Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/00184
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: July 3, 2005
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:00184

Full Text






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Wimbledon.
PAGE IB


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FORECAST: Partly
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PAGE 2A


10 ears


mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

i- others spoke and the
/ lives of Citrus
/ County's fishermen
ave not been the
same.
The year was 1994, and sport-
fishing organizations created
Save Our Sealife. That group and
commercial fishing organizations
combined to
spend $2 mil- U The net ban
lion-a huge impact on Ci
amount of economy.
money in those
days trying to
get their points across to voters.
Save Our Sealife said the
state's fisheries were in dire
straits and something had to be
done about it Commercial fisher-
men said laws already existed to
save fisheries and a constitution-
al amendment would effectively
end their livelihood.
In overwhelming numbers, vot-
ers sided with the sport fisher-
men. They approved Amendment
3, which banned most commer-
cial fishing nets from the state's
waters.
The so-called net ban law took
effect July 1, 1995.
Overnight, it seemed, commer-
cial fishing in Citrus County's
coastal towns of Homosassa,
Ozello and Crystal River disap-


c
t


peared. Generations of fishermen
had to find other ways to earn a
living. Some adapted to the new
rules. Some didn't, and found
other vocations. Some just moved
off.
The Citrus County Chronicle
introduced the net ban in a six-
day series, "Without a Net," at the
end of June 1995, leading up the
law's debut It discussed potential
effects on commercial fishermen
and their families, impacts on the
economy and
definitely had an the hopes of
rus County's sport fisher-
men and con-
PAGE 1D servationists.
But, really,
no one knew what would happen.
A decade later, they're still not
sure.
The Chronicle today marks the
10-year anniversary of the net
ban with a special report to show
the debate that raged between
fishermen then still rages today.
Lives have been changed, for
sure, but whether the net ban was
for the best remains anyone's
guess.
Incredibly, about 15 percent of
Citrus County's 2005 population
probably never even heard of the
net ban, because in 1995 they
lived elsewhere.
Today is a good chance for
those folks to understand the net
ban's impact, and for the rest of
the population to recall its signifi-


,*: ^ .- 1 1 #11


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file
Mullet fishing inshore, as seen in this file photo from 1994 in Ozello, is
all but finished. The net ban of 1995 ended Inshore fishing, forcing
many who had fished for mullet for generations to make a career
change.

NET BAN AMENDMENT JULY 1, 1995
N "The marine resources of the State of Florida belong to all the
people of the state and should be conserved and managed for
the benefit ot the state its people and future generations. To this
end, the people hereby enact limitations on marine net fishing in
Florida waters to protect saltwater finfish, shellfish and other
marine animals from unnecessary Villing, overfishing, and waste.
['o gill nets or other entangling nets shall be used in any Florida
waters. No other type of net connecting more than 500 square
feet mesh area shall be used in nearshore and inshore Florida
waters (all Florida waters inside a line three miles seaward of the
coastline of the Gulf of Mexico and inside a line one mile
seaward of the coastline along the Atlantic Ocean.)"


chance.
It may take decades before the
full brunt of the net ban is real-


ized. As today's Chronicle stories
show, though, truth is in the mind
of the beholder.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Marcus Young, 33, takes a breather Thursday night at Homosassa Seafood while preparing his boat for a night of shrimping. Young has taken
up shrimping to make ends meet after the Net Limitation Amendment was passed 10 years ago.


Trio of local fishermen


bemoan fading heritage


DAVE PlEKLIK
dpieklik@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

The three men sat at the kitchen
table, sharing not a meal between
friends, but stories about a past that is
fading.
Like the fish they seek, nets are clos-
ing in around the men in a struggle of
survival that they believe will cause
their heritage to die.
"How can you teach your kids to do


NET LOSS

something that's supposedly illegal?"
Homosassa fisherman Marcus Young
asked.
Young sat in his home recently with
his girlfriend, Misti Fields, his cousin,
Billy Huggins of Inglis, and their
friend, Harry Arnold of Crystal River,
to talk about the past 10 years,
recounting how their lives have
Please see LOSS/Page 7A


Has net ban law worked?

Depends on who's talking


Measuring its

value difficult
TERRY WITT
terrywitt
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
.Ten years after it was
implemented, the best that
can be said of Florida's ban
on marine fishing nets is
that it has helped declining


NET RESULTS
fish populations recover. To
what extent, however,
would be difficult to meas-
ure, according to a state sci-
entist
Mike Murphy, a senior
research scientist with the
Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute, said the agency
had implemented bag lim-

Please see RESULTS/Page 7A


Special to the Chronicle
Mary Costa, 82, was one of the founders of the
Cracker Quilters Guild and contributed to Citrus
County's Centennial Quilt, which is displayed at
the Inverness Historic Courthouse Museum. She
died June 24.

Mary Costa known for

her work, independence
CRiSTY LOFTIS
cloftis@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Bloom where you're planted.
That's what Homosassa resident Mary Costa
told her family.
"Whatever life gives you, make the most of it,"
Crystal River resident Cathy Mehrl said,
remembering her grandmother's advice. '"A lot
of times you can't choose where you are, but you
can choose what you do."
Mary Costa died Friday, June 24, 2005.
Family and friends remember Mary as an
avid fisherman and huntress, an artist and
fiercely independent woman.
She was born in 1922 in Witt, Ill. Her father
Please see .:"' /Page 4A


M Annie's Mailbox . 13A
Classified ....... 7D
Crossword ...... 14A
Horoscope ...... 14A
w Movies ......... 10A
Obituaries ....... 6A
Stocks .......... 2D
Together . . . 11A
Eight Sections



6 184578 20075! 0


Everything old is new again
M-BMM,


Cracker-style homes are now all the rage
in homebuilding circles./19E


Racing on the river


The American
Dream?

Steve Arthur
explores the
Supreme
Court's recent
ruling
regarding
eminent
domain, as
per the Fifth
Amendment.
/1C


f#


** -'W r 'ij
.4. ,. ., *,
.... -r^ i


The first powerboat races on Lake
Henderson rev up Inverness./3A


Live 8 around
. the world 8


Musicians worldwide
perform for charity./2A


Suicide



bombers



strike


26 dead nearly 50

injured in two attacks

Associated Press
BAGHDAD, Iraq Suicide bombers struck
Saturday in Baghdad and a Shiite city south of
the capital in attacks that killed 26 people and
injured nearly 50, Iraqi officials said. One of the
attackers targeted bystanders and police who
had rushed to the scene of an earlier blast.
In the first attack, an attacker blew himself up
outside a recruiting station for police special
forces in western Baghdad, killing at least 16
other people, including 11 recruits, police and
hospital officials said. Another 22 people were
injured. A Web statement claimed responsibili-
ty in the name of al-Qaida in Iraq.
The other attacks occurred in Hillah, a most-
ly Shiite city 60 miles south of Baghdad. Police
Capt Muthana Khalid Ali said the first blast
occurred when a suicide bomber detonated a
belt of explosives at a police checkpoint in the
city center.
Six policemen and the attacker died in the
blast, Ali said.
About 10 minutes later, a second suicide
attacker blew himself up in a crowa of police
and civilians who had rushed to the scene of the
first blast, Ali said. Twenty-six people were
injured, but only the attacker died, according to
Dr. Hashim Suleiman of the Hillah General
Hospital.
Hillah is a largely Shiite city about 60 miles
south of Baghdad. On Feb. 28, a suicide car
bomber struck a crowd of police -and army
Please see /Page 5A


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Local artist


remembered


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ENTERTAINMENT


2A SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


Florida
L-ZDIERES--


Here are the
winning numbers
selected Saturday
in the Florida
Lottery:


CASH 3
2-5-5
PLAY 4
6-0-2-1
FANTASY 5
1-12-14-27-35
LOTTO
1 15- 22 30 48 51

FRIDAY, JULY 1
Cash 3:2-8-7
Play 4:4 -1 7 4
Fantasy 5:3 9 13 18 29
5-of-5 1 winner $248,486
4-of-5 384 $104
3-of-5 12,662 $8.50
Mega Money: 1 23 37 44
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $1,150
3-of-4 MB 64 $354.50
3-of-4 1,291 $52
2-of-4 MB 1,791 $26
2-of-4 36,914 $2
1-of-4 MB 17,193 $2.50
THURSDAY, JUNE 30
Cash 3:3 9 5
Play 4: 8 2 0 -7
Fantasy 5: 5 11 -19 21 22
5-of-5 3 winners $71,622.60
4-of-5 445 $77.50
3-of-5 12,801 $7.50
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29
Cash 3:7-2-8
Play 4:7 0 4 3
Fantasy 5:5 9 12 14 19
5-of-5 7 winners $32,344.11
4-of-5 707 $51.50
3-of-5 14,690 $6.50
Lotto: 1-3-6-11-27-44
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 119 $2,732.50
4-of-6 6,368 $41.50
3-of-6 105,852 $3.50
TUESDAY, JUNE 28
Cash 3: 2 5 6
Play 4: 52-5-9-5
Fantasy 5:1 2 9 15 20


5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 367
3-of-5 10,802
Mega Money: 16 31
Mega Ball: 14
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7
3-of-4 MB 38
3-of-4 1,084


$208,216.46
$91.50
$8.50
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$1,296.50
$523
$54.50


O I IT I L t





Do you agree with the
Supreme Court's decision to
allow certain religious displays
and not others?


A Yes. It should be decided
case by case.
B. No. Religion had a part in
the formation of our govern-
ment and should not be cen-
sored.
C. Yes. Religion has no part
in government.
D. No. It sounds like the
court itself is confused about


the issue.
To vote, simply access the
Chronicle Web site,
www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear in the June
26 edition, along with a new
question.
Last week's results:
Do you think the Supreme
Court was right to allow cities


to bulldoze private property?
A Yes. It will bring in more
business. 0.5% (3)
B. No. It's another lost free-
dom. 85.8% (504)
C. Yes. Progress necessitates
it 3.9% (23)
D. No. I'm getting my pass-
port ready. 6.5% (41)


Live 8 seen, heard worldwide


Associated Press


LONDON Bono effortless-
ly worked the crowd. Bjork
strutted the stage. Celine Dion
was beamed via satellite. And
Bill Gates was treated like a
rock star.
Live 8's long, winding road
around the globe Saturday was
an eclectic, unprecedented
extravaganza.
From Johannesburg to
Philadelphia, Berlin to Tokyo,
Rome to Moscow, hundreds of
thousands gathered for a glob-


al music marathon to pressure
the world's most powerful
leaders to alleviate African
poverty at the Group of Eight
summit next week
Organizer Bob Geldof prom-
ised to deliver "the greatest
concert ever."
On Independence Day week-
end in the United States, Will
Smith, host of the Philadelphia
show, said people had united
for a "declaration of interde-
pendence."
"Today we hold this truth to
be self-evident: We are all in
this together," Smith said.
Paul McCartney and U2
opened the flagship show of
the free 10-concert festival in
London's Hyde Park with a
rousing performance of "Sgt.
Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club
Band." A thunderous roar
erupted from the crowd of
about 150,000 as the two iconic
rock stars belted out the first
line: "Itwas 20years ago today..."
- a nod to the mammoth Live
Aid concerts that raised mil-
lions for African famine relief
in 1985.
Geldof, who announced the
Live 8 gigs just over a month
ago, claimed 3 billion people
were watching on television
and the Internet around the


world.
"There's nothing more to do
now," he said backstage. "It's
either crap or it's great And so
far it's great."
The day's first concert
kicked off in Japan, where
Bjork and -Good Charlotte
joined local bands for a show
that failed to generate much
interest in Asia's only G-8
nation.
Live 8 then rolled on to


Johannesburg, South Africa,
where 24-year-old Zambian
singer Lindiwe opened before
a crowd of about 500 people
that was expected to swell to'
40,000.
In an open letter to the G-8
leaders, which appeared in
several British newspapers
Saturday, Geldof said the sum-
mit will disappoint the world if
it fails to deliver an extra $25
billion in aid to Africa.


