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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00205
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: July 24, 2005
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00205

Full Text





Sports

Section 7
Tournament
kicks off in
Crystal
River.
PAGE 1B
. .. . .... - . . .


Key events



prove quite



profitable


Grand total: $154,614.66


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle .
ABOVE: Key Training Center client James Wiggens jogs ahead of the runners Saturday as they finish the six-day Run for the
Money. TOP RIGHT: Runner Phil Royal gets a lot of hugs Saturday after the finish of the Run for the Money.


Runners, telethon workers, Key clients celebrate highly successful week


ASHLEY SORRELL
asorrell@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


As Key Training Center runners with
Key clients close at their sides made
their way toward a crowd of supporting
clients and spectators Saturday, the
clouds opened up and brought a down-
pour of rain that soaked through their
shirts and sneakers.
Despite the sudden rainstorm, spirits
were not dampened and a sense of
excitement, relief and accomplishment
flashed across the faces of the clients
and runners.
Runners participating in the Key


I wouldn't miss
this for the world.

Greg Milat
Key Training Center client.
Training Center's 29th annual Run for
the Money started the final leg of their
180-mile trek in Inglis Saturday morn-
ing. They arrived at the Key Center
complex at noon, where clients gath-
ered in 'anticipation of what is a
momentous event for them.
"I wouldn't miss this for the world,"


client Greg Milat said, as he counted
down the minutes until the arrival of
the runners.
A thunderous cheer greeted the run-
ners as they finished the last leg with
smiling faces.
"It was a hot day, but seeing everyone
here makes it worth it," Cabot McBride,
Key Center director of housing and res-
idential services, said. "This is a huge
event for the clients."
Chris Moling, Rebecca Thielemann,
Shivella Rogers, Pete Doyle, Phil Royal
and McBride ran the final leg of the
event.
Please see KEY/Page 7A


Hosni Mubarak

vows to hunt

down terrorists

Associated Press
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt-
Egypt launched a massive hunt
Saturday for terrorists who set
off multiple bomb blasts that
killed more than 88 in this Red
Sea resort packed with
European and Arab vacation-
ers. Just days after the latest
London strike, the world
reeled from yet another attack
with possible
links to al-
Qaida. Th
Egyptian TI
investigators world is
said they were
trying to deter- very dis
mine whether
foreigners car- The frequ
ried out the
string of blasts terrorist
that leveled
the reception seems
area of a luxu-
ry tourist hotel mounting
and ripped
apart a coffee- ,
house crowd-
ed with Egyp- Malaysian pr
tians at 1:15 chairs the 0
a.m. Saturday, Isla
No direct
link was seen
between the
devastating blasts in Sharm
and the two rounds of explo-
sions that recently hit London's
subway and buses, but together
the attacks reinforced a global
fear that militants can strike
anywhere.
The resort at the southern
tip of the Sinai Peninsula has
long felt like an oasis of safety,
known equally for partying,
scuba diving and high-level
political summits.
But last October, 34 people
were killed in attacks on two
other Sinai resorts at Taba and


Investors fuel county 'Big Bang' Numbers


Out-of-county buyers scoop up lots


JIM HUNTER
jhunter@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
It's not a real estate term, but
you could call what has hap-
pened in Citrus County in the
last year and a half the "Big
Bang."
If the numbers are
any indicator, the sud- I Rea
den expansion of the banE
county's previously dow
languid real estate for
market has been a PA
chain reaction fueled
by out-of-county in-
vestors buying lots, followed by
in-county investors who tried
to jump in after the explosion
in both price and demand for
Citrus County lots.
The whole real estate market
was taken for a rocket ride,
with homeowners seeing their
property almost double in
value in a few years. Coupled


I.
g
n
'4


with increased construction
costs, the price of houses went,
from a Citrus County perspec-
tive, through the roof to the
extent that some people who
could afford to buy a home a
few years earlier found them-
selves unable to even qualify.
Whether the purchasing by
outside investors
estate actually sparked the
has sudden explosion in
side real estate values may
county never be known, but a
GE 4A look at the numbers
shows they played a
significant role. The
statistics certainly tell a story
of a county suddenly being
dragged by its lots into realms
of real estate values the magni-
tude of which it. had never
dreamed.
Numbers tell the story
The number of developable
lots in the county hasn't


-changed that much since 2002,
when there were 72,647 unde-
veloped parcels, according to
county records. At the end of
the first half of 2005, for exam-
ple, there were 69,797 undevel-


oped lots.
On the other hand, the zoom-
ing lot sales figures tell the
story. Consider the numbers:
Please see BANG/Page 4A


tell story


in Citrus


Investors jump in,

market heats up
JiM HUNTER
jhunter@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The escalating numbers of
investors who bought 10 Citrus
County lots or more vs. those
who bought a lot for a home, or
maybe invested in a few lots,
from 2002 to mid-2005 is evi-
dent in the sales statistics for
lots.
In 2002, there were only
seven out-of-county investors
buying 10 or more lots. That
number increased to 20 in
2003, to 136 in 2004 and to 85


I



g




ir
ar


Ras Shitan, about 120 miles
north of Sharm el-Sheik.
"The whole world is getting
very disturbed. The frequency
(of terrorist attacks) seems to
be mounting," said Malaysian
Prime Minister Abdullah
Ahmad Badawi, who chairs the
57-nation Organization of the
Islamic Conference.
President Bush telephoned
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak to offer his support
"Standing together with the
rest of the civilized -world, we
will win the conflict against
this global scourge," said
White House spokesman Scott
McClellan.
There were conflicting
claims of
responsibility
e whole one from an
al-Qaida-linked
getting group, the
other from a
turbed. previously
unknown and
ency (of apparently
local group.
attacks) At hotels
across Sharm
to be el-Sheik late
Saturday, lob-
*. bies were
jammed with
.; Ahmad tourists with
Badawi their baggage,
ne minister, who eager to leave.
ganization of the At the nearby
mic Conference: international
airport, for-
eigners lined
up, with hun-
dreds of Italians trying to get
flights out. Some were pre-
pared to wait overnight in the
airport rather than stay at
hotels.
"I wanted to stay for all the
summer, but now I'm going
home," said 27-year-old
Stefano Alquati from Rimini,
Italy, who travels each year to
Sharm. "It's not good to stay
here ... Sharm el-Sheik is fin-
ished, the business and all. I
saw the panic."

Please see . '.I/Page 7A

NUMBER OF
UNIMPROVED
PARCELS IN
CITRUS COUNTY
Year Unimproved
parcels
S2002 72,647
12003 71,642
12004 70,056
E 2005 69,797*
At end of first half
Source: Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office


thus far in 2005.
In 2004, there were 52 out-of-
county interests who bought 25
or more lots. That compared to
eight in-county interests, who
were most often local builders,
who bought 25 or more lots that
year.
Out-of-county buying
In 2002, the most lots sold to
an out-of-county interest was
29. In 2003, there was only one
out-of-county buyer taking
more than 100 lots. Deltona

Please see ; iV.-'i/Page 4A


X Annie's Mailbox . 14A
a, Classified .. . 8D
a Crossword ...... 16A
y Horoscope ...... 13A
Movies ......... 13A
Obituaries ....... 6A
Stocks .......... 2D
Together ....... 15A
Eight Sections


6 811578 200751 o


Grounds for
concern
The fire ant
has made
itself at home
in the Florida
environs.
Learn what
you can do
to defend
yourself from
its fiery
ways./19E


Secondhand shopping savvy


Consignment shops offer upscale clothing
for a fraction of the original cost./1D


Not a fashion
accessory
Ankle
bracelets are
being touted
as a cost-
efficient way
to track
people who
authorities
need to keep
on a short
tether. /1C


Hunt for county
administrator
l Among the 33
applicants for
assistant county
administrator are
a number of
Citrus County
officials./3A
l United Way
meets national
certification
standards./3A,


>o 0




C >

"7 C) .


Egypt


mourns





attacks


Parcels WHO BOUGHT THE LOTS?
sold
20,000 g In-county buyers 8,083
15,000 14,965
10,000 / Out-of-county buyers
9,000 Source: Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000 4,0o1
4,000
3,000 2,ss 1 3-76
2,000 18 12
1,000
N m to
N N NMN


.;.7777 7


" -: 4'" ' "









2A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


Florida
LOTTERIES --...


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
7-5-1
PLAY 4
4-8-1-8

FANTASY 5
17 21 23 25 30
LOTTO
1 8 15 36 37 44
FRIDAY, JULY 22
Cash 3:3 9 2
Play 4:5-9-4-5
Fantasy 5:2 7 12 23 35
5-of-5 1 winner $233,839.51
4-of-5 385 $97.50
3-of-5 11,701 $9
Mega Money: 6 14 26 41
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,891.50
3-of-4 MB 59 $351
3-of-4 1,128 $54.50
2-of-4 MB 1,501 $28.50
2-of-4 35,968 $2
1-of-4 MB 13,038 $3
THURSDAY, JULY 21
Cash 3: 0-4- 1
Play 4:4 2 2 8
Fantasy 5:1 10- 12 16 -28
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 336 $712.50
3-of-5 10,184 $9
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20
Cash 3: 8 8 5
Play 4:7 7 9 2
Fantasy 5:15 20 23 30 31
5-of-5 3 winners $73,442.82
4-of-5 252 $141
3-of-5 8,205 $12
Lotto: 1 6 9 16 22 43
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 89 $3,661
4-of-6 5,173 $51
3-of-6 95,279 $3.50
TUESDAY, JULY 19
Cash 3:00- 5- 8
Play 4:0 1 4 2
Fantasy 5:1 12 26 27 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 245 $968
3-of-5 8,125 $11
Mega Money: 3-7-29-41
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $800,000
4-of-4 6 $1,619
3-of-4 MB 65 $327.50
3-of-4 1,254 $50.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
n To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
Players should double.-check
-the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


/P N i N.E PO LI


C ,P-KO 'C- v'0I-fA v


Are you happy junk food had
been banned from school
cafeterias?


A Yes. Children need to eat
healthier foods.
B. No; The school district
will lose income.
C. Yes. Junk food has no place
in the educational process.
D. No. First the FCAT, now
this.


To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the July
31 edition, along with a new
question.
Last week's results:
Are you planning on reading
the latest "Harry Potter" book?


A Yes. I bought it the day it
came out. 15.9% (43)
B. Yes. But I'm going to wait
for the paperback version. 8.0%
(23)
C. No. I'll just see the movie.
22.3% (61)
D. Who is this Harry Potter
fellow? 51.5% (137)


Spotlight on PERSONALITIES


Sizemore to



remain in rehab


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Actor
Tom Sizemore was ordered to
remain in a
live-in drug o
rehabilitation
program until
he is sen-
tenced in
September for
violating his
probation on
drug charges. Tom
Sizemore sizemore
admitted to a
series of violations, including
falsifying his urine tests and
failing to submit to drug test-
ing on eight occasions, Deputy
District Attorney Sean Carney
said.
The actor was nearly a no-
show in court, arriving several
hours late for Friday's hearing.
His attorney, Michael Rovell,
said Sizemore had been in the
rehabilitation facility since
July 11 and requested
Thursday that the actor be
excused from appearing.
Superior Court Judge Paula


Adele Mabrey denied the
request and delayed the hear-
ing so Sizemore could attend.

Love makes progress
LOS ANGELES A judge
has praised Courtney Love for
making
progress in a
court-ordered .
drug treatment f. .
program. '
Love, 41, did .|-
not appear in ,
Superior Court
for the status
report on how Courtney
she is doing. Love
But her lawyer,
Michael Rosenstein, said that
after reviewing her case, a
judge concluded the singer-
actress was "progressing
well."
The hearing took place less
than 48 hours after L6ve was
reportedly taken to a hospital
when she reported feeling
faint at an industry party in
Hollywood. The nature of her
illness was not disclosed.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.
us/ and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.


To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group
and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet. The
shelter is in Inverness near


the airport. It is open for
adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday
and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 726-7660 for more
information.


4- P.atchE.- NAME: Pooky NAME: (none) N: Spanky NAME: Fragel
AGE: AGE: adult AGE: adult AGE: kitten AGE: adult
SEX: SF SEX: F SEX: F SEX: F SEX: M
ID #: 49204 ID #: 54590 ID #: 48382 ID #: 50975 ID #: 54209


Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida, 563-2370,
or from the Humane Society
of Citrus County, 341-2222.


NAME: Keara NAME: Roxxy NAME: Sammi
AGE: adult AGE: puppy AGE: adult
SEX: F SEX: F SEX: SF
ID #: 54438 ID #: 50213 ID #: 54678


Rhinestone Roper


The weather REPORT


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


99- ,


City H
Daytona Bch. 91
Ft. Lauderdale 91
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 93
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 92
Key West 91
Lakeland 92
Melbourne 91


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


Northwest winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas Gulf water
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters a light tem perature
chop. Partly cloudy with scattered showers
and thunderstorms. 8 9 0


Taken at Egmont Key

Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 33.43 33.52 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.28 38.25 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.80 39.78 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.15 41.14 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data Is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this
data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka 9:14 a/4:37 a 8:37 p/4:32 p 9:45 a/5:15 a 9:32 p/5:24 p
Crystal River 7:35 a/1:59 a 6:58 p/1:54 p 8:06 a/2:37 a 7:53 p/2:46 p
Withlacoochee 5:22 a/11:42 a 4:45 p/- 5:53 a/12:25 a 5:40 p/12:34 p
Homosassa 8:26 a/3:36 a 7:49 p/3:31 p 8:57 a/4:14 a 8:44 p/4:23 p


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
-E TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 90 Low: 78
Partly cloudy with scattered show-
' .. ers and thunderstorms.


MONDAY
High: 91 Low: 79
Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
-' thunderstorms.
TUESDAY
I' ^High: 91 Low: 77
Partly cloudy with afternoon showers and
. thunderstorms.

WEDNESDAY
High: 89 Low: 76
Partly cloudy with afternoon showers and
S'" thunderstorms.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


90/73
96/66
72/91
82
0

0.03 in.
5.76 in.
27.52 in.
29.25 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.06 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 85%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were
all light.
"Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was moderate with pol-
lutants mainly ozone.


g iO JUtLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT 8 e P.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:47 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY..................... 11:09P.M.
J.I.27 AIG.-4 A.12 Mill- MOONSET.TODAY..... .....10:15A.M.
., -... -,* ,T-ABL S- .-

DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/24 SUNDAY 9:10 2:57 9:36 3:23
7/25 MONDAY 10:06 3:54 10:30 4:18

^0URliNtbNONS "
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

,.. WATERING RULES
, .- _ : ... -- .
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0, 1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. New plant material may
be Irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Invemess can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending in even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday,
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
Albany 83 62 ptcldy 85 63
Albuquerque 90 70 tstrm 91 68
Anchorage 66 52 shwrs 66 54
Asheville 87 69 ptcldy 86 67
Atlanta 91 74 ptcldy 95 74
Atlantic City 88 73 sunny 87 71
Austin 95 75 tstrm 94 75
Baltimore 87 70 ptcldy 89 72
Billings 93 66 ptcldy 90 59
Birmingham 93 76 ptcldy 98 74
Boise 89 60 ptcldy 96 60
Boston 84 68 sunny 82 65
Brownsville 93 77 tstrm 89 79
Buffalo 84 62 tstrm 83 71
Burlington, VT 78 61 ptcldy 83 61
Charleston, SC 92 77 ptcldy 94 76
Charleston, WV 88 70 ptcldy 93 70
Charlotte 92 70 ptcldy 90 71
Chicago 82 64 .03 ptcldy 10173
Cincinnati 90 69 .01 ptcldy 93 75
Cleveland 83 63 tstrm 92 73
Columbia, SC 93 73 .01 ptcldy 97 76
Columbus, OH 87 68 tstrm 92 75
Concord 81 60 ptcldy 82 60
Corpus Christi 95 74 tstrm 88 77
Dallas 98 76 ptcldy 98 78
Denver 10163 tstrm 87 63
Des Moines 97 76 sunny 10075
Detroit 82 65 tstrm 92 73
El Paso 96 77 ptcldy 97 74
Evansville 90 71 ptcldy 99 .75
Harrisburg 84 68 ptcldy 88 70
Hartford 87 75 sunny 85 64
Honolulu 89 77 shwrs 88 76
Houston 91 74 tstrm 92 76
Indianapolis 88 72 ptcldy 95 76
Jackson 96 75 ptcldy 96 75
Kansas City 99 75 sunny 10077
Las Vegas 99 84 tstrm 10281
Little Rock 96 72 ptcldy 10075
Los Angeles 86 68 tstrm 79 66
Louisville 92 73 ptcldy 98 77
Memphis 96 77 ptcldy 99 79
Milwaukee 83 65 .39 ptcldy 98 73
Minneapolis 84 70 .63 ptcldy 90 67
Mobile 94 77 tstrm 95 76
Montgomery 95 75 .04 ptcldy 98 76
Nashville 92 76 ptcldy 99 77


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 93 77 tstrm 93 78
New York City 85 72 sunny 86 72
Norfolk 86 77 ptcldy 90 74
Oklahoma City 99 74 ptcldy 10074
Omaha 10578 sunny 10074
Palm Springs 97 85 tstrm 10883
Philadelphia 87 76 sunny 88 72
Phoenix 10082 tstrm 10586
Pittsburgh 84 64 tstrm 88 69
Portland, ME 81 64 sunny 79 61
Portland, Ore 79 57 sunny 81 57
Providence 86 69 sunny 84 64
Raleigh 92 72 ptcldy 91 72
Rapid City 10370 tstrm 93 63
Reno 95 58 sunny 98 61
Rochester 81 58 ptcldy 83 69
Sacramento 10257 sunny 10263
St. Louis 95 75 sunny 10181
St. Ste. Marie 83 56 tstrm 78 58
Salt Lake City 90 73 ptcldy 96 70
San Antonio 93 77 tstrm 91 75
San Diego 74 68 .01 tstrm 82 67
San Francisco 88 57 sunny 74 56
Savannah 94 74 .01 ptcldy 95 75
Seattle 74 54 sunny 75 56
Spokane 83 55 ptcldy 83 52
Syracuse 82 58 ptcldy 83 67
Topeka 99 75 sunny 10076
Washington 87 71 .87 ptcldy 89 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 110 Winner, S.D. LOW 38 Meacham, Ore.


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdar
Athens
Beijing
Berlin
Bermuda
Cairo
Calgary
Havana
Hong Koni
Jerusalem


SUNDAY
H/L/SKY
88/78/ts
m 71/56/c
89/68/pc
90/75/ts
72/57/pc
87/74/pc
101/73/s
71/54/pc
89/77/pc
g 90/75/ts
93/64/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


88/65/s
74/51/sh
99/65/s
87/59/pc
79/62/pc
78/61/c
75/55/sh
80/66/ts
89/68/pc
67/50/c
89/71/pc
86/61/ts
69/53/c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02005 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Associated Press
Ten-year-old Cody Minks hops through his lariat Friday while
performing the Texas Skip rope trick in Ness City, Kan.
Minks has performed rope tricks with his father, Dan, and
mother, Kimberly, in The Rhinestone Roper Show since he
was three years old.


THE NATION


vM10


" "~""~~"" " "~" ".........." "


--------------- --- .. ..... ......... ....


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.I


ENTERTAINMENT


Today is Sunday, July 24, the
205th day of 2005. There are 160
days left in the year.
Today's Highliglht in History:
On July 24, 1969, the Apollo 11
astronauts two of whom had
been the first men to set foot on
the moon splashed down safely
in the Pacific.
On this date:
In 1866, Tennessee became the
first state to be readmitted to the
Union after the Civil War.
In 1974, the Supreme Court
unanimously ruled that President
Nixon had to turn over subpoe-
naed White House tape recordings
to the Watergate special prosecu-
tor.
In 1979, a Miami jury convicted
Theodore Bundy of first-degree
murder in the slaying of Florida
State University sorority sisters
Margaret Bowman and Lisa Levy.
In 2002, nine coal miners were
trapped in a flooded mine in west-
ern Pennsylvania; the story ended
happily three days later with the
rescue of all nine.
Ten years ago: A suicide
bomber set off an explosion in a
crowded commuter bus in Tel Aviv,
Israel, killing six people.
Five years ago: President
Clinton continued to mediate the
Camp David Mideast summit,
meeting with Israeli, Palestinian
and U.S. negotiators.
One year ago: Without promis-
ing what specific steps he would
take, President Bush said in his
weekly radio'address that his
administration was committed to
relying on the recommendations of
the Sept. 11 commission in waging
the war on terrorism.
Today's Birthdays: Movie
director Peter Yates is 76. Actress
Jacqueline Brookes is 75. Political
cartoonist Pat Oliphant is 70.
Comedian Ruth Buzzi is 69. Actor
Mark Goddard is 69. Actor Dan
Hedaya is 65. Actor Chris
Sarandon is 63. Comedian
Gallagher is 59. Actor Robert Hays
is 58. Former Republican National
Chairman Marc Racicot is 57.
Actor Michael Richards is 56.
Actress Lynda Carter is 54. Movie
director Gus Van Sant is 53.
Country singer Pam Tillis is 48.
Actor Kadeem Hardison is 40.
Actress-singer Jennifer Lopez is
37. Actress Laura Leighton is 37.
Actor John P. Navin Jr. is 37.
Actress-singer Kristin Chenoweth
is 35. Actress Anna Paquin*is 23.
Thought for Today: "1 never
liked the middle ground the
most boring place in the world." -
Louise Nevelson, Russian-
American artist (1900-1988).














~iI
/


SUNDAY
JULY 24, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


a' ~. iC \,&V"


Latest squall stays at sea


Tropical Storm Franklin continues to spin

in open water, no threat to land


Associated Press

MIAMI Tropical Storm Franklin
strengthened as it spun away from the
Bahamas on Saturday and moved far-
ther east in the Atlantic, but blasts of
warm air from its core were expected to
bring extreme heat to the Florida penin-
sula.
Heat index readings in Florida.
exceeded 110 degrees, even though
Franklin's 70 mph winds and strong rain
weren't forecast to affect land.


Experts:


Sandstorm


could hit


Florida


Desert dust may

affect breathing

Associated Press

MIAMI A cloud of dust
from the Sahara Desert could
move over large sections of
Florida by early next week,
although forecasters do not
expect the system to cause
widespread problems or pose
any serious health risks.
The massive cloud nearly
the size of the continental
United States should arrive
between Monday and Wed-
nesday. Dust clouds, especially
at this time of year, are not
uncommon.
"This is not going to be a
tremendous event, but it will
be kind of interesting," said
Jim Lushine, a severe weather
expert with Miami's weather
bureau. Sat
He added that the haze from at'
the dust could make views of the
sunrise and sunset spectacu- spe
lar. of I
Scott Kelly, a meteorologist
with the National Weather
Service in Melbourne, said
Saturday that the cloud -
which could dissipate may U
not have much effect on the
rest of the country.
"Maybe south Texas or
Mexico if that dust cloud keeps Aif
moving westward, but nothing m a1
north of Florida, unless a
weather system can dive
southward and pull that air J
northward," he said.
The dust outbreak starts
when tropical waves lift sand Am(
from the Sahara a couple of assist
miles into the sky, reducing it ber of
to even smaller particles. The dents.
dust drifts west on a dry tropi- The
cal wave. death
If the dust is concentrated deadli
enough, the cloud could create Citr
some issues for people with rector
respiratory problems, said Ken whom
Larson, a natural resource spe- applyi
cialist with the Broward rent p
County Environmental Pro- ter's d
tection Department Anc
"If somebody is subject to a Thom
respiratory condition, if they ty's as
see hazy skies, they might want 2001.1
to take a little more precau- Aquat
tion, not participate in strenu- for th
ous activity and stay indoors," lor's d
Larson said. Citr
Some scientists believe that Direci
dust clouds impede formation for th.
of tropical storms, which can tion fi
eventually turn into hurri- before
canes. plann


By early afternoon, the combination of
intense heat and high humidity led to
oppressive heat-index readings across
the state.
At 4 p.m., according to National
Weather Service data, Panama City's
heat index was 111, when combining its
95-degree temperature with 58 percent
humidity. It felt like 110 in Pensacola,
107 degrees in Vero Beach and
Jacksonville, 104 in Miami Beach, and
100 in Tallahassee and Key West.
"It's terrible," Mike Delay, an Orlando


painter, said as he took a break outside a
downtown job Saturday afternoon -
when the heat index was in the high 90s.


"I drink a lot of water."
And forecasters
warned the heat and
humidity could be
higher Sunday also
increasing the dangers
of exhaustion and


ON TH
M National Hu
Center: wwwv


other heat-related
problems.
Franklin's sustained wind was meas-
ured at 70 mph, just below the 74 mph
threshold to be classified as a hurricane.
At 5 p.m., the storm's center was about
295 miles northeast of Great Abaco
Island, and nearly 585 miles west-south-


west of Bermuda. Franklin was moving
east-northeast at 9 mph, and was expect-
ed to continue strengthening.
The system was no major threat to any
land mass, and the
National Hurricane
E NET Center in Miami said
rricane Franklin may lose its
-.nhc.noaa.gov tropical characteristics
by early next week
"It is quite possible
that little or nothing will be left of
Franklin ... in two to three days," hurri-
cane specialist James Franklin said
Saturday.
Franklin is the earliest sixth named
storm on record for the Atlantic hurri-
cane season, which began June 1.


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
turday started the state's nine-day tax-free holiday on certain school supplies, shoes and clothing. Corrine Morgan, left, shops
the Super Wal-Mart in Inverness with Estevan Manteca and Victoria Manteca. Both children are 10 years old and going into
e fifth grade at Forest Ridge Elementary. The holiday ends at midnight July 31. Businesses or shoppers with questions about
ecific items included in the holiday may call (800) 352-3671 between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. weekdays, or go to the Department
Revenue's Web site at www.myflorida.com/dor.




countyy job draws local interest


my apply for assistant administrator position


JIM HUNTER
jhunter@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

ong the 33 applicants for the job of
ant county administrator are a num-
[f Citrus ,County officials and resi-

job became vacant with the June
of Ken Saunders. Friday was the
ne to apply
us County Human Resources Di-
* Richard R. Petit Jr., the official to
the resumes are being sent, is
ing for the job. Petit has held his cur-
osition for four years and has a mas-
legree in business administration.
other county official applying is
as Dick, who has served as the coun-
ssistant Public Works director since
Before that, he served as the county
tic Services director. He has worked
e county 19 years, and has a bache-
[egree in environmental science.
*us County Community Development
tor Charles Dixon also is applying
e job. He has held his current posi-
or seven years, and for seven years
e that he served as a community
er for the county. He has a master of


science degree in planning.
Citrus County Public Safety Director
Charles Poliseno has also applied. He has
been the director of the department for six
years and was an Emergency Medical
Services supervisor in other counties.
before that. He has a master's degree in
business.
Former Citrus County Sheriff's Deputy
Dwight Giddens of Gainesville has applied
for the position. Giddens worked for the
sheriff's office for nine years in the patrol
division. He has a master's degree in pub-
lic administration and has worked with a
number of natural gas companies in man-
agerial positions.
A former director of the county parks
and recreation department has also
applied for the job. John Jackson, of Palm
Coast, was the director of the department
from 1986 to 1990, and he now holds a sim-
ilar position for the City of Palm Coast. He
has a master of science degree in leisure
services.
Alison Wheeler, who is the delinquent
tax deputy clerk for the Citrus County tax
collector, has also applied. She has a mas-'
ter's degree in international business mar-
keting strategy.
Other Citrus County residents have also


applied for the job. Teresa M. Houghton of
Homosassa, most recently a production
coordinator for Mercedes Homes, has
applied. She is currently pursuing a bach-
elor's degree in business administration.
Michael W Kirk of Crystal River, a proj-
ect engineer for Crystal Engineering &
Construction Inc., has applied for the job.
He graduated from the Naval Academy
with a bachelor of arts degree in systems
engineering.
Sonya E. Hall of Inverness is a finance
manager with Spectrum Global Networks
and has also applied for the job. She has a
bachelor's degree in accounting.
Other residents who have applied
include Richard Eliasen of Hernando, a
consultant for Novo Nordisk, and Richard
F Kubli of Hernando, the campus college
chairman of information systems and
technology for the University of Phoenix
at the Tampa campus. He has a Ph.D. in
computer sciences.
Two other residents are: William J.
Keeley of Lecanto, a former military offi-
cer who is a Realtor for RE/MAX Realty
One and who has a bachelor's degree in
computer and management science, and
Kathy P Brown of Homosassa, an opera-
tions coordination department head for
SunTacc and Co. Inc. who has a bachelor
of science in business management


Local United Way meets national certification standards


Special to the Chronicle


John Marmish, executive director,
announced that the United Way of
Citrus County has successfully complet-
ed all of the United Way of America
membership requirements satisfactori-
ly and on time.
The requirements include: Mem-
bership Requirements Certification,
Membership Investment and the
Database 2 Survey of Total Resources
Generated (a survey that captures the
full extent of a community's resource
development efforts during the year).
"It is important for us to maintain a
high standard of accountability and this
is part of the process to document that


It is important for us to maintain a
high standard of accountability.

John Marmish
executive director, United Way of Citrus County.


our operations are transparent and
meet or exceed United Way member-
ship criteria requirements," Marmish
said. "The membership standards must
be certified annually in order for us to
remain a member of the United Way
system."
The Board of United Way of Citrus
County reviewed the Membership


Requirements Certification June 20 at
the monthly meeting.
The certification mandates comple-
tion of 13 requirements for United Way
of America membership, along with
verification of the status of 44 indica-
tors that demonstrate a United Way
embodies the intent of the membership
requirements.


"It is critically important all United
Ways meet the highest standards and
verify on paper that they have con-
formed to the stringent requirements of
membership in the United Way sys-
tem," said Brian Gallagher, president
and CEO, United Way of America.
"We applaud and congratulate
United Way of Citrus County for demon-
strating their commitment to the mis-
sion and ideals of United Way by com-
pleting the recertification process."
The United Way of Citrus County is
part of a system of more than 1,300
United Ways. Each local United Way
must complete United Way of America's
requirements annually to retain its
United Way of America membership.


County ""-

Nuclear plant names
senior inspector
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission officials in the Region II
office in Atlanta have assigned
Thomas Morrissey as the senior
resident inspector at the Crystal
River nuclear power plant on the
west coast of Florida.
Morrissey joined the NRC as a
Project Engineer in Division of
Reactor Projects in Region II in
January 1998. In August 2000,
he was assigned as the resident
inspector at Vogtle Electric Gen-
erating Plant in Waynesboro, Ga.
Prior to joining the NRC,
Morrissey worked as an assis-
tant chief test engineer at
Norfolk Naval Shipyard in
Portsmouth, Va.
Morrissey earned bachelor of
science degrees in chemical
and electrical engineering at the
University of Florida.
Each U.S. commercial
nuclear power plant has at least
two NRC resident inspectors.
They serve as the agency's
eyes and ears at the facility,
conducting regular inspections,
monitoring significant work proj-
ects and interfacing with plant
workers and the public.
Morrissey joins Resident
Inspector Roger Reyes and
Secretary Gail Sonneville at the
Crystal River plant. The NRC
staff at the Crystal River plant
can be reached at 795-7677.
Apply now for
teen think tanks
Applications are ready for high
school students interested in join-
ing the Citrus County Chronicle's
writing and discussion groups.
The Chronicle Crew applica-
tion deadline is Saturday.
Chronicle Crew members
must be willing'to openly and
honestly contribute to discus-
sions, meet deadlines for writing
assignments, be available for
editor's questions and be able to
provide their own transportation
to monthly meetings at the
Chronicle's office in Crystal River.
Discussion group members
will participate in roundtable dis-
cussions and topics related to
student life. Writing group mem-
bers will have a chance to write
reviews, feature stories and
columns for the Chronicle's
Education section.
Students may download appli-
cations from www.chronicleon-
line.com under the Extras link, or
pick up applications at Chronicle
offices at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River; or 106 W.
Main St., Inverness, as well as
Citrus County libraries.
Call Cristy Loftis at 564-2925
with questions.
From staff reports

State BRIEFS

Infant girl left in car
died of heatstroke
ORLANDO Heatstroke
killed a 4-month-old girl who
was apparently forgotten in the
back of her father's car, accord-
ing to medical officials who ruled
the death an accident.
The Orange-Osceola Medical
Examiner's Office said Friday it
could not determine exactly,
when Kayli Saavedra died the
previous day, because of many
complicated variables in the
case. Kayli was discovered after
her father went to pick her up at
her day-care and workers there
told him she had never arrived,
authorities said.
Gabriel Saavedra rushed out
to his car at Storybook Nursery
School and found his tiny
daughter still strapped in her
infant seat from that morning,
police said. The girl was
declared dead at the scene.
Parents awarded
$15 M in son's death
ST. PETERSBURG -The
parents of a 15-month-old boy
who died in April 2002 have
been awarded $15 million, after
jurors decided that a medical
misdiagnosis led to the child's
death.
Marek and Kaleesa Rusiecki


of St. Petersburg each received
compensatory damages for their
son Andrew's funeral costs, as
well as $7.5 million apiece for
the loss. The jury did not consid-
er punitive damages.
From wire reports


Kr


-1


Saving on sales tax








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOTAL VALUE LOT SALE AND AVERAGE PRICE
(Dollars and average prices in and out of Citrus County)


Who purchased

Out-of-County
Out-of-County
Out-of-County
Out-of-County
In-County
In-County
In-County
In-County


Year

2002
2003
2004
2005
2002
2003
2004
2005


Total value of sales
(in millions)
$47
$89.6
$396.1
$288.4* (576.8)**
$33.8
$52.2
$103.4
$53.2* (106.4)**


Average price

$30,591
$31,583
$35,767
$47,014
$25,111
$26,955
$30,321
$46,362


*First half of year
**Projected for year
Source: Citrus County property appraiser's office


BANG
Continued from Page 1A

In 2002, there were 1,555 lots
bought by Citrus County inter-
ests. There were 1,812 lots
bought by interests outside the
county.
In 2003, there were 2,818 lots
sold to Citrus County interest.
There were 3,601 sold to out-of
-county interests.
Then came
the bang. The d
In 2004,
there were a out-Of-COU
whopping
4,081 lots sold trend is c
to interests in n
the county, into 200
which might
have raised as values
some eye- lots, suc
brows of those'
watching Citrus S
trends in the
county just a have incr
few years ago
- but there much as
were 14,965
parcels sold to
out-of-county
interests. The buying was so
furious it was not uncommon
for lots to be sold again before
they closed, so heated was the
buying. A dozen out-of-county
investors bought lots by the
hundreds; one investor pur-
chased 650 that year (see
accompanying story for details
about who was buying).
The 2004 out-of-county sales
trend is continuing into 2005,
even as values of some lots,
such as in Citrus Springs, have
increased as much as tenfold.
In the first half of 2005, the
number of lot sales to out-of-
county interests was 8,083,
ahead of last year, while sales
to in-county interests in the
first half of the year appeared
to have flagged, coming in way
behind last year at .1,375
parcels.
What it did to values
County Property Appraiser
Melanie Hensley, like every-
one else, is shaking her head
at what happened. She noted
the real estate market condi-
tions have contributed to more
than a billion dollars in reval-
uation in the county for this
year.
The total increased assess-
able tax value was a staggering
$1.6 billion, she said, adding
that only $294 million of that
increase was in new construc-
tion.
While homesteaded proper-
ties are somewhat protected
from increased assessments
with the 3 percent cap, that's
not the case for unimproved
lots and commercial property,
she noted.
Conditions were ripe
The sudden phenomenon in
lot sales caught most everyone
in the county by surprise,
though some local real estate
business people say the signs
- or at least conditions -
were there.
Monty Van Ness of Van Ness
Properties Inc., for example,
has done extremely well sell-
ing lots to outside interests,


I
0


J



C
I
19


0

Ic
s


especially in Citrus Springs,
the old Deltona planned
development that has more
than 30,000 lots.
Like some of his peers in
local real estate, Van Ness
points to lingering low interest
rates, the flat stock market,
and a national and even world-
wide trend of investors turn-
ing to real estate. Add to that
the inventory of lots in Citrus
County in some big, well-
planned but
very slow-
2004 growing devel-
opments like
nty sales Citrus Springs.
o n With two golf
continuing courses and a
community
5, even center and
of some infrastructure,
ofit is very
ch as in attractive to
outsiders, Van
springs Ness said.
Stir into that
eased as volatile mix
the proximity
tenfold. of Citrus
County to
Tampa Bay as
a bedroom
community with the new
Suncoast Parkway, and the
real expectation of an
increased flow of fairly afflu-
ent retirees from. the baby
boomer generation who are
only just beginning to retire.
Then add the spark of real
estate prices that are a frac-
.tion of the prices in adjacent
more-developed areas and
areas that weren't long ago
like Citrus.
What do you get? Boom.
Feeding frenzy
Then fan the flames with
investor frenzy. When the
word got out, it got out quickly,
not only around the state from
Miami to Port St. Lucie to
Jacksonville, but from
California to New York
Investors jumped in from
overseas, from Korea to
Austria, and way-out-of-town
investors began buying and
flipping lots. Big-development
interests bought hundreds of
lots at a clip. Prices in
Sugarmill Woods were some of
the first to go up early in the
boom, Van Ness said, and it
quickly spread.
Picking a metaphor from his
childhood, Van Ness laughing-
ly likens the event to the Hula
Hoop frenzy of the 1950s.
"It's mainly been an investor
boom," he observed, though he
said a lot of people, locals and
otherwise, started catching on,
too, and bought a lot or two to
flip.
He said his company's buy-
ing and selling of lots went in

Personal
Jcwdchy
Stcaln
clcallc



GEM
Established 1985
795-5900
600 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


stages. It started with lots
$1,200 to $5,000 and then
$2,500 to $8,000 and continued.
"This thing just kept going," he
added, noting that as lots were
flipped, the prices went up to
the next stage. Lots that had
started at a few thousand were
$30,000 by 2005.
Everybody got in on it
Van Ness tells the story
about a group of regular peo-
ple from Palm Coast, which
had already gone through its
own Big Bang of sorts, who
had seen how lot prices could
accelerate in a short time.
After he had a conversation
with one person from that
area, he found himself with an
office full of people from Palm
Coast who all wanted from one
to five lots each.
"They didn't have to be rock-
et scientists," he said. Van
Ness said he'd give any one of
them $25,000 today for any of
those lots he sold for $14,000
because the market is still
there.
It's ironic, Van Ness said,
because he always steered his
sales people away from
encouraging investment in
lots unless houses were
planned for them.
"But it's all changed," he
said. "It just changed over-
night."
Will it peak soon?
No one wants to be left hold-
ing lots when the market
peaks and even "adjusts"
itself as economists put it,
when prices fall after a surge.
As to when what some call
"the bubble" of increasing
prices might burst, Hensley
said it is hard to tell how long
the conditions will continue.
Logic dictates, she said, that
as long as people will pay the
next level, it will continue.
How that may be connected to
prices in other areas, such as
Palm Coast or areas adjacent
to Citrus, only time will tell,
she said.
"We can only assume that at
least for the rest of 2005 we
will continue to see it," she
said, adding, "It's a wait and
see proposition."
She said the economy and
interest rates which are
expected to slowly climb -
will be factors, but otherwise
it's anybody's guess.


Real estate explosion



also has downside


JIM HUNTER
jhunter@chronicleonline.comrn
Chronicle

The upside to what has happened in Citrus
County, says developer and real estate
investor Monty Van Ness, who has made a lot
of money in the lately frenzied real estate mar-
ket, is that it's serving to make the county a
more upscale community.
But there is a downside that worries him.
It's something other real estate veterans and
county housing officials have been saying, too.
With real estate values having doubled for
many in the past few years, because wages
haven't kept pace, many working people, from
service personnel to white-collar workers,
have been priced out of the home market.
When all agree that the county needs fewer


NUMBERS
Continued from Page 1A

Corp. bought 161 that year. The
next two highest out-of-county
buyers in 2003 were Finova
Capital Corp, with 92, and
Citony Development Corp.,
with 85.
In 2004, however, things
heated up.
There were 12 out-of-county
buyers that bought more than
100 lots. They were: Adams
Homes of Northwest, 111;
Brunswick Homes Inc., 125;
Peninsula Lots LLC, 139;
Maronda Homes Inc. of
Florida, 192, Builders Property
Group LLC, 235; Land Holding
LLC, 236; New Vista Properties
Inc., 244; National Lots Inc.,
248; Sky Development Group,
291; Crystal Ball Ventures LLC,
405; American Financial LLC,
578; and National
Recreational, 630.
In 2005 there have so far
been four out-of-county inter-
ests that have bought more
than 100 lots: Sunstyles LLC,
115; Peter D. Madison, 122; Sky
Development Group LLC, 374;
and New Vista Properties Inc.,
420.
In-county buyers
As for in-county buying, in





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mobile homes rather than more, Van Ness
said, what are those people supposed to do for
housing? Without affordable homes, he said,
it's either mobile homes, or the next phase of
development in Citrus County will have to
include affordable multifamily developments
for rental and sale.
"There's a ton of people," Van Ness said of
those who now can't qualify to buy a new
home. "That's our dilemma."
A number of new developments are propos-
ing to include multifamily units in their proj-
ects.
One new development company, Sky
Development in Citrus Hills, for example, says
it is presently preparing to submit plans for
multifamily units on. Deltona Boulevard, and
developments in Crystal River and Lecanto
are planned to include multifamily units.


2002 the most lots purchased of
1,555 sold was by Florida Low
Income Housing, which bought
34 lots. The next highest was
local builder Avanzini Builders
Inc, which bought 16.
In 2003, the highest in-county
buyers (2,818 lots) included:
Citony Development Corp,
which bought 623 parcels, and
Van Ness Properties, which
bought 116. Notably, Van Ness
Properties bought significant
amounts of lots for some out-of-
county interests.
In the 4,081 purchases by in-
county interests in 2004,
Marpad Inc. bought 42 lots,
Sweetwater Homes of Citrus
Inc. bought 71, Citony
Development Corp. bought 103
and Van Ness Properties Inc.
bought 570.
In the first half of 2005, Van
Ness Properties was the high-
est in-county buyer of the 1,375
lots sold with 70 parcels pur-
chased. Keigh Cook was the
second-highest in-county buyer
with 29, and the Citrus County
School Board was the third-
highest buyer with 28.


Value of lot sales
The total values of lot sales
accentuated the ratio of out-of-
county buying to in-county buy-
ing. The total values for lot
sales were: 2002 $47 million
(average parcel price $30,5911);
2003 $89.6 million (average
$31,583); 2004 $396.1 million
(average $35,767); and the first
half of 2005 $288.4 million
(average $47,014).
The total values of lots for in-
county buying were significant-
ly behind the out-of-county buy-
ing. The total values were: 2002
- $33.8 million (average parcel
price $25,111); 2003 $52.2
(average $26,955); 2004 $103.4
million (average $30,321); and
the first half of 2005 $53. 2 mil-
lion (average $46,362).
Finally, while the price of the
average parcel sold to an in-
county interest lagged about
$5,000 behind that sold to an
out-of-county interest, the aver-
age price for in-county sales
had almost caught up by mid-
2005, at about $46,000 to
$47,000.


C r- T L; 0 U Uc N T Y


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4A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005







SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 5A


. ... -- ---- For the o-:.- .r.


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrest
Jeremiah D. Carlucci, 22,
Inverness, at 2:53 a.m. Saturday on
a charge of domestic battery.
According to an arrest report,
Carlucci said he and his fiance were
arguing and he went to leave the
residence, but his fiance refused to
give him the key, so they began
pushing each other around.
According to the report, Carlucci's
fiance said he was intoxicated and
kicked the bedroom door down,
causing damage to the door and the
doorframe. She told deputies
Carlucci grabbed her arm and
pushed her around. She was unable
to break free so she dialed 911,
according to the report.
Deputies stated in the report that
they observed red marks on her
arms.


ASHLEY SORRELL
asorrell
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's
deputies arrested a 69-year-old
Dunnellon man Friday after
two girls told police he inap-
propriately touched them,
according to a police report.
Richard Lee Darling was
charged with two counts of cap-
ital sexual battery after
deputies interviewed the girls.
According the report, one of
the girls told them about an
incident that occurred when


Carlucci was transported to the
Citrus County Detention Facility.
He is being held without bond.
Other arrests
Chad M. Beaver, 23, 9318 W.
Hercules Lane, Crystal River, time
unknown, Friday on charges of
unarmed burglary of a conveyance,
grand theft, giving false information
to a pawn broker and dealing in
stolen property.
His bond was set at $12,000.
N Deericka C. Collins, 26, 30 N.
Columbus St., Beverly Hills, at 7
p.m. Friday on a charge of posses-
sion of a controlled substance and
possession of marijuana.
Her bond was set at $5,500.
M Johnnie M. Crace, 43, 7652
W. Autumn St., Homosassa, at
10:15 a.m. Friday on a charge of a
scheme to defraud.
He was released on his own


the girls were 9 years old.
According to the report, the
girl told police Darling had
inappropriately touched her
and attempted to perform oral
sex on her when she was 9
years old. The girl, now 11, was
protective of Darling at the
beginning of the interview.
The girl said Darling told her
not to tell anyone about the
incident because he would go
to jail, according to the report.
In an interview with the sec-
ond girl, she also said she was
inappropriately touched by
Darling when she was 9 years
old, and he told her not to tell


recognizance.
Bobbi Jo Gibson, 36, 10729
W. Halls River Rd., Homosassa, at
11:06 p.m. Friday on a charge of
acquiring or attempting to acquire a
controlled substance by fraud.
Her bond was set at $5,000.
Angela N. Love, 18, 1262 E.
Triple Crown Loop, Hernando, at
2:05 p.m. Friday on a charge of an
utter forged instrument.
Her bond was set at $1,000.
Justin M. Skuta, 28, 8232
Tower Trail, Floral City, at 2:15 p.m.
Friday on charges of driving while
license is suspended/revoked,
resisting/obstructing officer without
violence and having an illegal
license plate attached.
His bond was set at $1,500.
Citrus County Sheriff
Burglaries
N A burglary was reported at 5:33


anybody because he would go
to jail, according to the report.
Darling is held in the Citrus
County Detention Facility
without bond.


p.m. Tuesday, between 3:45 and
3:55 p.m. Tuesday, at a residence at
the 9200 block of North Greco
Terrace, Dunnellon.
A representative of the Path of
Citrus County, South Melbourne
Street, Beverly Hills, reported at 9:17
a.m. Wednesday a burglary to a
conveyance, between 11 p.m.
Tuesday and 8 a.m. Wednesday, at
the facility.
A burglary was reported at
10:03 a.m. Wednesday, between
Monday and 6 p.m. Tuesday, at a
residence at the 8200 block of
North Bellow Court, Homosassa.
*A vehicle burglary was reported
at 3:11 p.m. Wednesday, between 3
and 3:11 Wednesday, at a parking
lot at the 8700 block of East Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
SA vehicle burglary was reported
at 6:09 p.m. Wednesday, between
10:30 p.m. Tuesday and 8 a.m.


ADVERTISEMENT
CORRECTION
NOTICE o

The minimum purchase requirement for
"No Interest for 18 Months on all TVs
$299 & UP" in today's multi-page
Circuit City advertisement is incorrect.
The correct minimum purchase required
is "$499 & UP."
We apologize for any inconvenience this
may have caused you, our valued
customer.


Wednesday, at a residence at the
4200 block of South Alabama
Avenue, Homosassa.
A burglary, theft and vandalism
were reported at 9:45 p.m.
Wednesday, between 7 and 9:30
p.m. Wednesday, at the 400 block
of North Sams Point, Crystal
River.
H A vehicle burglary was reported
at 10:10 a.m. Monday, July 11,
between 5 p.m. Saturday, July 9,
and 8:30 a.m. Sunday, July 10, at
the 4300 block of South Colonial
Terrace, Homosassa.
A representative of Unique
Homes Inc. reported at 10:11 a.m.
Thursday a burglary to a construc-
tion site, between 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday and 10 a.m. Wednesday,
at the 8400 block of North
Tradewind Drive, Dunnellon.
A burglary was reported at 7
p.m. Thursday, between Friday, July


1, and 7 p.m. Thursday, at the 9300
block of West Hercules Lane,
Crystal River.
A vehicle burglary was reported
at 7:33 a.m. Friday, between 12:45
and 1:15 p.m. Thursday, at a parking
lot at the 4500 block of South
Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa.
Thefts
A theft was reported at 12:11
p.m. Thursday at a convenience
store at the 3200 block of South
Suncoast Boulevard, Hom-
osassa. The theft occurred at noon
Thursday.

ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org.


GO ONLINE
* Visit Aiww C hrjniIcleOnline.com to read today's headlines.


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CiTRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLED


Dunnellon man faces


sexual battery charges


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6A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


Donald Davis, 74
LECANTO
Donald James "Boss" Davis,
74, Lecanto, died Friday, July
22, 2005, at Thomas Jefferson
University Hospital in
Philadelphia, Pa.


He was a
retired owner
and operator
of the Tybouts
Corner Exxon
Station in New
Castle, Del.,


where he retired after 25 years
of service.
He was born July 25, 1930, in
Wilmington, Del., to Millard'
and Pearl Warren Davis.
He was a member of the U.S.
Air Force. After retiring from
his business, he took annual
trips to his childhood home in
Maryland. His family consid-
ered him to be a true "people
person."
Davis was preceded in death
by his parents, Millard and
Pearl Warren Davis.
He is survived by his wife of
55 years, Ada Irene Williams
Davis; four children, Ronald
Davis of Lecanto, Dianne Nau
of Bear, Del., K Scott Davis of
Lecanto and Donald Davis II of
Jacksonville; four siblings,
Alfred Davis of Bear, Del.,
Harold Davis of Lecanto, and
Doris Komnik and Walter
Davis, both of Wilmington,
Del.; eight grandchildren,
Kelly Davis, Ronald Davis,
Sarah Davis, Sheri
Stonebraker, Jeffrey Nau,
Kristin Nau, Jesse Davis and
Jade Davis; and two great-
grandchildren, Ashlyn and
Brayden Stonebraker.
Spicer-Mullikin Funeral
Homes Inc., New Castle, Del.

Charles
Dunavant, 59
CRYSTAL RIVER
Charles Edward Dunavant,
59, Crystal River, died Friday,
July 22, 2005, at his home under
the care of
family and
Hospice.
He was for-
mer adminis-
trative techni-
cian for the state of West
Virginia.
Dunavant, a native of
Charleston, WVa., moved to
Crystal River from Milton,
WVa., a year ago.
He was a Korean War and
Vietnam War veteran in the
U.S. Army, and was a retired
command Sergeant Major of
the U.S. Army Reserve in West
Virginia. He was a member of
the Red Level Baptist Church
in Crystal River. He had been a
member of the Beulah Ann
Missionary Baptist Church in
Ona, WVa. He was also a mem-
ber of Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 9097 of Mason, WVa., the
American Legion Post 0140 of
New Haven, WVa., and the
AMVETS Post 0008 in St.
Petersburg. He was Baptist.
Dunavant is survived by his
wife of 30 years, Sharon A.
Dunavant, Crystal River. Other
survivors include his son,
Timothy Wayne Dunavant, of
Little River, S.C.; two daugh-
ters, Theresa Lee McKinney, of
Milton, WVa., and Patricia
Eileen Summers, of Nitro,
WVa.; three brothers, Chester
Dunavant of Rock Hill, S.C.,
George W Dunavant of Geneva,
Ohio and Malcolm Cartwright
of Myrtle Beach, S.C.; three sis-
ters, Betty Jane Perrington of
Long, S.C., Lois Ann Medlen of.
Hernshaw, WVa., and Linda
Cartwright of Boone County,
W.Va.; seven grandchildren,
Brandon, Amanda and
Jonathan McKinney, Nicole,
Allison and Cody Dunavant,
and Stephanie Summers; and
many nieces and nephews.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Dunnellon Chapel.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be sub-
rritted by licensed
funeral homes.
Obituaries and funeral
notices are subject to
editing.


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Funeral Home
With Crematory

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WILDER FUNERAL HOME
Homosassa (352) 628-3344
www.dignitymnemorlal.com


Carmen
Fortino, 92
HOMOSASSA
Carmen S. Fortino, 92,
Homosassa, died Friday, July
22, 2005, at the Cypress Cove
Care Center in Crystal River.
He was a retired worker of
Crucible Steel in Syracuse,
N.Y, where he worked for 48
years.
He was born Dec. 26, 1912, in
Syracuse, N.Y, to Thomas and
Fannie Mesella Fortino. After
leaving Syracuse and moving
to Columbia, Tenn., he moved
three years ago to Homosassa.
He was a member of the
First Christian Assembly
Church in Syracuse, N.Y.
Fortino is survived by his
wife of 66 years, Gertrude,
Homosassa; two daughters,
Fannie Mazur and her hus-
band, Bob, of Liverpool, N.Y;
and Mary Jane Lawton and her
husband, Gary, Homosassa;
five grandchildren; and 13
great grandchildren.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Anthony
Palmiero, 48
BEVERLY HILLS
Anthony C. Palmiero, 48,
Beverly Hills, died Tuesday,
July 19, 2005, in Lansing, Mich.
He was born in Bridgeport,
Conn., and came here seven
years ago from.
West Palm
Beach. He was
a real estate .
agent with
RE / M A X
Relaty in
Beverly Hills.
He was a
member of the --.-..
N a t i o n a 1 Pamiero
Association of
Realtors. He
enjoyed boating, landscaping,
carpentry and working on cars.
He attended Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills.
He was preceded in death by
his brother, Carl G. Palmiero,
on Oct. 20, 2004.
Survivors include his par-
ents, Carl and Patricia
Palmiero of Beverly Hills; sis-
ters, Coreen Kucej of Beverly
Hills and Donna Palmiero of
Ansonia, Conn.; niece, Jessica
Palmiero of Ansonia, Conn.;
nephews, Jeffrey Palmiero
Folta of Ansonia, Conn.,
Nathan Palmiero of Beacon
Falls, Conn., and Mason Kucej
of Beverly Hills; and great-
nephew Jayden Palmiero of
Ansonia, Conn.
Fero Funeral Home with
Crematory, Beverly Hills.

Rose Pellock, 83
LECANTO
Rose Irene Pellock, 83,
Lecanto, died Friday, July 22,
2005, at the Hospice Unit of
Citrus Memorial Hospital.
She was a retired worker
with the University of Iowa.
She was born Dec. 31, 1921,
in Gregory, S.D., to Ernst and
Johanna Konicky Weaver. She
moved to Lecanto in 1996 from
Cheyenne, Wyo.
Mrs. Pellock was a member
of Our Lady of Grace Parish.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Robert, in
1985; her infant son Robert Jr.,
in 1943, another son, Edward,
in 1985; two brothers, Ralph
and Gregory Weaver; and her
sister, Mary.
She is survived by a son,
Gerald Pellock; daughter,
LeAnne Weaver, Clarence, Mo.;
two brothers, Amos and Ray
Weaver, both of Clarence, Mo.;
12 grandchildren; and 11 great-


grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Grace
Vaudreuil, 101
DUNNELLON
Grace M. Vaudreuil, 101,
Dunnellon, died Friday, July
22, 2005, at the Estell's Hospice
House in Ocala.
She was a retired bookkeep-
er for the A&N Corp. of Inglis.
She was born Nov. 1, 1903, in
Worcester, Mass., to Ulric and
Marie Paris Vaudreuil. She
moved to Inglis 28 years ago
from Clearwater, before mov-
ing again to Dunnellon.
Ms. Vaudreuil was a member
of the St. Anthony Catholic
Church of Williston.
She is survived by her two
sisters, Claire and Margaret
Vaudreuil, both of Worcester,
Mass.; along with many nieces
and nephews.
Strickland Funeral Home,
Crystal River.

Louise Wilson, 86
DUN NELLON
Louise B. Wilson, 86,
Dunnellon, died Friday, July
22, 2005, at her home.
She was a retired Licensed
Practical Nurse. at Doctors
Hospital in Fort Lauderdale.
She was born in Rudolph,
Ala., to John and Rhoda
Blocker. She moved in 1981
from Fort Lauderdale to
Dunnellon, where she lived for
the last 24 years.
Mrs. Wilson was Baptist.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Judson R.
Wilson; her sister, Helen Hau;
her brother, John Franklin
Blocker; and her parents, John
and Rhoda Blocker.
She is survived by two sons,
Judson R. Wilson, High
Springs; John W Wilson, Coral
Springs; three daughters, Judy
B. Handy, Dunnellon; Jane W
Vosloh, of Lawrenceville, Ga.;
Emily Jo Yarbrough, of
Loganville, Calif.; sister, Betty
Sue Lawley, Dunnellon; nine
grandchildren; and eight great-
grandchildren.
Roberts Funeral Home of
Dunnellon.

Elsie Wood, 64
LECANTO
Elsie Elizabeth Roebuck
Wood, 64, Lecanto, died
Thursday, July 21, 2005, at the
Surrey Place Convalescent
Center in Lecanto.
She was a retired owner and
operator of a plant nursery.
She was born Aug. 27, 1940,
in Okeechobee to Leon and
Elsie King Roebuck. She
moved to Lecanto in 1981 from
West Palm Beach.
She was a nationally pub-
lished writer and loved
antique roses and their preser-
vation. She was Protestant.
She is survived by her son,
William Troy Wood, Lecanto;
daughter, Renee Wood,
Brooksville; two sisters, Mary
Lynn Borecky, of Liberty, S.C.;
and Linda Sciacca, of Milton,
Mich.; seven grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.


Funeral Home and Crematory
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com Since 1962
352-795-2678 1901 SE HwY. 19 CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34423

The Citrus Community Concert Choir, Inc.
Under the direction of Jacki Hull
Proudly Presents
Rodgers and Hammerstein

on Broadway

Tuesday, July 26
Hernando United Methodist Church
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando 7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 29
7:30 p.m. Playhouse 19
817 N. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19)
Crystal River
Sunday, July 31
St Timothy Lutheran Church
1090 Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 2 p.m.
Tickets available at the door $5. General Admission.
Children 12 and under FREE.


For tickets call John at 382-7071
Call 212-1746 for more information.


CHRpNICLE


Armstrong's



legacy giving



cycling new life


Funeral
.! .4"T ,"";

Anthony C. Palmiero.
Funeral services for Anthony
C. Palmiero will be at 10 a.m.
Monday, July 25, 2005, at Our
Lady of Grace Catholic Church,
6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills, 34465, with services con-
ducted by Fr. Charles Leke.
Cremation will follow the
funeral Mass of remembrance,
under the direction of Fero
Funeral Home with Crematory.
Grace M. Vaudreuil. A funer-
al service for Grace M.
Vaudreuil, 101, Dunnellon, will
be conducted 10 a.m. Saturday,
July 30, 2005 at the Strickland
Funeral Home Chapel in
Crystal River. Internment will
follow at the Fero Memorial
Gardens in Beverly Hills.

Deaths



Long
John Baldry, 64
BLUES MUSICIAN
VANCOUVER, British
Columbia-- Long John Baldry,
the British blues legend who
helped launch
the careers of
such rock
greats as Rod
Stewart and the
Rolling Stones,
died Thursday
of a chest infec- a
tion, according
to his agent. He Long John
was 64.
Baldry, nick-
named Long John because of
his 6-foot-7 height, was one of
the main forces in British
blues, rock and pop music in
the 1960s. He first hit the top of
the U.K. singles charts in 1967
with "Let the Heartaches
Begin."
Although Baldry released
over 40 albums, he was per-
haps best known for nurturing
the nascent talent of a host of
musicians who are now world-
wide superstars.
Baldry's early 1960s stage act
featured the likes of Stewart,
Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts,
Jimmy Paige and Ginger Baker.

Eugene
Record, 64
SOULSINGER
CHICAGO Eugene
Record, founder of the leg-
endary Chicago-based vocal
group The Chi-Lites, died
Friday after a long battle with
cancer, the president of the
group's booking agency said.
He was 64.
Record was the composer of
many hits including The Chi-
Lites classic, "Have You Seen
Her?" and "Oh Girl," among
others.
In 2003, The Chi-Lites' song,
'Are You My Woman?" was the
basis for Beyonce's hit, "Crazy
in Love."

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Associated Press

Without fail, it happens daily
at this time of year. Someone,
typically middle-aged and at
least a wee bit out of shape,
ambles into Lance Armstrong's
favorite bike shop and profess-
es to be "just looking."
And a few minutes later, that
person wheels away a bicycle
- the first one he's owned in,
perhaps, decades.
There's no simpler example
of the legacy Armstrong has
created and will leave behind
Sunday, when barring some
sort of catastrophe he takes
his last victory laps along the
Champs-Elysees in Paris,
where hundreds of thousands
are likely to watch him wrap
up his seventh, and final, Tour
de France title.
"The business is a nice
reward, but the best thing is
still that a home boy is in the
Tour de France," says Ken
"Woody" Smith, manager of the
Richardson Bike Mart in
Richardson, Texas a store
that builds an annual shrine to
Armstrong, complete with
authentic yellow. jerseys and
other mementos.
"He's made cancer survivors
out of people. He's got people
who don't look like bike riders
buying bikes. He inspires every-
one to do more, to be better."
USA Cycling, the sport's
national governing body, says
more Americans are riding
bicycles these days than ever
before a direct correlation to
Armstrong's popularity. And the
stable of professional riders in
this country may have the most
depth and talent in history, in
large part because Armstrong
raised the bar so high.
Without question, when the
Texan pedals away he'll leave
cycling better than when he
found it.
"But I don't know what hap-
pens next," says John Sabatier,
a director of the rapidly grow-
ing Everglades Bicycling Club
in South Florida. "And that
scares me to death."
Since Armstrong who is
retiring at the end of this race
to devote more time to his fam-
ily won his first Tour in 1999,
membership in officially sanc-
tioned road-cycling clubs has
risen more than 20 percent.
Bicycle shops nationwide
report higher business, with a
distinct spike every summer
around Tour time.
Sabatier estimates that his
club has seen a 40 percent
jump in members since 1999,
mainly because of the
Armstrong phenomenon.


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"It's the bug. They get bit by
the cycling bug," he says.
Yet even while Armstrong has
dominated a sport like perhaps
no other athlete, cycling still
finds itself fighting for
respectability in the United
States. And several up-and-
comers might have to collec-
tively carry his torch now, since
no one expects to see another
Armstrong-type rider again.
"I think the biggest change
over these last few years has
just been having Lance in the
program and him doing the
things he's done," says Jim
Ochowicz, the president of
USA Cycling. "It's been huge
for him and huge for a lot of
other guys who find them-
selves having more and new
opportunities now."
Take Armstrong out of the
equation, and it's still been a
pretty solid Tour for American
riders.
David Zabriskie wore the
leader's yellow jersey at the
start, before dropping out
because of an injury.
Armstrong's longtime top lieu-
tenant, George Hincapie, won
a stage. Levi Leipheimer and
Floyd Landis were among the
top 10 at midweek and poised
for strong finishes. Olympic
bronze medalist Bobby Julich
wasn't far from the leaders.
It's a much different sce-
nario from the days when rid-
ers such as Armstrong and his
predecessor as the American
bike king, three-time Tour
champion Greg LeMond, were
considered the only true
world-class U.S. cyclists.
"Before Lance, there'd typi-
cally be a few elite Americans.
Now you see different
Americans leading different;
teams, having significant rolds
on premier teams," says Kip,
Mikler, editor of the cycling,
magazine VeloNews. "We're,
not going to have another
American seven-time- winner,
but they're pretty competitive."
Another major facet of the
legacy Armstrong a cancer
survivor-- leaves behind is his-
mark on culture, even away
from the bike.
More than 50 million of those
yellow "LiveStrong" wrist-
bands have been sold, with the
money raised going toward
cancer research. Now, a new
Armstrong-inspired clothing
line "10/2" rapidly is gain-
ing popularity, with some pro-
ceeds there benefiting the
Lance Armstrong Foundation.
The line derives its name
from the date Armstrong was
diagnosed with cancer Oct.
2, 1996.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTACKS
Continued from Page 1A

In all, 88 people were con-
firmed dead, mostly Egyptians,
said Saeed Abdel Fattah, man-
ager of the Sharm el-Sheik
International Hospital where
the victims were taken. At least
119 people were also injured,
Egypt's Interior Ministry said.
Among the dead were two
Britons, two Germans, an
Italian and a Czech, according
to Abdel Fattah and officials
from the victims' nations.
The attacks were well-coor-
dinated. The car bombs -
apparently driven by suicide
attackers detonated almost
simultaneously at the 176-room
luxury Ghazala Gardens hotel
in Sharm's main strip of
Naama Bay, and also two miles
away in a minibus lot in the Old
Market, ravaging a coffee shop
frequented by Egyptians who
work at Sharm's resorts.
A third blast, hidden in a
sack, went off about the same
time near a boardwalk along
the beach where tourists often
stroll at night.
At the Ghazala Gardens
hotel, construction workers
cleared away the flattened
reception lobby after emer-
gency teams apparently gave
up the search for survivors
after a car packed with 660
pounds of explosives barreled
into the hotel's driveway and
detonated.
Officials said the death toll
was not expected to rise signif-
icantly.
The attackers also pinpoint-
ed holes in the resort's securi-
ty: The Ghazala is one of the
few hotels with a reception
area easily accessible from the
main road, and the Old Market
has no security checks, unlike
parking areas along the main
hotel strip, a security official
involved in the investigation
told The Associated Press.
Egyptian police detained at
least 20 people for questioning,
including local Bedouin tribes-
men near the scene of the
bombings, although none were
currently suspected of involve-
ment, said police officials
speaking on condition of
anonymity because the investi-
gation was ongoing.
One security official
involved in the investigation
said some witnesses told police
the bombers "did not appear to
be locals." DNA samples were
being analyzed, he said,
although he would not elabo-
rate if those samples belonged
to attackers. He spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
the investigation continued.
Police were also exploring



KEY
Continued from Page 1A

"It was awesome seeing the
faces of the clients as we ran
in," Thielemann said.
Amid the cheers and jubila-
tion for a successful fund-rais-
ing week, Melissa Walker, Key
Center spokeswoman, said
everyone's minds are also with
Key Center founder Chet Cole
as he recovers at Citrus
Memorial Hospital from an
abdominal aneurysm.
McBride said before
Saturday's 15-mile run, every-
one gathered and said a prayer
for Cole.
Walker said Cole is continu-
ing to recover and the doctors
are happy with his progress.
"We miss his presence, but
we know we're pleasing him
with today's events," Walker
said. "It's very hard because
Mr. Cole is our leader."
Walker said the Key's fund-
raising week has gone wonder-
fully and a lot of people have
pitched in to help.
"It is just so unique how the
community comes in to help
us," Walker said.
Volunteers from the commu-
nity came in droves to take
part in Saturday's events,
which began with a human
football competition at 9 a.m.
Ultimately, the team from
Pennington Cabinets took top
honors in that event


There was also a dunk tank,
games and perhaps the most
popular activity, dancing.
Clients showed their fancy
footwork as they danced to
everything from Garth Brooks
to Guns and Roses.
At the end of the center's
live telethon, $154,614.66 had
been raised, surpassing this
year's goal of $150,000. The
fund-raiser's proceeds will
partially help support the
Key's 38 unfunded clients.


NEED A REPORTER?
Call Charlie Brennan or
Mike Arnold at 563-5660.


regime.
Security tightened after nation's deadliest terror attack Hours later, a previously
Egypt's president vowed to hunt down terrorists who unleashed a series of April 7 Suicide bomber unknown group calling itself
bombs at a Sharm El-Sheik hotel and coffee shop that killed at least 88 people. detonated near Khan al- the Holy Warriors of Egypt
Egypt attacks at sites frequented by foreigners -Sept. 18 Gunmen killed Khali marlt, killing three faxed a statement to newspa-
Islamic March 4 Islamic militants fire on a driveronaCarotourbus on a Cairo tour bus, then pers disputing the al-Qaida
insurrection cruise ship at Sidfa, killing a German. outside a museum, shoot themselves; an April claim and saying it had carried
begins. A British Aug.26 A Spanish teenager is killed Nov. 17 Islamic militants bo7 suspect dies whenaturday's attack It listed
tourist is killed on when militants fired at a tour bus killed 58 foreign tourists, bomb he is carrying goes out Saturday's attack It listed
a bus near Dairut. near Nag Hamadi. four Egyptians in Luxor. off during a police chase the names of five people it said
1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 were the bombers.
"II r --- The authenticity of the two
Feb 26 A bomh Sept 27 Four tourists are April 18 Four Oct. 7 Islamic July 23 Bombs l nt
,.i :.. : .n- i. .. r,-, ,ritant opens Islamic militants detonated exploded at a hotel statements could not be imme-
:r, :, T:,r .- H- resort, militants open bombs in the Sinai and coffee shop in the diately verified.
'-."i', i ,,,-, O ir,,. t OcT 23 & i, i,:r man is fire on Greek resorts of Taba and Red Sea resort of
Dol ;.,,_, i,,,-,, i i. ,.- _i,.is sand their tourists, killing Ras Shitan, killing Sharm el-Sheik, killing Meanwhile, the group al-
S.. ,-, ,-, :.,-, on their 18, outside a 34 people. at least 83. Qaida in Iraq released an
S,,,.. ... :..,, qada. hotel in Cairo. Internet video that appeared to
AP highlight one reason why mili-


links to simultaneous bomb
attacks last October on hotels
in Taba and Ras Shitan.
Several hours after the
Sharm attacks, a group claim-
ing ties to al-Qaida took
responsibility for the bombings


NOINlEEST
ilH IFIR


be asese frm, orgialdae o., .ha e on he a erae alnc

unes )th .blnc .i ai i fl bteen o.2, onh, an, ,2)
,-iim~ol payens a ad. Minimum mothrlypmet
wil bereuie itea mout f (I i f n a excar. hegrete/ o
S1500or % te tta a iont iane r fl aprt'ion o th


in a statement posted on an
Islamic Web site. The group,
the Abdullah Azzam Brigades,
al-Qaida, in Syria and Egypt,
was one of two extremist
groups that also claimed
responsibility for the October


bombings.
The group also claimed it
had carried out the attacks to
avenge the killings of Muslims
in Afghanistan, Iran and
Chechnya and to strike at
Israelis and the Egyptian


SUNDAY, JuLY 24, 2005 7A

tants might have targeted
Sharm: the presence of Israeli
tourists.
The video did not mention
the Sharm bombings nor claim
responsibility, but it showed
the interrogation of Egypt's top
envoy to Iraq, Ihab al-Sherif,
whom the group kidnapped
and said it killed earlier this
month. In the video, the diplo-
mat was asked about Egypt's
1979 peace treaty with Israel,
which allows Israelis to travel
without visas to a zone known
as "Part C," along the Sinai's
eastern coast.


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Brahms and bikers: British class meets Southern sass


London Symphony

Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH The London
Symphony Orchestra is known for its
striking interpretations of Bach,
Beethoven and Brahms. Daytona
Beach grew famous from its beaches,
biker bars and Busch Series car rac-
ing.
Yet every two years, the world-
famous symphony pays a two-week
visit to Daytona Beach in a culture
clash that brings Tchaikovsky to the
land of tank tops and tattoos. Even the
renowned soloists who perform dur-
ing the symphony's stays appreciate
Daytona Beach's unconventionality
as a classical music destination.
"Biker bars sound great," said
pianist Emanuel Ax, who is perform-
ing the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2
during the symphony's visit that start-
ed mid-July
Violinist Sarah Chang even admit-
ted to being an occa-
sional fan of
NASCAR races, I W
watching it on televi-
sion sometimes in a bit su
her hotel room when
she is touring world- some of '
wide. Chang said
friends had given her won't cru
a list of biker gear to
buy for them when (the orch
she came to perform their I
Shostakovich's Violin their
Concerto No. 1. Davidsol
"I think I probably avidso
saw more Harley-
Davidsons than any ...
other place that I've Bi
ever been to," said
Chang, who visited Daytona Beach
once before.
The symphony anchors a two-week
music festival that this year includes
jazz, Celtic, klezmer and flamenco


r
t



H
n

k


Orchestra does two-week stint in Daytona


performances. This year's festival
promises to benefit from classical-
music-world buzz because of the
appearance of conductor Marin
Alsop, who was recently named music
director of the Baltimore Symphony
Orchestra, becoming the first woman
to lead a major U.S. orchestra.
The festival's audience is almost as
widely varied as the musicians,
reflecting Daytona Beach's eclectic
citizenry of blue bloods, NASCAR
fans, bikers and a sizable black popu-
lation.
"It runs the gauntlet," said Bonnie
Miller, an original organizer of Bike
Week, one of the nation's largest biker
festivals, which is held every
February in Daytona Beach. "I would-
n't be a bit surprised if some of the
locals won't cruise to see the London
Symphony Orchestra on their Harley-
Davidsons."
Besides Bike Week, this city of more
than 70,000 residents'
is home to
wouldn't be Biketoberfest, a
biker festival in the
prised if fall; the NASCAR-
fueled Speed Weeks;
the locals college spring break;
and Black College
Ise to see Reunion, an annual
street festival attend-
estra) on ed by tens of thou-
,aJrle sands of young peo-
arley- ple. International
Speedway Corp., the
largest promoter of
NASCAR racing,
.. .: .- also makes its home
e Week organizer, here.
Some of the sym-
phony players have been known to
visit the city's popular biker bars,
such as the Boot Hill Saloon, or go on
motorcycle rides when they are in
town.


"Through the years, they've got kind
of a relationship with the bikers and
they would go to the Boot Hill Saloon
and then the bikers come to the con-
certs," said Eric Lariviere, general
manager of Central Florida Cultural
Endeavors Inc., which runs the festi-
val.
For their part, the soloists enjoy
performing in cities where classical
music isn't an everyday experience.
"It's far more important for the
London Symphony to do concerts in
Daytona Beach then come to New
York... because in New York there are
other choices," Ax said in a telephone
interview from the Tanglewood, the
summer home of the Boston
Symphony Orchestra in the
Berkshires.
Smaller cities also tend to be a
more welcoming place where musi-
cians are invited into residents'
homes for dinner, said Chang, who
has a long relationship with the
London Symphony Orchestra.
"They make that extra effort to
make you feel like you're at home,"
Chang said in a telephone interview
from Australia. "I can't tell you the
number of times where I've gone to a
slightly smaller city and the people
there take that extra amount of care
for you."
The relationship between Daytona
Beach and the London Symphony
Orchestra dates back to 1966 when
city leaders decided they wanted to
diversify the city's reputation beyond
cars and bikes. They wrote 100 letters
to some of the world's leading cultur-
al institutions offering to form a rela-
tionship but only received a single
encouraging response from Ernest
Fleischmann, then-manager of the
London Symphony Orchestra.
"Mr. Fleischmann actually drafted
in the letter a full festival all the


Associated Press
Members of the London Symphony Orchestra load their luggage and golf clubs
onto waiting buses Wednesday upon their arrival at Orlando International Airport.
The world-famous symphony is paying a two-week visit to Daytona Beach, during
the Florida International Festival, in a culture clash that brings Tchaikovsky to
the land of tank tops and tattoos.


programs, a full orchestra, chamber
music, educational programs,"
Lariviere said.
The symphony visited annually dur-
ing the summers until 1970 when local
support and funding faltered, causing
an almost 15-year hiatus. The orches-
tra resumed visiting in the mid-1980s
but this time only every two years.
When it started, the festival cost
$200,000 to stage. It now costs $2.5 mil-
lion, with most of it raised from
donors and the rest covered by ticket
and merchandise sales and a small
amount of public funding.
Although local officials don't track
the economic impact of the festival, it
is only a fraction of Daytona Beach's
other special events. A 2001 study put
the economic output of the area's two
biker festivals at $744 million,
NASCAR events at $561 million,
spring break at $196 million and Black
College Reunion at $145 million.


But city leaders believe the festival
gives the area cultural cache.
"It's a good marketing tool for the
destination," said Susan McClain,
director of public relations for the
Daytona Beach Area Convention &
Visitors Bureau. "If we're targeting
people who like to go on cultural vaca-
tions ... then we can point to that"
While locals acknowledge that the
London Symphony Orchestra is a
crown jewel of the area's cultural
events, they are reluctant to rate it
any higher than the city's other spe-
cial events. Those would include the
Bike Week crowd-favorite tradition of
coleslaw wrestling involving bikini
and T-shirt-clad women slogging it out
in a pit of mayonnaise, oil and shred-
ded lettuce.
"The culture you will find on Main
Street during Bike Week, that's cul-
ture too," Miller said. "Just a different
type of culture."


I// i i 4 -.- ..U ,.-."- ,
Associated Press
Entrants in the 2005 "Papa" Hemingway Look-Alike
Contest show off their looks to the judges Friday at Sloppy
Joe's Bar in Key West. Almost 150 men vied for the title
during Key West's 25th annual Hemingway Days festival.




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NOMINATION BALLOT


Ten of the most admired
women of Citrus County
will be featured in the
Chronicle's Women in
Business special section on
Saturday,
September 10, 2005.


/


Sponsored by


Swww.chronicleonline.comrn


Citrus County's


MOST ADMIRED





LMOMEN


ALTRUSA INTERNATIONAL


Join the Citrus County Chronicle and Altrusa International of Citrus County to choose the


10 Most Admired Women


in Citrus County


Most Admired in Business
Name:
Qualifications:



Most Admired in Government
Name:
Qualifications:


Most Admired in Education
Name:
Qualifications:



Most Admired in the Health Field
Name:
Qualifications:



Most Admired Up and Coming Youth
nme:


Qualifications:


Most Admired Mother
Name:
Qualifications:



Most Admired in the Arts
Name:
Qualifications:



Most Admired Leader
Name:.
Qualifications:



Most Admired in Community Involvement
Name:
Qualifications:


Most Admired for Making a Difference
N-


Qualifications:-


1. Nominees must be a Citrus County resident.
2. All nominations must be received at the Chronicle business
office no later than 5 p.m. on July 27, 2005. These may be
delivered to the Meadowcrest or Inverness office, or mailed to 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Envelopes must
be marked 10 MOST ADMIRED WOMEN. You may also fax


your entry form to the Citrus County Chronicle at 352-563-5665.
3. Only one nomination per category will be accepted. Additional
information may be attached for each nomination. Please include a
business name or contact number for the nominee and nominator.
4. Only one nomination entry form per person will be accepted.
5. Qualifications are required.


Hemingway Days


PLEASE INCLUDE A SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS/REASONS ON AN ATTACHED SHEET.

RULES AND REGULATIONS


NOMINATION BALLOT


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHR-ONICLE


OA 4.-,,.,. T2. .. '4f00S


I


STATE








, CITRUS CouNT' (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 9A


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SUNDAY
JULY 24, 2005
www.chronicleonline com


Experts look for links in bombings


Some feel that other extremist groups are following al-Qaida's example


Associated Press

LONDON Car bombs at an
Egyptian luxury hotel.
Explosions in London sub-
ways. Suicide blasts in
Baghdad.
With the frequency of terror
attacks apparently mounting,
experts searching for common
threads behind the attacks sug-
gest that the war on terror is
being waged against an ever-
increasing well of recruits,
bound together by motives and
cause rather than a single al-
Qaida mastermind.
With havens in Afghanistan
under pressure and their
finances under scrutiny, mili-
tants may take philosophical
guidance from the likes of
Osama bin Laden but are large-
ly relying on their own
resources in carrying out oper-
ations, experts interviewed by
The Associated Press said
Saturday.
"They all want to be part of
this phenomenon," said
Loretta Napoleoni, author of
"Terror Incorporated: Tracing
the Dollars Behind the Terror


Networks," as she explained
the terror wave. "It's not like
someone is telling (the mili-
tants), 'You bomb on the first of
July.'"
Anger over the U.S.-led war
in Iraq and the Israeli-
Palestinian conflict also seems
to be providing some inspira-
tion, despite early
arguments from
Bush administra-
tion officials that
fighting insur- bee
gents in Iraq
would help pre- absolul
vent them from
launching attacks al-Qaid
on Western tar-
gets. The war has
instead turned Pa
into a recruiting professor of
Bradford Uni
tool, experts said.
"Iraq has been
an absolute gift to al-Qaida,"
said Paul Rogers, a professor of
peace studies at Bradford
University in northern
England. "(Al-Qaida) seems to
have no difficulty in getting
more and more recruits."
The attack Saturday in Egypt
came only two days after four


I


t



p
v


bombs partially detonated on
three subway trains and a bus,
causing no deaths but spread-
ing panic two weeks after four
suicide bombers hit similar
targets, killing 52 people.
Magnus Ranstorp, a terror
expert at St. Andrews Uni-
versity in Scotland, said few
definitive links
between the
Shas attacks in Lon-
raq has don and Egypt
n an were likely
However, .the
e gift to attackers may
have taken note
1. of the London
attacks and
opted to acceler-
ul Rogers ate their plans-
eace studies at hoping to make
ersity, England. people even
more afraid and


the terror more widespread.
He also said al-Qaida itself
has long been divided into two
camps one that favors tar-
gets on secular regimes in the
Middle East and another favor-
ing targets among the "cru-
saders" of the West
What's more, no Arabs have


been blamed in the London
attacks. Three Britons of
Pakistani descent and a Briton
of Jamaican descent were iden-
tified as the suspected suicide
bombers in what has been seen
as a "homegrown" operation.
The Red Sea resort city was
believed to be one of the safest
places in the country a fac-
tor that would have made it
harder to carry out any attack
without surveillance, expertise
and planning. The complica-
tion involved suggests the
attacks were planned long ago.
A strange twist ih the
Egyptian bombing investiga-
tion suggested that while all
the attacks might not be relat-
ed, some of them might be.
A new video by al-Qaida in
Iraq showing an Egyptian
envoy who was kidnapped
and later reportedly killed by
the group indicated a possi-
ble reason the Sinai town could
have been targeted, saying
Egypt lets Israelis "desecrate"
the peninsula by giving them
easy access.
The spate of attacks in
London and Egypt also could


Associated Press
Nella Ciaccia mourns Saturday over the coffin of her daughter
Benedetta Ciaccia during her funeral, in Rome. Benedetta Ciaccia
was killed in the July 7 bomb attacks in London.


be seen as an attempt to
demonstrate al-Qaida's' prow-
ess in the face of the U.S.-led
war on terrorism, said Mustafa
Alani, a security analyst at a
Dubai-based think-tank, the
Gulf Research Center.
"They're saying this war is not
winnable," Alani said. "If you
look at the map of al-Qaida oper-
ations, they stretch from London
to Bali to Istanbul to Mombasa
to Saudi Arabia and Iraq."


Malaysian Prime Minister
Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, who
chairs the 57-nation
Organization of the Islamic
Conference, told reporters the
fresh attacks only underline
the need to study the root caus-
es of violence.
"The frequency (of terrorist
attacks) seems to be mounting,',
he said. "You just cannot tell,
these people (the terrorists) to
stop."


Phoenix


heat wave


kills 14


Homeless, transients are

succumbing at high rate

Associated Press

PHOENIX Almost every day, the lady
with the chestnut hair and slight smile stopped
by the tire shop to ask for a drink Jose Perez
would take a break from his work to offer a cup
of water or whatever he had on hand.
She was 50ish, he guessed, and painfully
skinny. But friendly, too. She once mentioned
having kids, though Perez had no idea how
many or where. She lived with a man under
a plywood shelter on the other side of a
chain-link fence behind the store.
Perez last saw her a week ago Sunday,
when the mercury hit 116 degrees. She lay on
a mound of dirt outside the shelter as para-
medics worked to revive her. The skinny lady
with the smile died right before his eyes.
"Scary," the 20-year-old says.
Perez never even
They lived in knew her name.
In the span of a
Obscurity, week, in the throes of
a record heat wave,
and many of this transient and 13
others perished on
them died the streets of metro-
politan Phoenix. They
the same lived in obscurity, and
many of them died the
Way same way anony-
mous, ignored, alone.
anonymous, Their bodies were
Ignored found crumpled on
sidewalks near strip
alone, malls or in the shad-
ow of downtown sky-
scrapers. Some were
discovered only after strangers stumbled
upon them and dialed 911.
Now, as Salvation Army volunteers pass.
out water and social workers coax vagabonds
into shelters, the city is grappling with anoth-
er challenge: How to put a name to the name-
less, find their families and bury the dead.
"Hopefully, he gets a nice funeral, he gets
to rest in peace," Rosalie Munoz says.
She stands in the parking lot behind
America Mufflers a few miles west of down-
town, sipping a cold drink through a straw.
She points to the wall where, on Monday
afternoon, she and her boyfriend found a
man known on the streets as Martin.
They'd seen him around, pushing a gro-
cery cart and distributing cards explaining
that he was a deaf-mute in need of spare
change. On Monday, however, Martin was
slumped against the wall under the scalding
sun. His cart and his pulse were gone.
Munoz surmises that anyone wandering by
probably thought Martin had passed out.
"He's a drunk," she explains, matter-of-factly.
Phoenix police so far have identified two of
the dead: 47-year-old Ruben Lopez, discov-
ered in a grassy patch near the vehicle where
he lived, and 52-year-old Richard Pacheco,
who died shortly after fire officials responded
to a report of a man vomiting along a road.
Both were found on Sunday; authorities had
no other information about them.
All the bodies are being examined by the
county medical examiner's office, which will
perform autopsies to determine cause of
death and obtain fingerprints.


AFL-CIO anniversary


marred by labor feud


Associated Press


CHICAGO Labor's toughest negotia-
tors are turning their bruising tactics on
each other, playing a high-stakes game of
chicken inside the AFL-CIO at a perilous
time for the long-fading union movement
A politically charged feud about the
future of organized labor comes to a cli-
max this, week when nearly 1,000 dele-
gates gather to celebrate the 50th year of
the AFL-CIO.
Four of the federation's 56 affiliates,
representing about one-third of its dues-
paying union members, are threatening
to leave Chicago before the convention
begins Monday and, eventually, bolt the
AFL-CIO itself.
A divided House of Labor threatens
the Democratic Party, which relies on
the AFL-CIO's organizing powers on
Election Day, and could affect the liveli-
hoods of 13 million workers represented
by the federation's affiliates. Whether
the civil war jolts organized labor from
its slumber or hastens its decline is a
subject of intense debate.
"Divided we fall," said Gerald


:4


McEntee, president of a John
government workers' Sweeney
union who hopes to keep president of
the AFL-CIO intact. AFL-CIO.
On the flip side, Andy
Stern of the Service Employees
International Union is leading an effort
to overthrow his former mentor, AFL-
CIO President John Sweeney, and radi-
cally overhaul the federation. He has
formed a coalition of seven reform-
minded unions, including the four
threatening to quit the AFL-CIO if their
demands are not met.
"Workers need organizations that are
new, modern and full of dynamic think-
ing for the 21st century, and to date the
labor movement has not been able to
change in a way that employers and the
economy have been changing," Stern
said.
He and his allies argue that the AFL-
CIO has failed to adjust to globalization,
the decline of industrial-based jobs and
the rise of the service economy In addi-
tion to ousting Sweeney, the dissidents
want to shift the federation's focus from
politics to recruiting new union members.


World BRIEFS....


British police: Killed
man not tied to attacks
LONDON Police identified the
man who was chased down in a
subway and shot to death by plain-
clothes officers as a Brazilian and
expressed regret Saturday for his
death, saying they no longer
believed he was tied to the recent
terror bombings.
Friday's shooting before horrified
commuters prompted criticism of
police for overreacting and expres-
sions of fear that Asians and
Muslims would be targeted by a
"trigger-happy culture" after two
well-coordinated attacks in two
weeks.
The man shot at the Stockwell
subway station was identified as
Jean Charles de Menezes, 27.
Clinton establishes
African HIV program
NAIROBI, Kenya Former
President Bill Clinton launched a
program Saturday that will nearly
double the number of children
receiving treatment for HIV infec-
tion in Kenya by the end of the
year.


Clinton flew to Rwanda Saturday
and donated a year's supply of
anti-retroviral treatment for 2,500 '
children infected with HIV, the virus'
that causes AIDS.
The initiative is part of the founda-
tion's goal to get 10,000 children on-
anti-retroviral treatment in at least 10
countries by the end of 2005.
Iranian activist
denounces hangings;
TEHRAN, Iran Nobel Peace
laureate Shirin Ebadi on Saturday'
condemned'the hanging of two
teenagers accused of raping
younger boys in northeastern Iran,
a punishment that also prompted
protests by the international com-
munity and rights groups.
Last week's hangings of an 18-
year-old and 16-year-old on
charges of involvement in homo-
sexual acts violated Iran's obliga-
tions under the International
Convention on the Rights of the
Child, which bans such executions,
Ebadi said.
Ebadi said her Center for the
Protection of Human Rights will -
intensify its fight against Iran's exe-
cutions of minors.


'~'


Urban oasis


Associated Press
Gregg Rosen, left, Pricilla Cascardo, center, and Michael Goldstein soak up some sun Saturday on a manmade beach along the East River as the
Manhattan skyline sits in the distance in New York. More than 400 tons of New Jersey beach sand was trucked over to this site in the Queens bor-
ough, offering another way for New Yorkers to survive the current heat wave.


.81_













JULN 24, 20)5
. I',,, , I ,- ,I ,, ,,T


Party making splash


Special to the Chronicle

Come to the pool
party Wednesday
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation will host the
Seventh Annual Summer Pool
Party for children ages 4 to 12
from 10 a.m. to noon
Wednesday at the Bicentennial
Park Pool.
There'll be fun, games and
:prizes. There will be organized
Group games, and we'll open up
*the Slip 'n Slide down the back
hill.
Admission is $3 per person
and includes pizza and soda.


Participation is limited to the
first 100 entrants, and reserva-
tions are recommended. Spend
your summer in style with
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation and have tons of
fun.
Groups of more than 10 are
welcome, but must make reser-
vations.
Call the Bicentennial Park
Pool at 795-1478, or Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
at 795-6520.
Any person requiring rea-
sonable accommodation at any
program because of a disability
or physical impairment should
contact the Citrus County
Parks and Recreation office 72


hours prior to the activity.
Floater's Club forms
at Bicentennial Park
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation has introduced a
new program at the
Bicentennial Park Pool. Taking
place from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday,
the Floater's Club is perfect for
a weekend wind-down. This


program is for quiet time,
relaxation and meditation. All
swimming, exercising and fit-
ness activities will be curtailed
during the session while you
float around the pool, quietly
reflecting on your day, your
plans, your goals, the greater
meaning of life or absolutely
nothing at all.
Flotation devices are permit-


ted during this session only.
Those who aren't old enough
or are unable to appreciate
quiet time should come to open
swim instead.
Open swim is from 1 to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
The cost per person is $1,
plus tax or pool pass.
Any person requiring rea-
sonable accommodation at any
program because of a disability
or physical impairment should
contact the Citrus County
Parks and Recreation office 72
hours prior to the activity.
Call the Bicentennial Park
Pool at 795-1478 or Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
at 795-6520.


