Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00186
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: July 5, 2005
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00186

Full Text






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FORECAST: Partly
cloudy, with isolated
showers and t-slorms
in the afternoon
PAG. 2 A


Water fees. have residents boiling


TERRY WpTT
terrywitt@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

George and Rosemary Van
Teslaar reluctantly talked
Thursday about selling their
$275,000 dream home in Pine
Ridge.


When they retired from their
government jobs in Hartford,
Conn., and moved to Pine
Ridge, they figured it was their,
last stop, so they plowed an
extra $100,000 into their new
home to make it really nice.
Three weeks later, they
received a letter from the-
Florida Governmental Utility


Authority telling them to pay
$6,751 for the water line FGUA
was building to their home.
They had not been informed of
the water line extension fee
when they decided to build in
Pine Ridge, and the notice
angered them.
Flabbergasted, they ap-
proached the county commis-
sion last week for relief.
Commissioners sympathized,
but said they could do nothing
at this time.


"This is nuts. This is not how
you welcome people to
Florida," he said. "I'm up in
arms. I'm willing to pay some-
thing, but not $6,571."
The Van Teslaars say the fee
is not justified and is intended
to take advantage of unsuspect-
ing newcomers like them-
selves.
The FGUA fee is retroactive
to a year, so anyone who had a
vacant lot then is facing the fee
now, even if they have a home,


like the Van Teslaars.
They were one of 380 proper-
ty owners whose land was
vacant at least a year ago in
Pine Ridge who were sent let-
ters June 24 explaining they
would have to pay the FGUA
assessment. An additional
6,120 lot owners in neighboring
Citrus Springs received letters
saying they would be assessed
$2,082 for water line exten-
sions.
Pine Ridge vacant lot owners


will also pay an additional
maintenance assessment of $32
to $35 a year until they are
hooked to the water system,
while Citrus Springs vacant lot
owners will pay a maintenance
fee of $16 annually
Robert Sheets, systems man-
ager for FGUA and chief exec-
utive officer for Government
Systems Group, which runs the
utility systems for FGUA, said


Please see


cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronichl
SWith butterflies in her stomach, she
began her first day at a new school.
Walking up to Citrus Springs
Elementary School's front desk. Patricia
Douglas smiled at the secretary, put out
her hand and said:
Hi., I'm the new principal."
Douglas, a former assistant principal at
Inverness primary school. is one of seven
district employees starting out as princi-
pals at new\ schools.
Some \ ere assistant principals, like


Douglas. One is coming from the district
office and four others are current princi-
pals sw itching to new schools.
While their first official day wasn't until
Friday. Douglas started earlier in the
week, meeting staff, students and learning
the school's layout.
Before a school tour Thursday, she met
a family who had just moved to the area -
the Davidson Family. Taxis Davidson will
Please see ... /Page 5A
Citrus Springs kindergarten teacher Deirdra
Byrne, left, and Principal Patricia Douglas
started out teaching kindergarten together
in the Citrus County School system.


j!






:!?
i ^


War brings changes for mom daughter

STEVE ARTHUR mother Linda Howell ill Citrus County so
htras ur@chronicleonline com th t th t ld il th


Chronicle


When Army Staff Sgt. Elissa Lonsdale
was serving as a combat medic in Iraq
and realizing how much she missed her
family, she bought a computer for her
Linda Howell, of Inverness, kept in touch'
with her daughter, Army Staff Sgt. Elissa
Lonsdale, via computer during her tour of
duty in Iraq.
BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle


alltL e11 wo coui e-ma11111 one ano Uer..
"I didn't know anything about comput-
ers," Howell said. "I was one of those peo-
ple who had no use for them, but when
my daughter sent me a $1,400 computer, I
started learning."
What resulted, besides keeping mother
and daughter connected on a daily basis
during those grueling months, was a new
start in life for Howell as. a business-


Lonsdale
wrote a book
abouhit her


experience in
Please see *' t./Page 8A Iraq.


/Page 4A


New principals learn the ropes


X Annie's Mailbox .. 5C
, Movies ..... . . 6C
Comics ....... .. 6C
Crossword ....... 50
Editorial ........ 10A
Horoscope ....... 6C
Obituaries ....... 6A
Community ...... 7A
Three Sections



6 1III111578 200251 5


Cosmic fireworks


July 4th goes
to Iraq
U.S. soldiers
in Iraq cele-,
brate the
Fourth of July
in various
ways, some
more elabo-
rate than oth-
ers./1lA


NASA blasts hole in comet 83 million
miles from Earth./12A


Measuring up to the military


Safe to get back In
the water?
* Despite shark
attacks, tourists
still flock to
Florida
beaches./8A
* Holiday winds
down with the
Crystal River duck
races./3A


Weight becomes an issue as more
recruits have to lose weight to enlist./1C


Utility says charges are justified


Bush:


Stay the


course


in Iraq

Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, WVa. -
President Bush,- with an
Independence Day appeal for
patriotism, urged resolve in
the war in Iraq on Monday and
said that "the proper response
is not retreat It is courage."
Bush made a quick holiday
visit -to the West Virginia
University campus and spoke
outdoors at a grassy circle on a
hot, humid day. The audience
of a couple thousand people
was restricted to ticket-holders
who gave him an enthusiastic
welcome. The shouts of sever-
al hundred protesters who
were kept out of sight could be
heard faintly during the
address.
With his approval ratings
sagging and anxiety over the
war rising, Bush has decided to
devote more attention to
explaining what he believes is
at stake in Iraq and his strategy
Please see /Page 5A


Donation


made to


library


Will be used to

stock large-print

book section

CRISTY LOFrTI
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
After losing her husband of
68 years, Nancy Kettell decid-
ed to do something her hus-
band would have loved she
gave away $10,000.
Readers who frequent the
large-print section of Crystal
River's library should begin
noticing much-needed im-
provements.
"The large-print collection
of the library really needs a
lot," Mrs. Kettell said, who
made the donation in honor of
her husband, Wilbur.
Wilbur Kettell, 94, died June
6.
He was an avid reader who
loved mysteries, histories,
biographies and sports stories,
but relied on the large-print
books because of his vision.
Unfortunately, the library does
not have a large-print section
that is nearly as inclusive as
Please see .. .; /Page 5A


DAVE SIGLER'Cnron,:ile
Citrus Springs Elementary School Principal Patricia Douglas talks to new student Tavis Davidson and his mother Sonia Davidson on her first day at the
school. Douglas has been transferred to Citrus Springs Elementary from Inverness Primary School, where she was an assistant principal. Citrus Springs is
one of seven schools slated to get new principals next school year.


Shake-up brings new leadership to seven schools


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2A TTrsDnAv TInLY 5 2005


FloTida
LOTTERIES____


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Monday in
the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
1-3-3
PLAY 4
9-2-3-0
FANTASY 5
11-13-16-23-24

SUNDAY, JULY 3
Cash 3:8-6-9
Play 4:8-0-4-2
Fantasy 5:13 -15 -19 22 23
5-of-5 3 winners $59,960.30
4-of-5 281 $103
3-of-5 8,624 $9
SATURDAY, JULY 2
Cash 3:2 5 5
Play 4:6 0 2 -1
Fantasy 5:1 12 14 27 35
5-of-5 4 winners $64,523.24
4-of-5 344 $121
3-of-5 10,663 $10.50
Lotto: 1 -15-22- 30-48-i51
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 69 $6,780.50
4-of-6 4,572 $83
3-of-6 98,803 $5
FRIDAY, JULY 1
Cash 3:2 8 7
Play 4:4- 1 -7-4
Fantasy 5:3- 9- 13- 18- 29
5-of-5 1 winner $248,486
4-of-5 384 $104
3-of-5 12,662 $8.50
Mega Money: 1 -23-37-44
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB No'winner
4-of-4 9 $1,150
3-of-4 MB 64 $354.50
3-of-4 1,291 $52
2-of-4 MB 1,791 $26
2-of-4 36,914 $2
1-of-4 MB 17,193 $2.50
THURSDAY, JUNE 30
Cash 3:3 9 5
Play 4:8 2 0 7
Fantasy 5:5 11 19 21 22
5-of-5 3 winners $71,622.60
4-of-5 445 $77.50
3-of-5 12,801 $7.50
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29
Cash 3:7-2-8
Play 4:7 0 4 3
Fantasy 5:5 9 12 14 19
5-of-5 7 winners $32,344.11
4-of-5 707 $51.50
3-of-5 14,690 $6.50
Lotto: 1 -3-6- 11 -27-44

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
cornr: by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


ENTERTAINMENT


Hollywood slump continues


aorm.k&


TOP MOVIES
1. "War of the Worlds," $77.6 million.
2. "Batman Begins," $18.7 million.
3. "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," $12.7 million.
4. "Bewitched," $10.8 million.
5. "Herbie: Fully Loaded," $10.5 million.
6. "Madagascar," $7 million.
7. "Rebound," $6 million.
8. "Star Wars: Episode Ill Revenge of
the Sith," $5 million.
9. "The Longest Yard," $3.5 million.
10. "George Romero's Land of the
Dead," $3.2 million.

downturn previously recorded was 17
weekends in 1985.
For the year, revenues are down about 7
percent, while factoring in higher ticket
prices, admissions are off 10 percent. The
longer the slump drags on, the harder it


gets for Hollywood to dig itself out of that
revenue hole, said Paul Dergarabedian,
president of box-office tracker Exhibitor
Relations.
"There's a spotlight on the slump and
people's dissatisfaction about going to the
movies. That negative perception can cre-
ate a negative reality," Dergarabedian
said. "It also gives people the opportunity
to vent all the reasons they don't like going
to movies, whether it's high ticket prices
or the costs at the concession stand. So
they feel validated in that by the slump."
"War of the Worlds," Spielberg and
Cruise's update on H.G. Wells' classic
about space invaders laying siege to Earth,
had the second-best four-day opening over
Fourth of July, behind the $115.8 million
for "Spider-Man 2."
'Anybody disappointed with the second-
biggest opening ever on Fourth of July
weekend should really sort of seek help,"
said Rob Friedman, vice chairman for
motion pictures at Paramount, which han-
dled domestic distribution for "War of the
Worlds."


Spotlight on PERSONALITIES


Ice-T tours



to take vacation


Associated Press

SYDNEY, Australia -
Rapper and television star
Ice-T is in Australia for a
series of gigs but he had an
ulterior
motive.
"This partic-
ular tour was.
set up for us to
travel point ."
blank," Ice-T
said. "So it was
like, let's set
up some gigs,
we will hit Ice-T
some clubs
and you know, get like a paid
vacation."
The star of "Law and Order:
SVU" told Australian
Associated Press on Monday
that he would not follow thou-
sands of other visitors who
climb Sydney Harbor Bridge.
He said he doesn't want to
get "blown off of some bridge
in Australia."
"That is not where it is going.
to end for me," he said.

Speaking up for kids
DUNBLANE, Scotland -


Actor Ewan McGregor called
for international action to
help children afflicted by
poverty, saying G-8 leaders
meeting this week have the
power to make a difference.
"These eight leaders are
going to have at their finger-
tips the power to make
extraordinary changes in the
world, truly to make poverty
history for these people,"
McGregor said Sunday,
launching a three-day work-
shop run by the U.N.'s chil-
dren organization, UNICEF.
"Now it's
time to hear
the voices from
the developing
world, espe-
dcially young
voices," said
McGregor, who
starred in the
film, "Star
Ewan Wars: Episode
McGregor III-- Revenge
of the Sith."
Children from eight of the
world's poorest countries and
the G-8 nations Britain, the
United States, Japan, Canada,
France, Germany, Italy and
Russia are taking part in


the UNICEF program, and
will draw up a list of recom-
mendations they hope to pres-
ent to G-8 leaders.
According to its Web site,
UNICEF estimates that more


than 1 billion children suffer
from severe deprivations asso-
ciated with poverty lacking
such basics as shelter, sanita-
tion, safe water, nutrition and
access to school or health care.


The weather REPORT


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


. L--IORIA TEMPERATURE S.. ': :
ne "*" "P UR '.. ..


City H
Daytona Bch. 94
Ft. Lauderdale 91
Fort Myers 94
Gainesville 95
Homestead 91
Jacksonville 96
Key West 91
Lakeland 95
Melbourne 92


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
ptcldy
tstrm
tstrm


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


., -^. MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters alight
chop. Partly cloudy with a chance of after-


F'cast
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm
tstrm


Gulf water
temperature


noon thunderstorms 8 8

Taken at Egmont Key

Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at'Holder n/a n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando n/a n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess n/a n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this
data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

T.ae lines are for ine rroutn, of ire riverrs
Tuesday Wednesday
City High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka 6:47 a/1:55 a 5:15 p/1:19 p 7:22 a/2:33 a 5:55 p/1:59 p
Crystal River 5:08 a/10:41 a 3:36 p/11:55 p 5:43 a/11:21 a 4:16 p/-
Withlacoochee 2:55 a/8:29 a 1:23 p/9:43 p 3:30 a/9:09 a 2:03 p/10:18 p
Homosassa 5:59 a/12:54 a 4:27 p/12:18 p 6:34 a/1:32 a 5:07 p/12:58 p


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
High: 92 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with a chance of
afternoon thunderstorms.
WEDNESDAY
S" High: 90 Low: 76
Partly cloudy with a chance of afternoon
thunderstorms.
THURSDAY
High: 90 Low: 76
.,,, -. Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
i, thunderstorms.
FRIDAY
High: 90 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
thunderstorms.


TEMPERATURE* Monday at 3 p.m. 30.13 in.
Monday 93/71 DEW POINT
Record 99/63 Monday at 3 p.m. 72
Normal 71/90 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 82 HM IdItY
Departure from mean +1 Monday at 3 p.m. 54%
PRECIPITATION* POLLEN COUNT**
Monday 0.01 in. Trees, grasses and weeds were
Total for the month 0.27 in. all light.
Total for the year 22.03 in. *Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
Normal for the year 24.96 in. toms, moderate most allergic will experience
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 10 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder- AIR QUALITY
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high Monday was good with pollut-
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE ants mainly ozone.
.'* I-*K. :.. !Ci ..CEi2'STIAL OUTLO iK ; '-

0/, -- SUNSET TONIGHT 8 3 PM
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:38 A.M.
^ \.j MOONRISE TODAY...........................5:34 A.M.
I JvI J1 l 1 21 JYi27 MOONSET TODAY....................... 8:21 PM.

.I DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/5 TUESDAY 5:09 11:22 5:35 11:48
7/6 WEDNESDAY 6:00 6:26 12:13


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

"A7" ':::.::. ;.;"*= s ',\.1- ',, ^' fr ~t .-.... -;., .. .. i. :.' .
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0, 1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. New plant material may
be irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Inverness can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending in even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday
City H L Pep.
Albany 83 60
Albuquerque 95 64
Anchorage 66 54
Asheville 79 66 .18
Atlanta 86 72 .07
Atlantic City 82 62
Austin 10277
Baltimore 85 63
Billings 82 50
Birmingham 91 72 .06
Boise 89 55
Boston 75 61
Brownsville 97 80
Buffalo 89 71
Burlington, VT 86 66
Charleston, SC 91 73
Charleston, WV 92 66
Charlotte 86 71
Chicago 87 70 .06
Cincinnati 90 67
Cleveland 91 71
Columbia, SC 88 73 .40
Columbus, OH 89 71
Concord 82 53
Corpus Christi 94 77
Dallas 97 73_
Denver 87 50
Des Moines 81 66 .78
Detroit 92 66
El Paso 10379
Evansville 93 62
Harrisburg 89 66
Hartford 82 58
Honolulu 90 76
Houston 98 80
Indianapolis 89 62
Jackson 96 73
Kansas City 82 66 .07
Las Vegas 10781
Little Rock 98 76
Los Angeles 72 59
Louisville 92 70
Memphis 99 76
Milwaukee 76 67 .11
Minneapolis 82 64
Mobile 92 76
Montgomery 88 72 .01
Nashville 96 73


Tuesday
Fcst H L
tstrm 85 66
ptcldy 94 66
ptcldy 71 53
tstrm 83 65
tstrm 90 69
ptcldy 80 67
ptcldy 10173
tstrm 87 70
sunny 89 60
tstrm 86 72
sunny 95 64
ptcldy 84 67
ptcldy 97 77
tstrm 82 61
tstrm 83 62
tstrm 92 75
tstrm 86 66
tstrm 90 70
ptcldy 81 64
tstrm 85 64
tstrm 83 64
tstrm 92 72
tstrm 85 65
tstrm 84 64
ptcldy 94 76
tstrm 98 74
tstrm 87 58
ptcldy 84 63
tstrm 80 61
ptcldy 10375
tstrm 87 65
tstrm 86 68
ptcldy 86 67
ptcldy 89 76
ptcldy 98 77
tstrm 86 64
tstrm 92 73
ptcldy 87 64
sunny 10479
tstrm 90 71
sunny 71 59
tstrm 88 69
tstrm 90 72
ptcldy 77 59
ptcldy 78 58
tstrm 87 74
tstrm 88 72
tstrm 88 69


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pop. Fcst H L
New Orleans 92 76 tstrm 89 76
New York City 83 63 ptcldy 86 69
Norfolk 80 68 tstrm 89 73
Oklahoma City 86 64 .18 tstrm 91 69
Omaha 85 71 .01, ptcldy 85 63
Palm Springs 111 75 sunny 10971
Philadelphia 87 62 ptcldy 87 70
Phoenix 10979 sunny 11083
Pittsburgh 88 66 tstrm 83 64
Portland, ME 74 54 tstrm 80 62
Portland, Ore 84 57 cldy 79 59
Providence 80 56 ptcldy 85 68
Raleigh 90 73 tstrm 92 71
Rapid City 84 51 tstrm 85 63
Reno 94 57 sunny 95 57
Rochester 88 66 .03 tstrm 85 63
Sacramento 97 59 sunny 96 61
St. Louis 87 73 .06 ptcIdy 87 68
St. Ste. Marie 74 61 .14 ptcldy 74 50
Salt Lake City 91 54 sunny 92 66
San Antonio 10077 ptcldy 98 75
San Diego 71 62 sunny 71 63
San Francisco 71 55 sunny 64 55
Savannah 93 73 .03 tstrm 94 74
Seattle 79 53 shwrs 71 58
Spokane 83 54 sunny 89 57
Syracuse 91 67 tstrm 83 63
Topeka 85 66 .01 ptcldy 86 62
Washington 89 72 tstrm 87 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 113 Blythe, Calif. LOW 28 Stanley, Idaho


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/76/ts
Amsterdam 66/53/sh
Athens 88/69/pc
Beijing 94/76/s
Berlin 70/53/sh
Bermuda 86/73/pc
Cairo 98/70/s
Calgary 82/54/s
Havana 89/76/pc
H.,:,-g it.',,.g 88/75/ts
Jerusalem 87/64/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


88/63/s
65/54/sh
93/64/pc
83/57/ts
81/61/ts
74/53/pc
70/54/sh
81/63/pc
86/63/pc
64/48/pc
84/69/ts
81/63/ts
76/58/pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair, h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/sanow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2005 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


I . *: :* .* ': ; ^ .r ,i s s 7 Z, ^:;',F E l


Munchkin birthday
m & a. ....__ __ __-_ __ __ "_ _


Associated Press
Members of the Munchkins from "The Wizard of Oz," from
left, Margaret Pellegrini, Clarence Swensen, Ruth Duccini,
Jerry Maren, Karl Slover, and Mickey Carroll, pose Oct. 30,
1997, in The Culver Hotel, in Culver City, Calif., where they
stayed during the filming of the famed movie. It's been 66
years since Mickey Carroll's only movie role, but he's still
being celebrated for it. On Saturday, friends and fans gath-
ered in a park to celebrate his 86th birthday. (His actual
birthday is July 8).


a


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES "War of the Worlds"
conquered the box office as easily as the
movie's aliens overpowered Earth, but it
did not have enough firepower to over-
come Hollywood's prolonged slump.
Steven Spielberg and Tom Cruise's sci-fi
tale took in $77.6 million over the long
Fourth of July weekend, lifting its total
since debuting Wednesday to $113.3 mil-
lion, according to studio estimates
Monday
That fell well short of the all-time high
held by "Spider-Man 2," whose $180.1 mil-
lion haul in its first six days led Hollywood
to a record Fourth of'July weekend last
year.
The top 12 movies took in $160.1 million,
off 25 percent from that 2004 record week-
end.
It was the 19th straight weekend that
domestic revenues were down compared
with last year's, extending the longest
slump since analysts began tracking
detailed box-office figures. The worst


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in


Today is Tuesday, July 5, the
186th day of 2005. There are 179
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 5,1865, William Booth
founded the Salvation Army in
London.
On this date:
In 1935, President Roosevelt
signed the National Labor
Relations Act, which provided for a
National Labor Relations Board,
and authorized labor to organize
for the purpose of collective bar-
gaining.
In 1946, the bikini made its
debut during an outdoor fashion -
show at the Molitor Pool in Paris.
In 1947, Larry Doby signed a
contract with the Cleveland
Indians, becoming the first black
player in the American League.
In 1975, Arthur Ashe became
the first black man to win a
Wimbledon singles title as he
defeated Jimmy Connors.
Ten years ago: More than 100
Grateful Dead fans were injured
when a deck on which they were
gathered collapsed at a camp-
ground near Wentzville, Mo.
Five years ago: At the United
Nations, President Clinton signed
an international agreement to ban
the forcible recruitment of youths
as soldiers in armed conflict, and a
companion accord to protect chil-
dren from being forced into slav-
ery, prostitution and pornography.
The U.N. Security Council
imposed a diamond ban on Sierra
Leone's rebels in a bid to strangle
their ability to finance a civil war.
One year ago: In a stinging
rebuke, Mexican President Vicente
Fox's chief of staff, Alfonso
Durazo, resigned.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
Katherine Helmond is 71. Actress
Shirley Knight is 69. Singer-musi-
cian Robbie Robertson is 62. Julie
Nixon Eisenhower is 57. Rock star
Huey Lewis is 55. Baseball pitcher
Rich "Goose" Gossage is 54.
Country musician Charles Ventre
(River Road) is 53. Singer-song-
writer Marc Cohn is 46. Actress
Edie Falco ('The Sopranos") is 42.
Rapper RZA is 36. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Joe is 32. Rock musi-
cian Bengt Lagerberg (The
Cardigans) is 32. Actor Dale
Godboldo is 30. Rapper Bizarre,
(D12) is 27. Rock singer Jason
Wade (Lifehouse) is 25.
Thoughtfor Today: 'The real
drawback to 'the simple life' is that
it is not simple. If you are living it,
you positively can do nothing else.
There is not time." Katharine
Fullerton Gerould, American writer
(1879-1944).













3A
TUESDAY
JULY 5, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Just ducky


Crystal River event nets funds for Rotary projects


TERRY WITT
terrywitt@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Beth Pearson and her
aunt, Beth Chenoweth, could
hardly believe their good for-
tune Monday when they won
the Rotary Club Duck Race in
Crystal River.
The 10-minute race pitted
about 1,200 to 1,300 floating
plastic ducks against one
another in a charity fund-
raiser sponsored by the
Rotary Club of Crystal River.
The ducks were powered
only by wind and water cur-
rents at Hunter's Spring
Park


Organizer Ed
Downey said the
event will net
about $3,500 for
the club's Rotary
Foundation.

Organizer Ed Downey said
the event will net about
$3,500 for the club's Rotary
Foundation, which provides
student scholarships, grants
for student trips abroad and
money for other community
needs.


Mrs. Pearson, of Baltimore,
Md., happened to be visiting
Mrs. Chenoweth and Donald
Chenoweth, Sr., her aunt and
uncle. They purchased tick-
ets for five ducks and won
$1,000 for their first place fin-
ish. They planned to split the
money three ways.
"I don't even know what
color our duck was. What was
it?" Mrs. Chenoweth said
excitedly.
The second-place winner
was Sharon Harris of Crystal
River, who won a two-night
beach resort stay. Third place
went to 17-year-old Joseph
Carrigan of Citrus Springs.
Carrigan is a member of
Boy Scout Troop 452, which


MATTHEW BECK/ChronicI
Charles Murgia fills out an entry form Monday afternoon a
Crystal River's Hunter Springs Park prior to the start of thi
annual Rotary Club of Crystal River's Duck Race. The fund-rais
er benefits the Rotary Club of Crystal. The plastic ducks ar
adopted for a fee, and placed into the Crystal River and floated
toward the finish. Prizes are awarded for first through third
place.


helped put on the race.
He wasn't sure what he
would do with his $250 cash


prize. This was Rotary's firs
duck race. Downey deemed
the race a success.


Inglis eyes


Process


Energy


parcel


annexation


Plant property plan

e faces afew hurdles

de before passing
d TERRY WITT
terrywitt@
chronicleonline.com
t Chronicle
d
In Inglis, Progress Energy has
always been a good neighbor, but
never a property owner in the town.
Mayor Carolyn Risher wants to
change that arrangement, and the
wheels of government have started
turning.
But there are a few hurdles to jump
first.
The town council has proposed
annexing 44 acres of waterfront land
Progress Energy owns in the center of
the city. The property, commonly
called the Inglis plant property, was
the site of a former oil-fired genera-
tion plant until the early 1990s. It is
surrounded by Ihglis residential
neighborhoods and borders the
Withlacoochee River.
When residents heard about the
annexation proposal, they questioned
whether the company was planning to
build a power plant on the property,
The answer was: not at this time.
"Most of the people don't want a
generation plant," Risher said Friday.
"I don't think they're going to do any-
thing right away."
If the property were to be annexed
into the city, Progress Energy would
pay the town about $20,000 in taxes
annually.
'And then everything in our town,
will be in town," Risher added.
Progress Energy has made no com-
mitment to support annexation, but
spokeswoman Carla Groleau said the
company wants to continue being a
good neighbor.
"We want to be supportive of what
they want to do," Groleau said. "We
just don't have any plans for the prop-
erty."
Groleau said the property is too
small for anything but a peaking
power generation plant. This type of
plant would generate power during
hours when electricity use is highest.
On the city side, there is a small
hitch to the annexation.
Last year, the city planning commis-
sion changed the town's utility zoning
code to allow power generation on the
44-acre tract, but did not change the
comprehensive plan to match the util-
ity code, said Planning Commission
Chairwoman Drinda Merritt The two
documents have to match.
However, Merritt said Progress
Energy plans to present a revised pro-
posal at the July 7 planning commis-
sion meeting to remove the language
allowing power generation plants. If
the annexation were to be approved,
she said the land would be zoned util-
ity, minus any reference to power gen-
eration to prevent a plant from being
constructed at the site.
Inglis has a natural gas line running
through town, Merritt said. If a peak-
ing plant were built, she said the only
technology that could be used would
be a gas turbine, which would gener-
ate noise.
"That's what the community feared.
The river is a good conduit of sound,
and they feared the sound would be all
over town," she said.


County hopes to make mark for past


ai
sv
gt
te
p
C
e(
B
eE
T
e
F
B


KATIE HENDRICK present-day Tampa Bay in
Chronicle intern 1539, equipped with more than
600 men and horses to help him
Long before the days of colonize the land and search
amusement parks, treacherous for gold. Throughout the year,
wamps and dense forests the army meandered north-
uarded Florida's uncharted ward, all the way to the
arritory. Carolinas, before heading back
In hopes of highlighting a south through Georgia and
iece of Florida's past, Citrus Alabama.
county representatives attend- Mary Craven, Citrus County's
d a meeting last week in tourism development manager,
radenton to discuss the re- said three prospective markers
establishment of the DeSoto include Citrus County sites. If
rail and markers. the project succeeds, informa-
Named after Spanish explor- tion kiosks will be located in
r Hernando DeSoto, the Floral City, near Duval Island;
'lorida trail extends from in Inverness, near Lake Tsala
.radenton to Tallahassee. Apopka by Wallace Brooks
DeSoto landed just south of Park; and at Turner Camp near


the Withlacoochee River, she
said.
"I think many folks are inter-
ested in history and would like
to learn more," she said. "So
adding the markers would def-
initely be beneficial for Citrus
County's tourism."
Tom Franklin, chairman of
Citrus County's historical
resources advisory board,
attended the meeting, as well.
"The state and federal parks
services said they are interest-
ed in seeing the trail renovated
to commemorate Hernando
DeSoto with markers," he said.
"They asked if Citrus County
would like to cooperate with
the project and our answer was


yes."
From archaeological evi-
dence and journal entries, his-
torians pieced together
DeSoto's path.
"Because he traveled
through Citrus County, this
project would definitely have
relevance for the area,"
Franklin said. "We're very
interested in displaying this
historical information."
He said that he and Craven
intend to bring the project
before their respective boards.
"We'll consider the possibili-
ties at each of our meetings,"
he said. "Then we plan to
advise the county commission
on what we can do."


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
The DeSoto trail marker on U.S. 41 will be removed because of the
road-widening project. Three other sites are being considered for
new markers.
The prospective project's Craven said the project
costs are unknown, Franklin would be promoted in The
said. However, grants are avail- Citrus County's Visitors Guide,
able, the state and national and on the county website,
parks services said. www.visitcitrus.com.


Q


Y^I ^I.C


I


Off to the races
-


Madison
White, 4,
left, encour-
ages her
father
Monday
morning as
her mother
Jojo White
takes a pho-
tograph of
her husband
competing in
the Fourth of
July Crystal
River Sprint
Triathlon at
Fort Island
Gulf Beach.
Madison and
her younger
sister
Sydney, 2,
brought
home-made
signs to the
event to
cheer for
their father.
Nearly 200
competitors
began the
competition,
swimming
one-quarter
mile then
hopping on
their bicycles
for a 15-mile
ride and fin-
ishing up
with a three-
mile run. St.
Augustine's
Leif Stringer
won the
event with a
time of one-
hour, four
minutes.
MATTHEW
BECK/
Chronicle

N For more
details,
see
Sports.
PAGE 1B









4A TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005


CHARGES
Continued from Page 1A

the Pine Ridge lots are larger
and there are fewer of them,
hence the higher assessment.
Sheets said the fees are based
on what it will actually cost
FGUA to build 4 to 6 inch. water
lines to vacant properties that
currently have no water. He said
the utility used past contractor
bids and construction contracts
to develop the assessments.
FGUA has scheduled an infor-
mational workshop for 3 p.m.
Wednesday at the Citrus Springs
Community Center to discuss
the property assessments for
both Pine Ridge and Citrus
Springs. A final public hearing
is set for 10 a.m. Friday, July 15,
in the county commission meet-
ing room at the courthouse to
adopt the assessments.
Sheets said FGUA is consid-
ered a local government, and
as such, it has the authority to
impose property assessments
to recover the cost of building
water line extensions. He said
those costs are about $35 to $37
for a linear foot.
In 2003, FGUA purchased 11
water and sewer utilities owned
by Florida Water Services Inc.
in Citrus County, including Pine
Ridge and Citrus Springs. In the
meantime, Sheets said the utili-
ty has received inore than $2


TERRY WITT/Chronicle
George and Rosemary Van Teslaar are happy with their new retirement home, but they say the water
line extension assessment is exorbitant. They are thinking about selling the home.


million in requests for water
line extensions. He said big
builders have moved into the
communities and are construct-
ing hundreds of homes.
FGUA will use the assess-
ments to finish water line con-
struction in Pine Ridge and
extend water lines to 5,000 more
parcels in Citrus Springs in the
highest growth area. Citrus


Springs had a total of 34,000 lots,
but it will take $52 million to
build water lines to the entire
subdivision, Sheets said. It will
have to be done in phases.
"We think we could see 800
to 1,200 new homes built annu-
ally in Citrus Springs and Pine
Ridge in the next two years,"
Sheets said.
Harry McBride, president of


the Pine Ridge Property Owners
Association, said he doesn't
think the assessment is fair to
the people who own vacant lots
and don't have a water line run-
ning in front of their home. The
association has hired Mike
Twomey, a Tallahassee utilities
lawyer, to represent them.
McBride pointed out that
homeowners who fail to pay


the $6,571 by Sept. 1 will be
required to pay an additional
$1,229 penalty. Property own-
ers also have the option of
spreading out the cost over 30
annual payments of $836. But
interest payments would drive
that total cost to more than
$25,000 for the homeowner.
"Some people can't afford
that," McBride said.
McBride also noted the num-
bers have changed since May 12
when FGUA met with the two
communities for an information-
al meeting. Back then, FGUA
was proposing one assessment
for Pine Ridge and Citrus
Springs vacant lot owners of
about $3,500 to $4,000. Residents
who couldn't afford the lump
sum could pay over $381 to $432
annually over 15 years.
Sheets said they split the two
communities into separate
assessment districts because of
the sensitivity in Citrus County
about some communities not
wanting to subsidize the fees
paid by other communities.
He said FGUA could raise
water rates in the two commu-
nities instead of imposing the
assessments, but he said that
would mean rate increases of 64
percent for Citrus Springs and
22.5 percent for Pine Ridge.
He said FGUA officials felt
the assessments would be bet-
ter because the property own-
ers causing the growth would
foot the bill.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

State BRIEFS

Two found dead after
hostage standoff
APOPKA--A woman and her
captor were found dead in her
house after the man held a gun to
her head and told police to call
backup, an official said Monday.
Deanna Rose Gallagher, 27,
was found dead inside a barricad-
ed bedroom closet in her Apopka
home along with the man, who has
not yet been identified, police said.
Former chief charged
with drug trafficking
KISSIMMEE The former
chief of Osceola County's fire
department has been charged with
running what officials described as
a million-dollar marijuana-produc-
tion operation.
Jeffrey Ray Hall, 42, was
charged Saturday with trafficking
marijuana, possession with intent
to sell, plus manufacturing a hallu-
cinogen, according to sheriff's
records. He was released from the
Osceola County Jail on Sunday
morning on a $50,000 bond.
Hall owns a mobile home in the
rural area where sheriff's deputies
found 460 marijuana plants, 18
pounds of marijuana and several
grow rooms with watering and
high-tech lighting systems.
From wire reports


For the K a*,;li n


FWC Boating Arrest
John Harold Hummel, 40, 327
S. U.S. 41, Invemess, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday on charges of operating a
boat under the influence of alcohol
and reckless/negligent operation of
a vessel.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission was
flagged down by a resident and
asked to investigate a collision on
Lake Henderson near Inverness.
An FWC officer said Hummel,
who had been drinking, had been
riding a jet ski when he struck a pon-


toon boat.
There were no injures in the
crash.
Bond was set at $15,500..
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Gary Chase Watson, 20, 2265
N. Heart Path, Crystal River, 10:01
p.m. Sunday on a charge of posses-
sion of a controlled substance.
Watson was a passenger in a
vehicle stopped near Turkey Oak
Drive and State Road 44 because


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the car had a bad headlight. When a
drug-sniffing dog, Magnum, was
walked around the vehicle, he indi-
cated that he smelled drugs in the
car. The occupants were asked to
leave the car.
Officers found three small wafers
in the car where Watson had been
sitting in the middle of the back seat.


The wafers tested positive for
cocaine, according to a sheriff's
report.
Bond was set at $2,000.
Paul J. Moore, 18, 3290 E.
Millwood Lane, Hemando, 2:50 p.m.
Sunday, on a charge of aggravated
stalking. -


A sheriff's report said Moore's 17-
year-old girlfriend had broken up
with him Friday, but-he returned and
tried to enter her home. He had left
64 messages on the girl's cell
phone, some threatening suicide if
they did not get back together, the
report said.


When Moore called back again,
the 17-year-old, following instructions
from the deputy, agreed to meet
Moore at a Jiffy Store near State
Road 200 and County Road 39. The
deputy responded in her place and
arrested Moore at the scene.
Moore was held without bond.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DONATION
Continued from Page 1A

the regular sections.
Mrs. Kettell said the smaller
selection would frustrate her
husband, and was glad to make
a donation to increase the
large-print section in honor of
him.
"We're very pleased we had
the money to do this for the
library," Kettell said.
The donation was made to
the Friends of the Coastal
Region Library, who have
already spent $1,000 on new
books.
Betty Smith, a Friends board
member, said they also plan to
purchase benches for the sec-
tion, to make it more accommo-
dating to readers.
Smith said she is honored
that the Kettells have been so
committed to refurbishing the
library.,
She remembers Kettell as
being a "cracker jack" bridge


SCHOOLS
Continued from Page 1A

be starting the fourth grade in
August.
"Are you excited? Nervous?"
Douglas asked. "Don't worry,
I'm learning about the school
too."
At night, Douglas studies the
school yearbook, so when
school starts she'll be familiar
with names and faces; when
she walks throughout the
school, she takes a map.
"I have a lot to learn,"
Douglas said.
Citrus Springs Elementary
has been graded an A school
for the last four years, an
achievement she expects to
maintain.
Coincidentally, this is the
second time Douglas has fol-
lowed in principal Cicely
Thomas's footsteps. Thomas is


BUSH
Continued from Page 1A

for dealing with it.
His address reflected the
same themes and some of the
same phrasing of his prime-
time address to the nation on
Tuesday and his weekly radio
address on Saturday.
The president's communica-
tions effort has been compli-
cated by the Supreme Court
vacancy caused by the surprise
retirement of Justice Sandra
Day O'Connor Bush is expect-
ed to have to spend an increas-
ing amount of time in selecting
and selling his nominee in a
tough Senate confirmation bat-
tle. He will take information
about potential nominees
when he sets out for Europe on
Tuesday to visit Denmark and
attend the annual summit of
leading industrialized nations.
In his speech, Bush said that
"times of war are times of great
sacrifice" and that. America
remembers its fallen on
Independence Day.
The war in Iraq has claimed
the lives of more than 1,740
Americans, wounded 13,190
and cost more than $200 billion.
"We know that the best way
to honor their sacrifice is to
complete the mission," Bush
said, "and so we will stay until
the fight is won."
"As we celebrate the Fourth
of July," he said, "we rededi-
cate ourselves to the ideals that
inspired our founders. During


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 5A


Family remembers Navy


SEAL killed in Afghanistan


I r %kift- -- --- -
Special to the Chronicle
The Kettell family recently made a $10,000 donation to Friends of
the Coastal Region Library on behalf of Wilbur Kettell, who died
June 6. Pat Haras, of Friends of the Coastal Region Library,
receives the check from Wilbur's son Leedom Kettell, wife Nancy
Kettell and daughter Linda Kettell, June 18 at the library.

player and having a good sense and smoke a pipe. But espe-
of humor. cially, he liked to read.
Kettell liked to take long "We both were great library
walks, play golf with friends users," Mrs. Kettell said.


SCHOOLS THAT WILL BE GETTING
NEW PRINCIPALS
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Citrus Springs Elementary Patricia Douglas
Lecanto Primary Cicely Thomas
Pleasant Grove Elementary Robert Snider
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Citrus Springs Middle David Stephens
Inverness Middle William Farrell
HIGH SCHOOLS
Citrus High Leigh Ann Bradshaw
Crystal River High Patrick Simon
C'.I'u Counr, B:,ara .:. Education


transferring from Citrus
Springs to be principal at
Lecanto Primary.
When Douglas began her
teaching internship in college,
Thomas was, teaching fourth
grade. Douglas interned with
Thomas, and at the end of the
year, took over Thomas's class.

that hot summer in
Philadelphia more than 200
years ago, from our desperate
fight for independence to the
darkest days of a civil war, to
the hard-fought battles of the
20th century, there were many
chances to lose our heart, our
nerve, or our way.
"But Americans have always
held firm, because we have
always believed in certain
truths," the president said. "We
know that the freedom we
defend is meant for all men
and women, and for all times.
And we know that when the


"She's been a great mentor,"
Douglas said.
Inverness Primary School
Principal Marlise Bushman
has also worked closely with
Douglas,' and is confident
Douglas will prove to be a great
instructional leader.
"She has the ability to calmly,

work is hard, the proper
response is not retreat It is
courage."
He called Iraq only the latest
battlefield in the war on terror,
and declared that "America
will not tolerate regimes that
harbor or support terrorists."
Bush said that insurgents
won't win.
"They continue to kill in
hope they will break the
resolve of the American people
but they will fail," Bush said.
Bush characterized the
insurgents there as "men who
celebrate murder" as they seek


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Associated Press
DEERFIELD BEACH -
Before being deployed to
Afghanistan this year, James
Suh bought and hid gifts for his
father to open while he was
away
"When we were growing up
we were poor," he wrote in a
letter that Solomon Suh
opened on Father's Day. "But
we never felt poor because you
took us to the beach every day,
taught us how to play tennis
and took us to the library."
Petty Officer 2nd Class James
Suh, 28, of Deerfield Beach,
was among 16 troops killed
when their Chinook helicopter
was shot down June 28 by
enemy fire in eastern
Afghanistan. He was assigned

rationally, deal with problems
and challenges as they come
up," Bushman said.
"I'm just so proud of her.
When I think about it, I have to
say 'OK, don't cry,' Bushman
said. "I know she'll be an amaz-
ing success."
Superintendent of Schools
Sandra "Sam" Himmel said
schools getting new principals
will benefit from the new per-
spectives.
"There are always new chal-
lenges when you go to a new
school," Himmel said. "But it
also sparks new excitement."
Along with Thomas's switch
to Lecanto Primary, here are
the other additions:- Lecanto
Primary Principal Robert
Snider is going to Pleasant
Grove. District coordinator of
at-risk programs David
Stephens is gding to Citrus
Springs Middle. Citrus Springs
Middle Principal William
Farrell is going to Inverness

to spread their ideology and
"turn the Middle East into a
haven of terror."
Even though the television
images of death "are "difficult
for our compassionate nation
to watch," he said, the insur-
gents are no closer to stopping
the move toward democracy."
"Terrorists can kill the inno-
cent but they cannot stop the
advance of freedom," he said.
Bush has made Indepen-
dence Day visits to West Vir-
ginia something of a tradition.
It was his third July Fourth
visit to the state in four years.


p


to SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team
One, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
His father, a Korean immi-
grant, moved from Deerfield
Beach to Hawaii two years ago.
"My father was extremely
proud of his son in a way that
wasn't in any way dependent
on him being a SEAL," said
Suh's sister, Claudia Suh
Brown of Benicia, Calif. "He
was so proud of the person that
he had become."
Brown said she's mourning a
little brother who played with
G.I. Joe action figures and
decided in high school that he
wanted to join the elite mili-
.tary unit. Suh joined the Navy
in 2001 .and began SEAL train-
ing five months later.
Born Sung Gap Suh, he legal-
ly changed his name to James

Middle. Citrus High Assistant
Principal Leigh Ann Bradshaw
will stay at Citrus High to take
over as principal and Pleasant
Grove Principal Patrick Simon
is going to Crystal River High.
"I think every principal is
excited to start a new year,"


Erik Suh to honor his best
friend, Erik Esposito, who was
accidentally shot and killed at
age 15 by another teen.
Esposito's mother, Linda
Cleveland of Boca Raton, said
Suh sent her cards every
Mother's Day
"He died a man's man, being
a SEAL, a warrior," Cleveland
said. "Now two best friends can
be together."
Two other Florida soldiers,
Chief Warrant Officer Chris J.
Scherkenbach, 40, of Jackson-
ville, and Sgt. Kip A. Jacoby, 21,
of Pompano Beach, also died in
the helicopter crash. Scherk-
enbach and Jacoby were mem-
bers of the Army's 160th
Special Operations Aviation
Regiment known as the Night
Stalkers.

Himmel said.
She said each principal will
be challenged to learn their
new schools' culture, processes
of communication and families.'
As for Douglas: "I'm ready to
get settled, focused and
start"


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6A TUESDAY, JULLY 5, 2005


Obituaries


Lucina Torres, 88
LECANTO
Lucina Gandia Torres, 88, of
Lecanto, died July 3, 2005, at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River.
She was born to Ebelia and
Vidal Gandia on April 9, 1917,
in Vega Baja, Puerto Rico and
she moved here 8 months ago
from Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico.
She was a retired grocery
store owner and a member of
the 1st Hispanic Church of
Inverness.
She is survived by her
Nephew Raymond Gandia of
Lecanto.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory.

William 'Hoover'
Boothe, 76
CRYSTAL RIVER
William Harold "Hoover"
Boothe, 76, Crystal River, died
July 2, 2005, while on vacation
in Biloxi, Miss.
A native of Huntington, W
Va., he was born on Oct. 22,
1928 to the late Charly and
Anna Boothe and came to this
area in 1981 from Apopka.
He was
employed by
the H. K.
Porter Steel
Mill in
Huntington, W
Va., and
served in Korea in the U.S.
Army.
He was a member of DAV
and VFW Posts in Winter
Garden.
He was preceded in death by
four brothers, SheltonJoseph,
Charles and Burles.
Mr. Boothe was known as
"The Carrot Man," having sold
carrots roadside and deliver-
ing them to Ocala horse farms.
He and his wife, Candace, were
the primary caregivers for
many years to the well-known
Dessie Smith Prescott, who
passed away in April, 2002.
Survivors include his wife,
Candace Riggle Boothe,
Crystal River; two sons,
Jefferey M. Boothe, Hillsboro,
Ohio, and William Boothe, Jr.,
Florence,' Ind.; three daugh-
ters, Patty Landers,
Huntington, WVa., Debbie
Wimer, Lake Alfred, and
Connie Smith, Huntington, W
Va.; one stepson, Scott Newell,
Boynton, Beach; three step-
daqghters, Cynthia Cole,
Mount Dora, Tina Davis,
Crystal River,, and Frances
Taylor, Fayetteville, Ohio; one
sister, Juanita Berry,
Inverness; 18 grandchildren;
24 great-grandchildren; and
many nieces and nephews.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.
Dorothy
Louglfrey, 88
INVERNESS
Dorothy R. Loughrey, 88,
Inverness, died on July 3, 2005,
in Inverness.
Born on June 17, 1917 in
Niagara Falls, N.Y, to George
and Pearl Swarthout, and came
here from Ocala in 1969.
She was a homemaker and a
member of the Shepherd of the
Hills Episcopal Church.
She enjoyed crafts and her:
grandchildren.
She was preceded .in death
by her son Paul George


Loughrey in 1982.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 68 years, Francis F
Loughrey, Inverness; two sons,
Gaylord E Loughrey, Niagara
Falls, N.Y., and Fred A.
Loughrey, Summerfield; a
daughter, Judith Buchner,
Hernando; eight grandchil-
dren, including Tricia (James)
Buchner Turner, Hernando;
and 16 great-grandchildren.
Hooper Funeral Homes,
Inverness Chapel.
Patricia
Sharp-Perkins, 63
CRYSTAL RIVER
Patricia L. Sharp-Perkins,
63, of Crystal River, died
Saturday, July 2, 2005, at her
home.
She was born January 4,
1942, in Spur, Texas, to
Gwendolyn and Albert Lazo,
and moved here 26 years ago
from Tampa
She was a homemaker.
She was Baptist.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 45 years, Michael Dyer
Perkins Sr, of Crystal River;
two sons, Michael Dyer
Perkins, Jr. and his wife,
Darlene, of Sweetwater, Tenn.,
and Albert Wayne Perkins and
his wife, Yvonne, of Crystal
River; two daughters, Lisa
Eiland of Crystal River, and
Lori Govantes and her hus-
band Luis of Melbourne; nine
grandchildren, Albert Lundy
Perkins of Crystal River,
Michael Lee Perkins of Tampa,
Christyna Pena of Melbourne
Beach, Yvette Perkins and
Kamron Eiland, both of Crystal
River, Marisa Pena of
Melbourne Beach, and
Amanda Presley, Ben Webb
and John Webb, all of
Tennessee; and three great-
grandchildren.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory
Charles Filley Ill,
60
FLORAL CITY
Charles Forrest Filley III, 60,
Floral City, died Sunday, July 3,
2005, at the Hospice Care Unit
at Citrus Memorial Hospital in
Inverness.
Born in Southbend, Ind., on
Dec. 29, 1944, to the late
Charles F. Filley Sr. and Norma
(Addington) Filley, he moved to
this area five
years ago.
He was a
manager in the
restaurant
industry, and
served in the U.S. Army during
the Vietnam War, where he was
wounded three times and was
the recipient of the Purple
Heart, Combat Infantry Badge


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and the Bronze Star with valor.
He was a member of Floral
City VFW Post 7122.
Survivors include his son,
Rick M. Filley, Kansas City,
Kan.; one brother, Fred Dils,
Elkhart, Ind.; one sister, Peggy
Bradley, Sturgis, Mich.; five
grandchildren, one great-
grandchild; and a host of many
friends.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

John Crosby, 53
HERNANDO
John Howard Crosby, 53,
Hernando, died Monday, July 4,
2005, at his residence under
the care of Hospice of Citrus
County.
Born in Brockton, Mass., on
April 7, 1952, he came here in
1974 from Middleboro, Mass.
He was a general contractor
in the construction industry
and enjoyed deep sea fishing,
singing and playing his guitar.
He is survived by one daugh-
ter, Shelley Crosby, Knoxville,
Tenn.; one stepson, John
Couch, Newport, Tenn.; one
stepdaughter, Cheri
Abramowich, Daytona; his
father, Forrest Crosby Sr.,
Taunton, Mass.; three brothers,
Billy Crosby, Alabama, Mark
Crosby, Hernando, and Steven
Crosby, Taunton, Mass.; three
sisters, Marilyn Crosby, Dixon,
Calif., Sandra Hamrick,
Longwood, and Linda
MacLeod, Harrison, Maine;
two grandchildren; and his
companion of 23 years, Marie
Beily.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory

Jonathan
Horace, 30
JACKSONVILLE
Jonathan Michael Horace,
30, of Jacksonville, formerly of
Lecanto, died on Friday, July 1,
2005, in Jacksonville.
Born on April 26, 1975, in
Manchester, Conn., to Harry S.
Horace, Jr. and Ruth A. Reece
Horace, he was an Eagle Scout
and a member of the Order of
the Arrow.
He was affiliated with the
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, the Lecanto
Ward.
He was preceded in death by
his paternal grandparents,
Harry S. Horace and Gladys
Wilkerson and maternal grand-
mother, Ruth Reece, maternal
great-grandparents Sam and
Annie Lyles and William and
Anna Reece.
Survivors include his wife of
five years, Monica Morrison
Horace, Jacksonville; his


daughter, Elaina Horace,
Jacksonville; his son, Ben-
jaman Horace, Jacksonville;
parents Harry and Ruth
Horace, Lecanto; paternal
grandfather, Herbert Wil-
kerson, Gulf Hammock; mater-
nal grandparents Bill and
Carrie Reece, Hampton, Va.; a
sister and her husband, Amy
(Eric) Sanders, Jacksonville;
three sisters Sheri, Sandra,
and, Kemberly Horace, all of
Lecanto; two nieces, Jayna and
Aurora Sanders, Jacksonville;
aunt Kathy Burke and husband
Charles, Hampton, Va.; two
uncles, Bill Reece and wife
,Vickie, McCommon Idaho, and
Jimmy Wilkerson and wife
Kathy, of Nashville, Ga.; par-
ents-in-law, Elaine and Craig
Morrisson, Napa, Calif, two
sisters-in-law, and one brother-
in-law, all of Napa, Calif.
Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa Springs


Funeral
NOTICES

Charles Forrest Filley III.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted at 2:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, July 6, 2005 from
the Florida National Cemetery
in Bushnell with the Floral
City VFW Post 7122 Honor
Guard officiating. Burial will
follow under the direction of
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home of Inverness. There will
be no calling hours at the
funeral home. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorials are suggested
to the Floral City VFW Post
7122.
Dorothy R. Loughrey. The
Service of Remembrance for
Dorothy R. Loughrey, 88,
Inverness will be at 11 a.m.,
Wednesday, July 6, 2005, at the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes with Fr. Ladd
Harris and Lay Reader Mary
Covington officiating.
William Harold "Hoover"
Boothe. Funeral services will
be conducted at 11 a.m.,
Thursday, July 7, 2005, from the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home
of Inverness with Pastor
Wainly Barber officiating.
Burial will follow in Florida
National Cemetery with mili-
tary honors. Friends may call
on Wednesday from 5 to 8 p.m.
at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home.

