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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00198
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: July 17, 2005
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00198

Full Text
us inthe -
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75 years.






Shortfani foretold


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FORECAST: Partly
91 cloudy and warm with
S,. ..scattered showers and
76 thunderstorms
PAGE 2A


for veterans' services


House GOP leaders fire the messengers


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Fellow Repub-
licans warned House Speaker Dennis
Hastert and Majority Leader Tom
DeLay more than a year ago that the
government would come up short -
by at least $750 million for veterans'
health care.
The leaders' response: Fire the
messengers.
Now that the Bush administration
has acknowledged a shortfall of at
least $1.2 billion, embarrassed


Republicans are scrambling to fill the
gap. Meanwhile, Democrats portray
the problem as another example of
the GOP and the White House taking
a shortsighted approach to the cost of
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and crit-
icize their commitment to the troops.
New Jersey Rep. Chris Smith, as
chairman of the House Veterans'
Affairs Committee, had told the
House GOP leadership that the
Veterans Affairs Department needed
at least $2.5 billion more in its budget.
The Senate passed a bill with that


READ THE LETTER SENT
TO THE REPUBLICAN
LEADERSHIP
http://wid.ap.org/docu-
ments/050715veterans.pdf

increase; the House's bill was $750
million short
Smith and 30 other Republicans
wrote to their leaders in March 2004
to make the point that lawmakers who
were not the usual outspoken advo-
cates for veterans were troubled by
the move.
Failure to come up with the addi-


tional $2.5 billion, they contended,
could mean higher co-payments and
"rationing of health care services,
leading to long waiting times or other
equally unacceptable reductions in
services to veterans."
Still, the House ignored them.
Smith was rebuked by several
Republicans for sounding the spend-
ing alarm, and House leaders yanked
his chairmanship in January. Rep.
Rob Simmons, R-Conn., lost his chair-
manship of the VA health subcommit-
tee, and Rep. Rick Renzi, R-Ariz., is
no longer on the committee. They, too,
had signed the letters to Hastert, R-
Ill., and DeLay, R-Texas.


In an interview with The
Associated Press, Smith refused to
blame House leaders or discuss his
firing.
"I'm not doing any of this 'I told you
so' nonsense," he said. "Now that
we're here, let's just get it right"
Ben Porritt, a spokesman for DeLay,
said that a year ago "we didn't see any
indication that there was going to be a
shortfall." He said House leaders will
"make sure that every veteran will
receive the coverage they need."
Hastert's office did not respond to a
request for comment.
Please see SHORTFALUPage 4A


Food for thought



Number of overweight children is up


CRiSTY LorTis
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
More than a third of chil-
dren attending Citrus
County schools are over-
weight or at risk for
becoming overweight, according to
estimates from the Citrus County
Health Department


"The health consequences are
very severe when they're younger,"
said Cathy Reckenwald, Citrus
County School District's student
health specialist
During the 2004-05 school year, an
estimated 38.1 percent of local stu-
dents were overweight, or at risk for
becoming overweight a number
that has risen from 24.7 percent in
2002.


The Citrus County School District
and the health department have
partnered together since 2001 to cal-
culate the body mass indexes (BMI)
of students. BMIs are used to calcu-
late whether a child weighs a nor-
mal amount based on age, height
and current weight
The health department began cal-
culating student BMIs during the
2001-02 school year. Since then, let-


ESTIMATED PERCENTAGES OF CITRUS COUNTY
STUDENTS OVERWEIGHT/AT RISK OF BEING OVERWEIGHT


School year
* 2001-02
* 2002-03
* 2003-04
* 2004-05


At risk for overweight
11.5 percent
13.7 percent
14.8 percent
17.2 percent


Currently overweight
13.2 percent
15.2 percent
18.3 percent
20.9 percent


- Source: Citrus County Health Department


ters are sent to the parents of chil-
dren who are overweight or at risk
for being overweight
"Not everyone was very happy
about receiving information about
their child not being in the norm,"
Reckenwald said.
The letters encourage parents
with overweight or at risk children
to see a nutritionist and recommend
children exercise more regularly.
Teresa Goodman, assistant direc-
tor for the health department, said
overweight and obese children are
more at risk to develop medical con-


editions, especially high cholesterol,
high blood pressure, heart problems
and type-two diabetes.
"We've not seen that in children
before," Goodman said. "We usually
see it in people in their 40s and 50s."
According to the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, in
2002, 57 percent of adults in Florida
were overweight or obese, a 43 per-
cent increase from 1990.
Reckenwald said these over-
weight adults are passing bad nutri-
Please see FOOD/Page 5A


Doctor strives to


battle obesity


foster good health


CRiSTY LOFTS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
To change a child's eating
and exercise habits, you must


first start with the
parent
That's why a local
pediatrician began
an innovative pro-
gram to combat child-
hood obesity and pro-
mote healthier life-
styles.
Dr Esther Gonzalez
of the Compre-
hensive Behavioral


STAR

HAB
* For m
informrr
about
Bee Fi
795-4


Institute in Crystal River start-
ed her Kids Bee Fit program
last week
Gonzalez has added a fitness
facility onto her practice, com-


plete with adult- and child-
sized fitness equipment, includ-
ing video game exercise bikes.
The goal of Kids Bee Fit is to
provide families with complete
nutrition and exercise plans to
gradually develop
TING healthier lifestyles.
OD Gonzalez also
OD offers laboratory
ITS work to detect early
ore signs of cardiovascu-
iation lar diseases, blood
Kids pressure problems,
it call diabetes and liver
223. problems. She'll take
initial resting meta-
bolic rates, blood
pressure, weight and body
measurements to calculate
body mass index with monthly
Please see OBESIT/Page 5A


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
A pork patty is the lunch of choice for first-grader Michael Fillinger, 7, and some of his schoolmates recently at Lecanto Primary
School. The school district food services department is adding more menu choices for students next year.

Citrus County students will have more choices at lunch next year


CRUSTY LOFTS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle


Crispy, tasty and attractive.
That was Citrus County School
Board member Linda Powers' impres-
sion of new foods on the menu at school
cafeterias for the next school year.
Sausage and shrimp jambalaya, fresh
fruit salads, Italian-style vegetables,
rotisserie chicken, ham and turkey
wraps, chicken fajitas and Greek salad
are just a few new offerings slated for


X Annie's Mailbox . 14A
W Classified ...... 10D
Crossword ...... 14A
Horoscope ...... 11A
. Movies . .... . 14A
Obituaries ....... 6A
Stocks .......... 2D
Together ....... 13A
Eight Sections


6 4578 2 L L!I00 e-Jf o


FOOD FACT
The Citrus County School District
serves 1.5 million meals each
school year.

the fall.
Shirley Greene, the district's director
of food services, and her staff have
been experimenting with new recipes
and foods so they will be able to offer
more choices for children.
"You can't say one-size-fits-all for stu-


Motel makeover








The new owner of the old Village Inn Motel
is doing some big renovations./1D


dents," Greene said. "It's best for them
to have choices."
District employees sampled the new
foods and gave Greene suggestion like
no mushrooms for the fajitas and cut
the pea salad altogether.
"They'll really go for the barbecue
chicken," Powers said at one of the
taste-testings.
Greene said they try and add a few
new items to menus each year, but are
focusing more nutritionally this year.
Please see CHOICES/Page 5A


Serving those
who served

The U.S.
Department j
of Veterans
Affairs,
which has
played a
huge
role in
American life,
faces some new
challenges./lC


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dr. Esther Gonzalez helps Junior Nunez, 10, use proper form while
exercising at her "Kids Bee Fit Center." Gonzalez began the pro-
gram for children and parents to help combat obesity. She has com-
bined her pediatric practice with it to give families complete fitness,
nutritional and health Information.


Kids in the great outdoors


A struggle for Tiger
Woods cuts his lead
down to two at the
British Open./1B


Author Richard Louv urges parents to get
children outside for the health of it./1lA


I









2A SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


Florida ONLINE POLL
LOTTERIES_ 'TRU COUNT "
M --Here are the


fd Lcatr.


winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
3-1-3
PLAY 4
1-7-2-9
FANTASY 5
2-10-14-15-30
LOTTO
1-20-33-35-37-48


FRIDAY, JULY 15
Cash 3:1 5 0
Play 4: 4- 9-7 3
Fantasy 5:1 -7 12-27 34
5-of-5 3 winners $77,902.69
4-of-5 390 $96.50
3-of-5 10,999 $9.50
Mega Money: 6 14 31 33
Mega Ball: 4
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $4,763.50
3-of-4 MB 53 $394
3-of-4 1,191 $52
2-of-4 MB 1,635 $26.50
2-of-4 36,279 $2
1-of-4 MB 15,517 $2.50
THURSDAY, JULY 14
Cash 3:2-2-4
Play 4: 8 0 0 6
Fantasy 5:4 14 28 29 30
5-of-5 1 winner $210,308.65
4-of-5 254 $133.50
3-of-5 8,052 $11.50
WEDNESDAY, JULY 13
Cash 3:1 3 3
Play 4: 8- 0-3-5
Fantasy 5: 6 11 26 28 33
5-of-5 1 winner $218,078.80
4-of-5 263 $133.50
3-of-5 9,083 $10.50
Lotto: 4 13 21 33 34 47
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 58 $4,412.50
4-of-6 3,119 $66.50
3-of-6 60,389 $4.50
TUESDAY, JULY 12
Cash 3:5 7 5
Play 4: 5 3- 0 5
Fantasy 5:2 9 18 24 30
5-of-5 4 winners $51,261.05
4-of-5 309 $107
3-of-5 9,429 $9.50
Mega Money: 12 13 23 42
Mega Ball: 5
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $2 million
4-of-4 5 $3,448


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verity the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
cornr: by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


Are you planning on reading
the latest "Harry Potter" book?
A Yes. I bought it the day it


Associated Press

DALY CITY, Calif. Victor
Edward Willis, the original
policeman in the 1970s music
group the Village People, was
arrested by real police who
allegedly found a gun and
drugs in his convertible.
Willis, who co-wrote disco
hits such as "Macho Man" and
"In the Navy" before leaving
the Village People in the late
1970s, was taken into custody
Monday after an officer
stopped his Chevrolet
Corvette.
Police said Willis didn't
have a valid license or identi-
fication and at first lied about
his name and residence.
Inside the car, the officer
found a .45-caliber handgun,
as well as rock cocaine and
drug paraphernalia, police
said.
Police arrested him on sus-
picion of six felony counts,
including possession of a
firearm, driving on a suspend-
ed license and transportation
of cocaine. He posted $100,000
bail Tuesday.


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.
us/ and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.


N: Patches
AGE:
SEX: SF
ID #: 49204


NAME: Bambi
AGE: adult
SEX: SF
ID #: 52962


EN TERTAINMENT


came out.
B. Yes. But I'm going to wait
for the paperback version.
C. No. I'll just see the movie.
D. Who is this Harry Potter
fellow?
To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,


www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the July
24 edition, along with a new
question.
Last week's results:
Should fireworks be legal to
sell even though they are not
legal to use?


Butkus gets real
PITTSBURGH Pro
Football Hall of Famer Dick
Butkus will help coach
Montour High
School as part
k ofa reality tel-
evision show
that begins
Sept. 20 on
ESPN.
"Bound for
Glory: The
Dick Montour
Butkus Spartans" will
consist of eight
one-hour episodes and will
document the team's season
and its community involve-
ment Butkus will assist the
team's first-year coach, Lou
Cerro.
Butkus, who will probably
live in the school district dur-
ing the season, has no high
school coaching experience.
He did play a high school bas-
ketball coach in the Saturday
morning TV show "Hang
Time" and has acted in a num-
ber of films.
Montour, a Class AAA school


A Yes. The present system
works fine. 11.1% (406)
B. No. Make it illegal to sell
and use. 51.2% (208)
C. Yes. I'll take my chances.
5.7% (23)
D. No. Make it legal to sell
and use. 31.8% (130)


AA title last year.
"I think it will be a good
thing for the team," Cerro said
recently. "The school will cer-
tainly benefit from it The
toughest job I'm going to have
is keeping the team's focus
with five cameras running
around."


in suburban Pittsburgh, was 1-
8 last season and hasn't quali-
fied for the District 7 playoffs
for the last six seasons. Cerro
had been the head coach at
Seton-La Salle High School in
Pittsburgh the past 12 seasons.
He guided the team to a 13-1
record and the District 7 Class


To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group
and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet. The
shelter is in Inverness near


NAME: Spanky
AGE: kitten
SEX: F
ID #: 50975


the airport. It is open for
adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday
and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 726-7660 for more
information.


NAME: (none) NAME: (none)
AGE: adult AGE: puppy
SEX: F SEX: F
ID #: 52439 ID #: 54073


NAME: Dakota
AGE: adult
SEX: M
ID #: 54309


Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of-
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida, 563-2370,
or from the Humane Society
of Citrus County, 341-2222.


NAME: (none) NAME: Dylan
AGE: yng adult AGE: adult
SEX: M SEX: NM
ID #: 53680 ID #: 51476


Spotlight on PERSONALITIES



'Policeman' gets



arrested for real


The weather REPORT


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


An exclusive service brought HI LO PR
Sto our readers by 91 72 0.30
woMth-.en.cm The Weather Channel

S" LORIDnA TEMPERATURES


City H
Daytona Bch. 89
Ft. Lauderdale 89
Fort Myers 94
Gainesville 92
Homestead 90
Jacksonville 92
Key West 89
Lakeland 94
Melbourne 89


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


East winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 1 to Gulf water
2 feet. Bay and inland waters a moderate temperature
chop. Partly cloudy with a chance of after-
noon showers and thunderstorms. 9 0 0


Taken at Egmont Key


Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 32.65 32.95 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.32 38.33 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.97 39.97 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.18 41.23 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this
data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.


city
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday M
High/Low High/Low High/Low
3:36 a/10:03 a 2:11 p/11:43 p 4:55 a/11:15 a
1:57 a/7:25 a 12:32 p/9:05 p 3:16 a/8:37 a
10:19 a/5:13 a ---/6:53 p 1:03 a/6:25 a
2:48 a/9:02 a 1:23 p/10:42 p 4:07 a/10:14 a


onday
High/Low
3:10 p/--
1:31 p/10:06 p
11:18 a/7:54 p
2:22 p/11:43 p


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
7 V TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
grf. High: 91 Low: 76
Partly cloudy, afternoon showers
',' and thunderstorms.


MONDAY
High: 92 Low: 76
Partly cloudy, afternoon showers and
thunderstorms.
TUESDAY
High: 91 Low: 76
Partly cloudy, afternoon showers and
thunderstorms.
WEDNESDAY
High: 90 Low: 76
Partly cloudy, afternoon showers and
thunderstorms.
ALMANAC -


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year


92/72
97/67
72/91
82
+1

0.00 in.
5.38 in.
27.14 in.
27.68 in.


*As of 6 p.m.from Hemando County Airport
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder-
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
CELESTIAL


Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.11 in.
DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 56%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were
all light.
"Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.
0 ., ,=0 K.


S SUNSET TONIGHT.................
SUNRISE TOMORROW.........
MOONRISE TODAY................
JIIY21 Y1127" AI 4 A6 .12 MOONSET TODAY.................


............8:30 P.M.
............6:44 A.M.
............4:59 P.M.
...........2:32 A.M.


.-- ,:. .-. ... .

DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/17 SUNDAY 2:11 8:25 2:39 8:53
7/18 MONDAY 3:02 9:18 3:33 9:49
k. &! "" -' W, r '. ..... ..
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0, 1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. New plant material may
be irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Inverness can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending in even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 84 71
Albuquerque 95 70
Anchorage 63 58 .05
Asheville 81 68
Atlanta 85 71 .16
Atlantic City 84 75
Austin 88 73 .26
Baltimore 83 741.31
Billings 95 73
Birmingham 86 72 .01
Boise 95 67
Boston 85 64
Brownsville 96 78 .38
Buffalo 85 75 .24
Burlington, VT 89 60
Charleston, SC 90 74
Charleston, WV 86 70 .11
Charlotte 86 72
Chicago 91 68
Cincinnati 86 73
Cleveland 90 72 .12
Columbia, SC 89 72
Columbus, OH 85 73 .11
Concord 86 61
Corpus Christi 88 75 .71
Dallas 91 73
Denver 10161
Des Moines 94 74
Detroit 80 75 .20
El Paso 97 74
Evansville 86 72 .08
Harrisburg 83 72 .34
Hartford 85 72
Honolulu 90 77
Houston 86 74
Indianapolis 85 73
Jackson 88 73 .01
Kansas City 93 73
Las Vegas 11489
Little Rock 90 72
Los Angeles 74 62
Louisville 84 73 .27
Memphis 88 73 .01
Milwaukee 85 70
Minneapolis 97 79
Mobile 90 74
Montgomery 89 72
Nashville 85 73


Sunday
Fcst H L
tstrm 82 72
ptcldy 97 70
shwrs 66 53
tstrm 87 66
tstrm 88 72
tstrm 85 73
tstrm 93 74
tstrm 90 73
ptcldy 79 55
tstrm 88 73
sunny 89 61
tstrm 78 73
tstrm 94 79
tstrm 82 70
tstrm 79 66
tstrm 93 77
tstrm 87 70
tstrm 91 72
ptcldy 93 74
tstrm 88 71
tstrm 87 72
tstrm 95 74
tstrm 87 72
tstrm 79 69
tstrm 94 78
tstrm 93 76
ptcldy 92 58
ptcldy 93 73
tstrm 87 70
ptcldy 10073
tstrm 88 73
tstrm 86 71
tstrm 78 71
ptcldy 89 78
tstrm 90 75
tstrm 88 72
tstrm 91 73
sunny 95 75
sunny 11488
tstrm 90 75
sunny 75 62
tstrm 87 73
tstrm 92 75
ptcldy 90 72
tstrm 96 68
tstrm 90.74
tstrm 92 74
tstrm 87 73


Saturday


Sunday


City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 90 77 .02 tstrm 90 78
New York City 82 73 tstrm 85 76
Norfolk 91 75 .59. ptcldy 90 76
Oklahoma City 90 69 sunny 94 74
Omaha 96 73 tstrm 94 69
Palm Springs 11484 sunny 11783
Philadelphia 84 74 .31 tstrm 86 77
Phoenix 11391 sunny 11692
Pittsburgh 87 72 .01 tstrm 85 70
Portland, ME 81 61 cldy 76 66
Portland, Ore 77 62 sunny 88 61
Providence 84 69 tstrm 81 70
Raleigh 93 74 tstrm 93 74
Rapid City 10963 ptcldy 82 57
Reno 10267 sunny 10166
Rochester 84 71 .18 tstrm 84 71
Sacramento 10465 sunny 10767
St. Louis 92 72 tstrm 95 75
St. Ste. Marie 90 66 ptcldy 89 65
Salt Lake City 10274 sunny 93 63
San Antonio 90 73 .20 tstrm 92 75
San Diego 73 64 sunny 77 67
San Francisco 77 55 .01 sunny 72 56
Savannah 92 72 .89 tstrm 93 75
Seattle 71 56 sunny 81 57
Spokane 72 60 .16 sunny 85 57
Syracuse 89 72 tstrm 83 71
Topeka 94 69 sunny 94 73
Washington 90 77 tstrm 91 76
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 121 Needles, Calif. LOW 45 Houlton, Maine


SUNDAY Lisbon 80/62/pc
CITY H/L/SKY London 78/58/s
Acapulco 87/78/ts Madrid 98/65/s
Amsterdam 75/54/pc Mexico City 88/56/ts
Athens 89/66/pc Montreal 86/73/ts
Beijing 93/66/sh Moscow 85/63/sh
Berlin 75/55/s Paris 87/66/s
Bermuda 87/73/ts Rio 75/62/pc
Cairo 91/67/s Rome 89/66/pc
Calgary 72/51/pc Sydney 59/47/pc
Havana 88/78/ts Tokyo 85/65/sh
Hong Kong 91/78/sh Toronto 84/71/ts
Jerusalem 93/64/s Warsaw 78/61/sh


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02005 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


The other Space Mountain


I


Associated Press
Astronaut Neil Armstrong, right, and Disney character
Mickey Mouse, wearing a space exploration suit, re-launch
Disneyland's "Space Mountain" attraction Friday In
Anaheim, Calif. The ride was closed for nearly two years
undergoing renovations.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 17, the
198th day of 2005. There are 167
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
Fifty years ago, on July 17,
1955, Disneyland debuted in
Anaheim, Calif.
On this date:
In 1821, Spain ceded Florida to
the United States.
In 1945, President Truman,
Soviet leader Josef Stalin and
British Prime Minister Winston S.
Churchill began meeting at
Potsdam in the final Allied summit
of World War I1.
In 1975, an Apollo spaceship
docked with a Soyuz spacecraft in
orbit in the first superpower linkup
of its kind.
In 1981, 114 people were killed
when a pair of walkways above
the lobby of the Kansas City Hyatt
Regency Hotel collapsed during a
'"tea dance."
In 1996, TWA Flight 800, a
Paris-bound Boeing 747, exploded
and crashed off Long Island, New
York, shortly after departing John
F. Kennedy International Airport,
killing all 230 people aboard.
Ten years ago: Thirty-two peo-
ple were injured when a Boston
Green Line trolley rammed anoth-
er train under Copley Square.
Five years ago: Bashar Assad,
son of Hafez Assad, began a
seven-year term as Syria's 16th
head of state.
One year ago: California Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger mockingly
used the term "girlie men" during a
rally as he claimed Democrats
were delaying the state budget by
catering to special interests.
Today's Birthdays: TV person-
ality Art Linkletter is 93. Comedian
Phyllis Diller is 88. The former
president of the International
Olympic Committee, Juan Antonio
Samaranch, is 85. Jazz singer
Jimmy Scott is 80. Comedy writer
Pat McCormick is 71. Actor Donald
Sutherland is 70. Actress-singer
Diahann Carroll is 70. Rock singer
Spencer Davis is 63. Rock musi-
cian Terry "Geezer" Butler (Black
Sabbath) is 56. Actress Lucie
Arnaz is 54. Actor David
Hasselhoff is 53. Singer Phoebe
Snow is 53. Television producer
Mark Burnett ("Survivor," 'The
Apprentice") is 45. Singer Regina
Belle is 42. Rock musician Lou
Barlow is 39. Hip-hop singer Guru
(Gang Starr) is 39. Contemporary
Christian singer Susan Ashton is
38.
Thought for Today: "All styles
are good except the tiresome
sort." Voltaire, French writer
(1694-1778).












3A
SUNDAY
JULY 17, 2005
wwwchronicleonline.com


Key raises $65,750


YET TO COME
Upcoming Key
Training Center fund-
raising events include
the Key carnival and
telethon Saturday,
July 23.
The carnival will be
held at Key's Lecanto
campus on S.R. 44.
The auction will run
on WYKE throughout
the day.
To learn more about
the Key Training
Center, find out how
to donate or volun-
teer opportunities,
call 527-8228.

"It's amazing to see how
caring this community is,"
said Gertrude Joy of
Spring Hill.
Her grandson Scot Von
Tanhoausen, 25, lives in a
group home in Key Pine
Village.
The annual dinner auc-
tion kicks off weeklong
events, aimed at raising
awareness and money for
Key
Monday, volunteers from
the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, Key and the com-
munity will begin a six-day
run from the steps of the
Capitol in Tallahassee, 180
miles down U.S. 19 to the
Key Training Center in
Lecanto.
"It has been an opportu-
nity for us to share our
story with the communi-
ty," said Cabot McBride,
director of housing and
residential services for
Key McBride began run-
ning with Key director
Chet Cole 29 years ago.
Five years ago, commu-
nity members raised
money so Cole would no
longer physically partici-
pate in Run for the Money,
which is why the sheriff's
office stepped up to the
challenge.
"What do you do when


CRUSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Dr. Andrew Petrella was
more than surprised when
he returned from the
bathroom only to find his
friends had auctioned him
off like cattle.
To raise money for the
Key Training Center an
organization that provides
services for about 200
developmentally disabled
adults in Citrus County -
Petrella was to conga
dance on stage with a
Cher impersonator at
Key's 23rd annual dinner
auction Friday night.
While his face was
flushed with embarrass-
ment, the impromptu
dance brought in an extra
$300.
"I am truly honored,"
Petrella said, laughing,
after leaving Citrus
Springs Community
Center's stage.
Good natured and gen-
erous people like Petrella
made the evening a com-
plete success with $65,750
raised during the night's
live and silent auctions -
about $8,000 more than
last year.
More than 400 people
attended the event com-
peting for donated auction
items including a Chesa-
peake kayak, which went
for $1,700, a Bette Midler
autographed jacket for
$350 and a Devil Rays
game package for $1,150.
The money will go to
support 38 unfunded
clients.
Key receives about 85
percent of its funding
from the state and about
6.5 percent from its thrift
stores, Citrus County's
government and United
Way. That leaves a balance
of about $800,000 to $1 mil-
lion.


It's amazing to see how
caring this community is.

Gertrude Joy
Spring Hill resident who attended the auction.


you need people in an
emergency you call the
sheriff," McBride said.
That is why the Key
Center named their 2005
Citizens of the Year as the
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office. They especially
recognized Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy and Sgt. Phil Royal


for organizing and partici-
pating in the run each
year. -
The Key Center has pro-
vided vocational training,
recreation, residential
and community services
to the developmentally
disabled since 1966.
The Key Center began


with a group of family
members and citizens hor-
rified by conditions for
the developmentally dis-
abled at state institutions.
Patients were kept in
unclean facilities and
many were kept drugged
to keep them manageable
and complacent.
Key client Aaron Wilcox
gave the invocation Friday
night to a hushed and
humbled crowd:
"Lord, thank you for the
people who are here sup-
porting the Key Center,
and Lord, we just pray for
the staff."


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
Cher, played by Betty Atchison of Orlando, entertained the audience Friday evening at
the Key Training Center's 23rd Annual Dinner Auction. The event was at the Citrus
Springs Community Center.


Sheriff speaks out at auction


Citrus County Sheriff Jeff Dawsy was awarded "Citizen of
the Year" at the 23rd Annual Dinner Auction held Friday
night by the Key Training Center. Shown on the right,
presenting the award is Cabot McBride, Key Training
Center housing and residential services director.


CRUSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
During an emotional speech Friday
night, Sheriff Jeff Dawsy assured resi-
dents justice will be served in the com-
munity rocked by the murder of a
Homosassa Springs girl..
After accepting an award on behalf of
the Citrus County Sheriff's Office from
the Key Training Center at its annual
dinner auction, Dawsy spoke about the
murder of 9-year-old Jessica Marie
Lunsford.
"February 24th, we changed in this
community," Dawsy said, "and I have
personally changed."
Recently, national media have criti-


cized the sheriff's office for what they
believe to be the "botched" or mishan-
dled confession of John Evander Couey
Couey has been charged with and is
awaiting trail for the kidnapping, rape
and murder of Jessica.
"The case is rock solid," Dawsy said,
with an emotional voice that silenced
the crowd at Citrus Springs Community
Center.
"They (detectives) did a damn good job
and they didn't violate any rights,"
Dawsy said.
He thanked the community and local
media for their continued support of the
sheriff's office and promised justice
would be served.
"I assure that man will never hurt
another child," Dawsy said.


Fund-raising events set to

continue throughout week


'Blondie' marks 75 years on comics pages


Associated Press
CLEARWATER BEACH Hard to
believe it's been almost 75 years since
ditzy flapper Blondie Boopadoop fell
for bumbling Dagwood Bumstead in a
love match made in the funny papers.
In those days, Dagwood was a rich
playboy whose snooty parents greatly
disapproved of the union. When he and
Blondie married in 1933, the J. Boling
Bumsteads disinherited their son, rele-
gating him to a modest suburban life of
raising kids, carpooling, battling
blowhard boss Mr Dithers and making
really big sandwiches.
Now one of the most famous married
couples in the world in the most widely
read strip in comics history, Blondie
and Dagwood are celebrating the mile-
stone anniversary this summer in a
running story line featuring cameos by
their comics-page cohorts, whose cre-
ators also will pay tribute to "Blondie"
by inviting the happy couple into their
own panels.
Garfield, Beetle Bailey, Hagar the
Horrible, baby Marvin, Dennis the
Menace, Dilbert, the kid from "Zits"


In this undated comic strip provided by
King Features Syndicate Inc., Dag-
wood makes a guest appearance on
the "Beetle Bailey" strip.
and others a virtual who's who of the
funnies will drop in and out as the
Bumsteads plan a huge party for an
unspecified wedding anniversary to be
celebrated in the Sunday comics Sept
4. President Bush and wife Laura are
also set to make an appearance.
Introduced by cartoonist Murat
"Chic" Young on Sept. 8, 1930,
"Blondie" is now written seven days a
week by his son, Dean, who took over
when his father died in 1973, and artist
Denis Lebrun. Reaching about 250 mil-


lion readers in more than 2,000 news-
papers in 55 countries, "Blondie" ranks
among the top five most popular strips
in newspaper comics surveys year in
and year out
"It's survival of the funniest it's
like Darwinian evolution on the comics
page," says "Hagar the Horrible" car-
toonist Chris Browne. "It's such a funny
strip. Humor really comes out of hon-
esty, and there's a lot of honesty and lot
of stuff we recognize in 'Blondie."'
The Bumsteads have been depicted
on a U.S. postage stamp, featured in a
Library of Congress exhibit and
inspired movies and a television series.
An overstuffed sandwich is known in
pop culture lexicon as well as in
Webster's dictionary as a "Dag-
wood." "Blondie" is an American insti-
tution, translated into more than 30 lan-
guages.
"God bless my daddy," the jovial
Young says in an interview in his
Clearwater Beach studio. "He was the
genius who created this wonderful
menagerie of characters. A monkey
could do my job with the characters I
have to work with. He left me this cast


Associated Press
Dean Young, writer of the "Blondie" comic strip, poses July 12 In his studio In
Clearwater. Young, who took over the strip from his father, Chic Young, In 1973,
is celebrating the 75th anniversary with a three-month story line featuring
cameos from fellow comic strip favorites and other surprises.


of characters and this dominant gene."
Dean Young, 65, has shepherded the
Bumsteads through myriad modern
day travails and family upheavals,
including Blondie going off to work in
her own successful catering business, a


plot twist that made international
headlines in 1991.
Young attributes the strip's longevity
to the quality of the art and the gags, but
also to Blondie and Dagwood's strong
bond through all these years.


Q,


N


Detective


finds things to


laugh about

AMY SHANNON
ashannon@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Ask Crystal River Police Detective Corey
Sharpe if he's got any "dumb criminal" stories,
and he'll share plenty from his nearly 16 years
with the department
Like the one about the guy who tried to buy
cocaine from an
off-duty officer
by offering $30
and a large ham
and cheese We
pizza, but ended
up in handcuffs. arrested -.
"He didn't him
have enough h
money to buy booked
what we were
'selling' for $60," him and sat and
Sharpe said
about the 13- ate the pizza with
year-old case he
tells as if it hap- him.
opened yesterday.
"Then, we found Corey Sharpe
out that he was a has served with the
manager at a Crystal River Police Department
pizza place." nearly 16 years.
On top of that,
the drug offender actually approached the officer
because of his appearance and just assumed he
sold drugs.
"Unfortunately for him, he was an officer,"
Sharpe said. "We arrested him, booked him and
sat and ate the pizza with him."
Then there was the time when Sharpe was mis-
taken for a celebrity when he was still working on
the drug unit Back then, he sported a mullet and
a scruffy goatee.
Sharpe and several fellow officers were work-
ing the Citrus County fairgrounds by walking
around and keeping an eye on fair employees and
attendees.
'After an hour, someone came up to me and
asked Are you really who I think you are?"'
Sharpe said. "So, I told them 'Yes, I am.'.
"They thought we were the Oak Ridge Boys ...
the country music stars," he said. "They thought
my partner was
the drummer" BAD BILLS FOUND
But mistaken BAD BILS FOUND
identities and M The Crystal River Police
pizza offerings Department is investigat-
aren't the only ing three cases in which
goofy things that local fast food restau-
Sharpe can rants have received
recall. counterfeit $20 bills.
He's still U On July 13, a total of
working to find five bills were passed at
the person re- two restaurants along
sponsible for U.S. 19.
taking the three-
foot concrete adv Chief steven Burchto
diver statue late advises businesses to
last November scrutinize the monies
from the Crystal they receive, as these
River welcome types of crimes usually
sign on State run in patterns."
Road 44. M Anyone with information
"I'm sure regarding this case is
somebody's got encouraged to call
itasalawnorna- Detective Sharp of the
ment some- Crystal River Police
where," Sharpe Department at 795-
said. "I thought 4241, or leave informa-
for sure we'd tion on the department's
have it back by tip line at 795-9599.
now."
Sharpe said the case is at a sunken halt after all
evidence collected at the scene was exhausted.
But he's hopeful a tip will turn up in the future
- it happened about a year ago after the city's
bingo hall in Sun Plaza was burglarized four
years prior.
"It went the good part of a year, maybe more
before we had anything," Sharpe said. '"Then
finally people started talking. You do the best you
can ... when you're at a dead end, those tips are
very important"


,)c /^~
/I \ \ "









CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4A SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


For the RECORD


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic Battery
Arrests
Thomas Oliver Owens Jr., 36,
Homosassa, at 11:56 p.m. Friday on
a charge of domestic battery.
According to a police report, sher-
iff's deputies responded to a resi-
dence in Homosassa and found
Owens to be intoxicated. Upon see-
ing the deputies, Owens told them
nothing occurred and he does not
know why they were called.
Deputies spoke to one of the two
victims and a witness who said
Owens arrived at the residence
drunk and screaming to speak to his
wife, who is the second victim,
according to the report.
When the second victim came
from the bathroom, Owens began
flailing his arms, kicked over a table
and grabbed the second victim by
her shirt and hit her in the chest,
which knocked- her backward,
according to the report.
Owens then left the residence, but
continued throwing things at the sec-
ond victim who then left the area,
according to the report.
Owens stayed in the area and
continued to kick out the front win-
dow of the home and hit the first vic-
tim by flailing his arms in the air and
scratching the victim's arm, leaving
a minor 2-inch laceration, according
to the report.
Owens was transported to the
Citrus County Detention Facility.
No bond was set.



SHORTFALL
Continued from Page 1A

The*White House first told
Congress that it could handle
this year's shortage by shifting
money from other programs. A
chagrined Jim Nicholson, the
VA secretary and former
national Republican chair-
man, then acknowledged last
month that his department
still was $975 million short.
The House voted almost
immediately to give it to him.
Last week, the Bush admin-
istration raised to $1.2 billion
the amount it says is needed.
Two days later, however,
White House Budget Director
Joshua Bolten told the House
Budget Committee that the VA
for the past three years has
gotten more money than it
needs for medical care.
About $250 million of the
shortfall can be attributed to
soldiers who have returned
from Iraq and Afghanistan,
the VA said. The agency had
predicted 23,000 of those war
veterans would need its serv-
ices. The department now
puts the number at 103,000.
"We know VA provides good
care, so veterans increasingly
are coming," Simmons said.
"So, we cannot afford to be
optimistic about low numbers.
They just haven't worked out
that way."
Some lawmakers say the
shortfall is a product of the
administration's scrimping on
veterans' care to reduce the
size of federal deficits.
"Most everybody is thought-
ful of veterans, but it seems
when comes it comes time to
roll up your sleeves and look
at the correct amount of
money, it seems, sometimes,
people don't want to roll up
their sleeves and face it," said
Rep. Walter Jones Jr., R-N.C.
Been done before
The VA has come up short
before.
In 2003, the agency wrote in
the Federal Register that it
had $21.6 billion for medical
benefits but needed $23.5 bil-
lion, a $1.9 billion shortfall.
That preceded a decision by
the department to stop
enrolling veterans whose
injuries or illnesses were not
service-related and veterans
who were not considered indi-


Christopher W. Meserve, 21,
Crystal River, at 4:33 p.m. Thursday
on a charge of domestic battery.
According to a police report, sher-
iff's deputies responded to a physi-
cal disturbance at a residence in
Crystal River. The victim told
deputies Meserve arrived at the res-
idence to pick up his articles and the
victim followed Meserve into the
house to make sure he did not steal
anything.
According to the report, the victim
stated as he followed the defendant
into the garage, Meserve stuck his
foot out behind him and tripped the
victim.
Once on his feet, the victim and
Meserve were face-to-face and
Meserve spit in the victim's face,
then struck him, put him in a head-
lock and continued to strike the vic-
tim, according to the report.
Deputies observed a scratch on
the victim's forehead and left ear,
according to the report.
Meserve was placed under arrest
and transported to the Citrus County
Detention Facility.
No bond was set.
Related to this case is the arrest
of a 17-year-old girl on charges of
battery on a law enforcement officer
and resisting officer with violence.
According to a police report, the
deputy said the girl was belligerent
toward sheriff's deputies and was
asked to calm down several times,
to which she said she did not have
to.


After advising the juvenile her
boyfriend was being placed under
arrest, she became irate, cursing
and yelling at the deputies, accord-
ing to the report.
The girl screamed at deputies to
go ahead and arrest her. At that time
she was placed under arrest,
according to the report.
She continued to turn and run
away from the deputies to her bed-
room. She refused to come out and
her father unlocked the door,
according to the report.
According the report, the juve-
nile struggled as the deputies placed
her in handcuffs. While escorting the
juvenile to the patrol vehicle, she
reached back with her left leg and
kicked a deputy in the leg.
The defendant was released to
the custody of her father for home
detention.
Other Arrests
Hasan A. Ajani, 55, 6348 S.
Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa, at 9:44
p.m. Friday on a charge of selling
alcohol to a person under 21.
Bond was not set.
Linda S. Antonetti, 41, 3565
N. Hiawatha St., Crystal River, at
11:24 p.m. Thursday on charges of
failing to pay child support and driv-


More veterans seeking health care
Faster-than-expected growth in demand for health care services
among veterans along with increasing costs have been blamed
for a shortfall in benefit funding.


Number of veterans using
VA medical services
8 million
7 -

5 : .; '




0:
4 : .'




'99 '00 01 '02 '03 '04 05*
*As of April


veteran
medical
$30 billion


is Affairs
I care spending


2E
20

1E

0
'99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05
Estimated


NOTE: As of January 2003, VA stopped enrolling veterans whose health problems
are not related to their military service and who are not considered indigent.


Number of veterans by state, 2004

35,000- 100,000- 250,000-
99,999 249,000 499,000


- -
500,000- More than
899,999 1 million


.1 D.C


SOURCE: Department of Veterans Affairs

gent.
About a month before the
House Republicans warned
HIastert and DeLay, then-
Veterans Affairs Secretary
Anthony Principi disclosed in
a hearing that the White
House's Office of
Management and Budget had
cut his budget request by $1.2
billion. It was a rare criticism
from within the administra-
tion.


The White House's d
for presidentially app


ing while license is suspended/
revoked.
Her bond was set at $3, 660.
Lori J. Connolly, 39, 230 S.
Harrison St., Beverly Hills, at 2:28
a.m. Saturday on a charge of driving
under the influence.
Her bond was set at $500.
Walid F. Daknil, 44, 1162 N.
LaJolla Pt., Crystal River, at 10:45
p.m. Friday on a charge of selling
alcohol to a person under 21.
Bond was not set.
Martyn A. Davenport, 38,
11511 Moonlight Terrace, Ingles, at 2
p.m. Friday on charges of posses-
sion of a controlled substance and
drug paraphernalia.
Her bond was set at $2,500.
Davenport was also arrested at
9:15 p.m. on a charge of a worthless
check. That bond was set at $150.
Michael A. Feaster, 28, 4661
E. Dartmouth Lane, Hemando, at
2:47 p.m. Thursday on a charge of
battery.
His bond was set at $500.
Jonathan V. Foy, 22, 2225
Nursery Rd, Clearwater, at 8:19 p.m.
Friday on charges of possession of
marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
His bond was set at $1,000.


officials who publicly waver
from the administration's
position was well-known. In
2002, the administration fired
Mike Parker, the civilian head
of the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, after he com-
plained to the Senate Budget
Committee about the water
projects Bush wanted to cut.
Principi survived his
moment of candor, but he
stepped down after Bush was
re-elected. He now heads the
Base Realignment and
Closure Commission. He did
not respond to requests for an
interview on the VA medical
care issue.
Bush repeatedly has pro-
posed and Congress has
rejected just as often mak-
ing better-heeled veterans pay
a $250 enrollment fee and
increasing their $7 prescrip-
tion drug co-payments.
Bush's budgets assumed the
enrollments fees and higher
medicine co-payments would
save $232 million in 2005 and
$440 million in 2006 even
C. though it was clear Congress
was not going to approve
them. Congress also rejected
the administration's plan to
cut the VA's nursing home
beds by 5,000 in 2005.
Nonetheless, the depart-
ment put some of the blame
for this year's shortfall in
budgeting for only 8,500 beds
rather than the 13,000 man-
AP dated by Congress. VA offi-
cials were unable to explain
disdain why fewer beds were budget-
)ointed ed.


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ON THE NET
M For more information about arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the link to Daily Reports, then Arrest Reports.


Meadowcrest office


DumbrifrI| i
N | \\ I
1624 N, Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


Michael B. Holcomb, 22,4661
E. Dartmouth Lane, Hemando, at
2:47 p.m. Thursday on a charge of
battery.
His bond was set at $500.
Ross W. Kinnecon, 41, 8520
Mayo Dr., Crystal River, at 8:04 p.m.
Thursday on a charge of battery.
His bond was set at $500.
Keith F. Munderville, 42, 7465
W. Arabis Lane, Homosassa, at
12:39 a.m. Saturday on a charge of
driving while license is suspend-
ed/revoked.
His bond was set at $10,000.
Deena M. O'Neal, 34, 4132 E.
Fort Apache Road, Hemando, at
noon Friday on a charge of petit theft.
Her bond was set at $500.
George A. Ross Jr., 36,19990
SW 109 Lane, Dunellon, at 7:14
p.m. Thursday on a charge of driving
while license is suspended/revoked.
No bond was set.
N Jeffrey D. Scott, 18, 34 S.
Monroe St., Beverly Hills, at 3:37
a.m. Friday on a charge of petit theft.
His bond was set at $250.
Scott was also arrested at 2:30
p.m. Friday on a charge of posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
His bond was set at $250.
Julie L. Strobaugh, 42, 8524
W. Kipling Lane, Homosassa, at
10:09 p.m. Friday on a charge of
selling alcohol to a person under 21.
Bond was not set.
Janet K. Vaughan, 45, 4506
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8:41 p.m. Friday on charges of driv-
ing under the influence and driving
while license is suspended/revoked.
Her bond was set at $1,000.
Crystal Police
DUI Arrests
Nancy A. Consalvo, 31, 8825
W. Harbor Lane, Homosassa, at
5:30 p.m. Friday on charges of pos-
session of a controlled substance
and drug paraphernalia.
Her bond was set at $5,500.
M Nicole R. Corbin, 24, 8825 W.
Harbor Lane, Homosassa, at 5:30
p.m. Friday on a charge of posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Her bond was set at $500.
M David J. Romeo, 40, 5459 S.
June Terrace, Homosassa, at 2;26
a.m. Saturday on a charge of driving
under the influence.
His was set at $500.
Other Arrest
Richard F. Joyce, 46, 56 S.
Jefferson St., Beverly Hills, at 1:35
a.m. Saturday on charges of driving
under the influence and possession
of marijuana.
His bond was set at $1,000.
Department of
Environmental
Protection
Arrest
Anthony L. Peranio, 46, 4151
S.W. 89th Ave., Ocala, at 12:36 p.m.
Friday on a charge of driving while
license is suspended/revoked.
His bond was set at $10,000.


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number and brief description of the story idea.








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SUNDAY, JUiAi 1/, 2005 5A


Firefighters clean sullied crash memorial


Others join in to

help restore defaced

SValujet crash site

Associated Press

MIAMI More than 30 volunteers
C removed swastikas and other vandal-
- ism Saturday from stone markers at a
memorial for the 110 victims of the
1996 ValuJet crash in the Everglades.
Vandals used red paint to deface


about 20 of the gray, obelisk-shaped
markers which bear the names of the
crash victims. The markers are lined
up at varying heights to form an arrow
that points to the site of the crash.
"It really (stinks) that people have to
stoop to that level and deface the
property like that," said Miami-Dade
fire Lt Thomas Carter, who drove a
fire truck to the memorial site along
Tamiami Trail to provide water for the
cleaners.
"It cuts your heart out when you see
it," he said.
Carter was a communications spe-
cialist who helped search-and-rescue


crews hunt for victims after the fatal
ValuJet DC-9 crash on May 11, 1996,
that killed 105 passengers and five
crew members in the swamps of the
Everglades.
With those memories still present,
he agreed to help radio operator and
installer Matthew Ginn by providing
the truck's 750 gallons of water. Ginn,
who learned of the vandalism last
week, previously worked at Miami-
Dade Fire Rescue and asked the
department if he could borrow the
truck
Carter and Ginn were joined in the
blazing sun by volunteers from the Boy


Scouts, Florida Power & Light and the
Miccosukee Indian tribe, whose police
department provided sandwiches,
french fries and drinks for the work-
ers.
The job took about three hours,
Carter said, and involved cutting the
weeds and grass around the markers
in addition to restoring them with
paint remover, wire brushes and pres-
sure cleaners. They cleaned all the
markers, some of which had algae
growing on them.
Some of the painted markers had
Nazi swastikas on them, and others
had the word "Die" written on them.


No arrests have been made.
"They had it spray painted on top of
the names of the victims," Carter said.
Ginn said he became involved with
the memorial a few years ago after he
noticed it was in disrepair while driv-
ing home from a camping trip, and he
began cutting the weeds and making it
presentable. He says he tries to visit
the memorial three times a year, and
the Scouts also help maintain it
Ginn said he didn't feel it was right
to allow the memorial to be neglected.
"That's people's family that died out
there. They don't have a gravestone
except for that monument," Ginn said.


Hurricane-delayed music festival delights divers, fish


Associated Pess

BIG PINE KEY Delayed a
week by Hurricane Dennis,
more than 250 divers and
snorkelers got wet Saturday to
hear a radio station's broad-
cast in the Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary



CHOICES
Continued from Page 1A

"We are very actively looking
at all menus so we are offering
more fruits and vegetables,"
Greene said.
That's not to say the district's
cafeteria's and breakfasts and
lunches aren't healthy now.
According to the USDA,
school lunches must meet the
Dietary Guidelines for
Americans, which recommend
that no more than 30 percent of
a child's calories, come from
fat, and less than 10 percent
from saturated fat
The regulations also require
school lunches to provide one-
third of the recommended
dietary allowances of protein,
Vitamin A, Vitamin C, iron, cal-
cium and calories.
To ensure Citrus County's
lunches comply, food services
inputs all recipes and cooking
methods into a computer pro-
gram that calculates the nutri-
tional, fat and caloric content
of all meal plans.
For example, school lunches
are not seasoned with butter
because that would make the


FOOD
Continued from Page 1A

tional and exercise habits
onto their children, who are
already inundated with
sedentary activities such as
video and computer games.
"Kids are eating more fast
food, they exercise less,"
Reckenwald said.


OBESITY
Continued Trom Page 1A

monitoring.
"In order for something to
work for you, you have to
change your lifestyle and get
excited about it," Gonzalez
said.
Gonzalez said obesity
among adolescents has
tripled in the last 20 to 30
years and doubled in pre-
teens.
Paul Earnheart is a physical
i education teacher at Rock
Crusher Elementary and
brought his 8- and 9-year-old
sons to Kids Bee Fit because
he couldn't find other local
health clubs with machines
for children.
He said with obesity becom-
ing more and more of a
nationwide issue, parents
should encourage children to
be more physically active.
"You've got more things that
keep kids active that aren't
physical," Earnheart said.
He said to get exercise
equipment in schools would
cost between $10,000 and
$15,000 more than budgets
will allow.
The part he really likes
about Kids Bee Fit is the focus


The theme from the 1960s
"Dennis the Menace" televi-
sion sitcom topped musical
selections at the Lower Keys
Underwater Music Festival at
Looe Key Reef.
"Hurricane Dennis turned
out to be no menace to the
Keys or the reef, so we played


fat content too high, Greene
said.
"The meals already meet
federal guidelines," Greene
said.
However, the same is not
true for vending machine and
ala carte items that middle-
and high-school students may
purchase.
Students may buy snack
cakes, potato chips, candy bars
and soda, which helps supple-
ment the cost of the lower-
priced USDA-approved lunch
meals. Lunches cost students
$1.25 at the elementary level
and $1.50 for middle and high
schoolers.
Two years ago, district offi-
cials took the initiative to offer

Overweight teens have a 70
percent chance of becoming
overweight or obese adults,
according to the CDC. This
number increases to 80 per-
cent if a parent is overweight.
In addition to health con-
cerns, the most immediate
consequence for an over-
weight child is the teasing or
discrimination of other chil-
dren, which can lead to poor
self-esteem and depression.


goes beyond the benefits of a
daily workout.
"They're doing a lot more
than just exercise," Earnheart
said.
Gonzalez's facility also
keeps track of weight loss and
does laboratory work, as well
as provide nutritional tips for
families.
"We have to teach the par-
ents how to go grocery shop-
ping and cook better meals at
home," Gonzalez said.
Gonzalez will help families
develop their own plans that
touch on nutrition, not watch-
ing television or playing video
games for more than two
hours a day and how to divvy
up food at dinnertime.
"Portions that's one of
our problems," Gonzalez said.
"We have learned to super-


theme from 'Dennis the
Menace' in its memory," said
festival coordinator Bill
Becker of Conch FM.
Divers and snorkelers, sev-
eral costumed as mermaids,
swayed to marine melodies
ranging from the Beatles'
"Octopus Garden" and "Yellow


100-percent real juice drinks in
machines as a healthier alter-
native to soda.
The push for healthier foods
in schools has really come in
the past two years as people
have noticed nationally that
childhood obesity on the rise,
Greene said.
But rather than take all junk
food out of schools, Greene
believes children should be
taught how to eat healthy.
"My philosophy is students
should still have a choice, but
first be taught to make good
choices," Greene said.
Greene said when children
leave school campuses they are
inundated with foods that are
high in fat and cholesterol,


Submarine" to humpback
whale songs.
To provide some visual cul-
ture, some divers attempted to
make sounds underwater on
instruments created by a local
artist August Powers each
one sculpted to resemble an
undersea creature.


Martha Puckett of
Louisville, Ky., tried Powers'
drumfishh" and discovered the
vibrations appealed to fish, as
well as her fellow divers.
"The fish came swimming
around and looked like they
were enjoying it as much as I
was," Puckett said.


Songs were accompanied by
public sc i vice announcements
promoting coral reef conserva-
tion.
Hurricane Dennis delivered
tropical force-strength winds
to the Florida Keys when it
passed about 125 miles west of
Key West on July 9.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
The school district food services department is adding more menu choices for students next year.


which is why they need to learn
how to choose those foods in
moderation.
However, at a school board
meeting Tuesday, board -mem-
bers directed the Food


In order for kids to be educated,
they need to be healthy.

Cathy Reckenwald
Citrus County School District student health specialist.


While not traditionally a
part of students' curriculum,
schools need to continue tak-


size our eyes."
For the past several years,
Gonzalez has volunteered two
days each week at the Citrus
County Health Department.
When the schools partnered
with the Heath Department to
determine how many children
were overweight or at-risk for
being overweight, families
were sent letters explaining
their child's assessment. The
letters directed parents of
overweight or at-risk children
to the health department's
nutritionist and directed the
children to be more physically
active.
"I saw the reality that send-
ing them to a nutritionist and
telling them to play outside
was not going to work,"
Gonzalez said. "I started
thinking, there has got to be


.IT licKets wiil be $ ana can be purchased on
the day of the show at the ticket office. L.
For more information call Monica at 382-0011 or Vangie at 795-0251 C *-


ing an active approach to
teaching and keeping chil-
dren healthy.

something I can do."
Crystal River mother
Debbie Pritchard began
bringing her three children to
Kids Bee Fit about a week
ago, and so far is pleased with
the overall benefits for her
family.
"They motivate me and I
motivate them," Pritchard
said. "It gives us an hour to be
together and bond."





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Services department to
research how much chips,
cookies and candy children
bought from schools last year
Board member Powers said
she hopes the district can

"In order for kids to be edu-
cated, they need to be
healthy," Reckenwald said.
School board member
Linda Powers agreed the dis-
trict should take advantage of
the time they have to teach
children healthier lifestyles.
"We have a very long-term
ability to offer good things to
children,"Powers said, noting
that the district has contact
with most children for 13


begin offering less and less
junk food in schools and even-
tually eliminate it all together
"We have a responsibility,"
Powers said, "to try and make
the situation better."

years before they graduate.
In addition to teaching
reading, writing and math,
schools can also focus on
improving the quality of chil-
dren's' lives.
"If you have a child in class
who is hungry, malnourished
and very sedentary, you're not
going to be able to teach
them," Powers said. "The
child is not going to feel like
learning."


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WHAT'S FOR LUNCH?
Example of Citrus County elementary school lunch
M .Students choose one entr6e:
chicken alfredo turkey sandwich salad shaker
* Students may choose fie additional items:
broccoli peaches bread roll oatmeal cookie
milk fruit luice
* Total meal fat: 29.13 percent (30 percent allowable)
* Saturated fat: 8.81 percent (10 percent allowable)
* Protein: 18.25 percent


SOUND OFF
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 563 0579.
* Be prepared to leave a brief message write it out before
calling to make sure you remember everything you want to
say.
* After the beep, speak loudly, slowly and clearly.
* Or try the online Sound Off forum available at
www.ChronicleOnline.com.


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649 E Gulf To Lake Lecanto FL
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Call the friendly office staff at 352-563-9959 for an appointment or
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.1 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Ronald Hoch, 73
INVERNESS
Ronald Eugene Hoch, 73,
Inverness, died Saturday, July
16,2005, at home under the lov-
ing care of his family and
Hospice of
Citrus County.
Born June
27, 1932, in
Woodstock,
Ill., he was the
son of John and Helen Hoch.
He moved to this area in 1997
from Woodstock
He served in the U.S. Navy
during the Korean War.
Mr. Hoch was a retired engi-
neering manager for
Woodstock Die Casting. He was
a member of the Loyal Order of
the Moose in Woodstock, Ill.,
and a member of Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church in
Hernando, where he served
two terms as vice president of
the congregation.
He is survived by his wife of
47 years, Clarene Hoch of
Inverness; a daughter, Kathryn
L Hoch, Seattle, Wash.; son,
Steven L. Hoch and wife,
Debra, of Burlington, Wis.;
brother, John 0. Hoch of
Woodstock, Ill.; sister, Lavonne
L. Fleming of Putnam, Ill.; and
several nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church
Building Fund, 439 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hernando,
FL 34442, or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

Joan
Holzmann, 76
INVERNESS
Joan Catherine Holzmann,
76, Inverness, died Friday, July
15, 2005, at Arbor Trail Rehab
and Skilled Nursing Center
after a battle
with cancer
Born June .., --.
24, 1929, in
New York City,
she was the
daughter of
Francis and
Bernadette
( G r o g an ) Joan
O'Neill. She Holzmann
came here
from Farmingdale, L.I., N.Y, in
1972.
She was a special education
teacher with the Citrus County
School District, having taught
at Inverness Middle School for
34 years. She also taught adult
continuing education, night
and summer classes. She was a
CCD teacher at Our Lady of
Fatima Parish.
She was a real estate agent
for Investors Realty Coldwell-
Banker, having achieved mil-
lion-dollar seller status.
Mrs. Holzmann was a mem-
ber of Inverness Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 4337 Ladies
Auxiliary, the National
Education Association, Re-
tired Teachers' Association,
SHARE Club, the Italian
American Social Club, Citrus
Singles and the Royal Oaks
Community Service Club.
She was a volunteer in the
newborn nursery at Citrus
Memorial Hospital, and was a
longtime member of Our Lady
of Fatima Parish.
Mrs. Holzmann enjoyed trav-
el, ceramics and golf, and was
devoted to her family.
She was preceded in death
by her former husband,
Charles Holzmann, in 1986.
Survivors include two sons,
William Holzmann of Las
Vegas, Nev., and Gerard
Holzmann of Temple Terrace;
four daughters, Kathleen
(Jack) Morrissey of Lithia,
Theresa (Robert) McLaughlin
of Cantonment, Joan Slack of
Park City, Utah, and Joanne
(James) Murphy of Inverness;
two brothers, Frank O'Neill of
San Diego, Calif., and Bernard
O'Neill of Connecticut; a sister,
Bernadette, of Port Richey; 12
grandchildren; and two great-
grandchildren.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries and funeral
notices are subject to
editing.


Sharon
McDaniel, 58
HOMOSASSA
Sharon K. McDaniel, 58,
Homosassa, died Friday, July
15, 2005, at H. Lee Moffitt
Cancer Center & Research
Institute.
Born March 11, 1947, in
Hastings, Mich., she was the
daughter of William E. and
Edna M. Helder Land. She
came here three years ago
from Chicago, Ill.
Mrs. McDaniel was a retired
senior vice president of
Motorola in Schaumburg, Ill.
She was Protestant.
She was preceded in death
by two brothers, Ricky Land
and William E. Land Jr.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 10 years, William R.
McDaniel, Homosassa; par-
ents, William and Edna Land,
Homosassa; four daughters,
Teresa Ziakas (Perry) of
Palatine, Ill., Lisa Simons of
Spring Hill, Katie McDaniel of
Chicago, Ill., and Meghan
Whitfield (James) of Leads,
Ala.; son, James Dueitt,
Atlanta, Ga.; two brothers,
Stephen Land (Marlene) of
Seattle, Wash., and Alan Land
of San Diego, Calif.; a sister,
Laura- Martinez (Raul) of
Stockton, Calif.; a sister-in-law,
Nancy Land of San Jose, Calif.;
and four grandchildren, Austin
and Aryana Ziakas, Palatine,
Ill., and Joey and Erika Blanco,
Spring Hill.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be sent to H. Lee Moffitt
Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia
Drive, Tampa, FL 33612.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.

Larry 'Bud'
NeSmith, 57
HOMOSASSA
Larry E. "Bud" NeSmith, 57,
Homosassa, died Thursday,
July 7, 2005, in Homosassa
after a battle
with cancer
Born Oct 24,
1947, in Fort
Lauderdale, he
was the son of
Bill and Vida
NeSinith.
He was origi-
nally hired in Larry
1987 as a utility NeSmith
technician
with Citrus County Utilities
Division and was promoted
several times throughout his
career. He reached the level of
utility field foreman. During
his 18 years of service with the
county, he was known as a ded-
icated employee.
Mr. NeSmith enjoyed golfing,
bowling and spending time
with his granddaughter
He was Methodist
He was preceded in death by
his father, Bill NeSmith, and a
sister, Patricia Sewell.
Survivors include his wife of
36 years, Rucell NeSmith,
Homosassa; two daughters,
Tracey Brown of Homosassa
and Lisa NeSmith of Tampa;
his mother, Vida NeSmith,
Chattahoochee; brother, Gary
NeSmith, Davie; and his
granddaughter, Myranda
Brown.
Hooper Funeral Homes,
Homosassa Chapel.

Billye
Boulden, 74
INVERNESS
Billye Ridgway Boulden, 74,
died Friday, July 15, 2005, in
Inverness.
Born Feb. 22, 1931, she
moved to Beverly Hills in 1989.
She was a native of St.
Petersburg and attended
schools in both Pinellas and
Pasco counties (Holy Name
Academy). She graduated from
St Petersburg High School in
1948, and attended the
University of Florida and the

HEINZ FUNERAL HOME
& Cremation
Just like you...We're Family!





U


University of Miami.
After moving to Beverly
Hills, she practiced real estate
until her retirement in 1999
after 27 years in that career
She was a former member of
the St. Petersburg Yacht Club
and the Daughters of the
American Revolution.
She was preceded in death
by a son, Brett, in 1994.
Survivors include two sons,
James (Coral) Boulden Jr.,
Newbury Park, Calif., and
Laird (Blanca) Boulden,
Geneva, Ill.; cousin, Ashleigh
Ale; four grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
Services will be private.
Fero Funeral Home, Beverly
Hills.
Funeral
NOTICES

Ronald Eugene Hoch.
Ronald Eugene Hoch, 73,
Inverness. There will be a
memorial service at 11 a.m.
Friday, July 22, 2005, at the
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando, with
Pastor Frederick Ohsiek pre-
siding. Inurnment will follow
the services at 2 p.m. Friday,
July 22, 2005, the Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell.
Joan Catherine Holzmann. A
Mass of Christian Burial will
be offered at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, July 20, 2005, from
Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. Friends may call at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
from 9 a.m. Wednesday morn-
ing until the procession
departs for the church at 9:45
a.m. Cremation arrangements
will follow. If family and
friends so -desire, memorial
contributions may be made, in
lieu of flowers, to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or the
American Cancer Society,
Citrus County Unit, PO. Box
1902, Inverness, FL 344511-
1902.
Larry E. NeSmith. The
Service of Remembrance for
Larry E. NeSmith, 57,
Homosassa, will be at 2 p.m.
Saturday, July 23, 2005, at the
Homosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes, with Pastor
Alan Jefferson officiating.
Friends, who wish, may send
memorials to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Deaths
ELSEWHERE


Clarence
Dennis, 96
SURGEON
ST. PAUL, Minn. Dr.
Clarence Dennis, who per-
formed the first open-heart
surgery that included the use
of a heart-lung machine, died
Monday. He was 96.
In April 1951, Dennis per-
formed the first open-heart
surgery that used a multiple-
screen blood oxygenator, or
heart-lung machine. The
patient died hours later A staff
member's error during surgery
led to the death of the second
patient on whom the machine
was used.

Carla Wood, 50
OPERA SINGER
WEST JORDAN, Utah -
Carla Wood, a mezzo-soprano
who performed with the
Metropolitan Opera and later
was the founder and editor of
Classical Singer magazine died
Wednesday. She was 50 and
had a brain tumor
Wood was a principal artist
for New York's Metropolitan
Opera and a featured soloist in
Carnegie Hall and regional
houses across the country.


Governors get




together in Iowa


National Governors

Association meets

in Des Moines

Associated Press


DES MOINES, Iowa Money, ambition and
hype are rising fast for a slew of governors races
that voters will decide next year, with allega-
tions in Florida of mismanaging money and
charges flying over job losses and outsourcing in
Michigan.
Presidential politics aside in this state where
the first caucuses are held, most of the dozens of
governors gathered here for a long weekend
looked to 2006, when three out of every four
states will elect their leaders.
"People recognize that 2006 is the Super Bowl
of governors races," said
Iowa's Tom Vilsack, a
People two-term Democratic
governor who is not
recognize seeking re-election.
"You've got governors
that 2006 races in all parts of the
country, you've got them
is the in very key, very critical
states that will play a
Super Bowl crucial role in 2008."
It's not just a numbers
of governors game, with two elections
this fall and 36 a year
races. later Governors shape
much of the nation's
Gov. Tom domestic policy and can
Vilsack play key roles in the
D-Iowa. presidential race, espe-
cially if it's close.
Currently, Republicans hold a majority of gov-
ernors seats, 28-22. Democrats are defending
both open seats this fall, in New4 Jersey and
Virginia.
But next year, 24 of the 36 contests will be for
seats now held by the GOP All six of the term-
limited seats are held by Republicans. Vilsack's
retirement will create the lone open
Democratic seat
That makes the odds likelier that
Republicans will lose seats. "There's no ques-
tion the landscape is not favorable," said GOP
Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, who is
deciding between seeking a second term or
making a bid for the presidency.
The largest states will see contests. Florida
has an open seat, since GOP Gov. Jeb Bush is
term-limited. New York's three-term Gov.
George Pataki, a Republican, is exploring a pos-
sible presidential bid while popular
Democratic Attorney General Eliot Spitzer is
raising millions for his shot at governor.
California GOP Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger
has seen his popularity numbers drop, giving
Democrats hope.
Several freshmen governors will face tough
tests, including Michigan Gov. Jennifer
Granholm, a rising Democratic star. Dick DeVos,
the son of a co-founder of Amway Corp. with a
personal fortune at the ready, has said he will


Associated Press.
Puerto Rico Gov. Anibal Acevedo-Vila throws out
the first pitch before the Iowa Cubs baseball
game Friday In Des Moines, Iowa. Acevedo-Vila is
In Des Moines for the annual meeting of the
National Governors Association.
run.
And governors' impact on presidential poli-
tics is never out of the picture, with elections in
swing states like Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin
and Colorado. National and issue-oriented
groups are all strategizing.
"We're very focused on these governors
races," Karen White, executive director of'
Emily's List, said from Washington. Her group,
works to elect pro-choice, Democratic women.'
"We'll help them with the resources they need
early on, and then with their races."
Her group expects to raise more than 2004,
when they spent nearly $11 million. The:
Republican Governors Association aims to;
spend at least $30,million. Democrats didn't pro-
vide a number
This weekend, governors cross party lines to
focus on policy, with Medicaid and improving
high school education atop their list. But it
began with partisan fundraisers and meetings
with political consultants.
Michigan's Republican Party last week began
statewide radio ads charging Granholm with
failing to stop job losses as unemployment:
soars. Democrats fired back, criticizing likely'
challenger DeVos for running a company that
laid off 1,000 Michigan workers while investing,
in China.
Granholm acknowledged the challenge. She:
said she's focused on helping workers in her,
state's battered automotive industry adjust to:
painful changes of globalization. She acknowl-'
edged voters might take out their anger at the
ballot box.
"They may. But there's no other way to go. You'
have to be honest with people," she said.


Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -
Bankrupt energy company
Enron Corp. has agreed to set-
tle claims that it gouged
California and other Western
states during the energy crisis
of 2000-2001, when the region
was hit with blackouts and
soaring electricity bills.
The once high-flying compa-
ny said Friday it would pay up
to $1.5 billion, but the exact
amount could be far less
because of Enron's bankruptcy
proceedings.
"We'll get some of it, we just
don't know yet how far the
assets of Enron will stretch to
these multiple claims,"
California Attorney General
Bill Lockyer said Friday. "We
hope to recover as much as
possible."
The agreement requires


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www.chronicleonline.com


Search for bombings evidence widens


Police release images of bombers entering train station; Death toll raised to 55


Associated Press


LONDON Prime Minister Tony
Blair warned on Saturday that an
"evil ideology" of Islamic extremism
was bent on spreading terror
through the West, and authorities on
three continents widened investiga-
tions into the London terrorist
bombings. The death toll rose to 55.
Police in the northern city of
Leeds searched an Islamic shop, the
home of an Egyptian biochemist and
a third address for more evidence
after investigators reportedly found
traces of explosives in the Egyptian's
bathtub.
Also, police moved the twisted
wreckage of the double-decker bus
where one of the bombers and 13
other people died. The bus became a
symbol of the capital's worst attack
since World War II. Londoners and
tourists stopped to watch as police
used a flatbed truck to haul away the
tangled wreckage for forensic test-
ing.
Police also released an image cap-


tured by surveil-
lance cameras
showing all four
bombers with back-
packs entering the
train station in
Luton, north of
London, on the mor-
ning of the July 7


I


attacks. Investigators say the four
took a train from Luton to London's
King's Cross station, where they split
up to carry out the bombings.
The hunt for clues pointing to
those who recruited, financed and
supplied the four suicide bombers
who blew up three underground
trains and the bus focused on the
men's ties to Pakistan. Authorities in
Islamabad said they questioned stu-
dents, teachers and administrators
at one of two religious schools
believed visited by one of the sus-
pects.
Asad Farooq, a spokesman for the
school, told The Associated Press
that intelligence agents had been
there Saturday but denied that the


suspect, Shahzad
Tanweer, had ever
been at the school.
British investigators
7 R say Tanweer, 22, car-
ried outthe bombing
of the London
i Underground's Ald-
gate station.
Senior Pakistani intelligence offi-
cials said authorities were examin-
ing a possible connection between
Tanweer and two al-Qaida-linked
militant groups.
ABC television reported Saturday
that the FBI was looking into possi-
ble ties between unidentified people
in New Jersey and a Jamaican-born
Briton, whom British authorities for-
mally identified for the first time
Saturday as Germaine Lindsay, 19.
Police said he died in the worst of
the suicide attacks a subway bomb
that killed at least 26 people
between the King's Cross and
Russell Square stations.
FBI spokesman Ed Cogswell said
Saturday the agency had no com-


ment on any pending investigations.
Authorities raised the death toll
from 54 to 55 after an injured victim
died overnight at a hospital. About
700 people were injured in the
morning rush-hour attacks, and
police said more than 40 people
remained hospitalized, at least six of
them in critical condition.
In a speech in central London
Saturday, Blair said authorities were
facing an "evil ideology" in their
struggle against Islamic terrorism.
"The greatest danger is that we
fail to face up to the nature of the
threat that we're dealing with," he
said. 'And what we are confronting
here is an evil ideology.... It is a bat-
tle of ideas, of hearts and of minds,
both within Islam and outside it"
Police began searching a property
in Leeds a few streets away from
Tanweer's home Saturday after-
noon, posting guards outside the
entrance and wrapping the building
to block the view to outsiders. West
Yorkshire police declined to com-
ment on the raid.


* A
.2
S.


Associated Press
ABOVE: A member of the public walks
Saturday past a missing poster at central
London's Euston Station close to Tavistock
Square, where a bus was blown up during
the series of London bombings on Thursday,
July 7. CENTER: A message of remembrance
in honour of Anat, a victim of the London
bombings, outside the Saint Pancras Parish
Church in central London.


Emily's wrath going strong


-3--


1/


Associated Press
A Jamaican man walks Saturday next to the waves provoked by Hurricane Emily, In Kingston, Jamaica.

Category 4 storm pummelsJamaica, continues course toward Yucatan


Associated Press
BULL BAY, Jamaica Fishermen
dragged skiffs to shore and workers
raced to board up buildings Saturday as
Hurricane Emily swept along the south-
ern coast of Jamaica, packing winds of
nearly 155 mph and rain that could
bring landslides and flooding.
The Category 4 storm was on track to
pass close to Grand Cayman Island later
Saturday or early today before smash-
ing into the Yucatan Peninsula, where
Mexican officials prepared to evacuate
tourists, on its way to the Gulf of Mexico
and possibly southern Texas next week
Jamaican officials sent buses to evacu-
ate hundreds of residents in flood-prone
communities along the southern coast,
but all refused to leave, said Nadene
Newsome, spokeswoman for Jamaica's
emergency management office.


In the seaside fishing village of Port
Royal, on a peninsula just south of
Jamaica's capital, Kingston, storm-
weary locals again boarded up windows
and tied down metal roofs, just more
than a week after Hurricane Dennis
sideswiped the island.
Many said they were staying put
"Last week it was Dennis, now it's
Emily. What's next, Franklin?" Gordon
Murphy, 39, joked as his 2-year-old son
played at his feet "If I'm going to die,
it's going to be right here."
Emily's winds spiked to 155 ipph
Saturday afternoon with higher gusts,
making it a Category 4 storm that could
still strengthen, according to the
National Hurricane Center.
U.S. meteorologist Stacy Stewart said
Friday that it was "very rare" to have
such a strong hurricane in the
Caribbean Sea so early in the season.


Hurricane force winds extended up
to 60 miles and tropical storm force
winds extended up to 150 miles. The
hurricane center warned the storm
could dump 5 to 8 inches of rain over
Jamaica, which could produce flash
floods and mudslides.
Mexican officials declared a hurri-
cane warning and advised tourists to
evacuate much of the country's
Caribbean coast including the resorts
of Cancun and Cozumel and Isla las
Mujeres islands but stopped short of
ordering the move.
"We're trying to anticipate things, so
we don't get caught rushing around
later," President Vicente Fox said
Friday. "I'm confident we can handle
this thing with good prevention work"
Long lines of people choked the
Cancun airport on Saturday as tourists
rushed to leave.


Bomb kills 5 in Turkey; Second this week


A wrecked
minibus, with
Turkish flags in
the back-
ground, is seen
Saturday after
an explosion In
Kusadasi that
killed at least
five people.
There was no
immediate
claim of respon-
sibility for the
attacks.
Associated Press


Associated Press


ANKARA, Turkey A bomb tore
apart a minibus in a popular Aegean
beach resort town Saturday, killing at
least five people, including two foreign-
ers, the second explosion in a week
aimed at Turkey's vital tourism indus-
try.
The blast in the coastal city of
Kusadasi, a favorite destination for
British, Irish and German tourists,
reduced the bus to a scorched, twisted
heap of metal.
Police boosted security in the town,
searching cars as they entered and
patrolling the town's center with dogs.
Nobody claimed responsibility for


the attack Kurdish rebels have carried
out bombings in Aegean resort towns
but a Kurdish rebel commander,
Zubeyir Aydar, condemned Saturday's
explosion in a statement to the
Germany-based Mezopotamya News
Agency, which often carries rebels'
statements. The statement could not be
verified.
Leftist and Islamic militants also are
active in the country, a member of
NATO and one of Washington's most
important Muslim allies.
One British citizen was killed and
five were wounded, the British Foreign
Office said, another blow to Britain
after the July 7 bus and subway bomb-
ings in London that killed 55 people.


Girl's recollections



could power case


Prosecutor:

9-year-old

vividly recalls

crime spree

Associated Press
COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho -
Eight-year-old Shasta Groene
remembers the smallest
details about the night her fam-
ily was murdered and the six
weeks that prosecutors say she
spent with a registered sex
offender.
According to court records,
Shasta remembered the brand
of the hammer used to
kill her family, the fact
that some victims had
their feet bound while
others did not, and that
the killer wore dark
gloves. She called her
kidnapper "Jet," a nick-
name Joseph Edward
Duncan III used on his
disturbingly violent Sha
Web journal. Gro
Although child wit- clair
nesses are sometimes reme
nigIf
considered unreliable, family
Shasta's detailed ac- murc
counts as the sole sur-
vivor of the carnage
could give prosecutors a pow-
erful tool in their case against
Duncan.
Duncan, 42, was arrested
when he took Shasta to a
Denny's restaurant,
and her account
closely corroborates
physical evidence
recovered from the
crime scenes and I do
Duncan's stolen vehi- thiL
cle, according to the
records. yo
"I don't think you
could have a better COu
witness," said Jim
Sweetser, the former havi
prosecutor in adja-
cent Spokane County, bet
Wash.
Shasta's grisly Witni
account starts when a
stranger broke into
her home and killed
her family, and she
and her brother were Swe<
taken deep into the
forests of western pro
Montana.
For nearly seven
weeks Shasta and 9-year-old
Dylan endured repeated sexu-
al assaults, according to her
account, and at some point
Dylan was killed. Dependent
on her abductor for survival,
investigators said Shasta had
little choice but to follow his
commands until people at
Denny's recognized her from
pictures plastered all over
town.
Duncan has been charged
with three counts of first
degree murder and three of
first degree kidnapping in .the
deaths of Shasta's mother
Brenda, 13-year-old brother


a
CH
I
)I
ht
iY
Jd


ir
1




J
E
I






E
e


Slade and Mark McKenzie, 37,
her mother's boyfriend.
Federal kidnapping and
murder charges will be filed
later in the abduction of Shasta
and the abduction and slaying
of Dylan. Most of the charges
carry the possibility of the
death penalty.
Meanwhile, additional de-
tails keep leaking into the
open. The Pacific Northwest
Inlander, a free weekly based
in Spokane, Wash., reported on
Thursday that officers had
recovered a video camcorder
from the stolen Jeep Duncan
was driving and found footage
of him abusing and threatening
to kill the two children. The
Inlander also reported that
Dylan Groene was shot to
death and his body was
burned.
The newspaper cited
unnamed sources who
were working on the
case. The FBI and
Kootenai County sher-
iff's office declined to
comment on the report.
But Duncan's public
Vista defender, John Adams,
ene is incensed about the
ns to leaks.
mber "I thought this was a
twas civilized society and
ered. Coeur d'Alene was a
city of human rights
and not mob rule and
trial by press and anonymous
sources," Adams complained.
According to statements
released this past week, Shasta
told investigators that Duncan
said he used night
vision goggles to case
the family's rural
house for two or three
it nights. Night vision
n goggles were found in
nk Duncan's Jeep, offi-
"k cials said.
U Inside the house,
Shasta said Duncan
lId wore dark gloves and
carried a shoulder-
e a style weapon. Inves-
tigators found dark
ter gloves and a 12-gauge
-shotgun in the Jeep
DSS. and a red shotgun
shell, which Shasta
also described, in the
house.
Jim Shasta accurately
;tser described how her
former brother and the two
secutor. adults were bound with
zip-ties and duct tape,
including that her
brother had just his hands
bound and the others were
bound hand and foot.
Detectives said they found an
empty zip-tie bag in the Jeep.
Although Shasta and her
brother were taken to a waiting
truck and did not witness the
killings of her family, she said
Duncan later showed her a
FatMax brand hammer and
told her he used it to kill the
others, according to sheriff's
detective Brad Maskell. He
said authorities bought a simi-
lar hammer and matched tool
markings on it to the wounds
on the victims' skulls.


,on








A2^



JUuV I 7, 200)5


Get quilting Wednesday


Group planning

summer fun

Special to the Chronicle

The Cracker Quilters of Cit-
rus County has scheduled a
workshop for Wednesday at
The Stitching Place in the
Beall's shopping center in
Crystal River.
This is a change of venue.
The class will sew a tote bag


that has a photograph applied
to the mesh area. The work-
shop is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
price for the class kit is $15, and
the student fee is $5 for Cracker
Quilter members and $10 for
non-members. For more infor-
mation or reservations, call
Dixie at 795-2451.
The quilters will conduct
their monthly business meeting
Wednesday, Aug. 3. The mem-
bers can bring their own proj-
ects to work on as well as help
with the community projects.
The usual potluck luncheon


held in the summer will be
Wednesday, Aug. 17, with a
round robin of various sewing
and quilting techniques
demonstrated by quilt mem-
bers. Glenna Blenkhorn will be
demonstrating binding tech-


niques, Judy McVaugh will be
teaching how to make artist
trading cards and postcards
that can actually be mailed,
Dixie Shaffer will be discussing
online resources for quilters
and Lois Weighall will give a


talk on selecting different fab-
ric colors for quilting.
Meetings for the Cracker
Quilters of Citrus County are
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. the first
and third Wednesdays of each
month at the First Baptist
Church, 700 Citrus Ave., Crystal
River. All levels of quilters are
invited to attend, bring their
lunch and own quilting proj-
ects. Meetings include time for
working on community proj-
ects.
Call Barb at 249-3221 or Dixie
at 795-2491.


Eye on Ireland


Johnnye Friedrich visited Tipperrary on St. Patrick's Day of 2004.


Special lo inei Chronicle


The Chronicle and The Accent published in the Sunday Chronicle. Please make sure photographs are
.. DR E A M Travel Group are sponsoring a photo At the end of the year, a panel of in'sharp focus.
DL R i L AML_. -I VI contest for readers of the newspaper. judges will select the best photo dur- Photos should be sent to the
VACATJONS Readers are invited to send a pho- ing the year and that photographer will Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Pot* o Con(_ te t tograph from their Dream Vacation win a prize. Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 or
with a brief description of the trip. Please avoid photos with computer- dropped off at any Chronicle office or
S If it's selected as a winner, it will be ized dates on the print, any Accent Travel office.







Centers offer many activities for July


* WHAT: Cracker Quilters workshop.
* WHEN: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday.
* WHERE: The Stitching Place in the Beall's shopping center
in Crystal River.
* COST: The price for the class kit is $15, and the student
fee is $5 for Cracker Quilter members and $10 for non-


Outfoxed


CSCC Citrus Springs Community
Center at 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs; phone 465-7007
ECCC East Citrus Community Center at
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness;
phone 344-9666
ICC Inverness Community Center, 1082
N. Paul Drive, Inverness; phone 726-1009
WCCC West Citrus Community Center
at 8940 W. Veterans Drive, Homosassa;
phone 795-3831
Schedule of some events for July at the
Citrus County Community and Senior
Centers.
Contact individual centers for more course
offerings.
Art Lessons:
WCCC: 10 a.m. Wednesday.
CSCC: Watercolor at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday;
Oil painting at 1 p.m. Wednesday.
Crafts:


Ceramics, quilting and crochet offered at
various sites.
ECCC: 9:30 a.m. daily; Plastercraft at 2
p.m. Friday.
WCCC: Needlework at 1 p.m. Thursday.
Woodcarving Classes:
Bring your projects to the group, or pick
up some valuable lessons.
ECCC: 1 p.m. Tuesday.
ICC: 10 a.m. Wednesday; 10 a.m. and
noon Thursdays.
Quilters:
CSCC: 9 a.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Introduction to the Computer:
A class for the beginner. $25 for a six-
week session.
WCCC: 2:30 p.m. Monday. Instructor Bill
Harmon.
ECCC: 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and 12:30
p.m. Thursday.
Intermediate Computer Classes:


A class for those who know the basics.
$20 for a five-week session.
WCCC: 9:30 a.m. Thursday. Instructor
Dick Bromley.
Introduction to the Internet:
$15 for a four-week session.
WCCC: 3:45 to 4:45 p.m. Tuesday.
Instructor Bill Harmon.
ECCC: 12:30 p.m. Tuesday and 2:30
p.m. Thursday.
Digital Camera Class:
Learn how to use that new camera. $7
per class.
WCCC: 2 p.m. Friday. Instructor Dick
Bromley.
American Sign Language:
Sue Paulus teaches the art of communi-
cation. $30 for an eight-week course. For
more information, call 527-8479.


CSCC: Mondays, Aug. 22 through Oct.
10.
Basic Sign Language, 10 a.m. to noon.
Introduction to American Sign Language,
12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Call Jim at 465-7007.
WCCC: Tuesdays, Aug. 23 through Oct.
11.
Basic Sign Language for Adults & Teens,
9:30 to 11 a.m.
Introduction to American Sign Language
for Adults & Teens, 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Call Diane at 795-3831.
ECCC: Wednesdays, Aug. 24 through
Oct. 12.
Basic Sign Language, 10 a.m. to noon.
Introduction to American Sign Language,
12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Call Mary or Sal at 344-9666.


Special to the Chronicle
Fox terriers are usually
described as "a small black
and white disturbance!"
Tommy, a champion, is a
smooth fox terrier in the back
and Lucky, a rescued pup, is
a toy fox terrier. They live
with the Healys in Pine Ridge.


1 .~ -.' '''
...


NewsN ';k!

Eagles plan day of
old-fashioned fun
The Fraternal Order of the
Eagles, Aerie 3992 in Inverness,
will have Good Old Days Music,
food and fun today. Members
and their guests are invited to
bring their old records and join
the party from 2 to 6 p.m. Food
will be served at $5 per plate.
Call the club for more informa-
tion at 344-5337.
Citrus 20/20 board
to meet July 20
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Central Florida
Community College, Citrus
Campus, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. The meeting will be in
the conference room in the wel-
come center. All directors are
urged to attend.
Interested persons are invit-
ed. For more information about
Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit its Web
site at www.citrus2020.org or
call 527-0800.
Crystal River Eagles
Aerie plan meeting
A special meeting of Crystal
River Eagles Aerie 4272 is
being called at 6 p.m. Thursday
at the aerie home at 3271 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
The stated purpose of this
meeting is to discuss and vote
on a method to raise the funds
for our new home.
Knights of Columbus
plan dinner
Knights of Columbus, All
Saints Council is having its 200
Club dinner from 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday.
The dinner features one-half
chicken (baked), salad, deep-
fried Irish potatoes, Mexicali
com, beverage and marble
cake. The dinner is open to the
public at $6 per person.
The hall is on Atlas Drive in
Homosassa Springs.
Masons to offer
breakfast Saturday
Citrus Masonic Lodge 118 will
present a breakfast from 8 to 10
a.m. Saturday. All Masons, fami-
lies and guests are invited to
come and enjoy a delicious
breakfast of eggs, sausage,
pancakes, biscuits, sausage
gravy, grits, orange juice and fel-
lowship for $4 at the Masonic
Temple, 301 Hendrix Ave.,
Inverness. Call Walt Mabie,
W.M., 726-4732.
Anniversary dance
party planned
You are invited the "The Spirit
of Citrus Dancers'" Fifth
Anniversary Dance Party
Saturday at the Kellner
Auditorium, Jewish Center in
Beverly Hills.
Along with great recorded
dance music by deejay Butch
Phillips, punch, goodies, coffee
and ice will be provided. Dance
exhibitions by club members will
round out the evening.
Doors open at 6:45 p.m., and
there will be dancing until 10.
Dress is "elegant casual," or as
dressy as you like. Men need
not wear coats and ties.
Pay at the door; $6 per per-
son. There is a "get acquainted"
table for dancers without dance
partners. Call Lloyd or Kathy at
726-1495.