Golden Key inducts Hernando woman


Special to the Chronicle

Cassie Diane Serio of Hernando has
accepted membership in Golden Key
International Honor Society and was
individually honored during a recent
campus ceremony.
"It is only fitting that a high academic
achiever like Cassie be recognized by
Golden Key," said Alexander D.
Perwich II, Golden Key's chief execu-
tive officer. "Our members are inspired
and motivated by the challenge not only
to be recognized for their outstanding
accomplishments, but also to make a


positive impact on our world through
the society's commitment to service."
Golden Key International was found-
ed more than 25 years ago in Atlanta,
Ga., and provides academic recognition
to college juniors and seniors in the top
15 percent of their class.
The mission of the global, nonprofit
society is to build global communities
of academic achievers by providing
opportunities for individual growth
through leadership, career develop-
ment, networking and service.
The society's values are integrity,


inclusiveness and collaboration, inno-
vation, teamwork and respect
Golden Key has 335 chapters in the
United States, Australia, Canada, Great
Britain, Malaysia, New Zealand and
South Africa. Membership in the socie-
ty is by invitation only, to students in all
fields of study.
Serio, daughter of Stanford and
Christine Solovich of Hernando, gradu-
ated from Lecanto High School in 2002.
She has attended the University of
Florida for the past three years, where
she has achieved the President's Honor
Roll each semester.


Serio is a member of Alpha Chi
Omega fraternity and served as vice
president of recruitment this past year.
She is also an active member of the
Student Athletic Trainers Association.
She is currently working as a student
athletic trainer for the University of
Florida's football team and is pursuing
a career as a professional athletic train-
er.
She will begin a master's degree pro-
gram in the fall of 2006, following com-
pletion of her internship and gradua-
tion from the University of Florida.


BICENTENNIAL PARK POOL PARTY
* WHAT: Bicentennial Park Pool party.
* WHEN: 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday.
M INFO: Call 795-6520.


CFCC hosts Taste


of Citrus breakfast


Special to the Chronicle

The Central Florida
Community College Citrus
County Campus hosted a kick-
off breakfast for potential 2005
Taste of Citrus sponsors on
Thursday.
The kick-off event provided
information to potential spon-
sors on sponsorship levels and
the importance of their sup-
port. Attendees met and heard
firsthand from Citrus students
who have benefited from Taste
of Citrus scholarships.
The 2005 Taste of Citrus will
be Sunday, Oct 30. This year's
theme, "Moonbeams and
Memories," will focus on past
Taste of Citrus scholarship
recipients and the successes
their educational experience
at CFCC has brought them.
Each year, proceeds from the
Taste of Citrus event generate
scholarships that benefit more


than 30 students each semes-
ter
Sponsored by the CFCC
Foundation, last year's event
raised nearly $30,000 for Citrus
County students.
The 2005 Taste of Citrus
Committee is co-chaired by Joe
Azzarelli and Cheryl Phillips.
Committee members are: Mike
Buchanan, John Clardy, Avis
Craig, Joanne Crowley, Lisa
Cupelli, Linda Daly, Nancy
Delgado, Tom Franklin, Susan
Gill, Sharon Harris, Linda
Hotchkiss Williams, Beth
Johns, Cindy Lewis, Dr. Torri
Lilly, John Murphy, John
Phillips, Brian Press, Amy
Prodan, Marc Shapot,
MaryLou Shevlin, Don Taylor,
Michele Wirt, Jane Young,
John Young and Ellen Zane.
Anyone interested in more
information or in becoming a
member of the committee may
call 746-6721.'


Patriot


Special to the Chronicle
Vicki, a rescued dog, lives in
Lecanto with Tom and Sue
Carscadden.


News .. .

Artists to meet
in Spring Hill
The Nature Coast Decorative
Artists will meet at 9 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 6, at the Weeki
Wachee Senior Citizens Club,
3357 Susan Drive, Spring Hill.
This month, Pat Lamb will
teach an Old World floral in
acrylics. Call Pat at 746-0907 or
Andi at (352) 666-9091.
Playhouse 19
auditions set
There will be auditions at
Playhouse 19 for the second
show of the season, "Jt Was A
Dark and Stormy Night," at 7
p.m. Monday and Tuesday, Aug.
8 and 9. This comedic mystery
spoof by Tim Kelly features a
cast of 14 actors. Show dates
are Oct. 20 through Nov. 6.
Five significant parts are des-
ignated for adult males and one
for a young male of college age.
Two leading roles are for mature
ladies, three for adult women,
and one for a college-age girl.
There are two very small parts
available for a man and a
woman, ideal for inexperienced
actors wanting to try acting.
Prepared readings are not
required. Anyone interested is
invited to attend. For informa-
tion, call the director, Jeri
Augustine, at 795-3077.
Citrus Singles plan
fall cruise
Citrus Singles is sponsoring a
10-night cruise to the Eastern
Caribbean, departing Oct. 29
from Fort Lauderdale. Visit St.
Vincent, Grenada, St. Lucia,
Martinique, St.'Thomas and
Princess Cays. Fares include
round trip bus to Fort
Lauderdale, cruise price, port
charges and taxes. Call Sol at
795-1336.
Travel down slippery
slope for fun
Friday have just gotten a lot
more fun. Citrus County Parks
and Recreation introduces Slip
'n Slide Fridays throughout the
summer at the Bicentennial
Park Pool. In addition to our reg-
ular open swim from 1 to 5 p.m.,
we will have a gigantic Slip 'n'
Slide down the hill out back.
Arrive before 1:30 p.m. and
you can get in on a fabulous
pizza deal from Domino's in
Crystal River. Order any large
one topping pizza for only $5,
plus tax. The pizza will be
brought to you at the
Bicentennial Park Pool.
Regular admission prices
apply ($2 for anyone 12 and
older; $1 for children ages 5 to
11; and children younger than 5
are admitted free). In addition,
your season pool pass may be
used for this session.
Clubs and daycares are not
permitted. Any person requiring
reasonable accommodation pro-
gram because of a disability or
physical impairment should call
the Citrus County Parks and
Recreation office 72 hours prior.
Call 795-1478.


Prince William Sound


.D R.EA M "* ": ," _- ,,





Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo contest
for readers of the newspa-
per.
Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in a,. -
the Sunday Chronicle. o-
At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photographer
will win a prize.07
Please avoid photos with '
computerized dates on the
print.
Please make sure photo- _7..
graphs are in sharpfocus. &5'... ..
Photos should be sent to -..
the Chronicle at 1624 N. --.. .
Meadovwcrest Blvd., Crystal .
River, FL 34429 or dropped ... -
off at any Chronicle office .."
or any Accent Travel office. Special to the Chronicle
This photo was taken aboard the Sun Princess as Mary Anne Collier, Beverly Hills, was sailing away from Prince William Sound head-
ing down to the southern part of Alaska. This was the cruise part of a land/sea tour taken in July 2004.


Locks of Love


WALTER CARLSONIFor the Chronicle
Rebecca Paugh, 8, and Katie Paugh, 9, recently donated their hair to Locks of Love at Abitare
Paris Salon and Day Spa in Crystal River. They donated their hair in memory of their grand-
father, Douglas Barter, who recently died of cancer.


1 ; . _









12A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


Veterans + /- c _______-_________________


The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is planning a fund-raising
family day with a big barbecue
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 6, at the main shelter in
Bicentennial Park, Crystal River.
Everyone is invited to come enjoy
great food, games, quality time
with the family and the park swim-
ming pool will be open. Tickets will
be $5 for coalition members and
$10 for non-members. All proceeds
will go toward the Transitional
House fund.
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has initiated plans for its
next project in providing a
Transitional House to provide
homeless veterans with a facility to
help them build a new life. With
more than 25,000 veterans calling
Citrus County home, there are
about 35 not as fortunate as most.
The coalition is dedicated to help-
ing those veterans in need. This
project is one that will take a lot of
help from all the veterans' organi-
zations, civic clubs, local business
and industry, national, state and
local government, the VA and the
citizens of Citrus County. With this
kind of cooperation this dream can
become a reality.
Raffle tickets will also be avail-
able for the "Cruise for a Cause."
Only 1,500 tickets will be sold at
just $2 apiece with the drawing to
be held September 11 for a seven-
day exotic Western Caribbean
cruise for two departing St.
Petersburg on Dec. 11 and return-
ing on Dec. 18. Again, all proceeds
from the ticket sales will go toward
veterans' assistance programs.
There will be no veterans coali-
tion meeting in July and the barbe-
cue will take care of the scheduled
August meeting.
The H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills has set its
schedule.
Sunday: Bingo at 1 p.m. in the
main hall, open to the public. Doors
open at noon. No snacks and
sandwiches available until further
notice. 25-cent wings, hot dogs,
hamburgers and fries served from
4to7.
Monday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m. .
Tuesday: Pool tournament at 2
p.m. ,
Wednesday: Lounge bingo 2
p.m. Grill out at 5 p.m. hot dogs,
hamburgers and sausages. Mike
on the keyboard, ladies night 5 to
8.
Thursday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m. Pool tournament at 7 p.m.
Friday: Lounge bingo 2 p.m.
Fish or chicken dinner served from
5 to 7 p.m. for $6. Open to the
public. Mike on keyboard 6 to 9
p.m. Special dinner every third
Friday by Ladies Auxiliary 4 to 7
p.m. Aug. 19: Stuffed pork chops,
$6. For tickets in advance, call
746-0440.
Saturday: DJ/karaoke starting
at 7 p.m. with snacks at 8:30. Aug.
6: Mark; Aug. 13: Debbie G; Aug.
20: Sheila; Aug. 27: Dick and Neil.
Golf tournaments at 8 a.m.
Monday and Thursdays.
The VFW Post Men's meeting is
at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
monthly, the Ladies Auxiliary meets
at 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly and the Men's Auxiliary
meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second
Wednesday monthly at the post
home. Rolling Thunder meets at 11
a.m. the second Saturday monthly
at VFW Post 10087.
For more information, call the
post at 746-0440. The post is locat-
ed at 2170 W. Vet Lane on County
Road 491 behind the AmSouth
Bank and across from Haywire's.
The Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 in Hemando, will serve
a corned beef and cabbage or ham
dinner from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday for $5.50. Free music for
dancing provided by Country
Swing from 6:30 to 10:30. You do
not have to be a Post or VFW
member and the public is invited.
Beginning Aug. 5, all Friday night
dinners will cost $6.
The post has bar bingo at 2 p.m.
Sunday. The Ladies Auxiliary
hosts bingo games at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, and doors open at 9.
Hot food and snacks available. The
auxiliary also sponsors bar bingo at
2 p.m. Tuesday.
Our post Web page can be
viewed by clicking on the VFW
logo at www.debbiefields.com. You
can e-mail us at usavets@nature-
coast net.
We host the VFW Post 4252


Young Marines and their Web page
can be viewed by clicking on their
logo at www.debbiefields.com. If
you have a child interested in this
wonderful program take a look at
the Web page. We will start recruit-
ing at the VFW from 6 to 8 pm.
July 26, from 6 to 7 p.m. Aug. 2
and from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 9. For
information, call Tammy Grant at
746-4590.
The post Honor Guard is avail-
able for funeral services at
Bushnell National Cemetery, local


cemeteries or any house of wor-
ship. Upon request, the Honor
Guard will provide school visits,
flag ceremonies, visit rest homes
or support any patriotic-related
affair. Call John Stewart, Honor
Guard commander, at 634-5568.
There will be an open house
from 6 to 9 p.m. Aug. 5 at VFW
Post 4684 in Citrus Springs to
meet the new Florida VFW State
Commander, Bob Shepherd. The
state commander homecoming will
be Aug. 6 at VFW State
Headquarters in Ocala. There will
be a cocktail hour from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. For reservations to these
events, call Judy Prive at 726-
3339.
The post will host a Jam Session
at 5 p.m. Aug. 7, featuring the band
Country.
Singles nights are 6:30 p.m. the
first and third Thursday monthly.
Music is provided by Katie Lynn for.
a $2 donation. Come out, enjoy
some great music, meet some
wonderful single people and have
a great time.
Come out and see our renovat-
ed facility. Halls are now available
to the public for weddings, club
meetings, private parties, etc. Food
and entertainment can be provid-
ed. Call us for details.
Mark your calendar for the annu-
al Labor Day picnic set for Sept. 4.
Watch this column for date tickets
will be available and specifics of
the picnic.
The dart league meets and com-
petes at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.
Grouper dinners are starting. By
popular request, we will serve
grouper once per month at the nor-
mal Friday night dinners prepared
by Tom's Grouper. Check this col-
umn or the post Web page for
scheduled meals and events. Our
first grouper meal will be on Aug. 5.
The post and Ladies Auxiliary
regularly visit several local nursing
homes. They encourage anyone to
join them and spread some cheer
to veterans who served this coun-
try and who now need our support.
Call for details.
We need help with our bingo
operations, which is a very impor-
tant part of your post revenue.
Callers and floor coordinators are
needed immediately. Donate a few
hours and receive a lifetime of sat-
isfaction.
Numerous people called the
answering service of John Stewart,
the post's Grapevine newspaper
editor, during his recent three-week
vacation regarding the paper.
Unfortunately, a lightning strike
destroyed the service, and all
recorded calls were lost. Please
call the reinstalled service and
repeat your request at 344-9112.
The next post and Ladies
Auxiliary meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
Aug. 11. For information, call Bob
Prive, post commander, at 726-
3339.
Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 Citrus
County will meet for breakfast at
8:30 a.m. Sunday, July 31, at
Crystal Paradise Restaurant, 508
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. All
Seabees, Honeybees and friends
are invited. For more information,
call Commander George Staples,
628-6927.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW


Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,
Inglis (one mile east of U.S. 19).
Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
the Post. Meh's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday month-
ly. Call Skeeter Fizz, (352) 447-
3495.
The Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,
Inglis, will have a dinner and music
on Saturday, Aug. 6. Dinner will be
from 5 to 7 p.m. and music from 7
to 10:30. Dinner will include fried
fish, baked beans, hush puppies
and coleslaw for a $6 donation.
Smoke-free dining. Public wel-
come. To-go orders or information,
call (352) 447-3495.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors of Citrus County meets at 2
p.m. on the fourth Thursday month-
ly at Ray's Bar-B-Q in Crystal
River. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.
The Marine Corps League
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will have its regular meeting at 7:30
p.m. on the third Thursday monthly
at VFW Post 7122 in Floral City. All
members are encouraged to
attend. Former Marines as new
members are also welcomed. Call
Tom Heron at 637-2724 or Bob
Hines at 746-6908.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Marine Corps League meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the VFW 7122 in Floral
City.
The Military Order of Devil
Dogs Meeting: Contact Chris at
795-7000.
The Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 is now
getting settled in its new meeting
hall at the VFW in Beverly Hills
located behind the AmSouth Bank
on County Road 491.
The meetings are at 7 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. All
Marines are invited to attend.
The Detachment has an Honor
Guard of Marine League members
available who take pride in con-


ducting a memorial service for the
deceased member of all branches
of the military not only at local
cemeteries but also at the Florida
National Cemetery in Bushnell. If
you would like more information or
to join the league, call Bob at 527-
1577 or Ralph at 726-7836.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 of Citrus Springs will have its
general meeting at 7 p.m. on the
first Tuesday monthly; Ladies
Auxiliary will meet at 7 p.m. on the
second Tuesday; the Men's
Auxiliary will meet at 7:30 p.m. o6n
the third Monday; and the monthly
staff meeting will be at 7 p.m. on the
third Tuesday.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 in Citrus Springs will be serv-
ing fried fish on July 29. Dinners
are served from 5 to 7 p.m. at our
usual price of only $6 per person.
Entertainment will be provided by
the Country Bluegrass Band. Hope
to see you there.
The post also serves a complete
breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m.
Saturday for $4 per person.
Don't forget the weekly activities:
Bingo at 1 p.m. every Tuesday,
Shuffleboard at 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Dart Tournament
on Thursday at 7 p.m.
The VFW Post 7122, Floral
City, and the Ladies' and Men's
Auxiliaries announce the following
events.
Today: The post opens at 1 p.m.
Tuesday: Early bird bingo starts
at 6:30 p.m. and regular bingo at 7.
Shareen's Kitchen opens at 5 p.m.
with sandwiches, salads and
wings.
Wednesday: Shareen's kitchen
offers barbecued ribs for $6,
served from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday: The Marine Corps
League meets at 7 p.m.
Friday: All you can eat grouper
fixed the way you like, or three-
piece fried chicken served from
4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Karaoke by,
Jannie Faye starts at 7.


Saturday: Char-broiled filet or
New York strip steak with all the
trimmings served from 5 to 7:30
p.m.
A new year is just beginning for
the VFW and the Ladies' and
Men's Auxiliaries. We welcome all
new and returning members.
Returnees from Iraq and
Afghanistan are especially wel-
come. Call the post at 637-0100 for
eligibility.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, Inverness, calendar July 25-
31:
Monday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Chicken wings four for $1
from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by
Marty from 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Free pool from 9
a.m. to noon.
Thursday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Friday: Free pool from 9 a.m. to
noon. AYCE fried or baked grouper
(chicken available) $6 from 4:30 to
7 p.m. Karaoke by Marty from 7 to
11 p.m.
Saturday: Lasagna dinner $7 at
5:30 p.m. Music by Sundown at
6:30 p.m.
Sunday: Pool tourney at 2 p.m.
Karaoke by Wild Willy from 5 to 9
p.m.
N The Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 of Inverness
invites all veterans of Inverness
and Lecanto to join them. Meetings
are at 7:30 p.m. the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training Center
building, 130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. The executive board


S.Wk


meets the third Thursday monthly.
Call the commander at 341-2276.
Yankee Air Force Inc. is
proud to have a "Commemorative
End of World War II" dance also in
conjunction with VJ Day, on Aug. 6
at American Legion Post 58 on
U.S. 41 next to Carolina Dental
Clinic in Dunnellon. There will be
live big band music, hors d'oeu-
vres, cash bar, social hour from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Live music from
7:30 to 11 p.m. Wear your uniform
proudly if you still have it.
Tickets are $15 per person or
$25 a couple. Make checks
payable to Yankee Air Force, Fla.
Div., and mail with a SASE to P.O.
Box 773364, Ocala, 34477.
Deadline for tickets is Aug. 1.
Proceeds to support Yankee Air
Force Museum. For information,
call Carolyn at (352) 489-3120 or
the airport at (352) 465-0727.
All LST Veterans and wives
are invited to monthly breakfast
meetings at 9 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the Golden
Corral Restaurant in Brooksville.
For information, call (352) 799-
1957.
Phone Cards for the Armed
Forces Help our U.S. soldiers
phone home. Simply purchase a
first class phone card and deposit it
in the special box at the Lecanto
post office.
The U.S. Postal Service, in con-
junction with the U.S. Armed
Forces, will make sure that our
men and women in Iraq receive
these cards as a gift from the car-

Please see VETERANS/Page 13A


New Homes & Lots
10260 N Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Ccrus Springs, FL (Corner of Rt. 41)


(_LL.L' 'LLL LL lLLLLLL LL
And our first annual community gathering

k0 JOIN Us FORTHIS
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0 W0 /OPb N/ 0 Meet Our Welcome
Vl 0"' 4, Center Staff


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to meeting our neighbors


Enjoy A Great
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~_~_~_~ ___II___~~___I__IX__


CITRus COUN'IY (FL) CIIRONICI.F


VETERANS








VETERANS 20


Editor's Note: The Purple
Heart Medal is awarded to
members of the Armed Forces
of the United States for
wounds received in action
from a hostile force. The com-
bat wounded members of
Aaron A Weaver Chapter 776,
Military Order of the Purple
Heart will be profiled in a
series of monthly articles. For
more information about the
chapter visit its web site at or
call 382-3847.
The doorbell at the
Inverness home of Kenneth L.
Bradshaw, Jr., greets visitors
with the Notre Dame fight
song. The greeting is illustra-
tive of Bradshaw's fighting
Irish spirit that enabled him to
survive on the battlefields of
Korea.
Born in Tauton,
Massachusetts, Bradshaw grew
up in neighboring Raynham.
After graduating from Taunton
Vocational School in 1947, he
enlisted in the U.S. Army in
January 1948.
Within weeks of the outbreak
of the Korean War on June 25,
1950, Bradshaw was sent as an
individual replacement to the
24th Infantry Division, which
was defending the Pusan
Perimeter against advancing
North Korean forces. Assigned
to Company E, 1st Battalion,
19th Infantry, he soon formed
an inseparable friendship with
three unit members-
Corporal Mitchell Red Cloud,
Corporal Bob Black and
I Sergeant John Moore
The September 15 Inchon
landings by the U.S. and break-
i out of the Pusan Perimeter
caused North Korean resist-
ance to evaporate. By late
October, Bradshaw's division
was within 18 miles of the Yalu
o River, which separates North
t Korea from the People's
Republic of China.
Amid talk of the war being
over by Christmas, Bradshaw's
company learned the People's
Liberation Army (PLA) had
crossed the Yalu River en
masse. In anticipation of the
PLA onslaught, Bradshaw's
company was ordered to with-
draw to Hill 123 and establish
defensive positions.
Prior to dawn on November


VETERANS
Continued from Page 12A



-ing people of Citrus County.
While at the post office, you can
also honor our heroes by purchas-
ing a patriotic piece of framed art.
Each 12-by-14-inch piece has a
military collage with a collectable
enamel pin and an actual
"Honoring Veterans" stamp.
Hunger and Homeless


5, Corporal Red Cloud, a
Marine veteran of WW II, fond-
ly called "Chief' because of his
Native American heritage,
sounded the battle cry with
"Here they come."
Under the cover of darkness,
the Chinese had flanked
Company E undetected to
attack it from the rear.
Bradshaw moved from his two-
man fighting position to a van-
tage point to engage the
advancing enemy with hand
grenades. Returning to his
fighting position, he found his
fellow defender dead.
As his company's defenses
crumbled, Bradshaw withdrew
down a ravine with three
Chinese
soldiers in
Pursuit.
Taking
c co e r
behind
rocks, he
took aim at
-- his pur-
-* suers
. ~killing all
Q three. He
then con-
tinued his
withdrawal
until he
came upon
and took temporary refuge
with a heavy weapons compa-
ny
Of the approximately 160
members of Company E, most
were killed, wounded or cap-
tured. While Bradshaw mirac-
ulously escaped unscathed, his
friends Red Cloud, Black and
Moore were killed in action.
Despite being wounded three
times, Corporal Red Cloud's
valiant and fierce fight to the
death earned him the
Congressional Medal of Honor
posthumously
After Bradshaw's company
was reconstituted, it endured a
series of engagements and
withdrawals southward until
the battlelines stabilized in the
vicinity of the 38th parallel.
In the days that followed,
Company E found itself ceding
and retaking ground and
preparing defenses for the
next major PLA assault.'
The inevitable assault came
on February 6, 1951, during

Coalition -Anyone who knows of
a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357.
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will have its annual
Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram, Oct. 31 to Nov. 10 as part of
its 13th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week activities.
Coordinated by the Military
Officers Association of America


which Bradshaw earned his
Purple Heart. The Chinese
assault was supported with
deadly fire from a machinegun
position. Bradshaw, in turn,
placed machinegun fire on the
enemy position, knocking it out
of action. Bradshaw's success-
ful action brought heavy enemy
fire on his position, wounding
him in the right arm and his
assistant gunner in the shoul-
der.
Severely wounded and seek-
ing medical attention,
Bradshaw and his assistant
gunner made their way to the
company aid station. After the
Chinese attack subsided, he
was evacuated to the battalion
aid station and then to Pusan
for further evacuation to the
155th Station Hospital in
Yokohama, Japan.
Close to two months later,
Bradshaw was evacuated to
Walter Reed Army Hospital in
Washington, D.C. Following
several surgeries and 15
months of rehabilitation, he
was medically retired from the
U.S. Army in May 1952.
Returning to Raynham,
Massachusetts as the proud
recipient of the Purple Heart
and Combat Infantryman
Badge, Bradshaw took up civil-
ian life, ultimately retiring in
1983 from General Electric
with 29 years service.
In 1988, he and his wife
Barbara relocated to
Inverness. Bradshaw is a life
member of the DAY Korean
War Veterans Association and
VFW
He is also a past commander
of VFW Post 4337 in Inverness,
a life charter member of Aaron
A. Weaver Chapter 776, MOPH,
a 32nd Degree Mason and a
Shriner. Among Bradshaw's
most cherished honors, howev-
er, was his induction as a war-
rior of the Ho Chong Nation in
a recent ceremony at Black
River Falls, Wisconsin. Once
comrades in battle, now he and
his friend Corporal Red Cloud
are reunited as warriors.

Curt Ebitz is the Commander,
Aaron A Weaver Chapter 776,
Military Order of the
Purple Heart

(MOAA), Citrus County.Chapter,
the Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram brings living history to the
classrooms of the county's public
and private schools, as well as
home-school groups. Veterans
share with students their first-hand
military experiences and travels
while serving our country in uni-
form during peace and war.
The program's success has gen-
erated the need for additional vet-
erans to participate as guest class-
room speakers. Men and women
veterans who served in the Persian
Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force,


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Your Birthday: Persons who are in positions to
help you may do so in the year ahead in ways that
they wouldn't do for just anybody. However, they
could quickly back off if you should appear ungrateful
or use their input in wasteful ways.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Lady Luck may be taking
the day off today, so don't do anything foolish where
you need to depend on her. She won't be around to
bail you out of risky or dangerous situations.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be very careful that
you are not the instigator who provokes a family dis-
pute or disruption. Once it gets on a roll, it will
boomerang on you and become quite difficult to calm
everybody down again.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Strive to be encourag-
ing rather than critical today of those who are doing
their best to help you. Caustic remarks could cause a
loss of support, but more importantly the loss of
friends.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Financial areas could
be quite tricky and treacherous for you today, so don't
do anything foolish or extravagant that could cause
you to have to pay for a loss that you alone brought
on.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Persons in your
charge can be led today, but not driven. Before throw-
ing your weight around and expecting them to do
more than you would do in their place, consider how
you are behaving.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Do not waste your
precious time today worrying about things that may


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Bad News Bears" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10 p.m. Digital.
"Charlie & the Chocolate Factory" (PG) 12:20
p.m., 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes or super
savers.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:45
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:25
p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Wedding Crashers" (R) 12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G) 12:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m.,
4:45 p.m.
"Dark Water" (PG-13) 7:05 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Bad News Bears" (PG-13) 12:25 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 9:55 p.m. Digital.


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms
available for wedding and
engagement announce.
ments, anniversaries,
birth announcements and
first birthdays.
* Call Linda Johnson at
563.5660 for copies.


National Guard are especially
needed. All interested veterans are
encouraged to call Mac McLeod,
746-1384, Gary Runyon, 563-5727
or Bob Truax, 860-1630.
The USS Chilton (APA 38)
Navy reunion will be Oct. 6-9 in
San Antonio, Texas. Any veteran of
the Chilton is invited. For informa-
tion, call Joseph Doherty at 341-
5959.


01.
: .


C. A.Toumbis MD, PhD
Fellowship Trained In Spine
* Minimally Invasive Surgery
*Artificial Disc Replacement
Laser Disc Surgery
* Cervical & Lumbar Spine


"The Devil's Rejects" (R) 12;05 p.m., 2:25 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Island" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:20 p.m. Digital.
"Charlie & the Chocolate Factory" (PG) 12:10
p.m., 12:40 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. Digital. No passes or super savers.
"Wedding Crashers" (R) 12:15 p.m., 4:35 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Digital.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) 12:35 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13) Noon, 4:10 p.m., 7
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13) 10:15 p.m. Digital.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area
movie listings and entertainment information.


== Sunday"s Pi 0 .-1 me =

Puzzle is on Page 16A.

NAVAL ASCOT CASTE BOSS
ALICE PH ONE ATTAR OPTED
COSTA PANEL SHUNS LEAVE
RHO FLARES CHECCKERS GEE
EARL EROS CHINK ATTEND
OFTEN SHOES MINER

RAISIN FLAIwR CULL DOLE

TREE LARK TEMES GET LED
ADAMS MER IT FALSE
BAG ATA CARET SAIL BLOT
AROSE SHAVE GRINS BAN
ROMP |TI LE GRAFsT STOOwGE
SWEETTAL K ALOFT MINARET
RANE WREST SALTS
COSTAR SAGAS HERA TALE
ASH GERANIUM DANISH WAN
SCARE OVATE CUBAN ELAND
TAPED POKER UNITE FARCE
RELY EWERS ESTER TWEED
7-24 @ 2005 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


ORTHOPAEDIC


Now SEEING NECK AND BACK PATIENTS

Dr. Andrew J. Petrella is pleased to
announce that C. A. Toumbis. MD, PhD
is joining him. Dr. Toumbis has recently
relocated from the Cleveland Clinic
Hospital and received his orthopaedic
training at Shands Hospital. He is
currently accepting new patients.


Andrew J. Petrella MD
Board Certified
*Joint Replacement
* Sports Medicine
* Pediatric Orthopaedics
* Fracture Care
* Hand Surgery


Call the friendly office staff at 352-563-9959 for an appointment or
visit www.citrusortho.net for more information 582 S.E. 7th Ave


1 (52 72-4 S09 o 1 .800 ):84 -05


never happen. If you do, it will not only make you mis-
erable, but could cause you to make some wrong
moves.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Do not allow your-
self to be intimidated by peer pressure today, espe-
cially if your better judgment warns you against doing
something they want to do. Don't go along with fool-
ishness.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) On occasion, you
can sometimes seesaw back and forth regarding
actions you should take. Today there's a good chance
that this type of behavior may be dominating your
judgment.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Instead of holding a
grudge, try to be forgiving today of someone who has
wounded you. There is nothing to be gained by hang-
ing on to resentment; in fact it usually recoils in on
oneself.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Deal cautiously today
with persons about whom you know little, especially if
it involves placing a lot of trust in someone. People
are not always what they appear to be on the surface.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's important that you
and your partner's aims are in harmony with one
another today. If either goes off on a tangent, a seri-
ous rift could result should something go wrong.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A bad attitude toward
distasteful chores will only make them worse than
they really are in your eyes. When you think some-
thing is difficult, you'll find a way to prove yourself
right.


Today s . .
isw~seC~i~tsia^^ f ^ /~ C '' ,^ Wfoaswaesct^


SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 13A


CITRUS COUNTn (FL) CHRONICLE








CiTi RUS COU'', (I.) (JIIIONIC I.


14A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


Time of year


to cruise returns


t's that time again when
I'm inundated with travel
brochures. Tempting me
mostly are the cruise
brochures for next winter.
They're doing the trick
because I am considering tak-
ing a short cruise five days
- come January, right after the
hectic days of Christmas and
holiday preparations.
I'm getting excited merely
thinking about it the cruise
will be paid for, shopping will
be completed and a
nice, relaxing vaca-
tion sounds great, ..
but most important- h
ly, it will be mar- '
velous to have
someone cater to "
ME, for a change.
Cruises stir up
many wonderful
memories of cruis- AnneI
ing in the
Caribbean, Europe, '
Australia and the OF A "
Orient. L '
I vividly recall
one particular
evening. We had visited
Barbados and the ship was
leaving the port in the late
evening, sailing into the dark
night. As we stood on deck, we
could hear the Bajan Band
from one of the nightclubs,
playing "Beautiful, beautiful
Barbados." It was such a
romantic evening we had
enjoyed the day in Barbados,
and this little musical touch
was so befitting. It seemed as if
the nightclub management bid
us "goodbye" in such a delight-
ful manner.
Another sight that impressed
me was visiting Carthagena,
Columbia. In the main square
of the city was a gigantic


cement sculpture of an old
shoe, which stated that the city
is so comfortable, "it fits like
wearing an old shoe." That's an
unusual sight.
In Hawaii it was thrilling
watching the hot lava drop in
the water, giving a spectacular
colorful show.
There are so many stories to
relate about cruising. You can
see, visit, take your time with-
out getting tired out. This will
be my first cruise on a mega
ship, so it should be
quite interesting,
< since our cruising
was done on the
smaller ships, like
the "Italia" a
26,000 ton ship with
a passenger capaci-
ty of about 160, plus
staff. It felt like you
owned the ship
Fusillo because you got to
know so many pas-
sengers and it was
- ' like family fun.
S'':' Something that
strikes at the heart
of everyone is the FOOD. True,
there are many dining servic-
es, so you won't go hungry.
Activities are constant you'll
be amazed ... and all you have
to do is concentrate on your
own activities and schedule
them. Do think about cruising
there's been so much
improvement to make the pas-
sengers happy and carefree.
Now, that's what I call a vaca-
tion. I deserve it and so do you.

Anne Fusillo and her hus-
band, Frank, owned a travel
agency in Wheaton, Ill.,
for 17years. Questions or
comments? Give her a
call at 564-9552.


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: This is me standing in front of Schonbrunn, the Habsburgs' summer residence. The Habsburgs ruled Austria for more than 600
years. .: This is the fountain in Salzburg where Julie Andrews flicks the water singing "I have confidence in me" as she leaves the
abbey to be a governess for the Von Trapp children. RIGHT: Vendors, dressed as Mozart, trying to sell tickets.to classical music con-
certs in front of the Imperial Palace, the Habsburgs' winter residence. My friends and I attended a Mozart and Strauss concert the other


Vienna provides rich memories


KATIE HENDRICKS
Chronicle intern

July 15, 2005
Wow, how time flies! Last weekend, I
took a train to Salzburg with a group of
three other girls for the famed "Sound of
Music" tour. We took a four-hour bus ride
with our guide, Gunther, and saw most of
the movie's most memorable sights, such
as the Von Trapp estate, the gazebo where
Lesil gets her first kiss, the fountain the
children dance around singing "Do re mi,"
the tree-lined boulevard where Maria
declares her "confidence" with suitcase
and guitar in hand, and many more. And
throughout the tour we managed to sing
the entire soundtrack We had a ball, but I
suspect that it gets a little tiresome for
Gunther, who gives the tour nearly every
day of the year.
This week also tested my bravery, as
well as my sense of directions. For a cou-
ple of afternoons after class, I took off by


myself downtown. One day I toured the
catacombs below St. Stephen's Cathedral,
the tallest and most central building in
Vienna. Unfortunately the tour guide's
English was not too clear, but I was able to
make out a little of what he said. Inside the
catacombs were some of the Habsburg
family's remains, along with thousands of
bones from Bubonic Plague victims.
It was an incredibly sobering experi-
ence to see the devastating effect the dis-
ease had on the city. In just one month,
more than 1000 Viennese people died. The
plague wiped out nearly a third. of
Europe's population in total.
Photography was not allowed in the cat-
acombs, which was a shame because,
although very eerie, it has been one of the
most intriguing and memorable sites I've
seen so far.
The week came to a lovely close with a
trip to Schonbrunn, the Habsburgs' sum-
mer residence. Eloquently decorated by
Empress Maria Theresa in the Rococo


style, this palace used to regularly house
1500 guests. Perhaps the most impressive
room of all was the royal ballroom, deco-
rated with lavish frescoes.
For centuries, Schonbrunn rivaled King
Louis XIV's Versailles, known for its osten-
tatious decadence. The Habsburgs' oppo-
sition to the French royalty ended when
Maria Theresa's daughter, Maria
Antoinette, married Louis XVI, the future
king of France. Like Versailles, the palace
also had breathtaking gardens and foun-
tains, complete with a maze and the
world's oldest zoo. Without a doubt, this
was the most gorgeous place I have visited
in Vienna. The trip has also encouraged
me to go back and brush up on my notes
from Mrs.. Nelson's world history class
from my sophomore year at Citrus High
School.
And for now, (forgive my unoriginality),
as the (movie) Von Trapp children would
say: "So long, farewell, I hate to say good-
bye!"


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of
submitted material. The earlier Chronrii..le editors receive
submissions, the better chance of notes running more
than once.
* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the
event.
* Veterans Notes: 4 p.m Wednesday for publication
Sunday.
* Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
* Business Digest: 4 p.m Wednesday for publication
Sunday
* Chalk Talk: 4 p m. Monday for publication Wednesday.
* Health Notes: 4 p.rn Friday for oublication Tuesday.
SReligious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication
Saturday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p m. Thursday for publication
Sunday.
* Photos and stores are published as space is available.
The Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on color pages.
* Submit material at Chromicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River: by fax at 563.3280, or by e-mail to news-
desk@chronicleonrline com.


GROUPS
BY.

Casino Washington Sterling Grand Show
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Magic 2, August 18a &September 15 August 21 J.14, 26
ug 14&Sep.11 6as S b 5 & August 28 aa
M149 s709,1 .. 09 $54

Atlantic Beau Branson Isle o Radio Ciy
City Rivage 14 MeaxoAg 6r 14. Rockettes
S7. Super..Spec..ial | .Only


Our Lady of Grace
Motorcoach Daily Mass
Sail January 16th to
Mexico & Grand Cayman

$499 p.p./dbl occup
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CASABLANCA
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ON THE BAY
elegant suites and breathtaking
views.
wo-course breakfast served on
the grand front porch.
1-(800) 826-2626
vww.casablancainn.com


7 nights on the Carnival Glory
Departing December 10, 2005
$5 2 includes cruise, port and government
$ charges
gW B Per Person
Eastern Caribbean Cruise
BECKY'S TRAVEL STORE
Call for ocean view prices.
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills; FL 34465
352-527-8855
email: beckystravelstore@earthlink.net
ehbsite: www heckystravelstore 4mvdeals.corn


Eastern Carihhbbean Cruise on
Costa Mediterranea Feb. 5-12
From $820.88 pp inc. ins. & trans.
Grand Opening Special:
RIU Ocho Rios Jamaica
3nts. All Inclusive from $629 pp
Inc. Air from Orlando*
Call Trumpet Travel Agency**
352-746-1207
for information and reservations
*Based on rnidweek Iravel, other restrictions apply.
Taxes ai( fees additional. ** ST
35i62


CITRUS UNITED BASKET
FUNDRAISER CRUISE
10/29/05 11/03/05
Sail from Tampa Bay on board
Carnival's Inspiration to the ports
of Cozumel and the Grand
Cayman Islands
Interior Cabins $483.35 per person*
Ocean View Cabins
$553.35 per person*
For more information and reservations
please contact
CITRUS UNITED BASKET
NOLA GRAVIUS
(352) 344-2242


HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
WILDLIFE PARK
Summer programs for
children in the third -
fifth grade -
Wildlife funshops
5 half days
Call Eileen
(352) 382-5300


CRYSTAL RIVER
ARCHAEOLOGICAL
STATE PARK
61 acres of
Native American
burial mounds.
6pen 365 days,

(352) 795-3817


0jo /dliu! ujild

HISTORIC
ST. FRANCIS INN
B&B Located in the
oldest part of the city
Guests receive FREE
admission to lighthouse
1-(800) 824-6062
www.stfrancisinn.com


Capt. Mike's aIi3J
Lazy RiverAY



Withlacoochee River
*Rainbow Springs River


I For Reservations 352-637-2726





52 Weeks $:625
26 Weeks $ -L750
6 Weeks $2000
Open Rate $3500
To place your ads,
call us today (352) 563-3231.
Publication every Sunday in the Citrus
County Chronicle and all week on
www.chronicleonline.com


!r


~


loR 'A TAWAY


I I I


YA.


1''~""" ~i' I I


TRAVEL


?







SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 15A


CITRUS CoivNTY (FL) CIIRONI(C:I.


Weddings .


=In the ; : ICE


Holland-Johns


Ronald Edward Johns and
Delynn Marie Holland were
united in marriage at 2 p.m.
Friday, June 24, 2005, at the
West Citrus Community Center
in Crystal River. Donna
Viglione from The Wedding
Chapel in Inverness per-
formed the Christian service.
The bride is the daughter of
Richard and Sherri Niemann
of Wesley Chapel.
The groom is the son of Edith
Turgeon of Homosassa.
Maid of honor was Staci
Hasbrouck and best man was
Mark Arnold. The groomsman
was Matt Vanslette. Flower
girls were Sierra Johns and
Victoria Holland.
The groom is self-employed
with Tony's Lawn Service and
the bride is employed at Intern
Health Care.


Santana-DiDonna
Paul DiDonna and Sylvia .'..,.
Santana were united in mar- "
riage at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, . '".'. -
June 25, 2005, at Scampi's .,,
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Donna Viglione from The .
Wedding Chapel in Inverness ,
performed the Christian serv-
ice.
A honeymoon cruise will be r
taken at a later date.
The newlyweds will live in
Crystal River


The couple went on a wed-
ding trip to Tennessee.
They will live in Homosassa.


Clark-Hamilton

John Douglas Hamilton and
Jessie Marie Clark were united :
,in marriage at 11 a.m. Sunday,
'June 26, 2005, at the home of 1'
Evelyn Wilson, the groom's .'.,
-grandmother, in Inverness.
Donna Viglione from The
Wedding Chapel in Inverness
performed the Christian serv-
ice.
The bride is the daughter of .. ,
'Rock Clark of Hernando and
the groom is the son of Ralph
Hamilton of Keyser, WVa.
The flower girl was Sarah
Hamilton and the ring bearer
was Taylor Anderson.
The groom is employed at
Raymond Frankart Roofing. -'.
The couple will live in
Inverness.


Kilgore-Brooks


David G. Brooks and Debra S.
Kilgore were united in marriage
Saturday, July 16, 2005, at First
Baptist Church of Lecanto. The
Rev. L.B. Thomason performed
the service.
The bride is the daughter of
Barbara Hansen of Clearwater
and the late Jack Kilgore.
The groom is the son of Gale
Brooks of Orlando and Rita
Bianco of Lecanto.
Given in marriage by her
sons Micah Petellat, Joshua
Petellat and Andrew Petellat
II, the bride wore a white satin
strapless gown and carried a
bouquet of stargazer lilies and
white roses.
Matron of honor was Maria


Allyn of Citrus Springs and
best man was Jordan Brooks,
son of the groom from
Piedmont, Ala. Ushers were
Micah and Joshua Petellat.
The reception followed at
the Outback Steakhouse in
Inverness, given by the bride
and groom.
The groom is employed in
law enforcement with the
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services and the
bride is manager of
Cumberland Farms in
Hernando.
The couple went on a seven-
day cruise to Mexico.
They will live in Beverly
Hills.


First .. 7
Emma Lane Barker cele-
brated her first birthday July 2
with a birthday party and trip
to Walt Disney World.
"Emmy's" mother and father
are Shalyn and Patrick Barker
of -Beverly Hills. Maternal .
grandparents are Mike and
Victoria Melfi of Beverly Hills.
Paternal grandparents are ..
Geri Crippen and Patrick
Barker both of Homosassa.
Maternal, great-grandfather is
Raymond Seijas Jr. of Ocala.
Paternal great-grandparents
are Rita Crippen of Crystal
River, and Jim and Emily
Barker of Crystal River.

Charles Brock Adams cele-
brated his first birthday on
May 24. Charles is the son of
Randy and Tracee Adams of
Citrus Springs. Maternal
grandparents are Kathy
Glover of Orlando and Lloyd ,
Glover of Orlando. Paternal .
grandparents are Gary and
Gloria Reed of Ocala.


S GO ONLINE
* Visit
www.Chr onicleOnli rie.conm
to read today's headlines,
add your thoughts to the
weekly opinion poll,
search the classified ads.
look up movie times or
play games.
To see manatees at
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, go to
www.ManateeCam.com.
Have trien-ds visit the cam-
era at
www.KingsBayCam.com
while you're out at the
springs in King's Bay


m Air Force Airman
Christopher J. Danielson has
graduated from basic military
training at Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio, Texas.
During the six weeks of
training, the airman studied
the Air Force mission, organi-
zation and military customs
and courtesies; performed
drill and ceremony marches,
and received physical training,
rifle marksmanship, field
training exercises and special
training in human relations.
In addition, airmen who


complete basic
training earn
credits toward
an associate
Degree through
the Community
-- College of the
Air Force.
He is the son
Christopher of Magdelene
Danielson Telekesi of
Floral City.
Danielson is
a 2003 gradu-
ate of Citrus High School,
Inverness.


Engagement

Ader-Hunt
Gary and Judy Ader of Collin Hunt, son of Rex and
Wellington announce the Donna Young of Inverness.
engagement of their daughter, The wedding is set for March
Deborah Beth Ader, to Jackson 18, 2006, in Wellington.


Special to the Chronicle
Floral City resident Eleanor Grandon received a surprise
visit recently from two of her 14 great-grandchildren, as
well as two of her granddaughters. The co-vice president of
the Floral City Woman's Club was excited to spend time
with her family, with whom she shared stories and many of
the area's attractions. Grandon and her family lunched at
Joe's Restaurant in Inverness. From left are: Lisa Moore,
granddaughter; Jennifer Moore, great-granddaughter;
Denise Pittenger, granddaughter; Eleanor Grandon (cen-
ter); Rebbecca Pittenger, great-granddaughter; Michael
Wade.







I .IJT I I --
4474 S. Florida Ave.72 Inve7700ess

.b ,tLU 4474 S. Florida Ave.# Inverness


3/4 mi, south of Fairgrounds*Hwy. 41


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7









I. 3UDY JL 4C&f


Leave the light on for me


After moving from the city to the country
a few years ago I thought I was getting a
handle on the way things worked.
I learned to wave at people as they went by in
cars whether I knew them or not I learned that
when somebody asks you to bring a
"dish to pass" you're not supposed to
show up with an empty plate. I .,:
learned that you don't ask if some- ',
body needs help changing a tire or is
feeling poorly, you just pitch in. In
other words, I've learned to do a lot of
things that would have been consid-
ered poor taste in the city.
But I still haven't shed all my city .
ways. It still upsets my fantasy picture ,
of country living every time I drive I
past Vardon Frazier's sagging old
farmhouse with its sprawl of old trac-
tors, car parts and rusting equipment
on the lawn.
Imagine how nice it would look if that ratty
old overstuffed chair wasn't on his front porch.
And that broken exercise bicycle. It has no seat
on it What muscles do you exercise with that?
Best not to ask Leaning against the bike is a
stack of balding tires from a car that hasn't been
made in 40 years. The porch is crammed with
stuff that gets rained on and snowed on.
What the sun hasn't bleached it has peeled,
what it hasn't peeled it has dried. There is a box
with a few old telephones in it, a collection of
old TV chassis, broken children's toys, a croquet
set with one mallet missing and an avocado-col-
ored washing machine. If Vardon lived in New
York and called himself an artist and this pile of
junk was in the corner of a huge empty white
salon in a famous museum, people from
Manhattan would trip all over themselves to see
it first
He would be the toast of the art world for
"metaphorically showing us what is on the
inside of us struggling to get out" "His use of
found objets to express futility of our existence
is saying to us, 'Why worry, it's all garbage."'
Or maybe not It is a pretty ugly array of junk
I would love to say, "Vardon, why don't I get my
truck and we'll load up all this stuff and take it


to the dump. Your house will look so much bet-
ter and my property values would go up."
But you can't say that. For the same reason
you can never congratulate a woman with a pro-
truding stomach on her impending happiness. If
you're wrong she's angry and you're
embarrassed.
1b What if only some of it's junk? I
% don't want to insult him.
Then I had a brilliant idea. The six
little words that have caused most of
the world's problems. I loaded our
J pickup with a few bags of our trash in
. ^it and drove past Vardon's even
though it was in the wrong direction
from the dump. I stopped. He was out
PA on his porch.
"Vardon," I yelled, "I'm going to the
landfill with a half empty truck You
want to come along?"
"Yep," he said, "Hang on a minute."
Ah, diplomacy. This is the way things should
work I'm helping him, he's helping me. It's
Woodstock all over again. There can be peace
and harmony in the world. Let the sun shine in,
it's the dawning of Aquarius.
This is the way to get things done. I don't want
to live in one of those towns where they pass
laws that tell you what color you can paint your
house and how many cars you can have in the
driveway and when to mow the lawn.
Two minutes later Vardon comes out of his
house with his "varmit gun" and a grin on his
face. He sidles in the passenger side, slams the
door and says, "I love to go down there and
shoot rats. C'mon, man, goose it."
"But isn't there anything you'd like to take?
Anything old and tattered you'd like to get rid
of?" I quizzed him as unsubtly as I could.
"Nah, I got rid of all the trash yesterday. If
there's one thing I can't stand it's a messy
house."

Jim Mullen is the author of "It Takes a Village
Idiot: Complicating the Simple Life" and
"Baby's First Tattoo." Reach him at
jimnmullen@myway.com.


Congregate Dining .-_-,- '_-._
Co 6


CONGREGATE DINING MENUS
Monday: Lower sodium frankfurter, baked
beans with tomato bits (HD: sliced carrots),
coleslaw with carrot, hot dog bun, cinnamon
apple crisp and low-fat milk
Tuesday: Chicken fricassee and diced red
pepper, mashed potatoes, carrot cuts, whole
wheat bread with margarine, fresh fruit in sea-
son and low-fat milk
Wednesday: Salisbury steak with gravy, garlic
mashed potatoes, green beans, whole wheat
bread with margarine, slice of cherry pie (HD:
Little Debbie spice cake) and low-fat milk





This is Herry.


Thursday: Crispy baked chicken quarter over
cornbread stuffing, whipped sweet potatoes,
cauliflower-broccoli-carrot mix, whole wheat
bread with margarine, fruited gelatin square
and low-fat milk
Friday: Birthday Celebration.-- Chilled tuna
salad, rotini pasta salad, tossed salad with
Italian dressing, whole wheat bread with mar-
garine, fig bar and low-fat milk
Congregate dining sites include: East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness,
and South Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 795-6264.


This is Herry's Habitat.
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OF CIRUS COUNTY, INC.
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Friend needs to consider


other's marriage in decision


t.


ACROSS
1 Partof USNA
6 Wide cravat
11 Hindu social class
16 Overseer
20 "- in Wonderland"
21 Call
22 Rose oil
23 Made a choice
25 Rica
26 Discussion group
27 Eschews
28 Depart
29 Between pi and
sigma ;
30 Fiery signals
32 Board game
34 whiz!
35 Nobleman
37 God of love
- 38 Narrow opening
39 Be present at
41 Frequently
43 Pumps and loafers
44 Worker underground
46 Manage
49 Seat with a back
50 Brought shame to
54 Wrinkled fruit
55 Panache
56 Sort out
57 Distribute (with "out")
58 American Indian
59 Memorize
60 Dipper
61 Something
hazardous
62 Denomination
64 Carpenter's hand
tool
65 Facets
66 Censure angrily
67 Sapling
68 Singing bird
69 Word in arithmetic
70 Acquire
71 Conducted
72 John Quincy -
74 Be deserving of
75 Untrue
77 Satchel
80 - loss for words
81 Insert mark
82 Jib
83 Ink spot
87 Highly decorated
89 Stir violently
90 Parts of faces
91 Headquarters
92 Came to be
93 Barber service
94 Smiles
95 Prohibit


96 Play boisterously
97 Flooring piece
98 Unethical payments
99 Straight man
102 Flattery (2 wds.)
105 Airborne
106 Mosque tower
107 Hoisting device
108 Take forcibly
109 Epsom -
110 Lead actor
113 Stories
114 Greek goddess
115 Tale
119 Cigar residue
120 Red flower
123 Pastry
125 Not at all ruddy
126 Frighten
128 Egg-shaped
129 Havana native
130 Antelope
132 Made sound record-
ings
133 Card game
134 Join
135 Broad comedy
136 Depend
137 Pitchers
138 Lab compound
139 Warm-clothing fabric


Dear Annie: I am a 20-year-old, single
female. I have been friends with "Tony"
for two years. Tony is 25, married and
has two children.
About a year ago, I started having feelings for
Tony. He and his wife were separat-
ed at the time. (She'd had an affair)
Then he and his wife got back togeth-
er. Two weeks ago, Tony told me he
has feelings for me and was afraid
he'd made a mistake returning to his
wife. I told him I felt the same way,
and we kissed. My intentions are not
to be a homewrecker, but it may
appear that way
Should I tell Tony I love him? Or
should I just try to be a supportive
friend? Loving Friend
Dear Loving: If you truly want to ,
be a friend to Tony, encourage him to
seek counseling and see if his mar-
riage is worth saving. There are two
children to consider. We know you want to do
the right thing, so please don't become involved
with Tony while he is conflicted about his mar-
riage. Let him be faithful to his wife or get a
divorce. Then, if he turns to you when he is
unattached, you will know that he isn't using you
for comfort. Whatever the outcome, at least you
won't have to feel guilty about your decision.
Dear Annie: I am part of a group of friends
(male and female) .who have dined together
once a week for the past seven years. One of the
women is about to get married, and, as she has
found love at age 60, we are thrilled for her.
However, her intended is having a real impact
on the rest of us.
The groom buys nothing, cooks nothing, pays
for nothing and eats enough for three people.
When we go to a restaurant, he somehow man-
ages to leave his wallet at home. When he comes
to one of our homes for dinner, he eats the last
morsel and drinks the last drop of everything.
He also is picky about what brands we serve,
particularly the wine. The more expensive the
wine, the more he drinks.
When it's our turn to go to the bride's house,


Sunday C..,.--

Puzzle answer is on Page 13A.


DOWN
1 Mother-of-pearl
2 Island greeting
3 Cap part
4 Perform
5 Turn over a new -
6 Clothing
7 Stone or Osboume
8 Ice cream holders
9 Singles
10 Aviv
11 Store employee
12 Greece's capital
13 Adhered
14 Armored vehicle
15 Gaelic
16 Prop up
17 Unclose, poetically
18 Phase
19 Playing card
24 Legal document
31 Make known
(2 wds.)
32 Group of vocalists
33 Sounded a bell
36 Oodles
38 Kind of letter
40 Wall Street worker
42 Cal. abbr.
43 Portion
44 Factories
45 Seagirt region
46 Pie part
47 Horse opera
48 Female relative
49 Metallic sound
50 Guys
51 Pink color
52 High society
53 Removed, in printing
55 Phobias
56 Student at Annapolis
59 Andes animal
60 Restrict
61 Vet's concern
63 Reception
64 Dish
65 Warning signal
66 Gongs
69 Haute
70 Wins
73 Sticky fruit
74 Purple shade
75 Swoon
76 tide
77 Male hogs
78 Dart relative
79 Folklore creature
81 Schoolroom
necessity
82 Work time
84 Toil
85 River in Missouri


86 Doctrine
88 Facet
89 Neighbor of Peru
90 Skill
93 Getz or Kenton
94 A dozen dozen
98 Shine
99 "- Marner"
100 Explosive stuff
101 Kiln
103 Calamity
104 Vetch seed
105 Disputants
106 Seaman
108 Cafe worker
109 Legislative body
110 Pitch
111 Movie award
112 Condition
113 Asp
114 Custom
116 Fully conscious
117 Knight's weapon
118 Ceased
121 Lasso
122 Admit openly
123 Demands payment
from
124 Weight
127 Kinsman (abbr.)
129 Actor's prompt
131 Ordinance


16~ i


CHnuis COUNTY (PL) CHRONICI.I


16A susexyJulY 24 5


she covers for him and does all the work, citing
how hard his day is. (We all are professionals,
and our days are equally hard.)
We have gone so far as to make our discomfort
known to the bride, and she has admitted she,
too, finds it embarrassing, but noth-
ing changes. We fear our friend is
V marrying a moocher. Is the solution
complete acceptance, or should we
attempt again to cajole the groom
into doing his share? The Maid of
I Honor
Dear Maid: The groom will not do
his share unless his future wife
insists on it, and she doesn't sound
ready to do that. If she is willing to do
the work and pay the costs for the
two of them, leave it be. That is her
choice. Otherwise, the rest of you
will have to decide whether her con-
tinued presence at these dinners is
worth the price of her new husband,
because he doesn't come cheap.
Dear Annie: You missed an important point in
your answer to "Anxious Employee," whose
boss was upset about not being invited to the
employees' baby showers and similar events.
Why are these parties being discussed at
work? Even kindergartners know you don't
hand out invitations in school unless you invite
the whole class. In addition, "Anxious" and her
coworkers are also wasting company time on
private social affairs. If they tended to their
social arrangements on their own time, their
boss would know nothing about it. -Unworried
Employee
Dear Unworried: You may be right that the
boss got wind of it through the office grapevine,
but events for coworkers are somewhat work-
related. Regardless, employee get-togethers, of
any kind, should not have to include the boss.

Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please e-mail your questions
to anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL:
60611. Visit the Web page at www.creators.com.


'47


dMw9f A 0%0 %0w0








One last
1I -- ^ -


Sports .. "

Central Citrus seniors
battle it out at state
The Central Citrus Senior soft-
11a team made its presence felt
t the State Toumament on Friday
nd Saturday in Cocoa Beach.
The team won its pool with a
cord of 2-1 and move into an
sight-team single-elimination tour-
ament. The team finished in a
ree-way tie for the lead but won
y allowing just eight runs in the
lam's three games.
Ali Savage eamed both of the
twins from the pitching circle for
,Central Citrus, starting with a 27-0
'drubbing of Clearwater on Friday
'night.
"We were just hammering on
offense," said Central Citrus man-
ager Carl Tirpak. "Everyone did a
great job in that game."
Sam Heaney led the charge by
going 5-for-5 and hitting for the
cycle against Clearwater.
. After losing their first game on
Saturday by a score of 7-1 to
Bade City, Central Citrus found
itself down 2-0 early against St.
Cloud.
After clawing back to within 2-1,
Stephanie Arcadipane rapped a
two-run single for the eventual
Oame-winning hit in a 4-2 win.
T' irpak held praise for catcher
Raina Johnson.
"She's been awesome in being
iour lead hitter," Tirpak said. "Plus
ishe's had to catch three games in
90-degree heat."
Central Citrus plays 1:30 p.m.
:against the second-place team
from another pool. If they win that
game, they play again at 6 p.m.
From there, the team would
play Monday for the champi-
:onship.
Fomer FAMU football
coach files lawsuit
TALLAHASSEE Former
Florida A&M football coach Billy
'Joe has filed a public-records law-
[suit against the school, seeking
!access to documents that could
explain why he was fired last
!month.
S"Coach Joe has the right to
know what evidence the universi'-
,ty used to justify terminating him,"
'his attomey, David K. Miller, said
!in the suit filed Friday in Leon
!County Court.
Joe who was 86-46 in 11
seasons at the historically black
college and two assistants
were fired June 14 by the school,
which cited NCAA rules violations
in recruiting and eligibility as rea-
sons the coaches were dis-
missed.
Florida A&M has since hired
former Denver Broncos defensive
tackle Rubin Carter as its football
coach. School officials could not
be reached Saturday; the school
typically declines comment on all
pending litigation.
Carter is taking over a program
in the midst of a school-wide fund-
ing crisis and an NCAA investiga-
tion into hundreds of rules viola-
tions throughout the athletics pro-
gram.
MU Baseball of
Citrus County
AAU Baseball will have signups
and tryouts at Central Citrus Little
League complex on Saturday,
,July 30, from noon to 3 p.m. for-
12-and-under and 13-and-under
age groups. Contact Steve
Arcadipane for additional informa-
tioni at 746-6837 or 697-0909 or
visit www.naturecoastsports.com.
From staff, wire reports


Little League heats up


Crystal River

baseball drops

opening games .
ANDY MARKS
amarks@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
It was a tough day for the
home team.
A rash of errors, some big
opposing bats and an untime- .-.
ly rain delay all contributed
to a doubleheader sweep
Saturday that eliminated the
Crystal River 11-year-olds
from any title hopes at the
Section 7 Tournament at -
Bicentennial .
a Complete Parks a ... .. .
Little "We had a"
League lot of errors
coverage and we also '" "" : -.. -"""
PAGE6B had a lot of -;" ,
bad atti- ..
tudes," man-
ager Mark Strifler said. "We
didn't come to play like they
did. They're all district.:".
champs and they're coming toW.-W3
play. We didn't and it showed, W
in the second game especial- (
ly"
In the opener against
Seminole, Crystal River fell
into a 2-0 hole thanks to a pair
of infield errors in the first
inning. Nick D'Amico's two-
run double was the big blow -
for Seminole. ,
But Crystal River stabilized ,
behind starting pitcher .... "
Donnie DeWees who .
allowed only one hit over the ... 4"...
next three innings and no ... .. ... '., .
BRIAN LaPETER/CHRONICLE
Please see : JPage 6B Crystal River's Sheldon Baxter (1) is tagged out by Seminole's Thomas Vickers.


Dunnellon

Junior softball

splits two
KHUONG PHAN
kphan@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Dunnellon Junior soft-
ball all-stars may have started
off slow in this weekend's sec-
tional tournament, but they
made sure they finished
strong real strong.
Dunnellon split a Saturday
doubleheader at Bicen-
tennial Park, falling to Citrus


Park (Tampa) 4-3, before lay-
ing a serious walloping on
Meadowlawn (St Petersburg)
for a 21-4 mercy-rule, five-
inning victory.
"We didn't hit the ball,"
Dunnellon coach Steve
Goodloe said of the gaine
against Citrus Park. "They
had some things go right for
them and not for us. I think
we took out some frustration
in this game (against
Meadowlawn). We were due
to bust out I'm happy for the
girls. They did a good job."
After a two-and-a-half hour
rain delay, Dunnellon simply
jumped on Meadowlawn,
making contact so often it was


like a hitting clinic.
DunLIellon managed at least
two runs in each inning and
racked up 23 hits in the lop-
sided win.
Leadoff hitter Stacey
Weimert got Dunnellon off
and running, by opening play
with a double to left Weimert
then stole third and was
brought home on the next at-
bat on a Kristie Hanewinckel
single. Hanewinckel scored
two batters later on a wild
pitch.
Up 2-0 with one out, a trio
of Dunnellon batters -
Danielle Burns, Samantha

Please see SOFTBALL/Page 6B


'L.


BRIAN LaPETER/CHRONICLE
Dunnellon's Danielle Burns (7) is tagged out at second base by
Citrus Park's Amanda Bueno


Yoakam rolls to win in Mini Stock


Laps field in

Speedway return
KIM BOLLINGER
kbollinger@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Robbie Yoakam dominated
the Mini Stock 50 race Saturday
night at Citrus -County
Speedway. Not only did the for-
mer champion set the night's.
fast time with a lap time of
15.181 seconds on the 3/8-mile
oval, he lapped all but the top


five running cars and earned
his second win in two attempts.
Yoakam, who grew up racing
at the Inverness Racetrack,
competes on a limited schedule
locally due to his participation
in the Mini Stock Challenge. He
is currently second in that
series.
"It feels good to come back
here and race," said Robbie
Yoakam after taking the win
over Chris Hooker, Jay
McKenzie, Jim Curry and
George Neumann.
At one point in the race,
Yoakam had pulled to a 10-car
advantage over the field.


'"A lot of times the lapped cars
get in the way," he explained
about past races he had com-
peted in. "This time they all
moved up out of the way."
His closest competitor, Chris
Hooker, pushed his car to the
limits trying to catch the race
leader With nine laps to go he
was glued to the rear deck lid of
Yoakam's No. 8 machine.
"I knew I was pulling away,"
he said of his initial lead on
Hooker. "And I knew I'd be
faster if I ran my line. But I
about lost it."
Hooker was right there wait-
ing for Yoakam to make a mis-


take, but once Yoakam
regrouped Hooker was unable
to keep uppwith the pace the
leader had set.
By the time the race was
complete, Yoakam had
lapped all but the top five
running cars and had pulled
to a three-car advantage over
Hooker.
"The car could have been
better, but it was real good,"
he said.
Kevin Stone set the early
pace in 4-cylinder Bomber
action and drove to his first
feature win in the 2005 sea-
son. Division point leader


Tim Herrington was able to
close the gap opened by Stone
early in the race but was
unable to complete a pass at
the finish for second. Rusty
Adams followed Herrington
to the line in third.
Ted Taylor powered from
outside the ninth row to win
in Thunder Stock action. Two
car-lengths back, D.J. Macklin
was able to hold off Steven
Stinedurf and Mike Loudy for
second.
Results from the Late
Model 50 and Hobby Stock
feature were not available at
press time.


Lance captures


20th Tour stage


Armstrong's win

almost certain

Associated Press
SAINT-ETIENNE, France -
As if Lance Armstrong had any-
thing left to prove, as if his
crowning achievement really
needed an emphatic stamp,
cycling's greatest champion
gave his best performance
Saturday claiming the stage
win he lacked and all but guar-
anteeing a seventh consecutive


Tour de France victory.
Armstrong swept away any
notion that this Tour would be
somehow incomplete without
winning a stage, pouring on
speed at the end of Saturday's
time trial to round out his
unparalleled career. Unlike
his previous six winning Tours,
the American had not won an
individual stage until
Saturday's 20th.
He beat stage runner-up Jan
Ullrich by 23 seconds and
extended his already comfort-
able overall race lead to 4:40
Please see TOUR/Page 3B


Any hopes of anyone overtaking Lance Armstrong ended when the six-time Tour winner
captured the 20th stage, an Individual time trial, to strengthen his already huge lead.


Armstrong


has no peers
E ach year, the
course has
been different
Each year, the result
the same.
For a half-dozen
years now, Tour de
France organizers
have tried to come up
with a setup that
would shake up AP columnist
Lance Armstrong, JIM LITKE
much the same way
the golfing lords of
Augusta National set out to "Tiger-proof
their course. And just like Tiger Woods, the
33-year-old Texan would not be deterred.
Please see LITKE/Page 3B


run
Rusty
W-irIh: :
rehrQ ,:,r t,:,l;,


". 1.. 2 1- 100
.* " 1 ,,. P |ULY 24, 200 5
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ClSRus COUN'lY (FL) CIIRONICL.E


2B SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


OR9 M .
Rays top 0's againBoston
P RjIISOS New York
Baltimore
Toronto
Associated Press I_'____._____TampaBay


ST PETERSBURG Lou
Piniella savored a rare victory
in which his last-place Tampa
Bay Devil Rays played well in
every phase of the game.
"Good pitching, good
defense and just enough time-
ly hitting," the manager said,
summing up Saturday night's
3-2 win over Sidney Ponson
and the struggling Baltimore
Orioles, who have dropped
four straight and 16 of their
last 24.
Scott Kazmir pitched seven
strong innings and Alex
Gonzalez hit a solo homer off
Ponson (7-9), subject of trade
talks between the Orioles and
San Diego Padres despite
being 0-5 in six starts since last
winning on June 18.
Damon Hollins snapped a
seventh-inning tie with an RBI
single for the Devil Rays, who
are 7-4 since a season-high, 10-
game losing streak that ended
July 9. The bullpen, a liability
the first half of the season, is 1-
0 and 6-for-6 in save opportuni-
ties since the All-Star break.
Kazmir (5-7) allowed one run
and four hits, struck out seven
and walked three. Joe
Borowski pitched the eighth,
and All-Star Danys Baez-
allowed Miguel Tejada's 21st
homer in the ninth before
striking out Sammy Sosa and
pinch-hitter Rafael Palmeiro


.~

'~N -i~






I ~~*tfl4.j',.4$ij,.. ~


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Devil Rays' Damon Hollins, left, slides past Baltimore Orioles catcher Sal Fasano, right,
to score during the seventh inning on Saturday in St. Petersburg. Hollins scored after teammate Toby
Hall grounded out to the pitcher.


to earn his 19th save in 25
chances.
"You never think about fac-
ing somebody You can't think
like that," Baez said of fanning
two members of the 500-home
run club. "If you think like
that, you're never going to be a
closer."
The NL West-leading Padres


are interested in acquiring
Ponson in exchange for first
baseman Phil Nevin, but had
not yet asked the San Diego
slugger about waiving a limited
no-trade clause in his contract.
Before the game, Baltimore
manager Lee Mazzilli called
reports about possible deals
involving Ponson strictly


rumors."
"Unfortunately that's part of
baseball ... Sidney is pitching
tonight for the Baltimore
Orioles, and that's where we're
at," Mazzilli said.
Ponson did not speak with
reporters after the game.
Baltimore is one of eight teams
Nevin can refuse a trade to.


AL: Visiting Red Sox best Chicago


Associated Press

CHICAGO Manny Ramirez
homered and Boston's Wade
Miller earned his first win since
May 30 by pitching seven sharp
innings to lead the Red Sox to a
3-0.
Miller (34) was 0-3 in his pre-
vious eight starts, but he foiled
White Sox rallies with timely
pitches and allowed just five
hits. He walked four and struck
out four.
Mike Myers and Mike Timlin.
combined on a scoreless eighth,
and Curt Schilling finished the
seven-hitter for his second save
in three chances.
Ramirez's 27th of the season
- he won Thursday's series
opener with a ninth-inning solo
shot increased his major
league-leading RBI total to 89.
Orlando Hernandez (7-3), in
his second start since coming
off the disabled list for a second
time after being bothered by a
sore shoulder, allowed four hits
and two runs in 6 2-3 innings.
Indians 4, Mariners 3
CLEVELAND Jhonny Peralta
had two RBIs in his first game as
Cleveland's latest No. 3 hitter, and
Cliff Lee pitched into the eighth
inning to lead the Indians past
Seattle.
Peralta, who began the season
batting ninth, hit a solo homer in the
fourth off Gil Meche (10-7) and
added an RBI single in a two-run
fifth as the Indians bounced back
from a demoralizing 4-3 loss Friday
night.
Lee (11-4) gave up three runs
and eight hits in 7 1-3 innings while
improving to 4-0 in four career starts


against Seattle. The left-hander
walked one and struck out five
before being pulled after giving up
Randy Winn's one-out RBI double
in the eighth.
Scott Sauerbeck'and Bob Howry
got Cleveland to the ninth, and Bob
Wickman finished for his 24th save


in 27 attempts.
Tigers 2, Twins 1, 1st game
Twins 5, Tigers 2, 2nd game
DETROIT Scott Baker allowed
five hits in seven innings and Justin
Momeau homered and drove in two
runs as Minnesota beat Detroit in
the second game of a day-night


doubleheader.
Mike Redmond also had two
RBIs in the second game, helping
the Twins earn a split.
After Detroit won the opener 2-1,
Baker (1-1) outpitched Justin
Verlander (0-2) in a matchup of top
pitching prospects who were mak-
ing their second major league starts.
Jesse Crain pitched a scoreless
eighth and Joe Nathan worked the
ninth for his 27th save in 30
chances, completing the six-hitter.
In the first game, Sean Douglass
(3-0) started two key rundowns and
pitched seven strong innings for the
Tigers, while Curtis Granderson hit
a go-ahead homer in the seventh.
Femanrido Rodney pitched the
eighth and Kyle Farnsworth finished
for his fourth save in six tries.
Carlos Silva (7-4) took the loss.
He allowed both runs on eight hits,
walking one and striking out three.
Blue Jays 9, Royals 4
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Shea
Hillenbrand and Eric Hinske each
hit two-run doubles in a six-run fifth
inning as Toronto beat Kansas City.
The Blue Jays sent 10 men to
the plate in the fifth and took advan-
tage of three walks, Donnie
Murphy's error and a wild pitch to
break open the game. The Blue
Jays have scored an American
League-high 126 runs in July.
Dave Bush (1-5), just recalled
from Triple-A Syracuse, earned his
first victory since Oct. 1. The right-
hander was 0-5 in 10 starts to begin
the season with Toronto before
being sent to the minors on May 29.
Kyle Snyder (0-1) allowed six runs
on eight hits and two walks in four-
plus innings of his first big league
start since Aug. 5, 2003.


NL: Lee knocks 32nd homer in Cubs' win


Associated Press

ST LOUIS Derrek Lee hit
his major league-leading 32nd
homer, and Jeromy Burnitz and
Aramis Ramirez also connected
for the Chicago Cubs in a 6-5 vic-
tory Saturday over the St. Louis
Cardinals.
Ramirez had three hits to
'help the Cubs end a three-game
losing streak in 93-degree heat
by beating an injury-ravaged
lineup minus four opening day
starters. Albert Pujols was
scratched with a mild left shoul-
der strain, although he drew an
intentional walk as a pinch-hit-
ter in the seventh ahead of
Mark Grudzielanek's RBI single
that cut the deficit to 6-5, and
then stayed in the game.
With runners at first and sec-
ond in the ninth, Pujols' liner to
shortstop turned into a game-
ending double play when
Abraham Nunez was caught off
second base.
Lee's 32nd homer matched
his career high set last year and
helped the Cubs win for only
the 10th time in 43 games at
Busch Stadium over the last six
seasons. Lee is batting a major
league-best .370.
His two-run shot off Matt


Morris (11-3) with two outs in
the fifth sailed over the visitors'
bullpen in left before clanging
off a guardrail, a drive estimat-
ed at 421 feet that put the Cubs
ahead 5-3.
Jerome Williams (3-3) gave up
four runs, three earned, in six
innings to win his second
straight start
Mets 7, Dodgers 5
NEW YORK-- Jose Reyes had
four hits, including his major league-
leading 10th triple, to lead Pedro
Martinez and New York to a come-
back victory over Los Angeles.
Reyes scored three runs and
stole two bases, and his triple in
the seventh inning tied the score
before Carlos Beltran singled him
home with the go-ahead run.
Reyes added an RBI single in the
eighth.
Olmedo Saenz drove in three
runs for the Dodgers with a double
and a home run on a day when
Martinez (12-3) struggled without
his best stuff and never hit 90 mph
on the radar gun.
Martinez gave up eight hits -
four for extra bases in seven
innings. He struck out four, raising
his NL-leading total to 147, and
walked two. Braden Looper got his


22nd save in 26 chances.
Giovanni Carrara (6-4) took the
loss.
Phillies 2, Padres 0

PHILADELPHIA- Chase Utley
homered for the second straight
game, and rookie Robinson Tejeda
allowed only two singles in six
innings to help Philadelphia defeat
San Diego.
The NL West-leading Padres lost
their sixth straight and had a
busy day off the field. San Diego
acquired third baseman Joe Randa
from Cincinnati for two minor league
pitchers and optioned struggling
third baseman Sean Burroughs to
Triple-A Portland.
The Padres might not be done
dealing, either. They were dis-
cussing a deal that would send first
baseman Phil Nevin to Baltimore for
pitcher Sidney Ponson, but had yet
to ask the slugger to waive his limit-
ed no-trade clause. The Orioles are
one of eight teams Nevin can block
a trade to.
Nevin went 1-for-3 with a walk
against the Phillies.
Tejeda (2-2) was wild but effec-
tive. He walked five and struck out
five. Ryan Madson, Rheal Cormier
and Billy Wagner polished off the


four-hit shutout. Wagner got his 21st
save in 23 opportunities.
Utley connected off Pedro Astacio
(0-1) in the fourth.
Brewers 11, Reds 7
CINCINNATI Lyle Overbay hit
two home runs, including a grand
slam, and drove in a career-high six
runs as the Milwaukee Brewers
pounded Brandon Claussen and
beat the Cincinnati Reds 11-7
Saturday.
Carlos Lee also homered and
drove in three runs to take over the
National League lead with 82 RBIs,
one more than Chicago's Derrek
Lee.
Overbay had his second career
multihomer game both this sea-
son against the Reds. He is 7-for-11
(.636) with four home runs in his
career against Claussen.
Claussen, who tied a club record
by allowing five home runs in his
last game, gave up three homers
Saturday. He allowed six hits and
nine runs with four strikeouts in 3 2-
3 innings.
Claussen (4-8) also walked three
and hit a batter, all in the fourth
inning. He has given up eight
homers in 7 1-3 innings over his last
two starts.


Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Oakland
Texas
Seattle


Washington
Atlanta
Philadelphia
New York
Florida

St. Louis
Houston
Chicago
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
54 43 .557 5-5
51 44 .537 2 z-6-4
50 46 .521 3% z-4-6
49 48 .505 5 5-5
34 64 .34720% 6-4
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
63 33 .656 z-6-4
53 44 .54610% 5-5
50 48 .510 14 3-7
48 49 .49515% z-6-4
35 62 .361 28% z-5-5
West Division
W L Pet GB L10
58 39 .598 6-4
52 45 .536 6 z-8-2
48 48 .500 91% 2-8
42 54 .438152 z-4-6
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
55 43 .561 3-7
54 43 .557 % 4-6
51 47 .520 4 z-7-3
50 47 .515 4% z-7-3
47 47 .500 6 3-7
Central Division


L Pc
35 .63!
47 .51!
48 .50!
50 .491
56 .42!
56 .42:
West C


W L Pc
San Diego 50 48 .511
Arizona 47 51 .481
Los Angeles 44 53 .45.
San Francisco 42 53 .44:
Colorado 34 62 .354
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Detroit 2, Minnesota 1, 1st game
Minnesota 5, Detroit 2, 2nd game
Cleveland 4, Seattle 3
Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 2
Boston 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Toronto 9,.Kansas City 4
Oakland 5, Texas 4
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Seattle (Sele 6-10) at Cleveland (Millwood
3-9), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Lohse 7-8) at Detroit
(Bonderman 12-6), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Harden 7-4) at Texas (Park 8-4),
2:05 p.m.
Toronto (Lilly 8-9) at Kansas City
(Carrasco 4-4), 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Bedard 5-1) at Tampa Bay
(Fossum 4-8), 2:15 p.m.
Boston (Arroyo 8-5) at Chicago White Sox
(Contreras 5-6), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Mussina 9-5) at L.A. Angels
(Washburn 6-5), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Texas at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:15 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 8:10
p.m.
Detroit at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.
Clevelanid at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.



Devil Rays 3, Orioles 2
BALTIMORE TAMPA BAY


ab rhbi ab
BRbrts 2b 4 11 0 Gthrght cf 4
Mora 3b 3 00 0 Crwfrd If 4
Tejada ss 4 12 1 Lugo ss 4
SSosa dh 2 01 1 Cantu 2b 4
Mrrero rf 3 00 0 Huffdh 3
RPImo ph 1 00 0 Hollins rf 3
Surhoff If 3 00 0 TLee lb 3
Gomez lb 3 00 0 THall c 3
Matos cf 3 01 0 ASGzlz 3b 3
Fasano c 2 00 0
Bigbie ph 1 00 0
Whtsde c 0 00 0


r h bi
0 1 0
000
0 0 0
000
0 1 0


020
0 1 1
1 1 1


Totals 292 5 2 Totals 31 3 9 3
Baltimore 100 000 001- 2
Tampa Bay 001 000 20x- 3
E-BRoberts (5). DP-Baltimore 2,
Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Baltimore 3, Tampa
Bay
S4. 2B-BRoberts (27), Huff (14). HR-
Tejada (21), ASGonzalez (5). SB-
Hollins (6). CS-SSosa (1), Matos (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Ponson L,7-9 7 9 3 3 0 4
Ray 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Kazmir W,5-7 7 4 1 1 3 7
Borowski 1 0 0 0 0 0
DBaezS,19 1 1 1 1 0 2
PB-Fasano.
T-2;14. A-20,571 (41,315).
Cubs 6, Cardinals 5
CHICAGO ST. LOUIS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Hrst Jr cf 4 00 0 Eckstin ss 5 0 1 1
TWalkr 2b 4 11 0 Nunez 3b 4 2 1 0
DeLee lb 3 11 2 Rdrgez If 2 0 2 1
Burnitz rf 4 11 1 Luna rf 2 1 0 0
ARmrz 3b 4231 Edmnd cf 3 1 00
Hlndsw If 4 11 0 Mabry lb 3 0 1 0
NPerez ss 4 00 1 Pujols lb 1 0 0 0
Barrett c 4 01 1 Grdzin 2b 3 02 2
JeWms p 2 00 0 Tguchi rf 4 0 1 0
Gerut ph 1 000 Mhony c 3 1 1 0
Wuertz p 000 0 Morris p 0 0 0 0
Ohmanp 0000 Mrquis ph 1 000
Novoa p 0 00 0 Eldred p 0 0 0 0
Murton ph 1 00 0 Seabol ph 1 0 0 0
Dmpstrp 0 000 AReyes p 0 0 0 0
Totals 356 8 6 Totals 32 5 9 4
Chicago 021 021 000- 6
St. Louis 002 110 100- 5
E-TWalker (3). DP-Chicago 2.
LOB-Chicago 3, St. Louis 9. 2B-
Hollandsworth (14), Eckstein (12),
Rodriguez 2 (2), iMahoney (1). HR-
DeLee (32), Burnitz (17), ARamirez (26).
S-Luna, Mahoney, Morris. SF-
Grudzielanek.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
JeWilliams W,3-36
Wuertz
Ohman
Novoa 1
Dempster S,14 1
St. Louis


7 4
1-3 0 1
1-3 0 0
1-3 1 0
1 0


Morris L,11-3 6 7 6 6 1 5
Eldred 2 1 0 0 0 1
Al Reyes 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Wuertz.
Umpires-Home, Ed Rapuano; First,
Jerry Crawford; Second, C.B. Bucknor;
Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T-2:47. A-49,942 (50,345).
Mets 7, Dodgers 5
LOS ANGELES NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Robles 3b 4 00 0 Reyes ss 5 342
Izturis ss 4 11 0 Cmeron rf 5 1 2 1
Brdley cf 3 02 0 Beltran cf 3 0 2 1
JKent 2b 4 10 0 Floyd If 3 0 0 1
Ledee If 4 11 1 Wright 3b 4 1 2 1
Saenz lb 4 12 3 Mntkw lb 3 0 1 0
Werth rf 411 0 RCstro c 3 001
JPhllps c 401 1 Cairo 2b 3 1 00
Houlton p 3 00 0 PMrtnz p 2 0 1 0
Carrarp 0 00 0 MrAnd ph 0 1 0 0
WAIvrz p 0 000 RHrndzp 0 0 0 0


t GB L10
9 z-7-3
5 12 6-4
5 13 z-6-4
0 14/2% z-6-4
9201/% 3-7
3 21 6-4
division
t GB L10
0 z-3-7
0 3 5-5
4 5/2 4-6
2 6% z-6-4
4 15 3-7


Home
27-18
29-19
27-20
26-20
22-26

Home
32-19
29-22
24-26
23-26
20-28

Home
29-21
30-17
28-23
22-24

Home
32-17
29-14
32-22
31-21
25-22

Home
33-19
30-14
24-22
26-17
23-27
30-25

Home
29-18
24-27
23-23
22-28
24-23


Away Intr
27-25 12-6
22-25 11-7
23-26 8-10
23-28 8-10
12-38 3-15

Away Intr
31-14 12-6
24-22 8-10
26-22 15-3
25-23 -9-9
15-34 9-9


Away Intr
23-26 12-6
25-29 .7-8
19-25 7-8
19-26 5-10
22-25 10-5

Away intr
29-16 10-5
20-33 ,7-8
25-26 6-9
22-33 8-7
19-29 5-7
11-31 7-8

Away Intr
21-30 7-11
23-24 8-10
21-30 5-13
20-25 6-12
10-39 6-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 5
Philadelphia 2, San Diego 0
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 3
Washington 4, Houston 2
Milwaukee 11, Cincinnati 7
Atlanta at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Florida at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Sunday's Games "
Houston (Rodriguez 5-4) at Washington
(Patterson 4-2), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Penny 5-5) at N.Y Mets
(Benson 6-3), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (D.Davis 9-7) at Cincinnati
(L.Hudson 1-5), 1:15 p.m.
Colorado (Chacon 1-6) at Pittsburgh
(Redman 4-10), 1:35-p.m.
San Diego (Lawrence 5-9) at Philadelphia
(Myers 7-5), 1:35 p.m.
Florida (A.J.Burnett 6-6) at San Francisco
(Correia 1-1), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Ramirez 8-5) at Arizona (Vazquez
8-9), 4:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Prior 7-3) at St. Louis
(Suppan 9-7), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Arizona at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

Snchezp 0 000 Offrmn ph 1 0 0 0
Choi ph 1 00 0 Looper p 0,0 0.0
Totals 355 8 5 Totals 32 712 7
Los Angeles 300 101 000- 5
New York 201 001 21x- 7
E-JPhillips (4). DP-Los Angeles 1.
LOB-Los Angeles 5, New York 7. 2B-
'Bradley (9), Saenz (15), Werth (14),
Wright (26), Mientkiewicz (8). 3B-Reyes
(10). HR-Saenz (8). SB-Reyes 2 (34),
Cameron (8), Beltran (5), Cairo (9). S-
Beltran, Mientkiewicz, RCastro.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Houlton 6 8 4 4 0 3
Carrara L,6-4 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
WAIvarez 0 1 0 0 0 0
Sanchez 12-3 2 1 1 2 1
New York
PMartinez W,12-37 8 5 5 2 4
RHernandez 1 0 0 0 0 1
LooperS,22 1 0 0 0 0 2
WAlvarez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
T-2:45. A-43,705 (57,369).
Tigers 2, Twins 1
MINNESOTA DETROIT
ab rhbi ab r hbi.


LFord cf
Punto 3b
ShStwrt If
Mauer c
THnter dh
JJones rf
BBoone 2b
Mrneau lb
JCastro ss


4 00 0 Inge 3b
3 01 0 CGillen ss
4 01 0 Shitn lb
3 12 0 MOrdz rf
4 00 0 Logan cf
4 01 1 DYong dh
3 00 0 IRdrgz c
2 00 0 Monroe If
3 01 0 Infante 2b
Grndsn cf


4 01 0
4 0 1 0
4.0 2 0
4 1 1 0
0 '0 0 0
3.0 1 0
4. 0 0
32-011 0
3.0 1 1
3 1 1 1


Totals 301 6 1 Totals 31 2 9 2
Minnesota 000 000 100- 1
Detroit 010 000 10x- 2
DP-Minnesota 2, Detroit 2. LOB-
Minnesota 6, Detroit 7. 2B-Mauef (15),
Shelton (8), DYoung (20). .HR-
Granderson (1). CS-Punto (5). .
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
CSilva L,7-4 7 8 2 2 1 4
JRincon 1 1 0 0 It 0
Detroit
Douglass W,3-0 7 5 1 1 4 1
Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 0
Farnsworth S,4 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Tim Tschida; First,
Kevin Kelley; Second, Dan lasiogna;
Third, Dale Scott.
T-2:23. A-20,206 (40,120).
Phillies 2, Padres 0
SAN DIEGO PHILA
ab rhbi' ab r hbi


DRbrts cf
Loretta 2b
BGiles rf
Klesko If
Nevin lb
KGreen ss
RaHrdz c
Blum 3b
Astacio p
MaSwy ph
Brslw p
Lnbrnk p


2 00 0 Rollins ss
4 00 0 Lofton cf
2 00 0 Crmier p
4 00 0 BWgnrp
3 01 0 Utley 2b
4 00 0 BAbreu rf
4 01 0 Burrell If
3 01 0 Howard lb
2 00 0 DaBell 3b
1 01 0 Pratt c
0 00 0 Tejeda p
0 00 0 Madson p
Mchels cf


4000
4000



2 0 1 0
30 1 0
2001
4 0 1 0
3-,0 1 0

0' 0 0 0
1 000


Totals 290 4 0 Totals 28 2 7 2
San Diego 000 000 000- 0
Philadelphia 000 101 00x- 2
DP-San Diego 1, Philadelphia 2.
LOB-San Diego 7, Philadelphia 8. 2B-
RaHernandez (15). 3B-Tejeda (1).
HR-Utley (14). CS-BAbreu (6). S-
Tejeda. SF-Howard.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
AstacioL,0-1 6 6 2 2 3 5
Breslow 12-3 1 0 0 .1 3
Linebrink 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
Tejeda W,2-2 6 2 0 0 5 5
Madson 1 2 0 0 o 0
Cormier 1 0 0 0 0 0
BWagnerS,21 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Tejeda.
T-2:36. A-33,992 (43,826).


Associated Pres
Boston Red Sox second baseman Alex Cora, right top, forces out
Chicago White Sox runner A.J. Pierzynski in the ninth inning
Saturday at U.S. Cellular Field Saturday in Chicago.


I


SPORTS


........ p


. .-- V


-. ..- ...,' . A R D









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICI.I


Indians 4


SEATTLE

ISuzuki rf
Winn If
Ibanez dh
Sexson lb
Beltre 3b
Blmqist 2b
Morse ss
'Reed cf
Olivo c
SnIling ph


4, Mariners 3
CLEVELAND


ab rhbi ab rhbi


4 22 0 Szmore cf
3 02 1 Crisp If
4 11 1 JhPIta ss
301 1 VMrtnzc
4 00 0 Brssrd lb
4 01 0 Blliard 2b
4 03 0 Blake rf
4 00 0 Boone3b
3 00 0 Dubois dh
1 00 0


4 100
41 20
4 1 22

3 000
4 020
3 000
3 0 1 0
3 1 1 1


Totals 34310 3 Totals 31 4 9 4
'Seattle 100 100 010- 3
Cleveland 000 120 10x- 4
E-Morse (10). DP-Seattle 2,
'"Cleveland 2. LOB-Seattle 6, Cleveland
5. 2B-ISuzuki (11), Winn (24), Sexson
'(21), Crisp (23). HR-JhPeralta (13),
Dubois (1). CS-Belliard (2). S-Winn.
IP H RERBBSO


Seattle
SMeche L,10-7
'Villone
JeNelson
Cleveland
SCILeeW,11-4
SSauerbeck
Howry
Wickman S,24


7 9 4 2 1 6
2-3 0 0 0 1 0
1-3 0 0 0 0 1


71-3 8 3 3
1-3 0 0 0
1-3 0 0 0
1 2 0 0


Umpires-Home, Tim Timmons; First,
-' Chuck Meriwether; Second, Tim
McClelland; Third, Adam Dowdy.
T-2:36. A-28,498 (43,405).