FORMS AVAILABLE
The Chronicle has forms
available lor announce-
ments Call Linda Johnson
at 563-5660 for copies.


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Mosquitos: One


researcher's life


Associated Press

VERO BEACH What the
late Roger Tory Peterson was
to birds, the imperial Richard
F Darsie Jr, Ph.D., is to mos-
quitoes. If it flies, if it whines, if
it bites and even if it never
bites he can describe it at
length.
And he will.
The white-haired Darsie
likes 'to study mosquitoes
through a microscope at the
University of
Florida's Medical
Entomology
Laboratory, on
the state's east
coast. He likes to buy thi
study eggs, larvae
and pupae. Are you
Sometimes he
goes looking for a me?
good puddle,
deposits larvae
into a vial and Darsie
raises the larvae mosq
to adulthood.
That way he can
identify a mosquito through its
life stages.
Every quarter-century or so,
he updates his tome,
"Identification and
Geographical Distribution of
the Mosquitoes of North
America, North of Mexico."
U.S. booksellers are not sweep-
ing "The Da Vinci Code" off
their shelves to make room for
a technical science book, but
this hardly bothers a dedicated
mosquito man. So far, 800 read-
ers have shelled out $75 for the
newest edition, a 384-page vol-
ume co-written with
Washington, D.C., entomologist
Ronald A. Ward.
"Who will buy this book? Are
you kidding me?" Darsie asks.


"Every mosquito control dis-
trict in the U.S. should have
this book, every agency that
has any dealings with mosqui-
toes, and every university
library that has an entomology
department should have this
book."
.Though humanity frets about
terrorists, AIDS and ebola, as
teeth are gnashed regarding
the unspeakable appetites of
sharks and alligators, the most
dangerous threat to Homo
sapiens most
likely remains
the humble mos-
Who will quito.
In the devel-
s book? oping world's
kidding tropics, mosqui-
kidding to-transmitted
malaria kills up
to 2.7 million
/ people a year,
Richard F. according to the
Jr., Ph.D. Centers for
luito researcher. Disease Control
and Prevention.
Although malar-
ia was virtually eliminated
from North America a half-
century ago, no mosquito
expert sleeps soundly here.
With bad luck, the disease
could fly in on a mosquito's
wings.
Dengue, another sometimes
fatal mosquito-borne disease,
is active along the Texas bor-
der. Encephalitis, which can be
fatal, flairs up annually some-
where in the United States. In
recent years, West Nile virus
has shown up from New York
to Florida.
That is 'why "Know thy
enemy" is the credo of folks in
the mosquito business, and
why Darsie is their Yoda.


Adopted kids among new citizens'


Associated Press

MIAMI BEACH -
Thousands of immigrants will
become American citizens at
Fourth of July ceremonies,
including six adopted children
in South Florida.
The children were born in
China, Colombia, Guatemala,
the Ukraine and Russia.
In the last week, more than
15,000 people have become
U.S. citizens across the coun-


try, according to U.S.
Citizenship and Immigration
Services. Each year more than
450,000 people become
Americans.
Every year, immigration offi-
cials hold two or three cere-
monies in Miami that natural-
ize more than 12,000 people at
once, she said. In Miami
Beach, the children's natural-
ization ceremony will kick off
the city's Independence Day
celebration.


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'It
I;-"-I '
.. ....- .____ __. -- .._ -


JULY 5, 2005
.,: ,rI...... i i. : .l' ." :..T.


Special to the Chronicle
A tribute to Flag Day was given June 12 at the Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 in Hernando. It was a joint service, with Inverness
Does Drove 232 of the Benevolent and Patriotic Order of Does performing "Flag Day Ritual."





Lions honor guest, install officers


ice District Governor of Florida
Lions District 35-R Lion Ellen
Durling, of the Homosassa Lions
Club, was the honored guest and installing
officer for the Crystal River Kings Bay
Lions, Club's Annual Installation Dinner
Saturday, June 18, at Oysters Restaurant in
Crystal River.
The 2005-06 officers are: Marilyn Jones,
president; Jackie DeGraff, vice president;
Juanita Spruytte, second vice
president; Marty Brown,
recording secretary; Audrey
Jonas-Strutt, corresponding
secretary; Jackie Smith, treas-
urer; Gail Barker, lion tamer;
Cynthia Childs, tail twister and
activities director; Ruth Levins,
program director, publicity and
scrapbook chairman; Peg
James, bulletin editor; Gail
Barker, phone chairman; Ruth ]
Jackie Taylor and Dugy ... -
Raymond, sunshine co-chair-
men. Comm
Jackie Smith received the
Lion of the Year Award.
Receiving Perfect Attendance and 25-
year membership awards were Jackie
- Smith, Ruth Levins, Jackie DeGraff and
Marilyn Jones. Receiving 20-year member-
ship awards were Dugy Raymond and
Cynthia Childs. Gail Barker and Peg
James received Perfect Attendance
awards and Peg James also received a 10-
year membership award.
Mu
Clearly, Playhouse 19 demonstrated the
fact that they are a community theatre as


I


t1 y welcomed Bruce Bellamy and his
group of Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church of Hernando players to their stage
June 17, 18 and 19 for benefit performanc-
es to renovate their church.
Bellamy, a popular and sought-after
artist who has thrilled audiences with his
performances at Playhouse 19, and the
Citrus County Art Center, wrote, produced,
directed and starred in their presentation
of a light-hearted musical comedy he aptly
titled "Church Folks."
The two-act play was enthusi-
astically and energetically per-
-formed to the hand-clapping
delight of the audience, be
encouraged to join in with joyful
participation during the numer-
ous musical offerings inter-
spersed throughout the play.
There was ample opportunity
for the cast to display their
Levins artistry in solo and duet format.
. THE The cast had a lot to say about
UNITY the preacher, the church mem-
bers, and society in general,
always passionate in their deliv-
ery and right to the point
As active church leaders, the cast is to
be commended for giving of their time to
fund the church's project.
Joining Bellamy, who starred as Granpa,
were Minister Tammy Langley, pastor of
the New Birth Gospel Tabernacle in
Inverness, as Clara, John Langley, co-pas-
tor of New Birth, as Jake, Shirley Futch,
Mt. Carmel member, as Sister Betty;
Althea Council Crummer, youth pastor,
praise and worship leader for Fountain Of
Life Restoration Church, as Sister Mable;


minister Geraldine Walker, praise and
worship leader at the Cathedral of Faith
Action Ministries, who also performed as
Sister Mable; Myehsa Hollis, Mime
Ministry and Music Ministry with the
Church Without Walls in Inverness, as
Sissy; Deleen Houston, Praise and
Worship leader and choir director at Mt.
Carmel Methodist Church in Floral City,
as Sister Linda; Gussie Williams, of
Tallahassee, as Sister Wilma, and Jeff
Hollis, co-pastor at Church Without Walls,
as the Rev Jones.
Arthur Crummer served as the musician
accompanist for the musical selections.
Serving as hostesses were Faye
Maxwell, Gail Bellamy, Marissa Wallace,
Ursula Bellamy and Judah Burton.
Publicity, set design and lighting volun-
teers were Kurt Hilthon, Doc and Shelby
Weingarten and Lisa Siegel.
Two lines linger: "God loves me because
of my availability," spoken by Clara, and
"Anger for a moment, favor for a lifetime,
joy cometh in the morning," spoken by
Rev. Jones. Clara's performance of"I Love
You Lord" and "I Surrender All" were my
favorite selections.
It was a timely joint venture for
Playhouse 19 and Mt Carmel Missionary
Baptist Church. Congratulations to the tal-
ented Bruce Bellamy and his cast.


Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community. Let her
know about your group's upcoming activi-
ties by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal
River FL 34423


Sams Club cleanup









7 7

















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Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Sams Chapter 176 recently helped clean up the roadsides in their neighborhoods in observance of National
Cleanup Day sponsored by the recreational vehicle (RV) Good Sam Club. If you are interested in the club, call the secretary,
Zola Treadwell, at 621-3523. Pictured, from left: Barbara and Len Berg, Jennie and Barney O'Connor, Jewel and Earl Kuehne,
Ann Benton, Bob Ward, Rod Jaeger, Reba Ward, Paul Cullum, Sue Meyer, Lee Levering, Diane and Don Garrison, Paul Dixon,
Lorraine Mahl, Dan Todd and Roma Jenkins: Syble Little and Judy Todd are in the trash bags.


Both Furbish and Lattin were
recently honored by the Inverness
Rotarians at a recognition lunch-
eon, where they were congratulat-
ed for their strong academic com-
mitments and their contributions to


Citrus High School and the
Rotary Club of Inverness proudly
announce the Rotary Seniors of
the Month for June, Laurel Furbish
and Brad Lattin. Furbish currently
holds a weighted 4.02 GPA and
Lattin has a 3.85 GPA. Each stu-
dent has also successfully partici-
pated in many extracurricular activ-
ities in addition to maintaining out-
standing grades.
Laurel Furbish is the daughter of
Barbara Furbish of Inverness.
Furbish has been a member of the
Key Club in 12th grade, Beta Club
in eleventh and 12th grades, the
National Honor Society in grades
10, 11, and 12, AIM (Achievement
in Motion) in eleventh grade, the
chorus in ninth grade, Spanish
Club in eleventh grade, and
Student Council in 12th grade.
Furbish has also served as her
senior class secretary. She has
been a member of the girls' tennis
team for all four years and
received the Gulf Coast Athletic
Conference
All-Academic
Award in
2002, 2003,
and 2004. .
Furbish also
received the- .
Gulf Coast
Athletic
Conference Laurel
A ll- .. .
Conference
Award in 2004.
She has been on the honor roll
for all four years, of her high school
career and received the
President's Education Award in
2001. Besides her commitments to
clubs and athletics, Furbish has
flourished in the field of student
photography, having been enrolled
in photography classes from tenth
through 12th grades and in 12th
grade qualifying to join ESP, the
Elite Society of Photographers at
CHS. Furbish's photography has
brought her many awards, includ-
ing receiving first place for portrait
photography and Best of Show at
the 2004 Citrus County Fair, then
receiving second place in portrait
photography at the 2005 Citrus
County Fair, followed by being
chosen as an exhibitor at the 2005
Florida State Fair.
Besides her school activities,
Furbish is an active member of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints and is involved in the
Young Women's Program, partici-
pating as a counselor and as a
chorister.
She will be attending Brigham
Young University in Utah and will
begin this summer term as a pho-
tography major. Furbish's career
goals entail working as a travel
photographer and eventually
teaching photography.
Brad Lattin is the son of Ed and
Deborah Lattin of Inverness. He
has been an honor roll student
throughout his four years at Citrus
High School and has been a mem-
ber of the National Honor Society
from grades 10 through 12.
His many school activities
include being a member of the Key
Club in grades 11 and 12 and a
member of the FCA (Fellowship of
Christian Athletes) from ninth
through 12th grades.
Lattin has been a four-year
member of the weightlifting team
and played JV basketball in ninth
and tenth grades, followed by var-
sity basketball in eleventh and 12th
grades. Lattin has also lettered
both years of his varsity basketball
career. Lattin was chosen by the
staff and faculty at Citrus High to
be one of twenty students elected
to the CHS Hall of Fame. *
In addition to his school commit-
ments, Lattin has been an active
member of his church's "New
Beginnings Fellowship Group" in
both eleventh and 12th grades. He
has also been actively involved in
the Citrus County Harvest Food
Drives from ninth
grade through
the present.
Lattin's future
plans include a s. ^
completing his
four year degree s- 1
in business,
majoring in hos- -
pitality manage- Brad
ment at the Lattn
University of
Central Florida and then attending
graduate school to complete a
master's degree in business man-
agement or finance.


ing.
The Rotary Club of Inverness
recently honored Rachael Gelin
and Zachary Banks at a luncheon
meeting, acknowledging their
many accomplishments.


their school and community.
Citrus High School and the
Rotary Club of Inverness are proud
to announce the May Seniors of
the Month, Rachael Gelin and
Zachary Banks. Both students
have maintained outstanding aca-
demic standings, while also being
involved in many school extra-cur-
ricular activities.
Rachael Gelin is the daughter-of
Dr. John Gelin and the late Norma
Gelin of Inverness. She currently
holds a 3.75 GPA.
Gelin has been a member of the
National Honor Society from tenth
through 12th grades and A.I.M.
(Achievement in Motion) in
eleventh grade. Gelin has been a
member of the CHS JV soccer
team, serving as its captain and
then in eleventh and 12th grades,
Gelin played varsity soccer and
served as team captain both sea-
sons. Gelin was a member of the
JV volleyball team in ninth grade
and served as the manager of the
varsity football team for all four
seasons of high school.
In addition to sports and clubs,
Rachael Gelin devoted most of her
time to the performing arts, being a
drama club member from grades
nine through 12, the chorus from
grades nine through 11, the cham-
ber choir from grades nine through
12, the concert choir from grades
nine through 12, and the entertain-
ment ensemble group, BREEZ,
during grades 11 and 12. Gelin's
many stage roles include the lead
witch in Into the Woods in ninth
grade, the lead
in her junior
year produc-
tion, Honk,
F and the parts
of Ms. Almond
in The Heiress
S' and Alice in
\ My Favorite
Year in 12th
Ge grade. Her
honors include
receiving a
superior at district drama competi-
tion and superior at state competi-
tion in eleventh grade.
-Gelin then earned Superiors in
judging at State Chorus
Convention in Solo Competition
and superior in drama district com-
petition and excellent at state
drama competition. Gelin has been
named to the CHS Hall of Fame, a
group of twenty seniors chosen.
She also was chosen to be on the
Homecoming Senior Court and
was voted by her class as "most
talented."
Gelin will be attending
Southeastern University in
Lakeland to major in business. Her
future plans include a strong desire
to work as a youth director.
Zachary Banks is the son of
Gary and Connie Banks of
Inverness. He currently holds a 3.9
weighted GPA and has been
involved in many extracurricular
activities, including the CHS
Marching Canes Band in ninth
grade. He was a member of the
track team in grades nine and 10
and Was on the cross country team
in 10th grade. Banks has been a
.member of the National Honor
Society in grades ten through 12,
serving as its treasurer in 11th
grade. Banks has also been a
member of the Beta Club
International in his eleventh and
12th grades, and the Future
Business Leaders of America for
the last two years.
In FBLA, Banks served as the
school club treasurer and district
treasurer in 11th grade also. In his
senior year
| Banks earned
the title of "dis-
trict winner" in
S.. .- the category of
website develop-
Sr ^ ment.
SBeside his
k X school extra-cur-
Zachery ricular activities,
Banks Banks will have
earned thirty
credits in his dual-enrollment col-
lege classes.
He has been a member of the
First Presbyterian Church of
Invemrness and is currently working
as an office assistant at the Citrus
County School Board. Zach Banks
will begin his college career as a
sophomore at Santa Fe
Community College in Gainesville,
intending to transfer to the
University of Florida to complete
his bachelor's degree in account-


Elks honor Flag Day


,Student ....













Sharks don't dissuade tourists on Fourth


Associated Press
ST GEORGE ISLAND -
Three shark attacks in Gulf of
Mexico waters off the Florida
coast ahead of the Fourth of July
weekend didn't keep tourists off
the white sands of this resort
island Monday, but many beach-
goers stayed close to. shore or
out of the water altogether.
The odds, most figured, were
in their favor especially if
they were careful.
"There's a beach so there's
sharks in there somewhere,"
said Karen McGlamory, of
Atlanta. "I'm not going out
there so deep I can't get a
foothold so that if I see any-
thing I can grab hold on the
bottom and run back to shore."
Carol Anderson, of Lanark
Village, who has lived along the
Gulf coast for nearly 17 years,
observed most visitors this
weekend were attentive to the
recent shark attacks in Gulf
waters.
"People are being more cau-
tious, but you can't keep them


CHANGES
Continued from Page 1A

woman and for Lonsdale as an
author.
Less than a year ago, while
surfing the Web researching
eviction law for a neighbor on
the brink of eviction, she came
across a home business selling
pre-paid legal services.
"It's not a pyramid, but it is
multilevel," she said.
She said she now has seven
Web sites and e-mails people
all day long.
"Last week in three days I
made $600," she said. "If it was-
n't for my daughter, I would
probably still be on welfare."
Her daughter's book, called
Blood, Tears and IV's, memoirs
of a US Army medic in
Operation Iraqi Freedom, is
based on a journal Sgt.
Lonsdale kept during her tour
in Iraq in the northern Kurdish
city of Kirkuk.
"I wrote it to tell people what
it was like, to let them know
that for all the death and
destruction, we are doing a lot
of good things there. It is also a
kind of closure for me," she
said.
She said that like many other
combat medics, she suffered
from post-traumatic stress dis-
order and sought counseling.
In the book, Lonsdale
recounts the good and the bad
that comes out of war from a
combat medic's perspective.
She tells the stories about the
help her unit provided to
Iraqis and even insurgents,
but, more importantly, to her
fellow soldiers.
"It's been almost two years,
and every once in a while I still
have nightmares," she told a
reporter, "but I have memories
that will last me a lifetime.
Some good and some bad, but
hey, you can't have everything
perfect."
She currently works in the
emergency room at Martin
Army Community Hospital at
Fort Benning, Ga., but was
recently selected to attend drill
instructor's school.
As a senior in high school,
Lonsdale joined the Army in
1997.
"It was a good move for me,"
she said. "I was kind of aimless
and starting to get in trouble. It
was kind of a whim," she said.
She said that with eight years
of service behind her, she
plans to make a career of the
army.
After completing basic train-
ing, advanced individual train-
ing and Airborne School, she
was assigned to Fort Bragg,
N.C. She has 48 jumps to her
credit
Her self-confidence and
determination earned her the
Expert Field Medical Badge as
a private first class at Fort
Bragg.
"It took me two tries, but I
finally got it," Lonsdale said. "I
wanted to prove to myself that I
could get it."
After spending three and a
half years at Fort Bragg, she
was assigned to the 173rd
Airborne Brigade in Vicenza,
Italy, where she was deployed
with her unit to Iraq and was
soon helping to treat soldiers
and.civilians.
She was in a convoy that was
ambushed, lost a fellow medic
who was a stroke victim, and
another who was electrocuted
on Christmas Eve. She has also
helped to treat Iraqi children
in villages there.
In February 2004, Lonsdale's
her Army psychologist suggest-
ed as self-therapy, she turn her
journal of experiences in Iraq
into a book.


out of the water," Anderson
said. "They don't seem to be
alarmed the sharks are headed
this way. They hit closer and
closer to this area."
A Tennessee teenager had his
right leg amputated after an
attack at neighboring Cape San
Blas on June 27, just two days
after a Louisiana teenage girl
was fatally mauled by a shark
near Destin, about 80 miles west
And just Friday, an Austrian
tourist was bit on the ankle by a
shark while in chest-deep
water in the Gulf of Mexico at
Boca Grande, about 300 miles
away. He was released from a
hospital Sunday
Anderson's son, Scooter An-
derson, of Douglasville, Ga., and
his fiancee, Christine Nappo,
had driven down for the week-
end to enjoy the beach, which
sits a half dozen miles and two
bridges away from the fishing
village of Apalachicola.
"I stayed in closer than any-
body else," Scooter Anderson
said. "I stayed in closer than
ever before."


"It took me a weekend to
write it and two years to get it
published," she said. "You real-
ize when you get back that
there is no way to erase bad
memories, only ways to try and
make sense of them."


vi


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~0~
S
~CI


Marc Moncrief, 42, of
Calvary, Ga., wife Sherry and
their two teenagers were down
for the day and acknowledged
the shark stories had them
debating just what exactly they
would do in the murky water in
the 90-degree heat.
"Sailboat? I said 'no' because
if we turned over out there I
didn't want to fight off any bull
sharks," Sherry Moncrief said.
"Also we talked about renting
jet skis (but) it was more the
price of jet skis ($50 a half
hour) than the bull sharks."
Last year's hurricanes dam-
aged the usual holiday stops in
the St Augustine and Crescent
Beach area on the Atlantic coast
for Dave Olinski, of Jacksonville,
who instead brought sons Scott,
19, and Chris, 22, to St George
for the first time.
While Scott fished from
shore, Olinski, 53, and son
Chris sunbathed.
Sharks?
"It's not a big deal for me,"
Olinski said. "I'm not a big
swimmer. Most of the time I


She's thinking about writing
another book about being a,
woman in the Army
"Women have to try harder
to prove themselves every step
of the way to earn the respect'
of the men," she said.


fish and sit on the beach."
Carol Anderson said she.
wished they would ban fishing
altogether in areas where peo-
ple swim.
"I'm not good fish bait," she
said.
Shark attacks in Florida are
relatively rare, with 30 in 2003
among the millions of people
who hit the state's beaches.
Last year, when four hurri-
canes kept many visitors away,
there were a dozen attacks.
Shark attacks increase in the
summer when the predators
swim closer to shore.


Associated Press
Marc Moncrief, right, along his wife Sherry, center, daughter
Megan, left, 16,-and son Trevor, 13, back, celebrate the holiday,
Monday at St. George Island. Three shark attacks in Gulf of
Mexico waters off the Florida coast ahead of the Fourth of July
weekend didn't keep tourists off the white sands of this resort
island.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


504-0705-TUCRN

NOTICE OF ESTABLISHMENT
OR CHANGE OF A REGULATION
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

An Application for Amendment to the Land Development Code Text has been received by the Citrus County
Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) for their review and recommendation to the Board of
County Commissioners to adopt or change a regulation affecting the use of land of the area shown in the
maIl in this advertisement. The Application was submitted by the Department of Development Services,
Community Development Division.
A public workshop on the proposed regulation, affecting the use of land will be held on July 7. 2005, and a
public hearing will be held on July 21. 2005, at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida, at 9:00 AM. Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that a particular item is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves
through the agenda.







9I495 491


44 9












All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or against, may be heard on the proposed amendment to
Ordinance No. 90-14, the Land Development Code, as described below and other items as necessary:
OA-05-07 Department of Development Services an Ordinance of Citrus County, Florida amending
Ordinance No. 90-14, The Citrus County Land Development Code, by establishing language determining
BFE's in unnumbered "A" flood zones; by establishing revisions to the Citrus County Historical Resource
Advisory Board; by providing for codification, severability, and an effective date. Copies of the proposed
amendments will be available for inspection and/or purchase between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M.,
Monday through Friday in the Department of Development Services, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto,
Florida 34461. For more information regardingthe proposals discussed herein, contact Gary Maidhof,
Development Services Director, at (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or Comprehensive Plan is available on the internet at
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on the Community Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to intervene" pursuant to procedures set forth in Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances. Such request shall be submitted to Department of
Development Services at least five (5) working days (excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hearing
on the matter. A "request to intervene" may be obtained on-line; click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450, (352) 341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Citrus County, Florida


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TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 9A


CITRUS COINnY (FL) CHRONICLE


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IOA
TUESDAY
JULY 5, 2005
.., .. ,. r ,:, -. ,, -,h '. ,,,


,, /.


'<,., :


.' "' ,. T'lC-'I
K.)Kl*


S"The aim of education is the
knowledge not of fact, but of
values. "
Dean William R. Inge


C TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ...............................publisher
Charlie Brennan .................................editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathle Stewart ........advertising services director
Steve Arthur ................ Chronicle columnist
------ Mike Arnold ...................... managing editor
Jim Hunter ................... ....... senior reporter
by Albert M. Curt Ebitz .......................... citizen member
Williamson Mike Moberley.....................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

WELCOME INITIATIVE




School board



trial telecast



positive step


Citrus County residents
have been able to access
the scheduled meetings of
the county commission, Crystal
River City Council and
Inverness City Council by simply
tuning their televisions to local
station WYKE-TV
Telecasting these meetings,
which have become
fixtures on WYKE-
TV, is open govern- THE IS
ment at its best, TV cove
because it conve- school
niently broadens meet
public access to the
deliberations and OUR 01O
decisions of govern-
ment. Nonetheless, Make it
the meetings of the
Citrus County
School Board have inexplicably
remained dark on local televi-
sion screens,
The public education of our
children is a-top priority of gov-
ernment and, as such, receives a
significant share of tax dollars.
Accordingly, local school boards
play an important role and have
a major impact in the life of
their communities. Therefore,
the recent trial telecast of a
Citrus County School Board
meeting by WYKE-TV was a wel-
come joint initiative that was
long overdue.


Fact left out So
I'm calling about "The
O'Reilly Factor" last night.
Why did they leave out the
fact that Bill Grant is chair-
man of the Republican
Party and that is the real
reason he is going after
our sheriff? Fair and bal- CALL
anced, huh? 5 L
Umit too low 563-
The four-lane highway
east of Inverness is a speed trap
with 45 and 55 speed limits where
they should be higher. I sometimes
see two and three county deputies
giving tickets at the same time on
this section of road. I now watch
my speed instead of where I am
going. Is this a better way?
Funeral etiquette
On June 21, my grandson's funer-
al was at Hooper Funeral Home.
There was a police car in the park-
ing lot; we assumed we'd have an
escort. Well, he left and we were left
on our own. As we were going
through Beverly Hills, people from
out of town were having to stop at
the traffic lights and people in
Beverly Hills were cutting in the line.
I know this for a fact, because I was
a family member in the limousine
and there were people pulling in
right behind the limousine. I'd just
like to know, these people who com-
plain about courtesy all the time -
I was in this funeral procession -
I'd just like to know where their
courtesy was when my grandson
was put away.
Weird letters
I'd like to comment on the article
in the paper about the bloggers and
about the fair and balanced editori-
al pages we have. We have two liber-
al writers from the Miami Herald,
which I canceled years ago. We've
got Eleanor Cliff, we've got Steve
Arthur and we get Cokie Roberts
and her husband. Now there's a
long list of fair and balanced report-
ing right there with them. And your


The trial telecast of the school
board's June 14 meeting report-
edly went well except for some
audio problems, which should
be resolved within a matter of a
few weeks, according to WYKE
Vice President Tom Franklin.
However, despite the relatively
successful trial telecast,
Franklin stated that
the school board is
iSUE: still considering
rage of whether or not to
board air its scheduled
ings. meetings.
With no technical
PINION: problems preclud-
ing future telecasts
happen, of scheduled school
board meetings, the
school board is
strongly encouraged to go
beyond the positive step .of a
trial telecast. By recognizing the
importance of making its taped
meetings a fixture on WYKE-TV
on weekends and evenings, resi-
dents will be afforded the oppor-
tunity to view them at their con-
venience.
Thus, in the interest of public
access that fosters open govern-
ment and broadens public par-
ticipation, school board mem-
bers are urged to finally make it
happen. There is no reason
whatsoever to do otherwise.

||IN letters to the editor are all
weird, too. I don't even
read the Commentary sec-
tion anymore, and it used
. to be my favorite section
of the paper. I sent it all
around the country to my
friends.
Bring home troops
0579 Mr. Bush: Support our
0 troops and send them
home alive now not in
2006, now.
Estimated departure
I got a laugh today reading the
editorial in the ultra-liberal St. Pete
Times that said President Bush did-
n't give us an exit plan from Iraq. I
guess they think in war that you're
going to tell your enemies when
you're going to attack and when
you're going to leave.
By the way, we went into the
Balkans and we've still got our
troops there. What's the exit plan?
Our troops are still in Korea. What's
our exit plan? We still have troops in
Germany. What's our exit plan? We
have none in any of those countries.
Plus, you cannot tell your enemy
what you're going to do.
Narrow roads
I'd like to know who designed the
roads in Citrus County. I wonder if
the editor knows. Because whoever
designed the roads in Citrus County,
they had to be brain dead at the
time or on drugs.
First of all, they didn't even make
the roads wide enough down here.
The cars look like they're going to
come right over the yellow line right
into you, especially when there are
big trucks on the other side of the
road.
Enforce codes
How long are Scott Adams and Van
Der Valk Inc. going to be allowed to vio-
late county code enforcement laws? And
I think sometimes people have more
money than brains. Just look at Michael
Jackson.


Lucas films inspire idealism


he genius of George
Lucas, the creator of
"Star Wars," is that
he realized in the 1970s that
America's young people
were starving and thirsting
for idealism.
Those were dark days.
President Jack Kennedy,
his brother Robert and
Martin Luther King Jr. had
all been assassinated dur- Charle
ing the 1960s. Riots in OTI
American cities had killed VOI
scores and gutted many
areas of our cities. The
Vietnam War, after such a bitter divide,
had ended in failure. University stu-
dents had been shot down on their
own campus by National Guardsmen.
The president was involved in the
Watergate scandal and was forced out
of office. After a two-year interim with
Gerald Ford, the glum and droopy
Jimmy Carter was moping about the
White House and accusing us all of
suffering from malaise. Hollywood
was churning out cynical, depressing,
"realistic" movies.
It's no surprise, then, that Lucas had
a difficult time getting his movie
green-lighted. He finally won the sup-
port of one studio head and was given
a small budget of about $5 million.
Hardly anyone expected it to be a suc-
cess.
It opened in 1977, and it hit with the
impact of a sociological hydrogen
bomb. Word of mouth spread like wild-
fire, and kids flocked to see it not
just once, but many times. It smashed
and exceeded every box-office record


I
y
Ic


up to that time. It grossed
$461 million. Even today,
4 only "Titanic" exceeds that
record.
I'm not a fan of science
fiction and had no interest
in seeing the movie.
However, I kept hearing so
much talk about it, I
dropped into a theater one
afternoon. To my surprise,
Reese what I saw was just like the
IER World War II movies I had
CES watched as a kid. The good
guys were all good. The bad
guys were all bad. The good
guys practiced the timeless virtues of
love, loyalty, honor and courage.
Except for the sets, it could have been
any one of a number of World War II
movies that always showed us tri-
umphing over the bad guys.
I've always thought that "Star Wars"
contributed to Ronald Reagan's elec-
tion in 1980.1 I certainly have no proof of
that But Reagan's idealism and opti-
mism would have been scorned and
mocked by the burnouts of the 1960s
and 1970s. The "Star Wars" generation,
however, connected with this man
because he spoke the same language as
George Lucas. If Reagan brought
morning to America, I think the dawn
began with the original "Star Wars."
Lucas also revolutionized the film
industry with his spectacular
advances in special effects and com-
puterization. Without his pioneer
work, "The Lord of the Rings" could
never have been made.
But more important is that he has a
good soul. Whatever's in an artist's


soul inevitably comes out in his cre-
ations. You can look at the body of,
work done by Lucas and know that he"
is one fine man. Four other good souls1
in Hollywood and there aren't many,!
- are John Milius, Simon Wincer,'
Kevin Costner and Ron Howard.
I've never seen the point of paying'
money to be depressed. I can be
depressed for nothing just by watching'
the news or volunteering to take care'
of terminally ill patients. Why pay $8 to
$10 just so a Hollywood reprobate with'
garbage for a soul can pour it into your'
head? Unless a film or play can make'.
me laugh or inspire me, I don't go. "
I'm definitely of the old school, like&
Louis B. Mayer, founder of MGM'
Studios. He reportedly told his part-P
ner, who wanted to do "serious"'
movies, that "If you want to send a
message, use Western Union." A very'
good plan. The world is full of gloomy)
but oh-so-earnest people who want to&
tell us all about the angst and ills ofthe
world. Well, we already know about-
them. Instead of exploiting the angst'
and the ills, why don't you try to do
something about them?
In the meantime, I'm a daisy-and-3
sunflower kind of guy this time of year.
Summer is one of the best treats thel
planet has for us. Enjoy it. If you get'
too hot and sweaty, duck into a theater'
and watch the final episode of Lucas'1
"Star Wars" saga. Even if you haven't
followed the story line, you'll enjoy the,
special effects.

Write to Charley Reese at P.O. Box T
2446, Orlando, FL 32802.
i


LETTERS / \ to the Editor


Blame game
The Democrats' latest barrage of
inane attacks on the administration
with regard to Gitmo prove beyond a
doubt that the Democrats and their
puppets fear Republicans far more
than they fear terrorists. And, unfor-
tunately, that won't change until the
terrorists win and America loses, at
which time they will blame it all on
the Republicans. Then they can take
back control of the government and
get back to the issues most important
to their constituents, such as abortion
at any age, at any time and without
parental notification, etc.
Osama bin Laden knew he was safe
with Democrats in control of America
and the United Nations, which is why
we were attacked on many occasions
without response. He also knew that
if the Republicans went after him, he
could count on Democrats to side
with him rather than support
Republicans, and, with the help of
Democrats, he could defeat America.
Like President Bush said, "You're
either with us, or you're with the ter-
rorists."
Clearly, the Democrats view this
war on terrorism exactly as they do
the problems with Social Security:
They only want it resolved if they are
in charge and they get the credit.
Unfortunately, bin Laden knows the
only way to defeat America is through
politics. Divide us from within.
American versus American. He
learned from the Communists. The
man is a genius.
June Quick
Homosassa


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political car-
toons, columns or letters do not neces-
sarily represent the opinion of the edito-
rial board.
Persons wishing to address the editorial
board, which meets weekly, should call
Linda Johnson at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and include a
phone number and hometown, including
letters sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed; phone num-
bers will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit letters for
length, libel, fairness and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than 350
words, and writers will be limited to
three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429. Or, fax to (352) 563-3280; or e-
mail to letters@chronlcleonlne.com.

Apparent truths
The letter from Gino Calderone,
"Democrats' distortions," was full of
prejudicial comments. I was at that
dinner, and I am not gullible or
unworldly.
I don't speak for the rest of the 162
people at that event, nor do I want to,
but this writer is wrong about the
163rd person at that social occasion,
so that makes that letter fallacious.
For someone who was not at the
Democrat entree, this author sure
knows how to toss the salad or should
I say mud-fling and seems to be
unable to terminate his wallowing of
issues concerning the Clinton admin-
istration.
In the state of Texas during the Gov.
Bush days, it was noted the adminis-


tration would put condemned people .
to death, such as the law passed to .
"pull the plug" on brain-dead individ- i
uals. The result was allowing at least 1
one infant the casualty of a decision r
by doctors, disregarding the wishes of,
the parents. Was this some sort of
family plan or late-term decision?
As we turn the page in Florida,
another Bush administration venti-
lates the wishes of a young woman's
family concerning the same issues.
But as the spotlight, clearly focused
on the need for living wills, exposed
courts blatantly disregarding family
and humane standards by the very '
laws created by present-day represen-j
tatives, it would seem that brutality is
always done by someone else! Even
once-working staff in this state have
become disabled by present-day laws. 1;
Many have fallen victims to the unhu- i
manistic barriers.
Our actions will always be more ,
important than what we converse as .
truth. Since the founding fathers did-
n't have to fight for oil issues, create a
war to revise terrorists' thinking, mir-
ror living wills to the extremist or
obstruct the working class, they were
busy developing a positive-thinking '
society with imposing civilized
actions for humanistic reasons, by
why of actions, creating our
Constitution or a fundamental law.
Those who act will be seen, those who
listen shall soon be heard and when
the truth is apparent, by witness of
true constructive results, no-,,
Democrat will have to say a word or
overcome anything!
Sandra Brasmeister


Invernessr


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


e

t


I








TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 11A


CirRus COUNTY (FL) CHROMCLE


U.S. troops in Iraq mark 4th


Gunfire, sirens

punctuate

celebration
Associated Press

BAGHDAD, Iraq In blis-
tering summer heat and blind-
ing sandstorms, U.S. troops
marked Independence Day on
Monday with barbecues, vol-
leyball and for those who
have them dips in the pool.
Bursts of gunfire and wailing
sirens served as a reminder of
why the troops are here.
President Bush vowed dur-
ing a Fourth of July speech in
West Virginia that U.S. forces
will stay in Iraq "until the fight
is won." But one soldier, Pfc.
Stephen Tschiderer, simply
prays he'll get home safely
after surviving a gunshot just
above his heart.
Tschiderer, an Army medic
from Mendon, N.Y, said he was
on patrol in Baghdad two days
ago when at least two gunmen
opened fire. Tschiderer was
standing next to his Humvee
when a bullet struck his flak vest,
knocking him to the ground.
"I opened up my vest, made
sure I wasn't bleeding, and con-
tinued with the mission," later
bandaging wounds of one of
the insurgents, he said. "It did-
n't seem weird until afterward
that I was treating the guy who
tried to kill me...I'm very proud
to serve my country, but I can't
wait to get back to live in my
country."
For most of the 136,000 serv-
ice members stationed in Iraq,
Independence Day passed
uneventfully in the 110 degree
heat. A blinding sandstorm
grounded most U.S. military
aircraft, muting the usual
;ound of hovering helicopters.
4 At a base in Taji, north of
paghdad, the storm forced can-


Associated Press
U.S. soldiers cut up an American flag cake Monday at a ceremony to mark the U.S. Fourth of July
Independence Day at Camp Victory in Baghdad, Iraq.


cellation of a boxing tourna-
ment. Other troops continued
their usual work of trying to
locate insurgents or stabilize
dangerous neighborhoods.
"To us, it is Independence
Day, but our soldiers are still
on patrols because the mission
is still going on," said Army Lt.
Taysha Deaton of Lake
Charles, La., serving with the
256th Brigade of the Louisiana
National Guard.
At Al Asad Air Base in west-
ern Iraq, Marine Cpl. Traben
Pleasant, 24, of Long Beach,
Calif., quaffed a nonalcoholic
beer and thought of home.
"This is my third July 4th in
Iraq," Pleasant said. "I miss my
family and friends. At home, I'd
be barbecuing on the beach
with my girlfriend."
In Baghdad, troops joined in
volleyball, Humvee pulls and
three-mile runs. The U.S. com-
mand threw a big barbecue
bash at Camp Slayer, with
troops cooling off'in a pool
overlooking a lake. Some let


loose with karaoke renditions
of songs like Roberta Flack's
"Killing Me Softly"
Soldiers on four-day rest
passes watched belly dancers
and a comedy show after roast-
ing a hog at the former Iraqi
Republican Guard officers'
club in Baghdad. The facility
was refurbished after the 2003
invasion and includes a pool
with a two-story diving plat-
form and big-screen TVs with
video games.
"People need to understand
that gaining independence is a
long process," said Army Sgt.
Andrew Chiu of Savannah, Ga.,
assigned to the 603rd Aviation
Support Battalion.
Others said the holiday took
on added meaning during their
tour in Iraq.
"Before, you kind of took it
for granted. Now we're seeing
what our forefathers went
through to gain (independ-
ence)," said Army Sgt. Kenneth
Alfred of Fort Hood, Texas, of
the 256th Brigade.


Others played horseshoes in
a grassy area dotted by palm
trees and surrounded by
Saddam Hussein's palaces,
some still damaged from U.S.
bombing at the start of the war
in 2003.
Smaller bases had less glitzy
commemorations. At Camp
Falcon in southern Baghdad,
dozens of U.S. soldiers gath-
ered to mark the holiday with
an afternoon prayer service.
"It was to remind them of
freedoms they have in the U.S.,
and to remember soldiers that
have passed on in this mis-
sion," said Maj. Alayne Conway
of St. Petersburg, Fla., serving
with the 3rd Infantry Division.
At Al Asad in western Iraq,
celebrations included roast pig
and a "Happy July 4th" poster
at the desert airfield's post
exchange. Troops looked for-
ward to a screening of "The
Patriot," a Mel Gibson film that
chronicles the life of a man and
his family during the American
Revolutionary War.


Justice picking involves risk for presidents


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Dwight D. -
lisenhower called hin
supreme Court appointments
he "biggest damn fool mistake
ever made." Richard Nixon
unwittingly named the future
liberal author of Roe v. Wade.
leorge H.W Bush's choice now
evokes a GOP grumble, "No
nore Souters!"
As President Bush mulls his
irst high court decision, he
mows well that the notion of
pickingg a' Supreme Court jus-
ice is indeed risky business.
le has to get the justice con-
irmed and then hope that his
choicee doesn't disappoint him.
Already, he's being buffeted by
ill kinds of advice not just
he institutional "advice and
consent" role that the
Founding Fathers carved out
br the Senate.


Liberal groups are preparing
to take aim at any staunchly
conservative jurist.
Conservative groups remem-
ber, with trepidation, that some
of the court's most liberal jus-
tices were picked by
Republican presidents. The
lesson is that justices are peo-
ple and people can be unpre-
dictable.
"There is a long history of
those who didn't turn out as
expected," said Tom Goldstein,
a Washington lawyer who fre-
quently argues before the high,
court. "It has something to do
with their independence -
justices, once they're appoint-
ed, answering to nobody but
themselves."
Bush plans to take material
about Supreme Court


prospects with him when he
goes to Europe today. "The
legal team has been working on
preparing. material." Dana
Perino, the White House
deputy press secretary, said
Monday.
Both sides are drawing bat-
tle lines after Justice Sandra
Day O'Connor a pivotal vote
on abortion, the death penalty
and affirmative. action -
announced last week that she
would retire upon Senate con-
firmation of her successor.
Liberal groups vow to fierce-
ly contest nominees who seek
to overturn the 1973 Roe deci-
sion affirming abortion rights,
while some congressional
Republicans were cautioning
against any selection of
Attorney General Alberto
Gonzales, a close friend of
Bush whom they believe isn't
steadfastly conservative.
Noting the, first President
Bush's choice of David H.
Souter, who has since become a
consistent vote in-the court's
liberal bloc, some conserva-
tives have said "Gonzales is
Spanish for Souter." Gonzales
has dismissed the criticism,
saying it is the president's
opinion that matters.
Justices hold lifetime
appointments and are charged
with upholding the
Constitution, a duty of political
independence that requires
them to strike down unlawful
acts of Congress or the presi-
dent Still, there are legal gray
areas that can bring cries of
dismay from interest groups if
justices don't rule as anticipat-
ed.
Legal historians said several
reasons explain why some


11 Muscile Sutais Musculosklctal
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: I Fi u -lOllll lyl
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S- l& ack Pa& i In,
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nominees disappoint. Many
were named despite a clear
record of judicial philosophy
or views on issues, perhaps
because they were prized for
factors such as gender, reli-
gious affiliation or political
background.
The court's internal dynam-
ics also play a factor Justices
craft their opinions with an eye
toward attracting at least a
five-vote majority. If they adopt
a hard-line position on princi-
ple, justices risk alienating col-
leagues and writing lonely dis-
sents for years.
"Generally speaking, nomi-
nees who have evolved in
unanticipated ways did not
have federal court back-
grounds," said David Garrow, a
Supreme Court historian at
Emory University
They include Chief Justice
Earl Warren and Justice
William Brennan, two Eisen-
hower appointees who from
the 1950s to the 1970s led the
court in assaulting racial segre-
gation and expanding individ-
ual rights against the govern-
ment. Warren was a former
Republican governor of
California; Brennan, a New
Jersey state court judge, was
coveted partly as a Catholic.
Eisenhower later said the
two were among his biggest
presidential mistakes.
Other "disappointments,"
according to historians, were
Harry Blackmun, Nixon's law-


and-order choice who penned
the landmark Roe v Wade deci-
sion making abortion a consti-
tutional right. He later
opposed the death penalty.
Souter's primary previous
experience was on state courts.
The Supreme Court current-
ly splits 5-4 on polarizing social
issues such as the death penal-
ty, even though seven of the
nine justices were named by
Republican presidents. That's
because two of them Souter
and John Paul Stevens, who
was chosen by President
Gerald Ford typically vote
with the two Democratic
appointees.
O'Connor, the first female
justice, and Anthony Kennedy,
President Reagan's compro-
mise choice after the doomed
bid of 'strong conservative
Robert Bork, also have drifted
left in recent years, making the
conservative majority a fragile
one.
Arthur Hellman, a constitu-
tional law expert at the
University of Pittsburgh, said
he believes O'Connor might
have been partly pushed away
by the fiery conservative rheto-
ric of Justice Antonin Scalia,
whom the president has cited
as the justice he most admires.
A new justice in the strident
Scalia mold might have the
same moderating effect on
Kennedy that Scalia had on
O'Connor, Hellman said.


