen 70-68-70 208
R.Thatcher 67-70-71 208
Mario Tiziani 70-66-72 208
T.Armour Ill 67-73-69 209
John Senden 70-70-69 209
Justin Rose 68-72-69 209
Wes Short, Jr. 69-70-70 209
C.Beckstrom 69-70-70 209
J.J. Henry 68-71-70 209
Paul Gow 69-69-71 209
Bob Heintz 68-70-71 209
Will MacKenzie 71-67-71 209
Scott McCarron 68-69-72 209
Rocco Mediate 71-66-72 209
Mark Brooks 66-71-72 209
Glen Hnatiuk 67-69-73 209
Doug Barron 69-71-70 210
Bob Estes 71-69-70 210
Tag Ridings 73-67-70 210
Tom Byrum 69-69-72 210
D.J. Brigman 70-70-71 211
Scott Verplank 73-66-72 211
Frank.Lickliter II 67-67-77 211
T.van der Walt 72-67-73 212
Jeff Hart 71-68-73 212
Mark O'Meara 72-67-73 212
Michael Harris 73-67-73 213
Neal Lancaster 66-70-77 213
Matt Davidson 71-69-74 214
Joey Snyder III 68-72-74 214
Andrew Magee 70-70-75 215
Steve Allan 75-65-75 215
Joey Sindelar .70-69-76 215
Ryan Brehm 71-69-77 217
LPGA
Women's British Open
At Royal Birkdale Golf Club
Southport, England
Third Round
(a-amateur)


Jeong Jang
A.Sorenstam
Cristie Kerr
Paula Creamer
a-Michelle Wie
Young Kim
S.Gustafson
L.Neumann


68-66-69
73-69-66
73-66-69
75-69-65
75-67-67
74-68-67
69-73-67
71-70-68


Karen Stupples 74-71-65
Carin Koch 76-68-66
Juli Inkster 74-68-68
Karrie Webb 75-66-69
Pat Hurst 75-65-70
B.Brewerton .75-71-65
Nicole Perrot 70-72-69
a-Louise Stahle 73-65-73


Laura Davies
* Becky Morgan
Grace Park
Yuri Fudoh
Shi Hyun Ahn
M.Redman
Candle Kung
Natalie Gulbis
a-C.Ciganda


76-70-66
79-66-67
77-68-67
75-69-68
78-68-67
75-71-67
76-71-67
76-70-68
73-72-69


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-.212
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Ai Miyazato 72-73-69
Emilee Klein 71-73-70
R.Hakkarainen 78-68-69
Heather Bowie 74-69-72
Kim Williams 71-72-72
G.Nocera 82-67-67
A.Molthe-Leth 78-71-67
Wendy Doolan 77-72-67
Kris Tschetter 78-69-69
Anja Monke 73-73-70
L.Wessberg 72-71-73
Moira Dunn 71-70-75
H. Alfredsson 79-70-68
Aree Song 79-70-68
S.Steinhauer 74-73-70
Kris Lindstrom 81-65-71
C.Ekelundh 77-69-71
C.Matthew 73-72-72
R.Hetherington 76-68-73
Sophie Sandolo 71-73-73
Iben Tinning 78-71-69
Miriam Nagl 74-75-69
Beth Daniel 76-71-71
M.Blomvquist 78-68-72
Jill McGill 76-70-72
Sung Ah Yim 76-73-70
Amy Hung 79-69-71
R.Hudson 78-70-71
C.Cartwright 76-72-71
Shani Waugh 75-72-72
Lorie Kane 73-74-72
Laura Diaz 74-72-73
Christina Kim 79-70-71
Marcy Hart 79-70-71
Kim Saiki 76-73-71
Brahdie Burton 74-75-71
Michelle Ellis 78-71-72
Paula Marti 73-75-73
Riko Higashio 73-75-73
Young Jo 76-71-74
Bo Bae Song 76-71-74
J.Van Hagen 75-72-74
Yu Ping Lin 78-70-74
Karen Lunn 78-71-74
Siew-Ai Lim 79-69-75


Champions Tour
U.S. Senior Open
At NCR Country Club, South Course
Kettering, Ohio
Third Round
(a-amateur)


Craig Stadler 64-69-69
Loren Roberts 66-67-69
D.A. Weibring 70-67-68
R.Floyd 69-67-69
Des.Smyth 70-66-70
Tom Watson 68-65-73
Greg Norman 68-70-69
Rodger Davis 69-72-67
Perry Arthur 71-72-66
Jerry Pate 73-67-69
Tom Jenkins 72-65-72
Wayne Levi 68-67-74
Dana Quigley 73-71-66
Don Pooley 72-67-71
B.Summerhays 68-69-73
Allen Doyle 71-67-73
Mark McNulty 70-67-74
Bob Gilder 69-72-71
Gil Morgan 70-70-72
Hajime Meshiai 70-69-73
Ron Streck 69-70-73
Peter Jacobsen 72-71-70
Walter Hall 72-70-71
D.Lundstrom 70-72-71
R.W. Eaks 70-71-72
Tom Purtzer 65-76-72
David Eger 70-69-74
John Harris 69-75-70
Bruce Lietzke 71-73-70
Dan Pohl 69-74-71
a-G.Reynolds 71-72-71
Hale Irwin 71-69-74
Ben Crenshaw 71-74-70
Larry Nelson 74-70-71
Jay Sigel 69-74-72
-Dick Mast ... 68-73-74
J.M.Canizares 75-70-71
Frank Shikle 71-72-73
Dale Douglass 73-70-73
V.Fernandez 72-71-73
a-G.Zahringer 72-70-74
Gary Hardin 71-74-72
Morris Hatalsky 69-76-72
a-Pat Tallent 73-70-74
Lonnie Nielsen 71-72-74
a-R.Nichols 73-69-75
Jay Haas 72-70-75
M.San Filippo 72-68-77
Terry Florence 73-72-73
Tom Kite 74-71-73
Doug Tewell 75-70-73
Jim White 72-72-74
Roy Vucinich 74-70-74
Bruce Fleisher 67-75-76
James Blair 71-70-77
Hubert Green 74-71-74
Mick Soli 70-74-76
Vance Heafner 74-69-77
Alan Tapie 73-72-76
Jim Colbert 70-74-77
Rick Karbowski 70-73-78
Mark James 72-73-77
Pat Laverty 70-74-78
Rick Rhoden 71-74-78


Schumacher gets



first pole of season


Seven-time Grand

Prix champ gets

Hungaianpole

Associated Press

BUDAPEST, Hungary -
Seven-time champion Michael
Schumacher earned his first
pole position of the season
Saturday, clocking the fastest
lap during qualifying at the
Hungarian Grand Prix.
"We feel very delighted after
a suffering period when things
did not work in our favor,"
Schumacher said. "I am pretty
confident There was no reason
to not believe in Ferrari's
return."
It was his 64th career pole
position, but his first in 14 races.
His previous pole came at last
October's Japanese Grand Prix.
Ferrari's last pole was the
final race of 2004, the Brazilian
GP when Rubens Barrichello
led. Schumacher had the pole
in the race before that and then
was shut out in the first 12 races
this season.
*' It is the first time since 1998
that Schumacher had gone so
long without a pole position.
His next one will tie him with
Ayrton Senna for the Formula
One all-time mark


"It is one step in the right
direction. Then we will see
where we go from there," the
German said.
Schumacher has struggled all
season after winning 12 of his
first 13 races last year He has
just one win, at the tainted U.S.
Grand Prix after seven teams
pulled out because of safety
concerns over Michelin tires.
On a hot day in the
Hungarian hills, with track tem-
peratures approaching 122
degrees, the Ferrari driver
clocked 1 minute, 19.882 sec-
onds on the twisting 2.722-mile
Hungaroring circuit
McLaren's Juan Pablo
Montoya, who has taken first
and second in the last two
races, was next with 1:20.779
ahead of Toyota driver Jarno
Trulli, third with 1:20.839.
"To be on pole is one thing,"
Schumacher said. "To do it with
such a time margin to the others
is another thing.
"But on the other side, it is
just qualifying, the race is still
to be done," he added.
Schumacher will be seeking
his fifth victory at the
Hungaroring. He won in 1994
for Benetton, the first year he
won the driving title. He repeat-
ed in 1998, 2001 and 2004 for
Ferrari.
Montoya looks ready to
pounce on any mistake by
Seohumacher at tbo start


Venus Williams reaches Classic final


Associated Press

STANFORD, Calif. Venus Williams
saved five match points in the second set
and overcame her inconsistent ground
game, rallying for a 2-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2 victory
over Patty Schnyder on Saturday to reach
the final of the Bank of the West Classic.
The second-seeded Williams will play
her 500th career match Sunday in the
very tournament where she made her
debut 11 years ago, when it was in
Oakland.
Williams got back in it by doing what
she does best: dictating the pace, showing
patience and winning big points with ath-
letic putaways at the net
She will play for the championship
against the winner of Saturday's late
match between No. 4 seed Kim Clijsters
and Anna-Lena Groenefeld.
Williams looked tired at times and
struggled with her serve in her first tour-
nament since winning Wimbledon in dra-
matic fashion earlier this month against
Lindsay Davenport, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 9-7 in the
longest women's final at the All England
Club: 2 hours, 45 minutes.
This one lasted 2:02, with the second set
at one hour Williams raised both arms
and managed a big smile after hitting a
backhand winner down the line on match
point Moments later she was out of
breath and slouching with her hands on
her hips on a warm Bay Area afternoon
After dropping a quick first set,
Williams faced six deuces before holding
serve to start the second. Still, she gave
Schnyder plenty of opportunities.
Williams broke for 4-2, then gave away her
next service game with three straight dou-
ble faults.


Associated Press
Venus Williams lost the first set to Patty Schnyder and had to go to the tiebreaker
in the second before managing a three-set win in the Bank of the West semifinals.

Schnyder came back, breaking for a 6-5 became impossible when top-seeded
lead. In the next game, Williams saved Davenport, the world No.1 and defending
five match points to force a tiebreaker champion of this event, retired in the first
She jumped to a 5-0 lead in the tiebreak- set of her opening match Thursday with a
er strained lower back. Davenport beat
A rematch of the Wimbledon final Williams for the title here in 2004.


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CITRus CouNTY' (FL) CIIONICI.Iu


SPORTS








qw 3N"Ay, j v ,0


Now what, Lance?


Discovery tries

to find new role

for Armstrong

Associated Press

SILVER SPRING, Md. -
In the weeks before what
would be Lance Armstrong's
final ride in the Tour de
France, Discovery
Communications launched a
media blitz across its cable
channels for the cycling
champion.
Discovery Health aired a
show featuring cancer sur-
vivors telling how they were
inspired by Armstrong's bout
with the disease. On TLC's
car makeover show
"Overhaulin'," his rocker girl-
friend Sheryl Crow had his
Pontiac GTO souped up for
him. TLC even aired a profile
of his mother, titled "Raising
a Champion."
But with Armstrong retired
after his seventh straight
Tour victory and with two
years left on a three-year
endorsement deal, Discovery
must decide how to use its
star now that he's stepped off
the winner's podium for
good.
"They went into this realiz-
ing there was going to have to
be a life after this sponsor-
ship," said Paul Swangard,
managing director of the
University of Oregon's
Warsaw Sports Marketing
Center. "They are banking on
Lance remaining a piece of
popular culture in the
absence of him competing."
Armstrong and his cycling
team signed a deal worth a
reported $10 million annual-
ly with Discovery last year
after the U.S. Postal Service
dropped its contract.
Discovery only required
Armstrong to ride in one
more Tour and knew he like-
ly was going to retire before
the contract expired, compa-
ny spokesman David Leavy
said.
It initially seemed an odd
move. The closest thing
Discovery had to a star ath-
lete was the Crocodile
Hunter, Steve Irwin, best
known for flinging himself
onto wild animals.
Discovery's brands such as
Animal Planet, TLC and the
Travel Channel do not carry
sports programming and the
company does not sponsor
other athletes or sports.
However, Discovery chan-
nels are now available in 160
countries, including regions
of Europe where cycling is,
much more popular than in
the United States. Despite
limited domestic interest in


Associated Press
Lance Armstrong and members of his Discovery team pose for photographers last Sunday dur-
ing a victory parade on the Champs Elysees after Armstrong won his 7th straight Tour de France
cycling race in Paris.


.the sport, choosing a cyclist
fit Discovery's market,
according to Leavy.
"To have Lance as a global
icon, to be an on-air person-
ality for us, opens up a lot of
possibilities," Leavy said.
The three-week Tour gave
Discovery broad global
brand exposure. The yellow
leader's jersey Armstrong
wore for most of the race
bore a big Discovery logo. His
teammates wore white and
blue Discovery jerseys and
shorts. News
photos of
Armstrong, ON TH
arms raised as B Discover
he celebrated Commun
his last Tour vic- www.disc
tory in Paris, all
captured the
Discovery symbol across his
chest.
The network is now mar-
keting cycling gear, including
racing hats, shorts, watches, a
DVD and a replica yellow jer-
sey that sells for $149.95.
Armstrong said he plans to
continue his television work
with Discovery and the
Outdoor Life Network, which
broadcasts the Tour.
Discovery still will sponsor
the racing team and after the
contract expires, it will
decide whether to continue
with the sport, Leavy said.
Even as he retires,
Armstrong has broad appeal
to sponsors. He earned about
$17.5 million last year on
endorsements, according to
Sports Illustrated, on deals
with companies such as
Nike, Subaru and Coca-Cola.
As a sign of his marketing
power, Nike has sold more
than 50 million of the $1 yel-


low LiveStrong bracelets to
raise money for Armstrong's
cancer foundation.
"Lance as a brand means a
lot of things to a lot of p'eo-
ple," Swangard said. "He
doesn't necessarily need to
be competing to reinforce
that He has built a lot of
equity in the last seven years
that will carry him forward."
Discovery plans to develop
programming with
Armstrong as an on-air per-
sonality, building on his
inspirational


IE NET
y
nications:
covery.com


appeal as a can-
cer survivor, for
example. Leavy
said there are
no current
plans for specif-
ic shows.


Discovery already has
tried to weave Armstrong in
with its stars through guest
appearances and other pro-
motions. The day after his
victory, the network ran full-
page ads in The Washington
Post and USA Today with
congratulatory notes from
the likes of Irwin, Stacy
London of TLC's "What Not
to Wear" and the crew from
the Discovery Channel's
"American Chopper."
However, shows featuring
Armstrong have not generat-
ed much extra attention from
viewers. The string of
Armstrong-themed shows
Discovery aired before the
tour, called "Lance Week,"
posted ratings only even with
the averages for their time
slots, Leavy said.
Having Armstrong signed
on may not be a guaranteed
money maker.
The Postal Service spent


$25 million sponsoring
Armstrong's team in the last
four years of its contract and
claimed it generated $18 mil-
lion in revenue. But a 2003
audit by the Postal Service's
inspector general only veri-
fied $698,000 of that $18 mil-
lion claim.
Leavy said the Postal
Service deal was aimed at
only the United States, a mar-
ket with a limited appetite
for cycling, whereas
Discovery hopes to use
Armstrong to build its brand
globally.
Armstrong faces the same
challenges as other sports
stars when they retire how
to stay in the spotlight while
no longer doing what made
them famous. Discovery will
have to find ways to keep him
in the public mind, said Jeff
Bliss, president of the
Alexandria, Va., sports mar-
keting firm Javelin Group.
"He needs to keep the
American public in particu-
lar excited about the Tour;
hopefully, that will rub off on
Discovery," Bliss said.
Bliss said Discovery could
play up his celebrity relation-
ship with Crow or develop a
reality show around the
cyclist to keep the public
interested. However, without
-Armstrong riding, interest in
the Tour, cycling and possibly
Armstrong himself likely will
wane in the United States, he
said.
"The appeal of him as an
athlete is what has brought
everyone along here," Bliss
said. "Without that, it is going
to be more manufactured,
perhaps not quite as authen-
tic."


Younger athletes poised to take over track


Associated Press

The conquering kids of
America, a fresh wave of
Caribbean speed, yet another
tireless troop of Africans and
a Russian female version of
Sergey Bubka. The young
have taken over track and
field, and not just in the
United States.
Most are in their early 20s,
some still in their teens.
Several already own Olympic
medals, and many will add to
their collection at the world
championships Aug. 6-14 in
Helsinki, Finland.
They aren't as familiar as
Marion Jones, Michael
Johnson, Maurice Greene or
Gail Devers, but give them
time, because theirs might be
the deepest and most talented
generation in the sport's his-
tory.
Among the best of the U.S.
contingent: Justin Gatlin (100
and 200 meters), Jeremy
Wariner (400), Sanya Richards
(400), Allyson Felix (200) and
Kerron Clement (400 hurdles).
Gatlin is the oldest at 23.
Internationally, start with
23-year-old Ethiopian
Kenenisa Bekele, who broke
the world 5,000- and 10,000-
meter records in a nine-day
span last year and is entered
in both events in Helsinki.
Bekele outran his famous
countryman, Haile
Gebrselassie, to win the
Olympic 10,000 in Athens.
Bekele and a rising contin-
gent of even younger
Ethiopians will do battle with
traditional nemesis Kenya,
whose top runners include


Isaac Kiprono Songok, 21, and
Eliud Kipchoge, 20.
The fastest of the Caribbean
sprinters, Asafa Powell of
Jamaica, is doubtful for the
worlds after tearing a groin
muscle at the Crystal Palace
meet in London on July 22.
Powell, just 22, set the world
100 record at 9.77 seconds last
month, but the fans at Olympic
Stadium in Finland could be
deprived of his much-antici-
pated showdown with Olympic'
gold medalist Gatlin.
The safest bet for a world
record is remarkable Russian
Yelena Isinbayeya in the pole
vault. After all, she's broken it
17 times, four in the last
month. At the Crystal Palace
meet, Isinbayeva broke her
world mark twice and became
the first woman to clear 5
meters (16 feet, 4% inches).
Bubka, who was watching, set
35 world pole vault records.
"I would like to have 36
world records," Isinbayeva
said. "It's my new goal."
She has no world champi-
onships, though, finishing
third in Paris two years ago.
The IAAF, the sport's inter-
national governing body,
promises its largest anti-dop-
ing effort, with more than 850
tests before, during and after
the competition.
No sport has been tainted
more by performance-enhanc-
ing substances than track and
field, but those connected with
the BALCO drug laboratory
scandal won't be competing in
Helsinki. Some weren't fast
enough, others are serving
suspensions. Kelli White,
stripped of the 100 and 200


gold medals she won at the
last world championships in
Paris, has admitted steroid
use, is cooperating with
authorities and has become an
anti-drug spokeswoman as she
serves a two-year ban.
The young stars say they
welcome the chance to put a
shine on track's tarnished
image.
"I hate it when people say
"Is he or she on drues?"' said
Richards, a 20-year-old who
has. run under 50 seconds in
the 400 five times this year and
beat Olympic champion
Tonique Williams-Darling in
Switzerland a month ago. "I
know that w ith the new crop of
athletes, and us running fast
and doing it the right way, it
will definitely reflect well on
the sport."
Gatlin rebuts concerns
about his coach, Trevor
Graham, who sent the vial con-
taining the designer steroid
THG to U.S. doping authori-
ties to show them what some
athletes were using to avoid
detection. Several of
Graham's athletes in years
past have tested positive for
steroids.
"I know what to say 'no'. to
and what to say 'yes' to,"
Gatlin said. "If any allegations
come up, I know it doesn't
involve me, because I want to
go out there and run the best
race I can clean."
He also wants to show emo-
tion but not the boorish, chest-
thumping braggadocio often
associated with his predeces-
sors:
"I know I took on a responsi-
bility of being a role model to


young kids," Gatlin said.
"When kids are watching,
they're going to mimic.
Obviously we want action and
entertainment in track and
field, but we don't want any-.
thing to go wrong like it has in
the past"
The competition will go on
without names who have dom-
inated the sport over the past
decade.
Dogged by doping suspi-
cions despite her vehement
denials. Jones was exceeding-
ly slow this year, then at the
U.S. championships Jones
picked up her clothes and left
the starting blocks just before
thle 100 preliminaries. Her
agent said she had a hip flexor
injury.
Devers has not been heard
from all season, and at 38
finally may be ready to call an
end to her long career.
Hicham El Guerrouj of
Morocco, double Olympic gold
medalist and four-time world
champion in the 1,500, con-
firmed a week ago that he
wold not compete this year.
Olympic triple jump cham-
pion Christian Olsson or
Sweden, Olympic 800 and
1,500 champion Kelly:Holmes
of Britain and defending
world 400 champion Jana
Pittman of Australia will miss
the Helsinki competition
because of injuries.
Greene, a three-time world
100 champion and 2000
Olympic gold medalist, will be
in Helsinki,, but only as a
member of the U.S. 400-meter
relay pool after pulling up
with a hamstring injury at the
nationals.


Associated Press
Associated Press reporter Megan McCloskey, white shirt, readies
herself along with other competitors for the half-mile swim in the
first leg of the Danskin triathlon on July 17 in Aurora, Colo.



'You ready'


Those buoys cannot possi-
bly be in the right place.
There is no way that's
the distance I have to swim -
it never seemed that far in the
lap pool.
The sun is just starting to
rise over the Aurora Reservoir
and thousands of women with
numbers scrawled on their
legs and arms in black marker
are staring out at the water.
Heads shake in disbelief.
I nudge my sister with my
elbow.
"You ready?"
Last year it was almost a
whim. A triathlon? Sure. Why
not? My sister was competing,
so I signed up, too. I'm a young
athlete. It didn't sound that
hard: A half-mile swim, 12
miles on a bicycle and a three-
mile run. I sent in my $75 reg-
istration fee two months before
the Danskin series race.
I know exactly how much
training I did for that race. I hit
the pool all of six times just
to know I could physically
swim the distance (breast-
stroke the whole way). I biked
three times. Once I even did a
"brick" (that's tri-speak for
doing two of the events back to
back, like a swim and a bike or
a bike and a run).
This year was different. It
was no whim; it was an obses-
sion. Five days a week I was
either on a bike, in a pool or on
a trail or doing something
that would help me when I was
on a bike, in a pool or on a trail.
It's amazing how a three-event
race can make you so single-
minded.
Now, standing with hun-
dreds of women in matching
swim caps, just minutes before
my turn to jump in, doubt starts
creeping into my head and but-
terflies begin to replace the
peanut butter and banana
sandwich I ate before the sun
came up.
"Ten, nine, eight," the crowd
chants. "Three, two, one."
No turning back now.
Triathlons have replaced the
team sports I played in high
school and college. The train-
ing is solo, but there is cama-
raderie at the event itself. It's
motivating to hang out with
women of all ages willing to
challenge themselves with
such a demanding race. This
year, I also paid for a little
additional motivation: a per-
sonal trainer
One day I made the mistake.
of telling him I had been too
busy to do much cardio that
week. As he set up orange
cones along the basketball
court, he announced: "No rest
in between sets today." A sadis-
tic .smile broke out on his face
and he added: "Instead, you'll
sprint."
Right now, I'm doing my best
just to float Blue, yellow and
purple swim caps bob in the
water. Swimming is my weak
link I hit the pool hard this
year, swimming too many laps
to count. Tap the wall and
swim back Over and over.
My goal was to swim the half


mile mostly freestyle, but a
couple of mouthfuls of reser-
voir later I revert to a head-
above-the-water breaststroke.
When I hit land 27 minutes
later, I have a barefoot sprint
on asphalt to my bike.
Last year, I really thought it
would be fairly easy. As easy as
riding a bike, right? I couldn't
have been more wrong. I didn't
figure out how hard a triathlon
is until I was smack in the mid-
dle of it. If there was a place to
quit along the bike route, I
probably would have.
The euphoria of passing the
finish line was enough to con-
vince me that I wanted to be a
triathlete. I think part of my
motivation is that word: triath-
lete. Workouts take on a higher
purpose. I'm not just running.
I'm training.
Still wet from the swim, I
jump on my bike, and with the
first pedal strokes I know all
those miserable hours in the
gym have paid off. I' start pass-
ing people right away; last
year, I was always the passee. I
cruise through the first couple
of miles.
But as I bike to the top of the
race's most brutal hill, my
quadriceps screaming in
protest, I figure out why my
motivation had started to wahe
two weeks earlier: This is a
miserable way to spend a
Sunday.
* "Almost halfway!" race vol-
unteers cheer during the bike
ride.
Yeah. Thanks.
A few pedal strokes later and
I'm reaping the rewards of that
beautiful, beautiful hill. I let
my feet coast on the pedals for:
a while and that's all I need to
kick it up a notch. My ego takes
over for my quads, and I'm
rocking on the remaining hills.:
My sister, already done with
her race (the older folks get t6
go first), is there to ,greet me
after I get off my bike.
A quick high five, a switch of
helmet for hat, and I'm off on
the run. My calves are burning
almost from the start and:
there's a weird ache in my
right Achilles tendon, but
determination overrides the
pain.
The sun is hot by this time.
I'm out of water, but it doesn't
matter: Something clicks on
that last leg of the race.
Whether it's knowing I'm
almost done or my brain just
taking over for my body, the
run seems like the easiest part.
I cross the finish line, exhaust-
ed but euphoric.
And I know that it's three
weeks until I do it all again.
m

Megan McCloskey, 23, works
in the AP's Denver bureau.
'She has completed two
triathlons, including this
year's Danskin race in
Colorado in 2 hours,
20 minutes, 22 seconds.
McCloskey's next race is the
Tri for the Cure in suburban
Denver on Aug. 7


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicie welcomes tips from readers about breaking
news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660, and be prepared
to give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.
* To submit story ideas'for feature sections, call 563-5660.


CITRUS COUN'IY (FI.) CHRONICL.I


SPORTS


OB SUNDAYJULY 31 2 5






/-


)L L*Li


JULY 31, 2005
1:7' ~ ~~~~.. ....' "'''.... ..
"1"
.l "," ,,- ;,; ,'" i' '. y--. i.- -


Anatomy of a batterer


p .'rjp-. I
Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Big wind

followed by

a big wind
When you are looking at
a tornado, it never
really matters how
big it is.
A tornado is a tornado and
you shouldn't mess around
with it.
That's my theory in life and
I've managed to live through
more than my fair share of
these storms.
We don't get Kansas torna-
does in Florida, and Dorothy
would probably be pretty dis-
appointed. But Kansas never
swung a presidential election,
so they can have Dorothy and
her slippers.
For at least the sixth time,
I've found myself dealing with
an active tornado on the
ground. Some might say I'm a
marked man. Others might say
I deserve whatever comes my
way Some coworkers say that
big winds tend to find each
other.
But I'm developing a weath-
er persecution complex. Two
weeks ago, our vacation plans
were slowed down because
Hurricane Dennis was in the
Gulf of Mexico and I didn't
want to leave town if a storm
might hit Citrus County. When
the storm passed, we contin-
ued with our vacation plans to
a Caribbean island. About
three days into our vacation,
Hurricane Emily reared her
Please see : .*- '/Page 6C


Domestic violence statistics reveal homegroum terrorists


F. DOUGLAS STEPHENSON
Special to the Chronicle
W e are horrified by weekly reports
of domestic violence, cruelty and
death by battering against women
and children.
Not new, battering and domestic
violence have been reported for at
least the past two millennia of
Western history. Ranging from physical to psy-
chological torture and abuse, carelessness,
sheer possessiveness and sadism, battering is so
extensive and disturbing that one might believe
that loving and healthy marriage and family
relationships are the exception rather than the
rule.
Battering is physical, violent aggression with
the purpose of control, intimidation and subju-
gation. Sometimes couples have "pushing and
shoving" arguments, a type of low level vio-
lence. Serious physical injury and death are at
the higher end of the violence scale.
N. Jacobson and J. Gottman, in "When Men
Batter Women: New Insights Into Ending
Abusive Relationships," report statistics show-
ing that 50 percent of newlyweds are involved


in some level of battering. Annually, 1.6 million
wives are assaulted; 33 percent of all murdered
women are killed by husbands, ex-husbands,
boyfriends or ex-boyfriends.
With such a lengthy history, many myths
about battering have developed.
"All batterers are alike." Untrue; there are
at least two distinct types.
"Battering is not caused by substances
abuse/alcohol." Untrue; alcohol is a key indica-
tor/factor of abuse in the first year of marriage.
Some men get high to initiate battering; women
are at risk when mates use substances.
"Batterers cannot control anger." Untrue;
battering is almost always voluntary.
"Battering stops on its own." Untrue; it may
decrease over time, but it doesn't stop.
"Women provoke men into battering."
Untrue; men initiate violence in spite of what
the wife says or does.
"Women who stay in abusive relationships
are crazy." Untrue; although 38 percent of
women do leave, ones who stay do so out of fear,
lack of money and holding onto a fantasy that
their batterer will change to a loving mate.
Please see .:-' : :. .,/Page 4C


CARL STEELFOX/Chronicle graphic


Shelter works


to break cycle


of violence

STEVE ARTHUR
sarthur@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Domestic abuse is thriving in Citrus County.
Between July 2004 and June 2005, the Citrus
County Abuse Shelter Association provided bat-
tered women and their children 'the equivalent
of 2,088 days of shelter from domestic abuse, pro-
vided 4,392 counseling hours, fielded 828 hotline
calls and recorded 14,604 contacts for informa-
tion and referral to other sources of help.
Twenty percent of all the violent crimes in
Florida in 2003 were domestic violence offenses.
Statewide, 120,697 incidents were reported in
the state in 2003; 784 of them were in Citrus
County, according to the Florida Department of
Please see .; /Page 4C


Washington thoughts: Rove, Roberts and the space shuttle


he Democrats had a gence that necessarily
wonderful time with -" involves some unsavory peo-
Karl Rove about the ple. A list was published in
"leak" issue before it went one of the major newspapers
off the front page because of I .| naming covert agents and, as
the Roberts Supreme Court a result of this, our cells
nomination. He beat them in N were rolled up in foreign
2000 and 2004, and there is nations, especially in Iron
no one they would like to get Curtain countries, and many
rid of more, except the pres- people were arrested and
ident Lou Frey some executed.
I was involved in Congress OTHER In the current situation,
when there truly was a secu- VOICES the individual we are talking
rity breach regarding our about was apparently not a
overseas CIA undercover covert agent stationed over-
agents. During the Carter administra- seas but was primarily working at the
tion, the president was attempting to do CIA headquarters in Virginia. This
away with a great deal of human intelli- means that she gets in her car each day,


drives to work, shows her identifica-
tion, parks and goes to her job. She was
not in harm's way.
There is no question that the White
House has not handled this well. They
have violated the Two Frey Rules of
Politics:
1. If you have to explain, you're in
trouble.
2. Don't get in a fight with someone
who buys their ink by the truckload.
When a major player in Washington
such as a chief of staff gets in trouble, a
pattern has developed through the
years as to what happens. At first, the
administration downplays it and rallies
around the individual. If the problems
continue and more information comes


out, the administration backs away.
Take the case of Karl Rove. The pres-
ident has not given him an unqualified
endorsement and is now saying this is a
serious matter and that he cannot com-
ment on it until all the facts are in.
I just recently did my radio show, The
Florida Roundtable, with Republican
Congressman Tom Feeney, who is a
good friend of Rove's and one of the
leaders of the conservative movement
in the Congress. He echoed the presi-
dent and said that this is truly a serious
matter; that this could impact Ameri-
can intelligence around the world even
to the extent of people not wanting to
Please see VOICES/Page 6C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


How about

a nice big

handshake?
Some things aren't for
everyone. Take, for
example, "man hugs."
There was a short segment
on NBC's 'Today" a couple of
days ago about man hugs. Yeah,
the guys proved they could still
be guys with no qualms about
giving their buddies a big old
squeeze.
And that's a great thing for
them.
It could well be that I'm
socially stunted because my
father and I weren't into hug-
ging. It didn't have anything to
do with love or respect or any-
thing. It's just that we weren't
huggers. I'm comfortable with
that We shook hands a lot and
even had a secret handshake.
Now, I'm not saying that
when an old buddy I haven't
seen in a year or more visits
that there's no embrace.
Typically there is. It usually
starts with a solid handshake
that seems inadequate and
leads to an awkward little semi-
dance where we defend our
masculinity while awkwardly
achieving something that
resembles a hug. It's very brief.
I'm comfortable with that
Still, that's not my desired
greeting for someone I see
every month or two, let alone
every week or two.
In this brave new world of
man-hug-o-mania, I contend
that I'm not alone. Still, there's
cause to wonder if my
Please see SHADES/Page 6C


L_,


/


.1 1
v... *,


-'.












.|I1. ) 3 1 2 )0 04


"Governments last as long
as the under-taxed can
defenid theiselhes against
the over-taxed.
,". ,..-* :H'".--'. ti, w ~:'Q ,r' .


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDiTTORiAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ............................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................ editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ....... advertising services director
Steve Arthur ................ Chronicle columnist
.. ... M ike Arnold ...........................managing editor
Found( in 1891 Jim Hunter .......................... senior reporter
by Albert M. Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
Williamson Mike Moberley .........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

CO .C .T O CE




Local tax




rates should




be reduced


he total assessed value of
property in Citrus County
has increased dramatical-
ly in 2005.
That has significant meaning
to every individual who owns
property and pays taxes in this
county. What it should mean is
that the tax rate levied by every
branch of local government'
should go down.
But if you're not careful, that
won't happen.
As Chronicle senior writer Jim
Hunter has pointed out in recent
articles, there has been a dra-
matic increase in
property sales and THE I
the cost of property THE I!
in our county. Higher F
The increased values mr
volume and cost of tax d(
those sales has
resulted in a wind- OUR 01
fall of new revenue Governmei
for every branch of reduce the
local government.
Some of that new
revenue in the form of new
homes comes with costs asso-
ciated. New homes bring new
residents who want new services
- and that costs money.
But much of the new value of
lands and new tax dollars -
come through the increased
value of vacant land. And since
no one lives on that vacant land,
there is no associated demand
for new services.
That's found money for local
government.
During the next two months,
every branch of local govern-
ment will finalize budgets for the
next fiscal year. Many millions of
new dollars will be generated
even if the existing tax rate is
held steady.
It's important for citizens not
to be fooled by politicians who
tell you they are holding your
taxes flat because they are not
raising the tax rate. If county
government holds the tax rate
flat, they will get $14 million
more dollars in 2005-06.
There is nothing flat about
that.
There are many reasons why
local government needs to spend
more money. Our schoolteachers
need higher pay and new
schools are needed to house


additional students. The sher-
iff's office needs a new emer-
gency operations center, and
growth brings demands for new
deputies. Our infrastructure -
sewers and water are terribly
outdated and in need of an infu-
sion of spending.
But not that much spending in
one year.
And remember, in this same
year where government is get-
ting all this new money, the
county commission already has
adopted an additional 6 cents on
the gas tax. That increase will


ISSUE:
property
ean more
dollars.

PINION:
ent should
e tax rate.


take effect Jan. 1,
2006.
Taxpayers should
challenge every
branch of local gov-
ernment to lower
their tax rate. The
level does not need
to go back to the
rollback rate the
rate that would
raise the same


amount of cash as 2005 but it
does need to be reduced.
The increased valuation of
property is going to have dra-
matic changes on our communi-
ty, and not all of them will be
good. It will be more difficult for
low-income and young families
to afford a home. It will be
tougher for new retirees to pay
steep property taxes. And it will
create an inequity in the amount
of taxes that homeowners pay.
Because the Save Our Homes
amendment limits the property
value increase on someone's
homestead to 3 percent a year,
new residents will end up paying
much higher taxes than existing
residents. The end result will be
that if two families live in Citrus
Hills with the exact same home,
one might pay $2,500 in property
taxes while the homeowner
around the corner will pay
$5,000. The gap will continue to
grow as the years go on.
There will be plenty of new
dollars for government in
2005/06. But let's all remember,
it's our money.
Local government needs to be
wise in the way those dollars are
spent. Government can send the
proper message by decreasing
individual tax rates.


Family activity
I read where the county
commission is going to
cut the family park on S
State Road 44. Why
don't they pay attention
to families with kids? We
need things to do. And
by the way, we are the
ores that will pay most
of your gas tax. You peo-
p!l are something,
Sleeping dogs
This"Iisin regard to CALL
Wednesdys,,article
about the BarCQentral 563
Park for dogs. That's.a
little bit too ridiculoi)sIJ
think our children need< hore parks
than dogs do. Dogs don't unrier-


-I


stand. They pee, poop and sleep -
what else do you want? Now we
need a park? That's a
^ waste of taxpayers'
money and I think it's
ridiculous. They ought to
build another park for
these children. Kids do
Enjoy stuff like this.

Children's project
Since the commission-
ers killed the project
with Mike Hampton, now
they want to kill the
water park. Why don't
0 5 U they care about giving
the kids of this county
something to do?
Anything but hang out in parking
lots.


Collecting wisdom from the past


( A n essential part of
knowing who we
A k are is understand- P'
ing where we came from,"
says Sen. Mary Landrieu, .
who comes from a family of
dedicated public servants.
The Louisiana Democrat
has introduced legislation '
aimed at helping African- *-
Americans uncover their Cokie an
particularly hard-to-trace V. Ro
family histories, but her OT-
statement is meant for all of ,..-7.,.
us. To understand where we -
came from we need records,
which could be hard for future genera-
tions to come by in this electronic age.
As we've each traveled the country
talking about books we've written draw-
ing on old letters, we've been surprised
at how many people ask the question,
"How will our kids and grandkids know
anything about our past without family
letters?" It's a good question, one that
deserves some attention.
When Steve was preparing to write
his recently published memoir, "My
Fathers' Houses" (William Morrow,
2005), he asked his mother if she had
anything that. might be useful to him.
"Oh, yes', Steven, I do," she replied.
Much to his amazement, she then pro-
duced bundles of carefully kept letters
from her courtship with his dad. They
met on her 17th birthday and lived only
one block away from each other in
Bayonne, N.J., but they corresponded
regularly for four years.
The letters not only open wonderful
windows into Steve's parents' young
lives, they also vividly bring to life the
struggles of the Depression and reveal
an important slice of American history,
not just the history of one American
family As he was piecing together that
history, Steve also had the benefit of
memory of hearing stories told by his


a, grandfather, who immigrat-
ed to this country. Some of
these tales were recorded by
S. cousins who had the fore-
s~sight to preserve them on
tape.
Cokie's challenge in
"Founding Mothers" (Wil-
liam Morrow, 2004) un-
earthing the stories of the
d Steven women who influenced the
berts Founding Fathers was a
? tougher one. Some of the
-,- women, like Martha Wash-
ington, had destroyed their
correspondence. Families of
other women failed to save their fore-
mothers' words, thinking them unim-
portant.
Even where letters of Revolutionary-
era women have been preserved, they
are often inaccessible tossed in dusty
boxes in historical societies, unread
and untranscribed. These treasures are
thus moldering away, depriving us of
half of our history. Fortunately, like
Steve's cousins, some of the 19th-centu-
ry descendants of these remarkable
women understood the contribution of
their ancestors and put together histo-
ries based on the spoken word as well
as the written one.
Now an exciting project called
StoryCorps has started collecting the
spoken word in a systematic fashion.
Taking his inspiration from the Work
Projects Administration oral history
project, radio producer David Isay has
set up recording booths in New York
City at Grand Central Station and, just
recently, at the World Trade Center site.
In those mini-recording studios and in
Airstream trailers carrying a couple of
mobile booths around the country, peo-
ple are lining up to interview family
members about their lives. A
StoryCorps "facilitator" helps guide the
interviewer through a 40-minute ses-


sion and provides the participants with
a CD of the conversation. A second CD
goes, if the family permits, to the
Library of Congress. Some stories are
also broadcast on National Public
Radio.
Isay told us in an interview that.he is
struck, in listening to the stories of so
many diverse Americans, that "so much
more binds us than divides us." That's
what studying our history is all about -
finding the things that bind us. As Steve
talks about his Russian-Jewish immi-
grant grandparents, he finds people of
all ethnicities nodding their heads, rec-
ognizing a family story told to them with
an Italian or Spanish or Vietnamese
accent instead of a Yiddish one. ,
And he finds, to his delight, people
asking, "What can I do? How canI tell
my own family, story?" There are sever-
al answers: print out important e-mails
from family members and save them;
talk to elderly relatives and record
their memories; and preserve those old
letters and photos that are in the base-
ment
Verifying family histories often
requires written records. That's why
Mary Landrieu is right to work on
making it easier for African-
Americans, most of whom were: not
listed in the.census records before the
abolition of slavery, to track down
their ancestors. "The first step to
building a better future for" all
Americans is for us to learn from our
past." That doesn't just mean the
grand events of government. It means
the everyday trials and triumphs of us
all. As David Isay says of StoryCorps,
"We're collecting more than history,
we're collecting wisdom."

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by e-mail at
stevecokie@gmail.com.


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LETTERS


Special case
Now, let me see if I have this
straight There is a city code in Crystal
River that states that grass growing on
landscaped or mowed lots may not
exceed 22 inches. A code enforcement
officer was doing his job and sent
notices to the Crystal River mayor and
11 other people to tell them that their
lawns were too high.
The mayor was given until June 29
to correct the violation. The mayor,
who had been on vacation for a month,
came home and mowed his lawn
before opening his mail and learning
about the notice. Although the mayor
was guilty of breaking the city code, he
believes that the code enforcement
officer was wrong because "there was
probably a better use of the inspector's
time than to check overgrown lots in a
season of heavy rain."
I guess a better use of the inspec-
tor's time would be to check whose
house is being notified of code viola-
tion. If it isn't the mayor or other gov-
ernment official or some other elected
official of the City of Crystal River, it is
fair to send a notice of code violation. I
didn't realize that the position of
mayor means that this was a position
of selective code enforcement Thanks
for setting me straight, Mr. Mayor.
Kathy Dobronyi
Inverness

Healthy decisions
After reading Choosing Health, the
school board made the correct choice
(Chronicle, July 22). Why did it take
you so long to act? Why was the trans-
portation budget put before the chil-
dren's health and well-being once obe-
sity was linked to junk food?
I recognize that it is never too late to


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chro
trials are the opinions of the
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political
toons, columns or letters do no
sarily represent the opinion of
rial board.
Groups or individuals are invite
express their opinions in a letter
editor.
M Persons wishing to address the
board, which meets weekly, sho
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-56
All letters must be signed and
phone number and hometown,
letters sent via e-mail. Names
hometowns will be printed; phc
bers will not be published or gi
We reserve the right to edit lett
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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mail to letters@chronicleonlino

right a wrong and that we shoi
thankful our school board has
corrective action now. Protect
children from the influence of
food promotions and bad eatiq
by not selling junk food in our
was the right thing to do.
For years, the medical estab
has warned junk food was the
all obesity evil. However, waiti
long to correct it is like cutting
after a hanging to save someone
money becomes more importa
the health and well-being of ou
dren, something is very wrong
those making such decisions si
held accountable. I do hope ou
board has learned from past mi
and we are witnessing the begin
a new outlook from school offi
I have not been one of the Sa
"Sam" Himmel supporters. I ai


to the Editor
however, who gives credit where credit
Sis due. Himmel deserves to be acknowl-
nicle edi- edged for taking action to correct a bad
editorial policy made by her long-gone predeces-
car- sors. Sam, if removing junk food from
it neces- our schools would have been your idea,
the edito- you may have won my support, but it
d to was not you. Pat Deutschman put the
ar to the children first Deutschman is the per-
son whom we should be congratulating.
editorial You are an outstanding school board
would call
c60. member in my eyes.
include a Lack of exercise and sitting in front
including of the television for more than an hour
and
ane num- a day should be placed ih the same
ven out. category as junk foods. Maybe oun-,
ers for school board could vote on a program
taste, to re-educate the parents about how to
350 make better health decisions for their
ed to children at home. After all, most par-
1624 N. ents of school-aged children were edu-
er, FL cated under the influence of junk '
80; or e- foods sold by our school system when
e.com. they were attending school.

uld be Paul Hertensen
taken Hernando
ing our
junk Out of order
nig habits Yesterday's (July 17) letter by ao
schools obvious left-wing basher gave me a
laugh. Edward Klein's book has b en
lishment downplayed and even bashed by his
root of own right-wing compatriots. He not
ng this only misspells names, but, by taking
the rope events out of chronological order cre-
ie. When ates lies. He is an embarrassment to
nt than himself and his book when he tries to
ar chil- defend it in an interview. If you wish
and to view this interview and have a'
should be semi-modern computer, go to sun-
ir school dancechannel.com/al. You will know
mistakes, the meaning of propaganda after ,
inning of viewing and listening to the video.:
cials.
andra Frederick He4ker
n one, Yankeethwn


I I


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~ c-I---



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c~3 ~ / Af'3'~P


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to.30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


- *.. --I -


* /.------...


-- --


=- Hot Corner: PARKS


Scaglecartoons.com


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CITRUS CouN'i (FL) CHRONICLI SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 3C



Decades later, he's still my good brother William


W ell, tomorrow is it. the one I refer.to in my writ-
If this column is \ ings as my "good brother
published on William."
schedule, today is July 31, There's a reason for his
tomorrow will be Aug. 1 ' title.
and it will be my 60th birth- I have no experience
day. I remember when I .- dealing with younger sib-
thought 60 was old; shoot, I lings, but by watching our
remember when I thought children, and now, their
30 was ancient, children, I've witnessed
' During these past six Fred Brannen just how much aggravation
decades, there's been but A SLICE OF little ones can be for their
one pelrs6i who's always ::.-E older brothers or sisters.
been a part of my life, only Obviously, what I did to my
one who was there when I brother, from breaking his
came into the world and is still toys to hitting him.on the head with a
around today, my brother. He was 3, hammer, caused him pain and frus-
going on 4, when I was born, and he's tration.


One day, in the midst of this frustra-
tion, he wrote a note to me. It was
written on the inside of my electric
train box.
I still have the train, the box and the
note, which reads, "Dear Fred Jr., You
are a very bad little boy Your good
brother, William."
The title stuck, and he remains my
"good brother William."
Being William's little brother
brought status. The bigger kids toler-
ated me. The little league coach kept
me on the team even though I had no
talent, continuing to hope one day I'd
develop into a player as good as my
brother. It didn't happen.
Having a big brother made me feel


safe, and even now, once in a while, it
still does.
As I mentioned in a recent column,
I bought a generator, something I had
no idea how to use. A few days after
buying it, during a telephone conver-
sation, I told my brother.
Trying to soft pedal the panic in his
voice, he inquired, "Do you know
what to do with it?"
I replied, "No, but I have an owner's
manual."
With no further thought about spar-
ing my ego, he blurted out, "A genera-
tor can kill you. I'll be over to set it up
and show you how to use it."
Based on his experiences and mine,
that was the right decision. He knows


about such things, I don't.
He set up my generator, taught me
how to use it and saw to it that instruc-
tions were written and posted in the
garage, right next to the main electri-
cal switch box, so anyone who might
use the generator would know pre-
cisely what to do and what not to do.
When I was born, the very minute I
first saw the light of day, he was there,
he was my big brother. He was 3, going
on 4. I'm now 60. He's 63, going on 64.
He's still my big brother, he's still my
good brother, William.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle columnist


-* Letters to the


Iraq's hatred
June Quick (July 4) does not
have it right. Let me answer
the few begging questions: I am
a true conservative. I do not
subscribe to the values and
beliefs of the former
Trotskyites who have taken
over the Republican Party
It's simply incredible how
some people still mulishly
clingto the belief that Iraq had
'anything to do with Sept 11,
2001, attack on the United
States, or had plans to go after
-"Americans. It's even more
amazing that these same peo-
ple completely overlook the
real reason why many Iraqis
hate us: Through three admin-
istrations, the United States
Shas bombed Iraq, starved its
children and murdered many
thousands of innocent people.
They'd rather blame it on the
.Democrats and-us.
Dennis Morris
Beverly Hills

Veterans' care
Editor's note: The following
letter to legislators is pub-
lished at the writer's request
On June 30, the House
Committee on Veterans' Affairs
-approved for House action the
- Veterans' Compensation Cost-
-of-Living Adjustment Act of
2005.
I urge your support of this
legislation.
H.R. 1220 provides, effective
Dec. 1, 2005, a cost-of-living
adjustment to the rates of dis-
ability compensation for (1) vet-
erans with service-connected
disabilities and (2) the rates of
dependency and indemnity
compensation paid to certain
spouses and dependent chil-
dren of service-disabled veter-
-ans. H.R. 1220 requires future
.: increases to be the same per-
f centage as the increase in ben-
efits provided under title II
(Old Age, Survivors and
Disability Insurance) of the
Social Security Act, on the
same effective date.
SThe approved bill includes
,'provisions derived from two
-bills below, as well as an
amendment:
H.R. 2988, the Veterans -
Medical Care Revenue
Enhancement Act of 2005,
which would authorize a two
_. year demonstration project to
improve business practices
within the Veterans Health
.Administration (VHA) relating
,to third-party billing collec-
tions.
H.R. 2959, which would pro-
vide for the establishment of
Parkinson's Disease Research
Education and Clinical Centers
in the Veterans Health Admin-
istration of the Department of
.Veterans Affairs.
An amendment to provide a
cost-of-living adjustment in fis-
'cal year 2006 to the additional
Payment of $250 per month
provided for the first two years


of DIC eligibility to surviving
spouses with minor children.
H.R. 1220 was placed on the
Union Calendar as item No. 98
and House action is expected
following the fourth of July
break
Please advise me of your
intentions.
James Black
Inverness

Sources of water
With all this hullabaloo -
about water problems in Citrus
County, I have been wondering
about a few things.
Where are we going to get all
the water necessary to supply
the astounding growth rate in
Citrus and surrounding coun-
ties?
Let's face it, more people
means more problems. Some
would be water usage, always a
problem, Street, traffic and
traffic light problems will have
to be dealt with. Look at the
mess we just put up with on
County Road 491 and that's
only a small part of the prob-
lem. State Road 41 is going to
be another one.
With the population explo-
sion, we will have school prob-
lems, bussing for the children,
again causing traffic problems.
Are the commissioners Ulp to
this huge task? I don't know,
but they had better start think-
ing about the planning and the
logistics of supplying these
needs right now, not tomorrow.
(Tomorrow never comes.)
As an ex-fireman, I know
how that water is necessary to
extinguish large fires. They
could be brush, condominiums,
duplexes, garden apartments
and of course "super duper"
shopping malls and factories. I
hope that all new, large con-
struction projects require
mandatory sprinklers and an
adequate water supply. I see
we are in the process of put-
ting in large pipes on Elkcam
Boulevard. What are they for?
Are they water supply or sewer
and drainage pipes?
If they are for water and fire
suppression, are they adequate
for all the new construction?
How are they cross-connected
to insure a continuous water
supply? Water main breaks are
not uncommon anywhere.
What procedures are or will be
taken in the event of a large
fire when water is needed
most Normal usage doesn't go
down while a fire rages.
Firemen and civilians have
been killed because of a drop
in pressure or no pressure at
all because of huge demands
on the water supply
Stopping dripping faucets
and illegal use of sprinklers if
corrected won't make a dent in
this problem. What we really
need is a well-thought-out solu-
tion to an ever-increasing prob-
lem.
Don Canham
Citrus Springs


Sound .- F


Enough already
This is in response to the gentleman on
TV from Channel 16 the other night in
regards to the tax money and who to help.
All we read in the papers nowadays is all
about taxing, how much more they can tax
people. Personally, I'm one that's a small-
business owner, plus own several homes in
the area. I will be the first one to sell my
business and my homes and move out of
Citrus County if they go ahead and raise
any more taxes. I'm born and raised here.
I think we've been taxed enough. If you
live on the water, you pay double; if you
own a business, you pay triple. There
should be some kind of cap on how much
you're going to keep taxing business peo-
ple and small.business people and individ-
uals. Property taxes have gone sky high.
Why don't you give some of the money
back to the people that are paying the
highest amount of tax brackets? Whoever's
paying the most taxes gets to have some
type of a rebate. Never mind this home- .
stead exemption for these older people,
the senior citizens. Start giving back to the
people that pay the most of it. Think that
would be a terrific idea. Love to see it in
the Chronicle. .
Don't mix meds
I have to laugh at these pharmacists.
They tell you to stick to one drugstore so
they know about any medicines that you're
already taking. What a joke. You pick up
your new prescription and take it home to
take as ordered. Before taking your first
dose, you read the paperwork that comes
with this new prescription. So what does
this information sheet tell you? It tells you
not to combine this medication with cer-
tain other medicines. One of these medi-
cines that you're not supposed to combine
with this newer one with is a medicine that


this pharmacist has been giving you for the
past three years, and yet he doesn't even
realize that you're not supposed to take
one if you're taking another. Fortunately I
read all this literature, but not everybody
else does. Many people just take a new
prescription home and start popping the
pills without any concern about side effects
if you're on something else. These pharma-
cists should recognize ... and warn you
that these two medicines can't be com-
bined, but they have no idea they shouldn't
go together. A big help they are.

Turtle tragedy
Several days ago, my daughters and I
were returning to Floral City from Inver-
ness. Suddenly the daughter who was driv-
ing saw a large turtle lumbering across the
highway ahead of us. Being a compassion-
ate creature lover, she took pains to avoid
hitting it. The turtle's slow progress made
this fairly easy. She watched in her rear-
view mirror to see its progress, fearful that
another car would hit it. She turned
around and drove back to rescue it by
movirig it off the highway. When she went
to pick it up, she cried out when she saw it
had indeed been hit and its shell crushed,
but it was still alive. She gently removed it
to the side of the road, but could not bear
to leave it in the hot sun to die. We
brought it home, watched it struggling to
breathe ... One daughter called our vet to
see if they could euthanize it. It was obvi-
ously mortally wounded. The nearest place
that would take the turtle was in Hom-
osassa too far and too late, we knew.
My daughters brought the turtle into the
garage and watched it as its life ebbed
away. Then they took it and sent it to a
watery grave in the lake behind my house.
The point here is: If my daughter could
avoid hitting this poor creature, why could


not the driver of the car who killed it?...

Elderly deceived
Can anyone recommend help for an eld-
erly woman who has been deceived: by a
water conditioner company? Several con-
tacts have been made to the company by
phone and a certified letter requesting
that they honor their written agreement to
remove the unit if it doesn't fix her water
problem. The first unit was supposed to fix
her water problem. Then they told her she
needed another unit to make it work, and
it doesn't. Won't call her back or come
and get the unit at her request. Water
causes black stains on fixtures, yellow
clothes and a lot of stress. A lot of con-
tacts have been made to the Better Bus-
iness Bureau, TV station help lines and so
forth. This elderly woman has been de-
ceived and her money took on the first
unit, and now they're trying to get her
again. Can anyone help her? She is a
Citrus County resident.
Front-line trouble
I'm calling in response to the individual
who wrote about "Protect borders," in the
Monday, July 25, Sound Off. I am all for
that ... I did several reports on this in col-
lege this past year. The problem is not just
not having enough people protecting our
borders; the problem is upper manage-
ment in INS, immigration and the
Homeland Security. They need to get down
to the front and speak to the people in the
front lines and see what'the problems are
because upper management is not cooper-
ating or speaking with the lower levels ... I
had a big report about how the people
from Mexico are coming through the dirti-
est river and bringing malaria. It's just
, unbelievable. It's more than 8,000 a day
that come in over our borders ..


NEW GASOLINE FUEL GAUGE FOR CARS





4C SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 ___________________________________________________________


Leaner labor could set the stage for new strategic,


DOUGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
Special to the Chronicle

It's about time that a handful
of revolutionaries within the
labor movement rose up and
challenged the leadership.
After a string of defeats at the
ballot box, it had become obvi-
ous that Big- Labor is more
tired and out of touch than it
ever has been, losing ground
and members with each suc-
cessive election.
A clue to how bad things are
is that John Sweeney, 71, presi-
dent of the AFL-CIO, traveled
to Chicago for the union's 50th
anniversary celebration with-
out really believing that at least
two giant unions, a quarter of
his membership, were ready to
break away. The union move-
ment under Sweeney's leader-


ship had grown "pale, male
and stale," say the dissidents
who represent a work force
that is increasingly more
female, people of color, and
younger than the factory and
assembly-line workers who
formed the bulk of union work-
ers back in the movement's
heyday.
Today only 8 percent of work-
ers in the private sector belong
to a union, compared to 35 per-
cent in the 1950s. Since then,
everything has changed.
Globalization has taken hold,
and the paternalistic bond
between corporations and
workers has fallen prey to the
need to downsize and maxi-
mize profits. Workers have
seen- their quality of life
decline while having little'
recourse to fight the trends
engulfing them. Mega compa-


nies like Wal-Mart are impervi-
ous to unions, a development
that the leader of the break-
away coalition, Andrew Stern,
54, president of the Service
Employees International
Union, vows to change.
Stern was ..once Sweeney's
protege, and their battle is as
much a clash of generations
and personalities as it is a dis-
pute over tactics. Stern is impa-
tient, a revolutionary by
nature, where Sweeney has
settled into the role of elder
statesman, more comfortable
explaining labor's losses than
challenging himself to change.
The core of their disagreement
is over resources and whether
they're better spent trying to
win political campaigns, which


Sweeney favors, or devoted to
large-scale organizing efforts,
which Stern is pushing as the
representative of service work-
ers such as janitors and nurs-
ing home aides, a rapidly grow-
ing and often exploited part of
the work force.
The break-up -comes -at a
time when many Americans
need to be reminded of the
value of unions in a democratic
system. A good place to look
historically is the memoran-
dum drafted by General
Douglas MacArthur after the
Japanese surrender in World
War II that outlined the condi-
tions for the country's democ-
ratization. First was voting
rights for women; second was
"the encouragement of the


Other VOICES


unionization of labor," which
MacArthur saw as an essential
building block for a stable civil
society. If MacArthur, no bleed-
ing-heart liberal, could stand
up so strongly for unions, sure-
ly today's workers deserve bet-
ter representation than they've
gotten in recent years.
One of the problems labor
unions face in making their
case to the broader public is
that they take in dues money
and spend it on political activi-
ties not all their members sup-
port They've managed to resist
government regulation, but
their focus on lobbying has
come at the expense of organiz-
ing, a lapse that Stern and his
fellow dissidents in the Change
to Win coalition hope to
redress.
The AFL-CIO had until this
week 56 unions and 13 million


Sound OFF


Misguided mail
I live on Gospel Island Road in Inver-
ness and I'm curious if anyone else is
experiencing horrible mail service. I.went
to the post office and complained, only'
to have the mail situation get worse. I
now do not get my utility bills after com-
plaining, and contracts had had to be
mailed three times before I finally re-
ceived them. I'm still waiting a week later
for someone to call me back from the po;
office since the last time I complained. I
do, however, get mail for other people tha
aren't even addressed to Gospel Island
Road. Just wondering.
Send copies
This is in response to Bob Hermanson';
letter of July 24 in the Sunday edition
of the Chronicle. Hooray for you, sir. You.
have done us a great service.-The great-
er service that you could do now would
be to send a copy of your letter to every
newspaper that you can possibly think
of, including the leftist Washington Post
and the New York Times. Thank you, sir,
thank you.

