<%BANNER%>
Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00191
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: July 10, 2005
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00191

Full Text





Baseball
Central Citrus
Major all-
' stars baseball
team faces
off against
Dunnellon.
PAGE 1B


r- -g r c


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ON
22- -<

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Dennis


Associated Press
PENSACOLA Hurricane
Dennis dealt a glancing blow to
the Florida Keys on Saturday,
knocking out power and leav-
ing streets flooded with sea-
weed as it roared toward the
storm-weary Gulf Coast, where
nearly 1.4 million people were
under evacuation orders.
The hurricane, blamed for at
least 20 deaths in Haiti and
Cuba, carried a threat of more
than a half-foot of rain plus
waves and storm surge that
could be more than a story high
when it makes landfall Sunday
somewhere along the coast of
the Florida Panhandle,
Alabama or Mississippi.


0 -ypss
-: -










6 bypasses


6 200 mi 7 p.m. Sat.
0 200km .- C L
E MX. 85 380 .
SOURCE: AccuWeather AP
A hurricane warning was in
effect from the Steinhatchee
River, about 130 miles north of


Please see


/Page 5A


FORECAST: Mostly
cloudy Windy
Showers and thunder-
storms likely
PAGE 2A


area


Hurricane a miss, this time
ASHLEY SORRELL
asorrell@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle intern
Looming dark clouds, sheets of rain, tornado
warnings and flooded roads plagued much of
Citrus County Saturday as Hurricane Dennis
traveled northwest toward the Florida
Panhandle and the Louisiana coast
The Citrus County Sheriff's Emergency
Operations Center stayed on top of the storm
Please see MiSS/Page 5A
Johnny Parson stacks filled sand bags Saturday
at the county site on State Road 44 in Crystal
River. The sand bags were available to resi-
dents who were worried about coastal flooding.
BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle


b


DAVE SIGLERCr.r.:,r..cle
Progressive Care Unit charge nurse Kathy Hotz, R.N., checks on the vital signs of Arthur Tomlinson recently at Citrus Memorial Hospital. The nurs-
ing shortage has been steadily growing; and as the baby boomers start retiring, the number of nurses needed will skyrocket.


Single mom finds

success through

nursing program


charris@chronicleonline.co
Chiron iclh"
'J or Jo.\ Mast, the nursi
Ishiortage has been an
n opportunity I,
to Improve her
The former
sta\ -at-home nlmonl
turned palrt-time
: neie paper carri-
er decided she
needed a career ,
that would d allo"
her to spend time first recpn
th herfour chii- of scholar
dren and pa\ the at CMHI
bills
Nursing seemed to be the b
option Problem w as. she coulI


Shortage may coincide with instructor deficit


Local training

programs stay full
CHER i 1ARR IS
sh rrihc@chron iaeonline com


aIts a bottleneck that could -'.
make the nursints shortage rorse.
If Florida's Inursine p rogr'ams ,h .
don't ha e all the instructors theat
expand rast Hspdl -I
enough to meet firnd ways -
the need b r nur- to keep
es that \%ill con- n urses
tinue to increase PA E 4
as baby boomers PAGE 4A
ent age and require Cindy Rogers, monitor technician, left. Toni Park, respiratory technician,
ship iMore health care ser\ ices and Pat Alexander work the nursing station in the Progressive Care Unit
Thenied ilist i-ictors IsR0% during a busy time at Citrus Memorial Hospital.
est earned in part b.% the same factor generation of baby boomers who Florida Community College in
Didn't expected to make nurses in high are at or nearing retirement age Ocala. talked about the nation-
demand obr years to come- many Karine Siplon, the dean of
e 4A nursing instructors belong to the health occupations at Central Please see !H;D. ii-./~Page4A

.- - .-- -- '-- --- ---- --*-- --"---C..-. ---.- --~--_.----.,---- -- ... .-
/


NUMBERS TO CALL
Citizen information lines for
storm-related questions
or concerns:
* Phone lines open to
public at5 a.m.
* 746-6555.
* 746-5470.
* In case of after-hours
emergency, call 746-6555.
Sunday high tide for mouths
of the rivers:
* Chassahowitzka 9:22 a.m.
* Crystal River 7:43 a.m.
* Withlacoochee 5:30 a.m.
* Homosassa 7 p.m.


Some say a decision whether or not
to throw out John Couey's confession
will be talked about years after the
case is closed.
Lawyers on both sides of the issue
say it will likely come down to a
judge's interpretation of a decades-
old law.
The 168 pages of
transcripts of inter- Read part
views between of the
Couey, 46, and inves- transcript
tigators detail what i e
prosecutors say is an
initial denial of any PAGE 5A
involvement in a 9-
year-old Homosassa girl's death, and
leads to Couey saying he raped the
girl and buried her alive behind his
home, which sat across the street
from her house.
However, the dispute centers on the
March 17 interview that happened
the day Couey was found near a
Salvation Army in Savannah, Ga., and
arrested as a "person of interest" in
the girl's disap-
pearance. About
30 minutes into an
interview with
Citrus County These
Sheriff's detec-
tives Scott Grace guys had a
and Gary
Atchison, Couey matter of
asks for an attor- seconds
ney.
After being told to make a
by Couey that he
knew nothing decision.
about Jessica
Lunsford's disap-
pearance, Grace
asks him if he Ric
would take a lie Ridgway
detector test. assistant state
Couey replied, "I attorney, speaking
guess. I'm just ... I. of the detectives
want a lawyer, you interviewing
know." He adds, "I JohnCouey.
want a lawyer
here present I want to talk to a
lawyer cause I mean... if people trying
to accuse something I didn't do. I did-
n't do it I ain't, you know...."
Grace responds by saying, "Hang
on, hang on, hang on, hang on ... so if
we were to do a lie detector test, you'd
want to get a lawyer for that?" Couey
replies, "I want to talk to a lawyer
first."
The interview continued for a
while longer before the detectives
stopped. The following day, according
to transcripts, Couey told the detec-
tives he entered Jessica's home, took
her back to his bedroom, raped her
Please see CONFESSION/Page 5A


X Annie's Mailbox . 14A
W Classified ...... 10D
0 Crossword ...... 14A
Z Horoscope . . . 11A
,, Movies ......... 11A
Obituaries ....... 6A
Stocks .......... 2D
Together ....... 12A
Eight Sections


6 1184578 2007 o


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After passage
Senior
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followed the
process that
made three
reformative
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affecting
doctors and
lawyers -
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launch has a
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* Business owners
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their companies
for disasters./1D
* Mold creeps into
area homes./19E


.4 v


86
L :''17 J
77


Confession


admissibility


questioned


Were Couey's

rights violated?
DAVE PIEKLIK
dpieklik@chronicle.com
Chronicle


,c. -


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- - $~.*.tp0 A
.


Galeria San Sebastian is one of the small
businesses honored by SCORE./ID


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Please ee ;',/Pag


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHIRONICL


2A SUNDAY, JU.LY 10, 2005


FlOTTERida
LOTTERI ES


an


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
3-1-0
PLAY 4
6-8-5-2
FANTASY 5
16 -.22 23 28


ONLINE POLL

c ui N iUtMr /6it




Should fireworks be legal to
sell even though they are not
legal to use?


A Yes. The present system
works fine.
B. No. Make it illegal to sell
and use.
C. Yes. I'll take my chances.
D. No. Make it legal to sell
and use.
To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.


Results will appear in the July
17 edition, along with a new
question.
Last week's results:
Do you agree with the
Supreme Court's decision to
allow certain religious displays
and not others?
A Yes. It should be decided
case by case. 9.6% (34)


B. had a part in the forma-
tion of our government and
should not be censored. 52.5%
(186)
C. Yes. Religion has no part
in government. 15.8% (56)
D. No. It sounds like the
court itself is confused about
the issue. 22.0% (78)


Spotlight on i ONALITIES


- 30


LOTTO
6 8 18 32- 38 45

.FRIDAY, JULY 8
Cash 3:2-5-4
Play 4: 8-4-9-6
Fantasy 5:12 14 15 22 34
5-of-5 5 winners $47,253.73
4-of-5 339 $112
3-of-5 10,210 $10
Mega Money: 6 31 32 39
Mega Ball: 7
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 $1,371
3-of-4 MB 48 $500.50
3-of-4 1,205 $59.50
2-of-4 MB 1,809 $27.50
2-of-4 36,089 $2
1-of-4 MB 17,446 $2.50
THURSDAY, JULY 7
Cash 3: 7-7-8
Play 4: 6 1 6 7
Fantasy 5:12 14 24 29 31
5-of-5 3 winners $69,986.73
4-of-5 289 $117
3-of-5 8,279 $11
WEDNESDAY, JULY 6
Cash 3:1 8 9
Play 4:4 5 6 2
Fantasy 5: 3-6-8- 12-27
5-of-5 1 winners $231,538.07
4-of-5 476 $78
3-of-5 13,434 $7.50
Lotto: 1 11 18 24 25 47
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 68 $6,101
4-of-6 5,256 $64
3-of-6 104,195 $4.50
TUESDAY, JULY 5
Cash 3:9-5-0
Play 4:8 7 0 4
Fantasy 5: 8 11 18 -20 -31


5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 367
3-of-5 10,802
Mega Money: 10 26
Mega Ball: 4
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7
3-of-4 MB 49


$208,216.46
$91.50
$8.50
- 39 -44


$1,387.50
$434.50


Co-star's demands


bring movie to halt


Associated Press

HONG KONG Jackie
Chan says the third install-
ment of "Rush Hour" is stuck
in neutral
because co-star
Chris Tucker is
making too
many
demands.
S "He wants
too much
power The
Jackie movie compa-
Chan ny hasn't
obliged. He
wants final editing rights and
the final look at the movie and
so on," Chan told The
Associated Press Thursday.
Chan called Tucker a "good
friend" but questioned
whether he had the stature to
be so demanding.
"He's still a new actor,"
Chan, 51, said. "How many
movies has he made? Two
movies have already made
him very famous and made
him a lot of money.
"He needs to learn slowly,"


he added.
A call by The Associated
Press to Tucker's publicist,
Samantha Mast, wasn't
returned Friday.

Boyle joins 'Las Vegas'
NEW YORK Lara Flynn
Boyle will return to series tel-
evision when she joins the
cast of the NBC drama "Las
Vegas" this fall.
Flynn Boyle, who played
Assistant District Attorney
Helen Gamble
on "Theb
Practice"
(1997-2003),
will portray
the flamboyant
new owner of
the Montecito
Resort &
Casino. Lara Flynn
"Obviously, ara yn.
we're excited
to have someone with the style
and panache of Lara Flynn
Boyle as we head into a sea-
son of transition for 'Las
Vegas,"' Gary Scott Thompson,


the series' creator and execu-
tive producer, said in a recent
statement.
"She will add even more
story potential and star power
to what is already a super-
charged cast playing against
the backdrop of a dynamic


city."
James Caan stars as Ed
Deline, the head of the sur-
veillance team for the
Montecito Casino. The cast
also includes Josh Duhamel,
Molly Sims, Nikki Cox, James
Lesure and Vanessa Marcil.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.
us/ and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.


NAME: (none)
AGE: kitten
SEX: F
ID #: 53635


To enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group
and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet. The
shelter is in Inverness near


NAME: (none) NAME: (none)
AGE: kitten AGE: adult
SEX: M SEX:
ID #: 53904 ID #: 51908


NAME: (none)
AGE: adult
SEX: F
ID #: 52439


the airport. It is open for
adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday
and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 726-7660 for more
information.


NAME: (none)..
AGE: adult
SEX: M
ID #: 53246


NAME: (none)
AGE: puppy
SEX: F
ID #: 52971


Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida, 563-2370,
or from the Humane Society
of Citrus County, 341-2222.





Ow 1


NAME: Terra
AGE: yng adult
SEX: SF
ID #: 53793


N: Skpeter
AGE:
SEX: NM
ID #: 50266


Almost bleu


The weather T


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


City H L F'cast City H L F'cast
Daytona Bch. 87 76 tstrm Miami 88 78 tstrm
Ft. Lauderdale 87 79 tstrm Ocala 86 76 tstrm
Fort Myers 87 76 tstrm Orlando 86 76 tstrm
Gainesville 86 75 tstrm Pensacola 83 79 tstrm
Homestead 87 79 tstrm Sarasota 86 78 tstrm
Jacksonville 84 76 tstrm Tallahassee 88 77 tstrm
Key West 89 80 tstrm Tampa 86 79 tstrm
Lakeland 86 75 tstrm Vero Beach 86 77 tstrm
Melbourne 84 78 tstrm W. Palm Bch. 86 78 tstrm


South winds from 30 to 35 knots. Seas 10 Gulf water
to 14. Bay and inland waters extremely temperature
rough. Very windy with heavy rain and
thunderstorms, as Hurricane Dennis make 0
landfall near the panhandle later this after-
noon. 87
Taken at Egmont Key
.. . . .. .. ., a-s. . . -, "


Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 31.55 31.67 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.39 38.33 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 40.12 40.06 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.08 41.07 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this
,J j i[ ,u r~e.a a ,-, qe i ,r,2 ou houiu d raI HIi-, H dr-,-l:,i. ai E ,:l I:. 1 i 7- 11
N M I -" .. ..,


City
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
9:22 a/4:42 a 8:28 p/4:33 p 9:50 a/5:12 a 9:11 p/5:16 p
7:43 a/2:04 a 6:49 p/1:55 p 8:11 a/2:34 a 7:32 p/2:38 p
5:30 a/11:43 a 4:36 p/- 5:58 a/12:22 a 5:19 p/12:26 p
8:34 a/3:41 a 7:40 p/3:32 p 9:02 a/4:11 a 8:23 p/4:15 p


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
W 'IT TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
H. igh: 86 Low: 77 4
. f t Windy with showers and
thunderstorms.


MONDAY
High: 86 Low: 75
Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.


TUESDAY
High: 90 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with a chance of afternoon
thunderstorms.
WEDNESDAY
^' .High: 90 Low: 75
..V.',, Partly cloudy with a chance of afternoon
thunderstorms.


TEMPERATURE* Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.90 in.
Saturday 87/72 DEW POINT
Record 98/66 Saturday at 3 p.m. 71
Normal 72/91 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 80 Saturday at 3 p.m. 82%
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION* POLLEN COUNT**
Saturday 0.49 in. Trees, grasses and weeds were
Total for the month 0.91 in. all light.
Total for the year 22.67 in. "Light- only extreme allergic will show symp-
Normal for the year 26.12 in. toms, moderate most allergic will experience
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 9 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder- AIR QUALITY
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high Saturday was good with pollut-
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE anids mainly parficulales.
-y

SSUNSETTONIGHT............................8:32 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:40 A.M.
... ..' 1 l A M OONRISE TODAY...: .....................10:11 A.M.
J1lY 14 JULY 21 JI.Y 27 AUG. 4 MOONSET TODAY ..........................11:27 P.M.


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/10 SUNDAY 9:22 3:12 9:43 3:32
7/11 MONDAY 10:08 3:58 10:28 4:18


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0, 1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. rafter 4 p.m. New plant material may
be irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Inverness can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending In even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday
City H L Pcp.
Albany 77 61 .10
Albuquerque 94 66
Anchorage 72 52
Asheville 84 57
Atlanta 88 71
Atlantic City 86 61
Austin 97 71
Baltimore 85 62
Billings 99 62
Birmingham 90 74
Boise 76 57
Boston 78 55 .12
Brownsville 10077
Buffalo 80 64
Burlington, VT 65 611.92
Charleston, SC 89 73 .82
Charleston, WV 86 62
Charlotte 90 65
Chicago 88 56
Cincinnati 87 60 .01
Cleveland 83 60
Columbia, SC 90 69
Columbus, OH 84 61
Concord 76 55 .47
Corpus Christi 10070
Dallas 95 73
Denver 96 60
.Des Moines 90 71
Detroit 84 60
El Paso 97 75
Evansville 92 66
Harrisburg 85 61
Hartford 82 59 .01
Honolulu 86 75 .06
Houston 92 75 .02
Indianapolis 88 60
Jackson 94 71 .09
Kansas City 89 71
Las Vegas 10482
Little Rock 88 72
Los Angeles 74 63
Louisville 91 69
Memphis 93 76
Milwaukee 84 58
Minneapolis 91 71
Mobile 92 731.50
Montgomery 93 73 .22
Nashville 94 70


Sunday
Fcst H L
ptcldy 87 65
sunny 97 67
cldy 70 54
tstrm 82 66
tstrm 82 70
sunny 87 67
ptcldy 98 70
sunny 89 66
tstrm 80 60
tstrm 85 73
shwrs 83 60
ptcldy 88 71
ptcldy 10077
ptcldy 85 65
ptcldy 86 64
tstrm 86 75
sunny 91 65
tstrm 188 71
sunny 91 66
sunny 90 66
sunny 88 64
tstrm 88 73
sunny 89 65
ptcldy 87 62
ptcldy 98 74
ptcldy 96 74
ptcldy 92 62
sunny 93 68.
sunny 89 68
tstrm 10172
ptcldy 90 67
sunny 89 66
ptcldy 92 65
sunny 87 75
tstrm 95 75
sunny 90 65
tstrm 90 71
ptcldy 93 72
sunny 10480'
ptcldy 91 71
sunny 73 63
ptcldy 91 68
tstrm 91 73
sunny 86 66
sunny 94 72
tstrm 81 75
rain 84 74
ptcldy 90 71


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 93 74 tstrm 89 74
New York City 81 62 ptcldy 91 72
Norfolk 89 70 sunny 89 73
Oklahoma City 90 68 ptcldy 93 70
Omaha 94 71 sunny 93 72
Palm Springs 10674 sunny 10575
Philadelphia 86 62 sunny 90 72
Phoenix 10982 sunny 111 84
Pittsburgh 82 61. sunny 87 61
Portland, ME 69 53 .94 ptcldy 82 63
Portland, Ore 68 58 shwrs 72 59
Providence 81 56 .11 ptcldy 89 68
Raleigh 92 67 ptcldy 87 70
Rapid City 10664 tstrm 93 63
Reno 80 59 sunny 90 60
Rochester 79 62 .01 ptcldy 86 64
Sacramento 85 60 sunny 86 58
St. Louis 93 68 ptcldy 93 68
St. Ste. Marie 86 52 ptcldy 85 60
Salt Lake City 97 70 sunny 90 66
San Antonio 96 75 ptcldy 99 75
San Diego 70 63 sunny 70 63
San'Francisco 69 59 sunny 68 57
Savannah 91 78 tstrm 85 75
Seattle 69 53 shwrs 70 55
Spokane 66 53 .65 shwrs 75 53
Syracuse 77 63 .25 ptcldy 88 62 "
Topeka 90 69 ptcldy 93 69
Washington 87 67 sunny 90 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
ua H 11n 0Nadle alif LIOW .Inarcknn Wun


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/77/ts
Amsterdam 69/53/pc
Athens 87/68/pc
Beijing 92/72/pc
Berlin 69/52/pc
Bermuda 89/76/ts
Cairo 92/69/pc
Calgary 72/47/sh
Havana 88/77/ts
Hong Kong 88/76/ts
Jerusalem 93/66/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


89/66/pc
67/49/pc
94/65/pc
87/58/ts
85/62/pc
74/54/pc
66/52/pc
69/60/ts
76/58/pc
62/45/c
77/56/ts
84/61/s
78/59/pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2005 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Today in


Today is Sunday, July 10, the
191st day of 2005. There are 174
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 10, 1940, during World
War II, the 114-day Battle of Britain
began as Nazi forces began
attacking southern England by air.
On this date:
In 1890, Wyoming became the
44th state.
In 1962, the Telstar communica-
tions satellite was launched from
Cape Canaveral.
In 1973, the Bahamas became
independent after three centuries
of British colonial rule.
In 1985, bowing to pressure
from irate customers, the Coca-
Cola Co. said it would resume sell-
ing old-formula Coke, while contin-
uing to sell New Coke.
In 1991, Boris N. Yeltsin took ;
theh ath of office as the first elect-,
ed president of the Russian repub-
lic.
Ten years ago: The defense
opened its case at the O.J.
Simpson murder trial in Los
Angeles.
Five years ago: Texas Gov.
George W. Bush, facing a skepti-
cal audience, told the NAACP con-
vention in Baltimore that "the party
of Lincoln has not always carried
the mantle of Lincoln," and prom-
ised to work to improve relations.
One year ago: President Bush
said in his weekly radio address
that legalizing gay marriage would
redefine the most fundamental
institution of civilization, and that a
constitutional amendment was
needed to protect traditional mar-
riage.
Today's Birthdays: "Mr.
Wizard" Don Herbert is 88. Eunice
Kennedy Shriver is 84. Former
boxer Jake LaMotta is 84. Writer-
producer Earl Hamner Jr. is 82.
Former New York City Mayor
David N. Dinkins is 78. Actor
William Smithers is 78. Broadway
composer Jerry Herman is 72.
Director Ivan Passer is 72. Actor
Lawrence Pressman is 66. Singer
Mavis Staples is 66. Actor Mills
Watson is 65. Actor Robert Pine is
64. Tennis player Virginia Wade is
60. Actor Ron Glass is 60. Actress
Sue Lyon is 59. Folk singer Arlo
Guthrie is 58. Country-folk singer-
songwriter Cheryl Wheeler is 54.
Banjo player Bela Fleck is 47.
Country musician Shaw Wilson.
(BR549) is 45. Singer-actress
Jessica Simpson is 25.
.Thought for Today: "A concept
is stronger than a fact." -
Charlotte Perkins Gilman,
American economist and feminist
(1860-1935).


Associated Press
British singer Elvis Costello performs Thursday with his band
The Imposters on the Auditorium Stravinski stage during the
.39th Montreux Jazz Festival in Montreux, Switzerland.


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SUNDAY
JULY 10, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com
* .***. :. ***-;' .: ,.:S


Space Coast eyes economic boost


Shuttle launch helps

bring in tourism

Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL Before the
space shuttle Columbia disaster, a
large part of Brenda Mulberry's busi-
ness came from supplying local shops
with T-shirts marking each space
shuttle mission.


But the grounding of the shuttle
fleet for 2 1/2 years forced Mulberry to
look elsewhere for business, and she
found a new niche making T-shirts for
Rotary clubs around the nation.
"We have had to diversify because I
don't get a check from NASA if the
shuttle doesn't fly," said Mulberry,
whose business is just outside the
Kennedy Space Center.
While local business owners are
excited about the prospects of as
many as 300,000 visitors filling up
their hotels, shops and restaurants


next week for the return to flight of
space shuttle Discovery, many are
much less dependent on space
tourism than they were three years
ago.
In the past several years, space
industry-related tourism in Brevard
County has gone from as much as 15
percent to less than 5 percent of the
Space Coast's $1 billion tourism
industry, said Rob Varley, executive
director of the Space Coast Office of
Tourism.
That decline, due in no small part to


the grounding of the shuttle fleet,
forced local tourism officials to
change how they market the area.
Instead of focusing marketing efforts
on the area as the gateway to space,
local tourism officials sold the area's
beaches and nature tourism spots.
But the economic impact of the
shuttle launch is no pocket change.
The local economy receives between
$5 million and $6 million for each
launch, so the grounding of the shuttle
fleet cost the local economy between
$40 million to $50 million if one calcu-


lates that four to five shuttle launches
a year were scotched.
"It's a moral booster for the tourism
industry to have them back," Varley
said. "It's going to be huge."
The Kennedy Space Center Visitor
Complex, which with 1.5 million
annual visitors is the area's largest
manmade tourist attraction, has sold
13,500 tickets ranging in price from
more than $35 to $70 to tourists who
want a close-up view of the launch at
either the visitor complex or the near-
by Astronaut Hall of Fame.


Wordsmithing her way to awards


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Local author Seeth Miko Trimpert recently won a third-place Book of the Year award for her book, "The Monastery," at the New York Expo. "The Monastery" is
Trimpert's fourth book. She recently returned from Ireland, where she was researching her next book.

Inglis author Seeth Miko Trimpert garners honors for her fourth book, 'The Monastery'


NANCY; .
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A nameless woman, "Brian's wife," stares into
her bathroom mirror. Somehow marriage, mother-
hood life had stripped her of her personhood.
The only thing she knows.for certain is that she's
deeply unhappy She climbs back into bed, goes to
sleep ... and is transported to the gate of a
monastery in 1319.
So begins "The Monastery," written by Inglis
author Seeth Miko Trimpert. The novel, set in
medieval times, won a third-place Book of the Year
award in the science fiction category at the New
York Book Expo earlier this month. The competi-
tion was sponsored by ForeWord magazine, open to
small and independent book publishers.
"The Monastery" is published by AuthorHouse.
This is Trimpert's second award for this book,
which took first place in the unpublished novel cat-
egory in 2003 from the Florida State Association of
the National League of American Pen Women.
Trimpert's book prior to this one was "Bear
Crossing."
"I was notified that ('The Monastery") was one of
the top 10 in the science fiction category, which I
thought was cool," she said. "But it got the bronze
(award), which they announced in New York"
Because of an e-mail error, she wasn't notified in
time to attend the award presentation. Instead, she


AUTHOR'S BOOK SIGNING
Seeth Miko Trimpert will sign her book, "The
Monatery,' from 10 a r-i. to noon Wednres'day
and Saturday at Poe House Books, 65'7 N
Citrus Ave.. Crystal Piver. Call '95-3887.

was on her way to Ireland to do more research on
her current work in progress.
A previous trip to Ireland was much of her inspi-
ration for "The Monastery"
"With 'Bear Crossing,' I started by writing a short
story about running a bed and breakfast on the
river, but as I started writing, it just wasn't a short
story," she said.
With "The Monastery," she had been reading
something about medieval times and that sparked
her interest to explore further. "After researching
at the library, the next thing I knew I was writing a
book," she said.
However, she soon discovered she had written a
travelogue, but not a story.
"Then I remembered a short story that I had
written that I thought would make a good prologue,
and from there it just went," she said.
Trimpert said everything is fodder. She keeps an
open file on her computer and whenever she gets
an inspiration a phrase, a name, a bit of dia-
logue, she.types it in for future use.
She said she enjoys the entire writing process,


from research to editing.
"The ideas come from the research," she said,
"and the more I read, the more ideas I get. But
wordsmithing is one of my favorite things. I have a
background in technical writing, and I can quite
happily spend half a day on one paragraph.
"To me, it's a real challenge to say exactly what
you want to say in the fewest number of words,
especially if you're doing technical work."
However, with a novel, such as "The Monastery,"
writers can take their time to develop mood and
setting and tone.
"The Monastery" is a time-travel fantasy, time
travel through reincarnation. The story shifts back
and forth between the adventures of a young
woman in medieval times and the attempts of a
modem-day paranormal researcher to awaken the
woman and bring her soul back to the present.
The researcher, Gurinder Chopak, is also a char-
acter in Trimpert's novel in progress.
"When I first did 'Bear Crossing' I got some nice,
personal responses, which I appreciated, being a
nobody," she said. Her hope is that the awards will
help sell this book and get her noticed by some big-
ger publishing houses.
"Three out of four of my books have won prizes,"
she said, "so I'm hopeful that if a publisher Googles
me, my books will come up." .
Both "Bear Crossing" and "The Monastery" are
available at Poe House Books, 657 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 795-3887.


Powerboat race organizer touts its success


But at least one

resident begs to differ
DAVE PIEKLIK
dpieklik@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The race boats may be gone from
Inverness, but it appears they didn't
cross the finish line.
Those behind this Fourth of July
weekend's two-day race in Inverness
want to come back next year, and say
things will be bigger and better.
"I'm looking for this thing to be a


major financial impact
to the city Inverness is
such a pretty town," I th
organizer Butch Kiddy very well.
said Thursday "With
the parks there, it's we need
.beautiful."
Kiddy, a former on it.
powerboat racer and
member of the Peace E
River Outboard Rac- power
ing Association, put
together the "Citrus County Champ-
ionship" as a trial run to see if the race
could be made a permanent part of the
American Power Boat Association's
annual racing circuit Kiddy said the


ink it went
Naturally,
I to grow


Butch Kiddy
boat race organizer.

ment next year.


event gave the city a
chance to see and hear
what the races were all
about.
"I think it went very
well. Naturally, we
need to grow on it,"
Kiddy said.
Chamber of
Commerce president
James Holder said he
wants more involve-


"It was awesome. It was a lot of fun,"
said Holder. "The rifat thing about it
was something to stimulate energy."
ButAl Grubman, president of the Sub


Association, Pritchard Island
Homeowners Association, is not riding
that wave of success. Opposed before
the race because of fear of pollution
and damage caused by the races, he
said he remains against the races
because the taxpayers and the people
in the area "were pushed out of the
way" while the races were going on.
He said he would consider it a "com-
promise" if the races were run on a
weekend that wasn't a major holiday.
Kiddy said he doubts that would hap-
pen next year. In the meantime, he
hopes to meet with city officials in the
next few weeks to talk about future
plans.


Officers


beef up


local


patrol

ASHLEY SORRELL
asorrell
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle intern
The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office increased
patrol in the area of Cypress
Cove Court, Inverness, after
a string of five burglaries
took place Wednesday and
Thursday night.
CCSO spokeswoman Gail
Tierney said three of the
burglaries were residential
and two were vehicle break-
ins.
Tierney said the burglars
apparently forced their way
into the screen porches of
the three homes by cutting a
portion of the screen and
unlocking the door from
inside the porch.
Tierney said the following
items were reported stolen
from the residences:
Two fishing rods stolen
Wednesday valued at $80
from 1254 Cypress Cove
Court.
Five rod and reel com-
bos stolen Wednesday val-
ued, at $150 from 1252
Cypress Cove Court.
One rod and reel stolen
Thursday valued at $280
from 1334 Cypress Cove
Court
Tierney said in addition to
the three residences, two
vehicle burglaries on
Cypress Cove Court were
also reported. Both vehicles
were reportedly unlocked.
Tierney said the burglars
stole three speakers, a car-
ton of cigarettes and a pair
of sunglasses from a vehicle
at 1312 Cypress Cove Court
The total value of the stolen
items is estimated at $234.
From a second vehicle at
1314 Cypress Cove Court,
burglars stole a purse and its
contents. The total value of
the purse and contents is not
known.
Tierney said the sheriff's
office has added an addi-
tional patrol in the area, but
currently does not have any
suspects in custody

Coun BRIEFS

Crystal River
officials to meet
The Crystal River city manag-
er will have a shade meeting
with the mayor and city council
at 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 19, in
the city manager's office, Crystal
River City Hall, 123 U.S. 19.
The meeting is to discuss
union business and is not open
to the public, in compliance with
Florida Statute 447.605(1).
City to negotiate
with police group
Crystal River will negotiate with
the Pinellas Police Benevolent
Association at 2 p.m. Monday,
July 25, in the city manager's
office at city hall, 123 U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
Persons requiring reasonable
accommodation at this meeting
because of disability or physical
impairment can contact the city
manager's office at 795-4216, at
least two days prior.
From staff reports


/7


. I Q 7









4A UNA U 2


Hospitals find ways to keep nurses MOM
Continued from Page 1A


CHERI HARRIS
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Both Citrus Memorial Hospital and
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
have come up with creative ways to deal
with the nursing shortage.
a Their strategies have aimed at decreas-
ing reliance on contract nurses, improving
retention and "growing their own" by en-
couraging hospital employees to go into
nursing.
Some local hospital leaders would also
like to see Central Florida Community
College open a nursing program at its
Lecanto campus.
Inside help
Pamela Moore, the chief nursing officer
at CMH, said the hospital recently created
a supplemental staffing pool of nurses
who are hospital employees who function
as contract nurses would, filling in on
floors that need extra help.
Moore said the hospital benefits
because there is no agency fee, but the
nurses in the pool also benefit because
they get a higher hourly rate of pay.
"We have decreased our use of contract
nurses by over two-thirds," Moore said.
Cyndi Heitzman, the chief nursing offi-
cer at SRRMC, said that hospital has also
created an internal nursing pool to fill
staffing holes.


SHORTAGE
Continued from Page 1A

wide instructor shortage dur-
ing a recent interview before
she retired.
"The crisis is acute," she
said. "There's no question
about it"
She said one of the barriers
to bringing in new instructors
is that nursing educators in
general make less money than
nurses in hospitals who have
the same academic degrees.
"So that is not a drawing card
to get people into education,"
Siplon said.
According to a Florida
Center for Nursing report,
"Nursing Education in
Florida" based on a January
survey, results showed that the
biggest barrier to expanding
nurse-training programs is the
shortage of qualified faculty.
The report concluded that if
enrollment in nursing schools
doesn't expand, the result
would be a gap between the
supply of and demand for reg-
istered nurses that grows
wider every year.
Of the 10,923 qualified nurs-
ing school applicants for the
fall semester of 2004, the FCN
survey showed that 4,630 were
accepted and 6,293 were
turned away.
The FCN survey also showed
that there were 38 vacant facul-
ty positions in associate degree
nursing programs and 54
vacancies for bachelor's or
graduate level programs.
According to the report,
nurse education programs will
continue to turn away thou-
sands of qualified applicants
because of shortages of faculty,
classroom space and clinical
sites for students to practice
their skills.
Though the statewide pre-
dictions' for the nursing
instructor shortage are bleak,
Siplon said other places in the
country, will likely feel effects
of the nursing shortage more
than Florida and CFCC has
adequate staff for the associ-
ate's degree nursing program.
"Right now we're better off
than a lot of places," Siplon
said, "and we have very experi-
enced teachers."
Gwen Lapham-Alcorn, the


Heitzman said another benefit of the
internal nursing pool is that because the
nurses are hospital employees, there is
never a doubt about whether or not a
nurse is qualified to work in a specific
department.
"You always know what their skill level
and competencies are," Heitzman said.
Heitzman said the hospital has not used
any contract nurses since Aug. 7, 2004.
Soon, Heitzman said, the hospital will
be able to share information about staffing
needs with sister hospitals in Spring Hill
and Brooksville, so that pool nurses look-
ing for work could take shifts in those
facilities.
Heitzman said testing for the shared
staffing software program that will make
that possible would begin later this month
at the participating hospitals.
Retention
Heitzman said most nurses don't leave
their jobs because of pay issues. It's usual-
ly the work environment.
One of the employee retention practices
at SRRMC is a 45-day interview after a
new nurse is hired to make sure that
employee has the tools needed to get the
job done.
Moore said that CMH recently began
participating in Save 100,000 Lives, a
national program.
It involves creating a critical assessment
team made of knowledgeable critical care


Right now we're better off than

a lot of places.

Karine ":
dean of health occupations, Central Florida Community College, Ocala.


associate dean of health occu-
pations at CFCC, said CFCC
will face more nursing faculty
retirements in a few years.
"Part of the problem with
nursing faculty and nursing in
general is that the nursing pop-
ulation overall and faculty pop-
ulation overall is aging,"
Lapham-Alcorn said.
"We have many more nurses
and nursing faculty in their 50s
than we do in their 30s and 40s.
Really, the goal is to bring some
of the younger people into
nursing and some of the
younger nurses into teaching."
Linda Bond, the acting chair-
woman of health occupations
at Withlacoochee Technical
Institute in Ocala, said one rea-
son for the nursing instructor
shortage is that nurses can
make a better income outside
of teaching.
"That's unfortunate," Bond
said.
Despite the challenges, local
schools with nursing programs
strive to train as many new
nurses as possible.
Bond said the waiting list for
WTI's practical nursing pro-
gram is about one year. She
noted that for some nursing
programs in the state, the wait
is three to four years.
WTI's practical nursing pro-
gram began in 1978 and gradu-
ates 24 students each year. For
the past 16 years, Bond said
WTI has maintained a 100 per-
cent passing rate for WTI grad-
uates who take the state exam
to become licensed practical

Personal
,Jcwcn- 1








SEstablished 1985
795-5900
600 SE Hwy. 19, Crystal River


Staffing pools, on-the-job training opportunities

and training partnerships help hold good staff


admission procedure for the
nursing program has also
changed.
In the past, students could
not apply for admission to the
nursing program until all pre-
requisite courses had been
taken. Now, she said they could
sign up ahead of time so stu-
dents can hopefully get a slot in
the program when they're
ready to start. Students are no
longer required to reapply if
they don't get in the program
the first time they apply.
"We hope it takes the guess-
work out for students,"
Lapham-Alcorn said, "and
helps them better plan their
admission."

WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dczen medical
professionals contribute
their expertise to
columns in Health &
L ife. "Tuesdays
Plan menus for the week
from the tempting recipes
in the Flair for Food sec
tion.!Thursdays
Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene. Friday
See what local houses of
worship plan to do for the
week in the Religion sec-
tion... Saturday
Read about area business-
es in the Business sec.
tion. Sunday


nurses.
Recently, Bond said WTI par-
ticipated in a state grant,
Nurses Now, which provided
money to help train 24 licensed
practical nurses. The partici-
pating students worked for
local hospitals.
Bond said that every year,
CFCC also reserves two spots
in its associate's degree nurs-
ing program for WTI practical
nursing grads who pass the
state exam who want to
become R.N.'s.
At CFCC, Lapham-Alcorn
said the practical nursing pro-
gram could produce about 30
practical nursing graduates a
year and the associate nursing
degree program can produce
about 80 graduates.
Lapham-Alcorn said that in
recent years, CFCC has
expanded its nursing program,
offering full-time and part-time
course schedules. She said the
school is also working to devel-
op online courses.
She said the online courses
should make it easier for
licensed practical nurses who
want to train to be R.N.s.
Laphlam-Alcorn said the


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nurses who are available to any nurse who
has a concern about a patient's condition.
When nurses on the team are called
upon, Moore said, they use it as an oppor-
tunity to teach their less experienced
peers.
"It's very well received by our nursing
staff," Moore said.
Nationwide, Moore said, the benchmark
for nursing staff retention is 17 percent
and the best practice is about 13 percent.
AT CMH, it is six percent.
"We have worked very hard to reduce
turnover," Moore said.
Growing their own nurses
Both local hospitals have offered schol-
arships for hospital employees who want-
ed to go into nursing.
They also serve as clinical rotation sites
for the nursing programs at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute in Inverness and CFCC
in Ocala. This gives nursing students
hands-on experience with patient care.
For several years, both CMH and
SRRMC have also helped pay for instruc-
tors at CFCC.
Though both Moore and Heitzman
would like to see a local associate's degree
nursing program open at CFCC in
Lecanto, Heitzman said that idea is cur-
rently in the "brainstorming" stage.
Recently, Heitzman said SRRMC has
also partnered with CFCC to provide qual-
ified staff members to serve as adjunct
professors during the clinical rotation at
that hospital.
"We're really trying to get as creative as
we can to bring a nursing program to
Citrus County," Heitzman said, "because
we desperately need one."


afford college tuition.
After doing a little Internet
research, she learned that some
hospitals paid for people to go
to nursing school in exchange
for working for the hospital
afterwards.
So she made a bold move.
She went to see the director
of human resources at Citrus
Memorial Hospital in Inver-
ness.
During that meeting, Mast
told Julia Doucette that she
wanted to be a nurse and asked
if the hospital would pay for her
education.
"I was just kind of grasping at
straws as to how to earn some
money," she said.
Mast said Doucette told her
that hospital leaders planned to
start a scholarship program for
non-employees.
She became their first recipi-
ent. Mast said the hospital paid
for her tuition and books. In
exchange, she agreed to work
for CMH for two years after she
became a registered nurse.
She started taking prerequi-
site courses in May 2001. She
was 36. It was the first time she
had been in class since she
graduated from high school.
That didn't keep her from
tackling a hefty course load of
19 hours in that first semester.
"Everybody thought I was
absolutely crazy," Mast said.
In August 2002, after she
started the nursing program at
Central Florida Community
College in Ocala, she started
working at CMH as a nurse
intern.
Mast said that allowed her to
gain more nursing experience,
because the charge nurse
allowed her to use the skills she
learned in school.
Some nurses allowed her to


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improve her technique with
starting intravenous therapy by
practicing on them.
"Now I get called all over the'
hospital to start IVs," Mast said,
"because I've gotten pretty good
at it"
While Mast was in school, she!
said her children made sacri-
fices, helping out around the
house with chores such as cookie
ing and cleaning, and she didn't'
get to spend much time witle
them. ,.
"It was really hard," she said.,'
Her marriage ended irfJ
September 2003. She graduated
three months later with an asso-
ciate's degree in nursing in
December 2003.
She passed her state exam tq,
become a registered nurse Jan,,
5, and a few days later, she went,
to work in the critical care unit
at CMH.
"God placed me there," she,
said. "It was the perfect posi-,
tion for me. It's exactly the kind
of nursing I like to do." -T
She works three 12-houn.
shifts each week, from 7 p.m. to;
7 a.m., which still gives her time
to pick up her children from,
school and then take them to-
sports practice before she goes.
to work
And her salary allows her to,
pay the bills and allows for,
extras like vacation.
"I am really grateful to thej
hospital," she said, "for helping
me change my circumstances."
Now she is working on as
bachelor's degree in nursing'
from the University of South
Florida in Tampa. She expects
to finish her degree this
December -
Though she knows having a
bachelor's degree will make
her a better nurse, she said she.
decided to work toward it to,
prove to herself that she is not,
stupid.
"You have to do things for'
yourself sometimes," she said,
"and the degree is for me."


4A sUNDAYJULY 10 2005


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the -0" .e "


Citrus County Sheriff
Domestic battery
arrest
Joseph M. Czarnecki, 39,
Homosassa, at 7:43 p.m. Friday on
a charge of domestic battery.
* According to a police report,
deputies responded to a Hom-
osassa home where the victim stat-
ed Czamecki grabbed her by the
throat and threw her on the floor. A
verbal altercation allegedly occurred
before the incident.
! No bond was set.
Other arrests
Gerard E. Paul, 31, 2650 W.
Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto, at
4:39 p.m. Friday on a charge of bat-
tery of a facility employee by throw-
ing/tossing fluids.
- According to a police report, a
deputy responded to a battery at the
Citrus County Detention Facility.
One of the victims, a nurse at the
facility, told the deputy Gerard came
to the Sick Call Room stating he
was not receiving enough food and
had a cold.
According to reports, Gerard be-
came belligerent and would not
answer any questions from one of
the victims. When the victim asked
Gerard what the symptoms of his
cold were, he proceeded to blow his
nose using his hand in the direction
of the two victims. The victims re-
ported having mucous on their arms.


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
.Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org and
click on the link to Daily
Reports, then Arrest
Reports.

Gerard was placed in lockdown.
His bond was set at $4,000.
Micalle A. Valenti, 35, 661
GulfAve., Crystal River, at 5:05 p.m.
Friday on a charge of petty theft.
Her bond was set at $500.
Terry W. Oliver, 53, P.O. Box
345, Homosassa, at 11:19 p.m.
Friday on charges of possession of
a controlled substance-two counts,
driving while license is suspended/
revoked, possession of drug para-
phernalia, possession of a drug
without a prescription, registration
required, improper temporary tag
and giving false information to a
police officer.
His bond was set at $15,750.
Joshua J. Prestidge, 21, 6172
W. Olive Branch Loop, Crystal River,
at 11:58 p.m. Friday on charges of
fleeing/attempting to elude a police
officer, resisting/obstructing officer
without violence and having an ille-
gal license plate attached.
His bond was set at $4,250.


DENNIS
Continued from Page 1A

Tampa, to the Louisiana-
Mississippi border.
Many Gulf residents were still
patching up roofs on their homes
or living in government trailers
because of damage caused by
Hurricane Ivan just 10 months
ago. For them, Dennis meant
another tense weekend of long
lines for gas and searching for
generators and plywood.
"I'm tired of all this packing
up," said Melba Turner, 70, of
Fort Walton Beach. "We look like
the Beverly Hillbillies when we
get all packed up and leave. I'd
rather stay We're getting too old
for all this fussing."
Dennis had grown to a
Category 4 storm with 150 mph
sustained winds early Friday,
but it weakened when it crossed
Cuba. It regained strength
Saturday and by evening had top
sustained winds just 6 mph shy
of Category 4 and still increas-
ing.
"Category 4 is not just a little
bit worse it's much worse,"
said Max Mayfield, director of
the hurricane center in Miami.
"The damage increases expo-
nentially as ,the wind speed
increases. And no matter where
it makes actual landfall, it's


Dennis charges toward Gulf Coast
Hurricane Dennis brushed past the Florida Keys and headed
towards the Gulf Coast. It is expected to make landfall along the
coast of the Florida Panhandle, Alabama or Mississippi.
Population density per square mile (2000) Hurricane
[-] Under 50 people j 201-2,000 warning
--- Tropical storm
51-200 Over 2,001 warning


n, IV ..o .. ......: .......
.Jackson .. .. !
ALABAMA GEORGIA e,


LA. miss.
SI Moolle Parnama
S ". B,oUAI | n
Baton Hcuj Pensacola Ci Y noo
B, n p ,ug., *. w' Talana.ssee-.

..- : Orlndo a
0 Ou mi -- Tampa .
.. 0..'.100 m .. : ,* *
S.,..i .., Dn -r -' ST PetersbLig


(Category 2)
25.7 N, 84.6 W
MAX WIND 125 mph
As of 5 p.m. EDT


94 93 9 9 90 90 89 880 87 860 85 84 83o 82 81 80
SOURCES: AccuWeather; Census Bureau; ESRI At


going to have a tremendous
impact well away from the cen-
ter"
Cuban state radio said hun-
dreds of homes around Cuba's
southeastern coast had been
destroyed or heavily damaged,
and civil defense officials said
more than 1.5 million people
had fled their homes.
Dennis largely spared the
Florida Keys as the eye passed


west of the islands, but more
than 211,000 homes and busi-
nesses lost power Saturday
across the southern tip of
Florida, including the entire city
of Key West
Branches, street signs and
other debris littered Key West's
streets. Waves washed sand and
coral onto a main road, and parts
of the tourist drag of Duval
Street were under about a foot


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 5A

E Record storms could
mean catastrophic
hurricane season
PAGE 6A

and a half of water. No injuries
were reported.
"We're holding up," Key West
Mayor Jimmy Weekley said.
Residents who evacuated the
lower Keys were asked to stay
away until Sunday, and visitors
were told they could return
Monday.
Several tornadoes in the
Tampa Bay area caused minor
damage such as downed trees,
and more twisters were likely in
parts of the Gulf of Mexico coast
Sunday
In Alabama, about 500,000
people were under evacuation
orders, as were 700,000 in
Florida and 190,000 in Missis-
sippi. Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and
Alabama Gov. Bob Riley urged
residents to evacuate if they
were told to do so.
"I do worry about the folks
in...places that really got hit
hard," Bush said. 'They're hurt-
ing. I think there is a legitimate
feeling, 'Why me? What did I do
wrong.'"
Traffic doubled on some
Mississippi highways as people
fled inland from the coasts of
Florida, Alabama and
Louisiana.


CONFESSION
Continued from Page 1A

and buried her alive because
he was afraid of getting caught.
With the Public Defender's
Office expected to ask to sup-
press the confession because
Couey's rights may have been
violated, there's concern the
information could be thrown
out along with any evidence
gained through Couey's state-
ments. However, Assistant
State Attorney Ric Ridgway
isn't faulting anyone.
: "These guys had a matter of
seconds to make a decision,"
he said.
Still frantically searching for
a girl who might have been
alive at that point, Ridgway
said the detectives felt they
had the person responsible for
her disappearance. Stop the
questioning at that point, he
said, and Couey probably
wouldn't have talked anymore.
'Anybody who wants to criti-
cize them doesn't know what
they're talking about," Ridg-
way said.
The deciding factor could lie
with the 1981 Supreme Court
decision in Edwards v. Arizona.
Simply put, the ruling says if
anyone asks for an attorney
during an interview, they can't
be questioned further unless- a
lawyer is present or they re-
sume talking with investigators.
Inverness defense attorney
Bill Grant a former prosecu-
tor himself-- said interpreting
it Couey's Sixth Amendment
fights were violated in the case
goes two ways: Was Couey ask-
ing for an attorney if he agreed
tp take a lie detector test, or
was it for the questioning he
was being subjected to?
"If I'm a prosecutor, where
Im concerned is, right after he
hears the 'E word, Grace is say-
ing, 'Hold on, hold on John,' "
Grant said. "Judge (Ric)
Howard needs to look at this."
Grant said if the statements
are thrown out, that could put
S other evidence in jeopardy
because, he said, the state
would have to prove it would
have found certain evidence
even if Couey hadn't talked.
Ultimately, if a defense
motion is made to suppress the
interviews, Circuit Judge Ric
Howard would likely make the
final decision. Grant said the
state would have the burden of


* The John Couey interview with the portion in
question was made on March P by Citrus
County Sheriff's Oftice Detective Gary
Atchison, assisted by Detective Scott Grace
in the Richmond County Sheriff's Ontice in
Augusta, Ga.
* The interview began at 2:26 p.m. and ended
at 4:45 p.m., according to the transcript that
has entered into the public record as evi
dence by the state attorney. A portion is
reproduced below, exactly as it was tran
scribed, which no changes in punctuation or
typing.
* The transcript is 94 pages and it begins with
Atchison reading Couey his rights, including
the right to have an attorney present during
questioning, which Couey acknowledges
before beginning to answer questions, it ends
with Couey still holding that he knew nothing
about happened to Jessica Lunsford.
* Within the first six pages the detectives had
begun pressing Couey about what he knew
about Jessica. and he kept denying knowing
anything other than what he had seen on TV.
On page 42 he said, "I swear to God I don't
know this little girl."
* On the next page, the transcript quotes
Couey as reiterating his ignorance of Jessica.
and it contains the following.
Couey: But I was saying I don't nothing about
Jessica, except what I know on the news. You
told rne ya'll got me ... I don't know. I don't
have nothing to do with it anyway. I didn't
have nothing to do with it. I don't know noth-
ing. I just know what I know on the news.
Grace: You take a lie detector for LIs?
Couey: if I did ... if I did ... .if I did, why would,
ah I mean it you came to the house, there'd
been something in the house. That's what
I m trying to say.
Grace: Well, not ... not necessarily John.
Couey: Well, where else would she be at ... .1
mean..
Atchison: That's what we're here asking. We
don't know.
Grace: John, would you take a lie detector test
for us7


showing Couey's rights weren't
violated when questioning con-
tinued after Couey "invoked
his right to counsel."
Ridgway said his office is
preparing the case two ways:
as if the statements will be
thrown out, and in case they're
allowed.
"In a capital murder case,
every issue gets this kind of
treatment," he said. "The
investigation will continue
right up to probably when the
jury goes out."
While Couey has pleaded not
guilty to murder, kidnapping,
burglary and sexual battery
charges in the case, Ridgway


Couey: I guess. I'm just .. I want a lawyer, you
know.
Grace: Hang on, hang on John. Alright Hang on
I'm lust asking.
Couey: If that's what you want to do, but I
mean, you know....
Grace: I'm just asking, would you...-im not say
ing do it now I'm saying would you
Couey: I said I would. I just want to talk to a
lawyer.
Grace: Okay
Couey: I want a lawyer here present. I want to
talk to a lawyer cause I mean,. It people try
ing to accuse something I didn't do. I didn't
do it. I ain't, you know..
Grace: Okay So if we do ... so if we do ....
Couey: I don't know. I lust said I want to talk to
a lawyer to get this thing straight.
Grace: Okay. Hang on, hang on. hang on, hang
on ... so if we were to do a lie detector test,
you'd want to get a lawyer for that?
Couey: I want to talk to a lawyer first
Grace: You want to talk to a lawyer first?
Couey: Yes sir.
Grace: Are you okay with talking to us still right
now about stuff?
Couey: Certain things I'll talk to a lawyer I'm
lust saying. I mean, you know, I don't mind.
talking to you. I try to be honest with you.
I'm trying to tell you what, you know .. you
asked me about.I told you what happened in
rmy past .
Grace: Urn-hun-,
Couey: I tried ... tned to tell you I don't have
nothing to do with this and y'all ... ya'll think
that I do .
Atchinson: Let rme ask you something John.
Couey: ... and I don't.
Atchison: If you ... it you did made a mistake,
would you tell us?
Couey: 'ies. I make plenty of mistakes. I mean
I I...1'll kill m yself.. like I tried to kill m yself I
tried it to, you know..


and Grant agree if he's convict-
ed, the decision will likely be
talked about and debated years
after the case is closed.


"Every question leads to its
own answers," Ridgway said.
"You're probably never going
to stop looking."


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Continued from Page 1A

with morning updates about the
path of the hurricane and the
danger it posed to Citrus County.
Sheriff's Capt Joe Ekstein
said Hurricane Dennis shifted
more to the west, which is good
for Citrus County, but the county
wasn't completely in the clear
At 2:27 p.m., the county was
under a tornado warning after
the National Weather Service in
Ruskin spotted a tornado on its
radar, southwest of Inverness
and moving northwest at 45
miles per hour.
Sheriff's office spokeswoman
Gail Tierney said no reports of
sightings or damage came from
the tornado warning The warn-
ing was lifted at 3 p.m., but the
county remained under a torna-
do watch until 11 p.m. Saturday
Tierney said their biggest con-
cern is tornado activity.
'Apparently conditions are
right for tornadoes," she said.
Countywide reports of
downed power lines and trees
were received by the sheriff's
office. Tierney said Progress
Energy reported 280 of its cus-
tomers without power at approx-
imately 6 p.m.
"If you look at those numbers
compared to last year's four hur-
ricanes, they are relatively
small," Tierney said. She said
there were no plans to activate
the Emergency Operations
Center.
Progress Energy spokesman
Mac Harris could not be






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How to report an outage:
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Sumter Electric
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Cooperative: 795-4382.

reached for comment
Tierney said there were no
reports of coastal flooding be-
cause the storm hit Citrus
County in squalls or band lines.
The lines were expected to in-
crease in frequency Saturday
night
Hurricane Dennis should be
parallel with Citrus County at 7
a.m. today. Tropical storm-force
winds are still expected off the
coast of Florida, and residents
can expect 4 to 8 inches of rain
and 30- to 40-mph wind gusts
before the storm passes, Tierney
said.
Citrus County remained un-
der a tornado watch, tropical
storm warning, flood watch and
coastal flood watch, Tierney
said.
The county offered locations
for sandbags Saturday, but will
not have these locations open
today As of Saturday evening,
there were no plans for -addi-
tional EOC live reports on
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CiTR'lUS COIINTY (FL) CI RONICI i


6A SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


Obituaries


Gerald
Glassmyer Jr., 70
INVERNESS
Gerald L. Glassmyer Jr., 70,
Inverness, died Thursday, July
7, 2005, in the Hospice Care
Unit at Citrus
Memorial
Hospital.
Born June
18, 1935, in
York, Pa., to
Gerald and Frances (Kielholz)
Glassmyer Sr., he came here in
1999 from Polk City. Mr.
Glassmyer was a retired mas-
ter sergeant of the U.S. Air
Force with 23 years of service.
After his retirement, he
worked for Walt Disney World
for 17 years as an electronics
technician.
He was a member of the
Lakeland VFW and American
Legion posts. He enjoyed hunt-
ing, fishing and camping.
Survivors include his wife of
24 years, Marjorie Glassmyer;
two sons, Gerald L..Glassmyer
III of Tampa and Raymond
Lonnen and wife Shannon of
Bellview; four daughters,
Jeanne Eisenstein and hus-
band Don of Jacksonville,
Elizabeth Blue and husband
Joe of Tampa, Sharon Pontes
and husband David of
Lakeland and Shelly Skiles of
Homosassa; brother, George
Glassmyer, of Bradenton; sis-
ter, Arlene Brown, of Sarasota;
18 grandchildren; one great-
grandchild; and several nieces
and nephews.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Eleanor
Mathis, 76
SUGARMILL WOODS
Eleanor Emilie Mathis, 76,
Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa,
died Thursday, July 7, 2005, at
Citrus Memorial Hospital in
Inverness.
She was born May 10, 1929,
in Maspeth, N.Y, to Adam Krol
and Anna (Zasadzinska) Krol.
She came here 15 years ago
from Setauket, N.Y.
Her hobbies included
sewing, crafts, crossword puz-
zles and cooking. She was
Catholic.
She was preceded in death
by three older sisters.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Paul E. Mathis, of
Homosassa; daughter, Lorraine
Grossi and husband Fabio, of
Grapevine, Texas; stepson,
Gary Mathis and wife Christy,
of Brookfield, Conn.; step-
daughters, Carol Kern and hus-
band Carl of C. Moriches, N.Y,
and Linda Watson and hus-
band Alan of Melbourne; 10
grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs.
Click on http://www.
chronicleonline.com to view
archived local obituaries.

Funeral
NOTICES

Gerald Glassmyer Jr.
Funeral services for Gerald
Glassmyer Jr. will be conduct-
ed at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 13,
2005, from the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home of Inverness,
with the Rev Leary Willis offi-
ciating. Burial will follow at
the Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell, with full military
honors provided by the
MacDill Air Force Honor
Guard. Friends may call from 2
to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, the family
suggests memorial contribu-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County or the Moffit Cancer
Center in Tampa.


Eleanor Emilie Mathis.
Funeral services for Eleanor
Emilie Mathis, 76, of Sugarmill
Woods, Homosassa, will be at 9
a.m. Tuesday, July 12, 2005, at
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs, with Fr.
David A. Banks officiating.
Interment will follow at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell. Family will receive
friends from 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday, July 11, at the funeral
home.


Deaths



Jim Haskins, 63
PROFESSOR &
AUTHOR
GAINESVILLE, Fla. Jim
Haskins, an English professor
and prolific author whose
book, "The Cotton Club,"
inspired the 1984 movie, died
Wednesday in his New York
City apartment He was 63.
A cause of death was not
released, but family members
said Haskins had emphysema.
He was on sabbatical from the
University of Florida when he
died.
Haskins wrote more than 100
books. His credits range from
counting books for children to
biographies on Rosa Parks,
Stevie Wonder and Spike Lee.
At the time of his death, he was
working on a book on Cubs'
Hall of Fame shortstop Ernie
Banks.
The film "The Cotton Club"
- about the famed Harlem
speakeasy was written by
William Kennedy, Mario Puzo
and Francis Ford Coppola.
They said the 1977 picture
book by Haskins by the same
name was the inspiration for
their story about 1928 gang-
sters and jilted love.
Haskins, who took a job at
the University of Florida in
1977, commuted between New
York and Gainesville.

Judy Mann, 61
JOURNALIST
WASHINGTON Judy
Mann, a longtime columnist for
The Washington Post who
often wrote about issues facing
women in American society,
died Friday. She was suffering
from breast cancer when she
died at a hospital in Palm
Springs, Calif., her daughter
said in a statement. She was 61.
Mann retired from the Post
at the end of 2001 after writing
a column for the paper for
more than 23 years. She told
readers that she was fortunate
to have been able to have a
voice over concerns that were
frequently unpopular and at
odds with mainstream think-
ing. She also lamented that
there were so few liberal
columnists and women writing
serious commentary.
Mann's column touched on
national and international
issues, as well as political and
social problems. She frequent-
ly focused on the state of
women's rights and the place
of women in society, but also
wrote about the challenges of
raising her three children.
She wrote two books, "Mann
for All Seasons" (1990), a col-
lection of her Post columns,
and "The Difference: Growing
Up Female in America" (1994).
Mann was born in 1943 in
Washington, D.C., and spent her
childhood in Paris, where her
father was an official with the
Marshall Plan. She attended
Barnard College in New York
but dropped out before gradua-
tion to organize Vietnam War
protests, her daughter said.


2005 already record year


Forecasters: 2004 storms were beginning of trend


Associated Press

Arlene, Bret, Cindy and now Dennis.
Storm hunters don't expect to be hunched
over their radar screens and dispatching
chase aircraft until Labor Day But 2005 is
no normal year.
Martin Nelson, the lead forecaster at the
National Hurricane Center in Miami, says
this is the first time the Atlantic hurricane
season had four named storms this early
since record-keeping began in 1851. The
season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30.
The first three storms never grew
beyond tropical storms that dumped rain
and cut utilities from Louisiana to the
Carolinas. Dennis got its name on July 5
and two days later it had morphed into a
Category 4 monster with winds reaching
150 mph. It also is the earliest occurrence
of a Category 4 hurricane in the
Caribbean, and possibly the U.S., meteo-
rologists say.
Having killed 20 people in Haiti and
Cuba, now Dennis has set its sights on the
U.S. Gulf Coast. Forecasters predict it will
regain strength over warm waters of the
Gulf of Mexico and the storm will hit the
mainland anywhere from Florida to


Louisiana on Sunday.
Researchers have several ideas why this
hurricane season is beginning so fero-
ciously, but they say one
thing appears likely. The mete
"If you get these really
early big storms," says sen- conditic
ior research meteorologist
Hugh Willoughby of spawn
Florida International
University in Miami, "that seas
means it is likely to be an de^s r
active season." desirIuc
That's just what 65 mil- persistil
lion Americans living on
the Gulf and Atlantic coasts Atlanl
don't want to hear.
Hurricanes are among Caribbea
nature's most fearsome
events. A storm can span
400 miles and tower 10 miles high.
Inhaling energy from warm seawater, it
might churn for a week or more across
3,000 miles before it collapses.
Some people still are rebuilding from
last year when five hurricanes and four
tropical storms pounded the Atlantic and
Caribbean basins in August and
September. At least four of the storms


'(



-t

n
ti
or


caused hundreds of deaths and billions of
dollars in damages. Scientists called it a
"once in a lifetime kind of a year."
Did they speak too soon? Maybe.
That's because the meteorological con-
ditions that spawned last season's destruc-
tion are persisting in the Atlantic and
Caribbean basins this year,
orological and possibly for decades to
come.
ps that Forecaster William Gray
' at Colorado State
ed last University has upped his
s2005 Atlantic hurricane
On'S forecast three times since
December, beginning with
tion are 11 named storms, then 13,
g in the then 15. Now he is saying
the number of named
ic and storms will be "significant-
ly above"' the long-term
n basins, average of 9.6 named'
storms and 5.9 hurricanes.
At least four storms may
blow up into major hurricanes like
Dennis, nearly twice as many as normal.
The chance of a major hurricane mak-
ing landfall somewhere on the East Coast,
including the Florida peninsula, is nearly
twice as high as in an average year, Gray,
says. For the Gulf coast from Pensacola to
Brownsville, Texas, the risk is about one-
third higher.


Teachers catch the blogging bug


Educators use the online journals to tell work stories,


CYNTHIA KoPKOWSKI
Palm Beach Post

WEST PALM BEACH It's a
digital teachers lounge, miss-
ing only the coffee-stained
sofas.
It's what a teacher mentions
when she wants students to
look up from their iPod
playlists and take an interest in
class.
It's the blog an online pub-
lishing forum. An intrepid
group of educators in Florida
and nationwide are starting to
use it to kvetch about their day
or as a teaching tool.
Boynton Beach
High science teacher
Jamey Young uses his
blog for the former, Some
alternately enthusing
online about good hate
days and grumbling
about bureaucracy or
FCAT requirements
on others.
He started the blog scien
last year, "to rant poste
about the craziness
in teaching," he said.
"It allows me to vent and tell


funny stories. It's a cheaper
form of psychiatry."
A phone call from .a pleased
parent on Feb. 9 prompted him
to write, "it really made me feel
better about being a teacher;
that I do make a difference."
It was a better day than the
one whose post began simply,
"Sometimes I hate my job."
Self-reflection is a hallmark
of many teachers' blogs,
according to the creator of
weblogg-ed.com the first
stop for most teachers who
want to try blogging. But think-
ing of them only as online jour-
nals shortchanges the medium,
said Will Richardson, the
nationally known lecturer on
the topic who runs the site.
"More and more teachers
now are finally starting to wrap
their brains around the idea
that you can do some really
interesting things" with them,
Richardson said.
He estimates there are about
3,000 teachers like Young.
When he began four years ago,


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ce
ed


the number of blogging teach-
ers could have fit into one car.
"There were three of us,"
Richardson said dryly.
Today's 3,000 is still a tiny
fraction of the total number of
teachers in the country, but
Richardson predicts the role of
blogs in schools is likely to
grow.
"I don't think there's any way
that these tools are going
away," Richardson said.
"Schools are going to have to
figure out how to make it work
for them. The expectation is
going to be when kids go to col-
lege that they need
to be able to work
collaboratively
and do it online."
times I A few hours ear-
lier he had moder-
ny job. ated a panel on the
topic at the annual
National Edu-
cation Computing
y Young Conference in
e teachers Philadelphia. The
I on his biog. conference is a
necessary stop on
many technophile
teachers' summer itineraries,
and this. year an estimated
12,500 of them attended.
For the first time, there were
at least 15 different sessions
devoted to or directly referenc-
ing blogging in the classroom.

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Richardson, a supervisor of
Instructional Technology at a
high school in Flemington,
N.J., recently landed a book
deal on the topic.
Word of mouth can be power-
ful as pioneering teachers talk
about the benefits to co-work-
ers.
That's why more than 300 of
7,000 teachers in McComb
County, Mich., are already reg-
istered bloggers on a site called
visitmyclass.com. Blog names
range from the eloquent, '"A
Literary Escape," to the point-
ed, "Ms. Klosowski's Helpful
Suggestions for GED Im-
provement."
Fear of the outside world
having a window into students'
lives is nagging at the Palm
Beach County school district,
according to technology pro-


vent grievances

grams specialist Kim
Cavanaugh.
"We're certainly not encour-,
aging it, and we're certainly not
discouraging it," Cavanaugh
said of students using teachers'
blogs, crystallizing the;
quandary that many observers
of the blogging trend said edu-
cators now find themselves in.
"There are so many security,
and privacy issues."
Not that the Palm Beach
County is taking a Luddite
stance. So many students are,
using the Internet already that,
it's too tempting of a tool to get
them interested in reading and
writing for school to shun,.
Cavanaugh said.
"We're certainly exploring
some safe ways for us to do.
that," he said.


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JULY 10, 2005
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Clues emerge, missing amass


Police: Seconds separated London

bombings; Birmingham evacuated


,";I:ll. H, .;
A police officer stands Saturday by the floral tributes left outside Kings Cross Station in London, as
people pay their respects following Thursday's bombings. Kings Cross station is near the site of the
deadliest of the three subway bombings, where at least 21 people were killed. Britain's Prime
Minister Tony Blair said Saturday that links to al-Qaida were likely, but it was not yet clear who was
behind the devastating blasts that shook London and killed at least 49 people.


Aswin ted Pre'ss

LONDON Police
issued a stuLnning re% i-izon
Saturday, shrinking the
time between deadly
explosions in lthe London
UndergrouInd to .ILut sec-
onds, 1.nt 26 mlinules as
firsi. reported, and sa iine
the blast. \eiere so power-
ful that none of' the 49
kntot n dead has yet been
ideniffied
Man.\ bodies till la\
buried in a ral-infested
subi\ay tunnel and i'antic
relatives begged ror \oIrd
about other'.s till inllssing
in the \\orst attack on
London since World War
II. Police indicated as
many as 50 victims wel'e
unaccounted tol:
Mustaf'a Set marian
Nasal. the alleged master-
mind or last year's Madrid
railway bombings, and
Abu Musab al-Suri, a
Syrian suspected ol being
al-Qailda's operations
chief in Europe, have
emerged as suspects inll
thile London attacks.
according to unidentified
inestiwators cited in The


Suncla. Times. Tihe
Sundaf.i Te-legraph and tihe
Mail on Sunday
Nasarl: a Sy rian fugitive,
allegedly played a key role
in sett 1n11 up an al-Qaida
structLure in Spain and
\was indicted there in con-
nection with the Sept 11,
2001. attacks in the United
States La-st ear. the Li S.
offeredd $5 million tor
information leading it0 his
arrest
In a siml o' the contin-
ued state of alert in
England. police evacuated
thousand( of' people from
Birminghal's central
enteialinment district
Saturday night and con-
ducted several controlled
explosions to destroy sus-
picious objects. the British
Broadcasting Corp. report-
ed. There as ino confirmna-
tion o1 an\ explosive
devices being found
In southern England,
Eurostar train services.
which link Paris and
London. were delayed
Saturday after a securl't
alert closed the .Ashford
international station lor
about an hour 'Two pieces


o ,t unattended Ilugage
were destroyed in con-
trIolled explosions and
lateVr found to contain
nothing suspicious
Deputy Assistant Police
Commissioner Brian
Paddic-k said the near-
siMIultaneous nature or
the attacks Thurlsday% indi-
cated timers- not suicide
bombers set off the
explosions He cautioned.
howe\er, that the investi-
gation wvas in an earl.
stage and nothing had
been ruled out
Investigators repeated
their assertions that the
bombings. bore the signa-
ture ofal-Qaida, the terror
network blamed for tilhe
Sept 11 attacks on the
United States The oreani-
zation, headed by Osama
bin Laden. has gained a
reputation tor sophistclat-
ed timing in its terror
strikes
"'It will be some time
before this job is complet-
ed and it \\ill be done w ith
all the necessalN dicmli.t
to the deceased." said
Andy Trotter of the British
Transport Police.


Families, friends, authorities seek growing list of those unaccounted for


.Asocinted Prt's -

LONE)DON On the eerily
deserted street \\here a terrorist
bomb shredded a double-decker
bus, there are silent but frantic
cries for help
Hoinemade posters hastily taped
ti phone booths and bus shelters
plead for itinforna-
tion about Lon-
doners i hli. hav' l 't l
been heard fi'om I
since Thursday's Is he al
attacks Friends
and relatives know know
its a race against
time, and hopes dreadful
faded Saturdcia as
the hours ticked by.
1"I just have to
find him." said a fiance m,
rearful Yvonne
Nash. \\ho went on telev ision witli
photos ofi,! her fiance. Jamie
Gordon, \ lio imay have been on tlhe
bus heree 13 people were killed
"I have to know what happened,"
she said "Is he dead? Is he alive?
Not know ing is dreadful."
Scotland Yardl has declined to


issue a list ol people unaccounted tor
Police said Saftrda.c they were look-
ing into more than 1.000 missing-
person reports, although they do not
believe more than 50 o"f them a're
connected to the bombings, suggest-
in the death toil w\ ill remain belov%
1(%-).
But it could take time. Police said


he dead?
ive? Not
ring is

il.


ssing since attacks

tamiulies, said


Saturday they had
yet to identity any
bod ies.
Officials said
the \ were open-
ing a 24-hour
reception celniter
to pro ide inmfor-
niation. ad% ice
and counseling to
relatives of the
missing. Police
also have sent
liaison officers for
Brian Paddick,


depur tt assistant commissioner of"
the Metropolitan Police.
More than 105.000 calls have
been logged to a hot line set tip bIv
the police Casualty Bureau., heree
officials are checking names
against a database containing


those provided by hospitals.
morgueii and funeral homes. Set.
Dave Storer said
"Some people are still discover-
ing friends and relatives," lie said.
Not Daid \\Webb, 38. who stood in
the mist Saturday onut.ide the King's
Cross iUnder-round station, not far
friom \% here crews were workile to
retrieve bodies and clues from the
wreckage ol'a sub ay train here at
least 21 people died
\\ebb. a teacher, clutched a
framed photograph of his 29-year-
old sister, Laura. who took the
Tube to work TliursclaN IIIorniing
and never show\ ed up.
"WVe don't know where she is," lihe
said. "This is a \ery upsetting and
very traumatic time for us, but we
have to remain conFident that we'll
hear from her soon. We'll keep
doing everything we can to find our
sitee"
Similar scenes chillingly rem-
Iniscent of the frantic searches that
followed the Sept. 11. 2001, attacks
in New York played out across
London at subway stations and
hospitals.
Nash and her family and friends


An image of 29-year-old Polish girl Ka
since the attack, hangs Saturday from

plastered uip posters along the
route of the No. 30 bus that carried
hearlt-wvrenching pleas for anri tid-
bit that Imight help them track
down tlie iman shle's been with for'
seven years and hopes to marry
"Have you seen this man'" they
read above a grai ny photo ot a grin-I


I-I-,
:-i .:.al-d F .:
arolina Gluck who has been missing
a bus stop near Kings Cross Station.

ning Gordon, a 30-year-old finan-
cial adviser
"Please help us find our fi'iend
\lho is missing. If youi hae seen
hlin or know where lie is. please
call the police or our office so that
we can let his family and friends
knokk he's safe."


North Korea agrees to resume talks


A Bush administration offi- reported.
cial who spoke with reporters In Washington, White House
accompanying Rice said Kim spokeswoman Dana Perino said,
told Hill that North Korea's "We are pleased that Nortlh
purpose in the talks will be Korea is corn ing back to the talks
denuclearization and that its with a commitment to a denu-
negotiators will be intent on clearized peninsula. We look for-
making progress., ward to making progress in the
North Korea's official six-party talks toward that goal."
Central News Agency con- The other countries involved
firmed the July 25 time frame. are China, Japan, Russia and
"The U.S. side clarified its offi- South Korea. spokesman for
cial stand to recognize (North Russia's foign ministry said
Korea) as a sovereign state, not the de opment was welcome
to invade it and hold bilateral new.
talks within the framework of Three rounds of largely fruit-
the six-party talks," KCNA less talks took place in 2003


and 2004; there have been no
six-party discussions during
the past year.
North Korea blamed "hostile
policies" of the United States,
including statements by U.S.
officials that they considered
inflammatory ahd disrespect-
ful. Rice, for example, branded
North Korea an "outpost of
tyranny" during her confirma-
tion hearings in January to be
the chief U.S. diplomat.
President Bush and Rice have
dropped such rhetoric lately, in
an apparent bid to encourage
North Korea to be flexible.


Associated Press

BEIJING North Korea
said Saturday it will abandon
its yearlong boycott of nuclear
disarmament talks and resume
negotiations this month with
the U.S. and four other nations,
a breakthrough reached just as
U.S. Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice began a mis-
sion to end the impasse.
North Korea's vice foreign
minister, Kim Gye Gwan,


informed U.S. Assistant
Secretary of State Christopher,
Hill that the North is prepared,
to return to the talks during the
week of July 25.
Word of the decision came as
Rice arrived in Beijing, the
first stop on a four-country
Asian tour devoted primarily to.
the North Korea situation.
. For weeks, the U.S. has
urged North Korea to get back
to the bargaining table and
take the discussions seriously


Giant panda gives birth to first cub at National Zoo


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Mei Xiang
looked surprised, perhaps a bit
put off by the shrill cries from
the first giant panda cub born
at the National Zoo in 16 years.
. Within a few minutes, howev-
er, the first-time mother was
licking and caring for her cub,
so fragile that zoo officials had
yet to determine its gender or
inspect it.
"Mei Xiang is the poster
child for a wonderful mom,"


Dr. Suzan Murray, the
zoo's chief veterinarian,
said Saturday at a news
conference hours after
the overnight birth of
the cub conceived
through artificial
insemination.
Zoo officials hope
that the cub will fare
better than the five pre-
vious ones born at the
zoo since 1983. All died
within days.
Their parents the


now-deceased Hsing-
Hsing and his female
partner, Ling-Ling -
were gifts from the
Chinese government in
1972 and the original
source of the capital's
panda fever.
Cubs typically weigh
Dr. Suzan only 3 ounces to 5
Murray ounces and are about
chief the size of a stick of but-
veterinarian ter.
at the The public will have
National Zoo. to wait at least three


months to see mother and cub,
who will remain indoors at the
panda exhibit area.
Until then the zoo's Web cam
- expected to be accessible
online at http://-
nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/Gia
ntPandas beginning Sunday
morning will provide the
only public view of the two.
The father Tian Tian is
expected to continue roaming
outdoors in the morning and
returning to the air-condi-


tioned enclosure during the
day's warmer hours.
Mei Xiang, 6, and Tian Tian,
7, are about half as old and in
better health than Ling-Ling
and Hsing-Hsing were when
they were conceiving.
That made zoo officials
hopeful the new cub would
become the third giant panda
to survive into adulthood in the
United States. The others were
born at the San Diego Zoo in
1999 and 2003.


Minnesota ends
statewide shutdown
ST. PAUL, Minn. The first
partial government shutdown in
Minnesota history ended early
Saturday as Gov. Tim Pawlenty
signed a temporary spending
plan and lawmakers agreed on
the outline of a two-year budget.
"I'm pleased to announce
agreement has been reached by
the legislative leadership to put
Minnesota back to work,"
Pawlenty announced around 2
a.m.
The Legislature overwhelm-
ingly approved the "lights on"
measure to send 8,900 fur-
loughed state employees back
to their jobs by restoring funding
until Thursday.
Lawmakers now have until
Wednesday night to hash out
the final details of the two-year
budget or risk another shutdown
- but that's considered unlikely.
Pawlenty said lawmakers had a
framework for the budget, more
than a week after the July 1
shutdown.
Minnesota had never before
had to suspend services
because of a budget dispute.
The last state government shut-
down was in Tennessee in
2002.
From wire reports


- - ,t.,,. -.


Will discuss denuclearization


'-, ,^ *r "- T










A2

JuLN 10, 2(005


Key Center plans gala


Friday event

to benefit clients

promises evening of

glamourfor attendees
Special to the Chronicle
The Key Training Center invites
everyone to "Wish for the Stars" with an
evening of classic Hollywood glamour
featuring legendary superstar "Cher."
Betty Atchison, one of the top Cher
impersonators in the nation, delivers
"Cher Through the Decades" extrava-
ganza.
The 23rd Annual Run for the Money


Dinner Auction will be Friday in the
Citrus Springs Community Center, and
promises great food by Outback
Steakhouse, a Sonny and Cher dinner
show and live and silent auction items
with a combined value of more than


$15,000.
This year's auction items deliver a
diversity of fun-filled getaways, enter-
tainment packages, fine jewelry and
art, autographed celebrity photographs
and sports memorabilia. Notable local


watercolor artist Anne Weaver will be
present for the evening, and, starting
with a blank piece of canvas, will pro-
duce a finished piece of artwork that
will be available in the live auction.
Weaver is a prolific painter, and
many of her works are purchased by
collectors because of her subject spe-
cialty.
The social hour and silent auction
begins at 5:30 p.m., with dinner starting
at 6:30.
Tickets are available at $50 per per-
son.
Call the Key Center Foundation at
527-8228.
Proceeds are used to provide a broad
scope of year-round, life-enhancing
services to nearly 300 adults with men-
tal retardation.


W ,;








Peter and Virginia D'Elia of Hernando took these photos
during a 2004 trip to Switzerland. "The Empire of :;
Mountains," involved a cogwheel train ride that rose
5,000 to 10,000 feet to the Gornegat Platform over-
looking the Matterhorn Mountains in Zermatt,
Switzerland. : -, Traveling by horsedrawn carriage,
the couple took this-picture while traveling toward the
Rosegglacier Mountains of St. Moritz, Switzerland.
Special l- the C hronncl ,










































-rint. Please make sure pho- dropped off at any C.ronicle
,


.





























graphs are in sharp focus. office or any Accent Travel
Photos should be sent to office.


---------------.----------------------- :
1 1
!,^

_ _ _ _. .... ._.. . _ . ..... .... ... ,


CMH Hospital seeks variety of volunteers


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Volunteer Program is seeking
volunteers interested in serv-
' ing the hospital four hours per
week in various areas.
Volunteers attend orientation,
receive free uniforms, a meal
for every four hburs worked
and are invited to several
social events during the year.
A bit of computer knowledge
can be of great value to the
admitting and medical records


departments. Scanners are
needed anytime from 8 a.m. to
8p.m.
The emergency room has
openings for volunteers.
A concierge is needed to
greet patients and families and
keep them informed about the
process.
The laboratory has several
positions available. This is a
chance to work in all areas of
the hospital's making deliver-
ies and picking up lab speci-
mens. If you are outgoing and


Do you enjoy computers?
Volunteers are needed to assist
nutritional services by taking
patient meal orders using a
palm pilot
Several other positions are
open in offices, as transporters,
and at the information desk
These service positions,
along with others, are open
now.
If you are interested, call
Penny Zaphel, volunteer coor-
dinator, for more information
at 344-6598.


enjoy doing a variety of jobs,
this is for you.
If exercise is what you are
seeking, nutritional services
will keep you busy dishing


desserts, wrapping' silver or
delivering meals to patients.
This position is for someone
who doesn't mind standing and
walking.


RUN FOR THE MONEY FACT BOX
* 23rd Annual Run for the Money Dinner Auction Friday at the Citrus
Springs Community Center. Social hour at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m.
* 29th Annual 180-mile run from Tallahassee to Lecanto July 18 to 23.
* Community Celebration at the Key Center's Lecanto campus 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, July 23.
* 18th annual telethon 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, July 23, WYKE-TV
Channel 16.
* For more information, call 527-8228.


News NOTES

Homosassa Elks
plan dinner dance
The West Citrus Elks of
Homosassa will host a dinner
dance at the lodge Friday.
Dinner will be served from 5 to
7:30 p.m., with a menu choice
of Chicken Marsala, baked or
fried fish or shrimp.
The highlight of the evening
will be the return of the Johnny
Angel Duo to provide music
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. The cost
to Elks and guests for the dinner
and dance is $8 per person at
the door.
If you would just like to come
and dance, the cover charge is'
$3. Join us for an evening of
fun.
Native plant society
to study insects
The Citrus Chapter of the
Florida Native Plant Society will
have its next meeting at 7 p.m.
Tuesday in the Florida Room at
the Visitors Center at the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa.
The speaker will be Dr.
Stacey Strickland from the
University of Florida. He will
present a program about benefi-
cial insects of Citrus County.
There will also be presenta-
tions on the plant of the month
and the propagation tip of the
month.
These meetings are open to
anyone who has an interest in
native plants or the wildlife of
this part of Florida.
For information, call Jim Bierly
at 382-3365.
Audition set
for playhouse talent
Playhouse 19, The
Community Theater of Citrus
County Inc. invites local talent to
participate in the third annual
Playhouse 19 Talent Show.
If you are a singer, dancer,
musician, juggler, comedian,
magician, or have any othertal-
ent in the performing arts, and
have not had many opportuni-
ties to perform on the local
stages, we would like to hear
from you. Please bring a
karaoke disk/tape or sheet
music to the audition.
Auditions are at 7 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday.
Rehearsals are at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July 19, and Thursday,
July 21. The show will be at 2
p.m. Saturday, July 23.
Playhouse 19 is at 865 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
For questions, call Monica
Tichauer, 382-0011, or Vangie
Rich, 795-0251.
Association to begin
summer dances
On Friday, the Beverly Hills
Recreation Association is break-
ing the trend of no dances dur-
ing the summer. The popular
and versatile "Starburst Band"
will be on hand to provide any
and all types of music for your
dancing pleasure. The largest,
and some say the best-main-
tained dance floor in Citrus
County, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Set-ups and popcorn are avail-
able.
Coffee, cake and ice are free.
Round up a group of friends and
neighbors and come enjoy a
great evening.
The cost is $5 plus tax. The
BHRA Clubhouse is at 77 Civic
Circle in Beverly Hills. Call 746-
4882 for directions. We'll look
forward to seeing you.


PET SPOTLIGHT
The Chronicle invites
readers to submit pho-
tos of their pets for the
daily Pet Spothlight fea-
ture.*
Photos need to be in
sharp focus. Include a
short description of the
pet and owners, includ-
ing names and home- ,
towns. Photos cannot
be returned without a
self addressed, stamped
envelope. Group photos
of more than two pets
Cannot be printed.


The Chronicle and The description of the trip a
Accent Travel Group are If it's selected as a winner, a
D R E / t\ sponsoring a photo contest it will be published in the Sun-
r. ', ;, c.- for readers of the newspaper. day Chronicle. c
"' Readers are invited to send At the end of the year, a p
I:ofo 7, sLC,." a photograph from their panel of judges will select the to
Dream Vacation with a brief best photo during the year


Several other positions are open in
offices, as transporters, and at the
information desk. These service posi-
tions, along with others, are open now.


* Send photos and infor-
mation to Pet Spotlight,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.


- *


., .. -'...-,. .








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICI.


Veterans BRIEFS


The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is planning a fund-raising
family day with a big barbecue
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 6, at the main shelter in
Bicentennial Park, Crystal River.
Everyone is invited to come enjoy
great food, games, quality time
with the family and the park swim-
ming pool will be open. Tickets will
be $5 for Coalition members and
$10 for non-members. All proceeds
will go toward the Transitional
House fund.
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has initiated plans for its
next project in providing a transi-
tional house to provide homeless
veterans with a facility to help them
build a new life. With more than
25,000 veterans calling Citrus
County home, there are about 35
not as fortunate as most. The coali-
tion is dedicated to helping those
veterans in need. This project is
one that will take a lot of help from
all the veteran's organizations, civic
clubs, local business and industry,
national, state and local govern-
ment, the VA and the citizens of
Citrus County.
Raffle tickets will also be avail-
able for the "Cruise for a Cause."
Only 1,500 tickets will be sold at
just $2 apiece with the drawing on
Sept. 11 for a seven-day Exotic
Western Caribbean cruise for two
departing St. Petersburg on Dec.
11 and returning on Dec. 18. Again,
all proceeds from the ticket sales
will go toward veterans' assistance
programs.
There will be no veterans coali-
tion meeting in July and the barbe-
cue will replace the scheduled
August meeting.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 of Citrus Springs will have its
general meeting at 7 p.m. on the
first Tuesday monthly; Ladies
Auxiliary will meet at 7 p.m. on the
second Tuesday; the Men's
Auxiliary will meet at 7:30 p.m. on
the third Monday; and the monthly
staff meeting will be at 7 p.m. on the
third Tuesday.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 in Citrus Springs Will be serv-
ing chicken fried steak Friday,
Italian sausage sandwiches on July
22 and fried fish on July 29.
Dinners are served from 5 to 7
p.m. at our usual price of only $6
per person. Entertainment will be
provided by the Country Bluegrass
Band. Hope to see you there.
The post also serves a complete
breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m.
Saturday for $4 per person.
Don't forget the weekly activities:
Bingo at 1 p.m. every Tuesday,
Shuffleboard at 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Dart Tournament
on Thursday at 7 p.m.
The H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills has bingo at
1 p.m. Sunday in the main hall,
open to the public. Doors open at
noon. Snacks and sandwiches
available.
Sunday: 25-cent wings, hot
dogs, hamburgers and fries served
from 4 to 7 p.m.