' 5 9:00-5:00
SATURDAY
f 9:00-2:00


STATE CERTIFIED LIC #CFC14260986


Aruba judge



frees two



brothers


Son of justice

Associated Press

ORANJESTAD, Aruba A
judge in Aruba ordered Monday
the immediate release of two
Surinamese brothers held for
nearly a month in the disap-
pearance of an Alabama teenag-
er, but the 17-year-old son of a
top justice official on the island
was held for 60 more days.
The justice official's son,
Joran van der Sloot, and
Surinamese brothers Deepak
Kalpoe, 21, and Satish Kalpoe,
18, have been held since June 9
on suspicion they had knowl-
edge about the disappearance
of 18-year-old Natalee
Holloway, of Mountain Brook,
Ala. The three young men have
acknowledged that they were
with Holloway the night she
disappeared.
Holloway vanished in the
early hours of May 30, the last
day of a five-day vacation on
the Dutch Caribbean island to
celebrate her high school grad-
uation with 124 other students.
"The detention of Deepak
and Satish K has not been pro-
longed," court clerk Isella
Wernet said, reading from a
prepared statement outside
the courthouse. "The suspects
are ordered released immedi-
ately. The detention of Joran
van der S. has been prolonged


official held

60 days beginning today."
Wernet did not explain the
reasons for the judge's decision.
It wasn't clear when the two
would be released from custody.
Under Dutch law that gov-
erns Aruba, a protectorate of
the Netherlands, detainees
can be held 116 days before
being charged by a judge. Van
der Sloot has still not been
charged formally, his lawyer
Antonio Carlo said.
Prosecutors have acknowl-
edged they have no solid evi-
dence that Holloway is dead.
They said they could proceed
with a criminal case anyway,
although it would be difficult.
The judge's decision was
announced several hours after
van der .Sloot and the Kalpoe
brothers were brought to the
courthouse in the capital,
Oranjestad, in unmarked cars
and escorted through a side
door of the building.
Holloway's mother, Beth
Holloway Twitty, her father,
David Holloway, and their
respective spouses were
allowed to wait inside the
courthouse, but were prohibit-
ed from attending the hear-
ings, a family friend said.
Earlier Monday, attorneys
for all three young men reiter-
ated their clients' claims of
innocence.


mmm-m


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I from these area businesses: I

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JULY 5, 2005
www.chronicleonline corn


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NASA punches hole in comet


Nation RIEFS

White buffalo


Mission to learn how

solar system formed

Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. They weren't a
red, white and blue spectacle, but the
cosmic fireworks NASA created by
blasting a hole in a comet were some-
thing for scientists to cheer about this
Fourth of July weekend.
The brighter-than-expected white
flash of light climaxed a daring mission
"that's something to be proud of on
America's birthday," said Rick
Grammier, the mission's project manag-
er at NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
About 12 hours after the barrel-sized
Deep Impact space probe smashed into
a comet half the size of Manhattan, sci-
entists showed off dramatic, sci-fi-like
images. Photos shot by the impactor
probe as it awaited its suicidal collision
revealed for the first time the surface of
the comet Tempel 1 as it closed in at
23,000 mph.
The close-ups revealed not so much
the pickle-shaped comet that scientists
originally thought, but one that looked
more like a potato, lumpy and pocked.
Michael AHearn, an astronomer at the
University of Maryland and Deep
Impact principal investigator, likened it
to a muffin or loaf of bread.
The impact released a bright flash
followed by a larger one as a plume of
trapped gas and debris spewed from
the comet's belly into space, backlit by
the sun. The cloud blocked scientists'
view of the excavated crater and it
could be weeks before the dust disap-
pears. Still, scientists were confident
they accomplished their mission
because they were able to see the
crater's shadow in the photos.
"Our experiment went very, very,
well," said co-investigator Pete Schultz
of Brown University, who seemed to be
brimming with enthusiasm. "We
touched a comet and we touched it
hard."
The mission seemed to spark enthu-
siasm of skywatchers too. Officials at
JPL said the Deep Impact Website had
1 billion hits, compared to some 400
million hits for the Mars mission.
Scientists said the comet appears to
have a soft, dusty surface with crater-
like features. said. Trapped ice seems
to be below the surface, possibly con-


Associated Press
The Tempel i comet is shown after the probe from the Deep Impact spacecraft col-
lided with the comet early Monday. The successful strike 83 million miles away
from Earth marked the first time a spacecraft touched the surface of a comet.


training the primordial ingredients of
the solar system, Schultz said.
Scientists are hoping to get to the core
of this rocky, ice-filled structure to
learn about the origins of the sun and
planets.
A giant cloud of gas and dust col-
lapsed to create Earth's solar system
about 4.5 billion years ago, and comets
formed from the leftover building


G8 summit leaders strive


to boost support for Africa


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Leaders of
the world's wealthiest nations
are gathering in Scotland on
Wednesday for their annual
economic summit amid, expec-
tations of a relatively rare
occurrence at these meetings -P,
the pledge of hard cash. The .
meeting is expected to agree on '
billions of dollars in new sup-
port for Africa, the world's
poorest continent. A young child
President Bush and the other for AIDS orph
leaders will conduct their three Muldersdrift, n(
days of talks at the Group of burg. The child
Eight summit after an unprece- ty-stricken squE
dented warm-up act Hundreds attended the p.
of the world's top musicians of a GS Summit
performed at free rock concerts ing Wednesd
in 10 cities around the world where politic
Saturday, seeking to raise are mounting
awareness about Africa's plight pargn to force
and bring pressure on G8 lead- top of the ager
ers to do something.
British Prime Minister Tony
Blair, who set the agenda as this year's host,
wants to achieve breakthroughs not only in
African aid, but also in global warming.
The discussions, which will be buffeted by
noisy demonstrations from hundreds of anti-glob-
alization protesters and anarchists, will include
the hot political topics of Iraq, Iran, North Korea
and the Israeli-Palestinian. peace process. With


i
a


a
or
re
a


IC
ay
a
a
nd


E an intense atmosphere sur-
rounding the protests, the meet-
ings will take place under heavy
security at a luxury hotel and
golf resort in Gleneagles,
Scotland.
Blair has described Africa's
:. condition as a "scar on the con-
-- science of the world" and is
calling on rich countries to dou-
ble the current assistance from
$25 billion annually $50 billion
Associated Press by 2010.
attends a party Bush, after initially resisting
ins Sunday In Blair's ambitious goals,
rth of Johannes- announced last Thursday that
an from a pover- he will ask Congress to double
tter settlement U.S. support for Africa by the
rty given ahead target date, an increase that
to be held start- aides said would take U.S. assis-
in Scotland, tance from $4.3 billion in 2004 to
activists, and more than $8.6 billion in 2010.
l organizations "We have ah unprecedented
poverty to the opportunity to help other
poverty to the nations achieve historic victo-
Ida. ries over extreme poverty,"
Bush declared in announcing
the increased funding, which included more
money to fight malaria, a preventable disease
which claims 1 million lives each year in Africa.
Critics, however, complained that Bush was
counting support he had previously announced
and said the total contribution is still $6 billion'
below what the U.S. share should be in order to
meet Blair's goal.


Al-Jazeera plans expansion


Associated Press

DOHA, Qatar Al-Jazeera
is nothing if not bold.
It has fought repeatedly with
Washington, which says its
exclusive broadcasts of Osama
bin Laden speeches show an
anti-American, pro-terrorist
bias. Its freewheeling broad-
casts have decimated state-run
TV stations across much of the
Arab world, leading some
countries to close its bureaus
down.


So what does such a network
do next? Plan a massive expan-
sion.
By March, the network will
launch Al-Jazeera Interna-
tional, a satellite channel that
will beam English-language
news to the United States -
and much of the rest of the
world from its base in tiny
Qatar.
The ever-contentious Middle
East will be its specialty. And
the news, including coverage of
Israel, will be served up from


an Arab perspective, Al-
Jazeera executives say.
With a touch of the evangel-
ist, perhaps, the station's exec-
utives say their mission is noth-
ing less than reversing the
dominant flow of global infor-
mation, which now originates
on TV channels in the West. .
The station's research shows
some of the world's one billion
English speakers, including
Americans, thirst for news
from a non-Western perspec-
tive.


blocks of the solar system.
The mission also gives scientists
some information about how they might
one day stop a comet if one threatens
Earth but they would need a far larg-
er strike to make a significant dent in
turning a comet off-course, A'hearn
said.
Launched on its mission Jan. 12 from
Cape Canaveral, Fla., the Deep Impact


spacecraft traveled 268 million miles to
get the comet in its sights. Late Satur-
day, it released its copper "impactor"
probe and pointed it toward Tempel 1,
83 million miles from Earth. The probe
made a 24-hour solo flight toward the
comet, heading for a smash-up.
The camera of the probe temporarily
blacked out twice, probably from being
sandblasted by comet debris, NASA sci-
entists said. Still, on battery power and
tumbling toward the comet, using
thrusters to get a perfect aim, it took
pictures right up to the final moments.
The last image was taken three seconds
before impact.
Soon after it crashed on the comet's
sunlit side, the mothership came within
310 miles of the comet and took pic-
tures of the receding comet as it flew
away. More images will be produced by
an arsenal of space observatories in the
coming days.
The energy produced from the
impact was equivalent to exploding five
tons of dynamite and it caused the
comet to shine six times brighter than
normal.
The crash was not visible from Earth
except through a telescope in western
parts of the Western Hemisphere. But
the impact late Sunday was cause for
celebration, not only to scientists in
mission control, but for the more than
10,000 people camped out at Hawaii's
Waikiki Beach to watch it on a giant
movie screen.
Brian Spears, a 19-year-old anthro-
pology student and Star Trek fan from
San Bernardino, Calif., called the event
"really a key point in our whole lives.
We might find out the origins of how we
came along."
"It's almost like one of those science
fiction movies," said Steve Lin, a
Honolulu physician
The cosmic smash-up did not signifi-
cantly alter the comet's orbit around
the sun and NASA said the experiment
never posed any danger to Earth -
unlike the scary comet headed in the
1998 movie "Deep Impact."
Scientists at mission control erupted
in applause and exchanged hugs as a
voice on a speaker proclaimed, "Team,
we got a confirmation."
It was a milestone for the U.S. space
agency, because no other space mission
has flown this close to a comet. In 2004,
NASA's Stardust craft flew within 147
miles of Comet Wild 2 en route back to
Earth carrying interstellar dust sam-
ples.


Studies link TV


with poor


academics


Associated Press

CHICAGO Too much TV-
watching can harm children's
ability to learn and even
reduce their chances of getting
a college degree, three new
studies suggest in the latest
effort to examine the effects of
television on kids.
Critics faulted the research
for not adequately considering
the content of the TV watched,
but experts said it bolsters
advice that children shouldn't
have televisions in their rooms.
The separate findings were
published Monday in,the July
issue of Archives of Pediatrics
& Adolescent Medicine.
One of the studies involved
nearly 400 northern California
third-graders. Those with tele-
visions in 'their bedrooms
scored about eight points
lower on math and language
arts tests than children without
bedroom televisions.
A second study, looking at
nearly 1,000' adults in New
Zealand, found lower educa-
tion levels among 26-year-olds
who had watched lots of televi-
sion during childhood.
A third study, based on
nationally representative data
on nearly 1,800 U.S. children,
found that those who watched
more than three hours of tele-
vision daily before age 3 scored
slightly worse on academic and
intelligence tests at ages 6 and
7 than youngsters who watched
less television. The effect was
only modest but still worri-
some, said co-author Frederick
Zimmerman, a researcher at
the University of Washington.
The studies took into ac-
count other factors that might
have influenced the outcome,
such as household income. But


they largely ignored other
research that "found positive
associations between chil-
dren's educational TV viewing
and subsequent academic
achievement," according to an
Archives editorial.
"Reliable and valid estimates
of viewing, including content-
based measures, are critical to
our udnderstanding of the effects
of TV on young children, espe-
cially ,children younger than
age 2 years," the editorial said.
Previous research has
linked television exposure in
young children with attention
problems and difficulty learn-
ing to read.
The American Academy of
Pediatrics recommends that
youngsters younger than 2 not
watch any television, that older
children watch no more than
two hours daily of "quality"
programming, and that televi-
sions be kept out of children's
bedrooms.
Recent data suggest, howev-
er, that U.S. youngsters from
infancy to age 6 watch an aver-
age of one hour of TV daily, and
that 8-to-18-year-olds watch an
average of three hours daily
John Wilson, senior vice
president of programming at
PBS, released a statement say-
ing that other studies have
shown that the Public Broad-
casting Service's children's
programs, which include
"Sesame Street," can benefit
child development
The New Zealand study led
by Dr. Robert Hancox of the
University of Otago in Dunedin
acknowledged that the results
don't prove that television is
the culprit and don't rule out
that already poorly motivated
youngsters may watch lots of
television.


Associated Press
A white buffalo calf is nuzzled
by her mother Sunday at
Buffalo Crossing farm near
Bagdad, Ky. Singers and
drummers from many Indian
nations held a ceremony hon-
oring the recent birth of the
calf, considered a rare and
sacred symbol. The calf was
named Medicine Heart.

Church group backs
gay marriage
ATLANTA The United
Church of Christ's rule-making
body voted overwhelmingly
Monday to approve a resolution
endorsing same-sex marriage,
making it the largest Christian .
denomination to do so.
The vote is not binding on
individual churches, but could
cause some congregations to
leave the fold.
Roughly 80 percent of the
representatives on the church's
884-member General Synod
voted to approve the resolution
Monday, a day after a smaller
committee recommended it.
Searchers for boy
find human remains
COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho -
Authorities said Monday they
found human remains during
their search for a missing 9-
year-old boy whose sister was
found days earlier at a Denny's
restaurant with a registered sex
offender.
Sheriff Rocky Watson said the
remains were found in western
Montana and would be sent to
an FBI laboratory for DNA
analysis. He did not say whether
the remains were believed to be
those of Dylan Groene, and
declined to answer questions.
The DNA analysis is expected
to take three days.

WorldBRIEFS

African summit


Associated Press
Libyan leader Moammar
Gadhafi chairs an African
summit amid global calls to
combat poverty in Africa and
attended by more than 50
leaders Monday in Sirte,
Libya. Gadhafi called on
African nations to stop "beg-
ging" during the opening.

U.N. nuclear agency
may amend treaty
VIENNA, Austria -
Delegates from about 100 coun-
tries began work Monday to
revamp an international treaty
on protecting nuclear material,
arguing existing laws fail to do
enough to safeguard nuclear
power plants from terrorism.
The push to shield nuclear
facilities has gained urgency
since the attacks of Sept. 11,
2001, amid new security con-
cerns and nightmare scenarios
of fuel-laden jumbo jets smash-
ing into atomic power plants.
The existing treaty was
signed in Vienna and New York
in 1980, long before the threat
of terrorist nuclear attacks had
become a pressing fear. It cov-
ers the international transport of'
nuclear material used for peace-
ful purposes, as well as some
provisions on domestic storage
and use.
From wire reports


/- _,-
'/ C
7 -








The best ever?


'...
....... :... -., ..:


.1 K


JULY 5, 2005


Sorts. .
Bonds rehabbing
knee in LA. area
SAN FRANCISCO Barry
Bonds is in Southern California
rehabilitating his surgically .
repaired right knee and probably
won't rejoin the San Francisco
Giants until after the All-Star break.
Bonds, who
hasn't played
this season as.
he recovers
from three
operations on
his knee since
Jan. 31, is pro-
gressing
Barry enough that the
Giants remain
yet to play this hopeful he will
season play sometime
this summer -
though there still is no timetable for
the slugger's return.
Bbnds will likely rejoin the
Giants next Thursday.
In his most recent journal entry
on his Web site, Bonds said:
"Last week my knee slightly
swelled, so I'll be taking it easy,
sticking with range-of-motion and
strengthening exercises. This is all
part of rehabilitation, so as long as
I pace myself correctly, I will be
able to work through this swelling
as I did with the infection. At this
point in the season, my outlook is
still positive."
Devil Rays call up
infielder Cortez
CHICAGO The Tampa Bay
Devil Rays called up infielder
Fernando Cortez from Triple-A
Durham before Monday night's
game against the White Sox.
Cortez, 23, replaces outfielder
Chris Singleton, who was released
on Sunday.
Cortez,
making his
major-league
debut, played second
, base and batted .278 in 21 games
at Durham after beginning the sea-
son at Double-A Montgomery.
Overall, he hit .317 with 21 stolen
bases in 76 games for Durham
and Montgomery.
Verdasco wins on
rainy day in Gstaad
GSTAAD, Switzerland -
Spain's Femando Verdasco beat
Czech qualifier Jaroslav Pospisil 6-
2, 6-4 in the only match completed
before rain halted play on Day 1 of
the Swiss Open on Monday.
Former two-time champion Jiri
Novak was tied with 2004 semifi-
nalist Potito Starace of Italy 3-6, 7-
6 (3) when the rain set in.
Vinciguerra comes
back at Swedish Open
BASTAD, Sweden -Andreas
Vinciguerra played his first match
in two years after being sidelined
with injuries, beating Michael
Ryderstedt 6-3, 6-1 Monday in the
first round of the Swedish Open.
In the other first-round match,
third-seeded Tommy Robredo of
Spain outlasted Michal Tabara of
the Czech Republic 7-5, 6-0.
French Open champion Rafael
Nadal is seeded first and hard-
serving Swede Joachim
Johansson is seeded second.
Both open play Tuesday. .
From wire reports


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Photos by MATTHEW BECK/Cnronicle
Chris White of Tampa strokes his way through the first portion of the swim at Ft. Island Beach Monday morning. Racers completed a one-quarter-mile swim and then onto
a 15-mile bike ride and finished up with a three-mile run. ; Overall winner Leif Stringer of St. Augustine (right) and women's winner Kristy Peterson of Tampa.

July 4 means beer and barbecue for many; for triathletes, it means strength, speed and endurance
C.J. RISAK Stringer of St Augustine. A Stringer. He won last year's
cjrisak@chronicleonline.com former cross country runner Memorial Day race in
Chronicle at University of Central 1:02:47, then placed second
'' '. ... Florida, Stringer crossed the in the Fourth of July race in
Sure, the Crystal River finish line in 1 hour, 4'min- 1:02:59. He missed this year's
Triathlon is individually-ori- utes 39 seconds ahead of Memorial Day race with a
ented, with athletes of all Jesse Peterson of Tampa. foot injury.
ages and all sexes driving Peterson, who's in the Air Now 25, Stringer has been
.... themselves toward their own Force and is stationed at competing in triathlons since
singular goals. But don't dis- MacDill Air Force Base, was- he was 14 and a student at
count the importance of fam- n't the only member in his Buholtz High School in
ily. immediate family to stand Gainesville.
Because as the Fourth of out. His wife, Kristy, was the "My godmother was doing .
July Sprint Triathlon proved, overall .winner in the triathlons and I would go
this is very much a family women's race in 1:09.19. with her to races," he said. -
affair. For that matter, Stringer The race intrigued him and
The overall winner in this wasn't the only Stringer. His before long he was compet-
test of endurance, a race that younger brother, Dylan, was ing, combining it with his dis-
starts with a quarter-mile first in the 15-19 age bracket tance running.
open-water swim, followed (and 16th overall) in 1:10:27. "Competition definitely
by a 15-mile bicycle race and Success in the Crystal
______________ __ a three-mile run, was Leif River series isn't new to Leif Please see ...'/Page 3B '


Citrus star to attempt Nextel race


Kim BOLLINGER
kbollinger@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
This weekend's Nextel Cup race at
Chicagoland Speedway could have spe-
cial meaning to local race fans.
Wildwood's Wayne Anderson will
attempt to qualify the No. 75 Dodge into
the USG Sheetrock 400 event scheduled
for Sunday.
The son of Florida's Short Track
King, Dick Anderson, the Citrus County
Speedway Super Late Model standout
has been given the opportunity to step
into the big leagues.
It's an opportunity of a lifetime, and a
reward for years of hard work from


local, state and nationwide stock car
events. He's set records in and won just
about everything he could from each
racing arena.
In NASCAR's All-Pro series,
Anderson set record-after-record,
earned wins throughout the series, and
topped his career with two All-Pro
championship titles.
Getting into the show won't be easy
though. With the top 35 positions
secured, he'll have to qualify his way in
driving for car owner Robert Rinaldi.
Chicagoland Speedway is a 1.5-mile
tri-oval with 18 degrees of banking in
the corners, 5-degree banking on the
backstretch, and 11-degree banking in
the tri-oval.


This is the fourth year Nextel Cup
drivers have competed at Chicagoland.
Kevin Harvick holds the race record
(2002) with a speed of 136.832 mph. Last
year's event was won by Tony Stewart
Jeff Gordon set the qualifying record at
186.842 mph. Harvick won back-to-back
events at Chicagoland Speedway (2001,
2002).
Qualifying for the USG Sheetrock 400
will be Friday at 3:10 p.m.
If he qualifies, he'll attempt to go the
distance of 400.5 miles on Sunday. The
race begins at 2:35 p.m.
Anderson replaces Mike Garvey, who
recently left to pursue other racing
interests. He will also attempt to qualify
at New Hampshire.


Lance yearning for yellow


Associated Press
TOURS, France Lance
Armstrong pedaled beside the
overall leader of the Tour de
France and admired his taste
in fashion. The six-time cham-
pion wants to be decked out in
yellow again, and he might not
have to wait long.
"Regardless of how many
I've had in my day, it's still a
jersey I cherish," Armstrong
said.
Armstrong was content to
ride safely in the main pack
again Monday. He finished in
87th place in the third stage
while Belgium's Tom Boonen
sprinted to victory for the sec-
ond straight day, the route
marked by towering gray cas-
tles, endless green fields and
Six-time Tour de France winner
Lance Armstrong, center, fol-
lowed by Alexandre Vinokourov,
left, of Kazakhstan, ride during
the third stage of the Tour de
France.
Associated Press


dozens of vineyards.
There will be nothing cau-
tious about the key time trial
Tuesday. Armstrong is a mere
two seconds behind leader
David Zabriskie of the United
States and will be looking to,
gain more ground on his rivals,
and perhaps move in front
again.
Then, Armstrong -'who has
worn the leader's jersey more
than 60 times will truly con-
sider himself on track for a sev-
enth straight title before retire-
ment
For the past two years,
Armstrong's team won the
team time trial for the U.S.
Postal Service squad. Now he
wants to win for new sponsor
Discovery Channel in the nine-
man discipline a 41.9-mile
ride from Tours to Blois.
"It's critical in that you can
gainr time and every second
counts," Armstrong said. "It's
good for the morale and good
for the team to show they are
strong. We've been lucky


enough to win the last two
years and we'd like to try
again."
A strong showing could, bol-
ster his advantage. The Texan
leads Jan Ullrich by 66 sec-
onds, Alexandre Vinokourov by
51 and Ivan Basso by 84.
"I can't go to bed at night
thinking 100 percent we're
going to win," he said. "I think
we're up against some strong
teams. It's critical at the end to
ride steady because the course
will be going up and down."
Ullrich and Vinokourov will
ride for the T-Mobile team
while Basso races for Team
CSC, as does Zabriskie.
Zabriskie finished in 56th
place in Monday's 133-mile leg,
which started from La
Chataigneraie in western
France and snaked toward the
medieval city of Tours.
Boonen won in 4 hours, 36
minutes, 9 seconds and kept
the green jersey as the best
Please see TOUR/Page 3B


For Tiger,


putts are


the pits
Turns out everybody
looking for the
Kryptonite in Tiger
Woods' bag the last few years
was probably focused on the
wrong club. It wasn't the
longest stick in there sapping
the strength of the world's
best player, but likely the
shortest one.
The putter sabotaged Woods
again Sunday afternoon, and
with it, his
chances of
stealing the
Western
Open from
Jim Furyk
Losing a
tournament
that he's
won three
times
already may AP Columnist
not have JIM
crushed. LTKE
Woods' ego,
but it can't
have boosted his confidence
with two weeks left before he
tees it up at St Andrews in
the season's third major.
Especially not after a three-
putt on No. 17 at Pinehurst
two weeks ago doomed him to
a second-place finish behind
Michael Campbell at the U.S.
Open.
After he shot a 66 at Cog
Hill to finish two strokes
behind Firyk, someone asked
Woods what part of his game
he'd improve immediately if
someone handed him a magic
wand. He didn't hesitate.
"Everything," he said.
"Everything is key at the
British Open. You have to
Please see LITKE/Page 3B


==. 3_q


*w-








2B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005


Yanks erupt past 0's


Associated Press

NEW YORK Jason Giambi
had his first multihomer game in
two years and Bernie Williams
hit a tiebreaking single in a
seven-run eighth inning as the
New York Yankees beat the
Baltimore Orioles 13-8 Monday
after wasting a big lead.
On the 75th birthday of
Yankees owner George
Steinbrenner, Gary Sheffield,
Hideki Matsui and Giambi home-
red to help New York go ahead 6-
0 after two innings against Bruce
Chen.
But Baltimore, coming off its
best first half since 1997, rallied
on a sunny Fourth of July for an
8-6 lead. Brian Roberts and Jay
Gibbons homered, Rafael
Palmeiro hit a tying single in a
three-run seventh and Luis
Matos hit a two-run double.
Giambi made it 8-7 in the
eighth with his second solo
homer, a drive off Steve Kline.
B.J. Ryan (1-2) walked Alex
Rodriguez with the bases loaded,
forcing in the tying run. Williams
then flared a single to right for a
10-8 lead.
Jason Anderson (1-0) got his
second major league win.
Steinbrenner did not attend the
4-hour, 12-minute, 397-pitch
marathon, the longest nine-
inning game in the major leagues


4L
..






-a"l -t -. '-i
'. 2 -. -.


Jason Giambi watches the flight of his eighth-inning h


this season.
Indians 9-6, Tigers 3-0
CLEVELAND Travis Hafner hit
his third home run of the day, Coco
Crisp added an inside-the-park
homer, and the surging Cleveland
Indians completed a sweep of a day-
night doubleheader
Hafner homered twice and drove in
five runs in the first game. He was 6-
for-10 with six RBIs in the double-
header.


Jason Davis (4-2), ca
Triple-A Buffalo to make
allowed four hits, struck
walked two in six inning
big league win since a 7
San Francisco on June
Making his major leach
Justin Verlander (0-1), ti
in the 2004 draft, gave L
and seven hits in 5 1-3
ing three, striking out fo
ing several pitches that
mph on the radar gun.


In the opener, Scott Elarton (5-3)
pitched a six-hitter for his fourth
career complete game and first since
a two-hit shutout of the Chicago
White Sox on Aug. 29.
Mariners 6, Royals 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Ryan
Franklin pitched a six-hitter to lead
Seattle over Kansas City.
Franklin (4-10), tied for the major
league lead in losses, pitched his
third career shutout. The Royals have
been shut out three times in the last
four games and scored in only one of
their last 37 innings.
Raul Ibanez hit a three-run homer
for Seattle, which has won consecu-
tive games.


*,.;. { Rangers 6, Red Sox 5
-"=- ARLINGTON, Texas Kevin
Associated Press Mench had an RBI single with one
omer. out in the ninth inning, and the
Texas Rangers rallied against
killed up from struggling closer Keith Foulke for a
3 the start, 6-5 win Monday night over the
out five and Boston Red Sox, who lost for the
s for his first fifth time in seven games.
7-0 triumph at The Rangers scored twice in the
11. ninth against Foulke (5-5). Michael
gue debut, Young had a one-out triple before
he No. 2 pick Mark Teixeira doubled into the right-
up four runs field corner to tie it 5-all. Hank
innings, walk- Blalock drew a walk and Alfonso
ur and throw- Soriano was hit by a pitch before
registered 99 Mench's liner went over the head of
drawn-in left fielder Manny Ramirez.


NL: Oswalt fires Astros past Padres


Associated Press

HOUSTON Roy Oswalt
made a strong case for late All-
Star voters, pitching a five-hitter
to lead the Houston Astros past
the San Diego Padres 4-1
Monday.
Craig Biggio hit a go-ahead,
three-run homer for the Astros,
who have won eight of 11. It was
Biggio's 2,722nd hit, moving him
past Lou Gehrig for 51st on the
career list
Oswalt (11-7) threw his third
complete game this season and
the eighth of his career, lowering
his ERA to 2.44. He struck out six
and walked two to win his fifth
straight start and eighth decision
in a row at home.
Hoping for his first All-Star
berth, Oswalt is one of five pitch-
ers eligible to earn the fihal spot
on the National League team in
Internet balloting this week
Mets 5, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON Demoted from
leadoff to seventh in the lineup, Jose
Reyes responded with two hits and
scored the tying and go-ahead runs,
helping New York beat Washington.
With the score 2-2 in the ninth,
Reyes legged out an infield hit, stole
his 24th base and scored on pinch-
hitter Jose Offerman's single off Sun-
woo Kim (1-1). An RBI double by new
leadoff hitter Mike Cameron and an
RBI single by Carlos Beltran provided
insurance runs as the Mets moved
back to .500.
Reds 11, Giants 10
SAN FRANCISCO Jason
LaRue hit a tiebreaking three-run
double and finished with a career-
high six RBIs, Ken Griffey Jr. home-
red and Cincinnati ended a four-game
road losing streak.
Wily Mo Pena hit a three-run
homer in the fourth that extended his
career-best hitting streak to 10
games. Griffey hit his 16th homer of
the season' and No. 517 for his career
leading off the third, moving within
four of tying Willie McCovey and Ted
Williams for 14th on the all-time list.
Phillies 12, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH Bobby Abreu


celebrated his All-Star selection by hit-
ting a grand slam during the first of
two breakout Philadelphia innings
against Pittsburgh starter Dave
Williams, leading the Phillies in a
matchup of slumping teams.
Abreu drove in five runs before
being lifted with the Phillies up by
nine in only their fourth win in 15
games two by Cory Lidle (8-6),
who held the Pirates to one run and
seven hits over seven innings in his
second consecutive victory.
Williams (6-6) was roughed up for
eight hits and eight runs in four
innings, though he didn't get much
help from his defense. Right fielder
Matt Lawton and center fielder Tike
Redman each committed a run-scor-
ing error by overrunning a ball in a
span of three batters in the fifth.
Cardinals 10, Diamondbacks 3
PHOENIX Matt Morris earned
his 10th win, Scott Rolen hit a two-run
double and St. Louis won for the sev-
enth time in 10 games.
John Mabry and pinch-hitters
Abraham Nunez and So Taguchi also
drove in two runs. Albert Pujols had
an RBI and extended his hitting
streak to 16 games for the Cardinals.
Morris (10-1) allowed one run and six
'hits in seven innings. -
Arizona's Troy Glaus had an RBI
single and a two-run homer the
200th of his career.
Brewers 3, Marlins 2
MIAMI Ben Sheets struck out
10 in his first win in six starts, and
Milwaukee scored the go-ahead run
in the ninth inning on catcher Paul Lo
Duca's error on a play at the plate.
With the scored 2-all, Milwaukee's
Chad Moeller led off the ninth with an
infield single off Todd Jones (1-3) that
shortstop Alex Gonzalez couldn't
reach. Pinch-runner Trent Durrington.
stole second and advanced to third
on Sheets' sacrifice. Brady Clark hit a
grounder to Gonzalez, who threw
home with plenty of time to get
Durrington. But Lo Duca couldn't hold
the ball when he applied the tag and
the Brewers went ahead 3-2.
Sheets (4-6) gave up a leadoff sin-
gle to Juan Pierre before being
removed for closer Derrick Tumbow,


Associated Press
Roy Oswalt pitched a complete game for the Astros on Monday.


who finished for his 16th save.
Braves 4, Cubs 0
ATLANTA-- Kyle Davies out-
pitched Kerry Wood, and Adam
LaRoche homered twice to lead
Atlanta.
Davies (4-2) pitched four-hit ball
into the seventh, helping Atlanta pull
within 41/2 games of Washington in


the NL East. He walked four but
held an opponent scoreless for the
fourth time in nine major league
starts, lowering his ERA to 4.05.
LaRoche's two-run shot off
Wood (1-2) highlighted Atlanta's
three-run first inning. He added his
11th homer in the eighth for his
second career two-homer game.


Four Fish enjoying All-Star attention


Associated Press

MIAMI Dontrelle Willis
didn't throw a single pitch in his
first All-Star appearance.
Barring something unfore-
seen, that won't happen this
time around. In fact, his team-
mates are convinced that the
left-hander who leads the
National League in wins and
ranks second in ERA should
throw the first pitch for his team
at next Tuesday's All-Star game.
Willis (13-3, 1.89) is one of four
Marlins headed to Detroit for
baseball's midsummer classic,
and could be the only starter.
Second baseman Luis Castillo,
catcher Paul Lo Duca and out-
fielder Miguel Cabrera all
reserve picks were also
tabbed for the team when the
roster was released Sunday
There's a handful of worthy
candidates for the NEs starting
pitching nod: Willis, Houston's
Roger Clemens (7-3, 1.41),
Washington's Livan Hernandez


(12-2, 3.32), and St Louis' Chris
Carpenter (12-4, 2.60).
But with the Cardinals' Tony
La Russa being the NL manager,
Willis believes Carpenter -
deservedly will start.
"It's not about the numbers
with me," said Willis, who made
his All'-Star debut in 2003 two
months after he was called up
from Double-A and won nine of
his first 10 major-league deci-
sions. "I think he deserved it,
and he made it for his team, and
his manager's the representa-
tive of the NL team so he should
be able to start It's not about
who has better numbers ... He
should get the ball."
But the Marlins camp an
admittedly biased lot is root-
ing for Willis.
"I get to watch him every day,"
right-hander Josh Beckett said.
"And what he's done has been
pretty impressive."
Before last year, the Marlins
never had more than three All-
Star representatives. Now, for


the second straight summer,
Florida has four players on the
NL team. And that's without for-
mer All-Stars like Carlos
Delgado, Alex Gonzalez both
meriting consideration this year
- and Mike Lowell even on this
year's squad.
Willis received more votes
than any other pitcher in polling
among NL players; he had 372,
while Roger Clemens, who has
the best ERA in baseball, got
296.
Lo Duca, like Willis, was the
top NL vote-getter at his posi-
tion in the players' balloting -
but he won't be starting, even
though his numbers match up
well, or better, in virtually all
categories when compared
against Mike Piazza of the New
York Mets, who won the fan vot-
ing.
It's the third straight All-Star
appearance for Lo Duca.
"When the players vote them
in, that's the most respect you
can get," Marlins' center fielder


Juan Pierre said. "If the guys
you play against respect you
enough to vote you in, that shows
the most"
And Cabrera the only cur-
rent Florida All-Star who repre-
sented the Marlins in last year's
game also clearly has the
respect of his peers. Among out-
fielders, only Philadelphia's
Bobby Abreu got more votes
from NL players than Cabrera,
who outdid even Atlanta's
Andruw Jones and Milwaukee's
Carlos Lee, two of the best run
producers so far.
Castillo also earned his way
onto the team via the players'
ballot; it'll be his third All-Star
trip. No other NL East team has
more than two All-Star selec-
tions at this point; in the NL,
only St. Louis, with six, has more
players packing for Detroit than
the Marlins.
"They were all selected by
their peers," Marlins manager
Jack McKeon said. "That's some-
thing special."


MLB SCOREBOARD


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay

Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Texas
Oakland
Seattle


Washington
Atlanta
Florida
Philadelphia
New York

St. Louis
Chicago
Houston
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
46 35 .568 z-5-5
44 38 .537 2V2 2-8
42 39 .519 4 5-5
42 40 .512 4V z-6-4
27 55 .32919/2 z-2-8
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
54 26 .675 z-6-4
45 34 .570 8V z-7-3
46 36 .561 9 z-8-2
37 43 .463 17 z-2-8
26 55 .321 281/2 1-9
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
50 31 .617 z-8-2
43 38 .531 7 z-6-4
40 41 .494 10 z-9-1
35 46 .432 15 z-3-7
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB, L10
50 32 .610 z-8-2
46 37 .554 4/2 z-7-3
42 38 .525 7 z-6-4
42 41 .506 81/2 3-7
41 41 .500 9 z-6-4
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
52 30 .634 z-7-3
40 41 .4941112 4-6
39 42 .481 12Y2 7-3
39 43 .476 13 z-6-4
35 46 .43216Y2 2-8
32 50 .390 20 z-3-7
West Division
W L Pct GB L1O


San Diego 45 38 .54.
Arizona 41 43 .48
Los Angeles 38 43 .46
San Francisco 34 47 .42(
Colorado 28 52 .35
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Cleveland 9, Detroit 3, 1st game
N.Y. Yankees 13, Baltimore 8
Cleveland 6, Detroit 0, 2nd game
Texas 6, Boston 5
Seattle 6, Kansas City 0
Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 7:05
p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore (Lopez 7-4) at N.Y. Yankees
(R.Johnson 7-6), 1:05 p.m. ,
Detroit (Maroth 5-9) at Cleveland
(Westbrook 6-9), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Haren 7-7) at Toronto (Towers 6-
7), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 7-6) at Texas (C.Young
8-4), 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hendrickson 3-5) at Chicago
White Sox (Garcia 8-3), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Meche 8-5) at Kansas City
(Carrasco 3-3), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Baker 0-0) at L.A. Angels
(E.Santana 2-3), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay, at Chicago White Sox, 8:05
p.m.
Seattle at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.



Yankees 13, Orioles 8
BALTIMORE NEW YORK
ab rhbi ab r hbi
BRbrts 2b 411 2 Jeter ss 5 3 2 0
Mora 3b 5 120 Cano 2b 3 1 1 1
Tejada ss 4 1 0 0 Shffield rf 3 2 1 3
RPImo lb 4 11-4 1 ARod3b 3 '-1l"1,
SSosadh 3 20 0 BWIImsdh 5 1 1 2
Gbbons rf 4 22 2 Matsui If 4 2 2 2
Newhn ph 1 00 0 Posada c 4 0 1 0
Matos cf 501 2 JaGbi lb 3 223
BigbieIf 3 01 0 TMrtnzlb 0 000
Fasano c 2 00 1 Wmack cf 3 0 1 0
Sierraph 1 .0 1 0
Crosbycf 1 1 1' 1
Totals 358 8 8 Totals 35131413
Baltimore 001 301 300- 8
New York 420 000 07x- 13
E-Tejada (11). DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-
Baltimore 9, New York 9. 2B-Mora 2 (19),
Matos (8). HR-BRoberts (15), Gibbons (12),
Sheffield (14), Matsui (12), JaGiambi 2 (7).
SB-Tejada (4), Bigbie (3), Womack (20).
CS-Womack (4). S-,Cano.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
BChen 11-3 6 6 6 2 2
Williams 22-3 3 0 0 1 0
Byrdak 11-3 0 0 0 0 2
Ray 12-3 0 0 0 1 2
Kline 0. 2 2 2 0 0
BRyanL,1-2 2-3 3 5 4 3 0
Julio 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
New York
Sturtze 32-3 3 4 4 3 1
Proctor 2 2 1 1 1 3
WFranklin 2-3 2 2 2 0 1
JAnderson W,1-0 12-3 1 1 1 4 1
MRivera 1 0 0 0 0 2
BChen pitched to 4 batters in the 2nd, Kline
pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
SHBP-by BRyan (JaGiambi), by Ray
(ARodriguez), by Williams (Sheffield), by
Sturtze (Tejada).
T-4:12. A-53,844 (57,478).
Brewers 3, Marlins 2
MILWAUKEE FLORIDA
ab rhbi ab r hbi
BClarkcf 4 01 0 Pierre cf 4 1 2 0
Weeks 2b 4100 LCstillo 2b 3 0 1 0
BHall3b 4 00 0 Cbrera If 4 0 0 0
CaLee If 4 01 1 CDIgdo lb 4 1 1 2
Helms lb 3000 JEcrcn rf 4 000
Ovrbaylb 0 00 0 LDucac 3 000
Mgrder rf 4120 Lowell 3b 3 000
Hardy ss 401 1 AGnzlz ss 3 0 1 0
Moeller c 4020 Olsen p 1 000
Drgtn pr O 100 Bump p 0 000
DMiller c 0 00 0 Conine ph 1 0 0,0
BShets p 2 00 0 Mecir p 0 0 0 0
Tumbw p 0 0 0 Motap 1 000
LHarrs ph 0 000
TJones p 0 0 0 0
Totals 333 7 2 Totals 31 2 5 2
Milwaukee 100 001001- 3
Florida 000 200 000- 2
E-Lo Duca (4). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-
Milwaukee 8, Florida 3. 2B-BClark (18),
CaLee (22). HR-CDelgado (16). SB-
Magruder (2), Durrington (2), Pierre (22),
AGonzafez (4). CS-BClark (10). S-
BSheets.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
BSheetsW,4-6 8 4 2 2 1 10
TumbowS,16 1 1 0 0 0 0
Florida
Olsen 52-3 6 2 2 3 8
Bump 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Mecir 1 0. 0 0 0 1
Mota 1 0 0 0 1 0
TJonesL,1-3 1 1 1 0 0 1


BSheets pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
T-2:35. A-24,207 (36,331).
Cardinals 10, Diamondbacks 3


ST. LOUIS

Eckstin ss
Edmnd cf
Tguchi cf
Pujols lb
LWalkr rf
Luna rf
Rolen 3b
Mabry If


ARIZONA
ab rhbi
4 11 0 Cunsell 2b
3 000 Tracy lb
1 01 2 LGnzlzlIf
4 11 1 ShGren rf
3 21 0 Glaus 3b
1 00 0 JoCruzcf
4 32 2 Clayton ss
4 142 CSnydr c


2 5-5
8 4/2 z-4-6
9 6 z-4-6
0 10 4-6
015/2 z-6-4


Home
24-14
24-19
25-18
20-16
19-23

Home
27-12
26-18
21-17
19-22
15-25

Home
24-14
24-16
27-16
20-22

Home
29-11
25-12
23-18
24-18
25-18

Home
27-16
21-21
25-13
23-16
17-20
24-22

Home
27-16
20-21
22-20
17-23
21-19


Away Intr
22-21 12-6
20-19 8-10
17-21 11-7
22-24 8-10
8-32 3-15

Away Intr
27-14 12-6
19-16 8-10
25-19 15-3
18-21 9-9
11-30 9-9

Away Intr
26-17 12-6
19-22 9-9
13-25 10-8
15-24 10-8

Away Intr
21-21 12-6
21-25 7-8
19-20 10-5
18-23 7-8
16-23 5-10


Away Intr
18-22 7-11
21-22 8-10
16-23 5-13
17-24 6-12
7-33 6-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets 5, Washington 2
Houston 4, San Diego 1
Cincinnati 11, San Francisco 10
Philadelphia 12, Pittsburgh 1
Milwaukee 3, Florida 2
St. Louis 10, Arizona 3
Atlanta 4, Chicago Cubs 0
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 8:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Mets (P.Martinez 9-2) at Washington
(Loaiza 4-5), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Capuano 8-6) at Florida
(Beckett 8-5), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lieber 8-8) at Pittsburgh
(K.Wells 5-8), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Maddux 7-5) at Atlanta
(Colon 0-4), 7:35 p.m.
San Diego (D.Reyes 3-1) at Houston
(Backe 6-6), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Od.Perez 4-4) at Colorado
(Francis 7-5), 9:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Suppan 7-7) at Arizona (Estes 6-
6), 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (Milton 3-9) at San Francisco
(Lowry 5-7), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Florida, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
San Diego at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Grdzln 2b 5 01 0 Cintron ph 1 0 0'0
YMlina c 4 11 1 Webb p 2 0 0 0
Morris p 3 00 0 McCkn ph 1 01 '0
Nunez ph 1 11 2 Aquino p 0-0 0--0
Thmpsp 0 00 0 JrLopz p 0 000
EDiazph 1 00 0 Kplove p 0 0 O00
Eldred p 0 00 0 TClark ph 1 0 0-0
Totals !. 38101310 Totals 36 3 9 3
St. Louis .- 013 000 141- 10
Arizona 000 001 020- 3
E-Glaus (16). DP-Arizona 1. LOB-St.
Louis 8, Arizona 7. 2B-Taguchi (8), LWalker
(14), Rolen (10), Nunez (6), Tracy (18),
ShGreen 2 (20). HR-Glaus (18). SB-Pujols
(8). SF-YMolina.


IP H RER BB S
St. Louis
Morris W,10-1 7 6 1 1 0
Thompson 1 3 2 2 0
Eldred 1 0 0 0 0
Arizona
Webb L,8-5 7 8 5 4 2
Aquino 1-3 3 4 4 2
JrLopez 0 1 0 0 1
Koplove 12-3 1 1 1 1
JrLopez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Morris (Glaus). WP-Webb.
T-2:48. A-31,197 (49,033).
Mets 5, Nationals 2
NEW YORK WASHINGTON


7
1
1

6
1
0
o


ab rhbi ab r hbi
Cmeron rf 5 122 Wlkrsn cf 4 0 00
Beltran cf 4 02 1 Carroll ss 3 1 2 0
Floyd If 4 00 0 JGillen rf 4 0 1 1
Piazza c 4 O0'O Castilla 3b 4 1 1 0
RCstroc 0 00 0 Byrd If 4 0 0,0
MrAnd 2b 4 12 0 Baerga 1b 4 0 0 0
Wright 3b 4 01 0 Spivey 2b 4 0 1 1
Reyes ss 4 22 1 GBnntt c 3 0 0 0
Wdwrd lb 3000 JoPttsn p 2 0 0 0
GeWlm pr 0 00 0 Ayala p 0 0 0 0
RHrndz p 0 00 0 Cepicky ph 1 0 0 0
Offrmn ph 1 11 1 SKim p 0 0 0 0
Looper p 0 00 0
Ishiip 2 00 0
HBellp 0000
Daubchlb 2 00 0
Totals 37510 5 Totals 33 2 5 2
New York 000 000 203- 5
Washington 010 001 000- 2
E-MarAnderson (2), Reyes (9). LOB-
New York 7, Washington 5. 2B-Cameron
(19), MarAnderson (5), Wright (22), JGuillen
(18), Castilla (21), Spivey (15). SB-Reyes
(24). CS-Carroll (3).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Ishii 51-3 5 2 2 1 5
HBell 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
RHrndz W,4-2 2 0 0 0 0 2
LooperS,18 1 0 0 0 0 0
Washington
JoPatterson 6 4 2 2 2 7
Ayala 1 2 0 0 0 1
SKim L,1-1 2 4 3 3 0 1
JoPatterson pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
T-3:37. A-44,331 (45,250).
Astros 4, Padres 1
SAN DIEGO HOUSTON


Jkson 2b
MaSwy lb
Klesko If
BGiles rf
Fick c
Blum 3b
Nady cf
KGreen ss
Lwmce p
Brrghs ph
Qantrill p


ab rhbi
4 01 0 Tveras cf
4 01 0 Biggio 2b
4 00 0 Brkmn lb
2 11 0 Ensbrg 3b
4 01 0 Lane rf
401 1 AEvrtt ss
3 00 0 Burke If
3 00 0 Asmus c
2 00 0 Oswalt p
1 000
0000


ab r h bi
4220
4 1 1 3
3 000
4 02 1
4000
4020
4 0 1 0
3 1 1 0
3 0 1 0


Totals 311 5 1 Totals 33 410 4
San Diego 000 100 000- 1
Houston 100 000 30x- 4
E-Blum (2). DP-San Diego 2. LOB-San
Diego 5, Houston 6. 2B-MaSweeney (7),
Blum (10), Taveras (9), Ensberg (17). HR-
Biggio (11). SB-Taveras 2 (21), AEverett (7),
Ausmus (2).
IP H RER BB SO
San Diego
Lawrence L,5-7 7 9 4 4 1 5
Quantrill 1 1 0 0 0 1
Houston
OswaltW,11-7 9 5 1 1 2 6
T-2:10. A-40,550 (40,950).


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


sU,


,' E .i *.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BASEBALL
AL Boxes
Rangers 6, Red Sox 5
BOSTON TEXAS
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Damoncf 5 11 0 Dlluccidh 4 1 1 0
Rnteria ss 4 100 MYong ss 5 2 1 0
DOrtiz dh 4220 Txeira lb 3 22 1
MRmrz If 3 11 3 Blalock 3b 4 0 1 2
Nixon rf 402 1 ASrano 2b 4 1 2 1
Millarib 4 01 0 Mench If 5 0 1 1
Olerud lb 0 00 0 Nix cf 4 0 0 0
Varitekc 4000 Brajas c 3 02 1
Mueller 3b 301 0 Mathwsrf 3 0 0 0
Blihorn 2b 2 00 0
Totals 335 8 4 Totals 35 610 6
Boston 002 001 020- 5
Texas 300 000 012- 6
One out when winning run scored.
E-WMiller (1), MYoung (5). DP-
Boston 1, Texas 2. LOB-Boston 7, Texas
11. 2B-DOrtiz (23), Nixon (17), Teixeira
(21), Barajas (13). 3B-MYoung (4). HR-
MRamirez (21).
IP H RERBBSO


Boston
WMiller 6
Gonzalez 2-3
Halama 1-3
Timlin 2-3
Embree 1-3
Foulke L,5-5 1-3
Texas
RRodriguez 51-3
Dominguez 1
BShouse 2-3
BenoitoW,1-0 2
BShouse pitched to 1


00 0
00 0
2 1 1
00 0
32 2


4 3 3 4 1
1 0 0 1 1
1 1 1 0 0
2 1 1 1 1
batter in the 8th.


