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Citrus County chronicle
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00207
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: July 26, 2005
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00207

Full Text




-~ -~.LJ'..'.7


End of an ei
What's next for
the Tour de
France?
PAGE IB


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FORECAST: Partly
94 cloudy wvith isolated
showers and I-storrns
77 Mostly clear tonight
Pr -..E 2.',


Fingers crossed, ready for liftoff


NASA might bend rules to launch shuttle


Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL With the
countdown entering its final hours
and a fuel gauge problem still unex-
plained, NASA said it is prepared to
bend its long-standing safety rules to
launch the shuttle Tuesday on the
first flight since Columbia's doomed
mission 2V2 years ago.
Discovery and a crew of seven
were set to blast off for the interna-
The Space Shuttle Discovery sits on
Launch Pad 39B on Monday after
the Rotating Service Structure was
'rolled back at the Kennedy Space
Center at Cape Canaveral. Discovery
is scheduled for launch today.
Associated Press


tional space station at 10:39 a.m.,
after a two-week delay caused by a
malfunctioning hydrogen fuel gauge
in the spaceship's giant external
tank.
Nature, rather than the fuel gauge,
could ultimately decide whether
Discovery takes off. Forecasters put
the odds of good launch weather at
60 percent, with rain and storm
clouds both posing threats.
NASA had the paperwork ready to
go in case the equipment trouble
reappeared and the space agency's
managers decided to press ahead
with the launch with just three of the
four fuel gauges working. That
would mean deviating from a rule
instituted after the 1986 Challenger
explosion.


"There's very little in life that is
100 percent guaranteed, and there's
probably less in rocket science that's
100 percent guaranteed," deputy
shuttle program manager Wayne
Hale said over the weekend. "That is
part of the risk we take."
The fuel gauges are designed to
prevent the main engines from run-
ning too long or not long enough, in
case the fuel tank is leaking or some
other major breakdown occurs. An
engine shutdown at the wrong time
could prove catastrophic, forcing the
astronauts to attempt a risky emer-
gency landing overseas, or leading to
a ruptured engine.
Both Hale and NASA
Administrator Michael Griffin noted
that multiple failures would have to
occur in multiple systems for the
worst-case scenario to come true.
Only two gauges, or sensors, are


needed to do the job. But ever since
NASA's return to space in 1988, the
space agency has decreed that all
four have to work to proceed with
launch.
NASA test director Pete
Nickolenko said Monday he did not
remember the last time one of the
"launch commit criteria," as the
rules are called, was waived. But he
expressed confidence in NASA's
game plan and said the space agency
had done everything possible to
understand the fuel gauge problem,
which first cropped up during a test
in April and resurfaced during a
launch attempt July 13.
During the past few days, NASA
rewired two of the sensors to try to
diagnose the trouble and repaired
faulty electrical grounding aboard


Please see


/Page 5A


Group


ponders


year-


round


idle zone

JIM HUNTER
jhunter@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Public Outreach Sub-
committee of the Kings Bay'
Advisory Group voted unani-
mously Monday to recommend
to its parent board that Kings
Bay should have idle speed
year round.
The bay now has what's
called a "sports" zone in the
south half during four months
of the summer for activities
such as waterskiing, tubing
and jet skiing. The zone allows
speeds of up to 35 miles per
hour. During the manatee sea-
son, it is slow and idle speed in
the bay.
Citrus County Community
Services Director Gary Maid-
hof, who sits on the subcom-
mittee, told members Monday
that the sports zone was creat-
ed in 1990 as part of the county
growth management plan
when the county was creating
its manatee protection plan.
The idea for the zone, he said,
was a compromise with those
who said the plan for idle
speed in the bay was cutting
off all recreational use of the
bay to protect manatees.
The manatees come into the
bay in the winter in large num-
bers seeking the warmer water
of the springs when the gulf
temperature drops. The mana-
tees have been making a slow
comeback, and while the win-
ter populations has increased
by 130 percent in the last 20
years, the smaller summer
population has increased by
twice that, at 244 percent,
According to subcommittee
chair Amy Remley, of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District.
That fact sparked the discus-
sion of the subject in the sub-
committee. About 55 manatees
now summer in the bay,
Remley said. As the discussion
ensued, the consensus of the
subcommittee and residents
and dive shop operators who
attended was that the summer
sports zone has created a num-
ber of problems, in addition to
being a threat to the larger
numbers of summering mana-
tee.
Public safety was the fore-
Please see : /Page 11A


In the heat of the moment


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Eduardo Fuentes, from Garrard Carpentry Inc., makes his way across the roof of the new Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union in Inverness. With temperatures
in the high 90s, people who work outside have to find ways to cope with the Florida heat during the summer months.


Summer sun harsh on outdoor workers


AmIY SHANNON
ashannon@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Underneath the shade of two oversized
umbrellas sat longtime rose vender
Elwood Faltinowski atop his green tractor
Wednesday afternoon, unfazed by the
harsh July sunshine.
"It's really hot," Faltinowski, 79, said
Wednesday "But, I've got my water."
Faltinowski said he's spent the past 40
years selling rose arrangements every day


at the corner of U.S. 41 and East Mimosa
Lane on the northern edge of Inverness.
"My wife puts them together and then
she'll holler at me when she's finished
another and I'll meet her halfway to pick
them up," he said about the roses his wife,
Muriel, 74, grows in their front yard just
down the road. "It's worth being out here.
She loves roses."
Though Faltinowski doesn't let the heat
get to him, National Weather Service
Please see HEAT/Page 11A


DON'T BE BEAT BY THE HEAT


SYMPTOMS OF HEAT STROKE:
E Warm, dry skin with no
sweating.
SStrong and rapid pulse.
* Confusion and/or uncon-
sciousness.
* High fever.
* Throbbing headaches.
* Nausea, vomiting or both.
Source: American Heart Association,
www.americanheart.org


SYMPTOMS OF HEAT
EXHAUSTION:
Heavy sweating.
- Cold, clammy skin
" Dizziness or fainting (syn-
cope).
1A weak and rapid pulse.
8 Muscle cramps.
Shallow and fast breathing.
Nausea, vomiting or both.


Flood-damaged property has county pulling out checkbook


Commission to settle lawsuit for $750,000


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Dale Osterling could see it coming.
The county was getting ready to
widen County Road 491 in front of his
Lecanto house. The county bought a


small chunk of his property for a
drainage ditch.
Osterling, a longtime Citrus County
physician, couldn't see how this ditch
wouldn't flood his yard during the sum-
mer thunderstorms.
The county engineer assured him
that wouldn't happen. He was wrong.


Today the Citrus County Commission
is expected to settle a lawsuit that pays
Osterling and his wife, Jane, $750,000
for their 9.1 acres because of a flooding
problem that never went away. The
commission meeting begins at 1 p.m. in
the courthouse.
Osterling, who has lived on the prop-
erty since 1972, declined to comment
until after the case officially ends.
County Administrator Richard Wesch


said the company that designed the
flawed drainage area is no longer in
business. The county engineer who
approved it, Chris Karr, is no longer
working for the county, but not as a
result of this project.
"Regrettably, any heads that should
have rolled are no longer with us,"
Wesch said.
Please see /Page 11A


X Annie's Mailbox ... 6C
wi Movies .......... 7C
Q Comics ......... 7C
F Crossword ....... 6C
Editorial . . . . 10A
Horoscope ....... 7C
Obituaries ....... 6A
Stocks .......... 8A
Three Sections



6 11184578 20025115


From left, Kanye West, P Diddy and Kelly
Clarkson announce nominations./2A.


Heat wave
Scorching
heat across
the Midwest
and East
pushed tem-
peratures in
the mid-90s
with the heat
index in the
100s./12A


Senses out of synch


Protest doesn't
hinder Lunsford Act
* Bidding to begin
for GPS monitors
for new law./3A
EMom allowed to
visit daughter she
injured./6A
* Stocks end
lower./9A





~;t'3L'.L.








2A TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2005


Florida
LOTTE...i. :-


m.a.-.


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Monday in
the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
2-3-9
PLAY 4
6-0-0-7
FANTASY 5
3- 5-8- 28- 34
SUNDAY, JULY 24
Cash 3:6-3-4
Play 4:4 0 6 7
Fantasy 5:3 6 8 11 13
5-of-5 5 winners $33,787.70
4-of-5 475 $57
3-of-5 11,397 $6.50
SATURDAY, JULY 23
Cash 3:7 5 -1
Play 4: 4 8 1 8
Fantasy 5:17 21 23 25 30
5-of-5 3 winners $82,399.24
4-of-5 358 $111
3-of-5 10,827 $10
Lotto: 1-8-15-36-37-44
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 90 $5,105
4-of-6 6,319 $59
3-of-6 105,866 $5
FRIDAY, JULY 22
Cash 3:3 9 2
Play 4: 5- 9 -4 5
Fantasy 5:2 7 12 23 35
5-of-5 1 winner $233,839.51
4-of-5 385 $97.50
3-of-5 11,701 $9
Mega Money: 6 14 26 41
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,891.50
3-of-4 MB 59 $351
3-of-4 1,128 $54.50
2-of-4 MB 1,501 $28.50
2-of-4' 35,968 $2
1-of-4 MB 13,038 $3
THURSDAY, JULY 21
Cash 3:0 4 1
Play 4: 4- 2 2 8
Fantasy 5:1 10 12 16 28
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 336 $712.50
3-of-5 10,184 $9
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20
Cash 3:8 8 5
Play 4: 7 7 9 2
Fantasy 5:15 20 23 30 31
5-of-5 3 winners $73,442.82
4-of-5 252 $141
3-of-5 8,205 $12
Lotto: 1 -6-9- 16-22-43


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
R To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers, "
players should double check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officiallyiposted
by the Florida Lottery, On the
Web, go to www.flalottery.
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


MTV lists nominees for VMAs


Sh s A g 28 ^o include scene-steali
OW SledAu past. While there wa
last year, there was ]
Associated Press pared to the 2003 sI
infamous Madonna-I
MIAMI BEACH Luxury yachts and "I'm going to tell
tricked-out cars. P Diddy and Gwen want to get naked an
Stefani. And lots and lots of water go ahead and do it,"F
MTV announced Monday that its Video Besides Green Da
Music Awards will feature all of those ele- ers at the American
ments next month as it seeks once again to looking picturesque
reinvent an awards show that routinely Kanye West and Ke
lures big stars and makes racy headlines, first-time, the VMAs
Green Day led all musical acts with original music comp
eight nominations, Stefani and Missy of Linkin Park and
Elliott followed with six and U2 with five. Jon. West and Clarks
P Diddy will host the Aug. 28 awards the nominees Monda
show, which comes at the height of Miami's Water will be the s]
steamy summer and peak of hurricane sea- promised to create
son. The hip-hop mogul or someone water effects ever p:
dressed like him (he was too far away to show. The water show
tell for sure) swooped into Monday's the arena by the sam
beachfront announcement on a jet pack. that erected the fou
Wearing a white suit and a gray shirt with Bellagio Hotel in Las
no tie, he promised that the show would "It could be a gig


Spotlight on, ..TIES


Former boyfriend to


auction star's keepsakes


Associated Press

NEW YORK One of
Jennifer Aniston's former
flings is auctioning off letters,
notes, pictures and other
memorabilia from the
"Friends" star.
Michael
Baroni, a
California
lawyer who
claims he had
a summer
romance in
1984 with
Aniston, is sell-
ing keepsakes Jennifer
A st11 A n is toni e
such as aAniston
makeshift
birthday card she wrote on a
piece of toilet paper and a
childhood picture of the pair.
According to Baroni, their
summer lovin' he was 16,
she was 15 -turned into a
longtime ,friendship until they
lost contact in 1991, when
Aniston's' showbiz career
began to soar.
Aniston's representative,
Stephen Huvane, didn't imme-
diately return a call Monday
from The Associated Press for
comment.
She was very fun and lively,
a loving kind of person,"
Baroni told the AP during a
phone interview Friday "I


think the materials show an
innocent look into someone I
think is very endearing."
Baroni's auction begins
Friday on eBay with a $100,000
reserve. If the reserve is not
met, the package of memora-
bilia will be withdrawn.
Baroni wouldn't comment on
why he was auctioning off the
items beyond citing "financial
reasons."

Actress to hawk jeans
NEW YORK Brittany
Murphy is the first celebrity
Jordache jeans girl. She stars
in a series of new ads for the
company that became famous
during the 1970s' designer
jeans craze.
The ads, shot by Patrick
Demarchelier, are a twist on
the horse-head logo, with the
27-year-old actress wearing
the jeans and a sweater and
posing on a horse with no sad-
dle. Jordache said the first ads
will run in national publica-
tions beginning in September.
Murphy's screen credits
include "8 Mile," "Just
Married" and "Sin City."

Singer pledges aid
AMMAN, Jordan On his
first visit to the Middle East,
Ricky Martin declared he will


ng stunts like in the
is plenty of sex appeal
little shock value com-
how that featured the
Britney Spears kiss.
the artists that if you
d run across the stage,
P Diddy said.
y, scheduled perform-
nAirlines Arena over-
Biscayne Bay include
lly Clarkson. Also, for
s will be scored with
osed by Mike Shinoda
hip-hop producer Lil
on announced some of
ay.
how's theme, and MTV
the most elaborate
produced in an awards
w will be engineered in
e production company
ntain in front of the
s Vegas.
;antic waterfall in the


arena. It could be remote performances
from pools around Miami," said Dave
Sirulnick, the show's executive producer.
Celebrities once again will pull up to the
bayfront arena in gleaming yachts.
But they will receive competition from
other stars who will arrive in souped-up
cars for an auto show on the red carpet. As
the celebrities arrive, viewers will get tours
of those cars from the talent themselves.
MTV President Christina Norman said:
"Every year we have to outdo ourselves and
this year is no exception ..."
This year's show promises to be different
from last year's, when politics played a part
because of the presidential campaign: The
daughters of Democratic candidate John
Kerry and President Bush made appear-
ances to urge people to vote and were
roundly booed.
Green Day's eight nominations include
six for their socially conscious song
"Boulevard of Broken Dreams" and two for
the 'American Idiot," which also is the
name of their critically acclaimed album.


try to change negative percep-
tions of Arab youth in the
West
"I promise I will become a
spokesperson, if you allow me
to, a spokesperson on your
behalf. I will defend you and
try to get. rid of any stereo-
types," the 33-year-old singer
told youngsters from 16 mainly
Arab countries at a youth con-
ference on Monday.
The children, ages 14 to 16,
expressed concern about
being labeled as "terrorists"


by the West
"I have been a victim of
stereotypes. I come from Latin
America and to some coun-
tries, we are considered 'los-
ers,' drug traffickers, and that
is not fair because that is gen-
eralizing," said-.Martin, who
was born in Puerto Rico.
.,"Those comments are made
out of ignorance and we have
to sometimes ignore the igno-
rant, but we also have to edu-
cate the ignorant. You have me
here as a friend," he said.


ENTERTAINMENT


The weather REPORT


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


City H
Daytona Bch. 92
Ft. Lauderdale 91
Fort Myers 93
Gainesville 95
Homestead 92
Jacksonville 96
Key West 91
Lakeland 95
Melbourne 92


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
,tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm


City,
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


South winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas 3 to Gulf water
4. Bay and inland waters light chop. Mostly tem perature
sunny early, then becoming partly cloudy
and hot with a'few afternoon thunderstorms
possible.

Taken at Egmont Key

Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.75 33.88 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.36 38.37 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.87 39.86 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.27 41.26 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Tuesday Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka 10:17 a/5:52 a 10:32 p/6:19 p 10:51 a/6:28 a 11:41 p/7:20 p
Crystal River 8:38 a/3:14 a 8:53 p/3:41 p 9:12 a/3:50 a 10:02 p/4:42 p
Withlacoochee 6:25 a/1:02 a 6:40 p/1:29 p 6:59 a/1:38 a 7:49 p/2:30 p
Homosassa 9:29 a/4:51 a 9:44 p/5:18 p 10:03 a/5:27.a 10:53 p/6:19 p


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK


TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by: [
High: 94 Low: 77 r"
Becoming partly cloudy and hot
with afternoon thunderstorms.
WEDNESDAY
High: 95 Low: 77
Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.


THURSDAY
.. High: 92 Low: 76
Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.
FRIDAY
High: 92 Low: 75
Partly sunny with scattered afternoon
showers and thunderstorms.


TEMPERATURE* Monday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in.
Monday 91/71 DEW POINT
Record 99/68 Monday at 3 p.m. 69
Normal 72/91 HUMIDITY
Departure frommean 0 Monday at 3 p.m. 50%
PRECIPITATION* POLLEN COUNT**
Monday 0.00 in. Trees, grasses and weeds were
Total for the month 6.17 in. all light.
Total for the year 27.93 in. **Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
Normal for the year 29.71 in. toms, moderate most allergic will experience
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 9 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder- AIR QUALITY
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high Monday was moderate with pol-
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE lutants mainly particulates.


MSUNSET TONIGHT......................8:25P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:49 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY................................NONE
Jil27 AUG. 4 AG. 12 AUG. 18 MOONSET TODAY ................. 12:23P.M.


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/26 TUESDAY 10:59 4:47 11:22 5:11
7/27 WEDNESDAY 11:49 5:37 6:01


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information.call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0,1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. New plant material may
be irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Inverness can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending in even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY
Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany 90 72
Albuquerque 89 71
Anchorage 66 57
Asheville 92 66
Atlanta 90 75
Atlantic City 87 70 .16
Austin 96 71
Baltimore 91 68 .39
Billings 74 53 .03'
Birmingham 94 75
Boise 87 58
Boston 83 67
Brownsville 91 78
Buffalo 88 75
Burlington, VT 88 68
Charleston, SC 91 72
Charleston, WV 94 69 .33
Charlotte 96 69 .
Chicago 89 72 .15
Cincinnati 96 74
Cleveland 90 76 .10
Columbia, SC 95 73 .02
Columbus, OH 97 73 .08
Concord 86 59
Corpus Christi 94 74
Dallas 98 80
Denver 88 60
Des Moines 97 76
Detroit 92 79
El Paso 10273
Evansville 94 77
Harrisburg 93 69 .22
Hartford 88 72
Honolulu 90 79
Houston 94 75
Indianapolis 95 77
Jackson 98 76
Kansas City 98 75
Las Vegas 10177
Little Rock 97 77
Los Angeles 76 66
Louisville 111 74
Memphis 96 81
Milwaukee 87 71 .08
Minneapolis 85 701.42
Mobile 94 77
Montgomery 95 75 .25
Nashville 96 75


ptcldy 93 71
tstrm 86 66
shwrs 67 52,
sunny 93 68
ptcldy 97 76
ptcldy 94 75
ptcldy 97 73
ptcldy 98 76
ptcldy 76 53
ptcldy 94 73
sunny 89 60
sunny 93 74
ptcldy 94 78
tstrm 88 63
tstrm 86 64
sunny 99 78
ptcldy 96 74
sunny 99 75
tstrm 80 61
ptcldy 94 70
tstrm 89 65
sunny 10377
tstrm 92 70
ptcIdy 91 66
ptcldy 94 75
ptcldy 99 76
tstrm 73 53
tstrm 77 60
tstrm 87 61
tstrm 96 71
ptcldy 95 70
ptcldy 95 75
ptcldy 96 74
sunny 89 78
ptcldy 97 75
tstrm 91 68
ptcldy 95 73
tstrm 81 62
sunny 10381
ptcldy 98 77
ptcldy 76 66
ptcldy 98 75
ptcldy 97 76
tstrm 76 59
ptcldy 75 58
ptcldy 94 76
ptcldy 95 74
ptcldy 96 74


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 98 78 ptcldy 94 78
New York City 91 70 .03 ptcldy 92 77
Norfolk 94 70 ptcldy 98 80
Oklahoma City 97 77 tstrm 92 66
Omaha 10275 .35 tstrm 76 57
Palm Springs 10779 ptcldy 10584
Philadelphia 92 71 .09 ptcldy 97 78
Phoenix 10585 tstrm 10686
Pittsburgh 93 74 ptcldy 92 70
Portland, ME 85 62 sunny 83 64
Portland, Ore 84 56 sunny 91 60
Providence 84 72 sunny 92 74
Raleigh 97 71 sunny 10278
Rapid City 72 60 .22 tstrm 75 53
Reno 93 59 sunny 96 59
Rochester 91 73 tstrm 93 63
. Sacramento 97 62 sunny 10465
St. Louis 10181 tstrm 94 70 .
St. Ste. Marie 83 63 tstrm 71 50
Salt Lake City 93 72 ptcldy 87 63
San Antonio 93 76 ptcldy. 94 76
San Diego 77 68 ptcldy 76 69
San Francisco 68 57 sunny 70 55
Savannah 93 72 tstrm 99 77
Seattle 79 54 sunny 82 58
Spokane 82 59 sunny 86 58
Syracuse 92 75 tstrm 90 67
Topeka 97 80 tstrm 82 62
Washington 93 72 .08 ptcldy 98 77
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Needles. Calif. LOW 36 Stanley. Idaho


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/77/ts
Amsterdam. 68/52/sh
Athens 88/67/s
,Beijing 93/76/s
Berlin 73/54/sh
Bermuda 88/75/ts
Cairo 99/71/s
Calgary 72/53/ts
Havana 90/79/pc
Hong Kong 88/76/pc
Jerusalem 90/62/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


78/63/pc
69/53/pc
91/62/pc
86/58/ts
78/64/ts
84/62/ts
74/56/pc
76/65/pc
85/65/s
69/51/sh
85/65/ts
84/60/ts
76/55/sh


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2005 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE~


Today in
HISTORY Y-.

Today is Tuesday, July 26, the
207th day of 2005. There are 158
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 26, 1945, Winston
Churchill resigned as Britain's
prime minister after his
Conservatives were soundly
defeated by the Labor Party.
(Clement Attlee became the new
prime minister.)
On this date:
In 1908, U.S. Attorney General
Charles J. Bonaparte issued an
order creating an investigative
agency that was a forerunner of
the FBI.
In 1947, President Truman
signed the National Security Act,
creating the Department of
Defense, the National Security
Council, the Central Intelligence
Agency and the Joint Chiefs of
Staff.
'In 1952, Argentina's first lady,
Eva Peron, died in Buenos Aires at
age 33.
In 1971, Apollo 15 launched
from Cape Kennedy in Florida.
In 1990, President Bush signed
into law the Americans with
Disabilities Act.
Ten years ago: The Senate
voted 69-29 to unilaterally lift the
U.N. embargo on arms shipments
to Bosnia.
Five years ago: A federal judge
in New York approved a $1.25 bil-
lion settlement between Swiss
banks and more than a half million
plaintiffs who alleged the banks
had hoarded money deposited by
Holocaust victims.
One year ago: Mohammed
Mamdouh Helmi Qutb, an Egyp-
tian diplomat held hostage by mili-
tants in Iraq for three days, was
released after successful negotia-
tions.
Today's Birthdays: Movie
director Blake Edwards is 83.
Actor James Best is 79. Singer
Dobie Gray is 65. Actress-singer
Darlene Love is 64. Singer
Brenton Wood is 64. Rock star
Mick Jagger is 62. Movie director
Peter Hyams is 62. Actress Helen
Mirren is 60. Rock musician Roger
Taylor (Queen) is 56. Actress
Susan George is 55. Actor Kevin
Spacey is 46. Rock singer Gary
Cherone is 44. Actress Sandra
Bullock is 41. Actor Jeremy Piven
is 40. Rapper-reggae singer
Wayne Wonder is 39. Actress Kate
Bebkinsale is 32.-
Thought for Today: "Govern-
ment is too big and important to be
left to the politicians." Chester
Bowles, American diplomat, busi-
nessman, author and politician
(1901-1986).


World Santa conference


Associated Press
Paradise Yamamoto and Yutaka Iwabuchi of Japan wait in
the rain Monday for festivities to begin at the annual Santa
Claus convention in Copenhagen, Denmark. More than 100
Santa Clauses and their little helpers were to gather Monday
in an amusement park north of Copenhagen for the annual
World Santa Claus Congress.


-----~II~


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// C-
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TUESDAY
JULY 26, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Law on track despite protest


Florida Department of Corrections opens

bidding on GPS monitors for LunsfordAct


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A protest about
the wording of a bid request for satellite
tracking systems for sex offenders was
withdrawn Monday, leading state offi-
cials to say that a new law requiring
GPS monitoring of some offenders
should go into effect on schedule.
The Jessica Lunsford Act, calling for
Global Positioning System satellite
monitoring of some sex criminals, is
scheduled to go into effect Sept. 1. But
the disagreement about the require-
ments of the monitoring system spelled


out in the bid request threatened to
delay it.
With the end of a protest by one track-
ing system company, Houston-based
Satellite Tracking of People, the
Department of Corrections said
Monday it will begin accepting bids
Aug. 1, said agency spokesman Robby
Cunningham.
"This should not jeopardize the
implementation date of Sept. 1,"
Cunningham said.
The protesting company, known as
STQP, had complained about last-
minute changes in specifications. for


the monitoring system the state is seek-
ing to buy
Among the changes was one that
required the company to run its own
help desk or monitoring center, a provi-
sion changed Monday to say only that
the company must provide such help.
The specifications were also changed
Monday to allow for two different types
of systems, either an all-in-one system
on the offender's body or one that
involves two pieces of machinery, a
tracking device and a transmitter.
The company plans to eventually
award two contracts, one for the north-
ern half of the state and one for the
southern half.
STOP had complained that before
Monday's change the bid specifications
would have precluded its system from


consideration. Among the supporters of
STOP is Mark Lunsford, whose daugh-
ter the bill is named for. The company
has said it isn't paying Lunsford, but he
wrote state corrections officials to com-
plain about the bid details and say he
supported STOP's product.
A STOP competitor that's expected to
bid is Florida-based Pro Tech, which
has deep connections in the state capi-
tal. Former Gov. Bob Martinez was a
founder of the Odessa-based company,
which has a lobbying team that
includes the former head of the state
police agency and several other promi-
nent lobbyists. Pro Tech also already
has a contract with the state prison sys-
tem for satellite tracking devices
already in use and the company has
contracts with several Florida counties.


Angling for some shade


..',.
1'.


'I
..1'*


KA.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Gloria Beltowski of Ocala uses an umbrella Monday morning to shield herself from the hot sun
while casting a line into the Gulf of Mexico near Fort Island Gulf Beach. Other family mem-
bers were searching for crabs while she wet her line.




Inglis man drowns in Kings Bay


AMY SHANNON
ashannon@chroniclonline.com
Chronicle


An Inglis man drowned July 16 in Kings Bay
after he jumped off a sailboat anchored about
50 yards from Cracker's Bar and Grill in Crystal
River, according to a police report.
Joseph P Mistretta, 51, was pronounced dead
at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center sometime after The
the 2:45 p.m. incident, accord- The i
ing to the report. Examine
Mistretta spent the day on a
sailboat with Robert Tuite, 42, comply
of Inverness, sailing around the
bay. Though toxicology reports autopsy
from the Medical Examiner's
Office were not in Monday, classif
Tuite told police during a July
22 interview that Mistretta had death
consumed eight or nine beers acci
prior to the incident, according acci
to the report. drow
Crystal River Police spokes-
woman Martha Langston said accon
the agency had not been dis-
patched to the scene because, the re
at the time, emergency officials
did not know it was going to be
ruled a drowning.
"I think they wanted to just get him to the hos-
pital," she said. "They we're hoping he was
going to be OK"
The 911 call was received at 2:56 p.m. as a "45-
year-old man possibly having a heart attack and
CPR was in progress," according to the report.
CRPD found out about the incident
Wednesday after receiving a call from a repre-
sentative with the Medical Examiner's Office in


Leesburg. The representative said he received
a call from a funeral home because Mistretta's
death certificate had been signed by a physician
at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Hospital and
needed a signature from the Medical
Examiner's Office.
The next day, the Medical Examiner's Office
completed an autopsy and classified the death
as an accidental drowning, according to the


medical
r's Office
eted an
sy and
ied the
as an
mental
ning,
ding to
report.


report.
According to the police
report, this is what happened:
During a Friday interview,
Tuite told police that he noticed
that the anchor for the dingy was
not set and Mistretta jumped in
to retrieve the dingy at about
2:45 p.m. July 16. After Mistretta
jumped in, he came back to the
surface and "didn't look right,"
according to the report
Tuite said Mistretta went
back under and appeared to not
be moving. Tuite said he
jumped in the water and
brought Mistretta to the sur-
face. He said Mistretta was
breathing, but was only taking
four to five breaths per minute
and was spitting up water.


Tuite told police he tried to get Mistretta back
into the sailboat, but he was too heavy. Tuite
said he called 911 after flagging down a passing
boater, who helped him get Mistretta onboard.
Mistretta was treated on shore by Nature
Coast EMS workers and transported to the hos-
pital, where he was later pronounced dead.
CRPD conducted its own investigation and
has since ruled Mistretta's death an accidental
drowning, Langston said.


CHERI HARRIS
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Citrus County's property
taxes could go a little lower.
The Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation Board, which
operates Citrus Memorial
Hospital in Inverness, deliv-
ered its annual funding re-
quest Monday to the -Citrus
County Hospital Board, which
owns the hospital and sets the
portion of the millage rate that
goes to the public hospital.
If the request is approved,
the hospital could charge resi-
dents .95 mills, or 95 cents per
$1,000 of assessed value. This


year's rate is 1 mill, or $1 for
$1,000 of assessed value. The
rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year
was .2359 mills.
The proposed budget for the
next fiscal year is $10,854,884
and includes $3,635,600 to up-
grade the hospital's informa-
tion systems, $500,000 to re-
design the emergency depart-
ment and $3,600,000 to improve
diagnostic imaging services.
The millage revenues for the
hospital would be about
$7,585,000.
After conducting public
hearings on Sept. 12 and Sept.
19, the hospital board will
make its final decision at the
Sept. 19 meeting.


Four more apply


for assistant county


administrator's job


JiM HUNTER
jhunter@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The county received four
more resumes for the job of
assistant county administrator
during the weekend before the
application deadline for the
position, bringing the total to
39 applicants.
Among the applicants are
five Citrus County officials,
seven residents and two for-
mer residents who previously
worked for the county. The job
became vacant with the death
of Ken Saunders in June.
Citrus County Human Re-
sources Director Richard R.
Petitt Jr. said he is forwarding
all the applications to County
Administrator Richard Wesch.
Petitt said he is having nothing
to do with the applications in
this case because he has
applied for the job, too.
Tom Dick, the county's assis-
tant Public Works director, is
another county official who
has applied for the county
staff's No. 2 job, and Citrus


County Community Develop-
ment Director Charles Dixon
has also applied.
Citrus County Public Safety
Director Charles Poliseno has
also applied, as well as Alison
Wheeler, the delinquent tax
deputy clerk for the Citrus
County tax collector.
Petitt said County Admin-
istrator Richard Wesch would
likely begin interviewing next
week and that the job would
probably be filled by Sept 1.
Former Citrus County Sher-
iff's Deputy Dwight Giddens
also applied for the position,
and John Jackson, former
director of the county's Parks
and Recreation Department,
has applied.
Citrus County residents
who've applied include: Tere-
sa M. Houghton of Homosassa,
Michael W. Kirk of Crystal
River, Sonya E. Hall of Inver-
ness, Richard Eliasen of Her-
nando, Richard F Kubli of
Hernando, William J. Keeley of
Lecanto, and Kathy P Brown of
Homosassa.


Nearly half in Florida didn't

have plan for fleeing storms


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE About
half of all Floridians didn't
have an evacuation plan when
the state was hit by four hurri-
canes last year, according to a
study by state health officials.
As Hurricanes Charley,
Frances Ivan and Jeanne in
turn bore down on the state,
48.7 percent of residents had
no plan mapped out for what
they would do should they
have to flee, Department of
Health officials reported last
week in the federal Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention's weekly compila-
tion of public health studies.
Officials say that likely com-
plicated the whole evacuation
process for everyone.
Without hurricane plans,
many likely weren't sure
where they were going, which
could have delayed their evac-
uation and crowded highways
more than necessary; they may
not have planned for problems
like gasoline shortages and


ON THE NET
CDC Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report:
www.cdc.gov.'mmwr'
Florida Department
of Health:
www.doh.state.fl.us

where to put pets, and weren't
prepared for dealing with the
aftermath, Florida Health
Secretary John-Agwunobi said
Monday.
"Every family should have a
preparedness plan," Agwunobi
said.
It's not clear yet whether
more families have such a plan
this year, although it's likely
many used last year's experi-
ences to make plans for what to
do when Hurricane Dennis hit
the Panhandle this year. More
people evacuated for Dennis
than for Ivan, which hit in the
same area, but surveys later
will show whether they did so
with a better plan than in 2004,
Agwunobi said.


Connel Heights area
should boil water
Residents in the area of
Woodside Drive and Woodhill
Court (Connell Heights) should
boil water. The bacteriological
quality of water is questionable
because of a loss of pressure in
the distribution system.
This is a precautionary meas-
ure to ensure that the water
meets all safe drinking water
standards. This notice will remain
in effect until satisfactory bacteri-
ological samples are received. At
that time, your door wiil be
tagged with a rescinding notice.
Also, the county has rescind-
ed its boil water notice for
County Road 486 and Fatima
Avenue including McGee Drive.
Call 527-7650.
Key Center director
in intensive care
Doctors are pleased with Key
Training Center's executive
director Chet Cole's recovery
progress, according to Key
spokeswoman Melissa Walker.
However, doctors expect him
to stay in Citrus Memorial
Hospital's intensive care unit for
the rest of the week, Walker
said Monday afternoon.
Cole, 60, suffered an abdomi-
nal aneurysm Thursday after-
noon at his office in Inverness.
Send support through flowers
and cards via the Key Center's
business office at 130 Heights
Ave., Inverness, FL 34452.
School board to adopt
tentative budget
The Citrus County School
Board meets at 5 p.m. today for
its first budget hearing to adopt
the proposed 7.924 tax rate for
the upcoming year, about 3 per-
cent less than last year.
The tax rate, measured in
mills, is based on $1 for every
$1,000 of assessed value.
Of the 7.924 tax rate, 2 mills
, .will go to capital outlay projects
such as the construction of an:
elementary school in Citrus,
Springs and the new Renais-
sance Center in Lecanto.
The final budget adoption is
set for September.
Board members will also con-
sider adding a dean to Crystal
River High School, approving
new job descriptions for district
staffing positions and approving
the utilization of $398,850 to
assist children who scored poor-
ly on the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test.
The meeting will be at the
District Services Center, 1007
W. Main St., Inverness. For
information about the meeting,
call 726-1931, Ext. 2202; or to
view the meeting agenda, go to
www.citrus.k12.fl.us/ and click
on the school board link.
CR business
burglarized, again
A Crystal River business was
burglarized for the second time
in 20 days, according to a
Crystal River Police report.
Fancy's Pets on U.S. 19 was
broken into through a back door
sometime between 7 p.m. July
19 and 8 a.m. July 20, accord-
ing to the report.
An undisclosed amount of
cash was stolen from the regis-
ter along with money from a
donation jar. The empty jar was
later found outside the back of
the store. No sign of forced
entry was noted in the report.
The business owners report-
ed a separate after-hours bur-
glary June 30.
No arrests have been made
in the case and police have not
named any suspects. Anyone
with information about either
burglary should call CRPD
Detective Corey Sharpe at
795-4241.
From staff reports

Corrections
Due to reporter error, Ann
Tang's name was misspelled in
a story, "Mother, teacher in a
'league of her own,'" on Page
1A of Monday's edition.
Due to reporter error, Citrus
County Human Resource
Director Richard R. Petitt's


name was misspelled in a story,
"County job draws local inter-
est," on Page 3A of Sunday's
edition.
The Chronicle regrets the
errors.


-~ 7K )


Hospital board


mulls tax rate drop


I'.- .'-. -. ~ ' ~


/ % I !


/I







CITRUus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.ILE


)02005 UNIVERSAL MEO' SYNDICATE"' SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE


0)2005 UNIVERSAL MEDIA SYNDICATE"' SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE 3939 EVERHARD RD., NW, CANTON, OHIO 44709


Rarely seen $2 bill sheets going to public

Uncut sheets of new $2 bills are being given up for face value after amazing discovery of old currency
By DANIEL COTTRELL .
Universal Medkl Syndiate


(SYNDICATED) Hotline opera-
tors are bracing for the public rush to
get them legally and for face value.
They are the once banned uncut
sheets of real U.S. legal tender $2
bills, and they are about to hit the
streets.
The crip. uncirculated full
sheets of four $2 bills are bcing
sent directly to the homes of all
ihoic who request them.
"Our announcement of this public
release was prompted by an aston-
ishing d.limLiery of hidden curren-
cy," confirms John T. White.
Director of the privately owned
World Reserve Monetary Exchange.
Authorities are now holding a treas-
ure trove of rare antique currency bills
dating from 1899-1929. Old metal
cans discovered secretly hidden away
in the roof of a barn held an estimated
1,800 bank notes. Some believe the
money was stashed away by bootleg-
gers or bank robbers in the late 1920's.
Sources quoted in Numismatic
News reported an initial offer had
been received putting the value at
$720,000.00. The hoard contains $2
Bills. $20 Bills, rare 1901 Bison $10
Bills, Gold Certificates, Silker Certifi-
cates and National Baink Notes.
The discovery made National
newspaper headlines and appeared
on CNN News'", ABC's Good
Morning Ameri, a and a feature
segment on NBC's 7Tdty show.'
And now it has prompted the 'ace
value release of the rarely seen uncir-
culated new uncut sheets of $2 bills.
-Th.it is %khy we have decided to
go ahead with the release of our
own private stock of rarely seen
new uncut $2 Bill sheets," con-
irmned White.
Originally issued in 1928, uncut
sheets were for vc.ir, illegal to own.
"According to our best sources, if
you could even find a full uncut
dozen of uncirculated S2 billk from
1928, the could now be northh
over $10,000.00" said White.
The Two Dollar Bill has largely
been locked away in dark U.S.
Federal Reserve vaults, rarely distrih-
uted by banks and almost never seen
in circulation. It is extremely rare to
actually find a Two. Dollar bill in
your pocket these days.
But the full sheets of four are
even more unusual. You can't
find them at banks. When our
stockpile is gone, collectors
would have to try to contact a
rare cullency dealer or go direct-
ly to the Bureau of Engraving to i
find them,' he said. .;
"All the other currency bills
have recrnil undergone major "'
design changes. Now. it is
feared new legislation may
discontinue the historic de- off. S
signs of these Two Dollar bills. uncu


And with all tili publicity in newspa-
pers and on TV about the dikcoucry
of rare currency, the popunlit) of
these bills is even Lreaiier than ever.
We have been flooded ilih calls.
That's why we a.itlthrizcd ith release
of a limited number of the full uncut
sheets of uncirculated new $2 Bills
from our own vault reserve to the
general public," White said
"The highly souiht after full
sheets of S21 Bills are so unusual, so
rarely seen and so extremely popu-
lar, thdc are perfect to give to friends
and family. They are the perfect gift
for ian. occasion," he said.
"Most young people have never
even seen one of the historic $2
Bills, let alone the unusual full
sheets of loutr."
The (cneral public can now get
up to ten full sheets of the $2 bills
by calling the National Direct
Hlutliine at 1-800-207-1724 ask for
Dept. UB406. The standard $11
procurement fee plus 'hipping gets
you a rarely seen full uincut sheet at
face value. But, dealer-, must sub-
mit requests in writing for 10 or
more ;shckt,.
Dealer limits will be .trictlI
enforced, While said.




. .







pecial- Tre hrst 10,000 people will get these
ial Cordovan Collector's Displays with each
t sheet requested.


. .- a .. ...


I- -IIA -
2 . . 2 .




-NMI& - I II


* Hidden Treasure: Authorities suspect
this treasure trove of rare antique currency bills
dating from 1899-1929 was stashed away in
metal cans by bootleggers or bank robbers and
then secretly hidden away in a barn. The rusted
old cans held an stimrnated 1,800 bank notes.
Now, readers can gret full sheets of new $2
bills by calling the Toll-Free Hotline.


a Currency Value: This
is one of the remaining full
sheets of four uncut U.S $2
Bills Currency values always
fluctuate. But, if parents or
grandparents living in 1923
had been able to find and
hang onto one of the handful
of full uncut dozen uncirculated
$2 bills from 1928, they could
now well be worth over
$10,000 00 or more today.


How to get the

rarely seen

uncut sheets

for face value
The World Reserve- Monetary
Exchange is now releasing the
rarely seen Full sheets of four
crisp Uncirculated new $2 Bills
at face value. Readers can get
them immediateLy by calling the
* National Toll-Free Order Hotline
at 1-800-207-1724 ask for
Dept. UB406. The standard $11
procurement fee plus shipping
gets you a rarely seen full uncut
sheet at face value. Satisfaction
is guaranteed.



k," .ii. ra .d.]l rw' .i' la.iJutI.l .r u s.I
THE WORLD RESERVE MONETARY EXCHANiE IS A
PRIVATE EXCHANGE NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE
U.S. MINT OR THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
r. 1 'A.ar- )* Fsr-.w r' 1H P IN l Y 11 ot.'XA w


Free trade-in program for newest state quarter begins

Everyone who sends in just one quarter from pocket change along with a stamped self addressed envelope
will be among the very first to get the brand new Oregon State Quarter in uncirculated condition.


Here's how the Free trade-in
works to guarantee you get
the newest state quarter:



"1^ +


1. Just send in any old quarter
from your pocket change Any
circulated quarter will work,
no matter how old or new.

The U. S. Mini has announced the release
dale of the ne%\cst of the Fifty State Quarters".
For a limited time the general public can
be among the first to get the new Oregon
State Quarter as part of a FREE trade-in
program. The UnLirculited new coins are
being gi\en awa5 in exchange for any quar-
ter from pocket change and even comes in a
,'pccial protective display capsule to pre-
serve its condition.
The coins are special because they are
straight from the mint in brilliant uncirculated
condition. You can not find these coins in


2. Then neatly address
an envelope and
affix three first class
stamps.


3. Put your stamped self addressed
envelope and the quarter in another
envelope and mail to the address
provided below


your pocket change. Only the Uncirculatedd
coin. have increased in value. All of the ear-
lier uncirculated state coins have already
increased in value, some by up to 780,%.
This national effort assures coins are a\ ail-
able not only to Oregon residents, but to all
citizens outside the state.
To be among the first to get the uncirculated
coins just send in one plain quarter from your
pocket change. Send it along with a neatly
self addressed envelope with 3 first class
stamps affixed. You will be among the first to
receive a brand new Uncirculated Oregon


* You will be among the first to get the latest new State Quarter-
shown in this artist rendering, honoring the Great State of Oregon.
It will be sent to you with information on how to also get the 49
other state quarters in brilliant uncirculated condition.


Stare Quarter in exchange.
You will alo get information on how to get
all the other 49 State Quarters, including the
first 30 issued from 1999-2004, all in brilliant
Uncirculated condition.
FREE TRADE-IN INSTRUCTIONS
Follow these simple instructions to be
among the first to get the new Oregon State
Quarter. Limit 1 per household:
1. hist send in any old quarter from. your
pocket change. Any circulated quarter will.
work, no matter how old or new.


2. Then neatly address an envelope and
affix three first class stamps.
3. Put your stamped self addressed enve-
lope and the quarter in another envelope and
mail to:
FREE Coin Trade-in
Postal Box 9902, Dept R0406
Canton, OH 44711-9902
,,, -_ ,2 : ,, i SJ -, _I RUTHORItEED
THE WORLD RESERVE MONETARY EDCHAIGE 6 A PRWATE EiCtWGE NOT
AFFILUATED WITH TiE US MWIT N T LItITED STATES GOMERNMENT
.Tho United States Mint" and '"Fifty State Quarters"
are registered Irademarks of the United States MInt'.


FIRST FIRST FIRST
CLASS CLASS "< CLASS
STAMP STAMP STAMP


"UlW riifc(4.;


lip -


. . . . .. .: ....


---~-~~-_


4A TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2005


teuve t~ts







TuEoSDnAY, JULx 26, 2005 5A


Crash injures two Couny
LHS parking permits any LHS student for $5 at the
Lane, according to a Florida available to seniors times listed above.
State troopers Highway Patrol. Lecanto High School parking Health Department
,. At about 4:24 p.m., the pick- permits are on sale for seniors to offer physical


wumgjrinr

driver ofpickup

AMY SHANNON
ashannon@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

State troopers are searching
for a red pickup truck believed
to have left the scene of a crash
Sunday afternoon in Crystal
River that sent a Tampa motor-
cyclist and his passenger to the
hospital.
James H. Barrow, 49, and his
passenger, Dawn Michelle
James, 36, were airlifted to
Shands Hospital in Gainesville,
though their conditions were
unavailable Monday afternoon,
a hospital spokeswoman said.
Barrow was traveling west in
front of the red pickup on
County Road 488 approaching
the intersection of Diamond T


up passed Barruw s Harley
Davidson motorcycle in a no
passing zone, causing Barrow
to lose control of his motorcy-
cle. The motorcycle continued
west on the south grass shoul-
der of County Road 488 where
it came to a final rest on its left
side facing southwest, accord-
ing to the report.
The pickup truck left the
scene traveling west on County
Road 488. FHP spokesman
trooper Larry Coggins said the
pickup is considered a "phan-
tom vehicle" because the driv-
er and the motorcyclist had no
contact. No one at the scene
could provide a description of
the pickup's driver or a tag
number, he said.
FHP investigators would like
to question the driver about her
or his role in the crash. Anyone
with information about the dri-
ver's whereabouts is asked to
call the Florida Highway Patrol
at (800) 500-1240.


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FREE REGISTRATION
FOR MEETINGS.
Pay on@ty he weekly fees.
Call 1.800.651.6000 or Click WeightWatchers.com
for more information
Beverly Hills Recreation Association
77 Civic Circle Mon 9:30 am
Crystal River Womens Club
320 Citrus Ave. Tues 9:30 am, Thurs 5:15 & 6:30 pm
Sat 8:30 am
Homosassa New Hope Baptist Church
8635 W. Goodman Ln Wed 9:30 am
Offer expires Aug 6th, 2005 & is valid at these locations ONLY
with this ad. Weigh-in & Registration begins
30 win prior 0o minei.i l;Oe..
1 i4 I r''ij [.mi r (di li'rrn) iTit5irj 'icitj :Si .od I i o lk ,. TmL c C,
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ti'[ll.H' 'H uil i O, N ,TSu., h.i. l.., .. ,{!r.. i.,r.,l. ui i,.n h a1,I [,. -h, ,.m -,.;.ll ir,.


from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 2:30
p.m. today.
Juniors can purchase a parking
permit during the same hours
Wednesday and Thursday. On
Friday, both seniors and juniors
can purchase parking permits.
Students enrolled in the following
programs will also be permitted to
purchase a parking permit: CDE,
Dual Enrollment, Externship, OJT
or WTI.
The day the student purchases
a parking permit the following con-
ditions are required to have the fol-
lowing:
$20 for the cost of the permit.
2.0 cumulative grade point
average.
Owe no school debts/fines.
Valid driver's license, vehicle
registration either in the student's
name or the student's
parent's/guardian's name.
Lockers can be purchased by


The Citrus.County Health
Department is taking appointments
for kindergarten, daycare and
sports physical.
The Inverness office is taking
appointments from 1 to 3:30 p.m.
today and again on Friday from 8
to 10:30 a.m. The telephone num-
ber for the Inverness office is 726-
1731. The Lecanto office is taking
appointments for Aug. 1 and Aug. 8
from 8 to 10:30 a.m. and again
from 1 to 3:30 p.m. The telephone
number for the Lecanto office is
527-0068.
The cost will be $40 per child.
Parents are asked to bring in a cur-
rent immunization record and a
urine sample for each child.
For more information, call 527-
0068.
Citrus High parking
permits available
Citrus High School parking per-


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interstate and intrastate Dial-1 calling. Monthly fee includes one phone line. Customers first invoice will include a partial monthly fee and the first month billed in advance. International rates vary and
surcharges may apply including surcharges on residential calls made to foreign mobile phones. Call 1-888-255-2099 for international rates. Additional in-state and universal service charges will apply.
Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls made from payphones in the US will be assessed a surcharge. All rates subject to change. Additional requirements and restrictions may apply.
Some services included in previous calling plans may not be included when converting to new unlimited long-distance plan. Contact Sprint for details. High-speed Internet: Taxes and surcharges are
additional and are based on standard monthly rate. Rate applies to 1.5 Mbps speed, which is not available in all areas, $49.99 activation fee will apply. Sprint high-speed Internet: A fee of $99 will be
charged for early termination. Actual performance may vary due to conditions outside of Sprints network control. These conditions may include variables such as customer location, physical equipment
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SSHUTTLE


mit applications will be available for
seniors only beginning today. They
will be available through Friday for
priority parking and assignments
will be on a first come, first served
basis.
Beginning Monday, Aug. 1
through Aug. 6, juniors may pick up
applications and also receive priori-
ty parking on a first come, first
served basis.
Spots will be assigned and
money will be due immediately
upon receipt of the parking applica-
tion. A parent's signature is
required for any student applying
for a spot.
The cost of a permit is $15 and if
lost, a replacement fee of $5 will
be due.
See Mrs. Mroczkowski in
Student Services between 8 a.m.
and 3 p.m. on any of the above
listed dates or call 726-2241, Ext.
234, for more details.


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6:30 to 11 a.m. Sunday
Call with questions: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday
6:30 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 563-6363. Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion
County residents, call toll-free at 1-888-852-2340
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 563-5966
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1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. 106 W, Main St.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 Inverness, FL 34450
Beverly Hills office: Visitor



.r Truir,r. [r,sr.uBr-

3603 N. Lecanto Highway
Beverly Hills, FL

Who's in charge:
Gerry Mulligan ................. ..................... Publisher, 563-3222
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lay Gillispie....... .................... Circulation Manager, 563-5655
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Report a news tip:
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o have a photo taken ......................... Linda Johnson, 563-5660
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Sound Off ...................................................... 563-0579

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Continued from Page 1A

Discovery in hopes that would
solve the problem.
"Bottom line is we've per-
formed a lot of analysis and
understanding and I think we're
smarter in understanding exact-
ly what we have on the condi-
tion and what we've got with our
systems," Nickolenko said.
But a retired agent in
NASA's inspector general
office, Joseph Gutheinz, said
the space agency does not
appear to have learned its les-
son with Columbia.
"It is clear to me that NASA
continues to put mission over
safety," Gutheinz said. "I fear
that if NASA is wrong this
time, as they were for Apollo 1,
Challenger and Columbia,
manned space missions may
be halted for a very long time
in the United States."






CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONIC!Eu


Rita Baggott, 85 Obituaries
DELAND


Rita E Baggott, 85, DeLand, a
former resident of Homosassa,
died Sunday, July 24, 2005, in
DeLand.
She was born Dec. 16, 1919,
in Jersey City, N.J., the daugh-
ter of the late Vincent and
Margaret Kinlin and moved to
Florida 28 years ago from
Lindenhurst, N.Y.
She was Catholic.
Survivors include three sons,
Joseph W Baggott of Hudson,
Raymond J. Baggott of Safety
Harbor and William T Baggott
of Lindenhurst, N.Y; two
daughters, Rita J. Malis of West
Islip, N.Y, and Lynne M. Bower
of Deltona; 13 grandchildren;
and five great-grandchildren.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.
George
McCaffrey, 76
CRYSTAL RIVER
George K. McCaffrey, 76,
Crystal River, died Saturday,
July 23,2005, at his home under
the care of his family and
Hospice of Citrus County.
Born March 24, 1929, in
Astoria, Queens, N.Y., to
Valentine and Lillian
McCaffrey, he moved to Crystal
River with his
family in 1974.
He was a
sergeant in the
U.S. Army
serving in
World War II.
Mr McCaffrey retired from
AT&T in New York and from
Sprint Telephone in Crystal
River He spent three years as
Sprint operations director in
Saudi Arabia.
He was an avid golfer and
bowler and was a member of
Seven Rivers Golf and Country
Club. He loved all sports, espe-
cially the New York Giants and
New York Mets.
He enjoyed doing crossword
puzzles, dancing and traveling
with his wife.
Survivors include his wife of
46 years, Barbara McCaffrey of
Crystal River; two daughters, Pat
Coles of Homosassa and Joanne
Cacyuk and husband, Mel, of
Homosassa; two sons, Tom
Heaney and wife, Carol, of
Dunnellon, and Rob Heaney
and wife, Janelle, of Hernando;
and five grandchildren, Emily
Strak, Michael Cacyuk, and
Sara, Samantha and Sean
Heaney.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River
Beverly
Moyer, 67
BEVERLY HILLS
Beverly Anne Moyer, 67,
Beverly Hills, died Sunday,
July 24, 2005, in Beverly Hills.
She was born Sept. 6, 1937, in
Altoona, Pa., to Jack and
Geraldine Bruckman, and
moved to this area in 1998 from
Pinellas County.
She was a retired bookkeep-
er She enjoyed gardening and
sewing.
Survivors include two sons,
James Bergman of Hernando
and Scott Moyer of Knoxville,
Tenn.; two daughters, Tracy
Osborn of Dunnellon and
Samantha Moyer of Beverly
Hills; two brothers, Thomas
Bruckman of Clearwater and
Rex Bruckman of Dunedin; one


nephew, Ryan Bruckman of
Dunedin; five grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.
Hooper Funeral Home,
Beverly Hills.
Constance
Oakley, 82
INVERNESS
Constance R. Oakley, 82,
Inverness, died Sunday, July
24, 2005, at Avante At In-
verness.
She was born Feb. 15, 1923,
in Jersey City, N.J., the daugh-
ter of Arthur and Bessie
Rodgers. She moved to this
area six years ago from
Clearwater.
She was a bookkeeper in the
clothing industry.
Survivors include her son,
Thomas F Oakley of Miami;
daughter, Constance Balk-
Picone of Inverness; two
grandsons, Albert Balk and
wife, Donna, of Inverness and
Daniel Balk and wife, Natlay,
of Brandon; and three great-
grandchildren.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

Anna Patcher, 77
HOMOSASSA
Anna K. Patcher, 77,
Homosassa, died Friday, July
22, 2005, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center in
Crystal River
She was born in Philadel-
phia, Pa. She moved to Florida
12 years ago from Stowe, Vt.
Mrs. Patcher was a retired
office manager for New Jersey
Bell Telephone.
She was Episcopalian.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Louis; daughter, Susan
Wagner of Englishtown, N.J.;
four grandchildren; and one
great-grandchild.
National Cremation Society,
Brooksville.

Rose Pellock, 83
LECANTO
Rose Irene Pellock, 83,
Lecanto, died Friday, July 22,
2005, in the Hospice Unit at
Citrus Memorial Hospital in
Inverness.
A native of Gregory, S.D., she
was born Dec. 31,1921, to Ernst
and Johanna (Konicky) Weaver
and moved to this area in 1996
from Cheyenne, Wyo.
Mrs. Pellock was employed
by the University of Iowa.
She was a member of Our
Lady of Grace Parish.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Robert, in
1985; infant son, Robert Jr., in
1943; son, Edward, in 1985;
brothers, Ralph and Gregory
Weaver; and her sister, Mary.
Survivors include a son,
Gerald Pellock; a daughter,
LeAnne Robbins of Inverness;
two brothers, Amos Weaver and
Ray Weaver, both of Clarence,
Mo.; 12 grandchildren; and 11
great-grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.
Monte
Phillips, 5.1
CRYSTAL RIVER
Monte R. Phillips, 53, Crystal
River, died Saturday, July 23,2005,
at Shands Hospital at University
of Florida in Gainesville.
He was born March 5, 1952,


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in Morrisville, N.C., to Wiley J.
and Martha (Patterson) Phil-
lips and moved to this area 17
years ago from Tampa.
Mr Phillips was a member of
the Iron Workers Union Local
398 in Tampa.
He was an avid fisherman
and enjoyed boating.
He was Baptist
Survivors include his wife,
Dorothy "Joy" Phillips of
Crystal River; two sons, Monte
R. Phillips II of Crystal River
and Lonnie R. Phillips of
Gainesville; daughter, Domin-
ique Alveraz of Tampa; mother
and stepfather, Martha and
Bruce Pratt of Tampa; two
brothers, Jerry Phillips of
Brooksville and Andy Fields of
Tampa; two sisters, Sandy Russ
of Ila, Ga., and Penny Darling of
Tampa; and three grandsons.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River

Dorothy Reid, 80
FLORAL CITY
Dorothy M. Reid, 80, Floral
City, died Saturday, July 23,
2005, at the Orange City
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center in DeBary.
She was born Jan. 7, 1925, in
Baltimore, Md., the daughter of
the late Charles and Elizabeth
Manly and moved here in 1980
from Gary, Ind.
Mrs. Reid was a homemaker
and her memberships includ-
ed the First Lutheran Church,
Moose Lodge 2112 and the
Eagles Aerie 3992, all of
Inverness.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Edward C.
Reid, Feb. 20, 1992.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter, Barbara Byrne of DeBary;
one brother, George Manly of
California; two sisters, Cath-
erine MacConnell of Bradenton
and Elizabeth Kerr of Gary,
Ind.; two grandchildren,
Dorothy and Diana Byrne; and
two great-grandchildren, Des-
tiny and Anthony Chiarella.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness..
Jean Root, 79
HERNANDO
Jean Elaine Root, 79,
Hernando, died Monday, July
18, 2005, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital in Inverness.
A native of Watertown,
Conn., she was born Oct 12,
1925, to Albert and Jeanette
(Harrison) Schwenterly. She
moved to this area six months
ago from Hudson, where she
had lived since 1999.
Mrs. Root was a homemaker
and also worked for King's
Department Store and the
Lutheran Home.
SHer enjoyment of life includ-
ed working jigsaw puzzles, and
she loved birds, as well as her
dog, Tar
She was Protestant
She was preceded in .death
by her husband, Benjamin
Harrison Root Jr, in 1974.
Survivors include a son,
Benjamin Harrison Root III of
Hudson; a daughter, Sandra
Delight Verner of Ansonia,
Conn.; four grandchildren; and
six great-grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home


with Crematory, Inverness.
Bernard
Sasada Sr., 77
CRYSTAL RIVER
Bernard "Bernie" Milton
Sasada Sr., 77, Crystal River,
died Sunday, July 24, 2005, at
Cypress Cove Care Center in
Crystal River
Born Oct. 24, 1927, in Biloxi,
Miss., to Brownie and Dorothy
(Berry) Sasada, he moved to
this area in 1976 from Selby-
ville, Del.
Mr. Sasada
was a World
War II U.S. Air
Force veteran
and a member
of the VFW in
Oceanview, Del., and the
American Legion for 46 years.
He enjoyed music and
played the spoons, harmonica
and the piano.
Survivors include his wife of
56 years, Florence V Sasada of
Crystal River; three sons, Bud
Sasada Jr and wife, Chris, of
Lecanto, Paul Sasada and wife,
Anne, of Clayton, Del., and
Mike Sasada and wife, Kim, of
Dagsboro, Del.; two daughters,
Dee Jones and husband,
George, of Selbyville, Del., and
Joan Gerrits and husband,
Eddie, of Crystal River; one
brother, Paul Sasada and wife,
Bonnie, of Crystal River; one
sister, Dorothy Majerowicz and
husband, Herman, of Arnold,
Md.; eight grandchildren, Jeff,
Kevin, Joey, Leslie and
Stephen Sasada, Lisa Browne,
and E.J. and Katie Gerrits; and
two great-grandchildren, Lara
Kay Carey and Addison
Browne.
Strhickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River


Rita F. Baggott. Funeral
services for Rita F Baggott, 85,
DeLand, formerly of
Homosassa, will be conducted
at 2 p.m. Thursday, July 28,
2005, at Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs, with
Deacon Sam Hunt officiating.
Interment will follow at
Fountains Memorial Park,
Homosassa. Family will
receive friends from 1 p.m.
until service time Thursday.
Monte R. Phillips. A memori-
al service for Monte R.
Phillips, 53, Crystal River, will
be conducted at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, July 27, 2005, from
the Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River with
Pastor Lloyd Bertine, of the
Gulf to Lake Baptist Church,
officiating. Private cremation
arrangements under the direc-
tion of Strickland Funeral
Home, Crystal River
Dorothy M. Reid. Funeral
services will be conducted at 2
p.m. Wednesday, July 27, 2005,
from the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home of Inverness.
Following cremation, iliurn-
ment will follow at the Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell. Friends may call
from 1 p.m. until the hour of
service Wednesday at the
funeral home.
Jean Elaine Root. A celebra-
tion of life memorial service
for Jean Elaine Root will be at
6 p.m. Tuesday, July 26, 2005, at


Judge permits


mom to visit


abused daughter


Associated Press
MIAMI A judge has
allowed a woman who served
prison time for deliberately
making her daughter so ill that
she was hospitalized some 200
times and subjected to surgery,
to visit her daughter, who is
now 18.
Broward Circuit Judge
Cheryl Aleman said in a ruling
made public Monday that
Kathy Bush, 47, may visit her
daughter. There is 'no evi-
dence, she said, that the visits
would cause psychological or
physical harm to Jennifer
Bush.
However, Aleman imposed
restrictions: The mother and
daughter may not live together,
and Kathy Bush is not allowed
to administer any drugs or
medicines or make any health
care decisions regarding her
daughter
Kathy Bush went to court
last week seeking a reunion,
and her daughter wrote the
judge a letter requesting con-
tact. A condition of Bush's lo-
bation restricted the mother
and daughter from being
together, and the two have had
only indirect contact, through
letters, in recent years.
"We are eager to pick up the
pieces and move on with our


lives," Bush said Monday She
looked forward to "recapturing
the life that we once had, and I
look forward to spending time
with Jennifer, my sons and my
husband to rebuild our lives."
"I'm absolutely thrilled; I
think everyone involved is,"
said Nancy Gregoire, the
daughter's attorney. "It's a
huge step in the process for
these people, of healing."
"It's been a long time com-
ing," added Robert Buschel,
Kathy Bush's attorney. "She is
looking forward to being mom
to the entire Bush family"
The last time the mother and
daughter saw one another was
1999, the year Kathy Bush was
convicted of aggravated child
abuse and fraud.
She was released in June
after serving three years in
prison, with several months in
a work-release program.
Prosecutors said Jennifer
was the victim of Munchausen
syndrome by proxy, a rare form
of child abuse in which parents
make a child ill to gain atten-
tion and sympathy for them-
selves. At trial, prosecutors
said Bush gave her daughter
excessive doses of seizure
medicine, and tampered with
her hospital feeding machine
and medical charts.


Bruce H. Mclnnis, age 66 passed
away peacefully on Monday,. July
25, 2005, at home'with his family.
Bruce is survived by his wife, Mary
McInnis, sonr Robert Mclnnis of
Clearwater Florida, daughter, April
Mclnnis Smith of Dunnellon
Florida, son-in-law rfnd fishing
buddy, Robert Smith,
granddaughter, Samantha Smirh,
and grandsonUJoseph Tucker.
I Smith.,
After years of drag racing, Bruce
and Mary opened Mclnnis
Automotive of Massachusetts in
January 1970. Hundreds of
awards and trophies followed, as
the original "Iceman" of drag
racing made his mark. Bruce and
Mary retired in 1989 and moved to
Dunnellon, Florida in 1990. Since
then, he has been able to enjoy
his life's passion of bass fishing
and family. Bruce was formerly
President of Dunnellon
BassMasters. He was a past
Commander of the Dunnellon
VFW Post #7991. He is a U.S.
Navy Veteran, service in the
Vietnam War era.
Bruce has "gone fishing "
In lieu of flowers, please send
donations to the angels at Citrus
County Hospice.
ROBERTS FUNERAL HOME OF
DUNNELLON


the Fort Cooper Baptist
Church with Pastor Dave
Maddox officiating. There are
no calling hours at the funeral
home.
Bernard "Bernie" Milton
Sasada Sr. The funeral service
for Bernard "Bernie" Milton
Sasada Sr., 77, Crystal River,
will be conducted at 2 p.m.
Thursday, July 28, 2005, from
the Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River with
Pastor Lloyd Bertine, of the
Gulf to Lake Baptist Church,
officiating. Friends may call
from noon until time of service
at the funeral home. Interment
will follow at Crystal River
Memorial Cemetery with full
military honors conducted by
the American Legion Post 155
Honor Guard.


Lai. E 1auti
'Funeral -Home With crcmatorVy

Jean Root
Private Cremation
Arrangements
Elsie Wood
Private Cremation
Arrangements
Dorothy Reid
Service: Wed 2pm Chapel
Ethel Holly
Arrangements Pending

726-8323


__ _ __ _ __ _ .1 . ; o
Finin Guidr r : Cu o urirq A Di~lti.:ulT im, ~I, C:TfiFrriri


Thot's Why People
Turn ToUs


1-800-286-1551 or 527-19881 FUN R HOMES
5685 Pine Ridge Blvd STATE CER1IFiED CBC,42359 A CREMATORY







MANAGER'S SPECIAL

NRetail $22,995."0

Singe Ower, M,21ONOLY


Funeral NOTICES


rvC VERTI Il.A
Includes deluxe track,
valance, and installation


UESDAY, J __


vmmll
IFORDI


GA T ULY 26 2005


q








'. 'L--


j


7A 26, 2005


News NOTES

Relatives' group
to meet Monday
If you are a grandparent,
aunt or uncle raising grandchil-
dren, nieces or nephews come
and meet people who are ready
to assist you with your role as a
parent.
The group's mission is to
provide moral and emotional
support through meaningful
learning experiences to benefit
others that are now in the par-
enting role raising their grand-
children, nieces and/or
nephews.
This program was started in
September 2003 as a
Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren Support Group,
but the group
The recognizes
that there are
next other family
m t. members also
meeting taking on the
will be role ofpar-
Wi o ents. The pro-
at 10 gram has
been expand-
a.m. ed to include
any relatives
Monday. who have
taken on the
role of a par-
ent.
The next meeting sponsored
by the Department of
Community Support Services
will be at 10 a.m. Monday in
Room 280 in the Lecanto
Government Building. Sitter
reimbursement is available for
qualified participants provided
by Family Caregiver Support
Program.
For more information, call
Jeanie Reid at 560-0370,
Bonnie O'Gane at 621-0739 or
Amy Engelken at Community
Support Services at 527-5434.
Resident graduates
from Emory U
Craig Cortright of Decatur,
Ga., son of Earle Cortright and
Patricia Cortright of Beverly
Hills, received a master's
degree in Business
Administration from the
Goizueta Business School of
Emory University in Atlanta, at
its 160th commencement cere-
mony on May 16th, 2005.
The Path to close
U.S. 19 thrift store
The Path Shelter store in
Nottingham Plaza, 1239 S.
Suncoast Blvd., between the
Chevy and Buick dealers on
U.S. 19, will close. The last day
of operation will be Saturday.
The new location will be
announced in the near future.
The store hours will be from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesday
through Saturday until that
date. Many items will be drasti-
cally reduced or free of charge.
Donations to the Path Shelter
would be appreciated.
For information, call 794-
0001._

Pet SPOTLIGHT

Pugs' mugs


Special to the Chronicle
Sisters Belle and Bailey
reside in Orlando, but Jove vis-
iting their human "cousin"
Coyleigh in Inverness.