Wednesday: Hot dogs, ham-
burgers and sausages on the grill
at 5 p.m. Ladies night 5 to 8 with
Mike on the keyboard.
Friday: Fish or chicken dinner
served from 5 to 7 p.m. every
Friday for $6. Open to the public.
Mike on keyboard 6 to 9 p.m.
Please note: H.F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 Ladies Auxiliary will
host an all-you-can-eat spaghetti
dinner from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, July
22, for $4. Open to the public.
Tickets in advance. Deadline on
tickets is July 17. Call 746-0440.
Saturday: DJ/karaoke start at 7
p.m. with snacks at 8:30.
Dart tournaments are at 7 p.m.
Monday and Thursday.
Golf tournaments are at 8 a.m.
Monday and Thursday.
Pool tournaments are at 2 p.m.
Tuesday and 7 p.m. Thursday.
Lounge bingo is at 2 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The VFW Post Men's meeting is
at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday
monthly, the Ladies Auxiliary meets
at 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly and the Men's Auxiliary
meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second
Wednesday monthly at the post
home. Rolling Thunder meets at 11
a.m. the second Saturday monthly
at VFW Post 10087.
Call 746-0440. The post is locat-
ed at 2170 W. Vet Lane on County
Road 491 behind the AmSouth
Bank and across from Haywire's.
The VFW Post 7122, Floral
City, and the Ladies' and Men's
Auxiliaries announce the following:
Today: The post opens at 1 p.m.
Tuesday: Early bird bingo starts at
6:30 and regular bingo at 7.
Shareen's Kitchen opens at 5 p.m.
with sandwiches and other choices.
Wednesday: Shareen's kitchen
offers teriyaki chicken. Dinner is
.$6, served from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday: The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m.
Friday: All-you-can-eat grouper
fixed the way you like or three-
piece fried chicken served from
4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Karaoke by
Jannie Faye starts at 7.
Saturday: Slow-roasted prime rib
with all the trimmings served from
5 to 7:30 p.m. Jannie Faye's
karaoke starts at 7.
A new year is just beginning for
the VFW and the Ladies' and
Men's Auxiliaries. We welcome all
new and returning members.
Returnees from Iraq and
Afghanistan are especially wel-
come. Call 637-0100 for eligibility.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, Inverness, calendar July 11
to 16:
Monday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
Tuesday: Free pool 9 a.m. to
noon. Chicken wings four for $1
from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Karaoke from 6
to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Free pool from a.m.
to noon.
Thursday: Free pool from 9 a.m.
to noon. Lounge bingo at 3 p.m.
,Friday: Free pool from 9 a.m. to
noon. All-you-can-eat fried or


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baked grouper (chicken available)
$6 from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Karaoke
from 7 to 11 p.m.
Saturday: Ladies Auxiliary dinner
for $6 at 5:30 p.m. Music by Katie
Lynn at 6:30 p.m.
The Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando will serve a
dinner with salad bar and dessert
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday.
Included is great music for dancing
and listening pleasure from 6:30 to
10:30 p.m. Cost is $5.50 for your
night out, and you do not have to
be a post or VFW member. Call
726-3339.
The post has bar bingo at 2 p.m.
Sunday. The Ladies Auxiliary
hosts bingo games at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, and doors open at 9.
Hot food and snacks available. The
auxiliary also sponsors bar bingo at
2 p.m. Tuesday.
The post Honor Guard is avail-
able, call the John Stewart, Honor
Guard Commander, at 634-5568.
The post Ladies Auxiliary is
starting a Junior Girls Division for -
girls 5 to 16 years old. Call Judy
Prive at 726-3339.
Singles Nights are at 6:30 p.m.
the first and third Thursdays
monthly. Music is provided by Katie
Lynn for a $2 donation.
Our post Web page is at
www.debbiefields.com, where you
will find a two-month schedule of
events. You can e-mail us at
usavets@naturecoast.net.
The dart league meets and com-
petes at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.
Mark your calendar for the annu-
al Labor Day picnic set for Sept. 4.
The next post and Ladies Auxiliary
meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
July 14. For information, call Bob
Prive, commander, at 726-3339.
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776, Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) will conduct its
bimonthly meeting at 1:15 p.m.
Tuesday, July 19, in Room 219,
Lecanto Govemment Building, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, (off County
Road 491), Lecanto. Members are
encouraged to attend.
Chapter 776 is comprised of
combat wounded veterans. All
combat wounded veterans are
invited to attend and to learn more
about Chapter 776. Visit the
Chapter 776 Web site at www.cit-
ruspurpleheart.org or call Curt at
382-3847.
Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 Citrus
County will meet for a luncheon at
2 p.m. Tuesday, July 19, at Foxy's
Restaurant on Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44) in Crystal


River. Call Commander George
Staples, 628-6927.
Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 Citrus County
will also meet for breakfast at 8:30
a.m. Sunday, July 31, at Crystal
Paradise Restaurant, 508 N. Citrus
Ave., Crystal River. All Seabees,
Honeybees and friends are invited.
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will meet at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 20, in the
Conference Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle Building located
in Meadowcrest.
The purpose of the meeting will
be to plan and coordinate activities
for the 13th Annual Veterans
Appreciation Week Oct. 31-Nov. 13.
Call Chairman Chris Gregoriou by
e-mail at allprestige@
yahoo.com or by phone at 795-7000.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,'
Inglis (one mile east of U.S. 19).
Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
the Post. Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday month-
ly. Call Skeeter Fizz, (352) 447-
3495.
The Marine Corps League
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
conducts its regular meeting at
7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 7122 in
Floral City. All members are
encouraged to attend. Former
Marines as new members are also ;
welcomed. Call Tom Heron at 637- --
2724 or Bob Hines at 746-6908.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Marine Corps League meets at


^, Dan Gardner M.S.
Free Consultation ,, udog',encie
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness, FL 352-795-5700
700 SE 5th Ter., Crystal River, FL
www.gardneraudiology.com


7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday month-
ly at the VFW 7122 in Floral City..
The Military Order of Devil
Dogs Meeting: contact Chris at
795-7000.
The Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 is now
'getting settled in its new meeting
hall at the VFW in Beverly Hills
located behind the AmSouth Bank
on County Road 491. The meet-
ings are at 7 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. All Marines are
invited to attend.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors of Citrus County meets at 2
p.m. on the fourth Thursday month-
ly at Ray's Bar-B-Q in Crystal
River. Call Jimmie at 621-0617.
The Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 of Inverness
invites all veterans of Inverness
and Lecanto to join them. Meetings
are at 7:30 p.m. the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training Center
building, 130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. The executive board
meets the third Thursday monthly.
Call the commander at 341-0971.
Yankee Air Force Inc. is


proud to have a "Commemorative
End of World War II" dance also in
conjunction with VJ Day, on Aug. 6
at American Legion Post 58 on
U.S. 41 next to Carolina Dental
Clinic in Dunnellon.
There will be live big band
music, hors d'oeuvres, cash bar,
social hour from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Live music from 7:30 to 11 p.m.
Wear your uniform proudly if you
still have it.
Tickets are $15 per person or
$25 a couple. Make checks
payable to Yankee Air Force, Fla.
Div., and mail with a SASE to P.O.
Box 773364, Ocala, 34477.
Deadline for tickets is Aug. 1.
Proceeds to support Yankee Air
Force Museum. Call Carolyn at
(3.52) 489-3120 or the airport at
(352) 465-0727.
All LST Veterans and wives
are invited to monthly breakfast
meetings at 9 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the Golden
Corral Restaurant in Brooksville.
For information, call (352) 799-
1957.


I'


Marine Corps League officers


Special to the Chroncile
Charles W. Smith of Inverness (center), Commandant Elect of the Marine Corps League,
Department of Florida, with his staff of officers elected for the coming year. Charles W. Smith,
a Marine veteran and a resident of Inverness, was elected to the position of Commandant,
Marine Corps League, Department of Florida. A Korean War veteran, he has been active in the
Marine Corps League for a number of years, and was instrumental in starting a new detach-
ment in Floral City. He has collected a large staff of former Marines to assist him in continu-
ing the numerous activities of the Marine Corps League.


p


I


r-SAVE TODAY
bb..- $20


10A SUNDAY. TUIY 10. 2005


VETERANS








Crlrnrv (7nrr rv (1-1,/Cv-ren~rcrF SUNDAY, JULY-10, 2005- -A


Today's HOROSCOPE


Today's MOVIES


Your Birthday: The year ahead could be an exciting
one for you with a variety of activities and involve-
ments going on at the same time.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Unless you plan your
itinerary very carefully today, you are apt to waste a
lot of time and energy accomplishing nothing.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Should you be conduct-
ing commercial dealings today, such as shopping, try
not to be apathetic about the costs just because buy-
ing is so much fun.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Once you make a
commitment to do something with a friend today, stick
to it short of an emergency. Your pal will be just as
angry as you would be if someone reneged on you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Even though you could
probably come up with an excuse, don't dodge a
responsibility you promised another you'd take on.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you are planning to
go out on the town today, it might be best to stick to
familiar places and familiar activities.


School NEWS

CONGREGATE
DINING MENUS
Monday: Barbecued pork riblet,
seasoned black-eyed peas, south-
ern greens with onion, whole
wheat bread with margarine, fig
bar and low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Sliced buffet ham with
pineapple sauce, candied yams
with marshmallows, broccoli-cauli-
flower-green bean mix, two slices
whole wheat bread with mar-
garine, cinnamon applesauce and
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Turkey salad, pick-
led beet salad, tossed salad with
French dressing, two slices whole
wheat bread with margarine, mixed
fruit cup and low-fat milk.
Thursday: Roast chicken with
gravy, home-style potatoes with
peppers and onion, whole kernel
corn, two slices whole wheat
bread with margarine, chocolate
chip cookie and low-fat milk.
Friday: Swedish meatballs with
mushroom gravy, baked potato,
green peas and carrots, whole
wheat bread, fresh banana and
low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include:
East Citrus, Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs, Inverness,
and South Dunnellon. Call Support
Services at 795-6264.

First BIRTHDAYS
















Jonathan J. Dourm celebrat-
ed his first birthday June 30
with his sister Sherry and par-
ents Linda and Jonathan
Dourm of Crystal River.
Maternal grandmother is
Beverly Breslin of Citrus
Springs. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Donald Dourm of
Citrus Springs and Janice and
Frank Rymar of Crystal River.

Anniversary


Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Accomplishing
important goals will be denied you today if you tend to
do things in fits and starts.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) This is not the day
to attempt to use one-upmanship tactics on another.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Even though a
challenge by way of a bet sounds too good to be true,
don't gamble too much.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) A number of outside
influences beyond your control may cut down on your
freedom of action today.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you have a task to
perform today which you've never done before and
may even know little about
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Take things in stride
today and don't be so insistent that others conform to
some kind of rigid program you have in mind.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Take charge and
keep relatives or outsiders out of your domestic affairs
today.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10 p.m. Digital. No passes or super savers.
"Dark Water" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes or super savers.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) Noon, 2:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G) 12:10 p.m., 2:25 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13) 9:45 p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dark Water" (PG-13) 12:25 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:50
p.m., 10:25 p.m. Digital.
"Fantastic Four" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,


.. M FTHIS COUPONCEXTENDS THE
I S I 1 MANUFACTURER'S WARRANTY
(Usually 90 Days) TO A FULL
. ... 2 YEARS FROM ORIGINAL
S DATE OF PURCHASE
Available Only On Items In A Factory-Sealed Box
i Not Subject To Prior Sale Offer Is For
Individuals, Not Businesses See Store For Details
EXPIRES 7/31/05


7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m. Digital. No passes or super
savers.
"Rebound" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 12:45
p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. Digital. No passes or super savers.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) Noon, 2:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G) 12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Digital.



Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area
movie listings and entertainment information.





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Francis and Janet Howard of
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50th wedding anniversary on a
cruise to the Bahamas with fam-
ily.
Francis and Janet (Nero)
Howard were married June 25,
2955, in Waverly, N.Y.
They are the parents of
Karen Lettow of Crystal River,
Amy Pace and Jennifer Crump
of Homosassa. They have eight
grandchildren and four great-
grandchildren.

New ARRIVALS
Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
i U To Pamela Erlandson and
Jeremy Parrish, Homosassa, a
Sson, Nathan Wyatt Erlandson,
born at 11:27 a.m. Monday,
June 20, 2005, at Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center,
' Crystal River. He weighed 8
pounds, 2 ounces.
, Proud grandparents are Joel
and Sharon Erlandson of
Homosassa and Gary and
L Cynthia Parrish of Lecanto.

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SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 11A


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


II I ii


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-I








12A SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


- Anniversaries --- -


S Weddinrs .---.-


The Clarks


May-Stuebe


Warner-Wilson


Dick and Carla Clark of
Floral City celebrated their
25th wedding anniversary on
June 28.
Residing originally in
Indiana County, Pa., the Clarks
were married by the Rev.
William Miller in The Ernest
Bible Church in Ernest, Pa.
They have been living in Citrus
County for three years.
Dick has been a self-
employed truck driver for Keys
Concrete of Odessa for the past
seven years.


Carla is office manager of
HPH Homecare of Citrus
County and Hernando-Pasco
Hospice of Citrus County.
They have three children,
Cory Michael of State College,
Pa., Jennifer Nicole of
Finleyville, Pa., and DC of
Floral City.
The Clarks celebrated their
anniversary with a weekend at
Honey Moon Island and a din-
ner cruise.


The Provenzanos
Thomas and Karen
Provenzano of Inverness
renewed their wedding vows
on June 4, 2005, at The
Wedding Chapel in Inverness.
Chaplain Sal Viglione per-
formed the Christian service.
For the ceremony George
Kaler was best man and Tracey .
Provenzano maid of honor. "
Flower girl was Brittani .
Provenzano. The ceremony |
was planned entirely by Tom ,. ,
as a "surprise" gift to his wife.
The couple was originally mar- .
ried April 3, 1995, in Lanok
Harbor, N.J. ,


Clinton Stuebe and Crystal
May were united in marriage
in an afternoon double ring
wedding ceremony on
Saturday, June 25, 2005, in the
old Courthouse in Inverness.
The wedding was officiated by
Jim and Robin Falkenburg of
Crystal River. The bride was
given away by her father, Larry
May
The bride is the daughter of
Larry May of Inverness and
Darlene Sanders of Ocala. She
chose her sister, Melissa
Whitfield, as her matron of
honor and Nicole Bryan as her
bridesmaid. Flower girl was
Hailey Griffith.
The groom is the son of
Richard and Susan Stuebe of
Inverness. He chose his broth-
er, Corey Stuebe, as his best
man and Rich Stuebe as his
groomsman. Ring bearer was
Doniven Stuebe.


Ben Keech and Ann
Tomberlin were united in mar-
riage in a double ring ceremo-
ny on Saturday evening, June
25, 2005, in Inglis. Jim and
Robin Falkenburg of Crystal
River officiated the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
the late James Dill and Cindy
Russo of Crystal River, and
Janine Chinn of West Virginia.
She chose her sister, Crystal
Hadley, as her matron of honor.
Jordan and Sadie Tomberlin
were flower girls.
The groom is the son of Earl
and Vickie Keech of
Dunnellon. He chose his broth-
er, Wesley Keech, as his best
man.
A wedding reception imme-
diately followed for family and
friends.


Immediately following the
ceremony was a wedding
reception for family and
friends held at the Lions Club
in Beverly Hills.
The newlywed couple plans
to reside in Inverness.


The newlyweds will live in
Crystal River


Jaime Lee Warner and
Phillip Charles Wilson were
united in marriage at 11 a.m.
May 23, 2005, at St. Joan of Arc
Catholic Church, Spring Hill.
Deacon Lee F Hinderscheid,
grandfather of the bride, offici-
ated the wedding.
The bride is the daughter of
John M. and Jeani A. Warner of
Floral City.
The groom is the son of
Thomas and Trina Wilson of
Inverness.
Given in marriage by her
parents, the bride wore a satin
A-line gown with spaghetti
straps and train. The gown was
decorated in crystal-like
sequins resembling flowers
and had satin buttons down the
back. A single layer of veil was
worn with a tiara. She carried
a live bouquet with yellow
sweetheart roses.
Matron of honor was Renae
Rogers of Inverness, and best
man was Sean Murphy of
Gainesville. Bridesmaids were
Melissa Gatto of Gainesville
and Brandi Martin of Panama
City. Junior bridesmaid was
Natalie Rosenbaum, cousin of
the bride from Beverly, Mass.
Julie Butler, cousin of the
bride from Jacksonville, and
Cynthia Hinderscheid, cousin
of the bride from Tampa, were
flower girls.
The bridesmaids wore strap-
less deep sky blue satin floor-
length gowns and silver shoes.
Bouquets were yellow silk flow-
ers. Jr. bridesmaid wore a blue
satin dress with white trim.
Ushers were Tim Warner,
brother of the bride of Denver,
N.C., and Chris Barefoot of
Panama City Junior usher was


Nicolas Rosenbaum, cousin of
the bride from Tampa. Alex
Hinderscheid, cousin of the bride
from Tampa, was the ring bearer
The reception followed in St.
Joan of Arc Parish Hall,
catered with a sit-down dinner
of Cornish hens and beef.
Beautiful silk flowers decorat-
ed the church and hall. Colors
were sky blue and pale yellow.
The bride had family mem-
bers attending from
Minnesota, Tennessee, Florida
and Massachusetts. The groom
had family from Tennessee,
Florida, Illinois and Georgia.
The bride is a graduate of
Citrus High School, Class of
2002, attended University of
North Florida and is now fin-
ishing a business and market-
ing degree with Regis Catholic
University online. She has
worked for Publix for four and
a half years, currently full-time
in the accounting office.
The groom ,is a graduate of
Citrus High School (1999) cur-
rently in his sixth year with the
U.S. Coast Guard, relocated
from Panama City to
Yankeetown as a Boatswain
Mate III.
The newlyweds honey-
mooned at Couples Resort in
Ocho Rios, Jamaica.
They will live in Inverness.


Engagement


Mark and Dora Lathan of
Lecanto are pleased and
proud to announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Mandy
Christine, to Kyle Smith, son of
Wayne and Paula Smith of
Crystal River.
Mandy is employed as a
sales and service representa-
tive for Alltel in Inverness.
Kyle works as part of the
management team for Movie
Gallery in Crystal River.
The couple plan to wed in
March 2006. After a Hawaiian
honeymoon, they will reside in
Beverly Hills.


Mark Foley and Heather
LeClair were united in mar-
riage in a late afternoon river-
side double ring wedding cere-
mony on Saturday, June 24,
2005, at the Plantation Inn and
Gulf Resort. The wedding was
officiated by Jim, and Robin
Falkenburg pf Crystal River.
The bride was given away by
her father, Stephen LeClair.
A reading from the book of
Matthew was given by Gary
Bibeau.
The bride is the daughter of
Stephen and Deborah LeClair
of Homosassa. She is a gradu-
ate of Lecanto High School.
The bride chose Megan Girard,
Daisy LeClair, Katie Albright,
Shilo Wagner, Kristin Korstick,
Heather Jacques, Kim Korstick
and Amanda Wilkinson as her
bridesmaids. Her junior
bridesmaid was Amber
Wilkinson and flower girl was


Karinne Heinz.
The groom is the son of
Stephen and AnnMarie Foley
of Inverness.
He is a graduate of Citrus
High School and a student at
CFCC. The groom chose
Antoine Marcel, Brian
Kirkpatrick, Brian VAnOver,
Tom Hohensee, Marc
McCrumb, Lance Fletcher,
Stephen LeClair and Barry
LaFond as his groomsmen.
Junior groomsman was
Thomas Wilkinson and ring
bearer was Alex McKenna.
Immediately following the
ceremony was a wedding
reception for family and
friends in the Magnolia Room
at the Plantation Inn.
After a honeymoon cruise to
the Western Caribbean, the
newlywed couple plans to
reside in Beverly Hills.


4. U..
/


Dr. R. Keeth and Mrs. Lauri
Staton of Citrus Springs
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Lyndsay Lee
Marie Staton, to Justin Luke
Johnson, son of Mr. Ray and
Mrs. Sandra Johnson of Citrus
Springs.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Covenant Christian
Academy, received an associ-
ate of arts degree from CFCC
and is a student. at St.. Leo
University pursuing a bache-
lors in elementary education.
The future bridegroom is a
Lecanto High School graduate
serving in the U.S. Coast



'' . ,




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CI7RLJS COLINIY (FL) CHRONICLE TRAVEL SUNDAY. JULY 10. 2005 13A


Special to the Chronicle
LEFT: The Belvedere Museum includes pieces of art formerly owned by the Hapsburgs. -':i. The St. Charles Church was built in mem-
ory of those who died from bubonic plague.



Student deals with language


barrier while traveling abroad


Special to the Chronicle


Wednesday, July 6, 2005- It's been five
days since I left Florida for a four-week
study abroad program here in Vienna,
Austria. The Flow House, where I am stay-
ing for the month, is a three-story villa
located in the northwest section of the city,
one block from Turkenschanz Park. I am
here with 13 other Wake Forest students, a
professor and his wife.
The jetlag has worn off and the transi-
tion back to schoolwork hasn't been as dif-
ficult as I'd imagined, but I still have one
little problem. The only words I know of
German, which is the primary language
here, are "danke" (thank you) and "zenf"


(mustard). Needless
to say, that only gets
me so far.
Fortunately, I can
usually find some-
one who speaks
broken English or I .
simply point at .
objects.
Despite the lan-
guage barrier, I'm Katie Hendrick
having a wonderful FROM
time here. I took a ABROAD
brief bus tour the
other day, visited St.
Charles church, explored a pedestrian
boulevard, and found a nice coffee house


complete with piano player to read for
'class.
This weekend, I am taking a four-hour
train trip to Salzburg, where the Sound of
Music, one of my favorite movies, was
filmed.
I expect to have wonderful stories to
share of my weekend excursion.
Until then, Auf Wiedersehen!
OK, I guess I know three phrases in
German.

Katie Hendrick is a summer intern at
the Chronicle. She graduated from Citrus
High School and is a student at Wake
Forest University.


Staying at Wal-Mart bargain for RVers


Associated Press
EMPORIA, Kan. Charlotte
Pinick takes a quick inventory:
Five recreational vehicles
parked in a nearby truck stop
parking lot; a few more up the
road at the Wal-Mart.
That's more than $120 the
owner of Emporia RV Park
won't be bringing in this day as
travelers choose free parking
over the campsites with water,
electricity, dump station and
wireless Internet service
Pinick and her husband are
offering for $22.50 a night.
"We don't like it, but it's one
of those things," Pinick says of
the RVs that could have been
filling the 20-some empty
spaces in her RV park.
With $2 gas prices making
their hobby more expensive,
RV enthusiasts are trimming
their travel costs any way they
can, whether it's taking fewer
and shorter trips or spending a
few nights in the local Wal-
Mart parking lot, experts say.
They're also looking for con-
venience, security and famil-
iarity as they drive their travel
trailers or $100,000-plus motor.
homes from one end of the
country to the other.
"There are those nights
when you're forced to drive in
the dark to find someplace to
park and you just don't know
what you're going to find," said
Chuck Woodbury, who publish-
es RV-related articles on the
Internet. "You say to yourself,
'There's a Wal-Mart over there.
I'm going to make life easy for


myself."
Woodbury operates what he
calls the largest book store
exclusively focused on recre-
ational vehicles.
Among the offerings on
rvbookstore.com is a publica-
tion that lists all the Wal-Marts
where overnight parking is not
allowed, and a Wal-Mart
locater guide, complete with
maps to every Wal-Mart store
in the country except those in
Hawaii.
Those are a must-have for
serious RVers, he said.
"Boondocking," also known
as primitive camping, is the
RVer term for camping without
the use of such conveniences
as electricity and water
The subject, especially as it
pertains to Wal-Mart lots, is a
favorite topic among Internet-
savvy travelers on such sites as
freecamping.com, fulltimerv-
er.com and Woodbury's rvtrav-
el.com.
There has even been a docu-
mentary about parking in Wal-
Mart lots, titled "This is
Nowhere," which includes
interviews with RVers in
Missoula, Mont
Critics of the practice -
especially campground owners
who feel they are losing money
because of it argue that peo-
ple who can afford to drive
vehicles worth hundreds of
thousands of dollars across the
country surely can, afford to
pay the $20 or $30 nightly fee
for a campsite.
But RVers say it's not always
about saving money. Most Wal-


Marts are easy to find, the lots
are lit up at night and usually
have security cameras.
Campers can restock their sup-
plies, get something to eat and
be back on the highway with
ease which is important to
. people who have someplace
else to be.
Pinick, the campground
owner, said most transient
campers she sees the ones
who are just passing through,
rather than the "snowbirds"
who park there for extended
stays alternate between
parking in campgrounds and
overnighting in places where
they don't have to pay
"Most people are every other
day," Pinick said. "If there's a
Wal-Mart, they'll stay there one
night, and the next come to
places like this and get water
and dump their tanks. That's
kind of a general consensus."
Wal-Mart spokeswoman
Christi Gallagher said there
are 3,167 Wal-Marts and Sam's
Club stores scattered across
the U.S. in communities of all
sizes.


The company whose founder,
Sam Walton, was said to be an
RV enthusiast, encourages
RVers to park in its lots wher-
ever it's allowed, she said.
"From Wal-Mart's perspec-
tive, RVers are customers and
we're certainly happy to host
them in our parking lot when
we can," she said. *
James Stover, public affairs
manager in Yuma,. said the city
has a 20-year-old ban on any
overnight camping without a
permit
Woodbury said that's not
uncommon in places where the
weather is nice year-round.
"If you look, the areas where
staying at Wal-Mart is not
allowed are generally places
like Florida, Arizona, Southern
California, where you get win-
ter snowbirds who would go in
and occupy parking lots and
there would be no room for
cars," he said. 'Also, there are
small towns where camp-
ground owners go to the city
council and say it's hurting
their business."


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Holiday caps off


travel roundup


M memorial Day it was
time to go home ... our
great adventure came
to an end ... so we thought! We
boarded the plane shortly after
1 p.m.; had planned to stop off
at Sanford for a bite to eat and
mull over our recent experi-
ences.
The flight was smooth. It was
a cinch to pick up our luggage
and our car and continue to
Crystal River.
About 2 miles down the road,
steam began rising
from the car and ,.
our air conditioning
went out. Now I' '"
what? Marianne
pulled into the 'l
empty commercial
parking lot, which
seemed to be wait-
ing for us. She
called triple A,
explaining our Anne F
predicament, and MEM
they promised to OF A T
send a repair truck COUNS
We sat down, antici-
pating a long stay.
We were happy to be parked
in a very visible place. It
proved to be a blessing since
quite a few people stopped by
to inquire if we needed any
assistance, which was very
friendly and thoughtful of
Sanford residents. The next
"Helpful Harry" was one of
Sanford's "finest." He was
quite concerned, but we
assured him the repair truck
was on its way. We had a nice
lengthy conversation with him
before he left He assured us
that he would alert other offi-
cers to check on us and he,
himself, would stop by on his
return trip from duty.
True to his word, several
patrol officers passed by and
we waved to thank them. How
about that for a police depart-
ment? Great PR!
While waiting, we realized
how hungry we were. The two
restaurants nearby were
closed due to the holiday. Well,
we snacked on cookies and
candy not nourishing but
temporarily sustaining. We
were happy that they were so
readily available.
Finally, the repair truck
pulled in, much to our delight
The repairman checked the
motor yes, the water hose
had broken. Fortunately, the
insurance contract covered the
car to be transported to the
hometown within the allotted


mileage.
I watched in amazement as
the truck bed was brought
down, the car placed on the
-trailer, hoisted up, and we
were ready to go. (Excuse me if
I have the wrong nomenclature
for these mechanical items.)
I have never ridden in a
truck cab, so this was a new
adventure. Marianne' and I
climbed into the cab, which we
found to be roomy, comfortable
and smooth riding. Hooray for
the truck drivers
who deserve this
comfort on their
S trips, especially
. long hauls.
The driver was
courteous, most
gracious and recep-
tive, stopping off at
a restaurant so we
could finally enjoy
Fusillo a meal.
IOIRS The conversation
was most stimulat-
RAVEL ing and informative
SELOR and we learned
much about their
driving trips and the shortcuts
in the Sanford-Crystal River
area. When we came close to
home we reciprocated with
shortcuts we knew.
This entire trip was most
interesting in many ways, but it
confirmed what I already knew
the majority of people are so
friendly, so helpful it makes
traveling a pleasure, regard-
less of circumstances.
People in Pennsylvania
readily conversed with us and
wanted to know where we
lived in Florida, all aboutour
area, and so much more,
including the location of my
hairdresser, etc. We really felt
like they were old acquain-
tances. Floridians fall into the
same category, searching for a
friendly smile so ... keep a
friendly look and smile on your
face.
So much for the trip ... now
back home on the "Fourth." It
was a great holiday and I did
my annual stint watching
the Boston Pops concert when
the finale is always synchro-
nized with the fireworks and
"God Bless America" touches
my heart with pride.

Anne Fusillo and her hus-
band, Frank, owned a travel
agency in Wheaton, Ill.,
for 17years. Questions or
comments? Give her a
call at 564-9552.


SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
Follow the instructions on today's Opinion page to send a
letter to the editor.
Letters must be no longer than 350 words, and writers will
be limited to three letters per month.




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CTfRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRAVEL


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 13A


19
F
14
ri
is


:_


I tIHIVfH









14A SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


Summer (yard care) camp


Welcome to "Yard Care and Home-
Cleaning Camp" for teens! Remember,
"Yard Care and Home-Cleaning
Camp" is a pre-requisite and must be complet-
ed before going off to soccer, baseball, football,
swimming, horseback riding or any
other kind of camp. .p
The good news is that "Yard Care
and Home-Cleaning Camp" is FREE!
That's right, you'll be living at home,
sleeping in your own beds, eating the
very same food you've come to know
and love. No crazy surprises here at
Yard Care Camp.
And you know you'll love your
counselors because you already know
them as Mom and Dad! During the -
first week, campers will play the
weed-pulling game almost every
morning, and in the afternoon they'll laugh and
cheer as they enjoy the mulching competitions!
By the second day, most campers should be able
to do this by themselves without help from the
counselors.
But not, to worry, campers who need extra
instruction will get it. Every noon there will be
exciting motivational talks by Mom and Dad on
such things as "Why I Can't Hear You When You
Whine" and "When You're Eighteen You Can
Move Out and Live in Your Own Filth and
Squalor" Yard Camp is a unique experience
that you'll talk about for years to come.
Imagine how jealous your friends will be
when they hear that you've gotten to fertilize
plants, trim the walk and pick up trash in one
short week. If only their parents loved them
enough to send them to Yard Camp but not
every child's that lucky. But that's not all that's
in store for our lucky campers.
For no extra money you'll get to mow the
lawn, clean the gas grill, scrape paint, wash the
deck, clean and replace all the tools, and a thou-
sand other little things. We call them "chores"
but you'll call them "fun." No more boring days
playing video games, watching television and
saying things like "There's nothing to do around
here!" There's plenty to do at Yard Camp and
you'll be doing it!
Some days, if there's time, and all the
"chores" are finished and the counselors aren't


342-0710-SUCRN


PUBLIC NOTICE BY CITRUS COUNTY
DIVISION OF HOUSING SERVICES

SHIP AWARD AMOUNT
The State Housing Initiatives Partnership Program (SHIP) anticipates an award of
$947,397 to Citrus County for FY2005-2006 to fund affordable housing programs in
Citrus County.

HOME REPAIRS FOR VERY LOW INCOME FAMILIES
Repairs that remove conditions that are an imminent threat to the health and safety of
the residents. Eligible repairs include re-roofs, electrical repairs, plumbing repairs,
heating/cooling replacement or repair, etc. This program can not remodel units but
instead repairs existing hazardous living conditions.

DOWNPAYMENT/CLOSING COST ASSISTANCE LOANS
No interest, deferred loans will be available to First Time Homebuyers for a substantial
down payment. Homebuyers. are required to make at least a $1500 contribution
towards closing costs and down payment. Participants will need to qualify, with a
financial institution for mortgage financing, and meet other requirements.

HOUSING REPLACEMENT STRATEGY
Funding will be available for households making up to 60% of area median income for
the construction of new homes to replace unsafe structures. Public/private funds will be
used as leverage with SHIP funds when possible.

UTILITY CONNECTION STRATEGY
Funding will be available to pay permit, impact, and other fees necessary to connect
very low and low-income households to regional central water- and/or sewer service.
Priority will be given to hook-ups done in conjunction with other state or federal
funding sources.

FORECLOSURE PREVENTION (INTERVENTION) STRATEGY
Assistance will only be provided to very low and low-income homeowners who
previously received assistance on their owner-occupied home through Citrus County's
SHIP program. Intervention must occur prior to foreclosure proceedings. No more.
than three monthly mortgage payments will be provided to bring mortgage loan(s)
current. The situation that led to the delinquency must be beyond the applicant's
control.

PROHIBITION OF MOBILE HOMES
State law states that SHIP funds may not be used to repair, rehabilitate, or purchase
mobile homes.

APPLICATION PERIOD
Applications will be accepted at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path-Suite 147, Lecanto, Florida, effective August 10, 2005. The application period
will remain open until further notice. It is unlawful to discriminate on the basis of race,
creed, color, religion, age, sex, marital or familial status, national origin or handicap in
the award application process for eligible housing.

INCOME CATEGORIES
If not specified under the Strategy, very low, low, and moderate-income families qualify.
In each category, applicants cannot have income that exceeds the following maximum
gross family incomes:


Family Size
1
2
3
4
5
6


Very Low
$15,100
17,300
19,450
21,600
23,350
25,050


60% of Area Median
$18,120
20,760
23,340
25,920
28,020
30,060


Low
$24,200
27,650
31,100
34,450
37,300
40,100


Moderate
$36,240
41,520
46,680
51,840
56,040
60,120


Interested persons should contact Housing Services at 527-5377.


too tired, we'll go out to get some ice cream or go
to a movie. Most kids think the second week of
camp is even more fun than the first. That's
when we move from Yard Camp to Home-
Cleaning Camp. You'll be in the "Separating the
Laundry" Challenge almost every day
competing with other teams (your
brothers and sisters) to see who can
be first.
Then you'll get to feed and clean
your very own animals right down
to the litter box. After that there's art
\J appreciation class, or as Counselor
*..(..9 Mom likes to call it, dusting and vacu-
uming.
There's nothing like it to make
teens feel grown up. Summer camp
doesn't get much more fun than this
there's never a dull moment The
counselors will lead campers in their
favorites songs such as "This is the way we load
the dishwasher, load the dishwasher, this is the
way we load the dishwasher, early in the morn-
ing" and "This is the way we clean the tub, clean
the tub, clean the tub, this is the way we clean
the tub, early in the morning."
. And you'll learn many new songs to sing
around the microwave at night, like "This is the
Way We Scrub the Floor" and "This is the Way
We Make the Bed," which are easy to learn and
sure to put a smile on everyone's face.
By popular demand there will a new feature
this year called "Watch Dad Write Some
Checks." Campers will sit quietly while coun-
selor Dad explains exactly how much it costs to
run "Yard Care and Home-Cleaning Camp."
He'll explain such things as kilowatt-hours
and roaming charges. He may even get into the
cost of food and clothing. New shoes are a par-
ticular favorite of his.
Many campers say they've never had two
weeks fly by so fast. Many ask what they have to
do to come back to "Yard Care and Home-
Cleaning Camp" next year. They don't have to
worry, enrollment is automatic!

Jim Mullen is the author of "It Takes a Village
Idiot: Complicating the Simple Life" and
"Baby's First Tattoo. "Reach him at
jimmullen@myway.com.


bathroom so you will have something of interest
to discuss at the dinner table. This must become
a priority for you even if it means skipping
the laundry or hiring someone to stay with your
mother. Relationships take regular mainte-
nance, too.
Dear Annie: I am the mother of the bride, and
a widow. I would like to know the proper proto-
col for wedding dances if one of the parents is
single. I know the.bride and groom dance first,
and then the groom dances with his mother


Puzzle answer

ACROSS
1 Craze
6 Strikebreaking worker
*10 Pace
14 Amphibian
18 "Lawrence of -"
20 Bridge charge
21 Fleshy fruit
22 Contender
24 Separate into parts
25 breve
26 Leave unmentioned
27 Very long river
29 Woodwind
30 Cairo's river
32 Bill and -
34 Zest
36 Son of Jacob
37 Annex
38 Close tightly
39 Small boat
41 Secular
43 Punta Este
44 Goatee location
45 Fighters for honor
47 Raucous noise
49 Romantic song
52 Lots of
53 Kind of processing
55 Runs off to wed
59 Audibly
60 Sign of a kind
62 Punning poet
64 Wetland
65 Bowling alley
66 Spackle relative
67 Noah's vessel
69 Golf term
71 Ten (prefix)
72 Use a spade
73 "- makes waste"
74 High card
75 Kind of palm
77 Jump
78 Unwilling
80 Doubting one
82 "A Streetcar Named
84 Whittle
85 Western Indian
87 "- She Sweet"
88 Middle
89 Soft color
90 Pertaining
to international
games
92 Most awful
93 Insect
94 Cut
96 Tavern
97 Burr or Copland
99 Mineral
102 Small piece cut off


is on Page 10A.

104 Inquire
105 In favorof
106 Cried like a cat
107 Forehead
108 Term of endearment
110 Office note ,
112 American inventor
114 City in Idaho
115 Fisherman
117 Egg part
119 Graven image
120 Dish
121 Tense
123 Variety of apple
125 Sing loudly
(with "out")
126 Cigar residue
129 Wild disturbance
131 Pigpen sounds
132 and void
133 Upperclassmen
(abbr.)
136 Purple color
138 Recess
140 Golf ball stand
141 Walking stick
142 Hit
143 Salad item
145 Wilson's
predecessor
147 Consequently
149 Singer Dion
151 Marshy area
152 Wings
153 Legal wrong
154 Sudden pang
155 Short sleeps
156 Furnish
157 Circular current
158 Moved little by little


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please e-mail your questions
to anniesmailbox@comcast.ne4 or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox,
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


DOWN
1 Mexico's Sierra -
2 "Tempest" sprite
3 Kind of orange
4 Abbr. in footnotes
5 Help
6 Play for time
7 Nat King -
8 Totality
9 Shiner (2 wds.)
10 Made a parody of
11 Male turkey
12 Give off
13 Flower part .
14 Delicate
15 Circular edge
16 Racetrack
17 Looked a long time
19 Epic by Virgil
23 Adore
28 Nothing
31 Fleming or McKellen
33 Artist's paint
35 Seize
38 Food fish
39 Cheerful
40 Candid
42 Serene
44 Fingerprint, e.g.
45 "Divine Comedy"
poet
46 Depot (abbr.)
. 48 Warty creature
49 Hairless on top
50 Jai -
51 Durable (hyph.)
52 Dillon or Damon
54 Side
56 Very, very old
57 Man on a date
58 Contour
60 Shrub
61 Contest of speed
63 Chapeau'
66 Kneecap
68 Fix.
70 Huge coniferous tree
,73 Privileged ones
74 With hands on hips
75 Container
76 Memorize
79 Table scrap
80 Undercover agent
81 A twitching
83 Family member,
for short
84 Big gun
85 Game played on ice
86 Bravo!
89 High ranking Turk
91 Reduce
92 Small bird
95 Doctrine


97 Famed fabulist
98 Like a missing GI
(abbr.)
100 A flower
101 Pitcher
103 Hit repeatedly
105 Book leaf
106 Golden-touch king
107 Boxing match
109 Time period
111 Cut down
113 PC storage device
114 Cotillion
116 Causing destruction
118 Used'needles and
yam
120 Choose
122 Also
124 Opp. of W.S.W.
125 Roll
126 Likely
127 Ufikempt one
128 Earthling
130 Kind of recall
132 Mean
133 Playground
attraction
134 Gamut
135 Horse
137 Indian of Yucatan
139 Cabbage
141 Milk portion
142 Lost one's footing
144 Spinning toy
146 Devotee
148 Coal scuttle
150 Female sheep


Sunday :P-


Ciimtus COUNTY (FL) CHIONmci.I




Hubby's disinterest


or wife uninteresting?


Dear Annie: My relationship with my hus- while the bride dances with her father In this
band is evaporating, and I can't seem to instance, there is no father for her to dance
get things back to where they used to be. with. What happens when the mother of the
It's my fault. My job requires me to work every bride is n6t part of a couple? Sun City, Ariz.
other weekend, which limits our Dear Sun City: Often, when the
time together. Besides that, my moth- father of the bride is unavailable,
er is becoming very dependent, and another male becomes a stand-in,
her care takes a good deal of my time walk the bride down the aisle.
and money. Usually this is an uncle, brother or
My husband and I are both close to other relative. If your daughter is not
retirement, so changing jobs is not using a stand-in to walk her down
an option. We used to have one recre- the aisle, you can designate someone
national activity together now he as your escort. Keep in mind, howev-
does it with his niece, on the week- er, that this dance is a traditional
ends when I work. When I'm home, custom, but you are not obligated to
he wants to get things done around follow it. It may be time for you to
the house. Besides my job, I do all -. suggest a new custom.
the housework, cooking, cleaning Dear Annie: You printed a letter
and laundry, plus I mow the lawn. I MAILBOX from "Sleepless in Sarasota," whose
feel like I'm becoming his house- neighbor goes outside to cough and
keeper. spit in the. middle of the night. You suggested
Physically, I'm in pretty good shape, but men- speaking to the neighbor or trying white noise
tally, I think I'm becoming boring. My life is so in the bedroom. I have a suggestion: Earplugs!
filled with obligations that I'm losing touch with My partner and I live on a busy street, and
my friends. What can I do to become interesting without earplugs we would be awake all night
again? Emily Plus, we both snore and. keep each other up.
Dear Emily: We trust that the "one recre- Earplugs are the perfect solution. We adjust the
national activity" is golf and not sex. We know you volume on the phone, and we crank up the clock
feel overwhelmed, but surely the two of you can radio. And we tested the smoke alarm to make
find a little time each week to do something sure we can hear that, too. If anyone tries to
together. break in, our dog will take care of waking us up.
Explain this to your husband. Tell him you The best kind of earplugs to use are the foam
can devote more time to him if he will help you kind, since they don't accumulate any waxy
with the housework (and he should). Set aside residue. Sleeping Peacefully in Eureka, Calif.
some time once a month to get together with Dear Eureka: We agree that earplugs can
friends, which can help broaden your horizons. cover a multitude of noises. Thank you for the
Pick up on current events when you turn on additional suggestion to help our readers get
your computer, and put newsmagazines in the enough rest.







NASCAR revs up
-r i.,er
prepare for
IC'' ,-, 1


*2~


.. / ,\, ,- ----, .. J E, r ,


S orts.-
Racing cancelled at
Citrus Speedway
Severe weather from
Hurricane Dennis forced Citrus
County Speedway officials to
cancel last night's racing pro-
gram early Saturday morning.
Racetrack general manager
Don Cretty made the call to can-
cel the program at 10 a.m. and
began the task of rescheduling
events.
Saturday's race card will
include the USA Sprints,
Modifieds, Mini Cup Cars,
Sportsman, 4-cylinder Bombers,
Figure 8, and the remainder of
the Hobby Stock 50 thatwas
postponed mid-way in the event
due to rain two weeks ago.
Open practice will be Thursday
from 5 to 8 p.m.
The July 23 show will include
double Late Model features,
Mini Stock 50, Hobby Stocks,
Thunder Stocks, and the 4-cylin-
der Bombers.
The Tampa Bay Area Racing
Association's Winged Sprint
series will return on July 30.
The Thunder Stock 50 and
Outlaw Modifieds will be
rescheduled at a later date.
Crystal River to host
volleyball clinic
The University of North
Florida Volleyball Clinic will be
held July 17-18 at Crystal River
High School. The clinic is for
students entering grades 9-12
and will be conducted by coach-
es and players from UNF.
Special sessions for setters will
be announced later.
The Sunday, July 17 session
will be from 2 to 7 p.m.; the
Monday session will run from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $40, with
all monies going to UNF.
Checks should be made
payable to CRHS VB.
To register or for more infor-
mation, call coach Brigit Boshell
at 563-1818.
Blue Jays' Halladay
out at least a month
TORONTO Blue Jays.,
pitcher Roy Halladay will miss at
least a month after breaking a
bone in his left leg Friday night.
"Hopefully, it will be a month,"
Toronto general manager J.P.
Ricciardi told The Associated
Press on Saturday.
Halladay, who had a good
chance at
starting
Tuesday's
All-Star game,
was struck in the left shin Friday
night by a line drive by Texas'
Kevin Mench.
The Blue Jays' ace was taken
to the hospital for X-rays, which
revealed the nondisplaced frac-
ture. Initial reports were that it
was just a bruise, but Ricciardi
said they knew last night that
there was a fracture.
"For a month we're going to
have to suck it up," Ricciardi
said. "We played without him last
year. It's not a comforting situa-
tion to be in, not having him."
The 2003 AL Cy Young award
winner won just eight games in
2004 after a troublesome right
shoulder limited him to 21 starts.
From staff, wire reports


Citrus takes All-Star title


Team downs

Dunnellon 2-1

for championship
KHUONG PHAN
kphan@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The clouds hanging over
Bicentennial Park may have
portended of rain, but the
weather held long enough for
the Central Citrus Major all-
stars baseball team to take
home the district 15 title.
Benefiting from a first
inning, two-run homer from
first baseman Jesse Chaffee,


Central Citrus downed
Dunnellon 2-1.
Both teams came into
Saturday's contest with perfect
3-0 records, but the difference
maker proved to be just one
pitch.
With one out and one on in
the top of the first, Chaffee
knocked his second home run
in as many days, giving Central
Citrus the only runs it would
need.
"It came down to that one
home run from Mr. Chaffee,"
Central Citrus coach Larry
Swain said. "He did it for us
yesterday and put the game
away."
In Friday's game against
Inverness, Chaffee capped a 7-


1 win by hitting a three-run
shot in the sixth.
Chaffee finished the day 2-
for-3, ripping a double down
the leftfield line in the fifth.
The start of the bottom half
of the first was delayed for
roughly 30 minutes as rain
soaked the field. Once the
weather began to cooperate, a
pitchers' duel ensued.
Central Citrus starter
Christian Rodriguez appeared
to be on cruise control in help-
ing his team maintain a firm
grasp on the game. The right-
hander was untouchable for
the first two innings, retiring
Dunnellon's first six batters in
order.
"I'm proud of Mr.


Rodriguez," Swain said. "This
is his first year as a pitcher. We
have the confidence in him and
he proved us right."
Rodriguez was the benefac-
tor of a spectacular play to end
the first when second baseman
Skylar Summers robbed batter
Jeritt Mitchell of a single by
making a diving, highlight reel
catch.
Rodriguez went the distance
in the win, giving up only two
hits while striking out five.
Not to be outdone,
Dunnellon starter David Miller
settled in after giving up the
home run and made sure his
team stayed close. Besides
three Dunnellon errors, Miller
never let Central Citrus put up


Ambrico wins Showdown


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Vinny Ambrico, of Orlando, fourth from left, leads the pack at the start of the 5K race Saturday at Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness en route to his win.


Tarpon Spring
C.J. RISAK
cjrisak@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Citrus Summer
Showdown is meant to serve
as a tune-up to the fall sea-
son. And that's just how the
race's male and female win-
ners used it Saturday at
Whispering Pines Park in
Inverness.
High humidity kept per-
formances from reaching
peak levels, and the threat of
Hurricane Dennis prevented
some runners from partici-
pating. But the weather coop-
erated long enough to allow
Vinny Ambrico to defend his
five-kilometer title in the
men's division, and to have
Jacki Wachtel collect a win in
the women's in her first try
here since 2002.


' Wachtel earns women's victory in 5K marathon


Strategy-wise, the race
unfolded perfectly for
Ambrico. A resident of
Altamonte Springs who now
attends Notre Dame,
Ambrico wanted to be with
the frontrunners at the start,
then make his move.
"I went out a little bit faster
than the others," he
explained. "I knew if I went
out fast, I'd still have a good
enough finishing kick.
"I didn't want to push it. I
haven't run a 5K race in a
while, about seven months,
and I wanted to experiment I
just wanted to go out with the
leaders and let things unfold,
then see what happens."
What happened was
Ambrico took the lead just
past the half-way point on
this cross country route, then
pulled away to finish first in


15:40, 20 seconds ahead of
runner-up Jake Wilke of
Orlando. Tyrone Bell of
Middleburg, who had the
early lead, placed third in,
16:07.
For Ambrico, who will be a
senior this fall, the run
allowed him to get prepared
for the upcoming track sea-
son. He runs the 800 and
1,500 meters for the Irish.
Wachtel's story is different,
although in general terms the
purpose was the same. A
graduate of River Ridge in
1997 and Ohio University in
'02 (she competed in track
and cross .country), Wachtel
ran the Crystal River Fourth
of July Triathlon last Monday
and still had enough left for
an impressive performance
in this race, winning in 19:29
-50 seconds ahead of second-


place, finisher Deirdra
Witherspoon of Citrus
Springs.
At least it was impressive
to most people. To Wachtel,
.the cross country coach at
Mitchell High School who
turns 26 today, it was just
passable.
"My time last Monday in
the triathlon was 18:24, and
that was after the (quarter-
mile) swim and (15-mile) bike
ride," she said, "so I thought
this was a little slow."
Still, it served its purpose.
Wachtel has bigger chal-
lenges ahead of her. The
Tarpon Springs resident is
training for the Chicago
Marathon in October, and
this is part of a new regimen
that includes running 21

Please see RACE/Page 3B


much of a threat after the first
"David came in and pitched
an awesome game," Dunnellon
coach John DeGeorge said.
"They jumped out on it right off
the bat Nothing against them,
but we played well. It was a
close game and I thought we
were going to come back and
beat them."
Miller surrendered four hits
and struck out six in the com-
plete game loss.
Dunnellon got on the board
in the third with Miller leading
off the inning with a single.
Miller then took second as
teammate Steve Arnaud
popped out on a foul ball field-
Please see CITRUS/Page 3B



A battle



for the



district

Crystal River

takes Game 1

from Dunnellon
C.J. RISAK
cjrisak@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The power is back in the
Crystal River lineup.
A week ago, this 11 year-old
all-star baseball team opened
district play with an 11-1 loss to
Inverness. That put Crystal
River in the loser's bracket,
facing an uphill climb to the
championship.
Now just one rung remains
in that ladder. A five-run first
inning combined with a three-
run insurance home run by
Donnie DeWees in the sixth
pushed Crystal River to a 10-4
victory Saturday at
Whispering Pines in
Inverness.
Which means the district
has one game remaining, with
Inverness going up against
Crystal River for the title and a
trip to sectionals. Hurricane
Dennis forced a postponement
of that game until 6 p.m.
Monday at Whispering Pines.
"It's winner take all," said
Crystal River coach Mark
Strifler.
That 10-run loss to Inverness
in the first game of the district
was still weighing on Crystal
River, who has not only won
four-consecutive games but
scored in double figures in
each. There was a reason for
that loss, of course: The team's
pitching ace, Tyler
Humphreys, had taken a spill
the night prior to the district
opener and suffered a bruised
spleen.

Please see TYLER/Page 3B


Wie's time may come


sooner than expected


A major sendoff for


Nicklaus' career


Associated Press
SILVIS, Ill. Sometimes it
takes good cry for Michelle
Wie to get over a disappoint-
ment. Other times, punching
something does the trick.
There's no need for either
this weekend. Despite a stun-
ning collapse that cost her a
historic finish at the John
Deere Classic, the 15-year-old
knows her time is coming.
And it could be sooner than
most expected.
"On the LPGA Tour, I made
tthe cut on my fourth try," she
said. "My fourth try (on the
'PGA Tour) is coming up, so I'm
really looking forward to that."
That's not just teenage pre-
cociousness talking. Though
Wie showed her inexperience
with disasters on two of her
last four holes, causing her to
miss the cut by two strokes, she
also showed she can hold her
own with the boys.


She played a PGA Tour event
at 1 under, and her tie for 88th
equaled that of three-time
major champion Nick Price.
She finished ahead of 54 men,
including former British Open
champ David Duval and play-
ing partner Nick Watney.
"I think she played very
well," said Watney, who was six
strokes behind Wie. "It was
unfortunate what happened,
but I'm sure she'll come back
better the next time."
No woman has made a PGA
Tour cut since Babe Didrikson
Zaharias in 1945. No one even
tried again until Annika
Sorenstam teed it up at the
2003 Colonial, and only Suzy
Whaley and Wie have played
PGA Tour events since then.
But while Sorenstam played
with the men as a way to gauge
her game, Wie wants to do this
on a regular basis. Some have
Please see WIE/Page 6B


Associated Press
Michelle Wie smiles after hitting a putt for birdie on the 10th hole
during the second round of the John Deere Classic Friday.


Associated Press
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland -
Of all the moments that have
defined the incomparable
career of Jack Nicklaus, per-
haps the most shocking display
of emotion showed just how
much he loves St Andrews.
His idol, Bobby Jones,
always said that a great career
was not complete without win-
ning the British Open at the
home of golf, and Nicklaus was
desperate to capture the claret
jug on the Old Course. He had
a one-shot lead over Doug
Sanders on the final hole of the
1970 playoff when Nicklaus
smashed his drive over the
18th green.
Sanders played a bump-and-
run to 5 feet, and Nicklaus
chipped down to 8 feet. He
crouched over the birdie putt,
frozen until he was ready, then
watched the ball curl in the
right side of the cup.


Nicklaus is famous for rais-
ing his left hand and the putter
when he makes a crucial putt
This one was much bigger.
He thrust his arm skyward and
leapt with such force that his
putter went airborne, causing
Sanders to duck.
"I had never shown emotion
like that before, and it was
totally out of character,"
Nicklaus later said. "But then,
I had never before won the old-
est golf championship in the
world at the cradle and home
of the game."
It wasn't the only time he lost
control on the Old Course.
Leading by two shots playing
the 18th hole in 1978, tears
began to fill his eyes as he
walked toward the green and
saw thousands of fans lining
the fairways and crammed into.
balconies. His caddie, Jimmy
Dickinson, had to jab him in

Please see NICKLAUS/Page 3B







CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


Willis unfazed by stardom


Associated Press

MIAMI Watching
Dontrelle Willis play has, on
occasion, left his catcher feel-
ing ill and threatening bodily
harm against the All-Star left-
hander.
Paul Lo Duca isn't entirely
kidding. He's one of many
older, wiser teammates who've
reprimanded Willis.
His indiscretion? Strange as
this sounds, sometimes Willis
just plays too hard.
"If you slide headfirst one
more time," Lo Duca tells
Willis, "I'll punch you right in
the head."
Other than his penchant for
diving into bases, there's not
much else in Willis' game that
.should anger his teammates.
After Saturday's start against
the Chicago Cubs, he was 13-4
with a 2.39 ERA, and was on
the short list of potential
starters for Tuesday's All-Star
game.
Willis made the All-Star
team in 2003, two months after
his call-up to the majors. He's
clearly honored to return to the.
game, yet vehemently insists
that he doesn't care about start-
ing for the National League.
"The All-Star game is for
individual accolades and I'm a
team guy," Willis said. "I know
I'm not anything without the
team."
A little fame, a little money
and a giant World Series ring
from 2003 haven't changed
Willis, who still has the same
mannerisms and attitude as
when he left the anonymity of
Double-A ball and joined the
Marlins.
But as a pitcher, he's defi-
nitely changed. Instead of
throwing hard on virtually
every delivery, he's mixing
speeds, as well as any Marlins
pitcher. He's more refined,
smarter about what to throw -
and in what situation.
At 23, he's growing up.
"He knows when to throw a
ball," said Josh Beckett, the
2003 World Series MVP "He
knows when to throw 93 and


C

1


Associated Press
Dontrelle Willis' delivery is still unorthodox, his cap still sweat-stained and askew, and he's remains
one of the youngest and most exuberant inhabitants of the clubhouse. About the only difference is
this: His success can't be considered fluky anymore.


when to throw 83. That's the
biggest thing. It's not easier, but
with that funky delivery, he
gets some pretty bad swings on
pitches that are a foot outside.
He knows that."
That unorthodox high-leg-
kick, body-twisting delivery
still befuddles opponents, even
those who've now faced Willis
many times. He still wears his
sweat-stained, flat-brimmed
cap askew. And he remains one
of the most exuberant Marlins,
someone who yelps joyously
when the latest video-game
console arrives in his locker.:
Manager Jack McKeon says
Willis' persona hasn't changed
one bit.
"He loves the game,"
McKeon said. "He loves to com-
pete. He loves the competition.


He has fun. He dives into
bases. And they say, 'Ooh-hoo,
that's dangerous. Don't you fine
him?' How do you take that out
of him? That's something that's
in there. That's the desire to be
successful. It's sensational."
Willis has no desire to talk
about his gaudy won-lost
record, glittering ERA, new-
found role as ace of the Marlins
staff, chances of being a 20-
game winner or potential Cy
Young candidate.
"It's pretty refreshing, actu-
ally, to see a guy that has that
much success that quickly and
it doesn't go to their head," said
outfielder Jeff Conine. "With
the contracts they're giving out
and the signing bonuses, I'
think it changes mindsets
quickly But he's continued to


be humble and play the game
with a lot of passion." ,-
The Marlins rave about his
work ethic. Willis often is one
of the first players at the ball-
park, especially on days when
he's not pitching. He lifts
weights for 30 minutes after
every start. Often, he's throw-
ing or running in the outfield
when the South Florida sun-
shine is at its absolute hottest.
That's why he's forgiven for
grievous lapses in judgment
like the one in Atlanta on June
23, when he dove into first for
a bunt single while beating the
Braves 8-0.
"I wish he wouldn't do that,"
said Marlins first baseman
Carlos Delgado. "But you have
to appreciate everything he
brings to the table."


AL: Rays end 10-game losing streak

Associated Press shoved the cameramen on the Orioles beat the Boston Red Sox
field. 9-1 Saturday.
ST. PETERSBURG Jonny Athletics 10, White Sox Miguel Tejada went 5-for-5 and
Gomes stopped Tampa Bay's Athletics 10, White Sox I Bruce Chen (7-5) allowed one run
10-game losing streak by hitting CHICAGO Barry Zito pitched and five hits in seven-plus innings
two-run, ninth-inning homer two-hit ball for seven innings and for the Orioles, who won for just
)ff Detroit's Troy Percival (1-3). Mark Kotsay hit a three-run homer the fourth time in 16 games. Chen
The Devil Rays were two for Oakland. struck out five and walked three in
)uts away from owning the After signing a three-year con- earning his second victory in nine
ongest skid in the majors this tract extension with the Athletics starts since May 18.


season wnen Travis ee sin-
gled. Gomes smashed the next
pitch over the 404-foot sign in
straightaway center.
Ivan Rodriguez, Dmitri
Young and Chris Shelton hit
solo homers off Hideo Nomo
for the Tigers before Tampa
Bay began its comeback with
Jorge Cantu's RBI grounder in
the fourth and Carl Crawford's
two-run double off Jason
Johnson in the fifth.
Danys Baez (5-2) pitched the
ninth for the win.
Rangers 12, Blue Jays 10
ARLINGTON, Texas Kenny
Rogers got plenty of cheers from
Texas fans in his first home start
since shoving two TV cameramen,
and a lot of help from a blown call
in a victory over Toronto.


Associated Press
Hideo Nomo pitches against the
Tigers during the first inning.

Mark Teixeira hit two of Texas'
five home runs, all of them coming
with two outs, and drove in six
runs. The All-Star had an RBI sin-
gle to go with his homers that
pushed his AL-leading total to 24.
Rogers (10-4) overcame a shaky
first inning, working through the
seventh in his first home appear-
ance since June 29, when he


before the game, Kotsay hit a
three-run homer in the seventh.
Royals 12, Twins 8
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Mike
Sweeney had five hits and three
RBIs, and the Royals scored six
runs in the sixth inning for a wild
victory over Minnesota.
Sweeney's five hits Saturday
gave him eight straight hits, tying a
Royals record, before grounding
out in the eighth. He had hits in his
last three at-bats Friday. During the
run, Sweeney had three doubles
and five singles during.
Orioles 9, Red Sox 1
BALTIMORE Rafael Palmeiro
homered, drove in six runs and
moved within three hits of 3,000 for
his career, and the Baltimore


Indians 8, Yankees 7
NEW YORK Jose Hernandez
hit a pair of two-run homers off
new Yankees starter Darrell May
and drove in five runs, and
Cleveland snapped a four-game
losing streak.
Cleveland which had dropped 10
of 12 to the Yankees and 1.1 of 12
to them on the road, ended New
York's six-game winning streak.
Cleveland's Scott Elarton fol-
lowed his complete-game victory
on Monday over Detroit with a
seven-inning effort.
May (0-1) lasted only 4 1-3
innings in his Yankees debut that
came a day after he was brought
up from Triple-A Columbus and
one week following his acquisition
from San Diego.


NL: Phillies cool off surging Nationals


Associated Press


PHILADELPHIA David
Bell's sacrifice fly off Hector
Carrasco in the ninth inning
snapped a rare pitcher's duel
at Citizens Bank Park and lifted
the Philadelphia Phillies to a 1-
0 win over the Washington
Nationals on Saturday.
Bobby Abreu lined a single to
right off Carrasco (3-2) to lead
off the ninth. After Pat Burrell
struck out for the third time,
Chase Utley doubled to right
and Ryan Howard was inten-
tionally walked.
Bell hit a long fly to left and
Matt Cepicky never attempted
a throw.
Billy Wagner (2-1) earned the
win with a scoreless ninth and
the Phillies won their first 1-0
game in the second year of
their home park
Astros 4, Dodgers 2
HOUSTON Roy Oswalt won
his sixth straight start, Craig Biggio
got two hits to tie Barry Bonds for
49th on the all-time hit list and the
Astros moved back to .500 for the
first time since April 22.
Oswalt (12-7) is 9-1 with a 2.07
ERA in 10 starts at home this sea-


son. He went 6 1-3 innings and
allowed two runs on nine hits and a
walk, striking out seven.
Brad Lidge worked the ninth for
his 19th save.
Biggio's second hit of the game
gave him 2,730 for his career and
moved him into a tie with Barry
Bonds, who has been injured all
season. Biggio is in his 18th sea-
son, all with the Astros.
Houston, which was 15 games
under .500 on May 24, has won 14
of its last 16 at home.
The Dodgers have lost three
straight and six of eight.
Jeff Weaver (7-8) went six
innings and allowed three runs on
five hits and a walk.
Giants 2, Cardinals 0
SAN FRANCISCO Brad
Hennessey pitched seven shutout
innings in a spot start and Michael
Tucker hit a fifth-inning single to
break a scoreless tie for the Giants.
Hennessey (3-2), recalled late
Friday to start in place of struggling
lefty Kirk Rueter, made his sixth
start of the season and 13th of his
career. He allowed three hits, struck
out two and walked one.
Tyler Walker completed the
three-hitter, pitching the ninth for his


13th save and 12th since taking
over the closer job May 12.
Cubs 8, Marlins 2
MIAMI Derrek Lee hit his 26th
homer in his return to the lineup,'
Kerry Wood won for the first time in
22 months and Chicago won its
second straight following an eight-
game losing streak.
Lee, second in the majors to
Atlanta's Andruw Jones in homers,
returned after missing three games
because of irritation in his left shoul-
der. His solo shot off rookie Scott
Olsen in the fourth gave him 68
RBIs.
Pirates 11, Mets 4
PITTSBURGH Jack Wilson
singled in the go-ahead run in the
sixth inning, then hit his first career
grand slam in a seven-run seventh
to lead the Pirates to their first
series victory in a month.
The Pirates won their third in a
row after going nearly a month
without consecutive victories. By
taking the first two games of the
three-game series, Pittsburgh is
assured of its first series win since
taking two of three from Tampa Bay
from June 10-12.
Pirates starter Dave Williams (7-


6) bounced back from his worst
start this season, shaking off Mike
Cameron's two-run homer and Cliff
Floyd's solo drive in a span of three
batters in the fifth and sixth innings.
Brewers 9, Braves 6
ATLANTA-- Ben Sheets pitched
seven strong innings and Brady
Clark drove in three runs as
Milwaukee snapped the Braves'
season-high six-game winning
streak.
Sheets (5-6), who struck out a
franchise-record 18 Braves last sea-
son in a 4-1 win, had only four strike-
outs, but was nearly as effective.
Rockies 1, Padres 0
DENVER Jason Jennings
scattered seven hits in seven
innings, All-Star Brian Fuentes
escaped a bases-loaded jam in the
ninth and Colorado beat San Diego
in the lowest-scoring game in
Coors Field history.
Jennings (5-8) walked four,
struck out one and benefited from
three double plays. Jay Witasick
worked the eighth before Fuentes
pitched around trouble for his 12th
save in 14 chances, finishing the
28th shutout at Coors Field 16th
combined.


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay

Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Texas
Oakland
Seattle


Washington
Atlanta
Florida
Philadelphia
New York

St. Louis
Houston
Chicago
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


San Diego 47 41 .53
Arizona 42 46 .47
Los Angeles 40 47 .46
San Francisco 37 49 .43
Colorado 31 55 .36
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 5, Cleveland 4
Detroit 7, Tampa Bay 3
Boston 7, Baltimore 2
Texas 7, Toronto 6
Oakland 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Minnesota 5, Kansas City 4 '
Seattle 10, L.A. Angels 4
Saturday's Games
Baltimore 9, Boston 1
Cleveland 8, N.Y. Yankees 7
Tampa Bay 5, Detroit 4
Oakland 10, Chicago White Sox 1
Kansas City 12, Minnesota 8
Texas 12, Toronto 10
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cleveland (Westbrook 6-10) at N.Y.
Yankees (R.Johnson 8-6), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 8-6) at Baltimore
(Lopez 7-5), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Towers 6-7) at Texas (C.Young 8-
5), 2:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Silva 7-3) at Kansas City
(Carrasco 4-3), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Maroth 6-9) at Tampa Bay
(Hendrickson 3-5), 2:15.p.m.
Oakland (Haren 7-7) at Chicago White
Sox (Garcia 8-3), 3:05 p.m.
Seattle (Meche 8-6) at L.A. Angels
(E.Santana 3-3), 4:05 p.m.





Devil Rays 5, Tigers 4
DETROIT TAMPA BAY
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Inge 3b 4 02 0 Crwfrd If 4 0 1 2
CGiljen ss 5 01 0 Lugo ss 4 1 2 0
Shltn lb 5 11 1 Huffdh 4 0 0 0
RoWhte If 4 130 Cantu 3b 4 0 0 1
Hooper If 1 00 0 TLee lb 4 1 2 0
Monroe rf 5010 Gomes rf 4 1 12
IRdrgz c 3 112 NGreen 2b 3 01 0
DYong dh 4 12 1 THall c 3 1 1 0
Infante 2b 3 02 0 Gthrghtcf 3 1 2 0
Logan cf 2 00 0
Totals 364134 Totals 33 510 5
Detroit 001 210 000- 4
Tampa Bay 000 120 002- 5
One out when winning run scored.
E-Cantu (11). DP-Detroit 1, Tampa
Bay 1. LOB-Detroit 10, Tampa Bay 3.
2B-RoWhite 2 (16), Infante (18),
Crawford (14), TLee (12). HR-Shelton
(7), IRodriguez (6), DYoung (14), Gomes
(7). SB-Gathright (4). CS-Lugo (5). S-
Logan 2. SF-IRodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
JJohnson 7 8 3 3 0 2
Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 0
Percival L,1-3 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Tampa Bay
Nomo 51-3 11 4 4 1 4
Harper 22-3 2 0 0 1 2
DBaezW,5-2 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP-JJohnson 2.
Umpires-Home, Adam Dowdy; First,
Tim Timmons; Second, Mike Everitt; Third,
Tim McClelland.
T-2:28. A-9,320 (41,315).
Indians 8, Yankees 7
CLEVELAND NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Szmore cf 5000 Jeter ss 5 01 0
Crisp If 5 23 0 Cano 2b 5 1 2 1
Hafnerdh 4122 Shffielddh 2 2 1 1
Blake rf 4 22 0 ARod 3b 5 1 1 1
JHrndz lb 5235 Matsui If 4 1 1 3
JhPltass 4 11 1 JaGbilb 4 0 1 0
Boone3b 400.OTMrtnzlb 0 000.
Bard c 4 01 0 Posada c 4 0 0 0
BPhillips 2b 4 00 0 Sierra rf 4 2 3 1
MeCbr cf 2 0 0 0
BWIIms cf 2 0 1 0
Wmack pr 0 0 0 0
Totals 39812 8 Totals 37 711 7
Cleveland 032 020 001- 8
New York 200 010 031- 7
DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Cleveland 6,
New York 6. 2B-Crisp (20), THafner 2
(22), Blake (13), Sierra 2 (10). HR-
JHernandez 2 (5), JhPeralta (11), Sheffield
(16), ARodriguez (23), Matsui (14), Sierra
(3). SB-Crisp (111.
Ie P H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Elarton W,6-3 7 6 3 3 1 3
Howry. 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
Rhodes 2-3 1 1 1 0 1
Wickman S,23 1 3 1 1 1 0
New York
MayL,0-1 41-3 8 7 7 0 3
Proctor 22-3 2 0 0 1 2
Sturtze 2 2 1 1 0 1
HBP-by Proctor (Blake).
Giants 2, Cardinals 0


ST. LOUIS


SAN FRAN


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Eckstin ss 4 01 0 Ellison cf 4 0 0 0
Tguchi If 4 00 0 Vizquel ss 3 0 0 0
Pujols ib 301 0 Snow ib 3 0 0 0
Edmndcf 2 00 0 Alou If 3 1 20
Rolen 3b 3 00 0 Drham 2b 3 1 2 0
Mabry rf 3 00 0 Tucker rf 3 0 1 1
Grdzln 2b 3 01 0 Feliz3b 3 0 1 0
Mhony c 2 000 Trralba c 2 000
Nunez ph 1 00 0 Hnesy p 2 0 0 0
EDiaz c 0 00 0 Hwkins p 0 0 0 0
Morris p 2000 0Niekro ph 1 000
RSndrsph 1 00 TyWIkrp 0 0 0 0
Totals 280 3 0 Totals 27 2 6 1
St. Louis 000 000 000- 0


14 4-6
'7 5 3-7
i0 6% z-4-6
10 9 z-5-5
60 15 z-5-5


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
49 37 .570 z-5-5
46 40 .535 3 z-4-6
45 40 .529 3% z-7-3
44 43 .506 5% z-6-4
28 60 .318 22 1-9
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
57 28 .671 z-6-4
47 38 .553 10 5-5
47 40 .540 11 z-5-5
41 44 .482 16 z-5-5
30 56 .34927% z-5-5
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
52 34 .605 5-5
45 40 .529 6% z-7-3
43 43 .500 9 z-7-3
37 48 .43514% 4-6
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
52 35 .598 z-6-4
50 38 .568 2% 7-3
44 41 .518 7 z-5-5
44 44 .500 8% 4-6
43 44 .494 9 z-5-5
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
55 32 .632 6-4
43 43 .500 11% z-8-2
42 44 .48812% 2-8
41 46 .471 14 z-6-4
39 47 .45315% 5-5
34 52 .39520% 4-6
West Division
W L Pct GB L10


Home
24-14
26-20
28-19
22-17
20-25

Home
30-14
26-18
21-19
19-22
19-26

Home
26-17
26-18
27-16
20-22

Home
30-13
29-13
25-21
25-19
25-18

Home
27-16
29-14
21-21
23-16
21-21
24-22

Home
27-16
21-24
22-20
20-25
24-22


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 6, N.Y. Mets 5, 10 innings
Washington 8, Philadelphia'7'
Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1
Chicago Cubs 9, Florida 6
Houston 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
San Diego 12, Colorado 2
Cincinnati 4, Arizona 3
St. Louis 3, San Francisco 1
Saturday's Games
Houston 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Philadelphia 1, Washington 0
San Francisco 2, St. Louis 0
Chicago Cubs 8, Florida 2
Pittsburgh 11, N.Y. Mets 4
Milwaukee 9, Atlanta 6
Colorado 1, San Diego 0
Cincinnati at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee (Capuano 9-6) at Atlanta
(Colon 1-4), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Maddux 7-6) at Florida
(Leiter 3-6), 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (P.Martinez 9-3) at Pittsburgh
(K.Wells 6-8), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Loaiza 5-5) at Philadelphia
(Lieber 8-8), 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Od.Perez 4-5) at Houston
(Backe 7-6), 2:05 p.m.
San Diego (P.Astacio 0-0) at Colorado
(Francis 8-5), 3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Milton 4-9) at Arizona (Gosling
0-2), 4:40 p.m.
St. Louis (Suppan 8-7) at San Francisco
(Lowry 5-8), 8:05 p.m.

San Francisco 000 020 OOx- 2
DP-St. Louis 2, San Francisco 2.
LOB-St. Louis 2, San Francisco 2. 2B-
Feliz (16). S-Torrealba.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
MorrisL,10-2 8 6 2 2 0 3
San Francisco
HennesseyW,3-27 3 0 0 1 2
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 0
TyWalkerS,13 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Gary Darling; First,
Rob Drake; Second, Mark Wegner; Third,
Tom Hallion.
T-1:59. A-42,423 (41,584).
Cubs 8, Marlins 2
CHICAGO FLORIDA
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Hrst Jr cf 5 13 1 Pierre cf
TWalkr 2b 4 2 33 LCstillo 2b
DeLee lb 421 1 CDIgdo lb
ARmrz 3b 3 00 0 MiCbraIlf
Macias 3b 2 11 1 L Duca c
Barrett c 2 01 2 Conine rf
Burnitz rf 5 00 0 Lowell 3b
NPerezss 4 11 0 AGnzlz ss
Murton If 2 00 0 Olsen p
HIndsw If 2 00 0 Mota p
Wood p 3000 LHarrs ph
Ohman p 0 00 0 VaSnts p
Grnbrg ph 0 00 0 Mecir p
Zmbrno pr 0 10 0
Novoa p 0 00 0


3 02 1
4000
4000
4 01 0
4000

3000
3 1 1 0
1 000
0000
1 000
01 000

0000


Totals 36810 8 Totals 31 2 6 2
Chicago 000 100 304- 8
Florida 000 020 000- 2
E-CDelgado (7), Olsen (1). LOB-
Chicago 7, Florida 4. 2B-Hairston Jr.
(14), TWalker (13), Macias (6), NPerez
(12). 3B-Pierre (8). HR-TWalker (3),
DeLee (26), Conine (2). CS-Barrett (1).
S-Olsen.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
WoodW,2-2 72-3 6 2 2 1 4
Ohman 1-3 00 0 0 0
Novoa 1 0 0 0 0 1
Florida
Olsen 6 4 1 1 3 4
Mota L,1-2 2 3 3 3 1 2
De Los Santos 2-3 1 3 3 1 1
Mecir 1-3 2 1 1 0 1
HBP-by De Los Santos (Greenberg).
WP-Olsen.
Umpires-Home, Tony Randazzo; First,
Ed Montague; Third, Jerry Layne.
T-2:44. A-22,863 (36,331).
Athletics 10, White Sox 1
OAKLAND CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Kendall c 5 13 1 Pdsdnk If 3 1 1 0
Kotsay cf 5 123 Iguchi 2b 2 0 1 0
Crosby ss 4 11 0 Thmas dh 3 0 0 1
EChavz 3b 5 11 2 Knerko lb 4 00 0
Kielty rf 4220 Rwand cf 4 0 0 0
Byrneslf 5 22 1 Dyerf 3 000
Swisher lb 3 20 0 TPerez ph 1 0 1 0
KGintr dh 3 00 1 Widger c 3 0 0 0
Httberg dh 0 001 Ozuna3b 3 0 0 0
MEIlis 2b 4001 Uribe ss 3 000
WHarrs ss 0 0 0 0
Totals 38101110 Totals 29 1 3 1
Oakland 020 000 332- 10
Chicago 000 001 000- 1
E--Ozuna 2 (6). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-
Oakland 6, Chicago 6. 2B-Kendall (14),
Kielty (16), Byrnes (15), Iguchi (15),
TPerez (2). HR-Kotsay (7), EChavez
(12). SB-Byrnes (2), Podsednik (44),
Iguchi (10). S-Crosby. SF-Thomas.
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Zito W,6-8
Calero
Yabu
Chicago


B
Je
T
K


2 1 1
0 0 0
1 0 0


.uehrle L,10-3 7 6 5 2 2 3
enks 1-3 2 3 3 2 C
akatsu 2-3 2 1 1' 0 C
(Walker 1 1 1 1 0 1
Takatsu pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-Zito, Buehrle, Jenks.


I, _-- . ... ........ .... j..........,, J


Away Intr
25-23 12-6
20-20 8-10
17-21 11-7
22-26 8-10
8-35 3-15

Away Intr
27-14 12-6
21-20 8-10
26-21 15-3
22-22 9-9
11-30 9-9

Away Intr
26-17 12-6
19-22 9-9
16-27 10-8
17-26 10-8

Away Intr
22-22 12-6
21-25 7-8
19-20 10-5
19-25 7-8
18-26 5-10

Away Intr
28-16 10-5
14-29 7-8
21-23 6-9
18-30 8-7
18-26 5-7
10-30 7-8

Away Intr
20-25 7-11
21-22.8-10
18-27 5-13
17-24 6-12
7-33 6-9


2B SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


SPORTS







SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 3B


SPORTS


RTIC us OUNTY ( ) HR C


AUTO RACING
Busch Seies
USG Durock 300
At Chicagoland Speedway
Jollet, III.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Starting position in parentheses)
1. (5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200,
$76,151.
2. (6) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200, $61,400.
3. (1) Ryan Newman, Dodge, 200,
S$47,875.
4. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, $40,083.
5. (10) Mark Martin, Ford, 200, $31,075.
6. (24) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200,
$46,245.
7. (16) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 200,
S$42,125.
8. (28) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 200,
$25,725.
9. (31) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200,
S$31,860.
10. (19) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 200,
S. $39,050.
11. (23) Ashton Lewis Jr., Ford, 200,
*' $34,200.
12. (2) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 200,
'$24,250.
13. (17) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 200,
$22,533.
14. (11) Michael Waltrip, Chevrolet, 200,
S$21,690.
15. (18) Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet, 200,
S$32,105.
16. (14) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 200,
S.$21,045.
17. (8).Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200,
$20,755.
18. (4) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 200,
S'$30,050.
19. (22) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 199,
$23,790.
20. (12) David Stremme, Dodge, 199,
$25,730.
21. (37) Casey Atwood, Dodge, 199,
$20,370.
22. (32) Jason Keller, Ford, 199,
,$25,060.
23. (36) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 199,
$22,083., ,
24. (30) Brent Sherman, Ford, 199,
$19,640.
25. (13) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 199,
$19,605.
26. (41) Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet, 199,
$23,415.
27. (33) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 199,
$23,305.
28. (27) Stacy Compton, Ford, 199,
$23,190.
29. (21) Kenny Wallace, Ford, 198,
$23,060.
30. (35) David Green, Ford, 198,
$23,400.
31. (42) Randy LaJoie, Chevrolet, 198,
$22,815.
S, 32. (39) Timmy Fedewa, Dodge, 198,
$22,705.
33. (7) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 198, $18,575.
34. (34) Jerry Robertson, Chevrolet, 198,
$18,470.
35. (38) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 197,
S: '$18,360.
36. (3) Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 197,
$19,250.
"' 37. (15) Jon Wood, Ford, 195, $22,160.
S 38. (20) Jeff Green, Dodge, 172, engine
:- failure, $23,580.
39. (26) Jeremy Mayfield, Dodge, 151,
accident, $17,955.
40. (29) Regan Smith, Dodge, 83, trans-
mission, $17,835.
41. (40) Justin Labonte, Chevrolet, 80,
accident, $27,230.
42. (25) Aaron Fike, Dodge, 75, accident,
S. $19,590.
43. (43) Steve Grissom, Ford, 28, acci-
dent, $19,502.
-?,. Winner's Average Speed: 130.340
mph.
STime of Race: 2 hours,.18 minutes,,6,
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 6.715 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 32 laps.
Lead Changes: 15 among 11 drivers.
Lap Leaders: R.Newman 0; K.Busch 1;
R.Newman 2-32; S.Compton 33; E.Sadler
34-36; R.Newman 37-59; J.Johnson 60-
70; R.Newman 71-130; J.Yeley 131;
M.Martin 132-138; R.Sorenson 139-146;
J.Nemechek 147-151; R.Newman 152-
155; M.Truex Jr. 156-158; R.Sorenson
.159-180; K.Harvick 181-200.
Top 10 in Points
1. M.Truex Jr. 2,661. 2. C.Bowyer 2,589.
3. R.Sorenson 2,555. 4. C.Edwards 2,456.
5. K.Wallace 2,369. 6. D.Hamlin 2,276. 7.
A.Lewis Jr. 2,198. 8. D.Stremme 2,176. 9.
- ( G.Biffle 2,104. 10. J.Keller 2,086.

CYCLING

, c Tour de France
3 At Gerardmer, France
, % Eighth Stage
S- 143.8 miles from Pforzheim, Germany
to Gerardmer, France
1. Pieter Weening, Netherlands,
7 Rabobank, 5 hours, 3 minutes, 54 sec-
onds.
S 2. Andreas Kloden, Germany, T-Mobile,
--E'() same time.
1 3. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Illes
= Balears, 27 seconds behind.
S 4. Kim Kirchen, Luxembourg, Fassa
S' Bortolo, same time.
S 5. Jens Voigt, Germany, CSC, same
S" time.
6. Jan Ullrich, Germany, T-Mobile, same
time.
S 7. Cadel Evans, Australia, Davitamon-
Lotto, same time.
8. Christophe Moreau, France, Credit
S* Agricole, same time.
9. Christopher Homer, United States,
Saunier Duval, same time.
10. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan,
- T-Mobile, same time.
11. Stefano Garzelli, Italy, Liquigas-
Bianchi, same time.
12. Franco Pellizotti, Italy, Liquigas-
Bianchi, same time:
13. Oscar Pereiro Sio, Spain, Phonak,
( same time.
14. Jorg Jaksche, Germany, Liberty
SSeguros, same time.
a I 15. Dario Frigo, Italy, Fassa Bortolo,
-. same time.
S e 16. Evgeni Petrov, Russia, Lampre,
S same time.
S 17. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
S Gerolsteiner, same time.
18. Michael Boogerd, Netherlands,
r. Rabobank, same time.