HBP-by Foulke (ASoriano). WP-
RRodriguez.
T-3:14. A-50,492 (49,115).
Indians 9, Tigers 3
DETROIT CLEVELAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Inge 3b 4 00 0 Szmorec f 5 1 1 0
CGillen ss 4 12 0 Crisp If 5 2 2 0
Shltn lb 4 120 Hafnerdh 5 345
RoWhte If 4 12 3 Brssrd lb 5 0 1 1
IRdrgz c 4 00 0 Blliard 2b 3 0 1 1
DYongdh 3 00 0 Gerut rf 3 0 1 0
Monroe rf 3 00 0 JHrndz 3b 3 1 0 0
JSmith2b 3000 Bardc 4 1 20
Loganhcf 3 00 0 JhPlta ss 4 1 2 1
Totals 323 6 3. Totals 37 914 8
Detroit 000 000 102- 3
Cleveland 102 401 10x- 9
E-CGuillen (5). DP-Cleveland 1.
LOB-Detroit 2, Cleveland 7. 2B-Shelton
(3), Crisp (18), Bard (3). HR-RoWhite (9),
THafner 2 (16). SF-Belliard.


IF
Detroit
JJohnson L,5-7
Creek
Spurling
German
Cleveland
Elarton W,5-3 <
WP-JJohnson.


P H RERBBSO


31-3. 11
22-3 1
I 2
1 0


6 3 3 0 6


T-2:34. A-26,869 (43,405).
Indians 6, Tigers 0, Game 2
DETROIT CLEVELAND
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Inge 3b 4 01 0 Szmore cf 5 02 1
Planco'2b 401 0 Crisp If 5 22 1
Shltn lb 401 0 Hafnerdh 5 1 2 1
MOrdzrf 4 00 0 VMrtnz c 5 1 1 1
DYongdh 2000 Brssrdlb 4 1 21
Monroe If 4 01 0 JhPlta ss 3 1 2 1
Infante ss 3 01 0 Gerut rf 2 0 1 0
VWilsn c 3 01 0 JHrndz3b 3 0 0 0
Logan cf 4000 Cora 2b 4 0 00
Totals 320 6 0 Totals 36 612 6
Detroit 000 000 000- 0
Cleveland 300 001 02x- 6
*E-Verlander (1). DP-Cleveland 1.
LOB-Detroit 9, Cleveland 10. 2B-
Shelton (4), Monroe (13), Infante (17),
Sizemore 2 (20), VMartinez (14),
Broussard 2 (19). HR-Crisp (8), THafner
(17). SB-Infante (5), Crisp (9).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Verlander L,0-1 51-3 7 4 4 3 4
JWalker 11-3 3 0 0 1 1
Rodney 11-3 2 2 2 0 2
Cleveland
JaDavisW,4-2 6 4 0 0 2 5
Miller 1 2 0 0 0 0
Howry 1 0 0 0 1' 2
Riske 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by JaDavis (DYoung). WP-
Verlander. Balk-Miller.
T-2:45. A-33,599 (43,405).
Mariners 6, Royals 0
SEATTLE KANSAS CITY


ISuzuki rf
Winn If
Ibanez dh
Beltre 3b
Season 1b
JoLpez 2b
Morse ss
Blmqist cf
Brders c


ab rhbi
4 03 0 DJesus cf
5 00 0 Gotay 2b
4 22 3 MiSwy dh
4 11 0 Stairs lb
4 02 1 Long rf
4 00 0 Berroa ss
3 11 0 Teahen 3b
4 11 0 Buck c
4 11 1 Costa If


ab r hbi
4 01 0
4 01 0
4.0 1 0
3000
4 01 0
4010
2000
3000
3010


Totals 36611 5 Totals 31 0 6 0
Seattle 004 002 000- 6
Kansas City 000 000 000- 0
E-Teahen (9). DP-Seattle 2, Kansas
City 3. LOB-Seattle 5, Kansas City 6.
2B-DeJesus (14), MiSweeney (20). HR-
Ibanez (12).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
RFranklin W,4-10 9 6 0 0 1 4
Kansas City
Howell L,1-3 5 8 6 6 1 2
MWood 2 1 0 0 1 1
Jensen 2 2 0 0 0 1
Howell pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by RFranklin (Stairs).
T-2:23. A-23,562 (40,785).
NL Boxes
Reds 11, Giants 10
CINCINNATI SAN FRAN
ab rhbi ab r hbi
FLopez ss 501 0 Tucker rf 4 3 3 1
Aurilia 2b 3 11 0 Vizquel ss 5 0 1 1
Casey lb 5 11 0 Snow lb 4 1 3 2
Grf Jr. cf 4 22 1 Feliz ph 1 1 1 0
WPena rf 5 22 3 Alou If 4 1 2 2
Dunn If 3 21 0 Drham 2b 5 1 1 2


On the AIRWAVES


On the AIRWAVES


EEcrcn 3b 4 22 0 DCruz 3b 5 1 1 1
LaRue c 3 12 6 Ellison cf 5 0 0 0
ERmrz p 2 00 0 Trralba c 3 2 1 0
Coffey p 0 00 0 Rueter p 0 0 0 0
Romno ph 1 000 Accrdo p 0 0 00
RWgnr p 1 00 0 Tschnr p 0 000
Wthers p 0 00 0 Hwkins p 0 0 0 0
Randaph 1 00 0 ASnchz ph 1 0 0 0
Merckr p 0 00 0 Munter p 0 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 00 0 Eyre p 0 0 0 0
Niekro ph 1 000
Chrstns p 0 0 0 0
Totals 37111210 Totals 381013 9
Cincinnati 013 304 000- 11
San Francisco 420 111 001-10
E-WPena (2), ERamirez (1), Durham
(9). DP-San Francisco 1. LOB-
Cincinnati 8, San Francisco 6. 2B-Dunn
(17), LaRue (13), Tucker 2 (13), Vizquel
(20), Snow (10), Feliz (15), Alou 2 (11).
HR-Griffey Jr. (16), WPena (12), LaRue
(7), Durham (5), DCruz (4). S-LaRue,
Rueter 2. SF-LaRue.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
ERamirez 32-3 8 7 7 2 0
Coffey 1-3 00 0 0 1
RWagnerW,3-2 2 3 2 2 1 2
Weathers 2 0 0 0 0 1
Mercker 0 2 1 1 0 0
Belisle S,1 1 0 0 0 0 0
San Francisco
Rueter 4 9 7 7 4 2
Accardo L,0-2 12-3 1 2 2 1 2
Taschner 0 0 1 1 1 0
Hawkins 1-3 1 1 1 1 1
Munter 1 0 0 0 0 0
Eyre 1 0 0 0 0 2
Christiansen 1 1 0 0 0 1
Mercker pitched to 2 batters in the 9th,
Taschner pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
PB-Torrealba.
T-3:24. A-40,333 (41,584).
Phillies 12, Pirates 1
PHILA PITTSBURGH
ab rhbi ab r hbi


Rollins ss
REMtiz ss
Mchels cf
BAbreu rf
Chavez cf
Burrell If
Utley 2b
DaBell 3b
Howard 1lb
Fultz p
Worrell p
Lbrthal c
Lidle -p
ToPerz lb


4 11 0 Lawton rf
2 01 0 Hill3b
4 32 1 Snchez 3b
4 22 5 Bay If
2 01 0 Rstvich If
5 13 2 Ward lb
6 12 0 Castillo 2b
6 12 1 VgIsng p
4 22 1 STorres p
0 000 Cota ph
0 00 0 RiWhtep
1 11 0 Mckwk cf
3 01 0 Doumit c
1 00 0 JWilsn ss
DWIms p
TRdmn of


4000
0000
4 01 0
3000
1 000
3 01 0
2 1 20
1 0 1 0
0000
1 000
0000
4 0 1 1
3000
4000
1 000
3 01 0


Totals 42121810 Totals 34 1 7 1
Philadelphia 004 060 101- 12
Pittsburgh 010 000 000- 1
E-Lawton (1), TRedman (5). DP-
Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Philadelphia 12,
Pittsburgh 8. 2B-Burrell (12), DaBell (13),
Ward (18), Vogelsong (1), Mackowiak (14).
3B-DaBell (1). HR-BAbreu (18). S-
Lidle. SF-Howard.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Lidle W,8-6 7 7 1 1 0 6.
Fultz 1 0 0 0 1 0
Worrell 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
DWilliams L,6-6 4 8 8 8 2 5
Vogelsong 31-3 8 3 3 2 3
STorres 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
RiWhite 1 2 1 1 1 1
DWilliams pitched to 4 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Lidle (Doumit), by STorres
(Lieberthal), by Vogelsong (Lieberthal).
T-3:12. A-37,259 (38,496).
Braves 4, Cubs 0
CHICAGO ATLANTA


ab rhbi
Hrst Jr cf 2 01 0 Furcal ss
TWaIkr 2b 4 00 0 Jhnson If
DeLee lb 4 00 0 MGiles2b
Burnitz rf 1 00 0 AJones cf
ARmrz 3b 402 0 LaRche lb
HIndsw If 4 02 0 JEstda c
NPerez ss 4 01 0 Lngrhn rf
Barrett c 4 00 0 Btemit 3b
Wood p 200 0 Davies p
Rmingr p 0 00 0 Foster p
Macias ph 1 00 0 Boyer p
Wuertz p 0 00 0 Ritsma p
Ohman p 0 00 0
CPttson ph 1 00 0


r h bi
0 1 0

1 1 1
223



000
0 1 0
0 1 0.


Totals 310 60 Totals 30 4 8 4
Chicago 000 000 000- 0
Atlanta 300 000 01 x- 4
E-Davies (1). DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-
Chicago 9, Atlanta 7. 2B-Furcal (11).
HR-LaRoche 2 (11). S-Davies.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Wood L, 1-2
Remlinger
Wuertz
Ohman
Atlanta
Davies W,4-2
Foster
Boyer
Reitsma


62-3 4 0 0
1-3 00 0
1 1 0 0
1 1 0 0


HBP-by Remlinger (JEstrada).
T-2:29. A-52,274 (50,091).
Baseball's Top Ten


BRoberts E
VGuerrero
Damon Bo
MYoung Te
Tejada Bal
ARodrigue
THafner CI
GAndersor
Matsui NY'
DOrtiz Bos


American League
GAB
Bal 75293
LAA 63240
s 75320
ex 77330
82326
z NYY 81307
le 74264
n LAA 77310
Y 81308
78303


R H Pct.
54105.358'
43 84.350
60109.341
58107.324
51104.319
59 98.319
52 83.314
44 97.313
52 96.312
56 94.310


Home Runs
Teixeira, Texas, 22; ASoriano, Texas, 20;.
ARodriguez, New York, 20; MRamirez,
Boston, 20; DOrtiz, Boston, 19; Konerko,
Chicago, 19; Tejada, Baltimore, 19.
Runs Batted In
MRamirez, Boston, 70; DOrtiz, Boston,
68; ARodriguez, New York, 67; Teixeira,
Texas, 64; Matsui, New York, 62;
GAnderson, Los Angeles, 61; Sheffield,
New York, 61.
Pitching (7 Decisions)
Crain, Minnesota, 8-0, 1.000; Buehrle,
Chicago, 10-2, .833; Clement, Boston, 9-2,
.818; Garland, Chicago, 13-3, .812; Park,
Texas, 8-2, .800; OHernandez, Chicago, 7-
2, .778; Halladay, Toronto, 12-4, .750;
CILee, Cleveland, 9-3, .750; Lackey, Los
Angeles, 6-2, .750; Donnelly, Los Angeles,
6-2, .750.


DeLee ChC
Pujols.StL
LCastillo Flie
Cabrera Fla
Alou SF
NJohnson V
FLopez Cin
BAbreu Phi
BClark Mil
Tracy Ari


National League
GAB
81307
82317
a 60216
79307
66239
Vas 74256
S 69270
83302
81339
75251


R H Pct.
66116.378
67108.341
45 73.338
55103.336
'42 78.326
43 82.320
45 86.319
60 96.318
59107.316
36 78.311


Home Runs
AJones, Atlanta, 26; DeLee, Chicago,
25; Ensberg, Houston, 22; CaLee,
Milwaukee, 22; Dunin, Cincinnati, 21;
Pujols, St. Louis, 21; Floyd, New York, 21:
Runs Batted In
CaLee, Milwaukee, 73; Pujols, St. Louis,
67; DeLee, Chicago, 67; Burrell,
Philadelphia, 63; AJones, Atlanta, 61;
Ensberg, Houston, 60; Cabrera, Florida,
59; CDelgado, Florida, 59; JKent, Los
Angeles, 59.
Pitching (7 Decisions)
Morris, St. Louis, 10-1, .909;
LHernandez, Washington, 12-2, .857;
Eaton, San Diego, 9-2, .818; PMartinez,
New York, 9-2, .818; Willis, Florida, 13-3,
.812; Peavy, San Diego, 7-2, .778;
Carpenter, St. Louis, 12-4, .750.

CYCLING

Tour de France
Monday at Tours, France
Third Stage
133 miles from La Chataigneraie to
Tours
1. Tom Boonen, Belgium, Quick Step, 4
hours, 36 minutes, 9 seconds.
2. Peter Wrolich, Austria, Gerolsteiner, same
time.
3. Stuart O'Grady, Australia, Cofidis, same
time.
4. Bernhard Eisel, Austria, Francaise des
Jeux, same time.
5. Allan Davis, Australia, Liberty Seguros,
same time.
6. Robert Forster, Germany, Gerolsteiner,


SPORTS


same time. T
7. Magnus Backstedt, Sweden, Liquigas-
Bianchi, same time.
8. Anthony Geslin, France, Bouygues
Telecom, same time. Continued from Page 1B
9. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Credit Agricole,
same time. sprinter. Peter Wrolich of
10. Angelo Furlan, Italy, Domina Vacanze, sri ee a o
same time. Austria was second and Stuart
11. Isaac Galvez, Spain, Illes Balears, same O'Grady of Australia was third.
time. Armstrong loathes such flat
12. Guido Trenti, United States, Quick Step, stages and was relieved to have
same time.
13. Gianluca Bortolami, Italy, Lampre, same avoided an accident. Two years
time. ago, he was caught in a 35-rider
14. Luciano Pagliarini, Brazil, Liquigas- crash on the Tour and was
Bianchi, same time. lucky to escape with cuts and
15. Daniel Becke, Germany, Illes Balears, bruises.
same time. bruises.
16. Manuel Quinziato, Italy, Saunier Duval, "Days like today aren't neces-
same time. sarily my idea of a great time,"
17. Juan Antonio Flecha, Spain, Fassa he said. "Everybody does some-
Bortolo, same time.
19. Fred Rodriguez, United States, thing a little bit crazy in front of
Davitamon-Lotto, same time.
20. Sebastian Lang, Germany, Gerolsteiner, 1 I* *
same time. I I T U


TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Baltimore Orioles at New York Yankees. From Yankee
Stadium in the Bronx, N.Y. (Live) (CC)
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Milwaukee Brewers at Florida Marlins. From Dolphins
Stadium in Miami. (Live)
8 p.m. (66 PAX) Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Chicago White Sox. From
U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago. (Live)
BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) WNBA Basketball Phoenix Mercury at San Antonio
Silver Stars. From the SBC Center in San Antonio. (Live) (CC)
BICYCLING
8:30 a.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 4. Stage 4
team time, trial from Tours to Blois, France. (Live)
12 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 4. Stage 4
team time, trial from Tours to Blois, France. (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 4. Stage 4 team
time, trial from Tours to Blois, France. (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Tuesday Night Fights lan Gardner vs. Mohammed
Said. Ian Gardner battles Mohammed Said in a middleweight bout. From
Boston. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
LACROSSE
4 p.m. (ESPN2) MLL Lacrosse Baltimore Bayhawks at Long Island
Lizards. (Taped)


Nicklaus wins four skins in Canada


Associated Press

WHISTLER, British Columbia
- Jack Nicklaus, weeks away
from his final British Open
,appearance, rolled in a 10-foot
birdie putt on the fourth hole
Monday to win four skins worth
$48,231 and take the first-day lead
at the Canadian Skins Game.
Canadian Stephen Ames col-
lected two skins worth $28,135,
while- John Daly won one skin
worth $12,058. Vijay Singh missed
two short birdie putts and was
shut out
Nicklaus is using the two-day
event as a warm-up for his final
British Open at St Andrews in 10
days, saying the competitive envi-
ronment would force him to focus
on his game.


"I knew if I had Stephen, Vijay
and John, it would be pretty good
competition. I hope they give me
some tomorrow, Nicklaus said
with a smile.
Playing the front nine of the
Nicklaus North course he
designed, the 65-year-old
Nicklaus didn't miss a fairway, but
was behind his playing partners
off the tee at the 459-yard, par-4
fourth. But his 5-iron from 194
yards stopped 10 feet from the
pin, inside Singh and Daly, who
hit their drives 75 yards farther
After Daly and Singh missed
birdie putts from 20 to 25 feet,
Nicklaus calmly made his putt.
and drew a big roar from the
gallery for winning four skins
after the first three holes were
carried over


"I'd like to just play when I'm
65," Singh said, joking. "Jack's
beating us at 65."
Daly claimed a skin at the 416-
yar, par-4 fifth, making an 8-foot
birdie putt after Ames missed on
the same line.
Singh, who missed a birdie putt
inside 5 feet on the opening hole,
had another good chance to win a
skin at the par-3 sixth when he hit
his tee shot within 4 feet But his
putt caught the lip of the cup and
spun out.
"You still have to put the ball in
the hole," Singh said. "I played
well, I was fired up out there. I
think Jack is fired up, too, he's
playing well and he's very com-
petitive, and it's a chance for him
to kick our butts."
Ames, a native to Trinidad and


Tobago who received his
Canadian citizenship in 2003,
picked up a pair of skins worth
$28,135 by making a 2-foot birdie
putt at the seventh.
"To play with Mr Nicklaus, I'm
just enjoying this as much as I
can and if a couple of putts go in
the hole and I get a couple of
skins, it's just a bonus for me,"
Ames said.
Ames and Daly birdied the par-
5 eighth and all four players
made par at No. 9, as two skins
carried over to Tuesday.
The first six holes were worth
$12,058 each, and the last three
on the front nine were worth
$16,077. On the back nine, Nos.
10-12 will be worth $16,067 each,
and the final six holes will be
worth $20,096.


Also
45. Christopher Horner, United States,
Saunier Duval, same time.
56. David Zabriskie, United States, CSC,
same time.
59. Bobby Julich, United States, CSC, same
time.
82. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Discovery
Channel, same time.
87. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Discovery Channel, same time.
89. George Hincapie, United States,
Discovery Channel, same time.
98. Manuel Beltran, Spain, Discovery
Channel, same time,
103. Jose Azevedo, Portugal, Discovery
Channel, same time.
106. Paolo Savoldelli, Italy, Discovery
Channel, same time.
111. Jose Luis Rubiera, Spain, Discovery
Channel, same time..
120. Benjamin Noval Gonzalez, Spain,
Discovery Channel, same time.
121. Pavel Padrnos, Czech Republic,
Discovery Channel, same time.
131. Floyd Landis, United States, Phonak,
same time.
174. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
Gerolsteiner, same time.
Overall Standings
(After three stages)
1. David Zabriskie, United States, CSC, 8
hours, 48 minutes, 31 seconds.
2. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Discovery Channel, 2 seconds behind.
3. Laszlo Bodrogi, Hungary, Credit Agricole,
:47 behind.
4. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, T-
Mobile, :53.
5. George Hincapie, United States,
Discovery Channel, :57.
6. Floyd Landis, United States, Phonak, 1:02.
7. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Fassa
Bortolo, 1:02.
8. Jens Voigt, Germany, CSC, 1:04.
9. Vladimir Karpets, Russia, Illes Balears,
1:05.
10. Igor Gonzalez de Galdeano, Spain,
Liberty Seguros, 1:06.
11. Bobby Julich, United States, CSC, 1:07.
12. Jan Ullrich, Germany, T-Mobile, 1:08.
13. Tom Boonen, Belgium, Quick Step, 1:09.
14. Jose Enrique Gutierrez, Spain, Phonak,
1:12.
15. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
Gerolsteiner, 1:13.
Also
17. Jose Luis Rubiera, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 1:16.
18. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Discovery
Channel, 1:18.
24. Benjamin Noval, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 1:28.
32. Pavel Padrnos, Czech Republic,
Discovery Channel, 1:34.
33. Paolo Savoldelli, Italy, Discovery
Channel, 1:35.
35. Jose Azevedo, Portugal, Discovery
Channel, 1:39.
54. Chris Homer, United States, Saunier
Duval, 2:01.
65. Fred Rodriguez, United States,
Davitamon-Lotto, 2:09.
72. Manuel Beltran, Spain, Discovery
Channel, 2:14.
174. Guido Trenti, United States, Quick Step,
3:21.
Tour de France Stages
July 2 Stage 1, Fromentiere to
Noirmoutier-en-L'lle, individual time trial, 19
km (11.8 miles) (stage: David Zabriskie,
United States; overall: Zabriskie)
July 3 Stage 2, Challans to Les Essarts,
182 (112.5) (Tom Boonen, Belgium; Zabriskie)
July 4 Stage 3, La Chataigneraie to
Tours, 208 (132) (Boonen; Zabriskie)
July 5 Stage 4, Tours to Blois, team time
trial, 66 (41.9)
July 6 Stage 5, Chambord to Montargis,
179 (113.5)
July 7 Stage 6, Troyes to Nancy, 187
(123.4)
July 8 Stage 7, Luneville to Karlsruhe,
Germany, 225 (141.7)
July 9 Stage 8, Pforzheim, Germany, to
Gerardmer, France, 235 (143.5)
July 10 Stage 9, Gerardmer to Mulhouse,
170 (106)
July 11 Rest day in Grenoble.
July 12 Stage 10, Grenoble to
Courchevel, 192 (119.4)
July 13 Stage 11, Courchevel to
Briancon, 173 (107.3)
July 14 Stage 12, Briancon to Digne-les-
Bains, 187 (116)
July 15 Stage 13, Miramas to Montpellier,
162 (107.6)
July 16 Stage 14, Agde to Ax-3
Domaines, 220 (136.7)
July 17 Stage 15, Lezat-sur-Leze to
Saint-Lary Soulan, 205 (127.4)
July 18 Rest day in Pau.
July 19 Stage 16, Mourenx to Pau, 177
(111.9)
July 20 Stage 17, Pau to Revel, 239
(148.5)
July 21 Stage 18, Albi to Mende, 189
(117.2)
July 22 Stage 19, Issoire to Le Puy-en-
Velay, 154 (95.2)
July 23 Stage 20, Saint-Etienne to Saint-
Etienne, individual time trial, 55 (34.1)
July 24 Stage 21, Corbeil-Essonnes to
Paris, Champs-Elysees, 160 (89.3)


i


rvunI n
Continued from Page 1B

attracts me," he said, but then
again that seems to be a family
trait. "My mom races, my dad
races, and today Dylan was rac-
ing," Leif noted.
Not surprising, it was during
the running phase that Stringer
pulled out the victory.
"I was sixth out of the water,"
he said, which was good for
him. The foot injury that kept
him out of the Memorial Day
race, plantar fasciitis, limited
his running but aided his swim-
ming workouts.
"I got better (swimming)
because of the injury," he said.
Brecht Heuchan of
Tallahassee was -ahead after
the bicycling phase, but shortly
after the halfway mark in the
run, Stringer passed him.
Heuchan placed third overall
in 1:04:54.
As for competing in the final
event of the Crystal River
triathlon series, the Labor Day
race, Stringer is uncertain.
"There are more and more
races everywhere in Florida,"
he said. "There are more choic-
es. There are races weekly."
He likes the Crystal River
races because the course is
"well hydrated and well
marked," which, he said, was
vitally important to any triath-
lete. At present, however,
Stringer is planning to run in
the Chicago marathon in
October for the third time, and
training for that could keep
him from the Labor Day
Triathlon.
For Kristy Peterson, the win
was her first at Crystal River in
her first time running this race.



LIKE
Continued from Page 1B

drive it well and position your
irons well."
More telling, though, was the
90 minutes Woods spent on the
practice green Thursday
evening after taking 29 putts en
route to an opening-round 73
that left him dangling perilous-
ly close to the cut line.
Talk about paying immediate
dividends: Woods vaulted back
into the tournament Friday and
Saturday, with nary a three-putt
in either round. He began the
final day five shots behind
Furyk, but a birdie-birdie-eagle
binge on Nos. 9-11 pushed him
to 13-under and into the unlike-
ly co-leader's spot for all of 10
minutes.
Then, Flryk rolled in a sec-
ond birdie., of his own at the
11th, plowed in a third straight
at No. 12, right about the same
time that Woods three-putted
the 13th and the tournament
was effectively over
"This year," Woods said after-
ward, "either I'm putting great
or I'm struggling. Nothing in
between. Either I'm rolling
them in from everywhere or I'm
three-putting."
That's hardly news, but nei-
ther is it the exaggeration it
might sound like. Woods has
wrestled with his driver since
he exploded on Southern
California's loaded junior ama-
teur circuit, and for all his awe-
some power, the plain fact is
that he's never been precise.
For all the fuss that's been
raised about his wildness off
the tee, the most telling num-
bers have always been those
he's rolled up on the greens.
Last year, for example, Woods
ranked ninth on the PGA Tour
in distance, averaging 302
yards, but 182nd in accuracy,
finding the fairway just 56 per-
cent of the time. He offset much
of that wildness by finishing
second in putting average, and
really limited the damage by
taking just 23 three-putts all
season.
Coming into the Western,
though, Woods already had 20
three-putts this season. He
chalked up No. 21 on on
Thursday, but after the lengthy
practice session, appeared to
have put the problem behind
him. Then game Sunday With
Firyk playing in the twosome
behind him and applying pres-
sure most of the way around,


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 3B


you on the finish."
Armstrong stayed in the mid-
dle of the pack as farmers put
down their tools and villagers
gazed from stone houses at the
mass of cyclists streaming past
in a militarylike unit. He even
found time to chat with
Zabriskie, his former teammate
at U.S. Postal.
"Lance was telling me to just
enjoy the yellow jersey,"
Zabriskie said. "He asked me if
he could have a turn."
Zabriskie fears Armstrong's
turn is imminent
"Holding onto the lead is
going to be really tough," he
said.


Also a former cross country
runner she ran for the
University of South Florida -
she took some time off after
graduating in 2003, then
became, interested in the
triathlon.
"I liked the challenge of it,"
she said.
With the Petersons, it would
be difficult to separate
triathlon and family. They met
just over a year ago while train-
ing and were married seven
weeks ago.
Although running is her
strongpoint her best 5-kilo-
meter time is 16:47 that was-
n't what carried her in this
race.
"Today it was the biking," she
said. Her running was a bit off,
she said, only because "I killed
myself on the bike."
And yet, she was able to hold
off the challenge of women's
runner-up Laura DeWitt of
Brooksville, who was second in
1:09:31.
Although it was the first time
in this race for both of the
Petersons, it won't be the last-
depending, of course, on where
the Air Force sends them.
Another triathlon family
with a notable absentee was
the Fitzgeralds if Dunnellon.
Todd Fitzgerald, a perennial
top-10 finisher overall for the
men, was away at school and
couldn't make the race. His
father, Dwight, did well
enough, placing 10th overall
and first in the 45-49 age brack-
et in 1:08:37.
Stringer, for one, was glad
Fitzgerald wasn't able to make
it.
"He'll be mad when he sees I
won it in 1:04," said Stringer.
"That's almost two minutes
slower than I was last year"


Woods three-putted Nos. 6 and
13 for bogeys. That saddled him
with 23 this season as many
as he had all last year
To top it off, Woods made a
third bogey by leaving a sand
shot in the bunker at No. 14.
That many mistakes in the final
round made Woods seem more
like a flinching Tiger than a
crouching one. Either way, it
caught Furyk off-guard.
"I would say it surprised me,"
he said, "because he's such a
good player. That's one negative
of being the best Everyone
expects you to be perfect If he
makes a mistake, it sticks out
more than anyone else. People
pay notice to it People will
mention it to him. He has to
relive those moments a little
more critically than everyone
else, because the spotlight is on
him."
That was apparent when
someone asked Woods about
the number of three-putts this
season versus last He didn't
even wait to hear the entire
question.
"I knew that," Woods said.
"It's speed," he continued.
"You're not going to misread a
putt by 8 feet If anything,
you're going to have poor
speed. Poor speed always leads
to three putts, not misreads."
Conventional wisdom is that
pro golfers are so close in the
skills necessary to play the
game that weekly comes down
to a putting contest By spend-
ing more hours at the gym, visit-
ing their sports psychologists
religiously and applying every
bit of technology that club and
ball manufacturers have devel-
oped in recent years, the pack
chasing Woods neutralized his


distance advantage.
None is his equal yet in the
mental-toughness department
But it's clear that Woods can't
will the ball into the hole every.
time he needs to and certain-,
ly not the way it seemed he
could once. Spraying tee shots
all around the grounds has
made Woods seem beatable.
But the golfers trying to do just
that know Woods is never more
vulnerable than when he's
wrestling with a balky putter
"He's human," Furyk said a
second time. "Sometimes it
doesn't seem that way, but he's
human."


Jim Litke is a national sports
columnist for The Associated
Press. Write to him at
jlitke@ap.org








4B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 SPORTS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Alone at the top


Associated Press
Switzerland's Roger Federer who won his third straight Wimbledon title on Sunday is being welcomed by thousands of fans In
Basel, Switzerland, on Monday.


Gap widening between Federer and everybody else


Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England -
A day before Wimbledon
began, Andy Roddick stood on
a slope overlooking the prac-
tice courts at the All England
Club. Down below, Roger
Federer was going through a
training session, and Roddick
sneaked a peek
Two weeks later and a short
walk away, Roddick got a
much closer look in the
Wimbledon final, and after
absorbing a lopsided loss to
fall to 1-9 against Federer, the
American arrived at two con-
clusions:
Federer is better than
everyone at everything, and
Roddick would love nothing
better than to keep trying to
defeat the man who's by far
*the No. 1 player of their gen-
eration and now is being
judged against the greats of
generations past
"He's probably as close as
has been to unbeatable,"
Roddick said Sunday after los-
ing to Federer at Wimbledon
for the third consecutive year.
"I want another crack at
him till my record is 1-31. I
still want to go against him
again. You want to compete
against the best. He's the
measuring stick,-so you kind
of know where you are and
where you go."
As talented as Roddick is -
good enough to win the 2003
U.S. Open, finish No. 1 that
year at the age of 21, and now
make it to the final at the All
England Club two straight
years he can't come close to
Federer at the moment
But that's OK No one can


on grass. And no one can, con-
sistently, on any surface.
"The bad news," as three-
time Wimbledon winner Boris
Becker put it, "is Roger is only
going to get better."
Since June 2004, Federer is
98-5 (a .951 winning percent-
age) with 15 titles that have
come on grass, hard, clay and
indoor courts. None of the
losses came in finals


(Federer's
won a record
21 in a row),
though two
were in semi-
finals at this
year's Grand
Slams ,
against Marat
Safin at the
Australian
Open and
Rafael Nadal
at the French


T
news is I
only going
better.


*Bo
Former ch


Open, the only major he has
yet to win and now will focus
on adding to his collection.
Unprompted, Federer men-
tioned those setbacks during
the on-court trophy ceremony
Sunday after his close-to-per-
fect performance beat
Roddick 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4. He
said the losses in Melbourne
and Paris meant "the pressure
was on" at Wimbledon.
After making 33 winners
and only three unforced errors
through two sets and whipping
passing shots by Roddick at
will, Federer was told that just
when it seems as if he can't get
any better, he does.
"It seems like it, yeah,"
Federer said, drawing laugh-
ter from the Centre Court
crowd.
What's vital for Roddick is


that he keeps trying to catch
up.
And that's what he plans to
do.
"There's things that Andy
could do to be effective
against Roger. It's all a learn-
ing process and it's obviously
gaining confidence in some of
the new things he was trying
against him," Roddick',s
coach, Dean Goldfine, said.
"His net game
is getting bet-
'he bad ter and that's
obviously one
Roger is of the keys. If
you sit back
ig to get there and let
Roger hit
from the
baseline and
don't pres-
ris Becker sure him, it's
lamp on Federer. tough."
The amaz-
ing thing about Federer is that
he's so versatile, he can beat
anybody in any way, including
a demoralizing tendency to
one-up opponents in their
strengths.
In the quarterfinals,
Federer faced No. 21-seeded
Fernando Gonzalez, who hits
every shot as if it's his last
Federer matched Gonzalez
power for power, and 'dis-
played dazzling defense to
win in straight sets.
In the semifinals, Federer
faced No. 3-seeded Lleyton
Hewitt, widely considered the
best returned in the game and
a baseline expert who's as
speedy as they come. Federer
looked every bit as quick and
adept in lengthy rallies, faced
only one break point all match
while earning eight, and


in men's tennis

broke Hewitt three times to
win in straight sets.
In the final, Federer faced
No. 2-seeded Roddick, owner
of the fastest serve and one of
the biggest forehands in the
game. Federer produced
more aces (11-7), more fore-
hand winners (14-3), and
broke Roddick four times to
win in straight sets.
'All of them are trying as
hard as they can," Federer
said. "Obviously, for the next
few years, I'll definitely be a
huge favorite also for this
tournament. Doesn't mean
necessarily I'll take them all."
If he's got a touch of a cham-
pion's arrogance, he's earned
it
Bjorn Borg and Pete
Sampras are the only other
men in the past 60-plus years
to win three consecutive
Wimbledon titles. And
Federer claimed his fifth
Grand Slam championship at
the same age 23 years, 10
months that Sampras was
when he won the fifth of his
record 14 majors.
"He loves playing at
Wimbledon, he loves the
game," Federer's mother,
Lynette, said at the All
England Club on Sunday. "I
hope the tennis world can
reap benefits from what he is
showing on court."
.It should, because
Federer's sublime tennis and
A-Rod's super 'tude are both
good for the game. From 1983-
03, the two top-seeded men
never met in the Wimbledon
final; now it's happened in
consecutive years.
There's little reason to
think it won't happen again.


World Team Tennis


stars ready to roll


obviously, it is impossible to
start this article about
World Team Tennis with-
out a quick look back at
Wimbledon.
After all, we had to wait a
while to see several
American players in -
the final of a Grand
Slam. The highlight
was, of course, the .,
women's final, first of
all because not many I,
of us had expected to
see Venus Williams
and Lindsay
Davenport in it.
Secondly, it was one, Eric v
of the best matches Hoc
ever, and it must have ON :
been one of the first
times that a women's


final took longer than the men's
final.
The men's final was what we
expected, as far as both the.
involved and also the outcome.
Let's not forget the Bryan broth-
ers who were in their third
Grand Slam final this year with,
unfortunately, the same result; a
loss. It would have been nice if
NBC, with several hours of
Wimbledon coverage left after
the quick men's final, would have
shown us some doubles.
Getting back to the 30th season
of the World Team Tennis league.
The league has 12 teams, divided
into Eastern and Western divi-
sions. The Eastern division con-
sists of the following teams:
Boston Lobsters, Delaware
Smash, Hartford FoxForce, New
York Sportimes, New York Buzz
and the Philadelphia Freedoms.
'The teams making up the
Western division are: Houston
Wranglers, Kansas City
Explorers, Newport Beach
Breakers, Sacramento Capitals,
St Louis Aces and the
Springfield Lasers.
The league format: Each
match consists of five sets, one
set each of men's and women's
singles, one set men's and
women's doubles and one set of
mixed doubles.
Next follows a list of the play-
ers of each team, maybe your
favorite player is in it:
Boston Lobsters; James Blake,
Martina Navratilova, Daja Bedanova,
Thomas Blake, Scott Draper, Kristen
Schlukebir.
- Delaware Smash; Venus
Williams, Liezel Huber, Robbie
Koenig, Wayne Odesnik, Chanelle
Scheepers.
Hartford FoxForce; Boris Becker,
Don Johnson, Lisa Mcshea, Milagros
Sequera, Meghann Shaughnessy,
Wesley Whitehouse.
New York Buzz; Jim Courier,
Jaymon Crabb, Evie Dominikovic,
Bryanne Stewart, Brian Vahaly.
New York Sportimes;.Martina
Hingis, John McEnroe, Natalie
Grandin, Jenny Hopkins, Robert
Kendrick, Mark Merklein.
Philadelphia Freedoms; Josh
Eagle, John Paul Fruttero, Carly
Gullickson, Patrick Rafter, Lisa
Raymond, Elena Tatarkova.
Houston Wranglers; Mardy Fish,
Steffi Graf, Tommy Haas, Ansley
Cargill, Ashley Fisher, Edina Gallovits,
Ryan Newport.
Kansas City Explorers; Bob
Bryan, Mike Bryan, Sesil
Karatantcheva, David MacPherson,


Brian MacPhie, Nana Miyagi.
Newport Beach Breakers (last
year's Champion); Maria Sharapova,
Katerina Bondarenko, Devin Bowen,
Ramon Degado, Anastassia
Rodionova.


J



an den
ogen


Sacramento
Capitals; Anna
Kournikova, Mark
Knowles, Elena
Likhovtseva, Nicole
Vaidisova, Sam Warburg.
St.Louis Aces; Andy
Roddick, Jonathan
Erlich, Jamea Jackson,
Andy Ram, Jennifer
Russell.
Springfield Lasers;
Lindsay Davenport, Rik
de Voest, Rick Leach,
Kaysie Smashey,


Tamarine Tanasugam.
ESPN2 will televise three
World Team Tennis matches July
9, 16 and 23 at 11 p.m. and the
finals on Sept. 22. You will also
be able to catch some of the
action on the Tennis Channel,
July 19,23 and Aug. 2, all starting
at 8 p.m.
The first match everybody is
looking forward to is the battle of
the Martinas on July 7. Of course,
we are talking about the singles
match between Martina Hingis
and Martina Navratilova.
If you are interested to follow
this league or just want more
information in general, go to
www.worldteamtennis.com.
Monday Night Ladies Doubles
This league is doubles only,
skill level 3.5 and up with no
limit. For more information or to
report scores, contact Antoinette
van den Hoogen at 382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
Citrus Tuesday Womens Leagues
USA Women Team Tennis
This league is geared towards the
3.0- and 3.5-level players. Each team
consists of four players. New players,
regulars or subs, are always wel-
come. To sign up or for information
about this league, contact Char
Schmoller at e-mail
schmoler@atlantic.net.
Senior Tuesday 3.0
This league will start up again on
Oct. 18. For information about this
league, contact Myrtle Jones at 341-
0970 or e-mail
mbj30@netsignia.net.
.Thursday Citrus Area Doubles
For information about this
league, contact chairperson Gail
Sansom at 746-4455 or gailsan-.
som@aol.com.
Thursday Evening Men's League
For information, contact the admin-
istration office at Whispering Pines
Park at 726-3913.
Friday Senior Ladies
Doubles 3.0-3.5
If you want to field a team (four
players per team with a maximum of
six) for the 2005-06 season, or if you
want to be a sub, contact Betsy
Dykes at 795-5299 or Lucy Murphy at
527-4239 or e-mail wjlrmurphy@xtal-
wind.net.

Eric van den Hoogen,
Chronicle tennis correspon-
dent, can be reached at
hoera@juno.com.


Local


2~I


Bowling Bite
What is a Dead Ball?
It is a ball that is out of play, or
that does not count as rolled (not
fair, not foul). Also ball with little
action. As it applies to resin balls, a
ball is "dead" when the reaction
cannot be obtained similar to what
it was when new. In such a case
resurfacing may be required.
Beverly Hills Bowl
The men's division leader is Dick
Newhall, who has a 13-point lead
and is a walk-over to take the crown.
The other division is a hotly con-
tested race. Barbara Steffan is the
leader with 201.75, Marian
Steenstra has 200.11 and Joy Wall
is next with a 199.33.
Marian Steenstra picked up six
points this week with her 724 series.
Men's High Series
Dick Newhall 766, Wally
Malphus 765, Kurt Wittig 743,
Frank Mulligan 676
Men's High Game
Kurt Wittig 279, Wally Malphus
274, Dick Newhall 264, Frank
Mulligan 263
Women's High Series
Marian Steenstra 724, Barbara
Steffan 620, Anna Dooley 608,
Jean Lawton 599
Women's High Game
Marian Steenstra 266, Jean
Lawton 258, Joanne Baumann
255, Maria Afflerbach 243
Men/Women's Handicap Series
Kurt Wittig 899/ Marian Steenstra
892
Elaine Fyfe


Hall-of-famer Hank Stram dead at 82


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Hall of
Fame coach Hank Stram, who
took the Kansas City Chiefs to
two Super Bowls and was known
for his inventive game plans and
exuberance on the sideline, died
Monday, his family said. He was
82.
Stram had been in declining
health for several years and Dale
Stram attributed his father's
death to complications from dia-
betes. He died at St Tammany
Parish Hospital, near his home
in Covington, across Lake
Pontchartrain from New
Orleans. He built a home there
during his two-year stint as coach
of the Saints and retired there.
"Pro football has lost one of its
most innovative and creative
coaches and one of its most inno-
vative and creative personalities
as well," Chiefs owner Lamar
Hunt said.
Stram was the Chiefs' first and
winningest coach. He took over
the expansion Dallas Texans of
the upstart AFL in 1960 and
coached them through 1974, mov-
ing with them to Kansas City
where they were renamed the
Chiefs in 1963.
The gregarious, stocky, blazer-
wearing Stram carried a rolled
up game plan in his hand as he
paced the sideline. He led the
Chiefs to AFL titles in 1962, '66
and '69 and to appearances in the


first Super Bowl, a 35-10 loss to
Green Bay, and the fourth, a 23-7
victory over Minnesota in 1970.
He had a 124-76-10 record with
the Chiefs and in 17 seasons as a
head coach was 131-97-10 in the
regular season and 5-3 in the
postseason.
Stram was credited with the
two-tight end offense that provid-
ed an extra blocker
He was the first coach to wear
a microphone during a Super
Bowl and Stram's sideline antics,
captured by NFL Films, helped
bring the league into the video
age.
Stram later coached two sea-
sons with the Saints and enjoyed
a successful second career in
CBS' television and "Monday
Night Football" radio booths as
an analyst
Stram made his mark in the
booth by consistently telling the
audience what would happen,
before it did.
"I think they'll go deep here,"
he would tell his partner, Jack
Buck.
"Elway to throw," Buck would
respond. "He's looking deep. He
throws deep. Caught by Steve
Sewell at the 11-yard line. You
called that one, Coach."
"John just saw what I saw,"
Stram would say.
Stram was inducted into the
Pro Football Hall of Fame in
2003. The then-80-year-old had to
be pushed onto the. stage in a


wheelchair and his induction
speech was videotaped.
In an interview that year,
Stram said he would accept
another coaching job in a
minute:
"I've lived a charmed life," he
said. "I married the only girl I
ever loved and did the only job I
ever loved."
Len Dawson, the Hall of Fame
quarterback who played under
Stram at Kansas City, also called
him an innovator
"He was responsible for doing
a lot of the things in the '60s that
teams are still using now," said
Dawson, citing the moving pock-
et and the triple stack defense.
"His whole life was football
that's what he was born for, I
think He had a passion for it, not
just a liking," Dawson said. "He
was really sincere when he
talked about the team being a
family Everybody really loved
him."
Hall of Fame linebacker Willie
Lanier, who played for the Chiefs
under Stram, said his former
coach was able to elevate his
players to new levels of success.
'All of us had a great joy in
being able to experience the
sport at the level we did because
of his creative mind and the kind
of personality that he put around
you," he said. "That allowed
everyone to perform at levels
higher than they would have
without him."


Associated Press
Hank Stram poses at his home in Covington, La, In this 2002
photo. Stram, who took the Kansas City Chiefs to two Super Bowls
and was known for his Inventive game plans, died Monday at a
hospital In suburban New Orleans, his son said.


4B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











C
TUESDAY
JULY 5, 2005
www.ch ronicleonline.com


FDA probes antidepressant risk


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The Food and
Drug Administration issued a second
public warning Friday that adults who
use antidepressants should be closely


monitored for warning signs of suicide,
especially when they first start the pills
or change a dose.
Much of the concern over suicide and
antidepressants has centered on chil-
dren who use the drugs. The FDA last


With America at war and in need of a
few good men, Jon Schoenherr
expected a warm reception when he
walked into an Army recruiting office
in this Midwestern farm community, Watertown,
Wis., intending to enlist.
But a sergeant gave the 17-year-old some sur-
prising news.
"He told me I'd have to lose a little bit of
weight," said Schoenherr, who dropped 50
pounds to qualify.
In addition to terrorists, germ warfare and
nuclear weapons, military officials increasingly
worry about a different kind of threat troops
too fat to fight.
Weight issues plague all branches of the mili-
tary, from elite Marines to the Air Force, often
lampooned as the "chair force" because of its
many sedentary jobs.
Thousands of troops are struggling to lose
weight, and thousands have been booted out of
the service in recent years because they could-
n't.
However, one of the biggest worries concerns
those not even in uniform yet: Nearly 2 out of 10
men and 4 out of 10 women of recruiting age


ON THE NET
FDA:
http://www.fda.gov/cder/drug/
advisory/SSRI200507.htm

fall determined there is a real, but
small, increase in risk of suicidal
behavior for children and ordered the


labels of all antidepressants to say so.
A year ago, the FDA issued a warning
that adults, too, may be at increased
risk. The agency began reanalyzing
hundreds of studies of the drugs to try
to determine if that's the case, and told
makers to add or strengthen suicide-
related warnings on their labels in the
Please see FDA/Page 4C


Soldiers too fat to fight?






.. .. -*. :,V.


Associated Press
Army Pfc. Jon Schoenherr, left, leads an exercise class outside the Army recruiting office last month In Watertown, Wis. Schoenherr had to lose 50
pounds in six months before he could qualify for boot camp.