Red Sox 3, White Sox 0
BOSTON CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
'-Damoncf 4 01 0 Pdsdnklf 3 0 1 0
Rnteria ss 4 00 0 Iguchi 2b 2 0 1 0
DOrtiz dh 3 10 0 CEvrtt dh 4 000
MRmrzl If 3 11 2 Knerkolb 4 020
Nixon rf 4 00 0 Przyns c 4 0 2 0
Varitek c 3 11 1 Rwand cf 4 0 0 0
Olerud lb 4 000 TPerez rf 4 0 0 0
Mueller 3b 4 01 0 Crede 3b 2 0 1 0
Cora 2b 3 01 0 Uribe ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 323 5 3 Totals 29 0 7 0
Boston 200 000 001- 3
Chicago 000 000 000- 0
DP-Boston 2. LOB-Boston 5,
Chicago 7. 2B-Iguchi (17). HR-
MRamirez (27), Varitek (14). CS-
Podsednik (10), Iguchi (5). S-Uribe.
no IP H RERBBSO
Boston
- WMiller W,3-4 7 5 0 0 4 4
MMyers 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
,tfr' Timlin 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
.. Schilling S,2 1 2 0 0 0 0
. Chicago
SOHernandez L,7-362-3 4 2 2 3 3
,'' Cotts 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
P,olitte 1 0 0 0 0 1
Marte 1 1 1 1 0 1
S.. WP-WMiller.
Umpires-Home, Larry Poncino; First,
Tom Hallion; Second, Paul Nauert; Third,
3,.io Mark Wegner.
T-2:39. A-39,408 (40,615).


MINNESC


Twins 5, Tigers 2
OTA DETROIT
ab rhbi


ShStwrt If 5 02 0 Inge 3
Punto ss 4 11 0 Grndsl
Mauer dh 4 02 1 ShItn
,' j THntercf 411 0 MOrd2
JJones rf 4 11 0 RoWhi
.. rneau lb 3 22 2 Monro
Cddyer2b 4 00 0 Infante
JCastro ss 0 00 0 VWilsr
S Rdmnd c 4 01 2 JMcDI
LRdrgz 3b 3 01 0
Totals 35511 5 Totals
'Minnesota 100
Detroit 100
DP-Minnesota 2, Detr
Minnesota 7, Detroit 3. 2B
Morneau (11), MOrdonez
(18). HR-Morneau (12).
IP H


b
n cf
lb
:rf
te dh
e If
S2b
S c
d ss


ab r h bi
4000
4 1 1 0
4000

3 1 1 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 1 1
3 000
3 0 1 0


31 -2 6 2
301 000- 5
000 100- 2
oit 2. LOB-
-Mauer (16),
(7), RoWhite

RERBBSO


Minnesota
Baker W,1-1 7 5 2 2 1 5
Crain 1 1 0 0 0 0
Nathan S,27 1 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Verlander L,0-2 6 8 5 5 2 3
JWalker 2 2 0 0 1 0
Dingman 1 1 0 0 0 0
nT HBP-by Verlander (LRodriguez).
Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Dan
lassogna; Second, Dale Scott; Third,
Kevin Kelley.
I T-2:12. A-34,388 (40,120).
,*1 Athletics 5, Rangers 4
" 'OAKLAND TEXAS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
'' 'Kendall c 3 00 0 Mench If 5 0 1 0
Swisherrf 3 11 1 MYong ss 3 1 2 0
Crosbyss 4 00 1 Txeira lb 3 1 1 3
EChavz3b 4 11 1 Blalockdh 4 0 1 0
Httberg dh 3 00 0 ASrano2b 4 1 1 1
Kieltylf 4 00 0 Hidalgo rf 4 0 1 0
DJnson lb 3 11 1 Mathws cf 4 0 1 0
-Payton cf 4 11 1 DeRosa3b 3 0 0 0
Scutaro 2b 4 12 0 Dllucci ph 1 0 0 0
Brajds c 4 1 1 0
Totals 325 6 5 Totals 35 4 9 4
',!',Oakland 120 110 000- 5
Texas 003 001 000- 4
Sra E-DeRosa (2). DP-Oakland 1, Texas
2. LOB-Oakland 4, Texas 7. HR-
Swisher (14), EChavez (15), DJohnson
(6), Payton (8), Teixeira (27), ASoriano
(24).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Saarloos W,6-6
Calero
RRincon
Witasick
Street S,9
Texas
RRdrgz L,2-2
Baldwin
FCordero


52-3 7 4
1 1 0
1-3 0 0
1 0 0
1 1, 0


52-3 5 5 5 4 3
21-3 1 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1


WP-Calero, RRodriguez.
Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First,
%- Paul Schrieber; Second, Andy Fletcher;
SThird, Mike Reilly.
T-2:33. A-38,841 (49,115).
Blue Jays 9, Royals 4
TORONTO KANSAS CITY
Sab rhbi ab r hbi
Jhnson cf 5 22 0 DJesus cf 5 0 0 0
;r Ctlnotto If 4 12 2 Gotay dh 4 1 1 0
S Wells dh 4 11 1 Long If 4 0 2 0
Hlnbrn 3b 5 11 2 Brownrf' 3 0 0 1
.'/AHill ss 4 10 0 Stairs lb 4 0 1 0
Zaun c 4 11 1 Berroa ss 4 1 1 0
Rios rf 3 11 0 Teahen 3b 3 2 2 0
Hinske lb 3 01 2 Buck c 3 0 2 2
OHudsn 2b 3 11 1 Murphy 2b 4 0 1 1
Totals 35910 9 Totals 34 410 4
Toronto 102 060 000- 9
Kansas City 020 000 110- 4
E-Stairs (3), Murphy (2). DP-Toronto
*2', Kansas City 2. LOB-Toronto 5,
Kansas City 6. 2B-VWells (21),
Hillenbrand (24), Hinske (22), Stairs (14),
Teahen (16). 3B-Catalanotto (3). SF-
S VWells, OHudson, Brown.
0 IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
, Bush W,1-5 7 8 3 3 1 2
0 Ghulk 1 2 1 1 0 0
0, Speier 1 0 0 0 0 3
r Kansas City
KSnyderL,0-1 4 8 6 6 2 1
MWood 4 2 3 2 2 1
Nunez 1 0 0 0 0 0
KSnyder pitched to 3 batters in the 5th


I ~ .'.-.~-. I


IL.. j H .7 ~~'li~)) H

SPORTS


14. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet,
166.472 mph.
15. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 166.217
mph.
16. (19) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge,
166.196 mph.
17 (31) JelffRBultnn .hevrnlett 1R Q7R


On the AIRWAVES -------- .m ph.g, .
18 (10) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 165.951


HBP-by Speier (Buck). WP-MWood.
PB-Zaun.
Umpires-Home, Paul Emmel; First,
Tony Randazzo; Second, Ed Montague;
Third, Jerry Layne.
T-2:39. A-26,626 (40,785).

Pirates 5, Rockies 3
COLORADO PITTSBURGH
ab rhbi ab r hbi


LuGnzl 2b
Mohr cf
Closser c
Helton lb
Holiday If
Atkins 3b
Byrnes rf
Rlaford ss
Ardon c
Sllivan cf
BKim p
Piedra ph
Willms p
Mceli p
Miles ph


4 00 0 Lawton rf
3 01 2 Snchez 3b
0 00 0 Bay If
4 00 0 Eldred lb
2 00 0 TRdmn cf
4 00 0 Doumit c
3 01 0 Castillo 2b
4 11 0 JWilsn ss
2 00 1 DWIms p
2 10 0 STorres p
1 00 0 Duffy ph
0 10 0 RiWhte p
0 00 0 Grabow p
0 00 0 Mesa p
0 00 0


4 1 00
4020
4 1 1 1
2 1 1 1
3 1 1 0
4 0 1 2
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 1
2 1 1 0
0 0 0 0
1 000
0 000
0 000
1 000


Totals 293 3 3 Totals 31 5 7 5
Colorado 000 010 020- 3
Pittsburgh 200 020 01x- 5
E-Atkins (12), Castillo (8). DP-
Colorado 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Colorado
7, Pittsburgh 8. 2B-Mohr (6), Relaford
(13), Bay (29), DWilliams (1). SB-Byrnes
(2), Lawton (12). S-LuGonzalez.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
BKim L,2-8 7 7 4 4 3 6
Williams 1-3 0 1 0 3 1
Miceli 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
DWilliams W,8-7 6 1 1 1 3 1
STorres 1 0 0 0 0 2
RiWhite 1-3 1 2 1 1 0
Grabow 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
MesaS,23 11-3 1 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Mesa (Miles), by DWilliams
(Holliday). WP-DWilliams.
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First,
Bruce Froemming; Second, Jerry Meals;
Third, Hunter Wendelstedt.
T-2:44. A-37,778 (38,496).
Nationals 4, Astros 2
HOUSTON WASHINGTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Tveras cf 4 000 Wlkrsn lb 2 1 0 0
Qualls p 0 00 0 Vidro 2b 4 0 0 0
Biggio 2b 2 10 0 JGillen rf 4 1 1 0
Brkmn lb 3 11 2 CCrdro p 0 0 0 0
Ensbrg 3b 4 01 0 Church If 3 0 1 0
Lane rf 4 00 0 PrWIsn cf 1 1 0 0
AEvrtt ss 3 010 Baerga 3b 4 1 23
Burke If 300 0 Carroll3b 0 000
Lamb ph 1 00 0 Schndrc 4 0 2 1
Quitr c 3000 CGzmn ss 4 000
JVzcno ph 1 00 0 Ar Jr. p 3 0 1 0
Backe p 2 000 Eschen p 0 0 0 0
Gallop 0-00 0 Mjwski p' 0 0 0 0
Sprgerp 0 00 0 Byrd If 0 0 0 0
OPlmro If 1 01 0
Totals 312 4 2 Totals 29 4 7 4
Houston 000 002 000- 2
Washington 400 000 00x- 4
LOB-Houston 6, Washington 7. 2B-
JGuillen (22), Church (14), Baerga (6).
HR-Berkman (9). CS-Church (1). S-


Wilkerson.

Houston
Backe L,8-7
Gallo
Springer
Quails
Washington
Armas Jr. W,5-4
Eischen
Majewski
CCordero S,34
Backe pitched


IP H RERBBSO


6 6 4 4
2-3 0 0 0
1-3 00 0
1 1 0 0


1 2 2 3
1 0 0 ,0
0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
batter in the


Eischen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.


HBP-by Quails (PrWilson), by Arimas.
Jr. (AEverett).
I Umpires-Home, Dana DeMuth; First,
Troy Fullwood; Second, Marty Foster;
Third, James Hoye.
T-2:51. A-42,680 (45,250).
Brewers 11, Reds 7


MILWAUKI

BClark cf
Weeks 2b
Ovrbay lb
CaLee If
Jenkins rf
BHall ss
Hardy ss
Helms 3b
DMiller c
VSants p
Drgtn ph
Eviand p
JuStna p
Mgrder ph
Turnbw p


CINCINNATI


ab rhbi ab r hbi
3 31 0 Freel 3b 4 2 2 0
421 1 FLopez ss 3 1 1 1
5 336 Stnrge p 0 0 0 0
5 133 Wthers p 0 0 0 0
4 01 0 JaCruzph 1 0 0 0
3 00 0 Merckr p 0 0 0 0
1 00 0 Casey lb 3 2 1 1
3 11 0 Grf Jr. cf 5 00. 0
4 11 0 Aurilia 2b 5 2 3 1
2 00 0 Dunn If 3 0 2 3
1 00 0 Kearns rf 3 0 1 1
1 00 0 Vientin c 4 0 1 0
0 00 0 Clausen p 1 0 0 0
1 00 0 Coffeyp 0 0 0 0
0 00 0 EEcrcn ph 1 0 0 0
Keisier p 0 0 0 0
Olmedoss 2 0 0 0


Totals 37111110 Totals 35 711 7
Milwaukee 301 502 000- 11
Cincinnati 001 040 200- 7
E-BHall (13), Freel 2 (6). DP-
Milwaukee 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB-
Milwaukee 7, Cincinnati 7. 2B:-BClark
(22), CaLee 2 (25), Aurilia (11), Dunn (21).
HR-Overbay 2 (14), CaLee (24). SB-
CaLee (11), Freel (23), FLopez (8). SF-
Kearns.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
VSantosW,3-10 5 9 5 5 3 3
Eveland 11-3 2 2 2 1 1
JuSantana 12-3 0 0 0 1 1
Turnbow 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cincinnati
Claussen L,4-8 32-3 6 9 9 3 4
Coffey 1-3. 00 0 0 0
Keisler 2 3 2 2 2 1
Standridge 1 1 0 0 1 0
Weathers 1 1 0 0 1 1
Mercker 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Claussen (BClark).
Umpires-Home, Derryl Cousins; First,
Jeff Nelson; Second, Rob Drake; Third,
Joe Brinkman.
T-3:34. A-36,320 (42,271).

AUTO RACING

NASCAR
Nextel Pennsylvania 500 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying
At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 mile oval
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (42) Jamie McMurray, Dodge,
168.761 mph.
2. (97) Kurt Busch, Ford, 168.533 mph.
3. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, 168.382 mph.
4. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 168.249
mph.
5. (21) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 167.857 mph.'
6. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 167.532
mph.
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 167.230 mph.
8. (25) Brian Vickers, Chevrolet,
167.230 mph.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
167.072 mph.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
167.072 mph.
11. (22) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 166.911
mph.
12. (49) Ken Schrader, Dodge, 166.713
mph.
13. (2) Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 166.583
mph.


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Formula One Racing Grand Prix of
Germany. From Hockenheim, Germany. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
1:30 p.m. (TNT) NASCAR Racing Nextel Cup Series -
Pennsylvania 500. From Pocono Raceway in Long Pond, Pa. '(Live)
(CC)
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) IndyCar Racing ABC Supply Co./A.J. Foyt 225.
From the Milwaukee Mile in West Allis, Wis. (Live) (CC)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing CarquestAuto Parts
Nationals Final Eliminations. From Seattle. (Same-day Tape)
(CC)
BASEBALL
2 p.m. (66 PAX) MLB Baseball Baltimore' Orioles at Tampa Bay
Devil Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg (Live)
3 p.m. (WGN) MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Chicago White
Sox. From U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago. (Live) (CC)
4 p.m. (FSNFL) MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at San Francisco
Giants. From SBC Park in San Francisco. (Live)
8 p.m. (ESPN) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at St. Louis
Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (Live) (CC)
BICYCLING
7:30 a.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 21.
Stage 21 from Corbeil-Essonnes, France to the finish at Champs-
Elysees in Paris. (Live)
2 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Cycling Tour de France Stage 21.
Stage 21 from Corbeil-Essonnes, France to the finish at Champs-
Elysees in Paris. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
8 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 21. Stage
21 from Corbeil-Essonnes, France to the finish at Champs-Elysees
in Paris. (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Boxing Sunday Night Fights. Julio Gonzalez
takes on Montell Griffin in a light heavyweight bout. From May 5,
2005. (Taped)
EQUESTRIAN
5 p.m. (ESPN) Horse Racing San Diego Handicap/Salvator Mile.
(Live)
GOLF
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Golf Deutsche Bank Players'
Championship of Europe Final Round. From Hamburg, Germany.
(Live)
2 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) Golf Senior British Open -
Final Round. From Royal Aberdeen Golf Club in Aberdeen,
Scotland. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
3 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) PGA Golf U.S. Bank Championship in
Milwaukee Final Round. From Brown Deer Park Golf Course in
Milwaukee. (Live) (CC)
SOCCER
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's Soccer United States vs. Team TBA.
(Live) (CC)
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Softball 2005 World Cup Final Teams TBA.
From Oklahoma City. (Taped) (CC)
TENNIS.
2:30 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) ATP Tennis U.S. Open Series RCA
Championships Final. From Indianapolis. (Live) (CC)
VOLLEYBALL
4:30 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Beach Volleyball AVP Nissan
Hermosa Beach Open Men's Finals. From Hermosa Beach, Calif.
(Live) (CC)


Channel, 44:30.
30. Jose Azevedo, Portugal, Discovery
Channel, 59:48.
33. Christopher Homer, United States,
Saunier Duval, 1:07:57.
35. Jose Luis Rubiera, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 1:11:48.
95. Pavel Padrnos, Czech Republic,
Discovery Channel, 2:49:53.
107. Benjamin Noval, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 3:00:59.
132. Fred Rodriguez, United States,
Davitamon-Lotto, 3:37:58.
139. Guido Trenti, United States, Quick


mph.
19. (11) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet,
165.853 mph.
20. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 165.801
mph.
21. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 165.752
mph.
22. (07) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
165.673 mph.
23. (18) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
165.603 mph.
24. (15) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet,
165.229 mph.
25. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 165.074
mph.
26. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, 164.953
mph.
27. (32) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Chevrolet,
164.772 mph.
28. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 164.699
mph.
29. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevrolet,
164.699 mph.
30. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 164.501
mph.
31. (4) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet,
164.072 mph.
32. (66) Mike Garvey, Ford, 164.060
mph.
33. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, 163.773
mph.
34. (0) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 163.464
mph.
35. (13) Greg Sacks, Dodge, 163.449
mph.
36. (34) P.J. Jones, Chevrolet, 163.366
mph.
37. (37) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 163.245
mph.
38. (8) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
162.528 mph.
39. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 161.705
mph.
40. (77) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 160.809
mph.
41. (99) Bobby Gerhart, Ford, owner
points.
42. (41) Casey Mears, Dodge, owner
points.
43. (27) Kirk Shelmerdine, Ford,
163.179 mph.
Failed To Qualify
44. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Dodge,
162.660 mph.
45. (92) Hermie Sadler, Chevrolet,
160.145 mph.
46. (00) Carl Long, Chevrolet.
47. (52) Derrike Cope, Dodge.

CYCLING
Tour de France Results
Saturday
20th (Penultimate) Stage
34.5-mile individual time trial begin-
ning and ending in Saint-Etienne,
France
1. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Discovery Channel, 1 hour, 11 minutes, 46
seconds.
2. Jan Ullrich, Germany, T-Mobile, 23
seconds behind.
3. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, T-
Mobile, 1:16.
4. Bobby Julich, United States, CSC,
1:33.
5. Ivan Basso, Italy, CSC, 1:54.
6. Floyd Landis, United States, Phonak,
2:02.
7. Cadel Evans, Australia, Davitamon-
LottO, 2:06.
8 George Hincapie, United- States,
Discovery Channel; 2:25.
9. Francisco Mancebo, Spain; Illes
Balears, 2:51.
10. Vladimir Karpets, Russia, Illes
Balears, 3:05.
11. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine,
Discovery Channel, 3:09.
12. Carlos Sastre, Spain, CSC, 3:10.
13. Christophe Moreau, France, Credit
Agricole, 3:11.
14. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
Gerolsteiner, 3:13.
15. Oscar Pereiro, Spain, Phonak, 3:25.
16. Sebastian Lang, Germany,
Gerolsteiner, 3:26.
17. Luke Roberts, Australia, CSC, 3:47.
18. Dario Cioni, Italy, Liquigas-Bianchi,
3:51.
19. Jorg Jaksche, Germany, Liberty
Seguros, same time.
20. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland,
Fassa Bortolo, 4:03. *
Also
25. Christopher Horner, United States,
Saunier Duval, 4:45.
31. Jose Luis Rubiera, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 5:24.
38. Pavel Padrnos, Czech Republic,
Discovery Channel, 5:53.
51. Jose Azevedo, Portugal, Discovery
Channel, 6:25.
56. Paolo Savoldelli, Italy, Discovery
Channel, 6:48.
86. Benjamin Noval, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 8:06.
123. Fred Rodriguez, United States,
Davitamon-Lotto, 9:50.
136. Guido Trenti, United States, Quick
Step, 10:39.
Overall Standings
(After 20 stages)
1. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Discovery Channel, 82 hours, 34 minutes,
5 seconds.
2. Ivan Basso, Italy, CSC, 4 minutes, 40
seconds behind.
3. Jan Ullrich, Germany, T-Mobile, 6:21.
4. Francisco Mancebo, Spain, Illes
Balears, 9:59.
5. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
Gerolsteiner, 11:25.
6. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, T-
Mobile, 11:27.
7: Mickael Rasmussen, Denmark,
Rabobank, 11:33.
8. Cadel Evans, Australia, Davitamon-
Lotto, 11:55.
9. Floyd Landis, United States, Phonak,
12:44.
10. Oscar Pereiro, Spain, Phonak,
16:04.
11. Christophe Moreau, France, Credit
Agricole, 16:26.
12. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine,
Discovery Channel, 19:02.
13. Eddy Mazzoleni, Italy, Lampre,
21:06.
14. George Hincapie, United States,
Discovery Channel, 23:40.
15. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 23:43.
Also
17. Bobby Julich, United States, CSC,
24:08.
25. Paolo Savoldelli, Italy, Discovery


must have seemed infinitely
remote just three. years
before that, when the testicu-
lar cancer that forced
Armstrong off his bike spread
to his lungs and brain and his
doctors gave him a 40 percent
chance of survival. But he'd
beaten long odds before.
Born to a 17-year-old single
mother and both of them
abandoned by the birth
father soon after, Armstrong
had been racing ahead of
adversity his whole life. He
was winning 10-kilometer
runs against grown-ups
before he finished sixth
grade, competing in


TOUR

Continued from Page 1B

over Ivan Basso of Italy, setting
him up for a victory ride on the
last leg into Paris on Sunday,
when the 33-year-old will
retire.
Riding with an aerodynamic
bike, helmet and suit to reduce
wind drag and save seconds,
Armstrong made easy work of
the winding, hilly and crowd-
lined 34.5-mile route that.
looped north of Saint-Etienne
in central France.
As race leader, Armstrong
set out last of the 155 riders, his
legs whirring, the yellow jersey
on his back. He trailed Basso at
the first time-check; but was
leading at the second and
stayed ahead from that point.
"Quite honestly, I wasn't
absolutely sure I could do it,"
Armstrong said. "I thought Jan
would be strong, and then
when I got to the first check I
saw that Ivan was seven sec-
onds up and I thought 'Oh boy,
this could be an interesting
day.'"
"I ended up turning things
around and winning," he said.
"So, pleasant surprise."
He even overtook Denmark's
Mickael Rasmussen, who had
started out six minutes before
him but had a disastrous ride
on the tricky and technical
route's sharp bends, fast down-
hills and tiring uphills.
"It's nice to finish your
career on a high note," said
Armstrong. '"As a sportsman, I
wanted to go out on top."
Armstrong's time was 1 hour,
11 minutes and 46 seconds, for
an average speed of 46.4 kilo-
meters (28.8 miles) per hour.
His three children were at the
finish to see him climb onto the
podium and don another race



LIKE

Continued from Page 1B

On the eve of a remarkable
seventh straight win, despite
racing at an age when all of
cycling's other greats were fin-
ished, Armstrong's vise grip on
the most grueling test in sports
remains as strong as ever.
"It's nice to finish your
career on a high note," he
said. "As a sportsman, I want-
ed to go out on top."
The 20th and next-to-last
stage of the tour began in
Saint-Etienne, beneath
sunny skies some 260 miles
from the capital, with the
prospects for real drama flat-
ter than most stretches of the
asphalt road over which
Saturday's time trial was con-
tested. The only question was
whether Armstrong would
risk a comfortable lead trying
for an individual stage win to
punctuate his dominance.
Little more than an hour
later 71 minutes, 46 sec-
onds to be exact the frantic
crowds lining the roads and
the racers who have provided
the backdrop in nearly every
one of his personal highlight
reels had their answer.
Armstrong rolled down the
start ramp already off his
seat and pedaling powerfully,
leaving the leader's yellow
jersey le maillot jaune -
half-unzipped against the
heat. By the time he crossed
the finish line of the 34.5-
mile stage, teeth bared at the
effort of averaging nearly 29
mph, he had boosted his
cushion over closest pursuer
Ivan Basso by almost two
minutes to 4:40 ahead of
Sunday's largely ceremonial
run-in to Paris.
A half-hour before
Armstrong took off, he pulled
his son alongside his bike in
a holding pen, then leaned
into the picture and smiled
while rock star girlfriend
Sheryl Crow snapped away
for the scrapbook.. When
Armstrong climbed off the
podium, 5-year-old Luke and
his 3-year-old twin sisters,
Isabelle and Grace, joined
Crow and Armstrong's moth-
er, Linda Armstrong, for a
brief celebration.
None of the kids was born
when Armstrong won his first
tour in 1999. And the idea he
would even have children


SUNDAY, JuL.Y 24, 2005 3B


leader's yellow jersey the
82nd of his career.
Only Belgian Eddy Merckx
- with 111 has won more.
Armstrong's rock star girl-
friend Sheryl Crow knelt at the
foot of the podium with
Armstrong's three-year-old
twin daughters, Grace and
Isabelle. Armstrong's mother
Linda hugged his team direc-
tor.
Armstrong said having chil-
dren there was "a dream for
me."
"I wanted to ride in today
and ride into Paris in yellow
for them," he added.
On Monday, Armstrong is
taking them on holiday in the
south of France, the rest of his
life ahead of him. Gaunt and
tanned after three brutal
weeks on French roads,
Armstrong said he would go to
the beach, drink wine, eat and
"not worry about a thing."
At this Tour, he hammered
his rivals from the first day in
the opening time trial, finish-
ing second well ahead of
Ullrich and other top chal-
lengers. He built on his lead in
the first day in the Alps and
comfortably controlled the
race from that point silenc-
ing doubters who questioned
whether he still had the will
and the legs to win.
Armstrong said that while he
is retiring from cycling, he
would keep fit and perhaps
take part in mountain bike or
cyclo-cross races from time to
time.
"It's not as if I'm going to sit
around and be a fat slob," he
said.
The individual stage win was
the 22nd of Armstrong's career.
Eleven of those were time tri-
als. Armstrong also won three
team trials with his support
riders.

statewide swim meets soon
after, then added bike racing
to his repertoire and became
a topflight triathlete by age
15. Two years later, after
watching fellow American
Greg LeMond win the Tour
de France a second time,
Armstrong decided it was
something he, too, could
achieve.
Now he stood just 24 hours
from the grandest achieve-
ment in a career chockfull of
them, surrounded by loved
ones, his steely blue eyes fill-
ing with tears.
"It's a dream for me,"
Armstrong said.
It was a rare glimpse into
the soul of a champion, a
restless striver with nothing,
finally, left to prove.
Armstrong won his first
tour to convince himself and
others that cancer wasn't
always a death sentence,
then, tore off four more wins
to demonstrate that he had
learned how much hard,
mind-numbing work is neces-
sary for a prodigy to become
a cold-blooded professional.
Last year, Armstrong cap-
tured five stages and roared
past all of the tour's other
legends five-time winners
Eddy Merckx of Belgium,
Miguel Indurain of Spain and
Frenchmen Bernard Hinault
and Jacques Anquetil. Yet
this one was more about mas-
tery than any of them, about
leaving on his own terms.
Because of the way he has
crushed not just opponents,
but much of the romance and
most of the suspense associ-
ated with the 102-year-old
race, a cartoonist for televi-
sion network France-2 fre-
quently draws Armstrong as
an anvil.
And this time around, he
didn't wait long to begin
throwing his weight around.
The opening stage, an 11.8-
mile time trial that ran past
marshes from Fromentine to
the island of Noirmoutier-en-
l'Ile, was barely long enough
to make a symbolic point, let
alone a substantial one.
Taking off last among the 189
riders at one-minute inter-
vals, Armstrong caught his
main rival, German Jan
Ullrich, finished second
overall, and put enough time
between himself and the rest
to all but clinch the 2,242-


mile, three-weeklong race on
the first day.
On Saturday, he bookended
that with a stage win, an
exclamation point reminding
everyone that for all the dan-
gers lurking around him for
three weeks the steep
ascents, rain-slicked pave-
ment and hairpin turns
strewn in his path this
journey was destined to
unfold according to the
schedule in his head.
And no one else's.



Jim Litke is a national
sports columnist for The
Associated Press. Write to
him atjlitke^@ap.org


EE







4B SI NDA', JUL 24, 2005


Saban set for camp


But how fast can he

turn Miami around?

Associated Press

DAVIE Nick Saban returned this week
from a family vacation in north Georgia to
find his new $7 million waterfront home in
Fort Lauderdale not quite finished, the
scheduled completion date of June 1 long
past
In his office overlooking the Miami
Dolphins' practice fields, empty picture
hooks dot the walls, evidence of a transition
still in progress.
Yet Saban said he's ready for work The
Dolphins take the practice field Monday to
begin their40th training camp- and Saban's
first as an NFL head coach.
"I told my wife, 'This is what I need to oper-
ate: Justgive me a mirror to shave, and a cou-
ple of nails to hang my clothes,'" Saban said
with a laugh.
Since accepting the Dolphins' job last
Christmas Day, Saban has overhauled a
once-proud franchise coming off its worst
season since the 1960s. In seven months he
hired a new coaching staff, installed a new
offense and defense, acquired 44 new play-
ers and welcomed back Ricky Williams,
whose sudden retirement a year ago this
weekend precipitated the Dolphins' decline.
"We definitely know there's a new sheriff
in town," linebacker Junior Seau said.
"There aren't any questions or gray areas."
There are, however, doubts as to how
quickly Saban can turn things around.
In his past two jobs, Saban said, his first
year exceeded expectations he went 6-5-1
at Michigan State in 1995, and 8-4 at


New Dolphins' coach Nick Saban over-
hauled the team, acquiring 44 new players.
Louisiana State in 2000. And it won't be diffi-
cult for the Dolphins to play better than last
season, when they went 4-12, setting a fran-
chise record for defeats in their first losing
year since 1988.
But Saban declined to speculate how
much the Dolphins might improve.
"In my mind, it's all about the challenge of
climbing the mountain not in terms ofjust
how many games you're going to win, but
more how are you going to get everybody
playing to the best of their ability," he said.
"Maybe we get everybody as good as we can
be, and we win half our games. Maybe we win
three-quarters. I don't know.
"We obviously have some good players.
There are guys who have had a lot of success
in this league."
One is Williams, whose return ensures a
circus-like media atmosphere when Camp
Saban opens Monday It's uncertain whether
the 2002 NFL rushing champion will address
reporters about his decision to retire, his
ensuing trips to Australia and India, his stud-


ies of holistic healing and yoga, his violations
of the league's substance abuse program, or
his strained relationship with the teammates
he left in the lurch a year ago.
"Ricky understands that he has some
fences to mend," said his agent, Leigh
Steinberg.
Saban said he decided Williams deserved
another chance despite the risk of souring
team chemistry
"It's a problem only if we let it become a
problem," Saban said. "I don't think there's
any question he has shown the ability to play
effective football in this league."
Williams' return overshadows the antici-
pated absence Monday of another running
back Ronnie Brown, the No. 2 pick in the
draft, is likely to miss the start of camp
because he's waiting for top pick Alex Smith
to sign with San Francisco before reaching a
deal with the Dolphins.
"That's just the way the system is," Saban
said with a shrug.
Playing time at running back suddenly
one of the team's deepest positions, with vet-
eran Lamar Gordon returning from a shoul-
der injury is just one of many personnel
issues Saban must address. There are worri-
some holes to plug in the offensive and
defensive lines and secondary, and there will
be a battle at quarterback between newly
acquired journeyman Gus Frerotte and
young holdover A.J. Feeley
"We hope that we can develop both of our
quarterbacks to be able to play winning foot-
ball for us," Saban said. "I would think it's
likely that they would both start at some
point during the season. Over 16 games, that's
just the way it usually works."
One likely upgrade will be in the chemistry
of the coaching staff. Infighting among the
assistants under coach Dave Wannstedt
helped sabotage last season.


Artest starts long road back


Pacers'standout

still unpredictable

Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS Ron
Artest's exile is over. His long
road back to the brink of NBA
stardom is only beginning.
That road began at the
Minnesota summer league,
where Artest played with rook-
ies, undrafted free agents and
desperate journeymen, trying
to get comfortable in an
Indiana Pacers uniform again.
It didn't take long.
Less than a minute into his
first game, Artest took a pass at
the left elbow of the 3-point
line, elevated and drilled the
shot. It was as though he had
never left
"Stopping on a dime and
throwing it up and making it
swish, that was cool," he said,
his eyes bright and his smile
beaming.
The pure love of the game
always has been there.
Unfortunately for Artest, that
love has been accompanied by
a volatile temper that can snap
in the blink of an eye.
Despite being one of the best
all-around players in the game
- able to shut down an oppo-
nent's top scorer .on defense
and drop 30 points with a near
limitless repertoire on offense
- Artest is known more in the
mainstream for his unpre-
dictable and often boorish
behavior.
He once grabbed a high-defi-
nition television camera from
its operator and smashed it to
the floor in the tunnel leading
to the locker rooms at Madison
Square Garden. He led the
league in flagrant fouls, he
applied for a job at an elec-
tronics store when he was play-
ing for the Chicago Bulls, and
he even asked the Pacers for
time. off to rest because he was
exhausted from promoting an
album for his record label.
But it all came to a head on
Nov. 19, when Artest charged
into the stands in Auburn Hills,
Mich., after a fan threw a beer
on him moments after Artest
was involved in an altercation
with Pistons center Ben
Wallace. Artest exchanged
punches with fans, who relent-
lessly pelted Artest and his
Pacers teammates with debris
in one of the worst brawls in
NBA history.


Associated Press
Ron Artest was suspended for 73 games the rest of the season
- after chasing a fan in the stands following a game in Detroit.


He was suspended for 73 reg-
ular-season games, lost nearly
$5 million in salary and was
barred from a chance at
revenge against the Pistons in
the playoffs.
Instead of sulking and pout-
ing about his suspension,
Artest went to work
He retained his linebacker's
physique and soft jumper
despite not playing in a pro
game for eight months, much to
the amazement of Indiana cen-
ter David Harrison.
"Every day he was in there
working out like he was play-
ing," Harrison said. "That
taught me a lot, just seeing him
out there still working after
everything. If they told me,
'You're out for thq year,' I don't
think you'd see me for a long
time."
Now he's back Speaking to
dozens of media members who
waited outside the locker room
after a meaningless summer
league game in the middle of


July, Artest said he might never
change the negative percep-
tions surrounding him.
"I'm not trying to redo my
image and I'm not trying to
PLEASE anybody," Artest said.
"I'm going to continue to do
what I have to do and be
myself."
"I'm not looking to do any
Cheerios commercials or Coca-
, Cola commercials," Artest said.
"I want to do a commercial in
the 'hood."
What he wants to do more
than anything is move ahead.
"When you have to sit out 73
games and not get paid, you're
going to look forward to being
back," coach Rick Carlisle said.
"And you're probably, going to
have a little different perspec-
tive on things than you did
before. I just know Ronnie's
ready to come back, and really
looking forward to being part
of the team."
Carlisle's not the only one to
notice a change.


"I admire the kid," team
president Larry Bird said. "Not
for what he did, but how he's
come back and he's worked
and he's done things to
improve himself. I look for a
great year out of him."
So, has Artest induced his
last headache? When talking
about a player so unpredictable
on and offthe court, Bird knows
not to make any promises.
"You never know," Bird said.
"I just know Ronnie missed the
game so much. It's the one thing
in his life that he truly loves
other than his family. Any time
you have something taken away
from you, you're going to miss
it. We'll see how he reacts."
And how opposing fans react
to him.
"Even before everything hap-
pened, fans were always trying
to get on me," Artest said. "They
know my history, they know my
personality and they know my
character, so they try to find
ways to get under my skin, but
we just have to go out there and
play"
He was greeted warmly last
week In a near-empty arena
where even casual conversa-
tion was clearly audible, nary a
smart-aleck remark was
uttered.
"Fortunately, there was a
bunch of people in the stands
that respect the game," he said
in a not-so-subtle shot at the
unruly Detroit fans. "That was
the only thing. There was noth-
ing I did different, just the peo-
ple that were in the stands had
respect for the game. That's
good."
He expects that to be the case
in most cities.
"I think you'll only see prob-
lems in Detroit, Boston and
Philly," Artest said of the noto-
riously hostile cities. "Even
when I went to L.A. for a Sparks
game, half the crowd was like,
'AR-TEST! AR-TEST!'
Everywhere I go, it's cool. It's
not as bad as everybody thinks
it is. It's cool."
For now, Artest isn't worried
about the fans. He's not wor-
ried about commissioner David
Stern watching his every move,
or endless questions about his
behavior.
The only thing he's worried
about is fine-tuning his game.
He's certainly off to a good
start. In five summer league
games he averaged 19.8 points
and 5.3 rebounds, albeit against
vastly inferior competition.


Nadal rolls into Mercedes Cup final


Associated Press
STUTTGART, Germany -
Rafael Nadal moved up to No. 2
in the world rankings Saturday
after beating Finland's Jarkko
Nieminen 6-2,7-5 to run his win-
ning streak on clay to 33 matches.
The win lifted the 19-year-old
Spaniard into the final of the
Mercedes Cup, where he will
face 2004 French Open champi-
on Gaston Gaudio. The third-
seeded Argentine advanced


when Russia's Nikolay
Davydenko pulled out of their
semifinal with the flu while trail-
ing 6-3,2-1.
"It's a lovely situation to play
against him and try and take
his record away," Gaudio said.
Win or lose, Nadal will pass
Australia's Lleyton Hewitt in the
rankings when they are updated
Monday.
"It's unbelievable for me, but
now I will have to play my best
tennis to win tomorrow," Nadal


said. "Gaudio and I are among
the best players in the world on
clay, so it will be a good match.".
With the sun finally shining on
the rain-affected event, Nadal
broke the 67th-ranked Finn's
serve in the first two games of the
first set to take command.
Nadal was challenged only
once during the 86-minute
match, when Nieminen broke
his serve to tie it at 5-5 in the sec-
ond set But the Spaniiard imme-
diately broke back


"He doesn't give you anything.
He is concentrated on every
point," said Nieminen, playing
on his 24th birthday
Nadal is chasing his sixth
straight title on clay and eighth
overall for the season.
He hasn't dropped a set in four
matches against unseeded play-
ers so far, and Gaudio will pose a
much tougher test
The Argentine is one of the few
to have beaten the 19-year-old
Nadal three times.


Patriots, Eagles



have questions



as camps open


Associated Press

New England begins its
quest for an unprecedented
third straight Super Bowl
victory and fourth in five
years without the two coordi-
nators who helped Bill
Belichick win the first three
titles.
And that quest also will be
without linebacker Tedy
Bruschi, the heart of the
defense, who is sitting out
the season after suffering a
mild stroke.
Philadelphia goes to camp
with Terrell Owens, the cata-
lyst in its run to the
Super Bowl, threat-
ening to hold out
just a year after
arriving and sign-
ing a big contract
As NFL camps
open over the next
few days, New
England and
Philadelphia start as
favorites to meet again in the
Super Bowl. But this is an
era of uncertainty, and even
two teams that have been the
NFEs most consistent in the
last four years have their
problems.
"Each year is its own enti-
ty," says Bill Belichick, who
has put himself in a class
with dare we say it -
Vince Lombardi with his
success in New England the
past four years.
"There are new people
and there changes every
year You have to build and
rebuild your team. Every
team in the league is going
through the same thing. We
are part of it It's unique."
That's why 31 other teams
are opening camp with
hopes of succeeding the
Patriots as champion.
Well, not quite 31 not
San Francisco, Cleveland or
Miami, which are starting
over Not Tennessee, which
purged a half-dozen veter-
ans from a highly successful
run from 1999-2004. And not
a half-dozen or more teams
that just don't have the play-
ers, including Washington,
where Dan "The Fan"
Snyder has made a mess of
things since buying the team
in 1999.
But others can think big,
emboldened by the success
of St Louis, which went from
4-12 in 1998 to a title the next
year, or Carolina, 1-15 in
2001, 7-9 the next year and
NFC champion thenext, los-
ing the 2004 Super Bowl on
(what else?) a last-second
field goal by New England's
Adam Vinatieri.
Even long-downtrodden
Arizona, emboldened by
some success in Dennis
Green's first year as coach,
has hopes of winning the
very ordinary NFC West
There are the usual big
changes, including the trade
of Randy Moss by Minnesota
to Oakland after seven tur-
bulent seasons with the
Vikings where like Owens
in San Francisco and then
Philadelphia his play was
outstanding, but he often
was a locker room distrac-
tion.
Jerry Rice, the NFEs
greatest receiver, signed
with Denver at age 42,
although there is no guaran-
tee he will make the team.
Emmitt Smith, the league's
career rushing leader,
retired after two seasons in
Arizona and 15 seasons in
the league.
The most glaring focus is
on the Patriots. If Belichick
calls the NFL "unique," so
are his Patriots, a team that
seems annually to find play-
ers who fit its unusual
schemes. Most often, it's a
combination of veterans who
have stagnated on losers and
rookies who are drafted
specifically for their abilities
to fit Belichick's system.
The past two years, the
veterans have included safe-
ty Rodney Harrison and run-
ning back Corey Dillon The
rookies have included six
who made significant contri-
butions to the 2003 champs,
and undrafted free agent
cornerback Randall Gay,
who ended up starting for
much of the 2004 season and


the playoffs.
This year, the veteran star
could be linebacker Chad


Brown, who might help
replace the seemingly indis-
pensable Bruschi.
Cornerback Ty Law and
wide receiver David Patten
also are gone, but would any-
one be surprised if David
Terrell, a first-round disap-
pointment in Chicago, reach-
es his potential at receiver?
Or a veteran such as Duane
Starks or Chad Scott helps
replace Law?
Replacing the coordina-
tors could be another story.
Charlie Weis, the offensive
coordinator, took the head
coaching job at Notre Dame.

his defensive coun-
terpart, is now the
Browns' coach.
Eric Mangini, 34,
the former second-
ary coach, is the
new defensive
coordinator in
New England and
might be the next Belichick
- he went to Wesleyan, the
head coach's alma mater
Belichick himself was even
younger than Mangini when
he got the defensive coordi-
nator's job with the New
York Giants.
Belichick, a defensive spe-
cialist, will help run the
offense with the help of a
staff that includes 29-year-
old quarterbacks coach Josh
McDaniels. The uncommon-
ly smart quarterback Tom
Brady also could have input
into game plans after signing
a contract that will help the
team stay under the salary
cap: $60 million over six
years, not much for a top-five
QB who is a two-time Super
Bowl MVP
Philadelphia, meanwhile,
remained intact in the
coaching department, where
Andy Reid oversees two out-
standing coordinators -Jim
Johnson on defense and
Brad Childress on offense.
But what can the Eagles
do about Owens?
They traded for the tem-
pestuous wide receiver
knowing that with the 49ers
he had run-ins with his
coaches and quarterbacks.
He was a model citizen last
season and came back unex-
pectedly from a broken
ankle to catch nine passes
for 122 yards in the 24-21
Super Bowl loss.
But in the offseason he
hired Drew Rosenhaus to
renegotiate the seven-year,
$49 million contract he
signed a year ago. Owens
also suggested that quarter-
back Donovan McNabb had
underachieved as the Eagles
tried to come back in the
fourth quarter of the title
game.
Reid has suggested in his
stoic way that the Eagles
won without Owens and can
do so again if he decides to
sit out the season. The organ-
ization has stayed on top in
part by not giving into the
contract demands of its stars.
Example: Philly let middle
linebacker Jeremiah Trotter
go to Washington in 2002
after not acceding to his
demands, then got him back
on the cheap last season and
he became a Pro Bowler
after underachieving with
the Redskins.
McNabb, the unchal-
lenged leader on a team that
has made four straight trips
to the NFC title game, has
tried to play down the jab-
bering.
"I think some people get
caught up in the whole deal
of expressing their feelings,
and any time you express
your feelings publicly it
never really works for you,"
he says. 'That's a tough way
of handling it The way of
handling it is to just keep it
in-house, talk to that person
and see if you can handle it
that way"
The Owens situation
extends to a number of
teams through the same
man, Rosenhaus, who has
snapped up high-profile
players and threatened to
hold them out His influence
on Green Bay wide receiver
Javon Walker earned him
the ire of Brett Favre.


Those things have a way of
working themselves out, and
Rosenhaus never has been
an agent who encourages
long and costly holdouts.


S PORTS


CR,'U'ls .COIN'TY (Fl.) CIJRONICm.l









SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 5B


SPORTS


CITRUS CoUiNT (Fl) CHRONICI.L


Finishing on top


Wallace hopes

to retire with a

Nextel Cup title

Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. Rusty
Wallace has a to-do list as long
as a 2.5-mile track once he
retires after this season.
From running car dealer-
ships to designing racetracks to
jumpstarting his son's fledgling
racing career, Wallace will
hardly pack up the camper,
count his millions and relax.
Before Wallace starts think-
ing too much about the future,
though, he still has one
grandiose goal to accomplish
before he quits. His best season
in years has him in contention
for the Nextel Cup
Championship and he intends
to finish on top.
"That would be perfect
because I know I've got the
capability to do that," Wallace
said before qualifying 13th in
his No. 2 Dodge Saturday at
Pocono Raceway "People don't
think that because I haven't
been there in so long."
After a couple-of trying sea-
sons that saw the 1989 series
champion finish far out of con-
tention, Wallace seems a lock
to qualify for NASCAR's Chase
for the Nextel Cup
Championship, sitting in fourth
place heading into Sunday's
Pennsylvania 500.,
"Right now, I'm just thinking
every single race is the most
important race and it's the last
race," said Wallace, who turns
49 in August "I've got to think
that way."


Rusty Wallace has four career wins at Pocono Raceway, site
of Sunday's Pennsylvania 500.


Wallace seems as big a threat
as any driver to win at Pocono,
with four career victories at the
2.5-mile triangle track the
only layout of its kind on the
NASCAR circuit But he's been
outspoken about the changes
on the track, blasting a new sin-
gle-gear rule that precludes
shifting and criticizing the
track's surface, most notably
the curb in the second turn.
"The track is in poor condi-
tion," Wallace said. "It's super
rough across the tunnel turn,
they put this curb in down
there and they absolutely
screwed it up big time. There's
not a driver out there that likes
it
"They should have gone to
drivers to ask them for their
opinion."
Maybe in retirement,
NASCAR will turn to a driver
make that a former driver -
like Wallace to seek their
advice on how to improve
tracks, rules or any other prob-


lems affecting the popularity of
the sport.
Wallace, talking with boyish
enthusiasm while relaxing in
his motorcoach, wants to
advise everyone from
NASCAR to team owner Roger
Penske and hopes they're open
to seeking his input
"I want to see this sport
grow," said Wallace, 230 points
behind leader Jimmie
Johnson. "There's a lot of nega-
tive things that I can help on."
Unlike veteran Mark Martin,
who's being forced to extend
his farewell tour another -sea-
son because his team has no
one to fill his spot, Wallace
insists he's done and Penske is
in agreement
"He just loves going out on
top of your game and retiring,"
Wallace said.
Wallace has grown tired of
the grueling schedule and
won't miss suiting up all that
much, though he acknowl-
edges getting a special satisfac-


Crane keeps lead at U.S. Bank


Associated Press


* I









* I








* I



.1
.1










* I











'I



* I
I


V
















II


II
II








I









I

'I

I


Crane's only other tour win came at the
2003 BellSouth Classic.
By the time the leaders finished at 8:30
p.m. CDT, fewer than 40 fans were in the
gallery on No. 18.
"It's different," Crane said. "It was kind
of like last night when we were running in
the dark."
Crane retreated to the clubhouse at 16-
under through 49 holes, tied with
Verplank, who was on the green at No. 13
with Crane and Jeff Sluman.
Smith, who was three shots off the pace
when the rains came, said he made the
mistake of rushing his shots when he
heard another storm was on its way.
"I was trying to play fast and get as far as
we could and I didn't take my time," said
Smith, who missed birdie putts on his last
two holes before the delay. "I think every-
body wants to get done. When they give
you word that in 45 minutes, 80 mph winds
are going to be heie, I think everybody
puts it in high gear."
Not Crane, whose slow play drew the ire
of Rory Sabbatini at the Booz Allen Classic
last month.
"Yeah, we were on the clock when the


rain delay came," Verplank said. "
bound to happen. I mean, one day Bei
either going to get heavily fined or I
going to play taster, I guess.
"Ben's working on it, I think He's re.
a nice guy And hopefully he'll work o:
again tonight and tomorrow ... He's de
ratee"
Maybe Smith should have been a li
more deliberate himself. He had bird
three of four holes to move to minus
when he hurried and paid the price.
"I think everybody wants to get dot
Smith said. "This is getting old. It wasn'
bad on on Thursday, but this is starting
get a little bit old. We want to get don
think everybody wants to get it d(
today."
They tried to get going again at 6:35 1
following the fourth delay of the tour
ment, but thunder and lightning for
tour officials to close the range and si
the golfers back to the clubhouse
another half-hour.
Rains had delayed the US B,
Championship just one time since 11
This week's delays have totaled 9 hours
minutes.


:Rookie gets 2nd Tour win!


Associated Press


EVIAN, France Paula
Creamer won her second
LPGA title Saturday at the
Evian Masters, beating fellow
teenager Michelle Wie and
Lorena Ochoa by eight shots.
The 18-year-old Creamer
shot a 1-under 71 to finish at 15-
under 273. Wie, a 15-year-old
amateur, shot a 68 and Ochoa a
69 to tie for second at the $2.5
million event.
The $375,000 prize boosted
Creamer to second on the
LPGA money list behind
Annika Sorenstam, who fin-
ished 12 strokes back with a 75.
Canada's Lorie Kane (71) fin-
ished fourth in the select 78-
woman field.


Creamer, who won the
Sybase Classic two months ago,
shot rounds of 68-68-66 to take
a seven shot-lead entering the
final round and cruised to vic-
tory.
"I've just had a great week,"
Creamer said. "Just the
strength of this field and the
Evian ensemble makes it huge
for me to win here."
Creamer opened with a
bogey, but closed with 11 pars
and a birdie over the final 12
holes. She finished with three
birdies and two bogeys.
When asked about a rivalry
with Wie, Creamer said
Sorenstam is the player to beat.
"I don't really see it as a
rivalry," Creamer said. "We're
all just trying to find our games


and play our best golf. I com-
pare myself to the No. 1 player
in the world, which is Annika
Sorenstam, and I'm not quite
there yet."
Wie had five birdies and one
bogey in her solid 68. But she
was left regretting the putts
and shots that went awry, par-
ticularly in the first two days
when she shot 75-70.
"It was a good day in some
ways," Wie said. "I didn't give
myself so many chances, but
took more of them. But when I
think of all the shots I left out
there ... I'm just pleased how I
came back the last two
rounds."
Sorenstam had a double-
bogey and five bogeys to offset
four birdies.


Associated Press
Paula Creamer gives the trophy
a kiss after winning the Evian
Masters, the second title won
by this 18-year-old.


Watson on top at Senior British Open


Record-matching

64 gives him a

one-stroke lead

Associated Press

ABERDEEN, Scotland -
Tom Watson matched the
course record at Royal
Aberdeen set only hours earlier
Saturday, a 7-under 64 in most-
ly calm conditions that gave
him a one-shot lead over Craip


Stadler going into the final
round of the Senior British
Open.
Watson was at 3-under 210
and poised to win a British
Open title on his fifth links
course in Scotland. He won the
British Open at Carnoustie,
Muirfield and Royal Troon, and
the British Open and Senior
British Open at Turnberry.
Watson was 4 over to start the
third round, but picked up
birdies on the third and fifth
holes, then made an eagle on
the par-5 sixth his first eagle
nf the year andr waq nn his


way to the 54-hole lead.
Craig Stadler didn't get as
much out of his round, making a
birdie on the par-3 17th for a 1-
under 70 that put him at 211 and
in the final group with Watson.
Greg Norman also had a 70
and was at even-par 213 with
Des Smyth, who had a 68.
Derrick Cooper, a 50-year-old
tournament director on the
European senior tour, also shot
a 64 earlier in the day that
enabled him to get into con-
tention. Despite an 80 in the
second round, Cooper was at 4-
over 217 and fied with Loren


Roberts, who shot 71. Both were
seven shots out of the lead.
Watson looked like an eight-
time major champion, especial-
ly with his putter
"Today was the first time in a
long time I made some putts,"
Watson said. "I hit the ball well,
the best I've driven it in two
day. I may play a little bit differ-
ently tomorrow, as far as where
I try to place the ball off the
tee."
Watson has not won on the
Champions Tour since collect-
ing his third senior major at the
9,003 Tradition.


Pocono pole spot



goes to McMurray


Associated Press


tion from his final season after
he finished 14th and 16th in the
standings the past two years.
Wallace finished in the top 10
in season points 16 times, but
has only one win in the last
four years.
Wallace attributes a tight
working relationship with
crew chief Larry Carter, softer
tires and good luck under the
hood to his five top-10 finishes
and seven straight weeks in the
top 10 of the standings this year.
With the Chase cutoff only
seven races away, Wallace is
ready to make a move toward
the top.
"There is no such thing as
'close is OK, close is good
enough,"' he said. "The car
feels pretty good. We'll be fine.
It's the last It's the most impor-
tant My strategy is, don't over-
work yourself and give it all the
focus you've possibly got"
His "Last Call" stops around
the country have brought thou-
sands of fans, some even wait-
ing in the pouring rain to meet
Wallace. He says he looks every
fan in the eyeball and tells
them thanks for the years of
support
As part of a sponsorship
commitment, he'll be taking a
cruise in December with even
more diehards.
"I'll sign 3,100 autographs
and I'll take 3,100 pictures," he
said, smiling.
Then it's off to work with the
NASCAR Busch Series team
he owns, test for Penske, build-
up a track in Iowa and help his
teenage son, Stephen, start his '
ARCA career So much to do
and for the first time in a while,
so much time.
'There'll be 50 more (plans),
I just don't know what they
are," he said.


LPGA
Evian Masters
At Evian Masters Golf Club
Evian, France
a-amateur
Final
Creamer $375,00068-68-66-71-273 -15
a-Wie 75-70-68-68 281 -7
Ochoa $246,064 71-69-72-69- 281 -7..
Kane $178,502 71-74-66-71- 282 -6,
Alfredsson $90,486 74-72-72-65-2E 3 -5
Hjorth $90,486 69-72-74-68 283 -5
Lee $90,486 71-74-68-70 283 -5
Koch $90,48666-73-74-70- 283 -5
Kim $90,486 68-68-75-72 283 -5
Icher $90,486 71-70-68-74 283 -5
Neumann $54,561 74-71-71-68-284 -4
Sorenstam $50,520 72-66-72-75-285 -3
Webb $47,152 70-70-71-75 286 -2
Kung $40,416 70-75-74-68 287 -1
Park $40,416 72-73-72-70 287 -1
Baena $40,416 66-75-73-73- 287 -1
Davies $40,416 69-70-70-78- 287 -1
Tinning $34,219 72-72-74-70- 288 E
Redman $34,219 72-73-70-73-288 E
Gustafson $30,447 70-74-76-69-289 +1
Han $30,447 71-73-72-73 289 +1
Taylor $30,447 69-75-71-74 289 +1
Waugh $30,447 72-72-70-75- 289 +1
Rosales $26,720 77-70-71-72-290 +2
Steinhauer $26,720 71-72-74-73-290 +2
Marti $26,720 74-69-71-76 290 +2
Park $22,929 73-75-74-69 291 +3
Jones $22,929 74-76-70-71 291 +3
Zorzi $22,929 75-70-74-72 291 +3
Morgan $22,929 74-75-68-74- 291 +3
Song $22,929 72-75-69-75 291 +3
Gulbis $16,368 72-800-7-70- 292 +4
Jang $16,368 75-76-70-71 292 +4
Matthew $16,368 78-72-71-71-292 +4
Ekelundh $16,368 79-73-68-72-292 +4
Ward $16,368 75-73-72-72 292 +4
McGill $16,368 76-73-70-73- 292 +4
B.Kim $16,36872-74-73-73 292 +4
M.H. Kim $16,368 72-73-72-75-292 +4
Sandolo $16,368 70-71-76-75-292 +4
Saiki $16,368 76-68-72-76 292 +4
Kang $16,368 71-72-72-77 292 +4
Inkster $16,368 70-73-72-77- 292 +4
Arricau $11,900 74-78-73-68- 293 +5
Brooky $11,900 66-80-74-73- 293 +5
Kerr $11,90075-71-71-76 293 +5
Bowie $11,047 73-74-73-74 294 +6
Hetherington $9,862 79-75-73-68-295 +7
M.-Lebouc $9,862 76-76-72-71-295 +7
Prieto $9,862 77-77-69-72 295 +7
Lunke $9,862 74-75-74-72 295 +7
Daniel $9,862 69-73-72-81 295 +7
Blomvquist $8,488 75-73-76-72-296 +8
D.-Donofrio $8,488 72-78-73-73-296 +8
Simpson $8,488 76-70-76-74- 296 +8
Pettersen $8,488 77-75-69-75-296 +8
Miyazato $7,680 72-76-75-74- 297 +9
Brewerton $7,680 68-80-75-74-297 +9
Stupples $7,275 72-75-76-75- 298 +10
Doolan $6,629 80-77-73-69 299 +11
Nocera $6,629 80-74-71-74 299 +11
Monke $6,629 77-73-75-74 299 +11
Gottmo $6,629 76-75-72-76 299 +11
Johnson $6,629 75-74-73-77- 299 +11
fOiaz $6,197 74-74-78-74 300 +12
Luna $6,063 75-78-76-72 301 +13
Dunn $5,793 79-79-72-72 302 +14
Mallon $5,793 84-75-70-73 302 +14
Sanchez $5,793 75-70-80-77- 302 +14
Wessberg $5,524 78-75-75-75-303 +15
Piovano $5,389 80-72-71-81- 304 +16
Champions Tour
Senior British Open


At Royal Aberdeen Course
Aberdeen, Scotland
Third Round


Tom Watson
Craig Stadler
Greg Norman
Des Smyth
Derrick Cooper
Loren Roberts
Mark James
Seiji Ebihara
John Bland
lan Mosey
H. Carbonetti
Mark McNulty
E. Romero
Martin Gray
Carl Mason
Frank Conner
nqviri lnpr


75-71-64
73-68-70
76-67-70
73-72-68
73-70-64
72-74-71
74-75-70
77-70-72
76-78-65
76-77-66
75-73-72
76-72-72
75-71-75
77-73-71
75-78-68
73-74-75
80-70-7?


LONG POND, Pa. Jamie
McMurray has the pole for
Pocono and a job for next year
He's only really happy about
winning the top starting spot
McMurray turned a lap of
168.761 mph in his No. 42 Dodge
Saturday for his second career
pole and first since the final race
of the 2003 season. While
McMurray celebrated the top
spot in Sunday's Pennsylvania
500, he's unhappy that Chip
Ganassi Racing has picked up the
option on next year's contract
McMurray will leave Ganassi
after his contract expires to drive
the No. 6 car for Roush Racing in
2007, but hoped he could make
the jump after this season.
McMurray did not talk about
some of the specifics that will
keep him with Ganassi for anoth-
er year, but pledged his full com-
mitment to the team.
"When you race a car, every-
time you get in it ... I don't think
anyone wants to drive all 500
miles and not give all you can," he
said.
McMurray spoke with his crew
last week at New Hampshire and
fully explained the situation to a
team that heard about the dri-
ver's jump to Roush Racing
through the Internet
"That's tough, but you get in a
situation where you can't talk," he
said. "You try to do the right thing
and it always ends up making
someone mad. They're not going
to give up on me. I told them I'm
going to give a 100 percent
"I think everyone just under-
stands the deal."
The deal is this: the 29-year-old
McMurray is effectively a lame
duck for the 2006 season.
With McMurray sticking with
Ganassi, there's a strong possibil-
ity that Mark Martin will extend


David Oakley 80-77-65. 222
Bob Gilder 76-74-72 222
John Chillas 75-74-73 222
Bill Longmuir 80-71-72 223 +
Giuseppe Calil 73-73-77 223 +
Noel Ratcliffe 80-74-69 223 -
Tom McKnight 82-75-66 223 -
Bobby Lincoln 77-72-75 224 .
David Russell 80-74-70 224
IsaoAoki. 75-75-75 225 -
Andy Bean 76-75-74 225 -
Ray Stewart 73-77-75 225 -
Lonnie Nielsen 81-74-70 225 -
D. O'Sullivan 76-77-72 225 -
Don Reese 77-76-72 225 -
Mike Ferguson 77-78-70 225 -
Alan Tapie 74-75-77 226 -
Bruce Heuchan 77-78-71 226
NormJarvis 77-71-78 226 -
M. Bembridge 77-75-75 227 -
Sam Torrance 77-75-75 227 -
Russell Weir 79-74-74 227 -
K. Tomori 78-76-73 227 -
Jim Rhodes 78-73-76 227 -
Kevin Spurgeon 78-75-75 228 -
Luis Carbonetti 76-78-74 228 -
Gary Player 82-74-72 228 -
John Harris 77-75-76 228 -
Bob Shearer 78-75-75 228
a-A. Morrow 79-78-71 228 .
John Grace 82-73-73 228 -
Yoshimi Niizeki 82-72-74 228 -
Martin Poxon 81-73-74 228
Joe Inman 85-72-71 228 .
Rex Caldwell 80-75-74 229
Bertus Smit 84-72-73 229
Terry Gale 73-81-75 229
C. O'Connor Jr. 81-73-75 229
Donald Stirling 79-76-74 229
Mike Sullivan 78-77-74 229
Gery Watine 78-79-72 229
PA Tour
U.S..Bank Championship
At Brown Deer Park Golf Course
Milwaukee
Third Round
Ben Crane 62-65-64 191
Scott Verplank 64-65-64 193
Kenny Perry 63-69-64 196
Chris Smith 647-65 196
JeffSluman 64-64-70 198
Matt Davidson 67-68-64 199
Steve Elkington 65-70-64 199
Bo Van Pelt 70-65-64 199
Daniel Chopra 66-68-65 199
M.Calcavecchia 69-65-65 199
R. Thatcher 65-69-65 ,.- 199
T. Armour III 66-65-68 199
Fred Funk 69-67-64 200
John Huston 68-67-65 200
Briny Baird 66-69-65 200
Chad Campbell 66-68-66 200
Arjun Atwal 69-67-65 201
J.L. Lewis 68-67-66 201
Dean Wilson 66-69-66 201
Jerry Kelly 64-68-69 201
Brad Faxon 67-64-70 201
Matt Kuchar 68-68-66 202
P. Sheehan 71-65-66 202
K. Streelman 65-70-67 202
Steve Allan 70-67-65 202
Harrison Frazar 67-68-67 202
Olin Browne 71-66-65 202'
Steve Flesch 69-68-65 202
Brett Wetterich 69-65-68 202
S. Leaney 65-69-68 202
James Driscoll 69-65-68 .202
Glen Hnatiuk 70-66-67 203
Carl Pettersson 68-68-67 203
Michael Long 66-69-68 203
Lee Janzen 69-66-68 203
Glen Day 67-70-66 203
Rocco Mediate 69-68-66 203
Marco Dawson 66-67-70 203
Kent Jones 69-64-70 203 .
R.S. Johnson 68-70-65 203
B. Hughes 69-67-68 204
Brian Gay 68-67-69 204
Jeff Hart 71-66-67 204
Jay Delsing 66-71-67 204
Brian Bateman 65-70-69 204
M. Gronberg 67-70-67 204
Heath Slocum 68-69-67 204
John Elliott 68-68-69 205
Alex Cejka 68-68-69 205
Jason Bohn 67-68-70 205
Brett Quigley 70-67-68 205
Hunter Mahan 67-67-71 205
D.A. Points 70-68-67 205
Mario Tiziani 71-67-67 205
Dan Fnrsman R7--71-R7 905


MILWAUKEE When word came that
high winds and thunderstorms were on
the way, Craig Smith hurried his game at
the US Bank Championship on Saturday.
Not so Ben Crane.
Crane, a notorious slow player who
showed some hustle when he ran between
shots to make sure he got his round in
before dark Friday night, was on the clock
when rains interrupted play for 3 hours, 42
minutes hours at Brown Deer Park on
Saturday.
After the restart, Crane finished with a
6-under 64 to take the 54-hole lead at 19-
under-par 191, two shots better than play-
ing partner Scott Verplank
Smith (64) and Kenny Perry (65) were
five shots off the lead, tied for third.
"Certainly, you never want to go on the
clock We fell behind today and we had to
'close the gap," Crane said. "It's one of
those things that happened. I'm trying to
get better at it."
Dawdler or not, Crane is trying to
become the first wire-to-wire winner in
Milwaukee since Robert Gamez in 1991.


his farewell tour, delay retire-
ment and race another year for
Roush. Martin was hopeful he
could move to the Craftsman
Truck series next year
When asked if this was his last
Cup start at Pocono, Martin only
smiled.
"I wish I knew," he said before
hopping off the podium.
Kurt Busch starts second in his
Ford on Sunday, turning a lap of
168.533 and Martin was third in
the No. 6 Ford at 168.383.
'At least I made McMurray
sweat for a little bit, Busch said.
Ryan, Newman joined Martin
on Row 2 and Ricky Rudd, Tony
Stewart and Greg Biffle round out
the top five. Points leader Jimmie
Johnsonis ninth.
McMurray, whose best start this
season was fourth and has two
second-place finishes, needs a
strong showing Sunday to make a
move in the Chase for the
Championship.
He fell 16 points short of quali-
fying for the playoff system last
year and would miss the cut this
year he's 439 points behind
Johnson and in 11th place.
McMurray has to be in the top 10
or within 400 points of the lead
after 26 races.
McMurray was a relative
unknown when Ganassi picked
him out of the Busch Series to
drive for him in 2003. He has long
been a rumored candidate for
several top rides, but Ganassi has
held him to the contract he signed
in 2002. When his name was men-
tioned for other jobs last season,
Ganassi picked up the option for
this season.
"There's nothing more I want
to do then prove all of you wrong
who said that we were going to
fall apart when that was
announced," McMurray said.
'That just kind of drives me and
it's driving my team right now."


i









S ITUSCu_' FL hRNIL


6B SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


Roller coaster day


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**-4- BRA aEE/hoil


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Dunnellon's Gavin Honeysette (24) doesn't make it to second base In time to beat Seminole's David Watts' in the third Inning.

Dunnellon loses thriller to Seminole, tops Tampa Bay in nightcap


ANDY MARKS
amarks@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

A sparkling pitching per-
formance by Bryan Neal kept
Dunnellon's title hopes alive.
Neal's gutsy, complete-
game six-hitter stymied
Tampa Bay and the
Dunnellon 9-10 All-Stars
scored a 2-1 win a remark-
able turnaround after a heart-
breaking 6-5 loss to Seminole
.earlier in the day.
Dunnellon (1-1) plays
Clearwater (0-2) at noon today
needing a win and a Seminole
(2-0) loss to Tampa Bay (1-1) to
force a three-way tie for first
place in pool play. In that sce-
nario, the tie would be broken
by each team's runs-allowed
average per defensive inning
during the tournament, a sta-
tistic in which Dunnellon cur-
rently holds an edge over
Seminole but trails Tampa
Bay.
Neal's performance, in
which he allowed only one
unearned run in the sixth


inning, certainly helped the
cause.
"He was just staying calm
and focused," manager Mike
Roberson said, "and when
you can get a pitcher to do
that at this age, he's going to
pitch a great game."
Neal breezed through the
first five innings before run-
ning into trouble in the sixth
when Tampa Bay set the table
with back-to-back singles to
open the inning. Greg
Oakley's fielder's choice and
Jason Nicholson's walk
loaded the bases, and an
infield error on Will
McClintock's grounder plated
Tampa Bay's first run and put
the pressure-cooker firmly on
Neal with the tying run at
third and the bases packed.
Neal coolly recorded a
strikeout to put the game on
ice, barely cracking a smile as
his teammates celebrated
around him.
"We came in here with our
heads on straight, played
strong defense and we had
the right man on the mound,


obviously," Roberson said.
Dunnellon picked up all the
offense it needed in the third
inning, starting with a Gavin
Honeysette walk. Ryan
Molloy replaced Honeysette
on base after a fielder's
choice and advanced around
to third base on Nick
Hooper's double. Connor
Wentz delivered the game's
first run with a single and
Connor Hannah 'singled in
Hooper.
"That's why (Wentz and
Hannah) bat three and four,"
Roberson said. "I'm proud of
both of them."
Three of Dunnellon's four
total hits came in the third
inning. Shane Williams' single
was the only other base hit
In the opener, Dunnellon
appeared to have Seminole
handled With a 5-2 lead mid-
way through the fifth. Hannah
and Neal provided the cush-
ion in the top of the inning
with bases-loaded walks and
then Chris Smith scored from
third on a wild pitch.
But Seminole answered


with a run in the bottom of the
frame and staged a rally of its
own in the sixth. Scotty
Withrow, Mike Mann and
Corey Baptist hit consecutive
singles to open the inning,
with Baptist's base knock
driving in his team's fourth
run and leaving runners on
second and third for Anthony
Lamoureux, who dropped a
bunt toward the third-base
line. Dunnellon botched the
play and the ball wound up
left field allowing Mann and
Baptist to come home with
the tying and winning runs.
After the last-second, 6-5
loss, Roberson said he wasn't
worried about his team's com-
posure heading into the night-
cap.
"They came out in the sec-
ond game ready to play and
they kept it together and
played hard," he said. "(Neal)
did a great job, the defense
did a great job, the outfield
did a great job and we cer-
tainly couldn't ask for more
than that, to come out and put
this team away."


Central Citrus



drops a pair


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
jmsoracchi@hotmail.com
For the Chronicle

In the first day of the Section
7 Tournament, the Central
Citrus Major baseball team
learned that a whole other play-
ing field exists.
After going undefeated and
being crowned District 15
champions, Central Citrus
ended Saturday with a 0-2
record after losing 6-0 to Citrus
Park and 11-1 to North East in
the late game.
"We went flat," said Central
Citrus manager Larry Swain.
"We didn't hit the ball and we
let so many strike threes go by."
In the team's opening loss, it
wasn't entirely Central Citrus'
fault.
Citrus Park pitcher Zack
Jackson twirled a two-hitter
while walking three and strik-
ing out 12 to earn the shutout.
In fact, Jackson pitched the
first four innings without allow-
ing a hit before Central Citrus
bunted for a pair of hits in the
fifth.
"That's the best 12-year-old
pitcher we've ever faced in this
group," Swain said.
Indeed, Central Citrus never
seemed to know what was com-
ing. Jackson did an outstanding
job with his fastball, changeup
and curve, switching speeds
and moving in and out of the
strike zone at will.
Meanwhile, Citrus Park did
an equally efficient job with
their bats.
After Central Citrus'
Christian Rodriguez struck out
the first batter of the game look-
ing, Citrus Park strung together
four consecutive hits.
Chad Porter and Jackson
came home on Kyle Flanagan's
single for a 2-0 lead. Flanagan
then scored himself on a Nick
Waites' double for a 3-0 lead
after one inning.
"The reason we win is that
this is a good team," said Citrus
Park manager Kevin Flanagan
of his team. "We played funda-
mental baseball."
In the second inning, Citrus
Park added another run when
Zachary Gilcrease's RBI double
plated Nick McCreary for a 4-0
margin.
Central Citrus had two major
chances to score, the first of
which came in the third inning
as Gary Leavengood drew a
one-out walk and stole second.
However, Jackson struck out
the next two batters to end that
threat


Citrus Park put across their
last two runs of the game in the
fourth inning to give itself a six-
run lead as Jackson had the no-
hitter intact
But in the bottom of the fifth,
Central Citrus looked to chip
into that lead.
Andrew Gage drew a leadoff
walk and was followed by a
bunt single from Freddy Smith.
After Jackson notched a strike-
out Leavengood bunted for a
single to load the bases with
one out
Yet Jackson tightened his belt
and struck out the last two bat-
ters of the inning.
"We had to play smallball
because we knew we couldn't
hit him," Swain said.
Central Citrus plays today at
noon against Palm Harbor.
Tampa North East 11,
Central Citrus 1 (4 innings)
Central Citrus finished the day 0-
2 in pool play after losing to North
East but not before making some-
thing happen in the top half of the
first inning.
Steve Arcadipane reached on a
two-base error and then scored onr-
a wild pitch and a passed ball to put
Central Citrus up 1-0.
Unfortunately, that would be the_
team's offensive highlight of the day-,
as Jake Dixon earned the team's
only hit of the game in the fourth
inning but with his team already
down ten runs.
Jerrod Flanagan earned the win'
for North East on the mound by
striking out eight in four innings of
work.
North East also scored in every
inning and took a 2-1 lead after
Jackson Sheddan (who drove in his
team's first run) scored on a wild
pitch.
None of the four pitchers Central
Citrus used were effective and as
North East took a 5-1 lead into the
third inning, it didn't get any better.
After getting the first out, Freddy
Smith (who had come in relief of 3
starter Thomas Bevis) allowed a
single.
That hit was followed by a home-
run to dead centerfield by Josh
Morrow to give North-East a 7-1
lead.
North East finished the inning up
10-1 and ended the game in the
fourth after loading the bases and
then having Jordan Lindsay score
on a wild pitch.
In other action, Palm Harbor
emerged undefeated after
Saturday's action, scoring a 5-3 9-
inning win over North East and a 2-
0 win over Citrus Park.


Inverness Junior baseball loses


STEVE WATERS
swaters@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Inverness fell just short of
salvaging a split at the Section
7 Tournament on Saturday, as a
wild comeback bid against
Palma Ceia ended in a 10-9
loss. Inverness lost 10-5 to
Seminole earlier in the day.
In Game 1, Seminole struck
first in the top of the second
with an infield RBI-single from
Luke Schomp for a 1-0 lead.


Inverness responded in the
bottom half of the inning with
an RBI single from Nick
Martone that plated Ryan
O'Neal. Logan Mails then
scored off a passed ball, and
Kyle Blocker tagged from third
off a pop fly to give Inverness a
3-1 lead.
Seminole closed the gap in the
third when pinch runner Mike
Carlin scored off a passed ball,
and then tied the game in the
fourth when Steve Nalewicai
scored on a fielder's choice.


Seminole's strategy of using
a different pitcher in each
inning paid off in the third,
fourth and fifth when its
hurlers retired nine straight
Inverness hitters.
In the top of the fifth, the
Seminole offense exploded to
break the tie with a seven-run
inning that included a two-run
home run smacked to left field
by Dominic Santini.
In the nightcap, Palma Ceia
looked dominant early, scoring
four runs in the first inning,


include
by Gra]
ter.
They
in the i
the third
Palmi
game i
scored
error.
Inver
ten a
inning
fourth
Camer


both opening round games

ing a three-run bomb hit passed ball, Kyle Blocker wall, Palma Ceia changed
ham Rames to deep cen- crossed the plate on an error, pitchers and Inverness took
and two more came home advantage by loading the bases
added three more runs when Geoffrey Labrador on two walks and an error.
second, and two more in reached base on an error. They then added runs on a
rd. They added another run in bases loaded walk and an
la Ceia made it a 10-run the fifth inning when West error, followed by a passed ball
n the fourth with a run tagged up from third on a Kyle that plated Ryan O'Neal.
by Jacob Konner off an Blocker pop fly The go ahead run, Blocker,
Inverness' pitching then then stepped to the plate and
mess, which hadn't got- dominated in the final two belted a single to narrow
hit in the first three innings, limiting Palma Ceia to Palma Ceia's lead to one.
s, fought back in the only two hits to set up a rally in But Palma Ceia held on,
with four runs, when the bottom of the seventh, notching a strikeout to secure
on West .scored on a With their backs against the the win.


SOFTBALL
Continued from Page 1B

Wright and Kalynn Goodloe -
each drew walks to load the
bases. Burns and Wright crossed
the plate on a pair of wild pitch-
es, while Kalynn Goodloe scored
on an errant throw to give
Dunnellon a commanding 5-0
lead.
Meadowlawn appeared to
make it game in the bottom of the
inning, with two runs scored on a
double by Miranda Tener, but
Dunnellon was not about to be
denied.
In the second frame,
Dunnellon batted around, man-
aging eight runs on eight hits.
Hanewinckel made it a 7-2 game


by driving in both Wright and
Kristina Armstrong on a single
driven to right field.
Hanewinckel went 4-for-5 with
four runs batted in.
Joining Hanewinckel in the
double-RBI club for the inning
was Wright who plated Burns
and Dallas Towns with a triple.
With the lead firmly in hand,
Burns, Dunnellon's starting
pitcher, retired the bottom half of
the inning in order Burns fin-
ished the day giving up six hits
while striking out eight
Dunnellon added two more
runs in the third with Tara
Goodloe and Mandy Lee each
knocking RBI singles.
Dunnellon capped the rout by
scoring three runs in both the
fourth and fifth innings.


Meadowlawn scored two runs
in the fifth, making it a 21-4 final.
Dunnellon's hot bats were rel-
atively cool in its opening match
against Citrus Park The game
opened up as pitcher's duel as
both Wright and Citrus Park's
Brittny Lafuente were hitless
after two innings of work
The difference-maker proved
to be the lone run Citrus Park
managed in the first inning on a
combination of a walk, a passed
ball, a wild pitch and sacrifice
bunt
With the 1-0 lead in hand,
Lafuente just kept grooving, until
finally giving up a hit in the bot-
tom of the fourth.
Citrus Park padded its lead in
the top of the fourth frame, plat-
ing three runs on a single and a
pair of wild pitches.


Dunnellon finally cracked the
scoreboard in the fifth when
Kalynn Goodloe made it a 4-1
game by scoring from third on an
error.
As Dunnellon's bats began to
warm, Citrus Park's cooled.
Burns took to the circle in relief
to start the fifth, and for the rest
of the game the crafty right-han-
*der gave up no hits.
Kalynn Goodloe drove in
Weimert on a double in the sixth
to cut the lead down to 4-2.
Dunnellon's Marissa Keeley
led off the seventh with a hard
single up the middle, and Wright
brought her home, two batters
later, on a triple to right field to
make it a 4-3 ballgame.
With two outs and a runner on
first, Dunnellon appeared to.
have tied the game up when


Towns pounded an 0-2 offering to
the leftfield fence. The ball, how-
ever, rolled under the fence and
out of play. Officials on the field
decided that it was ground-rule
double, so the runner was
stopped at third and Towns at
second.
Dunnellon's coaching staff
tried to appeal the play, but the
ruling stood. Dunnellon's rally
ended on the next at-bat with a
strikeout
"We can hit ball, but we didn't
do it early in that first game,"


Steve Goodloe said. "We made a
couple of mistakes that cost us
too. We picked it and hopefully,
we'll still have a chance on
Sunday to go to state."
In other Junior softball action
Saturday, while Dunnellon was
facing Citrus Park, Meadowlawn
dropped West Pasco 12-3. Citrus
Park then improved to 2-0 overall
by coming from behind to edge
West Pasco 10-9 in eight innings.
Dunnellon continues its
march to a possible state berth by
facing West Pasco today at noon.


BASEBALL
Continued from Page 1B

earned runs for the game and
received some stellar defensive
help from the outfield.
Centerfielder Jay Curry tracked
down a deep fly at the warning
track with his back to home plate
in the third inning, which proved
to be key when Seminole picked
up two more hits later in the
inning but failed to score.
Crystal River fed off the play in
the bottom of the frame with a
three-run rally, kicked off by
Adam Taylor's single to left. DJ.
Layton reached on an error and


then DeWees plated both runners
with a double to the gap in left-
center DeWees scored moments
later on Sheldon Baxter's base hit
to center and Crystal River had
both the lead, 3-2, and the momen-
tum heading into the fifth.
That's when a lightning strike
set off the park's siren and halted
play for two-and-a-half hours.
After the delay, Crystal River
returned to play as a different
team and Seminole capitalized
on another infield error for four
more unearned runs high-
lighted by pinch-hitter Thomas
Vickers' two-run single.
"We had momentum going into
it leading 3-2 and then the rain
delay came and killed us,"


Strifler said.
Crystal River went down qui-
ety in its final two at-bats against
Seminole pitcher Nathan
Richardson, who finished off a
complete-game five-hitter with a
perfect sixth to cap the 7-3 win.
The nightcap against
Northside saw the mistakes con-
tinue to mount, as an error, a
walk and four wild pitches con-
tributed to a five-run first for
Northside.
Crystal River came to life in
the third with the help of back-to-
back singles from Baxter and
Curry and bases-loaded walks
from DeWees and Tyler
Humphreys.
But any hopes of a comeback


were squashed in the bottom of
the third when Crystal River
committed three more errors
that played a large role in a six-
run outburst for Northside. Joey
Brabham's towering three-run
shot to dead center did the most
damage.
Northside put the 10-run rule
into effect in the bottom of the
fourth with another run for the
final tally of 12-2.
Crystal River wraps up its sec-
tional berth today at 10 a.m.
against East Lake.
"We're going to come out,
swing the bats and play the role
of spoilers," Strifler said. "We'll
try to play for pride now. These
kids have a lot of it"


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SfPORToS


pppl











0 a.:.7-.
I I.l. Ju...2, 200


Dut

on a


S These ankle bracelets are

not fashion accessories

a: sarthur@chronicleonline.com
SChronicl
'' 1 onmne Bussell has been using a brush
.a iand a bucket of paint to work otT his
community ?er\ ice hours imposed
Sb. a judge fora drinmg-% hile-intoxi-
cated conviction. He says lie has
already put in more hours than the judge stipu-
lated, but he plans to see the job through.
On hii- ankle, as part of his sentence, he
ears an electronic tracking (let ice He doesn't
mind wearingi the ankie bracelet as lie works.
He doesn't n i i packing t lie sending unit that
comes with it, and always staying w within 100
feet of that unit.
"* Bussell says being electronically monitored is
better than cooling his heels in the county jail.
Bussell, 66. and his w ife are raising a grand-
daughter on their own He's a quiet, plainspo-
ken man who recognizes he made a mistake he
Sis willing to face tip to.
Rather than jailing this man who works as a
handimnan, the ludge gate him the option ofthe
ankle bracelet. Bussell took it.
"It has its good points and bad points," he
says. "but it is definitely better than jail."
Inverness resident Don Bishop. w\ho says he
is a%%aitinie trial onl a marijuana possession
charge, is more anbitalent about electronic
*i monitoring. He says wearing the bracelet is
embarrassing: still, he says lie refuses to %wear
long trousers that would cover the de\ ice on his
ankle. He says lie resents ha tng to wear the
uiit at all.
"I'm not a criminal." he 'aid "I'ie never
inmissed a court date in my life "
S Bill Reach. the mian in charge of the sheriff's
office's electronic surveillance effort. looks at
the numbers and smiles.
"They save taxpayers money. Since we began
the program, we estimate it has saved us
:l $318,720 It costs about $50 a day to keep a per-
sont in jail. The ankle bracelets cost less than
$10 a day"
He said that tracked people are supposed to
pay $5 a da.\ and that up to 40 percent actually
do pay
I Although the sheriff's office has had ankle
bracelets since April 2003 and has detailed
three deputies to monitor people wearing those
bracelets, financing for the program was scant
t for statewide tracking otoffenders until tilhe
Jessica Lunsford tragedy and the resulting leg-
islation. %w which. whenn it comes into etfect on
Sept 1, will accelerate the program.
S "After 9.11. priorities changed and we were
left operating the program on our own.i
S Te Jessica Lunsfotrd Act that came in reac-
tion to the abduction and murder of the 9-year-
old Homosassa eirl tightens penalties forcon-
victed sex offenders and increases restrictions
on them after their release from prison
An irony embedded in this is that deputies
affirm that John Couey. the man accused of the
abduction and murder of the child. had himself
; worn an ankle bracelet for 17 days ini August
2004 after % violating his probation on a DLII con-
\ action. The bracelet was removed after he
ent to court.11.
Reach says the county's electronic surteil-
lance efforts are mostly for people awaiting
; iudicieal action, but the Florida Department of
Corrections uses them to monitor the move-






"More needs t(

T ast winter, Colleen Cor
Connors was driving the
L through the Washing- a
Iton, D.C., suburb of Bethesda ww
iand saw a sign on the side of sor
a synagogue that read dre,
'"SAVE DARFUR." "I almost tryi
,crashed my car," said sis
4Connors, a public relations ,, polio
executive with two young TCk and Steven T
Daughters. Cokie and Steven or
The human disaster in the V. Roberts froi
Darfur region of the Sudan OTHER wh(
had "just been eating away VOICES wri
{at me," said Connors, and the
mnow there was something tan]
]she could do about it She decided that directly influe
every "community of faith" should be see this over a
able to express a similar sentiment, and The idea is
sat down with two friends, Laura houses of woi
|Kumin and Jamie Butler, to plan a strat- area are alre.
!egy Darfur Coalit
SThey designed a 3-by-8-foot banner hundred bann
with white letters on a green back- ing them to c
ground that reads, "A Call to Your country. Th<


Ankle bracelets are being touted as a cost-efficient way to track people who authoril
on a short tether. While keeping an inmate in jail costs S50 a day, bracelets cost al
forward to lhav'ing this law imnplo
I I . .. . -. . .-."- sa id.


The electronic tracking device is linked to a send-
ing unit. Those wearing a bracelet must stay with-
in 100 feet of that unit. Other versions can be
tracked minute by minute, 24 hours a day, seven
days a week, using global positioning satellite
monitoring.
ments of people on parole or probation. He said
that the state, before the Lunsford Act, had
monitored only a small percentage of sexual
offenders.
Now all offenders who have been involved
with young people who were 13 or younger will
be required to be electronically monitored.
"It's a great law enforcement tool and we look


Some are equipped w ith pass
electronically report at the end
others can be tracked minute b)
hours a day, seven days a week.
positioning satellite monitoring
can tap into if they need to loca
son.
Reach tells the story of a your
have forgotten he was wearing
on June 9, 2003, when the man.
then 21, and a female companion
spree that included a home inv;
Washington Avenue in Invernes
after, a trip north up 1-75 into Gi
the pair was apprehended.
Reach points to sequential do
puter screen projected on a lan
that indicate one-minute incren
on a nap, where the man was u
the Withlacoochee River They r
signal again when the man cut t
a Wildwood motel.
"You can see that he spent ab
in the house tin Interness)," Re
ing to a cluster ofdots on the o\
He said sheriff's officials wer
present that information in cou
dant took an offer from the pros
not go to trial.
Reach said the county uses th
supplies the tracking de\ ices to
Department of Corrections. Pro
Inc. He said the firm supplies t-
charges the county only for the


'L
4













































DAVE SIGLER/.:r.:.-rn,,;e
ties need to keep
bout $10 a day.
emented." lie

ive sensors that
of the day, but
, minute, .24
using global
that deputies
t.e a tracked per-

ng man who may I
a tracking device
Claude Wells,
)n took offon a
asion on
s and, shortly ;
eorgia where
)ts on his com-
Per screen; dots
nents overlayed
intil he reached
picked up the
the device off in

)out 19 minutes
ach says point-
erlay map.
re prepared to
rt, but the defen-
secution and did

ie same firm that
the Florida
Tech Monitoring
he units and i
units in use.
.:=::-5-;, .T ;Z.-,Z:; S. = [:[I.


) be done in Darfur region


sciencee" A message in
corner refers viewers to
Web site,
w.SaveDarfur.org, spon-
ed by more than a hun-
d organizations that are
ng to keep the Darfur cri-
from slipping off the
itical radar.
he banners, said Con-
s, are aimed at everybody
m the "mom in a minivan"
o might donate money or
te her congressman to
journalists, think-
kers and Hill staffers who
nce policy "They need to
nd over again," she said.
taking off. Eight or nine
rship in the Washington
ady on board. The Save
ion has just ordered a
ers, and will soon be sell-
ongregations around the
e goal, said Martha


Heinemann of the Coalition, is to raise
the issue of Darfur "higher on the
administration's policy list"
The statistics about Darfur, ravaged
by civil war since early 2003, are so
huge that they almost lose their mean-
ing: as many as 400,000 dead and 2.5
million homeless, with 200,000 refugees
in neighboring Chad. Heinemann prais-
es the Bush administration for labeling
the carnage as "genocide," but adds,
"Still more needs to be done."
Things have brightened a bit recently.
Rival factions have settled a long-stand-
ing conflict in southern Sudan, and a
new government has taken power in
Khartoum. But Darfur, in the eastern
part of the country, continues to boil,
and life remains extremely hazardous
for refugees crammed into unsafe and
unsanitary camps. A United Nations
spokesman described the danger: "The
people are still very, very afraid of the
activities of the militias. There is a lot
of banditry going on in Darfur."


The most pressing issue is the role of
the 3,000 troops from African countries
now patrolling the region. More are
needed, says Heinemann, and their
mandate must be broadened. Presently
they act mainly as observers, without
authority to use their arms to protect
civilians. And those civilians badly
need protection, particularly women
who fear capture and rape by roving
marauders. Even international aid
workers are constantly at risk.
American and NATO forces are pro-
viding logistical support for the
Africans, but there's no appetite in the
West for direct military involvement
Apparently there's no appetite for con-
fronting China, either, which gets 6 per-
cent of its oil from the Sudan and
threatens to block resolutions that
would deepen the international com-
mitment to Darfur.
That's why Heinemann is right when

Please seeVOICES/Page 6C


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Chet Cole


changed


our view of


the world

A week ago this past
Friday, I stood at the
Key Training Center's
annual Run for the Money auc-
tion, talking with Key Execu-
tive Director Chet Cole.
Chet was on a rant.
The auction was at the Cit-
rus Springs Community
Center, and is held each year
to raise contributions for the
services provided by the Key
The nonprofit center provides
incredible services to 300 men-
tally handicapped citizens in
our community.
Chet's rant was that people
don't understand how govern-
ment ignores the plight of the
mentally handicapped. The
federal government through
the Medicaid program is
supposed to provide funding to
help mentally handicapped
citizens. But the government
doesn't provide enough fund-
ing for the effort, so many go
without services.
At the Key Center, more than
40 people get residential serv-
ices without any government
support That means the only
funding source for these folks
comes from the contributions
we all make to the Key
That lack of funding, and the
Please see WINDOW/Page 6C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


No slack

for those

with a past

W wednesday morning,
the discussion went
like this: "These peo-
ple cannot be rehabilitated.
Time and again, studies have
proven that to be true."
Wednesday afternoon, a dis-
cussion with different people
went something like this:
"How long must he pay for
something that happened long
ago?"
That conversation was with
family members of a convicted
sexual offender who had regis-
tered a new address with the
sheriff's office but hadn't
updated his driver's license.
We'd had a story in the
paper about his arrest for not
updating his license, and the
family members stressed that,
despite that oversight, regis-
tering with the sheriff's office
was the pressing requirement
Arrest reports and our story
did not indicate that one car-
ries a greater weight than the
other.
The afternoon conversation
grew intense, with me and
Managing Editor Mike Arnold
insisting that it's absolutely
newsworthy that the man was
arrested.
Since Jessica Lunsford's
murder, the whereabouts of
sexual offenders and sexual
predators have become an
enormous issue and right-
fully so, Mike and I explained.
Please see SHADES/Page 6C


*1 .. .:. -'- '::.1 1!~ . :~.