" 0C 19. Michael Rogers, Australia, Quick
Step, same time.
' 9 20. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Discovery Channel, same time.
--. Also
l--" 22. Bobby Julich, United States, CSC,
same time.
27. Floyd Landis, United States, Phonak,
same time.
41. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine,
Discovery Channel, 1:25 behind.
47. Jose Azevedo, Portugal, Discovery
Channel, same time.
48. George Hincapie, United States,
Discovery Channel, same time.
68. Paolo Savoldelli, Italy, Discovery
Channel, 2:57.
S74. Pavel Padrnos, Czech Republic,
S Discovery Channel, same time.
75. Manuel Beltran, Spain, Discovery
Channel, same time.
77. Jose Luis Rubiera, Spain, Discovery
Channel, same time.
81. Benjamin Noval Gonzalez, Spain,
-- Discovery Chanel, same time.
i_.. 106. Fred Rodriguez, United States,


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Champ Car World Series Racing
Molson Indy Toronto. From Exhibition Place in Toronto. (Live) (CC)
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Auto Racing Lucas Oil Dirt Track Series -
Memorial Race. From Florence, Ky. (Taped)
3 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Countdown to Green (Live) (CC)
3:30 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) NASCAR Racing Nextel Cup Series
- USG Sheetrock 400. From Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, III.
(Live) (CC)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Florida Marlins.
From Dolphins Stadium in Miami. (Live) ,
(WGN) MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Florida Marlins. From
Dolphins Stadium in Miami. (Live) (CC) '
2 p.m. (66 PAX) MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Tampa Bay Devil
Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg (Live)
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Minor League Baseball Future Stars Game. From
Comerica Park in Detroit. (Live) (CC)
8 p.m. (ESPN) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at San
Francisco Giants. From SBC Park in San Francisco. (Live) (CC)
BICYCLING
6:30 a.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 9. Stage
9, from G"'erardmer to Mulhouse, France. (Live)
3 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Cycling Tour de France Stage 9.
Stage 9, from G'"erardmer to Mulhouse, France. (Taped) (CC)
8 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 9. Stage 9,.
from G"'erardmer to Mulhouse, France. (Same-day Tape)
BILLIARDS
3 p.m. (ESPN) Billiards 2005 WPBA West Coast Classic -
Semifinal. From Camp Pendleton, Calif. (Taped)
4 p.m. (ESPN) Billiards 2005 WPBA West Coast Classic -
Semifinal. From Camp Pendleton, Calif. (Taped)
5 p.m. (ESPN) Billiards 2005 WPBA West Coast Classic Final.
From Camp Pendleton, Calif. (Taped)
BOXING
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Boxing Sunday Night Fights. Robert Guerrero
battles Cesar Figueroa in a featherweight bout from Dec. 9, 2004.
(Taped)
EXTREME
1 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Action Sports From Denver. (Live) (CC)
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Golf Barclay's Scottish Open -
Final Round. From Glasgow, Scotland. (Live)
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Golf Nationwide Tour National Mining
Association Pete Dye Classic Final Round. From Bridgeport,
W.Va. (Live)
2 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) PGA Golf John Deere Classic
- Final Round. From the Tournament Players Club at Deere Run in
Silvis, II. (Live) (CC)
(ESPN2) LPGA Golf Jamie Farr Owens Corning Classic Final
Round. From Sylvania, Ohio. (Live) (CC)
4 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) PGA Golf Champions Tour Ford
Players Championship Final Round. From the Tournament
Players Club in Dearborn, Mich. (Live) (CC)
SOCCER
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's Soccer United States vs. Team TBA.
(Live) (CC)


Davitamon-Lotto, 7:50.
136. Guido Trenti, United States, Quick
Step, 17:41.
180. David Zabriskie, United States,
'CSC, 51:12.'
Overall Standings
(After eight stages)
1. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Discovery Channel, 28 hours, 6 minutes,
17 seconds.
2. Jens Voigt, Germany, CSC, 1 minute
behind.
3. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, T-
Mobile, 1:02.
4. Bobby Julich, United States, CSC,
1:07.
5. Ivan Basso, Italy, CSC, 1:26.
6. Jan Ullrich, Germany, T-Mobile, 1:36.
7. Carlos Sastre, Spain, CSC, 1:36.
8. George Hincapie, United States,
Discovery Channel, 1:47.
9. Andreas Kloden, Germany, T-Mobile,
1:50.
10. Floyd Landis, United States, Phonak,
1:50.
11. Vladimir Karpets, Russia, Illes
Balears, 2:13.
12. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine,
Discovery Channel, 2:14.
13. Santiago Botero, Colombia, Phonak,
2:18.
14. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
Gerolsteiner, 2:31.
15. Jose Azevedo, Portugal, Discovery
Channel, .2:35.


BASEBALL


Pirates 11, Mets 4
NEW YORK PITTSBURGH
ab rh bi ab


Reyes ss
Cmeron rf
Beltran cf
Floyd If
Piazza c
Wright 3b
Wdwrd lb
HBell p
Graves p
Ring p
Offrmn ph
Koo p
Cairo 2b
Ishii p
MrAnd 1b


5 11 0 Snchez 3b
5 11 2 Doumit rf
4 11 0 Mckwk cf
4 13 1 Bay cf
3 01 0 CWilsn lb
4 00 0 Castillo 2b
3 01 0 Cota c
0.00 0 Rstvich If
0 00 0 JWilsn ss
0 00 0 DWIms p
1 01 1 Hillph
0 00 0 Snell p
4 00 0 Lawton ph
2 00 0 STorres p
1 00 0


r h bi


1 3 1
0 0 1
1 1 0
000
1 1 0
1 1 2
332
200
235
000
000
000
000
000


Totals 364 94 Totals 34111211
New York 000 021 010- 4
Pittsburgh 002 101 70x- 11
LOB-New York 7, Pittsburgh 6. 2B-
Sanchez (11), Cota (10). HR-Cameron
(9), Floyd (22), Cota (6), JWilson (5). S-
DWilliams. SF-Doumit,
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Ishii L,2-8 52-3 6 4 4 3 5
HBell 2-3 34 4 1 0
Graves 0 2 3 3 1 0
Ring 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Koo 1 0 0 0 0 3
Pittsburgh
DWilliams W,7-6 6 6 3 3 1 5
Snell 1 0 0 0 1 0
STorres 2 3 1 '1 0 2
Graves pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First,
Larry Young; Second, Eric Cooper; Third,
Fieldin Culbreth.
T-2:48. A-36,708 (38,496).
Brewers 9, Braves 6


MILWAUKE

BClark cf
Weeks 2b
Ovrbay lb
CaLee If
Jenkins rf
BHall ss
Brnyan 3b
Hardy ss
Moeller c
BShets p


EE


ATLANTA


ab rhbi
4 12 3 Furcal ss
5 11 0 Jhnson If
5 02 1 MGiles 2b
4 22 1 AJones cf
4 11 0 LaRche lb
3 22 2 JEstda c
2 11 0 McCnn c
1 00 0 Lngrhn rf
3 11 2 Brnero p
2 00 0 AMrte ph


ab rh bi
5 1 1 1

4 1 20
5 001
4 021
2 000
0 1 00
3000
0000
1 000


Wise p 0 00 0 Btemit 3b 4 1 3 0
Turnbw p 0 00 0 Davies p 0 0 0 0
Orr ph 1 0 0 0
Grybskp 0 000
Frrcur'rf' 2 1 2 0-
Totals 33912 9 Totals 36 611 6
Milwaukee 120 012 201- 9
Atlanta 200 000 004- 6
E-Jenkins (4). DP-Milwaukee 1,
Atlanta 1. LOB-Milwaukee 8, Atlanta 7.
2B-BClark (19), Overbay (15), Jenkins
(20), LaRoche (17). HR-Johnson (6). S-
BSheets 2, Davies. SF-BClark, BHall,


Moeller.

Milwaukee
BSheets W,5-6
Wise
Turnbow
Atlanta


IP H RERBBSO

7 8 2 2 1 4
12-3 3 4 4 1 2
1-3 0 0 0 1 0


Davies L,4-3 5 5 4 4 4 2
Gryboski 1 2 2 2 1 0
Bemero 3 5 3 3 0 2
HBP-by Bernero (Jenkins).
Umpires-Home, Brian O'Nora; First, Bill
Welke; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Gary
Cederstrom.
T-3:19. A-40,514 (50,091).
Rockides 1, Padres 0
SAN DIEGO COLORADO
ab rhbi ab r hbi
DRbtts cf 3 01 0 Miles 2b 4 1 1 0
Nadyph 1 000 LuGnzlss 4 021
EYong 2b 4000 Helton lb 2 0 1 0
BGiles rf 3 00 0 PrWIsn cf 3 0 0 0
Klesko If 3 02 0 Atkins 3b 3 0 0 0
MaSwylb 4010 Hawperf 2 010
RaHrdzc 4010 Piedra rf 1 000
Brrghs3b 3000 Wtsick p 0 0 000
Jkson ph 0 000 Fentes p 0 0 0 0
KGreen ss 3 01 0 Mohr If 3 0 0 0
Lwrnce p 3 01 0 Closser c 3 0 1 0
Otsuka p 0 00 0 Ardon c 0 0 0 0
Blum ph 1 00 0 JJnngs p 2 0 1 0
Sllivan rf 0 000
Totals 320 7 0 Totals 27 1 7 1
San Diego 000 000 000- 0
Colorado 000 001 00x- 1
E-LuGonzalez (2). DP-San Diego 3,
Colorado 3. LOB-San Diego 12,
Colorado
4. 2B-LuGonzalez (12), Helton (24),
JJennings (1). SB-BGiles (7). S-


Sullivan.
IP
San Diego
Lawrence L,5-8 7
Otsuka
Colorado
JJennings W,5-8 7
Witasick 1
Fuentes S,12 1


H RERBBSO

1-3 7 .1 1 1 1
2-3 00 0 0 0


7 0 0 4 1

0 0 0 2 3


Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First,
James Hoye; Second, Mike Reilly; Third,
Bob Davidson.
T-2:34. A-30,228 (50,449).
Royals 12, Twins 8
MINNESOTA KANSAS CITY
ab rhbi ab r hbi
ShStwrt If 4 110 DJesus cf 5 2 3 3
Punto3b 3 100 Long If 5 22 1
LFord rf 4 02 0 MiSwy dh 6 1 5 3
THnter cf 4 11 0 Stairs lb 3 0 1 0
LeCroy dh 3 222 Grffnno lb 1 0 0 0
MRyanph 1 000 Brownrf 5 120
Mrneaulb 400 0Teahen3b 5 1 3 1
Rdmnd c 4 12 0 Berroa ss 5 1 2 1
Rivas 2b 4 23 3 Gotay 2b 4 2 2 0
JCastro ss 3 01 2 Buck c 3 2 1 1
Totals 34812 7 Totals 421221 10
Minnesota 310 200 020- 8
Kansas City 040 006 02x- 12
E-LFord (2), JCastro (6). DP-
Minnesota 2, Kansas City 2. LOB-
Minnesota 6, Kansas City 12. 2B-LFord
(19), Rivas 2 (2), MiSweeney 2 (23),
Teahen 2 (13), Berroa (13), Gotay (12),
Buck (10). 3B-Rivas (1). HR-LeCroy (9),
DeJesus (5). CS-THunter (7), Brown (1).
SF-JCastro.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Mays 2 9 4 4 0 1


Mulholland 3 3 2 1 1 1
Crain L,8-1 0 3 4 4 1 0
Romero 2-3 2 0 02 0
Guerrier 21-3 4 2 2 2 2
Kansas City
Howell 12-3 4 4 4 3 0
Jensen 3 4 2 2 0 2
NunezW,2-1 11-3 1 0 0 0 0
Gobble 12-3 2 2 2 1 1
Sisco 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MacDougal 1 1 0 0 1 2
Mays pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd,
Mulholland pitched to 2 batters in the 6th,
Crain pitched to 4 batters in the 6th, Nunez
pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Howell (LFord). WP-Howell
2.
Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First,
Lance Barksdale; Second, Chris
Guccione; Third, Larry Poncino.
T-3:32. A-26,023 (40,785).
MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-BRoberts, Baltimore, .350;
Damon, Boston, .344; VGuerrero, Los
Angeles, .341; MYoung, Texas, .334;
Tejaaa, Baltimore, .330; ARodriguez, New
York, .320; Matsui, New York, .315;
THafner, Cleveland, .315; DOrtiz, Boston,
.315.
RUNS-Jeter, New York, 68; Damon,
Boston, 65; ARodriguez, New York, 64;
Teixeira, Texas, 63; MYoung, Texas, 63;
DOrtiz, Boston, 63; Figgins, LosAngeles,
59; ASoriano, Texas, 59; Erstad, Los
Angeles, 59.
RBI-MRamirez, Boston, 80; DOrtiz;
Boston, 75; ARodriguez, New York, 72;
Matsui, New York, 69; Teixeira, Texas, 65;
GAnderson, Los Angeles, 65; Sheffield,
New York, 65.
HITS-Damon, Boston, 118; MYoung,
Texas, 116; Tejada, Baltimore, 113;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 110; BRoberts, Baltimore,
108; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 106; Jeter,
New York, 104.
DOUBLES-Tejada, Baltimore, 29;
Matsui, New York, 24; ASoriano, Texas, 24;
DOrtiz, Boston, 24; Damon, Boston, 23;
IRodriguez, Detroit, 23.
TRIPLES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 9;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 8; Inge, Detroit, 7;
Sizemore, Cleveland, 6; DeJesus, Kansas
City, 6; Figgins, Los Angeles, 6.
HOME RUNS-ARodriguez, New York,
23; Teixeira, Texas, 22; MRamirez, Boston,
22; DOrtiz, Boston, 21; ASoriano, Texas,
20; Konerko, Chicago, 19; Tejada,
Baltimore, 19; Dye, Chicago, 19.
STOLEN BASES-Podsednik, Chicago,
44; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 27; Figgins, Los
Angeles, 25; Lugo, Tampa Bay, 24;
Womack, New York, 20; ISuzuki, Seattle,
19; THunter, Minnesota, 19.
PITCHING (8 Decisions)-Crain,
Minnesota, 8-0, 1.000, 1.59; Clement,
Boston, 10-2, .833, 3.85; OHernandez,
Chicago, 7-2, .778, 4.88; Buehrle,
Chicago,' 10-3, .769, 2.58; Garland,
Chicago, 13-4, .765, 3.37; Halladay,
Toronto, 12-4, .750, 2.41; Donnelly, Los
Angeles, 6-2, .750, 3.65.
STRIKEOUTS-JoSantana, Minnesota,
143; RaJohnson, New York, 109; Halladay,
Toronto, 108; Lackey, Los Angeles, 101;
Clement, Boston, 97; Bonderman, Detroit,
93; DCabrera, Baltimore, 89; Colon, Los
Angeles, 89.
SAVES-Nathan, Minnesota, 25;
Wickman, Cleveland, 23; Hermanson,
Chicago, 21; Guardado, Seattle, 20;
FCordero, Texas, 19; MRivera, New York,
19; BRyan, Baltimore, 18.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-DeLee, Chicago, .375;
Pujols, St. Louis, .338; MiCabrera, Florida,
.334; LCastillo, Florida, .328; NJohnson,
Washington, .320; Alou, San Francisco,
.320; BClark, Milwaukee, .312; Casey,
Cincinnati, .312.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Lois 70 DeLee.
Chicago,- 68; *BAbreu; Ph.iaaoeipa 62
MiCabrera, Florida, 59; Bay P.nsourgh
59; BClark, Milwaukee, 59; Dunn,
Cincinnati, 58.
RBI-CaLee, Milwaukee, 73; Pujols, St.
Louis, 69; DeLee, Chicago, 68; AJones,
Atlanta, 66; CDelgado, Florida, 64;
Ensberg, Houston, 63; Burrell,
Philadelphia, 63.
HITS-DeLee, Chicago, 117; Pujols, St.
Louis, 112; MiCabrera, Florida, 110;
BClark, Milwaukee, 110; Casey, Cincinnati,
100; Bay, Pittsburgh, 98; JGuillen,
Washington, 98; BAbreu, Philadelphia, 98.
DOUBLES-Wilkerson, Washington, 28;
BGiles, San Diego, 27; MGiles, Atlanta, 26;
DeLee, Chicago, 26; Bay, Pittsburgh, 25;
Lawton, Pittsburgh, 25; Biggio, Houston,
25.
TRIPLES-Reyes, New York, 9; Pierre,
Florida, 8; Furcal, Atlanta, 7; JWilson,
Pittsburgh, 5; Rollins, Philadelphia, 5;
DRoberts, San Diego, 5; BGiles, San
Diego, 5.
HOME RUNS-AJones, Atlanta, 27;
DeLee, Chicago, 26; Ensberg, Houston,
23; Dunn, Cincinnati, 22; Pujols, St. Louis,
22; CaLee, Milwaukee, 22; Floyd, New
York, 22.
STOLEN BASES-Furcal, Atlanta, 29;
Reyes, New York, 25; Pierre, Florida, 24;
Taveras, Houston, 22; Freel, Cincinnati,
21; BAbreu, Philadelphia, 21; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 20.
PITCHING (8 Decisions)-Morris, St.
Louis, 10-2, .833, 3.10; Eaton, San Diego,
9-2, .818, 3.42; LHernandez, Washington,
12-3, .800, 3.48; Willis, Florida, 13-4, .765,
2.39; Carpenter, St. Louis, 13-4, .765,
2.51; PMartinez, New York, 9-3, .750, 2.80;
Peavy, San Diego, 7-3, .700, 3.14;
Clemens, Houston, 7-3, .700, 1.48.
STRIKEOUTS-PMartinez,' New York,
129; Carpenter, St. Louis, 128; Peavy, San
Diego, 124; BMyers, Philadelphia, 113;
Clemens, Houston, 112; Burnett, Florida,
111; JVazquez, Arizona, 110.
SAVES-CCordero, Washington, 31;
Isrirtighausen, St. Louis, 24; Hoffman, San
Diego, 24; Mesa, Pittsburgh, 21; Looper,
New York, 20; BWagner, Philadelphia, 20;
Lidge, Houston, 19.

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Recalled INF
Brandon Phillips from Buffalo of the IL.
Optioned LHP Brian Tallet to Buffalo.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Placed 3B
Dallas McPherson on the 15-day DL.
Purchased the contract of INF Zach
Sorensen from Salt Lake of the PCL.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Agreed to
terms with OF Mark Kotsay on a three-year


contract extension through the 2008 sea-
son.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS-Agreed to terms
with RHP Brian Tollberg. Purchased the
contract of RHP Travis Driscoll from Round
Rock of the PCL.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Activated
INF-OF Craig Wilson from the 15-day DL.
Optioned C David Ross to Indianapolis of
the IL.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Activated LHP
Randy Flores from the 15-day DL.
Optioned LHP Carmen Cali to Memphis of
the PCL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS-Named
Lance Blanks and Chris Grant assistants
to the general manager.
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES-Agreed to
terms with F Hakim Warrick on a two-year
contract.


RACE
Continued from Page 1B

miles in a 24-hour span, with
distances varying and speed
work included.
Wachtel has run six
marathons already; Chicago
will be her seventh. "I'm trying
to break three hours," she said,
defining her immediate goal.



CITRUS
Continued from Page 1B

ed by Central Citrus catcher
Gary Levengood.
Swain came out of the
dugout to see if Miller had
tagged up on the play. While
the play was being discussed,
Miller swiped third. The
umpires ruled that Central
Citrus hadn't called time and
let Miller have the base.
Miller scored on the next at-
bat, coming home on a throw-
ing error.
Dunnellon threatened again
in the fifth as Victor Torres
landed on third with only one


TYLER

Continued from Page 1B

With him out of the lineup,
Crystal River just wasn't the
same team.
"All the kids look up to
him," said Strifler. "Tyler
and Donnie (DeWees),
they're our spark plugs."
Despite a 45-minute rain
delay before the game began,
there was still plenty of that
spark left to get Crystal
River started. The first three
batters reached base against
Inverness pitcher Patrick
Martin on a single and two
walks, loading the bases.
Martin struck out the next
two batters, but Jacob SanIow
doubled home two runs,
DeWees stole home and
Aaron Bertine doubled in
another run to make it 4-0. A
ground out brought in anoth-
er run and Crystal River was
up 5-0 before Inverness had
been to the plate.
"Since Tyler's been back
the kids have been hitting
the ball," noted Strifler.
Inverness, unbeaten in the
tournament to this point,
hardly surrendered without
a fight. A three-run home run
over the centerfield fence by:
Garrett Wilkinson trimmed
the Crystal River lead to 5-3


NICKLAUS
Continued from Page 1B

the ribs to remind him there was
still some golf left before he held
the claret jug
Nick Price remembers that
moment He was 21, playing in
his second British Open, and had
finished in a tie for 39th about
two hours earlier. Price stuck
around, wanting to watch
Nicklaus finish.
"When he walked off the 18th
green, there was a tear in his
eye," Price said. "I thought, 'Why
is he crying? Why is he so emo-
tional?' Only after a period of 15
years playing in the Open cham-
pionship do you realize how spe-
cial St Andrews is. I understand
very well now why he was so
emotional about it"
The most poignant moment
awaits.
Sometime next week possi-
bly on Friday, preferably on
Sunday Nicklaus will cross
the Swilcan Bridge down the
18th fairway at St Andrews and
wave goodbye to the greatest
championship career golf has
ever seen. He has said the 134th
British Open will be his final
appearance at a major
Nicklaus can think of no better
place to end his career
"The reception every time I've
ever played in Scotland the peo-
ple have always accepted me as I
went around," Nicklaus said.
"It's been fun, a great experience
for me every time I've gone
there. I thought that was my
place to want to finish up playing
golf."
Nicklaus calls himself a senti-
mental fool and expects emo-
tions he has never felt before. He
was in St Andrews two months
ago and walked onto the first tee
and over toward the 18th green,
breathing the wind off St
Andrews Bay and seeing the
hotels and shops lining the tiny
street next to the fairway.
Even then, his eyes welled up
with tears.
"It just sort of gets me every
time I go there," Nicklaus said.
'Just because what it has meant
to the game of golf, and what it
has meant to me."
Tiger Woods is pursuing
Nicklaus' benchmark of 18 pro-
fessional majors, and might one
day catch him. Still, it is difficult
to conceive of another player


What she ended up doing
was running away from every-
one. Following her and
Witherspoon was a group of
seven high school runners, led
by twin sisters Lauren and
Kristin Galbraith of Tampa
and Crystal River's Holly Van
Sicklen.
And they all managed to out-
run the storm, which hit just a
few minutes after the race's
completion.

out. Rodriguez quelled any talk
of a rally by ending the inning
with a pair of strikeouts.
"I just feel like I let them
down," an emotional
DeGeorge said of his players.
"They're all like sons to me. I'm
just proud of my kids."
With the district title in
hand, Central Citrus will now
play in the sectional tourna-
ment later this month. Swain
didn't mince words about how
far he thinks his team can go.
"We're looking forward to
playing in state," he said. "I'll
say that again. We look forward
to playing in state. We'd love to
play on television."
Sectionals will be held at
Bicentennial Park


at the end of the first inning.
Martin, who walked three
times in the game, scored on
a base hit by Cameron Copas
in the third and Inverness
was within a run, down just
5-4.
But Crystal River had an
answer, scoring single runs
in the top of the fourth and
fifth before putting the game
away with three runs in the
sixth. A two-out double by
Jay Curry put runners at sec-
ond and third for DeWees,
and he sent a rocket over the
right-center fence to make it
- 10-4. -
"That's his third-straight
game with a home run," said
Strifler.
In this game, he had plenty
of assistance in the offensive
department. Curry and
Bertine each had a double
and a single, and Sanow had
two hits as well. That was all
the support needed by
Humphreys, who settled
down after Wilkinson's first-
inning homer and got the
win. Only Copas nicked him
for two hits.
With each team claiming a
lopsided victory over the
other in the tournament, it
would seem Monday's show-
down is a toss-up. Strifler,
however,,was confident.
"As long as we hit the ball,
we'll be OK," he said.


dominating the four Grand Slam
events the way Nicklaus did.
Only four other men have won
all four professional majors -
the Masters, U.S. Open, British
Open and PGA Championship.
Nicklaus is the only one to have
captured them all at least three
times.
"He always showed up with
the intent of winning," Woods
said.
This will be his 164th start in a
major, including 146 in a row
from the 1962 Masters through
the 1998 U.S. Open. And while
his 18 majors define his career,
even more staggering is that
Nicklaus was a runner-up 19
times.
"He made it special, the way
he played the game," Scott Hoch
said. "If he can't compete, then
it's not worth playing for him.
Jack is all about competition,
and that's the way a warrior
should be."
Nicklaus is eligible to play the
Masters as long as he likes,
although he said in April he
would no longer compete at
Augusta National. Those close to
Nicklaus do not expect him to
change his mind next year
As. a former British Open
champion, he is eligible to play
until he is 65. The Royal &
Ancient Golf Club recognized
this was his last year of eligibility,
so it changed the rotation to
make St Andrews the host
course in 2005, one year ahead of
schedule. But there are no trib-
utes planned to mark Nicklaus'
farewell.
'Jack is not one for that sort of
thing," R&A executive Peter
Dawson said earlier this year
"He'd rather be treated like a
competitor than a monument"
In some ways, it is fitting that
Nicklaus go out at the British
Open.
He has won the Masters (six
times), the U.S. Open (four times)
and the PGA Championship (five
times) as often as any other play-
er, while 10 players have won
more than his three British Open
titles.
Even so, his performance at
golf's oldest championship
reveals a record that is unrivaled.
"For some reason, I went to
the British Open and every year
I felt like I was going to win; or if
I didn't win, I was going to be
right there. And I was," Nicklaus
said. "I just like the way they
played the game."


I, -wri r FL Ci-rrn[ CLE


,.,. I


.1







CITRUS CouMYv (FL) CRONIC.LE '


Sexton diagnosed with Lyme disease
C" said the disease has infected "It may come down to flipping are attributed to growing popu-
\FSU l Wilf Sexton's organs and recom- a coin as to who starts the sea- lations of deer that support
mended intensive antibiotic son," Bowden said. deer ticks, more homes being
miC 2005 seasonP' f therapy over a period of Sexton, 20, was the projected built in wooded areas and bet-


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Wyatt
Sexton, the Florida State quar-
terback who was found
disheveled and disoriented on a
city street last month, has been
diagnosed with Lyme disease
and will miss the upcoming sea-
son, the university reported
Saturday
Florida State coach Bobby
Bowden said the university
would seek a sixth year of eligi-
bility for Sexton, who has
already used his redshirt sea-
son. He is the Seminoles' only
experienced quarterback.
"It looks like Wyatt will need
several months of treatment
and will have to miss the sea-
son," Bowden said in a state-
ment
A specialist in the field of
Lyme disease, Dr S. Chandra
Swami from Hermitage, Pa.,


months.
"Wyatt has active Lyme
Disease that has resulted in
neuropsychiatric and cardio-
vascular deficits," Dr. Swami
said.
The disease is curable, but the
estimated recovery time for his
advanced stage of infection is
several months. If untreated, the
disease can cause joint swelling
and brain inflammation.
"We expect him to fully recov-
er," Sexton's parents, Billy and
Joy, said in a statement in the
school's release. Billy Sexton is
the running backs coach for the
Seminoles.
The Seminoles will now
choose between a pair of red-
shirt freshmen, Drew
Weatherford and Xavier Lee, as
the starting quarterback for
their nationally televised sea-
son opener Sept. 5 against
Miami. The team begins its pre-
season practice Aug. 9. :


starter at quarterback. He
played in 10 games in 2004, com-
pleting 55.2 percent of his pass-
es for 1,661 yards and eight
touchdowns. He also had eight
interceptions.
On June 14, Sexton was
doused by pepper spray and
taken to a hospital after he was
found lying in the street and
identifying himself as God. His
parents released a statement a
two days later that said drug
abuse was not the problem.
Lyme disease bacteria are
transmitted to humans by ticks
that are carried by deer.
The disease is often identi-
fied by an expanding "bulls-eye"
rash that develops days to weeks
after a tick bite. Other symptoms
include tiredness, fever, muscle
aches and joint pain.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention in
Atlanta said there are an
increasing number of cases that


ter recognition and reporting of
the disease, named in 1977
when a cluster was identified in
Lyme, Conn.
In addition to Sexton, the
Seminoles could also be with-
out their two linebackers,
Ernie Sims and A.J. Nicholson,
for the Miami game because of
recent run-ins with the law.
Florida State was 9-3 in
2004, but failed to win the
Atlantic Coast Conference title
for just the second time in 13
seasons, and wound up ranked
15th its fourth straight year
outside the Top 10 in the final
Associated Press poll.
Wyatt Sexton drops back to
make a pass during second
quarter action against Virginia,
in this Oct. 16, 2004 file
photo. Sexton has been diag-
nosed with Lyme disease and
will miss the upcoming season,
the university said Saturday.
Associated Press


Prepping for rule

High School

players with

NBA's age limit


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Vernon
Macklin thought his toughest
decision as a high school senior
would be choosing whether to
play college basketball or jump
to the NBA At 6-foot-8, 215
pounds, Macklin has the ath-
leticism and potential that
make pro scouts drool.
But after the NBA adopted a
new eligibility rule last month,
just one question remained:
Which school would he pick?
"I probably would have
looked at the NBA," Macklin
said, "but now I've got to go to
college."
Macklin, of I.C. Norcom High
School in Portsmouth, Va., is
among the first class of prep
players to deal with the NBAs
new requirement waiting
one year after high school
before entering the draft
At the Nike All-America
Camp, where about 120 of the
nation's top high schoolers try
to impress college and pro
scouts annually, the change is
obvious.
Only a handful of NBA scouts
signed this year's check-in
board rather than the dozens
that had become routine over
the past decade. Players who
once were peppered with ques-
tions about being the next
Kevin Garnett or Kobe Bryant
now answered queries about
their college choices.
In hotel rooms, players said
the conversations included
some talk about the NBA but
focused primarily on different
schools around the country.
For Macklin, the change has
forced him to re-evaluate his
future.
"I don't have a list of schools
rightnow," he said. "I'm starting
over"
Reactions to the change
range from disappointment to
relief


Assoc
Jeffrey Jordon, Michael Jordon's son, is one of the you
ers who thinks prep stars should make their own choice
entering the NBA.


Some, like Jeffrey Jordan -
Michael Jordan's son think
players should still make their
own choices. Others, like
Jonnie West Jerry West's son
believe the NBA did the
right thing
Opinions hardly matter now,
though.
Macklin and Spencer Hawes,
a 6-11,215-pound big man from
Seattle, were considered two of
the top candidates to make the
jump as Hawes' high school
* teammate, Martell Webster, did
this year Portland took Webster
with the No. 6 pick in last
month's draft.
"You'd like to see them let
you make the decision for your-
self," Hawes said. "But even
though you want kids to make


the right decision, son
so the league had to int
What options remain
Tywon Lawson, who
at Oak Hill Academy in
and is considered by so
the nation's top pre
guard, said he has tall
at least four players
considering prep sc
including some wh
attend for academic re
Others suspect play
opt for junior college,
or the NBDL a cho
could continue to hid
weaknesses and create
terious aura heading. i
day
"I think a lot of kid
take the prep school
even some who didi


changes

v they were going to the pros.'"
Hawes said. "That way you
don't get exposed and it will ,.
Smake you (look) that much bet- i;
ter.
College coaches also have
another predicament
National Association of'
4*1 B Basketball Coaches executive"
director Jim Haney said he
proposed a three-year commit-
ment, following the NFL
model which was upheld in
the Maurice Clarett case.
Baseball, too, requires players
S to wait three years after high
school to re-enter the draft if
they choose to enroll in col-
lege.
le When the coaches realized
their initial proposal would be
rejected, they sought a 20-year-
old age limit. Instead they
were left with a rule that could
force some coaches to gamble
on a one-year recruit to
remain competitive.
SArizona coach Lute Olson
believes short-timers are detri-
mental to programs that are
trying to plan for the future.
Few coaches, though, antici-
., pate top players fleeing for
S> other leagues.
"The good thing is that the
kids may get there and realize
maybe they aren't ready,"
ciated Press Illinois coach Bruce Weber
ng play- said. "I think a lot of kids think
es about they'll be in college one or two
years and then leave, and then
they realize they aren't ready
ne don't, So maybe it will be beneficial
ervene." in the long run."
I? While many players
D played acknowledge they could be.
Virginia enticed to skip the NBAs big
me tobe bucks and savor the college
p point environment, some believe the
ked with NBAs new rule simply isn't fair
who are "When it first came out,
hool there was a lot of talk about it,"
o10 may Lawson said. "People were
asons. wondering whether there
'ers will would be any exceptions or
Europe whatever
)ice that "I don't think I'm ready for
de their the NBA. But some people,
e a mys- like (Greg) Oden or (Kevin)
nto draft Durant are good enough to go
to the NBA and might get
Is might burned a little bit if they go to
1 route, college and get hurt or some-
I't think thing."


U.S. trails Russia 2-0 in Fed Cup semis


Associated Press


MOSCOW The United
States dropped its opening two,
matches to defending champion
Russia on Saturday, with
Wimbledon winner Venus
Williams and Mashona
Washington losing in the Fed
Cup semifinals
Anastasia Myskina rallied
past Williams 5-7, 6-4, 6-2, and
Elena Dementieva followed
with a 7-5, 6-4 victory over
Washington in the 29-year-old
American's Fed Cup debut
"I knew we would have two
tough days," U.S. captain Zina
Garrison said. "But morale in my
team is still high and the match
is not over yet"
In the other semifinal, France
took a 2-0 lead over Spain at Aix-
En-Provence, France. Amelie
Mauresmo defeated Anabel
Medina Garrigues 64, 6-3, and
Mary Pierce beat Nuria
Llagostera Vives 6-4, 64
The best-of-five competition
concludes Sunday with reverse
singles and doubles.. The two
semifinal winners play for the
title Sept 17-18.


In playoffs, in which winners
advance to the elite group in
2006, it was: Austria 2,
Switzerland 0; Belgium 1,
Argentina 1; Croatia 1, Germany
1; and Czech Republic 1, Italy 1.
The United States has won the
competition 17 times more
than any other nation and
been runner-up nine. times
Russia reached the final four
times before defeating France
last season for its first title.:
A minute's silence was held
before the Russia-U.S. matches
to mourn victims of the terror
attacks in London.
Williams is the leader of a
weakened U.S. team. Sister
Serena Williams, the Australian
Open champion, and top-ranked
Lindsay Davenport are injured.
In Sunday's doubles, Williams
will team with Corina Morariu
against Vera Douchevina. and
Dinara Safina.
Myskina, the 2004 French
Open champion, ended
Williams' eight-match Fed Cup
undefeated streak and sent the
American to her first defeat on
clay in six Fed Cup matches.
"She played too Well today,"


Williams said. "I tried my best
today I think, normally, I bring a
little bit more energy into the
match. It was just a tough day"
In the first set, a net cord ball
decided the set for Williams. In
the second game of the second
set, Myskina came back from
love-40 to hold serve. Williams
then had two double-faults in the
fifth game, but fought back four
break points before returning
long to lose serve. The American
broke back immediately to even
the set but was broken again in
the seventh game.
Myskina served to even the
match. The Russian jumped


ahead 3-1 in the third set and
saved a break point while serv-
ing for the match.
"I felt slightly nervous in the
opening set I was playing
against the Wimbledon champi-
on," Myskina said. "But I knew it
was emotionally tough for her to
play at full strength after win-
ning a Grand Slam title."
Dementieva, the French and
U.S. Open runner-up last season,
beat Washington 7-5, 6-1 in the
third round at Wimbledon last
month. On Saturday, Washington
took a 5-1 lead in the first set but
Demetieva won six straight
games to take the set


NFL: Alexander


threatening to hold out


Associated Prss

The list reads like a Pro Bowl
roster: Terrell Owensj.Richard
SeymTouI John Abralam and
Javon Walker are all timhappy
with their contract situations.
Add Shaun Alexander to the
list. The SeahaN\ks inning
back told The Seattlq Times
'this week that simgninga $6.32
million franchise tender is "out
of the question."
Alexander has been upset for
months, but his recerit com-
ments'are the strongest yet.
Though it seems his: anger
started when he fell a yard shy
of a rushing title last season,
Alexandertold told the paper there
is no strain in his relationship
with coach .Mike Holmgren.
Instead, he said he wanted to
have his contract extended ear-
lier in his career
"I told them three years ago
that I love playing here and
let's do something now. Let's
meet," Alexander told the
paper. "I .said, 'You know what?
My wife's here. My family's
here. I want to be here until I
retire. It's really funny because
back then I would have worked
for peanuts.
"Two Pro Bowls and 3,000
yards and 36 touchdowns later,
now it's time to talk? And I'm
like, 'Why would you do this?'
So now it's just one of those
things where I say, 'Let's do
what's right.' I'm not trying to
be evil or greedy or anything,
let's just do what's right"
Teams cannot start negotiat-
ing with franchised players
again until July 15.
Seymour certainly feels he
deserves a bigger payday. The
Patriots All-Pro is one of the
best defensive linemen in the
game but is still playing out a
six-year deal he signed as a
rookie, and is due to make $2.87
million this season and $1.22
million in 2006.
Meanwhile, players such as
Patrick Kearney, Bertrand
Berry and Kevin Carter are
slated to earn more than $5 mil-
lion in 2005. Seymour has been
unhappy with the situation for
more than a year, and missed a
mandatory minicamp in June
to show his displeasure.
Abraham is in a similar situ-
ation to Alexander. The Jets
Pro Bowl defensive end wants
a long-term, commitment and
never signed his $6.7 million
tender, missing offseason work-
outs and minicamp. Though
Abraham has a reason to feel
slighted the Jets doled out
big money to Shaun Ellis and
Chad Pennington last year -
the Jets put the franchise tag on
him because they want to keep
him and not risk losing him
during free agency
Plus, Abraham has been


injury prone, so it would make
sense for the Jets to wait before
giving him a long-term deal.
What makes the situation even
stranger is Abraham said dur-
ing the season he would have
no problem being franchised.
"I can't be mad at that,"
Abraham said in December. "It
sounds bad, and people harp
over it If I get franchise, I get
franchise. I'll just have another
thing to prove next year. It
won't be bad."
As for Owens, the Eagles star
.receiver held out of offseason
minicamps because he wants to
renegotiate the $49 million,
seven-year deal he signed in
March 2004. Walker took heavy
criticism from quarterback
Brett Favre for holding out of
Packers minicamps, wanting
more than the base salary of
$515,000 he is scheduled to
make this year.
And Pro Bowl players aren't
the only ones who are unhappy.
Cardinals receiver Anquan,
Boldin missed minicaamp
because he wants' i deal like
the one Larry Fitzgerald got as
a rookie.
And then there is Packers
tackle Grady Jackson, who has
a year left on a two-year, $2.31
million deal. The 32-year-old
Jackson has had arthroscopic
knee surgery each of the last
two offseasons. Last season, he
dislocated a kneecap in the
opening game and missed
more than a month before
returning to action. He finished
with 23 tackles and one sack
So who is the agent saying
Grady is "obviously underpaid
for his position and level of
contribution?" Drew
Rosenhaus, of course.
Lookin' Ahead
Early bets for easiest schedule
to start the season? St. Louis.
Toughest? Atlanta. The Rams open
with four games against teams
with losing records in 2004. The
fun begins at San Francisco (2-
14), then continues at Arizona (6-
10), home against Tennessee (5-
11) and at the New York Giants (6-
10).
With an improved defense and
the emergence of Steven Jackson,
the Rams are hoping to improve
on their 8-8 record from last sea-
son, when they squeaked into the
playoffs.
As for Atlanta, the Falcons play
both teams that played in the
Super Bowl early on. Things start
with a rematch against the Eagles
(13-3) at home, then at Seattle (9-
7, NFC West champs), at Buffalo
(9-7, never an easy place to play),
home against what should be a
much-improved Minnesota team
(8-8, wild card) and then home
against the Patriots (14-2, Super
Bowl champs).


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4B SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


i


SPORTS







SPORTS


IOC: baseball and softball need changes


Associated Press

SINGAPORE Baseball
must adopt tougher anti-doping
rules in the United States and
make Major League players eli-
gible for the Olympics to have a
chance of getting back into the
fold after the 2012 London
Games, IOC president Jacques
Rogge said Saturday.
Wrapping up a weeklong
International Olympic
Committee session in
Singapore, Rogge also said that
softball has to increase its glob-
al appeal to win back its place.
"The message is clear," Rogge
said. "The IOC wants clean
sport, the best athletes and uni-
versality."
Both sports were thrown out
of the Olympics for 2012 on
Friday in the first cut from the
program in 69 years. They


remain on the list for the 2008
Beijing Olympics and can reap-
ply in 2009 for readmission at
the 2016 Games.
Baseball was singled out
because Major Leaguers don't
play in the Olympics and the
U.S. league's drug-testing pro-
gram falls way short of interna-
tional standards. Softball suf-
fered because of a perceived
association with baseball and
lack of global popularity.
"In the case of baseball, the
best athletes are not competing
and the major athletes perform
in an environment where dop-
ing controls are not what we
have in the Olympic world,"
Rogge said. "The session
thought there was not enough
universal appeal (for softball)."
Rogge said the two sports had
not done enough to save them-
selves since the 2002 session in


Mexico Citwhere the IOC put
off a vote c dropping baseball,
softball ad modern pen-
tathlon.
"Both ports should have
read the/riting on the wall in
Mexico,' Rogge said. "They
could se that the IOC wasn't
happy Nth the way the sports
were beng organized. The two
sports ave not worked in the
interv, of three years to
addre; the concerns of the
IOC."
Th(removal of baseball and
softbil leaves 26 sports on the
program for London. It's the
first ime since the 1996 Atlanta
Garns tiat 28 sports haven't
beei on he list
Wiile some IOC members
raised tie possibility the com-
mitlee could still bring baseball
and softball back for 2012,
Rogge vtually closed the door


on that
"The decision we've taken in
the session is final," he said.
"This is not the intention of the
IOC or the session. It's a seven-
year process, not a two-year
process. We will not leave
enough time for London or
teams to prepare it's not a
realistic option."
Rogge said the IOC would
work with the two sports to put
on a good show in Beijing, then
give them a chance in 2009 to
make their case for reinstate-
ment in 2016.
"In four years, a federation
can do a lot of improvement,"
he said.
Softball and baseball are
sports with deep American
roots, and their removal reflects
the heavy European influence
in the IOC. But the decision
affects thousands of players


around the world. Baseball, in
particular, is popular in the
Caribbean, Latin America and
East Asia.
American IOC member Anita
DeFrantz, a leading advocate
for women's sports, said softball
had been unfairly linked with
baseball's problems. She said
softball the only female-only
sport in the games brings its
top players to the Olympics and
doesn't have a doping problem.
DeFrantz said she remained
hopeful softball could still find
its way back in for 2012. She
suggested London organizers
could request the sport's inclu-
sion, IOC members could
reconsider their decision or the
IOC could waive its rule on
finalizing the program seven
years before the games.
Just as stunning as the
removal of baseball and soft-


ball was the IOC's rejection of
the five sports in line to replace
them: rugby, squash, karate,
golf and roller sports. Squash
and karate were nominated for
inclusion, then overwhelmingly
shot down in a final vote.
With a two-thirds margin
required for final approval,
members voted 63-39 against
squash and 63-38 against
karate.
"Ultimately, the session was
of the opinion that none of the
five sports would add extra
value," Rogge said. "The IOC
chose quality over quantity."
Rogge said the IOC would
consider changing the rules in
the future to allow for a simple
majority vote to approve new
sports. He said the sports may
also be allowed to make pre-
sentations to the IOC before the
vote.


Pivotal race sel in Chicago


Associated Press

JOLIET, Ill. Tony
Stewart is pleased to have
won twice in a row after
nearly a year without a vic-
tory. He still believes, how-
ever, he's got plenty to
prove before he becomes a
true contender for
NASCAR's Nextel Cup
championship.
Stewart's victories at
the road course in Sonoma,
Calif., two weeks ago and a
dominating performance
last week in the restrictor
plate race at Daytona -
told the driver and his Joe
Gibbs Racing team very lit-
tle about the rest of the sea-
son. NASCAR's top series
races only twice a year on
road circuits and only twice
each at Daytona and
Talladega, the two tracks
where horsepower-sapping
plates are used to keep the
speeds down.
More telling, Stewart
said, will be the results of
Sunday's USG Sheetrock
400 on Chicagoland
Speedway's 1/2-mile oval -
a track where he has fin-
ished third, second and
first in the past three sea-
sons.
"It's a situation where I
don't think we can say, 'Hey,
we're back on track now
because of a road course
and a restrictor plate
race,"' he said. "This week-
end is going to be big. It's
going to be a telltale week-
end for us."
It began on a bad note. On
Friday, Stewart crashed
hard during practice and
spent part of his day being
checked out for possible
upper body and head
injuries at a local hospital.
Tough guy Tony got a
clean bill of health, but the
Gibbs team decided to hold
him out of qualifying and
let Busch Series regular J.J.
Yeley put the backup No. 20
Chevrolet into the field and
earn a decent spot on pit
road for the race. Yeley
qualified 13th but, under
NASCAR rules regarding
changing drivers, Stewart
will have to start the race
from the rear of the 43-car
field.
Stewart was back in the


S-,m,
Associated Press
Fans cheer as Tony Stewar (20) heads onto the track during practice for Sunday's USG
Sheetrock 400 race at Chicgoland Speedway


car for Saturday's to
morning practice session.
"I still don't remember
what happened, but .he
good thing is that I don't
feel terrible," Stewart aid.
"I'm just real sore. Ifeel
like I got invited to a)ase-
ball bat war and didn't get
my own bat."
Still, Stewart remains
confident heading jito the
race.
"The doctor saidI could
be in the car and that's
where I'll be. Were got a
good car," he said,"I realis-
tically feel like 've got a
shot to go out arn win this
thing again tomcrow."
Stewart an1 others
believe Sundays race will
be a key to t&l. rest of the
season because the Cup
series has so, nany races on
so-called intermediate
tracks avals of 1V2 and 2
miles. Including Sunday,
there are eight more races
on intermediate tracks this
season
Before a deflated tire
sent lim hard into the wall
on Friday, Stewart noted
thathis second-place finish
on the 2-mile oval at
Mi-higan the week before
Scnoma could actually be
irore telling than the two
victories.
"If we can have a really
good weekend this week-
end that backs up what we


had at Michigan, that will
really tell us where we
stand," he said. "Hopefully,
what we learned there and
what worked for us at
Michigan will work for us
here.
"If it doesn't, it tells us we
found something that works
good at one track. If it
works good here, it tells us
that we may have found
something that's going to
help us catch up and close
that gap between the
Hendrick and Roush teams
and the rest of us."
Hendrick and Roush driv-
ers have combined to win
13 of the first 17 races this
season and 18 of the last 23
overall.
Roush's Greg Biffle leads
the way with five wins in
2005, while Hendrick's
Jimmie Johnson with three
wins this season, leads
Biffle by 73 points in the
standings and will start
from the pole on Sunday.
For Jeff Gordon, another
Hendrick driver and a four-
time Cup champion,
Sunday's race is as key as it
is for Stewart.
Gordon won three of the
first nine races this season
and appeared on the way to
another big season. But five
finishes ,of 30th or worse in
the last seven races have
slowed his momentum con-
siderably.


"Whoever comes out of
here is definitely going to
show their muscle as far as
who the team to beat is thea
rest of the season," said
Gordon, who will start 14th
on Sunday.
Under NASCAR's Chase
format, the top 10 drivers
plus any drivers within 400
points of the leader after
the first 26 races will be eli-
gible to race for the cham-
pionship over the final 10
events.
Going into Sunday's race,
Gordon is 13th 396 points
behind Johnson the last
driver currently eligible for
the Chase.
Among the outsiders with
nine races left before the
Chase is Dale Ehrnhardt Jr.,
whose season has been one
long struggle. A third-place
finish at Daytona was a big
improvement for
Earnhardt, but he too looks
at Sunday as a harbinger of
things to come.
"I'm pretty upbeat about'
our opportunity this week-
end," said Earnhardt, who
qualified 25th here after
finishing 17th at Michigan.
"We've got a lot of stuff we
incorporated that helped it
drive really good at
Michigan, and we've got
some more stuff, too. We've
just got to keep working and
I think we'll be all right."


Harvick wins Busch


race in Chicagoland


Associated Press
Kyle Busch (5, front right), Ryan Newman (39, left), Kevin Harvick
(21, Reese's) and Greg Biffle (66) race through turn one during the
NASCAR Busch Series USG Durock 300 at Chicagoland Speedway
Saturday.


Associated Press,

JOLIET, Ill. Kevin
Harvick took control in the
waning laps Saturday and
drove away to a victory in the
NASCAR Busch Series race
at Chicagoland Speedway.
The Nextel Cup regular,
who has previously won two
Cup races on the l12-mile
oval, got a break when Ryan
Newman, who started from
the pole and led 118 of the
200 laps in the USG-Durock
300, was slowed late in the
race by a loose lugnut.
"His car was really strong,"
Harvick said of Newman.
-"He probably had the best
car for about 20 laps, then
our car was better the next 20
laps. It probably would have
been a good fight at the end,
but I'm glad we didn't have to
see it."
Newman, another Cup reg-
ular making only his second
Busch start of the year, was in
the lead and dominating
when he pitted on lap 155.
His inexperienced Busch
crew sent Newman back on
track with a loose lugnut on
his left front tire, and he was
then hit with a drive-through
penalty for too many men
over the pit wall when he
came back in on lap 156.
That left Newman 18th for
the restart on lap 159, but he
moved all the way to third for
the final restart on lap 195.
He tried hard to pass Greg
Biffle for second, but couldn't


get past and settled for a
third-place finish.
"It was a pretty good race,
but we made a mistake and
that's just what we
deserved," Newman said.
After fending off Newman,
Biffle found himself too far
behind Harvick to make a
run at the leader, who wound
up crossing the finish line
0.715-seconds about eight
car-lengths in front.
"I knew that Biffle was
good on the restarts,"
Harvick said. "I just had to
feel my car out and do what I
thought was right. It was a
good restart.
"We kept adjusting on the
car, a little half a pound (of
air in the tires) here and
there and it was real good at
the end," added Harvick,
who earned his second Busch
victory of the season and the
15th of his career.
Carl Edwards and Mark
Martin finished behind
Newman, giving Cup regu-
lars, all of whom will race on
the same track in Sunday's
USG Sheetrock 400, the top
five spots. Clint Bowyer,
Harvick's Richard Childress
Racing teammate, was sixth,
the top finish for a Busch reg-
ular.
Defending series champion
Martin Truex Jr. finished sev-
enth and now leads Bowyer
in the season standings by 72
points, with rookie Reed
Sorenson, who finished 10th,
106 points behind in third.


Armstrong keeps
Associated Press if not more disappointed than I
am, so I'll think they'll get bet-
GERARDMER, France ter."
Lance Armstrong kept his over- Armstrong remained 1 minute,
all lead in the Tour de France 2 seconds ahead of Vinokourov,
on Saturday despite a rough who is third overall. Armstrong is
day for his team and fierce 1:36 ahead of Ullrich. Germany's
challenges in the race's hard- Jens Voigt of Team CSC moved
est mountain climb so far. up to second place overall, 1
"I was trying to do my best behind the Texan.
and minimize the damage," Ullrich placed sixth in the
Armstrong said. "If it's two stage and Vinokourov was 10th.
more weeks of days like today, "It's a morale boost, a good
then you're in trouble." sign," Vinokourov said, refer-
Dutch rider Pieter Weening ring to Armstrong's difficulties.
of the Rabobank team won the "We wanted to try to attack him
eighth stage in a sprint against before the high mountains."
Andreas Kloeden, last year's Armstrong had to hold off
Tour runner-up. Kloeden and his T-Mobile
Armstrong, bidding for a sev- squad on the day's final climb.
enth straight title before retire- His Discovery Channel team-
ment after the three-week mates were unable to help him
race, finished in 20th place. He respond to the challenge on the
and key rivals Jan Ullrich and Col de la Schlucht ascent, leav-
Alexandre Vinokourov arrived ing him alone to contend.
in a pack with the same time, "Definitely, a crisis within
27 seconds behind the two our team on the final climb,"
leaders. said Armstrong, suggesting
"A tough day for team fatigue caused by the first fast
Discovery," Armstrong said. week was a factor.
'But I know those guys. They're "There was really nothing
goingto be just as disappointed we could do about that, some-


tour lead
times we have a bad day. I think
that maybe the team has been
working more than we need to
this week," he said.
Three T-Mobile riders -
Ullrich, Vinokourov and Kloeden
could threaten Armstrong's
hopes of a triumphant finish in
Paris on July 24.
T-Mobile combined on Col de
la Schlucht to make life diffi-
cult for Armstrong and his
teammates, who failed to keep
the pace in the final 10.4-mile
ascent. Six more climbs lie
ahead Sunday, before the even
harder Alps next week
Vinokourov attacked first,
surging ahead. Armstrong
accelerated and caught him,
only for Vinokourov to break
ahead again, following French
rider Christophe Moreau of the
Credit Agricole team.
Once more, and this time
alone, Armstrong chased
Vinokourov and was followed
by Ullrich. They eyed each
other warily as they powered
up the mountain.
After another attack from
Vinokourov. Kloeden took over,


despite r(
sprinting off ahead. Armstrong
let him go, concentrating
instead on Vinokourov and
Ullrich.
"I was isolated, definitely
suffering," Armstrong said.
Kloeden, meanwhile, surged
away, his pink team jersey
unzipped and flapping in the
wind. Weening was ahead, and
Kloeden caught him at the top
of the climb. The two raced
together downhill to the finish,
where Weening beat the
German by a whisker at the
line.
The 143.8-mile race started
in the German town of
Pforzheim and led straight into
a series of four climbs. Huge
crowds lined the fifth and final
climb before the finish in
Gerardmer, in eastern France.
Three of Armstrong's team-
mates finished the stage nearly a
minute behind him, and the five
others were a whopping 2:30
back
"We have some talking to do
tonight," Armstrong said. "There's
a lot of bruised egos on our team
and we have to try and recover"


ough day for team


Associated Press
Lance Armstrong pedals near Zellenberg, eastern France,. during
the 8th stage of the Tour de France cycling race between
Pforzheim, Germany. and Gerardmer. eastern France.


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 5B


COIrUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







SB SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


Lewis holds on to lead


Associated Press

SILVIS, Ill. J.L. Lewis has
the lead and the attention -
all to himself at the John Deere
Classic.
Lewis shot a 2-under 69
Saturday, extending his lead to
three strokes at 15-under 198
after three rounds. Hank
Kuehne (67), Richard S.
Johnson (68) and Craig Bowden
(68) are at 12-under 201.
Jeff Brehaut (66) and Robert
Damron (69) are at 11 under.
"I don't know if I've ever won
from the front on a tour event,"
said Lewis, who won in a play-
off here in 1999 and came from
seven shots back to win the 84
Lumber Classic in 2003.
"I don't really consider it a
lead because if you go out there
and you don't play well, they're
going to blow right by you," he
added. "I was surprised some-
body didn't do it today. I figured
I'd have to shoot 3 or 4 under
just to stay where I'm at."
Lewis led after the second
round, too, but few outside his
immediate family probably
noticed amid the Michelle Wie
mania. The 15-year-old from
Hawaii was on the brink of
becoming the first woman in 60
years to make a cut on the PGA
Tour, but she fell apart in the
last four holes and missed by
two strokes.
"I thought it was phenome-
nal," Lewis said. "She's only 15
years old. Where were you guys
when you were 15 years old? I
was about 5-foot-6 and weighed
about 120 pounds. I'm looking
at her going, 'Geez, she's great.'
I was hoping she'd make the
cut."
Instead, Wie was headed to
Ohio for the men's U.S.
Amateur Public Links next
week and attention at the TPC
at Deere Run was back on the
guys.
The crowds looked smaller
Saturday, or at least more
spread out, and the tourna-
ment didn't seem to have quite
the same buzz. But the higher
scores might have had some-.


J.L. Lewis hits his approach shot out of a bunker on th
during the third round of the John Deere Classic Sati
has a three stroke lead going into the final round.


thing to do with it, too.
Lewis got off to a slow start
with a bogey on the first hole,
and he looked as if he might be
in for a long day. His tee shot
went into a bunker and then he
flew the green, landing 91 feet
behind the hole.
He got within 7 feet and had
a chance to save par, but his
putt ran about a foot long.
But just as he did Friday,
Lewis got on a roll after a few
holes, getting some help from
nice putting. He made a 30-
footer for birdie on the par-3
No. 7, and a 41-footer on 15. He
also made one from 8 feet on
No. 8.
"I didn't make as many short
putts as I probably should
have, but I felt like I had my
game going pretty good," he
said. "I struck the ball OK, and
I felt like I hit it kind of where
I wanted to most of the day."
Scottish Open
LUSS, Scotland Maarten
Lafeber slowed down after a hot
start and had to settle for a 3-Under
68 on Saturday, giving him a share
of the lead with Tim Clark in a
Scottish Open that is up for grabs.
More glorious weather at Loch
Lomond allowed for another day of


low scores, and seven
a share of the lead at.
in the third round. Onl
remained there at the
although the final roun
be a wild scramble for
Clark also started st
added three birdies on
back nine for a 6-unde
him atop the leaderboa
Lafeber at 15-under 19
Alastair Forsythe, tr
Colin Montgomerie as
Scots to win their nation
since it began in 1986
from a few bad swings
iron into 10 feet for bir
15th and a 25-foot bird
last for a 67, leaving h
shot behind with Ange
(68).
Adam Scott posted
round of a calm, sunny
the bonnie banks with
that left him in the groin
that included Darren C
and Thongchai Jaidee
In all, 15 players we
shots of the lead going
final round.
Lafeber made it all p
first threatening to run
the field, then stalling o
14 holes to let everyone


the tournament.
"That was the gal, to be in the
lead after three rouis," Lafeber
said. "That's what I'd, and it's
very satisfying. But a lot of
strong players behinme, so I
have to play really wi tomorrow."
Montgomerie had 66 and was
at 10-under 203, but Sd he had
no chance. At the time.afeber
was still on the front nitl, and
Monty figured he woulde at least
eight or nine shots behti at the.
-4 end of the day.
"You shoot 66 and their you're
moving up, and you don!!
Montgomerie said. "Idon'have a
chance now. I've jusjgot 1 score
as low as I can and ry to (et as
Associated Press many world (ranking point as I
Associated Press can.
can."
e first green Ernie Els pulled hi tee 'tot into
irday. Lewis the water on the 18ti for a double
bogey, wrecking a god round. He
players had shot 67 and joined Mntgomerie in
some point the group at 203, altbugh the Big
y two players Easy was running howhen he
end, walked off the course
id figures to "I1 missed a lot of pts, and
the trophy. eventually it got me," e said.
strong and Els played with lan oulter, who
i the tougher also was disgusted withis 67 -
ar 65, putting although delighted withveather
ard with that is almost too good) be in
98. Scotland.
ying to join Senior Playei
nahe only DEARBORN, Mich. (A) Hale
recovered Irwin moved closer to his2th
, recovered career major victory, shooig a
die on the third straight 4-under 68 Sturday
die on the for a one-stroke lead afteriree
ime only one rounds of the Senior Playe,
im only one Championship.
Sabrera Still dominant more thaa

the best month after turning 60, Irwin
the best moved to 12-under 204, a strike
y day along ahead of Dana Quigley (72), ill
a 7-under 64 Morgan (67) and Tom McKnigt
up at 201 (70).
;larke (69) Don Pooley (65) is two sh!s
(66). back, and Peter Jacobsen (71)
re within five David Eger (65) and Doug Tewt
into the (65) trail by three.
Tom Watson (70), Gary
possible, at McCord (69) and Ron Streck (721
away from who is coming off a victory last
over the final week, are among five players tied,
ne back into at 8 under.


Han's 66 gives her two-shot edge in Farr


Associated Press

SYLVANIA, Ohio After
parring 11 holes in a row, Hee-
Won Han rolled in birdie putts
on two of the last three holes to
cap a 5-under 66 Saturday for a
two-stroke lead through three
rounds of the Jamie Farr
Owens Corning Classic.
Han, who started the day a
shot behind Beth Daniel, was
at 11-under 202.
To pick up her fourth .career
win, Han will have to hold off
fellow South Korean Jeong
Jang, who shot a 67 to reach 9
under. Defending champion
Meg Mallon and 50-year-old-
Marilyn Lovander winless
in 180 career LPGA Tour starts
- were 8 under after 68s. Leta
Lindley was alone in fifth
place at 7 under after a 68.


U.S. Women's Open champi-
on Birdie Kim (71), Sung Ah
Yim (68), Heather Bowie (69)
and Becky Morgan (68), .who
shared the first-round lead
with Kim, were all at 6 under.
the 48-year-old Daniel had a
double bogey on the last hole
to shoot a 73. Trying to break
her own mark as the oldest
ever to win an LPGA event,
she's at 208.
Han birdied three of the first
four holes, hitting an 8 iron to 6
feet at No. 1, a 7 iron to 10 feet
at No. 2 and an 8 iron to 4 feet
at No. 4. She saved par from off
the green twice on the front
side and then had routine two-
putt pars the rest of the way
until she got to the par-4 16th.
Her 7-iron approach ended
up 8 feet away and a look of
relief spread across her face as


she finally hit a birdie putt to
break a deadlock with Jang,
with whom she played junior
golf.
At the closing hole, she hit a
solid drive and laid up with
her second shot on the par-5
hole before hitting a gap
wedge to 5 feet and holing the
putt.
Four players had at least a
share of the lead in the third
round: Daniel, Mallon, Jang
and Han.
Mallon birdied the first
three holes to climb past
Daniel but played the final 15
holes in even-par.
Jang began the day two
strokes behind Daniel but
turned in 3-under 31 and then
had back-to-back birdies at 12
and 13 to get to 10 under. She
failed to get up and down from


the back fringe at the next
hole, however, and then could-
n't muster a birdie down the
stretch.
Lovander was born in
Minnesota and lives in Florida
but plays her best golf in the
Buckeye state. Her two best
finishes on tour have come in
the last year, both in Ohio. She
shot a 67 in the second round
of the Farr a year ago and
ended up tied for ninth, then
had a career-best tie for sixth
at the Wendy's Championship
for Children in suburban
Columbus last August.
Brittany Lang, making her
pro debut, shot a 72 and was at
209. Amateur Morgan Pressel
had a 69 and was at 212.
Carri Wood aced the second
hole on the way to 69 that left
her at 209.


LEADERBOARD


Champions Tour
Ford Senior Players Champlor
Saturday
At TPC of Michigan
Dearborn, Mich.
Purse: $2.5 million


Yardage: 7,069
Third Round
Hale Irwin 68-68-68
Gil Morgan 72-66-67
Tom McKnight 68-67-70
Dana Quigley 67-66-72
Don Pooley 70-71-65
David Eger 71-71-65
Doug Tewell 72-70-65
Peter Jacobsen 70-66-71
Gary McCord 68-71-69
Tom Watson 66-72-70
Morris Hatalsky 68-70-70
Ron Streck 66-70-72
Isao Aoki 66-69-73
Larry Nelson 68-74-67
Mark McNulty 71-68-70
Bruce Fleisher 68-69-72
Bruce Lietzke 69-72-69
Allen Doyle 74-67-69
Wayne Levi 67-74-69
Tom Kite 71-68-71
Jerry Pate 68-70-72
Gary Koch 71-68-72
Tom Wargo 72-74-66
Jim Colbert 69-74-69
Leonard Thompson 70-72-70


Brad Bryant
Jay Sigel
Graham Marsh
Lonnie Nielsen
Dick Mast
Ed Dougherty
Tom Purtzer
Jay Haas
Rodger Davis
D.A. Weibring
Andy Bean
Bobby Wadkins
Jim Ahern
James Mason
Craig Stadler
Mark James
M McCullough
Howard Twitty
Joe Inman
John Harris
B. Summerhays
Dan Pohl
Mark Johnson
Hajime Meshiai
Dave Barr
Don Reese
John Jacobs
Mike Reid
Bob Gilder
Vicente Fernandez
Curtis Strange
J. Canizares
Jim Thorpe
Keith Fergus
Pete Oakley
Walter Hall
Mark McCumber
Fuzzy Zoeller
Tom Jenkins
John Bland
Bob Eastwood
R.W. Eaks
J.C. Snead
Dave Stockton
Dave Eichelberger
Hugh Baiocchi
Mike Sullivan
Ed Fiori
Ben Crenshaw
Jim Albus
Jim Dent
Des Smyth
lob Murphy


69-71-72
71-69-72
64-76-72
70-69-73
70-67-75
74-72-67
70-73-70
71-71-71
69-72-72
70-70-73
68-72-73
69-70-74
67-71-75
71-77-66
73-69-72
70-69-75
72-75-68
74-71-70
70-71-74
69-69-77
69-78-69
72-72-72
72-72-72
75-69-72
75-68-73
68-73-75
69-71-76
77-71-69
76-70-71
75-70-72
72-72-73
74-73-71
76-70-72
72-71-75
69-73-76
70-71-77
71-77-71
70-75-74
70-77-73
72-74-74
74-78-70
70-74-78
72-72-78
74-77-72
75-76-72
74-75-74
70-76-77
77-73-74
73-78-74
74-77-74
72-75-78
79-68-79
76-75-86


LOGA
jamie Farr Owens Corning Cla
At Highland Meadows Golf C
Sylvania, Ohio
Purse: $1.2 million
Yarnge: 6,408
a-amateur
Third Round


Hee-Von Han
Jeonglang
MarilyrLovander
Meg MIlon
Leta Liriley
Sung Ah'im
Becky M an
Heather Ewie
Birdie Kim,
Pat Hurst
Beth Bader
Gloria Park ,
Beth Daniel
Mi Hyun Kim
Carri Wood
Brittany Lang
Janell Howland
Natalie Gulbis
Laura Diaz
Soo-Yun Kang


69-67-66 2
68-69-67 -
69-68-68 -2
68-69-68 2
69-69-68 2
69-70-68 2
65-74-68 -2
72-66-69 -
65-71-71 -
71-70-67 -
70-70-68 -
67-70-71 -2
70-65-73 -2
72-68-69 -
69-71-69 -
9-68-72 -
t-68-67 --
7V72-67 --
7270-68 -
71-\1-68 -


Marisa Baena
Candle Kung
nship Karen Weiss
Young Kim
Angela Stanford
Sherri Turner
R. Hetherington
Par: 72 Young Jo
Michele Redman
204-12 Dorothy Delasin
205 -11 Nicole Perrot
205 -11 S. Pettersen
205 -11 Emilee Klein
206-10 a-M. Pressel
207 -9 Angie Rizzo
207 -9 Meena Lee
207 -9 Amy Hung
208 -8 C. Hannemann
208 -8 Paula Creamer
208 -8 Emily Bastel
208 -8 Stacy Snider
208 -8 Tina Barrett
209 -7 Nanci Bowen
209 -7 Shani Waugh
209 -7 Christina Kim
210 -6 Nicole Jeray
210 -6 Young-AYang
210 -6 Katherine Hull
210 -6 Sae-Hee Son
210 -6 Kim Williams
211 -5 Kate Golden
212 -4 Joo Mi Kim
212 -4 NadinaTaylor
212 -4 Yu Ping Lin
212 -4 Johanna Head
212 -4 Sherri Steinhauer
212 -4 Miriam Nagl
212 -4 A.J. Eathorne
212 -4 Se Ri Pak
213 -3 Joanne Morley
213 -3 Jamie Hullett
213 -3 D. Ammaccapane
213 -3 C. Sorenstam
213 -3 Leslie Spalding
213 -3 Naree Song
213 -3 Tammie Green
213 -3 Riko Higashio
214 -2 Erica Blasberg
214 -2 Giulia Sergas
214 -2 S. George
215 -1 BrookeTull
215 -1 Tracy Hanson
215 -1 Chris Johnson
215 -1 KrisTamulis
216 E A.Macosko


216 E
216 E
216 E
216 E
216 E
216 E
217 +1
217 +1
217 +1
217 +1
218 +2
218 +2
218 +2
218 +2
218 +2
219 +3
219 +3
220 +4
220 +4
222 +6
222 +6
222 +6
223 +7
223 +7
223 +7
223 +7
224 +8
225 +9
225 +9
225 +9
226+10
237+21


.ssic
lub

Par 71

202 -11
204 -9
205 -8
205 -8
206 -7
207 -6
207 -6
207 -6
207 -6
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
208 -5
209 -4
209 -4
209 -4
210 -3
210 -3
210 -3
210 -3


69-72-69
72-68-70
70-70-70
68-72-70
67-77-67
73-70-68
73-69-69
72-70-69
71-69-71
70-67-74
73-71-68
72-72-68
71-72-69
70-73-69
74-68-70
71-71-70
69-73-70
69-73-70
72-68-72
72-72-69
71-73-69
75-68-70
73-70-70
69-74-70
70-72-71
69-72-72
70-69-74
75-69-70
74-70-70
73-71-70
74-69-71
73-70-71
73-69-72
73-69-72
69-73-72
72-69-73
70-69-75
75-69-71
73-71-71
72-71-72
70-72-73
75-69-72
74-69-73
72-71-73
73-71-73
72-72-73
73-69-75
70-72-75
72-72-74
72-72-74
76-67-75
74-69-75
73-70-75
73-71-76
69-73-79


-210 -3
- 210 -3
- 210 -3
- 210 -3
- 211 -2
- 211 -2
- 211 -2
- 211 -2
- 211 -2
- 211 -2
-212 -1
-212 -1
- 212 -1
-212 -1
- 212 -1
- 212 -1
- 212 -1
- 212 -1
- 212 -1
- 213 E
- 213 E
- 213 E
- 213 E
-213 E
- 213 E
- 213 E
-213 E
- 214 +1
- 214 +1
- 214 +1
-214 +1
- 214 +1
- 214 +1
- 214 +1
- 214 '+1
- 214 4+1
- 214 +1
- 215 +2
- 215 +2
- 215 +2
-215-42
- 216 +3
- 216 +3
- 216 +3
- 217 +4
- 217 +4
- 217 +4
- 2177 .4
- 218 +5
- 218 +5
- 218 +5
- 218 +5
- 218 +5
- 220 +7
- 221 +8


PGA Tour
John Deere Classic Par Scores
At TPC at Deere Run
Silvis, III.
Purse: $4 million
Yardage: 7,193 Par 7
a-amateur
Second Round
J.L. Lewis 64-65 12
Hunter Mahan 63-68 13
Shigeki Maruyama 68-63 13
Brandt Jobe 66-66 13
Jeff Sluman 67-66 13
Robert Damron 65-68 13
Joey Snyder III 67-66 13
Richard S. Johnson 65-68 13
Craig Bowden 65-68 13
Wes Short Jr. 66-67 13
Hank Kuehne 68-66 13
Ryan Palmer 66-68 1,
Will MacKenzie 67-67 18
Sean O'Hair 66-69 ,1
Blaine McCallister 68-67 -- 13
Kevin Stadler 72-63 ,13
Justin Bolli 69-66 "13
Todd Hamilton 68-67 ,13
Mark Hensby 70-66 13
John Senden 69-67 13
Dean Wilson 67-69 13
Jeff Brehaut 66-70 13
Darron Stiles 68-68 13
Glen Hnatiuk 65-71 13
Carlos Franco 68-68 13
Glen Day 66-70 13
Brett Wetterich 68-68 13
Esteban Toledo 70-67 13
Paul Goydos 69-68 -. 13
Ted Purdy 69-68 13
Heath Slocum 68-69 13
Guy Boros 68-69 13
Patrick Sheehan 69-68 13
Bob Heintz 69-68 -,.13
John Maginnes 70-67 13
Duffy Waldorf 66-71 13
D.J. Trahan 68-69 13
Zach Johnson 68-69 13
Woody Austin 72-65 -. 1
Billy Mayfair 68-69 13
Steve Stricker 71-66 13
Tom Gillis 68-69 13


Scott Gutschewski
Arjun Atwal
Omar Uresti
Matt Kuchar
Grant Waite
David Hearn
Jeff Maggert
Garrett Willis
John Huston
Stewart Cink


71-66
70-68
72-66
71-67
68-70
68-70
71-67
66-72
67-71
68-70


- 13
- 13
- 1
-13

- 13

- 13
- .1
- 1
-,'1
- 1


WIE
Continued from Page 1B

said she should win a few
LPGA tournaments first or,
better yet, junior events but
she feels the best way to get
better is by playing with the
best.
Look at the results. When
she missed the cut by seven
strokes at the Sony Open in
January, poor putting was part-
ly to blame. This week, Wie
ranked 20th in putting. She
made all but two from within 10
feet, and was 2-for-3 from 15 to
20 feet.


She had only one three-putt,
though it was the start of her
downfall Friday.
"She played very well. Good
putter, very good short game,"
said Scott Gutschewski, one of
Wie's playing partners. "I was
very impressed with hef short
game, and she hits the ball
straight. So a pretty good com-
bination for 15. You don't see
too many 15-year-olds with a
short game like that"
Her long game got better, too.
When she arrived at the TPC at
Deere Run, B.J. Wie said his
daughter's drives were averag-
ing about 260 yards. During her
two rounds, she averaged
almost 277 yards, including a


310-yard drive both days on No.
2.
"Coming to the PGA, she
always has such a sense of
privilege," B.J. Wie said. "She,
has a great respect for PGA
players, and she always learns
from the best."
She's also starting to show
the kind of flair that sets great
players apart. She was so far
right off the tee she couldn't
even see the No. 9 green on
Thursday. But from 200 yards
out, she played a slice that not
only reached the green, but
allowed her to make birdie.
On Friday, the 18th pin was
tucked along the bottom of the
green, a few feet from a pond.


The safe shot would have been
the middle of the green. But
she went for it, putting her sec-
ond shot within 6 inches.
"I feel like my game is a lot
more consistent," she' aid. "I
feel like I'm in the little control
room pressing the buttons now.
It feels good."'
There is, of course, still
room for improvement. She's
going to have to get stronger if
she wants to compete with the
men on a regular basis, and
her trainer has her lifting free
weights and doing exercises to
improve her balance.
She also needs to improve
her focus. At 4 under through
14 holes Friday, she lost con-


trol stunningly quck, three-
putting for a double bogey on
No. 6 and shankin her tee
shot on No. 7.
"I just really real d how
important the last siu holes
are. I just have to thin. about
that from now on," shk said.
"Even though I played the
front nine, I just have to start
all over and play great on the
back nine, too. And that's not
what I did."
But she's only 15. Tiger
Woods didn't even play his first
PGA Tour event until he was'
16, missing the cut in the 1992
Nissan Open at Riviera with
rounds of 72-75. It took him
eight tries to make a cut, and


he was 19 when he tied for 41st
at the Masters.
Wie plans to keep playing
occasional PGA Tour events,
and she's playing in the men's
U.S. Amateur Public Links
next week at Shaker Run; in
Lebanon, Ohio. The winner
has traditionally gotten a spot
in the Masters. Her father also
left open the possibility she
could turn pro after she turns
16 in October
'"As Todd Hamilton said the
other day, she's going to make
a cut on the PGA Tour," said
'Clair Peterson, tournament
director at the John Deere
Classic. "If it wasn't .today,
sbmeday."


1

9


32
3
3
3
93
4
i4
.4
5

.5
35
36
36
.6
36
36
36
36
6
6
7
37
37
37
17
17
17
17
17
17
173
17
17
17
17

18

18
18
18
18
18
36


,j4r


Daily Ramblings At "



Courtney Wes
Swww.chronicleonline.comStewart Fulton
www.chronicleonline.com From Afar Rough Cut.


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











C

JULY 10, 2005


Forgotten Florida


Constitutional

amendments affect -

medical, legal fields
-.,.,-


I


J i
i
i
i
I


hurricane


Editor's note: Florida i others
agreed wholeheartedly to rein in
doctors and lawyers by approving
three constitutional amendments.
Senior advocate Dan Rohan fol-
lowed the process that made these
three reformative amendments into
law.
DAN ROHAN
Special to the Chronicle
EOr all of the storm and drama
that preceded the elections
on Nov. 2, 2004, and the out-
come of the election in which
voters agreed to significant med-
ical and legal reforms, the resulting
laws crafted by legislators this year
have tempered the fervor implied
in those votes.
Those who voted for these
changes might be surprised how
these mandates changed after the
Florida Legislature crafted these
mandates into laws.
As background, in 2004 the
Academy of Florida Trial Attorneys
(AFTA) and the Florida Medical
Association (FMA) continued a
feud that resulted in changes to
Florida's constitution.
The medical association initiated
a proposed Amendment 3 to limit
attorneys' fees as they relate to
medical malpractice lawsuits.
Approved by voters, the legislative
outcome of that amendment is still
in flux. The limitations set into law
have been overcome by having
clients sign waivers to their right to
limit lawyer's fees.
The trial lawyers offered two
constitutional amendments of their
own, Numbers 7 and 8, aimed at
the medicos.
No. 7 was to provide the public
with full disclosure of physicians'
and hospital records.
No. 8 was even more retaliatory
and venomous; it would cancel the
license of any doctor who had more
than three cases of malpractice.
All these amendments, 3, 7 and 8,
were placed on the ballots in the
name of the people and all three
were overwhelming approved by
the people.
Numbers 7 and 8 became a
major headache to the docs across
this state. The language of these
amendments seemed to make them
retroactive but there was, uncer-
tainty.
In November and December of
2004, Amendments 7 and 8
received district court orders of
cease and desist In frustration, the
courts turned both over for legisla-
tive interpretation.
The Florida Hospital Association
contested No. 7 and the FMA con-
tested No. 8. In the meantime, doc-
tors began packing their bags,
preparing to flee Florida.
Physicians in other states looking
to settle in a community indicated
they wanted no part of our state.
A health care crisis appeared to
be in the works.
In the hands of the Florida
Legislature, Amendment 7 tem-
porarily became Senate Bill 938;
Amendment 8 became known as
SB 940.


CARL STEELFOX/Chronicle graphic
to ensure that there is "clear and
convincing evidence," as per the
rule, that a doctor has committed
repeated medical malpractice.
An out-of-state judgment may
count as a strike only if the stan-
dard of care and the burden of
proof applied in the out-of-state
matter equaled or exceeded that
used in Florida.
From these conditions it is clear
that the medical professions have
become politically savvy and are
now formidable opponents to the.
trial attorneys, should the malprac-
tice feud continue.
What appeared to voters as a ref-
ormation in the medical and legal
professions has become something
less, not very different from what
the conditions were in Florida
before the election.

Dan Rohan is the Chronicle's
senior advocate. He has
researched, written about and
been involved in health care
issues for 35 years.


Picking the next Supreme Court justice


In one sense, Sandra Day O'Connor And that is precisely why President
became the most powerful woman Bush should replace the departing jus-
in America by accident If the tice with someone who shares her belief
Supreme Court had not been that compromise is a worthy
so sharply divided between goal in public life, not an act
liberal and conservative of betrayal.
blocs, she would not have The president won two
provided the key vote on so elections promising to
many critical issues during appoint conservatives to the
her 24 years on the bench. court, and he has every right
But in another sense, her to fulfill that promise. But
impact was no accident at all. there are many different
As the nation's political life kinds of conservatives, and
grew increasingly polarized, C which model the president
O'Connor acquired influence Cokie and Steven chooses is probably the most
by being a pragmatic, reason- V. Roberts important decision of his sec-
able consensus builder As a OTHER ond term.
result, in 77 percent of the VOICES In an interview with USA
recent Supreme Court cases Today, the president urged
decided by a 54 vote, she the Senate "to get rid of the
joined the majority far more than any bitterness and rancor" that pollutes the
other justice. capital today. That's a fine idea, but the
O'Connor's approach bring warring only person who can accomplish that
factions together, look for workable solu- goal is Mr. Bush himself, by appointing
tions is very rare in Washington today. someone in the O'Connor mold.


As the president contemplates his
choice, it's worth examining the quali-
ties and experiences that made
O'Connor the jurist she became. Let's
start with gender. Not every woman is a
pragmatist or a consensus-builder, and
there are plenty of female warriors in
both ideological camps. But on balance,
women are more willing to defuse "bit-
terness and rancor" and see virtue in
their opponents' views.
Look at the U.S. Senate. The female
members meet regularly across party
lines, something their male colleagues
hardly ever do, and actually wrote and
published a book together
O'Connor is a mother who raised
three sons while pursuing her career,
and if you don't think that's the ultimate
test of pragmatic problem-solving then
you haven't tried it She was also a wife
who cared for her husband as he grew ill
with Alzheimer's, and that experience,
too, helped remind her that the law is
about people, not just principles.


As a woman, she suffered real dis-
crimination, as law firms ignored her
stellar record in law school and
slammed their doors in her face. Most
judges, like most journalists, live in a
rarified world of elite privilege, and it's
very useful, in both professions, to come
from a disadvantaged background -
and to not forget it
The second key quality for O'Connor
was geography. She was raised on an
Arizona cattle ranch, and the frontier
has always shaped the American experi-
ence. It has made us, as a people, more
practical and less ideological than
Europeans, more concerned with what
works in the real world than with the
dictates of abstract philosophy.
In addition, the western-U.S. brand of
conservatism O'Connor reflected is
more libertarian and less religious than
the Southern-based conservatism that
has come to dominate the Republican
Please see VOICES/Page 4C


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Juggling

dogs and

self-image

'm a golden retriever kind
of guy.
Irish setters are pretty
good. Black Labs are beautiful.
Poodles are from another
planet.
Carl Hiaasen, the Miami
Herald columnist who writes
regularly in the Chronicle, is
also the author of a number of
crime fiction books based in
South Florida. In one of his
books Hiaasen referred to a
poodle as "a rat with a perm."
I love that guy.
My problems with poodles
go back to my first paperboy
job in New York This little
white poodle would chase me
down the street and grab onto
the leg of my pants. I'd slap
him with a rolled-up 2-pound
edition of Newsday.
The poodle's owner would
always complain to my newspa-
per boss that I was injuring her
dog. I was just trying to get the
darned thing to let go of my leg.
This explanation is a round-
about way to explain that my
wife recently announced she
was going on vacation to her
sister's house in another state.
Being a bachelor for a few days
didn't sound so bad.
Several days later, she
announced the vacation plans
did not include her two dogs.
Bachelorhood suddenly had

Please see WINDOW/Page 4C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Attack is cause

to reenergize

terrorism war
he terrorist attacks on
the city of London have
put me over the edge.
I, like many, was beginning
to wonder if it's time to begin
withdrawing our troops from
the Middle East. One can't
help but wonder about the
logic of our presence in Iraq -
why we went in there, etc.
While I'm not wild about set-
ting a deadline to withdraw,
I've heard some good argu-
ments supporting such a move.
Then came Thursday.
While unconfirmed, past
acts of al-Qaida make it a
gimme that members of the
terrorist organization were
behind this appalling attack
SRegardless of questionable
logic for our military presence
in Iraq, al-Qaida is a destruc-
tive force there and must be
dealt with for the good of
Iraqis and victims of terrorism
around the world.
(As an aside, this stance has
probably alienated me from
half my friends.)
I don't feel like being under-
standing anymore. Very sel-
dom would I be categorized as
a hawkish person, but I'm sick
of seeing innocent people
.killed. I'm sick of seeing inno-
cent Iraqis killed. I'm sick of
seeing U.S. troops killed. And
I'm sick of seeing innocent
people from Kenya to
Indonesia to Saudi Arabia to
Morocco to Turkey to Spain
Please see SHADES/Page 4C


Months passed as interested par-
ties made their cases.
' Then, with no fanfare, SB 938
and SB 940 tiptoed to the office of
Gov. Jeb Bush, who signed both
into law.
What portended to be a potential
disaster to Florida doctors turned
into a gigantic win for the FMA.
How do these new constitutional
amendments affect the medical
profession and the electorate? Only
time will tell.
For one thing, both the disclosure
amendment and the three strikes
amendment are not retroactive to
the date of the election. This alone
is a huge victory for the FMA.
Here are some of the other high-
lights of Amendment 7, the disclo-
sure law.
Hospital and medical records
on a particular patient are open for
review if they have been created
within four years before the date of
request.
Records have been defined to
mean the final report of any
adverse medical incident. A physi-


I- .. 4- 4
___________________________ _________ ____________


cian's medical records of any
adverse medical care are not con-
sidered to be "records."
Medical records must be re-
quested from the patient of,the
facility or the provider and can
only pertain to the same or sub-
stantially similar condition, treat-
ment or diagnosis.
Patients must pay for copies of
records.
Here are some highlights of
Amendment 8, the three-strikes
amendment
Only incidents that occurred
after Nov. 2, 2004, can be consid-
ered a strike.
Settlements and reprimands
do not count as a strike.
Clear and convincing evidence
must be present: Even after a mal-
practice adjudication, the incident
must pass guidelines of clear and
convincing evidence to be consid-
ered a "strike."
Who determines what a strike
might be? The boards of medicine
and osteopathic medicine are
assigned the responsibility and are










L / ..