Flip-flop fashion
I'm calling in regards to Leonard Pitts'
article in the July 25 edition, titled
"Baring your'sole'for fashion. Oh-my
goodness, somebody actually hit it on
the nose. I was so appalled when I read'
about Northwestern University girls
. going to. the White House with flip-flops.


SNow I'd like to-know who their parents
are. Don't you think the parents should
have told them; "You know, you're go-
ing to the White House the man in
-charge of this.country and it should
be like a black-tie affair, not flip-flops and
shorts"?

Code enforcement
I'm calling Sound Off regarding code
st enforcement in Citrus County. I had called
for my neighbor last week regarding the
t very, very high grass at an abandoned
house in Citrus Springs. When I called the
code enforcement, they told me that
there's no such thing as code enforcement
until the end of October and that there
s was nothing that Citrus County could do -
about it. Could somebody tell me, is this
true?
Running scared..
Mr. Brennan: Pertaining to your article,
your editorial and your reporter's article,. I
don't see where it was newsworthy at all.
You'll have to forgive-me because I'm an
old man. But all you did was stir up these
.. close-minded.people in the county just a
little bit more. I happen to know the man
personally that you were writing about. He
bleeds, he lives, he breathes the same as
you do. He runs scared ever since (John)
Couey's little'escapade. He has had to..
move twice. The first time he had to move,
they-threatened to burn him out and him
asleep. Now you tell me what goes with.
. that..


Real estate tax
Just inquiring about something I read ii
your paper a couple of days ago regard-
ing the windfall real estate taxes here in
Citrus County and they're trying to figure
out what to do with the excess money.
The question that I have is regarding the
real estate taxes for senior citizens in the
county. I notice that several surrounding
counties in fact several counties in the
state of Florida have a somewhat, I
think it's a freeze on real estate taxes for-
people 65 and older, yet in Citrus County
we don't have such a thing. I wonder if
it's possible if you have any information
on that, if you could share that with us..It
would be, I believe, not only in the
upscale communities where the taxes are
rising so quickly, but throughout the
entire county. It would be great if seniors
could get just a little bit of a break on the
real estate taxes.
Editor's note: The county commission
voted against it earlier this year. The
Chronicle published several stories and edito
rials on it urging the commissioners to
approve it, but they didn't.

Woman builder
First of all, I want to thank everybody
who has contributed to helping.me with
my trailer problem, but I just think it's
really funny that everybody assumed that
was a man. I'm definitely not a manand I
just wanted to point out that, you know,
ladies do have trailers, too. .


.--..-- Letters to the


ASTROfMNAG1T


logically crafted book, or in
attempting to force a
child/adolescent to define rea-
sons for behavior, but rather in
parental insight.
If parents really want to un-
derstand.their children, they
may first simply begin with
earnestly seeking to under-
stand themselves! Then move
on to the creative exploration
of the myriads of other psycho-
dynamic forces that have con-
ditioned family behavior
William Young
Crystal River

Aim the blame
I get a kick out of our every
week letter writers (who
blame everyone but the right
ones for everything).
A good example is blaming
(Sheriff Jeff) Dawsy for not
finding the little girl who was
across the street from her own
home, and the D.A for not
keeping the owners of that
home locked up.
Well, I feel it's a shame the
deputies didn't knock the door
down. Butif they did, they
would probably lose their job,
and Dawsy would have lost his.
The blame goes on our legal
system. That man, from what
I've read, was in jai412 times,
so the blame should go against
the prison officials, and the
parole board. Ifthestate.
prison sy lei n :1ai'it aff'id.to
feed these maniacs, then send
them to G.W Bush ranch in
Texas. He is spending enough
feeding maniacs in Iraq, to
feed our maniacs here in our
prisons.
We have an administration
that is feeding the good and
the bad in Iraq. On top of that
we are losing too many of our
troops, close to 2,000 killed
and thousands more crippled
for life. Young kids, from- 18 to
grandfathers, and yes, even
grandmothers.
., One young lady on TV along
\ with a dozen others, all re-
serves, all but one were offi-
cers. One lady, an officer, Na-
tional Guard or Reserve, who
served her time was called
back, she has three children.
.This is ridiculous to take peo-
ple like that.
Yet we have a president who
didn't have the guts to go himi
self during Vietnam.
Art Clark
Citrus Springs


BATTERED
Continued from Page 1C

"Women could stop the battering
by changing their behavior." Untrue;
battering is not related to women's
behavior.
Two types of batterers have been
profiled.
. Type 1 batterers are more severely
violent. They will suppress their
wives' expressions of anger, and wives
can be very fearful. Their behavior
can produce significant sadness in
other family members.
Having severe antisocial, criminal-
like traits, they are highly sadistic,
aggressive and more violent toward
others. They are not emotionally
dependent, and encourage wives to
be independent
Hedonistic and impulsive, they feel
no feelings or remorse for their
'behavior Possessing no conscience,
they are often withdrawn and make
only superficial commitments. With
no fear of wife abandonment they
have chaotic family histories and
often abuse drugs and alcohol. They
realize that they are in control and
make no demands when left alone.
Type 1 batterers are always in con-
trol, can be persuasive con artists and
often suffer from various mental ill-
nesses. Violence is more severe, and


they commit more emotional abuse of "Type. 1, they, commit Jess. emotional
wives and children. Their own child- abuse. They seem more honest about
hoods were traumatic,- with very vio- themselves, and frequently see them-
lent mothers and chaotic family back- selves as a victim. Wives of Type 2's
grounds. demand more from them, with hus-
Marriage for Type 1 is more stable bands withdrawing more. Wives are
because of the wife's extreme fear. more overtly angry and less fearful.
Eighty percent of Wives do feel more
Type 1 wives are nor- trapped, however,
mal on personality, Violence will end and more controlled
scales. These wives and less free to make'
are themselves often When the battered life decisions. In turn,
victims of traumatic wives' sense of
family backgrounds reestablishes entrapment and vio-
with physical and lence generates ex-
sexual abuse. his control. treme anger that can
Type 2 batterers become explosive,
experience, anger The woman can thereby putting them-
more slowly, and see selves at increased
betrayal in the behav- n Vrisk of harm. Type 2
ior of their wives. battered when husbands express
Emo .nally depend- contempt for women
ent and insecure, the man is not but are dependent on
they fear abandon- them. Alcohol abuse
ment and thus mar- present. increases, and in-
riage is very unstable. creasing criticism is
Jealous rages and 'most often a systemat-
violence are confined to family mem- ic attack on the wife's sense of reality.
bers. Because their own fathers bat-. Why do wives of batterers stay in
tered their mothers, more than 51 these toxic relationships? Most of
percent of Type 2's are socialized that these wives seem to view their hus-
battering women is acceptable. bands as "damaged boys" who need
Motivated by fear of separation, they their support, love and care until they
deprive wives of independence. Often can heal and become great husbands.
they seem unaware that they are in, This dream and fantasy is highly dan-
control. gerous and accounts for much repeat-
Vulnerable women are especially ed physical and emotional harm.
attractive to them, and compared to While waiting for this dream/fanta-


sy to become reality, dangerous stages
of violence; can unfold. Violence
becomes unpredictable and uncon-
trolled by battered women. Once a
violent episode begins, the wife can-
not change the course of the episode.
Although the wife may try to inject
normalcy into the relationship, bat-
terers are unwilling to accept her
influence.
-Because of the "dream" of a normal
life, the wife treats the batterer as
normal and able to be reasoned with.
Because none of this is effective or
realistic, she remains in a constant
state of conflicting emotions, respond-
ing with a mix of anger and fear. The
wife is assaulted and degraded before
and during physical beatings.
Both women and men can be equal-
ly angry in violent incidents, where
the batterer is usually "in the face" of
the women. Violence will end when
the batterer reestablishes his control.
The woman can. now even feel bat-
tered when the man is not present
The batterer creates,' in the end, a
total mind control of the woman, who
often believes that she is insane.

F. Douglas Stephenson is a
psychotherapist with a private
practice in Citrus County since 1990.
He is a graduate of the University of
Chicago and was a faculty member
in the Department of Psychiatry
at the University of Florida:


SHELTER
Continued from Page 1C

Law Enforcement
To our credit, Florida has led the
nation in legislative efforts to reduce
domestic violence, and victims are
coming forward in record numbers to
seek help, according to Department
of Children & Families reports.
In fiscal year 2003-04, Florida's
domestic violence centers, including
CASA, responded to 131,321 crisis
calls, provided counseling services to
188,972 individuals and provided
emergency shelter to 14,537 individu-
als, according to DCF reports.
More than half the populations of
emergency shelter programs are chil-
dren and mothers who left their
homes, schools and neighborhoods
behind. .
CASA a 22-year-old private, non-
profit organization in Citrus County
that assists victims of domestic vio-
lence through support and education
efforts recently was awarded an
$883,199 grant from DCE
CASA Executive Director Diana
McIntosh says the money will be used
to build a new shelter facility and out-
reach offices to meet growing
demand. For the past three years, the
CASA shelter has increased capaitv
by 1,000 days each year; and last yc;r
CASA was over its capacity by 52 days.


members, a sprawling confed-
eration that because of its size
and diversity had to make lots
of compromises before it could
take action.
By striking out on their own
to create a smaller, more
focused and harder-charging
union, Stern and the others
may have found a formula that
can work in the modern world.
Instead of a lumbering army
hard to move a harder to
change, the breaI~vay group
offers at least the possibility f('
a fast-acting strike force in a
new world where mobility and
agility count more than loyalty.


. Douglas Cohn and Eleanor
Clift author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column,
founded in 1932 by Drew
Pearson.


CI'rIn7S COUNTY (FL) CtnO/cw (


Understand children
"I don't understand why my
children act'the way they do,"
is a statement often made by
parents.
A three-year psychoanalytic
research in New Orleans with
graduate students indicated
that 85 percent in several
experimental groups felt they
had behavioral patterns like a
parent
Most well-trained psy-
'chotherapists like to begin
their initial sessions with a
client by attempting to get ver-
biage in regards to what was
happening in their lives when
they developed a problem.
Then, the counselor will
move on to understanding the
client's relationship to their
parents, and the behavior pat-
terns of their grandparents.
A typical example of par-
ent/child "copy cat" behavior
is found in migraine
headaches. Often, when a per-.
son has migraines, so did one
parent Migraines, like all
physical and emotional diffi-
culties, can be used to manipu-
- late the interpersonal environ-
ment
Another example of
parent/child commonality
n might be a common taste in
clothes, food and in verbal and
non-verbal communication.
Most individuals like to be
comfortable and secure, and
they often find this security in
emulating family patterns of
activity, even when parental
upbringing is quite negative
(often called "Security in
Insecurity").
A typical example of this
insecurity life pattern manifes-
tation is the child abuser. If a
father beats a child, often
when the child becomes an
adult, he may beat his chil-
dren, and when they grow up,
they become abusers.
However, it must be noted,
that individuals often rebel
against parents' behavior and
react in an opposite pattern;
for example, a child of an alco-
holic parent might be a rigid
teetotaler.
Almost every psychodynam-
ic of a person's personality
may be conditioned by their
family during their developing
years.
I The key to understanding_
behavior may be not only
found in some psychiatric,
sociological theorem, psycho,-







Cwus CouNT (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 5C



Florida Governmental Utility Authority and the public interest


Ron Ze.i SHEETS
Special to the Chronicle

ight now, a number of people in
the Citrus Springs and Pine
Ridge areas are angry with the
Florida Governmental Utility
Authority (FGUA). The Authority and
its representatives have been accused
of arrogance and much worse. We have
always enjoyed a good relationship
with Citrus County government and
with our customers. We strive to pro-
vide service and value and, to the
extent that we've caused frustration,
we are truly very sorry.
We could have done a better job
communicating with the public con-
cerning the need for the assessment
program we have prepared for the
FGUAs Citrus Utility System. As we
move forward, we promise to do better.
Clear, timely, two-way communication
will frame the public discussion about
what's needed and how that need can
and should be met to serve the public
interest
The FGUA is a government body that
was formed for two main purposes: 1)
to buy private water companies and
put them into public management;
and, 2) to be a tool for other local gov-


ernments in extending critical water
and sewer infrastructure in a cost-
effective manner. That is, we exist as a
government management tool to own,
operate, improve and manage water
and wastewater facilities as a partner
with the host local government
This model has worked well for
years. We have successfully managed
facilities for Sarasota, Brevard,
Hillsborough, Collier, Lee, Polk and
Osceola counties. In the case of
Hillsborough, Sarasota and Brevard
counties, we have successfully trans-
ferred much-improved systems back to
the local government according to our
agreements and our mission.
We are not a private company We
are not a profit-based business. Our
board is made up of high-ranking staff
from the local governments represent-
ing our customers. These individuals
are knowledgeable, respected profes-
sionals who bring integrity and over-
sight to the FGUA operations.
There has been some criticism that
we are not accountable because our
board is not elected. This is simply
unfair. Our board is subject to all the
laws and rules that apply to every local
government and similar authority. Our
board members are appointed by


== uest ; 1"'- ."':

elected officials who can change that
appointment if they disapprove of
their members' actions or perform-
ance.
This has never happened because
the FGUA board members are acting,
and have always acted, in the interests
of the customers and the local govern-
ments they represent.
No government agency wants to
upset the public and we did not set out
to anger our customers. The FGUA is
facing the same challenge as every
other local government within the
state of Florida. That challenge is to
manage who pays for growth.
Our challenge in Citrus County is
paying for growth that has turned out
to be 10 times greater than anything in
the past The FGUA budgeted for dou-
ble growth based on the due diligence
performed prior to its acquisition of
the Citrus system. We, however, are
now faced with unprecedented growth
beyond any projections.
Reports and rumors have suggested
that we failed to budget properly or we
failed in the due diligence in acquiring
the facilities. In fact, the current


growth rates in the Citrus County utili-
ties has outstripped all predictions,
and has left most governments strug-
gling with the same issue of "who pays
for growth."
In staying true to our commitment of
no rate increase to our existing cus-
tomers, we have taken the position that
growth must pay for itself. Our goal has
and always will be to fund the unparal-
leled expansion in our systems in
Citrus County with minimal or no
impact on our current rate customers.
We believe that the programs that we
have developed in Citrus County will
ensure our ability to maintain water
and sewer customer rates at the pres-
ent levels in the foreseeable future.
As with any program it has been
modified based on public input and
direction from the Citrus County
Commission. Even though we have had
numerous meetings with the develop-
ers, builders and various homeowner
groups, it has obviously not been
enough. The FGUA's commitment will
be to work closely with the customers
and the county commissioners as we
move forward in addressing this chal-
lenge. Even though many things could
have been done differently, we are at a
point in our attempt to respond to the


unexpected growth where creative
funding solutions are our best option.
The FGUA will continue to improve
in its communication efforts with the
community. We are planning on form-
ing a utility advisory board that will
consist of representatives from the cus-
tomers and will help the FGUA in
responding to the future challenges
confronting our community.
The Citrus County Water and
Wastewater Utility Regulatory Board
will meet the first of August and we'll
be there to present the proposed pro-
gram.
We are committed to working
through this process, to improving
communication, and to restoring the
good working relationship we have
always had with Citrus County. We will
work hard to re-earn the trust of the
Citrus County Commission and re-
establish a solid relationship with our
customers.
We look forward to working with
you.


Robert Sheets is the system manager
for Florida Governmental Utility
Authority, which serves several
communities in Citrus County.


Congress poised to take


modest action on health


W while comprehensive health care
reform seemingly remains a distant
dream, Congress is working on some
incremental steps that could save lives and
improve insurance coverage.
Three overriding problems beset the health
system: a rising tide of uninsured Americans,
probably numbering 50 million; sa
quality care/medical-errors, crisis
that kills up to 90,000 people a year;
and exploding health costs. .
Last week, for example, a Harvard
University study showed wide varia-
tions between hospitals .in various '
cities in the treatment of heart dis-
eases and pneumonia, ranging from
95 percent effective in Boston to 60
percent or less in some cities in Morton K
California. 4-, ,
Another study showed that nearly
12,000 patients in Pennsylvania hos- V014
pitals contracted infections, costing
$2 billion for treatment and causing at least
1,500 preventable deaths.
Medical errors are ripe targets for lawsuits,
which raise insurance costs, drive doctors out of
business and inhibit free discussion among pro-
fessionals about needed improvements.
While Republicans want to cap medical mal-
practice awards the House is due to vote next
week on another bill to do so Democrats are
adamantly opposed, partly out of loyalty to the
trial lawyer lobby, which leads them to regular-
ly block such legislation in the Senate.
However, last week there was a partial break-
through: House-Senate agreement on a bill to
protect the content of future professional dis-
cussion of errors and "near-misses" from being
used as evidence in lawsuits.
The agreement was worked out in an all-night
negotiating session between aides to Sen. Mike
Enzi (R-Wyo.) and Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.), chairman and ranking member the
. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions
Committee, and aides to Reps. Joe Barton (R-
Texas) and John Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman
and ranking member on the House Energy and
Commerce Committee.
The resulting patient-safety bill is scheduled
for action in the House this week as part of its
"health week" agenda.
In the meantime, for years, experts have said
that one answer to the quality/medical-errors cri-
sis is information technology making medical
records and orders digital so they can be easily
read and transferred to people who need them.
The health industry, though steeped in
advanced technology for everything from artifi-
cial hips to brain implants to nuclear diagnos-
tics, has trailed other industries like financial
services and transportation in computerizing its
records.
FedEx packages and bank records are easily
traceable online, and people can buy stock and
even renew driver's licenses electronically But
95 percent of doctors' records are still filed on
paper, even if their billing systems are comput-
erized.
The computer industry is moving into the
field energetically, offering a blazing array of
hardware and software systems that are now
creating a new problem: They can't all talk to
one another.
Health and Human Services Secretary Mike
Leavitt likens the situation to the early days of
railroading in America, when companies had
different gauges of track, and freight and pas-
sengers had to transfer in mid-journey because
locomotives and cars couldn't continue.
Earlier this year, Leavitt appointed a commis-
sion to work out standards, and last week the


Senate HELP Committee worked out bipartisan
legislation to codify the HHS action and provide
grants to hospitals to upgrade IT systems, estab-
lish quality measurement systems and create
rewards for providers who improve the quality
of care patients receive.
The legislation is a compromise between bills
co-sponsored by Senate Majority
.- Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) and Sen.
..H.. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) and
by Enzi and Kennedy
-. Given some willingness to compro-
mise on patient safety and IT, the
ideal would be for Republicans and
Democrats to work out an even larg-
er agreement on medical malprac-
,l& tice allowing caps on malpractice
.ondracke damages while going even further to
,,.- -,. ensure quality care and encouraging
states to de-license providers who
CES habitually commit errors.
As part of "health week," the
House is also scheduled to take up measures to
expand health insurance coverage and reduce
costs, although the chances for bipartisan
progress appear slim unless changes are made
in the bills' design.
> One bill would authorize creation of "associa-
tion health plans," permitting.businesses in the
same industry to form insurance pools.
Another would allow individuals to shop for
insurance across state lines. Both bills are hotly
opposed by state-insurance commissioners and
many governors because they allow insurance
companies to escape state regulation. .
The AHP bill is opposed by BlueCross
BlueShield insurers who now write most small-
business policies.
The opposition is likely to assure that, even if
the bills pass the House, they are likely to die in
the Senate. Their chances of passage and of
helping the uninsured would improve if they
were modified to allow for state regulation to
guarantee the insurers' financial solvency
The House next week is not considering a
GOP bill that would expand health savings
accounts r- a surprisingly fast-growing device to
allow uninsured persons to buy high-deductible
insurance policies and establish tax-exempt
accounts to pay their medical bills.
According to a study by America's Health
Insurance Plans, the number of persons cov-
ered by HSAs more than doubled last year, up to
more than 1 million, although that does not
begin to dent the total number of the chronical-
ly uninsured, estimated at 20 million to 30 mil-
lion. Fifty million is the estimated number of
uninsured at some time during a year.
The GOP's bill to expand HSAs would give tax
credits to moderate-income persons and small
businesses to establish HSAs and also make
"catastrophic" insurance premiums deductible.
Republicans are convinced that HSAs will
help reduce overall medical costs by requiring
individuals to pay ordinary medical bills out-of-
pocket and shop for the most economical care.
Democrats traditionally oppose the plans as
threatening to existing employer-based and gov-
ernment health plans.
The House is not considering the HSA bill
now because of its cost $125 billion through
10 years. The bill deserves passage, even if it is
only a partial answer to the problems of cost
and the uninsured. Congress isn't ready to solve
problems in a big way, but small steps are better
than none.


Morton Kondracke is executive editor of Roll
Call, the newspaper of Capitol Hill.


Sound OFF


Scalding satire
This is in regards to a couple
days ago someone had wrote
in about how the City of In-
verness put a "boil water
(notice)' on and the person
wrote in that they thought it
wasn't right and they had to be
sent to the emergency room for
a scalded throat and a scalded
tongue. I just wanted to put in
there that the City of Inverness
does the "boiling water
(notices) for people's own safe-
ty. The person should have let
the water cool before drinking


it. Put ice cubes in it or put it
in the refrigerator before they
tried to drink it.
Dial for ICE
For those who have cell
phones, it would be a good
idea to list your person to noti-
fy in case of emergency in the
list of people to call in your
cell phone, under the title
"ICE." that way, when emer-
gency personnel are trying to
find out whom to contact, they
can look up "ICE" on your
phone and dial the number
that's listed there to contact


your contact person.
Sheriff's big sign
Why does a large billboard
remain in place going south
on (U.S.) 41 right by the air-
port, stating "Dawsy delivers?"
It was my understanding
that after a period of time -
usually 30 days all political
messages have to be removed
by law. I wonder why this
bill-board extolling the
virtues of Sheriff Dawsy
remains in place seven
months after the election in
November.


Letters tothe E
0 2. : i. .. .,.,. .


What were they thinking? Then we need
verance to scoi
It is disturbing and disgusting that (Donald) new honest age
Rumsfeld admitted to American negotiations of the citizens.
with the Iraqi insurgents only after the pro-
.ceedings were uncovered by the British press.
One wonders if our "embedded" American
reporters were still asleep, or were they as a
condition of their further privileges told to Fo
keep this under the covers, so to speak Seems to me
Of course, we are again disappointed with a it" President I
press that has no stomach for real, honest, cru- was accomplish
cial and courageous reporting, but the bigger worldwide pro
elephant in the room is once
again a furtive and dishonest
administration. "Open SHARE YOUR
covenants, openly arrived at" THOUGHTS
be damned, and full speed
ahead! Follow the instructions orn
ahead! today's Opinion page to
Did our government suspect send a letter to thpage edito
we would think less of it for send a letter to the edi-
approaching the enemy in pur-
suit of peace? Could this be E Letters must be no
perceived as evidence of longer than 350 words,
weakness? An erosion of our and writers will be limit
resolve? Something to be ed to three letters per
ashamed of? Most good and month.
honest citizens would leap for
joy at any opportunity to seek peace. that al-Qaida v
Or did, perhaps, the administration suspect Seems as thou
the chances of success in a peace initiative Cheney away f
were so slim as to risk subsequent public Meanwhile,
knowledge of a failed effort, a mistake? Or, the decline, as
simply, did the administration's congenital dis- veteran, will a
dain for the American citizenry once again troops in the fi
dominate any thought of honest disclosure?. American righ
And could, in view of this administration's president.
track record, the Iraqi side ever be expected to There is no
believe anything the covert American emis- winner in this
series were to say? We are never likely to gain for a forced fr
the answers to these questions unless the on an Eastern
British or another foreign press provides expo- As in Korea
sure. will remain in
What we do know is that we have a consis- secure our fin.
tently incorrigible administration, one which keep them hei
not only lies for war, but even lies for peace. our war on ter
We can now only hope and pray and work for
the insights to finally find the truth through the
fog of mendacity this administration generates.


to mount the courage and perse-
ur America's house and to install
cents that merit the sacred trust

Rafe Pilgrim
Crystal River

)rcing freedom
that people are finally "getting
Bush's "mission" to invade Iraq
hed. His invasion has caused
blems taken $ 200 billion
away from American taxpay-
ers for needed funding and
services in this country and
I challenge anyone to explain
what America has achieved
from Bush's invasion.
The fact that we are doing
"hard work" doesn't deter any
terrorist from, again, attacking
the United States. The terror-
ists are here (as they are in
London) and George Bush
can't'find them.
Dick Cheney hasn't been
heard from since he stated
vas in its last throes in Iraq.
gh the powers are keeping
from the press.
America's infrastructure is on
is our recruiting goals. I, as a
always be supportive of our
field. However, I have my
t not to support our current

way America can come out a
mission. Our troops are fighting
eedom. We cannot force freedom
cultural religious state.
and Germany, American forces
Iraq for decades. We need to
ances and forces in this country;
re. Then we will be able to win
rorism.
Richard F. Rose
Inverness







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

unbudgable perspective is flawed. Who
knows, maybe this man hug thing has some
advantages.
Lots of times when I come to work on
Monday morning, the publisher communi-
cates the rough edges of the newspaper from
the past weekend and, fairly I might add,
wants to know why certain things appeared
as they did. Certain "unfortunate" things.
So, suppose I got to work a couple of min-
utes before Gerry Mulligan, and the moment
he walked in I gave him a big-old Monday
morning man hug. Would that disarm him or
what? I think me getting to work before him
would throw him off mentally, but if I hugged
him I think he'd throw me off physically
I think I'm going to leave man-hugging to


VOICES
Continued from Page 1C

serve in the CIA because of this
kind of leak
Congressman Feeney said
that he is going to withhold
judgment and see what hap-
pens. He personally hopes that
Karl Rove will be all right, but
that remains for the judicial sys-
tem to decide.
The lesson through the years
that I have learned is that no
one is safe when the sharks
start to circle. Your best friend
becomes a mere acquaintance.
Those who fawned over you and
sought your favors aren't on the
phone as much and your calls
don't get returned as expedi-
tiously as before, or if it gets
worse, returned at all.


the guys macho enough to be comfortable
with such a greeting. Again, some things
aren't for everyone.
E It's great that the Crystal River City
Council has agreed to kick $5,000 in to help
fund a temporary skateboarding park for
youths. While 5 grand isn't chump change in
a small city, it's a positive message of con-
cern for young folks.
What I don't really understand is stuffy
attitudes that won't tolerate a deck atop a
boathouse in the city. While the structure in
question was reportedly permitted in error,
it's just strange that residences with patios
and porches can ring the bay, derelict ves-
sels can deteriorate in the bay, and uncouth
people can cruise the bay, yet this is deemed
a ddclass6 structural faux pas and incites
code enforcement folks to slap a $21,150 fine
on the owner to force its removal.
What about fun? Lighten up. Live a'little!
Many Citrus Countians are feeling pret-


The prosecutor has a reputa-
tion as a no-nonsense person, as
a reporter sitting in jail can tes-
tify. As one member of Congress
told me, the prosecutor must
really think that someone high
up is involved. This will stay on
the back page when Congress
adjourns unless some new
information is found or some-
one is indicted. Rove will prob-
ably survive, but has learned a
valuable lesson no one is
exempt from the Washington
shark feeding frenzy.
Finally, the space shuttle. We
all hope and pray for a success-
ful mission and a safe return. I
handled the space shuttle from
the first day it was on the floor
of Congress, and believe deeply
in the space program. I recog-
nize how NASA has been
stretched, because its percent-
age of the federal budget has


ty darned good about the increase in the
value of their property. Average Joe
Homeowner who bought a lot and built a
house for $75,000 a few years ago is able to
point with pride to a residence that's now
worth twice as much or more.
One can't be too tickled by this, though.
To sell and buy something new, you'd have
to spend twice as much for the same
amount of house and watch your taxes sky-
rocket because the 3 percent cap on the
millage rate wouldn't transfer to your new
abode.
Sometimes staying put is the best bet
Staying put and avoiding man hugs.


Charlie Brennan is editor of the
Chronicle. He can be reached at 563-3225
or by e-mail at cbrennan@
chronicleonline.com. Read his blog at
www.chronicleonline.com.


diminished year after year after
year from more than 5.4 percent
of the budget to now less than 1
percent
I know that if there is another
problem with the shuttle, we
can forget about any manned
space program for years to
come. That would be a tragedy
The economic benefits of this
space program are undeniable.
Some claim a 7-to-1 economic
return on dollars invested in
the space program. The spin-'
offs' have helped people
throughout our country and the
world in many ways. Just one
example is the revolution in the
computer industry caused by
the need for more capacity in
the Apollo program. The basic
research that has resulted from
the space program has helped
this nation's economy become
the strongest in the world.


When you take polls about
the space program, people say
that they really are for it If you
then add, "are you willing to
pay for it?," the results dramat-
ically change. The bottom line
is that NASA and those of us
who have supported it over the
years in the Congress have not
done a good job in selling the
program. Let's hope with this
new rebirth of the program we
can make amends and
Americans will once again rally
around something we all can be
proud of.


Lou Frey Jr. served as a
Florida representative in
Congress from 1969-'79. He is a
partner in Lowndes, Drosdick,
Doster, Kantor & Reed, PA,
Orlando, and can be e-mailed
at lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

ugly head and we had to leave
early.
Are we getting more active
weather systems, or is this stuff
just following me around?
Last weekend, I was driving-
through north Cocoa Beach on
AIA approaching the cruise
ship port when a huge thun-
derstorm appeared in front of
us. All of a sudden, a little tor-
nado came bouncing along the
road. My eldest daughter
Jessica was with me and she's
extremely observant
"Dad, what's that?" she
asked.
"That would be a tornado," I
said very calmly
Jessica is a very smart young
lady, and she's not one to
scream or yell during moments
of high stress. She is calm and
analytical. Sarcasm occasion-
ally works its way into her con-
versation.
"So what do you think we
should do?" she asked with
great understatement.
Since the tornado appeared
to be working its way straight
down AIA toward our vehicle, I
assumed there were two major
options. First, I could continue
to drive straight into the torna-
do and we, along with our vehi-
cle, could be picked up by the
winds and tossed into the
Atlantic Ocean or I could
get the heck out of there.
I chose the latter.
Without so much as a yelp, I


turned the car into a parking
lot and began to work my way
back into the neighborhoods.
We were going east, and I
knew there really wasn't much
wiggle room. The Atlantic
Ocean was just a few hundred
yards away. But driving away
from the tornado seemed like
an extremely smart option. If
nothing else, I have great sur-
vival instincts.
"Dad, what's that in front of
us?" the calm and observant
Jessica asked again.
"That appears to be the tor-
nado," I replied with a small
amount of irritation.
Apparently tornadoes, just
like Florida drivers, don't pay
any attention to highways or
rights of way. The little tornado
had jumped off of AIA and
decided to follow us through
the neighborhood along our
escape route.
My weather-related persecu-
tion complex was in high gear.
I turned the car .around
again and started driving back
in our original direction.
Debris flew all over the place,
but we managed to find safety
back on AIA.
It turned out to be just anoth-
er day at the beach with
Mother Nature letting us know
who's the boss. Daughter
Jessica is not sure she wants to
go driving with me anytime
soon.
E

Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His e-mail address is
gmulligan@
chronicleonline.com.


Y chlege-


S C I T R U SA C 0 U N T



www.chronicleonline.com


CpvO N A, jU -M


OC sUNDAYJULY 31 2 5


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CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NEWS
BUSINESs DIGEST
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SUNDAY
JULY 31, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


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Which way,


Investors stay focused on economic outlook


RACHEL BECK
Associated Press


NEW YORK Wall Street has never
been a place where big news is easily
overlooked, which makes what's going
on this summer all the more curious.
Everything from the terrorist attacks
in London to the unexpected move by
China to revalue its currency to oil
prices lingering around $60 a barrel has.
done little to sway the market. Instead,
investors seem to be focusing exclusive-
ly on the bright economic outlook.
It has proven to be a winning strategy
- so far. Both the Nasdaq composite
index and Standard & Poor's 500 index
have vaulted in recent weeks to levels
not seen in four years, and other major
market indexes also have been trend-


ing higher
The healthy economy has been ti
primary catalyst fueling recent stock
gains. Although the Federal Reserv
has raised short-term interest rat
nine times since June 2004, invest
have chosen to interpret that as a sig
that the central bank can keep econor
ic growth accelerating while inflation
remains in check.
"Despite all the things that there ar
to worry about, things are particular
good in the market and that is because
the economy has taken the center
stage," said Milton Ezrati, a senior ec
nomic strategist at the money manag
ment firm Lord Abbett.
But taking such a myopic view mean
investors have been shrugging off new
that in other times would have roile


Wall Street?

markets. Investors also didn't
Consider Wall have much of a reaction
Street's reaction to the Despite all to China's decision to
July 7 terrorist bomb- float its currency
he ings in London. After the things that against a basket of other
ck the major market there are to worry currencies, something
ve indexes opened in U.S. the U.S. government
es trading about 1 percent about, things was pressing it to do.
rs lower, they finished the Even though China's
gn day on a positive note are particularly move could potentially
m- without any signs of boost import prices,
Dn panic selling. gOOd in the and thus spur inflation,
That's a big change the market largely
re from the drop in U.S. market ... shrugged off the sur-
ly stocks after the terror- prise announcement
se ist bombing in Madrid Milton Ezrati Oil prices, which
er in March 2004. The economic strategist. have gained 35 percent
o- S&P 500 index fell 1.5 during the past year to
e- percent the day of the now trade around $60 a
bombing and tumbled 4.1 percent over barrel, have at moments pushed stocks
ns the next 10 days. It took 18 days to down, but overall have done little long-
vs rebound to the pre-bombing levels,
ed according to S&P Please see OUTLOOK/Page 7D


Family keeps business afloat


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The fibers fly as Joe Hill sands the excess off a deck top at Young Boats in Inglis. Hill is one of the nine employees who builds the custom 20-foot shallow water
boats for which Young Boats has become known.


Inglis boat builders find their


CHERI HARRIS
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
N obody said that starting a
new business was easy.
When Robb Young and his
family started their boat
building company in Inglis, he
did his homework.
He tried to find a niche in
the competitive market by
specializing in custom, shal-
low-water boats that could
also venture a little ways off-
shore in good weather.
Young believed that if he
designed and built the best
boat he could, orders would
start coming in after the first
boat show.
Imagine his surprise when
he didn't get any orders after
the first boat show. Or second.
Or third.
Young said it took about
four shows and five months
before Young Boats had its
first sale.
"That was a shocker," Young


said.
Building dreams
Young, 33, grew up in
Clearwater, where his father,
Brad, ran a bait shop.
He dreamed for most of his
life about building boats,
probably because he spent a
great deal of time around the
water Whenever he went to a
boat show, he would analyze
different boat designs and
often thought of ways they
could be improved.
He studied naval architec-
ture and ocean engineering
and earned a master's degree
in small craft design from the
Florida Institute of
Technology in Melbourne.
Young said that he and his
brothers, Ryan and Russ, all
worked as commercial
grouper fishermen to help pay
for college.
After he graduated, Young
worked several years for
Morgan Yachts in St
Petersburg. Then he decided


Smpany's niche
to do what he had always
wanted to do design and
build boats.
Young started the company
in 1998, but he also worked
full time as a commercial
grouper fisherman in Crystal
River until 2000, when his
family sold the commercial
license and their fishing boat
At first, Young worked with
one employee to create the
molds for the Young 20, a 20-.
foot flats boat. He used wood
and fiber glass to create the 14
original molds used to create
the boat, including the hull,
deck and cockpit
He said startup costs for the
company were about $20,000
for a metal commercial build-
ing, $20,000 to design and

Please see FAMILY/Page 7D
Robb Young stands on the
deck of one of his 20-foot shal-
low-water boats with his moth-
er Rosemary, left, and wife
Dante, right, in their showroom.


Brett Wattles
CITRUS
COUNTY EDC


Tech


group

updates


focus
During the past 16
months, the Citrus
County Economic
Development Council (EDC),
the Citrus Levy Marion
Workforce Connection (CLM)
and the Citrus County cam-
pus of Central Florida
Community College (CFCC)
have worked together to
establish the Citrus Inform-
ation Technology Alliance
(CITA).
This was done in hope of
establishing a forum for
those companies working in
the information technology
(IT) sector to have an arena
to discuss the needs of the IT
industry. Citrus County en-
joys a relatively large num-
ber of IT-sector companies,
along with an even larger
number of companies and
organizations with IT depart-
ments.
Up until this time, CITA
met monthly from 11:30 a.m.
until 1:30 p.m. on the second
Thursday, with a working
lunch provided by the EDC,
CLM or CFCC. All IT-related
companies and organiza-
tions of all sizes with IT
departments have been and
continue to be encouraged to
attend and participate in the
meetings. Please consider
this your invitation to do so if
your firm is involved in IT
activities.
At the June CITA meeting,
it was decided the group will
Please see EDC/Page 7D


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Come to

terms

with

insurance
DEAR BRUCE: I am 70
years old and have a
small-term insurance
policy (not my only coverage)
purchased through my credit
union. I was recently notified
that my term policy would
expire when I become 75. I
was offered the option of
converting a portion or the
entire policy amount to
whole life. I am in good
health and do not want to
lose the coverage should I
live beyond 75 years. I do not
need to make this decision
until just before my 75th
birthday; however, I was told
by a company representative
that each additional year of
age will significantly
increase the policy's premi-
um. What is your advice? -
N.H., via e-mail.
DEAR N.H.: Many term
policies must be converted
when one reaches an
Please see MONEY/Page 7D


-....,..,.....,, I ~ ~













STOCKS


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Lucent 1774599 2.93 +.08
Motorola 1605248 21.18 +1.18
TimeWam 1395318 17.02 +.38
Pfizer 1102786 26.50
Ctigrp 916069 43.50 -.48

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
HangrOrth 7.79 +2.05 +35.7
Ducomun 22.02 +4.15 +23.2
SturmR 11.19 +2.10 +23.1
Microfncl 4.74 +.75 +18.8
VidSanNig 19.60 +3,00 +18.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Prestige n 11,25 -8.35 -42.6
IntPoly 7.95 -2.75 -25.7
Wellmn 8.34 -2.24 -21.2
SpectBrds 31.00 -7.46 -19.4
ParPharm 23.42 -5.59 -19.3

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,112
1,374
682
65
3,576
90
9,660,839,702


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
SPDR 2491983 123.74 +.20
iShRs2000s1161952 67.89 +.57
IvaxCps 1104877 25.48 +2.60
SemiHTr 986427 37.36 +.16
SP Engy 543242 47.60 +.21

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
InbTiCon 5.85 +3.45+143.8
ImpftScwt 2.70 +1.00 +58.8
TGCIndsn 10.90 +3.85 +54.6
IMI Intg 2.66 +.87 +48.6
NatVis 7.16 +2.21 +44.7

LOSERS.($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
CoreMold 8.02 -3.28 -29.0


RaeSyst
IntlgSys
DHB Inds
Crystallx g


Advanced "
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


DIARY
673
405
212'
39
1,134
56
1,339,617,836


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Nasd100Tr3445009 39.58 +.16
Microsoft 2611056 25.61 -.07
Intel 2462345 27.14 +,39
SunMicro 2280367 3.84 -.04
Cisco 2212544 19.15 -.17

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
i2Techn 21.43 +10.42 +94.6
StaarSur 5.28 +2.13 +67,6
SimrnaThera 4.25 +1,62 +61.7
MDSI g 7.85 +2.94 +59,9
FrghtCarn 32.06 +9,31 +40.9

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
GrWfResn 13.59 -8.74 -39.1
Genitope 7,95 -4.49 -36.1
Pxiwrks 7.71 -3.99 -34.1
InfoSpce 24.14 -10.36 -30.0
Catuityrs 12.41 -4.98 -28.6

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,791
1,509
484
66
3,371
71
8,430,991,353


Here are the 400 most active stocks on the NewYork Stock Exchange, the 325 most
active on the Nasdaq National Market and 50 most active on the American Stock
Exchange. Mutual funds are 800 largest.
52 wk HI/Lo: High and low price over the past 52 weeks.
Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company's full name (not its abbrevia-
tion). Company names made up of Initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock.
PE: Price to earnings ratio.
PPE: Projected price to earnings ratio based on analysts' forecasts of earnings for next
12 months.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the week.
YTD % Chg: Loss or gain for the year. No change indicated by unc.
Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by unc.


Stock Footnotes: cc PE greater than 99. cild- Issue has been called for redemption by company. d New
52-week low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging
Company Marketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq
capital and surplus listing qualification.n Stock was a new Issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low
figures date only from the beginning of trading. pt Preferred stock issue., pr Preferences. pp Holder owes
installments of purchase price. q Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated, rt Right to buy security at
a specified price, s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when
the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, Including more than one security, vj Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reor-
ganized under the bankruptcy aw App.ear ir. i.r,,ur ...i e r,3..E
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra '.'d.a-ar: ..e, pai r.uL a -' r.:.t included. b Annual rate plus stock. c -
Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was
increased by most recent dividend announcement., i .um.r .:...,aerln. ip,, rer i..ck pil.i r,c. regularr rate.
I .um ,:of ii... 3j p~ ld a i yn a. Mt.o r ncen .lou .-.-.Tn.tl.d cr ,1 5rr.d v Declared or paid this
y.-,ar. a cumulai..E i u, j r. a, .. rcl, r..5d,. a r. a C i r.i r,ri.. a rire ,n.,-r. was decreased by most
ic.:nril c,.-iu.r..1 r....ju.-.c +mr'ni 1 I.-[.ah l ,.. -.j.. 3..r.j li rli ,. o,,r ki yield not shown. r Declared or
pai.3 r. pFe.' .,g 1 m..roninS pi- lu ii .: *.. r.' r i Pa .r, .1 :.:i ppr.:..mate cash value on ex-distribution
date. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STOC S O OAS ITRS


AT&T
AmSouth
BkofAm s
BellSouth
CapCtyBk s
Citigrp
Disney
EKodak
ExxonMbl
FPL Gp s
FlaRock s
FordM
GenElec
GnMotr
HomeDp
Intel
IBM


Wkly YTD
Div PE YId Last Chg %Chg
.95 ... 4.8 19.80 +.56 +3.9
1.00 17 3.6 27.91 ... +7.8
2.00 11 4.6 43.60 -1.25 -7.2
1.16 12 4.2 27.60 +.88 -.7
.61 20 1.6 37.15 +1.32 +11.1
1.76 11 4.0 43.50 -.48 -9.7
.24 21 .9 25.64 -17.8
.50 ... 1.9 26.74 -.58 -17.1
1.16 13 2.0 58.75 -.75+14.6
1.42 19 3.3 43.12 -.10+15.4
.. 27 ... 54.89 +2.49 +38.3
.40 8 3.7 10.74 +.12 -26.6
.88 20 2.6 34.50 -.57 -5.5
2.00 ... 5.4 36.82 +.57 -8.1
.40 19 .9 43.51 +.04 +1.8
.32 19 1.2 27.14 +.39 +16.0
.80 70 1.0 83.46 -.98 -15.3


Name
LowesCos
McDnlds
Microsoft
Motorola
Penney
ProgrssEn
SearsHidgs
SprntFON
TimeWarn
UniFirst
VerizonCm
Wachovia
WalMart
Walgrn


Wkly YTD
Div PE YId Last Chg %Chg
.24 23 .4 66.22 +.49 +15.0
.55 16 1.8 31.17 +.23 -2.8
.32 23 1.2 25.61 -.07 -4.2
.16 19 .8 21.18 +1.18 +23.1
.50 25 .9 56.14 -1.44 +35.6
2.36 19 5.3 44.61 +.16 -1.4
15 ... 154.60 -5.02 +56.2
.50 ... 1.9 26.90 +1.62 +8.2
.20 24 1.2 17.02 +.38 -12.5
.15 20 .3 44.51 -.43 +57.4
1.62 11 4.7 34.23 +.06 -15.5
1.84 13 3.7 50.38 -.14 -4.2
.60 20 1.2 49.35 -.19 -6.6
.26 31 .5 47.86 +1.18 +24.7


52-Week Daily Wky WkIy YTD
High Low Name Last Net Chg Net Chg % Chg % Chg
10,984.46 9,708.40 Dow Jones Industrials 10,640.91 -10.27 -.10 -1.32 +4.94
3,889.97 2,959.58 Dow Jones Transportation 3,799.95 +19.92 +.53 +.05 +22.12
400.17 274.84 Dow Jones Utilities 397.29 +4.37 +1.11 +18.61 +41.23
7,529.01 6,215.97 NYSE Composite 7,476.66 +29.50 +.40 +3.13 +16.77
1,610.22 1,186.14 AMEX Index 1,604.63 +58.09 +3.76 +11.87 +29.37
2,201.39 1,750.82 Nasdaq Composite 2,184.83 +5.09 +.23 +.43 +15.76
1,245.15 1,060.72 S&P 500 1,234.18 +.50 +.04 +1.84 +12.02
684.81 515.90 Russell 2000 679.75 +1.97 +.29 +4.32 +23.30
12,457.74 10,268.52 Wilshire 5000 12,360.81 +23.56 +.19 +3.26 +15.50


I EWOR SOCECANG


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
A-B-C
7.10 4.86 ABB Ltd ...... 16 6.81 +.31 +20.3
8.45 7.85 ACM Inco .66 q 8.37 +.03 +2.6
18.13 9.09 AES Cp ... 22 17 16.05 -.18 +17.4
46.33 33.85 AFLAC .44 17 16 45.10 +1.35 +13.2
39.32 28.66 AGL Res 1.24 16 16 38.45 +.55 +15.7
18.22 5.45 AKSteel ... 21 7 9.22 -.39 -36.3
33.49 26.76 AMLIRs 1.92 22 73 32.29 +.90 +0.9
14.95 6.34 AMR ... dd ... 14.05 +.41 +28.3
45.81 33.15 ASALtd .40 q ... 37.62 -.88 -7.0
20.06 13.59 AT&T .95 dd 12 19.80 +.56 +3.9
28.48 19.12 AXA .79e ...... 27.30 +.60 +10.3
50.00 38.26 AbtLab 1.10 21 18 46.63 +.59 unc
27.60 21.00 Accenture ... 17 16 25.04 +.24 -7.3
13.99 12.07 AdamsEx.90e q ... 13,29 +.08 +1.3
24.77 15.11 Adesa .30 21 16 24.20 +.23 +14.0
24.95 10.76 AMD .. cc 46 20.08 -.41 -8.8
86.47 39.03 Aetnas .02 10 15 77.40 +.95 +24.1
16.90 8,90 Agerers ... dd 20 11.19 -1.34 -17.7
9.23 6.15 Ahold ... ... 8.79 +.11 +13.1
13.15 7.40 AirTran dd 72 11.44 +1.04 +6.9
25.93 19.26 Albertsn .76 16 15 21.31 +.32 -10.8
34.99 25.55 Alcoa .60 19 14 28.05 -.56 -10.7
51.70 30.76 Alletes 1.26f 18 21 48.32 -.32 +31.5
49.90 32.35 AlliCap 2.58e 19 15 45.53 -2.81 +8.4
12.86 11.26 AIIWrld2 .89 q ... 12.42 +.09 +0.3
12.63 6.90 AldWaste ... 26 21 8.58 +.50 -7.5
40.27 24.35 AllmrFn ... 11 12 39.00 +.75 +18.8
65.73 50.83 Alteal 1.52 17 19 66.50 +3.81 +13.2
20.20 9.39 Alpharma .18 dd 26 14.04 -.92 -17.2
69.68 44.50 Altria 2.92 14 13 68.96 +.44 +9.6
56.16 43.22 Ameren 2.54 17 18 55.62 +.51 +10.9
21.60 10.76 AMovilLs ...... 16 22.26 +.92 +27.6
39.34 30.27 AEP 1.40 13 15 38.70 -.07 +12.7
58.03 47.95 AmExp .48 19 16 55.00 +.43 -2.4
73.80 49.91 AmIntGpl f.50 15 12 60.20 -.54 -8.3
12.75 10.65 AmSIP3 .78 q ... 11.18 -.08 -9.2
33.30 26.11 Anmerigas 2.24 32 18 33.44 +.87 +13.0
28.29 23.80 AmSouth 1.00 17 13 27.91 unc +7.8
53.16 43.58 Anheusr 1.08f 16 16 44.35 -1.37 -12.6
32.09 18.90 AquaAr .52 36 31 32.07 +1.29 +30.4
4.24 2.25 Aquila ... dd ... 3.72 +.02 +0.8
58.27 30.10 ArchCoal .32 98 21 56.92 +.42 +60.2
25.37 14.95 ArchDan .34 20 17 22.94 +.95 +2.8
65.25 59.33 Ashlandnl.10 2 16 61.45 -.54 -0.5
10.50 7.77 AsdEstat .68 dd ... 9.75 +.20 -4.6
29.59 24.40 ATMOS 1.24 16 16 29.16 +.33 +6.6
17.76 7.76 Avaya .. 14 16 10.33 +1.08 -39.9
34.78 18.00 Aviall .. 24 18 33.85 -.61 +47.4
46.25 30.73 Avon .66 16 16 32.71 +1.71 -15.5
31.01 17.62 BHP BillLt.46e ...... 29.62 +.10 +23.3
61.59 42.25 BJSvcs .40f 25 18 60.99 +3.14 +31.0
67.34 51.95 BPPLC 1.98e 13 ... 65.88 -.07 +12.8
25.10 19.61 BRT 2.00f 15 ... 23.80 +.35 -2.2
57.46 38.06 BakrHu .46 31 22 56.54 +1.49 +32.5
46.45 34.12 BallCps .40 14 13 37.95 -1.19 -13.7
47.47 41.70 BkofAms2.00f 11 10 43.60 -1.25 -7.2
34.09 26.93 BkNY .84f 16 14 30.78 -.35 -7.9
49.05 36.74 Banta .72 14 16 47.74 +1.03 +6.7
26.32 18.14 BarrickG .22 45 43 24.50 -.20 +1.2
87.89 57.17 BauschL .52 27 22 84.65 +2.02 +31.3
28.96 24.85 BellSouthl.16f 12 15 27.60 +.88 -0.7
79.75 43.87 BestBuy .48f 25 22 76.60 +1.69 +29.2
40.50 26.52 BIkHICp 1.28 21 20 39.88 +.13 +30.0
16.07 15.20 BlkFL08 .75a q ... 15.54 +.14 -2.0
6.94 5.86 BlueChp .56e q 6.61 +.12 -1.0
67.95 46.89 Boeing, 1.00 31 22 66.01 -.19 +27.5
27.47 21.20 Borders .36 15 13 24.81 -.49 -2.0
27.95 19.85 BostBeer ... 21 20 21.68 -1.00 +1.9
76.33 50.60 BostProp2.72a 24 35 76.15 +2.74 +17.8
26.60 22.22 BrMySq 1.12 20 19 24.98 +.03 -2.5
56.47 33.89 BurlNSF .801 20 13 54.25 +2.11 +14.7
64.95 34.92 BurlRsc .401 14 12 64.11 +1.68 +47.4
49.73 42.07 CHEngy 2.16 20 19 49.15 +1.10 +2.3
110.93 58.00 CIGNA .10 8 t15 106.75 +2.84 +30.9
37.48 28.98 CSSInds .48f 15 12 37.74 +.75 +18.8
31.60 19.31 CVSCps .15 29 21 31.03 +.61 +37.7
15.59 9.28 CallGolf .28 dd 23 14.99 -.06 +11.0
4.08 1.32 Calpine ... dd ... 3.32 -.07 -15.7
31.60 25.21 CampSp .68 19 17 30.85 +.14 +3.2
14.20 11.68 CapMpfBl.26 ...... 13.00 -.09 -4.4
54.60 34.25 Caterpils 1.00 16 12 53.91 +1.50 +10.6
23.54 19.04 Cendant .441 18 14 21.36 -.56 -4.2
13.84 9.78 CenterPnt28m dd 16 13.74 +.16 +21.6
87.00 76.00 CnlLtpf 4.50 ...... 86.00 urc +5.5


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last
35.54 29.55 CntryTel .24 14 15 34.37
15.85 8.33 ChmpE ... 42 16 12.06
19.50 14.38 Checkpnt .01 13 14 17.28
26.04 13.69 ChesEng .20f 18 12 26.11
63.15 46.21 Chevronal1.80 9 10 58.01
4.88 3.14 CinciBell ... 28 20 4.54
45.95 36.95 CINargy 1.92 21 15 44.15
49.99 42.10 Citigrp 1.76 11 10 43.50
27.41 18.84 ClairesStrs .40 17 15 25.41
45.88 38.30 CocaCI 1.12 22 20 43.76
25.77 18.45 CocaCE .16 17 17 23.50
9.31 8.08 Collntln .65a q ... 8.90
34.15 23.35 CmcBNJs .44 19 17 33.93
31.71 22.37 CompAs .16f cc 27 27.45
30.24 22.50 ConAgra 1.09 18 16 22.71
63.45 35.64 ConocPhil s1.24 8 9 62.59
48.74 39.42 ConEd 2.28 20 16 48.16
15.76 12.30 Cnvrgys ... 19 14 14.55
19.37 9.29 Corning ... dd 22 19.05
11.90 7.29 CorusGr ... ... ... 8.37
40.31 30.30 CntwdFn s .60 10 8 36.00
14.92 8.45 CypSem ... dd 46 14.36
D-E-F
11.95 10.24 DNPSelct.78a q ... 11.59
27.97 18.98 DPL .96 14 19 27.60
48.31 39.31 OTE 2.06 23 13 47.00
48.80 38.77 DaimlrC 1.93e ... 12 48.42
19.65 10.90 DanaCp .48 dd 11 15.71
34.77 19.30 Darden .08 19 17 34.70
74.73 56.72 Deere 1.24 12 11 73.53
9.81 3.20 Delphi .06m 19 ... 5.30
8.17 2.46 DeltaAir ... dd ... 2.96
18.25 13.88 DirecTV ... dd 48 15.40
29.99 20.88 Disney .24f 21 17 25.64
22.80 17.69 DollarG .18f 19 16 20.32
76.87 62.07 DomRes 2.68 20 14 73.86
56.75 37.95 DowChm 1.34 10 9 47.95
54.90 39.88 DuPont 1.48f 17 15 42.68
30.55 20.45 DukeEgy 1.24f 14 18 29.54
38.95 34.50 DuqpfA 2.10 ...... 37.00
19.44 16.93 DuqUght 1.00 15 16 19.40
6.09 3.21 Dynegy ... dd ... 5.56
16.04 10.31 ETrade ... 16 14 15.51
15.09 9.24 EMCCp .. 30 24 13.69
65.88 27.60 EOGRess.16 20 16 61.10
61.80 42.19 EastChm 1.76 13 9 55.39
35.19 24.63 EKodak .50 cc 11 26.74
13.15 7.13 ElPasoCp .16 dd 15 12.00
30.49 3.00 Elan ......... 7.48
23.38 16.65 EDS .20 59 37 20.57
25.01 19.53 EmpDist 1.28 31 17 24.18
56.15 45.60 EnbrEPtrs3.70 29 26 56.60
23.65 17.81 Endesa .92e ...... 22.43
30.37 17.35 EnPro ... 20 17.30.40
41.42 26.95 ENSCO .10 35 17 40.38
78.14 54.43 Entergy 2.16 20 16 77.94
13.65 8.41 Eqtyinn .60 cc 54 13.43
54.12 32.85 Exelon 1.60 18 16 53.52
64.37 44.20 ExxonMbil.16 13 12 58.75
44.59 32.59 FPLGps 1.42 19 16 43.12
77.80 49.75 FannieM If1.04 9 8 55.86
19.18 13.80 FedSignl .24 dd 24 17.50
22.27 19.28 Ferrellgs 2.00 dd 28 22.00
23.55 16.77 Ferroll ,58 42 19 22.50
22.17 13.79 FFinFds5.10e q ... 20.29
20.71 18.87 FtTrFidn 1.60 q ... 19.70
55.75 26.71 FlaRocks .., 27 22 54.89
15.22 9.07 FordM .40 8 10 10.74
96.18 68.47 FortuneBrl.44f 17 17 94.55
G-H-I
38.75 23.82 GATX .80 12 21 37.80
9.40 7.64 GabelliET.72a q ... 9.07
90.57 41.00 Genentch ... 94 60 89.30
37.75 31.42 GenElec .88 20 18 34.50
44.20 24.67 GnMotr 2.00 dd ...36.82
45.00 29.39 Goodrich .80 25 20 44.24
18.25 9.15 Goodyear ... 13 15 17.41
32.78 27.86 GtPlainEn1.66 14 16 32.46
30.88 24.80 GMP 1.00 14 ... 29.40
27.78 18.35 Griffon ... 17 13 25.85
20.74 13.10 GuangRy .71e ...... 17.45
58.60 34.70 HCAInc .60 16 14 49.25
56.80 26.45 Hallibtn .50 60 18 56.05


YTD 52-Wk
cha %chg HI Low Name DIv PE PPE Last


16.17 14.32
10.09 8.65
12.38 10.56
50.85 33.99
63.23 45.14
79.60 43.94
22.35 16.90
29.79 24.60
39.20 31.11
42.11 35.25
10.48 5.74
25.07 16.08
31.82 22.62
44.30 32,39
39.50 31,85
34.51 25.29
44.73 17.08
27.75 20.16
29.12 26.01


HanJS 1.11e
HanPIDIv .55
HanPtDv2 .78
Hanson 1.71e
HarleyD .64f
HarrahE 1.45f
Hasbro .36
HawaliEl 1.24
HItCrREIT2.48f
HlthcrRlI 112.64f
HellnTel .21e
HewlettP .32
HighwdP lfl.70
HomeDp .40
Honwlllntl .83
HughSups.36
Humana
IMS HIth .08
ITCHoldn ...