Associated Press
. .-:, The Eden Project in Cornwall, England, where the Live 8
Africa Calling concert was held Saturday. TOP, LEFT: A music fan
perches Saturday on traffic lights and a walk sign outside the
Chateau de Versailles, west of Paris, to watch a Live 8 concert.


CITRUS COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PET PROFILES


The Citrus County Animal
Control Shelter has online
listings of impounded ani-
mals. Go to the Web page
http://animalcontrol.citrus.fl.
us/ and click on "Impounded
Animals" to begin a search.,


NAME: (none)
AGE: kitten
SEX: F
ID #: 53950


NAME: Dizzy
AGE: adult
SEX: F
ID #: 53899


"to enquire about the ani-
mals listed here, refer to the
type (cat or dog), age group
and gender in a search.
The shelter can help you
save an innocent pet. The.
shelter is in Inverness near


NAME: (none)
AGE: kitten
SEX: M
ID #: 53673


NAME: Bambi
AGE: adult
SEX: SF
ID #: 52962


the airport. It is open for
adoptions from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday
.and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Call 726-7660 for more
information.


NAME: (none)
AGE: puppy
SEX: F
ID #: 49563


NAME: Gizzy
AGE: adult
SEX: NM
ID #: 53828


Financial assistance for
spaying and neutering of
your adopted pet is avail-
able through the Humani-
tarians of Florida, 563-2370,
or from the Humane Society
of Citrus County, 341-2222.


N: Meishka
AGE:
SEX: F
ID #: 53769


NAME: Lady
AGE: puppy
SEX: F,
ID #: 53722


, T
Lm R,-,


The weather REPORT


City H L F'cast
Daytona Bch. 91 74 tstrm
Ft. Lauderdale 90 79 tstrm
Fort Myers 92 76 tstrm
Gainesville 90 73 tstrm
Homestead 90 77 tstrm
Jacksonville 91 74 tstrm
Key West 89 82 tstrm
Lakeland 93 75 tstrm
Melbourne 89 75 tstrm


Southwest winds from 5 to 10 knots
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters s
Chance of scattered showers and tl
storms today.


City H L F'cast
Miami 91 79 tstrm
Ocala 91 74 tstrm
Orlando 93 75 tstrm
Pensacola 90 77 tstrm
Sarasota 91 -76 tstrm
Tallahassee 90 73 tstrm
Tampa 91 78 tstrm
Vero Beach 89 73 tstrm
W. Palm Bch. 91 77 tstrm


s. Seas Gulf water
mooth. temperature
hunder-
88

Taken at Egmont Key


Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 31.73 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.52 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 40.20 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 41.11 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year'flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained'from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will
the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this
.a U n 'fr, .e E ar. l..- :., u r.:. ul. .:.:. in. i ,a .l. :j..al.. I. . . 1
.' .,"; O ,' ,.. . " .,- "' .


city
Chassahowitzka
Crystal River
Withlacoochee
Homosassa


Tide times are for the mouths of the rivers.
Sunday Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
5:19 a/12:25 a 3:49 p/11:46 a 6:07 a/1:13 a 4:33 p/12:35 p
3:40 a/9:08 a 2:10 p/10:35 p 4:28 a/9:57 a 2:54 p/11:17 p
1:27 a/6:56 a 11:57 a/8:23 p 2:15 a/7:45 a 12:41 p/9:05 p
4:31 a/10:45 a 3:01 p/- 5:19 a/12:12 a 3:45 p/11:34 a


FOUR DAY OUTLOOK
l"y TODAY Exclusive daily forecast by:
t High: 91 Low: 76
,Partly cloudy with scattered
thunderstorms.


-n


MONDAY
High: 92 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with a chance of
thunderstorms.


TUESDAY
High: 91 Low: 75
Partly cloudy with scattered afternoon
thunderstorms.
F 4 WEDNESDAY
J High: 90 Low: 76
Partly cloudy with scattered afternoon
thunderstorms.


TEMPERATURE* Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.
Saturday 88/74 DEW POINT
Record 97/62 Saturday at 3 p.m. 76
Normal 71/90 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean 0 Saturday at 3 p.m. 77%
PRECIPITATION* POLLEN COUNT**
Saturday 0.18 in. Trees, grasses and weeds were
Total for the month 0.23 in. all light.
Total for the year 21.99 in. "Light only extreme allergic will show symp-
Normal for the year 24.48 in. toms, moderate most allergic will experience
*As of 6 p.m.from Hernando County Airport symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience
UV INDEX: 9 symptoms.
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moder- AIR QUALITY
ate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high Saturday was good with pollut-
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE anis mainly ozone.
.;7 .


SUNSET TONIGHT.....
] SUNRISE TOMORROW..
,-_ . MOONRISE TODAY........
JUY21 JUY27 MnnNSET TODAY


....................8:33 P.M.
...................6:37 A.M.
...................3:59 A.M.
6:11 PM


ff" .. # ..na"'c; e '"............................-'" .


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/3 SUNDAY 3:34 9:47 3:59 10:12
74 MONDAY 4-21 1033 4:46 10 59
.. .; ". . . :

Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

*'_.-"'--- '. ,;;.. ,' -.;- :. .'," :;..-' '-. ,"". --.c '. "'~ i
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County allow
residents to water twice a week: Addresses ending in 0, 1 or 2 and A through I may water
Monday and Thursday; addresses ending in 3, 4, 5 or 6 and J through R may water
Tuesday and Friday; and addresses ending in 7,8 or 9 and S through Z have Wednesday
and Saturday. Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. New plant material may
be irrigated during a 60-day establishment period (restrictions apply).
Residents within the city limits of Inverness can water according to the following schedule,
before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Addresses ending in even numbers or A-M water Tuesday
and/or Saturday only; addresses ending in odd numbers or N-Z water Wednesday and/or
Sunday only.
Residents of Crystal River can water on Tuesday and/or Friday, before 9 a.m. or after 5 p.m.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Saturday Sunday
City H L Pep. Fcst H L
Albany 79 61 sunny 81 57
Albuquerque 95 65 sunny 98 65
Anchorage 62. 54 shwrs 66 52
Asheville 81 64 tstrm 82 63
Atlanta 91 70 .49 tstrm 88 71
Atlantic City 83 70 sunny 80 62
Austin 10272 ptcldy 10075
Baltimore 86 74 sunny 82 65
Billings 81 55 sunny 78 55
Birmingham 90 71 .01 ptcldy 92 70
Boise 81 58 sunny 88 58
Boston 82 70 sunny 74 59
Brownsville 97 79 ptcldy 97 80
Buffalo 76 55 sunny 83 68
Burlington, VT 75 61 sunny 83 58
Charleston, SC 88 72 .03 tstrm 89 74
Charleston, WV 86 68 ptcidy 86 63
Charlotte 89 67 tstrm 87 68
Chicago 74 54 ptcldy 85 67
Cincinnati 82 60 sunny 87 63
Cleveland 72 63 sunny 84 65
Columbia, SC 90 70 tstrm 90 72
Columbus, OH 79 60 sunny 86 65
Concord 78 61 sunny 79 49
Corpus Christi 95 74 ptcldy 96 76
Dallas 97 75 ptcldy 98 75
Denver 93 65 ptcldy 86 57
Des Moines 82 61 tstrm 86 66
Detroit 76 54 sunny 83 65
El Paso 10676 sunny 10477
Evansville 84 62 sunny 89 67
Harrisburg 83 71' sunny 81 59
Hartford 80 67 sunny 82 55
Honolulu 87 78 sunny 87 74
Houston 10080 ptcldy 98 78
Indianapolis 79 58 sunny 85 67
Jackson 94 74 ptcldy 94 74
Kansas City 83 62 tstrm 91 71
Las Vegas 10683 sunny 10681
Little Rock 92 68 ptcldy 95 72
Los Angeles 71 59 sunny 71 59
Louisville 86 65 sunny 89 65
Memphis 94 74 ptcldy 94 76
Milwaukee 68 52 ptcldy 80 66
Minneapolis 80 58 tstrm 83 64
Mobile 91 73 .01 tstrm 93 76
Montgomery 93 72 .56 tstrm 94 73
Nashville 92 73 ptcldy 91 70


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 90 77 .02 tstrm 93 78
New York City 82 72 sunny 81 62
Norfolk 83 73 .03 tstrm 80 69
Oklahoma City 89 68 .06 fair .98 73
Omaha 89 68 tstrm 93 69
Palm Springs 10973 sunny 10979
Philadelphia 83 72 .06 sunny 82 64
Phoenix 10982 sunny 11084
Pittsburgh 78 61 sunny 84 61
Portland, ME 79 60 sunny 74 51
Portland, Ore 69 57 ptcldy 74 57
Providence 82 69 sunny 79 56
Raleigh 91 70 .08 tstrm 84 67
Rapid City 93 58 .01 ptcldy 81 53
Reno 92 58 sunny 92 57
Rochester 72 53 sunny 83 65
Sacramento 92 60 sunny 95 57
St. Louis 83 63 ptcldy 92 73
St. Ste. Marie 75 42 ptcldy 80 60
Salt Lake City 93 67 sunny 88 63
San Antonio 99 74 ptcldy 10077
San Diego 72 63 sunny 72 64
San Francisco 71 54 sunny 66 54
Savannah 94 73 .02 tstrm 91 74
Seattle 63 55 cldy 70 55
Spokane 71 53 sunny 78 52
Syracuse 76 61 sunny 81 59
Topeka 85 66 tstrm 92 70
Washington 87 76 sunny 82 66
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Needles, Calif. LOW 34 Pellston, Mich.
C A a 1. #0 .-.9. 1tg'Y


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/69/ts
Amsterdam 74/55/pc
Athens 88/76/ts
Beijing 94/73/ts
Berlin 75/59/pc
Bermuda 84/73/ts
Cairo 98/63/s
Calgary 75/48/pc
Havana 89/80/ts
Hong Kong 87/76/ts
Jerusalem 94/65/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


82/59/pc
71/59/pc
88/55/s
80/56/ts
79/65/s
71/54/pc
78/58/pc
85/66/s
86/61/pc
64/43/s
83/71/ts
78/65/pc
73/60/pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; hhazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02005 Weather Central, Madison, Wl.


i . .1


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially posted
by the Florida Lottery. On the
Web, go to www.flalottery
.com; by telephone, call (850)
487-7777.