- --I


"What our generation has forgotten is that the
system of private property is the most important
I guarmilty oJfreedon, not only for tIhose who own
i property, but scarcely less for those who do not."
F-ierii-ich Hayek


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
;-. Gerry Mulligan ........................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................ editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ....... advertising services director
Steve Arthur ................ Chronicle columnist
Mike Arnold ...................... managing editor
Jim Hunter ........................... senior reporter
Founded in 1891
by Albert M. Curt Ebitz ........................... citizen member
williamson Mike Moberley .....................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

ECONOMIC OUTLOOK




Land boom



requires



long-term view


M ( Tl oney burns a hole in
his pocket" is a long-
standing phrase that
reminds us of the human tempta-
tion to spend monetary gains
rather than invest them for the
future.
With the recent news from
Citrus County Property Ap-
praiser Melanie Hensley that
soaring real estate values have
increased the county's 2004 tax
roll by more than 22 percent, the
added revenue will fill county
government coffers beyond,
expectation.
Given the revenue
windfall, the expec- THE I1
station shared by Soaring r
county taxpayers is value
that our county com-
missioners will OUR O
wisely take advan-
tage of this fiscal Invest w
window of opportu- our fi
nity. In this regard,
investing the added
revenue in the county's infra-
structure would have a lasting
impact on the county's long-term
future.
Among the county's pressing
infrastructure needs, water qual-
ity is the most critical. County
officials recognized this need as
early as 1992. And, since 1997,
county government has touted
water quality as its top priority.
Nonetheless, the county budget
has given water quality short
shrift through the years. As a con-
sequence, infrastructure expan-
sion and improvement have lan-
guished behind the demands ort
the county's growth.
By dedicating a significant por-
tion of the added revenue to


Getting downtown
I have a problem with the way
they're putting the sidewalks along
the drainage ditch with benchesand
lighting. I'm disabled and I
have a hard time getting F l
downtown. Almost get run
over because you can't get
off the road in some
places. And the road going
down (U.S.) 19 is so close
to the road that the vehi-
cles come so close to you,
you feel like you're about
ready to get hit in a whepl- CALL
Chair. And I'd like to know 563
why they puta sidewalk on 56-F
a fishing bridge with about
three feet of water and there ain't
no fish going to be there. It's all lit
with a nice sidewalk, bordered.
What's the deal? Why can't they put
sidewalks so you can go downtown
without getting run over?
Worth the hookup
July 5's Chronicle headlines, front
page, "Water fees have residents
boiling," and that highlights the Van
Teslaars that moved here from
Connecticut. They complain, howev-
er, it's people like them who are
part of the problem here (putting)
pressure on our infrastructure. And
they move down and expect a free
ride or at least a cheap ride. Their
taxes alone in Connecticut was
more than this hookup bill to get
water for their lifetime.
Feeding the world
We can't take care of the world.
People must take control of their
lives and their future. People and
couples should have no more than


I


u

i
fu


water quality, central water and
sewer, storm water runoff and
water reclamation projects could
be earnestly pursued. Further,
the added revenue could pay
even greater dividends by using it
to leverage the awarding of avail-
able state and federal grants.
Hensley's bright news for the
county's coffers also carried a
bleak message for the county's
low-income families. With real
estate values soaring, the median
real estate market value rose an
astounding 28 percent during
2004. With no abate-
ment of real estate
SSUE: demand in sight, the
eal estate home ownership
jes. outlook for low-
income families is
PINION: cloudy.
It would be pru-
ndfall in dent for county com-
iture. missioners to also
give affordable
housing due consid-
eration. With services represent-
ing a large slice of the county's
economy, affordable housing is
key to attracting -and retaining
lower-paid service-sector work-
ers who are essential to the coun-
ty's overall economic vitality.
The unanticipated increase in
the value of the county's tax roll
offers a unique fiscal window of
opportunity to benefit our future
quality of life. Accordingly, the
county's budget for next year will
be the most important for many
more years to come.
Thus the expectation of taxpay-
ers is for county government to
use this windfall opportunity for
long-term needs, not short-term
wants.


two children. Take a lesson from
China. Plus, issue birth control pills
and condoms over in Africa. We just
cannot feed the whole world'. If you
can't feed them, don't
breed them.
Noisy trucks
... About noisy trucks
.with dual pipes and no
mufflers, as well as noisy
cars and boom boxes-
and this is in Beverly Hills
at all hours of the day
and night: Whatever hap.
opened to quiet? What hap-
0579 opened to law enforcement
and surveillance?
Property rights
Why has the Chronicle neglected
to tell the people of Old Homosassa
about this Overlay District. Private
property rights are being taken
away from the single-family home-
owners. It's restrictions on top of
more restrictions. Maybe a dog rid-
ing on the back of a motorcycle -
which is front page news is more
important than the citizens.
Budget workshop
Just when it seems like the furor
over the dissolution of the city has
been placed on the back burner,
news from the recent city council
budget workshop arises. There is a
proposal to increase our property
taxes, as well as a 1-percent
increase in city sales tax from 6 to
7 percent. Those council members
think the taxpayers should provide
them with health insurance a
$30,000 benefit they don't deserve
or have earned. Look out; dissolu-
tion is nearer than one thinks.


Prepare for Dennis the Menace, then relax


D on't glue yourself to
the television. Don't
get freaked out.
Dennis the Hurricane
Menace may come a' visit- % -
ing soon and although it's
still a big IF, if Dennis does
come, why not be pre-
pared?
As you read this on
Sunday, you will know more
about Dennis than I do writ- Steve
ing this on Friday afternoon FAB
as that named storm system & FO
approaches Cuba.
Whether it's Dennis or
another storm, I'm going to be ready, as
much ready as I can get on my budget.
For example, my family doesn't have
a hurricane room but we do have a
walk-in closet that might work, but
nothing as elaborate as a re-enforced
cage where people and animals can
huddle should the trees come crashing
in on the roof.
Do we really have anything to worry
about? Keep in mind what happened
last year: Bonnie on Aug. 12; Charley
on Aug. 13; Frances on Sept. 5; Ivan on
Sept. 16 and Jeanne on Sept. 26. Those
were significant blows.
Our county emergency operations
center chief, sheriff's Lt. Joe Eckstein,
says that one of the worst-case scenar-
ios would be if Dennis tore its way up
the Gulf Coast like a fillet knife, right
up from the Keys to Pensacola.
Oy, imagine the devastation.
What could happen in Chassa-
howitzka, Homosassa, Ozello, Crystal
River and Inglis/Yankeetown would be
only part of a much bigger area of dev-
astation, which would mean that for a
period of time, we would be on our
own until further notice.


i


So even if you are just
going through the drill on
1 this one, take what might
happen seriously and get
your act together. Then sit
N back and hope for the best
Sr You will see lists of things
to accumulate and to do in
-, other parts of the newspa-
per and in other media.
Here's one I can offer from
Arthur personal experience: Buy
LES lots of water. Stock your
BLES pantry with canned -goods,
dry milk, cereals, pow-
dered drinks, bread. Don't
forget pet food. Have a non-electric
can opener. Have garbage bags and
plastic utensils.
Get your medications together.
Refill prescriptions. Same for person-
al hygiene items. Go to the bank and
get some money in case the ATM
machines go blank Have decent rain
gear and sturdy boots.
Fill your vehicle's tarik with gas.
Have extra ice in the freezer. Clean up
the yard so that lawn furniture doesn't
become dangerous flying debris; have
a fire extinguisher handy Have flash-
lights and extra batteries. Have a
phone that doesn't need external
power to work.
If it looks bad, fill your tub with
water for toilet flushing, etc. Once the
power goes out, the water will no
longer be pumped.
If all this is daunting, there is some-
thing called ReadyFreddy
(www.ReadyFreddy.com), an emer-
gency preparedness kit for folks who
want it all in one backpack.
A very organized person must have
put this kit together. Publicist Andrea
Nelson in Los Angeles said I would


have to stand in line to interview that
person; I hate standing in lines.
For example, inside the backpack
there are six color-coded bags. The
green one contains a battery-free
flashlight, radio and cell phone charg-
er. The red bag has a 68-piece first aid
kit. The blue bag has a whistle, ther-
mometer, compass, emergency blan-
kets, hooded poncho, face masks for
dust and trash bags. The gold bag has a
multi-function tool knife, duct tape,
work gloves, emergency food supply,
emergency water, an emergency gas
shot-off tool and work gloves. The
black bag has a pen, pad of paper, a pill
arranger, and most importantly for
some, a pack of playing cards.
You can probably put something like
this kit together yourself, but if you are
a busy executive (Citrus County has
many) with only time to memo your
secretary, this might be just the thing
to have around should the big winds
blow, at least next time.
Mostly, though, the message here is
don't let the TV people put you into a
state of fear with their repetitive cov-
erage. Remember how they replayed
the 9/11 tapes until we were hypno-
tized with fear and loathing? .
Having a general knowledge of
where the storm is and knowing
whether or not it is bearing down on us
is a good thing. On the other hand,
being freaked out and in a nervous
wreck sitting in front of the tube for
hours on end is not a good thing.

Steve Arthur, a Chronicle columnist,
can be reached at 563-5660, Ext 1375,
or by e-mail at sarthur@
chronicleonline.com. Read his blog
at www.chronicleonline.com.


Li f .to the Editor


Playing the fiddle
Here is a question for not only citi-
zens of Citrus County, but for the
whole country. Why were the citizens
of ancient Rome luckier than the citi-
zens of America today? Answer: Nero
was the only official who knew how to
play the fiddle.
While the people who lived in John
Couey's mobile home are still sucking
up beer in Homosassa and supporting
local tattoo parlors, Assistant State
Attorney Rich Buxman is busy with
the trial of Steve and Fancy Taylor for
giving some teenage snots their come-
uppance.
Fiddle, fiddle, fiddle.
And that's just on the local level.
While the country is seeing the
highest gas and energy prices ever;
partisan politicians have dragged
their feet for almost six years on a
comprehensive national energy poli-
cy Why? Because of a postage stamp
sized piece of frozen tundra in a hun-
dred thousand acre preserve in
Alaska. And also, who the vice presi-
dent talked to in formulating the pro-
posed energy policy
Fiddle, fiddle, fiddle.
We have a president who is willing
to "touch the third rail with a wet fin-
ger" and propose a fix for the Ponzi
Scheme we call Social Security. The
"just say no" partisans admit it's a
problem, but we don't need to fix it
now.
Fiddle, fiddle, fiddle.
High energy prices, war on terror,
aging poorly maintained infrastruc-
ture, financial insecurity for the next


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
Groups or individuals are invited to
express their opinions in a letter to the
editor.
Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and include a
hone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronicleonlline.com.

generation of workers these are
just some of the problems we face
today. What's' the Senate doing?
Occupying its time worrying about
testing major league baseball players
for steroid use.
Fiddle, fiddle, fiddle.
I propose a Fiddle Award for politi-
cians of every level. The award would
be based on the Fiddle Factor which
would accrue one point every time a
politician said no to a proposal with-
out offering a viable alternative plan.
Two points would be awarded for
interjecting the government into mat-
ters where it does not belong, such as
the Terri Schiavo case.


Fiddle, fiddle, fiddle.
R.G. Van Alstine
Lecanto

Reaction off base
Re: Letter to the Editor by William
Grant, Citrus Times, June29.
In a letter to the editor, "Sheriff's
action, not legislators', was obff base in
Lunsford case," Bill Grant, chairman
of the Republican Party in Citrus,
County, unfairly criticized Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy Why is he doing all that he can
to destroy Dawsy's reputation in the
Jessica Lunsford murder case?
Grant is interested in replacing
Dawsy with a Republican sheriff. It is
politically motivated in a way that not
only has Democrats outraged with the
lies and distortions, but Grant's own
Republicans. Both Democrats and
Republicans are overjoyed with the
kind of decisions made by our sher-
iff's office and the FBI. To begin
with, the Lunsford case was so
bizarre as to be unbelievable. Dawsy
found and arrested the convicted sex
offender, John Couey, and he now
awaits trial. Please do not forget
Dawsy had to follow the laws that are
on the books.
I do not find any strength in the fact
that Grant appeared on the O'Reilly
Factor show. Please remember that
O'Reilly's reputation is zero.
Finally, let me say, our Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy is a man who gave all that he
could, day and night, searching for
Jessica.
Ruth J. Anderson
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I V V I


iUL I 2 00 5
,, . ., r ,, -, i.: ... h ....


. (








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


An adventure, a love story and a time in Ybor City


red was born on a company when it moved to
farm near Lake Lacoochee. Hazel's family
Butler in 1918. came from Williston shortly
Hazel was born in thereafter.
Williston in 1924. Fred and Hazel grew up,
In 1926, the Cummer d l and, along the way, they
Company moved their found each other, fell in
operations from Jackson- love, married, had two
ville to Lacoochee. For the sons, grew older and died,
next 30 years or so, the right there in Lacoochee.
company would harvest the Fred Brannen Their life together was a
huge cypress trees in the A SLICE OF love story and an adven-
central part of the state and LIFE ture, a tale with so many
produce lumber as well as facets it would take a book,
their primary item of commerce, field not a newspaper column, to tell. But
crates used for harvesting citrus fruit today I want to share just one of the
and other farm goods. details.
Fred's family worked for Cummer The only time they moved away
in Jacksonville and came with the from Lacoochee was during the early


part of 1945. A fire destroyed their
home, mandating at least a temporary
move.
At the time, Fred was working at the
shipyards in Tampa helping build bat-
tleships to win World War II. He must
have been pretty good at it because
every time the draft board wanted to
make a soldier out of him, the boat-
building folks stepped up and said he
was more valuable where he was.
After their home burned, they
moved to Tampa, to Ybor City, close to
the shipyards.
This happened when Hazel was in
the early stages of pregnancy with
their second son.
As you might have guessed by now, I
was that second son.


As history records, the atomic bomb
brought the war to a close much
quicker than most had expected, and
Fred and Hazel were soon able to
move back to Lacoochee which to
them was always home.
But I remember my mother talking
about those days in Tampa. She
enjoyed them. She was doted on by
the shopkeepers in Ybor City.
Why? She was pregnant, she was
pretty, and, with her raven hair and
dark complexion, she looked like a
local! She also told how she enjoyed
some of the big city conveniences,
especially the streetcars.
Cheryl and I had occasion to stay at
one of the highrise hotels adjacent to
the Tampa seaport recently, the very


same seaport that was utilized for the
building of battleships 60-plus years
ago.
Among other things, we rode a
refurbished, modernized version of a
streetcar into Ybor City to eat at the
famous Columbia Restaurant.
I enjoyed the food. In that environ-
ment, there is nothing better than a
real Cuban sandwich served with a
bowl of black bean soup. But what I
enjoyed most was remembering
Hazel and Fred and the adventure
that was their life together, including
the time they lived in Ybor City.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle columnist


Highway mowing
This is in response to (State Road) 44 in
Crystal River. I've called the county; I've called
the independent contractor and talked to him
personally and they stated they'd have some-
body out there to mow the median and the
sides of the road. It just seems to be that I read
an article in the paper today about (Mayor Ron)
Kitchen. I begged them to do the mowing along
in. front of the businesses and the easements.
Seems like they would have something better to
do than worry about people's yards. They
should take care of ui 6beautyway-.. It's really
very, sadjhat they can mow the side roads .
around here, but they can't mow the major
highways. I'd like something. Is there a number
that somebody can recommend that I can call
to try to get some information?
Not above law
I see the mayor of Crystal River got cited for
tall grass, Of course, he was able to do some-
thing about his and not have to really worry
about it. But, of course, you know, how do the
normal people in Crystal River feel when they're
on vacation and they get cited for it? Who do
they complain to? Nobody. But let the mayor get
his ticket ... Nobody's above the law, not even
people in Citrus County.


Letters to ti

-No perfect design suffering and 6
the world. Cream
Re: "Defective Design" by effects of entrc
Elwood Harding. bodies like a co
Defective design doesn't Originally th
prove that an incompetent designed perfe
designer made living things. to a God who h
First, the idea itself admits Him. Human fi
i'-that creatures are designed, er, has risks. T]
'no matter how intelligent the be' used for goc
designer used for evil. C
There is no "perfect" design excess of energy
of physical attributes. Let me around human
explain. A cat could be made lead to health
better at digesting food, but None of these
This would require an attributed to th
increased amount of energy, the universe. V
which in turn would require ble for the misi
more prey. ation He has ir
Designers aren't con- world, like a ru
strained to make a "perfect" still be attribute
design with regards to all design even if 1
parameters. Real designers time are appar
strive for optimality while God does no1
.keeping in mind certain con- the world this'
straints that are either look forward tc
imposed by the environment Jesus will judg
or the designer himself. God redeem his fall
could've created things based
on beauty rather than size.
Economy rather than power of
the eyes may have been the
ideal. Author
Unless you know the mind I have to disa
of the designer, including the Douglas Haugk
objectives he has in mind (June 15, Bible
when creating a novel thing, argument is cir
you cannot say that he hasn't sense that God
achieved his objectives per- because the Bi
Sfectly wrote it.
The Christian worldview There are fai
can explain imperfect design. errors and self
We believe that God created in the Bible for
' all things perfect (morally) and authored by ag
sustained them so that they even get through
would not run down or die. chapters of Gei
When mankind rebelled running into tw
against God, a curse came mankind. Hard
upon the world. The universe god to recreate
began deteriorating. Creatures had rested on t
resorted to violence. Disease, when he had a]


City pride
The mayor of Crystal River goes on vacation.
His lawn grows too high. He gets mad. Oooh,
oooh. He runs to City Manager (Phil) Deaton. He
tells Deaton that the grass along the city high-
way is higher than his grass. What's the matter
with the mayor? Does he not have any pride in
the city things? What's the matter with the city
that he can't enforce his own code on grass
height? Well, that's what's wrong with Crystal
River.
Long grass
It's too bad that the Crystal River mayor got
cited for his long grass, but I doh't think he's
any better than anybody else, and why he
should be given special preference beats me.
Live by rules
Well, the mayor surely showed his stripes,
.didn't he? He leads the city council and makes
the rules the rest of us have to live with, but his
grass is too long and those rules are being
applied wrong. As an excuse, his grass is not as
long as the city's grass on the roadways. Maybe
we need a mayor who'feels responsibility for the
length of his grass, the length of the city's
grass and the rules his council makes the rest
of us live with.


he EDITOR


leath entered
atures felt the
opy upon their
orroding car.
e world was
ectly according
as no evil in
'eedom, howev-
hings that can
)d can also be
causingg an
gy reserves
belly (fat) can
problems.
e things can be
he Designer of
We are responsi-
use of the cre-
Lade. A fallen
listed car, can
ted to intelligent
the effects of
rent.
t intend to leave
way, though. We
the time when
e all evil and
len creation.
Alex Stewart
Lecanto

of Bible
agree with
of Homosassa
's author). His
ocular in the
wrote the Bible
ble says God

r too many
-contradictions
rit to, have been
god. You can't
gh the first two
nesis without
wo creations of
dly the work of a
man after he
he seventh day
[ready created


man and woman on the sixth
day.
The Bible does as good a job
as any at supporting its own
claims. "It's true because I
said it was true two chapters
ago." even though later it
contradicts both "truths."
"This book is written at the
direction of God because God
told us to say that he told us
what to write."
Joseph Smith said God
spoke to him and now you
have the Mormon Church. Jim
Jones said God spoke to him,
but that one didn't turn out so
well. Just by saying it's so
doesn't make it so.
Curiously, the historical
record, other then the Bible
itself, has less to say about the
Bible and biblical characters
then it does about many other
far more obscure historical
events.
As I recall, the first "bible"
was assembled frorti written
texts and oral traditions some
500 years after the fact; hardly
up-to-the-minute reporting. It
was assembled by men, reli-
gious leaders of the age and,
of course, they said God
directed their hand. Was it
their fault God put them in
charge? Some texts were kept,
others edited or later discard-
ed, and some, I am sure, never
made the final cut
When it's all said and done,
the Bible is as good at predict-
ing the past and foretelling,
what's already written as any
book ever published. The
Bible defines self-fulfilling
prophesy

Oscar R. Fick Jr.
Beverly Hills


Letters to the EDITOR


Self-governing roles
On June 21, there were letters to the editor
by Barbara Dallenger and Art Clark, acting as
if they know better how to run things than our
president.
Let me set a few things straight Never in any
war have so many been liberated or (has there
been) such a major change (freedom of speech,
women having the right to vote, children going
to school regardless of gender and elections in
local communities) in a region of the world
with such a low loss of life. When I was a sol-
dier, we often asked each other, Why did you
join? I joined to protect my family and keep
them free. I also know that countries that are
democratic in nature don't attack other demo-
cratic countries. Germany hasn't attacked since
it became a democratic country and Japan has
rarely sent troops out of its borders since the-
monarchy was replaced for a democracy Just
think how the Middle East will be when the
people learn they can govern themselves and
they've been lied to by dictators about the U.S.
being the great evil.
As far as the money that the president is
sending to Palestinians, if we didn't, their gov-
ernment would continue to starve their own
people so they would be hungry, then they
would be told that it's all the U.S.'s.fault
Dallenger stated: "It's not your money to give
away, but all of the suffering American peo-
ples'." Don't you think that the money comes
from taxes and that the rich are the ones who
pay the most taxes? If we're sending money
overseas, don't you think the fact the suffering
people are part of one of the most prosperous
economy in the history of the U.S. where we
hear every year that the deficit and unemploy-
ment is lower than anticipated and that com-
panies can't find competent workers or even
just average laborers to fill the most basic jobs.
These suffering people should stop worrying
about money that is being taken from the rich
and focus on keeping the U.S. job market run-
nipg -
Jimmie T. Smith
Hernando

Academic freedom
This is from Campus News. AAUP, American
Association of University Professors, stated:
"Denying accused criminals a job constitutes
an unethical breach of academic freedom."
So if Osama or Hussein, et al., had doctorates
and respectable publication records (Guess
where they would get them? my question),
could they receive teaching positions at an
American University?
What about Mohammad Yousry, an adjunct
professor in Middle East studies at York
College of CUNY, (City University of New
York), a person accused of providing material
support to a terrorist organization ? He is
already on staff and teaching his poison.
And on today's news, I found out that we
have to give visas to terrorist teachers (read
terrorist mullahs or teachers of Islam) who
want to enter this country. Because of religious
reasons, they can't be denied visas. That's
right, Muslim clergy must be allowed to enter
this country legally Even if they preach that all
infidels (read U.S. of A.) must be annihilated. It
is their sworn duty to kill by any means, by any
method, by any scheme all of the people in the
United States. The rest of the world can wait,
but they are next
I can see it now the ACLU dancing in the
streets shooting guns in the air just like they do
in the Arab countries. Oh, in this case, the
ACLU will make an exception to their "no gun"
policy.
Don Canham
Citrus .Springs


Fireworks thanks
Americans from every corner of the earth join
together to celebrate the independence of our
great country every year Many families in Cit-
rus County were able to share in such a patriot-
ic' commemoration this year by participating in
a spectacular tribute of fireworks and festivities
on the Homosassa River, June 25.
You could feel the pride in the air as you lis-
tened to the men, women and children and
watched the sea of faces lining the banks of the
Homosassa River looking up to the sky that
night They were clearly "Proud to be an
American!"
Because of your generous donation and par-
ticipation, this celebration was a great success.
We all can take pride for the fifth year in a row
that our community has pulled together to make
such an event a true tribute to America.
We would like to extend our gratitude to the
following people for their support:
Rex Gruver, Falcon Fireworks, Inc. for the
incredible exhibition; DockMasters, for their
barges allowing us to set off the fireworks from
the safety of the river; Bob Vogel (Uncle Sam)
and Rick Olpinski, the masterminds behind the
incredibly fun poker run; the 300-plus poker
run players and stops Margarita Grill, Man-
atee Pub, Seagrass Pub, Riverside Crab House
and MacRaes of Homosassa (The Shed); Citrus
95.3 and Fox Radio for bringing the event to the
people; the Beacon and the Chronicle for their
public announcements and event coverage;
Jennifer MacRae for her expert roll as volley-
ball tournament coordinator; Publix for pies,
pies, pies; Homosassa Printing for flyers and
banners; and the management and staff of all
the establishments that worked so hard and so
long in preparation and throughout the event.
And to the following people for generously'
helping finance the event: *
Eagle Buick GMC; MacRaes of Homosassa;
Homosassa Riverside Resort; Taylor Made ,
Homes; Seagrass Pub and Grill; Abrahamson
Uiterwyk Barnes, professional injury law;
Abella Spa Wellness Center; DSK Management
Group Inc.; Sheldon PalmesInsurance; Hom-
osassa Game and Fish; Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce; Mike and Kautia Hampton; Gulf
Coast Marine; and Citrus County Cruisers.
And finally our special gratitude to the dep-
uties of the Citrus County Sheriff's Office, the of-
ficers of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commis-
sion, Division of Law Enforcement and the Hom-
osassa Fire Department for keeping all of us safe.
God Bless America!
Gail.Oakes and Pamela MacRae
Committee for the Homosassa River Fireworks
Festival & Poker Runr2005

Inaccurate cartoon
I believe that Mr. Stahl tried to represent
physically the five Supreme Court justices con-
curring in the 5-4 decision that local govern-
ments can take private property for a fair price
even if owners of the property object The
depiction was in his political cartoon published
June 25 in the Chronicle.
I think that two of the judges represented
were Justices Rehnquist and Thomas. No.
female justice was shown in his caricature.
That's wrong. The concurring justices were
Stevens, Kennedy, Souter, Ginsburg and Breyer.
Justice O'Connor wrote the dissenting opin-
ion, shared by Rehnquist, Scalia and Thomas.
Justice Thomas wrote a separate dissenting
opinion in which he worried that a good part of
the impact might be on urban minorities.
I attribute perhaps charitably Mr. Stahl's er-
ror to his ignorance of the decision. And shame
on you for not catching the false depiction.
Stan Brumaghim
Inverness


I T


Hot Corner: MAYOR


-
-----=-=-


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 3C








CrIRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


40 sUNDAYJULY 10 2005


WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

some strings attached.
These are actually two small
strings one Yorkshire terrier
weighs 6 pounds and the other
weighs 2 pounds and a couple of
ounces. He's so small that he
can get lost inside of one of my
shoes.
Our late golden retriever
Maggie could actually barf up
clumps of hair larger than this 2-
pound dog.
For the first day after my wife
left on her vacation, the two
dogs simply sat at attention at
the front door waiting for her
return. They would not eat,
sleep, go for a walk or take their
four eyes off the front door
I.broke them from their aban-
donment trance with some left-
over hotdogs.
You have to be very confident
in your manhood to walk
around Citrus County with two
girlie-dogs on a leash. One of my
neighbors-has a 70-pound dog
called Toughie. When I pass him
with my 2-pound dog called
Duffy, I can hear the snickers
from both Ed and Toughie.
Toughie could eat Duffy in
one bite and he'd still be hungry.
My main job during my wife's
vacation was to keep the dogs
alive. At one point, we were
standing on the end of our dock
and the 2-pounder managed to
back himself right off the end.
He fell about seven feet and
landed in the soft Crystal River
muck. I thought it was pretty
funny until his head disap-
peared below the muck's sur-



JANUARY
H Hike for Hospice
Manatee Festival
CFCC Performing Arts Dukes of
Dixieland
SOne Community, One Book

Fit in Citrus
l Celebrate Life
Crystal River Open TennisTournament

ACT Blithe Spirit
FEBRUARY
ACT Blithe Spirit
Fii ;r, C,,Ue
,. ,3 ,. ,.:4 the Stars
Ali.ui Monte Carlo Night
B .c.i Adelines "Who Invented Music?"
Consciousness 2005 and Beyond
SJr. A Bowl-A-Thon
s Community Ball
m CFCC Perorming Arts -The Spencers:
FiTheatre of Illusion
"Schoolastic" Classic Golf Tournament
Playhouse 19 Same Time Next Year
Rotary Mystery Dinner
Grand to be Irish
Singing Valentines
K of C Bingo Bananza
One Community, One Book
Grand Ole Opry Citrus Style
Bridal Fair
Sheriff's Celebrity Waiter
Spring Fling Craft Show
African-American History Month
i Beverly Hills International Festival
SParade of Homes
King and His Court
SNAMI Healthy Minds

MARCH
vKI-,, ,:,:-,.: ,iii
Si' ac '-er,'t Festival
SKiwanis Big Band Concert
SClean Air Bike Ride
SGulf Island Theatre
Manatee Car and Truck Show
Kiwanis Big Band Concert
Playhouse 19 Jesus Christ Superstar
ACT
SI Shriners Car Show
S K of C Western Dance
PlaI Cardn For Vidr
t GLa,.' r. P r1r, II
On e Co-ni tyn'ei B O
r- Ah Fl ,,-- l Fr.cit l.,:m rst l
Sr Par.c r :l ,',1l T.u. r, r ,in
S ring F.:,i' a fuS' h
SC,. r 'rr,,a 1-,i ur-. l rr ,nri
i c.:n:-.3 Am ,ri. a i ir, tr y
Be veD a.,rH usr, ral, Fesva
I -i C iCC pr t.:.r mIr-i
SCiruC :-l,
].a barg.B.rrncnp Fla r
caA APRIL
Ma' VnrTuir, Carwa 'd Cc:.it T:,ur ISToi.,-I
., -ay u1,' Li- C-I-Jeiu C-i:.l T;:,,u rrsri
SCORE CcIi i.:'uir~aT,r,I
S.r.,, sCn-,E SnC,,,lr
-,'r.,A F, ri, acl I e:u irrn]
-.r- V Ar.ai,, lHt,, M-.rr,,:,rei1 T.-ri'rn;
CC,: n- r, l -id-y H a ,ir' i-,,: ,-rl

Gi:, ao, iSr ^i
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ol'ru C-:j i / allr-,,.C ,
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CFC'2 C-p-r h,:,u-'
Serti.:ra M.ri:.ri- G.:.1,l Tournameni
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C .ru. I.pnng; Ii I I .l6
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| AIan',iri-naia-h Frf.'.c-,-i-ysc-rala Ij ,
Cr'-ial-r Gul C-:.,:' Ga, Aa..: Fl-rirn


face and I had to jump in and
conduct a dog rescue.
The real moment of truth
came when I had to go across
the state for a 24-hour trip. Now,
I could have locked the two dogs
up in the laundry room and I'm
sure they would have never rat-
ted me out They would have
tried, but their communication
skills are poor.
But with my luck, my wife
would have come home early
and found the dogs incarcerated
and my new bedroom would
look very much like the laundry
room.
So the two dogs all 8
pounds of them went off on a
little vacation.
As a golden retriever guy, I'm
used to driving with my dog. I sit
in my seat and drive the car and
the dog sits in the passenger
seat and drools out the window.
It's an American tradition.
As a Yorkshire terrier owner, I
was immediately made aware
that girlie dogs don't drool out
the passenger window. The 2-
pounder would have probably
been blown out if he tried.
Girlie dogs like to sit in your
lap and help you drive.
I didn't need any help driving,
so I kept picking up the two dogs
and tossing them into the back
seat of the Jeep. In less than 60
seconds, they would each make
their way back to my lap.
I'd toss them into the far back
of the Jeep, and it would take
them 90 seconds to find the lap..
Since this was a 120-mile drive,
I did a lot of tossing.
It was during one of these dog
tosses that I somehow attracted
the attention of A Florida
Highway Patrol trooper who


was driving along the turnpike.
He flashed his lights at me and
indicated I should pull over at
the upcoming rest stop.
Great, I was about to become
the first motorist ticketed for
dog tossing at 75 mph. I tried to
keep the dogs out of my lap as
the big old trooper walked to my
car The dogs thought this was
great we were getting a visi-
tor. They were wagging their
tails and shaking all 8 pounds of
their collective body weight
I rolled down the window as
the trooper approached. He was
obviously a black lab kind of guy.
He pushed back the brim of his
Stetson and looked into my car.
The two dogs stood up at the
windows and welcomed him.
The trooper looked into the
car.
He looked at the dogs.
He looked at me.
He looked back at the dogs.
He flipped closed his ticket
book, shook his head in disgust,
turned on his heels and walked
away.
He didn't say a thing.
He didn't give me a warning.
He didn't lecture me. He just
continued to shake his head, got
in his cruiser and drove off.
I was insulted. I wanted to yell
after him that these were my
wife's dogs. I wanted my ticket I
had earned my ticket Life was
so unfair.
In truth, I said nothing. I just
drove off with my girlie dogs sit-
ting in my lap.


Gerry Mulligan is the publish-
er of the Chronicle. His e-mail
address is gmulligan@
chronicleonline.com.


VOICES

Continued from Page 1C

Party. On the day she was
nominated, O'Connor was
proudly photographed next
to Sen. Barry Goldwater, "Mr. o
Conservative," the first great ca00
figure in the counter-revolu-
tion against the New Deal
that led to seven Republican
victories in the last 10 presi-
dential elections.
Both Goldwater and -
O'Connor were shaped by _
their frontier origins to favor
small government and indi-
vidual choice. That's a far cry
from the theology of evangel-
ical Christians who want to
use government to impose ~x-a-<
their own moral and reli-
gious precepts on the rest of the country.
Finally, O'Connor is a politiciari, the only one
on the current court. She served in the Arizona
legislature before becoming a judge, and those


SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

killed. And it's al-Qaida claim-
ing responsibility for nearly all
these evil, gutless acts.
Yes, the U.S. government is a
de facto agent for the industri-
alists who seek to do business
anywhere and everywhere
there's money to be made. Yes,
our government has been
insensitive to cultural differ-
ences, forcing the will of capi-
talists on those in their path.
But I'm not able to nor
willing to see the world from


Years gave her an instinct for
reconciling strongly held
views. Her position on abor-
tion keeping it legal, but
9 approving reasonable
restrictions that don't impose
an "undue burden" on
women is a rational com-
promise that closely mirrors
the moderate views or most.
Americans.
In the pool of choices the
president can draw from,
there aren't too many
women who roped cows,
raised children, surmounted
gender bias and served in
the legislature all before
becoming a judge.
But Sandra Day O'Connor
remains a good model for
the president. If he follows
-- B her example, he might actu-
ally succeed in reducing the
"bitterness and rancor" in Washington.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by e-
mail at stevecokie@gmail.com.


the perspective of those who
use "cultural differences" as
an excuse to impose and cele-
brate blood baths.
There's no equating al-
Qaida's actions with cultural
differences warranting con-
templation and compromise.
Not when al-Qaida's attacks
have left more than 4,000 vic-
tims dead since 1998.
Acts such as ramming jets
into skyscrapers and bombing
embassies, nightclubs, hotels,
banks and train stations aren't
going to win favorable world
opinion and sympathy for al-
Qaida's cause, whatever that
may be.


iJ4


.L--.


We are pleased to announce our 3rd Annual Talent Show.


Saturday, july 23 at 2 p.m.

865 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


Tickets will be $5 and can be purchased on
the day of the show at the ticket office.




For more information call Monica at 382-0011 or Vangie at 795-0251


5uIy/i~u~ust


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Telethon


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No, the United States and
our allies will never be able to
rid the world of terrorism. But
there's one terrorist network
that has proven to the world
that attempts at understanding
and compromise aren't worth
it.
I don't want to share this
planet with those people.


Charlie Brennan is editor o0
the Chronicle. He can be
reached at 563-3225 or by
e-mail at cbrennan@
chronicleonline.com.
Read his blog at
www.chronicleonline.com.


Superintendent's Golf Classic
Sheriff's Posse Yard Sale
MAY
Worlds Greatest Baby Shower
CASA Anniversary Dinner Dance
L* tecanto Relay For Life
SHurricane/Disaster Expo
Gospel Jubilee
Informational Fiesta
I 2005 Water Garden Tour
CMH Salute to Community
Yankee Air Force Corn Fest
ReMax Golf-Boys & Girls Club
Steak and Steak
Church Without Walls Golf
United Way Pro-Am Golf Tournament
LHS Project Graduation
CHS Project Graduation
Playhouse 19 Greater Tuna
JUNE
Chamber Hurricane Preparedness
Hurricane/Disaster Expo
Fiesta Tropicale
Adopt A Rescued Pet-Hurricane
Survival
SShake It up for Kids
Bowl For Child Mentoring
Yankee Air Force Ice Cream Social
Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
Musicon the Square
Homosassa Fireworks Show
Treasures on the Square
CFCC Golf Tournament
Boys & Girls Club Car Raffle Drawing
Gulf Island Theatre -
Is Love Everything?
JULY
Patriotic Evening
Crystal River Fireworks'
Rotary Duck Race
SSome Enchanted Evening
Run For The Money Auction
'ey Training Center Run For the Money
Key Center Telethon
Playhouse 19 Talent Show
I Community Choir Concert
V* veteran'ss Foundatipn Golf Scramble
AUGUST
' ankee Air Force Dance
SUnited Way Kickoff
SEPTEMBER
Harvest Moon Craft Show
Industry Appreciation Week
Habitat for Humanity Golf Tournament
Christmas In September
Arts & Crafts Show
SC-irlarir CIui.e O'Ltc.-n-."1
Save our Waleas Week
,r* ,r.i n 1 r, He..':.-
OCTOBER
Venlurlr,,..1 Cr- m .-152 lC-il Tljr., m,.r.T
'* i I ,:,r.: An; i Cral" br,,s
|| uiulT r, al Ir. G0 iri ,
C, :.-',hr.uill -, '-'a, AWVir.t Au,.;lh-.r
1 O TI IF R. :.: i r -, H.:1 .I .
rBFlail: I .':i Ti. 1 %i- t -i. dl
S.n,:,Tma C.i i'-li ,-rfve
LIID, i' Fall ?:1 ':':F Sal.
|'J 1 -n:r, F4., h 3 1
CFCC 1-r e.i Fe,'
I^. a. Cann-) Us,r.] ',
G| ,;,Ap Ffll.ai
[ *,Slr- 0l Qh'ui
||HB a S r ra,: Fa:ll;ai

NOVEMBER
LIo',ii C .rr'n',3ac Scquare
r i .al > r Arln
Cllru" Si a -rr,.p- l- l:. ,:,
| Wirr-i Vi ,r,. riar.-I C1aNt Snr.A
UCCBA Home ana OIj1-.0r ESrno,
Carir, ,carlr., Cr.cra.5iir,..
SPsra Jea ,oar,.
Di* lcO -. Crarr,;6r Luncr,r
DECEMBER
Hr -ici y 5v T,. Tu.ur
C,:.ur.lr, ri.:.- Tn, C i.r'/,-,r,
Fichral OIy H-,iiagie 1Day:
Su* -.13 Till Crr-.ri.ai, C r.:rinr
rClu: C.7'T.runrlI, C'rrl-i irn.a:
Cr'tOnili-ti'lrla T [6rria T,:.,,cr,-aml,=nl
Cry.lai r il'.T Cr .n-ma Fa,'.
/*Walianionir Mme To.I'
Ir-,,v-.'. Cnr,,mrrin PFa.-ane
Falc-r Cri-ri:nma.3 Ball
{ T* HoTC.-;,a IO51] i-,araai
NI Mi. M Iar.p.inr, Ia
lal* a ,jt-g Co:,.m Balltl Nul."rao, .r
j* Bar,-i-'';r,:.pper MuiHollo ay C.r.,:-ar i
,-ja* rr.a-s (O 'r1m.aa dParaio.a
H,* M3.m.t;as 5 Bcal P'3raa
Csi-: raic.r, .:.1 Lignris


S A ITING OF EVEfliS THEIR CilUS COuhNFf Crt BdIllE EtiHER mflt MiC Nll AIES t cN OFt 'PISRS IF IOuOutO [ LE MORE iNFORlMAtl nICN H,1/.TO W T
TiHE CHRONIUEf OR 10GETYOUREVENi SPiSORED PLEASE CALL NEALE BR .NJNAN ATI 5f- ,'


Swww.chronicU eo N Tne.com




www.chronicleonline.com


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SUNDAY
JULY 10, 2005
www chronicleonline com


When disaster strikes


Associated Press
NEW YORK With the Atlantic hur-
ricane season under way, many small
business owners in the paths of tropical
storms will undoubtedly find them-
selves coping with serious damage that
can shut their companies down.
Even owners who prepared their
companies for disasters will find it a
challenge to recover. Those who had no
plans particularly companies with-
out insurance might find that their
businesses are in danger of failing.


Disaster preparation means a contin-
gency plan, with provisions for operat-
ing even if your company's premises
are wrecked. It means adequate insur-
ance to cover physical damage and also
lost profits. It means having data and
important records backed up and
stored in a safe place.
But even if disaster strikes and you
have no plan, don't panic, is the advice
of Steve Lewis, editor in chief of
Edwards' Disaster Recovery Yellow


going to be against you and you should
have been prepared, if you're systemat-
ic, bit by bit, and do the most important
and doable things first," you'll have a
better chance of saving your company,
he said.
After the emergency has passed,
you'll understandably want to get to
your business to see what damage there
is. But that might not be possible -
roads can be washed out, for example,
or authorities might restrict access to
streets where power lines are down.
Steps to take


Pages. Carol Chastang, a spokeswoman with
"While it's true that the odds are the Small Business Administration,


suggests business owners take a camera
with them when they do go to the prop-
erty for the first time, and take plenty of
pictures to help either insurance
adjusters or a bank officer if they're
applying for an SBA disaster loan -
assess the damage.
"Get a really solid sense of what's
been lost, what's been destroyed,"
Chastang said.
Your next step should be calling the
people who help you stay in business -
employees, customers and vendors -
let them know what happened and
assure them you're trying to get the
Please see '.;, -:. ,'/Page 6D


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Artful


tasteful appreciation


KATIE HENDRICK/Chronicle
Kelli Sebastian with some of the paintings in her gallery, Galeria San Sebastian, in downtown Inverness. Sebastian was named one of SCORE's two businesses
of the year.


Gallery melds love of art

with admiration for process


KATIE HENDRICK
khendrick@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle intern
When Kelli Sebastian gazes at a piece of
art, she sees past the skilled lines or exqui-
site brush strokes.
Years ago, she acquired a deeper appreci-
ation for art while studying at the Parsons
School of Design in Manhattan.
"I realized the process of creating art is
what makes it beautiful," she said. "What
results is just a byproduct."
Fascinated by artists' purposes, her course
load migrated from fine arts to theory.
"My emphasis was always on aesthetics
though," she said.
She graduated with degrees in philosophy
and humanities, courses she went on to teach
at multiple schools, including the University
of Florida, the University of South Florida,
the University of Toledo in Ohio and
Heidelberg College in Ohio, before arriving
in Inverness five years ago.
Although a native of Los Angeles,
Sebastian has special ties to Citrus County.
"My mother lives here and I attended Citrus
High School for two years," she said.
Continuing her career as a professor, she
taught at Central Florida Community College
in Lecanto.
In just the past few months, however, that
all changed.
While visiting Cedar Key with her 16-year-
old son, Paris, Sebastian spoke with an artist


* WHAT: Galeria San Sebastian.
* WHERE: 107-A W. Main St.,
Inverness, FL 34450.
HOURS: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday
through Saturday.
U CALL: (352) 344-3838

who was in the midst of opening a gallery to,
promote local art
"That got me thinking, 'Oh, that'd be really
neat'," she said.
Immediately she saw the potential for an
art gallery in Inverness.
"Citrus County residents are a lot more
sophisticated than people realize," she said.
"But most artists and collectors were looking
elsewhere."
Intent on starting her own company, she
contacted SCORE, a group of retired execu-
tives who provide business counseling for
potential entrepreneurs, to guide her
through the requirements of starting a busi-
ness.
"There were obstacles here and there,"
she said, "but because I had 10 years experi-
ence with upper education, I was pretty
patient and used to going through adminis-
tration."
Her patience and determination paid off.
Her dream became a reality in March with
the grand opening of Galeria San Sebastian.
Please see GALLERY/Page 6D


Anna Maria and the Chocolate Fountain

Yummy business runs

'full stream' ahead


KATIE HENDRICK
khendrick *
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle intern
Anna Maria Briercheck was
instantly intrigued when she
saw a stream of chocolate gen-
tly cascading down a fountain
at a food show in Orlando last
October.
"I asked myself, 'What is
this?' People flocked around
it. It impressed everyone,"
she said.
Captivated, she bought the
chocolate fountain on the
spot
"I told them I didn't want to
wait and order one. I wanted
it now," she said.
After that was set and done,
she decided to call her hus-
band, Frank "Mind if I start


my own business?" she asked
him.
Frank, who runs a dry-
cleaning and formal wear
business in Crystal River, was
stunned. He supported her
decision, but warned her that
there was a lot of work
involved, even to get started.
Briercheck, however, was not
concerned.
She called SCORE, a busi-
ness-counseling group, the
next day.
"They told me they'd be
happy to schedule an appoint-
ment sometime later that
week but I told them I had to
start today," she said. "So they
told me they'd meet with me
in an hour."
To kill time, she ventured

Please see FOUNTAIN/Page 6D


Small businesses should be prepared now


STOCKS
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NEws
BUSINESS DIGEST
PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS


-.
Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY



Dodge


dooms


wife's


credit
DEAR BRUCE: When
I was married, my
then-husband signed
up for a couple of credit
cards without telling me. He
went a little crazy and
charged almost $15,000 on
them, and declared bank-
ruptcy after our divorce.
My credit has always been
good until now. Since he
filed for bankruptcy I can't,
get any kind of credit. The
card companies won't take it
off the report. They say that
even though I didn't sign for
the charges and was
unaware of the cards, they
were opened during our
marriage, and I have a
responsibility. Is this true?
- Reader, Las Vegas, Nev.
DEAR READER.: I'm
afraid they're right. In most
cases, if the accounts were
open during your marriage,
both parties are equally
responsible, and since he
took the easy way, bankrupt-
cy, the only person that they
can come after is you. You
may be able to work out
some kind of a deal with the
credit card companies, but I
certainly do sympathize with
you. The only clear way to
have all of the accounts go
away is to take the same
route your cowardly ex-hus-
band took
DEAR BRUCE: I paid my
credit card with a check for
$50. Shortly afterward, I
received an overdraft notice
from my bank, which I knew
was not possible. It turns out
that the check for $50 went
through my account as $500
and was honored by the
bank After some digging, my
bank admitted to its mistake
and contacted the credit
card company. I was reim-
bursed the overdraft fees
and they also sent letters to
each of the people whose
checks had bounced, letting
them know that the bank was
in error
A lot of people think that
banks don't make mistakes,
but that's not true. This type
of thing can and does hap-
pen. I had a friend who put
deposits in the night
deposits, but they somehow
became stuck in the door
and no one discovered them
until they started receiving
overdraft notices. When they
notified the bank, which had
no record of the deposit, the
bank checked and'found the
deposits stuck These kinds
of thing that can happen.
Please warn your readers. -
M.H., Homosassa.
DEAR M.H.: You are
absolutely right. Everyone
makes mistakes. People who
input the information are
capable of a mistake or two,
and everyone is too quick to
assume that computers don't
make mistakes, either. Time
and again I run across these
problems. Don't trust that
what you are reading is the
gospel Make sure you check
all of your statements, bank,
credit card, mortgage, insur-
ance, etc. for accuracy
DEAR BRUCE: My tenant,
who has been renting my
house from me, approached
me about buying it He was
having problems getting a
loan, so I said I would carry
him. We had a contract that I
drew up and it was signed
with witnesses. Now, all of a
Please see MONEY/Page 6D


* WHAT: Chocolate Fountains by Anna Maria.
U WHERE: 6784 W, Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Crystal River, FL 34429.
U CALL: 563-5267.
* E-MAIL: annaschocolate@tampabay.rr.com













STOCKS


21 SI),.A',, Jitls 10, 2005


CITRUS CouvrY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOST ACTIVE (S1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
,13NA 1325683 25.79 +02
Pzer 11517.11 2714 +04
GenElec 1091300 34.99 +25
Lucent 10791-149 2.98 +.04
BkcfAms 810819 45.15 +.17

GAINERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
IntegES 2.36 +.51 427.6
Amvescp 14.96 +2.82 +23.2
Ch:quta wt 12 65 +1.95 +18.2
FiatpfA 6.70 +1.00 +17.5
LamSessn 13.93 +1.98 +16.6

LOSERS (S2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
ChinSAir 14.08 -2.62 -15.7
BigLots 11.15 -1.97 -15.0
Bombay 4.89 -.70 -12.5
Braskems 14.57 -2.03 -12.2
HavertyA 13.00 -1.79 -12.1

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,491
999
611
56
3,571
81
7.737,530,273


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)


Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
SPDR 2648655 121.32 +1.79
iShRs2000s1043533 65.97 +1.99
SemiHTr 914495 3553 +1.74
SP Engy 620970 46.24 +.80
iShJapan 418502 10.23 +.09

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Versar 5.45 +2.29 +72.5
FortDiv n 5.95 +2.25 +60.8
AMS HIth 2.83 +.87 +44.4
Medifast 4.28 +1.22 +39.9
ImplntSc 3.87 +.88 +29.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
IntegBioPh 2.72 -.78 -22.3
GlobeTel n 2.38 -.45 -15.9
Xenonics n 2.00 -.33 -14.2
IvaxDiag 4.10 -.56 -12.0
PatientSf s 3.40 -.40 -10.5

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


663
407
151
39
1,133
63
1,072,053,834


Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Nasd100Tr3754058 37.77 +1.05
Microsoft 2607189 25.09 +.38
SunMicro 1987067 3.63 -.02
Oracle 1908605 13.56 +.27
Cisco 1796764 19.31 +.32

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Catuityrs 17.36 +7.86 +82.7
App lmg rs 2.70 +1.10 +68.8
Abrams 8.40 +3.40 +68.0
Paradyne 2.79 +.98 +54.1
PrmEgy 45.60 +14.60 +47.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
A Consl h 9.80 -4.30 -30.5
724 Sol 6.32 -1.90 -23.1
ADECp 21.9A -6.55 -23.0
YoungBd 3.44 -.82 -19.2
AbleLabs 2.88 -.64 -18.2

DIARY
Advanced 2,231
Declined 1,050
New Highs 315
New Lows 84
Total issues 3,357
Unchanged 76


Volume


6,373,088,330


Here are the 400 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 325 most
active on the Nasdaq National Market and 50 most active on the American Stock
Exchange. Mutual funds are 800 largest.


52 wk Hi/Lo: High and low price over the past 52 weeks.
Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company's full name (not its abbrevia-
tion). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock.
PE: Price to earnings ratio.
PPE: Projected price to earnings ratio based on analysts' forecasts of earnings for next
12 months.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the week.
YTD % Chg: Loss or gain for the year. No change indicated by unc.
Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by unc.


Stock Footnotes: .:.: PE ygr -a, Ir.r,99 1 I :U- I. r r .en c alloe1.d 0'., r.de p.:pin i t >:,,T..rpan, J. I ,u
J.ic 1u.1 il - L:.-; 1- t iE l I T : m. l.:.E.T l. 1, l:l -. ,:,r ir an.].ji. t ..: r i.-: e,-c.i.ry ...
h1.],j ,OE131 ,I u ,1 L ,, ,ui O ., '.'3'v,' .e i n. l',,,O'i,-,, I,,i3 u r.o F',eT i.iE,,h+,i .n 5,,1,ir5 '.,
. PAr.,, V lf .: .3'. 'd- lo j ai rr.ric. ,n ii'.o.'ar' i:.ir' r, l3;.pa.rr rmp; 1 .rn ,. 0.
a l oa l i s p lu : l r u :llili:. l ' l .:l ^ ^ a r i' i L iy i r^ I aI T ~rr f . :,:4 r r. & ..Tr .. .
opi a pp a 5 .I 9I I u W '- .0 p' O .. lo-' oO' 1.. L o1 a.o rr. 1.
ir'J 3 ,1 *.'l I: n"i .,.l i .Jj o.. HO l .- l : VJo a P-uh:r. e 1 r..1 -. pp I..id.r cs.. 1
,rn:aIullr ,- ,'i[ n ,: i .',,jro:i ,.'q ,: i l: d 'Tnuoijl Io rl.n Pc .'.o l.,Jlpt l : I n I,: t ':u ial
a ,:A II,.;,lll n:' ,pir 5r.:.'h ho: 'pr t ,t 0 I lo.x, p' ,"7J l'' l .l'nir, ', I .il .ar o '., T, ,.1,u S ill trJ..'flm i.3 rir

Ir,, i 0 ir, nli j i 0,10010 0"... i I, h,, .:.r, ', .'jhu, ,", , '.l. 3'Tp ', r, e .: 'U I :' ,, ,', :h.'--i ,_, n re',. 8n .0o ','c I
.,a'nrZe, njunl r l0,30 ,.a0 n nulop[.:., l aoj Mp,,.-.r ,r, I,,oi ,I ll',u ,;I ] ,Tit-
Di.lidend Footnotes: a E'iiria >,,, ,n,. ', r r o t n5 0 'nL" f'..u>.' '. : r-, w ro p uL r 1 i.?
L u ra ',,m o f ,a ir.: -i ,:..- l 3 : ..,: A :r p ,i , 3 I ,i'... O. ,' I. : Co u n rn r,, ij al rl o i- r.,


p a. n 4 '0."'l r :o' l'r,. a ri .. 'i: r c.; r.l .:u1 ..o .l inra ao i'a1 6 .r, '.:r. i3 :- oF.: ed i t.o, 'l .o

g .: ri- .3 er i o ar I or...uo o ar. p l.'.. l a.l .. )I r a, l I, c ..O:.I V I I'r... I ...I r.h.: r d.:Il. 3 :.r
C.,a10 irp ce 12 rn: l ni. s sro,: i. .:k .,1 1nJ,.3 I, 1 1 nan n ..) .;..:i sp r:,nn-i,.-" r ,ir. 1 a.ij,6 ...r. e. ,-s.satr .tuu r.,u
,3jle Source. The Associalea Piess. Sales 11guyars are unolffic.al


I ~~STOKS6 LC N6 RS


Wkly YTD
Div PE Yld Last Chg %Chg Name


AT&T
AmSouth
BkofAm s
BellSouth
CapCtyBk s
Citigrp
Disney
EKodak
ExxonMbl
FPL Gp s
FlaRock s
FordM
GenElec
GnMotr
HomeDp
Intel
IBM


.. -.6
+.62 +2.9
+.17 -3.9
+.18 -3.5
+2.33 +2.4
+.35 -3.5
-.09 -10.1
+.58 -15.2
+1.09 +15.9
+.65 +16.0
+2.13 +28.8
+.11 -28.8
+.25 -4.1,
+.03 -13.4
+.59 -6.2
+1.07 +16.6
+4.63 -19.6


Wkly YTD
Div PE YId Last Chg %Chg


LowesCos .24
McDnlds .55
Microsoft .32
Motorola .16
Penney .50
ProgrssEn 2.36
SearsHldgs
SprntFON .50
TimeWarn .20
UniFirst .15
VerizonCm 1.62
Wachovia 1.84
WalMart .60
Walgrn .21


+1.92 +3.4
+.71 -10.6
+.38 -6.1
+.27 +7.8
+2.43 +33.8
+.12 -.4
+.34 +53.7
+.27 +2.1
-.17 -15.6
-.17 +48.3
+.24 -15.1
+1.17 -4.3
+1.62 -5.5
+.81 +22.2


52-Week Daily Wkly Wkly YTD
High Low Name Last Net Chg Net Chg % Chg % Chg
10,984.46 9,708.40 Dow Jones Industrials 10,449.14 +145.70 +1.41 -3.10 +2.31
3,889.97 2,959.58 Dow Jones Transportation 3,589.96 +81.29 +2.32 -5.48 +16.26
391.94 274.84 Dow Jones Utilities 390.41 +.05 +.01 +16.56 +41.43
7,455.08 6,215.97 NYSEComposite 7,330.58 +84.99 +1.17 +1.11 +12.77
1,563.67 1,186.14 AMEX Index 1,561.01 +6.27 +.40 +8.83 +23.78
2,191.60 1,750.82 Nasdaq Composite 2,112.88 +55.51 +2.70 -2.88 +8.56
1,229.11 1,060.72 S&P 500 1,211.86 +17.42 +1.46 -.01 +8.90
662.69 515.90 Russell 2000 662.14 +19.10 +2.97 +1.62 +17.46
12,122.86 10,268.52 Wilshire5000 12,115.55 +199.33 +1.67 +1.21 +11.74


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PEPPE Last


YTD
chg %chg


A-B-C
7.10 486 ABB Ltd ..... 15 6.43 +.01 +13.6
845 785 ACMInco .66 q ... 8.29 +.04 +1.6
1813 9.09 AESCp ... 22 17 16.09 -.50 +17.7
44.84 3385 AFLAC .44 18 16 44.60 +.73 +11.9
39.32 2860 AGLRes 1.24 16 16 38.62 -.48 +16.2
33.11 26.76 AMLIRs 1.92 13 ... 3268 +1.28 +2.1
14.95 6.34 AMR .. dd .. 12.68 +.62 +15.8
4581 33.15 ASALtd .40 q ... 38.45 +.14 -4.9
2001 13.59 AT&T .95 dd 12 18.95 unc -0.6
2848 1912 AXA .79e 25.18 +.24 +1.7
4998 3826 AbtLab 1.10 24 19 49.35 +.32 +5.8
2774 2100 Accenlure ... 16 15 24.21 +.93 -10.3
1399 12.07 AdamsEx.90e q ... 13.01 +.13 -0,8
2485 15.11 Adesa 30 20 16 23.84 +1.93 +12.3
2495 1076 AMD .. cc 51 18,94 +1.49 -14.0
9.23 615 Ahold ... .. .. 8.17 unc +5.1
14.22 7.4A0 AirTran dd ... 9.37 +.09 -12.4
34.99 25.55 Alcoa .60 19 13 27.20 +1.06 -13.4
50.90 30.76 Alletes 1.26f 19 22 50.58 +.48 +37.6
4990 32.35 AllCap 2.43e 19 15 47.32 +.71 +12.7
12.86 11.03 AliWrld2 89 q ... 12.28 -.13 -0.8
37.55 24.35 AllmrFn 13 12 37.45 +.32 +14.1
20.20 20 9.39 Alpharma .18 dd 29 15.17 +.41 -10.5
69.68 4450 Allna 2.92 14 12 64.87 -.16 +6.2
55.86 42.41 Ameren 2.54 19 18 55.59 -.03 +10.9
37.47 30.27 AEP 1.40 13 15 38.09 +1.23 +10.9
58.03 47.70 AmExp .48 19 16 53.93 +.39 -4.3
73.80 49.91 AmlntGp l[ 50 15 12 60.05 +1.44 -8.6
12.75 10.65 AmSIP3 .96 q .. 10.91 -.14 -11.4
21.62 1310 AmTower .. dd .o 21.64 +.71 +17.6
33.25 25.94 Amerigas2.241 22 19 32.70 +.13 +10.5
27.12 23.80 AmSouth 1.00 15 13 26,64 +,62 +2.9
89.22 55.52 Anadrk .72 13 10 88.42 +3.76 +36.4
43.88 31.36 AnalogDev.24 29 25 39.49 +2.16 +7.0
54.62 44.85 Anheusr .98 17 16 45.93 +.05 -9.5
70.50 42.45 Apache .32 12 10 69.38 +2.48 +37.2
30.98 18.90 AquaAm .52 34 29 30,02 -,.26 +22.1
424 225 Aquila dd ... 3.60 -.03 -2.4
56.73 30.10 ArchCoal .32 78 19 56.39 +1.36 +58,7
25.37 14.95 ArchDan .34 18 15 20.89 -.59 -6.4
62.00 5935 Ashlandn1.12 9 16 62.54 unc +1.2
10.50 7.77 AsdEstat .68 dd .. 9.57 +.38 -6.4
29.35 24.40 ATMOS 1.24 16 16 29.42 +.32 +7.6
1776 7.76 Avaya .17 12 8.06 -.36 -53.1
34.07 18.00 Aviall 23 17 31.90 +.55 +38.9
46.65 35.64 Avon .66 20 17 37.23 -.57 -3.8
31.01 17.62 BHPBiiL.46e ...... 27.62 +.22 +15.0
66.70 51.95 BPPLC 1.87e 14 ... 66.31 +3.08 +13.5
25.10 19.45 BRT 2.00f 14 .. 23.20 +.08 -4.7
54.61 37.55 BakrHu .46 29 21 52.39 +.82 +22.8
4645 34.12 BallCps .40 14 13 39.08 +3.52. -11.1
4747 41.70 BkofAms2.00f 12 10 45.15 +.17 -3.9
34.09 26.93 BkNY' .80a 15 13 28.80 -.20 -13.8
46.88 36.74 Banta .721 17 15 46.40 +.28 +3.7
26.32 18.14 BarrckG 22 48 42 24.56 -.72 +1.4
8789 5717 BauschL .52 27 22 84.07 +2.29 +30.4
998 4.65 BeanngPIf ... dd 26 7.65 +.33 -4.7
28.96 24.85 BellSoulh1l.161 11 15 26.83 +.18 -3.5
38.17 26.52 BIkHICp 1.28 19 18 37.74 +.36 +23.0
16.07 15.20 BkFL08 .75a q .... 15.50 +.06 -2.2
6.94 5.86 BlueChp .56e q ... 6.65 +.15 -0.4
66.85 46.40 Boeing 1.00 30 22 65.07 +.39 +25.7
27.47 2120 Borders .36 16 14 25.60 +.38 +1.1
2795 1955 BostBeer 22 21 22.83 +.17 +7.3
72.12 5060 BostProp2.72f 29 34 73.05 +2.06 +13.0
42.78 26.50 BostonSci ... 19 14 27.80 +.91 -21.8
26.60 22.22 BrMySq 1.12 24 19 24.91' -.29 -2.8
56.47 33.51 BurlNSF 68 20 12 49.33 +1.34 +4.3
59.88 34.92 BurlRsc .34 14 12 58.54 +1.73 +34.6
49.65 42.07 CH Engy 216 20 19 48.95 +.40 +1.9
11050 58.00 CIGNA .10 8 15 109.12 +2.34 +33.8
15.40 858 CMSEng .. 11 16 15.47 +.37 +48.0
36.65 28.98 CSSInds .481 14 11 34.57 +1.36 +8.8
30.00 19.31 CVSCps .15 29 20 30.26 +1.21 +34.3
15.59 9.28 CallGolf .28 dd 25 15.49 +.06 +14.7
446 132 Calpine ... dd ... 3.35 -.03 -15.0
31.60 25.21 CampSp .68 19 17 30.51 -.14 +2.1
14.20 11.68 CapMpfB1.26 ...... 13.15 +.07 -3.3
58.98 4254 Carnival .80f 22 18 54.74 +.02 -5.0
10298 6850 Caterpillr2.00f 16 11 98.70 +2.77 +1.2
2500 1904 Cendant .36 15 14 22.33 +.04 +0.2
13.51 9.78 CenterPnt.28m dd 16 13.49 +.08 +19.4
86.45 76.00 CnlLtpf 4.50 ...... 85.00 +.50 +4.3
35.54 29.55 CntryTel .24 14 14 33.62 -1.14 -5.2


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
15.85 7.53 ChmpE ... 25 18 10.38 +.47 -12.2
19.35 14.38 Checkpnt .01 14 16 19.28 +1.08 +6.8
26.04 13.69 ChesEng .20f 17 12 25.14 +.95 +52.4
63.15 46.21 Chevron s1.80f 9 10 57.36 +.39 +9.2
4.88 3.14 CinciBell ... 28 20 4.49 +.04 +8.2
45.60 36.95 CINergy 1.92 20 15 44.97 -.44 +8.0
49.99 42.10 Citigrp 1.76 14 10 46.51 +.35 -3.5
27.41 18.84 ClairesStrs .40 17 15 24.79 +.70 +16.7
51.39 38.30 CocaCI 1.12 22 19 42.73 +.52 +2.6
28.76'18.45 CocaCE .16 19 16 22.08 +.02 +5.9
9.31 8.08 Collntin .65a q 8.84 -.08 -3.8
32.99 23.35 CmcBNJs .44 18 15 30.73 +.68 -4.6
30.24 22.50 ConAgra 1.09 18 16 22.99 -.18 -21.9
61.95 35.64 ConocPhilsl.24 9 9 60.24 +1.14 +38.8
47.23 39.17 ConEd 2.28 20 16 47.85 +.77 +9.4
15.76 12.30 Cnvrgys 19 14 14.66 +.26 -2.2
17.08 9.29 Corning .. dd 21 16.95 +.06 +44.0
11.90 7.05 CorusGr ........ 7.99 +.45 -18.6
14.92 8.45 CypSem ... dd 40 13.55 +.72 +15.5
D-E-F
11.95 10.24 DNP Selct.78a q ... 11.64 +.04 -2.3
27,84 18,98 DPL .96 14 19 27.43 -.11 +9.2
40.58 18.58 DRHortn s.361 11 9 39.96 +2.44 +32.2
48.31 39.31 DTE 2.06 23 13 48,11 +1.04. +11.5
48.63 38.77 DaimlrC 1.93e ... 10 40.25 -.23 -16.2
19.75 10.90 DanaCp .48 75 12 16.45 +1.12 -5.1
33.68 19.30 Darden .08 18 16 32.08 -.95 +15.6
74.73 56.72 Deere 1.24 11 10 68.76 +2.66 -7.6
10.12 3.20 Delphi .06m 18 ... 5.03 +.48 -44.2
8.17 2.46 DeltaAir ... dd ... 3.50 -.22 -53.2
54.72 31.61 DevonEs .30 12 10 54.03 +1,33 +38.8
18.25 13.88 DirecTV .. dd 46 15.65 +.14 -6.5
29.99 20.88 Disney .24f 20 17 25.00 -.09 -10.1
22.80 17.69 DollarG .18f 19 16 20.31 -.10 -2.2
76.87 62.07 DomRes 2.68 20 15 74.80 +.70 +10.4
56.75 37.95 DowChm 1.34 11 9 45.75 +1.06 -7.6
54,90 39.88 DuPont 1.48f 21 15 43.50 +.67 -11.3
30.18 20.15 DukeEgy 1.24f 14 18 29.90 -.09 +18.0
38.95 34.00 DuqpfA 2.10 ...... 38.25 -.35 +6.3
19.74 16.93 DuqLight 1.00 15 16 19.10 +.19 +1.3
6.09 3.21 Dynegy ... dd ... 5.02 -.11 +8.7
16.00 9.51 ETrade ... 15 14 15.05 +.96 +0.7
15,09 9.24 EMCCp ... 36 25 14.70 +.53 -1.1
61.80 42.19 EastChm 1.76 13 9 55.90 +.91 -3.2
35.19 24.63 EKodak .50 20 10 27.35 +.58 -15.2
13.15 7.09 EIPasoCp .16 dd 15 11.96 +.27 +15.0
30.49' 3.00 Elan ...... 7.23 +.46 -73.5
24.50 19.53 EmpDisl 1.28 32 17 24.57 +.32 +8.3
55.66 45.60 EnbrEPtrs3.70 28 25 54.26 +.61 +5.2
23.65 17.81 Endesa .92e ...... 22.13 -.60 -4.9
30.15 17.35 EnPro ... 19 16 29.30 -.03 -0.9
41.42 26.95 ENSCO .10 45 17 37,27 +1.02 +17.4
76.81 54.43 Entergy 2.16 20 16 76.58 +.81 +13.3
13.65 8.41 Eqtyinn .60 cc 53 13.15 -.16 +12.0
52.01 32.80 Exelon 1.60 18 16 51.61 -.12 +17.1
64.37 44.20 ExxonMbl1.161 14 13 59.40 +1.09 415.9
43.30 31.21 FPLGps 1.42 18 16 43.34 +.65 +16.0
19.18 13.80 FedSignl .24 dd 22 16.15 +.38 -8.6
22,27 19.28 Ferreligs 2.00 dd 27 21.48 +.42 +5.8
25.97 16.77 Ferrolf .58 38 17 20.60 +.84 -11.2
22.17 13.72 FFinFds510e q ... 18.48 +.39 -14.0
20.71 18.87 FtTrFid n 1.60 q ... 19.69 +.51 -1.5
50.10 26.50 FlaRocks ... 28 22 51.13 +2.13 +28.8
15.37 9.07 FordM .40 8 9 10.42 +.11 -28.8
92.30 68.47 ForuneBr 1.32 17 17 93.23 +2.72 +20.8
G-H-I
35.60 23.82 GATX .80 11 20 35.60 +1.00 +20.4
9.40 7.64 GabelliET.72a q ... 8.98 -.01 -0.4
24.00 18.12 Gap .18 17 14 20.97 +1.15. -0.7
6.92 2.78 Gateway ... dd 18 3.75 +.48 -37.6
37.75 31.42 GenElec .88 21 18 34.99 +25 -4.1
53.89 43.01 GenMills 1.321 15 16 46.20 -.18 -7.1
45.09 24.67 GnMoIr 2.00 46 54 34.68 +.03 -13.4
54.33 37.77 Gillette .65 29 25 50.69 -.02 +13.2
44.00 24.53 GlobalSFe.601 52 17 41.28 +.19 +24.7
114.25 83.29 GoldmanSl.00 12 11 105.65 +2.94 +1.5
43.45 29.39 Goodrich .80 29 20 43.13 +1.22 +32.1
16.09 8.70 Goodyear ... 12 14 15.30 +.18 +4.4
32.50 27.86 GtPlainEn1.66 14 16 32.44 -.02 +7.1
30.88 24.80 GMP 1.00 14 ... 29.43 -.36 +2.1
27.78 18.35 Griffon ... 17 13 24.97 +2.51 -7.5
20.74 13.10 GuangRy.71e ...... 17.79 -.40 -13.1
75.55 49.95 Guidant .40 40 24, 67.16 +1.43 -6.9


52-Wk YTD 52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
50.00 26.45 Hallibin .50 dd 19 48.36 +.26 +23.2 35.65 16.51 Lyondell .90 21 7 28.00 +1.55 -3.2
16.17 14.32 HanJS 1.11o q .. 15.10 -.12 -3.7
10.09 8.65 HanPtDiv .55 q ... 9.22 -.21 -7.8 M-N-0
12.32 10.30 HanPIDv2 .78 q ... 12.14 +.04 +5.5 108.75 87.00 M&TBk 1.80f 17 15 106.46 +.88 -1.3
50.85 33.40 Hanson 1.71e ...... 47.25 -.39 +10.1 29.01 18.28 MBNA .56 15 12 25.79 +.02 -8.5
63.75 45.14 HarleyD .641 16 15 49.74 -.04 -18.1 29.34 23.75 MDU Res .72 16 15 29.34 +.47 +10.0
75.05 43.94 HarrahE 1.32 22 19 75.30 +2.73 +12.6 9.06 8.35 MCR .50 q ... 8.80 unc -0.2
21.80 16.90 Hasbro .36 23 17 21.57 +.72 +11.3 11.00 6.52 Madeco ......... 9.56 +.36 -9.7
29.79 24.60 HawaiiEl 1.24 18 16 27.12 -.08 -7.0 83.92 60.00 Magnalg 1.52 11 10 74.58 +3.96 -9.7
38.68 31.11 HIItCrREIT2.481 29 30 38.84 +.76 +1.8 6.99 5.96 MgdHi .52 q ... 6.34 +.01 -3.5
42.11 35.25 HlthcrR lf2.62f 29 32 40.52 +1.52 -0.4 49.25 38.43 Manulifg 1.20f ... 13 49.01 +1.04 +6.1
10.01 5.74 HellnTel .21e ...... 9.60 -.29 +9.1 57.50 33.55 Marathon 1.12 15 11 56.13 +.59 +49.2
24.70 16.08 HewlettP .32 20 15 24.28 +.80 +15.8 47.35 22.75 MarshM .68 dd 14 29.40 +1.87 -10.6
30.71 22.62 HighwdP 11fl.70 cc .. 31.03 +.93 +12.0 37.49 8.30 MSewrt ... dd .. 29.60 +.35 +2.0
44.30 32.39 HomeDp .40 17 15 40.08 +.59 -6.2 18.16 10.26 MatScill ... dd 12 14.99 +.47 -16.7
39.50 31.85 Honwillntl .83 20 16 36.02 -.26 +1.7 24.30 9.21 Maytag .36m dd 23 15.77 -.19 -25.3
34.51 25.29 HughSups.36f 15 12 29.10 +.68 -10.0 34.56 25.64 McDnids .55f 15 14 28.65 +.71 -10.6
44.73 15.51 Humana ... 21 18 41.75 +2,40 +40.6 55.00 29.40 MedcoHIth ... 27 19 49.15 -3.95 +18.1
32.95 26.05 Idacorp 1.20 16 18 31.45 +.31 +2.9 47.05 25.60 Merck 1.52 12 13 31.00 -.06 -3.5


41.92 28.46 Imation .481
87.92 62.05 IngerRd 1.00
99.10 71.85 IBM .801
39.10 24.20 IntlGame .48
35.09 26.66 IronMtn .
J-
40.45 33.35 JPMorgCh1.36
69.99 54.37 JohnJn 1.321
63.98 50.97 JohnsnCtIl.00
34.02 26.52 Kaydon .48
46.89 39.88 Kellogg 1.01
42.87 24.40 Kellwood .64
34.50 29.00 Keycorp 1.30
41.53 35.19 KeySpan 1.82
58.50 41.02 Kohls ..
19.96 14.65 Kroger ...
8.29 4.74 LLE Ry .36e
9.60 4.01 LSI Log ...
22.42 16.45 LTCPrp 1.32
17.77 11.50 LaZBoy .44
32.80 26.31 Laclede 1.38
6.80 5.51 LbtyASG .59e
11.21 8.33 LibtyMA ...
69.57 50.34 LillyEli 1.52
49.42 40.78 LincNat 1.46
29.51 17.50 Lindsay .22
65.46 51.16 LockhdM 1.00
4.16 2.35 Lucent ...


61.99 47.35
46.97 32.99
14.50 9.32
47.31 35.13
24.00 14.59
3.98 1.65
58.10 42.01
63.80 43.79
60.51 46.54
20.27 12.47
19.25 12.37
11.75 10.15
20.20 14.24
39.84 21.01
29.75 25.05
52.39 39.40
23.08 11.85
2.29 1.94
49.00 39.54
49.98 34.90
7.95 4.72
18.88 15.01
19.41 15.61
25.11 20.50
41.87 32.37
92.43 68.61
64.66 34.15
17.70 10.89
4.86 2.26


MerrillLyn .801 13
MelLife .461 11
MicronT ... 34
MidAApt 2.34 cc
Midas ... 42
Milacron ... dd
Millipore ... 27
MiljsCp 2.51 23
MorgStan 1.08 13
MSEmMkt,07e q
Motorola .16b 28
MunienhFd.73 q
MylanLab .24f 26
NCRCps ... 21
NatFuGasl.161 15
NatGrid 2.17e ...
NatSemi .08 22
NewAm .21a q
NJRscs 1.36 18
NewmtM .40 39
NwpkRs ... 76
NewsCpAn.16e...
NewsCpB n.06e ..
NiSource .92 16
Nicor 1.86 18
NikeB 1.00 21
NobleCorp .08 51
NokiaCp .44e ...
NorelNet ... dd


+1.44 -5.5
+.68 +13.9
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+.03 -43.1
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+.51 +9.4
-.09 -26.5


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


NoFrkBcs .88 15 12
NoestUI .701 dd 17
NoBordr 3.20 18 20
NorthropGl.041 16 14
NSTARs 1.16 18 16
Nucors .60a 6 8
NvFL .88 q ...
NvIMO .89 q ...
OGEEngyl.33 18 16
OcciPet 1.24 11 10
Olin' .80 14 8
OshkshTrk.53f 21 16
OulbkSIk .52 21 16
P-Q-R
PNMRes .74 19 16
PPG 1.881 17 12
PPLCorp1.84 17 14
PacifCre ... 23 18
PaylShoe ... 99 18
Pengrth g 2.76 ......
PenVaRs2.481 ... 18
Penney .50 24 16
PepBoy .27 cc 39
PepsiCo 1.04f 21 19
PepsiAmer.34 20 18
Prmian 1,13e 16 ...
Pfizer .76 22 13
PiedNGs .92 21 18
PimcoStrat.89a q ...
PitnyBw 1.24 20 16
PlumCrk 1.52 21 23
PostPrp 1.80 19 ...
Praxair .72 22 18
ProctGaml.121 20 18
ProgrssEn2.36 15 14
ProsStHiln .30 q ...
Providian ... 14 10
PSEG 2.24 20 17
PSEG pfA4.08 ......
PugetEngyl.00 41 17
PHYM .38 q ..
PIGM .60 q ...
PPrlT .36a q ...
Quanexs .54 12 11
QwestCm .. dd ...
RPM .60 19 13
RadioShk .25 12 12
Ralcorp 1.00e 18 17
RJamesFn.32 17 14
Rayonier 2.48 24 24
Rltylncos1.34 23 23
RegionsFnl.36 16 14
Repsol .63e ... ...
RetailVent ... dd 24
Revlon ... dd ...
RiteAid ... 10 71
RoylDut 2.82e 11 ...
Royce 1.66e q ...
S-T-U
SBCCo 1ml.29 16 15
SCANA 1.56 19 15
SUtJoe .56 69 44
SalEMInc21.65a q ...
SalmSBF.14e q ..
SJuanB 2.94e 16 ...
SaraLee .79 13 13
SchergPI .22 dd 45
Schimb .84 31 25
Schwab .09f 63 22
ScottPw 1.65e ......
SeagateT .321 23 9
Sensient .60 14 13
ShopKo .. 16 15
Shurgard 2.24f 57 77
SierrPac .,, 28 21
SilcnGph h ... dd ..
SimonProp2.80 52 53
SmilhAO .64 21 14
Solectm ... ... 17
SouthnCol.49f 17 16
SovrgnBcp.16 17 12
SpmtFON .50 dd 17
Standex .84 22 ...


+.63 +0.5
-.10 +10.8
+1.77 +5.9
-.36 +1.1
+.20 +14.7
+2,74 -6.1
+.18 +2.8
+.11 -0.6
+.26 +10.8
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une -17.1
+3.25 +18.6
-1.05 -4.2


-.41 +13.7
+.06 -7.5
+.97 +15.2
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+.94 +68.3
+.43 +9.6
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+.04 +0.9
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-.43 -6.8
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-.19 +6.8
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unc -1.5
+.06 -2.9
+.03 +7.4
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-.01 -1.7
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-.05 -18.2
+.33 -5.1
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-.04 +1.1
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+.14 +9.7
+.16 +0.8
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-.86 +80.1
unc +33.5
+.02 +16.7
-.29 +14.5
+.44 -5.0


-.03 -8.5
+.47 +9.7
+1.75 +29.5
+.03 -17.9
+.20 +1.8
+.70 +47.8
-.26 -19.7
+.05 -9.1
+.86 +15.7
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-.59 +12.6
+.89 +5.6
+.64 -9.7
-.09 +30.3
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+.13 +21.9
-.16 -67.6
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+.16 -9.2
-.08 -31.1
+.53 +6.2
+1.48 +6.8
+.27 +2.1
+1.04 +3.9


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


26.51 19.80 Steris .16 22 18
36.82 22.95 StbrTch ... 21 19
11.90 6.41 SturmR .40 58 19
40.76 33.90 SunCmls 2.52 dd ...
75.00 63.50 SunTrst 2.20 14 13
32.62 24.55 TCFFncds.85 14 13
32.35 24.35 TDBknorlh.80 20 13
19.26 11.97 TECO .76 dd 16
25.96 20.64 TJX .24 18 15
87.25 38.34 TXUCorp2.25 dd 12
71.51 43.62 TXUpfD 4.06 ......
9.57 6.29 TaiwSemi .32r ......
56.99 40.03 Target .401 16 20
13.16 9.77 TenetHIt ... dd ...
45.45 37.44 Teppco 2.65 25 21
20.99 10.80 Teradyn ... 36 ...
9.38 5.73 Terra ... 16 13
28.80 11.01 TerraNitro2.45e 11 ...
33.33 23.71 TetraTech ... 37 18
29.46 18.06 Texlnst .10 27 23
4.70 3.04 Theragen ... dd ..
30.98 23.94 ThermoEl ... 12 16
33.88 23.19 ThmBet ... 17 15
89.30 71.03 3MCo 1.68 19 17
36.37 27.00 Tiffany .32f 16 21
19.90 15.41 TimeWam .20 23 19
29.50 22.50 Timken .60 13 10
22.87 11.15 TitanCp ... dd 18
20.15 14.85 ToddShp .40 12 ...
8.22 5.86 TorchEn .68e ......
57.57 49.28 Trchmrk .44 12 11
45.58 32.28 TorDBkg 1.60 ... 13
122.75 93.54 TotalSA3.53e ......
26.66 20.89 TotalSys .24f 29 23
29.50 24,00 TwnCtry 1.72 cc ...
58.19 25.94 Transocn ... 81 19
20.71 14.37 Tredgar .16 19 14
18.45 15.79 TriCont .24f q ...
36.58 27.27 Tycolntl .40 28 14
56.11 44.50 UILHold 2.88 10 24
43.95 25.50 UniFirst .15 19 17
24.80 18.83 UDomR 1.20 43 ...
4.35 3.08 UldMicro .32t ... 42
89.11 66.10 UPSB 1.32 23 19
31.65 26.80 USBancrpl.20 13 12
63:90 32.12 USSteel .40f 3 5
54.20 43.91 UldTechs .88 18 16
54.50 29.67 Uldhllhs .02 25 20
66.50 34.65 Unocal .80 13 12
V-W-X-Y-Z
27.37 16.75 ValeantPh .31 dd 55
85.70 31.79 ValeroEs .40f 11 11
4.60 3.40 VKHilncT .36 q .
29.20 24.08 Vectren 1.18 20 16
42.27 33.71 VedzonCml.62 12 13
38.99 31.80 ViacomB .28 dd .
35.67 15.11 VintgPt .221 6 11
28.54 20.83 Vodalone .75e
30.91 21.82 Wabash .18 11 8
56.28 43.05 Wachovia1.84 13 11
57.89 46.20 WalMart .60 20 18
47.39 34.89 Walgm .21 31 27
42.97 37.51 WAMutl 1.88f 12 11
15.42 6.38 Wellmn .20 dd 7
71.79 36.10 WellPoints ... 24 16
64.04 56.12 WellsFrgol.92 15 13
48.50 31.74 Wendys .54 95 20
24.38 19.58 WestarEn .92 11 14
13.85 12.16 WAstTIP2.82a q ...
16.10 6.39 WDigid ... 17 12
71.85 57.90 Weyerh 2.00f 11 15
18.98 14.00 WilmCS 1,45e 11
19.95 11.36 WmsCos .20 32 21
40.64 28.32 Winnbgo .361 17 15
39.36 31.12 WiscEn .88 15 16
22.73 15.11 Worthgtn .68 8 12
71.50 59.50 Wrigley 1.12 30 26
45.67 33.50 Wyeth .92 39 15
37.53 19.05 XTOEgys.20 22 14
19.69 16.32 XcelEngy .86f 25 15
17.24 12.82 Xerox ... 17 13
34.64 26.42 YankCdl .25 20 16
5.36 5.00 ZweigTI .54 q .