VT~TERAN S CITRUS COUNTY (FL,) OIRoNIcu~


10A SUNDAY, JUl. 17, 2005


-. Veterans BRIEFS


The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is planning a fund-raising
family day with a big barbecue
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 6, at the main shelter in
Bicentennial Park, Crystal River.
Everyone is invited to come enjoy
great food, games, quality time
with'the family and the park swim-
ming pool will be open. Tickets will
be $5 for coalition members and
$10 for nonmembers. All proceeds
will go toward the Transitional
House fund.
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has initiated plans for its
next project in providing a
Transitional House to provide
homeless veterans with a facility to
help them build a new life. With
more than 25,000 veterans calling
Citrus County home, there are
about 35 not as fortunate as most.
The coalition is dedicated to help-
ing those veterans in need. This
project is one that will take a lot of
help from all the veteran's organi-
zations, civic clubs, local business
and industry, national, state and
local government, the VA and the
citizens of Citrus County. With this
kind of cooperation this dream can
become a reality.
Raffle tickets will also be avail- .
able for the "Cruise for a Cause."
Only 1,500 tickets will be sold at
just $2 apiece with the drawing to
be held on Sept. 11 for a seven-
day Exotic Western Caribbean
cruise for two departing St.
Petersburg on Dec. 11 and return-
ing on Dec. 18. Again; all proceeds
from the ticket sales will go toward
veterans' assistance programs.
There will be no Veterans
Coalition meeting in July, and the
barbecue will take care of the
scheduled August meeting.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776, Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) will conduct its
bimonthly meeting at 1:15 p.m.
Tuesday, July 19, in Room 219,
Lecanto Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, (off
County Road 491), Lecanto. All
members are encouraged to
attend.
Chapter 776 is comprised of
combat wounded veterans. All
combat wounded veterans are
invited to learn more about Chapter
776. For more information, visit the
Chapter 776 Web site at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call Curt at
382-3847.
Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 Citrus
County will meet for a luncheon at
2 p.m. Tuesday at Foxy's
Restaurant on Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44) in Crystal
River. All Seabees, including those
who served with Seabee
Battalions, but were not rated as a
Seabee, plus all Honeybees and
friends, are invited to call for infor-
mation and reservations. Call
Commander George Staples, 628-
6927.
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will meet at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 20, in the
Conference Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle Building in
Meadowcrest.
The purpose of the meeting will
be plan and coordinate activities
for the 13th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week Oct. 31 to Nov.
13.
All veteran service organizations
are welcome and encouraged to
send representatives to participate
in the planning process.
Additionally, individual veterans are


cordially invited to participate in the
planning process.
Any organization or person
desiring additional information
should contact chairman Chris
Gregoriou by e-mail at allpres-
tige@yahoo.com or by phone at
795-7000.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,
Inglis (one mile east of U.S. 19).
Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
the post. Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday month-
ly. Call Skeeter Fizz, 447-3495.0
The Marine Corps League
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
will have its regular meeting at 7:30
p.m. on the third Thursday monthly
at VFW Post 7122 in Floral City. All
members are encouraged to
attend. Former Marines as new
members are also welcomed. Call
Tom Heron at 637-2724 or Bob
Hines at 746-6908.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Marine Corps League meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the VFW 7122 in Floral
City.
The Military Order of Devil
Dogs meeting: contact Chris at
795-7000.
The Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 is now
getting settled in its new meeting
hall at the VFW in Beverly Hills,
behind AmSouth Bank on County
Road 491.
The meetings are at 7 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. All
Marines are invited.
The detachment has an Honor
Guard of Marine League members
available who take pride in con-
ducting a memorial service for the
deceased member of all branches
of the military, not only at local
cemeteries, but also at the Florida
National Cemetery in Bushnell. If
you would like more information or
to join the league, call Bob at 527-
1577 or Ralph at 726-7836.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 of Citrus Springs will have its
general meeting at 7 p.m. on the
first Tuesday monthly; Ladies
Auxiliary will meet at 7 p.m. on the
second Tuesday; the Men's
Auxiliary will meet at 7:30 p.m. on
the third Monday; and the monthly
staff meeting will be at 7 p.m. on
the third Tuesday.
Edward W. Penno Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs will serve chicken
Italian sausage sandwiches on July
22 and fried fish on July 29.
Dinners are served from 5 to 7
p.m. at our usual price of only $6
per person. Entertainment will be
provided by the Country Bluegrass
Band. We hope to see you there.
The post also serves a complete
breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m.
Saturday for $4 per person.
Don't forget the weekly activities:
bingo at 1 p.m. Tuesday, shuffle-
board at 7 p.m. Wednesday and a
dart tournament on Thursday at 7
p.m.
E The H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills has bingo at
1 p.m. Sunday in the main hall,
open to the public. Doors open at
noon. No snacks and sandwiches
available until further notice.
Sunday: 25 cent wings, hot
dogs, hamburgers and fries served
from 4 to 7 p.m.
Monday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament at 2
p.m.
Wednesday: Lounge bingo 2
p.m. Hot dogs, hamburgers and
sausages on the grill at 5 p.m.


iUnCORIT DERfATOLOG
nD IKIf AJRGERY CeFATEA
Surgery and Diseases of the Skin, Hair and Nails
Board Certified American Board of Dermatology
Allen Ridge Professional Village
525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461
352-746-2200 352-873-1500
www.dermatologyonline.com

Sunday' PUZZLER ANSWER =

Puzzle is on Page 14A.

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7-17 @ 2005 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


Ladies night 5 to 8 p.m. with Mike
on the keyboard.
Thursday: Dart tournament at 7
p.m. Pool tournament at 7 p.m.
Friday: Lounge bingo 2 p.m.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087
Ladies Auxiliary will host an all-you-
can-eat spaghetti dinner from 4 to
7 p.m. Friday for $4. Open to the
public. Tickets in advance.
Deadline on tickets is today. There
will be some tickets available at the
door, but would appreciate
advance sales. Call the post for
information, 746-0440.
Saturday: DJ/karaoke starts at
7 p.m. with snacks at 8:30.
Golf tournaments are at 8 a.m.
Monday and Thursday.
The VFW Post Men's meeting is
at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
monthly, the Ladies Auxiliary meets
at 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly and the Men's Auxiliary
meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second
Wednesday monthly at the post
home. Rolling Thunder meets at 11
a.m. the second Saturday monthly
at VFW Post 10087.
Call the post at 746-0440. The
post is at 2170 W. Vet Lane on
County Road 491 behind the
AmSouth Bank and across from
Haywire's.
The VFW Post 7122, Floral
City, and the Ladies' and Men's
Auxiliaries announce the following
events.
Today: The post opens at 1 p.m.
Tuesday: Early bird bingo starts
at 6:30 p.m. and regular bingo at 7.
Shareen's Kitchen opens at 5 p.m.
with sandwiches, salads and
wings.
Wednesday: Shareen's kitchen
offers barbecued ribs for $6,
served from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday: The Marine Corps
League meets at 7 p.m.
Friday: All-you-can-eat grouper
fixed the way you like, or three-
piece fried chicken are served from
4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Karaoke by
Jannie Faye starts at 7.
Saturday: Char-broiled filet or
New York strip steak with all the
trimmings served from 5 to 7:30


p.m.
A new year is just beginning for
the VFW and the Ladies' and
Men's Auxiliaries. We welcome all
new and returning members.
Returnees from Iraq and
Afghanistan are especially wel-
come. Call the post at 637-0100 for
eligibility.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, Inverness, calendar for today
through July 24:
Today: Pool tourney at 2 p.m.
Karaoke from 5 to 9 p.m.
Monday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Chicken wings 4 for $1
from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Karaoke
from 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Free pool from 9
a.m. to noon.
Thursday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Friday: Free pool from 9 a.m. to
noon. AYCE fried or baked grouper
(chicken available) $6, from 4:30 to
7:30 p.m. Karaoke from 7 to 11
p.m.
Saturday: Beef tips and noodles
$7, at 5:30 p.m. Music by Just Us
4 at 6 pm.
The Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando will serve a
dinner with salad bar and dessert
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday.
Included is great music for dancing
and listening pleasure from 6:30 to
10:30 p.m. Cost is $5.50 for your
night out, and you do not have to
be a post or VFW member. Call
726-3339.
The post has bar bingo at 2 p.m.
Sunday. The Ladies Auxiliary
hosts bingo games at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, and doors open at 9.
Hot food and snacks available. The
auxiliary also sponsors bar bingo at
2 p.m. Tuesday.
The post Honor Guard is avail-
able for funeral services at
Bushnell National Cemetery, local
cemeteries or any house of wor-
ship. Upon request, the Honor
Guard will also provide school vis-
its, flag ceremonies, visit rest
homes or support any other patriot-


ic-related subject. Call John
Stewart, Honor Guard Commander,
at 634-5568.
The post Ladies Auxiliary is
starting a Junior Girls Division for
girls 5 to 16 years old. Call Judy
Prive at 726-3339.
Singles Nights are at 6:30 p.m.
the the first and third Thursdays
monthly. Music is provided by Katie
Lynn for a $2 donation. Come out,
enjoy some great music, meet
some wonderful single people and
have a great time.
Our post Web page is at
www.debbiefields.com, where you
will find a two-month schedule of
events. You can e-mail us at
usavets@naturecoast.net.
Come out and see our renovat-
ed facility. Halls are now available
to the public for weddings, busi-
ness meetings, club meetings, pri-
vate parties, etc. Food and enter-
tainment can be provided. Call us
for details.
The Dart League meets and
competes at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.
Mark your calendar for the annu-
al Labor Day picnic set for Sept. 4.
Watch this column for the date tick-
ets will be available and specifics
of the picnic.
We need help with our bingo
operations. Callers and floor coor-
dinators are needed immediately.
This is a very important part of your
post revenue and great recreation
for our members. Donate a few
hours and receive a lifetime of sat-
isfaction.
The post and Ladies Auxiliary
regularly visit several local nursing
homes. They encourage anyone to
join them and spread some cheer
.to veterans who served this coun-
try and now need our support. Call
us for details.
Call Bob Prive, commander, at
726-3339.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors of Citrus County meets at 2
p.m. on the fourth Thursday month-
ly at Ray's Bar-B-Q in Crystal
River. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.m
The Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77'of Inverness


invites all veterans of Inverness
and Lecanto to join them. Meetings
are at 7:30 p.m. the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training Center
building, 130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. The executive board
meets the third Thursday monthly.
Call the commander at 341-0971.
Yankee Air Force Inc. is
proud to have a "Commemorative
End of World War II" dance, also in
conjunction with VJ Day, on Aug. 6
at American Legion Post 58 on
U.S. 41 next to Carolina Dental
Clinic in Dunnellon. There will be
live big band music, hors d'oeu-
vres, cash bar, social hour from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Live music from
7:30 to 11 p.m. Wear your uniform
proudly if you still have it.
Tickets are $15 per person or
$25 a couple. Make checks
payable to Yankee Air Force Div.,
and mail with a SASE to P.O. Box
773364, Ocala, 34477. Deadline
for tickets is Aug. 1. Proceeds to
support Yankee Air Force Museum.
Call Carolyn at (352) 489-3120 or
the airport at (352) 465-0727.
All LST Veterans and wives
are invited to monthly breakfast
meetings at 9 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the Golden
Corral Restaurant in Brooksville.
Call 799-1957.m Phone Cards for
the Armed Forces Help our
U.S. soldiers phone home. Simply
purchase a first class phone card
and deposit it in the special box at
the Lecanto post office.
The U.S. Postal Service, in con-
junction with the U.S. Armed
Forces, will make sure that our
men and women in Iraq receive
these cards as a gift from the car-
ing people of Citrus County.
While at the post office, you can
also honor our heroes by purchas-
ing a patriotic piece of framed art.
Each 12-by-14-inch piece has a
military collage with a collectable
enamel pin and an actual
"Honoring Veterans" stamp.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who knows of

Please see '".-' /Page 11A


ATTENTION DIABETICS!

NEVER STICK YOUR FINGER AGAIN!!!
Come check out the newest technology for testing your blood sugar and...

NEVER STICK YOUR FINGER AGAIN!!!
All Diabetics who attend are eligible to receive the new FreeStyle Blood Glucose Monitoring System to be
paid for by Medicare. Also, Diabetics with Medicare qualify to be fitted for Diabetic shoes and 3 sets of
custom molded inserts. In the past year, Medicare has approved many new styles of all leather shoes...like
dress shoes, casual topsiders, and tennis shoes that are great for walking. These shoes are lightweight ar
are designed to provide your feet with extra support and cushioning to keep your feet healthy and
comfortable. Everyone fitted for shoes will be given 2 pairs of socks made especially for Diabetics...
FREEt111

MEDSOURCE is sponsoring a special "DIABETES DAY" at the Citrus County Builders
Association Hall in Lecanto, Florida on Monday, July 18th. Stop by any time from lOAM til
4PM. We'll do our best to have you in and out in less than 30 minutes. If you know of someone
who has Diabetes and Medicare, please be a good neighbor and let them know about it. They
won't want to miss this special event.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THEREIN
The Citrus County Builders Association Hall is located at 1196 S Lecanto Hwy in Lecanto, Florida.


Project Graduation Class of 2005

The Citrus High Class of 2005 and the Project Graduation committee would like to thank the following
community members for helping make this year's "Project Graduation Party" a success:


Beall's Department Store
Custom Car Care
Citrus Dental Association
Citrus Land Title
Crn steal Motor Car Compan
Deni.e A. L\n. P.A.
Don Po:,s' Roofing
Jeanic Adkisson '
Po1'piech Contracting, l .: ., ;. ..-
Sumter Electric Coop '.
Thoma. \W Davis;-.Aj ;
Santai Barbdra Siyle, Intc.;.'

H & L MA^btmy. t *
Grint iR io4t oii"#gInL-
Reahi h Count\
Nick Nic k J .d .
Central .. ...... .
Tile
United Me ifMeftr eI" sip ':
of Floral City :-
Beta Sigma Phi,'\i Ep ilon Chi
-Chapter \324-4
JW Morton Real Estate. Inc
Nlark H Stone, PA
Street Smart Shoes
The Bank of Inverness
Ted Williams Museum
Xi Mu Lambda Sorority
Suncoast Business Masters
VFW Post 4337


Citrus County Sheriffs Office
CHS Student Council
Ron's Auto Service
Timothy & Lori Hess


John and Mary Simonetti
Citrus County School Board
Publix Supermarkets Charities, Inc.
Church Without Walls of lnterness
:.Ceptralorid aMnnumnient Co
: Curves of Dunnellon
Witiri W\ie l 41S.
ER-\ AmericanRRealty &,Ilvestments
Kentucky Fled Chcken .. .
Michael's.FIor Covering .
The Hagr'Group ..
Lenno\ Cox and Gloria Gouveia Wells
Dale and Nancy Ladkfd rd
Josten;, Inc
AmSouth Bank
.;LPerle Memorlals, Perle. Inc
:' 'J6e' Deli
Lordco Enterpnses. Inc.
Citrus County Chronicle
Hungr> Howics
Pizza Hut
Huddle House
Brooklin Dell
The Coec
Joe'- Famil-\ Retiaurant
Donut Town
39 Pepperidge Farm
Pepsi
Coach's
Outback Steakhouse
Enrico's Italian Ristorante
Sonny's Real Pit BBQ
Burger King
Wendy's
B & F Stucco, Inc.


DA&B Construction (Lights)
Waste Management (dumpster)
Sue & Merrill Osterhaut
Citrus Coun\t Airboai Alliance, Inc
\Villiams Floor Store. Inc.
Econ-O-W~ash. Inc.
PRADO Enterprises. Inc
Kimanis Club ofl Ipverncs-
Idea LL.Andscapwig:& La% care
FloFid Coca-Cola.Botling Co
Angielo's PiZa
Ppa John's Pizza
Torellis -
Mlike'* Meat MNarkel
Heidi's
Chicken King
Cinnamon Siux
Kimberi's
Keebler
Applebee'.
Domino's Pizza
Golden Corral
SubwaN
McDonald's
Long John Sil\ers
Winn Dixie 44 W.
Ron's 581 Mini Storage
Santipotts
Swiftmud (use of McGregor Camp)


C I T h U c loa nineN ,i


www.chronlcleonline.cor -


CrrRnus CouNmY (FL) CHRONICLE.


VETERANS


<>








CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Don't let kids suffer with



'nature-deficit disorder'


Being outside helps

youngsters thrive
COLLEEN Lo IG
Associated Press
NEW YORK Lauren Showstead
sends her boys outside nearly every day to
play. In the summer, 5-year-old Justin and
3-year-old Brian collect bugs, pick up
worms and explore nearby ponds and
marshy areas. In the fall, they help rake
the leaves, and in the winter, they're mak-
ing snowmen and shooting down the luge
track their dad made for them.
'Just the fresh air alone is so important
for them. And it's great for their imagina-
tion. It's where they learn to be brothers
and work together," Showstead says.
She and her husband are often outdoors
with the kids, too, helping them build forts
and learn about plants in the backyard of
their Ridgefield, Conn., home.
The family might seem more like a
throwback to an era before video games,
the Internet and television came to rule
the recreation schedules of most families,
but Showstead says they've just learned to
balance high-tech toys and low-tech play
time.
"There are times when they watch TV or
use the PlayStation 2, but we just don't let
it get out of hand," she says. "We're lucky,
too, because our boys want to be outside.
Not a lot of kids want to be outside any-
more."
Mesmerized by gadgets
Doctors and teachers have been saying
for years that children spend too much
time indoors mesmerized by gadgets, or
that parents are holding their children
hostage inside for fear of kidnappers and
other dangers.
Richard Louv argues in his new book
that children are suffering from attention
problems and higher rates of mental and
physical illness because they aren't
exposed to direct nature. In "Last Child in
the Woods" (Algonquin Books), he calls the
idea "nature-deficit disorder."
(He's quick to note, however, that he's
not a medical doctor making an official
diagnosis.)
"One boy I met said he wanted to play
inside because that's where all the electri-
cal outlets are," Louv says. "That seems to
be how kids are thinking."
Louv, a journalist, has written several
books on nature and parenting. He gath-


Associated Press
Author Richard Louv tells Tim Schultz, right, and his six-year-old son, Nicholas, where to
find the trout and bass recently at the Miramar Reservoir in San Diego.


ered anecdotal information to help back
up his theory that nature helps children
become more observant, calm and cre-
ative. In his book, he refers to recent stud-
ies that back up these ideas, though there
are no long-term studies on how much
time children spend in nature, or how it
affects them.
Exercise consideration
Children badly need the exercise, too.
An estimated 16 percent of U.S. children
are obese, and 9 million children ages 6 to
16 are overweight, according to federal
health officials.
Overweight children usually grow into
overweight adults, at increased risk of
heart disease, diabetes, asthma and other
disorders.
Organized sports are helpful, but chil-
dren need unstructured time to explore,
Louv says. And the kids who do play on a
team usually don't do it year-round. Other
problems might be cultural pressures and
the sheer number of gadgets are making it
more difficult for children to just go out-
side.
Eve Edwards and her 9-year-old daugh-
ter, Sami, live in suburban Roslyn, N.Y,
but Sami goes to sleep-away summer
camp in Pennsylvania every summer for
exposure to nonstop nature. "There are no


distractions like TV You have to be out-
side, you have to play It's so old fash-
ioned," says Edwards.
Louv reports in his book that some sub-
urbs make it illegal to have basketball
hoops outside or to do chalk drawings on
the sidewalk in the name of aesthetics.
Other communities prohibit kids from
playing in nearby ponds or fields.
Other factors
Plus, parents feel their kids aren't safe
outside, with Amber Alerts regularly mak-
ing the national news and reports of scouts
going missing in the woods.
"Our culture lives in fear. We feel it
intensely," Louv says.
Time is another factor. Charlottesville,
Va., pediatrician Martha Hellems says she
sees patients in low-income households
whose parents work long hours and don't
have minutes, let alone hours, to chaper-
one the kids outside, and they can't afford
to send the kids to camp.
But Louv encourages parents to consid-
er the costs of keeping a child indoors all
the time.
"I'm not suggesting we revert to the '50s
when we let kids out to roam freely," he
says. "We have to go outside with our kids
and support programs that get our kids out
there."


Your Birthday: The year ahead
marks the beginning of more sta-
ble conditions in all areas of your
life mostly because you've learned
how to balance things out. It can
be a building cycle that will contin-
ue throughout your life.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
Don't be too surprised today if
someone you had helped in the
past now comes through for you in
a way that not only aids you in
material ways, but also helps you
better your social life.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) What
could be happening to you today
may be the fulfillment of a long
cherished dream. The events of
the day may even constitute a new
beginning that'll put you in an envi-
able position.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
While everyone is battling each
other for getting the best out of life,
in your own quiet way you'll make
your moves with the necessary
giant leaps forward to obtain the
big prize of the day.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
While you may not think that it is
such a big deal to get what you
want today without being abrasive
or pugnacious, onlookers who wit-
ness your actions will think you are
a genius.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
With ample faith in yourself and
armed with positive application,
you will be able to handle the
heaviest of responsibilities today.
You'll show others who have failed
how to succeed.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
- You possess the diplomacy to
deal with those who are unreason-


ably stubborn and will use it well
today, but once you seal the deal
on that agreement, carry it off with
style.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)-
Your modus operandi will be
incredibly artful and discreet today
and it's not likely you'll waste any
time in putting it to work for you in
meaningful ways, leaving you
ample time to socialize.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)-
Any alliance you form today should
prove to be quite durable and sur-
vive the test of time, particularly if
you associate or team up with
someone who is genuinely friendly
and cordial.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -
Your desires to be of service to
others today will be genuine and
sincere and be recognized by
those you help. Although you'll not
seek reward, they'll make certain
you get them anyway.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -
Something beneficial could devel-
op for you today through a friendly
social contact. It behooves you to
get out and mingle with your
friends, and be congenial with
everyone you encounter.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -A
condition that affects your basic
sense of security and well-being
will be handled so adroitly by you
today that it will put the entire fami-
ly at ease and make everyone feel
more secure.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
The biggest value of what you gain
out of extricating yourself from a
sticky situation today will be that
pleasantness calms stormy waters.
This knowledge will serve you well
from here on in.


Congregate Dining '


Monday: Beef tip stroganoff with
rotini noodles, garlic spinach (HD:
glazed carrots), tossed salad with
Italian dressing, whole wheat
bread with margarine, fruited red
gelatin and low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and cheese
sandwich on whole wheat, lettuce
and tomato, pea salad, diced
peaches and low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Ham and scal-
loped potato casserole, broccoli
cuts, stewed tomatoes, two slices
whole wheat bread with margarine,
peach cobbler and low-fat milk.


Thursday: Meatloaf with tomato
gravy, mashed potatoes, mixed
vegetables, whole wheat bread
with margarine, peanut butter
cookie and low-fat milk.
Friday: Oven-fried chicken leg
quarter, mixed greens with turkey
ham, black-eyed peas, cornbread
with margarine, fresh banana and
low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness
and South Dunnellon. Call Support
Services at 795-6264.


VETERANS
Continued from Page 10A

a homeless veteran in need of
food, haircut, voter ID, food
stamps, medical assistance or
more blankets is asked to call John
Young at the Hunger and
Homeless Coalition at 628-4357, or
pass along this phone number to
the veteran.
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will have its annual
Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram, Oct. 31 to Nov. 10 as part of
its 13th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week activities.


Coordinated by the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA), Citrus County Chapter,
the Veterans-in-the-Classroom pro-
gram brings living history to the
classrooms of the county's public
and private schools, as well as
home-school groups. Veterans
share with students their first-hand
military experiences and travels
while serving our country in uni-
form during peace and war.
The program's success has gen-
erated the need for additional vet-
erans to participate as guest class-
room speakers. Men and women
veterans who served in the Persian
Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air Force,
National Guard are especially
needed as participants.


All interested veterans are
encouraged to call Mac McLeod
746-1384, Gary Runyon 563-5727
or Bob Truax 860-1630.
N The USS Chilton (APA 38)


Navy reunion will be Oct. 6 to 9 in
San Antonio, Texas. Any veteran of
the Chilton is invited. Call Joseph
Doherty at 341-5959.
Salute veterans by taking .


cruise Salute veterans from
World War II, China-Burma-India,
Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and
Iraq by joining with friends and
families for a seven-day Western


Caribbean cruise Dec. 11 to 18.
For each cabin booked, $140
will be donated to support veter-
ans.
Call Amy Virgo at 564-9197.


Stuff the BusI

The Citrus County Chronicle along with Fun Oldies 102.7 presents "Stuff the Bus".
School bells will be ringing soon. Children in our area will be returning to school
without the proper school supplies. Please help us fill our buses with school supplies
for needy children.


GO ONLINE
* Visit www ChronicleOnline corn to read today's headlines.


Pediatric, Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine

S EXTENDED HOURS::AM
Appointments
& Walk-ins Welcome

DAVID W. POWERS, M.D.
1 0 S. Line Ave., inverness 726-8660



"? 'd,.(y 6^


SCHOL IBUS


Drop off locations


Perkins
State Bank
Inglis


All Children's
Sertoma
Therapy Center
Citrus Springs


Riverside
Antiques
and Gallery
Yankeetown



American Pro
Diving Center
Crystal River


GELING ABACI

"The Tension Collection"


89 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto


next to Smart Interiors
527-2556
Hcqji 10u 5 ii.n iru i ," 'Sal


wt~ ri ri


dl
I'.


Bus locations:
Saturday, July 23 K-Mart, Crystal River -10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Saturday, July 30 -Wal-Mart, Inverness -10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Saturday, August 6 Wal-Mart, Homosassa 10 a,m 2 p.m.

Sponsored by: Citrus County Chronicle, Bay News
9, Crystal River Mall, McRae's of Homosassa, Era ONICL
American Realty and Boulerice Roofing ---

For more information call 795-1027


Dr. Richard
Swanson
Family Dental
Center
Crystal River

Crystal
River
Music
Crystal River


Precious Cargo
Pre-School
Homosassa



Birds
Underwater
Dive Center
Crystal River


Nick
Nicholas
Ford
Inverness


DiaitaIHeiar


Dan Gardner M.S.
Free Consultation 33 "spn
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness, FL 3 795"570
700 SE 5th Ter., Crystal River, FL 3 9 5
www.gardneraudiology.com


,Aoll


SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 11A








CI'HtRUS COUNTY (FI,) CHRONICLII


Finding French Guiana


Visitors discover

jungles and

culture in old

penal colony
PETER PRENGAMAN
Associated Press

ST. JOSEPH ISLAND,
French Guiana Thick trop-
ical vines wrap around rusty
jail bars and trees grow
inside cells in the 19th centu-
ry prison on this far-flung
island off South America a
relic of French Guiana's dark
past as a penal colony where
thousands of prisoners died
of disease.
The prison, and many like
it on the mainland in French
Guiana, closed more than 50
years ago. But their history
haunts the French Guianese,
who are eager for the world
to discover their vast rain
forests and eclectic culture of
European lifestyles fused
with the many traditions
brought by Caribbean, Asian
and South American immi-
grants.
"This country has an image
of prison and death," said
Serge Colin, 74, a retired
French navy captain who
moved to St Joseph and gives
tours of the jail. "Even today,
parents in France tell their
young children, 'If you don't
behave I'll send you to
French Guiana.'"
The French government
spends $2.2 million a year to
shed that image, producing
brochures and buying televi-
sion commercials that show
off jungles filled with jaguars
and monkeys, beaches where
huge tortoises waddle out of
the surf, and fishermen
whisking piranhas out of
rivers.
The campaign dubbed
"Personne ne vous croira"
("No one will believe you") -
seems to be working.
Between 60,000
and 75;000 peo-
ple a year have
visited the
French depart- came I
ment of 200,0000
residents since the adv
2001 a surge
from the 1990s and m
when so few
tourists came loved it
that officials
stopped keeping
track, said Karl
Joseph, a Strast
spokesman for
the Tourism
Committee of French Guiana.
Travel booklets are devot-
ed to debunking myths like
rampant malaria and poison-
ous snakes. "Sanitary risks?
Be assured that I came back
in good health," says French
Red Cross president Marc
Gentilini in one book
"When we said we were
going to French Guiana, peo-
ple said we were crazy," said
Marc Ungerer, 27, an electri-
cian from Strasbourg,
France, on vacation with his
girlfriend. "They talked
about the mosquitos, sharks


Associated Press
The entrance to the abandoned prison on St. Joseph Island, French Guiana, is pictured March
20. Thick tropical vines wrap around rusty jail bars and trees grow inside cells in the 19th cen-
tury prison that closed more than 50 years ago. But history haunts the French Guianese, who
are eager for the world to discover their vast rain forests and eclectic culture of European
lifestyles fused with many traditions brought by Caribbean, Asian and South American immi-
grants.


and piranhas."
"We came here for the
adventure and we've loved
it," he said, sitting on a cata-
maran on the way to St.
Joseph Island. "We wanted to
see the forest, have a differ-
ent kind of vacation than sit
on a beach."
The French first settled
this small strip of land
between Suriname and
Brazil in the early 17th centu-
ry. Two hundred years later,
Napoleon III 'desperately
needed to build new prisons
for a burgeoning inmate pop-
ulations in France and its
colonies. He also needed a
new source of forced labor
after France abolished slav-
ery in 1848. The two needs
converged in French Guiana.
Between 1852 and 1946,
France sent 70,000 prisoners
to its remote possession in
South America, forcing them
to mine for gold
and cut wood in
We the forests.
Though esti-
iere for mates vary
widely, histori-
renture ans estimate
between 25 and
ve've 50 percent of
inmates died of
. diseases like
malaria and yel-
low fever, hun-
t"-..- ger or prison
rationing from ger or prison
ourg, France. violence, said
Serge Mam Lam
Fouck, profes-
sor at the Antilles University
in French Guiana.
The horrors were drama-
tized in former prisoner
Henri Charriere's memoirs,
"Papillon," which recounted
conditions and his repeated
escape attempts from a
prison on Devil's Island -
visible from St. Joseph Island
but closed to the public. The
book was made into the 1973
film starring Dustin Hoffman
and Steve McQueen.
France started closing the
prisons in the 1930s as the
world started taking notice of


* GETTING THERE: Air France provides most service
from Europe and the Caribbean. Smaller airlines like
Surinam Airways serve other destinations in South
America.
* LODGING: Options across the French department
range from guest houses to full service luxury hotels.
Reservations recommended if trip coincides with
major conference or a launch at European Space
Center.
* WHEN TO GO: January to June is the rainy season,
while July to December has less precipitation. But
because French Guiana has an equatorial climate, tem-r
peratures range from 79 to 91 all year.
* THINGS TO DO: Take guided tours of rain forests, fish
in Amazonian livers, visit the European Space Center,
camp on the Salvation Islands (lls dL Salut) off the
northern coast, visit jails that made up part of former
penal colony.
* HEALTH: Vaccination against yellow fever is mandate
ry. If traveling along rivers or in forests, anti-malarial
treatment is recommended.
* INFORMATION: Visit www.tourisme guyane.com or
www.cnes csg.fr.


the atrocities. The last of the
prisons closed in the early
1950s.
The former penal colony
has flourished into a haven
for immigrants fleeing pover-
ty, repressive regimes and
violence.
Chatter in more than a
dozen languages fill the
streets in the capital of
Cayenne.
Next to French boutiques,
Chinese immigrants hawk
electronics, and Brazilians
and Amerindians sell fresh
fruits and fish in open-air
markets. Haitians and
Vietnamese run small gro-
cery stores, and thrift shops
selling hammocks and mos-
quito nets.
The French department is
wealthier than its South
American neighbors, with
the European Space Center
satellite launch pad serving
as the main employer.
A decidedly French flavor
infuses life. Residents spend
euros, carry European Union
passports and congregate
around central plazas. The
roads have French rotundas
instead of stop lights.


The French Guianese favor
long conversations over
lunches of pepper steak
(steak-au-poivre) and top
cabernet wines.
Businesses close and
streets empty for most of the
afternoon as people escape
the oppressive heat and
humidity indoors.
A hit reality TV show in
France has brought new
attention to French Guiana.
Launched in February, "lere
Compagnie" (First Company)
is filmed on a fake military
base about 50 miles north-
west of Cayenne. Contestants
face challenge courses that
take them into rain forests
where they inevitably run
into wild animals like croco-
diles.
While the show has been
wildly successful in France,
the French Guianese are less
enthusiastic, quickly point-
ing out that filming takes
place just blocks from large
hotels and ordinary tourists
are unlikely to come across
such dangers.
"It's just a game," scoffs
Madeleine Calcagni, a hotel
owner.


Current events


highlight



changing times



in pretty Aruba


. on dia (good morning).
The news of the past
few weeks concerning
the disappearance of Natalee
Holloway has us wondering
just what DID happen to this
pretty teenager. She was with
her class enjoying the trip to
Aruba, and disap-
peared the night
before she was to ..
leave to go home. .
That was several
weeks ago, and thus
far, not much has
been discovered as
to what happened
but that's another
story, to read about Anne
in the newspapers.
Our hearts go out '"-
to her mother OF A
whose suffering is COUN
beyond words, won-
dering just what happened to
her lovely daughter how did
she disappear, is she still alive,
although the possibility of that
is extremely remote. Things
have changed drastically since
the times we stopped off at this
island on cruises.
Aruba is a lovely island. It is
the smallest of the three
islands comprising the
Netherland Antilles Aruba,
Bonaire and Curacao, general-
ly referred to as the ABC
islands.
It is so charming that one can
easily fall in love with this des-
tination of beautiful beaches,
hotels, restaurants, etc., but
particularly the weather.
There's always trade winds
blowing, which account for the
unusual sight of the trees.
Trees have the center trunk
reaching for the sky, but these
trees, known as divi divi trees,
have their branches bent in the
direction of the winds.
The island is primarily
Dutch, but everyone speaks
English. Spanish is also spo-
ken; however, the local dialect
is Papamiento. Its basis is
Portuguese spoken by the
Jewish emigrants who settled
there in the early 18th century.
However, since then a few
other languages crept in -
Dutch, Spanish, English,


F


Is


African and Arawak Indian
dialects.
Oranjestad is the capital of
Aruba. It is a mecca for shop-
ping, especially since it is
"duty free" shopping, which is
more a discount rather than a
bargain. However, items from
all over the world
can be found here.
We've always en-
joyed our cruise
. stopovers at Aruba,
*4 but that took place
l. years ago, when the
land was still rather
Pristine. Today,
however, much has
Fusillo changed to cater to
the visitors and
tourists it would-
;-,.. n't be the same. It is
SELOR really a traveler's
-- paradise, beckoning
those looking for a very active
or peaceful vacation. Let's hope
and pray that this incident of
Natalee will soon be over.
Oh, one more thing about our
vacation to my hometown. We
came home happy, but within
the next day or so, Marianne
took sick with a horrible sore
throat, which she attributed to
the flight. Not so, after seeking
medical advice, she learned
she was allergic to "mold" and
it became worse. The damp,
rainy weather played havoc
every time she went to the
shop, so she had to close the
shop, and presently is looking
for another place, temporarily
working from her home. Her
office phone number is still
active, so you can get in touch
with her. She is still fighting
that allergy'.,
Marianne, hurry and get well
- we all miss you, especially
the choir.
Te aworu See you later.
Ayo Goodbye!
(A few phrases in Papa-
miento.)

Anne Fusillo and her
husband, Frank, owned
a travel agency in Wheaton,
Ill., for 17years. Questions or
comments? Give her a call
at 564-9552.


SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
* Follow the instructions on today's Opinion page to send a
letter to the editor.
* Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will
be limited to three letters per month.
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 563.0579.


IIid IGRioUPS
-. V1'4 WEI COMFY


IL


Casino
Magic
Aug 14 a Sep1
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Atlantic
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ug 28&Sep 18
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Our Lady of Grace
Motorcoach Daily Mass 7 nights on the Carnival Glory
Sail January 16h to Departing December 10, 2005
Sall January 161 to7 includes cruise, port and government
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c'o009 57 Per Person
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From $820.88 pp inc. ins. & Irans.
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,T~ jJrJ\Yy~s


CITRUS UNITED BASKET
FUNDRAISER CRUISE
10/29/05 11/03/05
Sail from Tampa Bay on board
Carnival's Inspiration to the ports
of Cozumel and the Grand
Cayman Islands
Interior Cabins $483.35 per person*
Ocean View Cabins
$553.35 per person*
For more information and reservations
please contact
CITRUS UNITED BASKET
NOLA GRAVIUS
(352) 344-2242


HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
WILDLIFE PARK
Summer programs fc
children in the third
fifth grade -
Wildlife funshops
5 half days
Call Eileen
(352) 382-5300


CRYSTAL RIVER Capt. Mike's i TIW y
ARCHAEOLOGICAL Lazy River
STATE PARK Cruises
61 acres of River Cruises
Native American O The:
burial mounds. Withlacoochee River R
Open 365 days. Rainbow Springs River


(352) 795-3817


W l III IJijJl


HISTORIC
ST. FRANCIS INN
B&B Located in the
oldest part of the city


* Guests receive FREE
admission to lighthouse
1 -(800) 824-6062
www.sffrancisinn.com


For Reservations 352-637-2726


52 Weeks $ 125
26 Weeks $I750
6 Weeks $2000
Open Rate $3500
To place your ads,
call us today (352) 563-3231.
Publication every Sunday in the Citrus
Count" Chronicle and oil '..'eel' on
www.chronicleonline.com


Sterling
Cruise
August 18" & September 15"
Inverness Pick-Up Only


Branson
14 Meals. 6 Sow
$697
Oct0oe 11 .Noseber 1


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qt


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cust e,,
PLAN A DAY INw'N-Ew"' 'O"R'IL/fiA"'.-Sr WITH YOUR BiLom TRIP!


I


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I -LL- I


12A SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


TRAVEL


h


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b


LIf^-i^ 5im^


<


or


-il Am








SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 13A


40th VWeddings


The Richardsons


Festante-Howarth


Wimmer-Piazza


Phillip and Terry Richard-
son will celebrate their 40th
wedding anniversary on July
24.
They were married July 24,
1965, at Immaculate Heart of
Mary Church in Galesburg, Ill.
They lived in the Galesburg
/Knoxville, Ill., area their
entire lives, moving to Her-
nando five years ago.
Phillip is employed as a
machinist at Belimo Customi-
zation Inc. in Inverness. Terry
is employed as a nurse in the
Special Care Unit at Life Care
Center of Citrus County.
They have been blessed with
seven wonderful children and
14 beautiful grandchildren
(with another one expected in
the coming year).


They will celebrate this
event at a later date with their
family


Anthony Russel Howarth
and Cheri Lee Festante were
united in marriage at 6 p.m.
Friday, June 10, 2005, at the
couple's home in Leisure
Acres, Lecanto. Donna
Viglione from The Wedding
Chapel in Inverness per-
formed the Christian service.
The maid of honor was
Kristen McCrady and the best
man was Rusty Jones. The
flower girl was Heather Paige
and ring bearer was Justin
Paige.
The groom is self-employed,
Tony's Lawn Service, and the
bride is employed at Intern
Health Care.


Robert David Piazza of
Homosassa Springs and
Gwendolyn Lynn, Wimmer of
Floral City were united in mar-
riage on Sunday, May 29, 2005,
at the couple's home in Floral
City.
Donna Viglione from The
Wedding Chapel in Inverness
performed the Christian serv-
ice.
Maid of honor was Michelle
Wimmer and best man was
Joey Piazza.
The couple went on a wed-
ding trip to Niagara Falls, N.Y.


They went on a wedding trip
to Tennessee.


Engagement

Strongarone-McMahon


Robert and Susan Strong-
arone of Homosassa announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Daina Strongarone, to
Shawn McMahon, son of the
late Patrick McMahon and
Patty Franco of Marco Island. A
May 2006 wedding is planned
in Orlando.
The bride-elect has a degree
from the University of Central
Florida and graduated from
the Marion County School of
Radiologic Technology. She is
currently the lead emergency
room radiologic technologist at
Orlando Regional Medical
Center
The future groom is a gradu-
ate of the University of Central


Florida with a bachelor's
degree in communications. Mr
McMahon is currently with an
Orlando-based pharmaceuti-
cal company


Joseph John Lloyd and
Rebekah April Gregory were
united in marriage on
Saturday, July 10, 2004, in an
outdoor ceremony at Holiday
Inn SunSpree Resort Marina
Cove in St. Petersburg. Dr. Rev.
Cole performed the service,
which included the couple's
personal vows to each other,
family vows made to the
groom's daughters, and par-
ents' blessings.
The bride is the daughter of
David and Corl Gregory and
the groom is the son of Trish
Mlekodaj and Curtis Lloyd.
The bride wore an elegant
white gown with cowl neckline,
rhinestone detail on the straps,
and train. A Spanish lace and
pearl beaded veil adorned her
head. The bouquet was an
arrangement of white silk flow-
ers with cascading green
leaves.
The best men were Tony
Lloyd and James Gregory. The
matrons of honor were
Jennifer Gregory and Melissa
Chirichella. The groomsmen
were Mark Gregory, Pete
Stibbs, Kenny Cramer, Lloyd
Smith and Bob Sweet. The
bridesmaids were Dorreen
Flack, Stephanie Flack, Leslie
Davis, Cindy Smith and
Michelle Mahas. The ushers
were Nathan Gregory and
Franklin Noll II. The ring bear-
er was Joey Tirrell Jr. The
flower girls were Anzli Lloyd,
Matasyn Hall-Lloyd, Emily
Gregory, Kamryn Lloyd, Ashley
and Heather Noll.
The wedding reception was
held immediately following the
ceremony in banquet facilities


James Michael Allison and
Christy Lynn Salo were mar-
ried Saturday, June 25, 2005, at
the Lake Alice Chapel at the
University of Florida in
Gainesville with the Rev.
Robert Estling officiating.
Attendants included best
man, Scott Allison, son of the
groom from Raleigh, N.C.,
matron of honor, Theresa
McAlister, sister of the bride
from Ardmore, Okla., flower
girl Skyler McAlister, niece of
the bride also from Ardmore.
The bride was escorted
down the aisle by her son,
Jeremy Marshall from
Columbus, Ohio. A reception
for 100 guests was held at the
home of the couple.
The groom is a graduate of
UF, a retired lieutenant from
Gainesville Police Department
and former Chief of Police of
Dunnellon. The bride is a grad-


uate of Santa Fe Community
College and employed as an
insurance underwriter.
Following a honeymoon to
Sanibel Island, the couple will
reside in Gainesville.


Wedding First 2R7 L1


Gwynneth Marie Parker cel-
ebrated her first birthday on
July 3. Gwynneth is the daugh-
ter of Leslie and Kenny Parker
of Land 0' Lakes. Her mater-
nal grandparents are Bob and
Susan Hnat of Hernando and
Deanna Aylward of West Palm
Beach. Her paternal grandpar-
ents are Aloma and Larry
Parker of Carrolton, Ga.


of the resort. The out-of-town
guests were Sgt. Zachary
Gregory, Zachary Gregory II,
Christina Koelzer, John and
Carol Powers.
The groom is a graduate of
Citrus High School and the
manager of Crystal River Pizza
Hut. The bride is a graduate of
the University of South Florida
and works at Publix Super
Market and is a substitute
teacher.
The newlyweds honey-
mooned in South Beach
Miami.
They will reside in Hom-
osassa.


Logan Jakub Smerecki cele-
brates his first birthday on
Aug. 31. Logan is the son of
Raymond and Barbie
Smerecki. He was born in
Citrus County. His grandpar-
ents are Pam and Denis
Nevera and Bettyann and Caz
Smerecki, and his great-grand-
father is Gordon Jones.


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip, to submit to the
Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


Craig Heinz and Ruth
Duncan were united in mar-
riage at 4:30 p.m. Saturday,
June 4, 2005, at Inverness Golf
and Country Club, Inverness.
Charles Thomas, uncle of the
bride, performed the service.
The bride is the daughter of
Derrell and Helen Smith of
Inverness.
The groom is the son of Ellen
Baker and the late Byron E.
Baker of Inverness and Donald
J. Heinz of Dubuque, Iowa.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father, Darrell
Smith. The bride wore an ivory
satin gown with pearl encrust-
ed bodice and ivory veil with
pearl headband. She carried a
bouquet of white roses and
blue trim.
The maid of honor was Joy
Presley, bride's sister, and best
man was Donald Heinz,
groom's brother. The brides-
maids were Sherry Garcia and
Talisa Smith and the ushers
were Randy Presley and James
Smith. Junior bridesmaid was
Loni Duncan, flower girl was
Shylah Erskine and ring bear-
er was Shawn Nunnemaker.
Ashley Nunnemaker and
Dominique Presley attended
the guest register
The maid of honor wore a
royal blue gown with spaghetti
straps and matching shawl and
the bridesmaid wore a royal
blue draped back gown.
The wedding reception was
held immediately following the
ceremony at the Inverness Golf
and Country Club.
Out-of-town guests included
Sgt Randy and Joy Presley,
RAF, from Menwith Hill,
England; Mr. and Mrs. Steve
Suarez, Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy
McDermott, Jacksonville; Mr.
and Mrs. Kenny Blankenship,
Land 0' Lakes; Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Thomas, Hoyt; Mr and
Mrs. James Smith, The
Dyanders Family, Kenneth
Rugg, Mr and Mrs. Frank
Siedleck, Ms. Mary Barton, all
of Tampa; Mr. Donald Heinz,
Largo; and Mr and Mrs. Chris
Alli, Spring Hill.
The bride is a graduate of
Chamberlin High School,
Tampa, employed by Inverness
Golf and Country Club.
The groom is a graduate of
Pompey High School, Pompey,
N.Y, served in the U.S. Navy


and is employed by Inverness
Golf and Country Club.
The newlyweds honey-
mooned at Clearwater Beach.
They will live in Inverness.

FORMS AVAILABLE
The Chronicle has forms
available for wedding and
engagement announce.
ments, anniversaries,
birth announcements and
first birthdays.
Call Linda Johnson at
563 5660 for copies.
Submit items for the
Together page by 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday. This guide.
line does not guarantee a
specific publication date
S- material submitted
will appear as soon as
possible in the Chronicle.






Thank You
for Voti '

Store. 17

(352) 564-0124 B-'.
Ni l liJ"...l P,, P .I -rll C- R '.,


Your
life moves from one
day to the next. What was the
past evolves into the present and
grows into the future. Your health is
an important link in that circle. And the
: physicians and nurses at Oak Hill Hospital
,- utilize leading-edge technology at the
"f best facility in the area. All to keep
you enjoying the things you like to
do everyday. Because around


here, that's what
most.


matters-







I


Sao-Allison


Duncan-Heinz


Gregory-Lloyd


WE WANT
YOUR PHOTOS
* Photos need to be in
sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in
proper exposure: neither
too light nor too dark.
* Include your name,
address and phone num.
ber on all photos.
* When identifying persons
in your photo, do so from
left to right.
* We discourage the use of
Polaroid prints.
* Photos printed on plain
paper do not reproduce
well.
* Photos submitted elec-
tronically should be in
maximum-resolution JPEG
(.jpg) format.
* Photos cannot be
returned without a self
addressed, stamped enve
lope.
* For more information, call
Linda Johnson, newsroom
coordinator, at 563 5660.


CITRUS COUN'ITY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOGETI-IHER








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE.


AI. T-., -17 0';


4A sUNDAY, JULY 17, 20 5


Bring on the new garbage Unbalanced marriage might


I read that 125 million cell phones are
thrown away each year. Many of them
grabbed from the hands of inconsiderate
users on commuter trains and tossed out the
window by other passengers, no doubt
That would account for only 3 or 4
million of them, though.
Millions of others have probably
been stomped into smithereens by I
audiences at plays and movies who
had had their evenings interrupted
by people who refuse to turn them off.
Still, that leaves more than 100 mil-
lion cell phones thrown away by their
proper owners who have traded up.
I'm still not used to even having a
cell phone. The idea of throwing one A|
out that does not compute. Oh MU|
yeah, we threw out 133,000 personal
computers last year Some people
still don't have computers and others are throw-
ing them out
How many televisions and radios go to the
dump? There's a collection box at my gym
where you can throw away your tiny, little empty
printer cartridges to get them recycled for char-
ity. There is no box at my gym where you can
throw away your gigantic, bulky old printers.
It's a depressing certainty that the fanciest,
most expensive electronic gadget in your house
today will end up being garbage in a few short
tomorrows.
Fmnny that none of the consumer electronic
companies use that line in their advertising
campaigns.
Here's a catchy tag line you'll never hear from
any high-tech company "You wouldn't be
caught dead with this thing a year from now!"
It's hard to believe, but that slim little laptop
you bought last week is going to look so clunky
and gigantic in two or three years that people
will laugh at you if you lug one into a business
meeting in 2008. It will look as out of date as
showing up with a slide projector
Haven't you bought the new iDohickey yet?
The whole thing will be the size of a walnut Not
just a computer, it'll have room for a hundred
thousand songs that it downloads free off the


i
IL


Internet daily. It is also a cell phone, a radio, a
PDA, can send and receive e-mail and fold out
into a 36-inch plasma TV
It won't work unless it recognizes you with a
retina scan. You'll be able to leave it on during
plane trips and it will read your
thoughts, you won't even have to
speak them.
Then, in two or three years, you'll
throw it out for something better,
I something smaller, something cooler.
Why would anyone buy the extend-
ed warranty anymore? When the
salesman says for an extra $150 we'll
extend the warranty on this gadget
A for two years you say, "I wouldn't be
M caught dead with this gadget in two
LEN years.
Who cares- if it still works or not?
It's junk I'll take that $150 and buy a
new one, a better one. Why fix the old one?"
I remember when the Betamax VCR first
came. You could tape TV shows at home and
watch them whenever you liked.
But they were soooo expensive. $1,200. It took
a year or two, but the price gradually fell. When
they hit $600 I told Sue we had to buy one.
They'll never get cheaper than $600.
As Sue has reminded me almost daily for 25
years, within a year we could have picked up a
newer, better Betamax for less than $200. Pretty
soon they stopped making them altogether.
I just saw one on eBay for a buck It'd make a
nice anniversary present, I'm thinking. The
postage, however, was $15.
Still, it might be worth it to play all those old
TV shows we Betamaxed but have nothing to
play them on anymore.
But why bother, all those old shows are turn-
ing up on nice clean, easy-to-store DVDs. Which
will become tomorrow's garbage as soon as the
next big thing comes along.


Jim Mullen is the author of "It Takes a Village
Idiot: Complicating the Simple Life" and
"Baby's First Tattoo." Reach him at
jim mullen@myway.com.


Today 'sMOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Charlie & the Chocolate
Factory" (PG) 12:30 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes
or super savers.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) 12:50
p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05
p.m. Digital. No passes or super
savers.
"Wedding Crashers" (R) 12:40
p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:55
p.m.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10 p.m.
"Dark Water" (PG-13) 12:20


p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:55
p.m.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G)
12:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) 10:10
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Charlie & the Chocolate
Factory" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 12:45
p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
Digital. No passes or super savers.
"Wedding Crashers" (R) 12:10
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:25
p.m. Digital.
"Dark Water" (PG-13) 12:25
p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25


p.m.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) 12:40
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:55
p.m. Digital. No passes or super
savers.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
Noon, 4:10 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 9:50 p.m. Digital.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) 9:40 p.m.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G)
1.2:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13)
12:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.


I MEDICAL CENTER


HEALTHCARE, LLC O w ;

Vincent Alia, M.D.
Family Medicne


Mark Barnhurst, PA-C
Physicians Assistant .



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Do you suffer from knee or hip pain?

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For reservations or
more information call

(352) 291-6401


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THE

JOINT CARE CENTER

WEST MARION COMMUNITY HOSPITAL


need new set of parameters


Dear Annie: I am a 40-ish mom to three
children ranging in age from 2 to 8. My
husband and I have been together 14
years. When we first started dating, sex was
awesome. Over the years, our responsibilities,
priorities and workloads have
changed.
My husband works full time and
also does projects around the house.
I work full time, and my non-working
time is spent picking up the kids
from day care, fixing meals, cleaning
the house, doing laundry, paying
bills, grocery shopping, arranging
doctor's appointments, helping with
homework, etc. You get the gist
My husband's only housework
responsibility is to empty the dish-
washer When he feels like it, he
might make dinner, and he will give ANI
the baby a bath every once in a MAIL
while. I agree that his projects are
important, but they tend to be weather-related,
like mowing the lawn. In the winter, all he does
is empty the dishwasher, but if he can't find a
clean shirt, I get harassed and told I'm lazy.
Since the children have come into the pic-
ture, sex has been the last thing on my mind. At
the moment, I don't care if I ever get any again.
I'm exhausted. I have spoken to my Ob-Gyn, who
explained that sometimes a woman's body will
shut off the libido, because it knows energy
needs to be used for other things.
I have tried explaining this dynamic to my
husband, but he acts as if I'm punishing him by
withholding sex. I've suggested we do the
chores together, which will help put me in the
mood. I've offered to go with him for counseling.
I've even threatened divorce. All he says is, he
has his list of chores, and I have mine. Argh!!! I
need some advice. Overworked and
Overtired
Dear Overworked: Who made these lists? You
need some new ones. No one should get the win-
ter off, while his partner becomes an inden-
tured servant Some men simply don't grasp that
resentful wives do not make loving partners.
And don't disregard the possibility that you are
indeed punishing him because you feel taken
advantage of. Healthy intimacy requires that
each of you wishes to please the other


If your husband cannot see the value in a
more equitable distribution of duties, tell him
you are going for counseling with or without
him.
Dear Annie: I live in a complex that houses 24
apartments, some with balconies. On
about half of these balconies, there
are wind chimes. On a warm, breezy
night when I have my windows open,
all I hear is clang, clang, clang.
I realize some people like this
sound, but I am unable to sleep with
the continued noise. I have talked to
the manager, but since he also has
I wind chimes, he refuses to do any-
thing about it. I really like living here
and do not want to move, but the lack
of sleep is getting to me. Any ideas?
--All Clanged Out
HE'S Dear Clanged: Unless there is a
-BOX provision in your lease that promises
you peace and quiet from wind
chimes, there's not much you can do. Create
some white noise of your own (fans or ocean
waves), get earplugs or close your windows.
Sorry.
Dear Annie: This is for the "L.A. Fiancee" of
the biggest packrat and slob on earth. I am mar-
ried to his twin, and believe me, it will only get
worse, as he also will begin hoarding your
things as well as his.
The only way to convince my husband that
our 30-year-old couch needed to be replaced
was to find a relative who was willing to take it,
and who promised to give it back later. Once, I
threw my husband's ripped shirts in the
garbage, and the next day, he was wearing one
of them. If he dies first, I will call for a dumpster
before I call the morgue. Thorn in My Side
Dear Thorn: We admire your forbearance. If
off-site storage facilities don't alleviate the prob-
lem, try the Obsessive-Compulsive Foundation
(ocfoundation.org).


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please e-mail your questions
to anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. Visit the Web page at www.creators.com.


I
I


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page 10A.


ACROSS
1 Bend down
6 Garret
11 Book of maps
16 Works hard
21 Concert instrument
22 Push comes to -
23 Everest or McKinley
24 Quiver item
25 Inscribe
26 Tire surface
27 Scandinavian
28 Kind of pipe
or offering
29 Era
30 Sword
32 What's in a -?
34 Uncanny
36 Spigot
37 Descartes or Coty
39 Spoken
41 Take a break
43 Crimson
44 Powerful blow
45 Summer storm
phenomenon
48 Perjurer
50 Unctuous
52 Household
appliance
55 Worm on a hook
57 Woe is mel
59 Getup
63 Pale
64 Knocked
66 Shade of green
68 Wound mark
69 Military post
70 Neighbor of Iowa
(abbr.)
72 Lady-killer
73 Rather or Aykroyd
74 Rocky hill
75 Only
76 Unbroken
78 The rudiments
79 Mild oath
80 Everlasting
82 Motor vehicle
83 Glittering headband
85 Baldwin and
Guinness
86 Showy performer
'87 Vagrant
88 Books expert (abbr.)
89 They exist
90 Chick's cry
93 Kind of toast
95 Airplane
96 Decorated
100 Queen of the
Olympians
101 Corn spike


97 Tooth
98 Bring out
99 Removed, in printing
101 Beseech
103 Middle-earth
monster
104 Portrait of a kind
107 Freshly
108 Something hilarious
110 Tub washings
111 Adhesive ingredient
113 Supplemented
(with "out")
114 Cut short
116 Coach
117 Fuss
120 Long locks
122 Aid and -
124 Schoolboy's book
126 King Cole
128 Blackboard
accessory
129 Titleholder
130 Of the moon
131 City in Maine
133 Lariat
135 Procrastinator's
motto
138 Destroy by degrees
139 Sticker
140 Equals
142 Seven -
143 Narcotic
145 Bartok or Lugosi
147 Obi
150 Short swim
152 Dutch commune
154 Insect egg
156 Poor grade


102 Audibly
104 Storage structure
105 Poem
106 Arbor
107 Fury
109 Make a mistake
110 Prejudice
111 Jewish month
112 Of chemistry,
physics, etc.
.115 Metallic element
117 Swiftly
118 More timid
119 Legal wrong
121 Babe-
122 Loved
123 Pitcher
125 Ripped
127 Very cramped space
129 Lummox
132 Lingus
134 Ring recurrently
136 Certain
137 Canine cry
141 "Ben -"
142 Steady and sober
144 Attempt
146 Sign on a diner
148 "Norma -"
149 Battery terminal
151 Challenges
153 Portable shelters
155 Sun-dried brick
157 Craze
158 Musical composition
159 The cream
160 Passover meal
161 Braces
162 Storms
163 One that appraises
164 Cads


DOWN
1 Javelin
2 Trace of color
3 Of a grain
4 United
5 Skin opening
6 Toward the back
7 Worn, as a garment
8 Shoe part
9 the Terrible
10 Fragrant wood
11 Memory loss
12 Also
13 Enticement
14 Goose genus
15 Sound system
16 Kind of measure
17 Mineral
18 Very angry
19 Not widespread
20 Used a broom
31 Rlain hard
33 Actor Gibson
35 Stupid
38 An anesthetic
40 Jumped
42 Bath powder
44 Computer unit -
46 Farm bird
47 Van Winkle
49 Cheers
51 Lie in wait
52 Squander
53 Neck scarf
54 Use with others
56 Male vocalist
58 Desert in Africa
60 Soft candy
61 Newton or Asimov
62 Watches over
64 Bun
65 Punta Este
67 McEntire the singer
69 Froth
71 Nipped
75 Crisp cookie
76 Brazilian dance
77 Chopped into cubes
79 Basic (abbr.)
81 Flightless bird
82 -de-sac
84 Appropriate
85 Dry
87 Lacking (with "of")
89 War god
90 Gorge
91 From this time
92 Tennessee Ford
93 Wise men
94 Pub drink
95 Courtroom figure
96 "All's Well Ends
Well"


v I


Jl













JULY 17, 2005


1*


Sorts

Devil Rays designate
Nomo for assignment
TORONTO The Tampa
Bay Devil Rays designated
struggling right-hander Hidee
Nomo for assignment on
Saturday.
Nomo lasted just 2 2-3
innings in Friday's 11-6 loss to


Hideo
Nomo
dropped from
Devil Rays


Toronto, allow-
ing seven runs
and nine hits
with three
walks. It was
the third time
in the past five
starts that
Nomo allowed
at least six
runs, and
dropped him
to 1-7 with a


10.32 ERA in road games this
season.
Nomo went 5-8 with a 7.24
ERA in 19 starts. Tampa Bay
has 10 days to trade Nomo or
put him on waivers.
Riley says coaching
change not imminent
MIAMI -Attempting to quell
a flood of speculation about
Stan Van Gundy's future with
the Miami Heat, team president
Pat Riley insisted Saturday that
no coaching change is imminent
- while again saying he hasn't
completely ruled out a return to
the sidelines in the future.
"I would quit my job before I
would dismiss Stan Van Gundy
as the head coach simply
because I wanted to coach,"
Riley said in a call with the
team's beat writers. "Period.
That's not me. Anybody who
knows me know that I wouldn't
do that for the sake of me want-
ing to get back into the job."
Still, when asked if Van
Gundy was guaranteed of being
the team's opening-night coach,
Riley did not offer a direct
answer. "See, that's a loaded
question," Riley said.
Van Gundy, who is 101-63 in
two regular seasons since tak-
ing over when Riley resigned
unexpectedly days before the
2003-04 season, was not avail-
able for comment Saturday.
Riley has been at the center
of what he calls "a firestorm" for
weeks, after telling reporters
shortly after this past season
that he wants to takee a little bit
more of an active participation"
with the franchise.
He attempted to clarify that
remark Saturday, saying he
owes it to Heat owner Micky
Arison to be "more vigilant" in
overseeing the franchise.
American Miss wins
Glitter Handicap
MIAMI (AP) -American Miss
led from the gate to win the
$75,000 Nancy's Glitter
Handicap for fillies and mares
Saturday at Calder Race
Course, upsetting favored
Pampered Princess.
Gentille Alouette was third in
the field of seven going a mile
and a sixteenth.
Ridden by Manoel Cruz,
American Miss was timed in
1:47 2/5 and paid $26, $2.60
and $2.10. Pampered Princess,
the 1-to-9 favorite, paid $2.10
and $2.10 and Gentille Alouette
paid $2.10 to show.
The victory was the fifth in 26
starts for the 4-year-old Florida-
bred daughter ofAmeri Valay.
From wire reports


Open lead is still Tiger's


Associated iress


ST. ANDREWS, Scotland -
Tiger Woods hit the ball so
hard that he felt the shaft in his
putter flex ever so slightly
Standing 50 paces away on the
18th green, his caddie removed
the flag, backed away from the
cup, then turned and raised his
fist in a rare celebration
Saturday at the British Open.
The ball stopped inches
away for a birdie that allowed
Woods to break par.
Better yet, it gave him a two-
shot lead going into the final
round, a position that looked to
be in doubt during a surprising
struggle at windswept St.
Andrews.
"I'm very happy to be in the
lead," Woods said. "The condi-
tions got a little bit difficult
today. To have the lead all day,
and actually end up with the


lead, its pretty sweet.
A pivotal par save on the
Road Hole, followed by his tap-
in birdie on the 18th, gave
Woods a 1-under 71 and left
him two shots clear of Jose
Maria Olazabal.
But on a day when the cheers
were for everyone else -
Woods even heard some
throaty booing while paired
with Scottish hero Colin
Montgomerie he brought an
elite list of players back into
the picture.
Olazabal, a two-time Masters
champion, holed a 15-foot
birdie on the 18th for a 68.
Two-time U.S. Open champi-
on Retief Goosen went out
early before the wind arrived
and shot 66, leaving him three
shots behind with
Montgomerie (70). Another
shot back was Sergio Garcia
(69) and Brad Faxon (70), the


favorite American tourist at St.
Andrews after coming over to
qualify.
And don't forget U.S. Open
champion Michael Campbell
(68) and three-time major win-
ner Vijay Singh (71), both lurk-
ing five shots out ofthe lead if
Woods slips on Sunday.
"The game's on a little bit
now," Goosen said.
Woods failed to turn this into
a runaway, as he did five years
ago at St. Andrews when he
built a six-shot lead going into
the last day. For most of the
afternoon, he was a model of
futility.
Twice, he reached into the
prickly gorse to retrieve his
ball and take a penalty stroke.
He hung his head when a flop
shot sailed from one end of the
16th green to the other. He
Please see OPEN/Page 6B


Associated Press


Tiger Woods reacts after making par at 17. He didn't have his best
day, but Woods still led by two strokes after three rounds.


Dunnellon all-stars split


KHUONG PHAN
kphan@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

It was sort of a Jekyll-and-
Hyde day for the Dunnellon
Major softball all-stars. On
Saturday at Bicentennial
Park, Dunnellon split its
opening two games of the
Little League sectional tour-
nament, falling to
Bayshore/West Tampa 11-1 in
four innings in the first game
and topping Oldsmar 6-3 in
the second.
"The first team we played
was a good ball team they
just hammered it,"
Dunnellon coach Kevin
Fagan said. "This other team
is just solid. They play a lot
like us. We just ran into a
buzz saw with that first team.
They're just a superior ball
club."
Oldsmar entered the sec-
ond game riding high after an
11-1 dismantling of Seminole,
but Dunnellon proved it was
up to the task
Dunnellon put the ball into
the hands of No. 3 pitcher
Haley Fagan and she turned
in a solid performance in the
win. Haley Fagan went the
distance, giving six hits while
striking out five. The right-
hander hurler aided her own
cause at the plate, going 2-for-
3 with a pair of RBIs.
Dunnellon jumped out to
the 1-0 lead to start the game
with leadoff hitter Tori
Williams coming home on an
error
Oldsmar made it a 2-1
game in the bottom half of the
first with Haley Spencer driv-
ing in a run and Kelsey Oonk
scoring on a wild pitch.
In the second frame with
one out, Dunnellon's Lauren
Murray blooped a single to
center. Madrika Allen fol-
lowed with a hard grounder
to left and Alex Love drew a
walk to load the bases.
With the bases still full and
two outs, Haley Fagan
brought Murray home with a
single up the middle and
Allen came home on the next
at-bat on a wild pitch to put
Dunnellon up 3-2.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Dunnellon's Holly Roberson (11) makes it back to first under the tag of Bayshore/West Tampa
first baseman Ashley Orta (44) in the top of the fourth inning at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River.


Haley Fagan padded her
team's lead in the fourth,
driving in Williams with a
double and then scoring her-
self two batters later on a
wild pitch.
Oldsmar made it a 5-3
game in the bottom of the
fourth when Miranda Clark
came home on a, single by
Oonk
Dunnellon capped the
game in the fifth when
Caylee Underwood scored
from second on single, by
Williams.


The day's first game
against Bayshore/West
Tampa was a rematch of last
year's sectional champi-
onship that Dunnellon took
with 16-3 win on its way to an
eventual state title.
Led by starting pitcher
Reina Baluja, Bayshore/West
Tampa proved that some-
times the past doesn't really'
matter at all.
Baluja opened the game in
a fury, striking out eight of
the first 10 batters she faced.
She finished the game with


nine K's and gave up only two
hits.
Bayshore/West Tampa was
already up 7-0 after three
innings, scoring three times
in both the first and second
and once in the third, before
Dunnellon finally got on the
board.
In the top of the fourth,
Dunnellon's Holly Roberson
drew a walk, was moved to
second on a single by Sami
Fagan and then came home
on an errant throw.
Please see ./Page 3B


Crystal

River



tumbles

JON-MICHAEL' SORACCH
jmsoracchi@hotmail.com
For the Chronicle

There is not much of a dif-
ference in the talent level of
most 9-and-10 year-old softball
players.
But on Saturday morning,
the Crystal River 9-10 softball
all-star team showed how
important fundamentals
would be.
Palma Ceia (Tampa) man-
aged just a pair of hits but used
eight walks, seven wild pitches
and two defensive errors to
score a 7-0 victory against
Crystal River in each teams'
first game of the day at
Bicentennial Park.
In Crystal River's second
game Saturday, the same for-
mula repeated itself in a 10-4
loss to East Lake (Tarpon
Springs), leaving Crystal River
in a third-place finish in
Section 7 with a 1-2 record in
pool play
"We played great on Friday,"
said Crystal River manager
Dennis Jenkins of his team's
12-5 win over Seminole. "We
played great the first four
innings we played today."
Crystal River and Palma
Ceia each entered with a
record of 1-0 yet it was Crystal
River which came out with hot
bats early on.
Natalie Ezzell opened the
game with a clean single but
was thrown out trying to steal
second. One our later, Emily
Laga and Clarissa Consol hit
back-to-back singles and had
runners on first and third
against Palma Ceia pitcher
Taylor Newman.
However, Newman rebound-
ed from a shaky start by strik-
ing out the next batter to get
out of the jam unscathed. The
Palma- Ceia pitclfer wouldn't
falter again, pitching a com-
plete game and not allowing a
hit over the last five innings,
striking out 10 batters and issu-
ing one walk to pick up the

Please see SOFTBALL/Page 3B


Batson wins Hobby


Stock despite crash


K I BOLLINGER
kbollinger@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

After two rainouts and a
night off for the Daytona 500,
Citrus County Speedway rac-
ers got back to the task at hand
- Saturday night stock car
action on the 3/8-mile asphalt
oval.
It didn't take long for the
Hobby Stock drivers to read-
just to racing conditions. The
field picked up where they left
off a few weeks ago and when
the field restarted James
Batson was leading the way.
The race came down to a


three-car run for the check-
ered flag between Batson,
Richie Smith and Curtis
Flanagan.
Batson threaded his way
through slower traffic with
Smith on his read deck lid
while Flanagan began looking
for a way around to make a run
for the lead.
Flanagan attempted a move
to the outside of Smith before
diving to the low groove as they
came to the checkered flag. As
the pair came to the line,
Smith tagged Flanagan from
the rear and sent the second

Please see .' : :./Page 5B


Isolated from the rest of his team, six-time Tour de France winner
Lance Armstrong withstood a challenge from the T-Mobile team
during a mountain ascent.


Armstrong holds on


despite challenge


Associated Press
AX-3 DOMAINES, France -
As the Pyrenean peak loomed,
the assault Lance Armstrong
was bracing for finally came.
Here, the six-time champion
knew, was a Tour de France
moment of truth.'
"It's scary," he admitted
later.
Emotionless behind their
wraparound shades,
Armstrong's pink-shirted rivals
from the German T-Mobile
squad raced into the steep
ascent at full pelt The tactic
was simple: Isolate Armstrong
by riding so hard that his team-
mates would be unable to stay


with the pace.
It worked. By the time T-
Mobile's racers -were spent,
Armstrong's support crew
were strewn down the road
and his long-tormented chal-
lengers, including T-Mobile
leader Jan Ullrich, finally had
him were they wanted him -
alone on a climb. Now, it was
man-to-man.
"In that situation you either
fight back or you run away,"
Armstrong said.
He fought, and end result
was familiar: Armstrong came
out on top of his main chal-
lengers in an epic stage 14, tak-
Please see TOUR/Page 3B


A









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2B SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


Devil Rays win again


Associated Press

TORONTO Lou Piniella's
new lineup sure looked good.
Carl Crawford homered and
drove in three runs from his new
spot in the order, and the Tampa
Bay Devil Rays held on for a 6-5
victory over the Toronto Blue
Jays on Saturday
Piniella decided FYiday to drop
Crawford from the leadoffspot to
second. Joey Gathright went 3-
for-5 as the leadoff hitter.
Aubrey Huff- dropped to fifth
in the order also homered for
the last-place Devil Rays, who
have won two of three since the
All-Star break but just three of
their last 15 overall.
"We put six runs on the board.
If we can do that every night,
that's the lineup we'll keep
using," Piniella said to laughter
"I thought C.C. in the second spot
looked good, also Gathright in the
No 1. hole is bunting, which we
wanted him to do."
Crawford prefers hitting sec-
ond.
"I'm probably better suited for
the two hole because I don't think
I get on base as much as you
would like," Crawford said. "It's
more relaxing. You're not think-
ing about drawing a walk"
Former Blue Jay Mark
Hendrickson (4-6) benefited from
the new lineup, winning for the
first time since June 23 despite


allowing five runs four earned
- on seven hits in 5 1-3 innings.
The 6-foot-9 left-hander walked
three and struck out three.
Piniella visited Hendrickson in
the third inning when Toronto cut
the lead to 4-3.
"I tried to refocus him,"
Piniella said. "It was a simple
message. I said 'What did they
hit?' and he said 'this' and I said,
'Well, try something different!'"
Danys Baez pitched the ninth
for his 15th save in 21 chances.
Alex Rios hit a career-high
* three doubles for the. Blue Jays,
who have lost four of five since
ace Roy Halladay broke a bone in
his lower left leg. He is expected
to miss four to six weeks.
Toronto starter Josh Towers (6-
8) is 1-7 in his last 11 starts. He
tied a season high by allowing six
runs and a season-high 10 hits in
just four innings.
Towers has been tagged for 14
runs and 27 hits in 14 innings in
his last three starts.
"I try to stay positive and joke
around, but you should have seen
me when I came in here," Towers
said. "It doesn't look like it, but I
destroyed some stuff."
Tampa Bay jumped out to a 3-0
lead in the second on Toby Hall's
RBI single and consecutive run-
scoring singles by Gathright and
Crawford.
Huff homered in the third, his
ninth of the season.


S'


. -.




Associated Press

Devil Rays second baseman Nick Green (left) throws to first as
Toronto Blue Jays' Russ Adams slides into second.


NL: Cards topple Astros again


Associated Press


ST. LOUIS Jason Marquis pitched eight
sharp innings to earn his first victory in
more than a month, and Larry Walker hit a
three-run homer to help the St Louis
Cardinals continue their dominance of the
Houston Astros at Busch Stadium with a 4-2
win Saturday.
Dating back to Game 1 of last year's
National League championship series, the
Cardinals have beaten the Astros nine
straight at home. St Louis has won eight of
10 against Houston overall this year.
The loss snapped Houston right-hander
Roy Oswalt's six-start winning streak Oswalt
(12-8) had not lost since dropping a 3-1 deci-
sion to the New York Mets on June 7. He had
an ERA of 0.96 in his previous six starts.
Oswalt gave up four runs and eight hits in six
innings Saturday
Pirates 3, Cubs 0
CHICAGO Zach Duke outpitched Greg
Maddux for eight innings, allowing six hits.
In his third career start, Duke (2-0) struck out
four and extended his scoreless innings streak to
17. The 22-year-old left-hander lowered his ERA
to 1.23.
Jason Bay ended an 0-for-18 slump with a
homer as the Pirates snapped the Cubs' five-
game winning streak. Jose Mesa pitched the ninth
for his 22nd save in 25 chances.
Maddux (8-7) was nearly as sharp, allowing five
hits in eight innings.


Dodgers 5, Giants 4
LOS ANGELES Jason Phillips hit a two-out,
RBI single to cap a two-run rally in the bottom of
the ninth inning, lifting the Dodgers to their first win
in seven games.
The Dodgers entered the ninth with only one hit
since the third, and Tyler Walker (2-2) retired the
first two batters before pinch-hitter Olmedo Saenz
drew a four-pitch walk. Oscar Robles followed with
a single to center, and Cesar Izturis grounded an
0-2 pitch off the first base bag and into the right-
field comer for an RBI double to tie it.
Braves 3, Mets 0
NEW YORK -Tim Hudson pitched five-hit ball
for six innings and scored a run in his first start in
over a month for Atlanta.
Kelly Johnson had two hits with two RBIs for
the Braves, who has won two straight following a
three-game losing streak.
Hudson was activated from the disabled list
before the game and was on the mound for the
first time since June 13, when he was forced out
after 2 2-3 innings by a strained muscle in his left
side.
But Hudson (7-5) showed little signs of rust,
striking out one without walking a batter. He is 2-0
against New York this season and hasn't allowed
a run in 14 innings.
Reds 7, Rockies 6
CINCINNATI Wily Mo Pena doubled home
the tying run in the eighth inning and Ray Olmedo


followed with a pinch-hit double, rallying the Reds
past Colorado.
The Rockies blew four leads in a back-and-forth
game between the NL's two worst teams, falling to
7-35 on the road worst in the majors. The
Rockies have yet to win a series on the road.
Nationals 5, Brewers 3
MILWAUKEE Jose Guillen's two-run single
in the seventh inning snapped a tie, and
Washington ended a four-game losing streak.
Jose Vidro homered and Vinny Castilla added
two run-scoring doubles for the Nationals, who
won for just the third time in 10 games and
remained 1V2 games ahead of Atlanta in the NL
East.
Phillies 10, Marlins 5
PHILADELPHIA- Chase Utley hit a three-run
homer and Jon Lieber earned his first win in
seven starts, leading the Philadelphia Phillies over
the Florida Marlins 10-5,turday night.
Todd Pratt added a solo homer and an RBI sin-
gle for the Phillies, who have scored 30 runs in the
first three games of this series and have won four
of six.
Lieber (9-8) allowed four runs and nine hits with
no walks and three strikeouts in six innings. He
was 0-4 in six starts since beating Texas on June
7.
Juan Encamacion hit a three-run homer for
Florida, which has lost five of six. The Marlins
committed two errors that led to a pair of big
innings and six unearned runs for the Phillies.


AL: Yanks rebound, beat Boston


Associated Press

BOSTON Randy Johnson
struck out 10 in 6 1-3 innings to
rescue the injury-depleted
Yankees rotation, and Alex
Rodriguez homered to lead
New York to a 7-4 victory over
the Boston Red Sox on Saturday.
One day after the Yankees lost
17-1 in a game they were forced
to promote Tim Redding from
Triple-A Columbus to start,
Johnson (10-6) won his third
straight start to help New York
pull within 1V2 games of Boston
in the AL East
Rodriguez followed Gary
Sheffield's double with a homer
over the Green Monster to start
a six-run third inning.
Tom Gordon got five outs, and
Mariano Rivera pitched the
ninth for his 22nd consecutive
save. Robinson Cano had three
hits for the Yankees, who won
for the ninth time in 11 games.
Boston All-Star Matt Clement
(10-3) lasted just 2 2-3 innings,
allowing six runs on five hits
and five walks. Johnny Damon
singled in the sixth to extend his
hitting streak to 28 games the
longest in the majors this season
and tied for fourth-longest in
Red Sox history.
White Sox 7, Indians 5
CLEVELAND Mark Buehrle
pitched seven strong innings to get
back on the winning track, leading
Chicago to its third straight victory.
.Making his first start since earning
the win as the American League's
starter in Tuesday's All-Star game,
Buehrie (11-3) gave up two runs and
three hits, striking out six without a
walk. He also hit two batters, includ-
ing Travis Hafner in the cheek in the
first inning.
Hafner had some bleeding, said


Boston's Johnny Damon connects for a single against I
to stretch his hitting streak to 28-straight games.


he felt dizzy and was taken to a hos-
pital for observation. The Indians
announced that Hafner will be
examined by a dentist.
Aaron Boone had two RBIs for
the Indians, who have scored only
six runs in the series and lost for the
eighth time in nine games.
Cleveland pulled within 7-5 on
Grady Sizemore's two-run single off
Damaso Marte, but Marte got Coco
Crisp to ground out with two men on


for his third save of the
Rangers10, Ath
OAKLAND Calif. -
Rogers shrugged off th
jeering from the fans to
in seven innings, and 1
to beat Oakland.
Rogers (11-4), who
later this week if his 20
pension for shoving tw(
on June 29 will be sho


for the 20th time in his past 21 deci-
sions in Oakland. His hearing is
scheduled for Thursday.
Hank Blalock matched his career
high with four hits, including a homer
and two doubles, as the Rangers
ended a three-game road losing
streak. Kevin Mench added a three-
.-^ run homer and Michael Young also
connected.

Tigers 5, Royals 3
DETROIT Brandon Inge drove
in three runs and the Tigers took
advantage of four Kansas City
errors.
With the game tied at 3 in the
sixth, Nook Logan, considered one
of baseball's fastest players, led offk
with a single off Mike Wood (3-4).
He scored from first when right field-
er Terrence Long allowed Inge's sin-
gle to get past him.
Jason Johnson (6-7) improved to
4-1 at Comerica Park, allowing three
runs and seven hits in eight innings.
Johnson has a 1.95 ERA in 10
home starts this year.

Twins 5, Angels 4
MINNEAPOLIS Bret Boone
was hitless in his first 10 at-bats -
S0-for-18 overall with the Twins,
Associated Press when he fisted a single to center in
the Yankees the fourth inning that lifted Minnesota
to a victory over Los Angeles.
,season. The Twins acquired Boone from
Seattle in a trade during the All Star
hletics 8 break and he came through on
Kenny Saturday, capping a five-run fourth
ie constant inning against Angels starter Bartolo
allow six hits Colon (11-6) that erased a 4-0
rexas held on deficit.,
Johan Santana (8-5) was a little
will find out shaky early, but rebounded to pitch
)-game sus- seven innings for his first victory in
o cameramen six starts, which included three
rtened, won straight losses.


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay

Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Texas
Oakland
Seattle


Washington
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Florida
New York

St. Louis
Chicago
Houston
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


MLB SCOREBOARD
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10 Str Home
50 40 .556 4-6 L-1 25-16
49 40 .551 V/ z-6-4 W-4 27-20
48 41 .539 11/2 z-8-2 W-1 29-19
45 46 .495 51/2 z-4-6 L-1 23-19
30 62 .326 21 3-7 W-1 20-26
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10 Str Home
60 29 .674 6-4 W-3 30-15
49 40 .551 11 z-4-6 W-1 27-20
47 44 .516 14 z-2-8 L-4 21-22
44 45 .494 16 7-3 W-2 21-23
31 59 .344291/2 5-5 L-2 19-27.
West Division
W L Pct GB L10 Str Home
54 37 .593 4-6 L-1 26-19
47 42 .528 6 5-5 W-1 27-18
46 44 .511 71/2 z-7-3 L-1 29-17
39 50 .438 14 z-6-4 L-2 20-24
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10 Str Home
53 38 .582 3-7 W-1 30-13
52 40 .565 1 z-7-3 W-2 29-14
47 45 .511 6'/2 z-6-4 W-1 28-20
45 44 .506 7 3-7 L-1 25-22
45 46 .495 8 z-5-5 L-2 26-20
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10 Str Home
58 32 .644 z-8-2 W-3 29-16
45 45 .500 13 5-5 L-1 23-22
44 45 .494131/2 z-7-3 L-2 30-14
44 47 .484141/2 z-6-4 L-1 25-17
40 50 .444 18 5-5 W-1 21-22
37 53 .411 21 6-4 W-2 26-22
West Division


W L Pc'
San Diego 49 42 .538
Arizona 44 48 .478
Los Angeles 41 50 .451
San Francisco 39 51 .433
Colorado 31 58 .348
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 7, Boston 4
Chicago White Sox 7, Cleveland 5
Texas 10, Oakland 8
Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 5
Detroit 5, Kansas City 3
Minnesota 5, L.A. Angels 4
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Kansas City (R.Hernandez 6-9) at Detroit
(Maroth 7-9), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Garland 13-4) at
Cleveland (Elarton 6-3), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (McClung 0-5) at Toronto
(Walker 3-2), 1:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Lackey 6-4) at Minnesota
(Mays 5-3), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Young 8-5) at Oakland (Haren 7-
7), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Ponson 7-7) at Seattle (Meche
9-6), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Leiter 0-0) at Boston
(Wakefield 8-7), 6:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.