PET SPOTLIGHT
The Chronicle invites
readers to submit pho-
tos of their pets for the
Daily Pet Spotlight fea-
ture.
Photos need to be in
sharp focus. Include a
short description of the
pet and owners, includ-
ing names and home-
towns. Photos cannot
be returned without a
self-addressed, stamped
i envelope. Group photos
of more than two pets
cannot be printed.
' Send photos and infor-
mation to Pet Spotlight,
c 'o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


Crime victims may





seek assistance


Program may

CYNTHIA
HENDERSON-HOLDEN
Special to the Chronicle
If you are a victim of a crime,
you may be eligible for com-
pensation from the state's
crime-victim compensation
fund.
Crime-victim compensation
is a direct reimbursement to or
on behalf of a crime victim for
the following crime-related
expenses:
Medical costs.
Funeral and burial costs.
Mental health counseling.
Lost wages or loss of sup-
port.
Out-of-pocket expenses -
up to $500.
Other expenses related to


offer financial compensation for variety of expenses


time'limits for good cause.
Crime-victim compensation
is the payer of last resort; if
other financial resources, such
as private health and property
insurance are available to the
victim, the program pays only
to the extent that these
resources do not cover the loss.
Contact the National
Association of Crime Victim
Compensation at
www.nacvb.org or locally at
628-6481 and
www.sunco.com/victim.
The center also has speakers
available to any group, organi-
zation, school or gathering
interested in knowing what
rights are available to victims
of crime and how to access that
help.


the crime that may be covered
include the replacement or
repair of eyeglasses or other
corrective lenses, dental serv-
ices and devices, prosthetic
devices and crime-scene
cleanup.
Every state administers a
crime victim compensation
program that provides finan-
cial assistance to victims of fed-
eral and state crimes.
Although each state compen-
sation program is adminis-
tered independently, most pro-


grams have similar eligibility
requirements and offer a com-
parable range of benefits.
Maximum awards average
$25,000 but some states have
higher and lower maximums.
The typical compensation
program requires victims to
report the crime promptly to
law enforcement and to file
claims within a fixed period of
time usually one to two
years.
Most states can extend these


N.J. club

to gather

Monday
Special to the Chronicle
The New Jersey and
Friends Club of Citrus
County will host its regular
monthly meeting at 1 p.m.
Monday at the VFW Post on
State Road 200, Hernando.
After the business meet-
ing, the club will host a "Day
at the Races," a fun-filled
"wooden race day." Come on
out and enjoy the laughs. It
isn't too early to start think-
ing about the club's annual
bus trip to Biloxi. The dates
will be Jan. 29 and Feb. 1,
2006.
August's activity will be a
luncheon at the Evergreen
Buffet in Inverness.
Visit the club's Web-
site for information:
http://njclubfl.tripod.com/,
and to see what the club is
all about, or you can call
Frank Sasse' at (352) 489-
0053. The club is open to all.
You don't have to be Jersey
born and bred, or even have
lived there, to join.


Service recognized


at Sertoma banquet


recently, I was honored with one
of this year's Service to
Mankind Citizen of the Year
awards along with Jack Brown and
Stephen Potter at a Sertoma Club ban-
quet held in the Plantation Inn
Ballroom. Louie Lott was the guest
speaker and he told the Sertoma Clubs
gathered together about his volunteer
efforts as a Master
Gardener, specifi-
cally his well-
known and appre-
ciated Bluebird
Protection proj-
ect
He is passion-
ate about provid-
ing nest sites for
Ruth Levins them after fence
uthLeins posts are covered
AROUND THE over with creosote
COMMUNITY and dead trees
are removed due
to possible storm damage to residents.
In all, he has personally built more
than 4,000 bluebird houses from mate-
rials donated from job sites, using more
than 3,000 pounds of scrap wood from
landfills as well.
In the Pine Ridge area alone he has
placed 350 birdhouses for 1,000 blue-
birds.
He works closely with the 4-H
Foundation and is an avid member of
the group's Rodeo Committee.
As a consultant for the local exten-
sion office of the University of Florida,
his expertise is sought after by local
residents who have horticulture con-


cerns.
His bluebird houses are never sold.
Donations are accepted to benefit the 4-
H Foundation.
NE
At the Kings Bay Rotary Club
Banquet last month, my son was hon-
ored with the coveted Paul Harris
Fellow award along with Clint Massey
and Hugh McElvey for their service of
self to the club and the community.
It was a triumphal evening of awards
and recognition for a year of unselfish
service to our community.
Director recognition went to C.L.
Calloway, Galen Clymer, Jim Farley,
Sandra Johnson, Edward R. Johnston,
Hugh McElvey, Phil Noll, Jim Smith
and Ed Wilsek.
Officer awards were given to Carolyn
Caffee, Robert Mock, Roger Proffer and
Don Turner.
The Club Service award was given to
Ted Johnson, the International Service
Award was presented to Ed Wilsek and
the Vocational Service Award went to
Jim Farley.
C.L. Calloway received the
Community Service Award. Gifts in
appreciation were .presented to
Carolyn Caffee, social director; Phil
Noll, DAV sergeant-at-arms and
Showcase Food coordinator; Julie
Kidder for The Gold Package and
FREY Project; Curtis Rich, orientation
chairman; Jim Smith, Salvation Army
chairman; Jim Egan for the Upward


Special to the Chronicle
From left: Clint Massey, Hugh McElvey and Lyman Strickland are shown with their
Rotary International Paul Harris Fellow awards presented to them at the Kings Bay
Rotary Installation and Awards Banquet held June 20 at Nicole's Fine Dining In
Crystal River.


Bound program; Joe Turk and Floyd
Darling for coordinating the group's
Relay for Life efforts; Jack Reynolds for
chairing the group's Information and
Classification efforts; Galen Clymer for
the Sportsman Showcase project; Ed
Velez for club photography; Carl Meyer,
the assistant sergeant at arms; and to
Roger Proffer for the club's Web site
and newsletter.
Judge Mark Yerman installed the offi-
cers and perfect attendance awards
were given, including 31 years for Bill
Granger, 20 for Jon Conway, 19 for Bob
Granger, 18 for Curtis Rich and 15 for
Jim Egan and Ted Johnson.
Judge Yerman remarked that the


banquet room was full of stars and
soon-to-be stars.
As outoing president Bob Boleware
was awarded the Golden Gavel and
incoming president Roger Proffer was
applauded, I reflected upon the amaz-
ing contributions our community has
received over the years from this dedi-
cated group of humanitarians.


Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community. Let
her know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to P.O. Box 803,
Crystal River FL 34423.


Crime-victim compensation
is the payer of last resort.


Cookout to benefit MD


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
Members of the Center for Independent Living held a cookout recently at Lecanto Plaza. The cookout was to help Jerry's Kids, Muscular Dystrophy Association
and Celebrate the American Disabilities Act. Shown are Tommy Boggs, independent living center; receiving donation from Dorothy Bockee, independent living
center; and four individuals preparing food. From left are: Jack Smith, volunteer; Matt Williams, independent living; Ken Hogan, independent living center; and
David Corsi, volunteer.


SP~R~P~P~P~e~lll~sl~Bs~UeQgl r ~PltlPnrB~t#IPZ~~' '1~* ~F~I~I~W;ZI~IYF~;W*


trA~r*,aa *tlurTnt.k, g, :Jpi "h B


~~1, rrurrus~-i-~,--.~ar~~a.-r w.rrrm~--7 1- -- - - --~r~


1 Mill.ME....a'.
. -
>'^-:^ *^V- r.^--.^ -a- 1
iiiiiii .ii~a .i~irffrr m U U~i-nfr n-fir iriffcm g'ifin 'D I' 7'mrfi f.1-


~-~-~;~sTeY~6tt;~lF~p-~~









STOCKS


SA r Y ULY 26 2005


CnTRus CouN'IY (FlI) CHlIONICI.I


4M&IUUSDAY j UJ. Z, ZV .....


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Motorola 404416 20.54 +.54
Lucent 331126 2.86 +.01
Pfizer 218015 26.42 -.08
NokiaCp 211383 15.18 -.38
Xerox 199580 13.20 -.85

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DiagPdct 56.05 +8.05 +16.8
Whrlpl 82.68 +5.50 +7.1
Katylnd 3.57 +.23 +6.9
HDFCBk 50.70 +2.70 +5.6
VidSanNig 17.80 +.92 +5.5

LOSERS (S2 oR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HarvNRes 9.04 -1.92 -17.5
ParTch 32.20 -5.63 -14.9
Braskems 17.05 -1.97 -10.4
Copel 5.116 -.54 -9.5
Gerdaus 9.38 -.93 -9.0

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


2,072
173
3,465
251
18
1,695,198,650


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
SPDR 556748 123.19 -.35
IvaxCps 484744 25.17 +2.29
iShRs2000s220008 66.88 -.44
SPEngy 170352 47.83 +.44
SemiHTr 128485 36.98 -.24

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TGC Indsn 9.48 +2.43 +34.5
LawEnfn 3.71 +.60 +19.3
Tarpon n 4.25 +.65 +18.1
ImpltScwt 2.00 +.30 +17.6
WlssXcesn 12.48 +1.85 +17.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CoreMold 8.92 -2.38 -21.1
InfigSys 2.35 -.27 -10.3
CreatvCpt 2.05 -.20 -8.9
AMS HIth 2.58 -.21 -7.5
Encision 2.50 -.20 -7.4

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


389
533
122
1,044
85
8
282,541,005


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Cisco 580298 18.85 -.47
Intel 493207 26.52 -.23
Nasdl00Tr 488151 39.27 -.15
SunMicro 463310 3.85 -.03
Microsoft 448860 25.69 +.01

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Synergx 5.00 +1.88 +60.3
SirnaThera 4.05 +1.42 +54.1
A4Sun 7.34 +1.64 +28.8
Lifecell 20.38 +3.99 +24.3
IPIXCp 4.13 +.75 +22.2

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NetServic 2.32 -.52 -18.3
DayStrwtA 8.03 -1.65 -17.0
WidAccep 26.66 -5.43 -16.9
Incyte 7.42 -1.34 -15.3
S1 Corp 4.68 -.73 -13.5

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1,167
1,900
152
3,219
172
17
1,508,725,964


Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765 most active on the
Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold
are worth at least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in pr..:e Inina for 50 m..st acie?
our, rYSE and aiJ aq and 25 most ai .:e or. Amrne Tables isnow name, pr ce and net charge
ai,,'l .:ne t:. w 3.1j3.orial IIOlds r.'.taind irr.ugrn her weekl as follows

DIv: Currurni annual di.irovend rate paid on lock tased on lalesnt
quarierhi or semiannual doclaratlori unless otherwise lootrnoted ,
Name: Slicks appear alphatelica3iv t.by ile company a lull name
ino i is abtbreaiionli ames consisting of nriials appear at Ihe.
b linninr oi eacn ltlerI'.i i .
Last: Pric:e t:i. was iradirng at when s.:narnge 'losed for the la,
Chg: Luos Of gar a3 t:r lh day fli change inlicaled rty

Sloex Fcofnoles '.: F'E greilii rri ,-, i P .' haL ue ie r r.:a; l.d ELr r-.C"retTFr., sy f '. .

., Irh, .ArEc-.:a.. E-,:ha',1 ET,.-rg, ri, LCn.T.3r.' Ma, place 9 DIvHa aru a', : .
a tn C d" n- d ollar,, h -,.rarva t I i im lL J q .L ia l or.n iurrlur l i50 1
Ilrd na r1. .ta? a i I I.. laS t Vi.31 H ri, an,, n t .r6
jai6. r tf T I'. T.ae ili'r ] Pi i,,e- 3i .rl iu p. F'-ealeae,-vii ppr a
Hi-l l -' 1, wf ir q l1Tiiril, .;. l (v ,i.,. .i L I,,Aj i4,,j ,T.UIU61 ui' rill PE calui. lir.
- l Fi iurb .F'l, Ir, 31 a r.,.'le Pr,1 C 1 J r h i:II b a i U -, r l L2
rlH,,e, ii, 41 r ',I F.i H au A,l l t? ; l. ril lli. li u, rh '. a a3 'l r l 7
,lr.rir.l A Ti Aana .il dlu l' .3 2l. h lr .hluh 16 u 1 rl,* 5 .o64K Ni.3rgIh ur i f L I ..
'. e TharrC e Th As-| C:aiid Pre. Sae fgreer nfial
,ar.i.rl j.> z ir.c H 5 u5.2 ls a Appiar, ir. on i .: inoa r.rma
Dildend FootnGies. a E.,i3 d4 rJ re03 j.-r l tu SLjF ''J, rr.:lu.]] t Acnr.uai rl
Clu C L qu. idal r ,iai i e1 A. ',- :. f .r I . l r P a in l ai 2 m. nrr n i
Cwiw'"i E" hc a
-:I .. r .I1 a a.'i nIK[Vdu lar I 00- idY i:t>.1.3r5 ll IhiiT yli1f -1a173

.I ,I i ,M r. o ,: r 1-1.ar r Cujrieni air.r.u ia r p.rno.r w3, i. r tma nj s a: Li ta
S ,.ia nl ar 1rr uI- : .rr i l p l ur a fI 3 i.o r. a a rn ial rar e r. .:.r r. oan, *s l] n i '
H .:.H i I it. l .-j, pvHi ir. pl.s.:e.- r I; .1 Tw h i .plu r .:...: .12.jerod I H Foidn Ir. N.

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


aIC F AL R


YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg


AT&T .95
AmSouth 1.00
BkofAm s 2.00
BellSouth 1.16
CapCtyBk s.61
Citigrp 1.76
Disney .24
EKodak .50
ExxonMbi 1.16
FFPL p s 1.42
FiAR..ck s ...
ForMM.1 .40
G-,'.Eiec .88
, !M.,:,tr 2.00
H.:,|TeDp .40
InTr.,l .32
b81.1 .80


+.03 +1.1
+.08 +8.1
-.19 -5.0
+.09 -3.5
-.56 +5.5
+.11 -7.6
-.19 -7.8
-.80 -17.8
+.44 +16.9
-.35 +14.7
-1.17 +29.1
-.11 -27.5
-.30 -4.7
-.38 -10.5
-.41 +.7
-.23 +13.4
-.24 -14.6


YTD
Div Yid PE Last Chg %Chg


LowesCos .24
McDnlds .55
Microsoft .32
Motorola .16
Penney .50
ProgrssEn 2.36
SearsHidgs ...
SprntFON .50
TimeWarn .20
UniFirst .15
VerizonCml.62
Wachovia 1.84
WalMart .60
Walgrn .26


-.16 +13.9
-.32 -4.5
+.01 -3.9
+.54 +19.4
-.71 +37.4
-.31 -2.4
-1.18 +60.1
-.16 +1.1
-.13 -15.1
-.15 +58.4
-.15 -16.0
-.15 -4.2
-.09 -6.4
-.31 +20.8


52-Week Net % YTD 52-wk
High Low Name Last Chg Chg % Chg % Chg
10,984.46 9,708.40 Dow Jones Industrials 10,596.48 -54.70 -.51 -1.73 +6.37
3,889.97 2,959.58 Dow Jones Transportation 3,732.08 -47.95 -1.27 -1.74 +22.42
400.17 274.84 Dow Jones Utilities 391.99 -.93 -.24 +17.03 +42.02
7,495.11 6,215.97 NYSE Composite 7,423.25 -23.91 -.32 +2.39 +17.87
1,587.35 1,186.14 Amex Index 1,563.45 +16.91 +1.09 +9.00 +28.37
2,193.19 1,750.82 Nasdaq Composite 2,166.74 -13.00 -.60 -.40 +17.82
1,236.56 1,060.72 S&P500 1,229.03 -4.65 -.38 +1.41 +13.37
677.87 515.90 Russell 2000 670.99 -6.79 -1.00 +2.98 +25.77
12,363.89 10,268.52 DJ Wilshire 5000 12,283.33 -53.92 -.44 +2.61 +16.86


I EWYOKSTOKECANG


DIv Name Last Chg

.. ABB Ltd 6.46 -.04
.92f ACE Ltd 46.31 -.20
.66 ACM Inco 8.33 -.01
AESCp 16.03 -.20
.44 AFLAC 43.33 -.42
AGCO 20.40 -.62
1.24 AGLRes. 37.88 -.02
.. AK Steel 9.05 -.56
1.92 AMLIRs 31.21 -.18
AMR 13.45 -.19
.40 ASA Ltd 38.26 -.24
.95 AT&T 19.27 +.03
.38r AU Opton 15.73 -.02
.79e AXA 26.70
1.10 AbtLab 45.49 -.55
.50 AberFitc 70.20 -1.56
.. Acenture 24.85 +.05
.90e AdamsEx 13.22 +.01
.30 Adesa 23.45 -.52
.. AdvMOpt 40.20 -.10
AMD 19.75 -.74
Aeropst 30.76 -.81
.02 Aetnas 76.01 -.44
.. AffCmpS 50.27 -.91
.. Agerers 12.71 +.18
Agilent 25.60 +.01
.. Ahold 8.69. +.01
1.28 .n,'.,:.l 58' '2 .
..,',' ,, 1050 I,:
.76 tir ,s. 2 1'1 3- 2.:
1.81 air,-.ur. .c .17
.60 ii.. :\'b +'12
... l.Hi. 1 -r I
.60 h'Tc. .: :" -
.99e Alcon 109.30 -4.99
.24 AllegTch u28.10 -.18
.40 Alleigan 84.80 -1.41
1.26f Alletes 47.91 -.73
,2.43e AlliCap 48.25 -.09
.. AlliData 43.54 -.01
.89 AIIWdd2 12.37 +.04
.. AldWaste 8.00 -.08
.. AllmrFn 37.67 -.58
1.28 Allstate 61.26 +.19
1.52 Alltel 63.01 +.32
.18 Alpharma 14.79 -.17
2.92 Altlia 66.24 -.28
.60f AmbacF 70.96 -.40
... Amdocs 29.45 -.10
1.20 AmHess u117.81 -1.22
2.54 Ameren 54.94 -.17
Amerigrps 34.29 -.58
AMollILs 20.74 -.60
.. AmWest u8.28 +.21
.60 .AmAxie 25.54 -.13
1.40 AEP 38.56 -.21
.48 AmExp 54.56 -.01
.50 AmlntGpI 60.50 -.24
.60 AmStand 43.91 -.93
.78 AmSIP3 11.12 -.14
AmTower ?IIq4 -W
AirT^,Ml ?C74 -.1e.
Sti,- unr.tar s -t, S
1 x: A 'r.. 64. 0 1 1i
Ar0+1 & 885 3:+24Z
I ".l r..' .o i -.1 .
.98 Anheusr 45.80 +.08
.. AnnTaylr 2521 -.65
1.81e Annaly 17.07 -.18
.60 AonCorp 25.33 -.15
.32 Apache u70.72 +77
.17 ApplBio 19.74 -.14
.. Apria 33.31 -.19
.52 AquaAm u30.90 +.12


... Aquila 3.70
.32 ArchCoal 54.96 -1.54
.34 ArchDan 22.00 +.01
1.73 ArchstnSm u41.50 +.80
1.10 Ashlandn u61.79 -.20
.68 AsdEstat 9.53 -.02
.94e AstraZen 40.94 -.05
1.24 ATMOS 28.98 +.15
.. AutoNatn 21.40 -.06
.62 AutoData 43.80 -.14
Avaya 9.23 -.02
.. Aviall u34.15 -.31
... Avnet u26.36 +.15
.66 Avon 30.89 -.11
1.40 BB&TCp 42.29 -.25
.46e BHP BiDIU 29.20 -.32
BISYS 15.86 -.01
.32 BJSvcs u58.43 +.58
.. BJsWhIs 31.75 -.64
... BMCSft 18.95 -.04
1.87e BP PLC u66.88 +.93
2.001 BRT 23.70 +.25
.46 BakrHu u56.80 +1.75
.40 BallCps 38.66 -.48
.47e BanColum u20.06 +.07
2.001 BkofAms 44.66 -.19
.841 BkNY 31.04 -.09
.721 Banta 46.17 -.54
... BamNbIs 40.46 -.88
... BarrPhm 46.38 +.26
.2 bl'r..:,. 24.67 -.03
V Ba,:-:rL 82.21 -.42
'6 e. Ef.it. 38.82 -.09
1)if Bai. : 104.22 -.96
6e n.r.r.H 8.06 +.04
.H:1 6 ;.,HT, : 61.22 -2.81
,: .-...t:ul 54.16 -.49
.72 BectDck 54.18 -.73
1.16f BellSouth 26.81 +.09
.48f BestBuy 73.61 -1.30
BigLots 12.52 -.18
1.28 BIkHICp 39.47 -.28
.75a BlkFLO8 15.39 -.01
1.00f BlockHR 57.96 +.09
.08a Blockbstr 8.09 -.26
.56e BlueChp 6.45 -.04
1.00 Boeing 66.05 -.15
.36 Borders 24.75 -.55
... BostBeer 22.50 -.18
2.721 BostProp 74.10 +.69
... BostonSd 28.33 -.10
.50 BoydGm 53.75 -.13
1.12 BrMySq 24.79 -.16
.601 Brunswick 45.74 -.58
1.09e Buhrman 11.05 -.06
.801 BudNSF 51.00 -1.14
.34 BudRsc u62.91 +.48
2.16 CHEngy 48.13 +.08
.10 CIGNA 104.03 +.12
.64 CITGp 43.83 -.34
.16 CKERst 13.23 -.13
... CMSEng 15.47 +.13
.24f CPShipg 17.42 +.13
S CoVAt.n 1-'- -.66
j;481, .: .. :P .i. -.79
Le- i -.05
-."'C v5-C4'. 3)., -.42
f.. rg.rii-n i'x61 -.09
L ,_l.re 14 '1 +.20

... Cine 3.32 -.07
.24 Camecogs 48.82 -.24
.68 CampSp 30.56 -.15
1.00 CdnNRyg 64.30 +.54
... CdnNRsgs 40.13 -.18
.11 CapOne 83.74 -1.16
1.26 CapMpfB 12.89 -.20
.83e CapsteadM 8.25 +.33


.24f CardnlHith 57.28 -.61
... CaremkRx 41.78
... CarMax 26.51 -.66
.80 Carnival 53.45 -.37
.501 CarpTech 62.22 -1.92
1.00 Caterpils 51.85 -.56
... Celanesen 18.40 -.02
Celesticg 12.04 -.13
1.18e Cemex 44.48 -.63
.44f Cendant 21.70 -.22
... Centenes 32.06 -.55
.28m CenterPnt 13.60 +.02
.16 Centex 75.23 -2.73
4.50 CnlLtpf 86.00 ...
.24 CntryTel 33.54 +.01
... ChmpE 12.10 -.33
.01 Checkpnt 17.80 -.28
.201 ChesEng 25.75 +.22
1.801 Chevrons 58.37 +.58
1.84 ChiMerc 297.00 -6.31
.. Chicoss u39.65 -.25
.12e ChinaUni 8.65 +.09
... Cimarex 42.00 +.25
.. CinciBell 4.56 -.08
1.92 CINergy 44.57 -.41
.07 CircCity 18.01 -.09
1.76 Ctiar 44.53 +.11
1.00a CitzComm 13.07 -.16
.40 ClaresStrs 24.67 -.33
.75f ClearChan 31.98 -.14
1.12 Clorox 55.30 +.28
... Coach 34.94 -1.01
1.12 CocaCI 43.65 -.38
.16 CocaCE 22.41 -.33
... Coeur 3.45 -.08
1.16 ColgPal 51.86 -.12
.65a Collntln 8.92 +.18
2.20 Comerica 62.20 -.85
.44 CmcBNJs 32.86 -.36
.24 CmdMtis 28.73 -.52
.. CmtyHit 35.33 -.15
.89e CVRDs 31.90 -1.32
.89e CVRDpfs 27.05 -1.22
.16f CompAs 28.82 -.41
... CompSci 45.35 -.69
1.09 ConAgra 23.14 +.21
1.24 ConocPhilsu62.23 +.98
... Conseco 21.78 +.13
.56 ConsolEgy 65.05 -1.14
2.28 ConEd 48.14 +.27
... ConstellAs 28.07 -.20
1.34 ConstellEn 58.14 +.57
... ClAirB 15.40 +.07
Cnvrgys 14.47 -.28
.. CoopCam u70.66 +1.15
14e Copel 5.16 -.54
Comin g 17.79 +.11
... CorusGr 8.25 -.24
.. CottCp 23.71 +.59
.601 CntwdFns 36.62 -.96
Coventry 69.05 +.15
CrwnCsle 20.50 -.18
... CrownHold 15.85 +.08
1.20 Cummins 84.98 -1.13
.. CypSem 13.69 -.16

.78a DNPSelt 11.73 +.03
.96 DPL 27.55 -.01
.36f DRHortns 40.55 -1.39
2.06 DTE 47.48 -.11
1.93e DaimlrC 43.16 -.09
.48 DanaCp 15.90 -.16
.06 Danaher 54.85 +08
.08 Darden u34.33 -.14
... DaVita 43.28 -.32
... DeanFds 36.21 -.62
1.24 Deere 70.72 -.63


.06m Delphi 5.10 +01
.., DeltaAir 3.40 -.08
.80e DeutTel 19.20 -.06
.30 DevonEs u55.27 +.01
.28 DIagPdct u56.05 +8.05
.50f DiaOffs u58.16 +.04
.16 Dillards 22.90 -.75
... DirecTV 15.31 -.11
.24f Disney 25.64 -.19
.18f DollarG 20.18 -.03
2.68 DomRes 73.77 -.11
.72 DoralFin 16.24 -.48
.64 Dover 40.65 -.64
1.34 DowChm 47.91 -.69
1.00 DowJns 37.47 +.86
DrmwksAnd22.58 -.40
1.48f DuPont 44.04 -.16
1.24f DukeEgy 29.55 -.20
1.00 DuqUght 19.03 -.19
... Dycom 23.99 -.21
.. Dynegy 5.24 -.02
... ETrade 15.40 -.27
EMCCp 14.25 -.24
.16 EOGRessu64.30 +.77
1.76 EastChm 57.87 -.43
.50 EKodak 26.52 -.80
1.24 Eaton 66.32'
.35 Ecolab 33.57 +1.67
1.00 Edisonint 40.17 +.36
... EdwLfSd 45.06 +.60
.16 EIPasoCp 12.14 -.22
... Elan 7.85 +.06
.20 EDS 19.51 -.09
1.16e EBrasAero 32.54 -1.04
... Embratel 9.20 -.61
1.66 EmrsnEI 65.17 -.44
1.28 EmpDist 23.73 -.37
... Emulex 19.03 -.12
3.70 EnbrEPtrs 55.56 +.40
.30f EnCanas 42.53 +.45
.92e Endesa 22.35 -.11
1.10 EgyEast 27.85 -.23
EnPro u29.10 -.81
.10 ENSCO 39.03 +.67
Enterasysh 1.16 -.05
2.16 Entergy u77.01 +.08
.16f Equffax 36.29 -.18
.60 Eqtyinn 12.98 +04
2.00 EqOfiPT 34.91 -.07
1.73 EqtyRsd 39.15 +.18
.40 EsteeLdr 38.25
1.60 Exelon 52.28 +41
1.16f ExxonMbl 59.94 +.44
1.42 FPLGps 42.87 -.35
.. FarchldS 16.50 -.04
.38 FamDIr 25.57 +.04
1.04 FannieMIt 57.51 -.89
.321 FedExCp 83.90 -1.20
.24 FedSignl 16.74 -.16
.54 FedrDS u75.51 -.24
2.00 Ferrellgs 21.45 +.05
.58 Ferrolf 22.14 -.78
.28 FtBcPRs 25.13 -.15
.24 FirstlData 40.86 +.16
5.10e FFinFds 20.36 +.61
1.72 FstHorizon 41.33
..FstMab 34.46 +.31
1.60 RTrFRn 19.59 -.05
1.65 FirstEngy 49.04 -.60
... FlaRocks u51.23 -1.17
.30 Foottockr 26.26 +05
.40 FordM 10.61 -.11
5.20 FdgCCTg 100.01 -1.55
... ForestLab 39.70 -.70
1.32 FortuneBr 93.95 -.36
.40a FrankRes 81.59 -.61
1.40 FredMac 64.70 -.95
1.00a FMCG 40.35 +.05


... Freescalen 24.45 -.11
.. FreescB n 24.66 -.14
1.36 FriedBR 14.56 -.01
.161 FrontOwi 28.37 -.48
.60 FumBrds 21.72 -.42

.80 GATX 36.16 -.55
.72a GabelliET 9.00
1.08 Gannett 74.18 +1.16
.18 Gap 21.13 -.23
.. Gateway 4.00 +.02
.. Genentch 86.01 -1.59
1.60 GenDyn u117.30 +.53
.88 GenElec 34.77 -.30
1.44 GnGrthPrp 44.35 +.49
1.77p GnMarit 42.05 -.94
1.32f GenMills 46.89 +.23
2.00 GnMotr 35.87 -.38
1.31 GMdb32B 19.33 -.05
.26 Genworth 32.27 +.01
.70 GaPacif 34.07 -.25
.80e Gerdaus 9.38 -.93
.65 Gillette 53.06
... Glamis 17.62 -.15
1.55e GlaxoSKIn 46.83 +.33
.60f GlobalSFe u45.41 +.51
.11e GoldFLtd 10.74 -.21
.18a Goldcrpg u16.01 -.16
.24 GoldWFs 65.58 -1.39
1.00 GoldmanS 108.32 -.81
.80 Goodrich 43.25 -.05
... Goodyear u16.17 +.05
.52 Graco 36.98 +56
... GrafTech 5.26 -.06
... GranlPrde u29.94 +.34
... GtAtPc 27.94 -2.31
1.66 GtPldnEn 31.93 -.24
1.00 GMP 29.27 -.06
Griffon 25.37 -.43
.71e' GuangRy 17.84 +.12
.40 Guidant 68.71 -.57
.60 HCAInc 49.32 +.15
.30 HCC s 26.02 +.14
.84 HRPTPrp 12.77 +.11
.50 Hallibtn u54.86 +1.57
1.11e HanJS 15.15 -.05
.55 HanPtDiv 9.22 +.02
.78 HanPtDv2 12.25 +.11
1.71e Hanson 48.44 -.24
.641 HarleyD 54.00 +.55
.05 Harman 81.35 -.31
.05e HarmonyG 8.13 -.30
1.451 HarrahE 76.59 -1.14
1.16 HartfdFn 78.69 -.58
... HarvNRes 9.04 -1.92
.36 Hasbro 21.47 +.17
1.24 HawaliEl 27.37 -.30
2.481 HItCrREIT 38.32 +.09
.16 HIlMgt 24.79 +.37
2.621 HlthcrRllf 40.40 +.19
... HealthNet 38.39 +.03
... HedaM 4.22 -.09
1.20f Heinz 36.86 +.03
.21e HellnTel 10.28 -.06
.33 HelmPay u53.95 +1.11
.88 Hershey 62.75 -.23
.32 HewlettP 24.30 +12
1.70 HighwdPlf 31.05 -.09
.16f Hilton 24.36 -.44
.40 HomeDp 43.06 -.41
.83 Honwllinti 37.82 -.38
... Hospira 38.38 -.69
.401 HostMarr u18.57 +.06
... HovnanE 69.64 -2.66
.36f HughSups 27.88 +.10
... Humana 38.50 -.41
... Huntsmn n 22.31 -.90


.33e ICICI Bk u25.33 +1.00
.08 IMS HIth 27.14 -.17
1.20 Idacorp 31.12 -.31
1.12 rW 85.66 -.09
.481f nation u42.49 +.29
.40 INCO 42.30 -.71
Infineon 9.99 -.21
1.00 IngerRd 76.20 -.50
IngrmM 16.35 -.24
InputOut 6.86 +.09
.80f IBM 84.20 -.24
.48 IndtGame 27.20 -.73
1.00 IntPap 31.60 +.01
IntRect 54.13 -.81
Interpublf 12.55 -.05
.. IronMIn 31.87 -.44

1.36 JPMoroCh 35.44 -.16
... Jabil 31.93 +.03
.04 JanusCap 15.59 -.36
.. Jarden s 39.05 +.65
1.32 JohnJn 63.34 -.98
1.00 JohnsnCtl 58.44 +.05
.75 KBHomes 80.00 -3.45
... KCSEn u19.55 -.25
.48 Kaydon 28.93
1.111 Kelklogg 44.40 -.09
.64 Kellwood 27.73 -.36
.20 KerrMcG 79.64 -.03
1.30 Keycorp 34.41 -.04
1.82 KeySpan 39.89 -.03
1.80 KimbClk 63.63 -.75
... KinetcC 57.80 +.47
KingPhrm 10.95 +.06
.. KohIs 56.17 -.78
.50e KoreaFIc U17.80 +.39
.82 Kraft 30.61 -.23
.. KrspKrmif 7.16 -.09
.. Kroger 19.55 +,05
.50 L-3Com U78.33 +.79
.. LG Philipn 22.54 +.16
.36e LLERy 6.31 -.04
LSI Lo 9.89 -.33
1.32 LTCPrp 22.96 -.04
.44 LaZBoy 14.23 -.03
LabrRdy 22.73 -.57
LabCp u50.90 -.85
LaBmch 7.00 -.09
1.38 Ladede 31.98 -.37
... LVSandsn 39.00 -1.30
1.00 LearCorp 40.85 -.40
.721 LeggMass 112.02 -.05
.64f LeggPlat d25.58 -.55
.80 LehmBr 106.03 -.97
.55 LennarA 64.93 -1.47
... Lexmark 68.55 -1.87
.59e LbtyASG 6.10 -.01
... L UbtvMA 8.66 -.01
1.52 UllyEBi 54.75 -.25
.60 Limited 23.54 -.16
1.46 ULincNat 46.85 -.36
.24f Lindsay 24.39 -.62
... UonsGtg 10.26 +.04
.23 LizClab 41.78 -.36
1.00 LockhdM 62.51 +.51
.60 Loews u83.10 +.10
... LoneStTch 49.95 -.09
.50f LaPac 24.92 -.32
.24f LowesCos- 65.57 -.16
... Lucent 2.86 +.01
.90, Lyondell 28.77 -.63

1.80f M&TBk 109.90 -.56
1.12 MBIA 60.22 -.86
.56 MBNA 25.50 -.19
.72 MDURes 30.15 +.20


... MEMC 17.16 -.52
.50 MCR 8.69 -.04
MGMMirs 43.77 -1.46
MPSGrp 11.01 -.52
Madeco 10.30 +.20
1.52 Magnal g 76.30 -.70
1.60 MaguirePr 28.92 -.23
.. MaidenBn d19.50 -.35
.52 MgdHi 6.37 -.02
1.201 Manulifg 50.62 +.27
1.12 Marathon 57.99 +.59
.421 MarintA 68.30 -.28
.68 MarshM 29.06 -.43
MStewd 27.76 +.26
MarvelE 21.95 -.23
.80 Masco 33.54 -.30
.16 MasseyEn 43.61 -.74
MatSci 14.61 -.34
.45f Mattel 18.23 -.15
... MavTube 33.91 +.26
Maxtor 5.40 -.10
.98 MayDS u40.85 -.15
.36m Maytag 17.00 +.80
.551 McDnlds 30.62 -.32
.66 McGrwHs 44.43 -.31
.24 McKesson 44.11 -.46
McAfee 28.48 -.46
.92 MeadWvco 28.28 -.27
... MedcoHIth 48.22
.34 Medtmic 52.96 -.16
.80f MellonFnc 30.23 -.12
1.52 Merck 30.74 -.40
.80f MemillLyn 59.13 -.43
.46f MetiUfe 46.54 +.15
.04 MetrisCos 14.45
.40f MichStrs 41.04 -.36
... MicronT 11.72 -.21
2.34 MidAApt 47.00 +.20
... Midas 23.16 -.96
... Milacron 2.03 -.02
... Millipore 60.74 -.31
2.51 MillsCp 64.14 +.34
.57e MobileTel s 35.75 -.85
... MolinaH 25.41 +.59
.68 Monsnto 64.75 -1.89
1.08 MorgStan 53.96 -.04
.07e MSEmMkt 19.52 +.02
... Mosaic 16.77 -.17
.16b Motorola u20.54 +.54
.73 MunienhFd 11.56 -.02
.45 MurphOs 54.00 +.20
.24f MylanLab 17.66 +.14
.. NCRCps 34.30 -.45
1.48f NalCity 37.34 +.19
1.16f NatFuGas u29.87 +.05
2.17e .NatGrid 46.42 +44
... NOilVarco u51.77 +.30
.08 NatSemi 24.27 -.15
.21a NewAm 2.19 -.01
6.40f NwCentFn 51.80 +.22
1.36 NJRscs 47.73 -.14
1.65 NPlanExd 26.93 -.03
1.00 NYCmtyB 18.30 +.25
.66 NY Times 32.22 +.43
.84 NewellRub 23.67 -.08
... NewfExps 41.89 +.08
.40 NewmtM 37.94 -.49
... NwpkRs u8.15 -.05
.16e NewsCpAn 16.57 -.11
.06e NewsCpBn 17.57 -.08
.92 NiSource 24.31 -.10
1.86 Nicor 41.01 +53
1.00 NikeB 85.23 -1.40
.08 NobleCorp u67.83 +.33
.20 NobleEngy u81.75 -.45
.44e NoklaCp 15.18 -.38
.34 Nordstrms u36.17 -.97
.44 NorfkSo 34.51 -.38


... NortelNet 2,61 -.05
.88 NoFrkBocs 27.97 -.15
.70f NoestUt 21.35 +.01
3.20 NoBordr 51.50 -.35
1.04f NorthropG 56.57 +.30
.86e Novartis 48.73 -.03
1.16 NSTARs 30.12 -.25
.60a Nucors 54.30 -1.02
.72 Nuveenlnv 38.61 +.56
.88 NvFL 15.85 -.09
,89 NvIMO 15.42 -.04
1.33 OGEEngy 29.47 +.07
.32 OMICp 19.15 +.10
.15f Oakley 18.51 -.39
1.24 OcciPet u82.68 -.22
... OffcDpt 28.13 +.07
.60 OfficeMax 29.54 -.07
.80 Olin 19.35 -.40
.09 Omncre 46.85 -.01
.90 Omnicom 84.04 -.68
... OreSt 21.41 -.66
.531 OshkshTrk 84.11 -.24
.52 OutbkStk 45.89 +.36

1.20 PG&ECp 37.13 +.07
PHHCpn u27.60 +1.10
.18 PMIGrp 40.45 -.54
2.00 PNC 55.26 -.34
.80f PNM Res 28.80 -.07
1.99e POSCO 49.39 -.52
1.88 PPG 64.85 -.73
1.84 PPLCorp 60.85 +.14
.. PaciCre 74.22 +.10
.. Paciv 21.63 -.03
.40 Pal[Cp 30.83 +.11
... ParPharm d28.62 -.39
PaylShoe 20.67 -.20
.38f PeabdyEs u62.33 -3.03
2.76 Pengrthg 23.31 +.31
2.60f PenVaRs 51.70 -.29
.50 Penney u56.87 -.71
.52 Pentair 44.48 -.69
.27 PepBoy "13.68 -.23
.321 PepsiBott 29.32 -.29
1.04 PepsiCo 54.57 -.26
.34 PepsiAmer 25.80 +04
1.15e Prmian 16.95 -.28
3.18e PetChina u86.06 +2.36
.598e PetrbrsA 42.78-2.46
1.75e Petrobrs 49.54 -2.32
..76 Pfizer 26.42 -.08
1.501 PhelpD 107.11 -1.69
.52e PhilipsEl 26.99 -.05
.92 PiedNGs 24.41
.40 Piert 14.11 -.22
.06 PilgrimsPr 37.20 +.35
.89a PimooStrat 12.47 -.21
.20 PioNrl 43.03 -.18
1.24 PitnyBw 44.01 +.58
.10 PlacerD 14.80 -.42
... PlansEx 38.44 -.52
.20 Plantron 35.44 -1.20
1.52 PlumCrk 36.34 -.34.
1.80 PostPrp u38.59 +.15
.72 Praxair 48.47 -.24
.08 Premcor 76.63 +.44
... Prideint 26.03 +.31
3.60 Primewg u27.99 +.74
.55 PrinFnd 43.97 -.02
1.12 ProctGam 54.94 -.05
2.36 ProgissEn 44.14 -.31
1.48 Prologis 43.32 -.08
.27 ProsStHiln 3.42 -.03
... Providian 19.18 +.14
.63f Prudent 65.43 +.01
2.24 PSEG 62.18 +.09
1.00 PugetEngy 23.54 -.15


,20 PulteHm 90.19 -3.30
.38 PHYM 7.07 -.01
.60 PIGM 9.68 -.01
.36a PPrIT 6.28 -.01
.54 Quanexs 59.35 -1.65
... QuantaSvc 9.99 -.08
.36 QstDiags 51.12 -.50
... Quiksilvrs 16.34 +.06
... QwestCm 3.75 -.04
.60 RPM 18.92 -.05
.25 RadioShk 23.64 -.09
1.00e Ralcorp 39.53 -.62
.32 RJamesFn 30.01 -.17
2.48 Rayonier 54.25 +.05
.88 Raytheon 39.25 -.17
1.34 Rltylncos 24.85 -.03
1.70 Recksn 34.15 +.41
.30 Reebok 43.07 -.37
1.20 RegalEnt 18.20. -.26
1.36 RegionsFn 34.20 -.05
.36 ReinsGp 42.95 -.03
... ReliantEn 12.89
.80 RenalsRe d42.98 -4.25
.63e Repsol 27.97 +.15
.48 RepubSv 37.11 -.45
RetailVent u13.88 +.13
Revlon 3.32 -.01
... RiteAid 4.37 +12
.28 RobtHall 33.67 -.52
.90 RockwlAut 53.82 -.77
1.16f RoHaas 46.08 -.03
.25e Rowan 32.08 +01
.52 RylCarb 48.17 -.24
2.82e RoylDut 61.06 -.22
RoyDShAn 61.11 -.09
1.66e Royce 19.80 +.17
.20 RyersTull 17.15 -.06
24 Rylands 79.11 -2.86

.36e SAPAG 43.00 -.79
1.29 SBCCom 23.83 +.11
1.56 SCANA 42.04 -.54
1.13e SKTIcm 20.60 -.05
.88f SLMCp 50.72 -.50
.12e STMicro 17.58 -.24
.36 SabreHold d18.99 -.21
.20 Safeway 23.54 -.21
.56 StJoe 82.80 -.38
... SUudes 46.75 +.13
.921 StPaulTrav 40.75 -.34
... Sakslf 19.61 -.06
1.65a SalEMlnc2 13.58 -.06
.14e SalmSBF u13.70 -.04
2.94e SJuanB u45.43 +.68
.83e Sanofi 42.43 +.13
.79 SaraLee 19.52 +.07
.23e Satyam 28.00 -1.10
.22 ScherqaP 20.73 +.19
.84 Schlmb u84.88 +2.60
.09f Schwab 13.60 -.21
.04 SciAitanta 36.92 -.28
1.65e ScottPw 35.47 +.06
.321 SeagateT 18.52 +.21
1.16 SempraEn 42.05 -.22
.60 Senslent 19.00 +.14
.10 SvceCp 8.52 +.07
... ShawGp 18.97 -.54
.. ShopKo 25.26 +.06
2.24f Shurgard 46.31 +.07
3.32e SiderNac 17.24-1.16
... SierrPac 12.35 -.20
... SilcnGphh .66 +02
2.80 SimonProp 77.22 +.41
... SixFlags 5.12 -.08
.64 SmithAO 27.57 -.20
.48 Smithlntl 68.33 -1.21
... Solectm 3.69 -.01


.24e SonyCp 34.40 -.23
1.49 SouthnCo 35.21 -.13
5.49e SPeruC 49.95 -.54
.02 SwstAis 14.26 -.14
.. SwnEngys 54.15 +.65
.16 SovrgnBcp 24.16 -.22
.50 SpmtFON 25.12 -.16
.84 Standex 28.90 -.82
1.12 StanlWk 49.53 +04
.84 StaiwdHlf 62.48 -1.01
.72f StateStr 49.75 +.08
.16 Steris 26.93 +.15
... StorTch 36.44 +.02
... sTGodn 42.51 +.06
.09 Stryker 52.92 -.17
.40 SturmR 8.75 -.34
2.52 SunCmts 34.06 -.39
.24 Suncorg 49.70 +.63
... SunGard 35.75 -.01
1.60 Sunoco u123.33
2.20 SunTrst 74.81 -.37
.SupEnrgy u20.28 +.2
.61 Supvalu 33.68 +32
.02 Symbrr 11.40 -.08
.73 Synovus u29.84 -.02
.60 Sysco 36.29 -.36
.85 TCFFnds 28.14 -.36
.80 TDBknorh 29.38 -.20
.76 TECO 19.01 +.05
.24 TJX 24.02 -.18
2.25 TXUCorp 84.06-1.18
4.06 TXU p 68.40 -.86
.32r TaiwSemi 9.01 -.20
.34f TalismEg 42.14 +.27
.401 Target 58.72 -.38
1.36e TelNorL 14A7 -.91
.65e TelMexLs 19.48 -.33
.. TelspCel 4.17 -.13
TempurP 17.43 -.53
.. TenetHt 12.04 -.07
2.70f Teppco 42.60 +.30
.. Teradyn 15.70 -.23
... Terra 7.90 -.19
2.45e TerraNito u30.11 +.31
.20 Tesoro 48.45 -.34
... TetraTech 35.72 -.28
.30 Texind u70.50 +.17
.121 Texlnst 30.60 -.16
1.40 Textron 75.89 -1.33
... Theragen 3.23 -.01
... Thermo 29.11 -.06
... ThmBet 31.37 +02
2.72 Thombg 29.69 -.16
1.68 3MCo 74.17 -.54
.60 TidwV 40.73 +.01
.321 Tiffany 33.71 -.44
.20 TimeWarn 16.51 -.13
.60 Timken 26.66 +.22
... TitanCp u23.03 +.02
.. Todco u29.90 -.02
.40 ToddShp 19.14 -.11
... TollBross 54.85 -2.15
.68e TorchEn 7.05
.44 Trchmrk 52.16 +.15
1.60 TorDBkg 46.65 +11
3.53e Total SA 125.55 +1.24
.241 TotalSys 24.71 -.29
1.72 TwnCtry 28.79 +10
... Transocn u58.27 -.40
.16 Tredgar 16.02 -.65
.24f TriContI 18.43 -.05
... TiadH 49.20 -120
.30 TriarcB u15.00 -.15
.72 Tribune 386.82 +.05
.80 TrizecPr 21.19 +.09
.40 Tvcolndt 29.97 -.63
.16 Tyson 18.47 -.43
2.88 UILHold 54.97 -.38


2.20 USTInc 45.03 -.62
1.54e UUniao 35.07 -1.71
.15 UniFirst' 44.79 -.15
1.20 UnionPac 68.14 -.32
.. Unisys 6.42 -.05
1.20 UDomR 24.63 +.18
.321 UtdMicro 4.14 -.08
1.32 UPSB 72.70 -.22
1.20 USBancrp 30.41 -.18
.401 USSteel 41.63 -.93
.88 UtdTechs 50.45 -.69
.02 Utdhlth s 50.80
.32 UnvHIth 57.06 -.13
.. UnMsion 27.61 -.34
.80 Unocal 64.90 -.10
.30 UnumProv 19.25 -.15


.31 ValeantPh 19.40 +.48
.401 VaeroEs 84.25 +.90
.88 VKHilncT 3.77 +.03
.VarianMs 38.20 -.04
1.18 Vectren 28.86 -.03
1.62 VerizonCm 34.02 -.15
.28 ViacomB 32.45 -.43
.22 VintgPt 34.83 -.65
Vishay 13.26 -.38
.. Visteon 8.40 +.33
.75e Vodafone 25.37 +.39
.18 Wabash 20.61 -.16
1.84 Wachovia 50.37 -.15
.60 WalMart 49.45 -.09
.26f Walgm 46.37 -.31
1.92f WAMut u43.60 +.06
.80 WsteMInc 29.09 -.26
... WatsnPh 29.34 -.26
... Weathflnt u63.16 +.58
.20 Wellmn 10.37 -.21
... WellPoints 66.96 -.06
1.92 WelsFrgo 61.84 +.09
.54 Wendys 45.79 +22
.92 WestarEn u24.18 -.07
.82a WAsiTIP2 12.52 -.04
.. WDigit 14.09 -.05
.20 WstnGasR u39,83 +1.03
2.00 Weyerh 67.55 -.79
1.72 Whrlpl u82.68 +5.50
1.45e WilmCS 16.55
.30f WmsCos u2O.83, +.03
.361 Winnbgo 35.50 -.07
.88 WiscEn 39.12 +.17
.68 Worthgtn 17.40 -.40
1.12 Wrigley 69.38 -.13
.92 Wyeth 45.88 -,.27
.20 XTOEgys 36.32 +.06
.86f XcelEngy 19.10 -.16
-. Xerox 13.20 -.85
.25 YankCdl 32.40 -.20
.80 Yorkin 41.62 -.80
.46f YumBrds 52.80 +.03
.. Zimmer 81.35 +.13
.54 ZweigTI 5.16 +.02


I A MaERI CAN STOCKaXC G


Div Name Last Chg
.42 AbdAsPac 6.30 -.01
Ableauctn .47 -.02
Abraxas u4.25 +.33
.30f AdmRsc 21.75 +.40
AdvPhot 3.09 -.08
Adventrx 3.02 +.22
...Alteon .35 +.03
AmO&Gn 5.41 +.21
... AmOrBion u2.50 +.20
.. Anooraqg .93 +.01
.. ApolloG g 29
... AanrPh 329 -niT


... Avitar .06
.... BemaGold 2.25 -.02
.04e BiotechT 187.28 -2.47
... BootsCts 1.31 +.02
.08e BrdbdHT 16.97 +.08
CalypteBn .18 -.02
... CdnSEng 1.97 -.01
CanAmrio .82 +.13
.28 CarverBcp 17.05
... CelsionCp .41 +.02
... Chenieres 33.08 -.44
.28 ComSys 10.39 -.11
CorwMold 8.92 -2.38


... Crystallxg 3.25 +.01
... DHBInds 8.81 -.23
2.10e DJIADiam 106.13 -.35
... DSLnet h .08
... DanlHd 12.70 -.05
... ENGlobal u641 +.46
... EagleBbnd .22
... ecCity 1.05 -.01
.30e Elswth 7.70 -.04
.38a FTrVLDv 15.01 -.06
.62f FlaPUO 22.50 -.08
... GascoEn n 4.01 -.09
... GeoGlobal 7.76 -.41


... GlobeTen 2.12 -.07 .28e iShMexdo 28.45 -.66
... GoldStrg 3.10 -.05 .28e iShSing 8.00 -.14
... GreyWolf 8.06 +.03 2.46e iShSP500u123.24 -.30
... Gurunetn 15.58 +.35 .80e iShEmMklsu75.36 -.66
.. Harken .46 .. 4.04e iSh20TB 93.21 -.34
.. HomeSol 1.78 +.13 .80e iShEAFEs 53.40 -.15
1.26 INGGRE u15.85 +.05 ...iShNaBo 75.25-1.04
... ISCOInt .28 ... 1.53e iShR1000V 68.40 -.24
.46e IShBrazil 23.65 -1.41 .58e iShRlO00G 49.98 -.18
.27e IShHK 13.10 -.12 1.08e iShR2000Vsu67.35 -.54
.04e iShJapan 10.20 -.06 26e iShR2OOOG 68.42 -.43
.10e iShKor u35.28 +15 .77e iShRs2000s66.88 -.44
.16e iShMalasia 7.55 -.01 2.55e iShREsts 66.35 +.16


.49e iShSPSil]usI.6.4 -.4 9
... ImpIntSc 6.84 +.74
... IntgSys 2.35 -.27
... Intermixn 11.68 -.04
... IntrNAP .44
... IntntHTr 58.40 -.14
... Isolagen 5.22 +.07
... IvaxCDS u25.17 +2.29
... KFXInc 16.75 +.36
... MadCatzg 1.06 -.05
... Mediast u6.66 +31
... Merrimac 9.00 -.09
... Metallic g 1.03 -.03


... MeaTuml H, L.6I .0; ... if oyat 4.05 -.11
... Mpower 1.47 +.10 4.73e RegBkHT 138.11 -.04
... Nabors u65.98 +42 3.97e RetailHT 101.09 -.83
54e OilSvHT u112.68 +1.29 ... Rewards 5.15 -.05
... On2Tech .67 +.04 .18e SemiHTr 36.98 -24
1.92 PetrofdEg 16.95 +.11 2.34e SPDR 123.19 -.35
1.66e PhmHTr 72.13 -.43 126e SPMid u130.40 -.30
... PionDril 14.96 +.01 .54e SPMatls 28.53 -.24
... PwShBion 16.20 -.30 .38e SPHIhC 31.21 -.19
... Prvena 1.02 -.03 .40e SPCnSt 23.20 -.08
1.44 ProvETg 11.15 +.02 .25e SPConsum 34.30 -.27
.. Qnstakegn .24 ... .55e SPEny u47.83 +.44
... Questcor .62 ... .68e SPFnd 30.03 -.12


.416 oh id. 30.L8 -.L-
.42e SPTech 20.85 -.11
.94e SPUtil 31.81 +.01
... Stonepath .91 +.03
... TGCIndsn u9.48 +2A3
.35 TelDatas 39.69 -.20
.35 TelDspin 38.21 +.01
... Telkonet 5.19 +.09
... TransGIb 6.06 -.15
... UltraPtos u37.10 +.60
... VaalcoE 4.16 +.16
... Wstmlnd 27.15 -.30
... WlssXcesnul2.48 +1.85


NASDAQNATN M


Div Name Last Chg

.. A4Sun u7.34 +1.64
ACMoore 27.00 +.39
ADCTelrs 24.31 -.43
.. ADECp 25.66 -.54
ASMLHId 17.64 -.18
ATITech 12.90 -.05
.. ATMI Inc 32.95 -.13
ATPO&G 26.83 +.05
ATSMed 3.69 +.08
A...astrom 2.80 -.17
... Abgenix 10.22 -.42
.. AbleEnr 17.40 -.82
... AbleLabs 1.23 -.27
.. AccHme 46.15 -1.40
... Actvisn s 18.41 -.04
.. Acusphere 5.57 -.08
.20 Acxiom 20.06 -.57
AdamsResn26.87 +46
.. Adaptec 4.30 -.05
.. AdobeSys 29.65 -.13
.. AdolorCp 10.01 -.47
.36f Adhran 26.80 -.07
.451 Advanta 26.49 -.40
.54f AdvantB 28.59 -.36
.. AdventSft u23.79 +1.87
.. Aeroltex 9.06 -.12
.. Affymet 45.10 -.87
.. AgileSft 6.50 -.05
.. AkarmaT 14.46 -.11.
1.54e Akzo 40.88 -.08
.. Alamosa 15.71 -.03
... Alderwds u15.98 +.96
.40f Aldila 22.58 -.05
.90 AlexBId 53.10 -1.72
... AlignTedch 6.18 +12
... Alkerm 15.49 -.36
.. Allscripts 16.58 +.04
..AltairNano 2.96 +.02
.. AlteraCp 22.53 +.33
Alvarion 9.58 +.02
Amazon 37.95
.12 AmegyBcs 22.91 -.16
AmrBiowt .27
3.00f AmCapStr u37.48 -.27
.301 AEagleOs 32.37 -.83
.. AmrMeds 22.05 -.04
.. AmPharm 41.75 -1.79
.40 APwCnv 25.70 -.04
... AmSupr 10.98 +.75
Ameritrade 19.48 -.12
.. Amoen 81.07 -.24
.. AmkorT 5.74 +.01
... Amylin 19.77 -1.44
.. Anadigc 2.27 +.05
.32 Anlogic 49.29 -1.11
.. Analysts 3.88 -.06
.. AnlySur 1.96 -.03
.. AnchrGls d.48 -.07
.. Andrew 13.04 -.05
.. AndrxGp 21.69 +.04
.. AngloDyn 22.69-2.91
.. Antgncs 6.55 -,04
.. Aphton l.00 .03
ApolloG 72.05 +.47
1.24f Apollolnv 18.09 +232
ApoleCs 43.81 -.19
.06 Applebees 26.52 +.12
.. AppidDigl 3.40 -.04
..ApIdlnov 4.70 -.14
.12 ApIdMatl u18.18 -.12
.. AMCC 3.08 -.15
.. aQuantive 17.65 -.48
.. AiadP 7.18 -.20
.. AribaInc 5.80 -.08
.48 ArkBest 34.80 -1.19
.06e ArmHId 6.27 -.05
.. Arotech 1.11
.. Anrs 9.46 +.01
.. AtTech 1.15 -.01
.. AspectCm 11.36 -.01
1.08f .AsscdBanc 34.27 -.20
Afheros 9.94 -36
.. Almel 2.75 -.03
... Audible 16.96 -1.25


_... AudCodes 9.88 -.12
Audvox 17.76 +.21
.03 Autodsks 35.60 -.29
Avanex 1.00 -.04
... AvidTch 42.72 -.23
AvoctCp. 34.36 +.15
Aware u6.94 +.12
... Axcelis 7.38 -.04
...BE Aero u16.57 -.20
BEASys 8.79 -.04
.04 BEITch 34.71 -.11
... BOSLtd 2.69 +.07
Bankrate 22.20 -.38
... BeaconP 1.26 +.11
BeasleyB 16.08 -.53
.16 BebeStrss 28.00 -.57
... BedBath u46.14 +.14
Bogenldc 38.50 +.04
... BoMarin 8.55 -.09
.25e Biomet 37.37 +51
Bopurers 1.46 +.07
BioScoip 6.70 +.27
.. Bosite 58.63 -2.08
.48 BobEvn 23.91 -.04
.. Bodand 6.19 -.06
... BostnCom 2.03 -.12
BrigExp 8.39 -.01
Brdcom 42.27 -.73
.. Broadwing 5.36 +.11
BredeCm 9 4.38 +.14
.34a BrklneB 16.01 -.34
... BrooksAul 16.44 +.02
.40f BklgMat u80.13 +.22
... BusnObj 27.85 -.12
... C-COR 7.40 +14
.. CDCCpA 3.08 -.07
.43f CDWCorp 62.83 -.03
.60 CH Robn 59.34 -.95
... CMGI 1.94 -.04
CNET 11.48 -.21
CSGSys 17.64 -.29
CVThera 26.96 +.14
CabotMic 32.99 +.24
CalDive u58.35 +.26
.28 CalmsAstn 29.28 +.10
.61 CapCtyBks 35.27 -.56
.. CpsinTrb 1.87 +.15
.. CareerEd 35.91 -.97
.. Catultyrs 15.65 -1.74
.. Celgenes 46.90 -1.26
CellGens 6.06 -.24
... Celrhera 2.77 -.13
Centillm 2.70 +.05
Cephin 42.24 -.61
.. Cemer u74.03 -.98
... CerusCp u5.53 +53
... Chaparral w119.05-1.45
ChalRsse 14.94 -.06
... ChrmSh 11.65 -.15
... ChartCm 130 +.03
... ChartSemi 8.40 -.40
Chattem u46.02 -.06
ChkPoint 22.95 -.07
ChkFree 33.51 +.19
Checkers 13.19 +.12
S"Ch-,e." 86.43 +.52
:.r,,,,lH, 46.61 -.03
,'r,.:,, 35.52 -.09
.50 ChrchllD 46.03 -.13
.. CienaCp 2.22 -.08
.321 Cintas 45.23 -.09
CiphrBio 2.15 +.09
.. Cirrus u7.49 +.06
... Cisco 18.85 -.47
CitrixSy 22.21 +.01
CleanH u24.42 -.28
Cogentn 29.12 -.63
CogTech 48.84 +.52
.. Cognosg 38.57 +.23
Coherent u38.30 -.38
... CldwtrCrs u25.25 -.33
... Comarco 7.62 -.23
... Comcast 30,51 +.07
... Comcso 29.70 +.15
.301 CmrdCapB 19.15 +42
... CmclVehn 22.39 -.38
1.40 CompsBc 48.84 -.16


... CmpuDyn 8.57 +1.12
.. Compuwre 8.04 +01
... Covers 24.70 +.19
... ConcCm 2.32 +.12
Conexant 1.91 +.03
... Conmed 30.84 -.73
... Connetcs 17.69 -.47
Conolog 1.76 +.11
ConsolCm nul4.09 +.30
... CorinthC 13.36 -.03
.. Cosl Inc u8.83 +.50
.46f Costco 45.92 -.03
Craylnc 1.29 '+.06
.. CredSys 10.69 +.05
.. Creeinc 27.75 +.37
.. CubistPh 16.03 -.73
CumMed 12.89 +.05
CuronMed d.48 -.02
.. Cyberonic 44.07 +1.55
.. Cymer 34.81 +.03
.. Cytogen 5.23 +.07
.. Cytyc 23.81 +.04

.06 D&KHIth u1440 +01
... DRDGOLD 1.04
... DXPEnt 10.85-1.44
.24 DadeBeh u67.89 -1.22
Danka 1.91 -.02
Datawatch 4.31 +.43
... DayStar u14.14 -1.46
... DayStrwtB 6.18 -.87
DeckOut 27.89 -.36
deodGenet 9.56 -.43
... Dellinc 41.28 -.01
... DtaPIr 16.62 +30
.. Dndreon 5.82 -.45
... Dennysn 5.89 -.11
.24 Dentsply 52.41 +.51
... DigeneCp 27.90 -.11
Digilntl 11.38 +41
.DigiRec 3.10 -.09
... DigRiver 36.52 +.04
... Digtas 11.23 -.05
.. DscHIdAndl4.05 -.94
... DiscvLabs 8.96 -.14
.. DsatEnSy u6.09 +.42
... DitechCo 7.22 +.09
... DobsonCm 6.87 +.02
... DIlrTree 24.42 -.04
... DotHill 6.03 -.10
... drugstore 3.71 -.02
.80 DryShIpsndl5.04 -.97
... DurectCp 5.99 +09
.20 DynMat 40.72 +.03
... eBays 40.88 -.14
.. EGLinc 19.95 -.65
... eResrch 14.26 -.24
... EZEM 14.65 -.15
EagleBlkn 12.73 -.26
.. ErthUnk 9.17 -.23
.20 EstWstBcp 35.64 +.17
1.00e EchoStar 28.99 -.09
... Edipsys 13.90 +10
... eCosLcm n 3.76 -.09
.15f EduDv 10.40
... 8x8Inc 2.01 -.02
... EectSci 19.99 +.07
... Ectrgls 3.90 +10
... ectArts 61.90 +1.04
... EFII 21.31 -.20
.. tekLtd 2.72 +.27
... Emcore 5.24 -.22
.. EmmisC 19.86 +.64
EncysiveP 12.52 -.20
EndoPhrm 27.31 +1.08
EndWve 4395 -1.22
EngyConv 24.96 -.29
... Entegis ul11.77 +.11
1.92 Enterrags 25.53 +A64
.. Entrust u5.61 +.20
EnzonPhar 7.96 -.10
.. EpicorSft 14.39 -.49
Epiphany 3.75 -.05
.36e EricsnTi 34.20 -.18
.. EvrgrSIr 6.86 +23
Exar 16.32 -.10


... EadeTc 4.98 +.03
.301 Expdlnt 55.19 -.14
ExpScripts 48.52 +.13
... ExtNetw 4.91 -.09
Eyetech 12.28 +.09
... Ezcorp 15.31 +.72
... F5Netw 41.77 +.04
FLIRSyss 33.87 +.89
... FargoEl 19.00 -2.76
.62 Fastenal 62.60 -.56
1.40 FifthThird 42.42 +.05
.. FReNet 28.30 -.70
... Finisar 1.05 -.01
.10 FnUnes 18.19 +.17
... FrstHrzn 22.31 -.06
.401 FstNiagara 14.60 -.31
1.08 FstMerit u28.80 +.40
... ser 42.75 -.85
... Rextm 13.67 -.23
.. FLYi .72 -.01
... FocusEn .66 +.03
... FocusMed n 18.06 +.26
.. FormFac 24.41 +.59
.16 ForwrdAs u31.58 -.91
... Forward u24.00 +4.01
FosterWhn 20.19 +.12
Foundry 11.25 +.11
FoxHollwn 42.80 -.29
.08 Fredslnc u19.38 +.33
.. FuelCell 10.16 -.35
Ft... rmdia .59 +.03

GFIRGrpn 34.33 -1.99
.. Gemrnstar 3.53 -.10
.. GenProbe 44.35 +.06
.. Genaera 1.72 -.06
GeneLgc 4.56 -.06
.. GeneLTc .58 ...
GenesMcr 24.66 -.03
.. Genitope 12.21 -.23
.. Genta 1.23 -.03
.34 Gentexs 17.61
... Genzyme 67.81 -.97
.. Geores 14.66 -.77
GeronCp 9.58 -.23
... GigaTr 6.53 -.09
...GigaMed 1.86 -.19
... GileadScis 42.85 -1.62
Glenayre 4.10 -.10
... Globlind 9.74 -.16
... GiblePnt u6.45 -.48
GoldKistn 20.96 +.16
Gooslen 295.85 -6.55
... GuilfrdPh 3.37 +.05
.88 HMNFn 31.50 +.35
.20 HanmiFns 18.50 -.75
... Hansen 90.23 -1.87
.80 HarbrFL 37.89 -.03
Harmonic 5.15 -.03
HayesLm 7.78 +.13
.32 HelixTech 17.91 +.02
... HScheins u43.19 +.45
... Hittten d18.55 -.90
... HollisEden 9.29 +.16
Hologic 37.46 -1.07
... HomeStore 2.68 -.19
... HotTopic 17.40 -.05
.. HouseValn 16.89 -1.11
HubGrps 29.84 -1.40
.281 HudsCilvs 11.80 +.02
... HudsonHisu19.26 -.28
... HumGen 14.15 -.49
.24 HuntJBs 19.30 -.70
.86 HuntBnk 25.19 -.11
... HutchT 33.14 +.15
.. HyperSolu 46.38 +1.11
... 12Techn u12.61 +1.60
... IAC Interac 26.78 -.01
.. ICOS 23.62 +.07
... IPIXCp 4.13 +.75
... iPass 6.12 -.15
iPaymnt 36.31 -.68
.. IconlxBr u9.48 +.67
... Identix 5.45 +.10
ImaxCp 10.30 -.29
... Imclone 35.08 -.87