YTD
chg %chg
-.01 -3.1
+.13 -6.7
+.08 +6.2
+1.57 +17.1
-.26 -12.4
+1.01 +17.7
+.73 +13.2
-.74 -7.6
+1.49 +2.5
+.65 +0.4
-.01 +17.4
+.44 +17.4
+.51 +14.3
+.04 +1.8
+1.08 +10.9
+.66 -12.1
+.94 +34.2
-.06 +17.3
unc +6.1


32.95 26.22 Idacorp 1.20 16 18
43.10 28.46 Imation .48f 22 22
87.92 62.05 IngerRd 1.00 11 12
99.10 71.85 IBM .80 70 16
37.12 24.20 IntlGame .48 26 21
43.61 29.76 IntPap 1.00 dd 22
35.09 26.66 IronMtn ... 47 39
J-K-L
40.45 33.35 JPMorgChl.36 19 11
69.99 54.37 JohnJn 1.32 21 18
63.98 52.57 JohnsnCtl1.00 12 12
34.02 26.52 Kaydon .48 23 19
46.89 39.88 Kellogg 1.111f 20 18
41.13 23.83 Kellwood .64 12 11
35.00 29.35 Keycorp 1.30 14 12
41.53 35.19 KeySpan 1.82 15 17
19.99 14.65 Kroger ... dd 15
8.29 4.91 LLERy .36e 14 ...
10.75 4.01 LSI Log ... dd 21
23.92 16.50 LTC Prp 1.32 16 ...
17.44 11.50 LaZBoy .44 19 12
33.59 26.31 Laclede 1.38 19 17
90.50 59.50 Lexmark ... 16 14
6.80 5.51 LbtyASG .59e q ...
9.53 7.08 LibtyMA ... 80 63
67.30 50.34 LillyEli 1.52 49 19
49.42 40.78 UncNat 1.46 11 11
29.51 17.50 Undsay .24f 60 34


52-Wk
HI Low


112.5092.04
29.01 18.28
31.15 23.85
18.50 7.33
9.06 8.35
11.00 6.52
82.94 60.00
6.99 5.96
51.17 38.43
37.49 10.50
18.16 11.15
6.68 2.81
21.50 9.21


Name Div PE PPE Last


LockhdM 1.00
LowesCos .24f
Lucent
Lyondell .90
M
M&TBk 1.80f
MBNA .56
MDU Res .72
MEMC
MCR .50
Madeco
Magnalg 1.52
MgdHi .52
Manulif g 1.20f
MStewdt ...
MatSci
Maxtor
Maylag ,36m


19 16 62.40
23 18 66.22
12 15 2.93
15 7 27.94
-N-O
17 15 108.51
15 12 25.16
15 15 30.70
14 14 16.99
q ... 8.75
.. 10.90
11 10 77.10
q ... 6.43
... 13 50.30
dd ... 26.70
dd 12 15.00
dd 30 5.90,
cc 24 16.87


34.56 25.64 McDnlds .55f 16
55.44 46.88 Medtmic .34 36
47.00 25.60 Merck 1.52 15
61.99 47.35 MerrillLyn .80 13
48.49 32.99 MeLiUfe .46f 11
13.67 9.32 MicronT ... 35
48.76 35.13 MidAApt 2.34 cc
24.74 14.59 Midas ... 41
3.92 1.65 Milacron ,.. dd
63.74 42.01 Millipore .. 29
65.25 43.79 MillsCp 2.51 23
60.51 ,46.54 MorgStan 1.08 13
20.27 12.47 MSEmMkt.07e q
21.49 12.37 Motorola .16b 19
11.85 10.22 MunienhFd.73 q
20.03 14.24 MylanLab .241 28
39.84 21.01 NCR Cs ... 20
30.31 25.05 NatFuGas1.18f 16
52.39 39.40 NatGrid 2.17e ...
25.02 11.85 NatSemi .08 24
2.29 1.94 NewAm .21a q
49.34 39.54 NJRscs 1.36 17
49.98 34.90 NewmtM .40 37
8.66 4.72 NwpkRs ... 60
18.88 15.01 NewsCpAn.16e ...
25.50 20.50 NiSource .92 15
41.87 32.37 Nicor 1.86 18
92.43 68.61 NikeB 1.00 20
68.35 34.15 NobleCorp .08 45


YTD
chg %chg
+.40 +12.3
+.49 +15.0
+.08 -22.1
-1.46 -3.4

-1.95 +0.6
-.53 -10.7
+.75 +15.1
-.69 +28.2
+.02 -0.8
+.80 +2.9
+.10 -6.6
+.04 -2.1
-.05 +8.9
-.80 -8.0
+.05 -16.6
+.40 +11.3
+.67 -20.0


+.23 -2.8
+.82 +8.6
-.08 -3.4
-.78 -1.7
+2.75 +21.3
-.05 -3.8
+1.35 +16.8
-.99 +15.6
-.18 -44.8
+.22 +23.0
+1.26 +2.0
-.95 -4.4
+.15 +11.8
+1.18 +23.1
+.02 +6.9
-.16 -1.8
-.04 +0.3
+.58 +7.3
+.97 -2.2
+.29 +37.7
unc +0.5
-.61 +9.0
-.88 -15.4
+.26 +64.3
-.30 -12.2
+.11 +6.6
+.34 +10.5
-2.83 -7.6
-.32 +35.1


NADA ATINA ARE


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last

A-B-C
33.25 19.97 ACMoore ... 35 24 28.73
26.20 12.25 ADCTelrs 25 23 26.14
18.84 12.33 ASMLHId ...... 18 17.60
20.66 11:20 ATITech .. 18 17 12.58
4.75 2.85 ATSMed ... dd ., 3.67
4.36 .63 Aastro ... dd ... 3.19
11.30 6.45 Abgenx dd 3. 10.37
19.29 9.12 Activsns ... 31 27 20.35
34.48 19.66 AdobeSys ... 25 29.64
27.93 19.73 Advanta .45f 7 .. 27.78
29.90 20.30 AdvantB .541 7 14 29.91
59.73 24.48 Affymet .46 40 46.69
16.50 10.64 AkamaeiT 39 26 15.27
46.84 30.88 Akzo 1.54a ..... 41.13
16.10 6.73 Alamosa ... dd 38 16.06
30.00 8.94 Aldila .401 14 ... 27.42
18.68 5.29 Allscript cc 43 16.97
6.52 .95 AllairNano ... dd ... 3.03
24.26 17.50 AlteraCp ... 30 24 21.87
45.81 30.60 Amazon ... 36 54 45.15
.60 .02 AmrBio wt ......... .27
34.04 14.57 AEagleOs.301 21 16 32.95
28.40 14.55 APwCnv .4028 28 26 28.11
20.09 9.91 Ameritrade ... 28 23 19.53
83.10 52.00 Amgen .. 41 23 79.77
6.90 2.87 AmkorT ... dd ... 4.66
24.95 14.50 Amylin ... dd 18.66
52.03 37.73 Anlogic .32 24 40 51.37
4.63 2.75 Analyss ... 34 .. 3.75
8.74 1.01 AnlySur ... 10 1.81
15.49 9.30 Andrew ... 50 15 10.99
26.46 14.75 AndrxGp ... 18 15 18.55
90.40 62.55 ApolloG ... 61 25 75.15
45.44 14.85 AppleCs ... 36 27 42.65
5.37 2.84 Apldlnov ... 36 .. 4.73
18.51 14.33 ApldMasI .12 21 23 18.48
4.37 2.50 AMCC ... dd 38 3.01
20.00 7.25 aQuantive ... 29 43 18.86
11.14 3.73 Arris ... dd 21 11.04
11.84 7.33 AspectCm 19... 19 11.43
35.16 29.35 AsscdBancl.08 15 13 34.06
4.35 2.05 Atmnel ... dd ... 2.34
17.00 8.67 AudCodes .. 38 223 9.09
18.42 12.31 Audvox ... 5 26 18.02
39.90 18.01 Aulodsks .03j 33 27 34.19
7.15 2.29 Aware ... dd ... 7.15
17.54 7.90 BEAero ... dd 20 17.53
9.86 5.92 BEASys ... 27 21 9.07
18.29 12.90 BeasleyB ... 26 23 14.29
46.98 33.88 BedBath ... 27 22 45.90
70.00 33.18 Bogenldc ..96 23 39.29
49.64 33.64 Biomet .25e 27 21 38.13
6.96 1.21 Biopurers ... dd ... 1.45
28.54 19.91 BobEvn .48 24 24 25 25.36
44.87 25.25 Brdcom ... 75 28 42.77
15.90 3.46 Broadwing .. dd ... 5.00
8.17 3.77 BrcdeCrnl ... 14 13 4.48
29.40 17.15 BusnObj ...51 .. 33.01
9.75 5.57 C-COR ... dd 21 8.33
6.32 2.37 CDCCpA ...... 30 3.03
63.50 41.14 CHRobn .60 32 29 62.57
12.48 7.16 CNET ... cc 36 12.80
37.50 286.00 CapCtyBks.61 20 22 37,15
45.10 26.22 CareerEd ... 21 15 38.79
49.37 24.25 Celgenas ... 90 59 47.85
38.97 17.83 Ceradynes ... 28 17 31.87
26.21 16.46 ChkPoint ... 20 16 22.53
14.98 9.75 Checkers ... 15 13 14.05
48.09 29.00 Chiron ... dd 23 36.23
48.30 33.31 ChrchllD .50 97 26 46.60
3.50 1.64 CienaCp ... dd ... 2.24
7.76 3.70 Cirrus .. 42 24 7.47
21.30 17.01 Cisco ... 23 18 19.15
26.00 15.02 CitdxSy ... 26 21 23.83
25.91 8.21 CleanH ... dd 16 24.36
51.45 24.02 CogTech ... 63 40 49.08
9.15 5.45 Comarco ......... 7.81
34.50 26.25 Comcast ... 57 37 30.73
34.16 25.89 Comcsp ... 56 38 30.00
8.51 4.35 Compuwre ... 32 20 8.43
26.10 15.25 Comvers ... 70 38 25.29
2.95 1.35 ConcCm ... dd 40 2.28
32.61 20.45 Conmed .. 30 15 30.11
50.46 39.05 Costco .46 22 20 45.97


YTD 52-Wk
chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last


+2.12 -0.3
+1.40 +39.3
-.22 +10.6
-.37 -35.1
+.06 -21.2
+.22 +124.6
-.27 +0.3
+1.90 +34.5
-.14 -5.5
+.89 +22.8
+.96 +23.2
+.72 +27.7
+.70 +17.2
+.17 -3.2
+.32 +28.8
+4.79 +79.8
+.43 +59.0
+.09 +11.8
-.33 +5.7
+7.20 +1.9
unc +8.0
-.25 +39.9
+2.37 +31.4
-.07 +37.3
-1.54 +24.3
-1.07 -30.2
-2.55 -20.1
+.97 +14.7
-.19 -6.3
-.18 -46.0
-2.10 -19.4
-3.10 -15.0
+3.57 -6.9
-1.35 +32.5
-.11 +36.3
+.18 +8.1
-.22 -28.5
+.73+111.0
+1.59 +56.8
+.06 +2.6
-.41 +2.5
-.44 -40.3
-.91 -45.3
+.47 +14.2
-1.70 -9.9
+.33 +47.4
+.76 +50.6
+.24 +2.4
-2.33 -18.5
-.10 +15.2
+.83 -41.0
+1.27 -12.1
+.06 -59.0
+1.41 -3.0
-.23 +32.5
-.25 -45.1
+.24 -41.4
+5.04 +30.3
+1.07 -10.4
-.12 -34.3
+2.28 +12.7
+1.11 +14.0
+1.32 +11.1
+1.91 -3.0
-.31 +80.4
+5.26 -16.4
-.49 -8.5
+.98 +4.9
+.62 +8.7
+.44 +4.3
-.06 -32.9
+.04 +35.6
-.17 -0.9
+1.63 -2.6
-.34 +61.4
+.76 +15.9
-.04 -9.2
+.29 -7.7
+.45 -8.6
+.40 +31.5
+.78 +3.4
+.08 -20.3
-1.46 +5.9
+.02 -5.0


17.88 Cree Inc ... 25
12.78 Cyberonic ... dd
3.47 Cytogen ... dd
19.83 Cytyc ... 30
D-E-F
41.75 DadeBeh .24 43
1.14 Danka .,. dd
1.43 DayStar ... dd
32.71 Dellnc ... 32'
3.50 Dennysn ......
3.13 Depomrned ... dd
22.43 DigRiver ... 36
13.74 DiscHIdA n ......
1.54 DistEnSy ... dd
1.02 DobsonCm ... dd
22.29 DllrTree ... 16
30.78 eBay s ... 61
7.80 EZEM ... 17
8.11 EthLink ... 10
27.03 EchoStarl.00e 23
11.21 Eclipsys ... dd
9.70 EduDv .15f 18
16.25 ElectSci ... 32
2.12 EldrgIs ... dd
43.38 ElectArls ... 43
2.34 Entrust ... 67
2.93 E.piphany ... dd
23.18 EricsnTI .36e ...
2.01 EvrgSlIr ... dd
29.15 ExpScripts ... 27
10.93 Eyetech ... dd
40.24 FifthThird 1.40 17
24.12 FstMerit 1.08 19
32.20 Fiser ... 20
10.06 Rextm ... 25
1.90 Forward ... 28
7.95 Foundry ... 51
16.00 FoxHollwn ... dd


62.07 31.51
6.39 2.93
25.95 9.50
17.60 7.76
20.32 15.10
75.26 47.98
11.24 5.15
8.43 1.44
47.99 27.79
7.79 2.00
317.80 95.96
25.88 13.26
33.50 25.10
108.00 18.12
39.94 27.75
46.16 17.77
23.49 13.85
12.79 10.09
15.50 8.51
25.03 16.74
13.42 10.13
28.91 19.16
10.13 2.43
8.24 4.12
62.88 29.51
36.00 11.71
11.16 5.40
57.92 23.64
11.10 5.38
12.15 7.83
13.27 8.88
28.84 19.64
60.59 46.07
13.93 2.11
20.65 13.69
24.38 13.98
49.58 36.21
72.64 18.00
53.44 33.29
6.50 .87


G-H-1
Garmin .50 25
Gemstar ... dd
GenesMcr ... dd
Genitope ... dd
Gentexs .34 30
Genzyme ... cc
GeronCp ... dd
GigaTr ... 50
GileadScis .. '36
GIblePnt ... dd
Googlen ... 84
GrWIfResn ......
HMN Fn .961 13
Hansen ... 41
HarbrFL .80 20
Hologic ... 42
HotTopic ... 21
HudsCitys.28f 28
HumGen ... dd
HuntJBs .24 16
i2Techn ... cc
IAC Interac ... cc
IPIXCp ... dd
Identix ... dd
Imclone ... 38
Immucor s ... 65
Incyle ... dd
InfoSpce ... 6
Informal .. dd
InsightCm ... dd
IntgDv ... 50
Intel .32 19
IntlSpdw .06 16
IntmtlnitJ ... ...
Intersil .16 cc
IntraLasen ... dd
Intuit ... 25
IntSurg ... 77
InvFnSv .08 16
Isonics ... dd


J-K-L
42.16 22.25 j2Glob ... 26
26.40 17.06 JetBlue ... 78


YTD
cha %cha


23 29.65 +2.27 -26.0
... 38.62 -3.90 +86.4
... 4.90 -.26 -57.5
22 24.96 +1.19 -9,5


28 75.80 +6.69 +35.4
.. 2.05 +.12 -35.1
... 14.10 -1.50 +394.6
23 40.47 -.82 -4.0
31 5.62 -.38 +37.1
... 5.19 +.64 -3.9
19 39.98 +3.50 -3.9
56 14.27 -.72 -5.4
... 6.89 +1.22 +175.6
.. 7.05 +.20 +309.9
14 24.99 +.53 -13.1
43 41.78 +.76 -28.2
... 14.80 unc +1.4
10 9.53 +.13 -17.3
13 28.72 -.36 -13.6
46 16.97 +3.17 -16.9
... 10.34 -.06 +0.3
34 22.00 +2.08 +11.3
... 4.15 +.35 -11.9
34 57.60 -3.26 -6.6
40 6.00 +.59 +58.3
.. 3.79 -.01 -21.5
... 34.36 -.02 +9.1
... 7.05 +.42 +61.3
20 52.30 +3.91 +36.8
39 11.37 -.82 -75.0
14 43.10 +.73 -8.9
16 28.29 -.11 -0.7
18 44.37 +.77 +10.4
14 13.54 -.38 -2.0
... 26.75 +6.76+540.0
31 11.84 +.70 -10.0
... 51.29 +8.20+108.6


20 54.89 +3.62 -9.8,
3.08 -.55 -48.0
30 24.84 +.15 +53.1
... 7.95 -4.49 -53.3
23 17.82 +.21 -3.7
30 74.41 +5.63 +28.1
... 10.95 +1.14 +37.4
... 5.45 -1.17 +151.2
27 44.81 +.34 +28.1
... 7.21 +.28 +40.3
44 287.76 -14.64 +49.3
45 13.59 -8.74 -39.2
11 31.60 +.45 -4.2
24 92.40 +.30 +153.8
18 38.38 +.46 +10.9
41 45.59 +7.06 +66.0
16 17.04 -.41 -0.9
20 11.83 +.05 +3.0
.. 14.65 +.01 +21:9
13 19.63 -.31 -12.5
... 21.43 +10.42+111.5
22 26.70 -.09 -3.3
... 3.73 +.35 -35.7
.. 5.39 +.04 -27.0
22 34.70 -1.25 -24.7
25 27.47 -1.09 +16.8
. 7.97 -.79 -20.2
23 24.14 -10.36 -49.2
26 10.57 -.09 +30.2
58 11.57 +.15 +24.8
23 11.56 +.78 unc
18 27.14 +.39 +16.0
18 58.14 -1.07 +10.1
... 9.63 -.13 +97.7
26 19.37 -.10 +15.9
32 20.81 +1.92 -11.4
21 48.00 -.36 +9.1
58 69.40 +19.23 +73.4
16 34.42 +.28 -31.1
... 3.43 +.17 -37.5


19 40.11 +3.36 +16.3
62 21.00 +.04 -9.6


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last


30.25 19.65 JnprNtw ... 51 28
51.56 35.02 KLATnc .48 22 25
35.00 9.42 Komag ... 15 10
56.12 33.30 Kronos ... 30 26
10.60 4.80 Kulicke ... 88 24
42.23 21.91 Kyphon ... 67 39
30.50 13.28 LKQCp ... 30 23
15.55 8.40 LSIlInds .40 25 17
8.35 3.47 LTX ... dd 87
32.61 19.71 LamRsch ... 13 20
43.67 15.27 Lsrscp ... 43 33
4.27 1.55 Leve3 ... dd ...
10.45 2.55 LaexarM ... dd ...
22.10 7.18 Ufaecell ... 65 44
41.67 34.01 UnearTch .40 28 26
19.75 13.10 LodgEnt ... dd ...
2.30 .57 LookSmart ... dd ...
M-N-0
26.18 11.35 M-SysFD ... 34 20
27.74 13.69 MCIInc 1.60 dd ...
30.50 19.75 MGIPhr ... dd 25
13.37 3.87 MIPSTech ... 24 25
38.50 18.95 MTS .32 23 22
44.55 19.33 MarellT ... 70 33
49.00 36.20 Maxim .80 27 24
15.12 7.41 MaxlliT ... dd .
6.73 2.99 McDataA ... dd 16
29.33 21.70 Medlmun ... dd 64
20.87 14.76 MedAct ... 18 15
49.58 31.05 Merclntr ... 41 23
32.88 24.06 Mcrochp .50f 28 24
6.69 3.37 Mromse ,,. 51 18
27.50 23.35 Microsoft .32a 23 17
79.75 29.57 MicroStr ... 8 18
7.18 3.05 Microtune ... 26 ..
14.06 7.63 MillPhar ... dd .
8.10 4.60 Misonlx ... 39 15
34.25 17.60 MnstrWw .. 43 29
24.67 6.52 MullmGm ... 11 17
22.67 8.865 NETgear ... 25 18
10.40 3.35 Napstler ... dd .
40.68 32.35 Nasdl00Tr.41e q ...
16.56 7.25 Nastech ... dd .
12.56 9.75 NatAIIH ...... 7
4.16 1.37 Net2Phn ... dd ...
20.80 8.91 Netflix ... 60 33
34.99 15.92 NetwkAp ... 43 30
34.60 21.18 NextelC ... 18 17
26.81 13.70 NextlPrt ... 64 27
28.30 16.00 NobltyH .20 e 21 17
11.83 3.77 NwstAid ... dd .
27.07 8.54 NvIWrls .. 23 21
7.70 4.94 Novell ... 6 50
30.77 22.89 Novlus ... 25 25
8.72 5.58 NuHoriz ... 50 25
5.29 2.60 NuanceC ... dd ..
21.90 1.09 NutriSys ... cc 43
29.60 9.30 Nvodla ... 33 18
20.91 8.96 OmnlVisn ...11 1 12
6.30 3.99 OnAssrgn ... dd ..
5.94 2.49 OnSmcnd .. dd 17
7.96 3.90 Opsware ... rdd .
14.87 9.78 Oracle ... 24 16
48.61 29.00 Odhfx ... 20 17
29.39 23.77 OtterTall 1.12 18 16
P-Q-R
65.12 40.66 PFChng ... 40 33
12.37 7.42 PMCSra ... 82 31
29.05 17.64 PacSunwr ... 17 14
46.65 20.75 Palm Inc ... 40 17
27.20 7.39 PalmSrce ... 7 47
7.30 4.05 ParmTc ... 17 17
33.00 15.69 PattUTI .16 38 15
35.23 28.60 Paychex .52 36 29
49.26 22.24 PelDv ... 16 15
36.24 25.50 PeltsMad .12 25 21
58.49 18.68 Pharmion ... 67 26
6.24 3.25 PInnSyst ... dd ...
54.57 32.75 Pixars ... 26 41
12.80 6.90 Pxlwrks ... 23 22
8.20 4.62 PlugPower ... dd ..
33.45 15.59 PortlPlayn ...... 18
10.29 4.08 Power-One ... dd ...


YTD
cha %cha


+.15 -11.8
+1.45 +11.0
+3.33 +88.9
+1.32 -8.1
-.08 +12.3
+3.58 +57.8
+3.15 +53.5
-.23 +30.0
+.47 -14.0
-.53 -1.6
+3.80 -7.8
-.05 -39.5
-.46 -37.1
+5.80 +117.1
-2.20 +0.3
-.29 -7.6
-.12 -73,1


+2,40. +31.1
+.04 +26.6
+1.22 -2.5
-2.26 -28.0
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+.87 +23.2
-.53 -1.0
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-.28 -19.0
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+.35 -4.0
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-.64 +16.8
-.16 +1.8
-.07 -4.2
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-.82 -0.3
+.40 -14.9
+.22 +1.5
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-1.72 -33.5
-.29 +14.0
+.82 -45.1
+.16 -0.9
+.35 +18.8
+.13 +4.4
-.02 -46.2
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-1.86 -23.2
+2.06 +16.0
+.67 +27.4
+.40 +15.0
+.05 -57.5
-1.84 -38.0
-.02 -9.9
-.05 +3.4
-.21 -18.4
-.05 +15.9
+5.40 +716.5
+1.23 +14.9
-.18 -23.0
+.21 +3.9.
+.13 +26.2
-.23 -23.7
-.23 -1.1
+1.06 +15.8
-.03 +13.2


52-Wk
Hi Low Name DIv PE PPE Last


11.69 4.54 Powrway ... dd 23 11.47
12.80 7.05 Prestek ... cc 26 12.62
27.74 17.66 PdriHho .. 29 20 27.49
24.40 8.50 ProgPh ... dd ... 23.46
18.44 8.38 QLT ...... 11 8.53
43.66 21.44 Qlogic ... 17 17 31.05
44.99 32.08 Qualcor a .36 34 28 39.48
7.79 3.77 RFMicD .,. dd 43 6.09
23.91 9.75 RSASec ... 25 21 12.95
17.75 10.37 RedHat ... 61 47 15.24
3.50 1.22 Replgn .. dd .,. 3.02
16.28 12.43 RepBcp .44 15 13 14.80
103.56 52.25 RschMotn ... 48 24 70.66
31.37 20.95 RossStrs .20 23 16 26.50
S-T-U
34.16 19.66 SanDisk ... 23 20 33.82
9.35 3.74 Sanmina ... dd 13 4.78
9.35 4.80 Sapient ... 37 22 7.78
163.50 61.76 SearsHIdgs ... 15 22 154.60
24.73 13.14 SelCmfrt ... 24 18 21.31
50.93 33.58 Selctln .76 11 12 49.79
22.43 15.94 Semtech ... 26 f6 18.36
66.55 39.85 Sepracor ... dd ... 52.35
22.67 9.41 'SiRFTch ... 20 35 21.85
10.85 6.97 SiebelSys .10 cc 50 8.40
45.50 13.93 SigmaTel ... 10 13 20.03
41.76 24.62 SilcnLab ... 22 24 29.27
7.90 2.52 SST ... dd ... 4.72
9.43 2.01 SiriusS ... dd ... 6.82
5.60 1.60 SimaThera ... dd ... 4.25
11.10 5.02 SkywksSol ... 28 18 7.33
19.87 9.87 SmurIStne ... ... ... 12.13
23.74 13.56 Sohu.cm ... 23 19 18.18
7.02 3.16 Sonusn .. 61 44 4.84
19.00 13.85 SouMoBc .36 23 ... 14.43
13.37 3.45 Spire ... dd ... 10.47
23.84 17.25 Staples s .17 23 18 22.77
64.26 42.05 Starbucks ... 46 37 52.55
46.40 16.01 StlDyna .40 6 8 32.16
6.77 1.24 StemCells ... dd ... 6.10
5.65 3.29 SunMicro ... ..... 3.84
10.97 4.50 SupporSft ... 55 23 5.50
26.65 20.50 SusqBnc .92 17 15 26.82
34.05 18.01 Symantecs ... 26 19 21.95
12.00 6.29 Symetdic ... 34 21 10.46
41.19 13.53 Synaptics ... 16 14 15.85
6.26 1.00 Synergx ... 42 ... 3.74
12.70 6.95 Synovis ... cc ... 8.90
29.60 20.01 TakeTwos ... 18 17 24.61
33.45 7.33 TASERs ... 51 ... 9.72
46.00 33.04 TechData ... 14 15 38.77
1.96 .68 Tegal ... dd ... .69
5.67 2.20 TeleglbInt ... ... ... 4.33
10.32 6.56 Tellabs ... dd 21 9.72
46.28 15.79 TesseraT ... 25 26 35.12
34.25 22.82 TevaPhrm.24e 20 ... 31.47
5.06 2.96 3Com ... dd ... 3.64
13.50 5.53 TibcoSft ... 31 29 7.69
7.75- 3.45 TiVo Inc ... dd ... 6.25
32.51 9.58 TridMic ... dd 44 32.64
44.55 21.85 TdrmbleN ... 29 25 38.96
14.19 10.73 TrstNY .60 17 16 13.33
32.78 26.69 Trustmk .80 16 14 28.58
6.22 4.26 USUnwirn ... 17 60 6.22
25.59 6.70 UTStrcm ... 20 50 8.82
8.07 2.10 USEnr ... dd ... 4.03
50.05 28.54 UnivPor .10 17 15 49.95
V-W-X-Y-Z
44.20 25.61 VarianS ... 19 21 41.51
36.09 16.21 Verisign ... 30 22 26.31
18.14 8.06 VertxPh ... dd ... 15.95
12.58 1.40 ViroPhmn ... 46 ... 11.59
3.93 1.95 Vitesse ... dd ... 2.22
9.18 4.32 WPCS Intln ... ... ... 7.48
11.50 6.46 WebMD 8... 2 16 10.61
126.2873.21 WholeFd 1.00f 58 49 136.51 .
13.85 5.60 WildOats ... dd 81 13.43
76.45 34.18 Wynn ... dd 78 56.30
40.89 23.55 XM Sat ... dd ... 35.63
33.39 25.21 Xilinx .281 35 27 28.35
39.79 25.52 Yahoo ... 31 49 33.34
62.40 37.44 ZebraTs ... 24 24 39.00
18.70 8.71 Zoran ... dd 30 14.40


52-Wk YTD 52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
18.07 10.89 NokiaCp .44e ... ... 15.95 +.39 +1.8 30.31 21.55 Standex .84 22 ... 29.70 -.02 +4.2
4.23 2.26 NortelNlet ... dd 22 2.63 -.03 -24.2 27.65 19.80 Steris .16 22 19 27.17 +.39 +14.5
30.81 25.24 NoFrkBcs .88 14 12 27.39 -.51 -5.1 36.82 22.95 StorTch ... 21 20 36.73 +.31 +16.2
21.74 17.17 NoestUt .70f dd 17 21.58 +.24 +14.5 11.15 6.41 SturmR .40 75 25 11.19 +2.10 +23.9
52.99 38.61 NoBordr 3.20 18 20 50.65 -.40 +5.1 40.76 33.90 SunCmnts 2.52 cc ... 34.85 +.40 -13.4
58.15 49.54 NodhropGl.04 15 14' 55.45 -.82 +2.0 75.77 64.70 SunTrst 2.20 14 12 72.72 -2.46 -1.6
31.46 23.01 NSTARs 1.16 18 16 30.33 -.04 +11.8 32.62 24.55 TCFFnds.85 14 13 27.47 -.81 -14.5
16.40 14.12 NvFL .88 q ... 16.10 +.16 +5.9 32.35 24.35 TDBknorth.88f 21 13 29.78 +.20 +1.9
16.20 14.09 NvIMO .89 q ... 15.38 -.08 -2.4 19.30 12.18 TECO .76 dd 16 18.96 unc +23.5
30.04 24.10 OGEEngyl.33 18 17 30.38 +.98 +14.6 87.25 39.12 TXUCorp2.25 dd 12 86.64 +1.40 +34.2
83.91 47.76 OcciPet 1.24 9 10 82.28 -.62 +41.0 71.51 44.44 TXUpfD 4.06 ...... 70.38 +1.10 +23.1
28.95 13.87 OflcDpt ... 25 19 28.38 +.32 +63.5 9.57 6.29 TaiwSemi .32r ...... 8.59 -.62 +6.2
25.35 15.93 Olin .80 15 8 18.35 -1.40 -16.7 17.39 12.15 TelNorL 1.36e ...... 15.67 +.29 -7.1
86.54 48.32 OshkshTrk.531 22 17 84.80 +.45 +24.0 25.00 11.25 TempurP .. 18 14 17.21 -.75 -18.8
47.75 37.34 OutbkStk .52 23 17 46.58 +1.05 +1.7 12.93 9.77 TenetHIt ... dd ... 12.14 +.03 +10.6
P-O-R 45.45 37.44 Teppco 2.701 24 22 41.91 +.29 +6.4
P-Q-R 18.97 10.80 Teradyn ... dd 97 15.53 -.40 -9.0
30.38 20.38 PNM Res .801 23 16 29.39 +.72 +16.2 9.38 5.84 Terra ... 18 15 8.40 +.31 -5.4
74.73 56.20 PPG 1.88 16 12 65.03 -.55 -4.6 32.65 11.10 TerraNro2.45e 13 ... 33.95 +4.15 +52.2
61.79 44.70 PPL Corp 1.84 17 14 61.58 +.87 +15.6 40.52 23.71 TetraTech ... 43 21 39.87 +3.87 +40.9
21.71 9.20 PaylShoe ... 92 17 19.42 -1.45 +57.9 32.52 18.08 Texlnst .121 29 22 31.76 +1.03 +29.0
23.45 14.40 Pengrh g2.76 ...... 23.40 +.63 +12.4 4.52 3.04 Theragen ... dd ... 3.53 +.29 -13.1
57.15 35.90 PenVaRs2.60f ... 19 51.80 +.46 -0.6 30.98 23.94 ThermoEl ... 14 18 29.86 +.69 -1.1
57.99 34.03 Penney .50 25 16 56.14 -1.44 +35.6 33.88 23.19 ThmBet ... 18 17 33.77 +2.42 +9.8
21.64 11.83 PepBoy .27 cc 44 13.59 -.32 -20.4 87.45 71.03 3MCo 1.68 19 17 75.00 +.29 -8.6
57.20 47.37 PepsiCo 1.04 22 20 54.53 -.30 +4.5 38.00 27.00 Tiffany .321 16 21 34.03. -.12 +6.4
26.35 18.29 PepsiAmer .34 19 18 25.78 +.02 +21.4 19.90 15.41 TimeWam .20 24 20 17.02 +.38 -12.5
17.23 9.50 Prmian 1.15e 15 ... 15.90 -1.23 +14.0 29.50 22.50 Timken .60 15 11 26.47 +.03 +1.7
33.05 21.99 Pfizer .76 20 13 26.50 unc -1.5 23.09 11.30 TitanCp ... dd 19 23.09 +.08 +42.5
24.99 20.15 PiedNG a .92 21 18 24.72 +.31 +6.4 20.15 14.85 ToddShp .40 12 ... 19.01 -.24 +5.0
13.29 10.75 PimcoStrat.89a q ... 12.50 -.10 +3.6 58.67 18.55 TollBrss ... 16 11 55.42 -1.58 +61.6
47.50 40.62 PitnyBw 1.24 21 16 44.58 +1.15 -3.7 8.22 5.90 TorchEn .68e ...... 7.20 +.15 +10.8
39.45 30.44 PlumCrk 1.52 20 22 37.85 +1.17 -1.5 57.57 49.28 Trchmrk .44 12 11 52.27 +.26 -8.3
40.17 27.50 PostPrp 1.80 20 ... 39.91 +1.47 +14.4 47.21 32.45 TorDBkg 1.60 ... 13 45.71 -.83 +9.7
50.12 37.59 Praxair .72 21 18 49.39 +.68 +11.9 126.8693.54 TotalSA3.53e ...... 125.00 +.69 +13.8
21.15 10.10 Prestigen ... dd 12 11.25 -8.35 -36.6 28.66 20.95 TotalSys .24f 27 23 24.56 -.44 +1.1
57.40 50.53 ProctGaml.12 21 19 55.63 +.64 +1.0 30.01 24.00 TwnCtry 1.72 cc 29.04 +.35 +5.1
46.10 40.47 ProgrssEn2.3 19 14 44.61 +.16 -1.4 58.98 25.94 Transocn ... 83 19 56.43 -2.24 +33.1
4.00 3.05 ProsStHiln .27 q .. 3.43 -.02 -3.4 20.71 14.37 Tredgar .16 19 14 16.11 -.56 -20.3
64.32 38.10 PSEG 2.24 21 18 64.30 +2.21 +24.2 18.61 15.79 TriCont .24f q 18.46 -.02 +1.0
81.80 67.00 PSEG pfA4.08 ...... 79.00 unc -0.3 38.58 27.27 Tycolnt .40 28 14 30.47 -.13 -14.7
24.81 20.73 PugetEngyl.00 40 16 23.38 --.31 -5.3 586.11 44.50 UILHold 2.88 9 23 54.48 -.87 +6.2
7.19 6.39 PHYM .38 q ... 7.07 -.01 +6.3 45.75 25.50 UniFirst .15 20 18 44.51 -.43 +57.4
10.09 9.13PIGM .60 q ... 9.71 +.02 +1.8 25.62 18.83 UDomR 1.20 33 25.45 +1.00 +2.6
6.81 6.00 PPrT .36a q 6.31 +.02 -4.1 4.45 3.08 UtdMicro .321 30 3.85 -.37 +9.1
63.38 26.87 Quanexs .54 14 11 61.00 unc +33.4 31 2880USncpl.20 13 12 30.06 53 4.0
4.87 2.56 QwestCm dd ... 3.82 +.03 -14.0 3.9 0 32.12 USSteel .40 13 12 6 402.06 -.53 -4.0
19.95 13.85 RPM .60 21 13 18.75 -.22 -4.6 3.90 32.12 USSItee .40 4 6 42.65 +.0 -16.0
34.48 22.81 RadioShk .25 12 12 23.47 -.26 -28.6 54.20 44.24 UtdTechs .88 17 50.70 -.44 -1.9
48.00 33.90 Ralcorp 1.00e 18 17 43.00 +2.85 +2.6 54.50 30.04 Utdhlths .02 23 19 52.30 +1.50 +18.8
34.21 21.77 RJamesFn.32 16 14 29.85 -.33 -3.6 66.79 34.65 Unocal .80 13 11 64.85 -.15 +50.0
57.98 43.29 Rayonier 2.48 33 25 -57.04 +2.84 +16.6 V-W-X-Y-Z
26.08 19.68 Rftyilnosl.34 22 22 24.99 +.23 -1.2
35.97 29.24 RegionsFnl.38 16 13 33.64 -.27 -5.5 27.37 16.75 ValeantPh .31 dd 53 19.73 +.81 -25.1
28.50 19.92 Repsol 63e 27.87 +.05 +6.8 868.30 31.79 ValeroEs .40f 10 10 82.78 -.57 +82.3
14.34 6.02 RetailVent ... dd 48 13.79 +.04 +94.2 4.60 3.40 VKHilncT .88 q ... 3.78 +.04 -7.6
3.73 1.96 Revlon ... dd ... 3.74 +.41 +62.6 29.46 24.08 Vectren 1.18 18 16 28.98 +.09 +8.1
4.93. 3.02 RiteAid ... 10 75 4.49 +.24 +22.7 42.27 33.71 VerizonCml.62 11 13 34.23 +.06, -15.5
62.15 59.50 RoyDShAn.55p ... ;. 61.28 +.08 -1.2 38.99 31.80 ViacomB .28 dd ... 33.49 +.61 -8.0
20.80 16.70 Royce 1.66e q ... 20.15 +.52 -1.4 35.67 15.11 VintgPt .22 7 12 35.13 -.35 +54.8
28.54 20.83 Vodafone .75e ...... 25.83 +.85 -5.7
S-T-U 30.91 19.00 Wabash .18 7 8 21.51 +.74 -20.1
27.29 22.78 SBC Coi 1.29 17 15 24.45 +.73 -5.1 56.28 43.05 Wachovia1.84 13 11 50.38 -.14 -4.2
43.65 35.73 SCANA 1.56 20 15 42.03 -.55 +6.7 57.89 46.20 WalMart .60 20 17 49.35 -.19 -6.6
85.25 41.00 StJoe .56 68 39 81.39 -1.79 +26.8 48.09 34.89 Walgm .26f 31 27 47.86 +1.18 +24.7
43.11 30.23 StPaulTrav.92f 16 9 44.02 +2.93 +18.7 43.90 37.51 WAMutl 1.921 12 11 42.48 -.58 +0.5
17.04 12.37 SalEMInc21.65a q .. 13.80 +.18 -16.2 31.42 28.03 WsteMInc .80 13 17 28.12 -1.23 -6.1
13.91 11.36 SalmSBF.14e q ... 13.85 +.11 +6.5 15.42 6.38 Welimn .20 dd 8 8.34 -2.24 -22.0
46.13 24.50 SJuanB 2.94e 17 ... 45.46 +.99 +54.4 71.79 36.10 WellPoints .u. 23 16 70.74 +3.72 +23.0
21.59 16.56 SchergPI .22 dd 44 20.82 +.28 -0.3 64.04 56.12 WellsFrgo2.08f 14 13 61.34 -.41 -1.3
85.74 58.64 Schlmnb .84 31 23 83.74 +1.46 +25:1 48.50 31.74 Wendys .54 cc 22 51.70 +6.13 +31.7
14.23 8.27 Schwab .091 53 22 13.70 -.11 +14.5 24.47 19.58 WestarEn .92 12 15 24.33 +.08 +6.4
36.00 28.30 ScotlPw 1.65e ...... 35.34 -.07 +13.4 13.85 12.22 WAstTIP2.82a q ... 12.48 -.08 -2.7
21.50 10.11 SeagateT .321 14 10 19.37 +1.06 +12.2 16.10 6.39 WDigitl ... 16 12 14.99 +.85 +38.3
24.25 18.70 Sensient .60 13 13 19.01' +.15 -20.8 71.85 59.59 Weyerh 2.00 12 17 68.98 +.64 +2.6
26.70 14.43 ShopKo ... 16 16 25.45 +.25 +36.2 18.98 14.00 WilmCS 1.45e 11 ... 17.17 +.62 +7.5
47.60 36.26 Shurgard2.24f 57 77 46.90 +.66 +6.6 40.64 28.32 Winnbgo .38f 19 16 38.59 +3.02 -1.2
13.14 7.70 SierrPac ... 28 22 12.98 +.43 +23.6 40.31 31.12 WiscEn .88 14 16 40.15 +1.20 +19.1
2.03 .55 SilcnGph h ... dd ... 71 +.07 -59.0 22.73 15.11 Worthgtn .68 9 13 17.68 -.12 -9.7
79.79 48.65 SimonProp2.80 55 56 79.74 +2.93 +23.3 72.60 59.50 Wrigley 1.12 30 27 71.14 +1.63 +2.8
32.80 21.62 SmithAO .64 28 14 27.00 -.61 -9.8 37.73 19.05 XTOEgys.20 18 13 35.09 -1.17 +32.2
6.69 3.08 Solectm ...... 18 3.84 +.14 -28.0 19.70 16.32 XcelEngy .861 25 15 19.41 +.15 +6.6
35.92 29.10 SouthnCo 1.49 17 16 34.99 +.03 +4.4 17.24 12.87 Xerox ... 13 13 13.21 -.84 -22.3
24.79 20.05 SovrgnBcp.16 16 12 23.99 -.35 +6.4 34.64 26.42 YankCdl .25 18 14 30.30 -2.30 -8.7
26.75 17.80 SpmtFON .50 dd 17 26.90 +1.62 +8.2 5.36 5.00 ZweigTI .54 q .. 5.16 +.02 -3.6


A A NE A


YTD 52-Wk YTD 52-Wk
chg %chg HI Low Name Div PEPPE Last chg %chg HI Low Name DIv PEPPE


+2.42 +35.4
-.61 -43.6
-.76 -1.6
-5.02 +56.2
+.81 +18.8
+.89 +12.5
+.12 -15.9
-2.14 -11.8
+2.89 +71.8
-.24 -19.9
+.38 -43,6
+1.67 -17.1
-.13 -20.7
-.11 -10.5
+1.62 +34.1
-.53 -22.3
+.58 -35.1
-3.02 +2.7
+.02 -15.5
-.08 -22.0
+.38 +138.4
-.61 +1.3
+1.23 -15.7
-.71 -15.1
+.85 +44.2
-.04 -28.8
-.29 -17.4
+.96 +7.5
-1.66 -14.8
-.24 +7.7
-5.41 -48.2
+.62 +4.8
+.20 -17.7
-.69 +6.1
+.13 -69.3
+.01 -14.6
-.04 -57.7
+.64 +6.4
+.98 +13.2
+3.09 -5.6
+.31 +5.4
+.07 -12.7
+.31 -42.4
-.38 +6.5
+4.32 +95.2
-4.43 +17.9
-.05 -3.3
-.51 -8.0
+.02 +36.4
-.15 -60.2
+.56 +36.1
+1.36 +15.1


3,90 119 AMrn .. oP ..s 2.28
6.90 5.71 AbdAsPac .42 q ... 6.29
4.45 1.21 Abraxas ... 7 16 4.59
25.80 12.50 AdmRsc .30 8 ... 21.19
3.39 .78 Adventrx ,. dd ... 2.83
2.65 1.75 AmOrBlo n ......... 2.40
3.85 1.62 AvanirPh ... dd ... 3.26
3.87 1.70 BemaGold ... dd ... 2.17
194.37127.79 BiotechT .04e q ... 191.76
17.50 13.16 BrdbdHT .08e q ... 17.32
20.83 16.85 CarverBcp.321 17 13 17.03
39.77 7.89 Chenieres ... dd .. 33.99
40.00 4.80 CogentCrs ... dd ... 7.25
13.60 7.55 ComSys .28 17 15 10.22
13.47 2.31 CoreMold ... 12 ... 8.02
4.68 2.00 Crystallxg ... ... ... 2.76
22.70 6,50 DHBInds ... 11 11 7.61
109.83 97.27 DJIA Diam2.10e q ... 106.63
6.50 1.15 ENGIobal ... 53 ... 6.38
8.25 7.15 Elswth' .30e q ... 7.80
15.70 13.71 FTrVLDv .38a q ... 15.14
15.33 10.60 FlaPUtils .41 20 ... 14.99
4.48 2.85 GascoEnn ... dd ... 3.95
9.35 .77 GeoGlobal ......... 7.12
4.05 1.85 GlobeTel n ......... 2.09
5.69 2.33 GoldStrg ... dd 25 3.02


+.bb -0z,5
-.02 -2.9
+.67 +97.8
-.16 +20.1
+.03 +152.7
+.10 +29.7
-.09 -4.4
-.10 -28.9
+2.01 +25.4
+.43 +3.7
-.02 -14.9
+.47 +6.7
+.20 -66.4
-.28 -14.9
-3.28 +189.5
-.48 -23.1
-1.43 -60.0
+.15 -0.8
+.43 +105.8
. +.06 -3.5
+.07 -1.9
-.06 +17.4
-.15 -7.3
-1.05 +634.0
-.10 -46.7
-.13 -24.7


.as va./ 5 reywoir ... z
28.50 4.40 Gurunet n ... dd
2.08 1.06 HomeSol ... 18
25.99 14.73 iShBrazil .46e q
13.34 10.02 IShHK .27e q
11.09 9.36 iShJapan .04e q
36.06 21.59 iShKor .10e q
7.80 6.26 iShMalasia.16e q
29.45 18.35 iShMexico.28e q
8.22 6.06 iShSing .28e q
13.00 9.51 iShTaiwan.08e q
124.63106.64 iShSP5002.46e q
77.40 50.77 iShEmMkts.80e q
113.80107.55 iShGSCpBS.57e q
97.00 83.04 iSh20TB4.04e q
82.85 80.62 iShl-3TB1.94e q
55.36 44.47 iSh EAFE s.80e q
77.90 61.22 iShNqBio ... q
69.23 57.34 iShR1000V1.53e q
50.75 43.06 iShR1000G.58e q
67.57 56.79 iShRus10001.28eq
68.44 52.10 iShR2000Vsl1.08eq
69.67 52.02 iShR2000G.26e q
68.00 51.11 iShRs2000s.77e q
68.15 49.34 iShREsts2.55e q
58.63 43.47 IShSPSmls.49e q


YTD
Last chg %chg


14.65
... 2.14
25.37
... 13.18
... 10.25
... 35.99
... 7.44
... 29.43
... 8.11
12.25
..123.70
... 77.10
... 110.75
.. 93.11
.. 80.75
. 53.96
... 76.00
... 68.70
... 50.44
... 67.10
... 68.18
... 69.60
... 67.89
... 67.80
.. 58.40


M E A EA


Foreign Exchange
Value/ Prev Value Todays/ Prev$
Country name Currency In dollars value In currency
Argent Peso .3495 .3491 2.8612 2.8645
Australia Dollar .7584 .7591 1.3186 1.3173
Brazil Real .4191 .4140 2.3860 2.4155
Britain Pound 1.7576 1.7576 .5690 .5690
Canada Dollar .8167 .8128 1.2244 1.2303
Chile Peso .001785 .001776 560.25 563.05
China Yuan .1234 .1233 8.1051 8.1075
Colombia Peso .000433 .000432 2307.10 2313.10
Czech Rep Koruna .0402 .0403 24.86 24.84
Denmark Krone .1626 .1627 6.1510 6.1445
Dominican Rep Peso .0345 .0346 28.99 28.93
Egypt Pound .1732. .1732 5.7750 5.7750
Euro Euro 1.2129 1.2139 .8245 .8238
Hong Kong Dollar .1287 .1287 7.7730 7.7714
Hungary Forint .0050 .0050 201.85 201.85
India Rupee .0230 .0230 43.490 43.470
Indnsia Rupiah .000102 .000102 9800.00 9830.00
Israel Shekel .2212 .2209 4.5217 4.5270
Japan Yen '.008904 .008920 112.31 112.11
Jordan Dinar 1.4114 1.4114 .7085 .7085
Kuwait Dinar 3.4258 3.4258 .2919 .2919
Lebanon Pound .000666 .000666 1501.00 1501.00
Malaysia Ringgit .2667 .2666 3.7500 3.7505
Mexico Peso .094420 .09426C 10.5910 10.6080
N. Zealand Dollar .6823 .6835 1.4656 1.4631
Norway Krone .1542 .1533 6.4833 6.5220
Pakistan Rupee .0168 .0168 59.62 59.62
Peru New Sol .3073 .3073 3.254 3.254
Philpins Peso .0178 .0178 56.14 56.14
Poland Zloty .2985 .2985 3.35 3.35
Russia Ruble .0349 .0349 28,6150 28.6651
SDR SDR 1.45186 1.45011 .6888 .6896
Saudi Arab Riyal .2667 .2667 3.7501 3.7500
Singapore Dollar .6017 .6011 1.6820 1.6637
Slovak Rep Koruna .0311 .0311 32.11 32.16
So. Africa Rand .1528 .1518 6.5451 6.5876
So. Korea Won .000974 .000973 1027.20 1027.50
Sweden Krona .1288 .1291 7.7634 7.7482
Swtzerind Franc .7767 .7781 1.2875 1.2851
Taiwan Dollar .0314 .0314 31.82 31.85
Thailand Baht .02402 .02394 41.63 41.77
U.A.E. Dirham .2723 .2723 3.6728 3.6727
Uruguay NewPeso .0409 .0408 24.4750 24.5250
Venzuel Bolivar .00046 .000466 2147.30 2147.30


Spot Metals


NEW YORK (AP)_ Spot nonferrous metal prices Friday.
Aluminum 84.0 cents per lb., London Metal Exch. Fri.
Copper -175.00 cents Cathode full plate, U.S. destinations.
Copper 168.75 cents per lb., N.Y. Merc spot Fri.
Lead $878.00 per metric ton, London Metal Exch.
Zinc 58.3-58.63 cents Ib., delivered.
Gold $429.00 Handy & Harman (only daly quote).
Gold- $429.90 troy oz.,NY Marc spot Fri. -
Silver S7.245 Handy & Harman (only daily quote),
Silver $7.238 troy oz., N.Y. Mer spot Fri.
Mercury $750.00 per 76 Ib flask, N.Y.
Platinum -$885.00. troy oz., N.Y. (contract).
Platinum $897.90 troy oz., N.Y. Mearc spot Fri.
n,q.-not quoted, na.-not available r-revised

Money Rates
Today Prev.
Prime Rate 6.25 6.25
Discount Rate Primary 4.25 4.25
Fed Funds close 3.31 3.25
T-Bills:
3-month 3.33 3.30
6-month 3.57 3.51
T-Bill, annualized, adjusted for
constant maturity:
1-year 3.68 3.59
T-Notes:
1-year 3.90 3.79
2-year 4.02 3.91
5-year 4.12 4.03
10-year 4.28 4.22
T-Bond:
30-year 4.57 4.44
Ubor:
3-month 3.70 3.66
6-month 3.92 3.88
FHLB Cost of Funds, 11tl District:
Eff. June. 30 2.622 2.622
FNMA 30-year mortgage commitment:
30-days 5.63 5.69
Money market fund:
Merrill Lynch Ready Assets:
30-day avg yld: 2.63 2.60


Crnc Cls


&& UNDAY, JUY PV:


I


2D s DAYJULY 31 2005













CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MUTmALS


SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 3D


M UTULFUD


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
AARP Invst:
CapGrr 4593 +42 +154
GNMA x 14.98 -.06 +4.3
Global 2850 +55 +27.0
Gr0Inc 2249 +15 +147
Intl 4535 +.53 +21.2
MgdMunn 9 19 -03 +5.8
PathwayCnsv 11.77 + 05 +10 1
PathwyGro 1351 + 09 +14 1
ShtTermBd x 1002 -.05 +1.6
SmCoSt n 26 7 + 54 +26.9
ABN AMRO Funds:
GrwthN 2318 +.15 +94
M&CGroN 2369 +42 +10.1
AIM Investments A:
Agrsv p 1078 +.12 +18.7
BasicValA p 3347 +,45 +14.7
BlChlpAp 11.80 +08 +10.1
CapDe p 19.22 +18 +21.8
Chart p 13.16 +.15 +11.2
Constlp 2338 +.35 +14.0
HYIdA p 448 -01 +100
IntlGrow 2099 +.33 +25.4
MdCpCrEq 30.40 +.48 +16.7
MuBp 8.17 -.01 +6.7
PremEqty 10.16 +10 +12.7
RealEst p 28.40 +.39 +38.6
SelEqty 18.10 +,02 +15.3
SmCpGrA p 29.32 +.32 +22.0
Summill 11.42 +.14 +18.3
WemgAp 13.58 +.11 +16.4
AIM Investments B:
BasicValB t 31.49 +.42 +13.9
BlueChipBt 11.16 +.08 +9.3
CapDevBt 17.89 +.17 +21.0
PremEqty 9.38 +.08 +11.8
AIM Investor Cl:
Dynamc 17.47 +21 +23.4
Energy 37.79 +2.02 +54.2
SmCoGrlp 13.16 +.23 +270
Tech 24.95 -.13 +14.3
Utilities 13.46 +16 +36.6
AMF Funds:
AdjMtg n 9.73 +1.9
Advance Capital I:
Balanced np 18.19 +02 +11.7
Retnc n 10.06 -.01 +7.6
AegisValFund 19.10 +.36 +14.4
Alger American:
Growth 37.13 +33 +19.0
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr I 4.74 +09 +26.1
Alger Funds Instl:
MidCpGrl 17.75 +22 +24.4
Alleglant Cl I:
SCapVall 22.40 +35 +21.1
AllianceBemrn A:
AmGvlncA 7.57 -05 +12,3
BalanAp 17.36 -.02 +11.2
GIblTechA p 56.96 +16.0
GrolncA p 3.79 ... +13.1
GrowhA p 35.76 +.51 +22.4
IntValA p 16.81 +.18 +26.2
LgCapGrAp 19.14 +.30 +17.8
SmCapGrA 23.65 +.38 +22.3
AllianceBern Adv:
GrincAdv 3.80 -.01 +13.2
IntiValAdv 17.02 +.19 +26.6
LgCapGrAdv 19.75 +.31 +18.2
AllianceBem B:
AmGvlncB 7.56 -.06 +11.3
CorpBdB p 12.19 +.01 +7.4
GIbTechB t 51.43 +15.1
GrIncB p 3.72 .. +12.4
GrowthB t 24.81 +.35 +21.4
LgCpGrB t 17.28 +.27 +17.0
SmCpGrBt 19.92 +32 +21.4
USGovItBp 7.04 -.02 +4.0
AllianceBern C:
GrthncC t 3.73 ... +12.4
SmCapGrC t 19.97 +.33 +21.5
Allianz Funds A:
SmCpV A 31.69 +.68 +29.6
RenalsA 25.07 +.12 +7.4
Value A 17.73 -.04 +10.6
Allianz Funds B:
RenaisB 23.51 +.11 +6.6
Allianz Funds C:
RenasC t 23.36 +.11 +6.5
GwthCi 18.23 +15 +14.2
TargetC 16.25 +.20 +18.3
Alpine Funds:
US RE 48.83 +.53 +69.7
AmSouth Fds Cl I:
Value 17.41 +.06 +20,0
Amer Beacon AMR:
BalAmr 14.65 +.01 +16.8
LgCapAmr 20.88 +.08 +24.3
Amer Beacon Insti:
InUlEqlns 20.31 +10 +19.9
SmCplnst 21.59 +.31 +27.5
Amer Beacon Plan:
SmCpPlan 21.19 +.30 +27.2
Amer Century Adv:
EqGrop 23.19 +.22 +18.4
Eqylnc np 8.27 +.04 +12.8
Amer Century Ins:
Eqtylndex 4.92 +.02 +14.1
Ultra 29.75 +.18 +11.0
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n 16.95 +.09 +12.6
EqGrolv n 23.21 +.23 +18.7
Eqlnco n 8.27 +.04 +13.1
GNMAIn 10.35 -.01 +4.0
Gi n 16.60 +.21 +22.2
Growthl n 20.15 +.15 +14.5
Hertagal n 12.93 +.17 +22.7
ncGro n 31.66 +.18 +16.0
TInEBnd 13.59 *.07 +5.9
InDisc nr 13.93 +.20 +22.9
InlGrol n 9.10 +.0 +17.1
UfeSci n 5.24 -.02 +19,4
NewOppinr 5.758 +.09 +18.3
OneChgAggn 11.19 +.08 NE
RealEsll n 27.54 +.41 +36.0
Selectl n 30.18 +.25 +8.1
SGov n 9.43 -.01 +1.5
SnCapVaIn 10.94 +.18 +25.6

StrMd n 6.86 +.04 +12.7
Ultra n 29.42 +.18 +10.8
Utl n 13.47 +.01 +35.9
Valuelnv n 7.62 +.04 +15.1
Vista n 15.09 +.18 +19.3
Amer Express A:
Cal 5.23 -.02 +6.4
Discovery 9.31 +.13 +28.8
DEI 11.66 +.16 +24.0
DiorBd 4.86 -.01 +5.0
DivOppA 7.45 +.03 +22.5
EqSelect 13.66 +.17 +19.0
EqyVal p 10.63 +.15 +21.5
Growth 28.14 -.07 +172
HiYldBond 2.91 -.01 +10.6
HiYletd 4.45 -.01 +5.4
Insr 5.45 -.01 +4.9
LgCpEqA p 5.25 ... +12.8
MgdAII p 9.81 +.07 +17.6
Mass 5.40 -.01 +5.2
Mich 5.31 -.01 +5.0
Minn 5.31 -.02 *+4.9
Mutual p 9.91 ... +11.9
NewD 24.04 +.15 +8.2
NY 5.14 -.01 +5.2
Ohio 5.30 -.02 +4.9
PrecMt 8.86 +.32 +4.6
Select 8.63 -.01 +4.6
SDGovt 477 ... +1.7
SmColndex 8.96 +.13 +27.1
Slock p 19.80 +.13 +12.8
TE Bond 3.89 -.01 +5.4
Thdllnt, 5.93 +.07 +23.8
CThd[ntl 7.23 +.07 +17.1
Amer Express B:
DivrEqlnct 11.62 +.16 +23.1
EqVal p 10.64 +.14 +20.5
NewDt 22.69 +.14 +7.4
Amer Express Prtnr:
InoSelVal p 8.52 +.11 +23,8
SmCpVlAp 7.16 +.13 +22.2
Amer Express Y:
NewD n 24.17 +.15 +8.4
American Funds A:
AmcapFA p 18.77 +.13 +13.9
AmMutA p 27.07 +.07 +13.1
BalAp 18,14 -.06 +9,8
BondFdA p 13.43 -.01 +5.7
CaplnBiA p 53.18 +.20 +17.1
M CapWdAp 19.26 +.07 +9.5
CapWGrAp 34.76 +.34 +22.0
EspacAp 37.14 +.44 +21.7
FundlnvAp 33.64 +.43 +19.6
GovtAp 13.62 -.02 +3.8
GwthFdAp 29.09 +.35 +18.7
9HiTstA p 12.42 +10.2
'HilncMunAi 15.61 -.03 +7.0
IncoFdA p 18.63 +.02 +14.5
IntBdAp 13.57 -.02 +2.5
InvCoAAp 31.43 +.12 +14.1
LIdTEBdA p 15.36 -.04 +3.4
NwECOnAp 21.64 +.24 +17.3
NewPerA p 28.16 +.27 +17.0
NewWorldA 34.84 +.39 +29.4
SmCpWA0 p 33.25 +.63 +25.7
TaxExptAp 12.02 -.04 +5.6
TxExCAA p 16.75 -.06 +6.2
WshMu0A5 p 31.32 +,.06 +12.8
American Funds B:
AmcapBt 18.15 +,13 +13.0
BalanBt 18.09 -.06 +9.0
BondBt 13,43 -,01 +4.9
CapilalBBI 53.16 +.20 +16.2
CapWGrB0 0 34.63 +.33 +21.1
SEurpacB+ t 36.71 +.43 +20.9
FundlnvB I 33.56 +.42 +18.7
GrowlhBt 28.16 +*33 +17.8
HI TnstB t 12.42 ... +9.3
+ecomeBt 18.53 +.01 +13,6
[CABI 31.30 +.12 +13.2
NewPersp t 27.70 +.26 +16.1
WashB 31.15 +.05 +12.0
Ame50stckMF 40.42 -.19 +7.9
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 49.34 +.25 +17.0
Arel n 55.39 +.69 +19.0
Artisan Funds:
Inle 22.29 +,14 +1796
MidCap 30.62 +.35 +20.3
MidCapVal 19562 +.25 +34.6
SmCapVal .19.40 +.36 +27.7
Baron Funds:
Asset n 55.99 +.99 +28.9