+.45 +11.8
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-.52 -4.7
-3.33 +25.7
-2.12 +15.9
-.28 +10.1
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unc +7.4
-.17 +48.3
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+.03 +18.7
+.74 -18.1
+.22 -6.5
+1.82 -28.5
+.16 -0.3
+.24 +20.5
+.10 +52.0


NASDAQ9NTIOALMRE


52-Wk YTD 52-Wk YTD 52-Wk YTD 52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last


A-B-C
19.97 ACMoore ... 33 22
12.25 ADCTers ... 21 19
14.65 ADECp ... 8 16
1233 ASMLSHId ...... 16
11.20 ATITech .. 18 17
2.85 ATS Med ... dd ...
.63 Aastrom ... dd ...
6.45 Abgenix .. dd ,.
2.95 AbleLabs ... 3 ...
9.12 Activisns ... 26 23
19.66 AdobeSys ... 27 23
19.73 Advanta .45f 7 ...
20.30 AdvantB .541 8 14
24.48 Aflymet .. 59 48
3.20 AirspanNet .. dd ..
10.64 AkamaiT 42 23
3088 Akzo 1.54e
6.73 Alamosa .. dd 33
8.85 Aldrla .401 11 ...
8.48 Alkerm ... dd ...
.95 AllairNano ... dd ...
17.50 AlteraCp .. 29 25
13.90 AlIds 23 13
7.87 Alvaron ... dd 38
30.60 Amazon .. 27 43
16.15 AmegyBcs.12 23 19
.02 AmrBiowt ... ... ...
13.75 AEagleOs.301 20 15
14.55 APwCnv .40 26 21
9.35 Ameritrade ... 27 22
52.00 Amgen ... 35 22
2.87 AmkorT ... dd ...
14.50 Amylin ... dd ...
37.73 Anlogic .32 24 40
2.75 Analysts ... 31 ..
1.01 AnlySur .. 10 ...
930 Andrew 59 19
62.55 ApolloG ... 60 24
14.37 AppleCs .. 43 25
22.26 Applebees .06 19 15
2.84 Apldlnov ... ... ...
14.33 ApldMall .12 19 21
2.50 AMCC ... dd 25
7.25 aQuantive ... 29 43
3.73 Arris ... dd 19
733 AspectCm .. 19 18
28.67 AsscdBancl.08f 15 13
2.05 Amel ... dd ..
1231 Audvox 5 23
18.01 Aulotdsks .03j 33 26
229 Aware dd ...
5.92 BEASys 27 21
12.90 BeasleyB .. 27 22
33.88 BedBath .. 25 21
33.18 Biogenldc .. cc 21
33.65 Biomet .25e 25 19
1.21 Bpurers .. dd
19.91 BobEvn .48 22 22
2525 Brdcom ... 54 30
377 BrcdeCmlt .. 13 13
17.15 BusnObj 44 ..
557 C-COR .. dd 17
2.37 CDCCpA ... 20
51.86 CDWCorp.43f 20 17
41.14 CHRobn .60 34 26
7.16 CNET .. cc 34
1402 CSG Sys 20 17
11.28 CVThera dd ...
26.66 CapCltyBks61 19 20
2622 CareerEd 21 15
3.30 Caluityrs ... dd
2333 Celgenes 80 53
3735 Cephin dd 13
623 ChrmSh 20 16
1646 ChkPoint 19 15
975 Checkers .. 14 11
1677 ChldPIc 31 18
2900 Chiron ... cc 22
33.31 ChrchllD .50 95 26
1.64 ClenaCp ... dd ...
3.70 Cirrus ... dd 25
17.01 Cisco ... 23 18
15.02 CitixSy 24 20
8.03 CleanH ... dd 16


38.25 15.50 Cogenin
50.31 22.84 CogTech
47.40 28.90 Cognosg
9.15 5.45 Comarco
34.50 26.25 Comcast
34.16 25.89 Comesp
7.60 4.35 Compuwre
26.10 15.25 Comvers
2.95 1.35 ConcCm
32.61 20.45 Conmed
24.90 9.99 CorinthC
50.46 39.05 Costco .
13.44 5.76 CredSys
42.44 17.88 CreeInc
14.00 7,71 CubislPh
16.20 3.47 Cytogen

4.90 1,14 Danka
42.57 32.71 Dellnc
5.80 3.50' Dennys n
4.80 1.02 DobsonCm
30.29 22.29 DllrTree
8.75 4,52 DbleCIck
45.22 2.71 DynMatl
59.21 30.78 eBays
15.58 7.80 EZEM
11.99 8.11 ErthLink
34.38 26.95 EchoStarl.r
13.70 9.70 EduDv .
29.85 16.25 ElectSci
5.21 2.12 Elclrgis
71.16 43.38 EleclArts
16.81 5.70 EnzonPhar
5.00 2.93 Epiphany
34.57 23.18 EricsnTI .
8.23 1.92 EvrgrSIr
52.50 29.15 ExpScripts
7.25 4.02 ExtNetw
47.92 10.93 Eyetech
19,50 12.00 Fieldlnvn.
54.07 4024 FiflhThird 1
26.41 14.80 FrstHrzn
28.85 24.12 FstMerit 1
44.25 32.20 Fiserv
15.58 10.06 Flextm
23.38 1.90 Forward
14.28 7.95 Foundry


'6.39 2.93 Gemstar
20.19 15.10 Gentexs
65.13 44.14 Genzyme
9.85 5.15 GeronCp
2.59 .65 GigaMed
46.16 27.79 GileadScis
309.25 95.96 Google n
33.50 25.10 HMNFn
89.90 17.75 Hansen
38.53 26.51 HarbrFL
12.40 4.25 Harmonic
41.12 17.77 Hologic
4.25 1.65 HomeStore
12.79 10.06 HudsCitys.
13.85 8.51 HumGen
25.03 15.88 HuntJBs
51.45 31.15 HyperSolu
30.72 19.16 IAC Interac
12.43 2.43 IPIXCp
8.24 4.12 Identix
86.60 29.51 Imclone
11.16 5.40 Incyte
9.25 5.36 Informat
6.61 1.10 Innovo
7.05 4.15 Inslinet
25.67 17.36 IntegCirc
13.27 8.88 InlgDv
28.00 19.64 Intel
23.50 13.81 InlterDig
60.59 46.07 IntlSpdw
13.93 2.11 IntmtlniUJ
20.65 13.69 Intersil
47.13 35.84 Intuit
53.44 35.00 IlnFnSv
6.50 .87 Isonics


... 50 39
... 62 40
... 24 21

... 57 37
... 55 37
.. 38 19
... 68 38
... dd 40
... 29 15
... 16 17
461 22 20
... dd 25
... 23 21
... dd ...
... dd
D-E-F
dd ...
... 31 22
. ... .. 33
... dd ...
16 14
... 42 40
.20 cc ...
... 56 37
.. 16 93
... 9 11
00e 24 13
15f 17 ...
27 28
... dd ...
... 36 33
... dd 32
... dd ...
36e ... ...
... dd ...
... 26 19
... 36 25
... dd 46
47p 6 ...
.40 16 13
... 29 17
.08 19 16
21 18
23 15
... 29 ...
... 34 26
G-H-I
... dd ...
.34 32 24
... cc 25
... dd ...
... ... 13
.. 43 30
... cc 49
.88 13 11
... 4026
.80 21 18
... 63 22
... 49 42
... dd ...
.261 28 20
... dd ...
.24 18 14
.. 30 21
... cc 21
... dd ...
... dd ...
... 37 21
dd ..
... dd 26
... 39 12
...35 24
... 24 22
... 89 21
.32 20 18
... dd 55
.06 17 19

.16 90 28
... 25 21
.07 18 14
... dd ..


3.59
19.86
61.97
8.53
2.60
46.63
296.23
31.90
90.97
39.56
5.03
42.46
2.45
11.65
13.25
20.56
44.06
24.27
2.98
5.39
33.89
8.53
9.15
2.31
5.20
20.52
10.62
27.28
18.40
59.30
9.45
19.80
48.06
39.86
3.19


+.23 -45.9
+.45 -5.6
+.16 +31.7'
+.59 +179.7
+.75 -13.5
+.02 +8.4
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+1.62 -40.7
-.13 -1.6
+.32 -20.7
-.12 -9.6
-.03 -1.4
+.04 -8.6
-.26 -38.4
+1.71 -6.1
+1.07 -43.8
-.03 -27.1
+.99 +5.3
-.07 +47.4
-.47 +29.3
+.23 -34.0
+.74 -71.6
+.35 -13.8
+1.17 -10.7
+1.92 -8.9
+.65 -4.7
+1.26 +10.5
+.15 -3.5
+1.59 +365.8
+.57 -30.3


-.04 -39.4
+1.46 +7.3
+2.24 +6.7
+.75 +7.0
+.30 +43.6
+2.50 +33.3
+4.98 +53.7
-.10 -3.3
+6.10 +149.8
+1.73 +14.3
+.11 -39.7
+3.20 +54.6
+.34 -19.1
+.14 +1.4
+1.57 +10.2
+1.01 -8.3
+1.66 -5,5
+.51 -12.1
+.08 -48.6
+.28 -27.0
+3.18 -26.5
+1.17 -14.6
+.44 +12.7
+.16 -8.7
-.05 -13.8
-.16 -1.9
-.14 -8.1
+1.07 +16.6
+.90 -16.7
+2.29 +12.3
+1.78 +94.0
+.80 +18.5
+3.07 +9.2
+2.35 -20.2
+.23 -41.9


J-K-L
28.30 17.06 JetBlue ... 59 54
30.25 19.65 JnprNtw ... 85 32
51.56 35.02 KLATnc .48 20 22
12.19 7.28 KnghtCap ... 14 24
33.11 9.42 Komag ... 18 10
5.95 2.62 KopinCp ... dd 71
56.12 33.25 Kronos ... 27 23
9.91 4.80 Kulicke ... 75 22
36.37 21.91 Kyphon ... 73 45
51.32 13.28 LCAViss .32 33 31
28,06 13.28 LKQCp ... 27 21
15.15 8.40 LSI Inds .40 25 17
19.50 8.58 LakeEnslf ... ... ...
32.26 19.71 LamRsch ... 14 15
43.67 15.27 Lasrscp ... 50 38
4.27 1.55 Level3 ... dd ..
10,45 2.55 LexarMd ..dd ...
40.73 34.01 LinearTch .40 28 25
19.75 13.10' LodgEntl ... dd ...
2.30 .57 LookSmart ... dd ..
M-N-0
27.74 13.69 MCI Incn l.60 dd ...
30.50 19.75 MGIPhr ... dd 21
37.72 18.95 MTS .32 22 20
44.67 18.09 Macrmdia ... 68 32
18.52 7.82 Magal .05r cc ...
4.16 1.05 MagelPt ... dd ...
41.58 19.33 MarvellT ... 64 30
49.51 36.20 Maxim .80 25 23
13.15 7.41 MaxwIlT ... dd ..
6.73 2.99 McDataA ... dd 16
28.70 21.70 Medlmun ... dd 61
11.55 4.37 Medarex .. dd ..
20.87 14.76 MedAcI ... 17 15
49.58 31.05 Merclntr ... 39 22
12.18 7.90 Micrel ... 35 31
31.75 24.06 Microchp .28 30 26
6.69 3.37 Mcromse ... 55 21
27.50 23.35 Microsoft .32a 24 17
14.06 7.63 MillPhar .. dd ...
8.24 4.60 Misonix .. 35 13
34.25 17.60 MnstrWw ... 45 29
34.13 15.01 MovieGal .12 15 8
7.18 3.73 NGASRs ... 76 27
40.68 32.35 Nasd100Tr.41e q 27
16.56 7.25 Naslech ... dd ...
12.15 9.75 NatAtlHn ... ... 6
34.64 23.92 NeighCar ... 80 28
4.33 1.37 Net2Phn ... dd ...
34.99 15.92 NetwkAp ... 47 32
32.89 21.18 NexlelC ... 13 16
26.81 13.70 NexllPrt ... 62 28
27.99 5.70 NitroMed ... dd ...
28.30 16.00 NobItyH .20e 22 17
11.83 3.77 NwslAirl ... dd ...
27.07 8.54 NvtlWrls .. 24 21
7.79 4.94 Novell .. 6 50
31.18 22.89 Novlus ... 22 23
9.61 5.58 NuHoriz ... 53 25
5.29 2.60 NuanceC ... dd ..
29.60 9.30 Nvidia ... 35 18
74.95 34.57 OSIPhnm ... dd ...
20.91 8.96 OmniVisn .. 11 11
6.30 3.99 OnAssign ... dd ...
5.32 2.49 OnSmcnd ... dd 15
44.65 23.50 OnyxPh ... dd ...
18.18 7.69 OpnwvSy ... dd 24
7.96 3.90 Opsware ... dd ...
14.87 9.78 Oracle ... 24 16
48.61 29.00 Orhfx ... 19 16
28.25 23.77 OtterTail 1.12 18 16
P-Q-R
12.50 7.42 PMCSra ... 50 37
81.42 52.95 Paccar .841 12 10
29.05 17.25 PacSunwr ... 16 13
27.20 8.06 PalmSrce ... 7 53
46.65 20.75 palmOne ... 42 18
5.44 1.71 Paradyne ... dd 29
6.95 4.00 ParmTc ... 18 17
53.85 34.38 Pattersons ... 32 25
30.00 15.69 PatUTI .16 34 14
34.69 28.60 Paychex .52 35 29


-.08 +27.0
+1.62 -16.5
-.34 -0.1
-.71 +20.2
+.75 -28.2
+.74 +140.9
+1.91 +12.5
+1.49 -6.5
+.10 +23.4
+.28 -25.5
+1.09 +2.8
+.97 -13.7
+.20 -8.5
-.71 -17.7
+.91 +13.3
+2.23 +21.0
+.48 +8.5
+.38 -6.1
+.67 -18.9
-.16 -8,3
+1.61 -9.5
-2.54 +24.5
+.82 +49.7
+1.05 -5.4
+.58 +21.9
-.19 -0.1
+1.06 +12.5
+.05 -45.3
-.37 -16.3
+.65 +9.7
-.90 +24.4
+1.35 -11.8
+1.00 +17,1
-.02 -59.7
+.45 -33.4
+.01 -8.,7
+1.67 -5.9
+.37 -14.0
-.02 +7.2
+1.30 +19.4
+4.97 -40.5
+.06 -23.4
-.12 -5.2
+.01 +0.7
+3.17 -17.3
+1.42 +13.8
+.06 -30.5
+.27 -1.2
-.90 +9.5
+1.19 +12.9


49.26 22.24 PetDv ... 15 15
36.24 25.50 PetsMart .12 26 22
54.57 32.75 Pixars ... 26 41
8.20 4.62 PlugPower ... dd ...
24.07 13.97 Polycom ... 31 17
10.67 4.54 Powrwav ... dd 21
11.88 7.05 Prestek ... cc 23
24.40 8.50 ProgPh ... dd ...
21.67 13.79 ProtDsg ... dd ...
19.97 9.38 QLT ... ... 13
43.66 21.44 Qlogic ... 19 17
44.99 32.08 Qualcoms .36 31 25
8.04 3.40 QuanFuel .. dd ...
7.79 3.77 RFMicD ... dd 56
23.91 9.75 RSASec ... 24 20
22.10 10.37 RedHat ... 60 44
7.93 2,83 Redback .. dd ...
16.28 12.26 RepBcp .44 16 14
103.56 52.25 RschMotn 49 25
31.37 20.95 RossSIrs .20 24 16

S-T-U
31.96 19.28 SanDisk ... 17 16
9.35 3.74 Sanmina ... dd 13
41.33 21.00 Schnitzer .07 5 8
158.90 61.76 SearsHldgs ... 15 21
50.48 33,58 Selclln .76 12 12
22.43 15.94 Semtech ... 25 24
66.55 39.85 Sepracor .. dd ...
10.85 6.97 SiebelSys .10 66 36
45.50 13.79 SigmaTel ... 9 10
43.95 24.62 SilcnLab ... 18 20
9.43 2.01 SiriusS dd
11.10 5.02 SkywksSol ... 27 18
19.87 9.87 SmurfStne ... dd 24
7.02 3.16 Sonusn ... 59 44
19.00 13.85 SouMoBc .36 23 ...
22.60 17.25 Stapless .17 22 18
64.26 42.05 Starbucks ... 48 36
46.40 16.01 StlDyna .40 5 6
6.77 1.24 SlemCells ... dd ...
5.65 3.29 SunMicro ... 18 60
26.65 20.50 SusqBnc .92 17 15
34.05 18.01 Symantecs ... 30 19
12.00 6.29 Symetric ... 33 21
42.22 8.99 Syneronn ... 29 24
12.70 6.95 Synovis ... cc ...
32.49 16.67 THInc ... 21 27
12.53 7.70 TLC Vision ... 14 18
33.45 7.33 TASERs ... 41 91
46.00 33.04 TechData ... 14 14
1.96 .82 Tegal ... dd ...
10.32 6.56 Tellabs .... dd 21
34.25 22.82 TevaPhrm.24e 19 ...
6.02 2.96 3Com ... dd ...
13.50 5.53 TibcoSIt .. 27 25
7.75 3.45 TiVo Inc ... dd ...
2.52 1.01 TrnSwle ... dd ...
41.11 21.55 TrimbleN .. 31 26
14.19 10.73 TrstNY .60 18 '16
32.78 26.69 Truslmk .80 15 14
36.73 25.52 TuesMm .65 22 '16
23.98 15.07 UCBHHds.10 19 16
28.23 6.70 UTSIrcm ... 16 44
8.07 2.10 US Enr ... dd ...
44.55 28.54 UnivFor .10 16 13.
V-W-X-Y-Z
14.65 6.31 ValueClick ... 30 24
36,09 16.21 Versign .. 35 25
17.06 8.06 VerdxPh .dd ...
8.23 1.40 ViroPhrm ... 36 28
4.30 1.95 Vilesse ... dd ...
24.40 6.32 WPTEntn ... dd 68
10.57 6.46 WebMD ... 79 16
7.04 .69 WetSeal ... dd ...
126.2873.21 WholeFd 1.00f 55 44
76.45 34.18 Wynn ... dd 71
40.89 23.55 XMSat .. dd ...
33.39 25.21 Xilinx .281 32 27
39.79 25.52 Yahoo ... 53 51
64.47 38.25 YellowRd ... 12 9
3.81 1.80 ZhoneTch ... dd 50
75.17 58.40 ZionBcp 1.44 15 13


YTD
chg %chg
+1.68 -11.3
+1.21 -11.5
-.06 +0.5
-.68 -0.5
unc -36.5
+.23 +23.3
+.35 +22.7
+1.11 +31.1
+1.17 +3.0
+.42 -32.2
+1.05 -13.4
+1.15 -18.0
-.36 -28.7
+.42 -14.9
+1.10 -38.0
+.63 +11.9
+1.22 +43.7
+.06 -1.2
-.72 -12.0
-1.05 -4.3


+1.41 +0.3
+.03 -35.9
+2.39 -22.5
+.34 +53.7
-.09 +12.9
+.91 -20.1
-1.88 -2.9
-.23 -18.1
-.43 -53.3
+.78 -24.5
+.43 -8.4
+.49 -15.5
+.22 -44.8
-.02 -17.8
+.11 -24.2
+.93 -2.5
+.73 -17.0
+2.12 -24.1
+.33 +11.3
-.02 -32.7
+.66 +2.2
+.75 -14.7
-.02 +6.6
+.85 +27.5
-.11 -27.1
+3.04 +40.7
+.41 -17.5
+.10 -67.8
+.41 -19.1
-.03 -42.3
+.27 +4.3
-.22 +3.1
-.14 -17.5
+.35 -48.9
+.41 +18.1
-.01 +40.9
+1.35 +20.9
+.32 -2.5
+.94 -2.3
+.22 +4.2
+1.62 -20.9
-.10 -66.5
+.11 +25.3
+1.89 unc


+.54 -4.5
+1.49 -10.7
+.66 +60.7
+2.15 +180.0
+.21 -4.6
+7.85 +55.9
+.08 +25.1
-.48 +177.5
+4.99 +29.4
+3.53 -22.9
+.81 -5.3
+1.98 -7.4
+.18 -8.1
+2.44 -4.6
-.35 +10.8
-3.68 +2.7


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE
-~a 071 soetaAra g+


o.Uu b./1
3.38 1.09
25.80 12.50
6.40 2.90
22.02 11.51
3.85 1.55
3.87 1.70
175.80127.79
20.83 16.85
6.14 5.10
39.77 7.89
9.68 4.40
15.00 8.25
13.60 7.55
4.68 2.00
22.70 6.50
109.83 97.27
17.70 5.52
9.85 2.14
4.20 1.15
3.61 2.02
8.25 7.15
15,70 13.71
20,25 15.90
4.30 2.85
9.35 .77


fDo.tsrac .- q
Abraxas ... 4
AdmRsc .30f 9
AmO&Gn ... dd
ApexSilv ... dd
AvanirPh ... dd
BemaGold ... dd
BlotechT .04e q
CarverBcp .28 17
CFCdag .01 q
Chenieres ... dd
CoffeeHn ... 32
ColPacif .10 23
ComSys .28 17
Crystallxg ... '
DHBInds ... 13
DJIADlam2.09e q
DanlHd ... 18
DigitAngel ... dd
ENGIobal ... 38
EldorGld g ... dd
Elswth .30e q.
FTrVLDv .38a q
FlaPUtil .62f 18
GascoEn n ... dd
GeoGlobal ......


YTD 52-Wk
Last cha %cha HI Low


.. 3.02
... 21.78
... 5.38
... 14.08
... 2.97
... 2.29
... 177.50
.. 17.10
... 5.24
.. 32.50
.. 9.25
17 11.02
15 10.22
3.50
13 8.76
...104.56
... 12.72
24 4.35
... 4.59
... 2.75
.. 7.80
14.97
... 21.01
.. 4.15
... 6.20


+.24 +30.2
+1.68 +23.5
+.55 +68.1
-.07 -18.0
+.13 -12.9
-.10 -24.9
+9.21 +16.1
+.05 -14.5
+.03 -4.2
+.66 +2.0
+.95 +77.9
+.72 -20.3
-.25 -14.9
-.14 -2.5
+.23 -54.0
+1.44 -2.7
+.50 +50.5
+.54 -43.7
+.77 +48.1
-.03 -6.8
+.14 -3.5
+.25 -3.0
+1.81 +9.7
+.24 .-2.6
-.51 +539.2


Foreign Exchange
Value/ PrevValue Todays SI Prev $
Country name Currency In dollars value incurrency
Argent Peso .3483 .3477 2.8712 2.8763
Australia Dollar .7407 .7395 1.3501 1.3523
Brazil Real .4219 .4203 2.3705 2.3790
Britain Pound 1.7333 1.7425 .5769 .5739
Canada Dollar .8198 .8147 1.2198 1.2274
Chile Peso .001709 .001707 585.30 585.70
China Yuan .1208 .1208 8.2760 8.2760
Colombia Peso .000429 .000428 2329.85 2335.75
Czech Rep Koruna .0396 .0395 25.24 25.32
Denmark Krone .1602 .1603 6.2433 6.2373
Dominican Rep Peso .0351 .0353 28.45 28.35
Egypt Pound .1730 .1730 5.7800 5.7800
Euro Euro 1.1936 1.1949 .8378 .8369
Hong Kong Dollar .1286 .1286 7.7732 7.7732
Hungary Forint .0048 .0048 206.70 207.14
India Rupee .0229 .0229 43.610 43.640
Indnsia Rupiah .000102 .000101 9795.00 9872.00
Israel Shekel .2173 .2172 4.6015 4.6045
Japan Yen .008910 .008928 112.23 112.01
Jordan Dinar 1.4115 1.4118 .7085 .7083
Kuwail Dinar 3.4258 3.4258 .2919 .2919
Lebanon Pound .000666 .080666 1501.00 1501.00
Malaysia Ringgit .2632 .2632 3.7999 3.7999
Mexico Peso .093075 .092838 10.7440 10.7715
N. Zealand Dollar .6718 .6723 1.4885 1.4874
Norway Krone .1518 .1515 6.5880 6.6004
Pakistan Rupee .0167 .0167 59.85 59.85
Peru New Sol .3076 .3077 3.251 3.250
Philpins Peso .0178 .0178 56.19 56.29
Poland Zloty .2933 .2915 3.41 3.43
Russia Ruble .0348 .0347 28.7760 28.8100
SDR SDR 1.44197 1.44784 .6935 .6907
Saudi Arab Riyal .2667 .2667 3.7500 3.7500
Singapore Dollar .5878 .5889 1.7012 1.6981
Slovak Rep Koruna .0308 .0309 32.47 32.40
So. Africa Rand .1459 .1464 6.8551 6.8301
So. Korea Won .000948 .000953 1054.30 1049.50
Sweden Krona .1265 .1270 7.9075 7.8769
Switzerind Franc .7676 .7702 1.3028 1.2984
Taiwan Dollar .0312 .0312 32.09 32.02
Thailand Baht .02377 .02396 42.07 41.73
U.A.E. Dirham .2723 .2723 3.6727 3.6727
Uruguay New Peso .0403 .0401 24.7850 24.9350
Venzuel Bolivar .000466 .000466 2147.00 2147.30


Name Div PE PPE Last


4.ue 0 .13 GleuIT I ... ...
3.60. 2.38 Globixn ... dd
6.65 2.33 GoldStrg ... dd
8.00 3.75 GreyWolf ... 45
15.81 12,00 ING GRE 1.26 q
25.99 14.64 iShBrazil .46e q
18.87 14.49 iShGerm .19e q
12.58 9.81 IShHK .27e q
11.09 9.36 iShJapan .04e q
34.80 21.59 iShKor .10e q
7.80 6.26 iShMalasia.16e q
28.09 18.28 iShMexico.28e q
7.67 6.05 iShSing .28e q
13.00 9.51 iShTaiwan.08e q
18.92 15:40 iShUK .34e q
123.36106.64 iShSP5002.46e q
74.17 50.77 iShEmMkls.80e q
63.97 54.17 iShSPBaV1.25e q
97.00 83.04 iSh20TB4.04e q
55.36 44.47 iShEAFE s.80eq
76.19 61.22 iShNqBio .. q
68.81 57.34 iShR1000V1.53e q
49.45 43.06 iShR1000G.58e q
65.79 52.10 iShR2000Vsl.08eq
67.99 52.02 4iShR2000G.26e q
66.14 51.11 iShRs2000s.77e q


Spot Metals


NEW YORK (AP) Spot nonlerrous metal pdces Frday.
Aluminum 79.8 cents per Ilb., London Metal Exch. Fr.
Copper -167.00 cents Cathode full plate, U.S. destinations.
Copper 162.55cents per lb., N.Y. Merc spot Fri.
Lead $887.00 per metric ton, London Metal Exch.
Zinc 57.24-57.49 cents lb., delivered.
Gold $424.40 Handy Harman (on dly quote).
Gold $422.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri.
Silver $7.040 Handy Harman (only daily quote).
Silver $6.994 troy oz., N.Y. Mere spot Fri.
Mercury $900.00 per 76 b flask, N.Y.
Platinum -$869.00. Iroy oz., N.Y. (contract).
Platinum $862.55 troy oz., N.Y. Mere spot Fri.
n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-nol available r-revised

Money Rates


Prime Rate
Discount Rate Pimary
Fed Funds close
T-Bills:
3-month
6-month
T-Bill, annualized, adjusted for
constant maturity:
1-year
T-Notes:
1-year
2-year
5-year
10-year
T-Bond:
30-year
Libor:
3-month
6-month
FHLB Cost of Funds, 11th District:
Eff. June. 30
FNMA 30-year mortgage commitment:
30-days
Money market fund:
Merrill Lynch Ready Assets:
30-day avg yld:


Today
6.25
4.25
3.1875

3.10
3.29


2.51 2.46


YTD
cha %cha


.. 2.50
26 3.07
13 7.59
... 15.86
... 24.55
... 17.82
... 12.43
... .10.23
... 32.35
... 7.09
... 28.05
... 7.53
... 12.02
... 17.90
... 121.33
... 72.79
14 63.33
... 94.63
.,: 52.65
... 72.10
67.89
49.01
.... 66.47
... 67.41
.. 65.97


Chronicle Classfe o




i3=566W.1iZ tIIJL %A


I AMERAICNT OCKEXH ANGE


-4.62 -4.3
+.01 +16.6
-6.55 +17.1
+.53 +1.3
+1.14 -33.3
+.06 -22.7
-.01 +129.6'
+1.06 -7.4
-.64 -87.3
+.94 +14.6
-.52 -11.0
+1.07 +19.6
+.90 +20.1
+5.46 +62.1
+.40 +6.6
+.81 +7.2
-.15 -6.0
+.17 +14.8
+2.01 +43.7
+1.35 +2.9
+.10 +10.0
+1.74 +4.0
-1.46 -63.3
-1.62 -25.8
+1.83 -21.6
+.11 -3.4
unc -4.0
+.80 +35.5
-.14 +10.3
-.06 +31.4
+8.27 +7.8
+.41 -26.2
+.74 -6.9
+1.53 +15.2
+.04 -13.8
+.05 -46.5
+48 -4.2
-4.01 -8.3
+1.75 +18.8
-1.06 -4.7
+02 +31.7
+.52 -2.6
+.28 -30.9
+.78 +107.7
+.74 +33.5
+.18 +2.2
+.36 +3.3
+.20 -34.2
-.01 -1.1
-.14 -11.1
-.11 +27.2
+.29 +1.6
+.56 -14.8
+2.09, +9.2
+1.35 -46.8
+.23 -20.4
+.10 -59.3
-.62 -12.6
+1.56 +16.7
+.09 -47.6
+2.06 +11.9
+.27 -22.5
-.05 -39.3
+1.87 -11.4
-.31 +4.4
-.13 +5.0
-1.43 -5.2
+2.21 +7.4
+2.33 +2.4
+.71 -4.0
+7.86 +169.1
+.63 +60.0
-.18 -20.8
+1.75 +18.2
+.63 -15.2
-.38 -3.5
-.45 +25.8
+1.26 +8.7
+3.16 +2.0
+.19 -31.4
+.36 +2.2
+.32 -0.1
+.99 -8.5
+1.51 +57.5


* 03NY NDMEAL


-i


I


I AMEX


I NASDAQB


-- 9-n 7---- 7--7 91qT M J .T- -
















CTUCOC Y JY 1


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
AARP Invst:
CapGrr 45.00 +.86 +11.1
GNMA 15.05 -.01 +4.4
Global 2757 +.14 +21.2
Grwinc 2207 +.30 +11.5
Inll 44.29 +.25 +15.4
MgdMunl n 9.23 +6.0
PalhwayCns 11.68 +08 +6.7
PathwyGro 1332 +.16 +11.3
ShtTermBd 10.07 -.01 +1.7
SmCoSkn 26.29 +.81 +21.4
ABN AMRO Funds:
GnrthN 22.60 +.41 +5.5
M&CGroN 22.94 +.40 +4.1
AIM Investments A:
Agrsvp 10.60 +.23 +14.0
BalAp 25.42 +.15 +8.2
BaoscValAp 3277 .36 +11.3
BlChlpAp 11.58 +.21 +6.1
CapDev p 18.96 +.40 +17.9
Chartp 12.90 +19 +7.9
Constlp 22.80 +.47 +8.7
HYldAp 4.46 +.01 +10.0
InlGrow 20.34 +.08 +19.4
MdCpCrEq 29.71 +.44 +12.6
MuBp 8.19 -.02 +6.8
PremEqty 98 .14 +9.1
RealEst p 28.03 +66 +36.2
SelEqty 17.91 +.30 +12.1
SmCpGrAp 28.80 +.69 +15.0
Summil 11.18 +23 +142
WemgAp 1332 +.30 +11.1
AIM Investments B:
BascValBt 30.84 +.34 +10.6
BlueChlpB d 10.95 +.20 +5.5
CapDevBS 17.66 +.38 +17.2
ChanrtBl 12.34 +.18 +7.1
PremEqty 9.22 +.13 +8.2
AIM Investor Cl:
Dynamic 17.15 +.44 +178
Energy 36.30 +81 +48.8
HlGhSo 51.83 +1.05 +6.9
SmCoGrl p 12.86 +,36 +19.7
Tech 24.58 +.76 +9.3
To0lrnl 24.06 +.18 +5.3
Ulnes 13.29 +.03 +34.6
AIM/INVESCO Invstr:
CoreStock 10.56 +.17 +6.1
AMF Funds:
AdjMtgn 9.74 ... +1.8
Advance Capital I:
Balanced np 18.06 +.17 +10.1
Rellnc n 10.08 -.02 +8.1
Alger American:
Growth 36.34 +.76 +12.3
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.62 +.11 +18.5
Alger Funds Instl:
MdCpGrl 17.50 +.44 +16.1
Alleglant CII:
SCapVall 22.02 +.47 +17.1
AllianceBem A:
AmGvlncA 7.58 -.05 +13.1
BalanAp 17.28 +.14 +10.3
GlThechAp 55.52 +.78 +10.9
GrolncAp 3.76 +.05 +11.5
GrowthAp 34.67 +.90 +14.9
InllValAp 16.31 +.09 +21.0
LgCapGrA p 18.54 +.41 +11.8
SmCapGrA 23.09 +.68 +15.5
AllianceBern Adv:
GrtncAdv 3.77 +.04 +11.7
IntlValAdv 16.51 +.09 +21.3
LgCapGrAdv 19.12 +.42 +12.1
AllianceBem B:
AmGvlniB 7.58 -.05 +12.3
CorpBdBp 12.19 -.03 +8.0
GlbwTechB t 50.14 +.70 +10.0
GrlncB p 3.69 +.04 +10.5
GrowthB I 24,06 +.62 +14.0
LgCpGrBt 16.74 +.37 +11.0
SmCpGrBt 19.45 +.57 +14.5
USGovtBp 7.08 -.02 +4.5
AlllanceBern C:
GrthlnCt 3.70 +.04 +10.5
SmCapGrC 19.50 +.57 +14.6
Allanz Funds A:
SmCpV0 A 31,15 +.63 +25.4
RenaisA 24.80 +.38 +4.9
Value A 17,59 +.29 +8.6
Allianz Funds B:
RenalsS 23.26 +.35 +4.1
Alllanz Funds C:
RenalsCI 23.12 +.36 +4.1
ValueCd 17.03 +.28 +7.8
GwthC t 17.80 +.35 +8.6
TargetC 15.90 +.33 +11.0
AmSouth Fds Cl I:
Value 17.15 +.22 +17.3
Amer Beacon AMR:
BalAmr 14.54 +.11 +15.3
LgCapAmr 20.55 +.25 +21.2
Amer Beacon Insti:
InMEqlns 19.91 +.05 +14.8
SmCaplnst 21.21 +.48 +23.7
Amer Beacon Plan:
SmCpPlan 20.82 +.47 +23.4
Amer Century Adv:
EqGrop 22.74 +.38 +15.3
Eqtylncnp 9.18 +.07 +11.1
Amer Century Ins:
Eqlylndex 4.84 +,08 +10,9
.Ultra 29.14 +.50 +6.3
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n 16.77 +.15 +10.9
EqGrolnv n 22.75 +.38 +15.6
Eqlncon 8.18 +.07 +11.4
GNMAI0 n 10.37 -.01 +4.0
G0tn 16.48 +.44 +17.7
Growth n 19.73 +.36 +11.1
Heritsgeln 12.83 +.34 +18.2
IncGrrn 31.11 +.42 +13.3
InOBnd 13.51 -.04 +4.4
IntOiscnr 13.57 +.21 +15,4
IntlGomn 8.94 +.03 +12.5
UleScin 5.25 +.08 +15.4
-NewOppnr 5&72 +.16 +13.7
OneChgAgg n 11.02 +.14 NE
RealEsl n 2725 +.72 +33.5
Seleclln 837.38 +.60 +4.5
SGovn 9.,46 ... +1.7
SmCapValn 10.71 +.23 +21.4
SmaliCo 10.58 +.28 +27.2
StrMod n 6.77 +.06 +10.1
Ultra n 28.81 +,49 +6.1
Ul n 13.43 +.06 +35.3
Valuelnvn 7.50 +.09 +12.3
Vistlan 14.87 +.42 +11.9
Amer Express A:
Cal 5.26 ... +7.1
DLcovery 9.09 +.24 +22.3
DEI 11.43 +,13 +20.5
DrvrBd 4.87 -.01 +5.2
DivOppA 7.37 +.04 +20.6
EqSelect 13.38 +.34 +13.6
.EqtyValp 10.41 +.13 +18.0
Growlh 27.94 +.36 +13.8
HiYdBond 2.89 ... +10.6
H8Field 4.47 -.01 +5.6
insr 5.48 -.01 +5.5
LgCpEqAp 5.20 +.07 +10.1
MgdAllp 9.64 +.09 +14.0
Mass 5.43 -.01 +5.8
Mich 5.33 -.01 +5.4
Minn 5.34 -.01 +5.3
Mutual p 9.85 +.07 +10.6
NewD 23.67 +.40 +4.7
NY 5.16 -.01 +5.6
Ohio 5.33 -.01 +5.3
PrecMI 8.65 -.02 -4.4
Select 8.65 -.02 +4.6
SDGov 4.78 .. +1.7
SmColndex 8.80 +.24 +21.6
Stock p 19.45 +.27 +9.4
TE Bond 3.91 -.01 +6.0
Thdllnll 5.80 +.06 +19.68
Thdllntl 7.07 +.05 +12.3
Amer Express B:
DirEqlnct 11.40 +.14 +19.7
EqVal p 10.43 +.13 +17,0
NewDt 22.35 +.37 +3.8
Amer Express Prtnr:
IntlSelVal p 8.33 +.07, +20.3
' SmCpVAp 7.01 +.16 +17.5
Amer Express Y:
NewD n 23,80 +.40 +4.9
American Funds A:
AmcapFAop 18.43 +.25 +10.4
AmMusAh p 28.76 +.28 +11.4
BalAp 18,04 +.18 +8.5
BondFdAp 1343 -.03 +57
CaplnBelA p 52.51 -.11 +14.5
CapWIdA p '19.12 -.08 +..2
CapWGrAp 34.03 +.16 +18.2
EupacA p 38.25 +.23 +17.7
FundlnvAp 32.91 +.53 +15.6
GovAp 13.680 -.04 +4.1
GwlhFdAp 28.40 +.51 +14.1
HITralAp 12.31 +.01 +9.6
HilncMunAI 15.65 -.01 +7.2
lecoFdA p 18.45 +.04 +12.5
IntBOAp 13,62 -.02 +2.6
InvCoAAp 30.93 +.33 +11.1
8dTEBdA0p 15.42 -.01 +3.7
NwEconAp 21.06 +.27 +12.4
NewPerA p 27.49 +.26 +12.1
NewWorldA 34.08 +.20. +26.8
SmCpWA p 32.45 +.40 +20.2
TaxExplA p 12.58 -.01 +6.1
TxExCAAp 16,83 -.02 +6.6
WshMulAp 30,92 +.32 +10.5
American Funds B:
AmcapBt 17.82 +.23 +9.5
BlacB0t 17.98 +.15 +7.7
BondBe 13.43 -.03 +4.9
CapiltalBBt 52.51 -.11 +13.6
.CapWGrBt 33,89 +.17 +17.2
EurpacBt 35.84 +.22 +16.8
FundlnBet 32.84 +.52 +14.7
GrowhBrt 27.50 +.49 +13.3
HITruslts 12.31 +.01 +8.7
IncomeBt 18.36 +.05 +11.6
ICAB0 30.82 +.33 +10.3
Neworspe I 27.05 +.25 +11.2
WashB I 30.76 +.32 +9.7
AmerlstckMF 40.00 +.28 +5.9
Ariel Mutual Fds:
Applac 48.67 +.97 +14.6
Aein 54.70 +.56 +15.7
Artlsan Funds:
In0 21.61 +.11 +12.3
MidCap 30.07 +.58 +14.6


MidCapVal 19.29 +.33 +32.1
SmCapVal 18.98 +.45 +24,6
Baron Funds:
Asset n 54,63 +.78 +23.1
Growth 47.60 +1.09 +27.4
Partners p 17.65 +.33 +34.4
SmICap 23.43 +.42 +22.4
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.38 -.04 +5.3
Ca Mu 14.32 -.02 +3.6
D0vMun 14.16 -.02 +3.4
NYMun 14.01 -.02 +3.7
TxMgdlntlVI 22.26 +.14 +13.8
InlVal2 20.93 +.13 +14.0
EmgMkts 36.56 -.08 +48.8
BlackRockA:
AuroraA 41.12 +.83 +14,5
HIYdlnvA 6.07 +.01 +10.1
LegacyAp 13.60 +.25 +10.7
BlackRock Fds BIrk:
CoreBirk 9.73 -.02 +5.2
Bramwell Funds:
GrowthFdp 19.88 +.38 +7.3
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd 29.67 +.80 +22,4
Brandywine n 29.08 +.63 +23.8
BrInson Funds Y:
HlghYIdYn 7.20 +.02 +9.5


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
Buffalo Funds:
SmICap 28.58 +.90 +21.5
CGM Funds:
CapDev n 31.46 +.65 +38.0
FocusFd n 34.59 +.51 +36.2
Mut n 2770 +.27 +245
Realty n 33.50 +.92 +57.2
CRM Funds:
MidCapVall 27.00 +.52 +21.7
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncCt 30.16 +,33 +10.4
Grth&lncA p 29.97 +.33 +11.2
GrowthAp 52.17 +1.35 +12.1
GrowthB t 53.82 +1.37 +11.3
GrowhC t 50.08 +1.28 +11.3
Calvert Group:
Incop 17.12 -.01 +6.2
IntlEqAp 18.28 -05 +10.4
MuBdCAI 10.35 +1.4
Munlnt 10.92 .. +3.7
SocialAp 27.96 +.24 +9.7
SocBd p 16.27 -.02 +7.8
SoEqAp 35.31 +.72 +11.0
TxFUd4n 1058, ... +1.6
TxFLngp 16.81 +.01 +6.0
TxF VT 15.94 +01 +4.3
Causeway Intl:
Inslluional 16.11 -.01 +15.4
InvOslorr 16.03 -.02 +15.2
CltiStreet Funds:
Drond 12.04 -.02 +5.4
LgCoSlk 11.94 +.19 +13.3
Clpper 88.91 .79 +6,6
Cohen & Steers:
InsltRItyn 49.47 +1.27 +41.6
RItyShrsn 76.10 +1.98 +41.3
Columbia Class A:
Acorn I 26.88 +.56 +21.2
FedSec 10.71 -.03 +5.1
TxExA p 13.83 -.01 +8.2
Columbia Class B:
Acorn t 26.01 +.54 +20.3
Columbia Class C:
Acorn t 25.99 +.54 +20.2
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 27.48 +.58 +21.5
Acomlnl Z 29.65 .22 +23.8
IntmBdZ n 9.04 -.02 +5.8
LgCapGrwth 20.97 +.40 +9.1
LargeCon 28.10 +.41 +10.9
MidCapGrZ 21.58 +.47 +18.2
QltyPlusBo 10.84 -.03 +5.1
SmCaZ 19.29 +.47 +17.1
SmaICo1 n 22.43 +.61 +22.3
Columbia Funds:
HiYkd Zn 8.64 .. +7.7
IntlStkZn 14.86 +.04 +11.0
ReEsEqZ 28.19 +.69 +31.3
CG Cap Midkt Fds:
IntlEq 10.51 +.04 +14.5
LgGcn 12.37 +.26 +10.3
LgValn 11.34 +.14 +14.8
Davis Funds A:
NYVSn A 31.71 +.32 +13.1
Davis Funds B:
NYVenB 30.30 +.30 +12.1
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVsnY 32.10 +.33 +13.4
NYVenC 30.50 +.31 +12.2
Delaware Invest A:
LgCapValA 18.61 +.18 +10.2
TrendAp 20.91 +.68 +11.5
TxUSA p 11.72 -.02 +8.3
Delaware Invest B:
DechB 3.30 ... +11.8
SeiGrB0t 20.88 +.44 +12.6
Del-Pooled Trust:
EmgMkt 15.60 -.07 +40.2
IntlEq 19.37 +.03 +17.7
Dimensional Fds:
EmgMklVal 19.44 -.01 +41.2
InlSmVa n 16.02 +.04 +25.6
TMUSSm 21.90 +.62 +19.7
USLgCoVn 35.57 +.52 +11.1
USLgVa n 21.00 +.31 +21.1
USLgVa3 n 16.17 +.25 +21.3
US Micro 15.19 +.45 +17.9
US Small n 19.98 +.58 +18.9
USSmVal 27.70 +.67 +21.1
InglSmCo n 14.66 +.05 +20.1
EmgMk n 17.02 -.06 +34.0
Fixdnx 10,15 -.03 +1.7
IntVa7n 15.94 ... +18.2
Glb5Fxlnc 10.59 -.02 +4.3
LrgCaplnIn 17.42 +.03 +13.4
TMUSSmV 24.43 +.64 +21.3
TM IntlValue 13.99 +.01 +17.9
TMMktwdeV 14.42 +.25 +21.8
TMUSEq 12.77 +.22 +12.9
2YGIFxdn 9.88 ... +1.6
DFARIEst n 25.36 +.65 +36.5
Dlverslfd Inv Fds:
CoreBond 12.56 -.01 +4.8
EqGrowp 19.11 +.32 +10.0
Val+Inc 24.80 +.25 +12.9
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced n 79.62 +.52 +12.4
IncomeFd 12.75 -.02 +4.8
Inl Stk 31.13 +.08 +23.4
Stock 131.18 +1.38 +17,9
Domini Soc Inv:
SocalEq n 28.95 +.49 +6.5
Dreyfus:
Aprec 39.53 +.44 +6.9
BasIcSSP 25.27 +,37 +11.0
DIscp 32.50 +.45 +11.1
Dreylus 10.19 +.14 +9.5
DreyMidr 27.84 +.52 +21.0
Drey50OIntl 35.52 +.52 +10.8
EmgLead 45.65 +.96 +17.4
FL Int r 13.36 -.01 +3.9
GNMA0 p 14.61 -.01 +4.0
Grinc n 15.29 +.23 +9.1
InsMun nt 18.08 -.03 +6.4
Intermnr 13.50 -.02 +4.5
MtdcpVl r 33.34 +.79 +17.8
MunBdr 11.98 -.01 +7.2
NYATaxr 15.02 -.01 +5,9
SIrValAr 29.10 +.39 +16.8
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 9.95 .18 +7.6
GrowthFnp 10.44 +.20 +8.6
Dreyfus Premier:
CalTxExBdZ 15.00 -.02 +7.6
CoreEqA1 14.72 +.15 +5.6
CoreVIop 30.47 +.39 +13.1
EmgMktA 20.23 -.07 +30.3
LIdHYOA p 7.36 ... +7.9
NwLdrs n 44.59 +.75 +16.6
TaxMgdGCt 15.65 +.17 +4.4
TechGroA 22.04 +.42 +5.2
TechGrowR ... +5.7
Eaton Vance Adv:
RtgRalte 9.87 +.01 +3.5
Eaton Vance Cl A:
TMGl. 0 529.99 +8.59 +9.2
ChinaAp 14.50 -.18 +24.2
FloatRale 10.20 ... +3.4
GrowthA 7.19 +.19 +9.1
HRghScIAp 10.38 +.40 +3.8
aIcBosA 6.40 +.01 +9,4
LgCpVal 17.77 +.26 +20.3
NatlMun 11.32 +.0 + +10.9
SpcEqtA 4.72 +.13 +10.0
TMG1.1 22.61 +.37 +8.9
MunBdl 10.77 -.01 +.,4
TradGvtA 8.72 ... +3.1
Eaton Vance Cl B:
FLMunlB t 10.97 ... +6.2
HlthSc110 10.98 +.42 +3.0
NalMunB1 t 10.56 +.01 +10.1
TMG1.1 21.40 +.35 +8.1
Eaton Vance CI C:
FloatRt t 9.86 +2.8
Go0InCp 7.51 -.01 +2.3
NaIlMCt0 10.08 01 :10.0
Enterprise Cl A:
GwthA np 16.62 +.28 +3.6
Evergreen A:
AsltllAtp 13.80 +.04 +13.0
AdjRaleA 9,32 -.01 +1.8
SpValuAp 29.38 +.62 +21.6
Evergreen B:
AstAlloB t 13.63 +.04 +12.3
DlvBdB t 14.96 -.03 NS
MunilBondB t 7.55 -.01 +68.3
Evergreen.C:
AdjRaleC I 9.32 -.01 +1,1
AslAlloCt 13.41 +.04 +12.3
Evergreen Ih
CoreBdl 10.67 -.03 +5.3
AdjRatel 9.32 -.01 +2.1
InllEqtyl 9.01 +.03 +16,1
LgCapSqtyl 15.24 +.24 +14.5
PAMuBdl 11.51 -.01 +5.4
ShIlnoBdl 6.07 -.02 +3.9
SIMunll 10.03 -.01 +2.6
SpecVal 29.53 +.82 +21,9
SIrGrol 26850 +.33 +10.3
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 24.53 +,84 +46.4
HiYld8np 4.58 ... +4.7
VaIResIr n 44.22 +.67 +21.7
FAM Funds:
Value n 48.20 +.61 +15.4
FBR Funds:
SmallCap 44.05 +.88 +27.7
FMI Funds:
Focus n 34.66 +.64 +13.1
FPA Funds:
Cap08 42.74 +,48 +17.4
Newlnc 10.95 +.01 +0.6
FPACrwsn 24.85 +.16 +11.9
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.36 +,35 +12.3
CapAppA 25.29 +.37 +8.2
MIdGrSIA 32.00 +.73 +21.4
HilncBOA 7.95 +.01 +7.6
KaufmAp 5.46 +,11 +14.,
MkiOppA1 p 13.15 -.06 +5.6
MunSecA 10.84 -.01 +6.8
USGvSecA 7.79 -.01 +4.5
Federated B:
AmLdrBl 25.41 +.34 +11,4
KaufmnB p 5.34 +.11 +14.0
SIdlncB 8.67 -.01 +8.6
Federated C:
MklOppC 13.07 -.06 +4.8
Federated Instl:
Kaulman 5.46 +.11 +14.6
MidCap 22.29 +.42 +21.0
StockTr 37,73 +.46 +12.3


Fidelity Adv Foc T:
HIltCarT 22.00 +.43 +14.7
NatResT 39.71 +.82 +38,3
Fidelity Advisor A:
DIvrlnllAr 18.78 +.11 +15.7
EqGrA1 45.45 +.84 +5.8
EqIncAp 28.28 +.43 +11.2
MidCapAp 24.50 +.34 +14.0
Fidelity Advisor B:
EqGrB n 42.89 +.80 +5.0
MIdCpB np 23.68 +,32 +13.1
Fidelity Advisor I:
D0vnt ln 19.01 +.11 +16.0
DivGrthl 11,80 +.15 +7.4
EqGrIn 48.05 +.90 +6.3
EqIln 28.94 +.44 +11.6
IntBdIn 11.07 -.02 +4.1
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 15,99 +.16 +5.5
DivintlTp 18.63 +.10 +15.4
DvGrthT p 11.61 +.14 +6.8
DynCapAppTp14.33 +.28 +14.1
EqGrT p 45.59 +.85 +5.7
EqInT 28.61 +.44 +11.0
GovInT 10.11 -.04 +4,4
GrOppT 30.67 +.44 +10.1
HlncAdvT p 9.89 +,05 +14,4
InBdTT 11.05 -.03 +3.9


12-ma.
Name NAV chg % rtn
MdCapT7p 24.67 +.34 +13.9
MunllncTp 13.25 -02 +7.2
OwvseaT 17.59 +.17 +13.4
STFiT 9.48 -.01 +2.1
SmlCapT p 2559 +.66 +22.1
StrInT 11.66 ... +10.2
ValStraT 35.21 +.80 +13.3
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000n 12.19 +.04 +5.7
FF2010n 13.74 +.10 +8.5
FF2020n 14,10 +.16 +11.0
FF2030n 14.23 +.19 +11.9
FF2040n 8.35 +.11 +12.6
FF2015 11.16 .10 +9.8
FF2020p 11.42 +.14 +11.5
IncomeFdn 11.33 +.03 +5.0
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrr 16.82 +.46 +102
AMgr 16.09 +.10 +6.6
AMgrGrn 14.76 +.13 +7.4
AMgrin 12.77 +.05 +7.6
Balance 18.32 +.22 +14.3
BlueChipGr 41.58 +.69 +6.6
Canada n 37.01 +.96 +33.1
CapAppn 25.94 +.64 +11.1
Caplnco nr 8,44 +.04 +143
ChinReg n 17.76 -.10 +22.7
CongrStn 393.28 +4.06 +7.4
Contra n 59,81 +.95 +16.8
CnvSec 21.41 +.32 +9.32 .9
Destinyl 12.93 +.19 +8.6
Destmnyll 11.45 +.14 +7.4
DisEq n 26.51 +.50 +17.1
Diverlntl n 28.86 +.08 +16.1
DivGth n 28,29 +.34 +7.5
EmrgMktn 13.96 +.07 +40.8
Equllncn 51.95 +.70 +10.6
EQII 23.78 +.42 +12.7
EurCapApn 22.11 +.12 +17.6
Europe n 35.44 +.29 +28.4
ExchFdon 268.70 +2.83 +10.7
Export n 20.38 +.31 +16.3
FidelFd 30.04 +.38 +8.6
Fifty nr 20.54 +.37 +10.2
FItRaleHIr 995 +.01 +4.2
FourlOne n 25.47 +.29 +12.3
GNMA0 n 11.06 -.02 +4.5
Go0tlncn 10.27 -.03 +4.8
GroCoen 57.16 +1,30 +14.4
Groinc 37.84 +.41 +9.2
Grolncll 9.43 +.16 +6.3
Highlncrn 8.87 +.02 +8.9
Indepndncen 17.95 +.33 +12.9
InProBnd 11.35 -.10 +6.6
ntBd.n 10.43 -.02 +3.7
ntGov 10.17 -03 +2.9
:IntDisC 28.46 +.09 +17.1
InllSmCaprn 24.85 +.17 +25.5
InvGB n 7.48 -.02 +5.6
Japan n 12.32 +.11 +3.0
JpnSmCo n 12.87 +.12 +4.6
LatAmln 23.88 +.03 +61,3
LeUCoStock 25.00 +.50 +30.8
LowPrirn 41.82 +.64 +21.9
Magellan n 104.15 +1.68 +9,3
MIdCap n 24.43 +.63 +16.5
MtgeSec n 11.22 -.02 +4.7
NewMkt nr 14.26 -.05 +20,4
NewMill n 31.17 +.80 +9.0
OTC 35.03 +88 +12.9
Ovrsea n 35.14 +.34 +13.8
PacBason 20.08 -.01 +15.8
Puritan 18.87 +.16 +.89
RealEstn 32.35 +.86 +37.8
STBF n 8.93 -.01 +2.4
SmCapInd 20.87 +.49 +20,5
SmallCapSnr 17.83 +.39 +13,5
SE Asian 17.81 -.03 +32.8
SIkSIcn 23.19 +.38 +11,5
SItratncn 10.55 -.01 +10,4
Trend n 54.27 +.83 +11,3
USBIn 11.08 -.03 +5.4
UMShtBdum 10.03 -.01 +2.0
Utility n 14.33 +.01 +27.0
ValStra 36.80 +.84 +13.8
Value n 75.95 +1.24 +22.3
Wddwde n 18.25 +.24 +12,5
Fidelity Selects:
AiMn 34.67 +.58 +12.9
Auto n 33.60 +.71 +9.9
Banking n 37.81 +.45 +10.0
Biotech n 57.06 +2.33 +1.8
Broker n 61.40 +1.60 +35.7
Chem n 67.00 +1.68 +26.3
Compn c 34.86 +1.11 +9.4
Conlndn 24.85 +.29 +14,8
CslHoun 48.40 +1.50 +42.5
DfAeroen 71.49 +.67 +24.2
DevCom n 18.23 +.43 +8.1
Electrn 40.90 +1.61 +11.4
Energy n 41.81 *+.68 +50.8
EngSvcn 53.11 +.53 +46.9
Environ 14.93 +.31 +11.8
FInSvcn 109.88 +1.61 +11.3
Foodn 50.54 +.19 +10.0
Goldmnp 24.23 +.02 +4.9
Health n 139.60 +2.76 +15.7
HomeFln n 58.55 +.97 +3.5
IndMatn 37.64 +.60 +13.8
Isur n 64.66 +.78 +12.6
Leisr n 74.75 +.58 +13,6
MedDel n 50.80 +.67 +56.7
MedEqSysn 24.51 +.36 +10.6
Mlltimed n 44.91 +.44 +12.1
NatGas n 34.90 +.80 +49,8
Papern 27.68 +.42 -11.1
Phana n 8.95 +.12 +4.0
Retail n 54.35 +1.29 +22.0
Softwr n 50.28 +1.27 +14.0
Tech n 60.12 +1.71 +9.7
Telecom n 36.51 +.37 +13.8
Trans n 40.14 +.71 +17.8
UbGr n 42.89 +.26 +27.7
Wireless n 6.33 +.14 +27.4
Fidelity Spartan:
CAMunn 12.62 -.01 +7,2
CTMuntnr 11.68 -.02 +5.2
Equtlndxn 42.90 +.63 +11.2
ExIM1klnd 33.47 +.77 +21.3
5001ndxnr 83.68 +1.23 +11.2
FL MuTrn 11.73 -.03 +6.2
Gvin n 11,07 -.03 +5.0
InlmMuni n 10.11 -.02 +4.9
Intllndx 31.38 +.02 +14.0
InvGrBdn 10,66 -.03 +5.7
MDMunm 11.05 -.02 +5.7
MA Muni.n 12.19 -.02 +7.2
Ml Muni n 12.08 -.02 +5.7
MN Mun1 n 11.60 -.02 +5.6
Munilnc n 13.12 -.02 +7.3
NJ Munr 11.81 -.01 +7.1
NY Munn 13.09 -.02 +6.7
Oh Mun4n 11.99 -.03 +6.7
PAMunrnr 11.00 -.02 +6.0
ShtlnlMu n 10.28 -.01 +2.2
ToMktpInd 33.65 +.56 +13.6
Fifth Third Inst:
QualntyGrn 15.88 +.38 +6.6
First Amer Fds Y:
CoreBond 11.27 -.02 +5.1
Eqtylnco np 13.75 +.18 +9.9
EqldxInp 22.68 +.33 +10.9
InLBond 10.06 -.02 +3.7
Intl n 11.40 +.04 +10.5
LgCpGrOp 28.38 +.54 +10.2
LgCapVal np 19.49 +.27 +16.0
MdCpGrOp 42.26 +.87 +24.6
STBnd 9.99 ... +1.6
First Eagle:
GlobalA 40.00 +.22 +16.2
OverseasA 22.48 +,.06 +17.8
First Investors A
BlChlpA p 20.47 +,29 +9.5
GlobalA p 6.61 +,06 +10,0
GovtA p 10.97 -.01 +3.3
GrolncA p 13.63 +.23 +15,4
IncomeA p 3.08 +.01 +4.9
lnvGrdA p 9.91 -.03 +4,5
MATFAp 12.11 -.02 +5,2
MITFA0p 12.75 -.03 +4.7
MidCapA np 27.38 +.62 +23.9
NJTFAp 13.08 -.03 +4.6
NYTFA p 14.57 -.02 +4.7
PATFAp 13.29 -.02 +4.5
SpSitAp 20.02 +.43 +17.6
TaxExptAp 10.22 -.02 +4.7
TotRetAp 13.95 +.16 +11.1
ValueB p 6858 +.06 +14.3
Firsthand Funds:
GlobTech 3.73 +.01 -2.4
Tech Value n 28.91 +.92 +7.6
Frank/Temp Fmk A:
AGEAp 2.11 +,01 +11,1
Ad|USp 9.00 .. +2.2
ALTFAPp 11.62 -.02 +6,3
AZTFAp 11.30 -.02 +9.1
Ballsnp 61.46 +1.15 +24.1
CAHYBdp 10.39 -.02 +9.3
CallnsAp 12.61 -.02 +8.1
CA lesmAp 11.65 -.02 +5.4
CalTFrA p 7.38 ... +9.3
CapGrA 10,74 +.20 +3,4
COTFAp 12.11 -.02 +7,7,
CTTFAp 11.19 -.01 +8.2
CvtSecAp 16.54 +.26 +14,0
DblTxFrA 12.08 -.02 +8.4
DynaTechA 24.19 +.60 +8.3
EqlncAp 20.73 +.16 +9.8
Fedlnlem p 11,57 -.02 +5,.2
FedTxFrAp 12.24 ... +8,0
FPlxCapGrA 37.63 +.86 +11.1
FIRIDAp 10.11 ... +3.5
FL TFAPp 12.06 -.01 +7.4
FoundFAlp 12,42 +.06 +13.2
GATFAp 12.22 -.02 +7.4
GoldPrM0 A 17.87 -.05 +5.7
Grow0hAp 33.92 +.58 +10.6
HYTFAp 10,94 -.01 +10.2
IncoSerAp 2.51 +.01 +14.3
InsTFAp 12.46 -.01 +7.0
NYlnlmlTFp 11.07 -.03 +4.2
LATFAp 11.71 -.02 +6.7
LMGvSecA 10.07 -.01 +1.7
MDTFAp 11.86 -.02 +6.9
MassTFAp 12.07 -.01 +7.3
MIchTFAp 12.39 -.02 +6.6
MNInsA 12.24 -.02 +6.3
MOTFAp 12.42 ... +6.0
NJTEAp 12.27 -.01 +6.0
NY8nsAp 11.74 -.01 +6.9
NYTFAp 11.99 ... +7.2
NCTFAp 12.42 -01 +7.4


OhloITFAp 12.70 -.03 +7.4
ORTFAp 11.99 -.01 +7.8
PATFAp 10.53 -.02 +7.1
ReESecAp 28.78 +.54 +36.9
RIOsDAp 31.71 +.31 +7.0
SmCpGr2Ap 12.06 +.32 +14.0
SMCpGrA 35.25 +.86 +17.5
Stratlncp 10.22 -.01 +8.4
USGovAp 6.58 ... +4.2
UtilitlesAp 12.18 +.01 +31.86
VA TFA p 11.97 -.02 +7.7
Frank/rmp Fmk Adv:
IncomeAdv 2.50 +.01 +14.5
Frank/Temp Fmk B:
IncomeBl p 2.51 +.01 +13.7
IncomeB t 2.50 +.01 +13.4
Frank/Temp Fmk C:
FoundFAlp 12.32 +.05 +12.5
IncomeCt 2.52 +.01 +13.7
Frank/Temp MU A&B:
BeaconA 16.31 +.12 +15.3
DiscovA 25.15 +.14 +20.3
QualllledAt 20.00 +.15 +18.3
SharesA 23.65 +.17 +14.2
FrankrrTemp Mtl C:
DIscC1 24,97 +.14 +19.5
SharesC tI 23.40 +.16 +13.6
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DevMktAp 19.38 -.17 +31.7


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
ForeignAp 12.20 +.02 +14.5
GIBondA p 10.35 -.06 +8.2
GISmCoA p 9.48 +.10 +19.6
GrowlhA p 22.91 +.07 +12.7
IntlxEM p 14.67 +.01 +13.7
WorldA p 18.06 +.11 +16.1
Frank/TempTmp Adv:
FrgnAv 12.18 +.02 +14.7
GrthAv 22.95 +08 +13.0
FrankrTempTmp B&C:
DevMktC 19.00 -.16 +30.9
ForgnC p 12.01 +.01 +13.6
GrwthCp 22.39 +.07 +11.9
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Income n 11.47 -.03 +5.0
S&S PMn 45.58 +.56 +9.7
TaxEx 11.96 -.01 +6.8
Trusls n 54.47 +.71 +8.5
GMO Trust I1:
Foreign x 14.25 -.34 +147
GMOTrrust III:
CurHIntBd x 9.68 -.34 +11.2
CorePoBdx 10.47 -.07 +6.4
DmBd 996 -.03 +5.7
EmgMk r 17.67 -1.03 +45.5
ECDx 11.43 -.25 +27.5
Foreign x 14.30 -.34 +1406
InllGrwh x 26.24 -.35 +17.7
IntllntrValx 28.06 -.42 +17.4
IntlSmCo 16.00 -1.50 +22.2
US Corex 14.37 +.12 +13.0
GMOTrust IV:
EmgCnDtx 11.44 -.25 +27.7
EmerMkt x 17,63 -1.04 +45.5
Foreign x 14.31 -.34 +14.9
IntllnlrVal x 28.05 -.42 +17.5
US Core x 14.35 +.12 +13.0
USQualEq x 20.06 +.08 +5.2
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMkVl I 17.64 -1.04 +45.6
USCoreVI x 14.35 +.12 +13.0
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 42.58 +.38 +16.9
Growth 26,68 +.54 +10.6
Valued 1968 +.16 +14.3
Gartmore Fds D:
Bond 9.74 -.02 +6.1
GvlBdD 10.34 -.04 +5.0"
GrowthD 6.87 +.14 +12.4
NationwD 20866 +.34 +13.4
TxFrs r 10.68 -.01 +6,6
Gartmora Fds Instl:
InCldx In 8.10 +.01 +14.3
NwBdIdxIl n 11.02 -.03 +5.4
S&P51Onstl n 10.45 +.15 +11.0
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 25.02 +.06 +7.8
Glenmede Funds:
Intlx 1828 -.14 +17.2
Goldman Sachs A:
CapGrA 19.75 +.30 +6.6
GrIncA 25.41 +.25 +15.0
GrthOppsA 21.81 +.51 +15.2
HIfYleldA 7.98 +.01 +10.7
HYMualAp 11.26 -.04 +11.0
MidCapVA p 36.22 +.65 +26.9
SmaCapA 43.05 +1,02 +17.8
Goldman Sachs nst:
CoreFxc 10.13 -.02 +5,7
HYMual 11.26 -.04 +11,4
MIdCapVal 36.49 +.66 +27.4
UItraSDG 9.29 ... +2,3
Guardian Funds:
GBG IntGrA 13.21 +01 +15.0
ParkAv A 30.77 +.49 +6.4
Stock 27.90 +.45 +6,8
Harbor Funds:
Bond 11.87 -.02 +6.2
CapApplnst n 29.44 +.67 +13.5
Intl nllr 42.897 +.16 +16.2
SCpVllnsI 20.28 +.47 +31,9
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsAp 15.20 +.16 +.5
CapAppA p 34.60 +.61 +15,8
DIvGlhA p 16.93 +.22 +12.8
MIdCapA p 26.22 +.58 +24.6
SmICoA p 17.88 +.53 +20.6
StockA p 17.97 +.30 +5.6
Hartford Fds B:
CapAppBpn 32.20 +.56 +15.0
Hartford Fds C:
CapAppCt 32.29 +.57 +15.0
Hartford HLS IA:
Bond 11.76 -.02 +6.0
CapApp 52.52 +.96 +16.5
D'&Grlrth 20.68 +.24 +13.1
GIblLdrs 17.21 +.14 +4.3
Grwth&lnc 12.35 +.18 +12.4
GrwthOpp 28.72 +.63 +16.9
Advisers 23.18 +.24 +5.9
Stock 46.21 +.77 +6.5
Index 31.27 +.46 +10.8
InllOpp 11.89 +.09 +14.7
MIdCap 30.24 +.67 +25.3
MidCpVal 13.22 +.19 +16.8
SmalICo 17.50 +.52 +21.4
Hartford HLS IB:
Advisors p 23.31 +.24 +5.8
Bondnp 11.68 -.02 +5.7
CapAppracp 52.25 +.95 +16.2
Di&Gro p 20,60 +.25 +12.9
SlockP 46.05 +.77 +6.3
Heartland:Fds:
Value 48.03 +.59 +5.6
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrow 19.33 +.80 +26.3
HollBalFd 15.34 +.12 +2.7
Hotchkis & Wiley:
LgCpVal 23.88 +.32 +23.3
LCapValA p 23.80 +.32 +22.9
MdCpValA p 29.29 +.71 +27.7
MidCpVal 29.43 +.71 +27.9
HussmnStrGr 15.90 -.02 +5.8
ICAP Funds:
Equiy 45.53 +.50 +14.7
IGM SmICo 38.15 +.97 +20,7
ING Funds Cl A:
IntValAp 16.77 -.09 +10.8
ING Partners:
TRPGrEqln 49.94 +.91 +11.8
INGT,M,Q&1:
IntVall 16.80 -.09 +11.3
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.52 ... +9.2
Ivy Funds:
GINatRsAp 22.92 +.23 +28.8
JPMorgan A Class:
Inv Bal p 12.13 +.07 NA
InvGr&lnAp 13.12 +.12 NA
MdCpValwp 23.57 +27 +21.3
JPMorgan B Class:
InvG&l p 13.07 +.13 NA
JPMorgan C Class:
MdCpValu pn 23.13 +.26 +20.5
JP Morgan Instl:
MidCapVal n 23.90 +.29 +21.9
JPMorgan Select:
InllEq 29.19 +.10 +13.5
MdCpValu .... +21.5
TxAwreEq 16.97 +.21 +8.2
USEquity 10.91 +.17 +10.1
JPMorgan Sal CIs:
CoreBond 10.83 -.03 +4.7
CorePlusBd n 7,91 -.01 +5.4
OiMdCpGr 25.32 +,46 +17.7
DivMdCpVI 19.49 +28 +21.0
Eqlndx 27.59 +.40 +10.9
GovBond 10.40 -.02 +6.5
HiYIdBond 8.33 +.02 +9.3
IntBondl n 10.59 -.02 +4.0
InlmdTFBd 10.84 -.01 +3.6
InlAEq0 19.72 +.08 +16.0
IntrdAmer 23.33 +.33 +19.2
LgCapVal 15.97 +.19 +14.8
LgCapGr 14.95 +.22 +6,3
MlICpMkNeu r11.04 +.03 +5,9
SmCpCor e 44.94 +1.36 +18,7
TaxFrBond n 12.99 -.01 +5.6
UItrSTBOd 9.84 +.01 +2.5
JP Morgan Ultra:
MtgBacked 10.62 -.02 NS
Janus:
Balanced n 21.56 +.21 +10.1
Contrarian 13.84 +.29 +26.1
CoreEq 21.32 +.50 +16.7
Enterprn 36.73 +.90 +17.9
FedTxExn 7.09 .. +4.7
PlxBond 9.63 -.02 +4.9
Fund 24.39 +38 +5.6
GIUleScinr 19.02 +.46 +13.3
GfTech nr 10.55 +27 +6.9
Grthlncn 33.43 +76 +17.5
Mercury n 21.30 +.26 +10.5
MIdCapVal 23.17 +.30 +17.6
Olympus n 29.59 +.68 +13.2
Or0on n 7.37 +.09 +16.8
Overseas nr 24.98 +.17 +25.9
ShTmBd 2.89 ., +1.6
SCVInsI 31.58 +.50 +16.7
SCVInv 31.38 +.50 +16.5
Twenty 48.40 +,82 +19.5
Venlurn 59.03 +1.42 +19.6
WridWnr 40.21 +,11 +7.5
Janus Adv I Shrs:
Forty 26.99 +.42 +24.1
Janus Aspen InstI:
Balanced 24.64 +.24 +10.4
LgCpGrosh 19.90 +.31 +5.6
WorldwGr n 25.81 +*06 +6.6
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 15.88 +.29 +13.8
GovlncA 9.08 -.02 +4.5
GrowmhA 14.60 +.34 +13.3
HiYdA p 5.75 ... +8.6
InsuredA 11.03 -.02 +5.5
Util81yA 13.61 +.11 +40.8
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 13.47 +.31 +12.5
HIYodBln0 5.74 ... +7.9
InsuredB 11.05 -.02 +5.2
JennlsonDryden Z&h:
GrowmhZ 14.99 +.35 +13.6
Skldxil n 27.19 +.39 +11.0
StkldxZ 27.17 +.39 +10.9
Jensen 23.65 +.08 +1.5
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.24 -.04 +5.9
ClassloVal p 23.77 +.19 +14.6
RgBkA 41.79 +.47 +10,4
SolnvAp 19.25 +.26 +5.5
StrlncAp 7.01 +.01 +9.5


USGIbLdrsn 27.25 +.52 +3.3
John Hancock B:
Strlnc 7.01 +.01 +8,8
Julius Baer Funds:
IntlEql r 32.23 +.18 +20.0
IntlEqA 31.64 +.17 +19.6
Laudus Funds:
USSmCpn 14,19 +.37 +18.5
Lazard Instl:
EmgMkll 15.41 -.01 +46.8
IntlEqlnstl 12.58 +.02 +11.7
Legg Mason: Fd
OpportTrt 15.57 +.46 +11.5
Spinv np 46.28 +.85 +12.4
Va'rrp 64.39 +.97 +11.8
Legg Mason Instl:
BFM SmCp 11.61 +.42 +21.9
VaffrFIp 69.58 +1.06 +12.6
ValTrlnsi 70.55 +1.07 +13.0
LeutholdCI n 16.39 +.18 +13.4
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 3J.18 +.14 +5.8
Inll n 15.80 +.01 +7.0
SmCap 31.53 +.20 +17.4
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 13.65 +.02 +12.3
Lord Abbett A:
AlfillaldA p 14.39 +,.12 +9.9
AIIValueA 11.95 +.16 +13.3


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for
last day of the week.
Chg: Weekly not change In the NAV.
12 mo nn ITra prt:,ijr 0gair. r lOSi fto .:ne share iruci .,ng
'.,elnrn r f ,liodi r1'30 .r r O.r 1 i ,no rlh.
Muldal Funa Foolnoles: a < Caplli l 4 ,g t dirt.Ir.ll.jr, I -
P,-' ius 6d n 6 qu l- n r:.j1.I, lur,. p FurJ asr.'.ol u.-ei d 13
paS d'ai,'o.r.[hr-. :.' .l I - ,0 ,plt3i on 6 tea r .'o iTiq ert
d6lared 31 I load rr, Ia, apply 5 ',, ,h. ", ;:,pin i I -
Soiri p r.,d ,' Ev.ca nr, .1.. Jro NA r. N, inftrmai.:.r .. 1it
at.ie, NE Oala Inr qusi',. NN Funa ,.es noro .r. I., be.
i'acd6 NS FIj'ria did i:1 i .I t Sa 3r[ daie
Source Lipper, Inc. ana Tne Associated Press


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
Balance rx 1135 +.03 +8.5
BondDebA4px 7.90 -.02 +7.3
GlncA p 7.18 -.02 +3.8
Gvt$lScAp 2.63 .. +5.4
MidCapA p 23.01 +.34 +21.8
RsSmCpA 28.74 +.72 +20.5
RsAmVal p 12.37 +.13 +15.8
Lord Abbett B:
AtildB p 14.43 +.12 +9.2
BdDbBpx 7.91 -.01 +6.7
MidCapV7p 22.25 +.32 +20.9
Lord Abbett C:
AfildCG p 14.40 +.12 +9.2
BdDbC px 7.91 -.02 +6.5
MidCapVICp 22.19 +.33 +20.9
Lord AbbettY:
ASuY 14.42 +.12 +10.3
MFS Funds A:
MITAp 17.51 +.32 +13.9
MIGA p 12.31 +.24 +10.7
BondAp 12.95 -.04 +6.1
CapOpp 13.23 +.21 +11.9
EmGrAp 32.02 +,62 +12.5
GvScAp 9.68 -.03 +4,6
GrOpAp 8.681 +.17 +10.5
HllncA p 3.69 ... +8.6
IntNwDA p 21.61 +.22 +19.3
MCapA p 8.73 +.19 +9.0
MuBdA 10.77 -.01 +5.9
MuHIA 8.46 ... +10.0
MuFLAp 10.24 -.01 +7.1
RschAp 20.77 +.44 +17.3
ResrchlntlAp 15.47 +.0 +13.6
SIrValAp 16.03 +.18 +13.8
TolRAp 16.06 +.10 +11.6
UStlAp 11.92 +.02 +34.4
ValueA p 23.57 +.22 +15.8
MFS Funds B:
MA0ITB 17.09 +.31 +13.1
EmGrBI 29.59 +57 +11,7
MIGB 11.28 +.22 +9.8
GvScBIt 9,67 -.02 +3.9
HIlnBt 3.90 +8.0
MulnBI 8.69 -.01 +6.2
TotRB1 16.05 +.09 +10.8
ValueB 23.45 +.22 +15.1
MFS Funds C:
TotRtC t 16.11 +.09 +10.8
Value 23.43 +.22 +15.1
MFS Funds I:
ReInTIt 15.80 +.08 +14.0
Valuel 23.66 +.23 +16.2
MFS Funds InstI:
IntlEqty 15.61 +.11 +12.3
MainStay Funds A:
HIYIdBdA 6.33 +.01 +10.2
MainStay Funds B:
CpAppB t27.58 +.58 +9.1
ConvB I 13.07 +.14 +7.9
GovtB t 8.35 -.02 +3.4
HIYIdBB t 6.31. +.01 +9.4
InllEqB 12.58 +.03 +11,8
SmCpGrB p 14.90 +.45 +16.8
TotRtB1 19.06 +.22 +9.9
MalnStay Funds I:
S&P5001dx 28.13 +.41 +10.9
MaIrs & Power:
Growth n 70.42 +.92 +10.8
Managers Funds:
FremonlBdn 10.54 -.01 +6.7
SpclEq 91.04 +2.17 +15.2
Maralco Funds:
Focus p 16.63 +.20 +16.7
Growep 17.76 +.24 +16.5
MassMutual Inst:
,CoreBdS 11,15 -.02 +5.2
Mister Select:
Equity 14.89 +.26 +8.4
Intl 17,58 +.21 +21.2
Matthews Asian:
AsianG&l 16.44 -.01 +22.8
PaFclger 16.37 -.06 +29.1
Mellon Funds:
BondFund 12,65 -.02 +4.4
EmgMkts 21.23 -.08 +30.7
InvlFund 15.34 -.01 +9.5
LrgCapSIk 9.74 +.16 +11.7
MidCapStk 14.42 +.28 +23.3
SmlCapStk 17.35 +.47 +15.9
MergerFdn 15.54' +.03 +3.6
Meridian Funds:
Growth 36.44 +.56 +9.2
Value 3.67 +.4 +42 +13.7
Merrill Lynch A:
BalCapAp 26.80 +.22 +7,8
BasValAp 31.53 +.42 +8.3
FdGrAtp 17.46 +.26 +8.9
GbAlA p 16.73 +.06 +13.3
HeallhAp 6.65 +.18 +17.3
NJMuniBd 10.75 ., +9.7
S&P500 p 14.92 +.22 +10.7
USGovtA 10.26 -.02 +4.1
Merrill Lynch B:
BalaCapBt 26.01 -+.21 +6.9
BasVIBt 30.87 +.41 +7.4
BdHglnc 5.05 +.01 +6.2
CalnsMB 11.72 -.02 +5.6
CoreBdPtfBt 11.80 -.02 +4.6
CplTBt 11.98 -.02 +4.7
EqultyDiv 15.04 +.18 +17.4
EuroB1 14.66 +.10 +17.2
FocusValuel 12.54 +.18 +10.5
FundlGrB 1S 15.97 +.24 +8.1
FLMBI 10.51 -.01 +..1
GIAIB1 16.37 +.06 +12.5
HealthB1 5.02 +.13 +16.3
LaLAmB1t 26.38 -.08 +64.3
MnlnsB I 7.97 -.01 +6.4
ShtTrmUSGvt t 9.18 -.01 +1.4
MunShtTm 9.99 +0.9
MulntmTrB t 10.60 -.01 +4.0
MNallB t 10.63 -.01 +7.0
NJMB It 10.74 +9.2
NYMnBtl 11.17 -.01 +6.8
NatResTrBt 40.90 +1.47 +49.1
PacBt 18.71 -.10 +10.4
PAMB1 11.44 -.02 +7.0
ValueOpp.-t 2512 +.52 +14.8
USGovt 10,26 -.02 +3.6
Ulilcm t 11.73 +.05 +32.3
WldlncB I 6.18 -.03 +10.9
Merrill Lynch C:
BasVICl t 30.13 +.,40 +7.4
FdGrC t 16.06 +.24 +8.1
GlobAIC t 15.92 +.05 +12.4
Merrill Lynch I:
In7lVal 26.40 +.10 +16.0
BalaCapl 26.90 +.22 +8.0
BasVall 31.69 +.42 +6.5
BdHilnc 5.05 +.02 +7.0
CalnsMB 11.72 -.02 +6.2
CoreBdPll t 11.80 -.02 +5.,4
CplTI 11.97 -.03 +5.2
DevCapl p 17.83 -.02 +34.6
EqultyDIv 15.03 +.18 +18,7
Eurol 17.10 +.12 +18.4
FocusValual 13.78 +.20 +11.7
FundlGrl 17,86 +.27 +9,1
FLMI 10.51 -.01 +8,6
GIAII 16.80 +.07 +13.6
Healthl 7.21 +.,20 +17,7
LatAml 27.71 -.08 +686,0
Mnlnsl 7.98 -.01 +7.3
MunShortTm 9.99 ... +1.2
MulntTrl 10.60 -.01 +4.3
MNalll 10.64 .. +7.9
NatResaTr 43.25 +1.86 +50,6
Padc 20.43 -.11 +11.5
S&P500 14.97 +.22 +11,0
ValueOppty 27.98 +.,69 +15.9
USGovt 10.26 -.02 +4,3
Utmfcml 11,77 +.05 +33.3


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
WldlncI 6.18 -.04 11.6
Metro West Fds:
TotalRoeBondl 9.75 -.01 +6.9
Midas Funds:
MidasFdn 1.98 +.01 +4.8
Monetta Funds:
Monesnan 11.24 +.18 +19.8
MontagGr I 23.02 +.40 +4.4
Morgan Stanley A:
AmOppA 24.65 +.53 +12.2
DSvGthA 35.12 +.50 +9,2
GlobDivA 13.65 +.07 +9.6
US GvtA 9.19 -.02 +5.4
Morgan Stanley B:
AmOppB 23.19 +.49 +11.3
DivGlhB 35.24 +.50 +9.2
EqWAlghB 37.88 +.65 +15.8
GIbDivB 13.79 +.08 +9.1
GrowthB 12.32 +.19 +10.5
SP500B 12.73 +.19 +9.8
SIratB 18.03 +.17 +10.5
US Gvl 9.20 -.02 +5.4
Morgan Stanley D:
TaxExD 11.85 -.01 +6.5
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMkt n 20.42 +.10 +37.6
CrPIFInstnx 11.65 -.14 +6.4
GIValEqA ne 17.51 -.08 +9.4
IntlSmCpAne 25.07 -.48 +18.0
IntlEq n 20.71 +.06 +123
ntlEqB np 20.55 +.06 +12.0
LIdDurPt nx 10.36 -02 +1.7
MCGrAdvp 21.59 +.35 +22.2
SmCGrBnpe 12.99 +.22 +23.7
USReal nx 25.08 -.18 +42.8
ValuAdv nx 17.80 +.08 +14.8
Muhlenkmpn 83.77 +1.84 +28.9
Munder Funds A:
InlrnetA 18.07 +.41 +9.2
Mutual Series:
BeaconZ 16.40 +.12 +15.7
DiscZ 25.38 +.14 +20.7
QualdZ 20.12 +.16 +18.68
SharsZ 23.680 +.17 +14.6
Nations Funds Inv A:
FocusEqAtI 18.48 +.22 +16.4
InllValueAr 21.01 -.10 +12.2
MarsGroA 17.71 +.23 +16.6
Nations Funds Inv B:
FocEqtyB I 17,53 +.20 +15,6
MaMrsGrwB 16.78 +.22 +15.6
Nations Funds Pri A:
BondFdPrA 9.90 -.02 +5.6
ConSecPriA 17.08 +.20 +7.8
FocusEqAI 18.75 +.22 +16.7
IntMPAn 10.19 -.01 +4,5
IntEqPAn 13.36 +.01 +13.3
nllValPrAn 21.11 -.10 +12.5
LCapldxPrA 23.53 +.35 +11.1
MarsGrPrA 17.95 +.24 +16,9
MarlnOppr 11.02 +.06 +10.4
MldCpldxPrA nl .1,57 +.21 +21.5
STInPA 9.84 ... +2.0
STMuPA 10.22 -.01 +1.8
SmICapldxPrA n20.58 +.57 +22.5
StratGroPrA 12.41 +.15 +10.8
ValuePA 13.34 +.19 +17.5
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus n 38.36 +1.05 +17.7
Genesis n 32.92 +.58 +22.4
Geneslnstl 45.11 +.79 +22.6
Guard n 16.78 +.29 +15.6
HlghlncoBd 9.29 ... +6.5
Intl r 19.20 +.15 +23.6
Partner n 27.86 +.67 +29.3
Neuberger&Berrm Tr:
Genesis n 47.06 +.83 +22.3
Nicholas Applegate:
EmgGrol 10.54 +.31 +16.9
Nicholas Group:
Nichol n 62.09 +.66 +16.7
NichlncI 2.16 +.01 +6.6
Northeast Investors:
Trust 7.63 +.05 +8.3
Northern Funds:
FIxLInn 10.09 -.03 +5.2
GrEq 16.19 +.31 +12.1
HiYFxIncn 8.14 +.01 +8.0
IntGrEq n 10.09 -.01 +9.0
LrgCapVal 13.58 +.13 +8.8
SmICapIdxS n 10.49 +.31 +18.9
Technlyn 11.19 +.28 +4.6
Northern Instl Fds:
EqldxA 15.43 +.22 +11.0
Nuveen Cl A:
HYdMuBd p 22.14 +.03 +12.7
Nuveen Cl R:
InMunFR 11.07 -.01 +6.3
IntmDurMuBd 9.15 .. +6.1
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhOakSIGr n3.80 +1,.13 +0.2
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 24.25 +.18 +9.0
Global 22.17 +.10 +14.4
Intl I r 21.60 +.02 +16.,6
In0lSmCpr 20.65 +.07 +21.0
Oakurarkr 41.46 +.44 +9.2
Select r 33.75 +.35 +11.9
Old Westbury Fds:
Intln 10.15 -.01 +8.1
MidCapEqp 16.47 +.31 +11.8
Olstein Funds:
FncAlertC 17.99 +.38 +9.7
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFrMuA 10,18 +.01 +12.9
AMTFrNY 12.99 +.01 +12.6
CAMuniAp 11.53 +.02 +18.7
CapAppA p 40,90 +.65 +6.8
CaplncAp 12.47 +.12 +13.0
ChlncAp 9.47 +.01 +7.7
DevMktAp 29.07 -.22 +45.5
DiscFdp 43.24 +1.30 +7.7
EquityA 11,18 +.21 +15.4
GlobalAp 61.35 +.92 +19.2
GIblOppA 33.05 +.66 +22.7
Goldp 18.19 -.11 +11.1
GrowthAp 28.04 +.67 +.9
HighYldAp 9.46 ... +7.6
IntlBdAp 5.89 -.03 +14.0
LTGovAp 10.07 ... +2.0
LItdTrnMu 15.87 +.03 +12.3
MnStFdA 35,88 +.51 +10.,6
MainSorOpA p 13,36 +.21 +13,7
MnSISCpA0p 20.83 +.54 +22.7
MidCapA 17.18 +.35 +18.1
PAMunlAp 12.84 +.01 +15.7
RealAstAp 8.29 +.18 +22.9
S&MdCpVIA 33.23 +.62 +30,7
SIrmncAp 4.30 -.01 +10.2
USGv0 p 9.73 -.02 +5.6
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFrMuB 10,14 +12.,0
AMT-FtNY 12.99 ... +11.6
CapAppB p 37.63 +.60 +5.9
Ca0plcBt 12.35 +.12 +12.2
ChlncB1t 9.46 +.01 +6.9
Equity B 10.78 +.20 +14,4
GloblB t 57.34 +.86 +18,2
GIbOppB 31,73 +.64 +21.7
HiYIdB 1 9.32 +.01 +638
MnStFdB 34.73 +.48 +9.7
SltrlncBI 4.31 -.01 +9.1
Oppenhelmer C&M:
GlobalC p 58.26 +.87 +18.2
MnSItFdC 34.72 +.48 +9.8
SIrlncC I 4.29 -.01 +9.2
Oppenhelm Quest:
0B0lA 18.35 +.25 +8.6
QBalanC 18.07 +.24 +7,9
QBalanB 18.06 +.,25 +7.8
0QOpptyA 32.88 +.33 +10.3


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
Oppenheimer Roch:
LIdNYAp 338 +8.6
LtdNYC t 3.37 +7.8
RoMu.Ap 18.36 +13.4
RoMu B 1835 +.01 +12.4
RcNIIMuA 1262 +.03 +21.9
OppenhelmerY:
CapApprecY 41.94 +.68 +72
PBHG Funds:
CliprFocus 17.18 +.17 +8.0
SelGrowthn 20.86 +.37 +4.7
PIMCO Admln PIMS:
RelRetAdp 11.40 -.10 +6.9
ShtITmAdp 10.02 +2.0
ToltRelAd n 10.75 -.02 +6.0
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIIAsset 13.01 +12.9
CommodRR 15.96 +.24 +14.7
Diverlnco 11,13 -.02 +12.9
EmMktsBd 11.11 -.05 +21.0
FrgnBdn 10.76 -.01 +9.1
GlobalBd n 9.83 -.03 +5.2
HiYld n 985 11,3
LowDurn 10.13 +2.2
McdDurn 10.29 -.02 +4.0
RealRelurn 12.04 -.22 +12.3
RealRetllnsl 11.40 -.10 +7.2
ShortT 10.02 +2.3
ToltRetn 10.75 -.02 +6.2
TR IIn 10.19 -.02 +4.9
TRI8n 949 -.03 +6.2
PIMCO Funds A:
All Assel p 12.96 ... +12.1
CommodRR p 15.88 +.23 +14.1
HiYIdA 9.85 +.. 10.8
LowDurA 10.13 ... +1.7
RealRelA p 11.40 -.10 +6.7
TotRtA 10,75 -.02 +5.7
PIMCO Funds B:
RealRtBI 11.40 -.10 +5.9
ToRntBt1 10.75 -.02 +4.9
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIAsselC I 12.89 +.01 +11,4
CommRRp 15.77 +.23 +13.2
HIYIdC 9.85 ... +10.0
LwDurCnt' 10.13 .. +1.2
RealRetCp 11.40 -.10 +6.2
TotRtC I 10.75 -.02 +4.9
PIMCO Funds D:
CommodRR p 15.89 +.23 +14.1
RealRtnp 11.40 -.10 +6.7
TotllRtnp 10.75 -.02 +5.9
Parnassus Funds:
Eqylnco n 24.88 +.21 +9.8
Pax World:
Balanced x 23.52 +.14 +129
PennMuC p 10.26 +.25 +19.2
Phoenix Funds:
BalanA 14.83 +.07 +7.3
Phoenix-Aberdeen:
IntlA 10.10 +.03 +17.6
WldOpp 8.44 +.04 +13.7
Phoenlx-Engemann :
CapGrthA 14.74 +.19 +4.0
Pioneer Funds A'
BalancA p 9.67 +.07 +3.8
BondAp 9.35 -.02 +6.4
EqlncA p 29.60 +.33 +18.6
EuroSalEqA 29.83 +.14 +17.0
GrowthAp 12.09 +.23 +11.6
HighYldAp 11.28 +.05 +7.0
IntlValA 16.91 +.07 +13.0
MdCpGrA 15.16 +.25 +11.6
MdCpVaA p 26.27 +.28 +21.6
PionFdA p 42.18 +.56 +13.0
TaxFreeaA p 11.84 .. +9.6
ValueA p 18.06 +.25 +12.8
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYieldB 11.32 +.04 +6.1
MidCapValB 23.49 +.24 +20.5
Pioneer Funds C:
HIYdC t 11.42 +.05 +6.1
Preferred Group:
IntlVal n 16.00 +.01 +12.0
Price Funds Adv:
BIChp p 31.07 +.60 +10.2
Eqtylncp 26.47 +.31 +13.7
Growth pn 26.74 +.48 +11.9
HiYld p 6.9 +.01 +8.9
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.56 +.15 +11.3
BlueChlpG n 31.07 +.60 +10.4
CanTxn 11.12 -.02 +6.5
CapAprn 20.00 +.25 +13.8
DivGroan 22.88 +.22 +11.6
EmMktSn 21.24 +.12 +41.3
Eqlnc n 26.53 +.33 +14.0
Eqldx n 32.60 +.48 +10.9
Europe n 19.68 +.07 +13.6
FLIntmn 10.95 -.02 +3.6
GNM n 9,59 -.01 +4.3
Growth n 26.92 +.49 +12.1
Gwthlnn 21.89 +.34 +10.7
HlthScI n 23.28 +.76 +9.1
HiYIdn 6.99 +.01 +9.2
ForEq n 15.23 +.02 +12.4
IntlBd n 9.63 -.06 +3.6
IntlDisn 33.58 +.27 +17.7
IntStkn 12.72 +,02 +11.7
Japan n 8.45 +.02 +4.1
LatAmn 18.90 +.17 +67.1
MdSht n 5.16 -.01 +1.4
MdTxFrn '10.81 -.01 +5.8
MediaTI n 29.73 +.51 +23.2
MidCap n 52.10 +1.12 +19.4
MCapVal 283.55 +.36 +17,9
NewAm n 33.20 +.60 +9.7
NAslan 10.79 +.05 +35.1
NewEra n 38.41 +.84 +36.4
NwHrzn n 30.98 +.71 +22.1
Newlncon 9.12 -.02 +6.1
NYTpFn 11.47 -.01 +6.3
PSBal n 1832 +.20 +12.2
PSGrow n 22.29 +.31 +14,3
PSInco0n 14.89 +.11 +9.9
RealEst n 19.35 +.50 +38.2
R2010n 14.22 +.14 +11.2
Retire2020 n 15.09 +.18 +12.7
SITch n 19.08 +.53 +10.5
ST Bdn 4.72 ... +2.0
SmCapStkn 32.34 +.67 +17.6
SmCapValn 37.10 +.94 +22.1
Specr 17.20 +.25 +15,8
Speclnn 11.90 +.01 +7.5
TxFreen 10.11 -.01 +6.6
TxFrHYn 11.99 +9.0
TFInlm n 11.26 -.01 +4.0
TxFrSI n 5.39 -.01 +2.1
US In 5.43 -.02 +2.9
US Long 12.23 -.09 +11.1
VATFn 11.80 -.01 +6.2
Value n 23.33 +.33 +14.6
Principal Inv:
PrLV In 13.68 +21 +14.7
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.07 -.01 +3.68
AABalAp 10.83 +.05 +11.0
AZTE 9.37 -.02 +6.1
CATxA p 8.48 -.01 +6.4
ClassicEqAp 12.97 +.16 +11.5
Convert p 16.97 +.17 +6.0
DiscGr 17.51 +.33 +11.5
DvrlnAp 10.24 -.02 +8.9
EqlnAp 17.69 .19 +13.9
EuroEqlA 20.82 +.06 +16.6
FLTxA 9.34 -.01 +6.4
GeoAp 18.24 +.12 +9.7
GIGvA p 12.53 -.06 +4.5
GIbEqlyp 8,56 +.09 +15.0
GrInAp 19.59 +.22 +11,4
HthArp 62,49 +.95 +15.9
HiYdAp 8,05 +.02 +9.7
HYAdA p 6.07 +.01 +10.0
IncmA p 6,868 -.01 +5.2
IntlEqp 23.37 +.02 +14.7
InllGrlnp 11.69 +.02 +14.4
InvAp 12.97 +.21 +15.6
MITxp 9.11 -.01 +5.7
MNTxp 9.10 -.01 +5.4
NJTxAp 9.33 ... +6.,5
NwOpAp 42.48 +.78 +14.8
NwValA p 18.25 +.23 +14.4
NYTxA p 8.86 -.01 +6,2
OTCAp 7.49 +.15 +13.0
PATE 9,22 -.01 +6,5
TxExA p 8.91 -.01 +6.7
TFInAp 15.16 -.01 +5.8
TFHYA 13.02 ... +9.5
USGvA p 13.25 +.01 +4.0
U81A1p 10.92 +,04 +27.2
VslaA p 9.71 +.20 +19.0
VoyA p 16.70 +.32 +7.9
Putnam Funds B:
CapAprt 18.37 +.39 +19.3
ClassloEqBl 12,97 +.16 +10.7
DIscGvwIh 16.19 +.31 +10.7


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg.