JULY ,24 ,..2
JULY 24, '2005









"Unless justice be done
to others it will not be
dole to Is."


STCESERVED


Make jail time



permanent for



child predators


his newspaper has been
critical of some of the sen-
tences handed down by
Circuit Court Judge Ric Howard.
In some well-documented
instances, we believe Judge
Howard has been too harsh in
handing out long prison sen-
tences.
But in a recent case, we think
Judge Howard got things just
right. Thursday, July 14, the
judge gave a life
prison sentence to
Michael Spinney, THE I
55, of Homosassa, Life in
after a jury found for sexuL
the man guilty of of a
sexual battery.
Spinney was con- OUR 01
victed of sexually Get tough
assaulting a 7-year- cir
old girl.
The Jessica
Lunsford tragedy has struck a
cord with the American public.
For too long our legal and jud.i-
cial systems have been lax withla
group of criminals that live
deranged lifestyles based on sex-
ually abusing children.
Jessica was the 9-year-old
Homosassa girl who was abduct-
ed and murdered. Prime suspect
John Couey, who if convicted is
expected to face the death
penalty, was a well-known
offender of children. Yet the
judicial system treated him with
leniency and permitted him
back on the streets.
Indications are that Jessica
Lunsford paid for that leniency
with her life.
Adults who sexually abuse
children are sick individuals
who must be kept away from vic-
tims. The probation stipulations

Irritated pets SO
If your pet chews on
itself after going outside, k
it's probably because of
the cleaners, sprays or
powders you use on your
floors, rugs or furniture.
After laying on the floors
or furniture, the dry clean-CALL
ers and sprays do cling to
his hair and skin, and the 5634
dampness of the grass or
the outdoors re-hydrates
the cleaners and causes them to
irritate or burn the skin. Kyleen
(Gavin), do an article on this. I think
it's a real big problem with the pets
here.
Troops' involvement
I agree with the man who said,
"Where is the outcry about the Dick
Durbin situation?" I think he was
completely ludicrous by making
statements about our troops. I've
also come to the opinion that our
troops no longer care about what
happens in our country. They don't
support their organizations, and
that includes the VFW, American
Legion and AmVets. There's too
many of them that just sit around
and do nothing anymore instead of
getting out and supporting their vet-
erans groups. I think it's high time
somebody wakes up.
Renaming streets
Regarding renaming the street in
Crystal River Martin Luther King
Boulevard: That's an absurd idea.
There's nothing that mandates that
every city should have a Martin
Luther King Boulevard. There's


S

a
c

P

r
M(


that these abusers can't live
close to schools or parks are
absurd. They will: find a way to
re-abuse.
These individuals who commit
sexual crimes against children
should be forced to permanently
lose their freedom.
They are not like your typical
bank robber or burglar. It is pos-
sible for these criminals to see
the error of their ways and begin
to live productive
lives. Individuals
>SUE: who sexually abuse
prison children are crimi-
I battery nally sick. We have
child. not seen evidence
that there is a suc-
)INION: cessful way to med-
h on sex ically deter this
ges criminal behavior.
At this time, the
only answer
appears to be permanent incar-
ceration.


Judge Howard got things just
right in the case of Michael
Spinney.
In the future there might be a
way to treat these sexual
deviants. Some experiments
have been attempted with chem-
ical castration, but they have
bureaucratic and civil liberty
barriers that are too difficult to
overcome.
For now it appears to us -
the only recourse is prison. We
can't continue to sacrifice the
lives of our children because
some want to continue this
social experiment of rehabilitat-
ing sexual abusers.
The first goal of any civilized
society is to protect its children.
In this case, Judge Howard has
shown how to get the job done.

t enough of them around
that honors him. You can't
go out of the county with-
out crossing a Martin
Luther King Boulevard. So
don't do it in Crystal River.
There's plenty of other
.a ways to honor him. And if
f you're going to name a
boulevard after him, then
0579 let's get us some streets
named after all the other
great Americans.

Double frustration
... If the system does not help the
people, change the system, and
that's what has to be done. What
they're doing is.a disgrace. Doctors
are unhappy and the patients are
unhappy. Patients aren't getting the
help they need and doctors are frus-
trated because they can't help
them.

Seeking insurance
This is to the person that called
Sound Off about homeowners'
insurance problems. I just wanted
to say don't feel by yourself. We live
in an older but nice mobile home.
Our insurance company dropped us
when it was renewable, which was
in April. I have called all over Florida
and nobody will put insurance on it
unless it's "Citizens" whatever
that is. And they want well over
$1,000 for a year, which I can't
afford and I think most people can't
afford. And I know it's from the
storms, but it just doesn't seem fair.
So there's a lot of us sitting here
with no insurance, so hopefully that
can change.


(


Hey, hey: We're a bunch of weirdos


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDItTORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ............................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .............................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ....... advertising services director
Steve Arthur .................. Chronicle columnist
...... Mike Arnold ........................ managing editor
Jim Hunter ............................ senior reporter
Founded in 1891
by Albert M. Curt Ebitz ............................ citizen member
williamson Mike Moberley...................... guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
Dvid- S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


A
I
Ii


L ast week, we put out .3
a call to readers to
tell us what they con-
sider the weirdest things in _
Citrus County.
We were hoping to get
some leads on cool things to
check out in the county, like
the caves in the state forest,
the location of an enor-
mous cypress tree stump
that was felled to make Steve.
pencils a century ago, or FAB
about the old locomotive & FOj
engine that is supposed to
be out in Citrus Hills.
The story goes that the railroad com-
pany just rolled this big old engine off
the tracks when it stopped running
and left it out there for kids to play on
long before housing developments
went in. It's supposed to still be out
there. I wonder where?
So far, however, our plea has gar-
nered stories not about things, but
about weird animals and weird peo-
ple.
Marlene Hillsman told me that it
was back several years ago when she
was driving down County Road 486,
heading toward U.S. 19, when she saw
an amazing sight that she has filed in
her head under the heading "Weird."
Her family has considered her
weird for sticking to her story, which
she swears is true. As it happens, we
have confirmation, not of her weird-
ness, but that what she saw was real.
She and her daughter Diana were
returning home from a shopping trip
just before the beginning of a new
school year. They had violated a basic
but unwritten Citrus County code by


leading the county to do
N their shopping, but we all
-, live in glass houses on that
'" one.
"Diana was looking down
at a new blouse when it
l P happened," she said. "I
wish she had been looking
because nobody has really
believed me and now at
family gatherings they
Lrthur remind me and kid me
LES about the two monkeys I
BLES saw run across the road in
front of me."
"I said, 'Look Diana, mon-
keys!' When she looked up, they were
gone."
Marlene says she knows monkeys
because her eccentric grandmother
used to have a monkey she would
dress up in a velvet suit when Marlene
was a girl.
Let the record reflect that, in
January 2001, we wrote about multiple
sightings of a macaque primate
around Lake Henderson and by
County Road 470 near Hicks Point
Grove. In other words, what Marlene
saw was not an apparition. She is not
weird, although her grandmother does
sound odd.
Now to more possibly weird people.
Suzanne Millington wrote:
'After reading Steve's column about
weird things in Citrus County I imme-
diately thought that I might qualify.
"I am a Northerner with a Midwest
accent and my husband says that I look
like I belong on the front page of a
Bealls ad. But I do love my new
Florida wardrobe.
"However, I have become fascinated


LI,, /C \ to the Editor


Lead by example
I read with interest in the July 1
Chronicle the article as it relates to
Ron Kitchen, mayor for the City of
Crystal River.
The mayor would have sent a posi-
tive message to the residents of
Crystal River and the employees of
the city of Crystal River if he said his
yard was in violation of city code and
deserved no special attention be-
cause he was mayor and support code
enforcement when a violation exists.
Perhaps grass in excess of 22 inches
does not bother him, but maybe it
does his neighbors who arrange with
dependable people to care for their
yard. Does he realize what in excess
of 22 inches of grass looks like? Does
he realize that rats and other undesir-
able animals are attracted to high
grass? I have lived in Florida all my
life and have never seen grass grow in
excess of 22 inches in a month per-
haps the yard needed cutting before
he left?
(Regarding) his statement compar-
ing the height of city property, if he
has a concern, he needed to review
the city budget and take care of this
internally and not through a front-
page article in the newspaper.
Instead, he sent the message to the
very few hard core residents (5 percent
residents) that cause in excess of 90
percent of the violations in the city that
the mayor does not support code en-
forcement for the entire city and will
support select code enforcement Next
to the police officers' job, the code
enforcement officers are next in line of
emotional stress (and lousy pay).
The mayor needs to lead by good
examples and support our city


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
MAll letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,,Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronlcleonline.com.

employees who doing a great job.
This would be an excellent opportuni-
ty for the mayor to request another
article on the front page of the
Chronicle stating he was wrong and
supports his city employees who are
trying to do a good job and particular-
ly after last year's hurricane season.
Also, this would be a good chance
for the mayor to send a clear message
to the commission it is time to work
together and do away with some of
the petty bickering.
Robert Herig
Crystal River

Site honors loved ones
When I read "Cross by the Road" in
the July 3 edition of the Chronicle, it


really touched me. I, also, lost a son in
a motorcycle accident in 2001. Then
in 2003, we lost a daughter. Roberta
Wilson's idea of making a journal of
crosses by the road is an excellent
idea. It will help her to reach out to
others who have lost a loved one.
Upon the death of my son, I felt
moved to do a Web site in his memory.
It took more than a year for me to get
the strength to do it, but by the grace
of God, I was able to accomplish it
After losing our daughter, it now is in
memory of both our children. I offer it
as a site for other parents who have
lost a son or daughter to go to, to be
comforted. There are links there also
of places to go for help with the grief
and emptiness. It is a site for anyone
who has lost a loved one.
I welcome any submissions from
those who would like to put a remem-
brance of their loved one on the site.
Anyone visiting the site is encour-
aged to sign the guest book I can also
be e-mailed from the site. Roberta has
visited it and signed the guest book,
which I deeply appreciate. Please
visit www.hugsfromheaven.com.
Elaine Marshall
Beverly Hills

Timely letter
Regarding Chester H. Cowen letter
to editor:
Thanks to the Chronicle publishing
Mr. Cowen's letter, we sent our contri-
bution to Nature Coast Emergency
Medical Service instead to the tele-
phone solicitor for CCPP and EMTs.
Your letter to the editor was timely.
Ann and Ralph Downer
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers:


-L


K


with the facts, fantasies and folklore of
the county and it has thoroughly capti-
vated me. Whoever could believe an
area like this could be in the middle of
Florida?
. "The area I love is the drive to
Peck's. I anticipate every curve and
wonder what will be there and we
have seen a lot the lush vegetation,
mangroves and manatees out by Peqk's
and the wild pigs, but also the peace,
the calm and the beauty. All this was
strange at first to a Northerner.
"I've heard about the phosphate
miners whose children's children
inhabit the area and I've seen the
tombstones of the miners. And then
there is Citrus Hills and everyone has
strong feelings about that develop-
ment. This is an area like no other.
"Maybe I am the oddity," she don-
cluded, "but I am here."
Then there was Crazy Frank, who
called to say that his wife thinks he's
the weirdest thing in Citrus County. I
got her on the phone. Frank, she says,
is a very gregarious guy who people
mostly wish would stop talking. $he
said he has a weird sense of humrior,
too, and tends to lose the car in park-
ing lots. Now that he's retired, she
wishes he would go back to work.
I tried to assure her that this is not
weird, that what she described is in
fact normal male behavior. Just ask my
wife.

Steve Arthur, a Chronicle columnist,
can be reached at 563-5660, Ext. 1375,
or by e-mail at sarthur@
chronicleonline.com. Read his blog at
www. chronicleonline. com.


SLII 24. :2()()-5









CITRUS Coun'I (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, JUa t 24, 2005 3C



Maybe the supreme need an extreme makeover


O ne of the gimmicks have even given thought to
for modern, reality \ how I'd like to look more
television is the like Arnold
makeover. Someone who Schwarzenegger and less
isn't happy with the way like Arnold the pig. (You
"they look is given an oppor- 'remember Arnold, the
tunity to go through some porcine member of the cast
rather extreme procedures of "Green Acres".) But even
and come out looking hot. if my raw material meas-
The TV show lasts for an ured up, and it doesn't, I'm
hour, but the makeover Fred Brannen not ready to be grist for the
takes much longer, weeks A SLICE OF makeover mill.
or perhaps even months, LIFE Speaking of makeovers,
before it is completed. the United States Supreme
I'm embarrassed to Court is up for one. Justice
admit I've watched such shows and O'Connor is retiring and Chief Justice


Rehnquist's health makes his position
tenuous at best.
What can I say about the supreme?
First and foremost, they baffle me.
On the display of the Ten
Commandments on public property,
the court ruled 5-4 it is OK in one
instance, but 54 it isn't OK in another.
As to the recent ruling allowing indis-
criminate taking of private property
for public use, I'm not only baffled,
but frightened.
And, I haven't even touched on the
rulings during the past three decades
that continue to find an unborn child


has no rights whatsoever, not even the
right to live.
How will retirement change the
face of the court?
Virtually everyone has an opinion.
One of the major national newspapers
reported a majority of Americans
think the next justice should be a
Hispanic woman. The poll might have
overstepped a little and put two find-
ings together, that is, the sex should be
female and the national origin should
be Hispanic, but you get the picture.
Who fits the bill?
U.S. Attorney General Alberto
Gonzalez meets the Hispanic test, but


has been panned by both the conser-
vatives and liberals. Conservatives
think he is too liberal and the liberals
don't like him because he's the
President's friend.
Let's see. Hispanic woman?
1 have the answer!
Justice Jennifer Lopez!
She's Hispanic, she's a woman, and,
regardless of the rulings made by the
court, J.Lo would make the group
photos look a lot better!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle columnist


Proposals make sense
AARP's reports about Social Security reform
are misleading!
AARP declares every worker is guaranteed
benefits when they retire.
The truth is under the current Social Security
system you have no legal, contractual or proper-
ty rights to your benefits. Congress and the presi-
,dent can reduce or even eliminate benefits at
'any time. It was evidenced in 1983 when
Congress raised the retirement age, which
amounted to a benefit cut
Also, Congress can raise the payroll tax as it
sees fit, with or without raising future benefits,
as it has already done 21 times and as it is
guaranteed it will do again given Social
Security's looming financial crisis.
AARP states that private accounts are not
worth the gamble. Investments have never seen
a 20-year period in U.S. history during which
one would have lost money in the stock market
S* In the past 80 years, private investments in the
U.S. have earned an average annual return of
nearly 8 percent Moreover, there will be a safety
net in personal retirement accounts so that no
one will fall below a poverty line.
Millions of ordinary workers are already
investing in the stock market and they would be
investing a portion of their tax dollars in broad-
based diversified funds, not choosing individual
Stocks.
A large number of people receive little or no
benefit in later life from Social Security. Spousal
Benefits are restricting. Many workers die before
They collect a single penny or their life expectan-
cy is short, which limits the period and benefit
S- amount they receive. No one 55 or older will
have his or her Social Security benefits changed
in any way The proposals are to make a better
system for the younger generations.
Through personal accounts, we can give work-
iers ownership of and control over their retire-
ment income. Young people, women and minori-
ties would be treated more fairly Low- and mid-
dle-income workers should have the opportunity
to build nest eggs of real, inheritable wealth.
(Facts given here have been obtained from
Cato Institute, a non partisan public policy
research foundation.)
Howard W. Kemp Jr.
Crystal River

Show united front
1 I am hoping in this letter that maybe you will
feel as I feel about a certain subject our mili-
tary.
These are people who are fighting for our
freedom and the Democrats and Republicans
are fighting for themselves not our military
They are causing our military to question what
is going on at home.
Here we are fighting for our people and the
Congress, the news and newspapers are sending
a poor message to our troops. We should all be
united while our military are fighting and giving
up their lives for us and our freedom.
Will this newspaper start a new trend to
put on the front page every day how we are sup-
porting our troops and maybe others will follow.
All we hear is negatives, all day long, how about
positives on the front page of our newspaper.
Would that give the military a vote of confidence
that they so deserve.
I challenge this newspaper to start a trend -
for our military people who are giving their
lives for our freedom.


Frank I


/lendicino
Inverness


Choose respect


This I am sure will bring stinging remarks to
my letter, as the truth always does. Religion was
,designed to bring ... peace and happiness to
. each group of believers, but over the centuries it
has become a weapon against other believers
and has made others of other beliefs feel
insignificant and unworthy by their tormentors,
who claim their beliefs are the one and only


The results have been it has killed more people
than all the diseases to mankind combined in its
religious wars, (such) as the ones going on now.
There is not a man or religion on this planet
who can prove without a shadow of a doubt that
his religion or belief is the one and only one and
all the others are false and that unless they con-
vert to theirs they are doomed. We are all put on
this earth by one great Creator and will be taken
back by the same Creator and the sooner we
learn to respect each other and mind our own
business and let people think and choose for
themselves the better. Only then will wars end.
Ray Raphael
Pine Ridge Estates
Defending titles
Re: "County, developer settle differences,"
July 11.
So it now seems it's business as ustilI for
Marpad Inc. in that not only do they get to con-
tinue having owners fenced out of their land, but
now with bureaucratic and political approval.
According to the above article, Marpad does
not own 115 of the lots that it has fenced away
from the lawful owners. Even though Marpad is
slowly satisfying several of the legal require-
ments of adverse possession (fencing, clearing,
economic use, etc.) of the unowned parcels, it
appears that they now have official blessings to
continue doing so. What happens to the other
111 lot owners (I own four of the lots they fenced
for themselves)? Many of these absentee owners
will have no way to know their titles are in jeop-
ardy Unlike myself, who recently physically cut
their fence and removed the posts around my
land, they will. not know they must defend their
titles.
But then, all that has to be done, according to
the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, is con-
demn the unowned parcels under eminent
domain, pay the owners some paltry sum based
on their purchase price years ago and hand it
over to Marpad. Surely, the taxes gained on
$200,000 to $400,000 homes will be in the public
good as compared to modest two-bedroom, one-
bath retirement homes that might be built there.
Walter Treftz
Hernando
'Take care of it'
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy a man never averse to
taking advantage of a photo-op ought to bor-
row a page from Police Chief W Garrett
Chamberlain of New Ipswich, N.H.
Seems one Jorge Ramirez, an "undocument-
ed alien," was given a pass by the Immigration,
and Naturalization Service when they refused
to place the gentleman in custody So, Chief
Chamberlain arrested Ramirez and charged
him with criminal trespassing. The trespassing
statute says a person is guilty if, "...knowing
that he is not licensed or privileged to do so, he
enters or remains in one place."
Chief Chamberlain, frustrated by the feds'
inaction toward illegal aliens, stated, "It's basi-
cally a situation here where right now if you
make it past the Border Patrol, you're free and
clear. What I'm trying to do is find a way that if
the feds aren't going to help us out, then local
enforcement can take care of it."
What do you say, Sheriff Dawsy? Don't you
think our local law enforcement can take care
of it? Instead of building a $3 million monu-
ment to yourself, how about putting out a
BOLO for illegal aliens? They won't be hard to
find. They're all around you and us, most busi-
nesses employ them (paying them peanuts),
illegally, and the problem has grown out of
hand. Take a stand.
If you helped, "...take care of it," you would
make a lot of points with the electorate, create
very favorable PR, serve the Constitution and
country, aid in putting a halt to what the elite
power structure is turning a blind eye to (but
over 80 percent of Americans don't) and, just
imagine all those great photo-ops you'll enjoy
Dan Dragonette
Beverly Hills


-Letters to the


Thanks for the help
Joseph D. Rigney Memorial Scholarship
awards of $1,000 were given to John Colasanti,
Kaylen Summers and Bradley Allen.
I would like to thank several people for mak-
ing this year's awards.
I received a $1,000 donation from somebody
who wishes to remain anonymous, who lost her
brother under similar circumstances.
I also received a $500 donation from Chad
Fugere, a 1994 graduate of Lecanto High
School and close friend of my son. His dona-
tion was matched by his employer, Wachovia
Bank.
Since 1994, the first year of awarding at least
one $1,000 scholarship in my son's name, I
have been able to award $28,000 in scholar-
ships to deserving Lecanto High School gradu-
ates.
My son was tragically killed on June 26, 1993,
along with his best friend, Mike Feehan, also a
Lecanto High School graduate.
The requirements for receiving a scholar-
ship are as follows: the recipient must have
been accepted to a college, participated for a
full season at a varsity level of any sport in
their senior year and, most importantly, be
known as a "good kid."
Joseph W. Rigney
Lecanto

Gulf oil drilling
Ruth Anderson again attacks in her letter
July 2, and as always offers no alternative or
solution.
She states as fact that oil drilling in the east-
ern-Gulf of Mexico would not decrease our
dependence on foreign oil, and that the
destruction of our beaches, etc. would result.
That may be her opinion, but as fact it is
debatable.
Even one barrel of oil obtained from Gulf
drilling decreases our import by one barrel.
The time has come when we must open
domestic drilling, and at the same time reduce
our waste of oil while we also develop alter-
nate energy sources.
I fully support domestic drilling in all areas,
but I also would insist that there be meaningful
requirements placed on drillers that they set
aside funds to ensure that drillers are able to
immediately and at their expense (and not by
raising prices) fully clean up all spills and pro-
tect sea, land and avian dwellers.
I would make it a requirement that a mean-
ingful percentage of profits resulting from oil
so obtained be required to fund comprehen-
sive research on alternative sources of energy.
I would further move to build refining plants
within the United States to process this oil,
again with all the requirements on drillers I
have enumerated above.
And while I am at it, I would also push for
new nuclear power generation. Again, with
safeguards starting with those above, as well as
a realistic plan for research for disposal of
expended fuel rods.
We cannot permit ourselves to be held at the
mercy of oil cartels. And I can see no reason to
keep sending our dollars offshore to support
foreign regimes at our expense. If we are going
to pay for energy, let us at least pay ourselves.
Ms. Anderson, what is your proposal?


F.


M. Bennett
Homosassa

e


Lost letter, lost lif


This is a rebuttal to Ruth Anderson's letter
appearing in the Chronicle July 10, "Reaction
off base."
Bill Grant was not off base criticizing the
sheriff's (office) in the Lunsford case. Let me
give you the facts of his criticism.
On June 6, Bill O'Reilly revealed this infor-
mation. Maddie Secord, one of the three peo-


pie in the home that John Couey occupied with
her, Dorothy Dixon and Matthew Dietrich
informed Citrus County law enforcement,
before Jessica was kidnapped, sexually molest-
ed and murdered, that John Couey was living
with them. If her statement is true Jessica
would be alive today
There is the case of a missing letter that
Florida Department of Law Enforcement
(FDLE) dated Nov. 15, 2004, sent to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office containing the names
of all sex offenders in Citrus County for the
sheriff's office to check out and update.
Sheriff's spokeswoman Gail Tierney said
that they have not been able to confirm the let-
ter was received. She promised a full investiga-
tion into the lost letter, but to this date has not
responded with the results of her investigation.
Again, Jessica would be alive today had the let-
ter not been lost.
It appears to be one blunder after another at
the sheriff's (office) because of incompetent
people in responsible positions.
On Sunday, July 10, the Chronicle featured a
front page story on the allegation that the sher-
iff's (office) failed to give John Couey his
Miranda rights, thereby compromising the
investigation into the death of Jessica Lunsford
and quite possibly removing the death penalty
from the table.
In regard to Bill O'Reilly's zero reputation:
On a recent evening, the Bill O'Reilly program
had more viewers than ABC, CBS, NBC and
CNN "combined." Educated people are starting
to realize Fox News is the only network offering
viewers the news fair and balanced. The liberal
anti-American press keep attacking Fox News
because they are losing their audience.
John Blakely
Citrus Springs

Notching up a scam
Politicians are playing games with "Notch
Babies" again.
I don't know how many times in the past 20
years a committee,,politician or some group
doesn't pick this up and promise to get the
$5,000 that was decided as a fair amount for a
cash settlement. So far this month, I have
received four letters asking for contribution.
You can't call them donations for tax purposes
anymore. I received two from the TEA Senior
Citizens League, one sponsored or endorsed by
Rep. Virginia Brown-Waite, the other from
Charles Hardin, President RetireSafe's
Council for Government Reform.
I may have paid'upward of $200 in donations
to aid lobbying for H.R. 1164. They should have
received several millions through the years
and have done nothing. Pocket money for them
is the way I see it.
If they had done their job when the problem
was first discovered, they could have come up
with a plan to satisfy everyone. It doesn't take a
million dollars for a group of men to say this
was wrong, let's correct it.
Figuring the ages, 80 to 90 percent of those
people will never collect the money Look at the
obituaries in the paper; every day about 10 peo-
ple fall in that age group. The government will
never lose a dime on this. They say it would
cost $30 billion to pay off this debt There are
not enough of them alive today to collect
Here I am 83, born 1921, the same for my
wife. The bill probably won't pass this next
year. If passed, that would take another year,
and with the medical problems we have we
may not live to see the first payment. They
want to split that $5,000 over four years. That
would put me into the 90s. The $1,000 a year
won't go far when medical costs run $350 a
month, as is.
If they can't pay off this year, I say they
should cancel all efforts and stop the politi-
cians from raising funds on this national scam.
Leslie D. Case
Homosassa


Letters to the EDITOR


__________I________~~


BBLB~W~









4C SUNDAY, .July 24, 2005


,- /Letters to the !t-. :' i --


Home to roost
The July 5 letter by June Quick accuses
Democrats of almost every sin but cannibalism.
While most of the letter was the usual unsub-
stantiated rant, there was a kernel of truth in
one sentence. (Not the one where she calls
Osama a genius.)
She states that Democrats fear Republicans
more than terrorists, and I'm sad to say that this
becomes truer with each passing day
Terrorists can not destroy this country, but
Republicans can, and are.
In five years of power the Bush administra-
tion has taken our international standing to an
all time low, put us recklessly in record debt,
lied us into an endless war with a nation that
threatened oil monopolies, not our nation.
They have caused the death of tens of thou-
sands of innocents, while giving multibillion dol-
lar no bid contracts to corporate friends of the
Republican Party.
They have imposed a domestic surveillance
program that is clearly anti-constitutional, mis-
managed the aforementioned war, taken away
funding for the VA, leaving the veterans from
the greatest generation to die without the hard-
earned benefits they were promised.
In Florida, the Republicans have turned our
legislature into a special interest brothel, cut
funding for helpless children while passing tax
cuts for the wealthy. They are attacking the pub-
lic school system, killing the Everglades, and
destroying the public trust
Locally, Republicans have increased taxes on
the poor and working classes, and kicked small
business in the back with commercial impact
fees beyond the means of all but the wealthiest
investors.
I used to respect the Republican Party, but
now I would ask them to clean their own pigsty
before criticizing us.
The chickens have come home to roost
Mike Jarrett
chairman, Citrus Democratic Party

Treason from within
You know what the famous Roman Orator and
statesman, Marcus Tullius Cicero, said in 62 BC?
'"A nation can survive its fools and even the
ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from
within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable,
for he is known and carries his banner openly.
But the traitor moves among those within the
gate freely, his shy whispers rustling throughout
the alleys, heard in the very halls of government
itself.
"For the traitor appears not a traitor, he
speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he
wears their face and their arguments; he
appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the
hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation;
he works secretly and unknown in the night to
undermine the pillars of the city; he infects the
body politic so that it can no longer resist A
murderer is less to fear"
This was written before the fall of the Roman
Empire.
People like Kennedy, Durbin, Biden, Reid,
Shumer, Dean, etc., are the traitors to our coun-
try Some say their rhetoric is "free speech." In
wartime, the aid and comfort they are giving the
terrorists is treason and causing the death of a
lot of our troops.
Al-Jazeera plays these ravings daily and they
laugh at the U.S. and say: "Keep up the bomb-
ings, they (the U.S. public) are getting weak and
will demand that their troops are pulled out"
It is time somebody, and it doesn't look like
the gutless Republicans are going to do it,
should bring this up daily so the ill-informed
U.S. public would get the message and demand
that these politicians stop their diatribes.
Political parties mean nothing when we're at
war.
Bob Hermanson
Beverly Hills

If it ain't broke
Having successfully addressed the other burn-
ing issues confronting our nation, the House of
Representatives with flag waving patriotism
once again has endorsed a constitutional
amendment that will trump the First Amend-
ment's guaranteed freedom of expression by
authorizing laws that would enable punishment


of those who express dissension by burning the
American flag.
I admire the courage of our representatives
who have taken such a bold stance, particularly
in light of the recently reported fact (you read it
here first) that the epidemic of flag burning is
not predicted to occur until two years after
Medicare goes broke.
Rather than Social Security, Medicare and
soaring medical costs, our real challenge today
apparently derives from the fact that our forefa-
thers foolishly created a Constitution that allows
some among us to engage in a form of expres-
sion that others consider offensive.
Never mind that current flag burning activi-
ties seem to be by persons in parts of the world
where this amendment will not reach. And,
never mind that veterans who have fought to
protect American freedoms have expressed dis-
pleasure over the erosion of our constitutionally
guaranteed rights that this amendment would
produce.
Realizing that Congress has the fortitude to
take on the First Amendment, I'd like to pro-
pose a couple of other amendments that they
might consider to help improve our lives.
This pesky First Amendment is the reason
that we have to listen to politicians drone on
endlessly as they campaign for office. How
about an amendment that limits the length of a
political campaign to some reasonable time
period somewhere between two minutes and
30 days before the actual election?
And, this darned First Amendment seems to
prevent Congress from enacting meaningful leg-
islation to limit the amount of money elected
officials can siphon off rich cats for their cam-
paign trusts. Why not an amendment that says
you can spend some reasonable amount, say
between $1 and $5,000, on an election campaign
and that's it? Am I the only one getting excited?
Final words to the folks in D.C. don't fix
what ain't broke. And, gee, would you mind fix-
ing what is?
Elwood R. Harding Jr.
Pine Ridge

Sideshow issues
In reading the July 1 letter titled "Seeking
balance," I do not recall the entire content of
the referenced letter. However, I do remember
that it was somewhat over the line.
Yet, the reply letter is pointedly inconsistent
with the general line of today's Democratic
Party and unfairly describes the Republican
Party.
As an example, the Democrat philosophy has
been consistently that government knows best
and we should all be subject to "big daddy" gov-
ernment. We are almost all "common people"
and mostly capable of thinking for ourselves.
"Leaders," as well as competent leaders,
always rise above the masses. The best of them
believe that the rest should have an opportunity
to rise as far as they can along with them. This
statement best describes the Republican philos-
ophy. Before one gets riled at this statementI
am well aware that Republican, as well as
Democrat politicians often forget their mission.
Many are mostly interested in getting reelected.
Our greatest problem today appears to be that
the liberal-leaning people, which includes most
Democrat politicians, would rather see George
Bush go down in disgrace than help get this
awful war over so we can move ahead as a
nation.
The "Seeking balance" letter mentions con-
troversial social issues as a sideshow. Yet,
these issues have grown to be the mainstay of
the Democrat philosophy at this time. This is a
major reason that Democrats are not leading
the nation. True leadership in government
should be the goal of our politicians. However,
our leaders are failing us in many ways. This is
true of Democrats and Republicans alike. The
Republicans just seem to be less offensive at
this time.
When greed and envy are out of the picture,
conditions will improve. As long as we worry
more about what the other guy has than what
we can do to improve our own lot, we will not
move ahead. We all need to do something posi-
tive to stop those who gain undeserved rewards,
rather than wanting the same undeserved
rewards for ourselves.


Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa


Sound OFF


Generic insult
That fat, baldheaded guy in
the White House is an idiot.
But I haven't violated any pro-
tocol because I didn't leak his
name.
Absolving absentees
Regarding the Crystal River
City Council's suggestion of
eliminating garbage fees for
absentee homeowners: Why
not property taxes also? What
in the world are they thinking?
Aid for AIDS
Laura Bush is in South
Africa. She praises the women
for taking control of their lives.
Four hundred births each
month, 28 percent AIDS virus.
That's (more than) 100 new
cases each month. President
Bush proposes a $55 million to
fight AIDS in South Africa. We
should educate these men and
women to what is causing this
problem and stop them from
continuing to bring babies into
the world. They are having
babies after .babies even
though they have this AIDS
virus. Mrs. Bush appears to be
choking up. I think we taxpay-
ers are the ones who should be
choking.
Watching watchers
"Market madness," Friday's
paper (July 15). Seems like
that's a little weird; some-
body's walking around all our
supermarkets watching every-
body else watching somebody
else.
Pine Ridge water
I wish you'd put one of your
hotshot reporters on the case
and write a good story about
the water commission trying to
put those water lines in Pine
Ridge and Citrus Springs. How
could they want one day $48
million, then decide they've got
to drop off $36 million of that
and they only need $12 mil-
lion. By the way, who told them
that they had to provide water
to everybody in Citrus Springs
and Pine Ridge? If people have
wells, why can't they use their
own wells? Why do we have to
have government water? Get an
answer.
Conserve water, light
(Hurricane) Dennis came to
Citrus County and gave us
three days of rain that was
really needed. But in the mean-
time, at Cypress Village's
entrance to Sugarmill Woods,
the sprinklers are on. Hey,
three days of rain, three days
of sprinklers flooding every-
thing ... Great going, guys.
Also, 4 o'clock in the afternoon
hey, your spotlights are on
and all your Malibu lights are
-on around the building. Pretty
good, huh? Three hours before
it gets dark and all your lights
.are on. What a way to waste
money.
PC censorship
You know, politically correct
is only thpre for people who are
too afraid to say what they real-
ly think.
Lunchtime rescue
This is for the nice gentle-
man whose lunch I interrupted
to save a dog that was locked
in a parked car with no air con-
ditioning on. I want to say
thank you, thank you, thank
you. This happened on Friday,
July 15, around 1 o'clock.
Thanks again.
False attacks
The Democrats attacked the
military and the White House
by claiming that there was tor-
ture going on in Gitmo. Now
even one senator went as far as
to call our troops down there
Nazis. Now they find out there
was never any torture in
Guantanamo, so they moved *


on to Karl Rove and they
attacked him for outing the CIA
agent ... Now today, the New
York Times definitely not a
conservative newspaper, by any
means has found out or
reported that Karl Rove did not
out the CIA agent. Her name
was released long before he
had anything to say. Gee, once
again their mean attacks have
proven to be false.
Too much detail
I'm calling to complain about
that article on the front page of
today's Chronicle, "Man gets
life in child sex case." I don't
see where it's necessary to
have to print that article and.
describe the sex acts on the
front page about what hap-
pened to that little girl. It
might be one thing in court,
but there's no need to describe
that in the paper. I think it's
disgusting and I think you
should take it out.
Hurricane damage
Why hasn't there been some-
thing in the paper or a follow-
up on the insurance premiums
that are charged in this area
for homeowners insurance and
the unfulfilled commitment by
the insurance company to fix
people's homes from last
year's hurricanes? This has
gone on and on and on -
myself for 10 months. Some-
thing needs to be done about
it.
Zoning in and out
I'm calling in regards to the
title "Market madness," and
the comment that was made
about Citrus County citizens
acting like they were from the
"Twilight Zone." Well, I was
wondering if they ever heard of
the statement, "I wonder what
it is about that person; what I
don't like about that person,
him or her, that reminds me of
me." Does that sound like you?
How's that working for you? ...
Military view
The Chronicle is obviously a
shill for the Democratic Party.
You're entitled to be this way in
a free country. However, when
you print a cartoon showing
my son and many others who
have joined the military to look
like "Beetle Bailey," you should
be ashamed. Why don't you
change your name to "The Left
Wing Citrus Chronicle"?
A just sentence
On the case of the child
molestation in yesterday's
paper, Friday (July 15): Thank
you, jurors and Judge (Ric)
Howard. On small children or
any child younger than 18, life
in jail for molesters, and death
sentence within a one- to two-
year span for murdering of a
child. I hope all of you who
want to harm a child in any
way see this as justice.
Dog wagging
This is for "Terror at bay." I,
too, would like to know why we
are in Iraq. The caller calls us
bleeding hearts and says we
can't get the picture. The caller
says we are in Iraq fighting
there so we're not fighting on
our soil. The caller's the one
that cannot get the picture.
Fifteen of the Trade Center
bombers were Saudis. Presi-
dent Bush started the conflict
in Iraq for lack of being able to
run this country. It's called
wagging the dog. If he wants
to fight terrorism, then go after
the real terrorists.
Road should finish
What geniuses thought it was
a good idea to stop the toll
road just before a major bottle-
neck on U.S. 19 in Homosassa
to Crystal River? Why not at
least continue it to just north
of Crystal River where there's
clear sailing all the way up?


This road was not solely meant
to accommodate the locals. It's
supposed to be a quick route
from Tampa to as far as Tal-
lahassee. Widening U.S. 19, as
some have suggested, will just
make the traffic worse and give
already-bad drivers another
lane to cut someone off in. It's
just common sense to com-
plete the road north of Crystal
River. Why should anyone have
to sit in bumper-to-bumper
traffic where they don't intend
to stop?
Beautiful people
The person who wrote in
about "Market madness" says
that if anyone wants to see
strange behavior, go into the
supermarkets in Citrus County.
They don't know what they're
talking about. I live in Hom-
osassa Springs and the people
are so friendly. The people, the
clerks in the stores are so nice.
Publix, Winn-Dixie, Wal-Mart-
all these places are just beauti-
ful ... All these people here in
Citrus County are just wonder-
ful people. If you want to make
friends, you just go to Publix,
you just go to Wal-Mart. All the
employees are just wonderful
people, so I don't know what
she's seeing because I've lived
here for 19 years and I've never
seen anything like that in my
life. Citrus County has a lot of
beautiful people living here.
Cut back spending
We the taxpayers in Citrus
County must stop our commis-
sioners and the sheriff from
spending our money. They all
work for us. I would like to
know just how much the sher-
iff's budget is. How much does
he- make a year? How much do
the commissioners make? Our
national debt is
$7,809,953,208,444.13, our -
population is 296,000,353.
Each citizen's share of the
national debt is $26,353. If we
don't stop the spending, we
will have a depression.
Offenders' insert
Attention Sheriff Jeff Dawsy:
The Marion County sheriff
placed a 31-page insert into
their local paper listing names,
addresses and photos of
known sexual predators and
offenders. Don't you think it
would serve the public of
Citrus County if you did the
same?
Blight on paradise
I agree with the person who
wrote a little article about the
birds and everything. Citrus
County is a beautiful place to
live in, except for these slobs
who throw garbage all over the
place. But we do have beautiful
birds; I have all kinds of birds
in my yard. And you only look '
up to see the most beautiful
clouds ... The clouds are just
so beautiful, every day I look at
them. Each cloud is individual,
It covers the whole sky ... It's
just gorgeous to live here and
people ought to appreciate
what they have. Instead they're
slobs. They throw garbage all '.
over. They don't appreciate this
beautiful Garden of Eden we ,
live in. We do live in the Garden
of Eden and I love it here.
Tipsy boaters
The editorial in the Chronicle
on Monday, July 18, about
boating under the influence, is
a very nice article. One thing
about it: If they will check on
any given weekend out (County
Road) 581 North and go to
Jungle Camp Road down to
Hooty Point on the river, you
can just load them up any
weekend because they're all
out there under the influence
running their boats. So why
don't they get out here and
check on the river instead of
just over in Crystal River on the
bay?


CITRUS CoJNTY (FI.) CHRONIcI.:


YI__II______Y~U(__m~


_I~l~n~








SUNDAY, JuLY 24, 2005 5C


July 7 notable for reactions about terrorism


tor's note: This column was ernment in England as a show of soli-
m before additional attacks this darity. In the United States, people
veek turned toward the president for reas-
he attack in London on July 7 surance and leadership. The rallying
will be remembered around the flag will only
as another impor- bring short-term benefits
ate in the war on ter- to the president's political
n. situation, vis-a-vis Iraq.
the investigation in Iraq must stand on its own
nd has revealed, sui- -- and the political gain or
bombers born in loss for the president and
nd with Pakistani the Republicans will de-
rounds were respon- pend on the constitution
for this mindless to \ being adopted, the elec-
ly The impact was r tons being held and the
. TLou Frey Iraqi government and peo-
t, one couldn't help ple taking control of their
about the contrast of .. .. destiny.


Edi
written
past w


T
tant d,
rorism
Ast
Englar
cide
Engla
.backgi
sible
.tragec
global
Firs
-think
this a


meeting where the wealthiest nations
in the world were taking steps to help
the economy of the poorest nations
and with medical problems, such as
AIDS.
Most nations rallied around the gov-


To me, the most remark-
able part of the event was how in
many places it was accepted as part of
this new world we live in. The best
example I could give is the stock mar-
ket. Immediately after the event, the
markets around the world and in the


United States fell dramatically Yet, by
the end of the day, the stock market in
the United Stated had recovered all
the ground it had lost and actually
gained 35 points.
What that says is for better or for
worse, we're beginning to understand
terrorism is now part of our life. We're
beginning to understand that these
events will continue to happen. And
for all of us in the United States, we
are beginning to understand the 9/11
will not be the last terrorist attack on
our soil with the resulting loss of life.
The sad part is that there is nothing
we can do to .reason with these terror-
ists. There is no act we can take to
make them happy. However, we can
continue to try to isolate them finan-
cially and continue to put pressure on
them through the coordinated acts of
democratic governments throughout
the world.
We must also continue to try to raise
the standard of living in places where


these terrorists flourish so young peo-
ple have something to live for and
becoming a suicide bomber becomes
an absurd choice.
People in London, as they have since
World War II and through the problems
with the IRA, quickly went back to
work using the transportation system
that had been so brutally attacked. We
greatly admire their fortitude and
their courage. All of us will need that
in the months and years ahead.
The remarks by British Prime
Minister Tony Blair regarding the
immigration issue several weeks ago
are in some way startling and obvi-
ously important. Blair said that the
British are going to look at their poli-
cy of immigration to ensure that peo-
ple don't come into the country who
can cause them problems.
He further stated that if there were
people in the country who were incit-
ing problems they would be deported.
This was greeted with great acclaim


in many parts of England, except in
the Muslim areas. There is no talk
about human rights or the presump-
tion of innocence.
Blair did indicate that most
Muslims were good law-abiding Brit-
ish citizens. The problem of Muslims
is not restricted to England. France
has a large Muslim population and
Germany has more than 5 million
Turkish Muslims in their country.
Immigration is on the front burner
in the United States. Many are argu-
ing that it is time we look at our immi-
gration policies and make substantial
changes. One wonders if the Blair
statements and the new directions
England is taking will spill over to the
United States.


Lou Frey Jr. is a political analyst,
commentator and newspaper colum-
nist in Florida. Send e-mail to
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


Sound


Letters to the EDITOR----


Racetrack pond
I went to the Citrus County
Speedway this weekend. I'm
just a concerned race fan. I
was there and I just, you know,
I watched the races all week-
end and stuff. I just don't
understand their logic of why
they've got to have such a big
pond in the middle of the
infield. I mean there's got to be
some kind of risk if a driver
was to go upside down in it...
with all this rain we've been
having.
Getting glasses
Having been a lifelong mem-
ber of the Lions Club, I would
like to respond to the woman
who couldn't get glasses for
her 17-year-old grandson ... My
whole life, I've never know
them to refuse to give an indi-
vidual glasses who was truly in
need. If this individual would
contact me, I will see to it that
one of the appropriate Lions,
Clubs in,this area gives her
grandson the necessary glass-
es that he requires. At Lions
Clubs, all donations that the
Lions Clubs receive go directly
to helping the indigent and
needy in all the areas where
they participate. If this individ-
ual would contact me, I will see
to it that we solve her problem.
My name is Joan ... 726-0046,
637-4999. If there are any fur-
ther questions, let me know.
Old-fashioned static
I remember when radio was
new, we used a crystal ,and an
oatmeal box with wire. The
static noise was terrible.
Through the years, technicians
and lots of money cleared it up
and we enjoyed nice, clear
sound. Now some nitwit is pur-
posely putting it back. Will we
have to get a cat's whisker to
turn it off? Would changing
cable companies help? This
has got to stop.
Get a job
This is in response to
"Glasses needed," the woman
looking for glasses for her 17-
year-old son and she doesn't
know how to get them. You
open your door, you push the
17-year-old out and you say,
"Go find a job," and let him
work for what he needs. You
don't keep looking for a hand-
out all over the county. I mean
really, the kid's 17 years old;
he should be having a job any-
way.
Short staffed
I was in a (sandwich) shop ...
As I went in, they were lined up
by the door and only had one
person there to wait on us. I
believe this is called poor man-
agement.
Reporting fines
I'd like to know why the
Chronicle reporters do not
report when somebody goes to


court and what their fines are
or what kind of pleas they had
and what happened to them.
There's nothing ever in the
paper ...
Pull the plug
In reference to the loud,
annoying background music on
TV programs and movies: I've
pulled the plug already
because I know they will take a
long time before the industry
would respond to the majority.
Vehicle dump
I live in Old Homosassa and
we have many tourists who
come down to see the old mill
on Yulee Drive. There is one ,
place on Yulee Drive that looks
like a used-car dealer lot. They
have boats, they have cars,
they have trucks. Whether
they're registered or not, I
don't know. But it's a shame
that people have to go by that
to visit Old Homosassa. Where
is code enforcement? Why
don't they go down and check
this man out? It's a terrible,
terrible sight to go by when
those tourists' buses travel
down to Old Homosassa.
Well water preferred
I live at the Withlapopka
Islands. I moved there eight
years ago when my priority was
water. I had great water, a well,
and thought that was a won-
derful place. I bought, I lived
there and now they're telling
me I have to take city water...
I'm very upset and I'd like
some feedback.
Keep Family Circus
I'm responding to the letter
in letters to the editor, about
the "Family Circus." I don't
think it's being disrespectful at
all to make fun of the Pledge
of Allegiance. They're not mak-
ing fun; they're saying how
their children are saying it as
they're learning, which all chil-
dren need to learn ... When he
has children, he'll find out that
they say things differently when
they're first learning them.
Sure, they need to be corrected
and I'm sure that he was cor-
rected. But all he's doing is
saying how they were saying it
the first time. I love the "Family
Circus." I think it's great. It
reminds me of my own chil-
dren and I would love them to
keep it in the paper.
Missed the point
Well, President Bush nomi-
nated a Supreme Court justice.
He seems like a very middle-of-
the-road sort of guy, but I think
the Republicans can be happy
with him, I think the Demo-
crats should be able to be
happy with him, but absolutely,
within three minutes of the
nomination, Sen. Schumer was
up with his list stating what the
man had to meet before he
could become a Supreme
Court justice. Sen. Schumer


just still doesn't get it. He
doesn't get to make those
appointments; the president of
the United States does.
Mailbox bashing
Well, we have people who
have nothing else to do but go
around bashing mailboxes in
Floral City. Maybe my camera
will catch them next time. But
you know, it's expensive to
replace a mailbox, other than
inconvenient. But if you're
going to bash the mailboxes,
why don't you just go ahead
and pick up the trash that's on
the ground while you're doing
it? You know what I mean? And.
hey, come see me; maybe we'll
give you a shovel and you can
go dig a hole. But quit bashing
mailboxes. Put your time to
something that you can be
accountable for. And if we do
catch you, which I'm sure we
will sooner or later, the spill will
be out of who's doing this. But
you know, bashing mailboxes?
Let's pick up the litter instead
of doing that.
School's grades
I think our school system is
in serious trouble. I was just
reading in the paper a couple
of weeks ago about Crystal
River High School, that their
average grade is a "D," Well,
that's terrible. That'slpot a very
good example for the teachers
that are there. If Lecanto could
have an "A" average on the
FCATs, why can't Crystal River
High School? I think they need
to really buckle down on these
kids. It's absolutely terrible to
think the education in our
schools were a "D" average.
Some of them can't even read.
That's ridiculous. It's no won-
der our world is in such a
mess.
Get your money back
I am calling in regard to the
72-year-old man that pur-
chased a money order at the
Lecanto post office. If you still
have your end of your receipt,
go back to your post office and
they can reimburse you.
Otherwise, call the number on
the back'of your receipt and
they will give you instructions
on how to get your reimburse-
ment for your money order.
Stop bashing Bush
I have a comment about the
Bush abuse in the paper. I
think that we should thank God
for President Bush because if
he wasn't having our troops
over there, that war would be
here in about 10 years. And
the troops aren't upset that
they're over there; they're glad
and proud to fight for their
country and to help their fellow
men out. So these Bush bash-
ers need to stop and thank
God that the war is over there
and not here. They're there to
protect our country in the
future from that problem.


Avoiding violence
This morning as al-Zarqawi
and bin-Laden do their little
victory dance over the news
from London, we pork-eating,
unclean infidels should be
reminded that attacks from
these dispensers of such a
"peaceful" ideology must take
extreme measures from time
to time to show us the error of
our ways.
They might have considered
starting with Hollywood, but
that's another issue.
Let's take a stroll down
memory lane for a bit, folks.
Lenin despised the United
States ... he took refuge here
though and welcomed
American financiers to back
his revolution. Stalin took it a
step further and jealously
cadged all the New World
technology he could steal
along with our naive alliance.
Let's take a giant step for-
ward here for the sake of
brevity.
The Arab Emirates have
never been able to agree on
anything, but one: that Israel,
from time out of memory,
must be obliterated, period!
That a scrap of barren land
can be turned into a garden by
Sinfidel refugees will not
stand!
Mull that over from the per-
spective of a Bedouin culture.
Now take it a few decades
down the road.
"We have found we have
great reserves of oil that the
infidel desires." "We hate the
Westerners, but, perhaps, we
can use this to our advantage
(read Lenin) and a friend of
our enemy is our enemy, just
don't let them know it!"
So in short, we could get
along famously with the
jihadists if we (the Great
Satan), would declare war on
Israel, bow toward Mecca five
times a day, recognize Islam as
the true World Order, and
atone for our doggish ways by
building some more mosques
and palaces in honor of our
Muslim Masters.
All this violence could be
avoided. After all, it's our own
fault to begin with!
Let them eat pork!
Russ Matoti
Inverness

FCAT disparity
On June 29, Bill Sheets, a
retired schoolteacher, wrote to
the Chronicle protesting nega-
tive effects the FCATs are hav-
ing on Crystal River High
School.
Citing the 86 out of 250 stu-
dents who were honor gradu-
ates, he finds "horrible incon-
sistencies" between the good
grades the students are getting
and the school's FCAT rating
(D). Sheets blames the FCATs
for the disparity.
It's more likely that the fault
lies with a combination of
inflated grades and low aca-
demic standards.
When 34 percent of graduat-
ing seniors have a GPA of 3.5
percent or above (the mini-
mum required for honor grad-
uates) there's something
wrong. If a score on an exam
of 90 or above represents an A
(the top 10 percent of students
taking it) and 80 to 89 a B (the
second 10 percent), no more
than 20 percent of the gradu-
ates should have a GPA
reflecting an equal number of
As and Bs. The number of
honor grads might even fall
below 20 percent if courses
were challenging enough to
result in a higher FCAT rating.
The ones being hurt by this


are the students. Infla
grades grant them ad
to competitive college
on GPAs hollow of kn
and if high grades co
easily, students can n
learn through failure
their true talents lie.
Perhaps one clue to
poor performance on
FCATs can be found i
words of this former D
member: "... I firmly
our school grades wo
even better if they we
on something other tl
accountability."
Like what?

John H.


AARP a bo


ated were the ones responsible.
mission In my opinion he went after
es based Iraq who had nothing to do for
owledge, 9/11 to pacify his father from
me too the earlier encounter that he
ever being criticized for not going
where into Iraq when he had proba-
ble cause.
o CRHS' It really is a sad situation for
the the loss of our fighting person-
.n the nel since they should not be
faculty there in the first place. It's
believe going to be a long haul and the
uld.be loss of life and injuries galore
are based for years to come.
han basic Another thing I would like to
see a ban of the U.N. in New
York altogether and hold year-
ly or semiyearly meetings in
McFadden other major countries like
Inverness Iran, Germany, France,
England, India, Japan, China,
)on North Korea, South Korea,
Australin etc


Once again, Bob Hagaman
has shown his misunderstand-
ing of AARP and Social
Security in his letter of June
25.
In this last letter he states
that AARP's position on Social
Security is misleading. Let me
put it as simply as I can:
AARP only wants to strength-
en Social Security, not destroy
it. Now what is misleading
about that?
He further states that cur-
rent retirees will not be affect-
ed by private accounts. AAWP
knows that! Their concern is
not for "current" retirees but
for "future" retirees.
He seems to think that those
of us who are financially suc-
cessful are being forced to
provide for the less fortunate.
How so? The average worker
today pays 6.2 percent of his
wages into Social Security tax
while the more successful
worker making a million dol- /
lars pays only a little over one-
half percent And how about
the 7-foot athlete that makes
several million in a year?
As for private accounts,
AARP encourages the younger
generation to save; take
advantage of 401Ks and IRAs.
But do it on their own.
Don't siphon money out of \
Social Security tax don't
undermine the most success-
ful program in our nation's
history.
And, what Mr. Hagaman
doesn't take into account is
t the enormous cost of setting
5 up the necessary bureaucracy
to administer such a program.
Plus, having been a Wall
Street broker for almost 30
years, I can assure you that
any transaction going through
Wall Street involves a commis-
sion, or a management fee or
both. Compared to the low
cost of administering Social
Security the bare minimum
cost of setting up and manag-
ing a system of private
accounts would be prohibitive.
I have been an AARP volun-
teer for some time' and I find
that I don't always agree with
everything they do. But I have
definitely found that, if you
are retired and if you are eld-
erly, AARP is always working
in your behalf whether or not
you are a member. To trash
AARP for striving to protect
Social Security is unfair and
shows a lack of understanding.
Duane Smith
Homosassa

Terrible costs
No Ivy League scholar has
the know-how to understand
that it was the Saudi Arabia
personnel that flew into the
high towers in New York not
the Iraqis.
So my question is why the
president did not declare the
war against them, after all they


The expense we are paying
to keep the U.N. in New York
is terrible, and not appreciated
by most of the above countries.
Bob Reed
Inverness

Honor the flag
NASCAR drivers, to be
effective, need to follow the
guidance provided by dis-
played flags from the track
starter: i.e., Green means go,
Yellow means slow down and
follow the pace care, Black
indicates that the driver for
which is displayed is out of
the race and needs to go to the
garage, White indicates that
there is just one more lap left
in the race, and a checkered
flag tells them that the race is
over
However, there is one im-
portant flag for which the
majority of drivers seem to ig-
nore protocol: the American
flag.
NASCAR drivers, on a num-
ber of occasions, have done
things that were an embar-
rassment to me, but nothing
like Sunday when the
National Anthem was being
played prior to the beginning
of the race at the New
Hampshire Speedway.
\ The camera focused on a
\ driver with a branch of mili-
\tary service emblazoned on
his jump suit, standing with
his arms folded in front of
him. As the camera panned,
there were a number of other
red-blooded American race
car drivers standing in other
similarly related positions.
As a native redneck from
North Florida, a dyed-in-the-
wood NASCAR fan, as well as
a volunteer in two wars,
myself and supporting fans
deserve an appropriate ges-
ture from our heroes when the
National Anthem is sung and
the American flag is dis-
played.
All these men are knowl-
edgeable about so many
things, automobile mechanics,
race statistics, NASCAR pit
and track regulations, the
effect of heat and cold on
tires, driving etiquette, etc.
Surely they would know, or
be taught that the appropriate
gesture of a civilian when the
flag with the stars and stripes
is displayed, is to remove hats,
and place the right hand over
the heart.
William Young
Crystal River


NEED A REPORTER?
Approval for story ideas
must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.
Call Editor Charlie
Brennan at 563-3225.


attack and the G-8


_m~mq~U~


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONIC:I.I









CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLhu


6C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


VOICES
Continued from Page 1C

she says that more needs to be
done. But as Colleen Connors,
the banner lady, observes,
Darfur is an easy place to
shove aside: "It's far away, and
a lot of the names are hard to
pronounce." TV cameras don't
get there very often, and when
they do, the murky tribal poli-
tics of the region are almost
impossible to explain.
That's why public pressure
is so critical. Earlier this
month, religious congregations
across America participated in
a National Weekend of Prayer
and Reflection, aimed at rais-
ing awareness about Darfur.
Next month, 400 college stu-
dents from 90 campuses are
expected in Washington for a
workshop on how to organize
grassroots efforts promoting
the same objective.
About 230,000 green



SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

The family members coun-
tered that failing to notify the
Department of Motor Vehicles
was a slipup and not a crime
warranting arrest, let alone a
news story. And that it by no
means was on the same level as
the Lunsford case.
To them it was personal. To
us it was another police report
warranting a bit more than a
blurb on Page 4A.
The family members said the


bracelets have been sold at
$1.50 apiece to raise money
The motto inscribed on them is
inspired by a favorite phrase of
President Bush: "Not On Our
Watch Save Darfur."
A "witness tour" is planned
for the fall, bringing refugees
from the camps in Chad to
speak directly to Americans.
Meanwhile, pictures from the
camps can be viewed on the
Web site of the Holocaust
Museum in Washington
(www.ushmm.org/conscience).
So here's a summer project
beyond beaches and barbe-
ques. Buy a bracelet, view a
picture, tell a friend, send a
check Better yet, put a banner
on the side of your church or
synagogue or mosque. As
Colleen Connors said, your
neighbors "need to see this
over and over again."


Steve and Cokie Roberts can
be contacted by e-mail at
stevecokie@gmail. com.

coverage could make it impos-
sible for their loved one to con-
tinue living with them and that
he'll be scorned everywhere he
goes. He can't leave Florida.
Our position was that the
story was nothing personal and
that the reporter didn't know
the man from the Man on the
Moon. We emphasized that it's
never personal when we pub-
lish names in arrest reports.
That's what newspapers do.
Even when we know people
who are arrested, or feel sym-
pathetic toward people
because of how coverage of
their arrest will negatively


WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

fear that mentally handicapped
people will be left to fend for
themselves, is what keeps Chet
up at night
As has been reported in the
Chronicle, Chet is now in the
intensive care unit at Citrus
Memorial Hospital in Inverness.
On Thursday, he suffered an
aneurysm and was rushed to the
hospital. It's too early to say what
the future holds for him. Family
asks friends and supporters not
to visit the hospital at this time.
For three decades, Chet has
been the passion behind the
explosive growth at the Key
Center He has been at the fore-
front of a national movement to
recognize the rights of the men-
tally handicapped.
When he began 30 years ago,
the majority of the mentally
handicapped residents of this
country were kept in state-run

impact their lives, the newspa-
per's credibility would be shot
to pieces if we omitted arrest
reports for some and not for
others.
We were again accused of not
caring but, at that point, we
agreed to disagree.
Then things got interesting.
The intensity of the dialogue
was toned down. We talked.
These were two very nice
people angry that someone
they care deeply about can't
escape his past despite efforts
to rebuild and move on.
This man is a convicted sexu-
al offender, not a predator.


warehouses. They were fed
drugs every day to keep them
manageable and then left to rot
It took advocates like Chet to
force us to look at the mentally
handicapped in a different way.
Today, the 300 clients at the Key
are given as much freedom and
independence as they can indi-
vidually handle. Many live on
campus in Lecanto at Key Pine
Village. But many others now
live in homes and apartments
throughout our community
They have jobs, cars, families
and independent lives.
Chet Cole is a civil rights
champion for the mentally hand-
icapped. What's being done at
the Key has set a national stan-
dard for how these residents
should be treated. People from
all over the United States move
to Citrus County because they
want to participate in the move-
ment he has made happen.
The irony is that some people
in Citrus County have become
envious of the success that Chet
and the Key have achieved.

Clearly, neither status is good,
but predators have committed
the more grievous offenses.
While I totally agree with
coworker Mike's position that
his first concern is for victims,
questions remain: How long
must he pay for something that
happened long ago? Where can
he go?
The questions can't be
ignored. Today's editorial (see
Page 2C) calls for lifetime
imprisonment of sexual preda-
tors who victimize children. All
members of the editorial board
agree on that position.
What about lesser offenders,


Through his efforts, the Key has
gotten involved in many for-prof-
it ventures so that dollars can be
generated to cover the costs of
operation.
Government is not doing its
job to provide proper funding,
and Chet has been adamant that
residents in need of services will
get those services. His for-profit
ventures have provided those
extra funds.
The real irony is that Chet
never dreamed he would dedi-
cate his life to such a movement
He really wanted to be a univer-
sity-level baseball coach and
teacher He wanted to work with
athletes and make good things
happen for young people.
But his sister was mentally
handicapped, and he got a first-
hand view at the injustice she
suffered. What he thought was
going to be a short diversion
from his university dream
became his life's mission. It
turned into a 24-hour-a-day,
seven-day-a-week endeavor.
When asked recently, he couldn't

though? Can they be rehabilitat-
ed? When they were sentenced,
was there to be lifetime conse-
quences? Will society allow
them to rebuild their lives; and,
if not, where can they go?
There are no easy answers,
but the reality is they won't van-
ish if we ignore the problem.
While healthy-thinking folks
rightfully detest the actions of
sexual offenders, it's hearten-
ing to have become acquainted
with a couple of people dearly
wishing to help a loved one.
To them, it wasn't a fictitious
person or some stranger they
read about in the paper. It's


remember the last decade he
took a vacation.
There are a lot of really good
people in our community. There
are just a handful of great ones.
Chet is one of those.
If you've got a spare prayer
this weekend, use it for him. If
you want to help make a state-
ment, a contribution to the Key
Center would be appropriate.
While Run for the Money week
concluded Saturday, donations
are welcomed throughout the
year
Chet Cole has helped change
the way Floridians and Ameri-
cans view the rights of the men.
tally handicapped. If he were
that university baseball coach,
he would have been a three-time
winner of the College World
Series.
Instead, he just changed the
way we look at the world.

Gerry Mulligan is publisher of
the Chronicle. His e-mail
address is gmulligan@
chronicleonline.com.

someone they love.
One thing can be learned
from this case. The social cli2
mate is such that convicted sex-
ual offenders must be exceed-
ingly mindful of the law's
requirements, in detail, if they
stand any chance of getting on
with their lives.


Charlie Brennan is editor of
the Chronicle. He can be
reached at 563-3225 or by
e-mail at cbrennan@
chronicleonline.com. Read his
blog at
www.chronicleonline. com.


JANUARY
Hike for Hospice
Manatee Festival
CFCC Performing Arts Dukes of
Dixieland
One Community, One Book
Playhouse 19 Rodgers & Hart
Cattle Barons' Ball
SFit in Citrus
Celebrate Life
Crystal River Open Tennis Tournament
City of Inverness Political Forum
Tractor Pull
ACT Blithe Spirit
FEBRUARY
ACT Blithe Spirit
SFit in Citrus
Galaxy of the Stars
Altrusa Monte Carlo Night
Sweet Adelines "Who Invented Music?"
Community Ball
CFCC Performing Arts The Spencers:
Theatre of Illusion
SSchoolastic" Classic Golf Tournament
SPlayhouse 19 Same Time Next Year
Rotary Mystery Dinner
Grand to be Irish
Singing Valentines
SBravssimo
K of C Bingo Bananza
One Community, One Book
Grand Ole Opry Citrus Style
Bridal Fair
Sheriff's Celebrity Waiter
-Spring Fling Craft Show
African-American History Month
Beverly Hills International Festival
SParade of Homes
King and His Court
NAMI Healthy Minds

MARCH
Kiev Concert
Strawberry Festival
SFit in Citrus
Kiwanis Big Band Concert
-Clean Air Bike Ride
Gulf Island Theatre
Manatee Car and Truck Show
Kiwanis Big Band Concert
Playhouse 19 Jesus Christ Superstar
ACT
Shriners Car Show
K of C Western Dance
Play Cards For Kids

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CFCC rar, H,,'-e
m a rl. j. : ird.:-, Ir, in. i..:.1 .-ur rrir. ,r, T
^ .F VV.V. ,- lin Hrr-
Clru S ir,'-,,3 H..ai, for Llae
A..': )TA r, 1n i.-:.r."i.-"ril 1 :i r:
Sr,e,,i 3ael, F r ir,.. S.arr-j irT. r
C i.al, i.GuIl C: art Ca, I,;;.: Fi-rni.-,
m 6-. 1 u -..I I :
F r i .:.... ail ai


Fifth Annual Homosassa Lions Club










Saturday, October 1

FREE parking
9 a.m to 5 p.m *.Indoor displays
Outdoor booths
at the Homosassa Lions Club Food and
Homosassa Trail beverages
(C.R. 490 across from the Homosassa Fire Station) b
j~ I*l -C u N. 1 1
Proceeds to benefit the Homosassa Lions Foundation. A donation of a non f r'
perishable food item at the door would help to replenish our community food
pantries. For information call 352-621-7586. C,. ,,^.-

A a & -& X& & & & AA


P
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24 -. 25 26 27 28 29 30

Communitr Choir
C ,onn c rt



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-14 1 .i.. 6 17 16,-. 19 20
j'i :- :-. '. '" -'"""'-." ' -' '. .,'_ ... ",- " ' O Troop
... .Poker Run




-_21 :- ...4 26_ 27
21 22 2""'- 2 25 2''27

,. ..,, '. .,,


MAY
Worlds Greatest Baby Shower
CASA Anniversary Dinner Dance
Lecanto Relay For Life
Hurricane/Disaster Expo
Gospel Jubilee
Informational Fiesta
2005 Water Garden Tour
CMH Salute to Community
*Yankee Air Force Corn Fest
ReMax Golf-Boys & Girls Club
Steak and Steak
Church Without Walls Golf
United Way Pro-Am Golf Tournament
LHS Project Graduaton
CHS Project Graduation
Playhouse 19 Greater Tuna
JUNE
SChamber Hurricane Preparedness
Hurricane/Disaster Expo
Fiesta Tropica)e
Adopt A Rescued Pet-Hurricane
Survival
Shake It up for Kids
Bowl For Child Mentoring
Yankee Air Force Ice Cream Social
Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
SMusic on the Square
Homosassa Fireworks Show
T Treasures on the Square
CFCC Golf Toumrnament
Boys & Girls Club Car Raffle Drawing
Gulf Island Theatre -
Is Love Everything?
JULY
Patriotic Evening
Crystal River Fireworks
Rotary Duck Race
Some Enchanted Evening
Run For The Money Auction
Key Training Center Run For the Money
Key Center Telethon
Playhouse 19 Talent Show
Community Choir Concert
S Veteran's Foundation Golf Scramble
AUGUST
Yankee Air Force Dance
LHS Softball Tounament
Support OurTroops Poker Run
United Way Kickoff
SEPTEMBER
Harvest Moon Craft Show
H Industry Appreciation Week
Habitat for Humanity Golf Tournament
Christmas In September
Arl" Cair. Sr,,:,.
GohTi~r Ciur O ta't' '01.a,'
I Save our Waist,; WA-e
SN rzro fM Ir-H, .,r..,


OCTOBER
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SFnri.,r..31 -i ir, Lc-ra.i Iall t-:,:,, S-1
San.:-,Tla C i0,,-,.rl":p
SLID-ary Fall n ,:,:, l.1
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* Cre6a F ."Ii l
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NOVEMBER
* Lli:.r Cr,,i rrrrrlac ilu'n
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Ciliu" Sia- pe5r-3e I,.:-i -n
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DECEMBER
SI:,lll3la-, :iI.m, Tkui
SC.:,ur.i I.: ir, Ca T r,- Cr.r,
Fkal Ci, H-hi n La 1 iDo,
S ijulariTill Cr,.:.ai-l C;.,.r.,r:
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RALPH Russo: ASK SCORE 6D
FOOD SERVICE COURSE UPCOMING 7D
PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS 7D


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SUNDAY
JULY 24, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Well-grounded
The ground operation of
FedEx Corp. brought in
almost $4.7 billion of the
company's $29.4 billion in
overall revenue in fiscal 2005.
FedEx revenue
= Ground segment


SI: I .llrn


2002 2003 2004 200
SOURCE: The company


I C(
tr
ey
ch
si
5- gr
. AP at


FedEx's challenge

ru n* *J.* and elsewhere are suing FedEx, arguing
Truking diviion embroiled in labor ht the company skirts worker protection laws
by refusing to hire them as employees eli-
Associated Press haul of its work force. gible for overtime pay, health insurance,
The argument centers on the more than workers' compensation and other bene-
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Though FedEx 14,000 drivers of those trucks with the pur- fits. They also want to be reimbursed for
orp. was built on a cargo airline, its ple and green "FedEx" on the side that back operating expenses and lost benefits.
ucking business is now a big-time mon- make thousands of stops each day at FedEx Ground, headquartered in
maker and a tough competitor for its homes and businesses across America. Pittsburgh, was created seven years ago
chief rival, UPS Inc. The drivers are independent contrac- amid a reorganization of the parent com-
But the shipping giant's trucking divi- tors who own the trucks, pay all operating pany, which also owns FedEx Express, the
on, FedEx Ground, is now embroiled in a costs and get no company benefits. world's largest cargo airline.
rowing labor fight that could raise oper- But drivers in Tennessee, California,
;ing costs by millions and lead to an over- Massachusetts, Minnesota, South Dakota Please see CHALLENGE/Page 7D


Finding ine faS i1O for a fraction
fc/' J


BRIAN LaPETERCr.n.cOrc I
Sandra Tyre owns Merle Norman Cosmetics and Upscale Resale in Crystal River. The consignment shop offers "gently used" items that people bring in,
as well as some new, discontinued designer labels from stores such as Macy's and TJ Maxx.


Lisa Nichols
IN THE
WORKFORCE



Job fair


focuses


on vets
he One Stop Work-
force Connection will
host a Veterans Job
and Resource Fair from 8
a.m. to noon on Aug. 3 in the
Klein Conference Center at
Central Florida Community
College on State Road 200 in
Ocala.
Veterans interested in
reviewing current employ-
ment openings will have an
opportunity to apply on-site
with more than 20 local
employers.
Among some of the
employers currently signed
up to participate are Em-
ergency One, Marion County
Board of County Commis-
sioners, Closetmaid, Nobility
Homes, the VA Medical
SCenter, City of Ocala and oth-
ers. Be sure to come dressed
for success.
To prepare for the event,
veterans are encouraged to'
visit the closest One Stop
Workforce Connection office.
Workforce can provide assis-
tance improving a resume,
offering suggestions on inter-
viewing techniques, giving
advice on what to wear, or
answer other questions.
Several veterans' service
providers will be on-site with
information about veterans'
benefits.
If you cannot attend the
event, but would like to sub-
mit a resume for review,
please call Megan Cochran
at (352) 873-7950, Ext. 212, or
e-mail resumes for review to
mcochran@clmworkforce.com.
To ask specific questions
Please see WORKFORCE/Pe 6D


Comligzment stores showcase su rises
NANCY KENNEDY ular constitute a $1.5 billion a year
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com industry, with an estimated 15.000
ChrIonicle shops nationwide. Secondhand
began losing its stigma in the early
C consignment shopping is like '90s and now, buying pre-owned at a
a box of' chocolates. You great price is a strived-tbr tleat.
never know what you're Sandra Tyre, owner of Merle
going to get. Norman Cosmetics and Upscale
For Bonnie Wilson of Floral City Resale in Crystal River: began
that's the best part. shopping consign-
It's the thrill of the ment when she
hunt, the adventure o tound she was ruin-
of discovery. Plus. People who ing her nice cloth-
shopping consign- consign their ing while working
ment saes a whole with children.
lot of money. Clothes are "Then I found
"It's all I shop," that I was finding
she said. "I've been pretty savvy such wonderful
shopping consign- things that I didn't
ment for 18 years shoppers. want to wear my
I buy everything consignment things
consignment but mni to work," she said.
underwear." an r I Tyre bought the
According to the owner Upcale Resae existing consign-
N a t i o n a I ment store next to
Association of Resale and Thrift Kash 'n Karry. including its invento-
Shops, secondhand shops in gener- r., and opened in January. In addi-
al and consignment shops in partic- tion to the gently used items that


people bring in to sell. T-yre also
offers new, discontinued designer
labels from stores such as Macy's
and TJ Nlaxx. She also sells Merle
Norman cosmetics.
"People who consign their clothes
are pretty savvy shoppers," she said.
"\We get all the name-brand labels,
like Norton, Liz, Calvin Klein.
People shop on sale and buy these
brands, then when they're done
(wearing the clothes) they want a lit-


New business organization


advocates for mature adults


Comfort Keepers in

Inverness takes part
Special to the Chronicle
Mature adults nationwide will soon have an
online resource tool to learn how "senior
friendly" their local businesses are. From solv-
ing a consumer dispute issue to finding employ-
ment, the Senior Business Bureau promises to
bring mature adults and their local businesses
together.


The Senior Business Bureau is calling on all
businesses to take an active role in nurturing a
growing business relationship between the
business and mature adults.
"The bottom line is, mature adults are being
left behind as consumers and as employees.
This is a huge problem that we are faced with,"
said Andrew Maisonneuve, CEO of the Senior
Business Bureau. 'Ask any mature adult if they
have found that finding a job was easy."
The Senior Business Bureau is a new organi-
zation that is dedicated to the well-being of
mature adults. The main goal of the Senior
Please see ADULTS/Page 6D


tle money back from them."
She said those for whom consign-
ing is a lifestyle keep their clothes
in excellent condition, because they
buy and wear things knowing they
will eventually consign it. In that
way, clothing found in consignment
shops differs from that in thrift
stores, although thrift stores often
have a designer "boutique" section.
Please see PASiMlOI/Page 6D


Developer plans
open house Saturday
Sky Development Group of
Citrus Springs will have a grand
opening celebration at its sales
center from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Saturday.
The Miami-based developer,
which has purchased a large num-
ber of lots for development in
Citrus Springs, is selling lots and
new homes. It has made arrange-
ments with two local and one out-
of-county builders for new home
construction. The names of the
builders will be announced July 30.
The company invites the public
to the event. Sky officials issued a
special invitation to Citrus County


Realtors, so that they can become
familiar with what the company
offers.
There will be barbeque chicken,
ribs and soft drinks, as well as a
moon walk and giant slide for chil-
dren. Free information about
homes and lots will also be avail-
able.
The sales center is on North
bitrus Springs Boulevard, at the
main entrance by the fountain, just
off U.S. 41.
Persons interested in attending
are asked to call Julia at (352)
489-2997 by Monday for reserva-
tions, so that the company has an
idea of how many to expect.
Please see DIGEST/Page 6D


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Be sure

to pay

yourself

back
DEAR BRUCE: My
wife and I are in our
mid-60s, retired, but I
work part time. Our retire-
ment income is a little more
than $43,000 a year. There's
no first mortgage, but I do
have an equity line at 5.5 per-
cent with a balance of
$22,000, which we are paying
off at about $400 a month.
The minimum amount due is
only $100 a month. There are
no car payments, and we pay
our bills on time. We have a
modest savings of $35,000 in
an IRA.
We must do some mainte-
nance on the house, new roof
($4,500) and exterior paint
($1,500). My wife must also
have some dental work,
which will run about $5,000.
We are earning about 3 per-
cent on the IRA. Would it
make sense to deplete the
IRA or use the credit line? I
Please see MONEY/Page 7D


CONSIGNMENT SHOPS IN CITRUS COUNTY
* Children:
Kids Trading Post, 985 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, 564-3900.
Baby Bargains, 3660 N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando,
637.5437.
Kiddy Korner, 411 S. U.S. 41, Inverness, 637-1388.
* Upscale and everyday fashion:
Helen's Consignment Boutique, 130 N. Pine Ave., Inverness, 726-9090.
Ivy Lane, 1781 W. Main St., Inverness, 637-1112.
Ritzy Rags & Glitzy Jewels, 105 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
637-6333.
Upscale Resale, 1615 SE U.S. 19, Crystal River, 795 9542.
Blue Moon Resale, 431 SE Kings Bay Drive, Crystal River, 795-2218.


Business DIGEST


i : '


'Si


S












STOCKS


2D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Lucent 2744777 2.85 -.27
Pfizer 1588298 26.50 -1.07
Citigrp 1395974 44,42 -2.00
Motorola 1301668 20.00 +.50
NokiaCp 1218771 15.56 -2.40

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Fedders If 2.78 +.78 +39.0
GardDen 43.30 +9.05 +26.4
AK Steel 9.61 +1.89 +24.5
OreSt 22.07 +4.27 +24.0
WolvTub 6.61 +1.21 +22.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
MolinaH 24.82 -23.53 -48.7
Amergrp s 34.87 -9.42 -21.3
HuttigBId 9.18 -2.28 -19.9
TempurP 17.96 -3.79 -17.4
Avon 31.00 -6.35 -17.0

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,204
1,284
542
41
3,573
85
9,820,025,561


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
SPDR 3279938 123.54 +.70
iShRs2000s1212817 67.32 +1.32
SemiHTr 1045998 37.22 +.24
SPEngy 718279 47.39 +2.02
iShJapan 635019 10.26 +.04

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
CVD Eqp 3.31 +1.25 +80.7
ImplntSc 6.10 +2.01 +49.1
WIssXcesn 10.63 +2.88 +37.2
Vicon 3.43 +.79 +29.9


IntlgSys


2.62 +.57 +27.8


LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
LawEnfn 3.11 -.89 -22.3
TriValley 10.01 -2.19 -18.0
CapAllialT 9.25 -1.55 -14.4
Heartland 2.24 -.31 -12.2
Team 21.05 -2.70 -11.4

DIARY
Advanced 639
Declined 442
New Highs 160
New Lows 36
Total issues 1,133
Unchanged 52
Volume 1,363,624,569


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Microsoft 4357158 25.68 -.11
Nasd100Tr4237580 39.42 +.53
Intel 3716372 26.75 -1.55
Cisco 2438324 19.32 -.57
eBays 2039770 41.02 +5.94

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
GlblePnt 6.93 +3.59+107.5
Synergx 3.12 +1.43 +84.6
HstAmrwt 9.45 +4.24 +81.4
DXPEnt 12.29 +5.40 +78.4
GMXwtA 5,97 +2.05 +52.3

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Westell 4.19 -2.43 -36.7
ICTSIntlIf 2.11 -.79 -27.2
PhnxTc 6.47 -1.98 -23.4
NeoseT 3.27 -.97 -22.9
InnovSol s 18.01 -5,09 -22.0

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,130
1,134
409
66
3,351
87
8,842,446,468


Here are the 400 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 325 most
active on the Nasdaq National Market and 50 most active on the American Stock
Exchange. Mutual funds are 800 largest.
52 wk HI/Lo: High and low price over the past 52 weeks.
Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company's full name (not its abbrevia-
tion). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock.
PE: Price to earnings ratio.
PPE: Projected price to earnings ratio based on analysts' forecasts of earnings for next
12 months.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the week.
YTD % Chg: Loss or gain for the year. No change indicated by unc.
Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by unc.


Stock Footnotes: cc PE greater than 99. cld Issue has been called for redemption by company. d New
52-week low. dd Loss In last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging
Company Marketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq
capital and surplus listing qualification, n Stock was a new Issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low
figures date only from the beginning of trading pf Preferred stock issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes
installments of purchase price, q Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated, rt Right to buy security at
a specified price, s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi- Trades will be settled when
the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vj Company In bankruptcy or receivership, or being reor-
pizijd u."r ihK,. bvilkrupicy la AprDi a,';r,, CJI t ih+ ,'-irr:.
Dividend Footnotes Ea 'a ii ..a nd: er p r.ul a.- r..:.r .,,Jl .e3 Ar..a l r,, plu: i.:,. : .
LiQulairi.n ,i,,,lan.] mo A rlU li J1cla ir ,r pao in 1. :1 iTr ?r-Ti"; i I '_utr -T .n u5lal + Ar .:- i.. .

I S u :1 hl ,',, r a.' S m3 ir. yA i t M ,, 1 .-..c ri d ,, jd r r.a, :.,. .r ,n r ,ei..i i . L ', : 1..ei,. J i r, :
year sIaum ulaiv sSu & ir,. lr a- ,rr a.r a,-:a i m '. u. r.i j-r.u .1j e r. r,.r .. :.- ,ll ., '
receri Oai, rd r ann.-,uin.: r, rI p inli si i3l. llri- n nain. ai 1i. r i, r l:.r.. uI y .3 l. : r i .r .I Ir I a-.I lsr ,i
ae So pce:The Asocg ae12 P.r.ir. ess I .JSa.e..s igres a nof.:.ca.
-jale Source: The Associated Press Sales figures are unotficial.