Growth 47.57 +.04 +30.3
Partners p 17.97 +.22 +40.8
SmICap 23.74 +.42 +26.6
Bernstein Fds:
InlDur 1333 -.02 +5.0
Ca Mu 14.26 -04 +3.2
DivMun 14.10 -.04 +3.0
NYMun 13.95 -.04 +3.2
TxMgdlntlVI 2289 +.33 +19.6
IntVal2 ,21.49 +.28 +19.5
EmgMkts 38.42 +.54 +54.1
BlackRock A:
Aurora A 42.02 +.87 +20.0
HYdlnvA 8.14 +101 +10.4
LegacyA p 13.80 +05 +14.4
.BlackRock Fds Birk:
CoreBIrk 970 -.01 +4.9
Bramwell Funds:
GrowthFd p 20.46 +.36 +12.3
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd 30.72 +.65 +28,9
Brandywine n 29.78 +.73 +30.0
Brinson Funds Y:
HighYIdY n 7.23 -.04 +9.9
Buffalo Funds:
SmICap 29.14 +.18 +27.9
CGaM Funds:
CapDeovn 32.54 +1,21 +455


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
FocusFd n 3522 +1 19 +41.8
Mull n 28.04 + 63 +27.7
Realty n 34.21 +1.11 +60.0
CRM Funds:
MidCapVall 27.29 +.28 +24.0
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncC 30.48 +.22 +13.5
Grth&lncAp 3030 +22 +143
GrowthA p 5303 +27 +185
GrowvthSI 5470 +28 +176
GrolrhCot 5090 +26 +17.6
Calvert Group:
lncop 17,11 +5.7
IntlEqAp 18.71 +17 +153
MuBdCAI 1034 -.01 +1,2
Munlnt 1088 -.02 +3.3
SocialAp 28.31 +.12 +117
SocBdp 16.25 -.01 +72
SocEqA p 36 10 +36 +14.6
TxFLIdn 10.59 +.01 +1.6
TxFLng p 16.76 -.03 +5.6
TxF VT 15.87 -.04 +3.8
Causeway Intl:
Institutional 16.33 +.02 +19.3
Investor r 16.25 +103 +19.1
CitiStreet Funds:
DivBond 12.02 -.01 +5.1.
LgCoStk 12.17 +.08 +17.0
Chipper 89.09 -.33 +8.0
Cohen & Steers:
InslRItyn 49.99 +.71 +435
RltyShrs n 76.90 +1.09 +433
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 27.46 +.50 +26.7
FedSec 10.67 -.02 +4.8
TxExAp 1373 -.06 +7.5
Columbia Class B:
Acorn 1 26.57 +,49 +25.8
Columbia Class C:
Acorn 26.55 +49 +25.7
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 28.07 +.51 +27.1
AcorrilntlZ 30.68 +50 +29 5
AcmrnUSA 27.19 +.39 +28.4
IntmBdZn 9.01 -.02 +5.3
LgCapGrwth 21.39 +.03 +14.5
LargeCo n 28.61 +.14 +14.2
MidCapGr Z 22.12 +.31 +26.7
QltyPlusBd 10.79 -.02 +4.7
SmCaZ 19.65 +40 +2049
SmallCo n 2291 +.46 +27.9
Columbia Funds:
HYId Zn 8.66 -.02 +6.8
IntlSlkZ n 15.13 +.10 +146
ReEsEqZ 2856 +.38 +34.0
CG Cap Mkt Fds:
IntlEq 10.72 +.08 +19.0
LgGrm 1280 +.19 +16.9
LgValn 11.55 +.10 +18.0
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 32.06 +120 +16.7
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 30.63 +.19 +15.8
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 32.46 +.20 +17.1
NYVenC 30.83 +.19 +15.8
Delaware Invest A:
LgCapValA 18.89 +.08 +12.7
TrendA p 21.51 +.29 +17.5
TxUSA p 11.67 -03 +8.1
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.32 -.01 +11.8
SelGrB t 21.54 +.39 +19.7
Del-Pooled Trust:
EmgMkt 16.29 +.27 +45 2
IntlEq 19.86 +.20 +22.1
Dimensional Fds:
EmgMklVal 20.52 +.35 +489
IntSmVan 1640 +.20 +29.9
TMUSSm 22.52 +.49 +26.6
USLgCo0n 36.22 +.17 +14.4
USLgVa n 21.33 +.18 +23.8
USLgVa3 n 16.42 +.13 +24.0
US Micro 15.71 +.41 +26.0
US Small n 20.51 +43 +25.7
US SmVal 28.65 +.79 +28.5
InlSmCom n 14.99 +.16 +23.9
EmgMktn 17.92 +.34 +41.7
Fixd n 10.15 ... +1.7
IntVa n 16.54 +.23 +24.2
Glb5Fxlnc 10.57 +.01 +4.3
LrgCaplnt n 17.78 +.11 +17.2
TM USSmV 25.21 +66 +27.9
TM InlValue 14.48 +.20 +23.6
TMMktwdeV 14.71 +.18 +25.4
TMUSEq 13.01 +.09 +16.5
2YGIFxdZn 9.87 ... +1.5
DFARIEst n 25.54 +.31 +38.6
DIversifd Inv Fds:
CoreBond 12.54 ... +4.5
lEr0ow p 19.63 +19 +15.3
Val&lnc 25.21 +.10 +15.7
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced n 80.44 +.27 +13.7
IncomeFd 12.76 .. +4.6"
InllStk 31.88 +.21 +27.1
Stock 133.18 +.66 +20.0
Domini Soc Inv:
SodalEqn 29.69 +.20 +11.0
Dreyfus:
Aprec 39.81 -.11 +9.4
BasIcS&P 25.74 +.13 +14.3
Discp o 32.97 +.07 +14.4
Dreyfus 10.37 +.04 +12.6
DreyMid r 28.35 +.37 +24.6
Drey500n1t 36.16 +.17 +14.0
EmgLead 46.51 +1.01 +20.8
FLIntr 13.29 -.04 +3.5
GNMAo p 14.59 -.01 +3.7
GNlncn 15,49 ... +11.7
InsMunnl 118.00 -.04 +6.1
Intem nr 13.44 -.04 +4.1
MidcpVIr 34.40 +.49 +23.4
MunBdr 11.93 -.03 +6.8
NYTax r 14.93 -05 +5.4
SIrValAr 29.52 +.20 +20.0
Dreyfus Founders:
G0owlhB 10.18 +.02 +12.0
GrowthF np 10.668 +.03 +13.0
Dreyfus Premier:
CalTxExBdZ 14.91 -.05 +7.1
CoreEqAt 14.80 -.06 +7.8
CoreVlntp 30.79 +.03 +15.3
EmgMktA 21.15 +.25 +37.5
LtdHYIdAp 7.38 -.01 +7.8
NwLdrsn 45.63 +1.21 +22.8
TaxMgdGC t 15.74 -.06 +6.8
TechGroA 22.74 +.22 +13.0
TechGrowR +... 13.5
Eaton Vance Adv:
FIgRate t 9.88 ... +3.
Eaton Vance Cl A:
TMGl.0 540.62 +4.98 +12.9
ChinaA p 15.01 +.27 +29.2
FloatRae 10.22 ... +3.7
GrowthA 7.33 +.11 +12.9
HlhSciA p 10.69 +.03 +9.4
IncBosA 6.44 +.01 +9.9
LgCpVal 18.11 +.18 +23.3
NatlMun 11.35 +.01 +11.1
SpcEqtA 4.75 +.05 +14.5
TMGl.1 23.06 +.21 +12.5
MunBdl 10.76 -.02 +8.2
TradGvtA 8.67 -.02 +3.1
Eaton Vance CI B:
FLMuniB I 10.95 -.02 +6.2
HIhSciB 1 11.30 +03 +8.5
NalMunB 10.59 ... +10.2
TMG.1 1 21.82 +.20 +11.7
Eaton Vance Cl C:
F0oalRt t 9.88 +.01 +2.9
GovtC p 7.47 -.01 +2.3
Na8IMCt 10.09 ... +10.3
Enterprise Cl A:
GwthAnp 17,18 '+.32 +9.6
Evergreen A:
AstAIIA p 13.96 +.05 +14.9
BalanA 8.63 +.03 +11.5
AdjRateA 9.32 ... +2.0
FdLgCpA 23.19 +.14 +19.2
SpValuAp 30.18 +.70 +26.6
Evergreen B:
AsAlloBtt 13.77 +.04 +14.0
DivrBdB 14.94 -.02 NS
MuniBondB t 7.51 -.03 +5.9
Evergreen C:
AdjRateCt 9.32 ... +1.3
AslAMkoC 13.55 +.04 +14.0
Evergreen I:
CoreBdl 10.62 -.02 +4.8
AdjRatel 9.32 .,. +2.3
InlEqmyl 9.23 +.09 +21.7
LgCapEqlyl 1553 +.07 +17.9
PAMuBdl 11.46 -.03 +5.1
ShtletBdl 6.05 -.01 +3.6
SIMunil 10.00 -.02 +2.4
SpecVal 80.35 +,71 +27.0
SIrGrol 26.77 +.06 +15.0
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 25.63 +1.47 +55.3
HiYieldnp 4.61 ... +4.9
ValRestr n 44.98 +*53 +25.1
FAM Funds:
Value n 48.36 +.05 +17.0
FBR Funds:
SnallCap 44.20 +.02 +29.7
FMI Funds:
Focus n 35.82 +.78 +19.2
FPA Funds:
Capt 44.00 +1.06 +22.3
NewIco 10,96 +.01 +0.7
FPAC0s6 n 24,98 +.36 +13.2
Falrholme 24.56 +.04 +26.5
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25960 -.08 +14.2
COpAppA 25.75 +.07 +11.5
MidGrStA 32.55 +40 +26.9
HilncBdA 7.98 +.02 +7.7
KaufnA p 557 +.07 +21.2
MklOppA p 13.09 +.01 +*52
MunSecA 10.78 -.04 +6.4
USGvSecA 7.78 ... +4.1
Federated B:
ArLdrB t 25.65 -.09 +13,3
KaulmnB p 5.49 +.07 +20,8
SrlncB1 x 8.67 -.04 +8.5
Federated C:
MktOppC 13.01 +.01 +4,4
Federated Insti:
Kaufman t 5858 +.08 +21.4
MidCup 22.69 +.29 +2496


SlockTr 38.15 -.01 +14.4
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
HitCarT 22.15 +.05 +18.4
NalResT 41.13 +2,19 +43.6
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivrlntAr 19.17 +.09 +20.5
EqGrAt 46.64 +.48 +11.2
EqlncA p 28.85 +.17 +14.9
MidCapA p 24.98 +.19 +19.7
Fidelity Advisor B:
EqGrB n 43.99 +,45 +10.3
MIdCpB np 24.14 +.18 +18.8
Fidelity Advisor I:
Divlnlln 19.41 .10 +20.9
DI0vGhl 12.01 -.01 +10.0
EqGfIn 49.31 +.52 +11,6
EqlnI 29.52 +.17 +15.3
IntBdl8n 11.03 -.02 +3.8
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 16.22 +.13 +7.5
DivintlT p 19.02 +.09 +20.2
DivGrthTp 11.82 -.01 +9.5
DynCapAppT p14,79 +27 +21.9
EqGrT p 46.78 +.49 +11.0
EqInT 29.18 +.17 +14.7
GovlnT 10.07 -.01 +4.2
GrOppT 31.23 +12 +13.6
HIncAdT p 9.94 -.03 +15.5
IntBdT 11.02 -.01 +3.6


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
MidCapT p 25 16 +20 +195
MunilncT p 13.18 -.04 +6.7
OvrseaT 17.99 +08 +183
STFIT 9.46 -01 +20
SmICapT p 2631 +.54 +291
StrlnT 11 67 ... +9.9
ValStraT 35 84 +.32 +17.7
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000n 1225 +.02 +6.7
FF2010n 13.88 +.04 +10.5
FF2020 n 1431 +06 +13.9
FF2030n 1449 +.08 +15.6
FF2040n 8.51 +05 +16,6
FF2015 11.31 +.05 +12.5
FF202Op 11.61 +06 +148
IncomeFdn 11.37 +.01 +58
Fidelity Invest:
Agg0Grr 17.08 +.23 +169
AMgr 16.26 +01 +8.1
AMgrGrn 14.98 +.01 +9.5
AMgrln 1283 +.03 +8.8
Balanc 1862 + 15 +17.8
BlueChipGr 42.53 +.29 +10.9
Canada n 37.68 +.76 +35.0
CapAppn 26.54 +.20 +16 2
Caplnconr 8.49 +.01 +14.5
ChmaRegn 18.56 +.29 +28.4
CongrSt n 398.26 -.17 +102
Contran 60.68 +.45 +21.6
CnvSec 21.63 +.15 +13.1
Destlnyln 13.37 +.25 +14.8
Destinyll 11.71 +.10 +11.2
DisEqn 27.00 + 17 +21.0
Diverlntl n 29.48 +26 +21.1
DIvGlhn 28.81 -02 +10.2
EmrgMktn 14.64 +,23 +48.7
Equtllcn 52.96 +.32 +14.1
EQII 24.22 +.15 +15.2
EurCapAp n 22.62 +.16 +24.2
Europe n 36.44 +.19 +35.9
ExchFdn 273.70 +1.50 +14.4
Export n 21.06 +.39 +22.1
FIdelFd 30.62 +.14 +12.4
Fifty nr 21.05 +.33 +15.3
FItRaleHr 9.96 ... +4.3
FourlnOne n 25.87 +.14 +15.4
GNMAn 11.02 -.02 +4.3
Govllncn 10.22 -.02 +4.4
GroCo n 58.74 +.38 +21.8
Grolnc 38.36 +.07 +11.7
Grolncll 9.63 +.11 +9.7
Highlncrn 8.91 -.01 +9.0
Indepndnce n 18.40 +.29 +18.5
InProBnd 11.27 +.04 +6.1
IntBd n 10.40 -.01 +3.6
IntGov 10.13 -.01 +2.7
IntlDisc 29.04 +21 +22.1
InelSmCaprn 25'54 +.38 +32.0
lnvGB n 7.46 +5.3
Japan n 12.28 +.05 +1.8
JpnSmCon 12.95 +.09 +5.9
LatAmn 24,68 +.38 +64.0
LevCoStOck 25.46 +.35 +35.2
LowPr rn 42.50 +.33 +25.2
Magellan n 106.31 +.51 +12.9
MidCap n 25.13 +.43 +23.1
MtgeSecn 11.19 -.02 +4.5
NewMkt nr 1423 -.06 +18,.5
NewMIlln 31.97 +73 +15.4
OTC 35.96 +11 +19.2
Ovsean 35.95 +.16 +18.8
PacBasn 20.54 +.30 +18.0
Purtan 19.10 +.07 +11.1
RealEsI n 32.73 +.46 +40.
STBF n 8.91 -.01 +2.4
SmCapInd 21.21 +.37 +24.4
SmallCapS nr 18.25 +,30 +18.3
SE Asian 18.76 +.39 +40.9
StkSIcn 23.73 +.24 +15.6
Stratllncn 10.56 -.01 +10.2
Trend n 55.25 +.33 +14.8
USBIn 11.04 -.02 +5.0
UlShtBdrn 10.03 .. +2.1
UDlty n 14.37 -.06 +26:9
ValStra 37.46 +.34 +18.3
Value n 77.71 +104 +26.5
Wddwden n 18.71 +.14 +17.3
Fidelity Selects:
Airn 36.16 +1.07 +21.7
Auton 35.02 +.64 +14.7
Banking n 38.57 +.14 +11.6
Biotech5n 59.03 -.32 +14,2
Broker n 62.96 +.62 +40.4
Chem n 89.48 +171 +30.8
Compn 36.40 +,.44 +18,8
Conlnd n 25.51 +.23 +18.9
CstHoun 50.29 +.81 +47.5
DfAeron 73.16 +1.39 +28.9
DevCom n 18.66 -.18 +15.6
Elect n 42.53 -.01 +22.9
Energy n 43.04 +1.96 +54.4
EngSv n 56.35 +4.17 +51.8
Envi0on 15.33 +41 +18.7
FinSvon 111.32 -.11 +13.9
Food n 51.99 +.19 +13.6
Golden m 24.61 +.66 +13.5
Health n 140.59 +.32 +19.4
HomFinl n 59.03 -.23 +4.1
IndMatn 39.46 +1.44 +21.0
Insur n 64.86 -.39 +17.0
Leisrn 75.96 +.03 +15.8
MedDel n 49.87 -.53 +51.1
MedEqSysn 24.69 +.18 +18,2
Mulllfed n 45.48 +09 +14.2
NatGasn 35.87 +1.78 +52.1
Paper n 28.62 +1.17 -69.
Pharma0 n 9.12 ., +9.5
Retail n 55,89 +.83 +27.2
Softwrn 51.42 -.18 +18.4
Techn 61.99 +.10 +17.2
Telecom n 36.76 -.48 +14.3
Transen 41.91 +1.19 +24.7
UBlGrnp 42.84 -.30 +27.9
Wireless n 6.36 -.06 +31.7
Fidelity Spartan:
CA Munn 12.55 -.05 +6.6
CTMunnr 11.60 -.04 +4.6
Equtlndxcn 43.69 +.21 +14.4
ExIMkInd 34.10 +.48 +26.2
5001ndxnr 85.21 +.41 +14.4
FLMurn 11.08 -.03 +5.8
GovI nn 11.01 -.02 +4.6
InmMuni n 10.00 -.03 +4.5
Intllndx 32.03 +.18 +18.5
InvGrBdn 10.62 -.02 +5.3
MDMum 10.99 -.03 +53
MAMunin 12,13 -.03- +6.7
MI Mun n 12.01 -.04 +5,1
MN Munn 11.54 -.03 +5.1
Munilncn 13.06 -.04 +6.9
NJ Munr 11.74 -.04 +6.5
NY Munn 13.03 -.03 +6.3
Oh Munn 11.92 -.04 +6.2
PAMun nr 10.95 -.03 +5.5
ShltntMun 10,25 -.02 +1.9
TotMktnd 34.27 +.23 +17.2
First Amer FdsY:
CoreBondx 11.21 -.04 +4.7
Eqtylnconpx 13.97 +.08 +12.8
Eqldxainpx 23.07 +.09 +14.2
ItBondpx 10.00 -.04 +3.3
IntlTn 11.63 +.06 +15.4
LgCpGrOp 28.88 +.13 +14.1
LgCapVal npx 19.77 +.10 +19.0
MdCpGrOp 43.06 +.685 +293
First Eagle:
GlobaIA 40.81 +.41 +19.3
OvrseasA 23.02 +.24 +21.5
First Investors A
BIChipA p 20.85 +.13 +13.5
GlobalA p 6.77 +.06 +15.7
GovtAp 10.95 -.01 +3.4
GrFolecAp 13.92 +.16 +19.6
IncoReAp 3,10 ... +5.4
InvGrdAp 986 -.02 +4.1
MATFA p 12.04 -.04 +4.7
MITFAp +12 69 -.04 +4.4
MIdCapA np 27.94 +.43 +28.4
NJTFAp 13.03 -.03 +4.4
NYTFAp 14.50 -.03 +4.3
PATFAp 13.23 -.03 +4.2
SpSitAp 20.23 +.20 +23.4
TaxExpA p 10,16 -.03 +4.1
TotRetAp 14.14 +.11 +13.7
ValueBp 6.68 +.05 +17.0
FirAthand Funds:
GlobTech 3.88 +.03 +8.1
Tech Value n 30.01 +48 +14.4
Frank/Temp FmkA:
AGEAp 2,12 .. +10.5
AdjUSp ,8,99 ... +2.2
ALTFApx 11.58 -03 +6.0
AZTFApx 11.25 -02 +8.3
Ballnvp 63.13 +1.08. +28.3
CAHBd0px 10.38 ... +9.3
Ca0nsA px 12.78 -.02 +7.8
CA0InteApx011.59 -.04 +4.7
CalTFrA p 7.37 -.01 +*9.,
CapGrA 10.93 +.06 +7.7
COTFApx 12.08 -.03 +7.4
CTTFApx 11.16 -.02- +7.9
CvtSecAp 16.78 +.12 +17.0
Dbl0TxFrAx 12.03 -.03 +7,9
DynaTechA 24.90 +*21 +15.7
EqlncAp 20.79 -.09 +11.4
Fedlntsm px 11.49 -.05 +4.6
FedTxFrAp 12.23 -.01 +7.8
FlexCapGrA 38.40 +.37 +16.1
FIRtDAp 10.12 .. +3.6
FLTFApx 12.02 -.02 +7.1
FoundFA+ p 12.52 +*02 +15.5
GATFApx 12.18 -.02 +7,2
GoldPrM A 18,16 +.55 +13.8
Grow0hAp 34.91 +.34 +15.7
HYTFA px 10.94 ... +10.1
InoSerA+ p 2.53 ... +15.2
InsTFA px 12.41 -.03 +6.7
NY+ntmlTF px 11.01 -.03 +3.7
LATFApx 11.67 -.02 +6,4
LMGvSecA 10.03 -.02 +1.5
MDTFApx 11.82 -.03 +6.8
MassTFA px 12.01 -.04 +6.9
MichTF 0px 12.35 -.02 +6.4
MNIesAx 12.20 -.02 +6.1
MOTFApx 12238 -.03 +7,8
NJTFApx 12.23 -.02 +7.9
NYInsA px 11.69 -.03 +6.6
NYTFAp 11.97 -.01 +6.9
NCTFApx 12.38 -02 +7.1
OhiolTFApx 12.65 -.03 +7.1
ORTFApx 11.94 -.03 +7.5
PATFApx 10.49 -.03 +6.7


ReESecA p 29.01 +.36 +383
RisDivA p 3219 +08 +9.1
SmCpGr2Ap 12.39 +.23 +20.4
SMCpGrA 35.86 +41 +22.8
Stratlnc p 10.28 .02 +8.6
USGovAp 6.57 ... +4.1
UtiltiesAp 12.15 -.02 +31.5
VATFApx 11.93 -.03 +7.5
FrankfTmp Fmk Adv:
IncomeAdv 2.51 -.01 +15.0
Frank/Temp Fmk B:
IncomeB1 p 2.53 .. +14.6
IncomeBt 2.52 +13.8
Frank/Temp Fmk C:
FoundFAlp 12.43 +.02 +14.7
IncmeC t 2.54 ... +14.1
Frank/Temp Mti A&B:
BeaconA 16.50 +,22 +18.0
DiscovA 25.57 +.34 +23.6
QualifiedA I 20.31 +.31 +21.7
SharesA 23.85 +.19 +16.5
Frank/Temp Mti C:
DiscC t 25.38 +.33 +22.8
SharesCI 23.59 +.19 +15.8
FrankrrTemp Temp A:
DevMktAp 20.29 +,35 +39.1
ForelgnAp 12.51 +.10 +19.3
GIBondA p 10.43 +.06 +10.1
GISmCoA0 p 9.68 +09 +24.3


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
GrowthA p 23.22 + 01 +16.7
InxEM p 15.01 +.07 +16.8
WorldA p 1853 +.10 +21.1
Frank/TempTmp Adv:
FrgnAv 1249 +.09 +19.5
GrthAv 23.26 +.02 +17.0
Frank/TempTmp B&C:
DevMktC 1988 +34 +38 2


ForgnC p 12.32
GrwthC p 22.68
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Income n 11.43
S&S0PMn 46.18
TaxEx 11.90
Trusts n 55.54
GMOTrust II:
Foreign 14.53
GMO Trust III:
CurHIntBd 9 66
CorePlsBd 10.45
EmgMkr 18.64
ECD 11.42
Foreign 14.58
In+lGrwlh 26.66
IntllnmrVal 28.56
IntlSmCo 11.39
USQltyEqty 20.35
US Core 14.59
GMOTrust IV:
EmgCnDt 11.42
EmerMkt 18.60
Foreign 14.59
IntllntrVal 28 55
US Core 14.57
USQualEq 20.36
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMkVI r 18.62
USCoreVI 14.57
Gabell Funds:
Asset 43.42
Growth 27,42
Value t 20,01
Gartmore Fds D:
Bond 9.70
GvtBdD 10.30
GrowthD 7.02
NatonwD 20.99


+.09 +183
+.01 +15.9

-02 +4.7
+.18 +12.5
-.03 +6.3
+.48 +12.1

+.08 +18.1

+.01 +10.9
-.03 +6.1
+.36 +52.2
-.04 +25.2
+.08 +18.2
+.17 +208
+.18 +21 1
+.19 +26.7
+7,1
+.02 +16.1

-.04 +25.2
+.35 +52.2
+.08 +18.3
+.18 +21.2
+.02 +16.1
+7.2

+.36 +52.3
+.02 +16.2

+.60 +20.9
+.37 +15.1
+.23 +18.4

-.02 +5.7
-.01 +4.8
+.05 +17.4
+.11 +17.0


TxFre r 10.63 -.03 +6.1
Gartmore Fds Insti:
IntIdxI n 8.27 +.05 +18.5
NwBdIdxIln 10.97 -.02 +4.9
S&P5001nstl n 10.64 +.05 +14.4
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 25.08 -.01 +8.4
Glenmede Funds:
Intl 18,70 +.24 +22.2'
Goldman Sachs A:
CapGrA 20.21 +.23 +10.7
GrIncA 25.67 +.09 +16.8
3:.,, 22.30 +.26 +20.0
H 8 03 -.01 +10.8
HYMuniAp 11.28 +01 +11.1
MidCapVA p 36.79 +.43 +29.7
SmaCapA 43.81 +.65 +21.1
Goldman Sachs Inst:
CoreFxc 10.10 -.01 +5.5
HYMuni 11.28 ... +11.5
MidCapVal 37.06 +.43 +30.2
Guardian Funds:
GBGIntGrA 13.53 +.15 +20.1
ParkAvA 31.44 +.20 +10.8
Stock 28.50 +.18 +11.2
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.85 -.01 +6.0
CapApplnst n 30,29 +.32 +19.1
Intl nr 44,26 +.57 +20.8
SCpVllnst 20,69 +.31 +34.8
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsA p 15.40 +,07 +8.2
CapAppA p 35.46 +.44 +20.0
DivGthA p 19.22 +.17 +15.6
MidCapA4 p 26.77 +.44 +29.3
SmlCoA p 18.14 +.11 +27.5
SlockAp 18.34 +.12 +9.5
Hartford Fds B:
CapAppBpn 32.99 +.41 +19.1
Hartford Fds C:
CapAppCt 33.08 +.41 +19.2
Hartford HLS IA:
Bond. 11.75 ... +5.7
CapApp 53.89 +.73 +21.0
Div&Grwth 21.01 +.19 +16.0
GlblLdrs 17.55 +.03 +10.0
GnWth&lnc 12.52 +.04 +15.3
GrwthOpp 29.23 +.13 +23,5
Advisers 23.48 +.09 +8.4
Stock 47.15 +.32 +10.4
Index 31.84 +.15 +14.1
ItlOpp 12.21 +.13 +20.4
MidCap 30.88 +.51 +30.,0
SmalICo 17.74 +.11 +28.,2
Hartford HLS IB:
Advisors p 23.61 +.09 +3.2
Bondvp 11.67 ... +5.5
CapApprec p M 53.61 +.73 +20.7
Div&Grop 20.92 +.19 +15.8
Heartland Fds:
Value 49.34 +70 +12.0
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrow 19.95 +.47 +32.1
HolBalFd 15.39 +.01 +3.0
Hotchklds & Wiley:
LgCpVal 24.04 +.10 +25.5
LgCapalA p 23.97 +.09 +25.2
MdCpVap 29.79 +.2 +.2 +31.9
MidCpVal 29.93 +,21 +32.1
HussmnStrGr 15.92 +,02 +6.6
ICAP Funds:
Equity 46.37 +.20 +17.9
ICMSmICo 38.87 +.58 +24.7
ING Funds Cl A:
ntValA p 17.34 +.15 +15.0
ING Partners:
TRPGrEq n 50.81 +.26 +15.4
ING TMQ&I:
IntVall 17.37 +.15 +15.3
ISI Funds:
NoAm8 p 7.49 -.03 +8.4
Ivy Funds:
GINatRsAp 23,75 +.93 +34.2
JPMorgan A Class:
InvBalp 12.23 +.04 +10.5
InvGr&InAp 13.29 +.07 +13.1
MdCpValop 23.81 +.12 +22.9
JPMorgan B Class:
InvG&l p 13.22 +.06 +12.2
JPMorgan C Class:
MdCpValupn 23.36 +.11 +22.1
JP Morgan InstIl:
MdCapVal n 24.14 +.12 +23.5
JPMorgan Select:
InllEq 29.79 +.12 +17.7
MdCpValu ... +23.1
TxAwreEq 17.17 +,02 +10.1
USEquity 11.08 +.04 +13.4
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBond 10.81 -.01 +4.6
CorePlusBd n 7.89 -.01 +5.1
DivMdCpGr 25.68 +.20 +22.3
DivMdCpVl 19.69 +.15 +23.6
Eqlndx 28.10 +.14 +14.2
GovBond 10.36 -.01 +6.0
HiYldond 28.41 +.01 +9.8
InlBondIn 10.56 -.01 +3.7
nltmdTFBd 10.81 -.02 +3.2
In Eql 20.22 +.20 +21.3
IntrdAmer 23.77 +:20 +23.0
LgCapVal 16.10 +.03 +16.6
LgCapGr 15.29 +.10 +10.5
MItCpMkNeu r11.02 -.0 5 +5.5
SmCpCore 46.20 +1.00 +25.1
TaFrBond n 12.93 -.03 +4.9
UltrSTBd 9.84 .1. +2.6
JP Morgan Ultra:
MtgBacked 10.60 -.01 NS
Janus:
Balanced n 21.78 +.06 +11.9
Contrarian 13.94 +.19 +30.1
CoreEq 21.73 +.16 +20.4
Enterprn 39.91 +.70 +25.3
FedTxEx8 n 7.05 -.02 +4.5
FIxBond 9.59 -.02 +4.4
Fund n 24.83 +.16 +8,8
GI ileSclnr 19.19 -.01 +18.4
GITechnr 10.86 -.03 +15.7
GrIthncn 33.75 -.02 +19.5
Mercury n 21.68 +.08 +14.1
MidCapVal 23.61 +.35 +20.1
Olympus n 30.22 +.21 +18,7
Orion n 7.61 +.08 +22.3
Overseas nr 25.94 +.46 +29.4
ShTmBd 289 ... +1.9
SCVInst 32,21 +.75 +19.8
SCVInv 32.00 +.74 +19.5
Twenty 46.38 +.66 +24.3
Venlturn 60.21 +1.16 +27,3
WddW+nr 40.76 -.01 +9.2
Janus Adv I Shre:
Forty 27,34 +.30 +27.3
Janus Aspen Instl:
Balanced 24.89 +.07 +12.2
LgCpGrwth 20.27 +.14 +6.8
WorldwGrn 26.15 +.01 +8.3
JennisonDryden A:
BlendA 16.33 +.34 +18.7
GovincA 9.04 -.02 +4.0
Grow4hA 15.03 +.16 +19.1
HYIdA p 5.78 ... .6
InsumdA 10.96 -.03 +5.1
UtilityA 13.78 +.19 +43.6
JennisonDryden B:
GrowthB 13.85 +.14 +18.2
HIYIdB nl 5.77 +8.1
InsuredB 11.00 -.03 +4.6
JennlsonDryden Z&1
GrowthZ 15.42 +.16 +19.3
SIdxIln 27.69 +.13 +143
SIkldxZ 27.67 +.13 +14.2
Jensen 23.97 +.08 +5.9
John Hancock A:
BondA p 15.20 -.01 +5.5
ClassicValp 23.95 ... +16.7
RgBkA 42.77 +.16 +12.6
SvlnvAp 19.59 +.05 +8.6
SIlncA p 7.01 +.01 +9.6
USGIbLdrsn 28.39 +.53 +9.0
John Hancock B:
StirlnB 7.01 +.01 +8.9
Julius Beer Funds:
lelEql r 33.10 +.42 +25.5
IntlEqA 32.49 +.41 +25.1
LSVValEqn 16.11 +.11 +22.8
Laudus Funds:
USSmCpn 14.50 +.31 +23.,7
Lazard Instl:
E.gMkll 16.19 +.35 +54.5
IntlEqleslI 12.79 .. +17.4
Legg Mason: Fd
OpportTrI 16.04 +.16 +19.0
Splevnp 47.12 +.48 +16,9
varlrp 65.57 +.19 +15.3
Legg Mason Inst:
BFM SmCp 11.87 +.24 +27.3
Va0TrF0 p 70.87 +.21 +16.0
Vaolrlnsi 71.68 +.23 +16.5
LeulholdCI n 16.75 +.24 +17.7
Longleaf Partners:
Pautnes 31.58 +.04 +6.0
In8 n 16.12 +.09 +9.4
SmCap 31.63 -.02 +17.9
LoomIs Sayles:
LSBondl 13.73 +.02 +12.8
StrlecA 14.09 +.01 +14.3
Lord Abbett A:
AfflialdA p 14.65 +.12 +13.2
AIIValueA 12.23 +.17 +17.2
Balancer 11.49 +*05 +10.5
BondDebA p 7.97 +.01 +7.8
GlncA+p 7.18 +.01 +4.5
Gv+SecAp 2061 -.01 +4,6


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for
last day of the week.
Chg: Weekly net change in the NAV.
12 mo % rtn:The percent gain or loss for one share, including
reinvestment of dividends, over 12 months.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: e Ex-capital gains distribution. f -
Previous day's quote. n No-load fund. p Fund assets used to
p ,' d is trl, u ll rn .i 1 ,' F111.ij l-+ p n r. f, :- : .: : ri.l'n e r.I
J, a: .,',a3 1, I, ,d Ta, .p ly -':.' d. 3i rd .:.r pllI T -
8.:.ir, p sr,] r > E< .;asr. a,a r-r.j NA rj ,n.-rr. 5,i 3r. a, 5.
rl.' NE DaLa r, quIeJ-I.r, NiN Furi.] J.-,:: nri, .f sr re be
IrSCkhe NS F unjrr dd. nl i a .I SaT1 odi
Source. Lipper, Inc andThe Assoclaied Press


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
MidCapA p 23.44 +.33 +25.2
RsSmCpA 29.73 +.78 +27.6
RsAmValp 12.5 +.12 +18.1
Lord Abbett B:
AffildBp 14.68 +.12 +12.5
BdDbB p 7.98 +.01 +7.2
MIdCapV p 22.67 +.32 +24.4
Lord Abbett C:
AffildC p 14,66 +.12 +12.5
BdDbC p 7.98 +.01 +7.1
MidCapVICp 22.60 +.31 +24.4
Lord Abbett P:
MidCaplV p 23.00 +.33 +25.1
Lord AbbettY:
A8Y 14.68 +.12 +13.7
MdCapVI p 23.44 +.33 +25.7
MFS Funds A:
MITA p 17.96 +.24 +17.9
MIGAp 12.64 +.12 +15.3
BondAp 12.93 -.02 +5.9
CapOp p 13.53 +.06 +15.5
EmGrA p 32.72 +.24 +18.6
GvScA p 9.64 -.02 +4.2
GrOpA p 9.03 +.10 +14.7
HllncA p 392 ... +9.2
InlNwDA p 2240 +.38 +24.2
MCapAp 8.94 +.09 +15.4
MuBdA 10.73 -.02 +5,6
MuHIA 8.44 -.01 +9,7
MuFLAp 10.21 -.02 +6.9
RschA p 21.32 +.19 +21.8
ResrchlntlA p 15.85 +.11 +17.6
StrValAp 16,31 +.01 +16.3
TolRAp 16.18 +.03 +13.0
U0lAp 12.07 +.11 +36.6
ValueAp 23.91 +.10 +18.7
MFS Funds B:
MAITB 17.52 +,22 +17.0
EmGrB t 30.23 +.21 +17.7
MIGB 11.58 +.11 +14.5
GvScB t 9.63 -.01 +3.6
HllnBt 3.93 ... +8.2
MulnBt 8.66 -.02 +5.8
TolRB t 16.18 +.03 +12.3
ValueB 23.78 +.10 +17.9
MFS Funds C:
TotRICt 16.24 +.03 +12.2
ValueCp 23.76 +.10 +17.9
MFS Funds I:
RelnTut 16.19 +.11 +18.0
Valuel 24.00 +.11 +19.1
MFS Funds Insti:
IntlEqty 16.04 +.20 +17.6
MainStay Funds A:
HiYdBdA 6.39 +02 +10.5
MainStay Funds B:
CpAppBt 28.35 +.40 +14.2
ConvB+ t 13.22 +14 +9.7
GovtB t 8.33 ... +3.2
HiYIdBB 6.37 +.03 +9.7
EletEqB 12.74 +.01 +15.6
SmCpGrBp 15.12 +.21 +24.1
TotRtB t 19.30 +.12 +12.2
MainStay Funds I:
S&P5001x 28.65 +.14 +14.2
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 71.80 +.682 +14.1
Managers Funds:
FremontBd n 10.50 -.01 +6.3
SpclEq 92.49 +.79 +20.2
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 17.09 +12 +21.6
Growp 18,14 +.06 +20.6
MassMutual Inst:
CoreBdS 11.13 -.01 +4.9
Master Select:
EquBy 15.31 +.19 +13.6
Intl 17.91 +.27 +25.0
Matthews Asian:
sianG&o l 17.09 +.45 +28.3
PacTiger 17.51 +.54 +40.4
Mellon Funds:
BondFund 12.61 -.02 +4.0
EmgMoks 22.24 +.29 +38.0
In+IFund 15.64 +.08 +14.3
LrgCapStk 9.94 +.09 +15.7
MIdCapStk 14.74 +.25 +28.8
SmICapStk 17.63 +.35 +21.0
MergerFd n 15.66 +.06 +5:1
Meridian Funds:
Growth 36.92 +.27 +12.1
Value 39.36 +.37 +17,2
Merrill Lynch A:
BalCapA px 26.92 -.05 +9,7
BasValAp 32.13 +.19 +12.5
FdGrA p 17.78 +.17 +13.0
GIbAIApx 16.82 -.02 +15.0
HealthA pe 6.55 -.13 +22.4
NJMuniBd 10.74 -.01 +9.5
S&0P500px 15.18 +.06 +14.,i
USGovtA 10.21 -.02 +3.7
Merrill Lynch B:
BalaCapB tx 28.23 + 06 +8.9
BasVIBt 31.44 +.17 +11.6
BdHiInc 5.11 .. +6.9
CalnsMB 11.67 -.04 +5.0
CoreBdPBI t 11.76 -.01 +4.2
CplTB t 11.93 -.02 +4.3
EquityDivx 15.31 +.18 +21.1
EuroBt 15.01 +.13 +23.3
FocusValue 12.90 +.16 +16.3
FundlGrB t 16.25 +.15 +12.1
FLMB t 10.48 -.03 +7,8
GIAIBltx 16.50 +.04 +14.1
HealthBle 4.91 -.13 +21.5
LatAB t 27.28 +.49 +66.6
MnlnsBt 7.94 -02 +6.0
ShtTrmUSGvt t19.17 -.01 +1.4
MunShtTm 9.98 -.01 +0.80
MulntmTrB I 10.52 -.04 +3.5
MNatlBl 10.60 -.02 +6.7
NJMBt 10.73 -.02 +9.1
NYMnBt 11.13 -.03 +6.5
NatResTrBt 42.10 +1.87 +52.8
PacBlx 18.94 +.01 +11.9
PAMBt 11.41 -.03 +6.6
ValueOpp le 24.59 -.62 +18.9
USGovt 10.21 -.02 +3.1
Utircm4tx 11.75 +.01 +34.1
WIdlncBl t 6.22 +.03 +11.4
Merrill Lynch C:
BasVIC t 30.69 +.17 +11.6
FdGrCt 16.34 +.15 +12.1
GlobAIC tx 16.04 +.03 +14.2
Merrill Lynch I:
InllVal 26.99 +26 +202
BalaCapl x 26.99 -.08 +10.0
BasVall 32.29 +.18 +12.7
BdHinc 5.10 ... +7.7
CalnsMB 11.67 -.03 +5.6
CoreBdP8 l t 11.76 -.01 +5.0
CplTI 11.93 -.02 +4.8
DevCapl p 18.67 +.37 +42.0
EquityDrvx 15.27 +.15 +22,3
Eurolt 17.52 +.16 +24.6
FocusValuel 14.19 +.19 +17.6
FundlGr, 18.19 +.18 +13.3
FLMI 10,48 -.03 +83
GIAll tx 16.86 -.04 +15,3
Healthle 7,12 -.12 +22.9
LalAml 28,.67 +.52 +68.3
Mnlnsl 7.94 -.02 +6.8
MunShortTm 9.97 -.01 +1.0
Mu0lnTrl 10.53 -.04 +3.8
MNalll 10.61 -.02 +7.5
NalResTr t 44.53 +1.98 +54.3
Paclx 20.71 +.04 +13.1
S&P500X 15.24 +.07 +14.3
ValueOpplye 27,26 -.82 +20.1
USGov0 10.21 -.03 +3.9
U0TIcml tx 11,77 -.02 +35.1
WIdIncl 6.23 +.04 +12.2


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
Metro West Fds:
TotalRetBondl 9.75 ... +6.7
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd n 2.02 +.08 +13.5
Monetta Funds:
Monetta n 11.46 +.09 +23.1
MontagGrI 23.78 +.43 +10.4
Morgan Stanley A:
AmOppA 25.33 +.30 +17.7
DivGthA 35.58 -.02 +11.7
GlobDivA 13.83 ... +14.3
USGvtA 9.16 -.01 +5.0
Morgan Stanley B:
AmOppB 23.682 +.27 +16.8
DivGthB 35.71 -.02 +11.7
EqWeighB 38.78 +.41 +20.2
GIbDivB 13.97 ... +14.0
GrowthB 12,67 +.16 +16.7
SP500B 12.95 +.06 +13.0
SIratB 18.37 +.12 +14.0
USGvtB 9.16 -.02 +4.9
Morgan Stanley D:
TaxExD 11.79 -.03 +6.1
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMkt n 21.30 +.34 +44.4
CrPIFIstIn 11.65 ... +6.3
GIValEqAn 17.74 .. +14.1
IntlSmCpAn 25.64 +.24 +22.6
InliEq n 20.98 +.04 +16.9
InliEqB np 20.81 +.03 +16.6
LtdDurPt n 10.36 ... +1,8
MCGrAdvp 21.98 +.20 +27.9
SmCGrB np 13.12 +.14 +29.2
USReal n 25.40 +42 +44.6
ValueAdvn 17.99 -.03 +16.4
Muhlenkmpn 86.10 +1.51 +33.0
Under Funds A:
IntemetA 18.44 +.07 +15,8
Mutual Series:
BeaconZ 16.59 +.22 +18 4
DiscZ 25.81 +.34 +24,1
QualidZ 20.43 +.31 +22.1
SharesZ 24,01 +.20 +117.0
Nations Funds Inv A:
FocusEqA t 18.98 +.13 +21.3
IntlValueAr .21.73 +.18 +17.5
MarsGroAl 18,11 +.05 +21,1
Nations Funds Inv B:
FocEqtyB t 18,00 +.12 +20.4
MarsGrwB1 17.16 +.05 +20.3
Nations Funds Pri A:
BondFdPrA 9.88 -.01 +5.3
ConSecPrA 17.37 +.18 +10.5
FocusEqAl t19.26 +.14 +21.6
IntMPAn 10.12 -.04 +3.9
IntEqPAn 13.68 +.17 +18,3
lntlValPrAn 21.83 +.17 +17.7
LgCapldxPrA 23.96 +.11 +14.4
MarsGrPrA 18.36 +.06 +21.4
MarlnOpp r 11.31 +.18 +15,3
MidCpldxPrA n.79 +.16 +25.2
STInPA 9,82 -.01 +1.9
STMuPA 10.21 -.01 +1.7
SmlCapldxPrA n21.01 +.42 +28.0
StratGroPrA 12.66 +.08 +13.6
ValuePA 13.56 +.13 +20.7
Neuberger&Berrm Inv:
Focus n 39.23 +.07 +22.3
Genesis n 33.44 +.67 +28.0
Geneslnstl 45.83 +.92 +28.2
Guardn5 n 17.18 +.24 +20.0
HighlncuBd 9.32 -.01 +6.4
lonll r 19.69 +36 +29.1
Partner n 28.49 +.44 +34.4
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis n 47.80 +.96 +27.9
Nicholas Applegate:
EmgGrol 10.85 +.29 +25.9
Nicholas Group:
Nicholan 62.25 +.26 +18.2
Nichlnc5 2.20 .. +6.6
Northeast Investors:
Trust 7.70 +.03 +9.0
Northern Funds:
RxIn n 10.06 -.02 +4.8
HiYFxIncl n 8.19 .3. +8.1
IntGrEqn 10.21 ... +13.3
LrgCapVal 13.67 -.02 +10,8
SmICapldxn 10.74 +.23 +25.0
Techrnlyn 11.52 +.04 +10,9
Nuveen Cl A:
HYIMuBdp 22.10 ... +12.8
Nuveen ClR:
InMun R 11.00 -.02 +5.9
InlmDurMuBd 9.09 -.02 +5.6
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhStOakSIGrn33.02 +.70 +5.9
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylec r 24.31 +.05 +10.6
Goballr 22.66 +.23 +19.1
IntlIr 22..10 +.12 +21.5
InSrnCp r 21.29 +.27 +25.7
Oakmarkr 42.15 +.23 +11.4
Select r 34.56 +.45 +13.8
Old Westbury Fds:
Intln 10.42 +.06 +12.8
dCapEq p 16.4 +.84 21 +17.6
Olstein Funds:
FnclAlertC 18.54 +.34 +14.7
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFrMuA 10.17 -.01 +12.9
AMTFrNY 12.95 -.03 +11.9
CAMualAp 11.52 -.02 +18.3
CapAppAp 41.79 +.29 +10.4
CaplncAp 12.60 +.03 +14.8
ChlncA p 9.52 .4 +8.1
DevMktAp 30.34 +.56 +52.4
DIscFdp 43.85 +.44 +14.4
Equity A 11.42 +.09 819.7
GlobaA p .62.94 +.73 +25.2
GIblOppA 33.79 +.27 +32.6
Gold p 18.47 +.61 +19.5
GrowtlhAAp 28.63 +.241 +15.0
HighYIdA p 9.52 -.01 +..1
InltlBdAp 5.88 -.03 +15.1
LTGovA p 10.05 .. +2.0
LIdTrmnMu 15.88 -.01 +12.1
MnStFdA 36.43 +.12 +13.5
MainStlOpAp 13.56 +.07 +16.8
MnStSCpA p 21.23 +.35 +28.0
MidCapA 17.49 +.16 +23.4
PAMun[A p 12.84 -.01 +15.3
RealAslAp 8.08 -.12 +19.9
S&MdCpVIA 33.96 +.70 +34.5
StdIncAp 4.30 ... +10.2
USGAtp 8.69 -.02 +5.1
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFrMuB 10.14 -.01 +12.1
AMT-FrNY 12.96 -.02 +11.1
CapAppB p 38.43 +.26 +9.4
CapIncB t 12.47 +.02 +13.9
ChlncBt 9.50 -.01 +7.2
EquityB 11.01 +.08 +18.5
GloblB t 58.81 +.68 +24.2
GIbOppB 32.43 +.26 +31.5
HIYIdB1 9,38 ... +7.3
MnStFdB 35.26 +.11 +12.6
SIrlncBt 4.31 -.01 +9.4
Oppenheimer C&M:
GlobalC p 59.75 +.68 +24.3
MnStFdC 35.25 +.11 +12.6
StIncC 4.29 -.01 +9,4
Oppenhelm Quest:
QBalA 18.46 -.04 +10.6
QBalanC 10818 -.04 +9.8
QBalanB 18.16 -.04 +97
QOpptyA 33.04 ... +12.2
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.38 ... +8.2
LtdNYCt 3,37 ... +7.4
RoNtMuC t 12.67 +.01 +21.4
RoMuAp 18.37 -.01 +13.2


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

CORN (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 241.00 243.00 236.00 236.00 -4.00
Dec 05 253.00 254.00 248.00 248.00 -4.00
Mar 06 ,259.00 261.00 255.00 255.00 -4.00
May 06 263.00 264.00 259.00 259.00 -3.00
Jul06 267.00 267.00 263.00 263.00 -4.00
Sep06 261.00 261.00 259.00 260.00 -1.00
Dec06 260.00 262.00 258.00 261.00 +1.00
Est. sales 101,046. Thu,1as sales 78,972
Thu'kss open int. 742,374, +1,390
OATS (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 168.00 168.00 162.00 162.00 -5.00
Dec05 173.00 173.00 168.00 169.00 -3.00
Mar06 176.00 177.00 175.00 175.00 -2.00
May06 177.00 177.00 177.00 177.00 -3.00
Mar07 177.00 177.00 177.00 177.00 -3.00
May07 177.00 177.00 177.00 177.00 -3.00
Jul07 177.00 177.00 177.00 177.00 -3.00
Est. sales 3,657. Thu% s sales 695
ThunsMs open int. 8,048, +22
WINTER WHEAT (KCBT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 343.00 343.00 338.00 339.00 -3.00
Dec 05 355.00 355.00 350.00 351.00 -3.00
Mar06 365.00 365.00 357.00 357.00 -5.00
May06 364.00 364.00 361.00 361.00 -6.00
Jul06 364.00 367.00 364.00 364.00 -5.00
Sep06 370.00 370,00 370.00 370.00
Dec06 376.00 376.00 376.00 376.00
Est. sales .... Thu'es sales 13,650
Thu5 es open int. 86,667, +1,326
COTTON 2 (NYBT)
50,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Oct05 50.45 51.00 50.15 50.99 +.88
Dec 05 52.20 52.80 51.85 52.48 .72
Mar06 54.60 54.60 54.00 54.41 +.71
May 06 55.30 55.45 55.10 55.45 +.85
Jul06 56.00 56.50 56.00 56.50 +.85
Ocl 06 57.55 57.55 57.55 57.55 +.75
Dec 06 58.60 58.60 58.60 58.60 +.75
Est. sales 8,160. Thulas sales 4,132
Thu1-s open inl. 93,060, +69
COCOA (NYBT)
10 metric ton- $ per ton
Sep05 1455 1480 1451 1479 +26
Dec05 1486 1515 1485 1513 +27
Mar06 1522 1541 1520 1541 +26


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
RoMu 8 18.36 ... +1 3
RcNtJMuA 12.69 +.01 +222
OppenhelmerY:
CapApprecY 42.86 +.31 +10.8
PBHG Funds:
CliprFocus 1725 -.08 +10.2
SelGrowlhn 2152 +29 +13.4
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
RelRetAd p 11 33 +.05 +6.6
ShtTmAdp 10.02 .. +2.1
TolReLAd n 10.71 -01 +5.7
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsset 13.01 +01 +13,8
CommodRR 15.62 -.32 +14.2
Dverlnco 11.13 -.02 +12.0
EmMklsBd 1107 -.07 +19.1
FrgnBdn 10.74 +.02 +8.9
GlobalBdn 9986 +.04 +6.5
H0Yd8n 9,89 -.02 +11.1
LowDurn 10.11 -.01 +2,2
ModDurn 10.26 -.01 +3.9
RealRetlnsIl 11.33 +.05 +6,9
ShorT 10.02 ... +2.3
TotRetn 10.71 -.01 +6.0
TR II n 10.14 -.02 +4.5
TRII n 9.46 -.01 +6.1
PIMCO Funds A:
All Asset p 12.96 +.01 +13.0
CommodRR p 15.54 -32 +13.6
HIYIdA 9.89 -.02 +10.7
LowDurA 10.11 -.01 +1.7
RealRalAp 11.33 +.05 +6.4
TotRtA 10.71 -.01 +5.5
PIMCO Funds B:
RealRtBt 11.33 +.05 +5.6
TotRtBt 10.71 -.01 +4.7
PIMCO Funds C:
AlIAssetCt 12.88 +.01 +12,2
CommRR p 15,.43 -.32 +12.8
HiYIdC 9.89 -.02 +9.9
LwDurCnt 10.11 -.01 +1.2
RealRelC p 11.33 +,05 +5.9
ToRIC t 10.71 -.01 +4.7
PIMCO Funds D:
CommodRR p 15.55 -.32 +13.6
RealRl p 11.33 +.05 +6.4
TotlRInp 10.71 -.01 +5.6
Parnassus Funds:
Eqiylncon 25.35 +.23 +13.5
Pax World:
Balanced 23.78 +.19 +15.2
PennMuItCp 10.44 +.20 +24.0
PhoenixFunds A:
BalanA 14.91 +8.6
CapGrhA 15.03 -.02 +7,2
IntlA 10.38 +.13 +20.9
Pioneer Funds A:
BalancAp 9.80 +.05 +6.5
BondA p 9.32 -.02 +6.0
EqlncA p 29,97 +.19 +20.7
EuroSelEqA 30.64 +.19 +22.6
Grow1hAp 12.48 +.08 +17,3
HighYldA p 11.42 +.06 +8.0
IntlValA 17.29 +.09 +17.1
MdCpGrA 15.58 +.12 +17.8
MdCpVaAp 26.74 +.22 +24.5
PionFdA p 43.25 +.41 +17.5
TaxFreeA p 11.82 -.03 +9.4
ValueAp 18.26 +.09 +14.9
Pioneer Funds B:
HIYieldB1 11.47 +.06 +7.1
MIdCapValB 23.90 +.19 +23.3
Pioneer Funds C:
HIYIdC 1 11.57 +.0 6 +7.2
Price Funds Adv:
BIChip p 31.65 +.18 +13.9
Eqnylc p 26.62 +.07 +15.8
Growth pn 27.20 +.14 +15.4
HIYId p 7.03 ... +9.2
Price Funds:
Balance n. 19.76 +.06 +12.9
BlueChipGn 31.65 +.18 +14.0
CalTx n 11.07 -.03 +6.1
CapAprn 20.24 +.13 +15.9
DvGro n 23.18 +.08 +14.4
EmMtS n 22.38 +.47 +50.4
Eqlncn 26.87 +.07 +16.0
Eqldx n 33.19 +.16 +14.2
Europen 20.12 +.06 +19.4
FLInt+mn 10.90 -.03 +3.1
GNMn 9,56 -.01 +4.0
Growth n 27.38 +.13 +15.6
Gwthlnn n 22.24 +.06 +13.6
HlthScin 23.786 +.18 +17.4
HiYId n 7.05 +.01 +9.6
ForEqn 15,56 +.11 +16.8
InS1Bdn 9.71 +.06 +5.5
InlDissn 34.68 +.62 +23.2
Intl Grln 12.89 +.08 +23.3
IntStk n 12.98 +.08 +16.1
Japan n 8.52 +.08 +3.9
LatAmsn 19.45 +.38 +69.7
MdShtIn 5.15 -.01 +1.3
MdTxFrn 10.76 -.03 +5.5
MediaT n 30.00 +.10 +27.2
MidCapn 52.89 +.48 +23.7
MCapValu n 23.98 +.28 +20.7
NewAmtn 34.02 +.31 +14.1
NAsian 11.44 +.31 +43.0
NewEran 39.50 +1.48 +40.5
NwHA n n 31.69 +.36 +27.0
Newlco n 9.08 -.02 +5.7
NYTxFn 11.41 -.04 +5.7
PSBal n 18.56 +.10 +14.5
PSGrown 22.68 +.16 +17.4
PSIncon 15.03 +.06 +11.4
RealEst n 19.52 +.26 +40.2
R2010n 14.40 +.07 +13.4
Remre2020 n 15.30 +.08 +15.3
R2030 n 15.95 +.10 +17.0
SclTch n 19.62 +.05 +16.4
ST Bdn 4.71 ... +2.0
SmCapStkn 33.06 +.65 +22.8
SmCapValn 38.02 +.90 +26.6
SpecGr 17.53 +.12 +19.5
Spcin n 11.94 +.01 +7.9
TxFreen 10.07 -.02 +6.3
TxFrHYn 11.98 -.01 +9.0
TFInprnn 11.20 -.03 +3.5
TxFrSIYn 5.37 -.01 +2.0
US Int. 5.39 -.01 +2.5
US Long 12.12 -.05 +10.0
VA TF n 11.75 -.02 +5.9
Value n 23.57 +.03 +16.1
Principal Inv:
PILVoIn 13.89 +.06 +16.8
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvA8p 9.02 -.01 +3.3
AABalAp 10.97 +.06 +13.2
AZ TE 9.34 -.02 +5.8
CATxAyp 8.45 -.02 +6.1
ClasicEqAtp 13.20 +.07 +14.8
Convert p 17.26 +.15 +9.1
DlscGr 17.92 +.20 +18.0
DvrnA p 10.24 +.01 +8.9
EqlnAp 17.98 +.086 +17.3
EuroEq A 21.23 +.02 +22.1
FLTxA 9.31 -.02 +5.9
G0oAp 18.41 +.05 +11.5
GIGvApx 12.57 +.03 +5.9
GIbEqty p 8,78 +.09 +19.4
GrInA p 19.92 +.08 +14.8
HlthAp 63.56 +.52 +19.2
HIYdAp 8,07 ... +9.7
HYAdAp 6.09 +.01 +10.1
IncmA p 6.84 -.01 +4.8
IntlEq p 23.94 +.18 +19.5
InllGrIn p 12.08 +.15 +20.8
InvAp 13.30 +.13 +20.0
MITxp 9.07 -.02 +5.4
MNTxp 9.07 -.01 +5.1
NJTxA p 9.30 -.01 +6.4
NwOpAp 43.58 +.45 +21.0
NwValA p 18.56 +.12 +18.1
NYTxAp 8.83 -.02 +5.8
OTC0 Ap 7.65 +.09 +20.1
PATE 9.18 -.02 +6.1
TxExA p 8.88 -.02 +6.4
TFInAp 15.07 -.05 +5.3
TFHYA 13.00 -.02 +9.3
USGvAp 13.19 -.01 +3.8
U01A p 10.97 ... +28.1
VsltaAp 10.00 +16 +25.5
VoyAp 17.18 +.20 +13.4
Putnam Funds B:
CapApr1 18,93 +.32 +23.3
ClasaicEqB 13.09 +.07 +14.0
DlscGl0th 16.56 +.19 +17.0
DvrlnBt 10.16 +.01 +8.1
Eqlnc 17.84 +.08 +16.4
EuEqty6 B 20.45 +.02 +21.2
FLTxB t 9.31 -.01 +5.2
G0oBt 18.22 +.04 +10.8
GllecBlx 12.53 +*03 +5.2
GIbEqtyt 8,00 +.08 +18.5
GIN5Rst 27.77 +.92 +41.7


n epO High Levi Settle g


May 06 1545 1559 1545 1559 +27
Jul 06 1579 1579 1579 1579 +26
Sep06 1596 1596 1596 1596 +26
Dec 06 1620 1620 1620 1620 +27
Est. sales 13,091. Thueas sales 7,625
Thueas open nt 129.407, +109
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NYBT)
112,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Oct 05 9.84 9.89 9.81 9.83 -.09
Mar 06 9.80 9.87 9.78 9.81 -.07
May 06 9.55 9.61 9.55 9.57 -.04
Jul06 9.35 9.40 9.35 9.37 -.03
Oct106 9.24 9.28 9.24 9.25 -.02
Mar07 9.15 9.17 9.15 9.15 -.01
May 07 9.13 9.13 9.10 9.10 +.01
Est. sales 24,638. ThulsIs sales 28,447
Thu'eras open Int. 435,023, +5,778
CATTLE (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug05 79.60 81.30 79.60 81.20 +1.62
Oct05 82.00 83.50 82.00 83.40 +1.35
Dec05 84.20 85.55 84.20 85.47 +1.27
Feb06 86.00 87,20 86.00 87.15 +1.10
Apr 06 84,05 85.00 84.05 85.00 +.90
Jun 06 79.65 80.20 79.65 79.90 +.55
Aug 06 79.80 79.80 79.80 79.80 +.70
Es8 sales 32,443. ThuR.es sales 21,776
Thus open Int. 137,808, -28
FEEDER CATTLE (CME)
50,000 Ibs.- cents per Ilb.
Aug05 107.75 109.40 107.70 109.22 +1.65
Sep05 105.95 107.75 105.95 107.45 +1.62
Oct105 105.12 106.70 105.00 106.67 +1.65
Nov05 103.15 104.40 103.15 104.25 +1.25
Jan 06 100.85 101.72 100.85 101.50 +.80
Mar 06 97.708 98.42 97.70 98.42 +.72
Apr06 97.60 97.60 97.60 97.60 +.55
Est. sales 3,876. Thus/- sales 2,416
Thusias open Int. 23,487, -198
HOGS-Lean (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug05 67.15 67.92 67.15 67.87 +.60
Oc105 57.00 57.90 56.95 57.52 +.67
Dec 05 55.10 55.75 55.05 55.65 +.57
Feb06 58.00 58.25 57.95 586.22 +.27
Apr 06 58.40 58.80 58.25 58.75 +,35
May 06 60.90 61.10 60,90 61.00 -.08
Jun 06 62.00 62.32 62.00 62.32 +.23
EsL. sales 10,843. Thug2sm sales 12,445