CORN (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Jul05 233.00 233.00 224.00 226.00 -7.00
Sep05 240.00 240.00 233.00 234.00 -7.00
Dec 05 251.00 251.00 243.00 246.00 -6.00
fMar 06 255.00 256.00 250.00 253.00 -7.00
May 06 259.00 259.00 254.00 256.00 -7.00
Jul 06 263.00 263.00 258.00 259.00 -6.00
Sep 06 255.00 256.00 254.00 254.00 -3.00
Es. sales 104,192. Thush2s sales 138,322
Thus/as open Inl. 684,115, +6,192
OATS (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Jul05 166.00 170.00 166.00 169.00 +.00
Sep05 171.00 174.00 170.00 173.00 -1.00
Dec05 168.00 175.00 168.00 175.00 -1.00
Mar 06 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00
May06 179.00 179.00 179.00 179.00
Sep06 179.00 179.00 179.00 179.00
Mar07 179.00 179.00 179.00 179.00
Est. sales 923. ThutilS sales 752
ThueBs open int. 7,451, +63
WINTER WHEAT (KCBT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Jul05 333.00 335.00 332.00 333.00 -4.00
Sep05 340.00 342.00 338.00 340.00 -4.00
Dec05 350.00 355.00 350.00 351.00 -4,00
Mar06 364.00 364.00, 360.00 361.00 -5.00
May06 369.00 369.00 365.00 365.00 -5.00
Jul06 365.00 370.00 365.00 369.00 -.00
Sep06 375.00 375.00 375.00 375.00 -1.00
Est. sales 10,515. Thus sales 14.192
Thus/aes open int. 77,781, +1,188
COTTON 2 (NYBT)
50,000 Ibs.- cents per Ib.
Oct05 53.90 54.10 52.90 53.80 -.35
Dec 05 55.50 55.80 54.60 55.47 -.41
Mar 06 57.75 57.75 57.10 57.60 -.30
May 06 58.45 58.45 58.45 58.45 -.30
Jul06 59.35 59.35 59.35 59.35 -.30
Oct06 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 -.50
Dec06 61.00 61.15 60.20 61.15 -.65
Est. sales 4,663. Thuswas sales 7,189
Thu7/as open Int. 92.722, +121
COCOA (NYBT)
10 metric tons-S per ton
Jul05 1372 1378 '1372 1378 +6
Sep05 1385 1403 1377 1398 +1
Dec05 1420 1437 1413 1431 +1


Mar06 1453 1463 1443 1460
May06 1475 1480 1465 1480
Jul06 1490 1502 1490 1501
Sep06 1500 1520 1500 1516
Est. sales 9,966. Thumes sales 9,268
Thul es open int. 121,944, +1,478
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NYBT)
112,000 lbs.-cents per lb.
Oct 05 9.45 9.55 9.45 9.54
Mar 06 9.54 9.60 9.53 9.59
May 06 9.34 9.41 9.34 9.40
Jul06 9.14 9.21 9.14 9.20
Oct 06 9.07 9.09 9.06 9.09
Mar 07 9.08 9.09 9.08 9.09
May07 9.10 9.11 9.10 9.10
Est. sales 48,993. Thau/ms sales 23,855
Thumos open inm. 380,802, +988
CATTLE (CME)
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Aug 05 80.40 80.57 79.20 79.35
Oct 05 83.45 83.75 83.02 83.15
Dec05 85.30 85.60 85.05 85.12
Feb06 87.50 87.52 87.00 87.12
Apr 06 85.70 85.70 85.40 85.40
Jun06 81.10 81.15 80.85 81.10
Est. sales 17,296. Thue.ms sales 21.068
Thu/mas open Int, 124,551, +450
FEEDER CATTLE (CME)
50,000 Ibs.- cents per Ib.
Aug05 112.30 112.75 111.80 111.97
Sep05 111.25 111.70 110.90 111.02
Oct05 109.65 109.80 109.20 109.60
Nov05 107.15 107.40 106.85 106.97
Jan 06 104.25 104.25 104.12 104.12
Mar 06 100.45 100.,60 100.45 100.50
Apr06 100.30 100.30 100.30 100.30
Est. sales 3,829. Thugaks sales 4,653
Thuess open Int. 23,457, +598
HOGS-Lean (CME)
40,000 Is.- cents per Ib.
Jul05 68,75 68,.90 68.00 68.10
Aug05 68.35 68.45 66.60 66.82
Oct 05 59.70 59.70 58.65 58.90
Dec 05 56.05 56.50 55.20 55.35
Feb06 58.20 58,.20 57.50 57.72
Apr 06 56.90 57.00 56.70 56.70
May 06 58.60 58.60 58.25 58.25
Est, sales 17,026. Thuvas sales 19,008
Thu'vos open Int. 98,332, +1,812


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
DvrinBt 10,16 -.02 +8,1
Eqlnct 17,56 +.19 +13.1
EuEqly B 2006 +.05 +15.7
FLTxBI 9.34 -.01 +5.7
GeoBt 18.06 +.11 +.8
GllncB 12.49 -.06 +3.8
GrbEqty 7.80 +.08 +14.2
GINIRst 2725 +.63 +38.9
GrInBt 1931 +22 +10,5
HlthBt 56.95 +.86 +15.0
HiYIdBt 8.01 +.02 +8.9
HYAdvB 599 +.01 +91
IncomeBt 683 -02 +4.3
InUEq9p 22.47 +.02 +13.8
InllGrln I 11.46 +.02 +135
In1lNop1 11.27 +.08 +15.6
InvBt 11.90 +.19 +14.9
NJTxB 9.32 ... +5.8
NwOppBt 38.23 +.69 +13,9
NwValp 17.94 +.23 +13.6
NYTxBt 8.85 -.01 +5.6
OTC Bt 6.63 +.13 +12.2
TxExB t 8.91 -.01 +5.9
TFHYBI 1304 -.01 +.8
TFInB I 15.18 -.01 +5.1
USGvBt 1318 +.02 +.3
U1iB t 10887 +.04 +26.4
VislaBlt 8.49 +.17 +18.1
VoyB t 14.56 +.27 +7.1
Putnam Funds M:
Pvrlncp 10.16 -.02 +8.7
Putnam Funds Y:
George 18.29 +.12 +10.0
Gr&Inc 19.63 +.23 +11.7
Income 6.92 -.01 +5.4
IntlEq 23.53 +.02 +15.0
Voyager 17.25 +.33 +6.2
RS Funds:
RSEmGrnp 31.86 +.96 +16.9
RSNalRas np 28.45 +1.23 +42.9
RSPartners 36.98 +.74 +31.3
Value Fd 2362 +.50 +34.1
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 30.67 +,79 +22.0
Royce Funds:
LowPrSlkr 15,12 .37 +9,0
MicroCapl n 15.58 +.34 +10.7
Opptyl r 13.21 +.29 +14,9
PennMul r 10.71 +.26 +20.5
Premlerl nr 15,50 +.36 +14.5
SpeclEqlnv r 19,66 +,44 +8.2
ToltRel r 12.68 +.23 +17.7
Russell Funds S:
DIvBondSx 23.74 -.12 +4.9
DIvEqS x 44.18 +.59 +14.2
InltlSecS 61,13 +.26 +13.3
MslralBondSx 10.52 -.05 +5.5
QuantEqSx 38.30 +.56 +12.7
RESecSx 48.35 +1.13 +37.0
ShorDuraBdS x18.80 -.14 +1.5
SpecialGrS 53.05 +1,32 +16.5
Russell Insto I:
Eqy I I x 30.60 +.39 +14.4
EqtyQ I x 35.20 +47 +12.8
FixIncma Ix 21.17 -.24 +5.2
Intl I 37.79 +.16 +13.7
Russell LfePts C:
BalStrCpx 10.87 +.05 +10.9
Russell LfePts D:
BalStrltpx 10.94 +.04 +11.4
Rydex Advisor:
OTCn 9.95 +.28 +6.3
Rydex C Class:
JunoC pn 17.03 +.10 -15.4
Rydex Investor:
JunoFdn 17.73 +.12 -14.6
OTC n 10.31 +.29 +6.8
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFx1nA n 10.54 -.02 +5.2
EmMkDbt n 11.25 -.04 +23.8
EmgMkt np 13.68 -.02 +34.9
EqlndxA n 37,27 +.54 +10.9
HIY[d n 8,52 +.02 +8,7
InlMunlA 10,99 -.01 +3,8
In1EqAn 10,89 +,05 +13,3
IntFixA n 11,65 -.08 +3.3
LgCGroAn 18.63 +.41 +8,7
LsCValA n 21.94 +.27 +17.4
SmCGroAn 17.46 +.61 +15.1
SmCValAn 21.38 +.53 +24.0
TaxMgdLC 11.48 +.19 +13.3
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 16.17 -.04 +38.8
SP500n 19.97 +.29 +11.1
SmCap 29.52 +.83 +20.3
STI Classic:
CapAppLp 11.07 +.16 +2.3
CapAppAp 11.71 +.17 +2.7
CapAppTn 12.29 +.18 +3.4
GrowlncTnp 1.59 +.27 +17,2
HIghYldI 11.06 ... +7.9
SmCapGrTn 21.29 +.61 +19.1
TxSenGrTnp 24.82 +.49 +7.5
TaxSenGrL t 23.29 +.45 +6.5
VallcoStkA 12.60 +.11 +12.3
VallncTnp 12.64 +.12 +12.7
Salomon Brothers:
Balance p 12.81 +.10 +5.9
HIYdA 8.43 ... +11.4
InvesValO 20.59 +.18 +11.1
Oppon 49.97 +.48 +18.7
Schroder Funds:
NAmEqlnvn 11.13 +.18 +13.4
Schwab Funds:
IntlSSnr 15.94 +.09 +13.9
10001nvr 35.26 +.54 +12.6
1000Seln 35.27 +.54 +12.7
S&P5 n0 n 18.78 +.27 +10.9
S&P Seln 186.86 +28 +11.1
S&PlnslSel 9.56 +.14 +11.3
SmCplnv n 22.76 +.62 +20.4
SmCapSel n 22.80 +.62 +20.6
TolBondn 10.06 -.02 +5.4
YIdPlslnv 9.68 -. +2.7
Y1dPisSel 9.68 ... +2.
Scudder Funds A:
CapGrthp 44.67 +.85 +10,7
DrmHiRA 44.07 +.28 +17.0
FIgComA p 17.81 +.31 +24.6
HglncA 5.47 +.01 +11.0
MgdMun p 9.22 ... +5.8
RREEF p 22,23 +.58 +36.6
TechA 10.84 +.29 +6.1
TotRetA 9.07 +.09 +7.9
US GovtA 8.57 -.01 +4.0
Scudder Funds B:
.DrmHRB 43.95 +.28 +16.0
Scudder Funds C:
DrmHiRC 44.00 +.29 +16.1
Scudder Funds S:
EmMkIn 11.10 -.01 +24.2
EmgMkGrnr 18.69 -.03 +34.0
GIblBdSr 10,17 -.02 +6.2
GlobDis 36.86 +.58 +28.1
GlobalS 27.57 +.14 +21.5
Gold&Prem 15.72 -.07 -2.4
GrEurGro 27.48 +.32 +18,3
GrolncS 22.04 +.30 +11.5
HiYlIdTxn 12.93 .. +6.3
IncomeS 12.98. -.02 +6.4
IntrTxAMT 11.39 -.01 +4.3
In0ema11S 44.39 +.24 +15.6
LgCoGron 24.20 +.51 +9.3
LatAmer n 36.64 +.24 +59.9
MgdMuniS 9.23 ... +6.0
MATFS 14.63 -.01 +5.5
PacOppsnr 13.69 -.09 +24.3
ShtTmBdS n 10.08 +... 1.8
SmCoValSr 27.95 +.,78 +22.5
Scudder Instl:
Eqty500IL 137.25 +2.02 +11.2
Scudder Investment:
Eq5001nv 135.84 +1.99 +11.0
Selected Funds:
AmerShsD 37.94 +0.39 +12.6
AmShsSp 37.90 +.39 +12.3
Sellgman Group:
ComunAt 25.42 +.94 +13.7
FrontlerA t 12.96 +.32 +10.5
FronllerDtI 11.43 +28 +9.6
GIbSmCoA 16,22 +.39 +24.2
GlobTachA 12.48 +.40 +10.5
HIYBdA p 3,40 +7.5
Sentinel Group:
ComStkAp 29.59 +.32 +9.8
SmCoAp 7.76 +.18 +14.6
Sequola 102.56 +2.45 +4.1
Sit Funds:
LargsCpGro 35,16 +.76 +14.6
Smith Barney A:
AgGrAp 96823 +2.58 +12,6
ApprAp 14.58 +.20 +8,1
FdValAp 14,88 +.18 +.,5
HIlncA t 6.87 +.01 +8.9
InllAIICpGrAp 13.41 +.04 +13.1
LgCapGAp 21.50 +.55 +2.1


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
MgMuAp 15.48 +.05 +4.4
SBCplncA 16.79 +.19 +128
Smith Barney B&P:
AgGr1 t 86.39 +2.30 +11.6
ApprB t 14.28 +.20 +7.2
FdValB t 1399 +.17 +4.6
LgapGB t 20.29 +.52 +14
SBCaplnct 16.66 +.18 +12.1
Smith Barney C:
AggGrC 86.96 +2.32 +11.7
FdValC 13,99 +.17 +4.6
LgCapCp 20.28 +.52 +1.3
Smith Barney 1:
DivStralt 17.12 +.15 +3.4
Grolnc 1 15.34 +.25 +8.5
Smith Barney Y:
AggGroYt 99.84 +2.68 +13.0
LgCapGroY 22.14 .57 +2.5
SoundShn 36.89 +.57 +12.9
St FarmAssoc:
Balann 49.71 +.32 +5.9
Gwth n 48.24 +.59 +8.4
Stratton Funds:
Dividend n 37.88 +1.02 +27.0
Growth 43.16 +1.19 +28.1
SmCap 4372 +1.18 +32.7
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvB t 9.50 -.04 +4.7
SunAmervca Focus:
FLgCpAp 17.37 +.30 +4.7'
TCU ShODur 9.59 -.01 +2.4
TCW Galileo Fds:
SelEqty 18.66 +.41 +3,9
ValueOpp 22.82 +.48 +10.6
TCW Galileo N:
elEqtyN p 18.28 +.40 +6.5
TD Waterhouse Fds:
Dow30Fdsx 10.43 +.02 NA
TIAA-CREF Funds:
BondPlus 10.31 -.02 +5.4
EqIylndex 8.75 +.14 +13.3
Groinc 12.26 +,16 +11.0
GroEqty 9.12 +.16 +6.9
HIYIdtond 9.24 +.02 +8.5
InlEq9ty 10.44 +.08 +9.8
MgdAlIc 11.13 +.10 +10.2
ShtTBond 10.45 -.01 +2.1
SocChcEqty 9.32 +.17 .12.6
TaxExBond 10.94 -.02 +5.6
Tamarack Funds:
EnerSmCp 32.92 +.79 +12.7
Value 45.37 +.48 +14.7
Templeton Instit:
EmMSA p 15.78 -.13 +31.7
ForEqS 20.07 +.04 +17.4
Third Avenue Fds:
Intll r 19.57 +12 +26.2
RealEsIVal r 30.02 +.36 +32.1
SmlCapon 23.96 +.36 +20.1
Value 56.22 +.70 +25.4
Thompson Plumb:
Growth n 4.596 +.72 +0.7
Thornburg Fds:
IntlValA p 20.92 +.14 +19,0
LIdMunA p 13.68 -.01 +2.3
ValueA 31.64 +.53 +14.1
Thrivent Fds A:
HighYld 5.14 .. +9.1
Income 8.75 -.03 +5,3
LgCapStack 25.81 +.41 +11.1
MldCapStk 17.34 +.42 +22.5
MunlBd 11.53 -.02 +6.3
Torray Funds:
Fund 39.85 +.60 +6.3
InsLl 114.05 +1.73 +7.0
TA IDEX A:
FedTxExAp 11.86 -.01 +5.3
JanGrowp 24.01 +.29 +12.9
GrCoGlobp 23.93 +.19 +6.4
TrConHYBp 9.30 +.01 +8.5
TAFleInco p 9.56 ... +6.5
TA IDEX C:
AsAIModGrt 11.61 +.13 +10.3
Turner Funds:
MidcpGwth 25.42 +.66 +19.6
SmlCpGrwth 23.87 +.74 +12.9
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 24.75 +.03 +15.4
UBS Funds Cl A:
GlobAltot 13.39 +.07 +13.,6
UBS Funds Cl C:
GlobAllop 13.13 +.06 +12.7
UBS PACE Fds P:
LCGEqP n 20.26 +.29 +17.3
UMB Scout Funds:
World 24.87 +.21 +18.8
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.94 +.41 +14.3
GIbRacn 12.93 +.26 +61.2
GIdShr 7.63 -.07 +5.0
USChlna 6.82 -.05 +19.3
WIdPrcMin n 15.44 -.06 +11.2
USAA Group:
AgsvGth n 29.65 +.39 +16.7
CA Bd0 n 11.31 -.01 +7.5
ComstSIrn 26.90 +.28 +10.7
GNMA 9.72 ... +4.0
GrTaxStrn 14.94 +.14 +13.5
Grwth n 14.19 +.26 +17.3
GrS&lncn 18.75 +32 +12.2
InmStkn 17.09 +.20 +15.9
Income n 12.41 -.02 +6.1
Inll n 21.51 +.19 +12.0
NYBdn 12.14 -.02 +7.6
PrecMM 14.86 -.11 +1.3
S&PIdxn 18.17 +.27 +11.0
BScech '9.45 +.22 +6.1
ShITBndyn 8.89 -.01 +2.3
SmICapStkn 14.54 +.35 +24.1
TxET1 n 13.36 -.01 +5.8
TxELTn 14.28 -.02 +7.9
TxEShon 10.69 -.01 +2.2
VABd 11.78 -.02 +6.6
WIdGrdn 17.62 +.17 +10.9
UldAssoc500n 8.77 +.13 +11.2
Value Line Fd:
Levrge Ghn 26.89 +.78 +17.5
Van Kamp Funds A:
AggGrAp 14.78 +.42 +15.7
CATFAp 19.01 -.03 +7.0
CmstAp 18.32 +.12 +14.1
CorpBdAlp 6.73 -.02 +6.8
EmGroA p 39.20 +.74 +9.7
EntAp 12,57 +.22 +10.7
EqtylncAp 8.67 +.08 +13.6
ExchFd 361.67 +4.61 +9.4
GIblFranp 23.33 -.01 +12.3
GvScAp 10.37 -.02 +5.2
GrnA p 20.69 +.24 +16.9
HarbAp 14.32 +.17 +4.8
HlghYldA 3.60 .. +7.8
HYMuAp 10.97 .. +11.3
InTFAp 19.05 -.01 +6.7
MunlnA p 14.82 -.02 +6.1
PATFAp 17.58 -.03 +6.8
PaeFndAp 9.30 +.14 +11.3
StrMunInc 13.38 ... +10.5
USMtgeA 13.88 -.02 +4.3
UlilityAp 18.77 +.15 +31.8
Van Kamp Funds B:
CmslBt 18.33 +,13 +13.3
EmGrB1 33.53 +.62 +8.9
EnlerpBt 11.49 +.20 +9.7
EqlncBt 8.54 +.08 +12.7
GrIncBSt 20.53 +.24 +16.0
HYMuBt 10.97 ... +10.5
MunlnB n 14.80 -.02 +5.3
PATFPOnt 17.53 -.03 +6.1
SIrMunInc 13.38 .. +9.8
US Mtge B 13.83 -.02 +3,5
UtilB 18.74 +.14 +30.8
Van Kamp Funds C:
CommStkC 18.34 +.13 +13.3
EqlncC I 8.57 +.07 +12.7
Vanguard Admiral:
AsseltAdmI n 55.37 +.81 .11.9
BalAdmI n 19.59 +.18 +10,5
CAITAdmn 11.15 -.02' +4.2
CALTAdm 11.87 -.02 +6.9
CpOpAdIn 71.92 +1.69 +16.5
Energy n 95.89 +2,43 +50.5
EqlncAdml 49.51 +.54 +14.5
EuropAdml 60.69 +.07 +16.0
ExplAdml 72.14 +2.00 +19.2
ExntdAdm n .32.95 +.76 +22.1
500Admln 111.76 +1.64 +11.2
GNMAAdm n 10.41 ... +5.3
GrolncAdm 50.50 +.74 +12.6
G01thAdml n 26.45 +.49 +8.8
HIlthCarmn 58.43 +.75 +14.7
H67ICp4n 6.27 -. +.,0
HiYIdAdmn 10.89 -.01 +7.1
InsdLTAdmOn 12.85 -.02 +6.6
ITBondAdml 10.60 -.04 +6.5
ITsryAdmln 11.18 -.04 +4.8
IntlGrAdml 59.00 -.19 +13.5


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

GOLD (COMX)
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
Jul05 422.90 422.90 422.90 422,90 -.40
Aug05 424.40 425.80 422,30 423.80 -.40
Sep 05 425.20 425.20 425.20 425.20 -.40
Oct05 428.40 429.00 425.30 426.70 -.40
Dec05 430.90 432.00 428.50 429.70 -.40
Feb06 433.80 433.80 432.70 432.70 -.40
Apr06 435.70 435.70 435.70 435.70 -.40
Est. sales .... ThuSos sales 62,817
Thulss open Int. 275,664, +2,686
SILVER (COMX)
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
Jul05 695.0 702.0 691.5 699.4 +4.5
Aug05 700.5 700.5 700.5 700.5 +4.5
Sep05 700.0 707.0 694.0 703.0 +4.5
Dec 05 704.5 713.0 701.0 709.1 +4.6
Jan06 710.7 710.7 710.7 710.7 +4.6
Mar06 708.0 717.0 708.0 713.0 +4.6
May06 715.2 715.2 715.2 715.2 +4.6
Est. sales .... Thumas sales 15,811
Thue/s open Int. 123,414, -1,183
HI GRADE COPPER (COMX)
25,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Jul05 160.25 163.00 160.25 162.55 +1.60
Aug05 159.,00 160.00 158.50 159.40 +2.05
Sep05 153.50 156.60 152.80 155.60 +2.05
Oct05 152.50 152.50 152,20 152.20 +1.75
Nov05 149.10 149.10 149.10 149.10 +1.75
Dec05 144.20 146.40 143.80 145.95 +1.70
Jan06 142.95 142.95 142.95 142.95 +1.55
Est. sales .... Thus sales 7,248
Thua.ems open Int. 103,119, +1,057
EURODOLLARS (CME)
$1 million-pts of 100 pct.
Jul05 96.400 96.400 96.385 96.387 -.015
Aug05 96.230 96.245 96.230 96.235 -.035
Sep05 96.130 96.140 96.090 96.095 -.045
Oct05 96.010 96.010 96.005 96.005 -.060
Nov05 95.965 95.965 95.960 95.960 -.060
Dec05 95.965 95.990 95.910 95.910 -.070
Mar06 95.925 95.960 95.860 95.860 -.075
Est. sales 205,244. Thutes sales 2,431,981
ThuReas open Int. 7,439,367, -16,917
LUMBER (CME)
110,000 bd. ft.- $ per 1,000 bd. It.
Jul 05 336.5 336.8 334,5 336.3 +2.5
Sep05 329.0 331.2 326.6 329,2 +1.7
Nov05 319.5 322.3 319.5 319.7 +1.2


12-mo,
Name NAV chg %1rtn
TAdml n 13.52 -.02 +4.7
ITCoAdmd 9.97 -.04 +5.9


LtdTrmAdm 1080 01
LTGrAdml 9.84 -.08
LT Adml n 11.48 -.02
MCpAdml n 75.72 +1.54
NJLTAdn 12.07 -.02
NYLTAdm 11.53 -02
PrnCapr 64.27 +1.35
PALTAdmn 11.58 -.01
REITAdml r 86.24 +2.20
STsryAdml 10.41
STBdAdmin 1003 -02
Sh0TrmAdm 15.58
STF0dAdm 10.34 -.o1
STIGrAdm 10.57 -.01
SmlCapAdml n27.95 +.70
TxMCapr 57.85 +.94
TxMGrlnc r 54.26 +.79
TtlBdAdm n 10.23 -803
TotStkAdmn 29.07 +.47
USGroAdml n 42.70 +.99
ValueAdml n 21.75 +.26
WellslAdm n 52.69 +.08
WelllnAdmn 52.51 +.38
WindsorAdm n61.20 +.73
WdsrllAdm 56.22 +.53
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.66 +.36
CAITn 11.15 -.02
CALTn 11.87 -.02
CapOppn 31.12 +.73
Conv n 12.95 +.26
DividendGro 12.04 +.12
Energy 51.06 +1.30
Eqlnc n 23.62 +.26
Exploer n 77.43 +2.15
FLLTTn 11.86 -.02
GNMAn 10.41
GlobEqn 18.18 +.17
Grolnc n 30.92 +.45
GrowthEq 9.69 +.21
HYCorp n 6.27
HlthCae n 133.69 +1.77
InlaPro n 12.43 -.10
IntlExpr n 16.99 +.06
InllGr 18.53 -.07
IntlValn 31.11 +.11
IT] Grade 9.97 -.04
ITTsryn 11.18 -.04
LIFECoTn 15.29 +.09
LIFEGro n 20.15 +.24
LIFEInc n 13.53 +.04
LIFEModn 1 7.99 +.16
LT[nGrade n 9.84 -.08
LT7sryn 11.91 -.08
Morgan n 16.,63 +.32
MuHYn 10.89 -.01
MulnsLg n 12.85 -.02
Mulnt n 13.52 -.02
MuLtd n 10.80 -.01
MuLong n 11.48 -.02
MuShrtn 15.58
NJLTn 12.07 -.02
NYLTn 11.53 -.02
OHLTtxEn a 12.23 -.02
PALTn 11.58 -.01
PrecMtlsMin r 17.80 +4.19
Prmcpr 61.91 +1.29
SelValu r 19.72 +.13
STAR 18n 98 +.14
STIGrade 10.57 -.01
STFed n 10.34 -.01
STTsryn 10,41
StratEq n 22.83 +.59
TglRet2015 11,35 +.06
TgtRet2025 11.56 +.08
TgtRet2035 11.88 +.12
TxMCAp nr 28.73 +.46
TxMGI r 26.40 +.38
TaxMngdlntll10.17 .
TaxMgdSC r 22.38 +.61
USGron 16.48 +.39
USValue n 14.33 +.20
Wallslyn 21.75 +.04
WOlWtnn 30.40 +.22
Wndsron 18.14 +,22
Wndsll 31.67 +.30
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500n 111.75 +1.64
Balanced n 19.59 +.18
DevMkt n 9.06
EMktIn 15.48 -.07
Europe n 25.84 +.03
Extend n 32.92 +.76
Growth n 26.45 +.49
IB0ond n 10.60 -.04
LgCapldxn 21.64 +.33
LTBond n 12.16 -.09
MidCap 16.69 +.34
Pacfficn 9.03 -.02
REITpr 20,21 +.51
SmCap n 27.94 .71
SmICpGrow 15.69 +.44
SmICapVal 14.64 +.33
STBond n 10.03 -.02
TotBond n 10.23 -.03
ToIllntl n 12,50 -.01
TolStk n 29.07 +.48
Value n 21.75 +.26
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 19.60 +.19
DevMkllnst n 8.98
Eumolntl n 25.67 +.03
Extln n 32.97 +.76
mrowhlns l 26.45 +.49
Instldxn 110.84 +1.63
InsPIn 110.64 +1.62
ToBdldx n 51.63 -.13
MidCaplnslpn 16.74 +.34
Paclnsl n 9.04 -.03
SmCp0nn '27.97 +.70
TBIstn 10.23 -.03
TSInstn 29.08 +.48
Valuelnslln 21.75 +.26
Vantagepolnt Fds:
AggrOpp 11.10 +.19
AssetAlloc 7.40 +.11
CoreBondldxl 10.11 -.02
Eqlylnc 9.25 +.08
Growth n 8.15 +.18
Grow&lnc 10.24 +.17
MPLongTermGr21.28 +.25
MPTradGrwth 21.91 +.19
Victory Funds:
DvsStkA 16.71 +.32
WmBlnstlnll 16.39 -.09
WM Blair MU Fds:
IntllGrowthl r 22.78 -.15
WM Str Asset Mgmt:
BalancedAp 13.34 +.12
BalancedBl t13.31 +.11
ConGrwBI t 14.23 +.17
ConGwA p 14.62 +.17
StratGrAp 15.90 +.22
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Acamultiv 6.41 +.10
CorelnvA 5.87 +.08
Highlnc 7.41 +.02
NwCcptA p 9,30 +.16
ScTechA 11.19 +.36
VanguardA 9.00 +.14
Wasatch:
CoreGrth 45.55 +1.30
SmCapGrth 42.25 +1.15
Weitz Funds:
PartVal 23.59 +.21
Value n 36.89 +.28
Wells Fargo A:
AsetAIIA 19.89 .+.21
Wells Fargo Admin:
DivrsEq I 40.82 +.70
GrthBal n 30.11 +.40
LgCoGrl 46.48 +1.47
Eqlylnc n 35.60 +,43
Index 48.95 +.72
Wells Fargo Funds:
CmSIk 23.41 +.55
GovSec n 10.73 -.02
Growthlnv n 19.53 +.48
Opplntylnv n 47.67 +.74
SCapValZp 29.97 +.58
U0tStlnv 9.18 +.01
Western Asset:
CorePlus 10.65 -.03
Core 11.45 -.03
Westport Funds:
SmallCapl n 26.21 +.24
WIllIam Blair N:
GrowmhN 10,89 +.24
In001hN 22,49 -.13
Yacktman Funds:
Fund p 15.24 +.09


+2.0
+14.6
+6.4
+26.0
+5.9
+6.3
+12.0
+5.9
+35.3
+1.9
+2.0
+1.7
+2.0
+2.6
+21.4
+13.8
+11.2
+5.4
+13.6

+16.9
+9.8
+12.1
+14.2
+17.5

+11.8
+4.1
+6.8
+16.3
+4.9
+10.1
+50.4
+14.3
+19,1
+5.8
+5.3
+17.9
+12.4
+8.6
+7.9
+14.6
+6.5
+24.4
+13.3
+16.6
+5.7
+4.6
+8.6
+12.6
+6.8
+10.9

+12.9
+13,3
+7.0
+6. 5
+4.6
+1.9
+6.4
+1.6
+5.9
+6.2
+5.6
+5,8
+31.5
+11.9
+24.7
+12.1
+25
+2.0
+1.7
+25.6
+9.4
+10.2
+11.7
+13.7
+11.2
+13.6
+22.9
+11.1
+17.4
+9.8
+12.0
+14.2
+17.3

+11.1
+10.4
+13.5
+37.2
+15.9
+22.0
+8.4
+6,4
+12.5
+13.6
+25.9
+8.2
+35.2
+21.3
+19.1
+23.4
+1.9
+5.3
+15.8
+13.5
+16.8
+10.86
+13.7
+16.1
+22.2
+8.8
+11.3
+11.3
+5.5
+26.1
+8.5
+21.5
+5.4
+13.6
+16.9

+16.7
+11.2
+5.,0
+15.6
+4.7
+10.4
+9.i
+8.6

+12.5
+19.3

+19.8

+9.8
+8.9
+10.6
+11.5
+12.5

+13.7-
+15.1
+6.6
+16.1
+24.3
+14.0

+23.1
+23.2

+11.5
+10.7

+11.4

+12.2
+8.9
+8.2
+12.6
+11.0

+17.5
+4.7
+12.1
+15.8
+20.9
+2.8

+7.8
+5.7

+21.3

+13.1
+19.5

+9.4


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

Jan 06 324.0 324.0 324.0 324.0 +.8
Mar 06 329.0 329.0 329.0 329.0 +.9
May 06 328.0 328.0 328.0 328.0 +2.9
Est sales 454. Thusae sales 847
Thu'~ms open Int. 3,283, -65
NATURAL GAS (NYMX)
10,000 mm btuOm, $ per mm btu
Aug05 7.418 7.770 7.360 7.472 +.074
Sep 05 7.469 7.790 7.411 7.530 +.082
Oct05 7.515 7.820 7.464 7.578 +.075
Nov 05 8.090 8.350 8.056 8.133 +.040
Dec05 8.610 8.889 8.596 8.653 +.020
Jan 06 8.998 9.260 8.940 9.028 +.020
Feb06- 9.016 9.217 8.920 9.048 +.020
Est. sales.... Thuknes sales 78,107
Thutms open int. 484,605, +2,679
UNLEADED GASOLINE (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cants per gal
Aug05 100.50 186.00 176.00 176.34 -4.22
Sep05 173.80 178.00 171.00 171.87 -1.98
Oct05 161.05 163.50 159.57 159.57 -.93
Nov05 159.90 161.90 158.82 158.82 -1.08
Dec 05 160.90 164.00 159.07 159.07 -1.13
Jan06 164.05 164.05 160.37 160.37 -1.13
Feb06 165.00 165.00 161.82 161.82 -1.13
Est. sales.... Thu'ae sales 57,233
Thu ess open int 156,090, +5,242
HEATING OIL (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Aug05 177.90 179.40 171.30 171.81 -5.68
Sep05 178.86 181.60 173.70 174.26 -5.03
Oct05 181.10 182.80 176.31 176.31 -5.03
Nov05 182.73 185.75 178.76 178.76 -5.03
Dec05 184.57 188.50 181.41 181.41 -5.08
Jan06 188.05 190.50 183.71 183.71 -5.03
Feb06 189.60 191.90 185.31 185.31 -4.93
Est. sales.... Thu9As sales 52,439
Thulemms open int 189,670, -475
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX)
1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl.
Aug05 60.72 61.90 59.55 59.63 -1.10
Sep05 61.65 62.80 60.50 60.64 -1.04
Oct 05 62.35 63.40 61.29 61.29 -1.04
Nov 05 62.82 63.68 61.55 61.69 -1.05
Dec05 63.11 64.00 61.80 61.98 -1.05
Jan 06 63.21 64.00 62.10 62.12 -1.04
Feb06 63.30 63.90 62.14 62.14 -1.04
Esl. sales .... Thughms sales 275,675
Thuhals open Inlt. 825,973, +3,175


I FUTURES I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MUT.UALS


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 3D














4D

SUNDAY
JULY 10, 2005


Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce





numberr Connection


* * a aal River-


Chamber Staff


Chill out with cool things to do


Kitty Barnes .......................... Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ............Inverness Office Manager and
Special Events Coordinator
Debi Shields ................. Crystal River Office'Manager
Marion Elson ................Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Diane McInnis .............. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally .................... Office Assistant (Inverness)
Sarah Marx ................ Office Assistant (Crystal River)


Inverness ........................ . . . 726-2801
Hom osassa ................. ................. 628-2666
Crystal River ............ ... ................. 795-3149

www.citruscountychamber.com



G 1 ,Sm C A. $60 Rebate

On the new two-speed Five Star (C I
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It's hot outside and we sit in
our air conditioning keeping
cool. But what happens when
the air conditioner isn't work-
ing?
You go to www.citruscounty-
chamber.com and choose
Chamber Member, Business


Directory and select the catego-
ry for air conditioning/heat-
ing,equipment/repairs.
There you will find six quali-
fied businesses to see that it is
fixed properly.
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but have cabin fever. How


about gliding down the river on
a boat? Feel the warm breeze as
you relax in a guided boat tour
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self!
Where do you find these serv-
ices? Select the categories for
Boat Tours, Boat Rentals or be


brave and select airboat tours!
For things to do or services
needed any time of the year, join
the nearly one million visitors
since Jan. 1, in searching the
Business Directory of Citrus
County's busy and informative
website.


Nancy Bowdish-Trotter GMAC Realty

II __.. . . . . .


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle
Recently, the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomed Nancy Bowdish Trotter GMAC Realty as a new member with a ribbon cutting
ceremony. Pictured above from left, front row: Rhonda Lestinsky, chamber ambassador; Joanie West, chamber ambassador; Barbara Howard,
Nancy Bowdish, Hollie Kramer, John T. Barnes, chamber director, and Renee Melchlonne, chamber ambassador. Back row: Kitty Barnes,
chamber executive director; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador; Charles Richer, chamber ambassador; and John Porter, chamber ambassa-
dor. Nancy Bowdish can be reached at (352) 628-2410 at Trotter GMAC Realty. Her office Is located at 4177 S. Suncoast Blvd. In Homosassa.
She Invites you to contact her for all of your real estate needs. Nancy's website is www.buycitruscounty.com and her cell phone is (352) 422-
0296.

Member News


The PROOF
is in the PRINTING*
SInterprt


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352-344-1184 Our 23rd Editio


The KEY TRAINING CEN-
TER will hit the airwaves on
Saturday, July 23, from 9 a.m. to
6 p.m. for its 18th Annual Run
for the Money Telethon on
WYKE-TV on cable channel
16.
To help viewers visualize this
year's theme "Wish for the
Stars," awe-inspiring stories of
mentally challenged men and
women will be showcased.
"This is a great opportunity to
learn more about these special
people that are such a unique an
integral part of our community
while enjoying a great line up of
fabulous local entertainment,"
said Melissa Walker, Key
Center Foundation director.
Several of the consumer's
daily activities and accomplish-
ments will be aired showing
how they continue to grow from
Key Center services such as
classroom instruction, vocation-
al training, daily living teach-
ing, employment coaching, and
supported independent living
assistance.
All of the Key Center's serv-
ices work closely together pro-
viding the developmentally dis-
abled with the opportunity to
choose and realize their goals of
learning, living, and working to


n


\Neck & Back Care Center
y ^ "Underatnding and Correcting the Souco ot yourParin'

Jeffery S. Kinnard DC Anthony B. Oliverio
527-5433 563-5055
Beverly Hills Crystal River
in the Winn Dixie Shopping Center next to the Boy's & Gir's


their full potential.
The Key Center telethon will
present a wonderful line up of
local talent representing all
styles of music and entertain-
ment.
Local favorites will include:
Touched, Jon Sims, Gerry
Schabruch, Low Key, Mandy
Grimes, Lindsey Bradley, Roy
Zachry, Jim and Sheila Harpin,
Kevin and Bob's Country, Quail
Males. Also planned are special
presentations by the Royal
Guardsmen and Sensation.
Viewers will have the oppor-
tunity to bid on great auction
items from celebrities in the
world of sports and entertain-
ment, in addition to some great
household items.
Items this year include: two
reserved tickets to the Travis
Tritt and Trace Adkins Country
Rocks The Canyon Concert
with an autographed 8x10 color
photograph of Travis; Derek
Jeter Portrait by sports artist
Greg Crumbly; Giclee framed
print; United States flag that has
flown over the Capitol includ-
ing the certificate of authentici-
ty; Bass Master Shaw Grigsby
autographed book with a basket
of fishing lures; author Barbara
Taylor Bradford, autographed


uniropractic uare
Complete Fitness Center
Occupational/Rehab Therapy
Massage
AquaBed Therapy
At the Neck and Back Care Center,
we provide relief for -
Auto Accident Injuries
Work Injuries
DC Headaches
Numbness/Tingling
SCarpal Tunnel Syndrome
Shoulder, Hip and Knee Pain
lub *Arthritis Pain


"Emm's Secret" book; framed
painting by local WYKE-TV
teaching show artist Margaret
Messina; stylish "Red Hat" mug
set in a hat box; and a Wayne
Gretzky 8x10 autographed color
photograph.
The Key Center, a non-profit
organization, depends on a car-
ing community to provide year-
round services that enable men-
tally challenged adults to lead
personally satisfying, produc-
tive, and useful lives.
To make a telethon pledge on
July 23 call 795-4919 or toll
free 1-866-385-4919.
All donations are tax
deductible. For more informa-
tion call 527-8228.

SE

ERA AMERICAN REAL-
TY AND INVESTMENTS is
pleased to welcome Kristy
Dowell to "The American
Team."
Dowell will work as a sales
associate in the company's
Inverness office.
A resident of Citrus County
for 16 years, Dowell is making
the transaction from the insur-
ance industry to real estate.
"I learned very quickly in the
insurance business to jump in
and be a problem solver and I
will use the same strategy in
building my real estate business
with ERA American Realty,"
she said.
Dowell has certainly jumped
in as she has already completed
ERA American's core real estate
training program and is current-
ly participating in the compa-
ny's advanced training.
In addition, she completed
"At Home with Diversity"
through the Realtors
Association of Citrus County.
Dowell and her husband
enjoy their two beautiful little
girls and their leisure time activ-
ities that center around family,


friends, and church.
ERA American Realty, a top
10 ERA company nationally
that has served the real estate
needs of Citrus County since
1980, invites everyone to con-
tact Dowell at 726-5855 to help
with real estate needs.

Now

Officials at CITRUS ABUSE
SHELTER ASSOCIATION, a
nori-profit organization that
assists victims of domestic vio-
lence and sexual assault, are
accepting donations of new and
used cell phones.
Working and broken cell
phones can be dropped off at
CASA, 112 N Pine Ave.,
Inverness. Donated working
cell phones are then given to
CASA clients to use for 911
calls.
For more information about
CASA or its cell phone donation
program call 344-8111.

ONE

The FRIENDS OF
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
WILDLIFE PARK will be pre-
senting an Antique Car Expo on
Saturday, July 16, from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on the green adjacent
to the parking area at the Visitor
Center on U.S. 19.
Members of the Citrus Model
A's, Fun T Club, Citrus County
Cruisers and Ye Olde Ford Club
will be displaying their vehicles
that will include muscle cars,
Model A's and Model T's and
street rods. Admission is $1 and
refreshments will be available.
In the event of rain, the Antique
Car Expo will be held on
Saturday, July 23.
For more information on this
event, a fundraiser for the
Friends of Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park, please call Susan
Dougherty, park services spe-
cialist, at 628-5343 or Ernie
Lauer at 382-4724.


D

C


- -- 7









Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Connection


2~Th;;j,.~ .~~*--r'* -
.,.f,... .
- .-.k *.~v .
~


Great Florida Insurance


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce welcomes Great Florida Insurance of Crystal River as a new chamber member,with a ribbon cutting cere-
mony. Pictured above from left, front row: Reyna Bell, chamber ambassador; Rhonda Lestinsky, chamber ambassador; Jeff Mintz and Dan
Mintz of Great Florida Insurance of Crystal River; Renee Melchionne, chamber ambassador; Kitty Barnes, chamber executive director; Joanie
West, chamber ambassador; Curtis Peters, chamber ambassador. Back row: John Porter, chamber ambassador; Mike Gudis, chamber ambas-
sador; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador; and Dennis Miller, chamber member. Great Florida Insurance, Crystal River is a full service Insur-
ance agency offering auto, motorcycle, truck, boat, home, health, accident, life, recreational, and business insurance coverage.
Great rates and great companies like AIG, GMAC, Infinity, Mercury, Permanent General, Progressive, Safeco, Aflac and Mendota. Call (352) 563-
5555 or email jeff@greatflorida.net for a quote. Their business is located at 355 NE 10th Ave., Crystal River and their website is www.greatflori-
da.net.

Community Oxygen & Medical


JIM SHIELDS/For the Chronicle
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce recently welcomed new member Community Oxygen & Medical, Inc. with a ribbon cutting ceremony.
Pictured above from left of van: Lillian Smith, chamber ambassador; Rhonda Lestinsky, chamber ambassador; Benny Cruz; Bob Cornelius.
Right side of van, front row: Tony Demaio; Patty McGillicuddy; Monty Grow; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador; Laurene Holder; Kitty
Barnes, chamber executive director; Diane Carter; and John Porter, chamber ambassador. Community Oxygen & Medical is located 2216 Hwy
44 West in Inverness. For all of your Oxygen and Medical equipment needs, they invite you to call them at (352) 860-2111.


Member News


SEVEN RIVERS REGION-
AL MEDICAL CENTER is
participating in the American
Stroke Association's Get With
The Guidelines Stroke initia-
tive.
The goal of the program is to
improve overall quality of care
for stroke patients by improving
acute stroke treatment and pre-
venting future strokes and car-
diovascular events.
Get With The Guidelines -
Stroke was developed to help
hospitals employ proven sci-
ence-based treatment guide-
lines, including those developed
by the American Stroke
Association, American Heart
Association and Brain Attack
Coalition.
These guidelines address
acute stroke management, pri-
mary prevention of cardiovas-
cular disease, secondary preven-
tion of strokes and the establish-
ment of primary stroke centers.
As a Get With The Guidelines
- Stroke participating hospital,
Seven Rivers Regional has been
encouraged to develop a com-
prehensive system for providing
rapid diagnosis and treatment of
stroke when patients are admit-
ted to the emergency depart-
ment.


This includes being equipped
24 hours a day, seven days a
week to provide brain imaging
scans, making neurologists
available to conduct patient
evaluations and using clot-bust-
ing medications when appropri-
ate.
Seven Rivers Regional is also
increasing its efforts to prevent
secondary strokes through the
aggressive use of medications
such as stations and anti-platelets
as indicated in the secondary
stroke prevention guidelines.
Other methods include the
treatment of atrial fibrillation
and atherosclerosis and man-
agement of smoking cessation,
weight, exercise, diabetes and
cholesterol. ,
Through Get With The
Guidelines Stroke, the
American Stroke Association
provides Seven Rivers Regional
with training and staffing rec-
ommendations, care maps, dis-
charge protocols, standing
orders, data-collection and
measurement tools.
The program also facilitates
creating and sharing best prac-
tices among participating hospi-
tals.
The time is right for Seven
Rivers Regional to implement


Get With The Guidelines -
Stroke.
The number of acute ischemic
stroke patients eligible fdr treat-
ment is expected to grow over
the next decade due to increas-
ing stroke incidence and a large
aging population.
Each year, .about 700,000
people suffer a stroke 500,000
are first attacks and 200,000 are
recurrent.
Of stroke survivors, 22 per-
cent of men and 25 percent of
women die within a year. For
those aged 65 and older, the per-
centage is even higher. In 1999,
$3.4 billion was paid to
Medicare beneficiaries dis-
charged from short-stay hospi-
tals for stroke. Americans paid
about $51 billion in 2003 for
stroke-related medical costs and
disability.
The American Stroke
Association offers a wide array
of programs, products and serv-
ices, from patient education
materials to scientific state-
ments with cutting-edge infor-
mation for health care profes-
sionals.
The organization is commit-
ted to remaining the leader in
providing credible stroke infor-
mation to individuals and health


care providers.
For more information about
the American Stroke Associa-
tion or its initiative, visit
StrokeAssociation.org or call
888-4-STROKE.
For more information about
Get With The Guidelines -
Stroke, email guidelinesinfo
@heart.org mailto:guidelinesin-
fo@heart.org or visit www.str
okeasscoiation.org/getwith-
theguidelines.
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is a general,
medical/surgical acute care
facility that opened its doors in
1978.
The hospital has grown to
128 beds serving the communi-
ties of Citrus, Levy and South
Marion Counties.
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is fully accredit-
ed by the Joint Commission on
Accreditation of Healthcare
Organizations (JCAHO) and is
licensed by the Florida State
Department of Health and
Human Services, Health Care
Financing Administration, for
participation in Medicare
/Medicaid programs. Seven
Rivers can be found on the
World Wide Web at
www.srrmc.com.


Reserve now for the

chamber breakfast
This month's Citrus County day at noon. Reservations are


Chamber of Commerce break-
fast will be held on Thursday,
July 14, at the Black Diamond
Golf & Country Club in
Lecanto beginning at 7:45 p.m.
To make reservations, please
call 726-2801 before Wednes-


required.
Also, please note the day is
Thursday instead of the usual
Wednesday. The cost of the
breakfast is $8. The guest
speaker will be from the Citrus
County Sheriffs Office.


Reyna Bell Associate
Member
Larry Blanken Lawrence
Consulting
Pete Burrell Citrus County
Chronicle
Nancy Coffey Associate
Member
Mike Gudis Mike Gudis,
EA, CEP, CSA253
David Heinz Heinz
Funeral Home
Marlene Kaiser Exit Realty
Leaders
Kandy Kremnentz OSO
Pure Shaklee Products
Rhonda Lestinsky Nature
Coast Bank


Jackie Marx Regions Bank
Renee Melchionne Team
Spirit
Betty Murphy Manatee
Office Supplies
Curtis Peters Holcim (US), Inc.
John Porter Porter's
Locksmithing
Charles Richer Canadian
Meds
Lillian Smith Mary Kay
Rosann Strawn All
American Mortgage
Joanie West Eternal
Ascent Society
Donna Wyatt Lifesouth
Community Blood Center


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5D

SUNDAY
JULY 10, 2005


Chamber Ambassadors


(hmber










BUSINESS Gimus CouNTy (FL) CHRONICLE


6D SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


Business DIGEST


Rescuing Randy

- .: / - .














s M











Special to the Chronicle
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center staff members work
quickly to save "Rescue Randy" a clinical manikin suf-
fering from injuries caused by a hazardous chemical sub-
stance. Rescue Randy and the staff members met during
the hospital's recent two-day Emergency
Response/Hazardous Material training program. In total,
13 hospital employees participated in the program. Teams
worked with instructor Patty Jefferson of Citrus County's
Hazardous Materials Unit, learning how to recognize chem-
ical spills, correctly use personal protective equipment and
decontaminate victims and themselves. In 2003, Seven
Rivers Regional received a $106,125 grant from the
Health Resources and Services Administration as part of
an initiative that develops and implements regional plans
to improve the capacity of the health care system in
responding to incidents requiring mass immunization, iso-
lation, decontamination, diagnosis and treatment in the
aftermath of a biological or chemical-related public health
emergency. This year marks the third year of a five-year ini-
tiative to advance the community's preparedness in the
event of a bioterrorism or related public health emergency.


Center for Victim
Rights asks for help
The Center for Victim Rights is
expanding its program to educate
the public about their rights as vic-
tims of crime, and how to reach the
many resources already in place to
help them.
Knowing beforehand what num-
ber to call has been very effective
for victims, as opposed to getting
the information at the time of the
crime.
The center needs help from


GALLERY
Continued from Page 1D

Located in Inverness' his-
toric Courthouse Square,
Galeria San Sebastian show-
cases stained glass, pottery,
sculptures and paintings in all
media from local and regional


FOUNTAIN
Continued from Page 1D

into Publix, where she talked
to a baker about her recent
purchase.
"He was amazed," she said.
"He said I could get a job
demonstrating at the store the
next week!"
So when the SCORE officers
told her it would take her at
least two weeks to obtain all
the necessary licenses, certifi-
cation and insurance, she told
them of her upcoming job and
insisted that she would have it
done sooner.
True to her word, Briercheck
completed all the prerequi-
sites to start a business within
48 hours.
"It wasn't too hard," she said.


local businesses, which can assist
them by displaying a sign to get
the word out that there is free
assistance for victims of crime.
Each sign is professionally done
on a 12 inch by 18 inch durable
board, with the following informa-
tion: CrimeVictimHelp@aol.com,
FREE Assistance, Nationwide,
wwww.sunco.com/victim/, 352-613-
3315.
If your business would like to
help, call the center at 613-3315.
The center also has speakers
available and is currently setting up

artists.
"News of the gallery's open-
ing spread like wildfire," she
said. "Art never ceases to find
me. There hasn't been a day
when people don't call me, ask-
ing me to display their work
Private collectors provide me
with art, as well."
In addition, the gallery gen-
erates attention by hosting a

"SCORE gave very detailed
instructions. I just had to go out
and do it."
Her business, "Chocolate
Fountains by Anna Maria," was
up and running.
Just a few weeks after her
Publix demonstration, she
rented a booth at the Crystal
River Mall to attract after-
Thanksgiving shoppers.
"It was pretty exhausting,"
she said. "But it really got my
name out and a ton of people
stopped by."
Since then, with help from
her husband, Briercheck has
worked at events nearly every
weekend around the state,
including wedding receptions,
anniversary parties, corporate
events, banquets, birthday par-
ties, bar- and bat mitzvahs and
trade shows.
They're even heading off to


the fall/winter schedule. If your
group, organization, association or
club wants to learn more about vic-
tim rights, call Peggy at 628-5102.
Kioskpros Inc. deploys
first 'weather kiosk'
SPRING HILL- Kioskpros Inc.
of Spring Hill has announced that it
has been awarded a contract with
WGEM television in Quincy, IIl.
Under contract to WGEM,
Kioskpros Inc. has deployed its first
weather kiosk in the Quincy Mall.
Mall visitors will be able to view

special event once a month.
"We put on shows, demonstra-
tions, and appraisals," she
said. During which, "the traffic
can get quite heavy," she said.
Filled with an array of colors
and materials, Sebastian's
gallery sells everything from
decorative bookmarks to a
Picasso lithograph, with price
tags ranging from $10 to

New York City in early July for
a national food show in Central
Park to get some ideas for a
third business "La Vida
Dolce" they're trying to start
"La Vida Dolce," Italian for
"the sweet life," will include a
complete dessert, cordial and
coffee line.
"We're always trying to
expand," Briercheck said.
"There's no telling where
'Chocolate Fountains' or 'La
Vida Dolce' are going to go,"
her husband added.
Still, her husband maintains
that the business takes a lot of
hard work
"It's definitely not easy," he
said. "Setting up and cleaning
up takes a long time."
But for Briercheck, the effort
is worthwhile.
"It's a beautiful thing to have
the honor to be a part of some-


DISASTER
Continued from Page 1D

company running. Communi-
cation and information are
critical after a disaster.
Otherwise, "the rumors start
to spread and that's what does
a lot of businesses in,"
Chastang said.
Lewis said owners who did-
n't prepare a to-do or who-to-
call list should "try to remem-
ber what is coming up that's big
and important, like a big deliv-
ery, a shipment on the way ... or
if you have big deadlines due."
.Another reason to be in
touch with business contacts is
they're likely to help even
your competition.
"They know your problems,
they can empathize, they often
have stuff you can borrow,"
Lewis said.


MONEY
Continued from Page 1D

sudden, he has decided that he
doesn't want to buy the place
after all and wants his money
back Since all of this has been
going on, he has stopped pay-


Problems of aftermath
When Hurricane Ivan struck
Florida last year, the Escambia
county branch of The
Attorneys' Title Insurance
Fund was devastated. Branch
manager David Scarritt and his
employees had prepared for
water damage, but not for 4 1/2
feet that destroyed most of the
office's files and ruined its
computers.
"I was shocked I didn't
expect that level of destruc-
tion," Scarritt said. Among the
losses were maps and real
estate records that the office
used in helping attorneys with
title searches.
Perhaps the biggest help
came from Scarritt's competi-
tion. Another title company
offered to lease 2,500 feet of
space, and to let Scarritt and
his employees use their
records.

ing me rent waiting for the sale
to go through. Now he owes me
quite a bit of back rent, but
can't pay until I give him his
deposit back Reader, via e-
mail.
DEAR READER.: This
seems to be an ongoing prob-
lem with many of my readers,
and once again, I have to ask


"Surprisingly enough, I
could account for very little
lost revenues," he said. "With
our competitor helping us, we
were able to take orders and
produce revenue."
When a hurricane, tornado
or earthquake has devastated a
region, the federal government
usually will declare a disaster
area, which allows small com-
panies to apply for Small
Business Administration disas-
ter loans if they don't have
insurance or don't have ade-
quate coverage. The SBAs Web
site, www.sba.gov, has a section
devoted to disaster recovery.
But not every calamity that
befalls a company will qualify
as an official disaster there
are plenty of floods and storms
that can cause substantial dam-
age, yet the government might
not issue a disaster declara-
tion. In such cases, SBA disas-
ter loans are not available, and

the same question. Did you
have an attorney representing
you? What made you think that
you could handle a transaction
like this on your own? You
should have had an attorney
right from the beginning with
penalties for the purchaser
who failed to act Given the fact
that you didn't, I would suggest
that you hire an attorney to
work out the details of the back
rent and the deposit to get this
resolved.
Buying and selling real
estate is an extremely compli-
cated undertaking, especially
when you carry the paper your-
self. Get yourself an attorney
who will extricate you from
this and learn from your expe-


companies with heavy damage
and no insurance can be in
danger of collapsing.
SBA loans can help
If you're thinking of applying
for an SBA loan, your first
phone call should be to the
local office of the Federal
Emergency Management
Administration, or FEMA,
Chastang said. FEMA will then
likely direct you to the SBA.
The loan process is not
unlike trying to get any other
loan. You'll need to provide
documents and you'll be work-
ing with a bank Your premises
will be inspected to determine
how much damage you've suf-
fered.
What if you were totally
wiped out, with every last
shred of paper gone? You can
still apply for a loan; the SBA
can get copies of your recent
income tax returns from the

rience.
DEAR BRUCE: I recently
bought my first home. The
home was a "For Sale By
Owner." I gave her a deposit of
$5,000. I had arranged for
financing from a local bank, the
title company said everything
looked good, and we could
close. Just before closing, the
bank called and said there was
a problem. They found a lien
against the property, but the
owner assured me that it would
be cleaned up. Since the lien
was very small, the bank said
we could go ahead and move in
and then the closing would be
done when the lien was satis-
fied.
Well guess what? We were


IRS, and your bank will be able
to generate new statements for
you.
"We're really flexible,"
Chastang said, "even if all of
your paperwork is in a soggy,
muddy mess."
Lewis advises business own-
ers not to try to get the business
up and running and at the
same time handle contacts
with FEMA, the SBA and
banks.
"Hopefully, you can dele-
gate," he said. "Try and get
somebody to do that for you."
Friends can be the biggest
resource a business owner can
have.
Denise Dorman, a publicist,
and her husband Dave, an
artist, both run businesses out
of their Shalimar home. A tor-
nado spawned by Hurricane
Ivan tore the roof off the house,
leaving the couple with sub-
stantial wind and water dam-

not able to close on the proper-
ty because more liens were
found, totaling more than what
the sale would be. Obviously,
the sale would not clean up the
liens on the property Now I'm
out the deposit, too, because
the owner has already spent
my money Is there anything I
can do? Furious, via e-mail.
DEAR FURIOUS: The first
problem that I can see is that I
am assuming you didn't have
an attorney. You failed to men-
tion this is your letter. The
attorney wouldn't have been
able to solve the problem, but
he would have obviated all the
difficulty in the deposit and the
subsequent nonsale. I don't see
that there is a whole lot that


MONEY 3-MONTH 6-MONTH 12-MONTH 24-MONTH
MARKET C.D. C.D. C.D. C.D.


age. They ran their businesses
with the only working phone
they had; friends in other
places handled their e-mail.
Andrea Ridout's decorative
hardware showroom was
destroyed by a tornado in 1991.
She wasn't prepared with a
who-to-call list, so she and her
employees split up the compa-
ny's mailing list and began call-
ing customers.
She also began calling ven-
dors to let them know pay-.
ments might be late, and made
arrangements for some orders
to be shipped directly from
manufacturers to the cus-
tomers.
"In a disaster like this, you
find out who your good employ-
ees are," said Ridout, of
Garland, Texas.
. She said even family mem-
bers of her workers were pitch-
ing in to help with the cleanup
and recovery.

you can do. She did improperly
spend yourmoney, and yes, she
owes it to you, but she does not
have it. It appears that she is in
hock up to her eyes, as evi-
denced by the liens.
Any competent attorney
would have held the deposit
for the sale, not the seller, and
they also would have come
across these liens well before
the closing. Unfortunately, it's
an expensive lesson to have
learned.


Bruce Williams is a
columnist with Newspaper
Enterprise Association. Send
questions to Smart Money,
P.O. Box 503, Elfers 34680.


36-MONTH
C.D.


60-MONTH
C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

FIRST FEDERAL BANK 0.65 0.65 1.50 1.51 N/A N/A 2.00 2.02 3.10 3.15 2.50 2.53 3.50 3.56 3.75 3.82
(352) 637-4741
METLIFE BANK 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.14 1.15 3.25 3.30 3.44 3.50 N/A N/A 3.63 3.70 4.16 4.25
(877) 326-2210
SOUTHTRUST BANK 0.95 0.95 0.90 0.90 1.14 1.15 1.73 1.75 2.47 2.50 2.47 2.50 2.86 2.90 3.54 3.60
(352) 795-2265
STATE FARM BANK 1.49 1.50 2.81 2.85 3.20 3.25 3.92 4.00 3.97 4.05 N/A N/A 4.02 4.10 4.26 4.35
Call your local agent
SUNTRUST BANK .75 .75 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
(352) 795-8202

RAYMOND JAMES BANK N/A N/A 3.25 3.30 3.40 3.46 3.65 3.72 3.78 3.85 N/A N/A 3.87 3.95 4.31 4.40
(352) 527-3700

Please note: Each bank has its own set of requirements
Banks interested in listing their rates can call to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact the bank
the Citrus County Chronicle at (352) 563-5660. directly for up-to-date information.


435%APY*S
1 5Ya r D


UON
3,2,0
100 ~ mBka


Chuck d STATE FARM IS THERE." Ed Buckley
Chuck Everidge Inv e
Inverness, FL 'Annual PercentageYada a of 05/185.5Rateon all productssubjecjtchnge nihoA notic fwon Savings and Money MMarkt Acountl could ilun.o enrnllg, Mininlumopeningoldposismf$e a S iforSavingAccoUAtsaInd $0IforMreyMake actounMs.eorCDs: C Inve ess, FL
726 4I183 mecinimum blanci tn open an account and obain hie sanecil APY i, S500. CD ras apply idcposio l Ithan Si100,000 A penally may be inpoed for a iihdriwal prior t lo mauny Cificater aueomaekaly -enew a c mauritly aA ihe chn cune rae for thec ame tcn. 7 6000
STATE FARM BANK HOME OFFICE: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS statefarm.com mn


weather forecasts, as well as
watch live feeds from WGEM at
various times of the day.
These electronic kiosks feature
30-inch LCD screens that are easi-
ly viewed. The kiosk also allows for
electronic interaction.
Mall visitors will be able to surf
the WGEM Web site on an addi-
tional built-in 15-inch LCD touch-
screen monitor.
Kioskpros is a Spring Hill-based
company that can be reached at
(800) 497-1779, or by visiting
www.Kioskpros.com.

$10,000.
Inspired by San Francisco,
Sebastian said she chose an
eclectic decor for the gallery
because "a sterile atmosphere
cancels out the engagement we
feel with art."
"I don't want anyone to think
the gallery is snooty or elitist,"
she said. "I want this to be a
community place."

one's special day," she said. "I
still get teary-eyed at the wed-
dings. I love to see customers'
smile when they see the foun-
tain."
And for the most part, her
business has fit in nicely with
her family life.
She is able to stay at home
during the week with her sons,
Raymond, 12, and Rosario, 18
months. "Being a mother is my
top priority," she said.
Plus, it complements her
husband's dry cleaning and
formal wear business, she said.
Through weddings, they both
share a lot of customers.
"I don't think either Frank or
I thought we'd reach this level,
especially in this amount of
time," she said. "It's incredible
to own a business and to live in
a town you love. Life has cer-
tainly become very sweet"


Jackson Hewitt gives


Associated Press
Sharon Parker, right, manager for the Jackson Hewitt tax
preparation office in Inverness, recently presented a check
for $1,000 to Citrus Memorial Hospital's development
director Chris Pool to benefit CMH's capital campaign,
"Advancing the Vision ... Care for a Lifetime." CMH was
the Jackson Hewitt's "Lend a Hand" nonprofit partner in
Citrus County. Jackson Hewitt contributed $10 to the cap-
ital campaign for each CMH employee, volunteer or SHARE
Club for whom the company prepared taxes between Jan.
1 and April 15. The capital campaign has just entered the
community phase. Dollars raised will go toward the $1.5
million campaign to develop the Family Care Health and
Education Center at Allen Ridge, to bring services conven-
ient to the county's high-growth area. Individuals, compa-
nies or organizations wishing to participate in the capital
campaign should call Chris Pool at 344-6560.
Contributions may be mailed to Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation Inc. at 502 West Highland Boulevard,
Inverness 34452.


Good Neighbor.
GREAT RATES

s Banks
I.KE A GOOD NEIGHBOR


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


u.D.











t'i(va uuuiy C lx 7Y(I,.)q u RNnulvUDA, UY 0,2057


Property TRANSACTIONS


Property transaction infor-
mation is supplied to the
Chronicle by the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office.
Call 341-6600 with questions.
Seller: Roca Oscar & Dolores B
Buyer: Richards Peter A & Vera F
Price: $25000
Addr: East County:
Description: Quail Run Pb 12 Pg 53 Lot
54

Seller: Zarbock William M & Elizabeth
Buyer: Rowlands Lori L
Price: $81500
Addr: East County: 04226 E Sunup Ct
Description: Flying Eagle Ests Pb 11 Pg 97
Lot 5 Desc In Or Bk 802 Pg 271

Seller: Sweger Development Co Lic
Buyer: Sanderson Bay Fine Homes Uc
Price: $80000
Addr: East County:
Description: Shenandoah Pb 17 Pg 52
Lot 49

Seller: Boonyapredee Wichest &
Somporn
Buyer: Saplenza Construction Inc
Price: $19000
Addr: East County: 02687 E Celina St
Description: Celina Hills Pb 12 Pg 30 Lot
40 BIk F

Seller: Kalqmaras Peter.
Buyer: Savarese Frank Joseph Jr &
Price: $11900
Addr: East County: 05100 S Blossom Dr
Description: Floral Shores Pb 2 Pg 184 Lot
38 Desc In Or Bk 183 Pg 214

Seller: Medlyn Marjorie K
Buyer: Shelton Cindy H & Jeffrey
Price: $20000
Addr: East County: 08700 E Cresco Ln
Description: Davis Lk Gf Est #1 Pb 4 Pg 2
That Part Of Lot 3 Blk D More Particularly
Descr As Follows, Begin At The Most E'Ly
Co Of S

Seller: Wells Gordon T & Uldine M.
Buyer. Shuman William L &
Price: $262000
Addr: East County: 00030 N Spend A
Buck Dr
Description: Clearview Estates Second
Add Pb 15 Pg 3 Lot 56 Blk 15

Seller: Korff Erwin
Buyer: Sims Wesley M & Charlotte J
Price: $359900
Addr: East County: 09502 E Baymeadows
Dr
Description: Baymeadows At 7 Lakes Pb
12 Pg 62 Lot 33 & E 50 Ft Of Lot 32

Seller: Kontrafouris George
Buyer: Sookdeo Vishnu
Price: $33000
Addr: East County: 05075 N Carl G Rose
Hwy
Description: Willola Hgts Unit 1 Pb 3 Pg 14
Lots 5, 6 & 7 Blk C

Seller: Rooks Charles & Jean
Buyer: Sookdeo Vishnu
Price: $28000
Addr: East County: 06456 N Goldenrain
Cir
Description: River Lakes Manor Unit 1 Pb 3
Pg 96 Lot 95 Blk 21

Seller: Banach John & Helen
Buyer: Sookraj Stefan D & Mario S
Price: $7000
Addr: East County: 06286 E Waverly St
Description: Inverness Hglds West Pb 5 Pg
19 Lot 1 Blk 410 Desc In Or.Bk 345 Pg 198

Seller: Adams Robert E & Nina L
Buyer: Sunderville Donald J & Loretta
Pricd: $144000 *
Addr: East County: 00124 N Golf Harbor
Path
Description: The Moorings At Pt 0 Woods
Phase Two Pb 14 Pg 127 Lot 4 Bikf

Seller: Wright Raymond
Buyer: Sunnyfla Inc
Price: $295000
Addr: East County: 03040 N Aquaview Ter
Description: Sanders Hts Add To
Hernando Amended Pb 2 Pg 24 Lots 107
& 108

Seller: Wright Raymond
Buyer: Sunnyfla Inc
Price: $295000
Addr: East County: 03041 N Aquaview Ter
Description: Sanders Hts Add To
Hernando Amended Pb 2 Pg 24 Lots 126
& 126a

Seller: Wright Raymond
Buyer: Sunnyfla Inc
Price: $295000
Addr: East County: 03037 N Carl G Rose
Hwy
Description: Sanders Hts Add To
Hernando Amended Pb 2 Pg 24 Lots 97,
97a, 106 & 106a

Seller: HInkle Gerald E & Maple L
Buyer: Teachman Harry &
Price: $3500
Addr: East County:
Description: Pt Of Sec 33-17s-20e Known
As Parcel 3b000 On Citrus Co Assessment
Map 547c More Fully Desc As: Coam At
Nw Car Of Sec 5-1

Seller: Sweger Development Co LUc
Buyer: Thomas Widwell W & Angela M
Price: $89500
Addr: East County:
Description: Shenandoah Pb 17 Pg 52
Lot 40

Seller: Banta Gerald R Trustee
Buyer Thompson Clayton D & LUnda M
Price: $29900
Addr: East County: 03685 E Hidden Cove
Tri
Description: Arbor Lakes Unit 1 Pb 15 Pg
75 Lot 11 Blk F

Seller: Gregory LUnda S
Buyer: Thompson William J & Catherine
Price: $42500
Addr: East County: 00794 E Jenkins Ct
Description: Cltrus Hills 1st Add Pb 9 Pg 73
N1/2 Of Lt 27 Blk 32

Seller: Avanzlnl Bullders Inc
Buyer: Tinsley Deborah L
Price: $197200
Addr: East County: 00629 N Fresno Ave
Description: Citrus Hills 1st Add Pb 9 Pg 73
Lot 27 Blk 39

Seller: Washington Richard H Trustee
Buyer: Wade Charles W & Mary L
Price: $214000
Addr: East County: 00774 E Galnes Ln
Description: Citrus Hills Ist Add Pb 9 Pg 73
Lt 2 Blk 3


Seller: Carney John S & Sharman E
Buyer: Walko James A & Jamie K
Price: $20000
Addr: East County: 01414 E St James
Loop
Description: Cambridge Greens Of Citrus
Hills Pb 13 Pg 119 Lot 10 Blk 2

Seller: Davis Philip B'Jr & Jean Cody
Buyer: Westrack Tracy &
Price: $180000
Addr: East County: 00005 N Shadow
Wood Dr
Description: Shadow Wood Unrec Sub Lot
36 Desc As Follows: Comm At Intersection
Of W Ln Of E 1/2 Of Sw 1/4 Of Sec 3-19-
20 & N R/W Ln

Seller: 0 Meara William X & Lols M
Buyer: Whittaker Orville &
Price: $19000
Addr: East County: 01664 E St James


Loop
Description: Cambridge Greens Of Citrus
Hills Pb 13 Pg 119 Lot 23 Blk 2

Seller: Hutcheson Ernest C & Gladys F
. Buyer: Wright Judith D
Price: $74000
Addr: East County: 04110 N Bluewater Dr
Description: Apache Shores Unit 11 Lot 74
BIk 38 Desc In Or Bk 254 Pg 300 & Or Bk
661 Pg 1634

Seller: Reiber William C & Mary
Buyer: Wright Lorna
Price: $8500
Addr: East County: 00839 S Bel Air Dr
Description: Bel Air Pb 3 Pg 113 Lot 33 BIk
B

Seller: Usa Land Invest Coam Inc
Buyer: Zabukovec Heinz
Price: $7500
Addr: East County:
Description: Hercala Acres Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
16 Lot 153 (1997-Lot 4 ls All That is Left
Here) Desc In Or Bk 523 Pg 385 & Easm In
Or B

Seller: Hatten Sandra L
Buyer: Zawallch Mary Pascale &
Price: $2500
Addr: East County: 01038 Blue Bonnet Ter
Description: Inverness Hglds South Pb 3
Pg 51 Lots 9 & 10 BIk 256

Seller: Borkowski Loretta
Buyer: Adams Homes Of Northwest
Price: $19000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00033
Whitewood St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 10 Pg 1 Lot 14 BIk 56

Seller: Brewer Alonzo E ill & Joanne M
Buyer: Adams Homes Of Northwest
Price: $24000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00009 Milbark Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 12 BIk 44

Seller: Grenda Marie A
Buyer: Arrigo Robert J
Price: $151000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00017 Asparagus
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 13 BIk 222

Seller: National Recreational
Buyer: Arteaga Jalnie & Veronica
Price: $30500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00173 Daisy St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 16 Blk 215

Seller: Zielinski Jerome R & Barbara L
Buyer: Chapman James A
Price: $57000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00005 Deer Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress Vig
'Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 15 Blk

Seller: Mouzon Richard A & Denise V
Buyer: Chow Christopher C & Erma J
Price: $35000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00037 Saintpaulla
St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 34 BIk 222

Seller: Henson Carolyn F
Buyer: Christeson Carl G & Sandra L
Price: $222000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00071 Cypress
Blvd
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress Vig
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 2 BIk 129

Seller: Gonzalez Gilberto
Buyer: Corley Jerome T
Price: $24000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00002 Pagoda Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 1 BIk 46

Seller: National Recreational
Buyer: Crespo Edilberto Jr
Price: $32500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00114 Cypress
Blvd
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 3 Blk 71

Seller: National Recreational
Buyer: Damgen Manfred & Heldi
Price: $34000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00014 Browallia
Ct
Description: SugarmIll Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 12 Blk 200

Seller: Nealy Merveen E
Buyer: Dempster Eunice V
Price: $24500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00028 Pagoda Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 12 BIk 46

Seller: Christensen Robert R & Nancy R
Buyer: Emerald Bay Homes LIc
Price: $24900
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 06781 W Oak Park
Blvd
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 1 BIk 111

Seller: Toepfer Eileen P
Buyer: Emerald Bay Homes Uc
Price: $24500
Addr: Sugarmilll Woods: 05909 W Oak Park
Blvd
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 51 BIk 111

Seller: Renfrew A & G Trust
Buyer: Fernandez David & Maria R
Price: $25500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00023 Plum Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 9 BIk 113

Seller: Stall Judith D
Buyer: Fudge Diane J
Price: $170000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00016 Lemlngton
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 8 BIk 13

Seller: Crowell William E & Martha
Buyer: Gonzalez Carmelo & Carmen D
Price: $20000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00005 Zinnias Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 12 BIk 176

Seller: Hower Barbara G Atrustee
Buyer: Grenda Marie
Price: $120000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 0046A Cypress
Run
Description: Cypress Run Condo Phase Ill
Unit 46a

Seller: Ring Jason E
Buyer: Hager John & Jo Ann
Price: $175000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00070 Oak
Village Blvd
Description: Sugarmlli Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 5 BIk 196


Seller: Kirby Alfred L Jr & Brenda G
Buyer: Hamllin Loule F & Sally J
Price: $26500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00028 Balsam St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 32 Blk 192

Seller: National Recreational
Buyer: Hamman Margie
Price: $34000
Addr: Sugcrmill Woods: 00023 Ageratum
Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 13 Blk 236

Seller: Egan Richard
Buyer: Hampson Bruce & Ruth A
Price: $28000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00006 Portulaca


Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak Vig Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 37 Blk 213

Seller: Phllipsen Mary E
Buyer: Harrell John L & Sandra R
Price: $26000
Addr: Sugarmll Woods: 00011 Spruce
Pine Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 24 Blk 99

Seller: Christian Expansion Inc
Buyer: Hendry Valerie J
Price: $25000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00076 Corkwood
Blvd
Description: Sugarmll Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 32 Blk 64

Seller: Mc Coy Marie
Buyer: Hoke George J & Janice G
Price: $65000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 57-10 Douglas St
Description: Fairway Run Condo Unit 103-
A

Seller: Ferraro Daniel & Patricia
Buyer: Klemm Zachary & Michele M
Price: $59000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00002 Pine St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 1 Blk R

Seller: Nealy Merveen E
Buyer: Krot Alexandra
Price: $23500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00006 Paw Paw
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 3 Blk 24

Seller: Wolfe Robert E & Emily J
Buyer: Llndberg Craig A & Margie L
Price: $160000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00005 Sycamore
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 16 Blk 132

Seller: Buksa Peter & Stephen W
Buyer: Long Term Investment Holdings
Price: $16000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00201 Under Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 11 BIk 31

Seller: Swiedler David L & Louise S
Buyer: Luongo Antonio N & Jo Ann
Price: $220000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00012 Dahoon
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 29 BIk 18

Seller: Plattera Joseph Jr & Rose G
Buyer: Matarazzo Anthony & Janet
Price: $62000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00011 Deer Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 14 Blk M

Seller: Taylor Al
Buyer: Mc Donald Blair N &
Price: $117000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00054 Dogwood
Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Villa Replat Pb 11 Pg 105 Lot 35r & Sw'Ly
9 Ft Of Lot 36r Less Sw'Ly 6 Ft Of Lot 35r
Blk A

Seller: Conroy Ronald J & Mary Lou
Buyer: Mc Donald Blair N &
Price: $120000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00009 Golfvlew
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Villa Replat Pb 11 Pg 105 Lot 165r

Seller: Moreau Andre W & Catherine
Buyer: Myers Donald R Jr & Jean C
Price: $260000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00014 Nephthytis
Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 6 BIk 226

Seller: Pantnakee DInyar
Buyer: Nguyen Ken
Price: $17300
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00002 Viola Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 1 Blk 150

Seller: Truncall William G &
Buyer: Pedersen Carl A
Price: $30000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00007
Snapdragons Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak Vig Lot
17 BIk 212