Devil Rays 6, Blue Jays 5
TAMPA BAY TORONTO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Gthrght cf 5 13 1 Jhnsonlf 3 1 1 0
Crwfrd If 5 123 Ctlnotto If 1 0 1 1
Lugo ss 5 01 0 Rios rf 5 1 3-2
Cantu 3b 401 0VWellscf 4 1 1
Huffrf 5 22 1 Hlnbrn lb 5 021
Hollins rf 0 00 0 AHill 3b 5 0 0 0
Gomesdh 300 0 Mnchno dh 4 0 0 0
TLeelb 4120 Hinskeph 1 000
THallc 411 1 OHudsn2b2 0 0 0
NGreen 2b 3 00 0 Hkby c 3 1 1 0
Zaun c 1 000
Adams ss 1 1 0 0
Totals 38612 6 Totals 35 5 9 5
Tampa Bay 031 200 000- 6
Toronto 003 002 000- 5
E-Lugo (16), Huckaby (1). DP-
Tampa Bay 1, Toronto 1. LOB-Tampa
Bay 8, Toronto 10. 2B-Johnson (10),
Rios 3 (18), Hillenbrand 2 (22). 3B-
VWells (2). HR-Crawford (10), Huff (9).
SB-Gathright (5), Crawford (28), Lugo
(25). S-Catalanotto.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
HndrckW,4-6 51-3 7 5 4 3 3
Harper 1 2 0 0 1 0
TreMiller 1 0 0 0 2 0
Borowski 2-3 00 0 0 0
DBaezS,15 1 0 0 0 0 0
Toronto
Towers L,6-8 4 10 6 6 0 1
Downs 2 1 0 0 1 1
Speier 1 1 0 0 1 0
Frasor 1 0 0 0 0 2
MBatista 1 0 0 0 1 2
T-2:54. A-24,801 (50,598).
Yankees 7, Red Sox 4
NEW YORK BOSTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Jeterss 5 01 1 Damon cf 4 0 1 0
Cano 2b 5030 Rntera ss 5 1 1 0
Shffieldrf 5l120 DOrtizlb 5 000
ARod 3b 421 2 MRmrz If 4 2 2 2
Matsui If 3 10 0 Millar rf 3 0 1 1
JaGbi dh 3 12 0 Varitek c 3 0 0 0
BWIIms cf 5 11 1 Mrbelli dh 2 0 1 0
TMrtnzl b 3 10 0 Nixon dh 1 00 0
Flherty c 4 01 2 Mueller 3b 4 0 1 0
Blihorn 2b 3 1 1 1
Olerud ph 1 0 0 0
Cora 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 37711 6 Totals 35 4 8-4
New York 006000 100- 7
Boston 001 120 000- 4
E-TMartinrez (4), DOrtiz (2). DP-
Boston 2. LOB-New York 9, Boston 8.
2B-Sheffield (22), JaGiambi (9),
Flaherty (3), Renteria (15), MRamirez
(18). HR-ARodriguez (25),, MRamirez
(23), Bellhorn (7). CS-Matsui (1).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
RaJhsnW,10-6 61-3 8 4 4 310
Gordon 12-3 0 0 0 1 0
MRiveraS,22 1 0 0 0 0 1
Boston
Clement L,10-3 22-3 5 6 6 5 4
Gonzalez 31-3 3 1 1 1 0
Embree 1 1 0 0 0 1
Timlin 1 2 0 0 0 2
Schilling 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gonzalez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Clement. Balk-Embree.
T-3:34. A-34,694 (35,095).
Pirates 3, Cubs 0
PITTSBURGH CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Lawton rf 401 1 HrstJrcf 4 01 0
Mckwk3b 400 0TWalkr2b 4020
Bay cf 4 11 1 DeLee lb 4 00 0
CWilsn If 000 ARmrz3b 4000
TRdmncf 301 0 Murton if 3 01 0
Ward lb 4 00 0Grieveph 1 01 0
Castillo 2b 4 000 Burnitz rf 3 00 0
Cotac 411 0Cedenoss 3 020
JWilsnss 311 0 Novoap 0 000
Duke p 2001 HBInco c 2 0 0 0
Mesap 000 0 NPerezss 1 0 0 0


L10
z-5-5
z-4-6
z-3-7
5-5
3-7


Home
28-17
22-25
23-22
20-26
24-23


Away Intr
25-24 12-6
22-20 8-10
19-22 11-7
22-27 8-10
10-36 3-15
Away Intr
30-14 12-6
22-20 8-10
26-22 15-3
23-22 9-9
12-32 9-9
Away Intr
28-18 12-6
20-24 9-9
17-27 10-8
19-26 10-8

Away Intr
23-25 12-6
23-26 7-8'
19-25 7-8
20-22 10-5
19-26 5-10
Away Intr
29-16 10-5
22-23 6-9
14-31 7-8
19-30 8-7
19-28 5-7
11-31 7-8
Away Intr
21-25 7,11
22-23 8-10
18-28 5-1-3;
19-25 6-12
7-35 6-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 0
L.A. Dodgers 5, San Francisco 4
St. Louis 4, Houston 2
Washington 5, Milwaukee 3
Philadelphia 10, Florida 5
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Mets 0
Cincinnati 7, Colorado 6
Arizona at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta (Hampton 4-1) at N.Y. Mets
(P.Martinez 10-3), 1:10 p.m.
Colorado (Jam.Wright 5-9) at Cincinnati
(Ra.Ortiz 4-6), 1:15 p.m.
Florida (Willis 13-4) at Philadelphia
(Padilla 4-8), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Drese 3-1) at Milwaukee
(Ohka 5-4), 2:05 p.m. -.,
Houston (Clemens 7-3) at St. Lquis
(Carpenter 13-4), 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh (K.Wells 6-9) at Chicago Cubs
(C.Zambrano 6-4), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (Halsey 5-7) at San Diego
(Stauffer 3-4), 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Hennessey 3-2) at L.A.
Dodgers (Weaver 7-8), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.,
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:10 p.m.
Florida at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Atlanta at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. ;

Mddux p 2 01o 0
Barrettc 0 0.0 0
Totals 323 5 3 Totals 31 08' 0
Pittsburgh 110000 100--3
Chicago 000000 000- :o0
E-TWalker (2). DP-Pittsburgh ;4.
LOB-Pittsburgh 5, Chicago 6. '2B-
La.vnor, (26). HR-Bay (17). SB-
TRedman (3). SF-Duke.
IP H RERBBSO"
Pittsburgh
Duke W,2-O 8 6 0 0 2 4
MesaS,22 1 2'0 0 0 Q0: 0
Chicago
Maddux L,8-7 8 5 3 2 1 -
Novoa 1 0 0 0 0 0O
HBP-by Maddux (CWilson).
T-2:17. A-39,790 (39,538).
Cardinals 4, Astros 2 -:
HOUSTON ST. LOUIS
ab rhbi ab rth-bi
Tveras cf 4 00 0 Eckstin ss 3 0,1f0
Biggio 2b 401 0 Edmnd cf 4 1.'!I-1
Brkmn lb 2 12 0 Pujols 1b 3 1 *2'0
Ensbrg 3b 4.11 2 LWalkr rf 3 1 2 3
Lane rf 301 0 Rolen 3b 4 00 0
OPImro ph 1 00 0 Mabry If 4 0'0 0
AEvrttss 4000 Isrnghsp 0 000
Burke If 3 01 0 Grdzln 2b 4 0,2,0
JVzcno ph 1 00 0 Mhony c 4 0 "0
Asmus c 4 00 0 Mrquis p 3 1 1.0
Oswalt p 1 00 0 Tguchi If 0 0 0, 0
Brntlett ph 1 00 0
Burns p 0 00 0
Totals 322 6 2 Totals 32 4'9 4
Houston 200 000 000:--2
St. Louis 000 040 00x- 4
E-Ensberg (9), Pujols (7). DP-St.
Louis 2. LOB-Houston 6, St. Louis ,7.
2B-Biggio (26), Lane (20), Pujols (21),
Marquis (5). HR-Ensberg (25), LWa1ler
(11). S-Eckstein.
IP H RERBBSO0
Houston
Oswalt L,12-8 6 8 4 4 1 4'
Burns 2 1 0 0 1'
St. Louis
Marquis W,9-6 8 6 2 2 2 -2.
Isrnghs S,26 1 0 0 0 0--0
HBP-by Marquis (Oswalt).
T-2:14. A-48,034 (50,345).
White Sox 7, Indians 5
CHICAGO CLEVELAND h
ab rhbi ab r.hbi
Pdsdnk If 5 11 0 Szmore cf 5 0 l 2
Rwand cf 5 33 0 Crisp If 5 0.2 0
CEvrttdh 5 12 1 Hafner dh 0 00 0
Knerko lb 4 12 1 Gerut dh 3 0.0 0
Przyns c 5 01 2 JHrndz 1 b 4 01' 0
Dye rf 3 10 1 JhPltass 4 0.0-0
Crede 3b 401 1 Blake rf 2 2 00
WHarrs 2b 4 01 0 Blliard 2b 3 2 1 0
Uribe ss 4 00 0 Boone 3b 4 1,1 2
Bard c 3 0 0 1
VMrtnzph 0 000
Totals 39711 6 Totals 33 5,6.5
Chicago 012 030 100- 7
Cleveland 000 020 003--5
E-Belliard (8). LOB-Chicago, 7,
Cleveland 6. 2B-CEverett <13),
Konerko 2 (13), Pierzynski (9), Crede
(13), Crisp (22), Belliard (15). SB-
Rowand (12), Dye (8).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
BuehrleW,11-3 7 3 2 2 0; 6
Cotts 1 1 0 0 0 0
Takatsu 2-3 1 3 3 2 01
LVizcaino 0 0 0 0 1 0
Marte S,3 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
Wstbrk L,6-12 5 7 6 4 1 3
Tadano 4 4 1 1 0 1
LVizcaino pitched to 1 batter in the
9th.
HBP-by Buehrle (Blake), by
Westbrook (Dye), by Buehrle (THatner).
Umpires-Home, Bruce Dreckman;
First, Bill Hohn; Second, Gerry Davis;
Third, Doug Eddings.
T-2:46. A-27,114 (43,405). ,.


Sr. -, V~.~.., I


I SPORTS


I


I










CITRUS CoumNY (FL) CHRONICLE


BASEBALL

Tigers 5, Royals 3
KANSAS CITY DETROIT
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DJesus cf 4 11 1 Inge 3b 4 1 2 3
Gotay 2b 400 0 CGillen ss 5 0 0 0
MiSwydh 4 12 1 Shltn lb 5 02 0
Stairs lb 4 02 0 MOrdz rf 4 0 2 0
Long rf 3000 RoWhte dh 3 0 1 1
Berroass 4 00 0 IRdrgzc 4 1 1 0
Teahen 3b 4 11 0 Monroe If 2 2 1 0
Costa If 4 00 0 Hooper2b 2 0 00
ACstillo c 3 01 1 Logan cf 3 1 1 0
Totals 343 7 3 Totals 32 510 4
Kansas City 110 010 000- 3
Detroit 010 202 00Ox- 5
E-Long (3), Berroa (10), Teahen (13),
Gobble (2). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-
Kansas City 5, Detroit 11. 2B-Stairs (11),
Teahen (15), Inge (18), RoWhite (17).
HR-DeJesus (6), MiSweeney (12). S-
Hooper 2, Logan. SF-Inge.


ir
Kansas City
Howell 4
MWood L,3-4 1
Gobble 2
Detroit
JJohnson W,6-7 8
Farnsworth S,3 1
WP-JJohnson.


H RERBBSO

1-3 6 3 2 2 2
2-3 3 2 2 2 2


7 3 3 1 4
0 0 0 0 3


T-2:44. A-29,482 (40,120).
Twins 5, Angels 4
LOS ANGELES MINNESOTA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Figgins cf 4 100 Punto ss 5 0 0 0
Erstad Ib 4 000 BBoone 2b 5 0 1 1
VGrero rf 4101 ShStwrt If 4 01 0
GAndsnl If 411 0 Mauerc 4 1 20
BMolna c 4 01 0 THnter cf 3 1 1 0
DVnon pr 0 00 0 JJones rf 2 1 1 1
JRivradh 4 01 1 Mrneau lb 3 0 0 1
OCbera ss 4131 MRyandh 3 1 22
Srnsn3b 3 000 LRdrgz3b 4 1 1 0
SFinley ph 1 00 0 JCastro 3b 0 0 0 0
AKndy 2b 3 01 1
Totals 354 7 4 Totals 33 5 9 5
Los Angeles 300 100 000- 4
Minnesota 000 500 OOx- 5
E-Sorensen (1), Morneau (4),
LRodriguez (2). DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-
Los Angeles 4, Minnesota 9. 2B-
OCabrera (14), AKennedy (12), JJones
c(12). 3B-LRodriguez (2). HR-MRyan
(1). SB-OCabrera (6), ShStewart (6).
,SF-Morneau.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Colon L,11-6 5 8 5 5 3 5
-'Yan 2 0 0 0 1 1
JoPeralta 1 1 0 0 0 1
'Minnesota
JoSantana W,8-5 7 5 4 1 0 3
'JRincon 1 0 0 0 0 1
Nathan S,26 1 2 0 0 0 1
WP-Colon 2, JoSantana.
T-2:59. A-34,009 (46,564).
Rangers 10, Athletics 8
TEXAS OAKLAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Dlluccidh 4 01 1 Kendall c 4 1 2 1
MY6ng ss 4121 Kotsaycf 5 01 1
Txeira 1 b 5 000 Crosbyss 5 000
Blalock3b 5 44 1 EChavz 3b 3 02 0
ASrano2b 421 0 Mlhuse ph 1 1 1 0
Mench If 5 11 3 Kielty rf 4 1 1 0
.Mathws cf 3 11 1 Payton If 4 1 2 1
*Hidalgo rf 4 11 2 Swisherib 4 1 1 0
SAImr c 4 01 1 KGintr dh 4 1 1 2
MEIlis 2b 3 2 1 1
,Totals 38101210 Totals 37 812 6
Texas 011 104 300- 10
Oakland 000 012 005--- 8
E-Blalock (3), Matthews (3). DP-
Texas 3, Oakland 1. LOB-Texas 6,
Oakland 4. 2B-Blalock 2 (22), Hidalgo
(9),'Kendall (16), Melhuse (3), KGinter (5).
HR-MYoung (15), Blalock (17), Mench
(18), Payton (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Rogers W,11-4 7 6 3 2 1 1
Loe 11-3 2 2 2 1 1
BShouse 0 3 3 3 0 0
FCordero S,21 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Oakland
Blanton L,5-8 51-3 6 5 5 2 5
iCalero 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
fJKennedy 2-3 2 2 2 1 0
.,Duchscherer 2-3 1 1 1 0 2
rYabu 1 2 0 0 1 0
:Street 1 0 0 0 0 0
r BShouse pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
T-2:54. A-22,826 (43,662).
Braves 3, Mets 0
(ATLANTA NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
.Furcal ss 4 02 0 Reyes ss 4 0 0 0
Jhnson If 5 02 2 Cmeron rf 4 00 0
MGiles 2b 4 00 0 Beltran cf 4 0 1 0
.AJones cf 3 10 0 Floyd If 4 0 1 0
,LaRche lb 400 0 Wright 3b 4 0 1 0
.Lngrhn rf 4 02 1 Mntkw lb 4 02 0
McCnn c 301 0 RCstro c 3 000
"Btemit 3b 4 01 0 Cairo 2b 2 0 1 0
THudsn p 3 11 0 Zmbmo p 1 00 0
'Brower p 0 00 0 Heilmn p 0 00 0
Kolbp 0 00 0MrAndph 1 0 00
Orr ph 1 11 0 Graves p 0 0 0 0
Ritsmap 000 0
Totals 35310 3 Totals 31 0 6 0
Atlanta 001 100 001- 3
New York 000 000 000- 0
E-Furcal (7), Cameron (4), Floyd (2),
Graves (2). DP-Atlanta 2, New York 2.
LOB-Atlanta 10, New York 6. 2B-
Langerhans (9), THudson (1), Cairo (7).
CS-Furcal (6). S-Zambrano.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
THudson W,7-5 6 5 0 0 0 1
'Brower 1 0 0 0 0 1
.Kolb 1 0 0 0 0 0
(ReitsmaS,9 1 1 0 0 0 1
'New York
'Zambrano L,4-8 7 6 2 2 4 6
'Heilman 1 1 0 0 1 0
(Graves 1 3 1 1 0 0
SHBP-by THudson (Cairo).
T*--2:21. A-36,078 (57,369).
Reds 7, Rockies 6
COLORADOO CINCINNATI
S ab rhbi ab r hbi
'Miles 2b 411 0 FLopez ss 5 1 1 0
LuGnzl ss 4 22 2 Aurilia 2b 2 1 2 3
Helton lb 5 12 1 Casey Ib 2 000
'Atkins 3b 5 00 0 GrfJr. cf 4 1 1 1
-Byrnes If 4022 Randa 3b 4 00 0
Mohr cf 4120 Dunn If 2 21 0
Sllivan cf 1 00 0 WPena rf 4 1 22
Splbrghrf 402 1 LaRue c 3 1 1 0
Ardon c 3000 Milton p 1 0 0 0
Francis p 2 11 0 Mchadoph 1 00 0
Piedra ph 1 000 Coffey p 0 0 0 0
Dayp 000 JaCruzph 1 00 0
DeJeanp 0000 BelIslep 0 000
Grabitoph 0 00 0Stnrgep 0 0 0 0
Mcelip 0 000 Olmedoph 1 01 1
Merckrp 0 000
' Wthersp 0 000
Totals 37612 6 Totals 30 7 9 7
Colorado 000 311 100- 6
* Cincinnati 000 311 02x- 7
SDP-Colorado 2, Cincinnati 1. LOB--
Colorado 9, Cincinnati 6. 2B-LuGonzalez
2 (15), Byrnes (1), FLopez (19), Dunn (19),
WPena (13), LaRue (15), Olmedo (4).
3B-Mohr (3). HR-Aurilia (8), Griffey Jr.
(19). SB-Byrnes (1). CS-Mohr (1). S-
HLaRue.
IP H RERBBSO


SPORTS


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (TNT) NASCAR Racing Nextel Cup Series New
England 300. From New Hampshire International Speedway in
Loudon, N.H. (Live) (CC)
3 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Auto Racing American Le Mans -
Infineon Grand Prix of Sonoma. From Infineon Raceway in Sonoma,
Calif. (Live) (CC)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Mopar Mile-High Nationals
- Final Eliminations. From Denver. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Toronto
Blue Jays. From Rogers Centre in Toronto. (Live)
2 p.m. (WGN) MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Chicago Cubs.
From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Live) (CC)
6 p.m. (ESPN) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red
Sox. From Fenway Park in Boston. (Live) (CC)
BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA Basketball Connecticut Sun at Minnesota
Lynx. From the Target Center in Minneapolis. (Live) (CC)
BICYCLING
7:30 a.0i. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 15.
Stage 15, from L"'ezat-sur-L"'eze to Saint-Lary Soulan, France.
(Live)
5 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Cycling Tour de France Stage 15.
Stage 15, from L"'ezat-sur-L"'eze to Saint-Lary Soulan, France.
(Taped) (CC)
8 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 15. Stage
15, from L"'ezat-sur-L"'eze to Saint-Lary Soulan, France. (Same-day
Tape)
EQUESTRIAN
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Horse Racing Delaware Handicap/Leonard
Richards. (Live)
GOLF
6 a.m. (TNT) Golf British Open Final Round. From the Old
Course at St. Andrews in Fife, Scotland. (Live) (CC)
8 a.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) Golf British Open Final
Round. From the Old Course at St. Andrews in Fife, Scotland. (Live)
(CC)
3 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Golf American Century Championship -
Final Round. From Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course in Lake Tahoe,
Nev. (Live) (CC)
(USA) PGA Golf B.C. Open Final Round. From En-Joie Golf
Course in Endicott, N.Y. (Live)
5 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Golf Nationwide Tour Scholarship America
Showdown Final Round. From Hudson, Wis. (Live)
OUTDOORS
1:30 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) Great Outdoor Games
Men's log rolling; archery; super fly, from Orlando (Taped) (CC)
3 p.m. (ESPN) Great Outdoor Games Men's boom run; disc drive;
superweave; ATV; team relay, from Orlando (Taped) (CC)
RODEO
3 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Bull Riding PBR. (Taped)
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Softball 2005 World Cup Japan vs. United'
States. From Oklahoma City. (Taped) (CC)


Colorado
Francis 5 5 4 4 3 5
Day 1 1 1 0 1 1
DeJean 1 0 0 0 2 0
MiceliL,0-1 1 3 2 2 0 0
Cincinnati
Milton 5 7 4 4 1 5
Coffey 1 2 1 1 0 0
Belisle 1 1 1 1 0 0
StnrgeW, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Mercker 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Weathers S,5 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Standridge (Garabito), by
Belisle (LuGonzalez), by Coffey (Ardoin).
PB-Ardoin.
T-3:04. A-28,951 (42,271).
Phillies 10, Marlins 5
FLORIDA PHILA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Pierre cf 5 11 0 Rollins ss 4 1 1 1
LCstillo2b 5 01 0 REMtiz3b 4 1 1 0
CDIgdo lb 4 12 1 ToPerz 3b 1 0 1 2
MiCbra If 5 12 0 BAbreu rf 4 2 1 0
JEcrcn rf 4 11 3 Burrell If 4 1 1 2
L Ducac 4020Fultz p 0 000
Lowell3b 401 0 Utley2b 5 1 23
AGnzlz ss 3 00 0 Mchelscf 4 2 3 0
Olsen p 0 000 Howard 1b 2 1 1 0
Bump p 2 11 0 Pratt c 5 1 3 2
Mssngr p 0 000 Lieber p 3 0 0 0
Conine ph 1 00 0 Madson p 0 0 00
Mota p 0000 Lofton ph 1 0 00
Easley ph 1 00 0 Urbina p 0 0 00
Resop p 0000 Chavezcf 1 0 00
Totals 38511 4 Totals 38101410
Florida 001 003 100- 5
Philadelphia 330 000 31x- 10
E-CDelgado (9), AGonzalez (10). DP-
Florida 1. LOB-Florida 8, Philadelphia 11.
HR--JEncamacion (12), Utley (12), Pratt
(5). SB-Pierre (26), Rollins (22), BAbreu
(22). CS-BAbreu (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
Olsen L,1-1 12-3 5 6 3 1 1
Bump 2173 5 0 0 3 0
Messenger 1 0 0 0 1 2
Mota 2 2 3 0 1 3
Resop 1 2 1 1 1 1
Philadelphia
LieberW,9-8 6 9 4 4 0 3
Madson 1 2 1 1 0 2
Urbina 1 0 0 0 1 1
Fultz 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bump pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Fultz (CDelgado). WP-
Messenger, Madson.
T-3:14. A-33,268 (43,826).
Dodgers 5, Giants 4
SAN FRAN LOS ANGELES


ab rh bi
Tucker rf 4 01 1 Robles 3b
Trralba c 5 01 0 Izturis ss
Feliz 3b 400 0 JKent2b
Alou If 4 11 0 JPhllps c
Drham 2b 4 01 0 Choi lb
DCruz ss 4 22 1 Edwrds If
Snow lb 4 01 1 Werth rf
Ellison cf 3 12 1 Repko cf
Tomko p 0 000 Ledee ph
Chrstnsp 0 000 OPerez p
Munter p 0 00 0 Perez ph
Hwkins p 0 00 0 Carrar p
ASnchz ph 1 00 0 Schmll p
TyWlkr p 0 00 0 Saenz ph
CChen pr


ab r hbl
4 1 20
5 0 1 1
3000

3 21 0
4 1 20
4 0 1 1
3022
1 00
1 000
1 000
0000
0000
0000
0100


Totals 334 9 4 Totals 34 510 5
San Francisco 020 101 000- 4
Los Angeles 012 000 002- 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Durham (10). DP-San Francisco 2.
LOB-San Francisco 7, Los Angeles 9.
2B-Torrealba (7), Alou (12), DCruz 2 (7),
Izturls (13), Choi (8). S-Tomko 3, OPerez.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Tomko 6 6 3 3 2 4
Christiansen 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Munter 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 1
TyWalker L,2-2 2-3 3 2 2 2 1
Los Angeles


OPerez 6 9 4 4 2 3
Carrara 1 0 0 0 0 0
SchmollW,2-0 2 0 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Tomko (Choi). WP--OPerez.
PB-JPhillips.
T-3:01. A-48,490 (56,000).
Nationals 5, Brewers 3
WASHINGTON MILWAUKEE
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Wlkrsn lb 4 00 0 BClarkcf 4 0 1 0
Byrd If 3000 Weeks 2b 3 000
Church If 1 11 0 Ovrbay 1b 3 0 00
Vidro 2b 5 11 1 CaLee If 4 0 0 0
JGillenrf 4 02 2Jenkins rf 4 220
PrWIsn cf 320 0 BHall 3b 4 020
Castilla 3b 3 02 2 DMiller c 4 1 1 1
GBnntt c 401 0 Hardy ss 3 0 1 1
CGzmnss 3000 Mgrder ph 1 000
Carrollss 0000 Cpuanop 2 000
Loaiza p 2 00 0 Bttlco p 0 0 0 0
Baerga ph 1 11 0 Helms ph 1 0 1 0
Mjwski p 0 00 0 Eviand p 0 0 0 0
WCdero ph 1 000 JuStna p 0 00 0
Stanton p 0 00 0
CCrdrop 0 00 0
Totals 345 8 5 Totals 33 3 8 2
Washington 010 101 200- 5
Milwaukee 020 001 -000- 3
DP-Washington 2. LOB-Washington
9, Milwaukee 5. 2B-Castilla 2 (25),
BCIark (21), Hardy (13). 3B-Church (3).
HR-Vidro (5). S-Weeks.


Washington
Loaiza W,6-5
Majewski
Stanton
CCordero S,32
Milwaukee
Capuano
Bottalico L,2-2
Eveland
JuSantana


IP H RERBBSO

6 7 3 3 1 4
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0


6 5 3 3
1 222
12-3 1 0 0
1-3 00 0


WP-Loaiza 2, Bottalico.
T-3:04. A-45,079 (41,900).


RACING
NASCAR
Nextel-New England 300
Lineup after Saturday qualifying
At New Hampshire International
Speedway, Loudon, N.H.
(Car number In parentheses)
1. (25) B. Vickers, Chevrolet, 130.327.
2. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 130.215.
3. (38) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 129.798.
4. (12) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 129.776.
5. (97) Kurt Busch, Ford, 129.767.
6. (2) Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 129.736.
7. (5) Kyle Busch, Chevy, 129.714.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevy, 129.683.
9. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 129.617.
10. (18) B. Labonte, Chevy, 129.595.
11. (19) J. Mayfield, Dodge, 129.441.
12. (48) J. Johnson, Chevy, 129.362.
13. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevy, 129.296.
14. (21) Ricky Rudd, Ford, 129.151.
15. (43) Jeff Green, Dodge, 129.020.
16. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 129.016.
17. (42) J. McMurray, Dodge, 128.824.
18. (0) Mike Bliss, Chevy, 128.750.
19. (6) Mark Martin, Ford, 128.697.
20. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 128.641.
21. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevy, 128.589.
22. (01) Joe Nemechek, Chevy, 128.524.
23. (10) Scott Riggs, Chevy, 128.428.
24. (8) D. Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 128.415.
25. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevy, 128.342.
26. (41) Casey Mears, Dodge, 128.337.
27. (11) Jason Leffler, Chevy, 128.312.
28. (15) M. Waltrip, Chevy, 127.954.
29. (40) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 127.949.
30. (77) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 127.945.
31. (7) Robby Gordon, Chevy, 127.842.
32. (22) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 127.671.
33. (66) Mike Garvey, Ford, 127.517.
34. (88) Dale Jarrett, Ford, 127.376.
35. (00) Carl Long, Dodge, 127.180.
36. (32) B. Hamilton Jr., Chevy, 127.155.
37. (07) Dave Blaney, Chevy, 127.138.
38. (27) Ted Christopher, Ford, 126.973.


39. (89) M. Shepherd, Dodge, 126.947.
40. (4) Mike Wallace, Chevy, 126.913.
41. (49) K. Schrader, Dodge, Owner Points
42. (45) Kyle Petty, Dodge, Owner Points
43. (37) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 126.926.
Failed to Qualify
44. (34) Joey McCarthy, Chevy, 126.513.
45. (52) Derrike Cope, Ford, 126.128.
46. (75) W. Anderson, Dodge, 125.886.
47. (92) Hermie Sadler, Chevy, 124.365.
Citrus County Speedway
Sportsman Heat 1
1. Maloy Kelly
2. Stephen Anderson
3. James Batson
4. Mike Veltman
5. Johnny Sanders
Sportsman Heat 2
1. Chris Cross
2. Frank Buchanan
3. Kyle Maynard
4. Mike Veltman
5. Rick Kase
Modified Heat 1
1. Curtis Neumann
2. Kyle Bookmiller
3. Mike Bell
4. Butch Bassett
5. Mark Nelson
Modified Heat 2
1. Robert Ray
2. Ralph Bowman
3. Tommy Schnader
4. Billy Bechtelheimer
5. Bryan Rogers
USA Sprint Heat 1
1. Dakotah Stephens
2. Tommy Rice
3. Dennis Misuraca
4. Travis Bliemeister
USA Sprint Heat 2
1. David Stawiak
2. Timmy George
3. Mike Smith
4. RC Roper
5. Danny Jones
USA Sprint Feature
1. David Stawiak
2. Dennis Misuraca
3. Timmy George
Mini Cup All Pro Heat 1
1. Rick Auriemma
2. Steve Hardy
3. Doug Smith
4. Larry Folino
5. Brian Ayers
Mini Cup All Pro Heat 2
1. Brett Jameson
2. Francois Pelletier
3. Paul Tyson
4. Tom Mellin
5. Jamie Morey
Mini Cup Juniors Heat
1. Thomas Warnick
2.-Seth Greco
3. Scott Werstein
4. Tylor Payton
5. Blake Orr
4-cylinder Bomber Heat
1. James Pate
2. Justin Durbin
3. Kevin Stone
4. Rusty Adams
5. Tim Herrington
4-cylinder Bomber Feature
1. Justin Durbin
2. Rusty Adams
3. Tim Herrington
4. Kevin Stone
5. Jesse Mullis
Hobby Stock 50 (unofficial)
1. James Batson
2. Curtis Flanagan
3. Richie Smith*
4. Corky Miley*
5. John Zuidema
* Disqualifications may be imposed due to
incidents at the completion of the Hobby
Stock 50. Official results will to be deter-
mined at the completion of the race night.


GOLF
British Open
At St. Andrews, Old Course
St. Andrews, Scotland
(a-amateur)
Third Round
Tiger Woods 66-67-71 204
J.M. Olazabal 68-70-68 206
Retief Goosen 68-73-66 207
C. Montgomerie71-66-70 207
Sergio Garcia 70-69-69 208
Brad Faxon 72-66-70 208
M. Campbell 69-72-68 209
Vijay Singh 69-69-71 209
Soren Hansen 72-72-66 210
M.n Lafeber 73-70-67 210
Darren Clarke 73-70-67 210
Kenny Perry 71-71-68 210
Sandy Lyle 74-67-69 210
Sean O'Hair 73-67-70 210
B. Langer 71-69-70 210
Tim Clark 71-69-70 210
John Daly 1 71-69-70 210
Bart Bryant 69-70-71 210
Scott Verplank 68-70-72 210
Adam Scott 70-71-70 211
T. Immelman 68-70-73 211
Geoff Ogilvy 71-74-67 212
a-L. Saltman 73-71-68 212
Bob Tway 69-71-72 212
Stuart Appleby 72-68-72 212
Richard Green 72-68-72 212
Bo Van Pelt 72-67-73 212
Fred Couples 68-71-73 212
Tim Herron 73-72-68 213
N. Flanagan 73-71-69 213
Mark Hensby 67-77-69 213
Greg Norman 72-71-70 213
Nick Faldo 74-69-70 213
lan Poulter 70-72-71 213
Nick O'Hern 73-69-71 213
Simon Dyson 70-71-72 213
F. Jacobson 71-70-72 213
Phil.Mickelson 74-67-72 213
David Small 73-72-69 214
S. Drummond 74-71-69 214
T. Takayama 72-72-70 214
Tom Lehman 75-69-70 214
Kyoung Ju Choi75-68-71 214
Steve Webster 71-72-71 214
Pat Perez 72-70-72 214
David Frost 77-65-72 214
Henrik Stenson 74-67-73 214


a-E. Molinari
Hiroyuki Fujita
Tom Watson
Peter Hanson
Chris DiMarco
G. McDowell
Thomas Levet
Peter Lonard
Rod Pampling
John Bickerton
SK Ho
Steve Flesch


70-70-74
72-68-74
75-70-70
72-72-71
75-69-71
69-72-74
69-71-75
68-70-77
74-71-71
75-70-71
73-71-72
74-70-72


M. Calcavecchla70-73-73
Tino Schuster 68-74-74
a-Eric Ramsay 68-74-74
Chris Riley 68-73-75
T. Jaidee 73-68-75
Ernie Els 74-67-75
Joe Ogilvie 74-70-73
M.A. Jimenez 69-72-76
Simon Khan 69-70-78
Robert Allenby 70-68-79
Paul McGinley 70-75-73
Paul Lawrie 72-71-75
Luke Donald 68-73-77
Justin Leonard 73-71-75
Robert Rock 73-71-75
S. Gutschewski 76-69-75
Patrik Sjoland 74-71-76
a-M. Richardson75-69-77
Ted Purdy 72-72-77
Duffy Waldorf 74-68-81
Graeme Storm 75-70-80


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SOFTBALL
Continued from Page 1B

win.
In fact, Newman and coun-
terpart Brown, pitching for
Crystal River, were opposite
ends of the spectrum.
Brown looked very sharp
early on and retired the side in
order over the first three
innings via eight groundouts
and a strikeout Through those
first three innings, it appeared
as if a single run plated by
either team could be the decid-
ing factor.
"We had a slow start at the
plate today," said Palma Ceia
manager Chris Gronke, whose
team would finish as Section 7
champions, later defeating
Seminole 12-2. "They're a good
team, that was a reason."
Again, in the top of the
fourth, it looked as if Crystal
River would provide the
game's first run.
Emily Laga worked Newman
for a walk to lead off the inning.
Then, with out out, Bridget
Whitley reached on an error
and Tabby Augsburger moved
both runners into scoring posi-
tion with a sacrifice bunt
Newman buckled down, how-
ever, striking out the next batter
and, for the second time in four
innings, Crystal River left a pair
of runners on.
"She's been solid all year,"
Gronke said of Newman.
"Mentally, she's come a long
way."
Walks, wild pitches and an
error led Crystal River into
trouble in the fourth.
A defensive miscue put Emy
Pitisci on first to lead off in the
bottom of the fourth. Pitisci
stole second and advanced to
third on a sacrifice bunt
Brown showed her first signs
of wildness by uncorking a high
pitch that reached the back-
stop. Pitisci tried to score on the
play, but Brown applied the tag
at the plate for the second out
While disaster had been
diverted in that instance, the
next four batters would reach
base on walks. Blair Martin was
the first and scored on the last
of three wild pitches during
Megan Murphy's at-bat to stake
Palma Ceia to a 1-0 lead.
"The main thing was that we
needed baserunners," Gronke
said. "We were trying to lay
down bunts and be more


MAJOR
Continued from Page 1B

Undeterred by giving up the
lone run, Bayshore/West
Tampa ended the game in the
bottom half of inning by knock-
ing six singles and plating four
runs for the 11-1 win.
At 1-1, Dunnellon faces 0-2
Seminole at 11 a.m. today. Both
of Seminole's games Saturday
ended by the fourth inning.
Besides losing to Oldsmar, the
team was dealt a 16-2 loss by
Bayshore/West Tampa.
Even if Bayshore/West
Tampa loses to Oldsmar today



TOUR
Continued from Page 1B

ing another step toward a sev-
enth consecutive Tour victory
Even without his teammates
who usually lead him up moun-
tains, Armstrong fended off
Ullrich, Italian Ivan Basso and
others, and dealt out punishment
of his own by beating them to the
ski station of Ax-3 Domaines,
extending his overall lead.
Armstrong placed second, 56
seconds behind Georg Totschnig,
the first Austrian since 1931 to
win a stage. But he is not a chal-
lenger in the overall standings.
Basso, who is, stayed with
Armstrong up to Ax-3 Domaines
but couldn't follow his finishing
sprint, placing third.
Ullrich was fourth, dropped by
Armstrong's acceleration toward
the end.
Overall, Armstrong's lead over
Basso grew to 2 minutes, 46 sec-
onds and to 4:34 over Ullrich.
Those advantages could carry
Armstrong to victory in Paris on
July 24 if he keeps riding as he
has.
Closest overall remains


Mickael Rasmussen. But the
Dane lost 63 seconds to
Armstrong, placing eighth. For
now, he trails Armstrong by 1:41
but that will likely grow dramati-
cally in a time trial on the Tour's
penultimate day. Armstrong
excels in clock-races;
Rasmussen often struggles.
Armstrong's already comfort-
able lead over Ullrich going into
the stage placed the onus on the
German to try to make up time.
The best hope of doing that was
"to make Lance's team explode,"
said T-Mobile rider Alexandre
Vinokourov.
T-Mobile made their move by
sprinting into the toughest


SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 3B

patient."
Murphy walked and later
scored for a 2-0 margin on the
off-target fourth ball of
Christina Gerecke's free pass.
"We just needed to stop the
bleeding and we didn't do that,"
Jenkins said.
In the top of the fifth,
Newman struck out the side
and Palma Ceia quickly went
back to their patient ways at the
plate.
The bottom of the fifth inning
featured Brown walking the
first two batters to put runners
on first and third (thanks to a
wild pitch) with no outs. Brown
was replaced at that point by
Consol.
"It was just her," Jenkins said.
"I've never seen pressure affect
my team like it did today."
Overall in the fifth inning,
Palma Ceia plated five runs on
just two hits. But four walks and
a wild pitch did the damage.
Although the team would
eventually finish in third place,
Jenkins said that his girls had
nothing to hang their heads
about
"They should be proud to be
here," he said. "District 15 is
becoming a very competitive
district. Winning that is an
accomplishment"
East Lake (Tarpon Springs) 10,
Crystal River 4
Even after losing to Palma Ceia,
Crystal River had an outside
chance of finishing first until
Palma Ceia ended it with a 12-2
win over Seminole to finish 3-0.
Then Crystal River's chances for a
runner-up finish were also eliminat-
ed by East Lake.
East Lake had a 4-0 lead after
three innings before Crystal River
responded. Abbey Brown walked
and Clarissa Consol was hit by a
pitch; both would later score to cut
the East Lake lead to 4-2.
However, East Lake pulled away
with a five-run fourth inning that
made it 9-2.
Crystal River scored a single run
in the fifth inning to cut the lead to
9-3. All of Crystal River's runs up to
the fifth were scored without the
benefit of a base hit.
Crystal River finished with three
hits, which came consecutively in
the top of the sixth and scored the
game's final run. Bridget Whitley,
Rachel Roe and Samantha Jenkins
accounted for the hits.
Other scores in Section 7: East
Lake 17, Seminole 1; Palma Ceia
12, Seminole 2.

and Durinelloi wins, Kevin
Fagan believes that his team
won't advance past this tourna-
ment because it lost in head-to-
head play.
"They deserve to go on and
represent the section," Kevin
Fagan said of Bayshore/West
Tampa. "They got a real fine
team."
And even though Dunnellon
may have been relegated to a
consolation game, don't expect
this team or its coach to hang
their heads.
"It's a real tough section
we've got now with the teams
from Tampa," Kevin Fagan
said. "We'll show up tomorrow
and try to finish this out"

ascent, a 9.4-mile climb over the
Port de Pailheres. It peaks at
6,565 feet and is so hard that it is
classified as "hors categories" -
or unrated.
Armstrong knew he was being
set up for a fall.
"It's scary when you see five
kilomrheters before the bottom the
entire team go to the front and
start riding as hard as they can,"
Armstrong said. "You see what is
going to happen, the order they
are in, you see what they are set-
ting up for, so that naturally gives
you fear"
Only Armstrong, Ullrich,
Basso and a few others none
of them the American's team-
mates matched the pace. With
Armstrong alone, the challenges
began.
Basso accelerated, and was
followed by Ullrich and
Vinokourov
But Armstrong handled the
pressure.
Over the pass they rode, and
then raced down the descent
into a final climb to Ax-3
Domaines. There, sweat glisten-
ing on his arms, Armstrong
turned the tables, dancing out of


his saddle from side to side.
Neither Basso nor Ullrich
could match him and in the
end, he left both behind.
Afterward, Armstrong praised
T-Mobile's move as "the right
thing to do."
But"I feltgood atthe time," he
added. "I was motivated to not
necessarily be put down by such
strong tactics."
Basso, who rides for Team
CSC, said Armstrong was
"untouchable."
"I tried my utmost to see if I
could push him to the limit but it
. wasn't possible," he said.
The brutal 137-mile trek was
raced under a scorching sun.
Riders poured water over them-
selves to cool down.














Australian claims WSOP title


Associate Press

LAS VEGAS The sun set,
the sun rose and still they
played, caution trumping brav-
ery, adrenaline fighting off
fatigue, rare moments of
drama breaking through the
tedium, the chip lead shifting
for nearly 14 hours at the 36th
World Series of Poker the
longest final table in tourna-
ment history for the richest
prize.
Nine players had started
Friday afternoon, the survivors
among the 5,619 who entered
the $10,000 buy-in No Limit
Texas Hold 'em tournament
last week, and only two
remained Saturday morning -
Australian chiropractor-
turned-pro Joseph Hachem
and American amateur Steven
Dannenmann in the first World
Series for both of them.
The big shots of the poker
world were long gone, though
some sat enviously in the
black-draped room at Benny's
Bullpen in Binion's Gambling
Hall & Hotel, watching along
with hundreds of frenzied fans
as Hachem and Dannenmann
faced off one last time.
The $7.5 million first prize
lay piled high in everyone's
view, thick $50,000 bundles of
$100 bills guarded by security
men wielding shotguns.
At 6:44 a.m., on their sixth
head-to-head duel and the
232nd hand of the night,
Hachem claimed the fortune
and the priceless champi-
onship bracelet when his
seven-high straight beat


Dannenmann's pair of aces
with all $56 million in chips
pushed into the pot.
It was a theatrical finish to a
plodding night that had been
filled with smart moves and
goofy ones by pros and ama-
teurs exhausted by some 90
hours of poker each over six
brutal sessions.
Dannenmann raised before
the flop and Hachem called. A
six-five-four came out and
Hachem checked.
Dannenmann bet another
$700,000, Hachem raised to
$1.7 million.
The turn card was an ace and
Hachem tossed $2 million
more into the pot.
Dannenmann hesitated, stud-
ied the table and Hachem, then
raised to $5 million. Hachem
went all-in with more than $30
million and the small crowd
still packed in the Bullpen
roared as Dannenmann
instantly called.
Hachem flipped over his
cards a seven and three for a
straight against
Dannenmann's ace-three.
Dannenmann needed a seven
on the river to chop the pot
with an equal straight. A four
came out instead and Hachem
was the champion.
The first Australian to win
the poker World Series,
Hachem hugged Dannenmann,
then wrapped himself in an
Australian flag while his many
compatriots and fellow poker
players in the room chanted
'Aussie, Aussie, Aussie! Oi! Oi!
Oi!" as they had through the
night.


Joseph Hachem, from Australia, is
the World Series of Poker, which
"Thank you, America,"
Hachem shouted in delight.
Little known before now, the
39-year-old Hachem realized
immediately that his life would
never be the same.
"A million dollars changes
my life, let alone $7.5 million. It
changes everything," said
Hachem, a native of Lebanon


and spoke to her briefly, he
said, "just before she fainted."
All the money he won,
Hachem said, was secondary
to capturing the title of World
Series champion and the dia-
mond-studded, white gold
bracelet that he can take into
every tournament in the
future.
-- "The money's great," he
said. "I'd be lying if I said it's
not. But the bracelet is the
thing. It's an honor and a priv-
ilege to wear it."
While several other players
had held the lead in the chip
.count at different times
through the night, Hachem
,, had trailed for 11V/2 hours until
4:20 a.m. but never lost sight of
his goal or his strategy to con-
centrate on winning small
Cl. pots. Nor did he let himself get
distracted by the gragol prize.
"I never stopped thinking
about being the winner, but I
never once thought about the
money," he said.
Hachem led the chip count
4 with $39,995,000 to
Dannenmann's $16,350,000
when they started playing one-
Associated Press on-one after third-place finish-
surrounded by his winnings from er Tex Barch was eliminated.
totaled $7.5 million. Barch, who won $2.5 million,
went out when he lost a three-
who moved to Australia with way hand that Hachem took
his family in 1972. He gave up a with pocket jacks for $16 mil-
13-year chiropractic career lion in chips.
three years ago to play poker Dannenmann, a 38-year-old
for a living and vowed now to accountant and mortgage
succeed last year's champion, banker from Severn, Md., won
Greg Raymer, as a worthy the $4.5 million second prize
ambassador for the game. and took the defeat cheerfully.
He pulled out his cell phone He said he couldn't wait to go
to call his wife in Melbourne fishing with his friends.


"I got tired," he said. "I was
bored of it. I was trying to make
moves."
Claiming he was only the
fourth-best player in the game
he hosts at his house weekly, he
had entered the tournament on
a lark after a few beers with
golf and poker buddy Jerry
Ditzel, who put up half the
$10,000 entry fee and will get
more than $1 million in return.
"We kick his butt in the game
back home sometimes," Ditzel
said.
All the players at the final
table won at least $1 million.
Mike "The Mouth" Matusow,
a pro who came in sixth in
2001, was the first out but had
no regrets.
"I played the six best days of
poker in my life," Matusow
said. "I'm going to bed happy."
Brad Kondracki, a 24-year
University of Pennsylvania law
student from Kingston, Pa., fin-
ished eighth to take home $1.15
million.
"I'll probably drink way too
much and wake up and buy
something really expensive
that I don't need," he said, get-
ting a laugh from his parents
and brothers by his side.
Daniel Bergsdorf, a 27-year-
old Swedish truck driver, was
seventh. Scott Lazar, a 42-year-
old production assistant for
independent films who was
playing in his fourth World
Series, finished sixth. Irishman
Andrew Black took fifth, Aaron
Kanter, a 27-year-old pro from
Elk Grove, Calif., was fourth.


Phelps seeks more medals


Associated Press


Michael Phelps just can't
slow down.
Eleven months after a seem-
ingly once-in-a-lifetime
Olympic performance,
America's swimming phenom
is gearing up for a similarly
challenging schedule at the
world championships, which
begin Sunday in Montreal.
Call it an Athens Redux.
"He would like to push him-
self to a new level," said Bob
Bowman, Phelps' longtime
coach.
Bowman had projected
Greece as the likely peak of
Phelps' career He was experi-
enced enough to be one of the
world's best in several strokes,
but young enough only 19 at
the time to handle the physi-
cal toll of swimming eight
events in eight days.
Phelps certainly fulfilled his
coach's prophecy, capturing six
golds and a record-tying haul of
eight medals overall.
Now, instead of backing off in
a biennial championship that
won't bring nearly as much
attention in the U.S. even
with Montreal being just across
the border Phelps will
attempt to duplicate his
Olympian exploits at the ripe
ol' age of 20.
Phelps left his teenage years
behind a couple of weeks ago,
but he's hardly over the hill In
fact, his lanky, 6-foot-5 body still
seems fully capable of doing it
all over again.
"I feel good, so let's keep it
going," he said.
Who knows? Phelps might
keep it going all the way to
Beijing, still three years away
on the Olympic calendar
"If he continues along the
way he is now, has a good year
of training next year, I don't see
why he couldn't attempt the
same thing in Beijing that he
did in Athens," Bowman said in
a revised and more tantalizing
forecast
Phelps will take on a slightly
different challenge in
Montreal He swapped two of
his world-record events, the
200-meter butterfly and 400
individual medley, for the 100
and 400 freestyles.
"We just wanted to try some-
thing different," Bowman said.
Phelps also qualified for the
100 butterfly, 200 free and 200
IM holdovers from his
Olympic regimen along with
400 and 800 free relays. In addi-
tion, he likely will be picked to
swim the 400 medley relay.
That adds up to eight Again.
"Michael is like a lot of top-
level guys," American rival Ian
Crocker said. "Every time you
question them, say they can't do
something, that's when they
prove you wrong. I expect him
to deliver on his goals."
Bowman knows it will be dif-


Michael Phelps, who won eight medals at the last
six of them gold will try to capture eight more a
Championships in Montreal.


ficult for Phelps to match his
gold medal haul from last sum-
mer He's a long shot in the 100
free "I'd just like to see him
do a best time in that event," his
coach said and hasn't come
close to. matching Grant
Hackett in the 400 free.
But Phelps is eager to see
how he stacks up against the
Australian star and so is
Hackett, world record holder in
the 1,500. He even added the
200 free to his extensive sched-
ule in response to Phelps' deci-
sion to swim the 400.
"It's the competitor in him,"
Hackett's coach, Denis
Cotterell, told The Australian
newspaper "Grant's saying, 'I
don't want to look like I am
scared to meet him in his terri-
tory,' and there's also the moti-
vation of racing the guy who's
accepted as the best swimmer
on the planet"
With Ian Thorpe skipping
these championships, Phelps
vs. Hackett is shaping up as the
most intriguing showdown in
Montreal. Thorpe has been on
an extended break from train-
ing since the Athens Games.
Hackett is a former world
record holder in the 200, but
Phelps won an Olympic bronze
in that event ahead of
Hackett The Australian's best
time in the 400 is nearly four
seconds faster than Phelps'
mark, but the two have never
raced each other at that dis-
tance.
Phelps, Crocker, Aaron


Peirsol and Brenr
lead an overpo\
men's team, whici
much like the squad
nated in Athens.
"I'll certainly
blame if we don
men's coach I
quipped.
With three-tim4
Amanda Beard tak
off she's done s
ing and dated NAX
Carl Edwards t
women will rely
Natalie Coughlin, v
medals in Athens.
Also being cc
youngsters such a
and Kelsey Ditto,I
17-year-old Kate Zi
"We have to get
fast track so they
international exp<
confidence to be s
Beijing," said Chi
who heads USA
"We've got our wor
us."
The Americans
more hard-pressed
with the rest of the
other events at t
aquatic champions
synchronized swim
polo and open-w
ming.
As usual, the Chi
team to beat on the
ing claimed a reco
golds in Athens ai
winning all eight E
the Olympics coi
homeland in 2008.


The U.S. went back to the
drawing board after failing to
win an Olympic medal for the
first time in 92 years. New
selection procedures, new
training methods, a whole new
approach anything to help
America reclaim its former sta-
tus as a diving superpower
"In Athens, it all came crash-
ing down," said Steve
McFarland a vice president at
USA Diving and part of the
committee that selected the 14-
member Montreal team.
*..,. "We all looked at each other
and said, 'OK, let's do this. Let's
...., do something radically differ-
ent Let's start over."'
Sydney gold medalist Laura
Wilkinson is one of just four
-" holdovers from Athens. The
youth movement includes 15-
year-old Thomas Finchum, 16-
year-olds David Boudia, J.J.
Kinzbach and Kelci Bryant,
and 17-year-old Chelsea Davis.
S "We are focused on winning
Olympic medals," McFarland
said. "The world champi-
onships are a benchmark for us
along the wayto see howwe are
stacking up."
It's too early in the process to
mount a serious challenge to
Associated Press the Chinese, who are expected
to get their stiffest competition
Olympics from the home team. Olympic
t the World medalists Alexandre Despatie
and Emilie Heymans lead the
dan Hansen Canadians.
wearing U.S. Coughlin broke her left foot
h looks very shortly after the Olympics and
ad that domi- is just getting back to top form.
She qualified for two individ-
get all the ual events in Montreal and
't do well," hopes to swim all three relays,
Dave Salo as well.
Two years ago, Coughlin
e Olympian became ill during the world
king the year championships in Barcelona,
some model- ruining her hopes of a Phelps-
SCAR driver like performance.
he American "I don't feel I need to make
heavily on up for anything," Coughlin said.
who won five "That was a freak thing in
Spain. I had a 103-degree fever
mounted on: Alotofpeople would have been
s Katie Hoff hospitalized in that situation.
both 16, and I'm really proud of how I han-
iegler dled it"
them on the Phelps had a major hiccup
can get the handling his post-Athens suc-
erience and cess, getting arrested for drunk-
successful in en driving.
uck Wielgus, "I've learned from this mis-
Swimming, take and will continue learning
*k cut out for from this mistake for the rest of
my life," said a contrite Phelps,
will be even who pleaded guilty and
d to keep up received 18 months on proba-
world in the tion.
hese 15-day He also moved away from
ships: diving, Baltimore, leaving the comfort
timing, water of his mother's home to follow
rater swim- Bowman to the University of
Michigan.
inese are the "It was a big adjustment at
boards, hav- first," the coach said. 'Just
rd six diving being able to provide his own
nd intent on meals, keep everything clean-
events when that's all stuff he used to take
me to their for granted. It was tough for
him."


UNC's Williams denies


wrongdoing at Kansas


Associated Press

Roy Williams said he made a
"mistake" when he approved
gifts to graduating players and
others who had used up their
eligibility while coach at
Kansas, but denied there was
any intentional wrongdoing.
"We wanted a program that
would positively represent the
university and the integrity of
our basketball program was
always very important to me,"
Williams said in a statement
Saturday. "I am deeply sad-
dened to say there was evi-
dently a mistake."
Williams now the coach at
North Carolina issued the
statement to respond to a
report by Kansas outlining
NCAA rules violations in its
athletic department.
After conducting an internal
review, the school said
Williams who won the
national championship last
April in his second season in
Chapel Hill, N.C. approved
payments made by three repre-
sentatives of the university's
"athletics interests."
The school said Dana
Anderson, Joan Edwards and
Bernard Morgan gave cash and
clothing to graduating players
and others who had exhausted
their eligibility. Payments went
back as far as 1998, though no
player was said to have
received more than $400.
Williams said there was a


"communication problem"
with the school's compliance
department, leading him to
believe a gift was permitted.
The violation falls under the
NCAAs "extra benefit" rule
and specifies that once ath-
letes enroll, they are barred for
life from receiving gifts from
fans.
"I did not know the rule that
once you're a student-athlete,
you are a student-athlete until
death," Williams said.
"Kansas never gained a
recruiting or competitive
advantage the students had
completed their eligibility and
it was seen as a graduation gift
I have never promised any-
thing to a prospective student-
athlete, including playing
time."
The violations, which
Kansas reported to the NCAA
last month, were among sever-
al involving three programs,
ending in 2003. The school
responded to violations in the
football and women's basket-
ball programs by reducing
scholarships, but the men's
basketball violation will be
addressed through extra edu-
cation about the rules regard-
ing gifts.
No other sanctions against
the program are planned.
Williams won 418 games in
15 years at Kansas before
departing in 2003 for his alma
mater, where he spent 10 years
as an assistant to Dean Smith.


Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala.-
Kenneth Darby is doing every-
thing but taking hits and
breaking tackles. Brodie
Croyle has shed the knee
brace and tried to put his lat-
est injury out of his mind.
Alabama's two offensive
stars are hoping their prob-
lem-free summer workouts
are harbingers of what's to
come in the upcoming season
after promising seasons crum-
bled beneath injuries in 2004.
Croyle tore a ligament in his
right knee early last season
and Darby had surgery in the
spring to repair a pelvic injury
that slowed him much of the
final three games.
"All summer, I haven't worn
a knee brace," said Croyle, the
Crimson Tide's oft-injured
quarterback. "I haven't
thought about it. I've been
running wide open and plant-
ing and taking my drops, doing
everything. It's been the least
of my worries.
"Hopefully it's just a past


memory"
If so, that's good news for
Alabama fans who have fret-
ted so much about Croyle's
health that rumors circulated
through the Internet recently
that he'd had a) an accident
while hunting in Argentina or
b) been injured in a car wreck.
Neither is true, he assures.
"I didn't get shot, run over or
kidnapped, so I'm good to go,"
Croyle said.
Darby expects to be good to
go as well. He's been "100 per-
cent full-go" in workouts this
summer, but still checks in
with trainers afterward.
"I'm kind of anxious myself
to get out there and really see
how I feel when I break a tack-
le or make a certain move that
I didn't do without the pads." '
Darby is the Southeastern
Conference's top returning
rusher, gaining 1,062 yards
despite being hampered in the
final three games. He had sur-
gery to repair what was
described as a sports hernia
in March.


'Bama stars look



to return to form


CITRUS COUNTY (l1) CHRONICLE


4B SUNDAY, JULY 17, /-005


SPORTS








SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 5B


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gordon still upbeat


Driver avoids

looking for

scapegoat

Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Jeff
Gordon is in the midst of his
worst season, and hardly has
the look of a contender for
NASCAR's Nextel Cup cham-
pionship.
But he isn't seeking a
scapegoat, and if he were it
wouldn't be crew chief
Robbie Loomis. One of the
most common remedies for
problems in NASCAR is to
fire the man responsible for
setting up a failing car.
Gordon has no intention of
doing that.
"As long as Robbie wants to
be the crew chief, he's going
to be the crew chief," Gordon
said at New Hampshire
International Speedway,
where he'll race Sunday in
the New England 300. "He
works so well with this race
team. We brought him here
for a reason."
That reason wasn't to stand
a career-worst 15th with only
eight races remaining until
the field is reduced to the top
10 drivers and any others
within 400 points an
unlikely scenario of the
leader. Gordon is 502 points
behind pacesetter Jimmie
Johnson and 126 out of 10th
place.
Despite being saddled with
six points-robbing failures to
finish in 18 starts, the four-
time series champion won't
blame Loomis.
'At no time have I doubted
Robbie," Gordon said.
"There have been times
when I've doubted myself.
But I know we've got the right
people in place and the right
team and the resources we
need."
Still, Gordon has no
answers in a season that
probably will end without
him being part of the big
show. The worst career finish
in his first 12 years on
NASCAR's elite circuit was
14th in points in his rookie
campaign of 1993.
The failures have been so
rampant including five
recent finishes of 30th or
worse that Gordon isn't
even in position to make a
run at the top 10 without
those immediately in front
having consistent problems
from now until the cutdown
for the Chase for the
Championship. The elite
field will be finalized after
the race Sept. 10 in
Richmond and begin its run
here the next week.
Gordon said his problems
among them being crashed


Associated Press
Jeff Gordon leaves the track Saturday at New Hampshire International Speedway in Loudon,
N.H., aftpr qualifying for Sunday's NASCAR Nextel Cup New England 300.


out a few times by others -
are varied.
"The weeks that we have
run good, I felt like we've run
into some bad luck," he said.
"And then we've had weeks
where we've just run badly
and either also have bad luck
or just ran bad and finished
bad.
"There is no doubt that it
gets frustrating. You wonder
when it's going to stop and
when we're going to get it
turned around."
Gordon, who qualified 21st
Saturday, is now faced with
needing extremely strong
runs and no bad finishes if
he's to make the cut. Jeremy
Mayfield, who reached the
final 10 a year ago with a vic-
tory in Richmond, has no
such problems.
He's ninth in the standings,


40 points clear of relegation,
and filled with confidence.
Still, Mayfield is cautious.
"We can't do anything dif-
ferent now just., because
we're in the top 10," he said.
"We were in and out of the
top 10 a couple of times last
year and then we fell to 15th,
but we're not going to do it
this time."
He says only Johnson, Greg
Biffle and Tony Stewart are
in a position of relative com-
fort.
"You can go from fourth to
10th or from eighth to 15th
quick," Mayfield said. "It
looks like people are points
racing, but nobody has had a
real good year except Greg
Biffle."
Mayfield, 11th in qualifying
Saturday, has benefited from
some inauspicious finishes


and avoided the sort of disas-
ters that have punctuated
Gordon's season.
"I've run hard for 15th or
16th, but those days pay off at
the end of this thing,"
Mayfield said. "It's all work-
ing out. Our cars are getting
better and better."
Crew chief Slugger Labbe
also is happy with the way
things have gone, but sees
room for improvement
because the team is yet to
win this year.
But Mayfield is in a better
position than six of the nine
drivers with victories this
season.
'"A lot of the guys who have.
won races this year have won
a bunch of races," Labbe
said. "Jeff Gordon has won
three and he's 15th in
points."


Truex wins Busch Series race


NASCAR: Brian



Vickers wins pole


ppwl
ow- -*Io-


Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Brian
Vickers won the third pole of
his NASCAR Nextel Cup
career during qualifying
Saturday at New Hampshire
International Speedway.
Vickers, in his second full
season on the circuit, drove his
Chevrolet around The Magic
Mile at 130.327 mph.
That earned him the
top spot for Sunday's
New England 300, giv-
ing Vickers his first
pole since last
September at ,
California Speedway
"We really focused on
race trim," Vickers said Bri
of his preparations dur- Vick
ing Friday's practice. earns
"We really didn't have a for Su
chance to make a qual-
ifying run.
"We knew we had a good
race car, but didn't think it was
this good for qualifying."
The 21-year-old driver from
Thomasville, N.C., hopes to
parlay the pole into his first.
career victory in his 60th start
His top finish came last month
when he placed second in the
Pocono 500.
Although he's 22nd in the
series standings, Vickers has
had three top-six finishes -
including a fourth last Sunday
in Joliet, Ill. in the last six
races and has led the most laps
twice this season.
"The win is close," Vickers
said. "When you run well and
lead a lot of laps you can't leave
with your head hanging down."
Kasey Kahne qualified sec-
ond in a Dodge at 130.215,
falling just short of his third
pole of the season.
"We went out first, and in the
past it seems like that hurt," he
said, noting that the Busch
series cars finished qualifying
just 30 minutes before the Cup
cars hit the track. "But it was
actually a pretty good spot to
qualify. It was coolest then, and
I felt like it was a good lap."
Elliott Sadler wound up
third in a Ford at 129.798.
"Track position is very
important at this race track,"
he said. "We came up here and
tested a few weeks ago, and it
paid off for us."
Locking up the fourth spot in
the 43-car field was track
record-holder Ryan Newman,
who got around at 129.776 in a
Dodge. He set the record of
133.357 in September 2003.
Series champion Kurt Busch
was fifth in a Ford at 129.767..
Rusty Wallace, rookie Kyle
Busch, Kevin Harvick, Greg
Biffle and Bobby Labonte com-
pleted the top 10.
Points leader Jimmie
Johnson will start 12th.
Joey McCarthy, Derrike
Cope, Wayne Anderson and
Hermie Sadler failed to make
the field. Carl Long got in at
35th despite hitting the wall on
his second lap.
Newman doesn't win this time
Ryan Newman was hoping to
further enhance his position as the
fastest driver at New Hampshire
International Speedway. But it did-


Victory marks

fifth ofseason

Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Points
leader Martin Truex Jr. held off
Carl Edwards on the final lap
for his fifth victory of the sea-
son in a caution-filled
NASCAR Busch series race
Saturday at New Hampshire
International Speedway
'Truex, who started seventh,
led only the last 13 laps in the
New England 200. The victory
extended the reigning series
champion's points lead to 142
over 16th-place finisher Clint
Bowyer.
"Maximum points, that's
what we're here for," Truex
said.
But he wasn't so sure he
would be the winner.
"We had two tires, and one
time with about 40 or 50 to go
we started to back up," Truex
said. '"At the end it just worked
out in our favor."
It was the 11th career victory
on NASCAR's second-tier cir-
cuit for Truex, who will move
up to the Nextel Cup series
next year for Dale Earnhardt
Inc.
His Chevrolet beat the Ford
of fast-closing Edwards by two
car-lengths, with Truex win-
ning a two-lap dash in a race
extended a lap for a green-flag
finish following the final cau-


Associated Press
Martin Truex Jr. celebrates his victory Saturday in the NASCAR
Busch Series New England 200 at New Hampshire International
Speedway in Loudon, N.H. Truex led only the last 13 laps in the
win.
tion. Edwards said he had no
"I saw him coming, and I fig- choice in his plan of attack.
ured if I stayed on the bottom I "I knew that the outside was
had him beaten," Truex said. going to be the best for our car,


stayed on the
bottom I had him
beaten.

Truex, Jr.
about his strategy to hold off Car
Edwards to win Saturday.

but I didn't want to show him
my hand until the end," he said.
"We finished better than we
probably should have."
Rookie Denny Hamlin was
third in a Chevy, followed by the
Ford of Elliott Sadler and
Jamie McMurray's Dodge.
Hamlin was in front because
he stayed out on the track after
a late caution. Truex passed
him on the 189th lap.
"We were out there for so
long, we just couldn't overcome
those tires," Hamlin said.
The winner averaged 92.093
mph in a race slowed for 49
laps by 13 cautions flags. There
were six lead changes among
six drivers.
J.J. Yeley, Paul Menard, pole-
sitter Kevin Harvick, Matt
Kenseth and Stanton Barrett
completed the top 10.
Harvick dominated the first
half of the event, and wound up
leading twice for 90 laps.
Hamlin led for 67 laps.
The race was red-flagged
twice for repairs and track
cleanup, the last time with 18
laps remaining.


Continued from Page 1B

place finisher into the
frontstretch wall.
Initial reports indicated that
Smith would be disqualified for
his actions at the finish but the
decision would not be made
final until after the night's
event
At the line, Batson had the
win, Flanagan was second,
Smith third, Corky Miley fourth
and John Zuidema fifth.
In the Mini Cup Junior fea-
ture, Seth Greco took advan-
tage of slower traffic that left
Thomas Warnick with no place
to go to win the event uncon-
tested. Warnick followed Greco
to the finish in second after
coming from the rear of the


field for causing a late-race
caution. Erik Cunningham was
third.
James Pate forgot to go to the
post-race technical inspection
after winning the 4-cylinder
Bomber feature and was subse-
quently disqualified from the
event Justin Durbin was given
the win with Rusty Adams, Tim
Herrington, Kevin Stone and
Jesse Mullis rounding out the
top five, respectively.
David Stawiak lapped all but
the second running car to win
in USA Sprint action. Stawiak
was running lap times in the
low 13-seconds on the 3/8-mile
oval.
Dennis Misuraca was sec-
ond, Timmy George third.
Results from the Mini Cup
All Pro, Sportsman, Modified
and Figure 8 divisions were not
known as of press time.


I figured if I RACING


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SPORTS


n't happen, and that was some-
what of a surprise.
NASCAR's premier qualifier
wound up fourth on the grid.
Newman was hoping for his
fourth straight top qualifying spot at
the track. Still, he has five poles
this year no other driver has
more than two and 32 in his
career in just 135 starts.
"Obviously, the condi-
tions were better at the
start of qualifying," said
Newman, the 36th of 47
cars in line. "But it was a
good lap for us."
But starting near the
front was Newman's pri-
mary goal.
"Track position is very
aer important here," he said.
pole "We'll see if we can lead
unday. some laps and get some
bonus points and have a
good day Sunday."
Green's take
Jeff Green isn't concerned about
the speed his Dodge can generate
at New Hampshire International
Speedway.
"The turns are the most impor-
tant part," he said. "Anyone can
drive straight down the frontstretch
and backstretch. That's all horse-
power, and we can all be pretty
close in horsepower at a flat track."
With an ill-handling car, a driver
has no chance at The Magic Mile,
one of the flattest layouts on the
NASCAR Nextel Cup circuit.
"It's the guys who get through
the turns who are the ones to
beat," he said. "That's just a factor
of handling, and that's what New
Hampshire comes down to."
The former NASCAR Busch
series champion thinks most of the
field is so evenly matched that the
difference is knowing when to push
and when to cruise.
"You have to be the first to mash
the gas," he said. "You need to be
the best at rolling through the turns
and getting the car to turn through
the comer.
"It's what Tony Stewart, Greg
Biffle and Jimmie Johnson have
right now. They are getting their
cars close to perfect in these
races."
Green qualified 15th in his
Dodge.
Pit Stops
The polesitter has won only
twice in 20 New Hampshire races
... Roush Racing has six victories
on The Magic Mile and Hendrick
Motorsports has won five times ...
Jimmie Johnson has scored 13
top-10 finishes in 2005, three more
than any other.driver ... Tony
Stewart finished second, first, first
and fifth in his last four races ...
Dale Eamhardt Jr. has scored top-
five finishes in his last two races,
his only back-to back top fives ...
Roush Racing drivers have won
eight of the 18 races in 2005.
Hendrick Motorsports drivers have
won five and Joe Gibbs Racing
has two victories ..a Ryan Newman
has won three of the last five poles
here, including the top spot for this
race one year ago. Qualifying was
rained out for the other two races,
and the field was set according to
the car-owner points.


ik
kU







CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


GB SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


Moodie still leads


Stanford second

at Canadian

Women's Open

Associated Press

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia -
Janice Moodie was well aware
that Nova Scotia is Latin for
New Scotland before she
arrived at Glen Arbour for the
Canadian Women's Open.
"Believe me,. Lorie Kane
told me, and I also had a
cousin who lived up here," the
Scot said Saturday after top-
ping the leaderboard for the
third straight day.
While Kane struggled again
in front of her home crowd,
Moodie shot an even-par 72 in
tricky wind conditions to take
a one-stroke lead over Angela
Stanford.
"I'm really happy about the
way I played," Moodie said. "It
was more of a battle today
with the wind and I think
somebody sped up the
greens." 0
After finishing the first 36
holes with 10 birdies and just
one bogey, Moodie had two
birdies and two bogeys
Saturday in the swirling wind
that made club selection diffi-
cult on the Graham Cooke-
designed layout carved out of
dense forest
"With the trees and the gaps
in the trees, you just don't
know where it's coming from,"
said Moodie, coming off a
sixth-place tie Sunday in the
English Open.
The two-time European
Solheim Cup player, at ease in
the media center two days
after breaking down in tears
thinking about her late father,


Associated Press
Janice Moodie, from Glasgow Scotland, reacts after making
her putt on the 17th hole to save par Saturday at the BMO
Canadian Women's Open at the Glen Arbour golf course in
Hfammonds Plains near Halifax, Canada. Moodie maintained
her position as leader of the event.


is winless since the 2002 Asahi
Ryokuken International. She
also won the 2000 ShopRite
LPGA Classic.
"I'll just try to do what I've
done the last three days, just
play the golf course," Moodie
said. "Obviously, when you get
into the heat of the moment,
you'll be looking at who's
doing what But right now I
know I'm playing well. If I can
just stay calm and stay
focused, you never know
what's going to happen."
Stanford, also trying to end
a long victory drought, birdied
the final hole for a 70. The 27-
year-old Texan won the 2003
ShopRite event for her lone
LPGA Tour title and lost a


playoff to Hilary Lunke the
following week in the U.S.
Women's Open
"It's been a long time since
I've been one shot back going
into the final round," Stanford
said. "I don't know what to
expect, but if I stick to my
game plan, we should be OK...
It'll be interesting to see how I
react"
Stanford eagled the par-5
14th hitting a 4-iron to 5 feet
- to reach 8 under and coun-
tered a bogey on the par-3 17th
with a birdie on the par-5 clos-
ing hole.
"I just drilled that 4-iron,"
she said.
Dorothy Delasin shot a 69 -
matching the best round of the


day to join South Korea's Il
Mi Chung (72) at 7 under.
South Korean rookie Meena
Lee also shot a 69 to finish
three strokes back at 6 under.
Delasin had four birdies
and a bogey and finished with
seven straight pars. The 24-
year-old Californian won the
last of her four tour titles in
2003.
"The greens are getting
harder because the wind is
drying them out," Delasin
said. "If Mother Nature is
going to be nice, you'll see low
scores. If she's going to howl,
you'll see higher scores. It's
pretty tough judging the wind
because it swirls."
Kane shot a 74 to drop to 4
over. She again had a large
vocal gallery that included
many fans from her native
Prince Edward Island.
"I knew if the sun was shin-
ing and the beer was cold
there'd be a some Islanders
over here," Kane said. "I know
I'm not leading, but I sure felt
like I was."
She was paired with fellow
Canadian Kareen Qually
."Obviously, I've never
played before that many peo-
ple before," said Qually, a 30-
year-old Futures Tour player
from Alberta. "Lorie made it
so easy to play with her She's
the epitome of class. It was an
incredible experience."
Qually shot a 78 to finish at 8
over.
Dawn Coe-Jones was the
low Canadian. She had a dou-
ble-bogey 7 on No. 18 for a 76.
Defending champion Meg
Mallon was 2 under after a 72
that included a triple-bogey 7
on No. 16. Last year, Mallon
followed her U.S. Women's
Open victory with a four-
stroke win at the Legends on
the Niagara.


Aussie rookie tops field at B.C. Open


Associated Press

ENDICOTT, N.Y. -
Australian rookie Brendan
Jones shot a 6-under 66 on
Saturday to take a one-shot
lead after the third round of
the B.C. Open.
Jones, whose best PGA Tour
finish this year was a tie for
14th at the Zurich Classic, fin-
ished at 19-under 197, one shot
off the tournament record for
54 holes set in 1982 by Calvin
Peete and matched two years
ago by Steve Lowery.
One shot back were Ryan
Palmer (67), Jason Bohn (66)
and India's Arjun Atwal (65),
who had a chance to tie Jones
but missed a 4-foot birdie putt
at 18.
John Rollins, Canadian
David Hearn, and J.P Hayes
began the day tied and finished
the same way as each carded
64 to finish at 17-under 199.
They were even with second-


OPEN
Continued from Page 1B

dropped to his knees and
flipped his putter like a baton.
And the most emotion he
showed was for a putt that fell
for par.
But he didn't lose his grip on
his bid for a 10th major. Woods
was at 12-under 204, and the
numbers that mean just as
much are his 31-3 record when
he has at least a share of the
54-hole lead, including a 9-0
mark in the majors.
"I know, as well as everyone
else knows in this field, that
Tiger has probably had his hic-
cup today," Montgomerie said.
"And he got around under par."
Asked the last time he beat
Woods head-to-head in a
major, Montgomerie replied
with a smirk, "Not many have."
"I don't think I have, no," he
said. "If you have 150 players
up here, they'll give you the
same answer."
But not on Saturday.
Goosen was walking down
the 16th fairway as Woods teed
off on No. 3 and saw that the
world's No. 1 player had
already made bogey.
"It's not easy out there, some
holes," Goosen said. "You can
make mistakes quickly."
The last time Montgomerie
played in the final group at a
major with Woods seems like a
lifetime ago. It was the third
round of the 1997 Masters, and
Woods put on a clinic with a 65
that sent him to a 12-shot victo-
ry and kicked off his remark-
able career


round leader David Edwards
(70) and Matt Hendrix (69), who
each rallied on the back side
after faltering early.
Michael Bradley and Jim
McGovern also shot 64 and
were tied with Sweden's
Mathias Gronberg (68) another
stroke back
Barring a meltdown by every
one of the leaders, the tourna-
ment record of 22-under 266
since the course was renovated
for the 1997 tournament was
almost certain to fall. Jeff
Sluman and Paul Gow estab-
lished the mark in 2001. Calvin
Peete shot 265 in 1982 when
En-Joie played to par-71.
The PGA record for 72 holes
is 26 under (254) by Tommy
Armour at the 2003 Bolero
Texas Open on a par-70 course.
Play was halted by rain for 90
minutes in early afternoon, but
the delay had little effect on
the forgiving En-Joie Golf Club
course. It played soft for the


This time, Monty held his
own.
"I gained one shot today, and
I've got to gain another three at
least tomorrow," he said. "I've
got an opportunity here to win
a major, and I can't afford to
leave any putt short."
r- Montgomerie surely saw a
different player than the 21-
year-old at Augusta National.
Woods already had lost one
shot when his drive on No. 6
rode the wind so far to the right
that caddie Steve Williams
retrieved another ball from the
bag before the tee shot even
landed. Marshals found the
ball, although it was buried in
the prickly plant and Woods had
to take a penalty drop.
Then came the 352-yard
ninth, which played downwind.
Woods hit 3-wood that was
headed toward the flag until it
turned enough to the left that it
caught another gorse bush.
Montgomerie smacked his
drive on the green, and he
could feel the momentum
swinging.
Instead of staring at the tips
of his feet, the Scot stood tall
and proud. He made birdie to
cut another shot off the lead,
then dropped his approach into
5 feet on the 10th as the grand-
stand burst into cheers.
"Nice putt, Monty," Woods
told him, treating the moment
like a Saturday afternoon
match at the club.
Woods knew this was going to
be a grind, however. It showed
on his face. He stared anxious-
ly at each approach that raced
past the flag as the greens got
harder and faster in the wind
and late afternoon sun.


third straight day, allowing the
players to shoot aggressively at
the pins.
Jones needed only 21 putts
en route to a 64 on Friday, his
best round of the year Two
shots off the lead to start the
third round, he made four
birdies in a seven-hole span
and gained the lead with an
eagle at the par-5 12th.
Palmer made birdie at Nos.
16 and 17 to tie for the lead, but
his drive at 18 sailed into a
water hazard and he settled for
bogey
After parring the first two
holes, Hayes mounted his chal-
lenge by reeling off nine
birdies over the next 10 holes.
He took sole possession of the
lead at 18 under with a birdie
at No. 12, one shot ahead of
Palmer and Hearn. Just like
that, though, he made double
bogey at the par-4 15th when he
drove into the giant water haz-
ard that guards the green.


He nearly lost the lead over
the final three holes.
From behind the 16th green,
he tried a flop shot up the slope
and knew he hit it too hard
when it left his club. The ball
landed beyond the hole and
dropped into another swale.
Woods had to make a 6-footer
just to save bogey.
Up head, Olazabal birdied
the 18th to cut the lead to one
shot, and Woods promptly hit 2-
iron into grass up to his knees
along the left side of the 17th
fairway. He did well to leave his
approach short of the bunker
fronting the green, and ran a
putt some 15 feet by the hole.
He slung the ball at his cad-
die, frustrated at the thought of
losing another shot
"I worked so hard all day to
get back to under par," Woods
said. "If I missed that putt, I
would go back to over par I just
couldn't see that happening."


Playing in the final group,
Edwards and Hendrix, who
began the day one shot behind,
failed to take advantage of the
ideal scoring conditions early
and fell from the top of the
leaderboard.
Hendrix, playing only his
fourth PGA event, sputtered
early with his third straight
bogey at No. 1. Over the first
two rounds, he was five under
on the course's first two par-5s.
On Saturday, he had to scram-
ble to make par on each after
hooking his drives into the left
trees.
The 49-year-old Edwards,
who had moved into position to
challenge for his first win on
tour in a dozen years, had eight
pars and a bogey on the front
nine a day after making five
straight birdies there.
Edwards and Hendrix ral-
lied with three birdies on the
back, though, to remain in the
hunt.

He delivered a roundhouse
fist pump when it dropped for
par, and his birdie on the final
hole gave him one extra shot
between him and Olazabal for a
final round that figures to
require more work than he
wanted.
"It's a seven-mile walk tomor-
row, and he's obviously the
favorite, as he started the tour-
nament," Montgomerie said.
"He copes with the pressure
and the situation around him,
being Tiger Woods, incredibly
well. And if he does win this
again, it's an amazing effort"
Woods usually steals the
stage when Jack Nicklaus ends
his career at a major champi-
onship, as he did Friday at St
Andrews when he missed the
cut. Woods previously won the
U.S. Open, Masters and PGA
Championship when the
Golden Bear played for the
final time.


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L-------------------------------

Jim Cassia, PGA, Director of Operations
SInitiation Fee Has Been Reduced
Cotnna Breaka s JI 'AII|H0]t&Luc erv a, C in ental BreaUfast & mqm Lunch


Daly has plenty



to be happy about

H e brought the ciga- about them.
rettes along, but left He wasn't as forthcoming
the motorhome about other things. It turns
behind. The nearest Hooters out Daly has a heart as over-
is 340 miles away in sized as the rest of him.
Nottingham, meaning dinner Daly's surprise win in 1991
consists mostly of what they at Crooked Stick overshad-
call takeaway over here. owed the other news out of
In a place run mostly by the tournament that week On
stodgy old guys in coats and the first day of play, lightning
ties, John Daly walks around struck and killed a 39-year-
in a big blue shirt old spectator as he
adorned with more tried to take shelter
sponsors than a Tom Weaver left a
NASCAR racer. The wife and two daugh-
shirt has to be big ters behind. And his
just to get it over a death left the
prodigious belly, ..- unheralded new
but the side benefit champion shaken.
is that there's more "I felt I was
room to sell on it. almost responsible
Daly's caddie for him being
trails just behind, killed," Daly
lugging a garish AP columnist recalled in an inter-
blue and gold bag view in the August
covered with issue of Golf Digest.
"RedNeck" and The $230,000.
even more logos. Daly made for win-
Zip it open and you ning the PGA was
almost expect to find a six- the first real money he had
pack inside, ever made, and it wouldn't
Ten years ago, they take long for him to blow it
declared him the champion all. Before he did, though, he
golfer of the year at this very put $30,000 in a trust to the
course. That's British for Weaver family for the educa-
someone who wins the tour- tion of the girls, Karen, who
nament they've been holding was 8, and Emily, who was 12,
every summer for the last 134 at the time.
years. "I really didn't have any
They had never seen any- money at that time but I felt so
one like this flabby Yank with bad for them," Daly said
a bad haircut who left fair- Saturday "It was a young fam-
ways littered with cigarette ily, the girls wereso young."'
butts and muffin wrappers as Not wanting to stir old
he chain-smoked and ate his memories, Daly never con-
way to his second major tacted the family. But earlier
championship win. this year, they contacted him
likHe'd hinever srseen anything to share the news that, thanks
likth his odden bunkers and dou to his gift, Karen and Emily
with hiddenbunkersanddou-would be graduating from
ble greens. college.
Both came to the same con- cole's graduating to
clusion: Brilliant. becne graduating th
"The hair on your arms kind become a doctor and the
ofThe hair on your arms kind other is in college," Daly said.
of stands up when you tee it "The money went well."
up here," Daly said.
Hairwasn't the only thing Daly hopes to see the family
standing Saturday Fans by next month at a charity tour-
the thousands stood to cheer nament hosted by Fuzzy
him on as he made a run up Zoeller near their home in
the leaderboard that ulti- Illinois. He's seems almost
mately was frustrated by embarrassed that the gift was
some poor putting. revealed.
The buzz grew as he birdied First, though, he's got some
the first three holes and the work to do Sunday on the Old
cheers got louder as Daly kept Course. His chances of catch-
sticking it close on the front ing Woods are slim, but he
nine. remembers well 10 years ago
A series of missed short when the wind was howling 40
putts and a bad decision on mph and he shot a 71 in the
the 10th hole cost him, but final round to take the club-
this wasn't one of those house lead.
rounds where a mistake was When Costantino Rocca
going to make him fall apart. flubbed a chip from in front
He settled down to make a of the green, Daly and his
string of pars coming in, wife at the time celebrated
before finishing with a flour- before Rocca then knocked
ish, a 5-footer for birdie on the in a 65-footer to tie. Daly
final hole. went on to win a four-hole
It was good enough for a 2- playoff and his second major
under 70 that put him in a tie championship.
for sixth, six shots behind He still watches video of
Tiger Woods. that final round when things
"It's nice to be somewhat in are going bad, which they
contention," Daly said. often can in Daly's life.
The line that should follow Saturday night he'll eat
for Daly is that it is nice to be some take-out pizza then go to
anywhere. He came out of bed trying to figure out a way
nowhere to win the991 PGA to go low in the final round.
o win s Gter- Will he sleep well with all
Championship as an alter- the pressure?
nate, only to see his life spiral "When you eat as much as I
out of control as he partied do, you can sleep," Daly said.
away. "It's not hard to do."
The story is well known. "It's not hard to do."
The drinking, gambling,
divorces and blowups on and Tim Dahlberg is a national
off the golf course were easy sports columnist for The
to chronicle because Daly Associated Press. Write to
was never shy about talking him at tdahlberg@ap.org














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Comprehensive Up-To-Date

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www.chronicleonline.com












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Serving those who served


Department of

Veterans Affairs

faces challenges
GINNY BROWN-WAITE
Special to the Chronicle
Twenty-first century

many challenges, including
long waits for health care, too
few regional medical clinics,
and a resistance from within the
Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA) to modernize and innovate.
Citrus County veterans, indeed all
Florida veterans, are dispropor-
tionately affected by these prob-
lems due to the rural nature of the
5th Congressional District and the
huge numbers of veterans requir-
ing services who live in the region.
For my constituents, the good
news is that in the past three years
I have brought several new or
expanded VA facilities to the 5th
District, including clinics in
Brooksville, Leesburg, and the
Villages. Most importantly for our
veterans in Citrus County is the
upcoming relocation and expan-
sion of the Citrus County veterans'
clinic to the former Brown School
in Lecanto.
In 2003,1 I hosted then-VA
Secretary Anthony Principi for a.
tour of my district and to evaluate
the needs of my veteran con-
stituents. Following his visit and
my direct appeal for more federal
resources, the VA opened a new
outpatient clinic in the Villages, ,
tripled the size of the Brooksville
clinic and announced the renova-
tion of the Brown Schools in
Lecanto for VA use, as well. These
new VA facilities are a direct result
of my tour with secretary Principi,
as well as my service on the House
Veterans Affairs Committee.
In addition to these new local
facilities, Congress has dramatical-
ly increased funding to veterans
during the past 10 years. In 1994,
Congress spent $37 billion on vet-
erans' services. Today, we provide
funding to veterans at more than
$68 billion discretionary spending
on veterans has risen during each
of these years, and is at all-time
levels once again this year.
Congress does face challenges;
however, when it comes to funding
the VA and veterans' health care.
When America s committed and
engaged in an ongoing global War
on Terror, budgets for many feder-
al programs are held at current
levels, or even reduced.
Recognizing the important na-
ture of veterans' needs, Congress
has ensured that this is not the
case for veterans' health care and
benefits.
This year, the House passed a
budget that included record fund-
ing for health care and services for
our veterans. Just this past month,
however, the VA disclosed there is
a multibillion dollar shortfall for
veterans' health care. Within one
week of this disclosure by the VA,
the House passed an emergency
Please see .... ./Page 3C


VA plays important role in county


!T.-E A mR&-THU
sarthur@chronicleonline.com
Chron icre

President Abraham Lincoln. inI
his second inaugural address in
1865. addressed the war-torn nation
and offered a promise to our
nation's veterans
He said that Amierica would "...
care for him i who shall ha e borne
the battle and bfor his w ido\v and his
orphan."
Those words have become the
motto of the U.S. Veterans
Administration that has tor three-
quarters of a century provided
health services, educational oppor-
tunities, pensions and disability
compensation, Iife insurance and
more to American veterans.
Seventy-fivte years ago. President
Herbert Hoover signed Executive
Order 5398 with the ho-hum title:
"C(.onsolidation and Coordination of
Governmental Activities Affect ine
Veterans." Thus became what %we
know today as the VA, an essential
part of our society
The U S Department ofVeterans


The U.S. Department
of Veterans Affairs
has played an
enormous role in
American life.