For enlisting and re-enlisting obesity takes a heavy toll on the military


ON THE NET
Army Weigh-to-Stay:
http:.'/www.hooah4health.com/body/'
default.htm
Air Force Shape Your Future:
http:/, www.airforcemedicine.afms.mil/
shapeyourfuture
Marine Corps Semper Fit:
http://www.usmc-mccs.org/fitnessrec/
fithealthpromo.cfm
Navy Ship Shape: http://www.nehc.med.
navy.mil/hp/fitness/index.htm
Veterans Affairs MOVE program:
http://www.move.med.va.gov/
makes soldiers look more formidable to the.
enemy, they note.
But at an obesity conference in Las Vegas last
fall and in interviews since then, Bathalon and
other military officials detailed the heavy bur-
den that excess pounds are causing for some
troops and taxpayers.
Weight problems add stress to already stress-
ful jobs, costing many soldiers promotions and
Please see SOLDIERS/Page 4C


Army Pfc. Jon Schoenherr started his own
weight-management program to join the Army.
weigh too much to be.eligible, a record number
for that age group.
"This is quickly becoming a national security
issue for us. The pool of recruits is becoming
smaller," said Col. Gaston Bathalon, an Army
nutrition expert
Unless weight rules are relaxed, "we're going
to have a harder time fielding an Army," he said.
Today's soldiers are supersized, averaging 37
pounds heavier than their Civil War counter-
parts. Military officials say that's not all bad,
because most of it is muscle, not fat, and the
result of better nutrition. "Large and in charge"


New Medicare appeals process starts this week


It is another great tragedy that this any other writer. As a great writer and
week our new Medicare law will broadcaster used to state: '"And now for
transfer Medicare the rest of the story." I thank
appeals that require judicial -,. the great Paul Harvey for
interpretation from the i always informing the public
more than 140 Social .-.. of the rest of the story.
Security offices to the - I hope to always do the
Department of Health and I same, but it may take a week
Human Services (HHS). Videoconferencing?
HHS will have four offices If one is not used to speak-
that will hear these most dif- ing to another person via a
ficult of cases -'Arlington, method of talking to a televi-
Va.; Cleveland Ohio; Irvine, sion monitor mind you,
Calif.; and Miami, Fla. And Dan Rohan speaking to defend a neg-
they will be heard, moni- SENIOR elected Medicare claim- it is
tored, seen and adjudicated ADVOCATE intimidating, to say the least.
by videoconferencing. Remember, Medicare
This was where I ran out intermediaries who may
of my allotted words last week Kindly have misinterpreted a Medicare ruling
understand, this is no different than or regulation are wrong 70 percent of


the time.
A Medicare beneficiary, an attorney,
a provider of the service or a represen-
tative of the beneficiary may take a case
to this level.
I would have to presuppose two prob-
abilities.
The first is that if one finds oneself in
such a predicament, he or she, in all
probability, is elderly and ill. Also, sur-
gery was more than likely involved,
hence the illness and perhaps a slight
lapse of memory. I cannot imagine an
individual having to need to bother to
take a low-cost physician's office fee to
this level.
The second probability is that if,
indeed, anyone accompanies the indi-
vidual, it is in all likelihood a relative,
who is as nervous as the beneficiary


I find this new process repulsive and
disrespectful to our nation's elderly,
and, of course, it is another part of our
new Medicare law that "our elected
protectors" never told us about
Incidentally, this cost-saving and effi-
ciency policy, or modernization and
improvement policy, is not totally new
to various nationwide governmental
agencies.
In fact, many counties in this nation
now use videoconferencing for initial
arraignments of those jailed and sus-
pected of crime.
Hey folks, if it good enough for our
criminals, why not our elderly?
Think that I am idiotic, foolish, irra-
tional or just plain stupid, if you so
Please see ROHAN/Page 4C


Dr. Ed Dodge
A PASSION
FOR HEALTH


How


love


heals

Love is the underlying
foundation of health.
It is more powerful
than the best of medical or
surgical remedies. Please
don't misunderstand. I'm not
saying that medicine and
surgery .are not helpful.
They often are. ,I am simply
saying that love is the most
effective healing modality
known to science.
You may wonder about
this assertion, and I would
not blame you. Some scien-
tists are skeptical about the
power of love as a therapeu-
tic agent. Thinking that love
is mostly a "touchy-feely"
type of quality not easily
measured, such scientists
say it cannot be ranked with
therapeutic interventions
that are backed by hard
data. Other scientists dis-
agree.
In his book, "Love &
Survival," Dr. Dean Ornish
concludes that if any new
drug had the impact that
love does on health, virtually
all doctors would prescribe
it for their patients. He says,
Please see DODGE/Page 4C


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Common

cancer

myths
ore than 85 percent
of Americans con-
sider themselves at
least somewhat knowledge-
able about cancer, yet a sub-
stantial number of people
still believe common myths
about the disease and its
treatment That's the finding
from a new American
Cancer Society study pub-
lished online in the journal
Cancer
Researchers affiliated
with the American Cancer
Society analyzed responses
from a telephone survey of
957 adults in the United
States who said they'd never
had cancer. Participants
were asked how informed
they thought they were
about cancer, and about per-
sonal characteristics like
age, race/ethnicity, gender,
income, education and
where they lived. Then, they
were asked whether they
agreed with five common
cancer myths. These five
myths are:
Pain, medications are
not effective in reducing the
amount of pain people have
from cancer.
All you need to beat can-
cer is a positive attive attitude, not
treatment
Treating cancer with
surgery can cause it to
spread throughout the body.
There is currently a cure

Please see BENNETT/Page 4C


- ij. .1. L.~


Agency warns anew about suicide link


Associated Press












Improved detection of bladder cancer available


There are about 55,000 in the upper tracts seen in 4
new cases of bladder percent to 40 percent of
cancer each year in the patients.


United States.
Seventy percent
to 75 percent of
these are classified
as superficial. When
followed over time,
60 percent to 70 per-
cent of these tumors
will recur and 20
percent to 30 per-
cent of these recur-
rent tumors will
progress to a higher
stage or grade.


Dr. Tom
UROL
TOD


Since most
tumors are superficial, initial
cystoscopy with tumor resec-
tion often will result in com-
plete treatment for that tumor.
However, because of the high
recurrence rate, continued
surveillance ,is necessary.
Patients with muscle invasive
bladder cancer who undergo
bladder sparing therapy also
are at risk for bladder cancer
recurrence. Additionally, all
patients are at risk for subse-
quent development of tumors


Standard surveil-
lance is repetitive
cystoscopy initially
at three-month
intervals. In addi-
.* tion, patients usual-
ly undergo cytologi-
cal study of exfoliat-
ed cells in the urine.
However, urinary
Stringer cytology is often of
limited value for
OGY intermediate and
MAY low-grade tumors.
A number of
immunoassays for tumor-asso-
ciated protein in voided urine
have demonstrated efficacy
equal or superior to cytology in
the diagnosis of recurrent tran-
sitional cell carcinoma of the
bladder. FDA-approved tumor
assays include the BTA test,
BTA Stat test, NMP 22 and
Immunocyt
The use of molecular-based
DNA tests to determine the
presence of cancer is a promis-
ing field. Numerous chromoso-


mal abnormalities have been
identified in bladder cancer.
These genetic abnormalities
can be detected and identified
using the UroVysion fluores-
cence in situ hybridization
assay (FISH).
The FISH assay uses fluores-
cently labeled DNA probes. It
is a multitarget assay that may
be performed on voided urine
with the potential to detect up
to four chromosomal changes
frequently associated with
transitional cell carcinoma.
Study data demonstrates
that the multitarget UroVysion
FISH test has combined sensi-
tivity and specificity superior
to the BTA Stat and voided uri-
nary cytology for the detection
of transitional cell carcinoma.
Sensitivity refers to the ability
of the test to positively predict
a tumor and is correlated with
positive tissue diagnosis.
Specificity relates to the ability
of the test to discern only dis-
ease specific results.
Similar to the BTA stat test,
FISH sensitivity is about dou-
ble that of voided urinary cytol-


ogy. However, unlike all other
FDA approved clinical bladder
cancer tests, the FISH assay
has a specificity equal to that of
cytology.
As a result of these studies,
the UroVysion FISH assay is
the first genomic-based diag-
nostic test for bladder cancer
approved by the FDA.
The FISH assay does not
detect all recurrent tumors. It
is less likely to be positive for
the lowest grade and stage of
tumor. However, for all other
tumors it will detect 75 percent
to 100 percent of tumors inde-
pendent of cystoscopy.
Since a delay in diagnosis of
low-grade, low-stage tumors is
less likely to be of clinical
importance, the FISH assay
may allow for extension of the
interval between cystoscopies.
The FISH assay appears to
detect almost half of recurrent
bladder cancers before they
are visible by cystoscopy. Given
its specific genomic based
nature, it is not surprising that
the FISH assay is able to detect
malignant cells before visual


identification by a well-quali-
fled urologist.
The FISH assay also appears
to provide improved clinic
information for patients treat-
ed with intravesical therapy.
Bladder instillation of bacillus
Calmette-Guerin (BCG), mito-
mycin C and thiotepa are fre-
quently used in addition to
transurethral resection to
eradicate tumor that cannot be
controlled endoscopically, pre-
vent tumor recurrence or pre-
vent tumor progression.
Although intravesical thera-
pies seem to decrease tumor
recurrence and progression, a
high proportion of more
aggressive tumor pathologies
progress to muscle invasive
disease.
The FISH assay appears to
help identify the patients that
are at the highest risk for post
treatment recurrence and pro-
gression.
Patients with a positive post-
therapy FISH test are nearly 10
times as likely to have ,subse-
quent muscle invasive cancer
than patients with a negative


post-therapy FISH result
Using molecular-based DNA
analysis, the FISH assay
appears t6 offer improved sen-
sitivity over routine voided
urine cytology and immunoas-
says for the detection and fol-
lowup of transitional cell carci-
noma.
In addition, FISH appears to
improve the ability to deter-
mine the response to therapy
over currently available labo-
ratory techniques. It is hoped
that the increased sensitivity of
the FISH assay will result in
the reduction of bladder can-
*cer mortality by earlier detec-
tion and stratification of risk
for recurrence and progres-
sion.


Thomas F. Stringer, M.D.,
FACS, is president of Citrus
UrologyAssociates. He is a
clinical professor in the
Division of Urology at the
University of Florida,
Gainesville.


Health NOTES


Stop smoking
The Citrus County Health
Department will offer its next
"Freedom From Smoking" classes
from 6 to 7 p.m. beginning today in
the Lecanto Health Department
meeting room. Classes will run for
eight weeks, according to the fol-
lowing schedule. All classes begin
promptly at 6 p.m.
r'Orientation: Tuesday.
Session 1: Tuesday, July 12.
Session 2: Tuesday, July 19.
Session 3: Tuesday, July 26
(Quit Day).
Session 4: Thursday, July 28
(48-hour report).
Session 5: Tuesday, Aug. 2.
Session 6: Tuesday, Aug. 9.
Session 7: Tuesday, Aug. 16.
This program follows the
American Lung Association's
"Freedom From Smoking" guide-
lines. All those who wish to quit
smoking cigarettes are encouraged
to attend. There is no charge for
the information/orientation session
on the first night. The fee for the
remaining sessions is $20.
Call Tom O'Brien at the Citrus
County Health Department, 527-
0068, Ext. 287.
Cancer support
The "Look good ... Feel better"
program, a two-hour make-up and
wig demonstration sponsored by


the American Cancer Society for
cancer patients undergoing radia-
tion or chemotherapy, will be at 10
a.m. the. first Wednesday monthly
at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness. There is no
charge, and patients will receive a
free make-up kit and wig or tur-
bans if needed. To make a reser-
vation, call Mildred Roseberry at
746-7212.
Children's therapy
Florida Elks Children's
Therapy Services provides free.
in-home physical and occupational
therapy to Florida children in need.
Physical therapy concerns the
prevention of disability, alleviation
of pain and restoration of function
and mobility.
Occupational therapy assists
children in being more functional
and independent in their play,
schoolwork and daily living skills.
. Applications are reviewed to
determine if the program is appro-
priate for the patient's needs. If
accepted, a regular home visitation
is scheduled by a physical or occu-
pational therapist who is licensed
by the state of Florida. Parents or
guardians are required to be pres-
ent during the therapy sessions so
they may carry out treatments
between the therapists visits.
Applicants for consideration may
call Walt Mabie at Inverness Elks


Lodge 2522 in Hernando at 344-
3357 before noon Monday through
Friday, West Citrus Elks 2693 at
628-1221 or the Florida program
administrator toll free at (800) 523-
1673.
Health lecture
April Oakes and Dr. Gary Tunsky
will speak from noon to 6 p.m.
Saturday at First United Methodist
Church of Inverness at 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road (County
Road 581), Inverness, in a health
lecture for expecting mothers, par-
ents of young children and anyone
interested.
Oakes is the president of TAAP
(The Autism Autoimmunity
Project) and the founder of "Casi's
Quest" (TAAP of Florida). She
started the organization in honor of
her 4-year-old autistic daughter,!
Casi, who passed away on June
13,1999.
Oakes realized that her daughter
was vaccine-injured before she
received the "label" of autism.
TAAP is a nonprofit charity dedicat-
ed to obtaining funding for inde-
pendent research into the cause,
treatment and prevention of autism
and other autoimmune disorders.
Tunsky is a naturopathic physi-
cian. He is the treatment coordina-
tor for TAAP and an ordained min-
ister.


Wellness programs
Huffman's would like to invite
everyone to attend the following
presentations.
Saturday: Cooking class,
Dressing for Any Occasion, at
11:30 a.m. Don't ask a cook for
fashion tips, but if it's great tips and
ideas for keeping your salads and
dressings fresh and exciting all
summer long, this class is being
offered for you. It will be presented
by David Bibbey, chef.
July 14: Seminar on Men's
Health at 5:30 p.m. Will discuss
ways to optimize men's well being
as they mature and the role of
healthy nutrition in maintaining and
increasing the physical integrity of
the body. Presented by Seth


Buoymaster, holistic health care
consultant.
These free events are at
Huffman's Heritage Whole Foods
Inc., 430 Kings Bay Drive, Crystal
River. Call 795-2233.
Managing diabetes
Diabetes classes are offered
from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Health
Department in Lecanto. Classes
are free. No registration is required.
Monday What is diabetes?
July 18 Meal planning.
July 25 More about meal
plans.
Aug. 1 Medications and
monitoring.
Aug. 8 Sick days.
Aug. 15 -Avoiding complica-


tions.
Fasting blood sugar tests are
offered from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday
through Friday in all three Citrus
County Health Department sites.
There is a $10 fee for this service.
No appointment is necessary.
Every Monday before the Lecanto
class, anyone who would like to
have a blood sugar test should
come fasting.
Call Carol Hanewinckel, R.N.,
527-0068, Ext. 248 or Carol Burke,
RD, 726-5222.
Vision screening
Crystal Eye Center will offer
free vision, cataract and glaucoma
screening Wednesday, July 13.

Please see NOTES/Page 4C


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3M


2C TUESDAYJULY 5 2005


HEALTH


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







SICITRUS )-- T SD) JL 5 HR2 5 ,



Group offers Low-fat diet helps breast cancer


new cancer



treatments


Recently, at a meeting of the
American Society of Clinical
Oncology, an excellent study
was presented in a plenary ses-


Breast cancer is the most
common form of cancer
in women. Almost one
woman in 11 is likely to get
breast cancer in her
lifetime.
The earlier we
diagnose the cancer,
the better it is for ..S
the patient. Still,
women with early
breast cancer of,
say, stage one or two
have a significant ,,
chance of cancer Dr. Suni
recurrence. CAN
It is obviously a
source of anxiety for & BLI
every breast cancer DISE
patient.
So one of the com-
monest questions we face is:
"What can I do to reduce my
risk of recurrence of breast
cancer?"
We give medicine, like
chemotherapy and hormonal
therapy, to improve the cure
rate and reduce the risk of
recurrence.


sion.
Rowan Chlebow-
ski, M.D., of the Los
Angeles Biomed
Research Institute,
and colleagues initi-
ated the random-
ized, phase 3, multi-
center Women's In-
tervention Nutri-
tion Study (WINS)
trial in 1994 to
determine whether
reducing dietary fat
consumption to 15
percent of total
caloric intake with-


in one year of surgery could
improve the outcome.
The 2,437 women who partic-
ipated in the study were divid-
ed into two groups.
Those in the control group
(numbering 1,462) spoke with a
dietician every three months.
Those in the diet group (num-


being 975) were given a daily
dietary fat intake goal repre-
senting no more than 15 per-
cent of their total caloric con-
sumption in grams.
They also received intensive
dietary counseling that includ-
ed monthly group sessions.
With intensive dietary coun-
seling and monitoring, the
women in the diet group
reduced their mean fat intake
from about 30 percent to 20
percent of their total caloric
consumption and maintained a
23-grams-per-day reduction of
fat intake from baseline during
five years.
Women in the control group
showed only a slight (three to
five grams per day) reduction
of fat intake during the same
period.
After a median follow-up of
60 months, women in the diet
group were 24 percent more
likely to be relapse-free at five
years.
No significant effects of diet
on overall survival were


observed, but it is very likely
that this may take longer fol-
low-up.
The women in the diet group
who had estrogen-receptor
negative breast cancer had a
significantly reduced risk of
relapse, with a 42-percent
greater chance of being recur-
rence-free at five years.
In short, it seems to be a very
good idea to restrict dietary fat
intake if you are diagnosed
with breast cancer. This also
may help overall health by
reducing cardiovascular dis-
eases.


Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and oncologist.
He is the volunteer medical
adviser of the Citrus Unit of
the American Cancer Society.
Send questions or comments
to 521 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabayrr. com
or call 746-0707.


'Ram's horn nail' needs management


CRAIG W.
ENGLUND, M.D.
Special to the Chronicle
Florida Wellcare Alliance
has recently opened new clin-
ical research trials involving
lung cancer and colon cancer
treatment.
The treatment of lung can-
cer with the use of traditional
chemotherapy drugs has not'
shown any improvement in
treatment results in recent
years, despite the advent of
newer drugs alone or in com-
bination.
It has been said we have
reached a "therapeutic
plateau" with the treatment of
lung cancer. Therefore, newer,
more innovative approaches
are being looked at most
notably with the introduction
of so-called targeted or biolog-
ic therapy for treatment of
lung cancer. These include
drugs such as erlotinib, also
known as Tarceva, and gefi-
tinib, also known as Iressa.
These drugs are more sophis-
ticated and attack unique
aspects of the cancer cell.
These two drugs have shown
interesting, though not spec-
tacular results.
Another new drug called
bevacizumab or better known
as Avastin has also been devel-
oped, though primarily used
in the treatment of colon can-
cer. This drug inhibits the can-
cer's ability to produce new
blood vessels, which it needs
to sustain growth.
In view of their distinct
mechanism of actions, these
drugs are being considered to
be used in conjunction to
assess their effectiveness in
patients who have failed their



NAMI-Citrus (local group of
the National Alliance for the
Mentally III) will have its regular
monthly meeting July 5 at the
Gpod Shepherd Lutheran Church -
on County Road 486 in Citrus'Hills,
Hemando, with doors opening at-
6:30 p.m. for talk circle and
refreshments. In addition to a shar-
ing time, there will be a planning
meeting for the next year. All those
with an interest in mental health-
issues are warmly invited.
Man to Man Prostate Support
Group meets at 11:30 a.m. the first
Wednesday monthly in the confer-
ence room at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute at
522 N. Lecanto Highway in the
Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Spouses
and caregivers are welcome. Call
527-0106.
Breastfeeding Support Group
meets from 10 a.m. to noon the
first Thursday monthly at Nature.
Coast Birth Center in Crystal River.
Free. Call 564-4224.
Friends of the Blind meets
from 9 a.m. to noon the second
Friday monthly at the Church of the
Nazarene in Hernando. Call Butch
Shultz at 344-2693 or Bob
Johnson at 563-1890.
FFRA (Families and Friends
of Retarded Adults) will not meet in
July. General meetings are on the
second Friday monthly at the Key
Center Training Center, 130
Heights Ave., Inverness. Social
time is 9 a.m. with. complimentary
coffee and refreshments, business
discussion starts at 9:30 and the
educational portion at 10. The pub-
lic is encouraged to attend as well
as members.
Call Rene or Donna Laliberty at
746-5582.
District 13 Family Care
Council for Individuals with
Developmental Disabilities and
Families meets from 10 a.m. to
noon the second Monday monthly
at 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic (State
Road 44), Wildwood. Call Betty
Kay at (352) 753-1163.


initial conventional treatment
for lung cancer.
This approach holds prom-
ise for patients with non-small
cell lung cancer. Florida
Wellcare Alliance is enrolling
patients with non-small cell
lung cancer who have failed
initial treatment to be treated
as a second line with Avastin
and Tarceva.
Current treatment for
advanced colon cancer has
resulted from the develop-
ment of a number of new
drugs. Included in these drugs
are bevacizumab or Avastin
and Cetuximab or Erbitux.
A new drug called panitu-
mumab works in a fashion
similar to Erbitux, that being
it is a chemical (monoclonal
antibody) which binds to a
protein on the surface of the
cancer cell called an epider-
mal growth factor.
The result of this binding is
alternation of a complex bio-
logical pathway within cells
that is involved in cellular
replication.
In the same vein that the so-
called biologic therapies
Avastin and Tarceva are being
combined in the treatment of
lung cancer, two biologics,
Avastin and panitumumab,
are being combined along
with conventional chemother-
apy in the treatment of colon
cancer.
These two trials are open
for enrollment for lung and
colon cancer patients in
Citrus County.
As a principal investigator
for these trials, I would like to
invite patients to contact the
Florida Wellcare Alliance at
341-2100 for further informa-
tion.


ed if the nails become unman-
ageable. '
Surgical matrixectomy,
where the offending nail is
removed and its matrix or
"root" is permanently
destroyed, may be considered.
However, this is usually only
indicated for recalcitrant,
painful nails in healthy individ-
uals with adequate circulation.
Keralac is an excellent pre-
scription nail softening gel that
can be used quite effectively to
improve the quality and
appearance of these nail types
in a management plan.


David B. Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist located in
Inverness. He can be reached
at 726-3668 with questions or
suggestions for future
columns.


Drug can help 'restless leg'


Q: I heard about a new
"-drug for -restless- leg
syndrom:e.-,. -
'What can
you tell me about it?
A: The FDA
recently approved
Requip (ropinirole)
for the treatment of
restless leg syn-
drome. It is the first
and only medica-
tion that has been Richard]
approved for this
disorder. Requip ASK
has been available PHARR
since 1997 to treat
Parkinson's disease, but the
treatment of restless leg syn-
drome is a new indication for
this medication.
Restless leg syndrome is a
relatively common problem
that affects up to 10 percent of
American adults and is more
common in women and people
older than 50. About one-third
or more of people with this syn-
drome also have family mem-
bers with this problem.
Individuals with this: disor-
der have a compelling urge to
move their legs when sitting,
still or when lying in bed


d You Know?
pice is not just for
people.
Although the majority of hospice
ts are older, hospice serves
ts of all ages. The abc (all 'bout
en) Division of Hospice of Citrus
y serves children or young adults
re suffering from a life-limiting or
nal illness and also those who
experienced the loss of a loved
r friend.

hospice care give us a call.
Toll Free 866.642.0962
citruscounly. org


before going to sleep. During
sleep, the legs may move spon-
-taneQusly and
uncontrollably,
which can'cause the
:. person to wake up.
In addition, peo-
ple with restless leg
syndrome may have
uncomfortable or
"'" sometimes painful
sensations in the
tofflann legs often described
as creeping-crawl-
THE ing, tingling, pulling
LACIST or tightening.
-- Walking or moving
the legs can temporarily
relieve these symptoms, but
they can significantly disrupt a
patient's sleep and daily activi-
ties.


The cause of this neurologi-
cal disorder is unknown, but
researchers believe that it may
be related to a chemical known
as dopamine that carries the
signals between nerve cells
that control body movement
Requip is thought to work by
stimulating dopamine recep-
tors in the brain. During clini-
cal studies, the most common
side effects of Requip were
nausea, sleepiness, vomiting,
dizziness and fatigue.


Richard Hoffmann has prac-
ticed pharmacy for more than
20years. Send questions to
him at 1135N. Timucuan
Trail, Inverness, FL 34453.


CARDIOLOGY
Siaf CONSULTANTS P.A.
WWW.CITRUSCARDIOLOGY.ORG (352) 726-8353



WORKING HAND IN HAND WITH
CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL TO BRING LIFE SAVING MEDICAL
CARE TO THE CITIZENS OF CITRUS COUNTY.


Charlotte
Katz, ARNP


When a heart problem arises, we understand the
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made it an integral part of our mission to provide each
patient with clear information and honest compassion
along with the best cardiac care possible. Our group of
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exceptional diagnosis and treatment.
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PODIATRY CENTER, PA
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someone called my office trauma, ill-fitting shoegear,
and kindly requested nutritional deficiencies, dis-
that I elabo- ease processes such
rate on the causes of as diabetes, claudi-
and possible treat- cation or peripheral
ments for nail thick- arterial disease, or
ening." dermatological con-
Abnormal nail .., edition may cause
thickening or hy- these problems.
pertrophy is termed A nail or many
onychauxis or ony- nails may become
chogryphosis., affected, but the
Onychauxis is ab- Dr. David B. Raynor great toe is the most
normal nail thicken- BEST FOOT commonly affected.
ing. Onychogryph- The affected nail
osis is nail thicken- FORWARD will become thick
ing "like you have and discolored,
never seen." ranging from opaque to yellow-
A layman's term for ony- brown and may scale, flake,
chogryphosis is "ram's horn split, twist, lift and hump-up or
nail," if that gives the reader an pinch.
indication of how thick that These nails also are likely to
nail is. become infected by dermato-
The exact cause of these "phytes and become fungal
nail-thickening conditions is nails. They can twist and punc-
unknown, but it is thought that ture adjacent toes, causing


The nail thickens
'like you've
never seen.'


pain and infection.
Such thickened nails may
cause pain if they become
loose and move or thick and
rub on shoegear.
The caller asked if such thick
nails could be corrected.
They cannot be "turned
back" into normal appearing
nails, but they can be managed.
Treatment options include
trimming and filing by hand
with a nail nipper, that I prefer,
or with the use of power tools.
Trimming and filing of such
thickened nails needs to be
performed routinely, or else
professional care will be need-


Support GROUPS
Alzheimer's Family Catholic Charities, Our Lady of
Organization, serving Central Grace Church, 9 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Florida, announces the following Beverly Hills, at 12:30 p.m. For
monthlyy support group meeting. : more information, dall'Mrie
Public is invited. -, ., ; M ahaat (800)'24290,12.-
2:30 p.m. Monday, Sugarmill Alzheimer's Association
Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd., Florida Gulf Coast Chapter meets
Homosassa. Call Elaine Heller at at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
382-2531. monthly at Surrey Place, 2730 W.
10 a.m. Thursday, July 28, Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Call
Woodland Terrace, 124 W. Norvell Robbin Tibbetts, 746-9500.
Bryant Highway, Hernando. Call 0 Citrus Abuse Shelter
Pam Pepitone at 249-3100. Association (CASA), 112 N. Pine
The Alzheimer's Family Ave., Inverness, offers three week-
Organization is offering monetary ly women's domestic abuse sup-
reimbursement for respite costs port groups:
through its Respite Assistance 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Program. Respite is essential for 0 10:30 a.m. to noon
the caregivers of a dementia or Wednesdays.
Alzheimer's disease sufferer to 0 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday.
help refresh and revive. The group Child care is available for the
also will provide other national Tuesday and Wednesday night
respite resources that can reim- groups. All groups and child care
burse costs to caregivers. are free of charge and open to the
This free program is available to public.
all residents of Citrus, Hernando, Topics of discussion include:
Sumter and Lake counties caring What is domestic abuse? What
for an individual with dementia or keeps women in abusive relation-
Alzheimer's disease. Call the ships? What is the impact of
Alzheimer's Family Organization domestic abuse on children?
main office for full details at (727) Shame and guilt, anger, depres-
848-8888 or toll free at (888) 496- sion, boundaries. What is a healthy
8004. relationship?
Family Caregiver support Call CASA at 344-8111.
meetings for July:
Monday: Grandparents and
Relatives Raising Grandchildren
Support Group, 3600 W. Sovereign I\
Path, Lecanto Government Bldg., \
Lecanto, at 10 a.m. Call Sandra (E r Hos
McKay at (800) 717-3277 or Amy old
Engelken at Community Support Fact:
Services at 527-5434. a
July 20: Family Caregiver patent
Support Group, sponsored by The I patient
Cottages of Gentle Breeze, 9416 i Counthildr
N. Gentle Breeze Loop, Citrus r who a
Springs, at 11 a.m. Call Sophia termin
Hodge at (352) 489-5535 to make HOSPICE have e
OF CfREJS COUINTV INC
a reservation for onsite respite Excellence in Hospice one or
services. Refreshments will be pro- Care since 1983
vided. For more information, call For more information on h
Sandra McKay at (800) 717-3277. In Citrus 352.527.2020
July 27: Family Caregiver u h i
Support Group, sponsored by .... ,..... hospiceof


Active Lifestyles4

Don't let arthritis interfere with your everyday activities. -


* Total Hips and Knees Fracture Care
* Shoulders Arthroscopic Surgery


R Crane Couch, D.O.


Citrus Bone and Joint Specialists -
Orthopedic Surgery
Offices in Lecanto & Ocala
Lecanto 746-0654
3264 W. Audubon Park Path


*Sports Medicine
* Hand Surgery


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Ocala 237-9298 Mediare
8150 S.W. State Road 200 Accepted .n


1 Gandhi
ICER
.OOD
EASE


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 3C


11EALTH


C C FL C NICLE


H
(-







4C TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005


SOLDIERS
Continued from Page 1C

leading some to try desperate
measures like rubber suits and
risky pills to shed pounds.
Problems don't end when
active duty does, either. The
Veterans Affairs health system
increasingly is strained by vets
piling on pounds and develop-
ing weight-related diseases
like diabetes.
Ironically, the big concern
used to be soldiers not weigh-
ing enough. Congress passed
the school lunch program after
World War II, worried that too
many high-schoolers were mal-
nourished and unfit to fight.
"This is the same deal in
reverse. We've got young kids
who are not going to be quali-
fied for military service.
They're either unfit or overfat,"
said Col. Karl Friedl, com-
mander of the U.S. Army
Research Institute of
Environmental Medicine at
Natick, Mass.
USARIEM, as it is. known,
has 170 doctors, dietitians, psy-
chologists and other scientists
who study military medical
issues, from preventing heat
exhaustion to coping with
sleep deprivation. They view
soldiers as specialized athletes
whose physical condition can
be a life-or-death matter.
Increasingly, they deal with
weight
It starts with new recruits.
Each branch of the service has
its own entry rules, but by fed-
eral weight guidelines, 43 per-
cent of women and 18 percent
of men in prime recruiting
ages exceed screening weights
for military service, Bathalon
said.
Army standards are based on
body fat, using a chart for body-
mass index a ratio of weight
and height as a screening
tool. If soldiers or recruits
exceed .chart limits, body fat



FDA
Continued from Page 1C

meantime.
Since then, several new stud-
ies have been published in
medical journals about a possi-
ble connection. Citing them,
FDA issued, a new public
health advisory reminding doc-
tors and patients to watch


DODGE
Continued from Page 1C

"It would be malpractice not to
prescribe it" Ornish is one of
the foremost cardiologists in
the world, so when he speaks,
people take note.
In 1984, Ornish founded the
Preventive Medicine Research
Institute, bringing together an
extraordinary group of dedi-
cated people. His program
involves factors like diet, exer-
cise and stress reduction in a
comprehensive plan of
lifestyle change for patients
with critical coronary heart
disease.
The statistics emerging from
his program were so impres-
sive that skeptical insurance



ROHAN
Continued from Page 1C

choose. That is just fine with
me. However, I am factually
correct
M I have received many ques-
tions this past week regarding
the 19 million letters that the
Social Security Administration
has mailed regarding the new
prescription drug benefit You
should be getting your applica-
tion soon, if you have not


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's not enough to recruit healthy
young men and women, and later return
them safely to their families. We now try
to return them better than when they
joined the Army ...

Dr. Steve Yevich
director, VA health promotion center.


calculations are done using a
formula based mostly on waist
size.
Marines can be as much as
10 percent over weight stan-
dards to ship to boot camp.
"The Marines say, 'Send us
anybody and we'll turn them
into a Marine.' They're pretty
successful at it," Friedl said.
Schoenherr, the Wisconsin
Army recruit, was pretty suc-
cessful, too. After weighing in
at 215 pounds, he did his own
boot camp during his senior
year in high school, going to the
recruiting center for 6 a.m.
workouts, then downing a
boiled egg or two and orange
juice before heading to class.
Lunch would be "tuna fish
right out of the can" or a low-
carb wrap at school, he said.
After school, he'd lift weights.
He's now a svelte 165 pounds
and about to join a special
forces unit.
"I've had some people who
have lost close to 100 pounds to
join," said Sgt. Chad Eske, his
recruiter
But often, making it into the
military is just the start of the
struggle. The military even has
its own version of the "fresh-
man 15" after basic training,
Army women gain an average
of 18 pounds in their first year
and often have problems with
annual weigh-ins that deter-
mine whether they can stay
A survey Bathalon and oth-
ers did of 1,435 troops referred
to Fort Bragg Hospital for


closely for suicidal thinking or
worsening depression and
seek ,medical care if it hap-
pens.
It's a difficult issue to sort
out because depression itself
can lead to suicide, and studies
show that antidepressants
have helped many people
recover.
But there are concerns that
antidepressants may cause agi-
tation, anxiety and hostility in


companies began to cover its
costs for patients. Net savings
came to $30,000 per patient,
compared to patients who had
traditional treatment with sur-
gery.
While the full program is
important, Ornish found that
social support was a key factor
in helping patients reverse
severe coronary heart disease.
Social support consists of a
mutually supportive network
in which subjects feel
esteemed and cared for. If one
defines love as caring respect
for others, social support is
really love in action.
The healing power of social
support has been documented
in excellent scientific studies
involving millions of people
around the world. Ornish cites
many of them, and the verdict


already received one. I have
researched it most thoroughly,
and am dedicating two
columns to this issue soon.
I sincerely hope that y'all
had a great Fourth of July This
is still a, no, it is the greatest
nation on this planet
We just need some redirec-
tion to bring forward the wish-
es of many of our Founding
Fathers, who believed that the
domestic tranquility, welfare
and I now will add health care,
of and for all Americans should


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weight loss helps show the
drastic measures some try
Roughly three-fourths did
things doctors recommend -
eating less, exercising more
and downing more fruits and
vegetables.
But many resorted to poten-
tially harmful things. Nearly
half tried using rubber suits or
saunas to sweat off pounds, a
third of men and half of women
tried appetite suppressants,
and 1 in 5 tried laxatives.
Eleven percent of women and 6
percent of men had tried vom-
iting.
Half of the troops said stress
was a reason they had gained
weight, and half had come for
help because they'd been
denied promotion.
"The Air Force is not escap-
ing the national trends," Maj.
Christine Hunter said at the
obesity conference, showing a
photograph of the new
Baghdad Burger King, already
the third busiest in the world.
About 1,500 troops were
involuntarily separated, or
kicked out, of the Air Force
from 2000 to 2003 for failure to
maintain weight, she reported.
In 2003 alone, more than
3,000 people were kicked out of
all branches of the military for
failing weight standards,
Bathalon's study reports.
"You lose your income, you
lose your retirement, you lose
your medical benefits," he
said.
Even those with long mili-


a subset of patients who may be
unusually prone to rare side
effects.
Also, psychiatrists say there
is a window period of risk just
after pill use begins, before
depression is really alleviated,
but when some patients expe-
rience more energy, perhaps
enabling them to act on suici-
dal tendencies.
In addition to the advisory,
the FDA also updated its Web


is consistent The risk of heart
disease, stroke,, cancer and
many other serious diseases is
dramatically reduced in peo-
ple who live in networks with
loving social support.
Ornish is not the first or last
physician to discover the heal-
ing power of love.
Dr. Bernie Siegel wrote two
best sellers on the healing
power of love: "Love, Medicine
and Miracles," and "Peace,
Love and Healing." Dr. Gerald
Jampolsky wrote "Teach Only
Love," in which he outlined the
principles of attitudinal heal-
ing. More recently, Dr Greg
Baer has written the book,
"Real Love," in which he
shows how unconditional love
changes lives profoundly.
If love is so healing, why
don't we bring it into our lives


come first.
I sincerely thank our veter-
ans and the members of the
present military for their sacri-
fices. However, it is once again
time for our educational sys-
tem to start teaching American
history, and the errors of a his-
tory of manifest destiny, and
now the horrors and expense
of a delusional form of global
manifest destiny.


tary careers sometimes devel-
op weight problems afterward,
burdening the VA health sys-
tem, which treats about 5 mil-
lion veterans each year, half of
them older than 65.
They tend to be sicker than
the general population. More
than 70 percent are overweight
and 33 percent are obese, said
Richard Harvey, a health psy-
chologist at the VA Center for
Health Promotion. Pain is the
biggest reason they give for not
exercising, and 31 percent say
a disability prevents it, he said.
About 20 percent of veterans
have diabetes, compared to 7
percent to 8 percent of the gen-
eral population
"We knew that there were
enormous costs with that,"
Harvey said, so he developed
MOVE, a comprehensive pro-
gram of psychological counsel-
ing, nutrition, exercise, med-
ications and even sometimes
bariatric surgery.
Parts of it started in October
2003 at 17 pilot sites, and the
hope is to have a standardized
program available to all veter-
ans, said Dr. Steve Yevich,
director of the VA health pro-
motion center.
It will be a big improvement
from 2001, when a survey by
chief of staff Mary Burdick
revealed that only 37 of the VAs
160 major medical centers had
weight management programs,
ranging from intense programs
"down to just a little old dieti-
tian sitting there," Yevich said.
Sending soldiers home
healthy is the top goal, said
Friedl of the Army research
center.
"It's not enough to recruit
healthy young men and women
and later return them safely to
their families," he wrote in a
recent medical journal article.
"We now try to return them bet-
ter than when they joined the
Army with the promise that
they will 'be all they can be."'
Increasingly, that means
weighing a little less.


site with a notice about a high-
er-than-expected rate of sui-
cide attempts in research with
the nation's newest antidepres-
sant, Eli Lilly's Cymbalta.
Those studies were in women
trying Cymbalta as an inconti-
nence treatment; it was never
approved for that use. The
FDA insisted when it approved
Cymbalta last year that studies
of depressed patients showed
no suicide link.


more effectively? The answer
is complex. Part of our problem
is that we value independence
so highly that we downplay
social support systems.
Individual rights often trump
community values, and so we
have become more and more
fragmented as a society.
Yet, it is in social support sys-
tems that unconditional love
can truly thrive. Involve your-
self deeply in your families and
social support groups.
The quality of your life liter-
ally depends on this invest-
ment!


Dr. Ed Dodge is a retired
Inverness physician. He can
be reached by e-mail at
timangola@earthlinknet


America first for all
Americans. Is this is simple
enough?
Keep my green tea warm,
and I will talk to you next week.

Send questions to "Senior
Advocate," 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River FL 34429 or e-mail
danrohan@atlantic.net.


CRYSTAL RIVER PRIMARY CARE
Don Pritchard, MD
Internal Medicine
Christopher Cole, PA-C
Physician Assistant-Certified

(352) 564-2077 Fax: 564-2042
9030 W. Fort Island Trail #3 Crystal River, FL 34429

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Their positive attitudes, combined with our
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NOTES
Continued from Page 2C

There will be a free consultation
with Dr. Thomas Dawson regard-
ing vision, cataract and glaucoma
tests. A free eye-glass adjustment
also is available.
This program is a community
service.
Call 795-0212. The center is on
U.S. 19 South, Crystal River.
Nursing courses
Brashear's Vital Care
Pharmacy will offer free CEUs to
all local nurses. The instructor,
Penny Corbitt, RN, MSN, is a
national teacher who will make you
laugh as you learn. The courses
will be given over a three-day peri-
od as follows.
Tuesday, July 19 -
Bloodborne Pathogens and
Infusion Therapy, 9 a.m. to noon;
Hepatitis C, 1 to 3 p.m:; PICC, 3 to
4p.m.
Wednesday, July 20 Risk
Management, 9 to 11 a.m.; Intropic
Therapy, 11 a.m. to noon;
Medication Errors, 1 to 3 p.m.;
Immunoglobulin, 3 to 4 p.m.
Thursday, July 21 Pain
Management in the Pediatric
Patient, 9 to 11 a.m.;
Subcutaneous Infusion, 11 a.m. to
noon; TPN, 1 to 2 p.m.; Discharge
Planning for the Infusion Patient, 2
to 3 p.m.; Restoring Patency to



BENNETT
Continued from Page 1C

for cancer, but the medical
industry won't tell the public
about it because they make too
much money treating cancer
patients.
Cancer is something that
cannot be effectively treated.
About 75 percent of the peo-
ple who took the survey either
believed or were uncertain
'about at least one of these
incorrect statements. Many
people don't spend a lot of time
learning about specific health
problems until those condi-
tions affect them or someone
close to them. Therefore, peo-
ple recently diagnosed with
cancer who want to actively
participate in their healthcare
decisions often face the chal-
lenge of learning a lot of new
information very quickly. And
for those of you who have had
cancer, you know this fact all
too well. The amount of infor-
mation available is vast, and
often hard to understand.
The most commonly-
believed myth was that surgery
could make cancer spread.
Nearly 41 percent of partici-
pants said this was true, and
another 13 percent said they
weren't sure whether it was
true or not Men arid people
who said they weren't very
informed about cancer were
most likely to believe this mis-
statement People with at least
some college education were
least likely to believe this
claim.
In reality, surgery is often a
very effective treatment for
many types of cancer, and may
be combined with radiation
therapy and chemotherapy.
This myth may stem from earli-
er decades, when cancer
detection and treatment were
less refined than they are now.
In those days, cancer often
wasn't found until it was very
advanced, when surgery would
have been less likely to help.
People may have assumed the
surgery caused the problem,


Occluded Central Venous
Catheter, 3 to 4 p.m.
The classes will be given at the
Hospice in Inverness at 326 S.
Line Ave. The office is across the
street from Dr. Dale Osterling's
office and half a block past
Inverness Primary and CMH.
Please RSVP to Dianne Brashear
at 637-0069, Ext. 2.
July yoga
Yoga at the Historic Crystal
River Train Depot at 109 Crystal
Ave., Crystal River, is scheduled
as followed during July:
6 to 7 p.m. Thursday
9 to 10 a.m. Saturday
Classes are appropriate for 8
years and older and are multi-level.
The cost is $5 per class. Bring a
mat or towel and wear comfortable
clothes that allow for easy physical
movement. All certified instructors.
Call 563-6535 or 795-3710.
Loan closet
The Beverly Hills Lions Club Inc.
has a "Loan Closet," from which
they loan wheelchairs, walkers,
canes, bath chairs, etc. It is
presently in need of some wheel-
chairs.
There is narcharge for the use of
any item; however, sometimes a
donation is made, which is used to
repair items to keep them in good
working order.
Call Lion Hellene Wells to
schedule pickup for a wheelchair,
746-0335.


giving rise to this rumor.
The second most-commonly
held misconception was that
the medical industry is with-
holding a cure for cancer More
than 27 percent of participants
agreed with that statement,
and another 14 percent weren't
sure. People with lower educa-
tion levels were most likely to
believe this conspiracy theory.
Those figures point to a certain
level of distrust toward the
medical community that could
be problematic. If patients
don't trust their doctors,
they're less likely to follow
advice about cancer preven-
tion, screening and treatment,
and may even put their health
in danger
Two of the myths in the sur-
vey were recognized as false by
nearly everyone who partici-
pated. More than 87 percent of
people knew that cancer can
be treated effectively, and 89
percent knew a positive atti-
tude isn't enough to beat the
disease. However, 19 percent
of people thought pain medica-
tions weren't effective for can-
cer pain, and just over 13 per-
cent weren't sure. Older peo-
ple and poorer people were
especially likely to believe this
statement, and college gradu-
ates were least likely. One rea-
son for that gap may be that
poorer people simply don't
have as much access to effec-
tive pain medication, either
because they can't afford it or
because pharmacies in their
area don't carry the narcotics
needed for good pain control
because of a fear of them being
stolen.
-U-----

Dr. Bennett is a board-
certified radiation oncologist,
past president of the Citrus
County Unit of the American
Cancer Society and a member
of the board of directors of the
Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society. You
may contact him at 522 North
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, or by e-mail
at cjbennett@rboi.org


- '

-n Gardner MI.S.
Free onssuitation s'exnce
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness, FL 352-795-5700
700 SE 5th Ter., Crystal River, FL com
www.gardneraudiology.com


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TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 5C


:"CITRUS COUNT (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY EVENING JULY 5, 2005 A: Adelphia,Citrus B: Bright House D: Adelphia,Dunnellon 1: Adelphia, Inglis
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E 37 743 37 37 World's Wildest Police CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Movie: *** "Dr. No" (1963, Adventure) Sean Connery, Jack Lord. James
_(_i_ 37 43 37_ 37 Videos 'PG' 9 193292 Investigation '14, V' Investigation '14, V' Bond encounters a nefarious scientist in Jamaica. c9 667834
c f 4923 4949 Seinfeld Seinfeld Every- Every- Friends '14, Friends '14, Sex and the Sex and the The Real Gilligan's Island The Real Gilligan's Island
49 23 4 4 *'PG, D' 'PG'679501 Raymond Raymond D'930124 S'959259 City '14 City '14 121312 635327
c53 Movie: ***' "A Patch of Blue" (1965, Drama) Watch the Skies (N) ZB Movie: ***4 "The Thing From Watch the Skies 9[ "Forbid,
SI1_1)_ 53 Sidney Poitier. [9 (DVS) 5051037 5052766 Another World"5435655 5245698 Planet"
.. 5 3453 53Monster Garage 'PG' 9c American Chopper "NY Swift Water Rescue 'G' Coast Guard: Dangerous Deadliest Catch 'PG' Swift Water Rescue 'G'
IC 53 34 5 1742056 Jets Bike" 'PG' 473389 ] 482037 Rescues 'G'495501 465360 c9 173655
S 50o4650 50 Clean Sweep 'G' cc In a Fix 'PG,.L' c9 840563 Overhaulin' "Blue Bird" 'G' Overhaulin' 'G' ]9 846747 Rides "Syn" The newest Overhaulin' "Blue Bird" 'G
T8] 50 46 50 50 188360 859211 Ford model. 'G' 849834 9] 448389
4833 48 48 Charmed "Witch Wars" Law & Order "Panic"'14' Law & Order "Slaughter" Law & Order "White Lie" Law & Order "Hitman" The Closer "Show
I 48 33 'PG, L,V' [] 119230 j] (DVS) 848105 (In Stereo) '14' 857853 (In Stereo) '14' 844389 '14' 9 (DVS) 847476 Yourself' '14' 479259
T Las Vegas: Follow the. Vegas Revealed 'G' Las Vegas: Engineering Made in Made in Destination: Phoenix (N) Las Vegas: Engineering
.. 9AV 9 54 9 9 Money 'PG' c 8259292 6303143 Marvels 'PG' 6389563 America America 'G' 6302414 Marvels 'PG' 4689263
UI 47 32 47 47 Rose Red (In Stereo) '14' 9 332785 Law & Order: Special Movie: * "Beverly Hills Cop II" (1987) Eddie Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit '14' 571673 Murphy, Ronny Cox. cc (DVS) 321150 Victims Unit '14'633969
S- 18 18 Home Will & Grace Will & Grace Home Movie: ** "Letters From a Killer" (1998) WGN News at Nine (In Becker'PG, Becker'PG,
Wi 18 18 18 18 m PG, Srovemen 'PG, S' '14rovemen Patrick Swayze, Kim Myers. (In Stereo) 376563 Stereo) cc 395698 D,L' 664230 L' 368679

TUESDAY EVENING JULY 5, 2005 A:Adelphia,Citrus B:BrightHouse D:Adelphia,Dunnellon I: Adelphia, Inglls
A B D IT 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
Lizzie Sister, That's So That's So Movie: "Stuck in the Suburbs" (2004) Danielle Buzz on Sister, That's So That's So
S ) 46 40 46 46 McGuire 'G' Sister 'G' Raven 'Y7' Raven 'G' Panabaker, Brenda Song. 'G' cE 381495 Maggie 'G' Sister 'G' Raven 'Y7' Raven 'G'
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Walker, Texas Ranger Walker, Texas Ranger Movie: ** "The Unforgiven" (1960) Audrey Hepburn. M'A'S'*H
_Q- 68 'PG' 'PG' "Cyclone" '14, V' 9007582 "Lucky" 'PG' 9016230 Pioneers feud with Kiowa Indians over a birthright. 3966358 'PG'
I Movie: ** "Matchstick Men" (2003, Comedy- Movie: * "Troy" (2004, Action) Brad Pitt. Achilles leads Crashers: Ray Romano & Kevin
I, o Drama) Nicolas Cage. Ea 845582 Greek forces in the Trojan War. [9 15560230 1st James: Making the Cut
Movie: * "Contact" (1997) Jodie Foster. A devoted scien- Movie: "Sniper 2" (2002, Action) Movie: * "Boogie Nights" (1997, Drama)
t list hears a message from outer space. 784389 Tom Berenger. 9c 706360 Mark Wahlberg. c9 29745327
S 97 66 97 97 Punk'd 'PG, Punk'd 'PG, Direct Effect (In Stereo) TRL (iTV) (In Stereo) 'PG' The Real The Real The Real MTV's the Punk'd 'PG, Punk'd 'PG,
SV) 97 66 97 97 L206679 L' 220259 'PG' 558679 [1567327 World '14' World '14' World (N) '70s House L 826582 L 520921
S 71 The Dog The Dog Ultimate Strike Planes 'G' Naked Science "Atlantis" Seconds From Disaster Expeditions to the Edge Naked Science "Atlantis"
-(_ _) 71 _Whisperer Whisperer 5605230 'G'5681650 (N)'PG'5601414 'G'5604501 'G' 6843259 .
62 Movie: "The Mission" Movie: *** "A Soldier's Story" (1984, Drama) Cold Fusion (In Stereo) 'PG' c[ Movie: **'A "Stealing Home"
(1986) 30318230 Howard E. Rollins Jr. 9 91496921 7291360 (1988) Mark Harmon. 30711476

*I 43 43 43 Mad Money 9288211 Late Night With Conan Cover to Cover Host Liz Mad Money 8538259 The BigdeaWithDonny Cover to Cover Host Liz
CN 43 42 43 43 O'Brien '14' 3 8509747 Claman. 8518495 Deutsch Claman. 7426650
NN 40 29 40 40 Lou Dobbs Tonight 9 Anderson Cooper 360 c9 Paula Zahn Now c9 Larry King Live c9 NewsNight With Aaron Lou Dobbs Tonight
I 40 29 40 4 379124 171637 876245 476489 'Brown 63521178 631501
25 55 25 25 NYPD Blue (In Stereo) Cops '14, V' Cops '14, V' Forensic Forensic Forensic Forensic Mastermind The House of Fake Out
(COUR2525 '14, D,V' 9280679 3201766 5983489 Files 'PG' Files 'PG' Files 'PG' Files 'PG' s Takedown Clues 'PG' 5547747
S 39 50 39 39 Public Affairs 1902196 Prime Time Public Affairs 773766 Prime Time Public Affairs
44 37 4444 Special Report (Live) c The Fox Report With The O'Reilly Factor (Live) Hannity & Colmes (Live) On the Record With The O'Reilly Factor
(F 44 37 44 44 8338414 Shepard Smith 9 cc 9657766 c 9660230 Greta Van Susteren 4065489
!42 41 42 42 The Abrams Report Hardball 9 9644292 Countdown With Keith The Situation With Tucker Scarborough Country Hardball 9B 2960655
S4 41 8301360 Olbermann 9653940 Carlson 9643563

S 33 27 33 33 SportsCenter (Live) ) 2003 World Series of 2003 World Series of 2003 World Series of 2003 World Series of SportsCenter (Live)
180292 Poker cE 835105 Poker EB 844853 Poker cc 831389 Poker -- Final Round 459969
T342 8 3 3 2003 U.S. Poker ESPN ESPN WNBA Basketball Phoenix Mercury at San Antonio Boxing Tuesday Night Fights -- lan Gardner vs.
) 34 28 34 34 Championship 8275230 Chronicles Chronicles Silver Stars. (Live) cc 6383389 Mohammed Said. &B 7402495 1
3 3 3 The Sports Marlins on MLB Baseball Milwaukee Brewers at Florida Marlins. From Dolphins Stadium in Best Damn Sports Show The Sports Best-Sports
FF 3 9 3 5 List Deck (Live) Miami. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) 139501 Period 915476 List I
36 31 Sports Talk Live 43245 LPGA Today 2_Xtreem NASCAR Racing 1987 Daytona 500. 775124 Sports Talk Live 49834
367921 95292

T he PlusCode number printed next to each pro- PlusCode number, cable channels with the guide channel numbers using
gram is for use with the Gemstar VCR Plus+ sys. If you have cable service, please make sure that the convenient chart printed in the Viewfinder. This
I tern. If you have a VCR with the VCR Plus+ fea- your cable channel numbers are the.same as the procedure is described in your VCR user's manual.
fture (identified by the VCR Plus+ logo on your VCR), channel numbers in this guide. If not, you will need to Should you have questions about your VCR Plus+ sys-
all you need to do to record a program is enter its perform a simple one-time procedure to match up the tern, please contact your VCR manufacturer.
~ The channel lineup for LB Cable customers is in the Sunday Viewfinder on page 70.