Seller: Latham Glenn M & Virginia L
Buyer: Pensco Trust Company
Price: $342500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00017 Enclave Pt
Description: The Enclave Of Sugarmlll
Woods Pb 14 Pg 137 Lot 13

Seller: Miller Loretta F Trustee
Buyer: Price Ron A & Coral A
Price: $127500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00109 Golfvlew
Dr
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress VIg
Villa Replat Pb 11 Pg 105 Lot 94r & Pt Of
Lot 95r Desc As: Beg At Ne Car Of Lot 95r
Th S 4de

Seller: Williams Paul & Evelyn
Buyer: Reedy Wayne & Barbara
Price: $22500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00012 Hackberry
Dr
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 13 Blk 68

Seller: Sweetwater Homes Of Citrus Inc
Buyer: Ridge Evelyn H &
Price: $26000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00047 Cactus St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 22 Bik 147

Seller: Hubbard June S
Buyer: Ruane Michael D
Price: $24500
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00012 Lidflower
Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 7 BIk 16

Seller: Elder Ruth G &
Buyer: Sabawa Manglapane Eugenla
Price: $25000
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00049 Lone Pine
St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
9 Pg 86 Lot 34 BIk 176

Seller: Lexington Homes Inc
Buyer: Savage Robert &
Price: $18400
Addr: Sugarmlll Woods: 00016 Torenla
Verbenas Ct
Description: Sugarmlll Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 8 Blk 227

Seller: Gleave Judith A
Buyer: Selth L Karl & Louise B


Price: $235000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00034 Hawthorne
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 25 BIk 123

Seller: Kenny Mary P
Buyer: Smith William R & Patti
Price: $120000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00005 Shumard
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 2 BIk 104

Seller: Lexington Homes Inc
Buyer: Stabile William J Jr & Susan G
Price: $22900
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00004 Undwood
Ct
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg


Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 20 BIk 91

Seller: Goldberg Nathan S & Marilyn
Buyer: Stagliano Donald J & Susanna H
Price: $26000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00028 Black
Willow St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Cypress VIg
Pb 9 Pg 86 Lot 15 Blk 84

Seller: Barnes Jeffrey R
Buyer: Sweetwater Homes Of Citrus
Price: $13000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00043 Lone Pine
St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 37 Blk 176

Seller: Davis Geraldine
Buyer: Watson Mayllyn D
Price: $135000
Addr: Sugarmill Woods: 00051 Birchtree St
Description: Sugarmill Woods Oak VIg Pb
10 Pg 10 Lot 26 Blk 173

Seller: Connell William M
Buyer: A & L Holdings Of Orlando Inc
Price: $13000
Addr: West County: 11200 W Acacia Ave
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
112 Lot 15 Blk 125

Seller: Nature Coast Landings Storage
Buyer: Ainsworth John T & Katherine L
Price: $3000
Addr: West County:
Description: Nature Coast Landings
Storage A Co Op Unit 52

Seller: Hoefler Venera L Trustee
Buyer: America First Real Estate
Price: $4000
Addr: West County:
Description: Suffolk Meadows Unit 1 Pb 5
Pg 107 Lots 36 & 37

Seller: DIas Noeml
Buyer: Angelo Joaquin C & Emily Ruiz
Price: $160000
Addr: West County: 05730 N Princewood
Dr
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg 51
Lot 3 BIk 13

Seller: Hill Donald V
Buyer: Atwood Michael S
Price: $165000
Addr: West County: 00050 S School Ave
Description: N1/2 Of Nel/4 Of Nel/4 Of
Nwl/4 Less E 20 Ft For Rd R/W Desc In Or
Bk 775 Pg 1012 & Or Bk 1757 Pg 1812

Seller: Paltoo Unda C & Raymond M
Buyer: Barrientos Marester
Price: $62500
Addr: West County: 04951 W Colt St
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg 37
Lot 10 BIk 198

Seller: Heckman Edward
Buyer: Bartholomew Frederick & Miriam
Price: $16000
Addr: West County: 11392 W Cockscomb
Dr
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg
136 Lot 2 Blk 133

Seller: Robinson Kevin P & Robin
Buyer: Baylon Roger S & Idalsa &
Price: $15000
Addr: West County: 02167 N York Rd
Description: Citrus Acres Pb 2 Pg 68 Lot
35a (Aka 35.5)

Seller: Wall Carroll A
Buyer: Bell Dennis Lynn
Price: $3000
Addr: West County: 09746 W Berry Ln
Description: Holiday Hts Unit 1 Pb 4 Pg 61
Lots 6 & 7 Blk 12 Desc In Or Bk 226 Pg 561

Seller: Van Loon Ulbe Jan & Lammertje
Buyer: Blunno Ferdinand & Susan L
Price: $49000
Addr: West County: 02078 W Huntington
Dr
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg 51
Lot 4 Blk 345

Seller: Young Griffle & Roxanna
Buyer: Blackburn Arthur M
Price: $25000
Addr: West County: 03780 W Ivy St
Description: Withlacoochee River Hills
Annex Unrec Sub Lot 2 Unrec Of Lots 17,
18 & 19 Pine Knoll Pb 2 Pg 72 E 50ft Of N
113.62ft Of

Seller: Shotwell Joe E &
Buyer: Bolline Dan II & Cheryl
Price:,$57000
Addr: West County: 12550 W Snowdrop PI
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
112 Lots 6 & 7 Blk 60

Seller: Granata Louis S & L Colleen
Buyer: Bonaccorso John Jr
Price: $20000
Addr: West County: 00040 STeeple Ter
Description: Tropic Ter Unit 1 Unrec Sub
Lot 11 Blk A: Coam At Sw Car Of Nel/4 Of
Nel/4 Of Sec 4, Pt A Lso Being Nw Car Of
Lot 1 Blk A

Seller: Granata Louis S & L Colleen
-Buyer: Bonaccorso John Jr
Price: $20000
Addr: West County: 00029 STeeple Ter
Description: Tropic Ter Unit 1 Unrec Sub
Lot 13 Blk A: Coam At Sw Car Of Nel/4 Of
Nel/4 Of Sec 4, Pt Also Being Nw Cor Of
Lot 1 Blk A

Seller: Granata Louis S & L Colleen
Buyer: Bonaccorso John Jr
Price: $20000
Addr: West County: 00030 STeeple Ter
Description: Tropic Ter Unit 1 Unrec Sub
Lot 12 Blk A: Cam At Sw Cor Of Nel/4 Of
Nel/4 Of Sec 4, Sd Pt Also Being Nw Cor
Of Lot 1 B L

Seller: Granata Louis S & L Colleen
Buyer: Bonaccorso John Jr
Price: $20000
Addr: West County: 00052 STeeple Ter
Description: Tropic Ter Unit 1 Unrec Sub
Lot 10 Blk A: Cam At Sw Cor Of Nel/4 Of
Nel/4 Of Sec 4, Pt Also Belng Nw Cor Of
Lot 1 Blk A

Seller: Boyett Unda E
Buyer: Booth Gerl Ann
Price: $7000
Addr: West County: 14788 W Hide A Way
Dr
Description: A Tract In Govt Lot 2 Sec 10:
Coam At Nw Cor Of Sec 10 & Run S 89
Deg 53m 36s E Al N Ln Of Sd Sec 1252.69
Ft, Th S416.19

Seller: Gravely Thomas R
Buyer: Bostan George A & Stefanla P
Price: $5500
Addr: West County: 07321 W Cltruswood
Dr
Description: Rainbow Ests Unit 2 Pb 3 Pg
84 Lot 25 BIk 21

Seller: Gravely Thomas R


Buyer: Bostan George A & Stefania P
Price: $5500
Addr: West County: 07299 W Citruswood
Dr
Description: Rainbow Ests Unit 2 Pb 3 Pg
84 Lot 24 Blk 21

Seller: Jones Bernice L
Buyer: Brannon Brian K & Violet A
Price: $59500
Addr: West County: 04695 N Tallahassee
Rd
Description: Pcl A & Lot 3 Of An Unrec
Sub In Sec 7-18-17 On Citrus Co
Assessment Map 165a Parcel A Descr:
Beg At Ne Co Of Se 1/4 Of

Seller: Keefer Sheldon L
Buyer: Buffenbarger Jeff
Price: $23000
Addr: West County: 12588 W


Checkerberry Dr
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pg 8 Pg
112 Lot 20 Blk 84

Seller: Phillips Kenneth
Buyer: Buffenbarger Jeff
Price: $11500
Addr: West County: 08511 N Bachelor
Button Way
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
112 Lot 1 Blk 56

Seller: Gibbons Bryan
Buyer: Buffenbarger Jeff
Price: $23000
Addr: West County: 09931 N Snowball
Ave
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg
136 Lot 3 BIk 178

Seller: Meyer Frank E & Geraldine J
Buyer: Burns Nicholas J &
Price: $20000
Addr: West County: 06486 W Ost West St
Description: Homosassa Hills Unit 2 S 124
Ft Of Lot 136 BIk 18 Plantation Gardens
Pb 4 Pg 128

Seller: Meyer Frank E &
Buyer: Burns Nicholas J &
Price: $20000
Addr: West County: 06438 W Ost West St
Description: Homosassa Hills Unit 2 Pb 4
Pgs 128,Lot 137 Blk 18

Seller: Mc Cranle Gerald E &
Buyer: Byrer Dann F &
Price: $326000
Addr: West County: 03929 N Sagamon Pt
Description: Indian Waters Unit 3 Pb 4 Pg
107 Lot 8

Seller: Avens Karils & Meta'
Buyer: Cacclapuotl Joseph & Deborah
Price: $35000
Addr: West County: 01462 S Estuary Dr
Description: St Martins Est Rets Unit 1 Pb 4
(G 27 Lots 43 & 44 BIk A Descr In 0 R Bk
120 Pg 261

Seller: Mueller Uwe & Thea
Buyer: Cano Nilda C &
Price: $40000
Addr: West County: 02494 W Ivorywood
Dr
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg 51
Lot 1 Blk 333

Seller: Buckley Robert R & Sharon L
Buyer: Carney Jerry L & Dorothy R
Price: $59000
Addr: West County: 05245 N Lena Dr
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg 51
Lot 30 Blk 19

Seller: Root Beth J
Buyer: Caulfeild John & Joanna
Price: $240000
Addr: West County: 11428 W Bayshore Dr
Description: The Bay Villas Bldg 8 & 9
Condo Unit 39 Desc In Or Bk 1170 Pg 202

Seller: Durden Alan L & Mary E
Buyer: Clark Jerillyn M
Price: $192000
Addr: West County: 02478 S Bolton Ave
Description: Citrus Park N 1/2 Of Lt 10 BIk
A Pb 6 Pg 129

Seller: Jarrard Carolyn
Buyer: Colon Santos Jr
Price: $62000
Addr: West County: 06518 W Avocado St
Description: Mayfair Garden Acres Lots 1
& 2 In Lots 7 & 8 Blk C Desc As Follows:
Lot I Begin At Ne Cm Of Lot 8 Blk C Thn S
Odeg 16m

Seller: E K Realty Management Corp
Buyer: Connor Steven M & Tara M
Price: $24000
Addr: West County: 01136 N Sloan Ter
Description: Timberlane Ests Rev Pb 11 Pg
32 Pt Of Lot 269:Beg At Ne Car Of Lot
269, Th S Al E Ln Of Lot 269, 150 Ft To Se'
Car Of Lot

,Seller: Kohl Norman J
Buyer: Cooley Ann
Price: $94200
Addr: West County: 09878 W Riverwood
Dr
Description: Riverwood Shores Pb 3 Pg 21
Lot 5

Seller: Knickerbocker Christopher
Buyer: Courtemarche Charles T &
Price: $7500
Addr: West County:
Description: Sunny Acres Pb 11 Pg 38 S
143 Ft Of Lot 2 Desc In Or Bk 596 Pg 301 &
Or Bk 1752 Pg 2382

Seller: Knickerbocker Richard &
Buyer: Courtemarche Charles T &
Price: $7500
Addr: West County: 08582 W Rue Des
Prairies PI
Description: Sunny Acres Pb 11 Pg 38 Lot
2 Less S 143 Ft Desc In Or Bk 539 Pg 1728.
& Or Bk 596 Pg 524 & Or Bk 1752 Pg 2382

Seller: Douglas Cherron J & Gregory
Buyer: Dang Khuong & Thanh Llem
Price: $24000
Addr: West County: 09283 N Citrus Ave
Description: Woodridge Ctry Ests Unrec
Sub Tract 4 & Pcl 4-C Further Desc As:
Parcel 4a Begin At Nw Car Of S 1/2 Of Sw
1/4 Of Nw 1/4

Seller: Murphy Anne W
Buyer: Daniel Curtis & Heather
Price: $11000
Addr: West County: 01531 N (Unnamed)
Way
Description: Southern Hglds Unit 3 Unrec
Sub Map 338d Lots 7, 17 &
18 Title In Or Bk 626 Pg 156 & Or Bk 6 30
Pg 1

Seller: Fillers Jean &
Buyer: Daniel Curtis & Heather
Price: $5000
Addr: West County: 01513 N (Unnamed) '
Way
Description: Southern Hglds Unit 3 Unrec
Sub Lot 8: Cam At Sel/4 Of Nwl/4 Of
Sec 30, Th S 0 Deg 11 m 21s E AI E Ln Of
Nel/4 Of Swl/40

Seller: De Nisco Danlelle &
Buyer: Daugherty Christopher L &
Price: $83000
Addr: West County: 08165 W Cecil Ln
Description: Spring Gardens Unit 1 Pb 11
Pg 98 Lot 27 Blk A

Seller: First Magnus Financial
Buyer: Davis Carla
Price: $42000
Addr: West County: 08236 W Vick Ct
Description: Holiday Acres Unit 2 Pb 6 Pg
40 Lot 8 Unrec In Lot 19 ; S 157.83 Ft Of
The W 153 Ft Of Lt 19 Sub To A 15 Ft Ease
AI The

Seller: Dries Ronald H
Buyer: Davis J Baskin & Ruth E
Price: $6000


Addr: West County: 00344 S Honey Bear
Way
Description: Cinnamon Ridge Pg 12 Pg 35
Lot 4 Blk D

Seller: Ripa Lulsa Delia &
Buyer: De Andrade Helenara Rocha
Price: $6000
Addr: West County: 08640 W Basilico St
Description: De Rosa Inc Unit 2 Pb 6 Pg 23
Lot 51 BIk A

Seller: Lennard Jack E &
Buyer: Dean Dennis & Jeannette
Price: $2000
Addr: West County: 05426 W Bandy Ln
Description: Backwaters Hts Unit 4 Pb 5
Pg 69 Lot 16 Blk F

Seller: Heckman Edward
Buyer: Delgado Reynaldo & Selenla


Price: $48000
Addr: West County: 03856 W Birds Nest Dr
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg 51
Lot 2 BIk 306

Seller: Packham Clair & Margaret R
Buyer: Duchateau Don & Jeannine
Price: $4500
Addr: West County: 09638 W Pomelo Ln
Description: Rainbow Forest Pb 3 Pg 147
Lot 12 Blk F

Seller: Archer Earl R
Buyer: Duda Peter & Monica Moore
Duda
Price: $156000
Addr: West County: 11596 W Kingfisher Ct
Description: The Bay Villas Bldg 32, 33, 34,
35 & 36 Condo Or Bk 343pg638 Unit 185

Seller: Renn Edna M
Buyer: Dunne James H & Judy A
Price: $180000,
Addr: West County: 00177 N Crystal
Meadow Path
Description: Crystal Oaks Fourth Addition
Pb 15 Pg 135 Lot 7

Seller: Williams William K
Buyer: Durllng Ellen &
Price: $110000
Addr: West County: 04110 S Colony Ter
Description: Green Acres Add 6 Unit 2 Pb
7 Pg 70 E 340 Ft Of Lots 239 & 240 Aka Lot
239 Less W 300 Ft & Lot 240 Exc W 300 Ft
Desc I N

Seller: Simpson Evelyn
Buyer: Esser Marc & Christina
Price: $92500
Addr: West County: 04170 S Fireside Dr
Description: Green Acres Add 6 Unit 3 Pb
8 Pg 94 Lot 2 BIk 11

Seller: Whitaker Gene & Grithel
Buyer: Fagu Deoram & Blbi
Price: $9500
Addr: West County: 10794 W Dunnellon
Rd
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 1 Pb 8 Pg
82 Lot 7 Blk 13

Seller: Knott George Jr & Dolores R &
Buyer: Feola Alexandbr
Price: $23500
Addr: West County: 08444 N Briarpatch
Ave
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
112 Lot 12 Blk 42

Seller: Morgan Jason E & Judith A
Buyer: Fllby James F & Lois S
.Price: $250000
Addr: West County: 03200 N Prairie Dunes
Pt
Description: Bermuda Dunes Village Pb
13 Pg 112 Lot 43

Seller: Jackson F B
Buyer: Fisher J B Jr & Sandy T
Price: $211000
Addr: West County: 11604 W Kingfisher Ct
Description: The Bay Villas Bldg 32, 33, 34,
35 & 36 Condo Unit 183 Desc In Or Bk 706
Pg 1845 & Dc In Or Bk 923 Pg 159

Seller: Southeast Mission Inc Trustee
Buyer: Foster Bernard B Sr &
Price: $39900
Addr: West County: 05623 W Cisco St
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 1 Pb 8 Pg 25
Lot 13 Blk 130

Seller: Dahllng Robert
Buyer: Galit Michael S & Usa A
Price: $17000
Addr: West County: 10136 N Dunedin Rd
Description: Rainbow Ests Unit 2 Pb 3 Pg
84 Lots 10, 11, 12 & 13 Blk 6

Seller: Stender Anthony Jr &
Buyer: Garry Steven M
Price: $85000
Addr: West County: 07311 W Pinebrook St
Description: Crystal Paradise Ests Unit 3
Unrec Sub Lot 1 BIk S Desc As: Coam At
The Ne Corner Of Lt 15 BIk M Pb 4 Pg 88
Th N Odeg 29m

Seller: Eppers Charles
Buyer: Gaskins Max & Kathleen
Price: $24000
Addr: West County: 03165 S Anatole Way
Description: Villa Ter Unit 10 Of
Homosassa Pb 1 Pg 51 Lots 1 & 2 Blk 338

Seller: Gladwln Jay Revocable Trust
Buyer: Gaylord Joseph B
Price: $10900
Addr: West County: 09212 N China Pink
Way
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
112 Lot 14 BIk 95

Seller: Wiederstein Glenn A &
Buyer: Gillette Roger C & Evelyn R
Price: $289800
Addr: West County: 02849 W Pine Ridge
Blvd
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg 51
Lot 18 BIk 51

Seller: Broessel Dennis & Barbara
Buyer: Glass Thomas & Stepffanle
Price: $8500
Addr: West County: 00095 N Mcgowan
Ave
Description: Crystal Paradise Ests Unit 2 Pb
4 Pg 88 Lot 1 BIk K Less Outs: Or Bk 775 Pg
1958(Pt Added To 70000)

Seller: Belsler Tamara L &
Buyer: Goddard John F & Brenda C
Price: $1500
Addr: West County: 02680.W Sundown Ln
Description: River Gardens Unit 4 Pb 3 Pg
40 Lot 265

Seller: Penso Derryck M & Denlse J
Buyer: Golden Swan LiUc
Price: $45000
Addr: West County: 04926 N Buffalo Dr
Description: Pine Ridge Unit 1 Pb 8 Pg 25
Lot 11 BIk 146

Seller: Heckman Edward
Buyer: Good Paullne
Price: $18500
Addr: West County: 11928 W Cornflower
Dr
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 3 Pb 8 Pg
136 Lot 4 Blk 149

Seller: Shelton Ennis M & Brenda L
Buyer: Grlffith Arthur Dlnet & Laura
Price: $92000
Addr: West County: 01353 N Haggerty Pt.
Description: New Falrmont Unrec Sub Lot
2 Desc As Follows: Comm At Nw Crm Of
Lot 18 BIk A Southern Highlands Unit 1 In
Pb 3 Pg 13 Thn

Seller: Shelton Ennis M & Brenda L
Buyer: Griffith Arthur Dinet & Laura
Price: $92000
Addr: West County: 01373 N Haggerty Pt
Description: New Falrmont Unrec Sub
Map 338c Lot 1 Desc As Follows: Ne 1/4
Of Sw 1/4 Of Sec 30-18-18 Begin At Ne
Crn Of W 1/2 Of Sw I

Seller: Eck Harry J & Christine C Tsts


Buyer: Gringerl Ann
Price: $7000
Addr: West County: 08311 N Hatfield Ter
Description: Holiday Hts Unit 1 Pb 4 Pg 61
Lot 61 BIk 15

Seller: Painter Johnathan W
Buyer: Gutierrez Angel E & Sonla A
Price: $17000
Addr: West County: 07889 N Forsythia
Way
Description: Crystal Manor Unit 2 Pb 8 Pg
112 Lot I BIk 25
Seller: Hall Jesse L
Buyer: Hall Eugene &
Price: $62500
Addr: West County: 06988 W Green Acres
St
Description: Green Acres Add 6 Pb 7 Pg
37 Lot 99


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 7D


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


11











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Serving all of Citrus County including Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosassa Springs, Sugarmill Woods,


Floral City, Citrus Springs, Ozello, Inglis, Hernando, Citrus Hills, Chassahowitzka, Holder, Lecanto and Yankeetown.
^^^^~~~~~~:0pm -* 5pT/\XT^ KM^Bm. ^^^_


S563-5966




726-1441

Outside of Citrus County or Citrus Springs call:

1-888-852-2340


Sunday Issue...................5pm Friday
Sunday Real Estate. ........3pm Friday
Monday Issue........... 5:30 pm Friday
Tuesday Issue.............. I pm Monday
Wednesday Issue.......... 1pm Tuesday
Thursday Issue....... 1pm Wednesday
Friday Issue................. 1pm Thursday
Saturday Issue.................1 pm Friday


6 Lines for 10 Days!
2 items totaling

'I -150................. 50

$151 -$400............$1050

1401 -800 .............550

$801 -$1,500..........$2050
Restrictions apply. Offer applies to private parties only.


B t h k d ti t th


All ads require prepayment.









VISA .


oe su reIu ltcec your I ver semellllln ie
first day it appears. We cannot be
responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion. Adjustments are made only
for the portion of the ad that is in error.



Advertisements may be canceled as

billed only for the dates the ad actually
appears in the paper, except for specials.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same
as the deadlines for placing ads.


SPCIL OTCE 02-65HEP ANED105160 Fl ~ INANC~EIAsL J180-1 1 [SERVICE 21-6 AIML 40-15MBIE OESFO RN O SL 504
REA ETAT FR ENT57-60 RALESATEFO.SLE.01750VAAN PRPETY$1089 TANSORATON 0493


LETS SMELL THE
ROSES TOGETHER!
Seeking attractive Lady
40-55 who enjoys dining
out & weekend trips out
of town. Looking to
share quality times
together & wants the
nicer things In life.
Call 228-1579




** FREE SERVICE**
Cars/Trucks/Metal
Removed FREE. No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receiot
2 RECLINERS
Free
(352) 628-0996
2 Red Nose Pits
I neutered male, 1 fe-
male unspayed. Free to
good home, Call after
9a.m. (352) 628-5365
3 KITTENS
AND MOTHER
Free to good homes
(352) 621-4704
6 MALE BORDER COLLIE
& RIDGEBACK PUPPIES
Free to good homes
All have ridge backs on
them. (352) 726-1651
7 Mo. Old Mixed Breed,
male, great w/ kids &
other animals. Free to
good home.
(352) 344-0326
10 week old
Lab mix, male
Indoor/ outdoor
Free to good home
(352) 422-7739

50' TV TOWER
free. You take down.
(352) 621-0121
Adult Male Cat orange
Tabby neutered,
declawed, free to
good home. 341-2511

COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter Is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message

FREE
Mobile Home
14x52, 2/1, C/A, w/
some furniture.
Must be moved
(352) 341-0483
(352) 551-0597
FREE GROUP
COUNSELING
Depression/ Anxiety
(352) 637-3196 or
628-3831
Free Kittens, to good
home, litter box trained
(352) 564-8944
Free Oak Fire Wood
Inverness
(352) 344-4232
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
FREE ROUND KITCHEN
TABLE WITH 4 CHAIRS
You take away
(352) 726-1065
after 9am
FREE TO GOOD HOME
4 kittens, 2 are bob tails,
Also free Turkin Rooster
(352) 726-0636
KITTENS PURRFECT PETS
spayed, neutered,
ready for permanent
loving homes. Available
at Eileen's Foster Care
(352) 341-4125
Lab Mix, 3 yr. old,
neutered, all llc., shots
current, Inside dog,
needs good home.
(352) 794-7495
Sago Palm Owners
Retired, will trim your
Sago's for the pups
Homosassa, Crys. Riv,
area. (352) 563-1432
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
is seekhg Donatlions of use-
able
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating Items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
Volunteers are needed hI the
Home Store,
Store hours are:
9am-5pm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
information.


FREE
BULL TERRIER
Female
(352) 795-2762
LOST
TRAILER TAILGATE
w/registration E19NUI
Citrus Hills area.
(352) 746-4670
LOST PARROT
gray w/ bright red tall..
(352) 382-1168
$800 REWARD
Lost Pitt Bull Red & white
female, 10 mos. old,
name Dot or Dottle,
Homosassa area
352-795-7110
LOST SEAL POINT
Siamese & Persian mix,
neutered male. Lost
Wed. Vicinity: Citrus
Hills, Fresno Ave. area
(352) 746-0648



BRINDLE PIT
found N Apopka Ave.
area of Inverness.
Call to identify
(352) 637-6993
FOUND DOG
Female Golden Lab
In Vicinity of Mayo Dr.
Crystal River, golden
eyes, reddish nose.
Green collar, no tags.
Call Gall or Cheryl at
795-2697.

Looks like Rottweller
mix. Wearing choker
chain. Found In the
area of Highland Ridge
Estates, Homosassa.
(352) 628-0110




FDivrces ~
Bankruptcy i

ChidSuppot
Wls I
ve ............... 6374022







REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Uce. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.


R re


EXP. BOOKKEEPER
NEEDED

Fax Resume to:
352-746-4486
JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
PAYROLL/
HUMAN
RESOURCE
ASSISTANT
Fulltime with benefits.
Must be proficient in
Excel Spread Sheets
and have working
knowledge of Payroll
Accounting systems.
Please fax Resume to:
(352) 795-0134

RECEPTIONIST

Receptionist needed
for busy construction
office.
Full time position
requires answering
multi-line system,
greeting customers as
well as limited
clerical duties.
Fax resume to
(352) 746-9117
STANLEY STEEMER
.-.r. rr, r 7-.t C.i I,-t
:ileorI. ,-.: -. : or.,, inr,
-T, k_:.')1l F' rr, :- r,r +
C.',: ''u IF.'.--riF.,-
A Fe ore h..:..lg h. ,:.r ,
answer incoming
phone calls, schedule
appointments, and
other administrative
duties. Apply at
911 Eden Dr. Inverness
between 10am-3pm




NAIL SPECIALIST.
MESSAGE
THERAPIST,
HAIR DESIGNER
& ASSISTANT
NEEDED
658 SALONSPA
(352) 795-8643


DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
for 152 Bed Skilled
Nursing Facility
CRYSTAL RIVER
HEALTH AND REHAB
has a DON position
available for our 150
bed facility. EXCITING
opportunity for
anyone who can
follow in the foot
steps of a DON who Is
reclocating and has
set a high standard of
care In our facility.
Florida RN licensed
nurse who has
long term care
experience, with 1-2
years experience as a
DON or ADON. Self
motivated, hands on
Individual who enjoys
leading a team who
care for residents
and staff in a positive
environment.
Competitive salary
with full benefit
package offered.
PLEASE FAX YOUR
rI I :' .i- Crs -'
i: F r iTi-i
CT.[.rICFIt. iI.-,i i
ATTEtJIION:
ADMINISTRATOR
FAX- 352 795-5848
PAGER:
352-628-8306#
Enter your number
CRYSTAL RIVER
HEALTH AND
REHABILITATION
136 NEW 12TH AVE.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
(352) 795-5044


"MR CITRUS COUNTYt"






.. V .




ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

*CHRONICLE*
INV. OFFICE
106 W. MAIN ST.
Courthouse Sq. next
to Angelo's Pizzeria
Mon-Fri 8:30a-5p
Closed for Lunch
2pm-3pmg




ATTRACTIVE SWF
seeking male
companion. Candi,
352-628-1036



CAREGIVER FOR THE
ELDERLY 7/24. Compas-
sionate loving care for
your family member
suffering from Strokes,
demensla or Alzhelmers
15-yrs exp. Exc. refs.
(352) 270-1997
Will take care of your
love one in your home.
35 yrs. exp. Excellent
references. 527-6553




2 BURIAL SPACES
Memorial Gardens
In Beverly Hills, Garden
of Ten Commandments
$4,200. (502) 935-8756




ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
for CDA Certified
Teachers & Teacher's
Assistants. Send resume
to Blind Box 859P, c/o
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450
BRIGHT BEGINNINGS
PRESCHOOL
Is Accepting
Applications For:
*CDA CERTIFIED
TEACHERS
*TEACHERS
ASSISTANTS
(352) 795-1240




ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Mercedes Homes
seeks Individual with
a college degree
and 3 years
professional
administrative exp.
Must be skilled in MS
office, organized,
detailed oriented,
and able to
multi-task.
Construction
knowledge a plus.
E-mall
merhomes.com
or fax to
352-563-5810
EOE/DFWP

DECCA

Receptionist/
Office Support
For busy sales office,
Individual should
posses strong
customer Service and
computer skills.
Apply At:
DECCA in Oak Run,
7 ml off 1-75 on
SR 200 west,
Mon Thurs
8am-12 noon
or Call
(352) 854-6551
or fax resume
(352) 861-7252
Decca is a Drug Free
Work Place.
EOE


$$$$$$$$
SIGN-ON BONUS
LPN's
Full time 9:30 p- 8a
Full time 3p Ilp
Part time 6a 2p
For ALF.
Paid by experience,
Benefits after 60 days
Vacation After 90
Days. Apply in Person:
Brenfwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE


A+ Healthcare
Home Health
Agency

FT Insurance
Clerk
Must have
experience in
billing/collections.
Fax Resumes
(352) 795-4037





I t . -


COMFORT HOME
CARE
A department of
Hospice of Citrus
County
Is currently seeking a
Home Care Clinical
Services Manager
Registered Nurse
licensed in State of
Florida. 3 years Home
Care e vp
*:, L*3r .. .. ,-,



,T,'i u ir -.
:,- .l. T I :ui HF-urCI.
F IT ..- r Ii

352-527 2020
F.. 352.527.9366
llhacherihospiceol
ciuscounty.org
1.11FF .', ur:'J Jr-I
Comfort Home Care
P.O Box 641270
Beverly Hills. Flonda
34464
-" L '.'. : -1..r H ,.,.. I.:
,:.J .: r lJ ; .; ,:.:jrr,
, ,:.r,.lr., .3 1
hospiceofcrrus
county.org
*3r,, *I, F.- il .,-
or r.3 *c ,c^''j r,


23rd Annual Celebrity Dinner Auction
to benefit the Key Training Center


CARING
INDIVIDUAL
Male & female,
MIn. 2 years Exp.
working with
developmentally
disabled. Reliable
transportation.
Sumter & Citrus Co.
area. FT/PT, days,
evenings & weekends
Call
MOVING MOUNTAINS
(352) 637-9001


CNA'S
NEEDED 11-7
Apply at
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
(352) 249-3100
Or fax resume:
352-746-0748

CORRECTIONS -
JUVENILE

Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for 96 high and -
maximum risk males
committed to the
Dept. of Juvenile
Justice Is recruiting for
Juvenile Corrections
Officer. Supervise
and maintain
custody of male
offenders In
,a," r:' ..3
OIr,i: .ri.r lu.j:l c.-
S1-,.3.e .3
o .,ii :, 3, r.:r,
.,3.:l ,3.,:.ur. 3
,: i .- r, ,TF ._F ,,3
r , l'_,.3 t.'3 1.a l r- ._ In


Apply in person al'
Cypress Creek
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr
lecanto, FL

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST


I r..3ll r-.': .r

Colleen Bevis
1128W. Man SI..


Enjoy a wonderful
Dementia Care
Environment!

Nursing Assistants
needed for FT
Night Shifts.
NEW Pay Scale with
Differentials.

$100 QUEST Bonus
Must have Dementia
Care Experience

Also some limited
openings for
Nursing Assistant
TRAINING
Program.

Call Cottages of
Gentle Breeze
746-5626 TODAY !!


GET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE



HYGIENIST
Inverness
HYGIENE
ASSISTANT.
Spring Hill
M j I 1- ,3 e a .: ,i i 3 0
EFM C- ,3r., .1,3,
.: n iri .: .i l. ri,

F.:.r irrri,-:ir.,r
-.:.:.rl3 ll,:.r, v 'lr. 3 i
*:aI 1-877-COAST-17
Dial ext. 1001 for
Spring Hill and ext.
1032 for Inverness.
Please fax resumes to
813-289-4500.
We offer excellent
compensation and
benefits.
EOE/M/F/D/VN
Drug-Free Workplace.


Master
Level
Therapists
the Centers
i.--'i rr".,. _i:l l. '.:



Fr,- iE j Im
r.1. rl..r 1 r.-.l'u
F l .-TT. r r .'. Ii, r

.. M rh-r,..", .,r r,
ir-1rAV .iJir.,

C. ri 1- .l. :.r. l .-r lI



,: r .ll i uri-, I'.

3. 1 -1 3 F 3L )J .3I
r r r.,.:.: .-r. u :
.i "* i -ease"?*l'


*


Friday, July 15, 2005
Silent Auction & Social Hour at 5:30 p.m.
Cher Impersonator Dinner Show at 6:30 p.m.

Citrus Springs Community Center
1570 West Citrus Springs Boulevard, Citrus Springs


SPECIAL GUEST BETTY ATCHISON

PRESENTS

CHER THROUGH THE DECADES

DONATIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE
DRESS IS BUSINESS OR COCKTAIL ATTIRE


*


Key Training Center
23rd Annual Dinner Auction


Tickets
$50 per person. Call (352)527-8228



| C oNIiE


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/ Cell 422-3656
FULL TIME LPN OR
PCT FOR
INVERNESS
DIALYSIS CENTER

Hospital experience
preferred.
LPN/Hospital Tech,
EMT, PCT may apply.
Call Bridget DIdsbury
at 352-637-0500, 8-4

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
F/T Medical exp.
necessary/ Must
possess excel. c e -.lne
?. p.hc.n? :.'ill- .3c.,r,h
.-. r,,jIll 1.3' I '. .. II
i.,3r, i c. .r"i- r:
352-527-8863
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/LPN
F pen-rl crnC r e,.e'.3,,
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs.
S- : FL 34447
MEDICAL OFFICE
v n..sLr, tullh'F, C 0.).
nr .n .:.ni :..11.1 ,
pi,' rr-. Pla'l e 1.3
re,:urm h-. r |-JJ"
MEDICAL
SEC"II.A

Needed for Outpatient
Clinic, computer liter-
acy, typing, good pho-
ne & organ, skills neces-
sary. Medical term. &
medical office skills a
plus. Fax resume to:
860-2223 or
Call 860-2222

NOW HIRING
CNA's/HHA's or
Dependable
Compassionate
People who want to
become CNA's/HHA's
CALL LOVING CARE
M-F, 9:00 AM to 4:00PM
(352) 860-0885

RN
For Endoscopy center.
No endoscopy exp.
necessary. Fulltime
position or PRN position.
Benefits. Hours 7-3.
Fax resume to
(352) 637-2525


RN
SUPERVISOR 11-7
CNA'S ALL SHIFTS
RN'S & LPN's
FT 3-11
Auply in person to
rrey Place
2730 W Marc
Knighton Ct. Lecanto









Coordinator -
Enrollmenl/Studeni
Services-
Levy County Center:
,I-.."laM re J|T u

e.icn.lo.r : .3-_gre.5 in
S a ut; ,ii : ,r. ,:.r a
ri.FlEa flia .re a
3, ,r : rI ,.p *.orllria
.nr", "r.3 .r.o. r a-rir
piin ula .: r. ir
,- ,.ur,. lhr., ca, l ing


r,i..ur., '
anagerlGat
aDe.elop Ier.r l not

Ocl C,-6amull:
elucaor's, are or


-,c. rr. u l ril l-'s
Sc r.e c. hrgins
//2o/05
Manager Grants
Development-
OcalaCampus:
Bachelor's degree
req'd; Master degree
pref. 2+ yr's of
successful exp In
grant writing and
management pref.
Open until tilled.
Screening begins
7/26/05
For add'l Info visit
www.GoCFCC.com
Or call
(352) 873-5819.
Mall application
& unofficial
transcripts to:
CFCC-Attn:
H.R. Dept,
P.O. Box 1388,
OcalaFL 34478-1388
CFCC is an EE/AA &
DFWP Employer




&-


Celebrate Summer...

Join a Winning

Team!!
The following are positions
for which we are accepting applications;
RNs: Surgical Services (FT or Per Diem)
Women's & Family Center/OB (Per Diem)
Women's & Family Center/OB (Nurse
Manager)
ER/Triage (FT & Per Diem)
Psych (Per Diem)
MedSurg, Telemetry, ICU
Clinical Educator
Other Opportunities:
Physical Therapist (FT or Per Diem)
Physical Therapy Assistant (FT or Per Diem)
Respiratory Therapist (nights)
Medical Transcriptionist (FT & Per Diem)
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select positions!
SRRMC is part of the
HMA family of hospitals
For information about these and other
opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email:
Linda.Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com y
Web Site: www.srrmc.com If I t
EOFEDRUG FREE WORKPLACE O*

iMSEVEN RIVERS
, REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


I


YOU ARE INVITED TO WISH FOR THE STARS


I I ~IIVernII s. rL U I


COME JOIN OUR
STAFF
Where nursing is
grahlying and
working is a pleasure
Owned by an RN.
who knows what
exceptional core is
And the Importance
of an exceptional staff
Competitive pay,
Benefits & more.
We are seeking:
RN. F/7
RN. PRN
DIABEIIC NURSE, PRN
PT. OT & ST, PRN
HHA, PRN
OSIOMY WOUND
NURSE. PRN
Give us a call and let's
talk
Nurse to Nurse
564-0777
Ultimate Nursing Care


I -.L --I


i


8D SUNDAYJULY 10, 2005


CLASSIFIEDS


I











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Junk today



... is not always Treasure tomorrow.


Instead of donating that broken, run down TV, sofa, or table
and chairs to the many nonprofit thrift stores and agencies
across Citrus County, why not.take it to the landfill. -

It's free! For residential self-haulers.


Your good quality donations help fund
these agencies and make these items available
to those less fortunate than you.
Donations made after hours hurt more than help.


yl.ah~


-^i . :


Don't make them pay to haul off your old junk.
call toverilyacceptable items
Habitat Home Store 341-1800 '
Key Training Center Thrift Stores 726-0271
Annie Johnson Thrift Store 465-7957 This message brought to you by the
Hospicp of Citrus County Thrift & Gift Shops, 341-2220 Division of Solid Waste Management
Florida Sheriff's Youth Ranches 795-8886 527-7670 and TDD Telephone 527-5214
The Salvation Army 341-2448 landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us


CLASSIFIED




IGET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE


: Code
Enforcement
Officer
Responsible position
to supervise and
coordinate
operations of the
Code Enforcement
Section, Supervises
staff; monitors special
Code Enforcement
e projects and reviews
minutes/agendas.
Presents cases to
Code Enforcement
Board. Requires
Bachelor's degree or
education and
training equivalent to
four years of college
education, Requires
newspapers over six years
han 170,000 experience. Must
s, Marion, have valid Florida
Drivers Ucense. Must
Dixie and have or be able to
counties. obtain within one
year of employment
.mtor a Community Noise
lInBPenneaeCr Control and
.m lwC0-qTmB Protection
,Sods onincie Professional
* adi hoppe certification.
- TCiniyBuAin
Starting salary
o reach the $1,195.54 bi-weekly.
oast market is
ard-winning, Apply at the
vspapers. Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
<1 CLecanto, Florida
34461
eout aowrrd no later than
FL 34429
-6363 Friday, July 22, 2005,
'on .mom EOE/ADA


DIRECTOR
OF ADMISSIONS
Crystal River Health &
Rehabilitation Is
seeking an individual
wh6 is willing to work
In a competitive
health care market
that has been
established by an
outstanding
representative of our
facility. The person
who is well organized,
energetic, tenacious
and has previous
customer sales and
service experience Is
needed for our skilled
nursing facility.
Previous marketing
experience in health
care preferred but
not required, Road
warrior willing to
travel within a 50 mile
radius of the facility.
Salaried position with
benefits including
Incentive bonus plan.
Send resume or apply
in person to
Administrator-
Lyn Brecher
Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
136 NE 12th Avenue
Phone (352) 795-5044
Fax (352) 795-5848



Your T'orld first.
Et'L r Do '


CHi rNCLE


Your world first

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Classifieds






AUTOCAD
OPERATOR
Architectural 2004,
full time, immediate,
Dunnellon,
Phone 489-5805,
Fax resume to:
489-8960
EXECUTIVE
HOUSEKEEPER
For 114 Room Resort
Hotel in Crystal River. 3
years prior experience
In position required.
Health Insurance, 401,
Vacation & Holidays
Fax resume with salary
requirements to
352-795-3179


SUNDAY. JULY 10, 2005 9D


FIRE FIGHTER/EMT
(Pool/Part Time)

The City of Dunnellon
Is Accepting
Applications For The
Position of Pooled
Firefighter/EMT.
Requirements Include
High School Diploma
or GED, Minimum
Standards Firefighter
Certification. Gradu-
ated From An Ac-
credited School of
Emergency Medical
Technology, & Cur-
rent CPR Certification.
Applications Must Be
Received By 4:00 PM,
July 15, 2005. Appli-
cation and Complete
Job Description Avail-
able At City of
Dunnellon, City Hall,
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL, 34431
Or By Calling
(352)465-8500
EOE, Drug Free
Workplace.







Mechanical Inc,

IMMEDIATE NEED
for the following
positions:
* Warehouse /
Inventory, multi-
task, organized
Individual needed
*Class A CDL
License, clean
driving record
* Mobile Eqpmnt
Operator, certified
In operating boom
truck and backhoe
Seeking candidates
for the following
positions:
* Project
Superintendent, exp
In a mngmnt level
position In HVAC
Industry preferred
* Pipe Foreman, mln
2 yrs previous exp
required
Sheet Metal
Mechanics all
levels, including
helpers
Fax or e-mail resume
with salary req, to
352-237-6258 or
malinda@ccs
mechanical.com
Apply In person at
737 SW 57th Avenue,
Ocala
DFWP/EOE

INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
PRIVATE SCHOOL
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
Full Time + Benefits
Fax resume to
608-825-6496
or call
800-383-7364 Ext 102
Associated Training
Services
Lecanto, Fl.

NEEDED 220
AGENT '
For key position.
Commercial exp a plus.
Top Pay For the
Right Person.-
Reply Blind Box 858-M,
c/o Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main,
Inverness, FL 34450

REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060

SENIOR PLANNER
Professional planning
managing complex
projects, programs,
studies, zoning
case review and
presentation,
subdivision
administration,
development review
and long range
planning. Prepares
reports and
amendments to the
Comprehensive' plan
and land
development
regulations.
Coordinates and
conducts public
meetings; prepares
planning studies
Including
demographic and
land use projects,
Masters Degree In
urban planning and
two years professional
work experience or
Bachelors degree In
related field and four
years professional
work experience.
AICP certification
desirable.
Salary range
$1452.94-$2135.83
B/W, DOQ.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, Florida
34461 or visit our
web site at
www.citrus.bocc.fl.us
EOE/ADA,

STATE FARM
Hiring licensed P/C
and/or L/H CSR for
Chuck Everidge's
Agency. Salary, bene-
fits, commission, bonus.
Fax resume to 726-3019


-E
CART ATTENDANT,
POOL ATTENDANT,
HANDYMAN/
WOMAN
3 jobs in 1. Good
Starting pay. Call
Inverness Golf &
Country Club for appt
(352) 637-2526

HIRING ALL
POSITIONS
Apply within at
Peck's Old Port Cove
Ozello. See Craig.


I-L Estua


HIRING FRIENDLY
SERVERS
Frankie's Grill
(352) 344-4545

HUNGRY HOWIE'S
PIZZA & SUBS
Now Hiring
F/T, P/T, Delivery
Drivers
Please apply at
Hungry Howies
Inverness
Next to Kmart
(352) 637-6222

PREP COOK &
WAIT STAFF
THE COVE
(352) 344-5894

PREP COOK
WANTED
THE COUNTRY DINER
5490 S. Hwy. 41
352-344-1267

RELIABLE
EXP. SERVERS
Good Attitude a must.
We offer top pay,
benefits,
Full or part time
Apply in person
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club.
505 E Hartford Street
Citrus Hills
(352) 746-6855





Seeking career
oriented team
players.

SERVERS
LINE COOKS
PREP COOKS
Will Train, flexible
hours, limited nights
& weekends. Apply @
631 N, Citrus Ave,
Crystal River
8:30-11am




$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackie
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON

AAA AUTO
CLUB SOUTH
Offers a Sales Career
in Inverness/Inverness
Beverly Hills area.
Paid Training.
Company Benefits,
Strictly Full time
with flexible hours.
High Income Potential
Call Les Singleton
352-237-6251
Fax Resume
352-237-1748
or email
Isingleton@
aaasouth.com




















































NEW YEAR/
NEW CAREER

The best opportunity
in Citrus County.
Average Income for

Our 12
representatives
enjoy company trips.
bonuses, and
many other
incentives.
SQualifications:
*a Self-motivated
Team Player
Outgoing
Personality
and the
Willingness to Learn
2 POSITIONS


AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
necessary,
training available.
Take control of
your future-
call today!!







Micah Buck
(352) 726-7722


C4--
Ob rofSsi















1 2005 NISSAN TITAN


10D SUNDMJun 102005

M


INSURANCE
AGENTS
Career Opp. 15-20
leads per week,
Vested Renewal.
Bonus Trips
Diverse Product line
Serious Inquires only.
(352) 795-3355
REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Uc. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.
SEEKING
SALES STARS
for Citrus and Sumter
Counties, No cold
calling. A closer's
dream, Pre-set appoint-
ments. Sales bonuses
and incentives. Training
provided with national
corporation. Contact
Robert at 800-868-8648


Van Wants YOU!!








SCareerFor


Nature Coast
352-795-0021




$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!!
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers, solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
Call Now
800-362-0159 24 hours

A/C INSTALLERS
Exp.preferred,
but will train.
Great pay & benefits
Including health
& 401K.
Apply: Bay Area A/C
8021 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-2665
EOE DFW


*AC INSTALLERS
*SERVICE TECHS
No whiners, I don't
supply cheese.
Call 352-564-8822
ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Must have Florida
driver's license, hourly
or piece rate. Exp.
preferred, but will
train. Framing exp.
helpful. Apply today
& start tomorrow.
352-726-6547
ARE YOU an
automotive tech
who wants a life, a
real life? Call Kelley
at 352-726-5532.
ATTN. PLUMBERS
Exp. Commercial
Plumbers & Foreman
Competitive Pay,
Benefit pkg. Call
(352)726-5601 DFWP
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
For very busy shop. Exp.
in Diagnostics, Align-
ments & repairs. M-F
only. ASE Cert. Pref. but
not req. Valid Fl. Drvrs.
Lic. req. as well as own
tools. Apply in person or
call Beasley Tire
45 Hwy. 19S, Inglls, Fl.
(352)447-3174
(352) 563-5256
BONDED SEPTIC
TANK, INC.
*SEPTIC TANK
INSTALLER/OPERATOR
*PUMP TRUCK
DRIVER/OPERATOR
*YARD WORKER/HELPER
Drug Free Workplace
(352) 726-0974
Mon-Fri. 8am-4pm
CABINET PERSON
WOOD, MICA,VENEER
For Custom shop call
for apt. (352) 795-1100
CARPENTERS &
HELPERS NEEDED
Tools & trans a must.
Pay based on exp.(352)
489-5721 or 427-4871
CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH
Apply in Person at:
920 E Ray Street
Hernando
Or call 344-2400



Your" world first.
Eveni' DNa

C i 0\m c ,L ,


The top selling dealership on the
Suncoast has an outstanding
career opportunity for a full time
GM Certified Technician
Must be experienced and customer
service oriented.
Excellent benefits and more!
Call Guy Denig, Service Director,
for an appointment at:

352-795-6800

JOIN OU
WINNING Homo.s...FL
*E^'^EjiEEEEEEEE EOEEEEEER FHW


Trades
Ech/Sils


IC= SlesHel


. . . ....... 9 P .


; l' . .. .
"I've worked for the Citrus County Chronicle Classified Department
for 1 years, where I enjoy working with co-workers, who create a
productive and fun atmosphere. I'm proud to work for a company
that encourages growth, values the opinion of its employees and
gets involved in the community."
Beverly-

." i' ,.. ..;, i











Sr1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Send Resume to Crystal River, FL 34429

S1()N 1(\.E 4 -2) 5 W3"
---- --"-"---"---


R-


FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362
CONCRETE
FINISHERS, BLOCK
LAYERS &
LABORERS
(352) 563-1873
CONSTRUCTION
Local contractor
seeking exp. Framers
Competitive Pay.
447-3225



Mechanical Inc.
Currently seeking
candidates for the
following position:
* Service Technician,
experienced and
qualified EPA
certification req
Competitive pay &
benefits
Fax or e-mall resume
to 352-237-6258 or
malinda@ccs
mechanical.com
DFWP/EOE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVES
Infinite Energy, a
rapidly expanding
natural gas marketer
located in Galnes-
ville, FL has an
Immediate need for
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVES
$8.25 $11.00/HR
plus CO. paid
benefits, training
provided. Bilingual
English/Spanish
needed and
computer skills a must
Apply to
www.infinltenergyv.
com Or fax
(352) 240-4146
EOE/AA/MFDV
DUCT INSTALLER
Trainee Position,
HVAC Contractor
Call 344-0323
CERTIFIED AIR
ELECTRICIANS
AND HELPERS
WANTED ASAP
J.A. Floyd Inc
EC0002388
(352) 563-2962


AN EXP. FRAMER &
LABORERS NEEDED
(352) 637-3496









EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
Accepting
Application for exp
heavy equipment
operators.
Knowledge of Dozers,
Excavators, back
Hoes, Graders &
Loaders is helpful. Full
Time Employment w/
full benefits package
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE
EXP. AUTO
SERVICE WRITER
Good payl Good
hours Good Benefitsl
Apply in Person
See Jerry at
Como Auto Sales
1601 W. Main St.
Hwy. 44-W, inverness
EXP. AUTO TECHS
Good payl Good
hours Good Benefitsi
Apply in Person
See Jerry at
Como Auto Sales
1601 W. Main St.
Hwy. 44-W, Inverness
EXP. CONCRETE
FINISHER WANTED
Call Joe at
352-464-3548
EXP. EQUIPT
OPERATORS &
OPERATORS
For Utility Instillation. Full
Benefits & Retirement.
Background Checks
& drug testing
Conducted.
Call our Job Site.
352-799-8223
EOE
EXP. FRAMERS/
CARPENTERS
With tools and trans-
portation. Local work,
352-302-3927


NO PAYMENTS TIL JAN., 2006


AND RATES STARTING ATI %!!



2005 NISSAN PATHFINDER 2005 NISSAN ARMADA


Model #09215 Model #49215


23 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRI,999
2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE


2 9,999

2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE


A


OPEN 'TIL
10 PM

2200 SR 200
OCALA


LA


OCA


622-


4111


ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, '195 DEALER PRE. 72 MONTHS 0 7.9% APR, W.A.C. t WITH '500 COLLEGE GRAD REBATE W/ '1,000 TRADE EQUITY.


FREE !

INSTANT

APPRAISAL LINEji



1-800-342-3008

WE WILL TELL YOU WHAT

YOUR TRADE IS WORTH

OVER THE PHONE.


NISSAN


EXP. FRAMERS ONLY
(352) 726-2041
EXP. STEEL
FABRICATORS
& ERECTORS
MIG/STICK a must
8794 W Tradeways Ct.
Homosassa. 628-6674
EXP'D PAINTER
5 years minimum.
Must have own tools
& transportation:
(352) 3t2-6397
EXP'D STUCCO
PLASTERERS &
LABORERS
Steady work, gd. pay.
Own trans 352-302-7925
EXPERIENCED
DUMP TRUCK &
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS
Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170
EXPERIENCED
ROOFERS
Tools & transportation
a must. Dependable.
733 N Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River.
(352) 628-3516
EXPERIENCED
SERVICE TECH
Needed For AC
Company must have
good driving record I
Good pay & benefits.
(352) 489-9686
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT




Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers,
Excavators.
Next Class: Aug. 1st
-National
Certification
Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training
Services
atsn-schools.com


2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE



3$ PER


299 MONTH*


2005 NISSAN FRONTIER 2005 NISSAN XTERRA


OCTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECLASSIFIED


Model #13255




2 OR MO AVAILABLE AT THI59 9 9


2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE


Model #04165






9,9992 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE
2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE


Model #11515

* 4 DOOR V8 AUTOMATIC AIR CONDITIONING

LOWEST PRICE OF THE YEAR!




$40Q aGa











SUNDAY,JULY 10, 2005 11D


NEED HELP
Call AA Hotline
352-621-0599 or www.
ncinterarou ,rn ,)n


A WHOLE HAULING
appS. u te





& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermist.com
m AFFORDABLE,d
I DEPENDABLE I
A HAULING CLEANUP. |
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Apple. Furn, Const, I
IDebris & Garages
352-697-1126
DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal,
& trim. Lie. 99990000273
Insured 352-637-0681
Discount Tree Service
Uc #73490233097
Free est/quallty work

DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
HaulingCleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work, Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
Mr Bill's Landscaping
No Job Too Big or Small.
Tree Work and Land-
scaping. 352-220-4393
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, c ns.& Lic
#0256879 352-341-6827
STUMP GRINDING
Uc. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlin
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe it"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Uc#000783-0257763 &
Ins. Exp'd friendly serv.
Lowest rates Free
estlmates,352-860-1452


vChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Uc#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
AFFORDABLE PAINTING
WALLPAPERING & FAUX
Uc. 17210214277 & Ins.
(352) 697-1564

FIND EXACTLY
WHAT YOU
NEED IN THE

SERVICE
DIRECTORY


All Phase Construction
Quality painting & re-
pairs. Faux fin. #0255709
352-586-1026 637-3632
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
-Insured. 637-3765
FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior.
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchlck LIc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a profession-
al, Mike (352) 628-7277




Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig..
John (352) 746-4521




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. Lic#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352) 400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile Is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (P827)




Certified Nurse Assistant
Will care for your loved
one in your home. Exp.
& Refs. 352-726-8601
CNA/HHA Exp., caring.
Will care for you in your
home, Nights preferred
(352) 344-2094
PRIVATE ROOM AVAIL.
Your Home My Home
Valerie's Adult Family
Care Home, 12x15 rm.
walk-In closet, priv.
bath, great view.
$2800/ mo. LIc. 6905509
(352) 637-3253


-S
VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
AFFORDABLE PAINTING
WALLPAPERING & FAUX
Lic. 17210214277 & Ins,
(352) 697-1564




HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
Janice Gearhart's
Housecleaning now
accepting new clients.
Have refs. Lic. 564-0899


CITRUS COUAI'Y (1) CHRONICLE


ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes. 637-4373
CRC1326872
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
comp. cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. Ins. CBC avail
352-563-0104/228-1282




PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Lic./Ins. 422-1956




"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. Uc 0253851
(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Elec. etc. LIc. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
Maint & repair prob-
lems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395
. AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE I
| HAULING CLEANUP.
STrash Trees, Brush,
Apple. Furn, Const, I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126
1.-- -- Jm.1
All Around Handyman
Free est. Will Do Any-
thing, Lic.#73490257751
352-299-4241/563-5746
ALL TYPES OF HOME
IMPROVEMENTS &
REPAIRS #0256687
352-422-2708
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
fPressure & cleaning,
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small] Reliable, Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
Get My Husband Out
Of The House!
Custom woodwork,
furniture repairs/reflnish,
home repairs, etc.
Lic. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONEI
Moving.Cleanouts, 8
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
Home Repairs & Maint.
Quality Workmanship
Lic99990001061
Tree Service Available
(352) 621-3840
NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services. Lc.0257615/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
P & S ENTERPRISES
General Maint. repair,
pressure washing &
painting, free estimates
Lic. & Ins. 9990002510
(352) 522-1177


* *-P






GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
Willing to Train!
Call:(352) 563-2977


PAUL/Mobile Home'
Maintenance, painting
& clean up, Lic9999000
2321 (352) 344-8131
or (352) 697-4197
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks. Lic CRC1327335


JT'S TELEPHONE SERVICE,
Jack & Wire Installation
& repair. Free esti-
mates: CALL 527-1984


tiEPNtKAUK
INSTALLATIONS
CITRUS ELECTRIC INC.
ER1 3013233
(352) 527-7414
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Llc#0256991
(352) 422-5000




#l # A-A-A QUICK PICK
UPS & hauling, Garage
clean-outs, tree work.
Reasonable. 302-4130
Ar AFFORDABLE,
DEPENDABLE I
HAULING CLEANUP.
STrash, Trees, Brush,
SAppl. Furn, Const. I
I Debris & Garages
3 352-697-1126 *
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE'
Moving.Cleanouts. &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const. debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *-
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
Shop At Home
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic


IMMEDIATE OPENING

QUALIFIED
RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIAN
Min 2 yrs. Exp., Good
driving record req.
Insurance, paid Sick,
Holiday & Vacation
Apply in person
S&S ELECTRIC
2692 W. Dunnellon Rd.
CR-(488) Dunnellon
746-6825
EOE/DFWP '


GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm./Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences.
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431




Stack Underground
Sprinklers: Installation &
Service, Honest,
Reliable, Lic & Insured.
Low Prlcesl CL#2654
(352) 249-3165 *-


.Jonn Goraon Koouing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 1325492.
628-3516/800-233-5358




Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types Lic. & Insured.
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Patio- Walks.
Concrete Specialists.
Uc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates. Lic. #2000.
Ins. 795-4798.
DANIEL ENO CONCRETE
All types, All Sizes.
Lic #2506. Ins.
352-637-5839
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
Llc#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Drive & replace,
Slab. Lic. 1476 726-6554




DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
Uc. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




AM SIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798, 425-8184


Tile. uc2, m1aIJnsurea. CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Free Esti4mates. Bathroom remodeling,
(352) 422-2019 handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 634-1584

FIND EXACTLY
BEACH FENCE WHAT YOU
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352) 628-1190 NEED IN THE
813-763-3856 Cell
BEST PRICES SERVICE
Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453 DIRECTORY
(352) 795-7095, Dallas


EXP. PAINTERS
Needed for local work.
After 6pm (352)
341-3553 or 726-6761

[e] P lRIE[','D-F, 'i


CA RPENTES~i


BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways.
Call (352) 628-4743.
D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
Landclearing, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch.
Lic. Ins.(352)302-7096
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All types oft Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523
(352) 628-3924



* MOST AFFORDABLE *
& REASONABLE *
Land & Lot Clearing
Also Fill Dirt deliveries,
Free est. Lic. insured.
(352) 795-9956
All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day lx Clean
Ups, Lot & Tree Clear-
ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
Driveways 302-6955
Boxblading, Backhoe,
Bushhogging, Cleanup
Reas. rates. Lic.
(352) 422-3078






Excavation & Site Dev
BJL Enterprises
Lic. #CGC062186
(352) 634-4650
HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &
Ditching (352) 344-4288
or (352) 302-7234 cell




CALL CODY ALLEN
for complete lawn,tree
& hauling services
(352) 613-4924 Lic/Ins
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272
McBEE LANDSCAPING
Shrubs, Trees,
Landscape packages,
Instillation & redos
Avail. Uc. #24715
(352) 628-0690
Mr Bill's Landscaping
No Job Too Big or Small.
Tree Work and Land-
scaplng. 352-220-4393
Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up. Some FREE
Services. Prof & Reliable
Call 352-563-9824
A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize in
replugging your yard.
Lic/ins. (352) 527-9247
0 LAWN MOWING & 0
0 PRESSURE WASHING 0
Drives, Sidewalks, Patio,
Very reasonable rates.
352-257-5658


4I rd esH
cF/Sills


Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est. (352) 628-4258
CALL CODY ALLEN
for complete lawn,tree
& hauling services
(352) 613-4924 Lic/Ins
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service.
Mowing, landscaping,
pressure wash.563-5746
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
NEIGHBORHOOD KIDS
Lowest price lawn serv-
ice. Mowing, mulching,
trimming, 352-634-0138
P & S Enterprises of
Citrus Inc. Mowing &
Landscape, free est.
Lic. & Ins. 352-522-1177
Robbins & Sons
Lawn Service.
(352) 302-0345
(352) 302-7141
ELI'S LAWNCARE *
*Landscaping .Tree Srv
Fertilizing *Mowing
Lic. Ins. (352) 613-5855




CRYSTAL PUMP REPAIR
(352)563-1911
Subs, jet pumps, filters
FREE ESTIMATES
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Lic. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard





"MR CITRUS COUNTY"












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956



-w
SECRETARIAL SERVICE
20 years exp. MS Office.
etc. Fastrellable,




RAINDANCER
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascla, Siding, Free Est.
Lc. & Ins. 352-860-0714


EXP. PAINTERS
Needed. 10-yrs exp.
Lonny Snipes Painting,
Cell, 400-0501

HELP WANTED
Experienced. Neat &
Tidy Lawn Service
(352) 344-5134

LABORER
Accepting
Application for
General Construction
Laborers.
Asphalt paving
experience Is helpful.
Full time employment
w/ full benefit
package.
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE


c-Unea


INSTALLERS
Ceramic, Carpet,
Wood & Vinyl
Top Quality, Top Dollar.
Call:
877-577-1277 Press 5
LABORER NEEDED
For pool construction
company. No exp.
necessary. Valid FL,
Drivers, LIc. w/ clean
record, apply
593 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto
527-7946

LEEPER AIR
CONDITIONING
Now taking
applications for:
EXP. INSTALLER
Please call
(352) 746-2223
Between 9am -3pm
and leave message.

LOCAL
COMMERCIAL
STEADY WORK
- MASONS & TENDERS
-CONCRETE
FINISHERS & HELPERS
- RODBUSTERS
- FORM CARPENTERS
Contact:
Mark Wetherell
WaveCrest Masonry
(352) 302-8476 days
(352) 746-9191 eve.

LOCAL DELIVERY
DRIVER

Florida Public Utilities
is seeking a propane
delivery driver.
Applicants must have
a valid Class "B" CDL
with an "X"
endorsement or the
ability to attain one.
Must have a good
driving record, and
pass a physical and
drug test,
Interested
candidates
Apply in person or
send to:
FLORIDA PUBLIC
UTILITIES
50 Diana St, Inglls FI
.34449
(Equal Opportunity
Employer)


SJOB FAIR

&

FOOD SERVICE EXPO

Saturday,
July 16, 2005
9 am to 3 pm

Citrus High School
Cafeteria
600 W. Highland Boulevard
Inverness

Positions Available for
Full-Time Employment in
School Cafeterias
Applications Accepted and
Interviews Conducted
Assistance with Free and
Reduced Priced Meal
Applications
Information on Menus
Online services for Student
Accounts

For more information,
call (352) 726-1931 A
Extension 2430


ZA9Geea


LAWN CARE
Crew leader position.
Good Salary for exp
person, Must have
drivers Lic.628-3734

LOCAL
UNDERGROUND
UTILITY CO.
Seeking Pipe
Foreman & Crew.
Exp. only.
Croft Contracting,
Inc. Call between
9am-3pm
(352) 860-1202
DFWP

MASON HELPERS
Experienced and
reliable. Transportation
req'd. 352-302-9102
or 352-400-0274

PIKE'S
ELECTRIC
Bonded Licensed
Residential &
Commercial
Lake Sumter Polk
Don't miss the
opportunity to work
for the fastest,
growing electrical
contracting business
In Central Florida.
Many positions may
be available at our
Groveland/
Wildwood branches.
SIGN ON BONUS
MAY APPLY FOR
RESIDENTIAL
ROUGH LEADS &
RESIDENTIAL
TRIM LEADS
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
Top wages and
excellent benefits,
Including health &
dental, 401K plan.
Company trucks are
available for some
positions. Valid DL
required. Helper
positions also
available,
DFW, EOE
Apply today.
Openings will
fill quickly
352-748-6251


AL SM


REGIONS
BANK


JOIN OUR WINNING TEAM

Ready for a change?
Regions Bank is ready for you!

If you have 6-months cash handling,
enjoy customer service,
and have a high school diploma
or GED, we want to talk to you.
Opportunities for Tellers and FSR's
in Marion and Citrus counties.

Apply on-line: www.regions.com
fax your resume to: 813-639-3432
We offer competitive salaries, paid training,
and excellent benefits.
EOE M/F/D/W Drug Free Workplace


.


Every day hundreds of people like you turn to the Classifieds
to find the items they need at prices they can afford.

If you've got something to sell, go to www.chronicleonline
and place your classified ad with us!




What is ez?
It's the 24-hour,
c ... O do-it-yourself website
nfor creating ads that will
Appear in the Chronicle's
CLAS S IF I E D S classified section .


MASON TENDERS
Experience
not necessary,
Must be reliable.
(352) 795-7495
or 400-0404

MASONS &
MASON TENDERS

(352) 400-0290

MOBILE HOME
REPAIR TECH
#1 Dealer has
opening for highly
qualified person.
Must know Dry Wall &
Vinyl Lap Siding.
Only Top notch
person for Top Pay.
Must be able to
supply own truck
Call 352-621-9181
PAINTING CO.
Seeking Exp., & non-exp.
help. Must have own
transp. (352) 527-9274
PLASTERERS
AND LABORERS

Needed Citrus Co.
Work. Trans. provided.
Vacation. 352-621-1283
302-0743
Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed In Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED

Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/ 2 years
driving exp, Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply. 24/6 shift.
Good Pay.
Long Hours.
Call 352-489-3100
PUNCH OUT
PERSON
Experienced In all
aspects of punch out.
Fax resume to
352-746-5972


HOUSEXPERIENCEDRS

Must Have Auto
& Home Phone I
Mon-Fri 8-5,
Saturday 8-12 I
Start $6.50 hr I
726-3812

APPLY ATTHE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
I T BUSINESS OFFICE HUMAN
SIN aL FE RESOURCE DEPT.AT
EXPEIENCE 130 HEIGHTS AVE.
WO I H INVERNESS, FL 34452 OR
CALL 341-4633
S(TDD:1-800-545-1833
EXT 347) EOE
f*l WAKEY PINE VILLAGE
A :ND .I E MPLOYME ICF/DD
HE P YIC* AL LOCATED IN
W B E R CRYSTAL RIVER
OaR P OS- B O E HABILITATIVE TRAINING
E-MLO INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS!
Rewarding work assisting
developmentally disabled
adults learn basic living
skills in a residential setting.
2nd shift 3:30pm-12:15am.
On the job training. Proof of
HS Diploma/GED required.
assistn Background checks and
employment health
physical will be required for
post-job offer employees.















ualiied






















employment















-'9 9 .
- *I






















pre, .
wek.L



week, day v .l
quat f o o


REPUTABLE SWIMMING
POOL COMPANY
Seeking
: ALL PHASES
OF POOL
CONSTRUCTION
Exp. preferred. Good
Wages, Benefits
Paid Holidays.
Apply at
2221 E Norvell Bryant
Hwy. (352) 726-7474
DFWP

ROOFERS
Experienced. Must
have own tools &
transport. Drug free
work place.
Call (352) 637-3677
SERVICE HELPER
or SMALL
ENGINE TECH
Experience preferred.
(352) 795-6635
*STUCCO
CREW LEADER
*PLASTERERS
LABORERS
*LATHERS
*STONE MASONS
Wages negotiable.
Call for immediate
employment.746-5951
SUPERINTENDENT
Comm. Const. Prefer
Masonry or Struct.
Steel Background.
Local work. Verifiable
work experience.
352-860-0120

CAGnea


LAWN CARE LABOR
Short days, Transporta-
tion a must. 795-3993
AAA EMPLOYMENT
P/T MED. RECEPT. $8.00
Billing Exp. reql
CDL DRIVER $10.00
Clean w/Tanker-end.
F/C BOOKKEEPER $9.00
Very nice office
RECEPT. $8.00
Phone & computer exp
TRAINEE $10.00
Several positions avail
Call For Appt. 795-2721
NO FEE TILL HIRED
CAREER
OPPORTUNITY!
Laboratory Assistant/
Trainee. Potential full
time with tuition
reimbursement.
No experience
necessary. High
school diploma or
equivalent required
Please reply to the:
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Blind Box #857
Crystal River, FL 34429
CONCRETE
FINISHER NEEDED
For new company, call
Joe at (352) 464-3548

CONSTRUCTION
LABORERS
WANTED

No exp. necessary
Must be 18 or over,
Transportation
preferred. Call for
interview, 860-2055
ili i iX1


EarnEx



















KMART
DISTRIBUTION
CENTER
FULL TIME -
ISt and 2nd shift
General
Warehouse
O$9.50hr-$9.70/hr
O $10.,00-$10.20 AFTER
90 DAYS OF
EMPLOYMENT
O $11.00-$11.20 AFTER
1 YEAR SERVICE
O ON THE JOB
TRAINING
INCLUDING
EQUIPMENT
O LOADING AND
UNLOADING
TRAILERS
O ABILITY TO LIFT 70
LBS.
APPLICATIONS
accepted
MONDAY 1-4PM
TUESDAY -
THURSDAY
T1AM-4UPM .
The following
information will be
required:
O Picture ID
O Phone numbers,
addresses and
dates of
employment for
current and
previous
employment
Allow 30 minutes to
complete the
automated'
application
Walk Ins welcome,
Appointments
recommended
655 S.W. 52nd Ave.
Ocala, Florida
Directions: 1-75, exit
352; west on SR 40 to
1st light, left on SW.
52nd Avenue,
follow 'sins.

extension 0 for
appointment
Past employees are
eligible to apply
AEOE

LABORERS NEEDED


DRIVER NEEDED
for courier service. 25 ,
hrs or more per week.
(352) 628-0708
EXP. PLASTERERS
NEEDED $19.50/HR
Call (352) 572-4473










*F/T SEWING

*P/T INSIDE
SALES
Call for Appt. Mon -
Fri 9am -5pm
(352) 628-5980
FT Lawn Maint.
Year round work, exp. a
plus. (352) 382-5793 or
(727) 741-4455


I


CLASSIFIED


No exp. necessary
Benefits offered. Valid
Drivers Uc. & Heavy
Lifting Required
Gardners Concrete
8030 Homosassa Tri.









LAWN CARE

COMPANY
SeekIng experienced
help. Must have yalld
drivers pcenrse.
(352)621-1944


I


S











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CIIRONICLi


12D SUNDAY,JULY 10, 2005


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
LAWN SERVICE
PERSON NEEDED

Must have
transportation & exp.
(352) 344-0639
LOOKING FOR A
CAREER & A TAN?
Lots of hours, lots of
work. Will train. Good
benefits. Call Mike Scott
Plumbing, Ocala
352-237-2888



Need 3 reliable
people to set
appointments In
local Sears store P/T.
Earn up to and over
$12 per hour with
bonus. 2 locations
available,
No telemarketing
Call Joann @
1-888-790-1761
EOE DFWP M/F H/P
NEEDED CONCRETE
WORKERS

Layout/form, Placers,
Finishers, Block Masons,
Tenders & Laborers
Competitive pay, Call
352-748-2111

PRODUCTION
WORKERS

Dietrich Metal
Framing, located In
Wildwood, Florida, Is
currently looking for
full-time permanent
Production Workers.
Candidates must
have the ability to
read, lift up to 50 lbs.,
and possess basic
math skills and
MUST KNOW HOW TO
READ A TAPE
MEASURE
ACCURATELY.
We offer vacation
days, holidays, health
Insurance, 401(k)
Plan, bonuses and
morel Apply in person
Mon.-Frl., 9 am 4:00
pm, between 7/11/05
through 7/22/05 at
Dietrich Metal
Framing,
721 Industrial Drive,
Wildwood, FL.
EOE/AAP
PT & FT COUNTER
HELP
Mature person
w/counter experience
needed in Inverness, Lt.
cooking, Call Rob or
Caren 352-637-2955
R&R&
SWING PERSONS
Needed very busy
transmission shop.
Exc. Salary, Benefits,
Vacation, Experienced
Only need apply.
Days (352) 489-5580
Eve (352) 465-4437
REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Uc. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.

RESIDENTIAL
PLANNER/
ESTIMATOR
Seeking an experi-
enced Individual to
assist homebuyers
with the selection
and pricing of
options. Located in
the Ocala area, over
100 homes construct-
ed each year. Good
opportunity for
advancement and
benefit package.
Send resume In word
doc format to
sales@tvrs.com or
Fax to 352-489-4126
EOE, DFWP

ROOF TRUSS
PLANT
Now hiring truss
builders. Full time.
Will train. Apply:
2591W. Hwy. 488,
Dunnellon
352-465-0968

ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS
Exp Only. Paid .
Vacations, Benefits.
352-347-8530

ROUTE DRIVER
Good driving record.
Class B w/tanker
endorsement. Must be
willing to work nights.
Construction site.
Delivery exp. helpful.
Apply in person;
Job Site Services,
Inc./Sani-Pot Portable
Toilets, 425 S. Croft Ave.,
Inverness. No phone
calls please
SCHOOL CROSSING
GUARD
The City of Crystal River
Is accepting applica-
tions for the positions of
School Crossing Guard
and Alternate School
Crossing Guard.
Applicants must be .
available to work every
morning and afternoon
when schools are in
session. Training and
uniforms supplied.
Applications available
at the Crystal River
Police Department,
123 NW Hwy 19, Crystal
River, Monday through
Friday, 8 AM to 5 PM.
Drug Free
Workplace/EOE
SHEET METAL
WORKERS &
LABORERS


Needed for growing
company. No
experience needed,
paid vacations,
benefits, paid
holidays, bonuses.
Plenty of overtime '
available. Apply at
Gulf Coast
Metal Products
in Rooks Industrial
Park, Homosassa,
(352) 628-5555
*STUCCO
CREW LEADER
*PLASTERERS
*LABORERS
*LATHERS
*STONE MASONS
Wages negotiable.
Call for Immediate
employment 746-5951


WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast I
352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com
WELDERS
Needed for
Communication
Industry. Some travel.
Good Pay & Benefits,
O/T. Valid Driver's
License required. DFWP
352-694-1416 Mon-Fri




ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS

For part-time Snack
Counter Cook/Clerk
for nights & weekends.
10-15 hrs. wk. More In
Aug. Previous exp. &/or
knowledge of bowling
a plus. Apply in person
Manatee Lanes,
Crystal River. DWFP
Exp. Commercial
Lawn Person
Must be able to trim
shrubs, and have own
transportation.
(352) 628-9312
INVENTORY
CONTROL
Nature Coast EMS,
a private non-profit
ambulance co.
is accepting
applications for an
Inventory-Control
position. Order,
receive and inventory
supplies. Excellent
computer skills
required to enhance
and maintain
Inventory-tracking
software. Assist in fleet
and building
maintenance.
Valid FL drivers
license required. For
application contact
(352) 637-4121 or visit
www'
naturecoastems.org
EOE/DFWP
P/T POOL HELP
Eves. & Sat. & Sun.
Male or Female.
Call (352) 746-4882
PART TIME LAWN
MAINTENANCE
15-25 hrs. 352-795-8951
after 6 p.m.




TYPIST/
PRODUCTION
ASSISTANT

Type editorial copy
for hand written/
typed sources into
the computer.
Transfer copy from
email, and disk,
code and edit
properly, Newspaper
production
knowledge needed.
High typing speed
and high degree of
accuracy required,
high stress, noisy
environment.
29 hour part time
position. Monday
through Wednesday,
Saturday, may at
times be required.
Fax Cover Leffer
and Resume to
352-564-2935
Qualified applicants
must pass
drug screen
EOE





ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowlingly
accept
ads that are not
bonafide
employment
offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.

REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.




FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY

JOIN THE
INDUSTRY
LEADER
Start your own
business with as little
as $1,500 down!


CLEANING CONCEPTS
Guaranteed Customers
i Complete Training & Support
V Equipment & Supplies
V Guaranteed Financing
Our Secret
can be your Success!
Over 7,500
franchise owners
servicing more than
36,000 accounts.
Franchise Opportunities
Available In.
Central Florida
Call Now (800) 249-2532

ABSOLUTE
GOLD MINE!


Plantation Reality Inc.
Usa VanDeBoe
Broker (R)/Owner
(352) 422-7925
See all of the listings in
Citrus County at
www.plantatlon
realltyinc.com


[-Gnraln


7pm
DR Power Wagon,
DR Wood Splitter,
Snapper Riding
Mower w/ grass
sweeper, 1936
German Lugar
9mm. Smith & Wesson
357 Mag., Early 1900s
lead Soldiers,
Recliner, Sofas, 35mm
Camera w/ zoom
lines,Snappy On Tools
Including Top & Die
Set, Corner Computer
Desk, Wood Inlaid
table, computer, glass
wear, jewelry & lots of
extension cords.
Southern Auction
Marketing &
Appraisals
15991 NE Hwy 27A
Williston, FL
(352) 528-2950
www.southernauction
mktg.com
AU 1423 AU 1437
AB 2240
10% Buyers Premium
On All Sales


General
cyl
c= Hel


Two Craftsman
Riding Mowers,
42" & 46" Cut
Ann or nth


FRANCHISE/
MASTER FRANCHISE
Unique rapidly-growing
pizza concept, 24 yr.
history. Training,
marketing, operations
support, See why
we've sold over 225
Franchises In two years
1-888-344-2767 x210
LAWN BUSINESS for sale
80 accts, equipment,
Pine Ridge, $15,000
(352) 697-1290 Iv msg.




Complete Silk Screen
Printing Business,
$5,000. obo for details
(352) 303-7467
Inverness George
Weston Bread Route
For sale. 120K w/truck.
Co. will fin. est. 75k, bal.
due at closing. Call
Jamie @ 352-427-3807




CERAMIC MOULDS
400+ All makes $200
OBO.
ph 352-621-0115




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charllefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877
ANTIQUE CHINA
CABINET, glass front &
side, mahogany, $150
ANTIQUE MAGAZINE
HOLDER, $75 (352)
344-8142 after 4pm




Set of Gone With the
Wind Plates, plus many
more. $8 apiece.
(352) 726-7566


-g

3 PERSON JACUZZI
works good, needs
1 switch, $250
(352) 628-2769
A+ SPAS, INC.
Hydro spas- wholesale
pricing. 5 person, $1695.
(352)572-7940/351-9935
SPA, 5 PERSON,
Never used. Warranty.
Retail $4300. Sacrifice
$1425. (352) 346-1711
SPA'S
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195.
Other models Aval.
(352) 398-7202




APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers.
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C, A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy,44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
CONVECTION OVEN
exc. cond. Imperial
model No DFE 103 12:
rack on legs with dast-
ers, 8 amp 70,000 BTU,
gas convection $1,100
Ask for David
(352) 341-5400
DRYER, GOOD COND.
Can deliver, $75 or best
offer (352) 527-1557
Electric Range
Hot Point, 6 mos. old.
$250.
(352) 489-1644
Electric Range, GE,
good cond. white w/
bik oven door $75.
(352) 249-0877
For Sale 2 Dryers
I Washer $75. ea.
or all $200.
(352) 746-1467
Leave message
FULLSIZE GAS STOVE
$100
(352) 726-8381
after 5pm
KENMORE
REFRIGERATOR
18 cu.ft. Excellent
condition, white, $250
(352) 637-0168
KENMORE
Side by Side, Almond
w/ice maker, ice
dispenser, Runs great.
$150. 382-4889
REFRIGERATOR
side-by-side with water
& ice, white, $150.
(332) 795-6056
REFRIGERATOR
apt. size
good condition
$60
(352) 628-7505,
leave message
REFRIGERATOR,
side by side, Kenmore,
22 cubic ft, ice In door,
$225. (352) 621-3764
STOVE, Frigadaire,
Self cleaning oven,
good shape, wht & blk,
$125;.FREEZER, small
chest type, wht. $75
(352) 746-7753
STOVE, WHIRLPOOL 4
yrs new, self cleaning
oven, almond with
black glass door $150
(352) 527-2371
WASHER & DRYER Exc.
cond. like new, $250 90
day guar. Free del,& set
up 352-797-6090




ESTATE SALE
Monday July 11th


Mekita Sharpener,
Model 9820-2, w/ 60 grit
and 1000 grit wheels.
New $260, Asking $150.
Bob(352) 746-7023
TOOLS- Complete
home work shop, hand
tools, 2 work benches,
several work tables,
bench grinder 1 DAY
SALE ONLY SUN. JULY 10
9a-3p (352) 228-0304
WOODSHOP EQUIP.
For sale, Including
shaper, planer, drum
sander, radial saw &
various hand tools.
Call (352) 726-7663,
ask for Paul




4 SHELF SPEAKERS
Two 6"x6", two -15"x9"
$30. Two Pioneer Stereo
Speaker CS707 w/
16" Woofer $50.
(352) 726-9964
Audio Digital,
Tower Speakers
2 37 x 9 $250. Pr.
(352) 726-9964
PANASONIC
STEREO W/4 spkrs. &
woofer, also Memorex 4
head VCR, $125.
(352) 795-9146




14 Alum Frame MH
Windows. Eight 30/4x53
3/8"; Two 46 3/8" x39/2;
one bathroom wndw,
14 3/8 x 39 5/8; one
3014x27"; All for $400
.(352) 628-5736
PVC FENCE POSTS
5" x 5" x 98" long, $13
each or 10 for $100.,
(352) 726-4710
302-4310




15 GIGABITE DELL DJ
MP3 Music Player,
similar to Ipod, w/2
docking stations, case,
headphones. 10 mo,
old. loaded w/over
$2000 in music, $150.
(352) 637-0210
CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net
PC COMPUTER
Complete, Internet
ready, WIN 98, $100
(352) 726-3856
WINDOW 98
COMPUTER
W/printer, & stand, $125
PRINTER, LEXMARK,
NEW, $25.352-795-9146




FARMTRAC 30HP,
loader, boxblade; 7
months old, $14,000
obo (352) 476-5566
JOHN DEERE
770 Diesel, 4WD, front
end loader, mint cond,
$11,750. (352) 746-4703
JOHN DEERE TRACTOR
4010, 2004, 175 hrs.
Bush hog, finishing
mower & box blade, all
like new, $8,200 obo
(352) 423-2795
MASSEY 231
47HP, a real work horse
Only 6 hours. $10,500.
(352) 746-4703




8 PC. PVC PATIO SET
matching 48" round
table, w/4 chairs on
casters, lounge chair,
end table, tea cart,
exc. cond $400
(352) 746-5246
PVC PATIO SET, Table
6'x3-1A, 6 cushioned arm
chairs w/casters, white
w/bird of paradise de-
sign (turquoise & pink)
$600 352-382-5550


2 LEATHER SOFA'S
almond color, $300
each or $500 for both
(352) 746-9917
4 Dinette Chairs
$275.
3 Tables: end,
cocktail & sofa $485.
(352) 527-9481
ARMOIRE, for TV/stereo
equip. Light natural
wood finish, $200 obo
(352) 628-3514
AWESOME 3-section
wall units, all real wood,
$150 ea. Pine coffee &
end table, $45 ea. Misc
Items, too.352-527-9226

BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
*PT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat. Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sale
Prices.Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139- King
$199, (352)795-6006
Black Chaise Lounge,
$200; Mauve Chair, $50.
Both In exc. cond,
(352) 746-1705
Bunk Bed,
chllds, twin/full w/ desk,
exc. cond, twin matt.
incl., $350, OBO.
(352) 563-2915
BUNK BED, $250 obo
DRESSER w/mirror,
$100 obo
(352) 634-2549
CARLTON SWIVEL
ROCKER/ RECLINER
w/ottoman,exc. cond,
new $500. asking $150.
(352) 726-0040
Day Bed, excel cond.
two quality mattress's,
$200.
(352) 746-7437
DAYBED w/Trundle
underneath, white,
$150.
(352) 220-1125
Dining Room Set
Country Butcher block
top table & 4 chairs,
white, like new, 1,5yrs
old, $150.
(352) 527-6894
DINING ROOM SET
Oval table w/leaf, 6
chairs, tropical pattern
on seats. Light colored
wood. 42" china cabi-
net, $400. 352-527-2456
DINING ROOM TABLE
Travertine marble base
with glasstop, very
unusual, must see, $150
obo (352) 628-3514
FLORIDA DESIGN
Couch & Loveseat,
w/glass top coffee tbi,
& 3 end tbls. $390.
(352) 344-8126
Full Sz. Bed, mattress,
box spring & frame,
$40. New bedding $40.
(352) 527-8625
Head Board, King size,
Brass, very good cond,
$85.1
(352) 795-8915
King Size Wood Bedrm.
Set, 6pcs, med. oak.
$500; 2 Flex Steel
Recliners, Med. Hunter.
Green, $300/both.
(352) 746-6806
KINGSIZE BEDwithout
headboard, $200 obo
Full/Queen headboad
$50 obo
(352) 634-2549
LEATHER CLUB CHAIR
w/ottoman, burgundy,
exc cond. $150.
File Cabinet, legal, solid
oak, exc. cond. $40.
(352) 341-5620
LEATHER SECTIONAL
Almond, 4 piece,
Coffee & end tbls.
All for $400.
(352) 746-6806
Love Seat/Ottoman
$285.,
60" Round glass table/
6 chairs $875.
(352) 527-9481
Lt. Beige L shaped
Sectional Couch,
good cond. $400.
Leave message
(352) 423-0898
MATCHING 3-PC.
DRESSER SET, Matching
2-shelf unit & desk, $100
each, GLASSFRONT
ENT. CENTER, $100
(352) 726-8381
after 5pm
MUST SELL NOW!
New Furniture Arriving
4 PC. Liv. Rm. Set, 7fft.
couch, 5V2ft. Love Seat
w/ Ig. chair & ottoman,
except, quality & cond,
pillow type back, &
rolled arms, asking $475
352-212-5979
Homosassa
ONE FULL BED,
COMPLETE. $100. ONE
SINGLE BED, $30.
Antique styles.
(352)465-7212
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808


QUEEN ANN STYLE OAK
TABLE 4 chairs, one
captains chair, $200
CUSTOM MADE OAK
TABLE 42"x78" with 6
chairs, $300 (352)
489-1549 ask for Phil
QUEEN OAK WATERBED
Converted to California
queen mattress with
bookcase headboard,
dresser w/mirror, chest
& 2 night stands, $600,
(352) 382-0477
QUEENSIZE BED,
6 drawer dresser with
mirror, 4 drawer bureau,
nightstand, $350 obo.
(352) 795-4372
Rattan Entertainment
Center, holds 25" TV,
Rattan Coffee Table,
$199/both. Sofa,
Loveseat, Chair, $199.
(352) 564-4214
Rattan Love Seat
& matching ottoman,
excel cond. $300.
Rattan nesting Snack
Tables, $75.
(352) 746-7437
Set of 4 Early Maple Tbls
2 end, 1 occas, 1 caff.
$150; Antique Sewing
Cab, w/a New Home
Sewing mach, $200;
(352) 344-8786
Sofa & Loveseat
Blue Plaid, very good
cond. $100.
2 TV Stands, 1 Is dk grey,
1 bik, $20 ea exc. cond,
(352) 249-1252
SOFA AND LOVESEAT
Teal and mauve floral
print on light
background. Good
condition. $300.
(352) 746-0124
SOFA BED
white, 3/4 size, $100.
OCCASIONAL CHAIR
Blue, $50.
(352) 465-1262
SOFA, off white, rarely
used, 3 loose cushions
on back, $150 obo
(352) 628-3514
Sugarmill Woods
Moving Sale,
3 couches & love seat,
din. rm. table, 8 chairs,
all leather lounge chair,
ladies lounge chair &
stool, gas BBQ, lamp
tables, & coffee
table. (352) 382-5759
The Path's Graduates,
Single Mothers,
Needs your furniture.
Dining tables, dressers
& beds are In needed.
Call (352) 527-6500
Triple Dfesser, 2 Mirrors,
full size bed, high boy, 2
night stands, light hon-
ey color. Very clean.
Exc. cond. $355.
(352) 628-2839
TWIN BED, used
Craftmatlc, w/vibrator,
good cond, $375.
RECLINER, La-Z-Boy LIFT
chair, exc. cond, $400
dk. brown. 352-637-5685
Twin Beds, dresser,
nightstand, like new,
$395; Dining Rm. Table,
4 upholstered chairs on
rollers, It. oak color,
$295; (352) 564-4214
Twin Red Car Bed
w/dresser & shelf
$200. (352) 527-9800
Two sets of Twin Beds
& frames, excel, cond.
$125.ea.
(352) 527-9248
UNUSUAL LIGHT OAK
Dining room table, 2
leaves, 4 chairs and
server, $800 set.
(352) 344-8126
USED QUEEN SOFT SIDE
WATERBED, good cond,
$50.
(352) 527-8760
Wood Desk, tabletop
style, $35; Computer
desk, $35.
(352) 746-6806




CRAFTSMAN 14HP
LAWN TRACTOR,
$500
(352) 726-1872
CRAFTSMAN ROTOTILLER
5HP, 18", transmission &
new tires, exc, cond.
$235 (352) 726-5372
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
GARDEN TRACTOR
"White" 18HP, 42" cut,
12" R/wheels, no start,
needs carb. work, $185
JOHN DEERE Lawn
tilt/traller, like new, $75
(fiberglass)
(352) 341-0791
Gas Blower/Vacuum,
$25.
String Trimmer
$25.
(352) 489-1644
Lawn Mower, 2 yr old,
Club Cadet, 6.5 hp Ka-
wasaki engine, 6 spd
rear wheel drive,
mulch or bag, $250
(352) 382-2934
(352) 634-1642
LIKE NEW EXMARK 13HP
Kaw. 36" walk behind
ECS controls. new
bagger, never Installed,
$2,200 (352) 860-1416
RIDER LAWNMOWER
Runs, drives & cuts
$200 (352) 628-2769
Weedeater Rider
17.5HP, 42" CUT
Excellent condition
$375 or best offer.
(352) 637-1870 or
.. '-5:',.-.' 1'--'5i0


6' RED MAPLE TREE
$20; 5' Magnolia Tree,
$20; In Pots,
Or both for $30,
(352) 795-6693




CASABLANCA
WEDDING GOWN
Strapless, lace/tolle sz 4,
Veil, gloves, shawl Inc.