... Immucors 28.07 -.49
... ImpaxLablt 15.51 -.18
... Incvte 7.42 -1.34
... IndevusPh 3.30 -.02
... InfoSpce 33.25 -1.25
,20e infoUSA 11.91
... Infcrssing 9.76 +.22
... InFocus 4.56 +.21
I.. Informant ul0.65 -.01
.26e Infosyss +71.54 -.66
... InnovSols 18.03 +.02
.32p Instinet 5.17 -.03
IntegCirc 20.95 -.02
... IntgDv 10.84 +.06
... ISSI 8.99 +.04
.32 Intel 26.52 -.23
Intellisync 2.56 +.03
.32a InterTel 20.97 -.08
... Interchg n 8.22 -.35
InterDig 16.85 -.36
... InterMune- 15.15 -.48
.06 IntSpdw 59.03 -.18
... IntmtnitJ 9,60 -.16
... IntntSec 22.16 -.62
.16 Intersil 19.14 -.33
... Interwovn 7.78 +.15
... Inrawre .37
... Intuit 48.41 +.05
IntSurg 49.71 -.46
.08 InvFnSv 34.20 +.04
... Invitrogn 85.03 -.71
... onalron n 7.21 -.01
... Isonics 3.40 +.14
... lron u52.60 +1.53
... ivanhoeEn 2.30 -.01
a... b 16.96 -.85

.. j2GIob 36.47 -.28
.. JDSUniph 1.67 -.01
.18 JackHenry 19.20 -.33
... "JkksPac 16.86 -1.33
.. Jamdatn 30.07 +.90
.. JetBlue 20.49 -.47
.. Jmar 1.43 +.15
.45 JoyGlbis 37.10 -.65
.. JnprNtw 23.03 -.81
.. Jupitrmed 21.35 -.28
.48 KLATnc 50.03 -.22
.. KeryxBio 16.04 +.05
Kforce 8.74 -.17
KnghtCap 8.22 -.03
Komag 31.83 -.32
KopinCp 5.71 -.20
.. KosPhr 70.03 +.55
.. KosanBlo 8.96 +63
Kronos 44.64 -1.04
Kulicke u9.65 -.11
... Kyphon 38.36 +1.30
.32 LCAViss 44.60 +2.02
LKQCp u28.75 +1.10
.40 LSI Inds 14.83 -.29
... LTX 5.93 -.21
... Ladish 15.12 -.14
.. LamRsch 28.67 -.31
... LamarAdv 43.98 +.02
Landstars 33.05 -1.00
... Lasrscp 31.15 +1.83
.. Lattice 5.21 -.10
Laureate 44.04 -1.14
.. LawsnSft 5.44 -.03
... LeapWiren 30.11 +.06
... Level 2.07 -.03
... LexarMd 5.32 -.07
... UbtyGiobA u48.19 -.40
... Lfecell u20.38 +3.99
UfePtH 47.34 -.66
... UgandB If 7.81 -.28
... Uncare 39.31 -.54
.72 UncEl u36.80 +.13
.40 UnearTch 40.62 -.44
... Lionbrdg 6.97 -.40
LodgEnt 16.38 -26
.. Logilchs u36.10 +31
LookSmart .71
Loudeye .74 -.01
.36 Lufklns u48.00 -.16


M-SysFD 23.92 +.47
1.68 MCGCap 18.11 -.03
1.60 MCIIncn 25.48
... MDI Inc .87 +.43
... MGIPhr 25.90 -.18
... MIPSTech 9.15 -.20
... MIVA 6.60 +.01
.32 MTS 33.95 -1.00
MaceSec 2.77 +22
... MacroCh .26
Macnrmdia 40.31 -.17
.05r Magal 10.40 +.36
... MagelPt 2.94 -.11
MagnaEnt 6.33 -.14
Majescon 3.35 +.25
... Martek 43.27 -.76
MarvellT 42.94 +.12
MatridxOII 4.80 +.06
... Mattson 8.89 -.12
.80 Maxim 42.68 +.19
MaxwIlT 12.72 +15
... McDataA 5.05 -.06
... MechTch 2.88 +.27
... Medimun 27.08 -.17
... Medarex 9.75 -.30
MedAct 18.57 +.01
MediCo 21.09 -.41
... MentGr 10.53 -.32
... Merclntr 38.01 -.02
.30 MetalMg 23.17 -.81
MetalsUSA 19.92 +.04
... Micrel 12.57 -.15
.28 Microchp 31.56 -.15
... Mcromse 5.77 -.04
... Micros s 44.36 +54
MicroSemi 22.15 -.32
.32a Microsoft 25.69 +.01
... MicroStr 68.75 +.95
... Microtune 6.95 +.04
... MillCell 1.81 +.14
MillPhar 9.84 -.09
Mindspeed 1.24 -.02
.. Misonix 6.71 +32
... Momenta 24.26 -.92
... MnstrWw 28.29 -.50
.12 MovieGal 25.12 -.38
MultmGm 12.40 +20
NABIBio 14.27 -.41
NETgear 20.79 -.21
NIlHkldg 63.70 -.88
NPSPhm 11.45 -.25
NTLInc 67.38 +.75
Nanogen 4.33 -.09
Napster 4.78 +.46
.41e Nasdl0OTr 39.27 -.15
Nasdaqn 19.85 +.80
.72 NashF 41.34 +2.02
Nastech 13.91 -.12
NatAtHn u12.26 +.06
Navarre 7.40 -.05
NektarTh 19.35 -.05
.90e NetServic 2.32 -.52
.. Net2Phn 1.82 -.03
.. Net[Q, 11.86 +.01
Netease 57.94 +.88
Netfix 16.96 +.56
.. NetwkAp 27.06 -.31
Neurcrine 51.16 -.64
NexMed 1.79 +.19
.. NexteiC 32.57 -.17
NextPrd 24.05 -.18
NilroMed 20.83 -.70
.20e NobltyH 26.55 -.05
.84 NorTrst 50.76 -.45
.. NwstAld 4.45 -.15
... Novatel 36.21 +1.88
.. NvWrls 13.62 -25
.. Novell 6.13 +.03
.. Novlus 28.76 -.14
NuHoriz 6.74 +.02
.. NuanceC 4.82 -.03
... NutiSys 17.88 +.01
Nvidia 2598 +15
.. Nytlxinc u7.54 +.38
... o 7cr u 17 ...
... OReillyAs 30.85 +.27


.. OSI Phim 44.64 -1.03
.. OccuLogxn 9.06 +.19
OmniVisn 14.24 -.07
.. OnAssign 5.31 +.13
.. OnSmcnd u5.01 -.59
... OnyxPh d22.30 -1.64
.. OpnwvSy 17.62 -.66
OplinkC 1.67 +.02
.. Opsware 5.60 -.23
.08f OptonCrs 13.54 +.06
Oracle 13.79 -.01
OraSure 11.15 -.11
OrcktCm s 24.60 -1.58
... Orthfx 44.15 -.04
.. Oscdent 2.99 +.11
1.12 OtterTail 28.21 -.72
.. Overstk 41.11 +.16

PETCO 27.80 -.55
.. PFChng 63.61 -.38
.. PMCSra 9.92 +.01
... PSSWrid 13.89 -.41
.84 Paccar 74.39 -1.41
.. PacSunwr 23.42 +.14
.. Packetr 12.00 -.22
.. Palm nc 27.43 -1.26
.. PalmSrce d7.54 -.48
.. PanAShv 15.44 -.21'
.. PaneraBrd 60.98 +.48
.. Paradyne 3.26 +.11
ParPet u9.61 +29
.. ParrTc 6.82 -.09
... Pathmrk 10.44 -.48
... Patersons 41.89 +.39
.16 PattUTI u31.79 +.42
.52 Paychex 34.66 -.23
PnnNGms 36.12 -.12
Peregrine 1.29 +.09
.16 Perrigo 14.00 -.14
.. PelMed u9.00 +.20
.. PetDv 37.27 -.02
.12 PetsMart 29.38 -.07
.. PhrmPdI 57.63 -1.91
.. Pharmion 26.34 -.15
.. PhnxTc 6.36 -.11
.. Photln u26.78 +50
PinnSyst 4.67 -.18
.. Pixars 43.11 -.61
... Pxwks 11.49 -.21
.. Plexus 14.11 -.04
PlugPower 6.46 -.11
.Polycom 16.67 -.25
.. PordPlayn 26.65 -.41
Powrwav 11.35 -.23
.. PraecisP .70 +.02
Prestek 11.83 +.14
.92 PriceTR 66.50 -.24
PrimusT .64 +.03
PriHIthc 27.49 -.08
ProgPh 22.42 -.82
ProtDsg 22.31 -.27
QLT d9.18 -.10
... Qlogic 31.37 -.67
.36 Qualcoms 39.29 -.01
'QuanFuel 4.07 +.01
.. QuestSftw 14.16 -.09
... QuintMarin 11.46 +05
... RFMicD 6.29 +.02
.. RSASec 12.10 +.04
.. Radcom 1.95 +.17
.. ROneD 13.08 -.04
.. Rainmkr .70 +.05
Rambus 13.28 -.17
RealNwk 5.00 -.01
RedHat 15.34 -.26
Redback 7.86 -.15
Regenm 9.52 -.41
RentACt 23.33 -.67
.44 RepBcp 14.74 -.11
RschMotl 68.00 -3.38
ResConns 29.32 -.63
.. RightNown 12.09 +.37
.. RitaMed 3,85 +.30
20 RossSIrs 26.66. -.07
.Ryanair 47.00 -1.26
...RyanRet 13.31 +64


... Corp 4.68 -.73
.221 SElInv 38.00 -1.00
1.00f Safeco.' 54.55 +05
... SanDisk 31.77 +37
... Sanmna 5.20 -.19
... Sapient 8.17 -.37
... Sawis 1.14 +.09
.07 Schnitzer 27.79 -.80
SclClone 6.66 +.33
... SciGames 27.65 -.96
SearsHIdgs158.44 -1.18
.SecureCmp 11.80 +.04
... SeICmfrt 20.00 -.50
76 Seltin 48.07 -.83
Semtech 18.30 +.06
... Seracor 52.35 -2.14
.. Shanda 34.66 +.07
.. Shrplm 14.23 +.64
.17e ShirePh 33.84 -.17
.. ShufflMsts 27.53 +01
SRFTch u18.81 -.15
.10 SiebelSys 8.62 -.02
SierraWr 8.12 +.19
SIgmDg 8.70 +.45
.. SigmaTel 19.91 +.26
... SilLtd u3.91 +.11
.. SilicnImg 12.00 -.10
SlcnLab 29.49 +1.89
... SST 5.14 +29
.12r SIcnware 5.30 -.16
Sina 27.28 -.17
... SiriusS 7.00 +.07
SimaThera u4.05 +1.42
SSkywksSol 7.81 -.05
SmurfStne 11.55
... Sohu.cm 20.91 -.29
SonicCorp 30,95 -.20
SonlcSol 18.89 -.16
... SncWall 6.10 -.05
... Sonusn 484 +.02
.36 SouMoBc 14.50 -.01
.64 SouthFncl 28.95 +.02
... SprtnStr 10.91 -.38
... SpaltaU 5.96 +01
... SpctSg 1.50 +.21
... Spire 10.13 +.04
... Stamps.cm 17.78 -.72
.17 Stlale s u23.20 -.18
StarScien 4.68 +.25
.... Starbucks 50.45 -.87
STATSChp 7.80 -.05
.40 StlDyna- 31.68 -1.19
StemCells 5.02 -.23
Stricycle u56.97 -.37
.StotOfsh u10.61 +.20
Stratex 2.30 +.10
.50 Strayer 82.29 +2.50
StrchMb 2.25 -.11
SunMtro 3.85 -.03
.. SupTech .80 +06
SuperGen 6.79 +.13
.. Supriex u24.72.+1.52
.. SupportSti 5.73 -.06
.. SurModic 38.07 -1.52
.92 SusqBnc 25.80 -.29
.. SwiftTm 22.15 -.53
.. Sycamrelf 3.55 -.07
Symantec s 23.57 -.04
.. Symetric 10.41 -.29
... Synapcs 21.78 +.52
SSynerax uS.00+1.88
.. Syneronn 38.29 -.04
.. opsys 17.95 +02
.. vis 8.55 -.15
.. Qnc 33.38 -.65
.. TLCVision 9.48 -.15
... TrMTch 8.00 -.01
TakeTwos 25.43 +,13
.. TaroPh 25.95 +.12
.. TASERs 9.66 +07
.. TechData 38.47 -.29
.. Tegal .71 -.02
..Tkeec 16.09 +.04
Teleglblnt 4.35 +.66
... Telesys 15.90
.. TelwstG 2224 -.17


.. Teliklnc 16.96 -.37
Tellabs 8.89 +.15
.. Terayon 3.15 -.10
... TesseraT 32.79 +.76
.24e TevaPhrm 31.23 +.07
... Theravncn 19.10 +1.28
Th.. oratc 15.47
.. 3Com 3.53 -.04
... TibcoSft 7.53 +15
... TWTele 6.51 +01
... TiVo Inc 6.32 -.31
TractSupp u54.24 -.02
TrdeStatn 9.72 +.17
Tmskry 37.00 -.36
Tmsmeta .84 -.02
TmSwtc 1.70 -.06
TridMic 28.10 -22
TrimbleN 43.74 +.36
.. TriQuint 3.94 +.02
.60 TrstNY 13.15 -.23
.80 Trustmk 28.23 -.86
.. TumblwdC 3.35 +.10
.65f UAPHIdgnu18.92 +21
.10 UCBHHds 18.77 +38
.. USEnSys 1.51 +.10
.. USUnwirn 6.21 +.01
.. UTStrcm 8.73 -.24
.. UbiquiTI 9.07 -.20
.. Ultratech u22.35 +.47
.80 UtdOnIn 11.48 -.02
... USEnr 3.62 +.15
.10 UnivFor u47.93 -.66
.. UrbanOut 61.00 -1.60

VCA Ants 23.70 +.62
ValueClick 12.72 -.19
VarianS 41.91 -26
VascoDta u11.15 -.33
Vasogeng 5.57 -.20
Veecolnst 18.85 +.45
Ventv 21.72 -.08
Verisiqn- 25.79 +1.09
.. VersoTch .43
VertxPh 16.37 -.77
VerticiNet .74 +.08
.. ViaNet .09 ...
Vicuron 28.10 -.22
... Vignetters 14.60 +.20
... ViisageT 5.23 +.08
... VionPhm 2.75 -.08
..V. roPhrm 11.60 +.68
... ViroLogc 2.43 -.09
... Vitesse 2.21 -.01
... Vitrang 17.39 -.05
.. Volcomn u35.20 -.57
..Volterra 12.56 +.36
1.50e Volvo 41.38 -3.91
.15 WSIinds 3.89 +.38
.80f WashFed 23.49 +.06
.. WaveSys 1.11 +.10
.. WebMD 10.57 -.14
.. WebSIden 14.74 -.79
.. Websense 50.97 -.93
.161f WemerEni 19.24 -.35
Westell 4.24 +.05
WetSeal 6.09 +.22
1.00f WholeFd 119.18 +.11
WiltdOats 12.83 +.08
... WindRvr 17.30 -.10
Wd... Accep 26.668-45.43
... WordGate 4.30 +.35
... Wynn 56.92 +21
... Sat 36.36 -.04
... XOMA 1.70 -.01
.. Xenova .72
,28f Xlinx 28.67 +,32
Yahoo 33.85 +32
.. YelowRd 54,93 -.73
.. ZebraTs 47.14 +.35
... oneTch 3.26 +02
1.44 ZionBcp 72.73 +.35
... Corp 3.04 -.07
... Zoran 14.40 -.04


i REUSS;ITO* CS F "S e .


Request stocks or mutual lunds Dy
Ariling ire Chronicle. Ann- Stock
Requests, 162-4 N. Mrleadcwcres.
rlvd Crystal River. FL 34-429: or
prH.-ning 563-5660. For stocks. includee
the rnarne 01 the SIOCk. ais market and
Its IrcKer symo10. For mutual funds. lisI
Ine parent company and the exact
name rh me fund.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Australia 1.3115 1.3082
Brazil 2.4415 2.3780
Britain 1.7444 1.7374
Canada 1.2188 1.2187
China 8.1092. 8.1106
Euro .8299 .8289
Hong Konq 7.7731 7.7713
Hungary 203.31 203.44
India 43.440 43.490
Indnsia 9810.00 9770.00
Israel 4.5300 4.5395
Japan 111.50 111.20
Jordan .7085 .7085
Malaysia 3.7490 3.7780
Mexico 10.6970 10.6090
Pakistan 59.63 59.55
Poland 3.41 3.41
Russia 28.6617 28.6143
SDR .6897 .6870
Singapore 1.6606 1.6586
Slovak Rep 32.32 32.18
So. Africa 6.6457 6.5901
So. Korea 1024.30 1019.50
Sweden 7.8145 7.8214
Switzerlnd 1.2964 1.2959
Taiwan 31.70 31.54
U.A.E. 3.6722 3.6727
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show
dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day
Prime Rate 6.25 6.25
Discount Rate 4.25 4.25
Federal Funds Rate 3.25 3.25
Treasuries
3-month 3.33 3.20
6-month 3.54 3.39
5-year 4.07 4.02
10-year 4.25 4.22
30-year 4.47 4.47



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Sep05 59.00 +.35
Corn CBOT Dec05 2411/4 -3'/2
Wheat CBOT Sep05 325Y4 -4,4
Soybeans CBOT Nov05 6821/2 +3
Cattle CME Aug05 78.75 -.50
Pork Bellies CME Aug05 73.02 +2.00
Sugar (world) NYBT Oct05 9.90 +.20
Orange Juice NYBT Sep05 97.50 -.70

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $425.70 $420.40
Silver (troy oz., spot) $7.113 $6.7
Copper(pound) 1.6b80 $1.630-b
NMER =NewYorkMercantile Exchange. CBOT=Chicago
Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Exchange.
NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange.
NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.










TI'UisnAY, JUI.Y 26, 2005 9A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE BUSINESS


4-wk
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AARP Invst:
CapGrr 45.75 -.18 +3.8
GNMA 14.97 -.01 -0.3
Global 28.39 -.11 +3.2
Gthlnc 22.40 -.09 +3.3
Intll 4534 -.01 +2.6
PlhwyCn 11.75 -02 +1.4
PthwyGr 13.47 -.04 +2.7
ShTrmBd 10.02 ... -0.3
SmCoStk 26.57 -.30 +6.5
AIM Investments A:
Agrsvp 10.73 -.05 +4.8
BasValAp33.29 -.18 +2.3
ChartAp 13.10 -.06 +3.1
Constp 23.26 -.12 +4.5
HYdAp 4.49 +.01 +1.7
IntlGrow 20.92 -.07 +3.3
MdCpCEq 30.24 -.16 +4.0
MuBp 8.17 ... -0.4
PremEqty 10.11 -.05 +2.7
SelEqly 18.00 -.10 +2.9
Sumitl 11.37 -.05 +4.2
WeingAp 13.48 -.10 +3.9
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBI17.79 -.10 +4.5
PremEqty 9.34 -.04 +2.8
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 37.99 +.20 +8.7
SmCoGlp 13.07 -.09 +6.6
Utilities 13.42 -.04 +3.3
AMF Funds:
AdjMtg 9.73 ... +0.1
Advance Capital I:
Balancpn18.14 -.05 +1.7
Retlncn 10.05 -.01 -0.5
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt4.70 -.04 +6.8
AlllanceBern A:
AmGvlncA7.54 -.03 -0.5
BalanAp 17.32 -.04 +1.3
GlbTchA p 56.47 -.49 +2.9
GrincAp 3.78 -.01 +2.4
SmCpGrA 23.41 -.24 +6.5
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 19.65 -.10 +5.2
AllanceBern B:
AmGvlncB 7.54 -.02 -0.6
CorpBdBpl12.18-.01 -0.3
GIbTchB 150.99 -.44 +2.8
GrowthBt24.64 -.17 +5.7
SCpGrBt 19.71 -.21 +6.4
USGovlBp7.03 -.01 -1.2
AlllanceBern C:
SCpGrCt 19.76 -.21 +6.4
Allianz Funds C:
GwthCt 18.12 -.11 +4.1
TargtCt 16.18 -.07 +5.0
AmSouth Fds Cl I:
Value 17.34 -.07 +3.2
Amer Century Adv:
EqGropn23.09 -.10 43.9
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n16.90 -.05 +1.9
Eqlncn 8.25 -.02 +2.5
Growth n 20.01 -.14 +3.1
Heritagel n12.86 -.07 +4.6
IncGron 31.54 -.12 +3.1
IntDiscrn 14.01 +.08 +4.5
IntlGrol n 9.13 +.03 +2.1
ULifeScin 5.21 -.03 +2.0
New Opp r n5.71 -.04 +6.1
OneChAgn11.15-.04 NE
RealEstl n27.61 +.07 +5.5
Selectln 38.04 -.14 +3.4
Ultran 29.31 -.11 +3.8
UtLil n 13.46 -.01 +2.8
Valuelnv n 7.59 -.03 +3.4
Amer Express A:
Cal 5.23 ... -0.7
Discover 9.21 -.10 +6.4
DEI 11.64 -.02 +3.7
DivMBd 4.86 ... -0.5
DvOppA 7.45 ... +2.4
EqSel 13.68 +.02 +6.5
Growth 28.05 -.09 +2.2
HiYId 4.45 ... -0.6
Insr 5.45 ... -0.8
MgdAll p 9.78 -.03 +2.8
Mass 5.40 ... -0.9
Mich 5.31 ... -0.7
Minn 5.31 ... -0.7
Mutual p 9.89 -.02 +1.3
NwD 23.94 -.10 +2.7
NY 5.14 ... -0.7
Ohio 5.30 ... -0.7
PreMt 8.79 -.07 +1.6
Sel 8.62 -.01 -0.8
SDGovt 4.77 ... -0.2
Stockp 19.72 -.08 +3.1
TEBd 3.89 ... -0.8
ThdlntI 5.92 -.01 +3.1
Thdilntl 7.24 +.01 +2.7
Amer Express B:
EqValp 10.61 -.03 +3.1
Amer Express Y:
NwDn 24.07 -.10 +2.7
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 18.69 -.08 +3.5
AMutlAp 26.99 -.08 +2.5
BalAp 18.10 -.04 +1.5
BondAp 13.42 -.01 -0.4
CapWAp 19.25 -.01 -0.7
CaplBAp 53.17 -.01 +1.6
CapWGAp34.62-.16 +2.8
EupacAp 36.88 -.26 +2.8
FdlnvAp 33.58 -.06 +4.2
GwthAp 29.00 -.09 +4.1
HITrAp 12.42 ... +1.8
IncoAp 18.61 -.02 +1.7
IntBdAp 13.56 -.01 -0.7
ICAAp 31.37 -.06 +2.9
NEcoAp 21.56 -.08 +4.0
NPerAp 27.94 -.22 +2.6
NwWridA 34.63 -.21 +3.0
SmCpAp 33.14 -.11 +4.3
TxExAp 12.53 +.01 -0.5
WshAp 31.24 -.08 +2.5
American Funds B:
BalBt 18.04 -.04 +1.4
CaplBBt 53.17 -.01 +1.5
GrwthBt 28.07 -.09 +4.0
IncoBt 18.52 -.01 +1.7
CABt 31.24 -.06 +2.8
WashBt 31.07 -.08 +2.5
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 49.18 -.16 +4.6
Ariel 55.22 -.17 +3.2
Artisan Funds:
Int 22.32 +.03 +2.3
MidCap 30.44 -.18 +4.0
Baron Funds:
Asset 55.73 -.26 +5.8
Growth 47.30 -.27 +3.7
SmCap 23.58 -.16 +4.9
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.32 -.01 -0.6
DivMu 14.10 ... -0.6
TxMglntV 22.83 -.06 +2.7
IntVal2 21.44 -.05 +2.6
BlackRock A:
AuroraA 41.68 -.34 +5.8
HYlnvA 8.15 +.01 +2.1
Legacy 13.72 -.08 +3.3
Bramwell Funds:
Growth p 20.35 -.11 +5.3
Brandywine Fds:
Bmdywn n29.63 -.15 +6.0
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldlYn 7.24 +.01 +2.1
CGM Funds:
CapDvn 32.42 -.12 +8.0
Mull n 28.04 ... +2.4
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncAp30.22 -.08 +2.5
GrwthAp 52.74 -.29 +4.0
GrowthC t 50.61 -.29 +3.9
Calvert Group:
Inclp 17.10 -.01 -0.3
IntlEqAp 18.72 +.01 +1.6
MBCAI 10.34 ... -0.1
Munint 10.89 +.01 -0.4
SocialAp 28.21 -.10 +2.1
SocBdp 16.24 -.01 -0.5
SocEqAp35.93 -.17 +4.2
TxFPU 10.60 +.01 +6.3
TxFLgp 16.77 +.01 -0.1
TxFVT 15.88 +.01 -0.4
Causeway IntI:
Institutnlr n16.40 +.07 +1.4
Clipper 88.56 -.53 +0.4
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 77.11 +.21 +6.0
Columbia Class A:
Acom t 27.30 -.16 +5.4
Columbia Class Z:
AcomZ 27.91 -.16 +5.4
AcorlnItZ 30.56 -.12 +3.6
LargeCo 28.50 -.11 +3.2
SmallCo 22.72 -.19 +6.7
Columbia Funds:
ReEsEqZ 28.56 ... +5.5
Davis Funds A:
NYVen A 32.01 -.05 +2.4
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 30.58 -.05 +2.3
Davis Funds C & Y:
NYVen C 30.78 -.05 +2.3
Delaware Invest A:
TrendAp 21.32 -.19 +6.7
TxUSAp 11.67 ... -0.5
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.32 ... +1.8
SelGrBt 21.49 -.05 +5.8


Dimensional Fds:
lntSmVan16.41 +.01 +1.5
USLgVan21.22 -.11 +3.5
US Micro n15.55 -.16 +7.8
US Smalln20.32-.19 +7.1
US SmVa 28.37 -.28 +7.7
EmgMktn17.78 -.14 +4.3
IntVan 16.48 -.06 +3.1
DFARIE n25.62 +.08 +5.7
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 80.27 -.17 +1.4
Income 12.76 ... -0.2
IntlStkR 3180 -.08 +1.7
Stock 132.74 -.44 +2.2
Dreyfus:
Aprec 39.72 -.09 +1.5
Discp 32.82 -.15 +2.7
Dreyf 10.32 -.05 +2.9
Dr501n t 36.03 -.13 +3.2
EmgLd 46.13 -.38 +6.0
FLIntr 13.29 ... -0.6
InsMut n 18.00 ... -0.7
StrValA r 29.46 -.06 +3.3
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthBn10.12 -.06 +3.5
GrwthFpn10.62 -.06 +3.6


Dreyfus Premier:
CoreEqA114.76 -.04 +1.2
CorVlvp 30.75 -.04 +2.3
LtdHYdAp7.38 .. +1.2
TxMgGCI15.70 -,04 +1.1
TchGroA 22.68 -.06 +4.1
Eaton Vance Cl A:
ChinaAp 14.99 -.02 +1.2
GrwthA 7.24 -.09 +4.8
InBosA 6.44 ... +1.9
SpEqtA 4.72 -.03 +4.4
MunBdl 10.77 +.01 +0.3
TradGvA 8.67 ... -0.2
Eaton Vance Cl B:
FLMBt 10.96 +.01 +0.2
HllhSBt 11.20 -.10 +4.9
NaI MBt 10.60 +.01 +1.1
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovtC p 7.47 ... -0.3
NatlMCt 10.10 +.01 +1.1
Evergreen B:
DvrBdBt 14.94 ... -0.2
MuBdBt 7.52 +.01 -0.7
Evergreen I:
CorBdI 10.62 ... -0.9
SIMunil 10.00 ... -0.2
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 25.61 -.02 +9.9
HiYeld p 4.61 ... +1.6
ValRestr 44.59 -.39 +3.9
FPA Funds:
Nwinc 10.96 ... +0.2
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.52 -.08 +2.7
CapApA 25.64 -.11 +2.9
MidGrStA 32.29 -.26 +5.0
MuSecA 10.78 ... -0.5
Federated B:
StrlncB 8.67 ... +0.3
Federated Insti:
Kaufmn 5.54 -.04 +4.9
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
HItCarT 22.01 -.14 +2.9
NatResT 41.23 +.10 +7.6
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGr n 49.01 -.30 +4.0
EqlnI n 29.42 -.10 +3.5
IntBdIn 11.02 -.01 -0.8
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 16.17 -.05 +2.5
DivGrTp 11.76 -.06 +2.7
DynCATp 14.70-.09 +4.5
EqGrTp 46.49 -.29 +4.0
EqInT 29.08 -.10 +3.5
GovInT 10.06 -.01 -1.1
GrOppT 31.05 -.18 +2.5
HilnAdTp 9.93 -.01 +2.3
IntBdT 11.01 -.01 -0.7
MidCpTp 24.98 -.18 +3.2
MulncTp 13.18 ... -0.7
OvrseaT 17.98 -.01 +2.3
STFiT 9.46 ... -0.3
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 13.85 -.03 +1.5
FF202n 14.27 -.04 +2.4
FF2030 n 14.44 -.05 +2.9
FF2040n 8.48 -.03 +3.(f
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn16.96 -.12 +4.8
AMgrn 16.22 -.04 +1.5
AMgrGr n 14.92 -.06 +2.1
AMgrln n 12.81 -.02 +0.8
Balancn 18.55 -.07 +3.0
BlueChGr n42.33-.20 +3.6
Canadan37.63 -.05 +4.3
CapApn 26.35 -.19 +4.0
Cplncrn 8.49 ... +2.0
ChinaRg n18.59 +.03 +3.3
CngS n 397.23-1.03 +1.8
Contra n 60.47 -.21 +3.4
CnvScn 21.56 -.07 +2.5
Desti n 13.32 -.05 +5.4
Destll 11.64 -.07 +3.4
DisEqn 26.86 -.14 +4.0
Divlntl n 29.52 +.04 +2.2
DivGthn 28.67 -.14 +2.8
EmrMkn 14.60 -.04 +5.5
Eqlncn 52.83 -.13 +3.3
EQIIn 24.18 -.04 +3.7
ECapAp 22.68 +.06 +3.5
Europe 36.46 +.02 +4.1
Exch n 272.72 -.98 +2.8
Export n 20.98 -.08 +5.4
Fidel n 30.46 -.16 +2.7
Fifty rn 20.95 -.10 +4.4
FitRateHi r n9.96 ... +0.6
FrInOne n25.79 -.08 +2.7
GNMAn 11.01 -.01 -0.6
Govtlnc n 10.21 -.01 -1.1
GroCon 58.16 -.58 +3.8
Grolncn 38.20 -.16 +2.2
Grolncll n 9.60 -.03 +3.7
Highlnc r n 8.91 ... +1.6
Indepn n 18.28 -.12 +4.3
IntBd n 10.39 -.01 -0.6
IntGovn 10.12 -.01 -0.9
InllDiscn 29.05 +.01 +2.1
lntlSCp rn25.69 +.15 +3.8
InvGB n 7.45 -.01 -0.7
Japann 12.27 -.01 -0.2
JpnSm n 13.00 +.05 +1.8
LatAmn 23.75 -.93 +2.5
LevCoStk n25.29-.17 +5.5
LowPrn 42.26 -.24 +4.3
Magelln n105.89 -.42 +3.2
MidCap n 24.97 -.16 +5.4
MtgSecn 11.18 -.01 -0.5
NwMktrn14.19 -.04 0.0
NwMilln 31.77 -.20 +6.3
OTC n 35.73 -.23 +4.4
Cvrsean n 35.94 -.01 +2.4
PcBasn 20.62 +.08 +1.9
Puritnn 19.07 -.03 +2.0
RealEn 32.80 +.07 +6.1
STBF n 8.91 ... -0.2
SmCaplnd n21.12-.09 +6.4
SmllCpS r n18.09-.16 +5.8
SEAsian 18.83 +.07 +4.6
StkSIlcn 23.63 -.10 +3.9
Stratlncn 10.55 -.01 +0.1
Trend n 54.98 -.27 +3.1
USBIn 11.03 -.01 -0.8
Utilityn 14.33 -.04 +1.9
ValStratn37.20 -.26 +3.9
Value n 77.32 -.39 +4.3
Wrldwn 18.66 -.05 +3.1
Fidelity Selects:
Airn 35.83 -.33 +6.6
Auto nn 34.79 -.23 +7.3
Banking n38.44 -.13 +3.7
Blotch n 58.24 -.79 +7.6
Broken 62.81 -.15 +7.5
Chem n 68.85 -.63 +6.7
Compn 36.22 -.18 +6.2
Conlndn 25.34 -.17 +3.3
CstHon 49.21-1.08 +7.9
DfAern 72.93 -.23 +4.5
DvCmn 18.39 -.27 +1.8
Electrn 42.39 -.14 +6.8
Enrgyn 43.25 +.21 +7.5
EngSvn 56.97 +.62 +9.2
Envirn 15.23 -.10 +6.1
FinSvn 110.97 -.35 +4.0
Food n 51.73 -.26 +2.0
Goldrn 24.47 -.14 +1.7
Health n 139.68 -.91 +2.9
HomF n 58.62 -.41 +3.4
IndMtn 39.18 -.28 +7.6
Insur n 64.66 -.20 +3.6
Leisrn 75.51 -.45 +1.3
MedDI n 49.75 -.12 +0.2
MdEqSys n24.46-.23 +1.8
Mutmd n 45.27 -.21 +0.9
NtGasn 35.96 +.09 +6.4
Paper n 28.40 -.22 +2.9
Pharm n 9.09 -.03 +2.1
Retail n 55.37 -.52 +6.2
Softer n 51.21 -.21 +4.6
Tech n 61.60 -.39 +5.2
Telcmn 36.65 -.11 +1.9
Transn 41.50 -.41 +7.4
UtilGrn 42.77 -.07 +2.1
Wirelss n 6.34 -.02 +2.1
Fidelity Spartan:
CAMunn12.55 ... -0.6
CTMun rn11.60 ... -0.9
Eqldxn 43.53 -.16 +3.3
500ln rn 84.89 -.32 +3.2
FLMurn 11.68 ... -0.7
GovInn 11.00 -.01 -1.1
InvGrBdn10Al.61 -.01 -0.8
MDMuron.1099 ... -0.8
MA Mun n12.13 ... -0.6
MI M 9n n 12.01 ... -0.7
MNMunn11.54 ... -0.7
Munilnc n 13.06 ... -0.6
NJMunrnl.74 ... -0.8
NYMunAn13.03 ... -0.6
Oh Mun n11.92 ... -0.8
PAMunrnlO.95 ... -0.6
StIntMuan 10.25 ... -0.4
TotMktln n34.12 -.15 +3.7
First Eagle:
GIbIA 40.77 -.04 +2.4
OverseasA 23.01 -.01 +2.4
First Investors A
BIChpA p 20.76 -.09 +3.0
GloblAp 6.75 -.02 +2.7
GovtAp 10.94 -.01 -0.2
GrolnAp 13.85 -.07 +4.5
IncoAp 3.10 ... +1.9
InvGrAp 9.85 -.01 -1.1
MATFAp 12.04 ... -0.8
MITFAp 12.69 ... -0.5
a.41dCrutp? -.17 +5.4
*IJ IT ]:, "i :i'", .. -0.5
NYTFAp 14,50 ... -0.7


PATFAp 13,23 ... -0.5
SpSitAp 20.08 -.15 +4.7
TxExAp 10.16 ... -0.8
TotRtIAp 14.09 -.05 +2.8
Value p 6.66 -.02 +3.0
Firsthand Funds:
GIbTech 3.85 -.03 +3.2
TechVal 30.11 +.10 +7.3
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AGEAp 2.12 ... +1.6
AdjUS p 8.97 -.02 -0.2
ALTFAp 11.58 ... -0.4
AZTFAp 11.25 ... -0.6
Ballnvp 62.58 -.55 +5.5
CallnsAp 12.78 ... -0.3
CA IntA p 11.59 ... -0.8
CalTFAp 7.38 +.01 -0.2
CapGrA 10.86 -.07 +3.2
COTFA p 12.08 ... -0.4
CTTFAp 11.16 ... -0.3
CvIScA p 16.70 -.08 +3.6
DblTFA 12.03 ... -0.4
DynTchA 24.75 -.15 +4.3
EqlncAp 20.74 -.04 +1.4
Fedlntp 11.49 ... -1.0
FedTFA p 12.24 +.01 -0.2


I So* *ID TUALFNTAE


H.,re a ire -. 1 00c t. iggeSI ,Tluival ura',d U.:I ,1 orn rjd3.aq Tale.
r; j'.. i e turi ranl m n.cil pr.:', ,:,r ] e: : \el 1iue irJAV i In. ai311l
rnil j:r 3r 3 AII sl ,one I.-jal r urn tiqurEi ll..

T u e s : 4 ,l' 1 ,:,I i ri Ilui I
Wed: 1 .T-,T .-I GI131 Iluni l".
Tnu: 3 ,,,r cumiiialIih I1,Iala relurn i': :i
Fri: 5-yr .. umulai.i. Io.iai reluir rI:-
Name: NJarn, .:. muhul hun,3 and ia rnnl,
NAV: riet 3 ael value
Chg: Nj.1 .:riarn ge -i p- I,: 11 rJA.
Total return: Pi-.rr.-nri .:iarg. ,r, .nj v i:.r ine ii me prise -no r.:.n w ir
diidE.rid renrs .l 3 iT peri id loring. r 1ri3r 1 ye ,'a reluiin i Cum ula.
h.e
Data baFed orn N41'; reported ro Lpper t, c. p m EEastern
Footnotes: e E -,ap'al ,nsis lu.3 uirOculu I F re.i.uu iday s quole
r, ri .:'.i- .lunrd p Fund a ist uiied I. pay distribuion ,coii r -
RiedLrnplii lee or coniringeni delerred salei load my apply -
SIo.:K csi.derd r opil I Blri p arid. r E .casrh Br,]nd NA
j., inrtorirral,.rn 3Saa.laCle NE Data in quStC..:n NN Fund does -snol
.isrnh iT e- tracl:ed NS Funa did not ersi ail 5art date Source:
Lipper, Inc. and The Associated Press


FLTFAp 12.02 ... -0.4
FoundAlp 12.53 +.01 +1.8
GATFAp 12.18 ... -0.5
GoldPrMA18.12-.04 +1.2
GrwthAp 34.73 -.18 +4.1
HYTFAp 10.94 ... +0.1
IncomAp 2.52 -.01 +2.1
InsTFAp 12.41 ... -0.4
NYITFp 11.01 ... -0.8
LATFAp 11.67 ... -0.4
LMGvScA 10.03 ... -0.5
MDTFA p 11.82 ... -0.4
MATFA p 12.01 ... -0.6
MFTFAp 12.35 ... -0.3
MNInsA 12.20 ... -0.4
MOTFAp 12.38 ... -0.2
NJTFAp 12.23 ... -0.3
NYInsAp 11.69 ... -0.5
NYTFAp 11.97 ... -0.3
NCTFAp 12.38 ... -0.3
OhiolAp 12.65 ... -0.5
ORTFA p 11.94 ... -0.4
PATFAp 10.49 ... -0.4
ReEScA p 29.03 +.02 +4.3
RisDvAp 31.99 -.20 +3.3
SMCpGrA 35.72 -.14 +5.7
USGovAp 6.57 ... -0.2
UtilsAp 12.13 -.02 +1.6
VATFAp 11.93 ... -0.3
Frank/Temp Frnk B:
IncomB1 p 2.52 -.01 +2.1
IncomeBt 2.51 -.01 +2.1
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC 1 2.54 ... +2.1
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
DiscA 25.59 +.02 +2.6
QualfdAt 20.29 -.02 +2.9
SharesA 23.87 +.02 +2.1
FranklTemp Temp A:
DvMktAp20.28 -.01 +3.4
ForgnAp 12.53 +.02 +2.4
GIBdAp 10.45 +.02 -0.5
GrwthAp 23.27 +.05 +1.3
IntxEMp 15.04 +.03 +1.8
WorldAp 18.58 +.05 +3.3
Franlk/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 19.87 -.01 +3.4
ForgnCp 12.34 +.02 +2.3
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.42 -.01 -0.7
S&SPM 46.03 -.15 +2.5
GMO Trust Ill:
EmMkr 18.49 -.15 +4.5
For 14.55 -.03 +1.3
GMO Trust IV:
EmrMkt 18.45 -.15 +4.5
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 43.24 -.18 +3.3
Gartmore Fds D:
Bond 9.69 -.01 -0.9
GvtBdD 10.29 -.01 -1.0
GrowthD 6.98 -.04 +3.9
NationwD 20.90 -.09 +3.3
TxFrr 10.63 ... -0.6
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 25.04 -.04 +0.6
Goldman Sachs A:
GrIncA 25.60 -.07 +1.7
'MdCVAp36.71- -.08 +4.9
SmCapA 43.47 -.34 +6.0
Guardian Funds:
GBG InGrA 13.51-.02 +2.0
ParkAA 31.27 -.17 +3.3
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.84 -.01 -0.8
CapAplnst 30.15 -.14 +4.5
Int r 44.05 -.21 +2.7
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsAp 15.36 -.04 +2.1
CpAppAp 35.30 -.16 +4.9
DivGthA p 19.20 -.02 +2.9
SmICoAp 17.99 -.15 +5.6
Hartford HLS IA:
Bond 11.75 ... -0.6
CapApp 53.65 -.24 +5.1
Div&Gr 20.99 -.02 +3.0
Advisers 23.42 -.06 +2.1
Stock 46.99 -.16 +3.6
Hartford HLS IB:
CapApp p 53.37 -.24 +5.0
HollBalFd xn15.32-.07 +0.6
Hotchkis & Wiley:
LgCpVIAp23.83 -.14 +3.7
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.47 -.02 -1.1
JPMorgan A Class:
MCpValp 23.74 -.07 +3.7
JPMorgan Select:
IntEq n 29.74 -.05 +1.8
JPMorgan Set Cis:
CoreBd n 10.79 -.02 -1.2
Janus:
Balanced 21.75 -.03 +1.9
Contrarian 13.90 -.04 +4.8
CoreEq 21.67 -.06 +4.2
Enterprn 39.65 -.26 +5.8
FedTE n 7.05 ... -0.7
FIxBnd n 9.58 -.01 -0.8
Fundn 24.67 -.16 +2.9
GI UfeSd r n19.05-.14 +3.6
GITechrnlO1.81 -.05 +4.3
Grlnc 33.64 -.11 +3.0
Mercury 21.63 -.05 +2.9
MdCpVal 23.52 -.09 +4.4
Olympus n30.02 -.20 +4.3
Orion n 7.49 -.12 +4.0
Ovrseas r 25.85 -.09 +4.2
ShTmBd 2.88 -.01 -0.5
Twenty 46.21 -.17 +3.5
Venturn 59.75 -.46 +6.2
WdldWr 40.74 -.02 +1.1
JennisonDryden A:
BlendA 16.28 -.05 +4.9
HiYIdAp ... ... NA
InsuredA 10.98 .., -0.7
UtilityA 13.78 ... +4.5
JennisonDryden B:
GrowthB 13.79 -.06 +4.5
HiYldBt ... ... NA
InsuredB 11.00 ... -0.9
Jensen 23.88 -.09 +2.5
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.18 -.02 -0.7
StrlnA p 7.00 -.01 +0.2
John Hancock B:
StrIncB 7.00 -.01 +0.2
Julius Baer Funds:
IntlEqlr 33.1 1 +03.3
IntlEqA 32.50, +.01 +3.3
Legg Mason: Fd
OpporTrt 15.87 -.17 +5.9
Splnvp 46.76 -.36 +4.7
ValTrp 65.17 -.40 +2.7
Legg Mason Insti:
ValTriast 71.43 -.45 +2.8
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 31.47 -.11 +2.0
Intl 16.12 ... +2.9
SmCap 31.44 -.19 +1.5
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 13.71 -.02 +0.4
Lord Abbett A:
AffiA p 14.62 -.03 +2.0
BdDebAp 7.97 ... +1.6
GllncAp 7.18 ... -1.2
MidCpAp 23.39 -.05 +4.1
MFS Funds A:
MITAp 17.89 -.07 +4.0
MIGAp 12.57 -.07 +4.3
GrOpA p 8.98 -.05 +4.2
HilnA p 3.92 .. +1.6
MFLAp 10.21 ... -0.2
TotRAp 16.14 -.04 +1.2
MFS Funds B:
MIGB 11.52 -.06 +4.3
HilnBt 3.93 ... +1.5
MulnBt 8.67 +.01 -0.3

MainStay Funds B:
CapApBt 28.15 -.20 +5.2
GovtBI 8.32 -.01 -1.0
HYIdBBI 6.37 ... +1.7
IntlEqB 12.78 +.04 +1.4
SmCGBp 14.98 -.14 +5.9

Mairs & Power:
Growth 71.52 -.28 +3.5
Managers Funds:
SpclEqn 91.72 -.77 +5.4
Marsico Funds:
Focusp 16.94 -.15 +3.7
Merrill Lynch A:
GIAIAp 16.80 -.02 +1.8
HealthAp 6.52 -.03 +4.3
NJMunBd 10.74 ... +0.2
Merrill Lynch B:
BalCapBt26.15 -.08 +1.6
BaVIBt 31.36 -.08 +2.4
BdHiInc 5.11 ... +2.7
CalnsMB 11.67 ... -0.6
CrBPtBt 11.74 -.02 -0.9
CplTBt 11.92 -.01 -0.8
EquityDi 15.27 -.04 +3.5
EuroBt 15.04 +.03 +3.6
FocValt 12.83 -.07 +3.6


FndlGBt 16.17 -.08 +2.7
FLMBt 10.48 ,.. -0.3
GIAIBt 16.48 -.02 +1.7
HealthB t 4.89 -.02 +4.2
LatABt 26.26-1.02 +2.8
MnlnBt 7.94 .. -0.3
ShTUSGt 9.17 .. -0.1
MuShtT 9.97 -.01 -0.1
MulntBI 10.53 +.01 -0.8
MNtlBt 10.60 ... -0.2
NJMBt 10.74 +.01 +0.2
NYMBt 11.14 +.01 -0.1
NatRsTBI42.22 +.12 +7.6
PacBt 18.89 -.05 +0.8
PAMBt 11.41 ... -0.2
ValueOpp t24.44-.15 +6.8
USGovt 10.20 -.01 -0.9
UtIllcmt 11.71 -.04 +2.7
WdlnBt 6.20 -.02 -0.9
Merrill Lynch C:
GIAICt 16.02 -.02 +1.7
Merrill Lynch I:
BalCapl 26.91 -.08 +1.7
BaVII 32.20 -.09 +2.4
BdHilnc 5.10 ... +2.6
CalnsMB 11.67 ... -0.5
CrBPIlt 11.74 -.02 -0.8
CplTI 11.92 -.01 -0.7
DvCapp 18.53 -.14 +4.6
EquityDv 15.22 -.05 +3.5
Euroll 17.55 +.03 +3.7
FocVall 14.11 -.08 +3.7
FLMI 10.48 ... -0.3
GIAIIt 16.84 -.02 +1.8
Health 7.08 -.04 +4.3
LatAI 27.60-1.07 +2.8
Mnlnl 7.94 ... -0.4
MnShtT .9.97 ... -0.1
MulTI 10.54 +.01 -0.6
MNatll 10.61 ... -0.1
NatRsTrt 44.67 +.14 +7.7
Pacl 20.65 -.06 +0.9
ValueOpp 27.10 -.16 +6.9
USGovt 10.20 -.01 -0.9
UtlTlcmlt 11.74 -.03 +2.8
WIdlncl 6.20 -.03 -0.8
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd 2.00 -.02 +1.0
Monetta Funds:
Monettan11.38 -.08 +8.0
Morgan Stanley A:
DivGthA 35.44 -.14 +2.5
Morgan Stanley B:
GIbDivB 13.97 ... +1.8
GrwthB 12.58 -.09 +4.2
StratB 18.30 -.07 +2.4
MorganStanley Inst:
GIValEqA n17.73 -.01 +1.7
IntlEq n 21.05 +.07 +1.6
Muhlenk 85.44 -.66 +5.7
Under Funds A:
IntemlA 18.30 -.14 +3.1
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 16.58 -.01 +2.3
DiscZ 25.84 +.03 +2.6
QualfdZ 20.41 -.02 +2.9
SharesZ 24.02 +.01 +2.1
Nations Funds Inv B:
FocEqB 17.84 -.16 +3.5
MarsGrBtll.02 -.14 +3.0
Nations Funds Pri A:
IntVIPrAn21.66 -.17 +2.1
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 38.81 -.42 +4.6
IntIr 19.66 -.03 +3.0
Partner 28.19 -.30 +5.4
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 47.68 -.12 +6.1
Nicholas Applegate:
EmgGrol n10.76 -.09 +8.0
Nicholas Group:
Nich n 62.08 -.17 +2.2
Nchln In 2.21 +.01 +2.3
Northern Funds:
SmCpldxn10.63-.11 +6.6
Technlyn 11.46 -.06 +4.4
Nuveen Cl R:
InMunR 11.00 ... -0.6
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG n32.79-.23 +6.9
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr n24.28 -.03 +1.3
Global n 22.66 ... +3.0
Inllrn 22.15 +.05 +2.8
Oakmark rn41.95-.20 +2.3
Selectrn 34.41 -.15 +3.6
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 10.17 ... +0.2
AMTFrNY12.95 ... 0.0
CAMuniAp11.52 ... +0.3
CapApAp41.61 -.18 +2.9
CaplncAp 12.54 -.06 +1.9
ChlncAp 9.52 .. +1.5
DvMktAp30.12 -.22 +3.9
Disc p 43.52 -.33 +5.6
EquityA 11.36 -.06 +3.8
GlobA p 62.88 -.06 +4.0
GIbOppA 33.52 -.27 +3.6
Goldp 18.29 -.18 +0.9
HiYdAp 9.53 +.01 +1.6
LtdTmMu 15.88 ... +0.5
MnStFdA 36.29 -.14 +3.0
MidCapA 17.44 -.05 +5.5
PAMuniA p 12.84 ... +06.3
StrlnAp 4.29 -.01 -0.1
USGv p 9.68 -.01 -0.8
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 10.14 ... +0.2
AMTFrNY 12.96 ... -0.1
CplncBt 12.41 -.06 +1.8
ChlncBt 9.51 +.01 +1.4
EquityB 10.96 -.05 +3.8
HiYIdBt 9.38 ... +1.6
StrlncBt 4.30 -.01 -0.4
Oppenheim Quest :
QBalA 18.41 -.05 +2.5
QBalB 18.11 -.05 +2.5
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYA p 3.38 ... 0.0
RoMuApp18.38 +.01 +0.5
PBHG Funds:
SelGrwth n21.43 -.09 +3.9
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
TotRtAd 10.70 -.01 -0.8
PIMCO InstI PIMS:
AllAsset 12.98 -.03 -0.5
ComodRR 15.55 -.07 -4.8
HiYId 9.89 ... +1.2
LowDu 10.11 ... -0.3
RealRtnl 11.28 -.05 -2.3
ShortT 10.02 ... +0.1
TotRt 10.70 -.01 -0.8
PIMCO Funds A:
RealRtApll.28 -.05 -2.3
ToIRtA 10.70 -.01 -0.8
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.28 -.05 -2.4
TotRtCt 10.70 -.01 -0.9
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.70 -.01 -0.8
PhoenixFunds A:
BalanA 14.86 -.05 +0.7
CapGrA 14.94 -.09 +2.2
IntaA 10.41 +.03 +2.9
Pioneer Funds A:
BalanA p 9.81 +.01 +2.1
BondA p 9.31 -.01 -0.6
EqlncA p 29.88 -.09 +3.0
EurSelEqA 30.77 +.13 +3.6
GrwthAp 12.45 -.03 +5.1
HiYldAp 11.40 -.02 +2.3
IntlValA 17.33 +.04 +3.0
MdCpGrA 15.52 -.06 +5.2
MdCVAI p 26.67 -.07 +3.7
PionFdAp43.12 -.13 +4.0

ValueAp 18.24 -.02 +2.3
Pioneer Funds B:

Pioneer Funds C:
Price Funds Adv:
Eqlncp 26.74 -.08 +2.6
Price Funds:
Balancen19.73 -.03 +1.6
BlChipn 31.51 -.14 +3.7
CABond na1.07 ... -0.6
CapAppn20.20 -.04 +2.6
DivGron 23.12 -.06 +2.5
Eqlnc n 26.79 -.08 +2.6
Eqlndexn33.06 -.13 +3.2
Europe n 20.13 +.01 +2.7
FLIntmn 10.90 ... -0.6
GNMAn 9.55 -.01 -0.4
Growth n 27.29 -.09 +3.6
Gr&lnn 22.15 -.09 +2.8
HtlhSa n 23.52 -.26 +5.7
HiYieldn 7.04 -.01 +1.8
ForEqn 15.52 -.04 +1.9
InlIBond n 9.70 -.01 -1.3
InlDisn 34.79 +.11 +4.0
InllStkn 12.95 -.03 +1.7
Japan n 8.48 -.04 -0.5
LalAm n 18.79 -.66 +3.4
MDShrtn 5.15 ... -0.2
MDBond nl0.76 ... -0.5
MidCap n 52.72 -.17 +4.7


MCapVal n23.90 -.08 +3.6
N Amer n 33.80 -.22 +4.5
NAsian 11.53 +.09 +7.2
New Era n39.54 +.04 +6.1
N Horiz n 31.46 -.23 +5.5
NInc n 9.08 ... -0.8
NYBondn 1.42 +.01 -0.4
PSIncn 15.00 -.03 +1.6
RealEstn 19.59 +.07 +5.5
SciTecn 19.53 -.09 +4.9
ShtBd n 4.71 ... -0.2
SmCpSlk n32.80 -.26 +5.7
SmCapVal n37.74-.28 +7.0
SpecGrn 17.46 -.07 +3.4
Specinn 11.92 -.02 +0.3
TFIncn 10.07 ... -0.4
TxFrHn 11.98 ... +0.2
TFIntm n 11.20 ... -0.7
TxFrSIn 5.37 ... -0.3
USTInI n 5.39 ... -1.4
USTLg n 12.09 -.03 -2.5
VABond n11.75 ... -0.4
Value n 23.51 -.06 +2.3
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.01 -.01 -1.0
AZTE 9.34 ... -0.5
ClscEqAp 13.15 -.05 +3.0
Convp 17.20 -.06 +2.8
DiscGr 17.80 -.12 +5.3
DvrlnAp 10.24 ... +0.1
EuEq 21.16 -.07 +2.2
FLTxA 9.31 ... -0.5
GeoAp 18.37 -.04 +1.4
GIGvAp 12.54 -.03 -1.1
GIbEqtyp 8.73 -.05 +3.3
GrInAp 19.82 -.10 +2.7
HithA p 63.22 -.34 +2.7
HiYdAp 8.08 +.01 +1.6
HYAdA p 6.09 ... +1.6
IncmA p 6.84 ... -0.9
IntlEqp 23.84 -.10 +1.8
IntGrlnp 12.02 -.06 +2.8
InvAp 13.21 -.09 +4.4
MITxp 9.07 ... -0.4
MNTx p 9.07 ... -0.4
NJTxAp 9.30 ... -0.4
NwOpA p 43.28 -.30 +4.5
OTCAp 7.60 -.05 +5.7 -
PATE 9.18 ... -0.4
TxExA p 8.88 ... -0.3
TFInAp 15.07 ... -0.6
TFHYA 13.00 ... 0.0
USGvAp 13.18 -.01 -0.5
UtilAp 10.96 -.01 +2.3
VstaAp 9.94 -.06 +5.2
VoyAp 17.06 -.12 +4.9
Putnam Funds B:
CapAprt 18.79 -.14 +5.7
CIscEqB t 13.03 -.06 +2.8
DiscGr 16.44 -.12 +5.2
DvrlnBt 10.16 ... 0.0
Eqlnct 17.78 -.06 +2.7
EuEq 20.38 -.07 +2.2
FLTxBt 9.31 ... -0.5
GeoBt 18.18 -.04 +1.3
GlncB t 12.50 -.03 -1.1
GIbEq t 7.95 -.05 +3.2
GINtRst 27.91 +.14 +6.0
GrInBt 19.53 -.10 +2.7
HIthBt 57.59 -.32 +2.6
HiYIdBt1 8.04 +.01 +1.6
HYAdBt 6.01 ... +1.5
IncmBt 6.79 -.01 -0.9
IntGrln't 11.78 -.06 +2.8
IntlNopt 11.56 ... +3.1
InvBt 12.11 -.08 +4.3
NJTxB1 9.29 ... -0.4
NwOpBt 38.94 -.27 +4.5
NwValp 18.16 -.07 +2.8
NYTxBt 8.82 ... -0.4
OTCBt 6.72 -.05 -
TxExBt 8.88 ... 6
TFHYBt 13.02 ... 0.0
TFInBt 15.10 ... -0.6
USGvBt 13.11 -.01 -0.6
UtilBt1 10.90 -.01 +2.3
VistaBet 8.69 -.05 +5.2
VoyBt 14.87 -.10 +4.9
Putnam Funds M:
DvrIncp 10.15 ... 0.0
Royce Funds:
LwPrStkr 15.44 -.10 +6.3
MicroCapt 16.02 -.09 +6.7
Premierlr 15.89 -.06 +7.0
TolRell r 12.81 -.07 +4.9
Russell Funds S:
DivEqS 44.87 -.20 +3.5
QuantEqS 38.74 -.20 +3.3
Rydex Advisor:
OTCn 10.36 -.05 +6.4
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxAnlO.50 -.01 -0.6
IntlEqAn 11.12 -.02 +2.2
LgCGroA n19.13 -.10 +5.4
LgCValAn22.17 -.06 +2.9
STI Classic:
CpAppL p 11.20 -.05 +2.9
CpAppAp 11.85 -.05 +3.0
TxSnGrT p 25.16-.08 +3.9
TxSnGrLt23.60 -.07 +3.8
VIlnStkA 12.79 -.04 +3.0
Salomon Brothers:
BalancBp 12.91 -.01 +1.4
Opport 50.36 -.06 +2.9
Schwab Funds:
1000lnvrn35.74-.14 +3.4
S&P Inv n 19.05 -.07 +3.2
S&PSeln19.13 -.07 +3.2
YIdPlsSI 9.68 +.01 +0.3
Scudder Funds A:
DrHiRA 44.43 -.18 +2.4
FlgCornmAp17.81-.10 +4.3
USGovA 8.53 ... -0.5
Scudder Funds S:

GIbBdSr 10.18 +.01 -0.5
GIbDis 37.46 -.18 +3.7
GlobalS 28.39 -.11 +3.2
Gold&Prc 15.66 -.06 -0.6
GrEuGr 28.08 +.02 +3.0
GrolncS 22.37 -.09 +3.3
HiYIdTx 12.91 +.01 +0.1
IncomeS 12.92 -.01 -0.6
IntTxAMT'11.33 +.01 -0.6
Intl FdS 45.45 -.02 +2.6
LgCoGro 24.67 -.10 +4.4
LatAmr 36.42-1.29 +3.3
MgdMuni S 9.19 ... -0.2
MATFS 14.55 +.01 -0.4
PacOppsr 14.56+.05 +5.0
ShtTmBdS 10.02 -.01 -0.3
SmCoVIS r 28.00-.23 +5.1
Selected Funds:
AmShS p 38.22 -.07 +2.2
Seligman Group:
FrontrAt 13.04 -.15 +5.2
FrontrDt 11.50 -.13 +5.2
GIbSmA 16.63 -.08 +6.1
GIbTchA 12.69 -.08 +5.4
HYdBAp 3.42 ... +1.5
Sentinel Group:
ComS A p 30.09 -.07 +2.8
Sequoian151.84 -.20 +2.2
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 35.56 -.15 +3.5
Smith Barney A:
AgGrAp 99.07 -.42 +5.9
ApprAp 14.76 -.03 +2.6
FdValAp 15.16 -.04 +3.4
HilncAt .6.94 ... +1.8
InAICGAp 13.63 -.04 +1.6
LgCpGA p22.33-.10 +5.8
Smith Barney B&P: ,
FValBI 14.26 -.03 +3.4
LgCpGBI21.06 -.10 +5.7
SBCplnc 116.87 -.04 +2.9
Smith Barney 1:
DvStrl 17.25 -.06 +1.9
Grlnc 1 15.54 -.06 +3.4
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 48.95 -.08 +2.6
Stratton Funds:
De/dend 37.76 -.01 +4.1
Growth 43.85 -.43 +6.5
SmCap 44.08 -.44 +6.1
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.43 -.02 -1.2
SunAmerica Focus:
TCW Galileo Fda:
SelEqty 19.32 -.08 +4.0
TD Waterhouse Fds:
Dow30 .......0.0
TIAA-CREF Funds:
BdPlus 10.28 -.01 -0.9
Eqlndex 8.87 -.04 +3.7
Grolnc 12.47 -.04 +3.2
GroEq 9.35 -.05 +4.0
HiYldBd 9.32 +.01 +1.5
IntlEq 10.68 -.04 +2.7
MgdAlc 11.25 -.03 +1.9
ShtTrBO 10.44 ... -0.5
SocChEq 9.48 -.05 +4.6
TxExBd 10.88 ... -1.1
Tamarack Funds:
Value 45.89 -.16 +2.2


a. ha














1.. -


Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 20.76 +.05 +3.0
Third Avenue Fds:
Intlr 20.01 +.12 +2.3
RIEstVI r 30.08 -.03 +2.6
Value 57.00 -.10 +3.2
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 5.16 -.01 +1.2
Incom 8.72 -.01 -0.7
LgCpStk 26.17 -.12 +3.3
TA IDEX A:
FdTEAp 11.80 +.01 -0.5
JanGrowp24.19-.17 +1.7
GCGIobp 24.50 -.08 +2.9
TrCHYBp 9.29 +.01 +1.1
TAFIxIn p 9.54 ... -0.2
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGr n24.02 -.24 +6.4
Tweedy Browne;
GlobVal 25.22 -.01 +2.2
US Global Investors:
AIIAm n 25.09 -.17 +3.2
GIbRs ... NA
GldShr 7.74 -.06 +1.6
USChina 7.04 -.01 +2.6
WldPrcMn 15.64 -.08 +1.2
USAA Group:
AgvGt 29.95 -.28 +3.0
CA Bd 11.27 ... -0.4
CmstStr 27.24 -.01 +2.3
GNMA 9.68 -.01 -0.3
GrTxStr 15.03 -.06 +2.0
Grwth 14.38 -.11 +4.3
Gr&lnc 18.99 -.05 +3.3
IncStk 17.28 -.07 +3.6
Inco 12.38 -.01 -0.8
Intl 22.16 +.09 +3.6
NYBd 12.09 ... -0.5
PrecMM 15.08 -.03 +1.4
SciTech 9.67 -.03 +4.2
ShITBnd 8.87 -.01 -0.2
SmCpSlk 14.63 -.08 +5.6
TxElt 13.29 ... -0.6
TxELT 14.21 ... -0.6
TxESh 10.68 ... +0.1
VABd 11.73 ... -0.4
WIdGr 18.08 +.05 +3.1
Value Line Fd:
Lev Gttn 27.21 -.25 +6.2
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 18.91 -.01 -0.7
CmstAp 18.50 -.07 +1.5
CpBdAp 6.72 ... -0.4
EGAp 39.64 -.30 +3.6
EqlncAp 8.76 -.02 +2.1
Exch 368.18 -.64 +3.2
GrinAp 20.99 -.05 +2.9
HarbAp 14.46 -.05 +2.6
HNdA 3.62 .+1.4
HYMuAp 10.98 ... +0.6
InTFAp 18.97 .. -0.4
MunIlAp 14.75 ... -0.7
PATFAp 17.52 ... -0.5
StrMunlnc13.41 +.01 +0.7
US MlgeA 13.83 -.01 -0.3
UtilAp 18.77 -.07 +2.9
Van Kamp Funds B:
CmstBt 18.50 -.07 +1.5
EGBt 33.90 -.25 +3.5
EnterpBt 11.62 -.08 +3.5
EqlncBt 8.63 -.01 +2.1
HYMuBt 10.98 ... +0.6
MulB 14.73 +.01 -0.7
PATFBt 17.47 ... -0.5
StrMunlnc 13.40 +.01 +0.6
USMtge 13.77 -.01 -0.3
I.,.IE 18.74 -.07 +2.9
Vanguard Admiral:
500Adml n113.37-.43 3.2
GNMAAd n10.36-.01 -0.3
HllhCrn 56.58 -.35 +1.7
HiYldCpn 6.29 ... +1.1
TAdmI n 13.45 +.01 -0.7
LtdTrAd n 10.77 ... -0.3
PrmCap r n65.98 -.31 +4.8
STsyAdml n10.37-01 -0.4
ShtTrAd n15.56 ... +0.1
STIGrAd n10.55 -.01 -0.3
TtIBAdml n10.18 -.01 -0.9
TStkAdm n29.48 -.13 +3.7
WelltnAdm n52.94-.09 +1.7
Windsorn61.83 -.34 +2.3
WdsrllAd n56.64 -.13 +2.2
Vanguard Fds:
AssetA n 25.02 -.09 +3.3
CALTn 11.80 ... -0.7
CapOpp n31.42 -.20 +3.2
Convrtn 13.15 -.06 +3.9
DivdGron12.19 -.04 +2.1
Energy n 52.24 +.23 +6.5
Eqlncn 23.82 -.06 +2.6
ExpIr n 78.38 -.66 +6.2
FLLTn 11.78 ... -0.9
GNMAn 10.36 -.01 -0.3
Grolncn 31.35 -.16 +3.3
GrthEq n 9.78 -.08 +3.5
HYCorpn 6.29 ... +1.1
HlthCren134.04 -.84 +1.6
InflaPron 12.29 -.06 -2.3
IntlExpIrn 17.41 -.05 +2.5
IntlGrn 18.91 -.12 +1.6
IntlVal n 31.87 -.25 +2.7
ITIGraden9.91 -.01 -1.2
ITTsryn 11.10 -.01 -1.3
UfeCon n 15.40 -.03 +1.4
UfeGro n 20.43 -.08 +2.9
Ulelncn 13.57 -.02 +0.4
UfeModn 18.17 -.06 +2.0
LTIGraden9.74 -.02 -2.4
LTTsryn 11.77 -.03 -2.4
Morg n 16.80 -.12 +3.4
MuHYn 10.84 ... -0.5
MulnsLg n12.78 ... -0.6
Mulntn 13.45 +.01 -0.7
MuLtdn 10.77 ... -0.3
MuLongn11.42 +.01 -0.7
MuShrtn 15.56 ... +0.1
NJLTn 12.01 +.01 -0.7
NYLTn 11.47 +.01 -0.9
OHLTTE nl2.16 ... -0.7
PALTn 11.51 ... -0.7
PrecMtlsrnl8.73-.16 +7.2
Prmcprn63.55 -.30 +4.7
SelValurn20.00 -.10 +4.0
STARn 19.14 -.07 +1.6
STIGrade n10.55 -.01 -0.3
STFedn 10.31 ... -0.3
StratEqn 23.11 -.19 +6.0
USGro n 16.88 -.09 +5.2
USValuen14.51 -.06 +4.0
Wellslyn 21.76 -.02 +0.1
Welltnn 30.64 -.05 +1.6
Wndsrn 18.32 -.10 +2.3
Wndsll n 31.91 -.07 +2.2
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 113.36 -.43 +3.2
Balanced n19.73 -.06 +1.9
EMkt n 16.24 -.10 +5.0
Europe n 26.36 -.12 +2.2
Extend n 33.34 -.21 +5.5
Growth n 26.91 -.14 +3.9
ITBndn 10.52 -.02 -1.4
LgCaplx n21.94 -.08 +3.3
MidCap n 16.93 -.08 +5.2
Pacific n 9.17 -.09 +0.7
REITrn 20.41 +.06 +5.5
SmCap n 28.35 -.21 +6.4
SmlCpVln14.84 -.11 +6.1
STBndn 10.00 -.01 -0.5
TotBndn 10.18 -.01 -0.9
ToWlnl n 12.79 -.07 +2.2
TolStkn 29.48 -.13 +3.7
Value n 21.96 -.06 +2.7
Vanguard Insl Fds:
lnsldxn 112.44 -.43 +3.3
InsPIn 112.45 -.42 +3.3
TBIstn 10.18 -.01 -0.9
TSInstn 29.49 -.13 +3.7
Vantagepoint Fds:
Growth 8.31 -.05 +4.7
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 17.03 -.06 +3.8
Waddell & Reed Adv:
CorelnvA 5.98 -.01 +3.6
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 42.48 -.22 +5.4
Weitz Funds:
PartVal 23.63 -.11 +1.7
Value 36.94 -.16 +1.4
Wells Fargo Adv:
Opptylnv 48.91 -.21 +5.1
Western Asset:
CorePlus 10.65 -.01 -0.1
Core 11.43 -.02 -0.4
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.08 -.06 +4.7
Yacktman Funds:
Fundp 15.27 -.08 +0.9


I MUTAL FUNDSll I


Business ":... ,.