Will her daughter-in-law ever love her?
[ Se Sg


S1" ear Annie: I have raised four Dear.
sons, mostly by myself. My letter fr'
, \ youngest son ran away from col- teen dat
' ege to pursue his dreams, fell in love I am
w With a girl, and married her a year ago. "pre-sei
I always have welcomed my sons' sig- her glai
nificant others, but this one has me per- only to
plexed. When they first
began dating, I flew out to
meet her and told her how
\much I approved of her, ,
which I do. I send cards and
flowers on her birthday and
ask to speak to her when I
Scall, but she rejects me to the
Point where I am broken-
;-hearted.
My son married in a civil
ceremony, to which I was not
iinvited, and it just about
killed me inside. But this ANNIE'S
silent treatment has me AuELBO
depressed. I bought them, a MAILBOX
nice wedding gift, but my son is the only one wa3
one who responds. How can I get rebellion
through to my newest daughter-in-law? haps, a
Can't Understand It in Wheaton, Ill. why girl
Dear Wheaton: It's possible your new they liv
daughter-in-law is terribly shy. Shy peo- houseki
ple can come across as snooty or rude, Go fig
but she may be so intimidated by you Dear
that it is easier for her to avoid all forms is rebE
of communication. You need to discuss expects
1his with your son. Ask him what you sound 1
an do to warm things up between you. Dear
EWhatever happens, keep trying, Mom. "Airhea


Annie: I'd like to respond to the
om "Airhead's Dad," whose pre-
ughter, "Angel," is forgetful.,
the husband of a 68-year-old
nior" who is constantly losing
sses because she wears them
read, forgets where she puts
them down, and refuses to
develop any system for keep-
ing track of them except ask
me to help her search. She
has umpteen other similar
foibles that drive me up the
wall, but you know what? I
love her because she is
sweet and kind.
I think "Airhead's Dad"
might be part of the problem.
His daughter doesn't sound
so bad to me, and maybe she
needs a bit more love and
understanding and less
"guidance." All kids rebel in
y or another, and maybe she is
ng against a father who is, per-
bit too organized. It explains
ls who were absolute slobs when
ed at home become compulsive
keepers when they marry.
gure. F.L
F.L: While it is possible Angel
selling against a father who
too much organization, it didn't
ike that to us. Here's more:
Annie: The letter from
ad's Dad" sent me off the edge.


I'm 13 and often forget things. Being
scatterbrained is not a physiological
problem, it's simply being human. It is
condescending to make a problem out
of something normal. As he said, Angel
is "smart, caring, friendly and witty."
Should we not focus on those things
rather than this diminutive quirk? She
doesn't need medical treatment. Nor
does she need to be constantly remind-
ed that there's something wrong with
her when there isn't. Madison, Wis.
Dear Annie: You were right to suggest
that Angel be checked by a pediatrician,
but I think you were too subtle. Angel's
behavior is typical of Attention Deficit
in females.
For kids with other skills and
strengths, it's hard to notice ADD until
organizational demands get more com-
plex right around the pre-teen years.
Most girls are undiagnosed.
If folks label her an "airhead" or she
begins to think she is stupid, permanent
damage will be done. And it will get
worse as school gets more organization-
ally and academically demanding.
Please advise Dad to do some reading
on ADD, and check with a knowledge-
able pediatrician or specialist. We were
told our daughter was irresponsible,
lazy and "deliberately oppositional."
She is now on the dean's list at a top lib-
eral arts college. But it wouldn't have
happened without the ADD diagnosis.
- Been There


RLocal RA-DNO


WJUF-FM 90.1
WHGN-FM 91.9
WXCV-FM 95.3
WXOF-FM 96.3


National Public Radio
Religious
Adult Contemporary
Adult Mix


WRGO-FM 102.7
WIFL-FM 104.3
WGUL-FM 106.3
WRZN-AM 720


Oldies
Adult Mix
Oldies
Adult Standards


Bridge


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

First, look at only the West hand.
You are on lead against six spades.
What would you select after the
given auction, which tells you that
South has a strong two-bid in
spades and North has at least
eight points with five (or six)
respectable hearts? Do you start
with a trump, the heart ace, the
diamond nine or the club nine?
Although South has only 19 high-
card points, he has 10 winners all
on his own, so is definitely worth
his two-club opening. North is
immediately thinking about a
slam, so responds two hearts,
which guarantees at least a five-
card suit. A two-club opening and
a positive response will usually
equal a slam if a fit can be found.
And when North raises spades,
South rolls out Blackwood.
Englishman Terence Reese, one
of the best-ever writers and play-
ers, argued that slams are permit-
ted to make more often by not
leading an ace at the fist trick
than by leading one. However, that
applies to unbid suits, not to one in
which an opponent has advertised
length. So, scratch the heart ace. A
trump is too passive here. It comes
down to a minor-suit nine. And you
should have selected the club


ACROSS 42 Travel
on powder
1 Desk item 44 Dainty,
4 Prize fight perhaps
8 Gross! 47 Fix, as a copier
11 It has long arms 51 When shadows
12 Home of jazz are shortest
13 Salon job 52 Felt remorse
15 FBI counterpart 55 False front
16 Hematite 56 Gridiron play
yield 57 Pulpit
17 Gung-ho about 58 Lair
18 Buzz off! 59 Wield, as oars
20 Dirty look 60 Indent keys
21 - tree 61 Superman's
23 Sharp turn emblem
24 Mask feature
27 Film holder DOWN
29 Alfalfa
32 Hunter's garb 1 Snow boots
33 Symbol 2 Hero's tale
34 Military addr. 3 Kind of miss
35 Hi-fi component 4 Stadium
36 Frizzy do hoverer
37 Take a flier 5 Above, to poets
38 -relief 6 Famous numero
39 Ponder 7 Neutral color
40 vera 8 Sweet topping
41 Md. neighbor 9 Volcano top


North 07-05-05
A 7 6
V K QJ 4 3
10 5 2
SQ 3
West East
S5 2 4 8
VA 8 7 10 6 5 2
9876 J43
49 8 7 6 4 K J 10 4 2
South
A K QJ10 9 4 3
9
AKQ
4 A 5
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
2 A Pass 2 Pass
2 A Pass 3 A Pass
4 NT Pass 5 Pass
6 4 Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: ??

nine, not the diamond nine. Why?
Because partner did not double
the artificial five-diamond
Blackwood reply. This implies that
he isn't strong in that suit
As you will have seen, a club
lead defeats the contract It estab-
lishes a trick for partner, which
you collect when in with the heart
ace. Any other start lets six spades
through.Remember what partner
didn't do.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
O EG NUSEVI C
WP|AR IIRIS|HM ANA
EGGG SALSA MGR
E SCAP E SUPER

R E L I C R B R E E Z E S E


E A E
V ^E |ME RO L EB
0 RR EBG|E|A S E Rfi
V I | EANs VER FY
ORE G EARS OOH
I AN STRUT L G E
DNA~jA AYNDM


10 Paper to
14 On beha
19 Garage
contents
20 Lingerie
22 A load to


PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles
'Random House Crossword MecaOmnibus" Vols


y 23 Nulls
If of 24 Injury result
25 Mantra
3 chanter
fabric 26 Bratty kids
o carry 28 Headphones
-..--..... 29 Crop hazard
in 30 Lhasa-
1 & 2 31 Harness
1 & 2. 36 Parson's
o expletive
1 37 Sprinkle
41 Alley Oop's
ride
43 Acclaim
| 44 Wrap up
45 Air show
maneuver
46 Turkey
48 Precious
30 31 carving
---- 49 Poker pair
50 Rockies,
- -- briefly
52 Squeal on
- 53 Emma e
in "The
Avengers"
No 54 Recede


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Henri Arnold and Mike Argirion


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KERAM


02005 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
TURBS


7-u
PREEWT WHAT THE INTER-
^ ROGATOR EXPERI-
ENCEP WHEN THE
wwI-umbe-corn FAUCET PRIPP P
AL-.1 NJHT.
TONKYT i ---
/ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
7 suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LLAMA BEGUN LAGOON IMMUNE
Answer: How he described his fireworks business -
"BOOMING"


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals K



"XHXTWI HSW IRBP H YTBW

LHE OV IOHSO UWVUAW."

- MVY PWSVAM

"BPTAMPVVM'I H STIJ LW HAA

OHJW." MHHKTM PRFPWI
PREVIOUS SOLUTION "Don't one of you fire 'til you see the whites of their
eyes." Colonel William Prescott, before the battle of Bunker Hill
(c) 2005 by NEA, Inc. 7-5


ENTERTAINMENT


F,%.#JL ALALAL ALMOW V v Nw V 1%.f.ML w 141.0 A&Ah,%em v








Cn'Rus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS


6C TUESDAYJULY 5, 2005


For Better or For Worse


5IBLE I'V NOT A H THATT I PLMY COmPUTE9 T LEAST T- obT r.. ooss to KowWT.
WILLING T TRY GAMES A TEE T LT 'THEMO'HEDOWHOKNOW WHAT
I SAID I WAS SIT MORE THAN I ADflOITED... IMPORTANT THIN"E T/ WE'RE RE'LLU LIKE
OONi MOO PN... WILL NAERCHANN&E: W THEN NO ONCS AROUND,
-AND-1 fliD THAT I SPEND CAN'T SPEAK ENGLISH.
MORE TImE SHOPPIN&...


gC~fCMeKFZrrCH sc,';~ ~. .~


6SCTRCH,SKP-I'fCHSSSSss -
LCRP ~,FA


^L1?TC I
<.'' *** *-, ~ ~~I&.' -** / V t-


rI115ISA6WIrrcH.APRIIL
&F-5 -r8 STAY our AID ,
PARY19W HILC-CIJM&O
HOMFETO A PULL.HOUSF-.


The Born Loser


1UMMM, THIS ) YES, IF PAGWOOO
MEATLOAF SHOULD LEAVES ANY FOR
SELL OUT IN NO OUR CUSTOMERS
TIME


YOU BUT HE'S MILES AWAY IN HIS OFFICE!
KNOW HOW COULD HE POSSIBLY
HOW HE KNOW THAT YOU JUST
LOVES MADE...
SANDWICHES l


Kit 'N' .y,..


Rubes


Dennis the Menace


The Family v_- -


At the legendary creatures support group


"MF AN' JOGY THINK ITS A PERFECT PAY fOR
YOU TO MAK. GOME COOKIES."


7- 5
2005 Bd Keane, Inc.
Dist by King Features Synd'% %
www familycircus.com

"You can't have any ice cream, Barfy,
but you can lick my fingers."


.p :.ty


Frank & Ernest


"AtVOPTA kH WI AY" I



$Ism VP


_AL
> >rl


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) Noon,
2:25 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G)
12:10 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 10
p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13)
12:40 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Madagascar" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:10 p.mr., 9:15
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Rebound" (PG) 12:10 p.m.,
2:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,


9:50 p.m.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
4:30 prm., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:45
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) Noon,
2:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10 p.m. Digital.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G)
12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13)
12:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. Digital.
"The Longest Yard" (PG-13)
12:25 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Star Wars: Episode 111l" (PG-
13) 12:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 10:10 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Arlo and Janis


Today's HOROSCOPE
Your Birthday: Conditions in general look particu- change for the better. Keep selling and smiling until
larly favorable for you in the year ahead, especially those involved begin to see the values in your ideas.
where material rewards are concerned. Your possibili- Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) A well thought out
ties for rising to new professional heights, in both posi- calculated risk that could improve your lot in life has
tion and salary, are excellent. Lady Luck's blessings today. You shouldn't have to take
Cancer (June 21-July 22) This is an excellent any chances, but be bold enough to at least try.
day for you to focus on matters that could increase your Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Make your excuses
resources and material holdings. today as to why you can't pal around with a negative
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Influential contacts, espe- thinker and find yourself someone who thinks in lucky
cially persons bom under the signs of Aries or Libra, terms. Some of his or her good vibes will rub off on you.
may be particularly lucky for you today in personal Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You have the knack
ways. today for recognizing fortunate opportunities that aren't
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Money that has been likely to be obvious to others.
owed you for a while may finally come forth today. Aries (March 21-April 19) Not to worry if you
Enjoy your sudden wealth, wake up in somewhat of a foul mood; it won't last. Lady
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Turn on a positive atti- Luck will be smiling upon your endeavors today.
tude today and it will immensely help spark others into Taurus (April 20-May 20) Your greatest asset
aligning themselves with you and your causes, today, that you're likely to use in abundance, is your
Scorpio (Oct..24-Nov. 22) Your possibilities for ability to turn a negative situation into something that
achieving an important objective are extremely promis- will be of benefit to you and those around you.
ing today, but it will be important that you not be afraid Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today could turn out to
to go after something big you've been wanting, be one of your better days, so don't settle for anything
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Don't take no for but the best. You have the ability to get what you go
an answer today if you think there is something you can after as long as your faith remains unshaken.


.,y Forth


Blondie


HI, GIRLS! I OECIOEO
STO ROP B~ FOR )
LUNCH




I REPEAT, IF
4^ THERE'S ANY
LEFT OVER
FOR OUR
CUSTOMERS


Docjr,-.? .;ry


Big Nate


Today's MOVIES-


- 11 ul I . 11 ----


6 LL


*^ !- '-ii )- i.' ^i!!.:; ;












C_ I T R U S 0 U N T V""












itsS
Serving all of Citrus County, including Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosassa Springs, Sugarmill Woods,
Floral City, Citrus Springs, Ozello, Inglis, Hernando, Citrus Hills, Chassahowitzka, Holder, Lecanto and Yankeetown.

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SPECIALNOTICES00 5HELA NAED0FI NNCALSERCES2 6A N LS 4 1.M
^^ ^ * *lREA SATE FO iR RN 7-60RA SAE O AE71-5 AATPRPRY8089 RNPRATO 0-3


62-YEAR-OLD
220 lb WORKING
LONELY WHITE MALE,--
In search of lonely lady
for live-In companion,
under 55 yrs, under
140lbs, any race,
Write to or visit
316 NE 2nd, Lot 12,
Crystal River 34429
Honest, SWM, 5'10, 170
Ibs, brown hair & eyes,
Smoker, that has It all
except a slim SWF 49-62
yrs young to share it
with. 613-5825
LETS SMELL THE
ROSES TOGETHER!
Seeking attractive Lady
40-55 who enjoys dining
out & weekend trips out
of town. Looking to
share quality times
together & wants the
nicer things In life.
Call 228-1579
SINGLE BLACK MALE
50, own 4 bedroom,
pool home in Beverly
Hills, by himself, looking
for soul mate, 35-47,
female. New In the
state. Enjoy walking
on the beach, movies,
travel, etc. Call
(352) 746-1659



** FREE SERVICE**
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Removed FREE. No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
*WANTED* Dead or
Alive. Vehicle Removal
No title okay. (352)
563-6626 or 697-0267
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message
FREE GROUP
COUNSELING
Depression/ Anxiety
(352) 637-3196 or
628-3831
FREE KITTENS
to good home,
Inverness
(352) 560-0291
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
KITTENS PURRFECT PETS
spayed, neutered,
ready for permanent
loving homes. Available
at Eileen's Foster Care
(352) 341-4125
Pitt/Lab Mix, 7 mo. old.
Need big fenced in
yard, very friendly
352-634-0939
Realster Now FREE
Kindergarten thru 6th.
For families that
financially qualify. Call
West Coast Christian
School, (352) 795-2079
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
isseeking Donations ofuse-
dbe
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
Vojnteers are needed h the
Home Store.
Store hours are:
9am-5pm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
information.


www.adopta
rescuedoet.com
Requested donations
are tax deductible
Pet Adoption
Saturday, July 9,
9:30am 12:30pm
Barrington Place,
Rt 486, Lecanto
Cats
Black DSH 16weeks
ready to play gets
along with other pets
489-5121
Gray tabby M 6 wks
socialized and cuddly
628-4200
Kittens to young
adults M&F various
colors all ready for
their special family
746-6186
Himalayan Ulac F
adult & Siamese F
adult loveable lap
cats 527-9050
Calico 20wks F beau-
tiful, active and
friendly 726-5591 bet.
10AM 2:30 PM
Dogs
BIchon M adult retir-
ees / ShIh-Tzu adora-
ble red and white M -
needs eye Rx daily -
retirees / Chihuahua
adult shy good com-
panion retirees
527-9050
Choc, Lab M 9yrs
great pet diabetic
on Insulin retiree
home preferred &
Brindle Boxer Mix F
puppy 12wks both
are socialized and
get along with other
pets 628-4200
Yellow Lab F mix 3yrs
great family pet
249-1029
Wanted poodles and
small dogs suitable for
seniors adoptive
homes available
527-9050
All pets are spayed /
neutered, cats tested
for leukemia/aids,
dogs are tested for
heart worm and all
shots are current

GET RESULTS IN
THE CHRONICLE
-II



0 TOMATOES! 0
MARTINS' U PICK
Hwy 44 E to CR 475 N
Oxford
(Closed Sundays)
(352) 303-0566





Lost Dog Full Blooded
Boxer, tan In color,
male, in the vicinity of
Holiday St. Crystal River
(352) 628-2761





FOUND WEIMARANER
female, Vicinity: Citrus
Springs area.
(352) 637-1188


C= F e


CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT
Exp. In collections,
billing, front desk &
physical therapy. PT,
31/2 days/wk, Fax a
complete resume to
352-795-0803


SDivorces
SBankruptcyl
*I NcmeChange
ChidSupport
I *Wil
| nveness..............6374022
IIm oess 6379I


"MR CITRUS-COUNTY"










WA
ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

*CHRONICLE*
INV. OFFICE
106 W. MAIN ST.
Courthouse Sq. next
to Angelo's Pizzeria
Mon-Fri 8:30a-5p
Closed for Lunch
2pm-3pm







REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.




ATTRACTIVE SWF
seeking male
companion. Candi,
352-628-1036




2 BURIAL SPACES
Memorial Gardens
in Beverly Hills, Garden
of Ten Commandments
$4,200. (502) 935-8756




JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET

LEGAL SECRETARY
/RECEPTIONIST
For small very busy
Law Office, PT 2 3
months, then FT. Per-
sonable, good phone
etiquette, grammar,
letter composition
& computer skills
required. Legal exp,
a plus. Fax resume to:
352-795-0432 or mail
to PO Box 2019,
Crystal River, Fl. 34423




F/T HAIRDRESSER
Call (352) 628-5023




A+ Heallhcare
Home Health
Agency

FT Insurance
Clerk
Must have
experience In
billing/collections.
Fax Resumes
(352) 795-4037

CARING
INDIVIDUAL
Male & female.
Min. 2 years Exp.
working with
developmentally
disabled. Reliable
transportation.
Sumter & Citrus Co.
area. FT/PT, days,
evenings & weekends
Call
MOVING MOUNTAINS
(352) 637-9001


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/ Cell 422-3656

FULL TIME
CNA's
3-11 & 11-7
PT LPN's
7-3 & 3-11
For ALF. Sign on Bonus
Paid by experience,
Benefits after 60 days
Vacation After 90
Days. Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/LPN
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
FL 34447
RN
for endoscopy center.
fulltime position or PRN
position. Benefits. Hours
7-3. Fax resume to
(352) 637-2525


Apply at:
Cypress Cove Care
Center, 700 SE 8th I
SAve. Crystal River
L (352) 795-8832.

RN'S/LPN'S
ALL SHIFTS
Apply In person to
Surrey Place
2730 W Marc
Knighton Ct. Lecanto



-MW


Metal Industries, Inc.
A manufacturer of
air distribution
products Is seeking
Individual with
mechanical/
electrical/ a/c
and refrigeration
skills. Must have at
least 5 years
experience In
above field.
Apply in person at
400 West Walker Ave
Bushnell, Fl or
on line at
rblack@metal
aire.com
Competitive benefit
package with 401k.

REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060
STATE FARM
Hiring licensed P/C
and/or L/H CSR for
Chuck Everldge's
Agency. Salary, bene-
fits, commission, bonus,
Fax resume to 726-3019




ALL POSITIONS
Apply In Person
HOMOSASSA
RIVERSIDE RESORT
5297 S. Cherokee
Way, Hombosassa
ASSIST TO OWNER
Must have cooking,
bartending and
ordering skills.
FULL TIME COOK
(352) 447-5572
or 447-4470, Inglis
CART ATTENDANT,
POOL ATTENDANT,
HANDYMAN/
WOMAN
3 jobs in 1. Good
Starting pay. Call
Inverness Golf &
Country Club for appt
(352) 637-2526
Experienced
Breakfast Cook
Apply in person
Muddy Waters Cafe
14 Hwy 19 N
(352) 447-2555


COOK
Scampl's Restaurant
(352) 564-2030

FULL TIME
WAIT STAFF
For Retirement
Center. Includes
Holidays & weekends.
Positions include,
vacation after 90
days, health
insurance available
after 60 days
Apply In person
Brenlwood Retirement
Community
Commons Building
1900 W. Alpha Ct
Lecanto 746-6611
EOE, DFWP

HUNGRY HOWIE'S
PIZZA & SUBS
Now Hiring for our
newest location In
Dunnellon.
F/T, P/T inside store,
Delivery Drivers
Please apply at
Hungry Howies
3601 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills
Taking applications
dally. Opening In
mid-July.

LINE COOK
Apply Seven Rivers
Golf & Country Club
7395 W. Pinebrook St.




AGENTS

.Act Nom


Ready for an
EXPLOSIVE Career

We offer the
opportunity to
reach$75K to $100Kl in
your 1st year.
Licensed Insurance
Agents or quality
unlicensed people
may apply.
*We provide free
preset apts, no
prospecting.
*We advance 1st
year comm.
*We give large
monthly bonuses
*We take trips all over
the world
*We offer 1st yr
renewals
Call Micah Buck for
interview
352-726-7722
Fak Resume:
352-726-6813


AAA AUTO
CLUB SOUTH
Offers a Sales Career
in Inverness/Lecanto
Beverly Hills area.
Paid Training.
Company Benefits.
Strictly Full time
with flexible hours,
High Income Potential
Call Les Singleton
352-237-6251
Fax Resume
352-237-1748
or email
Singleton@
aaasouth.com


DECLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING~

SALESi~~ri^^^B
The itru CountyyB
ChjtMiti^ron!ice~n^





clsified dvet~ising.
It yu hvethe desire^^^
to'^^wor ina fas
paced,~i MHi fun, ^
environmnt pleas
apply today.Bi^B^






prosec1THting.^^^^

buE1 ^iing,^'^^^^







opportunitiesaT *TforTu


HMI
Enjoy Working
with People?

Immediate Opening
for
PART-TIME SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
WITH

.. l i -

established territory
with great potential
for growth.
Base salary
plus commission.
Please FAX resume to:
(352)854-9277 or
e-mail to tjenkins@
chronicleonline.com


Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales &
designers to sell &
create advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
ads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service skills,
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume to
HR at:
352-564-2935


Cu _A ICL1
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE






Your world first.

Even' Din'



CRONICLE
00-Ifltl,,l


23rd Annual Celebrity Dinner Auction
to benefit the Key Training Center


$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackie
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON
NOW RECRUITING
Lic. R.E. Associates
Call Frank for confiden-
tial Interview. Inverness
Horizon Realty 212-5222
PETRA FASHIONS
Lingerie & Outerwear.
Book a party. July
Specialbuy 2, get one
FREE or become a
consultant. Call Donna
220-6086; Ivy 220-8241
or Kim 228-7825
REAL ESTATE
AGENTS WANTED
Must have licence.
CALL 564-18100
REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.



Van Wants YOU!!











A Career For
You At


Nature Coast
352-795-0021




$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!!

Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers, solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
.Call Now
800-362-0159 24 hours

GET RESULTS

IN THE

CHRONICLE


*


CNAs

JOIN THE TEAM
We are expanding
our services. Now
accepting
applications for
3-11 and 11-7 shift.
Full Time and Part
Time. We offer:
New Wage Scale
*Medical/Dental
Insurance
-Tuition
Reimbursement
SBonuses
Baylor
*Shift Differential
*Pay for Experience
Apply in person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness
EOE


- CNAs i
1 -7

Shift differential
SBonuses abundant |
Highest paid in
Citrus County. I
Join our team,
Cypress Cove
Care Center
(352) 795-8832








COMFORT HOME
CARE
A department of
Hospice of Citrus
County
Is currently seeking a
Home Care Clinical
Services Manager
Registered Nurse
licensed in State of
Florida. 3 years Home
Care exp.
Oasis and PPS exp,
2 yrs. Management
exp. Effective
communication skills.
Exc. computer skills
required
Contact our Human
Resource Manager,
Jill Thacher at:
Telephone:
352-527-2020
Fax: 352-527-9366
Email:
jlhacher@hospiceof
citruscounty.org
Mail your resume and
credentials to:
Comfort Home Care
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Florida
34464
A Division of Hospice
of Citrus County
Apply on-line at
hospiceofcitrus
county.org
drug-free workplace
equal opportunity
employer


CORRECTIONS -
JUVENILE

Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for 96 high and
maximum risk males
committed to the
Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for
Juvenile Corrections
Officer. Supervise
and maintain
custody of male
offenders in
a secure and con-
trolled atmosphere.
Must be 21, have a
satisfactory back-
ground screening
and complete
required talning in
accordance with DJJ
rules and regulations,
Apply In person at:
Cypress Creek
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL

DENTAL OFFICE
STERIL. TECH P/T
MON. WED. FRI. AM
Will Train. Apply 259 E.
Highland Blvd. Inv.


Citrus Springs Community Center
1570 Uest Citrus Springs Boulevard, Citrus Springs


, I


SPECIAL GUEST BETTY ATCHISON

PRESENTS

CHER THROUGH THE DECADES

DONATIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE
DRESS IS BUSINESS OR COCKITRIL ATTIRE


Key Training Center
23rd Annual Dinner Auction


Tickets
$50 per person. Call (352)527-8228


FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362
ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Looking for
experienced but
willing to train
motivated person.
Construction
experience helpful
Driver's License
A Must!
CMD INDUSTRIES
352-795-0089

ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Must have Florida
driver's license, hourly
or piece rate. Exp.
preferred, but will
train. Framing exp.
helpful. Apply today
& start tomorrow.
352-726-6547
AN EXP. FRAMER &
LABORERS NEEDED
(352) 637-3496
AUTO TECH
ASE preferred. Drivers
Lic. a must. Tools
required. Salary nego.
w/Exp. Nice, well equip.
shop. 352-341-4040
BONDED SEPTIC
TANK, INC.
*SEPTIC TANK
INSTALLER/OPERATOR
*PUMP TRUCK
DRIVER/OPERATOR
*YARD WORKER/HELPER
Drug Free Workplace
(352) 726-0974
Mon-Fri. 8am-4pm
CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH
Apply in Person at:
920 E Ray Street
Hernando
Or call 344-2400
*CLASS B
DRIVERS NEEDED
ROOF LOADING
EXPERIENCE, -
PHYSICAL LABOR
INCLUDED
Excellent Pay And
Benefits.
Bradco Supply
1-800-829-7663
DFWP

LET US WORK
FOR YOU!
CHRONICLE
CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS
CALL 726-1441
563-5966


YOU RRE INVITED TO WISH FOR THE STARS.


Need aGED?



Conceded



about childcare?


Call ftor Information about Even Start, a family
literacy program 795-7887


Friday, July 15, 2005
Silent Auction & Social Hour at 5:30 p.m.
Cher Impersonator Dinner Shouu at 6:30 p.m.


TUI;SDAY,JULY 5, 2005 7C


C'IASSIFIEDS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CmHRONICLEu


^


T










8C TUESDAY, JULY 5


MME
CONCRETE
FINISHER
Exp. A Must. Good Pay.
1-877-398-6698
CONCRETE
FINISHERS, BLOCK
LAYERS &
LABORERS

(352) 563-1873













EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
Accepting
Application for exp
heavy equipment
operators.
Knowledge of Dozers,
Excavators, back
Hoes, Graders &
Loaders Is helpful. Full
Time Employment w/
full benefits package
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE

EXP. DUCT
MECHANICS &
HELPER
Willing to train Helper
Excellent pay rate.
Company vehicle.
Full family medical
paid in full, 401K,
vacations. Call
795-3042 for further
into. F&H Contractors
EXP. EQUIPT
OPERATORS &
OPERATORS

For Utility Instillation. Full
Benefits & Retirement.
Background Checks
& drug testing
Conducted.
Call our Job Site.
352-799-8223
EOE j
EXP. FRAMER
Must have own tools
and transportation
Call (352) 341-3259
EXP. FRAMER
WANTED
Top pay and benefits,
The Villages Area.
(352) 307-9671
or 352-516-6563

EXP. FRAMERS/
CARPENTERS
With tools and trans-
portation. Local work,
352-302-3927

EXP'D PAINTER
5 years minimum.
Must have own tools




TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS
Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170
EXPERIENCED
ROOFERS
Tools & transportation
a must. Dependable.
733 N Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River.
(352) 628-3516
GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER HELPER
NEEDED

Some Experience
Required. 746-2154
GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
WillIng to Train!
Call:(352) 563-2977










INSTALLERS
Ceramic, Carpet,
Wood & Vinyl
Top Quality, Top Dollar.
Call:
877-577-1277option 5


F`


CI7RUS COUNTY (Fl) CiHRONICLE


5,2005














LABORER

Looking for hard
working person for
Roof coating, Must
have good drivers
license and own
transportation, Serious
Inuires Only .DFWP.


MARINE
FORKLIFT
OPERATOR
Fulltlme position. Prior
marine forklift exp
req'd. Competitive
pay w/benefit pkg.
Apply In person
Riverhaven Marina,
5296 S. Rivervlew Cir.
Homosassa 628-5545
MECHANIC HELPER
MARINE TRADE
Apply in person,
55 N Inglis Ave. Inglls.

PIKE'S
ELECTRIC
Bonded Licensed
Residential &
Commercial
Lake Sumter Polk
Don't miss the
opportunity to work
for the fastest,
growing electrical
contracting business
In Central Florida,
be available at our
Groveland/
Wildwood branches,
SIGN ON BONUS
MAY APPLY FOR
RESIDENTIAL
ROUGH LEADS &
RESIDENTIAL
TRIM LEADS
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
Top wages and
excellent benefits,
Including health &
dental, 401K plan.
Company trucks are
available for some
positions. Valid DL
required, Helper
positions also
available,
DFW, EOE
Apply today.
Openings will
fill quickly
352-748-6251

PLASTERERS
PERMENTANT Positions
or Weekends $16/hr.
(352) 302-1240

PLASTERERS &
LABORERS

Local work, benefits,
vacation pay, must
have transportation.
(352) 302-0894
B & F STUCCO
After 5pm. Iv. msg.

Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed In Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED
Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/ 2 years
driving exp. Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply. 24/6 shift.
Good Pay,
Long Hours,
Call 352-489-3100
PUNCH OUT
PERSON

Experienced In all
aspects of punch out.
Fax resume to
352-746-5972
SHOPMAN/
INSTALLER
Growing local
company, seeking
young energetic
shopman/Installer.
DFWP/EOE
352-628-6147


Advertise Here


for less than you think!!!


Call Today!


563-5966


EXP. FRAMERS ONLY
(352) 726-2041
*STUCCO
CREW LEADER
*PLASTERERS
LABORERS
*LATHERS
*STONE MASONS
Wages negotiable.
Call for immediate
employment 746-5951

STUCCO
PLASTERERS
& LABORERS

Must have
transportation.
Pay based on exp.
Starting at $9 Laborers
$15 Plasters
(352) 302-9047
(352) 302-9064






















































DEVELOPMENTALL
DT ISALEDDUT Sl l


BACGROUND CiH ECKSi l~ll


NEED HELP
Call AA Hotline.
352-621-0599 or www.
ncintergroup.com



















A WHOLE HAULING
& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermlst.com

AFFORDABLE, .
I DEPENDABLE I
SHAUUING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees Brush, al
IAppl. Furn, Const, I
SDebTrs &Garages |

DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal,
& trim. Lic. 99990000273
Insured 352-637-0681
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Haullng,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
JOHN MILL'S TREE
SERV., Trim, top, remove
Uc #7830208687 (352)
341-5936 or 302-4942
Mr Bill's Landscaping
No Job Too Big or Small.
Tree Work and Land-
scaping. 352-220-4393
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, lns.& Lic
#0256879352-341-6827
STUMP GRINDING
Uc. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlln
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe Itl"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Uc#000783-0257763 &
Ins. Exp'd friendly serv.
Lowest rates Free
estimates,352-860-1452




VChris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Uc#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
AFFORDABLE PAINTING
WALLPAPERING & FAUX
Uc. 17210214277 & Ins.
(352) 697-1564
All Phase Construction
Quality painting & re-
pairs. Faux fin. #0255709
352-586-1026 637-3632
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. Licensed &
Insured. 637-3766


M
APPLY AT THE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DEPT. AT 130 HEIGHTS
AVE. INVERNESS, FL
34452 OR CALL 341-4633
(TDD: 1-800-545-1833
EXT. 347) EOE
KEY PINE VILLAGE ICF/DD
LOCATED IN CRYSTAL RIVER
HABILITATIVE TRAINING
INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS
Rewarding work assisting
developmentally disabled
adults learn basic living
skills In a residential
setting. 2nd shift 3:30 pm -
12:15 am.
On the job Training.
HS Diploma/GED required.
Background checks and
employment health physical
will be required tor
post-job offer employees.

BRAY'S PEST
CONTROL
3447 E Gulf to Lk.
Hwy. Inverness
No Phone Calls
Looking for a career?
We are hiring and
training people In the
pest control Industry.
Must have good
attitude and not
afraid of work. Good
pay and benefits.

CAREER
OPPORTUNITY!
Laboratory Assistant/
Trainee. Potential full
time with tuition
reimbursement.
No experience
necessary. High
school diploma or
equivalent required
Please reply to .the:
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Blind Box #857
Crystal River, FL 34429

Need
Dial-up
Access
to the
Internet


CHILD ADVOCATE
$8/hr. 30/hrs. wk.
Afternoons, some
Saturday. Flexible hrs.
Facilitate groups,
arrange activities,
advocate for
Individual needs.
Drop off resume or fill
out application at
CASA
112 N Pine Ave.
Inverness, FL 34451

CLEANING HELP
Valid DL. DFWP
(352) 860-0596


DECCA
CABLE TV
TECHNICIAN
Candidate should
possess strong
technical ability in
CATV. Familiar
w/CATV construction
maintenance,
troubleshooting,
hardline & CLI.
On -Call duty required
and valid FL Drivers
Lic. with good driving
record.


George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick LIc./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a professlon-


Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521




AT YOUR HOME Res,
mower & small engine
repair. Uc#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352)400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile is restored
to new cond, All colors
avall. 697-TUBS (8827)




CNA/HHA Exp., caring.
Will care for you In your
home, Nights preferred
(352) 344-2094




v'Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.All work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
AFFORDABLE PAINTING
WALLPAPERING & FAUX
Uc. 17210214277 & Ins.
(352) 697-1564




CLEANING. Reliable,
affordable, Weekly,
bl-weekly, monthly
Joy, 352-266-8653 cell
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
I Do House Cleaning,
errands to doctors
& grocery shopping.
home health, 25 yr.
exp. liec., 352-476-3192,
PENNY'S Home & Office
Cleaning Service Ref.
avail., Ins., Uc. &
bonded (352) 726-6265




ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes. 637-4373
CRC1326872
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357


--6 Gnera
CA nL'T*rsn
c= Help


CarpetiTj! CleaningT^
Techn^icians [TK^^
No^^ exp. ecessry^n
Sevralful t*im7e[iTr^




older LZ~~o
STANE1YST1u-I


FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
comp. cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. Ins. CBC avail
352-563-0104/795-2807




ARK POWER WASH
Full Service, Fast
Response, Free Est.
Lic. Ins. (352) 795-3026
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Cleaning Quality
Work, Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25 yrs
exp. LIc./Ins. 422-1956




"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. LIc 0253851
(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Elec. etc. Uc. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
Maint & repair prob-
lems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395

r AFFORDABLE,
DEPENDABLE
| HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appil Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
352-697-1126
All Around Handyman
Free est. Will Do Any-
thing. LIc.#73490257751
352-299-4241/563-5746
ALL TYPES OF HOME
IMPROVEMENTS &
REPAIRS #0256687
352-422-2708
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Malntenance/Repolrs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201
Get My Husband Out
Of The House!
Custom woodwork,
furniture repalrs/refinish,
home repairs, etc.
Uc. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Moving,Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
Home Repairs & Maint.
Quality Workmanship
Lic99990001061
(352) 621-3840
NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
servlces.Llc.0257615/Ins,
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
PAUL/Mobile Home
Maintenance, painting
& clean up, Llc9999000
2321 (352) 344-8131
or (352) 697-4197


CnGnea


JI S ILc l'InI OECKVIC'E,
Jack & Wire Installation
& repair. Free esti-
mates: CALL 527-1984




GENERATOR
INSTALLATIONS
CITRUS ELECTRIC INC.
ER13013233
(352) 527-7414
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Llc#0256991
(352) 422-5000




S#1#1 A-A-A QUICK PICK
UPS & hauling, Garage
clean-outs, tree work.
Reasonable. 302-4130
= AFFORDABLE, =
I DEPENDABLE I
| HAULING CLEANUP.
STrash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris & Garages |
L 352-697-1126 J

All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE!
Moving.Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const. debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909


BEACH FENCE
Free est., Uc. #0258336
(352) 628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell
iBEST PRICES
Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453
(352) 795-7095, Dallas


CONCRETE
FINISHER NEEDED
For new company, call
Joe at (352) 464-3548











*F/T SEWING
MACHINE '
OPERATORS
*P/T SALES
Call for Appt. Mon -
Fri 9am -5pm
(352) 628-5980

HOUSEKEEPER &
HANDYMAN

Good Benefits
Apply in person at:
Best Western
Crystal River




920 jKE.RA S







Clall"for Inff M -













'plyinprsn0 t




I *.Be ten
.rysal.SRiver


GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm./Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002
JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences.
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431




Stack Underground
SIrinklers: Installation &
Service, Honest,
Reliable, Uc & Insured.
Low Pricest CL#2654
(352) 249-3165




John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc 7325492.
AM $;1 / n n-93.'A '1;


Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types Uc. & Insured.
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Patio- Walks.
Concrete Specialists.
Uc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates. Lic, #2000,
Ins. 795-4798.
DANIEL ENO CONCRETE
All types, All Sizes.
Lic #2506. Ins.
352-637-5839
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
Llc#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Drive & replace,
Slab. Lic.1476 726-6554




DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
Uc. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Lic. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




AM SIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798, 425-8184


Ph-

CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Lic/Ins. #2441 634-1584




BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways,
Call (352) 628-4743.


D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
Landclearlng, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch.
Lic. lns.(352)302-7096
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All types of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-057.2
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523
(352) 628-3924


A MOST AFFORDABLE A
& REASONABLE *
Land & Lot Clearing
Also Fill Dirt deliveries,
Free est. lic. insured.
(352) 795-9956
All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day 1x Clean
Ups, Lot & Tree Clear-
Ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
.Driveways 302-6955






Excavation & Site Dev
BJL Enterprises
Lic. #CGC062186
(352) 634-4650
HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &
lt hIno / (35 2)A3-OA2


CALL CODY ALLEN
for complete lawn,tree
& hauling services
(352) 613-4924 Lic/Ins
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272
McBEE LANDSCAPING
Shrubs, Trees,
Landscape packages,
Instillation & reds
Avail. Lic. #24715
(352) 628-0690
Mr Bill's Landscaping
No Job Too Big or Small.
Tree Work and Land-
scaping. 352-220-4393



A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize In
replugging your yard.
Uc/ins. (352) 527-9247
Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up.
Professional & Reliable
Call 352-563-9824
O LAWN MOWING & 0
O PRESSURE WASHING 0
Drives, Sidewalks, Patio,
Very reasonable rates.
352-257-5658


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
LOCAL PLUMBING
WHOLESALER
DELIVERY DRIVER *
Needed to make
local deliveries.
Must have clean
Class D License.
352-795-2999
LOT PERSON/
DRIVER
FT Male or Female
w/computer skills pre-
ferred, must have clean
driving record. Pay
based on qualifications
Please fax resume or
qualifications 746-7736
MAINTENANCE
WORKER WANTED

Apply In person.
D/F/W/P EOE
El Diablo Golf &
Country Club
No Phone Calls
NEEDED CONCRETE
WORKERS

Layout/form, Placers,
Finishers, Block Masons,
Tenders & Laborers
Competitive pay, Call,
352-748-2111
PART TIME LABORER
Needed on Call, No
exp. (352) 220-8630
POOL CLEANING
Part Time, .Mature
person. Will train, Must
have own vehicle
Call for appt.
(352) 637-1904
PORTER
For Citrus County's
fastest growing and
dynamic dealership.
Part-time. Evenings
and Saturdays. Must
have a good driving
record. Apply In
person Mon-Fri 8-6,
ask for Ran or Craig.
EAGLE BUICK GMC
1275S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa .
PT & FT COUNTER
HELP
Mature person
w/counter experience
needed In Inverness, Lt.
cooking, Call Rob or
Caren 352-637-2955


Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est. (352) 628-4258
CALL CODY ALLEN
for complete lawn,tree
& hauling services
(352) 613-4924 Lic/Ins
DETAIL YARD CLEAN
John Hall Lawn Maint.
Free est. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 344-2429
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service,
Mowing, landscaping,
pressure wash.563-5746
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
NEIGHBORHOOD KIDS
Lowest price lawn serv-
Ice. Mowing, mulching,
trimming, 352-634-0138
ELI'S LAWNCARE *
*Landscaping .Tree Srv
Cr+Ild~nal *Mow\llr


CRYSTAL PUMP REPAIR
(352) 563-1911
Subs, jet pumps, filters
FREE ESTIMATES
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Lic,. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard





"MR CITRUS COUNTY"


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


RAINDANCER
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascia, Siding, Free Est,
Lic. & Ins. 352-860-0714




DIRTY ROOF?
Low Pressure Chemical
Roof Cleaning. Call For
Est. (352) 212-0876


R&R&
SWING PERSONS
Needed very busy
transmission shop.
Exc. Salary, Benefits,
Vacation. Experienced
Only need apply.
Days (352) 489-5580
Eve (352) 465-4437

RESIDENTIAL
PLANNER/
ESTIMATOR
Seeking an experi-
enced individual to
assist homebuyers
with the selection
and pricing of
options, Located In
the Ocala area, over
100 homes construct-
ed each year. Good
opportunity for
advancement and
benefit package,
Send resume In word
doc format to
sales@tvrs.com or
Fax to 352-489-4126
EOE, DFWP

r TELEMARKETER

The Citrus
County
Chronicle
PART TIME
TELEMARKETER
NEEDED

15hrs
per week,
5pm-8pm.
Monday thru
S Friday
Experience in
telephone
sales and customer
service a must.
Applications are
being accepted
at the
Citrus County
Chronicle
1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River
Apply in person
or tax resume and
cover letter to
564-2935
EOE, Drug screening
for all final
applicants


SCHkpMcLE
L- A--


7-4 LaughingStock International Inc./dist. by United Media. 2005

"Don't try to sneak by, sir."


----------



REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.

SERVICE TECH
NEEDED

For busy company
for maintenance
and servicing of
residential waste-
water systems. Need
to be self motivated
and able to work on
their own. Need to
have a class A or a
Class B with Tanker
endorsement license,
Premium pay plus
commissions and
benefits
Apply within
Monday- Friday
between the hours
of 8am 5pm
A Able Septic
2190 N. Crede Ave
Crystal River
(352) 795-1554


RESIDENTIAL DRIVER

Needed for Citrus
Waste. Exp. required,
great pay. Please Call
726-7440

ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS
Exp Only. Paid
Vocations, Benefits.
352-347-8530

SHEET METAL
WORKERS &
LABORERS

Needed for growing
-company. No
experience needed,
paid vacations,
benefits, paid
holidays, bonuses.
Plenty of overtime
available. Apply at
Gulf Coast
Metal Products
In Rooks Industrial
Park, Homosassa,
(352) 628-5555


CLASSIFIED


Positions Available!

Service Writer's

* Assistant Parts Mgr.

* Lot Porters/Drivers

Full Time, Full Medical

Benefits, 401 k, Great Pay

with Room for Growth.