CITRUS COUNTY WEATHER


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THE NATION


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, July 3, the
184th day of 2005. There are 181
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 3, 1863, the three-day
Civil War Battle of Gettysburg, Pa.,
ended in a major victory for the
North as Confederate troops
retreated.
On this date:
In 1890, Idaho became the 43rd
state of the Union.
In 1930, Congress created the
U.S. Veterans Administration.
In 1986, President Reagan
presided over a gala ceremony in
New York Harbor that saw the
relighting of the renovated Statue
of Liberty.
In 1988, the U.S.S. Vincennes
shot down an Iran Air jetliner over
the Persian Gulf, killing all 290
people aboard.
Ten years ago: Irish
Republican Army sympathizers
rioted in Northern Ireland's two
largest cities in outrage over the
early parole of a British soldier
convicted of killing a Roman
Catholic woman.
Five years ago: President
Clinton made a congratulatory
telephone call to Mexican
President-elect Vicente Fox, a day
after Fox's election.
One year ago: A statement
attributed to an Iraqi militant group
claimed on a Web site that a cap-
tive U.S. Marine had been
beheaded. However, the group
later denied the claim; Cpl. Wassef
Ali Hassoun turned up alive five
days later.
Today's Birthdays: Movie
director Ken Russell is 78. Jazz
musician Pete Fountain is 75.
Playwright Tom Stoppard is 68.
Writer-producer Jay Tarses is 66.
Singer Fontella Bass is 65. Actor
Kurtwood Smith is 62. Actor
Michael Cole ('The Mod Squad")
is 60. Country singer Johnny Lee
is 59. Writer Dave Barry is 58.
Actress Betty Buckley is 58. Rock
singer-musician Paul Barrere
(Little Feat) is 57. Actress Jan
Smithers is 56. Former. Haitian
President Jean-Claude Duvalier is
54. Talk show host Montel
Williams is 49. Country singer
Aaron Tlippin is 47. Rock musician
Vince Clarke (Erasure) is 45. Actor
Tom Cruise is 43. Actor Thomas
Gibson is 43. Actress Hunter Tylo
is. 43. Rock musician Kevin Hearn
(Barenaked Ladies) is 36.
Thought for Today: "A timid
person is frightened before a dan-
ger; a coward during the time; and
a courageous person afterward."
- Jean Paul Richter, German
author (1763-1825).


;. ;vw -,














3A
SUNDAY
JULY 3, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Mak



Powerboat

Lake Hender

ASHLEY SIPREU..
asorrell@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle intern

Racers, start your enginE
boat engines, that is
A crowd gathered at
Wallace Brooks and Libert
parks in Inverness Saturda
not to watch a NASCAR
race, but to take a front sea
to the much-anticipated
Inverness powerboat races
The races got a late stallrt
but the crowd braved the
heat and looming morning
rain clouds to see what all
the talk is about.
Bob Ewell, Lecanto, mad
sure he came fully
equipped for the races wit
binoculars, sunscreen and
lots orf water.
"I've seen similar races
years ago," he said "I
enjoyed them and hope
everDIhing goes well with
the race todav."
Before the races began.
participants received a
briefing on the course and
what to do in case of a
wreck
After the briefing, racers
started preparing for the
race and the crowd, with
excitement in their voices.
gathered with their binocu
lars along the banks of the
parks, on the dock over
Lake Henderson and in thi
water on their boats
For many onlookers, this
was the first time they had
seen a powerboat race
"I've never seen them
before and decided to corn
out and enjoy it," Harry
Getz, Inverness, said. "It's
good social affair."
S Others had seen races
before in other cities.
Bill and Diane Jehle, wh
came to Inverness from
Stuart, said they used to
race powerboats.
"We are thinking about
getting back into racing,"
Bill Jehle said. "The races
just supplement the festival
and are a pretty spectacular
spectator sport "


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racers take to

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As the boat races began,
some onlookers were still
thinking of the controversy
surrounding the event.
"I live on the lake and
wanted to come over and
see %w hat the races look
like," Cheryl Welder,
Inverness, said. "At first. I
was opposed to the race,
but now that I see w hat
they're all about, I no longer
oppose them."
Welder said once she saw
how little noise and wake
the boats make she decided
to support the races and
would like to see them
return next year.
Daniel Carmichael,
Inverness, said he came to
the races to show his sup-
port.
"It's a good thing for the
community" he said. "If you
live on the water., you have
boats, and boats make
noise.
Many in the audience
agreed the races offered a
different type of entertain-
ment for Inverness.
"We came to watch the
boat races because %\e
thought it would be interest-
ing and something differ-
ent," Rich Hoffian,
Inverness, said. "We don't
have a lot of events in this
town."
After the younger-age
class finished racing, it was
time for the big boats to
take center stage on Lake
Henderson.
The tunnel boats began
to prepare for take-off and
spectators gathered closer
to the shore with cameras
in hand.
"I think the bigger boats
are great." Donna
Bockskopfsaid.
As the sun set on Lake
Henderson and racers
began to leave with their
boats in tow, the crowd
began to d% indle, possibly
to return to another day of
boat racing Sunday.
"I think it's nice fora
change," Bockskopf said.
"It's great for the county."


Spectators
watch competitors come
and go to their pit area
Saturday from the board-
walk that links Liberty and
Wallace Brooks Parks.
. Brent Dillard of
Dalzell, S.C.. shows his
relief making it back to
shore Saturday afternoon
after being unable to get
his Mercury outboard
started after several
attempts to hand-pull
the outboard to life.


If you live on
the water, you have
boats, and boats
make noise.


Invemess resdenri


The races just
supplement the festival and
are a pretty spectacular
spectator sport.


came from Stuarl with his wife to watch the races
iI



























Matthew BeckiCriibriole

Lake Worth resident
Harry Pinner Jr. streaks
around the course on Lake
Henderson Saturday after-
noon during a heat race of
the Peace River Outboard
Racing Association's Citrus
County Championship for
Inverness.
7 Like all of the competi-
Stors in his division, Joel Brown
a of Cocoa Beach stands far
-' forward on the nose of his
boat to put the boat on plane.
Once on plane the boat drasti-
.cally Increases speed.

"- ------- --7- ..-.:. L e a o fth co t 1I


Monday: Adopt, race a rubber duck


CHERI HARRIS
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Come celebrate the Fourth with a pad-
dling of plastic ducks.
Crystal River Rotary Club will host the
Adopt-A-Duck Race on Monday at Hunter
Springs Park in Crystal River.
Ed Downey, chairman of the event, said
the race would start at 3 p.m., when more
than 1,000 toy ducks will be dropped into
the water to float toward the finish line.
Duck tickets are $5 each or four for $20.
Downey said each duck in the race would
have a number written on the bottom that


* WHAT: Adopt A.Duck Race.
: WHEN: Noon to 4 p.m. Monday: race
starts at 3 p.m.
WHERE: Hunter Springs Park, Crystal
River.
COST: Duck race tickets are $5 each
or four for $20.

corresponds to a ticket
The first duck to cross the finish line
will win the lucky ticket-holder $1,000.
Second place prize is a two-night stay at
the Best Western Sea Wake Beach Resort


on Clearwater Beach and third place is
$250 in cash.
. Adopt-A-Duck tickets will be for sale at
the event until 2 p.m.
The fun starts at noon and will include
Boy Scouts selling hot dogs and hamburg-
ers and inflatables sure to delight the
younger set.
Downey said a portion of ticket sales to
the inflatables would benefit the Boy
Scouts. Duck ticket sales will benefit the
Crystal River Rotary Foundation's schol-
arship fund. The fund-raising goal for the
duck race is $5,000.
"We hope it will generate some inter-
est," Downey said, "and fun."


Associated Press

MARATHON Officials at a
Florida Keys museum and envi-
ronmental center are looking
for a good home for two Cuban
refugee boats.
The boats have been dis-
played at the Museum of
Natural History of the Florida
Keys at Crane Point in
Marathon. But Alisha Adrianse
of the Florida Keys Land and
Sea Trust says the boats do not
fit the trust's revised mission
statement of focusing on "Keys
environmental conservation,
* preservation and restoration."
The Trust purchases land
tracts to preserve natural areas
and also administers the muse-
Sum where the boats are dis-
played.
"We don't want to sell them on


eBay, because of their historical
significance," Adrianse said of
the boats. "We want them to be
part of another museum's histo-
ry presentation."
One boat is 10 feet long and is
constructed of plastic foam sec-
tions banded together by steel
straps. In 1992, it carried four
refugees to a point about 24
miles south of Marathon.
Specific details on the other, a
19-foot wooden vessel with a
Russian engine, apparently
have been lost, Adrianse said.
A 63.5-acre land tract, Crane
Point is one of the Keys most
important historical and
archaeological sites. The
expanse contains evidence of
pre-Columbian and prehistoric
Bahamian artifacts, and was
once the site of an Indian
village.


Free pre-K for
4-yearmolds
Parents can enroll children in the
state's new, free voluntary pre-K
education program. Children who
will be 4 years old on or before
Sept. 1 are eligible to apply.
Applicants may enroll at
Childhood Development Services,
5641 W Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal
River.
Parents/Caregivers must have
proof of Florida residency, such as
a valid I.D. or pay stub with resi-
dential address and also have
proof of child's age (i.e. birth certifi-
cate or signed immunization
record).
For more information, contact
Childhood Development Services
(352) 795-2667 or the Early
Learning Coalition of the Nature
Coast at (877) 840-5437.
Local businesses
closed for holiday
The following businesses will be
closed Monday in observance of
the July Fourth holiday:
Citrus County Central Landfill.
Beverly Hills Waste
Management (Rolling Oaks
Utilities). All Monday customers will
be picked up on Thursday, July 7.