Affair's has played an enormous role
in Amnerican life and continues to
do so in the face of many challenge-.
The department estimates that
there are 25 million veteran- in the
U.S. population, all potential cus-
tomers. And that's not counting ig
their families
Man Citrus CountL veterans
make use of VA facilities for health
care. Nationwide, there are 862 VA
outpatient clinics that bring health
care to veterans where the. liie
There are 157 \A medical centers,
from Puerto Rico in the east to
Hawaii in the o est
World War II and Korean War vet-
erans, as have all veteranss of this
nation's maln wars, have a guaran-
tee for a burial at ox erninllent


expense. Eleven new \A national
cemeteries like the one in nearb.
Sumter County are expected to be
open by 2009.
Sone 21 million veterans have
used GI Bill education benefits
Higher education and training
*i~len to veteranss changed the
nation bh boosting the educational
level ot'the population
In addition. 18 million veterans
have taken advantage of VA home
loan guarantees, which helped
transform this nation from a land of
renters to one of homeow ners, an
essential aspect of the American
Vision.
These offerings haven't come
cheap, however, nor have the.\ come
%w without problems. An aging popula-
tion has put strains on the \As
health care system. A shifting popu-
lation, from' niorthernll cities to sun-
belt states, has also required flexi-
bilit, in the face of political pres-
sure to keep the status quo.
The agency's budget for its first
fiscal \ear was $786 million This
year's VA budget, in its 75th year, is
$65 billion


Tools for fighting terrorism, no matter the nation it strikes


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Chronicle


When I heard the news July 7
that four bombs had exploded
in the London transit system,
my first concern was for my daughter,
who happened to be in London.
After she assured me she was all
right, I was relieved for her.
Then, my son woke up. He heard the
news, and burst into tears.
London is the hometown of both of
my children. They were born there.
Their births were registered with the
American Embassy, so they are
Americans. They have lived in the
United States since 1991, but their early
childhood memories, the comforting
images captured within the primitive,
"reptile" brain, are set in London. My
son's tears did not surprise me. Then,
he wanted answers. And so do I. What
was the bombers' purpose?
Looking at the bombers, they are four
British men, three of Pakistani descent,
aged from 19 to 30. My son is in that age
range. With the exception of one of


Guest C


them getting caught for shoplifting, they
had no previous criminal records.
Scotland Yard calls them "lily whites"
and "clean skins." They are the sons
and grandsons of immigrants who
embraced Britain as their home.
Indeed, the 30-year-old bomber
taught children with disabilities. He
was the father of a baby girl. His moth-
er-in-law had just been honored by
Queen Elizabeth for her social work in
the immigrant community.
The others, likewise, seemed to have
assimilated backgrounds, having' been
raised by families that were well
respected. So how did this quartet end
up on London's subway and a bus, each
with a backpack containing 10 pounds
of explosives and a death wish?
The bombers' families are just as
shocked as the rest of us. At this point,
they believe their lives are ruined.
They are in hiding. The British press is
reporting that Britons of Pakistani
descent are being assaulted by mobs.
One Pakistani visitor has been beaten


to death. So what was the purpose?
Amir Taheri, an Iranian commenta-
tor on Middle Eastern affairs, tried to
explain in the Daily Telegraph. He
described the death of Dutch filmmak-
er Theo Van Gogh last November at the
hands of an Islamist-extremist assassin.
Van Gogh tried to reason with his
assailant, to no avail. During his trial
last week, the assailant told Van Gogh's
mother to her face that he had no
remorse and would do it again if he
could.
In Taheri's words to the British:
"Sorry, old chaps, you are dealing with
an enemy that does not want anything
specific, and cannot be talked back into
reason through anger management or
round-table discussions. Or, rather, this
enemy does want something specific: to
take full control of your lives, dictate
every single move you make 'round the
clock and, if you dare resist, he will feel
it his divine duty to kill you."
And thus we have the face of terror-
ism. It has no purpose to life as we


know it And it is not the Islamic rel
gion, it is the extremism. Sever;
devout Muslims were among the vii
tims July 7.
British Prime Minister Tony Bla:
was aware of the potential crisis of thi
extremism. According to The Time
Blair last year received a 36-page di
cussion paper compiled by civil se
vants advising him of this possibility.
The problem was pinpointed by civ
servants: "Often disaffected lone ind
viduals unable to fit into their commL
nity will be attracted to university club
based on ethnicity or religion, or b:
drawn to mosques or preaching group
in prison through a sense of disillusion
ment with their current existence."
The civil servants offered this sol
tion: "Policy should have two mai
aims: (a) to isolate extremists within th
Muslim community, and ... (b) to he]
young Muslims from becomir
ensnared or bullied into participation
in terrorist or extremist activity."
Blair is now considering ways 1
expel extreme clerics from Britain. I
Please see GUEST/Page 4


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY




Views



of PR

IA public relations pro was
in the office this past
week. While the subject
of discussion was important,
complicated and dry as desert
dirt, the back of her business
card was simple and kind of
. interesting.
"Media Interview Tips," it
; said, and it followed with a Top
10 list
Here they are:
No. 1- Delay the interview,
if possible. Be prepared.
Hmmm. The distributor of
the business card had set out
to meet with us several days
earlier but, at that time,
advised that incorrect travel
instructions were provided.
The meeting was postponed.
Being a trusting sort, I don't
believe that was a tactic to
adhere to Tip 1, but it does
make one wonder
For what it's worth, from a
reporter's standpoint, a
"delay" is fair game to say, "Mr.
So-And-So would not comment
when contacted Tuesday," or,
"Mrs. So-And-So was unavail-
able for comment"
That may be fine, but if
they're being contacted, it's
often in their best interest to
have their position on the
record. Daily newspapers can't
really wait around to report a
story until it's convenient for
all concerned. Great effort is
Please see SHADES/Page 4C


Mike Wright
WRIGHT
ON TARGET


Fans will

flock back

Sto hockey

Let's talk about hockey.
NHL hockey.
I'm a hockey fan, and
have been for 30 years.
; Growing up in the Detroit
area, where the Red. Wings
own the world, you'd have to
- be brain dead not to place
- hockey on the highest of sports
pedestals.
Moving to Florida 18 years
Sago was a sock in the hockey
gut Then Miami (Miami?) got a
hockey team. Hockey in South
i- Florida. Boy, that was some-
al thing.
c- When Tampa Bay got a hock-
ir ey franchise, my thoughts were
is along the lines of "this will
s never work" Tampa is a foot-
s, ball town, pure and simple.
s- People, including me, have fol-
r- lowed the Bucs with fervor for
years, even when they stank
il The Lightning began playing
u- in what really is a barn at the
s' state fairgrounds. Then they
bs moved to what now is
3e Tropicana Field, and, well, you
Ps haven't lived until you've
n- watched hockey in a domed
baseball stadium.
u- Then they moved to the Ice
in Palace (now the St Pete Times
pe Forum) in downtown Tampa,
P an excellent hockey facility.
tg Two years ago, the Lightning
)n pulled off what I consider one
of the biggest miracles in all of
no sports. This team that was just

4C Please see TARGET/Page 3C


...............................................................~ I ?~'.SI.,. tad


.~,ki I,~
.~ I
,~ -t


1 0..0 5
JuL' 17, 2005


j


91












V.
/


Ul. I 7, 2005


- I; -


"When a man tells you that
he got rich through hard
work, ask him whose?"


HUGH PRIORITY


County commission


needs to look


to salaries soon


t is disturbing that Citrus
County's development,
building and engineering
divisions are lacking key person-
nel that they can't seem replace
because qualified applicants
won't accept the pay levels.
It's troubling because the con-
sequences ultimately affect us
all. Overworked staff with not
enough time to thoroughly carry
out their responsibilities can't
be expected to cover all the
bases relating to growth manage-
ment in the time allowed. It's
either that or back-ups in per-
mitting. When back-ups and
delays occur, the pressure gets
turned up by interests for whom
time is money, and
who, in fairness, are
paying for reason- THE I!
ably timely servic- Non-cor
es.
So it's either count
back-ups or rush- OUR OP
ing, neither of
which is accept- Too import
able. We need thor- lang
ough, thoughtful
and timely permit-
ting processes.
Residents want all the bases
covered in development-related
services, because the way the
county develops determines the
quality of life in this county. If,
because of understaffing or over-
work, it is monitored and regu-
lated in a slapdash fashion, we
all lose in the end. It's not fair to
anyone businesses, builders,
employees or residents.
The county employees who
deliver these services are work-
ing hard to keep up with the
development boom, but more
employees have been lost to the
private sector and other coun-
ties. Just last week, the Public
Works director resigned to go
back to the private sector, where
he can make more money.
Planning, engineering and
building inspection personnel
need to train and gain experi-
ence and they need to have the
time to carefully execute their
duties. We have a good compre-
hensive growth management
plan, but if we don't give our reg-
ulatory people time to see it's
followed and adapted in the best
public best interest, we all suf-
fer.
It would seem the solution to
this problem is simple offer
higher pay for the positions that
applicants are shunning
because of the non-competitive
salary levels. And, seeing that
the funding for these positions

Island beauty SOI
In response to today's
caller: I did not call Guan- 4
tanamo a wreck. I said we
are renting it ... and,
through a misunderstand-
ing, the printed Sound Off
said we are wrecking it. It
wasn't acquired during the
Spanish-American War. A
treaty ratified in 1899 : 563"
established Cuba as an
independent republic
under U.S. protection. We leased
Guantanamo Bay as a naval base.
It's true that I have never been to
Gitmo, but I have been to many
other places in Cuba and the whole
island is beautiful.

Overloaded trucks
I live in Pine Ridge, and I saw a


S



P
rt


comes from an enterprise fund
- generated from fees it
would seem higher levels of
activities would generate more
funding for that higher pay.
Some county department man-
agers and supervisors will say,
however, that simply raising a
few salaries causes more prob-
lems than it solves. The message
to loyal county employees who
don't leave is that they aren't val-
ued. The wide-spread dissen-
sion and the perceived unfair-
ness caused by spot fixes can be
debilitating to a whole staff and
so, the managers say, the county
has to take a holistic approach.
The county has, in fact, con-
templated doing
another full-blown
;SUE: salary study. When
ietitive all positions "are
vpa weighed in compar-
pay. ison, and the appro-
'INION: private adjustments
NI are made systemati-
tant to let cally, the percep-
ish. tions of unfairness
will be much
reduced and the


salaries will be competitive.
The problem is first, as always,
money, though the county is see-
ing a windfall in tax revenue for
the coming year because of the
explosion in real estate values.
So there is a window of opportu-
nity here. There are many needs,
but this one is basic, with so
much dependent on it.
That new truck can wait a year
or two. This is a need of far-
reaching importance that county
commissioners and taxpayers
must understand and commit to
or accept the consequences.
The problem here is that time
is of the essence. Salary studies,
even if the county commission
immediately ordered an expedi-
tious one, can take time. Also,
there are other questions about
the county pay system, aside
from underpaid technical jobs,
such as the merit-only raise sys-
tem that need review, too. There
is no incentive to stay after one
tops out, some managers note.
And finally, there is a learning
curve for technical jobs involv-
ing the county's extensive codes
and regulations. It can take a
year or two to get a plans exam-
iner, for example, up to optimal
level.
If the county commission
wants to recruit and retain good
employees, and especially the
technically oriented develop-
ment related jobs, it needs to
invest in the future but it


0579


report that it's unreal on
Pine Ridge Boulevard that
with all the building going
on and everything, what the
police don't monitor the
trucks that are overloaded
with branches falling out of
their trucks, nothing on top
stopping that debris from
flying on the roads and hit-
ting your cars. ...
Burn the trash


I think the county com-
missioners should get together and
open up an incinerator and get rid
of these landfills. They stink anyway
on rainy days, and the smell really
gets bad when you live in the area
where I do, right across the street
from the landfill. They ought to get
an incinerator put in. They got the
money to do it.


Key Center tied to community


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
'fP EODITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ............................ publisher
Charlie Brennan ......................... .....editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ....... advertising services director
Steve Arthur .................. Chronicle columnist
-.. Mike Arnold ...... ................managing editor
Jim Hunter ............................. senior reporter
by Albert M Curt Ebitz .............................citizen member
williamson Mike Moberley ......................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


A
II


too, to accept donations, and
set up facilities in Inverness.
- Cabot McBride is in
charge of the many housing
,( units in the county, where
the more self-sufficient
clients of the Key live in
group home apartments like
little families. The homes
are the result of finding and
getting federal HUD grants
rthur to build them.
q.PS The main Key Center
BLES campus is a gathering of
buildings on the edge of
Crystal River that includes
classrooms, adult day training facilities
for clients who find fulfillment in work-
ing in the society of others and cottages
for those who need fairly constant
supervision and help in day-to-day life.
Recently, completely from donations
from the community, the Key opened
Contento Cottage for the non-ambulato-
ry (can't walk on their own) clients in
the Key community. It boasts light and
airy rooms, and in each room, a lift
mounted to the ceiling that makes it
easy to move a client from bed to the
shower or toilet
Another large recreational and edu-
cational building is under way that
should be completed by September,
funded by a low-interest USDA loan.
Chet will readily tell you that all this
has come from the grace of God.
This is the spirit that moves him and
those others in his team who have
worked hard for many years to build a
system of care within our little county
It has become a magnet for people with
mentally challenged children, a draw


that has brought people from all over
the nation to live here near their spe-
cial loved one.
Community support is vital for the
Key Center, and this community has
every right to be proud of and do all it
can to support its efforts.
What it does, it does splendidly
When young people who go through the
school system graduate from CREST
school, they would have no place to go
but home and terminal boredom if they
didn't have the Key
The Key is a godsend to the parents
of these children, too; especially the
parents who are too old to properly
care for their son or daughter who has
grown into adulthood severely dis-
abled.
One area of service where I urge the
Key to explore is to become a resource
to the courts for the families of low-IQ
men and women who get in trouble
with the law.
Sometimes people of low intelli-
gence have done unintelligent things
and have been punished as if they were
fully competent
If the courts had some expert help
dealing with and understanding these
tricky cases involving hapless individu-
als with low intelligence, a great serv-
ice would be rendered to the cause of
justice locally The Key might be- that
resource.

Steve Arthur, a Chronicle columnist,
can be reached at 563-5660, Ext. 1375,
or by e-mail at sarthur@
chronicleonline.com. Read his blog
,at www.chronicleonline.com.


LETT to the Editor


Arbor Lakes signal
To my neighbors and other travel-
ers on State Road 200 in Hernando:
For a period of time now, in the
Chronicle there have been Sound Off
articles about complaints of drivers
entering S.R. 200 from Arbor Lakes
and cutting off oncoming cars.
I am a resident of Arbor Lakes. I
am not in any way defending any such
occurrences at this area, but rather to
agree with the complaints about the
oncoming traffic.
However, I wish to share our mutu-
al aggravation; we drivers can help
each other.
People from Arbor Lakes have
asked the county and the DOT, receiv-
ing the same answer, "No" there
are not enough residents in our area
to warrant the cost of a traffic signal."
I ask you all: What is the cost of a
terrible accident there? In a short
time this area will have four lanes,
same as further up 200 toward Ocala.
Arbor Lakes now has 300-plus living
here. To all people involved in this
problem, we should make a louder
outcry to our local government to let
these people know that we need this
problem resolved now.
Jerry Corcoran
Hernando
Thanks and farewell
I want to thank county employees
for gifts and happy farewells. I will
never forget any of you!
I was very happy to work with you
all. I will miss you all very very much.
Thanks to my daughter Donna and
husband Roger Carrier and my son
Ricky Hunt and girl friend Kitty for
having a retirement party for me.
And my department "Facilities


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
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Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
I Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and include a
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letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
M We reserve the right to edit letters for
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M Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.,
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonline.com.

Maintenance" for having party for me.
I will miss you all. Love you all!
Marilyn Hunt
Homosassa

Heart of family
I have tried to write about my hus-
band to tell you what an exceptional
person he was and will always be in
our hearts. It is difficult to do so as I
never could express what he means
to me and my family and the void he
has left in our hearts and lives, but
we are so thankful we were able to
share more than 40 wonderful years
of our lives together.
We want to thank our friends for
their prayers, concern and sympathy
they have extended to us in our time
of need. Tony would be so proud and
grateful to see how his friends hon-


ored him at his breakfast, but I some-
how know that he knows and I also
know that he would say his favorite
expression: "How the hell are you?"
We thank Anthony D. for the beauti-
ful presentation he gave to honor the
memory of my husband, our thanks to
Elaine for the perfect preparation
and presentation she did to make our
breakfast the pleasant and memo-
rable occasion. Thanks to all the rest
of the people who helped make it the
success it was.
Now the time has come to say from
me to you, my love: Arrivederci, till we
meet again. From Karen, Ronnie and
Doreen: "Thanks, Dad, for being you,
love you and miss you so. From all our
grand children: "We will always love
you and never forget you." And last,
but not least our four great-grandsons:
"We love you very much, GGP!"
Virginia Mitarotondo
Beverly Hills

No doubt about it
There was a letter in your paper on
June 18, which was submitted by Art
Clark of Citrus Springs. Without a
doubt, he must be a Democrat from
up North. He stated that the newly
implemented 6-cent gas tax increase
was due to "the Bush family and their
oil-soaked friends."
Mr. Clark, allow me to set the
record straight since you do not seem
to understand what really happened.
The 6-cent gas tax was implemented
by your county commissioners. It was
not implemented by my president
Look up the county records, so that
you will know for sure who is really
responsible.
Ed Mance "
Lecanto .


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


f I


A lot of people in this
county have heard
about the Key Center,
but don't know very much
about it As they are about to --
begin their big fund-raising
effort for the year, lend me
your ears for a few
moments. I even have a sug-
gestion how it might per-
form yet another service to -
the community. Steve
Chet Cole is the head of ~-n.
this outfit He's a shy guy & FOI
with the passion of a very
energetic preacher. He's
very religious, focused and driven. He
talks with inspirational fervency, spray-
ing ideas with a machine-gun delivery.
His eyes pin you to the wall.
Years ago, he took a job with the state,
but quickly left it to join the Key when
the center was a small service provider
in the county for people with develop-
mental disabilities and retardation.
Because his sister Dorothy is in that
category, he had a personal stake in
helping this largely helpless popula-
tion.
Since then, he and his team have
built the Key into a dynamic organiza-
tion. Chet realized several years ago
that the state of Florida could not be
counted on to fund the care and train-
ing of the people he serves, so he did
some smart things and he continues to
do smart things.
That's why you will see little money-
making enterprises like thrift shops
and a plant shop and even a television
station, WYKE, contributing to the
efforts. He established a foundation,








SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 3C


Making vows might leave us tied up in knots


C heryl and I fell in understand. She's an excel-
love with Man-o-War\ lent swimmer, and I'm one
Cay (pronounced step removed from doggy-
"key") when we made a stop ,. paddling.
there several years ago We came home, a dose of
while on a cruise to the reality set in and I knew we
Bahamas. It is a small island -'" couldn't chuck it all and
occupied by folks who make move to the Caribbean.
their livings running sou- .... More recently, in view of
venir shops and diving for Fred Brannen political possibilities, I
lobsters. Typically, the men vowed if a certain senator is
dive for lobsters while the A -. ever elected president of
women run the shops. LIFE these United States, Cheryl
Teasingly, I told my sweet- and I will make the move to
heart we should move there and I'd Man-o-War Cay.
run a gift shop while she dove for lob- It sounded good until last year's hur-
sters. If you were to see us swim, you'd ricane season. Our fantasy island was


flattened by the same sequence of
storms that came pretty close to flat-
tening Florida.
For us, hurricane preparation might
mean evacuation to a shelter. For the
people on Man-o-War Cay, it includes
tying oneself to a palm tree to keep
from being blown into the ocean.
Speaking of last year's hurricanes, I
am now the owner of a generator.
Once more, I let my mouth cost me
money
While Cheryl and I were sitting in
the dark, smoldering because of the
lack of air conditioning and with sweat
trickling down my chin, I uttered with
animation and emphasis, "Before


another storm season comes, I'm going
to buy a generator!!"
I've lived in Florida all of my soon-
to-be 60 years. Last September is the
only time I remember being so dis-
comfited by a storm I thought I needed
my very own electricity-producing sys-
tem.
But, in a moment of weakness, I
blurted out a vow. Cheryl marked it
down as a promise, and now I own a
generator. I don't know how to use the
infernal thing, but I own it. Even so,
and of great importance, my wife still
considers me a man of my word.
I suppose I'll study the owner's man-
ual, learn how to use the generator


and have it properly hooked up. Then,
during the coming months, even if -
perish the thought we get hit with as
many storms as came our way last
year, we can stay cool.
While I'm at it, I'll buy some rope
and learn to tie some strong knots,
knots that will hold us to palm trees
when the winds hit 110 miles per hour.
I fully expect if our worst political
fears come true, Cheryl will want me
to follow through on the pledge to
move to us Man-o-War Cay!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle columnist


CWWRtN2T PLa2N'S TO auLLoW aTGaCIe TELC. ON 4U~aNS


Letters to the


Church splits
The Times of London reported June 23 that
the Anglican Consultative Council, the only
constitutional instrument of unity in the world-
wide Anglican Communion, has "formally
asked the churches of Canada and the U.S. to
go."
Voting 30-28, the council asked the Episcopal
Church in the United States and the Anglican
Church of Canada to withdraw from any
involvement in the affairs of the Anglican
Communion. Although phrased as a request
from the Anglican Consultative Council, "it
amounts in effect to a punishing expulsion,"
said Ruth Gledhill of The Times. This expul-
sion remains in effect at least until the 2008
Lambeth Conference of Bishops, at which time
the bishops of the Anglican Church as a whole
will likely take further action in support of tra-
ditional scriptural authority, should the
churches of the United States and Canada fail
to return to a more orthodox stance.
The BBC reports that the council voted them
out after the U.S. and Canadian churches
voted to ordain openly gay clergy and bless gay
marriages. The Episcopal Church recently
elected and consecrated as bishop a non-celi-
bate gay man who divorced his wife in favor of
his current same-sex partner.
This decision echoes the stance taken by the
assembled Primates (Archbishops) of the
Anglican Communion at their meeting this past
February in Dromantine, Ireland. All of this is
in line with the official stance of the Anglican
Church, enunciated in 1998 when the Lambeth
Conference of Bishops passed a resolution that
rejected "homosexual practice as incompatible
with Scripture."
In the United States, the only legitimate
national expression of Anglicanism remaining
in full, unfettered communion for orthodox or
traditional Episcopalians and Anglicans is the
Anglican Mission in America (the AMiA), estab-
lished a few years ago as a missionary out-
reach to the United States by the Archbishops
of the Anglican Province of Rwanda and the
Anglican Province of Southeast Asia. There are
several AMiA churches in central Florida,
including the Anglican Church of Our
Redeemer here in Citrus County.
Frank D. Gough II
Beverly Hills.

Don't leave pets
While Ms. Gavin's advice about pets being
left in cars is certainly a good one, her refer-
ence to time concerns me. Even though she
does ask that pets not be left for even a quick
trip, using "as little as 15 minutes" might lead
some readers to believe that five minutes or 10
minutes would be OK Even a few minutes in a
closed car at high temperatures could be disas-
trous to an animal. Her forum provided her
with the perfect opportunity to advise readers
about the appropriate response to finding an
animal in distress from heat exposure.
Unfortunately, it wasn't there.
Barbara Robinson
Hernando

Helping Boys & Girls
Boys & Girls Clubs are not baby sitters.
While they do provide after-school child care,
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County also have
the primary mission of encouraging mental,
physical, social and emotional growth in the
youths who attend one of the four club sites. It
is an expensive philosophy, but Citrus County
children are well worth the expense.
Because of this philosophy, board members
spend a lot of time raising money. Funds are


SERVING
Continued from Page 1C

bill to cover the shortfall, show-
ing once again that the needs of
veterans are a top priority for
Congress.
I have expressed my grave
concern to both House
Veterans Affairs Chairman
Steve Buyer and VA Secretary
Jim Nicholson, however, that
VA accounting procedures
need to be modernized and
thoroughly evaluated.
While the House passed leg-
islation giving appropriate
funds for veterans' health care,
I am concerned about the long-
term forecasting models used
by the VA. When it came to
light that the VA used 2- to 3-
year-old budget models to proj-
ect this year's budget, and did
not even consider the new
strains on our health care
needs from the ongoing War on
Terror, I could not believe my
ears.
I pledge to my constituents
and to all American veterans


raised through a variety of resources, such as
individual donations, program fees, the
Planned Giving Program, corporate sponsors,
fund-raising events such as the annual Steak
and Steak dinner, the annual car raffle, the
ReMax Golf Tournament, public and private
grants and United Way donations.
Many people have the perception that if a
charitable organization receives United Way
funds, they have no need for additional money.
This could not be further from the truth.
United Way of Citrus County funds only 6 per
percent of the total 2005 budget of the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Grants make up
an additional 19 percent of the total budget,
although most grants are specific and may be
used only to pay for certain purchases or pro-
grams. The clubs have no discretion in the way
they are used.
Other incoming funds provide salaries for
well-trained employees who supervise mem-
bers at each site, pay for utilities and provide
building maintenance, purchase materials and
supplies for programs, buy and maintain
equipment, pay for insurance and so on. The
need for money seems to never end, and, as the
cost of living increases, so all club expenses
increase.
When board members seem to continually
have their hands out, begging for support and
help, please don't look away Quality programs
cost money and our children are worth it. If
you would like to know more about the
Planned Giving Program, or wish to be a corpo-
rate sponsor, or simply wish to help, call
621-9225. The support you give helps to make
the Boys and Girls Clubs of Citrus County truly
positive places for kids.
Lane Vick
Crystal River

Abuse of power
Once again, Jeb Bush has abused the powers
of his office by directing the Attorney General
to investigate the time frame of the emergency
call placed by Michael SchiaVoin 1990. This
paper and others slanted that action as if the
Attorney General was more than willing to
undertake this foolish and cruel attack by
Bush. I defy anyone reading this to tell me
what time they did anything in an 2004 emer-
gency situation, much less have the ability to
recall times to perfection 15 years ago. What a
cruel thing to do! The Bushes hate to lose at
anything.
Leonard Pitts' editorial of June 27 clearly
states what really took place, without all the
hype of the fringe groups. They all had agen-
das, including Jeb and his big brother George.
With all the things that require real attention
in Florida and this country, how can the peo-
ple be so swayed and deceived by these stupid
sidetracking issues? I guess it takes our
thoughts off of the real issues and the terrible
record of our state legislators and those at the
national level.
Jeb and George hate to be told they are
wrong, and they will fight to all ends to get
their way imposed even if it is wrong. Terry
Schiavo was nothing but political fodder for
the two of them. And the memo written by our
own Florida senator clearly states what great
value could be obtained by riding this poor
women's plight for the voter issue value.She is
finally at peace, and we need to address the
real problems and stop wasting taxpayers'
money Wake up voters! There are real issues
that need attention and stuff like this is just to
keep you from seeing how poorly they are all
performing.
John Cassell


that I will continue my fight to
ensure that no eligible veteran
is denied services and that the
VA is provided with the health
care funding they need. I also
promise to you that I will hold
the VAs feet to the fire and
demand serious and substan-
tive reforms of current proce-
dures and models.
Another challenge to the sys-
tem is that new veterans
.returning from Iraq and
Afghanistan have very differ-
ent needs than older veterans.
Today's veterans often need
prosthetic limbs, job training
and mental-health services.
Older veterans need inpatient
care, .prescription drugs and
survivor benefits.
For Florida, and indeed for
the entire nation, this is a
direct challenge to the VA and
to Congress to transition and
modify the VA for future needs.
While we have many VA hospi-
tals and clinics around the
country, Congress must evalu-
ate both the overall need for
facilities, as well as their
regional placement.
Florida has long served as


home to thousands of veterans.
In fact, I represent the highest
number of veterans of any
member of the House of
Representatives, with more
than 106,000. Given these sim-
ple demographics, it is likely
that Florida will see expanded
services and facilities in the
future.
What I would hope all my
constituents and veterans will
recognize is that I will do what
it takes to provide the proper
and timely care that our veter-
ans deserve.
As your member in the U.S.
House of Representatives, and
as a member of the House
Veterans Affairs Committee, I
will continue to advocate for
the needs of America's veter-
ans. For the millions of men
and women who sacrificed for
our freedoms and for our
nation, they deserve the best
care in return.


Ginny Brown-Waite is U.S.
Representative for Florida
District 5, which includes
Citrus County.


Sound f


Maturing gracefully
In response to "Making
changes": Grow up. Change is
an inevitable part of life.
Mature adults should set posi-
tive examples on gracefully
dealing with it.
$10-an-hour jobs
The other day there was an
article in the Chronicle that
stated that the average person
in Citrus County that's working
is making (more than) $24,000
a year. I did a little division
with that. Dividing that by 12
comes out to (more than)
$2,000 a month. Dividing that
by 4 comes out to (more than)
$500 a week. Dividing that by
40 comes out to (more than)
$10 an hour. Where are these
jobs? I wish the Chronicle
would give us a list of where
these jobs are available.
Swapping freedom
This is about "Beautiful
Gitmo," published June 25.
After the Spanish-American
War, we meddled in, or ap-
pointed people in the govern-
ment of Cuba until Castro
overthrew the atrocious Batista
regime. Batista was put into
place by you guessed it -
the United States. The United
States agreed to lease 45
acres off the Bay of Guan-
tanamo ... Eventually, it
became a base. The Cuban
people have been anti-
American throughout the
entire occupation of Cuba by
Americans and they would love
us to get off that tip of land.
Now as far as the prisoners
having a beautiful place to be
imprisoned how much
would that compensate you for
your loss of freedom? Cheney's
sitting there saying, "Oh,
they've got air conditioning,


Homosassa RGET


Continued from Page 1C

plain awful for years won the
Stanley Cup. I'd never seen
anything like it. This was big-
ger than the Bucs winning the
Super Bowl because that team
had been building toward a
championship. For the Light-
ning, it emerged practically
overnight.
Why am I telling you this?
Simple.
Hockey is the greatest sport
in the world. Better than base-
ball, basketball and football
combined. This is what makes
it so great: It's not universally
accepted. Hockey fans are rare
but, boy, are they loyal.
You may have heard that the
NHL announced last week it
has a tentative contract with
the players. A lockout forced
the entire season canceled last
year, the first time that's hap-
pened to any major profession-
al sport.
Now sports writers across
the country are talking about
how the NHL and its players
must woo fans back to the
game, as if we're too insulted


they've got good food, they've
got this, they've got that. What
more could they want?" Maybe
to be free in their own country
with their own families. And
half, if not all, of those prison-
ers were turned in to the
United States by people col-
lecting bounties. It's not even
sure that those prisoners are
terrorists, yet we continue to
hold them.
Right to stand up
In the Sound Off, someone
accused the Democrats of
blocking everything in
Congress.:The person said that
the Democrats should stop
blocking. Well, you know some-
body has got to stand up for
what is left of this country.
Democrats need to stop the
Republicans from their foxy
way of government. It is bad
enough that they have undone
every single environmental rule
that was put in place over the
past 20 years. What more do
you want to give up?
Zero tolerance
You find out that school-
teachers don't have to go
through drug testing. I want to
know what is going on in Citrus
County, that you put up signs
that say "Zero Tolerance" for
kids, for drugs, but the teach-
ers can have all they want. That
is apparently the message the
county is relaying. There is no
random drug testing? I am a
retired law enforcement officer,
from up north, and this is
totally unacceptable.
Glasses needed
I have a 17-year-old grand-
son living with me. His father is
not able to work. He needs
glasses and the Lions Club
said that they could not help. I
live on Social Security, and I


from the labor strife that we've
lost interest
That just shows me how
uninformed many sports writ-
ers are. They've lumped hock-
ey in with other major sports
and have just assumed fans
will react the same way they
did when baseball went on
strike a few years back.
Look There's a world of dif-
ference between baseball and
hockey fans. Baseball is
America's national pastime.
It's played in the summer,
mostly outside, where dads
and their kids sit in the bleach-
ers hoping their favorite hero
will slug one into the seats.
Hockey is Canada's pastime
where all the slugging occurs
on the ice. Hockey fans are
rabid blue-collar people who
are not insulted easily, unless
you're making fun of their
team. Heck, many of them are
union workers. There are prob-
ably thousands of hockey fans
who have been victims of labor
strikes themselves.
You think people in Tampa
Bay are going to stay away from
watching the, Stanley Cup
champs, just because of this?
Please. Ditto for fans in
Detroit, Pittsburg, New York,


don't know what else the Lions
Club does with their donations.
Does anyone know what we can
do?
Breaking Iraq
I apologize for making fun of
President Bush saying, "mis-
sion accomplished." The mis-
sion has been accomplished.
Iraq is broken by us, we broke
it. Now, we are not going to
stay around and fix it, but we
did accomplish our mission.
They have fewer problems
under us than under Saddam.
And, we have been told by our
president that when we are
asked to leave, we will. So, now
that we have broken it, they
can fix it.
Washington's farewell
I read Washington's farewell
address several times. And,
while he speaks of religion, I
have yet to find Christian in
front of the word "religion,"
and I haven't found "Jesus" any
where in his farewell speech.
Great cartoon
I think the cartoon in the
Opinion section, Thursday (July
7) of your paper, was great. It
said it all. Congratulations!
Agree with Grant
In reference to the article on
Mr. Grant, the attorney, it was
wonderful. He is speaking the
same thing that most natural
citizens in this county believe.
That somebody messed up.
Keeping Iraq down
I'm calling in reference to the
"Recall Bush" in the Hot
Corner of Iraq Sound Off. Iraq
is one of the richest countries
in the world with their oil wells.
We just keep them down, like
the rest of the poverty in
America.

Los Angeles, Dallas, Denver
and a host of other crazed
hockey cities.
The teams that struggled
with attendance, mainly
because they're lousy, will con-
tinue to struggle. That's how
this works. Tampa Bay's base-
ball team couldn't finish first in
a sandlot league, and that's
why it attracts just a few thou-
sand people to each game.
That, and the stadium is a
nightmare.
Winning boosts attendance,
regardless of the sport.
Hockey needs to stop trying
to be the NFL. It isn't for every-
one; that's for sure. It can't
afford these mega salaries
because it doesn't have the TV
exposure. I'm a big hockey fan,
but even I know hockey has the
best playoffs but the dullest
regular season.
Hockey fans are second to
none. They'll come back as if
the NHL had never left


Mike Wright is a senior
reporter and assistant editor
for the Citrus County
Chronicle. He can be reached
at 563-3228; or wright@
chronicleonline.com.


CITnIs COUNT'L (FL) CHlRoNIcUL









CrImIs CouNIY (FL) CHRONICLE


4C SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


GUEST
Continued from Page 1C

the United States, Ali al-Timimi
- described in the New York
Times as an influential Muslim
scholar has been sentenced
to life imprisonment for inciting
his young followers in Northern
Virginia to wage war against the
United States in the days after
the Sept 11 attacks.
But expulsion and incarcera-
tion will not stop fanaticism.
Pandora's Box has been opened,
and the death-wish extremism
has flown out Remember the
American Taliban, John Walker
Lindh? He got into extremism
after reading a book, "The
Autobiography of Malcolm X."
That does not happen to all'the



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readers of that book, so let's not
ban it It just shows how easy it
is to make bad decisions.
The answer comes down to
having the faith that human rea-
son will prevail. The Times
relates the experience of
Abdullah Anas, a former
Algerian jihadi. Anas fought in
Afghanistan for eight years. But
he became disillusioned.
In the words of Anas: "I am
proud God chose me to be part
of that holy war. I went there
prepared to become a martyr
But it was very sad for me to see
that once they had liberated
their own land, they were
unable to build their country. It
was a big lesson for me," he said
last week
Anas continued explaining to
The Times: "I realized that
Muslims can win the battle, but


can't stabilize afterward and
win the peace. I saw it with my
own eyes. I saw the same in
Algeria, where my father and
grandfather fought for freedom
from the French, but once we
had it, it fell to pieces. The
Muslim fighters know how to
die, but not how to live."
Young extremists may still
want to live. Perhaps waging the
war on terror should project the
joy of life and should teach peo-
ple how to live.
Thinking of my son's tears, it
gives me hope that he loves life
as much as I do. Remember,
hope was what was left inside
Pandora's Box.


Chris Van Ormer, who lived in
London for 20 years, is a
Chronicle copy editor.


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iruu


SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

made to give all sides an opportunity to state
their position but there's limited patience with
playing the cat-and-mouse game.
No. 2 Determine your communication goal.
That's fair and very logical from a public rela-
tions perspective. That's PR terminology for
"spin."
In this anti-media environment, the masses
seem more interested in getting the PR spin. It
makes them happy. Who cares about reality?
Life's easier when there's only one side to a
story.
No. 3 Speak simply. Relate every answer to
your communication goal.
Amen to the "speak simply" suggestion. Again,
though, a reporter's goal of getting a good
overview of a given situation to concerned read-
ers may have little to do with the communication
goal of a PR pro.
No. 4 Listen. Answer. Don't ramble.
Great advice, and unless the day comes when
I can master that tip, I have no room to criticize.
No. 5 No matter how you're asked, always
answer the same way.
Unfortunately, I've known a few reporters with
pretty lousy social skills. If a reporter is antago-
nistic, call the editor and complain. Tabloid
journalism overshadows the fact that civility and
fairness are cornerstones of good reporting.
No. 6 Do not repeat the reporter's words.
Use your own, even if you agree.
Using your own words is a good thing. Don't be
surprised, though, if what's printed is not a quote
but a succinct answer. For example:
"So, Mr Department Chief, you're saying your
employee did run over Ms. Lanadoodle's dachs-
hund?"
Department Chief: "While an internal investi-
gation is in the works, there is, unfortunately,
physical evidence that the vehicle assigned to
the employee did terminate the life of Oscar the
dog, and since Employee Ernie was behind the
wheel initial indications have us concluding that
the dog was killed by the vehicle that was driven


.a ~'H~
a .- 'I
~ .4


I\L ,l'L tO ',l dtli tO ilML'lliO L [I i -C ;od Am mllll ,lllif ih t l 5 oiL'


Saturday, July 23 at 2 p.m.

865 N. Suncoa-t Blvd., Crvstal River


For more information call Monica at 382-0011 or ane at -02the ticket ffic.




For more information call Mionica at 382-0011 or Vangie at 795-0251 Li


18 19


T TOklahomi


24


20


With few exceptions, getting

the truth out overshadows

the need to drive a

journalistic pen through the

heart of someone who said

something in error.


by Ernie."
The reporter should follow with, "So the
answer is, yes?"
What likely will appear in the paper is: "Mr.
Department Chief said all indications are that
Ernie ran over the dog."
No. 7 Ifyou don't know, say so.
Absolutely Why do otherwise?
No. 8 Follow through with promised mate-
rials.
The option is breaking a promise? Contrary to
popular belief, reporters are human. They
appreciate helpful people the way all folks do.
No. 9 If you've made a misstatement, call
the reporter and say so before the story runs.
Heck, yes. And if you fail to do so before the
story runs, set the record straight ASAP With few
exceptions, getting the truth out overshadows
the need to drive a journalistic pen through the
heart of someone who said something in error.
(An exception: "I did not have sexual relations
with that woman.")
No. 10 "Off the record" and "No comment"
can hurt you.
True, but it's usually the source of the infor-
mation, not the reporter, asking to go off the
record. Most good reporters will say, "No, let's
stay on the record," or respect the request and
use the knowledge gained to find an alternate
means of obtaining the information.


Charlie Brennan is editor of the Chronicle.
He can be reached at 563-3225 or by e-mail
at cbrennan@chronicleonline.com.
Read his blog at www.chronicleonline.com.


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BANK RATE CHART
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NEWS
PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS


A i
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SUNDAY
JULY 17, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Kids' characters go veggie


Move over, Popeye. Here comes SpongeBob


Associated Press
Skip the Krabby Patty, SpongeBob
SquarePants is going veggie.
Pictures of the happy-go-lucky
sponge will appear on packages of car-
rots, spinach and citrus starting next
month, under licensing deals with pro-
duce companies. Dora the Explorer
and other Nickelodeon characters also
will debut on fruit and vegetable pack-
ages, according to the network.
SpongeBob already helps pitch a cart


ON THE NET
Nickelodeon: http://www.nick.com

full of foods ranging from cereal to ice
cream, but Nickelodeon executives say
the foray into the wholesome fruit and
vegetable market complements net-
work programming attempts to coax
kids to eat healthier.
"If we can use our popular characters
and help kids eat better, then we're all


Ferrari joins Citrus
Jazzercise team
Nikki Ferrari is the newest
instructor to join the Citrus County
Jazzercise team, raising the num-
ber of local instructors to three.
Ferrari teaches her Jazzercise
Lite classes to Citrus Hills club
members only on Monday and
Wednesday at Citrus Hills Activities
Center. She also leads workouts,
which are open to the public, at
5:45 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, and at 9 a.m. Saturday
at the Crystal Glen Clubhouse in
Lecanto. Trina Murphy and
Jennifer McLendon also teach


those sessions.
All Jazzercise instructors must
pass an intensive certification pro-
gram, which includes a written
exam in physiology and a teaching
audition. They are also certified
annually in CPR and participate in
continuing education programs
through Jazzercise Inc.
The 60-minute Jazzercise class
includes a warm-up, high-energy
aerobic routines, muscle toning
and a cool-down stretch segment.
Jazzercise combines the elements
of dance, resistance training,
Pilates, yoga, kick boxing and
more to create programs for peo-
ple of every age and fitness level.


for that," said Sherice Torres, vice pres-
ident of Nickelodeon & Viacom
Consumer Products.
The deals come as television execu-
tives are countering criticism they con-
tribute to the childhood obesity boom. A
crop of kids' shows try to inspire young
viewers to get up off the couch, like "Jo
Jo's Circus" on Disney and
Nickelodeon's "Lazy Town." Even
Sesame Street's Cookie Monster
changed his tune earlier this year,
singing, "A cookie is a sometimes food."
Nickelodeon also announced
Please see VEGGIE/Page 6D


Alternative formats include
Jazzercise Lite, Jazzercise Body
Sculpting, Jazzercise Step,
Jazzercise Plus, Jazzercise Circuit
Training, Jazzercise Personal
Touch and Junior Jazzercise.
For more information, contact
Jennifer McLendon at (352) 634-
3874.
Kalansky attends
education seminar
Lisa Kalansky of Masterpiece
Dental Studio recently attended a
continuing education seminar at
the Gaylord Palms Resort &
Convention Center in Orlando.
The seminar was titled "Pre-


emergency Planning." The course
had valuable information regarding
disaster plans for small businesses
in the event of a hurricane or any
type of disaster. Tom Sorrell, chief
meteorologist for Local 6 in
Orlando, lectured about hurricanes
and their history. Tom Gray also
gave a detailed lecture on emer-
gency planning before, during and
after the storm.
Pathways to host
retirees' seminar
Retirees wanting to re-enter the
workforce are invited to a free
career-transition seminar at Central
Florida Community College from 9


Nickelodeon/Associated Press
This image released by Nickelodeon on
Thursday shows the packaging design
including SpongeBob SquarePants, who
will appear on packages of carrots,
spinach and citrus starting next month.


Local motel gets j


a face lif


WALTER CARLSON/For the Chronicle
Roy Cavanaugh recently purchased the Village Inn Motel in Crystal River, and is in the process of doing some extreme makeovers both inside and out. Cavanaugh
wants to maintain the rustic appeal of the motel, while attracting upscale clientele with nice renovations.

New proprietor upgrades former Village Inn Motel with many inside, outside renovations


ASHLEY SORRELL
asorrell@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle intern


The former Village Inn Motel in
Crystal River has undergone a name
change, and an extreme makeover:
motel edition.
Roy Cavanaugh bought the motel -
now dubbed the Crystal Manatee -
April 19, and saw its potential as a
point of pride for Crystal River.
"I felt like it was a great opportuni-
ty to work with the city to change the
motel into a more upscale area,"
Cavanaugh said. "The location of the
motel is prime and in the heart of
Crystal River."


I feel very strongly about how this motel
fits into the community.

Roy Cavanaugh
owner of the now "Crystal Manatee" motel.

Crystal River City Commissioner Kirk said the Crystal Manatee
Susan Kirk said Cavanaugh is already joined the chamber of commerce and
creating a positive atmosphere with there are many ways the city will ben-
the motel renovations. efit from his presence.
"I am very pleased to have Mr. During renovations, Cavanaugh
Cavanaugh in our community," Kirk said he reroofed, repainted and land-
said. "He's looking at assimilating escaped the outside of the building.
into the city." Most notably, a manatee-shaped mail-


box and statue will adorn the front
and side of the motel.
But Cavanaugh focused more on
the individual motel rooms. He said
he gutted the rooms and installed
new carpeting, furniture, fixtures and
appliances.
Cavanaugh said he kept the rustic
look of the Village Inn Motel, but
changed the name of the motel to the
Crystal Manatee because the name is
more indicative of the city and its
, attractions.
"I feel very strongly about how this
motel fits into the community," he
said. "It is important for it to mesh
Please see LIFT/Page 6D


a.m. to noon on Friday, July 29.
The seminar will be at the col-
lege's Ocala campus in the
University Center, 3001 S.W.
College Rd. Reservations are
required.
Ed Kelly, author of 'Your Move
Into the World of Work," will lay out
steps for a smooth transition from
retirement or unemployment, to
employment.
Pathways to Living, Learning
and Serving, a program for Marion
County adults in or nearing retire-
ment, is hosting the seminar.
For more information, or to regis-
ter, call Pathways at 291-4444.
Please see DIGEST/Page 6D


- ~..


Brett Wattles
CITRUS
COUNTY EDC



Property

values


all the

buzz
wherever you go in
Citrus County, be it
the grocery store,
restaurants, retail establish-
ments, private parties or the
local barber shop or beauty
salon everyone is talking
about the rapid rise in prop-
erty values in Citrus County.
Just recently, we learned
from Property Appraiser
Melanie Hensley that the
average price of property in
2004 increased countywide
by a whopping 28 percent
And there appears to be no
letup in sight.
Gary Maidhof, director of
Citrus County Department of
Development Services, con-
tinues to report the ever-
increasing number of build-
ing permits for new con-
struction and expansions of
existing buildings. More and
more people locate to Citrus
County every year.
The many workers em-
ployed in the construction
and construction-related
industries and businesses,
along with the owners of
those companies, continue
to benefit from the rapid
growth of the county. Banks
see ever-increasing deposits
and loans; service compa-
nies and retail establish-
ments continue seeing
growth in sales and profits.
Realtors continue to grow in
sales and developers contin-
ue to see increases in home
prices and land values.

Please see EDC/Page 6D


SMART
MONEY


Living


with will


you make

DEAR BRUCE: I want
to get living wills for
myself and my par-
ents; however, my budget
does not stretch enough to
pay $120 a pop. I was consid-
ering downloading the forms
online. Will it still be as valid
as if I had gone through an
attorney? Will I need to have
the forms notarized? S.C.,
Gatesville, Texas.
DEAR S.C.: When you use
the term "living will," I won-
der if you know the differ-
ence between a living will
and your last will and testa-
ment I know of no reason
that it would cost $120 for a
living will, which is a rela-
tively "simple" document.
Your last will, meaning the
directions that you give as to
how your estate is to be set-
tled, can very easily cost
$100 to $150 for reciprocal
wills between husband and
wife.
The living will is an
expression of your desires
Please see MONEY/Page 6D


Business DIGEST


I












CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CiHONICLI,


BUSINESS


2D SUNDAY, JUI.Y 17, 2005


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Lucent 2554333 3.12 +.14
GenElec 1273242 35.53 +.54
Motorola 1117111 19.50 +96
NortelNet 1108907 2.80 +.25
TimeWam 1108483 16.67 +.25

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Salton 2.45 +1.36+124.8
Stonerdg 8.97 +2.29 +34.3
SunComWls 2.76 +.70 +34.0
Gplusacll 20.36 +4.72 +30.2
VidSanNig 15.63 +3.38 +27.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
FrontOwi 27.75 -5.35 -16.2
TitanMIl s 53.99 -9.00 -14.3
DrmwksAn 23.00 -3.81 -14.2
NtwkEq 4.57 -.73 -13.8
FrankCov 6.77 -.98 -12.6

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,083
1,396
757
29
3,577
98
9,937,504,726


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
SPDR 2580334 122.84 +1.52
iShRs2000 s1167555 66.00 +.03
SemiHTr 1031956 36.98 +1.45
SP Engy 892999 45.37 -.87
iShJapan 411114 10.22 -.01

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Meddast 5.69 +1.41 +32.9
Memry 2.68 +.60 +28.8
GeoGlobal 7.89 +1.69 +27.3
StedCons 9.69 +2.00 +26.0
Abraxas 3.67 +.65 +21.5

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Versar 4.41 -1.04 -19.1
IntegBioPh 2.21 -.51 -18.8
IncOpR s 7.40 -1.66 -18.3
CGI HIdg n 2.03 -.39 -16.1
CuisineS n 5.23 -.73 -12.2


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
volume


DIARY
658
417
198
28
1,130
55
1,295,780,655


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Nasd100Tr4233809 38.89 +1.12
Microsoft 2959102 25.79 +.70
SiriusS 2888566 6.80 -.18
Intel 2428561 28.30 +1.02
JDS Uniph 2329412 1.68 +.18

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
HstAmrwt 5.21 +4.16+396.2
HostAmr 10.15 +7.10+232.8
CorrecSv 5.76 +2.41 +71.9
D&KHIth 14.29 +5.79 +68.1
Momenta 29.09 +9.89 +51.5

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Majesco n 3.56 -3.22 -47.5
StaarSur 3.25 -1.82 -35.9
ArtWay 6.14 -2.46 -28.6
Motive 7.81 -2.96 -27.5
Infcrssing 9.21 -3.44 -27.2

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,882
1,395
463
64
3,364
87
8,441,156,805


Here are the 400 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 325 most
active on the Nasdaq National Market and 50 most active on the American Stock
Exchange. Mutual funds are 800 largest.
52 wk Hi/Lo: High and low price over the past 52 weeks.
Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company's full name (not its abbrevia-
tion). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock.
PE: Price to earnings ratio.
PPE: Projected price to earnings ratio based on analysts' forecasts of earnings for next
12 months.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the week.
YTD % Chg: Loss or gain for the year. No change indicated by unc.
Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by unc.


Stock Footnotes: cc PE greater than 99. cld Issue has been called for redemption by company, d New
.? etk- Ic.-... 3 L.:. ,, 1 r i' .,T .: r L r. :,, -.r.:i,,, ii,.l 3 .:.. ria e American Exchange's Emerging
C.:mrnpa f.1. ,iph,. -, D,. er.3 ,,3 a .3 -i r. ; ,, ,'.,i .. 3.-11.a. n temporary exmpt from Nasdaq
capital and surplus listing qualification, n Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low
I..3 U, :1 ,,1r Ir.,T. lir+. .3 i .,e Tir, h ,.: h ,lad'. p Ft r i,,, 1 .': ; u.: ,' Ftlc'ei-r:iii i, H,:,l3i. .I.1i-



n 1a.: i i ui- i .*.3 & I rn a n ju q r.1 a. Il ill.:..-..: 1.ra .:.l a P: J r i.: .ii ?
r.:li ri *t .nl. ir..:lau r-,.a .T Orr ir 1, :.n -.:uii l ., n,.:.5 ii t.n- .I ups.:, ir r.l.r : .:.r ,a'i.r ..'ri :
ir, .; d Sr jrc..e3 l : T.e rJ .-. iu pI.: l a.d., C eir ., trl.:.rI 1 ,r ar,.: &.- irt,-
D.ildend Footnole& a E f ra ,. Ai1 '3,,': .e e pa.,d L uT ,n- .- ': ir.:IluJ ed i . t r, Jal inTr.i plul lnl'h i ,
L,,uali,' ,3,.r.,31.,13 .Tiljr., 3.rI r.:lare3 r.r paid ir a1- 1 1. r. ,',riln T Curi-,'ad arl'r.ual aTe tir:., w.



r ,i Jsr t.3i 'i ,, 3r.r,o u,':crr.Trl ir i la u l ,.'ir.3-" 3 r- u-ji rilu ',i.. r.:. ,-i ,iE n., E :. :r,:.i r: r L r:l ,


dar. Source: The Associaled Press Sales figure are unolicilal


STOC S O LCAITEES


Name


Wklyv PE Yd Last TD Wkly YT
Div PE YId Last Chg %Chg Name Div PE YId Last Chg %Chg


AT&T .95
AmSouth 1.00
BkofAm s 2.00
BellSouth 1.16
CapCtyBk s .61
Citigrp 1.76
Disney .24
EKodak .50
ExxonMbl 1.16
FPLGps 1.42
FlaRock s
FordM .40
GenElec .88
GnMotr 2.00
HomeDp .40
Intel .32
IBM .80


+.40 +1.5
+.52 +4.9
+.83 -2.1
+.49 -2.7
+.15 +2.9
-.09 -3.7
+1.38 -5.1
+1.28 -11.2
-1.24 +13.5
+.12 +16.3
-.91 +26.5
+.58 -24.9
+.54 -2.7
+2.06 -8.3
+1.53 -2.6
+1.02 +21.0
+3.08 -16.4


LowesCos
McDnlds
Microsoft
Motorola
Penney
ProgrssEn
SearsHldgs

SprntFON
TimeWarn

UniFirst
VerizonCm
Wachovia
WalMart
Walgrn


+4.19 +10.5


+4.19 +10.5
+2.34 -3.3

+.70 -3.5
+.96 +13.4
-.16 +33.5
+.26 +.1

+5.40 +59.2
+.09 +2.5
+.25 -14.3

+1.40 +53.2
+.29 -14.4
+.94 -2.5
+.35 -4.9
+.21 +22.8


52-Week Daily Wkly Wkly YTD
High Low Name Last Net Chg Net Chg % Chg % Chg
10,984.46 9,708.40 Dow Jones Industrials 10,640.83 +191.69 +1.83 -1.32 +4.94
3,889.97 2,959.58 Dow Jones Transportation 3,646.03 +56.07 +1.56 -4.00 +18.06
400.17 274.84 Dow Jones Utilities 392.73 +2.32 +.59 +17.25 +39.23
7,457.77 6,215.97 NYSE Composite 7,403.59 +73.01 +1.00 +2.12 +14.68
1,587.35 1,186.14 AMEX Index 1,539.97 -21.04 -1.35 +7.36 +20.98
2,191.60 1,750.82 Nasdaq Composite 2,156.78 +43.90 +2.08 -.86 +14.53
1,233.16 1,060.72 S&P 500 1,227.92 +16.06 +1.33 +1.32 +11.49
674.33 515.90 Russell 2000 663.74 +1.60 +.24 +1.87 +19.49
12,322.58 10,268.52 Wilshire 5000 12,254.70 +139.15 +1.15 +2.37 +14.18


- I -Wk DI VTIl 1 5244 WD


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last
A-B-C
7.10 4.86 ABBLtd ...... 15 6.60
8.45 7.85 ACM Inco .66 q ... 8.30
18.13 9.09 AESCp ... 23 18 16.67
45.00 33.85 AFLAC .44 17 16 44.44
39.32 28.60 AGLRes 1.24 16 16 38.30
18.22 5.45 AKSteel ... 6 6 7.72
33.49 26.76 AMLI Rs 1.92 12 ... 31.60
14.95 6.34 AMR ... dd ... 13.56
45.81 33.15 ASA Ltd .40 q ... 38.00
20.01 13.59 AT&T .95 dd 12 19.35
28.48 19.12 AXA .79e ...... 26.34
50.00 38.26 AbtLab 1.10 21 18 46.87
27.60 21.00 Accenture ... 16 15 23.50
13.99 12.07 AdarnsEx .90e q ... 13.22
24.85 15.11 Adesa .30 21 16 24.36
24.95 10.76 AMD ... cc 54 20.01
26.65 19.51 Agilent ... 34 21 25.66
9.23 6.15 Ahold ... ... ... 8.65
13.60 7.40 AirTran ... dd ... 10.04
34.99 25.55 Alcoa .60 19 13 27.50
51.70 30.76 Alletes 1.26f 18 21 48.58
49.90 32.35 AlliCap 2.43e 19 15 47.22
12.86 11.07 AIIWdd2 .89 q ... 12.38
38.45 24.35 AIlmrFn ... 13 12 38.21
20.20 9.39 Alpharma .18 dd 29 15.15
69.68 44.50 Altria 2.92 14 12 66.65
56.16 42.41 Ameren 2.54 19 17 55.35
39.34 30.27 AEP 1.40 13 15 38.69
58.03 47.70 AmExp .48 19 16 53.76
73.80 49.91 AmInlGplf .50 15 12 61.21
12.75 10.65 AmSIP3 .96 q ... 10.95
21.89 13.10 AmTower ... dd ... 21.44
33.25 26.11 Amedrigas2.24f 22 19 32.73
27.13 23.80 AmSoulh 1.00 15 13 27.16
43.07 31.36 AnalogDev.24 30 26 40.45
54.62 44.85 Anheusr .98 17 16 46.48
30.98 18.90 AquaAm .52 33 29 29.78
4.24 2.25 Aquila ..dd ... 3.76
57.43 30.10 ArchCoal .32 74 18 53.11
25.37 14.95 ArchDan .34 19 16 21.74
62.70 59.35 Ashlandvn1.12 9 15 60.05
10.50 7.77 AsdEstat .68 dd ... 9.51
29.48 24.40 ATMOS 1.24 15 16 28.90
17.76 7.76 Avaya ... 20 15 9.56
34.07 18.00 Aviall ... 23 17 31.80
46.40 35.64 Avon .66 20 17 37.35
31.01 17.62 BHPBillL.46e ... ... 27.67
66.94 51.95 BPPLC 1.87e 13 ... 65.03
25.10 19.55 BRT 2.001 14 ... 23.43
46.45 34.12 BallCps .40 14 13 38.46
47.47 41.70 BkofAms2.00f 12 11 45.98
34.09 26.93 BkNY .841 16 14 29.66
47.25 36.74 Banta .721 17 15 45.93
26.32 18.14 BarrickG .22 47 41 23.75
87.89 57.17 BauschL .52 27 22 83.34
28.96 24.85 BellSouthi.16f 11 15 27.03
75.96 43.87 BestBuy .481 24 22 75.89
40.29 26.52 BIkHICp 1.28 20 19 39.51
16.07 15.20 BlkFLO8 .75a q ... 15.49
6.94 5.86 BlueChp .56e q ... 6.50
66.85 46.40 Boeing 1.00 29 22 64.75
27.47 21.20 Borders .36 15 14 25.07
27.95 19.65 BostBeer ... 22 21 22.55
74.06 50.60 BostProp 2.72f 29 33 72.70
-41.95 26.50 BostonSci ... 19 13 27.66
26.60 22.22 BrMySq 1.12 24 19 25.24
56.47 33.82 BurlNSF .68 20 12 48.64
61.07 34.92 BudRsc .34 14 12 58.90
49.73 42.07 CH Engy 2.16 19 19 48.55
110.93 58.00 CIGNA .10 8 15 109.95
36.65 28.98 CSSInds .48f 15 12 35.67
31.15 19.31 CVSCps .15 29 21 30.56
15.59 9.28 CallGolf .28 dd 24 15.29
4.46 1.32 Calpine ... dd ... 3.30
31.60 25.21 CampSp .68 19 17 30.81
14.20 11.68 CapMplB1.26 ... ... 13.12
51.49 34.25 Caterpils 1.00 17 ... 50.67
102.9868.50 Calerpillr 2.00f 16 ... 99.84
13.75 9.78 CenterPnt.28m dd 17 13.74
86.45 76.00 CnlLtpl 4.50 ...... 85.50
35.54 29.55 CnoryTel .24 14 15 34.29
15.85 7.53 ChmpE ... 25 18 10.51
19.50 14.38 Checkpnt .01 13 15 18.27
26.04 13.69 ChesEng .201 17 12 24.50


YTD Hi52-Wk YTD
chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


+.17 +16.6
+.01 +1.7
+.58 +21.9
-.16 +11.5
-.32 +15.2
+.97 -46.6
-1.08 -1.3
+.88 +23.8
-.45 -6.1
+.40 +1.5
+1.16 +6.4
-2.20 +0.5
-.71 -13.0
+.21 +0.8
+.52 +14.8
+1.07 -9.1
+1.32 +6.5
+.48 +11.3
+.67 -6.2
+.30 -12.5
-2.00 +32.2
-.10 +12.4
+.10 unc
+.76 +16.4
+.03 -10.6
+1.78 +9.1
-.24 +10.4
+.60 +12.7
-.17 -4.6
+1.16 -6.8
+.04 -11.0
-.20 +16.5
+.03 +10.6
+.52 +4.9
+.96 +9.6
+.55 -8.4
-.24 +21.1
+.16 +1.9
-3.28 +49.4
+.85 -2.6
-2.49 -2.8
+.11 -6.9
-.52 +5.7
+1.50 -44.4
-.10 +38.4
+.12 -3.5
+.05 +15.2
-1.28 +11.4
+.23 -3.7
-.62 -12.6
+.83 -2.1
+.86 -11.3
-.29 +2.6
-.81 -1.9
-.73 +29.3
+.49 -2.7
+3.12 +28.0
+1.77 +28.8
+.06 -2.3
-.01 -2.7
-.32 +25.1
-.53 -0.9
-.28 +6.0
-.35 +12.4
-.14 -22.2
+.33 -1.5
-.69 +2.8
+.36 +35.4
-.40 +1.0
+.83 +34.8
+1.10 +12.3
+.30 +35.6
-.20 +13.3
-.05 -16.2
+.30 +3.1
+.08 -3.5
+1.32 +3.9
+1.14 +2.4
+.25 +21.6
+.50 +4.9
+.67 -3.3
+.13 -11.1
-1.01 +1.2
-.64 +48.5


63.15 46.21 Chevronsl.80f 9 10 56.67
4.88 3.14 CinciBell ... 28 20 4.55
45.95 36.95 CINergy 1.92 20 15 45.13
49.99 42.10 Citigrp 1.76 14 10 46.42
27.41 18.84 ClairesStrs.40 17 15 25.11
51.39 38,30 CocaCI 1.12 22 19 43.08
28.59 18.45 CocaCE .16 19 16 22.00
5.25 2.70 Coeur ... dd ... 3.41
9.31 8.08 Collntln .65a q ... 89
32.99 23.35 CmcBNJ s .44 18 15 31.60
30.24 22.50 ConAgra 1.09 19 16 23.30
62.22 35.64 ConocPhilsl.24 9 9 59.35
48.74 39.30 ConEd 2.28 21 16 48.07
15.76 12.30 Cnvrgys .. 19 14 14.48
17.56 9.29 Corning ... dd 21 17.29
11.90 7.12 CorusGr ... ... ... 8.24
D-E-F
11.95 10.24 DNPSelct.78a q .. 11.70
27.97 18.98 DPL .96 14 19 27.65
48.31 39.31 DTE 2.06 23 13 47.68
48.63 38.77 DaimirC 1.93e 11 42.10
19.75 10.90 DanaCp .48 75 12 16.51
34.00 19.30 Darden .08 19 17 34.10
74.73 56.72 Deere 1.24 11 10 69.75
10.04 3.20 Delphi .06m 19 ... 5.20
8.17 2.46 DeltaAir dd ... 3.85
55.59 31.61 DevonEs .30 12 10 52.17
18.25 13.88 DirecTV dd 47 15.92
29.99 20.88 Disney .241 22 18 26.38
22.80 17.69 DollarG .18f 19 16 19.88
76.87 62.07 DomRes 2.68 20 15 74.73
49.45 9.81 DoralFin .72 4 7 15.28
56.75 37.95 DowChm 1.34 11 9 47.52
42.60 22.80 DrmwksAn ... 7 18 23.00
54.90 39.88 DuPont 1.481 21 15 44.06
30.55 20.36 DukeEgy 1.241 14 18 29.95
38.95 34.00 Duq pfA 2.10 ...... 37.75
19,74 16.93 DuqLight 1.00 15 16 19.01
6.09 3.21 Dynegy ... dd ... 5.06
16.00 9.51 ETrade ... 15 14 14.93
15.09 9.24 EMCCp ... 36 25 14.67
61.80 42.19 EastChm 1.76 13 9 56.49
35.19 24.63 EKodak .50 21 11 28.63
13.15 7.09 ElPasoCp .16 dd 15 11.73
30.49 3.00 Elan ... ... ... 7.35
25.01 19.53 EmpDist 1.28 31 17 24.14
55.66 45.60 EnbrEPtrs3.70 29 26 55.14
23.65 17.81 Endesa .92e ...... 22.15
30.15 17.35 EnPro ... 19 16 29.39
41.42 26.95 ENSCO .10 43 16 35.91
77.49 54.43 Enlergy 2.16 20 16 75.80
13.65 8.41 Eqtylnn .60 cc 53 13.17
54.12 32.85 Exelon 1.60 18 16 52.25
64.37 44.20 ExxonMbll.16f 14 13 58.16
44.59 31.21 FPLGps1.42 18 16 43.46
17.44 11.91 FairchldS ... dd 30 15.91
77.80 49.75 FannieM f11104 10 9 59.80
19.18 13.80 FedSignl .24 dd 21 15.90
22.27 19.28 Ferreligs 2.00 dd 27 21.52
25.80 16.77 Ferrolf .58 38 17 20.60
44.69 36.50 FirstData .24 19 16 40.13
22.17 13.72 FFinFds5.1O0e q 19.40
20.71 18.87 FtTrFidn 1.60 q ... 19.90
52.56 26.50 FlaRocks ... 27 22 50.22
15.37 9.07 FordM .40 *8 10 11.00
94.53 68,47 FortuneBr1.32 18 17 93.33
G-H-1
36.43 '23.82 GATX .80 11 20 36.42
9.40 7.64 GabelliET.72a q ... 9.03
23.75 18.12 Gap .18 17 14 20.72
6.92 2.78 Gateway ... dd 18 3.80
89.88 41.00 Genentch ... 94 62 89.58
37.75 31.42 GenElec .88 22 18 35.53
44.83 24.67 GnMotr 2.00 49 57 36.74
54.33 37.77 Gillette .65 30 26 52.60
44.00 24.53 GlobalSFe.60f 53 18 41.60
114.25 83.29 GoldmanS1.00 12 11 108.50
43.85 29.39 Goodrich .80 29 20 42.95
32.78 27.86 GtPlainEn1.66 14 16 32.20
30.88 24.80 GMP 1.00 15 ... 29.71
27.78 18.35 Griffon ... 17 13 25.31
20.74 13.10 GuangRy .71e ...... 17.10
75.55 49.95 Guidant .40 41 25 69.41


+.06 -1.8
+.22 +10.1
-.43 +10.5
+1.85 -12.4
+.06 -4.7
+2.02 +22.9
+.99 -6.3
+.17 -42.4
+.35 -48.5
-1.86 +34.0
+.27 -4.9
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-.43 -4.3
-.07 +10.3
-1.13 -69.0
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-3.81 -38.7
+.56 -10.2
+.05 +18.2
-.50 +4.9
-.09 +0.8
+.04 +9.5
-.12 -0.1
-.03 -1.3
+.59 -2.1
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-.23 +12.8
+.12 -73.0
-.43 +6.4
+.88 +6.9
+.02 -4.8
+.09 -0.6
-1.36 +13.1
-.78 +12.1
+.02 +12.2
+.64 +18.6
-1.24 +13.5
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-.09 -2.2
+.83 -16.0
-.25 -10.0
+.04 +6.0
unc -11.2
-.62 -5.7
+.92 -9.7
+.21 -0.5
-.91 +26.5
+.58 -24.9
+.10 +20.9


+.82 +23.2
+.05 +0.1
-.25 -1.9
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+.54 -2.7
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-.18 +31.6
-.24 +6.3
+.28 +3.1
+.34 -6.3
-.69 -16.5
+2.25 -3.7


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
58.60 34.70 HCAInc .60 18 15 49.95 -4.55 +25.0
50.00 26.45 Hallibtn .50 dd 18 46.68 -1.68 +19.0
16.17 14.32 HanJS 1.11e q .. 15.20 +.10 -3.1
10.09 8.65 HanPtDiv .55 q 9.20 -.02 -8.0
12.38 10.56 HanPtDv2 .78 q 12.11 -.03 +5.2
50.85 33.51 Hanson 1.71e ...... 47.78 +.53 +11.3
63.75 45.14 HarleyD .641 17 16 53.62 +3.88 -11.7
77.61 43.94 HarrahE 1.32 22 19 77.07 +1.77 +15.2
21.80 16.90 Hasbro .36 23 17 21.48 -.09 +10.8
29.79 24.60 HawaiiEl 1.24 18 16 27.40 +.28 -6.0
39.20 31.11 HIICrREIT2.48f 28 30 38.26 -.58 +0.3
42.11 35.25 HllIhcrRl 112.621 28 32 39.97 -.55 -1.8
10.09 5.74 HellnTel .21e ... ... 9.64 +.04 +9.5
24.73 16.08 HewlelttP .32 21 15 24.94 +.66 +18.9
31.79 22.62 HighwdP fl.70 cc ... 30.06 -.97 +8.5
44.30 32.39 HomeDp .40 18 15 41.61 +1.53 -2.6
39.50 31.85 HonwIllntl .83 21 16 36.57 +.55 +3.3
34.51 25.29 HughSups.36f 15 13 30.69 +1.59 -5.1
44.73 15.65 Humana ... 21 18 41.03 -.72 +38.2


27.40 20.16
32.95 26.21
41.19 28.46
87.92 62.05
99.10 71.85
37.45 24.20
35.09 26.66


IMS HIlh .08
Idacorp 1.20
Imalion .481
IngerRd 1.00
IBM .80f
IntlGame .48
IronMtn


+1.30 +17.1
-.15 +2.4
+.08 +26.6
+.95 -6.9
+3.08 -16.4
+.42 -14.4
-.64 +1.4


J-K-L
33.35 JPMorgChl.36 28 11
54.37 JohnJn 1.321 22 18
52.57 JohnsnCtll.00 13 12
30.64 KBHomes.75 12 8
26.52 Kaydon .48 21 17
39.88 Kellogg 1.01 20 18
24.40 Kellwood .64 14 12
29.00 Keycorp 1,30 15 13
35.19 KeySpan 1.82 15 16
14.65 Kroger ... dd 14
4.77 LLERy .36e 14
4.01 LSI Log ... dd 22
16.50 LTCPrp 1.32 15
11.50 LaZBoy .44 21 14
26.31 Laclede 1.38 18 16
5.51 LblyASG .59e q ..
8.33 LibtyMA ... 92 68
50.34 LillyEli 1.52 29 19
40.78 UncNat 1.46 11 11
17.50 Undsay .24f 61 34


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last


65.46 51,20 LockhdM 1.00 21 16 61.75 -.75 +11.2
63.35 45.90 LowesCos.24f 22 18 63.65 +4.19 +10.5
4.16 2.35 Lucent .. 12 16 3.12 +.14 -17.0
35.65 16.51 Lyondell .90 21 7 27,99 -.01 -3.2
M-N-0
111.4089.00 M&TBk 1,801 17 16 110.12 +3.66 +2.1
29.01 18.28 MBNA .56 16 12 26.22 +.43 -7.0
30.00 23.75 MDURes .72 16 15 29.86 +.52 +11.9
9.06 8.35 MCR .50 q 8.72 -.03 -1.1
11.00 6.52 Madeco ........ 9.75 +.19 -7.9
83.76 60.00 Magnalg 1.52 11 10 74.80 +.22 -9.4
6.99 5.96 MgdHi .52 q ... 6.37 +.03 -3.0
51.00 38.43 Manulifg 1.20 ... 13 49.90 +.89 +8.0
58.77 33.55 Marathon 1.12 14 11 55.23 -.90 +46.8
37.49 8.50 MStewrt ... dd ... 29.10 -.50 +0.3
18.16 10.40 MatScilf ... dd 11 14.60 -.39 -18.8
23.50 9.21 Maytag .36m dd 22 15.45 -.32 -26.8
34.56 25.64 McDnlds .55f 16 15 30.99 +2.34 -3.3


47.00 25.60 "Merck 1.52 13 13
61.99 47.35 MerillLyn .801 13 11
46.97 32.99 MetLife .461 11 11
14.15 9.32 MicronT ... 35 54
48.76 35.13 MidAApt 2.34 cc ...
24.74 14.59 Midas ... 41 30
3.92 1.65 Milacron ... dd ...
60.10 42.01 Millipore 27 23
64.61 43.79 MillsCp 2.51 23 ...
60.51 46.54 MorgStanl.08 13 11
20.27 12.47 MSEmMkI.07e q
19.74 12.37 Motorola .16b 29 '18
11.85 10.19 MunienhFd.73 q
20.03 14.24 MylanLab .24f 26 19
39.84 21.01 NCR Cps ...' 20 20
29.75 25.05 NatFuGas1.16f 15 15
52.39 39.40 NatGrid 2.17e
24.48 11.85 NatSemi .08 23 24
2.29 1.94 NewAm .21a q
49.34 39.54 NJ Rscs 1.36 17 17
49.98 34.90 NewmtM .40 38 32
8.00 4.72 NwpkRs ... 78 24
18.88 15.01 NewsCpAn.16e ....
19.41 15.61 NewsCpBn,06e ... 21
25.50 20.50 NiSource .92 15 15
41.87 32.37 Nicor 1.86 18 18
92.43 68.61 NikeB 1.00 21 17
65.25 34.15 NobleCorp .08 51 18
18.07 10.89 NokiaCp .44e


ch ch HI Low Nme Div PE PPE Lst chg
ch0 %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg_


4.86 2.26 NortelNet ... dd 22
30.81 25.24 NoFrkBcs .88 15 12
21.74 17.17 NoestUt .70f dd 17
52.99 38.61 NoBordr 3.20 18 20
58.15 49.54 NorhrvopGl.04f 16 14
31.46 23.01 NSTARs 1.16 18 16
65.53 36.36 Nucors .60a 6 8
16.40 14.12 NvFL .88 q ...
16.20 14.09 NvIMO .89 q ...
29.76 24.10 OGE Engyl.33 17 16
82.75 47.76 OcciPel 1.24 11 10
24.50 13.87 OficDpt ... 23 18
25.35 15.93 Olin .80 15 9
83.98 48.32 OshkshTrk.531 22 16
47.75 37.34 OutbkStk .52 22 17
P-Q-R
30.38 20.09 PNMRes .74 19 16
74.73 56.20 PPG 1.88f 17 12
61.79 44.70 PPLCorp1.84 17 14
83.45 29.35 PacilCre ... 22 18
21.40 9.20 PaylShoe ... cc 19
23.45 14.15 Pengrthg2.76 ......
57.15 35.75 PenVaRs2.48f ... 18
56.10 34.03 Penney .50 24 16
23.70 11.83 PepBoy .27 cc 38
57.20 47.37 PepsiCo 1.041 22 20
26.35 18.29 PepsiAmer .34 20 18
17.06 9.25 Prmian 1.13e 15 ...
34.46 21.99 Pfizer .76 22 13
24.99 20.15 PiedNGas .92 21 18
13.29 10.65 PimcoStrat.89a q ...
47.50 40.62 PitnyBw 1.24 20 16
39.45 30.44 PlumCrk 1.52 20 23
38.45 27.50 PostPrp 1.80 18 ...
49.42 37.59 Praxair .72 22 18
57.40 50.53 ProctGaml.12f 21 18
46.10 40.47 ProgrssEn2.36 15 14
4.00 3.05 ProsSIHiln .27 q ...
18.28 12.93 Providian ... 15 11
64.32 38.10 PSEG 2.24 20 18
81.80 67.00 PSEGpfA4.08 ......
24.81 20.73 PugelEngyl.00 41 17
7.19 6.39 PHYM .38 q ...
10.09 9.13 PIGM .60 q ...
6.81 6.00 PPrlT .36a q ...
63.38 26.87 Quanexs .54 13 11
4.87 2.56 QOwestCm ... dd ...
19.95 13.85 RPM .60 20 13
34.48 23.11 RadioShk .25 12 12
48.00 33.63 Ralcorp 1.00e 17 16
34.21 21.77 RJamesFn.32 17 15
55.00 43.29 Rayonier 2.48 23 24
26.08 19.68 Rltylncosl.34 22 22
35.97 29.24 RegionsFn1.36 17 14
28.50 19.92 Repsol .63e
14.20 6.02 RetailVent ... dd 25
3.50 1.96 Revlon ... dd
5.11 3.02 RiteAid ... 10 70
67.45 48.94 RoylDut 2.82e 11 ...
20.80 16.70 Royce 1.66e q ..,
S-T-U
27.29 22.78 SBCCom 1.29 17 16
43.65 35.66 SCANA 1.56 19 15
85.25, 40.00 StJoe .56 71 45
17.04 12.37 SalEMInc21.65a q ...
13.52 11.36 SalmSBF .14e q
44.50 24.50 SJudnB 2.94e 16
21.59 16.56 SchergPI .22 dd 48
79.50 58.64 SchImb .84 30 24
13.80 8.25 Schwab .091 64 22
36.00 28.30 ScottPw 1.65e ......
21.50 10.11 SeagateT .32f 25 9
24.25 18.95 Sensient .60 14 13
26.70 13.98 ShopKo ... 16 15
47.39 36.26 Shurgard2.24f 55 74
13.14 7.70 SierrPac ... 28 21
2.03 .55 SilcnGph h ... dd .
77.49 48.65 SimonProp2.80 53 53
32.80 21.62 SmithAO .64 21 14
6.70 3.08 Solectm ...... 18
35.92 28.85 SouihnCoI.49f 17 16
16:75 13.18 SwstAidr .02 28 25
24.79 20.05 SovrgnBcp.16 17 12


+.25 -19.3
+.71 +2.9
+.63 +14.2
+.23 +6.4
+.73 +2.4
-.20 +14.0
+.57 -5.0
+.04 +2.6
+.05 -0.8
-.23 +9.9
-2.20 +35.0
+1.44 +42.2
+.84 -13.3
+1.56 +20.9
+1,78 -0.3


+.33 +15.0
+1.10 -5.9
-.45 +14.4
-2.43 +31.6
+.45 +72.0
-.12 +9.0
-.13 -4.0
-.16 +33.5
-.46 -17.6
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unc +22.9
-.21 +15.1
+.43 +2.5
-.16 +5.1
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-1.32 -5.3
-.80 +6.1
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+.26 +0.1
-.02 -3.1
+.41 +9.3
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unc -1.5
unc -2.9
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unc +1.5
-.05 -2.4
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-.07 -26.1
-1.73 -3.0
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-.90 -2.7
+.21 -2.2
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+.46 +86.6
+.32 +47.4
-.08 +14.5
-1.51 +11.9
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+.55 -6.4
-.27 +9.1
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-.08 -18.4
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-.20 +47.1
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-1.66 +13.2
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+.90 +10.8
-.09 -10.0
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-1.65 +3.2
-.12 +20.8
+.03 -65.9
+.95 +18.3
-.14 -9.7
+.05 -30.2
-.04 +6.1
+.28 -12.7
+.49 +9.0


HI Low Name DIv PE PPE Last chg %chg


25.87 17.59 SprntFON .50 dd 17
30.31 21.55 Standex .84 21 ...
27.42 19.80 Steris .16 21 18
36.82 22.95 StorTch ... 21 19
11.64 6.41 SturmR .40 59 19
40.76 33.90 SunCmts 2.52 dd ...
75.77 64.40 SunTrst 2.20 14 13
19.12 9.55 SymblT .02 28 28
32.62 24.55 TCFFncls.85 14 13
32.35 24.35 TD Bknorth.80 20 13
19.30 12.18 TECO .76 dd 16
25.96 20.64 TJX .24 18 15
87.25 39.03 TXUCorp2.25 dd 12
71.51 44.07 TXUpID 4.06 ......
9.57 6.29 TaiwSemi .32r ......
58.97 40.03 Target .401 16 21
13.16 9.77 TenetHIt ... dd ...
45.45 37.44 Teppco 2.65 25 21
20.20 10.80 Teradyn ... 39 ...
9.38 5.84 Terra ... 16 13
29.24 11.01 TerraNitro2.45e 11 ...
34.29 23.71 TetraTech ... 36 18
31.06 18.06 Texlnst .10 28 24
4.60 3.04 Theragen ... dd ...
30.98 23.94 ThermoEl ... 12 17
33.88 23.19 ThmBet ... 18 16
89.30 71.03 3MCo 1.68 19 17
36.37 27.00 Tiffany .32f 16 21
19.90 15.41 TimeWam .20 23 20
29.50 22.50 Timken .60 14 10
23.02 11.30 TitanCp ... dd 19
20.15 14.85 ToddShp .40 12 ...
55.74 18.55 TollBross ... 16 ...
8.22 5.90 TorchEn .68e ......
57.57 49.28 Trchmrk .44 12 11
46.44 32.45 TorDBkg 1.60 ... 13
126.86 93.54 Total SA 3.53e ... ...
26.66 20.89 TotalSys .241 29 23
30.01 24.00 TwnCtry 1.72 cc ...
58.19 25.94 Transocn ... 80 19
20.71 14.37 Tredgar .16 19 14
18.45 15.79 TrContl .24f q ...
36.58 27.27 Tyconll .40 28 14
56.11 44.50 UILHold 2.88 10 24
43.95 25.50 UniFirst .15 20 17
24.95 18.83 UDomR 1.20 42 ...
31.65 26.80 US Bancrpl.20 14 12
63.90 32.12 USSleel .401 3 5
54.20 44.24 UtdTechs .88 18 16
54.50 29.91 Uldhlths .02 23 19
66.79 34.65 Unocal .80 13 12
V-W-X-Y-Z
27.37 16.75 ValeantPh .31 dd 58
86.30. 31.79 ValeroEs .40f 11 10
4.60 3.40 VKHilncT .36 q ...
29.46 24.08 Vectren 1.18 20 16
42.27 33.71 VedrizonCml.62 12 13
38.99 31.80 ViacomB .28 dd ...
35.67 15.11 VinlgPt .22f 6 11
28.54 20.83 Vodalone .75e ......
30.91 21.82 Wabash .18 12 8
56.28 43.05 Wachovia1.84 13 11
57.89 46.20 WalMart .60 20 18
47.67 34.89 Walgrn .28f 31 27
42.97 37.51 WAMull 1.88f 13 11
15.42 6.38 Wellmn .20 dd 7
64.04 56.12 WellsFrgol.92. 15--13
48.50 31.74 Wendys .54 92 19
24.38 19.58 WestarEn .92 11 14
13.85 12.16 WAstTIP2.82a q ...
71.85 57.90 Weyerh 2.00 11 15
18.98 14.00 WilmCS 1.45e 11 ...
20.53 11.36 WmsCos .20 31 21
40.64 28.32 Winnbgo .361 17 14
39.70 31.12 WiscEn .88 15 16
22.73 15.11 Worthgin .68 8 12
71.50 59.50 Wrigley 1.12 30 26
45.67 33.50 Wyeth .92 40 15
37.73 19.05 XTOEgys.20 21 14
19.70 16.32 XcelEngy .86f 24 15
17.24 12.82 Xerox ... 17 13
34.64 26.42 YankCdl .25 19 16
5.36 5.00 ZweigTI .54 q ...