Name


AT&T .95
AmSouth 1.00
BkofAm s 2.00
BellSouth 1.16
CapCtyBk s .61
Citigrp 1.76
Disney .24
EKodak .50
ExxonMbl 1.16
FPLGps 1.42
FlaRock s
FordM .40
GenElec .88
GnMotr 2.00
HomeDp .40
Intel .32
IBM .80


DIv PE YId Last


Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg
-.11 +.9
+.75 +7.8
-1.13 -4.6
-.31 -3.9
+1.43 +7.1
-2.00 -7.8
-.55 -7.1
-1.31 -15,3
+1.34 +16.1
-.24 +15.6
+2.18 +32.0
-.28 -26.8
-.46 -3.9
-.49 -9.5
+1.86 +1.7
-1.55 +14,4
+2.06 -14.3


LowesCos
McDnlds
Microsoft
Motorola
Penney
ProgrssEn
SearsHldgs
SprntFON
TimeWarn
UniFirst
VerizonCm
Wachovia
WalMart
Walgrn


Wkly YTD
DIv PE YId Last Chg %Chg
.24 22 .4 65,73 +2.08 +14.1
.55 16 1.8 30.94 -.05 -3.5
.32 23 1.2 25.68 -.11 -3.9
.16 18 .8 20.00 +.50 +16.3
.50 25 .9 57.58 +2.33 +39.1
2.36 15 5.3 44.45 -.85 -1.7
... 16 ... 159.62 +2.13 +61.3
.50 ... 2.0 25.28 -.19 +1.7
.20 23 1.2 16.64 -.03 -14.4
.15 20 .3 44.94 +1.61 +58.9
1.62 11 4.7 34.17 -.52 -15.7
1.84 13 3,6 50.52 -.76 -4.0
.60 20 1.2 49.54 -.71 -6.2
.26 31 .6 46.68 -.42 +21.7


52-Week Daily Wkly Wkly YTD
High Low Name Last Net Chg Net Chg % Cg % Chg
10,984.46 9,708.40 Dow Jones ndustrials 10,651.18 +10.35 +.10 -1.22 +6.92
3,889.97 2,959.58 Dow Jones Transportation 3,780.03 +134.00 +3.68 -.47 +24.20
400.17 274.84 Dow Jones Utilities 392.92 +.19 +.05 +17.31 +41.89
7,495.11 6,215.97 NYSEComposite 7,447.16 +43.57 +.59 +2.72 +17.76
1,587.35 1,186.14 AMEX Index 1,546.54 +6.57 +.43 +7.82 +25.38
2,193.19 1,750.82 Nasdaq Composite 2,179.74 +22.96 +1.06 +.20 +17.88
1,236,56 1,060.72 S&P 500 1,233.68 +5.76 +.47 +1.80 +13.58
677.87 515.90 Russell 2000 677.78 +14.04 +2.12 +4,02 +25.69
12,363.89 10,268.52 Wilshire 5000 12,337.25 +82.55 +.67 +3.06 +16.90


NE YRKSOC0ECANG


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last
A-B-C
7.10 4.86 ABB Ltd ...... 15 6.50
8.45 7.85 ACMInco .66 q ... 8.34
18.13 9.09 AESCp ... 23 17 16.23
45.00 33.85 AFLAC .44 17 16 43.75
39.32 28.60 AGLRes 1.24 16 16 37.90
18.22 5.45 AKSteel ... 8 7 9.61
33.49 26.76 AMLIRs 1.92 12 .. 31.39
14.95 6.34 AMR ... dd .. 13.64
45.81 33.15 ASA Ltd .40 q ... 38.50
20.01 13.59 AT&T .95 dd 12 19.24
16.77 8.94 AUOptron.38r .. 14 15,75
28.48 19.12 AXA .79e ...... 26.70
50.00 38.26 AbtLab 1.10 21 18 46.04
27.60 21.00 Accenture ... 17 16 24.80
13.99 12.07 AdamsEx .90e q ... 13.21
24.85 15.11 Adesa .30 20 16 23.97
24.95 10.76 AMD ... cc 47 20.49
9.23 6.15 Ahold ... ... ... 8.68
13.15 7.40 AirTran dd 10.40
34.99 25.55 Alcoa .60 20 14 28.61
51.70 30.76 Alletes 1.26f 18 21 48.64
49.90 32.35 AlliCap 2.43e 20 16 48.34
12.86 11.26 AlWrdd2 .89 q 12.33
38.70 24.35 AllmrFn 13 12 38.25
63.22 45.50 Allstate 1.28 12 10 61.07
20.20 9.39 Alpharma .18 dd 28 14.96
69.68 44.50 Altia 2.92 14 12 66.52
56.16 43.22 Ameren 2.54 19 17 55.11
39.34 30.27 AEP 1.40 13 16 38.77
58.03 47.70 AmExp .48 19 16 54.57
73.80 49.91 AmIntGplf .50 15 12 60.74
12.75 10.65 AmSIP3 .96 q ... 11.26
33.25 26.11 Amerigas2.24f 21 19 32.57
28.29 23.80 AmSouth 1.00 17 13 27.91
53.69 44.85 Anheusr .98 17 16 45.72
30.98 18.90 AquaAm .52 35 30 30.78
4.24 2.25 Aquila .. dd ... 3.70
57.43 30.10 ArchCoal .32 78 21 56.50
25.37 14.95 ArchDan .34 19 16 21.99
62.70 59.33 Ashlandnl.10 9 16 61.99
10.50 7.77 AsdEstat .68 dd .. 9.55
29.48 24.40 ATMOS 1.24 15 16 28.83
17.76 7.76 Avaya .. 19 14 9.25
34.07 18.00 Aviall .. 25 18 34.46
46.25 30.73 Avon .66 15 15 31.00
31.01 17.62 BHP BilLt.46e ...... 29.52
66.94 51.95 BPPLC 1.87e 14 .. 65.95
25.10 19.61 BRT 2.00f 14 ... 23.45
46.45 34.12 BaliCps .40 14 13 39.14
47.47 41.70 BkofAms2.00f 11 10 44.85
34.09 26.93 BkNY .84f 16 14 31.13
47.25 36.74 Banta .721 17 15 46.71
26.32 18.14 BarrickG .22 48 43 24.70
87.89 57.17 BauschL .52 26 22 82.63
9.98 4.65 BearingP If ... dd 26 8.02
28.96 24.85 BellSouthl.16f 11 15 26.72
40.50 26.52 BIkHICp 1.28 20 20 39.75
16.07 15.20 BIkFL08 .75a q .. 15.40
6.94 5.86 BlueChp .56e q .. 6.49
66.85 46.40 Boeing 1.00 30 22 66.20
27.47 21.20 Borders .36 15 14 25.30
27.95 19.85 BostBeer ... 22 21 22.68
74.29 50.60 BostProp 2.72f 29 34 73.41
40.20 26.50 BostonSd .. 22 14 28.43
26.60 22.22 BrMySq 1.12 24 19 24.95
56.47 33.82 BurNSF .80f 22 13 52.14
61.07 34.92 BuriRsc .34 15 12 62.43
49.73 42.07 CH Engy 2.16 19 19 48.05
110.9358.00 CIGNA .10 8 14 103.91
36.65 28.98 CSS Inds .48f 15 12 36.99
31.15 19.31 CVSCps .15 29 20 30.42
15.59 9.28 CallGolf .28 dd 24 15.05
4.46 1.32 Calpine ... dd ... 3.39
31.60 25.21 CampSp .68 19 17 30.71
14.20 11.68 CapMpfB1.26 ...... 13.09
53.60 34.25 Caterpils 1.00 16 12 52.41
13.80 9.78 CenterPnL28m dd 16 13.58
87.00 76.00 CnlLt pf 4.50 ...... 86.00
35.54 29.55 CntryTel .24 14 14 33.53
15.85 7.57 ChmpE .. 43 17 12.43
19.50 14.38 Checkpnt .01 13 15 18.08
26.04 13.69 ChesEng .20f 17 12 25.53
63.15 46.21 Chevrons1.80f 9 10 57.79
4.88 3.14 CinciBell ... 29 20 4.64


YTD
chg %chg

-.10 +14.8
+.04 +2.2
-.44 +18.7
-.69 +9.8
-.40 +14.0
+1.89 -33.6
-.21 -1.9
+.08 +24.6
+.50 -4.8
-.11 +0.9
-.60 +19.9
+.36 +7.9
-.83 -1.3
+1.30 -8.1
-.01 +0.7
-.39 +13.0
+.48 -6.9
+.03 +11.7
+.36 -2.8
+1.11 -8.9
+.06 +32.4
+1.12 +15.1
-.05 -0.4
+.04 +16.5
-1.19 +18.1
-.19 -11.7
-.13 +8.9
-.24 +9.9
+.08 +12.9
+.81 -3.2
-.47 -7.5
+.31 -8.5
-.16 +10.0
+.75 +7.8
-.76 -9.9
+1.00 +25.2
-.06 +0.3
+3.39 +59.0
+.25 -1.4
+1.94 +0.3
+.04 -6.6
-.07 +5.4
-.31 -46.2
+2.66 +50.0
-6.35 -19.9
+1.85 +22.9
+.92 +12.9
+.02 -3.7
+.68 -11.0
-1.13 -4.6
+1.68 -6.9
+.78 +4.4
+.95 +2.0
-.71 +28.2
+.39 -0.1
-.31 -3.9
+24 +29.6
-.09 -2.8
-.01 -2.8
+1.45 +27.9
+.23 unc
+.13 +6.6
+.71 +13.5
+.77 -20.0
-.29 -2.6
+3.50 +10.2
+3.53 +43.5
-.50 unc
-6.04 +27.4
+1.32 +16.5
-.10 +35.0
-.24 +11.5
+.09 -14.0
-.10 +2.7
-.03 -3.8
+1.99 +7.5
-.16 +20.2
+.50 +5.5
-.76 -5.5
+1.92 +5.2
-.19 +0.2
+1.03 +54.7
+1.12 +10.1
+.09 +11.8


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


45.95 36.95 CINergy 1.92 20 15 44.98
49.99 42.10 Citigrp 1.76 11 10 44.42
27.41 18.84 ClairesStrs.40 17 15 25.00
50.69 38.30 CocaCI 1.12 22 20 44.03
27.92 18.45 CocaCE .16 20 16 22.74
9.31 8.08 Collntin .65a q 8.74
33.15 23.35 CmcBNJs .44 19 16 33.22
36.60 16.46 CVRDs .89e 13 ... 33.22
30.24 22.50 ConAgra 1.09 18 16 22.93
62.22 35.64 ConocPhilsl.24 9 9 61.25
48.74 39.42 ConEd 2.28 20 16 47.87
15.76 12.30 Cnvrgys ... 20 14 14.75
18.48 9,29 Coming ... dd 22 17.68
11.90 7.29 CorusGr ......... 8.49
40.31 30.30 CntwdFns.60f 10 9 37.58
14.92 8.45 CypSem ... dd 41 13.85
D-E-F
11.95 10.24 DNPSelcl.78a q ... 11.70
27.97 18.98 DPL .96 14 19 27.56
42.82 18.58 DRHortns.36f 11 9 41.94
48.31 39.31 DTE 2.06 23 13 47.59
48.63 38.77 DaimlrC 1.93e ... 10 43.25
19.75 10.90 DanaCp .48 dd 11 16.06
34.30 19.30 Darden .08 19 17 34.47
74.73 56.72 Deere 1.24 11 11 71.35
10.01 3.20 Delphi .06m 18 ... 5.09
8.17 2.46 DeltaAir ... dd ... 3.48
18.25 13.88 DirecTV ... dd 48 15.42
29.99 20.88 Disney .241 21 17 25.83
22.80 17.69 DollarG .181 19 16 20.21
76.87 62.07 DomRes 2.68 20 14 73.88
56.75 37.95 DowChm 1.34 11 9 48.60
54.90 39.88 DuPont 1.48f 21 15 44.20
30.55 20.45 DukeEgy 1.241 14 18 29.75
38.95 34.50 Duq pfA 2.10 ...... 37.00
19.74 16.93 DuqUght 1.00 15 16 19.22
6.09 3.21 Dynegy ... dd ... 5.26
16.00 9.51 ETrade ... 16 14 15.67
15.09 9.24 EMC Cp ... 32 25 14.49
61.80 42.19 EastChm 1.76 14 10 58.30
35.19 24.63 EKodak .50 cc 12 27.32
13.15 7.09 EIPasoCp .16 dd 3 12.36
30.49 3.00 Elan ... .. 7.79
25.01 19.53 EmpDist 1.28 31 17 24.10
55.70 45.60 EnbrEPtrs3.70 29 26 55.16
23.65 17.81 Endesa .92e ...... 22.46
30.15 17.35 EnPro ... 20 17 29.91
41.42 26.95 ENSCO .10 46 17 38.36
77.49 54.43 Entergy 2.16 20 16 76.93
13.65 B.41 Eqtylnn .60 cc 52 12.94
54.12 32.85 Exelon 1.60 18 16 51.87
64.37 44.20 ExxonMbll.16f 14 13 59.50
44.59 31.52 FPLGps 1.42 18 16 43.22
19.18 13.80 FedSignl .24 dd 23 16.90
22.27 19.28 Ferreligs 2.00 dd 27 21.40
25.75 16.77 FerroP .58 42 19 22.92
44.69 36.50 FirstData .24 20 16 40.70
22.17 13.79 FFinFds5.10e q ... 19.75
20.71 18.87 FtTrFidn 1.60 q ... 19.64
52.75 26.71 FlaRocks ... 28 23 52.40
15.22 9.07 FordM .40 8 10 10.72
95.95 68.47 FortuneBr1.32 18 17 94.31
43.90 31.52 FMCG 1.00a 14 14 40.30
G-H-1
37.12 23.82 GATX .80 11 20 36.71
9.40 7.64 GabelliET.72a q 9.00
90.57 41.00 Genentch ... 92 59 87.60
37.75 31.42 GenElec .88 21 18 35.07
." :'V GnMotr 2.00 dd .. 36.25
1J;' '. GoldmanSl.00 12 11 109.13
43.90 29.39 Goodrich .80 29 20 43.30
32.78 27.86 GtPlainEn1.66 14 16 32.17
30.88 24.80 GMP 1.00 14 .. 29.33
27.78 18.35 Griffon ... 17 13 25.80
20.74 13.10 GuangRy .71e ...... 17.72
75.55 49.95 Guidant .40 43 25 69.28
58.60 34.70 HCA Inc .60 17 14 49.17
50.00 26.45 Hallibtn .50 dd 21 63.29
16.17 14.32 HanJS 1.11e q ... 15.20
10.09 8.65 HanPtDiv .55 q .. 9.20
12.38 10.56 HanPtDv2 .78 q ... 12.14
50.85 33.99 Hanson 1.71e ...... 48.68
63.23 45.14 HarleyD .64t 17 15 53.45


-.15 +8.0
-2.00 -7.8
-.11 +17.6
+.95 +5.7
+.74 +9.1
-.15 -4.9
+1.62 +3.2
+2.27 +14.5
-.37 -22.1
+1.90 +41.1
-.20 +9.4
+.27 -1.6
+.39 +50.2
+.25 -13.5
-1.17 +1.5
+.17 +18.1


unc -1.8
-.09 +9.8
+.48 +38.7
-.09 +10.3
+1.15 -10.0
-.45 -7.3
+.37 +24.3
+1.60 -4.1
-.11 -43.6
-.37 -53.5
-.50 -7.9
-.55 -7.1
+.33 -2.7
-.85 +9.1
+1.08 -1.8
+.14 -9.9
-.20 +17.4
-.75 +2.8
+.21 +2.0
+.20 +13.9
+.74 +4.8
-.18 -2.6
+1.81 +1.0
-1.31 -15.3
+.63 +18.8
+.44 -71.4
-.04 +6.3
+.02 +7.0
+.31 -3.5
+.52 +1.1
+2.45 +20.9
+1.13 +13.8
-.23 +10.2
-.38 +17.7
+1.34 +16.1
-.24 +15.6
+1.00 -4.3
-.12 +5.4
+2.32 -1.2
+.57 -4.3
+.35 -8.1
-.26 -1.8
+2.18 +32.0
-.28 -26.8
+.98 +22.2
+1.70 +5.4


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last


YTD 52-Wk
chg %chg HI Low Name


78.99 43.94 HarrahE 1.45f 23 19 77.73 +.66 +16.2
22.35 16.90 Hasbro .36 21 16 21.30 -.18 +9.9
29.79 24.60 HawaliEl 1.24 18 16 27.67 +.27 -5.1
39.20 31.11 HIItCrREIT2.48f 28 30 38.23 -.03 +0.2
42.11 35.25 HlthcrRI 2.621 28 32 40.21 +.24 -1.2
10.19 5.74 HellnTel .21e ...... 10.34 +.70 +17.5
25.07 16.08 HewleftP .32 20 14 24.18 -.76 +15.3
31.79 22.62 HighwdPlfl.70 cc 46 31.14 +1.08 +12.4
44.30 32.39 HomeDp .40 19 16 43.47 +1.86 +1.7
39.50 31.85 Honwlllntll .83 22 17 38.20 +1.63 +7.9
34.51 25.29 HughSup s.36f 14 12 27.76 -2.93 -14.2
44.73 17.00 Humana ... 20 17 38.91 -2.12 +31.1
27.75 20.16 IMSHIth .08 24 19 27.31 +.12 +17.7
32.95 26.22 Idacorp 1.20 16 18 31.43 +.13 +2,8
41.88 28.46 Imallon .481 22 22 42.20 +1.90 +32.6
87.92 82.05 IngerRd 1.00 11 12 76.70 +1.92 -4.5
99.10 71.85 IBM .80f 71 16 84.44 +2.06 -14.3
37.12 24.20 IntlGame .48 26 21 27.93 -1.50 -18.8
43.66 29.76 IntPap 1.00 dd 21 31.59 +.73 -24.8


35.09 26.66 IronMtn ... 46 37 32.31 +1.40 +6.0
J-K-L
40.45 33.35 JPMorgCh1.36 20 11 35.60 -.26 -8.7
69.99 54.37 JohnJn 1.32 21 18 64.32 -.71 +1.4
63.98 52.57 JohnsnCtUl.00 13 12 58.39 -.48 -8.0
34.02 26.52 Kaydon .48 21 18 28.93 +.32 -12.4
46.89 39.88 Kellogg 1.01 20 18 44.49 -.31 -0.4
41.13 24.40 Kellwood .64 14 12 28.09 +.21 -18.6
35.00 29.00 Keycorp 1.30 14 13 34.45 +.11 +1.6
41.53 35.19 KeySpan 1.82 15 16 39.92 +.068 +1.2
58.90 41.66 Kohls 26 21 56.95 -.48 +15.8
19.96 14.65 Kroger ... dd 14 19.50 -.07 +11.2
26.60 13.22 LG Philipn .........22.38 +.03 +24.4
8.29 4.91 LLERy .36e 14 ... 6.35 +.19 +1.6
10.75 4.01 LSILog ... dd 22 10.22 +.11 +86.5
23.92 16.50 LTCPrp 1.32 16 ... 23.00 +.97 +15.5
17.46 11.50 LaZBoy .44 20 13 14.26 -.51 -7.2
33.59 26.31 Laclede 1.38 18 16 32.35 +.27 +3.9
6.80 5.51 LbtyASG .59e q ... .6.11 +.02 -7.6
9.53 7.08 UbtyMA ... 79 62 8.67 -.01 -7.1
67.30 50.34 UllyEli 1.52 48 18 55.00 -1.66 -3.1
49.42 40.78 UncNat 1.46 11 11 47.21 -.25 +1.1
29.51 17.50 .Lindsay .24f 61 34 25.01 +.03 -3.4
65.46 51.20 LockhdM 1.00 21 16 62.00 +.25 +11.6
66.65 45.90 LowesCos.24f 22 18 65.73 +2.08 +14.1
4.16 2.35 Lucent ... 12 15 2.85 -.27 -24.2
35.65 17.04 Lyondell .90 22 8 29.40 +1.41 +1.7


YTD 52-Wk
Div PE PPE Last chg %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last


M-N-0
112.5092.04 M&TBk 1.801 17 1
29.01 18.28 MBNA .56 15 1
31.00 23.79 MDURes .72 15 1
9.06 8.35 MCR .50 q
11.60 6.52 Madeco ......
82.94 60.00 Magnalg 1.52 11 1
6.99 5.96 MgdHi .52 q
51.17 38.43 Manulilg 1.201 ... 1
37.49 10.22 MStewr ... dd
18.16 11.15 MatScl .. dd 1
22.20 9.21 Maytag .36m dd ;2
34.56 25.64 McDnlds .55f 16 1
55.44 46.88 Medtrnic .34 36 i2
47.00 25.60 Merck 1.52 15 1
61.99 47.35 MerrillLyn .801 13 1
46.97 32.99 MetLife .461 11 1
13.88 9.32 MicronT ... 35 i


48.76 35.13 MidAApt 2.34 cc
24.74 14.59 Midas ... 42
3.92 1.65 Milacron ... dd
63.74 42.01 Millipore ... 29
64.61 43.79 MillsCp 2.51 23
60.51 46.54 MorgStan 1.08 13
20.27 12.47 MSEmMkt.07e q
20.14 12.37 Motorola .16b 18
11.85 10.22 MunlenhFd.73 q
20.03 14.24 MylanLab .24f 29
39.84 21.01 NCRCps ... 21
39.66 32.08 NatllCity 1.48f 9
29.75 25.05 NatFuGasl.16f 16
52.39 39.40 NatGrid 2.17e ...
25.02 11.85 NatSemi .08 23
2.29 1.94 NewAr .21a q
49.34 39.54 NJRscs' 1.36 17'
49.98 34.90 NewmtM .40 39
8.17 4.72 NwpkRs ... 82
18.88 15.01 NewsCpAn.16e ...
25.50 20.50 NiSource .92 15
41.87 32.37 Nicer 1.86 18
92.43 68.61 NikeB 1.00 21
65.25 34.15 NobleCorp .08 46
18.07 10.89 NokiaCp .44e
4,53 2.26 NortelNet ... dd
30.81 25.24 NoFrkBcs .88 14
21.74 17.17 NoestUt .701 dd
52.99 38,61 NoBordr 3.20 18
58.15 49.54 NorthrqpGl.041 16


31.46 23.01 NSTARs 1
65.53 37.52 Nucors .1
16.40 14.12 NvFL
16.20 14.09 NvlMO
29.99 24.10 OGEEngyl
82.75 47.76 OcciPet 1
28.25 13.87 OlffcDpt
25.35 15.93 Olin
84.60 48.32 OshkshTrk.
47.75 37.34 OutbkSlk


.16
60a
.88
.89
.33
.24

.80
53f
.52
P-


30.38 20.38 PNM Res .80f1
74.73 56.20 PPG 1.88
61.79 44.70 PPLCorp 1.84
21.71 9.20 PaylShoe ..
23.45 14.40 Pengrthg2.76
57.15 35,75 PenVaRs2.60f
57.69 34.03 Penney .50
22.40 11.83 PepBoy .27
57.20 47.37 PepsiCo 1.04
26.35 18.29 PepsiAmer.34
17.06 9.50 Prmian 1.15e
33.05 21.99 Plizer .76
24.99 20.15 PiedNGs .92
13.29 10.75 PimcoStrat89a
47.50 40.62 PitnyBw 1.24
39.45 30.44 PlumCrk 1.52
38.45 27.50 PostPrp 1.80
49.42 37.59 Praxair .72
57.40 50.53 ProctGarnl.12
46.10 40.47 ProgrssEn2.36
4.00 3.05 ProsStHiln .27
19.62 12.93 Providian ...
64.32 38.10 PSEG '2.24
81.80 67.00 PSEG pfA4.08
24.81 20.73 PugetEngyl.00


18 16
6 9
q ...
q ...
18 16
12 10
25 20
16 9
22 17
22 17
Q-R
19 16
16 12
17 14
99 18

... 19
25 16
cc 45
22 20
20 18
17 ...
20 13
21 18
q ...
20 16
20 23
19 ..
22 18
21 19
15 14
q ...
11 11
20 18

40 16


7.19 6.39 PHYM .38 q
10.09 9.13 PIGM .60 q
6.81 6.00 PPrlT .36a q
63.38 26.87 Quanexs .54 14
4.87 2.56 QwestCm ... dd
19.95 13.85 RPM .60 20
34.48 22.83 RadioShk .25 121
48.00 33.63 Ralcorp 1.00e 17 "
34.21 21.77 RJamesFn.32 171
55.00 43.29 Rayonier 2.48 24
26.08 19.68 Rtylncos1.34 22
35.97 29.24 RegionsFnl.36 17
28.50 19.92 Repsol .63e ...
14.20 6.02 RetallVent .. dd
3.63 1.96 Revion ... dd
5.11 3.02 RieAid .. 10 6
67.45 48.94 RoylDul 2.82e 10
62.15 60.60 RoyDShAwi......
20.80 16.70 Royce 1.66e q
S-T-U
27.29 22.78 SBCComrn 1.29 17
43.65 35.73 SCANA 1.56 19
85.25 41.00 StJoe .56 69
47.50 31.13 StJudes ... 40
17.04 12.37 SalEMInc21.65a q
13.74 11.36 SalmSBF.14e q
44.50 24.50 SJuanB 2.94e 16
25.00 19.10 SaraLee .79 13
21.59 16.56 SchergPI .22 dd
79.50 58.64 Schlrnb .84 33 2
14.23 8.25 Schwab .09f 53 ;
36.00 28.30 ScoftPw 1.65e ...
21.50 10.11 SeagateT .321 13
24.25 18.70 Sensient .60 13 1
26.70 14.07 ShopKo ... 16
47.39 36.26 Shurgard 2.24f 56 7
13.14 7.70 SierrPac ... 27 ;
2.03 .55 SilcnGphh ... dd
77.88 48.65 SimonProp2.80 53 !
32.80 21.62 SmithAO .64 29
6.69 3.08 Solectm ... ...
35.92 29.10 SouthnCol.49 17 1
16.75 13.18 SwstAid .02 28 0
24.79 20.05 SovrgnBcp .16 17
25.87 17.80 SpmtFON .50 dd "
30.31 21.55 Standex .84 22
27.42 19.80 Steris .16 22 1


YTD
chg %chg


-.56 +11.9
+5.59 +5.7
+.34 +4.8
-.18 -1.9
+.26 +10.9
+4.10 +42.0
+3.38 +61.6
+.66 -10.3
+1.70 +23.4
-.13 -0.5


-.22 +14.2
+1.41 -3.8
-.24 +13.9
-.28 +69.7
+.31 +10.5
+1.99 -0.2
+2.33 +39.1
-.15 -18.5
-.62 +5.0
-.34 +21.3
+1.17 +23.5
-1.07 -1.5
-.02 +5.0
unc +5.1
-.32 -6.2
+.28 -4.6
+1.41 +10.1
+.83 +10.3
+.77 -0.2
-.85 -1.7
+.01 -2.8
+1.04 +15.6
-.31 +19.9
+.91 -0.3
-.05 -4.1
-.03 +6.5
+.06 +1.6
-.10 -4.4
+4.55 +33.4
+.02 -14.6
+.11 -3.5
-.57 -27.8
-.52 -4.2
-.44 -2.6
+1.12 +10.8
+.28 -1.6
-.54 -3.8
+.44 +6.6
+.50 +93.7
-.06 +44.8
+.06 +16.1
-2.93 +6.8
unc -1.4
-.32 -4.0


-.40 -8.0
-.39 +8.1
-1.55 +29.8
+3.72 +11.2
+.21 -17M1
+.25 +5.7
+1.45 +52.0
-.58 -19.4
+.57 -1.6
+6.47 +22.9
+1.07 +15.5
+.63 +13.6
-.83 +6.0
-2.72 -21.4
+.46 +34.9
+.84 +5.1
-.13 +19.5
+.05 -63.0
+.33 +18.8
+.72 -7.2
-.02 -30.6
-.23 +5.4
+.18 -11.5
-.19 +8.1
-.19 +1.7
+.90 +4.3
+.37 +12.9


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
36.82 22.95 StorTch ... 21 19 36.42 +.08 +15.2
11.50 6.41 SturmR .40 61 21 9.09 +.20 +0.7
40.76 33.90 SunCmts 2.52 cc ... 34.45 -3.22 -14.4
75.77 64.40 SunTrst 2.20 14 13 75.18 -.55 +1.8
32.62 24.55 TCFFncls.85 15 14 28.50 +1.81 -11.3
32.35 24.35 TD Bknorth.80 20 13 29.58 +.75 +1.2
19.30 12.18 TECO .76 dd 16 18.96 +.06 +23.5
87.25 39.03 TXUCorp2.25 dd 12 85.24 +2.15 +32.0
71.51 44.44 TXUpfD 4.06 ...... 69.26 +1.76 +21.2
9.57 6.29 TaiwSemi .32r ...... 9.21 -.15 +13.9
60.00 40.03 Target .401 16 21 59.10 +.40 +13.8
25.00 11.25 TempurP ... 21 14 17.96 -3.79 -15.3
12.93 9.77 TeneHIt ... dd ... 12.11 +.01 +10.3
45.45 37.44 Teppco 2.701 25 21 42.30 -.10 +7.4
18.97 10.80 Teradyn ... dd ... 15.93 +2.13 -6.7
9.38 5.84 Terra ... 18 14 8.09 +.56 -8.9
29.99 11.01 TerraNitro2.45e 11 .. 29.80 +.80 +33.6
35.20 23.71 TetraTech ... 39 19 36.00 +3.19 +27.2
31.50 18.06 Texlnst .10 28 24 30.76 unc +24.9
4.52 3.04 Theragen ... dd ... 3.24 +.06 -20.2
30.98 23.94 ThermoEl ... 13 17 29.17 +1.55 -3.4
33.88 23.19 ThmBet ... 18 16 31.35 +1.08 +2.0
87.45 71.03 3M Co 1.68 19 17 74.71 -.74 -9.0
36.00 27.00 Tiffany .32f 16 21 34.15 +.20 +6.8
19.90 15.41 TimeWam .20 23 20 16.64 -.03 -14.4
29.50 22.50 Timken .60 15 11 26.44 +1.13 +1.6
23.03 11.30 TtanCp ... dd 19 23.01 +.04 +42.0
20.15 14.85 ToddShp .40 12 .. 19.25 +.20 +6.4
58.67 18.55 TollBross ... 17 11 57,00 +1.03 +66.2
8.22 5.90 TorchEn .68e ...... 7.05 -.03 +8.5
57.57 49.28 Trchmrk .44 12 11 52.01 -1.03 -8.8
47.21 32.45 TorDBkg91.0 ... 13 46.54 +.71 +11.7
126.8693.54 Total SA3.53e ...... 124.31 +.21 +13.2
26.66 20.89 TotalSys .24f 27 24 25.00 +1.04 +2.9
30.01 24.00 TwnCtry 1.72 cc ... 28.69 -.06 +3.8
58.19 25.94 Transocn ... 86 20 58.67 +3.95 +38.4
20.71 14.37 Tredgar .16 20 15 16.67 +.87 -17.5
18.48 15.79 TdrConl .24f q ... 18.48 +.17 +1.1
36.58 27.27 Tycolntl .40 29 14 30.60 +.44 -14.4
56.11 44.50 UIL Hold 2.88 10 24 55.35 +.42 +7.9
43.95 25.50 UniFirst .15 20 18 44.94 +1.61 +58.9
24.95 18.83 UDomR 1.20 43 .. 24.45 +.27 -1.4
89.11 66.10 UPS B 1.32 23 20 72.92 +2.77 -14.7
31.65 26.80 US Bancrpl.20 13 12 30.59 -.05 -2.3
63.90 32.12 USSteel .401 4 6 42.56 +5.23 -17.0
54.20 44.24 UtdTechs .88 17 16 51.14 -.57 -1.0
54.50 30.04 Utdhlths .02 23 19 50.80 -.02 +15.4
66.79 34.65 Unocal .80 13 12 65.00 -.65 +50.3
V-W-X-Y-Z
27.37 16.75 ValeantPh .31 dd 51 18.92 +.52 -28.2
86.30 31.79 ValeroEs .40f 11 10 83.35 +1.27 +83.6
4.60 3.40 VKHilncT .36 q ... 3.82 -.04 -6.6
29.46 24.08 Vectren 1.18 20 16 28.89 -.12 +7.8
42.27 33.71 VerizonCml.62 11 13 34.17 -.52 -15.7
38.99 31.80 ViacomB .28 dd ... 32.88 +.01 -9.6
35.67 15.11 VintgPt .22 7 12 35.48 +4.63 +56.4
28.54 20.83 Vodafone .75e ...... 24.98 -.12 -8.8
30.91 19.00 Wabash .18 7 7 20.77 -3.93 -22.9
56.28 43.05 Wachovia1.84 13 11 50.52 -.76 -4.0
57.89 46.20 WalMart .60 20 17 49.54 -.71 -6.2
47.67 34.89 Walgm .26f 31 27 46.68 -.42 +21.7
43.25 37.51 WAMult 1.921 12 11 43.54 +2.07 +3.0
61.90 42.91 Weathfint ... 25 21 62.58 +4.80 +22.0
15.42 6.38 Wellmn .20 dd 8 10.58 +.50 -1.0
71.79 36.10 WellPoints .. 22 15 67.02 -1.88 +16.6
64.04 56.12 WellsFrgol.92 14 13 61.75 -1.12 -0.6
48.50 31.74 Wendys .54 91 19 45.57 -.31 +16.1
24.38 19.58 WestarEn .92 12 15 24.25 +.46 +6.0
13.85 12.16 WAstTIP2.82a q ... 12.56 +.04 -2.0
16.10 6.39 WDigitl .. 16 11 14.14 -.14 +30.4
71.85 57.90 Weyerh 2.00 11 16 68.34 +4.06 +1.7
18.98 14.00 WilmCS 1.45e 11 ... 16.55 +.34 +3.6
20.89 11.36 WmsCos .301 33 21 20.80 +.97 +27.7
40.64 28.32 Winnbgo .36f 18 15 35.57 +1.52 -8.9
39.75 31.12 WiscEn .88 15 16 38.95 -.21 +15.5
22.73 15.11 Worthgtn .68 9 13 17.80 +1.66 -9.1
71.50 59.50 Wrigley 1.12 30 26 69.51 +1.04 +0.5
46.52 33.50 Wyeth .92 37 15 46.15 +.40 +8.4
37.73 19.05 XTOEgys.20 18 14 36.26 +.51 +36.6
19.70 16.32 XcelEngy .86f 24 15 19.26 -.04 +5.8
17.24 12.82 Xerox ... 17 14 14.05 +.24 -17.4
34.64 26.42 YankCdl .25 19 16 32.60 -.05 -1.7
5.36 5.00 ZweigTI .54 q .. 5.14 +.02 -3.9


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last

A-B-C
33.25 19.97 ACMoore .. 32 22 26.61
25.67 12.25 ADCTelrs .. 24 21 24.74
18.84 12.33 ASMLHId ...... 18 17.82
20.66 11.20 ATITech .. 18 17 12.95
4.75 2.85 ATS Med .. dd .. 3.61
4.36 .63 Aastrom ... dd ... 2.97
11.30 6.45 Abgenix .. dd ... 10.64
18.71 9.12 Acvisns .. 28 24 18.45
27.14 16.15 Acxiom .20 31 25 20.63
33.25 21.50 AdamsRes n.. ... ... 26.41
34.48 19.66 AdobeSys .. 29 25 29.78
16.84 7.95 AdolorCp ... dd .. 10.48
29.29 15.75 Adtran .36f 30 22 26.87
27.50 19.73 Advanta .451 7 ... 26.89
29.90 20.30 AdvantB .54f 8 13 28.95
59.73 24.48 Aftymel ... 45 37 45.97
46.84 30.88 Akzo 1.54e ...... 40.96
16.09 6.73 Alamosa ... dd 36 15.74
24.62 8.94 Aldila .40 12 .. 22.63
18.05 5.63 AlgnTech ... 55 ... 6.06
16.07 8.48 Alkerm ... dd ... 15.85
24.26 17.50 AeraCp ... 30 27 2.20
47.85 30.60 Amazon .. 29 45 37.95
.60 .02 AmrStowt ... ...... .27
34.04 13.80 AEagleOs.30f 21 16 33.20
27.16 14.55 APwCnv .40 28 23 25.74
20.09 9.35 Ameritrade .. 28 23 19.60
83.10 52.00 Amgen ... 41 24 81.31
6.90 2.87 AmkorT ... dd ... 5.73
24.95 14.50 Amylin ... dd ... 21.21
52.03 37.73 Aniogic .32 24 40 50.40
4.63 2.75 Analysts ... 36 3.94
8.74 1.01 AnlySur ... 11 ... 1.99
16.37 9.30 Andrew ... 60 19 13.09
93.75 62.55 ApolloG ... 58 24 71.58
45.44 14.85 AppleCs .. 37 28 44.00
5.37 2.84 Apldlnov .. 37 ... 4.84
18.50 14.33 ApldMatI .1221 21 23 18.30
4.37 2.50 AMCC ... dd 38 3.23
20.00 7.25 aQuanfive ... 28 43 18.13
17.50 5.40 Aba nc ... dd 19 5.88
35.16 29.14 AsscdBancl.08f 15 13 34.47
5.04 2.05 Atmel .. dd ... 2.78
18.04 12.31 Audvox ... 5 24 17.55
39.90 18.01 Autodsks .031 35 28 35.89
68.35 39.80 AvidTch ... 21 16 42.95
40.70 22.99 AvoctCp ... 49 24 34.21
6.80 2.29 Aware ... dd 6.82
9.86 5.92 BEASys ... 27 19 8.83
18.29 12.90 BeasleyB .. 30 25 16.61
45.79 33.88 BedBath ... 27 23 46.00
70.00 33.18 Biogenldc ... cc 22 38.46
49.64 33.64 Blomet .25e 27 20 36.86
6.96 1.21 Biopurers .. dd ... 1.39
4.92 .57 BluDolp ... dd ... 3.28
28.54 19.91 BobEvn .4823 23 23,.95
39.85 25.25 BrdCom ... 75 35 43.00
15.90 3.46 Broadwing ... dd ... 5.25
8.17 3.77 BrcdeCmlf ... 14 13 4.24
9.75 5.57 C-COR ... dd 17 7.26
6.32 2.37 CDCCpA ...... 30 3.15
68.26 51.86 CDWCorp.431 21 18 62.86
60,.32 41.14 CHRobn .60 35 28 60.29
36.78 26,66 CapCtyBks.61 20 21 35.83
45.10 26.22 CareerEd ... 20 14 36.88
49.37 23.33 Celgenes ... 91 60 48.16
52.24 37.35 Cephin ... dd 14 42.85
26.21 16.46 ChkPoint ... 20 17 23.02
42.12 24.56 ChkFree ... 67 21 33.32
14.98 9.75 Checkers .. 14 12 13.07
48.09 29.00 Chiron ... cc 22 35.61
48.30 33.31 ChrchIlD .50 96 26 46.16
3.50 1.64 CienaCp .. dd .. 2.30
46.87 37.51 Cintas .32f 26 22 45.32
7.68 3.70 Cirrus ... 41 24 7.43
22.27 17.01 Ciso ... 23 18 19.32
26.00 15.02 CitrixSy 24 20 22.20
24.83 8.03 CleanH ... dd 16 24.70
9.15 5.45 Comarco ... ... ... 7.85
34.50 26.25 Comcast ... 56 37 30.44
34.16 25.89 Comcsp .. 55 37 29.55
7.99 4.35 Compuwre ... 40 22 8.03
26.10 15.25 Comvers ... 68 38 24.51
2.95 1.35 ConcCm ... dd 40 2.20


YTD 52-Wk YTD
oho %chs Hi Low Name Div PEPPE Last cht %cha


-.92 -7.6
+1.73 +31.9
+.72 +11.9
+.12 -33.2
+.07 -22.5
-.232+109.2
+.64 +2.9
+.39 +21.9
-.49 -21.6
unc +2.6
+.88 -5.1
+.42 +5.6
+.80 +40.4
-.03 +18.9
+.05 +19.3
-10.81 +95.8
+.61 -3.6
-.30 +26.2
+.14 +48.4
-1.64 -43.6
+1.45 +12.5
+.26 +7.2
+.80 -14.3
unc +8.0
+.54 +41.0
+.73 +20.3
+.08 +37.8
+10.68 +26.7
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-2.31 -11.3
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-.04 +3.7
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-.26 -0.3
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unc -60.7
+.48 +234.7
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-.04 -21.9
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-3.72 -7.8
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-1.00 -12.5
-.08 -2.5
-.42 +6.8
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-.03 -31.1
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+1.37 +34.8
-.57 unc
-.36 -9.2
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-.29 -8.7
+.01 -8.5
-.10 -10.0
+.19 +25.3
-.10 +0.2
+.14 -23.1


32.61 20.45 Conmed ... 30 15
ConsolCm n... ... ...
24.04 9.99 CodnthC ... 16 17
50.46 39.05 Costco .46f 22 20
11.17 5.76 CredSys .. dd 28
17.40 7.71 CublstPh ... dd ...
47.77 12.78 Cyberonic ... dd ...
35.25 22.65 Cymer ... 31 32
15.75 3.47 Cytogen ... dd ...
D-E-F
4.61 1.14 Danka ... dd ..
17.49 1.43 DayStar .. dd ..
49.12 20.83 DeckOut ... 14 11
42.57 32.71 Delllnc ... 33 23
13.36 4.31 Dndreon ... dd ..
21.85 20.50 Diamond n .........
15.10 14.20 DiscHIdAn ... ... ...
6.20 1.54 DistEnSy ... dd ...
7.07 1.02 DobsonCm ... dd ...
30.29 22.29 DrTree ... 15 14
59.21 30.78 eBays ... 60 43
15.58 7.80 EZEM ... 17 ...
34.38 26.95 EchoStarl.OOe 23 13
13.70 9.70 EduDv .151 18 ..
26.64 16.25 ElectSci ... 29 29
4.80 2.12 Elctrgs ... dd ...
71.16 43.38 ElectArs .. 38 35
28.73 15.78 EndoPhrm ... 26 15
16.58 9.66 EpimorSft ... 17 15
5.00 2.93 Epiphany ... dd ...
34.89 23.18 EdrcsnTI .36e ......
58.40 45.15 Expdlnl .30f 38 30
7.25 4.02 ExtNetw ... 42 31
47.92 10.93 Eyetech ... dd 41
59.12 21.40 FSNetw .. 30 26
35.35 23.85 FLIRSyss ... 33 25
52.34 40.24 FifthThird 1.40 16 13
28,85 24.12 FstMert 1.08 19 17
45.10 32.20 Fiser .. 20 18
15.01 10.06 Flextm ..24 15
29.98 16.00 FormFac .. 42 25
14.28 7.95 Foundry ... 41 32


21.35 9.50 GenesMcr ... dd
20.32 15.10 Gentexs .34 29
72.10 47.95 Genzyme ... cc
11.24 5.15 GeronCp .. dd
7.61 1.44 GigaTr .. 47
2.79 .65 GgaMed ......
47.99 27.79 GileadScs ... 36
6.64 2.00 GIblePnt .. dd
317.80 95.96 Googlen ... 88
5.88 2.05 GuilfrdPh ... dd
33.50 25.10 HMN Fn .88 13
108.00 18.12 Hansen ... 41
39.94 27.75 HarbrFL .80 20
12.40 4.25 Harmonic 65
42.65 17.77 Hologic 44
16.88 2.69 HostAmr .dd
12.00 .22 HstAmrwt ......
23.49 13.85 HotTopic 21
12.79 10.06 HudsCiltys.281 28
15.33 8.51 HumGen dd
25.03 16.74 HuntUBs .24 16
25.41 22.15 HuntBnk .86 15
43.00 20.93 HutchT ... 18
29.80 19.16 IACInterac ... cc
10.60 2.43 IPIXCp ... dd
8.24 4.12 Identix ... dd
81.43 29.51 Imclone ... 40
11.16 5.40 Incyte ... dd
57.92 26.50 InfoSpce .. 9
9.63 5.38 Informal ... dd
7.05 4.15 Instinet .32p 35
13.27 8.88 IntgDv ... 90
28.84 19.64 Intel .32 19
60.59 46.07 IntiSpdw .06 17
13.93 2.11 IntmtlnilJ ... ...
20.65 13.69 Intersil .16 89
49.58 36.00 Intuit .. 25
53.44 33.29 InvFnSv .08 16


44 24.69
22 17.61
27 68.78
... 9.81
... 6.62
13 2.05
27 44.47
... 6.93
50 302.40
.. 3.32
11 31.15
27 92.10
17 37.92
22 5.18
38 38.53
14.25
9.45
16 17.45
20 11.78
14.64
14 20.00
14 25.30
12 32.99
... 26.79
... 3.38
... 5.35
23 35.95
... 8.76
16 34.50
29 10.66
24 5.20
22 10.78
17 26.75
19 59.21
... 9.76
28 19.47
21 48.36
16 34.16


+1.11 +11.1
unc unc
-.21 -28.9
-.50 -5.1
+.70 +16.3
+.60 +41.7
-2.46 +105.2
+5.79 +17.7
+.08 -55.2


+.26 -38.9
+.72 +447.2
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+.33 -2.0
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unc -1.0
unc -0.7
+1.05 +126.8
+.86+298.3
-.16 -15.0
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-.87 -12.5
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-1.15 +8.5
-.03 +0.6
-3.42 -12.2
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+4.05 +52.2
-2.32' -4.9
-1.53 +18.4
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-.35 +13.3
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-1.37 +40.3
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-1.32 +1.5
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-.01 -10.8
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-7.29. -4.6
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-.19 -12.3
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-.04 -13.8
+.50 -6.7
-1.55 +14.4
unc +12.1
+.93 +100.4
-.53 +16.5.
-.63 +9.9
+.11 -31.7


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chn %cha


J-K-L
26.40 17.06 JetBlue ... 78
30.25 19.65 JnprNtw ... 51 2
51.56 35.02 KLATnc .48 22 2
12.19 7.28 KnghtCap ... 9 3
35.00 9.42 Komag ... 19 1
56.12 33.25 Kronos ... 29 2
9.99 4.80 Kulicke ... 89 2
28.61 13.28 LKQCp ... 27 2
15.55 8.40 LSIlnds .40 26 1
8.69 3.47 LTX ... dd
32.61 19.71 LamRsch ... 14 14
43.67 15.27 Lasrscp ... 38
50.51 30.50 Laureate ... 34 2
4.27 1.55 Leve3 ... dd
10.45 2.55 LexarMd ... dd
46.00 28.45 Uncare ... 16 11
41.67 34.01 UnearTch .40 30 2
19.75 13.10 LodgEnt ... dd
2.30 .57 LookSmart ... dd
M-N-0
27.74 13.69 MCIIncnl1.60 dd
30.50 19.75 MGIPhr ... dd ,
23.70 4.07 MIVA ... 12 2'
37.72 18.95 MTS .32 232
44.67 18.09 Macrmdla ... 71
4.16 1.05 MagelPt ... dd
43.12 19.33 MarvellT ... 69 2
49.51 36.20 Maxim .80 27 2!
13.35 7.41 MaxwllT ... dd
6.73 2.99 McDataA ... dd
29.33 21.70 Medlmun .. dd6
11.55 4.37 Medarex ... dd
20.87 14.76 MedAct ... 18 1
32.40 19.93 MediCo 80 2
49.58 31.05 Merclntr ... 39 2
32.88 24.06 Microchp .28 29 2
27.50 23.35 Microsoft .32a 23 1
7.18 3.05 Microlune ... 30
14:06 7.63 MIIPhar ... dd
8.10 4.60 Misonix ... 38 1
34.60 6.46 Momenta ... dd
34.25 17.60 MnstrWw ... 42 2
8.10 2.50 Nanogen ... dd
40.68 32.35 Nasd100Tr.41e q 21
16.56 7.25 Nastech ., dd
12.24 9.75 NatAtHn ......
20.62 9.05 NektarTh ... dd
4.16 1.37 Net2Phn ... dd
34.99 15.92 NelwkAp ... 46 2
33.40 21.18 NexteIC ... 17 1
26.81 13.70 NextlPrt ... 62 21
28.30 16.00 NoblIyH .20e 21 1
50.57 38.40 NorTrst .84 21 1
11.83 3.77 NwstAir ... dd
7.70 4.94 Novell ... 6
30.77 22.89 Novlus ... 25 2
8.72 5.58 NuHoriz ... 52 2!
5.29 2.60 NuanceC ... dd
29.60 9.30 Nvidia ... 32 1
20.91 8.96 OmnlVisn ... 12 1
6.30 3.99 OnAssign ... dd
5.50 2.49 OnSmcnd ... dd 1
44.65 23.50 OnyxPh ... dd
19.19 7.69 OpnwvSy ... dd 2
7.96 3.90 Opsware ... dd
14.87 9.78 Oracle ... 25 1
48.61 29.00 Orthfx ... 19 1
29.30 23.77 OfterTail 1.12 18 1
P-Q-R
39.91 27.20 PETCO ... 20 1
12.37 7.42 PMCSra ... 50 3
29.05 17.25 PacSunwr ... 16 1
17.49 7.55 Packetr ... 27 2
27.20 7.91 PalmSrce ... 7 t
7.30 4.00 PanoTc ... 17 1
31.09 15,69 PaftUTI .16 36 1
35.23 28.60 Paychex .52 36 2,
49.26 22.24 PelDv ... 16 1
36.24 25.50 PetsMart .12 25 2
27.03 12.60 PhotrIn ... 31 2
6.24 3.25 PInnSyst ... dd 8
54.57 32.75 PIxars ... 27 4


-.19 +26.4
-.83 -6.9
+1.55 -62.8
+.40 +3.4
+1.50 +30.1
+.17 +131.1
+.88 +20.7
+.38 +0.2
+.49 +24.0
+.20 -14.3
-1.86 +0.5
+.25 -6.8
+.59 -5.8
-2.78 -25.3
-.77 -16.5
-.72 +19.3
-.11 -3.9
+.68 +13.1
-.01 -18.2
+.49 -1.8
-3.91 +256.7
-.21 -14.4
+.45 -39.9
+.53 -1.2
-.31 +16.0
+.18 +3.3
+.92 -4.2
+.01 -45.6
-1.63 -17.6
-.28 +9.1
-.27 +24.0
-.28 +13.3
+2.26 +5.4
-.15 -57.9
-.05 -9.6
+1.53 +3.6
-.07 -15.8
+.01 +17.1
-1.06 +9.6
-.14 -22.0
-.15 -0.2
+.50 +23.3
-1.93 -26.1
-.27 +18.2
+.26 -20,6
-.24 +0.6
+.94 +13.1
+.66 +13.3


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PEPPE Last

11.62 4.54 Powrwav ... dd 23 11.58
12.48 7.05 Prestek .. cc 23 11.69
26.51 17.66 PriHIthc ... 29 20 27.57
24.40 8.50 ProgPh ... dd ... 23.24
23.15 13.79 ProtDsg .. dd ... 22.58
19.50 9.36 QLT ...... 12 9.28
43.66 21.44 Qlogic .. 18 17 32.04
44.99 32.08 Qualcoms.36 34 286 39.30
7.79 3.77 RFMicD ... dd 67 6.27
23.91 9.75 RSASec .. 24 20 12.06
27.85 12.34 Rambus ... 54 50 13.45
17.75 10.37 RedHat .. 62 47 15.60
8.25 2.83 Redback ... dd ... 8.01
16.28 12.43 RepBcp .44 15 13 14.85
103.56 52.25 RschMotn 48 25 71.38
31.37 20.95 RossStrs .20 23 16 26.73
S-T-U
31.96 19.66 SanDisk ... 21 19 31.40
9.35 3.74 Sanmina ... dd 13 5.39
163.50 61.76 SearsHIdgs 16 22 159.62
4.75 2.53 SeeBeyond ... cc 57 4.19
50.93 33.58 SeidctIn .76 11 12 48.90
22.43 15.94 Semlech .. 26 26 18.24
66.55 39.85 Sepracor .. dd ... 54.49
45.40 15.00 Shanda ...... 18 34.59
10.85 6.97 SiebelSys .10 66 44 8.64
32.99 6.33 SierraWr ... dd .. 7.93
45.50 13.79 SigmaTel .. 10 12 19.65
18.37 8.69 Silicnlmg ... 43 20 12.10
43.60 24.62 SilcnLab ... 19 21 27.60
9.43 2.01 SiriusS .. dd ... 6.93
11.10 5.02 SkywksSol ..30 18 7.86
19.87 9.87 SmurfStne ... dd 50 11.55
23.74 13.56 Sohu.cm ... 27 22 21.20
7.02 3.16 Sonusn .. 60 44 4.82
19.00 13.85 SouMoBc .36 23 ... 14.51
13.37 3.45 Spire ... dd ... 10.09
23.66 17.25 Staples s .17 24 19 23.38
64.26 42,05 Slarbucks .. 48 36 51.32
46.40 16.01 StlIDyna .40 6 8 32.87
6.77 1.24 StemCells ... dd .. 5.25
5.65 3.29 SunMicro .. 19 50 3.88
26.65 20.50 SusqBnc .92 17 15 26.09
26.19 15.49 SwiftTm ... 15 13 22.68
34.05 18.01 Symantecs 32 21 23,61
12.00 6.29 Symetric ... 35 21 10,70
12,70 6.95 Synovis cc ... 8.70
12.53 7.70 TLC Vision ... 16 20 9.63
29.60 19.15 TakeTwos ... 19 18 25.30
33.45 7.33' TASERs .. 50 ... 9.59
46.00 33.04 TechData ... 14 15 38.76
1.96 .68 Tegal ... dd ... .73
10.32 6.56 Tellabs ... dd 21 8.74
34.25 22.82 TevaPhrm.24e 19 ... 31.16
5.36 2.96 3Com ... dd ... 3.57
13.50 5.53 TibcoSft .. 30 29 7.38
7.75 3.45 TiVoInc ... dd ... 6.63
37.59 12.83 Tmskry ... dd ... 37.36
44.55 21.55 TrimbleN .. 33 28 43.39
14.19 10.73 TrstNY .60 17 16 13.38
32.78 26.69 Trustmk .80 16 14 29.09
6.22 4.26 USUnwirn ... 17 60 6.20
26.38 6.70 UTStrcm ... 20 50 8.97
9.52 3,41 Ubiqu ... dd 27 9.27
8.07 2.10 US Enr ... dd ... 3.47
48.34 28.54 UnNVFor .10 17 14 48.59
62.30 25.78 UrbanOut ... 50 34 62.60
V-W-X-Y-Z
14.65 6.31 ValueClick ... 31 24 12.91
36.09 16.21 Verisign .. 28 20 24.70
18.14 8.06 VertxPh ... dd ... 17.14
14.60 5.42 ViaCelln ... ... ... 8.45
5.18 2.03 VionPhm ... dd .. 2.83
12.58 1.40 ViroPhrm ... 44 .. 10.92
3.93 1.95 Vilesse ... dd 2.22
11.08, 6.46 WebMD .. 82 16 10.71
23.24 17.55 WemerEnt.161 17 14 19.59
7.86 3.59 Westell ... 7 11 4.19
76.45 34.18 Wynn ... dd 78 56.71
40.89 23.55 XMSat ... dd ... 36.40
33.39 25.21 Xilinx .28f 33 27 28.35
39.79 25.52 Yahoo ... 31 49 33.53
64.47 38.70 YellowRd ... 13 9 55.66


I AMEIANSOC xCAGE -


YTD 52-Wk YTD
chn %cha Hi Low Name Div PEPPE Last chs %chg


+3.90 +25.8
-.14 -36.4
+2.13 +61.3
+.02 +17.0
-1.00 +10.5
+.62 -16.5
-5.49 -8.2
-.47 -18.6
-.05 -17.6
+.34 -55.1
+1.25 -44.7
+.63 -26.5
-.40 -21.8
+.13 -9.1
-.52 -16.6
+1.23 -38.2
-2.26 +19.7
+.23 -15.9
+.51 -21.6
+3.41 +129.8
+.19 +4.0
-1.38 -17.7
+4.40 -13.2
-.63 +24.1
+.12 -28.0
+.34 +4.6
-.75 +5.6
-.24 -8.3
+.19 +10.2
+.82 -19.5
+.60 -7.6
-1.20 +9.1
-.41 -69.7
+1.00 -14.6
-.12 -55.2
-.23 +1.7
+1.16 +4.4
+.30 -14.4
+.20 -44.7
-.57 +12.9
+.23 +47.1
+2.47 +31.3
+.19 -3.0
-.76 -6.4
+.01 +36.0
+.42 -59.5
+.18 +30.2
-.13 +17.2
+1.31 +12.0
+4.03 +41.0


+.45 -3.2
-3.98 -26.5
+.40 +62.2
-1.42 -2.7
+.29 -39.7
+1.05 +236.0
-.21 -37.1
-.17 +31.3
-.17 -13.5
-2.43 -38.4
+1.61 -15.3
+.78 -3.2
+.62 -4.4
-3.05 -11.0
+1.54 -0.1


6.90 5.71 AbdAsPac .42
3.98 1.21 Abraxas ....
25.80 12.50 AdmRsc .30f
3.39 .78 Adventrx ...
2.14 1.75 AmOrBion ..
22.02 11.51 ApexSilv ...
3.85 1.55 AvanirPh
3.87 1.70 BemaGold ...
194.37127.79 BiotechT .04e
20.83 16.85 CarverBcp .28
6.14 5.10 CFCdag .01
39.77 7,89 Gheniere s ..
13.60 7.55 ComSys. .28
4.68 2.00 Crystallxg ...
22.70 6.50 DHB Inds ...
109.8397.27 DJIA Diam2.10e
9.85 2.14 DigitAngel ...
6.08 1.15 ENGlIobal ...
19.48 17.25 EV LtdDurl.51
3.61 2.02 EldorGIdg ...
8.25 7.15 Elswth .30e
4.55 2.55 Endvrlnt ...
15.70 13.71 FTrVLDv .38a
22.99 15.90 FlaPUtil .621
4.48 2.85 GascoEnn ...
9.35 ,77 GeoGlobal ...


+.06 -2.6
+.25 +69.0
+.09 +21.0
+.47 +150.0
unc +24.3
+.38 -19.4
+.10 -1.8
+.05 -25.6
+3.81 +24.1
+.15 -14.8
+.08 -4.0
+1.37 +5.2
+.50 -12.6
-.28 -9.7
+.10 -52.5
+.19 -1.0
-.23 -45.8
+.60 +91.9
-.01 -3.2
+.24 -4.7
-.06 -4.2
+.23 -2.6
+.04 -2.4
+.48 +17.9
-.07 -3.8
+.28 +742.3


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %cha


4.05 1.85 Globe I eln ... ...
6.65 2.33 GoldStrg ... dd
8.00 3.75 GreyWolf ... 47
28.50 4.40 Gurunetn ... dd
15.91 12.00 INGGRE1.26 q
25.99 14.73 iShBrazil .46e q
13.34 9.99 ISh HK .27e q
11.09 9.36 iShJapan .04e q
7.80 6.26 iShMalasia.16e q
8.22 6.05 iShSing .28e q
13.00 9.51 iShTaiwan.08e q
123.73106.64 iShSP5002.46e q
76.35 50.77 iShEmMkt s.80e q
97.00 83.04 ISh20TB4.04e q
87.49 82.58 iSh7-10TB3.20e q
82.85 80.62 iShl-3TBl.94e q
55.36 44.47 iShEAFEs.80e q
71.81 54.92 IShSPMids.70e q
43.45 31.08 iShGSSit .24e q
77.90 61.22 iShNqBio ... q
68.91 57.34 iShR1000V1.53e q
50.42 43.06 iShR1000G.58e q
68.02 52.10 iShR2000Vsl.08eq
69.67 52.02 iShR2000G.26e q
67.55 51.11 iShRs2000s.77e q
66.92 49.34 ShREst s2,55e q


-.12 -44.1
+.18 -21.4
+.49 +52.4
+1.71 +75.1
+.08 +4.4
-.01 +12.7
+.38 +9.3
+.04 -6.0
+.34 +5.7
+.45 +13.5
+.10 +4.5
+.68 +2.1
+1.27 +13.0
-.42 +5.6
-.09 +0.2
unc -0.7
+.39 +0.2
+.74 +8.1
+.11 -4.5
+2.01 +1.2
+.16 +3.4
+.31 +2.1
+1.46 +5.6
+1.28 +2.3
+1.32 +4.0
+.89 +7.5


M EA MA


Foreign Exchange
Value / Prey Value Todays S Prev S
Country nameCurrency In dollars value in currency
Argent Peso .3493 .3497 2.8625 2.8592
Australia Dollar .7644 .7656 1.3082 1.3062
Brazil Real .4205 .4272 2.3780 2.3410
Britain Pound 1.7374 1.7565 .5756 .5693
Canada Dollar .8205 .8236 1.2187 1.2142
Chile Peso .001762 .001764 567.53 566.88
China Yuan .1233 .1208 8.1106 8.2760
Colombia Peso .000432 .000432 2314.15 2313.55
Czech Rep Koruna .0400 .0403 25.03 24.80
Denmark Krone .1619 .1633 8.1777 6.1238
Dominican Rep Peso .0346 .0346 28.93 28,93
Egypt Pound .1732 .1732 5,.7750 5.7750
Euro Euro 1.2064 1.2189 .8289 .8204
Hong Kong Dollar .1287 .1288 7.7713 7.7654
Hungary Forint .0049 .0049 203.44 202.40
India Rupee .0230 .0232 43.490 43.140
Indnsia Rupiah .000102 .000102 9770.00 9790.00
Israel Shekel .2203 .2202 4.5395 4.5417
Japan Yen .008993 .009084 111.20 110.08
Jordan Dinar 1.4114 1.4114 .7085 .7085
Kuwait Dinar 3.4258 3.4258 .2919 .2919
Lebanon Pound .000666 .000666 1501.00 1501.00
Malaysia Ringgit .2647 .2632 3.7780 3.7995
Mexico Peso .094260 .094233 10.6090 10.6120
N. Zealand Dollar .6860 .6867 1.4577 1.4562
Norway Krone .1517 .1529 6.5915 6.5419
Pakistan Rupee .0168 .0168 59.55 59.55
Peru New Sol .3074 .3074 3.253 3.253
Philpins Peso .0179 .0180 55.85 55.50
Poland Zloty .2933 .2959 3.41 3.38
Russia Ruble .0349 .0350 28.6143 28.5740
SDR SDR 1.45553 1.45315 .6870 .6882
Saudi Arab Riyal .2667 .2667 3.7500 3.7500
Singapore Dollar .6029 .6059 1.6586 1.6505
Slovak Rep Koruna .0311 .0313 32.18 31.90
So. Africa Rand .1517 .1531 6.5901 6.5301
So. Korea Won .000981 .000990 1019.50 1010.20
Sweden Krona .1279 .1288 7.8214 7.7613
Switzednd Franc .7717 .7798 1.2959 1.2824
Taiwan Dollar .0317 .0313 31.54 31.94
Thailand Bahl .02418 .02420 41.36 41.32
U.A.E. Dirham .2723 .2723 3.6727 3.6727
Uruguay New Peso .0409 .0410 24.4250 24.3750
Venzuel Bolivar .000466 ,000466 2147.30 2147.00


Spot Metals


NEW YORK (AP) Spot nonferrous metal prices Friday.
Aluminum 82.5 cents per Ib., London Metal Exch. Fri.
Copper -170.00 cents Cathode full plate, U.S. destinations.
Copper 165.55 cents per Ilb., N.Y. Merc spot Fri.
Lead $848.00 per metric ton, London Metal Exch.
Zinc 59.15-59.40 cents lb., delivered.
Gold $425.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote).
Gold $424.70 troy oz., NY Mare spot Fri.
Sihver $7.095 Handy& Haerman (only daily quote).
Silver- $7.086 troy oz., N.Y. Mre spot Fri.
Mercury $750.00 per 76 Ibflask, N.Y.
Platinum -$885.00. troy oz., N.Y. (contract),
Platinum $898.50 troy oz., N.Y. Mere spot Fri.
n.q,-not quoted, na.-not available r-revised


Money Rates
T
Prime Rate
Discount Rate Primary
Fed Funds close
T-Bills:
3-month
6-month
T-Bill, annualized, adjusted for
constant maturity:
1-year
T-Notes:
1-year
2-year
5-year
10-year
T-Bond:
30-year
Ubor:
3-month
6-month
FHLB Cost of Funds, 11 th District:
Eff. June. 30 2
FNMA 30-year mortgage commitment:
30-days
Money market fund:
Merrill Lynch Ready Assets:
30-day avg yld:


C o c 8




,56=596 EL, K CAI$m


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STOCS O oAS ITRS


Iu. uAS AQ A IO Au AR E


Today Prev.
6.25 6.25
4.25 4.25
3.25 3.3125

3.30 3.18
3.51 3.37


2.60 2.56


_ I


17













CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MUTUALS


SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 3D


MTAL FND


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
AARP Invst:
CapGrr 4593 +.42 +15.4
GNMA x 14.98 -06 +43
Global 28.50 +.55 +27.0
Grwinc 22.49 +.15 +14.7
Intl 45.35 +.53 +21.2
MgdMun n 919 -03 5.8
PalhwayCnsv 1177 +.05 +10.1
PathwyGro 13,51 + 09 +14.1
ShtTermBd x 1002 -.05 +1.6
SmCoSlkn 2687 +.54 +26.9
ABN AMRO Funds:
GrwthN 23.18 +.15 +9.4
M&CGroN 23.69 +42 +10.1
AIM Investments A:
Agrsv p 1078 .12 +18.7
BasicValA p 33.47 +.45 +14.7
BIChipA p 11.80 +.08 +101
CapDe p 19.22 +.1 +218
Char p 13.16 +.15 +11.2
Conslp 23.38 +.35 +14.0
HYIdAp 4.48 -.01 +10.0
InllGrow 20.99 +.33 +25.4
MdCpCrEq 30.40 +48 +16.7
MuB p 8.17 -.01 +6.7
PremEqty 10.16 +.10 +12.7
ReaEst p 28.40 +.39 +38.6
SelEqty 16.10 +.02 +15.3
SmCpGrA p 29.32 +.32 +22.0
Summit 11.42 +14 +18.3
WeingA p 13.58 +.11 +16.4
AIM Investments B:
BasicVaIB t 31.49 .42 +13.9
BlueChipet 11.16 +.08 +9.3
CapDevBt 17.89 +.17 +21.0
PremEqty 9.38 +.08 +11.6
AIM Investor Cl:
Dynamic 17.47 +.21 +23.4
Energy 37.79 +2.02 +54.2
SmCoGrIlp 13.1 +23 +27.0
Tecan 24.95 -.13 +14.3
Utilities 13.46 +. 16 +36.6
AMF Funds:
AdjMtg n 9.73 ... +1.9
Advance Capital I:
Balanced np 18.19 +.02 +11.7
Retnc n 10.06 -.01 +7.6
AegosValFund 19.10 +36 +14.4
Alger American:
Growth 37.13 +.33 +19.0
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.74 +.09 +26.1
Alger Funds InstI:
MidCpGrI 17.75 +.22 +24.4
Allegiant Cl I:
SCapVall 22.40 +.35 +21.1
AllilanceBem A:
AmGvlncA 7.57 -.05 +12.3
BalanAp 17.36 -.02 +11.2
GIbTechA p 56.96 ... +16.0
GrolncA p 3.79 .. +13.1
GrowlhA p 35.76 +.51 +22.4
IntlValAp 16.81 .18 +26.2
LgCapGrAp 19.14 +.30 +17.6
SmCapGrA 23.65 +.38 +22.3
AllianceBem Adv:
GrsncAdv 3.80 -.01 +13.2
IntlValdv 17.02 +.19 +26.6
LgCapGrAdv 19.75 +31 +18.2
AllianceBem B:
AmGvlncB 7.56 -.06 +11.3
CorpBdBp 12.19 +.01' +7.4
G echB t 51.43 ,.. +15.1
GrIncBp 3.72 ... +12.4
GrowthB t 24.81 +.35 +21.4
LgCpGrB t 17.2 +.27 +17.0
SmCpGrB t 19.92 +.32 +21.4
USGovtB p 7.04 -.02 +4.0
AllianceBem C:
GrthlncC 3.73 ... +12.4
SmCapGrCt 19.97 +.33 +21.5
Allianz Funds A:
SmCpV A 31.69 +.65 +29.6
RenalsA 25.07 +.12 +7.4
Value A 17.73 -.04 +10.6
Allianz Funds B:
RenaisB 23.51 +.11 +6.6
Allianz Funds C:
RenalsC t 23.36 +.11 +6.5
GwthC I 18.23 +.15 +14.2
TargetC 16.25 +.20 +18.3
Alpine Funds:
US RE 48.83 +.53 +69.7
AmSouth Fds Cl I:
Value 17.41 +.06 +20.0
Amer Beacon AMR:
BalAmr 14.65 +.01 +16.8
LgCapAmr 20.88 +.08 +24.3
Amer Beacon Insti:
Int[Eqlns 20.31 +.10 +19.9
SmCaplnst 21.59 +.31 +27.5
Amer Beacon Plan:
SmCpPlan 21.19 +.30 +27.2
Amer Century Adv:
EqGro p 23.19 +.22 +18.4
Eqtyinc np 8.27 +.04 +12.8
Amer Century Ins:
Etylndex 4.92 +.02 +14.1
Ultra 29.75 +.18 +11.0
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n 16.95 +.09 +12.6
EqGrolnv n 23.21 +.23 +18.7
Eqlnco n 8.27 +.04 +13.1
GNMAIn 10.35 -.01 +4,0
G04n 16.60 +.21 +22.2
Growth n 20.15 +15 +14.5
Heritagel n 12.93 +.17 +22.7
IncGro n 31.6 +.018 +16.0
IntIBnd 13.59 +.07 +5.9
InlDsc nr 13.93 +.20 +22.9
IntGroA n 9.10 +.08 +17.1
LifeSci n 5.24 -.02 +19.4
NewOpp nr 5.75 +.09 +1.3
OneChgAgg n 11.19 +.08 NE
ReawEsl n 27.54 +.41 +36.0
Selecl n 38.18 +.25 +9.1
SGovn 9.43 -.01 +1.5
SmCapValn 10.94 +.18 +25.6
SmalICo 10.88 +.20 +32.5
StrMod n 6.86 +.04 +12.7
Ultra n 29.42 +.18 +10.8
USiln 13.47 +.01 +35,9
Valuelm n 7.62 +.04 +15.1
Vista n 15.09 +.18 +19,3
Amer Express A:
Cal 5.23 -.02 +6.4
Discovery 9.31 +.13 +28.8
DEI 11.66 +.16 +24.0
DlnrBd 4.86 -.01 +5.0
Du'OppA 7.45 +.03 +22.5
EqSeFecd 13.66 +.17 +19.0
EqtyVal p 10.63 +.15 +21.5
Growth 28.14 -.07 +17.2
HiY]dBond 2.91 -.01 +10.6
Wield 4.45 -.01 +5.4
Iens 5.45 -.01 +4.9
LgCpEqAp 5.25 ... +12.6
MgdAll p 9.81 +.07 +17.6
Mass 5.40 -.01 +5.2
Mihi 5.31 -.01 +5.0
Minn 5.31 -.02 +4.9
Mutual p 9.91 .. +11.9
NewD 24.04 +.15 +8.2
NY 5,14 -.01 +5.2
Ohio 5.30 -.02 +4.9
PrecMt 8.66 +.32 +4.6.
Select 8.63 -.01 +4.6
SDGovt 4.77 ... +1.7
SmColndex 8.98 +.18 +27.1
Slek p 19.80 +.13 +12.6
TE Bond 3.89 -.01 +5.4
Thdllnll 5.93 +.07 +23.0
ThdIlnll 7.23 +.07 +17.1
Amer Express B:
DivrEqlnc t 11.62 +.16 +23.1
EqValp 10.64 +.14 +20.5
NewDt 22.69 +.14 +7.4
Amer Express Prtnr:
InlSelVal p 8.52 +.11 +23.8
SmCpVlAp 7.16 +.13 +22.2
Amer Express Y:
NewD n 24.17 +.15 +8.4
American Funds A:
AmcapFAp 18.77 +.13 +13.9
AmMu9A p 27.07 +.07 +13.1
BalAp 18.14 -.06 +9.8
BondFdAp 13.43 -.01 +5.7
CaplnBlAp 53.18 +.20 +17.1
CapWldA p 19.26 +.07 +9.5
CapWGrAp 34.70 +.34 +22.0
EupacAp 37,14 +.44 +21.7
FundlnvAp 33.64 +.43 +19.6
GovtA p 13.62 -.02 +3.8
GwthFdAp 29.09 +.35 +18.7
HITrstAp 12.42 ... +10.2
HrlncMunAi 15.61 -.03 +7.0
locoFdAp 18.63 +.02 +14.5
Int18A p 13.57 -.02 +2.5
InvCoAAp 31.43 +.12 +14.1
UdTEBdAp 15.36 -.04 +3.4
NwEconAp 21.64 +.24 +17.3
NewPerAp 28.16 +.27 ,17.0
NewWoddA 34.84 +.39 +29.4
SmCpWA p 33.25 +.63 +25,7
TaxExptAp 12.52 -.04 +..6
TxExCAAp 16.75 -.06 +6.2
WshMutAp 31.32, +.06 +12.8
American Funds B:
AmcapB I 18.15 +.13 +13.0
BalanBt 18.08 -.06 +9.0
BOndBt 13.43 -.01 +4.9
CopiltalBBI 53.16 +.20 +10.2
CapWGrB I 34.63 +.33 +21.1
EurpacB t 36.71 +.43 +209
FundlnvBI 33.56 +.42 +18.7
GrowthBI 28.16 +.33 +17.8
HI TrosIB I 12.42 ... +9.3
InomeBm 18.53 +.01 +13.6
ICABt 31.30 +.12 ,13,2"
NewPersp t 27.70 +.26 .16,1
WeshBt 31.15 +.05 ,12.0
AmeostckMF 40.42 -.19 +7.9
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 49.34 +.25 +17.0
Ariel n 55.39 +.69 +19.0
Artisan Funds:
1n9 22.29 +.14 +17.6
MIdCap 30.62 +.35 +20,3
MIdCapVat 19.62 +.25 +34.6
SmCapVal 19.40 +.36 +27.7
Baron Funds:
Asset n 55.99 +.99 +28.9


Growth 47.57 +.04 +30.3
Partners p 17.97 +.22 +40.8
Sm Cap 23,74 +.42 +28.6
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.33 -,02 +5.0
CaMu 14.26 -.04 +3.2
DivMun 14.10 -.04 +3.0
NYMun 13,95 -.04 +3.2
TxMgdInllVI 22.89 +.33 +19.6
IntVal2 21.49 +.28 +19.5
EmgMkIs 38.42 +.54 +54.1"
BlackRock A:
Aumrora A 42.02 +.87 +20.0
HiYdlnvA 8.14 .01 10.4
LegacyAp 13.80 +.05 +14.4
BlackRock Fds BIrk:
CoreBIrk 9.70 -.01 +4.9
' Bramwell Funds:
GrowthFdp 20.46 +.36 +12.3
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd 30.72 +.65 +28.9
Brandywie n 29.78 +.73 +30.0
Brinson Funds Y:
HighYIdY nx 7.23 -.04 +9,9
Buffalo Funds:
SmICap 29.14 +.18 +27.9
CGM Funds:
CapDevn 32.54 +1.21 +45,6


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rt
FocusFdn 3522 +119 +41 8
Mul n 28.04 +63 +27.7
Really n 3421 +1.11 +60.0
CRM Funds:
MidCapVall 27.29 +.28 +240
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncCI 30.48 +.22 .13.5
GthlncA p 3030 +22 +14.3
GrowthA p 5303 +27 +18.5
GrowthBIt 54.70 +.28 +17.6
GrowthCI 5090 +.26 +17.6
Calvert Group:
Incop 17.11 .. +5.7
IntlEqAp 18.71 +.17 +153
MuBdCAl 10.34 -.01 +1.2
Munlnt 10.88 -.02 +3.3
SocialAp 28,31 +.12 +11.7
Socadp 16.25 -.01 +7.2
SocEqAp 36.10 +.36 +14.6
TxFLd n 10.59 +.01 +1.6
TxFLngp 16.76 -.03 +5.6
TxF VT 15.87 -.04 +38
Causeway Intl:
Inslitutlional 16.33 +.02 +19.3
Investor r 16.25 +.03 +19.1
CItlStreet Funds:
D0Bond 12.02 -.01 +5.1
LgCoS0 k 12.17 +.08 +17.0
Clipper 89.09 -.33 +68.0
Cohen & Steers:
InsltRltyn 49.99 +.71 +43.5
RItyShrs n 76.90 +1.09 +43.3
Columbia Class A:
Acomt 27.46 +.50 +26.7
FedSec 10.67 -.02 +4,6
TxExA p 13.73 -.06 +7.5
Columbia Class B:
Acorn t 26.57 +.49 +25.8
Columbia Class C:
Acomt 26.55 +.49 +25,7
Columbia Class Z:
Acor Z 28.07 +.51 +27.1
AcorolntlZ 30.68 +.50 +29.5
AcomUSA 27.19 +.39 +28.4
IntmBdZ n 9.01 -.02 +5.3
LgCapGrwth 21.39 +.03 +14.5
LargeCo n 28.61 +.14 +14.2
MIdCapGr Z 22.12 +.31 +26.7
O)tyPlusBd 10.79 -.02 +4.7
SmCaZ 19.65 +.40 +20.9
SmoallCon 22.91 +.46 +27.9
Columbia Funds:
HiYId Zn .66 -.02 +6.8
IntlStkZn 15.13 +.10 +14.6
ReEsEqZ 28.56 +.38 +34.0
CG Cap Mkt Fds:
IntlEq 10.72 +.08 +19.0
LgGrw 12.80 +.19 +16.9
LgValn 11.55 +.10 +16.0
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 32,06 +.20 +16.7
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 30.63 +.19 +15.8
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 32.46 +.20 +17.1
NYVenC 30.83 +.19 +15.8
Delaware Invest A:
LgCapValA 16.89 +.08 +12.7
TrendAp 21.51 +.29 +17.5
TxUSA p 11.67 -.03 +8.1
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.32 -.01 +11.68
SeGrB t 21,54 +.39 +19.7
Del-Pooled Trust:
EmgMkt 16.29 .27 +45.2
InllEq 19.86 +.20 +22.1
Dimensional Fds:
EmgMktVal 20.52 +.35 +48.9
IntSmVa n 16.40 +.20 +29.9
TM USSm 22.52 +.49 +26.6
USLgCo n 36.22 +.17 +14.4
USLgVa n 21.33 +.18 +23.8
USLgVa3n 16.42 +.13 +24.0
US Micro 15.71 +.41 +26.0
US Small n 20.51 +.43 +25.7
US SmVal 28.65 +.79 +28.5
IntlSmodn 14.99 +.16 +23.9
EmgMktn 17.92 +.34 +41.7
Fixd n 10.15 ... +1.7
IntVan 16.54 +.23 +24.2
GIb5Fxlnc 10.57 +.01 +4.3
Lgaplnt n 17.78 +.11 +17.2
TM USSmV 25.21 +.66 +27.9
TM IntlValue 14.48 +.20 +23.6
TMMklwdeV 14.71 +.16 +25.4
TMUSEq 13.01 +.09 +16.5
2YGIFxdn 9.67 ... +1.5
DFARIEs n 25.54 +.31 +36.6
Diverslfd Inv Fds:
oreBond 12.54 ... +4.5
EqGrowp 19.63 +.19 +15.3
VaIInc 25.21 +.10 +15.7
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced n 80.44 +.27 +13.7
InormeFd 12.76 ... +4.6
InrlStk 31.88 +.21 +27,1
Stock 133.18 +.66 +20.0
Domini Soc Inv:
SodalEqn 29.69 +.20 +11.0
Dreyfus:
Aprec 39.81 -.11 +9.4
BasicS&P 25.74 +.13 +14.3
Disc 32.97 +.07 +14.4
Dreyfus 10.37 +.04 +12.6
DroyMid r 28,35 +.37 +24.6
DryySOIn t 36.16 +.17 +14,0
EmgLead 46.51 +1.01 +20.8
FL Int r 13.29 -.04 +3.5
GNMAtp 14.59 -.01 +3.7
Grincn 15.49 ... +11.7
InsMun nit 18.00 -.04 +6.1
Intmlemnr 13.44 -04 +4.1
MidcpVl r 34.40 +.49 +23.4
MunBdr 11.93 -.03 +6.8
NYTax r 14.93 -.05 +5.4
StralAr 29.52 +.20 +20.0
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 10.18 +.02 +12.0
GrowthFnp 10.68 +.03 +13.0
Dreyfus Premier:
CaOxExBdZ 14.91 -.05 +7.1
CoreEqAt 14.80 -.06 +7.8
CoreVlnv p 30.79 +.03 +15.3
EmgMktA 21.15 +.25 +37.5
LIdHYIdAp 7.38 -.01 +7.8
NwLdrsn 45.63 +1.21 +22.83
TaxMgdGCI 15.74 -.06 +6.8
TechGroA 22.74 +.22 +13.0
TechGrowR ... +13.5
Eaton Vance Adv:
FAgRatel 9.88 ... +3.6
Eaton Vance CIlA:
TMG1.0 540.62 +4.98 +12.9
ChnaA p 15.01 +.27 +29.2
FloatRate 10.22 ... +3.7
GrowthA 7.33 +.11 +12.9
HthScIAp 10.69 +.03 +9.4
ncBosA 6.44 +.01 +9.9
LgCpVal 18.11 +.18 +23.3
NatiMun 11.35 +.01 +11.1
SpcEqtA 4.75 +.05 +14.5
TMG1.1 23.06 +.21 +12.5
MunBdl 10.76 -.02 +8.2
TradGvtA 8.67 -.02 +3.1
Eaton Vance CI B:
FLMuniBI 10.95 -.02 +6.2
HIlhSiB t 11.30 +.03 +6.5
NatlMunBd 10.59 ... +10.2
TMG1.1 t 21.82 +.20 +11.7
Eaton Vance Cl C:
FloaltRt 9.88 +.01 +2.9
GoSvC p 7.47 -.01 +2,3
NaitMCt 10.09 ... +10.3
Enterprise Cl A:
GwlhA np 17.18 +.32 ,9.6
Evergreen A:
AstAeA p 13.96 +.05 +14.9
BalanA 8.63 +.03 +11.5
AdjRatIA 9.32 ... +2.0
FdLgCpA 23.19 +.14 +19.2
SpValuAp 30.18 +.70 +26.6
Evergreen B:
AstAicoBt 13.77 +.04 +14.0
DivrtdBl 14.94 -.02 NS
MunSBondB t 7.51 -.03 +5.9
AdjRaleC 9.32 ... +1.3
AstuAoCt 13.55 +.04 +14.0
Evergreen I:
CoreBdl 10.62 -.02 +48
AdjR68el 9.32 .. +2.3
IntlEqtyl 9.23 +.09 +21,7
LgCapEqtyl 15.53 +.07 +17.9
PAMuBdl 11.46 -.03 .5.1
Shtln6Bol 6.05 -.01 +3.6
SIMunll 10.00 -.02 +2.4
SpecVal 30.30 +.71 +27.0
StrGroI 26.77 +.06 +15.0
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 25.63 .1.47 +55.3
HiYield np 4.61 ... +4.9
ValRestrn 44.96 +.53 +25.1
FAM Funds:
Value n 48.38 +.05 +17.0
FBR Funds:
SmallCap 44.20 +.02 +29.7
FMI Funds:
Focus n 35.82 +.78 +19.2
FPA Funds:
CaplI 44.00 +1.06 +22.3
Newlnc 10.96 +.01 +0.7
FPACres n 24.96 +.36 ,13.2
FalrPolme 24.56 +.04 +26.5
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.60 -.08 +14.2
CapAppA 25.75 +.07 011.5
MidGrSIA 32.55 +,40 +28.9
HilncBdA 7.98 +.02 +7.7
KaulmA p 5.57 +.07 +21.2
MktOppAp 13.09 +.01 +5.2
MunSecA 10.78 -.04 +6.4
USGvSecA 7.78 ... +4.1
Federated B:
AmLdrB 25.65 -.09 +13,3
KaufmaB p 5.45 +.07 +20.5
Strlncex 8.67 -.04 +8.5
Federated C:
MklOppC 13.01 +.01 +4.4
Federated InaI:
Kaulmn 5.58 +.08 +21.4


MilCap 22.69 +.29 +24.6
StockTr 38.15 -.01 +14.4
Fidelity Adv Foc T:
HIlCarT 22.15 +.05 +18.4
NatResT 41.13 +2.19 +43.6
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivrlniA r 19.17 +.09 +20.5
EqGrAt 46,64 +.48 +11.2
EqlncA p 28.85 +.17 +14.9
MIdCapA p 24.98 +.19 +19.7
Fidelity Advisor B:
EqGrB n 43.99 +.45 +10.3
MIdCpBnp 24.14 +.18 18.8
Fidelity Advisor I:
Divlntl n 19.41 +.10 +20.9
DivGrhl 12.01 -.01 +10.0
EqGrl n 49.31 +.52 +11.6
Eqlnl 29.52 +.17 +15.3
intBd n 11.03 *-.02 +3.8
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 16.22 +.13 +7.5
DivlinT p 19.02 +.09 +20,2
DhvGdhT p 11.82 -.01 +9.5
DynCapAppTp14.79 +27 +21.9
EqGrT p 46.78 +.49 +11.0
EqnT 29.18 +.17 +14.7
GovInT 10.07 -.01 +4.2
GrOppT 31.23 +.12 13.6
HlncAdvTp 9.94 -.03 +15 5
IntBdT 11.02 -.01 +36


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
MidCapT p 25.16 +.20 +195
MunilncT p 13.18 -.04 +67
OvrseaT 17.99 +08 +18.3
STFT 9.46 -.01 +2.0
SmlCapT p 26.31 +54 +29.1
StrlInT 11.67 ... +9.9
ValStaT 35.84 +32 +17.7
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000 n 1225 +,02 +6.7
FF2010n 1388 +04 +10.5
FF2020n 14.31 +.06 +13,9
FF2030n 1449 +.08 15.6
FF2040 n 851 +.05 +16.6
FF2015 11.31 +05 +12.5
FF2020p 11.61 +.06 +14.8
IncomeFdn 11.37 +.01 +5.8
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrr 17.08 +23 +16.9
AMgr 16,26 +.01 +8.1
AMgrGrn 14.98 +.01 +9.5
AMgrln 12.83 +.03 +6.8
Balance 18.62 +.15 +17.8
BlueChlpGr 42.53 +.29 +10.9
Canada n 37.68 +.76 +35.0
CapApp n 26.54 +.20 +16.2
Caplnco nr 8.49 +.01 +14.5
ChinaReg n 18.56 +.29 +28.4
CongrSt n 398.26 -.17 +10.2
Contra n 60.68 +.45 +21.6
CnvSec 21.63 .15 +13.1
Destiny n 13.37 +.25 +14.8
Destinyll 11.71 +.10 +11.2
DisEq n 27.00 +.17 +21.0
Diverintln 29.48 +.26 +21.1
DivGth n 28.81 -.02 +10.2
EmrgMktIn 14.64 +.23 +48.7
Equtlnc n 52.96 +.32 +14.1
EQII 24.22 +.15 +15.2
EurCapAp n 22.62 +.16 +24.2
Europe n 36.44 +.19 +35.9
ExchFd n 273.70 +1.50 +14.4
Export n 21.06 +.39 +22.1
FIdelFd 30.62 +.14 +12.4
Fifty nr 21.05 +.33 +15.3
FtRateHir 9.96 ... +4.3
FourlnOne n 25.87 +.14 +15.4
GNMAn 11.02 -.02 +4.3
Govtlnc n 10.22 -.02 +4.4
GroCon 58.74 +.38 +21.8
Groin c 38.36 +.07 +11.7
Groncll 9.63 +.11 +9.7
Highlnc rn 6.91 -.01 +9,0
IndepindnCe n 18.40 +.29 +18.5
InProBnd 11.27 +.04 +6.1
IntBd n 10.40 -.01 +3.6
IntGov 10.13 -.01 +2.7
IntlDisc 29.04 +,.21 +22.1
IntlSmCap m 25.54 +.38 +32.0
InGBn 7.46 ... +5.3
Japan n 12.28 +.05 +1.8
JpnSmCo n 12.95 +.09 +5.9
LalAm'n 24.68 +.38 +64.0
LevCoSlock 25.46 +.35 +35.2
LowPrm 42.50 +.33 +25.2
Magellan n 106.31 +.51 +12.9
MidCapn 25.13 +.43 +23.1
MIgSecan 11.19 -.02 +4.5
NewMkt nr 14.23 -.06 +18.5
NewMilln 31.97 +.73 +15.4
OTC 35.96 +.11 +19.2
Ovrsea n 35.95 +.16 +18.8
PacBas n 20.54 +.30 +18.0
Puritan 19.10 +.07 +11.1
RealEst n 32.73 +.46 +40.8
STBF n 8.91 -.01 +2.4
SmCaplnd 21.21 +.37 +24.4
SmallCapS nr 18.25 +.30 +18.3
SE Asian 18.76 +.39 +40.9
SIkSFcn 23.73 +.24 +15.6
Stralncn 10.56 -.01 +10.2
Trend n 55.25 +.33 +14.8
USBIn 11.04 -.02 +5.0
UlShtBdrn 10.03 ... +2.1
Utility n 14.37 -.06 +26.9
ValStmrat 37.46 +34 +18.3
Value n 77.71 +1.04 +26.5
Wddwden 18.71 +.14 +17.3
Fidelity Selects:
Ain 36.16 +1.07 +21.7
Auton 35.02 +.64 +14.7
Banking n 38.57 +.14 +11.6
Botech nd 59.03 -.32 +14.2
Broker n 62.96 +.62 +40.4
Chem n 69.48 +1.71 +30.8
Compn 36.40 +.44 +18.8
Conlndn 25.51 +.23 +18.9
CstHounn 50.29 +.81 +47.5
DfAeron 73.16 +1.39. +28.9
DevCom n 18.66 -.18 +15.6
Electr n 42.53 -.01 +22.9
Energy n 43.04 +1.96 +54.4
EngSvcn 56.35 +4.17 +51.8
Enviro n 15.33 +.41 +18.7
FinSvcn 111.32 -.11 +13.9
Foodn 51.99 +.19 +13.6
Gold n 24.61 +.66 +13.5
Health n 140.59 +.32 +19.4
HomFini n 59.03 -.23 +4.1
IndMat n 39.46 +1.44 +21.0
Insurn 64.66 -.39 +17.0
Leisrn 75.96 +.03 +15.8
MadDel n 49.87 -.53 +51.1
MedEqSysAn 24.69 +.16 +16.2
Multimed n 45.48 +.09 +14.2
NaGas n 35.87 +1.78 +52.1
Paper n 28.62 +1.17 -6.6
Pharma n 9.12 ... +9.5
Retail n 55.89 +.83 +27.2
Softwrn 51.42 -.18 +18.4
Techn 61.99 +.10 +17.2
Telecom n 38.76 -.48 +14.3
Transn 41.91 +1.19 +24.7
UtlGr n 42.84 -.30 +27.9
Wireless n 6,36 -.06 +31,7
Fidelity Spartan:
CA Muntn 12.55 -.05 +6.6
CTMunnr 11.60 -.04 +4.6
Equllndx n 43.69 +.21 +14.4
ExtMkIcnd 34.10 +.48 +26.2
500ndx nr 85.21 +.41 +14.4
FL Murn 11.68 -.03 +5.8
Govinn 11.01 -.02 +4.6
InImMuni n 10.06 -.03 +4.5
Intllndx 32.03 +.18 +18.5
IlnGrBd n 10.62 -.02 +5.3
MDMum 10.99 -.03 +5.3
MA MunIn 12.13 -.03 +6.7
MI MunI n 12.01 -.04 +5.1
MN Mun n 11.54 -.03 +5.1
Munilncn 13.06 -.04 +6.9
NJ Muncr 11.74 -.04 +6.5
NY Munb n 13.03 -.03 +6.3
Oh Munn 11.92 -.04 +6.2
PAMun nr 10.90 -.03 +5.5"
ShIlnlMun 10.25 -.02 +1.9
TotMktlnd 34.27 +.23 +17.2
First Amer FdsY:
CoreBond x 11.21 -.04 +4.7
Eqtlyincnpx 13.97 +.08 +12.8
Eqldxl npx 23.07 +.09 +14.2
InLBondx 10.00 -.04 +3.3
Intl n 11.63 +.06 +15.4
LgCpGrOp 28.88 +.13 +14.1
LgCapVal npx 19.77 +.10 +19.0
MdCpGrOp 43.08 +.65 +29.3
First Eagle:
GlobalA 40.81 +.41 +19.3
OverseasA 23.02 +.24 +21.5
First Investors A
BIChipA p 20.85 +.13 +13.5
GlobalA p 6.77 +.06 +15.7
GovLA p 10.95 -.01 +3.4
GmIlncAp 13.92 +.16 +19.6
lnsomeAp 3.10 ... +5.4
MnGrdAp 9.86 -.02 +4.1
MATFAp 12.04 -.04 +4.7
MITFA p 12.69 -.04 +4.4
MIdCapA np 27.94 +.43 +28.4
NJTFAp 13.03 -.03 +4.4
NYTFAp 14.50 -.03 +4.3
PATFA p 13.23 -.03 +4.2
SpSitA p 20.23 .20 +23.4
TaxExplA p 10.16 -.03 +4.1
TolRetAp 14.14 +.11 +13.7
ValueB p 6.68 +.05 +17.0
Firsthand Funds:
GlobTanh 3.86 +.03 +8.1
Tech Value n 30.01 +.48 +14.4
Frank/Temp Fmk A:
AGEAp 2.12 ,...+10,5
AdjUS p 9.99 ... +2,2
ALTFApx 11.59 -.03 +6.0
AZTFApx 11.25 -.02 +6.3
Ballnvp 63.13 +1.08 +28,3
CAHYBd px 10.38 ... +9.3
COlInsApx 12.78 -.02 +7.8
CAIntrmA px 11.59 -.04 +4.7
COlTFrAp 7.37 -.01 +9.0
Cap~rA 10.93 +.06 +7.7
COTFApx 12.08 -.03 +7.4
CTTFApx 11.16 -.02 +7.9
CvtSecAp 16.78 +.12 +17.0
DblTxFrAx 12,03 -.03 +7.9
DynaTechA 24.90 +.21 +15.7
EqlncAp 20.78 -.09 +11.4
Fedlnlerm px 11.49 -.05 +4.6
FedTxFrAp 12.23 -.01 +7.6
FlexCapGrA 38.40 +37 +16.1
FIRIDAp 10.12 +.. +3.6
FLTFApx 12.02 -.02 +7.1
FoundFAl p 12.52 +.02 +15.5
GATFApx 12.18 -.02 +7.2
OoI4PrMA 18.16 +.55 +13.6
GrowlhAp 34.91 +.34 .15.7
HYTFApx 10.94 ...+10.1
IncoSerAp 2,53 ... +15.2
InsTFA px 12.41 -.03 +6.7
NYlnlmlTFpx 11.01 -.03 +3.7
LATFApx 11.67 -.02 +6.4
LMGvSecA 10.03 -.02 +1.5
MDTFApx 11.82 -.03 +6.8
MaseTFA px 12.01 -.04 +6.9
MIchTFA px 12.35 -.02 +6.4
MNInsAx 12.20 -.02 +6.1
MOTFApx 12.38 -.03 +7.8
NJTFA px 12.23 -.02 +7.9
NYInsApx 11.89 -.03 +6.6
NYTFAp 11.97 -.01 +6.9
NCTFApx 12.38 -.02 +7.1
OhloITFA px 12.65 -.03 +7.1
ORTFApx 11.94 -.03 +7.5
PATFApx 10,49 -.83 +6.7


ReESecAp 29.01 +.36 +36.3
RIsDIvAp 32.19 +.OB +9.1
SmCpGr2Ap 12.39 +.23 +20.4
SMCpGrA 35.56 +.41 +22.8
StIrmtlncp 10.28 +.02 +8.6
USGovA p 6.57 ... +4.1
UtilitiesAp 12.15 -.02 +31.5
VATFApx 11.93 -.03 +7.5
Frank/Tmp Fmk Adv:
IncomeAdv 2.51 -.01 +15.0
Frank/Temp Fmk B:
IncomeBI p 2.53 .. +14.6
IncomeB t 2.52 ... +13.8
Frank/Temp Fmk C:
FoundFAlp 12.43 +.02 +14.7
IncomeC 2.54 .. +14,1
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
BeaconA 16.50 +.22 +18.0
DIscovA 25.57 +.34 +23.6
QuallliedAl 20.31 +.31 +21.7
SharesA 23.85 +.19 +16.5
Frank/Temp Mtl C:
DOlcC I 25.,3 +.3 +228
SharesC I 23.59 +.19 +15.8
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DevMktA p 20.29 +.35 +39.1
ForelgnAp 12.51 +.10 +19.3
GIBondAp 10.43 +.06 +10.1
GlSmCoA p 9.68 +.09 +24,3