Both yard waste and household
garbage will be picked up on
July 7.
F.D.S. Disposal. All Monday
customers will be picked up the fol-
lowing Thursday. Yard waste will
be taken the following Monday. All
other pick-up days remain the
same.
Waste Management of
Central Florida. The next day of
service for household garbage will
be on the next regular service day,
Thursday, July 7. All other days of
service will remain the same.
The Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum. For information, call 341-
6429.
The Chronicle business office.
The Chronicle circulation depart-
ment will take calls only from 7
a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday-- no
walk-ins. The Chronicle newsroom
will have a limited staff.
The City of Crystal River.
Garbage collection will return to
regularly scheduled pick-up on
Tuesday, July 6.
NCRS Disposal Inc.
Riverhaven residents only: If your
service day is Monday, garbage
will be picked up on Thursday, July
7.

From staff reports


State BRE F


Man gets second
death sentence
BARTOW For the second time,
a central Florida man was sentenced
to death for the fatal stabbing of an
elderly Illinois couple at a trailer park
on New Year's Eve 1996.
Circuit Judge Susan Roberts on
Friday sentenced Thomas Woodel,


35, to the death penalty for the
murders of Clifford Moody, 79, and
his 74-year-old wife, Bemice.
The Moodys, winter residents
from Kankakee, Ill., lived at
Outdoor Resorts of America in the
Four Comers area of Polk County.
Woodel was convicted in 1998
and sentenced to death.
From wire reports


'I1


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J.


xd


-C-uy County BRIEFS


Cuban boats adrift


in search for new home


Stay away, sharks



!.t . .. -















Associated Press
Brian Clemons 26, and his son Krishaun, 6, of Boynton
Beach play in the ocean Saturday in Deerfield Beach.
Beaches in Deerfield Beach were closed to swimmers for
a few hours after sharks were spotted unusually close to
shore on Thursday.


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I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jury clears elementary school


teacher accused of sex abuse


Associated Press

LARGO An elementary school music
teacher has been cleared of sexually abus-
ing two of his students.
A jury took less than an hour Friday to
find 50-year-old music instructor Mark
Fronczak innocent
Fronczak was working at Southern Oak
Elementary School in Largo when two sec-
ond-grade girls accused him of abusing
them in his classroom in late 2003. The
children said Fronczak touched them as
the rest of the class watched a video.


ARTIST
Continued from Page 1A

was in the U.S. Air Force, leav-
ing her and her mother during
World War I to fight.
Mary's daughter, Chanda
Costa, said her mother began
learning how to hunt and fish
for food at a young age. Mary
developed her skills and
became an expert marksman
with a rifle.
"She could shoot from her
hip and hit things," Mehrl said.
Later in life, Mary married
Robert James Costa, who was
also in the military. The couple
moved around quite a bit dur-
ing their lives. After visiting
Homosassa for several years,
they decided to move there in
1965.
Costa said what drew her
parents to Homosassa was the'
secluded location.
"It was the fishing and
nature that they really loved,"
Costa said.
At one point, Mary and her
husband joined with the
University of South Florida,
tagging sharks in the Gulf of
Mexico.
Mehrl said that while she
admires her grandmother's
adventurous spirit, she would
worry the family.

NEED A REPORTER?
i Approval for story ideas
must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before
a reporter is assigned.
Call Charlie Brennan, edi-.
tor, at 563-5660.


Defense attorneys questioned how a
teacher could abuse two children in his
class and not be seen.
Fronczak had insisted on his innocence
from the very beginning.
"I have never, ever touched a student
sexually, inappropriately," Fronczak said
from the stand Friday "Never. Period."
After his arrest in April 2004, the
Pinellas County School Board approved a
staff recommendation that Fronczak be
fired.
Fronczak, who had been a school
teacher for 25 years, has appealed that


"The thought of two little
people being on a boat
wrestling sharks there's
something not right there,"
Mehrl said, laughing.
Mary's fami-
ly is also left
with a legacy of St
art
When the shoot fr
family lived in
Massachusetts, hip an
Mary began
tole painting things.
where she
would first
paint furniture C
black and then Mary Costa
add gold and
silver leafing.
Her passion for creating art
grew from there. When she
wasn't out fishing, she was mak-
ing art.
"It's something she didn't
really have time to do when she
was a kid," Mehrl said.
By the end of her life, Mary
was a skilled oil and water
painter, China painter and jew-
elry maker. She also mastered
Japanese sumi-e art.
Many of her pieces are on
display at the Raymond James
Financial Center in Tampa,
and local medical offices.


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decision and has been on unpaid suspen-
sion for months.
Besides his career, Fronczak lost his
house and life savings during the ordeal.
He voluntarily gave up custody of his two
teenage sons to his ex-wife after his arrest.
"My life as I know it has been ruined,"
said Fronczak, who could have been
imprisoned for life if convicted.
After the verdict, Fronczak said he was
uncertain if he would attempt a return to
teaching.
Despite the verdict, the girls' families
said they still think Fronczak is guilty.


She earned an art degree
from Pasco-Hernando Com-
munity College so she could
teach others in a professional
setting.
Mary taught
Central
he could Fl o r i d a
Community
rom her College's adult
education art
nd hit class, as well as
helped to
found the
Cracker
Quilters Guild
athy ", ::,*'. in 1987.
s granddaughter. She stitched
two squares on
the Citrus
County Centennial Quilt, which
is on display at the Inverness
Historic Courthouse Museum.
One of the squares is called
"Moon over Fort Cooper" and
is a source of chuckling in the
community because Costa
stitched a Native American
mooning settlers on the square.
"We didn't want an X-rated
quilt so she put a bush over
him," fellow quilter and close-
friend Helen Spivey said. "You
have to physically move the


bush to see the man."
Spivey said Mary had a great
cackling laugh that she loved to
hear while they painted, quilt-
ed and visited with each other.
"She's going to be sorely
missed," Spivey said.
Mary was an avid bingo play-
er and lifetime member of the
VFW, Disabled American
Veterans, American Legion,
ASAF Sergeants Association
and Moose Lodge.
She also made great cheese-
cake and loved visiting Disney
World.
Costa also said her mother
was her best friend. The two
lived next door to each other in
Homosassa, but despite their
proximity, Mary determined
she would be independent,
even after her husband died in
1995.
Mary was known for never
failing at anything she did. In
fact, Mehrl believes her grand-
mother would have outlasted
any of the contestants on the
reality show "Survivor" when
she was a bit younger.
"She was independent to the
end," Mehrl said, "just the way
she wanted."


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For the RECORD


Citrus County Sheriff
DUI Arrests
David W. Boucher, 64,
address unknown, at 12:24 p.m.
Saturday on a charge of driving
under the influence.
His bond was set at $500.
Mamie F. McDonald, 33,
13079 South Florida Ave., Floral
City, at 1:37 a.m. Saturday on a
charge of driving under the influ-
ence.
Her bond was set at $1,000.
Other Arrests
Clifton W. Carroll, 34, Inglis, at
1:05 a.m. Saturday on a charge of
possession of drug paraphernalia.
His bond was set at $500.
David B. Cave Jr., 23, 5136
West Emy Lou Court, Dunnellon, at
11:59 p.m. Friday on a charge of
driving while license is
suspended/revoked.
His bond was set at $500.
Mark A. Dennis,45, 26273
High Seas Drive, Bonita Springs, at
7:47 p.m. Friday on charges of driv-
ing while license is
suspended/revoked and giving false
information to a police officer.
His bond was set at $11,000.
Ricky T. Dorman, 25, 6220
East Seneca St., Inverness, at 11:11
ap.m. Friday on a charge of writ of
bodily attachment.
His bond was set at $570.
Christopher K. Garifalos, 30,
address unknown, at 5 a.m.
Saturday on charges of burglary
and grand theft.
His bond was set at $7,000.
Juan Sanchez, 21, address
unknown, at 8:53 a.m. Saturday on
charges of no valid driver license
and registration required.
His bond was set at $300.
Baro Santos, 19, address
unknown, at 11:23 a.m. Saturday on
*a charge of battery on juvenile
detention staff.


No bohd was set.
Edward A. Smith, 39, address
unknown, at 8:01 a.m. Saturday on
a charge of writ of bodily attach-
ment.
His bond was set at $1,160.
Crystal River Police
Department
Domestic battery
arrest
Robert J. Burns, 45, Crystal
River, at 7:13 p.m. Friday on
charges of aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon and domestic bat-
tery.
No bond was set.
Other arrests
Justin W. Dorsey, 22, 5565
West Classic Lane, Homosassa, at
2:41 a.m. Saturday on charges of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance, possession of marijuana
and possession of drug paraphema-
lia.
His bond was set at $3,000.
Bryan J. Jarrett, 23, 1371
South Brookfield Dr., Lecanto, at
2:41 a.m. Saturday on charges of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance, possession of marijuana
and possession of drug paraphema-
lia.
His bond was set at $3,000.
Florida Highway
Patrol
Arrest
Paul S. Fiester Jr., 38, at 3:14
p.m. Friday on charges of driving
while license is suspended/revoked
and being in contempt of court.
His bond was set at $2,000.


: F i U 0 Iu N _T v


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Me;


















John Pro
N
162
Cryo









Gerry Mi
Charlie
Tim Hes
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Neale Bi
Jay Gili,
John Mu
Tom Fee
Kathie S


Report a news tip:


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about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org


Personal

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1 Truman Boutevbd
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Who's In charge:
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v6st ............................. Advertising Director, 563-3240
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irphy ....... .................... Classified Manager, 563-3255
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tewart ................... Advertising Services Director, 563-3234


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4A SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


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SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 5A


Next court term poses contentious issues


justices face

tough choices

Associated Press


WASHINGTON- Abortion,
assisted suicide, gay rights, the
death penalty. Some of the
toughest issues in the land
confront the Supreme Court in
its new term in the fall.
A new lineup of justices -
assuming the successor to
influential Justice Sandra Day
',O'Connor is on the bench -
makes the outcome of these
cases more unpredictable than
' usual.
The high court has not had a
new member since 1994, a
modern-era record. That sta-
-bility has made it easier to
.,gauge what issues the court
will take on and how they will


STRIKE
Continued from Page 1A

recruits in Hillah, killing 125
and wounding more than 140 in
'the second deadliest attack
-since the 2003 fall of Saddam
Hussein.
There was no immediate
claim of responsibility for the
Hillah attacks. However, a
posting on an Islamic Web site
claimed responsibility for the
Baghdad blast in the name of
,.al-Qaida in Iraq, led by
*c Jordanian terror mastermind
Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.
The statement's authenticity
could not be confirmed. Al-
Zarqawi's group is believed
responsible for numerous sui-
cide bombings and beheadings
of foreign hostages in Iraq.
In other violence Saturday,
three Iraqi soldiers were killed
Saturday in a roadside bomb-
ing northeast of Baghdad, their
commander said. Gunmen also