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I N SDA NA IO AL ARK T


52-Wk YTD 52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


A-B-C
33.25 19.97 ACMoore ... 33 22
23.77 12.25 ADCTeIrs ... 22 20
18.84 12.33 ASMLHId. .. 17
20.66 11.20 ATITech ... 18 17
4.75 2.85 ATSMed ... dd ...
4.36 .63 Aastrom ... dd ...
11.30 6.45 Abgenix ... dd ...
18.71 9.12 Activisns ... 27 24
27.14 16.15 Acxiom .20 29 24
34.48 19.66 AdobeSys ... 28 24
27.50 19.73 Advanta .45f 7 ...
29.90 20.30 AdvantB .54f B8 13
59.73 24.48 Affymet ... 56 46
16.50 10.64 AkamaiT ... 44 25
46.84 30.88 Akzo 1.54e ......
15.89 6.73 Alamosa ... dd 38
24.62 8.85 Aldila .40f 12 ...
15.61 8.48 Alkem ... dd ...
18.68 5.29 AIlscripts ... cc 44
24.26 17.50 AlteraCp ... 30 25
50.40 30.60 Amazon ... 28 47
25.01 16.15 AmegyBcs.12 23 19
.60 .02 AmrBio wt ...
34.04 13.75 AEagleOs.301f 20 16
27.16 14.55 APwCnv .40 27 23
19.55 9.35 Amerilrade ... 27 23
70.58 52.00 Amgen ... 36 22
6.90 2.87 AmkorT ... dd ..
24.95 14.50 Amylin ... dd ...
52.00 37.73 Anlogic .32 23 39
4.63 2.75 Analyss ..34 ...
8.74 1.01 AnlySur ... 10 ...
94.31 62.55 ApolloG ... 60 24,
45.44 14.37 AppleCs ... 35 27
29.19 22.26 Applebees .06 19 16
8.55 1.99 AppidDigl ... dd 50
4.96 2.84 Apldlnov ... ... ...
18. 14.33 14.33 ApdMatl .12 20 22
4.37 2.50 AMCC ... dd 38
20.00 .7.25 aQuantive .. 29 43
9.80 3.73 Ards ... dd 19
35.16 28.90 AsscdBancl.08 15 13
5.04 2.05 Almel ... dd ...
1794 12.31 Audvox ... 5 24
39.90 18.01 Autodsks .03j 34 28
68.35 39.80 AvidTch ... 20 14
6.80 2.29 Aware ... dd ..
9.86 5.92 BEASys ... 28 21
5.40 1.51 BOSLd ... dd ...
18.29 12.90 BeasleyB ... 26 22
44.92 33.88 BedBath ... 26 22
70.00 33.18 Biogenldc ... cc 22
49.64 33.64 Biome .25e 26 20
6.96 1.21 Biopurers ... dd ...
28.54 19.91 BobEvn .48 22 22
39.45 25.25 Brdoom ... 55 31
8.17 3.77 BrcdeCm lf ... 13 10
18.91 11.50 BrooksAut ... 42 21
9.75 5.57 C-COR ... dd 17
60.18 41.14 CHRobn .60 35 28
12.18 7.16 CNET ... cc 34
25.94 11.28 CVThera ... dd ...
36.78 26.66 CapClyBks.61 19 20
45.67 26.22 CareerEd .... 22 16
43.27 23.33 Celgenes ... 89 59
52.24 37,35 CephIn ... dd 14
12.25 6.23 ChrmSh ... 21 16
26.21 16.46 ChkPoinI ... 20 16
42.12 24.56 ChkFree ... 69 22
14.98 9.75 Checkers ...14 14 12
48.09 29.00 Chiron ... cc 22
48.30 33.31 Chrch[ID .50 94 26
3.50 1.64 CienaCp ... dd ...
46.87 37.51 Cintas .321 25 22
6.37 370 Cirrus ... dd 30
22.62 17.01 Cisco ... 24 18
26.00 15.02 CitrixSy ... 25 20
24.42 8.03 CleanH dd 16
50.31 22.84 CogTech ... 62 40
47.40 28.90 Cognosg ... 25 22
9.15 5.45 Comarco ... ... ...
34.50 26.25 Comcast .. 56 37
34.16 25.89 Comcsp ... 55 37
7.92 4.35 Comnuwre .. 39 19


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-.23 -9.7
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26.10 15.25 Comvers ... 68 38 24.61
2.95 1.35 ConcCm ... dd 40 2.06
32.61 20.45 Conmed ... 28 15 30.46
50.46 39.05 Costco .46f 22 20 46.45
11.85 5.76 CredSys ... dd 25 9.94
16.08 7.71 CubistPh ... dd ... 16.16
16.12 3.47 Cytogen ... dd ... 5.08
D-E-F
14.35 6.75 D&KHIth .06 51 35 14.29
4.87 1.14 Danka ... dd ... 1.67
17.10 1.43 DayStar ... dd ... 14.88
42.57 32.71 Dellinc ... 32 23 40.96
6.05 3.50 Dennys n .. 33 5.98
6.25 1.02 DobsonCm ... dd 5.99
30.29 22.29 DlIrTree ... 15 14 24.62
8.75 4.52 DbleCIck ... 42 .. 8.49
46.87 2.78 DynMatl .20 cc .. 40.22
59.21 30.78 eBays ... 5738 385.08
15.58 7.80 EZEM ... 17 93 14.56
11.99 8.11 EdrthLink .. 9 11 9.13
34,38 26.95 EchoSlarl.00e 24 13 29.95
13.70 9.70 EduDv .151 17 ... 10.30
26.80 16.25 ElectSci ... 29 29 19.41
5.01 2.12 EIlcrgIs ... dd 3.53
71.16 43.38 ElectAs ... 36 33 57.46
5.00 2.93 Epiphany ... dd 3.61
34.89 23.18 EricsnTI .36e ...... 34.42
6.94 2.07 EuroTechs ......... 4.40
8.23 1.92 EwvgrSIr ... dd ... 6.44
7.25 4.02 ExtNetw .. 41 25 4,90
47.92 10,93 Eyelech ... dd 50 13.45
54.07 40.24 FifthThird 1.40 16 13 42.22
28.85 24.12 FstMerit 1.086 19 16 27.64
15.01 10.06 Flextrn ... 24 15 13.93
21.00 18.25 FocusMedn... .. ... 19.59
14.28 7.95 Foundry ... 34 26 9.31
G-H-I
6.39 2.93 Gemstar ... dd ... 3.56
20.19 15.10 Gentexs .34 32 24 19.93
65.45 44.14 Genzyme ... cc 29 70.31
2.79 .65 GigaMed 13 2.40
46.76 27.79 GileadScis ... 42 29 45.47
23.95 10.15 GoldKistn ... 9 20.72
309.25 95.96 Googlen .. cc 50 301.19
33.50 25.10 HMNFn .88 13 ... 31.90
100.42 17.75 Hansen ... 43 28 97.80
39.94 27.75 HarbrFL .80 20 18 38.08
12.40 4.25 Harmonic ... 65 22 5.20
18.75 11.40 HelixTech .32 18 29 16.92
42.65 17.77 Hologic .. 46 39 39.90
9.98 2.69 HostAmr dd ... 10.15
4.58 .22 HstAmrwt .... .... 5.21
23.49 13.85 HotTopic .. 23 17 18.77
12.79 10,.06 HudsCitys.261 28 20 11.81
14.20 8.51 HumGen ... dd ... 14.34
25.03 16.74 HuntJBs .24 17 14 20.01
29.93 19.16 1ACInterac... cc 22 25.10
21.15 8.94 I-Flow ... dd ... 13.83
8.24 4.12 Idenlix ... dd ... 4.96
81.43 29.51 Imclone ... 38 22 34.15
20.15 8.69 Infcrssing 9 12 9.21
9.63 5.38 Informal ... dd 26 9.20
78.74 42.70 Infosyss .26e 43 32 70.17
6.61 1.11 Innovo ... 44 12 2.63
7.05 4.15 Instinet .32p 35 24 5.24
25.67 17.36 InlegCirc ... 24 22 20.21
13.27 8.88 InIgDv ... 86 21 10.28
28.13 19.64 Intel .32 21 19 28.30
60.59 46.07 IntlSpdw .06 17 19 59.21
13.93 2.11 IntrnllniU ... ... ... 8.83
20.65 13.69 Intersil .16 91 29 20.00
49.25 35.84 Intuit ... 26 21 48.99
53.44 35.00 InvFnSv .07 16 12 34.05
J-K-L
26.96 17.06 JetBlue ..62 57 21.87
30.25 19.65 JnprNtw ... 87 33 26.08
51.56 35.02 KLATnc .48 21 23 48.47
15.72 6.71 KeryxBio .. dd ... 15.81
12.19 7.28 KnghtCap ... 14 24 7.97
56.12' 33.25 Kronos ... 27 23 42.88
9.30 4.80 Kulicke ... 82 22 8.98
51.32 13.28 LCA Visa .32 33 31 45.08


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+.78 +4.2
-.27 +92.7


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PEPPE Last cha %cha


28.61 13.28 LKQCp ... 26 21 27.38
15.28 8.40 LSI Inds .40 25. 18 15.04
32.26 19.71 LamRsch ... 15 16 30.52
43.67 15.27 Lasrscp 45 34 34.60
4.27 1.55 Level3 ... dd ... 2.18
10.45 2.55 LexarMd ... dd ... 5.03
48.40 28.60 UbtyGlobA ..... 47.01
14.56 4.69 UgandB If ... ... 47 8.41
40.73 34.01 UnearTch .40 29 27 39.95
19.75 13.10 LodgEnt ... dd ... 16.75
2.30 .57 LookSmart ... dd .70
M-N-0
27.74 13.69 MCIIncn .60 dd .. 25.67
30.50 19.75 MGIPhr dd 23 26.91
37.72 18.95 MTS .32 23 20 34.55
4.16 1.05 MagelPl .. dd ... 2.88
13.45 3.06 Majescon ... 5 3.56
42.15 19.33 Marvelr ... 68 32 41.94
49.51 36.20 Maxim .80 27 25 42.11
13.35 7.41 MaxwIlT ... dd ... 12.08
6.73 2.99 McDalaA ...d 16 4.91
28.70 21.70 Medlmun ... dd 66 29.11
11.55 4.37 Medarex ... dd ... 9.80
20.87 14.76 MedAcIt ... 17 14 17.97
49.58 31.05 Mercntr ... 40 23 38.80
13.15 7.90 Micrel ... 36 31 12.87
32.88 24.06 Microchp .28 30 26 32.43
6.69 3.37 Mcromse ... 51 18 5.56
22.59 9.44 MicroSemi .. 93 25 22.39
27.50 23.35 Microsoft .32a 25 17 25.79
7.18 3.05 Microtune 27 ... 6.23
14.06 7.63 MilPhar ... dd ... 9.94
8.10 4.60 Misonix ... 35 13 5.90
23.98 6.46 Momenta ... dd ... 29.09
34.25 17.60 MnstrWw ... 43 28 29.00
16.00 8.75 NABIBio .. dd ... 14.63
22.40 8.85 NETgear ..26 19 21.75
40.68 32.35 Nasd100Tr.41e q 27 38.89
16.56 7.25 Nastlech ... dd ... 14.34
12.15 9.75 NaAtIlHn ... ... 7 12.02
20.62 9.05 NeklarTh ... dd ... 18.48
4.16 1.37 Net2Phn ... dd ... 1.84
34.99 15.92 NetwkAp ... 49 35 29.00
33.40 21.18 NexteIC ... 13 17 33.02
26.81 13.70 NextlPrt ... 63 28 24.50
27.99 5.70 NitroMed ... dd ... 22.82
28.30 16.00 NobltyH .20e 21 16 26.88
49.43 38.40 NorTrst .84 21 18 48.95
11.83 3.77 NwstAirl ... dd ... 4.75
7.70 4.94 Novesll ... '6 50 6.15
30.77 22.89 Novlus ... 23 24 27.37
8.96 5.58 NuHoriz 52 25 6.79
5.29 2.60 NuanceC ... dd ... 4.84
29.60 9.30 Nvidia ... 33 17 26.89
74.95 34.57 OSIPhrm ... dd ... 46.18
20.91 8.96 OmniVisn ... 12 11 14.45
6.30 3.99 OnAssign .. dd ... 5.33
5.32 2.49 OnSmcnd ... dd 19 5.10
27.12 12.00 OpenTxt ... ... 10 11.75
18.80 7.69 OpnwvSy ... dd 25 18.55
7.96 3.90 Opsware ... dd ... 5.57
14.87 9.78 Oracle ... 25 17 14.04
11.83 5.19 OraSure cc 73 11.13
48.61 29.00 Orthlx 19 16 43.25
29.30 23.77 OltterTail 1.12 18 16 28.27
P-Q-R
39.91 27.20 PETCO ... 20 16 28.74
12.37 7.42 PMC Sra ... 52 37 10.34
29.05 17.25 PacSunwr ... 16 13 22.98
27.20 8.06 PalmSrce ... 7 53 8.16
4.95 1.71 Paradyne ... dd 29 2.55
7.30 4.00 ParmTc ... 20 20 7.13
31.09 15.69 PattUTI .16 34 14 29.55
35.00 28.60 Paychex .52 36 29 34.76
49.26 22.24 PelDv ... 14 15 33.61
6.35 3.25 PinnSyst ... dd ... 4.76
54.57 32.75 Pixars ... 27 41 43.52
8.20 4.62 PlugPower ... dd ... 6.50
24.07 13.97 Polycom ... 34 19 16.27
33.45 15.59 PortlPlayn ...... 20 24.43
11.32 4.54 Powrwav ... dd 23 11.13
12.48 7.05 Prestek ... cc 23 11.47
27.08 17.42 priceline ... 32 17 23.67


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52-Wk
HI Low Name


Div PEPPE Last chg


24.40 8.50 ProgPh ... dd ... 21.92
22.43 13.79 ProtDsg ... dd ... 21.60
19.97 9.38 QLT ...... 13 10.88
43.66 21.44 Qlogic 19 17 32.54
44.99 32.08 Qualcoms .36 31 26 35.58
7.79 3.77 RF MicD ... dd 67 6.46
27.85 12.34 Rambus ... 54 38 13.62
21.10 10.37 RedHat ... 61 47 15.35
6.70 5.79 Remecn ... dd ... 5.92
16.28 12.26 RepBcp .44 15 13 14.85
103.56 52.25 RschMotn .. 49 25 72.27
29.98 16.23 ResConns ... 26 27 29.22
31.37 20.95 RossStrs .20 24 16 27.26
S-T-U
31.96 19.66 SanDisk ... 19 17 27.50
9.35 3.74 Sanmina ... dd 13 5.53
161.75 61.76 SearsHldgs .. 16 22 157.49
4.75 2.53 SeeBeyond ... cc 57 4.17
50.93 33.58 Secln .7612 12 12 49.90
22.43 15.94 Semlech 25 24 17.62
66.55 39.85 Sepracor ... dd ... 59.98
45.40 15.00 Shanda ...... 19 35.06
18.60 8.75 SiRFTch .. 16 32 17.76
10.85 6,97 SiebelSys .10 67 36 8.69
45.50 13.79 SigmaTel ... 10 11 18.40
43.60 24.62 SilcnLab .. 19 22 28.00
5.53 2.84 Slenware .12r 16 5.56
9.43 2.01 SiriusS ... dd ... 6.80
11.10 5.02 SkywksSol ... 29 21 8.36
19.87 9.87 SmurfSlne ... dd 24 10.32
7.02 3.16 Sonusn ... 57 44 4.59
19.00 13.85 SouMoBc .36 23 ... 14.00
22.74 17.25 Slapless .17 24 19 23.19
64.26 42.05 Slarbucks ... 49 37 52.70
46.40 16.01 SIIDyna .40 5 6 28.47
6.77 1.24 SemCells ... dd ... 5.88
5.65 3.29 SunMicro ... 19 60 3.76
8.05 4.00 SuperGendw ... dd ... 6.25
10.97 4.50 SupportSft ... 36 23 5.72
26.65 20.50 SusqBnc .92 17 15 25.75
34.05 18.01 Symantecs ... 32 21 23.85
12.00 6.29 Symeric .. 34 21 10.51
12.70 6.95 Synovis ... cc ... 7.88
12.53 7.70 TLCVision ... 15 20 9.03
29.60 19.15 TakeTwos ... 19 17 26.50
33.45 7.33 TASERs ... 40 91 10.00
46.00 33.04 TechDala ... 14 15 37.76
1.96 .82 Tegal ... dd ... .85
10.32 6.56 Tellabs ...dd 21 8.97
34.25 22.82 TevaPhrm.24e 19 ... 30.00
5.36 2.96 3Com ... dd ... 3.27
13.50 5.53 TibcoSh .. 29 29 7.18
7.75 3.45 TiVoInc .. dd ... 7.20
2.52 1.01 TrnSwtc ... dd ... 2,12
41.18 21.55 TrimbleN ... 31 27 40.92
14.19 10.73 TrstNY .60 17 16 13.19
32.78 26.69 Truslmk .80 15 14 29.85
6.22 4.26 USUnwirn ... 17 60 6.19
27.10 6.70 UTStrcm ... 19 50 8.55
9.52 3.41 UbiquiTI ... dd 26 9.09
8.07 2.10 US Enr ... dd ... 3.60
48.34 28.54 UnivFor .10 16 14 47.28
60.82 25.78 UrbanOut ... 46 32 58.57
13.88 3.76 Urologix .. 26 21 5.47
V-W-X-Y-Z
14.65 6.31 ValueClick ... 30 24 12.46
36.09 16.21 Vedisign 33 24 28.68
17.31 8.06 VertxPh .. dd ... 16.74
28.23 8.76 Vicuron .. dd ... 27.75
5.18 2.03 VionPhm ... dd ... 2.54
10.35 1.40 ViroPhrm ... 39 28 9.87
3.93 1.95 Vitesse ... dd ... 2.43
29.50 6.32 WPTEntn ... dd 55 21.11
10.57 6.46 WebMD ... 84 16 10.88
44.15 23.75 WWirelss ... 22 20 43.87
7.04 .69 WetSeal .. dd ... 5.72
13.89 2.56 WorldAir ,.. 11 9 12.30
76.45 34.18 Wynn ... dd 76 55.10
40.89 23.55 XMSal ... dd ... 35.62
33.39 25.21 Xilinx .281 32 27 27.73
39.79 25.52 Yahoo ... 56 54 36.58
64.47 38.60 YellowRd ... 12 9 54.12
3.81 1.80 ZhoneTch ... dd 50 2.77


+2.45 +10.1
+.10 -34.7
+5.40 +59.2
-.02 +16.5
-.05 +12.8
+.16 -19.3
+2.34 +1.0
-3.87 -17.5
+.36 +39.6
+.10 -17.2
+1.81 -48.2
+1.35 -20.7
+.38 +35.6
-.18 -10.8
+.41 -11.1
nc -44.8
-.12 -19.9
-.01 -24.3
+1,27 +3.2
,+.92 -15.5
-.28 -24.8
+1.17 +39.0
+.13 -30.2
+.79 -11.3
+.48 -14.1
+.25 +3.2
+1.88 -7.4
+.16 +8.2
unc -27.1
+.43 -13.3
;.-.22 +14.3
-.20 -68.4
+1.01 -16.8
-.09 -47.9
+.01 +4.4
-.80 +0.5
-.17 -21.6
+.36 -46.2
+.27 +22.7
-.05 +37.7
+.97 +23.8
-.26 -4.4
-.49 -3.9
+.03 +35.7
+1.13 -61.4
+.84 +27.7
-.11 +21.6
+3.67 +8.9
+.28 +31.9
+.95 -15.5


-.27 -6.5
-1.34 -14.6
-.25 +58.4
-.23 +59.4
+.21 -45.8
+.77 +203.7
+.12 -31.2
-5.39 +24.2
+.67 +33.3
+.12 +49.7
-.58 +152.0
-.82 +93.7
+3.51 -17.7
-.01 -5.3
+.27 -6.5
+1.96 -2.9
+.97 -2.9
-.10 +6.9


I AMERIAN TOK5 XHAGE -


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PEPPE Last chg %chg


b.u a.n A7oAsbac a.42 q
3.98 1.21 Abraxas ... 5
25.80 12.50 AdmRsc .30f 9
22.02 11.51 ApexSilv ... dd
3.85 1.55 AvanirPh ... dd
3.87 1.70 BemaGold ... dd
185.40127.79 BiotechT .04e q
17.30 13.16 BrdbdHT .08e q
20.83 16.85 CarverBcp .28 16
39.77 7.89 Chenieres ... dd
13.60 7.55 ComSys .28 17
4.68 2.00 Crystallxg ...
22.70 6,50 DHBInds ... 13
109.83 97.27 DJIA Diam2.09e q
17.70 5.52 DanlHd ... 17
9.85 2.14 DigitAngel ... dd
6.00 1.15 ENGIobal ... 45
3.61 2.02 EldorGdg ... dd
8.25 7.15 Elswth .30e q
12.59 3.02 EmpireRs .201 10
15.70 13.71 FTrVLDv .38a q
22.99 15.90 FlaPUtil .621 19
4.48 2.85 GascoEnn ... dd
9.35 .77 GeoGlobal ......
4.05 1.85 GlobeTeln ......
6.65 2.33 GoldSIrg ... dd


+.IU -4.0o
+.65 +58.2
-.52 +20.5
-.61 -21.6
+.28 -4.7
-.07 -27.2
+8.44 +21.6
+.63 -2.9
-.20 -15.5
-.35 +0.9
-.22 -16.7
+.02 -1.9
+.18 -53.0
+1.73 -1.1
-.18 +48.4
+.07 -42.8
+.76 +72.6
-.18 -12.9
unc -3,5
+.79 +142.5
+.06 -2.7
+1.09 +15.4
+.02 -2.1
+1.69 +713.4
-.07 -41.1
-.10 -25.9


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


o.ou a.1o
15.91 12.00
25.99 14.73
12.90 9.81
11.09 9.36
35.00 21.59
7.80 6.26
28.68 18.28
7.70 6.05
13.00 9.51
123.39106.64
76.00 50.77
97.00 83.04
82.85 80.62
55.36 44.47
56.50 43.70
76.19 61.22
75.19 5403
68.91 57.34
49.98 43.06
67.71 52.10
68.69 52.02
67.14 51.11
24.90 20.75
66.92 49.34
57.82 43.47


Greyvvon ... ,+
ING GRE 1.26 q
iShBrazil .46e q
ISh HK .27e q
iShJapan .04e q
iShKor .10e q
iShMalasia.16e q
iShMexico.28e q
iShSing .28e q
iShTaiwan.08e q
iShSP5002.46e q
iShEmMkt s.80e q
iSh20 TB4.04e q
iShl-3TB1.94e q
iSh EAFEs.80e q
iShGSSem ... q
iShNqBio ... q
iShC&SRIts 2.30e q
iShR1000Vl.53e q
iShR1000G.58e q
iShR2000Vmsl.08eq
iShR2000G.26e q
iShRs2000 s.77e q
iShDJTel .64e q
iShREst s2.55e q
iShSPSml s.49e q


-.05 +43.1
-.03 +4.6
+.52 +12.7
+.41 +6.2
-.01 -6.4
+1.80 +16.8
+.13 +1.0
+.33 +12.8
+.16 +7.3
+.48 +3.6
+1.53 +1.5
+1.96 +11.1
-.66 +6.1
-.04 -0.7
+.51 -0.5
+2.32 +7.4
+2.18 -1.5
-.34 +7.9
+.59 +3.2
+.84 +1.4
-.04 +3.3
+.16 +0.4
+.03 +1.9
+.23 -1.8
-.45 +6.0
+.05 +5.0


Foreign Exchange
Value / Pre Value Todays $ / Prey $
Country name Currency in dollars value in currency
Argent Peso .3498 .3489 2.8588 2.8660
Australia Dollar .7498 .7510 1.3337 1.3316
Brazil Real .4284 .4273 2.3340 2.3405
Britain Pound 1.7513 1.7561 .5710 .5694
Canada Dollar .8188 .8264 1.2213 1.2101
Chile Peso .001730 .001728 577.88 578.85
China Yuan .1208 .1208 8.2758 8.2760
Colombia Peso .000429 .000429 2333.50 2332.45
Czech Rep Koruna .0399 .0399 25.09 25.04
Denmark Krone .1616 .1621 6.1895 6.1697
Dominican Rep Peso .0334 .0351 29.91 28.45
Egypt Pound .1732 .1732 5.7750 5.7750
Euro Euro 1.2042 1.2090 .8304 .8271
Hong Kong Dollar .1286 .1286 7.7768 7.7771
Hungary Forint .0049 .0049 204.31 204.20
India Rupee .0230 .0230 43.520 43.480
Indnsia Rupiah .000102 .000102 9768.00 9790.00
Israel Shekel .2200 .2208 4.5447 4.5300
Japan Yen .008911 .008910 112.22 112.23
Jordan Dinar 1.4114 1.4114 .7085 .7085
Kuwait Dinar 3.4258 3.4258 .2919 .2919
Lebanon Pound .000666 .000666 1501.00 1501.00
Malaysia Ringgit .2632 .2632 3.7999 3.7999
Mexico Peso .094277 .093773 10.6070 10.6640
N. Zealand Dollar .6735 .6742 1.4848 1.4832
Norway Krone .1514 .1525 6.6048 6.5576
Pakistan Rupee .0168 .0168 59.59 59.59
Peru New Sol .3076 .3076 3.251 3.251
Philpins Peso .0179 .0179 55.84 55.88
Poland Zloty .2924 .2907 3.42 3.44
Russia Ruble .0357 .0349 27.9870 28.6650
SDR SDR 1.45281 1.45149 .6883 .6889
Saudi Arab Riyal .2667 .2667 3.7501 3.7500
Singapore Dollar .5928 .5919 1.6868 1.6894
Slovak Rep Koruna .0308 .0309 32.44 32.36
So. Africa Rand .1512 .1515 6.6126 6.6026
So. Korea Won .000965 .000965 1036.50 1036.50
Sweden Krona 1284 .1287 7.7886 7.7686
Switzednd Franc .7725 .7754 1.2945 1.2896
Taiwan Dollar .0313 .0313 31.94 31.91
Thailand Bahl .02394 .02392 41.77 41.81
U.A.E. Dirham .2723 .2723 3.6727 3.6728
Uruguay New Peso .0408 .0408 24.4850 24.4850
Venzuel Bolivar .000466 .000465 2147.00 2150.00


Spot Metals


NEW YORK (AP) Spot nonferrous metal pces Friday.
Aluminum 82.7 cents'per Ib., London Metal Exch. Fn.
Copper -168,00 cents Cathode full plate, U.S. destinations.
Copper 162.90 cents per lb., N.Y. Mere spot Fd.
Lead $824.00 per metric ton, London Metal Exch.
Zinc 58.24-58.49 cents lb., delivered.
Gold $418.35 Handy & Harman (only daily quote).
Gold $420.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri.
Silver $6.980 Handy & Herman (only daily quote).
Silver -$6.956 troy oz, N.Y. Merc spo Fri.
Mercury $900.00 per 76 Ib lask, N.Y.
Platinum -$870.00. troy oz., N.Y. (contract).
Platinum $871.50 troy oz., N.Y.Mere spot Fri.
n.q.-notl quoted, .a.-not available r-revised

Money Rates
Today Prev.
Prime Rare 6.25 6.25
Discount Rate Primary 4.25 4.25
Fed Funds close 3.3125 3.1875
T-Bills:
3-month 3.18 3.10
6-month 3.37 3.29


T-Bill, annualized, adjusted for
constant maturity:
1-year
T-Notes:
1-year
2-year
5-year
10-year
T-Bond:
30-year
Libor:
3-month
6-month
FHLB Cost of Funds, 11th District:
Efl. June. 30
FNMA 30-year mortgage commitment:
30-days
Money market lund:
Merrill Lynch Ready Assets:
30-day avg yld:


2.56 2.51


MONY NDMEAL


Mule


w q 7 r,..WM AA VA 7 -A


11,


p
D
F













CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 3D


MUUA FND


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
AARP Invst:
CapGrr 45,51 +.51 .12.7
GNMA 1504 -.01 +4.6
Global 27.95 +.38 +23.2
Grwlnc 2234 +.27 +13.0
Intl 44.82 +.53 +18.2
MgdMunI8 n 9.22 -.01 +6.1
PathwayCnsv 11.72 +.04 +9,2
PathwyGo 13.42 +,10 +12.4
ShtTermBd 10.07 .. +1 8
Sm0CoSkn 26.33 +.04 +21t2
ABN AMRO Funds:
GrwthN 23.03 +.43 +8.3
M&CGmN 23.27 +.33 +5.9
AIM Investments A:
Agrsv p 10.66 +.06 +15.1
BalApx 25.49 +07 +8.7
Bas+cValAp 33.02 +25 +11.8
BIChipAp 11.72 +.14 +7.9
CapDev p 19.04 +.08 +18.2
Chart p 13.01 +.11 +9.4
Constl p 23.03 + 23 +10.7
HYIdAp 449 +.03 +10.3
IntlGrw 2066 +.32 +22.9
MdCpCrEq 29.92 +.21 +13.5
MuBp 8.18 -.01 +6.9
PremnEqty 10.06 +08 +10.2
RealEstp 28.01 -.02 +33.9
SlEqty 18.08 +.17 +13.0
SmCpGrAp 29.00 +.20 +17.0
Summi 11,28 +.10 +15.2
WeingAp 1347 +.15 +13.1
AIM Investments B:
BasicValB t 31.07 .23 +11.1
BlueChipBI t11.08 +.13 +7.2
CapDevBt 17.72 +.06 +17.4
PremEqty 9.30 +.08 +9.4
AIM Investor Cl:
Dynamc 17.26 +.11 +18.7
Energy 35.77 -.53 +440
HlthSc e 51.77 -.06 +6.6
SrnCoGrIep 1293 +.07 +20.7
Tech 25.08 +.50 +13.5
TotRtnIx 24,12 +.06 +5.8
utilties 13.30 +.01 +33.8
AIM/1NVESCO Invstr:
CoreStockx 9.99 -.57 NE
AMF Funds:
AdjMtg n 9.73 -.01 +1.9
Advance Capital I:
Balancednp 18.17 +.11 +10.9
elinc n 10.07 -.01 +7.9
AegisValFund 18.74 +.17 +10.8
Alger American:
Growth 36.80 +.46 +14.6
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.65 +.03 +19,2
Alger Funds Inst:
MidCpGrI 17.53 +.03 +17.4
Alleglant CI I:
SCapVall 22.05 +.03 +16,7
AllianceBem A:
AmGvlncA 7.62 +.04 +13.2
BalanA.p 17.38 +.10 +10.5
GIblbTechAp 56.96 +1.44 +15.5
GrolncAp 3.79 +.03 +11.7
GrowthAp 35.25 +.58 +16.9
IntlValAp 16.63 +.32 +23.6
LgCapGrAdp 18.64 +.30 +14.0
SmCapGrA 23.27 +.18 +16,3
AllilanceBem Adv:
Gr6ncAdv 3,81 +.04 +12.5
IntlValAdv 16.83 +.32 +24.0
LgCapGrAdv 19.44 +.32 +14.4
AlliancaBem B:
AmGvlncB 7.62 +.04 +12.4
CorpBdBp 12.18 -.01 +7.4
GIblTechB t 51.43 +1.29 +14,6
GrIncB p 3.72 +.03 +11,1
GrowthBt 24.46 +.40 +16.0
LgCpGrB1 t 17.01 +.27 +13.2
SmCpGrB t 19.60 +.15 +15.3
USGovtB p 7.06 -.02 +4.3
AllianceBem C:
GrthncC t 3.73 +.03 +11.1
SmCapGrC t 19.64 +.14 +15.3
Allianz Funds A:
SmCpVA 31.04 -.11 +24.4
RenalsA 24.95 +.15 +5.5
Value A 17.77 +.18 +10.2
Allianz Funds B:
RenaisB 23.40 +.14 +4.7
Allianz Funds C:
RenalsCt 23.25 +.13 +4,6
GwthCt 18.08 +.28 +10.7
TargeIC 16.05 +.15 +13.1
Alpine Funds:
US RE 48.30 +1.08 +64.4
AmSouth Fds Cl I:
Value 17.35 +.20 +18.6
Amer Beacon AMR:
BalAmr 14.64 +.10 +16.0
LgCapAmr 20.80 +.25 +22.4
Amer Beacon Instl:
IntlEqIns 20.21 +.30 +17.7
SmCapInst 21.28 +.07 +23.5
Amer Beacon Plan:
SmCpPlan 20.89 +.07 +23.3
Amer Century Adv:
EqGrop 22.97 +.23 +16.8
Eqtylmcnp 8.23 +.05 +11.8
Amer Century Ins:
Eqtylndex 4.90 +.06 +12.6
Ultra 29.57 +.43 +6.3
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n 16.86 +.09 +11.7
EqGmolnvn 22.98 +.23 +17.1
Eqinco n 8.23 +.05 +12.1
GNMAIn 10.36 -.01 +4.3
Gifnn 16.39 -.09 +17.1
Growth n 20.00 +.27 +12.4
Heritagein 12.76 -.07 +17.5
IncGron 31.48 +.37 +15.0
IntBnd 13.52 +.01 +5.0
IntDiscnr 13.73 +.16 +19.0
IntlGroln 9.02 +.08 +14.5
LUfeScin 5.26 +.01 +15.6
NewOppnr 5.66 -.06 +12.5
OneChgAgg n 11.11 +.09 NE
RealEstl n 27.13 -.12 +31.0
Selectin 37.93 +.55 +5.7
SGovn 9.44 -.02 +1.6
SmCapVal n 10.76 +.05 +21.6
SmallCo 10.68 +.10 +27.0
SlrModn 6.82 +.05 +11.3
Ultra n 29.24 +.43 +6.1
Utlln 13,46 +,03 +35.0
Valuelnv n 7.58 +.08 +13.6
Vistan 14.91 +.04 +13.0
Amer Express A:
Cal 5.25 -.01 +7.1
Discovery 9.18 +.09 +23.7
DEI 11.50 +.07 +20.4
DWrBd 4.87 ... +5.4
DiOppA 7.42 +.05 +21.4
EqSelect 13.49 +.11 +15,2
EqtyVal p 10.48 +.07 +17.8
Growth 28.21 +.27 +15.5
H8YidBond 2.92 +,03 +10.9
Hileld 4.46 -.01 +5.6
Insr 5.46 -.02 +5.3
LgCpEqA p 5.25 +.05 +11.6
MgdAlIp 9.74 +.10 +15.7
Mass 5.41 -.02 +5.6
Mich 5.32 -.01 +5.4
Minn 5.33 -.01 +5.3
Mutual p 9.91 +.06 +11.2
NewD 23.89 +.22 +5.9
NY 5.15 -.01 +5.6
Ohio 5.32 -.01 +5.3
PrecMI 8.54 -.11 -4.4
Select 8.64 -.01 +4.8
SDGovt 4.77 -.01 +1.5
SmColndex 8.80 ... +21.3
Stock p 19.87 +.22 +10.5
TEBond 3.90 -.01 +5.7
ThIdInt 5.86 +.06 +21.1
Thdilnll 7.16 +.09 +14.7
Amer Express B:
DivrEqlnc t 11.46 +.06 +19.5
EqVal p 10.50 +.07 +17.0
NewDt 22.55 +.20 +5.0
Amer Express Prtnr:
InllSelValp 8.41 +.08 +20.8
SmCpVIAp 7.03 +.02 +17.5
Amer ExpressY:
NewDn 24.02 +.22 +6.1
American Funds A:
AmcapFAp 18.64 +.21 +11.8
AmMutlAp 27.00 +.24 +12.2
BalA p 18,20 +.16 +9.7
BondFdAp 13.44 +.01 +5.8
CaplnBIAp 52.98 +.47 +16.0
CapWIdAp 19.19 +.07 +8.9
CapWGrAp 34.44 +.41 +20.2
EupacA p 36.70 +.45 +19.9
FundlnvAp 33.21 +.30 +16,68
GovtAp 13.64 -.04 +4,0
GwthFdAp 28.74 +.34 +15.8
HITrslAp 12.42 +.11 +10.3
HrincMunAI 15.64 -.01 +7.2
IncoFdAp 18.61 +.16 +13.6
ntBOA8p 13.59 -.03 +2.5
nCoAA p 31.31 +.38 +12.6
LtdTEBdAp 15.40 -.02 +3.7
NwEconAp 21.40 +32 +15.0
NewPerA p 27.89 +.40 +14.7
NewWoddA 34.45 +.37 +28.0
SmCpWAp 3262 +17 +21.6
TaxExp2Ap 12.56 -.02 +6.1
TxExCAAp 16.81 -.02 +6.7
WshMutAp 31.26 +.34 +11.7
American Funds B:
AmcapB I 18.02 +.20 +10.6
BalanBt 18.14 +16 +8.8
BondB t 13.44 +.01 +5.0
CaptalBBt 52.98 +47 +15.1
CapWGrB t 34.30 +.41 +19,2
EurpacB t 36.28 +.44 +19.1
FundlnvBI 33.14 +30 +15.8
GrowthBIt 27.83 +.33 +15.0
HI TrustB 12.42 +.11 +9.4
IncomeB t 18.52 +.16 +12.8
ICAB0 31.18 +.36 +11.7
NewPersplt 27.44 +39 +13.8
WashBt 31.10 +.34 +10.9
AmedstlokMF 40.61 +.81 +7.9
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 49.09 +.42 +15.6
Ariel n 54.70 .. +15.6
Artisan Funds:


Intl 22.15 +.34 +15.4
MidCap 30.27 +.20 +16.0
MIdCapVal 19.37 +.08 +31.5
SmCapVal 19.04 +.06 +24.0
Baron Funds:
Asset n 55.00 +.37 +23.8
Growth 47.53 -.07 +27.3
Partners p 17.75 +,10 +36,8
SmICap 23.32 -.11 +21.8
Bernstein Fds:
IrntDur 13.35 -.01 +5.3
CaMu 14.30 -.02 +3.5
DIvMun 14.14 -02 +3.4
NYMun 13,99 -.02 +3.6
TxMgdlnllVI 22.56 +.30 +16.5
IntVal2 21.21 +.28 +16.6
EmgMkIs 37.88 +1.32 +53.0
BlackRock A:
Aurora A 41.15 +.03 +14,2
HIYdInvA 8.13 +.06 +10.4
LegacyA p 13.75 +,15 +12.2
BlackRock Fde BIrk:
CoreBIr 9.71 -.02 +5,1
Bramwell Funds:
GrowlhFdp 20,10 .22 +8,4
Brandywlne Fds:
BlueFd 30.07 +.40 +23.0
Brandywine n 29.05 -.01 +23.1


12-mo. 12-mo.Na 12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn Name NAV chg % rtn Name NAV chg %rtn


Brinson FundsY:
HghYldY n 7 27 + 07
Buffalo Funds:
SmlCap 28.96 + 38
CGM Funds:
CapDev n 31.33 -.13
FocusFd n 34.03 -.56
Mutt n 27.41 -29
Really n 3310 -.40
CRM Funds:
MdCapVall 27.01 +.01
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncC t 30.26 +10
G0h&lncA5 p 3008 +11
GrowthAp 52,76 +.59
GrowthB t 54.42 +.60
GowthC 50.64 +56
Calvert Group:
Incop 17,11 -.01
ntlEqA p 18.54 +.26
MuBdCA8 10.35
Munint 10.90 -02
SocialA p 28.19 +.23
SocBd p 16.26 -.01
SocEqA p 35.74 .43
TxFLId n 10.58
TxFLng p 16.79 -.02
TxFVT0 15.91 -.03
Causeway Intl:
Insttulional 16.31 +.20
,Investor r 1622 +.19
CitiStreet Funds:
DIvBond 12.03 -.01
LgCoSlk 12.09 +.15
Clipper 89.42 +.51
Cohen & Steers:
InsIRty+n 49.28 -.19
RltyShrs n 75.81 -.29
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 26.96 +.08
FedSec 10.69 -02
TxExAp 13.79 -.04
Columbia Class B:
Acon t 26.08 +.07
Columbia Class C:
Acorn 1 26.06 +,07
Columbia Class Z:
AcoR Z 27.56 +.08
Acomlntl Z 30.18 +.53
AcoMUSA 26.80 -.03
InltmBdZ n 9.03 -.01
LgCapGrwth 21.36 +39
LargeCo n 28.47 +.37
MidCapGrZ 21.81 +.23
QltyPlusBd 10.81 -.03
SmCaZ 19.25 -.04
Smalo n 2245 +.02
Columbia Funds:
HiYId Zn 8.68 +.04
IntlStkZn 15.03 +.17
ReEsEqZ 28.18 -.01
CG Cap Mkt Fds:
IntlEq 10.64 +.13
LgGMw 12.61 +.24
LgValn + 11.45 +.11
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 31.86 +.15
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 30.44 +.14
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 32.26 +16
NYVen C 30.64 +.14
Delaware Invest A:
LgCapValA 18.81 +.20
TrendAp 21.22 +.31
TxUSA p 11.70 -.02
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.33 +.03
elGrB0t 21.15 +.27
Del-Pooled Tlrust:
EmgMkt 16.02 +.42
IntlEq 19.66 +.29
Dimensional Fds:
EmgMktVal 20.17 +.73
IntSmVan 16.20 +.18
TM USSm 22.03 +.13
USLgCo n 36.05 +.48
USLgVa n 21.15 +.15
USLgVa3n 16,29 +.12
US Micro 15.30 +.11
US Small n 20.08 +.10
USSmVal 27.86 +.16
InllSmCo n 14.83 +.17
EmgMkt n 17.58 +.56
Foxdn 10.15
IntVan 16.31 +.37
Glb5Fxlnc 10.56 -.03
LrgCaplntn 17.67 +.25
TM USSmV 24.55 +.12
TM IntValue 14,28 +.29
TMMktwdeV 14.53 +.11
TMUSEq 12.92 +.15
2YGIFxd n 9.87 -.01
DFARIEst n 25.23 -.13
DIversfrd Inv Fds:
CoreBond 12.54 -.02
EqGrowp 19.44 +.33
Va0&lnc 25.11 +.31
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced n 80.17 +.55
IncomeFd 12.76 +.01
Inll Stk 31.67 +.54
Stock 132.52 +1.34
Domini Soc Inv:
SoclelEq n 29.49 +.54
Dreyfus:
Aprec 39.92 +.39
BasicS&P 25.61 +.34
Discp 32.90 +.40
Dreyfus 10.33 +.14
DreyMidr 27.98 +.14
Drey501n t 35.99 +.47
EmgLead 45.50 -.15
FLIntr 13.33 -.03
GNMAtp 14.60 -.01
Grnc n 15.49 +.20
InsMun nt 18.04 -.04
Inoerm nr 13.48 -.02
MidcpVI r 33.91 +.57
MunBdr 11.96 -.02
NYTaxr 14.98 -.04
StrValA r 29.32 +.22
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 10.16 +.21
GrowhF np 10.65 +.21
Dreyfus Premier:
CalTxExBdZ 14.96 -.04
CorMEqAt 14.86 +.14
CoreVinvp 30.76 +.29
EmgMktA 20.90 +.67
UdHYIdA p 7.39 +.03
NwLdrs n 44.42 -.17
TaxMgdGCt 15.680 +.15
TechGroA 22.52 +.48
TechGrowR
Eaton Vance Adv:
FltgRale t 9.688 +.01
Eaton Vance Cl A:
TMG1.0 535.64 +5.65
ChlnaA p 14.74 +.24
FloatRate 10.22 +.02
GowthA 7.22 +.03
HthScIA p 10.66 +.28
IncBosA 6.43 +.03
LgCpVal 17.93 +.16
Na8Mun 11.34 +.02
SpcEqtA 4.70 -.02
TMG1.1 22.85 +.24
MunAdl 10.78 +.01
TradGvtA 8.69 -.03
Eaton Vance CI B:
FLMuntR 1 10.97
HthSBtt 11.27 +.29
NalMunBt 10.59 +.03
TMG1.11 21.62 +.22
Eaton Vance Cl C:
FloatRt 1 9.87 +.01
Go0tC p 7.48 -.03
NaIMCti 10.09 +.03
Enterprise Cl A:
GwthAnp 16.86 +.24
Evergreen A:
AstAIlAp 13.91 +.11
BalanA 8.60 +.06
AdjRateA 9.,32 ,
FdLgCpA 23.05 +.26
SpValuAp 29.48 +.10
Evergreen B:
AsCAllBt 13.73 +.10
DivrBdB 14.96
MuniBondBl 4 7.54 -.01
Evergreen C:
AdjRa6eC1 9.32 .
MAstApoC0 13.51 +.10
Evergreen I:
CoMreBl 10.64 -.03
AdjRatlel 9.32
InLEq9yl 9.14 +.13
LgCapEqlyl 15.46 +.22
PAMuBdl 11.49 -.02
ShtlnlBd1 6.06 -.01
SIMun8 l 10.02 -.01
SpecVal 29.64 +.11
S1Grol 26.71 +.21
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 24.16 -.37
HiYleld np 4.61 +.03
Valaslrn 44.45 +.23
FAM Funds:
Value n 40-31 +.11
FBR Funds:
SmallCap 44.18 +.13
FMI Funds:
Focus n 35,04 +.38
FPA Funds:
Capri 42.94 +.20
Newloc 10.95
FPACrs n 24.62 -.03
Falrholme 24.52 -.05
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.68 +.32
CapAppA 25.68 +.39
MidGrStA 32.15 +.15
HilncB1 Ax 7,96 +.01
KaufmA p 5.50 +.04
MktOppAp 13.08 -.07
MunBecA 10.82 -.02
USGvSecA 7.78 -.01
Federated B:
AmLdrB I 25.74 +.33
KaulmnB p 5.38 +.04
StrlncB 8.71 +.04
Federated C:


MkOppC 13.0 -.07
Federated InstI:
Kaufman 5.50 +.04
MidCap 22.40 +.11
StockTr 38,16 +.43
Fidelity Adv Foci T
HItCarT 22.10 +.10
NatResT 38.94 -.77
Fidelity Advisor A:
DInrllA r 19.08 +.30
EqGrA1 46.16 +.71
EqlncA p 28.68 +.40
M8CapA p 24,79 +.29
Fidelity Advisor B:
EqGrB n 43.64 +.65
MIdCB np 23,96 +.28
Fidelity Advisor I:
lvlntl n 19.31 +.30
DIvGrhl 12.02 +.22
EqGrI n 48.79 +.74
EqIlnl 29.36 +41
IntBdIn 11.05 -.02
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalncT M 1609 +.10
OMntIT p 18.93 +.30
DIvGrthTp 11.83 +.22
DynCapAppT p14.52 +.19


EqGrT p 46.29 +.70 +6.4
EqInT 29.01 +.40 +12.8
GovlnT 100B -.03 +4.3
GrOppT 31.11 +.44 +12.1
HilncAdvTp 9.97 +.08 +15.0
IntBdT 11.03 -.02 +3.8
MidCapTp 24.96 +.29 +15.5
MunilncT p 13.22 -.03 +7.1
OvrseaT 17.91 +.32 +16.6
STFiT 9.47 -.01 +2.1
SnlCapT p 2577 +.18 +23.3
StI0nT 11.67 +.01 +10.0
ValStraT 35.52 +31 +14.7
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000n 12.23 +.04 +6.2
FF2010n 13.84 +10 +9.6
FF2020n 1425 +.15 +12.6
FF2030n 14.41 .18 +13.8
FF2040n 846 +.11 +14.7
FF2015 11.26 +.10 +11.2
FF2020p 1155 +.13 +13.2
IncomeFd n 11.36 +.03 +5.5
Fidelity Invest:
AggD3rr 1.685 +.03 +11.1
AMgr 16.25 +.16 +7.9
AMgrGr n 14.97 +.21 +9.2
AMgrhn 12.80 +.03 +8.2
Balance 18.47 +.15 +15.5
BlueChipGr 42,24 +.66 +9.0
Canada n 3692 -.09 +33.1
CapAppn 26.34 +.40 +13.5
Caplnco nr 8.48 +.04 +14.4
ChinaRg n 18.27 +.51 +28.7
CongrSt n 39843 +5.15 +9.2
Contra n 6023 +.42 +17.9
CnvSec 21.48 +.07 +10.3
Desltnyl 13.12 +.19 +11.1
Destinyl 11.61 +.16 +9.1
DisEqn 26.83 +.32 +18.7
Diverin5n 2922 +.36 +16.7
DivGlhn 28.83 +.54 +10.0
EmrgMktn 14.41 +.45 +45.5
Equlnc n 52.64 +.69 +12.2
EQ1I 24.07 +.29 +13.9
EurCapAp n 22.46 +.35 +21.5
Europe n 36.25 +.81 +33.9
ExchFdn 272.20 +3.50 +12.4
Export n 20,67 +.29 +17.9
FdelFd 30.48 +.44 +10.7
Fifty nr 20.72 +.18 +11.4
FItRaleHi r 9.96 +.01 +4.2
FourlnOne n 25.73 +.26 +13.7
GNMAv n 11.04 -.02 +4.6
Govtlncn 10.24 -.03 +4.7
GroCon 58.38 +1.20 +18.3
GLoinc 38.29 +.45 +10.6
Grohlcll 9.52 +.09 +7.9
Highlnc m 8.92 +.05 +9.1
Indepndncen 18.11 +,16 +14.1
InProBnd 11.23 -.12 +5.6
ntBd n 10.41 -.02 +3.7
lntGoe 10.14 -.03 +2.7
IntlDIsc 28.83 +.37 +19.7
InIlSmCapm 25.16 +.31 +28.7
InvGB8n 7.46 -.02 +5.5
Japan n 12.23 -.09 +0.1
JpnSmCon 12.86 -.01 +5.1
LatAm n 24.30 +.42 +59.3
LeVCoStock 25.11 +.11 +30.9
LowPrS m 42.17 +.35 +22,4
Magellan n 105.860 +1.65 +11.3
MIdCap n 24.70 +.27 +18.6
MIgeSec n 11.21 -.01 +4.9
NewMkltnr 14.29 +.03 +19.0
NewMUll n 31.24 +.07 +9.8
OTC 35.85 +.82 +17.3
Orsea n 35.79 +.65 +17.1
PacBas n 20.24 +.16 +15.9
Puritan 19.03 +.16 +9.9
RalEst n 32.27 -.08 +35.5
STBF n 8.92 -.01 +2.5
SmCapInd 20984 -.03 +198
SmallCapSnr 17.95 +.12 +14.3
BE Asian 18.37 +.56 +40.6
StkScn 23.49 +.30 +13.5
Strallncn 10.57 +.02 +10.4
Trend n 54.92 +.65 +12.9
USBIn 11.06 -.02 +5.3
UItShlBdm 10.03 ... +2.1
Uelityn 14.43 +.10 +26.3
ValStral 37.12 +.32 +15.3
Value n 76.67 +.72 +22.5
Wddwde n 18.57 +.32 +15.1
Fidelity Selects:
Airm 35.09 +.42 +15,2
Au6ton 34.38 +.78 +11.9
Banking n 38.43 +.62 +12.3
Biolechn 59.35 +2.29 +6.6
Broker n 62.34 +.94 +40.4
Chem n 67.77 +.77 +25.5
Compn 35.96 +1.10 +163
ConIndn 25.28 +.43 +16.1
CstHoun 49.48 +1.08 +43.5
DfAeron 71.77 +.28 +24.7
DevComn 18.84 +.61 +14.5
Electr n 42.54 +1.64 +22.7
Energy n 41.08 -.73 +45.8
EngSvcn 52.18 -.93 +38.4
Eniron 14.92 -.01 +12.1
FinSv n 111.43 +1.55 +13.4
Foodn 51.80 +1.26 +11.5
Gold0 m 23.95 -.28 +5.0
Health n 140.27 +.67 +15.9
HomeFinIn 59.26 +.71 +4.2
IndMat n 38.02 +.38 +12.9
Insurn 65.25 +.59 +13.5
Leisrn 75.93 +1.18 +14.3
MedDe4 n 50.40 -.40 +50.9
MedEqSysn 24.51 ... +12.3
Multimedxn 45.39 +.48 +13.5
NalGasnd 34.09 -.81 +42.4
Papern 27.45 -.23 -12.6
Pharman 9.12 +.17 +7.7
Retailn 55.06 +.71 +23.,4
Sottwrn 51.60 +1.32 +16.5
Techan 61.89 +1.77 +16.5
Telecom n 37.24 +.73 +16.2
Trans n 40.72 +.58 +19.1
UMAGr n 43.14 +.25 +28.5
Wireess n 6.42 +.09 +32.6
Fidelity Spartan:
CA Mun6 n 12.60 -.02 +7.2
CTMunnr 11.64 -.04 +5.1
Equtlndxn 43.48 +.58 +12.9
Ex1Mkand 33.62 +.15 +21.6
5001ndxnr 64.80 +1.12 +12.9
FL Mum 11.71 -.02 +6.3
Govlnun 11.03 -.04 +4.8
IntmMuni n 10.09 -.02 +4.9
Intlndx 31.85 +.47 +16.7
InvGrBon 10.64 -.02 +5.7
MD Mu m 11.02 -.03 +5.7
MAMunin 12.16 -.03 +7.1
MI Muni n 12.05 -.03 +5.7
MNMunn 11.57 -.03 +5,5
Munilncin 13.10 -.02 +7.3
NJMunr 11.78 -.03 +7.1
NY Munn 13.06 -.03 +6.7
Oh Munn 11.96 -.03 +6.6
PAMunnr 10.98 -.02 +6.0
ShtlnltMu n 10.27 -.01 +Z2.2
TotMkand 34.04 +.39 +15.1
First Amer FdsY:
CoreBond 11.25 -.02 +4.9
Eqtylnohnp 13,89 +.14 +11.0
EqldxInp 22.98 +.30 +12.6
IntBond 10.04 -.02 +3.5
Inlln 11.57 +.17 +13.7
LgCpGrOp 28.75 +.37 +12.2
LgCapValnp 19.67 +.18 +17.0
MdCpGrOp 42.41 +.15 +24.8
First Eagle:
GlobalA 40.40 +.40 +17.2
OversaeasA 22.78 +.30 +19.6
First Investors A
BIChipAp 20.72 +.25 +11.2
GlobalApp 6,71 +.10 +13.2
GovtAp 10.96 -.01 +3.7
GrolncA p 13.76 +.13 +16.2
IncomeAp 3,10 +.02 +5.4
lnvGrdA p 9.88 -.03 +4.4
MATTFAp 12.08 -.03 +5.2
MITFAp 12.73 -.02 +4.8
MidCapAnp 27.51 +.13 +23.9
NJTFAp 13,06 -.02 +4.8
NYTFA p 14.53 -.04 +4.7
PATFAp 13.26 -.03 +4.5
SpSitAp 20.03 +.01 +18.4
TaxExptAp 10.19 -.03 +4.6
ToltReAp 14.03 +.08 +11.7
ValueB p 6.63 +.05 +15.0
Firsthand Funds:
GlobTech 3.85 +.12 +3.5
Tech Value n 29.53 +.62 +10.3
Frsnk/Temp Frnk A:
A6EAp 2.12 +.01 +11.0
AdJUS p .99 -.01 +2.3
ALTFAp 11,61 -.01 +6.5
AZTFAp 11.27 -.03 +68.9
Ballnv p 62.05 +.59 +23.6
CAHYBd p 10.38 -.01 +9.4
CallnsA p 12.80 -.01 +6.2
CAIntermAp 11.63 -.02 +5,2
CaITFrA p 7.38 +9.3
CapGrA 10.87 +.13 +5.6
COTFAp 12.11 ... +7.68
CTTFAp 11.16 -.01 +6.3
CvoSecAp 16.66 +.12 +14.4
DblTxFrA 12.06 -.02 +6.4
DynaTechA 24.69 +.50 +12.0
EqlncApx 20.87 +.14 +11.1
Fedlntermp 11.54 -.03 +5.1
FedTxFrAp 12.24 ... +6.1
RlexCapGrA 38.03 +.40 +13.0
FIRDATp 10.12 +.01 +3.6
FLTFAp 12.04 -.02 +7.6
FoundFAI p 12.50 +.06 +14.3
GA TFA p 12,20 -.02 +7.6
GoldPrM0 A 17.61 -.26 +5.6
GrowthAp 34.57 +.65 +13.2
HYTFAp 10.94 ... +10.3
IncoSerA p 2.53 +.02 +14.7
InTFA p 12.44 -.02 +7.1
NYInsmlTFp 11.04 -.03 +4.1
LATFAp 11.69 -.02 +6.7
LM.vSecA 10.05 -.02 +1.7
MDTFAp 11.58 -.01 +7.1
M8ssTFA p 12.08 -.02 +7.5
M80hTFA6 p 12,37 -.02 +6.7
MNInsA 12.22 -.02 +6.4
MOTFAp 12.41 -.01 +6.2
NJTFAp 12.25 -.02 +6.1
NYlnsAp 11.72 -.02 +7.0
NYTFAp 11.98 -.01 +7.3
NCTFAp 12.40 -.02 +7.4


Ohlo1TFAp 12.68 -.02 +7.5
ORTFAp 11.97 -.02 +7.8
PATFAp 10.52 -.01 +7.2
ReESecAp 28.65 -.13 +33.6
RIaDivAp 32.11 +,40 +7.0
SmCpGr2A p 12.16 +,10 +15.8
SMCpGrA 35.45 +.20 +18.8
Strallnc p 10.28 +,04 +8.4
USGovA p 6,57 -.01 +4.4
UlltlesaAp 12.17 -.01 +30.5
VA TFAp 11,98 -.01 +7.9
Frank/rmp Fmnk Adv:
IncomeAdv 2.52 +.02 +15,0
Frank/Temp Frnk B:
IncomeBlp 2.53 +.02 +14.2
IncomeBI 2.52 +.02 +13.8
Frank/Temp Fmnk C:
FoundFAl p 12.41 +.09 +13.6
IncomeC t 2.54 +.02 +14.1
Frsnk/Temp Mtl A&B:
BeaconA 16.28 -.03 +14.9
DlscovA 25,23 +.08 +20.8
QuallfledA 20.00 ... +18.0
SharesA 23.66 +.01 +14.2
Frankrremp Mti C:
DscC t 25.05 +.08 +20.0


SharesC t 23.40
FranklTemp Temp A:
DevMklA p 19.94 +.56
ForeignA p 12.41 + 21
GIBondApx 10.37 +.02
GISmCoA p 959 +.11
GrowlhAp 2321 +.30
lInlxEM p 14.94 +.27
WorldA6p 18.43 +37
Frankrfemp Tmp Adv:
FrgnAv 1240 .22
GrthAv 23.24 +.29
FrankfTempTmp B&C:
DevMkC 19 54 +.54
ForgnC p 12.23 +22
GrwIhC p 22.67 +.28
GE Elfun S&S:
Sl&SIncomen 11.45 -.02
S&SPMn 46.00 +.42
TaxEx 11.93 -.03
Trusts n 55.06 +.59
GMOTrust II:
Foreign 14.45 +.20
GMOTrust III:
CurHIntBd 9.65 -.03
CorePIsBd 10.48 +.01
EmgMk 18.28 +61
ECD 11.46 +.03
Foreign 14.50 +.20
intlGrwth 26.49 +.25
InFllntrVal 28.38 +.32
IntlSmCo 16.20 +.20
USQItyEqty 20.35 +.30
US Core 14.57 +.20
GMO Trust IV:
EmgCnDtl 11.46 +.02
EmerMkI 18,25 +.62
Foreign 14.51 +.20
InllntrVal 28637 +.32
US Core 14.55 +.20
USQualEq 20.36 +.30
GMO Trust VI:
EmgMkVI r 18.26 +.62
USCoreVI 14.55 +.20
Gabelll Funds:
Assel 42.82 +.24
Growth 27.05 +.37
Value I 19.78 +10
Gartmore Fds D:
Bond 9.72 -.02
GvtBdD 10.31 -.03
GrowthD 6.97 +.10
NationwD 20.88 +.22
TxFre r 10.66 -.02
Gartmore Fds Instl:
Intldxin 8.22 +.12
NwBdIdxl n 10.99 -.03
S&P5001nslt n 10.59 +.14
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 25.09 +,07
Glenmede Funds:
IntI 18.48 +.18
Goldman Sachs A:
CapGrA 19.98 +.23
GrncA 25.58 +.17
22.04 +.23
,,n 8.04 +.06
HYMunlA8 p 11.27 +.01
MkiCapVA p 36.36 +.14
SmaCapA 43.16 +.11
Goldman Sachs Inst:
CoreFxc 10.11 -.02
HYMun 11.28 +.02
MkICapVal 36.63 +.14
Guardian Funds:
GBG IntGrA 13.38 +.17
ParkAvA 31.24 +.47
Stock 28.32 +,42
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.86 -.01
CapApplnstn 29.97 +.53
Intlnr 43.69 +.72
SCpVilnsI 20.38 +.10
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsAp 15.33 +.13
CapAppA p 35.02 +.42
DvGthA p 19.05 +.12
MIdCapAp 26.33 +.11
SmlCoA p 18.03 +.15
StockA p 18.22 +.25
Hartford Fds B:
CapAppBpn 32.58 +,38
Hartford Fds C:
CapAppCt 32.67 +.38
Hartford HLS IA:
Bond 11.75 -.01
CapApp 53.16 +.64
Div&Grwth 20.82 +.14
GIblLdrs 17.52 +.31
Grwth&lnc 12.48 +.13
GrwthOpp 29.10 +.38
Advisers 23.39 +.21
Stock 46.83 +.62
Index 31.69 +.42
InSOpp 12.08 +.19
M8iCap 30.37 +.13
SmalCo 17.63 +.13
Hartford HLS IB:
Advisors p 23.52 +.21
Bondp 11.67 -.01
CapApprec p 52.88 +.63
Div&Gro p 20.73 +.13
Heartland Fds:
Value 48.64 +.61
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrow 19.48 +.15
HollBalFd 15.38 +.04
Hotchkls & Wiley:
LgCpValx 23.94 +.06
LgGapValA px 23.88 +.08
MdCpValAp 29.58 +.29
MidCpVal 29.72 +.29
HussmnStrGr 15.90
ICAP Funds:
Equity 46.17 +.64
ICM SmlCo 38.29 +.14
ING Funds Cl A:
IntValAp 17.19 +.42
ING Partners:
TRPGrEql n 50.55 +.61
INGT,M,Q&I:
IntVall 17.22 +,42
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.52
Ivy Funds:
GINatRsA p 22.82 -.10
JPMorgan A Class:
Inv Bal p 12.19 +.06
InvGr&inAp 13.22 +.10
MdCpVal p 23.69 +.12
JPMorgan B Class:
InvG&Il p 13.16 +.09
JPMorgan C Class:
MdCpValu pn 23.25 +.12
JP Morgan Instl:
MidCapValn 24.02 +.12
JPMorgan Select:
IntlEq 29.67 +.48
MdCpValu
TxAwreEq 17.15 +.18
USEqulty 11.04 +.13
JPMorgan Sel Cis:
CoreBond 10.82 -.01
CorePlusBdn 7.90 -.01
DivMdCpGr 25.48 +.16
DIvMdCpVI 19.54 +.05
Eqlndx 27.96 +.37
GovBond 10.37 -.03
HIYIdBond 8,40 +.07
InlBondIn 10.57 -.02
IntmdTFBd 10.83 -.01
InOlEql 20.02 +.30
IntrdAmer 23.57 +.24
LgCapVal 16,07 +.10
LgCapGr 15.19 +.24
MItCpMkNeur 11.07 +.03
SmCpCore 45.20 +.26
TaxFrBondn 12.96 -.03
UltrSTBd 9.84
JP Morgan Ultra:
MtgBacked 10.61 -.01
Janus:
Balanced n 21.72 +.16
Contrarian 13,75 +.11
CoreEq 21,57 +.25
Enterpr n 39.21 +.48
FedTxExn 7.07 -.02
FIxBond 9.61 -.02
Fund n 24.67 +.28
GILefeScinr 19.20 +.18
GITech nr 10.89 +.34
Grthlnon 33./7 +.34
Mercury n 21.60 +.30
MIdCapVal 23.26 +.09
Olympus n 30.01 +.42
Odon n 7.53 +,16
Overseas nr 25.48 +.50
ShTmBd 2.89
SCVInst 31.46 -.12
SCVInv 31.26 -.12
Twenty 45.72 +.32
Ventur n 59.05 +,02
W7dW nr 40.77 +.56
Janus Adv I Shrs:
Forty 27.04 +.05
Janus Aspen Instl:
Balanced 24.82 +.18
LgCpGw. h 20.13 .23
2Wo8dwGrn 26.14 .33
JennisonDryden A:
BlendA 15.99 +.11
GovlncA 9.06 -.02
GrowthA 14.87 .27
HiYdA4p 5.78 +.03
InsuredA 11.01 -.02
UtilityA 13.59 -.02
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 13.71 +.24
iYl1dB nt 5.77 +.03
InsuredB 11.03 -.02
JennlsonDryden Z&I:
GrowhZ 1526 +.27
Stkldxl n 27.56 +,37
StkldxZ 27.54 +.37
Jensen 23.89 +.24
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.21 -.03
ClasskcVal p 23.95 +.18
RgBkA 42.61 +.82
SvlnvA p 19.54 +.29
SlIrlncA p 7.00 -.01
USGIbLdrsn 27.86 +.61
John Hancock B:


S0rlncB 7.00 -.01
Julius Baer Funds:
InSEql r 32.68 +.45
InllEqA 32.08 +.44
LSV ValEq n 16.00 +.14
Laudus Funds:
USSmCp n 14.19
Lazard Instl:
EmgMkll 15.84 +.43
InllEqlnstl 12.79 +.21
Legg Mason: Fd
OpportTr 15.88 +.31
Splnv np 48.6,64 +.38
ValTr p 65,38 +.99
Legg Mason InstI:
BFM SmCp 11.63 +02
VaslTrFl p 70.66 +1.08
ValTrlnst 71.65 +1.10
LeulholdCI n 18.51 +.12
Longleef Partners:
Patner 31.54 +,38
Inltl n 18.03 +.23
8mCap 31.65 +.12
Loomise Sayles:
LSBondl 13.71 +.06
SIrlncA 14.08 +.07


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for
last day of the week.
Chg: Weekly net change In the NAV.
12 mo % rtn: The percent gain or loss for one share, Including
reinvestment of dividends, over 12 months.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: a Ex-capital gains distribution. f -
Previous day's quote. n No- ..3s'ij i,la Fu.'.o a, ie uiue i i.
pay distribution costs,. r Redemption fee or contingent
,al+rr-,3 a8le7 Ioa ma, a Iply 5 l,:i. ,h rld r,.d ,or plil I -
B.-.rr,Iran i E .ia .h di..a-3'l NA J .? rir.i orm.ii,.3 3.
atle NE Dal .l. ric.iin NN Fun',1 : vr. uic. .r, Ic. tL
ir.:w'..,3 NS Fur.ad ., l a r, I -, Sl rl di3tin -
Source. Lipper. Inc and The Associailed Press


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
Lord Abbett A:
AfflialdA p 14.53 +.14 +11.1
AIllValueA 12.06 +11 +13.8
Balancer 11.44 +.09 +9.2
BondDebAp 7.96 +.06 +7.7
GIIlncAp 7.17 -.01 +4.1
GvlSecA p 2.62 -.01 +5.4
MidCapA p 23.11 +.10 +20.9
RsSmCpA 28.95 +21 +19.7
RsAmVal p 12.43 +.06 +15.6
Lord Abbett B:
AfflldBp 14.56 +.13 +10.4
BdDbBp 7.97 +.06 +6.9
MidCapV0 p 22.35 +.10 +20.1
Lord Abbett C:
AffldC p 14.54 +.14 +10.4
BdDbC p 7.97 +.06 +7.0
MdCapVIC p 22.29 +.10 +20.1
Lord Abbett Y:
A0Y 14.56 +.14 +11.5
MFS Funds A:
MITAp 17.72 +.21 +14.9
MIGAp 12.52 +.21 +12.8
BondAp 12.95 ... +6.1
CapOpp 13.47 +.24 +13.9
EmGrAp 32.46 +.46 +14.5
GvScA p 9.66 -.02 +4.5
GrOpAp 8.93 +.12 +12.2
HIncA6p 3.92 +.03 +9.2
In1NwDA p 22.02 +.21 +21.2
MCapAp 8.85 +.12 +10.5
MuBdA 10.75 -.02 +5.9
MuH8 A 8.45 -01 +10.0
MuFLAp 10.23 -.01 +7.2
RschAp 21.13 +.36 +19.2
ResrchlntlAp 15.74 +.27 +16.0
SIrValAp 16.30 +.27 +15.2
ToRA p 16.15 +.09 +12.2
UtllAp 11.96 +.04 +34.1
ValueA p 23.81 +.24 +17.3
MFS Funds B:
MAITB 17.30 +.21 +14.1
EmGrBt 30,02 +.43 +13.7
MIGB 11.47 +.19 +12.1
GvScBt 9.64 -.03 +3.8
HIInB t 3.93 +.03 +6.2
MuinBI1 8.68 -.01 +6.2
TotRB1 16.15 +.10 +11.5
ValueB 23.68 +.23 +16.5
MFS Funds C:
TotRtCt 16.21 +.10 +11.5
ValueC p 23.66 +.23 +16.5
MFS Funds I:
ReinTI 16.08 +.28 +16.5
Valuel 23.89 +.23 +17.6
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEqty 15.84 +.23 +15.3
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBdA 6.37 +.04 +10.4
MainStay Funds B:
CpAppB t 27.95 +,37 +11.0
ConvB t 13.08 +.01 +7.6
GovtB t 8,33 -.02 +3.3
HIYdBB t 6.34 +.03 +9.5
IntlEqB 12.73 +.15 +14.4
SmCpGrB p 14.91 +.01 +17.6
TotRtB t 19.18 +.12 +10.6
MainStay Funds I:
S&P5001dx 28.51 +.38 NA
Mairs & Power:
Growth 71.18 +.76 +11.3
Managers Funds:
FremonlBdn 10.51 -.03 +6.5
SpolEq 91.70 +.66 +15.8
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 16.97 +.34 +18.3
Growp 18.08 +.32 +18.0
MassMutual Inst:
CoreBdS 11.14 -.01 +5.1
Master Select:
Equity 15.12 +.23 +10.9
Intll 17.64 +.06 +22.4
Matthews Asian:
AslanG&I 16.64 +.20 +25.9
PacTiger 16.97 +.60 +37.2
Mellon Funds:
BondFund 12.63 -.02 +4.2
EmgMkts 21.95 +.72 +36.2
InlFund 15.56 +.22 +12.4
LrgCapStk 9.85 +.11 +13.2
MidCapStk 14.49 +.07 +24.0
SmlCapStk 17.28 -.07 +15.5
MergerFdn 15.60 +.06 +4.4
Meridian Funds:
Growth 36.65 +.21 +9.9
Value 38.99 +.32 +14.1
Merrill Lynch A:
BalCapA p 26.97 +.17 +6.4
BasValAp 31.94 +.41 +10.5
FdGrA p 17.61 +.15 +9.4
GIbAIA p 16,84 +.11 +13.6
HealtlhAp 6.68 +.03 +16.9
NJMuniBd 10.75 ... +9,7
S&P500 p 15.12 +.20 +12.4
USGovtA 10.23 -.03 +4.0
Merrill Lynch B:
BalaCapB+ t 26.17 +.16 +7.5
BasVIBt 31.27 +.40 +9.6
BdHilnc 5.11 +.06 +7.1
CalnsMB 11.71 -.01 +5.4
CoreBdPtfBI 11.77 -.03 +4.4
CplTBt 11.95 -.03 +4.6
EquityDiv 15.13 +.09 +17,9
EuroBt 14.88 +.22 +20.2
FocusValue t 12.74 +.20 +13.2
FundlGrBt 16.10 +.13 +6.5
FLMBt 10.51 ... +8.1
GIAIB1 16.46 +.09 +12.7
HealthB I 5.04 +.02 +15.8
LatAmB I 26.79 +.41 +61.6
MnlnsB t 7.96 -.01 +6,4
ShtTrmUSGvt 19.18 ... +1.5
MunShtTm 9.99 .. +0.9
MulntmTrB t 10.56 -.04 +3.8
MNatIBt1 10.62 -.01 +6.9
NJMB1t 10.75 +.01 +9.4
NYMnBt 11.16 -.01 +6.8
NatResTrBt 40.23 -.67 +44.9
PacBI 18.93 +.22 +11.3
PAMBI 11.44 ... +7.2
ValueOppt 25.21 +.09 +14.6
USGovt 10.23 -.03 +3.5
UtTcm t 11.74 +.01 +32.2
WldlncBIt 6.19 +.01 +10.7
Merrill Lynch C:
BasVICI 30.52 +.39 +9.6
FdGrC t 16.19 +.13 +6.5
GlobAIC I 16.01 +.09 +12.7
Merrill Lynch I:
IntlVal 26.73 +.33 +17.6
BalaCapl 27.07 +.17 +6.7
BasVall 32.11 +.42 +10.8
BdHIInc 5.10 +.05 +7.7
CalnsMB 11.70 -.02 +6.0
CoreBdPtIt 11.77 -.03 +5.2
CplTI 11,95 -.02 +5,1
DevCapI p 18.30 +,47 +38.1
EquityDiv 15.12 +.09 +19.0
Eurol t 17.36 +.26 +21.5
FocusValuel 14,00 +.22 +14.4
FundlGrl 18,01 +.15 +9.8
FLMI 10.51 ... +8.6
GIAIIl 16.90 +.10 +13.9
Health 7.24 +.03 +17.3
LatAml 28,15 +.44 +63.3
Mnlnsl 7.96 -.02 +7.0
MunShortTm 9.98 -.01 +1.1
MulntTrl 10,57 -.03 +4.2
MNatII 10.63 -.01 +7,8
NatResTr t 42.55 -.70 +46.4
Pad 20.67 +.24 +12.5
S&P500 15.17 +.20 +12.8


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
Valueopply 28.08 +.10 +15.8
USGovt 10.24 -.02 +4.4
UtT1cmIl t 11.79 +.02 +33.4
WIdlncI 6.19 +.01 +11.3
Metro West Fds:
TolalRelBondl 9.75 ... +6.6
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdn 1.94 -.04 +2.6
Monetta Funds:
Mone0a n 11.37 +.13 +20.7
MontagGr 1 23.35 +.33 +6.1
Morgan Stanley A:
AmOppA 25.03 +.38 +13.8
DIvGthA 35.60 .48 +10.6
GlobDIA 13.83 +.15 +12.0
US GtA 9.17 -.02 +5.4
Morgan Stanley B:
AmOppB 23.55 +.36 +12.9
DivGthB 35.73 +.49 +10.7
EqWeighB 38.37 +.49 +17.2
GIbDtlB 13.97 +.18 +11.6
GrowthB 12.51 +.19 +12.8
SP500B 12.89 +.16 +11.4
StratB 18.25 +.22 +12.4
US GvtB 9.18 -.02 +5.3
Morgan Stanley D:
TaxExD 11.82 -.03 +6,4
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMkI n 20.96 +,54 +41.1
CrPIFInsI n 11.65 ... +6.5
GIValEqAn 17.74 +.23 +11.9
InlSmnCpA n 25.40 +.33 +20.3
IntlEq n 20.94 +.23 +14.9
In.lEqBnp 20.78 +.23 +14.7
LIdDurP n 10.36 .. +1,8
MCGrAdv p 21.78 +.19 +24.1
SmCGrBnp 12.98 -.01 +24.3
USReal n 24,98 -.10 +39.3
ValuAdv n 18.02 +.22 +15.9
Muhlenkmps n 84.59 +.82 +29.3
Under Funds A:
InlarnelA 18.37 +.30 +12.4
Mutual Series:
BeaconZ 16.37 -.03 +15.2
DiscZ 25.47 +.09 +21.2
Qual0dZ 20.12 ... +18.4
SharesZ 23.81 +.01 +14.7
Nations Funds Inv A:
FocusEqAl 18.85 +.37 +18.0
ntlValueA r 21.55 +.54 +15.2
MarsGroAl 18.06 +.35 +18.5
Nations Funds Inv B:
FocEqtyB1 17.88 +.35 +17.1
MarsGrwB 17.11 +.33 +17.6
Nations Funds Pri A:
BondFdPrA 9.89 -.01 +5.6
ConSecPrIA 17.19 +.11 +8.1
FocusEqAl 19.12 +.37 +18.2
IntMPA7n 10.16 -.03 +4.3
IntEqPAn 13.51 +.15 +15,7
InllValPrAn 21.66 +.55 +15.5
LgCapldxPrA 23.85 +.32 +12.9
MarsGrPrA 18.30 +.35 +18.8
Marln0ppr 11.13 +.11 +12.5
MldCpldxPrAnll.63 +.06 +21.6
STInPA 9.83 -.01 +1.9
STMuPA 10.22 ... +1.8
SmiCapldxPrA n20.59 +.01 +22.3
SlraGroPrA 12.58 +.17 +12.0
ValuePA 13.43 +.09 +18,2
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus n 39.16 +.80 +22.3
Genesis n 32.77 -.15 +21.9
Genealnstl 44.91 -.20 +22.1
Guardnn 16.94 +.16 +17.2
HighlncoBd 9.33 +.04 +6.6
Inllr 19.33 +.13 +25.8
Partner n 29.05 +.19 +3050
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis n 46.84 -.22 +21.8
Nicholas Applegate:
ErngGrl 10.56 +.02 +17.6
Nicholas Group:
Nichopln 61.99 -.10 +158
NIchIndc 2.20 +.02 +7.1
Northeast Investors:
Trust 7.67 +.04 +8.4
Northern Funds:
1RxInn 10.08 -.01 +5.1
HiYFxlnc n 8.19 +.05 +8.1
InlGrEq n 10.21 +.12 +11.9
LrgCapVal 13.69 +.11 +9.7
Sm[Capldxn 10.51 +.02 +18.9
Technly n 11.48 +.29 +9.3
Nuveen Cl A:
HYIdMuBd px 22.10 -.04 +12.9
Nuveen CI R:
InMun R, x 11.02 -.05 +6.3
IntmDurMuBdx 9.11 -.04 +6.1
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOakSIGrn32.32 +.52 +3,3
Oakmark Funds I:
EqtyInc r 24.26 +.01 +9.4
Globallr 22.43 +.26 +16.6
Intll r 21.98 +.38 +19.4
IntlSmCpr 21.02 +.37 +23.7
Oakmark1 r 41.92 +.46 +10.0
Select r 34.11 +.36 +11.9
Old Westbury Fds:
Intln 10.36 +.21 +11.5
MidCapEq p 16.63 +.16 +13.5
Olstein Funds:
FnclAlertC 18.20 +.21 +10.7
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFrMuA 10.18 ,,, +13.3
AMTFrNY 12.98 -.01 +12.5
CAMunlAp 11.54 +.01 +18.8
CapAppAp 41.50 +.60 +8.6
CaplncA p 12.57 +.10 +13.7
ChlncAp 9.52 +.05 +7,9
DevMktAp 29.78 +.71 +48.5
DiscFdp 43.41 +.17 +9.1
Equity A 11.33 +.15 +17.4
GlobalAp 62.21 +.86 +22,6
GIb10ppA 33.52 +.47 +28.9
Goldp 17.86 -.33 +10.5
GrowthAp 28.59 +.55 +12.1
HIghYIdA p 9.53 +.07 +8.0
IntlBdAp 5.91 +.02 +15.1
LTGovA1 p 10.05 -.02 +2.0
LtdTrmMu 15.89 +.02 +12.4
MnStFdA 36.31 +.43 +12.3
MalnStrOpA p13.49 +.13 +15.1
MnStSCpA p 20.88 +.05 +22.6
MidCapA 17.33 +.15 +19.0
PAMunilAp 12.85 +.01 +15.7
RealAstA p 8.20 -.09 +22.4
S&MdCpVIA 33.26 +.03 +29.9
StrlncAp 4.30 ... +10.2
USGvtp 9,71 -.02 +5.6
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFrMuB 10.15 +.01 +12.4
AMT-FrNY 12.98 -.01 +11.6
CapAppB p 38.17 +.54 +7.6
CapincB 1 12.45 +.10 +12.7
ChincB t 9.51 +.05 +7.1
Equity B 10.93 +.15 +16.3
GloblBt 58.13 +.79 +21.6
GIbOppB 32.17 +.44 +27.9
HIYIdBt 9.38 +.06 +7.2
MnStFdB 35.15 +.42 +11.4
StrincB t 4.32 +.01 +9.4
Oppenheimer C&M:
GlobalCp 59.07 +.81 +21.7
MnStFdC 35.14 +.42 +11.5
StrlncCt 4.30 +.01 +9.4
Oppenheim Quest:
QBalA 18.50 +.15 +9.9
QBalanC 18.22 +.15 +9.1
QBalanB 18.20 +.14 +9.0
Q0pptyA 33.04 +.16 +11.1


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
Oppenheimer Roch:
LIdNYA p 3,38 +8.6
LtdNYC t 3.37 ... +78
RoNtMuC I 12.66 +806 +21.6
RoMuAp 1838 +02 +13.5
RoMuB 18.36 +.01 +12.5
RcNIIMuA 12.68 +06 +22.5
OppenheimerY:
CapApprecY 4255 5 .61 +8.9
PBHG Funds:
CliprFocus 17.33 +.15 +9.7
BlGrowh n 21.23 +.37 +8.2
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
RelRetAdp 11.28 -.12 +6.0
ShTmrAd p 10.02 .. +2.1
TolRetAd n 10.72 -.03 +5.9
PIMCO InstI PIMS:
AlIAsset 13.00 -.01 +12.9
CommodRR 15.94 -.02 +15.4
Diverlnco 11,15 +.02 +12.3
EmMklsBd 11,14 +03 +19.9
FrgnBd n 10.72 -.04 +8,8
GlobalBd n 9.82 -.01 +5.7
HiYIdn 9.91 +.06 +11.5
LowDurn 10.12 -.01 +2.2
ModDurn 10.27 -.02 +4.0
RealRIeansll 1128 -.12 +6.3
ShortT 10.02 ... +2.3
TotRtB n 10.72 -.03 +6.2
TR IIn 10.16 -.03 +4.8
TRIII n 9.47 -.02 +6.1
PIMCO Funds A:
AllAsset p 12.95 -.01 +12.2
CommodRR p 15.86 -.02 +14.9
HiYIdA 9.91 +.06 +11.0
LowDuTA 10.12 -.01 +1.7
RealRetA p 11,28 -.12 +5.8
TotRtA 10,72 -.03 +5.7
PIMCO Funds B:
RealRIBI 11.28 -.12 +5.0
ToIRtIB1 10.72 -.03 +4.9
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAssetIC I 12.87 -02 +11.3
CommRRp 15.75 -.02 +14.0
HiYIdC 9.91 +.06 +10.2
LwDurC nt 10.12 -.01 +1.2
RealRetCp 11,28 -.12 +5.3
TotR1Ct 10.72 -.03 +4.9
PIMCO Funds D:
CommodRR p 15.87 -.02 +14,9
RealRtnp 11.28 -.12 +5.8
TollRtn p 10.72 -.03 +5.8
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 25.12 +.24 +10.9
Pax World:
Balanced 23.59 +.07 +13.1
PennMutC p 10.24 -.02 +19.1
Phoenix Funds:
BalanA 14.91 +.08 +8.0
PhoenlxFunds A:
CapGrhA 15.05 +.31 +6,4
InllA 10.25 +.15 +18.9
Pioneer Funds A:
BalancA p 9.75 +.08 +5.2
BondA p 9.34 -.01 +6.4
EqlncAp 29.78 +.18 +18.9
EuroSealEqA 30.45 +.62 +20.9
GrowlhAp 12.40 +.31 +15.0
HighYIdA p 11.38 +.08 +7.4
IntlValA 17.20 +.29 +15.4
MdCpGrA 15.46 +.30 +13.9
MdCpVaA p 26.52 +.25 +21.2
PlonFdA p 42.84 +.66 +15.2
TaxFreeA p 11.85 +.01 +9.8
ValuaAp 18.17 +.11 +13.5
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYialdB1 11.41 +.09 +6.5
MidCapValB 23.71 +.22 +20.1
Pioneer Funds C:
HIYIdC I 11.51 +.09 +6.5
Price Funds Adv:
BIChip p 31.47 +.40 +11.6
EqtyInc p 26.75 +.28 +14.8
Growth pn 27.06 +.32 +13.3
HIYId p 7.03 +.05 +9.4
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.70 +.14 +12.0
BlueChipG n 31.47 +.40 +11.7
CalTxn 11.10 -.02 +6.,5
CapAprn 20.11 +.11 +14.3
DiGro n 23.10 +.22 +12.8
EmMktS n 21.91 +.67 +45.6
Eqlnc n 26,80 +.27 +15.1
Eqldx n 33.03 +.43 +12.7
Europe n 20.06 +.38 +17.4
FLIntmn 10,93 -.02 +3.5
GNM.n 9.57 -.02 +4.3
Growth n 27.25 +.33 +13.5
Gwthinn 22.18 +.29 +12.1
HIthScin 23.60 +.32 +10.4
HiYkin 7.04 +.05 +9.6
ForEqn 15.45 +.22 +14.9
IntBd n 9.65 +.02 +4.3
IntSDisn 34.06 +.48 +19.9
Int Gr&lnc 12.81 +.19 +21,6
IntStkn 12.90 +.18 +14.3
Japan n 8.44 -.01 +2.7
LatAm n 19.07 +.17 +64.1
MdShtn 5.16 +1.5
MdTxFr n 10.79 -.02 +5.8
MedjaTI n 29.90 +.17 +24.6
MidCapn 52.41 +.31 +20.1
MCapVal n 23.70 +.15 +18.2
NewAm n 33,71 +.51 +11.1
NAsian 11.13 +.34 +41.1
NewEra n 38.02 -.39 +32.4
NwHrznn 31.33 +.35 +22.6
Newinco n 9.10 -.02 +6.0
NYTxF n 11.45 -.02 +6.2
PSBal n 18.46 +.14 +12.9
PSGrow n 22.52 +.23 +15.3
PSInco n 14.97 +.08 +10.3
RealEst n 19.26 -.09 +35.4
R2010 n 14.33 +.11 +12.1
Retire2020 n 15.22 +.13 +13.7
R2030n 15.85 +.15 +15.1
SciTchn 19.57 +.49 +15.3
ST Bd n 4.71 -.01 +2.0
SmCapStk n 32.41 +.07 +17.5
SmCapVal n 37.12 +,02 +21.2
SpecGr 17.41 +.21 +17.2
SpecInn 11.93 +.03 +7.8
TxFreen 10.09 -.02 +6.6
TxFrHYn 11.99 ... +9.2
TFInrtmn 11.23 -.03 +3.9
TxFrSIn 5.38 -.01 +2.1
US Int 5.40 -.03 +2.5
US Long 12.17 -.06 +10.6
VA TF n 11.77 -.03 +6.2
Value n 23.54 +.21 +15.1
Principal Inv:
PtrLV In 13.83 +.15 +15.5
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvA px 9.03 -.04 +3.6
AABalA p 10.91 +.08 +12.0
AZTE 9.36 -.01 +6.2
CATxAp 8.47 -.01 +6.4
ClassicEqA p 13.13 +.16 +13.3
Convert p 17.11 +.14 +7.0
DiscGr 17.72 +.21 +13.7
DvrinA px 10.23 -.01 +9.0
EqInAp 17.90 +.21 +15.5
EuroEq A 21.21 +.39 +20.7
FLTxA 9.33 -.01 +6.3
GeoAp 18.36 +.12 +10.6
GIGvA p 12.54 +.01 +5.0
GIbEqty p 8.69 +.13 +17.6
GrInAp 19.84 +.25 +13.1
HlthA p 63.04 +.55 +17.3
HiYdA px 8.07 +.02 +10.0
HYAdApx 6,08 +.01 +10.3
IncmA px 6.85 -.03 +5.2
IntlEq p 23,76 +.39 +17.7
InlGrinrp 11.93 +.24 +18.1
InvAp 13.17 +.20 +17.8
MITx p 9.09 -.02 +5,6
MNTxp 9.06 -.02 +5.3
NJTxAp 9.31 -.02 +6.5
NwOpAp 43.13 +.65 +17.2
NwValA p 18.44 +.19 +15.7
NYTxA p 8.85 -.01 +6.2
OTCA p 7.56 +.07 +15.1
PATE 9.20 -.02 +6.5
TxExAp 8.90 -.01 +6.7
TFInAp 15.12 -.04 +5.8
TFHYA 13.02 ... +9.5
USGvApx 13.20 -.05 +4.0
UtilAp 10.97 +.05 +26.9
VstaAp 9.84 +13 +20.4
VoyAp 16.98 .28 +10.7
Putnam Funds B:
CapApr t 18.61 +,24 +19.8
ClassicEqBI 13.02 .15 +12,4
DiscGrwth 16.37 .18 +12.7
DvrnB9tx 10.15 -,01 +8.1
Eqlnct 17.76 +,20 +14.6