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
GrowthAp 23.22 +.01 +167
IntlxEM p 15.01 +.07 +16.68
WoddA p 186,53 +.10 +21.1
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
FrgnAv 12.49 +.09 +19.5
GrthAv 23.26 +.02 +17.0
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMkIC 19.88 +.34 +38.2
ForgnC p 12.32 +.09 +18.3
GrwlhCp 22.6 +.01 +15.9
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Income n 11.43 -.02 +4.7
S&S PM n 46.18 +.18 +12.5
TaxEx 11.90 -03 +6.3
Trusts n 55.54 +.48 +12.1
GMO Trust II:
Foreign 14.53 +.08 +18.1
GMO Trust IIV:
CurHlntBd 9+66 +.01 +10.9
CorePIsBd 10.45 -.03 +6,1
EmgMkr 18.64 +.36 +52.2
ECD 11,42 -.04 +25,2
Foreign 14.58 +.08 +18.2
IntIlGrwth 26.66 +.17 +20.8
IntllnrVal 28.56 +.18 +21.1
,InSmCo. 16.39 +.19 +26.7
USQtlyEqly 20.35 ... +7.1
US Core 14.59 +.02 +16.1
GMO Trust IV:
EmgCnDl 11.42 -.04 +25.2
EmerMkt 18.60 +.35 +52.2
Foreign 14.59 +.08 +18,3
InIntrVa4l 28.55 +.18 +21.2
US Core 14.57 +.02 +16.1
USQualEq 20.36 ... +7.2
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMkVl r 18.62 +.36 +52.3
USCoreVI 14.57 +.02 +16.2
Gabelli Funds:
Assel 43.42 +.60 +20.9
Growth 27.42 +.37 +15.1
Value t 20.01 +.23 +16.4
Gartmore Fds D:
Bond 9.70 -.02 +5.7
GvtBdD 10.30 -.01 +4.68
GrowthD 7.02 +.05 +17.4
NationwD 20.99 +.11 +17.0
TxFre r 10.63 -.03 +6.1
Gartmore Fds InstI:
Intldxin 6.27 +.05 +18.5
NwBdIdxl n 10.97 -.02 +4.9
S&P500lnslln 10.64 +.05 +14.4
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 25.08 -.01 +8.4
Glenmede Funds:
Intl 18,70 +.24 +22.2
Goldman Sachs A:
CapGrA 20.21 +.23 +10.7
GncA 25.67 +.09 +16.6
GrthOppsA 2230 +.26 +20.0
HIYlildA 8,03 -.01 +10.9
HYMunlAp 11.28 +.01 +11.1
MdCapVA p 36.79 +.43 +29.7
SmnaCapA 43.81 +.65 +21.1
Goldman Sachs Inst:
CoreFxc 10.10 -.01 +5.5
HYMunI 11.28 ... +11.5
MIdCapVal 37.06 +.43 +30.2
Guardian Funds:
GBG IntGrA 13.53 +.15 +20.1
ParkAvA 31.44 +20 +10.6
Stock 28.50 +.18 +11.2
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.685 -.01 +6.0
CapApplnstn 30.29 +.32 +19.1
Inll nr 44.26 +.57 +20.8
SCpVIInst 20.69 +.31 +34.8
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsA p 15.40 +.07 +8,2
CapAppA p 35.46 +,44 +20.0
DivGthA p 19.22 +.17 +15.6
MIdCapAp 26.77 +.44 +29.3
SnICoAp 18.14 +.11 +27.5
SlockApp 18.34 +.12 +9.5
Hartford Fds B:
CapAppBpn 32.99 +.41 +19.1
Hartford Fds C:
CapAppCt 33.08 +.41 +19.2
Hartford HLS IA:
Bond 11.75 .. +5.7
CapApp 53.89 +.73 +21.0
Div&Grwth 21.01 +.19 +16,0
GIbILdrs 17.55 +.03 +10,0
GrMIh&lnc 12.52 +.04 +15.3
GrwthOpp 29.23 +.13 +23.5
Advisers 2348 +.09 +8.4
Stock 47.15 +.32 +10.4
Index 31.04 +.15 +14.1
IntlOpp 12.21 +.13 +20.4
MidCap 30.8 +.51 +30.0
SmnalCo 17.74 +.11 +28.2
Hartford HLS IB:
Advisors p 23.61 +.09 +6.2
Bondp 11.67 ... +5.5
CapApprecp 53.61 +.73 +20.7
Div&sGrop 20.92 +.19 +15.6
Heartland Fds:
Value 49.34 +.70 +12.0
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrow 19.95 +.47 +32.1
HollBalFd 15.39 +.01 +3,6
Hotchkids & Wiley:
LgCpVal 24.04 +.10 +25.5
LgCapValA p 23.97 +.09 +25.2
MdCpValA p 29.79 +.21 +31.9
MkdCpVal 29.93 +.21 +32.1
HuEsmnStlGr 15.92 +.02 +6.6
ICAP Funds:
Equity 46.37 +.20 +17,9
ICM SmICo 386.7 +.5B +24.7
ING Funds CIlA:
InLValAp 17.34 +.15 +15.0
ING Partners:
TRPGrEqln 50.81 +.26 +15.4
INGT,M,Q&1:
InlVall 17,37 .15 +15.3
ISI Funds:
NoAmrp 7.49 -.03 +8.4
Ivy Funds:
GINaRsAp 23.75 +.93 +34.2
JPMorgan A Class:
InvBalnp 12.23 +.04 +10.5
lnvr&rinAp 13.29 +.07 +13.1
MdCpVol p 23.81 +.12 +22.9
JPMorgan B Class:
InvG&l p 13.22 +.06 +12.2
JPMorgan C Class:
MdCpValupn 23.36 +.11 +22.1
JP Morgan Instl:
MidCapVaI n 24.14 +.12 +23.5
JPMorgan Select:
IntlEq 29.79 4.12 +17.7
MdCpValu ... +23.1
TxAwreEq 17.17 +.02 +10.1
USEquity 11.08 +.04 +13.4
JPMorgan Selt CIs:
CoreBond 10.81 -.01 +4.6
CorePlusBo n 7.89 -.01 +5.1
DivMdCpGr 25.68 +.20 +22.3
DIvMdCpVI 19.69 +.15 +23.6
Eqlndx 28.10 +.14 +142
GovBond 10.36 -.01 +6.0
HIYyBond 8.41 +.01 +9.6
InlBondl n 10.56 -.01 +3.7
InmdTFBed 10.81 -.02 +3.2
IndEql 20.22 +.20 +21.3
InWrdAmer 23.77 +.20 +23.0
LgCapVal 16.10 +.03 +16.6
LgCapGr 15.29 +.10 +10,5
MtCpMkNeu r 11.02 -.05 +5.5
SmCpCore 46,20 +1.00 +25,1
TaxFrBondn 12.93 -.03 +4.9
UtrSTBd 9.84 +2.6
JP Morgan Ultra:
MIgBacked 10.60 -.01 NS
Janus:
Balanced n 21.76 +.06 +11.9
Conlrarian 13.94 +.19 +30.1
CoreEq 21.73 +.16 +20.4
Enlerpr n 39.91 +.70 +25.3
FedTxEx n 7.05 -.02 +4.5
FIxBond 9.59 -.02 +4.4
Fundn 24.683 +.16 +8.8
GI LfeSci nr 19.19 -.01 +18.4
Gtrech nr 10.66 -.03 +15.7
Grthlncn 33.75 -.02 +19.,5
Mercury n 21.68 +.,08 +14.1
MIdCapVal 23.61 +.35 +20.1
Olympus n 30.22 +.21 +16,7
Orion n 7.61 +.08 +22.3
Oerseesnr 25.4 +.46 +29.4
ShTmBd 2.69 ... +1,9
SOVInst 32.21 +.75 +19.8
SCVIlnv 32.00 +.74 +19.5
Twenty 46.38 +.66 +24.3
Ven9urn 60,21 +1.16 +27.3
WrldW nr 40,76 -.01 +..2
Janus Adv I Shrs:
Forty 27.34 +.30 +27.3
Janus Aspen InstIl:
Balanced 24.89 +.07 +12.2
LgCpGrwtt 20.27 +.14 +.8,
Woridwdrn 26.15 +.01 +683
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 16.33 +.34 +18.7
GovlncA 9.04 -.02 +4.0
GrowthA 15.03 +.16 +19.1
HSIYdAp 5.78 .. +.6
InsuredA 10.98 -.03 +5.1
UliltyA 13,78 +.19 +43.6
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 13.85 +.14 .18.2
HIIdBnt 5.77 ... +9,1
InsuredB 11.00 -.03 +4.6
JennlsonDryden Z&h:
GrowthZ 15.42 +.16 +19.3
Stkldx1 n 27,689 +.13 ,14.3
StkldxZ 27.67 +.13 ,14.2
Jansen 23.97 +.08 +5.9
John Hancock A:
BondA p 15.20 -.01 +5.5
Cl00si9Val p 23.95 ,,, +16,7
RgBkA 42.77 +.16 +12.6
SlnvA p 19.59 +.05 +8.6
SlncA p 7.01 +.01 +9.6
USGIbLdrsn 29.39 +.53 +9.0
John Hancock B:
6ltlncB 7.01 +.01 +8.9
Julius Bear Funds:
InlEql r 33.10 +.42 +25.5
IndEqA 32`49 +.41 +25.1


LSVValEqn 16.11 +.11 +22.8
Laudus Funds:
USSmCpn 14.50 +.31 +23.7
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 16.19 +.35 +54.5
IntEqlnstl 12.79 ... +17.4
Legg Mason: Fd
OpportTrt 16,04 +.16 +19.0
Splnv np 47.12 +.48 +16.9
ValTr p 65,57 +.19 +15.3
Legg Mason Instl:
BFMSmCp 11.87 +.24 +27.3
ValTrFI p 70.67 +.21 +16.0
ValTrnst 71.88 +.23 +165
LeutholdCI n 16.75 +.24 +17.7
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 31.58 +.04 +8.0
Intln 16.12 +.09 +9.4
SmCap 31.63 -.02 +17.9
Loomls Sayles:
LSBondl 13.73 +.02 +12.8
SIrlncA 14.09 +.01 +14.3
Lord Abbett A:
AfflliaodA p 14.65 +.12 +13.2
AllValueA 12.23 +.17 +17,2
Balancemr 11.49 +.05 +10.5
BondDebA p 7.97 +.01 +7.8
GlIncA p 7.18 +,01 +4.6
GvtlSecAp 2.81 -.01 +4.6


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for
last day of the week.
Chg: Weekly net change In the NAV.
12 mo % rtn: The percent gain or loss for one share, including
,air,.. ,l.T.ler. I 1 d .linarl ,. r I .T :-.nihll '
Mulual Fund Foolnotre' E..3ap iiuI al ditilIuTi',1 -
Pro,..UjOu. do'S QUOt'j r, 1. IJ, lo a ur'd I Funrd .a5361 us60 I'
, 3; dilllnditr ull:rl C S, r l'.a errf. .li lei or conringr ri
.jlerr.id Sile.; la,1 may app.iv 510.: dlu..,a ra r spinn I -
Bor. p ar,3 r Ex:.iaj h l.o lara NA C.o ii.r..rm31o' .a.3i.1I
i0l. NE D l ir. quei',l NN Furd d .:.e' :I ln I r.
IrLackao NS - FJ.3 ,Jil o.j ,.irs i al l o'I jalsI
Source: Llppei. Inc. and The Associated Press


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn


MidCapA p 23.44
RsSmCpA 29.73
RsAmValp 12.55
Lord Abbett B:
AffidB p 14.68
BdDbB p 7.98
MIdCapV p 22.67
Lord Abbett C:
AlflldC p 14.66
BdDbC p 7.98
MidCapVIC p 22.60
Lord Abbett P:
MIdCaplV p 23.00
Lord AbbettY:
AffY 14.68
MdCapVl p 23.44
MFS Funds A:
MITAp 17.96
MIGAp 12.64
BondA p 12.93
CapOp p 13.53
EmGrAp 32.72
GvScA p 9.64
GrOpA p 9.03
HllncA p 3.92
IntNwDA p 22.40
MCapA p 8.94
MuBdA 10.73
MuHiA 8.44
MuFLAp 10.21
RschAp 21.32
ResrchlntlA p 15.85
StrValAp 1631
ToIRAp 16,18
U1lA p 12.07
ValuaAp 23,91
MFS Funds B:
MA ITB 17,52
EmGrB t 30.23
MIGB 11,58
GvScBt 9.63
HIlnBt 3.93
MulnB t 8.66
To7RB t 16.18
ValueB 23.78
MFS Funds C:
TotRICt 16.24
ValueC p 23.76
MFS Funds I:
RelnT t 16.19
Valual 24.00
MFS Funds InstIl:


+.33 +2502
+.78 +27.6
.12 +181

+.12 +12.5
+,01 +7.2
+.32 +24,4

+.12 +12.5
+.01 +7.1
+.31 +24.4

+.33 +25.1

+.12 +13.7
+.33 +25.7

+.24 +17.9
+.12 +15.3
-.02 +5.9
+.06 +15.5
+.24 +18.6
-.02 +4.2
+.10 +14.7
+9.2
+.38 +24.2
+.09 +15.4
-.02 +5.6
-.01 +9.7
-.02 +6.9
+.19 +21.8
+.11 +17.6
+.01 +16.3
+.03 +13.0
+.11 +36.6
+.10 +18,7

+.22 +17.0
+.21 +17.7
+.11 +14,5
-.01 +3.6
+6.2
-.02 +5.8
+.03 +12.3
+.10 +17.9

+.03 +12,2
t.10 +179

+.11 +18.0
+.11 +19.1


Inl[Eqty 16.04 +.20 +17.6
MainStay Funds A:
HiYidBdA 6.39 +.02 +10.5
MainStay Funds B:
CpAppB t 28.35 +.40 +14.2
ConvBt 13.22 +14 +9.7
GovtB1I 8.33 .., +3.2
iYIdBB1 6.37 +.03 +9.7
[nriEqB 12.74 .01 +15.8
SmCpGrB p 15.12 .21 +24.1
TotRtB1 19.30 +.12 +12.2
MainStay Funds I:
S&P5001dx 28.65 +.14 +14.2
Maise & Power:
Growth n 71.80 +.62 +14.1
Managers Funds:
FremontBd n 10,50 -.01 +6.3
SpclEq 92.49 +.79 +20.2
Marslco Funds:
Fo i p 17.09 +.12 +21.6
Growp 18.14 +.06 +20.6
MassMutual Inst:
CoreBdS 11.13 -.01 +4.9
Master Select:
Equity 15.31 +.19 +13.6
Intl 17.91 +.27 +25.0
Matthews Asian:
AslanGl 17.09 +.45 +28.3
PacTiger 17.51 +.54 +40.4
Mellon Funds:
BondFund 12.61 -.02 +4.0
EmgMkts 22.24 +.29 +36.0
InlFund 15.64 +.0 +14,3
LrgCapStk 9.94 +.09 +15.7
MidCapSlk 14.74 +.25 +28.8
SmICapStk 17.63 +.35 +21.0
MergerFdn 15.66 +.06 +5.1
Meridian Funds:
Growth 36.92 +.27 +12.1
Value 39.36 +.37 +17.2
Merrill Lynch A:
BalCapA px 26.92 -.05 +9.7
BasValAp 32.13 +.19 +12.5
FdGrAp 17.78 +.17 +13.0
GIbAIApx 16.82 -.02 +15.0
HaalthApe 6.55 -.13 +22.4
NJMuniBd 10.74 -.01 +9.5
S&P500px 15.18 +.06 +14.0
USGovtA 10.21 -.02 +3.7
Merrill Lynch B:
BalaCapB tx 26.23 +.06 +8.9
BasVBt 31.44 +.17 +11.6
BdHincr 5.11 ... +6.9
CalnsMB 11.67 -.04 +5.0
CorABdPtfB 11.76 -.01 +4.2
CplTB1I 11.93 -.02 +4.3
EquityDiv x 15.31 +.18 +21.1
EuroB t 15.01 +.13 +23.3
FocusValuat 12.90 +.16 +16.3
FundlGrBt 16.25 +.15 +12.1
FLMBt. 10.48 -.03 +7.6
GIAIBtx 16.50 +.04 +14.1
HealthBls 4.91 -.13 +21.5
LatAmBeI 27.28 +.49 +66.6
MnlnsBI 7.94 -.02 +6.0
ShtTrnUSGvtt 9.17 -.01 +1.4
MunShlTm 9.98 -.01 +0.8
MulnSmTrB1I 10.52 -.04 +3.5
MNaoB 1 10.60 -.02 +6.7
NJMB1t 10.73 -.02 +9.1
NYMnB 11.13 -.03 +6.5
NatResTrBI 42.10 +1.67 +52.8
PacBtx 18.94 +.01 +11.9
PAMBt 11.41 -.03 +6.6
ValueOpp te 24.59 -.62 +18.9
USGoVt 10.21 -.02 +3.1
U8Mcmbx 11.75 +.01 +34.1
W4dlncB1 6.22 +.03 +11.4
Merrill Lynch C:
BasVIC1 30.69 +.17 +11,6
FdGrCI 16.34 +.15 +12.1
GlobAC tx 16.04 +.03 +14.2
Merrill Lynch I:
In9Val 26.99 +.26 +20.2
BalaCapl x 26.99 -.0 6 +10,0
BasVal l 32.29 +.18 6 +12.7
BdHilnc 5.10 ... +7.7
CalnsMB 11.67 -.03 +5.6
CoreBdPtflI 11.76 -.01 +5.0
CpITI 11.93 -.02 +4,8
DavCaplIp 16.67 +.37 +42.0
EquityDiv x 15.27 +.15 +22.3
Euml 17.52 +.16 +24,6
FocusValuel 14,19 +.19 +17,6
FundlGrI 16.19 .18 +13.3
.FLMI 10.46 -.03 +6.3
GIAII0 x 16.86 -.04 +15.3
Heallhle 7.12 -.12 +22.9
LatAml 28.67 +.52 +68.3
Mnlnsl 7.94 -.02 +6.8
MunShortTm 9.97 -.01 +1.0
MulntTrl 10.53 -.04 +3.8
MNatll 10.61 -.02 +7.5
NatResTrt 44.53 +1.98 +54.3
Paclx 20.71 +.04 +13.1
S&P500X 15.24 +.07 +14.3
ValueOpply e 27.26 -.82 +20.1
USGovt 10.21 -.03 +3.9
UtmcmlIN 11.77 -.02 +35.1
Wldncl 6.23 +.04 +12.2


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
Metro West Fds:
TotalRetBondl 9,75 ... +6.7
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd n 2.02 +.08 +13.5
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 11.46 +.09 +23.1
MontagGri 23.78 +.43 +10.4
Morgan Stanley A:
AmOppA 25.33 +.30 +17.7
DivGthA 35.58 -.02 +11.7
GlobDivA 13.83 ... +14.3
US GvA 9.16 -.01 +5.0
Morgan Stanley B:
AmOppB 23.82 +.27 +16,8
DivGthB 35.71 -.02 +11.7
EqWaighB 38.78 +.41 +20.2
GIbDivB 13.97 ... +14.0
GrowthB 12.67 +.16 +16.7
SP500B 12.95 +.06 +13.0
StralB 16.37 +.12 +14.0
USGvtB 9.16 -.02 +4.9
Morgan Stanley D:
TaxExD 11.79 -.03 +6.1
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMklIn 21,30 +.34 +44.4
CrPIFInlsn 11.65 .,, +6.3
GIValEqAn 17.74 ., +14.1
JntlOmCpAn 25.64 +.24 +22.6
IntlEq n 20.98 +.04 +16.9
IntlEqB np 20.81 +.03 +16.6
LIdDurPI n 10.36 +1.6
MCGrAdvp 21.98 +.20 +27.9
SmCGrBnp 13.12 +.14 +29.2
USRealn 25.40 +.42 +44.6
ValueAd n 17.99 -.03 +16,4
Muhlnkmprn 86.10 +1.51 +33.0
Under Funds A:
InternetA 18,44 +.07 +15.6
Mutual Series:
BeaconZ 16.59 +.22 +16.4
DiscZ 25.81 +.34 +24.1
QualfdZ 20.43 +.31 +22.1
SharesZ 24,01 +,20 +17.0
Nations Funds Inv A:
FocusEqA t 18.98 +.13 +21.3
InllValueAr 21.73 +.18 +17.5
MarsGroAt 18.11 +.05 +21.1
Nations Funds Inv B:
FocEqtyB t 18.00 +.12 +20.4
MarsGrwB t 17.16 +.05 +20.3
Nations Funds Pri A:
BondFdPrA 9.88 -.01 +5.3
ConSecPriA 17.37 +.18 +10.5
FocusEqAt 19.26 +.14 +21.6
IntMPA n 10.12 -.04 +3.9
IntEqPA n 13.68 +.17 +18,3
IntlValPrA n 21.83 +.17 +17.7
LgCapldxPrA 23.96 +.11 14.4
MarsGrPrA 16.36 +.06 21.4
MarlnOppr 11.31 +.18 +15.3
MidCpldxPrA 11.79 +.16 +25.2
STInPA 982 -.01 +1.9
STMuPA 10.21 -.01 +1.7
SmlCapldxPrAn21.01 +.42 +28.0
SIralGroPrA 12.66 +.08 +13.6
ValuePA 13.56 +.13 +20.7
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus n 39.23 +.07 +22.3
Genesis n 33.44 +.67 +28.0
Geneslnsl 45.83 +.92 +28.2
Guardnn 17.18 +.24 +20.0
HighlncoBd 9.32 -.01 +6.4
Intr 19.69 +.36 +29.1
Partner n 28.49 +.44 +34.4
Neuberger&Bermn Tr:
Genesis n 47.80 +.96 +27.9
Nicholas Applegate:
EmgGrol 10.85 +.29 +25.9
Nicholas Group:
Nicholqn p 62.25 +.26 +18.2
Nichllncl 2.20 +6.6
Northeast Investors:
Trust 7.70 +.03 +9.0
Northern Funds:
Fxin n 10.,06 -.02 +4.86
HiYFxInc n 8.19 +.1
IntGrEq n 109.21 ... +13.3
LrgCapVal 13.67 -.02 +10.8
SmICapldx n 10.74 +.23 +25.0
Technlyn 11.52 +.04 +10.9
Nuveen Cl A:
HYldMuBdp 22.10 ... +12.8
Nuveen Cl R:
InMun R 11.00 -.02 +5.9
IntmDurMuB 9.09 -.02 +5.6
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOakSIGr n33.02 +.70 +5.9
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 24,31 +.05 +10.6
Globallr 22.66 +.23 +19.1
Intl r 22.10 +.12 +21.5
lInlSmCpr 21.29 +.27 +25.7
Oakmark r 42.15 +.23 +11.4
Select r 34.56 +.45 +13.8
Old Westbury Fds:
nll n 10.42 +.06 +12.8
MidCapEq p 16.84 +.21 +17.6
Olstaln Funds:
FnclAirtC 18.54 +.34 +14.7
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFrMuA 10.17 -.01 +12.9
AMTFrNY 12.95 -.03 +11.9
CAMuniAp 11.52 -.02 +16.3
CapAppAp 41.79 +.29 +10.4
CaplncAp 12.60 +.03 +14.8
ChlncAp 9.52 ... +8.1
DevMktAp 30.34 +.56 +52.4
DiscFdp 43.85 +.44 +14.4
EquityA 11.42 +.09 +19.7
GlobalAp 62.94 +.73 +25.2
GlblOppA 33.79 +.27 +32.6
Goldp 18.47 +.61 +19,5
GrowthAp 28.83 +.24 +15.0
HighYIdAp 9.52 -.01 +8.1
IntlBdAAp 5.688 -.03 +15.1
LTGovAp 10.05 ... +2.0
LldTrnnMu 15.688 -.01 +12.1
MnSIFdA 36.43 +.12 +13.5
MalinStrOpAp 13.56 +.07 +16.6
MnSISCpAp 21.23 +.35 +28.0
MIdCapA 17.49 +.16 +23.4
PAMunlAp 12.64 -.01 +15,3
RealAstAp 8.01 -.12 +19.9
S&MdCpVIA 33.96 +.70 +34.5
StrlncA p 4.30 ... +10.2
USG0tp 9.69 -.02 +5.1
Oppenhelmer B:
AMTFrMuB 10.14 -.01 +12,1
AMT-FrNY 12.96 -.02 +11.1
CapAppB p 3.43 +.26 +9.4
CapincBt 12.47 +.02 +13.9
ChncS t 9.50 -.01 +7.2
Equity B 11.01 +.08 +18.5
GloblB I 5.81 +,66 +24.2
GIbOppB 32.43 +.26 +31.5
HIYdB1 9.38 .. +7.3
MnStFdB 35.26 +.11 +12.6
StrdncB1 4.31 -.01 +9.4
Oppenheimer C&M:
GlobalC p 59.75 +.68 +24.3
MnStFdC 35.25 +.11 +12.6
StrlncC1 I 4.29 -.01 +9.4
Oppenhelm Quest:
QBalA 16.46 -.04 +10.6
QBalanC 18.18 -.04 +9.8
QBalanB 18.16 -.04 +9,7
QOpptyA 33.04 ... +12.2
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYA p 3.38 +8... .2
LIdNYC t 3.37 .. +7.4
RoNIMuC t 12.67 +.01 +21.4
RoMuAp 18.37 -.01 +13.2


Name NAV
ROMu B 1.36
RcNIlMuA 12.69
Oppenheimer Y:
CapAppracY 42.86
PBHG Funds:
CllprFocus 17.25
SelGrowh n 21.52
PIMCO Admin PIMS
RelRetAd p 11.33
ShtTmAd p 10.02
TotRetAdn 10.71
PIMCO Instt PIMS:
AIIAsset 13.01
CommodRR 15.62


Diverlnco 11.13
EmMktsBd 11.07



LowDurn 10.11
ModDur n 10.26
RaalRetlnsl 11.33
ShortT 10.02
TotRel n 10.71
TR 11n 10.14
TRIll n 9.46
PIMCO Funds A:
All Asset p 12.96
CommodRR p 15.54
HIYIdA 9.89
LowDurA 10.11
RealRetA p 11.33
TotRtA 10.71
PIMCO Funds B:
RealRtB t 11.33
TotRtB t 10.71
PIMCO Funds C:
AllAssetC t 12.88
CommRRp 15.43
HiYIdC 9.89
LwDurC nt 10.11
RealRetCp 11.33
TotRIC t 10.71
PIMCO Funds D:
CommodRR p 15.55
RealRInp 11.33
TotlRIn p 10.71
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylnco n 25.35
Pax World:
Balanced 23.78
PennMutC p 10.44
PhoenlxFunds A:
BalanA 14.91
CapGrhA 15.03
InllA 10.38
Pioneer Funds A:
BalancA p 9.80
BondA p 9.32
EqlncA p 29.97
EumoSelEqA 30.64
GrowthA p 12.48
HIghYldAp 11.42
InllValA 17.29
MdCpGrA 15.58
MdCpVaA p 26.74
PlonFdA p 43.25
TaxFreeA p 11.82
ValueA p 18.26
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYieldB1 11.47
MIdCapValB 23.90
Pioneer Funds C:
HIYIdC t 11.57
Price Funds Adv:
BIChlpp 31.65
Eqtyinc p 26.62
Growth pn 27.20
HIYId p 7.03
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.76
BlueChlpGn 31.65
CaITx n 11.07
CapApr n 20.24
DivGro&n 23.18
EmMkIS n 22.38
Eqlnc n 26.87
Eqdx n 33.19
Europe n 20.12
FLInt rn 10.90
GNM n 9.56
Growth n 27.38
GwthIn n 22.24
HlthSci n 23.78
H9IId n 7.05
ForEqwn 15.56
In0Bd n 9.71
InSlDis n 34.68
IntlGr&lnc 12.89
IntSlk n 12.98
Japann n .52
LatAm n 19.45
MdShItn 5.15
MdTxFr n 10.76
MediaTI n 30.00
MidCap n 52.89
MCapVal n 23.98
NewAmn 34.02
NAsian 11.44
NewEran 39.50
NwHrznn 31.69
Newlnomn 9.08
NYTxF n 11.41
PSBal n 18.56
PSGrown 22.68
PSInco n 15.03
RealEstn 19.52
R2010n 14.40
Relre2020 n 15.30
R2030 n 15.95
Scich n 19.62
STBdn 4.71
SmCapStkn 33.06
SmCapVal n 38.02
SpecGr 17.53
Specin n 11.94
TxFree n 10.07
TxFrHYn 11.98
TFIntmn 11.20
TxFrSI n 5.37
US Inlt 5.39
US Long 12.12
VA TFn 11.75
Value n 23.57
Principal Inv:
PIrLV In 13.89'
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.02
AABalA p 10,97
AZTE 9.34
CATxA p 8.45
ClassicEqAp 13.20
Convert p 17,26
DiscGr 17.92
DvrlnAp 10.24
EqlnAp 17.98
EuroEqA 21.23
FLTxA 9.31
GeoAp 18.41
GIGvAcpx 12.57
GIbEqty p 8.78
GrInAp 19.92
HlthA p 63.56
HiYdAp 6.07
HYAdA p 6.09
IncmA p 6.84
InllEq p 23.94
InlIGrlnp 12.08
InvAp 13.30
MITxp 9.07
MNTxp 9.07
NJTxA p 9.30
NwOpAp 43.58
NwValAp 18.56
NYTxAp 8.83
OTC A p 7.65
PATE 9.18
TxExAp 8.88
TFInAp 15.07
TFHYA 13.00
USGvA p 13.19
UtilA p 10.97
VstlaAp 10.00
VoyA p 17.16
Putnam Funds B:
CapAprt 16.93
ClasslcEqB I 13.09
DiscGmth 16.56
DvrInB 1 10.16
EqlncI 17.84
EuEqty 8 20.45
FLTxB I 9.31
GeoBt 18.22
GIlncBtx 12.53
GIbEqy t 8.00
GINtRs t 27.77


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg


CORN (CBOT)
5.000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 234.00 238,00 232.00 233.00 -.00
Dec 05 244.00 248.00 243.00 244,00
Mar06 251.00 254.00 250.00 251.00 +.00
May 06 254.00 258.00 254.00 255.00 +.00
Jul06 258.00 260.00 257.00 258.00 +.00
Sep06 257.00 257.00 253.00 254.00 +.00
Dec06 253.00 254,00 251.00 253.00 +.00
Est. sales 95,342. Thuhes sales 12,142
Thuvlas open Int. 736,043, +8,065
OATS (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 174.00 175.00 171.00 172.00 -2.00
Dec05 178.00 178.00 175.00 175.00 -1.00
Mar06 179.00 179.00 179.00 179.00 -2.00
May06 184.00 184.00 184.00 184.00 ..
Mar07 184.00 184.00 184.00 184.00
May07 184.00 184.00 184.00 184.00
Jul07 184.00 184.00 184.00 184.00
Est. sales 715. Thua/es sales 668
ThuAmes open int. 7,986, -4
WINTER WHEAT (KCBT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 337.00 340.00 336.00 336.00 +1.00
Dec 05 349.00 352.00 347.00 349.00 +2.00
Mar06 356.00 360.00 355.00 356.00 +2.00
May 06 362.00 363.00 361.00 361.00 +3.00
Jul 06 363.00 363.00 362.00 362.00 +2.00
Sep06 368.00 368.00 368.00 368.00 +2.00
Dec 06 378.00 378.00 378.00 378.00
Est. sales 14,273. Thusles sales 12,656
Thultms open Int. 85,616, +454
COTTON 2 (NYBT)
50,000 Ibs.-cents per lb.
Oct 05 48.65 50.27 48.65 50.20 +1.30
Dec05 50.20 51.80 50.15 51.76 +1.16
Mar06 53.00 54.05 53.00 53.95 +1.07
May06 54.95 54.95 54.90 54.94 +1.04
Jul06 55.75 55.95 55.75 55.95 +1.05
Oct06 56.95 56.95 56.95 56.95 +1.05
Dec 06 58.05 58.05 58.05 58.05 +1.00
Est, sales 7,383. Thus/ms sales 10,059
Thueis open Int. 93,750, +1,359
COCOA (NYBT)
10 metric tons-$ pert Ion
Sep05 1417 1419 1398 1407
Dec05 1446 1446 1433 1438 -1
Mar06 1475 1476 1463 1468 -1


May 06 1485 1488 1485 1488
Jul06 1515 1515 1510 1510
Sep 06 1528 1528 1528 1528
Dec06 1546 1546 1546 1546
Est. sales 2,693. Thusems sales 6,854
Thusls open int. 129,669, +2,330
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NYBT)
112,000 lbs.- cents per Ib.
Oct 05 9.65 9.73 9,62 9.70
Mar 06 9.70 9.75 9.65 9.73
May 06 9.54 9.57 9.46 9.47
Jul06 9.35 9.35 9.25 9.27
Oct06 9,.19 9.20 9.15 9.16
Mar 07 9:06 9.08 9.06 9.08
May 07 9.05 9.05 9.02 9.02
Est. sales 75,394. ThuRlas sales 59,516
Thuaes open Int. 411,628, +5,352
CATTLE (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug 05 79.20 79,82 79.17 79.25
Oct 05 81.47 82.00 81.30 81.45
Dec05 83.82 84.10 83.55 83.65
Feb 06 85.55 85.82 85.50 85.65
Apr06 83.95 84.15 83.85 84.00
Jun 06 79.20 79.55 79.20 79.20
Aug 06 79.30 79.50 79.30 79.40
Est. sales 15,410. Thu9uessales 19,150
Thuaes open Int. 140,418, +438
FEEDER CATTLE (CME)
50,000 Ibs.-cents per lb.
Aug05 107.75 108.15 107.40 107.65
Sep 05 105.97 106.40 105.70 105.75
Oct 05 104.50 104.95 104.25 104.52
Nov05 102.40 102.80 102.10 102.32
Jan 06 100.27 100.40 100.15 100,25
Mar 06 97.50 97.50 97.45 97.50
Apr06 97.30 97,30 97.25 97.25
Est..sales 2,198. Thusa= sales 3,943
Thumes open Int. 24,082, +199
HOGS-Lean (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug05 68.45 68.52 67.80 68.22
Oct05 58.90 59.05 57.70 57.95
Dec 05 56.40 56,55 55.55 55.92
Feb 06 58.55 58,60 57.95 58.52
Apr06 57.70 57.70. 57.10 57.52
May 06 60.00 60.10 59.90 60 05
Jun 06 61.35 61.40 61.35 61.40
Est. sales 14,011. ThuSs=s sales 11,951


12-mo.
chg % rtn
... +123
+01 +222

+.31 +10,8

-.08 +102
+,29 +13.4
S:

+.05 +6.6
+2.1
-.01 +5.7

+.01 +13.8
-.32 +14.2
-.02 +120
-.07 +19.1
+.02 +8.9
+.04 +6.5
-.02 +11.1
-.01 +22
-.01 +3.9
+.05 +6.9
+2.3
-01 +6.0
-02 +4.5
-.01 +6.1

+.01 +13.0
-.32 +13.86
-.02 +10.7
-.01 +1.7
+.05 +6.4
-.01 +5.5

+.05 +5.6
-.01 +4.7

+.01 +12.2
-.32 +12.0
-.02 +9.9
-.01 +1.2
+.05 +5.9
-.01 +4.7

-.32 +13.6
+.05 +6.4
-.01 +5.6

+23 +13.5

+.19 +15.2
+.20 +24.0

+8,6
-.02 +7.2
+.13 +20.9

+.05 +6.5
-.02 +6.0
+.19 +20.7
+.19 +22.6
+.08 +17.3
+.06 +6.0
+.09 +17.1
+.12 +17.8
+.22 +24.5
+.41 +17.5
-.03 +9.4
+.09 +14.9

+.06 +7.1
+.19 +23.3

+.06 +7,2

+.186 +13.9
+.07 +15.8
+.14 +15.4
+9.2

+.06 +12.9
+.18 +14.0
-.03 +6.1
+.13 +15.9
-+.08 +14.4
+.47 +50,4
+.07 +16.0
+.16 +14.2
+.06 +19.4
-.03 +3.1
-.01 +4.0
+.13 +15.6
+.06 +13.6
+.18 +17.4
+.01 +9.6
+.11 +16.8
+.06 +5.5
+.62 +23.2
+.08 +23.3
+.08 +16.1
+.08 +3.9
+.38 +69.7
-.01 +1.3
-.03 +5.5
+.10 +27.2
+.48 +23.7
+.28 +20.7
+.31 +14.1
+.31 +43.0
+1.48 +40.5
+.36 +27.0
-.02 +5.7
-.04 +5.7
+.10 +14.5
+.6 +17.4
+.06 +11.4
+.26 +40.2
+.07 +13,4
+.08 +15.3
+.10 +17.0
+.05 +16.4
+2.0
+.65 +22.8
+.90 +26.6
+.12 +19.5
+.01 +7.9
-.02 +6.3
-.01 +9.0
-.03 +3.5
-.01 +2.0
-.01 +2.5
-.05 +10.0
-.02 +5.9
+.03 +16.1

+.06 +16.8

-.01 +3.3
+.06 +13.2
-.02 +5.8
-.02 +6..1
+.07 +14.8
+.15 +9.1
+.20 +18,0
+.01 +6.9
+.08 +17,3
+.02 ,22.1
-.02 +5.9
+,05 +11,5
+.03 +5.9
+.09 +19.4
+.08 +14.8
+.52 +19.2
+9.7
+.01 +10,1
-.01 +4.8
+.18 +19.5
+.15 +20,8
+13 +20.0
-.02 +5.4
-.01 +5.1
-.01 +6.,4
+.45 +21.0
+.12 +18.1
-.02 +5.8
+.09 +20.1
-.02 +6.1
-.02 +6.4
-.05 +5,3
-.02 +9.3
-.01 +3.8
... +28.1
+.16 +25.5
+.20 +13,4

+.32 +23.3
+,07 +14.0
+.19 +17,0
+.01 +8.1
+,.8 +16.4
+,02 +21.2
-.01 +5.2
+.04 .10.6
+.03 .5.2
+.06 +18,5
4.02 +417


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
GrlnBI 19.63 +08 +13.9
HlthB t 57.91 +.46 +16.3
HiYldB 8 03 .. +869
HYAdvB t 601 ... +9.2
IncomeB I 6.80 -01 +4 1
IntlEq p 2301 +.17 +18.6
IntlGrdn1 11.84 +.15 +198
IntlNopt 11.56 +.14 +21.0
InvB t 12.19 + 12 +19.0
NJTxBt 9.29 -.02 +5.6
NwOppBt 3921 +.40 +201
NwVal p 18.23 +.11 +17.1
NYTxB t 86.2 -.02 +5.3
OTCB1 6.77 +08 +19.2
TxExBt 6 88 -.02 +5.6
TFHYBtI 13.02 -.02 +8.5
TFInBt 15.10 -.04 +4.7
USGvB1 13.12 -.01 +3.0
UtilB1 10.91 -.01 +27.1
VistaB1t 8.74 +14 +24.5
VoyB 1497 +.17 +12.6
Putnam Funds M:
Dvrlncp 10.15 +.01 +8.6
Putnam Funds Y:
George 18.46 +.05 +11.8
Gr&lnc 19.96 +.08 +15.0
Income 6.86 -.01 +5.0
lntlEq 24.11 +.18 +19.8
Voyager 17.75 +.21 +13.7
RS Funds:
RSEmGrnp 32.48 +.45 +24.3
RSNatRes np 29.84 +1.52 +49.9
RSPartners 37.64 +.67 +34.8
Value Fd 23.95 +.41 +36.4
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 31.18 +.37 +27.7
Royce Funds:
LowPrStkr 15.54 +.39 +15.2
MIcroCapln 16.11 +.45 +17.6
Opptylr 13.64 +.35 +22.4
PennMulrn 10.89 +.20 +25.2
PremleIdnr 15.95 +.35 +20.4
TotRetlr 12,88 +.22 +21.0
Russell Funds S:
DivBondS 23.69 -.02 +4.6
DivEqS 45.07 +.30 +18.5
IntlSecS 62.40 +.44 +18.0
MstratBondS 10.50 -.01 +5.2
QuantEqS 38.94 +.19 +16.0
RESacS 48.85 +.68 +39.2
ShorOuraBdS 18.79 +1.5
SpecalGrS 54.15 +.84 +21.7
Russell Instl I:
Eqly II 31.22 +.22 +18.7
EqlyQ I 35,81 +.17 +16.1
Flixncme I 21.12 -.02 +4.8
Intl l 38.57 +.27 +18.4
Russell LfePts C:
BalSrC p 10.99 +.04 +13.1
Russell LfePts D:
BalSlralp 11.07 +.05 +13.8
Rydex Advisor:
OTCn 10.41 +.15 +13.0
Rydex C Class:
JunoCpn 17.27 +.10 -13.7
Rydax Investor:
Juno Fd n 17.98 +.11 -12.8
OTC n 10.79 +.16 +13.7
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxlnAn 10.51 -.01 +4.9
EmMklDbtn 11.24 -.05 +21.6
EmgMklInp 14.39 +.28 +43.0
EqlndxA n 37.95 +.18 +14.2
HiYId n 8.59 +9.0
InltMunIA 10.93 -.03 +3.3
IntlEqAn 11.14 +.10 +18.8
InlFixA n 11.78 +.12 +5.3
LgCGmAn 19.23 +.27 +15.1
LgCValA n 22.23 +.07 +19.6
SmCGroA n 18.01 +.39 +24.9
SmCValA n 21.83 +.40 +28.0
TaxMgdLC 11.74 +.10 +17.4
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 16.95 +.31 +46.5
SP500n 20.34 +10 +14.4
SmCap 30.22 +.55 +26.4
STI Classic:
CapAppLp 11.25 +.03 +6.9
CapAppAp 11.90 +.03 +7.3
CapAppT n 1249 +.03 +8.0
GrowlncTnp 16.76 -.01 +19.6
HIghYldl 11.08 -.02 +7.5
SmCapGrTn 21.85 +.45 +25.5
TxSenGrT np 25.24 +.18 +11.4
TaxSenGrL 23.67 +.15 +10.3
VallncoSlkA 1283 +.09 +15.3
VallncTnp 12.87 +.09 +15.7
Selomon Brothers:
BalancBp 12.92 +.05 +7.3
HiYldA 8,48 -.01 +11.3
lnsesValO 20.86 ... +13.5
OppoDt 50.42 +.24 +21.3
Schroder Funds:
NAmEqnvCn 11.31 +.06 +16.5
Schwab Funds:
HInSS nr 16.27 +.13 +18.7
1l000nvr 35.88 +.18 +15.9
10OSeb n 35.90 +.19 +16.1
S&PIInv n 19.12 +.09 +14.2
S&PSeln 19.20 +.09 +14.4
S&PlnslSel 9.74 +.05 +14.5
SmCplnvn 23.23 +.42 +26.0
SmapSel n 23.27 +.42 +26.2
TotBond n 10.02 -.02 +5.2
YIdPIsinv 9.67 -.01 +2.7
YIdPIsSel 9.67 -.01 +2.8
Scudder Funds A:
Caoprthp 45.60 +.42 +15.0
DrmHiRA 44.61 +.24 +19.3
RgComAnp 17.91 +.04 +28.5
HilncAx 5.49 -.03 +11.3
MgdMunip 9.18 -.03 +5.5
RREEFpx 22.38 +,25 +39.1
TechA 11.23 +.10 +13.1
TotRetA 9.17 +.04 +10.2
USGovtAex 8.53 -.04 +3.7
Scudder Funds B:
DrmHiRB 44.47 +.23 +18.3
Scudder Funds C:
DrmHiRC 44.52 +.24 +18.3
Scudder Funds S:
EmMkIn 11.14 -.01 +22.4
EmgMkGrnr 19.61 +.39 +42.7
GIblBdSr 10.17 +.01 +6.9
GlobDIs 37.64 +.36 +34.5
GlobalS 26.50, +.55 +27.3
Gold&Prec 15.72 +.28 +4.
GrEurGro 28.06 +.32 +24.6
Grolnc 22.46 +.15 +14.7
HiY]dTxn 12.90 -.03 +8.1
Income Sx 12.93 -.05 +6.2
IntrTxAMT 11.32 -.04 +3.9
IntlmatIS 45.47 +.54 +21.7
LgCoGnon 24.77 +.28 +14.0
LatAmern 37.71 +.76 +61.9
MgdMuni S 9.19 -.03 +5.8
MATFS 14.54 -.05 +5.1
PacOpps nr 14.51 +.37 +32.2
ShtTmBdSnx 10.03 -.04 +1.7
SmCoValS r 2,8.23 +.34 +24.6
Scudder Instil:
EqtySO1L 139.77 +.67 +14.5
Scudder Investment:
Eq5001nv 138.32 +.66 +14.3
Selected Funds:
AmerShsD 38.34 +.25 +15.9
AmShsSp 38.29 +.25 +15.6
Seligman Group:
ComunAt 26.17 +.15 +19.8
FmronlierAt 13.19 +.19 +15.9
FronllerDt 11.83 +.16 +14.9
GIbSmCoA 16.71 +.30 +30.6
GlobTechA 12.77 +.05 +16.5
HiYBdAp 3.42 ... +7.8
Sentinel Group:
ConmSltkAp 30.16 +.28 +12.7
SmCoAp 7.66 +.10 +18.6
Sequoia 152.04 +.05 +5.9
Sit Funds:
LargeCpGrn 35.71 +.22 +18.7
Smith Barney A:
AgGrAp 99.49 +1.84 +16.4
ApprA p 14.79 +.07 +10.7
FdValAp 18.20 +.11 +10.8
HIncA I 6.94 ... +9.2
InlAIICpGrA p 13.67 +.11 +17.5
LgCepGAp 22.43 +.28 +10.0
MgMuAp 15.50 +.01 +4.5
SBCaplncA 17.04 +.10 +15.2
Smith Bamey B&P:
AgrB t 89.28 +1.63 +17.4
ApprB I 14.40 +.07 +9.9
FdValB 14.29 +.10 +9.9
LoCapGBt 21.16 +.27 +8,2
SBCaplnct 16.91 +.11 +14.7


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg
ThuaRs open Int. 99,246. +694
GOLD (COMX)
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
Jul05 424.70 424.70 424.70 424.70 -.70
Aug 05 426.00 426.90 424.50 425,00 -.70
Sep05 426.40 426.40 426.40 426.40 -.70
Oct05 429.00 429.80 427.50 428.00 -.70
Dec 05 432.00 432.70 430.20 430.90' -.70
Feb06 435.50 435.50 434.00 434.00 -.70
Apr06 438.70 430.70 437.10 437.10 -.70
Est. sales.... Thu /ess sales 88,977
Thuess open Int. 268,426. +1,079
SILVER (COMX)
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
Jul05 712.0 712.0 708.0 708.6 -2.0
Aug 05 709.0 709.0 709.0 709.0 -2.0
Sep05 714.0 718.5 709.0 711.5 -2.0
Dec05 721.0 724.0 714.0 717.8 -1.8
Jan06 719.5 719.5 719.5 719.5 -1.8
Mar 06 722.1 722.1 722.1 722.1 -1.6
May 06 724.1 724.1 724.1 724.1 -1.6
Est. sales .... Thuves sales 20,059
Thures opening. 125,235, -1.603
HI GRADE COPPER (COMX)
25,000 lbs.- cents per Ib.
Jul 05 165.40 166.00 164.20 165.55 +2.45
Aug05 159.90 163.50 159.90 162.95 +3,45
Sep05 157.50 161.15 157.00 160.35 +3.35
Oct05 158.00 158.00 157.55- 157.55 +3.25
Nov05 155.20 155.20 155.20 155.20 +3.60
Dec05 150.45 152.90 142.80 152.40 +3.50
Jan 06 149.40 149.40 149.40 149.40 +3.50
Est. sales .... Thueas sales 13,587
Thu9os open Int. 110,016, -454
EURODOLLARS (CME)
$f million-pts of 100 pct.
Aug05 96.197 96.207 96.197 96.207 +.002
Sep05 96.035 96.055 96.035 96.045 +.005
Oct 05 95.945 95.945 95.940 95.940 +.010
Nov05 95.875 95.885 95.875 95.885 +.020
Dec 05 95.805 95.8650 95.805 95.830 +.025
Jan 06 95.805 95.805 95.805 95.805 +.030
Mar06 95.710 95.765 95.710 95.745 +.035
Est. sales 164,861. Thuv/ms sales 2,204,054
ThueMs open Int. 7,399,897, +35,078
LUMBER (CME)
110000 bd. t.- $ per 1,000 bd. It.
Sep05 322.0 324.0 321.5 323.3 +.5
Nov 05 315.9 317.0 315.1 315.5 -.6


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
Smith Bamey C:
AggGrC 89.87 +1.64 +17.5
FdValC 14.29 +.11 +9.9
LgCapC p 21.15 + 26 +9.1
Smith Barney 1:
DivStrall 17.31 +.05 +6.2
Groln0 1 15.60 +05 +11.5
Smith Barney Y:
AggGroY I 103.24 +1.92 +18.9
LgCapGroY 23.10 +.29 +10.4
SoundShn 37.51 +.08 +15.5
St FarmAssoc:
Balan n 50.21 -.01 +8.3
Gwthn 49.03 +,07 +11.8
Stratton Funds:
Dividend n 37.77 .37 +28.1
Growth 44.28 +.87 +32.4
SmCap 44,52 +.87 +364
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBI 9.45 -.01 +4.2
SunAmerica Focus:
FLgCpA p 17.99 +.34 +12.3
TCU ShrtDur 9.57 -.01 +2.3
TCW Galileo Fds:
SelEqty 19.40 +.25 +13.7
ValueOpp 23.50 +.31 +17.4
TCW Galileo N:
SelEqtyN p 19.00 +.24 +13.3
TD Waterhouse Fds:
Dow30 Fds .. 0.0
TIAA-CREF Funds:
BondPlus 10.29 -.01 +5.0
Eqtylndex 8.91 +.06 '16.9
GroInc 12.51 +.06 +14.5
GroEqty 9.40 +.12 +13.4
HIYIdBond 9.31 ,,, +8,4
IntlEqty 10.72 +.16 +15,7
MgdAllc 11.28 +.07 +12.8
ShtTrmBond 10,44 -.01 +2,1
SocChcEqiy 9.53 +.08 +16.6
TaxExBond 10.88 -.04 +4.9
Tamarack Funds:
EnterSmCp 33.69 +.57 +16.5
Value 468.05 +.24 +17.;
Templeton Instit:
EmMS p 16.55 +.31 +39.4
ForEqS 20.71 +.26 +23.7
Third Avenue Fds:
Intl r 19.89 +.18 +29,2
RealEstValr 30.11 +.12 +31.7
SmlCapn 24.34 +.30 +23.0
Value 57.10 +.10 +28.3
Thompson Plumb:
Growth n 46.06 +.09 +2.7
Thomrburg Fda:
InllValAp 21.44 +,20 +22.7
LIdMunAp 13.63 -.02 +2.1
ValueA 31.95 +.08 +16.1
Thrivent Fds A:
HtighY[d 5.17 ... +9.3
Income 6.73 -.01 +5.0
LMgCapStock 26.29 +16 +14.4
MidCapStk 17.68 +.25 +26.6
MuniB d 11.48 -.03 +6.0
Torray Funds:
Fund 40.52 +.30 +9.4
Instl 115.90 +.72 +9.9
TA IDEX A:
FedTxExAp 11.79 -.03 +4.9
JanGrowp 24.36 -.07 +17.8
GrCoGlobp 24.58 +.25 +13.3
TrConHYBp 9.28 -.01 +8.3
TAFlexlnco p 9.54 +5.9
TA IDEX C:
AsAIModGr t 11.79 +.08 +13,9
Turner Funds:
MdcpGwth 25.864 +.21 +26.7
SmlCpGrwth 24.26 +.28 +19.1
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 25.23 +.18 +19.6
UBS Funds CI A:
GlobAlol t 13.57 +.06 NA
UBS Funds Cl C:
GlobAloFp 13.31 +.06 NA
UBS PACE Fds P:
LCGEqP n 20.60 +.14 +19.7
UMB Scout Funds:
orld 25.45 +.28 +24.0
US Global Investors:
ATIAmt 25.26 +.22 +18.9
GIbRsc n 13.21 +.45 +66.6
GOdShr 7.80 +.29 +16.2
USChIna 7.05 +.06 +23.8
WIdPrcMinn 15.72 +.41 +21.2
USAA Group:
AgsvGthn 30.23 +.05 +21.2
CABdn 11.27 -.02 +7.1
ComstStrn 27.25 +.14 +13,6
GNMA 9.69 -.01 +3.8
GrTaxStr n 15,09 +.04 +16.4
Grwihn 14.49 +.07 +23.2
Gr&lncn 19.04 +.10 +15.5
Inctk n 17.35 +.01 +18.4
Income n 12.39 ... +5.8
Inl n 22.07 +.29 +17.4
NYBd9 n 12.09 -.04 +7.2
PrecMM 15.11 +.55 +10.0
S&P Idxn 16.50 +.09 +14.3
SoTech 9.70 +.03 +14.1
ShtTBnd n 8.688 ... +2.4
SmICapStn 14.71 +.18 +26.0
TxEITn 13.29 -.04 +5.3
TxELTM n 14.21 -.04 +7.4
TxESh n 10.68 -.01 +2.2
VA9 d 11.73 -.03 +6.0
WIdGrn 18.03 +.17 +15.4
UtdAssocS00n 8.93 +.05 +14,4
Value Line Fd:
Levrge Gthn 27.46 +.39 +23.8
Van Kamp Funds A:
AggGrA p 15.12 +.21 +22.5
CATFA p 18.92 -.06 +6.5
CmstAp 18.57 +.03 16.0
CorpBdAp 6.72 -.01 +6.5
EmrGroAp 39.94 +.32 +T5.7
EntAp 12.80 +.08 +15.5
EqtlyncAp 8.78 +.03 +15.8
ExchFd 368.82 +3.63 +13.3
GCslFranp 23.55 +.12 +16.7
GvScA p 10.33 -.01 +4.9
.GrInAp 21.04 +.06 +19.9
HarAmp 14.51 +.09 +7.4
HighYdA 3.62 ... +7.8
HYMuAp 10.98 ... +11.4
InTFAdp 18.97 -.05 +6.3
MuninAlp 14.75 -.05 +5.8
PATFAep 17.52 -.04 +6.5
PaceFndAp 9.57 +.13 +17.8
StMunInc 13.40 -.01 +10.8
US MlgeA 13.84 -.01 +4.0
UlptyA p 18.84 +.09 +32.4
Van Kamp Funds B:
CmstB 18.57 +.03 +15.2
EmorBdt 34.15 +.26 +14.8
EnterpBt 11.70 +.07 +14.7
EqlncBt 8.64 +.02 +14.8
GrncBA 20.86 +.06 +19.0
HYMuB t 10.98 ... +10.6
MunlnBn 14.72 -.05 +4.9
PA TFBnt 17.47 -.04 +5.8
SIrMunInc 13,39 -.01 +9.9
USMIgeB 13.78 -.02 +3.2
UtIB 18.81 +.09 +31.4
Van Kamp Funds C:
CommStkC 18.58 +.03 +15.2
EqlncCt 8.68 +.03 +14.8
Vanguard Admiral:
AsselAdmli n 56.38 +.27 +14.9
BalAdmI n 19.79 +.07 +12.4
CAITAdmn 11.09 -.04 +3.7
CALTAdm 11.80 -.04 +6.4
CpOpAdIn 73.08 +.41 +21.2
Energy n 97.69 +3.04 +53.3
EqIncAdml 50.,07, +.04 +16.8
EuropAdml 62Z21 +.45 +22.8
ExplAdml 73.65 +1.04 +25.7
ExntdAdmn 33.58 .46 +27.2
50OAdml n 113.80 +.54 +14.5
GNMAAdrsn 10.37 -.01 +4.9
GrolncAdm 51.46 +.23 +15.5
GrwthuAdml n 27.05 +.21 +13,0
H0hCaren 56.93 -.17 +16.6
HiYIdCp n 6.29 -01 +7.6
HiYldAdm n 10.84 -.03 +6.8
InsdLTAdm n 12.78 -.04 +6.1
ITBondAdml 10.54 -.02 +5.8
ITsryAdml 11.11 -.03 +4.3
IntlOrAdml 60.57 +.79 +19.4
ITAdmIn 13.44 -.04 +4.2
lTCoAdmd 9.92 -.02 +5.3
LtdTrmAdm 10,77 -.02 +1,7
LTGrAdml 9.76 -.04 +13.3
LTAdmIn 11.41 -.04 +5.9
MCpAdmln 77.21 +.99 +30.3
NJLTAdn 12.00 -.04 +5.4
NYLTAdm 11.46 -.04 +5.6


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

Jan 06 321.3 322.4 321.3 322.4 -.2
Mar06 326.5 326.5 326.5 326.5 -2.5
May 06 325.5 325.5 325.5 325.5 +1.5
Est, sales 348. Thuses sales 575
Thuae' s open Int. 3,202, -70
NATURAL GAS (NYMX)
10,000 mm btus, $ per mm btu
Aug 05 7.299 7.400 7.285 7.384 +.084
Sep 05 7.359 7.440 7.333 7.421 +.074
Oct05 7.470 7.510 7.400 7.486 +.074
Nov05 8.010 8.110 8,000 8.090 +.074
Dec 05 8.545 8.610 8.510 8.604 +.084
Jan 06 8.880 8.961 8.862 8.961 +.089
Feb 06 8.900 8.971 8.877 8.971 +.089
Est. sales.... Thusms sales 103,381
ThuRues open Int. 514,852, +3,557
UNLEADED GASOLINE (NYMX)
42.000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 168.20 173.50 167.40 172.80 +4.70
Sep05 164.50 169.50 164.00 168.55 +4.32
Oct05 152.92 158.00 152.60 157.45 +4.52
Nov05 152.19 156.05 152.05 156.05 +4.22
Dec05 152.90 156.60 152.90 156.60 +4.22
Jan 06 155.00 158.10 155.00 158.10 +4.22
Feb06 158.00 159.65 158.00 159.65 +4.22
Est. sales.... ThaRms sales 46,353
Thu'Oes open Inlt. 158,748.-1,139
HEATING OIL (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 156.89 159.10 156.20 158.19 +1.30
Sep0S 161.50 163.80 159.70 162.83 +1.55
Oct 05 164.20 166.00 163.00 165.78 +1.60
Nov05 167.10 169.00 166.70 168.53 +1.70
Dec05 169.28 171.30 168.00 171.03 +1.75
Jan06 171.53 173.75 171.00 173.23 +1.70
Feb06 172.78 175.00 172.50 174.43 +1.65
Est. sales.... ThuQms sales 47,703
Thu/69 open int. 177,736, -2,216
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX)
1,000 bbl.-dollars per bbl.
Sep05 57.27 58.70 57.13 58.65 +1.52
Oct05 58.05 59.40 57.88 59.26 +1.40
Nov05 58.63 59.85 58.46 59.83 +1.38
Dec 05 58.90 60.40 58,84 60.20 +1.36
Jan 06 59.00 60.43 59.00 60.43 +1.37
Feb06 59.40 60.53 59.40 60.53 +1.37
Mar 06 59.60 60.53 59.45 60.53 +1.37
Est. sales.... Thulis sales 193,183
Thusas open Int. 803,392, -4,094


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
PrmCapr 66.29 +.89 +18.0
PALTAdm n 1151 -.04 +5.4
REITAdm f 86.84 +1.07 +37,4
STsryAdml 10.38 -.01 +1.8
STBdAdml n 1001 -.01 +2.0
ShtTrmAdm 15.56 -.01 +1.5
STFedAdm 10.31 -.01 +1.9
STIGrAdm 10.56 ... 2.7
SmICapAdml n28.58 +.50 +27.0
TxMCapr 58.91 +30 +17.4
TxMGrInc r 55.26 +.27 +14.5
TIIBdAdmIn 10.19 -.02 +5.0
TotStkAdm n 29.61 +.20 +173
USGroAdml n 43.99 +.59 +17.8
ValueAdmL n 22.02 +.04 +18.6
WellslAdmn 52.78 -.01 +10.4
WelltnAdm n 53.03 +.28 +14.0
WindsorAdm n62.17 +.22 +16.9
WdsrllAdmn 56.77 -.06 19.9
Vanguard Fds:
AsetAn 25.11 +.12 +14.8
CAITn 11.09 -.04 +3.7
CALTn 11.80 -.04 +6.3
CapOppn 31.62 +.17 +21.1
Convtn 13.21 +.06 +7.7
DividendGro 12.23 +.02 +13.4
Energy 52.01 +1.62 +53.2
Eqlnc n 23.8 +.02 +16.7
Explorer 79.04 +1.12 +25.5
FLLTn 11.78 -.04 +5.1
GNMAn 10.37 -.01 +4.9
GlobEq n 18.69 +.25 +23.1
Groln n 31.51 +.14 +15.4
GrowthEq 9.86 +.04 +14,3
HYCorp n 6.29 -.01 +7.5
HlthCaren 134.88 -.40 +16.5
InllaPron 12.35 +.06 +6.1
InllExpIr n 17.46 +.25 +29.6
IntlGr 19.03 +.25 +19,1
InSlValn 32.12 +,35 +22.8
ITI Grade 9.92 -.02 +5.2
ITTsry n 11.11 -.03 +4.2
LIFECon 15.43 +.04 +10,2
LIFEGron 20.51 +.13 +16,0
LIFEInc n 13.59 +,01 +7.5
LIFEMod n 18.23 +.08 +13.4
LTInGrade n 9.7 -.04 +13.1
LTTsryn 11.60 -.05 +11.8
Morgan n 16.92 +.08 +17.6
MuHYn 10.84 -.03 +6.7
MulsLg n 12.78 -04 +6.0
Mulnt n 13.44 -.04 4.1
MuLtd n 10.77 -.02 +1.7
MuLongn 11.41 -.04 +5.8
MuShrtn 15.56 -.01 +1.4
NJLTn 12.00 -.04 +5.3
NYLTn 11.46 -.04 +5.6
OHLTTxE n 12.16 -.04 +5.0
PALT2n 11.51 -.04 +5.4
PrecMtsMInr 16.09 +,96 +42.6
PrmCpCore m 10.90 +.11 NS
Prmcpr 63.85 +.85 +17.8
SelValu r 20.10 +.25 +28.4
STAR n 19.21 +.08 +14.7
STIGrade 10.56 ... +2.6
STFed n 10.31 -.01 +1.8
STTsryn 10.36 -.01 +1.7
SIrlEqn 20 23 +..3 33 +30.2
TgtRel2015 11.44 +.03 +11.0
TagtRe2025 11.6 +.04 +12.4
TgtRet2035 12.06 +.07 +14.7
TxMCAp nr 29.26 +.15 +17.3
TxMGoI 26.89 +.13 +14.5
TaxMngdIntll m10.43 +.11 +19.2
ToxMgdSC r 22.85 +.45 +28.4
USGro n 16.97 +.23 +17.4
USValue n 1457 +.03 +20.2
Wellslyn 21.78 -.01 +10.2
aelltnn 30.69 +.15 +13.8
Wndsr n 18.42 +.06 +16,8
Wndsi 31.98 -.03 +19.8
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 113.79 +.54 +14.4
Balanced n 19.79 +.07 +12.4
DevMkt n 9.29 +.09 +19.1
EMIktn 16.34 +.35 +45.4
Europe n 26.48 +.19 +22.6
Extend n 33.5 +.46 +27.0
Growh n 27.05 +.21 +12.9
ITBondn 10,54 -.02 +5.7
LgCapldxn 22.02 +.10 +15.8
LTBondn 12.06 -.05 +12.3
Midcap 17.01 +.21 +30.1
Pacficn 9.26 +.14 +11.5
REITr 20.35 +.25 +37.3
SmCap n 28.56 +.50 +26.9
SmlCpGrow 16.06 +.26 +25.9
SmlCapVal 14.95 .28 +27.8
STBond7 n 10.01 -.01 +1.9
TotBondn 10.19 -.02 +4.9
Tosllntln 12.86 +.14 +21.7
TotStkn 29.61 +.20 +17.1
Value n 22.02 +.04 +18.1
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Balnstn0 19.79 +.07 +12.5
DevMklinstn 9.21 +.09 +19.5
Eumnsll n 26.52 +.19 +22.9
ExtIn 33.61 +.47 +27.3
Growthinsl 27.06 +.22 +13.1
InProtilnstn 9.88 +.05 +6.2
Insldx n 112.87 +.54 +14.5
nsPItn 112.87 +.54 +14.6
TollBdldx n 51.40 -.0 +5.0
MidCaplnsl n 17.07 +.22 +30.3
PacDnsi n 9.28 +.15 +11.9
SmCpln n 28.60 +.50 +27.1
TBIstn 10.19 -.02 +5.0
TSInstn 29.62 +.20 +17.3
Valuelns8.n 22.02 +.04 +18.9
Vantagepoint Fds:
AggrOpp 11.32 +.11 +21.3
AssetAlloc 7.54 +.04 +14.3
Coreondlldxl 10.03 -.01 +4.6
Eqitylnc 9.36 +.02 +17.7
Growth n 6.36 +.068 +9.9
Grow&inc 10.43 +.05 +14.1
MPLonTermGr21.61 +.11 +13.0
MPTradGtNh 22.16 +.09 +11.0
Victory Funds:
DvsStkA 17.09 +.10 +16.2
WmBllnstlntl 16.89 +.20 +23.8
WM Blair Mt Fds:
IntlorowthI r 23.46 +.27 +24.3
WM Str Asset Mgmt:
BalancedAp 13.48 +.04 +12.0
BalancedB t 13.44 +.03 +11.0
ConGrwBt 14.42 +.05 +13.5
ConGrwA p 14.62 +.06 +14.4
StratGrA p 16.5 +.08 +16.0
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Accumulfv 6.49 +.06 +17.4
CorelnvA 5,99 +.07 +18.4
Highlnc 7.44 +.02 +6.9
NwCcptAp 9.61 +.14 +23.0
ScTechA 11.51 +.13 +31.5
VanguardA 9.22 +.06 +22.8
Wasatch:
CoreGrth 46.05 +.23 +26.3
SmCapGrth 42.70 +.31 +28.1'
SmlCapVal 5.81 +.06 +25.6
Weltz Funds:
PartVal 23.74 +.09 +11.0
Value n 37.10 .14 +10.1
Wells Fargo Ad Adm:
Index 49.84 +.24 +14.2
ToRtBd 12.31 -.02 +4.8
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AsetlAIIA 20.16 +.07 +14.0
Wells Fargo Adv :
CmStkZ 23.96 +.28 +22.6
GovSecn 10.68 -.03 +4.3
Growthlnvn 19.79 +.12 +16.9
Opplnlylnvn 49.12 +1.01 +19.5
SCapValZp 30.98 +1.01 +27.0
UItStlnv 9.17 ... +2.8
Wells Fargo Admin:
DiwsEq I 41.67 +.27 +16,5
GrthBaln 30.60 +.16 +12.1
LgCoGrl 48.22 +.54 +15.2
Eqtyinc n 35.94 -.08 +15.0
Western Asset:
ComPlus .10.66 -.01 +7.9
Core 11.45 -.01 +5.8
Westport Funds:
SmallCapI n 26.39 +.18 +23.1
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.14 +.15 +17.3
IntlGthN 23.16 +.26 +24.0
Yacltman Funds:
Fundp 15.35 +.01 .11.5


I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ FU-TURES I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^













4D

SUNDAY


Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


[homber


connectionn


JULY 24, 2005


Chamber Staff


Kitty Barnes ................... . . Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ............Inverness Office Manager and
Special Events Coordinator
Debi Shields ................. Crystal River Office Manager
Chamber Connection Newspaper Editor
Marion Elson ................Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Diane McInnis .............. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally .................... Office Assistant (Inverness)
Sarah Marx ................Office Assistant (Crystal River)


Inverness ................... ................ 726-2801
Hom osassa .................. ................ 628-2666
Crystal River ................. ............... 795-3149

www.citruscountychamber.com


Paradise Custom Orthotics


SThe postmenopausal stage for women in their
50s can be the most critical time in their lives,
especially when considering the declining
hormone levels and bone density. Evidence
-. suggests thatwomen lose approximately
S25 percent of their bone mineral density,(BMDL
1 i per year following menopause. However, recent
S studies show that aerobic exercise can help
maintain BMD as women age.
S The best forms of aerobic exercise for
improving Done density appear to be jogging,
brisk walking and stair climbing, in that order.
Results found that BMD was most improved
in the lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck.
For years, pharmaceuticals have been the
only method for preventing bone loss and
osteoporosis. However, these BMD studies
add to increasing evidence that suggest the
value of more conservative approaches
such as exercise.


For more information on ways to maintain bone
density and ward off osteoporosis, talk to your
Doctor of Chiropractic
Let the caring professionals at
Neck and Back Care Center help you
regain the joy's of living life, pain free!


Anthony B. Oliverio DC
563-5055
Crystal River
next to the Boy's & Girls Club


Jeffery S. Kinnard DC
527-5433
Beverly Hills
in the Winn Dixie Shopping Center


Chiropractic Care Fitness Center Occupational/Rehab Therapy Massage AquaBed Therapy
Impovig te Q aliyoYu ife


The PROOF
is in the PRINTING*
Sr n' t'Dnr .
Interr ,

,' 06.30 940 I - _
NC VISITORS GUIDE 352.3441 118. .
I 1188 SOUTH HWY. 41
FLORAL CITY FL
^^ "i"^ '' --^? .
40.,M00 i 40.112 VISITORS GUIDE SUMMERCIIRUS EDITION
I-
[ ... _,_._I________________A C H (CT.
.. . t- -- ..
_~~6 SKIDS. 589 CTNSt-68 EACH CTN
-, ,7 ,


HAVE YOU SEEN ANY
PROOF LATELY???
Documented, provable numbers-not vague promises.






The original, award
winning magazine of
Citrus County...
Call today to advertise
in the magazine with
proven results!
www.ncvg.com
352-344-1184 Our 23rd Editio


n


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle
Recently the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony to welcome new member Paradise Custom Orthotics.
Pictured above from left: Joanie West, chamber ambassador; Carol Lee Wallis, chamber member; Jeff Moser, LO, C. Ped, owner; Charles
Richer, chamber ambassador; Lori Moser, owner; Renee Melchionne, chamber ambassador; John Porter, chamber ambassador; Rhonda
Lestinsky, chamber ambassador; Curtis Peters, chamber ambassador; anrd Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director. Custom Orthotics and
Comfort Shoes is located at 3778 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, in the plaza across from Cowboy Junction Flea Market. The phone number Is
527-8200. Owners Jeff and Lori Moser Invite you to stop in and let them assist you with your orthotic needs today.


Member News


Two associates at RE/MAX
REALTY ONE have been rec-
ognized for reaching the 100
percent Club level in 2005.
Gerry Schabruch and Judy
Blackstock have both attained
this impressive level of success
this year. Gerry is a 20-year vet-
eran on real estate business who
works in the Crystal River
office of RE/MAX.
Judy has been a Multi
Million-dollar producer for sev-
eral years and works in the
Central Ridge office of
RE/MAX.
Both agents are teamed with
their spouses in each office. The
associates and staff would like
to congratulate these two pro-
fessional agents on their accom-
plishment.
Realtor TONY MOUDIS has
joined the 2005 Platinum Club
at RE/MAX Realty One. This is
a huge accomplishment within
the RE/MAX organization with
only a small percentage of their
agent qualifying.
Tony is a Realtor in the
Central Ridge office of
RE/MAX Realty One on
Highway 491.
He has been a Realtor in
Citrus County for nearly five
years and has joined the ranks of
their top producers. Tony works
with his wife Connie who is also
and agent. Tony and Connie


have four children.
The brokers and associates of
RE/MAX congratulate Tony in
thus tremendous accomplish-
ment.


ERA AMERICAN REAL-
TY & INVESTMENTS is
proud to announce the latest
production levels achieved by
several of its agents in 2005.
Lauretta Hajik of the
Homosassa office and Doug
Reeb of the Beverly Hills office
have both surpassed the $4 mil-
lion dollar mark for sales thus
far in 2005.
The over $3 million dollar.
mark in sales volume has been
most recently reached by Sarah
Spencer, Jackie Davis and Bob
Davis of the Inverness office
and Mark Augustsson of the
Homosassa office.
Exceeding $2 million in sales
volume are Anita Wesolowski
and Barbara Banks of the
Inverness office and Annie
Adams of the Homosassa office.
Rob Ash, Louis Miele, Fran
Perez, and Anita Fuss, all from
the Beverly Hills office, have
also exceeded $2 million.
Denise Simmons, Kim Spiegel
and Ken Swihart of the
Inverness office have sold over
$1 million this year.
Also selling over $1 million


Venturing Crew 452

i> 0Golf Tournament 4\


Boy Scouts ofAmerica
Net scramble w/handicap
Saturday, October 1, 2005
8:30 a.m. shotgun start
El Diablo Golf & Country Club
$50 per player includes: 18 hole green fees,
breakfast, lunch and soft drinks during and
after play, tax and gratuity, PRIZES,
.M. RAFFLES and more PRIZES.

A hole in one on the 3rd hole mn,j. a newv car
S ibji Pnrze for the cloeii to ,the pi on hole
#6 for %onren and hole #f13 hlo men Pnzes
for longest dne (in latira) on hole #11 and
hole #2 lor men. Firi econJ .nd third win
cash prizes.
All entries must be submitted by
September 24,2005.
For information ncall. DillonWhiiela at
795-9222 or pai Rundi,, a144 I 114N


are Debe Johns, Richard Naylor,
Lee Wakefield and Kathy
Whitley of the Homosassa
office and Carol Ann Estrada,
Annette Hoey, and Bob
Westmoreland of the Beverly.
Hills office. ERA American
Realty is proud to recognize the
achievements of these fine Real
Estate Professionals.

mom

The Citrus Information
Technology Alliance announced
today that it would support the
CYPRESS CREEK JUVE-
NILE OFFENDERS COR-
RECTIONAL CENTER by
addressing ongoing information
technology needs.
Mark Bumette, chair of the
Cypress Creek Project
Subcommittee, said CITA wants
to enhance the workforce devel-
opment of offenders who are
taking college courses at the
facility.
In addition, to meeting hard-
ware and software needs, CITA
will provide guest speakers and
scholarships.
The CENTRAL FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CITRUS COUN-TY
CAMPUS began offering
courses at the level-10 correc-
tional facility in fall 2004.
The partnership is the only
one of its kind in Florida,
according to the Department of
Juvenile Justice, and is current-
ly used as a model for other cor-
rectional facilities and commu-
nity colleges throughout the
state. Dr. Erica Moore, Cypress
Creek principal, said the faculty,
staff and students "are excited
about the prospect of having
more up-to-date equipment and
software as well as being able to
access online courses through
CFCC."
Made up of Citrus County IT
professionals, providers, and
others interested in IT-related
matters, CITA focuses on
attracting, growing, and retain-
ing information technology and
related businesses and IT
employees.
It was formed in 2004


through a partnership among the
CITRUS COUNTY
ECONOMIC DEVELOP-
MENT COUNCIL, the
CITRUS LEVY MARION
WORKFORCE CONNEC-
TION and the CFCC CITRUS
CAMPUS.
Everyone interested in IT or
the IT industry is welcome to
attend CITA meetings, which
are held the second Thursday of
every other month, from 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the college,
3800 S. Lecanto Highway.
For more information about
CITA, call the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council at 795-2000.



HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY will host a six-week
workshop for persons who have
recently experienced a death of
a close friend or family member.
The sessions will be
Tuesday's, starting August 2
from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Hospice
of Citrus County's Inverness
Office on 326 South Line
Avenue.
The presenters will cover
information on the grieving
process; ways to reduce stress
affiliated with coping and
adjustment, and provide infor-
mation on community
resources.
Individuals are often sur-
prised at the physical and emo-
tional effects of grief. This
workshop will offer information
that will assist grievers in how
to cope with the array of emo-
tions commonly experienced.
Those interested in the work-
shop may register by calling
Hospice of Citrus County at
527-2020 or 866-642-0962.
Hospice of Citrus County also
offers additional support pro-
grams for persons who have suf-
fered a loss due to a death.
All programs are free and
open to the community.
For more information you
may visit our Web site at
www.hospiceofcitruscounty.org.


Neck & Back
Care Center
"Understanding and Correcting
the Source ofYour Pain"


www.citruscountychamber.com


v








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce





(bhmber Connection


Authentic Taste of Philly Sub Shoppe, Inc.


Authentic Taste of Philly Sub Shoppe, Inc.


5D

SUNDAY
JULY 24, 2005


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle


Recently the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed new member Authentic Taste of Philly Sub Shoppe, Inc. with a ribbon cutting cer-
emony. Participating were, from left: Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director; Joanle West, chamber ambassador; Curtis Peters, chamber
ambassador; Chris Downey; Adam Downey; Edward HInsey; Linda Downey, owner; Paul Downey; Megan Wenzel; Mike Gudls, chamber ambas-
sador; Renee Melchionne, chamber ambassador; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador; and John Porter, chamber ambassador. Authentic Taste
of Philly Sub Shoppe, Inc. was voted biggest hoagles, burgers and cheesesteaks In the country. They are located at 630 NE 2nd Ave In Crystal
River, just off Hwy 19 North one block north of Fancy's Pets and one block south of Hwy 495. Look for the bright yellow building behind
Subway and Century 21 office. They are open Monday through Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Their phone number Is 795-7805. Call ahead and
they will have your order waiting.

Member News


Volunteers needed! THE
HEART OF FLORIDA
COUNCIL OF GIRL
SCOUTS needs leaders, train-
, ers, administrators, event plan-
ners, mentors, and short-term
volunteers, advisors for STU-
DIO 2B Program. Do you enjoy
volunteering? Do you enjoy
having fun with children? Call
Jiuie Linhart Membership
Director toll free at 877-215-
4425 extension 103.
MEN
The CENTRAL FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CITRUS COUNTY CAMPUS
will offer four new courses dur-
ing the fall 2005 semester.
Introduction to Horticulture,


Customer Service Help Desk,
Advanced Creative Writing and
Introduction to African-
American History are being
offered to meet the education
and training needs of Citrus
County students and potential
students.
Introduction to Horticulture
and Customer Service Help
Desk are hybrid courses. Parts
of the courses are completed in
the classroom and parts are
completed online.
Introduction to Horticulture
will meet five times during the
fall semester and is taught by
professor Bob Dumond.
Customer Service Help Desk
will meet four times during the
semester and is taught by pro-
fessor Pat Fleming.


Citrus County Chamber of

Commerce Board of Directors


James Holder ............................. AmSouth Bank
President

Kevin Cunningham ................... RE/MAX Realty One
President-elect

Janet Yant ................................... JDP Kennel
Past President

Leanne Hadsell ................. Citrus Management Services
Secretary

Carl Flanagan .......................... Nature Coast Bank
Treasurer

John Barnes ...................... . . .J&K Consultants
Richard Bradtmuller ...................Publix Supermarket
Joyce Brancato ........Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
Pete Burrell ....................... Citrus County Chronicle
C.L. Calloway ................. Withlacoochee River Electric
Jim R. Crosley ......................... Rusaw Homes Inc.
Charles E. Davis .............Charles E. Davis Funeral Home
Karen Dixon ..................... Central Florida State Bank
Dick Dolbow .................. Citrus County School District
M ike Fitzpatrick .............................. . .Sprint
Jim Harvey ..............Central Florida Community College
Rocky Hensley ................. SunTrust Bank, Nature Coast
Mike Moberly ....................... Tropical Window Inc.
Gerry Mulligan .................... Citrus County Chronicle
Jim Neal ............................ James A. Neal, Jr. PA
Richard Olpinski .......................Associate Member
Jack Reynolds .................... Homosassa Springs Bank
Frances Roberts ..........Best Western Crystal River Resort
Don Sutton ............................ Associate Member
Don Taylor .................... Progress Energy Florida, Inc.
Rob Wardlow ........... Williams, McCranie, Wardlow & Cash
Janice Warren .............................. Tax Collector
Rick Welch ....................Welch Cabinet & Appliances
Chet White .......... ................... Stanley Steemer



www.citruscountychamber.com


In response to student
demand professor Susan Monier
will teach the Advanced
Creative Writing course on
Wednesday from 3 to 5:40 p.m.
Introduction to African-
American History will be taught
by professor Kenneth Quinnell
on Thursday from 3 to 5:40
p.m. All classes will be on the
Citrus County Campus.
Call the campus at 746-6721
or view the fall schedule at
www.GoCFCC.edu.


Looking for new business
leads? Want to share in commu-
nity events?
Join the SUNCOAST
BUSINESS MASTERS


For the month of August, $25
table-top displays have been
offered at the chamber luncheon
or chamber breakfast. So far, the
response has been great.
We have only eight available
tables for the August 12 lunch-
eon. There are three available
breakfast spaces for the August
17 meeting. If you are planning


JIWo nV~~l-lll -v mWTiij~~


Wednesday at 12 noon at
Romano's Restaurant. Make
new friends and participate in
community events. Suncoast
Business Masters is a single cat-
egory business-networking
group.
The categories are as follows:
Attorney; Banking; Prescription
Medications; Candle Consul-
tant; Chiropractor; Financial
Planner; In-Home Non-Medical
Care; In-Home Medical Care;
Insurance; Marketing; Orthotic
Footwear; Property and
Casualty Insurance; and Real
Estate.
If your category is not there,
then come and join the Suncoast
Business Masters.
Call President Fred Clark at
746-2623.


on reserving, please do so
quickly as spaces are filling
fast.
It is a fabulous networking
opportunity and a great time to
take advantage of our half price
offer.
Call Debi at 795-3149 for
information or Suzanne at 726-
2801.


1'~^


Fun Lovin'


* Barbecue Eatin'

SSocializin'

Cowpokes

For the 23rd Annual Industry
Appreciation week Barbecue!
Presented by the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council, Inc.

For information call
795-2000.

Thursday, September 22
at the Holcim Ranch,


Crystal River


Workforce has professional openings!
Submit your resume: ProJobs@clmworkforce.com


To view current openings
www.clmworkforce.com
click Career Seekers/Job Search/Professional


ONE STOP
WORKFORCE
..llE


Contact the Professional
Placement Team today!
352-873-7950 ext. 202


a o a a . Eoa0 a

On the new two-speed Five Star e'o\
Edition of the Infinity System! di
The world's first self-monitoring residential air conditioning
system, designed and programmed to run a daily
diagnostic check. It actually adjusts itself to maintain
maximum efficiency.
(Offer ends 8/31/05. W.A.C. & purchase of qualifying
equipment. See Bay Area for details. Homeowner occupants only) -
AIR CONDITIONING

SCitrus 795 -
Marion 489 2 6
Levy 447 00
www.bayareacool.com www.carrier.com www.natex.org State Certified CAC010415


"For Cataract .cptng New
B Patients
Surgery, The
Best Choice Is
Dr. Chris Ward."
Focused training '
and countless
surgeries have
made Dr. Ward
a Premier
Cataract Surgeon.
Dr. Ward is an accomplished surgeon and has chosen to devote
much of his practice to the study and advancement of cataract
surgery. Your surgery will be as precise and safe as possible. The
doctor will tailor each surgery to the exact specifications needed for
each patient.
Customized service is the specialty of Ward Eye Center, so we hope
you'll consider us for your cataract surgery and all your vision needs.
Dr. Christopher Ward
Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


WarEde

Eve Center


& OPTICAL


Great response for

luncheon displays


WANTED


:Fn-


IImII7 1m


1 f(32)48-37


CATARACIS -GLAUCOMA -DESIGNER FRAMES -PROGRESSIVE & TRANSITION LENSES
WARNING: As with any operative procedure, Cataract Surgery has rijsks.
potential risks will be fully explained during consultation.


J


,&AL


, ,IF














Is business ownership right choice for you?


If you are thinking about starting a
business, there are several criti-
cal issues to address before pro-
ceeding. These include the risk of los-
ing your life savings, the
realization that most start- ,
ups require five years to
begin maturing, and a 50- to .e..
70-hour work week to meet -
the many demands of a
business owner.
After these considera-
tions, if you decide to pro-
ceed, a test market to qual-
ify your products and serv- Ralph
ices is in order The results
of your testing may require AS
some modifications, or per- SC<
haps you may find that the
market does not meet your satisfac-
tion.
This phase will require a small
investment of time and money to qual-
ify your business idea. Assuming all is
well and you are prepared to proceed
- have the talent to make it work and
the market for your products and


services, then go for it!
The next phase is to create a busi-
ness plan that covers every aspect of
your business operations and devel-
opment. The business plan
examines the environment
in which a business oper-
.,, ates, describes how the
business will function and

lems and opportunities.
The plan addresses the
solution to problems and
responses to opportunities.
Russo A business plan is the
"definitive" document that
5K showcases your thoughts
)RE about the business.
If you require financing,
a copy of your business plan is gener-
ally required to support your idea
with realistic plans to execute for
business success. The following ques-
tions should be answered: Who are
your target customers and how will
you gain their business? What are
your advantages over the competi-


tion? How will the competition react
to your presence in the market? What
new trends are developing and how
will you accommodate them? How
will you grow your business once you
are established?
Don't be surprised if more ques-
tions and issues surface in addressing
these issues.
The business plan should cover
future contingencies from both finan-
cial and operational perspectives.
Putting your ideas in writing forces
you to think realistically about what
the business can achieve under the
best and worst conditions.
Preparing a business plan may
sound like a lot of work, and it is. The
benefits are well worth the effort.
Planning will help assure that you
have defined and described the key
business topics such as sales, expens-
es and goals of your business.
The more detailed and accurate the
plan, the better prepared you will be
to handle the day-to-day challenges of
building a successful business.


Typical business plan format
Executive summary
Provide a succinct explanation of
your business and activities with an
overview of key goals and objectives.
Business description
Describe your perception of the
company. How will your business
profit and grow?
The market and competition
(largest section)
Honestly acknowledge the competi-
tion and describe how your company
will differ and succeed. Cover prob-
lems and opportunities.
The products and/or services
Describe the core of your business.
Selling
Explain how you will access the
marketplace will you advertise,
attend trade shows, Web site, etc.?
Management and personnel
Describe how you will staff and
manage the business. Include one
paragraph on profiles yourself,
partners and key managers.:


Financial data
This contains the balance sheet,
profit and loss statements, break-even
and cash-flow analyses.
Appendices
Include testimonials from potential
customers, research clips, various
charts and graphs that relate to your
market outlook, products and servic-
es.
If you need help with your business
plan and would like to arrange a
meeting with a SCORE counselor,
contact SCORE at 621-0775. This free
service is available to existing busi-
nesses, as well as new start-up busi-
nesses. You will receive a free copy of
the business-planning workbook
"How to Really Start Your Own
Business."
Anyone interested in becoming a
SCORE member can contact Bob
Radcliffe at 621-0775.


Ralph Russo is the past chairman
and founder of SCORE chapter 646.


FASHION
Continued from Page 1D

"People who do thrift stores
don't usually shop in consign-
ment stores because they
would think the prices are too
high," Tyre said. "Here you'll
find a Liz for $25, and that's a
good price, but not if you're
looking for things to be $2 or
$3."
What's in it for me?
Depending on store policy,
the split between store owner


and consigner ranges from
70/30 to 50/50. With a 50/50 split,
when a consigned item sells,
the store gets 50 percent of the
selling price and the consigner
gets 50. (In a 70/30 split, the
store gets 70.)
Some stores, such as Kids
Trading Post in Crystal River,
offer immediate store credit
toward store inventory; Trendz
in Inverness offers cash out-
right for children's and con-
temporary teens' clothing.
Before you decide to consign
or sell your clothing or other
items, do your research, Tyre
suggested. Visit the store to see


what types of merchandise it
carries and ask about store
policies.
Consignment and resale
stores are selective about what
they accept. Items must be
clean, pressed and on hangers
- nothing torn, worn or need-
ing repair.
Shoes should look almost
new. Styles should be up to
date; the only exception would
be vintage.
-Depending on the store's
consignment agreement, cloth-
ing that doesn't sell is either
returned to the consigner or
donated to local thrift stores.


What can I find?
In an informal survey of sev-
eral local shops, some of the
items found include a black,
gauzy, dressy dress, size XL,
marked $62 (originally $255);
an Ann Taylor Loft sleeveless,
ankle-length, aqua floral dress,
size 12, for $30; and a purple
jacket and skirt suit, size 8, for
$25.
Need a classic "little black
dress?" Bridal gown? Cruise-
wear? How about square dance
crinolines or Western boots?
"I have at least 50,000 items
here," said Ann Modine, owner


of Helen's Consignment
Boutique in Inverness.
However, because of a 90-day
in-store policy, the inventory
changes daily
That's the fun of consign-
ment shopping you never
know what you'll find.
"This is a hard business to
operate and it's very time-con-
suming, but there's a lot of
fun," she said. "I like watching
the clothes come in and match-
ing them up to my regular cus-
tomers. You get to know what
they like and are looking for"
Tyre, too, said she keeps a
tickler file of things people are


looking for. She said right now
people want capris and
cruisewear
The key to this business, said
Modine, is cultivating a core of
good consigners, those with an
eye for what makes good
resale.
"People tell me that they love
consignment because you find
things that you won't find on
the racks at (the mall stores),"
Tyre said, "and it's great for
people who like to wear nice
things, but still want to be fru-
gal with their money. Per-
sonally, I'd much rather spend
my money traveling."


DIGEST
Continued from Page 1D

Chefs, cooks group
will meet Aug. 8
The August meeting of the ACF Gulf to
Lakes Chefs & Cooks Association will be
Monday, Aug. 8, at Lake Technical Center,
2001 Kurt St., Eustis. Contact Chef Ken
Koenig at (352) 589-2250 for more infor-
mation and directions.
Koenig and the staff of the Lake
Culinary Institute will host the meeting.
Also, George Hernandez from Baker &
Baker will give a presentation on the latest
pastries and breads.
The golf committee will hand out infor-
mation for the upcoming golf tournament,
slated for Oct. 29 at the Country Club of
Mount Dora. Golfers, sponsors and door
prizes are still needed. Visit the Web site
at www.gulftolakeschefs.com/golf.htm.
Founded in 1929, the American Culinary
Federation is the largest and most presti-
gious chefs' organization in America.
ACF's goal is to make a positive difference
for culinarians internationally through edu-
cation, apprenticeship and certification,
while creating a fraternal bond of respect
and integrity among culinarians every-


where. For more information about the
American Culinary Federation, call Chef
Jeffrey Rotz at (352) 742-8278 or e-mail
him at gulfchefs@earthlink.net.
Physicist completes
board certification
Kathleen M. Hintenlang, Ph.D., a staff
physicist for the Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute, recently completed her
third board certification.
According to the American Board of
Radiology, only a small percentage of indi-
viduals in the United States hold board
certification in all three subspecialties of
therapeutic radiological physics, diagnostic
radiological physics and medical nuclear
physics.
Alzheimer's chapter
embarks on campaign
The Central & North Florida Alzheimer's
Association Chapter is embarking on an
immediate educational and philanthropic
campaign seeking to raise corporate assis-
tance for its many programs presently
serving persons diagnosed with
Alzheimer's in the 31-county area.
The chapter's campaign seeks major
corporations and private individuals to help
with cash contributions, volunteer time and
appropriate in-kind donations.


'We have a moral obligation to take care
of our greatest generation and to provide
for others who also suffer from this disease
because it's the right thing to do," said
Douglas Allen, president and CEO of the
regional Alzheimer's chapter. "We are
grateful for every financial gift. Our work
has helped thousands of families cope
with unimaginable hardships and we
urgently need to maintain high levels of
service to those in need."
It is estimated by the state that this
region has approximately 100,000
Floridians who are affected by this disease
and other dementias. Age is the greatest
risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. As the
population'of Florida, including the baby
boomer generation, continues to mature,
there will be an estimated 44 percent
growth rate in persons diagnosed with
Alzheimer's by 2025.
The National Institute on Aging esti-
mates that the latest direct and indirect
cost of caring for Alzheimer's-diagnosed
individuals is in excess of $100 billion per
year. The average family lifetime cost of
care for an individual with Alzheimer's is
conservatively estimated at more than
$174,000 per person diagnosed. Medicare
costs for beneficiaries with Alzheimer's are
expected to increase 75 percent from
$91,000,000,000 to more than $160 billion


in 2010.
Corporations that have a robust busi-
ness presence in Central and North
Florida will be sent information regarding
the myriad state-of-the-art programs pro-
vided by this regional chapter. Referral and
information services will also be made
available, so that businesses might assist
their customers and employees.
For more information, contact Sharon
Melton at (407) 228-4299, Ext. 106, or
Sharon:Melton@alz.org.
Raymond James associate
earns designation
Anthony Marotta of the Raymond James
& Associates Crystal River office, has been
awarded the wealth management special-
ist designation. Jim McLaughlin, branch
manager of the Crystal River office, said it
gives him great pride and pleasure to
announce that Marotta has recently
achieved this major accomplishment.
The wealth management specialist des-
ignation is achieved after completing a rig-
orous course of study. It recognizes his
dedication to training in the fundamentals
of'wealth accumulation and management
for affluent investors by considering time
value of money principles, the measure-
ment of investment risk and return, the
asset allocation process, insurance alter-


natives in the wealth management
process, business ownership and plan-
ning, as well as retirement and estate plan-
ning considerations.
Marotta has agreed to a code of ethics
and is well equipped to address the range
of financial issues confronting affluent indi-
viduals, as well as those individuals who
are seeking to grow their wealth.
Raymond James & Associates, which
has built a national reputation during the
past 40 years as a leader in financial plan-
ning for individuals, corporations and
municipalities, is a wholly owned sub-
sidiary of Raymond James Financial Inc.
(NYSE_RJF). Through its three investment
firms, Raymond James Financial has more
than 5,200 financial advisers in 2,300 loca-
tions throughout the United States and
internationally. In addition, its asset-man-
agement subsidiaries currently manage in
excess of $16 billion.
SCORE offers free
business services
The Citrus County SCORE Chapter 646
offers free confidential counseling services
to new and existing businesses in the
county.
The counseling covers a range of busi-
ness-related topics.
For an appointment, call 621-0775.