LOVE NISSAN/HONDA
352-628-9444
2021 S, Suncoast Blvd
H H.., i in H.: rna-:m-o










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


START YOUR
CAREER NOW
Earn while you learn.
Inverness Dental Lab
seeks IndIv. for difficult,
high-stress profession.
Start at the bottom,
earn your way up. Only
hard-working, highly
motivated Indlv. need
apply. (352) 341-4919
*STUCCO
CREW LEADER
*PLASTERERS
LABORERS
*LATHERS
*STONE MASONS
Wages negotiable.
Call for immediate
employment 746-5951
SWIMMING POOL
MAINTENANCE
and REPAIR
TECHNICIAN
Needed, highly Experi-
enced only need apply
good opportunity for
right person. Call Dave
352-527-3999
WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast I
& 352-637-2973
Ihomesold.com
WELDERS
Needed for
Communication
Industry. Some travel.
Good Pay & Benefits,
O/T. Valid Driver's
License required. DFWP
352-694-1416 Mon-Fri

Cn Pat-tim
cp Help


TYPIST/
PRODUCTION
ASSISTANT

Type editorial copy
for hand written/
typed sources Into
the computer,
Transfer copy from
email, and disk,
code and edit
properly. Newspaper
production
knowledge needed.
High typing speed
and high degree of
accuracy required,
high stress, noisy
environment.
29 hour part time
position. Monday
through Wednesday,
Saturday, may at
times be required.
Fax Cover Letter
and Resume to
352-564-2935
Qualified applicants
must pass
drug screen
EOE




ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowlingly
accept
ads that are not
bonaflide
employment
offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.

REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.

S'i^ a
[-ifBRBiU


"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charilefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877




1960 Stan
Musical BB Card.
$50.
Joe (352) 344-9502


-S

3 PERSON JACUZZI
works good, needs
1 switch, $250
(352) 628-2769
A+ SPAS, INC.
Hydro spas- wholesale
pricing. 5 person, $1695.
(352)572-7940/351-9935
HOT TUB/SPA
like new, 5 person,
24 Jets, cabinet,
digital LED, loaded,
Must sell. $1,495
(941) 234-3394

SPA's
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195.
Other models Aval.
(352) 398-7202




APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers.
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C., A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy.44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
CONVECTION OVEN
exc. cond. Imperial
model No DFE 103 12
rack on legs with cast-
ers, 8 amp 70,000 BTU,
gas convection $1,100
Ask for David
(352) 341-5400
ELECTRIC RANGE
Whirlpool, white. Exc.
cond, 6 mos. old, $100
(352) 628-5911
KENMORE WASHER
AND DRYER
2 years old. Moving
and cannot take. $400
352-466-1017
QUASAR 10,000 BTU
L window A/C,
runs perfect, $75
- (352) 344-2171
REFRIGERATOR
Amana, 5 yrs old
Freezer on Bottom,
$200.(352) 637-1397


WASHER & DRYER
$125/both
(352) 628-4140
Washer & Dryer
1 yr old
$250 for pair
(352) 503-3104
WASHER & DRYER Exc.
cond, like new, $250 90
day guar. Free del.& set
up 352-797-6090
WASHER & DRYER,
Excellent cond.
Clean $150 for both
(352) 341-3000



--- ---
4 ESTATE 4
MERCHANDISE
AUCTION
*THURS. JULY 7-
4000 S. Fla. Ave. I
Hwy. 41-S, Inverness
PREVIEW: 3 PM
AUCTION: 5 PM
Furn,, glassware,
tools, mower, golf
clubs, artwork, Box
lots See Web: www.
dudleysauction.com
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
(352) 637-9588
I AB1667 AU2246 I
12% Buyers Premium I
2% disc. cash/check
L- --




FRAMING GUNS,
saws & yard tools
(352) 563-1801
Mekita Sharpener,
Model 9820-2, w/ 60 grit
and 1000 grit wheels.
New $260, Asking $150.
Bob(352) 746-7023
Pressure Washer
2200PSI Honda Engine,
Barely used. $225.
(352) 220-6011




4 SHELF SPEAKERS
Two 6'x6", two -15"x9"
$30. Two Pioneer Stereo
Speaker CS707 w/
16" Woofer $50.
(352) 726-9964
36" HITACHI, surround
sound & PIP, 8-yrs old,
works like new, great
picture, $300 obo
(352) 228-1055
Audio Digital,
Tower Speakers
2 37 x 9 $250. Pr.
(352) 726-9964
JVC 32"
2 tuner, D series, exc.
cond. $275.
(352) 746-9348, Iv. msg,
Stereo,
Kenwood tuner/
cassette, Yamaha
5 discchanger, Sony
Speakers, w/ stands,
$125.(352) 464-0800




LUMBER
24 Treated used, 2 x 4,
10ft. long $36.
36 Untreated 8ft. 2 x 4's,
8ft. L $27.
(352) 795-4384




COMPUTER,
complete w/monitor,
mouse & keyboard,
Internet ready. $100.
(352) 564-1564
CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DELL DIMENSION 2400
computer. 2.2 GIG
Pentium 4 processor,
768 Megs of Ram CD
burner, DVD ROM drive
40 GIG hard drive, 17"
monitor, very nice wire-
less keyboard & mouse
HP Printer/Scanner/
Copier, 1 yr old. Nice
fast system, $525.
(352) 637-0210
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service, New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net




GOOSNECK TRAILER
hitch, 3-car hauling
trailer, new tires and
new tie downs.
(352) 795-6911




MASSEY 231
47HP, a real work horse
Only 6 hours. $10,500.
(352) 746-4703




11 PC PATIO SET
(PVC/cush). 2 recliners
w/ottomans, 1 round
53" table, 4 chairs, on
casters. 2 small end
tables. Exc. cond. $425.
(352) 382-8996
48" Round, Fiber Glass
Table 4 chairs, w/ cush-
ions + 4 extra cushions,
Tea Cart & lounge
chair all PVC $150. obo
(352) 382-4324
Porch Rocking Chair,
Cypress, large. Cost
$318. Asking $150.
(352) 726-2721
SWING
Wicker Swlng $75,00.
Girls blke w/ helmet
$25.00. (352) 795-2825




2 LEATHER SOFA'S
almond color, $300
each or $500 for both


(352) 746-9917

"MR CITRUS COUNTY"'


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


ARMOIRE, for TV/stereo
equip. Light natural
wood finish, $200 obo
(352) 628-3514
BABY GRAND PIANO
Krell, $1,800.
OLD LARGE ROLLTOP
DESK, marble green
top, $1,200
(352) 726-3062
BEAUTIFUL GLASS
1 pc. china hutch,
lighted, w/Interior
glassware, $200.
(352) 344-8126
BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
*PT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
Bedroom Set, full sz.
custom made, black
lacquer, mirrored back
unit, dresser & 7 lights
make up table $1,000.
take all. (352) 860-1242
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat. Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sale
Prices,Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139- King
$199. (352)795-6006
Black Chaise Lounge,
$200; Mauve Chair, $50.
Both In exc, cond.
(352) 746-1705
BUNK BED w/computer
desk underneath $250
KITCHEN TABLE, wood
with 4 chairs, oval, plus
2 wood bar stools, $150
(352) 726-8596
BUNK BED, $250 abo
DRESSER w/mirror,
$100 obo
(352) 634-2549
DINING ROOM TABLE
Travertine marble base
with glasstop, very
unusual, must see, $150
obo (352) 628-3514
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
27" TV and cabinet
$100.00. Bike $35.00
(352) 795-2825
Glass Top
End Tables &
Cocktail Table.
$160. Set
(352) 746-9897
INDUSTRIAL
steel desk, $20.
Office chair, $15.
(352) 746-5988
KING SIZE BED
Mattress & box spring.
$100.
(352) 726-6805
KINGSIZE BEDwithout
headboard, $200 obo
Full/Queen headboad
$50 obo
(352) 634-2549
Kitchen Set,
48'D Round glass top
table, 4 chairs on rollers,
perfect, $275.
(352) 527-8043
LazyBoy Chair
w/Ottoman, 1 /2 yrs. old,
excel cond, $225.
(352) 746-6998
LEATHER SECTIONAL
Contemp. Couch, exc.
cond Off white, $700/
abo; DR Tbl, glass top,
w/dolphin base, 4 up-
hol. chairs, very nice,
off white, $500. Exc.
cond, (352) 860-1426
LIGHTED CHINA HUTCH,
2-pc. w/curved glass,
real wood, $600 Match-
Ing server, w/fold down
extensions, $300.
2 Matching cushioned
arm chairs, $200.
Mahogany high boy 7
drawer dresser, real
wood $500
(352) 527-0763
Packing Material
$30.
Two, 6 drawers dressers
& 1 night stand
$100.
(352) 527-3463
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN ANN STYLE OAK
TABLE 4 chairs, one
captains chair, $200
CUSTOM MADE OAK
TABLE 42"x78" with 6
chairs, $300 (352)
489-1549 ask for Phil
Rattan Entertainment
Center, holds 25" TV,
Rattan Coffee Table,
$199/both. Sofa,
Loveseat, Chair, $199.
(352) 564-4214
Sofa & Loveseat
Blue Plaid, very good
cond. $100.
2 TV Stands, Is dk grey,
1 bik` $20 ea exc. cond.
(352) 249-1252
SOFA AND LOVESEAT
Teal and mauve floral
print on light
background. Good
condition. $300.
(352) 746-0124
SOFA
Beautiful, like new,
county French Style,
pale yellow, $400.
(352) 527-8043
SOFA, off white, rarely
used, 3 loose cushions
on back, $150 obo
(352) 628-3514
SUGARMILL WOODS
SALE WED. & THURS.
7 Pc. Bone Mica bdrm.
set, $350; Trundle Bd.
mattress/sgl, frame, $30
Trundle Bd mattress
$25; Lamps; Sewing
Mach, $10; Lt. Bone
leather Scandinavian
Recllner &8 Ottoman,
$300; Leather beige
recllner, $200; 4 Luclte
Bridge chairs, $30;
Quantumexerclser,
$100; 2 patio recliners/
cushions, $30 ea: Ampil-


ftier; Receiver; Cassette
Plyr; Bone color TV Stnd.
Kitchen Items; Foyer
console,w/mirror, $300;
Toys; Cookout; Silk Flow-
ers; Call 352-382-4991,
NO ANSWER CALL
732-974-0016
SUGARMILL WOODS
SALE WED. & THURS.
7 Pc. Bone Mica bdrm.
set, $350; Trundle Bd
mattress/sgl. frame, $30
Trundle Bd, mattress
$25; Lamps; Sewing
Mach, $10; Lt. Bone
leather Scandinavian
Recllner & Ottoman,
$300; Leather beiae
recllner, $200; 4 Lucite
Bridge chairs, $30;
Quantumexerclser,
$100; 2 patlo recliners/
cushions, $30 ea: Ampil-
fler Receiver Cassette
Plyr; Bone color TV Stnd.
Kitchen Items; Foyer
console w/mirror, $300;
Ioys Cookout Silk Flow-
ers; Call 352-382-4991,
NO ANSWER CALL
732-974-0016


SOLID LIGHT OAK
china cabinet.
$350 or best offer.
(352) 628-5038
Twin Beds, dresser,
nightstand, like new,
$395; Dining Rm. Table,
4 upholstered chairs on
rollers, It. oak color,
$295; (352) 564-4214
UNUSUAL LIGHT OAK
Dining room table, 2
leaves, 4 chairs and
server, $800 set.
(352) 344-8126
USED QUEEN SOFT SIDE
WATERBED, good cond.
$50.
(352) 527-8760




1996 LAWN TRACTOR
642 MTD w/grass
catcher, $225.
(352) 795-5151
CRAFTSMAN 14HP
LAWN TRACTOR,
$500
(352) 726-1872
CRAFTSMAN ROTOTILLER
5HP, 18", transmission &
new tires, exc. cond.
$235 (352) 726-5372
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
Lawn Mower, 2 yr old,
Club Cadet, 6,5 hp Ka-
wasaki engine, 6 spd
rear wheel drive,
mulch or bag, $250
Riding Lawn Mower,
Murray, 8 hp, 30" cut,
7yrs old, low hrs,
exc, cond, $200.
(352) 382-2934
(352) 634-1642
LIKE NEW EXMARK 13HP
Kaw, 36" ECS controls,
new bagger, never
Installed, $2,500
(352) 860-1416
MTD LAWN TRACTOR
18HP, 46" cut,
Rubbermald dump
cart, $400.
(352) 489-0962
RIDER LAWNMOWER
Runs, drives & cuts
$200 (352) 628-2769
Riding Lawn Tractor,
Craftsman, 1982
w/ 44" Deck, $200.
(352) 564-4598
Snapper Rider,
33", 14.5HP, new blade
and tune up ready to
run. $550. obo,
Yard-man 5HP 22" gas
trimmer, needs work
$60. (352) 697-3124
Two Craftsman
Riding Mowers,
A"" a. A4" 'Cu*


6' RED MAPLE TREE
$20; 5' Magnolia Tree,
$20; In Pots.
Or both for $30.
(352) 795-6693
ANGEL TRUMPETS,
peach, pink & yellow
one gal. pots, $10
(352) 637-2147




BEVERLY HILLS
r.lu .1 7^ .i r.,.r,, EFc
-.. r._,. ;_ '/.'IC rn ir e. .
chairs clothes .Antqus
3 S Barbour St


* BURN BARRELS *
$8 Each
860-2545
4 NEW GOODYEAR
Wrangler HT Tires
245/75/16R
Must purchase all
$450/obo
(352) 613-6132

2005

SPECIALS
6 lines 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$5.50
$151-$400......$10.50
'$401-$800.......$15.50
$801-$1,500....$20.50
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
Two general
merchandise items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

24' ft ROUND ABOVE
ground pool, Liner is
only 1 yr old. $500 -
you remove.
(352) 563-0466
or 697-2181.
Aquariums
30 Gal., $15
50 Gal. $25
Good Cond, Not Equip.
(352) 628-2613
CARPET
100's of Rolls left from
carpet Inst. Many
colors 352-341-2146
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
(352) 637-2411
Chest Freezer
$275.
Ab Scissor Exerciser
$300.
352-476-3192
CUISINART FOOD
PROCESSOR, $50.
Jack LaLanne
juicer, $60
(352) 726-1296
DECORATIVE RUG black
with gold, 11FTx7'8", like
new cond. Pd. $530 Sell
for firm price of $225
(352) 746-9955
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE'
Moving.Cleanouts, &
Handyman Service
Lic. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000
MOVING, Reclining.
chairs, desk, yard
equip., bar stools, misc.
Items (352) 341-1621
Mulcher/Mower
Craftsman, $100.
Commercial Smoker
Grill, $225,
(352) 628-3868
OFF WHITE, LEATHER
NATUZZI COUCH and
love seat, $300 for both
ORTHOPEDIC BOOT
$100 (352) 249-1010
PIANO, $500
Butler server, $50
(352)344-8537
POOL FILTER, Jacuzzi,
Landslide LS 70, $50
1-1-I---


PRESSURE TREATED 3-/4"
tongue & groove floor-
ing, 8' & 12', 600+ sq.ft,
$500 takes all. HEAVY
WAGON WHEEL, 42" P/T,
12 spokes, (will hold
kitchen utensils,) $50
(352) 726-3062
Range w/ self cleaning
oven GE, almond w/
bik. glass door. $150.
Sm. computer table &
chair $25. ea.
(352) 527-9330
RIDING LAWNMOWER,
Murray 12HP Briggs, runs
good,$200. Refrigerator
side-by-side with water
& Ice, white, $150.
(352) 795-6056
SOD, ALL TYPES
Installed and delivery
available.35 2-3363
STAINLESS DOUBLE SINK,
faucet, 6 month old
Sears disposal, $75
WOOD KITCHEN TABLE,
4 chairs, cushions, $35
(352) 422-5000
UTILITY SINK
Almost new, $25.
(352) 564-0646
or (352) 422-1874
Washer & Dryer,
$150
Lawn Roller,
$75.
(352) 628-3868
WESTINGHOUSE AIR
PURIFIER, like new, cost
over $200. Sell for $100
obo (352) 228-1055
White Fabric Sectional,
excel cond., w/
matching swivel
tub chair $350.
(352) 527-0785




CONVECTION OVEN
exc. cond. imperial
model No DFE 103 12
rack, on legs w/casters,
'8 amp 70,000 BTU, gas
convection $1,100
Ask for David
(352) 341-5400




INDOOR OUTDOOR
PACESAVER RF Scout
power wheelchair with
charger & cover $1,500
obo (352) 527-0763
LIFT CHAIR
Exc. cond. Taupe
Microfiber Suede.
$400.
(352) 726-6805
Remote Control
Lift Chair
used 3 months, neutral
color, $900. obo
(352) 382-3551




GRAND PIANO
New keytops installed,
bench Incl. needs
refinishing, $1000.00
352-563-1173
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music.
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
PEAVY CLASSIC 50 watt
all tube amp with road
case, on casters, $400
(352) 201-0804
SPINET ORGAN
Two 61, Note
Keyboards, Midi in &
out. 3.5.floppy drive,
white lacquer finish
$1,750. Call for Details
(352) 746-6898


Piano
Dark Mah, nice
cond w/ bench
$500 OBO.
(352) 860-1426




PRO-FORM dual motion
cross trainer, treadmill
w/arms, $200 abo.
Foozball/ air hockey
table, $50 oabo
(352) 628-2448
Treadmill, Lifestyler,
works well. $75.
(352) 220-6011


L-6 K


'01 MURRAY
off-road
GO-CART.
EXC. COND. $900.
352-422-2634
American 180, 155
Round .22 Cal,
Pre Ban, Mint, $600.
Lulgi Franchi 12 gage
$400.(352) 302-4199
Black Diamond Ranch
3 D Viewers
of the Quarry Course,
3 for $20.
(352) 464-2861
Complete Set of Wom-
en's Golf Clubs
Including shoes, balls,
tee's, etc.. super buy at
$150.
(352) 628-9660
MURRAY 26" American
classic cruiser series,
Basket, mirror & light,
rear carrier, kick stand,
exc. cond. $150 firm
(352) 344-5174
Norinco, AK-47, Pre
Ban, 4 mags, Mint,
$425.
1-75 Round drum $100
352-302-4199

POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
leather pockets,
LUfe Time Warranty.
$1,295
(352) 597-3140
VINTAGE VALLEY
BUMPER POOL TABLE
with balls and 8 pool
cues. $400/obo
(352) 628-7934




16FT CAR HAULER
with ramps,
$900 obo
(352) 302-0441
BUY, SELL, TRADE, PARTS
REPAIR, CUSTOM BUILD
www.ezoulltrallers.com
Hwy 44 & 486
CHEROKEE, 6 x 12
inclosed cargo trailer,
custom model, ramp
back door, $2,250.
(352) 628-2126


NOTICE
Pets for Sale
In the State of Florida
per stature 828.29 all
dogs or cats offered
for sale are required
to be at least 8 weeks
of age with a health
certificate per
Florida Statute.
2 Tame Ball Pythons
J rn I.rg.e c,.-
all accessories, $200
Firm (352) 465-6456


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2005 9C



woGURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE


1. Money owed for a house animal (1)


2. Movie about a hayseed (1)


3. Object of Scrabble, e.g. (1)


4. Castro's country's sousaphones (2)


5. Insubstantial caprice (2)


6. Big boo-boo involving pirated loot (2)


7. Taking lessons in old butter-making (2)


Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word. To win
$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
newspaper. All entries become
the property of UFS, Inc.
2005 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thanks and $10 to
Ford Thompson of
Grandview, MO for
S#2. Send your entry
to this newspaper.


ODNUM0 DNINHVHTL', LIaNflT la lRNfIId '9 ASWIHAM ASKIT Sg
SVa i sV l0 1' MWIV T O '8 DITI IIH 'g (I a ,L3 d 'I
7-4-05 SIaASNV





Advertise -Here


for less than you think!!!


Call Today!


563-5966


DOBERMAN PUPPIES
Black & rust. Champion
bloodlines. Warlock/
Kimbertal Due 7/7.
Father Search &
Rescue. Call for details
Unda, (352) 527-7784
FAWN PUG
Male, 2+ yrs. Shots
current. Friendly.
$150 to good home
(352)563-0801
Free to good home.
Akita, 1 /2 yr. old, male,
,neutered, need fenced
yard. (352) 344-9768,
212-6679
Gold Crown Conure
.w/ new cage, 3 yrs old,
$125.
(352) 489-2098
HAND-FED
COCKATIELS
Don't bite and super
affectionate. Variety of
colors 45,00-60.00
(352) 465-8193

Humanitarians
of Florida
Low Cost Spay &
Neuter by Appt.
Cat Neutered $15
Cat Spayed $25
Dog Neutered &
Spaveb start at $30
(352) 563-2370

PUPPIES
Pit Bull Pups $150 O.B.0
9 weeks old,
4 Females 1 Male.
795-2590 or 476-5780
YORKIE, MINI, 2y21b girl
11 mo. AKC, friendly,
smart, lap dog, good
companion for retiree.
$300. (352) 628-2448


FOR RENT 2 Stalls, 6 ac.,
4 stalls, 10 ac. Across
from State Forest.
(352) 628-0164
Horse for Sale, mare,
great riding horse, $900
w/ new tack.
New Pony Saddle, $100.
(352) 726-4367
Reg. Qtr. Horses
For Sale. Foundation
4 yr. olds + 3 yr. olds
(352) 346-3478




Alpacas Males
2 gelded, I breeding.
All for $1900
352-628-0156
PIGS FOR SALE
35-45lbs, $20 ea.
(352) 854-4933
YORK/SPOT PIGLETS
weaned, approx 40lbs.
$40. Also rabbits, $8.
(352) 628-4636




2 & 3 BEDROOM HOMES
Pool, wonderful neigh-
borhood. Reasonable.
(352) 447-2759
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bdrm, C-H/A, Private
lot. No pets. $500 mo.+
1st. 1st. $500 sec,
352-795-2096/422-1658
Crystal River
Senior Discount on
Clean Rental. 302-7073
DW 2/2 new carpet,
paint. No pets,
no smoking $525/up,
Homosassa. 628-4441


HOMOSASSA
3/2, $700. mo. + util.
$700. dep. 207-651-0923
HWY 488
Clean 2/1, private lot,
$425 mo. + deposit. No
pets 352-795-6970
INVERNESS
Lakefront 55+ Park. Fish-
ing piers, affordable
living 1 or 2 BR. Screen
porches, appliances.
Leeson's 352-637-4170




2 Bedroom MH, on
Homosassa River Canal,
newly remodeled, furn.
Ig, fenced yd., great lo-
cation no water access
$89,000. 352-398-6786
American Homes
your Discount Dealer
for Homes of Merit,
Skyline, Southern
Energy
352-628-0041 -
866-466-3729
www.american
homesfl.com

ATTENTION
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
Deliver and Set Up
$35,900 Includes
10 Year Warranty.
Homemart
Mobile Homes
(352)307-2244

DOUBLEWIDE 3/ 2, 2 car
attached carport, 1296
sq.ft, open floor plan,
glassed in sun room,
hew floors throughout.
$86,000 (352) 228-1163,
after 5Pm


)









10C TUESDAYJULY 5, 2005
Gig iSof


FOR SALE BY
OWNER
Must sell this one.
Move in nowl
3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
New-Nice home &
land only $85,900.
Owner will be able to
pay for all costs.
352-621-9181










NEW LISTING
This beautiful home
won't last.
Ready for Immediate
move In.
3 bedroom, 2 baths,
great locatloni
$4,500 down,
$614. per month
No hidden charges.
Call
352-621-9183
REPOS AVAILABLE
in your area.
Call today. Ready to
move Into.
352-795-2618




CHASSAHOWITZKA
Newly remodeled.
2/1, 2/2, Quiet. No
smoking. No dogs. Boat
slips Access to Gulf.
$650 & UP, mo, + Sec.
Need ref.(352) 382-4235




2 Bedroom MH, on
Homosassa River Canal,
newly remodeled, furn,
Ig. fenced yd., great lo-
cation no water access
$89,000. 352-398-6786



2 Bedroom MH, on
Homosassa River Canal,
newly remodeled, furn,
Ig. fenced yd., great lo-
cation no water access
$89,000. 352-398-6786
3 BR, 2 BA 2000 Jacob-
son mobile home,
approx 1500 s.f. on
fenced 1/2 acre,
Deadend street, close
to everything, wood
storage bldg, pool
w/decking, 8 person
spa, large screened TIkI
bar w/TV, sound sys-
tem, fridge, sink, lit bar-
fenced dog run, wash-
er, dryer, new dish-
washer, side by side
fridge, glass top stove,
pot rack, great water.
Stucco siding. Clean.
Ready to move In. Over
$130,000 value- priced
right for fast sale,
$99,900. (352) 563-0034
days. 563-2793 eves
8165 W Steele Ct.
Crystal River
'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806sq. ft.own at $895.
down and $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
2/2, 14X60
on 1+ SECLUDED ACRE.
Very close to river and
El Diablo Golf Course.
$75,000. (352) 726-1997
or (352) 266-6785
Beautiful 3/2 on
1/2 acre in great
school district.
$2,000 and $650 mo,
(352) 795-6085

Great Country Setting
Mini Farms. Easy to
Qualify. $4,000 down
and $560 mo.
(352) 795-1272
Hernando, Double
Wide, 4/2, Double
corner lots, 20x24
addition. Block
garage. Close to Lake
channel. Fixer-fix.
$48,500.
586-7675/726-1950
Just what you've
been looking for. New
4/2 on 5 acres. Zoned
for agriculture. Horses
Welcome. $6,000
Down $750 mo.
(352) 795-8822
Like New 2004
Homes of Merrlt. 3/2.5
on 1/2 Acre, Owner
says sell now.
Price reduced
Kllllngsworth Real Estate
(352) 302-8376





New Land Home
Packages Available.
Many to Chose from.
Call today for
approval. Low down
and low monthly
payments.
1-877-578-5729

OPEN HOUSE
Brand new warranted
home 3 bedroom,
2 bath, tiled floors,
appliance package,
eat-In kitchen, top of
the line, deck,
driveway on paved
road. Must see,
Call for directions
352-621-0119
SAVE $1000'S
NEW & PREOWNED
Manufactured homes
and Modulars. Easy
qualifying even with
bankruptcy.
Call 1-800-870-0233


Crystal River Village
2002, 1,280 sq. ft., 3/2
w/40' carport, den,
sun porch, attached
workshop, all
appliances $69,900
(352) 795-6495
CRYSTAL RIVER VILLAGE
Fully furnished, 2/2
dollhouse, must see,
Large double carport.
$75,000. (352) 795-6895
MANUFACTURED
HOME In nice park,
Doublewlde, all
updated amenities,
44-E, Inverness $55,000
(352) 527-4832
0'LON


Park Model
TOP-OF-THE-LINE
FI Rm, 2 bdrms,
40x24,outside shed, lot
64. Lake Rousseau RV
Park $18,500.
Joy (352) 564-0342
Jesse (518) 686-1777
WALDEN WOODS
Nobility home, built
2004, 1749 living space,
3/3, double driveway,
all appl's, custom
window treatments,
enclosed screen room.
(352) 382-3341


-U
BEVERLY HILLS
PINERIDGE POOL HOME
MILLION DOLLAR VIEW.
DIRECTLY ACROSS
FROM EQUESTRIAN
CENTER. BACKS UP TO
28 MILES OF RIDING
TRAILS. 2 BEDROOM,
2BATH, 2 CAR GARAGE,
WOODBURNING FIRE-
PLACE. RENT WHILE U
BUILD. CALL TONY
MOUDIS, OWNER
LICENSED AGENT,
NO FEE'S..
352-212-3019
Classified Ads from
575 through 660 are
sorted by town names
to assist you In your
search for rental
property.

Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
>- Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt, Is our
only Business
> Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
owner Assoc. Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM, Realtor
352-628-5600
info@Oprooertyv
manaamentgroup.
morn




'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq. ft. own at $895.
down and $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
Crystal Palms Apts
I& 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 564-0882
INGLIS VILLAS
Newly Renovated*
Affordable Rental
Apartments 1, 2.& 3
bedroom, available
immediately.
Rent is based
on your incomell
Located on SR40 one
block East of US 19,
Only 7 minutes from
Crystal Riverl
M W F 2PM 5PM
T, TH 10AM 7PM
(352)447-0106
Equal Housing
Opportunity
INVERNESS
1 & 2Bdrms $360-$500.
clan ouietanrpa. Ist.


Crystal Palms Apts
1& 2 Bdrm Easy Terms.
Crystal River. 564-0882




200' ON US 19
across from Crystal
River Airport. GNC. Call
Owner, 352-212-3041
HWY 19, N Hmassa.
approx 450sq.ft. 2 rm.
office. $600/mo. Incl.
elec. (352) 628-7639




CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse 2/2V2,
Furn. 352-746-0008
CITRUS HILLS
Beautiful 2/2, Condo
carport, vaulted ceil-
ings, Golf community
$729/mo. 561-213-8229
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $1100 mo, 1st, last,
security. References
(352) 257-8769
INVERNESS
2/2, Condo, 55+, 1 yr,
lease, no smoking, smn.
pet ok. 1st., last., sec.,
(352) 637-5200
SMW VILLAS
For rent,2/2/1 & 2/2.5/2
On driving range.
$875mo. 352-212-2077
WATERFRONT CONDO,
2/2, Furn, Kings Bay
View, Dock.. $1,500mo
(352) 634-0129




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lgr., 3/1, Separate Utility
Rm w/ Washer/Dryer
hook up $550/mo. +
$550 dep(352) 564-1776
Call before 5pm




HERNANDO
(TWO) 1 BDRM FURN.
$450 + elec. all utilities
paid and $140 wk or
$600 mo, All utilities
paid. 352-726-2225




Daily/Weekly
o" Monthly
o" Efficiency

$600-$1800/mo.
Maintenance
Services
Available

Assurance
Property
Management

352-726-0662
$725,00-18 Meadowdale, Beverly
Hlls-Immaculate 2/1/1 All New
Appliances. Incl. Lawn Service
$750.00- 61 S.Lincoln, Beverly
Hills, 2/2/1, family rm & lanal
$700.00- 514 S. Jackson, Beverly
Hills, 2/1/1 family rm& lanai
Fine Homes-Hedick Group
746-3390


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Beverly Hills 2/1/1
Lg Fl. rm, W&D, DW, mi-
cro, furn/unfurn, secl.
302-1370 or 795-9048
Homes from $199/mol
4% down, 30 yrs. @5.5%
1-3 bdrm. HUDI Listings
800-749-8124 Ext F012




2/2/2 POOL HOME
Rock Crusher area
$ 950, 1st, last &
security, (352) 795-4093



2 Large BR/2 BA
Family Room, Newer
appliances, CHA,
garage. $750

2 BR/1.5 BA
Eat-in kitchen, family
room, newer appliances,
garage, CHA. $750

Call 746-3700
Real Estate Agent
AVAILABLE JULY.
1/1 Duplex. $325,
Homosassa; 3/2/2,
New Citrus Springs $775.
River Links Realty
628-1616/800-488-5184
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, Fl. Rm., 1st, last,
sec., ref. no pets, $725.
mo. 352-303-5343
BEVERLY HILLS
22 N Osceola, 3/1.5
$625, 1st, sec. dep.
352-697-1907
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1 + FL room. $715 mo
(352) 527-3054
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 Fl. Rm.
352-746-4673/464-2514
CITRUS HILLS
2/2 on 1 acre,$750 mo,
(786) 553-2577
CITRUS HILLS
2/2Y2/2, cath. ceilings,
2400 tsf, Beau. wooded
Iac. pool, $1075 mo
561-306-0316
CITRUS HILLS
3/2/2 Citrus Hills $1200
3/2/2 Laurel Rdg $1300
Townhomes & Condos
2/2/1 Brentwood $900
2/2 Citrus Hills $850
Greenbriar Rentals, Inc.
(352) 746-5921
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1-/2/1, Irg, Fla. Rm.
Furn, $850 Unfurn, $800
1st, last, security,
(352) 746-9436
HERNANDO
3/1, 2 story, yard, First
Last Sec. $600 302-3927
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, Fresh Paint,
inside & out, Just off 19,
$825/mo. 352-628-7526
954-984-1523
HOMOSASSA
Lg. 2/2/2, new paint, &
carpet, big lot, homes
only neighborhood.
$850/mo. 352-628-7526,
954-984-1523
HOMOSASSA
Rock Crusher area.
2/2/2, like new cond,
$750 + sec. No pets.
On Hesse Ct.
Call Matt, 228-0525
INVERNESS
Highlands, Large,
Charming, 2/2/1, quiet
street, apple $800.-$825,
mo. (954) 650-7884
INVERNESS
NEW. 2/2/1
NO PETS OR SMOKING
$725.
2/1 $525 344-2500
Magnolia Village
Lecanto, FL

Grand Opening!
The wait is over!
Spacious &
Affordable, 3BR 2 BA
Rental apt are now
available for
occupancy.
Rents from $360 plus
electric, water &
sewer. Leasing office
in Inverness Heron
Woods, 701 White
Blvd, Ste C.
Phone 352-726-3476
Mon-Fri
9:00AM -5:00PM
TTY 1-800-955-8771
Call or stop by for an
application.
Previews by
appointment
Equal Housing '
Opportunity
PINE RIDGE
4/2/2, $1,000/MO. New.
(561) 827-2024
SUGARMILL WOODS
Home & Villa Rentals
Call 1-800-SMW-1980 or
www.starrental.com




2/2 HOUSE, CHAZ


628-1616800-48-5184

2/2/1, fireplace, Ig.
deck, & dock privileges,
end unit, no smoking,
no pets. $1,100. mo., 6
m. min. (727) 224-5230




2/2 CRYSTAL RIVER
HOME. College grad
female look for same
to share home.
$215 mo. 1/2 until. &
cable. Plus deposit.
(352) 278-1239


DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Country Club
Estates.
Rent or Rent to Own,
Large 2/2/2 With
Fireplace, Large Treed
Lot. Immediate
Occupancy.
(352)527-3953




FEMALE WITH KIDS
looking for same to
share 4 bdrm In Leisure
Acres, $400 includes
elec, (352) 628-2448
FLORAL CITY
Roommate to share
home with pool. $400,+
352-726-7774 or
422-7992 or ro.net


Beverly Hills 2/1/1
Lg Fl. rm, W&D, DW, mli-
cro, furn/unfurn, secl.
302-1370 or 795-9048




YOUR LOVELY
HOME
Room, bath & free
computer access
needed. Last week of
every month. By
professional, working,
Grandma (local family)
from Atlanta. Please
call (404) 786-7992
to discuss




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
Advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes It Illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
Intention, to make
such preference, limi-
tation or discrimina-
tion." Familial status In-
cludes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which Is In
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby Informed that
all dwellings
advertised In this
newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis,
To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing Impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EIUtL HOUS-NG


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising In this





satsornFatilor
Houshg Act which makes
It e-
gal to advertise "any
preference Itatwomen or
cratron basd on race,
cck
S secur hing p,
Id staodyus orf children
htenlton, to make such
ence, imitation or -isalr
tianr" Fancid status

children under the
age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,

securing
custody of children
under 18.


tising for
red esate which s h viola-
telephon
of the law, Our read-
ers are
herebyerformed hat d
dwe^

advertised In this
newpCer Oe avcbTe
equal opportunity
basis.
To complain of
dscbznratton cdaHUD
to-wee
at 1-ao05699777,1he
telephone
number for the
hearing Impaired Is
1-800-927-9275.







"MR CITRUS COUNW '


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956





JULY 9, 12 4PM
PINE RIDGE FARMS
10 ACRE FARM
Everything you need,
bring family and
horses. Hosted by
Bob Bracken, Remax
Premiere Realty
(352) 208-4035 5




SOLUTIONS FOR
TODAY'S HOMEBUYER
FAMILY FIRST
MORTGAGE
Competitive Ratesll
- Fast Pre-Approvals
By Phone.
- Slow Credit Ok.
- Purchase/Ref.
a FHA, VA, and
Conventional.
* Down Payment
Assistance.
- Mobile Homes
Call for DetallsI
Tim or Candy
(352) 563-2661
Lic. Mortgage Lender



OPPORTUNITY


ACROPOLIS MORTGAGE
*Good Credit
*Bad Credit/No Credit
*Lower Rates
*Purchase/ Refinance
*Fast Closings
Free Call 888-443-4733









2/2/carport on Elkcam,
could be 3/2, newly
remod. Lots of tile 1245
living. 1/2 acre w/shed
like new home $143,900
(352) 634-0052
4/2/1 Lg. Kit, DR, Fam.
Rm, Liv. Rm, on oversize
lot on Golf Course,
Inground pool, land-
scaped. New roof,
$199,000. 352-465-7697

CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs, Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.

GREAT LOCATION
& CHARMING
Close to entrance,
2bed/1 bath, carport,
new paint & carpet,
florida room, privacy
fenced backyard.
Perfect starter or
investment home,
$89,900, 352-637-2973

NEW HOME, 3/2/2.
Tile baths, nice area
1528 living. $175,000
(352) 628-0100

'Your Neighborhood
REALTOR'








call Cindy Blxler
REALTOR
352-613-6136
cbxler1 5@tamoa
bay~rr.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq..ft. own at $895.
down and $625. mo.,
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
3/2/2 + detached
garage, carport, pool,
needs minor TLC,
Must Sell, 1 + acre,
$219,900.
(352) 527-1765


Home
ca Loans


9-1


-I^^

BY OWNER
2003, 3/2/2, fenced,
1 acre. 15x30 pool
2934 W. Beamwood Dr.
$309k, Open house, Sat.
& Sun. 352-400-1552
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis'
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.


.






DONNA HUNTER
Realtor
Selling or Buying,
call me today.
For the EXIT way of
exceeding your Real
Estate expectations.
EXIT REALTY
LEADERS
(352) 422-4235

Don't Horse Aroundl
-5'




Call Diana Willms
A Pine Ridge Resident
REALTOR
352-422-0540
dwillmsl@tampa
bay.rr.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

PINE RIDGE
Prime new listing:
3/2/3 pool home on
golf course Must see!
$384,900,
Citrus Realty Group,
(352) 795-0060
POND, WATERFALL
JACUZZI & STONE GRILL
on private, natural pre-
mlum corner, 1.4 Acre
Save / on util. w/ dbl
reinforced concrete
(hurricane strength)
Former model many
extras: Gourmet kit.
fireplace In master bdr.
$349K. Call for appt. or
brochure emalled,
352-746-3330
RUSS
LINSTROM
TIP







HAMPTON SQUARE
REALTY, INC.
rllnstrom@
digitalusa.net
800-522-1882
(352) 746-1888


CLASSIFIED '


-I^-

Pine Ridge Estates
1 Acre N SULTANA TER
cross st. Pine Ridge &
Carnation $100,000,
352-746-3983
Thinking of Selling
Your home? Visit:
www.aetmvhomes




'04 New 3/2/2 Concrete
Stucco Homes
1806 sq. ft. own at $895.
down & $625. mo.
No credit needed
1-800-350-8532
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.




CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Servlce/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON& KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.
HORSE LOVERS
Next to Withla. Horse
trails, 15 ac, 3/2 w/fam.
rm. Lg. Scrn, pool, 5 stall
barn w/tack. $625,000
Will Divide
(352) 628-4915
New, 3/2/2, scrn. lanal,
sewer, water, Crystal
Glen Estates, $212,900.
pre construction price.
800-414-5256
SALE BY OWNER
3/2/2 1450 sf kit appi
fans blinds $159,900.
1890 S. Hoylake Terrace
Lecanto 422-4830.




CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Servlce/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call
for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
.. BROKERS/REALTORS..
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.


6 MO. OLD 3/2/2 Over
2300 sq.ft. 1 ac., lots of
upgrades. Huge Master
bath w/jetted tub.
897 W National St.
$279,900 (352) 400-1863
A beauty that has It All
3/2/3, solar heated
pool, Jetted tub, 2127
sf., bit. 1996, 1 acre, 4
sliders open to huge la-
nal, gas FR a must see,
$279,000. 352-220-3897
BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2, + den, kit. cab.
w/ pull out drawers, all
around sound. & many
extra's, excel, cond.,
inside & out. $189,900.
2101 Brentwood Cir.
352-249-1012
BY OWNER, custom
3/2/3, pool, 1 acre, top
quality throughout
Thousands below
replacement cost
$450K (352) 527-2749
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.
CONDO, Beautiful 2/2
In Country Club/Golf
Community., carport,
vaulted ceilings.
$139,000. (561)213-8229
FREE REPORT
What Repairs Should
You Make Before
You Sell??
Online Email
debbie@debbie
Or Over The Phone
352-795-2441.
DEBBIE RECTOR


Realty One
www.buyflorida
homesnow.com

LINDA WOLFERTZ
Broker/Owner








HAMPTON SQUARE
REALTY, INC.
llndaw@
toampabay.rr.com
800-522-1882
(352) 746-1888
New Custom Home
Golf course S. exp.
Huge M-bath, up-
grades galore. $337,000
By Owner 352-746-7512
LET US WORK FOR YOUI
CHRONICLE
CLASSIFIED
GET RESULTS
CALL 726-1441
563-5966


4
.


)


.4W~


~I'


4/3/2, on 1 acre,
2500 sq ft, Cath ceiling,
$235,000. OBO.
(352) 860-1426
Oaks Golf Course 3/3/2
Pool Home, lots of
closets & oak trees,
best location.
$379,000.
(352) 527-7275
Terra Vista Golf Course
Pool Home 3/3/2
Separate Inlaw suite.
New In 2003
$395,000 352-527-9973
See Byowner.cam




3/2 POOL HOME
12x36 screen porch.
Private, close to
Whispering Pines Park.
Lot next door Included.
$135,000.(352) 726-6779
CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing

Full Servlce/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Inverness Highlands
West 2/2, 1-car garage,
built 1995, $123,000.
(352)461-6973 cell
HIGHLANDS
Desirable 2/2/1 split
plan, newly renovated,
new roof & AC,
$119,000. 726-7181
HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $94,900.
3/2/1 w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Llc.# CBC059685
JACKIE
WATSON


--S













-isv


SELLS YOUR HOUSE



in The Citrus County Chronicle Classifieds


^^^^^We^ WillHU~j^^^^^




^^^^^^Sell Your^^^^^^


^^^^^Home, ^


^^^^Condo,^^


^^^^^^^or ^


Only the Citrus County Chronicle can give you all these benefits

* Your person-to-person ad will reach the largest audience

* Your ad goes on line to the largest database of homes for sale

* Change the price of your home as often as you like

* Our Real Estate Classifieds are categorized for ease of readership

* Your ads consists of the make and 6 lines of description for $49.50

* Your ad will be scheduled thirty days and appear in the Citrus County

Chronicle and online each and every day.

* Get your ad in right away!









563-5966 CNI
some relrictions apply


SELL YOUR HOME
Place a Chronicle
Classified ad
6 lines, 30 days
$49.50
Call
726-1441
563-5966
Non-Refundable
Private Pay Only
Somre Reslrlons
May oppy)
Thinking of Selling
Your home? Visit:

Waterfront Luxury
Home, 3/2, Dock,
access to over 8,500
acres of lake 9507 E.
Beech Circle $425,000
(352) 726-3873
WHISPERING PINES
VILLA FOR SALE
Accepting bids over
$100,000. (352) 726-967




2.17 ACRES
2/1 needs work,
Access Lake Apopka
via Orange State
Canal from backyard.
10520 E. Trails End Rd.
$75K (352) 302-5351
2/2/2, w/2 car carport,
1400 s.f. living, C-H/A. /2
acre. Asking $129,900
Open house Sun.l-4.
7646 E. Savannah Dr.
(352) 637-2407 or
220-1570 cell
LAKEFRONT, 4/3/4
Approx. 2600 Sq. ft. liv.
area, situated on beau-
tiful landscaped 1 3/4
acre lot w/ azaleas, ca-
meilia's, and fruit trees.,
Located in floral City
priced to sell at
$339,000. Call for appt.
(352) 344-0062 or
(727)543-1989
WATERFRONT Lowest
price on deep canal to
Lakes & River. 2/1 w/Irg
enclosed porch, park
like setting, Only
$94,900 (352) 726-6785




3/2/2 16X31 Encl. Pool
1900 Sq. Ft. LA,
11190W Thoreau Pr
$254,900. By Owner, -.
220-1349 or 220-1350
3/2/2 Block/Stucco, ,
city water, near mall,
N.W 21st St. Rm. for RV,
near boat ramp.,
$162,900
(352) 795-0917
BEAUTIFUL 2005 triple ~
wide log cabin mobile
home, tape & textured,
On hlll,121/2 acres. 3 Ds
on land.Asking $375,000
(352)795-3012/795-3311
KATHY TOLL
(352) 302-9572







List with me & get
A Free Home
Warant
(352) 302-9572



Nature Coast


Hampton Square
Realty, Inc.
Let us give you a
helping hand
352-746-1888
1-800-522-1882

Marilyn Booth, GR
23 years of
experience
"I LOVE TO MAKE
HOUSE-CALLS"


J.W. Mort ni.:R.E., Inc
726-6668C 637-4904










&RUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JUST LISTED
SECLUDED &
WOODED
Beautiful 3/2 w/office
on 1.5 acres. Pond.
approx 2000 sq/ft com-
pletely remodeled
2-WBF's, New
appliances
the works.
GotOurHomecom or
call 813-294-7041


















NEW HOME, Connell
Heights, 3000 s.f. under
roof, 3/2/2, many
upgrades, $194,900.
(352) 422-4533


Steve & Joyce Johnson
Realtors
Johnson & Johnson
Team
Call us for all your
real estate needs.
- Investors, ask about
tax-deferred
exchanges.
ERA American Realty
and Investments
(352) 795-3144
s. Thinking of Selling
", Your home? Visit:.
," www.getmyhomes
Ya lu Le..m




2.5 ACRES. Cross
fenced. Homes of Merit
D/W. 3/2, pool, fire-
place, French doors,
walk-In closets, Indoor
laundry, appl's- as Is.
$132,500. 352-628-4217
2/1, FIREPLACE,
screened In-porch,
close to Chass River.
Recently remodeled
bath. $89,000.
(352 52 K7-0299


U.


"MR CITRUS COUNTY"'


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Reallty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

BUYING A NEW
HOME?
Buy through me and
get a 1 year home
warranty FREE
SELLING A ROME?
Ust with me and give
your buyers a 1 year
home warranty FREE
View all of Citrus
County's Ustings on
my website
kenbell
centurv21.com



NATURE COAST
352-795-0021

CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Servlce/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllllon SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Listings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.

FREE REPORT
What Repairs Should
You Make Before
You Sell??
Online Email
debble@debble
Or Over The Phone
352-795-2441
DEBBIE RECTOR



Realty One
www.buyflorida


*"**JCrystal River
N3
"Homes


Here To Help!
Visit:
waynecormier.com
(352) 382-4500
(352) 422-0751
Gate House
Realty




CEDAR KEY
1 week + bonus week.
$3000 obo.
(352) 212-5277




CITRUS REALTY GROUP

3.9% Listing
Full Service/MLS
Why Pay More???
No Hidden Fees
20+Yrs. Experience
Call & Compare
$150+Mllion SOLDIII
Please Call for Details,
Hustings & Home
Market Analysis
RON & KARNA NEITZ
BROKERS/REALTORS
CITRUS REALTY GROUP
(352)795-0060.
GOSPEL ISLAND
3/2/2 Lakefront Home.
Over 1800 sf. of living.
100 feet of lakefront
with fenced yard. Up-
grades throughout.
7410 East Allen Dr.
(352) 344-9007. Call for
webslte address to
view pictures and
details. $349,000.