Interest rates

on Treasury bills rise

WASHINGTON Interest rates
on short-term Treasury bills rose in
Monday's auction to the highest
levels in four years.
The Treasury Department auc-
tioned $19 billion in three-month
bills at a discount rate of 3.345 per-
cent, up from 3.220 percent last
week. Another $17 billion in six-
month bills was auctioned at a dis-
count rate of 3.540 percent, up
from 3.420 percent last week.
The three-month rate was the
highest since these bills averaged
3.360 percent on Sept. 4, 2001.
The six-month rate was the highest
since 3.550 percent on May 29,
2001.
The new discount rates under-
state the actual return to investors
- 3.420 percent for three-month
bills with a $10,000 bill selling for
$9,915.45 and 3.655 percent for a
six-month bill selling for $9,821.03.
Separately, the Federal Reserve
said Monday that the average yield
for one-year Treasury bills rose to
3.68 percent last week from 3.59
percent the previous week.

Drug companies

set to merge

NEW YORK In a deal that will
create the world's largest generic
drug company, Teva Pharma-
ceutical Industries Ltd. said Monday
it is acquiring rival Ivax Corp. for
about $7.4 billion in cash and stock.
Ivax shares climbed 10 percent.
The acquisition comes as the
generic drug industry has been
benefiting from a drive to lower
health care costs and a spate of
patent expirations on major medi-
cines. But competition among
generic makers is intensifying and
the deal may trigger further consoli-
dation.

Sony BMG to cease

pay-for-play practice

NEW YORK-- Recording
industry titan Sony BMG Music
Entertainment agreed Monday to
pay $10 million and stop bribing
radio stations to feature.its artists in
what a state official called a more
sophisticated generation of the
payola scandals of decades ago.
The agreement springs from an
investigation by New York state
Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who
called the practice "pervasive" in
the industry and suggested other
music industry giants could face
similar penalties.

From wire reports


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Stocks lower as oil prices up


Associated Press PanAgora Asset Management
As- -c Market watch Inc.

NEW YORK Wall Street July 25, 2005 "A directionless market is
waffled before finishing lower usually a down market," Peters
Monday as oil prices seesawed Dow Jones -54.70 said. "Right now, people are
and traders weighed lackluster industrials 10,596.48 waiting instead of buying."
earnings from Xerox Corp. The Dow Jones industrial
against a surge in housing Nasdaq 3.oo average fell 54.70, or 0.51 per-
prices, composite 2,166.74 cent, to 10,596.48.
Investors were nervous about Standard & -4.65 Broader stock indicators
oil after crude futures' rally on Poor's 500 were slightly lower. The
Friday. So stocks gave up early 1,229.03 Standard & Poor's 500 index,
gains as oil crept upward; Russell -6.79 which has gained for the last
futures finally closed at $59 a 2000 four weeks, fell 4.65, or 0.38 per-
barrel, up 35 cents, on the New 670.99 cent, to 1,229.03, and the Nasdaq
York Mercantile Exchange. NYSE diary composite index fell 13.00, or
Stocks had advanced on news 0.60 percent, to 2,166.74. The
that the median price for exist- Advanced: 1,220 New highs drop sent the Nasdaq back into
ing homes in July was a record Declined: 2,072 251 negative territory for the year.
$219,000, a gain of 14.7 percent Unchanged: 173 Newlows Bonds fell, with the yield on
from the median, or midpoint,18 the 10-year Treasury note rising
prices a year ago. That was the Volume: 1,732,538,016 to 4.25 percent, up from 4.22
biggest jump in prices since Nasdaq diary percent Friday The U.S. dollar
November 1980 and another in Newhihs was up against the euro. Gold
a string of reports showing the Advanced: 1,167 172New high prices were higher.
nation's economy continues to Declined: 1,900 New lows BellSouth Corp., the domi-
expand at a healthy pace. Unchanged: 152 17 nant local telephone provider
But investors may stay on the Volume: 1,508,725,964 in nine southeastern states,
sidelines until the Commerce reported a more than 20 per-
Department releases its eagerly AP cent drop in second-quarter
anticipated report on second- profit on a slight rise in rev-
quarter gross domestic product numbers Friday, enue. The decline beat analysts' expectations,
said Ed Peters, chief investment officer at and the stock rose 9 cents to $26.81.


0 MKIll lIltl


1


UETIS CO^


BATTERIE


REPAI R


B HLME ;CLEN 'E mI













jIiLi 26, 20 )5
v,-,,t ,,:,i ,I ,,-I -, ,,,-'


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SI I *. II


..... -:_ -:--: ...... _..-_"..... .. ....


"Laws and institutions must go
hand in hand with the
progress of the human mind. "

aihodulas Jc-fStafyrson


* .~. 1-.. ""-1 *'**".>..WN A> ~ &Stn
..,talt1;9.t'-7-5r~: U; ~4~ruCSfl~s~rireAA aAVrIS


LONG OVERD E


Tough sentence



puts corporate



thieves on notice


oo often convictions for
greed-driven crimes by
the rich and powerful are
followed by sentences that
amount to slaps on the wrists
that make a mockery of justice.
However, the tough prison sen-
tence received by former
WorldCom CEO
Bernard Ebbers left
him weeping and
his thousands of vic- THE I!
tims silently cheer- WorldCc
ing. sent
Ebbers, 63, was
found guilty of engi- OUR OP
neering an $11 bil-
lion securities Justice
accounting fraud.
The consequences
of Ebbers callous greed have
been devastating. The
WorldCom telecommunications
giant went bankrupt. Thousands
of its employees lost their jobs.
Employee retirement funds van-
ished. And investors suffered
staggering financial losses.
Prior to sentencing, Ebbers'
attorneys filed a brief for lenien-
cy accompanied by 169 letters of
support portraying him as a
charitable man of character.
Given the fact that the punish-
ments for white-collar criminals
rarely fit the crime, Ebbers'
attorneys and supporters were
optimistic that the worse-case
scenario would be a sentence
ranging from five to 10 years.
For Ebbers' countless victims,
however, justice was served.
Unmoved by Ebbers' plea for

Weighing trailer i


This is in response to W
the gentleman who needs
to get his trailer weighed,
his homemade trailer. He
needs to rent a trailer
that's big enough to load
his trailer on top, take the
whole thing to the scale. CA
Get the total package
weighed, then go back
again without his trailer
and get the rented trailer
weighed by itself. The difference is
the weight of his trailer. Problem
solved.


e
P


-L


Gas prices
Don't you just love the way big
business and our government con-
tinue to take from us? When crude
oil prices rise, so do gas prices
daily. Have you noticed that oil
prices have dropped from (more
than) $60 to $57 a barrel, but gas
prices continue to go up? We're
being gouged by the oil companies,
and our government stands by and
watches.
Get a laptop
I'm reading in the July 21, paper
about the young man or young
woman or whoever was on the tele-
phone calling Progress Energy
about their outage and they said to
go on a Web site to get more infor-
mation. Well, your computer will
work if you have a laptop, because
my husband uses his all the time
when we have a power outage.
Pricey towing
The Crystal River Police had my
daughter's car towed 2.5 miles.
When she went to pick it up the
next day, it cost her $180. That is
way too excessive. If the Crystal
River Police and the government of
Crystal River can do that to its own
citizens, it's no wonder why people
want to disband that city charter.


leniency, U.S. District Court
Judge Barbara Jones imposed a
25-year sentence declaring "a
sentence of anything less would
not reflect the seriousness of the
crime." Ebbers' tough sentence,
following on the heels of the 15-
year sentence for securities
fraud handed down
to 80-year-old
Adelphia founder
SSUE: John Rigas, sends a
m fraud long-overdue mes-
mnce. sage to would-be
corporate thieves
'INION: that greed-driven
crimes violating the
served,. public trust will no
longer be tolerated.
If this message is
to further resonate in corporate
boardrooms, it must be rein-
forced at next year's trial of for-
mer Enron chairman Kenneth
Lay, should charges prove true.
As thousands of Enron employ-
ees were losing their retirement
funds, Lay salted away millions
of his allegedly ill-gotten dollars
beyond the reach of creditors
and legal judgments, guarantee-
ing he and his wife a combined
monthly income of approximate-
ly $76,000 for the rest of their
lives.
Given the greed of Rigas,
Ebbers and others of their ilk,
vigorous prosecution and tough
sentences are essential to mak-
ing it indisputably clear to
would-be corporate thieves that
crime doesn't pay not even
white-collar crime.

Drug education
In the case of the young
man on drugs, I just wish
we had more judges like
Mr. (Ric) Howard. He's giv-
ing the man three years of
drug education and proba-
-' ='^ tion a real chance to
S realize how serious this is
for the rest of his life. I
0579really wish all the luck in
the world to the young
man. He's a teenager ... I
know he will appreciate this some-
day.


Stop growth
When they tell us to start conserv-
ing water, I will laugh at them and
keep on using what I need. With all
the greedy people who want growth
in Citrus County, with all these new
housing developments, where is all
their water to come from? Not my
house. Where will all their sewage
go? Where will their trash go? Our
landfill has problems now. All this
growth will bring more school class-
rooms, police, larger roads with
bumper-to-bumper cars. We don't
need it.
Leaving a mess
I would like to know why the con-
tractors, when they build up here in
the Highlands and I suppose, all
over the county, aren't responsible
for cleaning up the mess when they
leave. They tear up the landscape,
the erosion goes down, sand is two
or three inches deep on the paved
roads. They get their money and
pull out, then the neighborhood is
left with the mess.
We try to mow the rights of way
and keep them nice out here, but
their trucks tear them all up.
Nobody cares. They tear street
signs down, nobody cares. They just
get their money and run. It's wrong.
The commission should do some-
thing about it.


Liberty: Choices, responsibility


y Gerry Mulligan ...........................publisher
Charlie Brennan ................................editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ........advertising services director
Steve Arthur ................... Chronicle columnist
Mike Arnold ...........................managing editor
Jim Hunter ..............................senior reporter
Founded in 1891
by Albert M. Curt Ebitz .............................. citizen member
Williamson Mike Moberley .........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


By
H
4


4


mentally, law by law by law.
Dictatorships do not arise from dicta-
tors' telling people what terrible
things they plan to do; all dictatorial
power is built on a promise of good
things safety, security, prosperity.
Power rests either with the people
or with the government; it cannot
reside in both at the same time. Power
is like electricity and is never still. It is
always flowing in one direction or the
other. Power is more seductive and
addictive than cocaine. These are
basic principles based on human
nature and are as true today as they
were in classical Rome.
As a true conservative with a strong
libertarian streak, I fear government
more than terrorists and criminals.
Random acts by random individuals
with no army and no air force can be
dealt with much more easily than
actions by a government backed up by
military and police power. In recent
years, federal law enforcement has
expanded to the point where there is
now an equivalent of five military divi-
sions armed and invested with the
power to make arrests.
The problem with freedom is that it
is a two-sided coin. On one side is the
liberty to make decisions; on the other
is responsibility. I pray we have not
reached the point where more
Americans fear responsibility than
love liberty. As many have said before,
those willing to sacrifice freedom for
security will end up with neither.

Write to Charley Reese at P.O. Box
2446, Orlando, FL 32802.


LETTERS to the Editor


Hunting gators
A friend explained that one way to
hunt gators it to go into the lakes or
ponds in the area where you have
seen the gators. Once you're in the
pond, splash just a little of the water
in front of you. Once gators get a hint,
they will investigate. As they come in
closer to see what was moving in the
water, you stand still and when within
arm's reach, you strike them in the
head, stunning them. You then use
whatever sharp item to cut the throat.
You could look at the strategy we
are using in Iraq as nearly the same
thing. We have waded into the heart
of the Middle East and stirred the
waters drawing terrorists to us so we
could stun them and deal the death
stroke.
The Democratic Party doesn't
understand the strategy of dealing
with people there instead of here.
These people won't negotiate, don't
want any concessions and push their
children into being suicide bombers
because they want a theocratic socie-
ty based on ancient Muslim teachings.
I just want to know what is the
Democratic Party plan for wiping
these people out? How would they get
information from captured prisoners
who gladly throw urine at our sol-
diers? The Democratic Party has no
answers other than this war is illegal
even when proven it's not and that
there was no connection to Osama
and Saddam, even as receipts are
found (in Iraq) showing payments to
al-Qaida, and paperwork shows that
Iraqi intelligence were at the meeting
al-Qaida held before the 9/11 bombers
coming to the United States to start
their mission.
Just answer these questions.
What would the Democrats have


OPINIONS INVITED
w The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonllne.com.

done after 9/11?
What is the Democrats' plan to fight
terrorists?
How would they have brought the
Middle East an example of freedom
that is now Iraq?
Why, if the war is going so bad, is
the re-enlistment rate so high among
our frontline fighters?
Jimmie T. Smith
Hernando

Help maimed vets
On July 4 on MSNBC there was one
hour of looking at the wounded sol-
diers from Iraq and Afghanistan of
which a good deal had missing arms,
legs and eyes and this is how they
would spend the rest of their lives.
I know for a fact there is a shortage


of funds to the VA, but the tax cuts to
the rich is alive and well.
This Bush-initiated war is a horri-
ble burden on our soldiers and all of
America and we are no safer now
than before or after 9/11.
I write this with tears in my eyes as
I see these kids in person every time I
go to the VA hospital in Gainesville,
which is often, and I make sure I have.
talks with these kids as often as I can.
They really respect us World War II
vets.
I say stop the tax cuts to the super
rich and give these kids everything
they need and deserve for life.
Ray Raphael
Pine Ridge Estates

Thanks for shirts
After the successful completion of
the first week of Wildlife Week in the
Park, sponsored by the Friends of
Homosassa Wildlife Park Inc., I would
like to extend my sincere thanks to
Betty Skidmore, of Action Design in
Crystal River, for the great job she did
on the children's and counselors' T-
shirts for this year.
The children are able to wear a
shirt that pictured all of the wildlife
at the park, that they spent the week
learning about
Our summer camp is all about
young people learning to respect and
care for the diverse wildlife that
Citrus County has to offer.
With little time to spare, Betty took
on the job and made a lot of little peo-
ple and big people happy!
Virginia Svoboda
board member, Friends of
Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park Inc.
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD


S should your personal
life be an affair of ."
state? That's what
divides libertarians and
true conservatives from the
modern Jacobins who false-
ly wear the label of "liber-
al" or "moderate."
The libertarian/true-con-
servative position is that
your private and personal
affairs are not the business Charle
of the state as long as you OTI
refrain from applying force VOI
or fraud against your fellow
citizens. The Jacobin posi-
tion is that your life belongs to the
state and your personal interests may
be sacrificed for the common good,
which, of course, the Jacobins will
define.
The most recent example was the
Supreme Court decision that the state
may take your property not for any tra-
ditional public purpose, such as a
school or road, but simply because the
politicians want to hand it over to
developers who will put more expen-
sive buildings on it The fact that a fam-
ily may have worked a lifetime to
acquire their home or small business,
faithfully paid their taxes and obeyed
the laws means nothing. To the Jacobin,
the end always justifies the means.
Jefferson Davis, one of America's
greatest statesmen, said after the
Northern victory that a question set-
tled by force will always arise again in
another form and in another time. He
was right. The same division that was
present at the Constitutional
Convention, that was argued almost


continuously during the
early days of the republic
and that led to war between
the North and South
remains with us yet.
That question is: Do you
'^ want a strong central gov-
ernment or a weak central
government acting as an
-. agent for sovereign states
with clearly defined and
Reese limited powers? The North
IER stood for the central gov-
ES ernment, the South for the
confederation. Unfortu-
nately the manpower and
industrial might decided the issue in
favor of a centralized government. Just
as several Confederate leaders pre-
dicted, this quickly evolved into
empire and imperial wars.
The next war was indeed a war for
empire the Spanish-American War
and was immediately followed by
another war that put the lie to the
claim of liberating people from Spain.
That war was the Philippine
Insurrection, in which we crushed
those who wanted true independence.
It was, by the way, far bloodier than the
war against a very weak Spain. Every
war since has been a clash of empires,
including World War II.
What Americans need to realize is
that it is impossible to increase gov-
ernment power- without decreasing
individual liberty. Government power,
after all, means coercing people into
doing some things and into refraining
from doing other things. Every law
says to the citizen, "You must" or "You
shall not." Thus, liberty is lost incre-


c(








TuliSilAY, juYix 26, 2005 11A


SFor the


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrest
Gabriel Stone, 19,
Homosassa, at 11:47 p.m. Thursday
on a charge of domestic battery.
A deputy responded to an area in
Hernando, where a woman told him
she and Stone got into an argument
at a Hemando gas station, accord-
ing to an arrest report. She said
Stone grabbed her by her hair and
yanked her toward him and began
punching her face, according to the
report.
The deputy saw red marks on the
woman's face from her temple to her
jaw, according to the report.
No bond was set.
Other arrests
Cynthia Bradshaw, 49, 6105
W. Framingham Court, Crystal
River, at 7 p.m. Friday on a charge


HEAT
Continued from Page 1A

meteorologist Barry Goldsmith
said temperatures are above
what they typically are this
time of year.
"July is definitely the
warmest month of the year,"
Goldsmith said. "In summer,
we tend to stick close to nor-
mal, but even one and a half to
two degrees above average is
going to feel a lot warmer
People notice these things."
Goldstein said daytime highs
for July in Citrus County aver-
age about 89.7 degrees, but
have been running into the


BAY
Continued from Page 1A

most concern, in addition to
the many speeding craft
adding to the turbidity of the
shallow bay by disturbing the
bottom and eroding the shore-
line, members noted.
"It's a hazard for people, not
just manatees," said Jerry
Hogan of the Crystal Lodge
Best Western Dive shop. Hogan
said idle speed should at the
very least be considered for
weekends and holidays based
on the dangerous conditions of
so many speeding craft in a
small place. "It's a zoo out
there," he said.
After" discussion, the mem-
bers agreed that basing a rec-
ommendation on making the
whole bay idle speed all year
round on manatee concerns
was not strong enough and
such a proposal would have to
go through the state, which
would require evidence that
wasn't compiled, like mortality
and injury data, to back up the
need.
Approaching it from the pub-
lic safety and water quality
angle would keep it a local
decision, Maidhof said, allow-


LAWSUIT
Continued from Page 1A

According to court records,
this is what happened:
In January 1998, Osterling
and his wife sold part of his
property. for $14,200 for a
drainage easement The coun-
ty planned to build a "wet"
drainage retention area,
meaning it would look more
like a pond most of the time.
Osterling was concerned
that the drainage ditch would
flood his property. Not so, Karr
said. He wrote in a letter to
Osterling's attorney that he
would see virtually no change
after the C.R. 491 road widen-
ing project between State
Road 44 and Grover Cleveland
Boulevard was complete.
"The only difference is that
the runoff will now receive
water quality treatment," Karr
wrote.
Just the opposite happened.
Osterling's complaint said
heavy rain flooded about four
acres, killing oak trees. The
complaint said the ditch's
design diverted water directly
into his yard.
With the. $750,000 settle-
ment, Citrus County will own
the property by June 2006. The
Osterlings will continue to live
there until then, unless they
move beforehand.
The settlement is on the
commission's consent agenda,
meaning it will not be dis-
cussed publicly today unless a
commissioner specifically
wants that item discussed.
Commission Chairwoman
Vicki Phillips said the settle-
ment is appropriate.
"I know this has been going
on for quite some time," she
said. "It's obvious, the county
has some responsibility there
in flooding Dr. Osterling's
property."


of possession of drug paraphernalia.
A deputy pulled over a white 1999
Suzuki SUV registered to Bradshaw
because the driver entered South
Rock Crusher Road from Homeland
Court without coming to a stop,
according to an arrest report.
A passenger in the SUV,
Bradshaw was not wearing her seat-
belt. The deputy searched
Bradshaw's purse and found a
homemade crack pipe, which had
residue in it, according to the report.
The deputy also found several Q-
tips, which had burnt ends. A shav-
ing of the end of one of the Q-tips
tested positive for cocaine, accord-
ing to the report.
Her bond was set at $500.
Bradshaw's driver, Deericka
Collins, 26, 30 N. Columbus St.,
Beverly Hills, was also arrested on
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance and possession of


low- to mid-90s. A Crystal
River weather watcher report-
ed Monday's high to be 95 de-
grees.
Nighttime temperatures for
Citrus County average about 75
degrees, though they've been
running closer to the upper
70s, Goldstein said.
Heat index, which is defined
as the combination of humidity
and air temperature to give the
apparent temperature or "how
it feels," ran close to the danger
zone of 60 percent during the
weekend, Goldstein said.
Heat indexes of 60 percent or
more combined with tempera-
tures in the 90s can be haz-
ardous to people's health, he
said.


ing the Crystal River City
Council and the Citrus County
Commission to decide it.
So while the danger to the
manatees was part of the con-
cern, the group felt the public
safety issue and water quality
and environmental issues were
actually stronger arguments,
given the traffic on the bay and
its effects.
Maidhof said the situation
has changed after 15 years of
growth and that there
appeared to be easily observ-
able evidence to that. "I don't
think it will be difficult to
accomplish," he said. Given


marijuana. The deputy found two
plastic baggies in Collins' purse -
one contained marijuana and the
other contained cocaine, according
to the report.
Her bond was set at $5,500.
Andrea Michelle Smith, 37,
Crystal River, at 8:21 p.m. Saturday
on a charge of aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon (domestic).
A man told a deputy Smith lunged
at him with a box cutter, slicing his
chest and right arm, according to an
arrest report.
The deputy saw a 2-inch cut in the
middle of his chest and a 8-to 10-
inch cut on his right arm, according
to the report.
No bond was set.
William Allen Joseph
Mataitis, 20, 12900 Trails End,
Floral City, at 3:05 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of battery.
His bond was set at $500.


The American Heart Assoc-
iation stresses the importance
of knowing the symptoms of
heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, such as dizziness,
cramping or high fever. If any
symptoms appear, stop exercis-
ing or working and cool down
immediately with cold water,
according to www.american-
heart.org. Heat exhaustion can
progress quickly to heat stroke,
which can kill you.
Each year, more people die
in the United States from
extreme heat than from hurri-
canes, lightning, tornadoes,
floods and earthquakes com-
bined, according to the U.S.
Department of Labor's
Occupational Safety and


today's situation, he said, "The
time for the summer sports
zone is past."
Remley said she would pass
the recommendation on to the
full advisory board. It will meet
in mid to late September in
Crystal River at the state's St
Martins Preserve office and
consider whether it want to


Christopher Niel Stokes, 23,
7224 E. Hampton Court, Floral City,
at 5 p.m. Saturday on charges of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance, possession of marijuana
and possession of drug parapher-
nalia.
He was released on his own
recognizance.
Justin Miles, 28, 8232 Tower'
Trail, Floral City, at 2:15 p.m. Friday
on a charge of driving while license
suspended/revoked, resisting/ ob-
structing and officer without violence
and illegal license plate attached.
His bond was set at $1,500.
Brandy Nicole Studrey, 8775
S. Brittany Path, Inverness, at 11:16
p.m. Saturday on a charge of pos-
session of a controlled substance
and possession of a marijuana.
Her bond was set at $5,500.
Brandon Weinacker, 26,
Citrus County Detention Facility,


Health Administration.
But working outdoors is com-
monplace for many county
laborers, who try their best to
stay hydrated and healthy.
Many of their descriptions of
working in the July heat bring
new meaning to the term "hot
as hell."
"Can I say 'hell' in the
paper?" asked Pat Rouzzo, who
works for Rain Control
Aluminum of Central Florida
out of Brooksville. "Because
that's what it's like. Last Friday,
we were saying we met Satan.
Sometimes it's hard to
breathe."
Rouzzo accepted a glass of
ice water from Inverness resi-
dent Shirley Martin on Monday


pass the recommendation on to
the county and city of Crystal
River.

AIRPORT

TA I

746-2929


Lecanto, at 6:57 a.m. Monday on a
charge of introduce/posses contra-
band into/at county jail.
His bond was set at $2,000.
Erika Boscarino, 20, 1728 W.
Pine Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills, at
1:44 a.m. Sunday on a charge of
possession of marijuana.
She was released on her own
recognizance.
Also arrested in this incident was
Gina Neaman, 23,1479 N. Endicott
Point, Crystal River, at 1:44 a.m.
Sunday on charges of possession of
marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
She was released on her own
recognizance.
Ronnie Key, 20, 8775 S.
Brittany Path, Inverness, at 11:16
p.m. Saturday on a charge of pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
He was released on his own
recognizance.


afternoon as he finished work-
ing on the gutters on her
Apopka Avenue home.
"It's terrible," Martin said
about the heat. "This is the
time of year young people have
strokes. I don't go outside
unless I have to. Today, I had
to."
A lawn full of shirtless men
perspiring under the blazing
sun, Rouzzo, his supervisor Jim
Woodson and several other
workers,, loaded equipment
into their van.
Woodson said he and his
employees work 12-hour days.
Their breaks tend to be in
between.jobs when they can


. I...


Maurice Calvin Ayres, 42,
6415 S. PremiereAve., Homosassa,
at 7:06 p.m. Saturday on a charge of
petty theft.
His bond was set at $500.
Crystal River Police
DUI arrest
Andrew Dean Patten, 24,
33619 E. Lake Joanna Drive, Eustis,
at 2:02 a.m. Sunday on a charge of
driving under the influence.
Patten told police he refused to
take field sobriety tasks without "his
lawyer present," according to an
arrest report.
His bond was set at $500.
Other arrest
Chad Beaver, 22, 9318 W.
Hercules Lane, Crystal River, at
10:30 a.m. Monday on charges of
burglary of a conveyance and petty
theft.
His bond was set at $3,250.

enjoy the air conditioning
inside their van.
Like Woodson's company,
Danella utility construction
company carries a large cooler
in their van to prevent workers
from becoming dehydrated as
temperatures rise.
Scott Beckett, who works for
Danella, said he drinks lots of
fluids while on the job during
his 10-hour shifts.
"I don't push it," Beckett said
last week while taking a break
from working on a sewer line
on Halls River Road near
Margarita Grill in Homosassa.
"I'm used to (the heat), but it's
still not fun."


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CITRUS COUNnT (FL) CHRONICLE


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TUESDAY
JULY 26, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


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AFL-CIO splinters over goals


Associated Press

CHICAGO The AFL-CIO splin-
tered on Monday, spooking some
Democratic Party leaders and the ranks
of organized workers, their futures in
the hands of labor rebels who bolted
the 50-year-old federation vowing to
reverse the steep decline in union
membership.
"Our goal is not to divide the labor
movement but to rebuild it," said Andy
Stern, president of the 1.8 million-mem-
ber Service Employees International
Union. He and Teamsters President
James P Hoffa said their unions would
leave the AFL-CIO, paving the way for
other unions to follow.
Their action drew a bitter rebuke
from AFL-CIO President John
Sweeney, who called it a "grievous
insult" that could hurt workers already


Leamon
Stanifer works
under the blaz-
ing sun as he
puts the finish-
ing touches on
a walkway,
Monday in
Lafayette, Ind.
People who
worked out-
side Monday
faced temper-
atures in the
mid-90s with
the heat
index in the
100s.


Heat wave



scorches



country



Some cities see temperatures

reach three digits

Associated Press

A large swath of the U.S. suffered through anoth-
er miserable day of sizzling temperatures and
steamy humidity Monday a deadly heat wave
that had people cranking up air conditioners,
scrambling to cooling shelters and running through
sprinklers in the park
Temperatures soared past 100 in several cities,
and the National Weather Service posted excessive
heat warnings and advisories from Illinois to
Louisiana and from Nebraska to the District of
Columbia.
"It feels like basically just walking around in an
oven," said 20-year-old McDarren Paschal as he
mowed grass at Sinclair Community College in
Dayton, Ohio.
The blistering heat has caused numerous deaths.
The Chicago Fire Department said three people
died Sunday from what appeared to be heat-relat-
ed injuries, but added that the exact causes of
death have yet to be confirmed. Twenty-four peo-
ple, most of them homeless, have died from heat
this summer in the Phoenix area.
City workers in Chicago checked on elderly resi-


buffeted by the global economy M
and anti-union forces in
Congress.
"The labor movement belongs
to all of us," Sweeney said, "and {
our future should not be dictat-
ed by the demands of any group
or the ambitions of any individ-
uals." Jam
The future of the labor move- Hi
ment could be greatly affected Tea
by the success or failure of preside
Sternm's effort to build a coalition Andy
outside the AFL-CIO that dedi- presi
cates more money and manpow- SEIU
er to recruiting union members to I
while adjusting to demands of memi:
the global economy.
His Change to Win Coalition consists
of seven unions, four of which boy-
cotted the AFL-CIO convention: The
SEIU, Teamsters, United Food and


e
ri

e
ide
bL
be


Commercial Workers and
UNITE HERE, a group of tex-
Si tile, hotel and restaurant
employees.
Labor officials expect the
UFCW and UNITE HERE to
leave the AFL-CIO later.
Those four unions represent
P one-third of the AFL-CIO's 13
S P million members. The SEIU
ster and Teamsters alone account
snt aner for more than $20 million of an
Stern, estimated $120 million AFL-
ent of CIO budget.
want Much of that money goes to
build Democratic candidates and to
arship. political operations that benefit
the Democratic Party. Stern,
Hoffa and their colleagues in the
Change to Win Coalition pushed the
AFL-CIO to shift focus from such politi-
cal activity to recruiting new union


members, contending that a growing
union movement would naturally
increase its political and bargaining
power.
"They said no," Hoffa said at a coali-
tion news conference held a few blocks
from the AFL-CIO convention site.
"Their idea is to keep throwing money
at politicians."
Democratic politicians catch most of
the AFL-CIO donations, one reason
why party leaders worry about a weak-
ened federation. The AFL-CIO also
spends millions of dollars on programs
that help get Democratic voters to turn
out on Election Day.
Some Democrats said Monday they
hoped the warring factions would come
back together. Others suggested the
competition would jolt organized labor
out of its decades-old slumber.


dents and shuttled people to cooling centers
Monday, hoping to avoid a repeat of a disastrous
1995 heat wave that killed 700 people. Wilmington,
Del., set up sprinklers in city parks so people could
run through the spray to cool off. A social service
agency in Oklahoma City handed out fans to elder-
ly people who didn't have air conditioning.
Sherri Ball went to a cooling center in Peoria, Ill.,
because her window air conditioner couldn't keep
up with the heat, a day after the mercury topped
100 degrees in the central Illinois city for the first
time in a decade.
"It's hot and I can't breathe when it's real hot out-
side," said the 46-year-old Ball.
In other states, at least three deaths have been
blamed on the heat in Missouri this summer, and
authorities were looking into the death of a woman
found Sunday in a home without air conditioning.
Four people have died of the heat in Oklahoma, two
of them young children left in cars, and at least
three heat deaths have been tallied in New Jersey.
Some 200 cities in the West hit daily record highs
last week, including Las Vegas, Nev., at 117, and
Death Valley soared to 129, the weather service
said.


Home sales set new record


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Existing
homes were sold at the fastest
pace in history last month, and
the median price set a record
as well. But some private econ-
omists predicted housing may
be nearing its peak as mort-
gage rates begin to rise.
In June, existing homes sold
at an annual rate of 7.33 million
units, an all-time high and an
increase of 2.7 percent from the
seasonally adjusted sales pace
in May, according to a report
Monday from the National
Association of Realtors.
The gain reflected a 2.4 per-
cent rise in sales of single-fam-
ily homes, which climbed to a
record of 6.37 million units at
an annual rate. Sales of condo-
miniums also set a record, ris-
ing by 4.5 percent from the May
level to an annual rate of
966,000 units in June.
The strength in sales helped
. pushed the median price of an
" existing home to a new record


of $219,000, a gain of 14.7 per-
cent from the median, or mid-
point, for homes sold a year ago.
That was the biggest jump in
prices in nearly 25 years, since
a 15.6 percent year-over-year
increase in November 1980.
Gains in prices of that magni-
tude have spurred concerns that
housing markets in parts of the
country may be in the grips of
what Federal Reserve Chair-
man Alan Greenspan last week
called a "speculative fervor"
that is pushing home prices to
unsustainable levels similar to
the 1990s stock price boom.
"Just when you think sales
activity is ready to settle into a
more sustainable pace, the
housing market continues to
surprise," said David Lereah,
the Realtors' chief economist
Lereah said the boom in
housing is being driven by
mortgage rates which, defying
expectations, have remained
near rock-bottom levels this
year even as the Federal
Reserve has continued to raise


Home sales
Sales of existing homes rose to
7.33 million units last month:
Seasonally adjusted annualized rate
7.33 million
8 million units .. .....


6 -


4
3
1

0
J J ASONDJFMAMJ
2004 2005
SOURCE: National Association AP
of Realtors
short-term interest rates.
But other analysts noted that
mortgage rates, as measured
by Freddie Mac's nationwide
survey, stand at 5.73 percent for
a 30-year mortgage.


A break in the heat was on the way, at least for the
Midwest.
A cold front brought rain Monday to parts of
Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and was on 'its way
to crossing Illinois, Missouri and Indiana today,
said Ed Shimmon, a weather service meteorologist
in Lincoln, Ill. He said rainfall will likely be scat-
tered, but still welcome in the drought-stricken
region.
Demand for electricity to run air conditioners
has hit near-record peaks from Southern California
to the region served by the Tennessee Valley
Authority. The load on generators caused a power
outage in St. Louis County, Mo., where more than
900 customers were still without electricity
Monday.
The heat was hardest on people who have to
work outside.
"I try not to think about it," said Beatrice
Gonzales, running a hot dog stand in Baltimore as
the temperature neared 90. *
"I guess you can never really get used to the heat,
but you get tolerant of it," construction worker Lee
Tate said in Jackson, Miss., where the mercury hit
the mid 90s before noon Monday.


London police


name 2 suspects


Associated Press
LONDON British police
Monday identified two of four
men believed responsible for
last week's botched transit
bombings and said an explo-
sive found in a park was like
those used in the attempted
attacks, raising fears a fifth
bomber was on the loose.
London's police chief said
the force was "racing against
time" to find the bombers, who
fled three subway trains and a
bus when their devices failed
to fully detonate. Those bombs
and the one found abandoned
Saturday all were made using
clear plastic food-storage con-
tainers put into dark-colored
bags or backpacks.
At a televised press confer-
ence, Peter Clarke, head of the
Metropolitan Police anti-ter-
rorist squad, held up one of the


white-lidded, 1.65-gallon con-
tainers called a Delta 6250
- and urged any shopkeeper
who had sold five or more of
them to contact police.
Earlier, Prime Minister Tony
Blair apologized for the killing
of a Brazilian electrician mis-
taken for a terrorist as officials
confirmed that undercover
police shot him eight times -
one in the shoulder, seven in
the head. Blair also urged
Britons to come forth with
information on .the fugitive
bombers.
Police identified two of the
suspects as Yasin Hassan
Omar, 24, and Muktar Said
Ibrahim, 27, also known as
Muktar Mohammed Said, but
did not give their nationalities.
Authorities also released
new closed-circuit images of
the four suspects and gave
details of their movements.


Nation BRIEFS

High on the
food chain


Associated Press
A bald eagle .circles
Nubanusit Lake on Sunday in
search of food for its two
fledgling eagles in a nest
nearby in Hancock, N.H.

Roberts' documents
'out of bounds'
WASHINGTON The White
House on Monday warned
Democrats not to make exten-
sive requests for Supreme Court
nominee John Roberts' legal
writings in previous Republican
administrations, saying many
such documents are "out of
bounds."
With Bush's first chance to
shape the Supreme Court at
stake, the White House is hop-
ing to avoid the kind of show-
down with Dempcrats over doc-
ument requests that has
stymied Senate confirmation of
some of the president's other
high-profile nominees. Asked
repeatedly to say whether the
administration was open to mak-
ing Roberts' writings as a former
administration lawyer available,
White House.press secretary
Scott McClellan avoided saying
"no" outright.

World RIEFS

Good for
business


Associated Press
Sea lions rest Sunday on the
port of San Antonio, some 64
miles southwest of Santiago,
Chile. The sea lions are
attracting tourists and have
benefitted the merchants in
San Antonio economically.

Israel criticizes
Pope Benedict XVI
VATICAN CITY Pope
Benedict XVI faced the first
major conflict of his 3-month-old
papacy when
Israel sum-
moned the
Vatican envoy
Monday to
express out-
rage that the
pope "deliber-
ately failed" to
condemn ter- Pope
rorist attacks Benedict
against XVI
Israelis.
The pontiff also said in sepa-
rate comments Monday that he
didn't see any anti-Christian
motive in recent attacks blamed
on Muslim extremists and urged
dialogue with the best elements
of Islam.
The German-born Benedict,
who has consistently reached
out to Jews since assuming the
papacy, was criticized by Israel
for remarks Sunday from his
Alpine vacation retreat in north-
westem Italy.
He prayed for God to stop the
"murderous hand" of terrorists
and referred to the recent "abhor-
rent terrorist attacks" in Egypt,
Britain, Turkey and Iraq, but did
not mention attacks in Israel.
"The pope deliberately failed
to condemn the terrible terror
attack that occurred in Israel last
week," a Foreign Ministry state-
ment issued in Jerusalem said.
From wire reports


~~-;\


.~.

~


Associated Press
Arlo Gleghorn,. left, fills out the required paperwork for receiving a free fan Monday while David Clay, right,
cools off in the lobby which doubles as a cooling center for heat stressed individuals at Contact Ministries
in Springfield, III. A heat wave across the Midwest is sending people inside to escape temperatures flirting
with triple digits for the third straight day and the fan will bring some relief. The stifling heat is expected to
break today when a cold front bearing needed rain crosses the state.


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JuRI 26, 2005


Sports -
Top pick Smith gets
megadeal from SF













Niners QB Alex Smith now has
57 million reasons to smile.
NEW YORK Alex Smith, the
first pick in April's draft, agreed to
terms Monday on a six-year, $57
million deal with the San Francisco
49ers.
Smith will receive a guaranteed
$24 million, a lawyer familiar with
terms of the deal told The
Associated Press on condition of
anonymity.
The agreement is expected to
set off a run of signing of first-
round draft picks.
The only other first-rounder to
agree to terms is offensive line-
man Logan Mankins, taken by
New England with the 32nd and
last pick of the first round. His deal
was announced Monday.
But Miami had been waiting for
Smith to sign before completing its
deal with running.back Ronnie
Brown, taken second overall.
Nevin nixes Padres
deal with Orioles
BALTIMORE San Diego
Padres first baseman Phil Nevin
on Monday rejected a trade that
would have sent him to the
Baltimore Orioles for pitcher
Sidney Ponson.
The proposed deal was contin-
gent upon Nevin's approval. He
has the right to block a trade to
eight teams, including the Orioles.
Nevin, 34, is batting .263 with
nine home runs, 11 doubles and
47 RBIs in 71 games. Nevin did
, not immediately return a phone
call seeking comment.
Ponson is 7-9 with a 5.91 ERA.
The non-waiv6r deadline is
Sunday afternoon, so Ponson still
may be deal by the Orioles. He
I has not won a game for Baltimore
"'since June 18.
AAU U-12, U-13, U-14
Baseball tryouts
AAU Baseball will have signups
Sand tryouts at Central Citrus Little
League complex on Saturday, July
30, from noon to 3 p.m. for 12-
and-under and 13-and-under age
groups. Contact Steve Arcadipane
for additional information at 746-
6837 or 697-0909 or visit
www.naturecoastsports.com.
Tryouts for AAU baseball U-14
age group will be this Friday, Aug.
29, at Whispering Pines Park from'
6-8 p.m. Call Ed Gruman at 860-
2207 after 7 p.m. or e-mail at gru-
mane42@hotmail.com.
Tryouts scheduled
for Pirate volleyball
Crystal River High School will
be holding volleyball tryouts for
varsity, junior varsity and rookie
team Aug. 1-4 from 6-8 p.m.
i A current physical examination
is required to participate.
For further information, contact
the high school at 795-4641.
From staff, wire reports


Who will carry the torch?


Armstrong's exit

could mean a

tighter field

Associated Press

PARIS Lance Armstrong
is gone. What now for the
Tour de France?
For one, it should be a more
closely contested race next
year, with former champion
Jan Ullrich and emerging
new rivals battling for the yel-
low jersey.
"Without Armstrong here,
everyone's going to think
they've got the Holy Grail,"
American rider Chris Homer
said. "I think it might be more
nervous in the beginning.
There'll be all the specula-
tion. Instead of talking about
Armstrong's next victory,
they'll be talking about the
next guy to win."
The 33-year-old Texan
retired Sunday after his
record seventh consecutive
victory in cycling's showcase
event.
"He contributed to the
myth of the Tour," deputy
race director Christian
Prudhomme said. "Next year
the suspense will be far high-
er, there will no longer be a
huge favorite. The boss who
ruled the Tour de France will
be gone."
His departure offers hope
to Ullrich, the 1997 champion
from Germany who has been
a five-time runner-up -three
times to Armstrong. He fin-
ished third this month, but
will be 32 next year and
knows it could be his last
chance to win another title.
Italian rider Ivan Basso,
who finished third in 2004
and second this year, is anoth-
er potential champion.
"With Ivan, we have a rider
who can win," said Basso's
Team CSC director Bjarne
Riis. "He is the one to become
Armstrong's successor."
Also in contention should
be Alexandre Vinokourov of
Kazakhstan, the third-place
finisher in 2003 and winner of
Sunday's final stage. He has
left Ullrich's T-Mobile team
because he wants a team built
around him next year.
And there's Alejandro
Valverde, a talented young


Lance Armstrong, center, cycles with the pack on the Champs Elysees on his way to
7th straight Tour de France.


Spaniard who beat
Armstrong in a sprint finish
on an Alpine climb to the ski
resort of Courchevel on stage
10.
'A guy like him I'm not
blowing smoke could be
the future of cycling,"
Armstrong said.
Italian rider Damiano


Cunego, 23, missed the race
with an illness but will be
expected to challenge soon.
Then there's Armstrong's-
Discovery Channel teammate
Yaroslav Popovych. He won
the white jersey awarded to
this year's best young rider.
"We cannot replace Lance,"
team director Johan


Some will miss

Lance, others are

glad he's gone

Life after Lance began in
France with a thud.
"Never to such an extent,
probably, has the departure
of a champion been wel-
comed with such wide-
spread relief," huffed
EEquipe, the nation's lead-
ing sports daily
So much for the notion
that you don't know what
you've got till it's gone.
No sooner had Armstrong
lighted out of Paris for the
beaches in the south -
swapping champagne for
^ cold beer than French
media outlets published a
r' laundry list of complaints.
According to their tastes,
he was too aloof, too control-
ling, too cor-
porate, too
Good and ,
despite a
lack of proof
Sto support
doping alle-
gations

Armstrong,
too good to AP
be true. Colu
"It's not Columnist
only the end JIM LITKE
of an era,
but also of a
doubt," EEquipe added.
;. "That's so true that he felt
the need to express himself,
yesterday on the Champs-
Elysdes, a microphone in his
hand to ask skeptics to
Believe in miracles."
At least the feeling wasn't
mutual.
"I have a special place in
my heart for this race,"
Armstrong said. "I dream
_ about coming back to
Associated Press France, telling stories to my
children. I really care about
Winning his t"


Bruyneel said. "There is not a
second one in line to really
step up. Being the next leader
is difficult."
Armstrong, meanwhile, is
expected to play a prominent
advisory role to Bruyneel
next year and could have a

Please see LANCE/Page 3B


Never mind that what
Armstrong did for cycling
actually bordered on the
miraculous.
Almost single-handedly, he
turned what was a recre-
ational, niche sport in
America into must-see TV
for nearly three weeks each

Please see LITKE/Page 3B


The highs and lows of a Saturday at the speedway


Some drivers shine, others are missed


Kim Bollinger
KEEPING
TRACK


Herb Neumann Jr.'s domina-
tion in the Late Model divi-
sion Saturday night at
Citrus County Speedway meant
more than an $1,800 payday. The
former Late Model champion also
took over the No. 1 spot on the divi-
sion's point list after collecting
double points in the 50-lap Late
Model race.
Neumann earned the pole after
qualifying ninth of 20 cars due to
the inversion pill picked by fast
qualifier Mike Bell. And right from
the start it was Neumann leading


the way all the way to the check-
ered flag.
Chris Hooker was unable to reel
in the powerful No. 98 machine
driven by Neumann and had to set-
tle for a second place finish over
Gary Grubbs, Jim Smith and Tuffy
Hester.
While the Late Model field has
proven to be a crowd-puller, it was
the Hobby Stock division that kept
the attention of most.
Thirty Hobby Stocks entered
into the night's action with 24 mak-
ing the big show.


The outside .lane proved to be
the fastest way to the front and
when it was over, Herb Hoefler
was in victory lane for the first
time this season. John Zuidema,
Tim Anderson, points leader Bill
Ryan, and James Batson finished
out the top five, respectively.
Noticeably absent were three of
the divisions top drivers.
Corky Miley, Tommy Smith and
his brother Richie Smith were all
suspended indefinitely for their
actions at the conclusion of the
Hobby Stock 50 over a week ago
now.
It is unfortunate that things
escalated to the point that they are


no longer able to compete at the
Inverness racetrack.
I'm sure not everyone will agree,
but they are all very talented driv-
ers. Aggressive at times? Yes.
Temperamental? Definitely But
very talented, nonetheless.
As expected, their absence has
already impacted the Hobby Stock
division, both good and bad.
Their departure opened the
lane for at least two drivers that
have had problems getting into the
A-main in past events who finally
make it to the big show. There
were even a few new drivers

Please see TRACK/Page 3B


Humble and slender, Williams returns


Assopiated Press
ABOVE: Ricky Williams
addresses the media during a
news conference Monday. in
Davie. FAR RIGHT: Williams
hauls in a pass during the
team's workout.


Associated Press


DAVIE Back in the Miami
Dolphins' backfield Monday,
Ricky Williams made all the right
moves.
First, he showed up. Then he
reached the end zone on his first
carry, smiled at cheering fans,
apologized for leaving the team in
the lurch, said he was done with
dope and calmly submitted to a
media interrogation regarding his
surreal one-year retirement.
One question the first one -
momentarily stumped him,
though: Why did he return?
"Why? Why? I don't know. I
don't know," he said.
Uh-oh. This roller-coaster ride
still seems a little rickety.
Greeted with hugs from team-
mates and cheers from fans,
Williams returned to the
Dolphins for their opening train-


ing camp practice Monday under
new coach Nick Saban. Lining up
for his first play since the 2003
season, Williams took a handoff
from Gus Frerotte and sprinted 20
yards to the goal line.
But there was no defense on the
field, and Williams is sure to meet
stiffer resistance in the weeks to
come as he tries to regain favor
and reclaim a starting job.
"Look, we're kind of in the risk-
taking business," Saban said.
"I've talked to the team about it. I
think everybody is accepting of
his ability and respectful of him
as a competitor. I think everybody
is anxious to see that he is com-
mitted and to evaluate his level of
commitment."
At a team meeting Sunday after
players reported for camp,
Williams spoke briefly and apolo-
gized for the impact caused by his
retirement a year ago last week-


end. The Dolphins went into a
nosedive and finished 4-12, their
worst season since the 1960s.
"There were things about life
that I wanted to explore outside
of football, and I had never had
the chance," Williams said at a
news conference after practice. "I
realize by making that decision, I
affected the team in a negative
way and upset a lot of fans.
"I'm very regretful that people
were hurt in the process of me
doing that I do realize that to a lot
of people it comes off as being
very selfish. So I do offer an apol-
ogy to all the people who were
negatively impacted."
His words of contrition seemed
to satisfy teammates, including
center Seth McKinney, who a year
ago called Williams a quitter.
"In the team meeting, he did


Please see ... M WS/Page 3B


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SPORTS


Huff hammers Bosox


IF.,



Associated Press
Aubrey Huff, second from right, is mobbed by his Devil Rays teammates after ripping an RBI-double to lead Tampa Bay to an extra-inning
win over the Red Sox.

Huffs two-out double off Schilling delivers winning run in 10th inning


Associated Press


ST. PETERSBURG The
Tampa Bay Devil Rays
matched their longest winning
streak of the season with their
fourth straight victory, beating
Curt Schilling and the Boston
Red Sox 4-3 Monday night on
S Aubrey Huff's two-out RBI
double in the 10th inning.
Jorge Cantu scored from first
base when the game-winning
hit off Schilling (2-4) soared
over right fielder Trot Nixon's
head and bounced off the wall
to end Boston's first extra-
inning game of the season.
Jesus Colome (2-2) pitched 2
1-3 innings for the win as
Tampa Bay, which swept
Baltimore over the weekend,
improved to 8-3 since the All-
Star break Boston's lead in the
AL East shrunk to one game
over second-place New York
The Red Sox set a major
league record to start a season
by not playing extra-innings
until their 99th game.


Schilling pitched a perfect
ninth before giving up a leadoff
single to Carl Crawford in the
10th. Cantu reached on a field-
er's choice, bunting into a force
play.
Red Sox starter David Wells,
who hasn't to lost the Devil
Rays since 1999, allowed three
runs and nine hits over 6 1-3
innings. He was lifted after giv-
ing up one-out singles to Toby
Hall and Nick Green, and
reliever Mike Timlin was
unable to keep Tampa Bay
from tying the game.
Julio Lugo's RBI single off
Timlin wiped out a 3-2 lead the
Red Sox took on Johnny
Damon's two-run homer off
Travis Harper in the top of the
seventh. Bill Mueller drove in
Boston's first run with a sec-
ond-inning RBI single off Devil
Rays starter Doug Waechter.
The Devil Rays tied it 1-all on
Hall's. sacrifice fly in the sec-
ond after wasting an opportuni-
ty to get off to a quick start
when Wells gave up a double to


Lugo and single to Crawford to
begin the game.
Wells escaped the jam by
striking out Cantu and Jonny
Gomes and getting Huff to
ground out to end the inning.
Huff singled with one out in the
fourth and scored when Damon
Hollins doubled to left-center
for a 2-1 lead.
Home runs have been a prob-
lem for Waechter, particularly
at Tropicana Field where he's
given up 27 in 110 career
innings. But he kept the potent
Red Sox in check, allowing four
singles and a double before
leaving with two outs in the
fifth.
Waechter was activated from
the disabled list earlier in the
day after being sidelined since
June 29 with tendinitis in his
right index finger. He allowed
one run and five hits in 5 2-3
innings, departing with a 2-1
lead.
Harper replaced Chad
Orvella with a 2-0 count on
Tony Graffanino, who eventual-


ly walked with one out in the
seventh. Damon followed with
his seventh homer on a tower-
ing fly ball that struck the right
field foul pole to put the Red
Sox ahead 3-2.
Harper had not allowed a
run 12 innings over seven out-
ings since yielding nine in just
two-thirds of an inning against
the Yankees on June 21. Damon
is 2-for-10 lifetime against the
right-hander, but both of those
hits were home runs.
Notes
The previous three extra-inning
games the Red Sox played in they
won, all during last year's playoffs
... Wells has won nine consecutive
decisions against the Devil Rays
dating to 1999 when he was with
Toronto. He's 10-1 overall ... INF
Fernando Cortez was optioned to
Triple-A Durham to make room on
Tampa Bay's roster for Waechter ...
The Devil Rays released RHP
Hideo Nomo, who had been desig-
nated for assignment on July 16.


MLB: Red-hot Astros rip Phillies


Associated Press

HOUSTON Craig Biggio
and Lance Berkman set an
Astros record by hitting consec-
utive home runs twice in one
game, and Andy Pettitte won
his fifth straight decision to
lead Houston past the
Philadelphia, Phillies 7-1
Monday night.
Jason Lane also connected
for Houston, which has won
eight of nine and 20 of 27.
The Phillies lost for only the
fourth time in 13 games but
have dropped seven of 10 on
the road. They also have lost
seven straight to the Astros and
haven't won in Houston since
May 18, 2003.
The win moved the Astros a
half-game ahead of
Philadelphia in the NL wild-
card race, three games behind
Washington and Atlanta, who
are tied for the NL East lead.
Pettitte (8-7) is 5-0 in seven
starts since a 6-1 defeat June 14
at Baltimore. He is two wins
short of his longest career win
streak set in 2000 with the New
York Yankees.
The left-hander allowed just
Jimmy Rollins' homer and
seven hits in seven innings,
striking out seven and walking
three. Pettitte lowered his ERA
to 2.73, his lowest mark ever
through 20 starts.
Cubs 3, Giants 2
CHICAGO Jeromy Burnitz hit
a bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the bot-
tom of the ninth inning Monday night,
and the Chicago Cubs rallied for a 3-
2 victory over the San Francisco
Giants.
Shut down by Jason Schmidt for
seven innings, Chicago tied the game
in the eighth on Neifi Perez's bases-
loaded single.
Ronny Cedeno led off the bottom
of the ninth with a single against Tyler
Walker (3-3) and was sacrificed to
second by Jerry Hairston. Todd
Walker followed with a single to right
with Cedeno holding at third before
Derrek Lee was walked intentionally
to load the bases.
Jeff Fassero, the Giants' sixth


Houston Astros second baseman Craig Biggio
Philadelphia Phillies David Bell after throwing to first
second inning.


pitcher in the final two innings,
relieved and Burnitz hit a line drive to
center. Jason Ellison caught it and
made a strong throw to the plate, but
Cedeno just beat the tag and slid in
with the game-winning run.
Ryan Dempster (4-3) pitched the
ninth for the win.
With the Giants leading 2-1 head-
ing into the bottom of the eighth, San
Francisco manager Felipe Alou used
five relievers to try and hold the lead
and get a win for Schmidt.
LaTroy Hawkins, booed loudly at
Wrigley Field in 2004 and for two
months this season before he was
traded to.the'Giants, was booed
again and then gave up a leadoff sin-
gle to Todd Walker.
After two forceouts, Aramis
Ramirez singled and pinch-hitter Matt
Murton got an infield hit to load the
bases before Perez who hit a
10th-inning grand slam Sunday night
against the Cardinals lined a single
to center for a 2-2 tie.
Schmidt, who won his previous
four starts against the Cubs, allowed
six hits and a run in seven strong


innings before his bullpi
down.
Brewers 4, Diamo
MILWAUKEE J.J.
tiebreaking solo home r
enth inning that backed
and the Milwaukee Brev
Arizona Diamondbacks
night.
Hardy, in an 0-for-11
red offTim Worrell (0-2:
second appearance sin
acquired him from Phila
Thursday. It was just thi
in 216 at-bats this year
second in six days.
Lyle Overbay added
inning homer against La
Sheets (6-7) allowed
seven hits in seven inni
seven strikeouts and thi
came in with a no-decis
since beating Atlanta on
Jorge De La Rosa pi
eighth, and Derrick Turn
for his 21st save in 23 c
Diamondbacks started
Gosling gave up two rui
in six innings.


Milwaukee took a 2-0 lead in the
first on Brady Clark's homer and
Geoff Jenkins' two-out RBI single that
scored Lyle Overbay, who had dou-
bled.
Koyie Hill hit a run-scoring double
in the second and a sacrifice fly in the
fourth that sent home Alex Cintron.
Rangers 4, Orioles 2
BALTIMORE Alfonso Soriano
homered, had three hits and drove
in two runs, leading the Texas
Rangers to a 4-2 victory over the
Baltimore Orioles on Monday night
that stopped a five-game losing
streak.
Joaquin Benoit (2-1) blanked
Baltimore on four hits over five
.;E .-._ innings in his second start of the
^ :'season. The first came last
-. Wednesday, when he allowed six
runs in five innings in a loss to the
New York Yankees.
Francisco Cordero, the fifth
Associated Press Texas pitcher, worked the ninth for
jumps over his 23rd save, getting Miguel
base in the Tejada to hit into a game-ending
double play,
It was a bad night for Baltimore
en let him in more ways than one. Not only
did the Orioles extend their losing
ndbacks 2 streak to six games, tying a season
Hardy hit a high, but they also lost a possible
run in the sev- addition to a struggling offense that
Ben Sheets, stranded 10 runners and has
wers beat the scored more than five runs only
4-2 Monday once since the All-Star break.
Jay Gibbons homered and
slide, home- Melvin Mora had three hits for the
), making his Orioles, who dropped to two games
ce Arizona over .500 (50-48) for the first time
idelphia last since April 21.
e third homer Baltimore starter Daniel Cabrera
for Hardy, his (8-8) pitched five innings, giving up
three runs, three hits and a career-
an eighth- high seven walks.
ance Cormier. After Benoit left, Jay Gibbons hit
two runs and his 15th homer on the second pitch
ngs with from Ron Mahay, and Larry Bigbie
ree walks. He added a run-scoring groundout to
3ion and a loss bring the Orioles to 3-2 in the sixth.
n July 9. But that was the extent of the
tched the Baltimore offense, which failed to
nbow finished benefit from the return of catcher
chances Javy Lopez, who spent two months
,r Mike on the disabled list with a broken
ns and six hits hand. Lopez went 0-for-4 with a
strikeout.


Boston
New York
Baltimore
Toronto
Tampa Bay

Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Oakland
Texas
Seattle


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Florida

St. Louis
Houston
Chicago
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
54 45 .545 4-6
52 45 .536 1 5-5
50 48 .510 3% z-2-8
49 49 .500 4% 5-5
36 64 .36018% 7-3
Central Division
W I. Pct GB L10
64 33 .660 z-6-4
53 45 .541 11% z-5-5
51 48 .515 14 4-6
49 49 .50015% z-6-4
36 62 .367 28% 5-5
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
59 40 .596 z-6-4
53 45 .541 5% z-8-2
49 49 .500 9% z-3-7
42 55 .433 16 3-7
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
55 44 .556 5-5
55 44 .556 3-7
52 48 .520 3% 6-4
51 47 .520 3% z-7-3
49 47 .510 4% 5-5
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
62 36 .633 z-6-4
52 47 .52510% 8-2
51 48 .515 11% 6-4
49 51 .490 14 5-5
43 56 .43419% z-4-6
42 56 .429 20 z-7-3
West Division


W L Pct
San Diego 50 49 .505
Arizona 48 53 .475
Los Angeles 44 54 .449
San Francisco 42 56 .429
Colorado 34 63 .351
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Texas 4, Baltimore 2
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10
p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Texas (Rogers 11-4) at Baltimore (Lopez
9-5), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Radke 6-9) at N.Y. Yankees
(R.Johnson 10-6), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Byrd 9-6) at Toronto (Chacin
9-5), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Clement 10-3) at Tampa Bay
(Hendrickson 4-7), 7:15 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 11-3) at
Kansas City (Lima 3-8), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (J.Johnson 6-8) at Seattle (Pineiro
3-6), 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Westbrook 7-12) at Oakland
(Blanton 5-8), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 2:10
p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.


Rays 4, Red Sox 3, 10 innings
BOSTON TAMPA BAY
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Damon cf 5 122 Lugo ss 5 0 3 1
Rnteria ss 5 01 0 Crwfrd If 5 0 3 0
DOrtiz dh 401 0 Cantu dh 5 1 00
MRmrz If 410 O'Gomes rf 5 01 0
Nixon rf 5 02 0 Huff lb 5 1 2 1
Varitek c 4010 ASGzlz 3b 4 1 2 0
Millar lb 4 00 0 Hollins cf 4 0 1 1
Olerud lb 1 01 0 THall c 2 0 1 1
Mueller3b 5 01 1 Gthrght pr 0 1 0 0
Grffnno2b 3l120 Lafrstc 1 000
Stern pr 0 00 0 NGreen 2b 4 0 1 0
Cora 2b 0 00 0
Totals 40311 3 Totals 40 414 4
Boston 010 000 200 0- 3
Tampa Bay 010 100 100 1- 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
DP-Boston 2. LOB-Boston 11, Tampa
Bay 8. 2B-DOrtiz (27), Lugo (21), Huff
(15), ASGonzalez 2 (8), Hollins (12). HR-
Damon (7). SB-Nixon (2), Lugo (29),
Crawford (31). SF-THall.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
DWells 61-3 9 3 3 0 5
Timlin 12-3 3 0 0 0 0
Schilling L,2-4 12-3 2 1 1 0 2
Tampa Bay
Waechter 52-3 5 1 1 2 7
Orvella 2-3 0 1 1 1 0
Harper 0 2 1 1 0 0
TreMiller 11-3 0 0 0. 0 1
ColomeW,2-2 21-3 4 0 0 1 2
Harper pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
WP-Harper.
T-3:40. A-21,550 (41,315).
Rangers 4, Orioles 2


TEXAS BALTIMORE
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Mench If 3 00 0 BRbrts2b 3 0 1 0
MYong ss 3 01 0 Mora 3b 5 0 3 0
Txeira lb 4 10 1 Tejada ss 5 0 0 0
Blalock 3b 4 00 0 RPImo lb 3 0 1 0
ASrano2b 423 2 SSosa rf 3 0 0 0
Hidalgo rf 4 00 0 JvLopzc 4 0 0 0
AGnzlz dh 3 01 1 Gbbons dh 4 1 1 1
Mathws cf 3 01. 0 Matos cf 3 1 2 0
Brajas c 3 10 0 Bigbie If 2 0 0 1
Mrrero If 1 0 0 0
Totals 314 64 Totals 33 2 8 2
Texas 001 110 010- 4
Baltimore 000 002 000- 2
E-Barajas (6), BRoberts (6). DP-
Texas 2. LOB-Texas 9, Baltimore 10.
HR-ASoriano (25), Gibbons (15). SB-
ASoriano (12), Matos (11). CS-Matthews
(2). SF-AGonzalez.
IP H RERBISO
Texas
Benoit W,2-1 5 4 0 0 4 2
Mahay 2-3 2 2 2 0 0
Loe 11-3 1 0 0 1 0
BShouse 1 0 0 0 0 1
FCordero S,23 1 1 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
DCabrera L,8-8 5 3 3 3 7 5
Williams 11-3 1 0 0 0 0
Byrdak 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Julio 1 1 1 0 0 1
BRyan 1 1 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Benoit (Matos). WP-Mahay.
T-3:21. A-29,314 (48,290).
Astros 7, Phillies 1
PHILA HOUSTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Rollinsss 4 12 1 Tverascf 4 1 1 0
Mchels cf 301 0 Biggio 2b 4 323
BAbreurf 4 00 0 Brkmn lb 4 22 2
Burrell If 4 01 0 Ensbrg 3b 3 0 1 0
DaBell3b 3 01 0 Lanerf 4 1 22
Howard b 401 0 AEvrttss 4 00 0
Lbrthal c 3 00 0 Burke If 4 0 0 0
REMtiz2b 3 00 0 Asmus c 3 0 1 0
Geary p 0000 Pettitte p 2 000
Fultz p 0000 Burnsp 0 000
Chavez ph 1 00 0 Brntlett ph 1 0 0 0
Lidlep 2 01 0 Hrvllep 0 0 0 0
Kata2b 2000
Totals 331 7 1 Totals 33 7 9 7
Philadelphia 000 010 000- 1
Houston 203 020 00x- 7
E-REMartinez (1). LOB-Philadelphia
8, Houston 5. HR-Rollins (8), Biggio 2
(15), Berkman 2 (11), Lane (15). SB-
Taveras (24), Biggio (10). CS-Howard


Home
27-18
29-19
27-21
26-20
24-26

Home
33-19
29-22
25-26
24-26
21-28

Home
30-22
30-17
28-24
22-24

Home
29-14
32-18
33-22
32-21
25-22

Home
33-20
31-14
25-22
27-17
24-27
31-25

Home
29-18
25-28
23-23
22-30
24-23


Away Intr
27-27 12-6
23-26 11-7
23-27 8-10
23-29 8-10
12-38 3-15

Away Intr
31-14 12-6
24-23 8-10
26-22 15-3
25-23 9-9
15-34 9-9

Away Intr
29-18 12-6
23-28 10-8
21-25 9-9
20-31 10-8

Away Intr
26-30 7-8
23-26 12-6
19-26 7-8
19-26 5-10
24-25 10-5


Away Intr
21-31 7-11
23-25 8-10
21-31 5-13
20-26 6-12
10-40 6-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Milwaukee 4, Arizona 2
Chicago Cubs 3, San Francisco 2
Houston 7, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Pittsburgh (Fogg 4-6) at Florida (Moehler
6-6), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (L.Hernandez 12-4) at Atlanta
(Smoltz 11-5), 7:35 p.m.
Arizona (Webb 8-7) at Milwaukee
(Capuano 11-6), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lowry 6-10) at Chicago
Cubs (Maddux 8-7), 8:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lieber 9-9) at Houston
(Oswalt 13-8), 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Ishii 3-8) at Colorado (Francis
8-7), 9:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Mulder 11-5) at San Diego
(W.Williams 5-6), 10:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Milton 4-10) at L.A. Dodgers
(Od.Perez 5-5), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Arizona at Milwaukee, 2:05 p.m.,
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


(1). S-Pettitte.