ADULTS
Continued from Page ID

Business Bureau is to protect
its members.
"We believe we can educate
businesses across the country
on the importance of involving
mature adults in all aspects of
today's business," said
Maisonneuve. The Senior
Business Bureau will profile
its business members as "sen-
ior-friendly companies" and
will have strict guidelines for
business members to follow in
order to maintain their senior-
friendly status. The bureau will
rely on its mature adult mem-
bers to give direct feedback
Also, the Senior Business
Bureau will coordinate mature
adult mystery shoppers to
ensure their experience was
positive, as well as track its
business members recruiting
process.
Assisting members
The bureau will assist all its
business members in adapting
the communication skills,



WORKFORCE
Continued from Page 1D

about veterans' employment
services, you can call Bob Weil,
lead veterans' employment
representative at 732-1700, Ext.
107.
In 2003-04, approximately
1,000 businesses and 30,000
career seekers received servic-
es through the One Stop
Workforce Connection.
Services include profession-
al and technical recruitment,
training, job fairs and financial
incentives.
The One Stop Workforce
Connection is funded by and a
program of CLM Workforce
Connection, with the motto


recruiting practices and over-
all excellence needed to
become a senior-friendly com-
pany.
"We want a noticeable differ-
ence when a mature adult
walks through the door. We
need better parking, places for
seniors to rest, cleaner rest-
rooms, wider walkways and
better employee attitudes
toward seniors," said
Maisonneuve. "The Senior
Business Bureau will only rep-
resent companies that truly
want to make seniors a priority
in their business plans."
The bureau will educate
mature adults on the impor-
tance of buying goods from
local retailers that know about
the products they sell. The
bureau will help educate
mature adults that product
knowledge and knowing what
you are buying is far more
important than price.
"We are pleased to announce
that Comfort Keepers is the
first nationwide company to
join the Senior Business
Bureau and commit to being a
senior-friendly company," said
Ed Maisonneuve, vice presi-

"Employment solutions that
work for business."
The One Stop Workforce
Connection welcomes people
with disabilities.
If you need any special
accommodations, call the local
One Stop office or (352) 732-
1700, Ext 106. Florida Relay
users please dial 711.


Lisa Nichols is director of
marketing and business
development for CLM
Workforce Connection. To
learn more about CLM
Workforce Connection or the
One Stop Workforce
Connection, call
352) 873-7939, or visit
www.clmworkforce.com.


dent of operations for the
Senior Business Bureau.
Comfort Keepers
Comfort Keepers is a nation-
al franchise that offers com-
panionship and other in-home
nonmedical care services for
aging adults and others need-
ing assistance. Founded in
1998 by a registered home
health care nurse and her hus-
band, Comfort Keepers has
grown to more than 468 loca-
tions in 45 states, Canada and
England, including an office in
Inverness. Comfort Keepers
services include: meal prepa-
ration, grocery shopping, light


housekeeping and laundry, 24-
hour care, transportation serv-
ices and more.
"We're thrilled to work with
the Senior Business Bureau,"
said Allen Riggs, president and
CEO of Comfort Keepers. "Our
business caters to mature
adults and we understand the
issues that seniors face daily
"The senior population- is
expected to double during the
next three decades.
Mature adults will need to
rely more on their local busi-
nesses for service, while busi-
nesses will need to recognize
seniors as a strong customer
base."','


The Senior Business Bureau
is free for mature consumers
and job seekers.
Advantages of membership
will allow mature adults to file
a consumer dispute complaint,
search for employment oppor-
tunities in their area,j post
their resume for potential
employers to view, search for
discounts and senior-friendly
companies in their area and,
most importantly, support the
companies that support them.
All mature adults are invited
to join for free by registering
on the Senior Business
Bureau's Web site at
www.SeniorBB.org.


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas
must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.
* Call Charlie Brennan, edi-
tor, at 563-5660.
* Or call Mike Arnold,
managing editor, at 563-
5660.
* Be prepared to leave a
message with your name,
phone number and brief
description of the story
idea.


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH 12-MONTH 24-MONTH 30-MONTH 36-MONTH 60-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D.
S/I APY S/I APY S/I A S/I/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

FIRST FEDERAL BANK 0.65 0.65 1.50 1.51 N/A N/A 2.00 2.02 3.10 3.15 2.50 2.53 3.50 3.56 3.75 3.82
(352) 637-4741
METLIFE BANK 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.14 1.15 3.25 3.30 3.44 3.50 N/A N/A 3.63 3.70 4.16 4.25
(877) 326-2210
SOUTHTRUST BANK 0.95 0.95 0.90 0.90 1.14 1.15 1.73 1.75 2.47 2.50 2.47 2.50 2.86 2.90 3.54 3.60
(352) 795-2265
STATE FARM BANK 1.49 1.50 2.81 2.85 3.20 3.25 3.96 4.04 3.97 4.05 N/A N/A 4.02 4.10 4.26 4.35
Call your local agent
SUNTRUST BANK 75 .75 N/A A A N/A N/A N/A N/A NA N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
(352) 795-8202

RAYMOND JAMES BANK N/A N/A 3.25 3.30 3.45 3.51 3.73 3.80 3,83 3.90 N/A N/A 3.97 4.05 4.36 4.46
(352) 527-3700

Please note: Each bank has its own set of requirements
Banks interested in listing their rates can call to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact the bank
the Citrus County Chronicle at (352) 563-5660. directly for up-to-date information.


Good Neighbor.
GREAT RATES

I Bank
LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR


Chuck-Eveidge STATE FARM IS THERE." Ed Buckley
Chuck Everidge InvemessF
Invemess, FL Invemess. FL
Inverness, FL .^*pali.ronntage cldssof05/15.Ralcsonal pnklLp"u subjllocglieihouno` ccFmnonSaing`ui '` oney-Mak ,,iAro uldrnuccami,,g, MinlmunnipilingitfcpilhaP: SoHX0fi0rSavingsAccnundl 0IXX)fr"Molw)'yMaakccu(HnKForCD;: . .. IRVerness, FL
S. 1 SminTmum b..... ...a onT.. d A.ll, C , d APY is B5 AN, CD r,, I app S A ly .H y OIEt'E LO'OMIN rON y ,l I LhL O *ih 1 sNIcm ra I a S /0
/72-48-3l STATE FARM BANK HOME OFFICE: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS statefamr.com ]


C04%APY
1 1 earCD


-I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


6D SUNDAY,t JULY 24, 2005


*
C








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Extension office trains -PropertyTRANSACTIONS


food service workers


Special to the Chronicle

The University of Florida/IFAS-Citrus County
Extension Office provides training to enable
food managers and staff to offer Florida's con-
sumers the safest food prepared in a clean envi-
ronment
This is a comprehensive training that pro-
vides the most up-to-date information and cur-
rent regulations. The ServSafe Manager's Exam
is given at the end of the training, which pro-
vides a national certification that is good for five
years.
Certification is required in Florida for food
managers of all establishments licensed by the
Department of Business and Professional
Regulation, the Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services and selected licenses of the
Department of Health.
Class will be Aug. 4 at the new Citrus County



CHALLENGE
Continued from Page 1D

The unit brought in almost $4.7 billion in rev-
enue out of Fedex Corp.'s $29.4 billion total for
the last fiscal year that ended May 31. The com-
pany has consistently described the FedEx
Ground division as one of the primary reasons
for a steady increase in corporate earnings.
Ground's operating income grew 16 percent to
$604 million in fiscal 2005.
A victory by the unhappy drivers would raise
employee costs and force FedEx Ground to
maintain its own fleet of trucks, said University
of Memphis business professor David Ciscel.
"FedEx Ground would feel this dramatically,"
Ciscel said. "It would have to be reorganized."
Spokesman Perry Colosimo said FedEx
Ground is confident it can win in court and has
no intention of changing the way it does busi-
ness. The independent-contractor system, he
said, keeps shipping prices competitive and
allows the drivers to run their own small busi-
nesses.
"It has served our customers well," Colosimo
said.
The drivers say FedEx controls just about
everything they do the hours they work,
where and when they pick up or deliver pack-
ages, how they maintain their trucks, even how
they dress.
FedEx also prohibits drivers from using their


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

am afraid if we use the savings,
we will never repay it, and if I
die first, my wife's income
would be cut by $1,400. -F. W,
Hernando, Miss.
DEAR F.W.: Your final line
is the meat of the conundrum.
If you borrow the money from a
lender, you'll be required to
make payments and reduce the
debt If you take it out of sav-
ings, there is no such impera-
tive only the discipline that
you bring to the transaction
can determine if or when the
savings will be replenished.
It should be observed that if
you are only earning 3 percent
in your IRA, you will have a net
cost in borrowing the money,
since it is highly unlikely you
will be able to borrow it at any-
thing near that rate. I am sure
you are aware that you will
have to pay income tax on the
withdrawals from the IRA and
because of your age, you could
have the deferral for another
six years or thereabouts. The
major consideration is, do you
have the discipline to replen-
ish the savings that you with-
draw? If not, borrow the
money.
DEAR BRUCE: Two months
ago, I was advised to take
$60,000 from my mutual fund
and place it in an annuity with
an insurance company at 5.7
percent for the first year.
Although the yield on the
mutual fund was low, it was
federal income tax-exempt.
The idea was to protect the
principle, which fluctuates
downward, as interest rates go
up as they were expected to do
the rest of this year. In your
opinion, did I do the right
thing? -J.V., via e-mail.


Extension Office at 3650 W Sovereign Path,
Suite 1, Lecanto. (From State Road 44 go south
on County Road 491, turn west on Sovereign
Path, go one block, turn left at entrance to
Lecanto Government Building.) The new exten-
sion building is on the right.
The brochure/registration form can be down-
loaded from http://foodsafety.ifas,ufl.edu or call
the toll-free hotline, (888) 232-8723, to register by
credit card. No cash will be accepted; preregis-
tration required. Cost for the course and test is
$75. Manuals may be purchased in English or
Spanish for $40.
For more information, call Katherine or Janet
at the University of Florida/IFAS-Citrus County
Extension Office at (352) 527-5700.
All programs offered by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service are available to
all persons regardless of race, creed, sex or
national origin.


trucks to carry non-FedEx shipments.
"They're calling these drivers independent
contractors, but they're really employees," said
Christopher Gilreath, a lawyer for a group of
Memphis drivers who filed suit against FedEx
in federal court last month.
Gilreath said more than a dozen similar suits
are planned or have been filed around the coun-
try.
The lawsuits directly affect small groups of
current or former drivers, and some plaintiffs
have already sought class-action status that
could expand the reach of court rulings.
A state court in Los Angeles decided last year
that one category of contract drivers for FedEx
Ground should be treated as company employ-
ees. FedEx has said it will appeal.
FedEx Corp. referred to the contract-driver
dispute in a Securities and Exchange
Commission report early this year saying the
company "cannot yet determine the amount of
potential loss in these matters, if any."
FedEx cranked up its competition with
Atlanta-based UPS in 1998 when it bought sev-
eral trucking operations, including RPS Inc.'
which later became FedEx Ground. RPS had
relied on contract drivers since its creation in
1985.
Drivers for UPS are company employees driv-
ing company-owned trucks.
FedEx Express is still the heart of FedEx
Corp., and the airline has a fleet of 40,000 trucks,
with purple and orange logos, driven by compa-
ny employees.


DEAR J.V.: You say you were
"advised" to take your money
out of mutual funds and put
into an annuity; I suspect that
the advice came from an insur-
ance salesman. You'll note that
the high interest rate was only
guaranteed for a year, and I
believe you will find that if you
were to try to withdraw your
money in the first several
years, the penalties would be
severe.
Annuities serve a useful pur-
pose in some situations, but
there has been much abuse by
salespeople because the annu-
ities often generate a far high-
er commission than securities.
Whether there are circum-
stances in your life i.e., age,
income and other variables -
that would recommend the use
of the annuity, I do not know. I
receive much mail from peo-
ple, particularly the elderly,
who not only have no need for
an annuity, this is an inappro-
priate investment, yet "finan-
cial duress" persuades them to
the contrary.
DEAR BRUCE: My wife and
I recently bought a house
together, but at the closing, the
bank would only allow my
name to be put on the deed,
since the mortgage is solely in
my name. I would like her
name on the deed. My wife
would like the security of
knowing that the house is in
her name also, in case some-
thing should happen to me. Is
there a way to go about adding
her name? Reader, via e-
mail.
DEAR READER: It's all up
to the company that holds the
mortgage to decide if they
would allow your wife's name
on the deed. If they say no, then
the only other way that I know
of is to apply for a new mort-
gage application in both
names. If the reason you didn't


add her name to the mortgage
in the first place is bad credit,
then you might have a problem
and only be allowed to have
your name alone on the deed.
DEAR BRUCE: We currently
have an underground oil tank
where the oil was stored to
heat our home. It is. no longer
in use. When and iflwe decide
to sell our home, is this going to
present some problems? We
know that the tank is currently
sound, but are not sure how
many years it has left before it
starts deteriorating, as it is
made out of metal. We have
heard you mention several
times about filling these tanks
with a plastic. -Is this what we
should do? AS., Lionville,
Pa.
DEAR A.S.: When you do
decide to sell the house, your
tank will. be tested to make
sure that it isn't leaking and not
a pollution hazard. They check
to make sure that the tank is in
good condition, no water leak-
ing into it, and then fill it full of
a plastic material that swells to
fill up the inside to avoid
future intrusions. A certificate
is then issued that states your
underground tank does not
present itself as a pollution
hazard and is now an inopera-
tive storage tank.



Bruce Williams is a columnist
with Newspaper Enterprise
Association. Send questions to
Smart Money, P.O. Box 503,
Elfers 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions ofgeneral
interest will be answered
in future columns.


Property transaction infor-
mation is supplied *to the
Chronicle by the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office.
Call 341-6600 with questions.
Seller: Buena Antonio
Buyer: Whittaker Orville & Kelveta
Price: $21000
Addr: East County: 01739 E St James
Loop
Description: Cambridge Greens Of Citrus
Hills Pb 13 Pg 1191ot 32 BIk 1
Seller: Somogyvary George Est
Buyer: Wilbur Elaine
Price: $26000
Addr: East County: 01510 N Arkansas Ter
Description: Hernando City Hts Pb 3 Pg
111 Lot 3 & N1/2 Of Lot 4 Blk E
Seller: Dunlap Grace E
Buyer: Yates Richard T & Judy C
Price: $18000
Addr: East County: 02501 E Mercury St
Description: Hlltop Pb 5 Pg 42 Lot 100 Blk
B
Seller: Rubin Esther Ruth & Max
Buyer: Zhoe Ping
Price: $3500
Addr: East County: 06711 E Bluebird Ln
Description: Inverness Hglds West 2nd
Add Pb 8 Pg 68 Lot 21 Blk 461
Seller: Nellson John R & Marcia A
Buyer: Arthur Scott E &
Price: $187900
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00020 Wild Olive
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 7 Blk 127
Seller: Bartek Claudia S
Buyer: Barlowe Bruce D & Maria A
Price: $27000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00051 Linder Dr
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress
Village Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 2 Blk 22
Seller: Singer Leo G & Marion L
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $12000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00017
Hawthorne Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 11 Blk 123
Seller: Baker Laverne W & Lorena M
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $10000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00024 Balsam St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak Vig Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot30 Blk 192

Seller: Mooney Robert I
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $15000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00009 Cocoplum
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 15 Blk 34
Seller: Congdon Dorothy H
Buyer: Builders Property Group Lic
Price: $12000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00012 Nemesia
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 13 BIk 191

Seller: Vervaet Roger & Angela M
Buyer: Builders Property Group Llc
Price: $10000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00021 Paw Paw
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg86 Lot 12 BIk 24
Seller: Byrne Eugene W Trustee
Buyer: Builders Property Group LIc
Price: $12000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00010 Witch
Hazel Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 3 BIk 69
Seller: Santopietro Ann C
Buyer: Collins Suzanne H
Price: $155000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00003 Byrsonlma
Ct
Description: The Hammocks Of Sugarmilll
Woods Pb 14 Pg 6 Lot 63
Seller: Mc Guire John G
Buyer: Dawson Joseph A & Michele A
Price: $20000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00011 Lemlngton
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress Vig
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot36 BIk 13

Seller: Rgv Construction Lic
Buyer: Dawson Joseph H & Marlene F
Price: $328000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00006
ThUnbergia Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 7 BIk 235
Seller: Delgado R Lawrence & Betty
Buyer: Delgado R Lawrence
Price: $18000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00046 Jamaica
St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Lot 392 & E1/2 Of Lot 391 BIk A Pb 9 Pb 86
Seller: Meyer Frank E & Geraldine J
Buyer: Erman Audia M
Price: $4000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00003 Hackberry
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 26 BIk 67


Seller: Meyer Frank E & Geraldine J
Buyer: Erman Audla M
Price: $4000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00013 Hackberry
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 13 BIk 67


Seller: Lexington Homes Inc


Buyer: Flax Jay & Joyce
Price: $19900
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00033 Candytuft
Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 22 BIk 240
Seller: Kontos Thomas & Frances M
Buyer: Holllngworth Roger B & Anne R
Price: $26500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00004 Mllbark Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress Vig
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 20 Blk 44
Seller: Bass Burton A & Doris
Buyer: Hurlburt Kathleen
Price: $27000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00059 Corkwood
Blvd
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 10 Blk 74
Seller: Eckman Andrew J
Buyer: Kendrot Kimberly
Price: $27000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00006 Elder Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress
Village Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 17 Blk 66
Seller: Rawlins Margaret
Buyer: National Recreational
Price: $10000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00001 Lone Pine
St
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 28 Blk 179
Seller: Langlo Lars H & Marion L
Buyer: National Recreational
Price: $12300
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00014 Black
Willow Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress Vlg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 8 BIk 88
Seller: Bateman Donald D & Virginia M
Buyer: Nelson Bryan R Trustee
Price: $59000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods:
Description: Southern Woods At Sugarmill
Woods Phase lib Pb 17 Pg 1 Lot 22 Blk E
Seller: Zapp Fredrick
Buyer: Penrose Kenneth A & Janet L
Price: $106000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00029 Beverly Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 17 Blk 11
Seller: Preble Roger M & Marjorie E &
Buyer: Perkins Ronald & Monica
Price: $14000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00010 Poplar Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 12 Blk 83
Seller: Blue Stone Real Estate
Buyer: Ross Jennifer
Price: $179000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00003 Foxglove
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 18 BIk 159
Seller: Barnfather Gerald R & W Gall
Buyer: Ryan Sharon
Price: $139000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00004 Wild Olive
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 2 BIk 127

Seller: Erlandson John B & Madeline P4
Buyer: Selvaggi Annabella
Price: $33500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00028 Gourds Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 14 BIk 160
Seller: National Recreational
Buyer: Show Robert S & Jeanne M
Price: $29900
Addr: Sugarmill Woods:.00002 Geranium
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak Vig Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 1 BIk 202
Seller: Johnson Dennis A
Buyer: Stagllano Ronald J
Price: $26000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00005 Black
Willow Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pg 9 Pg 86 Lot 5 Blk 88

Seller: Shadley James S & Harriet D
Buyer: Supp Joseph & Ellen
Price: $26500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00010 Mimosa Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot41 Blk 148

Seller: Sanchez Bernardo &
Buyer: Alello Vincent
Price: $200000
Addr: West County: 07546 W Maryland
Rd
Description: Nel/4 Of Swl/4 & Sel/4 Of
Nwl/4 & Nel/4 Of Nwl/4 Desc In Or Bk
635 Pgs 1358 & 2081 1988 Less Outs: Or Bk
757 Pg 1621(700

Seller: Sandlin Danny G
Buyer: Ash Amy
Price: $132500
Addr: West County:
Description: Forest Hills Unrec Sub Lot 8:
Comm At NwCrn Of Sw 1/4 Of Se 1/4 Of
Sec 30-18-18 Thn N 88deg 46m 34s E Alg
N Ln Of Sd

Seller: Woody Loretta
Buyer: Beaver G Michael
Price: $92000
Addr: West County: 06951 W Avocado St
Description: Mayfair Garden Acres Lot 3
Unrec Of Lot 16 BIk E Further Desc As:
Coam At Sw Cor Of Lt 16 BIk E Sd Pt Being
On N'Ly R/W L


Seller: Guthrie A Ray
Buyer: Bennett Tim E & Mary L
Price: $30000
Addr: West County: 02885 N Brentwood


Cir
Description: Brentwood Pb 12 Pg 70 Lot 4
Tract 37
Seller: Tidey Donald
Buyer: Biggins Dale & Llef Boogaerts
Price: $28500
Addr: West County: 10363 N Marigold Ter
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg
136 Lot 1 BIk 162
Seller: Wachovia Bank National
Buyer: Bish David
Price: $8800
Addr: West County: 03111 N Amphibian
Pt
Description: Shady Oaks West Unrec Sub
Lot 16 Desc As: Cam At Nw Car Of E 1/2
Of Sw 1/4 Of Sec 13-18-17 Th N 89deg
13m 24s E Al N Ln
Seller: Crabtree Rene R & Lois Elaine
Buyer: Black Melvin B & Karen E
Price: $230000
Addr: West County: 01625 S FIshcreek Pt
Description: St Martins Est Rets Unit 7
Unrec Sub Lot 4 & Pt Of Lot 3: Lot 4: Beg
At A Pt Found By Measuring From The
Accepted Ne Car
Seller: Riverside Llc
Buyer: Blankenship Robert N & Mary
Price: $194900
Addr: West County:
Description: Riverside Villas A
Condominium Unit 106 Villa 1
Seller: Parderllkes Roger P
Buyer: Bourke Liam
Price: $54000
Addr: West County: 03330 W Hughes Ct
Description: Leisure Acres Unit 5 Pb 5 Pg
88 Lot 9 Replat Of Lots 15 & 16 BIk K Desc
As: Cam At Nw Cor Of Lt 16 BIk K Th S
Odeg 15m 2
Seller: Eck Harry J & Christine C
Buyer: Buffenbarger Jeff
Price: $22900
Addr: West County: 08306 N Shannon
Ave
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 1 Pb 8 Pg
82 Lot 13 Blk 21
Seller: Johnson Philip G & Sandra J
Buyer: Burke Johnny & Edna Nell
Price: $119000
Addr: West County: 08524 W Drew Ct
' Description: Chassahowitzka VIg Unit 3
Unrec Lots 10 & E 40 Ft Of Lt 11 BIk H Desc
As Lot 10: Com At Se Car Of Sw 1/4 Of Se
1/4 Of Se
Seller: Brown Paul R Trustee &
Buyer: Burns Timothy W & Cathryn 0
Price: $188000
Addr: West County: 11629 W Clearwater
Ct
Description: Riverview Mobile Ests Unrec
Sub Lot 38: Coam At Se Cor Of Lot 44,
Homosassa Co'S Subd Of Sec 31-19-17 As
Rec In Plat Bk
Seller: Messer Ed
Buyer: Cajigas Carmelo &
Price:$21500
Addr: West County: 08176 W Mayo Dr
Description: Crystal River VIg Unrec Sub
Lots 7 & 8 Blk C Desc As: Lot 7 Com At Sw
Cor Of Se 1/4 Of Se 1/4 Of Sec 27-18-17
Th N Odeg
Seller: Miles Ernest M & Wendy L
Buyer: Chaves Frank J Sr
Price: $8000
Addr: West County: 10280 W Ohio Dr
Description: Holiday Hts Unit 2 Pb 6 Pg 51
Lot 5 Blk D
Seller: Miles Ernest M & Wendy L
Buyer: Chaves Frank J Sr
Price: $8000
Addr: West County: 10270 W Ohio Dr
Description: Holiday Hts Unit 2 Pb 6 Pg 51
Lot 4 BIk D
Seller: Cox David & Suzanne
Buyer: Cheatham Christopher R
Price: $21200
Addr: West County: 03871 S Millston Pt
Description: Lecanto Hills Pb 3 Pg 131 Lot
18
Seller: R J Land Group Inc
Buyer: Cimini Mark P & Dawn L
Price: $11900
Addr: West County:
Description: ((Survey For J Wright Dated-
5/13/80 Accepted Unrec Subd) Lot 14
Desc As: Cam At Intersection Of W Ln Of
Sec 1-17-17 And

Seller: Gunter Thomas C
Buyer: Citrus County Land
Price:$7500
Addr: West County: 06695 W Cherrywood
Ct
Description: Mayfair Gdn Acres Lots 3 & 4
Unrec Of Lots 12 & 13 BIk F Desc As
Follows: E 125.66ft Of W 376.98ff Of N
173.34ft Of Lot
Seller: Gunter Thomas C
Buyer: Citrus County Land
Price: $7500
Addr: West County: 06671 W Cherrywood
Ct
Description: Mayfair Gdn Acres Lots 3 & 4
Unrec Of Lots 12 & 13 Blk F Desc As
Follows: E 125.66ft Of W 376.98ft Of N
173.34ft Of Lot
Seller: Miller Code Leath Mills
Buyer: Corso James C & Lori E
Price: $10000.
Addr: West County:
Description: Tract 15: Corn At Se Cor Of
W1/2 Of Se 1/4 Of Sec 4-17-18 Th N
00deg 41m 45s W Al E En Of Sd W 1/2 Of
Se 1/4 1638.99 Ft
Seller: Mc Lendon R E & Marian
Buyer: Costello Martin J & Delight M
Price: $229000
Addr: West County: 04460 S Cox Pt
Description: Homosassa Co Sub Of Sec
29-19-17 Lot 15 Of An Unrec Sub Of Lot
28 Further Desc: Corn At Sw Co Lot 28 &
RunN 180 Ft To Po


005 Ford G


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in sharp locus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure' neither too light nor
too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all pho
tos.
* When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to
right.
E If desired. include the name of the photographer for credit.
* We discourage the use of Polaroid prints.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well: sub
mit the digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff will color cor
rect and otherwise "work up" the image to Chronicle publica-
tion standards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maximum reso-
lution JPEG (.Ipg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a selI addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call Linda Johnson, newsroom coordi-
nator, at 563-5660.


_____._


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005 7D


I FOR









8D SUNDAY,JULY 24, 2005


CHRornein* *




Classified
Serving all of Citrus County, inc/vding Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosossa Springs, Sugarmill VVoods,
Fl l Cit Citrus S rin s Ozello Inglis Hernando Citrus Hills, Chassohowitzka, Holder, Leconto and Yankeetown.


1a24ro ,4. gI1. C, y ,t i ,FL A s i w y u an i e a w h o i l o li e c mF- 83 c~" rn

3-42 63~m. -59ri. 5 5 Li 2p
A See C C C -


a ~ fi ~ ~ 3'1 I U Ic ~j.- .. ~ I ,... J,.~. r, ~ ~ ~ ...................r. .........


4iMwV % w AV w

726-1441
Outside of Citrus County or Citrus Springs call:
1 -888-852-2340


_fun ay Issue ................... --lpm ri ia y
Sunday Real Estatle 3pm Fridoy
MAonday Issue ........... 5:30 pm Friday
Tuesday Issue. .. ... 1 pm /onday
Wednesday Issue.......... 1 pm Tuesday
Thursday Issue I pm Wednesday
Friday Issue................. 1 pm Thursday
Sat-Jrday Issue ......... 1 pmrn Friday


2 items totaling
11 -- S150 .............. ..... S5.:'
$151 400.............. 1050
s401 -- 800............. .15 o0
$801 -- 1,500..........2050
Restrictions apply Offer applies to private parties only


4


.5


rpo(lofo~rimr han on* incorr.t
inrtrIon. AdJiu.tmnti ar. mod. only
for the portion of the ad that i. in *r.or.

A A *
d..li; = Ina[.I.'ncIP-1a:
.oan a.r...ilf a,. oab.'in*d. Y~aw will b.
bi~lld only for *h. da*. th. ad acftually
appwa.'. in 0.. pap..-. *,.cwp* far *plal.
D~odlinf for ircan llaion. a.-.r th. Sam.
t h.. dqdlin. for placing ad..


Cc=- -il Fre = Cleicl 4 4 m
Connect c O^ffers c=-- Sert araljJ~fe M ei cl c jLr EZr Me ica Medical Profesional i-ioMissionlm c ProessioMa


ACTIVE, RETIRED
gentleman, 57, 6'2,
1901bs, non-smoker,
boater, enjoyer of life-
seeking to hear from
witty, charming gal
Hope you call soon,
(352) 795-4504
HOOKING UP I
W.M. financially secure
would like to get
acquainted online with
slim under 40 girl who Is
bored and wants more
7 Send me Info. about
you with e-mail or
phone #, and I will
respond. Blind Box
862-M, c/o Chronicle,
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FL
34429
LETS SMELL THE
ROSES TOGETHER
Seeking attractive Lady
40-55 who enjoys dining
out & weekend trips out
share quality times
together & wants the
nicer things In life.
Call 228-1579
SINGLE BLACK MALE
50, own 4 bedroom,
pool home In Beverly
Hills, by himself, looking
for soul mate, 35-47,
female. New In the
state. Enjoy walking
on the beach,
movies, travel, etc.
Call (352) 746-1659
Single Male, In my
40's looking for old
fashion girl, under 50,
who's thin to med built.
Enjoys the outdoors
and is looking for some-
one to share life with.
PJ (305) 984-2986
SWM SEEKS SWF slender
build, 30-40 Please call
(352) 812-1890
SWM, 60, seeking SWF
50 to 65. Ukes fishing &
Nascar races. quiet
nights &dining out.
Call and we will talk,
(352) 564-0214




American Bulldog
Brown w/wht. markings
Must have fenced yard
Loves everyone.
(352) 795-2347
FREE BABY KITTENS







Removed FREE. No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
1 yr. Dobie Lab, great
w/8 year old and
above, housebroken,
Loveable, must move
(352) 637-3253
3 FREE KITTENS
10wks old, tiger cats
(352) 628-3829
Calico Cat w/ five
kittens, assorted colors,
all have six or more
toes. (352) 628-1816
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter Is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service,
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message
CUTE FEMALE TABBY
Kitty, about 10wks. old.
Yours to lovel
(352) 527-4188
FREE CUTE
CUDDLY KITTENS
to a good home
(352) 795-9524
FREE PUPPIES, Shit-zu,
Pomeranian &
Chihuahua mix To good
home (352) 344-5038
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, jet ski's,
3 wheelers, 628-2084
FREE TO GOOD HOME
2 female 6 month old
Pit mix puppies. Both
have all shots & are
housebroken. Good
with kids. PUREBRED RED
NOSE PIT BULL female,
6 months old, to good
home 7-wk old
American bull dog
puppy, male, to good
home. Please save us
all from the Pound
(352) 302-3492
Free to Good Home,
two Beautiful Cats, eld-
erly owner unable to
care for them. Diane
(352) 621-3542/476-5763
FREE, Pine Logs
28" Diameter, 15' long,
very heavy, you haul.
(352) 344-1515
HOMOSASSA
FREE KITTENS
(352) 621-4704
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
Is seenbg Docnatns of use-
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating Items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
Vrnteei ore needed h the
Home Store.
Store hours are:
9am-5pm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
Information.


FREE KITTENS
To good home.
(352) 489-6277
LOST
Black Lab w/ chain
collar In Homosassa
Madador Lane
(352) 628-5853
RABBIT, 4 year old In
house, with cage.
Lgove ble must move
(352) 637-3253
SHARPEI/AUSSIE
MIX/FREE TO GOOD
HOME!
Spayed, shots, crate.
Very Sweet. 613-0278
TO GOOD HOME
2 LAB MIX PUPS
6 months old. One
male, one female.
Spayed and neutered.
Puppies must go to-
gether. Loves children,
very friendly, 302-0520.
WANTED: A GERMAN
SHEPHERD
(352) 746-7462
Work out equipment,
double mattress w/ box
spring, couch, all fair
cond. (352) 341-4449







www.adopto
rescuedoet.com

Requested donations
are tax deductible
Cats
Kittens weeks gray
M&F sweet, social-
ized, ok with dogs
489-8966
Two adults F social
lap cats need new
homes due to family
circumstances -
Himalayan Lilac -
declawed & Siamese
exotic 527-9050
Gray tabby M 10 wks
socialized and cuddly
628-4200

Kittens to young
adults M&F various
colors all ready for
their special family
746-6186
Dogs
Choc. Lab M 9yrs'
great pet diabetic
on insulin -.retiree
home preferred
628-4200
German Shepherd
mix F young adult
great with kids, peo-
ple, dogs NO Cats
Pug mix F 18mosp-
family pet playful
249-1029
Toy Poodle 3yr / M
sweet & playful Scot-
ty -Terrier mix F
18mos active Bichon
M handsome / adult
retirees 527-9050
ShIh-Tzu M 4yrs adult
home Dachshund
Black/Tan longhaired
M 1 yr no small chil-
dren 341-2436
Wanted poodles and
small dogs suitable for
seniors adoptive
homes available
527-9050
All pets are spayed /
neutered, cats tested
for leukemia/alids,
dogs are tested for
heart worm and all
shots are c current


JaCK Kussei Itmer
Large male, off Rock
Crusher Rd. Blue leash,
"Jake" REWARD. Please
call (352) 628-2770
Lost Cat, name
Garfield, orange &
white. lost behind Times
Square, in Inverness
(352) 637-6536
Red Toy Poodle,
Gabby, needs
medication Reward,
no questions asked
(352) 489-3944

pa-


BIG SET OF KEYSfound
area of West Noble
near the woods In
Lecanto. Keys belong
to "TIm." Please call
(352) 212-2213
Black Kitten, w/ green
eyes, friendly, Old
Homosassa Area
(352) 628-6539
FOUND
GERMAN SHEPHERD
In Beverly Hills. Call with
description, please
provide photo and
prove ownership.
(352) 400-2441






1Bankruptcy
I NameChcnge
ChldSupport
S Wit
I| Mven ..............637-4022
[---------

*CHRONICLE-
INV. OFFICE
106 W. MAIN ST.
Courthouse Sq next
to Angelo's Pizzeria
Mon-Frl 8:30a-5p
Closed for Lunch
29-2A Rjm j


"MR CITRUS COUNTY"












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956









ATTRACTIVE SWF
seeking male
companion. Candi,
352-628-1036




KID'S STUFF
PRE-SCHOOL
Is looking for qualified
teachers & Cook. Top
pay, Pd. holidays &
Vacs. Call Director
(352) 341-1559
NANNY
At $700 week,
Immediately In Crystal
River, Must love
children. (678) 318-1498
NANNY
Full time In my hqme,
live In/out references
req 352-422-3304
SMALL WORLD
LEARNING CENTER
Is accepting applica-
tions for cook, teacher
& teacher's aide. Apply
In person 243 NE 7th
Terr. Crystal River
TEACHER 2/yr. old
Full Time -CDAE Req.
Precious Cargo
(352) 628-3719




Admin.
Assistant

Long established real
estate developer is
seeking skilled
Admin. Asst. Diverse
responsibilities require
strong computer skills
in Access & Excell.
Flexible schedule
Includes Saturday or
Sunday. Benefits with
medical. Fax to
352-746-4456

DATA
PROCESSING
CLERK P/T
Keypunch or other
numeric experience
preferred. Will
consider training
you If you can use
a .!0-key adding
machine by touch.
Must understand
debits & credits,
be detail oriented &
good w/ figures. May
assist w/ statement
rendering. Will work
30-32 hrs. Mon. Fri.
Position at our Data
Center In the Town
of Hernando.
Interested applicants
please call for
appointment
352-726-9001
BRANNEN BANKS
OF FLORIDA
320 U.S. Highway 41 S.
Inverness, FL 34450
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP

FRONT DESK
PERSON

Professional Health
Care Office. Good
phone, office and
computer skills
required. Must be
able to multi-task.
Accepting applica-
tions with salary
requirements Tues-Fri.
from 10 a.m. 3 p.m.
at 211 S Apopka Ave.
Local A/C Service
Company is currently



Office Manager,
experience
Including billing,
purchasing and
customer service
Mall resume with
salary requirements
to:
P.O. Box 771255
Ocala, FL 34477
DFWP/EOE
OFFICE MANAGER/
PROFESSIONAL
ASSISTANT
Must have basic
accounting &
computer knowledge,
. be able to multl task&
be personable on
phone. 8-5 Mon-Frl,
Salary negotiable
according to
experience.
(352) 748-6462


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
OFFICE MANAGER
For Real Estate Office,
Fax Resume to:
(352) 489-0109
P/T RECEPTIONIST
Needed evening until
9pm & weekends,
$10. hr. Inverness
(352) 683-0186
RECEPTIONIST
Exp. with phone
& computers,
Fax resume to
527-3365
REMAX REALTY ONE
Lecanto












CAREGIVER/
ASSISTANT

3/4 Days a wk.
Housekeeping, Shop-
ping, etc. Depend,
local work ref, own
rhans, 495 area. Pass
sec. & bkgmd ck. Fax
Resume w/ all prs.
into. (352) 564-0733

EXPERIENCED
DOZER OPERATOR
Apply in person
2190 N Crede Ave.,
Crystal River 795-4357




1 -7
RN/LPN
FULL-TIME

Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness EOE

3-11 & 11-7




and part time nurses
for3-11 & 11-7 nurses.
Avante offers
excellent wages and
benefits Including
shift differentials
and bonuses,
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness


a Skilled Facility has
openings for:

NURSES
3-11 and
PRN All Shifts
Fax resume to
746-0748 or apply at
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100

A+ Healthcare
Home Health
Agency

Immediate Work

C.N.A's & HHA's
Day Hours
(352) 564-2700

BUSINESS OFFICE
COORDINATOR
Supervisor for all
phases of the
business office at
outpatient surgery
center. Must have
excellent
references and
experience In
medical billing,
collections or
scheduling. Must be
willing to learn and
supervise all activities
in Business Office.
Minimum of Associate
Degree in Business
preferred. FT with
great benefits and
opportunities.
Pleasant working
environment.
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827

CARDIOLOGY
PRACTICE

LPN
BCLS/ACLS Req,
salary based on exp.
MA
BCLS w/ Cardiology
office experience

FRONT OFFICE
Multi-tasking, exp. In
physicians office only.
FAX RESUME TO:
HR 352-795-4879


ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
F/T Must have
computer knowledge.
Responsible for
scheduling appts.,
handling money &
communicate well.
Organizational skills
a plus. Will be drug
screened & have
background check
completed. $9/hr to
start. Fax resume to
(352) 341-4055
CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT
Exp. In collections,
billing, front desk &
physical therapy. PT,
3V' days/wk. Fax a
complete resume to
352-795-0803
CNAs
3-11 & 11-7

Avante at Inverness
Is currently
accepting
applications for
CNAs for3-11 & 11-7
shifts. Avante offers
excellent pay for
years of experience
shift differential,
weekend differential,
bonuses for extra
shifts, excellent
benefits package for
fulltime employees.
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness, FL



A-

CNAs
3-11/11-7
Fulltime opportunities
available for quality-
oriented caregiver.
We offer excellent
pay and benefits in a
mission driven
environment.
Please call
Hannah Mand, RN
at (352) 746-4434
or fax resume to
(352) 746-6081.
Or visit us at
3325 W. Jerwayne
Lane, Lecanto FL
34461. EOE

DIETARY AIDE
FULLTIME

Apply In person to
Crystal River
Health & Rehab
136 N.E. 12 th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-5044 EOE
DOCTOR'S
ASSISTANT
Full-time, apply at:
Citrus Pulmonary,
5616 W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy., Crystal River, FL
(352) 795-1999
FULL TIME
LPN/MA
Needed for busy,
Urology office.
Please fax resume to
R. Wardlow
352-527-8863 or mall
to P.O. Box 1420,
Lecanto, FL 34460
FULL TIME
MEDICAL ASSISTANT

Busy office Phlebotomy,
Vitals. Needs to be a
Team Player.
Send resume to
800 Medical Court East,
Inverness, Fl. 34452 or
Fax 352-726-8193
HHA, CNA/ NA,
MENTAL HEALTH
TECH
Needed
In the inverness Area,
Full or Part Time
Good pay, Flexible
Hours. (727) 868-2779

HYGIENISTS
$1,000 Sign-On Bonusl
Inverness & Spring Hill
Coast Dental Is
currently seeking
experienced Florida
licensed Hygilenists.
Receive a $1,000
sign-on bonus if hired
by 8/31/05
Coast Dental offers
compensation and
benefits. Call
1-877-COAST- 17,
ext. 1001 or fax
resumes to
(813) 289-4500
EOE/M/F/D/V
Drug-Free Workplace

LCSW

the Centers
Is seeking a Licensed
Clinical Social Worker
to work in our
Children's Services
Program. Master's
Degree In the human
service field with
Florida LCSW and ,
ability to Supervise
required. Must have
a min 5 yrs exp with a
broad knowledge of
psychotherapeutic
theory & practice.
Please submit salary
requirements.
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE. send, fax,
or emarl resume to:
HR, 5664 SW 60th
Ave., Ocala, FL 34474
hr@thecenters.8us
(352) 291-5580


MEDICAL ASSISTANT
F/T needed for
busy physician's office.
Good Benefits and
Competitive Salary.
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-6333

MEDICAL
COLLECTIONS
CLERK
FT day shift position
with excellent
benefits In business
office at Outpatient
Surgery Center.
Must have
experience in
Medical Collections
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827

OPERATING
ROOM
REGISTERED NURSE
CIRCULATOR
Minimum of 2 years
experience.
Fast-paced,
Multi-speciality
Outpatient Surgery
Center.Excellent
hours, no calls, or
weekends.Very
pleasant working
environment. 2-FT
positions available
excellent benefits
and opportunities
Fax resume to:
(352) 527-1827


Psychiatric
ARNP or
Master's Level
RN

the Centers
In Ocala is seeking a
Psychiatric ARNP or
Master's Level RN to
provide services to
work in an adult
"i ,. r ,lar nrl: Irnp.,ll _r, [
fO.': lllr, an lhir rjill
time, or contract.
Please submit' salary
requirements.
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mall resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,

or come by 5664 SW
60thAve., Bldg.#1,
Ocala and fil out aun
application.



RNs:
Clinical Educator
Nurse Manager -
Labor & Delivery
MedSurg, Telemetry,
ICU, OR, Psych
ER/Triage (4pm-12am)
ICU Charge Nurse
(7am-7pm)
Other Career Opportunities
Physical Therapist
Physical Therapy
Assistant
Medical Transcriptionist
Payroll Coordinator
Cook
PBX Operator
Inquire about our
sign-on bonus


SRRMC is a part of the
HMA family of hospitals.
Please apply to:
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical
Center
Human Resources
6201 N, Suncoast Blvd,
Crystal River, FL 34428

Job Llne:352-795-8418
fax: 352-795-8464
Email:
careers@srrmc.hma-
corp.com
Web Site: www.srrmc.com
EOE/DFWP


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656


NOW HIRING
CNA's/HHA's or
Dependable
Compassionate
People who want to
become CNA's/HHA's
CALL LOVING CARE
M-F, 9:00 AM to 4:00PM
(352)860-0885

X RAY TECH
Part time, for busy spine
practice. Tues, Thurs &
Fri. Please fax resume to
352-341-4477


Youth
Case Manager
Eckerd Youth
Alternatives, Inc. a
leader In alternative
treatment programs
for youth-at-risk, Is
seeking a Group
Treatment
Coodlnator
(Case Manager) for
our wilderness
educational camp
located In Floral City,
FL Responsibilities
Include Individual,
group, and family
counseling, monitor
and document treat-
ment, formulate and
Implement family
intervention plans,
prepare parents for
camp visits, and help
children bring camp
experiences home.
Bachelor's degree In
a human services
field and two years
experience working
with children with
serious emotional
disturbances or
substance abuse
problems.
Send resume to
Margie James, EYA,
100 N. Starcrest Dr.,
Clearwater, FL 33765;
Fax: 727-461-4387;
Online:
www.eckerd.ora
EOE/Drug-free
M/F/D/V, Workplace


Central Florida
Community College
Is seeking qualified
professionals for the
following positions:

Accountant III -
Business Office:
Graduation from an
accredited 4/yr
college or university
with a degree In Acct
or Bus Admin req'd.
3/yrs f/t acct exp
req'd w/one yr being
in government
accounting
preferred.
Close Date 8/5/05
Legacy Corp
Program
Manager:
Grant Funded-
Position not to
exceed one year.
'Bachelor's degree In
education, health
care, social services,
nonprofit
management, or
related field req'd.
3/yrs of related f/t
exp req'd.

Close Date 8/4/05
For add'l info
please visit
www.GoCFCC.com
or call
(352) 873-5819
Mdll application
& unofficial
transcripts to:
CFCC
Attn: H.R. Dept.
P.O. Box 1388
Ocala, Fl 34478-1388
CFCC is an EE/AA
& DFWP Employer


Where Rewards
Respect are

right at home.

At BayCare Home Care, we're providing the
best in high-quality, specialty-focused home
health care to more than 50,000 Floridians. And
that's why you'll feel right at home with us!







Learn More When You
Search Poiironb & Apply Online:
.. ww .baycarehomecare.com


You may also contact Mary Miller, RN,
at (800) 746-5255; or fax resume to
(352) 795-1914; or apply in person at
1582 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34423.
JOIN OUR TEAM TODAY!


HomeCare
BerI'rR HFAirH. RIc;HI AI HOME.


EOE/AA
M/F/DNV


FULL CHARGE
w/COMPUTERIZED
GL, AP, AR & PR EXP.
Construction exp. a
plus. great benefits.
Construction firm
Submit resume
PO Box 2832, Inverness,
FL 34450. EOE DFWP
Citrus Hills
Construction

Due to our continued
growth, we
are seeking an
Administrator
for Our Cabinet
Department.
Experience
Would be an asset
with job training
Provided to the
proper applicant.
Excellent benefit
package.

Fax resume to
(352) 746-9117

ENGINEERING
INSPECTOR

Advanced technical
field Inspection and
office related work In
connection with civil
engineering
construction projects.
Inspects construction
projects to ensure
conformity with plan
specifications and
adherence to
regulations.
Evaluates road
conditions for annual
road resurfacing
project. Investigates
grading and
drainage problems
and creates a
proposed action plan
to resolve the
condition. High
School, GED or
specialized training
and five years
experience in the
field of civil
engineering,
construction
Inspection, materials
testing and sampling,
plan review and
estimating. Must
possess a valid Florida
Driver License.
Starting pay
$12.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto,
Fl 34461
no later than Friday,
July 29, 2005;
EOE/ADA.




Your World

4 49"W s'e


sm.r nronlie)ni nlla.com


DIRECTOR
OF ADMISSIONS
Crystal River Health
& Rehabilitation Is
seeking an Individual
who Is willing to work
in a competitive
health care market
that has been
established by an
outstanding
representative of our
facility. The person
who Is well organized,
energetic, tenacious
and has previous
customer sales and
service experience
and enjoys working
with the elderly
will succeed In this
position. Previous
health care
marketing
experience and
Bachelor Degree
preferred. Must be
able to travel outside
of county. Salaried
position with benefits
Including Incentive
bonus plan.
Send resume or
apply in person to
Administrator-
Lyn Brecher
Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
136 NE 12th Avenue
Phone (352) 795-5044
Fax (352) 795-5848
EOE DFWP

Land Rights
Coordinator
Sumter Electric
Cooperative, Inc.,
one of the fastest
growing electric
distribution
Cooperatives In the
nation, has an
Immediate opening
for a qualified Land
Rights Coordinator.
This position is
available In
engineering & IT at
our headquarters
located at 330 N. US
Hwy 301, Sumtervllle,
FL 33585, in Sumter
County.
This position requires a
BA degree or
aq'jI.Jril 5 1-:r-.
enernice in real
ar.,,3 in-, a-rlit/, i.-,
obtain a Florida Real
Estate license.
Experience in court
testimony for county,
state and federal
agencies, county
planning and zoning
procedures, and in
land surveying
preferred.
Experience with an
electric utility also
preferred.
Starting salary based
on qualifications and
experience, and
Includes an excellent
benefit package.
Applications accept-
ed by mall to: SECO,
Attn: Land Rights
Coordinator, P.O.
Box 301, Sumterville,
FL 33585; fax to
(352)568-7777; or
email to: secolobsL
secoonerag.com
SECO Is an Equal
Employment
Opportunity
Affirmative Action
Employer. M/F/D/V


CERTIFIED
LEGAL ASSISTANT
OR LAWYER

Estate planning, pro-
bate, legal research
and writing experience
irqed. Send resume
to: Blind Box 864-P,
Citrus Co. Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
Florida 34429


Executive Vice
President
The Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce
is searching for a new
Executive Vice Pres-
ident. Check the
chamber websIte for
a detailed job
description at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com
Send Resume to
Citrus County
Chamber of
Commerce,
Executive Search
Committee, Blind Box
866 P c/o Citrus
County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429


LIBRARIAN II
Advanced
professional library
work managing
professional librarians
and Reference and
Information Access
services for the
County library system.
Includes public
computing,
computer Learning
Center and
evaluation and
selection of
informational
databases.
Coordinates and
conducts public and
staff training. Advises
and assists librarians
and other employees
engaged In library
activities. Asslstsiln
planning, evaluating,
co.-.irainaolrg ana
services Conduct?
public r i r,,:
..work and takes
active parf In"
professional meetings
and conferences.
Functions as part of a
managerial
workgroup. ALA
accredited Master's
Degree in ULibrary
Science
supplemented with
experience
managing branch
library. Four years In
public library service
with some supervisory
experience.
Starting Salary:
$1,195.54 bi-weekly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at or send
resume to the
Office of Human
Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, Fl 34461
no later than Friday,
August 12, 2005.
EOE/ADA


Come Grow With Us!








HOSPICE
OF CITRUS COUNTY INC.
Join our team of caring professionals.
As the premier provider of responsive end-of-life
care to the people of Citrus County since 1983,
Hospice of Citrus County continues to grow to
meet the needs of our community. Consider a
rewarding career where you will make a difference.
Opportunities presently available:
Full Time Positions

Licensed Clinical Social Worker
Grief Services

Chaplain
Masters degree required

PRN RN's, LPN's, PCA's
PRN SW's MSW's preferred

Begin a rewarding career with us by calling,
mailing or faxing our Human Resource Manager,
Jill Thacher at:
Telephone: 352.527.2020
Fax: 352.527.9366
Email:
jthacher@hospiceofcitruscounty.org

Mail your resume and credentials to:
Hospice of Citrus County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464

Apply on-line at
hospiceofcitruscounty.org

drug-free workplace equal opportunity employer


I I


1


CITRUS COUNyY (FL) CIIRONICI.E


CLASSIFIED


gwrpfia-


I











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




GARDENER

$8/hr. PT. No benefits.
C C S ^Maintains garden
areas in park.
Requires knowledge
of native plants, use
of fertilizers,
M, .hr ii ,ilI nc herbicides and
pesticides, Irrigation
w system operation and
maintenance and
IMMEDIATE NEED ability to read
for the following landscape architect
positions: plans.Contact
Chris Hawthorne
* Warehouse / at Rainbow Springs
Inventory, multi- State Park
task, organized (352) 465-8556
Individual needed
* Class A CDL NATURE COAST
License, clean LAND SURVEYING
driving record Currently taking
* Mobile Eqpmnt applications for the
Operator, certified following positions:
in operating boom
truck and backhoe
*CADD TECH
Seeking candidates *PARTY CHIEF
for the following *INSTRUMENT
positions: PERSON
PERSON
* Project .REGISTERED
Superintendent, exp LAND SURVEYOR
In a mngmnt level Fully paid health, dental
position in HVAC & life Insurances,
Industry preferred Retirement plan
* Pipe Foreman, min 1907 Highway 44 W.
2 yrs previous exp Inverness, FL 34453
required PH: 352-860-2626
FAX: 352-860-2650
Fax or e-mall resume ncls@tampabay.6
with salary req. to ncsmarnpaby.
352-237-6258 or rr.com
malindafccs
mechanical.com
Apply in person at GET RESULTS IN
737 SW 57th Avenue,
ocala THE CHRONICLE
DFWP/EOE







CABLE &
DIlGITAL PHONE
INSTALLERS



SNoexp. req.
Earn up to s1200/wk.

Must have good work ethic &
CAN DO attitude.
Must have truck/van.


Kablelink
6513 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Crystal River. FL 34429


CLASSIFIED


HIRING TEACHERS
& PART TIME HELP
IMMEDIATELY
Call Julie at
352-489-1933
For more Info.

LICENSED 440/220
Great pay & benefits.
Send resume to
Blind Box 867M, c/o
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,,
Crystal River, FL 34429

NEEDED 220
AGENT
For key position.
Commercial exp a plus.
Top Pay For the
Right Person.
Reply Blind Box 858-M,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main,
Inverness, FL 34450


-E


ALL POSITIONS
Apply In Person
HOMOSASSA
RIVERSIDE RESORT
5297 S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa


FULL TIME
BREAKFAST/
LUNCH COOK
Apply at DECCA
at OAK RUN
7ml off 1-75 on SR 200,
applications
accepted
8am-12 noon,
Mon-Fri, call for more
Information
352-854-6557.
Decca is a Drug Free
Workplace.EOE


*BARTENDERS
*COOKS
*SERVERS
High volume
environment. Exp.
preferred. Positions
available In Inverness
& Dunnellon,
COACH'S Pub&Eatery
114W. Main St., Inv.
11582 N. Williams St.,
Dunnellon EOE

Exp. Line Cook
& Wait Staff
Exc. wages. Apply at:
CRACKERS
BAR & GRILL
Crystal River

Hardee's
Management
Open House

Interviewing
GM's, AM's &
Shift Managers
in the
Homosassa Springs &
Tarpon Springs areas
Interview Thurs.
July 28th 10am-4pm
(No Appt. Nec.). @
Hampton inn
1344 Commercial
Way (US 19) in
Spring Hill
Directions
352-684-5000.
Fax/Emall resume
214-222-6525 or
FTL@sel
opportunity.com
Questions
800-594-7036

HIRING ALL
POSITIONS

Apply within at
Peck's Old Port Cove
Ozello. See Craig.

HIRING COOKS
& MANAGER
TRAINEES
Benefits available
Huddle House
321 S. Hwy41
Inverness

LINE COOK
Flexible hours
experience with good
work ethic. Good pay
and benefits. 746-6855.

SERVERS
Apply at FISHERMAN'S
RESTAURANT, 12311
E, Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness 352-637-5888


-=SaeH


AAA AUTO
CLUB SOUTH
Offers a Sales Career
In Inverness/Inverness
Beverly Hills area.
Paid Training.
Company Benefits.
Strictly Full time
with flexible hours.
High Income Potential
Call Les Singleton
352-237-6251
Fax Resume
352-237-1748
or e-mail
Singleton@
aaasouth.com



























CLASSIFIED.


SUNDAY,JULY 24, 2005 9D


$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackie
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON



BADCOCK & MORE
seeking energetic,
self-motivated person
willing to learn all
facets of operations.
Apply in person
BADCOCK & MORE
Bushnell, FL


Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle Is now
accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales &
designers to sell &
create advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
ads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume to
HR at:
352-564-2935


CHipNKILE
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE




INSURANCE
AGENTS
Career Opp. 15-20
leads per week.
Vested Renewal.
Bonus Trips
Diverse Product line
Serious Inquires only.
(352) 795-3355


CHpmCLE DM r-l-Ira


A WHOLE HAULING
& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermist.com
A AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE
| HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Apple. Furn, Const, I
( Debris & Garages
352-697-1126 J
Pr-p-I-c.










DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal,




Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
#0256879352-341-6827
STUMP GRINDING
Uc. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlin
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe Itil"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Uc#000783-0257763 &








& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533

CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Ucensed &
Insured. 637-3765

FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631

George Swedlige
PaInting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245


FIND EXACTLY

WHAT YOU

NEED IN THE

SERVICE

DIRECTORY


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Uc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
Ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a profession-
al, Mike (352) 628-7277
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
QUALITY OUTBOARD
REPAIRS, Full & dock
side service. Morrill
Marine (352) 628-3331




Appliances Sales
and Services
New & Used, drop off,
parts avail., coln-op.
Sales, Service
352-220-6047 lye msg




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Llc#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352) 400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs 8& ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY
Modern & antique.
Denny, 628-5595
or 464-2738




IF YOU NEED A CARE
GIVER w/21 yrs exp.
Call Shella
(352) 637-2107, Iv.msg.




IN HOME CHILD CARE
In Inverness, off
Anna Jo Ages 2 and
up. 352-344-1737 After


vhnrl oarcnell raining
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Uc#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




CLEANING. Reliable,
affordable, Weekly,
bi-weekly, monthly
Joy, 352-266-8653 cell


HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
QUALITY CLEANING
and landscaping.
15 yrs experience
Jenni, (352) 726-7512




Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Uc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes, 637-4373
CRC1326872
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
camp. cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. Ins. CBC avail
352-563-0104/228-1282




AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning Quality
Work Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Uc./Ins. 422-1956


"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. Lic 0253851
(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Elec. etc. Lic. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
Maint & repair prob-
lems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395
r AFFORDABLE,
DEPENDABLE
| HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
3L52-697-1126

All Around Handvman
Free est. Will Do Any-
thing. Uc.#73490257751
352-299-4241/563-5746
All Around the House
Gen, Home repairs plus
Uc2120-0863567. 27 yrs.
352-465-1189
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
tPressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No Job
too smalll Reliable. Ins
0256271352-465-9201
Get My Husband Out
Of The Housel
Custom woodwork,
furniture repairs/refinish,
home repairs, etc.
Lic. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914


ALL TYPES OF HOME
IMPROVEMENTS &
REPAIRS #0256687
352-422-2708
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Moving.Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HOME REPAIR .:.u
need It done, we'll do
It. 30 yrs. exp. Lic., Ins.
#73490256935, 489-9051
NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
servlces.Lic.0257615/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
P & S ENTERPRISES
General Maint. repair,
pressure washing &
painting, free estimates
Lic. & Ins. 9990002510
(352) 522-1177
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.'
344-1952 CBC058263
X/CHEAP HANDYMAN
CLEAN UP/HAULING
"FREE" SCRAP REMV
344-1902 AC 23082




JT'S TELEPHONE SERVICE
Jack & Wire Installation
& repair. Free esti-
,-,.,C- Al I. Ail r'f *


I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59,95 Llc#0256991
(352) 422-5000




#1# A-A-A QUICK PICK
UPf & hauling, Garage
clean-outs, tree work,
Reasonable, 302-4130
S AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE I
HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I AppL. Furn, Const, I
Debris &Garages



clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER I DONE!
Movlng,Cleanouts. a
Handyman Service
Lc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
HAULING SMALL LOADS
Landscape products,
rock products lumber,
etc.Reas.rates 634-1789
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const, debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329


CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
SHOP AT HOME!
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Llc.#2713, Insured.
Free Estimates.
(352) 422-2019
Richard Nabbfeld
Hardwood, Laminate &
Tile. 6 yrs. exp. Prices
start at $1.50 sq.ff. LLC
LIc./ins. L05000028013
(352)361-1863




BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell
BEST PRICES
Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453
(352) 795-7095, Dallas
GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm./Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences.
Free estimates.


John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
628-3516/800-233-5358




Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types Lic. & Insured,
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Patio- Walks.
Concrete Specialists.
Llic#2579/Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates, Lic. #2000.
ins. 795-4798.
DANIEL ENO CONCRETE
All types, All Sizes.
Lic #2506. Ins.
352-637-5839
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Licns. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
Lic#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Drive & replace,
Slab. Lic.1476 726-6554




Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Lic. & Ins, CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
Uc. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl, Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263


AM SIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798, 425-8184


Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways.
Call (352) 628-4743.
D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
LandclearIng, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch.
Lic. Ins.(352)302-7096
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tves of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523
(352) 628-3924




MOST AFFORDABLE A
& REASONABLE *
Land & Lot Clearing
Also Fill Dirt deliveries,
Free estc.L. Insured.
(352) 795-9956
All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day lx Clean
Ups, Lot & Tree Clear-
Ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
Driveways 302-6955
Boxbladlng, Backhoe,
Bushhogging, Cleanup
Reas. rates. Lic.
(352) 422-3078







HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &
Ditching (352) 344-4288
or (3521302-7234 call


McBEE LANDSCAPING
installation of Shrubs
& Trees, Landscape
packages Avail.
Llc. #24715
(352) 628-0690


D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &


Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up. Some FREE
Services. Prof & Reliable
Call 352-563-9824
A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize in
replugging your yard.
Uc/ins. (352) 527-9247
Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est. (352) 628-4258
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service.
Mowing, landscaping,
pressure wash.257-1522
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
P & S Enterprises of
Citrus Inc. Mowing &
Landscape, free est.
Lic. & Ins, 352-522-1177
Woodlawn Landscape
Complete lawn care,


& models. Uc. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard





"MR CITRUS COUNTY












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956
Cuckoosl Grandfathersl
Fumiture Total Repair
/(.2.99-4fl 7A


RAINDANLIER
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascia, Siding, Free Est.
Llc. & Ins. 352-860-0714

kV,


MAJOR APPLIANCE
SALES HELP
Combination part time
and full time, Exp.
preferred. Call for
appointment 726-1911
NEW SMALL
BRANCH REAL
ESTATE OFFICE
Seeking a motivated
Licensed agent, great
career opportunity.
(352) 795-0455
RECEPTIONIST
/SECRETARY

Citrus 95 and Fox
Classic Hits 96.3
Need a bright,
friendly & Computer
Literate Co-Worker
for our Radio Stations.
You will work with
smart, knowledgea-
ble people at our
Homosassa Square
Studios. Health,
Dental, Vacations,
401k $325. weekly/
References Please
Fax Resume:
727-787-3523
emall: cJmarcoccl
@aol.com

SALES
It's all about
opportunity
Termlnix, the world's
largest pest control
company Is growing
again. We are
looking for eager and
hard working
Individuals to Join our
outside sales team.
We offer:
PAID TRAINING
1ST YR EARNING
POTENTIAL 35K+
GAS ALLOWANCE
OUTSTANDING
GROWTH POTENTIAL
BENEFITS HEALTH,
DENTAL 401 K,
STOCK PLAN ETC.
Join our team and
strengthen you future.
Apply:
TERMINIX
3177 Gulf to Lake Blvd
Inverness, FL 34453
352-341-1350
Email: tmx2249@
terminix.com

SALES ASSOCIATE

Great Earning
Potential plus salary
& commission.
Fax resume to
(352) 628-7791
Or apply in person
American Homes
5240 S SUNCOAST
BLVD


Phone Sales Help
Earn $1000 week easy
Mon.-Fri. 35 hrs.week.
Base pay + comm.
Cell 464-3613

SALES PEOPLE
NEEDED FOR
Lawn & Pest
Control
Prefer exp. In the pest
control industry.
2 wks paaid training,
benefits, company
vehicle.
Apply In Person
Bray's Pest Control
3447 E Gulf to Lk. Hwy.
Inverness
SALES/
TELEMARKETING
Best Job In town,
Guaranteed salary &
commission, medical &
Barb, (352) 726-5600

VILLAGE

Village Cadillac
Toyota/Scion is
starting a two week
AUTO SALES
TRAINING CLASS
AUGUST Ist, 2005
We offer:
Paid Training
Best Pay Plan In
area
Blue Cross/
Blue Shield
401K with employer
contribution
Paid Vacation
Dental Plan
Promotion from
within
No experience
necessary but you
must be well dressed,
articulate, have
a great attitude
and work ethic.
Please apply in
person at:
Village Cadillac
Toyota/Scion
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
We are a Drug Free
Workplace





$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers, solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
Call Now
800-362-0159 24 hours
FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362


On Top of the World
Comunitifes
ESTIMATOR
Proficient in estimating
software-required.
Timberline exp a plus
Must have strong residential
development experience
Send resume w/salary
requirements to:
Humanres Q2.fi.net
Or mail to:
8447 SW 99?St Rd.
Ocala, FL 34481
or
Applications available at
Main Guard Gate
8447 SW 99 ST RD
Ocala, FL
come
'Find your place in the
world"
DFWP/EOE

*AC INSTALLERS
*SERVICE TECHS
No whiners, I don't
supply cheese,
Call 352-564-8822
AN EXP. FRAMER &
LABORERS NEEDED
(352) 637-3496
APPRENTICE OR
TILE SETTER WANTED
Ultimate goal- own your
own business. Call for
info @ 697-2591
AUTO DETAILERS
Exp, HS Buffing. DL
& background check
Req. DFWP
Call 352-302-2863

*AUTO TECH
*WRECKER
DRIVER
*LUBE TECHNI-
CIAN
For Busy Shop.
Benefits offered.
Serious Inquires Only
Apply In person at:
Scally's Lube & Go,
12059 N Florida Ave.
(next to Front Porch
Restaurant),
Dunnellon, 489-6823


The top selling dealership on the
Suncoast has an outstanding
career opportunity for a full time

GM Certified Technician
Must be experienced and customer
service oriented.
Excellent benefits and more!

Call Guy Denig, Service Director,
for an appointment at:

352-795-6800


WINNING HomosassaF
TEAMi lBP


BLOCK MASONS
TENDERS and
GENERAL LABORERS

Must have own
transportation and
tools. (352) 302-8999
Carpenters/
Framers
Exp. Only, Local &
Steady work.
Good pay
MH THRASHER
FRAMING CO.
(352) 465-3086

CARPET, VINYL,
CERAMIC &
LAMINATE
INSTALLERS.
Work yr round. 2 yrs
minimum experience
877-577-1277 Press 5
COMMERCIAL
CARPET HELPER
Willing to train. Must be
reliable & have own
transportation 400-1327
CONCRETE
FINISHERS, BLOCK
LAYERS &
LABORERS

(352) 563-1873

COURTESY TECH
Friendly smile
needed. Must have
valid drivers license.
Will train.Apply at:
Shell Rapid Lube
1050 SE Hwy 19
Crystal River
(352) 795-2333

S ,:l r r te l i.X,


Currently seeking
candidates for the
following position:
SService Technician,
experienced and
qualified EPA
certification req
Competitive pay &
benefits
Fax or e-mail resume
to 352-237-6258 or
malinda@ccs
mechanical.com
DFWP/EOE
CUSTOM
HOME BUILDER
seeking experienced
person to do warranty
work, punch out, and
work closely with
superintendents. Pay
based on experience.
Please fax resume to
352-746-5972
DIESEL
MECHANIC
Experience
required. For trucking
company. Benefits,
1-800-833-8725

DRIVER
Part-time
Ferrellgas Is a national
.leader In the propane
Industry with over 600
Districts throughout
the U.S. We have an
excellent opportunity
for a part-time Driver
in the Crystal River, FL
area.
Ferrellgas Is looking
for an enthusiastic,
performance driven
individual to join our
team. The qualified
candidate will
have excellent
.communication skills
and a genuine
commitment to
providing superior
customer service.
Must be able to meet
applicable DOT
requirements.
Responsibilities
include delivering
propane, maintaining
equipment, providing
service to customers,
and identifying
and selling to
new accounts
We offer a
competitive salary
with annual
reviews for increases,
bonus opportunities,
paid vacation, and
employee owner-
ship. Interested
candidates should

resume and salary
requirements to:


EMPLOYEE OWNERS
279 NE 3rd St
Crystal River, FL 34429
Fax 352/795-5522
EOE/AAP/M/F/D/V
www.ferrellgas.com

DRIVERS

, Class A, B & D.
Required, Full time &
Part Time. Local/
Long Distance.
Home most
weekends,
Contact
Dicks Moving Inc.
(352) 621-1220


have or obtain within
24 months
certification In
Housing
Rehabilitation.
Experience working
with federal, state, or
local housing
programs strongly
desired. Must be
certified In one of the
building trades or
have held a general
contractor's license.
Pay range $12.45 to
$18.05 hourly, DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
August 5, 2005.
EOE/ADA.


TradsBB
cm/klffls I


CUSTOM CABINET
BUILDER

(352) 465-4263
DRYWALL FINISHER
Must have tools &
transportation.
352-563-0710, David
ELECTRICAL
ESTIMATOR/
PROJECT MANAGER
Action Electric















EXP. BUCKET
TRUCK DRIVER
For Tree Service. Good
Driving record
Great Pay w/ benefits,
Call (352) 637-0004
EXP. ROOFERS.
METAL INSTALLERS
& REPAIRMAN

Top pay.
AAA ROOFING
563-0411 or
726-8917
EXPERIENCED
DUMP TRUCK &
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS

Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170

EXPERIENCED
SEALCOATING
STRIPING,
ASPHALT PAVING
DUMP TRUCK
DRIVERS
CDL License TOP PAY!
(352) 563-2122

EXPERIENCED
SERVICE TECH
Needed For AC
Company must have
good driving record I
Good pay & benefits.
(352) 489-9686
FIELD PERSONNEL
Experienced help
required. For
Crystal River Land
Surveying Company.
563-0315

FLIGHT
INSTRUCTOR
CFII with 1000 Hrs
needed in Dunnellon
area, ATP a plus.
Salary commensurate
with experience.
Send Resumes to
Box 868M
Citrus Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429
EOE

FRAMERS
WANTED
(352) 307-0207
FRAMERS &
CARPENTERS
Must be dependable &
experienced. Own
tools & ride a must.
352-279-1269.
FRAMERS/SUBS
NEEDED
Call 352-341-5673
or cell 407-709-2122
GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER HELPER
NEEDED

Some Experience
Required. 746-2154
GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
Willing to Train!
Call:(352) 563-2977











HOUSING
REHABILITATION
SPECIALIST


This Is skilled work In
the Inspection of
homes occupied by
low Income families
to Identify health and
safety related repairs,
overall condition of
the house and
feasibility of providing
home repairs. Acts as
liaison between
Housing Division,
general contractor,
and homeowner.
Provides Interim and
final Inspections.
Ensures compliance
with all work order
specifications. Solves
construction related
problems on-site.
Graduation from high
school or trade
school or GED. Must


ff


ffl












0D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005
mill


FULL TIME
TRUCK DRIVERS
Dump Truck.
3-R'S Trucking
(352)-628-0923
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT


.1' [A



Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers,
Excavators.
Next Class: Aug. 1st
-National
Certification
- Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training
Services
Www.
atsn-schools.com
HELP WANTED
Experienced. Neat &
Tidy Lawn Service
(352) 344-5134
IMMEDIATE OPENING

QUALIFIED
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIAN
Min 2 yrs. Exp., Good
driving record req.
Insurance, paid Sick,
Holiday & Vacation
Apply In person
S&S ELECTRIC
2692 W. Dunnellon Rd.
CR-(488) Dunnellon *
746-6825
EOE/DFWP

J & E Concrete
FINISHERS
& LABORERS
Needed, Top pay.
352-465-4239


On Top of the World
Communities
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE
Residential grounds
maintenance. No
experience required. Full or
Part time positions.
BENEFITS
401K -Medical *Dental
Vision Life
Applications available at
Guard Gates
8447 SW 99 ST RD
Ocala, FL 34481
Come
"Find your place in
the world"
DWP/EOER

LABORERS,
EQUIPMENT
OPERATORS &
SUPERINTENDENT

For Construction
Company.
Great Pay & benefits
(352) 628-7799
LANDSCAPE
DESIGNER NEEDED
Must be able to create
Landscape drawing.
References required
(352) 621-1944
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Full Time laborer
wanted. Must have
transportation to
& from work.
(352) 860-0299

LAWN
SUPERVISOR
NEEDED
Looking for a proven
winner with sales and
lawn exp. Able to
diagnose turf &
ornamental
problems. Good pay
and benefits. No
phone calls please.
Apply within
Brays Pest Control
3447 Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness, Fl

MARINE
FORKLIFT
OPERATOR
Fulltime position. Prior
marine forklift exp
req'd. Competitive
pay w/benefit pkg.
Apply in person
RIverhaven Marina,
5296S. Rivervliew Cir.
Homosassa 628-5545
MASON HELPERS
Exp'd and reliable.
Transportation req'd.
$10.50 hr. 352-302-9102
or 352-400-0274
MASONS

$18 hour, O/T $27 hour
Marion County
352-529-0305
METAL BUILDING
Erectors, Laborers
All phases pre-
engineered bldgs.
Local work. Good
starting salary. Pald
holidays & vacation.
Call Mon-Fri, 8-2,
toll free, 877-447-3632
MOBILE HOME
REPAIR TECH
#1 Dealer has
opening for highly
qualified person.
Must know Dry Wall &


Vinyl Lap Siding.
Only Top notch
person for Top Pay.
Must be able to
supply own truck
Call 352-621-9181
MONACO COACH
CORPORATION
Service Center
Leading RV
manufacturer is
currently accepting
applications for skilled
Automotive paint
and body repair
technicians at our
Wildwood location.
Previous experience
Is required. Apply to:
Monaco Coach Corp.
4505 Monaco Way
Wildwood, FL 34785
Fax: 352-330-3852
EOE/DFWP


PAINT & BODY
COMBO PERSON
NEEDED
Exp. Only Apply I
TEAM WAYNE AUTO
(352) 746-3222

PIKE'S
ELECTRIC
Bonded Lcensed
Residential &
Commercial
Lake Sumter Polk
Don't miss the
opportunity to work
for the fastest,
growing electrical
contracting business
In Central Florida.
Many positions may
be available at our
Groveland/
Wildwood branches.
SIGN ON BONUS
MAY APPLY FOR
RESIDENTIAL
ROUGH LEADS &
RESIDENTIAL
TRIM LEADS
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
Top wages and
excellent benefits,
Including health &
dental, 401K plan.
Company trucks are
available for some
positions. Valid DL
required. Helper
positions also
available.
DFW, EOE
Apply today.
Openings will
fill qulckl
352-748-6251

PLASTERERS
& LABORERS
352-344-1748
PLASTERERS NEEDED
Immediate opening.
Must have drivers
license, 18 yrs or older.
Days, (352) 220-8505
Eves. (352) 860-1502
Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed In Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

POST CLOSER

Experienced only,
for busy Title Co.
Fax resume to
(352) 637-4413
or 637-0340

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED

Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/2 years
driving exp. Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply. 24/6 shift.
Good Pay.
Long Hours.
Call 352-489-3100
Qualified Carpet &
Vinyl Installers

New construction.
Top dollar paid.
352-344-1500

ROOFERS
Experienced. Must
have own tools &
transport. Drug free
work place.
Call (352) 637-3677
SMALL ENGINE
MECHANIC
P/f, pay commensu-
rate w/ experience,
Call (352) 564-2025 or
727-919-1853
SPA MFG
hiring Fiberglass help.
Lamlnators & Chop
Gun Operator,
(352) 748-0044
STRUCTURAL
DETAILER
Senior structural steel
detailer and plans
checker for local
long-span building
manufacturer. Must
have 5+ proven years
exp. & be proficient In
AutoCAD. Excellent
benefits & environment.
Send background
resume to:
P.O. Box 130, Crystal
River, FL 34423
STUCCO LABORERS
PLASTERERS
(352) 302-5798
TRIM CARPENTER

352-726-4652

F 'TRUCK DRIVER
CDLCLASSA I
I Local, Must have
forklift experience
and know the area.
ESTABLISHED 1

726-7828/302-0943
WANTED:
1,000 SIGN ON
BONUS FOR
*EXP. RESIDENTIAL
MAINTENANCE/
SALES TECH
*SERVICE TECH
*A/C INSTALLER
Your tools, clean
license. Well estab-
lished local company.
Year round work, Great
pay. Co. vehicle. Call
for details & appt.
(352) 860-2522

. ^^
t-j ji-


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$4000 To $6000
MONTHLY

Join a national effort
to assist In the
enrollment of the new
part D prescription
drug plan for retirees
on medicare.
Duties Include:
Education and
distribution of part D
materials. You will
work in pharmacies
and senior centers In
your local area. train-
ing
Is provided.
* Call Scott Schultz
today to secure
full Informatton
(362) 726-7722


On Top of the World
Communities
BUILDING MAINTENANCE
Exterior & Interior renovation
& repair experience required.
Hands-o experience in all
facets of building
maintenance.
BENEFITS
401 K Medical -Dental
Vision Life
Applications available at
Guard Gates
8447 SW 99" ST RD
Ocala, FL 34481
Come
"Find your place in
the world"
DFWP/EOE
























































































APPLY ATTHE KEY
RAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DEPT. AT 130 HEIGHTS
AVE. INVERNESS, FL
34452 OR CALL 341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833
EXT.347) EOE
KEY PINE VILLAGE
ICFIDD
LOCATED IN CRYSTAL RIVER
HABILITATIVE TRAINING
INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS!
Rewarding work assisting
deveopmentally disabled adults
learn basic iMng skills In a
residential setting. 2nd shift
3:30 pm-12:15 am.
On the job Training. Proof of
HS Diploma/GED required.
Background checks and
employment health physical
will be required for
post-Job offer employees.

AAA EMPLOYMENT
MAINT. SUPVR. $10
Seml-retired welcome
DRIVER $6.25+
Semi-retired welcome
SALES P/T $6.15+COM
Real Estate Sales A+
TITLE PROCESSOR $11
Exp. w/Land Titles
P/T CLERICAL $8
After training $10

For Appt. Call 795-2721
NO FEE TILL HIRED


AUTO DETAIL/
LOT PERSON
FT must have exp. In
auto detailing, small
amount of lot work. Fax
qualifications 746-7736

---. m
Best Kept Secret
In Citrus County
* No Weekends-
I M-F, 9-5 I
*I Unlimited Earning
Potential
S'Good People
S Skills a Must
I No Experience
Necessary
Paid Training
SEOE/ Drug Free
Work Place
To apply, call I
| 866-777-1166, ask for
Janne or Darlene
IL .10=- -=-=-No--NAI


BonWorth
(Ladles wear
factory outlet)
Inverness Regional
Mall
1488 US Hwy 41N,
Inverness FI
is looking for

*F/T MANAGER
Must be available
days, nights, and
weekends. Flexible
hours are a necessity.
We offer competitive
wages, benefits (F/f)
and generous
employee discount.
EOE
Fax Resume or letter
of Interest to
407-397-0744 or
or email
csr@bonworth.com
or Call
1-877-472-1537
and leave a message
for Lort at ext. 326
Retirees are
encouraged
to apply.


'


X cinauljar
,, ,u 3
Cingular Wireless
Authorized Agent
Clngular Wireless
Authorized Agent
Stores In Citrus
County & Marion
County, looking to
fill Full & Part Time
positions.
SSales Associate
SShift Supervisor
Positions require
proficiency In
Microsoft Office.
Please Call Shirley
(352)726-2209
Ext. 228 or send
resume online to
cwrs@spectrumglobal
networks.com

CLASS A CDL
LICENSE
DRIVER NEEDED

For Septic System
Installations. Full time
position. Apply within
Monday- Friday
between the hours
of 7:30am 5pm
A Able Septic
2190 N. Crede Ave
Crystal River
(352) 795-1554

CLERK
Apply In person,
Coastal Station,
1017 SE Hwy. 19,
Crystal River

CONSTRUCTION
LABORERS
WANTED

No exp. necessary
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
Interview, 860-2055

Crystal River
Energy Complex

CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP
For fast pace office
environment. Detail
oriented, flexible
schedule, computer
skills and able to
multitask. Exc. phone
and customer service
a must. Part time to
temp full time. $8.00
per hr. Fax Resume
by July 25th to
352-563-4506
Securitas Security
Services USA, Inc.
Is an Equal
Opportunity Employer
DEPENDABLE
CLEANING TECH
For Evenings. Good Pay
w/ Benefits.
(352) 748-4855

DIESEL
MECHANICS
Experience
required. For trucking
company, Benefits.
1-800-833-8725

DOCK ATTENDANT
Part-time, Seasonal
work Apply In Person:
Riverhaven Marina
5296 S Rivervlew CIr
Homosassa,
352-628-5545
DOCKSIDE
ICE CREAM
Part time. Must work
nights & weekends.
Over 18. Apply in
person 300 NW Hwy.19,
Crystal River,
11am-9:30pm.
EXP. LAWN CARE
HELP NEEDED
Must have own trans.
(352) 628-9312

On Top of the World
Communities

WARRANTY SERVICE
PROFESSIONAL
Full time. Experienced in
new home warranty and
repair, strong customer
service skills required
CONSTRUCTION LABOR
Full time. Must be
experienced w/
construction site work,
hand tools, valid FL driver's
license
BENEFITS
401K- Medical Dental
'Vision-Life
Applications available at
Main Guard Gate
8447 SW 99s ST RD
Ocala, FL
Come
"Find your place in the
world"


/


GOLF COURSE
MAINTENANCE

Sugarmlll Woods Golf
Club. Apply In person
2 Cypress Circle
Homosassa
HIRING
ATTENDANTS
Apply In person, ULC
Game Room, 1239 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Unit 1,
Homosassa. 564-0079
HOUSEKEEPERS &
LAUNDRY AIDES

Avante at Inverness
Is currently accepting
applications for
Housekeepers and
Laundry Aides, full
time positions
available.
Excellent benefits.
Please apply In
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness, FL

HOUSEKEEPERS &
LAUNDRY AIDES

Avante at Inverness
Is currently accepting
applications for
Housekeepers and
Laundry Aides, full
time positions
available.
Excellent benefits.
Please apply In
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness, FL
HOUSEKEEPING

Part Time. 20 Hours
Guarantee. Hours Vary.
Flexible Schedule. Able
To Work Weekends.
Relate Well To People.
Able To Uft 50 lbs.
Accepting
Applications.
Rainbow Rivers Club
20510 The Granada
Dunnellon
(352)489-9983
























JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
JOIN OUR TEAM

Established food service
Company Is looking for
All positions. Please
Apply in person,
Mon thru Fri. between
1pm-5pm at
KENTUCKY FRIED
CHICKEN
1110 Hwy. 41-N,
Inverness and
849S. Hwy. 19,
Crystal River
LABORER
Mobile home set-up.
352-249-0879/427-9349
LABORERS NEEDED
No exp. necessary
Benefits offered. Valid
Drivers Uc. & Heavy
UIfting Required
Gardners Concrete
8030 Homosassa Tn.

LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Need Experlenced
Lawn Maintenance
Person. Must have
valid driver's license,
795-5117, if no answer
leave message.
LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER

looking for Delivery Driv-
er, warehouse. Room
for advancement.
Benefits, 401K. Apply In
person Morgan Bros.
Supply 7559 W. Gulf to
Lake Hwy, Crystal River.
LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER ,
Looking for Inside sales,
counter, warehouse
help. Room for ad-
vancement. Benefits,
401K. Apply In person

Hwy, Crystal River,
LOOKING FOR A
CAREER & A TAN?
Lots of hours, lots of
work. Will train. Good
benefits. Call Mike Scott
Plumbing, Ocala
352-237-2888
MAINTErANCE
REPAIR & SECURITY
Requires ability to work
hard, full time Including
Saturday and Sunday.
Must be a team player
and have valid driver's
license. A Drug Free
Workplace and Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Located In Homosassa,
352-628-4656
Modular Office
Building Installers


Be willing to travel.
Call anytime, Including
weekends.Valid DL
(352) 563-0921
MUNRO'S
LANDSCAPING
Is seeking exp'd land-
scaping personnel.
Must have valid driver's
license. (352) 621-1944
PAINTER
Experienced painter
to strip and remove
wallpaper, paint
ceilings, walls and
trim.
Call jobllne
352-291-7007
or apply in person
TimberRidge Nursing
& Rehab
9848 SW 110th St,
Ocala
EOE/DFWP


C."-" General
c= Help


CLASSIFIED


BE/ILLS

Join Beall's one of Florida's fastest
growing retail department store
chains. Beall's is seeking a
dependable individual to perform
daily cleaning tasks and other store
custodial responsibilities as needed,
Required Schedule is
Monday through Saturday 7am-I lam

Beall's offers excellent company
benefits (major medical coverage not
available) and a pleasant working
environment. Qualified candidates
should apply in person at:
Beall's Department Store
2851 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34453
637-6250
S Beall's Is an Equal Opportunity Employer


CITRUS COUNTY (EL) CHRONICLE


PARK ATTENDANT
Primarily manual work
at the assigned park
maintaining the park
grounds, cleaning
facilities and
repairing equipment.
Keeps records, assists
customers, Previous
customer service
experience. High
School diploma or
G.E.D Certificate.
Starting rate
$6.59 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto Fl 34461
no later than Friday,
July 29, 2005.
ADA/EOE

POOL SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
Exp. requested but
not necessary. Will
train, senior citizens
welcome. Apply In
person. Mon-Frl
8am-3pm1233 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy.
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE AT
LOCAL MARINA
Must have knowledge
of computers & be
able to work early
mornings & weekends
352-795-3552
Ask for Chandra

PRE-SCHOOL
TEACHER
F/T Exp. only
(352) 344-9444

PRODUCTION
WORKERS

Dietrich Metal
Framing, located In
Wildwood, Florida, Is
currently looking for
full-time permanent
Production Workers.
Candidates must
have the ability to
read, lift up to 50 lbs.,
and possess basic
math skills and
MUST KNOW HOW TO
READ A TAPE
MEASURE
ACCURATELY.
We offer vacation
days, holidays, health
Insurance, 401(k)
Plan, bonuses and
morel Apply In person
Mon,-Frl., 9 am 4:00
pm, between 7/25/05
through 8/05/05 at
Dietrich Metal
Framing,
721 Industrial Drive,
Wildwood, FL.
EOE/AAP
PRODUCTION
WORKERS

No experience needed.
Gulf Coast Metal
Products
Homosassa
Call between
7-11am, M-F
(352) 628-5555
RANCH HAND
ANIMAL
CARETAKER
1 Person Only. Stable,
possible room & board
& pay. Repairs, lifting,
cleaning & caretaking.
(352) 795-2959
ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS'
Exp Only. Paid
Vacations, Benefits.
352-347-8530













SERVICE WRITER
Service Writer needed
with comp skills must be
customer oriented 75
Truck Service Ctr, Wlld-
wopd, call Richard
352-748-7575
SWIMMING POOL
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
Discount Pool & Spa
352-527-3999


LABORERS
Mobile Home Set-Up
for MH Services
(352) 628-5641
7075 W Homosassa Trl
TOWER HAND
Bldg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
DFWP. Valid
Driver's License. Steady
Work. Will Train
352-694-1416 Mon-Frl
WAREHOUSE
WORKERS

Immediate Opening.
For Crystal River Area.
Lift up to 201bs.
7am-4pm Mon-Frl.
(352) 622-2040
WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast I
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.jom



BAKERY HELP
& PKG & DELIVERY
EARLY MORNINGS
Apply Monday Friday
before I Oam at
211 N. Pine Ave., Inv.
Cleaning Position

Dependable, team,
player w/refs, good
driving record 212-1032
CNA NEEDED
Wed. & Sat. evenings
to care for wom-
an In her Inverness
home at $8.50/hr.
Call Joe
352-726-1067

P/T PROGRAM
ASSISTANT
Before School
Monday-Friday
6am-9am
After School
Monday-Friday
2pm-6pm

Programs In Crystal
River, Homosassa
Inverness & Lecanto
Call Jo at:
(352) 341-2507,
between 1 am 6pm





TYPIST/
PRODUCTION
ASSISTANT

Type editorial copy
for hand written/
typed sources Into
the computer.
Transfer copy from
email, and disk,
code and edit
properly. Newspaper
production
knowledge needed.
High typing speed
and high degree of
accuracy required,
high stress, noisy
environment.
29 hour part time
position. Monday
through Wednesday,
Saturday, may at
times be required.
Fax Cover Letter
and Resume to
352-564-2935
Qualified applicants
must pass
drug screen
EOE_




ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowingly
accept
ads that are not
bonaflde
employment
offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.




FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY
JOIN THE
INDUSTRY
LEADER
Start your own
business with as little
as $1,500 down!


CLEANING CONCEftlS\
V Guaranteed Customers
V Complete Taining & Support
V Equipment & Supplies
V Guarsnteed FInancing
Our Secret
can be your Success!
Over 7,500
franchise owners
servicing more than
36,000 accounts.
Franchise Opportunities
Available In
Central Florida
Call Now (800) 249-2532


ABSOLUTE
GOLD MINE!

60 Vending Machines
All for $10,995.
800-234-6982
AIN #B02002039
COMPLETE LAWN CARE
BUSINESS FOR SALE
All equip. & 90 + accts.
SW Ocala, asking
$49,500. (352) 572-6101
ESTABLISHED GREETING
CARD ROUTE In Citrus
County. Inventory Inc.