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
GrInB1 19,63 +.08 +13,9
HlhB t 57.91 +.46 +18 3
HYIdB t 8 03 +8.9
HYAdvB t 601 +9.2
IncomeB t 6 80 01 +41
InlEq p 23.01 +.17 +186
IntlGrln t 1184 +.15 +19.8
IntlNop 11 56 +14 +21.0
InvB t 1219 + 12 +19.0
NJTxBt 9.29 -.02 +5.6
NwOppBt 39,21 +40 +20.1
NwVal p 18.23 +.11 +171
NYTxBt 8,82 -.02 +5,3
OTC0B1 677 +.08 +192
TxExBt 8.88 -.02 +5.6
TFHYBt 13.02 -.02 +6.6
TFInBI 15.10 -04 +4.7
USGvBt 13.12 -01 +3.0
111Bt1 1091 -.01 +27.1
VistaB1 8.74 +.14 +245
VoyBt 14.97 +.17 +12.6
Putnam Funds M:
Dvrlnc p 10.15 +.01 +8.6
Putnam Funds Y:
George 18.46 +.05 +11.8
Gr&Inc 19,96 +.08 +15.0
Income 6,88 -.01 +5.0
IntlEq 2411 +.18 +19.8
Voyager 17.75 +,21 +13.7
RS Funds:
RSEmGrnp 32.48 +.45 +24.3
RSNatRes np 29.84 +1.52 +49.9
RSPartners 37.64 +.67 +34.8
Value Fd 23.95 +.41 +36.4
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 31.18 +.37 +27.7
Royce Funds:
LowPrSIkr 15.54 +.39 +15.2
MicroCap n 16.11 +.45 +17.6
Opptylr 13.64 +.35 +22.4
PennMulrn 10.89 +.20 +252
Premierl nr 15.95 +.35 +20.4
TotRetlr 12.88 +.22 +21.0
Russell Funds S:
DivBondS 23,69 -.02 +4.6
DivEqS 45.07 +.30 +18.5
InIlSecS 62.40 +.44 +18.0
MstralBondS 10.50 -.01 +5.2
QuantEqS 38.94 +.19 +16.0
RESecS 48.85 +.68 +39.2
ShortDuaBdS 18.79 ... +1.5
SpecalGGrS 54.15 +.84 +21.7
Russell Instl I:
Eqtyll 31.22 +.22 +18.7
EqtyQI 35.81 +.17 +16,1
FIx1ncme I 21.12 -.02 +4.8
IntlI 38.57 +.27 +18,4
Russell LfePts C:
BalSrC p 10,99 +.04 +13.1
Russell LfePts D:
BalStratp 11.07 +.05 +13,8
Rydex Advisor:
OTC n 10.41 +.15 +13.0
Rydex C Class:
JunoC pn 17.27 +.10 -13.7
Rydex Investor:
JunoFdn 17.98 +.11 -12.8
OTC n 10.79 +.16 413.7
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxlnAn 10.51 -.01 +4.9
EmMktDbtn 11.24 -.05 +21.6
EmgMktnp 14.39 +.28 +43.0
EqlndxAn 37.95 +.18 +14.2
HYId n 8.59 ... +9.0
IntMuniA 10.93 -.03 +3.3
InlEqA n 11.14 +.10 +18.8
InlFixAn 11.78 +12 +5.3
LgCGroAn 19.23 +.27 +15.1
LgCValAn 22.23 +07 +19.6
SmCGroAn 18.01 +.39 +24.9
SmCValAn 21.83 +.40 +28.0
TaxMgdLC 11.74 +10 +17.4
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 16.95 +.31 +46.5
SP00n 20.34 +.10 +14.4
SmCap 30.22 +.55 +26.4
STI Classic:
CapAppLp 11.25 +.03 +6.9
CapAppA p 11.90 +.03 +7.3
CapAppT n 12.49 +.03 +3.0
GrowlncTnp 16.76 -.01 +19.6
HighYdl 11.08 -.02 +7.5
SmCapGrT n 21.85 +.45 +25.5
TxSenGrTnp 25.24 +18 +11.4
TaxSenGrL I 23.67 +.15 +10.3
VallnoSIkA 12.83 +.09 +15.3
VallncT np 12.87 +.09 +15.7
Salomon Brothers:
BalancB p 12.92 +.05 +7.3
HIYIdA 8.48 -.01 +11.3
InvesValO 20.86 ... +13.5
Opport 50.42 +.24 +21.3
Schroder Funds:
NAmEqlnv8 n 11.31 +.06 +16.5
Schwab Funds:
InlSS nr 16.27 +.13 +187
101Onvrs 35.88 +.18 +15.9
10OSel n 35.90 +.19 +16.1
So&PInvn 19.12 +.09 +14.2
S&PSeln 19.20 +.09 +14.4
S&PlnstlSel 9.74 +.05 +14.5
SmCplnv n 23.23 +.42 +26.0
SmCapSel n 23.27 +.42 +26.2
TotBondn 10.02 -.02 +5.2
YIdPislnv 9.67 -.01 +2.7
YIdPlsSel 9.67 -.01 +2.8
Scudder Funds A:
CapGrthp 45.60 +.42 +15.0
DrmHiRA 44.61 +.24 +19.3
FigComA p 17.91 +.04 +21.5
HilncAx 5.49 --.03 +11.3
MgdMuni p 9.18 -.03 +5.5
RREEFpx 22.38 +.25 +39.1
TechA 11.23 +.10 +13.1
TotRetA 9.17 +.04 +10.2
US GovtA x 8.53 -.04 +3.7
Scudder Funds B:
DnnmHiRB 44.47 +.23 +18.3
Scudder Funds C:
D5mHiRC 44.52 +.24 +18.3
Scudder Funds S:
EmMkin 11.14 -.01 +22.4
EmgMkGrnr 19.61 +.39 +42.7
GIBdS rx 10.17 +.01 +6.9
GlIbDis 37.64 +.36 +34.5
GlobalS 28.50 +.55 +27.3
Gold&Prec 15.72 +.28 +4.8
GrEurGro 28906 +.32 +24.8
GrolncS 22.46 +.15 +14.7
HIYIdTx n 12.90 -.03 +8.1
Income Sox 12.93 -.05 +6.2
lInrTxAMT 11.32 -.04 +3.9
IntmernatIS 45.47 +.54 +21.7
LgCoGron 24.77 +.28 +14.0
LatAmercn 37.71 +.76 +61.9
MgdMunIS 9.19 -.03 +5.8
MATFS 14.54 -.05 +5.1
PacOppsnr 14.51 +.37 +32.2
ShtTmrdS nx 10.03 -.04 +1.7
SmCoValS r 28.23 +.34 +24.6
Scudder Instl:
Eqty5001L 139.77 +.67 +14.5
Scudder Investment:
Eq500nlv 138.32 +.66 +14.3
Selected Funds:
AmerShsD 38.34 +.25 +15.9
AmShsSp 38.29 +.25 +15.6
Sellgman Group:
ComunAt1 26.17 +.15 +19.8
FronierA 1 13.19 +.19 +15.9
FrontlleiDI 11.63 +.16 +14.9
GIbSmCoA 16.71 +.30 +30.6
GlobTechA 12,77 +.05 +16.5
HIYBdA p 3.42 .. +7.8
Sentinel Group:
ComStkAp 30.16 +.26 +12.7
SmCoAp 7.86 +.10 +18.8
Sequoia 152.04 +.05 +5.9
Sit Funds:
LargeCpGrn 35,71 +.22 +18.7
Smith Barney A:
AgGrAp 99,49 +1.84 +18.4
ApprAp 14.79 +.07 +10.7
FdVa0Ap 15.20 +.11 +10,8
HilncAt 6.94 ., +9,2
InllAIIC+ GrAp 13.67 +,11 +17.5
LgCapGAp 22.43 +.28 +10.0
MgMuAp 15.50 +.01 +4.5
SBCaplncA 17.04 +.10 +15.2
Smith Barney B&P:
AgGrBI 89.28 +1.63 +17.4
'ApprBt 14.48 +*07 +..8
FdValB0 14.29 +.10 +9.9
L9CapeBI 21.16 +.27 +9.2
SBCapleno 16.91 +.11 +14.7


Thuesn open inL. 93,397, -1,226
GOLD (COMX)
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
Aug 05 427.70 430.50 427.00
Sep05 431.30 431.30 431.30
Oct 05 430.70 433.50 429.70,
Dec 05 433.60 436.50 432.90
Feb 06 439.00 439.00 439.00
Apr 06 440.50 442.40 440.50
Jun06 446.00 446.00 445.40
Est. sales.... Thus sales 119,645
Thueoss open Int. 247,514, -7,202
SILVER (COMX)
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
Jul05 778.2 775.0
Aug 05 723.8 723.8 723.8
Sep05 719.0 727.0 715.0
Ocl 05 729.6 723.4
Dec 05 725.0 735.0 723.0
Jan 06 734.4 734.4 734.4
Mar 06 734.0 736.8 734.0
Est. sales ... Thu/ems sales 20,817
Thueas open int. 123,723, +187
HI GRADE COPPER (COMX)
25,000 Ibs.- cents per Ib.


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
Smith Barney C:
AggGrC 8967 +1.64 +17,5
FdValC 14.29 + 11 +9.9
LgCapC p 21,15 +.26 +9.1
Smith Barney 1:
DwStrall 17,31 +.05 +6.2
Grolnc 1 1560 +05 +11.5
Smith Barney Y:
AggGroYt 103.24 +1.92 +189
LgCapGroY 2310 +.29 +104
SoundShn 37.51 +.08 +15.5
St FarmAssoc:
Balann 5021 -.01 +8.3
Gwthn 49.03 +07 +11.8
Stratton Funds:
Diwdend.n 37.77 .37 +28.1
Growth 44.28 +.87 +32.4
SmCap 44.52 +.87 +36.4
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBI 9.45 -.01 +4.2
SunAmerica Focus:
FLgCpA p 17.99 +.34 +12.3
TCU ShrtDur 9.57 -.01 +23
TCW Galileo Fds:
SelEqty 19.40 +.25 +13.7
ValueOpp 23.50 +.31 +17.4
TCW Galileo N:
SelEqtyN p 19.00 +.24 +13.3
TD WaterhouseFds:
Dow30 Fds ... 0.0
TIAA-CREF Funds:
BondPlus 10.29 -.01 +5.0
Eqtylndex 891 +.06 +16.9
GroInc 12.51 +.06 +14.5
GroEqty 9.40 +12 +13,4
HiYldBond 9.31 ... +8.4
In8tEqty 10.72 +.16 +15.7
MgdAlc 11,28 +.07 +12.8
ShtTrmBond 10.44 -.01 +2.1
SocChcEqty 9.53 +.08 +16.6
TaxExBond 10.88 -.04 +4.9
Tamarack Funds:
EnlerSmCp 33.69 +.57 +16.5
Value 46.05 +.24 +17.3
Templeton Instit:
EmMS p 16.55 +.31 +39.4
ForEqS 20.71 +.26 +23.7
Third Avenue Fds:
Intl r 19.89 +.18 +29.2
RealEstValr 30,11 +.12 +31.7
SmICap*n 24.34 +.30 +23,0
Value 57.10 +.10 +283
Thompson Plumb:
Growth n 46.06 +.09 +27
Thornburg Fds:
IntlValA p 21.44 +,20 +21.7
LtdMunAp 13.63 -.02 +2.1
ValueA 31.95 +.08 +16.1
Thdvent Fds A:
HighYld 5.17 +9.3
Income 8.73 -.01 +5.0
LgCapStock 26.29 +.16 +14.4
MIdCapStk 17.68 +.25 +26.6
MunlBd 11.48 -.03 +6.0
Torray Funds:
Fund 40.52 +.30 +9.4
Inst 115.90 +.72 +9.9
TA IDEX A:
FedTxExAp 11.79 -.03 +4.9
JanGrowp 24.36 -.07 +17.8
GrCoGlobp 24.58 +.25 +13.3
TrConHYBp 9.28 -.01 +8.3
TAFexIncop 9.54 ... +5.9
TA IDEX C:
AsAIModGrt 11.78 +.08 +13.9
Turner Funds:
MidcpGwth 25.84 +.21 +26.7
SmICpGrwth 24.26 +.,2 +19.1
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 25.23 +.18 +19.6
UBS Funds ClA:
GlobAio5 t 13.57 +.06 NA
UBS Funds Cl C:
GlobAIlo p 13.31 +.06 NA
UBS PACE Fds P:
LCGEqP n 20.60 +.4 +19.7
UMB Scout Funds:
Wo9dd 25.45 +.28 +24,0
US Global Investors:
AGIAm 25,26 +.22 +18.9
GIbRscn 13.21 +.45 +66.6
GIdShr 7.80 +.29 +16.2
USChina 7.05 +.16 +23.8
WIdPrcMl n 15.72 +.41 +21.2
USAA Group:
AgsvGthn 30.23 +.05 +21.2
CASBn 11.27 -.02 +7.1
ComstStr n 27.25 +.14 +13.6
GNMA 9.69 -.01 +3.8
GrTaxStrn 15.09 +.04 +16.4
Grwthn 14.49 +.07 +23.2
Gr&lncn 19.04 +.10 +15.5
IncStkn 17.35 +.01 +18.4
Income n 12.39 ... +5.8
nll n 22.07 +.29 +17.4
NYBdn 12.09 -.04 +7.2
PrecMM 15.11 +.55 +10.0
S&PIdx n 18.50 +.09 +14.3
SciTech 9.70 +.03 +14.1
ShtTBndn 8.88 ... +2.4
SmICapStkn 14.71 +.18 +28.0
TxEITn 13.29 -.04 +5.3
TxELT n 14.21 -.04 +7.4
TxEShn 10.68 -.01 +2.2
VA0 d 11.73 -.03 +6.0
WndGr n 18.03 +.17 +15.4
UIdAssODcOn 8.93 +.05 +14.4
Value Line Fd:
Levrge Gth n 27.48 +.39 +23.
Van Kamp Funds A:
AggGrA8 p 15.12 +.21 +22.5
CA TFAm p 18.92 -.06 +6.5
CmstAp 18.57 -+.03 +16.0
CorpBdAp 6.72 -.01 +6.5
EmGroAp 39.94 +.32 +15.7
EntAp 12.80 +.08 +15.5
EqtylncAp 8.78 +.03 +15,8.
ExchFd 368.82 +3.63 +13.3
GIblFran p 23.55 +.12 +16.7
GvScALp 10.33 -.01 +4.9
GrlnAp 21.04 +.06 +19.89
HarbAdp 14.51 +.09 +7.4
HIghYldA 3.62 ... +7.8
HYMuAp 10.98 ... +11.4
InTFA p 18.97 -.05 +6.3
MunlnA p 14.75 -.05 +5.8
PATFAep 17.52 -.04 +6.5
PaceFndAp 9.57 +.13 +17.8
StiMunInc 13.40 -.01 +10.8
US MIgeA 1184 -.01 +4.0
U1lI1tyAp 18.84 +.09 +32.4
Van Kamp Funds B:
CmslB t 18.57 +.03 +15.2
EmGrBt 34.15 +.26 +14.8
EnlerpmBt 11.70 +.07 +14.7
EqlncBt 8.64 +.02 +14.8
GrdncBt 29.86 +.06 +19.0
HYMu8Bt 10.98 ... +10.6
MunlnBn 14.72 -.05 +4.9
PATFBnt 17.47 -.04 +5.8
StrMuninc, 13.39 -.01 +9.9
US MLgeB 13.78 -.02 +3.2
Ut111 18.81 +.09 +31.4
Van Kamp Funds C:
CommStkC 18.58 +.03 +15.2
EqlncC t 8.68 +.03 +14.8
Vanguard Admiral:
AssetAdmI n 56.38 +.27 +14.9
BalAdml n 19.79 +.07 +12.4
CAITAdmn 11.09 -.04 +3.7
CALTAdm 11.80 -.04 +6.4
CpOpAdIn 73.08 +.41 +21.2
Energy n 97.69 +3.04 +53.3
EqlnCAdml 50.07 +.04 +16.8
EuropAdml 62.21 +.45 +22.8
ExplAdml 73.65 +1.04 +25.7
ExntdAdm n 33.58 +.46 +27.2
500Admlh n 113.80 +.54 +14.5
GNMAAdmn 10.37 -.01 +4.9
GrolncAdm 51.46 +.23 +15.5
GmthAdml In 27.05 +.21 +13.0
HIthCaren 56.93 -.17 +16.6
HIYIdCp n 6.29 -.01 +7.6
HiYIdAdm8 n 10,84 -.03 +6.8
InsdLTAdm n 12.78 -.04 +6.1
ITBondAdml 10.54 -.02 +5.8
ITsryAdmIn 11.11 -.03 +4.3
InliGrAdml 60.57 +.79 +19.4
ITAdml8 n 13,44 -.04 +4.2
ITCoAdm4 9.92 -.02 +5.3
LIdTnrAdm 10.77 -.02 +1.7
LTGrAdml 9,76 -.04 +13.3
LTAdmln 11.41 -.04 +5.9
MCpAdmI n 77.21 +.99 +30.3
NJLTAd n 12.00 -.04 +5.4
NYLTAdm 11,46 -.04 +5.6


I----T URES----


. pxE Open High Low S g


429.90 +2.50
431.130 +2.50
432.80 +2.50
435.80 +2.50
439.00 +2.60
442.20 +2.60
445.40 +2,70


Jul05 129.35 129.20 129.20
Aug05 168.30 169.20 167.80 168.75 +.45
Sep05 164.90 165.40 163.60 164.45 -.45
Oct05 162.40 162.40 161.00 162.25 -.05
Nov05 160.15 160.30 159.90 160.05
Dec05 157.35 158.30 156.80 157.95 +.15
Jan 06 154.75 154.75 154.75 154.75 +.05
Est. sales.... Thu7 as sales 12,094
ThuRe-s open int. 115,938, +506
EURODOLLARS (CME)
$1 million-pts of 100 pct.
Aug05 96.205 96205 9 6.197 96.202 -.005
Sep05 96,040 96,040 96.020 96.025 -.015
Oct 05 95,900 95.900 95,895 95.895 -.025
Nov05 95.815 95.815 95.815 95,815 -.030
Dec 05 95.785 95.790 95.735 95.735 -.050
Jan 06 95.700 95.700 95.700 95.700 -.050
Mar 06 95.700 95.705 95.630 95,630 -.065
Est. sales 234,890. Thuans sales 1,080,573
Thules open Int. 7,585,973, +78,644
LUMBER (CME)
110,000 bd. t.- $ per 1,000 bd. ft.
Sep05 313.0 313.0 302.9 302.9 -10.0
Nov 05 304.2 304.2 293.0 300.0 -3.0


12-mo.
Name NAV ch 1%rtn
PrmCapr 66,29 +.89 +18.0
PALTAdmn 11,51 -.04 +5.4
REITAdml r 86.84 +1 07 +37.4
STstyAdml 10.38 -.01 +1.
STBdAdmIn 10.01 -01 +2.0
ShtTrmAdm 15.56 -.01 +1.5
STFedAdm 10.31 -.01 +1.9
STIGrAdm 10.56 ... +2.7
SmlCapAdml n28.58 +.50 +27.0
TxMCapr 58.91 +.30 +17.4
TxMGrlnc r 55.26 +.27 +145
TtBdAdmIn 10.19 -.02 +80
TotStkAdmn 2961 +.20 +17.3
USGroAdml n 4399 +.59 +17.8
ValueAdml n 22.02 +.04 +18.8
WellslAdm n 52 78 -.01 +10.4
WellnAdm n 53,03 +28 +140
WindsorAdmn62.17 +22 +16.9
WdsrllAdm 56.77 -.06 +19.9
Vanguard Fds:
AssetA n 25.11 +12 +148
CAIT n 11.09 -.04 +3.7
CALTn 11.80 -.04 +6.3
CapOpp n 3162 +17 +21.1
Convt n 13.21 +.06 +7.7
DrvidendGro 12.23 +02 +134
Energy 52.01 +1.62 +53.2
Eqlncn 23.88 +.02 +16.7
Explorer n 79.04 +1.12 +25.5
FLLTn 11.78 -.04 +5.1
GNMA n 10.37 -.01 +4.9
GlobEq n 18.69 +.25 +23.1
Grolnc n 31.51 +.14 +15.4
GrowthEq 9.86 +.04 +14.3
HYCorpn 6.29 -.01 +7.5
HIlhCare n 134.38 -.40 +16.5
InflaPron 12.35 +.06 +6.1
IntlExpl n 17.46 +.25 +29.6
IntlGr 19.03 +.25 +19.1
IntlVanl 32.12 +.35 +22.8
ITI Grade 9.92 -.02 +5.2
ITTsryn 11.11 -.03 +4.2
,I0FEConn 15.43 +.04 +10.2
LIFEGron 20.51 +.13 +16.0
LIFEInc n 13.59 +.01 +7.5
LIFEModn 18.23 +.08 +13.4
LTInGrade n 9.76 -.04 +13.1
LTTsry n 11.80 -.05 +11.8
Morgan n 16.92 +.08 +17.8
MuHYn 10.84 -.03 +6.7
MulnsLgn 12.78 -.04 +6.0
MuInt n 13.44 -.04 +4.1
MuLtdn 10.77 -.02 +1.7
MuLong n 11.41 -.04 +538
MuShrtn 15.56 -.01 +1.4
NJLTn 12.00 -.04 +5.3
NYLTn 11.46 -.04 +5.6
OHLTTxEn 12.16 -.04 +5.0
PALTn 11.51 -.04 +5.4
PrecMtlsMinr 18,89 +.96 +42.6
PrmCpCore rn 10.90 +.11 NS
Prmcpr 63.85 +.85 +17.8
SelValu r 20.10 +.25 +28.4
STAR n 19.21 +.08 +14.7
STIGrade 10.56 +2.6
STFed n 10.31 -.01 +1.8
STTsryn 10.38 -.01 +1.7
StratEqn 23.30 +.33 +30.2
TgtRet2015 11.44 +.03 +11.0
TgtRet2025 11.68 +.04 +12.4
TgtRet2035 12.06 +,07 +14.7
TxMCApnr 29.26 +.15 +17.3
TxMGI r 26.89 +13 +14.5
TaxMngdlnI rn10.43 +.11 +19.2
TaxMgdSCr 22.85 +45 +28.4
USGron 16.97 +.23 +17.4
USValuen 14.57 +03 +20.2
Wellsly n 21.78 -.01 +10.2
Weltnn 30.69 +15 +13.8
Wndsr, n 18.42 +.06 +16.8
Wnds1g 31.98 -.03 +19.8
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 113.79 +.54 +14.4
Balanced n 19.79 +.07 +12.4
DevMktn 9.29 +.09 +19.1
EMktn 16.34 +.35 +45.4
Europe n 26.48 +19 +22.6
Extend n 33.55 +.46 +27.0
Growth n 27.05 +.21 +12.9
ITBondn 10.54 -.02 +5.7
LgCapldxn 22.02 +.10 +15.8
LTBondn 12.06 -.05 +12.3
MidCap 17.01 +.21 +30.1
Pacdficn 9.26 +.14 +11.5
REITdr 20.35 +.25 +37.3
SmCap n 28.56 +.50 +26.9
SmICpGrow 16.06 +.26 +25.9
SmICapVal 14.95 +.28 +27.8
STBond n 10.01 -.01 +1.9
TotBonddn 10.19 -.02 +4.9
Totllntl n 12.86 +.14 +21.7
TotStk n 29.61 +.20 +17.1
Value n 22.02 +.04 +18,8
Vanguard InstI Fds:
Ballnstn 19.79 +.07 +12.5
DevMkInst n 9.21 +.09 +19.5
Eurolnstl n 26.52 +.19 +22.9
Exln n 33.61 +.47 +27.3
Growahdnswt 27.06 +.22 +13.1
nlPronstn 9.88 +.05 +6.2
Instldxn 112.87 +.54 +14.5
InsPI n 112.87 +.54 +14.6
TotlBdidxn 51.40 -.09 +5.0
MidCaplnsgln 17.07 +.22 +30.3
Paclansln 9.28 +.15 +11.9
SmCpln n 28.60 +.50 +27.1
TBest n 10.19 -.02 +*5.0
TSInstn 29.62 +.20 +17.3
Valualnsll n 22.02 +.04 +18.9
Vantagepoint Fds:
AggrOpp 11.32 +.1 +11 +21.3
AssmeAlloc 7.54 +.04 +14.3
CoreBondldxl 10.08 -.01 +4.6
Eqtyinc 9.36 +.02 +17.7
Growth n 8.36 +.08 +9.9
Gmw&lnc 10.43 +.05 +14.1
MPLongTermGr21.61 +.11 +13.0
MPTradGrwth 22.18 +.09 +11.0
Victory Funds:
DvsStkA 17.09 +.10 +16.2
WmBilnsllntl 16.89 +.20 +23.8
WM Blair Mt Fds:
InmGrowthl r 23,46 1 +.27 +24.3
WM Str Asset Mgmt:
BalancedAp 13.48 +.04 +12.0
BalancedBl t13.44 +.03 +11.0
ConGrwB I 14.42 +.05 +13.5
ConGrwAp 14.82 +.06 +14.4
StratGrAp 16.15 *+.08 +16.0
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Accumul0iv 6.49 .06 +17.4
CoreivA 5.99 +.07 +18.4
HighIec 7.44 +.02 +6.9
NwCcptA p 9.61 +.14 +23.0
ScTechA 11.51 +.13 +31.5
VanguardA 9.22 +.08 +22.8
Wasatch:
CoreGrth 46.05 +.23 +26.3
SmCapGrth 42.70 +.31 +28.1
SmlCapVal 5.81 +,06 +25.6
Weltz Funds:
PartVal 23.74 +.09 +11.0
Value n 37.10 +.14 +10.1
Wells Fargo Ad Adm:
Index 49.84 +.24 +14.2
ToRtBd 12.31 -.02 +4.8
Wells Fargo Adv A:
ASelAIIA 20.16 +.07 +14.0
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 23.96 +.28 +22.6
GovSec n 10.68 -.03 +4.3
Growthlevn 19.79 +.12 +16.9
Opplntylnvn 49.12 +1.01 +19.5
SCapValZ0 p 30.98 +1.01 +27.0
UtStlnv 9.17 ,.. +2.8
Wells Fargo Admin:
DivrsEq I 41.67 +.27 +16,5
GrthBal In 30.60 +16 +12.1
LgCoGrl 48.22 +.54 +15.2
Eqty1inc n 35.94 -.08 +15.0
Westerm Asset:
CorePlus 10,66. -.01 +7.9
Core 11.45 -.01 +.58
Westport Funds:
SmallCapln 26039 +.18 +23.1
William Blair N:
Grow0hN 11.14 +.15 +17.3
In8G0hN 23,16 +.26 +24.0
Yacktman Funds:
Fund 15.,35 +.01 +11.5


p. xE Open High tow Settl g


Jan 06 310.0 310.0 305.0 308.0 -1.2
Mar06 312.0 312.0 312.0 312.0 -4.0
May06 312.2 312.2 312.2 312.2 -7.8
Est. sales 1,080. Thukes sales 604
Thusmss open Int. 3,590, +75
NATURAL GAS (NYMX)
10,000 mm btuesas, $ per mm btu
Sep05 7.701 7.900 7.701 7.885 +.191
Oct05 7.760 7.950 7.760 7.943 +.195
Nov05 8.302 8.488 8.302 8.488 +.190
Dec05 8.790 8.958 8.790 8.958 +.175
Jan06 9.135 9.308 9.120 9.308 +.177
Feb06 9.130 9.305 9.130 9.305 +.174
Mar06 8.960 9.141 8.960 9.141 +.170
Est. sales... Thu'Irs sales 62,737
Thul open int. 498,830, +2,474
UNLEADED GASOLINE (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 172.50 176.00 171.50 173.87 +1.67
Sep05 170.93 173.05 170.80 172.61 +1.52
Oct05 161.93 164.50 161.85 163.40 +1.71
NOv05 161.05 162.00 160.60 161.75 +1.66
Dec05 161.05 162.20 161.00 16220 +1.61
Jan 06 162.60 163.75 162.60 163.75 +1.61
Feb06 165.00 165.50 165.00 165.30 +1.61
Est. sales .... Thursn sales 56,763
Thuases open int. 151,636, -5,230
HEATING OIL (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 164.00 166.50 163.00 163.62 -.93
Sep05 167.70 170.00 166.80 167.62 -.09
Oct05 171.05 173.10 170.50 171.07 +.11
Nov05 174.15 175.70 174.00 174.17 +.21
Dec 05 177.40 178.60 176.40 176.82 +.26
Jan 06 179.20 180.10 178.75 178.82 +.26
Feb06 180.00 181.10 179.50 179.57 +.26
Es. sales .... Thuoes sales 55,585
Thulsss open Int. 178,195, +119
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX)
1,000 bbl.-dollars per bbl.
Sep 05 59.93 61,05 59.81 60.57 +.63
Oct05 60.85 62.00 60.85 61.65 +.67
Nov 05 61.56 62.40 61.56 62.35 +.67
Dec 05 62.11 63.07 62.07 62,86 +.67
Jan 06 62.58 63.22 62.56 63.22 +.67
Feb 06 62.77 63.50 62.77 63.44 +.67
Mar 06 62.60 63.51 62.60 63.51 +.67
Est. sates.,,. Thu s sales 176,003
Thuves open Int. 807,162, +696


I r"F -rF ... ..q. .. . ....- .. - .. ....U.... ...FI. 9-'-- V "1 r1 .I.. ...-- .. .. ...... ..








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


SUNDAY
Sitl31, 2005


(hbmber


Connection


.' ,'* .-, -;;.*^ '^ s,- ; .
..... .. :,,, ..,.'
.. -......-ra..:


Chamber Staff


Kitty Barnes ................... . . Executive Director
Suzafine Clemente ........... .Inverness Office Manager and
Special Events Coordinator
Debi Shields .................Crystal River Office Manager
Chamber Connection Newspaper Editor
Marion Elson ................Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Diane Mclnnis .............. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally ................... .Office Assistant (Inverness)
Sarah Marx ................ Office Assistant (Crystal River)


Inverness ................................ 726-2801
H om osassa .................... .............. 628-2666
Crystal River ................. ............... 795-3149

www.citruscountychamber.com


,~-.a EdE2,3I"


Paquette's Adult Family Care Home honored


Krista Paquette's Adult
Family Care Home is, a home
setting, which provides a family
atmosphere for those needing
assistance in daily living.
The home is. a small state-
licensed facility of five beds.
This allows residents to receive
more personalized care. ,
Home Health services are
covered under Medicare and a


Member of the Week


large number of private insur-
ance carriers.
If additional services are
needed such as nursing; physi-
cal therapy; occupational thera-


py; speech therapy; nutritional
guidance; wound care; etc.,
Krista Paquette can obtain these
services through several local
home health care agencies.


This home is perfect for those
who no longer wish to live
alone or are worried about their
safety.
It is the solution to ensure
security and improve the quali-
ty of life of your loved ones or
yourself.
For further information,
please contact Krista at 563-
2908.


Paradise Art Angels


On the new two-speed Five Star oo
Edition of the Infinity System!
The world's first self-monitoring residential air conditioning
system, designed and programmed to run a daily
diagnostic check. It actually adjusts itself to maintain
maximum efficiency.
(Offer ends 8/31/05. W.A.C. & purchase of qualifying
equipment. See Bay Area for details. Homeowner occupants only)
AIR CONDITIONING L ..


lf & HEATING


Citrus
Marion
Levy


www.bayoreocool.comn www.corrier.com www.rtitex.org sotn Certified CAC 415


fl T NEW'352-726-7700
UJ 4474 S. Florida Ave. Inverness




T M tVI 3/4 mi. south of Fairrounds Hwv. 41


I


I NEW !352-726-7700
4474 S. Florida Ave. Inverness
f3/4 mi. south of Fairgrournds* Hwy. 41



ST. SCHOLASTIC CHURCH'S


CRFT SHOW

Saturday, October 1,
2005
9 a..m. to 3 p.m.

Pope John Paul II School
(About one mile south of intersection
of HWY 490 and 44) Lecanto
Food and Beverage
Menu Available


Crafters invited, for information call
Darrell Weston at 527-4449



Co-sponsored by
:L; I 1 St. Scholastica
='I Men's Club


Recently the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed Paradise Art Angels as a new member with a ribbon cutting ceremony.
Participating were, front row from left: Rhonda Lestinsky, chamber ambassador; Jeannie "Jay" Durran; Rita Fleming, owners. Middle row:
Mike Gudis, chamber ambassador; Dylan Scott; Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director. Back row: Bonnie Carlin; Tom Buchannon; Larry
Blanken, chamber ambassador; Pete Burrell, chamber director and ambassador; John Porter, chamber ambassador. Paradise Art Angels is
located at 406 N.E. 1st Ave., Crystal River. They offer art supplies, have a gallery and teach art classes. For information, call (352) 564-2788 or
email them at paradiseangelsart@hotmail.com.


Member News


HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY'S HOSPICE
CARE UNIT AT CITRUS
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
welcomes
K athi

the volun- '
teer team. ";
Being a
volunteer 2 .
at the ; ,
Hospice /
Care 'Unit
is a unique Hospice of Citrus
a s s i g n County Volunteer
m e n t Kathi Lazar
Volunteers
are an important part 'of the
services that patients and fami-
lies receive. Volunteers sit with
patients and provide compan-
ionship to them and their fami-
lies. Volunteers may also run
errands, answer telephones or
assist with meals. Volunteer
shifts are generally four hours
beginning at 8 a.m. and ending
at 8 p.m.
Gerrit van den Thoorn, a
Volunteer Chaplain, makes a


difference
in every
life he
touches.
He assists
patients,
family
members,
friends
and staff
with their
spiritual
needs. He
helps
patients


. .
, ,





Hospice of Citrus
County Volunteer
Chaplain Gerrit van
den Thoorn


and families at a inost difficult
time and provides an opportuni-
ty for them share stories with
him. Hospice of Citrus County
offers volunteers training for
anyone interested in helping at
the CMH Hospice Care Unit.
For more information, contact
Judy Knowlton at (352) 527-
6613.
ENE


Constantine A. Toumbis,
M.D., Ph D, has been appointed
to the medical staff at SEVEN
RIVERS REGIONAL MED-
ICAL CENTER with privi-
leges in orthopedics and spine
surgery.
The hospital's governing


board con-
firmed 'his
appoint-
ment in
J une .
Toumbis,
board eli-
gible in
orthopedic
surgery,
received
his med-
ical degree
with dis-
tinction in
biomedical


Constantine A.
Toumbis, M.D., Ph
D.

research from


Wayne State University School
of Medicine in Detroit, MI.
He completed a surgical
internship at University of
Florida Department of Surgery
in Jacksonville; an orthopedic
surgery residency at University
of Florida Department of Ortho-
paedic Surgery in Jacksonville;
and a spine surgery fellowship
at Cleveland Clinic Florida
Spine Institute in Weston.
He has joined Andrew
Petrella, M.D. at Citrus
Orthopaedic and Joint Institute,
Crystal River.
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is a general,
medical/surgical acute care
facility that opened its doors in
1978.
The hospital has grown to 128
beds serving the communities of
Citrus, Levy and South Marion
Counties.
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is fully accredit-
ed by the Joint Commission on
Accreditation of health care
Organizations (JCAHO) and is
licensed by the Florida State
Department of Health and
Human Services, Health Care


Financing Admini-stration, for
participation in
Medicare/Medicaid programs.
Seven Rivers can be found on
the web at www.srrmc.comhttp:
//www.srrmnc.com.
SN

SEVEN RIVERS REGIO-
NAL MEDICAL CENTER
offers free blood pressure
screenings from 12:30 p.m. to
2:30 p.m. the first Friday
monthly in the main hospital
lobby. The next screening will
be August 5.
Appointments are not neces-
sary. Call 795-6560 for addi-
tional information. -
Dunnellon Diagnostic. Center
offers free blood pressure
screenings Fridays from 10 a.m.
to 12 p.m. The center is at
11673 N. Williams Street in
Dunnellon.
Free health information from
the American Heart Association
,is provided with every screen-
ing.
Appointments are not neces-
sary. Call 489-7211 for addi-
tional information.


"Hat's Off' to the Senior


Companion Volunteers for a job
well done providing over
10,000 hours of companionship,
escorted transportation, home-
making, and respite care to over
150 clients in the past year.
Senior Companion Volunteers
providing hours of community
service are: SCP Coordinator,
Tindy Cunningham; SCP volun-
teers: Maria Navarro, Jackie
Sims, Hugh Gragen, Gail
Durand Ada Fox, Alma Kadel,
Barbara Watkins, Alice
Anderson, Carol Lunsford,
Janet Murrey, Marvell Marshall,
Boyd Murrey, Alfredo- Roque,
Marylou St. Clair.
Collectively they have driven
over 60,000 miles delivering
these much needed services.
The Senior Companion
Program is recruiting for volun-
teers on the east side of Citrus
County to join our dedicated
corps.
Senior Companions experi-
ence the joy of helping others to
remain independent and live on
their own, which benefits both
clients and the volunteers.
For more information on the
Senior Companion Program
please contact the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center at (352) 527-
5431 or e-mail: ncvc@bocc.cit-
rus.fl.us.


www.citruscountychamber.com


(


4795 (
447 (D







Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


[hnmber


Abitare' Paris Day Spa & Salon


Mr. Mark Barnhurst,
Certified Physician's Assistant
for Access health care will be
the guest speaker at the August
12 luncheon.
His topic will be "Becoming
your own Medical Advocate
and taking charge of your health


care."
There will also be over ten
tabletop displays. Come out and
network and meet some of our
new members and support our
speakers.
For reservations, call 795-
3149 or 628-2666.


H Website Watch
iHave you linked to www.citr-
uscotuntychamber.com?
\\ell, 1,066,065 people have hit
our site since January 1, 2005. To
get on the "hit list" call Debi at
795-3149.
7L- *


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle
Recently the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony to welcome Abitare' Paris Day Spa & Salon as a returning
member. Participating from left, front row: Melissa Disanza, nails and skincare; Angela Oliverio, owner; Cheryl Johnson, skincare and perma-
nent make-up; Jeremy Boucher, salon/spa coordinator. Middle row: John Porter, chamber ambassador; Kris Werner, nails; Courtney Tobin,
massage therapist; Melissa Cancel, nails; Tina Reiner, massage therapist; Rikki Werner, nails and skincare; Lillian Smith, chamber ambassador.
Back row: Curtis Peters, chamber ambassador; Desiree' Fielding, hair design; Erica Gatto, hair design; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador;
Barbara Trosper, hair design; Tracy Bechtel, hair design; Angie Loethen, hair design; Michelle Cooper, hair design; Mike Gudis, chamber
ambassador; Jamie Nicholson, hair design team; Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director, not pictured are Connie Purcell, massage therapist;
Jacy Johnson, associate hair designer; and Sharon Nachbaucher, salon/spa coordinator. An established business in Citrus County since 1991,
Abitare' Paris originally opened as a European Spa offering a skincare clinic combined with massage therapy. In 1993, they expanded to the
first full-service day spa in the county. They became a true state-of-the-art salon and day spa in 2000 offering the very latest equipment, prod-
ucts, and spa services available in the spa industry today. For the ultimate in atmosphere and customer service, they invite you to stop in or
call for an appointment. They are located at 6630 W Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crystal River and can be reached at (352) 563-0011.


to 10 z I:.mI--L. a.J

Yo c :, eg, :1 r I a lar,.



C.Hf F&r Dj

^ClifMCL


---'-4


2-


1-1 service launches in Citrt


The 2-1-1 service launches in
Citrus County on Wednesday,
August 3 with County
Commissioner Chairwoman
Vicki Phillips dialing the first
official 2-1-1 call.
2-1-1 provides an easy to
remember telephone number
that connects residents with
important community services
and volunteer opportunities.
Now, individuals and families
seeking services or volunteer
opportunities can call 2-1-1, a
universally recognizable 3-digit
number that makes a critical
connection between callers and
the appropriate community-
based organization and govern-
ment agencies.
"The partnership between
Board of Citrus County
Commissioners, Shared
Services Alliance and United
Way of Citrus County focuses
on making services more acces-


sible to those in need," said
John Mannish, Executive
Director of the United Way of
Citrus County.
"With 2-1-1, we are breaking
down the barriers between those
who need help and those who
can help them."
"The tragedy of 9/11 and the
devastating hurricane season of
2004 showed us, more than
ever, how important it is for
members of a community to
know where to call for help or to
volunteer in the wake of a disas-
ter," said John Mannish.
"To aid in relief efforts or to
help with the everyday issues of
people in need, the 2-1-1 system
streamlines access to resources.
It makes it easier for those in
need to find the right services
and for potential volunteers to
get connected with organiza-
tions that need help."
Telephone access is available


Citrus County Chamber of

Commerce Board of Directors


James Holder ............................AmSouth Bank
President

Kevin Cunningham ................... RE/MAX Realty One
President-elect

Janet Yant ................................. JDP Kennel
Past President

Leanne Hadsell ................. Citrus Management Services
Secretary

Carl Flanagan ....................... . .Nature Coast Bank
Treasurer

John Barnes ............................. J&K Consultants
Richard Bradtmuller ...................Publix Supermarket
Joyce Brancato ........Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
Pete Burrell ....................... Citrus County Chronicle
C.L. Calloway ................. Withlacoochee River Electric
Jim R. Crosley ............... . . .. .. .Rusaw Homes Inc.
Charles E. Davis .............Charles E. Davis Funeral Home
Karen Dixon ..................... Central Florida State Bank
Dick Dolbow .................. Citrus County School District
M ike Fitzpatrick .......................... . . .... Sprint
Jim Harvey ..............Central Florida Community College
Rocky Hensley ................. SunTrust Bank, Nature Coast
Mike Moberly ....................... Tropical Window Inc.
Gerry Mulligan .................... Citrus County Chronicle
Jim Neal .... . ............ .James A. Neal, Jr. PA
Richard OIpinski ....................... Associate Member
Jack Reynolds .................... Homosassa Springs Bank
Frances Roberts .............Best Western Crystal River Resort
Don Sutton ............................ Associate Member
Don Taylor .................... Progress Energy Florida, Inc.
Rob Wardlow ..........Williams, McCranie, Wardlow & Cash
Janice Warren ............................. Tax Collector
Rick Welch .................... Welch Cabinet & Appliances
Chet W hite ............ ........... . . Stanley Steemer


in Citrus County 24/7 in over
150 languages.
Should you dial 2-1-1 from
your place of business and get a
busy signal, this means your
business has blocked 3-digit
numbers and will need to
unblock 2-1-1. 2-1-1 is not
accessible by cell phone. Cell
phone users will need to dial toll
free number 877 700-8177.
2-1-1 is accessible for
TDD/T.TY users. Computer
access to the database is avail-
able on the Web site
www.211tampabay.org and then
click "2-1-1 Database" on the
left side of the screen.
Churches, nonprofit agencies
and government departments
may enroll in 2-1-1 at no cost by
downloading the forms found at
www.citrusunitedway.org under
the top header: 2-1-1.
Competed forms should be
mailed directly to 2-1-1 Tampa


is County
Bay Cares, Inc., Resource
Dept., P.O. Box 5164, Largo
33779 or fax to (727) 518-3353.
Once submitted, the organiza-
tions have the ability to update
information online.
Information on E-Citrus, a
free Citrus County service for
health and human professionals,
can also be found at www.cit-
rusunitedway.org under the
header 2-1-1.
Subscribers to E-Citrus can
post community information
such as: new programs
/resources in the community,
local training opportunities, vol-
unteer management issues,
potential grant/fmunding opportu-
nities, coalition meeting dates
and times and job opportunities
at local human service agencies.
To schedule a speaker for
your organization to learn more
about 2-1-1, please call the
United Way office at 527-8894.


WANTED


Fun Lovin'


* Barbecue Eatin'


* Socializin'

Cowpokes


I
:


For the 23rd Annual Industry
Appreciation week Barbecue!
Presented by the Citrus County
Economic Development
-Council, Inc.

For information call
795-2000.

Thursday, September 22
at the Holcim Ranch,
Crystal River


- A 1f 1 -t -Tr


U


MEi __I_________


i Neck & Back Care Center
",-U*nderstanding and Correcting theSource o your Pain"

Jeffery S. Kinnard DC Anthony B. Oliverio
527-5433 563-5055
Beverly Hills Crystal River
in the Winn Dixie Shopping Center next to the Boy's & Gif's


Chiropractic Care
Complete Fitness Center
Occupational/Rehab Therapy
Massage
AquaBed Therapy
At the Neck and Back Care Center,
we provide relief for -
Auto Accident Injuries
Work Injuries
DC Headaches
SNumbness/Tingling
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Shoulder, Hip and Knee Pain
ub Arthritis Pain


your hair color means
the earth to us.
* our formulas are up to 99%
naturally derived"
* with conditioning plant oils
that infuse hair with shine
let us go to the ends cor the
earth for y,'ou and your hair-
book an aveda hair color
appointment now.
SA V, I: E DAr .3 ,3 :,, -rC li. C -3 ,. : 3I
AVEDA


'For Cataract


Surgery, The ^ 'r
Best Choice Is
Dr. Chris Ward."
Focused training ." J '
and countless .
surgeries have
made Dr. Ward .,
a Premier
Cataract Surgeon.
Dr. Ward is an accomplished surgeon and has chosen to devote
much of his practice to the study and advancement of cataract
surgery. Your surgery will be as precise and safe as possible. The
doctor will tailor each surgery to the exact specifications needed for
each patient.
Customized service is the specialty of Ward Eye Center, so we hope
you'll consider us for your cataract surgery and all your vision needs.
Dr. Christopher Ward
Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


Ward

Eye Center
& OPTICAL


8490 T


a.,F3


[onn..ton


Reserve now for

chamber luncheon


www.citruscountychamber.com


52;Pi kUd-I._I T"


I


I


*"l


CATARACIS -GIAUCOMA -DESIGNER FRAMES -PROGRESSIVE & TRANSITION LENSES
WARNING: As with any operative procedure, Cataract Surgery has ri,:sks.' LTSES]
I These potential risks will be fully explained during consultation


I


D

5C/


i;


i'31200AY
. 4,.I 31 2005


I


I








Crrinsw COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICILE


GD SUNDAY, .liN." 31, 2005


Cash levels in mutual funds creep up


Managers eye valuations, build up stakes


Associated Press

When you invest in mutual funds,
you probably expect the managers to
be a bit more creative than you'd be
with your piggy bank, yet a recent sur-
vey shows cash levels are on the rise
in many portfolios.
A hefty cash stake can dent long-
term returns and may irk individuals
who wish to be fully invested at all
times, but experts say it's not always a
negative. While a large chunk of unin-
vested change could be a warning sig-
nal that a portfolio has grown too
large too quickly, it might also reflect
a disciplined investment strategy,
said Todd Trubey, a mutual fund ana-
lyst with Morningstar Inc.
In the latter case, cash levels tend
to grow when valuations are on the
rise and bargain-priced stocks are
scarce.
"We are seeing a lot of managers,
especially those for whom valuation
is really important ... build up cash
stakes that are higher than historical
averages," Trubey said. "It's some-
thing we are seeing some very good
managers do right now."
According to a survey conducted by
Merrill Lynch in early July, 19 per-
cent of all fund managers describe


March, but he'd "struck out" in
attempts to find suitable investments.
In mutual funds, the same has been


themselves as overweight in cash, true for many small-cap value portfo-
and the mean cash balance in portfo- lios. Cash levels at FPA Capital
lios stands at a relatively high 4.1 per- (FPPTX), which closed to new
cent. Among asset allocators those investors last year, stood at 29.8 per-
who invest in both stocks and bonds cent at the end of June. Manager
- 23 percent say they are overweight Robert Rodriguez seems to be stick-
in cash, up from 18 percent in the pre- ing with a strategy he outlined at this
vious month, time last year, when he complained of
This suggests a reticence to take on "slim pickings" in his asset class; at
risk, which Merrill found somewhat that point, his cash stake had swollen
surprising since many to nearly 40 per-
managers expressed cent.
confidence in global ON THE NET Similarly, the
growth and expect cor- Ii www.morningstar.com level of cash at
porate profits to the small-value
improve. Some of the Ariel fund


caution could be due to inflation wor-
ries; 37 percent of those surveyed
expect global core inflation to be
higher a year from now, versus 22 per-
cent in June. There may also be some
doubts about the ability of companies
to raise prices.
Many value-minded money man-
agers have seen their cash levels rise
over the last year amid a dearth of
attractive investment opportunities.
Even Warren Buffett's Berkshire
Hathaway Inc. ended 2004 with $43
billion in cash equivalents. Having
such a large cash stake is "not a
happy position," Buffett lamented in
his annual letter to shareholders in


(ARGFX) climbed to the mid-20 per-
cent range during the last quarter,
though it has since dropped to 16 per-
cent as the firm found new opportu-
nities, said Charlie Bobrinskoy, vice
chairman of Ariel Capital
Management.
Ariel's rise in cash levels was part-
ly due to a number of key holdings
being purchased by large corpora-
tions and private equity firms,
Bobrinskoy said. These included
casino operator Caesars Enter-
tainment Inc., acquired by Harrah's
Entertainment Inc. last month, and
high-end department store retailer
Neiman Marcus Group Inc., pur-


chased by a group of private equity
firms in May. Other holdings were
sold off as they reached their price
targets amid the recent run-up in
small cap stocks, he said.
"Both of those two factors are very
nice problems to have: companies
being acquired, producing a great
return for your investors, and compa-
nies having their stocks perform so
strongly they reach your valuation
requirements," Bobrinskoy said.
"The second part of this equation is
that we have found it challenging to
find new names that meet our valua-
tion and quality criteria."
At Ariel, where the motto is "slow
and steady wins the race," buy-and-
hold is the rule, and portfolio
turnover is quite low about 20 per-
cent, compared to about 200 percent
at other funds. The typical holding
period for a stock in this fund is about
five years, so when manager John
Rogers buys a new issue, he doesn't
do it lightly.
"If we thought that we were no
longer able to find good opportunities
to invest our cash in new names, we'd
have to consider closing the fund. But
we are starting to find new names,"
Bobrinskoy said.
"Secondly, small cap value has had
a very good run for a very long time.
Those conditions tend not to last for-
ever, which means there could be


more opportunities to invest in good
quality companies in the future."
High cash levels are not exclusive
to small cap offerings. In fact, a dou-
ble-digit cash or bond stake is typical
for the Clipper Fund (CFIMX), a large
value portfolio that serves as a core
holding for many investors.
In the quest for investments trading
below fair value, this team-managed
offering frequently takes large posi-
tions in controversial companies, and
its managers aren't afraid to let cash
collect if they can't find stocks that
meet their criteria. Clipper currently
holds 26.9 percent in cash.
A high level of cash should raise a
red flag for individual investors when
it develops very rapidly, said Trubey,
of Morningstar, because that could be
a sign the manager is unable to con-
trol the money coming in.
There's less cause for alarm when
cash stakes build over time because a
manager has chosen to hold off on
purchases for valuation reasons.
Whether a fund's high cash stake is
OK with you is a personal preference.
Investors who like to exercise a lot of
control of their portfolios, including
how much cash they hold, might pre-
fer funds that are fully invested.
Others might rather leave the mat-
ter to professional investors, but they
should always be aware of how it fits
in with the rest of their portfolio.


Business


Networking group
to meet Aug. 14
Women Evolving in Business
(WEB), a networking group for
women interested in building a life-
long community of colleagues, con-
tacts, friends and mentors, will me
at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14, at
Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant in
Inverness.
Due to limited seating, those
who plan to attend are asked to
RSVP to Danielle E. Batog at 746-
2447.


Special to the Chronicle
Wally Anderson accepts two
safety awards on behalf of
Cemex for Mossy Head and
Inglis Quarry from Jean Casey of
Florida Rope & Supply.

Cemex earns two
safety awards
Wally Anderson accepted two
safety awards on behalf of Cemex
for Mossy Head and Inglis Quarry
from Jean Casey of Florida Rope &
Supply recently.
Florida Limerock & Aggregate
Institute (FLAI) presented Cemex
with the awards at its annual mem-
bership meeting at Mission Inn Golf
& Tennis Resort in Howey-In-The-
Hills on April 28. This award is
bestowed annually upon individual
mines that reach at least one year
without a lost-time accident or
reportable injury. The two mines
receiving awards were Mossy
Head with two years without a lost-
time accident or reportable injury,
and Inglis Quarry with one year.


Special to the Chronicle
Curtis Peters accepts a safety
award on behalf of Holcim (US)
- Crystal River Plant from Jean
Casey of Florida Rope & Supply.


Holcim is given
safety award
Curtis Peters accepted a safety
award recently on behalf of Holcim
(US) Crystal River Plant from
Jean Casey of Florida Rope &
Supply.
Florida Limerock & Aggregate
Institute (FLAI) presented Holcim
(US) Crystal River Plant with the
award at its annual membership
meeting at Mission Inn Golf &
Tennis Resort in Howey-In-The-
Hills on April 28.
This award is bestowed annually
upon individual mines that reach at
least one year without a lost-time
accident or reportable injury.


The Crystal River Plant success-
fully reached three years in 2004
without a lost-time accident or
reportable injury.
Progress Energy
gives scholarships
Three local students have
earned Progress Energy merit
award scholarships.
Progress Energy awards the
scholarships annually to qualifying
college-bound children of company
employees and retirees:
The awards are worth $1,500
per year and are'renewable annu-
ally for up to four years.
Melinda Biggs earned one of 30
merit scholarships. Melinda, the .
daughter of Norman and Martee
Biggs, graduated from Crystal
River High School.
Melinda plans to attend the
University of South Florida.
Nicholas Peterson earned one-of
30 merit scholarships. Nicholas,
the son of Patrick and Marcie
Peterson, graduated from Crystal
River High School.
Nicholas plans to attend the
University of Central Florida and
study computer engineering.
Kevin Spellicy also earned one
of 30 merit scholarships.
Kevin, the son of Dennis and
Cindy Spellicy, graduated from
Citrus High School. Kevin plans to
attend the University of Florida at
Gainesville and study mechanical
engineering.
Harley, Buell extend
helping hand
To commemorate Harley-
Davidson's 25th anniversary as a
national sponsor for the Muscular
Dystrophy Association, Buell of
Crystal River will be selling special
Harley and MDA wristbands to
benefit the MDA.
Buell of Crystal River will offer
orange wristbands to customers
who make a donation to the MDA.
Additionally, customers who come
in for a test ride on a Harley-
Davidson or Buell motorcycle dur-
ing the "Demo Days for MDA" pro-
motion can also receive a Harley-
Davidson collector's edition wrist-
band.
"We're proud to participate in this
latest fund-raiser for the MDA. We
hope to continue to raise money
and support the programs and
services until a cure is found and
no child or adult suffers from neu-
romuscular disease," said Derek
Kelley of Buell of Crystal River.
A portion of the proceeds from
the sale of each bracelet will go to
support the life-saving research,
comprehensive medical care for
children and adults with neuromus-
cular disease and the MDA sum-
mer camps.
In 2004, MDA-funded research
made several breakthroughs,
including news that the gene for a
specific protein can preserve
strength and prolong life in mice
that have amyotrophic lateral scle-
rosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). That
protein is now being tested in peo-
ple with ALS.
The wrist bands will be available
throughout the summer while sup-
plies last.
Since 1980, Harley has raised
more than $50 million for the MDA
through its family of dealers, cus-
tomers, suppliers and employees
as a national sponsor.
For more information or to sup-
port Demo Days for MDA, visit
Buell of Crystal River at 1785
South Suncoast Blvd. in
Homosassa, or call 563-9900.