Philadelphia
Lidle L,8-9
Geary
Fultz
Houston
Pettitte W,8-7
Burns
Harville


H RERBBSO

7 7 5 0 2
2 0 0 1 2
0 0 0 0 0

7 1 1 3 7
0- 00 0 0
0 0 0 0 2


HBP-by Lidle (Ensberg).
T-2:31. A-36,029 (40,950).
Cubs 3, Giants 2
SAN FRAN CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Vizquel ss
Alfonzo 3b
Niekro lb
Alou rf
Feliz If
TyWIkr p
Fssero p
Mtheny c
Grssom cf
Ellison cf
DCruz 2b
Schmdt p
Hwkins p
Eyre p
Munter p
Chrstns p
Tucker rf


5 02 0 Hrst Jr cf
5 01 0'TWalkr2b
400 0 DeLee lb
4 01 0 Burnitz rf
411 1 ARmrz3b
0 00 0 HIndsw If
0 00 0 Murton If
3 11 0 NPerez ss
4 01 1 Dmpstr p
0 00 0 Barrett c
3 01 0 Hill p -
3 00 0 Macias ph
0 00 0 Rmlngrp
0 00 0 Gerutph
0 00 0 Mitre p
0 00 0 Cedeno ss
1 00 0


3 01 0
5030
4000
4121
3010
3 000
1 0 1 0
4 0 1 1
0000
4 1 1 1
1 01 0
1 000
0000
1 000
0000
1 110


Totals 362 8 2 Totals 35 312 3
San Francisco 010 100 000- 2
Chicago 001 000 011- 3
Two outs when winning run-scored.
E-Feliz (6), ARamirez (13). DP-San
Francisco 1. LOB-San Francisco 10,
Chicago 11. 2B-Alou (14), Matheny (25).
HR-Feliz (16), Barrett (10). SB-Vizquel
3 (17), Alou (3), Hairston Jr. (7). S-
Hairston Jr.. SF-Burnitz.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Schmidt 7 6 1 1 1 5
Hawkins 1-3 1 1 1 0 0
Eyre 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Munter 0 1 0 0 0 0
Christiansen 0 1 0 0 0 0
TyWalker L,3-3 2-3 3 1 1 1 0
Fassero 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Hill 5 5' 2 2 2 5
Remlinger 2 1 0 0 ,0 1
Mitre 1 1 0 0 1 1
Dempster W,4-3 1 1 0 0 0 0
Munter pitched to 1 batter in the 8th,
Christiansen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Schmidt (ARamirez).
T-3:04. A-39,477 (39,538).
Brewers 4, Diamondbacks 2


ARIZONA MILWAUKEE
ab rhbi ab
Cunsell 2b 5 00 0 BClark cf 4
Clayton ss 5 02 0 Weeks 2b 4
LGnzlz If 4 00 0 Ovrbay Ib 4
ShGren rf 411 0 CaLee If 3
Cintron 3b 4 11 0 Jenkins rf 4
Tracy lb 4 01 0 BHall 3b 4
JoCruz cf 1 01 0 DMiller c 3
Hill c 2 01 2 Hardy ss 2
Terrero ph 1 00 0 BShets p 2
CSnydr c 0 00 0 Brnyan ph 1
Gosling p 2 00 0 La Rsa p 0
McCkn ph 1 01 0 Tumbw p 0
Worrell p 0 00 0
Crmer p 00 0
TClark ph 1 00 0


r h bi

0 1 0
2 2 1

000
0 2 1

00 0
000
1 1 1
000
00 0
000
000


Totals 342 8 2 Totals 31 4 8 4
Arizona 010 100 000- 2
Milwaukee 200 000 11x- 4
E-Counsell (8). DP-Arizona 2. LOB-
Arizona 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B-ShGreen
(24), Cintron (13), Tracy (21), JoCruz (9),
Hill (2), Overbay (21), Jenkins (23). HR-
BClark (8), Overbay (15), Hardy (3). SB-
Clayton (5). SF-Hill.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
Gosling 6 6 2 2 2 4
Worrell L,0-2 1 1 1 1 0 0
Cormier 1 1 1 1 1 2
Milwaukee
BSheetsW,6-7 7 7 2 2 3 7
De La Rosa 1 1 0 0 0 0
TurnbowS,21 1 0 0 0 0 0
T-2:39. A-20,062 (41,900).


.M.B SC- I.- '.


--. u --- *i7-


Clnus COUN'IY (F.L) CIHONICl:E.


2B TuiiESDAY, JULY 26, 2005










Crrus COUNTY (FL) CIImONICiEI


Baseball Today
SCOREBOARD
Tuesday, July 26
Philadelphia at Houston (8:05 p.m
EDT). Roy Oswalt (13-8) and the Astros
meet Pat Burrell and the Phillies.
STARS
Sunday
Neifi Perez, Cubs, hit a tiebreaking,
two-out grand slam in the top of the 10th
inning to give Chicago an 8-4 win over St.
Louis.
Kris Benson and Mike Piazza, Mets.
Benson allowed four hits and struck out
five over eight shutout innings and Piazza
went 3-for-3 with a home run and three
RBIs in New York's 6-0 win over the Los
Angeles Dodgers.
Javier Vazquez, Diamondbacks,
struck out a season-high 11 in eight
innings to lead Arizona over Atlanta 3-2.
-A.J. Burnett, Marlins, allowed just one
unearned run over 7 1-3 innings and hit a
solo home run in Florida's 4-1 win over
San Francisco.
Victor Martinez, Indians, went 3-for-4
with a three-run homer to lead Cleveland
to a 6-3 win over Seattle.
Mark Redman, Pirates, allowed six
hits and struck out five over eight shutout
innings to lead Pittsburgh over Colorado 3-
0.
ROAD WOES
The Colorado Rockies lost their 40th
road game Sunday afternoon against
Pittsburgh 3-0. Colorado's 10-40 road
record is the worst for any major league
team to this point since the 1979 Oakland
Athletics sported the same record.
DECISION
Padres slugger Phil Nevin has until
Tuesday night to decide whether to accept
a proposed trade to the Baltimore Orioles
for right-hander Sidney Ponson. Baltimore
is one of eight teams Nevin can block a
trade to. Nevin did not play in Sunday's 5-
1 loss to Philadelphia. In December 2002,
Nevin blocked a deal that would have sent
him to the Reds for Ken Griffey Jr.
NO DECISION
Milwaukee left-hander Doug Davis struck
out a career-high 11 over eight innings, but
earned his fifth no-decision in as many
starts in a 3-2 loss to Cincinnati. ...
Washington right-hander John Patterson
struck out 10 over eight innings, also earn-
ing a no-decision in a 4-1 loss to Houston
in 14 innings.
STREAKING
Miguel Cabrera's solo homer in Florida's
4-1 win Sunday over San Francisco was
his third homer in three straight games and
fifth in his past five. In the five-game span,
Cabrera has amassed 11 hits and seven
RBIs.
AMAZING A's
Oakland's 8-3 win over Texas on Sunday
gave the As a four-game sweep and
added to their impressive run of wins.
Oakland has reeled off 26 victories in their
last 32 games to tie Minnesota for the AL
wild-card lead.
SPEAKING
"You look at our record (48-52), and it's
like the black and blue division. But we're
lucky enough to be in it. You'll always have
the excitement of being in a pennant race,
as long as you don't look at the record." -
Diamondbacks manager Bob Melvin on his
team being only 2 games behind NL
West-leading San Diego, despite a losing
record.
SEASONS
July 26
1962 -Warren Spahn of the Milwaukee
Braves set the National League record for
career home runs by a pitcher when he hit
his 31st off New York's Craig Anderson.
Spahn dealt the Mets their 11th straight
loss with a 6-1 victory.
1970 Johnny Bench of the Cincinnati
Reds hit three straight homers off Steve
Carlton of the St. Louis Cardinals. On the
same day, Orlando Cepeda of the Atlanta
Braves connected for three consecutive
homers in an 8-3 victory over the Chicago
Cubs.
1984 Pete Rose of the Montreal
Expos tied Ty Cobb on the career singles
list with No. 3,052 in the eighth inning of a
5-4 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
1991 Montreal's Mark Gardner
became the first to pitch nine no-hit innings
against a Dodger home team since Johnny
Vander Meer beat Brooklyn at Ebbets Field
on June 15, 1938, for his second straight
gem. But the Dodgers won in the 10th on
two singles off Gardner and Darryl
Strawberry's RBI single off Jeff Fassero.
1998 Trevor Hoffman's bid to set a
major league record with 42 straight saves
ended when the San Diego closer gave up
a home run to Moises Alou on his first
delivery in the ninth inning, tying the game.
The Padres wound up beating Houston 5-
4 in the 10th, but Hoffman blew his chance
at history.
Today's birthdays: Joaquin Benoit 28;
Greg Colbrunn 35.
Major League Leaders
American League
BATTING-BRoberts, Baltimore, .337;
Damon, Boston, .335; MYoung, Texas,
.324; Tejada, Baltimore, .319; ARodriguez,
New York, .318; Mauer, Minnesota, .311;
THafner, Cleveland, .310.
RUNS-Damon, Boston, 77; Jeter, New
York, 75; ARodriguez, New York, 75;
Teixeira, Texas, 73; MYoung, Texas, 71;
DOrtiz, Boston, 71; Figgins, Los Angeles,
68; ASoriano, Texas, 68.
RBI-MRamirez, Boston, 90; DOrtiz,
Boston, 87; Teixeira, Texas, 83;
ARodriguez, New York, 79; Matsui, New
York, 76; Sheffield, New York, 76; Sexson,
Seattle, 75.



WILLIAMS

Continued from Page 1B

what he had to do," McKinney
said. "He's a man about it.
We're all being men about it.
Nobody is holding any grudges.
We all want him back. He's a
great player."
Locker-room teasing helped
lighten the mood, players said.
Defensive tackle Larry Chester
noted Williams' long, scraggly
beard and multidirectional


hairdo.
"Guys were saying he looked
like a little homeless guy,"
Chester said. "It was all in fun."
Williams said he found the
warm reception from team-
mates surprising.
"It's awkward, you know?" he
said. "So many things have
been floating around, you just
never know what to expect."
His return overshadowed
Saban on the new coach's first
day of camp. It was Saban who
reached out to Williams in
January, laying the groundwork
for the running back's come-


SPORTS


T ALh e

-- --**-r-n -

On the .


TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (66 PAX) MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay
Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg (Live)
(FSNFL) MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Florida Marlins. From
Dolphins Stadium in Miami. (Live)
8 p.m. (WGN) MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Chicago
Cubs. From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Live) (CC)
BASKETBALL
10 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at
Phoenix Mercury. From America West Arena in Phoenix. (Live) (CC)
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Basketball BDSSP Presents: Las Vegas Prep
Championship. (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Boxing Tuesday Night Fights Ivan Hernandez
vs. Cesar Morales. Ivan Hernandez takes on Cesar Morales in a
super bantamweight bout. From Memphis, Tenn. (Live) (CC)
LACROSSE
4 p.m. (ESPN2) MLL Lacrosse Philadelphia Barrage at Boston
Cannons. (Taped)
RODEO
9 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Bull Riding PBR. (Taped)


HITS-Damon, Boston, 134; MYoung,
Texas, 132; Tejada, Baltimore, 125;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 123; Crawford, Tampa
Bay, 120; BRoberts, Baltimore, 120; Lugo,
Tampa Bay, 116; ARodriguez, New York,
116.
DOUBLES-Tejada, Baltimore, 33;
BRoberts, Baltimore, 27; DOrtiz, Boston,
27; Damon, Boston, 27; Matsui, New York,
26; ASoriano, Texas, 26; IRodriguez,
Detroit, 26.
TRIPLES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 8; Sizemore, Cleveland,
7; Inge, Detroit, 7; DeJesus, Kansas City,
6; Figgins, Los Angeles, 6.
HOME RUNS-Teixeira, Texas, 27;
ARodriguez, New York, 27; MRamirez,
Boston, 27; ASoriano, Texas, 25; DOrtiz,
Boston, 24; Sexson, Seattle, 23; Konerko,
Chicago, 22.
STOLEN BASES-Podsednik, Chicago,
50; Figgins, Los Angeles, 34; Crawford,
Tampa Bay, 31; Lugo, Tampa, Bay, 29;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 23; THunter, Minnesota,
21; Womack, New York, 20.
PITCHING (9 Decisions)-Crain,
Minnesota, 9-1, .900, 2.14; Garland,
Chicago, 15-4, .789, 3.19; Buehrle,
Chicago, 11-3, .786, 2.66; Clement,
Boston, 10-3, .769, 4.30; Halladay,
Toronto, 12-4, .750, 2.41; CILee,
Cleveland, 11-4, .733, 3.87; Rogers,
Texas, 11-4, .733, 2.71.
STRIKEOUTS-JoSantana, Minnesota,
149; RaJohnson, New York, 131; Lackey,
Los Angeles, 125; Bonderman, Detroit,
113; Halladay, Toronto, 108; DCabrera,
Baltimore, 107; Clement, Boston, 106.
SAVES-Nathan, Minnesota, 27;
MRivera, New York, 25; FRodriguez, Los
Angeles, 24; Wickman, Cleveland, 24;
FCordero, Texas, 23; Hermanson,
Chicago, 23; Guardado, Seattle, 22.
National League
BATTING-DeLee, Chicago, .369;
MiCabrera, Florida, .350; Pujols, St. Louis,
.334; Alou, San Francisco, .331; BClark,
Milwaukee, .316; ARamirez, Chicago,
.316; LCastillo, Florida, .315.
RUNS-DeLee, Chicago, 80; Pujols, St.
Louis, 79; MiCabrera, Florida, 71; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 70; BClark, Milwaukee, 69;
BAbreu, Philadelphia, 69; Bay, Pittsburgh,
67.
RBI-CaLee, Milwaukee, 83; DeLee,
Chicago, 81; Pujols, St. Louis, 78; AJones,
Atlanta, 77; CDelgado, Florida, 76;
MiCabrera, Florida, 74; Ensberg, Houston,
74.
HITS-DeLee, Chicago, 133;
MiCabrera, Florida, 131; BClark,
Milwaukee, 130; Pujols, St. Louis, 124;
Reyes, New York, 115; ARamirez,
Chicago, 114; Rollins, Philadelphia, 112.
DOUBLES-DeLee, Chicago, 31; Bay,
Pittsburgh, 30; Wilkerson, Washington, 30;
BGiles, San Diego, 29; MiCabrera, Florida,
28; MGiles, Atlanta, 28; CDelgado, Florida,
28.
TRIPLES-Reyes, New York, 10; Pierre,
Florida, 9; Furcal, Atlanta, 8; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 7; JWilson, Pittsburgh, 6;
BGiles, San Diego, 6; Eckstein, St. Louis,
5; DRoberts, San Diego, 5; CGuzman,
Washington, 5.
HOME RUNS-DeLee, Chicago, 32;
AJones, Atlanta, 32; Dunn, Cincinnati, 28;
ARamirez, Chicago, 27; Pujols, St. Louis,
26; Ensberg, Houston, 26; CaLee,
Milwaukee, 24.
STOLEN BASES-Reyes, New York,
34; Furcal, Atlanta, 32; Pierre, Florida, 31;
Taveras, Houston, 24; Freel, Cincinnati,
23; Rollins, Philadelphia, 23; BAbreu,
Philadelphia, 23.
PITCHING (9 Decisions)-Eaton, San
Diego, 9-2, .818, 3.42; PMartinez, New
York, 12-3, .800, 2.79; Morris, St. Louis,
11-3, .786, 3.42; Carpenter, St. Louis, 14-
4, .778, 2.26; LHernandez, Washington,
12-4, .750, 3.44; Prior, Chicago, 7-3, .700,
3.23; Benson, New York, 7-3, .700, 3.14.
STRIKEOUTS-PMartinez, New York,
147; Carpenter, St. Louis, 140; Peavy, San
Diego, 136; JVazquez, Arizona, 127;
BMyers, Philadelphia, 126; Zambrano,
Chicago, 124; Burnett, Florida, 124.


back
When Williams returned to
the field, nearly a thousand
fans were on hand in humid,
85-degree sunshine. His name
and number 34 were still miss-
ing from a roster handout an
oversight, a team official said.
But a dozen fans wore No. 34
jerseys, the same ones sold for
half price in South Florida last
fall.
When a pass pattern sent
him sprinting toward the
stands, the crowd cheered,
prompting him to grin. He
smiled again later when he
stepped to a lectern to answer
questions from a cluster of
reporters, never his favorite
activity and something he had-
n't done in 19 months.
When the topic turned to his
admitted use of marijuana,
Williams said he no longer
smokes it. He faces a four-game
suspension at the start of the
season for violating the NFL
substance abuse policy
"Being an NFL player, I had
a problem with some of the
rules. I wasn't very comfortable
with it. and I decided to walk


SAVES-CCordero, Washington, 34;
Isringhausen, St. Louis, 27; Hoffman, San
Diego, 27; Mesa, Pittsburgh, 24; Lidge,
Houston, 23; Looper, New York, 22;
Turnbow, Milwaukee, 21; BWagner,
Philadelphia, 21.

.-.

Nextel Cup Points Leaders
1. Jimmie Johnson, 2799
2. Tony Stewart, 2733
3. Greg Biffle, 2712
4. Rusty Wallace, 2617
5. Kurt Busch, 2537
6. Ryan Newman, 2507
7. Mark Martin, 2490
8. Jeremy Mayfield, 2394
9. Elliott Sadler, 2391
10. Dale Jarrett, 2372
11. Jamie McMurray, 2363
12. Carl Edwards, 2360
13. Kevin Harvick, 2299
14. Dale Earnhardt, Jr., 2262
15. Jeff Gordon, 2258
16. Joe Nemechek, 2169
17. Matt Kenseth, 2159
18. Jeff Burton, 2137
19. Michael Waltrip, 2122
20. Kyle Busch, 2092
Laps Led Leaders
(number of races led in parentheses)
1. Tony Stewart, 1063 (9)
2. Greg Biffie, 1012(14)
3. Kurt Busch, 468 (11)
4. Jimmie Johnson, 392 (11)
5. Jeff Gordon, 338 (9)
6. Kasey Kahne, 335 (6)
7. Matt Kenseth, 288 (7)
8. Brian Vickers, 281 (6)
9. Rusty Wallace, 249 (5)
10. Ryan Newman, 205 (11)
Money Leaders
1. Jeff Gordon, $4,526,293
2. Kurt Busch, $4,357,578
3. Jimmie Johnson, $4,308,013
4. Tony Stewart,' $,917,809
5. Dale Earnhardt, $Jr., $3',639,738
6. Mark Martin, $3,602,553
7. Greg Biffle, $3,443,248
8. Ryan Newman, $3,293,053
9. Elliott Sadler, $2,963,078
10. Matt Kenseth, $2,940,878
11. Kevin Harvick, $2,913,778
12. Rusty Wallace, $2,889,033
13. Kasey Kahne, $2,859,643
14. Bobby Labonte, $2,756,014
15. Dale Jarrett, $Z,744,443
16. Michael Waltrip, $2,663,499
17. Jeremy Mayfield, $2,614,743
18. Scott Riggs, $2,508,457
19. Carl Edwards, $2,498,093
20. Ricky Rudd, $2,487,628
Miles Led Leaders
1. Tony Stewart, 1472.06
2. Greg Biffle, 1371.70
3. Kurt Busch, 395.12
4. Jeff Gordon, 646.10
5. Jimmie Johnson, 589.18
6. Brian Vickers, 513.45
7. Matt Kenseth, 409.54
8. Kasey Kahne, 308.00
9. Ryan Newman, 278.13
10. Michael Waltrip, 233.95
Pole Winners
1. Ryan Newman, 5
2. Jeff Gordon, 2
2. Kasey Kahne, 2
4. Kyle Busch, 1
4. Kevin Harvick, 1
4. Dale Jarrett, 1
4. Jimmie Johnson, 1
4. Jamie McMurray, 1
4. Scott Riggs, 1
4. Elliott Sadler, 1
4. Tony Stewart, 1
4. Michael Waltrip, 1
4. Brian Vickers, 1
Winners
1. Greg Biffle, 5
2. Jeff Go[don, 3
2. Tony Stewart, 3
4. Kurt Busch, 2

away from it, Williams said.
"Being away and having a
chance to learn a lot about
myself, I realized that freedom
is having the strength to be in
any situation and be content
with that situation."
Defensive end Jason Taylor,
critical of Williams when the
drug issue surfaced last year,
said he considers the matter
closed.
"I don't think he needs to talk
to us about it," Taylor said. "It's
none of our business. He can
deal with things however he
wants. Just don't leave again."
After Williams vanished last
July, he lived in a tent in
Australia, studied holistic med-
icine at a California school and
spent a month at a yoga center
in India, becoming certified as
an instructor.
Does he regret the decision
to sit out last season?
"It's hard to regret it myself,
just because I had an incredi-
ble year," he said. "I got to do
pretty much all the things in my
life that I never thought I would
do or I had a chance to do. So
for me it was verve fulfilling."


4. Carl Edwards, 2
4. Jimmie Johnson, 2
7. Dale Earnhardt, Jr., 1
7. Kevin Harvick, 1
7. Kasey Kahne, 1
Rookie Standings
1. Kyle Busch, 259
2. Travis Kvapil, 210
3. Stanton Barrett, 59
4. Mike Garvey, 31
5. Eric McClure, 25
Manufacturer Standings
Wins in parentheses
1. Chevrolet, 146 (10)
2. Ford, 139 (9)
3. Dodge, 95 (1)
'Busch Standings
1. Martin Truex Jr., 3006
2. Clint Bowyer, 2884
3. Reed Sorenson, 2822
4. Carl Edwards, 2687
5. Kenny Wallace, 2669
6. Denny Hamlin, 2567
7. Ashton Lewis, 2395
8. David Stremme, 2336
9. David Green, 2327
10. Paul Menard, 2249
Craftsman Truck Standings
1. Dennis Setzer, 2089
2. Ted Musgrave, 1931
3. Bobby Hamilton, 1926
4. Ron Hornaday Jr., 1841
5. Jimmy Spencer, 1814
6. Ricky Craven, 1803
7. David Reutimann, 1799
8. Terry Cook, 1778
9. Matt Crafton, 1758
10. David Starr, 1752


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Activated C Javy
Lopez from the 15-day DL. Optioned C Eli
Whiteside to Ottawa of the IL.
. BOSTON RED SOX-Agreed to terms with
RHP Craig Hansen on a four-year contract.
Transferred RHP Matt Mantei from the 15- to
the 60-day DL.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Optioned RHP
Mike Wood to Omaha of the PCL. Purchased
the contract of RHP Shawn Camp from
Omaha. Transferred RHP Denny Bautista
from the 15- to the 60-day DL.
TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS-Released RHP
Hideo Nomo. Activated RHP Doug Waechter
from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Fernando
Cortez from Durham of the IL.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Placed RHP Kerry
Wood on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July
21. Recalled LHP Rich Hill from Iowa of the
PCL.
COLORADO ROCKIES-Optioned RHP
Zach Day to Colorado Springs of the PCL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Placed 1B-
OF Wil Cordero on waivers for the purpose of
granting him an unconditional release.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
INDIANA PACERS-Agreed to terms with
G Sarunas Jasikevicius on a three-year con-
tract.
MILWAUKEE BUCKS-Named Lester
Conner assistant coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ATLANTA FALCONS-Signed DE
Chauncey Davis and LB Michael Boley.
BALTIMORE RAVENS-Signed FB Justin
Green and QB Derek Anderson to three-year
contracts.
CAROLINA PANTHERS-Waived RB Joey
Harris, DT Cleveland Pinkney and S Scott
Farley. Signed DT Ben Johnson.
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Signed DB
Brqdney Pool to a five-year contract and DL
David McMillan to a four-year contract.
DENVER BRONCOS-Waived K Jeff
Crowell, K Tyler Fredrickson and G Reese
Hicks.
DETROIT LIONS-Signed CB Stanley
Wilson and QB Dan Orlovsky.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Signed S
Marviel Underwood and LB Brady Poppinga.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Signed S Matt
Giordano and DE Jonathan Welsh. Agreed to
terms with G Dylan Gandy.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS-Signed RB
Alvin Pearman.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Reinstated RB Ricky
Williams from the reserve-retired list.
Claimed P Donnie Jones off waivers from the
Seattle Seahawks.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS-Signed OL
Logan Mankins and WR Brandon "Bam"
Childress. Released RB Earl Charles and DT
Demarco McNeil.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES-Signed DE
Mike Patterson to a five-year contract and OL
Calvin Armstrong and LB David Bergeron to
four-year contracts.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS-Agreed to
terms with QB Alex Smith on a six-year con-
tract.
TENNESSEE TITANS-Signed WR
Roydell Williams.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS-Signed LB
Robert McCune.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL BOARD OF GOVERNORS-Re-
elected Harley Hotchkiss chairman.
DETROIT RED WINGS-Placed D Derian
Hatcher, F Darren McCarty and F Ray
Whitney on waivers.
LOS ANGELES KINGS-Agreed to terms
with LW Luc Robitaille on a one-year con-
tract.
MONTREAL CANADIENS-Declined the
options on the contracts of D Patrice
Brisebois and F Gavin Morgan.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS-Named Brad
Shaw assistant coach.


Fulfilling but less filling: He
lost 30 pounds on a vegetarian
diet and took the field Monday
at 213, well below his listed
weight of 226 on the 2004 pre-
season roster.
He's no longer big enough for
the workhorse role he assumed
in 2002-03, and he's not even
assured of starting. As a hedge,
Saban took Auburn's Ronnie
Brown with the No. 2 overall
pick in the April draft.
Brown, ironically, was the
running back absent Monday.
He has yet to sign.
Williams said he missed foot-
ball and his teammates last
year, but money also motivated
him to return. A court found the
1998 Heisman Trophy winner
in breach of contract by retir-
ing, and ordered him to repay
the team $8.6 million.
"It's like the sword of
Damocles hanging over some-
one's head," said Williams'
agent, Leigh Steinberg.
Because Williams sat out last
season, he's due only the NFL
minimum $540,000 this year,
compared with the $3.7 million
he passed un in 2004.


USA Cycling spokesman Andy
Lee called "the incredible
human interest component to
his story."
Diagnosed with testicular
cancer in October, 1996,
Armstrong's doctors gave him
a 40 percent chance of sur-
vival and never expected he'd
compete at anything more
strenuous than gin rummy.
Winning the world's most gru-
eling sporting event less than
three years later made
Armstrong a hero, and his
stature has only grown with
his insistence that this ele-
ment of the story not slip all
the way off the page.


TRACK
Continued from Page 1B

entered on the night's 30-car
entry list.
For spectators, there was a
lot of action to keep track of
with the divisions top competi-
tors spread out throughout the
field.
At the end of the race there
were new cars in the bullpen
for the mandatory post-race
technical inspection, as well as
a new driver in the winner's
circle.
And that's all good for the
division as a whole.
On the downside, instead of
seeing six or seven drivers
maneuvering through a full



LANCE
Continued from Page 1B

hand in developing another
Tour winner.
"He's created a very calculat-
ed way of winning," American
rider Fred Rodriguez said. "I
don't see why he's not going to
continue the legacy"
Among the top American rid-
ers are Armstrong's teammate
George Hincapie and former
teammate Floyd Landis, as
well as Levi Leipheimer and
David Zabriskie.
"For the American public to
stay interested in cycling and
the Tour they have to have an
American guy," Armstrong said.
"That's the only way I think it
crosses over to the big-time
press and the networks."
Back home, Armstrong's per-
formances led to a huge boost
in television ratings. He con-
quered a primarily European
sport his own way and brought
it into living rooms across
America.
During this year's Tour, the
OLN network which held
exclusive TV rights reported
its prime-time ratings had
tripled over the network's
usual programming. Race cov-
erage overall was up 18 per-
cent over last year, spokes-
woman Amy Phillips said.
"Next year will be the trial
year, to see if we can sustain
the interest," said Frankie
Andreu, a former teammate of
Armstrong's now working for
OLN.
Armstrong's impact on the



LIKE

Continued from Page 1B

summer and made millions
for the Outdoor Life Network
More Americans are riding
bicycles than ever before and
sales of the Trek brand which .
Armstrong rides, have tripled
since he won the first of seven
straight tours in 1999. Some
300 customers already shelled
out $10,000 each for the limit-'
ed-edition, 24-karat, gold-leaf-
adorned model Armstrong
rode to his record-setting sixth
win and they're still rolling
out of the showrooms.
John Burke, CEO of the
Waterloo, Wis.-based bike
manufacturer, has several
ways to measure what his
company has dubbed the
"Lance factor." His personal
favorite involves riding
around his neighborhood and
counting how many bikes are
parked in the corner of
garages where golf clubs used
to sit.
"He inspired a lot of guys
who quit running because of
bad backs or bad knees to try
and become athletes again,"
Burke said.
But like a handful of other
business owners churning out
steady profits while Armstrong
cranked the pedals, he knows
finding a replacement will be
difficult, if not impossible.
Over the last week, USA
Cycling boss Jim Ochowicz,
OLN president Gavin Harvey,
the editors of cycling maga-
zines and hundreds of cancer
survivors inspired to climb on
a bike have talked about what
made Armstrong so com-
pelling. It wasn't just arriving
first at the finish line in Paris
year after year. It was how
Armstrong got there, what


The rest of Armstrong's
parting words on the Champs-
Elysdes might have ruffled
some feathers, but speaking
his mind was part of his
appeal.
"I can't hold a press confer-
ence in a month and say, 'Hey,
you guys, you bad guys, shame .
on you for not dreaming.' So
that was my chance," he said
during his appearance on
CBS. "I just said take a good
look at this face because
you're never going to see it
again."


Jim Litke is a national
sports columnist with The
Associated Press. Write to him
at,ilitkec(an.org


TUISDOAY, JULY 26, 2005 3B


field of drivers, there were
only three or four who had to
find their way through the 24-
car starting field to get to the
front. And that's a great loss.
Under the "House of Pain"
label they have branded for
themselves, Miley and the
Smiths have created a reputa-
tion that seems to follow them
wherever they go.
You either love them or hate
them, but either way you won't
be seeing them at Citrus
County Speedway for some
time to come.



Kim Bollinger, Chronicle
racing correspondent, can be
reached at kbollinger@chroni-
cleonline.com.

Tour has been unquestionable.
Rocked by the 1998 Festina
doping scandal, the event was
on its knees and needed rescu-
ing.
Along came Armstrong a
year later who beat cancer
and then went on to dominate
the world's toughest race like
no one before.
He redefined the Tour with
his meticulous attention to.
detail, indomitable will to win,.
ruthlessness and uncanny abil-
ity in motivating teammates to
work for his cause.
"He's physically more capa-
ble than anyone else out
there," Rodriguez said. "It's
whatever you're born with -
genetics, the mental capacity,
the body He has the best team,
the best technology, the fastest
bikes. He's done everything he:
can to know he's 100 percent."
Armstrong won two more
titles than any other rider in
the 102-year history of the race
- Jacques Anquetil, Eddy:
Merckx, Bernard Hinault and .
Miguel Indurain all won five -
but his manner of victory both-:
ered some purists.
"His only concern was the:
yellow jersey, whereas Merckx.
and Hinault were more like
cannibals and wanted to win
stages as well," Tour director
Jean-Marie Leblanc said.
Often reproached for focus-
ing only on winning the Tour,
Armstrong used other races
simply as preparation for the
French event
"You cannot say the Tour was
overwhelmed with suspense,"
Prudhomme said. "The para-
dox is he crushed his rivals."


Armstrong did that again
Monday during an interview
on CBS News' "The Early
Show."
"If you consider the size
and the scope of the illness,
not just the people diagnosed,
not just the people who have
survived, but the people that
it has touched ... you have
basically 250 million people
realizing what's going on, and
realizing that your story some-
what reflects theirs.
"That's powerful stuff,"
Armstrong added. "You know,
nobody else none of the
other 180 guys that started
three weeks ago had that
advantage. So perhaps that's
part of the secret"
Whatever it was, we won't
see his like anytime again
soon, if ever.
Only nine Americans start-
ed in the tour, but four began
as team leaders and exclud-
ing Armstrong, four still
placed among the top 33 over-
all. Unfortunately, none looks
like a potential successor.
Even with Armstrong playing
a consulting role for his
Discovery Channel team, it's
unlikely next year's champion
will emerge from there,
either.
On the winner's podium
Sunday, he suggested either
second-place finisher Ivan
Basso of Italy or German Jan
Ullrich, who was third and
has been Armstrong's princi-
pal rival, would own his spot
next year. For all their popu-
larity in Europe Ullrich
won the tour in 1997 and has
finished second five times -
neither is likely to pull in
nearly as many eyeballs as
Armstrong did during his
reign.









TI 205SOT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.I


Serve and volley on sacred ground


Here I am reading in our
screen-room during one
of the many thunder-
storms we have almost every day
lately
The article in front of me is
about the National Public Parks
Tennis Championships (NPPTC).
I don't know about you, but I have
never heard
about this
event and it
has been
around since

l But that's
=-"' not all; this
tournament
S was created
by the same
Eric van den gentleman
Hoogen who founded
ON TENNIS the Davis
Cup. We are
talking about
Dwight Davis, who was the St
Louis commissioner of public
parks between 1911 and 1915, in
which time he helped construct
the first municipal tennis courts
in the U.S.
The reason he started this
event in 1923 was for municipal
parks to be able to show off their
parks and players. The 78th


NPPTC event in 2004 was held in
St. Louis at the Dwight Davis
Tennis Center. 350 players from
20 different states participated in
virtually all age and ability lev-
els.
This year's competition start-
ed yesterday and runs through
July 31 at Scalzi Park in
Stamford, Conn.
Yes, I know it is too late to sign
up for this year's event, but I
want your attention for next
year's tournament. The 2006
National Public Parks Tennis
Championships will be at the
USTA National Tennis Center in
Flushing Meadows, NY. Go
ahead read that last line again,
we are talking about playing ten-
nis on the courts that are home to
the U.S. Open the same courts
that your favorite players will be
playing on in about five weeks
from today. That would be some
kind of vacation, a week of tennis
for the whole family at the USTA
National Tennis Center.
The NPPTC will feature the
Open Division in singles, doubles
and mixed doubles, as well as
Junior events (ages 10-18 and
under). Also, there will be Adult
(age 35 and over to 95 and over)
and NTRP (3.5-4.5 singles and


doubles; 7.0-9.0 mixed doubles)
divisions. There are wheelchair
events and family events (Father-
Son and Parent Child doubles).
No date has been set for the
2006 NPPTC, you can check at
the USTA Web site. Click on
National Tennis Center, there
you will find an event schedule
for the public courts of the
National Tennis Center.
Monday Night Ladies Double
This league features levels 3.5 and
up and will start in September. For
more information or to report scores,
contact Antoinette van den Hoogen at
382-3138 or hoera@juno.com.
Tuesday Womens Tennis Leagues
USA Women's Team Tennis
This league is geared towards the
3.0-3.5 level players. Each team
consists of four players. New play-
ers, regulars or subs, are always
welcome. To sign up or for informa-
tion about this league, contact Char
Schmoller at e-mail
schmoler@atlantic.net.
Senior Tuesday 3.0 League
This league will start up again on
Oct. 18. For information, contact
Myrtle Jones at 341-0970 or e-mail
mbj30@netsignia.net


Thursday Morning Citrus Doubles
This is a women's doubles league
that starts up again on Oct. 20. For
information about this league, con-
tact chairperson Gail Sansom at
746-4455 or gailsansom@aol.com
Thursday Evening Men's League
For information, contact the
administration office at Whispering
Pines Park at 726-3913.
Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0-3.5
If you want to field a team (four
players per team with a maximum of
six) for the 2005-06 season, or you
want to be a sub, contact Betsy
Dykes at 795-5299 or Lucy Murphy at
527-4239 or e-mail wjlrmurphy@xtal-
wind.net.
USTA Leagues
6.0 Adult Mixed doubles; Pine
Ridge lost 3-0 to Fort King. Record
0-2.
9.0 Adult Mixed doubles; Citrus
Hills lost 3-0 to Fort King. Record 0-2.


Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis correspon-
dent, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


ACC: Hokies, Noles favored, replay ready


Bowden FSU

Linebackers will

start in opener

Associated Press

HOT SPRINGS, Va. -
Virginia Tech coach Frank
Beamer decided to follow the
lead of a couple of his players
and didn't wear his Atlantic
Coast Conference champi-
onship ring Monday at the
league's annual media kickoff.
Defensive end Darryl Tapp
and tight end Jeff King also put
away the gaudy jewelry in their
sessions with reporters a day
earlier, and the message from
all was clear. Last year's title
was great, but this is 2005.
"In this business, it's year-to-
year, and we're trying to get
ready for this year," Beamer
said. "I'm awfully proud of
what we did last year, but it's
time to get another ring."
If the preseason poll is any
indication, Beamer and the
Hokies should have a chance to
do just that They were picked
to win the Coastal Division and
more than doubled the first-
place votes given to Miami,
which came in second. Virginia
also got a vote for the top spot
and came in third.
The addition of Boston
College to the Atlantic Division
did little to change things at
least in the minds of the voters
- as Florida State was the easy
choice to meet Virginia Tech in
the league's first championship,
game later in the year. The
Eagles were second, followed
by North Carolina State and
Clemson.
Last year, the Hokies were
picked to finish sixth in what
was then an 11-team confer-
ence, but they completed a sur-
prising run to the champi-
onship by beating the
Hurricanes on the last week of
the schedule.
"We accomplished a lot,"
Tapp said. "This year, we
haven't accomplished anything.
It's only preseason. It's nice to
be honored, but it doesn't mean
anything. We have to go out
there and work for it, every day
from when practice starts until
we play N.C. State the last
week"
Beamer clearly appreciated
the attitude of his players and
their gesture of putting away
their rings. He also realizes
that Virginia Tech had a magi-
cal run to the top of the ACC a
year ago, and duplicating that
feat would take a similar effort
Of course, his team should be
loaded. The Hokies return 14
starters eight on offense -
and get Miami and Boston
College at home.
"Last year, we probably did-
n't have as much talent, but we
played great together," Beamer
said. "I do think our kids under-
stand there's work to be done."
Virginia Tech also gets the
talented but troubled Marcus
Vick at quarterback He was
suspended from the university
for the 2004 fall semester after
he was arrested following a
night of drinking with under-
age girls, and he later pleaded
guilty to reckless driving and
no contest to marijuana posses-
sion after a traffic stop last
summer.
Vick was cleared to re-enroll
in school in January and seems
to be making the most of his
opportunities. He won the


starting job in spring practice
but wasn't available to
reporters this week
"I don't have concerns about
Marcus," Beamer said. "He's
been there and he's been work-
ing out, he's leading the team.
That's why I named him the
starter. I think he's getting
ready to have a great year. He's
prepared for it"
The Hurricanes finished two
games behind the Hokies last
year in a tie for third, a surpris-
ing result for a team used to
battling for the national cham-
pionship. The slide started
with a last-second loss at North
Carolina and continued with a
couple more to Clemson and
Virginia Tech.
Yet those results haven't low-
ered expectations at Miami.
"I feel we can run the
charts," defensive end Thomas
Carroll said. "When I look at
our team and our schedule,
there's no reason why we
shouldn't."
To get there at least the top
of the division the path again
likely goes through the Hokies.
"Virginia Tech certainly
deserves to be where they are,
they're the defending champi-
ons," said Georgia Tech coach
Chan Gailey, whose team was
picked fourth out of the six
teams in the Coastal Division.
"Everybody else, you can put
where you want to put them.
But I'll let you know the first
week in December exactly how
it worked out"
Replay revealed
Chan Gailey voted against instant
replay when he was the coach of the
Dallas Cowboys. Now that he's at
Georgia Tech, he has no problem
with the system the Atlantic Coast
Conference plans to use in 2005.
The conference will experiment
with a plan similar to the one used by
the Big Ten a year ago, where a tech-
nical adviser watched the game from
the press box and notified officials on
the field via pager if he saw some-
thing questionable. Play was halted
while the adviser reviewed the call
using video from the television feed.


Calls could be overturned only if
there was "indisputable video evi-
dence," and only calls such as scor-
ing plays, pass plays and number of
players on the field could be
reviewed. Hard fouls such as blocks
in the back and face masks, and
some other judgment calls like false
starts, were not eligible for review.
That differs from the NFL, where
coaches must challenge plays to
have them reviewed.
'We assume that guy in the booth
has the same capabilities and the
same integrity as the back judge and
the umpire and the referee," Gailey
said Monday at the ACC's annual
media kickoff. "If we assume that that
referee is making the right call and he
knows his job and he's doing a good
job, then we need to assume the guy
in the booth is doing it."
The Eagles Have Landed
Boston College is in the Atlantic
Coast Conference. Officially.
And coach Tom O'Brien has a lot
of work to do after he gets his team
ready.
"We're going to take care of our-
selves first," he said. "The only thing I
have control over is my football team,
so I've got to do the best I can
preparing my guys. We have eight
opponents we have to learn that,
we've never played before, and
they've only got us. It's going to be
new and it's going to be exciing, and
who knows where we might fall."
O'Brien watched last year as for-
mer Big East foes Virginia Tech and
Miami went through the ACC for the
first time, and he came away with
some surprises -- mainly, watching
the Hurricanes lose to North Carolina.,
The Hokies, of course, went on to win
the conference title.
"I watched that, and I was like,
'holy cow,"' he said. "But I was more
surprised with Miami losing three
games than I was with Virginia Tech. I
knew they'd have a chance to win the
championship."
FSU linebackers to play
Star linebackers Emie Sims and
A.J. Nicholson will both be in the line-
up for the Sept. 5 season opener
against Miami, despite their summer


brushes with the law, Florida State
coach Bobby Bowden said Monday.
Bowden said he'll handle the disci-
pline since the legal issues are mis-
demeanors.
Sims was arrested following an
early morning fight with his live-in girl-
friend outside a university residence
hall while Nicholson had a pair of run-
ins with local police, including a mis-
demeanor DUI.
"There are more ways to discipline
other than suspension," Bowden told
writers at the annual Atlantic Coast
Conference's football media kickoff.
'You've heard of pain, haven't you."
One of Bowden's favorite punish-
ments through the years has been
making players run stadium steps for
mistakes of many kinds, including
those involving police.
Bowden also said redshirt fresh-
men Xavier Lee and Drew
Weatherford.will be even when the
quarterback competition starts next
month. And unless one player clearly
separates during the August work-
outs,.Bowden said he wouldn't hesi-.
tate to play both .
Aside from their legal distraction,
the Seminoles also have a slew of
casualties to contend with as they
enter Bowden's 30th year the helm.
The season's anticipated starter,
Wyatt Sexton, will miss the season
while he's treated for Lyme disease.
The Seminoles will also be without
cornerback Antonio Cromartie for the
season. A first team all-conference
pick a year ago,tCromartie had sur-
gery last week after he injured his left
knee during a voluntary workout earli-
er this month.
Cromartie also returned kickoffs
and was the chaser on punt coverage
as one of the team's fastest players.
Florida State also has an academic
casualty, Clifton Dickson, the team's
most dominating interior defensive
lineman in the spring, who was
declared academically ineligible and
must graduate from a community col-
lege before he can be readmitted to
the university.
"We've always had somebody in
trouble, somebody with grades,"
Bowden said. "Thafs life. It's the way
it is."


LocalIB OW I ;,,' :--- ..--.-. -
ELAINE FYFE Brinker/Marvin Brgner (33), Jim Stack/Larry Huxley
em_ ffe@yahoo.com (34) and John Saltmarsh/Leon Wierzbinski (35). Jim
Van Gilder and Brad Briscoe won the closest-to-pin
awards, and high scratch bowling scores were rolled
I recently had the opportuni- by John Saltmarsh (230,234,678); Larry Huley (241);
ty to go bowling. What a hoot. Jay Rizzo (225); and C. H. Crockett (225).
I grabbed the lightest bowl- Holder Hotshots
ing ball I could find, with no Handicap: Joe Hitt 262; Robert Stein 259;
Nick Waters 718; Doc Andrews 709; Liz
regard for weight distribution, #.emberga 271,718; Sherry Hitt 255; Yvonne
Guess I'm just a casual bowler. Perkins 702. Scratch: Lori Ciquera 210.
Instead of really taking my SUMMER OWLS: Handicap: Tony Thompson
own game seriously,since I am 270; Robert Castleberry 266,754; Bobby
absolutely awful, I watched Willingham 701; Theresa Cain 254,694; Rue
Pilkinton 253; Char Simpkins 697.
other people. Bowling is a Scratch: Tony Thompson 247.
great place for people watch- Manatee Lanes
ing. You hear the cheers as a Tuesday Summer Mixed 7/12
young lady gets her third High Series-Men
strike, not in a row, but enough Frank Sojka 713, Joe Monday 729, Grant
strike,noZachary 673
to win the game. You hear the High Game-Men
hecklers who laugh as their Frank Sojka 268, Joe Monday 258, Grant
buddy throws a gutter ball, or Zachary 256
now known to be politically Jennif High Series-Women
now known to be politically Jennifer Gompers 538, Carol Haisten 530,
correct, a channel ball. Donna Brown 493
Then there are the children High Game-Women
who are just happy to see, with Carol Haisten 215, Jennifer Gompers 202,
the greatest of smiles, a few third Edna Jones 178
pins topple over. Tuesday Summer Mixed 7/19
pins topple over. High Series- Men
My score was terrible, even Frank Sojka 719, Joe Monday 666, Rob Platz
pathetic. Just a 162. I never did 661
so well before, but really High Game-Men
enjoyed my night out Bowling Joe Monday 279, Steve Dumal Jr 268, Rob
is for everyone. It brings family Platz 256 High Series-Women
and friends together in a com- Edna Jones 506, Katrina Rigdon 477, Carol
petitive, but amicable atmos- Haisten 458
phere. Nothing is better than High Game-Women
bowling for a great time out. Katrina Rigdon 193, Edna Jones 182, Carol
Haisten 182
Bowling Bite Hot hotz Week Of 7/16
What is early timing? High Series-Men
W a is eal timi ? Eric Avery 628, James Jackson 621, Art
Early timing is releasing the ball Avery 589
before the sliding foot completes High Game-Men
its slide; usually results in less Eric Avery 264, James Jackson 235, Bill
hook and a less strong ball as the Schaak 232
High Series-Women
player does not have the proper Manda Schaak 445, Alice Avery 432, Pat:
balance and leverage to hit up on Avery 415
the ball. If you are having trouble High Game- Women
constantly coming high, you may Manda Schaak 181, Brandy Coffey 170,
constantly coming high, you may Alice Avery 151
have a case of early timing. Jay-Cee Match Play Trio (4 Game Series)
Getting the ball into the push-away 7/14
faster might help. Hi/Gh Series-Men, Patrick Dombrowski 877,*
John Gibbs 786, Mark Mixon 783
Beverly Hills Bowl High Game-Men
Our Gang, with a seven-point RyanAguilar 265, Patrick Dombrowski 248.
Mark Mixon 236
lead, will be bowling last-place The High Series-Women
Fabulous Five. Marian Steenstra is Susan Sheehy 789, Barbara Hatten 644,
putting the pressure on Barbara Deb Proctor 606
High Game-Women
Steffen the women's high average Susan Sheehy 219, Deb Proctor 179,-
leader. She is only .97 behind Virginia Taylor 138
Barbara. M Generation Gap 7114
Men's High Series High Series-Boys
Dick Newhall 742 Wally Malphus 737 Chet Eric Riser 577, Ricky Akkasian 562, Zack.
Pierzgalski 676 Fred Steenstra 633 Cmar 345
Men's High Game High Series-Men
Dick Newhall 276 Wally Malphus 264 Chet Frankie Brown 800, Travis Richards 730, Les
Pierzgalski 253 Fred Steenstra 250 Ralph Cook 618
Jerivs 250 High Series-Girls
Women's High Series Elfrieda Hertel 634, Kelli Richards 551
Maria Afflerbach 719 Marian Steenstra High Series-Women
667 Joanne Baumann 646 Lou Dickerson April Saxer 387, Melinda Barry 364
627 High Game-Boys
Women's High Game Brandon Carver 239, Eric Riser 212, Ricky
Maria Afflerbach 268 Barbara Steffen 266 Akkasian 205
Joanne Baumann 256/244 Nancy High Game-Men
Dunwoodie 242 Frankie Brown 288, Les Cook 273, Alan
Men/Women's High Handicap Series Carver 242
Lou Mr Ninety Something Nahodyl 878/ High Game-Girls
Maria Afflerback 896 Elfrieda Hertel 232, Kelli Richards 208
Parkvi LanHigh Game-Women
Parkvew Lanes April Saxer 167, Melinda Barry 137
Rizzo's Pizza Golfbowl Yaba Summer Fun-Juniors 7/12
Lawson's Detailing (Ted Lawson, Chuck Clouse, High Series Boys
Eric Glowacki and Chris Hughes) won the Rizzo's Travis Richards 673, Steve Major 630, Frank
Pizza GolfBowl by tying for third in golf (63) and fin- Brown 615
fishing second in bowling (878). Parkview Lanes High Series Girls
(Marilyn Seymour, Dick Pesonen, John Saltmarsh Kelli Richards 397, Chelsea Rigdon 318
and C. H. Crockett) took second money with a first- High Game Boys
place tie in golf (62) and sixth in bowling (729), and Travis Richards 257, Steven Major 222,
also won the Mystery Skin pot with an eagle on No. Frank Brown 213
18. The final money spot went to Rizzo's Pizza (Jay High Game Girls
Rizzo, Ron Barrett, Bill Thomas and Craig McNall) Kelli Richards 153, Sarah Alyounes 84
with a 65 in golf and 831 in bowling. Closest-to-pin Yaba Summer Fun-Preps 7/12
awards went to Troy Suarez, Bill Thomas, Brad High Series Boys
Briscoe and Jay Rizzo. Marvin Brigner Eric Riser 578, Josh Roberts 510, Jimmy
(248,279,784) and Ted Lawson (290,712) took the Tully 434
high bowling games awards. High Series Girls
Mixed Doubles Tourney Grace Payne 409, Desiree Crocker 338,
Saad Bouve and Anthony Nott won it with a 542 in NoorAlyounes 214
the money game, followed by Sue and Ives High Game Boys
Chavez with 539, Mary and Buck Morrow with 529 Eric Riser 202, Josh Roberts 185, Kevin
and Marilyn Seymour and C.H. Crockett with 512. Walker 171
Winners in the Singles money round were Eddie Hih Game Girs
Stromberg with 285, followed by Buddy Bardot, 174 Desiree Crocker 125,
Chuck Clouse and Leslie Young, all with 277s. Grace Payne 174, Desiree Crocker 125,
Strike-A-Mania Noor Alyounes 82
Sue Chavez, Saad Bouve and Anthony Nott won Yaba Summer Fun-Bantams 7/12
games with 300s, and Sue had two second places, High Series Boys
resulting in a series win for her (871). Anthony and Jared Nash 128
Buck Morrow tied for the other second place. The 8- High Series Girls
pin Strike-A-Mania is held Saturdays night, and Kasey Veltman 159,' Kaitlyn Stewart 114,
players must be signed in by 6:30 p.m. The cost is Allison Nash 83
$8/person ($6 lineage; $2 strike pot), and the High Game Boys
game/series pots are optional. Jared Nash 80
League Scores High Game Girls
Summer Golfbowl Kelsey Miles 99, Kasey Veltman 82, Kaitlyn
Sub-par golf scores were shot by Dennis Stewart 60







TENN. NC
ARK.., 2 p.m.
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Comprehensive Up-To-Date

Tracking Maps







CW W .CTo i c e nli 0 eUlo

www.chronicleonline.com


I Softball Tournament


48 TUBSDAYJULY 26 20 5


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JULY 26, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Drugs, alcohol treatment down


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The num-
ber of people treated for addic-
tion to alcohol or drugs
dropped for the first time in six
years during 2003, the federal


government reported Monday
The drop occurred primarily
because of a significant decline
in admissions for alcohol
abuse.
The bad news highlighted
within the report, which was


released by the Substance
Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration, was a
spike in admissions for
methamphetamine use.
The findings for both alcohol
and meth continued trends


ON THE NET
Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services
Administration:
http://www.samhsa.gov

that began at least a decade
earlier.


In 1993, the number of peo-
ple treated for alcohol addic-
tion numbered more than
921,000. Almost every year
since then, that number has
dropped, including in 2003
when admissions dropped
about 6 percent to about
Please see '- '.c/Page 4C


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Ii K.


All bad


news for


aspirin?
Last week, I discussed
the recent findings of
the Women's Health
Study, and the fact that
Vitamin E appeared to have
no benefit regarding the pre-
vention of many disease
processes. This week, I want
to discuss the aspirin side of
the study, and other findings
that may hold some promise
of an aspirin a day being
beneficial.
While the WHS study did
not find a benefit in the
aspirin arm of the study, it
may be that people need to
take aspirin every day, not
just every other day, to see
some sort of cancer preven-
tion. Or perhaps higher
doses are required. Aspirin
also may affect specific can-
cers that weren't seen in the
.Women's Health Study
Another recently pub-
lished study in the Journal
of the National Cancer
Institute has reported that
aspirin may protect men
from prostate cancer. In this
study, researchers looked at
more than 70,000 men who
were taking part in an ACS
study about lifestyle and dis-
ease. The men reported how
often they took aspirin or
Please see BENNETT/Page 4C


DAVE SIGLERCr
Occupational Therapist Gail Huecker works with Svieta Gilbert on her balance during a recent visit to OT4Kids in Crystal River. Svieta was recently a
ed from the Ukraine and has had to adjust to her new environment. The occupational therapy has helped Svieta gain control over her physical ac
level and learn how to control her hyperactivity.

Rather than ADHD, your problem child may have sensory difficulties


STEe-z AP-aUi.Tn
sarthur@
chronicleonline.coni
Chron icle


S vieta came out of
Russia as a whirling
dervish of h.\per-
kinetic energy,
After Virpinia Gilbert
adopted her daughter from
a Russian orphanage and
brought the 5-\ ear-old
home to Citrus Countb on
No% 28, 2002, she realized
her beautiful blonde child
had challenges.
A chatterbox of a child.


Gilbert sa.\ s Sieta remem-
bers having her lips
painfully shut with clothes-
pins in the orphanage to
stop her nonstop talk.
In addition to the chatter,
Gilbert noted her daughter
was frenetic in her play
and totally una%%are of dan-
ger:
"'She played too fast and
too rough She couldn't reg-
ulate her activity. She
couldn't go to sleep,"
Gilbert said. "Those first
months weren't eas.:"
Svieta might easily have
been labeled with Attention


Deficit Hyperactivity Dis-
order and prescribed a
drue like Ritalin to calm
her down.
Instead, Gilbert, a guid-
ance counselor at Lecanto
High School, thought her


daughter might have a sen-
sory processing disorder.
Friends with similar prob-
lem children refen'rred her
to a therapy provider in
Crystal River who had
shove n amazing success


helping children
Svieta
OT4Kids has two
rooms filled with enor
cushions and padding,
Please see FANC.H/Pa


hrornoc e
dopt-

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Simple books give good background to government


an's Book Club: I had the oppor- I abide by an honesty of criteria,
tunity to read a couple of new which has to satisfy me before I would
books this week. I even suggest a book
either receive or am offered Not only do I consider the
a number of books weekly. material, its sincerity, read-
This is not because I am spe- ability, as well as the
cial; most writers receive .. '. author's credibility, but also
books from various publish- I consider font size. If I don't
ers. Of course, publishers . know which pair of eyeglass-
hope I will like the books i i. es to use, I think many of my
and "suggest" them to my readers might have the same
readers. ^' problem.
It is a common practice of Anyway, the books I read
publishing agents to offer Dan Rohan this past week pass all of my
books to members of the SENIOR requirements; so from me to
media. In the course of nine
years of producing and host- ADVOCATE you.The series of books are
ing a radio. show, the books published by Alpha, a mem-
would just pile up in a storage room in ber of the Penguin Group.
my then office. And they all begin with the title of


"The Complete Idiot's duide (CIG) to
...", not to be confused with the series of
'"A Dummy's Guide ..." The two I read
this past week were "The CIG to
American Government," authored by
Mary M. Shaffrey and Melanie Fonder,
and "The CIG to Fibromyalgia,"
authored by Lynne Matallana. I found
both books informative, educational
and extremely readable.
If you want to know more about
how your government was founded and
continues its function, read and reread
this book It would also be a great
starter for your children and grandchil-
dren, all of whom desperately need a
basic civics course.
Matallana's CIG to fibromyalgia
relates to the misunderstanding and
problems that face patients with this lit-


tle-known disease; indeed, a book that
should not only be read by fibromyalgia
patients (by the way, the author is one),
but also by members of the medical pro-
fession and health-care professionals,
as well as our state and federal "elected
protectors."
I shall write more about this subject,
as well as take questions.
If you choose to read both or either of
these books, they are available at book-
stores nationally, or conveniently at
www.idiotsguides.com.
Upon arrival at this Web site, you will
be told that "you're not an idiot," but
rather like most people who visit this
Web site "you're smart, curious, at ease
with yourself, and interested in learn-
Please see ROHAN/Page 4C


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE


Too many


platelets


spell


trouble

n 85-year-old patient
developed sudden
weakness in his right
arm and leg. This lasted for
20 minutes and it then disap-.
peared on its own. The next
day, he saw his internist. A
CBC (blood count-- a simple
blood test) showed that
patient's platelet count was
1.5 million. An emergency
consultation was arranged,
and I saw the patient right
away.
Platelets are blood cells,
just like red blood cells and
white blood cells. They clot
blood. A normal platelet
count is 150,000 to 400,000.
When platelets increase sig-
nificantly, particularly in
elderly patients, it increases
the risk of stroke, heart
attack, etc. My patient had a
TIA (Transient Ischemic
Attack) or a mini-stroke. An
outpatient bone marrow
biopsy was done. The
patient is .now diagnosed
with a myeloproliferative
disorder.
It is a group of conditions
that cause an overproduc-
tion of blood cells -
platelets, white blood cells
and red blood cells in the
Please see GANDHI/Page 4C


. .T. -


But admissions spike for methamphetamine use


SIGNS OF SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER
* Either overly or under reactive to touch, E Low esteem, social and 'or emotion
movement, sights, food tastes and tex- problems.
tures. Clumsiness or apparent carelessness
* Easily distracted. Difficulty making transitions from on
* Activity level unusually high or low. situation to another.
* Impulsive, lack of self-control. 0 Delays in speech, language, motor sk
* Inability to unwind or calm self. or academic achievement.


''~: ~~


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CITrus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE.


Study: Better diabetes care means less kidney failure


Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Far fewer
Americans with diabetes are
ending up in emergency rooms
or developing kidney failure -
a sign that diabetes care has
improved dramatically over
the last decade, the govern-
ment reported this month.
The federal Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention said the rate of peo-
ple with diabetes who need
hospitalization or develop kid-
ney failure has dropped about
a third since the mid-1990s.
However, a separate study
raises concern that doctors
may be missing opportunities
to diagnose and treat kids with
Type 1 diabetes, who need
insulin to survive. Many chil-
dren were misclassified as
Type 2, the diabetes linked to
obesity, possibly because their
weight problems are throwing


ON THE NET
American Diabetes
Association:
http://www.diabetes.org
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention:
http://www.cdc.gov

doctors off track.
Both studies were presented
at an American Diabetes
Association meeting in San
Diego Saturday.
From 1994 to 2002, the rate of
diabetes-related hospitaliza-
tions fell from 55 to 36 per 1,000
diabetics. Similarly, the rate of
diabetes patients with kidney
failure dropped from 327 to 229
per 100,000 population
between 1996 and 2002.
Researchers used two
sources of information. The
kidney failure rates came from
a national database of people


who had dialysis or transplants
in the last decade. The hospi-
talization rates were based on
figures from big hospitals
across the country
"We are at last improving the
quality of life for diabetics,"
said Alan Cherrington, presi-
dent of the diabetes associa-
tion and professor at
Vanderbilt University Medical
Center, who had no role in the
study.
The number of people with
both types of diabetes has
tripled over the past two
decades to an estimated 18 mil-
lion Americans, but more than
90 percent have Type 2. It is the
sixth leading cause of death,
and complications can include
heart, kidney and nerve dis-
ease, eye damage and limb
amputation.
Doctors have urged people
with diabetes to control their
blood sugar and blood pressure


to avoid or delay kidney fail-
ure, which often requires a
transplant or dialysis, in which
a machine cleans the blood of
wastes normally filtered by the
kidneys.
"We've been working really
hard to make diabetes a more
common household word and
to educate people with dia-
betes to reduce their risk fac-
tors," said Nilka Rios Burrows,
an epidemiologist at the CDC's
diabetes division.
About 130,000 diabetics
underwent dialysis or kidney
transplant in 2000. The new
research suggests that many
more have avoided those dras-
tic measures by controlling
their blood sugar.
In another study presented
at the meeting, researchers
found that one out of three chil-
dren diagnosed with Type 2
diabetes were found to be Type
1 after they were given a more


sensitive test that is not com-
monly used in doctors' offices.
Diabetes treatment differs
depending on the type. Type 1
patients cannot make insulin
and need to get this hormone,
which regulates blood sugar
levels, through shots or a
pump. Those with the more
common Type 2, linked to obe-
sity, often can't effectively use
the insulin their bodies make.
They are advised to lose
weight, eat a healthy diet and
exercise, and sometimes drugs
are prescribed.
Researchers led by Dr. Diana
Petitti of Kaiser Permanente of
Southern California, a large
health insurer, looked at med-
ical records of 2,868 children
and adolescents diagnosed
with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes
by their health-care providers
in 2001-02.
The patients went to one of
six participating U.S. medical


centers to be given a highly
sensitive biochemical test.
'Researchers compared the
results and found that 31 per-
cent of children who had been
diagnosed with Type 2 actually
were Type 1, according to the
test.
Specialists say the finding
raises questions about whether
young diabetics are getting
proper treatment and whether
this test should be more avail-
able to doctors.
Childhood obesity has
become more prevalent in the
United States, raising the risk
of diabetes and many other dis-
eases. An estimated 210,000
young people have diabetes.
"What we're finding is that
diabetes is much more compli-
cated than we thought," Petitti
said.
The study was funded by the
CDC and the National
Institutes of Health


Health :.


CHS athletes
Free physical for athletics are
being offered to all incoming Citrus
High School students at 6 p.m.
Wednesday at the school.
CCHD physical
The Citrus County Health
Department is taking appointments
for kindergarten, daycare and
sports physical.
The Inverness office is taking
appointments from 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, and again from 8 to
10:30 a.m. Friday. The telephone
number for the Inverness office is
726-1731.
The Lecanto office is taking
appointments from 8 to 10:30 a.m.
and 1 to 3:30 p.m. Monday and
Aug. 8. The telephone number for
the Lecanto office is 527-0068.
The cost will be $40 per child.
Parents are asked to bring in a cur-
rent immunization record and a
urine sample for each child. Call
527-0068.
Managing diabetes
Diabetes classes are offered
from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday at the
-- Citrus County Health Department
in Lecanto. Classes are free. No
: registration is required.
Monday Medications and
monitoring.
Aug. 8 Sick days.
Aug. 15-Avoiding compli-
cations.
Fasting blood sugars are offered
from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday through
Friday in all three Citrus County
Health Department sites. There is
a $10 fee for this service. No
appointment is necessary. Every
Monday before the Lecanto class,
anyone who would like to have a
blood sugar test should come fast-
ing.
Call Carol Hanewinckel, R.N.,
527-0068, Ext. 248, or Carol
Burke, R.D., 726-5222.
Hospice workshop
Hospice of Citrus County will
host a six-week workshop for those
who have recently experienced the
death of a close friend or family
member.
The sessions will be from 4 to 6
p.m. Tuesday, starting Aug. 2 at
the Hospice of Citrus County's
Inverness office at 326 South Line
Ave.
The presenters will cover infor-
mation on the grieving process;
ways to reduce stress affiliated with
coping and adjustment and provide
information on community
resources. Individuals are often
surprised at the physical and emo-
tional effects of grief. This work-
shop will offer information that will
assist grievers in coping with the
array of emotions commonly expe-
rienced.
Those interested in the work-
shop may register by calling
Hospice of Citrus County at 527-
2020 or (866) 642-0962. Hospice
of Citrus County also offers addi-
tional support programs for those
who have suffered a loss due to a
death. All programs are free and
open to the community.
Visit the Hospice Web site at
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.


0 CIs COUNT, NC
Excellence in Hospice
Care since 1983


Cancer support
The "Look good ... Feel better"
program, a two-hour make-up and
wig demonstration sponsored by
the American Cancer Society for
cancer patients undergoing radia-
tion or chemotherapy, will be at 10
a.m. the first Wednesday monthly,
at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness. There is no
charge, and patients will receive a
free make-up kit and wig or tur-
bans, if needed. To make a reser-
vation, call Mildred Roseberry at
746-7212.
Neck, back pain
Citrus Memorial Hospital will
host a session about back and
neck pain at noon on Wednesday,
Aug. 3, in the CMH Auditorium, on
the corner of Grace Street and
Osceola Avenue, Inverness.
The hospital's newest orthopedic
surgeon, C. A. (Dean) Toumbis,
M.D., specializes in problems with
the spine and neck. His presenta-
tion will be about treatments
(including minimally invasive sur-
gery) for back and neck pain.
The program is free of charge
and open to the public.
Registration is required by calling
344-6513. Reserved parking for
the program-will be available in the
hospital's "Q" parking lot, on the
opposite comer of Grace Street
affd Osceola Avenue.
Tighter skin
Citrus Memorial Hospital will
host "Skin Tightening and
Contouring" at 4 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 4, in the CMH Auditorium, on
the corner of Grace Street and
Osceola Avenue, Invemess.
Thermage is a new, non-surgical
procedure that can tighten skin and
renew facial contours. It is being
provided by Todd Sisto, M.D., CMH
physician who is board-certified in
plastic surgery.
This will be a two-hour program,
with demonstrations included. This
is a repeat of a program presented
in May, and space is limited.
The program is free of charge
and open to the public.
Registration is required by calling
344-6513. Reserved parking for
the program will be available in the
hospital's "Q" parking lot, on the
opposite corner of Grace Street
and Osceola Avenue.
Blood pressure
Citrus Memorial Hospital will
host its monthly free blood pres-
sure screening from 10 to 11 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 5, in the CMH
Auditorium. Make this a monthly
habit to keep your blood pressure
in check. No appointment is neces-
sary.
The program is free of charge
and open to the public. Reserved
parking for the program will be
available in the hospital's "Q" park-
ing lot, on the opposite comer of
Grace Street and Osceola Avenue.
Keeping awake?
Do you have a "sleep disorder"
that prevents you from getting a
restful night's sleep? Sunoj
Abraham, M.D., will discuss sleep
problems (snoring, sleep apnea


Did You Know?

Hospice is not giving up.