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg


CORN (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 249.00 258.00 248.00 257.00 +7.00
Dec 05 260.00 269.0 259.00 259.00 268.00 +6.00
Mar 06 264.00 272.00 264.00 272.00 +4.00
May06 271.00 273.00 266.00 272.00 +2.00
Jul06 270.00 275.00 267.00 274.00 +2.00
Sep06 260.00 265.00 260.00 264.00 +2.00
Dec06 260.00 262.00 258.00 262.00 +1.00
Est. sales 161,965. Thuas sales 176,767
Thul7, a open int. 704,592, +12,966
OATS (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 176.00 182.00 176.00 182.00 +4.00
Dec05 181.00 185.00 181.00 184.00 +3.00
Mar06 189.00 189.00 188.00 188.00 +4.00
May06 188.00 188.00 188.00 188.00 +6.00
Dec06 188.00 188.00 188.00 188.00 +6.00
Mar07 188.00 188.00 188.00 188.00 +6.00
May07 188.00 188.00 188.00 188.00 +6.00
Est. sales 1,709. Thu i's sales 2,271
Thusa's open Int. 7,942, +139
WINTER WHEAT (KCBT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Sep05 350.00 353.00 347.00 350.00 +2.00
Dec05 363.00 364.00 359.00 363.00 +2,00
Mar06 371.00 372.00 369.00 372.00 +3.00
May06 375.00 376.00 375.00 376.00 +5.00
Jul06 370.00 375.00 370.00 373.00 +3.00
Sep 06 376.00 376.00 376.00 376.00
Dec06 380,00 380.00 380,00 380.00
Est. sales 12,159. Thuvesa sales 14,820
Thul'ass open Int. 79,866, +532
COTTON 2 (NYBT)
50,000 IDbs.- cents per lb.
Oct 05 50.15 50.50 49.45 49.54 -.66
Dec05 51.84 52.10 51.05 51.45 -.39
Mar 06 53.90 54.00 53.40 53.57 -.43
May 06 54.80 54.80 54.45 54.45 -.35
Jul06 55.35 55.35 55.35 55.35 -.35
Oct 06 56.40 56.40 56.40 56.40 -.25
Dec 06 57.50 57.50 57.50 57.50 -.25
Est. sales 5,913. Thuse.s sales 10,524
Thu'/,es open int. 90,680, +538
COCOA (NYBT)
10 metric tons-$ per ton
Sep05 1408 1417 1401 1405 -4
Dec05 1442 1450 1432 1436 -6
Mar06 1474 1475 1464 1466 -6


May06 1486 1486 1486 1486 -6
Jul06 1507 1507 1507 1507 -6
Sep06 1530 1530 1525 1525 -6
Dec 06 1543 1546 1543 1546 -4
Est. sales 6,472, Thus'ms sales 6,184
Thuses open int. 127,339, +922
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NYBT)
112,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Oct 05 9.53 9.57 9.49 9.55 -.04
Mar 06 9.65 9.68 9,61 9.67 -.02
May 06 9.47 9.50 9.45 9.50 -.01
Jul06 9.26 9.29 9.25 9.28 -.01
Ocl06 9.09 9.11 9.09 9.11 -.02
Mar 07 9.10 9.10 9.09 9.09 -.03
May 07 9.08 9.08 .9.08 9.08 -.04
Est. sales 19.534. Thu sales 1534.29,283
Thuveos open int. 404,748, +662
CATTLE (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug 05 78.60 78.80 78.05 78.52 -.42
Oct05 81.30 81.65 80.80 81.20 -.85
Dec 05 83.40 83.70 83.00 83.20 -1.05
Feb 06 85.40 85.70 85.00 85.50 -.82
Apr06 84.00 84.10 83.65 84.10 -.70
Jun06 80.50 80.50 79.75 79.90 -.75
Aug 06 79.35 79.50 79.35 79.50 -.35
Est sales 25,413. Thu%+ sales 33,749
Thu/ems open int. 145,550, +4,727
FEEDER CATTLE (CME)
50,0001 bs.- cents per Ib.
Aug05 106.00 106.30 105.40 106.15 -1.97
Sep05 104.15 105.00 104.15 104.70 -2.45
Oct05 104.00 104.10 102.95 103.57 -2.20
Nov05 102.15 102.20 101.40 101.55 -2.50
Jan 06 99.00 99.50 99.00 99.17 -1.52
Mar 06 96.00 96.35 96.00 96,35 -1.35
Apr06 95.50 96.00 95.50 95.90 -1.70
Est. sales 4,825. Thu',r sales 6,101
Thu9nes open Int. 24,164, -130
HOGS-Lean (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per b1.
Jul05 68.55 68.77 68,50 68.67 +.15
Aug 05 668.30 66.65 64,85 65.75 -.30
Oct 05 58.40 58.85 57.00 57.57 -1.35
Dec 05 55.20 55.90 54.50 54.95 -.75
Feb06 56.70 57.50 56.55 57.10 -.75
Apr06 56.00 56.15 55.60 55.80 -.57
May 06 57.90 57.90 57.90 57.90 -.40
Est, sales 17,736. Thumas sales 21.320


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
EuEqty B 2043 +.37 +19.8
FLTxB t 9.32 -.02 +5.5
GeoBt 18.18 +.12 +9.8
GlfncB t 1250 +.01 +4.2
GIbEqtyt 7.92 +.12 +16.6
GINtRs t 26.85 -.40 +355
GrlnBt 19.55 +.24 +12.2
HIhB 1 57.45 +.50 +16.4
HIYIdBtx 8603 +.02 +9.1
HYAdvB tx 6.01 +,02 +9.5
IncomeB sx 6.61 -.02 +4.4
IntlEq p 22.84 +37 +16.8
InllGllnt 11.69 +.23 +17.1
IntNopt 1142 +15 +16.5
InvBt 12.07 +.17 +17.0
NJTxBt 9,31 -.01 +5.9
NwOppBI 38,81 +.58 +163
NwValp 18,12 +.18 +14.8
NYTxB I 8.84 -.01 +5.6
OTC B t 669 +.06 +14.2
TxExB t 8.90 -.01 +5.9
TFHYB t 13.04 ... +8.8
TFInBt 15.14 -.04 +5.1
USGvBtx 13.13 -.05 +3.2
U118I 10.92 +.05 +2601
VWslaB1 8.60 +.11 +19.4
VoyB1 14.80 +.24 +9.9
Putnam Funds M:
Dvrlnc px 10.14 -.02 +8.7
Putnam Funds Y:
George 18.41 +.12 +10.9
Gr&tnc 19.88 +.25 +13.4
Income x 6.89 -.03 +5.4
IntlEq 23.93 +.40 +18.0
Voyager 17.54 +.29 +10.9
RS Funds:
RSEmGr np 3203 +,17 +18.3
RSNalRes np 28.,32 -.13 +41.6
RSPartners 36.97 -.01 +30.7
Value Fd 23.54 -.08 +31.7
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 30.61 +.14 +23.0
Royce Funds:
LowPrSkr 15.15 +.03 +9.6
MicroCapI n 15.66 +.0 +11.5
Opplyl r 13,29 +.08 +16.0
PannMul In 10.69 -.02 +20.4
Pramlerlr 15.60 +.10 +15.9
ToRReer 12.66 -.02 +17.0
Russell Funds S:
DIvBondS 23,71 -.03 +4.8
DivEqS 44.77 +.59 +16.1
IntlSecS 61.96 +.83 +16,0
MslralBondS 10.51 -.01 +5.4
QuanlES 38.75 +.4 5 +14.3
RESecS 48.17 -.18 +34.0
ShorDuraBdS 18.79 -.01 +1.5
SpeclGrS 53,31 +.26 +16.9
Russell Instl I:
Eqty II 31.00 +.40 +16.3
Eqty Q I 3564 +.44 +14.5
Fixilncme I 21.14 -.03 +5.1
In511 38.30 +,51 +16.4
Russell LfePts C:
BalStrCp 10.95 +.08 +11.9
Russell LfePts D:
BalStratp 11.02 +.08 +12.5
Rydex Advisor:
OTCn 10.26 +.31 +10.8
Rydex Investor:
Juno Fdn 17.87 +.14 -13.7
OTC n 10.63 +.32 +11.3
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxlnA n 10.52 -.02 +5.1
EmMklDbtn 11.29 +.04 +22.3
EmgMkl np 14.11 +.43 +39.8
EqlndxAn 37.77 +.50 +12.7
HiYIdn 8.59 +.07 +9.1
IntMunlA 10.96 -.03 +3.7
IntllEqA n 11.04 +.15 +16.1
IntlFlxAn 11.66 +.01 +4.0
LgCGroAn 18.96 +.33 +11.6
LgCValAn 22.16 +.22 +18.4
SmCGromAn 17.62 +.16 +17.6
SmCValA n 21.43 +.05 +23.2
TaxMgdLC 11.64 +.16 +15.3
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 16.64 +.47 +43.2
SP5002n 20.24 +.27 +12.8
SmCap 29.67 +.15 +20.9
STI Classic:
CapAppL p 11.22 +.15 +4.7
CapAppAp 11.87 +.16 +5.1
CapAppT n 12.46 +.17 +5.7
GrowincTnp 16.77 +.18 +18.5
HighYldl 11.10 +.04 +7.9
SmCapGrTn 21.40 +.11 +19.5
TxSenGrT np 25.06 +.24 +9.1
TaxSenGrLt 23.52 +.23 +6.0
VallncoStkA 12.74 +.14 +13.7
VallncTnp 12.78 +.14 +14.1
Salomon Brothers:
Balance p 12.87 +.06 +6.6
HiYIdA 8.49 +.06 +11.3
InvesValO 20.86 +.27 +12.7
Opport 50.18 +.21 +19.4
Schroder Funds:
NAmEqlnv n 11.25 +.12 +14.9
Schwab Funds:
InlSS nr 16.14 +.20 +16.4
1001nv.r 35.70 +.44 +14.2
1000SeIn 35.71 +.44 +14.3
S&PInvn 19.03 +.25 +12.6
S&P Sel n 19.11 +.25 +12.9
S&PInstlSel 9.69 +.13 +12.9
SmCplnvn 22.81 +.05 +20.3
SmCapSel n 22.85 +.05 +20.5
TotBond n 10.04 -.02 +5.5
YIdPIsnv 9.68 ... +2.8
Y1dPIsSel 9.68 ... +2.9
Scudder Funds A:
CapGrth p 45.18 +.51 +12.3
DrmHiRA 44.37 +.30 +17.8
FIgComA p 17.87 +.06 +27.0
HilncA 5.52 +.05 +11.4
MgdMuni p 9.21 -.01 +5.9
RREEFp 22.13 -.10 +33.6
TechA 11.13 +.29 +11.6
TotRetA 9.13 +.06 +8.7
US GovtA 8.57 ... +4.2
Scudder Funds B:
DrmHiRB 44.24 +.29 +16.9
Scudder Funds C:
DmnHIRC 44.28 +.28 +16.9
Scudder Funds S:
EmMkIn 11.15 +.05 +22,6
EmgMkGr nr 19.22 +.53 +38.9
GIb[BdSr 10.16 -.01 +6.3
GlobDis 37.28 +.42 +30.2
GlobalS 27.95 +.38 +23.4
Go l&Prec 15.44 -.28 -1.8
GrEuGro 27.74 +.26 +21.9
GrolncS 22.31 +.27 +13.0
HiYIdTx n 12.93 ... +8.3
IncomeS 12.98 ... +6.4
IntrTxAMT 11.36 -.03 +4.3
IntematIS 44.93 +.54 +18.6
LgCoGro n 24.49 +.29 +11.2
LatAmern 36.95 +.31 +56.8
MgdMuniS 9.22 -.01 +6.1
MATFS 14.59 -.04 +5.5
PacOppsnr 14.14 +.45 +30.8
ShtTmBdS n 10.07 -.01 +1.8
SmCoValS r 27.89 -.06 +21.3
Scudder Instl:
Eqty5001L 139.10 +1.85 +12.9
Scudder Investment:
Eq500I1n 137.66 +1.82 +12.7
Selected Funds:
AmerShsD 38.09 +.15 +13.8
AmShsS p 38.04 +.14 +13.5
Seligman Group:
ComunAt 26.02 +.60 +17.4
FromnerAt 13.00 +.04 +11.5
FrontierDl 11.47 +.04 +10.7
GIbSmCoA 16.41 +.19 +26.5
GlobTechA 12.72 +.24 +14.6
HiYBdA p 3.42 +.02 +7.8
Sentinel Group:
ComStkAp 29.88 +.29 +10.8
SmCoA p 7.76 ... +14.6
Sequoia 151.99 -.57 +4.0
Sit Funds:
LargoCpGrn 35.49 +.33 +15.8
Smith Barney A:
AgGrAp 97.65 +1.42 +13.5
ApprA p 14.72 +.14 +9.1
FdValAp 15.09 +.21 +7.9
HilncA t 6.94 +.07 +9.4
IntlAICpGrA p 13.56 +.15 +15.5
LgCapGAp 22.15 +.65 +6.5
MgMuA p 15.49 +.01 +4.6
SBCaplncA 16.94 +.15 +13.5
Smith Barney B&P:
AgGrBt 87.65 +1.26 +12.6
ApprBt 14.41 +.13 +8.2


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
FdValB t 14.19 +.20 +7.1
LgCapGB t 2089 +.60 +5,7
SBCaplnc t 16.80 +.14 +12.9
Smith Barney C:
AggGrC 08.23 +1.27 +12.7
FdValC 14.18 +.19 +7.1
LgCapCp 2089 +.61 +57
Smith Barney 1:
DivStratI 17.26 +.14 +50
Grolnc 1 15.55 +.21 +10.0
Smith BameyY:
AggGroYt 101.32 +148 +14.0
LgCapGroY 22.81 +.67 +6.9
SoundShn 37.43 +.54 +13.8
St FarmAssoc:
Balann 5022 +.51 +7.6
Gwhn 48.96 +.72 +10.6
Stratton Funds:
Dividend n 37.40 -48 +23.5
Growth 43.41 +.25 +27.7
SmCap 4365 -.07 +31.0
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvB 9.46 -.04 +4.4
SunAmerica Focus:
FLgCpAp 17.65 +.28 +6.6
TCU ShDur 9.58 -.01 +2.4
TCW Galileo Fds:
SelEqty 19.15 +.49 +110
ValueOpp 23.19 +.37 +13.5
TCW Galileo N:
SelEqtyNp 18.76 +.48 +10.6
TD Waterhouse Fds:
Dow30 Fds ... NA
TIAA-CREF Funds:
BondPIus 10.30 -.01 +5.4
Eqtylndex 8.85 +.10 +14.8
Grolnc 12.45 +.19 +13.0
GroEqty 9.28 +.18 +9.8
HIYIdBod 9.31 +.07 +8.7
IntlEqty 10.56 +.12 +12.4
MgdAIlc 11.21 +.08 +11.3
ShtITrrBond 10,45 +2.2
SocChcEqty 9.45 +.13 +14,3
TaxExBond 10.92 -.02 +5.5
Tamarack Funds:
EntlerSmCp 33.12 +.20 +12.6
Value 45.81 +.44 +15.4
Templeton Instit:
EmnMS p 18.24 +.46 +36.7
ForEqS 20.45 +.38 +20,9
Third Avenue Fds:
Ingr 19.71 +.14 +27,7
ealEslVal r 29.99 -.03 +30.5
SmICapon 24.04 +.08 +20.1
Value 57.00 +.78 +26.2
Thompson Plumb:
Growth n 45.97 +.41 +2.0
Thorburg Fds:
IntValA p 21.24 +.32 +20.4
LtdMunArp 13.65 -.03 +2.2
ValueA 31.87 +.23 +14,5
Thrivent Fds A:
HIghYId 5.17 +.03 +9.2
Inomsed 8.74 -.01 +5.3
LgCapStock 26.13 +.32 +12.6
MidOapSok 17.43 +.09 +22.4
MunlBd 11.51 -.02 +6.3
Torray Funds:
Fund 40.22 +.37 +7.5
InsTl 115.18 +1.13 +8.2
TA IDEX A:
FedTxExApx 11.82 -.04 +5.3
JanGrow p 24.43 +.42 +15.1
GrCoGlob p 24.33 +.40 +10.9
TrConHYB px 9.29 -.01 +8.7
TAFIexInco px 9.54 -.02 +6.2
TA IDEX C:
AsAIModG t 11.71 +.10 +11.4
Tuner Funds:
MIdcpGwth 25.63 +.21 +21.7
SmlCpGrwth 23.98 +.11 +14.4
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 25.05 +.30 +17.9
UBS Funds CIlA:
GlobAllot 13.51 +.12 +14.9
UBS Funds Cl C:
GlobAlo p 13.25 +.12 +14.1
UBS PACE Fds P:
LCGEqPn 20.46 +.20 +18.1
UMB Scout Funds:
World 25.17 +.30 +20.9
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 25.04 +.10 +14.7
GIbRsc n 12.76 -.17 +59.1
GldShr 7.51 -.12 +4.5
USChina 6.89 +.07 +23.7
WIdPrcMinn 15.31 -.13 +10.9
USAA Group:
AgsvGthn 30.18 +.53 +18.4
CABdn 11.29 -.02 +7.4
ComstStrn 27.11 +.21 +12.1
GNMA 9.70 -.02 +4.1
GrTaxStrn 15.05 +.11 +14.6
Grwth n 14.42 +.23 +19.4
Gr&lnc, n 18.94 +.19 +13.7
IncStkn 17.34 +.25 +17.5
Income n 12.39 -.02 +5.9
Inl n 21.78 +.27 +14.5
NYBdn 12.13 -.01 +7.7
PrecMM 14.56 -.30 +1.1
S&PIdxn 18.41 +.24 +12.7
SciTech 9.67 +.22 +13.0
ShtTBnd n 8.88 -.01 +2.3
SmICapStk n 14.53 -.01 +23.6
TxEITn 13.33 -.03 +5.6
TxELT7 n 14.25 -.03 +7.8
TxEShn 10.69 ... +2.2
VABd 11.76 -.02 +6.4
WldGr n 17.86 +.24 +13.0
UtdAssoc500n 8.88 +.11 +12.8
Value Line Fd:
Levrge Gth n 27.07 +.18 +18.6
Van Kamp Funds A:
AggGrA p 14.91 +.13 +17.3
CATFAp 18.98 -.03 +7.0
CmslAp 18.54 +.22 +15.0
CorpBdA p 6.73 ... +6,8
EmGroA p 39.62 +.42 +11.8
EntAp 12.72 +.15 +13.0
EqtylncA p 8.75 +.08 +14.7
ExchFd 365.19 +3.52 +11.8
GlblFranp 23.43 +.10 +14.2
GvScAp 10.34 -.03 +5.2
GrInAp 20.98 +.29 +18.5
HarbAp 14.42 +.10 +5.5
HIghYIdA 3.62 +.02 +7.8
HYMuAp 10.98 +.01 +11.5
InTFA p 19.02 -.03 +6.6
MunlnAp 14.80 -.02 +6.2
PATFAp 17.56 -.02 +6.8
PaceFndAp 9.44 +.14 +13.7
StrMunInc 13.41 +.03 +10.9
US MIgeA 13.85 -.03 +4.3
UlIltyA p 18.75 -.02 +30.8
Van Kamp Funds B:
CmstB1 18.54 +.21 +14.2
EmGrBt 33.89 +.36 +11.0
EnterpB t 11.63 +.14 +12.2
EqlncB t 8.62 +.08 +13.8
GrIncSt 20.80 +.27 +17.6
HYMuBI 10.98 +.01 +10.7
MunlnBn 14.77 -.03 +5.3
PATFB nt 17.51 -.02 +6.1
StrMunInc 13.40 +.02 +10.1
USMtgeB 13.80 -.03 +3.5
UtiB 18.72 -.02 +29.9
Van Kamp Funds C:
CommStkC 18.55 +.21 +14.1
EqlncC t 8.65 +.08 +13.7
Vanguard Admiral:
AssetAdmln 56.11 +.74 +13.6
BalAdml n 19.72 +.13 +11.4
CAITAdmn 11.13 -.02 +4.1
CALTAdm 11.84 -.03 +6.8
CpOpAdln 72.67 +.75 +19.2
Energy n 94.65 -1.24 +46.8
EqlncAdml 50.03 +.52 +15.6
EuropAdml 61.76 +1.07 +20.2
ExplAdml 72.61 +.47 +20.7
ExnIdAdm n 33.12 +.17 +22.6
500Adml4 n 113.26 +1.50 +12.9
GNMA8Admn 10.38 -.03 +5.3
GmlncAdm 51.23 +.73 #+14.5
GrwthAdml n 26.84 +.39 +10.8
HthCaren 57.10 +.67 +16.2
HiYIdCpn 6,30 +.03 +8.0
HiYIdAdm n 10.87 -.02 +7.1
InsdLTAdmn 12,82 -.03 +6,6
ITBondAdm1 10.56 -.04 +6.1
ITsryAdmI n 11.14 -.04 +4.6
InlGrAdml 59.78 +.78 +16.2
ITAdmI n 13.48 -.04 +4.5
ITCoAdmrd 9.94 -.03 +5.5
LtdTrmAdm 10.79 -.01 +2.0
LTGrAdml 9.80 -.04 +14,0
LTAdmIn 11.45 -.03 +6.3


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg
Thu4omesopen int. 101,405,+2,267
GOLD (COMX)
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy 0oz.
Jul05 420.70 420.70 420.70 420.70 +1.10
Aug05 420.00 421.50 418.20 421.30 +1.10
Sep05 422.00 422.80 422.00 422.80 +1.10
Oct05 423.30 424.50 421.40 424.30 +1.10
Dec05 426.30 427.40 424.20 427.10 +1.00
Feb06 429.10 430.70 429.00 430.10 +1.00
Apr06 432.40 433.20 430.00 433.20 +1.00
Est. sales .... Thuva's sales 87.318
ThuSeAs open int. 270,876, +1,659
SILVER (COMX)
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
Jul05 692.0 698.0 692.0 695.6 -.5
Aug05 696.5 696.5 696.5 696.5 -.5
Sep 05 699.5 705.5 696.5 699.0 -.5
Dec05 707.0 712.0 702.5 705.2 -.6
Jan 06 707.0 707.0 707.0 707.0 -.8
Mar06 714,0 717.0 .709.2 709.2 -1.2
May06 711.3 711.3 711.3 711.3 -1.5
Est. sales ... Thumes sales 20,772
Thunens open int. 125,544, +1.607
HI GRADE COPPER (COMX)
25,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Jul05 161.80 163.50 161.80 162.90 +1.10
Aug05 158.20 159.55 157.80 159.40 +1.50
Sep05 154.70 156.70 154.30 156.20 +1.50
Oct05 152.30 153.00 151.80 153.00 +1.40
Nov05 149.60 150.00 149.60 150.00 +1.20
Dec05 146.20 147.60 145.80 147.20 +1.20
Jan 06 144.10 144.30 144.10 144.30 +1.25
Est. sales.... Thunes sales 11.301
ThuSes open Int. 108,706, +894
EURODOLLARS (CME)
$1 milllon-pts ol 100 po.
Jul05 96.377 96.380 96.375 96.377 -.002
Aug05 96,215 96.215 96.210 96.215 -.005
Sep 05 96,060 96.070 96.050 96.060
Oct05 95,970 95.970 95.960 95.965 +.005
Nov05 95.905 95.905 95.905 95.905 -.010
Dec 05 95.870 95.890 95.845 95.855 -.010
Mar 06 95.810 95.840 95.785 95.790 -.015
Eat. sales 159,163. Thu,.e sales 1,815,799
Thu7es open Inl. 7,345,591, -22,613
LUMBER (CME)
110,000 bd, ft.-$ per 1,000bd, ft.
Jul05 348.1 355,8 348.1 355.6 +10.5
Sep 05 339.0 339.0 332.0 334.9 +.2


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
MCpAdml n 76.22 +.50 +26.6
NJLTAd n 12.04 -.03 +5.8
NYLTAd m 11.50 -.03 +6.1
PrmCapr 6540 +1.13 +14,7
PALTAdmn 11.55 -.03 +5.8
REITAdml r 85.77 -.47 +32.4
STsryAdml 10.39 -.02 +1.8
STBdAdmIn 10.02 -.01 +2.0
ShITrmAdm 15.57 -.01 +16
STFedAdm 1032 -.02 +2.0
STIGrAdm 10.56 -.01 +2.6
SmICapAdml n28.08 +.13 +21.7
TxMCap r 58.61 +76 +15,5
TxMGrlncr 54.99 .73 +13.0
TtlBdAdmIrn 10.21 -.02 +5.3
TotStkAdmn 29.41 +.34 +15.1
USGroAdml n 43.40 +.70 +13.4
ValueAdmIln 21.98 +.23 +17.8
WellslAdmn 5279 +10 +10.0
WelltnAdmn 5275 +24 +12.7
WindsorAdm n61.95 +75 +15.7
WdsrilAdm 56.83 +.61 +18.7
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.99 +.33 +13,5
CAITn 11,13 -.02 +4.0
CALTn 11.84 -.03 +6.8
CapOppn 31.45 +.33 +19.1
Convt n 13.15 +.20 +6.3
DildendGro 12.21 +.17 +11.9
Energy 50.39 -.67 +46.7
Eqlncn 23.86 +.24 +15.5
Explorer n 77.92 +.49 +20.5
FLLTn 11.82 -.04 +5.6
GNMA0 n 10,38 -.03 +5.3
GlobEq n 18.44 +.26 +20,7
Grolnc n 31.37 +.45 +14.3
GrowlhEq 9.82 +.13 +11,3
HYCorp n 6.30 +.03 +7.,8
HllhCare n 13528 +1.59 +16.2
InflaProan 12.29 -.14 +5.5
InllExpIrn 17.21 +.22 +27.1
IntlGr 18.78 +.25 +15.9
InlVal n 31.77 +.66 +20.7
TI Grade 9.94 -.03 +5.4
ITTsry n 11.14 -.04 +4.5
LIFECon n 15.39 +.10 +9.4
LIFEGro n 20.38 +.23 +14.3
LIFEIncn 13.58 +.05 +7.3
LIFEModn 18.15 +.16 +12.1
LTInGradan 9.80 -.04 +13.9
LTTsryn 11.85 -.06 +12.5
Morgan n 16,84 +.21 +15,4
MuHY8 n 10.87 -.02 +7.0
MulnsLgn 12.82 -.03 +6.5
Mulnt n 13.48 -.04 +4.4
MuLtdn 10.79 -.01 +1.9
MuLongn 11.45 -.03 +6.3
MuShrtn 15,57 -.01 +1.5
NJLTn 12.04 -.03 +5.8
NYLTn 11.50 -.03 +6.0
OHLT'rxEn 12.20 -.03 +6.5
PALTn 11.55 -.03 +5.7
PrecMIsMinr 17.93 +.13 +31.6
Prmcpr 63.00 +1.09 +14.5
SelValu r 19.85 +.13 +24.0
STARn 19.13 +.15 +13.3
STIGrade 10.56 -.01 +2.5
STFed n 10.32 -.02 +1.9
STTsry n 10,39 -.02 +1.7
StralEqn 22.97 +.14 +26.0
TgtRet2015 11.41 +.06 +10,2
TgtRet2025 11.64 +.08 +11.3
TgtRe92035 11.99 +.11 +13.0
TxMCAp nr 29.11 +.38 +15.5
TxMGIr 26.76 +.36 +12.9
TaxMngdIntl mlO.32 +.15 +16.5
TaxMgdSC r 22.40 +.02 +22.7
USGro n 16.74 +.26 +13.1
USValue n 14.54 +.21 +19.0
Wellsly n 21.79 +.04 +9.9
Welltnn 30.54 +.14 +12.5
Wndsr n 18.36 +.22 +15.6
Wndsll 32.01 +.34 +18.6
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 113.25 +1.50 +12.8
Balanced n 19.72 +.13 +11.3
DevMktn 9.20 +.14 +16.7
EMkt n 15.99 +.51 +42.7
Europe n 26.29 +.45 +20.1
Extend n 33.09 +.17 +22.5
Growth n 26.84 +.39 +10.7
ITBond n 10.56 -.04 +6.0
LgCapidxn 21.92 +.28 +14.2
LTBond n 12.11 -.05 +13.1
MidCap 16.80 +.11 +26.5
Pacific n 9.12 +.09 +6.9
REITr 20.10 -.11 +32.4
SmCapn 28.06 +.12 +21.5
SmlCpGrow 15.80 +.11 +20.4
SmICapVal 14.67 +.03 +22.6
STBondn 10.02 -.01 +1.9
TotSond n 10.21 -.02 +5.2
Totllnl n 12.72 +.22 +19.2
TotStkn 29.41 +.34 +15.0
Value n 21.98 +.23 +17.7
Vanguard InstI Fds:
Ballnstn 19.72 +.12 +11.4
DevMklnst n 9.12 +.14 +16.8
Eurolns an 26.33 +.46 +20.3
Extinn 33.14 +.17 +22.7
Growthlnsti 26.84 +.39 +10.9
InfProtinst n 9.83 -.11 +5.6
Instldxn .112.33 +1.49 +13.0
InsPIn 112.33 +1.49 +13.0
TotlBdIdxn 51.49 -.14 +5.3
MldCap[nstln 16.85 +.11 +26.6
Paclnsin 9.13 +.09 +9.0
SmCpInn 28.10 +.13 +21.7
TBIst n 10.21 -.02 +5.3
TSInst n 29.42 +.34 +15.1
Valuelnsan 21.98 +.23 +17.8
Vantagepoint Fds:
AggrOpp 11.21 +.11 +17.9
AssetAlloc 7.50 +.10 +13.0
CoreBondldxl 10.09 -.02 +4.9
Eqtylinc 9.34 +.09 +16.2
Growth n 8.28 +.13 +7.0
Grow&Inc 10.38 +.14 +12.4
MPLongTermGr21.50 +.22 +11.2
MPTradGrwth 22.07 +.16 +9.7
Victory Funds:
DvsStkA 16,99 +.28 +14.1
WmBllnstlnti 16.69 +.30 +22.2
WM Blair Mtl Fds:
IntlGrowth r 23.19 +.41 +22.9
WM Str Asset Mgmt.
BalancedAp 13.44 +.10 +10.8
BalancedB t13.41 +.10 +9.9
ConGrwBt 14,37 +.14 +11.9
ConGrwAp 14.76-. +.14 +12.8
StratGrAp 16.07 +.17 +13.9
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Accumultiv 6.43 +.02 +14.3
CoreInvA 5.92 +.05 +15.4
HighInc 7.42 +.01 +6.8
NwCcptlAp 9.47 +.17 +19.6
ScTechA 11.38 +.19 +27.9
VanguardA 9.14 +.14 +17.2
Wasatch:
CoreGrth 45,82 +.27 +23.6
SmCapGrth 42.39 +.14 +23.4
SmICapVal 5.75 +.03 +22.5
Weltz Funds:
PartVal 23.65 +.06 +10.1
Value n 36.96 +.07 +9.2
Wells Fargo Ad Adm:
Index 49.60 +.65 +12.7
ToRIBd 12.33 -.02 +5.1
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AsetAllA 20.09 +.20 +12.8
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 23.68 +.27 +18.7
GoSec n 10.71 -.02 +4.7
Growthlnvn 19.67 +.14 +13.2
Opptntyvlrn 48.11 +.44 +16.1
SCapValZp 29.97 ... +19.6
UlISItn 9.17 -.01 +2.7
Wells Fargo Admin:
DivrsEq I 41.40 +.58 +14.3
GrthBaln 30.44 +.33 +10.5
LgCoGr0 47.68 +1.20 +12.6
EqtyInc nx 36.02. +.42 +14.5
Western Asset:
CorePlus 10.67 +,02 +68.1
Core 11.46 +.01 +6.0
Westport Funds:
SmallCaplin 26.21 ... +20.2
William Blair N:
GrowthN 10.99 +.10 +14.6
IntlGthN 22.90 +.41 +22.6
Yacktman Funds:
Fundp 15.34 +.10 +10.6


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

Nov05 325.8 326.3 321.1 322.9 -.4
Jan 06 327.9 329.7 327.8 328.7 +.7
Mar 06 332.2 332.2 332.2 332.2 +.2
May06 331.9 331.9 331.9 331.9 +.9
Est. sales 636. Thus.2sa sales 1,334
ThuvAs open Int. 3,254, -181
NATURAL GAS (NYMX)
10,000 mm bLtu. es, Sper mm btu
Aug05 7.872 8.290 7.810 7.849 +.005
Sep05 7.965 8.310 7.870 7.898 +.003
Oct 05 7.995 8.320 7.910 7.953 +.004
Nov05 8.523 8.725 8.410 8.433 +.004
Dec 05 8.890 9.051 8.800 8.868 +.001
Jan 06 9.253 9.440 9.130 9.193 -.002
Feb 06 9.264 9.345 9.170 9.195 -.005
Est. sales ... Thusm sales 89,580
ThuSies open Int. 500,932,. +1,665
UNLEADED GASOUNE (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 169.00 173.70 167.40 168.83 -.52
Sep05 164.15 168.20 163.30 164.88 +.46
Oct 05 154.85 157.90 153.25 155.88 +1.56
Nov05 154.70 156.70 152.45 155.33 +1.26
Dec05 155.35 156.50 153.95 155.98 +1.26
Jan06 156.60 157.58 156.60 157.58 +1.36
Feb06 157.95 159.13 157.95 159.13 +1.36
Est. sales .... Thua2e sales 67,758
Thul9es open Int. 164,729, +1,852
HEATING OIL (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 166.36 169.90 164.50 166.21 +.52
Sep05 168.95 172.50 167,05 169.00 +.63
Oct05 171.24 174.75 170.00 171.25 +.58
Nov05 173.95 177.80 172.84 173.65 +.43
Dec05 176.60 180.00 174.85 176.00 +.23
Jan06 178.70 181.75 177.00 178.10 +.23
Feb06 180.25 183.00 178.50 179.35 +.18
EsL. sals,.. T sales Thm s68.,747
Thu09as open int. 184,573, -42
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX)
1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl.
Aug 05 57.87 58.90 57.33 58.09 +.29
Sep05 58.80 59.80 58.21 59.13 +.43
Oct 05 59.35 60.30 58.83 59.77 +.44
Nov05 59.71 60.45 59.12 60.11 +.42
Dec 05 59.05 60.82 59.05 60.36 +.39
Jan 06 60.38 60.76 59.50 60.51 +.37
Feb 06 60.49 60.74 60.35 60.54 +.36
Est. lm s .... Thu7 s sales 320,796


I FuTURES I









Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


[humber


SUNDAY


(onnection


JULY 17, 2005


*~*7. -
* I ~'
-1~..~~~
1.
.,~ *. PV.~p ~


Chamber Staff


Kitty Barnes ................... . .... Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ............Inverness Office Manager and
Special Events Coordinator
Debi Shields .................Crystal River Office Manager
Marion Elson ................Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Diane McInnis .............. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally .................... Office Assistant (Inverness)
Sarah Marx ................ Office Assistant (Crystal River)


Inverness ............................ . ..... 726-2801
Hom osassa ........................... . ..... 628-2666
Crystal River ............... ................. 795-3149

www.citruscountychamber.com




Doyubav eou ru Pere


Workforce has professional openings!
Submit your resume: ProJobs@clmworkforce.com


To view current openings
www.clmworkforce.com
click Career Seekers/Job Search/Professional


ONE STOP7
WORKFORE
I I]


Contact the Professional
Placement Team today!
352.873-7950 ext. 202


SCORE efforts are honored


Thinking of starting a busi-
ness? Don't know how to
begin? Need advice for an exist-
ing business? Look to your local
SCORE chapter.
The objective of SCORE is to
provide professional guidance
and information to enhance the
success of Citrus County's
emerging and existing small
businesses.
Their core values demand
excellence of themselves and all


" Member of the Week
a "**


aspects of their organization.
SCORE offers no fee small
business counseling, mentoring
and training to prospective
entrepreneurs and small busi-
ness owners.
The primary services are


face-to-face counseling, work-
shops, seminars and online
counseling. Their expertise
includes the area accounting,
management, retail, marketing,
sales, banking, health care,
insurance, agriculture, hospitali-


ty, construction, computer sys-
tems, human resources, engi-
neering, education, and interna-
tional trade.
Their counselor's education
consists of the following: 12
bachelors; 7 masters; and 1
PHD; 2 CPAs; and 2 CLUs.
SCORE is at 3810 S Lecanto
Highway, Bldg. PI-101,
Lecanto 34461. SCORE invites
you to call for an appointment at
621-0775.


Nature Coast Lighthouse Realty


G aeA -, A,60, bt e!

On the new two-speed Five Star
Edition of the Infinity System! \!
The world's first self-monitoring residential air conditioning
system, designed and programmed to run a daily
diagnostic check. It actually adjusts itself to maintain
maximum efficiency.
(Offer ends 8/31/05. W.A.C. & purchase of qualifying
equipment. See Boy Area for details. Homeowner occupants only)
AIR CONDITIONING fz!
& HEATING

Citrus 795 -
SMarion 489 C2
Levy 447 -
www.ayoreacool.com www.corrier.com www.notex.org Stwat Certified CAC010415


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle


Recently the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed Nature Coast Lighthouse Realty, LLC as a new member with a ribbon cutting cer-
emony. Pictured above from left, first row: Betty Murphy, chamber ambassador; Dharma Murphy; Reyna Bell; JoAnn Heckman; Ed Heckman,
owners; Carol Lee Wallis, chamber member; Rene Melchionne, chamber ambassador. Back row: Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director;
John Porter, chamber ambassador; Ronan Wasylyk; Aaron Roberts; Ryan Grady; Mike Gudis, chamber ambassador; and Larry Blanken, cham-
ber ambassador. Nature Coast Lighthouse Realty, LLC wants to "help you find your dream home" and they invite you to call them at (352) 564-
1810. Their office is located at 911 SE Hwy 19 in Crystal River and their Web site is www.nclighthouserealty.com.


Member News


The PROOF
is in the PRINTING*

Ilniergrt

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HAVE YOU SEEN ANY
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Documented, provable numbers-not vague promises.






The original, award
winning magazine of
Citrus County...
Call today to advertise H
in the magazine with
proven results!
www.ncvg.com
352-344-1184 Our 23rd Editio


Realtor Jeyte Gilson has
made the move to RE/MAX
REALTY ONE. A well-known
Realtor in Citrus County, Jeyte
joins the Re/Max team in their
Crystal River office.
She is a multimillion-dollar
producer and a popular busi-
nesswoman in the Crystal River
area.
Jeyte has an extensive back-
ground in real estate with sever-
al years experience in the insur-
ance field and over five years as
a Realtor. Jeyte joins her friends
Martha Sather and Sue Weigle
who form the "Live Your Dream
Team" at Re/Max. The associ-
ates and staff of Re/Max Realty
One welcome Jeyte to the
Re/Max team.
The brokers of Re/Max
Realty One are proud to recog-
nize two associates who have
recently qualified for the 2005
100 percent Club.
Joy Bily and Pat Phillips have
both passed this impressive
milestone at Re/Max. With over
one hundred thousand in gross
commission income, these asso-
ciates have joined the ranks of
the top agents in Citrus County.
Both of these agents will be
recognized for their accom-
plishment at the annual Re/Max
Regional convention.
The associates and staff of
Re/Max Realty One join the
brokers in congratulating Joy
and Pat. Debbie Fields has
reached career milestone.
In just over six months she
has qualified for the prestigious
Platinum Club. This award is
given to a small percentage of
Re/Max agents each year for
stellar production levels. She is
a veteran to the Citrus County
real estate market who has given
countless hours to her profes-
sion.
Debbie works in the
Inverness Re/Max Realty One


A,
', 'I,.. ~'


Special to the Chronicle
Recently Anthony J. Palumbo, left, CEO of Hospice of Citrus County,
honored LB Thomason, Chaplain, for ten years of service to Hopsice.


office with her husband Darrell.
The brokers of Re/Max Realty
One congratulate Debbie on this
huge accomplishment. Debbie
invites all of her friends and
customers to contact her to find
out more about this wonderful
accomplishment.


Lisa Kalansky of MASTER-
PIECE DENTAL STUDIO
recently attended a continuing
education seminar at the
Gaylord Palms Resort and
Convention Center in Orlando.
The seminar was entitled Pre-
Emergency Planning.
The course had valuable
information regarding having a
disaster plan for small business-
es in the event of a hurricane or
any type of disaster.
Tom Sorrell Chief
Meteorologist for Local 6 in


Orlando gave a very informative
lecture on hurricanes and the
history behind them. Tom Gray
also gave a detailed lecture on
Emergency Planning before,
during and after the storm. This
valuable seminar was held on
Wednesday July 6.



THE CENTRAL FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CITRUS COUNTY CAMPUS
will offer four new courses dur-
ing the fall 2005 semester.
Introduction to Horticulture,
Customer Service Help Desk,
Advanced Creative Writing and
Introduction to African-
American History are being
offered to meet the education
and training needs of Citrus
County students and potential
students.
Introduction to Horticulture


and Customer Service Help
Desk are hybrid courses. Parts
of the courses are completed in
the classroom and parts are
completed online.
Introduction to Horticulture
will meet five times during the
fall semester and is taught by
professor Bob Dumond.
Customer Service Help Desk
will meet four times during the
semester and is taught by pro-
fessor Pat Fleming.
In response to student
demand professor Susan Monier
will teach the Advanced
Creative Writing course on
Wednesday from 3 to 5:40 p.m.
Introduction to African-
American History will be taught
by Professor Kenneth Quinnell
on Thursday from 3 to 5:40
p.m.
All classes will be on the
Citrus County Campus.
Call the campus at 746-6721
or view the fall schedule at
www.GoCFCC.edu.

ME.

At a recent staff meeting for
HOSPICE OF CITRUS
COUNTY, LB Thomason a
chaplain for Hospice of Citrus
County was honored for his ten
years of service to the organiza-
tion. LB started working for
Hospice of Citrus County in
June of 1996 after serving as the
pastor of the Crystal River First
Baptist Church.
He served two terms as the
Chaplain of the Florida Senate
during the annual sessions of the
Florida Legislature and in 1980
was honored as Minister of the
Year for the State of Florida.
"LB is among the many exam-
ples of the quality of profession-
als working at Hospice of Citrus
County," noted Anthony J.
Palumbo, CEO, Hospice of
Citrus County.


on


..


C' ";'; ;







Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


numberr


~; ~L ~


Connection


~,"' .,.,


. , ,


SUNDAY
JULY 17, 2005
-K -,.. .. .


Golf tournament almost beats the rain


The ending was soggy but well worth the
trouble! The Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce's first golf tournament was a
success despite the approaching storm. All
had a good time.
The chamber would like to sincerely
thank the following hole sponsors:
Acme Homes II, Inc.
Altman's Family Pest Control
AmSouth Bank
Bay Area Air Conditioning
BG Rusaw, Inc.
Bright House
Capital City Bank
Carl A. Bertoch, PA
Citrus County Chronicle
Citrus Management Services
Citrus Pest Management
Clark Surveying
CLM Workforce
Consumer Credit Counseling
Crystal Engineering
ERA American Realty
J & K Consultants
James A. Neal Jr. PA
JDP Kennel
Nature Coast Bank
Poseidon Computers

Lou Whitten Realty


Progress Energy
RE/Max Realty One
SCORE
Sprint
Stanley Steemer
Suncoast Plumbing
Team Spirit
Tropical Windows
Wilder Funeral Home
Williams, McCranie, Wardlow and Cash
Willis R. Howell, Inc.
Withlacoochee River Electric Co-op
Thank you to Steve and Jewel Lamb from
Crystal Chevrolet for sponsoring the hole in
one for the car. Thanks to EZ Golf Cart for
sponsoring the hole in one for the golf cart.
Thank you to John Barnes and Jim Neal for
donating the refreshments
We appreciate all of our door prize spon-
sorships and thank the sponsors for their
donations:
J & K Consultants
VanAllen-Clifford Insurance
Homosassa Printing
O'Connell's Nursery
Brannen Banks
Sherwin Williams Crystal River


Shields Enterprise Digital Photography
We appreciate the participation of all of
the teams and congratulate everyone on a
job well done. Our teams were from the fol-
lowing businesses:
James Neal, PA, J & K Consultants,
Citrus County Chronicle, Sprint, Poseidon
Computers, CLM Workforce, AmSouth
Bank, Withlacoochee Electric, Progress
Energy, Citrus Memorial Hospital,
Consumer Credit Counseling, Bright
House, ERA American Realty, and the fol-
lowing individuals: Carl Bertoch, Jack
Hinkle, Chuck Morgan and Patrick Barker.
And the winners are . First place -
Poseidon Computers, with the team of Sean
Sullivan, John Sullivan, Walter Newell and
Tommy McCombs. Second place Citrus
Memorial Hospital with the team of Jerry
DeLoach, Jerry Steele, Trip Mundy and Lee
Glotzback. Last but certainly not least, third
place goes to CLM Workforce with the team
ofAllona Clark, Mike Filfi, Anna Ferrai and
Cathy Roche.
Congratulations to all winners and play-
ers, hole sponsors and prize donors. Thank
you and we will see you next year.


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle
Recently, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony in honor of Lou Whitten Realty's new location. Participating
were, from left, front row: Lou Whitten, owner and Jim Howsan. Back row, John T. Barnes, chamber director; Marion Elson, chamber staff;
Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director; John Porter, chamber ambassador; Renee Melchionne, chamber ambassador; Larry Blanken, cham-
ber ambassador; and Joe Andrepont. Lou Whitten Realty is now located at 3191 S. Canadian Way in Homosassa. She invites you to call (352)
628-3955 for all of your real estate needs.


What's new at your county chamber?


Breakfasts and luncheons are
first-rate tools for business-to-
business networking. During the
month of August, your opportu-
nity to network has been


enhanced.
For only $25 you can have a
tabletop display at either the
luncheon, August 12 at the
Plantation Inn or breakfast,


August 17 at the Golden Corral
in Inverness. Display your
information to all attendees and
have your own mini "home
show" for half the price during


the month of August!
Call Debi at 795-3149 for the
luncheon or Suzanne at 726-
2801 for the breakfast and
reserve your table today.


CHURCHES
Open Arms for Christ
Ministries
Crystal and Jackie Wilson
Inverness
637-6827
COMPUTERS SERVICES
AND CONSULTANTS
Citrus Computer Training
Laura Termini
Lecanto
621-7606
HOSPICE
Hernando-Pasco
Hospice, Inc.
Anne Huette
]Lecanto
527-4600
ORTHOTICS/
THERAPEUTIC SHOES
Paradise Custom
Orthotics
Jeffery Moser
Lecanto
527-8200


REAL ESTATE
Paradise Realty &
Investments, Inc.
Leila Wood
Crystal River
795-9335
THRIFT STORE
Life Changing Ministries
Thrift Store
Gary L. Cronau
Crystal River
564-2055
TROPHIES
AND PLAQUES
Awards Unlimited
Jack 0. Moore
Crystal River
795-5233



ew*


E l Website Watch
The www.citruscountychamber.com
site has had 1,008,595 hits since
January 1, 2005. The statistics show the
i_ te is read the most on Mondays.
Second best read day is Friday.
If you haven't linked and need
..-_--__ _- information, call Debi at
S --- =_, 795-3149.


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HOSPICF
OF CrTRUS COUNTY, INC


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LIFT
Continued from Page 1D

with the community by keep-
ing a rustic look."
Cavanaugh said it is impor-
tant for the motel to portray a
positive image in the commu-
nity.
"Quality is at the top of my
list," he said. "I will not run a
motel that is anything less than
top quality and premiere cus-
tomers."
Through the help of his
property manager, John


EDC
Continued from Page ID

For at least the next 10 years,
growth in Citrus County is
expected to continue at record
pace due in part to the vast
number of baby boomers retir-
" ing and moving to Florida.
There will also be those who
move here to support the ever-
increasing need to serve and
supply the growing population.
As the demography of Citrus
countyy changes along with the
prices of homes and land, a
lew challenge emerges -
Rffordable housing for those
Providing services while mak-


VEGGIE
Continued from Page 1D

Wednesday the launch of pub-
lic service announcements
,promoting balanced breakfast,
;including an animated "It's
Breakfast Time" spot featuring
singing spoons and forks. It will
be added to existing program-


" MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

regarding what type of care
you will receive, and how
much effort will be made to
keep you alive artificially. The
last will and testament is a mat-
ter of having someone handle
your affairs, paying your final
obligations at death and dis-
tributing what worldly goods
you have in a fashion that is
consistent with law and your
wishes.
In both cases, you will have
to know the laws of the state in
which you live. If you own real
estate in more than one state,
then your will must satisfy the
laws of each state where the
real estate is held. There are
will kits available in stores and
online, but want my advice?
Use an attorney. As to witness-
es, notarization, etc., this is a
matter that must be done in
accordance with the law of
your state.
.DEAR BRUCE: I have no
debt, aside from a $20,000 stu-
dent loan at 1.5 percent inter-
est and a mortgage for $50,000
at 2.8 percent. I recently won
$35,000, after taxes. I already
have money invested in an
IRA. What would you suggest I
do with this money? James,
via e-mail.
DEAR JAMES: Both of the
interest rates you have quoted
are incredibly low and should
not be paid off, even 25 min-
utes early Since you have a stu-
dent loan obligation, it is likely
that you are relatively young.
You have not shared with me
what other investments, if any,
that you may have other than
your IRA. I assume that you're
contributing your maximum


O'Dell, Cavanaugh said he is
positive his clientele are
upscale and will help the
motel to portray a positive
image. Cavanaugh said his
market area is focusing on the
upscale clientele to change the
image of the motel.
The Crystal Manatee is an
extended-stay motel, which
features fully equipped
kitchens in every room, among
other amenities.
"The rooms have everything
people need to stay here on a
long-term basis," Cavanaugh
said.
Cavanaugh is halfway

ing lower wages. Our neighbors
to the south have seen this
change and face the same chal-
lenge. In parts of Florida,
workers are bussed into the
community daily while living
in an adjacent community with
lower home and land prices.
This is but one change likely to
occur
Without proper vision and
planning, we could face dra-
matic changes requiring fore-
sight and careful consideration
in order for all to live and work
here successfully. Perhaps the
most important challenge for
our community is the ability to
diversify our local economy to
support all types of businesses,
including primary employers

ming that encourages kids to
exercise.
Under the licensing deals,
SpongeBob will be giving a
thumbs-up on bags of spinach
from Boskovich Farms.
SpongeBob, Dora and "Lazy
Town" characters will appear
on bags of carrots from
Grimmway Enterprises, and a
stable of Nickelodeon charac-
ters will adorn bags of oranges,

amount. You can also open a
Roth IRA for you and a spouse,
even though she may not be
employed, for $4,000 for each a
year.
The balance of the money
will have to be invested taking
into account your tolerance for
risk. Some people are very
comfortable with a certain
amount of adventure; others
wouldn't sleep well unless the
money was invested in some
form such as a no-risk govern-
ment bond. Before any of these
investments are made, you owe
it to yourself to take some time
and study the world of invest-
ing by reading periodicals,
surfing the Internet and invest-
ing the most important thing
that you are given: your time.
DEAR BRUCE: I am selling
my home in Orlando and mov-
ing to southern California per-
manently My plan is to lease a
condo for a year before buying
a new home. What should I do
with the proceeds of the sale?
You may be wondering why I'm
selling my home, since it very
likely is going up in value, but I
don't want to deal with renting
it. -AG., Orlando.
DEAR AG.: There's no won-
der in my mind about selling it;
I think it's the smart thing to
do. Leasing quarters in an area
of which you are unfamiliar is
also a good move. One thought,
however, is that you might
stumble into a deal that you
don't want to pass up during
the rental period. Unless you
have the proceeds liquid, you
may miss out.
If you can agree with that
thesis, I would consider gov-
ernment bonds, which can be
sold almost instantly on the
secondary market. While there
is a possibility of a small loss if
interest rates go up, in this


through with the renovations.
He said he hopes to have 95
percent of the renovations
complete within the next few
weeks.
"I love to take on projects
and turn them around into a
glowing piece of property,"
Cavanaugh said.
Once the renovations are
complete, Cavanaugh esti-
mates the total cost will
exceed $300,000.
"This motel represents a lot
of the heritage of Crystal
River," he said. "We are in full-
court press to get everything
completed."

and their supporting compa-
nies. The Citrus County
Economic Development
Council will continue its efforts
to establish and expand such
companies, but it will take a
community effort to ensure
this outcome.
The EDC will continue to
seek support and input from its
many partners and all who are
willing to work toward this
goal. For more information,
contact the EDC at 795-2000.


Brett Wattles is the executive
director of the Economic
Development Council. Contact
the EDC at 795-2000.

tangerines and clementines
from LGS Specialty Sales.
SpongeBob and Co. are not
the first cartoon characters to
go wholesome. Clifford the Big
Red Dog lent his name to an
organic cereal, Clifford
Crunch. And Arthur the aard-
vark appears on some products
made by Annie's Homegrown,
including cans of organic
Arthur Loops.

short of period of time, a large
hit is unlikely If that were the
case, you could use bonds as
collateral for a short-term loan.


Bruce Williams is a
columnist with Newspaper
Enterprise Association. Send
questions to Smart Money,
P.O. Box 503, Elfers 34680.
E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com.


Technology alliance adopts


center as special project


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus Information Technology Alliance has
announced that it will support the Cypress
Creek Juvenile Offenders Correctional Center
by addressing ongoing information technology
needs.
Mark Burnette, chairman of the Cypress
Creek Project Subcommittee, said CITA wants
to enhance the workforce development of
offenders who are taking college courses at the
facility. In addition to meeting hardware and
software needs, CITA will provide guest speak-
ers and scholarships.
The Central Florida Community College
Citrus County Campus began offering courses at
the level-10 correctional facility in fall 2004. The
partnership is the only one of its kind in
Florida, according to the Department of
Juvenile Justice, and is currently used as a
model for other correctional facilities and com-
munity colleges throughout the state.


Special to the Chronicle
Florida Medicare Quality Assurance presented Ultimate Nursing Care an award for outstand-
ing achievement for outcome-based quality improvement. Presenting the award to Connie
Argue, R.N., director of nursing, is Peggy Loesch, R.N., from FMQAI. Looking on are: Katherine
Vincent, R.N., executive administrator; Cheryl Parrish, LPN; Pat Kern, R.N.; and Stacy
Dearborn, LPN.


MARKET C.D.


C.D.


Dr. Erica Moore, Cypress Creek principal,
said the faculty, staff and students "are excited
about the prospect of having more up-to-date
equipment and software, as well as being able
to access online courses through CFCC."
Made up of Citrus County IT professionals,
providers, and others interested in IT-related
matters, CITA focuses on attracting, growing
and retaining information technology and relat-
ed businesses and IT employees. It was formed
in 2004 through a partnership among the Citrus
County Economic Development Council, the
Citrus, Levy, Marion counties Workforce
Connection and the CFCC Citrus Campus.
Everyone interested in IT or the IT industry is
welcome to attend CITA meetings, which are
held the second Thursday of every other month,
from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the college, 3800
S. Lecanto Highway.
For more information about CITA, call the
Citrus County Economic Development Council
at 795-2000.


DIGEST
Continued from Page 1A

Dr. Garibaldi joins
Citrus Memorial staff
Dr. Abel A. Garibaldi has joined
the Citrus Memorial Hospital staff
in vascular and thoracic surgery.
He is certified by the American
Board of Surgery
and by the
American Board
of Thoracic .
Surgery. He "
comes here from 'i.,
the Texas Heart '
Institute in
Houston, where
he completed Abel A.
advanced train- Garibaldi
ing in endovas-
cular techniques.
Garibaldi has trained in general,
vascular and thoracic surgery. He
will perform peripheral angiograms,
thrombolysis and peripheral angio-
plasty, and stent insertions. He
also performs the usual vascular
surgery interventions, including
carotid endarterectomies,
aneurysm resections, and extremi-
ty revascularizations, hemodialysis
access surgery and thrombec-
tomies, and vein surgery, including
varicose veins, chronic venous
insufficiency and deep vein throm-
bosis, among other procedures.
A Homosassa resident, he will
participate in the general surgery
emergency call schedule at Citrus
Memorial Hospital.
Garibaldi is working from the
office of Inverness Surgical
Association at 403 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness, phone 726-3646.
Citrus Memorial Hospital is a
171-bed, not-for-profit community
hospital.
Sylvan offers online
tutoring program
The Inverness Sylvan Learning
Center has introduced "Sylvan
Online," a new way to get Sylvan's
personalized reading and math
tutoring online with live, certified
teachers from the convenience of
home.
As with Sylvan's in-center tutor-
ing, the Sylvan Skills Assessment
- a combination of standardized
tests, diagnostic tools and personal
interviews is used to develop a
personalized lesson plan for each
individual student.
Students can then receive their
instruction in the Sylvan Learning
Center, or online at home.
Sylvan provides all the tools to
create the Sylvan Online live inter-


C.D.


C.D.


C.D.


studies.
Fernandes is fluent in English,
Portuguese and Spanish.
Hernando Gastroenterology
Associates is at 12190 Cortez
Blvd., Spring Hill, phone (352) 597-
1206.
Seven Rivers shows
low Caesarean rates
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center has the lowest Caesarean
delivery rate in Florida's Region 3
and the second-to-lowest rate in
the entire state.
In a report based on hospitals
with 25 or more deliveries in 2003,
the Agency for Health Care
Administration (AHCA) shows
Seven Rivers Regional's
Caesarean rate to be 18.8 percent
- well below Florida's 32.7 per-
cent state average.
"This is the second time Seven
Rivers Regional has held the low-
est Caesarean rate in Region 3,"
said Joyce Brancato, chief execu-
tive officer at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center. "And
we're proud to have the second to
the lowest rate in the state.
"We attribute this to our affiliated
physicians and their commitment
to providing excellence in health
care to our patients before and
during childbirth."
The report, "Caesarean
Deliveries in Florida Hospitals 1993
to 2003," presents data on new-
born deliveries in Florida and .
examines trends in Caesarean and
vaginal deliveries.
Among individual hospitals with
25 or more deliveries, the
Caesarean rates varied from 15.8
percent to 54.8 percent.
The hospitals with the highest
and the lowest Caesarean rates
were both in Miami-Dade County.
SCORE offers free
counseling services
The Citrus County SCORE
Chapter 646 offers free confidential
counseling services to new and
existing businesses in the county.
The counseling covers a range
of business-related topics.
For an appointment, call 621-
0775.
ABWA chapter invites
new members
The Citrus County Manatee
Chapter of the American Business
Women's Association invites area
businesswomen who would like a
chance to network and enhance
their business skills to join the
chapter.
Call Diane Elswick at 563-2933
for more information.


C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I AIPY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

FIRST FEDERAL BANK 0.65 0.65 1.50 1.51 N/A N/A 2.00 2.02 3.10 3.15 2.50 2.53 3.50 3.56 3.75 3.82
(352) 637-4741
METLIFE BANK 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.14 1.15 3.25 3.30 3.44 3.50 N/A N/A 3.63 3.70 4.16 4.25
(877) 326-2210
SOUTHTRUST BANK 0.95 0.95 0.90 0.90 1.14 1.15 1.73 1.75 2.47 2.50 2.47 2.50 2.86 2.90 3.54 3.60
(352) 795-2265
STATE FARM BANK 1.49 1.50 2.81 2.85 3.20 3.25 3.96 4.04 3.97 4.05 N/A N/A 4.02 4.10 4.26 4.35
Call your local agent
SUN35R2)US 795-820BANK .75 .75 N/A N/A NA N /A N/A NA N /A/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

RAYMOND JAMES BANK N/A N/A 3.25 3.30 3.40 3.46 3.68 3.75 3.78 3.85 N/A N/A 3.87 3.95 4.31 4.40
(352) 527-3700

Please note: Each bank has its own set of requirements
Banks interested in listing their rates can call to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact the bank
the Citrus County Chronicle at (352) 563-5660. directly for up-to-date information.


Good Neighbor.
GREAT RATES

Bank@
LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR
STATE FARM IS THERE.-
Ed Buckley Chuck Everidge
Inverness, FL FAnnuaIPc.,agnlu;a 5d. Ilp iuhj oagw lhl l, Ftoavigl ap M.y a A nllcul n Minimumiupmningdcpoarlt$1fwSavingisAccms iandSl afo(MonneyMacacxns. CDs | Inverness, FL
S726-6000 jnUad nie S APY i CD aply to piusII. A I y may i awlh pn o mlny Ccnialsouiomalcall renew lmluI n n me ta 72 4183
726-6000 mlSTATE FARM BANK HOME OFFICE: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS statefarmn.comn 72 4


Ultimate Nursing Care award


active tutoring session at home. All
parents need to provide is a per-
sonal computer with Windows soft-
ware and an Internet service
provider. Trained and certified
Sylvan Online teachers then tutor
students in real time, using a
hands-free headset connected to
an ordinary PC.
The student and teacher talk to
each other as they write questions
and answers on the same work-
space, displayed on both the stu-
dent's and teacher's computer
screens, using a digital pencil and
digital writing pad, similar to a
mouse pad.
Sylvan Online is available by
calling 637-0550 or visiting
www.educate.com/sylvanonline. As
with in-center tutoring,
Sylvan offers a guarantee that a
student's reading or math skills will
improve by one full grade-level-
equivalent in only 36 hours of
instruction, or the next 12 hours of
instruction are free.
Sylvan's trained and certified
teachers provide personalized
instruction in reading, writing,
mathematics, study skills and test-
prep for college entrance and state
exams. Call (800) 31-SUCCESS or
visit www.educate.com/info.
Fernandes joins
Hernando practice
Hernando Gastroenterology
Associates announce the appoint-
ment of Dr. Angelo M.O.
Fernandes as an associate in their
practice.
Fernandes has just completed a
fellowship in gastroenterology at
the prestigious Long Island Jewish
Medical Center in New Hyde Park,
N.Y.
He also completed a residency
in internal medicine at Montefiore
Medical Center, Bronx, N.Y. He
received his
medical degree
from McGill
University
Faculty of
Medicine in
Montreal, and '
holds a bachelor I
of science ..
degree in biology Angelo
from city college
of the City
University of New York, where he
graduated summa cum laude.
He is board certified in internal
medicine and board eligible in gas-
troenterology. .
He holds several awards, includ-
ing the Jonas E. Salk scholarship
from the City University of New
York, and has several publications
to his credit, as well as research


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










CI'RUS COOUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


PropertyV T-


Property transaction infor-
mation is supplied to the
Chronicle by the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office.
Call 341-6600 with questions.

Seller: Clanton Homes Inc
Buyer: Crosley James R & Margie G
Price: $20000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02710 W Tracy Ct
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
93Lot2Blk 1524

Seller: Clanton Homes Inc
Buyer: Crosley James R & Margie G
Price: $8000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10662 N Adler Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 8 BIk 1388

Seller: Family Investment Group Inc
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08071 N Dyke Way
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 7 Or Bk 542
Pg 954 Lot 1 Bik 794

Seller: Kongquee Milton G & Nadeen S
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $13500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00445 W
Hummingbird Dr,
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 16 Pb 6 Pg
145 Lot 11 BIk 980

Seller: Glimpse Claude E Or Florence M
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $14800
Addr: Citrus Springs:
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 6 Pb 6 Pg 15
Lot 17 Bik 593

Seller: Family Investment Group Inc
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09843 N Sandree Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 26 BIk 97

Seller: Kaplan George
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $12800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00647 E Abady Ln
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 17 Pb 7 Pg
1 Lot 8 Blk 1178

Seller: Duono Dominick
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $15500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10153 N Academy Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 1 BIk 6

Seller: Buono Dominick
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LUc
Price: $12600
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02631 W Pintado Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
78 Lot 18 BIk 1409

Seller: Family Investment Group Inc
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Uc
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07926 N Keystone Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg
61 Lot 14 BIk 654

Seller: Amico Catherine
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $24000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00901 W Glasgow Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 21 Blk 934

Seller: Maurer Margaret E &
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08101 N Galena Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 13 BIk 907

Seller: Maurer Margaret E &
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07989 N Galena Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 12 BIk 907

Seller: Silvia Thomas &
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $16000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02892 W Manitoba PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 7 BIk 668

Seller: Silvia Thomas &
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $16000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02880 W Manitoba PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 8 BIk 668

Seller: Shapiro Mike
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $14800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07824 W Jamaica Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg
61 Lot 14 BIk 642

Seller: Shapiro Mike
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Uc
Price: $15800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00096 W Goldcoast
PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 5 Blk 1003

Seller: Dion Sharon A
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $14700
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10984 N G Martinelli
Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 10 BIk 1438

Seller: D Ella Peter E & Virginia L
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $11700
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01645 E Carson Rd
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 17 Pb 7 Pg
1'Lot 23 Blk 1214


Seller: Mc Keever Terry & Denise
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $16000
Addr: Citrus Springs:
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 16 Blk 17

Seller: Whitman Herbert G
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $14500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03786 W Eunice Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 25 Pb 8 Pg 19
Lot 9 BIk 1780

Seller: Kongquee Milton G & Nadeen S
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Uc
Price: $13500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00901 W Homeway
Loop
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 16 Pb 6 Pg
145 Lot 23 Blk 978

Seller: Gress Robert R & Johanna E
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $13000


Addr: Citrus Springs: 07120 N Veronica Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg
61 Lot 16 Bik 627

Seller: Amico Catherine
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $24000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00949 W Glasgow Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 24 Bik 934

Seller: Counsil Lisa A
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $15200
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08803 N Pelican Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 5 Pb 6 Pg 1
Lot 3 Blk 481

Seller: Counsli Lisa A
* Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $11000


Addr: Citrus Springs: 10752 N Moreno Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 16 BIk 1409

Seller: Amico Richard & Mary Ann
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $14800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03711 W Century
Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg 67
Lot 6 BIk 825

Seller: Cossa William & Julia
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $14700
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09913 N Corsair Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg
116 Lot 2 Blk 251

Seller: Kongquee Milton G & Nadeen S
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $13500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06389 N New Japan
Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 16 Pb 6 Pg
145 Lot 9 BIk 981

Seller: Santopletro Ugo A
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $13900
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11897 N Monica Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 45 Bik 1512

Seller: Family Investment Group Inc
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02844 W Santana Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 1 Blk 1432

Seller: Family Investment Group Inc
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Lic
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09835 N Sandree Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg
89 Lot 27 Blk 97

Seller: Tracey Kirkpatrick A &
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $14700
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02177 W Wavecrest
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg 43
Lot 30 Bik 760

Seller: Family Investment Group Inc
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures Llc
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02799 W Blink Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Pb 5 Pg 133
Lot 1 BIk 452

Seller: Kongquee Milton G & Nadeen Ns
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $13500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06375 N New Japan
Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 16 Pb 6 Pg
145 Lot 8 BIk 981

Seller: Warden Lloyd W & Jacqueline M
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $12500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08347 N Ibsen Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 3 BIk 679

Seller: Lopez Manuel F
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $15500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07148 N Cricket Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg 43
Lot 20 BIk 762

Seller: Kaplan George
Buyer: Crystal Ball Ventures LIc
Price: $15500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01818 W Evergreen
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Pb 5 Pg 133
Lot 5 BIk 406

Seller: Minnella Mary L &
Buyer: De La Nuez Antonia &
Price: $12500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00571 E Abend Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 19 Pb 7 Pg
40 Lot 10 BIk 1290

Seller: Togati Benedetto & Lydia
Buyer: Dean Dennis M
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08949 N Comodore
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 6 BIk 66

Seller: Scaramazza Agnes M
Buyer: Dean Dennis M
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09211 N Commodore
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lots 21 & 22 BIk 55

Seller: Veguilla Raymond & Beth Ann
Buyer: Dean Dennis M
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11059 N Mataro Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 32 Blk 1458

Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Donovan Elias & Coletta
Price: $13400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10936 N Morrell Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 9 Bik 1467

Seller:,Hochkins James W & Joyce A
Buyer: Eisenberg Burt E & Rhonda H
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02810 W Xenox Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 8 Blk 1505

Seller: Hochklns James W & Joyce A
Buyer: Elsenberg Burt E & Rhonda H
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02796 W Xenox Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 9 Blk 1505

Seller: Cheney John G & Katherine &
Buyer: Eisenbert Burt E & Rhonda H
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08754 N Trojan Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 6 Lot 15 Blk
580 Descr In OR Bk 527 Pg 150

Seller: Switek Edward A & Lola M
Buyer: Emanskl Tom
Price: $6700
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08088 N Pitcairn Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 18 Pb 7 Pg 34
Lot 5 BIk 1024

Seller: Roberts Allen G
Buyer: Emanski Tom
Price: $14500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10157 N Elkcam Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 13 Bik 227

Seller: Cinlgllo Rafael J
Buyer: Emanski Tom
Price: $5500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03333 W Edison PI
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg
61 Lot 22 BIk 641


Addr: Citrus Springs: 08596 N Vince Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Pb 5 Pg 133
Lot 21 BIk 348

Seller: Counsil Lisa A
Buyer: Ewer Stephen E
Price: $30000
Addr: Citrus Springs:
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 7 BIk 796
Pb 6 Pg 33 Lots 21 & 22

Seller: Steiner Harold &
Buyer: Ewer Stephen E
Price: $15500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00701 W Horizon Ln
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 16 Pb 6 Pg
145 Lot 11 BIk 970

Seller: Barth Joseph
Buyer: Ewer Stephen E
Price: $20000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09392 N Sherman Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 5 Pb 6 Pg 1
Lot 12 BIk 527

Seller: P & G Properties Of Ocala Inc
Buyer: Family Investment Group Inc
Price: $9100
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09843 N Sandree Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 26 Blk 97

Seller: Smith Owen K
Buyer: Fernandes Joao &
Price: $12500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06640 N Pavilion
Loop'
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg 93
Lot 21 Blk 1564

Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Fledtkou Balmatee
Price: $15400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02256 W Magenta Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 3 BIk 1463

Seller: CItony Development Corporation
Buyer: Flnestlne Norman H & Cindy B
Price: $25200
Addr: Citrus Springs: 04294 W Malaluka
Cir
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg 93
Lot 19 BIk 1537

Seller: Murphy Patrick J
Buyer: Fischbach Rose R
Price: $8000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08431 N Upland Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 4 Pb 5 Pg
133 Lot 6 BIk 115

Seller: Howard Homes By Mercedes
Homes
Buyer: Flores Jeremiah & Zalda
Price: $164000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07882 N Hale Rd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 1 BIk 911

Seller: Nardlello Elleen C
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11260 N Fuego Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 20 Pb 7 Pg 52
Lot 3 Blk 1342 ,

Seller: Cintron Rafael Perez
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09611 N Cherry Lake
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 3 Blk 309

Seller: Estrella Pedro H & Jeannette
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $16000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03197 W Citrus
Springs Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg 61
Lots 21 & 22 Blk 613

Seller: Featherston William J &
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $7500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08621 N Cinder Way
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5
Pg 133 Lot 8 BIk 403

Seller: Nardlello Eileen C
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11280 N Fuego Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 20 Pb 7 Pg 52
Lot 4 Blk 1342

Seller: Cintron Rafael Perez
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09595 N Cherry Lake
Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 4 BIk 309

Seller: Riley Matthew P
Buyer: Florida Land Inc
Price: $7000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06525 N Matheson Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 23 Pb 7 Pg
115 Lot 17 BIk 1723

Seller: Brown Vincent
Buyer: Florida Land LUc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11108 N Trigger Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 13 BIk 1442

Seller: Brown Vincent
Buyer: Florida Land Llc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09439 N Fairy Lilly Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 3 Plat Bk 5
Pg 116 Lot 5 BIk 314

Seller: Brown Vincent
Buyer: Florida Land Lic
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07949 N Elwood Way
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 15 Pb 6 Pg
123 Lot 25 BIk 1144

Seller: Brown Vincent
Buyer: Florida Land LIc
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03166 W Hampshire
Blvd
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg ,


93 Lot 11 BIk 1573

Seller: Brown Vincent
Buyer: Florida Land Lic
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 06511 N Winlock Ter
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
93 Lot 11 Blk 1575

Seller: Rieley Laura M
Buyer: Florida Land Lic
Price: $11000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01735 W Magenta Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 5 BIk 1480

Seller: National Lots Inc
Buyer: Freedland Michael & Marilynn
Price: $25800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11074 N Iron Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 3 Blk 1466

Seller: National Lots Inc
Buyer: Freedland Michael & Marilynn
Price: $25800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08502 N Wallingford
Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 26 Pb 9 Pg
7 Lot 5 BIk 1649

Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Gallo Victor M & Leticia De
Price: $14400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08664 N Santos Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5
Pg 133 Lot 15 Blk 403 Desc In Or Bk 653 Pg
1884

Seller: Giles Laura & Wayne Hemmerich
Buyer: Giles Alan
Price: $52000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09247 N Citrus
Springs Blvd
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 6 Pb 6 Pg
15 Lot 6 BIk 548

Seller: CItony Development Corporation
Buyer: Giron Crecla &
Price: $14400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00086 W Navarro PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 18 Pb 7 Pg 34
Lot 10 Blk 1023

Seller: Viens George F & Dorothy
Buyer: Git Properties Lic
Price: $6000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08112 N Dandelion
Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 19 Bik 672

Seller: Van Ness Properties Inc
Buyer: Gleason Mary Ann
Price: $10800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01187 W Zamora Ln
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 10 BIk 911

Seller: Szymczyk Virginia
Buyer: Gonzalez Onelllo I & Ernestina
Price: $13000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08761 N Muller Way
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5
Pg 133 Lot 6 BIk 341

Seller: Lopez Victor H & Wilma L
Buyer: Gorman Cheryl
Price: $68000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09332 N Citrus
Springs Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 2 Pb 5 Pg 108
Lot 20 BIk 159

Seller: Mc Kay Lizabeth E Est
Buyer: Govi Erin M
Price: $6500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01197 E Odin Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 17 Pb 7 Pg 1
Lot 9 Blk 1189

Seller: National Lots Inc
Buyer: Guzman Yhony & Diana Duque
Price: $14900
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02004 W Swanson Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 23 Pb 7 Pg
115 Lot 11 BIk 1695

Seller: De Bartolo Peter
Buyer: Hansborough Randolp V Trustee
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs:
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 23 Pb 7 Pg
115 Lots 1 & 2 BIk 1696 Desc In Or Bk 569
Pgs 1551 & 1552

Seller: Russo Steve
Buyer: Hattenback Edward F &
Price: $10000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10581 N Adler Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 23 BIk 1386

Seller: Ramsden Margaret E
Buyer: Heers Rick &
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02696 W Dellwood St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 4 Blk 234

Seller: Ramsden Margaret E
Buyer: Heers Rick &
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02680 W Dellwood St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 5 Blk 234

Seller: Ramsden Margaret E
Buyer: Heers Rick &
Price: $7000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07285 N Santos Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg 43
Lot 3 Blk 772 Desc In Or Bk 532 Pg 1073

Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Hernandez Ennio Fratlni
Price: $14400
Addr: Cltrus Springs: 08161 N Merrlmac
Way
Description: Cltrus Spgs Unit 18 Pb 7 Pg 34
Lot 7 Bik 1022

Seller: Millan Francisco & Nelba
Buyer: Hornberger Kenneth Louis &
Price: $10500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02928 W Shella Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 12 Blk 1435


Seller: Lada Construction Inc
Buyer: Huckstepp Charles L & Rita J
Price: $121000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09697 N Gaillardia
Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 6 BIk 240

Seller: Boorom Robert F Trustee
Buyer: laci John & Carolyn Ann &
Price: $11500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00220 W Bolero PI
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 5 Pb 6 Pg 1
Lot 11 BIk 466

Seller: Jordan Donald C & Beverly K
Buyer: lacl John R & Carolyn A
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08705 N Ronda Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg
67 Lot 4 BIk 838

Seller: Conklin Charles E & Rosallne
Buyer: Ingersoll Keith R
Price: $7500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10036 N Lindon Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 6 Blk 216

Seller: Henry Frank R
Buyer: Joiner John
Price: $12500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02344 W Paragon Ln
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 25 Pb 8 Pg
19 Lot 15 BIk 1777

Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Juste Reynold & Gayelle
Price: $14400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01985 W Corrine St
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg 54
Lot 18 BIk 1490

Seller: Turano James R
Buyer: Kehle Glen & Helen
Price: $13000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08382 N Empire Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 10 Pg 6 Pg
67 Lot 72 BIk 836

Seller: Turano James R
Buyer: Kehle Glen & Helen
Price: $13000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08398 N Empire Ave
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg
67 Lot 71 Bik 836

Seller: Atkinson Dale B & Virginia C
Buyer: Kharast Larlsa
Price: $13500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01640 W Lorraine Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5
Pg 133 Lot 9 BIk 385

Seller: Atkinson Dale B & Virginia C
Buyer: Kharast Larisa
Price: $14000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02098 W Snowy Egret
PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Plat Bk 5 Pg
133 Lot 1 Bik 388 Descr In Or Bk 525 Pg
457

Seller: Elliott Roy P & Mary
Buyer: Krot Alexandra
Price: $12000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10395 N VIcki Ter
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 3 Blk 1420

Seller: Jenkins Robert L & Betty
Buyer: Krot Alexandra
Price: $18000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01507 W St Elizabeth
PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 16 Blk 62 Descr In 0 R Bk A46 Pg 276

Seller: Jenkins Robert L & Betty
Buyer: Krot Alexandra
Price: $18000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01489 W St Elizabeth
PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 15 Blk 62 Descr In 0 R Bk A46 Pg 423

Seller: National Lots Inc
Buyer: Laguerre Julfete
Price: $15900
Addr: Citrus Springs: 11143 N Iron Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 27 Pb 9 Pg
54 Lot 1 Blk 1462

Seller: Cavallerl Kenneth A & Michelle
Buyer: Levchenko Audrey T & Inna
Price: $32000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02559 W Fairway
Loop
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 4 Pb 5 Pg 133
Lot 11 Blk 455

Seller: Orion Land Corporation
Buyer: Lindo Vincent J & Lldla De
Price: $29000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03817 W Baton Ln
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 9 Blk 1559

Seller: Orion Land Corporation
Buyer: Lindo Vincent J & Lidia De
Price: $29000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03839 W Baton Ln
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 22 Pb 7 Pg
73 Lot 10 Blk 1559

Seller: Marco Polo Builders Inc
Buyer: Lodge Harold & Zenalda
Price: $17600
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10235 N Spaulding Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 23 Blk 229

Seller: Cuttala Terri L
Buyer: Lyons Scott G & Sheryl A
Price: $7000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03171 W
Montgomery Ln
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 3 Pb 5 Pg 116
Lot 15 BIk 259

Seller: Schmldt Gabrlela
Buyer: Lyons Scott G & Sheryl A
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03305 W Falrbank Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg 61
Lot 15 Blk 611

Seller: Veenhuls Rita Ann
Buyer: Lyons Scott G & Sheryl A


Price: $7000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 04233 W Vicksburg Dr
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg
67 Lot 29 BIk 852

Seller: Schmidt Gabriela
Buyer: Lyons Scott G & Sheryl A
Price: $21000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 03319 W Fairbank Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 9 Pb 6 Pg 61
Lot 16 BIk 611

Seller: De Peter Joseph Francis
Buyer: Lyons Scott G & Sheryl A
Price: $6500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 10559 N Adler Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 13 BIk 23

Seller: Evans Robert E
Buyer: Magnani Charles E
Price: $20000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 09338 N Deltona Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 1 Pb 5 Pg 89
Lot 11 BIk 55

Seller: Clyde Kopp Trust Agreement
Buyer: MaharaJ Saligram S
Price; $4200
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08867 N Citrus
Springs Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 6 Pb 6 Pg 15
Lot 7 BIk 574 Descr In 0 R Bk 530 Pg 500

Seller: Pav Peter A Trustee
Buyer: Maloney John & Barbara
Price: $104900
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07875 N Galena Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 21 BIk 911

Seller: Savlnsky Helen
Buyer: Mandrick John & Rosemary
Price: $3500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02895 W Striblin Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 21 Pb 7 Pg 73
Lot 13 BIk 1443

Seller: Pica Barbara Jean Trustee
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc
Price: $5500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07214 N Varsity Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg 43
Lots 17 & 18 Blk 759

Seller: Baumunk Lloyd J & Shirley J
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs:
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg
98 Lots 3 & 4 Blk 996

Seller: Leapley Robert D & Betty J
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01642 W Newbury St
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg
43 Lot 2 BIk 813

Seller: Visser Marlnus J &
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01499 W Lamplighter
St
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg
43 Lot 3 BIk 811

Seller: Snyder David H & Barbara G
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $6000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07898 N Ryan Way
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 14 Pb 6 Pg
110 Lot 6 Blk 712

Seller: Porrata Judith Maria Doria
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07433 N Ireland Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 8 BIk 1005

Seller: Gerbert Robert C Sr
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07060 N Farmington
Ter
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 8 Pb 6 Pg 43
Lot 14 BIk 752

Seller: De Vengencle Alfred
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $6000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08021 N Fieldstone Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 8 Blk 670

Seller: Ritza Michael & Joanne
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08228 N Amboy Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 11 Pb 6 Pg 80
Lot 6 BIk 673

Seller: Gibson James R & Karen M
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 07929 N Sarazen Dr
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 14 Pb 6 Pg
110 Lot 28 BIk 723

Seller: Waage Tom
Buyer: Maronda Homes Inc Of Florida
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 01911 W Quaker Ln
Description: Citrus Springs Unit 7 Pb 6 Pg
33 Lot 7 Bik 733

Seller: Dunn Leonard
Buyer: Mercedes Homes Inc
Price: $5000
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00196 W Baker PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 5 Pb 6 Pg 1
Lot 11 BIk 465

Seller: Neely Felicia G
Buyer: Metcalfe John M & R Kaye
Price: $6800
Addr: Citrus Springs: 08366 N Empire Ave
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 10 Pb 6 Pg 67
Lot 73 BIk 836

Seller: Reeves Linda D
Buyer: Miner Warren H Trustee &
Price: $12500
Addr: Citrus Springs: 02146 W Snowy Egret
PI
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 14 Pb 6 Pg
110 Lot 8 BIk 719


Seller: CItony Development Corporation
Buyer: Escurdla Juan Jose & Claudia
Price: $14400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00850 W Citrus
Springs Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 5 Bik 933

Seller: Cltony Development Corporation
Buyer: Escurdia Juan Jose Lanz &
Price: $14400
Addr: Citrus Springs: 00862 W Citrus
Springs Blvd
Description: Citrus Spgs Unit 13 Pb 6 Pg 98
Lot 4 BIk 933

Seller: Citony Development Corporation
Buyer: Espinoza Humberto & Marbellys
Price: $14400


I F g'Dgl


SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 7D


BUSINESS








Promotional information from the Citrus County Builders Association


17,00NDAY
; 1- 17, 2005


Builders


connectionn


County Builders Association


Your Staff

Your Citrus County Builders Association Staff..
Executive Officer Linda Thompson
Assistant Executive Officer/ '
Membership Coordinator Donna Bidlack
Office Assistant Jodi Bagwell


Hot Weather Is On The Way!
Get the A/C Tuned Today!