VERTICAL BL
649 E Gulf To La
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ALL TYPES Of


be decided. remain on the
On major ones, the court fre- successor i
quently splits 54. O'Connor, a Depending
moderate put
on the court
by President ON THE NET
Reagan, has Supreme Court:
been a key www.supremecourtus.gov/
vote in death
penalty, reli-
gion and abortion cases. continue servi
Her view often became the cases could 1
final word. split 4-4.
Her retirement, announced Also in doubt
Friday, shook up the world of Chief Justic(
Supreme Court lawyers who Rehnquist, w
prepared cases with O'Connor and could step
in mind. mer, too. The
"She was widely viewed as were two vaca
the key by experienced and Justices alre
successful litigators. They'll lineup of cas(
have to figure some other way month term t
to win their cases," said first Monday ii
Nelson Lund, a George Mason The court ha
University law professor and about 40 app
former clerk to O'Connor four death pe
O'Connor said that she will two abortion


assassinated a police lieu-
tenant colonel in the northern
city of Mosul, officials said.
Two other people were killed
when a bomb hidden in a veg-
etable cart exploded Saturday
in Mahmoudiya, 12 miles south
of Baghdad.
The blast occurred a few
minutes after mourners passed
by with the body of an aide to
Shiite Grand Ayatollah Ali al-
Sistani who was slain Friday
outside a Baghdad mosque.
The mourners were carrying
the body through the town en
route to burial in the Shiite
shrine city of Najaf.
Also Saturday, a policeman
and a female relative traveling
with him in a civilian car were
killed in a drive-by shooting in
Kirkuk, 290 kilometers north of
Baghdad, authorities said.
A parked car bomb exploded
Saturday near a police station
in the New Baghdad section of
the capital, wounding nine
people including two police-
men, officials said.


IND OUTLET
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court until her
.s confirmed.
on President
Bush's choice,
there could be
a lengthy fight
that stretches
into the fall.
If O'Connor
is not able to
ing, many major
leave the court
bt is the future of
e William H.
'ho has cancer
p down this sum-
last time there
ncies was 1971.
ready have a full
es for the nine-
that begins the
in October
is agreed to hear
peals, including
nalty cases and
-related cases.


More than 1,400 people have
been killed in Iraq since Prime
Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari
announced his Shiite-led gov-
ernment on April 28.
Also Saturday, the U.S. mili-
tary promised a full investiga-
tion into a June 25 incident in
which Iraq's U.N. ambassador,
Samir Sumaidaie, said
Marines killed his unarmed 21-
year-old cousin in "cold blood"
in Anbar province.
Sumaidaie said his cousin
Mohammed Sumaidaie took
Marines doing house-to-house
searches to a bedroom to show
them where a rifle that had no
live ammunition was kept.
When the Marines left, he was
found in the bedroom with a
bullet in his neck, Sumaidaie
said.


About 40 more appeals will be
added later.
Whoever the president
names to the court will imme-
diately face cases involving the
Bush administration.
In one, the court will decide
if law schools may restrict mil-
itary recruiters as a way of
protesting the Pentagon's
"don't ask, don't tell" policy
excluding openly gay people
from military service.
Schools argue that their
nondiscrimination policies
apply to all recruiters that
base hiring on race, gender or
sexual orientation. 6
Justices will take up the
administration's challenge to
Oregon's law allowing physi-
cian-assisted suicide.
In addition, there is a fight
that tests freedom of religion,
over a church's use of hallu-
cinogenic tea in. its religious
services.

He called the killing "a
betrayal" of the values and
aspirations of Iraqis and
Americans to defeat the terror-
ists and build a country based
on freedom, democracy, and
respect for human rights and
the rule of law.
"The events described in the
allegations roughly correspond
to an incident involving
Coalition Forces on that day in
that general location; therefore
a military inquiry has been ini-
tiated," Maj. Gen. Stephen T.
Johnson said in a statement.
"We take these allegations
seriously and will thoroughly
investigate this incident to
determine what happened,"
Johnson said, adding that the
investigation could take sever-
al weeks.


The abortion cases involve a
parental notification law from
New Hampshire and a long-
running fight over the liability
of people who protest outside
clinics.
O'Connor's successor proba-
bly will be quizzed during
Senate confirmation hearings
about those subjects.
"I'd expect any of the nomi-
nees to duck answering," said
Paul Schiff Berman, a law pro-
fessor at the University of
Connecticut
Berman said that a major
question is whether the new
justice will be a pragmatist
like O'Connor.
The 75-year-old former
Arizona state senator and
mother of three sons
approached cases with a prac-
tical view.
"She always chose the least
extreme solution, the compro-
mise solution," Berman said.


"She's kept the court very
close to the American popular
consensus on most issues."
Unlike the court's other con-
servatives, she believes that
affirmative action has a place
in government institutions,
although limited.
She believes that abortion
should be legal. While she sup-
ports the death penalty, she
has talked openly about con-
cerns that it is being fairly
imposed.
Among the death penalty
cases in the next term is a
potentially significant issue of
allowing inmates to get a new
chance to prove their inno-
cence with DNA evidence.
"In many cases, Justice
O'Connor's votes were to pro-
tect the rights of defendants,"
said Richard Dieter, executive
director of the anti-capital
punishment Death Penalty
Information Center.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking
news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660, and be prepared to
give your name, phone number, and the address of the
news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 563-5660
and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be prepared to leave a
detailed message.



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nation needs to hear. This free lecture will help you sift through the maze of disinformation amidst a sea of chaos so you, your family, and your loved
ones won't become another victim of pharmaceutical pseudoscience.

April Oakes
April Oakes is the President of TAAP (The Autism Autoimmunity Project) and the founder of "Casi's Quest" (TAAP of Florida). She started the
organization in honor of her 4-year old autistic daughter Casi, who passed away on June 13th, 1999. April realized that her daughter was vaccine
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rupert
LaBelle, 74
BEVERLY HILLS
Rupert C. LaBelle, 74,
Beverly Hills, died Saturday,
June 25, 2005, at home under
the care of his companion,
Burnice Smith, and Hospice.
A native of
Raymond,
N.H., he was
born Jan. 30,
1931, to Joseph
and Mildred
LaBelle and came to this area
in 1992 from Orlando.
He served in the Korean War
with the U.S. Navy.
Prior to moving to Florida,
he lived in Connecticut for
more than 30 years, where he
was an aircraft parts machin-
ist
Mr. LaBelle was a member of
VFW Post 4252 and Inverness
Elks Lodge. He was a member
of First Church of Christ in
Wethersfield, Conn.
He loved fishing, boating,
working in the garden and
telling stories.
He is survived by his com-
panion, Burnice "Cathy"
Smith, Beverly Hills; sister,
Audrey Franklin, Standish,
Maine; three daughters; two
stepdaughters; and many
nieces and nephews.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Robert "Bob"
McDougald, 58
FLORAL CITY
Robert Hall "Bob"
McDougald, 58, Floral City,
died Wednesday, June 29,2005,
at Citrus Memorial Hospital in
Inverness.
Born in Freeport, Texas, on
Oct. 2, 1946, he
was the son of
Robert H. and
Susana (Lake)
McDougald.
He came here
in 1977 from Leesburg.
He served in the U.S. Marine
Corps during the Vietnam War.
Mr. McDougald was a retired
road estimator in the concrete
and ready-mix industry. He
was a member of Inverness
VFW Post 4337, and enjoyed
hunting.
He was Baptist.
Survivors include a son,
Robert H. McDougald 1V,
Belleview; a daughter, Darla
"Lisa" Del Rosario, Orlando;
two sisters, Sarah McGlohorn,
Leesburg, and Caroline Scharf,
Mt Dora; and four grandchil-
dren, Robert V Madeline,,
Rodney and Eric Jr.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Inverness.

Francis "Nick"
Nickerson, 84
SPRING HILL
Francis V "Nick" Nickerson,
84, Spring Hill, died Friday,
July 1, 2005, at home under the
care of his family and
Hernando-Pasco Hospice.
Born in Bangor, Maine, he
came to this
area nine
years ago from
Hernando,
after moving
there in 1977
from Windham, Maine.
He was a World War II veter-
an, having served in the
Merchant Marines. He sur-
vived the torpedo strike on the
William Boyce Thompson oil
tanker in the Atlantic Ocean on
July 7,1943.
Mr. Nickerson retired from
the Merchant Marines as an
engineer after 37 years of serv-
ice, and was a member of the
Marine Engineers Benefit
Association.
Survivors include his wife,
Dorothy; son, Mike Nickerson,
Brooksville; daughter, Beth
Nickerson, Standish, Maine;
two brothers, Lawrence E.
Nickerson, Windham, Maine,
and Daniel G. Nickerson,
Hickory, N.C.; and three grand-
children.
Turner Funeral & Cremation
Center, Spring Hill.

SO YOU KNOW
Obituaries must be sub-
mitted by licensed
funeral homes.


Constance
Nunamaker, 84
HOMOSASSA
Constance K -z-
Nunamaker, 84,
Homosassa,
died Friday,
July 1, 2005, at, "
home.
She was born
Dec. 24, 1920, in
Camden, S.C.,
the daughter of Constance
Alma and Nunamaker
Harold Kinney
She was a homemaker.
Mrs. Nunamaker attended
St. Scholastica Catholic
Church in Lecanto. She was in
the pre-entrance program for
the Associates in Mission for
the Sisters of Charity of
Cincinnati. She was a member
of the Faith Partners Group of
St. Scholastica.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Ernest J.
Nunamaker.
Survivors include her
daughter, Linda Wolfertz,
Homosassa; son, Joseph
Nunamaker, Irmo, S.C.; and
two grandchildren, Joe
Nunamaker and Susannah
Nunamaker, both of Irmo, S.C.
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory, Crystal River.

Funeral
NOTICES

Robert Hall "Bob"
McDougald. Friends may call
at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home of Inverness from 5 to 7
p.m. Tuesday, July 5, 2005,
where funeral services will be
conducted at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, July 6, 2005, with
the Rev. Ronnie Walker, pastor
of the First Baptist Church of
Belleview, officiating. Burial
will follow at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, with full
military honors provided by
Inverness VFW Post 4337
honor guard. In lieu of flowers,
memorials are suggested to
Hospice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Francis V. "Nick"
Nickerson. The family will
receive friends from 12:30 to 1
p.m. today at Turner Funeral &
Cremation Center, where a
funeral service will be held at
1 p.m. with Dr. Greg
Champagne officiating. Burial
will follow at Fountains
Memorial Park in Homosassa.
Constance K. Nunamaker.
Prayer services for Constance
K Nunamaker, 84, Homosassa,
will be held at 3:30 p.m. today
at Brown Funeral Home in
Crystal River, with Father Jim
Fleming officiating. Family
will receive friends from 2 to 4
p.m. today at the Brown
Funeral Home. Mass and bur-
ial will be in Columbia, S.C. In
lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to the St. Scholastica
Catholic Church Building
Fund.