Doctors join Seven
Rivers medical staff
Paul K. Awa, M.D., has been
appointed to the medical staff at
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical
Center with privi-
leges in anesthe-
siology. The hos-
pital's governing'
board confirmed
his appointment
in July.
Awa, board P
certified in anes- Awa
thesiology, a
received his
medical degree from Universidad
de Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez in
Mexico and attended University of
Texas Medical School at Houston.
He completed an internship in
obstetrics and gynecology at
Flushing Medical Center in New
York; a residency in anesthesiology
at Mount Sinai Medical School in
New York; and a fellowship in car-
diac/pediatric anesthesiology at
Illinois Masonic Hospital/Shriner's
Hospital for Crippled Children in
Illinois.
Awa is a member of the
American Society of
Anesthesiologists and the Illinois
Society of Anesthesiologists.
Constantine A. Toumbis, M.D.,
Ph.D, has been
appointed to the
medical staff at
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical ,-. ..
Center with privi-
leges in orthope- '
dics and spine
surgery. The hos- ,
pital's governing Constantine
board confirmed A. Tou mbis
his appointment
in June:
Toumbis, board eligible in ortho-
pedic surgery, received his medical
degree with distinction in biomed-
ical research from Wayne State
University School of Medicine in
Detroit, Mich. He completed a .sur-
gical internship at University of
Florida Department of Surgery in
Jacksonville; an orthopedic surgery
residency at University of Florida


Department of Orthopaedic
Surgery in Jacksonville; and a
spine surgery fellowship at
Cleveland Clinic Florida Spine
Institute in Weston.
He has joined Andrew Petrella,
M.D.; at Citrus Orthopaedic and
Joint Institute, Crystal River.
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center is a general, medical/surgi-
cal acute care facility that opened
its doors in 1978. The hospital has
grown to 128 beds serving the
communities of Citrus, Levy and
South Marion counties.
Tadpoles earns
NAC accreditation
The National Accreditation
Commission for Early Care and
Education Programs announced
that Tadpoles Learning Center
Corp. has been awarded NAC
accreditation.
As a NAC-accredited center,
Tadpoles has been recognized as
an early care and education pro-
gram that exemplifies excellence in
the care of young children. NAC
accreditation benefits everyone
involved. Tadpoles has met stan-
dards that exceed the minimum
necessary for licensing, while the
staff of Tadpoles has benefited
from professional development.
The children enrolled at Tadpoles
have an environment that is con-
ducive to their individual growth
and development.
The accreditation process includ-
ed a self-study, observation by an
early childhood professional and
evaluation by national commission-
ers. The National Accreditation
Commission for Early Care and
Education Programs (NAC) is man-
aged by the National Association of
Child Care Professionals
(NACCP).
For more information about NAC
accreditation, see the NACCP Web
page at www.naccp.org or contact
Lois Gamble, director of accredita-
tion at NACCP, P.O. Box 90723,
Austin, TX 78709-0723; phone
(800) 537-1118.
Liberty Tax Service
offers tax education
Could you be overlooking tax


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D.


deductions, or making costly errors
on your tax return and not even
know it?'Tax knowledge is power: it
equates to tax savings and a new
skill set.
Each fall,. Liberty Tax Service
offers classes to educate the public
about individual tax preparation,
and to clarify the latest tax
changes. The only cost is a charge
for books.
During the 10 weeks of instruc-
tion, students learn the fundamen-
tals of basic income tax prepara-
tion. Then they apply the tax code
to prepare returns both on paper
and on the computer. Liberty Tax
School instructors cover all.sched-
ules, credits and forms that can be
filed with an individual tax return.
Topics include filing an amended
return, and how to file as a sole
proprietor business owner. After
completing the course, students
can utilize their new skill set by
applying for tax preparer positions.
"Life's changes such as mar-
riage and having a child bring tax
changes, and our courses can help
plan ahead. We spend a session
addressing buying and selling a
home and its tax implications.
Many people have refinanced their
homes to take advantage of histori-
cally low interest rates, and we'll
cover that, too," said Linda Long,
manager Liberty Tax Service.
Liberty Tax Service is in the
Inverness Regional Shopping


Center and can be reached at 344-
8042.
Hospital plans
newcomer reception
Oak Hill Hospital will host a
reception at 10,a.m. Aug. 18 to
introduce newcomers to Hernando
County and the area to the many
services available.
Oak Hill staff will have a tour of
the hospital and share information
about medical services, as well as
information about restaurants and
entertainment, government servic-
es and schools, sports, parks and
creation, government voting and
vehicle registrations, where to shop
and more. The reception will be at
the Hernando Medical Office
Building, entrance C, room 403.
Refreshments will be served. Free
valet parking is available.
Please RSVP to (352) 597-6333
from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., seven days
a week. Seating is very limited, so
please call soon.
SCORE offers free
counseling services
The Citrus County SCORE
Chapter 646 offers free, confiden-
tial counseling services to new and
existing businesses in the county.
The counseling covers a range of
business-related topics.
For an appointment, call 621-
0775.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to -be in sharp focus
* Photos need to' be in proper exposure' neither too light nor
too, darI..
* Include your name address and phone number on all pho
to:..
* When identifying persons in your photo, do s o from lett to
right.
* PhotoSi: printed on home printers do not reproduce well; sub-
nmit the digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff will color cor.
iect and otherwise "work up" the image to Chronicle publica-
tion standards.
* Photos subrriitted electronically should be in maximum resc.
lution JPEG I'.ipg') format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self.-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call Linda Johnson, 563-5660.


12-MONTH 24-MONTH 30-MONTH
C.D. C.D. C.D.


36-MONTH
C.D.


60-MONTH
C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

FIRST FEDERAL BANK 0.65 0.65 1.50 1.51 N/A N/A 2.00 2.02 3.10 3.15 2.50 2.53 3.50 3.56 3.75 3.82
(352) 637-4741 1I

METLIFE BANK 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.14 1.15 3.25 3.30 3.44 3.50 N/A N/A 3.63 3.70 4.16 4.25
(877) 326-2210
SOUTHTRUST BANK 0.95 0.95 0.90 0.90 1.14 1.15 1.73 1.75 2.47 2.50 2.47. 2.50 2.86 2.90 3.54 3.60
(352) 795-2265
STATE FARM BANK 1.49 1.50 2.81 2.85 3.20 3.25 3.96 4.04 3.97 4.05 N/A N/A 4.02 4.10 4.26 4.35
Call your local agent
SUNTRUST BANK .75 .75 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
(352) 795-8202

RAYMOND JAMES BANK N/A N/A 3.25 3.30 3.45 3.51 3.83 3.90 3.88 3.96 N/A N/A 4.02 4.10 4.41 4.51
(352) 527-3700______ _______________________________________________

Please note: Each bank has its own set of requirements
Banks interested in listing their rates can call to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact the bank
the Citrus County Chronicle at (352) 563-5660. directly for up-to-date information.


--- Good Neighbor.
Or GREAT RATES

Z B a n k


4,5AP

- earC


ElLIKEAGOODNEIGHBOR il.il.. &lAril- 41
STATEFARMISTHERE *
Ed Buckley Chuck Everidge
Inverness, FL Amnua, nnlPerentageYlds 050IMl)5 RatonallpxlclshllntinhJ angeti thiulnolice.r, reonSavlng, a ldMone, y M. ktActlA Incl Mrd' ceainngs M ummu, pe (ngd,d sar$1(0)f(orSangsAccountSIand$1000frMoncyMarktaccount rr Inverness, FL
726-6000 hi A.Y S5CD r,,lpl Ip, -han A- )'llay p rawhd ... ...rawap..n.fl ..nal., -ls ....ll alm I'lh-. rnl. forlh. -- 726-4183
..........STATE FARM BANK HOME OFFICE: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS statefarm.com I n


BANK SAVINGS RATES


BUSINESS


r.












Property TRANSACTIONS


Property transaction infbr-
mation is supplied to the
Chronicle by the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office.
Call 341-6600 with questions.

Seller: Pfog Inc
Buyer: Brown Garvin R
Price: $13900
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08653 N Cinder Way
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5
Pg 133 Lot 6 Bik 403
Seller: Vitous Dan R & Teresa A
Buyer: Bruce S Yarock Inc
Price: $13700
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08648 N Sandree Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5 Pg
133 Lot 14 BIk 344
Seller: Kendall Kenneth W
Buyer: Brunswick Homes Inc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01019 W Rum PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5 Pg
133 Lot 16 BIk 357
Seller: Evangelista Irene H
Buyer: Brunswick Homes Inc
Price: $6800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08083 N Killian Pt
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 17 Pb 7 Pg. 1
Lot 7 Blk 1206
Seller: Oliver Cleve D & Bonnie I
Buyer: Brunswick Homes Inc
Price: $5300
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00634 W Newbury St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 2 BIk 943
Seller: Mandeville Frank & Carol A
Buyer: Brunswick Homes Inc
Price: $2500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06561 N Whispering
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 23 Pb 7 Pg
115 Lot 13 Blk 1715
Seller: Fisher James M &
Buyer: Brush Lucille
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07121 N Trinidad Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 9 Blk 951
Seller: Galecki Rosemarie
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $10100
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11045 N Mataro Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 31 Blk 1458 Desc In Or Bk 657 Pg
1591
Seller: Hamilton David B
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08009 N Dyke Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 7 Pb 6 Pg 33
Lot 5 Blk 794
Seller: Viles Paul R


Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10450 N Spaulding Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 P 7 Pg 73
Lot 2 BIk 1424
Seller: Barnes Glen E & Shizue 0
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $6000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08315 N Rondo Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg 67
Lot 8 BIk 826
Seller: Leombruni John W & La Vonne
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price:.$21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11797 N
Shenandoah Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 32 Bik 1514
Seller: Leombruni John W & La Vonne
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11835 N
Shenandoah Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 34 Blk 1514
Seller: Prolette Richard L & Claire A
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00773 W 1-omeway
Loop
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 16 Pb 6 Pg
145 Lot 8 BIk 977
Seller: Rydell Edward A
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08273 N Galena Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 11 BIk 902 Desc In Or Bk 446 Pg 202
Seller: Vaughan James E & Kary A
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price: $4000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06588 N Clarion Ter
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg 93
Lot 6 Blk 1563 Descr in 0 R Bk 581 Pg 1862
Seller: Galecki Rosemarle
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $10100
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11031 N Mataro Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 30 Blk 1458 Desc in Or Bk 658 Pg
2004
Seller: Wlsniewski Marion E
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09753 N Mitchelle Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 12 Blk 130 Desc In Or Bk A47 Pg 553
Seller: Wisniewski Marion E
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09737 N Mitchelle Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 11 Bik 130 Desc In Or Bk A47 Pg 765
Seller: Rowan Thomas P & Valeria A


Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $4500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03863 W Wilburton Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg 93
Lot 36 Blk 1550
Seller: Arena Anthony & Blanch
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price: $6000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01610 W Beach Plum
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Lot 5 BIk 64
Descr In OR Bk 418 Pg 428
Seller: Mackie Jane K Yetter
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07137 N Neal Ter
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 8 Blk 947
Seller: Cebular Alex & Anna
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01326 W Alexander
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 10 Blk 9 Descr In 0 R Bk A47 Pg 54
Seller: Cebular Alex & Anna
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09809 N Vaughn Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 10 Blk 255 Descr In 0 R Bk 429 Pg 97
Seller: Cooper R Stuart & Virginia L
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02890 W Gaucho Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 3 BIk 1508
Seller: Mc Clintock John A
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06664 N Waterrhan
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg 93
Lot 10 Bik 1557
Seller: Rydell Edward A
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08280 N Galena Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 3 Blk 901 Desc In Or Bk 446 Pg 201
Seller: Rydell Edward A
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08290 N Galena Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 2 Blk 901 Desc In Or Bk 446 Pg 200
Seller: Martis James G
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $3500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07278 N Gibralter Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 2 Blk 921
Seller: Brchan Evelyn S Trustee
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic


Price: $4500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02820 W
Andromedae Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 6 Bik 1439
Seller: LeombrunI John W & La Vonne
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11821 N
Shenandoah Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 33 BIk 1514
Seller: Faklaris Gloria
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $5500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10910 N Adler Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 1 BIk 1387 Descr In 0 R Bk 616 Pg 1291
Seller: Community Housing & Shelter
Buyer: @urnett William Michael Sr &
Price: $37000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10259 N Sherman Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 5 Pb 6 Pg 1
Lot 3 BIk 539
Seller: Hernandez Rgul
Buyer: Camarda Charles J iiI & Mary A
Price: $19000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03491 W Fleece Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg
116 Lot 7 BIk 305
Seller: Lynn Frances L
Buyer: Capital River Company Lic
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06766 N Varsity Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 23 Pb 7 Pg
115 Lot 33 BIk 1672
Seller: Brzezinski Philip L & Carol A
Buyer: Capital River Company LIc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07038 N Gladstone
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 3 BIk 927
Seller: Mc Daniels Peggy E
Buyer: Capital River Company. Llc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06765 N Pavilion
Loop
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
93 Lot 6 BIk 1580
Seller: Mc Daniels Gregory C &
Buyer: Capital River Company LIc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06759 N Pavilion
Loop
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
93 Lot 5 BIk 1580
Seller: Timmerman David 0 & Donna H
Buyer: Capital River Company LIc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03459 W Dittany Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 32 Blk 283
Seller: Capital River Company Lic


Buyer: Captiaol River Company LIc
Price: $5500
Addr: Citrus Springs:
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
BIk 323 Lot 4 Desc In Or Bk 533 Pgs 344 &
345
Seller: Mills Ralph
Buyer: Cardonick Reuben J & Susan M
Price: $113000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10936 N Airway Loop
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 20 Pb 7 Pg 54
Lot 21 Blk 1319
Seller: Besaw Gayle P
Buyer: Case Rietel
Price: $13500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10480 N Burbank Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 9 Blk 203 ,
Seller: Saitis Athanaslos & Jessica
Buyer: Chapman Darryl D & Marie G
Price: $75000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03860 W Drysdale Ln
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg 67
Lot 7 BIk 820
Seller: Huerta Blanco
Buyer: Cherisme Prudhomme & Hollone
Price: $15000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06613 N Airmont Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
93 Lot 30 Blk 1611
Seller: Largey David M
Buyer: Chiao Charles & Chenhua
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06621 N Grayton Ter
Description: Citrus Sprgs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
93 Lot 7 Blk 1607
Seller: West Janice Ann
Buyer: Chisholm Robert
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03524 W Eunice Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 25 Pb 8 Pg 19
Lot 27 Blk 1780
Seller: Dourvetakis Peter
Buyer: Citrus Builder Owner Corp
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01563 W Riley Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 23 Pb 7 Pg
115 Lot 48 Blk 815
Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Claro Jose Da Silva
Price: $14400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07808 N Udal Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 7 Pb 6 Pg 33
Lot 9 BIk 801
Seller: Palm Allen & Berthe
Buyer: Cooper Raymond
Price: $21100
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11170 N Sonnet Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 3 BIk 1450
Seller: Palm Allen & Berthe
Buyer: Cooper Raymond
Price: $21100
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11154 N Sonnet Ter


Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 4 Blk 1450
Seller: Benson Fred C Jr
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $13000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02701 W
Andromedae Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 48 Bik 1449
Seller: Field J Sheperd & Harriett
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03706 W Galleon St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Plat Bk 5 Pg
116 Lot 6 Blk
Seller: Pires Rejane
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $31400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 011,53 E Klngsdale St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 26 Pb 9 Pg 7
Lot 18 BIk 1614
Seller: Pires Rejane
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $31400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01139 E Kingsdale St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 26 Pb 9 Pg 7
Lot 19 Blk 1614
Seller: Counsll Lisa A
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $13300
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01999 W Shelibark Ct
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 16 Blk 1463
Seller: RIeley Laura Mae
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07916 N Primrose Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 7 Pb 6 Pg 33
Lot 14 Blk 784
Seller: Dubanoski Joseph A & Blanche A
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $12800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07972 N Elkcam Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 20 Blk 680
Seller: Dubanoski Joseph & Blanche
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $25600
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01544 W G Martinelli
Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 10 BIk 1362
Seller: Dubanoski Joseph & Blanche
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $25600
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01568 W G Martinelli Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 9 Blk 1362
Seller: Theobald Stuart W Trustee
Buyer: Daly Cedric A
Price: $14900
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09421 N Sandree Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 1 Plat Bk 5
Pg 89 Lot 57 Blk 97


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

"advanced" age. You've indicated that
you want to continue the coverage. As
often as not, when one takes a term
policy out one needs more insurance
and it may very well be that you still
need the coverage. If it's just to leave
an insurance estate to heirs, that may
be something you should reconsider.
The agent is telling you correctly that
the premium, if converted at 75, will
be greater than at 70, but it also
should be pointed out that you'd pay a
whole lot less in premium for the next
five years. You mentioned that this is
not your only coverage; at the very
least, I would consider how much of
an insurance estate you really need
and act accordingly.
DEAR BRUCE: I am planning to
sell my house and will clear $300,000.
I am going to move and want to rent


for six months or a year to see what
shakes out with the housing bubble
before purchasing another (less-
expensive) house. What do you rec-
ommend as the best, safest six-month
investment for the money, and what
kind of return, should I expect? -
N.S., Las Vegas, Nev.
DEAR N.S.: As soon as anyone puts
the words "best, safest and short-
term" into the equation, you have very
dramatically reduced your options.
On balance, a higher-earning instru-
ment of a point or so will not make
much difference during the six-month
period. Given that, Treasury bills
might be a very viable option. They
are 100 percent safe and pay a rea-
sonable rate of return and they have
the added quality of being readily
converted (at some cost), even in a
shorter period of time, should the
need arise.
DEAR BRUCE: Due to illness, I
decided to retire in 2002. I was eligi-
ble for full government pension


because I had 27 years in the system. I
am now 50. My pension is approxi-
mately $24,500 annual gross with
$2,922 federal taxes deducted from
that In 2003, I earned $15,600 at a
part-time job and paid $4,775 in fed-
eral tax (including tax on a pension). I
had to take out a $2,000 IRA in order
to get a $750 refund.
I do itemize because of my mort-
gage, etc. I did my 2004 taxes in
online. I earned only $4,100 part time.
I paid $3,461 in federal tax (including
tax on my pension). My refund will be
$643 (no IRA). For your information,
Kentucky exempts pension from tax
and I will be refunded all of my
Kentucky tax on wages due to low
income.
It seems the more I work, the less I
am ahead. Am I missing something?
Why so much federal tax? Any sugges-
tions? L.L. in Kentucky.
DEAR LL: Your lament is a com-
mon one. You clearly understand that
your pension is fully taxable and the


tax on the pension increases if you
earn money outside, since you're
taxed on gross income. You say you
had to "take out an IRA," but what you
really mean is that you were required
to save $2,000 in order to reduce your
gross adjusted income. That's a pretty
decent reward for that savings.
That having been said, this is
always the lament of all of us, the
more we earn, the more we pay. That,
is called the progressive system.
There are many who would quarrel
with it Hands up for a flat tax maybe?
DEAR BRUCE: We have -a home
that we purchased in 1995 for $176,000
and have put about $100,000 into it.
Would you believe it's now easily
worth $650,000? There are more-
expensive homes popping up in the
neighborhood, but I am afraid, as
before, this Southern California real
estate bubble will burst I would like
to sell my house, bank whatever I'm
able to net, which is of course tax-free,
and wait until the prices go down and


buy a cheaper house. On the other
hand, I don't want to kick myself for
getting out too early and make even
more profit. What do you think? -
D.B. in California.
DEAR D.B.: You have the same
problem that people have with the
stock market. When is it time to get
out? When is it time to cut your loss-
es? When is it time to take a profit?
No one can answer that for you. My
father once gave me a piece of advice
that I have yet to find fault with and
that is, "nobody ever went broke tak-
ing a profit" If you are uncomfortable
with the stability of the housing mar-
ket, as many are, I see no problem in
taking a very substantial profit and
sitting on the cash.


Bruce Williams is a columnist with
Newspaper Enterprise Association.
Send questions to Smart Money,
P.O. Box 503, Elfers 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com.


OUTLOOK
Continued from Page 1D

lasting damage to the market.
Even some disappointing
earnings news from companies
considered market bell-
wethers, including Microsoft
Corp., Citigroup Inc. and Intel
Corp., has failed to unnerve
investors.
All this has left market-


watchers wondering what all
this bullish behavior means. Is
it a sign of resiliency or evi-
dence that we are in the final
innings of this current market
run?
In the more optimistic cor-
ner sits S&P's chief investment
strategist Sam Stovall. He says
that small-cap and growth
stocks are outperforming the
broader market, which sug-
gests more gains could be
ahead. In addition, he notes


that technology and consumer
discretionary stocks, which
typically perform best early in
a market acceleration cycle,
are leading the current gains.
Others, though, ,think the
gains this summer have thrust
the market into overbought ter-
ritory. Francois Trahan, chief
investment strategist at Bear,
Stearns & Co. Inc., points to
investor sentiment gauges,
which he says are too bullish.
The Volatility Index (VIX) of


the Chicago Board Options
Exchange hit a decade-low
level of just under 10 last week,
down sharply from a reading
above 17 in April right before
the market began to rally,
Trahan said. While that
decline indicates some
extremely positive sentiment
on the part of investors, often
when such measures become
so bullish it indicates a market
correction could be nearing.
He also sees red flags in cer-


tain measures of momentum.
Seventy-nine percent of S&P
stocks are now trading above
their 10-week moving averages,
well ahead of the nearly 15 per-
cent reading in April. Anything
above 75 percent, he believes,.
indicates an overbought mar-
ket
. "We generally think a good
entry point to buy is when
there is a great deal of fear in
the market," Trahan said,
which he points out we are


clearly not seeing right now.
But even Trahan acknowl-
edges that the market could
easily go "from overbought to
extremely overbought" Given
the current mystery of this
summer's market, the trouble
is that no one really knows
what will come.


Rachel Beck is natioVal
business columnist for
The Associated Press.


EDC
Continued from Page 1D

meet bimonthly, with the first such
meeting taking place from 11:30 a.m.
until 1:30 p.m. Aug. 11 in the Jerome
Room at CFCC in Lecanto. Res-
ervations are necessary in order to
have lunch provided and may be
made by calling the EDC at 795-2000.


Future meetings will be at the same,
time and place on Oct. 13 and Dec. 8.
As it now stands, CITA meetings dur-
ing 2006 will begin on Jan. 12 and con-
tinue on the second Thursday of each
alternating month.
While there are a number of IT-sec-
tor companies represented on the
alliance, more such companies are
needed to ensure the ongoing success
of the group. While supporting organ-
izations are also important, the input


from the IT organizations is the main
focus of the alliance in order to repre-
sent the needs of the group in terms of
support activities such as training and
financial support activities. This
input will determine the role of the
EDC, CLM and CFCC in terms of the
training/education curriculum and
support activities necessary to imple-
ment services to provide trained
employees and ongoing services for
the IT sector.


The stated vision of CITA is, "To
become a thriving information tech-
nology hub in Florida." The mission
of CITA is, "To attract, grow and retain
information technology and related
businesses and IT employees to
Citrus County"
CITAs customers include local and
external businesses and IT workers.
The community will also be a benefit-
ing "customer," due to the increased
infrastructure development and use.


The needs of your business and
your input into the CITA process is
important; you are encouraged to join
us in this effort to serve the needs of
the IT sector in Citrus County. We
hope to see you Aug. 11, but remem-
ber to make reservations by Aug. 9.


Brett Wattles is executive director
of the Economic Development
Council. Contact the EDC at 795-2000.


FAMILY
Continued from Page 1D

build the molds and $20,000 for
the industrial property in
Inglis.
Building boats
In 2000, he completed his
first Young 20. He said he sold
four boats the first year
because it was hard to find
someone willing to take a
chance on a new company.
Fortunately, one of his com-
pany's first customers was a
popular charter boat captain
in the Keys.
"You 'influence the influ-
encers and it helps," Young
said.
Now, Young has nine full-
time employees and is on
track to build about 40 boats
this year.
"It's been a good year," he
said.
Last September, Young


Boats opened a showroom.
Young said it takes about
eight days and 400 man-hours
to build one boat, depending
on the rigging.
Customers can choose from
several different brands of
motors, such as Yamaha and
Evinrude, as well as different
combinations of live wells and
dry storage compartments.
There are also 180 colors to
choose from. Young said many
customers opt to match the
boat with the pickup truck
they will use to tow it.
He said the boats range in
price from about $35,000 to
$43,000, depending on the
options.
Because Pro-Line boats is in
Homosassa and Monterey
Boats is in Williston, Young
said there is a skilled labor
pool available for Young
Boats.
"That's helped me a lot," he
said.
While Young is president of
the company, it is definitely a


family business. His father,
who also works in sales for a
large cosmetics company,
takes customers on test rides.
"He is a very good sales-
man," Young said. "I'm not a
salesman."
Ryan, 30, represents Young
Boats at boat shows and Russ,
35, an accountant, keeps the
books. His mother, Rosemary
Young, works part-time in the
office along with his wife,
Dante, the office manager.
Young creates daily work
lists for each employee and
oversees each step of the boat
building process.
He said quality control is
important because it is less
expensive to fix a problem
early in the construction
process, rather than make, a
repair when the boat is near
completion.
In addition to boat shows
and advertising in a fishing
magazine, Rosemary Young
said customers have also been
great advertisers, providing


references and sometimes
offering test rides to potential
buyers.
Young said getting help-and
references from customers
was very important in the
beginning because they didn't
have many boats available.


"We really had no other
choice," he said.
Next year, Young plans to
begin production of a 24-foot
bay inshore-style boat with a
center console and head.
Within three years, Young
hopes to increase production


to build about 70 boats a year
with about 20 full-time
employees.
His long-term goal is to offer
about five custom boat models
and continue selling boats fac-
tory-direct, rather than using a
dealer network.'


Call Me Today Realty

John Daly 427-8551 Joe Spornhauer 219-2723 Martha Ensing 274-0223






Homosassa/$179,900 Rainbow Lakes Estates/$94,900 1. Hablo espanol.
5.08 acres of peace & tranquility Affordable 2 bedroom home near 2. Your Internet Specialist.
This 2003 home features over 1600 Tiger Lakel Family room is great for 3. Citrus County Resident for over
sq. ft. of living area, a cozy fireplace, company or may be used as 3rd 10 years.
island kitchen w/upgraded appli- bedroom. There is also a screened
ances, split bedrooms, a detached 2 patio for yor entertaining need .4 riendly-& Professipnal.
car carport, a storage shed $94,900
w/electric & plenty of room for a with a $2,000 carpet allowancell Four of Many Great Reasons
pool. Call John Daly for personal Call Joe Spornhauer to Call Marthalli
showings (352) 427-8551. (352) 219-2723 (352) 274-0223

Stop "Buy" our New Citrus Springs Office
7503 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs Main# (352) 465-3626


SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 7D


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










8D SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


Serving all of Citrus County, including Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosassa Springs, Sugarmil Woods,
Floral City, Citrus Springs, Ozello, Inglis, Hernando, Citrus Hills, Chassahowitzka, Holder, Lecanto and Yankeetown.


r- 563-5966




S726-1441


Outside of Citrus County or Citrus Springs call:

1-888-852-2340


Sunday Issue................ 5pm Friday
Sunday Real Estate...... .3pm Friday
Monday Issue...........5:30 pm Friday
Tuesday Issue............1 pm Monday
Wednesday Issue.......... 1pm Tuesday
Thursday Issue........ 1 pm Wednesday
Friday Issue.................pm Thursday
Saturday Issue ................ pm Friday


6 Lines for 10 Days!
2 items totaling

S- 50.................... 55

$151 400........... 1050

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$801 $1,500...........$2050
Restrictions apply. Offer applies to private parties only.


All ads require prepayment.


cards


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first day it appears. We cannot be
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insertion. Adjustments are made only
for the portion of the ad that is in error.




Advertisements may be canceled as
soon as results are obtained. You will be
billed only for the dates the ad actually
appears in the paper, except for specials.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same
as the deadlines for placing ads.


SPryECI[LNOI[ES002065HLPWANTEDk H I 1U 05-160 INNCIAuL8 91 EICES 20 1-266 ANIMALSMENL
REALSTATFORRENT 75-60REL ESTF SA 715 V TSP N 04


Handsome SWM,
Lean Muscular body, 36
year old, 6'1", 215 lbs.
Tired of the games,
looking for monoga-
mous relationship with
a good woman. I laugh
easily and love hard,
country boy at heart,
financially secure. Plan
to relocate to this area
In the fall. If interested,
send letter and photo
to P.J., 1150 Alto Ave,
Atlanta,GA 30307
MISSING OUT ?
You are if you don't call
me! Successful W/M
would like to make
friends with slim/petite
lady 25/50. call
352-201-0054 for
recorded message.
SWM SEEKS SWF slender
build, 30-40 Please call
(352) 812-1890



** FREE SERVICE**
Cars/Trucks/Metal
Removed FREL No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Recelot
4 MONTH OLD
WALKER PUPPIES TO
GOOD HOMES
(352) 476-3410
Australian Shepherd Mix
6 yrs. Neu. male. Happy
Healthy, Smart FREE to
good home. "Our Loss is
Your GAIN" Shots up to
date. (352) 382-2488
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message
Free
Unpainted Ceramic
& under glaze
(352) 795-8634
FREE BED COUCH
(clean). Free kittens,
lovable, cute, wormed.
6640 W Quaint Ct.,
Crystal River behind
Publix. 795-5404
FREE CUTE
CUDDLY KITTENS
to a good home
(352) 795-9524
Free
Kittens
(352) 563-1580
FREE
Lrg Metal Office Desk
(352) 860-1155
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, jet ski's,
3 wheelers, 628-2084
FREE TO GOOD HOME
2 female 6 month old
Pit mix puppies. Both
have all shots & ore
housebroken. Good
with kids. PUREBRED RED
NOSE PIT BULL female,
6 months old, to good
home 7-wk old
American bull dog
puppy, male, to good
home. Please save us
all from the Pound
(352) 302-3492
Free to Good Home
Pedigree 3 yr. old male
German Shepherd,
and Pedigree 3 yr. old
female Rottweiler/fixed
must give away due to
new baby coming.
(352) 621-9820
FREE TOILET
Round bowl, good
cond, almond.
(352) 527-2769
FREE, Good
Commercial Carpet
plus, minus 2,200 sq. ft,
you haul,
(352)601-2444
NEUTERED SEALPOINT
male Siamese cat,
2 years oldeall shots
current. Name "Jose".
Must be single cat
family. Please bring
pet carrier
(352) 637-0522
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
Is seeing Donations of use-
ate
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating Items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
V lunteers are needed hIthe
Home Store.
Store hours are:
9am-5pm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
Information.


CELL PHONE lost at
Largo Plaza in front of
Embroidery Store, Alltel
wht. flip phone,
REWARD. 352- 341-2323
Grey/brown Tabby,
very friendly, thin build,
female, name Sadie
Sugarmill Woods,
(352) 628-3193 REWARD
HEART SHAPED
DIAMOND RING
lost in Highland Woods
or Whispering Pines
Adult Field. Sentimental
Value. Call 341-2588.
REWARD
Jack Russell Terrier
Large male, off Rock
.Crusher Rd. Blue leash,
"Jake" REWARD. Please
call (352) 628-2770
LOST
Jack Russell Terrier,
Female. Last seen In
the Vicinity of the Mini
Farms & Holiday Acres
in CR (352) 563-1689
Lost Dog, large, approx.
70lbs, reddish brwn. w/
black face markings, Ig.
Jowels, Beverly Hills
Area, family
heartbroken, REWARD.
(352) 476-3012
Lost Yorkie, male, blind
in left eye, answers to
name of Gizmo or little
man, in area off Inde-
pendence ,
(352) 726-7074


MR CITRUSCOUNTY







"l



ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


Lassiter-Ware, Inc., an
ins. co.. is seeking a
Receptionist. Answ.
phones, sort mail,
scan, greet visitors.
H.S. diploma or GED
req., know. of Word,
Excel, Pwrpt. Ins exp
a plus.
Email res to:
nancvr@lassiter-
ware.com
or fax to
352-344-3305

LET US WORK
FOR YOU!
CHRONICLE
CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS
CALL 726-1441
563-5966


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
LEGAL SECRETARY
With Inverness Law
Firm, exp. preferable.
Salary commensurate
with experience.
Send Resume Tao:
Post Office Box 895,
Inverness Fl. 34451




HAIR DRESSERS
WANTED

FT or PT for Busy Shop,
must be able to work
w/ mature clientele call
746-3311 or 795-1339
IMMEDIATE
OPENING FOR A
PT BARBER
Call (352) 422-1058





$$$$$$$$
SIGN-ON BONUS
PAID BY
EXPERIENCE
LPN
FT & PT
1:30-10:00OPM

CNA
FT & PT
3-11 & 11-7
For ALF.
Benefits after 60 days
Vacation After 90
Days. Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE


NURSES
CRYSTAL RIVER HEALTH
AND REHABILITATION
YOUR EXPERIENCE
COUNTS WITH US
FULL TIME/PART TIME
RNS/LPNs
3-11 & 11-7 Shifts
United number of
positions available for
flexible scheduling.
Competitive Health/
Dental Benefits.
COME JOIN OUR TEAM
Contact Connie
or apply at
36 NE 12th Ave.
(352) 795-5044
Fax (352) 795-5848
DFWP EOE
3-11 & 11-7
Nurses

Avante at Inverness is
currently accepting
applications for full
and part time nurses
for 3-11 & 11-7 nurses.
Avante offers
excellent wages and
benefits including
shift differentials
and bonuses,
Please apply in
person at:
304 S, Citrus Ave.,
Inverness


Where Rewards
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You may also contact Mary Miller, RN,
at (800) 746-5255; or fax resume to
(352) 795-1914; or apply in person at
1582 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34423.
JOIN OUR TEAM TODAY!


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O SEVEN RIVERS
RNs:
Nurse Manager -
Labor & Delivery
MedSurg, Telemetry,
ICU, OR, Psych
ER/Triage
ICU Charge Nurse
(7am-7pm)
Other Career Opportunities
LPNs
Director of Rehab
Services
Respiratory
Therapist (Nights)
Physical Therapist
Physical Therapy
Assistant
Medical Transcriptionist
Public Relations
Coordinator
Payroll Coordinator
Inquire about our
sigh-on bonus
for Select positions!
SRRMC is a part of the
HMA family of hospitals.
Please apply to:
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical
Center
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd,
Crystal River, FL 34428
Job Line:352-795-8462
fax: 352-795-8464
Email:
careers@srrmc.hma-
corp.com
Web Site: www.srrmc.com
EOE/DFWP


a skilled facility-
needs a

COOK
Excellent pay. Must
have Institutional
cooking experience
w/knowledge of
therapeutic diet
and consistencies.
Apply at
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100



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Cl IRONICLE
C-lamrifeds

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a Skilled Facility has
openings for:

CNAs 3-11
PRN All Shifts
Fax resume to
746-0748 or apply at
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100

A+ Healthcare
Home Health
Agency

Immediate Work

C.N.A's & HHA's
Day Hours
(352) 564-2700

ACTIVITIES PERSON
Mature parttime.
CNA preferred.
Apply at
Cypress Cove
Care Center,'
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832

BUSINESS OFFICE
COORDINATOR
Supervisor for all
phases of the
business office at
outpatient surgery
center. Must have
excellent
references and
experience in
medical billing.
collections or
scheduling. Must be
willing to learn and
supervise all activities
in Business Office.
Minimum of Associate
Degree in Business
preferred. FT with
great benefits and
opportunities.
Pleasant working
environment.
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827

CARDIOLOGY
PRACTICE

LPN
BCLS/ACLS Req,
salary based on exp.
MA
BCLS w/ Cardiology
office experience
FRONT OFFICE
Multi-tasking, exp. in
physicians office only.
FAX RESUME TO:
HR 352-795-4879


CARING
INDIVIDUAL
MIn. 2 years Exp.
working with
developmentally
disabled. Reliable
transportation.
Sumter & Citrus Co.
area. FT/PT, days,
evenings & weekends
Call
MOVING MOUNTAINS
(352) 637-9001




CASE
MANAGER

Must be experienced
in Long-term,
subacute or acute
care MSW prrfed
but not required.
Call JoblUne at
(352) 291-7007
Fax resume to
(352) 854-9730
Or apply in person to
TimberRidge
Nursing & Rehab. Cntr
9848 SW 110th St.
Ocala
EOE/ DFWP


COMFORT
HOME CARE
o department of
Hospice of Citrus
County
Is currently seeking a

Licensed
Practical
Nurse
Home Care exp.
preferred
Effective
communication
skills Contact our
Human Resource
Manager,
Jill Thacher at:
Telephone:
352.527.2020
Fax: 352.527.9366
Email:
jthacher@hospiceof
citruscounty.org
Mail your resume and
credentials to:
Comfort Home
Care
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills,
Florida 34464
A Division of Hospice
of Citrus County
Apply on-line at
hospiceofcitrus
county.org
drug-free workplace
equal opportunity
employer


0


There's Something For YOU Here

Citrus Memorial Hospital, the community's preferred resource for
acute core, is proud to provide o faomily-like atmosphere where you con
feel comfortable with success. Join us now to do your best work ever

EXPERIENCED NURSES NEEDED
* RN/LPN/CMA (Allen Ridge Open Heart PCU & Recovery
Family Care, CPC Homosassa IV Team
& Beverly Hills) Med/Surg/Ortho
* PCU Home Health

STAFFING RESOURCE POOL
Flexible scheduling that meets your needs
Weekend Only Positions Availablel
Great Womg Environmentl

f you've been looking for the right environment, come see why
your next career destination is here. Please apply online at:


www.citrusmh.com


CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT
Exp'd in front desk,
billing & physical
therapy. This is a
part-time 3 days a
week position. Fax a
complete resume to:
795-0803

CNAs
3-11 & 11-7

Avante at Inverness
is currently
accepting
applications for
CNAs for 3-11 & 11-7
shifts. Avante offers
excellent pay for
years of experience
shift differential,
weekend differential,
bonuses for extra
shifts, excellent .
benefits package for
full-time employees.
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness, FL


Cook -
Dietary
Assistant
the Center's
is seeking a full-time
cook to work in an
institutional setting.
Experience preferred
but will train the right
people. $6.83-$7.69
per hr. Background
check required.
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE, fax, or
email resume to:
(352) 291-5580
hrthecenters.us
or come by 5664 SW
60th Ave., Bldg. #1,
Ocala and fill out an
application.


Dishwasher
the Center's
is seeking a full-time
dishwasher to work In
an institutional setting.
Responsible for
dishwashing, cleaning
& assisting dietary
staff. Experience
preferred but will train
the right people.
$6.15 per hr.
Background check
required.
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE, fax, or
email resume to:
(352) 291-5580
hrthecenters.us
or come by 5664 SW
60th Ave.. Bldg. #1,
Ocala and fill out an
application.

DOCTOR'S
ASSISTANT
Full-time, apply at:
Citrus Pulmonary,
5616W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy., Crystal River, FL
(352) 795-1999


FULL TIME
LPN/MA
Needed for busy
Urology office.
Please fax resume to
R. Wardlow
352-527-8863 or mail
to P.O. Box 1420,
Lecanto, FL 34460

HR

MANAGER
Citrus Memorial
Hospital, the
community's
preferred resource for
acute care, is excited
about our plans for a
healthy future!
As a HR Manager,
you will be
responsible for
programs and ,
projects related to
wage and salary
administration,
position control, leave
of absence policy
and performance
improvement and
appraisals.
The selected self-
starting candidate will
possess a Bachelor's
degree and two
years of relevant HR
experience, with
knowledge of federal
and state regulations
and JCAHO
standards.
Course work in HR
Management,
Business ,
Administration or
Psychology preferred.
For more information
and to view other
career opportunities,
visit us online at
www.citrusmh.com
Or call 352-344-6588;
fax your resume to
352-341-0136 or
apply in person at:
Citrus Memorial
Hospital,
502 West Highland
Blvd. Inverness,
FL 34608.

CFITRU8
MEMORIAL
Ol[HOSPlAL















RN L(l e -


- an equal opportunity college -
L The CFCC Praclical Nurring
program in seeing A temporary
tull-ime instructor tor the Pro.:- tioal
Nursing program Duties include
teaching ir,. t nursing la. ciiri,:al
seating and clos..-..,mrr student
g'Qauonce Cporticipationr .-r,
prc:grarr, C ,.mrrmnee-e, rda reiate,3
prc.tfeSiorlDl re.por.l' DIII i Ie
Qualifications:
Bachelor ,-Je..ree in 'ljurirg is
required A I-later',-, degree 1;
preferred Florida i-rNi license onao
ilrree ,earsi' recent ,riedic.l-
surgical ,-liriclI e'leerierce
required E ,perience ..orkinrg .vith
di.erse p.,puiaiic.rr r.. successful
teoa.nrg aiDigr,.//e-perience ,;
preferred
Environment:
Corrririiunir, C, ,lle e Ca:,r,:m
ceriing ins dce er,. ircnmenri
lriis pcii..n i oper, untli tilled
FY.-r ,.3J k i h t'i A ir


H; ,.,r P- B '13 8 ,COi FL
i a E. :'. ' E' *r o
. ,) II''?; '- 1'3 *'p -lC


CERT. MED. ASST.
Office exp., resume:
204 S. Apopka Ave,
Inverness FL. 34452
Enjoy a wonderful
Dementia Care
Environmental

*Clinical Nursing
Manager

Call Cottages of
Gentle Breeze
746-5626 or 489-5539
TODAY 11
F/T EXP. FRONT
& BACK DESK
For Internal Medicine
Fax Resume To
(352) 465-3733
Growing Therapy
department has open
positions for:
*FTCOTA
*PRN PT
*PRN PTA
*FT/PT SLP
Apply in person
or Fax Resume to
352-637-1014
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness
EOE

HOSPITAL
Opportunities
Citrus Memorial .
Hospital, the
community's
preferred resource for
acute care, Is excited
about our plans for a
healthy future. Join us
now to find out what
we have in mind for
you! We are currently
hiring for the following
positions.

*CERTIFIED'
SURGICAL
TECH

*Transcriptionist

*RESPIRATORY
THERAPISTS

*PHARMACISTS:
PRN

*ENVIRONMENTAL
SERVICE
TECHNICIAN

*NUTRITIONAL
SERVICES AIDE
If you're been thinking
ahead to tomorrow,
come see why your
next career
destination is here.
Please apply online at
www.cltrusmh.com

crmus
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Equal Opportunity
Employer


1LE..


There's A HOME

For Your Skills HERE


LC1m


CITRUS COUIIN'IY (FL) CIIHRONICI.I


CLASSIFIED


FREE ASSISTANCE
for innocent victims of
crime. Leave details,
352-628-6481 or
advocate4victims
@aol.corn


C=
4hh
c.n Personals


= Cifld are


Cleruical










SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 9D


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/ Cell 422-3656
IMMEDIATE OPENING

F/T NURSING/
BILLING ASST

For Busy OB/GYN
Office.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 794-0877

MEDICAL
RECORDS
CLERK
Full time position
available for Medical
Records Clerk in 120
bed Nursing Facility.
Previous experience
in Medical Records or
related field desired.
Must possess strong
organizational skills,
be detail oriented
and able to maintain
files and records in
accordance with
Federal and State
guidelines.
Apply In person at:
Surrey Place
2730 Marc
Knighton Ct., Lecanto

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

needed in Physician's
Office. Part time or
fulltime. 352-563-0835

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/ LPN

For growing family
practice in Beverly
Hills. Immediate
openings. Must have
experience in back
office procedures
including vitals, EKG,
Phlebotomy/ Injec-
tions and assisting in
minor procedures.
Fax resume to
352-688-6189

MEDICAL
COLLECTIONS
CLERK

FT day shift position
with excellent
benefits in business
office at Outpatient
Surgery Center.
Must have
experience in
Medical Collections
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827






MEDICAL- FRONT
OFFICE MANAGER
Duties to include
scheduling for
Outpatient Therapy
Clinic, cash in/ Batch
Procedures. Expertise
in Word, Excel,
Outlook & Lotus. Must
be organized &
be able to work
independently.
Strong customer
service skills
necessary. Medical
Office &/or
Outpatient Rehab
experience a plus!
Competitive pay &
benefits. Please
fax resume to
352-382-0212

MIS Specialist
the Centers
Is seeking MIS
Specialist who is a
motivated,
team-oriented
computing
professional to
support a rapidly
growing & dynamic
computing
environment.
Applicants should
have knowledge of
PC hardware,
windows operating
system, productivity
software &
networking (Including
TCP/IP, DNS & email).
Troubleshooting &
customer service skills
a must. BA degree or
equiv exp in
Information
Technology,
Computer Science or
Management of
Information Systems.
Salary range $25,000.
to $31,000.
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE, send, fax,
or email resume to:
HR, 5664 SW 60th
Ave., Ocalo, FL 34474
hr@lhecenters.us
(352) 291-5580

MONDAY

JOB FAIR

the Centers
is holding an
On-site Job Fair
Monday
August 15
from
3:00-8:OOPM
at our Administrative
Building #1, 5664 SW
60th Ave.
(also known as Airport
Rd.) in Ocala.
Personnel will be
available to conduct
"on the spot" inter-
views, take applica-
tions and answer
questions for the fol-
lowing positions:
V Masters
Level Therapists


V Child Welfare
Workers
V Supported
Employment
Specialist
V Supported Housing
Specialists
" Family Support
Coordinator

V Mental Health
Tech/Transporters
Background checks
will be conducted.
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE
If you are unable to
attend, fax, or email
resume to:
(352) 291-5580
hr@thecenters.us
or come by 5664 SW
60th Ave., Bldg. #1,
Ocala and fill out
an application.
.. .. .. . ..pp ....


HM






















NOW HIRING
CNA's/HHA's or
Dependable
Compassionate
People who want to
become CNA's/HHA's
CALL LOVING CARE
M-F, 9:00 AM to 4:00PM


OPERATING
ROOM
REGISTERED NURSE
CIRCULATOR
Minimum of 2 years
experience.
Fast-paced,
Multi-speciality
Outpatient Surgery
Center.Excellent

weekends.Very
pleasant working
environment. 2-FT
positions available
excellent benefits
and opportunities
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827

ORAL SURGERY
ASSISTANT

Surgical Assistant for
busy Oral Surgery
Office. We strive to
provide the best
quality of care w/
integrity in a
caring atmosphere,
Looking for a
dedicated
professional person
to complete our
staff. Benefits include
insurance &
retirement plan.
Send resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks. Dr.
(In Meadowcrest)
Crystal River, Fl 34429

PHLEBOTOMIST
With some office
experience,.
Please send
resume to:
Po Box 640309,.
Beverly Hills, FL 34464

RN

Needed for
Webster Elementary
School in Sumter
County. Contracted
Services position.
Leave message at
(352) 793-2315
ext. 203

SPEECH
PATHOLOGIST

Avante at Inverness is
currently seeking a
Speech Pathologist
PRN. Must have a
valid Florida License,
excellent wage scale
for years of
experience.
Please fax resume
to 352-637-0333
or e-mail to
mwalker@avante
group.com
or apply in person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness

Therapeutic
Behavioral
On-Site
Therapists
the Centers
is seeking Master's
Level Therapists for
Marion and Citrus
Counties. Experience
working with children
in TBOSS environment,
providing services in
schools and at home
counseling services to
emotionally disturbed
children required.
Flexible schedule.
Master's degree in
field of Human
Services required
with min of 2 yrs
related exp.
$30,000 annually.
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE, send, fax,
or e-mail resume to:

hr@thecenters.us
(352) 291-5580

VET ASSISTANT
Needed for busy
Animal Hospital. 3
days a week to start,
May become fulltime.
Experience in animal
restraint important.
Fax Resume To:
(352) 726-1018
X RAY TECH
Part time, for busy spine
practice. Tues, Thurs &
Fri. Please fax resume to
*352-341-4477




BOOKKEEPER
FULL CHARGE


w/COMPUTERIZED
GL, AP, AR & PR EXP.
Construction exp. a
plus. great benefits.
Construction firm
Submit resume
PO Box 2832, Inverness,
FL. 34450. EOE DFWP
CASE
MANAGER

Must be experienced
in Long-term,
subacute or acute
care MSW preferred
but not required.
Call JobLine at
(352) 291-7007
Fax resume to
(352) 854-9730
Or apply in person to
TimberRidge
Nursing & Rehab. Cntr
9848 SW 110 Oth St.
Ocala
EOE/ DFWP


CERTIFIED
LEGAL ASSISTANT
OR LAWYER

Estate planning, pro-
bate, legal research
and writing experience
required. Send resume
to: Blind Box 864-P,
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429 .
COMMUNITY
LIAISON
REPRESENTATIVE

Government Services
Group, Inc. (GSG), a
Florida-based consult-
ing firm, is currently
recruiting for the
position of Community
Liaison Representative
to reside and work in
Citrus County. The
position will support the
Florida Government
Utility Authority (FGUA)
systems in Citrus County
This position will carry
out an aggressive and
extensive program
involving quality
assurance regarding
customer service and
utility billing provided
by contract operators;
serve as our customer
ombudsman regarding
customer's issues and
disputes; actively
participate in a
community outreach
program regarding the
FGUA's goals and
objectives with others
governmental entities;
serve as the spokesman
on all FGUA issues
before various groups
(i.e., schools, civic
organizations,home
owners associations,
etc.); be the first point
of contract for builders
and developers
regarding growth issues
within our service areas;
and represent the
FGUA before other
governmental agen-
cies (city and
county commission
meetings, etc).
All candidates must
possess a minimum of 5
years of general
experience in the local
government arena.
This experience can be
in City or County
management,
community develop-
ment/ planning or
water and sewer
management.
Candidates must
demonstrate success in
building a team
approach to solution
and experience in
providing presentations
before elected officials,
civic organizations and
neighborhood groups.
Candidate must
possess at a minimum a
degree in either public
administration,
business, planning/
community develop-
ment, or engineering.
It is anticipated the
starting salary for this
position will be $50,000
to $55,000 depending
on qualifications of the
Individual. GSG offers
an excellent compen-
sation program with an
extensive benefits
package. Please
submit a resume along
with a cover letter.
If you are interested,
please contact Kathy
Lindsay, Director,
Human Resources,
Government Services
Group, Inc.,
(850) 681-3717 or
Klindsav@aovserv.com
Dunnellon, FL,
population 1,931
CITY MANAGER
Salary range:
$42,000 $60,000K
DOQ + benefits.
Seeking City
Manager.
Mayor/council
member and
4-member council
elected at large,
2-year terms,
non-partisan election.
$2.3 M general fund
budget including
police and fire dept.,
$1.0M water/sewer
budget, 16M sewer
project; 34 full-time, 5
part-time, 2 secsonal
employees. Services
provided through
combination of
private contracts and
direct service.
Require bachelor's
degree in business
administration,
public
administration/
related field/
equivalent w/3 years
progressively
responsible
experience in public
administration,
"Master's Degree
preferred". Require
skill in financial
management, utility
operation and
extension, employee
union negotiations
and downtown
redevelopment.
Independent, rural
city. Popular fishing
community
experiencing tourism.
Resume, cover letter
and list of
references to
City Clerk,
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, Fl. 34431
by 09/15/2005,
5:00 p.m.
Fax 352-465-8505.
EOE, Drug Free
Workplace

FIELD CREW CHIEF/
COMPUTER
DRAFTSMAN
McKean & Associates
Surveyors, Inc., is


seeking a Field Crew
Chief and a Computer
Draftsperson.
Experienced only
need apply.
McKean & Associates
Surveyors,lnc.
Inverness, Florida
Fax (352) 344-8254
FULL-CHARGE
BOOKKEEPER
For public accounting
firm located in
Crystal River. Candidate
should have extensive
knowledge of all facets
of general ledger,
accounts payable,
accounts receivable,
payroll, bank
reconciliation,
depreciation and
financial reporting,
Verifiable experience
required. Reply with
salary requirements to
P.O. Box 426,
Crystal River. FL 34423


CAFE ON THE AVENUE

Seeking Chief
Sou Chief
& Line Cook
Apply in person
631 N. Citrus Ave. CR
(352) 795-3656

HIRING TEACHERS
& PART TIME HELP
IMMEDIATELY
Call Julie at
352-489-1933
For more info.


C ') j' ( N


Is currently
seeking a FT

Licensed
Clinical Social
Worker
For our Grief Services
program
Chaplain
Masters degree
required
PRN RN's,
LPN's,
PCA's
PRN SW's
MSW's preferred
Effective
communication
skills.
Contact our Human
Resource Manager,
Jill Thacher at:
Telephone:
352.527.2020
Fax:
352.527.9366
Email:
ithacher@hosoiceof
citruscounty.ora
Mail your resume and
credentials to:
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills,
Florida 34464
Apply on-line at
hospiceof
citruscountv.org
drug-free workplace
equal opportunity
employer


A WHOLE HAULING
& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermist.com
Quality








r AFFORDABLE
DEPENDABLE I
| HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush
App. Furn, Const I
| Debris&Garages
Lot C1795







S 352-697-126

DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal,
& trim. Ins. AC 24006.
352-637-0681 220-8621
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
STUMP GRINDING
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlin
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe it!"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Uc#000783-0257763 &
Ins. Exp'd friendly serve.
Lowest rates Free
estimates 352-860-1452


VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins,
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a professional,
Mike (352) 628-7277
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263


LICENSED 440/220
Great pay & benefits.
Send resume to
Blind Box 867M, c/o
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429

NATURE COAST
LAND SURVEYING
Currently taking
applications for the
following positions:

*CADD TECH
*PARTY CHIEF
*INSTRUMENT
PERSON
*REGISTERED
LAND SURVEYOR
Fully paid health, dental
& life insurances,
Retirement plan
1907 Highway 44 W.
Inverness, FL 34453
PH: 352-860-2626
FAX: 352-860-2650
ncls@tampabay.
rr.com

NEEDED 220
AGENT

For key position.
Commercial exp a plus.
Top Pay For the
Right Person.
Reply Blind Box 858-M,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W, Main,
Inverness, FL 34450

PASTORAL
HELP WANTED
An Evangelical
Lutheran Church in
Citrus County is looking
for a pastoral assistant
to serve the congrega-
tion..The time required
would not exceed 30
hours per month.
Hospital, home bound
and care center visits
will be a major portion
of the work. There will
be opportunities for
preaching and worship
leadership. All clergy
related by agreement
with the ELCA are open
to apply. Resumes
and/or phone inquiries
will be accepted
between 9 am & 3 pm
at Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church,
9425 N Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs,
Florida 34434.
Phone is 352-489-5511.
Mailing address is
Box 2070, Dunnellon,
Florida 34430


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
QUALITY OUTBOARD
REPAIRS, Full & dock
side service. Morrill
Marine (352) 628-3331




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWERREPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352) 400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile Is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)





MY 2ND OFFICE
I provide multiple
office duties from my
home, saving you
time, hassle, money.
By the hour or by the
job, (pricing varies
w/each situation). Go
to my2ndofflce.com
or call 352-560-7166





CARING COMPASSION-
ATE well exp. CNA
seeks position n the
home. 352-726-8601
HONEST DEPENDABLE
woman will care for
elderly 24/7 in my home
or yours. Local Ref. Rea-
sonable. 352-270-1996




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




Cleaning& Personalized
Services for elderly/dis-
abled. Call "A Helping
Hand" 628-1348
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334




Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes. 637-4373
CRC 1326872


M-
I Ela~aU~~


Seeking qualified
candidates for the
following positions:
Executive Admin
Assistant-
Foundation:
High school diploma
or equivalent req'd,
Associates degree
pref. 6/yrs f/t
secretarial or
complex clerical
computer & typing
exp req'd.

Position is open until
filled. Screening
begins 8/10/05
Program
Coordinator-
Liberal Arts &
Sciences-
Grant Funded:
Bachelor's Degree
req'd. 4/yrs f/t exp in
teaching Is req'd.
Middle school
teaching Is pref.
3+/yrs mgmt exp that
includes supervisory
and training duties.
May be req'd to work
a flexible schedule,
late afternoons/
evenings, or
weekends.

Close Date 8/10/05

Staff Assistant 11l-
Educational
Opportunity Center:
High school diploma
or equivalent.
Two years of full
time secretarial/
clerical/computer
and typing
experience.
Close Date 8/10/05
For add'I info visit
www.GoCFCC.com
or call (352) 873-5819.
Mail application
& unofficial
transcripts to:
CFCC-
Attn: H.R. Dept,
P.O. Box 1388, Ocala,
FL 34478-1388
CFCC is an EE/AA &
DFWP Employer


FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
comp. cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. Ins. CBC avail
352-563-0104/228-1282
FREEDOM RESCREEN
Pool Cages, Window
Scrns, etc. Will beat
other estimates. Licc#
2815. (352) 795-2332




AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 422-1956




"HOME REPAIRS"
painting, power wash
jobs big & small #1453
(Eng./ Spanish)746-3720
"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. Lic 0253851
"(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
Elect. That Doesn't
Require A Permit
Etc., Llc. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
Maint & repair prob-
Slems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395

AFFORDABLE,
DEPENDABLE
HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl, Furn. Const, I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126

All Around Handvman
Free est. Will Do Any-
thing, Lic.#73490257751
352-299-4241/563-5746
All Around the House
Gen. Home repairs plus
Lic2120-0863567. 27 yrs.
352-465-1189
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small! Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
Get My Husband Out
Of The Housel
Custom woodwork,
furniture repairs/refinish,
home repairs, etc.
Lic. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONEI
Moving,Cleanouts 8
Handyman Service
Lic 99990000665
(352) 302 2902
HOME REPAIR, You
need it done, we'll do
It. 30 yrs. exp. Lic., Ins.
#73490256935,489-9051


TEEN COURT
PROGRAM
COORDINATOR
Plans, directs and
supervises Teen Court
program activities
including all court
sessions. Assist with
preparing periodic
management
reports, budgets
submissions and grant
applications.
Maintains data base,
researches,
recommends
improvements and
prepares reports.
Conduct intake
interviews; make
presentations to
schools and
community groups
regarding Teen Court
and recruit
volunteers. Schedule
cases and follow up
on sanction
compliance. Serve as
liaison with Teen
Court adult
volunteers, agencies
and institutions. A.A in
criminal justice,
sociology or related
field. One year
experience in
criminal justice,
delinquency
management or
social services. Prior
juvenile justice,
juvenile diversion or
juvenile probation
experience
preferred. Must be
able to work
independently and
available to work
some evenings. Must
possess valid Florida
Driver license and
successfully pass an
extensive State of
Florida, Department
of Juvenile Justice
background
screening prior to
being hired.
Starting pay
$10.26 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Send Resume or
apply at Office of
Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, Florida,
34461
no later than
Friday, August 5, 2005.
EOE/ADA


* I COASUK OMjES3i flvc
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services.Lic.0257615/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
PI & S ENTERPRISES
General Maint. repair,
pressure washing &
painting, free estimates
Lic. & Ins. 9990002510
(352) 522-1177
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.