NO W 7 Th'E TIME ITO CALL P SEP. VTCE
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ATTENTid T
HOMEOWNER/BUILDERS
Bring Us Your Blueprints! .
Over 10 Manufacturers To Choose From
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On the new two-speed Five Star (Coi
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system, designed and programmed to run a daily
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Know how to protect your property

from damage caused by natural disasters


The following are some preventative steps communities; busi-
nesses and homeowners can take to reduce property and casual-
ty loss caused by natural disasters. Identifying potential hazards
ahead of time can reduce the dangers of serious injury or loss.
Floods
* Elevate homes in flood-prone areas.
* Elevate the main breaker or fuse box, and any heating, venti-
lating, and cooling equipment.
* Install and check valves in building sewer traps to prevent
water from backing up in sewer drains.
* Anchor the legs of your fuel tank into a large concrete slab.
Tornadoes
* Build a safe room in your house. For information on building
a safe room, visit http://www.fema.gov/mit/saferoom/ and
request a copy of "Taking Shelter from the Storm, Building a
Safe Room Inside Your House."
* Determine if your home uses connections between the roof,
walls and foundation.
M Use devices like anchors, clips and straps to secure wood
frame buildings.
* Properly brace the end wall of gabled roofs to reduce lift
loads.
* Reinforce or retrofit garage doors for strength.
Wildfires
M Create a 25' safety zone to separate the home from com-
bustible plants and vegetation. Stonewalls can act as heat shields
and deflect flames. Swimming pools and patios can be a safety
zone.
M Prune all branches around the residence to a height of 8 to 10
feet. Keep trees adjacent to buildings free of dead or dying wood
and moss.
* Remove all dead limb, needles, and debris from rain gutters.
* Store combustible or flammable materials in approved safety
containers and keep them away from the house.
Hurricanes
M Install storm shutters on windows.
* Reinforce your roof with hurricane straps and bracing.
M Reinforce garage doors.
* Ensure double doors are secured at the top and bottom,


adding bolts or pins where needed.
Know the difference between a hurricane watch and a hurri-
cane warning.
A hurricane watch means there is the threat of a hurricane.
Listen to news reports, bring in outdoor furniture, remove out-
side antennas, board-up windows and review an evacuation
plan.
A hurricane warning means a hurricane is expected within
24 hours.
Turn off utilities, move furniture to upper levels of the house
if you are in a storm surge area and store valuables and person-
al papers in a waterproof container.


'C Model 5685 Pine Ridge BlId.
Localed in Pine Ridge Emiales.
A ebsile: ""iu.goldcremlhomes.com
mail: sales,' goldcreslhomes.com
1-800-286-1551
s Co unt... 0(352) 563-1551
Citrus County 2003 Builder of the Year-


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2004-2005 CCBA Officers and Directors


President
Dan Galbraith Rusaw Homes
President-Elect
Chuck Sanders SanderSon Bay Fine Homes
First Vice President
Linda Daly Daly & Zilch (Florida) Inc.
Associate Vice President
Darrell Reneau Central Florida Gas
Second Associate Vice President
Rich Gelfand Sherwin Williams
Treasurer
Gaston Hall Hall Brothers of Citrus County
Secretary
Peggy Wheeler Wheeler Construction, Inc.
Immediate Past President
Ron Lieberman Nu-Era Homes Inc.
Immediate Past Associate Vice President
Joe Bell Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
Builder Directors
Greg Conard Gold Crest Homes
Larry Tate Sweetwater Homes of Citrus


Mike Moberley Tropical Window
Peggy Wheeler Wheeler Construction, Inc.
Associate Directors
Katie Lucas Bay Area Air Conditioning
Jim Crosley Crosley Group Realty
Stan Solovich Crowley & Company Advertising
Todd Workman Suncoast Plumbing & Electric
Life Directors
Gaston Hall Hall Brothers of Citrus County
Rainer Jakob Citrus County Sheriff's Office
John Osborne Pinecrest Building Corporation
Chuck Sanders SanderSon Bay Fine Homes
Dick Dolbow Citrus County School Board
Gerry Gaudette Gaudette Electric
Lorie Clark-Mills Clark Construction
Chris Ensing Southern Exposure Construction
Lloyd Myer Sherwin Williams
Jim Loos Schlabach Security & Sound
Larry Triana Triana Coast to Coast Pools
George Rusaw Rusaw Homes
Chuck Sanders SanderSon Bay Fine Homes


Citrus







Promotional information from the Citrus County Builders Association





Builders connectionn


l Irfetaro i6i Briders Aoiatin


Should I hire a professional?


Do-it-yourself (DIY) projects
have skyrocketed in popularity
in recent years on the'heels of
Martha Stewart Living, HGTV,
and other popular home
improvement shows and publi-
cations. And, for certain small
projects, a DIY project can be
rewarding and fun if you are
prepared and have the proper
skills. But before you start
knocking down walls and taking
out wiring, ask yourself the fol-
lowing questions:
* Do you have a clear idea of
what you want your project to
look like?
* Do you have the time to com-
plete this project (be realistic!)?


* Have you ever undertaken a
project like this before?
* Do you know everything you
will need (materials, tools, etc.)
to complete the project?
* Are you familiar with the
applicable building codes and
permits?
* Do you enjoy physical labor?
* Do you have all the tools you
will need?
* Do you have the necessary
skills for this project?
M If not, do you have the time
and resources to learn these
skills?
* Where will you obtain the
necessary materials?
* If you cannot complete the


Project according to your origi-
nal schedule, are you (and your
family) prepared, to handle the
resulting inconvenience?
* Will you.need assistance with
this project? If so, who will
assist you? Do they have the
time and skills required for this
project?
* Do you understand all the
safety issues associated with
this project?
* Are you familiar with the
architecture and structural
makeup of your home (i.e., how
knocking down one wall will
affect the rest of the structure)?
* Have you considered the hid-
den costs associated with doing


it yourself time, tools, and the
possibility that you may actual-
ly decrease the value of your
house if the result isn't up to
professional standards?
It is easy to look at the cost of
hiring a professional remodeler
and think only of labor and
materials. But remember that a
professional remodeler offers
you an important service years
of experience, the right tools, a
network of suppliers and sub-
contractors, and an in-depth
understanding of legal regula-
tions, cost estimating, schedul-
ing, and the latest construction
techniques.


Guide to choose the right contractor


Beware of con artists they
may:
* Target the elderly, unin-
formed and the young and inex-
perienced.
* Focus on driveway paving,
roofing and painting.
* Solicit door-to-door claiming
to have "just finished a job
down the street."
* Arrive in unmarked vans or
trucks.
* Have a post office box
address with no street address,
or give a local motel as their
address.
* Promise to use your home as
a "demonstration model" at a
bargain price.
* Offer to work for you only if
you will obtain any necessary
building permits, which makes
you responsible for the work
done.
* Ask for all the money up
front.


How to find a reputable and
reliable contractor:
* Check to see if your contrac-
tor has fulfilled the professional
and occupational licensing
requirements established by
your city, county and the Florida
Dept. of Business &
Professional Regulation.
* Determine how long a con-
tractor has been in business.
You may wish to check with
local building supply retailers.
An established contractor with a
reputation for using quality
materials and paying his bills
with suppliers is more likely to
do quality work for you.
* Check with the Citrus County
Builders Association, (352)
746-9028 to determine if the
contractor is a member in good
standing, and .to see what
resources are available to check
if complaints have been filed
against the contractor.


After following these options,
consider everything you have
learned before hiring a contrac-
tor.
* Ask for references of people
for whom the contractor has
done work and check them out.
Narrowing the field
M Choose several contractors
and obtain a written estimate
from each. Explain what you
want done, specifying such
items as the quality and type of
materials.
* Obtain detailed estimates
from several contractors for
material specifications, how
long the job will take and the
total cost.
* Be suspicious of a contractor
who offers the fastest, cheapest
job on a "you must act now"
basis. Poor workmanship, infe-
rior materials, and unfinished
jobs are often the result.
* Get the agreement in writing.


Tips
* Avoid any contractor who
requires advance payment.
Arrange to pay after the work is
completed or in regular pay-
ments.
* Don't sign the work comple-
tion certificate until all work is
completed to your satisfaction.
* Avoid paying cash.
* If you are financing the
improvement or repair, compare
the interest rates and payments
of several lending institutions,
especially if you are considering
a second mortgage to. finance
improvements.
* If your contract exceeds
$2,500, you should become
familiar with the Florida
Construction Lien Law.
A notarized release of lien
will help ensure that you will
not have to face double payment
or possible loss of property to
the unpaid parties.


2004-2005 CCBA Officers and Directors


President
Dan Galbraith Rusaw Homes
President-Elect
Chuck Sanders -
SanderSon Bay Fine Homes
First Vice President
Linda Daly -
Daly & Zilch (Florida) Inc.
Associate Vice President
Darrell Reneau -
Central Florida Gas
Second Associate
Vice President
Rich Gelfand Sherwin Williams
Treasurer
Gaston Hall -
Hall Brothers of Citrus County
Secretary
Peggy Wheeler -
Wheeler Construction, Inc.
Immediate Past President
Ron Lieberman -


Nu-Era Homes Inc.
Immediate Past
Associate Vice President
Joe Bell Sherwin Williams
Builder Directors
Greg Conard Gold Crest Homes
Larry Tate -
Sweetwater Homes of Citrus
Mike Moberley Tropical Window
Peggy Wheeler -
Wheeler Construction, Inc.
Life Directors
Gaston Hall -
Hall Brothers of Citrus County
Rainer Jakob -
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
John Osborne -
Pinecrest Building Corporation
Chuck Sanders -
SanderSon Bay Fine Homes
Dick Dolbow -


Citrus County School Board
Gerry Gaudette Gaudette Electric
Lorie Clark-Mills -
Clark Construction
Chris Ensing -
Southern Exposure Construction
Lloyd Myer Sherwin Williams
Jim Loos The Home Depot
Larry Triana -
Triana Coast to Coast Pools
George Rusaw Rusaw Homes
Chuck Sanders -
SanderSon Bay Fine Homes
Associate
Directors
Katie Lucas -
Bay Area Air Conditioning
Jim Crosley Crosley Goup Realty
Stan Solovich -
Crowley & Company Advertising
Todd Workman -
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric


SUNDAY
JuLY 17, 2005
.;;-":" :;~ ~.1.,..?3 : ,


CCBA New Members

The following new members for June:
Fly-N-Inn Inc
Franklin Realty Consultants of Citrus County
Keene Contractor's Inc.
Nautilus Construction LLC
Spectrum Global Networks
University of Florida Citrus County Extension



Citrus County Builders

Association calendar of

events for 2005

Mark your calendar for these upcoming
Citrus County Builders Association events:

2005 Golf Outing
At Black Diamond Ranch
Monday, Oct. 10.
Watch for dates and more information
on these upcoming CCBA events:
2005 1st Annual Truck Night

2005 Home & Outdoor Show
Nov. 12 & 13, 2005


Build your new storage building
or workshop for less!
* Specializing in all aspects of
pre-engineered metal
buildings.
* Commerical grade
* Personalized service
-Total building package
installed by our crews
* Locally owned & operated -
over 15 years

Fly-N-Inn, Inc.
General Contractors & Steel Erectors
352-447-3558 Toll Free 877-447-3632 Inglis, FlI u cson19


Florida's Award Winning
11 A

www.citrusbuilders.com



Need somewhere

to hold your

special event or

business seminar?


Use our recently renovated hall!

Call the CCBA at 352-746-9028 or
e-mail donnab@citrusbuilders. coin
for rate details and information


BEST.

746-6500
Models on Pine Ridge Blvd.
CRC# 009635 www.flrh.com


*TRAIN & EDUCATE 'TRAIN & EDUCATE 'TRAIN & EDUCATE 'TRAIN & EDUCATE*



ATTENTION CONSTRUCTION z


INDUSTRY BUSINESS OWNERS... m

z. Are you tired of the same excuses? c
z Not enough qualified people to do the work? 0

!- Now is the time to join the CCBA's m

,, "BUILDING CAREERS PARTNERSHIP"

< And support the Withlacoochee Technical Institute's

"ACADEMY OF BUILDING CAREERS"

.w Call Today for more information 1

z CCBA (352) 746-9028 C

WTI (352) 726-2430 Day Classes ext. 244*Night Classes ext. 281


*TRAIN & EDUCATE *TRAIN & EDUCATE TRAIN & EDUCATE *TRAIN & EODULCA'





IOD SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


CHipNICE*f








ClassusleoSy


Serving all of Citrus County, including Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosassa Springs, Sugarmill Woods,
Floral City, Citrus Springs, Ozello, Inglis, Hernando, Citrus Hills, Chassahowitzka, Holder, Lecanto and Yankeetown.


344 9 M n. 'F i..8 a ~ 5p :0 p .m -5 m .


- 563-5966



726-1441

Outside of Citrus County or Citrus Springs call:

1-888-852-2340


Sunday Issue................ 5pm Friday
Sunday Real Estate.......... 3pm Friday
Monday Issue...........5:30 pm Friday
Tuesday Issue.... .. ..... 1 pm Monday
Wednesday Issue..........1 pm Tuesday
Thursday Issue...... 1 pm Wednesday
Friday Issue..............1 pm Thursday
Saturday Issue...... ........ 1pm Friday


6 Lines for 10 Days!
2 items totaling

'1 '150 ...................$5

S151 400............. 050

'401 -'800.............. 15

$801 -$1,500..........$2050
Restrictions apply. Offer applies to private parties only.


All ads require prepayment.





VISA.


BHRG IT k dOR h


ew sure iv t i ec your advertIisement tl
first day it appears. We cannot be
responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion. Adjustments are made only
for the portion of the ad that is in error.



Advertisements may be canceled as
soon as results are obtained. You will be
billed only for the dates the ad actually
appears in the paper, except for specials.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same
as the deadlines for placing ads.


SPEIALNOICE 00-05 HLP ANED[05160 FINANCIAL 1.80-91 SERVICS 201-26 ANIMAS 400-15VlFi. MOBI UrSIE OMS[OR RENT ORISAL.E 500-545
RE.6ETAT FR ENT57-60.RALESATEFO*SLE 01750VAAN PRPETY81089 TANSORATONu0493


HOOKING UP I
W.M. financially secure
would like to get
acquainted online with
slim under 40 girl who is
bored and wants more
? Send me info. about
you with e-mail or
phone #, and I will
respond. Blind Box
862-M, c/o Chronicle,
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River, FL
34429
LETS SMELL THE
ROSES TOGETHER!
Seeking attractive Lady
40-55 who enjoys dining
out & weekend trips out
of town. Looking to
share quality times
together & wants the
nicer things in life.
Call 228-1579
LOOKING FOR TRIM
petite gal'who likes to
go on weekend trips.
Camping, motorcycle
riding, so on. For lasting
relationship. No
smoking or drugs.
Being employed
is not important.
352-209-0151
Single Male, in my
40's looking for old
fashion girl, under 50,
who's thin to med built.
Enjoys the outdoors
and is looking for some-
one to share life with.
PJ (305) 984-2986
Southern Bell, young
at heart, SWF, seeking
SWM, non smoking
68 78 yrs. old, for
-possible LTR, loves
camping, movies, flea
markets, dining out,
and cooking in your


2 MALE LOP EAR
BUNNIES TO
GOOD HOME
2 FEMALE
LAB/DALMATIONS.
HOME CHECK
REQUIRED, PREFER TO
KEEP TOGETHER.
(352) 795-6345




Your world first


** FREE SERVICE**
Cars/Trucks/Metal
Removed REE. No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
Catahoola Mix
2 years, spayed female,
needs room to run.
(352) 795-1957
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message
FOR ADOPTION: Sweet,
loving 5 yr old Siamese
mix female cat, indoor
only. (352) 344-1982


FREE
Two Washing
Machines,
you remove.
(352) 628-2535
FREE
Horse manure, clean
no wood chips. Cit.
Springs/Dunnellon area
489-2325
FREE KITTENS
Fluffy, long haired,
multi-colored. Almost 6
weeks old.
(352) 726-7106
FREE KITTENS. Calicos,
Persian/Angora mix.
Long hair. Beautiful,
(352) 621-4800
FREE LOVEABLE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME,
7-wks old,
(352) 726-4534
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
FREE TO GOOD HOME
2 female 6 month old
Pit mix puppies. Both
have all shots & are
housebroken. Good
with kids. Please save
from the Pound
(352) 302-3492
Free to good home,
Two Sheep,
mother/daughter,
7 & 5 yrs.
(352) 489-3323
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
isseeking Donationsof use-
able
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
\b'-inteers ore needed h the
Home Store.
Store hours are:
9am-5pm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
information.
WANTED: INDOOR
HOME ONLY
for spayed 6 yr old
Dalmatian. Not hyper.
Very loving and
intelligent. Better with
older children.
(352) 344-4824


-11 a


Need a job 249-1029 GOOD & SWEET
$6 gallon. Fresh picked
or a Black Lab mix M 3yrs to order. (352) 795-7355
qualified energetic & playful ]
gets along with other
employee? dogs NO small
children 794-7495
r a Wanted poodles and LOST 2 FEMALE
This areas small dogs suitable for SHIHTZU'S
# seniors adoptive Vicinity of Dunklin,
homes available Between Citrus Springs
employment 527-9050 & Citronelle,
(352) 465-5729
source! All pets are spayed/ LOST OLDER female
neutered, cats tested Chihuahua, Inverness
for leukernia/aids, area. Answers to
Cdogs are tested for "Lucky" Reward
Classifed heart worm and all (352) 344-2157
shots are current PLEASEII



SVenturing Crew 452


S0Golf Tournament


Boy Scouts of nAmerica
Ncl i c,[mble ithandlc.p
Saturday, October 1, 2005
8:30 a.m. shotgun start
El Diablo Golf & Country Club
$51 pr: pla.,'I r irilud I.' hole grtll Ice,.,
hreakl.ts. lunch and Il drink duqJun. jad
aller pla,. i anid gratuliy. PRIZES,
RAFFLES arid mrnc PRIZES

A h-i le in :ne 'tn the Ird hole wi.rn j ne car
ilhat Prn&s lo'r ith clo' si to the pin on while
#6 fIr '-mcn arid hole I ) for men Pij'c-
Ior longer Jinc inr lairvway i on hole' nll Irid
h,,c h2 f.-.r men Firi. secondd arid third ,in
ash prize,
All entries mist be subhmilled h
September 24. 2005.
For information call. Dili,.nWkiielja at
7r-9222 or paj Rundto at 344- I 140


CHRoNICLE


LUOSI tSEAL UPOINI
Siamese & Persian mix,
neutered male. Lost
Wed. Vicinity: Citrus
Hills, Fresno Ave. area
(352) 746-0648
LOST SET OF DODGE
TRUCK & TRAILER KEYS
with keyless remote,
Inverness area
(352) 637-5357
SMALL WHITE FEMALE
POODLE TYPE DOG,
beige & white, lost area
of S. Apopka and Kings
Lane. Answers to name
of "Buddy" (short for
Buttercup.) REWARD"
("352) '3441_8Q05


BROWN DOG
LONG WAVY HAIR
Very well mannered
and very sweet.
Crystal Manor area.
(352) 795-9580
Found Dock Box,
courtesy Dennis
Call (352) 564-0889




SDivorces
SBankruptcy
I *Name Change
S* Chid Support
S*Wills
|Inverness............ 63740221
CIR.1 &omos295.591

"MR CITRUS COUNTY"











ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders


*CHRONICLE*
INV. OFFICE
106 W. MAIN ST.
Courthouse Sq. next
to Angelo's Pizzeria
Mon-Fri 8:30a-5p
Closed for Lunch










ATTRACTIVE SWF
seeking male
companion. Candi,
352-628-1036



Elder care 24 hrs. super-
vision, room & meal
incl. call Mary or Irma
795-2762, 628-9961



2 BURIAL SPACES
Memorial Gardens
in Beverly Hills, Garden
of Ten Commandments
$4,200. (502) 935-8756
FOUNTAINS MEM. PARK
Crypt inside Chapel of
Peace for 1 or 2. Mov-
ing out of state. Below
Market value. Call
Donna at 628-2555.




Administrative
Assistant

Mercedes Homes
seeks individual with 3
years professional
administrative
experience. Must be
skilled In MS Office,
organized, detailed
oriented, and able to
multi-task. Real Estate
experience helpful,
but not required.
E-mail resume to
palderson@
merhomes.com
or fax to
352-563-5810.
EOE/DFWP.


BOOKKEEPER/
MARKETING

For Wholesale
Nursery. Exp. in
Quick books, Word
and Excel
Fax Resume:
352-465-1351


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET


OFFICE MANAGER

Experienced w/ Word
Excel & dispatching.
Dicks Moving
Fax Resume to
(352) 628-7889





Fun Busy Salon
Searching for
enthusiastic, Stylist
& Nail Tech, call In and
walk in, chemical
services dally
Before 5pm 628-6379
After 5pm 628-3654


SIGN-ON BONUS
LPN's
Full time 9:30 p- 8a
Full time 3p 1p
Part time 6a 2p
For ALF.
Paid by experience,
Benefits after 60 days
Vacation After. 90
Days. Apply In Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE



DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
for 150 Bed Skilled
Nursing Facility
CRYSTAL RIVER
HEALTH AND REHAB
has a DON position
available for our 150
bed facility, EXCITING
opportunity for
anyone who can
follow in the foot
steps of a DON who is
reclocating and has
set a high standard of
care in our facility.
Florida RN licensed
nurse who has
long term care
experience, with 1-2
years experience as a
DON or ADON. Self
motivated, hands on
individual who enjoys
leading a team who
care for residents
and staff In a positive
environment.
Competitive salary
with full benefit
package offered.
PLEASE FAX YOUR
RESUME FOR
CONFIDENTIAL
CONSIDERATION
ATTENTION:
ADMINISTRATOR
FAX: 352-795-5848
PAGER:
352-628-8306#
Enter your number
CRYSTAL RIVER
HEALTH AND
REHABILITATION
136 NEW 12TH AVE.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
(352) 795-5044


$ 2500 $
-SIGN ON
BONUS FOR
LPN/RN -F/T
3-11 & 11-7
*Competitive pay
based on exp.
"Generous extra -
shift bonus & shift dif.
*Paid vacation after
90 days
Contact Cheryl Fix,
DON
Health Center @
Brentwood
352-746-6600
ext. # 8694
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug-free facility
3-11 & 11-7
Nurses

Avante at Inverness is
currently accepting
applications for full
and part time nurses
for 3-11 & 11-7 nurses.
Avante offers ,
excellent wagesrand
benefits including shift
differentials
and bonuses,
Please apply in
person at:
304 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness

aorotive
Your Iworld first.
Ev'erv Day




Healthcare


A+ Healthcare
Home Health
Agency

Immediate Work

C.N.A's & HHA's
Day Hours
(352) 564-2700

oCNAs *
3-11

Shift differential
Bonuses abundant
Highest paid in
Citrus County.
Join our team,
Cypress Cove
Care Center
(352) 795-8832

Come Join our
Caring Team

PT ACTIVITY ASST.
Experienced
preferred.
High energy level
a must.
Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness
EOE'

DIETARY AIDE
FULLTIME

Apply in person to
Crystal River
Health & Rehab
* 136 N.E. 12 th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-5044 EOE


RNs LPNs aOT
HHAs Homemakers
Per Diem
Join the team at Housecall Home
Healthcare, one of the leading providers of
quality home care services in the Southeast,
and get the respect & flexibility that you
deserve as a health care professional. As our
CRYSTAL RIVER AGENCY continues to grow,
we need dynamic self-starters who enjoy
working one on one with patients in the
privacy of their own homes. All positions
require appropriate current licensure/
certification for the state of Florida, a valid
driver's license, at least I year of clinical
experience, ideally in home care, & good
communication skills for interacting with
patients! Enjoy flexible scheduling!!! RNs,
LPNs & OTs will also benefit from Internet-
based continuing education earn CEU
credits! Please call Kathie Assmus
Toll Free at 800-545-5996, email:
recruitment@housecall.com or apply
online at www.housecall.com EOE/AA.
HHA213900961.

HOUSECALL.
-- Health s In Your --Home
Health Services In Your Home


FULL TIME
LPN/MA
Needed for busy
Urology office.
Please fax resume to
R. Wardlow
352-527-8863 or mail
to P.O. Box 1420,
Lecanto, FL 34460


FULL TIME
MEDICAL ASSISTANT

Busy office Phlebotomy,
Vitals. Needs to be a
Team Player.
Send resume to
800 Medical Court East,
Inverness, Fl. 34452 or
Fax 352-726-8193


GENERAL
DENTIST
Well established-
multi-office and
specialty practice is
searching for a
full time
ASSOCIATE
& SR. ASSOCIATE
General Dentist for
the Crystal River area.
These positions offer
an excellent com-
pensation including:
salary guarantee vs
bonus %, full lab,
malpractice
reimbursement, CE
allowance, and a
Corporate benefit
package including:
401 K, medical,
dental, life and
disability insurance.
Please e-mail your
C.V. to: Richard
Gordon at rgordon@
brightnow.com
or Fax: 305-466-0781
or Call: 305-206-1539

HAND THERAPY
REHAB TECH
Citrus Hills, FL
Fulltime
Seeking energetic,
reliable individual to
work in rehab setting
with our therapy team.
Duties include the
processing of
treatment paperwork
and assisting with
patient care.
Experience desired.
Excellent pay and
benefits to include
quarterly Employee
Incentive Plan.
Fax resume to
(352) 382-0212


* RN, F/T
* RN (PRN)
* HHA
* Homemaker/
Companion

ULTIMATE
NURSING CARE
A Home Healthcare
Agency
1-352-564-0777
EOE


There's A PLAN

For Your Future HERE


There's Something For YOU Here

Citrus Memorial Hospital, the community's preferred resource for acute care, is excited about
our plans for a healthy future. Join us now to find out what we have in mind for youl

NOW HIRING
NURSING
RNs: PCU, Home Health & RNs/LPNs/CMAs: Allen Ridge
Staffing Resource Pool Family Care, Beverly Hills CPC

ADDMONAL OPPORTUNMES
Chemistry Supervisor Incentive Transcriptionist
Physical Therapist Decision Support Assistant
Physical Therapy Assistant Environmental Service Technician
Cath Lab Tech Nutritional Services Aide
Surgical Tech

If you've been thinking ahead to tomorrow, come see why
your next career destination is here. Please apply online at:


www.citrusmh.com
Equal Oppoltunily Employe,


HOME HEALTH
AIDE/CNA
Position in Lecanto
area. Good pay,
exp. req.
CareStaf
1-800-881-4410
or fax 352-351-4389
or apply online
www.carestaf.net

LCSW
the Centers
is seeking a Licensed
Clinical Social Worker
to work in our
Children's Services
Program. Master's
Degree in the human
service field with
Florida LCSW and
ability to Supervise
required. Must have
a min 5 yrs exp with a
broad knowledge of
psychotherapeutic
theory & practice.
Please submit salary
requirements. .
Comprehensive
benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE, send, fax,
or email resume to:
HR, 5664 SW 60th
Ave., Ocala, FL 34474
hr@thecenters.us
(352) 291-5580


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/Cell 422-3656



LPN / RN
needed for busy
Primary. care/Pain Man-
agement practice. Fax
resume & salary req

MEDICAL ASSISTANT
F/T needed for
busy physician's office.
Good Benefits and
Competitive Salary.
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-6333

MEDICAL CLERK
F/T POSITION

Seeking dependable
team player with exc.
phone, computer
and organizational
abilities. Position
requires prior
Medical office exp.
with knowledge of
insurance billing.
Fax resume to
352-746-0720


Celebrate Summer...

Join a Winning

Team!!
The following are positions
for which we are accepting applications:
RNs: Surgical Services (FT or Per Diem)
Women's & Family Center/OB (Per Diem)
ER/Triage (FT & Per Diem)
MedSurg, Telemetry, ICU
Clinical Educator
Other Opportunities:
Physical Therapist (FT or Per Diem)
Physical Therapy Assistant (FT or Per Diem)
Respiratory Therapist (nights)
Medical Transcriptionist (FT & Per Diem)
Public Relations Coordinator
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select positions!
SRRMC is part of the
HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax 352-795-8464
Job Line #352-795-8418
Email:
Linda:Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com j )
Web Site: www.srrmc.com T
EeE/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE 'A'-,

@ SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


Where Rqrards.
S Respect are-

right at home.
At BayCare Home Care, we're providing the
best in high-quality, specialty-focused home
health care to more than 50,000 Floridians. And
that's why you'll feel right at home with us!


RGSTEE USE e ien.5


Learn More When You
Search Poaibotos & Apply Online
www.baycarehomecare.come


You may also contact Mary Miller, RN,
at (800) 746-5255; or fax resume to
(352) 795-1914;,or apply in person at
1582 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34423.
JOIN OUR TEAM TODAY!



HomeCare EOE/AA
BE'IER HEALTH. RIGHT Ar HOME. M/F/D/VN


I I


cl--Asslr-lul3s


CIrmIis COUN'IY (FIL.) CIIHONICIE


I


1










CITRUS Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


-"Me -aMei


MEDICAL OFFICE
seeking fulltime back/
front office assistant.
Medical office exp.
preferred, Please fax
resume to: 341-4477

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST/
BACK OFFICE
for family practice.
No experience req'd.
Fax 795-2296


NURSING
ASSISTANT
Do you have nursing
exp. but are not
certified? If you're
willing to work hard
and have a positive
attitude, come
apply at Barrington
Place. Strong
communication and
customer service skills
a must.
Excellent benefits.
Fun place to work
and

Apply at: ,
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy. Lecanto
No Phone Calls

*PT*PTA*OTo

OTA*SLP *
Palm Garden has
full-time and PRN
opportunities for
licensed therapists
and assistants in
Ocala. Active rehab
programs include
sub-acute & out-pt
programs with a
diverse caseload.
Experienced team.
Excellent benefits:
Health / Dental /
Vision / Life
401K / Life/
Flex Spending
Sign-On Bonus/
Paid Time Off
Tuition
Reimbursement
Call Glenn Jones at
854-6262, fax
resume to 854-0010
or apply in person
at Palm Garden,
2700 SW 34th Street
Ocala, Florida
34474
rehab.pgocala@
chcmfl.com
EOE/DFWP


NEED HELP
Call AA Hotline
352-621-0599 or www.
ncintergroup.com


















A WHOLE HAULING
& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermist.com
F AFFORDABLE ,
I DEPENDABLE I
STrash, Trees, Brush
S App. Furn, Const,.

Debris & Garages
352-697-1126
DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal,
& trim. Lic. 99990000273
Insured 352-637-0681
Discount Tree Service
Uc #73490233097
Free est/quallty work
(352) 621-3840
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Lic
#0256879352-341-6827
STUMP GRINDING
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlin
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe itt"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Lic#000783-0257763 &
Ins. Exp'd friendly serve.
Lowest rates Free
estlmates,352-860-1452




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
All Phase Construction
Quality painting & re-
pairs. Faux fin. #0255709
352-586-1026 637-3632
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
, DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3765
FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
- Free Estimates,
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631


NOW HIRING
CNA's/HHA's or
Dependable
Compassionate
People who want to
become CNA's/HHA's
CALL LOVING CARE
M-F, 9:00 AM to 4:00PM
(352) 860-0885

RECEPTIONIST
NEEDED
Are you dependable,
honest, organized and
efficient? BayCare
Home Care is seeking
this type of individual to
fill our Part-Time
Receptionist position.
Excellent benefits
included! Office duties
include filing, answering
phones and other light
office work. If you are a
team player and are
interested, please call
Amy Moore at 795-4495
or you may fax your
resume to 795-1914.

Therapeutic
Behavioral
On-Site Therapists
the Centers
is seeking Master's
Level Therapists for
Marion and Citrus
Counties. Experience
working with children
in TBOSS environment,
providing services in
schools and at home
counseling services to
emotionally disturbed
children required.
Flexible schedule.
Master's degree In
field of Human
Services required with
min of 2 yrs related
exp. $30,000
annually. Compre-
hensive benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE, send, fax,
or email resume to:
HR, 5664 SW 60th
Ave., Ocala, FL 34474
hr@ihecenters.us
(352) 291-5580

Work you own
HOURS!!!

Home Health Aides
Homemakers
Paying the
HIGHEST
in the COUNTY!!!
Nurse Temps Inc.
Call today
352-344-9828


George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a profession-
al, Mike (352) 628-7277
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263




Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521
QUALITY OUTBOARD
REPAIRS, Full & dock
side service. Lic#9999
0002670 (352) 628-3331




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Uc#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352) 400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




CNA Private duty, your
home or mine, must be
ambulatory. 30 yrs exp.
(352) 795-9045
Elder Care 24 hrs. super-
vision, room & meal
incl., Call Mary or Irma
795-2762, 628-9961




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533




FAITH DEAN'S Cleaning
Family Busn. Since '96
Free Est. Lic# 0256943
(352) 341-8439 Home
476-4603 cell
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334




ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes. 637-4373
CRC 1326872


PT DIETARY AIDE
AM & PM
Shifts available

Apply in person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness EOE






Assistant County
Attorney

Professional legal
work performing a
variety of difficult and
responsible legal
services for the
County. Primarily
responsible for the
prosecution for
county ordinances
and violations.
Prepares complex
cases for hearing;
drafts resolutions,
ordinances and
documents; renders
legal opinions to
County departments,
boards, committees
and agencies. Assists
in the development
of policies and
procedures. Performs
legal research;
reviews contracts,
leases and other
legal documents.
Represents the
County in hearings
and litigation;
investigates different
matters; attends
meetings; advises
Board members and
County staff on legal
aspects of various
matters. Member of
the Florida Bar.
Experience in the
prosecution of
criminal matters in
county/circuit court
desired.
Salary range
$49,730.15 to
$74,594.70 per
annum DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
Send resume or
apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resource Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
EOE/ADA


TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
comp. cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. Ins. CBC avail
352-563-0104/228-1282
Rescreening By Guido
Small pools, Lanais,
Screen rooms, & more
352-527-1320 Cell,
352-476-5073




AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning Qualitfy
Work, Low Prices, FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 422-1956




"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. Lic 0253851
(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Elec. etc. Lic. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
Maint & repair prob-
lems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395

AFFORDABLE,
DEPENDABLE
| HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl. Furn, Const, I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126

ALL TYPES OF HOME
IMPROVEMENTS &
REPAIRS #0256687
352-422-2708
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
FRessure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable, Ins
0256271352-465-9201
Get My Husband Out
Of The Housel
Custom woodwork,
furniture repairs/refinish,
home repairs, etc.
Lic. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Movlng.Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Uc 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
Home Repairs & Maint.
Quality Workmanship
Llc99990001061
Tree Service Available
(352) 621-3840


DIRECTOR
OF ADMISSIONS
Crystal River Health
& Rehabilitation is
seeking an individual
who is willing to work
in a competitive
health care market
that has been
established by an
outstanding
representative of our
facility. The person
who is well organized,
energetic, tenacious
and has previous
customer sales and
service experience
and enjoys working
with the elderly
will succeed in this
position, Previous
health care
marketing
experience and
Bachelor Degree
preferred. Must be
able to travel outside
of county. Salaried
position with benefits
including incentive
bonus plan,
Send resume or
apply in person to
Administrator-
Lyn Brecher
Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
136 NE 12th Avenue
Phone (352) 795-5044
Fax (352) 795-5848
EOE DFWP






Your world first


Need a job
or a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1

employment
source!



C Classifieds


NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
servlces.Lic.0257615/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
P & S ENTERPRISES
General Maint. repair,
pressure washing &
painting, free estimates
Lic. & Ins. 9990002510
(352) 522-1177
PAUL/Mobile Home
Maintenance, painting
& clean up, Lic9999000
2321 (352) 344-8131
or (352) 697-4197
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks. Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263
X/CHEAP HANDYMAN ,
CLEAN UP/HAULING
"FREE" SCRAP REMV
344-1902 AC 23082




JT'S TELEPHONE SERVICE
Jack & Wire installation
& repair, Free esti-
mates: CALL 527-1984




I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000




AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE
| HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages
352-697-1126

All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONEI
MovlngCleanouts. &
Handyman Service
Lic 99990000665
(352) 302-2902

HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const. debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
Shop At Home


CLASSIFIED




EXEC
HOUSI
Engineering For 114 Ri
Director Hotel in Cr
vears a rior


11


CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic.#2713, Insured.
Free Estimates.
(352) 422-2019




BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell

Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453
(352) 795-7095, Dallas
GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm. /Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences.
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431




John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You,
ccc 1325492.
628-3516/800-233-5358


Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types! Lic. & Insured.
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Patio- Walks.
Concrete Specialists.
Lic#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates. Uc. #2000.
Ins. 795-4798.
DANIEL ENO CONCRETE
All types, All Sizes.
Lic #2506. Ins.
352-637-5839
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
Lic#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Drive & replace,


DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
Lic. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
morL. 30n \vrs ex o


AM HIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798, 425-8184


in position
Health Insi
Vacation
Fax resume
require
352-75


CUTIVE
EKEEPER
oom Resort
ystal River. 3
experience
n required.
urance, 401,
& Holidays
e with salary
ments to
95-3179


Professional
management
position supervising a
division consisting of
four distinct sections
and approximately
25 employees. Plans,
delegates, reviews
assignments and
ensures completion
of projects.
Responsible for or
supervises
engineering and
design work and
projects, directing
field work, plan
design and
preparation and
prepares cost
estimates and
specifications.
Represents the
department in
meetings with the
public, engineering
consultants, County
management staff,
state agencies, etc.
Oversees the design
and construction of
multi-million dollar
roadway
construction projects.
Prepares and
manages the County
roadway capital
improvement
program. Performs
related work as
required. Graduation
from a four year
college or university
with a degree in civil
engineering.
Considerable
experience In
professional
engineering.
Registration as a PE in
the State of Florida or
able to obtain Florida
Registration within six
months of
employment.
Pay range
$56,883.69 to
$85,324.48 per
annum DOQ.
Apply at or send
resume to
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W, Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto,
Florida 34461.
Please visit our
website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
EOE/ADA


CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 634-1584,




Wall & Ceiling Repairs
Drywall, Texturing,
Painting, Vinyl. Tile
work. 30 yrs. exp.
344-1952 CBC058263


r-Can t^


BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways.
Call (352) 628-4743.
D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
Landclearing, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch,
Uc. Ins.(352)302-7096
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All types of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523
(352) 628-3924




A MOST AFFORDABLE *
& REASONABLE *
Land & Lot Clearing
Also Fill Dirt deliveries,
Free est. Lic. insured.
(352) 795-9956
All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day lx Clean
Ups. Lot & Tree Clear-
ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
Driveways 302-6955







HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &
Ditching (352) 344-4288
or (352) 302-7234 cell




D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272
McBEE LANDSCAPING
Shrubs, Trees,
Landscape packages,
Installation & redos
Avail. LIc. #24715
(352) 628-0690


* Homosassa Beacon

* Crystal River Current


SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 11-D


MEI MA


NEEDED 220
AGENT
For key position,
Commercial exp a plus.
Top Pay For the
Right Person.
Reply Blind Box 858-M,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main,
Inverness, FL 34450



PSYCHOLOGIST/
LCSW
as independent
contractor
Flex. Hours/Days.
SThis is a great
complement to a
private practice.
Toll free
(866) 940-8182




Public Works
Director
Highly responsible
administrative and
technical work
planning, organizing
and directing public
works functions which
currently Includes
Road Maintenance,
Aquatic services,
Engineering, Utilities
and Solid Waste
Management. BS
degree in public
administration or
function areas in
public works. PE
desirable. Experience
in public works/civil
engineering including
considerable
experience in a
responsible
supervisory capacity.
Related training and
experience may be
substituted for the
minimum
qualifications.
Salary range:
$61,652.50 to
$92,478.10 per
annum. Starting
Salary DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
Send resume with
salary history to or
apply at
Office of Human
Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto FL 34461.


Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up. Some FREE
Services. Prof & Reliable
Call 352-563-9824
A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize in
replugging your yard.
Lic/Ins. (352) 527-9247
Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est. (352) 628-4258
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn.Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service.
Mowing, landscaping,
pressure wash.257-1522
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
P & S Enterprises of
Citrus Inc. Mowing &
Landscape, free est.
Lc. & Ins. 352-522-1177
ELI'S LAWNCARE *
*Landscaping -Tree Srv
Fertilizing .Mowing
Lic. Ins, (352) 613-5855




CRYSTAL PUMP REPAIR
(352) 563-1911
Subs, let pumps, filters
FREE ESTIMATES
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Lic. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


RAINUAN(t.ER
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascia, Siding, Free Est.
LIc. & Ins. 352-860-0714


-ar

Social Programs
Assistant
Responsible position
performing general
and clerical duties
which Include typing
correspondence,
composing letters,
maintaining files,
assembling
information and
record keeping,
Performs accounting
functions,
coordinates
schedules, takes
messages, takes and
transcribes minutes of
the Transportation
Disadvantage Board.
Heavy public and
phone contact.
Graduation from H.S
or GED, Knowledge
of Microsoft Office
Suite of Products and
ability to transcribe
minutes.
$10.26 hourly to start.
Apply at
Citrus County Human
Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than
Friday, July 22, 2005.
EOE/ADA

STATE FARM
Hiring licensed P/C
and/or L/H CSR for
Chuck Everidge's
Agency. Salary, bene-
fits, commission, bonus.
Fax resume to 726-3019





ALL POSITIONS
Apply In Person
HOMOSASSA
RIVERSIDE RESORT
5297 S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa


BARTENDER
NEEDED

In smoking establish-
ment. Apply in person:
Four Acres Tavern
Hwy. 41, Hernando.

COOK
WANTED
Must show stability,
Exp. a must. Exc. pay.
Vacation pay, meal
allowance, Come join
one of the finest
cooking staffs in Citrus
County!
Apply In person,
DILLON'S INN
589 SE, Hwy. 19
Crystal River, 34429

EXP'D LINE COOKS
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Apply In person at
Sugarmill Woods
Country Club at
1 Douglas St.
(352) 382-3838

HIRING ALL
POSITIONS
Apply within at
Peck's Old Port Cove
Ozello. See Craig.

HIRING FRIENDLY
SERVERS
Frankle's Grill
(352) 344-4545

MORNING COOK
needed. Will train.
Cockadoodles Cafe
206 W. Tompins St.
Inverness

SERVERS
Apply at FISHERMAN'S
RESTAURANT, 12311
E. Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness 352-637-5888


/


V


CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking an
energetic individual to
consult businesses on
the use of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire
to work in a fast
paced, fun,
environment please
apply today.
Essential Functions
Develop classified
customers through
cold calling and.
prospecting.
Strong rapport
building,
professional
communication
and good listening
skills
Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing.
Maintain
customers through
servicing after
the initial sale.
Qualifications
High School
diploma or
equivalent.
Prior sales
experience
Advertising or
marketing
experience
preferred.

Send resume to:


1124 N Meadowcresl
Blvd.,
Crystal River, Fl 34429
Fox: (352) 563-5665
EOE, drug screening
for final aplicant


1~




.1


* Inverness Pioneer

* Sumter County Times


* Williston Pioneer Sun-News South Marion Citizen


* Riverland News

* Chiefland Citizen


* Riverland Shopper

* Tri-County Bulletin


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* Citrus County Chronicle The Visitor


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growing newspapers.


A"% CITRUS. COUNT Y






1624 North Meadowcrest Boulevard
Crystal River, FL 34429

(352) 563-6363

www.chronicleonline.com


Plantation Inn
& Golf Resort
Is accepting
applications for a
people oriented
Individual with the
ability to lead and
motivate a team for a
hands-on Front Desk
Manager position.
responsible for hiring,
training, scheduling.
Must have at least
one year
management
experience as front
desk or guest relations
manager. SMS
Property
Management
experience helpful.
Must be able to work
a flexible schedule.
Apply In person at
Human Resources
DFWP, EOE, M/F, D/V









12D SUNDAY, Juiy 17, 2005

Ob SalesHeJI ZR Skil


VILLAGE

"CAREER
OPPORTUNITY AT
VILLAGE CADILLAC
TOYOTA"
Consider joining our
Staff of:
PROFESSIONAL
SALES AND
LEASING
REPRESENTATIVES:

We offer:
Training from the
area's best managers
*Blue/Cross Blue
Shield
*Paid Vacations
*Dental Plan
*401K with employer
contribution
*5 day work week
No experience
necessary but we
expect a professional
appearance and a
strong desire to work.
Come dressed for
success and apply at:
Village Cadillac
Toyota
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
We are a Drug Free
Workplace
$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%1/
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackie
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON
CELLULAR SALES
Great opportunity for
hungry sales people.
Need can-do
attitude, Fax resume:
Charles Pope Cellular
352-564-0142 or call
Otis at 352-634-1705


Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales &
designers to sell &
create advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
ads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service skills.
Fax or mall cover
letter and resume to
HR at:
352-564-2935




1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE
"A- "A- "A


INSURANCE
AGENTS
Career Opp. 15-20
leads per week.
Vested Renewal.
Bonus Trips
Diverse Product line
Serious Inquires only.
(352) 795-3355

REAL ESTATE

Lic. exp. Key
Agent for area.
Unlimited potential.
HOT daily leads, draw
poss. Turn Key Realty,
Huge growth
800-720-0630
Fax 561-659-9373

SALES PEOPLE
NEEDED FOR
Lawn & Pest
Control,
Prefer exp, in the pest
control industry.
2 wks paid training,
benefits, company
vehicle.
Apply in Person
Bray's Pest Control
3447 E Gulf to Lk. Hwy.
Inverness


$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers, solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
Call Now
800-362-0159 24 hours
FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362


On Top of the World
Communities

BENEFITS
401K Medical -Dental
SVisieon Life
ESTIMATOR
Profck tisn esimating
sotere- required,
Tombertex epaplus

deveopmentexpw
Send rescue w!saly
reqsuiementls


8447SW 9St Rd
Ocala FL 34481
or
Applications available at
Main Guard Gate
8447 SW 99f ST RD
Ocala, FL
come
'Findyour place in the
WOrldW
DFI/EOE

A/C INSTALLERS

Exp.preferred,
but will train.
Great pay & benefits
including health
&401K.
Apply: Bay Area A/C
8021 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-2665
EOE DFW

*AC INSTALLERS
*SERVICE TECHS
No whiners, I don't
supply cheese.
Call 352-564-8822

ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Must have Florida
driver's license, hourly
or piece rate. Exp.
preferred, but will
train. Framing exp.
helpful. Apply today
& start tomorrow.
352-726-6547
APPRENTICE OR
TILE SETTER WANTED
Ultimate goal- own your
own business. Call for
info @ 697-2591
AUTO DETAILERS
Exp. HS Buffing. DL
& background check
Req. DFWP
Call 352-302-2863
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
For very busy shop, Exp.
In Diagnostics, Align-
ments & repairs. M-F
only. ASE Cert. Pref. but
not req. Valid Fl. Drvrs.
Lic. req. as well as own
tools. Apply in person or
call Beasley Tire
45 Hwy. 19S, Inglis, Fl.
(352) 447-3174
(352) 563-5256
BENCH JEWELER
NEEDED
with experience, for
established business in
Crystal River. Fax
resume 352-794-4132
or call 352-564-0010
CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH
Apply in Person at:
920 E Ray Street
Hernando
Or call 344-2400

CHET'S SEPTIC


BACKHOE
OPERATOR/SEPTIC
INSTALLER
Benefits, Apply at:
1101 Middle School
Rd. Inverness


S l TrDo r,3 t H- lr, in: r-
r irje or-

* CSrrii.-l- irjr 1 *rHF r :-
* Proper Supervision Paid Vacation
* Finar.:;Ial 1.3bilit, r l- .th:-l F :.,r.amjn
* UnlilTr ed ,..pp.:.rturir, Ji4ii -l.3r,
ifyou aie hiul, ,,rri-A l.3 li .y, nr-r.. -.r .-J-. lr ih.,r
-,n,; .-.: itnr .21.:' rr, p._'4-r,iii.,i or, rI,3 r, ,r,,,3n-m e
tr,.r. :,-r. ir, LF-r... -,. ':' vrr, .3 ,,."1 LiT,

Aprl. ir, r-,r-- iuoIl ,-,p' ,:,Lrhj,-,ui', ,'-rplj,er

LOVE NISSAN/HONDA
352-628-9444
S U.S. .-., H si.a&r...e To ra&Crvytal Rli


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASS A CDL
DRIVER NEEDED
F/T for Dump Trailer, 2
yrs exp. Also P/T driver.
212-8034 or 628-3845

CONCRETE
FINISHERS, BLOCK
LAYERS &
LABORERS

(352) 563-1873

CONSTRUCTION
LABORERS NEEDED
In Homosassa Fl.
Soupcon Inc.
(352) 394-6600
(352) 250-6384
CONSTRUCTION
Local contractor
seeking exp. Framers
Competitive Pay.
447-3225
CONSTRUCTION
SUPERINTENDENT
Min. 2 yrs supervisory
exp. in home building.
Fax to 352-527-7088.
Call 352-400-1567 or
352-527-7022 or email
mary@vbfh.com
CUSTOM
HOME BUILDER
seeking experienced
person to do warranty
work, punch out, and
work closely with
superintendents. Pay
based on experience.
Please fax resume to
352-746-5972


CUSTOM CABINET
BUILDER
Exp Only.
(352) 465-4263
DIESEL
MECHANIC
Experience
required. For trucking
company. Benefits.
1-800-833-8725

DUCT INSTALLER

Trainee Position,
HVAC Contractor
Call 344-0323
CERTIFIED AIR

ELECTRICIANS
With Exp. in service,
residential & T-pole,
(352) 341-2004

EXP. FRAMERS/
CARPENTERS
With tools and trans-
portation. Local work,
352-302-3927
EXP. MARINE
ENGINE TECH.
Citrus Co. Area.
(352) 795-9630
EXP. MASONS &
LABORERS NEEDED
Good pay. Must have
transportation
352-860-2793
EXP. PAINTERS
Needed for local work.
After 6pm (352)
341-3553 or 726-6761


EXP. STEEL
FABRICATORS
& ERECTORS
MIG/STICK a must
8794 W Tradeways Ct.
Homosassa. 628-6674

EXPERIENCED
DUMP TRUCK &
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS

Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170
EXPERIENCED
ROOFERS
Tools & transportation
a must. Dependable.
733 N Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River.
(352) 628-3516
EXPERIENCED
SEALCOATING
STRIPING,
ASPHALT PAVING
DUMP TRUCK
DRIVERS
CDL License TOP PAYI
(352) 563-2122

FRONT END LOADER
OPERATOR
Wanted Front end
Loader operator for
weekly PT work. Job
located In Crystal
River, Experience In
loader operations a
must. For More Info
contact Gene or
Garry @ DES Inc.
Tampa 813-248-3256
or 800-786-3256


EXPERIENCED
SERVICE TECH
Needed For AC
Company must have
good driving record I
Good pay & benefits.
(352) 489-9686

GREAT TRADE
OPPORTUNITY
LP/Natural Gas
Installers & Techs
Exp. preferred, but not
necessary. Drug test
required. Apply at
Anderson Gas Service.
3029 E Thomas St.
Inverness
(352) 344-1059
GREAT TRADE
OPPORTUNITY
LP/Natural Gas
Installers & Techs
Exp. preferred, but not
necessary. Drug test
required. Apply at
Anderson Gas Service,
3029 E Thomas St.
Inverness
(352) 344-1059
GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
Experienced. Call for
appt. 637-1979


c.n /S4;,. Trades
l kills


EXP. FRAMERS ONLY

(352) 726-2041

HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT






Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers,
Excavators.
Next Class: Aug. 1st
-National
Certification
Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training
Services
www.
atsn-schools.com

LABORER
Accepting
Application for
General Construction
Laborers.
Asphalt paving
experience is helpful.
Full time employment
w/ full benefit
package.
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE


.feI


GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
Willina to Trainl
Call:(352) 563-2977
INSTALLERS
Ceramic, Carpet,
Wood & Vinyl
Top Quality, Top Dollar.
Call:
877-577-1277 Press 5
LABORERS
For Roofing Tear off.
733 N Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River.
(352) 628-3516

LABORERS
Needed for good
local road
construction
company. 401 K,
Health, Vacation.
Call (352) 797-3537
EOE/DFWP

LAWN
SUPERVISOR
NEEDED
Looking for a proven
winner with sales and
lawn exp. Able to
diagnose turf &
ornamental
problems. Good pay
and benefits. No
phone calls please.
Apply within
Brays Pest Control
3447 Gulf to Lake Hwy
Inverness, Fl


Every day hundreds of people like you turn to the Classifieds
to find the items they need at prices they can afford.
If you've got something to sell, go to www.chronicleonline
and place your classified ad with usl


What is ez?
It's the 24-hour,
do-it-yourself website
for creating ads that will
appear In the Chronicle's
classified section


CLASSIFIED


LABORERS NEEDED

For Lawn Service. Clean
driver's lic, Exper. a must
& shrub exp, a plus.
(352) 382-2287
LAWN CARE
Crew leader position,
Good Salary for exp
person. Must have
drivers Lic,628-3734

LEEPER AIR
CONDITIONING
Now taking
applications for:
EXP. INSTALLER
Please call
(352) 746-2223
Between 9am -3pm
and leave message.

LOCAL DELIVERY
DRIVER

Florida Public Utilities
is seeking a propane
delivery driver.
Applicants must have
a valid Class "B" CDL
with an "X"
endorsement or the
ability to attain one.
Must have a good
driving record, and
pass a physical and
drug test.
Interested
candidates
Apply in person or
send to:
FLORIDA PUBLIC
UTILITIES
50 Diana St., Inglis FI
34449
(Equal Opportunity
Employer)


0


FRAMER
Apply at 7394 W.
Gulf To Lake Hwy,
(352) 794-7653
LOCAL
COMMERCIAL
STEADY WORK
- MASONS & TENDERS
- CONCRETE
FINISHERS & HELPERS
- RODBUSTERS
- FORM CARPENTERS
Contact:
Mark Wetherell
WaveCrest Masonry
(352) 302-8476 days
(352) 746-9191 eve.
LOCAL TOWER CO

Looking for F/T, Tower
Service Techs. Must
have electrical
knowledge, clean FL
D/L, and be able to
travel. Benefits.
Toll Free
877-445-4487 or
(352) 564-8830
MAINTENANCE
PERSON

Part-time. Must have
ability to perform a
variety of general
maintenance duties
including minor
plumbing & electrical,
painting, carpentry,
etc, PT hours will be
scheduled as required.
Generally between
Man. & Fri., Please
Call for appt, 726-9001
Brannen Banks of Fla
Inc. P.O. Box 1929
Inverness, FL 34451
EOE/M/F/V/D DFWP


^ \ CLAWSIFIED5









SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 13D


LOADER
OPERATOR

CDL LIC. REQ.
(352) 563-1873


;.-

Manufacturer of
A/C grilles, registers
and diffusers has
Immediate openings.
-Production Workers
for day and night shift
available.
Entry Level MIl
Welders
for day and night shift
Apply In person to
Metal Industries,
400 W. Walker Ave.,
Bushnell, FI 33513
or call Rhonda Black
at 352-793-8610
for more details.
Excellent benefits
package, 401k
with company
contributions.
DFW, EOE
MASON HELPERS
Experienced and
reliable. Transportation
req'd. 352-302-9102
or 352-400-0274
MASON TENDERS
Experience
not necessary.
Must be reliable.
(352) 795-7495
or 400-0404
MASONS
$18 hour, O/T $27 hour
Marion County
.352-529-0305
METAL BUILDING
Erectors, Laborers
All phases pre-
engineered bldgs.
Local work. Good
starting salary. Paid
holidays & vacation.
Call Mon-Frd, 8-2,
toll free, 877-447-3632
METAL FRAMERS
Residential Interior
framing, Experienced or
will train (352) 726-7703
(352) 585-0005


Metal Industries, Inc.
A manufacturer of
air distribution
products is seeking
individual with
mechanical/
electrical/ a/c
and refrigeration
skills. Must hove at
least 5 years
experience in
above field.
Apply In person at
400 West.Walker Ave
Bushnell, Fl or
on line at
rblack@metal
aire.com
Competitive benefit
package with 401k.

MOBILE HOME
REPAIR TECH
#1 Dealer has
opening for highly
qualified, cr-cr.
Si1ut know Dr, Wall l
' ,rl Lo3p *;rch,-..3


Must be able to
supply own truck
Call 352-621-9181
PAINTERS NEEDED
Seeking Exp. & non-exp.
help. Must have own
transp. (352) 527-9274

PIKE'S
ELECTRIC
Bonded Licensed
Residential &
Commercial
Lake Sumter Polk
Don't miss the
opportunity to work
for the fastest,
growing electrical
contracting business
in Central Florida.
Many positions may
be available at our
Groveland/
Wildwood branches.
SIGN ON BONUS
MAY APPLY FOR
RESIDENTIAL
ROUGH LEADS &
RESIDENTIAL
TRIM LEADS
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
Top wages and
excellent benefits,
including health &
dental, 401K plan.
Company trucks are
available for some
positions. Valid DL
required. Helper
positions also
available.
DFW, EOE
Apply today.
Openings will
fill quickly
352-748-6251

Plant
Operations
Supervisor
the Centers
is seeking a Plant
Ops Supervisor who
is responsible for
maintaining the
Interior/exterior of the
Center's Marion &
Citrus County
structures, vehicle
maintenance repairs,
Supervision of the
Plant Ops Techs and
holds emergency
on-call status.
Extensive experience
in plumbing, basic
carpentry, electrical,
& HVAC preferred.
Salary range is
$25,000-$30,000


based on related
experience. HS
diploma or equiv.
with acceptable
driving record.
Vac/slck/hollday/
med beneflts/401K
DFWP/EOE Fax or
e-mail resume to HR,
the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
hr@thecenters.us
or come by 5664 SW
60th Ave.. Bldg. #1,
Ocala and fill out an
application.
PLASTERERS
AND LABORERS

Needed Citrus Co.
Work. Trans. provided.
Vacation. 352-621-1283
302-0743


E^HA Tade
cn/Sills


G-ea
c= Help


On Topof the World
Commnitiks

WARRANTY SERVICE
PROFESSIONAL
Fill time, Fpedienced in
new home wrranty and
repair, sWog customer
service skits required
CONSTRUCTION LABOR
Full lime. Must be
experienced w!
construction site wort,
hand tools, valid FL dfivefs
license
BENEFITS
401K* Medical *Dental
*Vton. Life
Applications available at
Main Guard Gate
8447 SW IN99"ST RD
Ocala,FL
Come
'Findyour place in the

DMW/E=E
AAA EMPLOYMENT
SALES MGR. NEG
ASS'T.SALES MGR 30-35K
DELIVERY DRIVER $10
P/T SECRETARY $8
LOT PERSON $7.50
AUTO PARTS REC NEG.
FABRICATOR $8
RECEPT. $8-$10
LABORER $8
CONST. SECRETARY $8
Call For Appt. 795-2721
NO FEE TILL HIRED


Ge


GROUNDS PERSON
Wanted for Tree
Service. DL. 746-5129
PLUMBERS
Exp Commercial
Plumbers & Foreman
Competitive Pay,
Benefit pkg. Call
(352)726-5601 DFWP

PLUMBERS HELPER

Experienced or
Inexperienced.
(352) 746-5807

Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed in Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED

Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/ 2 years
driving exp. Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply. 24/6 shift.
Good Pay.
Long Hours.
Call 352-489-3100
PUNCH OUT/
HANDYMAN
Exp. with construction
punchout, do a little bit
of everything. Fax to
352-527-7088. Call
352-400-1567 or
352-527-7022 or email
mary@vbfh.com
REPUTABLE SWIMMING
POOL COMPANY
Seeking
r ALL PHASES
OF POOL
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred. Good
Wages, Benefits
Paid Holidays.
Apply at
2221 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. (352) 726-7474
DFWP

ROOFERS
Experienced. Must
have own tools &
transport. Drug free
work place.
Call (352) 637-3677
SERVICE HELPER
or SMALL
ENGINE TECH
Experience preferred.
(352) 795-6635
STRUCTURAL
DETAILER
Senior structural steel
detailer and plans
checker for local
long-span building
manufacturer. Must
have 5+ proven years
exp. & be proficient In
AutoCAD. Excellent
benefits & environment.
Send background
resume to:
P.O. Box 130, Crystal
River, FL 34423
SUPERIOR
CABINETS INC'

INSTALLERS HELPER
f.j:r t *X, i: In
heavy cabinetry.
Apply In person
SUPERIOR CABINETS
780 N. Enterprise Pt
Lecanto 7:30 to 4.
(352) 746-0020

TRUCK DRIVER

For Construction
Company class A
CDL good driving
record required,
Need copy
Call (352) 746-7030
1=--=--= ,,1
TRUCK DRIVER
CDL CLASS A
Local, Must have
forklift experience
and know the area.
ESTABLISHED I

726-7828/302-0943

We are seeking a
dedicated,
enthusiastic,
innovative applicant
for the position of
A/C MECHANIC
Minimum
Qualifications:
*High school diploma
*Valid Florida driver's
license
*Minimum 5 years of
experience required
The position is $11.80
per hour starting pay
with an excellent
benefit package
including retirement
and medical plans.
If Interested please
contact, Karen at
(352) 726-1931,
ext. 2443


WML I
or, General
%01
III= Hel



KEY TRAINING
CENTER




HELP OTHERS BECOME
INDEPENDENT BY
USINGYOURLIFE
EXPERIENCES.
WORK WITH
DEVELOPMENTALLY
DISABLED ADULTS.
BACKGROUND CHECKS
AND EMPLOYMENT
HEALTH PHYSICAL
.WILL BE REQUIRED
FOR POST-JOB OFFER
EMPLOYEES

RESIDENT
MANAGER
ASSISTANT: FT &
PIT position in a
group home setting
in the Lecanto &
Invernessare2.
Responsible for
assisting
Developmentally
Disabled adults with
daily living skills. HS
Diploma\GED
required.
TRANSITIONAL
LIVING COACH : P\T
position. Experience
preferred. Work with
Developmentally
Disabled adults with
living skills in an
apartment setting.
HS DiplomaIGED
required. jF\Tj M-F
12:00 noon -8:00pm,
some weekends,
flexibility with
schedule required.
SUBSTITUTE
INSTRUCTOR
ASSISTANT : PIT on
call position working
in a classroom or
workshop setting
assisting
Developmentally
Disabled adults with
learning skills. HS
DiplomaXGED,
required.
BUS DRIVER : PkT
position transporting
developmentally
disabled adults to
CDL Class B with P
endorsement license
with clean driving


I Key Training Center.
record required.
THRIFT STORE
CLERK : PIT position
available performing
a variety of retail
store clerical
functions including
display of items,
donation processing,
sales and customer
assistance. Lecanto
and Inverness store
locations.
LIFEGUARD : P\T
position, 10 20
hours per week,
days and hours vary
week to week.
Lifeguard
credentials required.
Starts at $ 10.00 per
hour. HS
DiplomaXGED
required.
RESIDENTIAL AIDE:
FXT 3rd shift
position, and PXT M.
F. Responsible for
assisting
Developmentally
Disabled adults in a
residential setting.
HS Diploma\GED
required.

APPLY AT THE KEY TRAINING
CENTER BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE DEPT.
AT 130 HEIGHTS AVE.
INVERNESS, FL 34452
OR CALL 341-4633
ITDD: 1-800-5451833 EXT. 3471
EOE


Sat 7/23
9am-4pm


Tues 7126 1) Potentials with the Industry
6pm-7:30pm 2) What it takes to succeed
Employment opportunities may be available


To sign up for the free seminar, call 795-2665 ext. 1146 and

leave your name and number. Or come by Bay Area NA/C &

Heating Mon-Fri 8am 4pm. First come basis only 30 seats.

State Certified CACOI 0415


-CA

CLERK
Apply in person,
Coastal Station,
1017 SE Hwy. 19,
Crystal River
CONST. HELPER
Elevator Const. Helper:
must be physically fit
with dependable trans-
portation & able to
travel. Full time + bene-
fits. Call June Johnson
800-441-4449 ext 298
CONSTRUCTION
LABORERS
WANTED

No exp. necessary
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
interview, 860-2055

DIESEL
MECHANICS
Experience
required. For trucking
company. Benefits.
1-800-833-8725


On Top of the World
Cwmmrnities
GROUNDS MAIITENAtICE

maintenance, No
expediece required Ful or
Pa time psations.
BENEFITS
401K- Medical Dental
Vision- Life
Applications available at
Guard Gates
8447 SW 99 ST RD
Ocala,FL 34481
Come
"Find your place in
the world"
DFI1l/EOEl










FAITH BASED
SHELTER
WOMEN'S
ADMINISTRATOR
FOR EVENINGS
Call (352) 527-6500
GLAZIERS
Experienced
Job Supervisor
MIDSTATE GLASS
(352) 726-5946
Fax Resume to
352-726-8959, Inverness
GOLF COURSE
MAINTENANCE
& MECHANICS
HELPER
F/T & P/T Available
Preserve Golf Club
(352) 854-9199

GOLF COURSE
MAINTENANCE
ASSISTANT- MECIH-. -
SSPRAY TECH &
OPERATORS
World Woods Golf
.Club (352) 754-0322

Housekeeping
People
Strength
Commitment
HCR Manor Care, Is
one of the nation's
premier providers of
long-term care, skilled
nursing and subacute
specialty services.
Come join us as:

HOUSEKEEPING/
LAUNDRY
7am-3pm
40 hours a week
We offer excellent
salary and benefits
package Including
medical, dental and
401(k).
Please apply In
person at:
Heartland of
Brooksville,
575 Lamar Ave.,
Brooksville, Fl 34601,
call (352) 799-2226 or
Apply online at:
www.hcr-manor
care.com.
EEO/Drug-Free
Employer


-e


HOUSEKEEPER

Good Benefits
Apply In person at:
Best Western
Crystal River

HOUSEKEEPING
POSITION
3 days a week
Apply In person.
Inverness Club
518 Ella Ave.
(352) 344-8477

























APPLY AT THE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DEPT. AT 130 HEIGHTS
AVE. INVERNESS, FL
34452 OR CALL 341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833
EXT. 347) EOE
KEY PINE VILLAGE ICF/DD
LOCATED IN CRYSTAL RIVER
HABILITATIVETRAINING
INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS!
Rewarding work assisting
developmentally disabled
adults learn basic living
skills in a residential
setting. 2nd shift 3:30 pm -
12:15 am.
On the job Training.
HS Diploma/GED required.
Background checks and
employment health phyacals
will be required for
post-job offer employees.

LABORERS
Mobile Home Set-Up
for MH Services
(352) 628-5641
7075 W Homosassa TrlI
LABORERS NEEDED

For Lawn Service. Clean
driver's ic. Exper. a must
& shrub exp. a plus.
(352) 382-2287

LABORERS NEEDED
No exp. necessary
Benefits offered. Valid
Drivers Lic. & Heavy
Lifting Required
Gardners Concrete
8030 Homosassa Trl.


- e


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET










LAUNDRY AIDE

Fulitime, Swing Shift
Crystal River
Health & Rehab
136 N.E. 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-5044
EOE

LAWN SERVICE HELP
Experienced. F/T
position, Cell: 302-6034
LOOKING FOR A
CAREER & A TAN?
Lots of hours, lots of
work. Will train. Good
benefits. Call Mike Scoftt
Plumbing, Ocala
352-237-2888
MORNING COOK
needed. Will train.
Cockadoodles Cafe
206 W. Tompins St.
Inverness
NEEDED CONCRETE
WORKERS

Layout/form, Placers,
Finishers, Block Masons,
Tenders & Laborers
Competitive pay. Call
352-748-2111
Part Time Kennel
Worker
Manual labor work
taking care of
Impounded animals
at the County animal
shelter. Cleans and
maintains the
kennels, feeds and
waters animals.
Some experience in
the care and
handling of animals
and knowledge of
animal breeds.
Experience In basic
building/grounds
maintenance.
Experience dealing
with the general
public desirable. Must
have sufficient
physical strength and
agility to handle or
restrain large or
potentially dangerous
animals. Computer
experience.
$ 8.04 hourly to start.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than Friday,
July 22, 2005.
EOE/ADA


The Citrus County Sheriff's Office has current and future
vacancies for qualified applicants with a strong desire to
be a part of the team of professionals involved in keeping
Citrus County safe. A service-oriented attitude is essential.

DEPUTY SHERIFF

911 COMMUNICATIONS OFFICERS

CROSSING GUARDS

Successful completion of a background investigation required. The
Citrus County Sheriff's Office is a Drug-Free workplace. We offer a
competitive salary and excellent benefits package. For additional
information and qualifications needed for each position please contact:

Human Resource Division
CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
1 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
Inverness, Florida 34450
(352) 726-4488, ext. 303, 253, 373

On-line employment applications are available at www.sheriffcitrus.org

An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F


Et uo wi i h

air cnditining beaing iduOtrZLD


Are you looking for a career, not just a job?

Wondering if you have what it takes?

Want to find out for FREE?


Bay Area A/C & Heating is hosting a FREE 1-day,3

night seminar on "Introduction to the HVACR Industry."

The HVACR Industry is, by far, one of the most important industries
to mankind. It has allowed us to control the environment around
us, create life saving processes and to virtually feed the world.
Due to that importance, demand for knowledgeable, qualified
technicians in all areas is great.

This FREE offering will let you get a glimpse at the working end
of the business and learn the beginning of what you need to
know to get started. ONLY 30 SEATS AVAILABLE on a first
come first serve basis. All classes will be held at the Bay Area A/C
training room:
S AIR CONDONING 8021 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy

SAIR CONDIl&TING Crystal River, FL
JBHT~~~~am WFAjluArM(aoyia ier


Instructed by Robert Alexander
Bay Area Technical Instructor
With 25 years experience.


CAREER




FULL-TIME 1s and 2nd Shift

General Warehouse

m $9.50/hr. $9.75/hr.
m $10.00 $10.20 after 90 days of employment
m $11.00 $11.20 after 1 year service
m On the job training including equipment
m Ability to lift 70 lbs.
n Forklift experience a plus

Applications accepted Monday 1-4PM
TUESDAY THURSDAY 10AM-6PM
The following information will be required:
* Picture ID
* Phone number, addresses and dates of employment of
current and previous employment
Allow 30 minutes to complete application
Walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended

KMART DISTRIBUTION CENTER
655 S.W. 52nd Ave., Ocala, Florida
Directions: 1-75, exit 352, west on SR 40 to 1st light,
left on SW 52nd Avenue, follow signs
352-873-7377 Extension 0 for appointment
Past employees are eligible to apply AEOE


Class Schedule

Wed 7120 1) Intro to HVACR Industry
6pm-8:30pm 2) History of Ref. & A/C
3) Human Comfort Needs
4) Physics of Matter & Heat Transfer
5) The Basic Cycle


Thur 7/21 1) Components of a system
6pm-8:30pm 2) Air Properties
3) Duct systems and Components
4)Control Devices & Systems


6-8 Hour Hands on
"Introductions to A/C System Installation"


PIPE LAYERS
AND
LABORERS

2190 N. Crede Ave
(352) 795-4357

PRODUCTION
WORKERS

Dietrich Metal
Framing, located In
Wildwood, Florida, is
currently looking for
full-time permanent
Production Workers.
Candidates must
have the ability to
read, lift up to 50 Ibs,,
and possess basic
math skills and
MUST KNOW HOW TO
READ A TAPE
MEASURE
ACCURATELY.
We offer vacation
days, holidays, health
insurance, 401(k)
Plan, bonuses and
morel Apply In person
Mon.-Fri., 9 am 4:00
pm, between 7/11/05
through 7/22/05 at
DIetrich Metal
Framing,
721 Industrial Drive,
Wildwood, FL.
EOE/AAP

PRO-LINE BOATS
HIRING

We have a few
select full time
positions.
Laminators, detailers
& assemblers,
Benefits Include; paid
holidays vacation,
health and dental
Insurance, 401K.
Pay scale starting at
$7.50-$8.50/hr.
With merit Increases
possible at the 30,s60
& 90 day periods.
Apply in person:
1520 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa. FL
EOE/DFWP

ROOF TRUSS
PLANT
Now hiring truss
builders. Full time.
Will train. Apply:
2591W. Hwy. 488,
Dunnellon
352-465-0968

ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS
Exp Only. Paid
Vacations, Benefits.
352-347-8530

ROUTE DRIVER
Good driving record.
Class B w/tanker
endorsement. Must be
willing to work nights.
Construction site.
Delivery exp. helpful.
Apply in person;
Job Site Services,
Inc./Sani-Pot Portable
Toilets, 425 S. Croft Ave.,
Inverness. No phone
calls please


SATELLITE
INSTALLER

Company Truck,
Overtime +
Commission, Paid
Vacation. 860-1888

SOLID WASTE
TECHNICIAN I

Part time position
performing scale
house duties
including issuing
tickets, charging fees,
making change and
preparing bank
deposits. Assure
proper placement of
materials, collect and
relocate misplaced
materials,
coordination of
contractors for oil
disposal, Heavy
public contact.
Graduation from H.S
or GED certificate.
Experience with
computers and
cashiering.
Experience with
ground maintenance
equipment such as
hand tools, pickup
trucks and light
tractors. Must have
a valid Florida Driver
License.
$8.79 hourly to start.
Apply at the
Office of Human
Resources,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, Florida
34461
no later than
Friday, July 22, 2005.
EOE/ADA.


M-.


CTRUS COUNTy (FL) CHRONICLE


SHEET METAL
WORKERS &
LABORERS

Needed for growing
company. No
experience needed,
paid vacations,
benefits, paid
holidays, bonuses.
Plenty of overtime
available. Apply at
Gulf Coast
Metal Products
in Rooks Industrial
Park, Homosassa,
(352) 628-5555

TOP HAT
LAWN CARE
Seeking Experienced
lawn person. Salary
plus. (352) 344-8444

TOWER HAND
Bldg Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
DFWP. Valid
Driver's License. Steady
Work. Will Train
352-694-1416 Mon-Frl


BLACK DIAMOND
RANCH
Has Immediate
openings.
Experienced and
entry level positions
for Golf Course
Maintenance Staff.
Drug Free
Environment, uniforms
provided, Benefit
packages, Full time.
Apply by calling
352-746-0404


JOIN A WINNING TEAM












4 Great opportunity for a versatile individual
with high speed, accurate typing skills to
learn basics of newspaper page pagination
and advertising production. This is a 29-hour
part-time position.

Send Resume: Attn. Kathie Stewart

SCobNiE
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, Florida 34429

Fax: (352) 563-5665
EOE, Drug Screening for Final Applhcant




FFR S


CLASSIFIED


WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h.Fast I
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com




MOTHERS HELPER/
HOUSEKEEPER
Call Veronica at
(352) 422-6364


CHI*pNicLE


TYPIST/
PRODUCTION
ASSISTANT

Type editorial copy
for hand written/
typed sources Into
the computer.
Transfer copy from
email, and disk,
code and edit
properly. Newspaper
production
knowledge needed.
High typing speed
and high degree of
accuracy required,
high stress, noisy
environment.
29 hour part time
position. Monday
through Wednesday,
Saturday, may at
times be required.
Fax Cover Letter
and Resume to
352-564-2935
Qualified applicants
must pass
drug screen


I









CnO'us CouN'r (FL) CHIRONICLI


14D SUNDAY. JTu.Y 17, 2005


ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowlingly
accept
ads that are not
bonafide
employment
offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.




FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY
JOIN THE
INDUSTRY
LEADER
Start your own
business with as little
as $1,500 down!
COVERAL
BEING CONCEPTS-
V Guaranteed Customers
Complete Training & Support
v Equipment & Supplies
V Guaranteed Financing
Our Secret
can be your Success!
Over 7,500
franchise owners
servicing more than
36,000 accounts.
Franchise Opportunities
Available in
Central Florida
Call Now 1800) 249-2532

ABSOLUTE
GOLD MINE!

60 Vending Machines
All for $10,995.
800-234-6982
AIN #B02002039

FRANCHISE/
MASTER FRANCHISE
Unique rapidly-growing
pizza concept. 24 yr.
history. Training,
marketing, operations
support. See why
we've sold over 225
Franchises in two years
1-888-344-2767 x210
NEED TO BORROW
$75,000. secured by
Reolestate, good ref.
(352) 212-3997




Exciting Retail Store
Pottery, furniture & ac-
cessories, busy Hwy. 19,
$89,000. (352) 628-2880
or (352) 726-7181
UNIQUE PIZZA/SUB
SHOP N. Citrus county
$90K. 795-5657
Serious inquiries only.




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
ANTIQUE CHINA
CABINET, glass front &
side, mahogany, $150
ANTIQUE MAGAZINE
HOLDER, $75 (352)
344-8142 after 4pmr


-g

BAQUA SPA Weslo 207,
2 person, 135 gal
w/cover. Cedar
cabinet, temp control,
all supplies, extra filter,
$900. (352) 628-0298
SPA, 5 PERSON,
Never used. Warranty.
Retail $4300. Sacrifice
$1425. (352) 346-1711

SPA's
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195.
Other models Aval.
(352) 398-7202

USED SPA
Leasury Bay 4 person
Spa MUST SELL 2yrs old
In good condition. Fits
thru screen door. mov-
ing In Citrus included.
$2800.00 OBO Call
3no.-1i 51r A67-0n35a8


22 CU. FT.
SIDE BY SIDE
REFRIGERATOR
ice & water in door.
$250
(352) 726-1761
A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS New in box
5 &10 year Factory
Warranties at
Wholesale Prices
-2Ton $827.00
-3 ton $927.00
-4 ton $1,034.00
Install kits available
or professional
installation also avail.
Free Delivery
*ALSO POOL HEAT
PUMPS AVAILABLE
Uc#CAC 057914
Call 352-746-4394


30" ELECTRIC RANGE
Whirlpool, white, self
cleaning, $50,
(352) 344-4934
ALMOND
REFRIGERATOR
FREEZER $200
30" TAPPAN self clean-
ing gas stove, almond,
black glass door. $350
Both work fine
(352) 726-3093
AMANA UPRIGHT
FREEZER, frost free,
like new, $250
(352) 344-1750
APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers.
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C., A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy.44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
KENMORE WASHER
AND DRYER
2 years old. Moving
and cannot take. $400
(352) 795-9271
Kitchen Aid heavy Duty
Clothes Dryer
$100.
(352) 249-3299
LIKE NEW GE
Spacemaker
microwave, black,
wall mount, paid $350,
Sell for $150
(352) 726-3093
STOVE, WHIRLPOOL, 4
yrs new, self cleaning
oven, almond with
black glass door $150
(352) 527-2371
WASHER & DRYER Exc.
cond. like new, $250 90
day guar, Free del.& set
up 352-797-6090
White Westinghouse
Dryer, $150;
White Westinghouse
Washer, $175,
4 yrs. old.
(352) 344-4326



Brand new 27"
Toshiba Flat Screen TV,
w/VCR & DVD player.
Cost $500, sell $300.
(352) 795-6895
TV, Toshiba, 20" w/
remote, excel picture,
works good, $60.
(352) 746-6813



CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net
IBM APTIVA. Lexmark
printer, IBM Selectric
typewriter, UMC,
Memorex scanner- free
Compaq printer. $410
for all or sell separate.


14/ rFARKiVIALL
SUPER A
$1200 or best offer.
Runs good!
(352) 637-3333
FARMTRAC 30HP,
loader, boxblade, 7
months old, $14,000
obo (352) 476-5566
JOHN DEERE
770 Diesel, 4WD, front
end loader, mint cond.
$11,750. (352) 746-4703
JOHN DEERE TRACTOR
4010, 2004, 175 hrs.
Bush hog, finishing
mower & box blade, all
like new, $8,200 obo
(352) 423-2795



2 Patio Sets, one steel
w/ round glass top
table. 5 chairs w/ cush-
ions. $125. 1 Table, 4
chairs & lounge $35.
(352) 527-0460
LARGE PICNIC TABLE
with 2 benches, solid,
well built, painted off
white, $45.
(352) 746-7044
Patio Set, 36 x 60 table,
4 chairs, 2 lounges w/
cushions. 8ft Umbrella,
$150.
(352) 527-4147


g -
4 Dinette Chairs
$275.
3 Tables: end,
cocktail & sofa $485.
(352) 527-9481

MR CiTRUSCOUNTY"








S .


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders


AWESOME 3-section
wall units, all real wood.
$150 ea. Pine coffee &
end table, $45 ea. MIsc
items, too.352-527-9226
BED, single, w/ book-
case headboard,
practically new, used
2 weeks, $200.
352-527-2807
BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
*PT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat. Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sale
Prices.Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139- King
$199. (352)795-6006
BERKLINE sofa,
3-pc. sectional, with
2 recliners & double
hide-a-bed, no kids, no
smoke, nice cond. $400
(352) 344-4934
CARLTON SWIVEL
ROCKER/ RECLINER
w/ottoman,exc. cond.
new $500. asking $150.
(352) 726-0040
COMPUTER DESK
Solid Oak w/Hutch
$200; Oak Entertain-
ment Center $65;
697-2466
Daybed, without
trundle, $75
Sleeper/Love Seat,
Rattan, $50.
(352) 628-6621 L/M
DINING ROOM SET
Oval table w/leaf, 6
chairs, tropical pattern
on seats. Light colored
wood. 42" china cabi-
net, $400. 352-527-2456
DINING ROOM TABLE
w/4 chairs,
& hutch.$325.
(352) 746-3522
DOUBLE RECLINING
SOFA w/matching
rocker recliner,
$75 or best offer.
(352) 527-4928
Full Sz. Bed, mattress,
box spring & frame,
$40. New bedding $40.
(352) 527-8625
Head Board, King size,
Brass, very good cond,
$85.
(352) 795-8915
INVERNESS GOLF &
COUNTRY CLUB
Beautiful Glass top
dining table, w/ 4 bik.
parsons chairs, $500.
4 Fancy Iron Bar stools
$500. Everything in,
excel, condition. Call
352-860-2856, 212-9430
LEATHER CLUB CHAIR
w/ottoman, burgundy,
exc cond. $150.
File Cabinet, legal, solid
oak, exc. cond. $40.
(352) 341-5620
Leather Sofa, taupe
color, w/large
matching chair,
like brand new,
$500 for both.
(352) 303-3320
Love Seat/Ottoman
$285.,
60" Round glass table/
6 chairs $875.
(352) 527-9481
Lt. Beige L shaped
Sectional Couch,
good cond. $400.
Leave message
(352) 423-0898
MAUVE RECLINER
Excellent cond., $75
OVERSTUFFED
CHAIR & ottoman,
floral design $60
(352) 527-9193
Mission Oak Computer
desk, two book cases,
filing cabinet, solid oak,
$800.
(352) 527-8879
MISSION STYLE oak side-
board, 60"L 17"D 42"H
separate glass top $335
SOLID CHERRY kingsize
bed,4 posters are wood
& metal, $625 344-8720
MUST SELL NOW!
New Furniture Arriving
4 Pc. Liv. Rm. Set. 7'/2ft.
couch, 5/2ft. Love Seat
w/ Ig. chair & ottoman,
except. quality & cond.
pillow type back, &
rolled arms, asking $475
352-212-5979
HOmosassa
Oak Pedestal Table,
w/ six chairs, 2 leaves
excellent condition
$250.
(352) 613-0647
ONE FULL BED,
COMPLETE. $100. ONE
SINGLE BED, $30.
Antique styles.
(352) 465-7212
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN OAK WATERBED
Converted to California
queen mattress with
bookcase headboard,
dresser w/mirror, chest
& 2 night stands, $600.
(352) 382-0477.
Queen Sz. Bedroom Set
2 mirrors, mattress, box
spring, 1 nightstand, 1
dresser, headboard,
Dixie Furn. $450. King Sz.
Clinique Mattress & box
spring, dbl. cushion.
$150. (352) 465-8155
ROLLTOP DESK
48" long, 41" high. 19"
wide, pressed board,
exc. cond., $150 obo
(352)726-8991
Sectional Sofa
w/ matching Swivel
Tub Chair, Exc, Cond.
$300 for both
(352) 527-0785
Set of 4 Early Maple Tbis
2 end, 1 occas, 1 coff.