Fact: Receiving hospice care
does not mean giving up hope
for comfort and dignity. The
earlier an individual receives
hospice care, the more
opportunity there is to live life
fully during their remaining days.


and other conditions) and possible
treatments that are available.
Abraham is board-certified in
sleep medicine and is on the staff
at Citrus Memorial Hospital. The
program will be at 1 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 11, in the Citrus Memorial
Hospital Auditorium, on the corner
of Grace Street and Osceola
Avenue, Inverness.
The program is free of charge
and open to the public.
Registration is required by calling
344-6513. Reserved parking for
the program will be available in the
hospital's "Q" parking lot, on the
opposite corner of Grace Street
and Osceola Avenue.
Emergency room
Join us at Citrus Memorial
Hospital as our ER manager,
Derek Vinti, R.N., describes the
experiences that can be expected
when you come to the CMH
Emergency Room for service.
"When should I call 911?" "Why is
the wait so long?" "What should I
bring?" Get these and other ques-
tions answered at this meeting.
The program will be at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 23, in the CMH
Auditorium, on the corner of Grace
Street and Osceola Avenue,
Inverness.
This is free of charge and open
to the public. Registration is
required by calling 344-6513.
Reserved parking for the program
will be available in the "Q" parking
lot, on the opposite corner of Grace
Street and Osceola Avenue in
Inverness.
Telephone Friends
Trained volunteer callers offer a
friendly and familiar voice, social-
ization and reassurance to home-
bound Citrus County seniors who
live alone. The service, which con-
firms safety and imparts care and
concern, is available at no cost.
Prospective clients are asked to
provide emergency contact infor-
mation and sign a release to be eli-
gible. All client information is kept
confidential. Contact Nature Coast
Volunteer Center at 527-5402 or e-
mail ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us to find
out more about this program,
FTRI equipment
Telecommunication equipment is
available to any Florida resident
who have a hearing or speech
impairment. There are no financial
qualifications. To qualify, you must
be:
a Florida resident.
N 3 years of age or older.
certified by a licensed audiolo-
gist, speech pathologist, hearing
aid specialist, physician, deaf serv-
ice center director or by appropri-
ate state or federal representative.
The Florida Telecommunications
Relay Inc. (FTRI) serves as the


administrator of the statewide
Specialized Telecommunications
Equipment Distribution Program,
located in Tallahassee.
Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services (CHIPS) is
under contract with FTRI to distrib-
ute and provide equipment training.
*Equipment and applications are
available in our'office. Call and
schedule an appointment. CHIPS
offers other services and programs
to local residents. Call 795-5000
(voice) or 795-7243 (TTY). Visit the
FTRI Web site at www.ftri.org.
ADA rules
Barrier Free America as advo-
cates will work with persons who
have disabilities and the entity
involved in complying with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990 (ADA). The ADA requires that
structural barriers must be
removed and provide equal access
to persons with disabilities.
Services and programs must be
readily accessible and available
under the ADA to those who use
wheelchairs, have a vision or
speech impairment or any other
disability that requires accommoda-
tion.
Those who think Barrier Free
America can help and who would
like to file a grievance (the service
is free), can call for an appoint-
ment. Bapre.r Free America is
located at the Golden Eagle Plaza,
3269 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa; phone 628-5401.
Barrier Free America is a nonprofit
community agency, operated solely
by volunteer staff, serving persons
with disabilities in Citrus County.
Mental health guide
The "Florida Consumer Guide to
Mental Health Professionals and
Services," by Crystal River psy-
chotherapist F. Douglas
Stephenson, LCSW, BCD, has
been revised to now include a
directory of licensed mental health
professionals and services in Citrus
County.
Free copies are available from
the office at 6212 W. Corporate
Oaks Drive, Meadowcrest Doctors
Office Park, Crystal River, FL
34429. Include $5 postage and
handling for mail copies. Call 795-
7070.
Counseling offered
Professional Counseling
Services are available to individu-
als, couples, families and children
experiencing a broad range of per-
sonal, relationship and family prob-
lems. Sessions are provided on a
sliding fee scale to ensure that
mental health services are avail-
able to those in need. Daytime and
evening appointments are offered
in Beverly Hills, Inverness and
Lecanto. Call Marty at Catholic


COMPLETE MEDICAL &

SURGICAL FOOT CARE


It: /


- Adult & Pediatric

Specializing in:
* Wound Care &
* Reconstructive
Foot/Ankle Sugey


Charities, (800) 242-9012, to
schedule an appointment.
Children's therapy
Florida Elks Children's Therapy
Services provides free in-home
physical and occupational therapy
to Florida children in need.
Physical therapy concerns the pre-
vention of disability, alleviation of
pain and restoration of function and
mobility. Occupational therapy
assists children in being more func-
tional and independent in their play,
schoolwork and daily living skills.
Applications are reviewed to
determine if the program is appro-
priate for the patient's needs. If
accepted, a regular home visitation
is scheduled by a physical or occu-
pational therapist who is licensed
by the state of Florida. Parents or
guardians are required to be pres-
ent during the therapy sessions so
they may carry out treatments
between the therapist's visits.
Applicants for consideration may
call Walt Mabie at Inverness Elks
Lodge 2522 in Hernando at 344-
3357 before noon Monday through
Friday, West Citrus Elks 2693 at
628-1221 or the Florida program
administrator toll free at 1-800-523-
1673.
Loan closet
The Beverly Hills Lions Club Inc.
has a "Loan Closet,", from which.
they loan wheelchairs, walkers,
canes, bath chairs, etc. It is
presently in need of some wheel-
chairs.
There is no charge for the use of
any item; however, sometimes a
donation is made, which is used to
repair items to keep them in good
working order. Call Bonnie Wilson
at 527-3738 or Jeanne Vollmer at
746-6265 to schedule pickup for a
wheelchair.
HIV testing
Free HIV Testing is available at
the Citrus County Health


Department.
Inverness 726-1731
Crystal River 795-6233
Lecanto 527-0068
Walk-ins accepted, appoint-
ments preferred.
CMH speakers
Citrus Memorial Hospital wel-
comes requests from community
groups that would like a hospital
representative to visit their meeting
to make a brief presentation.
Topics include the new Heart
Center, heart-healthy lifestyle tech-
niques, the SHARE Club's pro-
grams and activities for seniors,
and other general hospital-related
topics.
Mail requests to Rebecca Martin
in Public Relations, Citrus
Memorial Hospital, 502 W.
Highland Blvd., Inverness, FL
34452, or call her at 344-6501.
Speaker available
Diane White of New Horizons
Service Dogs is available as a
guest speaker. An educated pres-
entation on service dogs is provid-
ed free of charge. Service dog
awareness ideas for the classroom
are available for any teacher inter-
ested..
If interested in volunteering,
scheduling a speaking engage-
ment, desire more information, or
, in need of the specialized services
of a service dog, call Diane at 344-
8618.
Yoga class
Yoga Forest offers yoga of con-
centration and meditation from 2 to
4 p.m. Saturday in Hemando.
Learn to dissolve stress and its
causes. All are welcome to relax.
Tea time included. Free. For direc-
tions, call Vrinda at 726-9889.
Hearing loss
Undetected hearing loss can


Please see ';': /Page5C


2C TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2005


For more information on hospice care give us a call.
In Citrus 352.527.2020 Toll Free 866.642.0962


CITRUS4



PODIATRY CENTER, PA
EDWARD J, DALY, DPM*
KENNETH P PRITCHYK, DPM*
*Board Certified Podiatric Physician & Surgeon
"Frll,., 4mpihtw i C olle' .e ,,t Fooi jron 4nkle Sufei'.,ni'

^^^^^^^ ROOM' A^


HEALTH








CITRUS CQUAfl (FL) CliRoNicus H HEALTH iULSDAY, fuix 26. 2005 3C


Older patients and medical ethics Medication targeted


Medical ethics has been
around for hundreds
and even thousands of
years, but in the past 30 to 40
years has become a field of
study in its own. While these
principles have a broad appli-
cation to outpatient care, it
might be a little bit more rele-
vant for the ,elderly patient
population. This is a time in
life where we want to maintain
our autonomy and self-govern-
ing. This respect is something
that all of us want in the
autumn of our life.
Doctors, with the help of
HIPA guidelines, protect
patient information. Patients
need to be free from outside
controlling influences and,
hopefully, possess the mental
and physical capability for
decision-making.. Doctors can
help in this area by stressing
informed consent; in short, giv-
ing you all the options and
allowing you to make your own
decisions.
Many patients here in Citrus
County tend to have some hear-


ing and/or visual problems that pared is the best defense.
can make communication diffi- Events directives, which
cult. Add to that describe exactly
dementia that what you would like
occurs with age, done in certain cir-
which can make for cumstances while
a difficult decision- .. you are at the hospi-
making process., tal need to be in
Also, as we age, we place and power
sometimes have 4. of attorney issues
multiple medical for health care are
problems, which ~ important, as well.
can lead to complex Dr. Denis Grillo Repeat office vis-
decision-making. In its with your doctor
some instances, EAR NOSE provide an opportu-'
families are around & i '-: -: nity for you to initi-
to help with that ate that discussion
process. But with or so that if and when
without families, it Doctors that time comes that
may be more time Doctors you are in the emer-
consuming and take protect agency room or
multiple visits to Intensive Care Unit,
accomplish the patient you know that your
goal. wishes will be
Another thing informa- respected and you
that is evident is don't have to make
lack of planning. tion. any snap decisions
None of us wants to that you may regret
think about bad later. This is impor-
things happening to us, but that tant in light of the fact that
is a possibility and being pre- patients have different opin-


ions about whether they want
treatment withheld or with-
drawn, and if they want
extraordinary measures taken
to prolong their lives. Artificial
nutrition and hydration via
tube feedings help babies and
non-terminally sick patients
return to normal activity and
grow and thrive.
However, it could be futile in
a terminally ill patient and pro-
long an unnecessary and
unpleasant event.
At this point in time, society
cannot come to an agreement
about how health care should
be delivered and used, which
may not be a bad thing. And
while we still have this choice,
it would be a great time to dis-
cuss your desires with family
members and your physician.
You just can't be too prepared.


Denis Grillo, D. 0., is an ear,
nose and throat specialist
in Crystal River. Call him
at 795-0011.


Tecnis lens improves vision, safety


Both the cornea and the
lens of the eye help
focus light on the retina.
The cornea is the clear dome of
the eye and the lens is situated
just behind the pupil, inside
the eye.
The cornea is not optically-
perfect. The central cornea
focuses light differently, less
acutely, than the peripheral
cornea.
This is called positive spher-
ical aberration. In a young eye,
the lens negates this by induc-
ing negative spherical aberra-
tion, resulting in images from
the central and peripheral
cornea being focused on the
retina.
However, with each year of
life, an approximately 0.01 mil-
limeter layer is added to the
lens. This compresses the
existing lens fibers resulting in
loss of negative spherical aber-
ration.
Thus, the positive spherical
aberration in the cornea is no
longer corrected. A diminished
quality of vision is the result,


especially with contrast vision, center than in the periphery of
Contrast vision is our ability to the lens. This results in nega-
see one shade on tive spherical aber-
another such as a ration, like a young
gray truck in the fog natural lens. By cor-
or a golf ball on the reacting for the posi-
green or in the tive spherical aber-
clouds, ration of the cornea,
* A cataract occurs contrast vision is
when the lens enhanced.
becomes cloudy. .. For .instance, a
Cataract surgery patient with a
involves removing Tecnis lens is less
the lens from the Dr. Kyle Parrow apt to bump into a
eye and replacing it ; ." chair in a dark
with an artificial LOOK room.
lens or implant. Another example
There are literal- was demonstrated
ly dozens of in a clinical study.
implants available The cornea Patients viewing a
for implantation, rural road through
However, one is not a Tecnis lens identi-
stand4 out because fied a pedestrian
it corrects for the optically sooner than through
positive spherical a traditional lens
aberration of the effect. implant.
cornea. While traveling at
This implant is 55 mph, patients
called the Tecnis lens. perceived the pedestrian 45
The Tecnis lens focuses feet earlier. This equates to 0.5
slightly more. acutely in the seconds. To put this in perspec-


tive, the third taillight required
by the federal government
improved response time by
only 0.35 seconds.
Thus, the Tecnis lens has
been demonstrated to improve
functional vision, improving
patient safety in daily situa-
tions under low visibility con-
ditions.
My experience with the
Tecnis lens has been extremely
positive. It has unique quali-
ties not available in other lens
implants.
This is an exciting, new gen-
eration implant, not only
improving quality of vision in
perfect lighting, but also under
less-than-optimal conditions in
which safety can be a signifi-
cant issue.


Kyle Parrow, M.D., is a
board-certified physician
in Lecanto. Contact him
at 240 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto 34461 or e-mail
wcei@westcoasteye.com.


Q: I heard that a new
drug was approved to
treat heart failure in
black patients only.
What can you tell me about it?
A: The FDA recently
approved BiDil to
treat heart failure
(HF) in black
patients only, which ,
makes it the first
medicine to be tar-
geted for a specific
racial group. HF is
an epidemic in the .
U.S., affecting an .
estimated 5 million Richard
people. Among Richard
black individuals, ASK
the estimated pre- PHARI
valence of HF is 3.1
percent for men
and 3.5 percent for
women compared Afri
to 2.5 percent and
1.9 percent for Amer
white men and ha1
white women.
African Amer- hig
icans have a higher
incidence ofcardio- incid
vascular disease,
and death rates are of ca
also higher for
black males and Vas(
females with HF
compared to the dise
white population. It
is estimated that
750,000 African Americans
have been diagnosed with HF
and this number is expected to
grow to approximately 900,000
people in 2010.
While the exact causes) of
heart failure are complex, it
has been shown that a chemi-
cal known as nitric oxide (NO)
may be involved.
Several studies have report-
ed that there are reduced lev-
els of NO in black patients,
which may make them more
likely to develop heart failure.
BiDil contains two different
drugs that have been used for a


long time to treat high blood
pressure and angina. It con-
tains isosorbide dinitrate and
hydralazine, which help to
expand blood vessels, reducing
blood pressure and improving
blood flow. Isosorb-
ide dinitrate is con-
verted to NO in
blood vessels and
leads to blood ves-
,. sel expansion (vaso-
dilation).
SMeanwhile,
Y" hydralazine has
-- been shown to pro-
Hoffmann long these vasodi-
k THE lating effects by pro-
tecting the NO
VIACBST formed by isosor-
bide dinitrate from
breaking down (de-
ican activating).
Hydralazine is a
ricans vasodilator agent
and is also an
ve a antioxidant.
sher The FDA ap-
er proved the use of
lence BiDil based upon a
lenc large study in black
irdlo- patients with HE
In this study, the
cular use of BiDil result-
ed in a 43 percent
ase. reduction in deaths
and a 39 percent
decrease in hospi-
talizations for HF compared to
those who did not receive
BiDil.
In addition, the quality of life
was much better for patients
taking BiDil. BiDil is usually
taken three times a day in con-
junction with other drugs used
to treat heart failure.


Richard Hoffmann has
practiced pharmacy for more
than 20 years. Send questions
to him at 1135N. Timucuan
Trail, Inverness, FL 34453.


How blood storage area works


any people feel they
have or have been told
they have poor circu-
lation. This is an overly broad
approach to understanding
true vascular hemo-
dynamics. Many
folks with varicose
veins or swollen,
tender legs tell me
they have "poor cir-
culation," especially
when I have to
explain to them that
Medicare will not ___
pay for their routine Dr. David
foot care because
4 they do not have BEST
poor arterial circu- FORM
lation.
The venous sys-
tem should be The v
thought of as a large
storage area of system]
blood. The venous
system can hold up hold
Sto three-quarters of
our blood volume at three
one time. There are tero
more veins than ters
*m arteries in our body bloc
Veins have the func-
tion of bringing VOlur
blood back to the
heart. Veins become one t
larger in size as they
come closer to the
heart. Veins in the lower
extremity have relatively frag-
ile bicuspid (two cusp) valves
located in areas where veins
come together to ensure that
blood flows in one direction
back to the heart. These valves
help blood from pooling or run-
ning back to the heart. The
pressure of blood in the veins
is also much more variable
than in the arteries. A person
lying down may have a vein
pressure of 10 mmHg, whereas
the same person standing may
have a pressure of l20mmHg in
the vessels of the foot.
Fluid loss from veins is nor-


mal. A person may lose 15 per-
cent of blood volume from the
veins, especially of the lower
extremity, which is normal and
returned to the general circu-
lation by the lym-
phatic system. The
heart is not strong
enough to pump
blood to and from
the foot on its own.
u. Inhalation in the
chest, movement of
skeletal muscles
against the veins,
B. Raynor and opening and
closing of valves
FOOT leads to increased
WARD blood flow back to
the heart, thus help-
ing to prevent pool-
enous ing and fluid vol-
ume loss in the
n can lower extremity.
Failure of the
up to valves because of
injury, hereditary
-quar- weakness, environ-
Of our mental factors, pro-
)f our longed standing
eod (such as with wait-
resses or cashiers)
ne at and lack of exercise
can lead to
lime. increased volume
and pressure in the
veins of the lower
extremity called venous hyper-
tension. Prolonged venous
hypertension can put too much
strain on the valves. The veins
may then become damaged
and allow blood to back-flow,
thus increasing hypertension
and vein permeability. This
can lead to an increase in the
volume of fluids escaping from
the veins and pooling in the
extremity as gravity pulls the


fluid down toward the foot
along tissue planes.
These factors produce the
classic signs and symptoms of
chronic venous insufficiency
or CVI. Legs that appear "nor-
mal" size in the morning, but
swell and become painful as
the day progresses character-
ize CVI.
Elevation helps this prob-
lem. Patients with CVI often
complain about discolored,
tired, achy, tender, swollen
legs. They may also complain
of heat, redness, skin irritation
and even ulceration. CVI can
lead to blood clots, cellulitis,
phlebitis, venous dermatitis,
skin discoloration, and venous
stasis ulcerations.
The veins store a large vol-
ume of blood (liquid). Long
periods of static standing over
time and sedentary lifestyles
increase the chance for venous
hypertension and CVI. CVI is
best treated with aerobic walk-
ing and medical-grade pre-
scription graduated compres-
sion stockings. These stockings
may be considered unsightly,
difficult to don and uncomfort-
able in the beginning. Exercise
and stockings makes you hot
and uncomfortable as well, but
these things can't be changed.
In my opinion, it is better to
deal with stockings than have
to try to overcome the compli-
cations of CVI.


David B. Raynor, DPM, is
a podiatrist in Inverness. He
can be reached at 726-3668
with questions or suggestions
for future columns.


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HEALTIH-


TU*SDAY, IUI.Y 26, 2005 3C


w w


]








IT
t








4C TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2005


SYNCH
Continued from Page 1C

rooms for kids who like to
swing and tumble and play in
a way that tends to calm them.
It uses massage and gentle
brushes. OT4Kids director
Gail Huecker explains that
the sensory integration thera-
py she uses is based on the
understanding that some chil-
dren, teens and adults have
difficulty with organizing the
great volume of information
sent to their brains from their
senses.
For example, she said that
for some children she works
with, touch of any sort can be
alarming or threatening. They
avoid any stimulation. Others
feel little or nothing and don't
react to touch. They crave
stimulation.
Hearing can be another sen-
sory problem. For the hyper-
sensitive, the varied sounds
in a noisy classroom can be a
cacophony of confusing, irri-
tating noise. Hearing instruc-
tions can be impossible. In
frustration, the child could
become a behavioral problem.
Another child may crave
sound and may tap a pencil,
hum, kick the desk or other-
wise produce noise that will
disrupt the classroom.
Some children like Svieta,
she said, need to burn up
excess energy before they can
sit down in the classroom.
From time to time, they need
to get up to hop or jump on a
trampoline to stay focused.
Others want no exercise at all
and have to be urged out to the



DRUGS
Continued from Page lC

768,000.
Officials warned against con-
cluding that alcohol abuse is
becoming less of a problem in
the United States. Jennifer
DeVallance, a spokeswoman for
the White House Office of
National Drug Control Policy,
said another annual study that
,-surveys alcohol and drug use
shows no statistically signifi-
cant decrease in alcohol use.
The trend may reflect shifts
in state funds from treatment
of alcohol abusers to treatment
of- drug abusers. Officials also
note that the government data
does not include all admis-
sions for substance abuse
treatment In general, the num-
bers reflect only those patients
treated at facilities that
5. receive public funding for
treatment services.
"Clearly, from the data,
fewer people are in treatment
for alcohol as their primary
drug of abuse," said SAMHSA
administrator Charles Curie.
'"At the same time, there has
been a large increase in
methamphetamine and pre-
scription drugs as primary rea-
sons for treatment. The major-
ity of people come to treatment
with more than one drug of
abuse, and alcohol may well be
one of them."
Officials used the report to
highlight the increase in the
number of people treated for
methamphetamine addiction.
Treatment for methamphet-



ROHAN
>- Continued from Page 1C

ing ... (in) a relaxed, casual-
dress-only place..."
This is the manner in which
I visualize this column. Always
Remember this column belongs
to you, the curious, at ease,
interested, seekers of knowl-
Sedge and truth.
As many of you know I try
to answer all correspondence
whether it is a letter or e-mail.
SI believe that I am caught up. If
I have missed someone, kindly
resend it. Also, because many
Questions are more complicat-
ed than one might think, your
telephone number might help.
All letters that are mailed must


include a telephone number.
We shall have a busy fall
making sure that everyone is
aware of the ins and outs of our


CIr'us COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


SENSORY
INTEGRATION
DYSFUNCTION
When working properly,
our minds organize and
process information from
our senses: hearing, see-
ing, touching, tasting, feel-
ing and the senses of
movement and balance.
Sensory integration dys-
function results from
either receiving too much
or too little information
from the senses.
In one dysfunction, the
brain is overloaded and
confused. In the other
type, there is a craving for
sensory information.
These conditions affect
behaviors and cause other
problems at school and
home.

playground.
Gilbert, too, said she came
up with a way for Svieta to use
acceptable, alternatives that
will help her organize and
calm her confusion.
She said that because her
child needs plenty of move-
ment to focus her attention,
she made a list of activities
she, could do to meet her sen-
sory needs like swinging in a
tire swing, bouncing a red ball,
riding her bicycle and taking a
walk.
"Now when she has a senso-
ry need, she has acceptable
ways to fulfill that need."
Another OT4KIDS mom,
Michelle Morris, said her son
Michael, who is now 7, had
serious behavioral and learn-
ing problems.


Getting help
While the ranks of people
treatment for alcohol abi
declined, those seeking
addictions to methamphi
have climbed steadily.
Admissions for subs
abuse treatment
2.0 million
1.8 All substances
1.6
1.4
1.2
Alcohol
1.0
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2 Methamphetamine
0 o .I T I
'93 '95 '97 '99
SOURCE: Substance Abuse &
-lealth Services Administration


... fea
people are


seeking
use
to end


"He avoided people. No eye
contact. He had meltdowns,
sometimes 12 a day He could-
n't go to sleep. Noises made
him afraid. The sound of a
flushing toilet. He couldn't
stand being touched. Even a
shower. He was a mess. I was a
mess."
Her child's pediatrician Dr.
Esther Gonzalez of the
Comprehensive Behavioral
Institute in Crystal River, rec-
ommended a sensory integra-
tion evaluation. They were
sent to OT4KIDS to determine
his sensory needs and to work
on them.
Morris said her son's needs
were many, but once she
understood Michael's chal-
lenges she retrofitted her
home with low wattage light
bulbs, installed a gentler
shower and continued a vari-
ety of therapeutic interven-
tions at home.
They began with simple
things like brushing his body
with special soft brushes and
using a professional massage
therapist's vibrator to begin
the process of modulating his
sensitivity to touch. He also
uses listening program thera-
py and a computer-driven
metronome therapy that
attunes his senses to better
cope with the stresses of
school and life.
"It wasn't immediate, but
after a few weeks we began
seeing results," Morris said.
"They were dramatic." She
has since established a sup-
port group and has become an
advocate for children and par-
ents who may not yet know
about sensory integration
therapy.



BENNETT
Continued from Page 1C


etamine similar painkillers known as
NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-
stance inflammatory drugs during the
course of about seven years.
The results of the study
showed that men who took
- aspirin or another NSAID reg-
million ularly, defined as about 30 pills
per month for five years or
more, had an 18 percent lower
767,998 risk of developing prostate
cancer than men who did not
use these drugs. The study sup-
ports the findings of previous
116,604 research that also suggested
,-, aspirin and similar drugs
'01 '03 might help protect against
Mental AP prostate cancer.
But the new findings aren't
conclusive. The study couldn't
completely control for other
factors that may have influ-
"er enced a man's prostate cancer
in


treatment for
alcohol as their GANDHI


primary drug
of abuse.

Charles Curie
SAMHSA administrator.
amine use has soared nearly
every year since 1993, when
there were nearly 21,000
admissions. By 2003, there
were 116,600 admissions
directly connected to metham-
phetamine.


new Part D of Medicare.
I don't mind helping you, and
a phone number would help
me; it will expedite the solu-
tion to any problem.
Your telephone number and
all other information will be
discarded upon the conclusion
of any situation, and as always,
your anonymity is paramount.
Don't worry about long dis-
tance; this is why cell phones
are useful.
Next week back to pre-
scription drugs and our future.
Keep my green tea warm,
and I will talk to you next
week.


Send questions and comments
to "Senior Advocate,"
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River FL 34429
or e-mail
danrohan@atlantic.net.


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Continued from Page 1C

bone marrow. The reason for
this abnormal increase in cells
is largely unknown.
My patient had a mini-stroke
and is elderly, so he should be
treated to reduce his platelet
count. This requires oral med-
ications. Two such drugs are
available hydroxyurea and
anagrelide.
Dr. A. R. Green, of the
Cambridge Institute of Medical
Research in the United


--- Support GROUPS


Family Caregiver support
meetings:
Tuesday: Family Caregiver
Support Group, sponsored by
Catholic Charities, Our Lady of
Grace Church, 9 Roosevelt Blvd.,
.Beverly Hills, at 12:30 p.m. Call
Marie Monahan at (800) 242-9012.
Monday: Grandparents and
Relatives Raising Grandchildren
Support Group at 10 a.m., 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto
Government Bldg., Lecanto. Call
Sandra at (800) 717-3277.
Aug. 3: Family Caregiver
Support Group, sponsored by The
Cottages of Gentle Breeze, 9416
N. Gentle Breeze Loop, Citrus
Springs, at 11 a.m. Call (352) 489-
5539 to make a reservation for
onsite respite services.
Refreshments will be provided. Call
Sandra at (800) 717-3277.
Aug. 24: Family Caregiver
Support Group, sponsored by
Catholic Charities, Our Lady of
Grace Church, at 10 a.m. at 9
Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills.
Call Marie Monahan at (800) 242-
9012.
Cancer Support Group will
meet Thursday at Cancer
Treatment Center, 3406 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. Phone:
746-1100. Medical doctor available
to answer questions at meeting.
Amputee Support Group
meets on the last Thursday month-
ly at Cinnamon Sticks Restaurant
on State Road 44 West in
Inverness. Amputees and family or
friends are invited to attend for
information and social fellowship.
Call Donna at 344-1988 or Perry
at Sonlife Prosthetics, 344-8200.


Alzheimer's Family
Organization, serving Central
Florida, announces the following
monthly support group meeting.
Public is invited.
10 a.m. Thursday, Woodland
Terrace, 124 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Call Pam
Pepitone at 249-3100.
2:30 p.m. Monday, Sugarmill
Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa. Call Elaine Heller at
382-2531.
10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 25,
Woodland Terrace, 124 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hemando. Call
Pam Pepitone at 249-3100.
The Alzheimer's Family
Organization is offering monetary
reimbursement for respite costs
through its Respite Assistance
Program. Respite is essential for
the caregivers of a dementia or
Alzheimer's disease sufferer to
help refresh and revive. The
Alzheimer's Family Organization
will also provide other national
respite resources that can reim-
burse costs to caregivers.
This free program is available to
all residents of Citrus, Hernando,
Sumter and Lake counties caring
for an individual with dementia or
Alzheimer's disease. Contact the
Alzheimer's Family Organization
main office for full details at (727)
848-8888 or toll free at (888) 496-
8004.
E The DBSA of Citrus County
Support Group is a place where
people with depression or bipolar
disorder and those who care about
them can share experiences, dis-
cuss coping skills and offer hope to
one another.


More research is needed to understand
whether aspirin has a role in preventing
cancer. Until that question is answered,
though, people should not take
aspirin in the hopes it will keep
them from getting the disease.


risk And because the study
relied on men's memory of
their aspirin use, it's possible
that some participants misre-
ported how often they took
aspirin.
More research is needed to
understand whether aspirin
has a role in preventing cancer.
Until that question is
answered, though, people
should not take aspirin in the
hopes it will keep them from
getting the disease. The
American Cancer Society cur-


Kingdom, and his team studied
high-risk patients with myelo-
proliferative disorder with
increased platelets. Of these,
404 were randomly assigned to
hydroxyurea plus aspirin, and
405 to anagrelide plus aspirin.
Doses of the study drugs were
adjusted to maintain platelet
counts of-less than 400,000 per
cubic millimeter. Aspirin was
prescribed at a daily dose of 75
to 100 mg.
During a median followup of
39. months, the anagrelide
group was significantly more
likely to develop arterial or
venous thrombosis, serious


FORGET TO PUBLCIZE?
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lished in the Chronicle. Call 563.5660 for details.


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820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness, FL 352-795-5700
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rently does not recommend
using aspirin or other NSAIDs
to prevent cancer because
NSAIDs can cause side effects,
including serious gastrointesti-
nal bleeding, and they can also
interact with a lot of other
drugs.
But there are steps people
can take to lower their risk of
cancer, the two researchers
point out.. For example, the
American Cancer Society rec-
ommends all Americans 50 and
older receive a screening test



hemorrhage or.death from vas-
cular causes than was the
hydroxyurea group.
Specifically, the rates of arte-
rial thrombosis, transient
ischemic attacks and serious
hemorrhage were significantly
higher in the anagrelide group.
Moreover, significantly more
patients withdrew from treat-
ment because of side effects in
the anagrelide group (88 versus
43).
In an accompanying editori-
al, Drs. Tiziano Barbui and
Guido Finazzi of Ospedali
Riuniti, Bergamo, Italy, noted
that in light of these findings,
"hydroxyurea plus aspirin
should be the standard treat-


The DBSA of Citrus County
Support Group holds regularly
scheduled meetings on Thursday
nights, general meeting at 7 p.m.,
doors open at 6. DBSA of Citrus
County meets in Bailey Hall, First
Lutheran Church, 1900 Highway
44 West, Inverness. The public is
invited. All meetings are confiden-
tial.
Thursday: Self-help and peer
support will be the discussion for-
mat.
We offer a supportive setting
where you will find comfort and
direction and where you can make
a difference in your life and in the
lives of others. DBSA of Citrus
County provides peer-based self-
help through facilitated meetings
and educational sessions.
Call DBSA of Citrus County at
726-8920. The National DBSA
Association, headquartered in
Chicago, Ill., is reached at (800)
826-3632.
CMH Support Groups
Meeting rooms for the following
support groups are in the Citrus
Memorial Hospital Administration
Building unless otherwise indicat-
ed. To register or for information,
call the telephone number indicat-
ed for the support group.
Bariatric Support
6:30 p.m. second Tuesday in the
administration building. Call Terri
Davis, 726-3646.
Breast Cancer Support
Will not meet in August. Call
527-0106.
Cardiac Support
Will not meet until further notice.
Call 344-6538.
Please see GROUPS/Page 5C


for colorectal cancer. But many
Americans do not receive these
potentially lifesaving tests.
Another important step is to
quit smoking. Cigarette smok-
ing accounts for about 30 per-
cent of all cancer deaths and
about 87 percent of deaths
from lung cancer, the leading
cancer killer in the United
States. Also exercise regularly
and eat a healthy diet, low in
fat and high in fiber.


Dr. Bennett is a board-certi-
fied radiation oncologist, past
president of the Citrus County
Unit of the American Cancer
Society, and a member of the
board of directors of the
Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society. You
may contact him at 522 North
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, or E-mail at cjben-
nett@rboi.org.


ment."
My patient was started on
hydroxyurea. He tolerated it
well and now his platelet count
is 300,000 and he has not had
any more episodes of mini-
strokes.


Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and oncologist
He is the volunteer medical
adviser of the Citrus Unit of
the American Cancer Society.
Send questions or comments
to 521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com or
call 746-0707.


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1TuS)AY,, Juiv 26, 2005 5C


Exercise key to a healthy brain


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Exercise
your brain. Nourish it well.
And the earlier you start, the
better.
That's the best advice doc-
tors can yet offer to ward off
Alzheimer's disease.
There's no guarantee. But
more and more research
shows that some fairly simple
steps can truly lower your risk
of the deadly dementia.
Also, if Alzheimer's strikes
anyway, people who have fol-
lowed this advice tend to do
better their brains with-
stand the attack longer before
symptoms become obvious.
The goal: build up what's
called a "cognitive reserve."
"Cognitive reserve is not
something you're born with,"
Dr. Yaakov Stern of Columbia
University told a meeting of
Alzheimer's researchers
Monday. "It's something that
changes, and can be modified
over time."
In fact, there's now enough
research backing this theory
that the Alzheimer's
Association is offering free
classes around the country to


Tips to maintain I
a healthy brain
Just like your hearing and your '
vision, your brain changes as
you age. The Alzheimer's
Association recommends the
following tips to keep your
"thinker" healthy:
Stay mentally 'Pump up' Remain so-
active with exercise cially involved
Participate in Physical exercise Add small chang-
problem-solving increases the es to your life that
activities that amount of blood will keep you cu-
stimulate the flowing to the rious and in-
brain and form brain and stimu- volved-join a
new connections lates growth of club, take a class
within it new brain cells or volunteer


Choose
healthy foods
Eat dark-skinned
fruits and vegeta-
bles high in anti-
oxidants; reduce
your intake of
foods high in fat
and cholesterol


SOURCE: Alzheimer's Association AP


teach people of any age, but
especially baby boomers -
just how to do it. They call it
"maintain your brain."
"There is tremendous inter-
est in making sure that by the
time you're 80, your brain is
there with you," explains
California psychologist
Elizabeth Edgerly, who leads
the program.


A healthy brain weighs
about 2 pounds, roughly the
size of a cauliflower. Networks
of blood vessels keep oxygen
flowing to 100 billion brain
cells.
Branch-like tentacles
extend from the ends of those
cells, the brain's own special-
ized wiring to communicate.
Under a microscope, they look


like bushy hairs. A healthy
brain can continue to grow
new neurons and rewire and
adapt itself throughout old age
- and you want your brain to
be as bushy as possible.
That growth starts in child-
hood, when parents read to
tots, and depends heavily on
getting lots of education. The
less educated have double the
risk of getting Alzheimer's
decades later than people
with a college education.
Likewise, people who are less
educated and have a not-so-
challenging job have three to
four times the risk of getting
Alzheimer's, Stern says.
If you're already 40, don't
despair. What's the advice?
Your brain is like a muscle
- use it or lose it. Brain scans
show that when people use
their brains in unusual ways,
more blood flows into differ-
ent neural regions and new
connections form. Do a new
type of puzzle, learn to play
chess, take a foreign language
class or solve a vexing prob-
lem at work. Try to challenge
your brain daily, Edgerly
advises.
A healthy brain isn't just


ON THE NET
Alzheimer's Association:
http://www.alz.org

an intellectual one. Social
stimulation is crucial, too.
Don't sit in front of the televi-
sion. People who are part of a
group, whether it's a church or
a book club, age healthier.
Declining social interaction
predicts declining cognitive
function, new government
research shows.
So do stress and anxiety.
People who have what's called
chronic distress extreme
worriers are twice as likely
to develop some form of
dementia, reports Dr. Robert
Wilson of Rush University
Medical Center. Why?
Autopsies show these people
actually had fewer bush-like
tentacles, or dendrites, linking
their brain cells, meaning their
brains were more vulnerable
when disease struck.
It's not clear if someone can
reverse a lifetime of worry and
anxiety, but animal studies sug-
gest exercise eases the effects
of this kind of stress.
Getting physical is crucial


Scientists finding earliest signs of Alzheimer's GROUPS


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A subtle
change in a memory-making
brain region seems to predict
who will get Alzheimer's dis-
ease nine years before symp-
toms appear, scientists report-
ed Sunday.
The finding is part of a wave
of research aimed at early
detection of the deadly demen-
tia and one day perhaps
even preventing it.
Researchers scanned the
brains of middle-aged and
older people while they were
still healthy They discovered
that lower energy usage in a
part of the brain called the hip-
pocampus correctly signaled
who would get Alzheimer's or a
related memory impairment 85
percent of the time.
"We found the earliest pre-
dictor," said the lead
researcher, Lisa Mosconi of
New York University School of
Medicine. "The hippocampus
seems to be the very first
region to be affected."
But it is too soon to offer
Alzheimer's-predicting PET
scans. The discovery must be
confirmed. Also, there are seri-
ous ethical questions about
how soon people should know
that Alzheimer's is approach-
ing when nothing yet can be
done to forestall the disease.
Still, the discovery may pro-
vide leads to scientists search-
ing for therapies to at least
delay the onset of the degener-
ative brain disease. It already
affects 4.5 million people in the
U.S. and is predicted to strike
14 million by 2050 as the popu-
lation ages.
Moreover, researchers are
honing in on lifestyle choices



NOTES
Continued from Page 2C

negatively affect all areas of a per-
son's life. Free hearing screenings
will be offered from 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays by
appointment. Call 746-3300.
The center is at 760 W.
Hampshire Blvd., Suite 9, Citrus
Springs.
SRRMC speakers
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center welcomes requests from
community groups seeking a hos-


ON THE NET
Alzheimer's Association:
http www.alz.or'g
National Institute on
Aging:
http:. vww.rnia.rnh.grov

that may help protect the brain
in the first place.
"It's exciting that we can
even talk about prevention,"
said William Thies, scientific
director of the Alzheimer's
Association. He noted that just
10 years ago there was hardly
any research into that possibil-
ity.
Among the findings present-
ed Sunday at the association's
first Alzheimer's prevention
conference:
People who drink fruit or
vegetable juice at least three
times a week seem four times
less likely to develop
Alzheimer's than nonjuice
drinkers, according to a study
of 1,800 elderly Japanese-
Americans. The theory is that
juice contains high levels of
polyphenols, compounds that
may play a brain-protective
role.
Less education, gum dis-
ease early in life, or a stroke
were more important than
genes in determining who got
dementia, concluded a study of
100 dementia patients with
healthy identical twins.
Education stimulates neuronal
growth; gum disease is a mark-
er of brain-harming inflamma-
tion.
Decreasing social activity
in old age is a risk factor, a
National Institute on Aging
study suggests. It is not clear if


pital representative to present a
health-related subject.
Call Amy Kingery, public rela-
tions and communications coordi-
nator, at 795-8344.
LifeLink speakers
LifeLink of Florida, the agency
which coordinates organ and tis-
sue donations, has speakers avail-
able. Call Jennifer Krouse at (800)
262-5775 or (813) 253-2640.
Blood pressure
A+ Healthcare Home Health will
be at the following locations to offer
free blood pressure screening.
East Citrus Community Center:


the men in the study became
less social because
Alzheimer's already was at
work, but social activity is men-
tally stimulating.
A brain-healthy lifestyle
aside, a big quest is to develop
ways to identify Alzheimer's
disease before symptoms
emerge finding biomarkers
that could be targets for pre-
ventive therapies.
Think of it as hunting the
equivalent of the cholesterol
test for Alzheimer's, Dr. Neill
Graff-Radford of the Mayo
Clinic said.
He measured blood levels of
different types of beta amyloid,
the sticky protein that makes
up Alzheimer's hallmark brain
plaques, in 565 people. Those
.with lowest ratios of a particu-
lar amyloid type were three
times more likely to develop
dementia within five years.
The reason: Probably less
amyloid was floating in the
blood because it was sticking in
the brain instead.
PET scans already can show
Alzheimer's plaques in
advanced disease. Mosconi's
study is the first to so rigorous-
ly examine people's brains
before symptoms appear.
PET, or positron emission
tomography, scans show
images of how brains use glu-
cose, or sugar, which is the
brain's main fuel.
Mosconi scanned 53 healthy
people. She tracked them for
up to 24 years. Six so far have
developed Alzheimer's and 19
developed an Alzheimer's pre-
cursor called "mild cognitive
impairment," or MCI. Those
people showed less glucose
metabolism in the hippocam-
pus than the still healthy


9 to 11 a.m. first Wednesday
monthly.
Brentwood Health Center: 10 to
11 a.m. second Tuesday monthly.
West Citrus Community Center:
9 to 11 a.m. third Wednesday
monthly.
Inverness Community Center:.9
to 11 a.m. third Tuesday monthly.
Call Mary Pearsall at 564-2700.
Child seat checks
The Citrus County Health
Department offers child safety seat
checks by appointment at the
Inverness office, 120 N.
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Littnan
at 726-1731, Ext. 242.


MEDICAL CENTER





A C C ES S
HEALTHCARE, LLC ,

Vincent Alia, M.D.
Family Medicine

Mark Barnhurst, PA-C
Physicians Assistant


Other research supports the
hippocampus' early role.
University of Wisconsin
researchers gave a different
brain scan, called a functional
MRI, to healthy adult children
of Alzheimer's patients. The
researchers found that the hip-
pocampus was not as active as
in people without that familial
risk.
To prove if these early indi-
cators are real, the National
Institute on Aging, with finan-
cial help from the pharmaceu-
tical industry and Alzheimer's
Association, is beginning a $60
million study to scan the brains
of 800 older Americans and try
to pin down Alzheimer's earli-
est biological changes.
That Alzheimer's begins
developing so early means
even young people should
adopt a brain-healthy lifestyle,
said Dr. Mark Sager of the
Wisconsin Registry for
Alzheimer's Prevention. "what
we're hoping is that 55 is not
too late," he said.

J'A-


Continued from Page 4C


Childbirth Classes
A four-week course that meets
from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday.
Registration is required. Call 344-
6576.
Citrus Cancer Support
4:30 p.m. third Tuesday in the
CMH cafeteria. Call Carol at 726-
1551, Ext. 6596 or 3329.
Diabetes Support
Will not meet in August. Call
Carol McHugh, 344-6504.:
Fibromyalgia Support
1 p.m. second Saturday and
fourth Friday in the Cypress room.
Call June Rogers, 746-6122.


also. Bad memory is linked to
heart disease and diabetes,
because clogged arteries slow
blood flow in the brain. Elderly
people who were less mentally
and physically active in middle
age are about three times as
likely to get Alzheimer's as they
gray. A study from Sweden
found the obese are twice as
likely to get Alzheimer's.
Go for the triple-whammy of
something mentally, physically
and socially stimulating all at
once: Coach your child's ball
team. Take a dance class.
Strategize a round of golf.
And don't forget diet. The
same foods that are heart-
healthy are brain-healthy, so
avoid artery-clogging saturated
fat and try for omega-3 fatty
acids, found in fish and nuts.
Eat dark-skinned fruits and
vegetables, which are particu-
larly high in brain-healthy vita-
mins E and C. Harvard
researchers found eating dark
green leafy vegetables like
spinach improves cognitive
function. Also, B vitamins and
folic acid, found in cereals,
breads and fruits like straw-
berries, are important for
brain health.

Grief Support Group
3 p.m. third Monday in the Lake
room. Call Dee Peters, 634-0608.
Heart-Healthy Eating
Will not meet in August. Call
344-6513.
Ostomy Support
2 p.m. third Sunday in the
Cypress room. Call Bob at 746-
6693, Betty at 726-3802, Elizabeth
at (352) 489-6166 or Frank at 341-
0005.
Pain Management
Will not meet in August. Call Dr.
Ruben's office, 746-1358.
Prostate Cancer Support
ACS program meets at 11:30
a.m. first Wednesday at the Allen
Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call
527-0106.


TimberRidge: Full-service emergency care.

Munroe Regional excellence.

~ __ i When time matters most,
TimberRidge is there-with the
same high-quality emergency care
f g ~ you receive at Munroe Regional.
This full-service, free-standing,

emergency center is staffed by a team of board-certified emergency
medical specialists, available every day, around the clock. And
because of our convenient location, there is almost no wait time for
treatment. To learn more about TimberRidge emergency care, plus
our lab, radiology, pre-admission testing and imaging center services,
visit us at www.MunroeRegional.com or call (352) 351-7500.



.' "
Across fromWal-Mart M "rc.r .:"" kR5
on Hwy. 200, near the W ,. R UMu roe
intersection of Hwy. i84 . Regional
r' .. ......i -Medical Center
r,.Lt',4i .d
--------i____i-^----l-^^---__K --^KH ----I^K--^ K **MJ^i---Kiillil~li--o--M--,,


CRYSTAL RIVER PRIMARY CARE
Don Pritchard, MD
Internal Medicine
Christopher Cole, PA-C
Physician Assistant-Certified

(352) 564-2077 Fax: 564-2042
9030 W. Fort Island Trail #3 Crystal River, FL 34429


tIlAu ri!


CraRUs CouNT' (FL) CIIRONICaI.









CrrlTs COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICLF


TUESDAY EVENING JULY 26, 2005 A: Adelphia,Citrus B: Bright House D: Adelphia,Dunnellon 1: Adelphia, Inglis
A B D I 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
NWESH9I News 997 NBC News Ent. Tonight Access Average Joe: The Joes I Want to Be a Hilton (N) Law & Order: Special News Tonight
NBC 19 19 19 1 ____ _____Hollywood Strike Back'PG' X 9775 'PG' c 9539 Victims Unit '14'2626 4397997 Show
LWEDUI BBC World Business The NewsHour With Jim Florida Teacher of the Nova "Nova Wide Angle "Border P.O.V.'The Self-Made
PBS B 3 3 News 'G' Rpt. Lehrer B[ 9751 Year Awards scienceNOW" (N) 'G' Jumpers" I9 9152 Man" (N) 'PG' M 25959
LWUFT1 BBC News Business The NewsHour With Jim Florida Teacher of the Nova "Nova Wide Angle "Border Being Tavis Smiley
PBS 0 5 5 5 5 3539 Rpt. ___ Lehrer (N) 48201 Year Awards scienceNOW" (N) 'G' Jumpers" I9 47572 Served 50171
WFL 8 8 8 News 6249 NBC News Ent. Tonight Extra (N) Average Joe: The Joes I Want to Be a Hilton (N) Law & Order: Special News Tonight
NBC 8 8 8 8 'PG' [] Strike Back (N) 'PG' 'PG' E] 60423 Victims Unit '14' 63510 9937046 Show
WFTVl News [] ABC WId Jeopardy! Wheel of My Wife and George According to Rodney Empire (N) '14, V' [ News Nightline
ABC G 20 20 20 20 9355 News 'G' I 8510 Fortune 'G' Kids 'PG, D' Lopez 'PG, Jim'PG' 'PG, D,L 90688 1702152 90458775
WTSPi News 7997 CBS Wheel of Jeopardy! NCIS "Vanished" (In Big Brother 6 (N) (In Rock Star: INXS (N) (In News Late Show
CBS 10 10 10 10 1IEvening Fortune 'G' 'G' M7133 Stereo) 'PG, L' 9 43797 Stereo) M 11171 Stereo) 9 81930 1700794
(WTVT) News Bc 82220 A Current King of the Trading Spouses: Meet House "Poison" '14, L' cc News c9 43794 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H
FOX 113 13_ Affair 'PG' Hill 'PG, L' Your New Mommy 'PG, L' 40607 'PG' 11666 'PG' 45143
WCJB) News 23317 ABC WId Ent. Tonight Inside My Wife and George According to Rodney Empire (N) '14, V' BB News Nightline
ABC 1B H JNews Edition Kids 'PG, D' Lopez 'PG, Jim 'PG' 'PG, DL' 43336 4521607 76341881
LWCLF Richard and Lindsay Kenneth Fresh Rejoice in the Lord 'G' Life Today Bay Focus The 700 Club (N) 9] Turning Point 5686978
IND 2 2 2 2 Roberts 'G' 9119539 Hagin Jr. Manna 9336046 'G' 6169152 9114084 9359997
WFTS News 74143 ABC WId Access The Insider My Wife and George According to Rodney Empire (N) '14, V' c News Nightline
ABC 11 11 News Hollywood 21997 Kids 'PG, D' Lopez 'PG, Jim 'PG' 'PG, D,L' 32268 7257125 13006539
wM R Will & Grace Will & Grace The Nanny Just Shoot Movie: "Deadly Heroes" (1993, Suspense) Fear Factor (In Stereo) The Nanny Cheers 'PG'
IND 12 12 12 12 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'70978 Me'PG' Michael Pare, Billy Drago. 59959 'PG' c 61794 'PG'47626 44713
(wTTA 6 i Yes, Dear Every- Every- Seinfeld Gilmore Girls "Emily Says Gilmore Girls (In Stereo) News 5304171 Seinfeld Yes, Dear
ND 6 6 6 6 'PG, L' Raymond Raymond 'PG' Hello" 'PG' 5381220 'PG, D,L' c 5301084 'PG' 'PG'
WTGj 4 4 The Malcolm in The Friends 'PG' One on One All of Us Girlfriends Half & Half The King of The King of Friends 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
IND 4 4 4 4 impsons the Middle i Simpsons c 5355 'PG' 1626 'PG' 'PG'24171 'PG, D' Queens Queens 11648 45125
AWE Patchwork Marketplace County Sport Talk Live 852336 Winner's Inside Mello-Art Circuit Court Lifelong Medically Connect
FAM 16 16 16 16 11713 Live Court Circle Business 90189 Learning Speaking Zone
(WOGX) Friends 'PG' That '70s King of the The Trading Spouses: Meet House "Poison" '14, L' c News (In Stereo) I9 A Current Malcolm in
FOX 13 13 [K] 4423 Show'PG, Hill 'PG, L' Simpsons Your New Mommy 'PG, L' 15997 18084 Affair (N) the Middle
fWACX1 Variety 8607 The 700 Club 'PG' [ Bishop T.D. The Power Manna-Fest This Is Your Rod Trusty Praise the Lord Nc 20317
IND 21 21 2 1245751 Jakes of Praise 'G'2317 Day'G' 20881_____
WVEA( Noticias 62 Noticiero Inocente de Ti 740133 Apuesta por un Amor La Madrastra 746317 Casos de la Vida Real: Noticias 62 Noticiero
UNI 15 15 15 15 498133 Univision 'PG'759881 Edici6n Especial 134666 Univision
WxPX] Shop 'Til On the MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field Early Edition "Fatal It's a Paid
PAX 17 You Drop Cover 'G' in St. Petersbur Fla. (Live) 233607 Edition" 'PG' 81510 Miracle 'G' Proaram
&E 54 48 54 54 City Confidential 'PG' c American Justice "In the Cold Case Files '14' B9 Bounty Bounty Inked'PG, Inked'PG, Criss Angel Criss Angel
934084 Hands of a Child" 'PG' 667775 Hunter Hunter L' 294978 L' 203626
A 5564 55 55 Movie: **'4 "Indecent Proposal" (1993) Robert Movie: **u "Office Space" (1999) Movie: *** "Airplane!" (1980, Comedy) Robert "Office
A I 4 I 5 Redford, Demi Moore. ] 256930 Ron Livingston. 3812688 Hays, Julie Hagerty. c] 68604152 Space"
S 5235 52 52 The Crocodile Hunter The Most Extreme Dog Show "Eukanuba Tournament of Champions 2005" Dogs from around the Dog Show: Tournament
52 _35 Diaries 'G' 9 9111997 "Swarms" 'G' 9352084 country compete in Harrisburg, Pa. 'G' 2589930 of Champions
RA 77 The West Wing 'PG' c The West Wing "College Situation: Comedy (N) Situation: Comedy (N) Queer Eye for the Situation: Comedy 'PG'
S 918572 Kids" 'PG' 566133. 'PG' cc 575881 'PG' c9 562317 Straight Guy '14' 565404 9c 294539
CC 27612727 Mad TV David Boreanaz, Com.- Reno911l Daily Show Premium Reno911! South Park Reno 911! Stella (N) Daily Show Daily Show
I 1 ncubus. '14, D,L' 17510 Presents '14'93317 Blend'PG' '14'44539 'MA' 29355 (N)'14' 'PG'93442
CMT] 98 45 98 98 Cowboy U 20084 Dukes of Hazzard "Big Cowboy U 'Texas" 53775 Greatest Cowboy Songs Inside Fame (In Stereo) Dukes of Hazzard
_ Brothers, Duke" 77355 73539 76626 "Farewell, Hazzard"
IEIT 95 60 60 nSaturday Night Live (In El News (N) Gastineau NASCAR: Life in theFast Lane: The E! True Good Girls The Soup Party at the Howard
I_ 95 60 60 Stereo) '14' cc 885828 'PG' 775794 Girls 'PG, L' Hollywood Story (In Stereo) '14' cc 755065 Gone Bad 'PG' 357572 Palms Stern '14,
I N 96 65 96 96 Suffering Catholic Daily Mass: Our Lady of Mother Angelica Live Religious The Holy Threshold of Hope 'G' Fr. Rutler Sacraments
God Church the Angels 8039607 Classic Episodes Catalogue Rosary 8038978 1755626
FAM 29 52 29 29 7th Heaven "Lost Souls" Smallville "Delete" (In Movie: "Pizza My Heart" (2005, Romance) Shiri Whose Whose The 700 Club 'PG' ca
'G' [] 190688 Stereo) '14, V' BB 731959 Appleby, Michael Badalucco. 'PG' I9 744423 Line? Line? 452065 .
S) 30 60 30 30 "Darkness King of the King of the Movie: * "Lethal Weapon 4" (1998, Action) Mel Gibson, Rescue Me "Reunion" (N) Rescue Me "Reunion"
Falls" Hill 'PG' c9 Hill 'PG, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci. 7776336 'MA' 8045268 'MA' 2981607
GItV 23O K57 23 23 Weekend Landscaper Curb Appeal House Designed to Get Color Decorating Mission: Designers' Designers' Design on a Painted
i 23 57 23 23 Warriors'G' s 'G' Hunters'G' Sell 3719607 Cents Orqnz Challenge Challenge Dime House
T 51 25 51 51 Organized Crime: A Modern Marvels Jet truck. Wild West Tech Shootout! "Guadalcanal" Modern Marvels'G'B Breaking Vegas "Slot
World Histor 'PG' 'G' cc 8044539 1"Massacre Tech" 'PG, V' 'PG' c9 8033423 8036510 Scoundrel" 'PG' 2989249
24 3bS 24 24 Golden Girls Golden Girls Movie: "Fatal Reunion" (2005, Suspense) Erika Movie: *** "Out of Sight" (1998, Drama) George Clooney, Golden Girls
fi_ 24 3 2 24Eleniak, David Millbern. '14, L,V' cc 469355 Jennifer Lopez. Premiere. 2 6282681
NICK 28 36 28 28 Amanda Ned's Fairly Jimmy SpongeBob Ned's Fresh Fatherhood Fresh Fresh Fresh Fresh
School Oddparents Neutron [ School Prince 'G' Prince Prince Prince Prince
IF 31 59 31 31 Stargate SG-1 'The Nox" Movie: *u "Dinocroc" (2004, Suspense) Costas Movie: ***' "Jurassic Park" (1993) Sam Neill, Laura Dern. Cloned
'PG, L,V' [] 8641930 Mandylor, Bruce Weitz. '14, L,V' cc 1813161 dinosaurs run amok at an island amusement park. cc 5746775
SPiKE 37 43 37 37 World's Wildest Police CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Movie: *** "You Only Live Twice" (1967, Adventure) Sean Connery.
Videos 'PG' c] 307442 Investigation 'PG, V' Investigation 'PG, V' James Bond pursues missing space capsules. c9 857404
49 23 49 49 Seinfeld Seinfeld Every- Every- Friends 'PG' Friends '14, Sex and the Sex and the Friends 'PG' Friends '14' Movie: "Domestic
I 49 23 49 49 'PG, DS' PG'869171 Raymond Raymond' 120794 S'109201 City'14, City'14, 6300626 3039317 Disturbance" 84380133
53___ Movie: * "The Strange Love of Martha Movie: **' "Song of the Thin Movie: ** u "The Thin Man Goes * "Shadow of the
TCM Ivers" (1946) Barbara Stanwyck. 5399249 Man" (1947, Mystery) 4481046 Home" (1944) cc 1837626 Thin Man" 87950862
S53 34 53 53 Monster Garage 'PG' B9 American Chopper Deadliest Catch "Lady Dirty Jobs Garbage man. Gut Busters 'PG' BB Deadliest Catch "Lady
916688 "Firebike 2" 'PG' 663959 Luck" 'PG' 672607 (N) '14' 685171 655930 Luck" 'PG' 285355
(T ) 50 46 50 50 Clean Sweep 'G' BB In a Fix 'PG, L' cc 939853 Rides Jay Leno finds a Overhaulin' Thanking a Miami Ink "Never Forget" Rides Jay Leno finds a
392510 treasure. (N) 'G' 738751 kidney donor. 'G' 633107 (N) 'PG' 483684 treasure. 'G' 645249
48 33 48 48 Charmed "From Fear to Law & Order "DNR"'14, Law & Order Law & Order "Asterisk" Law & Order "Vaya Con The Closer 'You Are
48334848 Eternity" 'PG, V' 390152 L' E (DVS) 833125 "Possession" '14' 538733 (In Stereo) '14'433189 Dios" '14' 283666 Here" '14' 636591
TRA 4 9 9 Hot Dog Heavens 'PG' World's Best Bathrooms Taste of Taste of Made in Made in Top Ten Monster Trucks Taste of Taste of
I9 8597404 'G' c9 6641355 America America America America 'PG' BB 6640626 America America
SA 47 32 747 7 Movie: *s "American Pie 2" (2001) Jason Law & Order: Special Movie: "In Hell" (2003) Jean-Claude Van Law & Order: Special
Biggs, Shannon Elizabeth. 9 200404 Victims Unit '14' 201133 Damme, Lawrence Taylor. cc 204220 Victims Unit '14' 890201
Home Will & Grace Will & Grace Home MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Chicago Cubs. From Wrigley Field in WGN News Becker'PG,
E_28 1 I improvement 'PG' 'PG' Improvemen Chicago. (In Stereo Live) cc 400510 L'565539

TUESDAY EVENING JULY 26, 2005 A: Adelphia,Citrus B: Bright House D: Adelphia,Dunnellon I:Adelphia, Inglis
A B D T 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

46 40 46 46 Lizzie Sister, That's So That's So Movie: ** "Snow Dogs"(2002, Comedy) Cuba Buzzon Sister, That's So That's So
McGuire 'G' Sister 'G' Raven 'G' Raven 'G' Gooding Jr., James Coburn. [W 588355 Maggie'G' Sister'G' Raven 'G' Raven 'G'
68 M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Walker, Texas Ranger Walker, Texas Ranger Movie: "Back to You and Me" (2005, Drama) Lisa M*A*S*H M*A*S*H
68 'PG' 'PG' '14' M 9345794 '14, V' [ 9354442 Hartman Black, Dale Midkiff. 'PG' c9 9324201 'PG' 'PG'
Movie: ** "You Got Bill Russell: My Life, My Movie: "Anacondas: The Hunt for Chocolate Real Sports (N) (In Ask Dr. Baden: An
SServed"48684292 Way 'PG' 9 915733. the Blood Orchid" (2004) 3810220 Fact. Stereo) 'PG' [I 365274 Autopsy Special 'MA'
Movie: ** "Starsky & Hutch" Movie: **' "Man on Fire" (2004) Denzel Washington. A Movie: ** "Kiss the Girls" (1997) Morgan
m1(2004) Ben Stiller. 29286317 bodyguard takes revenge on a girl's kidnappers. 986794 Freeman, Ashley Judd. (In Stereo) 90 761369
Em 97 66 97 97 VMA Nominee Videos (In Direct Effect (In Stereo) MTV's the MTV's the The Real The Real The Real MTV's the Laguna Beach: The Real
) 9766 97 Stered) 181930 'PG' 722201 '70s House '70s House World '14' World '14' World (N) '70s House Orange County '14'
71 Dogs With Dogs With Expeditions to the Edge Seconds From Disaster Seconds From Disaster Seconds From Disaster Seconds From Disaster
Jobs'G' Jobs 'G' G' 5943442 'PG' 5929862 (N) 'PG' 5949626 'PG'5942713 'PG' 6174171
LLEX 62 Declarations of War '14' Movie: **' "Lost in Yonkers" (1993, Comedy- Movie: **' "The Port of Last Movie: ** "A Home of Our Own"
S 62 9 65026713 Drama) Richard Dreyfuss. c] 1002152 Resort" (1999) 'PG' B[ 4504997 (1993) Kathy Bates. 3867997

S 43 42 4343 Mad Money 9526423 Late Night With Conan The Contender (In Mad Money 8869171 The Big Idea With Donny The Contender (In
43 42 43 43O'Brien '14' B 8847959 Stereo) 'PG' c9 8856607 Deutsch Stereo) 'PG' 9 7764862
CN 40 29 40 40 Lou Dobbs Tonight c9 Anderson Cooper 360 cc Paula Zahn Now cc Larry King Live c9 NewsNight With Aaron Lou Dobbs Tonight
550046 207317 216065 296201 Brown 1c 206688 805133
25 55 25 25 NYPD Blue 'The Final Cops '14, V' Cops '14' The Investigators Rikers Forensic Forensic Mastermind The Psychic Psychic
2555 2525Adjustment" 'MA' 9511591 3549978 4731341 Island. '14' 8841775 Files '14' Files 'PG' s 'PG, V' Takedown Detectives Detectives
CsP 39 50 39 39 House of Representatives 6255648 Prime Time Public Affairs 970626 Prime Time Public Affairs
I961978
S 44 37 44 44 Special Report (Live) cc The Fox Report With The O'Reilly Factor (Live) Hannity & Colmes (Live) On the Record With The O'Reilly Factor
8676626 Shepard Smith c 9 9 9995978 c9 9908442 Greta Van Susteren 3813341
MSC 42 41 42 42 The Abrams Report Hardball c9 9982404 Countdown With Keith The Situation With Tucker Scarborough Country Hardball c9 7213107
8649572 Olbermann 9991152 Carlson 9981775

E 33 27 33 33 SportsCenter (Live) c9 2005 World Series of 2005 World Series of 2005 World Series of Tilt '14' cc 165256 SportsCenter (Live) cc
387152 Poker cc 715715 Poker cc 410323 Poker c9 315779 623591
34 28 34 34 2005 World Series of 2005 World Series of Boxing Tuesday Night Fights. From Memphis, Tenn. WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at Phoenix
34PN2 283 4 Poker c9 8513442 Poker cc 6634065 (Live) c9 6614201 Mercury. (Live) [9 7740607
3 5 39 35 35 The Sports Marlins on MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Florida Marlins. From Dolphins Stadium in The Sports Basketball BDSSP Presents: Las
List Deck (Live) Miami. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) 329171 List Vegas Prep Championship. 489648
(cln 36 31 Sports Talk Live 33510 Travel and 32 Xtreem NASCAR Racing 1990 Daytona 500. 972084 Sports Talk Live 79959
suN 36 31 Sports Talk Live 33510 Travelfand183713 p Talk Live179959

T he PlusCode number printed next to each pro- PlusCode number. cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys- If you have cable service, please make sure that the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
tern. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea- your cable channel numbers are the same as the procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
ture (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR), channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys-
all you need to do to record a program is enter its perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the tern, please contact your VCR manufacturer.
The channel lineup for LB Cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.



Co-worker bothered by suspicions of affair


ear Annie: I work in an office of you are reluctant to do nothing while a
about 100. About six months ago, co-worker self-destructs. Does Beth
two co-workers (male and have a friend at the office who would
female) began arriving at work early, feel comfortable telling her that she is
together, walking each other to their jeopardizing her job as well as her mar-
offices and hanging out Both of them riage? If not, you might warn her, as a
are married to others. professional courtesy, that
At first, their actions the higher-ups in the office
weren't noticeable, but now, are beginning to notice her
more and more people are behavior and she might want
talking about the obviously to be more discreet If she
close "friendship" between resents your interference,
these two. The female co- .. back off.
worker, "Beth," has started ... Dear Annie: I am a 55-
dressing differently and now year-old woman in my first
acts like she is Miss Con- serious relationship since
geniality. Before, she was my marriage ended 10 years
kind of shy and reserved. ago. "Jim" and I see each
I'm not a close friend to i other as often as we can,
either of them, but I do -1 given that we live 80 miles
believe this is not normal apart. The problem? After
behavior for Beth. She's al- MAILBOX knowing him for eight
ways bragged about what a masculine months, I am falling in love. Jim, how-
husband she has and how she is so lucky ever, is newly divorced after more than
to be married to him. Yet, in my opinion, 30 years of marriage. He says we should
she is putting her marriage at risk by wait and see where it goes.
carrying on with this male co-worker We are very close and talk on the
I know it's really none of my business, phone and e-mail several times a day. I
but I want her to consider how her say that if he wants a more casual rela-
actions appear to others. Office gossip tionship, he should not be showering
can take down even the most innocent me with gifts, taking me on expensive
person. Many people know Beth's hus- trips and paying so much positive atten-
band, and I'm afraid it's only a matter of tion to me.
time before he finds out. What should I It's been a long time since I've had a
do? Worried Co-worker boyfriend, and I'm inexperienced. Do I
Dear Worried: You're right it's just hang in there? Can a man really not
none of your business, but obviously, know whether or not he's in love after


eight months? I feel like my heart is at
risk, and I'm tempted to turn and run
before the pain is unbearable. The joy
of falling in love has been taken away as
I monitor my feelings to match his. Am I
just crazy? Just Wondering
Dear Wondering: No, your feelings are
perfectly understandable, but you must
realize that Jim is a little skittish about
making a commitment after a recent
divorce. He wants to be sure you aren't
his "rebound" relationship. Create a lit-
tle more space by keeping what you have
but maintaining a casual attitude about
the future. This will allow Jim to listen to
his heart without pressure.
Dear Annie: My beloved mother
recently passed away My family has
been overwhelmed with a generous out-
pouring of sympathy, including plants,
notes and contributions. I have written
nearly 160 letters of thanks.
While all these expressions of caring
have been deeply appreciated, no one
has offered to do the one thing we
would like most: invite us over for a
meal, dessert or a cup of coffee. This is
what a bereaved family could really
use, especially when the funeral is long
over and the family feels a great void in
their lives. Personal contact would be
priceless at this time. Upper St Clair,
Pa.
Dear Pa.: People often don't realize
that such invitations are welcome.
Thanks for making it clear. Our condo-
lences.