CLAJillID9


-T i



-- -, ,


:P


General merchni3nd e ,lem-; ,nr.iy teo sn,. pe acl 3 ads per household per year. private part only
All asd are prepaid and nonrelundable


R E 563-5966 or 726-1441


* BURN BARRELS *
$8 Each
860-2545
2 Propane Tanks &
Regulator from RV, $25;
Harley Davidson Pocket
Watch w/eagle display
stand, never used,
$125, firm (352) 563-1073
or cell (352) 586-8196
4 NEW GOODYEAR
Wrangler HT Tires
245/75/16R
Must purchase all
$450/obo
(352) 613-6132
42 ROOFING PANS
121/2' long by 12", $450.
Kenmore drop-in stove,
excellent condition,
$50. (352) 637-0592

2005

SPECIALS
6 lines 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$5.50
$151-$400......$10.50
$401-$800.......$15.50
$801-$1,500....$20.50
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

357/9mm ammo
reloading equipment
w/ table plus extras,
$195 OBO,
(352) 795-7764
5TH WHEEL HITCH
15,000 capacity.
Complete. $125.00
Call 352-527-2969
500FT (6' high)
CHAIN LINK FENCE all
accessories, $1,000 obo
(352) 422-7685
CARPET
100's of Rolls left from
carpet Inst. Many
colors 352-341-2146
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile
Wood (352) 341-0909
Shop At Home
CARPETING 4 Lg. Rms.
w/ pad, It. beige
berber, very gd. cond.
remodeling. $300. all
Beverly Hills,
352-746-3069
Casino Slot Machine
excel. cond., takes
quarter, accepts
$1. -$100. great enter-
tainment $1,500. obo
(352) 489-6098
DECORATIVE RUG black
with gold, 11 FTx7'8", like
new cond. Pd. $530 Sell
for firm price of $225
(352) 746-9955
Filing Cabinet,
4 drawer, $25.
Antique, Fire Screen,
Mahogany, $75
Antique Dresser, $50.
Parrot Cage, Large, $50.
T.V, RCA, 27", $50.
DVD Player, $30.
Recliner, Burgundy, $25,
(352) 423-0975
Freezer, 5 cu. ft.,
good shape
$50.
(352) 795-0004
GENERATOR
5,000 WATT, only used
twice, $495,
(352) 382-2440
GENERATOR
Port, B&S Elite Series,
1000 starting watts.
New cond, used once
$425. Call
352-621-4642.
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER If DONE!
Moving.Cleanouls. &
Handyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
GRACE LIVINGSTON
HILL BOOKS
Total of 74, All 74 books
for $74, all books must
be purchased together
(352) 726-9003
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000 -
LATE 1920'S TIGER OAK
CHINA HUTCH, exc.
cond., $400 obo LRG.
GAS FIRED POTTER'S
KILN with extras, $250
-... (352) 344-0480


MANAGING LAMP
$40;
(352) 465-1262
Lawn Mower, Snapper
mulching bag
attach. 5.5hp, $60.
Dog Cage, Med,
36x24x24, $15.0BO.
(352) 228-9449
Leather Executive chair
on castors, $75, like
new. (352) 563-1073 or
cell (352) 586-8196
LIKE NEW 3-pc. section-
al sofa, florida colors,
including chair & 2
lamps, $300 obo JVC
speakers, $100 obo
(352) 287-1139 cell
MIRRORED CLOCK,
30"H, 28"W, new, $75.
Harley Davidson
women's half helmet,
studded, new, size
extra small, cost $170,
sell $125. (352) 628-1092
or 212-8294
MOBILE HOME AXLES &
WHEELS, $100; Matching
Coffee table, end
table & bookcase, all
wood, mahogany,
$250, (352) 563-1073/
Cell (352) 586-8196
Mulcher/Mower
Craftsman, $100,
Commercial Smoker
Grill, $225.
(352) 628-3868
NEW MOBILE HOME
STEPS, 5 steps
w/platform, Asking $250
(352) 344-1096
Old Wood Swing Leg
Kitchen table, mahog-
any, $50; Sony
Camcorder, approx. 6
hrs. use, $175.
(352) 563-1073
or cell (352) 586-8196
PIANO, $500
Butler server, $50
(352) 344-8537
Potter's Kick Wheel
Motorized w/bat mold.
$300. Skutt Kiln, Int. dim.
172x1 8, w/limit timer &
blink ring, $300.
(352) 795-1567
Propane Tank,
large, over 3/4 full.
Furnace for Mobile
Home Coleman
Both for $350 OB0.
(352) 344-8795
Single twin bed
w/ mattress & box
spring.$250
Ride on Lawn Mower,
Craftsman, 30" cut, 2 yrs
old, $575.
(352) 527-3167
SOD, ALL TYPES
Installed and delivery
available.352-302-3363
SOUTHWESTERN Home
decor Items, from pic-
tures, to knick-knacks to
misc. All in nice shape.
$500 takes all or will sell
sep. (352) 746-7753
TV, Sharp 27" $100;
Swivel Rocker Recliner,
mauve, $35;
(352) 563-1073
or cell (352) 586-8196
Two Winston Lounge
Chairs, Pressure washer,
beige chair & ottoman
new, small excer, bike.
(352) 382-0001
UTILITY SINK
Almost new, $25.
(352) 564-0646
or (352) 422-1874
Verticle Blinds,
Custom tapestry, 139" w
x 94.5"H, Pastel Floral
pattern & color, like
new, $150.
(352) 746-0183
Washer & Dryer,
$150
Lawn Roller,
$75.
(352) 628-3868
WEDDING DRESS
Beautiful wedding
gown, sz. 8 Imported
, from Italy cost $3,000
Sell $150, 352-527-3054




CONVECTION OVEN
exc. cond. Imperial
model No DFE 103 12
rack, on legs w/casters,
8 amp 70,000 BTU, gas
convection $1,100
Ask for David
(352) 341-5400




PRIDE- JET 7
Power chair, list $5700,
sell for $2500. NEVER
USED. (352) 564-2721
Remote Control
Lift Chair
used 3 months, neutral
color, $900. obo
(352) 382-3551




GRAND PIANO
New keytops Installed,
bench Inci, needs
refinishing, $1000.00
352-563-1173
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music.
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
Organ
Yamaha, exc. shape,
$350.
(352)563-1719
ROLAND E-38 Intelligent
Keyboard, Digital
display, recorder, 64.
music styles, 223 tones;
8 drum sets; w/ base,
bench & music 2 full
range speakers. Hardly
used $700. orlg. $1,200
(352) 527-0138


PRO-FORM dual motion
cross trainer, treadmill
w/arms, $200 obo.
Foozball/ air hockey
table, $50 obo.
(352) 628-2448


-4

Complete Set of Wom-
en's Golf Clubs
Including shoes, balls,
tee's, etc.. super buy at
$150.
(352) 628-9660
GOLF CART
E-Z GO 1992
Good condition
$1200
(352) 465-5613
MURRAY 26" American
classic cruiser series.
Basket, mirror & light,
rear carrier, kick stand,
exc. cond. $150 firm
(352) 344-5174

POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
leather pockets,
Life Time Warranty,
$1,295
(352) 597-3140

RUGER 357
Magnum Blackhawk.
Stainless steel. Like new.
$450, (352) 382-5677
(352) 228-7363
SHOTGUN, Mossberg 12
gauge pump short
barrel with pistol grip.
Like new cond. $250.
(352) 795-9365
VINTAGE VALLEY
BUMPER POOL TABLE
with balls and 8 pool
cues. $400/obo
(352) 628-7934




16FT CAR HAULER
with ramps,
$900 obo
(352) 302-0441
BUY, SELL, TRADE, PARTS
REPAIR, CUSTOM BUILD
www.ezpulltrallers.com
Hwy 44 & 486
NEW TRAILERS SALE
Lawn/Equipment
Car Haulers/Enclosed
Dunnellon
489-5341 or 427-1206
UTILITY TRAILER
4X6' NEW
$400/OBO
(352)621-4854




MEMBERSHIP
Rainbow Rivers Club
available for transfer
fees. (386)424-5699





NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
AKC BOXER PUPPIES
Health Certificate
$500. each
(352) 344-3581
CANARIES FOR SALE, ..
singing males,
2 females & cages
(352) 341-1334
DOBERMAN PUPPIES
Black & rust. Champion
bloodlines, Warlock/
Kimbertal Due 7/7.
Father Search &
Rescue. Call for details
Unda, (352) 527-7784
FAWN PUG
Male, 2+ yrs. Shots
current. Friendly.
$150 to good home
(352)563-0801


Metal Roofing

Direct from
Manufacturer


Tri-County


Metals, LLC

(Located Behind the Dollar
General Trenton, Florida)

Many colors in stock -

All Accessories

Cut to Length
Delivery Available

State of Florida
Approved

for fast quotes call:

(352) 463-8400 or

(800) 823-9298
www.tricountymetals.com


Free to good home.
Akita, 1 1/2 yr. old, male,
neutered, need fenced
yard. (352) 344-9768,
212-6679
GOLDEN RETRIEVER,
male, 2 yrs old.
Very playful. To good
home, $150 obo
(352) 341-3033
Great Pyrenees Puppy,
8 mo., neutered, good
w/ children, guard dog
$200. Umbrella
Cockatoo, female w/
cage $750. obo Citron
Cockatoo, female,
talks, unique, w/cage
$1000/obo352-465-0845
HAND-FED
COCKATIELS
Don't bite and super
affectionate, Variety of
colors 45.00-60.00
(352) 465-8193
Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $15
Cat Spaved $25
Dog Neutered &
Spaved start at $30
(352) 563-2370
Red Nose Pitt Bull
11 mo w/ papers, very
good w/ children $300.
(352) 302-2199
Sugar Glider, 6 nros.
old, male, large cage &
stand $250. after 10am
(352) 527-8279
TWO IGUANAS
In large cage & lights,
trees misc. $200
MALE CHINCHILLA
w/cage & misc. $210,
(352) 341-1267




FOR RENT, STALLS
with pasture. Across
from State Forest.
(352) 628-0164

J----

6 MONTH OLD SILVER
BILLY GOAT, NICE
$45. Also 2' Savannah
Monitor w/large cage
& accessories, $95 obo
(352) 628-7907
Alpacas Males
2 gelded, 1 breeding.
Allt for 1900
352-628-0156




Boat Motor,
1993, 8hp, Mariner, long
shaft, 28", low hrs,
perfect for sail boat,
runs great, clean, $450.
(352) 628-5070
Manual Jet Ski Lift
Harness type
$300.
(352) 564-0856
(352) 628-3090
MERCURY
2002 200EFI
Longshaft,
$6995
(352) 586-9347
STRATUS DRIVE-ON
BOAT TRAILER, 20'.
$300
(352) 423-3088




SEADOO
1996XP, completely
rebuilt, new gas tanR,
trailer, $2000.
(352)563-1217
Windsurfer
12ft. Mistral
$50.
(352) 527-3529




$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & Trailers!
No FeesI352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$












CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-ii


0000
THREE RIVERS
MARINE




We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES!!
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U. S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-5510

1985 MARATHON
24' Cruiser-Deep "V'





New Merc 5.7/250hp
Inboard w/ approx.
50/hrs.(60 gal. fuel tank)
forward & after cabins
w/ fold out bunk at the
helm. Will sleep 6. All
new seating. JRC
closed array RADAR (16
mile range) Lowrance
"LMS-160' map
plot/GPS-JRC model
200 VHF marine radio
Fullyloaded enclosed
camper/weather pkg.
AM-FM, CD, Sound Sys.
w/ 2002 Performance
alum. trailer Survey
Avail. $17,000.
Larry.(352) 341-4606


SPECIAL
New 17' Sport ProLine
90HPYamaha
$5,29500
1976 S.Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448



BASS TRACKER
1987, 16', 45hp Merc.,
runs great, new parts
w/ extras, $2750 OBO.
(352) 382-1273
BASS TRACKER
2000,18' 185, on 2001
trailer, 50hp Merc.,
20/hrs use, take over
payments 352 621-9774
CANOE OLD TOWN
Discovery 17, $500
2.5 HP Evinrude Motor,
and mount, $200
(352) 746-4429
CAROLINA SKIFF
2000
With 25HP Honda,
bowmount trolling mo-
tor, eagle depthfinder,
pro style seats, and gal-
vanized trailer, like new.
ready to fish, $4,000
352-302-1003
CAROLINA SKIFF
2000, 17' extra wide, w/
2002 65hp Jet Drive
engine, t top, trailer,
$8,000.(352) 621-3764
CHASSAHOWITZKA
"Cricket Boat' L 24', B 9',
flat tunnel boat, 85HP
2002 Suzuki & 15HP
Yamaha, $8500 obo.
(352) 382-1735










CRISCRAFT
1960, 55,; Constellation,
3 state room, twin 871
Detroit, radar & GPS,
Great live aboard or
cruiser, $89,900 OBO
Will trade for land.
Possible Financing.
(352) 344-4288
(352) 302-7234
DYNASTY
20', CC, new trailer.
Very nice boat needs
motor work. $4600/obo
(352) 795-2078
FourWinns
1984, Remodeled, boat
& trailer, exc .cond,
1998, Yamaha 115hp,
marine radio, fish finder,
$3,800. (352) 423-0975
GRADY WHITE
Exployer 240, Twin John-
sons, Engine bracket/
dive platform, trailer
w/brakes. (352)628-5568
HARRIS PONTOON
1992, exc. cond.
60HP Johnson
Outboard motor
(352) 564-2387


CONSTRUCTION
SALE
Here We Grow AgainI

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS
17' to 23'


15'-24'

POLARKRAFT
JONS
12'-20'

POLAR OFFSHORE
21'-23'
CLEAN PRE-OWNED
BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days

MECHANIC'S
SPECIAL
23' Weekender, 200HP
w/tandem trailer. Extra
engine, $800.
(352) 423-3088


MALIBU
14ff. V Hull 25H elect.
start, low hrs. great
boat $2,000.
(352) 860-2408
MONARK
2004, 17'8', CC, 50HP
Merc., SS prop, galv.
trir., many extras, all
2004 or newer Test rides
avail, asking $7,300
(352) 344-4614
PONTOON 1998
22', full camper canvas,
50HP Mariner 4 stroke,
180hrs. on boat & mtr,
$13,500. (352) 795-4865
PONTOON
1993 Fiesta, 18', new
canvas, has motor, no
trailer asking $2800,
(352) 628-9741
PONTOON
20' Palm Beach, 55
Suzuki OB, galv. tndm,
trir. Always covered.
Freshwater use, exc.
cond. $5495.
(352) 564-9665
RINKEN 28'
Walk around cuddy,
'95, GPS, rods, reels,
VHS, compass, FF, fresh
Yamaha eng. w/trir.
Needs some repair,
$3,500. 795-2300, Stacy
SEA DART
19', Bow rider, 120hp
Johnson, trailer, new
tires, fish finder, $2,000.
(352) 795-3133
TIED CRAFT
16', Bassboat,
Fiberglass, 35hp Merc,
trailer & all accessories.
Exc. Cond.
(352) 563-1719
VIKING
'80, 22f,. Tr-lhull Deck
Boat, Engine & outdrive
.redone last year.
$3,500., 352-220-8158
WANTED TO BUY
or repair Pontoon boat
needing repair.
(352) 637-3983
WANTED: PONTOON
BOAT TRAILER
8'x20' (to 24')
(352) 634-2249



-g
2 FIXER RV,S
1994 Scotty 29' ram
cummings delsel AT.
roof dmg. $6,995 OBO.
1986 Newmar 27' Ford
7.5L AT. $3,250 OBO
both drivable need
work. Lecanto,
260-377-9662 cell
CHAMP
1975 RV, runs good,
$800 (352) 212-5351
FLEETWOOD
1988, 33FT, w/attch
porch 10Of x 30 under
roof shed, Must sell
$7,500 (352) 344-4016
FUN FINDER
'05 18 Ft. Used one time,
also '04 Chevy Ext. P/U
Both for only $35,500 will
separate(352) 527-3935
HOLIDAY
1992, 32', Rambler, 33K,
self cant, Q. bed, A/C,
3 way Fridge, 1 owner,
$15,000(352) 726-8126
PATRIOT
made by Beaver. 1993
37'. Only 50,000 miles.
Cummings diesel, new
Michelin tires, too many
extras to list. Exc. cond,
Kept under cover.
(352) 795-4314
WANTED CLASS B
RV Trade nice 2000
Cadillac SeVille SLS or
Cash (352) 628-7969




AVION
'94,5th Wheel, excel.
cond: 17ft. llv. area
slide, queen bedrm.
many extras. must sell
$16,500. (352) 527-4697
COACHMEN
30', Slide out, new AC,
exc cond, $8,000
(352) 464-0725
(352) 341-0280
COLEMAN
'98, Pop Up, sleep six,
AC, refrig. stove,
$2,300.
(352) 341-09345
COLEMAN POP-UP
'92, canopy, 2 stoves,
New AC/heat. Shower.
Micro, king, quee, twin
bed. Extras $2600/obo.
352-400-1110
JAYCO
Lowboy pop-up camp-
er, 10', opens up. King
bed one end & queen
in other. Awning,
screen rm attached.
New AC. Many extras.
$3000. (352) 628-1988
MALLARD 20'
1975 Self-cont. Clean.
$1400 352-344-9198
PROWLER
'84, 28', rear twin, 2 dr,
AC, non-smoker. New
wtr htr. HI toilet $4,500.
(352)726-4196/400-4571
SUNLITE 1988
Slide In pop up camper
Fully equipped, $2500/
abo. (352) 447-3842/
(352) 978-0658
SUNRAY
'90, 17ft., 2 axle, new
tires, brakes, AC, water
pump & heater, sleeps
5, $3,850. 352-489-6260
YELLOWSTONE
89, 23', self cont. A/C,
extra clean, $4,500.
(352) 527-9133




BLACK TOPPER
for small truck,
good cond., $100.
(352) 726-2722
After 5pmr
FLATBED 8' long,
6'7' wide, $200.
Front & rear bumper
6'X8" wide, rear bumper
has lights & H/D trailer
hitch, $125. Will fit 1/2
ton or 3/4 ton pickup.
(352) 563-2941
LARGE TOPPER


LG Blue High Rise Top-
per for Ext Bed Truck. EX
COND Fib-Glass. Ught, 2
Handle locks, Tinted
and bar. Retail $1500
Sell $600/OBO. Call
(352) 344-4122
MACCO COMMERCIAL
air compressor, $500
ENGINE HOIST
$150
(352) 302-0441
MINI TRUCK SHELL
Almost new, fits bed
size 75r/2X60, white.
$600/obo
(352) 621-4854
PARTS
4 truck tires B.F. Good-
rich, all terrain radial
T.A. L.T.265/70 17" 6000
miles. New $ 825.00
sell $425.00 cash.
352-344-1591


Truck Engine, 1992,
7.3 Intl., eng. diesel,
w/od trans., $1,600.
352-563-6361 or
352-212-3178
VENT TAILGATE, no rust
louvered, fits F-250, 350
Ford, '97-'04. 1 wk. old.
$150. (352) 726-0282













ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR CONSIGN
98% Sales Success
No Fee to Seller
90944W and US19-
airport. 212-3041
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars, ATV's, 628-2084
VEHICLES WANTED,
Dead or Alive.
Call Smlity's Auto


V, Loaded, Clean............$3,995
'95 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER SUV
V'6, Sunroof, Loaded..........$4,995
'98 CADDY.SEDANDEVILLE
V-8, Leather, Loaded...........$7,995
'97 LINCOLN TOWNCAR EXEC.
Ivory Pead, Leather, Nice....$7,995
MANY MORE IN STOCK ALL







Auto

Truck

*RV

Sales &
Service
Get Financed!!

CALL JIM



dA-







WEFINANCE.YOU
100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CARS
FROM-1350-DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
1675 US 19- HOMOSASSA


BUICK
1996 Century. Fully
equipped. 18.240 MILES
$6000. Call from 9 to 5
(352) 489-2104
CADILLAC
1996 Sedah DeVille.
Pearl white w/maroon
top. All leather. Exc.
cond. $6000. 527-8682
Cadillac
'93, Fleetwood, Brough-
am, blue, rear wheel,
RWD, 80k ml., $6,295.
(352) 382-0635
or 302-6774
CAMARO
1987, runs great, cold
AC. T-tops. $2000 obo..
(352) 400-2364
CAMARO
1988, Flowmasters. Runs
good. $800 or best offer
(352) 726-4623
CARS. TRUCKS. SUVS
CREDIT REBUILDERS
$500-$1000 DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19Airport
564-1212 or 212-3041
CHEVROLET
2000, Corvette, slIver,
31K, exc. cond, ext.
warr avail., $28,800.
(352) 382-4331
CROWN VICTORIA
LX, 2004, like new, 20K
ml. Exc. cond. Factory
warr. $16,000 firm.
(352) 341-1421
Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
It off your taxes then
trading It In.
Donate it to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
DODGE
'91 Diplomat, Ice cold
air, no dents, every-
thing works, $750
(352) 563-5986



AFORFABLEW
100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CARS
IFROM-350-DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT


FORD
1996 Crown Vic.
103,000 ml. Very good
condition, $2800.
(352) 795-6056
FORD
Lady's '89 Tempo
4dr, 79K, Super clean,
AC, PWR, Real prizel
$3600. (352) 628-5790
FORD MUSTANG
2000, black/tan Interior,
88K ml. 6 cyl, all power,
looks clean, runs good,
$6500. 352-212-6090




100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CARS
RIOM-*350-DOWNI
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
16 -US19-HOM SASSA
*" *y 4 4 1


FORD TAURUS
2002, exc. cond. $8500
Days 628-5885,
Evenings 628-1933
GEO
TRACKER
$1500 or best offer.
(352) 527-3975
HONDA
1989 Accord LXI, new
rims & tires, black, runs.
$1500. (352) 601-3035
KIA
'01 Rlo, 52K, CD player,
tinted windows, new
tires, good cond. $4,000
obo 352 344-3046
KIA
'01, Rio, 4DR, PT, AC,
new tires. 39,500ml.,
excel cond. $4,650 obo
352-527-1812, 302-9498
LINCOLN
'96, Signature Towncar,
Jack Nicklaus, wht. w/
burgundy cloth top,
22-25 mll per gal. 113k
ml. excel cond. $5,000.
obo (352) 628-3363
MAZDA
1990 MX-6, 114K ml.,
runs great, needs minor
work, $1,500 Call after
4pm (352) 726-4177
MAZDA
2002, Mlata, 11,800k ml.,
sliver ext., 5 spd., pris-
tine $15,500.
(352) 628-4497
MERCURY
'00, Grand Marquis, GS,
white, 40,900 ml,,
very clean $8,500.
352-212-7533
MERCURY
1987 Grand Marquis LS
wagon, 8 pass., full
power, good shape,
cold A/C $1,995 abo
(352) 746-0973
MERCURY
1994, Marquis LS, 85K,
AC/ stereo, Spoked
hubs, leather Int. new
brakes, $4,000 B0.
352 464-1032
MERCURY
1998, Grand Marquis
GS, V8, 76K, fair cond,
dependable transpor-
tation, NADA, $8450.
Quick sale for $5,500.
(352) 382-5323
MERCURY
'89 Cougar, 3.81 need
head gaskets, $400.
'91 Pontiac Grand Am,
2.5L needs oil pump,
$400. (352) 476-1835
MERCURY
'98, Sable, auto trans.,
cruise contrail, ice cold
air, good tires, high ml.
runs good. $2,500.
(352) 220-4927
NISSAN
1994 Sehtra, 5 spd. cold
A/C, clean, Reliable.
$2,700 abo
(352) 795-6299
OLDSMOBILE
1996 Delta 88 LSS
Garage kept., second
owner, always well
malntain,$3,000.'
(352) 527-3519
OLDSMOBILE
'93, Cutlass, 36k org. mi.,
Must Seel
Asking $2,599.
(352) 795-7994
OLDSMOBILE
'99 Alero, 2 dr, V-6,
auto, sunroof, runs &
looks great, $3000.
(352) 746-1739
PONTIAC
'93, Grand Am, 2 DR,
PW, cold AC, 16 tires &
wheels, new, 129k ml.
$1,600. 352-697-0889
SAAB
'97, 95k, Immaculate,
electric sunroof, 5sp.,
$4,500 abo
(352) 628-9559
TOYOTA CELICA
2002
80,000, Air Cond.,
Sliding Sun Roof, Single
Compact Disc, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Cruise Control,
$9500 1B0 Call any-
time 352-476-3260 or
352-302-0816




CHEVROLET
Convertible, '65,
Impala, excel, body,
looks & runs great
$15,500. (352) 382-5641
CORVETTE
1975 Stingray, excellent
body & paint. all new
suspension front & back
98% restored, turn key
$9,000 firm
(352) 220-6047
FORD
1954 2-dr, good eng. &
trans. No body rust.
Restorable, $3500. After
4pm call (352) 212-4839
MERCURY
'70, Cougar, good look-
ing, fast, dependable,
too many new parts to
list. $3,700. 352-860-2556
MUSTANG COUPE
1965, 6cyl., lots of new
parts, good cond.
need some work.
$4,800. (352) 628-2126
VW SUPER BEETLE
1973. Lt. Blue, 96,814 ml.
Runs good, many after
market perf. parts. All
stock parts incl. $3,200/
aba, 443-655-7209 or


CHEVEROLET
1984, S10 Sport Model,
new engine w/ 9000ml
$2,500 OBO.
(352) 795-9490
CHEVROLET
'02, Silverado 2500,
auto, towing package
60k ml. $13,500.
(352) 613-7277
CHEVROLET
1988 V-6, auto, air, top-
per, driven dally, $1500
(352) 279-1660
CHEVROLET
1993 S-10, $1,100
(352) 344-8584
CHEVROLET
2004, Silverado Ext.
cab, 1500ml, loaded,
Must See.
(352) 634-5665
CHEVROLET
'85, Pickup, full size, one
owner, orig '85 title,
excel cond. $3,500.
(352) 527-8499
CHEVY
1981 P30 Step Van
(UPS style) Alum body,
completely rebuilt,
Everything new. Drive
anywhere. Make offer,
352-527-3756


CHEVY
1972 Stepslde. 350, 4
spd, 8" lift. Good shape.
$4000 obo. or trade
boat? (352) 613-3579
DODGE
1987 Dakota Pickup.
Runs good, new tires,
$1500 or best
offer. (352) 464-2055
DODGE
1989 Sport Pickup
convertible $3,000
(352) 637-0057
DODGE
2004, SLT, 1500, custom
rimms, 20" Tires,
blue/sliver, 5CD, 13K,
$16,500. (352) 628-7888
(352) 382-7888
DODGE DUALLIE
DIESEL, 1997
High mileage, well
maint. $7500/pbo
(352) 212-0699
FORD
2001 F150 XLT. Super
cab. 5.3 liter V-8,factory
tow pkg. rated 8,400
Ibs. 5th wheel hitch
rated 15,000 lbs. 5 disc
CD player. Alum tool-
box, 46,000 ml. $14,000.
(352) 382-7316
FORD
2001, Lightning, bick,
show rm cond, only
8300ml, garaged,
$27,000, 352-560-6186
FORD
2003, F350, Dually
$27,000.
YAMAHA 250.
& 2003 Raptor
CALL (352) 563-0869
FORD RANGER
2001 XLT, 4 door, auto,
loaded, 98K ml. exc.
cond. $7,200/obo
352-422-7910/795-9090
FUN FINDER
'05 18 Ft. Used one time,
also '04 Chevy Ext. P/U
Both for only $35,500 will
separate(352) 527-3935
GMC
1961 PICKUP 327 eng.
auto., 139k actual miles.
gray primer, great deal
$3,300obo 341-0787
GMC
1991 pickup. New
motor, roof rack & tool-
box Included. $1500
obo. (352) 489-1759
NISSAN
1995, 130K ml., runs
good, $2,500 obo
(352) 341-5650
NISSAN
1999, Frontier, like new,
matching topper, 46K,
$7,500 OBO.
(352) 795-8755
TOYOTA
02,Tacoma Pre Runner,
extra cab, trd pack-
age, pwr window/locks,
70K, great cond, great
gas milage $13,900.
(352) 302-8981
WANTED TO BUY
24-26 Ft Box Truck
(352) 726-7982






















CHEVY SUBURBAN
1981 Air Condition,
Power Steering, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Tilt Wheel,
AM/FM Stereo, Single
Compact Disc, Rear
Wheel Drive, $800.00,
fair condition, 454c.i.
engine, Call Crickett at
352-382-1439.
FORD EXPLORER
S1996, 4X4, 4dr, rebuilt
engine, runs like newly
$3500.
(352)563-2130
JEEP WRANGLER X
2004, low ml., loaded,
mint cond. New
$23,900. sell for, $17,900.
352-228-7772
MITSUBISHI
2002 Montero XLS ,4wd,
6 cyl.All pwr. Sunroof. 7

SUBURBAN LT
2000 Pewter w/ grey
leather. Runs & looks
great. 90k ml$16,500
422-1316 or 726-1326
- UPWRNLE


1981 P30 Step Van


anywhere, Make offer.
352-527-3756
DODGE
1991 Caravan. Body
good, no rust. Runs
great. Cold air. New
trans, battery, starter,
shocks, belts & hoses &
radiator. Asking $1600.
(352) 726-2330


CHEVY ASTRO
1995 Capt chairs, Ice
cold AC & very clean.
148k miles $2,900,
(352) 476-7229.
DODGE
2000 hi-top conversion
van.19,000K ml. Loaded
w/luxuries. $12,500 NEG.
(352) 746-5044
DODGE
2000, Ram Wagon,2500
8 passenger, 5.2, V8,
loaded, 8,500k ml.,
$7,200 obo
(352) 628-0825
HONDA
2001 Odyssey, 51,000 ml
5 door, CD player,
Michelins, exc. cond.
$14,900. (352) 795-9004
LEISURE VAN
Beautiful cond,
Hurricane escape,
$6,900.
(352) 527-9245
MERCURY
1994, Villager, very
good cond., $3,000.
352-302-6082
OLDSMOBILE
2002, Silhouette,
4 captain chairs, auto
drivers seat, silver
$12, 599. (352) 746-6599
PONTIAC
'95, Transport, mechan-
Ic special, good eng.
high ml,, needs sensors,
minor work. $1,200. obo
(352) 489-6098




ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
For Sale
Go Karts.
(352) 628-6269
HONDA RECON
250, 2002, $2300/obo
(352) 302-5948
POCKET BIKE
'04, blue, bought on a
whim, rode twice,
$350 obo. after 10am
(352) 527-8279
POLARIS
2001 Trailblazer 250 cc.
new transm. lots of
Performance parts,
$2,000 352-572-2903
YAMAHA
2001, Raptor 4 wheeler
660, w/ many extras
$4,000.OBO.
(352) 344-0304


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956
-BUELL XB9S
2003, Ughtning, 2500ml,
warr. till Aug., Corbln
Seat, Extras, Adult
owned flawless $5,500
(352) 746-1366
(352) 634-4685
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Deuces 340 ml., fuel
Inj., orig. owner, silver,
health forces sale.
$17,250. (352) 621-0143
HONDA
'87, Motor Scooter
$650.
352-212-9978
HONDA GOLDWING
1986 Aspincade, runs
great, 42K ml. $3300/
obo. (352) 637-5052
leave message.
HONDA OF
CRYSTAL RIVER
ATV's
05.65004x4
$6999.00
05. 4x2

$2500.00
01. 300 Ex 4x2
$2500
00 20KAW 4X2
$2000
(352) 795-4832
KAWASAKI
1993 KLX 650, Street/
Trail, exc. cond, low
miles, $2,500 abo
(352) 860-0176
Motorcycle Carrier
5001b class 3 hitch
mounted, USED 1 TIME
$250.
(352) 382-7046
SUZUKI
'05 Boulevard, 800cc,
700 ml. fully dressed,
under warr. Uke new,
$7,350 726-6351
SUZUKI
'94 Intruder 1400, extra
chrome. Immaculate.
Saddlebags, new Pirelll
tires, 16K orig. ml.,$4,200
obo (352) 302-3712
SUZUKI
'94 Intruder 800
Excellent condition,
Must see $3,000
(352) 341-1854
VULCAN
'98, Classic, 14K,
mint cond. $3,300. obo
(352) 795-7757 L/M

YAMAHA
Scooter, 125cc, 8Korg
ml, garaged, Sr driven,
as new w/ helmets,
$1,500 (352) 563-0022




347-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Board of Directors for
the Academy of Environ-
mental Science will hold a
regular monthly meeting
at 2:30 p.m. on Wednes-
day, July 13th 2005, at the
Academy of Environmen-
tal Science, a Charter
School sponsored by the
Citrus County School Dis-
trict, located at 12695
West Fort Island Trail, Crys-
tal River, Florida. The pur-
pose of the meeting is to
discuss and act upon any
business that needs to
come before the Board
of Directors. A copy of
the Agenda Is available
for public review at the
Academy office.
If any person decides to
appeal a decision made
by the Board of Directors
with respect to any mat-


ter considered at this
meeting, that person may
need to Insure that a ver-
batim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which
record should Include tes-
timony and evidence
upon which that person's
appeal Is based.
Carl T. Hansen, Chairman
Board of Directors
Academy of Environmen-
tal Science, Inc.
Published one (1) time In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 10, 2005.


343-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehlcle(s)
will be sold at public auc-
tion, free of all prior liens,
per FL Stat. 713.78 at 9:00
AM on July 22, 2005, at
Uenor's address. No titles,
as is, cash only,
1995 CHEVROLET
IGNDU06LIST132541
Uenor: None
Interested parties, con-
tact: Greg's Car Center.
Inc., 6934 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Crystal River, FL
(352) 795-5129.
Published one (1) time In
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 10, 2005.


350-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 104-05
Roofing Services
To obtain additional Information concerning the an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Webslte at:
www.bocc.cifrus.fi.us and click on the Bid Information
option or call OnvIa/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: July 28, 2005 at 2:00
p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on July
28, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, located
at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. local time,
on the 20th day of July, 2005, at Citrus County Fire
Training Center located at 1300 S, Lecanto Hwy., Build-
ing 26, Lecanto, Florida 34461. Contact 352-527-7621
for directions.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
VIcki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 10, 2005.

345-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold an Adminis-
trative Hearing, 1:00 p.m., a Reguldr Meeting; 2:00 p.m.
and Public Hearing, 3:30 p.m. in the Board Room of the
District Services Center located at 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, on July 12, 2005.
The purpose of the Administrative Hearing Is to act
upon proposed student expulslon(s). The Regular Meet-
ing is to discuss and act upon other business that needs
to come before the Board. The purpose of the Public
Hearing is to approve the revisions to the llness-Or-Inju-
ry-In-Une-Of-Duty Leave Policy, 6.543.
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings Is made, which record should Include
the testimony and evidence upon which his appeal Is
to be based.
-s- Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 10, 2005.

346-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will hold a Public Hear-
ing In the Board Room of the District Services Center lo-
cated at 1007 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida. The
Public Hearing will be held on Tuesday, July 26, 2005, at
5:30 p.m.
The purpose of the hearing is to adopt the tentative
Budget and tentative Millage Rates.
If any person decides to appeal a decision made by
the Board, with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, he may need a record of the proceed-
ings and may need to Insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record should Include
testimony and evidence upon which his appeal Is to
be based.
-s- Sandra Himmel
Superintendent
Citrus County School Board
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 10, 2005.

337-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Audit Committee Is requesting pro-
posals for the purpose of retaining an Independent
Certified Public Accounting firm or Individual to per-
form a financial and compliance audit of the records
of Citrus County. The audit will Include the records of
the following Citrus County Constitutional Officers:
Board of County Commissioners, Clerk of Courts, Sheriff,
Property Appraiser, and Supervisor of Elections. The
proposal should be for a three year period, auditing Fis-
cal Years 2004/2005, 2005/2006, and 2006/2007. A pro-
posal packet should be requested from Sarah Koser, Fi-
nance Director at (352) 341-6449.
Proposals should be delivered to Susan Sullivan, Assis-
tant Finance Director, Citrus County Clerk of Courts,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Room 101, Inverness, Flori-
da 34450. Proposals must be received by 2:00 P.M. July
15.,2005.
Vickl Phillips, Chairwoman
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, and 10, 2005.

348-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 084-05
Airport Security Fencing and Electric Gates
The cost for the plans and specifications Is a
non-refundable fee of $40.00. To obtain additional In-
formation concerning the announcement please visit
the Citrus County Website at: www.bocc.ctrus,.fl.us
and click on the Bid Information option or call
Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at 2:00
p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
A Pre-BId meeting will be held at 9:00 a.m. local time,
on the 21st day of July, 2005, at Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 219 Lecanto,
FL 34461. Contact 352-527-5488 for directions.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
The plans and specifications carn be examined at the
following locations:
Tampa Builders Exchange
4302 Henderson Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33606
Mid State Builders Exchange, Inc.
19 NW 8th Street
Ocala, FL 34475
South Marion Underground
4125 NW 44th Avenue
Ocala. FL 34482
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
5102 W. Laurel Street, Suite 500
Tampa, FL 33607
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
320 E. South Street, Suite 100
Orlando, FL 32801
Gulf Coast ABC
2008 N. Himes Avenue
Tampa. FL 33607
Citrus County Builders Association
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461


CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips. Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 10. 2005.


SUNDAY,JULY 10, 2005 13D




344-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare
Organizations will conduct an accreditation survey of
BayCare HomeCare on September 14th-16th. The pur-
pose of the survey will be to evaluate the organiza-
tion's compliance with nationally established Joint
Commission standards. The survey results will be used
to determine whether, and the conditions under
which, accreditation should be awarded to the organi-
zation.
Joint Commission standards deal with organizational
quality, safety-of-care Issues and the ,safety of the envi-
ronment In which core is provided. Anyone believing
that he or she has pertinent and valid information
about such matters may request a public Information
Interview with the Joint Commission field representa-
tives at the time of the survey. Information presented
at the Interview will be carefully evaluated for rele-
vance to the accreditation process. Requests for a
public Information Interview must be made to writing
and should be sent to the Joint Commission no later
than five working days before the survey begins. The
request must also Indicate the nature of the Informa-
tion to be provided at the Interview. Such requests
should be addressed to:
Division of Accreditation Operations
Office of Quality Monitoring
Jolnt Commission on Accreditation of
Healthcare Organizations
One Renaissance Boulevard
Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181
Or Faxed to 630-792-5636
Or E-malled to complaln@lcaho.or
The Joint Commission's Office of Quality Monitoring will
acknowledge In writing or by telephone requests re-
ceived 10 days before the survey begins. An Account
Representative will contact the Individual requesting
the public Information Interview prior to survey, Indicat-
ing the location, date, and time of the interview and
the name of the surveyor who will conduct the Inter-
view.
This notice is posted In accordance with the Joint
Commission's requirements and may not be removed
before the survey Is completed.
Date Posted: July 10, 2005
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 10, 2005.

349-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 105-05
Construction of the Chassahowtizka Area
Water and Sewer Project
The cost for the plans and specifications Is a
non-refundable fee of $200.00. To obtain additional in-
formation concerning the announcement please visit
the Citrus County Website at: www.bocc.clfrus.fl.us
and click on the Bid Information option or call
Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 11, 2005 at 2:00
p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 11, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floo. -Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461: (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
The plans and specifications can be examined at the
following locations:
Tampa Builders Exchange
4302 Henderson Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33606
Mid State Builders Exchange, Inc.
19 NW 8th Street
Ocala, FL 34475
South Marion Underground
4125 NW 44th Avenue
Ocala, FL 34482
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
5102 W. Laurel Street, Suite 500
Tampa, FL 33607
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
320 E. South Street, Suite 100 ,
Orlando, FL 32801
Gulf Coast ABC
2008 N. Himes Avenue
Tampa, FL 33607
Citrus County Builders Association
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vickl Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 10, 2005.

336-0731 SUCRN
PUBUC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
that on Monday, August 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m., at the
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Services Office,
sealed proposals will be opened for the following:

MEDICAL DIRECTOR
Emergency Medical Services,
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Foundation,
Citrus County, Florida
"SCOPE OF WORK"
.The services provided shall be as described in the Re-
quest for Qualifications specifications and "draft" con-
tract and shall Include but not necessarily be limited to
the following:

1. The Medical Director shall be responsible to the Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical Foundation, Inc., Board
of Directors and report to the Executive Director.

2. The Medical Director shall comply with the respon-
slbilities as set forth In Florida Statutes 401, Medical Di-
rectors. These Include supervising and assuming direct
responsibility for the medical performance of pre-
hospital emergency response employees.
3. The Medical Director shall comply with the duties
and responsibilities as set forth In Florida Administrative
Code 64E-2, Emergency Medical Services, Medical Di-
rection.
4. The Medical Director shall be available 24 hours a
day for emergency consultations from system provider.
He/she shall provide for and be available by either
pager or cell phone at all times and shall provide for
an electronic email address for messaging and corre-
spondence. He/she shall respond In a timely manner
to specified pages, cell phone calls or messages and
email, In the event the Medical Director shall be una-
vailable he/she shall appoint a similarly qualified physi-
cian to cover all responsibilities.
All requests for qualifications must be received by the
office of the Executive Director, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Inverness, Florida 34453 on or egore.0:00
a.m. on Monday. August 1st. 2005.
All requests for qualifications, Including the recom-
mendation of the Executive Director and/or Executive
Committee, will be presented to the Nature Coast
Emergency Medical Foundation Board of Directors for
final awarding or otherwise.

The Board will automatically reject the RFQ of any per-
son or affiliate who appears on the convicted vendor
list prepared by the Department of General Services,
State of Florida, under Section 287.133(3)(d), F.S. (1999).


All submissions must Include two (2) signed originals
and four (4) complete copies of each request for quall-
fications In a sealed envelope marked on the outside,
"Request for Qualifications for Medical Director, EMS'.
All RFQ's must remain valid for a period of one hundred
twenty (120) days.
Specifications and/or further Information may be ob-
talned by contacting Teresa L. Gorentz. Executive Di-
rector, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake Highway, Inverness, Florida
34453, (352) 637-4121.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all re-
quest for qualifications, to waive Informalities in any or
all request for qualifications, and to re-advertlse for re-
quest for qualifications.
The Board also reserves the right to separately accept
or reject any Item or items of the request for qualifica-
tions and to award and/or negotiate a contract In the
best Interest of the Foundation.
NATURE COAST EMERGENCY MEDICAL FOUNDATION
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: -s- Teresa L. Gorentz
Executive Director
Published five (5) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 7, 10. 17, 24, and 31, 2005.










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14D SUNDAY, JuIY 10, 2005


El


E


To listen and respond to ads using your


= F-6 can 1 -866-529-4742

To respond to ads at $1.99 per min, call


1-900-226-1602 Must be 18+.


To bcom a mmbe, cal 1-866-28-521


HERE I AM
SWF, tall,slender, pretty, brown/brown,
N/S, loves classical music, art, books,
intelligent conversation, boating, cook-
ing. Seeks rugged interesting N/S,
SWM, 57-63, for companionship, pos-
sible LTR. 02223790
EASYGOING PERSONALITY
Educated, positive, level-headed,
secure SWF, 52, 5'2", blond/blue, will-
ing to talk things through, enjoys travel,
cooking. Seeking SWM, 50-58, H/W-
proportionate, with a similar outlook on
life for LTR. 0469082
ONE IN A MILLION
Attractive DBF, 43,5'2", 118lbs, mother
of 10-yr-old. Black/indian decent, in the
nursing profession.Looking for someone
who likes movies, flea markets, camp-
ing, beaches and cooking. 0595051
MY GUY WANTED
This 55-yr-old/ blonde young-at-heart,
seeks a guy of her own. Friendly, lov-
ing, and kind who is ready for a rela-
tionship. Looking for my guy, 47-57,
N/S. 0589861
HEY, TALL GUYS
Attractive, well-built, long-haired, Libra
SWF, 50, 5'9", N/S, enjoys movies,
tropical fish keeping, cats, and music.
Seeking stable, honest, caring SM, 45-
60, 6'-6'6". Life is short. Let's enjoy
some together. 'l625057
GAME-FREE LTR
SBF, 51, 5'4", enjoys cooking, church,
yard sales, flea markets. Seeking hon-
est, commitment-minded, family-ori-
ented SBM, 50-55, for LTR. No games,
serious replies only ''427683
NEW AGE
Blonde, fair, 5'3", mature, freethinker,
good with people, poetry, singer, histor-
ical novels, kind, fun to be with, N/chil-
dren. Seeks emotionally available part-
ner 60-80. l580103
WEEK WACHEE GIRL
SWF, 46, 130lbs, blonde/blue, smoker,
enjoys the outdoors, water, music, tv,.
and chatting. Seeking WM, 45-55,
smoker, with similar interests. Need a
good friend? 0684286
SRING HILL AREA
DWF, 48, N/S, N/D, attractive, 'honest,
sweet, likes laughter, horses music.
Seeks DM, 45-58, N/S, honest, humor-
ous, caring, likes kids. '533300
YOUNG & VIBRANT
Artistic SWF, 18, 5'3", 160lbs,
brown/green, smoker, N/D, enjoys
drawing and dancing. Seeking WM, 18-
23, smoker, light drinker ok, for friend-
ship. 0718404
BROWN EYED GIRL
Looking for a friend that's fun to be
with, into rock music, custom and clas-
sic cars, movies, travel, animals,
nature, and more. Call and check me
out. V916643 "
ACTIVE WOMAN SEEKS...
SWF, 39 Iook,nag ir a SWM, 39-45 to'
enjoy a gc,,:,, gia; c I wine AiRI over a
great conversation.., 0719170
GOOD FRIENDS
SWF, 26, 5', brown/brown, with 2 chil-
dren, smoker, love i.:ia.scal iaz'z, rap,
and sc.ul mrruic Seeking er.1, 19-35,
smoker, goal-oriented, fun to be with.
0570398
NEED A NEW FRIEND?
Devoted SBF, 41, God-fearing, mother of
1, interested in going to church, flea mar-
kets, strolls in the park, seeks SBCM,
37-53, w/similar interests. 0643952
MOTHER OF TWO
WF, 28, 5'1", 170lbs, would like to meet
a loving SWM, 28-36, who would like to
spend time with us. 0'628205
SO MANY BOYS. ISO THAT...
one man. WF, 26, occasional smoker,
with son, quiet at first, has sarcastic
sense of humor. Seeking frank,
straightforward WM, 33-40. 0'723332
KNIGHT AND SHINNING AMOR
I have a great personality, love to laugh
and really love water, I'm outgoing yet
a little shy. I'm very old-fashoned with a
slight twist. Treat me like a lady!!!
0f727217
MAKE MY DAY
Athletic SWF, 49, 5'6", N/S, enjoys the
music of Rod Stewart, loves Adam
Sandier movies, seeks SWM, 47-53,
N/S, who is into spending time out-
doors. 0f721122
IT MUST BE YOU
SBF, full-figured, 30, 5'5", Capricorn,
N/S, mother, seeks family oriented BM,
25-42, who knows what they want in
life. 0f696938


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* Text Send "citruS to 23578
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WHATTA YA SAY...
we go catch a flick? SBF, 31, smoker,
enjoys Las Vegas casinos. Seeking
BM, 27-45, to chill with. 0685193
LOOKING TO LOVE...
someone. Want to date with possible
long term relationship I am a sexy blonde
31, looking for Mr. right. V710152
CHRISTIAN WOMAN
WF, 27, enjoys camping, going to
movies and having fun. Looking for a
Christian man, 25-40, who likes the
same. If that's you, call me. V673671
PEOPLE PERSON
SWF, 57, 5'6", N/S, does a lot of hugging,
looking for neat, clean, honest SWM, 52-
70, for possible LTR. "0722071
HONESTY A MUST
SWF, 35, 5'4', N/S, blonde/blue, single
mom, overweight, seeks honest guy,
19-55, who loves having fun. 'F.-9"- _
WHERE ARE YOU?
Honest SWF, 21, chubby, 5'5",
brown/brown, mother, Scorpio, smok-
er, loves movies, flea markets, seeks
man, 25-45, for possible romance.
0l710346
LET'S HAVE A GOOD TIME
SWF, 59, N/S, enjoys dining out, danc-
ing, cookouts, fishing, flea markets,
seeks special SWM, 55-65, to spend
some time with. '713370
WOWI
Super fit SWF into outdoor adventures,
foreign films, cultural events, is seeking
a non-smoking, very fit, intelligent, cre-
ative SWM, 30-45, for LTR. Must love
peanut butter. l277278
NO TIME FOR FOOLISHNESS
Open SWF, 58, 5'2", average build,
N/S, really likes to go out for Italian
food, loves flea markets, animals, trav-
el, seeks SWM, 56-65, N/S, for possi-
ble LTR. 1&714884
LOYAL AND LOVING
SWF, 46, N/S, seeks good, Christian
SWM, 35-60, N/S, who enjoys animals,
likes to walk, talk, hit the beach, shop at
the mall. 0'715937
FISHING, FOOTBALL...
and camping. SWF, 46, independent,
outgoing, enjoys camping, fishing,
seeking friend and maybe more later
on, who's a gentleman, 45-55, and
enjoys going out to a movie or dinner.
W729406
SOMEONE TO LOVE FOREVER
SF, 35, likes camping out, fishing, car
races, amusement parks. Looking for SM,
35-45, with same interests. "0269410
HOW ABOUT ME?
SWF, 43, smoker, has .1 child, loves
cookouts, beaches, boating, races, hors-
fes, laughter, seeks SWM, 40-58, smoker,
6'+ who loves to hug. _664002
NEW TO AREA
.larmaican lao., 55.1. 1l.'S, urniversi, .
graduate i.:.rmner lea:rier, pn oys ,uieT
evenrings ai r,.:rre; athlete diinr-1 J, ou
rriu?-;- is, ..:..:, r.'ss.. iqg. i-e grg
S marriage- T,,rde. DM, 35-.i0j, icar goj
friendship, possible LTR. 0'f693050
EMOTIONALLY AVAILABLE'
Independent, free-spirited SWF, 59,
5'8", spontaneous, creative, N/S,
-enjoys kayaking, camping, photogra-
phy, traveling, and good conversation.
Seeking WM, 55-68, N/S, who believes
life is an exciting adventure. V708586
GREAT WOMAN LOOKING...
For great guy, I'm fun loving, enjoy din-
ner, movies and love to dance. I'm an
active person, I enjoy the simple things
in life. Seeking someone to have fun
with. 0734342
LIKES COUNTRY LIFE
WF, 39, 5'2",' 1201bs, looking for a gen-
tleman, 38-48, N/S. I enjoys working
out, going to movies, dining out, hiking',
gardening and most anything outdoors.
V564449
A REAL MAN
Attractive SBF, 48, 5'5", N/S, in the med-
ical profession, likes movies, dining,
dancing, quiet evenings at home, long
walks. Seeking honest, mature SM, 35+,
N/S, financially stable. V690857
TAKE IT EASY
SWF, 50, Aquarius, N/S, seeks sweet,
loving, HF, 35-55, N/S, for possible
romance. 0695759
JUST BE YOU
SWF, 50, sincere, honest, caring, look-
ing for the same in a good-hearted,
happy man. Why not call? '693109
ISO SINCERITY
SWF, 40, 5'6", single mother of 2 (son,
20, daughter, 11), smoker, works irh
nursing field. Seeking truthful, compat-
ible, fun WM, 30-45, for LTR, 70681370


-.,


Th frs t xtmesa e n ah on eratonisFR E! 1


WE CAN BE TOGETHER
SWF, 44, marriage-minded, smoker,
homebody, would like to share
evenings in with a special man, 40-55,
who likes to watch movies, read, cook,
go out on the town. 0587120
ISO TRUE FRIEND...
and confident lover. SWPF, 47, blonde/
blue, very successful, N/S, seeks a fun,
fulfilling, romantic relationship with
WM, 42-57, N/S. 0720901
GOOD LISTENER
SBF, 50, 5'6", 145lbs, black/brown,
Gemini, N/S, loves movies, long walks,
and occasional dining out. Seeking
BM, 45-55, into serious dating and
relationship. 0'661326
WITH LOVE
SBF, 18, 5'3", 120lbs,. N/S, loves ro-
mance movies. Seeking BM, 18-26,
5'4"+. N/S, for friendship,, p sc.sible
*r.man;:e. 0660691 '
JUST A CALL AWAY
Compassionate, kind, considerate
SWF, 51, light auburn hair, 5'2", medi-
um build, enjoys people, likes cooking,
travel, boating, fishing. Seeking similar,
loving, active, open-hearted and true
gentleman. 0232518
LADY RANCHER
Widowed female, 54, 5'7", average
build, Taurus, loves horses and most
other critters, country lifestyle, easygo-
ing but hard-working, not too hard on
the eyes, ISO SWM, 46-59, with similar
interests. 0682019
STOP LOOKING! READ.
DWF, 57, full-figured, blonde/blue, 5'3",
enjoys dancing, movies, occasional
dining out, cooking. Seeking S/DWM,
55-65, for dating, possible LTR.
V853666
THIS IS MY TIME
41-year-old single mother of 2,
blonde/green, medium build, works in
the insurance field, loves to bowl, cook,
watch movies, work in the yard. ISO
SM, 36-46, who likes kids. 0498280
KISSES AND HUGS
Seeking true love, not lust. No cow-
ards, and no games please. BCF, 50,
single mom, seeks honest, mature,
strong, hardworking male, for a
monogamous relationship and true
love. 0840803
LET'S GET TOGETHER
SWF, 62, N/S, enjoys crocheting.
Seeking WM, 60-70, N/S, who likes to
cuddle, sample local eateries, watch
movies, and take walks. 0'630231
BROWN SUGAR
SBF, 21, looking for someone, 21-30,
who is down-to-earth, fun, sweet, and
not really religious. '645309
7 IN CAT YEARS
SWCF, professional, seeking someone
SWCM, with savvy, who likes garden-.
ing, travel, friendship, dominos, board,
games, res. proograph, readr.r,
writing. paniinr, anc oiher arts and
,c .at s,; 0 m.: l r __1 , .,.
.= TELL IT LIKE- .'-
SWF, 5'7 gI ue Il -.. 1, og blonde
hair, 43, l,. is mu'r .. an Seekirg inir i.
ligent, open-minded, drama-free, sin-
cere, honest, loving SWM, 30-50, with
good sense of humor, for friendship
first. 0404773
SEEKING CHRISTIAN MALE
SBCF, 40, 6', large build, N/D, N/S,
loves kids, going to church, movies,
more. Seeking SWCM, 35-60, who
loves life, is very honest and marriage-
minded. 0596730
SEEKING PLEASANT MAN
WiWF, 60, would like to meet a WM,
55-70, N/S, social drinker, who likes
day trips, going to movies and dining
out. '594035
NEW TO THE AREA
SWF, 5'6", 1261bs, smoker, many inter-
ests, seeks SWM, 62-72, smoker, to
share the best years. 0'646004
PRETTY EASYGOING
Spontaneous, fun SWCF, 56, 5'8",
175lbs, N/S, loves cooking, fishing, the
outdoors, blue jeans or a dress.
Seeking WM, 55Z70, N/S, for friend-
ship, possible romance. 0'685070
PRETTY WOMAN
SWF, 5'4", 1151bs, seeks SWM, 50-63.
You and I are in great shape, fun,
active, attractive, sensuous, clean,
N/S, healthy, kind, genuine, trustwor-
thy, intelligent, classy, secure. Call for
further details. 0P956254
MAYBE YOU'RE MY GUY
Easygoing SWF, 57, smoker, loves the
country life, country/oldies music,
cooking, camping. ISO outgoing man,
57-62, who likes movies, dining, quiet
times and laughter, for sharing a last-
ing, loving relationship. V588873
SEEKS ONE-WOMAN MAN
SWF, young 67, 5'7", N/S, has car,
"stays out after dark very active
romantic, misses the Inings a womrrar
does for a man. Seeking WM,.66-79,
who has similar interests. 0'536212
LIKES THE SIMPLE THINGS
WF, 5'2", 1251bs, blonde/blue, would
like to find a true friend. Someone who
is cheerful, pleasant to be with, likes
long conversations, dancing, dining out
and have simple fun. 52-60. 0515437


SEE WHAT HAPPENS
Single male, 33, 2401bs, Cancer, N/S,
would like to meet a woman, 21-50,
N/S, who likes sports and trying new
things. 0651103
BABY BLUE EYES
Slim SWM, 29, 5'8", N/S, likes the con-
venience of fast food, relaxes by play-
ing sports, seeks woman, 18-45, who
wants to be treated right. 0624851
LET'S HAVE FUN
SHM, 63, dark/blue, average build,
seeks lady, 57-63, N/S, who's pleasant
to be with, enjoys life, likes going to
movies, day trips, dining out. n719784
A NEW BEGINNING
Commitment-minded DM, 47, 6',
brown/brown, 180lbs, ISO a special
lady, someone who enjoys life, the out-
doors and classic rock, for sharing hap-
piness and a lasting relationship.
0610840
LOADS OF FUN
SWM, 64, 5'11", 2001bs, enjoys '50s
and '60s music, dancing, gardening,
animals, very open-minded, seeks full-
figured lady who is fun to be with.
'690280


HEARTS AND FLOWERS
SBM, 40, 6'5", 2351bs, Leo, smoker,
enjoys simple pleasures of life, seeks
sexy, woman, 29-40, for possible
romance. 0f712805
GREAT MAN AVAILABLE
At present time, looking for a lady to
date and have some fun. I enjoy the
company of youth and smile with hap-
piness. Be great to be pen pals.
0f726368
GOOD-LOOKING GUY
WM, 39, brown/brown, in good shape,
wants to meet a WF, 30-41, to go out
and have fun with. 0716349
SEEKING SOMEONE SPECIAL
DWM, 38, professional, likes riding
Harleys and waterskiing, enjoys life
and would love to enjoy your company.
.f542587
GREAT DAD
SWM," 33, smoker, single dad, full-time
student, has weekends free to share with
special SWF, 24-36, smoker. %P717513
MAN OF YOUR DREAMS
SM, 29, wants to find the right woman
so we can start our life together. I like
playing pool, cooking, nights on the
town, cuddling, quiet moments. Your
turn! 733663
LIVE WELL, LOVE WELL
31 year-old master electrician, enjoys
salt water fishing movies on sunday,
and the local gym. Seeking active, fun,
spontaneous SF to share and explore
life with. let's talk! 0f722723
FULL OF LIFE
SM, 34,5'11", average build, likes to go
out for Italian or Spanish food, loves
travel, amusement parks, pool, seeks
single woman, 21-45, who is serious
about finding love. 0f720385
LOOKING 4 REAL FRIENDSHIP
SM, 31, looking to meet a special, hon-
est lady who's not afraid of taking
chances, has positive attitude and
loves life. I'm intelligent but not. boring,
funny and reliable. Interested?
0'739803
TALENT SEARCHING
SWM, 67, 5'11", 170lbs, N/S, enjoys
flying, Disney parks, church, square
dancing, travel; movies, Nascar, dining
out, animals. Seeking A/W/HF, 30-60,
N/S, who shares a passion for travel.
0f717150
CUDDLY BEAR
SWM, 45, 6'1", 250lbs, brown/green,
lives locally, smoker, enjoys- Nascar,
football, bowling, pool. Seeking petite
WF, 25-45, smoker. V256201
LET ME KNOW YOU'RE THERE
SWM, 19, 6', 180lbs, smoker, tan com-
plexion, looking for a female, .18-23,
who is good-looking has a nice sense
ot.numor, enjoys ile 0V690796


NEWTO GAINSVILLE AREA '
SWM, 55-weilocaied Irom Maine, N.S.
loves movies and beaches. Seeking
woman, 35,59, smoker to help me get
acquainted w in ihe area 0f662489
BUILT, HANDSOME
Successful, fun-loving SWM, 45, will
promise you the most.fun you've ever
nad in your Ifte! If you love romance,
travel, adventure, excitement, health,
fitness, and fine dining, call me!
0P740711
WAITING FOR YOU
SBM, 24, 6'1", smoker, brown eyes, 1
tattoo, seeks nice, pretty SBF, 24-24,
N/S, for possible relationship. 0P723565
A LITTLE QUALITY TIME
SBM, 34, N/S, loves movies. Seeking
fun, loving, honest, game-free BF, 33-
46, ready to have fun in life. 0f709291
HARD-WORKING MAN...
; ith loving arms, friendly, outdoorsy
man, 45, a good listener, communica-
tive, caring, open and supportive, ISO
a lady who's not afraid to be herself or
afraid of love. 07739160
SINCERE AND HONEST
SWPM, just turhed 62, 5'9', 2301bs,
N/S, starting over, new in Ocala, active,
working, travels, outdoors, barbecues,
fish, Nascar, cards, golf, trips to the
islands, home is great, one-woman
man. 0f721166
INCURABLE ROMANTIC
SWM, 55, likes long walks, holding
hands, reading, dining out, gardening.
Seeking SWF, 50-65, with similar inter-
ests, for cuddling in front of the tv. Good
times, possible LTR. Let's talk.
0P723244
BE YOURSELF
Brown-complected SBM, 30, 5'10",
N/S, seeks very spontaneous, ener-
getic outgoing, nice-looking woman,
20-42, N 5, wno knows how to make
her own decisions. 0f674730
OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
SWM, 33, 6', 175lbs, Cancer, mar-
riage-minded, smoker, mechanic, sin-
gle father of 2, seeks SWF, 32-42, for
wonderful relationship. 0I675133
LET'S GET TOGETHER
Open-minded, compassionate, affec-
tionate DWM, 35, 5'8", 160lbs, smoker,
enjoys cookouts, movies. Seeking WF,
25-45, H/W proportionate, smoker,
who wouldn't mind being swept off her
feet. 0f680448
LONESOME
SWM, 72, retired, 5'2", N/S, N/D, likes
dining out, movies. Looking for slender,
fit W/HF, under 5'3", 135lbs, 60-80, for
friendship maybe more. 0P718022
TOO MUCH FUN
SWM, 20, 5'9", 1381bs, N/S, brown/
blue, seeks single woman, 18-24, N/S,
who knows what she wants out of a
relationship. 0f560749
VERY OUTGOING
SBM, 29, 511", athletic build, Virgo,
smoker, loves to have fun. Seeking BF,
25-45, smoker, for friendship, possible
romance. 07633324
HALLELUJAH
SBM, 30, Libra, N/S, enjoys church,
movies, dining out. Seeking a God-
fearing BF, 29-38, N/S, who loves
church. 0f634527
IT'S ALL TRUE
Widowed WM, 47, 6', with 2 sons,
smoker, enjoys camping, football, and
watching car racing. Seeking WF, 35-
50, smoker, for honest LTR. 0'709372


RETIRED MILITARY
WM, 71, 6', 180lbs, brown/blue, enjoys
bowling, dancing, long walks, exploring
new eateries and new places. Searching
for a lady, 60-80, who is broad-minded
and affectionate, with similar interests.
0716376
WANTING LONG LASTING
Average type of person, good sense of
humor, quiet, creative, sensitive and
caring. Looking for the person who has
the right chemistry and that I can click
with. 0728327
LET'S GO SEE IT
Semi-retired SWM, 53, smoker, seeks
SWF, 50-59, smoker, who would like to
travel and see the world. 0716580
CHRISTIAN SINGLE SEEKS...
Christian single. SWM, 22, Sagittarius,
N/S, attends church regularly, seeks
Christian SWF, 18-30, for serious but
fun relationship. 0724750
I WANT IT ALL
Active, attractive SWM, 55, 5' 7, 175lbs,
athletic build, Cancer, N/S, seeks
woman, 25-45, N/S, for LTR. 0l677768
LET'S TALK
WIWM 70, looks younger, very energetic,
enjoys dining out, sports, the water, air
boating, flea markets. Looking to meet a
caring, fun woman who enjoys the same.
0695772
WHY NOT CALL?
DWM, 42, heavy machinery operator,
likes '70s/'80s rock, exploring life.
Seeking easygoing, energetic woman
to share outdoor adventures, boating,
4-wheeling, life, laughter and possible
LTR. 0701300
CITRUS COUNTY
DWM, 50, 6'2", brown/blue, attractive,
with 2 children, N/S, enjoys cruising,
weekend getaways, and good conver-
sation. Seeking attractive woman, 40-
55, H/W proportionate. '710072
SEEKING LTR
Attractive WM, 64, 6', dark/blue, smok-
er, likes cooking, oldies, movies, dining
out, RVs, ISO WF, 50-60, with average.
build, who likes country lifestyle and
travel. 0610257
LET'S HAVE FUNI
SWM, 63, enjoys reading, movies, din-
ners in or out, and going to the gym.
, Looking to meet a SF, 40-62, with sim-
ilar interests. 0713773
AVERAGE JOE LOOKING'
SWM, 55, looking to spend quality time
with someone who enjoys life, good
food, and good conversations. Seeking
.SF, 30-45. 1720056
PLAYFUL PISCES
SWM, smoker, love to meet special
woman, 44-60, .loves music, movies,
the beach, sunsets, quiet times,
romantic nights. Call'if you wani to be
lc.eaO Spring HilI area W679528


NO COUCH POTATOES
AoivNe,- healthy SWM young 63.-eno,1cys
ne -water, boaiing Seei'jnq ciss ,
attractive, active SWF, 50-62, N/S, for
possible relationship. 0757364

BROKEN-HEARTED
Attractive WM, 43, 5'7", 150lbs,-seeks
attractive WF, for repairs. Tools must.-
include love, 'trust, communication,
'friendship, and possible marriage, with
TLC bedside manner. Hurry! Need
meds ASAP!! '680509
SPECIAL LADY WANTED
SWM, 48, enjoys fishing, movies,
cooking, quiet times at home. Seeking
SWF, 38-52, in shape, down-to-earth,
who appreciates a good loyal man.
Friends first. 0412132
A NEW BEGINNING
SWM, 62, 1751bs, Libra, N/S, active,
seeks WF, 50-60, active and healthy,
for good times and possible LTR.
0433493
JOIN ME
Compassionate, fun-loving, light-heart-
ed SM, 64, Cancer, enjoys boating,
simple times. Would like to meet a kind,
attractive, fun female to share dinner
dates, quality talks, romance and then
who knows? 0631763
MR MELLOW
Handsome, passionate SWM, 48, ath-
letic build, from Israel, marriage-mind-
ed, N/S, heavy equipment operator,
seeks a gentle WF, 18-48, N/S, for fun
and dating. 0665111
FUN, FUN, FUN
SWM, 46, 5'10", 170lbs, retired from
the navy, N/S, fitness-minded, low-
keyed, beach bum, surfer, seeks intelli-
gent WF, 42-50. 0666383
RETIRED MILITARY
DWM, 48, 5'10", 185bs, brown/blue,
moustache, lots of fun, likes outdoors,
the beach, camping, 'fishing; more. If
you're interested, leave a message.
V670253
STARTING OVER
WiWM, 72, 5'9", 180lbs, N/S, social
drinker, very active, likes dancing, din-
ing out, travel. Looking for SWF, 65-75,
for companionship, travel, talks, fun
times. 0679020
I'LL COLOR YOUR WORLD
SWM, 57, 5'6", 160lbs, in great shape,
active, healthy, N/S, loves painting and
sailing. Seeking adventurous, sponta-
neous WF, 40-57, N/S, for LTR.
0686477
ALL CALLS RETURNED
Honest SWM, 63, 6'4", 2601bs, smoker,
loves cooking, fishing, watching
Nascar. Seeking SWF, 50-65, to spend
some time with. 0566775
SIMILAR INTERESTS?
SWM, 20, 5'9", 140lbs, brown/blue,
smoker, seeks woman, 18-24, for
movies, games, sports, and more.
0584882
HOPE IT'S YOU
Hard-working SBM, 41, 145lbs, enjoys
children, amusement parks, wood-
working, weightlifting, running, fine din-
ing and good movies. Seeking a nice,
affectionate, romantic lady to treat like
a queen. 0607942
HORSE NEEDS RIDER
SM, 54, 170lbs, 5'9", ruggedly hand-
some, horse ranch owner, Capricorn,
enjoys road trips, cook outs, riding,
dancing, socializing, country life. Seeks
adventurous, well-adjusted woman,
42-56, country and horse lover.
0435846


LOOKING OUT MY BACK DOOR
Fit SWM, 63, 5'8", average build, N/S,
N/D, big fan of Creedence Clearwater
Revival, seeks SWF, 50-70, N/S, for
possible LTR. 0646822
REALLY GREAT GUY
DWM, 56, 5'9", medium build, enjoys
the outdoors, fishing, loves flea mar-
kets, dining in/out, 50s to 60s music,
bowling, tennis, horseback riding.
Seeking SF for possible relationship.
0433284
SINGLE FATHER
WM, 42, enjoys sports, Nascar, swim-
ming, fishing, the ocean, more. Looking
for WF, 25-50, to possibly share life
with. 0658668
ROMANTIC-AT-HEART
WM, 47, looking for a woman, 35-47,
who likes fishing, boating, gardening,
country life, romance, country music,
playing pool, more. '665851
WHAT I REALLY WANT
SWPM, 49, 6', 195lbs, brown/brown,
smoker, loves traveling up and down
the east coast. Seeking a sincere,
financially stable WF, 45-53, N/S, who
is not a bar fly. 0664898
NATURE AND ME
SWM, 42, 6'1", N/S, gentleman, home-
owner, enjoys time spent in the great
outdoors, seeks attractive, honest.
SWF, 35-50, N/S, for dating, possible
LTR. "226878
HONEST DUDE
Widowed WM, 58, 510", Gemini,
smoker, nature lover, loves traveling.
Seeking WF, 48-60, for friendship, pos-
sible romance. 0638041
COULD IT BE YOU?
SWM, a youthful 79, enjoys the out-
doors, fishing, hunting, camping, boat-
ing. ISO attractive SWF, 50+, N/S, for
friendship and possible.LTR. &550451
KNOWS HOW TO TREAT A LADY
SWM, young 57, 5'7", 1751bs, N/S, very
active, honest, educated, intelligent,
financially secure, farmer/rancher,
enjoys dining out; outdoors, football,
weekend getaways. Seeking honest
SWF, 35-55, petite/slender, friendship,
companionship, possible LTR. 0261794
GERMAN/ITALIAN BLEND
SWM, 22, 5'9", 1751bs, brown/brown,
medium build, Cancer, smoker, loves
darts, billiards, movies, theme parks,
beaches, and clubs. Seeking WF, 18-
26, open-minded. "686494
LET'S GETTOGETHER
Caring, decent, physically appealing,
SBPM, 42. ISO sexy, attractive, SBF,
27-45, for possible relationship.
0480766 .
YARD DOG, SHORT HAIR
Affectionate, house broken, all paper
shots, warm feet, cold nose, doesn't
drink from porcelain or chase cars or
cats, likes to dig, seven years old.
SWM, ISO SF. "948521
- ..TELL IT LIKE IT IS
Sharp, good-looking, rugged 67 year-
old ex-marine, seeks attractive, older,
financially secure female to travel and
have fun with. If you like to have a good
time, let's talk. 0'204397
COUNTRY LIFE
.SWM, young-looking 44, 5'9", 185lbs,
very short nair. mustache, goatee,
muscular build, N/S, heavy equipment
operator, financially stable, seeks WF,
30-50,, kids? 0"245245
LOVE HORSES?
SWM, 47, N/S, works on horse farm,
enjoys the outdoors, hunting, fishing,
pickup trucks, country and rock-n-roll
music, seeks SWF, 35-50, who likes
horses, similar interests, for friendship,
possible LTR. U652549
LAID-BACK GUY
SWM, 6'1", 200lbs, in good shape,
likes flea markets, going to movies,
boating, fishing. Looking for an easygo-
ing, happy WF, 38-45, who likes the
same things. 0628452
AS THE SUN SETS
Hard-working SWM, 40, father of 1, smok-
er, likes going out to beaches, movies,
enjoys watching the sunset, seeks SWF,
34-46, for possible romance. 0Z682823
LOVE AND DEVOTION
SWM, 62, 5'8", 1551bs, healthy, dark
complexion/blue eyes seeks female 52-
62, H/W-proportionate, for the love of the
life time.Brooksville area. 0563600


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DA
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nRUS OUNTY ( ) H


FROM THE


FORD MOTOR


COMPANY


FAMILY TO


YOURS...



WELCOME.


-'a.'.


-U 1


'1.-I


Right now, Ford Motor Company, America's car company, invites you to join the family.
And pay the same low prices our employees and their families pay. Until August 1st,


you'll get our discounts on select 2005 Ford


vehicles at Gulf Coast Ford.





Offer Expires 8/1/05. _--
NoIE.


=N o t~SB ^^^ 'I B ^ "^ "^?^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


. A "...- -. . -' .
.^-^* -. ; ,
(,. .. ., ,', .


1!42005 Ford
Five Hundred


2005 Ford
Expedition


'01 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Loaded, white w/gray leather. #GST169A
1 1,995
lo


'U4 PUKD TAURUS SE
Full Power. #GPR917
$1 2.995


'U3 FUUUS WAUUN S
17,000 miles.
$1 0.995


Full Power #GPO830B
$7,995
%:'-3


'U0 UMU ENVUT SLI AUV
Loaded, only 9,000 miles.
27,995


43,000 miles, full power.
$9,995


'U4 FrunH IHbTAH h5t
Full Power, 1 owner. #GPR927
$1 7-.QQS


4~ -


'02 FORD EXPLORER XLS
$1 2,995


'02 FORD WINDSTAR LTD '05 FOCUS Zx4
Loaded, one owner Auto, A/C, 13,000 miles. #GP0863
$1 59995 *1 0,995


'99 MERCURY GR MARQUIS
Loaded, loaded.
1 01995


'03 DODGE RAM 1500
Quad cab, Hemi, one owner.
o2.QQS5


'98 FORD EXPEDITION
Eddie Bauer
$8,995


'04 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Touring Convertible, loaded, full pwr.
$16,995
SW ^ ^ S" **a .' s


'04 FORD EXPEDITION
Eddie Bauer, loaded, full power.
$29,995


'02 GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo
$1 4,995


'04 FORD E.250
12 passenger club wagon
$19,995
* W 7W I -


'02 EXPLORER SPORT
Loaded, leather interior.
$1 3,995


PONTIAC GRAND AM SE
yl., Full power, 27,000 Miles. #G4T370E
$*1 -2-QQ


10 FORD F150 XL
Only 46,000 miles.
$8,995
-, p


T '0


4x4, automatic, A/C.
$7 .Q_5


1 CROWN VICTORIA
41,000 miles, full power.
$1 0,995


'00 F-150 XLT
. Super cab, #G5T020A
$1 2.995


'04 FORD F150 LARIAT 4X4
Super Crew, one owner, loaded.
$28.995


'00 CADILLAC DEVILLE
One owner, full power.
$14.-995


49,000 Miles, hull power. #USG081
$ ,995


Loaded, Leatrer. # HRu9l .
$16..995


One owner, only 34,000 miles.
$1 49995
M1


'03 SUPER CREW 4X4
Loaded, loaded with extras.
229,995


'05 ESCAPE XLT
All wheel drive, 15,000 mi., leather, full power. GPR922
$21 995%


'02 FORD TAURUS SE
Wagon, full power, one owner.
$1 2,995


'04 F250 SUPER DUTY
Super cab, Turbo diesel.
$325 995


'04 FOUHU E-15 UAHUU VAN
V8, Auto, A/C. #GP0867


. .'Ana:Cruz;
.: years Sales


.- ick Petro
21 years'- Sales


F-rank Espiritu
22 years Sales


Jim Preston Ron Tesar Scofft
11 years Sales Mar. 27 years Sales 5 yearsni


- - - -


!1


2005 Ford F150
Super Crew


2005 Ford
Explorer


SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005 15D


C C FL CHRONICLE


.......


Pa~itrfif^ed






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tn 4Ho mosassa t in Inerness
tr" ".':"; "' "' : ? x ^, .-. . *...- ; : ..., '.$* "
.... 1 ;k.,JT.. -.& .'..._ (. -. . -.. ..i .E......:. i :. :- u r 1.i ....... ..... , . ./ *. ..... _. -_-,.l


03 CHRYSLER
VOYAGER
Silver blue. #J050598B




03 FORD
EXPLORER
#8145T




04 DODGE
RAM 1500
#8205T
*21888


02 CHEVROLET
MALIBU
#8072P
.'.i f ta' '


04 DODGE NEON
SXTm
#8216P

L ^___ __1__


05 CHEVY 05 DODGE
UPLANDER RAM 1500
Blue. #J050697A Lava red. #B69637A


02 FORD F-350
4X4 LARIAT
Diesel. #8278P


01 DODGE
CARAVAN
Loaded. #8170T
.." .' .,. ,


04 PONTIAC
MONTANA
Ready for family. #8341 A
*- ,S


02 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONVERTIBLE
Convertible. #8309P

$ I T


04 JEEP 05 CHRYSLER 04 DODGE 03 DODGE 2500
WRANGLER PACIFICA DURANGO LARAMIE
Sport. #D50656B 7 passenger. #8185T All power, leather. #8276T Leather, diesel. #D50721A
88 t $ t,488 1$9 .4j' $25,988t


tPrices and payments excliLde tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and includes all factory incentives, rebates and customer loyalty. Dealer incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for illustration purposes only.


CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

OVM 1.877-692.7998
563-2277 MY CRYSTAL
1005 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


;. CHRYSLER* DODGE JEEP
LOC 1.877-692-7998
726-1238 4MY CIRYTAL.
--2209 Hwy.-44 West, Inverness


I ~ tm ,,.'- ,_ -- --'- :1tW A -. :- -:





)PEN 24 HOUS/ DAYS AT CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


.'-u -. nnsm'a .... .J. 7132


"* .i't l; rrrr rrr' fnrrTT


nu 14t A r., r l=- 'I


04 CHEVY
CAVALIER
#8230P
*$0,988t


05 CHEVY 04 FORD RANGER 02 SATURN
CAVALIER XLT EXT CAB VUE
SAVE, auto. #8268T V6, auto. #N5305A Affordable, reliable. #N5176A
f i 1 ,29, $15,783t
-U ^vi *~s^SP Aiyygs


04 DODGE 03 DODGE 05 CHEVY 02 BMW 04 CHEVY OS DODGE 04 DODGE 05 CHEVY 1500
RAM 1500 RAM 1500 4X4 TRAILBLAZER 330i SILVERADO 1500 RAM DURANGO Z71 EXT CAB
Blue. #8129T White. #8146T Black. #8299P #8331P Auto, factory warranty #8115T Quad cab. #8275T SLT, 4x4. #8257T Uke New, $AVE. A lot of extras. #8033P
a20,488t 20,888' 20,888 a35,8813 at BLa98888j
tPrices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and includes all factory incentives, rebates and customer loyalty Dealer incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for Illustration purposes only


CHEVROLET


CAL 1.877-692-7998
795-1515 MY CRYSTAL
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa


CHEVROLET


AL 1 -877-692-7998
637-5050 MY CRYSTAL
2209 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness


1.D SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2005


03 CHEVROLET 03 PONTIAC 02 FORD
S-10 VIBE WINDSTAR
#25231A #25196A #J050607A
*12,488 $13,488t *13,888


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