LAWNCARE BUSN. FOR
SALE 35 accts. All
equipment, 16FT trailer
$10,000 (352) 302-0441
Serious Inquiries Only


TRAVEL INDUSTRY
5.9 Trillion Dollar Travel
We Pay $1000/ sale
$1995 start-up fee
(877) 791-7486
(TP2263)
TURNKEY ICE CREAM
PARLOR/SANDWICH
SHOP. All equip + video
games & more- too
much to list, Fun family
atmosphere w/regular
clientele. Asking
$50,000. (352) 382-3647
VENDING- Snack, soda,
new machines. Excel-
lent cash flow, $8000
(352) 563-1928



START YOUR OWN
THRIFT STORE
$3000
(352) 860-0472



"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charllefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
4 Hitchcock Chairs,
circa 1940's excel.
cond,$500. obo
(352) 302-1911
LARGE WASH BOWL
& Pitcher. $50;
4 Greek Urns $100.
(352)465-65-97
Tool Box
large, old, wagon
makers box, no tools,
key lock. $350.
(352) 465-0853


-g

BAQUA SPA Weslo 207,
2 person, 135 gal
w/cover. Cedar
cabinet, temp control,
all supplies, extra filter,
$900. (352) 628-0298
HOTTUB, 4 person, 6' 11"
x 4.9' W x 26' D, very
good cond. hardly
used. $800. obo
(352) 746-1816
SPA, 5 PERSON,
Never used. Warranty.
Retail $4300. Sacrifice
$1425. (352) 346-1711
SPA's
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195. ,
Other models Aval.
(352) 398-7202
USED SPA
Leasury Bay 4 person
Spa MUST SELL 2yrs old
in good condition. Fits
thru screen door. mov-
Ing In Citrus Included.
$2800.00 OBO Call
302-1541 or 637-0358


me We
22 CU. FT.
SIDE BY SIDE
REFRIGERATOR
Ice & water In door.
$250
(352) 726-1761
A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS New In box
5 &10 year Factory
Warranties at
Wholesale Prices
42 Ton $827.00
-3 ton $927.00
4 ton $1,034.00
Install kits available
or professional
Installation also avail.
Free Delivery
-ALSO POOL HEAT
PUMPS AVAILABLE
Uc#CAC 057914
Call 352-746-4394
APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers.
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C., A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy.44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
Dorm Size Refrig.
$40
Microwave, $15;
13" Color TV, w/remote.
$15. (352) 726-9728
DRYER
Works good. Heavy
Duty, large capacity.
$75/obo
(352) 726-7537
GE Dishwasher & Stove,
white, $75. ea,
or $125. for both
4 person Hot Tub,
w/ cover $400.
(352) 564-8578
LIKE NEW GE
Spacemaker
microwave, black,
wall mount, paid $350,
Sell for $150
(352) 726-3093


MICROWAVE, TABLE
TOP, GE, 1100 watts, 1.8
cu.ft., turntable, $75
(352) 746-7355
NEW KENMORE
DISHWASHER
$250.
(352) 621-0250
NEW KENMORE
over-range
microwave, $200.
Sony entertainment
center, $200.
(352) 621-0250
REFRIGERATOR
Whirlpool Regal, Top &
bottom, off white, ice
maker, frost free,$100.
(352) 637-3360
UPRIGHT FROST FREE
REFRIGERATOR, almond
20 cu.ft., works great,
$125 (352) 634-0127
WASHER & DRYER Exc.
cond. like new, $250 90
day guar. Free del.& set
up 352-797-6090
WHIRLPOOL LAUNDRY
CENTER extra Lrg. cap.
washer & dryer, (all In 1-
dryer on top, washer on
bottom) A steal at $399
(352) 527-2981
WHIRLPOOL WASHER &
DRYER, very good
cond., $100 each
(352) 527-7747
Will deliver locally
White Westinghouse
Dryer, $150;
White Westinghouse
Washer, $175.
4 yrs. old.
(352) 344-4326


^1----

2 HUGE AUCTIONS
Antiaues/Collectibles
Sat July 30 @ 1pm
811 US19 Cr Riv
Sandy Bottom
Antiaues/Dec Arts
Sat, Aug 6 @ 10am
Courthouse Sq, Inv
Info 795-2061 or
charllefudge.com
MC,VI,Cash 10%BP
fudgeAUl1593/AB1131

r AUTOMOTIVE
& MACHINE
SHOP AUCTION I
'SAT. JULY 30-
174 N. U.S. 41
INVERNESS
PREVIEW: 8 AM
AUCTION: 9 AM
Transm., A/C&
I Mach. Shop equip.
Amoco brake lathe,
1000's New partsI
See Web: www.
dudleysauction.comrn
DUDLEY'S AUCTION I
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12% Buyers Premium
2% disc. cash/check


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956
BED, single, w/ book-
case headboard,
practically new, used
2 weeks. $200.
352-527-2807

BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
*PT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat. Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sale
Prices.Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139 King
$199. (352)795-6006
Breakfast Set, table w/
leaf & 4 captains chairs
$125., Triple dresser &
3 night stands,
good cond. $145.
(352) 746-7312


Metal Roofing
Direct from
Manufacturer


Tri-County


Metals, LLC

(Located Behind the Dollar
General Trenton, Florida)

Many colors in stock -

All Accessories
Cut to Length
Delivery Available
State of Florida
Approved

for fast quotes call:
(352) 463-8400 or
(800) 823-9298
www.tricountymetals.com,


w/opener and 4 screen
doors, $300,
You remove.
(352) 746-5234
HUNTER DOUGLAS
DOOR LITES
New In box, 22"x64",
$165 list, $80 firm.
(352) 228-7458





complete with monitor,
mouse & keyboard, 56K
modem, Windows ME,
$100. (352) 564-1564
CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DELL COMPUTER, 17"
screen, printer & table,
$200.
Trailer hitch,
Draw-Tite, $50.
(352) 637-0513
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net
IBM APTIVA. Lexmark
printer, IBM Selectric
typewriter, UMC,
Memorex scanner- free
Compaq printer. $410
for all or sell separate.
352-637-1078


I/ZHPr KUUltK
CUTTERS, $75
GAS WELD EQUIP., $75
Both In good condition
(352) 637-4718
10" COMPOUND SAW,
,$65
12" BELT SANDER, $50
Both In good condition
(352) 637-4718
16" SCROLL SAW
$60
10' radial arm saw
$200 Both In good
condition
(352) 637-4718
CHAINSAW
Stihl16", 028, w/case
$175/obo
(352) 382-4928

AUTOMOTIVE
& MACHINE
SSHOP AUCTION I
*SAT. JULY 30-
174 N. U.S. 41
INVERNESS
AUCTION: 9 AM
Transm., A/C &
Mach, Shop equip.
Amoco brake lathe,
1000's New parts
See Web: www,
dudleysauction.com
DUDLEY'S AUCTION .


(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246





after 8amr
WELDER, Uncoln,
Weld-Pack 155w/gas
cony, $600.
Stick Welder, Lincoln,
$100.
(352) 637-9512




Toshiba Flat Screen TV,
w/VCR & DVD player.
Cost $500 sell $0.
(352) 795-6895
Magnavox Color TV
w/remote 27"
$25.
(352) 344-2321
SONY SURROUND
SYSTEM, $125;
SONY SURROUND
w/speakers, $80.
(352) 382-4928
TV, Toshiba, 20" w/
remote, excel picture,
works good, $60.
(352) 746-6813


1947 FARMALL
SUPER A
$1200 or best offer.
Runs good
(352) 637-3333




LARGE PICNIC TABLE
with 2 benches, solid,
well built, painted off
white, $45.
(352) 746-7044




** MOVING"
Sony record player,
radio, $105.6-piece
white wicker furniture,
$125. All excellent
cond. (352) 628-2839
2 Chaise Rocker/
Recliners, 1 Burgundy
velour, 1 Tan Microflbre.
exc. cond.
$75. each/obo
Call (352) 726-9355
2 off white table lamps,
modern 37" H, $10 ea.
I lamp, gray/lavender
ceramic, 24" high. $7.
(352) 746-7044
3 PC. Blue Sect. w/hlde-
bed & recllner, $250;
Blonde king Med. bdrm
set w/2 night tbls, Ig.
ladies dresser w/2 mir-
rors & men's bureau,
$275. (352) 795-1947
4 Honeycomb Shades
$10 ea/obo
Platform Swivel Rocker/
Recliner, light burgundy
exc. cond. $75/obo
(352) 726-9355
6' Cherry Wood Curio
Cabinet $175. like new,
Cherry wood coffee
table; sofa table &
end table set. $250.
(352) 795-7905

"MR CITRUS COUNT"


Afibiih










CITRUS CouNTn' (FL) CHRONICLE




7 DRAWER white wash SOFA, C
dresser & night stand 2 Lane i
$400 or best offer (352
(352) 341-2949 TW
Brown Microsuede
Rocker/ Recliner (352
6 mos. new. $200.
(352) 726-0559 WX
ENTE
BUNK BED SET. Dresser & ENT
desk, multi-colored, 2 70" wi(




Solid Oak w/Hutch (352
$200; Oak Entertain-
menths oldCenter $65
2 end tables, 1 coffee (352
table, $25.
(352) 527-2336 Wicker ,(
C T chairs$


white, Large, beautiful, io ta


excel, cond. $500. obo (352
corner TV wall unit, WO
mission style, $100, obo 6
352-302-1911 O
SolD d Oak w/Hutch (352
$200; Oak Entertain- WOOD
meant Center $65; glass tal




697-2466 chairs,
Curve Sofa baker's
white, Large, beautiful, Irg. store



excel condo. $500. obo (352
corner TV wall unid t,









wood chairs, 2 ca t., 4 needs r
mission style, $100. obo b6
352-302-01911525
DINETTE Quality set with (352
48" bevelled edge glass
top on rattan base & 4




cushioned rattan chairs
like new $725 (352)
726-7949 before 7pm
Dinette Set 48" Round 2 WI
expands. to 70" 6 all One goa



wood chairs, 2 capt 4 needs
side maple finish $2. bth.
(352) 382-0525 42"
DINING ROOM TABLE MART
Sw/4 chairs, riding
re& hutch.r325. (352




one time, $250. Call Dot CR
(352) 746-43522 6HP
Lg. Dinning Room Table 22" seR
with 6 chairs $2 21" Toromu
$250 obo(352




















Solid Oak Entertain- Model 2
ment center; F n; cut x

By appt. only (35
(352) 344-3078 (352
FASHION DOUBLE DAY CRAFTs
BED w/p up two er chair t,r
ma/ ottessesomancluded.rn 3 whee
Sycamore green, used (352












one time, $250. Call Dot CR
or Will, 352-564-9172, RIDIl4
LAMPS (5) $10-$15 14/2HP Bi
each. (5) Maple Bar Engine,
Stools, $20 ea. Coffee good co
tbl. pine. $25. (352









(352) 6795-1947 CAGX

Large Recliner,blue mowe
new, Asking $275. $75.o(3
(352) 249-4460 Craft
Lg. Dinning Room Table 20" Rota
& 6 chairs, $250. mul
Stereo Record Player


















LIGHT OAK (352
dinette set w/leaf, LIKE NEW
coastered choirs ECS c
Console $00. (352
(352) 746-4057 CL
Lg. Living Room Set; LAWI
Solid Oak Entertain- Model
ment center; Futon; cut, exc
Computer table. $1500
By appt. only (352












Hugh two person ch25 air Cars.
w/ottoman, modern 3 wheeast
cream & beige pattern Jol
w/ rolled arms, $850. Riding
obo (352) 637-5335 GX 75,e


CENTER (3525











4oa hgh by 44 wide LI
35 TV included. $700 or MURR










best offer 352-422-387.5OHV EH
LIGHT OAK (352
dinette set w/leaf, LIKE NEWI

coastered chairs ECS co
w/wood frame, $200. bagger,;n
(352) 344-8679 $2,200 (









LOVESEAT M
Beige, rocker & recliner. Riding










$300. Exc, c5nd. All g
(352) 746-0937 352
MATCHING COUCH &
LOVESEAT. Also couch SELF
and chair, $125 per set. me
Both good condition. Mas S
(352) 628-3195 or mower,;4
(352) 476-3192 (352
Mission Oak Computer RIDI
deskl two book cases, Master
filing cabinet, solid oak, and c
$800. $425 (35
(352) 627-8879 Self Pr
MISSION STYLE oak side- Mower
board, 601 17"D 42"H wheel
separate glass top $335 OHV, Es
SOLID CHERRY kingsIze (352
bed,4 posters are wood
& metal, $625 344-8720 SFihl, St
MOVING- 4 cha M
6 pc bedroom set rangeoo
fulstablze mattress, $325p (352
5 pca bedroom set, twin
mattress, $255. All
excellent.352-628-2839
MOVING
Big man overstuffed
couch, $175. 2 large beaut
recliners, $60 each.d- (35
All excellent cond. HFi SC
(352) 628-2839 Eve ytl
MOVING SALE-lst days GRE
4 pc leather living rm
groupexc. co50nd. $150p oakbo CIT
wall unit $2000. Two c
leather recliners $400. IHauset
6 pc pine bedroom ers, toolt
$1000. (352) 7264-1515
New Wicker Love Seat CRYI
$50. Mo
New, Gel mattress Lots I
$100. (352)
(352) 628-1408 212-31
Patio Seta wit
40" round glass top Ma
table, & 4 chairs MOVIN
w/ cushions $25l range

(352) 795-4647 HO2

























Tub Chair; Exc, Cond. (352


$300 for both 200 MII
(352) 527-0785 for sale,
SOLID OAK TABLE, ble offer
4 chairs, $275.
Loveseat, $75.
(352) 563-5137 2
STEEL DESK, 60x20", solid
wood top, Broyhl!I SPE
swivel rocker with 6 line
slipcover. $75 each 6 line
or best offer, Items
(352) 344-1982 $1-$15
Sugarmlll Woods $151-$
Dib. Bed w/ boxspring, $401-$
complete comforter set $801-$
$300. Dib. dresser, CALL
maple w/ mirror, single CU
maple chest $375. S6
(352) 382-9040 726
The Path's Graduates, 56
Single Mothers, Two
Needs your furniture. merct
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed, private
Call (352) 527-6500 (Non-
USED FURNITURE Some
BARGAINS Ma
Upright piano, double
bed, sofa sleeper, 200' Airh
comfy chair, long table, Paflos
etc. Call Dave 527-9062 Gun
for appt. to see and Gas Stov
directions to 947 W. Chang
Colbert, Beverly Hills $25. (3


HAIR, $200 set.
recllners, $175.
2) 563-5137
/IN BED
$50.
2) 527-9248
VASH OAK
ERTAINMENT
CENTER
de, fits 32" TV,
$100.
) 746-5460
Settee, w/ one
$150. 1 metal
ble 4 chairs $75
) 527-0075
METAL round
>le, 48", 4 capt.
with matching
rack, 84"H with
age bin, $350
) 527-8467
OD TABLE,
hairs, $250
OP DESK $250
) 637-0780




IEELHORSE
EN TRACTORS
od shape, one
epair. $650 for
352-220-2374
CUT 12.5HP
ERCUT Classic
mower, $325
) 344-9697
RAFTSMANN
elf propelled.
, self propelled.
75 each.
) 564-1776
SMAN 19.5HP
riding mower,
250 obo
) 637-4912
AFTSMAN
NG MOWER
riggs & Stratton
42" deck, very
condition. $450.
2) 344-5448
*SMAN riding
r, 18'/2 HP, 46"
,ck, $550.
r self-propelled,
52) 746-7357
tsman, 6HP,
ry Push Mower,
ch or bag
$50.
) 795-4647
IB CADET
N TRACTOR
2146. 14HP, 38"
cellent cond.
or best offer,
) 382-7347
EMOVAL OF
, motorcycles,
,TV's, jet ski's,
,lers. 628-2084
hn Deere
ng Mower
'HP, 32" blade,
d condition
$800.
) 795-4647
IKE NEW
RAY MOWER
42" cut, $500.
) 795-4303
'EXMARK 13HP
6" walk behind
controls. new
never Installed,
352) 860-1416
IOWERSI
&walk-behind.
guaranteed.
-628-2161
9URRAY
-PROPELLED
power, $75.
er Cut riding
12' deck, $400.
) 746-7357
ER, 12/42
Cut, red, runs
uts good. First
352) 344-5255
spelled Lawn
, Scotts, large
real, B&S 6.5
:c. cond, $150
2) 344-2799
Ting Trimmers
55 $100.
S60 $25.
d condition
!) 795-4647




EARLY HILLS
Garage Sale
at, Sun Only
hing Must Go
Barbour St

RUS HILLS
lold, comput-
s. Sun. 9a-2pm
Jenkins Ct.
STAL RIVER
ving Sale.
of Furniture,
) 563-6361/
178/212-3889
MOSASSA
IG SALE. Gas
heater, furn, Ig.
352) 628-6884
MOSASSA
g. Sat, & Sun.


ding Dress,
16, long train,
il, pearl beads,
sleeves, gloves
urse, $350.
2) 344-1644




N BARRELS *
8 Each
60-2545
IONED GLIDER
$45;
BOY HUNTER
Recliner, $50.
Q) 746-5168
GALLON
ISH TANK
h stand, all
rules $150 obo.
i) 621-0474
!RORS, 4' x 4'
any reasona-
(352) 746-3762

2005

"CIALS
s 10 days
totalling
400......1.50
800....... $15.50
1,500....$20.50
CHRONICLE
ISTOMER
SERVICE
-1441 OR
63-5966
o general
handise Items
per ad,
e party only.
Refundable)
e Restrictions
ay Apply

ose w/flttings &
da air Staple
n, $100/obo
se, works good
ed to Electric.
152) 344-8795


0IXLI ,.MKrVUKI
$800 or best offer
(352) 726-2508
25" Sharp TV,
$100
Graber Bike Rack,
$50.
(352) 726-0406
ABEKA Home School
Curriculum, 4th, 7th
& 8th grade, $150.
8x10 Kennel w/canopy
2 dog houses, &
cement pavors $150.
(352) 637-4206
Above Ground Pool,
$100
20 Cubic Ft Freezer, $50
(937) 564-0277
Air Cleaner,
Honeywell, 3 sp.
w/ hepa filter,
new $200. sell. $75. obo
(352) 637-0799
CAMERA BAG, DOMKE,
New, Heavy Duty, $100.
CAMERA TRI POD,
Professional, $125.
(352) 341-2399
Carlton Sofa Bed,
$275. white wicker
rocker, $50, both
like new. Call
(352) 726-0040
CARPET
1000's of Yards/In
Stock. Many colors.
Sacrifice352-341-2146
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
SHOP AT HOME!
COMPLETE TRAILER
HITCH for Chevy
Venture, Olds,
Silhouette, Pontiac
Transport or Montana.
New $120. Sell for $60.
(352) 489-9970
CRAFTSMAN
pressure washer,
2600 psi, 7HP $275.
Golf clubs, bag & cart,
lots of balls & tees, $50.
(352) 637-0513
ELEC. HOSPITAL BED,
special mattress with
side table, $450 COMM.
8FT BEVERAGE COOLER
30 case capacity, $500
352-697-2659
352-793-6762
ELECTRONIC METERS
& Instruments from
50 cents to $15
(352) 746-4279

36" woodburning. Used
one year, blower, flue,
flashings, cap & acces-
sories. All for only $375.
(352) 726-5077
FISHING STUFF
Trolling Motor, 28 lbs.
Uke New. $75; 4-0 Penn
Reel & Rod $50.
(352)465-6597
Futon, $75;
Small Maple desk, $75.
(352) 726-9728
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Moving,Cleanauts, &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Uc#0256991
(352) 422-5000
JUKE BOX, Prestige,
NSM ES 160. $1100 obo.
DESK, steel, commercial
$100.
Inglis (352) 447-4240
10am-4pm
KENMORE, DRYER, works
good, $100 obo
ANTIQUE PIANO, good
condition, $500 obo
(352) 726-2618
PATIO SET, 2 chairs,
loveseat, glass coffee
table, new cushions,
$200 POOL VACUUM
with hose, $25
(352) 746-1767
PLAY STATION Caddy
with storage, 15 games,
and accessories, $100
60 CD Changer, $50
(352) 344-8449
Ask for Laura
Shower Glass Doors,
gold trim, $50.
All excellent.
352-746-5031
TRUCK BRA, fits F100
pickup, only $20.
(352) 726-5077
TV PROJECTOR
$395
(352) 344-2947
Two Regular Size
Dog Houses
like new $25. ea.
Jack LaLanne
Power Juicer, new $50.
(352)-628-4054
Water Distiller
produces 30 liters
of distilled-water dally,
stainless steel $350.
(352) 527-8879
Window Air Condition.
$25
24' Aluminum Ladder
Warner, $100
(937) 564-0277




1104 JAZZY ELEC.
WHEELCHAIR with lift,
8hrs. use, $2,500 Obo
352-697-2659 or
352-793-6762
CRAFTMATIC
ADJUSTABLE BED,
$1200 OBO
(352) 212-9210
DELUXE POWER CHAIR
Cost $5600. Only used
about 6 hours. Like
new. Asking $1200.
(352) 637-0230
ELECTRIC LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR
Excellent condition.
Brown fabric. $150
or best offer.
(352) 382-7347




Conn Spinet Electronic
Organ & bench,
many voices $250.
(352) 382-0525
FULL DOUBLE KEYBOARD
ORGAN. Exc. condition.


fold-down top &bench.
Must sell, Great buy at
$495 or best offer. No
reasonable offer
refused. (352) 795-6876
Great Package Deal:
Epiphone Electric Play-
er Pack that Includes:
Special Guitar, Hard
Case and Gig Bag, 10
watt amp, tuner, extra
strings, picks, pitch pipe
and book $250.00
Call: (352) 527-2480
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music.
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
ORGAN Kawal KL2,
Exc. cond. complete
w/ bench,
Original $2,900
Will Sacrifice for $750.
(352) 344-2799


ORGAN, Yamaha, full
pedals, $400.
Baby Grand Piano,
good cond, $950.
(352) 726-2658




Treadmill, Proeform GLX
760, $400.
(352) 382-3895
Universal Home Gym
like new, $150.
(352) 726-2426
(352) 422-3493




7' POOL TABLE
Balls and accessories
Included. Very nice
cond $150 obo. Call
(352) 465-6456 or
(352) 613-0010
For Sale,
Men's Golf Clubs
Ping eye, used, left
handed, 3 woods, 6
Irons, & golf bag $75.
(352) 465-2591
GOLF CART, EZ-GO
electric, excellent
condition, $1200. obo,
(352) 746-9211
GOLF CLUBS
Set of left handed
ladles golf clubs, $75.
Also ladles right
handed clubs, $55.
(352) 726-2644
KING COBRA 454 Comp
Driver, 9 deg. loft, reg.
flex w/mitt, 2 mo. old,
$275 (352) 746-5966
OAK GUN CABINET
holds 6 long guns,
lockable, glass doors
and bottom storage
cabinet, $175
(352) 344-8509
POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
leather pockets,
Life Time Warranty,
$1,295
(352) 597-3140
STEVENS 410 double
barrel, $500 RANGER
double barrel, 16
gauge, $450 Both like
new (352) 344-5311




18FT CAR HAULER
with ramps,
$900 obo
(352) 302-0441
8X16
DUAL AXLE
DROP GATE
LAWN TRAILER
$1500 or best offer.


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
2 SUN CONURES
with 2 cages, $1,000
(352) 341-1648
6 Mo. Old Blk. Min.
Schnauzer, with vet &
reg. papers. $350.
(352) 228-2046
African Grey Parrot
7 yrs old, needs hand
ling & very Ig, cage. '
$1,000/obo. 220-4866
AKC MINI-PINS
"The perfect small
companion.' 9 wks old.
Black & rust. M/F. $500.
Inglis, (352) 447-2370
BABY COCKATIELS
$30. Young adults,
$25. (352) 726-7971
BLUE & GOLD MACAW
still hand feeding, I'll
train you to hand feed
$700 (352) 726-7191
CHIHUAHUA'S
Born May1, shots,
papers, health cert,
$500. (352) 465-6280
COMPANION CATS
Female cats-sweet,
healthy, spayed,
shots-perfect for seniors
$25-$40 352-476-6832
DECLAWED CATS
Himalayan, Siamese,
long-haired, others,
neutered, shots, tested
$80-$125 352-476-6832
FABULOUS FELINES
Exotic breeds, cats and
kittens, healthy, neu-
tered, shots, tested,
$80-$150, 352-476-6832
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $15
Cat Spaved $25
Doa Neutered &
Spaved start at $30
(352) 563-2370
JUST OVER 1 YR OLD
MALE FERRET, cage &
all accessories, $150
firm. Please call for
details (352) 637-5545
LOST WEIMARANER
puppy, approx. 3,mos.
old. Wine & purple
color, vie. Old
Homosassa Fire Dept.
(352) 621-0484
MINI DACHSHUND
Male, born March 17,
AKC Reg. Had 1st shots.
Asking $250. (352)
746-2086 or 476-7008.
ONE AKC BOXER
PUPPY LEFT
Health Certificate
$500. (352) 344-3581
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Cute & Cuddly
w/ paper. $550.
(352) 726-6103
RAISED W/KIDS
Padagonlan conure,
$150 -2 Quaker parrots
$150 each.
(352) 795-9343
STUD FOR FEMALE
BLOND LAB Must be
calm & good natured.
Share puppies.628-2313
TWO 4' TAME BALL
PYTHONS. Large cage
and accessories
Included. $150 obo.
(352) 465-6456 or
(352) 613-0010




15" BLACK WESTERN
SADDLE leather &
Cordura, very good
cond. $150 firm. Also
lots of misc. tack
(352) 746-2271


MUST SELL
Two Western Pleasure
Horses. Easy Keepers,
527-1963
Registered Miniature
Horse, asking $800.
worth $1,500. Must Sell
(352) 628-9780




1987 20HP JOHNSON
Elec. start, w/controls,
runs exc. $475.
(352) 634-5300
50hp Mercury Thunder
Bolt, has not been
taken apart, Possible
head damage,
Make offer
(352) 341-1569
'96 JOHNSON 150
Saltwater Series, just
serviced and ck'd.
Exc. cond. $3500
Days, 352-267-4830
Air Conditioner, Marine
carry-on 7000 btu, cool
for 12" x 12" hatch,
$500. obo
Call (352) 489-9569
Boat Trailer
for 18 ft, boat,
fair cond.
$200.
(352) 527-9697
EVINRUDE 9.5HP
excellent condition,
1973, $400
(352) 697-0078
New Electric Motor
Moto brand, 441b thrust,
cost $250. org. sacrifice
$100.
(352) 795-8047
T TOP w/ 2 place center
console, complete
controls, gauges
steering & live well,
pumps & all hook ups,
cooler seats, Asking
$1,200, (352) 302-4532




YAMAHA
1993, Waverunner 650,
runs like a Yamaha..
Great, $1,200 OBO.
(352) 527-4887
YAMAHA
2003 1200 SUV 4 seater,
2 stroke, w/traller only
175 hrs. great cond.,
garaged, complete
service 6/05, swim lad-
der, $350 in accessories.
$7,000 (352) 621-3185




$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & Trailerst
No FeesI352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
0000
THREE RIVERS
MARINE


We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES !!
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U.S. Highway 19
CrWstal River
56165510
2 KAYAKAES
$495 each
(352) 795-9280
after 8am
20' PONTOON BOAT
Fiesta-New P/T floor,
carpet, lights, No Trailer
$2500 o/b/o
352-212-9718
ALUMINUM BOAT
12', semi-V-hull, no title,
$200. Crystal River
(352) 302-6069
BAYLINER
Bowrider, 4 cyl I/O,
engine rebuilt, new
upholstery & cover.
Nice. $4000 obo.
Trade for pontoon?
352-795-8792
CAROLINA SKIFF
18'8", 60hp Yamaha,
Low hrs, 24 volt auto.
trolling motor(never
used) lots of extras
(352) 382-3352
CAROLINA SKIFF
'97 19 'Semi V 90HP T&T
Johnson, CC, SS, GPS,
fish finder, $5,600
(352) 637-6034
CHAPARRAL
'86, 187 XL 96-150
Evinrude & trlr. Lots of
extras, runs great
$3,500 obo/trade? 352-
344-4434 613-5801
CHECKMATE
21', Bought new 1994,
2000, 250 MercEFI, low
hrs, GPS, ship to shore,
new all aluminum
trailer, to many extras
to mention, $8,500.
(352) 489-7770
CRISCRAFT
1960, 55, Constellation,
3 state room, twin 871
Detroit, radar & GPS,
Great live aboard or
cruiser, $89,900 OBO
Will trade for land.
Possible Financing.
(352) 344-4288
(352) 302-7234
FISHING BOAT
12 ft. gheenoe with
trailer, New seats and a
live well. $800 Call
212-9193 or 344-0902
after 6 pm.

CONSTRUCTION
SALE
Here We Grow Againl

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS
17' to 23'
SWEETWATER
PONTOONS
15'-24'

POLARKRAFT
JONS
12'-20'

POLAR OFFSHORE
21'-23'
CLEAN PRE-OWNED
BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days


GALAXY
20', 1986, cuddy, Kept
in high & dry, new mo-
tor, low hrs. Exc. cond.
$6500. (352) 795-7335
GHEENOE
2002 4HP Mercury.
trailer, $1,500 or trade
for 25HP outboard
(352) 697-0078
JON BOAT
12', Aluminum w/ 4hp
Johnson & home made
trailer, $600 OBO.
(352) 220-6055
MAKO
23'2", 225 Johnson
Ocean Runner, new
steering, trim tabs, dive
platform, canvas, all
electronics Included,
Boat has been
completely redone.
Asking $16,000/obo.
(352) 447-1758
NEW BOAT TRAILERS
At dealer's cost
or less Final Summer
Clearance on all
alum. & galv. In stock
352-527-3555
CLOSING END OF
MONTH! CALL NOW!
Bargains! Don't Wait




MODEL
YEAR
CLOSEOUT
Up To

|4000








Pontoon, 48HP,
evinrude, w/trailer
$4,000. (352) 341-1507
PONTOON
18' Stardust, '98 trailer,
25HP Johnson, new
carpet/tlres, bimlni,
many extra's must
see/sell $3,500. obo
(352) 464-1616, Mike
PROLINE
20' 1973, Rebuilt '89
200HP Johnson, solid,
runs exc. w/2 axle galv.
trir. $5300. 352-634-5300
PROLINE 20'
'73. '86 Evinrude 110HP
trailer, needs TLC.
$2,000/obo
352-795-4779
ROBALO
22'. 2000, 200HP
Yamaha, low hrs, CC,
w/trailer $12,500 obo
(352) 238-2249
SEA SPRITE
16', 1982, low hours, '97
Yamaha, 60HP 2 stroke
outboard. Very good
cond. W/traller. $2900.
(352) 860-0277
SILVERTON
FUN BOATI 1987. 34 Ft.,
runs great $25,000 OBO
(352) 249-6982 or
249-6324
STAMAS
1975, 26' w/ 10ft beam
and fly bridge.w/ 1985
twin 140 hp I/O engines,
new upholstery and
curtains, triple axle
trailer, $8,500.
(352) 464-1077
STINGRAY
'81, 17ft., sports boat,
120HP merc cruiser, in-
board outboard, asking
$1,700. (352) 527-1263
SUNBIRD
17' Day Sailer. Main &
Jib Genoa. Cuddy, trail-
er, excel, sailing for only
$1000.352-341-8465




giwmf


SPECIAL
2000 Stott Craft
115HPTohatsu
$8,995o
1976 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448



WELLCRAFT
1996 20' ski boat, runs
and looks great $8500.
(352) 621-0250
Fishing Boat, motor. &
trailer., 14' Mercury 9.8
Runs like new. Tr6ll mtr,
fish finder, many extras.
$1500. obo Must see.
352-464-1616




CALLISTA
27FT By Carriage 1987 E
350 rear bedrm 10 gal
HW, 7 new tires, exc.
cond (352) 344-2288
CARRI-LITE
31' fifth wheel by
Carriage w/ Ford F250,
460/V8. $12,500 for
combo. 352-726-7355
COMO "RV"
SALES
NEW PRE-OWNED
TRADE IT-SELL IT-
OR CONSIGN IT
Ask for Tony or Jerry
(352) 344-1411
FOUR WINDS
03, 32', Chateau, Class
C w/slide, Ford V10,
12,500ml, every options
Immaculate cond,
$47,500, (352) 726-2670
PATRIOT
made by Beaver. 1993
37'. Only 50,000 miles.
Cummings diesel, new
Michelln tires, too many
extras to list. Exc. cond.
Kept under cover.
(352) 795-4314
PROTECT YOUR RV


14x40FT alum, cover
$1,500 and you move
(352) 726-8293
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.comrn

| |l6\l( 1Ji?, -


MHr


'99 FORD TAURUS LX
T, o $ 3,995

Auto, Ar,Coupe,Sharp......$5,980
7 LINCOILN TOWNCARSIGNATURE
Triple White Ctrome, Nice...$6,995
'03 LINCOLN TOWNCAR, PEARL
17KMiles, Like Ne.........$22,900
MANY MORE IN STOCK ALL

I, '- 4


c=


01 Chevy Malibu 7990
01 Chevy Impala 7990
02 Dodge Intrepid 8990
02 Ponflac Aztek 9990
01 Toy.Tacoma 10,990
02 Ford Exp.XLS 13,500
02 Ford F-250 4 dr
"Diesel" 24,990
628-1411
TOYOTA CELICA
2002
80,000, Air Cond.,
Sliding Sun Roof, Single
Compact Disc, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Cruise Control,
$9500 OBO Call any-
time 352-476-3260 or
352-302-0816


SUNDAY,JULY 24, 2005 11D

TT r


(352) 746-2149
after 1:30pm
COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
'03 Ford Ranger Edge
8,500 miles
$12,990
628-1411*
VOLVO
2003, S40, 24K,
Garaged kept, fully
loaded, leather,
sunroof, $20,000 Crystal
River (352) 563-5882


SOUTH WIND
1994, 36' Diesel Pusher
Many extras, nice cond
$29,000/obo or trade
for Pick Up truck/ travy.
trr. (352) 748-0602
TOYOTA
1982 motorhome, good
transm. & motor, Interior
needs work, $600
(352) 860-1761




ATTN: RV/TT USERS!
Dish satellite system
w/2 satellite receivers,
$100. 20" RCA color TV
w/remote, $50.
(352) 564-1106
DUTCHMAN
'96 Signature LTD 33FT
5th wheel, slide-out,
fully equip. $13,000
(352) 341-6821
FLEETWOOD
2005, Pull camper, like
new, 18FT, $11,000
nego. (352) 726-8005
JAYCO
88, 20', sleeps 5, fully self
contained, like new
w/ hitch, $4,500.
(352) 726-8464 after
(352) 302-2521 cell
JAYCO
'95, 34' 5th wheel, 14'
slide, excellent cond.
Many extras. $11,500
obo. (352) 628-7414
RV PARTS EAZ-Lift hitch
parts, head 2 5/16 ball,
torsion bars, stabilizer,
all rated 10,000 lb. $135.
(352) 344-8509
SUNLINE
'94, 20', sleeps 5, Self-
contained. AC/heat,
Extras. excellent cond.
$6,500, (352)220-3688
TIRES, 2 PAIRS
2 Firestone P195-60R15
2 Cooper Radlals,
P185-60R14, good
cond, $12 each,
(352) 489-9569
TRUCK CAMPER
1993, 8', bath, shower,
roof AC, 3-burner
stove/oven.$4250. (352)
212-7838 or 220-1928
WILDWOOD
2000, 30, w/ slide out,
A/C, awning, queen
size bed, sleeps 6,
$10, 900(352) 726-6120




2 CLOTH Captain's
reclining chairs; 1
fold-out bench seat,
seat belts, matched
set, new cond. $300.
(352) 476-1835
ALUM. TOPPER
Off Mazda Pick up,
5'Wx6'7L $150/obo
(352) 476-1835
Car Engine
Magnum 360, long
block, roller cam, $250.
OBO.(352) 726-2426
(352) 422-3493
CHEVY
Set of 4 Crager Wheels,
215-65-15, like new $375
Set of 4 Prime Wheels
235-60-15, $175.
(352) 527-6529

w AUTOMOTIVE
& MACHINE
I SHOP AUCTION
*SAT. JULY 30-
174 N. U.S. 41
INVERNESS
PREVIEW: 8 AM
AUCTION: 9 AM
Transm., A/C &
I Mach. Shop equip. I
Amoco brake lathe,
000's New parts
See Web: www.
dudleysauction.com
I DUDLEY'S AUCTION I
(352) 637-9588
I AB1667 AU2246 I
12% Buyers Premium
2% disc. cash/check

FACTORY IN DASH
AM/FM CD player, 1996
2004, Ford/Merc/
ULincoln, $150.
(352) 382-4928
MACCO COMMERCIAL
air compressor, $500
ENGINE HOIST
$150
(352) 302-0441
SET OF 4
USED TRUCK TIRES
265/70/17,
$165.
(352) 527-1812
or 302-9498
Volks Cabrio 2000-2003
Front end Bra, Tonneau
cover, car cover $20
ea. Call (352) 527-9860













ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pmi Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR CONSIGN
98% Sales Success
No Fee to Seller
909 44W and US19-
airport. 212-3041
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, Jet ski's,
3 wheelers. 628-2084


AFFORDABLECARS
100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CAS
FROM-S325-DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
675-US 9-HOMOSASSA


COMO
AUTO SALES
rHOMOSASSA*
CASH CARS
95 Chev.Beretta $1,200
92 Buick Cent. $2,900
95 Merc.VIllager GS
$2,900
k 628-1411*

I.11 1N
30 MINUTE E-Z CREDIT
00 INIREPID.- $4950
4DRV6,AUTOAC CLEAN
98 MAZDu MPV4995
4DRVAUTO DUAL AC, NICE
97 JBPOI0K45975
4DR,6 CYL, AUO,AC, SHARP
1675-US 19-HOMOSASSA


COMO
AUTO SALES
INVERNESS*
'03 Mitsubishi Spyder
GS Convert. 17K mi
$16,990
344-1411*




100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CAIS
FROM-1325-DOWN
30 MIN. EZ CREDIT
1675- US19-HOMOSASSA


r
IF I


Auto

Truck

*RV

Sales &
Service
Get Financed!!

CALL JIM



'99 CHRYSLER
Concorde LXI,
561 Siver/Sage,
$9,488. Call Ricnard
726-1238
ACURA INTEGRA
'92 2 dr hatch, blue,
good cond., 1 owner,
CD, moon roof call
628-1732,$2800 obo
BUICK
1996 Century. Loaded.
18.240 MILES $6000.
Consider tools part
trade. (352) 489-2104
BUICK
'88, Park Ave, $795.
excel., running car. only
89k org. ml., needs
paint, AC blows warm
air. (352) 527-0009
BUICK CENTURY
'98 Good cond., cold
AC, High Mileage,,
$1000. (352) 382-7879
CADILLAC SLS
2 '0 1C,.-, m dl- 103,3 ,3
.r r.,; ril._, rriu I t -_ '
'. i."i 352-628-1969
or 352-228-2980
CARS. TRUCKS. SUVS
CREDIT REBUILDERS
$500-$ 10 00 DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19Alrport
564-1212 or 212-3041
CHEVROLET
'02 Cavalier, LS Sport, all
power equip. 1-owner
Adult driven, gar. kept
$8,500 (352) 422-6380
CHEVROLET
1993 Blazer S-10, org.
owner, new exhaust,
reese hitch, Reliable,
$995 (352) 344-8051
CHEVROLET
1996 Cavalier, well
maintained, 62K ml.,
$3,000 obo
(352) 637-1818
CHEVROLET
2000 Corvette
Convertible, yellow,
exc. cond. 77,000 ml.
$28,000. (352) 621-0300
CHEVROLET
'94 Cavalier R/S, 4-dr,
red, bik Int. V-6, auto
cold A/C, 131K, $1,250
obo (352) 637-5327
CHEVROLET
'97, Lumina, 4DR, V6,
god runner, new tires,
$2,300. (352) 465-0853
or 274-0385
CHEVY
1991 Camaro Z-28.
New paint, runs well,
needs TLC. $3200.
(352) 422-7599

COMO
AUTO SALES
INVERNESS*
'03 Chevy Corvette
convertible, 13K mi.
540,900
344-1411 *





95MAZDAMX6..$3495
V6,5 SP, NC, 2DR, S/R, SPORTYI

1675-US .H f ~ASSA


COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
99 Chevy Pdzm 5990
01 Ford Focus 6990
01 Saturn L-300 7990


CHEVY
1994 fullsize Blazer, 4x4,
new AC, new 33' tires &
lift kit. PW, PD, PS, CD
player. Runs & looks
awesome. $5500 obo or
partial trade. 344-4864,
ask for Jay.


CLASSIFIED


P H 0 N E [I] t qj


COMO
AUTO SALES
*HOMOSASSA*
'04 Ford Mustang
convert 40th edition
18K miles
16,990
628-1411*



HRE PAMY
I100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CARS
IROM-'325-DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US 19-HOMOASSA


COMO
AUTO SALES
*INVERNESS*
01 Ford Focus 6990
01 Dodge Neon 6990
02 Chevy Cavalier 7590
02 Mercury Sable 7990
02 Mitsub.Gallant 8990
04 Olds. Alero 9990
02 Pontiac GR/Am 9990
00 NIssan Quest
GXE 9990
02 Ford Escape 9990
04 Chevy Impala 11,990
02 NIssan Frontier 4d
Loaded 13,500
02 Jeep Grand
Cherokee 14,490
02 Dodge Raml500 29K
4 dr. Loaded 16,990
02 Chev.TahoeLS 18,990
344-1411*

Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
It off your taxes then
trading It In.
Donate It to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
DODGE
1989 Dynasty, good
cond. All the bells &
whistles 50K ml. $2,695
(352) 344-0227
HONDA
1989 Accord LXI, 4
door, black $2000 In
rims & tires. $1500.
(352) 601-3035
LINCOLN
1989 Mark VII. LSC, Sun-
roof, High output 5.0
eng. New tires, 90k ml.
$2,900. (352) 746-7729
LINCOLN
1996 Towncar Executive
series, very good cond
in and out, silver ext.,
gray leather Int. $5,995
(352) 208-2407
LINCOLN
'89 Towncar, Cartier
Exc. running cond,
Nice ride, clean,
dependable, $1,495
(352) 341-0610
LINCOLN
'96, Executive Pres. new
trans, & top, 109k hwy.
ml. $5,800. firm
(352) 527-6517
LINCOLN
'97 Towncar Signature,
all leather, 110K miles.
Excellent In/out. $5995
obo. (352) 344-1210
MAZDA
1990 MX-6, 114K ml.,
$1,400 obo, fully load-
ed, many new parts
(352) 726-4177
MAZDA MIATA
MX-5 2005
-180 miles, Air Cond-.
tfion; Power Steering,
Power Windows, Pow-
er Door Locks, Cruise
Control, Single Com-
pact Disc, $19,995
Black over Razor
Blue.Mint ConditlonI
352-746-9115
MERCURY
1992 Grand Marquis
AC, power everything.
Runs great. Looks ok.
First $1500. 564-1776
MITSUBISHI
2001 Eclipse, Silver, 85k,
alloy wheels, fully equip
1 owner, well malnt.
$8500. (352) 220-0998
MITSUBISHI
'03, Outlander, White,
31k ml. excel, cond.
$12,500.
(352) 628-3811
NISSAN SENTRA
GXE1996,4dr, PW, PL,
gd. cond. reliable, very
econ. $2250/ obo.
(352) 344-8882
PLYMOUTH
VOYAGER 1993, gd.
cond, air cold, Trans.
starting to slip, $250.
(352) 527-6500
PONTIAC
Grand Prix, 1994, good
dependable trans, very
gd. cond. $2400
352-634-6723/563-6450
PT CRUISER 2003
Take over payments
Maroon, great cond.
(352)586-1026
SATURN
1994, Wagon, 68K,
loaded exc. cond
$2,900 OBO.
(352)795-9090/422-7910
SATURN
1998 SL-2, white, 4-Dr.
46K ml., Power locks,
windows, security sys-
tem, cruise, tilt steering,
AC, stereo cass. $5,500
obo (352) 527-0763
SATURN
'96 SC2, 5 speed, motor
needs some work, $400
obo (352) 344-0571
Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

CIQ ll 1. ial,,.,,

TOYOTA
2002 Avalon XLS 26K ml
fully loaded, like new
cond., $18,000 obo


CHEVROLET
1988 2500, 350 engine,
auto., 8FT bed, high
Well malnt. Orig. owner,
$3,000 (352) 637-4428
CHEVY
'75, Scottsdale, 1/2 ton,
PS BP, auto, 350, new
tires, runs great $1450
(352) 344-4579
DODGE
2003 Ram 1500, reg
cab, SWB, auto, AC, CD
player; bedllner, trailer
hitch. Low mileage,
$12,000. (352) 628-0173
or (352) 613-0929
FORD
1990 F150, 302 V-8,
$2750. (352) 621-4607
FORD
1999, Ranger XL auto, 6
cycle, A/C, needs
engine, $2,500.
(352) 628-5700
FORD
2003 F150 crew cab.
32K miles. Excellent.


FORD F-150
'00, Ext. cab. new tires
ex. shape, single own
er, 108K ml. AC. AM/FM
CD $9,000. 795-8721



Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.comn



TOYOTA
2002 Tacoma, 5-spd.,
green, Book $10,900
Sell $9,900
(352) 344-4497
TOYOTA
'87, 4 wheel Dr., 16" lift,
44 ground hog, chevy
350Cl, $4,500. obo
(352) 795-7808










FORD
'99, Explorer Sport, 2DR,
red, gray int.,' keyless,
very sharp $5,500.
(352) 795-5062
JEEP
'95 Grand Cherokee,
exc. cond. runs great,
$3,500 obo
(352) 302-0441
JEEP WRANGLER X
2004, low ml., loaded.
mint cond. New
$23,900. sell for, $17,900.
352-228-7772

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com



TOYOTA
'99, 4 Runner, SR5,
green, loaded, low ml.
new tires & brakes,


SUBARU GL
1987, 86K orig. ml, Very
clean, $1,000 080
(352) 628-2879




1937 SS 100 JAG
replica VW power, all fi-
ber glass, beautiful car.
$5,800. obo, may take
motorcycle In trade
697-2659, 352-628-7594
CHEVROLET
1940 1/2 ton pickup,
$5,800 or best offer
(352) 628-5371 Iv.msg
CHRYSLER
1968 New Yorker
All original, excellent
condition, $6000.
(352) 726-7982
DATSUN
'79, Pickup, great cond.
61k ml. all org. equip.
$3,500.
(352) 628-3811
MUSTANG 1966
Very Good cond.
Asking $10,000
(352) 527-0669
OLDSMOBILE
'46, 98, 4DR, restorable
cond., extra parts, fami-
ly car, $3,000. Canton










CIIRus CouN'IY (FIL) CHIRONICLE


12D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


I LI


To listen and respond to ads using your


F, call 1-866-529-4742


To respond to ads at $1.99 per min, call


1-900-226-1602 Must be 18+.


To6 become emer cll -6626 -5 .1


CHANGE OF PACE
I'm a single mother of two, I think there is
nothing sexier than a nice southern
accent. I'm an honest, caring person, who
is in search of a honest man. V742589
HERE I AM
SWF, tallslender, pretty, brown/brown,
N/S, loves classical music, art, books,
intelligent conversation, boating; cook-
ing. Seeks rugged interesting N/S,
SWM, 57-63, for companionship, possi-
ble LTR. V223790
GOOD LISTENER
SBF, 50, 5'6", 145bs, black/brown, Ge-
mini, N/S, loves movies, long walks, and
occasional dining out. Seeking BM, 45-
55, into serious dating and relationship.
'661326
GOD-FEARING WOMAN
SBF, 44, three children, goes to church,
likes having fun and living life. Looking
for a loving, adventurous, spiritual, hard-
working man, 45-60, with same outlook.
V739060
FRIENDSHIP FIRST
DWF, 41, 5'5", brown hair, two sons,
looking for WM to share movies, dining
out and good conversation. 0739293
MY GUY WANTED
This 55-yr-old/ blonde young-at-heart,
seeks a guy of her own. Friendly, loving,
and kind who is ready for a relationship.
Looking for my guy, 47-57, N/S.
0589861
GAME-FREE LTR
SBF, 51, 5'4", enjoys cooking, church,
yard sales, flea markets. Seeking hon-
est, commitment-minded, family-orient-
ed SBM, 50-55, for LTR. No games, seri-
ous replies only V427683
CREAM OF THE CROP
Cute, 5'4", mature, blonde, good dress-
er, alert, no children, wants pleasant
connection. Hudson. V580103
WEEK WACHEE GIRL
SWF, 46, 130lbs, blonde/blue, smoker,
enjoys the outdoors, water, music, tv,
and chatting: Seeking WM, 45-55, smok-
er, with similar interests. Need a good
friend? 0I684286
WHAT'S UP!
GBF, 21, looking for sexy, sweet, honest
guy who likes movies, chilling and hav-
ing a good time, for friendship, fun and
more. 0729689
I AM SPECIAL....
I'm a fun-loving person who gets along
with everyone. I haven't met anyone
who has not liked me. I'm caring, kind,
have a big heart for others and love peo-
ple. V744166
SEXY BROWN EYES
I'm looking for an honest, down-to-earth
man, who can be just as silly as me.
Intelligence and activeness goes togeth-
er well and a goal-oriented stable man is
a plus. V741175
PEOPLE PERSON
SWF 57, 5'6", N/S, does a lot of hugging,
looking for neat, clean, honest SWM, 52-
70, for possible LTR. "'722071
NEW TO AREA
Attractive SWF, 42, slim, marriage-mind-
ed, no children. Seeking SWM, 35-58,
who is caring, honest, emotionally avail-
able. No games. '729195
HOPE TO HEAR FROM U
DWF, 52, young at heart, enjoys dining
out, nights on the town, exploring life.
Wishing to meet some special to share
dates, talks, laughter and possibly love.
V736860
ONE IN A MILLION
Attractive DBF, 43,5'2", 118lbs, mother
of 10-yr-old. Black/indian decent, in the
nursing profession.Looking for someone
who likes movies, flea markets, camp-
ing, beaches and cooking. V595051
OCALA ANGEL
Fun, sweet, caring, family-oriented SWF,
38, 5'4" blonde/blue eyes, enjoys beach-
es, quiet nights. ISO B/HM, 35-50, for
dates and possible LTR. V731166
SRING HILL AREA
DWF, 48, N/S, N/D, attractive, honest,
sweet, likes laughter, horses music.
Seeks DM, 45-58, N/S, honest, humor-
ous, caring, likes kids. V533300
GOOD FRIENDS
SWF, 26, 5', brown/brown, with 2 children,
smoker, loves classical jazz, rap, and soul
music. Seeking BM, 19-35, smoker, goal-
oriented, fun to be with. V570398
ACTIVE WOMAN SEEKS...
SWF, 39, looking for a SWM, 39-45, to
enjoy a good glass of wine with over a
great conversation.. V719170


KNIGHT AND SHINNING AMOR
I have a great personality, love to laugh
and really love water, I'm outgoing yet a
little shy. I'm very old-fashoned with a
slight twist. Treat me like a lady!!!
'Z727217
EASYGOING PERSONALITY
Educated, positive, level-headed, secure
SWF, 52, 5'2", blond/blue, willing to talk
things through, enjoys travel, cooking.
Seeking SWM, 50-58, H/W-proportion-
ate, with a similar outlook on life for LTR.
0469082
CHRISTIAN WOMAN
WF, 27, enjoys camping, going to movies
and having fun. Looking for a Christian
man, 25-40, who likes the same. If that's
you, call me. 0'673671
YOUNG & VIBRANT
Artistic SWF, 18, 5'3", 160lbs, brown/
green, smoker, N/D, enjoys drawing and
dancing. Seeking WM, 18-23, smoker,
light drinker k, for friendship. 718404
NEED A NEW FRIEND?
Devoted SBF, 41, God-fearing, mother of
1, interested in going to church, flea mar-
kets, strolls in the park, seeks SBCM,
37-53, w/similar interests. 0643952
HONESTY A MUST
SWF, 35, 5'4', N/S, blonde/blue, single
mom, overweight, seeks honest guy, 19-
55, who loves having fun. 0679735
IT MUST BE YOU
SBF, full-figured, 30, 5'5", Capricorn,
N/S, mother, seeks family oriented BM,
25-42, who knows what they want in life.
0r696938
BROWN EYED GIRL
Looking for a friend that's fun to be with,
into rock music, custom and classic cars,
movies, travel, animals, nature, and
more. Call and check me out. %916643
HEY, TALL GUYS
Attractive, well-built, long-haired, Libra
SWF, 50, 5'9", N/S, enjoys movies, trop-
ical fish keeping, cats, and music.
Seeking stable, honest, caring SM, 45-
60, 6'-6'6". Life is short. Let's enjoy some
together. '625057
MAKE MY DAY
Athletic SWF, 49, 5'6", N/S, enjoys the
music of Rod Stewart, loves Adam
Sandier movies, seeks SWM, 47-53,
N/S, who is into spending time outdoors.
0f721122
FRIENDS FIRST
SWF, 52, originally from Long Island, NY,
loves animals, nature, outdoors, enter-
taining at home, going out, very family-
oriented, loyal, good SOH, home proj-
ects, yard sales, seeking SWM, 48-62.
0735162
WHATTAYA SAY...
we go catch a flick? SBF, 31, smoker,
enjoys Las Vegas casinos. Seeking BM,
27-45, to chill with. 0685193
LOOKING TO LOVE...
someone. Want to date with possible
long term relationship I am a sexy
blonde 31, looking for Mr. right.
0f710152 "
MAYBE YOU'RE MY GUY
Easygoing SWE, 57, smoker, loves the
country life, country/oldies music, cook-
ing, camping. ISO outgoing man, 57-62,
who likes movies, dining, quiet times and
laughter, for sharing a lasting, loving
relationship. 0l588873
LET'S HAVE A GOOD TIME
SWF, 59, N/S, enjoys dining out, danc-
ing, cookouts, fishing, flea markets,
seeks special SWM, 55-65, to spend
some time with. 0r713370
NO TIME FOR FOOLISHNESS
Open SWF, 58, 5'2", average build, N/S,
really likes to go out for Italian food, loves
flea markets, animals, travel, seeks
SWM, 56-65, N/S, for possible LTR.
'Z714884
LOYAL AND LOVING
SWF, 46, N/S, seeks good, Christian
SWM, 35-60, N/S, who enjoys animals,
likes to walk, talk, hit the beach, shop at
the mall. 0'715937
FISHING, FOOTBALL...
and camping. SWF, 46, independent,
outgoing, enjoys camping, fishing, seek-
ing friend and maybe more later on,
who's a gentleman, 45-55, and enjoys
going out to a movie or dinner. 0729406
WHERE ARE YOU?
Honest SWF, 21, chubby, 5'5", brown/
brown, mother, Scorpio, smoker, loves
movies, flea markets, seeks man, 25-45,
for possible romance. 0l710346
LIKES COUNTRY LIFE
WF, 39, 5'2", 120lbs, looking for a gen-
tleman, 38-48, N/S. I enjoys working out,
going to movies, dining out, hiking, gar-
dening and most anything outdoors.
0564449


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GREAT WOMAN LOOKING...
For great guy, I'm fun loving, enjoy din-
ner, movies and love to dance. I'm an
active person, I enjoy the simple things
in life. Seeking someone to have fun
with. 0734342
NEW TO AREA
Jamaican lady, 55, N/S, university grad-
uate, former teacher, enjoys quiet
evenings at home, theater, dining out,
musicals, cookiin, sewing. Seeking mar-
riage-minded DM, 35-50, for good
friendship, possible LTR. 0r693050
EMOTIONALLY AVAILABLE
Independent, free-spirited SWF, 59, '8",
spontaneous, creative, N/S, enjoys
kayaking, camping, photography, travel-
ing, and good conversation. Seeking
WM, 55-68, N/S, who believes life is an
exciting adventure. '0708586
CALL ME NOW
SWF, 19, Scorpio, N/S, seeks mature
SWM, 19-35, who wants a commitment,
LTR, and will accept children. 0l738922
WE CAN BE TOGETHER
SWF, 44, marriage-minded, smoker,
homebody, would like to share evenings
in with a special man, 40-55, who likes to
watch movies, read, cook, go out on the
town. 0587120

Q ISO SINCERITY
SWF, 40, 5'6", single mother of 2 (son,
20, daughter, 11), smoker, works in nurs-
ing field. Seeking truthful, compatible,
fun WM, 30-45, for LTR. 0'681370
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
SWF, 5'7", big blue eyes, long blonde
hair, 43, likes music, art. Seeking intelli-
gent, open-minded, drama-free, sincere,
honest, loving SWM, 30-50, with good
sense of humor, for friendship first.
0404773
THIS IS MY TIME
41-year-old single mother of 2,
blonde/green, medium build, works in
the insurance field, loves to bowl, cook,
watch movies, work in the yard. ISO SM,
36-46, who likes kids. I498280
KISSES AND HUGS
Seeking true love, not lust. No cowards,
and no games please. BCF, 50, single
mom, seeks honest, mature, strong,
hardworking male, for a monogamous
relationship and true love. 0'840803
STOP LOOKING! READ.
DWF, 57, full-figured, blonde/blue, 5'3",
enjoys dancing, movies, occasional din-
ing out, cooking. Seeking S/DWM, 55-
65, for dating, possible LTR. 0853666
LET'S GET TOGETHER
SWF, 62, N/S, enjoys crocheting.
Seeking WM, 60-70, N/S, who likes to
cuddle, sample local eateries, watch
movies, and take walks. 0630231
BROWN SUGAR
SBF, 21, looking for someone, 21-30,
who is down-to-earth, fun, sweet, and
not really religious. 0645309
SEEKING PLEASANT MAN
WiWF, 60, would like to meet a WM, 55-
70, N/S, social drinker, who likes day
trips, going to movies and dining out.
0594035
LADY RANCHER
Widowed female, 54, 5'7", average build,
Taurus, loves horses and most other crit-
ters, country lifestyle, easygoing but
hard-working, not too hard on the eyes,
ISO SWM, 46-59, with similar interests.
0682019
SEEKING CHRISTIAN MALE
SBCF, 40, 6', large build, N/D, N/S, loves
kids, going to church, movies, more.
Seeking SWCM, 35-60, who loves life, is
very honest and marriage-minded.
0596730
A REAL MAN
Attractive SBF, 48, 5'5", N/S, in the med-
ical profession, likes movies, dining,
dancing, quiet evenings at home, long
walks. Seeking honest, mature SM, 35+,
N/S, financially stable. ''690857
ISO TRUE FRIEND...
and confident lover. SWPF, 47,
blonde/blue, very successful, N/S, seeks
a fun, fulfilling, romantic relationship with
WM, 42-57, N/S. 0720901
WITH LOVE
SBF, 18, 5'3", 120lbs, N/S, loves romance
movies. Seeking BM, 18-26, 5'4"+, N/S, for.
friendship, possible romance. '660691
JUST A CALL AWAY
Compassionate, kind, considerate SWF,
51, light auburn hair, 5'2", medium build,
enjoys people, likes cooking, travel,
boating, fishing. Seeking similar, loving,
active, open-hearted and true gentle-
man. 0232518
NEW TO THE AREA
SWF, 5'6", 1261bs, smoker, many inter-
ests, seeks SWM, 62-72, smoker, to
share the best years. 0646004
PRETTY WOMAN
SWF, 5'4", 1151bs, seeks SWM, 50-63.
You and I are in great shape, fun, active,
attractive, sensuous, clean, N/S, healthy,
kind, genuine, trustworthy, intelligent,
classy, secure. Call for further details.
0'956254
SEEKS ONE-WOMAN MAN
SWF, young 67, 5'7", N/S, has car, stays
out after dark, very active, romantic,
misses the things a woman does for a
man. Seeking WM, 66-79, who has sim-
ilar interests. 0536212
LIKES THE SIMPLE THINGS
WF, 5'2", 125lbs, blonde/blue, would like
to find a true friend. Someone who is
cheerful, pleasant to be with, likes long
conversations, dancing, dining out and
have simple fun. 52-60. 0515437
JUST BE YOU
SWF, 50, sincere, honest, caring, looking
for the same in a good-hearted, happy
man. Why not call? 0693109



GOOD-LOOKING GUY
WM, 39, brown/brown, in good shape,
wants to meet a WF, 30-41, to go out and
have fun with. '716349
HELLO SWEETIEl!
Well...l'm just a nice handsome guy look-
ing for a nice woman, with a nice body to
date, or maybe something more serious.
I love to talk, cook and dive. 0747075
A NEW BEGINNING
Commitment-minded DM, 47, 6', brown/
brown, 180lbs, ISO a special lady, some-
one who enjoys life, the outdoors and
classic rock, for sharing happiness and a
lasting relationship. '610840


NO COUCH POTATOES
Active, healthy SWM, young 63, enjoys
the water, boating. Seeking classy,
attractive, active SWF, 50-62, N/S, for
possible relationship. 0'757364
FUN, FUN, FUN
SWM, 46, 5'10", 170lbs, retired from the
navy, N/S, fitness-minded, low-keyed,
beach bum, surfer, seeks intelligent WF,
42-50. l666383
LOADS OF FUN
SWM, 64, 5'11", 200lbs, enjoys '50s and
'60s music, dancing, gardening, animals,
very open-minded, seeks full-figured
lady who is fun to be with. 0690280
PLAYFUL PISCES
SWM, smoker, love to meet special
woman, 44-60, loves music, movies, the
beach, sunsets, quiet times, romantic
nights. Call if you want to be loved.
Spring Hill area. '679528
SEE WHAT HAPPENS
Single male, 33, 240lbs, Cancer, N/S,
would like to meet a woman, 21-50, N/S,
who likes sports and trying new things.
"7651103
LET'S GET TOGETHER
Open-minded, compassionate, affec-
tionate DWM, 35, 58", 160lbs, smoker,
enjoys cookouts, movies. Seeking WF,
25-45, H/W proportionate, smoker, who
wouldn't mind being swept off her feet.
0680448
SEEKING GREAT LADY
I'm 31, divorced now single white male,
ISO an honest, dedicated person for a
long term relationship. I enjoy movies,
dinners by candle light and walks on the
beach. 0742132
LET'S HAVE SOME FUN
Easygoing SWM, 36, medium build,
185lbs, hard-working, father, likes Nascar,
the outdoors, swimming, children. Seeking
understanding, easygoing, sociable lady
to share movies nights, dinners dates,
friendship, fun, possible LTR. 0'734071
WORTH YOUR CALL
SWM, 41, N/S, likes boating, camping,
fishing, the outdoor activities, bowling,
movies, more. IS independent, opinion-
ated SF, 33-46, N/S, who enjoys some of
the same. 0735988
SPECIAL LADY WANTED
SWM, 48, enjoys fishing, movies, cook-
ing, quiet times at home. Seeking SWF,
38-52, in shape, down-to-earth, who
appreciates a good loyal man. Friends
first. 0'412132

"* LET'S HAVE FUN
SHM, 63, dark/blue, average build,
seeks lady, 57-63, N/S, who's pleasant
to be with, enjoys life, likes going to
movies, day trips, dining out. 0719784
BABY BLUE EYES
Slim SWM, 29, 58", N/S, likes the con-
venience of fast food, relaxes by playing
sports, seeks woman, 18-45, who wants
to be treated right. 'l624851
NEW TO THE AREA
SBM, 33, Cancer N/S, seeks sweet,
spontaneous, creative .female for friend-
ship, possible LTR. Don't miss out.
Contact me! 0727862
NEWTO THE AREA
SWM, 33, enjoys the outdoors, sports,
movies, walking and biking. Seeks SF,
26-42. 0745660
GREAT DAD
SWM, 33, smoker, single dad, full-time
student, has weekends free to share
with special SWF, 24-36, smoker.
0'717513
LAID-BACK GUY
SWM, 6'1", 200lbs, in good shape, likes
flea markets, going to movies, boating,
fishing. Looking for an easygoing, happy
WF, 38-45, who likes the same things.
0628452
MAN OF YOUR DREAMS
SM, 29, wants to find the right woman so
we can start our life together. I like play-
ing pool, cooking, nights on the town,
cuddling, quiet moments. Your turn!
0733663
LIVE WELL, LOVE WELL
31 year-old master electrician, enjoys
salt water fishing movies on sunday,
and the local gym. Seeking active, fun,
spontaneous SF to share and explore
life with. let's talk! 0722723
FULL OF LIFE
SM, 34, 5'11", average build, likes to go
out for Italian or Spanish food, loves trav-
el, amusement parks, pool, seeks single
woman, 21-45, who is serious about
finding love. 0720385
LOOKING 4 REAL FRIENDSHIP
SM, 31, looking to meet a special, hon-
est lady who's not afraid of taking
chances, has positive attitude and loves
life. I'm intelligent but not boring, funny
and reliable. Interested? 0l739803
THE NEW GUY IN TOWN
SM, 46, brown/blue, enjoys movies, din-
ing, keeping active. Seeking loving, like-
minded lady to share friendship, good
times, good talks and possibly more.
0726480
WANT TO HAVE SOME FUN?
I'm an easy going guy who wants a
woman to be friends with. I enjoy movies,
walks, eating out and whatever.
r744824I
TALENT SEARCHING
SWM, 67, 5'11", 170lbs, N/S, enjoys fly-
ing, Disney parks, church, square danc-
ing, travel, movies, Nascar, dining out,
animals. Seeking A/W/HF, 30-60, N/S,
who shares a passion for travel.
10717150
CUDDLY BEAR
SWM, 45, 6'1", 2501bs, brown/green, li-
ves locally, smoker, enjoys Nascar, foot-
ball, bowling, pool. Seeking petite WF,
25-45, smoker. 0256201
BE YOURSELF
Brown-complected SBM, 30, 5'10", N/S,
seeks very spontaneous, energetic, out-
going, nice-looking woman, 20-42, N/S,
who knows how to make her own deci-
sions. 0674730
OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
SWM, 33, 6', 1751bs, Cancer, marriage-
minded, smoker, mechanic, single father
of 2, seeks SWF, 32-42, for wonderful
relationship. 0675133
LET ME KNOW YOU'RE THERE
SWM, 19, 6', 1801bs, smoker, tan com-
plexion, looking for a female, 18-23, who
is good-looking, has a nice sense of
humor, enjoys life. 0690796
VERY OUTGOING
SBM, 29, 5'11", athletic build, Virgo,
smoker, loves to have fun. Seeking BF,
25-45, smoker, for friendship, possible
romance. '633324


HALLELUJAH
SBM, 30, Libra, N/S, enjoys church,
movies, dining out. Seeking a God-fear-
ing BF, 29-38, N/S, who loves church.
W634527
BUILT, HANDSOME
Successful, fun-loving SWM, 45, will
promise you the most fun you've ever
had in your life! If you love romance,
travel, adventure, excitement, health, fit-
ness, and fine dining, call me! 0740711
WAITING FOR YOU
SBM, 24, 6'1", smoker, brown eyes, 1
tattoo, seeks nice, pretty SBF, 24-24,
N/S, for possible relationship. 0l723565
READY TO BE ROCKED?
SWM, 47, Harley rider who is looking for
someone to occupy the spot behind me
on road trips. Seeks SF, 25-55 who likes
to explore. 0P732955
SEEKING MISS RIGHT
SWM, 55, likes good conversation,
movies, beach walks, travel. Seeking a
woman, 35-59. Let's meet for coffee and
see where it takes usl 0"662489
GREAT MAN AVAILABLE
At present time, looking for a lady to date
and have some fun. I enjoy the company
of youth and smile with happiness. Be
great to be pen pals. 0726368
HARD-WORKING MAN...
with loving arms, friendly, outdoorsy
man, 45, a good listener, communica-
tive, caring, open and supportive, ISO a
lady who's not afraid to be herself or
afraid of love. 0M739160
SINCERE AND HONEST
SWPM, just turned 62, 5'9', 230lbs, N/S,
starting over, new in Ocala, active, work-
ing, travels, outdoors, barbecues, fish,
Nascar, cards, golf, trips to the islands,
home is great, one-woman man.
0'721166
INCURABLE ROMANTIC
SWM, 55, likes long walks, holding
hands, reading, dining out, gardening.
Seeking SWF, 50-65, with similar inter-
ests, for cuddling in front of the tv. Good
times, possible LTR. Let's talk. V723244
ROAD LESS TRAVELED
Through life's twists and turns, a calm
spirit keeps everything in perspective.
SWM, 48, has a passion to find an keep
that special person keep me going.
Seeking SF, 38-52. 0733585
LET'S SNEAK OUT...
and go to the beach. SWM, 67, tall, slim,
happy, trusting, funny, rock/gemstone
hound, loves horses, clean, neat, has
great children/grandkids, cook, reader,
church, always interested in you, SF, 56-
69. V739633
LIKE TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS
SWM, 24, looking to make new friends in
town, seeking SF, 18-25, to share some
off time with. '734268
NOW, TOMORROW, FOREVER!
SWM, 59, active, secure, no baggage,
laid back, romantic, enjoys flea markets,
yard sales, car/bike shows, dining out,
dancing, beach. Seeking life partner, Su,
48-58, for honest, loving, meaningful
relationship. 0730690
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
WIWM, 60, retired, smoker, loves county
life, looking for Like-minded SWF, 45-65,
with interests in horses and the easy life,
for fun, dating, romance and possible
LTR. '725854
LET'S CHIT CHAT
Cute SWM, 36, 6'1", seeks SF, 26-42, for
movies, dinners, dancing, long walks
and talks. Must be shapely, funny, down-
to-earth. 01116986
I WANT IT ALL
Active, attractive SWM, 55, 5'7", 175lbs,
athletic build, Cancer, N/S, seeks
woman, 25-45, N/S, for LTR. '677768
WHY NOT CALL?
DWM, 42, heavy machinery operator,
likes '70s/'80s rock, exploring life.
Seeking easygoing, energetic woman to
share outdoor adventures, boating, 4-
wheeling, life, laughter and possible LTR.
0701300
CITRUS COUNTY
DWM, 50, 6'2", brown/blue, attractive,
with 2 children, N/S, enjoys cruising,
weekend getaways, and good conversa-
tion. Seeking attractive woman, 40-55,
H/W proportionate. 0710072
LONESOME
SWM, 72, retired, 5'2", N/S, N/D, likes
dining out, movies. Looking for slender,
fit W/HF, under 5'3", 135lbs, 60-80, for
friendship maybe more. 0"718022
RETIRED MILITARY
WM, 71, 6', 180lbs, brown/blue, enjoys
bowling, dancing, long walks, exploring
new eateries and new places. Searching
for a lady, 60-80, who is broad-minded
and affectionate, with similar interests.
0716376
WANTING LONG LASTING
Average type of person, good sense of
humor, quiet, creative, sensitive and car-
ing. Looking for the person who has the
right chemistry and that I can click with.
0728327
IT'S ALL TRUE
Widowed WM, 47, 6', with 2 sons, smok-
er, enjoys camping, football, and watch-
ing car racing. Seeking WF, 35-50,
smoker, for honest-LTR. 01709372
WIFE WANTED WEEKIWACHEE
WM, 49, 6'1". Enjoys gardening, arts,
and crafts. Seeking single/divorced WF,
age open, N/S, N/D, for permanent rela-
tionship. 0729298
V MEND MY HEART
Attractive WM, 43, 5'7", 150lbs, seeks
attractive WF, for repairs. Tools must
include love, trust, communication,
friendship, and possible marriage, with
TLC bedside manner. Hurry! Need meds
ASAPi! 0680509
MR MELLOW
Handsome, passionate SWM, 54, athlet-
ic build, from Israel, marriage-minded,
N/S, heavy equipment operator, seeks a'
gentle WF, 18-48, N/S, for fun and dat-
ing. 0665111
A NEW BEGINNING
SWM, 62, 175lbs, Libra, N/S, active,
seeks WF, 50-60, active and healthy, for
good times and possible LTR. '433493
JOIN ME
Compassionate, fun-loving, light-heart-
ed SM, 64, Cancer, enjoys boating, sim-
ple times. Would like to meet a kind,
attractive, fun female to share dinner
dates, quality talks, romance and then
who knows? '631763
RETIRED MILITARY
DWM, 48, 5'10", 1851bs, brown/blue,
moustache, lots of fun, likes outdoors,
the beach, camping, fishing, more. If
you're interested, leave a message.
0670253


STARTING OVER
WiWM, 72, 5'9", 180lbs, N/S, social
drinker, very active, likes dancing, dining
out, travel. Looking for SWF, 65-75, for
companionship, travel, talks, fun times.
0679020
I'LL COLOR YOUR WORLD
SWM, 57, 5'6", 160lbs, in great shape,
active, healthy, N/S, loves painting and
sailing. Seeking adventurous, sponta-
neous WF, 40-57, N/S, for LTR.
V686477
LET'S TALK
WIWM 70, looks younger, very ener-
getic, enjoys dining out, sports, the
water, air boating, flea markets. Looking
to meet a caring, fun woman who enjoys
the same. 0V695772
SIMILAR INTERESTS?
SWM, 20, 5'9", 140lbs, brown/blue, sm-
oker, seeks woman, 18-24, for movies,
games, sports, and more. '584882
HOPE IT'S YOU
Hard-working SBM, 41, 145lbs, enjoys
children, amusement parks, woodwork-
ing, weightlifting, running, fine dining and
good movies. Seeking a nice, affection-
ate, romantic lady to treat like a queen.
V607942
SEEKING LTR
Attractive WM, 64, 6', dark/blue, smoker,
likes cooking, oldies, movies, dining out,
RVs, ISO WF, 50-60, with average build,
who likes country lifestyle and travel.
V610257
HORSE NEEDS RIDER
SM, 54, 170lbs, 5'9", ruggedly hand-
some, horse ranch owner, Capricorn,
enjoys road trips, cook outs, riding,
dancing, socializing, country life. Seeks
adventurous, well-adjusted woman, 42-
56, country and horse lover. '435846
LOOKING OUT MY BACK DOOR
Fit SWM, 63, 5'8", average build, N/S,
N/D, big fan of Creedence Clearwater
Revival, seeks SWF, 50-70, N/S, for pos-
sible LTR. V64682_2
REALLY GREAT GUY
DWM, 56, 59", medium build, enjoys the
outdoors, fishing, loves flea markets, din-
ing in/out, 50s to 60s music, bowling,
tennis, horseback riding. Seeking SF for
possible relationship. V433284
SINGLE FATHER
WM, 42, enjoys sports, Nascar, swim-
ming, fishing, the ocean, more. Looking
for WF, 25-50, to possibly share life with.
'658668
ROMANTIC-AT-HEART
WM, 47, looking for a woman, 35-47,
who likes fishing, boating, gardening,
country life, romance, country music,
playing pool, more. V665851
WHAT I REALLY WANT
SWPM, 49, 6', 195lbs, brown/brown,
smoker, loves traveling up and down the
east coast.'Seeking a sincere, financially
stable WF, 45-53, N/S, who is not a bar
fly. 1664898
I YARD DOG, SHORT HAIR
Affectionate, house broken, al paper.
shots, warm feet, cold nose, .doesn't,;
drink from porcelain or chase cars or
cats, likes to dig, seven vear rold. SWM,
ISO SF. V948521
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
Sharp, good-looking, rugged 67 year-old
ex-marine, seeks attractive, older, finan-
cially secure female to travel and have
fun with. If you like to have a good time,
let's talk. '204397
IT COULD BE YOU
WiWM, a youthful 79, knows how to treat
a lady, enjoys the outdoors, fishing, hunt-
ing, camping, boating. ISO attractive
SWF, 50+, N/S, for friendship and possi-
ble LTR. V550451
AS THE SUN SETS
Hard-working SWM, 40, father of 1, smok-
er, likes going out to beaches, movies,
enjoys watching the sunset, seeks SWF,
34-46, for possible romance. V682823
INTELLIGENT, HONEST...
young-looking, dependable, attractive
DWPM, 43, 5'6", 140lbs, N/S, D/D-free,
w/daughter at home, loves sports, read-
ing, movies, ISO intelligent, non-smok-
ing female. '713278
INTERESTED?
SWM, 47, 5'10", 170lbs, well-groomed,
seeks SWM, early to mid-40s, for com-
panionship. I enjoy fishing, beaches,
cooking, gardening. Call! 0"678334


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CITRUS COUvTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DODGE
1995 4x4. 40K. V-8, bed
cover Michelln,1 owner.
Showroom cond, $7500
obo. (352) 382-1981

FORD
1989 Ranger, 4WD, V-6,
auto, AC, new tires.
Bedllner. Clean. $1900,
(352) 400-1951

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

I0 .










-- -
"MR CITRUS COUNT?













ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


'04 Pontiac Mont.
34K mi. 7 pass.
loaded, Blue
$13,888. Call
Richard 726-1238
CHEVY
1992 Astro, excellent
shape, 87,000 miles,
$4000 or best offer,
(352) 344-8892
CHEVY ASTRO
'95 68k, $4800.00
(352) 637-4388
CHEVY LEISURE VAN
1994, qn. bed. TV,
Beautiful interior. Teal
Ithr. Cost new today,
$75,000, Just $6,900.
(352) 527-9245
CHEVY VENTURE
1999, Van, Red, Dual
AC, 3 row seating, syn-
thetic oil, great mpg.
$4,950, (352) 564-1390
DODGE
02, Grand Caravan EX,
6 pass., auto duel air,
pw, pw side/rear doors,
stereo/Cass/CD, 88K
$9,850. (352) 382-1710
(352) 476-1828
DODGE
1991 Caravan. Body
good, no rust. Runs
great. Ice cold air.
Asking $1800. OBO
(352) 726-2330

FORD
1994 E-150, Mark 3
conversion, high miles,
runs good, clean,
$2,500 (352) 860-0608


GET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE


FORD
'96 Windstar GL V-6, 3.8
cold AC w/rear. Quad
seating. PW.crulse.150K,
$3130. (352) 212-3823

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Local Autos
Online at
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( J, l l l. T.,


TOYOTA
2000 Siena XLE, fully
loaded, leather, 51,700
ml. $12,999 obo.
(352) 746-0205




ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2004 Heritage Soft tall
2,800 ml. like brand new
Sell due to sickness
(352) 302-0441





HARLEY DAVIDSON
ELECTRA GLIDE
1993
Excellent Condition,
need loan pay off of
approx. $12,000.00
Call 746-1392
HONDA
1977, Goldwlng, 31K,
must see, $3,800 OBO
(352) 344-1283


HONDA
1986 Shadow, 700 cc,
24,000 ml. Runs & looks
great. New tires & batt.
Adult owned, $2600
obo. (352) 341-1486
HONDA
1992, Night Hawk 750,
lowered for a woman,
can be brought back
to stock, $2,000 abo
(352) 726-6454
HONDA
1998 Shadow 1100, 24K
mi. Windshield, hard
bags-lock, lots of extras,
$4400. (352) 341-7788
HONDA CBR
2000 F-4 600 6,900 orlg.
ml, garage stored,
Immaculate, some
extras, must see $5,700
obo (352) 422-2738
HONDA
Helix 250 scooter, '93,
excellent cond. Owned
by older gentleman,
$1800 firm.352-795-6650
KAWASAKI
'03, Vulcan 750, WS,
Immac. garaged, 8K,
must see, $5,200.
352-382-0005
Kymco Scooter,
'03, 60MPH, only 340 mi.
gorgeous powder blue,
w/ custom seat, like
new over $2,800,
invested steel at
$1,600. 352-464-2169

Search 100's of
Local Autos
Online at
www.naturecoast
wheels.com

(h .! tL ,. I.l ,. .


CLASS




HONDA 1999
1100 TOUR
CB & Radio, $3900
(352) 563-2096
SUZUKI
'05, GSXR 600, Bik. Sil. &
Red. like new, Includes
modifications, 1,300 ml.
Incl. new Icon, helmet
& jacket $8,000.
(352) 422-5736

YAMAHA
'01, Roadstar, 1600cc,
some accessories, new
tires, 15k ml.
(352) 795-6416


370-0724 SUCRN
Citrus County Aviation
Advisory Board Mtg. 7/28
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the CITRUS COUNTY
AVIATION ADVISORY
BOARD will meet at 3:00
p.m., on Thursday, July 28,
2005, in Room 166 of the
Lecanto Government
Center, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Lecanto, FL
34461.

Any person desiring fur-
ther information regard-
ing this meeting may con-
tact the Engineering Divi-
sion, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 241, Lecanto,
FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
VICKI PHILLIPS
CHAIRWOMAN
BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA


24. 2005 13D


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC:
Any person who decides
to appeal any decision of
the Governing body with
respect to any matter
considered at this meet-
ing will need a record of
the proceedings and for
such purpose may need
to provide that a verba-
tim record of the pro-
ceeding is mode, which
record Includes testimony
and evidence upon
which the appeal Is to be
based. (Section 286.0105,
Florida Statutes.)
Any person requiring rea-
sonable accommodation
at this meeting because
of a disability or physical
impairment should con-
tact the Engineering Divi-
sion, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path. Suite 241, Leconto,
FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446, at least two
days before the meeting,
If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the
TDD telephone (352)
637-9981.
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 24, 2005,




366-0724 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Public Safety Co-
ordinating Council will
meet on Friday, August 5,
2005, at 2:00 p.m., in the
County Administrator's
conference room located
on the 2nd floor of the
courthouse at 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida. The purpose


of the meeting Is to con-
sider such matters as may
properly come before the
Council.
Any person requiring rea-
sonable accommodation
at this meeting because
of a disability or physical
Impairment should con-
tact the County Adminis-
trator's Office, 110 N,
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness. Florida 34450, (352)
341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting.
If you ore hearing or
speech Impaired, use the
TDD telephone (352)
341-6580.
If a person decides to


appeal any decision
made by the Council with
respect to any matter
considered at this meet-
ing, he/she will need to
ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceed-
ings Is made which record
shall Include the testimo-
ny and evidence upon
which the appeal Is to be
based.
BY: -s- VICKI PHILLIPS,
CHAIRWOMAN
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 24, 2005.


364-0724 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
RFP No. 091-05
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed proposals for:
RFP No.: 091-05
Water Meter/Reading Devises
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at:
www.bocc.citrus, fl.us and click on the Bid information
option or call Onvia/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of proposals: August 18, 2005
at 2:00 p.m.
A public opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on August
18, 2005 at the Leconto Government Building, located
at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Leconto, Florida 34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
flice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 oft least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312,.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 24, 2005,


365-0724 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
RFQ No. 096-05
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners Is
accepting statements of qualifications from Interested
firms to provide engineering and consulting services for
the reuse upgrade and capacity expansion of the
Meadowcrest Wastewater Treatment Facility. Qualifi-
cations should be delivered to Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners, Attn: Georgette Brock, 3600
West Sovereign Path, Suite 266, Leconto, FL 34461, by
2:00 P.M., August 11, 2005. Contact the above office
at (352) 527-5203 for a copy of the Request for Qualifi-
cation.
A public opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on August
11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, located
at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Leconto, Florida 34461.
VICKI PHILLIPS, CHAIRWOMAN
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 24, 2005.

367-0724 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold a Special
Meeting, 5:00 p.m. and a Public Hearing, 5:30 p.m., on
July 26, 2005, in the Board Room of the District Services
Center located at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness,
Florida.
The purpose of the Special Meeting is to approve vari-
ous personnel recommendations and any other busi-
ness that needs to come before the school board. The
Public Hearing Is to adopt the tentative Budget and
tentative Millage Rates for FY 2005-2006.
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings Is made, which record should include
testimony and evidence upon which his appeal is to
,be based.
-s- Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 24, 2005.

368-0724 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold a Workshop,
9:00 a.m. In the Large Conference Room, Second
Floor, Room 234, of the District Services Center located
at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, on Tues-
day, August 2, 2005.
The purpose of the workshop Is to establish School
Board Goals,
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record should Include
testimony and evidence upon which his appeal Is to
be based.
-s- Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 24, 2005.


369-0724 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Audit Committee will
meet on July 28, 2005, at 4:00 P.M., in the Citrus County
Courthouse. 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flori-
da, for the purpose of reviewing proposals of inde-
pendent Certified Public Accounting firms or individuals
to perform a financial and compliance audit of the
records of Citrus County.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450,
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus Cbunty Chronicle,
July 24, 2005.


363-0728 SU/TU/THCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Invitation to Bid
Fencing, Layout, Site Clearing Project
Sealed bids will be received by the town of Yan-
kdetown, Florida, until Friday, August 12, 2005, at 12:00
noon for fencing project. Bids will be opened and
publicly read during the Town Council Meeting on
Monday, August 15, 2005, at 7:30 PM. Any bid re-
ceived after the date and time specified will not be
considered. The Town of Yankeetown reserves the
right to reject any or all bids. All bids shall be sealed
and clearly marked "Fencing'. The bids shall be sent to
Debra A. Stines. Town Clerk, P.O. Box 280, Yankeetown,
Florida 34498-0280.
Specifications and contract may be obtained at the
Town Hall. 6241 Harmony Lane, Monday through Fri-
day, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
Published three (3) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 24, 26 and 28, 2005.


336-0731 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
that on Monday, August 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m., at the
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Services Office,
sealed proposals will be opened for the following:
MEDICAL'DIRECTOR
Emergency Medical Services,
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Foundation,
Citrus County, Florida
"SCOPE OF WORK"
The services provided shall be as described in the Re-
quest'for Qualifications specifications and "draft" con-
tract and shall include but not necessarily be limited, to
the following:
1. The Medical Director shall be responsible to the Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical Foundation, Inc., Board
of Directors and report to the Executive Director.
2. The Medical Director shall comply with the respon-
sibilities as set forth in Florida Statutes 401, Medical DI-
rectors. These include supervising and assuming direct
responsibility for the medical performance of pre-
hospital emergency response employees.
3. The Medical Director shall comply with the duties
and responsibilities as set forth In Florida Administrative
Code 64E-2, Emergency Medical Services. Medical Di-
rection.
4. The Medical Director shall be available 24 hours a
day for emergency consultations from system provider.
He/she shall provide for and be available by either
pager or cell phone at all times and shall provide for
an electronic email address for messaging and corre-
spondence. He/she shall respond in a timely manner
to specified pages, cell phone calls or messages and
email. In the event the Medical Director shall be una-
vailable he/she shall appoint a similarly qualified physl-
cian to cover all responsibilities.
All requests for qualifications must be received by the
office of the Executive Director. 3380 E. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Inverness, Florida 34453 on or befoe1000
a.m. on Monday. Auaust Ist. 2005.
All requests for qualifications, including the recom-
mendation of the Executive Director and/or Executive
Committee, will be presented to the Nature Coast
Emergency Medical Foundation Board of Directors for
final awarding or otherwise.

The Board will automatically reject the RFQ of any per-
son or affiliate who appears on the convicted vendor
list prepared by the Department of General Services.
State of Florida, under Section 287.133(3)(d), F.S. (1999).

All submissions must Include two (2) signed originals
and four (4) complete copies of each request for quall-
fications in a sealed envelope marked on the outside,


"Request for Qualifications for Medical Director. EMS'.
All RFQ's must remain valid for a period of one hundred
twenty (120) days.
Specifications and/or further information may be ob-
tained by contacting Teresa L, Gorentz, Executive Di-
rector, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake Highway, Inverness, Florida
34453. (352) 637-4121.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all re-
quest for qualifications, to waive informalities In any or
all request for qualifications, and to re-advertise for re-
quest for qualifications.
The Board also reserves the right to separately accept
or reject any Item or items of the request for qualifica-
tions and to award and/or negotiate a contract In the
best Interest of the Foundation.
NATURE COAST EMERGENCY MEDICAL FOUNDATION
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: -s- Teresa L. Gorentz
Executive Director
Published five (5) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 2005.


~s;BE~






14D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2005


in t mosass


" in 1 inernessi


03 CHEVROLET
S-10 EXT CAB
#25376A
*12,488



02 FORD
ESCAPE 4X4
#JO50636A
16,883t


04 DODGE 05 CHEVY 05 DODGE
RAM 1500 UPLANDER RAM 1500
#8205T Blue. #J050697A Lava red. #B69637A
S21 888 22,988- $23I488'


04 DODGE
NEON
#8217P
1r1,8881.
$,]AftA


01 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT.
#J050391 A
$=Fees,


03 JEEP
LIBERTY SPORT
#J050532A


02 FORD F-350
4X4 LARIAT
Diesel. #8278P
$29,888"'


tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and Includes all factory incentives, rebates and customer loyalty. Dealer incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for illustration purposes only.


SCHRYSLER DODGE JEEP
LOCAL 1.877.692.7998

563-2277 MY CRYSTAL
1005 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


94 JEEP
WRANGLER
Ready for mud I


02 DODGE
RAM
Ready for work. #8203P
$ T i .'i
a~ *W >


02 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS LS
All power. #D50651 A
s448


04 JEEP
LIBERTY
LTD. #B50857A
11%,9881


99 CHRYSLER 04 FORD
CONCORDE LXI FOCUS
Loaded, leather. #8357P Great on gas. #8328T
a ^mm mamntmi, dilaneliumit


01 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS LS
Leather, loaded. #J050647B




04 SUZUKI
LX7
Leather, sunroof. #8204P
t8


04 JEEP
WRANGLER
Sport. #D50656B
'8,888


C3 CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

Lc w 1.877.692.7998
726-1238 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


01 FORD
WINDSIAR
Leather, loaded. #D60002A
$10488'


~71~~C#1i ~ 'Ti I


HOURS/


DAYS AT CRYSTALAUTOSCOM


a a E3 E 050 6wo


01 CHEVY
S-10 LS
Loaded, reliable. #8323P
$9873t



04 FORD
FOCUS
Loaded, pw, pl. #8267A
11,284t



04 FORD RANGER
XLT EXT CAB
V6, auto. #N5305A
015295t


04 CHEVY 04 CHEVY
MALIBU CAVALIER LS
3 To Choose From HURRY! Power windows/locks. #8239P
,861 10426



03 CHEVY 04 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER MALIBU
Clean, reliable. #N5295A New body style, loaded. #8324P
* 192' $14,623t


01 CHRYSLER
PT CRUISER
Leather, sunroof. #N5324A
$9,896'


05 CHEVY
CAVALIER
$AVE, auto. #8268T
11,926



02 SATURN
VUE
Affordable, reliable. #N5176A
S15,783'


03 DODGE 03 JEEP 05 CHEVROLET 02 BMW 05 CHEVY 03 CHEVY 02 CHEVY 1500 01 CHEVY
RAM 1500 4X4 RUBICON SILVERADO LS 1500 330i IMPALA TRAILBLAZER LS EXT CAB 4X4 TAHOE '
White. #8146T #8333P #25484A #8331P $AVE, factory warranty. #8393P Ext, loaded. #N5325A Loaded. #N5092A Loaded, affordable. #N5224B
9,888 21,88' $23,488t $34,888t I6 19 17687 8,976 9,23
tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and includes all factory incentives, rebates and customer loyalty. Dealer incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for Illustration purposes only.


CHEVROLET


rL 14877.69247998
795-1515 MY CRYSTAL
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


< CHEVROLET i
x mc, 1.877.692.7998
637-5050 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


Crmtus CouN'mY (FL.) CHRONICLE


02 DODGE 04 PONTIAC
CARAVAN MONTANA
Family Ready. #D50444A Ready for family. #8341 A
*11,9488 '13, 888'


04 DODGE 03 DODGE 2500
DURANGO LARAMIE
All power, leather. #8276T Leather, diesel. #D50721 A
$11488' *25,988'


0


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~sc----- 1 -~L~1--r~--~----4L~U~PLI~


i


05 CHEVY
VENTURE
#8235L
1a6,488


03 FORD
EXPLORER
#8145t
$I4,833
I imafilm~timr-040 ELM


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