Death
ELSEWHERE

Renaldo
Benson, 69
SOUL SINGER
DETROIT Renaldo
"Obie" Benson, a member of
the legendary Motown singing
group the Four Tops, died
Friday. He was 69.
The Four Tops sold more
than 50 million records and
recorded hit songs such as
"Baby I Need Your Loving,"
"Reach Out (I'll be There)," "I
Can't Help Myself" and
"Standing in the Shadows of
Love."
Benson's death leaves two
surviving members of the orig-
inal group: Levi Stubbs and
Abdul "Duke" Fakir.
HEINZ FUNERAL HOME
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Staying in step with Travolta


Stand-in for, friend of

star follows his lead

to new life in Florida

The Florida Times-Union

JACKSONVILLE Nick Loren is very
close to John Travolta. Sometimes he even
is Travolta on film, at least.
Loren is Travolta's movie double, his
stand-in and his occasional stuntman. He's
been with the star for 11 movies, including
the filmed-in-Jacksonville "Lonely
Hearts" and "Basic."
He's also his friend, and has been since
Travolta tapped him on the shoulder nine
years ago and asked if they'd met before.
"Some people you click with. Pretty much
everyone clicks with John, but there was a
real connection there for us. There's just a
good chemistry there," Loren said. 'John
Travolta is such an amazing person, a men-
tor to me, I wouldn't trade it for anything."
Loren moved from Los Angeles to north-
east Florida a few. months ago, at the urg-
ing of Travolta, who .has a home near
Ocala: "He's been telling me: 'Move to
Florida, just move to Florida you don't
need to be in L.A.'"
Loren and his family are waiting to
move into a house in Fernandina Beach,
far from what he calls the madness of
Hollywood.
Other changes are in store, too: Loren,
his wife, Denise, and a partner have
formed Bow Wow TV and are marketing a
DVD aimed at an apparently untapped
viewing audience dogs. It's an hour-long
video, inspired by their dog, Monty, that,
shows dogs being dogs playing, panting,
sniffing, barking. It's meant for pets to
watch while their owners are away.
It's a novel concept, and it's put him in
the July issue of "O," Oprah Winfrey's'
magazine. And the video is in line to
appear in several national TV news shows,
including a "Dateline NBC" show on pets
scheduled to air several times this month.
Loren thinks Bow Wow TV's Dog-On
Television DVD has a big future; there's
talk about it going to Japan, Europe and
Australia. And Bow Wow is in production
on two other pet-related DVDs, including
one for cats to watch.
The Lorens plan to move Bow Wow's
offices and distribution center to
Fernandina Beach. "We're going to be a
full-fledged Florida company," he said.
But that's not the end of his work with
Travolta.
"I love it, absolutely. I love the industry,
I love being on set, learning and watch-
ing," he said.
Loren is not related to Sophia Loren,


Associated Press ,"
Actor John Travolta, left, poses with his stand-in, Nick Loren, during the filming of the
movie "Lonely Hearts" in April in St. Augustine. Loren has been Travolta's stand-in and his
occasional stuntman for 11 movies, including the filmed-in-Jacksonville "Lonely Hearts"
and "Basic."


though he was once identified in print as
her son. He's 34, younger than Travolta.
He's 6 feet tall, 1/4 inch shorter than the star.
He's slimmer than Travolta and doesn't
have the famous chin. But they both have
blue eyes and similar facial structure.
On set, Loren wears an identical cos-
tume to the star. He cuts hit hair the same
- and even had to get it cropped short and
dyed gray to match Travolta's in his little-
seen role as an alcoholic writer in "A Love
Song for Bobby Long." -
As his stand-in, Loren, well, stands in for
Travolta as crews set their lighting and
arrange their shots just so a process that
can be long and tedious.
His blue eyes help there. "You've got to
make sure these eyes are lit well, that
they're shown," he said. "Especially with
John, because the eyes are a window to his
soul."
As a double, he might appear briefly as
Travolta in a film, shot from behind or
from a distance. He even does minor
stunts for the star driving a car, perhaps,
or getting in a fight
"But if it's crazy, if it's jumping out of a
100-foot window, I let someone else do
that," he says.
Loren was a "starving musician" from
San Diego who moved to Los Angeles to
try to crack into the music business. While
there, he started working as a movie extra,
here and there. In 1996 he was chosen to
be an extra in "Face/Off," John Woo's
luridly entertaining yarn with Travolta
and Nicolas Cage.
He was in a scene with a bunch of tough-
looking, muscle-bound, tattooed extras


playing prisoners ex-prisoners, most of
them, which accounted for their authentic ,
look
He was pulled aside and asked if he
wanted to stand in for Cage.
"I didn't know what a stand-in was," said ,.
Loren, "but they were offering a little
more money, so I said sure."
Travolta wasn't in that scene. But he was
there a few weeks later, when Loren was
called back to the set to be an extra again. p
A few minutes later, Travolta tapped '
him on the shoulder: He was sure he knew
*Loren from somewhere. Loren assured
him they'd never met he'd remember, ,
after all.
But then they started talking, about life,
about kids. Loren told Travolta about how
he was raising a son by himself. He told
him about music.
They became friends, Loren said, and
have stayed friends.
Before long, he was a stand-in for the
star in "Face/Off." And he's been ,
Travolta's stand-in on "The General's
Daughter," "Lucky Numbers,"
"Swordfish," "Domestic Disturbance,"
"Basic," "Ladder 49," "A Love Song for
Bobby Long," "The Punisher," "Be Cool"
and "Lonely Hearts."
He's even been credited with several
small roles "Man at Bar," or "Helicopter
Pilot," for example in some of the same
films.
His best role came in Swordfish, as an
FBI agent who crashes a car while fighting
with Hugh Jackman. "I'm the guy who gets
elbowed in the nose by Hugh Jackman,"
he said. "It was a great scene."


7 military brothers honored for service


Associated Press

TAMPA When the seven
Vila brothers swap war stories,
they cover everything from
World War II's battle at
Guadalcanal to the frozen fox-
holes of Korea in the 1950s, the
jungles of Vietnam, and the
fight in the Persian Gulf.
They have served in the mil-
itary across seven decades,
from 1942 to 2003, with only a
few interruptions. They own
Purple Hearts, Navy Crosses,
and dozens of other honors.
Saturday, Tampa officials
renamed a neighborhood park
in their honor Vila Brothers
Park
At the ceremony, the men, all
residents of the Tampa area,
watched a U.S. Marine Corps
color guard present the flag, to
the strains of the national
anthem.


"We were proud to serve,
and never expected a reward
for our service," Hector Vila,
74, told. the crowd. "Never
would we have done anything
less for the love of our country
and her freedom."
Their parents were the late
Carmen and Wilfredo Vila. She
was a homemaker, and he
worked in a bakery and rolled
cigars to support his 14 chil-
dren. The couple also had
seven daughters, four of whom
are still living.
The eldest son, Joe, now 81,
and Willie, now 80, enlisted in
the U.S. Marines only weeks
after the Japanese attacked
Pearl Harbor, and in 1942, were
among the Allied forces invad-
ing Guadalcanal in the South
Pacific.
In 1944, Wilfredo Jr., 78, was
drafted into the U.S. Army and
served in Europe, where he


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in Korea, while Robert, now 73,
enlisted in the U.S. Navy that
year and served aboard a ship
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In 1960, Denio, now 67, was
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became a sharpshooter and a
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6A SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005








CrTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOSS
Continued from Page 1A

changed in the wake of a law they say
has all but forced them out of work
"Our annual income has just plum-
meted," Arnold said. "Here I am try-
ing to scrape together and catch fish."
Conservation conflict
At the center of the debate is the
Net Limitation Amendment a 1995
law intended to protect fisheries, pre-
vent overfishing and protect the envi-
ronment which the men said has
forced them to readapt to a job that's
been in their families for more than
four generations. The law, placed in
the Florida Constitution by voters,
restricts the use and size of certain
'types of nets, restricts where they can
be used, limits mesh size and places
limits on the number of fish that can
be caught in one day.
The law originally focused on pre-
venting what conservationists
believed were large numbers of mul-
let that were unnecessarily killed by
nets, before expanding to conserve
younger fish populations.
Huggins said the law achieves the
exact opposite: Smaller fish are
caught in the nets while the larger
fish swim off. Those that are caught
tend to die, despite efforts to throw
them back, he said, while all along
profits decline because the sought-
after fish are caught less often.
"We don't catch a third of what
we're after," he said.
As an example, Huggins described
a fishing trip a few days prior when he
and Arnold spent all day trying to
catch mullet, but had limited success
after reeling in about 400 pounds of
fish. He said after expenses, they
weren't left with much.
"It was an all-day job for him to
make $140, and for me to get $140 for
412 pounds of mullet," he said.
Some of the provisions of the law
include prohibiting the use of nets
such as gill and entangling within
nine miles of shore; Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation officers
enforce laws. Past this point, the laws
become broader and are enforced
through several different state and
federal agencies.
The men all feel part of the prob-
lem is that the law conflicts with other
rules, is poorly written and has
changed often, leading to confusion
among fishermen and those enforcing
the law.
"You don't know who's going to be
out there to, pull you over," Young
said. "And every officer seems to have
a different opinion of what the law is."

Fishing for options
With fewer fish being caught, the
three have had to hook on to other
sources of income. To help make ends
meet, Young has begun shrimping
Monday through Thursday to earn
extra money, leaving the docks in
Homosassa about 7:30 p.m. and stay-
ing out all night.
Arnold said he can't make his living
staying put, so he heads to Alaska in
the summer for herring and salmon
fishing, returning home in the fall to
catch mullet.
"With the restrictions and all, I
wanted to step up and do a little bet-


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Local commercial fishermen Billy Huggins and Harry Arnold have faced many financial challenges since the July 1995 net
ban law was enacted. Some days they fear a loss of their heritage as commercial fishermen, because their children will
not be able to go into the business.


ter in life," he said. "Unless you go out
of state, you can't really survive."
The job doesn't come cheap;
between replacing nets, gas for boats,
gear and other expenses, money -
like fish can get away. Arnold said
he probably lost about $50,000 last
year after his costs were paid, which
includes the $14,000 he said he has
invested in his boat
Huggins said his gross income has
decreased between $35,000 and
$45,000.
"Now, I'm not going to say I don't
pay my bills, because I do," Huggins
said, before adding, "If it wasn't for.my


family, I wouldn't do this no more."