Local RADIO


WJUF-FM 90.1
WHGN-FM 91.9
WXCV-FM 95.3
WXOF-FM 96.3


National Public Radio
Religious
Adult Contemporary
Adult Mix


WRGO-FM 102.7
WIFL-FM 104.3
WGUL-FM 106.3
WRZN-AM 720


Oldies
Adult Mix
Oldies
Adult Standards


Bridge


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

In the stock market, you hope to
buy low and sell higher. At the
bridge table, sometimes we must
make a small investment, paying
up one trick to get two in return -
as in this deal. You are South, the
declarer in four hearts. West leads
the spade jack: queen, ace, five.
East shifts to the diamond queen,
which you take with your ace. How
would you continue?
.South might have opened two
clubs. Although one doesn't often
make this bid with only 18 high-
card points, this hand has nine
winners (six hearts, one diamond
and two clubs) and defensive
tricks. Not that it would happen
here, but the risk in starting with
two clubs is that the opponents
compete and have the auction at
four spades before it gets back to
South.
One option is to cash the two top
trumps. If the queen drops, you
are home. But if the queen doesn't
fall, you will surely lose one trick
in each suit.
It is better to accept the loss of
one trump trick in order to guar-
antee one spade trick and no club
loser. So, at trick three, lead a low
heart toward the dummy. It is pos-


ACROSS
1 Vain fellow
4 Golfers' org.
7 Night flyers
11 Singer
Grant
12 Desertlike
14 Chits
15 Damage
superficially
16 Like it was
17 Helped a
borrower
18 Constructs
20 Curves
22 Dinny's rider
23 Miners dig it
24 Impaneled one
27 Rico
30 Primates
31 Pivot
32 Chinese
dynasty
34 Feminine principle
35 Gets stuck
36 Left, at sea
37 String of rosaries
39 Melted snow


West
A J 10 9 6
SQ5 4
* K 10 7
J 9 3


North
A KQ 7
V J9


8 6 3 2
8 7 5 2
East
6 A 8 4 3 2
S7
SQJ 9 4
Q 10 6
uth
5
A K 10 8 6 3 2
A 5
AK 4


Soe
A
V
4



Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
1 V Pass 1 NT Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: A J

sible that West will play low, letting
you win with the heart nine, cash
the spade king, discarding a
minor-suit loser, draw trumps, and
collect an overtrick. But even if
West does rise with his heart
queen, then cash the diamond
king, and plays another diamond,
you ruff and, lead a heart to the
board's jack, gaining access to the
spade king. You gather one spade,
six hearts, one diamond and two
clubs.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
BU GP PARECAD
ETAISEUCLA ENE
L IIOINELOAF DNA
AL LAIYISLEAF
ZIAE CPA
yS E Z F R S SA T
C NN CR W OILL A
TYCIONU SE D
USM K MIT
SHDNOBLE R
UU URGE IAGO0
RL RIPE DI AN
LA 0OSS DDSQ


Fontanne's
husband
Sound-
barrier breakers
Roundabout
ways


J4 PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in
8"Random House Crossword MeqaOmnibus" Vols. 1 & 2.


2005 by NEA, Inc.


19 Talks fondly
21 Small bird
24 Leno
of late night
25 Go--
smoke
26 Gambler's
town
27 Fierce feline
28 You,once
29 Skiff movers
31 OPEC carriers
33 degree
35 Thicken,
as pudding
36 Appeal
38 Treacherous
ones
39 Makes
coleslaw
41 Play the guitar
42 Carvey
of "Wayne's
World"
43 Seine alts
44 Overly docile
46 The brass,
for short
47 Sit for
a portrait
48 Epic
51 Crack pilot


4


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I MURYM I


Sv Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SNORT TANGY DECODE MOHAIR
I Answer: When he won the poker tournament, he
knew it was IN THE CARDS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals T


"ECHYJ HR BFLV KUA ELK.

XLIAJ HR BFLV KUA ZJV."

- BLCCJT SAN NJ V V

"LTKVFHTZ BUCVF FLXHTZ FLR

HVR ECHYJ." DULT MHMHUT
PREVIOUS SOLUTION "I hope all this won't change me; I would like to stay
the same as I've always been." Grand Slam winner Rafael Nadal
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 7-26


40 Sort
41 That woman
42 Facial feature
45 Hikes
49 Nautical
position
50 Not plentiful
52 Region of India
53 "Faint heart -
won ..."
54 Low-drifting
clouds
55 Flavor enhancer
56 Tries to
find out
57 911 responder
58 Drink with
scones
DOWN


Renown
- Khayyam
Fiery heap
Clergy member
Take hold of
Point a weapon
Slicker
Misfortunes


-


6C TLIISDAY, JUI.Y 26, 2005


ENTERTAINMENT


07-26-05


0-









ITuESI)AY, JU.Y 26, 2005 7C


Cathy


WE'RE INSArE TO
P'A TH15/I UCH FOR,
THI5 HOUSE!
INSANEf!!



pnl-


SOMEONE ELSE OFFERED"
THE 5AME AMOUNT
SRIAHT AFTER i 010.
O fWERE NMOT
E5NEv? (


'-. Loser


Kit


Rubes


BECAUSE IF I OON'T, YOU'LL HAVE OKAY, LET'S START AT THE TOP 01
STO SPENO LONG HOURS HELPING THE LIST! A5ERCROM81E
ME INSTEAD OF RELAXING AND CATERING..._r-;'
J EATING WITH OUR GUESTS C -


the The Fanil- .-


"Please, Doc, you needn't remind me again
that my hour's almost up. In case
you forgot, I'm the one who's chronically
obsessed with punctuality."


7-1-
DiM. Kg F Sym
www.familycircus.com

"Can too! I can get a wish
at a wishing well!"


Y4q, 7 KNOW.
eAWIN'HI/SNICK-
NA44-IA7.Y
/


0 0 0 C) 0


Frank &


Big Nate


1ToWay's'.*
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness "The Devil's Rejects" (R)
Box Office 637-3377 12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
"Bad News Bears" (PG-13) 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:15 p.m., "The Island" (PG-13) 12:30
10 p.m. Digital. p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20
"Charlie & the Chocolate p.m. Digital.
Factory" (PG) 12:20 p.m., 3:30 "Charlie & the Chocolate
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Factory" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 12:40
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13) p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.; 7 p.m.,
12:40 p.m., 3:45, 7:10, 9:45 p.m. 7:30 p.m., 9:45 p.m. Digital.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) "Wedding Crashers" (R)
12:50 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 12:15 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. 10:25 p.m. Digital.
"Wedding Crashers" (R) "Fantastic Four" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:40, 7:05, 9:55 p.m. 12:35 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G) 9:50 p.m. Digital.
12:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m. "War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
"Dark Water" (PG-13) 7:05 Noon, 4:10 p.m., 7, 9:40 p.m.
p.m., 9:45 p.m. "Batman Begins" (PG-13)
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Bad News Bears" (PG-13) "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-
12:25 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 13) 12:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20
9:55 p.m. Digital. p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Times subject to change; call ahead.


* :-., and Janis


. A L. "i- '_.


Your Birthday: Give full expression to your creative
juices in the year ahead, because your bright ideas
could easily lead you to a larger bank account.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Situations that you per-
sonally take an interest in and direct have excellent
chances for success today.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be alert for opportuni-
ties you could take advantage of today. Prospects for
gains from other than your usual sources are good.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If a successful friend
wants to talk to you about something new he or she has
been considering getting involved in, give your friend
your full attention. There could be something worth-
while in it for you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Set meaningful objec-
tives for yourself today and don't waste this valuable
achievement cycle you're in.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Things you cannot
accomplish solely on your own can be achieved today
if you will first take the time to find some competent
assistance. Don't hesitate to ask a good friend for help.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) When it comes to
commercial dealings today, you must be determined
and exact regarding your terms.


Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) There's no need to
feel intimidated today should you be required to make
some important decisions. Your judgment pertaining to
critical issues is exceptionally keen at this time.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) The pieces could all
come together today regarding a matter which you've
been hoping would produce a profit. Try to get every-
thing cleared up and finalizedas promptly as possible.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't even think about
playing a subordinate role today in a situation that
needs a capable manager who is far sighted and firm.
Your leadership qualities fit that bill quite well.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Someone is going to
come to your aid today and do some manipulating from
behind the scenes in order to help you resolve what
has been a sticky situation.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Attending a social
function and socializing with the participants in the mid-
dle of your workweek won't be a waste of time for you
today. The business contacts will prove helpful.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) You could be far luck-
ier today in financial or career matters than you will be
tomorrow, so take maximum advantage of these favor-
able conditions now.


Doonesbury


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIC(I.I-


COMICS









8C TUESi)DAY, JULY 26, 2005


Serving all of Citrus County, including Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosassa Springs, Sugarmill Woods,
Floral City, Citrus Springs, Ozello, Inglis, Hernando, Citrus Hills, Chassahowitzka, Holder, Lecanto and Yankeetown.



InenssOfc
M eadowcrest Offce 106 W. MainSt.,. nensIL3 4


- 563-5966




726-1441

Outside of Citrus County or Citrus Springs call:


1-888-852-2340


DEADLINES 1II 'IiJ ~41


Sunday Issue................ 5pm Friday
Sunday Real Estate.......... 3pm Friday
Monday Issue...........5:30 pm Friday
Tuesday Issue................1pm Monday
Wednesday Issue.......... 1pm Tuesday
Thursday Issue........ 1pm AWednesday
Friday Issue................. 1 pm Thursday
Saturday Issue................. pm Friday


6 Lines for 10 Days!
2 items totaling

1 150...................$550

$151 400............. 050

'401 '800................1550
$801 $1,500..........$2050
Restrictions apply. Offer applies to private parties only.


11 --RRRS j


Be sure to check your advertisement the
first day it appears. We cannot be
responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion. Adjustments are made only
for the portion of the ad that is in error.



, Advertisements may be canceled as
soon as results are obtained. You will be
billed o~ly for the dates the ad actually
appears in the paper, except for specials.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same
as the deadlines for placing ads.


SPEClNTCSl0206lP llE


h*MI 0 Ju i M O1ROIi


ACTIVE, RETIRED
gentleman, 57,6'2",
1901bs, non-smoker,
boater, enjoyer of life-
seeking to hear from
witty, charming gal
who also enjoys life.
Hope you call soon,
(352) 795-4504
HOOKING UP!
W.M. financially secure
would like to get
acquainted online with
slim under 40 girl who Is
bored and wants more
? Send me info. about
you with e-mail or
phone #, and I will
respond. Blind Box
862-M, c/o Chronicle,
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
LETS SMELL THE
ROSES TOGETHER!
Seeking attractive Lady
40-55 who enjoys dining
out & weekend trips out
of town. Looking to
share quality times
together & wants the
nicer things in life.
Call 228-1579
SINGLE BLACK MALE
50, own 4 bedroom,
pool home in Beverly
Hills, by himself, looking
for soul mate, 35-47,
female. New in the
state. Enjoy walking
on the beach,
movies, travel, etc.
Call (352) 746-1659
Single Male, in my
40's looking for old
fashion girl, under 50,
who's thin to med built.
Enjoys the outdoors
and is looking for some-
one to share life with.
PJ (305) 984-2986
SWM SEEKS SWF slender
build, 30-40 Please call
(352) 812-1890
SWM, 60, seeking SWF
50 to 65. Likes fishing &
Nascar races, quiet
nights &dining out.
Call and we will talk.
(352) 564-0214




** FREE SERVICE**
Cars/Trucks/Metal
Removed FREE. No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
CHIHUAHUA/MINI
PINSCHER
ULight brown,male,'very
sweet. (352) 621-3840


www.adopta
rescuedoet.com

Requested donations
are tax deductible
Cats
Kittens weeks gray
M&F sweet, social-
ized, ok with dogs
489-8966
Two adults F social
laop cats need new
homes due to family
circumstances -
Himalayan Lilac -
declawed & Siamese
exotic 527-9050
Gray tabby M 10 wks
socialized and cuddly
628-4200
Kittens to young
adults M&F various
colors all ready for
their special family
746-6186

Choc. Lab M 9yrs
great pet diabetic
on insulin retiree
home preferred
628-4200
German Shepherd
mix F young adult
great with kids, peo-
ple, dogs NO Cats
Pug mix F 18mos -
family pet playful
249-1029
Toy Poodle 3yr / M
sweet & playful Scot-
ty -Terrier mix F
18mos active Bichon
M handsome / adult
retirees 527-9050
Shlh-Tzu M 4yrs adult
home Dachshund
Black/Tan longhaired
M 1 yr no small chil-
dren 341-2436
Wanted poodles and
small dogs suitable for
seniors adoptive
homes available
527-9050
All pets are spayed /
neutered, cats tested
for leukemia/ailds,
dogs are tested for
heart worm and all
shots are current


I


COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message
FREE CATS, approx. 10
months old, need good
homes. (352) 341-2219
FREE
Dryer
(352) 422-5707
FREE HAMSTER
and glass cage
(352) 344-4279
FREE PUPPIES, Shit-zu,
Pomeranian &
Chihuahua mix To good
home (352) 344-5038
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, jet ski's,
3 wheelers, 628-2084
FREE TO GOOD HOME
2 female 6 month old
Pit mix puppies. Both
have all shots & are
housebroken. Good
with kids. PUREBRED RED
NOSE PIT BULL female,
6 months old, to good
home 7-wk old
American bull dog
puppy, male, to good
home. Please save us
all from the Pound
(352) 302-3492
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for1
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
is seekhig Donati of use-
dle
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
Vounteers are needed h the
Home Store.
Store hours are:
9am-Spm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
information.




Jack Russell Terrier
Large male, off Rock
Crusher Rd. Blue leash,
"Jake" REWARD. Please
call (352) 628-2770
LOST WEIMARANER
puppy, approx. 3 mos.
old, Wine & purple
color, vic. Old
Homosassa Fire Dept.
(352) 621-0484
THANK YOU Lord
and everyone who
helped find the missing
red toy poodle Gabby.




FOUND 4-6
MONTH OLD PUPPY
Area of Mustang Blvd
and Pine Ridge.
Call to identify.
(352) 527-2528
FOUND IN DERBY OAKS
area, English Bulldog.
Call (352) 302-4852


^i-I

SDivorces
i Bankruptcy
I *NameChange
Chii Support
SInverness 637.40221
SILL &RjuS 79B95-5999j

"MR CIUS COUNit











ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

*CHRONICLE-
INV. OFFICE
106 W. MAIN ST.
Courthouse Sq. next
to Angelo's Pizzeria
Mon-Frl 8:30a-5p
Clo unch
2pm-3pm


ATTRACTIVE SWF
seeking male
companion. Candl,
352-628-1036


-I

KID'S STUFF
PRE-SCHOOL
Is looking for qualified
teachers & Cook. Top
pty, Pd. holidays &
Vacs. Call Director
(352) 341-1559
SMALL WORLD
LEARNING CENTER
is accepting applica-
tions for cook, teacher
& teacher's aide. Apply
in person 243 NE 7th
Terr. Crystal River
TEACHER 2/yr. old
Full Time -CDAE Req.
Precious Cargo
(352) 628-3719




JOBS GALOREIII
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
OFFICE MANAGER
For Real Estate Office,
Fax Resume to:
(352) 489-0109
P/T RECEPTIONIST
Needed evening until
9pm & weekends,
$10. hr. Inverness
(352) 683-0186




IMMEDIATE
OPENING FOR A
PT BARBER
Call (352) 422-1058




EXPERIENCED
DOZER OPERATOR
Apply in person
2190 N Crede Ave,,
Crystal River 795-4357




11-7
RN/LPN
FULL-TIME

Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness EOE

3-11 & 11-7
Nurses

Avante at Inverness is
currently accepting
applications for full
and part time nurses
for 3-11 & 11-7 nurses.
Avante offers
excellent wages and
benefits including
shift differentials
andbonuses,
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness

BUSINESS OFFICE
COORDINATOR
Supervisor for all
phases of the
business office at
outpatient surgery
center. Must have
excellent
references and
experience In
medical billing,
collections or
scheduling. Must be
willing to learn and
supervise all activities
in Business Office.
Minimum of Associate
Degree In Business
preferred. FT with
great benefits and
opportunities.
Pleasant working
environment.
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827


C4 CAestamurant Tae
1mMedca C=Prfesioal itLougeSal 0'ls Hel

I II-aglc -, iSkl-


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656
IMMEDIATE OPENING

F/T NURSING/
BILUNG ASST

For Busy OB/GYN
Office.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 794-0877

MEDICAL
COLLECTIONS
CLERK
FT day shift position
with excellent
benefits In business
office at Outpatient
Surgery Center.
Must have
experience in
Medical Collections
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827

OPERATING
ROOM
REGISTERED NURSE
CIRCULATOR
Minimum df 2 years
experience.
Fast-paced,
Multi-speciality
Outpatient Surgery
Center. Excellent
hours, no calls, or
weekends.Very
pleasant working
environment. 2-FT
positions available
excellent benefits
and opportunities
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827

ORAL SURGERY
ASSISTANT
Surgical Assistant for
busy Oral Surgery
Office. We strive to
provide the best
quality of care w/
Integrity in a
caring atmosphere.
Looking for a
dedicated
professional person
to complete our
staff. Benefits include
Insurance &
retirement plan.
Send resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks. Dr.
(In Meadowcrest)
Crystal River, Fl 34429

X RAY TECH
Part time, for busy spine
practice. Tues, Thurs &
Fri. Please fax resume to
352-341-4477


A+ Healthcare
Home Health
Agency

Immediate Work

C.N.A's & HHA's
Day Hours
(352) 564-2700

AIDE
Nights. 40 hrs. Alzheimer
exp. Lifting required.
352-795-3117

CARDIOLOGY
PRACTICE

LPN
BCLS/ACLS Req,
salary based on exp.
MA
BCLS w/ Cardiology
office experience
FRONT OFFICE
Multi-tasking, exp. in
physicians office only.
FAX RESUME TO:
HR 352-795-4879

CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT
Exp. In collections,
billing, front desk &
physical therapy. PT,
31/2 days/wk. Fax a
complete resume to
352-795-0803

CNAs
3-11 & 11-7

Avante at Inverness
is currently
accepting
applications for
CNAs for 3-11 & 11-7
shifts. Avante offers
excellent pay for
years of experience
shift differential,
weekend differential,
bonuses for extra
shifts, excellent
benefits package for
fulltime employees.
Please apply In
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness, FL





CNAs
3-11/ 11-7
Fulltime opportunities
available for quality-
oriented caregiver.
We offer excellent
pay and benefits In a
mission driven
environment.
Please call
Hannah Mand, RN
at (352) 746-4434
or fax resume to
(352) 746-6081.
Or visit us at
3325 W. Jerwayne
Lane, Lecanto FL
34461. EOE

DOCTOR'S
ASSISTANT
Full-time, apply at:
Citrus Pulmonary,
5616W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy., Crystal River, FL
(352) 795-1999

Enjoy a wonderful
Dementia Care
Environmental

Nursing Assistants
needed for FT
All Shifts.
NEW Pay Scale with
Differentials.

$100 QUEST Bonus
Must have Dementia
Care Experience

Also some openings
for
*Nursing Assistant
TRAINING
Program.
*Clinical Nursing
Manager

Call Cottages of
Gentle Breeze
746-5626 or 489-5539
TODAY II

FULL TIME
LPN/MA
Needed for busy
Urology office.
Please fax resume to
R. Wardlow
352-527-8863 or mall
to P.O. Box 1420,
Lecanto, FL 34.460


BOOKKEEPER
FULL CHARGE
w/COMPUTERIZED
GL, AP, AR & PR EXP.
Construction exp. a
plus. great benefits.
Construction firm
Submit resume
PO Box 2832, Inverness,.
FL. 34450. EOE DFWP
FIELD CREW CHIEF/
COMPUTER
DRAFTSMAN
McKean & Associates
Surveyors, Inc., is
seeking a Field Crew
Chief and a Computer
Draftsperson.
Experienced only
need apply.
McKean & Associates
Surveyors,lnc.
Inverness, Florida
Fax (352) 344-8254
HIRING TEACHERS
& PART TIME HELP
IMMEDIATELY
Call Julie at
352-489-1933
For more info,
LICENSED 440/220
Great pay & benefits.
Send resume to
Blind Box 867M, c/o
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
NATURE COAST
LAND SURVEYING
Currently taking
applications for the
following positions:

*CADD TECH
*PARTY CHIEF
*INSTRUMENT
PERSON
*REGISTERED
LAND SURVEYOR
Fully paid health, dental
& life Insurances,
Retirement plan
1907 Highway 44 W.
Inverness, FL 34453
PH: 352-860-2626
FAX: 352-860-2650
ncls@tampabay.
rr.com
NEEDED 220
AGENT
For key position.
Commercial exp a plus.
Top Pay For the
Right Person.
Reply Blind Box 858-M,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main,
Inverness, FL 34450




RADTIENDERS I


*Cooks
*SERVERS
High volume
environment. Exp.
preferred. Positions
available In Inverness
& Dunnellon.
COACH'S Pub&Eatery
114 W. Main St., Inv.
11582 N. Williams St.,
Dunnellon EOE
COOK NEEDED
Fulltime and part-time.
Call for interview,
(352) 341-7771
Exp. Line Cook
& Wait Staff
Ixc. wages. Apply at:
CRACKERS
BAR & GRILL
Crystal River

O








FULL TIME
BREAKFAST/
LUNCH COOK
Apply at DECCA
at OAK RUN
7mi off 1-75 on SR 200,
applications
accepted
8am-12 noon,
Mon-Frl, call for more
Information
352-854-6557.
Decca is a Drug Free
Workplace.EOE
FULL TIME COOK
For busy, active kitch-
en, creativity a plusl
(352) 447-5572
or 447-4470, Inglls
HIRING ALL
POSITIONS
Apply within at
Peck's Old Port Cove
Ozello. Sea Craig,


HIRING COOKS
& MANAGER
TRAINEES
Benefits available
Huddle House
321 S. Hwy41
Inverness
LINE COOK
Flexible hours
experience With good
work ethic. Good pay
and benefits., 746-6855.
MORNING COOK
needed. Will train.
Cockadoodles Cafe
206 W. Tompins St.
Inverness
SERVERS
Apply at FISHERMAN'S
RESTAURANT, 12311
E. Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness 352-637-5888




$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackie
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON





















CLASIFIE
ADVRTIING


Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of'
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales &
designers to sell &
create advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
ads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume to
HR at:
352-564-2935



1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE
T* W *f If I


BADCOCK & MORE
seeking energetic,
self-motivated person
willing to learn all
facets of operations.
Apply in person
BADCOCK & MORE
Bushnell, FL

INSURANCE
AGENTS
Career Opp.15-20
leads per week.
Vested Renewal.
Bonus Trips
Diverse Product line
Serious Inquires only.
(352) 795-3355

MAJOR APPLIANCE
SALES HELP
Combination part time
and full time. Exp.
preferred. Call for
appointment 726-1911

SALES ASSOCIATE
Great Earning
Potential plus salary
& commission.
Fax resume to
(352) 628-7791
Or apply In person
American Homes
5240 S SUNCOAST
BLVD I

VILLAGE

Village Cadillac
Toyota/Scion is
starting a two week
AUTO SALES
TRAINING CLASS
AUGUST 1st, 2005
We offer:
Paid Training
Best Pay Plan in
area
Blue Cross/
Blue Shield
401K with employer
contribution
Paid Vacation
Dental Plan
Promotion from
within
No experience
necessary but you
must be well dressed,
Well groomed,
articulate, have
a great attitude
and work ethic.
Please apply in
person at:
Village Cadillac
Toyota/Scion
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
We are a Drug Free
Workplace


Phone Sales Help
Earn $1000 week easy
Mon.-Fri. 35 hrs.week.
Base pay + comm.
Call Note, 563-0314,
Cell 464-3613

SALES PEOPLE
NEEDED FOR
Lawn & Pest
Control
Prefer exp. in the pest
control industry.
2 wks paid training,
benefits, company
vehicle.
Apply in Person
Bray's Pest Control
3447 E Gulf to Lk. Hwy.
Inverness




$ $$$$$$ $$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!!

Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers, solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
Call Now
800-362-0159 24 hours
FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362
*AC INSTALLERS
*SERVICE TECHS
No whiners, I don't
supply cheese.
Call 352-564-8822

AUTO DETAILERS
Exp. HS Buffing. DL
& background check
Req. DFWP
Call 352-302-2863
BLOCK MASONS
TENDERS and
GENERAL LABORERS

Must have own
transportation and
.tools. (352) 302-8999
CARPET, VINYL,
CERAMIC &
LAMINATE
INSTALLERS.
Work yr round. 2 yrs
minimum experience
877-577-1277 Press 5


UITHRCOOOt S TTE TARIL

Sunday,

October 2, 2005
on the Withlacoochee


State Trail


AN EXP. FRAMER &
LABORERS NEEDED
(352) 637-3496
COMMERCIAL
CARPET HELPER
Willing to train. Must be
reliable & have own
transportation 400-1327
COURTESY TECH
Friendly smile
needed. Must have
valid drivers license.
Will train.Apply at:
Shell Rapid Lube
1050 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River
(352) 795-2333
CUSTOM
HOME BUILDER
seeking experienced
person to do warranty
work, punch out, and
work closely with
superintendents. Pay
based on experience.
Please fax resume to
352-746-5972
CUSTOM CABINET
BUILDER
Exp Only.
(352) 465-4263
DRIVERS

ClassA, B & D.
Required, Full irn.
Part Time. L:..: aI'
Long Distance.'
Home most
weekends.
Dicks Moving Inc..
(352) 621-1220
DRYWALL FINISHER
Must have tools &
transportation.
352-5630710, David
ELECTRICAL
ESTIMATOR/
PROJECT MANAGER
Action Electric
(352) 795-3285




Ele trc a s
IM E. HIRE
Reidnta
Rougs & *rims
Ex.preerd


11th


Annual


Rails to


Trails


Bike


tr Ride!

Start Time:
7:00 am 9:00am (No mass start)
Rain or Shine.
Location:
The ride will begin at the North Apopka
Avenue Trail Crossing in Inverness. Continental
Breakfast available, light lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Entry Fee:
$15 per rider up to 9/20/05. $20 per rider thereafter.
Children under 12 years of age must be
accompanied by an adult.






For more information or applications log onto:
www.railstotrailsonline.com
or call (352) 527-3263
or e-mail harnage@atlantic.net
- --- -NOTICE - - -
Thank you for participating in our Bike Rides In the past. This year, Suncoast
Bike Shop Is donating a bicycle to be given away as a door prize. Only pre-
registered riders are eligible to participate in the drawing for this door prize.
Therefore, we encourage you to sign up early. Again, our price is still $15 for the
ride If you pre-register before Sept. 20, 2005. We hope you will Join us this year
and enjoy a day of fun as well as support the betterment of the Withlacoochee
State. Tall. SIGN UP EARLY! C, "I1


CERTIFIED
LEGAL ASSISTANT
OR LAWYER

Estate planning, pro-
bate, legal research
and writing experience
required. Send resume
to: Blind Box 864-P,
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429

Citrus Hills
Construction

Due to our continued
growth, we
are seeking an
Administrator
for Our Cabinet
Department.
Experience
Would be an asset
with job training
Provided to the
proper applicant.
Excellent benefit
package.
Fax resume to
(352) 746-9117

Executive Vice
President
The Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce
Is searching for a new
Executive Vice Pres-
ident. Check the
chamber webslte for
a detailed job
description at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com
Send Resume to
Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce,
Executive Search
Committee, Blind Box
866 P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429


All ads require prepayment.









VISA


.j


I


11


CLASSIFIED


CrnUus COUN'IY (PL) CIIONIC.I


I


'd d


=










TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2005 9C


EXP. BUCKET
TRUCK DRIVER
For Tree Service. Good
Driving record
Great Pay w/ benefits.
Call (352) 637-0004

EXP. ROOFERS
& LABORERS
Must have own tools &
transport. Drug free
work place.
Call (352) 637-3677
EXP. ROOFERS.
METAL INSTALLERS
& REPAIRMAN

Top pay.
AAA ROOFING
563-0411 or
726-8917
EXPERIENCED
DUMP TRUCK &
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS

Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170
FIELD HELP NEEDED
For Surveying
Company. Exper
Preferred. Will Train.
(352) 563-0315

FLIGHT
INSTRUCTOR
CFII with 1000 Hrs
needed in Dunnellon
area, ATP a plus.
Salary commensurate
with experience.
Send Resumes to
Box 868M'
Citrus Chronicle
1624N Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429
EOE

FRAMERS
WANTED
(352) 307-0207
FRAMERS &
CARPENTERS
Must be dependable &
tools & ride a must.
352-279-1269.
FRAMERS/SUBS
NEEDED

Call 352-341-5673
or cell 407-709-2122
FRAMING
CARPENTERS &
HELPERS NEEDED

Transportation Req.
(352) 422-5518
FULL TIME
TRUCK DRIVERS
Dump Truck.
3-R'S Trucking
(352)-628-0923
GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
Willing to TrainI
Call:(352) 563-2977










IMMEDIATE OPENING

QUALIFIED
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIAN
MIn 2 yrs. Exp., Good
driving record req.
Insurance, paid Sick,
Holiday & Vacation
Apply In person
S&S ELECTRIC
S2692 W. Dunnellon Rd.
CR-(488) Dunnellon
746-6825
EOE/DFWP

J & E Concrete
S FINISHERS
& LABORERS
Needed, Top pay.
352-465-4239
LANDSCAPE
DESIGNER NEEDED
Must be able to create
Landscape drawing.
References required
(352) 621-1944
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Full Time laborer
wanted. Must have
S transportation to
S & from work.
,' (352) 860-0299


LAWN SERVICE
MANAGER
NEEDED
Looking for a proven
winner with sales and
lawn exp. Able to
diagnose turf &
ornamental
problems. Vehicle
provided. Good pay
and benefits. No
phone calls please.
Apply within
Brays Pest Control
3447 Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness, FI

MARINE
FORKLIFT
OPERATOR
Fulltime position. Prior
marine forklift exp
req'd, Competitive
pay w/benefit pkg.
Apply in person
Riverhaven Marina,
5296 S. Riverview Cir.
Homosassa 628-5545
MASON HELPERS
Exp'd and reliable.
Transportation req'd.
$10.50 hr. 352-302-9102
or 352-400-0274
MASONS
$18 hour, O/T $27 hour
Marion County
352-529-0305
Masons Needed
Top pay and benefits;
Immediate work
must have trans:
Call Todd
813-623-2996
METAL BUILDING
Erectors, Laborers
All phases pre-
engineered bldgs.
Local work. Good
starting salary. Paid
holidays & vacation.
Call Mon-Fri, 8-2,
toll free, 877-447-3632
MONACO COACH
CORPORATION
Service Center
Leading RV
manufacturer is
currently accepting
applications for skilled
automotive paint
and body repair
technicians at our
Wildwood location.
Previous experience
is required. Apply to:
Monaco Coach Corp.
4505 Monaco Way
Wildwood, FL 34785
Fax: 352-330-3852
EOE/DFWP
PLASTERERS NEEDED
Immediate opening.
Must have drivers
license. 18 yrs or older.
Days, (352) 220-8505
Eves. (352) 860-1502
Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed in Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

POST CLOSER

Experienced only,
for busy Title Co.
Fax resume to
(352) 637-4413
or 637-0340

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED

Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/ 2 years
driving exp. Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply. 24/6 shift.
Good Pay.
Long Hours.
Call 352-489-3100
Qualified Carpet &
Vinyl Installers

New construction.
Top dollar paid.
352-344-1500
SMALL ENGINE
MECHANIC
P/T, pay commensu-
rate w/ experience,
Call (352) 564-2025 or
727-919-1853
STRUCTURAL
DETAILER

Senior structural steel
detaoiler and plans
checker for local
long-span building
manufacturer. Must
have 5+ proven years
exp. & be proficient in
AutoCAD. Excellent
benefits & environment.
Send background
resume to:
P.O. Box 130, Crystal
River, FL 34423


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


l


FhT
= /S ill


4II"Tade


vChrls Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Ucensed &
Insured. 637-3765
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400/628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a profession-
al, Mike (352) 628-7277
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263

FIND EXACTLY

WHAT YOU
NEED IN THE

SERVICE

DIRECTORY


PLASTERERS
& LABORERS
352-344-1748
SPA MFG
hiring Fiberglass help.
Laminators & Chop
Gun Operator.
(352) 748-0044
STUCCO LABORERS
PLASTERERS
(352) 302-5798
TRIM CARPENTER

352-726-4652
T' RUCK DRIVER
CDLCLASS A
I Local, Must have I
forklift experience
and know the area.
ESTABLISHED
COMPANY
726-7828/302-0943

WANTED:
1,000 SIGN ON
BONUS FOR
*EXP. RESIDENTIAL
MAINTENANCE/
SALES TECH
*SERVICE TECH
*A/C INSTALLER
Your tools, clean
license. Well estab-
lished local company.
Year round work. Great
pay. Co. vehicle. Call
for details & appt.
(352) 860-2522












































Genra


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$4000 To $6000
MONTHLY
Join a national effort
to assist in the
enrollment of the new
part D prescription
drug plan for retirees
on medicare.
Duties Include:
Education and
distribution of part D
materials, You will
work in pharmacies
and senior centers in
your local area. train-
ing
is provided.
Call Scott Schultz
today to secure
full information
(352) 726,7722
APPLY AT THE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DEPT AT 130 HEIGHTS
AVE. INVERNESS, FL
34452 OR CALL 341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833
EXT 347) EOE
KEY PINE VILLAGE
ICF/DD
LOCATED IN CRYSTAL RIVER
HABILITATIVE TRAINING
INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS!
Rewarding work assisting
developmentally disabled adults
learn basic living skills In a
residential setting. 2nd shift
3:30 pm- 12:15 am
On the job Training Proof of
HS DiplomaiGED required.
Background checks and
employment health physical
will be required for
post-job offer employees




Your World

ad 94iZ9e 94&J


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
QUALITY OUTBOARD
REPAIRS, Full & dock
side service. Morrill
Marine (352) 628-3331





Appliances Sales
and Services
New & Used, drop off,
parts avail., coin-op.
Sales, Service
352-220-6047 Ive msg




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Uc#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352) 400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond, All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY
Modern & antique.
Denny, 628-5595
or 464-2738




CARING COMPASSION-
ATE well exp. CNA
seeks position in the
home. 352-726-8601
IF YOU NEED A CARE
GIVER w/21 yrs exp.
Call Sheila
(352) 637-2107, lv.msg.




IN HOME CHILD CARE
In Inverness, off
Anna Jo Ages 2 and
up. 352-344-1737 After
5pm 352-341-1866




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




CLEANING. Reliable,
affordable. Weekly.
bi-weekly, monthly
Joy, 352-266-8653 cell
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
QUALITY CLEANING
and landscaping.
15 yrs experience
Jennl, (352) 726-7512


r;--- -- -
B stKept Secet
in Citrus County
*No Weekends-
M-F, 9-5 I
*Unlimited Earning
Potential
*Good People
Skills a Must
*No Experience
Necessary
*Paid Training
EOE/ Drug Free
Work Place
To apply, call
866-777-1166, ask for
Joanne or Darlene


GET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE


Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Lic. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes. 637-4373
CRC1326872
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
comp. cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. Ins. CBC avail
352-563-0104/228-1282




AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp, ULic./Ins. 422-1956




"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. Lic 0253851
(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
HANDYMAN SERVICE,
Elec. etc. Lic. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
MaInt & repair prob-
lems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395
AFFORDABLE,
S DEPENDABLE
| HAULING CLEANUP.
I Appl. Furn, Const, I
Debris & Garages
352-697-1126

Free est. Will Do Any-
thing. Lic.#73490257751
352-299-4241/563-5746

Gen. Home repairs plus
Lic2120-0863567. 27 yrs.
352-465-1189
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271352-465-9201
Get My Husband Out
Of The House!
Custom woodwork,
furniture repairs/refinish,
home repairs, etc.
Lic. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Moving,Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HOME REPAIR, You
need It done, we'll do
It. 30 yrs. exp. Uc., ins.
#73490256935, 489-9051


IAGnea
c= Help i^


AUTO DETAIL/
LOT PERSON
FT must have exp. in
auto detailing, small
amount of lot work. Fax
qualifications 746-7736
GET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE

CLASS A CDL
LICENSE
DRIVER NEEDED

For Septic System
installations. Full time
position. Apply within
Monday- Friday
between the hours
of 7:30am 5pm
A Able Septic
2190 N. Crede Ave
Crystal River
(352) 795-1554


CLERK
Apply in person,
Coastal Station,
1017 SE Hwy. 19,
Crystal River


CONSTRUCTION
LABORERS
WANTED

No exp. necessary
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
interview, 860-2055

EXP. LAWN CARE
HELP NEEDED
Must have own trans.
(352) 628-9312

HOUSEKEEPERS &
LAUNDRY AIDES

Avante at Inverness
is currently accepting
applications for
Housekeepers and
Laundry Aides, full
time positions
available.'
Excellent benefits.
Please apply In
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness, FL


Need a GED?



Concerned



about childcare?


A-e


AUTO DETAILER
Will Train
Apply in person
(352) 344-1151
FURNITURE DELIVERY
PERSON
EXPERIENCED ONLY
Assembly required.
Call 860-1963, after Ip

IN EARffi-













B -oeBeforMo



People Gt. Up!
-CRYSTAL RIVER^^^
KDUNNELLOHdffN


The top selling dealership on the
Suncoast has an outstanding
career opportunity for a full time

GM Certified Technician
Must be experienced and customer
service oriented.
Excellent benefits and more!

Call Guy Denig, Service Director,
for an appointment at:

352-795-6800


Call for Information about Even Start, a family
literacy program 795-7887


NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services. Lic.0257615/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
P & S ENTERPRISES
General Maint. repair,
pressure washing &
painting, free estimates
Lic. & Ins. 9990002510
(352) 522-1177
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263
X/CHEAP HANDYMAN
CLEAN UP/HAULING
"FREE" SCRAP REMV
3AA.-O90 AC- o0n8o


JT'S TELEPHONE SERVICE
Jack & Wire Installation
& repair. Free esti-
mates: CALL 527-1984


1 WILL KCrLELC IYUUK
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Uc#0256991
(352) 422-5000




#1#I A-A-A QUICK PICK
UPS & hauling, Garage
clean-outs, tree work.
Reasonable. 302-4130

S AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE I
HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126
--- --m J
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
cleanups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Moving.Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902

HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
HAULING SMALL LOADS
Landscape products,
rock products lumber,
etc.Reas.rates 634-1789
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const. debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329


0-1- MI


CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
SHOP AT HOME
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic.#2713, Insured.
Free Estimates.
(352) 422-2019


Richard Nabbfeld
Hardwood, Laminate &
Tile. 6 yrs. exp. Prices
start at $1.50 sq.ft. LLC
Lic./Ins. L05000028013
(352)361-1863




BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell
BEST PRICES
Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453
(352) 795-7095, Dallas
GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm./Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences.
Free estimates.





John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
628-3516/800-233-5358




Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types Lic. & Insured.
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Pati6- Walks.
Concrete Specialists.
Llc#2579/Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates. Lie. #2000.
Ins, 795-4798.
DANIEL ENO CONCRETE
All types, All Sizes.
Lic #2506. Ins.
352-637-5839
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
Lic#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Driule Pr rinlIce


Aaalilons/ KRIMUvLLIItuI
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
LUc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
Lic. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
TMark Construction Co.'
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic.CRC 1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 vrs.exo.r


AM SIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798,425-8184


CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 634-1584




Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs, exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways.
Call (352) 628-4743.
D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
Landclearlng, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch.
Uc. Ins.(352)302-7096
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tvoes of DIrt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523
(352) 628-3924




* MOST AFFORDABLE A
& REASONABLE *
Land & Lot Clearing
Also Fill Dirt deliveries,
Free est. LUc. Insured.
(352) 795-9956
All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day 1x Clean
Ups, Lot & Tree Clear-
ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
Driveways 302-6955
Boxblading, Backhoe,
Bushhogging, Cleanup
Reas. rates. Uc.
(352) 422-3078







HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &,
Ditching (352) 344-4288
or (352) 302-7234 cell




D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272
McBEE LANDSCAPING
Installation of Shrubs
& Trees, Landscape
packages Avail.
Uc.#24715
(352) 628-0690


Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up. Some FREE
Services. Prof & Reliable
Call 352-563-9824
A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize in
replugging your yard.
Lic/ins. (352) 527-9247
Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est. (352) 628-4258
Blade Runners Lawn
Maintenance. Uc/Ins,
Affordable, Free Est.
(352) 563-0869
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
SHaullng,Cleanup,.
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service.
Mowing, landscaping,
pressure wash.257-1522
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
P & S Enterprises of
Citrus Inc. Mowing &
Landscape, free est.
Uc. & Ins. 352-522-1177
Woodlawn Landscape
Complete lawn care,
Call Michelle
352-342-5704




CRYSTAL PUMP REPAIR
(352) 563-1911
Subs, let pumps, filters
FREE ESTIMATES
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Uc. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard





'MR CRUSCOUNTY'












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956
Cuckoosl Grandfathersl
Furniture Total Repair
(352t592-n1,7A


RAINUANCUE
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascia, Siding, Free Est.
Uc. & Ins. 352-860-0714


Advertise Here


for less than you think!!!


Call Today!


563-5966


S7-26 LaughingStock International Inc./dist by United Media, 2005 |

"You're not using enough gunpowder, Harry."


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
JOIN OUR TEAM
Established food service
Company is looking for
All positions, Please
Apply in person,
Mon thru Fri. between
1pm-5pm at
KENTUCKY FRIED
CHICKEN
1110 Hwy. 41-N,
Inverness and
849 S. Hwy. 19,
Crystal River
LABORERS NEEDED
No exp. necessary
Benefits offered. Valid
Drivers Lic. & Heavy
Lifting Required
Gardners Concrete
8030 Homosassa Trl.

LAWN SPRAY TECH
Exp. Preferred.
Self motivated.
Salary + Commission.
352-726-3921

LAWN SPRAY TECH
Exp, Preferred.
Self motivated.
Salary + Commission.
352-726-3921


.1


LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER
looking for Delivery Driv-
er, warehouse. Room
for advancement.
Benefits, 401 K. Apply in
person Morgan Bros.
Supply 7559 W. Gulf to
Lake Hwy, Crystal River.
LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER
Looking for inside sales,
counter, warehouse
help. Room for ad-
vancement. Benefits,
401K. Apply in person
Morgan Bros. Supply
7559 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Crystal River.
LOOKING FOR A
CAREER & A TAN?
Lots of hours, lots of
work. Will train. Good
benefits. Call Mike Scott
Plumbing. Ocala
352-237-2888


Svj.chronicl.nlina cam


CLASSIFIED


LABORER
Mobile home set-up.
352-249-0879/427-9349
MAINTENANCE
REPAIR & SECURITY
Requires ability to work
hard, full time including
Saturday and Sunday.
Must be a team player
and have valid driver's
license. A Drug Free
Workplace and Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Located in Homosassa,
352-628-4656
MARINA HELP
PART & FULL TIME
Hours Vary. Able To
Work Weekends, Able
To Lift 501bs. Relate Well
With People. Accepting
Applications At The
Rainbow Rivers Club
20510 The Granada
Dunnellon
(352)489-9983


C"AIGeea


A WHOLE HAULING
& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermist.com
Quality








AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP. I
STrash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl. Furn,Const, I
I Debrisn&Garages

DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal,
& trim. Ins. AC 24006.


Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879352-341-6827
STUMP GRINDING
LiUc. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlin
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe It!"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Lic#000783-0257763 &
Ins. Exo'd friendly serve.


S cinqular
rcSirslrhot ', a4
Cingular Wireless
Authorized Agent
Cingular Wireless
Authorized Agent
Stores in Citrus
County & Marion
County, looking to
fill Full & Part Time
positions.
4 Sales Associate
= Shift Supervisor
Positions require
proficiency in
Microsoft Office.
Please Call Shirley
(352)726-2209
Ext. 228 or send
resume online to
cwrs@spectrumglobal
networks.com


GM TECHNICIANS

WE WANT YOU!










1O TUESDAY JULY 26 20 5


MORNING COOK
needed, Will train.
Cockadoodles Cafe
206 W, Tompins St,
Inverness
MUNRO'S
LANDSCAPING
is seeking exp'd land-
scaping personnel.
Must have valid driver's
license. (352)621-1944
POOL SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
Exp, requested but
not necessary. Will
train, senior citizens
welcome. Apply in
person. Mon-Fri
8am-3pm1233 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy.

PRODUCTION
WORKERS

No experience needed.
Gulf Coast Metal
Products
Homosassa
Call between
7-11am, M-F
(352) 628-5555
ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS
Exp Only. Paid
Vacations, Benefits.
352-347-8530














SERVICE WRITER
Service Writer needed
with comp skills must be
customer oriented 75
Truck Service Ctr, Wild-
wood, call Richard
352-748-7575
SWIMMING POOL
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
Discount Pool & Spa
352-527-3999


The City of Inverness
is accepting
applications for

TWO (2)
PUBLIC WORKS-
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
POSITIONS


Detailed job
descriptions may be
obtained at the
administration office
212 W. Main St.
Inverness, Florida
between 8:00 AM
and 5:00 PM,
Weekdays.
EEO/
Accommodations
for Handicapped
Employee-Veteran
Preference.
TOWER HAND
Bldg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
DFWP. Valid
Driver's License. Steady
Work. Will Train
352-694-1416 Mon-Frl
TRUCK DRIVER
Class A CLD, clean
driver's abstract, drug
free, fax resume to:
352-341-2654 or call
352-341-2838
WAREHOUSE
WORKERS

Immediate Opening.
For Crystal River Area.
Lift up to 201bs.
7am-4pm Mon-Fri.
(352) 622-2040
WE BUY HOUSES.
CaSh........Fast !
352-637-2973
Thomesold.com




BAKERY HELP
& PKG & DELIVERY
EARLY MORNINGS
Apply Monday Friday
before 10am at
211 N. Pine Ave., inv.
Cleaning Position
Dependable, team,
player w/refs, good
driving record 212-1032
INSTRUCTOR
KidzArt, a unique,
inspiring drawing
program for children,
Is seeking part time
Instructors. Will train.
Must be dependable,
energetic, and lbve
kids.$10/hr. Call
Jennifer 352-628-2925

P/T PROGRAM
ASSISTANT
Before School
Monday-Friday
6am-9am
After School
Monday-Friday
2pm- 6pm

Programs In Crystal
River, Homosassa
Inverness & Lecanto
Call Jo at:
(352) 341-2507,
between 11am 6pm





ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowlingly
accept
ads that are not
bonafide
employment
offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.


C._ nea


A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS New in box
5 &10 year Factory
Warranties at
Wholesale Prices
-.2 Ton $827.00
3 ton $927.00
4 ton $1,034.00
Install kits available
or professional
installation also avail.
Free Delivery
*ALSO POOL HEAT
PUMPS AVAILABLE
Lic#CAC 057914
Call 352-746-4394

AMANA Heavy Duty
WASHER,
Good condition
$75
(352) 860-0158
APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers.
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C., A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy.44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
Dorm Size Refrig.
$40
Microwave, $15;
13" Color TV, w/remote.
$15. (352) 726-9728
DRYER
Works good. Heavy
Duty, large capacity.
$50/obo
(352) 726-7537
GE Dishwasher & Stove,
white, $75. ea.
or $125. for both
4 person Hot Tub,
w/ cover $400.
(352) 564-8578
MICROWAVE, TABLE
TOP, GE, 1100 watts, 1.8
cu.ft., turntable, $75
(352) 746-7355
NEW KENMORE
DISHWASHER
$250.
(352) 621-0250
NEW KENMORE
over-range
microwave, $200.
Sony entertainment
center, $200.
(352) 621-0250
REFRIGERATOR
Whirlpool Regal, Top &
bottom, off white, Ice
maker, frost free,$100.
(352) 637-3360
UPRIGHT FROST FREE
REFRIGERATOR, almond
20 cuft1, works great,
$125 (352) 634-0127
WHIRLPOOL LAUNDRY
CENTER extra Lrg. cap.
washer & dryer, (all in 1-
dryer on top, washer on
bottom) A steal at $399
(352) 527-2981





2 HUGE AUCTIONS
Antiaues/Collectibles
Sat July 30 @ 1pm
811 US19 Cr Riv
Sandy Bottom
Antiaues/Dec Arts
Sat, Aug 6 @ 10am
Courthouse Sq, Inv
Info 795-2061 or
charllefudge.com
MC,VI,Cash 10%BP
fudgeAU1593/AB1131


-- - -". j


** MOVING **
Sony record player,
radio, $105. 6-piece
white wicker furniture,
$125. All excellent
cond. (352) 628-2839
2 Chaise Rocker/
Recllners, 1 Burgundy
velour, 1 Tan MIcroflbre.
exc. cond.
$75. each/obo
Call (352) 726-9355
2 GLIDER ROCKERS
$20 each. Loveseat
recliner, $20.
(352) 795-5374
2 off white table lamps,
modern 37" H, $10 ea.
1 lamp, gray/lavender
ceramic, 24" high. $7.
(352) 746-7044
3 PC. Blue Sect. w/hide-
bed & recliner, $250;
Blonde king Med. bdrm
set w/2 night tbls, Ig.
ladles dresser w/2 mir-
rors & men's bureau,
$275. (352) 795-1947
4 Honeycomb Shades
$10 ea/obo
Platform Swivel Rocker/
Recliner, light burgundy
exc. cond. $75/obo
(352) 726-9355

"MR CITRUS COUNT













ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


board, night tables,
mattress, boxsprlng.
$460.
(352) 527-8104
ROLLTOP DESK & chair,
excellent condition.
Oak finish. Lighted desk
top. Plenty of storage,
$350. Call Bob,
(352) 795-9194
SOFA, CHAIR, $200 set.
2 Lane recliners, $175.
(352) 563-5137
SOLID OAK TABLE,
4 chairs, $275.
Loveseat, $75,
(352) 563-5137
STEEL DESK, 60x20", solid
wood top, Broyhill
swivel rocker with
slipcover. $75 each
or best offer.
(352) 344-1982
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed,
Call (352) 527-6500


ABSOLUTE
GOLD MINE!

60 Vending Machines
All for $10,995.
800-234-6982
AIN #B02002039

COMPLETE LAWN CARE
BUSINESS FOR SALE
All equip. & 90 + acts,
SW Ocala, asking
$49,500. (352) 572-6101
ESTABLISHED GREETING
CARD ROUTE in Citrus
County. Inventory Inc.
(352) 563-6680
LAWNCARE BUSN. FOR
SALE 35 accts, All
equipment, 16FT trailer
$10,000 (352) 302-0441
Serious Inquiries Only



TRAVEL INDUSTRY
5.9 Trillion Dollar Travel
Industry Needs YOU.
We Pay $1000/ sale!
$1995 start-up fee
(877) 791-7486


TURNKEY ICE CREAM
PARLOR/SANDWICH
SHOP. All equip + video
games & more- too
much to list. Fun family
atmosphere w/regular
clientele. Asking
$50,000. (352) 382-3647
VENDING- Snack, soda
new machines. Excel-
lent cash flow, $8000
(352) 563-1928




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charlliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
4 Hitchcock Chairs,
cond. $500. abo
(352) 302-1911

LARGE WASH BOWL
& Pitcher. $50;
4 Greek Urns $100.
(352)465-6597

Tool Box
large, old, wagon
makers box, no tools,
key lock. $350.
(352) 465-0853


-4

SPA, 5 PERSON,
Never used. Warranty.
Retail $4300. Sacrifice
$1425. (352) 346-1711

SPA's
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195.
Other models Aval,
(352) 398-7202

USED SPA
Leasury Bay 4 person
Spa MUST SELL 2yrs old
In good condition. Fits
thru screen door. mov-
ing in Citrus included.
$2800.00 OBO Call
302-1541 or 637-0358


S AUTOMOTIVE
& MACHINE
SHOP AUCTION
*SAT. JULY 30.
174 N. U.S. 41
INVERNESS
PREVIEW: 8 AM
AUCTION: 9 AM
Transm., A/C &
SMach, Shop equip.
SAmoco brake lathe,I
1000's New parts!
SSee Web: www.
dudleysauction.com
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12% Buyers Premium
2% disc. cash/check


1/2HP ROUTER &
CUTTERS, $75
GAS WELD EQUIP., $75
Both in good condition
(352) 637-4718
10" COMPOUND SAW,
$65
12" BELT SANDER, $50
Both in good condition
(352) 637-4718
12" WOOD LATHE,
$125
DRILL PRESS,
(floor model)
$125.
(352) 527-1109
16" SCROLL SAW
$60
10' radial arm saw
$200 Both In good
condition
(352) 637-4718
CHAINSAW
Stihl 16", 028, w/case
$175/obo
(352) 382-4928

r AUTOMOTIVE q
& MACHINE
I SHOP AUCTION
*SAT. JULY 30.
174 N. U.S. 41
INVERNESS
PREVIEW: 8AM
AUCTION: 9 AM
Transm., A/C &
SMach. Shop equip.
Amoco brake lathe,
1000'sNew parts!
SSee Web: www. I
dudleysauction.com
DUDLEY'S AUCTION I
(352) 637-9588
I AB1667 AU2246 I
12% Buyers Premium
2% disc. cash/check

Table Saw, $150.
Radial Arm Saw, $150.
(352) 795-9280
after 8am
WELDER, ULincoln,
Weld-Pack 155 w/ gas
cony, $600.
Stick Welder, Lincoln,
$100.





Magnavox Color TV
w/ remote 27"
$25.
(352) 344-2321
SONY SURROUND
SYSTEM, $125;
SONY SURROUND
w/speakers, $80.
(352) 382-4928




16' GARAGE DOOR
w/opener and 4 screen
doors, $300.
You remove.
(352) 746-5234
HUNTER DOUGLAS
DOOR LITES
New in box, 22"x64",
$165 list, $80 firm.
(352) 228-7458




COMPUTER MONITOR
Dell 17" SRT, color,
5 mo old, $70,
(352) 860-2434
COMPUTER,
complete with monitor,
mouse & keyboard. 56K
modem, Windows ME,
$100. (352) 564-1564
CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DELL COMPUTER, 17"
screen, printer & table,
$200.
Trailer hitch,
Draw-Tite, $50.
(352) 637-0513
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net


7 DRAWER white wash
dresser & night stand
$400 or best offer
(352) 341-2949
6' Cherry Wood Curio
Cabinet $175. like new,
Cherry wood coffee
table, sofa table &
end table set. $250.
(352) 795-7905
BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
SPT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
BEDROOM SUITE
Queen size, Bassett
$450.00. Roll Top Desk
$300.00. 352-564-1668
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat, Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sdle
Prices.Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139 King
$199. (352)795-6006
Breakfast Set, table w/
leaf & 4 captains chairs
$125., Triple dresser &
3 night stands,
good cond. $145.
(352) 746-7312
Brown Microsuede
Rocker/ Recllner
6 mos. new. $200.
(352) 726-0559
BUNK BED SET. Dresser &
desk, multi-colored, 2
months old, $350.
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, $25.
(352) 527-2336
Curve Sofa
white, Large, beautiful,
excel, cond, $500. obo
corner TV wall unit,
mission style, $100. obo
352-302-1911
DANISH MODERN
5 drawer chest of
drawers, light walnut,
46" High, 40" wide,
19" deep, $95 cash
(352) 344-2752
DINETTE Quality set with
48" bevelled edge glass
top on rattan base & 4
cushioned rattan chairs
like new $725 (352)
726-7949 before 7pm
Dinning Room Table
with six chairs
$250 obo
(352) 344-3078
FASHION DOUBLE DAY
BED w/pop-up and two
mattesses included,
Sycamore green, used
one time, $250. Call Dot
or Will, 352-564-9172,
LAMPS (5) $10-$15
each. (5) Maple Bar
Stools, $20 ea. Coffee
tbl. pine. $25.
(352) 795-1947
Large Recllner,blue
2 mo old, storage In
right arm, Cost $450
new, Asking $275.
(352) 249-4460
LEATHER COUCH
Mustard color.
Very soft. Good
condition. $400.
352-860-2122
Lg. Dinning Room Table
& 6 chairs, $250.
Stereo Record Player
Console $100.
(352) 746-4057
Lg. Overstuffed Couch,
Hugh two person chair
w/ ottoman, modern
cream & beige pattern
w/ rolled arms, $850.
obo (352) 637-5335
LIGHT CHERRY
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
74 high by 44 wide
35" TV included. $700 or
best offer. 352-422-3875
LIGHT OAK
dinette set w/leaf,
5'x42", 4 beige
coastered chairs
w/wood frame, $200.
(352) 344-8679
LOVESEAT
Beige, rocker & recliner.
$300. Exc. cond.
(352) 746-0937
MATCHING COUCH &
LOVESEAT. Also couch
and chair, $125 per set.
Both good condition.
(352) 628-3195 or
(352) 476-3192
MOVING-
6 pc bedroom set,
fullsize mattress, $325.
5 pc bedroom set, twin
mattress, $255. All
excellent.352-628-2839
MOVING
Big man overstuffed
couch, $175. 2 large
recliners, $60 each.
All excellent cond.
(352) 628-2839
New Wicker Love Seat
$50.
New, Gel mattress
$100.
(352) 628-1408
NEWER ORIENTAL STYLE
RUG, 9x12, $100
SOFA, 83", exc. cond.
with extra slip cover,
$50 (352) 726-6642 If no
answer leave message
OAK DINING RM TABLE
w/leaf & 4 chairs
(French Country) $275.
Club chair- floral print,
exc. cond, $75.
(352) 563-5137
Patio Set
40" round glass top'
table, & 4 chairs
w/ cushions $25,
(table needs paint)
(352) 795-4647
Patio set w/ glass top
37" x 60"table 6 chairs,
bronze $250
Bookcase, 5 tier, 26x70,
black, $50.
(352) 382-3895
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN SIZE BED,
Like new, w/ head-


CLASSIFI


TWIN BED
$50.
(352) 527-9248
USED FURNITURE
BARGAINS
Upright piano, double
bed, sofa sleeper,
comfy chair, long table,
etc, Call Dave 527-9062
for appt. to see and
directions to 947 W.
Colbert, Beverly Hills
WASH OAK
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
70" wide, fits 32" TV,
$100.
(352) 746-5460
Wicker Settee, w/ one
chair $150. 1 metal
patio table 4 chairs $75
(352) 527-0075
WOOD METAL round
glass table, 48", 4 capt.
chairs, with matching
baker's rack, 84"H with
Irg. storage bin, $350
(352) 527-8467
WOOD TABLE,
6 chairs, $250
ROLLTOP DESK $250
(352) 637-0780




2 WHEELHORSE
GARDEN TRACTORS
One good shape, one
needs repair. $650 for
both. 352-220-2374
42" CUT 12.5HP
MASTERCUT Classic
riding mower, $325
(352) 344-9697
6HP CRAFTSMAN
22" self propelled.
21" Toro, self propelled,
$75 each,

CRAFTSMAN
14/V2HP Brggs &Stratton
Engine, 42' deck, very
good condition. $450,
(352) 344-5448
CRAFTSMAN riding
mower, 18/2 HP, 46"
deck, $550.
Snapper self-propelled,
$75. (352) 746-7357
CUB CADET
LAWN TRACTOR
Model 2146. 14HP 38"
cut, excellent cond.
$1500 or best offer.
(352) 382-7347
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, jet ski's,
3 wheelers. 628-2084
John Deere
Riding Mower
GX 75, 9HP, 32" blade,
good condition
$800.
(352) 795-4647
LIKE NEW
MURRAY MOWER
14.5 HP, 42" cut, $500.
(352) 795-4303
MOWERSI
Riding &walk-behind.
All guaranteed.
352-628-2161
MURRAY
SELF-PROPELLED
mower, $75.
Master Cut riding
mower, 42" deck, $400.
(352) 746-7357
Self Propelled Lawn
Mower, Scotts, large
wheel real, B&S 6,5
OHV, Exc. cond, $150
(352) 344-2799
TORO RIDING MOWER
12HP, 32" cut, $800.
(352) 382-5957
after noon on Friday
and weekends.




CRYSTAL RIVER
Moving Sale.
Lots of Furniture.
(352) 563-6361/
212-3178/212-3889




Wedding Dress,
Sz,14 16, long train,
beautiful, pearl beads,
w/ long sleeves, gloves
& purse, $350.
(352) 344-1644


18x21 CARPORT
$800 or best offer
(352) 726-2508
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile
Wood (352) 341-0909
SHOP AT HOME
COMPLETE TRAILER
HITCH for Chevy
Venture, Olds,
Silhouette, Pontac
Transport or Montana.
New $120. Sell for $60.
(352) 489-9970
CRAFTSMAN
pressure washer,
2600 psi, 7HP $275.
Golf clubs, bag & cart,
lots of balls & tees, $50.
(352) 637-0513
ELEC. HOSPITAL BED,
special mattress with
side table, $450 COMM.
8FT BEVERAGE COOLER
30 case capacity, $500
352-697-2659
352-793-6762
ELECTRONIC METERS
& Instruments from
50 cents to $15
(352) 746-4279
FIREPLACE
36" woodburning. Used
one year, blower, flue,
flashings, cap & acces-
sories. All for only $375.
(352) 726-5077
FISHING STUFF
Trolling Motor, 28 Ibs,
Like New. $75; 4-0 Penn
Reel & Rod $50.
(352)465-6597
Futon, $75;
Small Maple desk, $75.
(352) 726-9728
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Movlng,Cleanouts, &
Hondyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HOOKED ON PHONiCS
Reading Program, $75
complete. Barney the
Dinosaur LearnlngVideo
collection, 20 VHS
movies, all exc. cond.
$50 all. (352) 697-2133
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000
KENMORE, DRYER, works
good, $100 obo
ANTIQUE PIANO, good
condition, $500 obo
(352) 726-2618
PLAY STATION Caddy
with storage, 15 games,
and accessories, $100
60 CD Changer, $50
(352) 344-8449
Ask for Laura
TRUCK BRA, fits F100
pickup, only $20.
(352) 726-5077
Two Regular Size
Dog Houses
like new $25. ea.
Jack LaLanne
Power Juicer, new $50.
(352) 628-4054
Window Air Condition,
$25
24' Aluminum Ladder
Warner, $100
(937) 564-0277




1104 JAZZY ELEC.
WHEELCHAIR with lift,
8hrs. use, $2,500 obo
352-697-2659 or
352-793-6762
CRAFTMATIC
ADJUSTABLE BED,
$1200 OBO
(352) 212-9210
ELECTRIC LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR
Excellent condition.
Brown fabric. $150
or best offer.
(352) 382-7347




Conn Spinet Electronic
Organ & bench,
many voices $250.
(352) 382-0525
Great Package Deal:
Epiphone Electric Play-
er Pack that Includes:
Special Guitar, Hard
Case and Gig Bag, 10
watt amp, tuner, extra
strings, picks, pitch pipe
and book $250.00
Call: (352) 527-2480
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music,
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
ORGAN Kawai KL2,
Exc. cond. complete
w/ bench.
Original $2,900
Will Sacrifice for $750.
(352) 344-2799
ORGAN, Yamaha, full
pedals, $400.
Baby Grand Piano,
good cond, $950.


15" BLACK WESTERN
SADDLE leather &
Cordura, very good
cond. $150 firm. Also
lots of misc. tack
(352) 746-2271
Circle Y Western
Show Saddle,
$475.
(352) 568-3386




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR, scrn porch-no pets
$450. 352-563-2293
DUNNELLON
2/1, $425/mo. Ig. porch.
Allen (850) 933-4877
DW 2/2 new carpet,
paint. No pets,
no smoking $525/up,
Homosassa, 628-4441
FLORAL CITY
2/1, fantastic view,
Irg yard. 352-637-1497
FLORAL CITY
2/2, FP, nice view,
Irg yard.. (352) 637-1497
INVERNESS
Lakefront 55+ Park. Fish-
ing piers, affordable
living 1 or 2 BR. Screen
porches, appliances.
Leeson's 352-637-4170
OZELLO
3/2, garden tub &
shower In master, very
Irg deck on this 1 yr old
DW. On approx 1 acre
1 ml. off US 19. Close to
everything. 1st, last &
Sec. Req. W/ verifiable
references. No pets, lyr
lease, Avail. Aug 1st
$700 mo.(352) 621-0232
or(352) 220-8218
RENTALS
Hernando 2/1, $450
Cry.River 1/1, $350
Cent Heat &Air No pets
1st, last, sec. 564-0578


CIrRus COUNTY( (FL) CIRONICCLE




WI WORDK GUR BY TRICKY RICKYKANE


Sig Sauer 380 Auto
M/P230, like new, In box
w/instruction book,
2 Mags, 2 holsters. $450.
(352) 634-0432




18FT CAR HAULER
with ramps,
$900 obo
(352) 302-0441
4X8 UTILITY TRAILER
W/fold down ramps &
spare tire. $250/obo
(352) 637-3317
8X16
DUAL AXLE
DROP GATE
LAWN TRAILER
$1500 or best offer.
(352) 628-4228
BUY, SELL, TRADE, PARTS
REPAIR, CUSTOM BUILD
www.ezoulltrailers.com
Hwy 44 & 486
HALLMARK TRLR.
2004, enclosed, 24'X8/2'
$4300. (352) 586-9614




BASSINETTE & CRIB
$25 each. Kids' clothing
$1 per item,
1.191 9-A7


Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
squares..The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word. To win
$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
newspaper. All entries become
the property of UFS, Inc.
2005 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


II | |l Thanks and $10 to
Jerry Davis of
6. Minnesota player on a picket line (2) North Bellmore, NY
for #4. Send your
entry to this
7. Party girl Paris's English cheeses (2) newspaper.