$150; Antique Sewing
Cab. w/a New Home
Sewing mach, $200:
(352) 344-8786
SOFA BED
white, 4 size, $100.
OCCASIONAL CHAIR
Blue, $50.
(352) 465-1262
SOFA, CHAIR, $200 set.
2 Lane recllners, $175.
(352) 563-5137
SOFA, olive brown, 6',
new cond, $200;
BOOKCASE, wood,
hunter green w/cherry
trim, 2'x6', 5 adj. shelves,
$30. (352) 382-3837
SOLID OAK TABLE,
4 chairs, $275.
Loveseat, $75.
(352) 563-5137
Sugarmlll Woods
DIb, Bed w/ boxspring,
complete comforter set
$300. DIb. dresser,
maple w/ mirror, single
maple chest $375.
(352) 382-9040


The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are needed.
Call (352) 527-6500
Triple Dresser, 2 Mirrors,
full size bed, high boy, 2
night stands, light hon-
ey color, Very clean.
Exc. cond. $355.
(352) 628-2839
TWIN BED, used
Craftmatic, w/vibrator,
good cond, $375.
RECLINER. La-Z-Boy LIFT
chair, exc. cond, $400
dk. brwn. 352-637-5685
Twin Poster Beds,
custom made, includes
3 pc. dresser set.
$200.
(352) 637-5426
Twin Red Car Bed
w/dresser & shelf
$200. (352) 527-9800
Two Flex Steel Recliners,
Med. Hunter Green,
$300/both.
(352) 746-6806
Wood Desk, tabletop
style, $35;
(352) 746-6806




21" Toro Super Recycler
Mower, self propelled,
cast alum. deck, 6 HP
Briggs & Stratton Eng.,
5 yrs. old, good cond.
$100. (352) 527-1345
38" SEARS
CRAFTSMAN
Rider Mower
Excellent condition.
$695.
(352) 344-2947
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
JOHN DEERE TRACTOR
L-110, auto., 17HP,
Kohler, 42" cut, 46 hrs.
positively mint! $1,395
Men's bike 26" 5-Spd.
English type, exc. $45
(352) 341-0791
LIKE NEW EXMARK 13HP
Kaw. 36" walk behind
ECS controls, new
bagger, never installed,
$2,200 (352) 860-1416
MOVING- MUST SELL
Basic Landscaper Be-
ginner's Pkg.Cub Cadet
50"deck, zero turn. Echo
straight shaft trimmer,
hand held blower. 5x8
A-frame trailer w/4'
gate & weedwacker
rack. (352) 464-3474
RIDER, 12/42
Master Cut, red, runs
and cuts good. First
$425. (352) 344-5255




CITRUS
SPRINGS
Huge Moving Sale
Sat. & Sun.
9:30 am- 6 pm
Sofa sleeper &
loveseat. full capacity
washer & dryer. Oak
wood entertainment
center, Fullsize oak
computer desk,
Dinette table 4 chairs.
Solar plywood sheets
5/8", much more
9364 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd
HOMOSASSA
Moving Sale, Daily 11-7
Until all is gone.
5369 S. Memorial Dr.
352-423-0297
INVERNESS
GARAGE SALE
Sat & Sun 8-2
5623 Kline Terr
INVERNESS
Sun. Only, 8am- 2pm
1498 E. St. James Loop
Citrus Hills




BLACK LEATHERS
ladies size small, jacket,
vest and chaps. $450.
(352) 422-1667
CASABLANCA
WEDDING GOWN
Strapless, lace/toile sz 4.
Veil. loves. shawl inc.


$8s Each
860-2545
2 CUSHIONED GLIDER
$45;
LA-Z-BOY HUNTER
GREEN Recliner, $50.
(352) 746-5168
2 MID 20TH CENTURY
LAMPS, Large box of old
records, $150 takes all
(352) 726-7877
6 x 8 SHED
with pressure treated
floor, $1,300. delivered
563-7616
42 ROOFING PANS
12V2' long by 12", $450.
Kenmore drop-in stove,
excellent condition,
$50. (352) 637-0592

2005
SPECIALS
6 lines 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$5.50
$151-$400......$10.50
$401-$800 .......$15.50
$801-$1,500....$20.50
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply
5,000 WATT COLEMAN
GENERATOR, never
used, $550. RECLINER
LIFT CHAIR, brown,
works perfect, $150
(352) 637-3052
500FT (6' high)
CHAIN LINK FENCE all
accessories, $1,000 obo
(352) 422-7685
CAMERA BAG, DOMKE,
New, Heavy Duty, $100.
CAMERA TRI POD,
Professional, $125.
(352) 341-2399
CARPET
.1000's of Yards/In
Stock. Many colors.
Sacrifice352-341-2146
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
Shop At Home


CARVING WOOD
Basswood & Butternut
(352) 794-7625
Casino Slot Machine
excel. cond., takes
quarter, accepts
$1. -$100. great enter-
tainment $1,500. obo
(352) 489-6098
DINING ROOM
TIER CHANDELIER
w/matching foyer
chandelier, $50 for both
Shower glass doors,gold
trim,$100. All excellent.
352-746-5031
Glass Shower Door
$100,
White Bathroom
Cabinet $150.,
(352) 249-3299
Glass Top Range, GE
$200 Dining Room Set,
glass top, rattan w/ 4
cushioned chairs.$250
352-220-2542
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONEI
Moving,Cleanouts. &
Handyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HANGiNG LAMP
$40;
(352) 465-1262
HEPA FILTER,. New air
purifier, was $148
asking $130,
Laser record player $20.
(352) 637-1804
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95' Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000
JUKE BOX, Prestige,
NSM ES 160. $1100 oabo
DESK, steel, commercial
$100.
Inglis (352) 447-4240
10am-4pm
KENMORE, DRYER, works
good, $100 obo
ANTIQUE PIANO, good
condition, $500 abo
(352) 726-2618
King Size Damask
Covered thick fiber
filled Mattress topper,
Like new, $25.
3 Water bed sheet sets,
king size, very good
cond, $20.
(352) 746-7437
Kirby Vacuum w/
cleaning attach. &
shampooer, model G5,
new $1,600. sell $395.
obo (352) 860-0048
Lawn Mower, Snapper
mulching bag
attach. 5.5hp, $60.
Dog Cage, Med.
36x24x24, $15.0BO.
(352) 228-9449
Lots of Misc items
for only $125
Electronics, Dresser &
Flea Market Items.
(352) 637-9521
MIRRORED CLOCK, 30"H,
28"W, new, $75.
Harley Davidson
women's half helmet,
studded, new, size
extra small, cost $170,
sell $95. (352) 628-1092
or 212-8294
Moving Sale, Sugarmill
Woods, Furn., painting,
misc. items. Please Call
(352) 382-4234
Moving Sale, Table
Saw, roll top computer
desk, table/6 chairs,
treadmill, kiln, potters
wheel, (352) 637-0780
New Lawn Trailer
$75.
(352) 628-5428
PATIO SET, 2 chairs,
loveseat, glass coffee
table, new cushions,
$200 POOL VACUUM
with hose, $25
(352) 746-1767
Potter's Kick Wheel
Motorized w/bat mold.
$300. Skutt Kiln, int. dim.
17/2x18, w/limit timer &
blink ring, $300.
(352) 795-1567
SEARS 6.5HP self
propelled 21" rear
bagger mulcher key
start w/battery charger,
exc cond. used 5 times
$250 cash CHAMPION
JUICER in orig. box, $100
cash (352) 344-2790
Sectional Couch,
neutral, good cond.
$500.,
wood glider rocker
$150.
(352) 249-3299
Shirley Temple
Toddler, Porcelain Doll
Collection Set of 4,
asking $800.
Danbury Mint Collect.
(352) 302-5912
TRUCK TOPPER for
standard truck bed, $50
REPTILE CAGE. 2'x2'
square w/rolling stand,
asking $90.
(352) 795-8777
TV PROJECTOR
$395
(352) 344-2947
Water Distiller
produces 30 liters
of distilled water dally,
stainless steel $350.
(352) 527-8879




DELUXE POWER CHAIR
Cost $5600. Only used
about 6 hours. Like
new. Asking $1200.
(352) 637-0230
PRIDE DELUXE LIFT
CHAIR. Deluxe heat &
massage. Infinite
position. Removable
cushions. $600 obo.
(352) 746-6747
PRIDE- JET 7
Power chair, list $5700,
sell for $2500. NEVER
USED. (352) 564-2721



FULL DOUBLE KEYBOARD
ORGAN. Exc. condition.
fold-down top &bench.
Must sell. Great buy at
$495 or best offer. No
reasonable offer
refused. (352) 795-6876


Great Package Deal:
Epiphone Electric Play-
er Pack that includes:
Special Guitar, Hard
Case and Gig Bag, 10
watt amp, tuner, extra
strings, picks, pitch pipe
and book $250.00
Call: (352) 527-2480
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music.
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
Organ
Yamaha, exc. shape,
$350.
(352) 563-1719
Peavy Base
Guitar
Hard shell case, $150
(352) 746-9278
UPRIGHT PIANO
very good cond,,
must self,$450 OBO
(352) 341-0428


PROFESSIONAL WEIGHT
BENCH, $100.
(352) 794-7625




2 SCHWINN Continental
bicycles, His & Her's 27"
set, nice cond. $60 for
both. (352) 344-4934
38, Carter Arms
2" Barrel, blue, like new,
walnut grips, pack
grips, leather Inside hol-
ster, ammunition, &
cleaning equip. $300.
352-344-2353
Adult Trike, Miami Sun,
barely used cost new
$325. asking $185.
(352) 563-0683
CALLOWAY, Big Bertha
Irons, 3 thr. PW & Cal-
loway Warbird Woods
1,3 & 5, graphite, $395.
abo (352) 860-0048
Golf Cart,
Utility, EZ Go, Gas
$1,200.
(352) 726-1725,
344-2280
GOLF CART, EZ-GO
electric, excellent
condition, $1200. abo.
(352) 746-9211
GOLF CLUBS
Set of left handed
ladies golf clubs, $75,
Also ladies right
handed clubs, $55.
(352) 726-2644
KING COBRA 454 Comp
Driver, 9 deg. loft, reg.
flex w/mitt, 2 me. old,
$275 (352) 746-5966
OAK GUN CABINET
holds 6 long guns,
lockable, glass doors
and bottom storage
cabinet, $175
(352) 344-8509
POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
leather pockets,
Life Time Warranty.
$1,295
(352) 597-3140
RUGER 357
Magnum Blackhawk.
Stainless steel. Like new.
$450. (352) 382-5677
(352) 228-7363 .
STEVENS 410 double
barrel, $500 RANGER
double barrel, 16
gauge, $450 Both like
new (352) 344-5311
Tanning Bed
Wolf Professional,
face tanner, barely
used, $1,200.
(352) 795-4585




16' Completely Caged
Utility trailer w/tandem
axles, great for land-
scapers or animal haul-
ing. $1300. Crystal River
(941) 350-8883
APPROX. 4-/2X9FT
UTILITY TRAILER with
sides, needs some work,
$50 (352) 212-7232 CELL
BUY, SELL, TRADE, PARTS
REPAIR, CUSTOM BUILD
www.ezpulltrailers.com
Hwy 44 & 486
NEW TRAILERS SALE
Lawn/Equipment
Car Haulers/Enclosed
Dunnellon
489-5341 or 427-1206
UTILITY TRAILER
4X6' NEW
$400/OBO
(352) 621-4854




14KT 2 Tone Gold Ring,
1 pear shaped
diamond, 6 round
diamonds. Appraised
$4700, sell for $4000/
abo. (352) 447-1758
MEN'S WEDDING BAND,
$100;
DIAMOND BRACELET,
VALUED AT $600, SELL
$350. (352) 447-1758




WANT TO BUY cabinet
for under bathroom
sink. 36/2x1 8'/x32. Mine
ruined by rain water.
Will pay up to $50.
(352) 795-3394




NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
AKC
YORKIE PUPPY
10 week old male
(352) 628-6914
AKC BOXER PUPPIES
Health Certificate
$500. each
(352) 344-3581
AKC CHIHUAHUA's
Adorable, Unique,
$350
(352) 637-3222
BABY COCKATIELS
$30. Young adults,
$25. (352) 726-7971
Beagle Puppies, small
bred CKC registered,
ready on 7/23/05, good
hunting line, $300.
352-302-7976
BEAUTIFUL AKC
WEIMARANER
female puppy, $400
(352)621-0484
COMPANION CATS


Female cats-sweet,
healthy, spayed,
shots-perfect for seniors
$25-$40 352-476-6832
DACHSHUND, mini,
health cert., red male,
4-mo. Crate trained,
$375 (352) 726-8866
DECLAWED CATS
Himalayan, Siamese,
long-haired, others,
neutered, shots, tested
$80-$125 352-476-6832
FABULOUS FELINES
Exotic breeds, cats and
kittens, healthy, neu-
tered, shots, tested,
$80-$150, 352-476-6832
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $15
Cat Spaed $25
Dog Neutered &
Spayed start at $30
(352) 563-2370


GOLDEN RETRIEVER,
male, 2 yrs old,
Very playful. To good
home, $150 obo
(352) 341-3033
JACK RUSSELL
neutered, 2-yr. old,
house broken, good
nature, all shots,
$95 or best offer
(352) 860-2812
Moluccan Cockatoo,
beautiful & sweet huge
Cal. cage, $600. firm
352-795-5070, 795-1555
PALMARIAN PUPPIES
Cute & Cuddly
w/ paper. $550.
(352) 726-6103
PARROT
Golden Sun Conure,
2 yrs old, very tame,
great w/ kids & other
birds, w/ cage, $300
OBO. (352) 628-5784
RAISED W/KIDS
Padagonian conure,
$150 -2 Quaker parrots
$150 each.
(352) 795-9343
REGISTERED FEMALE
Cocker Spaniel puppy
Born 1/28/05. Rare
chocolate roan color
Great temperament.
Only $400 to good
home. Cage, etc.
included. 352-637-4864
TWO IGUANAS
In large cage & lights,
trees misc. $200
MALE CHINCHILLA
w/cage & misc. $210,
(352) 341-1267




Black Arabian Gelding
Saddle & tack, $800
firm. (352) 341-3936
HORSE SITTER
Specialized care at
your barn, Pine Ridge
resident. 35 yrs. exp.
Linda Valdez,
352-746-1661, licensed
Horse Trir. 2 horse BP.
Thor or draft horse size.
Ramp. Walk- thru.Good
cond. $1,500. 628-1916
Must Sell,
Two pleasure Horses.
Easy rider,
527-1963
THOROUGHBRED MARE
Very good companion.
Adult ridden. Moving.
(352) 564-1321


PASTURE FOR LEASE
(need three 4-legged
lawnmowers) $100 ea
per mo. (352) 621-3868




1987 20HP JOHNSON
Elec. start, w/controls,
runs exc. $475.
(352) 634-5300
Boat Motor,
1993, 8hp, Mariner, long
shaft, 28", low hrs,
runs great, clean,
$400 or best offer.
(352) 628-5070
Boat Seats, back to
back gray, lounge, 8"
base, brand new,
still in box.
$200. pair
(352) 563-0801
MERCURY
2002 200EFI
Longshaft,
$6995
(352) 586-9347


Air Conditioner, Marine
carry-on 7000 btu, cool
for 12" x 12" hatch,
$500. obo
Call (352) 489-9569
New Electric Motor
Moto brand, 441b thrust,
cost $250. org. sacrifice
$100.
(352) 795-8047




KAWASAKI
1996, Jet ski, ZXI1100,
new motor, new prop,
custom paint, $2650
OBO.(352) 746-4693
SEADOO
1996 XP. completely
rebuilt, new gas tank,
trailer, $2000.
(352) 563-1217
YAMAHA
1993, Waverunner 650,
runs like a Yamaha.,
Great, $1,200 OBO.
(352) 527-4887
YAMAHA
2003 1200 SUV 4 seater,
2 stroke, w/trailer only
175 hrs. great cond.,
garaged, complete
service 6/05, swim lad-
der, $350 in accessories.
$7,000 (352) 621-3185




$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & Trollers!
No Fees1352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
0000

HOT JULY
SPECIALS!!
'94 Keywest 20'
Walk around,
200HP Mariner,
'03 Performance
alum. trir,, GPS, depth
finder, VHF, BIminl
top. SS Prop,
VERY CLEAN $12,875.

'96 Proline Bay
Stalker, 18'
90HP Honda 4 Stroke,
alum. trir, full cover,
Bimini top, depth
finder, VHF, Low
hours A must seel
'99 Praline 22' CC
'03 Proline 20'
walk around
'90 Lowe 19' Pontoon
Stop in and see our
Huge selcection of
new and preowned
boats only at....

Three Rivers
Marine
U. S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-5510
0000
THREE RIVERS
MARINE




We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES !!
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U. S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-5510


WUITHLROOC 6 STAT TRPIL

Sunday,


October 2, 2005

on the Withlacoochee

State Trail


1985 MARATHON
24' Cruiser-Deep "V"




New Merc 5.7/250hp
inboard w/ approx,
50/hrs (60 gal. fuel tank)
forward & after cabins
w/ fold out bunk at the
helm. Will sleep 6. All
new seating. JRC
closed array RADAR (16
mile range) Lowrance
"LMS-160" map
plot/GPS-JRC model
200 VHF marine radio
Fullyloaded enclosed
camper/weather pkg.
AM-FM, CD, Sound Sys.
w/ 2002 Performance
alum. trailer Survey
Avail. $17,000.
Larry.(352) 341-4606







SPECIAL
2000 Stott Craft
115HP Tohatsu
$8, 995
1976 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448


USHy1 N",.1- U1


AIRBOAT
13FT Rivermaster hull,
6 cyl. ground power,
Polymer bottom & trlr,.
$5,000 firm 637-6105
BASS TRACKER
2000,18', 185, on 2001
trailer, 50hp Merc.,
20/hrs use, take over
payments 352 621-9774
BAYLINER
Bowrider, 4 cyl I/O,
engine rebuilt, new
upholstery & cover.
Nice. $4000 obo.
Trade for pontoon?
352-795-8792
CAROLINA SKIFF
18'8", 60hp Yamaha,
Low hrs, 24 volt auto.
trolling motor(never
used) lots of extras
(352) 382-3352
CAROLINA SKIFF
2000, 17' extra wide, w/
2002 65hp Jet Drive
engine, t top, trailer,
$8,000.(352) 621-3764
CAROLINA SKIFF
2004,19' DLX, 90 hp
Johnson (less than
40hrs), SW Series, live
well, large center
console, 27 gal. fuel
tank, Galv. Magic
Tilt trailer, $11,500.
(352) 476-6905
CHAPARRAL
'86, 187 XL, 96-150
Evinrude & trir. Lots of
extras, runs great
$3,500 abo/trade? 352-
344-4434 613-5801


CHECKMATE
21', Bought new 1994,
2000, 250 MercEFI, low
hrs, GPS, ship to shore,
new all aluminum
trailer, to many extras
to mention, $8,500.
(352) 489-7770









CRISCRAFT
1960, 55', Constellation,
3 state room, twin 871
Detroit, radar & GPS,
Great live aboard or
cruiser, $89,900 0b0
Will trade for land.
Possible Financing.
(352) 344-4288
(352) 302-7234
DIAMOND
GHEENOE
with 4HP Mercury, runs
good, $450 firm,
(352) 628-0331
DYNASTY
20', CC, new trailer.
Very nice boat, needs
motor work. $4600/obo
(352) 795-2078
FISHING BOAT'
12 ft. gheenoe with
trailer. New seats and a
live well. $800 Call
212-9193 or 344-0902
after 6 pm.
FLOATING DOCK
Encapsulated Flotation
Never used, 8'x12'
w/walkway.
755 S. US 19, Homosassa
$1495. (352) 486-5836
FourWinns
1984, Remodeled, boat
& trailer, exc cond,
1998, Yamaha 115hp,
marine radio, fish finder,
$3,200. (352) 423-0975
GALAXY
20', 1986, cuddy, deep
V-hull, 205 HP, V-6, 1/O,
low hrs. Exc. cond.
$6500. (352) 795-7335
GHEENOE
2002 4HP Mercury,
trailer, $1,500 or trade
for 25HP outboard
(352) 697-0078
GRADY WHITE
Exployer 240, Twin John-
sons, Engine bracket/
dive platform, trailer
w/brakes. (352)628-5568
JON BOAT
12', Aluminum w/ 4hp
Johnson & home made
trailer, $600 OBO.
(352) 220-6055


CONSTRUCTION
SALE
Here We Grow AgainI

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS
17' to 23'


15'-24'

POLARKRAFT

12'-20'

POLAR OFFSHORE
'21'-23'

CLEAN PRE-OWNED
BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days


llth




Annual




Rails to




Trails




Bike




Ride!


Start Time:

7:00 am 9:00am (No mass start)

Rain or Shine.

Location:

The ride will begin at the North Apopka

Avenue Trail Crossing in Inverness. Continental

Breakfast available, light lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Entry Fee:

$15 per rider up to 9/20/05. $20 per rider thereafter.

Children under 12 years of age must be
accompanied by an adult.


For more information or applications log onto:
www.railstotrailsonline.com
or call (352) 527-3263
or e-mail harnage@atlantic.net
-- NOTICE
Thank you for participating in our Bike Rides in the past. This year, Suncoast
Bike Shop is donating a bicycle to be given away as a door prize. Only pre-
registered riders are eligible to participate in the drawing for this door prize.
Therefore, we encourage you to sign up early. Again, our price is still $15 for the
ride if you pre-register before Sept. 20, 2005. We hope you will join us this year
and enjoy a day of fun as well as support the betterment of the Withlacoochee
14 State Trail. SIGN UP EARLY! .----" .1"

k3wns J


Metal Roofing
Direct from
Manufacturer

Tri-County


Metals, LLC

(Located Behind the Dollar
General Trenton, Florida)

Many colors in stock -

All Accessories

Cut to Length
Delivery Available
State of Florida
Approved

for fast quotes call:
(352) 463-8400 or
(800) 823-9298
www.tricountymetals.com


R. I-


CLASSIFIET-DS













Cihus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE.;


MAKO
23'2', 225 Johnson
Ocean Runner, new
steering, trim tabs, dive
platform, canvas, all
electronics included,
Boat has been
completely redone.
Asking $16,000/obo.
(352)447-1758
MONARK
2004, 17'8", CC, 50HP
Merc., SS prop, galv.
trir., many extras, all
2004 or newer Test rides
avail, asking $7,300
(352) 344-4614
PONTOON 1998
22', full camper canvas,
50HP Mariner 4 stroke.
180hrs. on boat & mtr,
$13,500. (352) 795-4865
PROLINE
20' 1973, Rebuilt '89
200HP Johnson, solid,
runs exc. w/2 axle galv.
trir. $5300. 352-634-5300
SEA DART
19', Bow rider, 120hp
Johnson, trailer, new
tires, fish finder, $2,000.
(352) 795-3133
SILVERTON
FUN BOATI 1987, 34 Ft.,
runs great $25,000 OBO
(352) 249-6982 or
249-6324
SUNBIRD
17' Day Sailer. Main &
Jib Genoa. Cuddy, trail-
er, excel, sailing for only
$1000. 352-341-8465
TIDECRAFT
16', Bassboat,
Fiberglass, 35hp Merc,
trailer & all accessories.
Exc. Cond.
(352) 563-1719
14' FIBERGLASS JON
BOAT, mtr. & trailer.
Johnson 9.5 Runs like
new. Troll mtr, fish find-
er, many extras. $1500.
Must see. 352-464-1616




CALLISTA
27FT By Carriage 1987 E
350 rear bedrm 10 gal
HW, 7 new tires, exc.
cond (352) 344-2288
CARRI-LITE
31' fifth wheel by
Carriage w/ Ford F250,
460/V8. $12,500 for
combo. 352-726-7355
CHAMP
1975 RV, runs good,
$800 (352) 212-5351
FOUR WINDS
03, 32', Chateau, Class
C w/slide, Ford V10,
12,500mi, every options
immaculate cond,
$47,500. (352) 726-2670
FUN FINDER
'05 18 Ft. Used one time,
also '04 Chevy Ext. P/U
Both for only $35,500 will
separate(352) 527-3935
PATRIOT
made by Beaver. 1993
37'. Only 50,000 miles.
Cummings diesel, new
Michelin tires, too many
extras to list. Exc. cond.
Kept under cover.
(352) 795-4314
PROTECT YOUR RV
14x40FT alum. cover
$1,500 and you move
(352) 726-8293


3!


ATTN: RV/TT USERS
Dish satellite system
w/2 satellite receivers,
$100. 20" RCA color TV
w/remote, $50.
(352) 564-1106
AVION
'94, 5th Wheel, excel.
cond. 17 ft. liv. area
slide, queen bedrm.
many extras, must sell
$16,500. (352) 527-4697
CITATION
1991, 25FT, 2-dr., rear
bed, lots of extras.
$6,300 (352) 637-7221
COACHMEN
1998,30', Slide out, new
AC, exc cond, $8,000
(352) 464-0725
(352) 341-0280
COLEMAN
'98, Pop Up, sleep six,
AC, refrig. stove,
$2,300.
(352) 341-0935
COLEMAN POP-UP
'92, canopy, 2 stoves,
New AC/heat. Shower.
Micro, king, quee, twin
bed. Extras $2600/obo.
352-400-1110
JAYCO
88, 20', sleeps 5, fully self
contained, like new
w/ hitch, $4,500.
(352) 726-8464 after
(352) 302-2521 cell
JAYCO
Lowboy pop-up camp-
er, 10', opens up. King
bed one end & queen
in other. Awning,
screen rm attached.
New AC. Many extras.
$3000. (352) 628-1988
PROWLER
'84,28', rear twin, 2 dr,
AC, non-smoker. New
wtr htr. HI toilet $4,500.
(352)726-4196/400-4571
RV PARTS EAZ-Lift hitch
parts, head 2 5/16 ball,
torsion bars, stabilizer,
all rated 10,000 lb. $135.
(352) 344-8509
SUNLITE 1988
Slide In pop up camper
Fully equipped, $2500/
obo. (352) 447-3842/
(352) 978-0658
SUNRAY
'90,17ft., 2 axle, new
tires, brakes, AC, water
pump & heater, sleeps
5, $3,850. 352-489-6260
TIRES, 2 PAIRS
2 Firestone P195-60R15
2 Cooper Radials,
P185-60R14, good
cond. $12 each.
(352) 489-9569




ALUM. TOPPER
Off Mazda Pick up,
5'Wx6'7"L, $150/obo
(352) 476-1835
DODGE 2 cloth
captain's reclining
chairs; 1 fold-out bench
seat, seat belts, match-
ed set, new cond. $300.
(352) 476-1835
GO-RHINO SUMATRA
3000 series grill & brush
guard w/step, chrome,
like new cond., fits
'97-01 Dodge Dakota,
$250 (352) 637-6734


MBoa~tsH^


*99 CHRYSLER
Concorde LXI,
56K Silver/Sage,
$9,488.
Call Richard
726-1238
ACURA INTEGRA
'92 2 dr hatch, blue,
good cond., 1 owner,
CD, moon roof call
628-1732,$2800 obo
BUICK
'88, Park Ave, $795.
excel., running car. only
89k org. mi., needs
paint, AC blows warm
air. (352) 527-0009
BUICK REGAL LTD
1990, 87k mi, runs great,
not to bad ext/int.
New tires, $1199. Crys,
Rvr. (941) 350-8883
CADILLAC SLS
2000, low miles, loaded,
very nice, must sell,
$18,500. 352-628-7969
or 352-228-2980
CARS. TRUCKS. SUVS
CREDIT REBUILDERS
$500-$ 1000 DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19Airport
564-1212 or 212-3041
CHEVROLET
'02 Cavalier, LS Sport, all
power equip. 1-owner
Adult driven, gar. kept
$9,500 (352) 422-6380
CHEVROLET
1996 Cavalier, well
maintained, 62K mi.,
$3,000 obo
(352) 637-1818
CHEVROLET
2000, Corvette, silver,
31K, exc. cond, ext.
warr avail., $28,800.
(352) 382-4331
CHEVROLET
2003, Cavalier, 4 dr,
auto, cold A/C, CD,
45K, $5,000.
(352) 795-8986
CHEVROLET
'94 Cavalier R/S, 4-dr,
red, blk Int. V-6, auto
cold A/C, 131K, $1,250
obo (352) 637-5327
CHEVY
1991 Camaro Z-28.
New paint, runs well,
needs TLC. $3200.
(352) 422-7599
CHEVY LUMINA
'95 1 Owner, Oil chngd
per/3000 mi. 82000 mi,
Cold Air, $2900-obo
344-2425 or 220-0535
CROWN VICTORIA
LX, 2004, like new, 20K
mi. Exc. cond. Factory
warr. $16,000 firm,
(352) 341-1421
Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
it off your taxes then
trading it in.
Donate it to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
FORD
1988 Crown Victoria,
like new tires, nice
Int., runs good $850 obo
(352) 726-4448
352-634-2052 cell


CHEVROLET
Convertible, '65,
Impala, excel, body,
looks & runs great
$15,500. (352) 382-5641
CHEVROLET
1940 1/2 ton pickup,
$5,800 or best offer
(352) 628-5371 Iv.msg
CORVETTE
1975 Stingray, excellent
body & paint, all new
suspension front & back
98% restored, turn key
$9,000 firm
(352) 220-6047
OLDSMOBILE
'46, 98, 4DR, restorable
cond., extra parts, fami-
ly car, $3,000. Canton
OH 330-879-5810










































CHEVROLET
1988 V-6, auto, air, top-
per, driven daily, $1500
(352) 279-1660
CHEVROLET
K, Sd-ilv e15r0


1993 S-10, $1,100
(352) 344-8584


lc--Car


CLASSIFIED

U-!


LARGE TOPPER
LG Blue High Rise Top-
per for Ext Bed Truck, EX
COND Fib-Glass, Light, 2
Handle locks, Tinted
and bar. Retail $1500
Sell $600/OBO, Call
(352) 344-4122
VENT TAILGATE, no rust
louvered, fits F-250, 350
Ford, '97-'04. 1 wk. old.
$150. (352) 726-0282













ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR CONSIGN
98% Sales Success
No Fee to Seller
909 44W and US19-
airport. 212-3041
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
VEHICLES WANTED,
Dead or Alive.
Call Smitty's Auto
628-9118
Wanted to Buy S10, Sz.
Pickup no motor/no
bed okay, pay in cash
cheap. (352) 563-6621















Truck























MANY MORE MN STONK ALL
V-3, m ioAe, CDean..............$3,995




T98CADDY SEDAN DEV1LLE,

MANl lRE NiSc Ar
726E-1238NT


FORD TAURUS
2002, exc. cond. $8500
Days 628-5885,
Evenings 628-1933
HONDA
1989 Accord LXI,'new
rims & tires, black, runs,
$1500. (352) 601-3035
KIA SOFIA
1998, 93K, good cond.
$1800/obo
(352) 527-4936
LINCOLN
'95, Mark VIII, beautiful
cond., leather int., red,
$2,500. obo, must sell
this wk, (352) 860-2143
LINCOLN
1989 Mark VII. LSC, Sun-
roof, High output 5.0
eng. New tires, 90k mi,
$3500. (352) 746-7729
LINCOLN
1996 Towncar Executive
series, very good cond
in and out, silver ext.,
gray leather int. $5,995
(352) 208-2407
LINCOLN
'96, Executive Pres. new
trans, & top, 109k hwy.
mi. $5,800. firm
(352) 527-6517
MAZDA
1990 MX-6, 114K mi.,
runs great, needs minor
work, $1,500 Call after
4pm (352) 726-4177
MERCURY
'00, Grand Marquis, GS,
white, 40,900 mi.,
very clean $8,500.
352-212-7533
MERCURY
1987 Grand Marquis LS
wagon, 8 pass., full
power, good shape,
cold A/C $1,995 obo
(352) 746-0973
MERCURY
1998, Grand Marquis
GS, V8, 76K, fair cond,
dependable transpor-
tation, NADA, $8450.
Quick sale for $5,500.
(352) 382-5323
MITSUBISHI
2001 Eclipse, Silver, 85k,
alloy wheels, fully equip
1 owner, well maint.
$8500. (352) 220-0998
NISSAN
1994 Sentra, 5 spd. cold
A/C, clean, Reliable,
$2,500 obo
(352) 795-6299
OLDSMOBILE
1996 Delta 88 LSS
Garage kept,, second
owner, always well
maintain,$3,000.
(352) 527-3519
PONTIAC
'91 Grand Am, 2.5L,
needs oil pump, $400.
(352) 476-1835
SUBARU GL
1987, 86K orig. mi. Very
clean, $1,000 OBO
(352) 628-2879
TOYOTA
1992, Camery, Exc.
Cond, A/C, auto,
$1,800 OBO.
(352) 564-8645
TOYOTA
2002 Avalon XLS 26K mi
fully loaded, like new
cond., $18,000 obo
(352) 746-2149
after 1:30pmr
TOYOTA CELICA
2002
80,000, Air Cond.,
Sliding Sun Roof, Single
Compact Disc, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Cruise Control,
$9500 OBO Call any-
time 352-476-3260 or
352-302-0816
VOLVO
1990 240 DL
AC, auto. Need to sell-
moving, $650.
(352) 527-0749
VOLVO
2003, S40, 24K,
Garaged kept, fully
loaded, leather,
sunroof, $20,000 Crystal
River (352) 563-5882


CHEVROLET
1996, 1500 Pick up,
5 spd, cold air, runs
great, $5,250.
(352) 746-4693
CHEVROLET
2004, Silverado Ext.
cab, 1500mi, loaded,
Must See.
(352) 634-5665
CHEVY
1977 pickup. V-8, auto,
runs great, lots of new
parts, $900 obo.
(352) 563-6626
CHEVY
'75, Scottsdale, 1/2 ton,
PS, BP, auto, 350, new
tires, runs great $1,750.
(352) 344-4579
DODGE
2003 Ram 1500, reg
cab, SWB, auto, AC, CD
player, bedliner, trailer
hitch. Low mileage,
$12,000. (352) 628-0173
or (352) 613-0929
DODGE
2004, SLT, 1500, custom
rimms, 20" Tires,
blue/silver, 5CD, 13K,
$16,500. (352) 628-7888
(352) 382-7888
FORD
1994, F150 Flareside,
6cyl, 5spd, A/C,
AM/FM/CD$3495 OBO
(352) 746-7856
FORD
1998 150 XLT, 1 owner,
74K mi., exc. cond.
$10,500 (352) 795-5411
FORD
1999, Ranger XL, auto, 6
cycle, A/C, needs
engine, $2,500.
(352) 628-5700
FUN FINDER
'05 18 Ft. Used one time,
also '04 Chevy Ext. P/U
Both for only $35,500 will
separate(352) 527-3935
GMC
1961 PICKUP 327 eng.
auto.,139K actual miles.
gray primer, great deal
$2,500obo 341-0787
NISSAN
1995, 130K ml., runs
good, $2,500 obo
(352) 341-5650
NISSAN
1999, Frontier, like new,
matching topper, 46K,
$7,500 OBO.
(352) 795-8755
TOYOTA
02,Tacoma Pre Runner,
extra cab, trd pack-
age, pwr window/locks,
70K, great cond, great
gas milage $13,900.
(352) 302-8981


If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
Ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings Is made, which record should Include
the testimony and evidence upon which his appeal Is
to be based.
-s- Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board

Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.


PONTIAC
'95, Transport, mechan-
ic special, good eng.
high mi., needs sensors,
minor work. $1,200. obo
(352) 489-6098
TOYOTA
2000 Siena XLE, fully
loaded, leather, 51,700
mi. $12,999 obo.
(352) 746-0205





ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
HONDA RECON
250, 2002, $2300/ obo .
(352) 302-5948


---7-


FORD
'99, Explorer Sport, 2DR,
red, gray Int., keyless,
very sharp $5,500.
(352) 795-5062
JEEP WRANGLER X
2004, low mi., loaded,
mint cond, New
$23,900. sell for, $17,900.
352-228-7772
SUBURBAN LT
2000 Pewter w/ grey
leather. Runs & looks
great. 90k mi$16,500
422-1316 or 726-1326
TOYOTA
'99,4 Runner, SR5,
green, loaded, low mi.
new tires & brakes,
$16,000. (352) 382-3551


-Uo

KING OF THE ROAD
RV STORAGE, RV Repair
/UHaul, Store your Boat,
RV or Auto $15. mo.
Hwy 19, N. of the Mall.
(352) 795-7901










CHEVY
1994 fullsize Blazer, 4x4,
new AC, new 33" tires &
lift kit. PW, PD, PS, CD
player. Runs & looks
awesome. $5500 obo or
partial trade. 344-4864,
ask for Jay.
FORD
1989 Ranger, 4WD, V-6,
auto, AC, new tires,
Bedliner. Clean. $2400.
(352) 400-1951
JEEP PARTS
Too many to list
Call for prices $25/up
(352) 628-2769




'04 Pontiac Mont.
34K mi. 7 pass.
loaded, Blue
$13,888.
Call Richard
726-1238
CHEVY VENTURE
1999, Van, Red, Dual
AC, 3 row seating, syn-
thetic oil, great mpg.
$5500. (352) 564-1390
DODGE
1991 Caravan. Body
good, no rust. Runs
great. Ice cold air.
Asking $1800.
(352) 726-2330
DODGE
2000 hi-top conversion
van.19,000K mi. Loaded
w/luxurles. $12,500 NEG.
(352) 746-5044
FORD
1994 E-150, Mark 3
conversion, high miles,
runs good, clean,
$2,500 (352) 860-0608
FORD
'96 Windstar GL, V-6, 3.8
cold AC w/rear. Quad
seating. PWcruise.150K.
$3320. (352) 212-3823
MERCURY
1994, Villager, very
good cond., $3,000.
352-302-6082
OLDSMOBILE
2002, Silhouette,
4 captain chairs, auto
drivers seat, silver
$12,599. (352) 746-6599


this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings Is made, which record should Include
the testimony and evidence upon which his appeal Is
to be based.
-s- Sandra HImmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board

Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle.
July 17, 2005.


HARLEY DAVIDSON
ELECTRA GLIDE
1993
Excellent Condition,
need loan pay off of
approx. $12,000.00
Call 746-1392
HONDA
1977, Goldwing, 31K,
must see, $3,800 OBO
(352) 344-1283
HONDA
1986 Shadow, 700 cc,
24,000 ml. Runs & looks
great. New tires & batt.
Adult owned, $2600
obo. (352) 341-1486
HONDA
1992, Night Hawk 750,
lowered for a woman,
can be brought back
to stock, $2,000 obo
(352) 726-6454
HONDA
'92, 750k, needs tune
up, $650.
352-400-1071
SUZUKI
'94 Intruder 1400, extra
chrome. Immaculate.
Saddlebags, new Pirelli
tires, 16K orig. mi.,$4,200
obo (352) 302-3712
VULCAN
'98, Classic, 14K,
mint cond. $3,300. obo
(352) 795-7757 L/M


Your World

4 pare4e daled-




C01I)NiWo-E
ctv iiauear

ww.oronlsoleonaI-o.odr






1991 Chevy P.U. VIN #
1GCDC14H8MZ160062
For: Recovery of towing
and storage accrued.
Seller reserves the right to
refuse any bid less than
the amount representing
such towing, storage,
publication .and any other
costs addendum to the
conduct of sale. Seller re-
serves the right to bid.
-s- Lois R. Lynch, President
Published one (1) time In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 17. 2005.


354-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 007-06
Emulsified Asphalt AE-90 and AE-90 Modified
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.

A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice. 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312,

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
VIcki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.

356-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 009-06
Sod & Sodding
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at:
www.bocc.citrus,fl.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11. 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice. 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto. Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vickl Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.

357-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
BId No.: 011-06
Thermoplastic Traffic Striping
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Webslte at:
www.bocc.citrus.fl us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Leconto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because, of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vlcki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.

359-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 013-06
Sign Posts and Hardware
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Webslte at:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvia/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.


358-0717 SUCRN
PUBUC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
BId No.: 010-06
Concrete Culverts
To obtain additional Information concernmlng the an-
nouncement, please vislt the Citrus County Website dt:
www.bocc.clitrus.fl.us and click on the Bld Information
option or call OnvIa/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712,
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11. 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path. First Floor. Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vickl Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronlcle.
July 17, 2005.


361-0717 SUCRN
PUBUC NOTICE

The Citrus County School Board will hold an Administra-
tive Hearing; 1:00 p.m., a Regular Meeting; 2:00 p.m.
and a Public Hearing; 3:30 p.m. In the Board Room of
the District Services Center located at 1007 West Main
Street. Inverness. Florida on August 9, 2005.


351-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING
THE CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSING AND
APPEALS BOARD WILL CONDUCT A MEETING ON JULY
27, 2005, AT 2:00 P.M., AT THE LECANTO GOVERNMENT
BUILDING, 3600 W. SOVEREIGN PATH. ROOM 166,
LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461.

SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
1. JACK VAUGHN TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL
TO TAKE EXPERIOR EXAM FOR ROOFING CONTRACTOR.
2. JASON SIMMONS TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROV-
AL TO TAKE EXPERIOR EXAM FOR INSULATION CON-
TRACTOR.

3. DANNY SEIJAS TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL
OF PLASTERING & STUCCO CONTRACTOR COMPETEN-
CY CARD.
4. PIERRE CHAPUIS TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL
OF CERAMIC TILE CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY CARD.
5. MARK WETHEREL TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL
TO TAKE EXPERIOR EXAM FOR MASONRY/CONCRETE
CONTRACTOR.
6. JOHN BARR TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROVAL OF
INACTIVE ELECTRICAL COMPETENCY CARD.
7. TERRY CARLOCK TO MEET THE BOARD FOR APPROV-
AL TO TAKE EXPERIOR EXAM FOR CERAMIC TILE CON-
TRACTOR.
CITATIONS:
1. JAMES E. GERLACH CITATION # 0612 "ENGAGE IN
THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR
ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BE-
ING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED."
2. ROBERT M. BOZEMAN CITATION # 0613 "ENGAGE
IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON- *
TRACTOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR
ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BE-
ING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED.'

3. JAMES D. WHITE CITATION # 0616 "ENGAGE IN THE
BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR
OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE
CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BEING DULY
REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED."
4. RANDALL WORTHINGTON CITATION # 0617 -
'ENGAGE IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF
A CONTRACTOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS
OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT
BEING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED."
5. IVAN MCKINLEY CITATION # 0619 "ENGAGE IN
THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR
ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BE-
ING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED.'

6. ALLEN D. CARTER CITATION # 0621 "ENGAGE IN
THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRAC-
TOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR ACT IN
THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BEING
DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED."
7. CHRISTOPHER PRIMO CITATION # 0622 "ENGAGE
IN THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR
ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BE-
ING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED.'
8. CHARLENE RACKET CITATION # 0623 "ENGAGE IN
THE BUSINESS OR ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CON-
TRACTOR OR ADVERTISE ONE'S SELF OR BUSINESS OR
ACT IN THE CAPACITY OF A CONTRACTOR WITHOUT BE-
ING DULY REGISTERED OR CERTIFIED."
ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINTS:
1. MARK STRIFLER dba QUALITY POOL CARE SERVICE
2. SCOTT AMUNDSEN dba CONDOR POOLS
3. BENN POLLARD
4. DOROTHY CLANTON
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION
MADE BY THE CONSTRUCTION LICENSING & APPEALS
BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED TO INSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED. (SECTION 286.0101. FL STATUTES.)

ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODA-
TION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR
PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, MASONIC BUILDING, 111
WEST MAIN STREET, 3RD FLOOR, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-9801AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEET-
ING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE
THE TDD TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTO GOV-
ERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5312).
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17,2005.


336-0731 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
that on Monday, August 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m., at the
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Services Office.
sealed proposals will be opened for the following:
MEDICALDIRECTOR
Emergency Medical Services,
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Foundation,
Citrus County, Florida
"SCOPE OF WORK"

The services provided shall be as described In the Re-
quest for Qualifications specifications and "draft" con-
tract and shall Include but not necessarily be limited to
the following:
1. The Medical Director shall be responsible to the Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical Foundation, Inc., Board
of Directors and report to the Executive Director.
2. The Medical Director shall comply with the respon-
sibilities as set forth In Florida Statutes 401, Medical Di-
rectors. These Include supervising and assuming direct
responsibility for the medical performance of pre-
hospital emergency response employees.
3. The Medical Director shall comply with the duties
and responsibilities as set forth In Florida Administrative
Code 64E-2, Emergency Medical Services, Medical DI-
rectlon.

4. The Medical Director shall be available 24 hours a
day for emergency consultations from system provider.
He/she shall provide for and be available by either
pager or cell phone at all times and shall provide for
an electronic email address for messaging and corre-
spondence. He/she shall respond In a timely manner
to specified pages, cell phone calls or messages and
email. In the event the Medical Director shall be una-
vailable he/she shall appoint a similarly qualified physi-
clan to cover all responsibilities.
All requests for qualifications must be received by the
office of the Executive Director, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake
Highway. Inverness, Florida 34453 on or bf1010.00
a.m. on Monday. Auaust Ist. 2005.
All requests for qualifications, Including the recom-
mendation of the Executive Director and/or Executive
Committee, will be presented to the Nature Coast
Emergency Medical Foundation Board of Directors for
flnal awarding or otherwise.
The Board will automatically reject the RFQ of any per-
son or affiliate who appears on the convicted vendor
list prepared by the Department of General Services,
State of Florida, under Section 287.133(3)(d), F.S. (1999).
All submissions must Include two (2) signed originals
and four (4) complete copies of each request for quali-
fications in a sealed envelope marked on the outside,
"Request for Qualifications for Medical Director, EMS".
All RFQ's must remain valid for a period of one hundred
twenty (120) days.
Specifications and/or further Information may be ob-
tained by contacting Teresa L Gorentz, Executive DI-
rector, 3380 E. Guf to Lake Highway, Inverness, Florida
34453, (352) 637-4121.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all re-
quest for qualifications, to waive Informalities In any or
all request for qualifications, and to re-advertise for re-
quest for qualifications,


The purpose of the Administrative Hearing Is to act
upon proposed student expulslon(s). The Regular
Meeting Is to discuss and act upon other business that
needs to come before the Board. The purpose of the
Public Hearing Is to approve the Emergency Compen-
sation Policy, 6.916 and for the adoption and/or
amendment to the Student Progression Plans for the
2005-2006 school year.
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at


362-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE
Notice Is hereby given to:
Realstered Owner:
KENNETH DARREN
RAULERSON
13563 CR 737
Webster, FL 33597
and lien holder: Unknown
and all other parties that
on July 28, 2005, at 9:00
AM, a public sale under
statute 713.78 will be con-
ducted at Lynch Recy-
clers, Inc., 1616 W.C. 48,
Bushnell, FL 33513 of a:


352-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 099-05
Water Main Tapping Services
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at:
wwwbocc.citrus.fl.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvia/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.

A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vickl Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.


353-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 006-06
Furnish Limerock Base Material
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Webslte at:
www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvia/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor. Lecanto. Flor-
ida 34461. (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting, If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.

355-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information

The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 008-06
Contract Road Work-Hauling
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at:
www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at
2:00 p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting, If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 17, 2005.

360-0717 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold a Workshop:
1:00 p.m., and a Special Meeting: 4:00 p.m., on July 19,
2005, In the Board Room of the District Services Center
located at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida.
The purpose of the Workshop Is to discussion various
board requested topics, The purpose of the Special
Meeting is to approve advertisement of the Tentative
Budget FY 2005-2006, approval of various personnel
recommendations and any other business that needs
to come before the school board.


The Board also reserves the right to separately accept
or reject any Item or items of the request for qualifica-
tions and to award and/or negotiate a contract In the
best Interest of the Foundation.
NATURE COAST EMERGENCY MEDICAL FOUNDATION
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: -s- Teresa L Gorentz
Executive Director
Published five (5) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3. 10. 17, 24, and 31, 2005.


-i










CrrIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHIRONICL.


16D SUNDAY, IJULY 17, 2005


1r)'A


El


E


To listen and respond to ads using your


=10j, can 1 -866-529-4742

To respond to ads at $1.99 per min, call


1-900-226-1602 Must be 18+.


To become a member, cIaIll3'1--866-28-522


PEOPLE PERSON
SWF, 57, 5'6", N/S, does a lot of hugging,
looking for neat, clean, honest SWM, 52-
70, for possible LTR. "T722071
NEW TO AREA
Attractive SWF, 42, slim, marriage-mind-
ed, no children. Seeking SWM, 35-58,
who is caring, honest, emotionally avail-
able. No games. @T729195
ONE IN A MILLION
Attractive DBF, 43,5'2", 118lbs, mother
of 10-yr-old. Black/indian decent, in the
nursing profession.Looking for someone
who likes movies, flea markets, camp-
ing, beaches and cooking. 7r595051
MY GUY WANTED
This 55-yr-old/ blonde young-at-heart,
seeks a guy of her own. Friendly, loving,
and kind who is ready for a relationship.
Looking for my guy, 47-57, N/S. %r589861
GAME-FREE LTR
SBF, 51, 5'4", enjoys cooking, church,
yard sales, flea markets. Seeking hon-
est, commitment-minded, family-orient-
ed SBM, 50-55, for LTR. No games, seri-
ous replies only "S427683
NEW AGE
Blonde, fair, 5'3", mature, freethinker,
good with people, poetry, singer, histori-
cal novels, kind, fun to be with, N/chil-
dren. Seeks emotionally available part-
ner 60-80. 1r580103
WEEK WACHEE GIRL
SWF, 46, 130lbs, blonde/blue, smoker,
enjoys the outdoors, water, music, tv,
and chatting. Seeking WM, 45-55, smok-
er, with similar interests. Need a good
friend? g684286
WHAT'S UPI.
GBF, 21, looking for sexy, sweet, honest
guy who likes movies, chilling and hav-
ing a good time, for friendship, fun and
more. "r729689
SRING HILL AREA
DWF, 48, N/S, N/D, attractive, honest,
sweet, likes laughter, horses music.
Seeks DM, 45-58, N/S, honest, humor-
ous, caring, likes kids. T533300
OCALA ANGEL
Fun, sweet, caring, family-oriented SWF,
38, 5'4" blonde/blue eyes, enjoys beach-
es, quiet nights. ISO B/HM, 35-50, for
dates and possible LTR. 2731166
EASYGOING PERSONALITY
Educated, positive, level-headed, secure
SWF, 52, 5'2", blond/blue, willing to talk
things through, enjoys travel, cooking.
Seeking SWM, 50-58, H/W-proportion-
ate, with a similar outlook on life for LTR.
V469082
HERE I AM
SWF, tall,slender, pretty, brown/brown,
N/S, loves classical music, art, books,
intelligent conversation, boating, cook-
ing. Seeks rugged interesting N/S,
SWM, 57-63, for companionship, possi-
ble LTR. '223790
;, KNIGHT AND SHINNING AMOR
I have a great personality, love to laugh
and really love water, I'm outgoing yet a
little shy. I'm very old-fashoned with a
slight twist. Treat me like a lady!!!
7727217
FRIENDS FIRST
SWF, 52, originally from Long Island,
NY, loves animals, nature, outdoors,
entertaining at home, going out, very
family-oriented, loyal, good SOH, home
projects, yard sales, seeking SWM, 48-
62. r735162
MAYBE YOU'RE MY GUY
Easygoing SWF, 57, smoker, loves the
country life, country/oldies music, cook-
ing, camping. ISO outgoing man, 57-62,
who likes movies, dining, quiet times and
laughter, for sharing a lasting, loving
relationship. Y'588873
HEY, TALL GUYS
Attractive, well-built, long-haired, Libra
SWF, 50, 5'9", N/S, enjoys movies, trop-
ical fish keeping, cats, and music.
Seeking stable, honest, caring SM, 45-
60, 6'-6'6". Life is short. Let's enjoy some
together. %625057
IT MUST BE YOU
SBF, full-figured, 30, 5'5", Capricorn,
N/S, mother, seeks family oriented BM,
25-42, who knows what they want in life.
"r696938
ACTIVE WOMAN SEEKS...
SWF9, looking for a SWM, 39-45, to
enjoy a good glass of wine with over a
great conversation.. 1r719170
GOOD FRIENDS
SWF, 26, 5', brown/brown, with 2 chil-
dren, smoker, loves classical jazz, rap,
and soul music. Seeking BM, 19-35,
smoker, goal-oriented, fun to be with.
g570398


LOOKING TO LOVE...
someone. Want to date with possible
long term relationship I am a sexy
blonde 31, looking for Mr. right.
7710152
CHRISTIAN WOMAN
WF, 27, enjoys camping, going to movies
and having fun. Looking for a Christian
man, 25-40, who likes the same. If that's
you, call me. 7r673671
YOUNG & VIBRANT
Artistic SWF, 18, 5'3", 160lbs, brown/
green, smoker, N/D, enjoys drawing and
dancing. Seeking WM, 18-23, smoker,
light drinker ok, for friendship. CT718404
WOW!
Super fit SWF into outdoor adventures,
foreign films, cultural events, is seeking a
non-smoking, very fit, intelligent, creative
SWM, 30-45, for LTR. Must love peanut
butter. 'E277278
WHERE ARE YOU?
Honest SWF, 21, chubby, 5'5", brown/
brown, mother, Scorpio, smoker, loves
movies, flea markets, seeks man, 25-45,
for possible romance. 7P710346
NO TIME FOR FOOLISHNESS
Open SWF, 58, 5'2", average build, N/S,
really likes to go out for Italian food, loves
flea markets, animals, travel, seeks
SWM, 56-65, N/S, for possible LTR.
7'714884
LOYAL AND LOVING
SWF, 46, N/S, seeks good, Christian
SWM, 35-60, N/S, who enjoys animals,
likes to walk, talk, hit the beach, shop at
the mall. 7r715937
FISHING, FOOTBALL...
and camping. SWF, 46, independent,
outgoing, enjoys camping, fishing, seek-
ing friend and maybe more later on,
who's a gentleman, 45-55, and enjoys
going out to a movie or dinner. 1&729406
BROWN EYED GIRL
Looking for a friend that's fun to be with,
into rock music, custom and classic cars,
movies, travel, animals, nature, and
more. Call and check me out. If916643
NEED A NEW FRIEND?
Devoted SBF, 41, God-fearing, mother of
1, interested in going to church, flea mar-
kets, strolls in the park, seeks SBCM,
37-53, w/similar interests. Tl643952
HONESTY A MUST
SWF, 35, 5'4', N/S, blonde/blue, single
mom, overweight, seeks honest guy, 19-
55, who loves having fun. 0'679735
SWF, 37, brown/blue, 5'9", medium
build, two children. Seeking SWM, 37-
45, who's honest, dependable, w/great
SOH for LTR, enjoys outdoor activities,
movies and family functions. If sounds
good contact me. 7'712551
GREAT WOMAN LOOKING...
For great guy, I'm fun loving, enjoy din-
ner, movies and love to dance. I'm an
active person, I enjoy the simple things
in life. Seeking someone to: have fun
with. l734342
MAKE MY DAY
Athletic SWF, 49, 5'6", N/S, enjoys the
music of Rod Stewart, loves Adam
Sandier movies, seeks SWM, 47-53, N/S,
who is into spending time outdoors.
T'721122
LIKES COUNTRY LIFE
WF, 39, 5'2", 120lbs, looking for a gen-
tleman, 38-48, N/S. I enjoys working out,
going to movies, dining out, hiking, gar-
dening and most anything outdoors.
7r564449
WHATTAYA SAY...
we go catch a flick? SBF, 31, smoker,
enjoys Las Vegas casinos. Seeking BM,
27-45, to chill with. "l685193
TAKE IT EASY
SWF, 50, Aquarius, N/S, seeks sweet,
loving, HF, 35-55, N/S, for possible
romance. 7695759
LET'S HAVE A GOOD TIME
SWF, 59, N/S, enjoys dining out, danc-
ing, cookouts, fishing, flea markets,
seeks special SWM, 55-65, to spend
some time with. Vg713370
EMOTIONALLY AVAILABLE
Independent, free-spirited SWF, 59, 5'8",
spontaneous, creative, N/S, enjoys
kayaking, camping, photography, travel-
ing, and good conversation. Seeking
WM, 55-68, N/S, who believes life is an
exciting adventure. I708586
NEWTO AREA
Jamaican lady, 55, N/S, university grad-
uate, former teacher, enjoys quiet
evenings at home, theater, dining out,
musicals, cooking, sewing. Seeking mar-
riage-minded DM, 35-50, for good
friendship, possible LTR. 7Q693050


I To payfr-urservice s uing.chck caB180.-25g2-0920


WE CAN BE TOGETHER
SWF, 44, marriage-minded, smoker,
homebody, would like to share evenings
in with a special man, 40-55, who likes to
watch movies, read, cook, go out on the
town. "I587120

9 ISO SINCERITY
SWF, 40, 5'6", single mother of 2 (son,
20, daughter, 11), smoker, works in nurs-
ing field. Seeking truthful, compatible,
fun WM, 30-45, for LTR. V681370
A REAL MAN
Attractive SBF, 48, 5'5", N/S, in the med-
ical profession, likes movies, dining,
dancing, quiet evenings at home, long
walks. Seeking honest, mature SM, 35+,
N/S, financially stable. V690857
ISO TRUE FRIEND...
and confident lover. SWPF, 47,
blonde/blue, very successful, N/S, seeks
a fun, fulfilling, romantic relationship with
WM, 42-57, N/S. '720901
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
SWF, 5'7", big blue eyes, long blonde
hair, 43, likes music, art. Seeking intelli-
gent, open-minded, drama-free, sincere,
honest, loving SWM, 30-50, with good
sense of humor, for friendship first.
V404773_
THIS IS MY TIME
41-year-old single mother of 2,
blonde/green, medium build, works in
the insurance field, loves to bowl, cook,
watch movies, work in the yard. ISO SM,
36-46, who likes kids. V498280
KISSES AND HUGS
Seeking true love, not lust. No cowards,
and no games please. BCF, 50, single
mom, seeks honest, mature, strong,
hardworking male, for a monogamous
relationship and true love. V840803
STOP LOOKING! READ.
DWF, 57, full-figured, blonde/blue, 5'3",
enjoys dancing, movies, occasional din-
ing out, cooking. Seeking S/DWM, 55-
65, for dating, possible LTR. V853666
BROWN SUGAR
SBF, 21, looking for someone, 21-30,
who is down-to-earth, fun, sweet, and
not really religious. '645309
LADY RANCHER
Widowed female, 54, 5'7", average build,
Taurus, loves horses and most other crit-
ters, country lifestyle, easygoing but
hard-working, not too hard on the eyes,
ISO SWM, 46-59, with similar interests.
I'682019
SEEKING PLEASANT MAN
WiWF, 60, would like to meet a WM, 55-
70, N/S, social drinker, who likes day
trips, going to movies and dining out.
V594035
LET'S GETTOGETHER
SWF, 62, N/S, enjoys crocheting.
Seeking WM, 60-70, N/S, who likes to
cuddle, sample local eateries, watch
movies, and take walks. V630231
SEEKING CHRISTIAN MALE
SBCF, 40, 6', large build, N/D, N/S, loves
kids, going to church, rri.ovies more.
Seeking SWCM, 35-60, rw.:. lo.es litie ,..
very honest and marriage-minded.
*g596730
JUST A CALL AWAY
Compassionate, kind, considerate SWF,
51, light auburn hair, 5'2", medium build,
enjoys people, likes cooking, travel,
boating, fishing. Seeking similar, loving,
active, open-hearted and true gentle-
man. V232518
WITH LOVE
SBF, 18, 5'3", 120lbs, N/S, loves ro-
mance movies. Seeking BM, 18-26,
5'4"+, N/S, for friendship, possible
romance. V660691
GOOD LISTENER
SBF, 50, 5'6", 1451bs, black/brown,
Gemini, N/S, loves movies, long walks,
and occasional dining out. Seeking BM,
45-55, into serious dating and relation-
ship. V661326
PRETTY WOMAN
SWF, 5'4", 115lbs, seeks SWM, 50-63.
You and I are in great shape, fun, active,
attractive, sensuous, clean, N/S, healthy,
kind, genuine, trustworthy, intelligent,
classy, secure. Call for further details.
IP956254
PRETTY EASYGOING
Spontaneous, fun SWCF, 56, 5'8",
175lbs, N/S, loves cooking, fishing, the
outdoors, blue jeans or a dress. Seeking
WM, 55-70, N/S, for friendship, possible
romance. V685070
NEW TO THE AREA
SWF, 5'6", 1261bs, smoker, many inter-
ests, seeks SWM, 62-72, smoker, to
share the best years. Vl646004
SEEKS ONE-WOMAN MAN
SWF, young 67, 5'7", N/S, has car, stays
out after dark, very active, romantic,
misses the things a woman does for a
man. Seeking WM, 66-79, who has sim-
ilar interests. V536212
LIKES THE SIMPLE THINGS
WF, 5'2", 1251bs, blonde/blue, would like
to find a true friend. Someone who is
cheerful, pleasant to be with, likes long
conversations, dancing, dining out and
have simple fun. 52-60. V515437
JUST BE YOU
SWF, 50, sincere, honest, caring, looking
for the same in a good-hearted, happy
man. Why not call? V693109



SEE WHAT HAPPENS
Single male, 33, 2401bs, Cancer, N/S,
would like to meet a woman, 21-50, N/S,
who likes sports and trying new things.
'g651103

LET'S HAVE FUN
SHM, 63, dark/blue, average build,
seeks lady, 57-63, N/S, who's pleasant
to be with, enjoys life, likes going to
movies, day trips, dining out. @719784
NO COUCH POTATOES
Active, healthy SWM, young 63, enjoys
the water, boating. Seeking classy,
attractive, active SWF, 50-62, N/S, for
possible relationship. "757364
A NEW BEGINNING
Commitment-minded DM, 47, 6', brown/
brown, 180ibs, ISO a special lady, some-
one who enjoys life, the outdoors and
classic rock, for sharing happiness and a
lasting relationship. "610840
LOADS OF FUN
SWM, 64, 5'11", 2001bs, enjoys '50s and
'60s music, dancing, gardening, animals,
very open-minded, seeks full-figured
lady who is fun to be with. '690280


HEARTS AND FLOWERS
SBM, 40, 6'5", 2351bs, Leo, smoker, en-
joys simple pleasures of life, seeks sexy,
woman, 29-40, for possible romance.
7B712805
THE NEW GUY IN TOWN
SM, 46, brown/blue, enjoys movies, din-
ing, keeping active. Seeking loving, like-
minded lady to share friendship, good
times, good talks and possibly more.
7726480
LET'S HAVE SOME FUN
Easygoing SWM, 36, medium build,
1851bs, hard-working, father, likes
Nascar, the outdoors, swimming, chil-
dren. Seeking understanding, easygo-
ing, sociable lady to share movies
nights, dinners dates, friendship, fun,
possible LTR. 7r734071
GOOD-LOOKING GUY
WM, 39, brown/brown, in good shape,
wants to meet a WF, 30-41', to go out and
have fun with. 7r716349
BABY BLUE EYES
Slim SWM, 29, 5'8", N/S, likes the con-
venience of fast food, relaxes by playing
sports, seeks woman, 18-45, who wants
to be treated right. 7'624851
NEW TO THE AREA
SBM, 33, Cancer N/S, seeks sweet,
spontaneous, creative female for friend-
ship, possible LTR. Don't miss out.
Contact me! '727862
GREAT MAN AVAILABLE
At present time, looking for a lady to date
and have some fun. I enjoy the company
of youth and smile with happiness. Be
great to be pen pals. 7r726368
GREAT DAD
SWM, 33, smoker, single dad, full-time
student, has weekends free to share with
special SWF, 24-36, smoker. '7717513
MAN OFYOUR DREAMS
SM, 29, wants to find the right woman so
we can start our life together. I like play-
ing pool, cooking, nights on the town,
cuddling, quiet moments. Your turn!
V733663
LIVE WELL, LOVE WELL
31 year-old master electrician, enjoys
salt water fishing movies on sunday,
and the local gym. Seeking active, fun,
spontaneous SF to share and explore
life with. let's talk! 7722723
FULL OF LIFE
SM, 34, 5'11", average build, likes to go
out for Italian or Spanrish food, loves trav.
el, amusement parks. pool. seeks single
woman, 21-45, who s serious about
finding love. 7r720385 ':
LOOKING 4 REAL FRIENDSHIP
SM, 31, looking to meet a special, hon-
est lady who's not afraid of taking
chances, has positive attitude and loves
life. I'm intelligent but not boring, funny
and reliable. Interested? Ia739803
ROAD LESS TRAVELED
Through life's twists and turns, a calm
spirit keeps everyirnig in perspective
SWM, 48, has a passion io 1frngan keep
that special person keep me going
Seeking SF, 38-52."f733585
LET'S SNEAK OUT...
and go to the beach. SWM, 67, tall, slim,
happy, trusting, funny, rock/gemstone
hound, loves horses, clean, neat, has
great children/grandkids, cook, reader,
church, always interested in you, SF, 56-
69. 1'739633
LIKE TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS
SWM, 24, looking to make new friends in
town, seeking SF, 18-25, to share some
off time with. l734268
NOW, TOMORROW, FOREVER!
SWM, 59, active, secure, no baggage,
laid back, romantic, enjoys flea markets,
yard sales, car/bike shows, dining out,
dancing, beach. Seeking life partner,
SF, 48-58, for honest, loving, meaningful
relationship. g730690
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN
WIWM, 60, retired, smoker, loves county
life, looking for Like-minded SWF, 45-65,
with interests in horses and the easy life,
for fun, dating, romance and possible
LTR. "725854
WIFE WANTED WEEKIWACHEE
WM, 49, 6'1". Enjoys gardening, arts,
and crafts. Seeking single/divorced WF,
age open, N/S, N/D, for permanent rela-
tionship. 02729298
A LITTLE QUALITY TIME
SBM, 34, N/S, loves movies. Seeking
fun, loving, honest, game-free BF, 33-46,
ready to have fun in life. I'709291
TALENT SEARCHING
SWM, 67, 5'11", 170lbs, N/S, enjoys fly-
ing, Disney parks, church, square danc-
ing, travel, movies, Nascar, dining out, ani-
mals. Seeking A/W/HF, 30-60, N/S, who
shares a passion for travel. "'717150
CUDDLY BEAR
SWM, 45, 6",6'1", 250lbs, brown/green,
lives locally, smoker, enjoys Nascar, foot-
ball, bowling, pool. Seeking petite WF,
25-45, smoker. l'256201
BE YOURSELF
Brown-complected SBM, 30, 5'10", N/S,
seeks very spontaneous, energetic, out-
going, nice-looking woman; 20-42, N/S,
who knows how to make her own deci-
sions. *674730
OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
SWM, 33, 6', 175lbs, Cancer, marriage-
minded, smoker, mechanic, single father
of 2, seeks SWF, 32-42, for wonderful
relationship. 7675133
LET'S GET TOGETHER
Open-minded, compassionate, affec-
tionate DWM, 35, 5'8", 1601bs, smoker,
enjoys cookouts, movies. Seeking WF,
25-45, H/W proportionate, smoker, who
wouldn't mind being swept off her feet.
*f680448
LET ME KNOW YOU'RE THERE
SWM, 19, 6', 1801bs, smoker, tan com-
plexion, looking for a female, 18-23, who
is good-looking, has a nice sense of
humor, enjoys life. '690796
LONESOME
SWM, 72, retired, 5'2", N/S, N/D, likes
dining out, movies. Looking for slender,
fit W/HF, under 5'3", 1351bs, 60-80, for
friendship maybe more. "718022
VERY OUTGOING
SBM, 29, 5'11", athletic build, Virgo,
smoker, loves to have fun. Seeking BF,
25-45, smoker, for friendship, possible
romance. '633324
HALLELUJAH
SBM, 30, Libra, N/S, enjoys church,
movies, dining out. Seeking a God-fear-
ing BF, 29-38, N/S, who loves church.
C634527


NEW TO GAINSVILLE AREA
SWM, 55, relocated from Maine, N/S,
loves movies and beaches. Seeking
woman, 35-59, smoker, to help me get
acquainted with the area. '662489
BUILT, HANDSOME
Successful, fun-loving SWM, 45, will
promise you the most fun you've ever
had in your life If you love romance,
travel, adventure, excitement, health, fit-
ness, and fine dining, call me! 0740711
WAITING FOR YOU
SBM, 24, 6'1", smoker, brown eyes, 1
tattoo, seeks nice, pretty SBF, 24-24,
N/S, for possible relationship. V723565
WANTING LONG LASTING
Average type of person, good sense of
humor, quiet, creative, sensitive and car-
ing. Looking for the person who has the
right chemistry and that I can click with.
V728327
HARD-WORKING MAN...
with loving arms, friendly, outdoorsy
man, 45, a good listener, communica-
tive, caring, open and supportive, ISO a
lady who's not afraid to be herself or
afraid of love. V739160
SINCERE AND HONEST
SWPM, just turned 62, 5'9', 2301bs, N/S,
starting over, new in Ocala, active, work-
ing, travels, outdoors, barbecues, fish,
Nascar, cards, golf, trips to the islands,
home is great, one-woman man.
V721166
INCURABLE ROMANTIC
SWM, 55, likes long walks, holding
hands, reading, dining out, gardening.
Seeking SWF, 50-65, with similar inter-
ests, for cuddling in front of the tv. Good
times, possible LTR. Let's talk. V723244
CHRISTIAN SINGLE SEEKS...
Christian single. SWM, 22, Sagittarius,
N/S, attends church regularly, seeks
Christian SWF, 18-30, for serious but fun
relationship. ''724750
I WANT IT ALL
Active, attractive SWM, 55, 5'7", 175lbs,
athletic build, Cancer, N/S, seeks
woman, 25-45. NS5, for LTR 0677768
LET'S TALK
WIWM 70, looks younger, very ener-
getic, enjoys dining out, spons, the,
water, air boating, flea markets. Looking
to meet a caring fun woman who enjoys
the same. V695772
WHY NOT CALL?
DWM. 42, heavy machinery operator.
likes '70s/'80s rock, exploring lite
Seeking easygoing, energetic woman to
share outdoor adventures, boating, 4-
wheeling, life, laughter and possible LTR.
V701300
CITRUS COUNTY
DWM, 50, 6'2", brown/blue, attractive,
with 2 children, N/S, enjoys cruising,
weekend getaways, and good conversa-
tion. Seeking attractive woman, 40-55,
H/W proportionate. '710072
SEEKING LTR. .
Attractive WM, 64, 6', dark/blue, smoker,
likes cooking, oldies, movies, dining out,
RVs, ISO WF, 50-60, with average build,
who likes country lifestyle and travel.
0610257
LET'S HAVE FUN!
SWM, 63, enjoys reading, movies, din-
ners in or out, and going to the gym.
Looking to meet a SF, 40-62, with similar
interests. '713773
IT'S ALL TRUE
Widowed WM, 47, 6', with 2 sons, smok-
er, enjoys camping, football, and watch-
ing car racing. Seeking WF, 35-50,
smoker, for honest LTR. V709372
RETIRED MILITARY
WM, 71, 6', 180lbs, brown/blue, enjoys
bowling, dancing, long walks, exploring
new eateries and new places. Searching
for a lady, 60-80, who is broad-minded
and affectionate, with similar interests.
V716376
LAID-BACK GUY
SWM, 6'1", 200lbs, in good shape, likes
flea markets, going to movies, boating,
fishing. Looking for an easygoing, happy
WF, 38-45, who likes the same things.
V628452
PLAYFUL PISCES
SWM, smoker, love to meet special
woman, 44-60, loves music, movies, the
beach, sunsets, quiet times, romantic
nights. Call if you want to be loved.
Spring Hill area. V679528

V MEND MY HEART
Attractive WM, 43, 5'7", 150lbs, seeks
attractive WF, for repairs. Tools must in-
clude love, trust, communication, friend-
ship, and possible marriage, with TLC
bedside manner. Hurry! Need meds
ASAPII 0680509
SPECIAL LADY WANTED
SWM, 48, enjoys -ishing, movies, cook-
ing, quiet times at home Seeking SWF,
38-52, in shape, down-to-eanh, who
appreciates a good loyal man. Friends
first. '412132
A NEW BEGINNING
SWM, 62, 175lbs, Libra, N/S, active,
seeks WF, 50-60, active and healthy, for
good times and possible LTR. V433493
JOIN ME
Compassionate, -fun-loving, light-heart-
ed SM, 64, Cancer, enjoys boating, sim-
ple times. Would like to meet a kind,
attractive, fun female to share dinner.
dates, quality talks, romance and then
who knows? 0631763
MR MELLOW
Handsome, passionate SWM, 48, athlet-
ic build, from Israel, marriage-minded,
N/S, heavy equipment operator, seeks a
gentle WF, 18-48, N/S, for fun and dat-
ing. 0l665111
FUN, FUN, FUN
SWM, 46, 5'10", 1701bs, retired from the
navy, N/S, fitness-minded, low-keyed,
beach bum, surfer, seeks intelligent WF,
42-50. 0666383
RETIRED MILITARY
DWM, 48, 5'10", 1851bs, brown/blue,
moustache, lots of fun, likes outdoors, the
beach, camping, fishing, more. If you're
interested, leave a message. 0f670253
STARTING OVER
WiWM, 72, 5'9", 1801bs, N/S, social
drinker, very active, likes dancing, dining
out, travel. Looking for SWF, 65-75, for
companionship, travel, talks, fun times.
0679020


I'LL COLOR YOUR WORLD
SWM, 57, 5'6", 160lbs, in great shape,
active, healthy, N/S, loves painting and
sailing. Seeking adventurous, sponta-
neous WF, 40-57, N/S, for LTR. V686477
TOO MUCH FUN
SWM, 20, 5'9", 1381bs, N/S, brown/blue,
seeks single woman, 18-24, N/S, who
knows what she wants out of a relation-
ship. V560749
ALL CALLS RETURNED
Honest SWM, 63, 6'4", 2601bs, smoker,
loves cooking, fishing, watching Nascar.
Seeking SWF, 50-65, to spend some
time with. V566775
SIMILAR INTERESTS?
SWM, 20, 5'9", 140lbs, brown/blue, smok-
er, seeks woman, 18-24, for movies,
games, sports, and more. '584882
HOPE IT'S YOU
Hard-working SBM, 41, 1451bs, enjoys
children, amusement parks, woodwork-
ing. weightlifting, running, fine dining and
good movies Seeking a nice, affection-
ate, romantic lady to treat like a queen.
V607942
HORSE NEEDS RIDER
SM, 54, 170lbs, 5'9", ruggedly hand-
some, horse ranch owner, Capricorn,
enjoys road trips, cook outs, riding,
dancing, socializing, country life. Seeks
adventurous, well-adjusted woman, 42-
56, country and horse lover. 0"435846
LOOKING OUT MY BACK DOOR
Fit SWM, 63, 5'8", average build, N/S,
N/D, big fan of Creedence Clearwater
Revival, seeks SWF, 50-70, N/S, for pos-
sible LTR. V646822
REALLY GREAT GUY
DWM, 56, 5'9", medium build, enjoys the
outdoors, fishing, loves flea markets, din-
ing. in/out, 50s to 60s music, bowling,
tennis, horseback riding. Seeking SF for
possible relationship. '433284
SINGLE FATHER
WM, 42, enjoys sports, Nascar, swim-
ming, fishing, the ocean, more. Looking
tor WF. 25-50, to possibly share life with.
0658668
ROMANTIC-AT-HEART
WM, 47. looking for a woman, 35-47,
who likes tisninri,, boating, gardening,
country lile. romance, country music,
playing pool. more. V665851
WHAT I REALLY WANT
SWPM; 49, 6', 195lbs, brown/brown,
smoker, loves traveling up and down the
east coast. Seeking a sincere, financially
stable WF, 45-53, N/S, who is not a bar
fly. V664898
NATURE AND ME
SWM, 42, 6'1", N/S, gentleman, home-
owner, enjoys time spent in the great out-
doors, seeks attractive, honest SWF, 35-
50, N/S, for dating, possible LTR.
0'226878
LET'SGET-TOi I
Caring, decent phys b ling,
SBPM, -2 ISO .exy,, anracive, SBF, 27-
45, for possible relationship. 1'480766
YARD DOG, SHORT HAIR
Affectionate, house broken, all paper
shots, warm feet, cold nose, doesn't
drink from porcelain or crase cars or
cats, likes to dig, seven years old. SWM.
ISO SF. 0948521
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
Sharp, good-looking, rugged 67 year-old
ex-marine. seeks arnrachve. older, finan-
dially secure female to travel and have
fun with. If you like to have a good time,
let's talk. V204397
AS THE SUN SETS
Hard-working SWM, 40, father of 1, smok-
er, likes going out to beaches, movies,
enjoys watching the sunset, seeks SWF,
34-46, for possible romance. 0'682823
INTELLIGENT, HONEST...
young-looking, dependable, attractive
DWPM, 43, 5'6", 1401bs, N/S, D/D-free,
w/daughter at home, loves sports, read-
ing, movies, ISO intelligent, non-smok-
ing female. V713278
INTERESTED?
SWM, 47, 5'10", 170lbs, well-groomed,
seeks SWM, early to mid-40s, for com-
panionship. I enjoy fishing, beaches,
cooking, gardening. Call! V678334


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W White
A Asian
S Single
J Jewish
P Professional
N/D Non-Drinker
N/S Non-smoker









SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005 17D


CITRUS CouN'Y (FL) CHRONICLE


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'01 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS LS
Tills Isa lot of car for the money- and It


9 rFnD rF-av
CREW CAB
Fontaine pkg, 6.8 diesel, all power white,
only 60,326 miles #NPR4550.
$24,995

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cruise, dark bli
$26,

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pw pl, AC, cruise, AM/FM, CD, alloy
wheels, towing package. #N5T568A
S12-.o


'00 FORD '96 Fl
EXPEDITION XLT EDD
4.6 Liter V8, elect luel inj, pw, pl, A/C, cruise 4.0 Uter
control, AM/FM, cassette. #N5C154A w/OD, A
$16995


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Power windows/locks, keyless entry,
ne, A/C, 19,141 miles and much more. All te
#NP4604. trim
!91 .:. __ _ _1


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SUPER CREW XLT
Only 8,000 miles and loaded.
#NP4536
!925 .O9


towing pkg., 11,300
M ust see this one
#NP4452
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DUTY EXT CAB '03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC SUV
6.0 Liter 8 cyl diesel, ps, pl, pb, 40 Liter 6 cyl, auto w/overdrlie, power
pw, cass, CD, tint. #N5T409A steering, pw, pi, CD player, A/C. #NP4554
tAd QQan

'01 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Iv auLo, A/i, sunrool,
leather, one owner, only
36,000 miles. #N5T354A
$15,995


'01 WINDSTAR
All power, leather, A/C,
49,671 Miles. #N5T537A
$15,995


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'03 FORD TAURUS SE
3,0 Liter, 6 cyl, auto w/OD, pw, pl, A/C,
cruse, tilt, AM/FM, cass. #NP4606
$11,995


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5,995


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'04 FORD EXPLORER '02 D
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ES S P E C IA L Retail 22,99 40 Liter 6 cyl, tuel injected, auto, AC, pw 52 Uter 8 (
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LSo l e Tachometer Tint -nll-LOCi Braoes lloy WVheels
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i+* Bed Liner Sliding Rear Window Console Dual Sport
". Mirrors Body Side Mouldings Keyless Entry Step
Bumper Towing Package and fMuch Much ilMorel


'04 HONDA CIVIC LX '03 MERCURY MARAUDER
1.11 I I : [ 11 116 l.4 fro P I I
$uI' IIII $Pi2. ,5, N5.,471. .. ll 11' l i r
$1 6995 $24,995 #N5T4


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CIrrus COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


18D SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2005


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95 PONTIAC 02 CHEVROLET 04 DODGE NEON 04 DODGE 01 DODGE 94 JEEP 99 CHRYSLER 01 FORD
GRAND AM MALIBU SXT NEON CARAVAN WRANGLER CONCORDE LXI WINDSTAR
#25227A #8072P #8216P #8217P Loaded. #8170T Ready for mudl Loaded, leather. #8357P Leather, loaded. #D60002A
,, 93* I8 M AL LA ^$10,488


01 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS LS
Leather, loaded. #J050647B
*11,988'


02 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS LS
All power. #D50651A


02 DODGE
CARAVAN
Family Ready. #D50444A
*11,988'1


03 FORD
EXPLORER 4X4
Leather, loaded. #B50929A
*17,888'


99 DODGE
RAM
Quad, loaded. #8319P
$12,488'



02 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
Loaded. #8080A
17,r988


04 DODGE 05 CHEVY 05 DODGE 02 FORD F-350 04 JEEP 04 JEEP 04 DODGE 03 DODGE 2500
RAM 1500 UPLANDER RAM 1500 4X4 LARIATLI UBERT WRANGLER DURANGO LARAMIE
#8205T Blue. #J050697A Lava red. #B69637A Diesel. #8278P LTD. #B50857A Sport. #D50656B All power, leather. #8276T Leather, diesel. #D50721 A
21,383 22,988 123,488t 2 9,8A88t 988 t $,888 19,488't 25,988t
tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and Includes all factory incentives, rebates and customer loyalty. Dealer Incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for illustration purposes only.


CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP
CAL 1.877.-692-7998
563-2277 MY CRYSTAL
1005 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


.... CHRYSLER* DODGE JEEP
OCAL 1.877.692-7998
726-1238 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


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04 CHEVY 99 DODGE
MALIBU CARAVAN
3 To Choose From HURRYI Low miles, only 12k. #81525
9,986' $9,993t
L M W.


03 CHEVY
MALIBU
Loaded, sunroof. #N5312A
$ i,893't


05 CHEVY
CAVALIER
$AVE, auto. #8268T
*$E,l926t


04 CHEVY
CAVALIER LS
Power windows/locks. #8239P
30,426t
iiiim -vI


04 FORD
FOCUS
Loaded, pw, pl. #8267A
$11,284'


02 CHEVY 04 CHEVY
BLAZER 4-DR MAUBU
Clean, reliable. #N5246A New body style, loaded. #8324P
3,541 A623


03 GMC 03 DODGE 05 CHEVY 02 BMW 04 FORD RANGER 02 SATURN 03 CHEVY 01 CHEVY
SIERRA X-CAB RAM 1500 4X4 TRAILBLAZER 330i XLT EXT CAB VUE TRAILBLAZER LS TAHOE
#25329A White. #8146T Black. #8299P #8331 P V6, auto. #N5305A Affordable, reliable. #N5176A Ext, loaded. #N5325A Loaded, affordable. #N5224B
Pries and payments exclude ax, ag, ile and dealer fee (299.50)and includes all factory Incentives, rebates and customer loyalty. Dealer Incentives subject to change. See Dealer for 7831Details. Photos for llustrati687on purposes on19 213
tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50)and Includes all factory Incentives, rebates and customer loyalty Dealer Incentives subject to change See Dealer for Details Photos for iustratIon purposes only


CHEVROLET


LOeA 1.877-692-7998
795-5515 MY CRYSTAL
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


CHEVROLET


Oa 1.8774-692-7998
637-5050 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


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