JT'S TELEPHONE SERVICE
Jack & Wire installation
& repair. Free esti-
mates: CALL 527-1984




I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000




#l#l A-A-A QUICK PICK
UPS & hauling, Garage
clean-outs, tree work.
Reasonable. 302-4130
AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE I
| HAULING CLEANUP.
STrash Trees, Brush,
Apple. Furn, Const. I
Debris & Garages
352-697-1126 J

All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Moving,Cleanouts. &
Handyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902

HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
HAULING SMALL LOADS
Landscape products,
rock products lumber,
etc.Reas.rates 634-1789
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const. debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile*
Wood (352) 341-0909
SHOP AT HOME
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic.#2713, Insured.
Free Estimates.
(352) 422-2019


ALL POSITIONS
Dishwasher/Prep Cook,
Servers/ Bartenders,
Apply In person
Seagrass Pub & Grill
10386 W. Halls River Rd
BARTENDER
WAIT PERSON
Up beat personality
Inquire within
Caseys Pub
948 S. Hwy. 41
Inverness
COOK NEEDED

Fulltime and part-time.
Call for interview,
(352) 341-7771
Exp. Line Cook
& Wait Staff
Exc. wages. Apply at:
CRACKERS
BAR & GRILL
Crystal River
Exp'd Line Cooks
P/T Waitress
P/T Dishwasher
Banquet Manager
Contact Food and
Beverage Manager,
Park Inn, (352) 628-4311
FULL TIME COOK
For busy, active kitch-
en, creativity a plus
(352) 447-5572
or 447-4470, Inglls
HIRING COOKS
& MANAGER
TRAINEES

Benefits available
Huddle House
321 S. Hwy 41
Inverness
Hiring
Kitchen Prep
Apply in person
8a-I Ia Charlies Fish
House Restaurant
Crystal River
MORNING COOK
needed. Will train.
Cockadoodles Cafe
206 W. Tompins St.
Inverness
VAN DER VALK
FINE DINING HIRING

*SERVERS
*COOKS
*BARTENDERS
Please contact
(352) 637-1140


Richard Nabbfeld
Hardwood, Laminate &
Tile. 6 yrs. exp. Prices
start at $1.50 sq.ft. LLC
Lic./Ins. L05000028013
(352)361-1863




ABSOLUTELY BEST PRICES
Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453
(352) 795-7095, Dallas
BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell
GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm./Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences.


Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types Lic. & Insured.
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Patio- Walks.
Concrete Specialists.
Llc#2579/Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates. Lie. #2000.
Ins. 795-4798.
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
Lic#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Drive & replace,
Slab. Lic.1476 726-6554




Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Lie. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
Lic. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall. Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exo.


AM SIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798.425-8184


WAIT STAFF &
COOK
Scampi's Restaurant
(352) 564-2030

EXP. COOK
Upscale Dining
Apply at Decembers



^Ep^nsi^
4:111111B^

c= Sales* Hej>Tnl^
CLASS^ 3[t*TIFIED
^^^[TjiLrA IFuD
AADVERKTnISINGG^L^~j
SALESiTjT~TB^^
AE^1^n35f^l^
o^K*I7n T QinT^

^^^^iThe CitrusCountyn
h, j icjt^^^^~ [w

Chronicle0IS^^^^^

is seeking i[]Tgn^^



yThe 'ri^v~ ^'^
energeic Tinividual to^
cosl uinesses onK*TT.^^^





towok n a fast^^^





Develop classf~ied^^
cutoer through^^^^
cold cingOTT and^^^^^
prospec*ting.^^








and good l[isteningT^
skB~mis w~TTT^


CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 634-1584




Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways.
Call (352) 628-4743.
D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
Landclearing, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch.
Lic. Ins.(352)302-7096
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All types of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523
(352) 628-3924




All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day 1x Clean
Ups, Lot & Tree Clear-
ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
Driveways 302-6955







HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &
Ditching (352) 344-4288
or (352) 302-7234 cell


-g-
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272
McBEE LANDSCAPING
Installation of Shrubs
& Trees, Landscape
packages Avail.
Lic. #24715
(3,521628-0690


GLENN BEST
MOW- EDGE
*TRIM HEDGES- PALMS
795-3993


il


Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up. Some FRE5
Services. Prof & Reliable
Cal/352-563-9824 ;
A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize in
replugging your yard.
Lic/ins. (352) 527-9247
Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est. (352) 628-4258
Blade Runners Lawn
Maintenance. Lic/Ins,
Affordable, Free Est.
(352) 563-0869
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service.
Mowing, landscaping, .
pressure wash.257-1522
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
P & S Enterprises of
Citrus Inc. Mowing &
Landscape, free est.
I in & Ins 352-522-1177


Commercial Pure RO
Water System, used 4
mos. 50-100 GPD, well
water, brackish water,
list $3,200. sell $1,400.
(352) 249-3259
CRYSTAL PUMP REPAIR
(352) 563-1911
Subs, jet pumps, filters
FREE ESTIMATES
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Lic. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


"MR CITRUSCOUNTY"


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


RAINDANCER
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascia, Siding, Free Est.
lie & Ins 352-860-0714


9


$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackie
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON


AAA AUTO
CLUB SOUTH
Offers a Sales Career
In Inverness/
Beverly Hills area.
Paid Training.
Company Benefits.
Strictly Full time
with flexible hours,
High Income Potential
Call Les Singleton
352-237-6251
Fax Resume
352-237-1748
or email
Isingleton@
aaasouth.com




Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales &
designers to sell &
create advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
Sads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume to
HR at:
352-564-2935




1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429

Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE


CITRUS CoUin" (FL) CHRONICI.E


CLASSIFIED










10D s 31 2005


CONSULTATIVE
BUSINESS SALES
Are you looking for a
career with unlimited
income potential?
Then apply today!
NFIB is the nation's fl
Advocacy group for
small businesses.
NFIB offers paid train-
ing, unlimited earning
potential and a full
benefits package
including medical,
dental, and a 401 (k)
with match. To learn
more about our
organization and to
apply for a sales
position, please visit:
www.nfib.com/
careers
EOE
MAJOR APPLIANCE
SALES HELP
Combination part time
and full time. Exp.
preferred. Call for
appointment 726-1911
PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
needs sales techs for
career opportunity. Top
pay, company vehicle,
exp. a plus. 344-3444
REAL ESTATE
SALES ASSOCIATE
Must have FL R.E. I-c.
Fax resume: 795-6133

SALES
It's all about
opportunity!
Terminix, the world's
largest pest control
company is growing
again. We are
looking for eager and
hard working
Individuals to join our
outside sales team.
We offer:
PAID TRAINING
IST YR EARNING
POTENTIAL 35K+
GAS ALLOWANCE
OUTSTANDING
GROWTH POTENTIAL
BENEFITS HEALTH,
DENTAL, 401K,
STOCK PLAN ETC.
Join our team and
strengthen you future.
Apply:
TERMINIX
3177 Gulf to Lake Blvd
Inverness, FL 34453
352-341-1350
Email: tmx2249@
terminix.com

SALES PEOPLE
NEEDED FOR
Lawn & Pest
Control
Prefer exp. in the pest
control industry.
2 wks paid training,
benefits, company
vehicle.
Apply in Person
Bray's Pest Control
3447 E Gulf to Lk. Hwy.
Inverness
SALES PEOPLE
NEEDED

For national club mem-
berships, paid daily
1-888-661-3995
SALES/DELIVERY
Fun, small company
looking for someone to
grow with us. Retail &
delivery longterm
position. Knowledge of
area with clear driver's
licensed needed. No
nights or weekends.
Call Karen, 746-4355




$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
Call Now
800-362-0159 24 hours
FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362
AN EXP. FRAMER &
LABORERS NEEDED
(352) 637-3496
AUTO DETAILERS
Exp. HS Buffing. DL
& background check
Req. DFWP
Call 352-302-2863
AUTO MECHANIC
Wanted, Immed. open-
ing. Apply in person
Powell Square Auto
41-N.. Inverness
AUTO TECH
ASE pref. Diagnostic
abilities & ref's. req.'l,
flat rate salary, busy
clean well equip, shop
352-341-4040

AUTO TECH
Exp., career oriented,
team player needed.
Busy shop, new equip.
Family owned
business. Call Brian
(352) 726-1828
BARTENDER
WANTED
VFW Post 10087
2170 W Vet Lane, .
Beverly Hills, off 491
behind AM South Bank
across from Haywires.
Stop in and fill out
application.
(352) 746-0440
Citrus Hills
Construction Co.
Due to Our Sustained
Growth we


Are Seeking
Production Oriented,
Self Motivated
Professionals to
Join Our #1 Team
*Carpenters
*Carpenter Helpers
*Construction
Laborers
Offering Local,
Steady Work,
Competitive Wages,
Excellent
Benefit Package, and
Advancements
To Qualified
Individuals
Fax Resume to
352-746-9117 or
Fill out application @
2440 N. Essex Ave,
Hernando, FI.


r SlesHep


Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170

EXPERIENCED
SERVICE TECH
Needed For AC
Company must have
good driving record I
Good pay & benefits.
(352) 489-9686

FLIGHT
INSTRUCTOR
CFII with 1000 Hrs
needed in Dunnellon
area. ATP a plus.
Salary commensurate
with experience.
Send Resumes to
Box 868M
Citrus Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429
EOE


;i


, Y _yM 1 "k


BLOCK MASONS
TENDERS and
GENERAL LABORERS

Must have own
transportation and
tools. (352) 302-8999
Carpenters/
Framers
Exp. Only. Local &
Steady work,
Good pay
MH THRASHER
FRAMING CO.
(352) 465-3086

CARPET, VINYL,
CERAMIC &
LAMINATE
INSTALLERS.
Work yr round. 2 yrs
minimum experience
877-577-1277 Press 5

Citrus Hills
Construction Co.
Due to Our Sustained
Growth we Are
Seeking Professional:

Sub Contract
Framers

To Join Our Team
Must Be Licensed
And Insured
Competitive Square
Foot Rate
Steady Local Work
Fax Resume to
352-746-9117 or
Fill out application
@ 2440 N. Essex Ave,
Hernando, Fl.
Citrus County
COMMERCIAL
CARPET HELPER
Must be reliable & have
own transportation
352-400-1327
CONCRETE FINISHER
W/ CURB WORK
EXPERIENCE
Good Driving
record.Great Pay
w/ benefits.
Call (352) 637-0004
CONCRETE
FINISHERS &
LABORERS

Local & steady work.
(352) 344-2065
CUSTOM CABINET
BUILDER
Exp Only.
(352) 465-4263
DRIVER NEEDED
OTR driver needed for
local company to work
the tri-state area. Must
have clean Class A Uc.
& flatbed exp. Please
call Craig, 352-302-9586
ELECTRICAL
ESTIMATOR/
PROJECT MANAGER
Action Electric
(352) 795-3285














ESTIMATOR
For commercial
roofing company.
exp. in built up &
single ply. Broaksville
1888-766-3001 or
352-225-1407

EXP. DUMP TRUCK
LOADER OPERATOR

Boxblade, house pads,
etc. Class A CDL No
smoking (352) 860-2270

EXP. ROOFERS
& LABORERS
Must have own tools &
transport. Drug free
work place.
Call (352) 637-3677
EXP'D MASONS &
LABORERS NEEDED
Excellent pay.
Transportation a must.
352-860-2793
Exp'd Plasterers,
Apprentice; Lathers
& Non-Experienced
Laborers Wanted
Steady work and paid
vacation.Transportation
a must. No drop offs.
527-4224, Iv msg.
EXP'D STUCCO
LABORERS
Steady work, gd. pay.
Own trans 352-302-7925
EXPERIENCED
PAINTERS

With Transportation.
Leave message
(352) 726-6322
(352) 266-4320
EXPERIENCED
TECHS & RIGGERS
for our growing
dealership.
Fax resume to 794-0093
or call 794-0094
EXPERIENCED
DUMP TRUCK &
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS


extension 0 for
appointment
Past employees are
eligible to apply
AEOE

CAREGIVERS
Get paid to:
T Play Cards
S Talk with a friend
I Read a book
I Watch television
I Prepare Meals
1 Go Shopping
1 Light Housekeeping
We provide
non-medical In-home
care to the elderly.
Training Provided.
Contact Lindsey:
726-9145
9am-5pm
Comfort Keepers
2244 Hwy 44 West
Inverness, FI.


Im


FIELD HELP NEEDED
For Surveying
Company. Exper
Preferred. Will Train.
(352) 563-0315
FINISHERS WANTED
No form work involved.
Must have own
transportation Call
Joe 352-464-3548
FRAMERS
WANTED
(352) 307-0207
FRAMERS &
CARPENTERS
Must be dependable &
experienced. Own
tools & ride a must,
352-279-1269.
FRAMING
CARPENTERS &
HELPERS NEEDED

Transportation Req.
(352) 422-5518
GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
Willing to TrainI
Call:(352) 563-2977










HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT

.1




Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers,
Excavators.
Next Class:
Aug. 22nd
-National
Certification
Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training
Services
www.atsn-schools.
corn





Needed, Top pay.
352-465-4239

LABORER

Accepting
Application for
General Construction
Laborers.
Asphalt paving
experience is helpful.
Full time employment
w/ full benefit
package,
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE
Large Utility
Contractor needs

Qualified Field
Superintendents
w/ 7yrs minimum
experience as
a Super for
Gravity, Sewer,
Storm,
water, etc.
Exc. pay & benefits,
Call
(352) 628-7799
or fax resume to
352-628-7717

LAWN SERVICE
MANAGER
NEEDED
Looking for a proven
winner with sales and
lawn exp. Able to
diagnose turf &
ornamental
problems. Vehicle
provided. Good pay
and benefits. No
phone calls please,

Apply within
Brays Pest Control
3447 Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness, Fl
MAINTENANCE
OPERATIONS
MANAGER
For senior apartment
complex, HVAC, exp.
helpful Apply:
518 Ella Ave. Inverness
or Call 352-344-8477
MASON HELPERS

Exp'd and reliable.
Transportation req'd.
$10.50 hr. .352-302-9102
or 352-400-0274
MASONS
$18 hour, O/T $27 hour
Marion County
352-529-0305
MASONS &
LABORERS
Must have own
transportation,
(352) 795-6481
or 302-3771


schedules, and com-
ply w/ state DJJ regu-
lations.
Call Camp
E-Nlnlhassee
726-3883
8am-4:30pm.


Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed in Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

PROFESSIONAL
POOL BUILDERS
Seeking
SMALL PHASES
OF POOL
CONSTRUCTION
FULL TIME
Exp. preferred. Good
Wages, Benefits
Paid Holidays.
Apply at
2221 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. (352) 726-7474
DFWP

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED

Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/ 2 years
driving exp. Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply, 24/6 shift.
Good Pay,
Long Hours.
Call 352-489-3100
PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
needs sales techs for
career opportunity. Top
pay, company vehicle,
exp. a plus. 344-3444
PT DRIVER

Needed for nursing
facility Van. Must
have clean driving
record and be
available as needed
for errands and
transportation of
residents. Please
apply in person
SURREY PLACE
2730 W. Marc
Knighton Ct., Lecanto

QUALIFIED
FRAMERS NEEDED
FOR CITRUS
COUNTY AREA
Call 813-918-9233
QUALITY CONTROL
MANAGER
Express Materials in
Wildwood now
accepting applications
for Quality Control
Manager. Require ACI
level 1&2, D.O.T. certifi-
cation, knowledge and
exp. of setting up mix
designs, and field test-
ing. Great benefits,
salary based upon
experience. Fax resume
to 352 330-1414.
SCREENPRINTER
Must Be Experienced
563-5652
SPA MFG
hiring Fiberglass help.
Laminators & Chop
Gun Operator.
(352) 748-0044
Sullivan Watts
Mazda Isuzu
AUTO TECHS
NEEDED
Bonus after 90-day
review. Full benefits,
401K. (352) 620-9000,
ask for Nick.
Cn Gnea


APPLY AT THE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DEPT AT 130 HEIGHTS
AVE. INVERNESS, FL
34452 OR CALL 341-4633
(TDD 1-800-545-1833
EXT. 347) EOE
KEY PINE VILLAGE ICF/DD
LOCATED IN CRYSTAL RIVER
HABILITATIVE TRAINING
INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS!
Rewarding work assisting
developmentally disabled
adults learn basic living
skills in a residential
setting. 2nd shift 3:30 pm -
1215am.
On the job Training.
HS Diploma/GED required.
Background checks and
employment health physical
wil be required for
post-job offer employees,

AAA EMPLOYMENT
IRRIGATION TECH $7
PARTSPERSON $7
SCREEN PRINTER $10
SERVICE ADVISOR, Cornm
LUBE & SERVICE $7
TERMITE TECH
$10
Class A/CDL Driver 30K
LOT PERSON $7
RECEPT. $8
MGR. TRAINEE
20K
TITLE PROCESSOR $10
SALES MGR 30K
CONST. SECRETARY $8
Call For Appt. 795-2721
NO FEE TILL HIRED

Aquatic Plant
Technician
Broad technical and
manual work spraying
or mechanically
removing water '
vegetation from
County waterways.
Operates alrboat,
harvester, trucks,
hand tools, saws and
related equipment.
Assist In loading and
unloading of
herbicides, cleans,
fuels and greases
equipment as
required. Performs
related work as
required. High school
diploma or GED
certificate. Must
possess a valid Florida
Class "E" Driver
License. Must have
or be able to obtain
a Florida Restricted
Herbicide and
Pesticide License
within six months of
employment.
$10.26 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Send resume or
apply at the
Citrus County Office
of Human Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
August 5, 2005.
EOE/ADA

AUTO DETAIL/
LOT PERSON
FT must have exp. in
auto detailing, small
amount of lot work. Fax
qualifications 746-7736
BUDDY'S HOME
FURNISHINGS

Is currently seeking a
Delivery Driver/
Account Manager
Trainee. Must have
clean Class D license,
Good people skills.
(352) 344-0050 or
Apply In person at
1534 N. Hwy. 41,
Inverness.
EOE DFWP

CAREER
OPPORTUNITY
FULL TIME -
1st and 2nd shift
General
Warehouse
0$9.50/ hr. -
$9.70/ hr.
0 $10.00-$10.20
AFTER
90 DAYS OF
EMPLOYMENT
0$11.00-$11.20 AFTER
1 YEAR SERVICE
0 ON THE JOB
TRAINING
INCLUDING
EQUIPMENT
ABILITY TO LIFT 70
LBS.
OFORKLIFT
EXPERIENCE A PLUS
APPLICATIONS





The following
Information will be
required:
O Picture ID
O Phone numbers,
addresses and
dates of
employment for
current and
previous
employment
Allow 30 minutes to
complete the
automated
application
Walk ins welcome,
Appointments
recommended
KMART
DISTRIBUTION
CENTER
655 SW. 52nd Ave,
Ocala, Florida
Directions: 1-75, exit
352, west on SR 40 to
1st light, left on S.W.
52nd Avenue,
follow signs.
352-873-7377


CARWASH
BKLEEN Carwash has
Fulltime Positions avail-
able. Must pass drug
screening. 3874 N.
Lecanto Hwy.(49,1),
352-527-4977

CONSTRUCTION
LABORERS
WANTED

No exp. necessary
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
interview, 860-2055



VILLAGE


DETAILER/ PORTER

Full Time.
Must have clean
driving record. Drug
Free work place.
Good benefits.
Apply at:
Hwy. 19, Homosassa
Ask for Renee Zamora


MERCANTILE BANK
Elevate your career!
Mercantile Bank has
opportunities for
exceptional sales and
service oriented
professionals In the
following areas:

Fulltime Teller
Crystal River
Position #0650703
Mortgage Loan
Originator
Citrus County
Position #0685111
When your needs
outgrow your current
job, consider an
investment in your
future. Join
Mercantile Bank
where you will
receive competitive
compensation and a
comprehensive menu
of benefits to include
accelerated,
family- friendly
benefits of tuition
reimbursement,
adoption assistance
and dependent care
subsidy thru flexible
spending accounts.
Indicate on your
resume the position
number of the job for
which you wish to be
considered. Resumes
without a position
number will not be
considered. Qualified
candidates may
submit their resume in
confidence to
Gail Holland via fax
at (407) 622-8475
or email to
gail.holland@
bankmercantile.com
EEO Employer
M/F/V/D

Employment

CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES, INC.

The following positions
are available in
Hernando and
Citrus Counties.


*EHS
DATA/ADMIN
ASSISTANT

Apply in person or
call our JOB LINE
for more details:
1-800-635-KIDS
Fax: 352-351-4279
E-mail: jobs@cdsi.org
Attn: HR
1601 N.E. 25th Ave.
Suite 900,
Ocala, FL 34470
EOE/AA/DFWP

EXP. TREE HELP
Bucket truck, chain
saw, Tree climbing exp.
No smoking. Class A or
B CDL (352) 860-2270

EXP'D SCREEN
ROLLERS

$10 hour plus. Call The
Screen Guy 564-0698
EXPERIENCED
BOOKKEEPERS
Wanted for oil & fuel
delivery company
Send resume to:
P.O. Box 1257, Crystal
River, FL 34423

F/T DELIVERY
DRIVER/
WAREHOUSE HELP

Must be 21 or over,
valid Class D drivers lic.
Clean driving record,
must be able to lift
50+ Ibs. Benefits avail.
Fill out application at
Deem Cabinets,
3835 S. Pittsburgh Ave.
Homosassa, FL 34448

FULL TIME
NIGHT WATCH

Needed, wilderness
program, Back-
ground screening &
drug testing required.

NIGHT WATCH
SUPERVISOR
Supervisor exp.
desired, ability to
write evaluations,
determine work


CI'RUs COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HANDYMANS
HELPER


F/T Office Cleaner
Nights & weekends.
S7 per hour to start.
(352) 344-8567

F/T SEWING
Call for Appt. Mon -
Fri 9am -5pm
(352) 628-5980

FULLTIME
YARD & GENERAL
MAINTENANCE

to help keep up our
home. (352) 563-0314
Nights 422-6939, Bob
GEN. CLEANING
SPECIALIST
Position avail, for hon-
est, motivated Inde-
pendent Individual.
Position is currently PT.
No exp. neccesary. Exc.
pay w/incentive pro-
gram. Call First Quality
Cleaning (352)
563-0937
GENERAL
MAINTENANCE
ASSISTANT

Up to 30 hrs. per
week, carpentry,
plumbing, HVAC
& electrical
knowledge a plus,
Apply in person
Mon-Frl. 10am-4pm
with Kathy at World
Woods Golf Club,
17590 Ponce De Leon
Blvd. Brooksville Fl.
INSA
























LABORERS NEEDED

Benefits offered. Valid
Drivers LI. & Heavy
Lifting Required
Gardners Concrete
8030 Homosassa Tr.

LABORERS NEEDED
No exp. necessary







fting RequiredO SHOP &
LABORERS NEEDED
Apply in personal


at Pro Shop
EL DIABLO GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB

LANDSCAPE ASST.
Can pick up In Crystal
River/ Homosassa area.
Dependable.
352-228-9059
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Exp. Crew Supervisgr
Also Lawn Service
Personnel 352-621-0436
LAWN CARE
PERSONNEL

Lawn care co. seeking
exp'd help. Must have
valid driver's license.
(352) 621-1944

LAWN SPRAY TECH
Exp. Preferred.
Self motivated.
Salary + Commission.
352-726-3921

LAWN SPRAY TECH
Exp. Preferred.
Self motivated.
Salary + Commission.
352-726-3921

LOOKING FOR A
CAREER & A TAN?
Lots of hours, lots of
work. Will train. Good
benefits. Call Mike Scott
Plumbing, Ocala
352-237-2888
Management



2nd/3rd
Shift Production
Supervisor

Experienced
Management
person needed at our
500+ person, 2 million
square foot
distribution center
located In
Ocala Florida
Requirements/
Experience:
o Manage staff of
20+ people (hourly
and salaried)
o Achieve budget/
production goals
Q Experience In fast
paced Warehouse
Distribution Center
a Open to future
relocation
opportunities at
other Kmart DC's
nationwide
(relocation
assistance avail.)
o College Degree
Preferred


JOBS GALOREI!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
MUNRO'S
LANDSCAPING
is seeking exp'd land-
scaping personnel.
Must have valid driver's
license. (352)621-1944
P/T All Around
Handyman

(352) 302-2902

PRODUCTION
WORKERS

Dietrich Metal
Framing, located in
Wildwood, Florida, is
currently looking for
full-time permanent
Production Workers.
Candidates must
have the ability to
read, lift up to 50 lbs,,
and possess basic
math skills and
MUST KNOW HOW TO
READ A TAPE
MEASURE
ACCURATELY.
We offer vacation
days, holidays, health
insurance, 401(k)
Plan, bonuses and
more! Apply in person
Mon.-Fri., 9 am 4:00
pm, between 7/25/05
through 8/05/05 at
Dietrich Metal
Framing,
721 Industrial Drive,
Wildwood, FL.
EOE/AAP

PRODUCTION
WORKERS

No experience needed.
Gulf Coast Metal
Products
Homosassa
Call between
7-1 lam, M-F
(352) 628-5555
ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS
Exp Only. Paid
Vacations, Benefits.
352-347-8530














SERVICE WRITER
Service Writer needed
with camp skills must be
customer oriented 75
Truck Service Ctr, Wild-
wood, call Richard
352-748-7575
TOWER HAND

Bldg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
DFWP. Valid
Driver's License. Steady
Work. Will Train
352-694-1416 Mon-Fri
TRAINERS &
COUNTER STAFF
Kelly's Health Club is
hiring an enthusiastic,
friendly, charming staff.
Hours vary. Please stop
In for application NO
PHONE CALLS. 6860 W.
Kelly Ct, Crystal River.
TRUCK DRIVER
Class A CLD, clean
driver's abstract, drug
free, fax resume to:
352-341-2654 or call
352-341-2838
TRUSS BUILDERS
O/T; Full Benefits. Call
Bruce Component
Systems, Inc.
(352) 628-0522 Ext 15
WE BUY HOUSES
CaSh........Fast !
352-637-2973
1homesold.com
WILL TRAIN

Willing to work long
hours, for position In well
drilling operation &
pump repair.. Must
have clean driving
record. Apply
Citrus Well Drilling
2820 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando




APPROX 18 HRS WK.
Must have gd. people
skills, valid driver's lic. &
be able to do heavy
lifting. Call betw. 3-6.
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
BAKERY HELP
& PKG & DELIVERY
EARLY MORNINGS
Apply Monday Friday
before 10am at
211 N. Pine Ave., Inv.

Data Entry Clerk
Routine P/T
(12-15 hours
Including some
Tuesday evenings)
clerical work
following prescribed
and well established
procedures. Types
correspondence,
memoranda, reports,
documents and
forms. Answers
telephone, greets
the public, operates
standard office
equipment.
Knowledge of
Microsoft Office Suite
of Products.


K pcBsns
0 ,.


Homosassa Area.
(352) 302-6040
MOTHERS HELPER
PT help with House-
keeping & child care.
Hours are M-Th. Must be
warm, loving & honest.
Great for young senior
or mom with kids in
school. Call Veronica
at (352) 422-6364
PT Housecleaning
Assistant

$6.50hr. all supplies
provided,
Dependable transp.
needed,
Sr. please apply,
Ann's "Home Keeping"
489-7616
SNACK COUNTER
Help- nights & week-
ends. Over 18. Previous
exp. a plus. Apply in
person Manatee Lanes,
Crystal River. DFWP


ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowlingly
accept
ads that are not
bonafide
employment
Offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.





sales
Citi Financial
Help others to
achieve their
financial dreams

BRANCH
MANAGER
INVERNESS, FL -
As a leading provider
in the consumer
finance industry,
we're all about
helping individuals
meet their financial
goals. For employees,
this means offering
the tools, training and
opportunities to
ensure career
success. So, if you
seek recognition for a
job well done, look
no further than
CitiFinancial.
As the leader of the
branch team
commiffed to sales
and service, this
individual will
manage the
operation and team
to retain customers,
develop new business
and marketplace
presence, optimize
profitability, control
operating expenses,
and manager the
branch portfolio.
Requires degree or
equivalent related
work experience and
two years of directly
related work
experience in sales
and consumer
finance, or customer
service. Previous
management
experience Is a must.
We offer competitive
salary and a
comprehensive
benefits package.
To be considered,
please apply on line
at www.careers.
citifinancial.com
Please reference
Job Code: 5014916
You may also send
your resume to
Email:
florentinoa@
citiflnancial.com
Fax: 813-604-3465.
CitiFinanclal is an
equal opportunity
employer.
M/F/D/V





ABSOLUTE
GOLD MINE!

60 Vending Machines
All for $10,995.
800-234-6982
AIN #B02002039
FRANCHISE/
MASTER FRANCHISE
Unique rapidly-growing
pizza concept. 24 yr.
history. Training,
marketing, operations,
support. See why
we've sold over 225
Franchises In two yearsI
1-888-344-2767 x210
LAWNCARE BUSN. FOR
SALE 35 accts. All
equipment, 16FT trailer
$10,000 (352) 302-0441
Serious Inquiries Only


Metal Roofing

Direct from
Manufacturer

Tri-County


Metals, LLC

(Located Behind the Dollar
General Trenton, Florida)

Many colors in stock -

All Accessories

Cut to Length
Delivery Available
State of Florida

Approved

for fast quotes call:
(352) 463-8400 or

(800) 823-9298

www.tricountymetals.com


CLASSIFIED


I MOM& M -L A.! -- I


Established Lawn
Business, 80 + accounts
$35,000. call for details
352-341-4123
SCREEN PRINTING EQUIP
Start your own business,
$4.000. 352-303-7467 or
352-637-2687




FOR RENT
Large StOrage unit,
20x50, 18' ceiling, small
office, 10x10 roll up
door, 1 access door,
$350.mo + tax.
(352) 344-8433




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
4 HItchcock Chairs,
circa 1940's excel.
cond. $500. obo
(352) 302-1911
Antiques Reference
Books, 1990 Warmans.
Kay Finch collectibles
values. Tammy col-
lectibles values, Kovels
1999 & '02, Schroeders
1992, 1994, '95, '97, '98.
'99 & '02, Take All $100.
(352) 637-3673
FENTON DESK TOP LAMP
Soft yellow, hand paint-
ed, soft pink flowers,
signed by artist. Exc.
cond. (352) 637-2901
LARGE WASH BOWL
& Pitcher. $50;
4 Greek Urns $100.
(352)465-6597
SIDEBOARD &
DRESSER
$600 ea,/obo
(352) 563-1928
Tool Box
large, old, wagon
makers box, no tools,
key lock. $350.
(352) 465-0853




MUST SELL- SPA
Leasury Bay 4 person
Spa MUST SELL 2yrs old
In good condition. Fits
thru screen door. $2400
OBO Call 302-1541
or 637-0358
SPA, 5 PERSON,
Never used. Warranty.
Retail $4300. Sacrifice
$1425. (352) 346-1711
S SPA's
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195.
Other models Aval.
(352) 398-7202
Washer, Kenmore,
works good, $75.
Call after.
I lIam(352) 341-3543


F/T position, 14-F 8:00am -
2:30pm assisting
Developmentally Disabled
adults with learning skills
in a classroom setting. HS
Diploma/GED required.
HOUSEKEEPER: PfT
position including all
aspects of housekeeping
in adult residents with
Developmentally
Disabilities. Proof of HS
Diploma/GED required.
THRIFT STORE CLERK
PkT position available
performing a variety of
retail store clerical
functions including
display of items, donation
processing, sales and
customer assistance.
Leoanto and Inverness
store locations.
APPLY AT THE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUtIAN RESOURCE DEP
AT 130 HEIGHTS AVE.
INVERNESS, FL 34452
OR CAL 341-4633
c i. Ir
rDD: SM545-1833 EXT. 3471
-EOE*


SYSTEMS New in box
5 &10 year Factory
Warranties at
Wholesale Prices
-+2Ton $827.00
-3 ton $927.00
4 ton $1,034.00
Install kits available
or professional
Installation also avail.
Free Delivery
*ALSO POOL HEAT
PUMPS AVAILABLE
Uc#CAC 057914
Call 352-746-4394
AMANA Heavy Duty
WASHER, .
Good condition
$75
(352) 860-0158
APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers.
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C., A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy.44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
Appliances Sales
and Services
New & Used, drop off,
parts avail., coin-op.
Sales, Service
352-220-6047 Ive msg
GAS STOVE,
$50.
NEW GAS STOVE,
self cleaning,
$250.
(352)621-4721
GE 18.2 CU. FT.
Refrigerator
ICE MAKER, GLASS
SHELV, EXC. COND
$200/OBO
(352)341-4033
GE Dishwasher & Stove,
white, $75. ea.
or $125. for both
4 person Hot Tub,
w/ cover $400.
(352) 564-8578
GE SIDE BY SIDE
REFRIGERATOR 21 Cu. Ft
* w/ice maker, nice
cond. $150 cash.
(352) 746-0066


Send resume and
salary requirements
to:
Kmart Corp.,
Ocala DC
ATTN: PS
FAX: 352-873-3731
EEOE
MARINA HELP
PART & FULL TIME
Hours Vary. Able To
Work Weekends. Able
To Lift 501bs. Relate Well
With People. Accepting
Applications At The
Rainbow Rivers Club
20510 The Granada
Dunnellon
(352)489-9983
MORNING COOK
needed. Will train.
Cockadoodles Cafe
206 W. Tomplns St.
Inverness '


Masons Needed
Top pay and benefits;
Immediate work
must have trans;
Call Todd
813-623-2996

PLASTERERS
Permanent Positions
$16/hr. (352) 302-1240

PLUMBERS
Exp. Commercial
Foreman Plumbers
& Helpers
Competitive Pay.
Benefit pkg. Call
(352)726-5601 DFWP

POST CLOSER

Experienced only,
for busy Title Co.
Fax resume to
(352) 637-4413
or 637-0340


$7.32 hourly to start.
Apply at the
Office of Human
Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto
FL 34461
no later than Friday,
August 5, 2005.
EOE/ADA

P/T PROGRAM
ASSISTANT
Before School
Monday-Friday
6am-9am
After School
Monday-Friday
2pm-6pm

Programs In Crystal
River, Homosassa
Inverness & Lecanto
Call Jo at:
(352) 341-2507,
between 11 am -6pm











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) C




KITCHENAID
SUPERBA
Side By Side Water/Ice
in door. Like new $900
OBO 352-563-0262
Microwave, $15;
(352) 726-9728
MICROWAVE, TABLE
TOP. GE, 1100 watts, 1.8
cu.ft., turntable, $75
(352) 746-7355
WASHER & DRYER
$150
(352) 344-9225
WASHER & DRYER,
$150.
27" SANYO TV $75.
(352) 621-4721
WHIRLPOOL
Washer & Dryer
Stacked, nice
condition.
$125 cash.
(352) 746-0066


C4 i

2 HUGE AUCTIONS
Antiaues/Collectibles
Sat July 30 @ 1pm
811 US19CrRiv
Sandy Bottom
Antlaues/Dec Arts
Sat, Aug 6 @ 10am
Courthouse Sq, Inv

Info 795-2061 or
charliefudge.com
MC,VI,Cash 10%BP
fudgeAU1593/AB1131

r Antiaue Coilect
S AUCTION
*SAT. AUG 6*
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
I Hwy.41-S, Inverness
PREVIEW: NOON
AUCTION: 5 PM
Lrg. assorted of
I antique & collect.
Quality estate furn.
Over 400 lots
SSee Web: www.
Sdudleysauction.com
I DUDLEY'S AUCTION
S (352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12% Buyers Premium I
2% disc. cash/check

ESTATE AUCTION
Aug. 6th, DUNNELLON
1227 SW Ivy PI.,
Rainbow Lakes AB213
Coburn Auction
Service 345818


12" WOOD LATHE,
$125
DRILL PRESS,
(floor model)
$125.
(352)527-1109
WELDER, Lincoln,
Weld-Pack 155 w/gas
cony, $600.
(352) 637-9512



I
Bath Tub & Glass
Shower Doors, 5',
almond tub, gold
shower doors. $150
(352) 302-2135
HUNTER DOUGLAS
DOOR LITES
New in box, 22"x64",
$165 list, $80 firm.
(352) 228-7458




BRAND NEW 17" DELL
MONITOR $70
plus free color printer.
(352) 860-2434
CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DIESTLER COMPUTERS -
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net
IBM APTIVA all acces-
sories, incl. printer/
scanner.extra software
$150. obo; Lexmark
4-in-I incl. extra ink
cart. $80., 352-527-6944
Macintosh I Mac
Computer
lots of games &
software $200.
Call after 4pm
(352) 465-5408
NINTENDO
GAME CUBE
2 controllers, 1 memory
card, 12 games, $220.
(352) 726-8596
PENTIUM II
Computer
w/ monitor
good cond. $150.
(352) 746-9394


-
42" DIAGONAL TABLE
with four chairs on
casters & 2 reclining
lounge chairs,
removable stuffed
cushions included for
chairs & lounges. Two
19" matching side
tables. Exc. cond. $350.
(352) 726-5832
Patio Furniture Set,
Sears, 10 piece, glass
top table Taupe color,
floral cushions, good
cond, $200.
(352) 621-5153
Patio Furniture, all red
wood, 60" round table
w/ 4 benches and
umbrella, 2 seat settee,
reclining lounge chair,
round cocktail table,
incl. new cushions.
SAnn c.52 )20


2 GLIDER ROCKERS
$20 each. Loveseat
recliner, $20.
(352) 795-5374
2 off white table lamps,
modern 37" H, $10 ea.
1 lamp, gray/lavender
ceramic, 24" high. $7.
(352) 746-7044
4 Honeycomb Shades
$10 ea/obo
Platform Swivel Rocker/
Recliner, light burgundy
exc. cond. $75/obo
(352) 726-9355
5 PIECE GIRL'S
WHITEWASHED PINE
BEDROOM SET
Nice condition.
Call for details, $800.
(352) 563-1518 or,
(352) 400-2332.
6' Cherry Wood Curio
Cabinet $175. like new,
Cherry wood coffee
table, sofa table &
end table set. $250.
(352) 795-7905


'HRONICLE





'MR CITRUSCOUN r












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956
BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY
FRENCH hand carved
solid dark oak loveseat.
6 plush cushions. Orig
cost over $1000- $499.
(352) 795-1127
BEAUTIFUL TAN OAK
dining room table, 2
leaves, 4 padded
chairs plus large server,
$795 for the set.
(352) 344-8126
BED, LUXURY 15" Stearns
& Foster, double pillow
top mattress. Low
profile box w/frame.
Like new. Used in guest
room. Moving. Don't
want to store- beautiful
set. Orig. $2,800- $695
obo. (352) 746-7992
BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
*PT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
BEDROOM SUITE
Queen size, Bassett ,
$450.00. Roll Top Desk
$300.00. 352-564-1668
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat. Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sale
Prices.Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139- King
$199. (352)795-6006
BUNK BED SET. Dresser &
desk, multi-colored, 2
months old, $350.
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, $25.
(352) 527-2336
Computer Desk,
$40
Entertainment Center
$40.
(352) 628-6621 L/M
CRAFTMATIC
twin size, works well.
Includes bed &
mattress. $125/obo
(352) 344-2311
Curve Sofa
white. Large, beautiful,
excel. cond. $500. obo
corner TV wall unit,
mission style, $100. obo
352-302-1911
DANISH MODERN
5 drawer chest of
drawers, light walnut,
46" High, 40" wide,
19" deep, $95 cash
(352) 344-2752
DINETTE Quality set with
48" bevelled edge glass
top on rattan base & 4
cushioned rattan chairs
like new $725 (352)
726-7949 before 7pm.
DINING ROOM TABLE.
Four cushioned chairs,
light oak color, $199.
2 straightback chairs,
ivory color cushions,
$65. (352) 564-4214
Dinning Room Set,
country, French, break-
front hutch, oval table
w 6 chairs originally
$4,000. excel. cond.
$995. (352) 795-1702
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
perfect cond., $50
(352) 726-0866
ETHAN ALLEN-LIKE
antique pine trestle
table, 6 chairs, 2 12"
leaves. $250 Sugarmill
Woods (352) 382-4911
LA-Z-Y BOY SOFA
and loveseat. Coffee
table, end table & sofa
table. All excellent
condition. $650.
(352) 527-8104
LA-Z-Y COUCH,
3 seater, 2 reclining,
$100.
(352) 746-7437
LEATHER COUCH
Mustard color.
condition. $400.
352-860-2122
Lg. Dining Room Table
& 6 chairs, $250.
Stereo Record Player
Console $100.
(352) 746-4057
LIGHT CHERRY
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
74 high by 44 wide
35" TV included. $700 or
best offer. 352-422-3875
LIGHT OAK
dinette set w/leaf,
5'x42", 4 beige
coastered chairs
w/wood frame, $200.
(352) 344-8679
LIVING
ROOM COUCH
and loveseat,
$250.
(352)344-8126
LOVESEAT
& ottoman, perfect
condition. $225
(352) 746-7437
LOVESEAT
Beige, rocker & reclner.
$300. Exc. cond.
(352) 746-0937
MAPLE TABLE, 6 Mates
chairs, $125 DROP LEAF
TABLE, yellow base, 2
yellow captains chairs,
$75. (352) 527-4301


MOVING
Preowned Quality
Furniture,
(352) 228-0392
MOVING SALE
Thomasville bdrm set,
washed oak, queen
4-poster bed, marble
top bedside tables,
triple dresser w/mirror,
armoir, $1600. Dining
table, designer glass
top on 2 Italian pedes-
tals w/6 upholstered
chairs & 2 wingbacks,
$1500. Large oak
entertainment center,
$150. Cocktail table,
square & end table,
honeypine w/wrought
Iron trim. $250. Oak
armoir Drexel Heritage,
$350. Rugs: 6x9 wool,
floral design $200. 8x10
Pottery Barn Killm rug,
$150. 4x6 wool decora-
tor leopard, $100.
Kayak- 2 seater,
w/paddles, $300.
(352) 795-4370


MOVING SALE
Large computer desk
w/hutch, Smoked glass
dining rm table, 4 chairs
Pictures. (352) 628-7068
MOVING SALE
Power lift chair, $400;
Oak tbi w/5 chrs. $100:
Cherry Dng tbl w/4 chrs,
$100 19" color TV, $35;
Rider Mwr, $450; Patio
Furn. (352) 382-8905
MOVING. 8 pc dining
rm set, wood & glass-
$500. Curio cabi net-
light wood & glass w/
palladium, $400 obo.
(352) 527-4379
New Wicker Love Seat
$50.
New, Gel mattress
$100.
(352) 628-1408
NEWER ORIENTAL STYLE
RUG, 9x12, $100
SOFA, 83", exc. cond.
with extra slip cover,
$50 (352) 726-6642 if no
answer leave message
OAK DINING RM TABLE
w/leaf & 4 chairs
(French Country) $275.
Club chair- floral print,
exc. cond. $75.
(352) 563-5137
Oak Dinning Rm. Table
w/ 6 chairs $700.
Recliner $65.
(352) 220-4082 or
(352) 344-9225
Office Furniture,
Sleigh Sofa, 2 end
tables, & misc, items.
(352) 527-7880
ORIENTAL STYLE RUG
8x10 Rose beige w.
floral pattern, 2 yrs old,
like new, used in
bedroom, New $900
Sell $200.(352) 382-7296
Patio set w/ glass top
37" x 60"table 6 chairs,
bronze $250
Bookcase, 5 tier, 26x70,
black, $50.
(352) 382-3895
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN SOFA-CASTRO.
Loveseat-Castro. 2 end
tables. Telephone
table. TV table &
bookcase, triple
dresser, 2 night tables.
249-0881 LEAVE MSG.
Rattan Entertainment
Center, holds 25" TV,
Rattan Coffee table &
side table. $199/all
Sofa, tan, $99.
(352) 564-4214
ROLLTOP DESK & chair,
excellent condition.
Oak finish. Lighted desk
top. Plenty of storage.
$350. Call Bob,
(352) 795-9194
Sectional Sofa, w/
recliners 3 Pc. Green/
White $500. Furniture
Set & wall unit,
rattan,$500. Sugarmill
Woods (203) 494-8432
SEE THESE BARGAINS!
Complete dbl. bed $75.
Comfy. Chair $20.,
Cocktail table $20., Re-
cliner w/ hassock $35,
Sleeper sofa $75. Love
seat $50., spinet piano,
w/ bench & light $395.
Call Dave 527-9062
for apt. to Bev. Hills
SOFA
82", Cream, Mauve,
Blue, Floral.
Like New. Must Sell. $75
(352) 382-4209
Sofa Sleeper, neutral
color $100
Entertainment center,
oak finished w, wood &
glass doors, $50.
(352) 564-4123 after
9am
Soft Turquolse La-Z-Boy
recliner, coffee table
S53" long, open ends
w/2 door cabinet &
center, $35 each.
(352) 637-2153
STEEL DESK, 60x20", solid
wood top, Broyhill
swivel rocker with
slipcover. $75 each
or best offer.
(352) 344-1982
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 527-6500
Two 2-drawer filing
cabinets on wheels, 25
Matching coffee table,
3 end tables, $85.
(352) 344-8126
Verticals
Custom made, 2
72"X50"; 1 36"X50, & 1
36"X36", embossed
pattern, navy blue, $75/
all. (352) 795-0876
WALL UNITS- China
cabinet, dropleaf desk,
deep drawer &
cabinets, $650.
DINETTE SET, cultured
marble round table,
w/4 chairs on castors,
$345. (352) 726-7239.
WATERBED, KINGSIZE
With foundation. Dual
bladder/ heat controls,
almost motionless. No
leaks/tears. $400.
(352) 527-1670
WHITE LIVING ROOM
TABLES Glass top in
mahogany, coffee,
end tables, long narrow
octagonal. Exc shape.
$150 all or will sell sepa-
rately. (352) 628-2839
Wicker Settee, w/ one
chair $150. 1 metal
patio table 4 chairs $75
(352) 527-0075




3'/HP 20"
King of Lawn
Yard & Drive
vacuum, $50.
(352) 637-2238
6HP CRAFTSMAN
22" self propelled.
21" Toro, self propelled.
$75 each,.
(352)564-1776


CRAFTSMAN
RIDING MOWER
14/2HP Brlggs & Stratton
Engine, 42" deck, very
good condition. $450.
(352) 344-5448
CUB CADET
LAWN TRACTOR
Model 2146. 14HP, 38"
cut, excellent cond.
$1500 or best offer.
(352) 382-7347
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, jet ski's,
3 wheelers. 628-2084
John Deere
Riding Mower
GX 75, 9HP, 32" blade,
good condition
$800.
(352) 795-4647
JOHN DEERE
riding mower
w/mulcher attachment,
30" wide, model SX85.
Auto trans, $800.
(352) 746-7437


Lawn Tractor
99 MTD, 14.5HP, 42" cut,
rear bagger, runs great,
$395.
240-994-8765
LIKE NEW
MURRAY MOWER
14.5 HP, 42" cut, $500.
(352) 795-4303
Pressure Washer
Craftsman, 11HP
3400PSI 18 mos. old
completely over-
hauled $400. Beverly
Hills (352) 527-1259
Self Propelled Lawn
Mower, Scotts, large
wheel real, B&S 6.5
OHV, Exc. cond, $150
(352) 344-2799
TORO RIDING MOWER
12HP, 32" cut, $800.
(352) 382-5957
after noon on Friday
and weekends,
TROY BILT ROTOTILLER
Horse Model, 8 HP $275.
TROY BILT CHIPPER
Shredder, Tomahawk
model, 8 HP, $250.
(352) 726-5330




CITRUS SPRINGS
BEDROOM $300;
REFRIG $500
CALL STEVE
352-207-7619
CRYSTAL RIVER
Moving Sale.
oI t f Fl im ritl Ir


* BURN BARRELS *
$8 Each
860-2545

2005

SPECIALS
6 lines 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$4 150...........$.50
$151-$400......$10.50
$401-$800.......$15.50
$801-$1,500....$20.50
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

25" Sharp TV,
$100
Graber Bike Rack,
$50.
(352) 726-0406
ABEKA Home School
Curriculum, 4th, 7th
& 8th grade, $150.
8x10 Kennel w/canopy
2 dog houses, &
cement pavors $150.
(352) 637-4206
Above Ground Pool,
$100
20 Cubic Ft Freezer, $50
(937) 564-0277
Air Cleaner,
Honeywell, 3 sp.
w/ hepa filter,
new $200. sell. $75. obo
(352) 637-0799
Antique Dinning Table
w/ 4 chairs, $250. 1 cof-
fee & 2 end tables,
wrought iron w/ glass
tops $75. for all. Sewing
Machine Cab. w/ chair
$75. Lge Sewing Ma-
chine Cab. w/ motor-
ized lift $200. Quilting
items, fabric, etc.(352)
621-0464
AVON COLLECTIBLES
from '70s on up. All
types. $400 for all.
(352) 746-4670
or (352) 634-4019
Barney the Dinosaur
LearningVideo collec-
tion, 20 VHS movies, all
exc. cond. $30 all. (352)
697-2133
BBQ GRILL, Ig. George
Foreman/ Electric/
stand, like new, $50;
LINCOLN Stick Welder,
230 volt, new, $150;
352-628-2855, before 6p
Bedroom Set, Antique
French Prov. 7 pc's, Lg.
Off white, solid wood,
really nice, no bedding,
$775; End table/ lamp.
round glass top, $15;
Dining Room Set, table,
antique w/2 leaves, w/6
beautiful chairs, $650;
Nice Clown Collection,
25 mixed items, $125;
Coffee Table, beautiful
antique, glass top, claw
feet, scalloped top, w/2
matching end tables,
Duncan Phyfe, $500;
Queen sz. firm Mattress,
exc. $85. 352-860-1885
or 352-697-2290
CARPET
1000's of Yards/In
Stock. Many colors,
Sacrifice352-341-2146
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
SHOP AT HOME
DIGITAL NIKON
COOL PIX 5700
with lots of extras, orig.
box, additional memo-
ries, all manuals, Like
new, used a few times
$365. 352-628-3992
FILE CABINETS 5 drawer
lateral with pull out shelf
Good to Exc. cond.
$100 ea. (443) 270-4229
FISHING STUFF
Trolling Motor, 28 Ibs.
Like New. $75; 4-0 Penn
Reel & Rod $50.
(352)465-6597
Futon, $75;
Small Maple desk, $75.
(352) 726-9728
GAF Model 2680 slide
projector, $45.
Over 100 VHS (novie
videos, $75 for all.
(352) 563-0022
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Movlng,Cleanours, &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
International Heartland
China Set, service for 8
many extras, canisters,
glasses, salt n pepper,
and more, $65.
(352) 726-9003
Loveseat Sofa Bed
Great for dorm $250.,
White Wicker Rocker,
$40.
Both like new.
Call (352) 726-0040
MEN'S
10 speed
bike, $15.
LADIES
bike, $10.
(352) 560-0378


$100 obo.
(352) 563-0022
POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
,leather pockets,
Life Time Warranty,
$1,295
(352) 597-3140
Scuba Diving
Equipment, complete
set, Fishing Rods &
tackle (352) 447-1758
Treadmill, Pro Form,
745 CS power incline,
EKG, trainer programs
$100.
(352) 637-3673




18FT CAR HAULER
with ramps,
$900 obo
(352) 302-0441
BUY, SELL, TRADE, PARTS
REPAIR, CUSTOM BUILD
www.ezpulltrallers.com
Hwy 44 & 486


I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000
OIL BURNING FURNACE
32,000 BTU with stacks,
100 gal. tank & stand
$50. 3 SLIDING GLASS
DOORS, Excellent, $100
(352) 422-2603
Oven /Microwave
Combo, $75
Dishwasher, $75
Both work perfect
(352) 527-3190
PLAY STATION Caddy
with storage, 15 games,
and accessories, $100
60 CD Changer, $50
(352) 344-8449
Ask for Laura
SEARS CAR
CARRIER $20,
Unsinkable float,
originally $69.99, $20.
(352) 746-7437
Solane Torch Tank,
for oxygen, large,
$80.
Floral City
(352) 341-0787
SOLAR PANELS
suitable for pool or hot
tub. Good cond. $100
Cash, (352) 746-0066
STEREO
RECORD PLAYERS
electronics, lots of misc.
$60 for all.
(352) 637-9521
Verticals
Custom made, 2
72"X50"; 1 36"X50, & 1
36"X36", embossed
pattern, navy blue, $75/
all. (352) 795-0876
Window Air Condition,
$25
24' Aluminum Ladder
Warner, $100
(937) 564-0277




2 WHEEL CHAIRS
I large 1 small,
call after 7:30pm
(352) 746-7156
4 Wheel Shop Rider
Mobility Scooter
10" pneumatic wheels,
factory battery charger
$800. call after 8am
(352) 564-8685
1104 JAZZY ELEC.
WHEELCHAIR with lift,
8hrs. use, $2,500 obo
352-697-2659 or
352-793-6762
ADJUSTABLE BED
Electric. Twin size,
excellent condition,
$500 (352) 637-2838
Electric
Wheelchair
red, like new, $600
(352) 794-8794
ELECTRIC LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR
Excellent condition.
Brown fabric. $150
or best offer.
(352) 382-7347
MERITS SCOOTER
DL5.2, 4 wheel, heavy
duty, electric, $400
(352) 621-3627




9 PC DRUM SET
Zildjian cymbals,
$300 or best offer.
(352) 563-0166
Conn Spinet Electronic
Organ & bench,
many voices $250.
(352) 382-0525
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music.
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
ORGAN Kawai KL2,
Exc. cond. complete
w/ bench,
Original $2,900
Will Sacrifice for $750.
(352) 344-2799
PEAVEY PA power mixer
XR696F, 9 channel,
stereo, monitor & main
amps. Both w/EQ
effects feedback
eliminator, 1200W total
power. Exc. cond. $495.
(352) 628-7251
or cell (352) 586-8503
SPINET PIANO
$350
628-4847




5 PC'S Work-out Equip.
Healthrider treadmill,
Elliptical Strider, Nor-
dictrac Sklier, Welder
Crossbow & Total gym.
$500/all. (352) 586-9614
Exercise Equipment
Stationary Bike,
Cardlo-glide, 2 24" new
bikes, $50ea. or 2/$75.
(352) 341-0246
Treadmill, Preform GLX
760, $400.
(352) 382-3895
WElDER HOME GYM
(Pro Model 9625)
$150.
(352) 382-5957
after noon on Friday
& weekends.




4V/2X9 REGULATION 3-pc
slate pocket billiard
tables, $1300 ea. Two
toy crane games, $150
ea. Three billiard light
fixtures, $50 ea.
$4000 takes all.
352-795-4546 (Lars)
7' POOL TABLE
Balls and accessories
included. Very nice
cond $150 obo, Call
(352) 465-6456 or
(352) 613-0010
ALUM. DOG BOX
4'X4' 2 doors, $200
(352) 628-4915
GO SCALLOPINGII
20 sets of fins, masks,
snorkels, exc. cond.


1996 XP, completely
rebuilt, new gas tank,
trailer, $1600.
(352) 563-1217




0000
THREE RIVERS
MARINE


We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES !
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U. S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-5510


UTILITY TRAILER
4X6' NEW
$350/OBO
(352) 621-4854
UTILITY TRAILER,
pulls great,
new paint, $275
(352) 422-5000




BASSINETTE & CRIB
$25 each. Kids' clothing
$1 per item.
(352) 795-5374
RACECAR BED
Toddler racecar bed.
Used,Blue, No mattress.
Little Tikes $75.00 Firm
302-2966




1 CARAT diamond
anniversary band.
Yellow gold,
$700 or best offer.
352-422-8093
Ladies White Gold Dia-
mond Wedding Rings.
1 Karat. Size 71/2, Never
Been Worn. Asking
$1,000 OBO
(352)489-5438




TOOLS OF ANY
value, rods, reels,
tackle, collectibles,
hunting equipment,
352-564-2421




NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
30 GALLON FISH TANK
Upright Hexagon,
w/oak stand, light, filter
+ extras. Ready for set
up. $160.
(352) 795-7764
AMERICAN PITBULL
TERRIERS FOR SALE
Beautiful puppies.
$150 or best offer.
Call to see, Laura,
(352) 563-5579
BEARDED DRAGON
LIZARD
13" long, tame, 40gal
tank w/light $125.00
OBO 352-726-5225
FISH AND TANK
30 Gallon Fish Tank with
accessories and 7 fish.
$75.00 OBO
352-726-5225
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $20
Cat Spaved $25
Dog Neutered &
Spaved start at $35
(352) 563-2370
JUST OVER 1 YR OLD
MALE FERRET, cage &
all accessories, $150
firm. Please call for
details (352) 637-5545
RICHARDSON GROUND
SQUIRRE., paid $115,
, sell for $40
(352) 344-4279
TWO 4' TAME BALL
PYTHONS. Large cage
and accessories
included. $150 obo.
(352) 465-6456 or
(352) 613-0010
Walker Pups
Reg. Champion
bloodline $200 each
(352) 344-1428




4 YEAR OLD
Tennessee Walker
Gelding. Green broke.
$1700. 352-302-3552
5
OLD WESTERN
SADDLES
in rough cond. From
$15 to $30,
(352) 344-1515
15" BLACK WESTERN
SADDLE leather &
Cordura, very good
cond. $150 firm, Also
lots of misc. tack
(352) 746-2271
SHOW SADDLE
Western Pleasure Show
Saddle & bridle. 16"
seat, full quarter horse
bars. Decorated w/
Montana silver. $650.
obo (352) 344-8238




'96 JOHNSON 150
Saltwater Series, just
serviced and ck'd.
Exc. cond. $3500
Days, 352-267-4830
Boat Trailer
for 18ft. boat,
fair cond.
$200.
(352) 527-9697
EVINRUDE 9.5HP
excellent condition,
1973, $400
(352) 697-0078
OUTBOARD MOTOR
1990, Johnson, 175hp,
only 300hrs, runs great,
controls & gauges incl.,
$2,800. (352) 628-4237
T TOP w/ 2 place center
console, complete
controls, gauges
steering & live well,
pumps & allhook ups,
cooler seats, Asking
$1,200. (352) 302-4532




SEADOO


PROLINE 20'
'73. '86 Evinrude 110HP
trailer, needs TLC.
$2,000/obo
352-795-4779
ROBALO
22', 2000, 200HP
Yamaha, low hrs, CC,
w/traller $12,500 obo
(352) 238-2249
SEA SPRITE
16', 1982, low hours, '97
Yamaha, 60HP 2 stroke
outboard. Very good "
cond. W/trailer. $2900.
(352) 860-0277
SILVERTON
FUN BOATI 1987, 34 Ft.,
runs great $25,000 OBO
(352) 249-6982 or
249-6324
STAMAS
1975, 26' w/ 10ft beam
and fly bridge.w/ 1985
twin 140 hp I/O engines,
new upholstery and
curtains, triple axle
trailer, $8,500.
(352) 464-1077
STINGRAY
'81, 17ft., sports boat,
120HP mercy cruiser, In-
board outboard, asking
$1,700. (352) 527-1263
WELLCRAFT
1996 20' ski boat, runs
and looks great! $8500.
(352) 621-0250




COMO "RV"
SALES
NEW PRE-OWNED
TRADE IT-SELL IT-
OR CONSIGN IT
(352) 344-1411
FOUR WINDS
03, 32', Chateau, Class
C w/ slide, Ford V10,
12,500ml, every options
Immaculate cond,
$47,500. (352) 726-2670
JAYCO
Must sell 2001 Eagle,
super clean, low miles,
slide-out. Loaded.
$32,900. (352) 746-2266
or cell (352) 220-1161
PATRIOT
made by Beaver. 1993
37'. Only 50.000 miles.
Cummings diesel, new
Michelin tires, too many
extras to list. Exc. cond.
Kept under cover.
(352) 795-4314
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

Gq.Nf. '1


$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & Trailers!
No Fees0352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
12 ft. Aluminum V-hull,
w/ 7'/2HP motor & trailer
$750.
(352) 860-2183
12'V-HULL ALUM.
oar locks, trailer, galv.
301b thrust trolling mo-
tor, exc. cond. $600/
obo. 352-621-0560,
9a-6p
20' PONTOON BOAT
Fiesta-New P/T floor,
carpet, lights, No Trailer
$2500 o/b/o
352-212-9718
24' Pontoons
w/ new diamond plate
deck & trailer, $1,200.
(352) 795-2801







SPECIAL
Sea Chaser 180 Flats
115HP Suzuki 4 Stroke
$20,995
1976 S.Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448



AIR BOAT
Nice Rivermaster, fiber-
glass hull, w/Teflon
bottom, new uphol.,
300HP, lycomlng Eng.
(fresh overall) 5- blade
prop. Very fast! $14,500.
firm 800-782-8120
ALUM. BOAT 12'
Motor and Trailer, and
Electric Motor, $550.
(352) 726-7109
CAROLINA SKIFF
'97 19 'Semi V 90HP T&T
Johnson, CC, SS, GPS,
fish finder, $5,600
(352) 637-6034
GHEENOE
12ft Gheenoe with trail-
er, New seats, live well
and trolling motor. $600
Call 212-9193
Incredible
Blow Out Sale
Lowe Jon Boats,
For sale $1,500.
Call 352-795-7234
For additional Info.
JON BOAT
12FT, alum. V-hull,
with trailer, $325
(352) 344-4279


CLEARANCE SALE

ALL SWEETWATER
PONTOONS

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS

POLARKRAFT JON
BOATS MUST GO!