Caught in court
As uncertain as their income is,
what's also unclear is their future
amid serious charges of violating the
net law. The trio were arrested Nov. 3
when. a conservation officer said they
had an illegal gill net and had exceed-
ed their mullet catch limit.
Huggins, who was operating the
boat the men were on in the Gulf near
the Homosassa River that night, faces
up to 20 years in prison on charges of
possessing an illegal net, possessing


game fish more than the daily bag
limit, improperly displaying a saltwa-
ter products license and fleeing law
enforcement.
Arnold and Young face up to 15
years on related charges.
Huggins said he is preparing "for
the worst," putting money away for his
family, just in case. He said his biggest
fear is his children growing up with-
out their father because he was put in
prison for "something so simple."
Young said though he's trying not to
worry, he, too, has begun making
preparations.
"Sometimes I don't know what to


If it wasn't for my
family, I wouldn't do
this no more.

Billy Huggins
commercial fisherman from Inglis.



Our annual
income has just
plummeted. Here I am
trying to scrape
together and

catch fish.

Harry Arnold
commercial fisherman from Crystal River.

say because I think it's ridiculous,"
Misti Fields said. "It's not like they're
out selling crack to children. They're
just trying to make a living for their
families."
The three appeared in court June
15 for what was expected to be a trial.
But the case was delayed because of
procedural matters. Now, all there is
to do is wait.
"I still feel like I have an anvil over
my head," Arnold said.
Despite there being no decision in
the case yet, the men say they're still
treated like criminals by some in the
community because of the attention
the case is receiving. Regardless,
Young is confident that when the time
comes, a jury will make the right deci-
sion.
"I feel any six people with level
heads will see what's going on," he
said.

Heritage cast away
The friends share similar fears that
have nothing to do with guilt or inno-
cence. They're afraid the craft they
learned as children and that they
grew up with will end with them.
Huggins learned what he knows
through his father, Henry, but even his
dad has decided fishing just isn't
worth as much to him anymore.
"He does nothing but blue crab now.
He was tired of being harassed," he
said.
Young grew up in a family of fisher-
men and shrimped and fished
throughout his childhood, and said
instead of going to football games as a
teen, he went to work. He said that is
a life his children probably won't
know.
"I can't pass on my heritage. This is
what Homosassa is all about, com-
mercial fishing," Young said.
All three said in terms of other
employment, there .is no fall-back
plan for them because they have
fished their whole lives. However,
they said they must continue to work
and hope things will change with
time.
"Some days I wake up and just
sigh," Huggins said. "I don't know
what else to do. My bills still have to
be paid."


RESULTS
Continued from Page 1A

its, weekend closures and size
limits on certain species of fish
before the net ban was
approved by voters in 1994, and
those rules were gradually
improving fish populations.
The net ban accelerated the
recovery of some species, and
was an obvious boost to the
mullet fishery. Death rates for
mullet dropped to almost zero
after the ban became effective,
Murphy said. Mullet had been
caught only in large nets. In the
post net-ban era, mullet fisher-
men could use only small hand-
held cast nets.
"The net ban was certainly
helpful in protecting some of
species, but there were other
things going on," Murphy said.
"The net ban did have an
effect, especially on fish exclu-
sively harvested with nets
(mullet for one), but there were
regulations on recreational
and commercial fishermen
before the net ban."
Seventy-two percent of
Florida voters approved the
net ban in November1994; it
became effective July 1, 1995.
The amendment banned gill
nets and other entangling nets
in Florida waters to protect
saltwater finfish, shellfish "and
other marine animals from
unnecessary killing, overfish-
ing and waste."
Murphy said the net ban was
a reallocation of a resource by
the voters of Florida.
Translated, that means when
commercial fishermen were no
longer able to use large entan-
gling nets to make a living, the
resource was available prima-
rily to recreational fishermen.
Recreational fishing inter-
ests pushed for the amend-
ment.


Opposing views
The question of whether the
net ban achieved its purpose is
one that may never be
answered, in part because
there is disagreement about
the motives of the sport fishing
group that backed the amend-
ment
Ted Forsgren, executive
director of the Coastal
Conservation Association
(CCA) of Florida, one of the pri-
mary sponsors of the citizen-
backed constitutional net ban,
and Bob Gill, owner of Shrimp
Landing, a seafood house near
Crystal River, are worlds apart
in how they view the net ban.
Forsgren said CCA and
Florida Sportsman Magazine, a
publication for saltwater fish-
ermen, supported putting the
net ban on the ballot as a con-
stitutional amendment when a
decade of lobbying in
Tallahassee failed to generate
legislation to stop commercial


What we're
seeing is a lot of
success.
Ted ; -' -.
executive director,
Coastal Conservation Association
of Florida.

overfishing in Florida waters.
The amendment was intend-
ed to eliminate gill- and entan-
gling nets from Florida waters,
not to take the resource away
from one group of users and
give it to another, he said. To
back his argument, he said 23
conservation groups in the
state and most of the major
daily newspapers supported
the net ban editorially
"It has exceeded my expecta-
tions," Forsgren said. "What
we're seeing is a lot of success."
Forsgren said the net ban


allowed the mullet and bait
fish populations to recover. He
said both are critical food fish
for larger animals like the
osprey. He said many animals
in the food chain depend on
mullet for survival.
Gill said the primary pur-
pose of the amendment was to
drive commercial net fisher-
men off the water and give the
resource to recreational fisher-
men, but it was packaged and
sold to the public as environ-
mental protection initiative.
"It did do what it was sup-
posed to do, frankly, from a
recreational standpoint, but at
a fearsome price," Gill said,
noting Florida's traditional
coastal fishing communities
were decimated by the net ban.
Gill said he believes the net
ban may have accelerated the
recovery of fish populations in
some areas by eliminating one
of the user groups from the pic-
ture.


But he said one television
commercial mislead people
into believing the ban would
protect certain species of ani-
mals that aren't even found in
Florida waters.
"The whole video was a
sham and misleading, but it's
history, and we are what we
are," Gill said. "It's a constitu-
tional amendment, and it's not
going away"
Gill said the net ban should
never have been a constitution-
al issue.

Evaluating the fishery
Fish populations in Florida
waters are constantly moni-
tored by the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, Murphy said, but it's
still difficult to pinpoint just
where the net ban fits into the
picture.
Citing Spanish mackerel as
an example, he said the num-
ber of adult females of spawn-


ing age reached a low point in
1988. In 1996, the year after the
net ban, the mackerel popula-
tions began to increase, and by
2001, the last year the agency
has statistics, they were not
being overfished.
However, during the decline,
and in the 1990s before the net
ban, bag limits and restrictions
on commercial fishing such as
shorter fishing seasons, limits
to the number of pounds and
restrictions on weekend fish-
ing had begun to help the fish-
ery slowly recover, Murphy
said.
Exactly how much of the
recovery can be attributed to
the net ban, and how much to
state regulation, will be diffi-
cult to measure, he said.
But neither Forsgren nor Gill
felt the state regulations were
effective. Gill said the state
often would make a regulation
and revise it a year or two later
before anyone could measure
whether it was being effective.
Forsgren said the state's
rules were ineffective.
"There were a lot of interac-
tions and fixes that didn't
work," Forsgren said.
But Gill believes a hidden
stress factor hurt the inshore
fishery more than commercial
or recreational fishing. He said
the loss of water quality is tak-
ing a big toll on finfish and
shellfish.
At one time, Gill said a hand-
ful of oystermen could make a
living off the coast of Citrus
County, but he said the number
of oyster beds declined from
poor water quality.
And he said the declining
water quality has all but
destroyed the sea trout fishery.
"If you had to pick out one
single factor causing the degra-
dation of the fisheries, it's the
water-quality issue," Gill said,"
but we don't have the corporate
will to do anything about it"


HOW MUCH OF WHAT'S BEING CAUGHT ... AND BY WHOM
* The Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute keeps statistics on fish landings. After the
net ban, the numbers changed dramatically for some species.
* Pompano Recreational fishermen landed 161,000 pounds of pompano in 1994, 10 0.ears
the year before the net ban became effective. In 2003, recreational fishermen landed
770,000 pompano.
Commercial fishermen landed 600,000 pounds of pompano in 1994, and
275,000 pounds in 2003.
* Sea Trout In 1994, recreational fishermen landed 2.7 million pounds of trout, and
in 2003 they landed 2.8 million pounds.
Commercial fishermen landed 888,000 pounds of trout in 1994, and 54,000 ,
pounds in 2003.
* Bluefish Recreational fishermen landed 741,000 pounds of bluefish in 1994,
and 1.2 million pounds in 2003. >
Commercial fishermen landed 1.2 million pounds of bluefish in 1994, and _____
127,000 pounds in 2003.
* Spanish Mackerel Recreational fishermen landed 1.8 million pounds in 1994, and 3.3 million pounds in 2003.
Commercial.fishermen landed 5.5 million pounds in 1994 and 3.5 million pounds in 2003.
* Black Drum Recreational fishermen landed 825,000 pounds of black drum in 1994, and 728,000 pounds in 2003.
Commercial fishermen caught 84,000 pounds of black drum in 1994, and 15,000 pounds in 2003.
* Mullet- Commercial fishermen harvested 15 million pounds in 1994, and 7.8 million pounds in 2003.
Source: Mike Murphy, senior research scientist with theFlorida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute


SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 7A











S
'I
-...


JULY 3, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


*'. i-'
: ( ~

K


Blasts target U.N. in Kosovo


Nation

Hang in there

r -_f r_


No one hurtfollowing 3 blasts; police seal area


Associated Press

PRISTINA, Serbia-Montenegro At
least three blasts rocked the center of
Kosovo's capital on Saturday, and one
targeted the U.N. mission headquarters.
An Associated Press reporter saw at
least three U.N. vehicles set ablaze in
the parking lot of the U.N. mission head-
quarters in Pristina.
There were no immediate reports of


any injuries after at least three near-
simultaneous blasts, said Hua Jiang,
chief U.N. spokeswoman.
The second blast detonated near the
building of the Organization for Security
and Cooperation in Europe, the OSCE,
which is a block away from the U.N.
compound.
The third blast went off near the
Kosovo government building which also
houses the province's parliament and


damaged it slightly, said Jiang. She did
not say what caused the blasts.
Police sealed off the areas after the
explosions.
Kosovo has been administered by the
U.N. mission and patrolled by NATO-led
peacekeepers since 1999 after the
alliance's bombing of Serb forces wag-
ing a crackdown on separatist ethnic
Albanians.
The province remains disputed
between its ethnic Albanian majority
who want it to become independent, and
Serbs demanding it remain part of


Serbia-Montenegro, the union that
replaced former Yugoslavia.
Talks to determine its future status
will be later this year, if the province
reaches standards including those on
democracy, rights of minorities, and rule
of law.
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan
last month appointed a senior
Norwegian diplomat Kai Eide to evalu-
ate progress and report back to him by
the end of summer. Eide arrived in
Kosovo on Friday, on his second fact-
finding visit since his appointment.