SNOM1IILS SNO'ITIH 'L ONIMIA DNiaaiS 9 aIZZniW 'IzzflN '
7 ONI5ad a3ONIS T' Oa.A OuIflb e laHS IAIMS Z af O aaH I
7-2 6-05








Kin o t Store Your
Auto/Boat or RV for
115.00 per mo>

352-795-7901
Just North of the Mall


2 Bedroom MH, on
Homosassa River Canal,
newly remodeled, turn.
Ig. fenced yd., great lo-
cation no water access
$89,000. 352-398-6786
2/2, Carport
14' x 60', Scmrn. in porch
& shed, split plan,
all apple. Included
(352) 746-1781after
4pm or leave message
American Homes
your Discount Dealer
for Homes of Merit;
Skyline, Southern
Energy
352-628-0041 -
866-466-3729
www.american
homesfl.com

ATTENTION
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
Deliver and Set Up
$35,900 Includes
10 Year Warranty.
Homemart
Mobile Homes
(352)307-2244
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
Must sell this one.
Move In nowl
3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
New-Nice home &
land only $85,900.
Owner will be able to
pay for all closing costs.
352-621-9181





NEW LISTING
This beautiful home
won't last.
Ready for Immediate
move in.
3 bedroom, 2 baths,
great location!
$4,500 down,
$614. per month
No hidden charges.
Call
352-621-9183
NORTHWOOD ESTATES
InglIs -2 bdrm, needs
minor work, kid's/pets
ok, $6,000. Owner fin.
(352) 447-2759
Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

REPOS AVAILABLE
in your area.
Call today. Ready to
move into.
352-795-2618


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
2 SUN CONURES
with 2 cages, $1,000
(352) 341-1648
6 Mo. Old BIk. Min.
Schnauzer, with vet &
reg. papers. $350.
(352) 228-2046
African Grey Parrot
7 yrs old, needs hand
ling & very Ig. cage.
$1,000/obo. 220-4866
AKC MINI-PINS
"The perfect small
companion." 9 wks old.
Black & rust, M/F. $500.
Inglls, (352) 447-2370
BABY COCKATIELS
$30. Young adults,
$25. (352) 726-7971
BLUE & GOLD MACAW
still hand feeding, I'll
train you to hand feed
$700 (352) 726-7191
COMPANION CATS
Female cats-sweet,
healthy, spayed,
shots-perfect for seniors
$25-$40 352-476-6832
DECLAWED CATS
Himalayan, Siamese,
long-haired, others,
neutered, shots, tested
$80-$125 352-476-6832
FABULOUS FELINES
Exotic breeds, cats and
kittens, healthy, neu-
tered, shots, tested,
$80-$150, 352-476-6832
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $15
Cat Soaved $25
Dog Neutered &
S d start at $30
(352) 563-2370
JUST OVER 1 YR OLD
MALE FERRET, cage &
all accessories, $150
firm. Please call for
details (352) 637-5545
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Cute & Cuddly
w/ paper. $550,
(352) 726-6103
RAISED W/KIDS
Padagonlan conure,
$150 2 Quaker parrots
$150 each.
(352) 795-9343
RICHARDSON GROUND
SQUIRREL, paid $115,
sell for $40
(352) 344-4279
TWO 4' TAME BALL
PYTHONS. Large cage
and accessories
included. $150 obo.
(352) 465-6456 or
(352) 613-0010


-E.
Circle Y Western
Show Saddle,
$475.
(352) 568-3386


CRYSTAL RIVER
Handyman Spec.
2/2, outbldgs. Lg. lot.
$32,900. (352) 795-7374
Great Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres in the
Mini Farms. Easy to
Qualify. $4,000 down
and $560 mo.
(352) 795-1272
Hernando, Double
Wide, 4/2, Double
corner lots, 20x24
addition. Block
garage. Close to Lake
channel. Fixer-fix.
$48,500.
586-7675/726-1950
Just what you've
been looking for. New
4/2 on 5 acres. Zoned
for agriculture. Horses
Welcome. $6,000
Down $750 mo.
(352) 795-8822
LECANTO. NICE 3/2,
screen porch & carport.
Washer & dryer. Huge
shed. Fenced yard.
Quiet road. $89,000.
352-228-1098
Like New 2004
Homes of Merrit. 3/2.5
on 1/2 Acre. Owner
says sell now.
Price reduced
Killingsworth Real Estate
(352) 302-8376




NEW LAND & HOME
3/2 on 3/4 Acres on
Wildfire Ln. Call
(352) 746-5912
New Land Home
Packages Available.
Call today for
approval. Low down

1-877-578-5729
OPEN HOUSE
Brand new warranteed
home 3 bedroom,
2 bath, tiled floors,
appliance package, .
eat-in kitchen, top of
the line, deck,
driveway on paved
road. Must see,
Call for directions
352-621-0119
RAILS TO TRAILS FRNTG
1.2 ac. 3/2 DW, Large
living addition, covered
deck, $90,000
Parsley Real Estate, Inc.

SAVE $ 1000'S
NEW & PREOWNED
Manufactured homes
and Modulars. Easy
qualifying even with
bankruptcy.
Call 1-800-870-0233
WON'T LASTI 3/2 on 1/2
Acre. Only $54,900
(Off Rockcrusher Rd.)
Call: (352) 302-3126



- E1,


2/2 DWMH, newly
remodeled. In 55 &
over park. Furnished.
Asking $34,000
(352) 746-5606
31' Vacation Home In
Turtle Creek Resorts
ww carpet, fridge &
stove, 20' scr. porch w/
carpet, 20x1l 1 carport,
$16,000.(352) 628-4608
BY OWNER, beat the
heat Well maintained,
fully furnished 2/2. New
appliances & furnace.
Across from clubhouse
& pool. 55+ park. In
beautiful Hendersonville
NC. $21,000.
828-692-5018
or 828-692-5307
Crystal River Village
2002, 1,280 sq. ft., 3/2
w/40' carport, den,
sun porch, attached
workshop, all
appliances $69,900
(352) 795-6495
CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE
Fully furnished. 2/2
dollhouse, must see.
Large double carport.
$75,000. (352) 795-6895




WALDEN WOODS
Nobility home, built
2004, 1749 living space,
3/3, double driveway,
all oppl's, custom
window treatments,
enclosed screen room.
(352) 382-3341




Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Classified Ads from
575 through 660 are
sorted by town names
to assist you In your
search for rental
property.
INVERNESS
New duplex 2bed/2ba,
garage, w/d hookups,
beautiful yard, $750.00
Rondi Moore 527-9733
Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
SProperty & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
> Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home.
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
Info@orooertv
managmentgroup.





'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq. ft.own at $895.
down and $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
Crystal Palms Apts
1& 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 564-0882
INGLIS VILLAS
Newly Renovated*
Affordable Rental
Apartments 1,2,& 3
bedroom, available
immediately.
Rent Is based
on your incomell
Located on SR40 one
block East of US 19,
Only 7 minutes from
Crystal Riverll
M W F 2PM 5PM
T TH 10AM 7PM
(352)447-0106
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INV/HERNANDO
Very nice 1 BR apts.
Many lakefront Boat
docks, boat ramp,
fishing, etc. $495 mo.
(352) 860-1584




Crystal Palms Apts
1& 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 564-0882




200' ON US 19
across from Crystal
River Airport. GNC. Call
Owner, 352-212-3041
HERNANDO
1,200 sq ft, commercial
space, shop or storage.
Includes trash. 634-1201




2/1, Homosassa $425
2/2/2 Villa, Unfurn.
Crys. Rvr. $825.
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
BEVERLY HILLS
Lakeside Villages
Condo, 55+ furnished
2/2/1 + den, screened
lanai, comm. pool,
non smokers, no pets,
$975 mo. Avail 08/15
(352) 746-2621
FOREST RIDGE
Large 2/2/1, Like new,
$1,000 1st & last
(352) 746-2932
LARGE LIKE NEW Forest
Ridge Villa, 2/2, 1-car
gar., eat in kitchen,
dining area, living rm.,
screen lanal, walk In
closets, (352) 746-2932
PRITCHARD ISLAND
3/2 Condo, pool,
waterfront, $1,000. mo.,
No dogs
CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Condo, pool, $795.
No dogs 352-697-1907
WATERFRONT CONDO,
2/2, Furn, Kings Bay
View, Dock.. $1,500mo
Contact Lisa
BROKER/Owner
(352) 634-0129




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, with W/D hookup,
CHA, wtr/garbage Incl.
$500mo., 1st, Last & sec.
No pets. 352-465-2797




HERNANDO
1/1 completely furn.
Electric Included.
(352) 465-0871


1. egret a stage prom t (1)


2. Fast changing of car gears (1)


3. Bill blocker in Ecuador's capital (2)


4. Char "Oklahoma!" surrey border (1)


5. Rub a nose on a dog's bite restraint (2)


1 CARAT diamond
anniversary band.
Yellow gold.
$700 or best offer,
lefi j9.non a


* BURN BARRELS *
$8 Each
860-2545
55 GALLON
FISH TANK
with stand, all
accessories, $150 obo.
(352) 621-0474
200 MIRRORS, 4' x 4'
for sale, any reasona-
ble offer (352) 746-3762

2005

SPECIALS
6 lines 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$1 .50
$151-$400......$10.50
$401-$800.......$15.50
$801-$1,500....$20.50
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

200' Alrhose w/fittings &
Pafloda air Staple
Gun, $100/obo
Gas Stove, works good
Changed to Electric.
$25. (352) 344-8795
25" Sharp TV,
$100
Graber Bike Rack,
$50.
(352) 726-0406
*ABEKA Home School
Curriculum, 4th, 7th
& 8th grade, $150.
8x10 Kennel w/canopy
2 dog houses, &
cement pavors $150.
(352) 637-4206
Above Ground Pool,
$100
20 Cubic Ft Freezer, $50
(937) 564-0277
Air Cleaner,
Honeywell, 3 sp.
w/ hepa filter,
new $200. sell. $75. obo
(352) 637-0799
BACK TO SCHOOL girls'
wardrobe, size 6X thru
7/8. All seasons. Multi-
dozen clean pieces.
$40 for all. 352-697-2133
Carlton Sofa Bed,
$275. white wicker
rocker, $50. both
like new, Call
(352) 726-0040
CARPET
1000's of Yards/In
Stock. Many colors.
Sacriflce352-341-2146


Top of the line 2000
Series, Palm Harbor
5 star adult community
3 bdrm, 2 bth., lanai,
numerous extras.
$89,000. .(352) 382-7755




2 Bedroom MH, on
Homosassa River Canal,
newly remodeled, turn,
Ig. fenced yd., great lo-
cation no water access
$89,000. 352-398-6786
Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com




2 Bedroom MH, on
Homosassa River Canal,
newly remodeled, turn.
Ig. fenced yd., great lo-
cation no water access
$89,000. 352-398-6786
'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes'
1806 sq. ft. own at $895.
down and $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
2/2 CORNER LOT.
Fenced yard, good
condition, asking
$36,000. (352) 302-7113
3/2, C/H/A, DW on
1.5 +/- acres fenced.
12x24 AC workshop.
Dble Carport, Ig. front
porch, 2 add. out
buildings, no owner fin.
$69,900. 352-795-0907
4/2 ON 1/2 ACRE
Country setting close to
town. '99 Home with
large fenced yard.
$85,000 By Owner -
697-2466 or 344-0014.
Beautiful 3/2 on
1/2 acre In great
school district.
$2,000 and $650 mo,
(352) 795-6085


----- -- ----
5 PC'S Work-out Equip.
Healthrider treadmill,
Elliptical Strider, Nor-
dictrac Skller, Welder
Crossbow & Total gym.
$500/all. (352) 586-9614
Inversion Table
F7000, heavy duty,
Height/weight cap.
Max. 6'6"/300lbs, $195.
(352) 382-7326/
212-1345
Treadmill, Preform GLX
760,$400.
(352) 382-3895
Universal Home Gym
like new, $150.
(352) 726-2426
(352) 422-3493
WEIDER HOME GYM
(Pro Model 9625)
$150.
(352) 382-5957
after noon on Friday
& weekends.




7' POOL TABLE
Balls and accessories
Included. Very nice
cond $150 obo. Call
(352) 465-6456 or
(352) 613-0010
ALUM. DOG BOX
4'X4' 2 doors, $200
(352) 628-4915
OAK GUN CABINET
holds 6 long guns,
lockable, glass doors
and bottom storage
cabinet, $175
(352) 344-8509
POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
leather pockets,
Life Time Warranty.
$1,295
(352) 597-3140
Ruger 9MM Auto
Model/P85, like new, 2
mags, Holster, $400;
ROSSI 38 SPEC.
REVOLVER, w/holster,
$200. (352) 634-0432
















Daily/Weekly
Monthly
Efficiency

$600-$1800/mo.
Maintenance
Services
Available

Assurance
Property
Management

352-726-0662

BEVERLY HILLS 2/2/2
Fam. Rm. w/FP, office.
Part. turn. Avail 8/4.
$800 (352) 746-2980
CITRUS SPRINGS 2/1
Carport w/strg. Shed,
fenced, $725/mo. 1st.
sec. Ref. (352) 489-4834




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 $900/mo. Garbage,
Water, cable & lawn
maint. incl. 1st. Ist. &
sec. (352) 564-2831
INVERNESS 3/2/2
No pets. Incity. $850/
mo. (352) 637-0844
ON THE WATER
Very nice 2/2 w/large
enclosed porch.
Carport, shed, fishing,
nice view. $900 mo. 1 yr
lease. 4 miles, east of
Inv. 1-800-747-4283




2 HOMES
Beverly Hills 2/1/1. Also
Mini Farms 2/2 on 2
acres. $650 mo. ea. +
security. (352) 795-3766



2 Large BR/2 BA
Family Room, Newer
appliances, CHA,
garage. $750
2 BR/1.5 BA
Eat-in kitchen, family
room, newer appliances,
garage, CHA. $750
PINE RIDGE
Remodeled ranch home
in lovely country setting
on 2 acres. Equestrian
trail, 2/2, new appls, Fain
rm. w/working FP, screen
room. Lawn maintenance
included. $1200
Call 746-3700
Real Estate Agent
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, family rm, W/D,
garage. $675 mo. 1st,
last. sec. (352) 634-4030
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, w/central air, wash-
er/dryer included, very
clean, 960 sq.ft. close to
shopping, $600./mo
352-563-0447
BEVERLY HILLS
2/11/2/1, freshly remod-
eled, priv. dead end St.
$750 mo., 352-613-3095
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 Fl. Rm.
352-746-4673/464-2514
BEVERLYHILLS
NEWLY REMODELEDIII
2/1/2/1, + Florida Room,
Fenced Yard, $699. mo.
352-542-8365
CITRUS HILLS
3/2/2 Citrus Hills $1200
3/2/2 Laurel Rdg $1300
Townhomes & Condos
2/2/1 Brentwood $900
2/2 Citrus Hills $850
Greenbriar Rentals, Inc.
(352) 746-5921

CITRUS HILLS
Waiting to have
your home built?
3/2/2, immaculate.
Membership
included. Available
immediately. $1350
mo. (540) 888-4889

CITRUS SPRING
Brand new 3/2/2, for-
mal Living & Dining Rms,
great rm, kitchenette.
No smoking/pets,
$1,000/mo. + Sec. credit
check. (352) 621-7572
CITRUS SPRINGS
New 4/2/2 1583 Cary
Avail Aug $1,050/mo +
Sec Inclds Watr & Lawn
No Pets 352-812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
New 4/2/2 8440 Sorazen
Dr. Avail Aug $1,025/mo
+ Sec Includes Water &
Lawn No Pets
352-812-1414
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, Nice, clean, $800
mo. (352) 795-6299
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $550 mo., 1st,
last & Sec. No Pets.
(352) 860-2953
HOMOSASSA
2/1/I. C-H/A.quiet,
trees. $550 mo.628-2703
HOMOSASSA 4/2
5 yr old CBS home, new
paint/carpet, Ig. strg.
shed, acre lot. Immed.,
occ. $900. 352-628-3543
or 305-804-6168
INGLIS ON CANAL
3/2/1, direct access,
1st. Ist. Sec. Ref. req.
$1300/mo. 239-825-5789
INVERNESS
3/2 near lake, schools,
shopping City Limits
$1300 1st/last/sec.
Call 352 586-9785
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS, 3/2/2
$780. (352) 341-1142
INVERNESS
Newly renovated 2/2/1


Fla rm. fenced yard,
annual lease, no pets,
Deposit required. $775
mo. (352) 344-0186






Meadowvlew
2/2/1 w/ pool
$995. mo






SUGARMILL
WOODS
2 & 3 Bdrms.Vlllas,
Homes,Condos
$750 & Up
SMW Sales
(352) 382-2244


3. ent H
c= *6uri


INVERNESS
Town home, 2/2, scrn
porch, fenced yard,
$695 mo (352) 860-0346
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2, beautifully
remodeled home,
$1,100 mo, 1st. lost
& Sec.
Waybright Real Estate
(352) 795-1600
Ask for Stephanie
SUGARMILL WOODS
Home & Villa Rentals
Call 1-800-SMW-1980 or
www.starrental.com

-U.

AVAIL. NOW CRYS. RVR.
3/2/2 Pool, $1300
River Links Really
628-1616/800-488-5184
CRYSTAL RIVER,
3/2, Manufacuted
Home on Lake
Rousseau
Immaculate,$ 1,000.mo.
Contact Lisa
BROKER
(352) 634-0129
DUNNELLON
River Access, 2/2/2,
nice house on 1/2 acre,
Irg fam rm, $850mo.
1st, last & Sec. Pets ok
(352) 489-0979 or
(352) 812-0716




INVERNESS
Priv. bath, util. Incl, very
nice, $110wk. 637-6297











Ea m=
"MR CTRUSCOUN1T













ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

BECAUSE THERE IS NO
SUBSTITUTE FOR
EXPERIENCE......








Plantation Reality Inc.
Lisa VanDeBoe
Broker (R)/Owner
(352) 422-7925
See all of the listings in
Citrus County at
www.olantation
realtvinc.com











Free Home Warranty
Personalized Service
For All Your
Real Estate Needs


eeene,

Nature Coast
Bwein.c2 inature.cm

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
Allreal estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes i illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
nationalporigin, or an
intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tion." Familial status in-
cludes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are





hereby ing formpaired isthat





1-800-927-9275.
all dwellings
advertised In this
newspaper are avail-










Purchase/ Refinancequal
FasTo omplain of
FreeHUD toCall 888-443-4733free at


SOLUTIONS FOR


MORTGAGE
Competitive Rates!l
Fast Pre-Approvals
By Phone.
SSlow Credit Ok.
, Purchase/Ref.
- FHA, VA, and
Conventional.
Down Payment
Assistance.
* Mobile Homes
Call for Detailsl
Tim or Candy
(352) 563-2661
Llc. Mortgage Lender



-


--


call Cinay bixier
REALTOR
352-613-6136
cblxlerl5@tamoa

Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515



-Il-

'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq. ft. own at $895.
down and $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mlllion SOLD!II
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON &KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.










DONNA HUNTER
Realtor
Selling or Buying,
call me today.
For the EXIT way of
exceeding your Real
Estate expectations.
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 422-4235


Call Diana Willms
A Pine Ridge Resident
REALTOR
352-422-0540
dwillmsl @tampa
bay.rr.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
POND, WATERFALL
JACUZZI & STONE GRILL
on private, natural pre-
mium corner, 1.4 Acre
Save i2 on util. w/ dbl
reinforced concrete
(hurricane strength)
Former model many
extras: Gourmet kit.
fireplace in master bdr.
$339K. Call for appt. or
brochure emailed,
352-746-3330


Pine Ridge Estates
1 Acre N SULTANA TER
cross st. Pine Ridge &
Carnation $100,000,
352-746-3983

RUSS
LINSTROM


FOR LEASE
Warehouse & Offices
on corner property in
Homosassa, Sec,
fenced. Lots of
parking. Aprox. 3000 sq
ft. (352) 628-5700
GNC CORNER PARCEL
200x300 MOL in
Homosassa Dblwide,
outbldgs, 1 mi. from
Hwy19, Grover Cleve-
land. (352) 613-3027




BELLEVIEW, 2/2 CBS -
1050 living area, newer
A/C & appliances, lots
of tile. Compare at
$105,000
352-726-1909

Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com




2 possibly 3 bedroom
I V2 bath.
Central heat and air
$99,000.
(352) 212-3997
2/2/carport on Elkcam,
could be 3/2, newly
remod. Lots of tile 1245
living. 1/2 acre w/shed
like new home $143,900
(352) 634-0052
3/2/2,NEW APPLIANCES,
carpet, paint. Whole
house audio system.
Built-in home theater.
Very private. $189,900.
352-615-9043
3/2.5/1.5
Pool home caged, split
plan, Fam. liv. combo,
tiled Berber, cathedral
ceiling, $163,900.
352-257-1513
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Million SOLD!!
Please Call for Details,
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.

GREAT LOCATION
& CHARMING
Close to entrance.
2bed/lbath, carport,
new paint & carpet,
florida room, privacy
fenced backyard.
Perfect starter or
investment home.
$89,900. 352-637-2973

I 'Your Neighborhood I


2V2 Year Old Pool Home
By Owner, 3/2/2t/2, lac+
40K below replace-
ment cost. $310,000
(352) 527-1138
4/2'/2, 2600 sq. ft,.pool,
shop, 1 acre! smart
investment,, will go fast
at $228, owner may
finance. Richard
(352) 795-3676
LINDA WOLFERTZ
Broker/Owner








HAMPTON SQUARE
REALTY, INC.
lindaw@
tampabay.rr.com
800-522-1882
(352) 746-1888
New Custom Home
Golf course S. exp.
Huge M-bath, up-
rades galore. $337,000
By Owner 352-746-7512
Oaks Golf Course 3/3/2
Pool Home, lots of
closets & oak trees,
best location.
$359,900.
(352) 527-7275
Priced below Appraisal
3/2/3, solar heated
pool, jetted tub, 2127
sf., bit. 1996, 1 acre, 4
sliders open to huge la-
nai, gas FP, a must see,
$280,000. 352-220-3897
Terra Vista Golf Course
Pool Home 3/3/2
Separate inlaw suite.
New in 2003
$395,000 352-527-9973




2/1 COTTAGE
near Lake &
Bike trail, $45,900
Call (352) 341-1999




1800 sq ft. Block Home,
2/2 w/garage, Lrg cov-
ered porch, fenced
back yard, $125,000
NO QUALIFYING,
OWNER FIN. Richard
(352) 795-3676
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing

Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Million SOLDII!!
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $97,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
HOUSE FOR SALE BY
OWNER 4 bedroom 2
bath, Call for details
(352),344-8035

JACKIE
WATSON


'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq. ft. own at $895.
down & $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
2/2/2
Adorable home, close
to shopping, fenced
in back yard.
(352) 527-8369
3/2/1, inground pool &
screened enclosure.
Completely remodeled
w/new roof. $159,000.
46 S. Monroe St.
(352) 795-9001
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Million SOLDIl
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.
Newly renovated, 2/2/2
w/lanai in newest &
most desirable section.
2000 sq.ft. home, 1450
sq.ft. under air. Built
1987. Corner lot, new
carpet, tile & paint.
New appliances &
fixtures. Newer AC &
water heater. Move
right in. $165,000.
(352) 527-1071




2/2/2 ON 1 ACRE,
New roof and A/C,
1491 sq.ft. living area,
Kensington Estates.
$174,000
(352) 344-8272
3/2 FAM. RM. LG. SCRN.
POOL, Horse barn on
15 acres, near
Withlacoochee forest
(352) 628-4915
3/2/2 1490SF, Scrn Lanai
CRYSTAL OAKS
Lg. fenced yard, new
air, all appliances, city
wtr. & sewer. $165,000
(352) 746-4784
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Million SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON& KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.

Crystal Glen Estates.
Paved road, sewer,
water. Will build to
suite. Your plan
our ours. See our
Model Homes.
1-800-414-5256
CGC011962
SALE BY OWNER
3/2/2 1450 sf kit appi
fans blinds $159,900.
1890 S. Hoylake Terrace
Lecanto 422-4830




CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & compare
$150+Mlllion SOLDl!
Please Call
for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEIIZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.




CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Milllon SOLD!!I
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.

FREE REPORT
What Repairs Should
You Make Before
You Sell??
Online Email
debble@debble
Or Over The Phone
352-795-2441
DEBBIE RECTOR


Realty One
www.buyflorida
homesnow.com


== 21.,
J.W. Morton, R.E., Inc
726-6668 637-4904
NEW WATERFRONT
HOME 3/2/2, 2300 sq.ft.
Pick colors, call for
details. (516) 443-9591
SELL YOUR HOME!
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$49.50
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Party Only
(Some ITestiricilons
Ma, apple )
Wolerhlon Luxury
Home, 3/2, Dock,
access to over 8,500
acres of lake 9507 E.
Beech Circle $300,000.
(352) 726-3873




3/2 2000 SQ.FT. 1 acre
of beautiful wooded
area. Sunken living rm.
2 dining rms, screened
In Fla. rm. Firepl., extra
Irg. A/C unit, Hardwood
floors, $260,000 nego.
352-341-2537 476-8712
LIKE NEW
Beautiful 2/2/2 on 1 1/4
acres. Everything like
brand new. Move in
condition. Must see
$169,900 (352)344-4711


WATERFRONT Lowest
price on deep canal to
Lakes & River. 2/1 w/lrg
enclosed porch, park
like setting, Only
$94,900 (352) 726-6785


TUESDAY. IUi.Y 26. 2005 11C


.CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.F


IiniKing or Seling
Your home? Visit:
www.getmvhomes





2.5 ACRES. Cross
fenced. Homes of Merit
D/W. 3/2, pool, fire-
place, French doors,
walk-in closets, indoor
laundry, appl's- as is.
$132,500. 352-628-4217
6630 W. Seagull Ln.
CB Home, 2/1'2/1,
tile fireplace, $82,000.
(352) 422-0698
2/1, FIREPLACE,
screened in-porch,
close to Chass River.
Recently remodeled
bath. $89,000.
(352) 527-0223
3/2/1 On I ac. w/pool,
shed, Fla. rm. 1996
Block Home. Great
starter or retirement
home. $140,000.OBO
Lv. msg. (352) 563-2226
4/2, end of Cul-de-sac,
fenced yard, 1 acre lot
1589 sq. ft. by owner
6160W. Schwalben Ct.
Homosassa
352-464-0872


















RIVERHAVEN POOL
HOME 2/2/2,.FAM. RM.
Custom granite Kit. &
laundry, all new SS ap-




RIVERHAVEN.Only 3
years old, custom built,
3/2/2. Screened porch,
beautifully landscaped.
A must see @ $242,000
(352) 621-4661


{{(GF, 1,0.00,0.0
0,0.00oo0.00,0,"
AW5!"l}H





CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing

Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Milllon SOLDIIS

Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis

RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.


2/2/2, Beautiful Home
in Meadowcrest, sub
division, new roof, din.
area, living room,
scrn. lanai, $167,900
(352) 795-7905
3/2/2 16X31 Encl. Pool
1900 Sq. Ft. LA,
11 190 W Thoreau PI.
Reduced to $245,900.
220-1349 or 220-1350
3/2/2 Block/Stucco,
city water, near mall,
N.W 21st St. Rm. for RV,
near boat ramp.
$162,900
(352) 795-0917
BEAUTIFUL HOME
This 3/2 home
features a great room
design, w/ gas FP
custom mantle &
beamed vaulted ceil-
ings and cherry hard-
wood floors. You'll
love the eat-in kitch-
en w/ new tile & new
Maytag appliances.
A spectacular
enclosed tiled florida
room overlooking the
wooded area behind
the home. Many
Extra's & Upgrades.
$185,900 Virtual Tour
@www.buyowner
#TPA59857 or Call
352-564-0472

FIXER UPPER
On deep water canal
Owner Realtor
$425,000
(352) 302-4546
(352) 422-7925

KATHY TOLLE
(352) 302-9572








List with me & get
A Free Home
Warranty
(352) 302-9572



Nature Coast


Here To Helpl
Visit:
waynecormier.com
(352) 382-4500
(352) 422-0751
Gate House
Realty
Why wait to Build and
Pay Impact Fees., 3 yr.
4/2/2, w/caged pool
on a cul-de-sac and
greenbelt. Stone kit.
counter, raised kit. cab.
upgraded apple. Serious
inquiries only. No Real-
tors please, $289,500,
(352) 382-7633







Real Estate
Agents
Join a fast
growing
team.
Now hiring!
Call Harold Morton
SR atinall
Discount
SBrokers

795-1598



MR IRUS COUNTY












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

BUYING A NEW
HOME?
Buy through me and
get a 1 year home
warranty FREE
SELLING A HOME?
List with me and give
your buyers a 1 year
home warranty FREE
View all of Citrus
County's Listings on
my website
kenbell@
centurv21.com



NATURE COAST
352-795-0021

S07R


Call Me
PHYLLIS STRICKLAND
(352) 613-3503
EXIT REALTY LEADERS

CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Million SOLDI!!
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.


Debbie Anderson
"Working hard to
give you the service
you deserve"
Curb Appeal Realty
2619 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness
(352) 400-2573
curbaoeal3@


FREE REPORT
What Repairs Should
You Make Before
You Sell??
Online Email
debble@debble
Or Over The Phone
352-795-2441
DEBBIE RECTOR


Realty One
www.buyflorlda
homesnow.com


'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq. ft. own at $895,
down and $625. mo,
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $97,900.
3/2/1, w/Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


Deborah Infantine
EXIT REALTY LEADERS
(352) 302-8046

Thinking of Selling
Your home? Visit:
www.getmvhomes


Vic McDonald
(352) 637-6200









Realtor
My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE .-
Outs5anding Agents
Outstanding Relts
(352) 637-6200


We're

Selling

Citrus!!

NO Transaction
fees to the
Buyer or Seller.
Call Today


Craven Realty, Inc.
(352) 726-1515


F-4-


Beautiful Woodlands/
Rainbow Springs CBS
home, Remodeled w/
wood floors, 2/2/1, Fl
Rm. FP New apple. & AC
$214,000. 352-465-7156




BELLEVIEW, 2/2 CBS -
1050 living area, newer
A/C & appliances, lots
of tile. Compare at
$105,000
352-726-1909

Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com





DREAMING OF
COUNTRY LIVING?
3/1.5/2 on one acre
south of Chiefland. Easy
commute to Citrus
County. Concrete
block high and dry -
built 1997 -just remod-
eled with hickory cabi-
nets, stainless appli-
ances, quartz counters.
wood floors and ber-
ber. Pre-listing priced at
$165,000. Call
407-744-9291 to
schedule viewing

Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Picture Perfect Home In
the Enclave, 3/2.5/3
Heated Pool & Spa
Fireplace in Fam. Rm,
Jacuzzi in Master Bath
$298,900. Call for appt.
(352) 382-7879 or
(352) 634-4360
SENSATIONAL
3 BDM 2 BTH HOME
PLUS DEN.
FOR MORE INFO:
877-639-4215 EXT 7975
WAYNE
CORMIER


Here To Help!
Visit:
waynecormier.com
(352) 382-4500
(352) 422-0751
Gate House
Realty




2200 SQ.FT. 3/3/2Y2,
Liv. rm, din. rm. eat-in
kitchen. All walk-in
showers. Lots of closet
space. Ceramic tile.
Central vac. Heated
pool, lanai. On Lake
Davis Cove. Shed,
dock. On tropical 2/3
acre. $375,000.
(352) 344-2263
3/2/2 Split Floor Plan in
INDIAN WATERS
Crys. Rvr. & Gulf Access
$475,000. Brkr/owner
(352) 795-2053

CITRUS REALTY GROUP

'3.9% Listing

Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Million SOLD!l
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, deep canal,
minutes to Gulf. Great
location! $385, obo.
(352) 274-3164
or (352) 572-6350

LET OUR OFFICE
GUIDE YOU !


Plantation Realty, Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Cell 422-7925
Lisa VanDeboe Broker






Licensed R.E. Broker
-a Leading Indep.
Real Estate Comp.
SCitrus, Marion,
Pasco and Hernan-
do
a Waterfront, Golf,
Investment, Farms &
Relocation
a Excep. People.
Except'nal Properties
Corporate Office
352-628-5500
www.slnverking
properties.com
in Rny Rand/ Bkerl

MINUTES TO GULF
Deep Canal, 3/2/2
Den, 14x40 sun rm (H/A)
Landscaped, deck,
dock, Crys. Rvr.
-$449,900 (352) 563-0348

Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

Thinking of Selling
Your home? Visit:
www.aetmvhomes

WATERFRONT Lowest
price on deep canal to
Lakes & River. 2/1 w/lrg
enclosed porch, pork
$like setting, Only
$94,900 (352) 726-6785


NEW HOME
3/2 on 2.7 wooded
acres.You pick the
finishes. $219,000 call
Woody at 352-516-4859

Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com





LARGE LIKE NEW Forest
Ridge Villa, 2/2, 1-car
gar., eat in kitchen,
dining area, living rm.,
screen lanai, walk in
closets, only $129,900
(352) 746-2932
SMW, large 2/2,
screened lanai. All
appliances including
washer & dryer. 2nd
floor end unit. $155,000.
(352) 382-7335





Over 3,000
Homes and
Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com

PINE RIDGE 14th Fairway
West Begonia Dr. 3/2/3
pool home w/hot tub,
every option. $399,000.
For more info or appt,
call (352) 527-3671

WAYNE
CORMIER


Here To Help!
Visit:
waynecormler.com
(352) 382-4500
(352) 422-0751
Gate House
Realty




HOMOSASSA RIVER
165', SEAWALL, DOCK
Impact fees paid.
Central water. Blue
water. $209,000. Make
offer. (352) 628-7913




50hp Mercury Thunder
Bolt, has not been
taken apart, Possible
head damage,
Make offer
(352)341-1569


CA~c SmterCount
JbHme


CLASSIFIIEDS


WE BUY HOUSES & LOTS
Any Area or Cond.
1-800-884-1282 or
352-257-1202
Non Profit Private
Foundation Seeks large
Farm N of Tampa or
established as a school
for boys. Must be
productive & profitable
w/ permanent water
supply( river/lake)
Call Justin
(305) 643-0966
WE BUY HOUSES
Cash....fast closing

WE BUY HOUSES
Any situation including
SINKHOLE. Cash, quick
closing. 352-596-7448
WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast l
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com
















30 Acre Subdivision on
Ozello Trail, 24 lots 1 to 2
acre lots, 352-274-3164
or 352-208-6285
FLORAL CITY Suburban
Acres. Two 5-acre tracts
MOL. Wooded. $79,900
each. (352) 795-3533
HLERNAND
2 Acres, E. Fletcher St.,
well, septic & permits,
$90,000. (352) 464-4317
HOMOSASSA




352-286-4482
LOTS FOR INVESTORS/




PINE RIDGE, Ranger St.
2.75 acres, $182,000
Agent/Owner
(352) 746-3932
RESIDENTIAL LAND
FOR SALE
BUY IT TO BUILD ON
OR BUY IT TO HOLD AS
AN INVESTMENT: LOT
22 ON HILLCREST
STREET IN INVERNESS
FLORIDA. SALE PRICE
OF ONLY $21,700.
CALL 812 634-6360



-s
PRIME HUNTING LAND
44 ACRES, Lebanon
Station, HWY 19 access
1 mi. frontage on
Gothe State Forest,
$495,000 brkr/ownr.
(352) 634-1378/795-2053




1.25 Acre Lot, High &
Dry, Beautiful Oaks,
Crystal Manor $75,000.
(352) 795-7808
11.5 Acres
equestrian community,
new subdivision. Deed
restrictions, no subdi-
vide. $432,000.
The Preserves at
Oak Hill in Wildwood.
(954) 461-4625.

BEAUTIFUL LOT in the
Inverness Highlands,
108x120, $38,000
(352) 726-1708
Building Lots
in Inverness Highlands.
River Lakes &
Crystal River.
From $16,900.
Call Ted at.
(772) 321-5002
Florida Landsource Inc
CITRUS & MARION
COUNTIES
Many Lots in many
areas! $19,900 & Up!
Great investments!
Call Ted at
1-772-321-5002
Florida LANDSOURCE
CITRUS SPRINGS, 5 lots
avail: 2 are double lots,
1 Is single, $36,500 per
lot, Gary 352-341-3242
INVERNESS CITY LOT
75x117 adjacent to
Whispering Pines Villas
$30,000. (423) 247-2525
PINE RIDGE
1.3 acre partially
wooded lot on quiet
street. $89,900
(352) 527-1123
WAYNE
CORMIER


L


Hampton Square
Realty, Inc.
Let us give you a
helping hand
352-746-1888
1-800-522-1882

Marilyn Booth, GRI
23 years of
experience
LOVEE TO MAKE
HOUSE-CALLS"


P2H 0 NAEu 1mate











12C TUESDAY, JUL


J- SE


'96 JOHNSON 150
Saltwater Series, just
serviced and ck'd.
Exc. cond. $3500
Days, 352-267-4830
Boat Trailer
for 18 ft, boat,
fair cond.
$200.
(352) 527-9697
EVINRUDE 9.5HP
excellent condition,
1973, $400
(352) 697-0078
New Electric Motor
Moto brand, 441b thrust,
cost $250. org. sacrifice
$100.
(352) 795-8047
OUTBOARD MOTOR
1990, Johnson, 175hp,
only 300hrs, runs great,
controls & gauges incl.
$2,800. (352) 628-4237
T TOP w/ 2 place center
console, complete
controls, gauges
steering & live well,
pumps & all hook ups,
cooler seats, Asking
$1,200. (352) 302-4532


U.

YAMAHA
1993, Waverunner 650,
runs like a Yamaha..
Great, $1,200 OBO.
(352) 527-4887
YAMAHA
2003 1200 SUV 4 sweater,
2 stroke, w/trailer only
175 hrs. great cond.,
garaged, complete
service 6/05, swim lad-
der, $350 in accessories.
$7,000 (352) 621-3185





$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & Trailersl
No Feest352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

0000
THREE RIVERS
MARINE


We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES II
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U. S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-5510
2 KAYAKAES
$395 each
(352) 795-9280
after 8am
20' PONTOON BOAT
Fiesta-New P/T floor,
carpet, lights, No Trailer
$2500 o/b/o
352-212-9718
ALUMINUM BOAT'
12', semi-V-hull, no title,
$200. Crystal River
(352) 302-6069
BAYLINER
Bowrider, 4 cyl I/O,
engine rebuilt, new
upholstery & cover.
Nice. $4000 obo.
Trade for pontoon?
352-795-8792
CAROLINA SKIFF
18'8", 60hp Yamaha,
Low hrs, 24 volt auto.
trolling motor(never
used) lots of extras
(352) 382-3352
CAROLINA SKIFF
'97 19 'Semi V 90HP T&T
Johnson, CC, SS, GPS,
fish finder, $5,600
(352) 637-6034
CHAPARRAL
'86, 187 XL, 96-150
Evinrude & trlr. Lots of
extras, runs great
$3,500 obo/trade? 352-
344-4434 613-5801
CHECKMATE
21', Bought new 1994,
2000, 250 MercEFI, low
hrs, GPS, ship to shore,
new all aluminum
trailer, to many extras
to mention, $8,500.
(352) 489-7770
CRISCRAFT
1960, 55', Constellation,
3 state room, twin 871
Detroit, radar & GPS,
Great live aboard or
cruiser, $89,900 OBO
Will trade for land.
Possible Financing.
(352) 344-4288
(352) 302-7234
FISHING BOAT
12 ft. gheenoe with
trailer. New seats and a
live well. $800 Call
212-9193 or 344-0902
after 6 pm.
GALAXY
20', 1986, cuddy, Kept
in high & dry, new mo-
tor, low hrs. Exc. cond.
$6500. (352) 795-7335


CONSTRUCTION
SALE
Here We Grow AgainI

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS
17' to 23'


15'-24'

POLARKRAFT
JONS
12'-20'

POLAR OFFSHORE
21'-23'

CLEAN PRE-OWNED
BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days

MAKO
23'2", 225 Johnson
Ocean Runner, new
steering, trim tabs, dive
platform, canvas, all
electronics included,
Boat has been
completely redone.
Asking $16,000/obo.
(352)447-1758

NEW BOAT TRAILERS
At dealer's cost
or less Final Summer
Clearance on all
alum. & galv. in stock
352-527-3555
CLOSING END OF
MONTH CALL NOWI
BargainsI Don't Wait

PONTOON
28FT, Riviera Cruiser
Pontoon, 48HP,
evinrude, w/ trailer
$4,000. (352) 341-1507


JUN BOAI
12FT, alum. V-hull,
with trailer, $325
(352) 344-4279
PONTOON
18' Stardust. '98 trailer,
25HP Johnson, new
carpet/tires, bimini,
many extra's must
see/sell $3,500. obo
(352) 464-1616, Mike
PROLINE
20' 1973, Rebuilt '89
200HP Johnson, solid,
runs exc. w/2 axle galv.
trir. $5300. 352-634-5300
PROLINE 20'
'73. '86 Evinrude 110HP
trailer, needs TLC.
$2,000/obo
352-795-4779
ROBALO
22', 2000, 200HP
Yamaha, low hrs, CC,
w/trailer $12,500 obo
(352) 238-2249
SEA SPRITE
16', 1982, low hours, '97
Yamaha, 60HP 2 stroke
outboard. Very good
cond. W/trailer, $2900.
(352) 860-0277
SILVERTON
FUN BOATI 1987, 34 Ft.,
runs great $25,000 OBO
(352) 249-6982 or
249-6324
STAMAS
1975, 26' w/ 10ft beam
and fly bridge.w/ 1985
twin 140 hp I/O engines,
new upholstery and
curtains, triple axle
trailer, $8,500.
(352) 464-1077
STINGRAY
'81, 17ft., sports boat,
120HP mercy cruiser, in-
board outboard, asking
$1,700. (352) 527-1263
SUNBIRD
17' Day Sailer. Main &
Jib Genoa. Cuddy, trail-
er, excel. sailing for only
$1000. 352-341-8465
WELLCRAFT
1996 20' ski boat, runs
and looks great! $8500.
(352) 621-0250
Fishing Boat, motor. &
trailer., 14' Mercury 9.8
Runs like new. Troll mtr,
fish finder, many extras.
$1500. obo Must see.
352-464-1616




CALLISTA
27FT By Carriage 1987 E
350 rear bedrm 10 gal,
HW, 7 new tires, exc.
cond (352) 344-2288
CARRI-LITE
31' fifth wheel by
Carriage w/ Ford F250,
460/V8. $12,500 for
combo. 352-726-7355

COMO "RV"
SALES
NEW PRE-OWNED
TRADE IT-SELL IT-
OR CONSIGN IT
Ask for Tony or Jerry
(352)344-1411

FOUR WINDS
03, 32', Chateau, Class
C w/ slide, Ford V10,
12,500mi, every options
immaculate cond,
$47,500. (352) 726-2670
PATRIOT
.made by Beaver. 1993
37'. Only 50,000 miles.
Cummings diesel, new
Michelin tires, too many
extras to list. Exc. cond.
Kept under cover.
(352) 795-4314
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com




SOUTH WIND
1994,36' Diesel Pusher
Many extras, nice cond
$29,000/obo or trade
for Pick Up truck/ trav.
trir. (352) 748-0602
TOYOTA
1982 motorhome, good
transm. & motor, interior
needs work, $600
(352) 860-1761




DUTCHMAN
'96 Signature LTD 33FT
5th wheel. slide-out,
fully equip. $13,000
(352) 341-6821
FLEETWOOD
2005, Pull camper, like
new, 18FT, $11,000
nego. (352) 726-8005
JAYCO
88, 20', sleeps 5, fully self
contained, like new
w/ hitch, $4,500.
(352) 726-8464 after
(352) 302-2521 cell
JAYCO
'95,34' 5th wheel, 14'
slide, excellent cond.
Many extras. $11,500
obo. (352) 628-7414
NOMAD
1994, 22', great shape,
everything works.
Asking $9000.
(352) 302-6311
NOMAD TRV, TRLR.
2004,32', sips. 9
All the goodies!
$15,400.
(352) 586-9614
RV PARTS EAZ-Lift hitch
parts, head 2 5/16 ball,
torsion bars, stabilizer,
all rated 10,000 lb. $135.
(352) 344-8509
SUNLINE
'94,20', sleeps 5, Self-
contained. AC/heat,
Extras, excellent cond.
$6,500, (352)220-3688
TRUCK CAMPER
1993, 8', bath, shower,
roof.AC. 3-burner
stove/oven.$4250. (352)
212-7838 or 220-1928
WILDWOOD
2000, 30', w/ slide out,
A/C, awning, queen
size bed, sleeps 6,
$10, 900(352) 726-6120


-AUTOMOTIVE
& MACHINE
I SHOP AUCTION
*SAT. JULY 30.
174N.U.S.41
INVERNESS
PREVIEW: 8 AM
AUCTION: 9 AM
Transm., A/C &
Mach. Shop equip.
Amoco brake lathe,
1000's New parts
See Web: www.
dudleysauctlon.com
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
AT(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12% Buyers Premium
2% disc. cash/check
L - J .5


CLASSIFIED


4 MICHELIN TRUCK
TIRES, 235/70R 16.
raised white letters, exc.
tread. $75 for all four.
(352) 746-4160
Car Engine
Magnum 360, long
block, roller cam, $250.
OBO.(352) 726-2426
(352) 422-3493
CHEVY
Set of 4 Crager Wheels,
215-65-15, like new $375
Set of 4 Prime Wheels
235-60-15, $175.
(352) 527-6529
FACTORY IN DASH
AM/FM CD player, 1996
2004, Ford/Merc/
Lincoln, $150.
(352) 382-4928
MACCO COMMERCIAL
air compressor, $500
ENGINE HOIST
$150
(352) 302-0441
SET OF 4
USED TRUCK TIRES
265/70/17,
$165.
(352) 527-1812
or 302-9498
Volks Cabrio 2000-2003
Front end Bra, Tonneau
cover, car cover $20
ea. Call (352) 527-9860














ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR CONSIGN
98% Sales Success
No Fee to Seller
909 44W and US19-
airport. 212-3041
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, jet ski's,
3 wheelers. 628-2084
VEHICLES WANTED,
Dead or Alive.
Call Smitty's Auto
628-9118












'99 FORD TAURUS LX
V, Loaded, Clean...........$3,995
'01 CHEVY CAVALIER
Auto, Air, Coupe, Sharp...$5,980
'97 INCOUI TOWCAR SIGNATURE
Triple Whie Chrome, Nice...$6995
'03 LINCOLN TOWHCAR, PEARL
17KMiles, UkeNew.........$22,900
MANY MOREIN STOCK ALL
UNDER WARRANTY



'99 CHRYSLER
Concorde LXI,
56K SlIver/Sage,
$9,488. Call Richard
726-1238
ACURA INTEGRA
'92 2 dr hatch, blue,
good cond., 1 owner,
CD, moon roof call
628-1732,$2800 obo
BUICK
1996 Century. Loaded.
18.240 MILES $6000.
Consider tools part
trade. (352) 489-2104
CADILLAC SLS
2000, low miles, loaded,
very nice, must sell,
$18,500. 352-628-7969
or 352-228-2980
CARS. TRUCKS. SUVS
CREDIT REBUILDERS
$500-$1000 DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19Airport
564-1212 or 212-3041
CHEVROLET
'02 Cavalier, LS Sport, all
power equip. 1-owner
Adult driven, gar. kept
$8,500 (352) 422-6380
CHEVROLET
1993 Blazer S-10,orig.
owner, new exhaust,
reese hitch, Reliable,
$995 (352) 344-8051
CHEVROLET
1996 Cavalier, well
maintained, 62K mi.,
$3,000 abo -
(352) 637-1818
CHEVROLET
2000 Corvette
Convertible, yellow,
exc. cond, 77,000 mi.
$28,000. (352) 621-0300
CHEVROLET
'94 Cavalier R/S, 4-dr,
red, blk int. V-6, auto
cold A/C, 131K, $1,250
obo (352) 637-5327
CHEVROLET
'97, Lumina, 4DR, V6,
good runner,.new tires,
$2,300. (352) 465-0853
or 274-0385
CHEVY
1991 Camaro Z-28.
New paint, runs well,
needs TLC. $3200.
(352) 422-7599

COMO
AUTO SALES
INVERNESS*
'03 Chevy Corvette
convertible, 13K mi.
$40,900
344-1411*

COMO
AUTO SALES


INVERNESS*
'03 Mitsubishi Spyder
GS CInvert. 17K mi
$16,990
344-1411*

COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
99 Chevy Przm 5990
01 Ford Focus 6990
01 Saturn L-300 7990
01 Chevy Malibu 7990
01 Chevy Impala 7990
02 Dodge Intrepid 8990
02 Pontiac Aztek 9990
01 Toy.Tacoma 10,990
02 Ford Exp.XLS 13,500
02 Ford F-250 4 dr
"Diesel" 24,990
628-1411*

COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
'03 Ford Ranger Edge
8.500 miles
$12,990
628-1411*


COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
'04 Ford Mustang
convert 40th edition
18K miles
$16,990
k 628-1411

COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
CASH CARS
95 Chev.Beretta $1,200
92 Buick Cent. $2,900
95 Merc.Villager GS
$2,900
628-1411*

COMO
AUTO SALES
*INVERNESS*
01 Ford Focus 6990
01 Dodge Neon 6990
02 Chevy Cavalier 7590
02 Mercury Sable 7990
02 Mitsub.Gallant 8990
04 Olds. Alero 9990
02 Pontiac GR/Am 9990
00 Nissan Quest
GXE 9990
02 Ford Escape 9990
04 Chevy Impala 11,990
02 NIssan Frontier 4d
Loaded 13,500
02 Jeep Grand
Cherokee 14,490
02 Dodge Ram1500 29K
4 dr. Loaded 16,990
02 Chev.TahoeLS 18,990
344-1411 *

Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
it off your taxes then
trading it In.
Donate it to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
DODGE
1989 Dynasty, good
cond. All the bells &
whistles! 50K mi. $2,695
(352) 344-0227
FORD
2004, Crown Victoria
LX like new. Factory
warr., 20K m. $15,900
(352) 341-1421
HONDA
1989 Accord LXI, 4
door, black $2000 in
rims & tires. $1500.
(352) 601-3035
LINCOLN
1989 Mark VII. LSC, Sun-
roof, High output 5.0
eng. New tires, 90k mi.
$2,900. (352) 746-7729
LINCOLN
'89 Towncar, Cartier
Exc. running cond.
Nice ride, clean,
dependable, $1,495
(352) 341-0610
LINCOLN
'96, Executive Pres. new
trans, & top, 109k hwy.
mi. $5,800. firm
(352) 527-6517
LINCOLN
'97 Towncar Signature,
all leather, 110K miles.
Excellent in/out. $5995
obo. (352) 344-1210
MAZDA
1990 MX-6, 114K mi.,
$1,400 obo, fully load-
ed, many new parts
(352) 726-4177
MAZDA MIATA
MX-5 2005
1500 miles, Air Condi-
tion, Power Steering,
Power Windows, Pow-
er Door Locks, Cruise
Control, Single Com-
pact Disc, $19,995
Black over Razor
Blue.Mint ConditionI
352-746-9115

MERCURY
1992 Grand Marquis
AC, power everything.
Runs great. Looks ok.
First $1500. 564-1776
MERCURY
'99, Grand Marquis LS,
loaded, leather,
excel, cond. 65k mi.
$8,500. (352) 746-6052
MITSUBISHI
2001 Eclipse, Sliver, 85k,
alloy wheels, fully equip
1 owner, well maint.
$8500. (352) 220-0998
MITSUBISHI
'03, Outlander, White,
31k ml. excel, cond.
$12,500.
(352) 628-3811
OLDS CUTLASS
Supreme, 1997.
Exc. cond. CD &
cassette player, $5,000.
(352) 726-7789
PONTIAC
Grand Prix, 1994, good
dependable trans, very
gd. cond. $2400
352-634-6723/ 563-6450
PT CRUISER 2003
Take over payments
Maroon, great cond.
(352) 586-1026
SATURN
199A, Wagon, 68K,
loaded exc. cond
$2,900 OBO.
(352)795-9090/422-7910
SATURN
1998 SL-2, white, 4-Dr.
46K ml., Power locks,
windows, security sys-
tem, cruise, tilt steering,
AC, stereo cass. $5,500
aba (352) 527-0763
SATURN
'96 SC2, 5 speed, motor
needs some work, $400
obo (352) 344-0571

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com




TOYOTA CELICA
2002
80,000, Air Cond.,
Sliding Sun Roof, Single
Compact Disc, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Cruise Control,


$9500 OBO Call any-
time 352-476-3260 or
352-302-0816
VOLVO
2003, S40, 24K,
Garaged kept, fully
loaded, leather,
sunroof, $20,000 Crystal
River (352) 563-5882


CHRYSLER
1968 New Yorker
All original, excellent
condition. $6000,
(352) 726-7982
DATSUN
'79, Pickup, great cond.
61k mi. all org, equip.
$3,500.
(352) 628-3811
MUSTANG 1966
Very Good cond.
Asking $10,000
(352) 527-0669
OLDSMOBILE
'46, 98, 4DR, restorable
cond., extra parts, fami-
ly car, $3,000. Canton
Hi3 38n.'o.-K51in


CHEVROLET
1988 2500, 350 engine,
auto., 8FT bed, high
$107588. C5al Richard
'01 Ford .Wids






















iles 95K this engine,
Well maint. Orig. owner,
$3,000 (352) 637-4428
CHEVROLET


reg. cab. Good cond.
$5600. (352) 527-1109
DODGE
2003 Ram 100 reg
cab SWB auto AC CD
player, bedliner, trailer
hitch. Low mileage,
Cell Ri.card











$12,000. (352) 628-0173
or (352) 613-0929
FORD
1990 F1500 302 V-8,
auto, AC, 116K miles.
$2750. (352) 621-4607

FORD
1999, Ranger XL, auto, 6

engine, $2,500.
(352) 628-5700
FORD
2003 F150 crew cab.
32K miles. Excellent.
$20,000.
(352) 795-5003
FORD

'98 F150, runs excellent,
ice cold AC, $5200
obo. (352) 476-1159 or




er, 108K mi. AC, AM/FM
CD, $9,000. 795-8721
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com




TOYOTA
2002 Tacoma, 5-spd.,
green, Book $10,900
Sell $9,900
(352) 344-4497
TOYOTA
'87,4 wheel Dr., 16" lift,
44 ground hog, chevy
350CI, $4,500. obo
(352) 795-7808











FORD
'99, Explorer Sport, 2DR,
red, gray int., keyless,
very sharp $5,500.
(352) 795-5062
JEEP
'95 Grand Cherokee,
exc. cond. runs great,
$3,500 obo
(352) 302-0441
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com



TOYOTA
'99,4 Runner, SR5,
green, loaded, low ml.
new tires & brakes,
S16.000. (352) 382-3551


CHEVY BLAZER S-10
'86, 2.8, All terrain Tires
31X10.5, 4X4, $1400/obo
352-621-3840/220-4691
DODGE
1995 4x4, 40K, V-8, bed
cover,Michelin. 1 owner.
Showroom cond. $7500
obo. (352) 382-1981
FORD
1989 Ranger, 4WD, V-6,
auto, AC, new tires.
Bedliner. Clean. $1900.
(352) 400-1951
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
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wheels.com

Cm~pNT~i/^,


1937 SS 100 JAG
replica VW power, all fl-
ber glass, beautiful car.
$5,800. obo, may take
motorcycle In trade '04 Pontiac Mont.
697-2659, 352-628-7594 34K ml. 7 pas.
CHEVROLET loaded, Blue
1940 1/2 ton pickup, $13,888. Call
$5,800 or best offer
(352) 628-5371 Iv.msg Richard 726-1238'-


"MR CITRUSCOUNTY,


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

CHEVY
1992 Astro, excellent
shape, 87,000 miles.
$4000 or best offer.
(352) 344-8892
CHEVY ASTRO
'95 68k, $4800.00
(352) 637-4388
CHEVY LEISURE VAN
1994, qn. bed. TV,
Beautiful interior. Teal
Ithr. Cost new today,
$75,000, Just $6,900.
(352) 527-9245
DODGE
02, Grand Caravan EX,
6 pass., auto duel air,
pw, pw side/rear doors,
stereo/Cass/CD, 88K
$9,850. (352) 382-1710
(352) 476-1828
DODGE CARAVAN
Good work vehicle,
$750/obo
724-570-9607
FORD
1994 E-150, Mark 3
conversion, high miles,
runs good, clean,
$2,500 (352) 860-0608
FORD
2000 black Mustang,
86K, loaded, $6,490
860-1866 or 563-4169
FORD
'96 Windstar GL, V-6, 3.8
cold AC w/rear. Quad
seating. PW.cruise.150K.
$3130. (352) 212-3823

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Local Autos
Online at
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wheels.com




TOYOTA
2000 Siena XLE, fully
loaded, leather, 51,700
ml. $12,999 obo.
(352) 746-0205




ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2004 Heritage Soft tall
2,800 mi. like brand new
Sell due to sickness
(352) 302-0441




1996 HONDA CBR
600 F3, 1996
27,000 miles. Runs great
$2500. 352-228-1686
HARLEY DAVIDSON
ELECTRA GLIDE
1993
Excellent Condition,
need loan pay off of
approx. $12,000.00
Call 746-1392
HONDA
1977, Goldwing, 31K,
must see, $3,800 OBO
(352) 344-1283
HONDA
1986 Shadow, 700 cc,
24,000 ml. Runs & looks
great. New tires & batt.
Adult owned, $2600
obo. (352) 341-1486
HONDA
1992, Night Hawk 750,
lowered for a woman,
can be brought back
to stock, $2,000 obo
(352) 726-6454
HONIDA
1998 Shadow 1100, 24K
ml. Windshield, hard
bags-lock, lots of extras.
$4400. (352) 341-7788
HONDA 1999
1100 TOUR
CB & Radio, $3900
(352) 563-2096
HONDA CBR
2000 F-4 600 6,900 orig.
ml. garage stored,
Immaculate, some
extras, must see $5,700
obo (352) 422-2738
HONDA
Helix 250 scooter, '93,
excellent cond. Owned
by older gentleman,
$1800 firm.352-795-6650
KAWASAKI
'03, Vulcan 750, WS,
Immac. garaged, 8K,
must see, $5,200.
352-382-0005
Kymco Scooter,
'03, 60MPH, only 340 ml.
gorgeous powder blue,
w/ custom seat, like
new over $2,800.
invested steel at
$1,600. 352-464-2169

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com





SUZUKI
'05, GSXR 600, Blk. Sll. &
Red. like new, includes
modifications, 1,300 mi.l
Incl. new Icon, helmet
& jacket $8,000.
(352) 422-5736

YAMAHA
'01, Roadstar, 1600cc,
some accessories, new
tires, 15k ml.
tW) 7018-AA1A


554-0802 TUCRN
Notice to Credltors
Estate of John Leensvaart
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No: 2005-CP-858
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN LEENSVAART,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the


OT Classic
ma
cy) Vehicles


110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the
personal representatives'
attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice has
been served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE,


I


estate of JOHN LEENS-
VAART, deceased, whose
date of death was June
11. 2005, and whose So-
cial Security Number Is
323-05-6766, is pending In
the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is 110 N. Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, FL
34450. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM,
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE,
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
ilcation of this Notice Is
July 26, 2005.
Personal Representative:
-s- LINDA GODBY
525 Lakewood Drive
Inverness, FL 34450
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
DONALD F. PERRIN, P.A.
-s- Donald F. Perrin
Florida Bar No. 164338
Post Office Box 250
Inverness, FL 34451-0250
Telephone: (352) 726-6767
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. July 26 and August 2,
2005.


547-0726 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of
Helen M. Goldschmledt
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2005-CP-888
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN M. GOLDSCHMIEDT,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered In the estate of
HELEN M. GOLDSCHMIEDT,
deceased. File Number
2005-CP-888; by the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which
Is 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue. Inverness, Florida
34450; that the total cash
value of the estate Is real
property, and that the
names and addresses of
those to whom it has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
FRANK J. GOLDSCHMIEDT,
JR. a/k/a FRANK J. GOLD-
SCHMIEDT
8218 South 48th Drive
Laveen, Arizona 85339
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims br de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is
served within three
months after the date of
the first publication of this
notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or de-
mands against the estate
of the decedent must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publilca-
tion of this Notice is July
19,2005.
Person Giving Notice:
-s- FRANK J. GOLD-
SCHMIEDT, JR. a/k/a
FRANK J. GOLDSCHMIEDT
8218 South 48th Drive
Laveen. Arizona 85339
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
-s- JOANNE WILBURNE,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for Estate
Florida Bar No. 0125164
305 N. Apopka Avenue
Inverness, FL 34450
Telephone: (352) 344-1313
Facsimile: (352) 344-4050
Published (2) two times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 19 and 26, 2005.

552-0802 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of Roger C, Smith
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2005-CP-452
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
ROGER C. SMITH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
Estate of Roger C. Smith,
deceased, whose date of
death was April 6, 1995, Is
pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which Is


ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is July
26, 2005.
Personal Representatives:
-s- DANIEL L SMITH
-s- DENISE M. SMITH n/k/a
DENISE M. MORRIS
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
HAAG, FRIEDRICH &
BLUME, P.A.
452 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida 34452
(352) 726-0901
(352) 726-3345 (Facsimile)
Florida Bar No,: 0196529
-s- JEANNETTE M. HAAG
Attorney for Estate
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 26 and August 2,
2005.



548-0726 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of
Clifton E. Van Blarcum
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2005-CP-877
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLIFTON E. Van BLARCUM,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered In the Estate of
Clifton E. Van Blarcum.
deceased, File Number
2005-CP-877, by the Cir-
cuit Court of Citrus Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which
is 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida
34450; that the dece-
dent's date of death was
May 20, 2005; that the to-
tal value of the estate Is
$56,336.55 and that the
names and addresses of
those to whom it has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
Jean Clevenger and
Everett 0. Clevenger
1904 Winnetka Street
Hernando, FL 34442
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate
of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against the estate
of the decedent other
than those for whom pro-
vision for full payment was
made In the Order of
Summary Administration
must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE TIME
PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
lication of this Notice Is
July 19. 2005.
Person Giving Notice:
-s- Jean Clevenger
1094 Winnetka Street
Hernando, FL 34442
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY,
P.A.
-s- Michael Mountioy, Esq.
209 Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar No.: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 19 and 26, 2005.

553-0802 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of
Vera Jean Gilmore
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2005-CP-919
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VERA JEAN GILMORE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered in the Estate of
VERA JEAN GILMORE, de-
ceased, File No.. 2005-CP-
919, by the Circuit Court
for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450; that the
decedent's date of death
was March 5, 2005; that
the total cash value of
the estate Is $1000.00 and
that the names and ad-
dresses of those to whom
It has been assigned by
such order are:
Cheryl WIeland
1213 Chantilly Circle
Niceville, Florida 32578
Blllle Anderson
1440 190th St.
Corning., Iowa 50841
Jenny O'Dea
12305 N. 138th St.
Omaha, Nebraska 68142
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate
of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against estate of
the decedent other than
those for whom provision
for full payment was
made In the Order of
Summary Administration
must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME
PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
Ilcation of this Notice Is


CITRUS Cc





(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered in the Estate of
HARDING B. COOPER, de-
ceased, File Number
2005-CP-890, by the Cir-
cuit Court of Citrus Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which
Is 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness. Florida
34450; that- the dece-
dent's date of death was
MARCH 14, 2005; that the
total value of the estate is
$41,180.16 and that the
names and addresses of
those to whom It has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
HELEN H. COOPER
3510 S, FAIRWAY TERRACE
INVERNESS, FL 34450
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate
of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against the estate
of the decedent other
than those for whom pro-
vision for full payment was
made in the Order of
Summary Administration
must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE TIME
PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
lication of this Notice Is
July 19, 2005.
Person Giving Notice;
-s- HELEN H. COOPER
3510 S. Fairway Terrace
Inverness, FL 34450
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY,
P.A.
-s- Michael Mountjoy, Esq.
209 Courthouse Square
Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar No.: 157310
Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 19 and 26, 2005.

555-0802 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
Mary Louise Costa
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2005-CP-951
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY LOUISE COSTA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Mary Louise
Costa, deceased, whose
date of death was June
24, 2005, is pending In the
Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the trustee and the trus-
tee's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice Is re-
quired to be served must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM,
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against dece-


557-0726 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
RFP No. 107-06
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners Is.
accepting proposals for the purpose of retaining a firm-
or firms to provide third party claims administration ser-
vices for the County's property, liability, automobile)
and workers' compensation claims. Proposals should&
be delivered to Citrus County Board of County Com-,
missioners. Attn: Georgette Brock, 3600 West Sovereign',
Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461, by 2:00 P.M. August
23, 2005. Contact the above office at (352) 527-5203
for a copy of the Request for Proposal.
VICKI PHILLIPS, CHAIRWOMAN
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 26, 2005.


363-0728 SU/TU/THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Invitation to Bid
Fencing, Layout, Site Clearing Project
Sealed bids will be received by the town of Yan-
keetown, Florida, until Friday, August 12, 2005, al 12:00
noon for fencing project. Bids will be opened and
publicly read during the Town Council Meeting on
Monday. August 15, 2005, at 7:30 PM. Any bid re-
ceived after the date and time specified will not be
considered. The Town of Yankeetown reserves the
right to reject any or all bids. All bids shall be sealed
and clearly marked "Fencing'. The bids shall be sent to
Debra A. Stines, Town Clerk, P.O. Box 280, Yankeetown.
Florida 34498-0280.
Specifications and contract may be obtained at the
Town Hall, 6241 Harmony Lane, Monday through Fri-
day, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
Published three (3) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 24, 26 and 28, 2005.


551-0816 TUCRN
Notice of Action-Quiet Title
Reinaldo Rebollo, et al. vs. Joseph C. Fox, et al.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2005-CA-2433e
REINALDO REBOLLO and SONIA
REBOLLO, husband and wife,
Plaintiffs.
-vs.-

JOSEPH C. FOX and SANDRA L. FOX,
GRAHAM WILLIAM ALBERT LAVERS and
ROSEMARY JUNE LAVERS, his wife,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GRAHAM WILLIAM ALBERT LAVERS and
ROSEMARY JUNE LAVERS
Old Road Inn, 296 Old Lalra
Lalro, Plymouth, Canada, P13 6AG
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title on the
following described property In Citrus County. Florida,
to-wit:

Lot 4, Block 328, CITRUS SPRINGS, Unit No. 3, a Subdivi-
sion according to the plot thereof, as recorded In Plat
Book 5, pages 116 through 129, Inclusive, public rec-
ords of Citrus County, Florida

has been Instituted against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses. If any, to it on
GLEN C. ABBOTT, ESQ., Plaintiffs' Attorney, whose ad-
dress Is Post Office Box 2019, Crystal River, Florida 34423,
on or before August 25, 2005, and file the original with-
the Clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs'
Attorney or Immediately thereafter: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.

DATED this 19th day of July, 2005.
BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of Court
By: -s- Marcia A. Michel
Deputy Clerk

Published tour (4) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 26. August 2,.9 and 16. 2005,


dent's estate must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-.
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publca-
tion of this notice Is July
26, 2005.
Personal Representative:
-s- Chanda Lee Costa
f/k/a Chanda Lee Baler
Homosassa, Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
-s- Wendell Pendleton,
Esquire
Florida Bar No. 364916
SLAYMAKER AND NELSON,
P.A.
6027 South Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-1204
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 26 and August 2,
2005.


556-0802 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
TerryWayne Oliver, Jr.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 2005-CP-947
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
TERRY WAYNE OLIVER, JR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
Estate of TERRY WAYNE
OLIVER, JR., deceased,
File Number 2005-CP-947
Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses
of the personal represent-
ative and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against the dece-
dent's estate, Including
unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this No-
tice is served must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against the dece-
dent's estate, Including
unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice Is July
26,2005.
Personal Representative:
R. WESLEY BRADSHAW
209 Courthouse Square
Inverness, Florida 34450
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
BRUCE CARNEY, ESQUIRE
Camey & Associates, P.A.
7655 W Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Suite 2
Crystal River, Florida 34429
352/795-8888
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 26 and August 2-
2005. .


July 26. 2005.
Person Giving Notice:
-s- CHERYL WIELAND
1213 Chantilly Circle
Niceville, Florida 32578
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
DONALD F. PERRIN, P.A.
By: -s- Donald F. Perrln
FL Bar No. 164338
Post Office Box 250
Inverness, FL 34451-0250
(352) 726-6767
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 26 and August 2,
2005.

546-0726 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of
Harding B. Cooper
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO, 2008-CP-890
IN R ESTATE OF
HARDING B. COOPER,
DECEASED,
NQ1DW10.RRW1QBS