Licensed R.E. Broker
- Leading Indep.
Real Estate Comp.
* Citrus, Marion,
Pasco and Hernan-
,do
T Waterfront, Golf,
Investment, Farms &
Relocation
-w Excep. People.
Except'nal Properties
Corporate Office
352-628-5500
www.silverking
proper2ies.com
Randy Rand/ Broker
Thinking of Selling
Your home? Visit:.
wwwg.aetnmvhomes

WATERFRONT Lowest
price on deep canal to
Lakes & River. 2/1 w/lrg
enclosed porch, park
, ,like setting, Only
$94,900 (352) 726-6785
YOUR OWN PIER
All tile 2/2, single floor,
quiet Villa In the Island
Condos, reduced to
$295K Furn/unfurn. Fin,.
Avail. (352) 795-6721




WE BUY HOUSES & LOTS
Any Area or Cond.
1-800-884-1282 or
352-257-1202
'WE BUY HOUSES
Any situation Including
SINKHOLE. Cash, quick
closing. 352-596-7448
WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast
352-637-2973
lhomesold.com

















St., side street on both
ends, high, dry, cleared
& seeded. Large oaks,
new well, new fence &
cross fenced. Owner
finance avail. $135,000.
(352) 628-3098
12 ACRE CORNER
Plne Ridge Estates. Very
wooded. Princewood
Street. $101K
Tim, (303) 960-8453
WANT A BETTER
RETURN
ON YOUR MONEY?
ONITACTU I


We Specialize In
Helping the Small
Investor Acquire
Homesites & Acreage
352-795-3144,
ask for C.R. Bankson
at ERA American
Realty & Investments
cr.bankson@era.com
100+ Homesltes AVall
FREE PACKAGE
Site Maps & Flyers,
Call 1-800-476-5373
Ask for CR


9-1


Here To Help!
Visit:
waynecormier.com
(352) 382-4500
(352) 422-0751
Gate House
Realty




COOL N.CAROLINA
Mountains, near
Asheville, 5.5 acres,
Views, trails, private
road, close to town
$55,000 (352) 233-0101




2.2 ACRES on canal to
2 rivers. Partly cleared.
New well & pump.
Ready to build.
$125,000
(352) 233-0101
5 WATERFRONT LOTS
Private & pristine 1-2
acres each on Crystal
River, Gated with
water, sewer & under-
ground utilities. (352)
795-4487 or 726-4352




15hp MERCURY, 2003
boat motor. Excellent
condition. Retail $1720,
will sell for $1000.
(352) 382-1735
18' to 20' Galvanized
PONTOON TRAILER
In like new condition.
$1150. (352) 746-2084
Manual Jet Ski Lift
Harness type
$300.
(352) 564-0856
(352) 628-3090
STRATUS DRIVE-ON
BOAT TRAILER, 20'.
$300
(352) 423-3088




KAYAKS, w/ paddles,
Pamllco, double, $475.
2 Mallard, Single, $300.
ea. (352) 465-0949
SEADOO
2000 GTX RFI, 3-seater
Serviced for the sum-
mer. Runs great. $4500.


THREE RIVERS
MARINE




We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES !!
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U.S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-15510
1985 MARATHON
24' Cruiser-Deep "V"





New Merc 5.7/250hp
Inboard w/ approx.
50/hrs (60 gal. fuel tank)
forward & after cabins
w/ fold out bunk at the
helm. Will sleep 6. All
new seating. JRC
closed array RADAR (16
mile range) Lowrance
"LMS-160" map
plot/GPS-JRC model
200 VHF marine radio
Fullyloaded enclosed
camper/weather pkg.
AM-FM, CD, Sound Sys.
w/ 2002 Performance
alum. trailer Survey
Avail. $17,000.
Larry.(352) 341-4606


I


2003 ROCKWOOD
POP UP
AC, awning, loaded
$5,995. (352)795-7901

2005 TRAVEL TRAILER
35ft., with 14ft., slide.
Rent It while you build
your New Home.
(352) 464-2481
AVION
'94, 5th Wheel, excel.
'cond. 17 ft. llv. area
slide, queen bedrm.
many extras. must sell
$16,500. (352) 527-4697
KING OF THE ROAD
RV STORAGE, RV Repair
/UHaul, Store your Boat,
RV or Auto $15. mo.
Hwy 19, N. of the Mall.
(352) 795-7901


lc= BoatsB


HOME FOR SALE
On Your Lot, $94,900.
3/2/1, w/ Laundry
Atkinson Construction
352-637-4138
Uc.# CBC059685
Thinking of Selling
Your home? Visit:
www.getmvhomes





Citrus Hills Greenbriar II
Remodeled 2/2 condo,
carport, must see. By
appt. $144,900
Principals only
(352) 302-5714




WAYNE
CORMIER


INVESTORS/BUILDERS
70 Vacant Citrus
Springs Res. Lots for
Sale, $34,900 each.
Package Deal Avail.
(954) 728-9381
KENSINGTON ESTATES
at end of cul-de-sac,
on Foster Ct. 1 V2 acres,
(352) 637-4919




10.8 ACRES ON HWY.19
Great locale near Inglls
14 ml. N. of Crystal River
Minutes to State Park,
SGulf, Fishing, Boating
$175,000. 813-484-9096




COMMERCIAL LOTS
227FT frontagel Hwy.
41-N zoned GC, clear-
ed. Has city water &
trees, $99,900 (352)
465-3999 or 302-0297




1 1/4 ACRE LOT
N. ODYSSEY DR.
CRYS. RVR IN
CRYS. MANOR $99,800
rillalberto hotmall.com
2 PRIME LOTS,
Citrus Springs,
net $30,000 ea.,
(352) 302-6025
3 Lots In Floral City
Approx Vs ac well,
septic, & pwr hook up.
$30k obo 352-586-7396
Building Lots
In Inverness Highlands,
River Lakes &
Crystal River.
From $16,900.
Call Ted at
(772) 321-5002
Florida Landsource Inc
CITRUS HILLS/
PRESIDENTIAL ESTATES
beautiful, level, heavily
treed acre. No agents.
$68,500 ea.
(352) 400-0489
PINE RIDGE
1.25 acre partially
wooded lot on quiet
street. $98,900.
(352) 527-1123
WAYNE
CORMIER


$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & Trallersl
No Feesf352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

14' F-GLASS JON BOAT,
mtr, & trir. Johnson 9,5
Troll mtr, fish finder,
many extras, $1800obo.
Must see. 352-464-1616
BASS TRACKER
2000,18', 185, on 2001
trailer, 50hp Merc.,
20/hrs use, take over
payments 352 621-9774
CANOE OLD TOWN
Discovery 17, $500
2.5 HP Evinrude Motor,
and mount, $200
(352) 746-4429
CANOE, OLDTOWN
14", 7", w/ paddles and
life Jackets, used 3 times
$395.00
(352) 628-0825
CAROLINA SKIFF
2000
With 25HP Honda,
bowmount trolling mo-
tor, eagle depthflnder,
pro style seats, and gal-
vanized trailer, like new.
ready to fish, $4,000
352-302-1003
CHASSAHOWITZKA
"Cricket Boat" L 24', B 9',
flat tunnel boat, 85HP
2002 Suzuki & 15HP
Yamaha, $8500 obo.
(352) 382-1735
CRISCRAFT
1960, 55', Constellation,
3 state room, twin 871
Detroit, radar & GPS,
Great live aboard or
cruiser, $89,900 OBO
Will trade for land.
Possible Financing.
(352) 344-4288
(352) 302-7234


CONSTRUCTION
SALE
Here We Grow Again!

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS
17' to 23'
SWEETWATER
PONTOONST
15'-24'

POLARKRAFT
JONS
12'-20'

POLAR OFFSHORE
21'-23'

CLEAN PRE-OWNED
BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days

MALIBU
14ft. V Hull 25H elect.
start, low hrs. great
boat $2,000.
(352) 860-2408
MECHANIC'S
SPECIAL
23' Weekender, 200HP
w/tandem trailer. Extra
engine, $800.
(352) 423-3088
PONTOON
1993 Fiesta, 18', new
canvas, has motor, no
trailer asking $2800.
(352) 628-9741
RINKEN 28'
Walk around cuddy,
'95, GPS, rods, reels,
VHS, compass, FF, fresh
Yamaha eng. w/trir.
Needs some repair,
$4500. 795-2300, Stacy
SEA LION
14Vs Ft. fiberglass Fishing
Boat, 50HP force motor,
F.C. trolling motor, fish
finder, w/ trailer
$1,900. (352) 726-7239
SPORTSCRAFT
$4995.
20'11" fiberglass I/O.
3795 S. Suncoast,
Homosassa
TRACKER CANOE
17ft., 2 person,
aluminum, $200
(352) 563-1096
VIKING
'80, 22ft. Tr-lhull Deck
Boat, Engine & outdrive
redone last year.
$3,500., 352-220-8158
WANTED TO BUY
SEXTANT
(352) 563-0022
WANTED to BUY:
Center console,
14'-16', no motor.
Call (352) 746-7649




2 FIXER RV,S
1994 Scotty 29' ram
cummings delsel AT.
roof dmg. $6,995 08,
1986 Newmar 27' Ford
7.5L AT. $3,250 OBO
both drivable need
work. Lecanto,
260-377-9662 cell
FLEETWOOD
1988, 33FT, w/ attch
porch 10ft x 30 under
roof shed, Must sell
$7,500 (352) 344-4016
FORD
1991 Class C
motorhome. 27'. 50,000
ml. Extras. $8000.
(352) 795-5151
HOLIDAY
1992, 32', Rambler, 33K,
self cant, Q. bed, A/C,
3 way Fridge,1 owner,
$15,000(352) 726-8126
PACE ARROW
1994, 33' Class A, 60K,
Air, generator, much
storage, 460 Ford,
2 TVs, $21,900.
(352) 563-6558


BOX TRUCK
1990 GMC 16'
Maintained, good
shape, $4500.
(352) 422-2821
CHEVEROLET
1984, S10 Sport Model,
new engine w/ 9000ml
$2,500 OBO.
(352) 795-9490
CHEVROLET
'02, Silverado 2500,
auto, towing package
60k ml, i13,500.
(352) 613-7277


r


YELLOWSTONE
89, 23', self cont. A/C,
extra clean, $4,500.
(352) 527-9133




1974 Ford Pickup Body
8' Box Cab, front clip
complete good cond.
$1,500. neg
352-422-2554
BLACK TOPPER
for small truck,
good cond., $100.
(352) 726-2722
After 5pmr
FLATBED 8' long,
67" wide, $200.
Front & rear bumper
6'X8" wide, rear bumper
has lights & H/D trailer
hitch, $125. Will fit 1/2
ton or 3/4 ton pickup.
(352) 563-2941
MACCO COMMERCIAL
air compressor, $500
ENGINE HOIST
$150
(352) 302-0441
Wood Decked Steel
Frame Flat
Truck Body
75" Wide, 96" Long
$350. neg.
352-422-2554













ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR? CONSIGN
98% Sales Success
No Fee to Seller
90944W and US19-
alrport. 212-3041
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
VEHICLES WANTED,
Dead or Alive.
Call Smitty's Auto
628-9118











'99FORDTAURUS LX
V-6, Loaded, Clean ..............$3,995
'95 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER SUV
V-6,Sunroof, Loaded..........$4,995 .
199, d PrkAven
'98 CADDY SEDAN DEVILLE
V-8, weather, Loaded. ..........$7,995
'97 LINCOLN TOWNCAR EXEC.
vory arl,eathrNice.....$7,995
MANY MORE IN STOCK ALL









BUICK
1995, Park Avenue,
all pwr, all leather very
(352) 746-9375
(352) 634-0619
BUICK
1996 Century. Fully
equipped. 18.240 MILES
$6000. Call from 9 to 5
(352) 489-2104
BUICK
'99, Park Ave, excel.
cond. new Michelin
tires, 1 yr. warr. 37k ml
$12,500. (352) 527-1026
CADILLAC
1986 DeVille, looks and
runs good, good trans.
$650.
(352) 795-8085
CADILLAC
1996 Sedan DeVille.
Pearl white w/maroon
top. All leather. Exc.
cond. $6000. 527-8682
CADILLAC
1998, Sedan Deville,
Pearl white w/mar. Ithr.
Int. excel, cond, $5,800.
(352) 382-5309
Cadillac
'93, Fleewood, Brough-
am, blue, rear wheel,
RWD, 80k ml., $6,295.
*(352) 382-0635
or 302-6774
CAMARO
1987, runs great, cold
AC. T-tops. $2000 oab.
(352) 400-2364
CAMARO
1988, Flowmasters. Runs
good. $800 or best offer
(352) 726-4623
CARS. TRUCKS. SUVS
CREDIT REBUILDERS
$500-$1000 DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19Airport
564-1212 or 212-3041
CHEVROLET
2000, Corvette, sliver,
31K, exc. cond, ext.
warr avail., $28,800.
(352) 382-4331
CHRYSLER LEBARON
'93, 27K orlg. ml. Estate
Car. All pwr, new
tires, PERFECT 30MPG.
$4700. (352) 563-9815
CHRYSLER SEBRING
Limited 2004. Exc. cond.
Less than 6,000 ml,
(352) 726-0318
COUGAR
'88, P/SP/BP/W. Opera
top. 1-owner, always
araged, 118,000 ml.
$1700 aba. 527-3560


FORD BRONCO
1995 Sport. 1 owner,
red on red. Loaded,
AC, etc.Llke new, $5000
nhn b F3-.A99-5599


FORD
1996 Crown Vic.
103,000 ml. Very good
condition, $2800.
(352) 795-6056
FORD
1999, Taurus, 49K, good
cond, PW, PL, P/Seat
owned by older senior,
$5,100. (352) 726-6228
FORD FOCUS
2002 ZTW wagon, Zetec
engine, auto., silver,
leather, all power, 16"
Alloys, 6-CD changer,
front side alrbags, ABS,
tinted, new tires, 16K ml.
100K mile warranty
$9,300 (352) 344-0632
FORD
Lady's '89 Tempo
4dr, 79K, Super clean,
AC, PWR, Real prizel
$3600. (352) 628-5790
FORD MUSTANG
'00, Conv. Red, all pwr,
dual CD/Tape player.
Bg. top/int, 59k, exc.
$11,000. (352) 527-0809
FORD
Steal it! $6300, 2002
Focus SE. Mint. Great
on gas. 70K+ ml,
Contact (352) 249-1121
FORD TAURUS
2001 wagon, 64K ml.,
great shape, $6,800
(352) 344-2752
GEO
TRACKER
$1500 or best offer.
(352) 527-3975
KIA
'01 Rio, 52K, CD player,
tinted windows, new
tires, good cond. $4,000
obo 352 344-3046
KIA
'01, Rio, 4DR, PT, AC,
new tires. 39,500mi., ex-
cel cond. $4,900. obo
352-527-1812, 302-9498
KIA
01, Sephia,
white, manual,
$3500 FIRM
(352) 527-3519
LINCOLN
'89 Towncar, Cartier
Exd. running cond.
Nice ride, clean,
dependable, $1,495
(352) 341-0610
LINCOLN
'96, Signature Towncar,
Jack Nicklaus, wht. w/
burgundy cloth top,
22-25 mil per gal. 113k
ml. excel cond. $5,000.
obo (352) 628-3363
Lincoln Town Car
1992. Clean. Good ride,
looks good, minor
mechanical repairs.
$1800. (352) 527-1139
MAZDA
2002, Miata, 11,800k mi.,
silver ext., 5 spd., pris-
tine $15,500.
(352) 628-4497
MERCURY
1994, Marquis LS, 85K,
AC/ stereo, Spoked
hubs, leather int. new
brakes, $4,000 BO.
352 464-1032
MERCURY
1999 Cougar, black,
A/C, radio, $6,000
cash (352) 726-3084
MERCURY
'98, Sable, auto trans.,
cruise contrail, ice cold
air, good tires, high ml.
runs good. $2,500.
(352) 220-4927
NISSAN MAXIMA
'99, SE, very clean, runs
great, sun rf, AC, CD,
5sp. stick. 128k ml.
$4400/obo 352-220-2709
OLDSMOBILE
'92 Cutlass Supreme
A/C, good cond. runs
good, $1,200 abo
(352) 344-0551
PONTIAC
'93, Grand Am, 2 DR,
PW, cold AC, 16" tires &
wheels, new, 129k ml.
$1,600. 352-697-0889
PONTIAC
'95 Bonneville. Good
cond. Has a '98 eng. &
trans. $3950
(352) 795-0063
PONTIAC FIREBIRD
1992 Formula, V-8,
T-tops, auto trans, pwr
accessories. $2500 abo
(352) 465-3942
SAAB
'97, 95k, Immaculate,
electric sunroof, 5sp.,
$4,500 obo
(352) 628-9559
SATURN
2000 station wagon,
original owner, 37 mpg,
never In accident, exc.
cond. (352) 382-7661
TOYOTA CELICA
2002
80,000, Air Cond,,
Sliding Sun Roof, Single
Compact Disc, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Cruise Control,
$9500 08 Call any-
time 352-476-3260 or
352-302-0816




FORD
1954 2-dr, good eng, &
trans. No body rust.
Restorable, $3500, After
4pm call (352) 212-4839
MERCURY
'70, Cougar, good look-
Ing, fast, dependable,
too many new parts to
list. $3,700. 352-860-2556
MUSTANG
1968 Coupe. 302 V-8.
Automatic. New tires
& morel $7200.
(352) 726-6779
MUSTANG COUPE
1965, 6cyl., lots of new
parts, good cond.
need some work.
$4,800. (352) 628-2126
VW SUPER BEETLE
1973, Lt. Blue, 96,814 ml.
Runs good, many after
market perf. parts. All
stock parts Incl. $4,200/


CLASSIFIED


CHEVROLET
2004, Sllverado Ext.
cab, 1500ml, loaded,
Must See.
(352) 634-5665
CHEVROLET
'85, Pickup, full size, one
owner, orig '85 title,
excel cond. $3,500.
(352) 527-8499
CHEVY
1972 Stepslde, 350, 4
spd, 8" lift. Good shape.
$4000 obo. or trade
boat? (352) 613-3579
CHEVY
1981 P30 Step Van
(UPS style) Alum body,
completely rebuilt.
Everything new. Drive
anywhere, $5995 obo.
352-527-3756
CHEVY
'97, S10 Pickup, ext.
cab, runs good, body
rough, 150k. V6. AC
$1,500. (352) 746-2982
DODGE
1987 Dakota Pickup.
Runs good, new tires.
$1500 or best
offer. (352) 464-2055
DODGE
1989 Sport Pickup
convertible $3,000
(352) 637-0057
DODGE DUALLIE
DIESEL, 1997
High mileage, well
malnt. $7500/obo
(352) 212-0699
FORD
'97, F150, Pickup, ext.
cab., V6, 5sp., 48k ml.
on factory second.
motor, $5,800. obo
(352) 628-7414
FORD
2001 F150 XLT. Super
cab. 5.3 liter V-8,factory
tow pkg. rated 8,400
lbs. 5th wheel hitch
rated 15,000 Ibs. 5 disc
CD player. Alum tool-
box. 46,000 ml. $14,000.
(352) 382-7316
FORD
2001, Lightning, blck,
show rm gond, only
8300mi, garaged,
$27,000. 352-560-6186
FORD
2003, F350, Dually
$27,000.
YAMAHA 250,
& 2003 Raptor
CALL (352) 563-0869
FORD RANGER
2001 XLT, 4 door, auto,
loaded, 98K mi. exc.
cond. $7,200/obo
352-422-7910/795-9090
GMC
1991 pickup. New
motor, roof rack & tool-
box included. $1500
obo. (352) 489-1759
MAZDA
'92 5-spd. cold air, ext.
cab, easy on gas, 4 cyl.
clean, little truck, $1,200
(352) 860-0948
TOYOTA
1984, Pick up, topper,
chrome wheels, new
clutch, $1,195 080.
(352) 422-6661
TOYOTA
2002 Tacoma, 5-spd.,
green, $10,900 obo
(352) 344-4497
TOYOTA
PU truck, 1983, good
running condition.
$600/obo.
(352) 860-1426


JULY 5, 2005 11 ;




SUZUKI
'05 Boulevard, 800cc,
700 ml. fully dressed,
under warr. Like new,
$7,350 726-6351
SUZUKI
2002, Savage 650,
9,000mil, looks & runs
good, $3,000. OBO.
352-726-4753 after 8am
SUZUKI
'94 Intruder 800
Excellent condition.
Must see $3,000
(352) 341-1854
YAMAHA
Scooter, 125cc, 8Korg
ml, garaged, Sr driven,
as new w/ helmets,
$1,500 (352)563-0022


CaSll RichardB

726-1238~
'01 Ford7WndstarTC




Caraan 2


COUGAR
'94 XR7, 78,000, $3000
'91 Caddy Brougham,
Gold Series, 118K, $3200
Must sel(352) 621-3541
Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
It off your taxes then
trading it In.
Donate It to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
DODGE
'91 Diplomat, Ice cold
air, no dents, every-
thing works, $750
(352) 563-5986
FORD
1991 Tempo GL
44.1K ml., exc. cond,
moving, $1,500
(352) 344-5372


CHEVY
1981 P30 Step Van
(UPS style) Alum body,
completely rebuilt,
Everything new. Drive
anywhere, $5995 obo,
352-527-3756
CHEVY
1987 C20 hi-top conver-
sion van w/elec wheel-
chair lift & fold down
bed. Runs excellent.
$2500obo.352-465-8779
CHEVY ASTRO
1995 Capt chairs, Ice
cold AC & very clean.
148k miles $2,900.
(352) 476-7229.
DODGE
1999, Grand Caravan,
white, high milage, mint
cond. loaded, 1st
$3,000, (352) 302-4326
DODGE
2000 hi-top conversion
van.19,000K ml. Loaded
w/luxuries. $12,500 NEG.
(352) 746-5044
DODGE
2000, Ram Wagon,2500
8 passenger, 5.2, V8,
loaded, 8,500k ml.,
$7,200 obo
(352) 628-0825
FORD
1965 van, needs TLC,
$500 obo
(352) 344-4531
FORD
2000 E150 XLT. Trailer
pkg. Tinted windows,
PL, PW, rear AC. Run-
ning boards. 72,000 ml.
Excellent cond, $11,500.
(352) 637-4640
HONDA
2001 Odyssey, 51,000 mi
5 door, CD player, *
Michelins, exc. cond.
$14,900. (352) 795-9004
LEISURE VAN
Beautiful cond.
Hurricane escape,
$6,900.
(352) 527-9245




AMPHIBIOUS ATV
1984 Scrambler, $1,995.
New starter, master cyl.
(352) 621-1241
or (727) 432-3426
ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
Go kart
"$300.
(352) 795-7766
HONDA
'04, Rancher ES, 329CC,
2WD, garage kept, per-
fect cond. only 280 hrs.
$3,800. (352) 428-1267
HONDA
1998CR 125.
Exc. cond. Runs great.
$1750 or best offer.
(352) 489-6377
HONDA
2004 TRX 450R.
Less than 20 hours.
Uke new. $4900 obo.
(352) 489-6377
POLARIS
2001 Trailblazer 250 cc.
newtransm, lots of
Performance parts,
$2,000 352-572-2903
YAMAHA
2001, Raptor 4 wheeler
660, w/ many extras
$4,000.OBO.
(352) 344-0304




2 Honda Mopeds
For Sale &
Go Karts.
(352) 628-6269




-
"MR CITRUS COUNTY"





!, ,






ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956
BUELL XB9S
2003, Lightning, 2500ml,
warr. till Aug., Corbin
Seat, Extras, Adult
owned flawless $5,500
(352)746-1366
(352) 634-4685
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Deuce, 340 ml., fuel
InJ., orig. owner, silver,
health forces sale.
$17,250. (352) 621-0143
HONDA GOLDWING
1986 Asplncade, runs
great, 42K ml. $3300/
obo. (352) 637-5052
leave message,.
KAWASAKI
1993 KLX 650, Street/
Trail, exc. cond. low
miles, $2,500 obo
(352)860-0176
KAWASAKI
1999, KLR 650,27K. w/
extras runs great
$2500. OBO
(352) 302-8046
KAWASAKI
2003 250 NinJa.
Very low miles. $2200.
(352) 726-6779
KAWASAKI
2004 Vulcan 1600, low
miles, beautiful. Paid
$10,500, asking $8500.
(352) 302-6311
Motorcycle Carrier
Versahaul, 5001b ca-
pacity, class 3 hitch
$260.
(352) 382-7046


CHEVROLET
1993, Suburban, 350
engine, cust. paint &
ent, radar, Ice cold
A/C, runs great, $5,800
OBO. (352) 621-8021
(352) 302-0725
CHEVY BLAZER
2002 LS, 40K ml.
Garage kept. Perfect
cond. Like newly $9800
(352) 746-7970
CHEVY SUBURBAN
1981 Air Condition,
Power Steering, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Tilt Wheel,
AM/FM Stereo, Single
Compact Disc, Rear
Wheel Drive, $800.00
fair condition, 454c.i.
engine. Call Crickett at
352-382-1439.
FORD BRONCO II

100K plus miles. CB
hookup, roof rack,
back, Exc. transport.
(needs valve guide re-
pair) asking $1,995 obo
or will trade for 3/4 ton
pickup, V-8, with a trail-
er hitch. Also need a RV
tow dolly. Must be com-
plete with chains & tire
straps. Will pay up to
$500 faor used tow dolly.
Call (352) 344-8334
leave msg. oricall my
cell (352) 302-0850
FORD EXPLORER
1996, 4X4, 4drnew tirebuilt
engine, runs like newly
$3500.
(352) 563-2130
JEEP WRANGLER X
2004, low ml,, loaded,
mint e ond. New
$23,900. sell for, $17,900.
352-228-7772
MITSUBISHI
2002 Mwntera XLS ,4wd,
6 cyl. All pwr. Sunroof 7
pass. 60K ml. Exc. cand.
$15,500. (352) 746-0625




KING OF THE ROAD
RV STORAGE, RV Repair
/UHaul, Store your Boat,
RV or Auto $15. ma.
Hwy19, N. of the Mall.
(352) 795-7901
pass. 60K mi. Exc. condo.


obo. 443-655-7209 or


516-0705 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
Robert Lee Johnson
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2005-CP-721
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT LEE JOHNSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of ROBERT LEE
JOHNSON, deceased,
whose date of death was
February 24, 2005, File
Number 2005-CP-721, is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice has
been served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBUCATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is June
28, 2005.
Personal Representative:
-s- HENRY L. STAUFFER
PO Box 5026
Inverness. FL 34450-0026
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HAAG, FRIEDRICH &
BLUME. PA.
452 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, FL 34452
(352) 726-0901
(352) 726-3345 (Facsimile)
Florida Bar No.: 764949
-s- Johnnye L. Friedrich
Attorney for Estate
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 28, and July 5,
2005.
517-0705 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of Ralph M. Higbee
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CITRUS COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No: 2005-CP-771
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RALPH M. HIGBEE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered in the estate of
RALPH M. HIGBEE, de- ,
ceased. File Number
2005-CP-77L by the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which
is 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450;
that the decedent's date
of death was September
28. 2003; that the total
value of the estate is
$2,600.00 and that the
names and addresses of
those to whom It has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
Leona HIgbee
4 Fiddlewood Court
Homosassa, FL 34446
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate
of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against the estate
of the decedent other
than those for whom pro-
vision for full payment was
made in the Order of
Summary Administration
must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE TIME
PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is June
28, 2005.
Person Giving Notice:
-s- Leona M. Higbee
4 Fiddlewood Court
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
-s- John S. Clardy, III
Florida Bar No. 123129
Cider Clardy Law Firm PA
PO Box 2410
Crystal River. Florida
34423-2410
Telephone: (352) 795-2946
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, June 28, and July 5,
2005.
518-0712 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
Robert F. Bromwell
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No,: 2005-CP-865
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT F. BROMWELL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of ROBERT F.
BROMWELL, deceased,
whose date of death was
June 16, 2005, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Cit-
rus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address
of which Is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness. Florida 34450. The
name of the trust is the
ROBERT F. BROMWELL
AND NELL R. BROMWELL


Si











-12C TUESDAY JUL




LIVING TRUST DATED THE
3RD DAY OF MAY, 1995,
and names and address-
es of the successor trustee
and the successor trus-
tee's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must
fil their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice Is July 5,
2005.
Personal Representative:
-s- Robert F. Bromwell, Jr.
334 Fire Tower Road
Mill Spring, North Carolina
28756
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
-s- Thomas E. Slaymaker,
Esquire
Florida Bar No. 398535
SLAYMAKER AND NELSON,
P.A,
2218 Highway 44 West
Inverness, Florida 34453
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. July 5, and 13, 2005.
519-0712 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
Estate of
Lee A. Radeker, Sr.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2005-CP-000786
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEE A. RADEKER, SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of LEE A. RADEKER,
SR., deceased, whose
date of death was May
21, 2005; File Number
2005-CP-000786, Is pend-
ing In the Circuit Court for
Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address
of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice has
been served, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against dece-
dent's estate must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO-FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is July 5,
2005.
Personal Representative:
-s- JOHN S. STEVENS
BB&T Building
One West Pack Square
Suite 1100
Asheville, North Carolina
28801
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
-s- Robert M. Donlon, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 654485
4400 PGA Boulevard
Suite 900
Palm Beach Gardens;
Florida 33410
(516) 835-8855-telephone
(516) 835-8877-facsimile
Published two (2) times In
the Citrus County Chronl-
cle, July 5, and 12, 2005.
530-0712 TUCRN
Notice to Creditors
(Summary Administration)
Estate of Robert E. Lee
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CITRUS COUNTYFLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2004-CP-050350
Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT E. LEE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE:
You are hereby notified
that an Order of Summary
Administration has been
entered in the estate of
ROBERT E. LEE, deceased,
File Number 2004-CP-
050350, by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida
34450; that the dece-
dent's date of death was
October 1, 2004; that the
total value of the estate is
$32,220 and that the
names and addresses of
those to whom it has
been assigned by such or-
der are:
INGEBORG LEE
10496 South Walden For-
est Circle
Homosassoa, Florida 34446
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate
of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against the estate
of the decedent other
than those for whom pro-
vision for full payment was
made In the Order of
Summary Administration
must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME
PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME
PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is July 5,
2005.
Person Giving Notice:
-s- Ingeborg Lee
10496 South Walden
Forest Circle
Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
-s- Gabriel W. Falbo, Esq.
Gabriel W. Falbo, JD,
LL.M., Esq.
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 08721481
4609 Village Glen Circle
Tampa, Florida 33618
Telephone: (813) 334-7398
Published two (2) times in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle, July 5, and 12, 2005.

To pla Ie c. ur
Legal
Acl.- rtsir, in.r
rile
Chronicle


563-3266


529-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-55 McKenzie Permitting for Undo C. Goodman Is
requesting a two-part Variance from the Citrus County
Land Development Code (LDC). This request Is to al-
low for the construction of a new single family resl-
Sdence, (1) having less than the required 50-foot mini-
mum building setback from the mean high water line
(35-foot with berm and/or swale), pursuant to Section
4122, Surface Water Quality Protection Standards, and
(2) having more than the impervious surface ratio al-
lowed by Section 4654, Impervious Surface Require-
ments (ISR) for All Uses, of the LDC. The request is for
property lying In: Section 30, Township 18 South, Range
17 East; more specifically, Dixie Shores Unit 1 Replat;,
which address is known as 11806 W. Bayshore Drive,
Crystal River, Florida. (Crystal River Area) (A complete
legal description is on file in the Department of Devel-
opment Services Office,) Land Use Designation: CLR,
Coastal and Lakes Residential, on the LDC Atlas map.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl,us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article 11I
Division 2. of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment, Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
Ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene" may be ob-
tained on-line: click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she.will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development'Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005,


506-0712 TUCRN
Notice of Action Dissinger
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Case No.: 2005-CC-1888

CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, a
political subdivision of the
State of Florida,
Petitioner,

vs.

CYNTHIA DISSINGER,
Respondent,

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: All defendants named In Exhibit "A", attached; to
all parties claiming Interests by, through, under, or
against the named defendants; and to all parties hav-
ing or claiming to have any right, title, or Interest In the
animals as described below.


A Petition for Seizure of 32 dogs seized from 3814 W.
Ranchetta Street, Dunnellon, Citrus County, Florida has
been filed against the above named Defendant.

Each defendant Is required to serve written defenses to
the Petition on Peititioner's attorney, Michele L Sling-
erland, Esquire, Assistant County Attorney, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, on or before
July 2. 2005, and to file the original of the defenses
with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the
Petitioner's attorney or Immediately thereafter, showing
what right, title, or interest, the defendant has In or to
the animals described In the petition, and to show
cause why the animals should not be seized. If any de-
fendant fails to do so or falls to attend the scheduled
hearing on this matter, a default may be entered
against that defendant for the relief demanded In the
Petition.

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Petitioner will apply for an Or-
der of Seizure and any other order this Court deems
proper before the Honorable Mark Yerman, one of the
judges of this Court, on the 25th day of July, 2005. at
11:30 A.M.., at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. All defendants In
this action should attend the hearing at the time and
place designated and be heard.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on the 13th
day of June, 2005.

BETTY STRIFLER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s- M. Evans
Deputy Clerk

EXHIBIT "A"

CYNTHIA DISSINGER
2914 N.W. 65th Avenue
Margate, Florida 33063-5569

Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 21, 28, July 5, and 12, 2005.



508-0705 TUCRN
Ch. 163 Notice/Case 05-SE-01
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City of Inverness, Inver-
ness, Florida, pursuant to Chapter 163, Laws of Florida,
for the following Public Hearing to consider and act
upon the following Special Exception,

The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a Public
Hearing on the 6th day of July, 2005 at 5:00 P.M. at City
Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to act upon the
following case:

Case 05-SE-01 Applicant David Loewy and Owners
Robert Bradshaw, Burton Bradshaw, Donald Bradshaw,
Nancy Plaisted and Kimberly Weed, request a Special
Exception use for Cluster Development (detached sin-
gle-family, 34 units and townhouses, 20 units) in the
ULD/R-2 Zoning District on the following described"
property:

COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 78.
WHITE LAKE SUBDIVISION, UNIT 2, RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 7, PAGE 84, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUN-
TY FLORIDA; THENCE S0017'E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LOT 78 AND A SOUTHERLY EXTENSION OF SAID
WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF 193.74 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WHITE LAKE
BOULEVARD, AS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; THENCE
S89*12'34E ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DIS-
TANCE OF 38.92 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 125 OF SAID PLAT, THENCE SO0'17'E ALONG THE
WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID PLAT A DISTANCE OF 2326.33
FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF HOWARD AVENUE AS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT, SAID
POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THENCE
N89*43'E ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE
OF 10 FEET TO THE NW CORNER OF LOT 103 OF SAID
PLAT THENCE SOO*'17'E ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
LOT '103 A DISTANCE OF 131.54 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
SOUTH LINE OF THE NE s OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 19
SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, THENCE N89'50'38" W ALONG
SAID SOUTH LINE A DISTANCE OF 951.50 FEET THENCE
NOO*'16'57"W A DISTANCE OF 483.57 FEET THENCE
S89'50'38' E A DISTANCE OF 881.49 FEET THENCE
SO*7'E, PARALLEL TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF
SAID PLAT 352.57 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY EX-
TENSION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID
*HOWARD AVENUE, THENCE N89*43'E ALONG SAID
WESTERLY EXTENSION A DISTANCE OF 60 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

The Zoning Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hear-
ing on the 20th of July, 2005 at 5:00 P.M. at City Hall, 212
West Main Street, Inverness, to consider the recom-
mendation of the Planning and Zoning Commission on
the above referenced Case 05-SE-01.

Copies of the proposed application and plans are on
file in the Department of Development Services at 212
West Main Street In the City Hall and may be reviewed
between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday
through Friday of each week.

All property owners and interested persons are Invited
to Inspect such proposed regulation changes and to
be present at and participate In the public Hearings by
the Planning Zoning Commission and Zoning Board of
Adjustment.

Any person who decides to appeal any decision of this
Board with respect to any matter considered at these
hearings will need a record of proceedings, and for
such purposes, any need to ensure a verbatim record
of proceedings Is made, which includes the testimony
and evidence upon which this appeal Is based
(Section 286.010 F.S.).

Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually
impaired, etc.) may be arranged, with advanced noti-
fication of 5 days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Pre-arrangements may be Initiated by dialing (352)
726-3401 weekdays from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

Signed: /s/ Kenneth Koch, Director
Development Services

Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 21, and July 5, 2005.




520-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.
CU-05-10 Bruce D. Crowford is requesting a Conditional
Use to allow for a detached accessory structure for res-
Idential use, exceeding slze limits imposed on lots less
-than one acre In size, pursuant to Section 4420, Gener-
al Standards (for Accessory Uses and Structures), of the
LDC, Whlch property is located In Section 23, Township
18 South, Range 20 East; more specifically,
Withlachoochee River Shores #3, Unrecorded SubdIvi-
sion, which address Is known as 9400 East Briar Court,
Inverness, Florida. (Inverness Area) (A complete legal
description is on file In the Department of Develop-
ment Services Office.) Land Use Designation: CLR',
Coastal & Lakes Residential, (mobile homes permitted),
on the LDC Atlas Map.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Internet at
httf://www.bocc,citrus,fl.us (click on the Community.
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to in-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth in Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene" may be ob-
tained on-line; click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings Is made, which record includes testimony and evi
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,


Masonic Building, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two days before
the meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired,
use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005.


521-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:

,The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.


1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

CU-05-11 Timothy and Linda Stevenson Is requesting a
Conditional Use to allow for a Home Occupation, a
cottage Industry (dental lab), In a portion of an existing
single family residence In a PSO, Professional Service
and Office District, pursuant to Section 4434, Home Oc-
cupatlon Activities Permitted By Conditional Use, and
Section 5300, Conditional Uses, of the LDC. Which
property is located In Section 30, Township 18 South,
Range 18 East; more specifically, Lots 1 and 2, Block B,
Connell Heights Unit 6, which address Is 1100 North Lyle
Avenue, Crystal River, Florida. (Crystal River Area) (A
complete legal description is on file in the Department
of Development Services Office.) Land Use Designa-
tion: PSO, Professional Service and Office District on
the Atlas of the LDC: and PSO on the. Generalized Fu-
ture Land Use Map of the Comprehensive Plan.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
httD://www. bocc.citrus,fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene' may be ob-
tained on-line; click on "Quasi-Judlcial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Masonic Building, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two days before
the meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired,
use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

For more information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005.





523-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-'
Ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM In'the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard,, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-47 McKenzie Permitting for Eleanor Dixon Is re-
questing q Variance from the Citrus County Land De-
velopment Code (LDC), This request is to allow for the
construction of a single family residence, having less
than the required 50-foot minimum building setback
from the mean high water line (35 foot with' berm
and/or swale), pursuant to Section 4122, Surface Water
Quality Protection Standards, of the LDC. The request is
for property lying In: Section 22, Township 19 South,
Range 20 East; more specifically, Davis Lake Golf Es-
tates Unit 5 Unrecorded Subdivision Lot 8 Described In
OR Book 561 Page 998, which address Is known as
2918 South Circle Point, Inverness, Florida. (Inverness
Area) (A complete legal description Is on file In the
Department of Development Services Office.) Land
Use Designation: CLR, Coastal and Lakes Residential,
on the LDC Atlas map.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the internet at
httr://www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to in-
tervene' pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
Ing on the matter. A "request to intervene" may be ob-
talned on-line; click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence uponrwhich the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005.




524-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
Ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto, Government Bulldlng,- 3600 West, Sovereign
Path, Room 1.66, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request,
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-48 McKenzle Permittina for John and Deborah
Cowan is requestlng.a Variance from the Citrus County
Land Development Code (LDC). This request Is to al-
low the construction of a new single-family residence
and swimming pool, (1) having less than the required
50-foot minimum building setback from the mean high
water line (35 foot with berm and/or swale), pursuant
to Section 4122, -Surface Water Quality Protection
Standards, and (2) having less than the required
50-foot minimum bulldlng setback from the centerline
of the right-of-way of a local street (minimum 25 foot
from the property line), pursuant to Sectlon 4245, Bujld-
Ing Setback Requirements, of the LDC. The request Is
for property lylng In: Section 36, Township 19 South,
Range 16 East; more specifically, Lot 18, Block 1, River-
haven Village, as recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 31,
which property is located at 12043 West Tarpon Court,
Homosassa, Florida. (Homosassa Area) (A complete
legal description Is on file in the Department of Devel-
opment Services Office.) Land Use Designation: CLR,
Coastal and Lakes Residential District, on the Atlas of
the LDC, and CL Low Intensity Coastal and Lakes Dls-
trict on the Generalized Future Land Use Map of the
Comprehensive Plan.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Internet at
htto://www, bocc.citrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene" may be
obtained on-line; click on "Quasl-Judlcial-FAQ".


If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, ,Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005.


522-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
Ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Roorp 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meetina beaIns at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Conditional Use request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

CU-05-12 E.W. McLean for D.M. & Sons Inc. is requesting
a Conditional Use to allow for the operation of a porta-
ble air curtain incinerator, pursuant to Section 4698, In-
cinerators, Debris Bums, and Bum Pits/Barrels, of the
LDC. Which property Is located In Section 18, Township
19 South, Range 19 East; more specifically, Frasure Hill
Peach Orchards unrecorded subdivision tracts 3
through 8, 11 through 16, and 19 through 23 which ad-
dress is 2957 South Race Avenue, Lecanto, Florida.
(Lecanto Area) (A complete legal description Is on file
In the Department of Development Services Office.)
Land Use Designation: EXT, Extractive, on the LDC Atlas
Map.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances,
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene" may be ob-
tained on-line; click on "Quasl-Judiclal-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Masonic Building, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two days before
the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired,
use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

For more information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239,

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle.
July 5, and 13, 2005.



525-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-50 Keith Cook is requesting a Variance from the
Citrus County Land,Development Code (LDC). This re-
quest Is to allow for the construction of a single family
residence, having less than the required 50-foot mini-
mum setback from the centerlne of a local
right-of-way pursuant to Section 4245, Building Setback
Requirements, of the LDC. The request is for property
lying In: Section 02, Township 19 South, Range 19 East;
more specifically, Lots 43, 44, 45, and 46 Block 60 of In-
verness Highlands Unit No. 2 as recorded in Plat Book 2,
Page 99, which address is known as 3132 East Bradley
Street. Inverness, Florida. (Inverness Area) (A complete
legal description is on file in the Department of Devel-
opment Services Office.) Land Use Designation: MDR,
Medium Density Residential District, on the LDC Atlas
map.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to in-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such requestshall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
Ing on the matter. A "request to intervene" may be ob-
tained on-line; click on "Quasl-Judicial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
Ings is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005,




526-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Sald hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-52 Peter Gerardin Is requesting a Variance from
the Cltrus County Land Development Code (LDC), This
request is to allow for the construction of a pool addi-
tion and pool.enclosure to a single-family residence
having less than the required 50-foot minimum building
setback from the mean hlgh water line (35-foot with
berm.and/or swale), pursuant to Section 4122, Surface
Water Quality Proatection Standards, of the LDC, The re-
quest Is for property lylng In: Section 18, Township 18
South, Range 17 East; more specifically, Indian Waters
Unit 3A: which address Is known as 3933 N. Calusa
Polnt, Crystal River, Florida. (Crystal River Area) (A
complete legal description Is on file In the Department
of Development Services Office.) Land Use Designa-
tion: CLR, Coastal and Lakes Residential, on the LDC
' Atlas map,.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Intemrnet at
htto://www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.


Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
Ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene" may be ob-
tained on-line: click on "Quasi-Judicial-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13. 2005.


509-0705 TUCRN
Ch. 163 Notice/Case 05-SE-02
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City of Inverness, Inver-
ness, Florida, pursuant to Chapter 163, Laws of Florida,
for the following Public Hearing to consider and act
upon the following Special Exception.

The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a Public
Hearing on the 6th day of July, 2005 at 5:00 P.M. at City
Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to act upon the
following case:

Case 05-SE-02 Applicant Susan Sullivan and Owners
Brenda Bryan, President, Bark Central Pet Park, Inc., re-
quest a Special Exception Use Private Passive Park
(Dog Park) in the LD/R-1 Zoning District on the following
described property:

E ti OF SE Y4 OF SW Y4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 19,
RANGE 20, LESS THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CR581.

The Zoning Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hear-
Ing on the 20th of July, 2005 at 5:00 P.M. at City Hall, 212
West Main Street, Inverness, to consider the recom-
mendation of the Planning and Zoning Commission on
the above referenced Case 05-SE-02.

Copies of the proposed application and plans are on
file in the Department of Development Services at 212
West Main Street in the City Hall and may be reviewed
between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday
through Friday of each week.

All property owners and Interested persons are invited
to Inspect such proposed regulation changes and to
be present at and participate In the public Hearings by
the Planning Zoning Commission and Zoning Board of
Adjustment.

Any person who decides to appeal any decision of this
Board with respect to any matter considered at these
hearings will need a record of proceedings, and for
such purposes, any need to ensure a verbatim record
of proceedings is made, which Includes the testimony
and evidence upon which this appeal Is based
(Section 286.010 F.S.).

Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually
impaired, etc.) may be arranged, with advanced noti-
ficatlon of 5 days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Pre-arrangements may be initiated by dialing (352)
726-3401 weekdays from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

Signed: /s/ Kenneth Koch, Director
Development Services

Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 21, and July 5, 2005.




527-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
ing will be held by:

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular Item is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request.
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-53 J & K Consultants for Dena McPherson Is re-
questing a Variance from the Citrus County Land De-
velopment Code (LDC). This request is to allow for the
construction of a single family residence having less
than the required 50-foot minimum building setback
from the mean high water line (35 foot with berm
and/or swale), pursuant to Section 4122, Surface Water
Quality Protection Standards, of the LDC. The request is
for property lying in: Section 29, Township 19 South,
Range 17 East: more specifically. Lot A of LR-01-03, an
unrecorded subdivision of Lot 28, Homosassa Company
Subdivision, as recorded in plat book 1 page 5, public
records of Citrus County Florida, which property is lo-
cated at 4441 South Charles Albert Point, Homosassa,-
Florida. (Homosassa Area) (A complete legal descrip-
tion is on file in the Department of Development Servic-
es Office.) Land Use Designation: CLR, Coastal and
Lakes Residential District, on the Atlas of the LDC, and
CL Low Intensity Coastal and Lakes District on the
Generalized Future Land Use Map of the Comprehen-
sive Plan.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or'
Comprehensive. Plan Is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth in Article II,.
Division 2, of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
(excluding Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
ing on the matter. A 'request to intervene' may be ob-
tained on-line; click on "Quasi-Judiclal-FAQ".

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal Is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565. at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle.
July 5, and 13, 2005.





528-0713 TU/WCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following public hear-
Ing will be held by:

The* Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) on July 21, 2005, at 9:00 AM In the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that
a particular item Is discussed will vary depending on
how fast the PDRB moves through the agenda.

1. Said hearing shall be for the purpose of considering
a Variance request. ,
2. All persons desiring to be heard, to speak for or
against, may be heard.

V-05-54 J & K Consultants for Julle Ann Maxwell Is re-
questing a Variance from the Cltrus County Land De-
velopment Code (LDC). This request Is to allow for the
construction of a single-family residence having less
than the required 50-foot minimum building setback
from the mean high water line (35-foot with berm
and/or swale), pursuant to Section 4122, Surface Water
Quality Protection Standards, of the LDC. The request Is
for property lylng In: Section 29, Townshlp 19 South,
Range 17 East; more specifically, Lot B of LR-01-03, an
unrecorded subdivision of Lot 28, Homosassa Company
Subdivision, as recorded in plot book 1 page 5, public
records of Citrus County Florida, whlch property Is lo-
cated at 4453 South Charles Albert Point, Homosassa,
Florldd. (Homosassa Area) (A complete legal descrip-
tion Is on file In the Department of Development Servic-
es Office.) Land Use Designation: CLR, Coastal and
Lakes Residential District, ,on the Atlas of the LDC. and
CL Low Intensity Coastal and Lakes District on the
Generalized Future Land Use Map of the Comprehen-
slve Plan.

Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (click on the Community
Development link). All persons desiring to become a
party to the proceedings may submit a "request to In-
tervene" pursuant to procedures set forth In Article II,
Division 2, of .the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Such request shall be submitted to Department of De-
velopment Services at least five (5) working days
excludingg Weekends and Holidays) prior to the hear-
ing on the matter. A "request to Intervene" may be ob-
tailned on-line: click on "Quasl-Judlclal-FAQ",


If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he o? she may
need to Insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made, which record Includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6565, at least two'days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.

For more Information about this application please
contact a Planner at the Department of Development
Services (352) 527-5239.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County. Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 5, and 13, 2005.




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