Large Selection of
Used Pontoons

Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days


WE.INANCE.YOU
100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CARS
FROM-1325-DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675- US19- HOMOSASSA


BUICK
2000 Century Custom
Like new, all power. CD,
30mpg. Priced near
wholesale $3895.
(352) 344-0288
BUICK
'98, LeSabre,
$3,500.
need AC work
(352) 527-4418
CADILLAC
1993 Sedan DeVille
Leather, loaded, cold
AC, 130K orig mi. 1
owner, like new, except
paint, $1850. 341-0004 .
CAMARO
1987, runs great, cold
AC. T-tops. good cond.
$2000. obo.
(352) 400-2364
CARS. TRUCKS. SUVS
F REBUILDERS
500$1000 DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19Airport
564-1212 or 212-3041


SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 11D


[1 4


REXHALL
'04, 36FT, double slide,
9K ml., open house Sat.
& Sun. 5041 W. Rolling
View Place, Lecanto
(352) 746-2873 Mon
thru Fri. by appt.
SOUTH WIND
1994, 36' Diesel Pusher
Many extras, nice cond
$29,000/obo or trade
for Pick Up truck/ trav.
trlr. (352) 748-0602
SOUTHWIND STORM
34', 1997, Slide-out, all
new tires, 2 AC's, many
extras. Asking $33,000
(352) 628-6527
TOYOTA
1982 motorhome, good
transm. & motor, Interior
needs work, $600
(352) 860-1761




COMO "RV"
SALES & SERVICE
(352) 344-1411
(352) 628-1441
DUTCHMAN
'96 Signature LTD 33FT
5th wheel, slide-out,
fully equip. $13,000
(352) 341-6821
FLEETWOOD
2005, Pull camper, like
new, 18FT, $11,000
nego. (352) 726-8005
HORNET
98, 29', Fully equip,
sleeps 8, bunk beds,
$5000.(352) 465-1934
JAYCO
'95, 34' 5th wheel, 14'
slide, excellent cond.
Many extras, $11,500
obo. (352) 628-7414
LUXURIOUS
'05, TT, 33ft. full slide,
W/D ready, awning,
used 1 week, must sell
ASAP $18,500. abo
(352) 563-2829 after 5 or
352-586-6801 anytime
NOMAD
1994,22', great shape,
everything works.
Asking $9000.
(352) 302-6311
NOMAD TRV, TRLR.
2004, 32', sips. 9
All the goodies
$15A00.
(352) 586-9614
SUNLINE
'94, 20', sleeps 5, Self-
contained. AC/heat,
Extras. excellent cond.
$6,500. (352)220-3688
TRUCK CAMPER
1993, 8', bath, shower,
roof AC. 3-burner
stove/oven.$4250. (352)
212-7838 or 220-1928
WILDWOOD
2000, 30', w/ slide out,
A/C, awning, queen
size bed, sleeps 6,
$10, 900(352) 726-6120




4 MICHELIN TRUCK
TIRES, 235/70R 16,
raised white letters, exc.
tread. $75 for all four.
(352) 746-4160
CONVERTIBLE KIT
for Corvette C-4
Hatchback, $500
(352) 628-9101
MACCO COMMERCIAL
air compressor, $500
ENGINE HOIST
$150
(352) 302-0441
TRUCK SHELL
Almost new, fits bed
size 751/2x60, white.
$450/obo
(352) 621-4854
TURBO 350
TRANSMISSION
completely rebuilt, like
new, $450/obo.
(352) 628-5371, Iv. msg.






SPECIAL 995 SALE
92TOWNCAR $2995I
LEATHER, LOOKS& RUNS GREAT
94 MAZDAPROTEG.$2995
954 A A N CE
4DR.,V6,AUTO, AC,CLEAN


ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR CONSIGN
98% Sales Success



FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, Jet ski's,
3 wheelers. 628-2084
VEHICLES WANTED,
Dead or Alive.
Call Smitty's Auto
628-9118
y1iff 1rj- iL/.


'89 Towncar, Cartier
Exc. running cond.
Nice ride, clean,
dependable, $1,495
(352) 341-0610
LINCOLN
'90 Town Car. Signature
Series. Beautiful. 107K
ml. Runs great, $2800.
(352) 726-5890
LINCOLN
'97 Towncar Signature,
all leather, 110K miles.
Excellent In/out. $5995
obo. (352) 344-1210
MAZDA MIATA
MX-5 2005
1500 miles, Air Condi-
tion, Power Steering,
Power Windows, Pow-
er Door Locks, Cruise
Control, Single Com-
pact Disc, $19,995
Black over Razor
Blue.Mint Conditionl
352-746-9115


Auto
Truck
RV

Sales &
Service
Get Financed!!

CALL JIM






100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CARS
FROM-325-DOWN
30 MIN. -Z CREDrrI
1675US19- HOMOSASSA


CHEVROLET
1993 Blazer S-10, orig.
owner, cold A/C, reese
hitch, Reliable, $895
OBO(352) 344-8051
CHEVROLET
2000 Corvette
Convertible, yellow,
exc. cond. 77,000 ml.
$28,000. (352) 621-0300
CHEVROLET
'97, Lumlna, 4DR, V6,
ood runner, new tires,
2,300. (352) 465-0853
or 274-0385
CHEVY BLAZER
1989, 5 speed, lots of
accessories, looks
great, $2700.
(352) 746-1230
CHEVY LUMINA
2000, 4dr, V-6, loaded,
56K actual miles, mint
cond, $4,950.
(352) 422-0126


AFFORDABLE CARS
91 TOPAZ--$2250
4DR., AUTO AC, NICE
92 MAZDA 32-$2250I
2DR, AUTO, AC, GOOD MPG
94 ESCORT-- $2250
4DR., AUTO, AC, CLEAN
1675- US 19 OMOSASSA

CHRYSLER
2004 GTC convertible
Nicely equipped, 25K
mi. White/tan. Garaged
$16,900. 352-382-4008

COMO
AUTO SALES
INVERNESS*
344-1411*

COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
Call Jim
628-141 1*

Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
it off your taxes then
trading it in.
Donate it to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
DODGE
1989 Dynasty, good
cond. All the bells &
whistlesI 50K mi. $2,695
(352) 344-0227


SPECIAL 2250 SALE
90 NISSANS!NRA..$2250
2DR., 5 SPD., GREAT MPG
92 DESLTA 88.- $2250
94 DODGE S96 9 ..$2250
4DR., V6, AUTO, NICE
1675 US 19 HOMOSASSA


DODGE OMNI
1984, "Isn't very pretty,
but It runs" New starter
& battery, $400.
(352) 637-1859
FORD
1988 Mustang converti-
ble, needs motor. $500
or best offer. After 5pm,
call (352) 302-4755
FORD
1995 Crown Victoria.
Good Interior/exterior.
Dual air bags. New
brakes, tires. Good AC
S$2750. Eves, 637-4914
FORD
1998, Escort, 26K, Mint
Cond, $5,000
(352) 628-6996
FORD
2004, Crown Victoria
LX like new, Factory
warr., 20K ml. $15,900
(352) 341-1421
FORD
'93, Taurus, 4 DR, very
well maint, must see
call anytime $2,350.
(352) 697-2159
FORD
96' Contour, ice cold
air, V6. runs great, pwr '
locks/Windows, new
tires, must see/sell
$2,700 OBO
(352) 464-1616 Mike
FORD ESCORT
1991 4dr, hatchback,
auto, $550 or will trade
for Snap-On tools.
352-464-0564
FORD ESCORT
'97 wagon 4D dual air
bags, cold AC, PSauto.
75k, am/fm/pass, exc.
cond. Non-smoker, ga-
raged. $3280. 563-0022
FORD MUSTANG
2000 black, 86K,
loaded, $6A490
860-1866 or 563-4169
GEO
1994 Tracker
Convertible, 5 spd. Runs
great. $2000 obo.
(352) 628-3551
LINCOLN


ton, good work truck,
$2750. (352) 302-2520
CHEVY SCOTTSDALE
'75,1/2 ton, PS, PB, auto,
350, new tires & wheels.
runs great $1350
352-344-4579
CHEVY SUBURBAN
'86, Cold AC, Runs
great. $1400/obo
352-621-3840/220-4691

COMO
AUTO SALES
INVERNESS*
344-1411*

COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
Call Jim
628-1411*


CL.ASSIFIEDS


KIA OPTIMA
2004, LOADED, Great
Cond. $12,750/obo
(352) 726-5467
MAZDA
1990 MX-6, 114K ml.,
$1,400 obo, fully load-
ed, many new parts
(352) 726-4177
MERCURY
'98, Sable, auto trans.,
cruise control, ice cold
air, good tires, high mi.
Runs good. $2,000.
(352) 220-4927
MERCURY
'99, Grand Marquis LS,
loaded, leather,
excel. cond. 65k mi.
$8,500. (352) 746-6052
MITSUBISHI
'03, Outlander, White,
31k mi. excel. cond.
$12,500.
(352) 628-3811
NISSAN
1985, well maintained,
very reliable, 35+ mpg.
$750 or best offer.
(352) 527-9259
NISSAN
1994 Sentra, 5 spd. cold
A/C, clean, Reliable.
$2,500 obo
(352) 795-6299
OLDS CUTLASS
Supreme, 1997.
Exc. cond. CD &
cassette player, $5,000.
(352) 726-7789
PONTIAC
1992 Grand Am, 4 dr,
V-6, AC, PW, runs &
drives exc. 146K mi.
$1550. (352) 476-5390
PONTIAC
Grand Prix, 1994, good
dependable trans, very
gd. cond. $2,000.
352-634-6723/ 563-6450
PONTIAC SUNBIRD
1994 reliable, many
new parts
$2,000 O.B.O.
Call 795-9929
PT CRUISER 2003
Take over payments
Maroon, great cond.
(352) 586-1026
SATURN
1994, Wagon, 68K,
loaded exc, cond
$2,900 OBO.
(352)795-9090/422-7910
SATURN
1998 SL-2, white, 4-Dr.
46K mi., Power locks,
windows, security sys-
tem, cruise, tilt steering,
AC, stereo cass. $4,500
obo (352) 527-0763
SATURN
'96 SC2, 5 speed, motor
needs some work, $400
obo (352) 344-0571
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com





'97 NISSAN SENTRA SE
40r, A Air, Clean............$2,750
'01 CHEVY CAVALIER
Auto,Air, Coupe,Sharp.......$5,980
'97 LINCOLN TOWNCAR SIGNATURE
Triple WhiteChrome, Nice...$6,995
'03 LINCOLN TOWNCAR, PEARL
17KMiles, keNew......$22,900
MANY MORE IN STOCK ALL






1937 SS 100 JAG.
replica VW power, all fi-
ber glass, beautiful car..
$5,800. obo, may take
motorcycle in trade
697-2659, 352-628-7594
ALFA ROMEO
1989, Graduate, 2 door,
conv, 5 speed, 91K,
Good Cond, $4,800.
(352) 527-9979
CHEVY 1940
1/2 TON PICK UP
Good cond. Restorable
$3500/obo
(352) 628-5371, Iv. msg.
CHRYSLER
1968 New Yorker
All original, excellent
condition. $6000.
(352) 726-7982
DATSUN
'79, Pickup, great cond.
61k mi. all org. equip.
$3,500.
(352) 628-3811
FORD LTD 1967
289,2 dr, runs good,
$2500/obo
(352) 726-6264
MUSTANG 1966
Very Good cond.
Asking $10,000
(352) 527-0669.
MUSTANG
1967 Convertible
289, auto, $15,000.
(352) 527-9943
OLDSMOBILE
'46,98, 4DR, restorable
cond., extra parts, fami-
ly car, $3,000. Canton
OH 330-879-5810









CHEVROLET
1996, 75,000 miles, 8'
covered body, white,
reg. cab. Good cond.
$5600. (352) 527-1109
CHEVROLET 2500
'88 350 engine, auto.,
8FT bed, high miles, 95K
this engine. Well maint.
Orig. owner, $3,000/
offers. (352) 637-4428.
CHEVY
'03, Sllverado, 4.8L,
34,524 ml. fully loaded,
3DR, asking $18,000.
(352)563-6428
CHEVY C3500
1993 Cabin Chassis 1









C'nR'US, COUNTY (FL) CHIRONICI.K


12D SLNDAY, Jtuly 31, 2005


El


F


To listen and respond to ads using your


Scall 1-866-529-4742


To respond to ads at $1.99 per min, call


1-900-226-1602 Must be 18+.


To beome amembe, cal 1.-66-26-521


NEED A NEW FRIEND?
Devoted SBF, 41, God-fearing, mother of
1, interested in going to church, flea mar-
kets, strolls in the park, seeks SBCM, 37-
53, w/similar interests. V643952
MY GUY WANTED
This 55-yr-old/ blonde young-at-heart,
seeks a guy of her own. Friendly, loving,
and kind who is ready for a relationship.
Looking for my guy, 47-57, N/S. 7r589861
WEEK WACHEE GIRL
SWF, 46, 130lbs, blonde/blue, smoker,
enjoys the outdoors, water, music, tv,
and chatting. Seeking WM, 45-55,
smoker, with similar interests. Need a
good friend? T'684286
WHAT'S UP!
GBF, 21, looking for sexy, sweet, honest
guy who likes movies, chilling and hav-
ing a good time, for friendship, fun and
more. '729689
CALL ME NOW
SWF, 19, Scorpio, N/S, seeks mature
SWM, 19-35, who wants a commitment,
LTR, and will accept children. V'738922
SEEKING QUALITY MAN
BF, 5'2", stocky build, looking for a
patient, fun-loving, Christian male, who
knows how to have fun. I enjoy reading,
cooking, watching sports and time with
my children. V743002
CHANGE OF PACE
I'm a single mother of two, I think there
is nothing sexier than a nice southern
accent. I'm an honest, caring person,
who is in search of a honest man.
U742589
HERE I AM
SWF, tall,slender, pretty, brown/brown,
N/S, loves classical music, art, books,
intelligent conversation, boating, cook-
ing. Seeks rugged interesting N/S,
SWM, 57-63, for companionship, possi-
ble LTR. '223790
FRIENDSHIP FIRST
DWF, 41, 5'5", brown hair, two sons,
looking for WM to share movies, dining
out and good conversation. V739293
GOD-FEARING WOMAN
SBF, 44, three children, goes to church,
likes having fun and living life. Looking
for a loving, adventurous, spiritual, hard-
working man, 45-60, with same outlook.
U739060
KISSES AND HUGS
Seeking true love, not lust. No cowards,
and no games please. BCF, 50, single
mom, seeks honest, mature, strong,
hardworking male, for a monogamous
relationship and true love. U840803
GOOD LISTENER
SBF, 50, 5'6", 145lbs, black/brown, Ge-
mini, N/S, loves movies, long walks, and
occasional dining out. Seeking BM, 45-
55, into serious dating and relationship.
V661326
OCALA ANGEL
Fun, sweet, caring, family-oriented
SWF, 38, 5'4" blonde/blue eyes, enjoys
beaches, quiet nights. ISO B/HM, 35-50,
for dates and possible LTR. '731166
SEXY BROWN EYES
I'm looking for an honest, down-to-earth
man, who can be just as silly as me.
Intelligence and activeness goes
together well and a goal-oriented stable
man is a plus. V'741175
GAME-FREE LTR
SBF, 51, 5'4", enjoys cooking, church,
yard sales, flea markets. Seeking hon-
est, commitment-minded, family-orient-
ed SBM, 50-55, for LTR. No games,
serious replies only U427683
CREAM OF THE CROP
Cute, 5'4", mature, blonde, good dress-
er, alert, no children, wants pleasant
connection. Hudson. 580103
ACTIVE WOMAN SEEKS...
SWF, 39, looking for a SWM, 39-45, to
enjoy a good glass of wine with over a
great conversation.. V71.9170
GOOD FRIENDS
SWF, 26, 5', brown/brown, with 2 chil-
dren, smoker, loves classical jazz, rap,
and soul music. Seeking BM, 19-35,
smoker, goal-oriented, fun to be with.
'570398
KNIGHT AND SHINNING AMOR
I have a great personality, love to laugh
and really love water, I'm outgoing yet a lit-
tle shy. I'm very old-fashoned with a slight
twist. Treat me like a lady!!! V727217


EASYGOING PERSONALITY
Educated, positive, level-headed,
secure SWF, 52, 5'2", blond/blue, willing
to talk things through, enjoys travel,
cooking. Seeking SWM, 50-58, H/W-
proportionate, with a similar outlook on
life for LTR. "l469082
PEOPLE PERSON
SWF, 57, 5'6", N/S, does a lot of hugging,
looking for neat, clean, honest SWM, 52-
70, for possible LTR. IZ722071
NEW TO AREA
Attractive SWF, 42, slim, marriage-
minded, no children. Seeking SWM, 35-
58, who is caring, honest, emotionally
available. No games. "T729195
HOPE TO HEAR FROM U
DWF, 52, young-at-heart, enjoys dining
out, nights on the town, exploring life.
Wishing to meet some special to share
dates, talks, laughter and possibly love.
T'736860
IT MUST BE YOU
SBF, full-figured, 30, 5'5", Capricorn,
N/S, mother, seeks family oriented BM,
25-42, who knows what they want in life.
'696938
HONESTY A MUST
SWF, 35, 5'4', N/S, blonde/blue, single
mom, overweight, seeks honest guy, 19-
55, who loves having fun. ST679735
ONE IN A MILLION
Attractive DBF, 43,5'2", 118lbs, mother
of 10-yr-old. Black/indian decent, in the
nursing profession.Looking for someone
who likes movies, flea markets, camp-
ing, beaches and cooking. 7r595051
LOOKING TO LOVE...
someone. Want to date with possible
long term relationship I am a sexy blonde
31, looking for Mr. right. 7'710152
FRIENDS FIRST
SWF, 52, originally from Long Island,
NY, loves animals, nature, outdoors,
entertaining at home, going out, very
family-oriented, loyal, good SOH, home
projects, yard sales, seeking SWM, 48-
62. Z735162
MAYBE YOU'RE MY GUY
Easygoing SWF, 57, smoker, loves the
country life, country/oldies music, cook-
ing, camping. ISO outgoing man, 57-62,
who likes movies, dining, quiet times
and laughter, for sharing a lasting, loving
relationship. '7588873
HEY, TALL GUYS
Attractive, well-built, long-haired, Libra
SWF, 50, 5'9", N/S, enjoys movies, trop-
ical fish keeping, cats,. and music.
Seeking stable, honest, caring SM, 45-
60, 6'-6'6". Life is short. Let's enjoy some
together. T625057
WHATTA YA SAY...
we go catch a flick? SBF, 31, smoker,
enjoys Las Vegas casinos. Seeking BM,
27-45, to chill with. "685193
SRING HILL AREA
DWF, 4E ,i S N 1 attractive, honest,
sweet, l'Ie laughter, horses music.
Seeks DM, 45-58, N/S, honest, humor-
ous, caring, likes kids. Wl533300
YOUNG & VIBRANT
Artistic SWF, 18, 5'3", 160lbs, brown/
green, smoker, N/D, enjoys drawing and
dancing. Seeking WM, 18-23, smoker,
light drinker ok, for friendship. If718404
WHERE ARE YOU?
Honest SWF, 21, chubby, 5'5", brown/
brown, mother, Scorpio, smoker, loves
movies, flea markets, seeks man, 25-
45, for possible romance. 1T710346
NO TIME FOR FOOLISHNESS
Open SWF, 58, 5'2", average build, N/S,
really likes to go out for Italian food,
loves flea markets, animals, travel,
seeks SWM, 56-65, 'N/S, for possible
LTR. T714884
LOYAL AND LOVING
SWF, 46, N/S, seeks good, Christian
SWM, 35-60, N/S, who enjoys animals,
likes to walk, talk, hit the beach, shop at
the mall. 'T715937
FISHING, FOOTBALL...
and camping. SWF, 46, independent,
outgoing, enjoys camping, fishing, seek-
ing friend and maybe more later on,
who's a gentleman, 45-55, and enjoys
going out to a movie or dinner. 7729406
ISO TRUE FRIEND...
and confident lover. SWPF, 47, blonde/
blue, very successful, N/S, seeks a fun,
fulfilling, romantic relationship with WM,
42-57, N/S. "g720901
LET'S HAVE A GOOD TIME
SWF, 59, N/S, enjoys dining out, danc-
ing, cookouts, fishing, flea markets,
seeks special SWM, 55-65, to spend
some time with. W713370


I Tpay.for-our service sui -nga Bcheckca.llg1 a02 0


bt I 1 1:, )

^ir Web wte^A1~(Is


EMOTIONALLY AVAILABLE
Independent, free-spirited SWF, 59,
5'8", spontaneous, creative, N/S, enjoys
kayaking, camping, photography, travel-
ing, and good conversation. Seeking
WM, 55-68, N/S, who believes life is an
exciting adventure. W'708586
GREAT WOMAN LOOKING...
For great guy, I'm fun loving, enjoy din-
ner, movies and love to dance. I'm an
active person, I enjoy the simple things
in life. Seeking someone to have fun
with. "l734342
MAKE MY DAY
Athletic SWF, 49, 56", N/S, enjoys the
music of Rod Stewart, loves Adam
Sandier movies, seeks SWM, 47-53,
N/S, who is into spending time outdoors.
"721122
NEW TO AREA
Jamaican lady, 55, N/S, university grad-
uate, former teacher, enjoys quiet
evenings at home, theater, dining out,
musicals; cooking, sewing. Seeking
marriage-minded DM, 35-50, for good
friendship, possible LTR. '693050
WE CAN BE TOGETHER
SWF, 44, marriage-minded, smoker,
homebody, would like to share evenings
in with a special man, 40-55, who likes
to watch movies, read, cook, go out on
the town. V587120

Q ISO SINCERITY
SWF, 40, 5'6", single mother of 2 (son,
20, daughter, 11), smoker, works in
nursing field. Seeking truthful, compati-
ble, fun WM, 30-45, for LTR. g681370
BROWN SUGAR
SBF, 21, looking for someone, 21-30,
who is down-to-earth, fun, sweet, and
not really religious. lr645309
.A REAL MAN
Attractive SBF, 48,5'5", N/S, in the med-
ical profession, likes movies, dining,
dancing, quiet evenings at home, long
walks. Seeking honest, mature SM,
35+, N/S, financially stable. 'Z690857
JUST A CALL AWAY
Compassionate, kind, considerate SWF,
51, light auburn hair, 5'2", medium build,
enjoys people, likes cooking, travel,
boating, fishing. Seeking similar, loving, -
active, open-hearted and true gentle-
man. V232518
THIS IS MY TIME
41-year-old single mother of 2, blonde/
green, medium build, works in the insur-
ance field, loves to bowl, cook, watch
movies, work in the yard. ISO SM, 36-
46, who likes kids. %498280
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
SWF, 5'7", big blue eyes, long blonde
hair, 43, likes music, art. Seeking intelli-
gent, open-minded, drama-free, sin-
cere, honest, loving SWM, 30-50, with
good sense of humor, for friendship first.
"404773
SEEKING CHRISTIAN MALE
- SBCF, 40, 6', large" build, N/D. N S, io..+s
kids, going to church, movies, more."
Seeking SWCM, 35-60, who loves life,
is very honest and marriage-minded.
Tg596730
STOP LOOKING! READ.
DWF, 57, full-figured, blonde/blue, 5'3",
enjoys dancing, movies, occasional din-
ing out, cooking. Seeking S/DWM, 55-
65, for dating, possible LTR. 7B853666
SEEKING PLEASANT MAN
WiWF, 60, would like to meet a WM, 55-
70, N/S, social drinker, who likes day
trips, going to movies and dining out.
T594035
LADY RANCHER
Widowed female, 54, 5'7", average bu-
ild, Taurus, loves horses and most other
critters, country lifestyle, easygoing but
hard-working, not too hard on the eyes,
ISO SWM, 46-59, with similar interests.
"T682019
WITH LOVE
SBF, 18, 5'3", 1201bs, N/S, loves ro-
mance movies. Seeking BM, 18-26,
5'4"+, N/S, for friendship, possible
romance. g660691
SEEKS ONE-WOMAN MAN
SWF, young 67, 5'7", N/S, has car, stays
out after dark, very active, romantic,
misses the things a woman does for a
man. Seeking WM, 66-79, who has sim-
ilar interests. "V536212
PRETTY WOMAN
SWF, 5'4", 115lbs, seeks SWM, 50-63.You
and I are in great shape, fun, active, attrac-
tive, sensuous, clean, N/S, healthy, kind,
genuine, trustworthy, intelligent, classy,
secure. Call for further details. I'956254
NEW TO THE AREA
SWF, 5'6", 1261bs, smoker, many inter-
ests, seeks SWM, 62-72, smoker, to
share the best years. W646004
LIKES THE SIMPLE THINGS
WF, 5'2", 125lbs, blonde/blue, would like
to find a true friend. Someone who is
cheerful, pleasant to be with, likes long
conversations, dancing, dining out and
have simple fun. 52-60. '515437
JUST BEYOU
SWF, 50, sincere, honest, caring, look-
ing for the same in a good-hearted,
happy man. Why not call? 1693109



SEE WHAT HAPPENS
Single male, 33, 2401bs, Cancer, N/S,
would like to meet a woman, 21-50, N/S,
who likes sports and trying new things.
"651103
HELLO SWEETIE!!!
Well...I'm just a nice handsome guy
looking for a nice woman, with a nice
body to date, or maybe something more
serious. I love to talk, cook and dive.
"'n747075
A NEW BEGINNING
SWM, 62, 1751bs, Libra, N/S, active,
seeks WF, 50-60, active and healthy, for
good times and possible LTR. hfl433493
CUDDLY BEAR
SWM, 45, 6'1", 2501bs, brown/green,
lives locally, smoker, enjoys Nascar,
football, bowling, pool. Seeking petite
WF, 25-45, smoker. a256201
LET'S HAVE FUN
SHM, 63, dark/blue, average build,
seeks lady, 57-63, N/S, who's pleasant
to be with, enjoys life, likes going to
movies, day trips, dining out. CT719784


HORSE NEEDS RIDER
SM, 54, 170lbs, 5'9", ruggedly hand-
some, horse ranch owner, Capricorn,
enjoys road trips, cook outs, riding,
dancing, socializing, country life. Seeks
adventurous, well-adjusted woman, 42-
56, country and horse lover. "435846
HEARTS AND FLOWERS
SBM, 40, 6'5", 2351bs, Leo, smoker,
enjoys simple pleasures of life, seeks
sexy, woman, 29-40, for possible
romance. V712805
POSSIBLY YOUR MAN...
who knows how to treat a woman. A
giver, intuitive listener. Not a puppy dog
or couch potato. Outside thrill seeker,
Inside romantic, charming WM, 40,
seeks WF, 30-42. T'666718
LET'S SNEAK OUT...
and go to the beach. SWM, 67, tall,
slim, happy, trusting, funny, rock/gem-
stone hound, loves horses, clean, neat,
has great children/grandkids, cook,
reader, church, always interested in you,
SF, 56-69. 73739633
GOOD-LOOKING GUY
WM, 39, brown/brown, in good shape,
wants to meet a WF, 30-41, to go out
and have fun with. V716349
A NEW BEGINNING
Commitment-minded DM, 47, 6', brown/
brown, 180lbs, ISO a special lady,
someone who enjoys life, the outdoors
and classic rock, for sharing happiness
and a lasting relationship. V610840
FUN, FUN, FUN
SWM, 46, 5'10", 170lbs, retired from the
navy, N/S, fitness-minded, low-keyed,
beach bum, surfer, seeks intelligent WF,
42-50. Tf666383
LET'S GET TOGETHER
Open-minded, compassionate, affec-
tionate DWM, 35, 5'8", 160lbs, smoker,
enjoys cookouts, movies. Seeking WF,
25-45, H/W proportionate, smoker, who
wouldn't mind being swept off her feet.
lf680448
LOADS OF FUN
SWM, 64, 5'11", 200lbs, enjoys '50s and
'60s music, dancing, gardening, animals,
very open-minded, seeks full-figured lady
who is fun to be with. lg690280
LET'S HAVE SOME FUN
Easygoing SWM, 36, medium build,
185lbs, hard-working, father, likes
Nascar, the outdoors, swimming, chil-
dren. Seeking understanding, easygo-
ing, sociable lady to share movies
nights, dinners dates, friendship, fun,
possible LTR. W734071
BABY BLUE EYES
Slim SWM, 29, 5'8", N/S, likes the con-
venience of fast food, relaxes by playing
sports, seeks woman, 18-45, who wants
to be treated right. ".624851
LOOKING FOR YOU
DWM, 37, with 1 child and dog, search-
ing for special woman, 25-40, .HPTW,
p.r;si,;aii>i, 1i in shape. eri|u "'s ir .j ut-
OnOrs l'.'ves traveling IT976306
TAKE A CHANCE
Dark-complected SBM, 21, 5'9", Libra,
smoker, really intelligent, independent,
seeks single woman, 18-33, smoker, for
relationship. "691104
NEW TO THE AREA
SBM, 33, Cancer N/S, seeks sweet,
spontaneous, creative female for friend-
ship, possible LTR. Don't miss out.
Contact me! "727862
NEW TO THE AREA
SWM, 33, enjoys the outdoors, sports,
movies, walking and biking. Seeks SF,
26-42. V745660
THE NEW GUY IN TOWN
SM, 46, brown/blue, enjoys movies, din-
ing, keeping active. Seeking loving, like-
minded lady to share friendship, good
times, good talks and possibly more.
l'726480
SEEKING GREAT LADY
I'm 31, divorced now single white male,
ISO an honest, dedicated person for a
long term relationship. I enjoy movies,
dinners by candle light and walks on the
beach. "742132
LOVE HAPPENS
SWM, 55, Sagittarius, N/S, good listen-
er, seeks WF, 40-55, N/S, for possible
LTR. 741594
PLAYFUL PISCES
SWM, smoker, love to meet special
woman, 44-60, loves music, movies, the
beach, sunsets, quiet times, romantic
nights. Call if you want to be loved.
Spring Hill area. 'S679528
MAN OF YOUR DREAMS
SM, 29, wants to find the right woman
so we can start our life together. I like
playing pool, cooking, nights on the
town, cuddling, quiet moments. Your
turn! V733663
LIVE WELL, LOVE WELL
31 year-old master electrician, enjoys
salt water fishing movies on sunday,
and the local gym. Seeking active, fun,
spontaneous SF to share and explore
life with. let's talk! 'S722723
FULL OF LIFE
SM, 34, 5'11", average build, likes to go
out for Italian or Spanish food, loves
travel, amusement parks, pool, seeks
single woman, 21-45, who is serious
about finding love. '720385
LOOKING 4 REAL FRIENDSHIP
SM, 31, looking to meet a special, hon-
est lady who's not afraid of taking
chances, has positive attitude and loves
life. I'm intelligent but not boring, funny
and reliable. Interested? f739803
WORTH YOUR CALL
SWM, 41, N/S, likes boating, camping,
fishing, the outdoor activities, bowling,
movies, more. Is independent, opinion-
ated SF, 33-46, N/S, who enjoys some
of the same. "735988
SPECIAL LADY WANTED
SWM, 48, enjoys fishing, movies, cook-
ing, quiet times at home. Seeking SWF,
38-52, in shape, down-to-earth, who
appreciates a good loyal man. Friends
first. "412132
OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
SWM, 33, 6', 1751bs, Cancer, marriage-
minded, smoker, mechanic, single
father of 2, seeks SWF, 32-42, for won-
derful relationship. "675133
PURE COUNTRY
SWM, 32, father of 2, tired of games,
ready to settle down with someone hon-
est, 30-43. "691926


ROAD LESS TRAVELED
Through life's twists and turns, a calm
spirit keeps everything in perspective.
SWM, 48, has a passion to find an keep
that special person keep me going.
Seeking SF, 38-52. "2733585
LIKE TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS
SWM, 24, looking to make new friends
in town, seeking SF, 18-25, to share
some off time with. T734268
NOW, TOMORROW, FOREVER!
SWM, 59, active, secure, no baggage,
laid back, romantic, enjoys flea markets,
yard sales, car/bike shows, dining out,
dancing, beach. Seeking life partner,
SF, 48-58, for honest, loving, meaningful
relationship. "'730690
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
WIWM, 60, retired, smoker, loves coun-
ty life, looking for Like-minded SWF, 45-
65, with interests in horses and the easy
life, for fun, dating, romance and possi-
ble LTR. 72725854
WANTTO HAVE SOME FUN?
I'm an easy going guy who wants a
woman to be friends with. I enjoy
movies, walks, eating out and whatever.
"r744824
LET'S CHIT CHAT.
Cute SWM, 36, 6'1", seeks SF, 26-42,
for movies, dinners, dancing, long walks
and talks. Must be shapely, funny, down-
to-earth. I'116986
LET ME KNOW YOU'RE THERE
SWM, 19, 6', 1801bs, smoker, tan com-
plexion, looking for a female, 18-23, who
is good-looking, has a nice sense of
humor, enjoys life. 7g690796
LONESOME
SWM, 72, retired, 5'2", N/S, N/D, likes
dining out, movies. Looking for slender,
fit W/HF, under 5'3", 1351bs, 60-80, for
friendship maybe more. I"718022
TALENT SEARCHING
SWM, 67, 5'11", 1701bs, N/S, enjoys fly-
ing, Disney parks, church, square danc-
ing, travel, movies, Nascar, dining out,
animals. Seeking A/W/HF, 30-60, N/S,
who shares a passion for travel.
"717150
BUILT, HANDSOME
Successful, fun-loving SWM, 45, will
promise you the most fun you've ever
had in your life! If you love romance,
travel, adventure, excitement, health, fit-
ness, and fine dining, call me! V740711
WAITING FOR YOU
SBM, 24, 6'1", smoker, brown eyes, 1
tattoo, seeks nice, pretty SBF, 24-24,
N/S, for possible relationship. "723565
READY TO BE ROCKED?-
SWM, 47, Harley rider who is looking for
someone to occupy the spot behind me
on road trips. Seeks SF, 25-55 who
likes to explore. V732955
SEEKING MISS RIGHT
SWr.. 55 like ,_o,:d :,:nr.ersaiior,
m,.,,is. eachn wai., Ira.el Seeir ng a
.womrna. 35-59 LeIl meet Jor cone anda
'see irere ,i rc ., a us' '.r2 '--8'?
RETIRED MILITARY
WM, 71, 6', 180lbs, brown/blue, enjoys
bowling, dancing, long walks, exploring
new eateries and new places. Searching
for a lady, 60-80, who is broad-minded
and affectionate, with similar interests.
Tr716376
HARD-WORKING MAN...
with loving arms, friendly, outdoorsy
man, 45, a good listener, communica-
tive, caring, open and supportive, ISO a
lady who's not afraid to be herself or
afraid of love. "739160
SINCERE AND HONEST
SWPM, just turned 62, 5'9', 2301bs, N/S,
starting over, new in Ocala, active, work-
ing, travels, outdoors, barbecues, fish,
Nascar, cards, golf, trips to the islands,
home is great, one-woman man.
@T721166
INCURABLE ROMANTIC
SWM, 55, likes long walks, holding ha-
nds, reading, dining out, gardening.
Seeking SWF, 50-65, with similar inter-
ests, for cuddling in front of the tv. Good
times, possible LTR. Let's talk. 7r723244
IT'S ALL TRUE
Widowed WM, 47, 6', with 2 sons,
smoker, enjoys camping, football, and
watching car racing. Seeking WF, 35-50,
smoker, for honest LTR. "T709372
MR MELLOW
Handsome, passionate SWM, 54, ath-
letic build, from Israel, marriage-minded,
N/S, heavy equipment operator, seeks a
gentle WF, 18-48, N/S, for fun and dat-
ing. V665111
JOIN ME
Compassionate, fun-loving, light-heart-
ed SM, 64, Cancer, enjoys boating, sim-
ple times. Would like to meet a kind,
attractive, fun female to share dinner
dates, quality talks, romance and then
who knows? T631763
I WANT IT ALL
Active, attractive SWM, 55, 5'7", 175lbs,
athletic build, Cancer, N/S, seeks
woman, 25-45, N/S, for LTR. V677768
STARTING OVER
WiWM, 72, 5'9", 180lbs, N/S, social
drinker, very active, likes dancing, dining
out, travel. Looking for SWF, 65-75, for
companionship, travel, talks, fun times.
a679020
I'LL COLOR YOUR WORLD
SWM, 57, 5'6", 160lbs, in great shape,
active, healthy, N/S, loves painting and
sailing. Seeking adventurous, sponta-
neous WF, 40-57, N/S, for LTR.
"686477
LET'S TALK
WIWM 70, looks younger, very ener-
getic, enjoys dining out, sports, the
water, air boating, flea markets. Looking
to meet a caring, fun woman who enjoys
the same. "695772
WHY NOT CALL?
DWM, 42, heavy machinery operator,
likes '70s/'80s rock, exploring life.
Seeking easygoing, energetic woman to
share outdoor adventures, boating, 4-
wheeling, life, laughter and possible
LTR. "701300
CITRUS COUNTY
DWM, 50, 6'2", brown/blue, attractive,
with 2 children, N/S, enjoys cruising,
weekend getaways, and good conversa-
tion. Seeking attractive woman, 40-55,
H/W proportionate. "710072


V SEEKING MY BEST FRIEND
WM, 48, 6', 2351bs, looking for a petite,
slim, tall female, who likes motorcycles.
If interested, leave a box number, all
calls answered. 'g680509
HOPE IT'S YOU
Hard-working SBM, 41, 145lbs, enjoys
children, amusement parks, woodwork-
ing, weightlifting, running, fine dining
and good movies. Seeking a nice, affec-
tionate, romantic lady to treat like a
queen. 7607942
SEEKING LTR
Attractive WM, 64,6', dark/blue, smoker,
likes cooking, oldies, movies, dining out,
RVs, ISO WF, 50-60, with average build,
who likes country lifestyle and travel.
Va610257
LOOKING OUT MY BACK DOOR
Fit SWM, 63, 5'8", average build, N/S,
N/D, big fan of Creedence Clearwater
Revival, seeks SWF, 50-70, N/S, for
possible LTR. V646822
REALLY GREAT GUY
DWM, 56, 5'9", medium build, enjoys
the outdoors, fishing, loves flea markets,
dining in/out, 50s to 60s music, bowling,
tennis, horseback riding. Seeking SF for
possible relationship. "r433284
SINGLE FATHER
WM, 42, enjoys sports, Nascar, swim-
ming, fishing, the ocean, more. Looking
for WF, 25-50, to possibly share life with.
"r658668
ROMANTIC-AT-HEART
WM, 47, looking for a woman, 35-47,
who likes fishing, boating, gardening,
country life, romance, country music,
playing pool, more. Vl665851
WHAT I REALLY WANT
SWPM, 49, 6', 195lbs, brown/brown,
smoker, loves traveling up and down the
east coast. Seeking a sincere, financial-
ly stable WF, 45-53, N/S, who is not a
bar fly. "l664898
NATURE AND ME
SWM, 42, 6'1", N/S, gentleman, home-
owner, enjoys time spent in the great
outdoors, seeks attractive, honest SWF,
35-50, N/S, for dating, possible LTR.
V226878
HONEST DUDE
Widowed WM, 58, 5'10", Gemini, smok-
er, nature lover, loves traveling. Seeking
WF, 48-60, for friendship, possible
romance. "638041
KNOWS HOW TO TREAT A LADY
SWM, young 57, 5'7", 175lbs, N/S, very
active, honest, educated, intelligent,
financially secure, farmer/rancher, enjoys
dining out, outdoors, football, weekend
getaways. Seeking honest SWF 35-55.
petite/slender, friendship, c .rriparinris-riip.
possible LTR. V261794
GERMAN/ITALIAN BLEND
SWM, 22, 5'9", 175lbs, brown/brown,
medium build, Cancer, smoker, loves
darts, billiards, movies, theme parks.
ea~cres. ard clubOs Seeking WF. 18-26
opeiinoed ,I686494
-" YET'S GET TOGETHER
Caring aer,:er ni ph.ysically appealing.
SBPM, 42. ISO sexy, attractive, SBF, 27-
45, for possible relationship. "480766
YARD DOG, SHORT HAIR
Affectionate, house broken, all paper
shots, warm feet, cold nose, doesn't
drink from porcelain or chase cars or
cats, likes to dig, seven years old. SWM,
ISO SF. V948521
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
Sharp, good-looking, rugged 67 year-
old ex-marine, seeks attractive, older,
financially secure female to travel and
have fun with. If you like to have a good
time, let's talk. V204397
IT COULD BE YOU
WiWM,. a youthful 79, knows how to
treat a lady, enjoys the outdoors, fishing,
hunting, camping, boating. ISO attrac-
tive SWF, 50+, N/S, for friendship and
possible LTR. '550451
MAN OF HONOR
SWM, 48, N/S, N/D, 6', loyal, adventur-
ous, playful, with a serious side, broad
interests, travel, arts and crafts, reading,
water, amusement parks, classic music,
nature, and much more. Seeking that
special lady, with similar qualities and
interests, 30+, N/S. V688565
HAND IN HAND
57-year-old DWM is seeking the compa-
ny of a female, 50-65, to go out and have
a good time holding hands. V256976


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SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005 13D


DODGE DAKOTA
1994, Low miles, well
maintained, but needs
some paint, $3000.
(352) 726-5648
FORD
1990 F150, 302 V-8,
auto, AC, 116K miles.
$2750, (352) 621-4607
FORD
2003 F 150 crew cab.
32K miles. Excellent.
$20,000.
(352) 795-5003
FORD
'90, F150, V8, PS, PB,
cruise, PW, PL hitch &
receiver, 4 WD, $1,200.
(352) 464-3670
FORD
'98 F150, runs excellent,
ice cold AC, $4,650.
obo. (352) 476-1159 or
(352) 795-0000
FORD F 150
2004, Completely
loaded, 8,000 miles.
New $34,000 Sell
$25,000. (352) 637-0313
FORD F-150
'00, Ext. cab. new tires
exc. shape, single own-
er, 108K ml.AC, AM/FM
CD, $9,000, 795-8721
FORD RANGER
1999, 70K, $6250.00
Below Retail -Auto, Air,
Good Maint Record,
Call: 249-3290

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

t i: i( )\!t.Ll( .,..


GMC
1997, 1500 SLE, extra
cab, loaded. Exc.
cond. 72k ml. $8500.
352-613-5445
TOYOTA
2002 Tacoma, 5-spd.,
green, Book $10,900
Sell $9,900
(352) 344-4497
TOYOTA
'87, 4 wheel Dr., 16" lift,
44 ground hogchevy
350CI, $4,500. obo
(352) 795-7808





COMO
AUTO SALES
INVERNESS*
344-1411-*

COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
Call Jim
628-1411*

GMC JIMMY
1988, runs great, no AC,
$1000/obo or will
consider trade
(352) 726-1463
HUMMER H2
2004, 9,000, Excellent
shape, Black Beauty,
Taupe Interior, fully
loaded. 55K. Call
JOAN @ 352-726-7474
JEEP
'95 Grand Cherokee,
exc. cond. runs great,
$3,500 obo
(352) 302-0441


Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com




SUBARU
'99, Forester, 93k, black,
$7,500.
(352) 341-3338


DODGE
'00, Pickup 2500, diesel,
SLT, tow pkg., bed liner,
topper, excel cond.
$18,500. (352) 628-2150
DODGE
1995 4x4, 40K, V-8, bed
cover,Michelln.1 owner.
Showroom cond. $7500
obo. (352) 382-1981
JEEP
'87, Cherokee, one
owner, good work truck
$1,000. obo
(352) 628-9263
JEEP CHEROKEE
1993,4x4, Ice cold AC,
needs motor, $800.
212-4560


"MR CITRUS COUNTY"'




".-.y







ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


CHEVY
1992 Astro, excellent
shape, 87,000 miles.
$3,500 or best offer.
(352) 344-8892
CHEVY ASTRO
'95 68k, $4800.00
(352) 637-4388
DODGE
02, Grand Caravan EX,
6 pass,, auto duel air,
pw, pw side/rear doors,
stereo/Cass/CD, 88K
$9,850. (352) 382-1710
(352) 476-1828
DODGE CARAVAN
Good work vehicle,
$750/obo
724-570-9607
DODGE RAM 250
Custom, 1986, no rust,
good tires & paint,
$1250 csh or $600 down
$100/mo for 10 mos.
(352) 341-0787
FORD
'96 Windstar GL, V-6, 3.8
cold AC w/rear. Quad
seating. PWcrulse.150K.
$3130. (352) 212-3823
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com


GMC
'94 Safari van. 7 pass. 1
owner. Very nice. cond.
$1,575. (352) 637-5394




ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2004 Heritage Soft tall
2,800 ml. like brand new
Sell due to sickness
(352) 302-0441
SUZUKI
2003 Ozark 250.
New, used less than 10
times. $2500. 302-8118
YAMAHA
2003 Bear Tracker, Bare-
ly used. Must sell. $2000
obo. (352) 637-3637
228-1367
Two 2004 HONDA 85s
$2,800 each. 2003
Kawasaki 125, $1500.
(352) 628-6197




HONDA
1998 Shadow 1100, 24K
ml. Windshield, hard
bags-lock, lots of extras.
$4400, (352) 341-7788


HONDA
'79, Classic, CX500
deluxe, excel, cond.
windshield, high way
pegs, low ml.. serv,
manual incl. & two
helmets $1,500. firm.
(352) 564-1776
HONDA
'85, Shadow, excel.
cond. + parts bike,
$1,600.
(352) 746-7290
HONDA CBR
2000 F-4 600 6,900 orig.
mi. garage stored,
Immaculate, some
extras, must see $5,700
obo (352) 422-2738
HONDA
Helix 250 scooter, '93,
excellent cond. Owned
by older gentleman,
$1800 firm.352-795-6650
KAWASAKI
'03, Vulcan 750, WS,
Immac. garaged, 8K,
must see, $5,200.
352-382-0005
Kymco Scooter,
'03, 60MPH, only 340 mi.
gorgeous powder blue,
w/ custom seat, like
new over $2,800.
Invested steel at
$1,600. 352-464-2169

GET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE


POCKET BIKE
49 CC, Looks great, runs
good, blue, 1 yr old,
needs work, $175 obo
352-637-2241 257-0213

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.corn




SUZUKI
'05 Blvd. S/83. 1463 cc.
280 miles, like new. See
@ Trikes by Tony or call
Rick, 352-344-8637
SUZUKI
'05, GSXR 600, Blk. Sil. &
Red. like new, Includes
modifications, 1,300 mi.
Incl. new Icon, helmet
& jacket $7,500
(352) 422-5736
SUZUKI 2005
Blvd., fuel Inject 800cc,
loaded, fact. warr. 835
mi. Showroom cond.
$7350. (352) 726-6351
VIRAGO 1100 YAM
1992 23K ml, must sell,
new bike Is here. New
18'x8' endcl, bike/car
hauler, make offer
(352) 464-2369


1996 HONDA CBR
600 F3, 1996
27,000 miles. Runs great
$2500. 352-228-1686
YAMAHA
'01, Roadstar, 1600cc,
some accessories, new
tirp. 1 Sl mi .


HONDA 1999
1100 TOUR
CB & Radio, $3900
(352) 563-2096
YZ 250 2003
Clean, $2400
(352) 464-0163


372-0731 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a regular
business meeting Wednesday. August 10. 2005. at 9:00
a.m. in the Lecanto Government Bulldina. 3600 W. Sov-
ereglan Path. Room 166. Lecanto. FL 34461 and World
Team Challenae Press Conference at 4:00p.m, at the
Homosassa Sprinas Wildlife State Park. 9225 West Fish-
bowl Drive. Homosassa. FL 34448. (Please enter the
park through Gate 3 on Fishbowl Drive.)
Any person desiring further information regarding this
meeting may contact the Executive Offices of the
Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida,
34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one day before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
VICKI PHILLIPS, CHAIRWOMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the Governing Body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based
(Section 286.0101, Florida Statute),
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 31, 2005.


336-0731 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
that on Monday, August 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m., at the
Nature Coast Emergency .Medical Services Office,
sealed proposals will be opened for the following:
MEDICAL DIRECTOR
Emergency Medical Services,
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Foundation,
Citrus County, Florida
"SCOPE OF WORK"
The services provided shall be as described in the Re-
quest for Qualifications specifications and "draft" con-
tract and shall include but not necessarily be limited to
the following:
1. The Medical Director shall be responsible to the Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical Foundation, Inc., Board
of Directors and report to the Executive Director,
2. The Medical 'Director shall comply with the respon-
sibilities as set forth in Florida Statutes 401, Medical Di-
rectors. These include supervising and assuming direct
responsibility for the medical performance of pre-
hospital emergency response employees.
3. The Medical Director shall comply with the duties
and responsibilities as set forth in Florida Administrative
Code 64E-2, Emergency Medical Services, Medical Di-
rection.
4. The Medical Director shall be available 24 hours a
day for emergency consultations from system provider.
He/she shall provide for and be available by either
pager or cell phone at oiall times and shall provide for
an electronic email address for messaging and corre-
spondence. He/she shall respond In a timely manner
to specified pages, cell phone calls or messages and
email. In the event the Medical Director shall be una-
vailable he/she shall appoint a similarly qualified physi-
cian to cover all responsibilities.
All requests for qualifications must be received by the
office of the Executive Director, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Inverness, Florida 34453 on or before 10:00
a.m. on Monday. August 1st. 2005.
All requests for qualifications, including the recom-
mendation of the Executive Director and/or Executive
Committee, will be presented to the Nature Coast
Emergency Medical Foundation Board of Directors for
final awarding or otherwise.
The Board will automatically reject the RFQ of any per-
son or affiliate who appears on the convicted vendor
list prepared by the Department of General Services.
State of Florida, under Section 287.133(3)(d), F.S. (1999).
All submissions must include two (2) signed originals
and four (4) complete copies of each request for quali-
fications In a sealed envelope marked on the outside,
"Request for Qualifications for Medical Director, EMS".
All RFQ's must remain valid for a period of one hundred
twenty (120) days.
Specifications and/or further Information may be ob-
tained by contacting Teresa L, Gorentz, Executive DI-
rector, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake Highway, Inverness, Florida
34453,. (352) 637-4121.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all re-
quest for qualifications; to waive informalities in any or
all request for qualifications, and to re-advertise for re-
quest for qualifications,
The Board also reserves the right to separately accept
or reject any Item or items of the'request for qualifica-
tions and to award and/or negotiate a contract In the
best interest of the Foundation.
NATURE COAST EMERGENCY MEDICAL FOUNDATION
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: -s- Teresa L. Gorentz
Executive Director
Published five (5) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3. 10, 17, 24, and 31, 2005. *


373-0731 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 012-06
Contract Mowing Zones 1 & 3
To obtain additional information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at:
www,bocc.citrus,fl.us and click on the Bid information
option or call Onvia/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 25, 2005, at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 25, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Leconto, Florida
3446'1.
A pre-bid meeting will be held on Friday, August 12,
2005 at 9 AM at the Grounds Maintenance Parks & Rec-
reation office located at 2971 W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto. Florida 34461. Contact Bob Giancy at
(352) 746-5478 for directions.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 WestISoverelgn Path, First Floot Lecanto, Flor-
ida 34461, (352) 527-5203, at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 31, 2005,

371-0814 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
CITY ATTORNEY
The City of Dunrfellon is seeking applications for the po-
sition of City Attorney. Applicants must be In good
standing of the Florida Bar continuously for the previous
five years with established practice In North Central
Florida. The City Attorney will be appointed by the
Dunnellon City Council, Anyone Interested In the posi-
tion should contact the City Clerk's Office to receive a
copy of the Request for Proposals and Guidelines for


Application to be considered for City Attorney. (1) One
master and (6) six copies of the application are to be
submitted to the City Clerk's Office no later than 4:00
P.M. on August 31, 2005. The applications must be In a
sealed envelope and marked "Request for Proposal
#05-03, City Attorney'.. The City of Dunnellon reserves
the right to accept or reject any or all proposals. The
City of Dunnellon Is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
City of Dunnellon
20750 River Drive
Dunnellon, Florida 34431
(352) 465-8500
Published three (3) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 31, August 7 and 14, 2005.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC.I


14D SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2005


(n dtomosassd,




02 CHEVROLET 04 DODGE NEON 04 DODGE (
MALIBU SXT NEON
#8072P #8216P #8217P
*81932 9884 *II888


02 FORD 03 JEEP
ESCAPE 4X4 LIBERTY SPORT
#J050636A #J050532A
$6,883I $18,488t


03 FORD
EXPLORER
#8145T
*14,833


$1


Cn nVerness

P^^B^W,^BI_ ....


02 DODGE
CARAVAN
Family Ready. #D50444A
1 9j988'


02 DODGE 01 MERCURY
RAM GRAND MARQUIS LS
Ready for work. #8203P Leather, loaded. #J050647B


04 FORD
FOCUS
Great on gas. #8328T
$10A488f
WAufib aW
I Mvj=H


02 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
Leather, DVD, loaded. #D50761A
"1,4488


04 PONTIAC 02 MERCURY 04 SUZUKI 04 JEEP
MONTANA GRAND MARQUIS LS LX7 LIBERTY
Ready for family. #8341 A All power. #D50651 A Leather, sunroof. #8204P LTD. #B50857A
13888 14488 $1,888t 98


04 DODGE 05 CHEVY 05 DODGE 03 CHEVY 04 JEEP 04 CHRYSLER 04 DODGE 04 CHRYSLER
RAM 1500 UPLANDER RAM 1500 SUBURBAN WRANGLER PACIFICA AWD RAM TOWN & COUNTRY
#8205T Blue. #J050697A Lava red. #B69637A W/DVD. #24383A Sport. #D50656B Leather, loaded. #B51026A Leather, loaded. #D50270A Limited. #D50735A
21,888 22,988 *23,488t *25,993 318,888t $22,888 22,888 23,888'
tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and Includes all factory Incentives, rebates and .customer loyalty. Dealer incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for illustration purposes only.


CHRYSLER* DODGE JEEP
met 1-877-692-7998
563-2277 MY CRYSTAL
1005 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


.,.CHRYSLER* DODGE JEEP
CAL 14877.692.7998
726-1238 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


p-A IP U --- t*
qf~ ~~~~U 44^VIW-: r J/^i/j 7JiiZ^*14[t


HOURS/


DAYS AT CRYTALAUT .COM


a3 Ewe Whc,
e "Y -. IF


04 CHEVY 04 CHEVY
MALIBU CAVALIER LS
3 To Choose From HURRY! Power windows/locks. #8239P
'9,986I *0,4w26t


02 CHEVY
SILVERADO
Economical, reliable. #8269T
$W10,983'


04 FORD
FOCUS
Loaded, pw, pl. #8267A
$11,284'


03 JEEP 05 CHEVY EXP 05 CHEVROLET 02 BMW 02 SATURN 03 CHEVY 01 CHEVY 04 CHRYSLER
RUBICON 3500 15 PASSENGER SILVERADO LS 1500 330i VUE TRAILBLAZER LS TAHOE PACIFICA
#8333P #8365P #25484A #8331P Affordable, reliable. #N5176A Ext, loaded. #N5325A Loaded, affordable. #N52246 Only 2100 miles. $AVE. #8364T
2',888I 21,983 $23,488 34,888 $15,783 17,687t $19,213t 28,457'
tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and includes all factory incentives, rebates and customer loyalty. Dealer Incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for Illustration purposes only.


CHEVROLET


CA-L 1-877-692-7998
795-1515 MY CRYSTAL
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


CHEVROLET


LOCAL 4774924998
^ 1.877,692-7998
637-5050 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


N


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5O CHEVY
VENTURE
#8235L
MAW88


02 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONVERTIBLE LXI
Leather. #D50771 A
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