Missing Idaho girl found with man


Girl whose family was bludgeoned

to death seen eating with sex offender


Associated Press

COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho
- More than six weeks after
she disappeared from a
home where family members
were bludgeoned to death,
an 8-year-old girl was found
safe Saturday, shar-
ing a meal with, a reg-
istered sex offender
at a Denny's restau-
rant in her home-
town.
Shasta Groene was
being reunited with
her father, but her 9-
year-old brother, Dyl- She
an, remained missing Gro
and was feared dead, recogn
Kootenai County a De
Sheriff's Capt. Ben waitres
Wolfinger said. home
"Our initial infor-
mation is that he may
be deceased," Wolf- i
inger said, adding
that officials were
continuing the search
for him.
Joseph Edward ___
Duncan III, a regis-
tered sex offender Jo0
from Fargo, N.D., was
arrested and charged register
with kidnapping. He offend
was being held with- treated
out bond, and
Wolfinger said more
charges were possi-
ble.
Duncan, 42, had an
outstanding warrant
for failing to register
as a high-risk sex
offender and was fac-
ing charges of molest- Dy
ing a 6-year-old boy in Gr
Minnesota. He was Sha
released on bail in brother
April, just weeks dea
before the children authi
disappeared.
Shasta was spotted by a
waitress early Saturday just
miles from the home where
her mother, older brother
and mother's boyfriend were
discovered bound and bludg-
eoned to death on May 16.
Amber Dean, 24, said she


NASA


plans


fireworks

Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. It's a
space mission straight out of
Hollywood launch a space-
craft 268 million miles so it can
aim a barrel-sized probe
toward a speeding comet half
the size of Manhattan and
smash a hole in it.
But that's what NASA
expects its Deep Impact mis-
sion to do this weekend, with a
goal of viewing the icy core of a
comet that may hold cosmic
clues to how the sun and plan-
ets formed.
It's not without challenges.
To ensure a bull's-eye hit -
and a spectacular Indepen-
dence Day fireworks display in
space several things must
happen just right.
Around 2 a.m. EDT Sunday,
the Deep Impact spacecraft
must release the 820-pound


e
izi
en
S
istc
it


re
er
m


as1
r,
ad
or


thought she recognized the
girl eating onion rings.
cheese sticks and chicken
strips with an older man.
Shasta's picture has been
posted around to\\n and
shown in the med ia.
"It clicked in my brain that
she looks familiar,"
she said.
Dean tried to keep
the pair at the restau-
f rant longer y giving
the girl crayons. col-
oring paper and a
mask from the mov ie
"Madagascar." and
sta offering the girl
*ne dessert.
:ed by "I was trying to fie-
ny's ure out a way to keep
in her them there so the offi-
own. cers would have time
to get there," she said
It was not yet
known where the girl
had spent the past six
weeks. She k\as being
interviewed at a ned-
ical center but
appeared physically
well.
,ph "She's a little girl."
' Wolfinger said.
ed sex "Obviously. she's
r, who been through a pretty
Shasta traumatic time."
Tom Kraus. Brenda
Groene's great-uincle
in Whitefish. Mont..
said family members
were elated by the
news of Shasta's
return and hoping
that Dylan also \would
be found alive
"Obviously, we
sne were very excited
ta's they found Shasta,"
feared Kraus said.
by "We are hopeful
ities. they can find Dylan.
We're very happy
those folks at Denny's recog-
nized her and that they
found her."
Dylan and Shasta had
been missing since at least
May 16, when sheriff's
deputies responded to their
rural home after a neighbor


Associated Press
This is the boarded-up home, eight miles east of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, where three people were
found murdered May 25. Shasta Groene, the 8-year-old girl who disappeared with her brother six
weeks ago from a home where their family members were bludgeoned to death, was found
Saturday at a Denny's restaurant in the same town where they grew up.


reported that dogs were barking and the door
of one vehicle was open but no one was in
sight
The deputies found the bound bodies of
Brenda Groene, 40, Slade Groene, 13, and
Mark McKenzie, 37. The victims were bound


and then bludgeoned to death.
Investigators had interviewed hundreds of
people, searched through 800 tons of trash
and fielded more than 2,000 tips.
It was not known whether Duncan had a-
connection with the victims.


'Most hated woman in

Canada' to be released


Associated Press
Monte Henderson, program manager with Ball Aerospace &
Technologies Corp., speaks at a briefing July I about NASA's Deep
Impact space mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in


Pasadena, Calif.
copper "impactor" on course
for a collision expected 24
hours later with the comet
Tempel 1.
Scientists are confident they
will be able to position the
probe in the onrushing comet's
path, though that calls for pre-
cise maneuvers that the probe
must execute without help
from mission control. Once on
auto-pilot, the probe has up to
three chances before the colli-
sion to fire its thrusters to
adjust its flight path for a
direct strike.
"To hit the nucleus of a comet
is a little bit like a baseball


player trying to hit a knuckle-
ball," said Dave Spencer, mis-
sion manager at NASA's Jet
Propulsion Laboratory in
Pasadena, which is in charge of
the $333 million project
Comets are blobs of ice and
dust that orbit the sun and were
born about 4.5 billion years ago
- nearly the same time as the
solar system itself. When a
cloud of gas and dust con-
densed to form the sun and
planets, comets formed from
what was left over.
Scientists hope studying
them will provide clues to how
the solar system formed.


Associated Press

MONTREAL The most
reviled woman in Canada is set
to walk out of prison Monday,
facing death threats and rage
from a public still bitter
that she only served 12
years for the rapes and
murders of teenage
girls, including her
younger sister.
Karla Homolka is so
frightened someone
might harm her that her
lawyers are demanding Ka
an unprecedented Hon
media blackout on her crimes
release and subsequent Car
whereabouts, a move
that will be challenged by
media attorneys in a Montreal
courtroom on Monday
Many in this French-speaking
city believe Homolka has done
her time and should be given
her second chance at life,
which she got after making a
deal with the state in exchange
for testifying against her ex-
husband.
Dubbed "English-Canada's


s
in


monster," by Quebecois, the 35-
year-old former veterinarian
assistant who grew up near
Niagara Falls has said she
intends to settle in Montreal,
hoping for anonymity amid
those perhaps less
familiar with her
crimes.
Those offenses, when
made public through
her testimony at her ex-
husband's murder trial
in 1995 and from home-
made videotapes of
rla their sexual killing
olka sprees, knocked the
hocked wind out of the nation.
ada. Canadians, unaccus-
tomed to the grisly
crimes they typically attribute
to their neighbors to the south,
felt as if they had lost a touch of
innocence. Renewed interest in
the killer, who now calls herself
Karla Teale, has reached
beyond Canadian borders. The
Internet search engine Google
reports Homolka was among
their top 10 search subjects last
week, just 'after Michael
Jackson and Angelina Jolie.


Associated Press
14-year-old Tom Becker of
Holland Patent, N.Y., tries to
hang on Saturday during a
tug-of-war match at Roland
Williams' Free Football and
Life Skills Camp at Utica
College in Utica, N.Y. In addi-
tion to football practice and
other drills, the camp teach-
es about life skills including
computers, financial literacy,
goal achievement and health.
Williams is a football player
with the St. Louis Rams. In
the background is Justin
Green, 15, of Herkimer, N.Y.


Nine-year-old boy
falls to death
HIGHLAND, Ind.-A 9-year-
old boy died after falling more
than 25 feet from the gondola of
a rotating carnival ride during a
Fourth of July festival at a town'
park.
"Rider error, operator error,
equipment failure we don't
know at this point," Highland
Police Chief Peter Hojnicki said.'
"His death was caused by
unknown reasons."
Dakota Stevenson of Gary
was pronounced dead at a
Munster hospital shortly after
falling Friday night from the
Wind Shear, a ride in which pas-
sengers are strapped into a
rotating gondola with over-the-
shoulder restraints.
All of the carnival rides
remained shut down Saturday
while the festival continued.


Woreconciliation

Reconciliation


Associated Press
Pope Benedict XVI holds his .
pastoral staff during a mass
June 29 inside St. Peter's
Basilica at the Vatican. The
Vatican said Saturday 11
hoped to quickly normalize
diplomatic relations witl
Vietnam following a week-'
long visit to Rome by a govw
ernment delegation.

French woman defies
Catholic church
LYON, France-A French
woman defied a threat of
excommunication by the Roman`
Catholic Church and held a cer-'
emony proclaiming herself a
priest on Saturday.
In a small ceremony on a
boat, Genevieve Beney was
joined by other women from
around the world who have
taken similar dramatic action to
draw attention to the church's
policy against women priests.
"This is not a rupture with the
Roman Catholic Church," Beney
said in a statement read aloud
before she boarded the boat. "If
there is a rupture on my part, it
is with a situation that I consider
to be obsolete and unjust to
women."
The Vatican has not com-
mented on the case.

From wire reports


I


L I


'/


Na:tac:i:
























Special to the Chronicle

An exhibit of printed images of
Florida's past will be on display in the
Old Courthouse Heritage Museum now
through Aug. 21.
The Printed Florida Illustrated
Newspaper Images, 1860 to 1900 exhib-
it will showcase 25 original, Florida-
themed prints from Harper's Weekly
and Frank Leslie's Illustrated
Newspaper. The prints show the state
from the perspective of the illustrators
who explored Florida before the Civil


War, during the Reconstruction and in
the days that followed.
These publications became house-
hold favorites in the days before pho-
tography became widespread in peri-
odicals, relying instead on drawings to
convey ideas. As such, the exhibit not
only represents Florida's past, but also


Road to Recovery seeks


volunteer drivers


Special to the Chronicle
The American Cancer Society's Road
to Recovery Program is having trouble
staying on course in Citrus County. This
vital patient service program is in need
of volunteers who are willing to drive
cancer patients to and from their can-
cer treatments. Currently in the Citrus
area there are only three or four dedi-
cated volunteers available to drive
patients. Dozens more are needed to
ensure that all patients are getting the
care that they desperately need to get
back on the "Road to Recovery."
A successful Road to Recovery
Program can be a tremendous asset to


the community. Volunteers provide an
essential and necessary service. Even
the greatest medical advance is useless
if the patient cannot get to treatment.
Training, maps and directions are
provided to those who want to volun-
teer their time. "We want this to be an
easy and stress-free service for both
patients and volunteers," said Tobey
Hunter, Cancer Control manager for
the Citrus Unit of the American Cancer
Society. Requirements for volunteering
include having a good driving record,
valid driver's license and a vehicle in
good working condition.
Call 637-5577.


the past of the publishing industry. The
telling images and engaging stories of
these publications appealed to the
nation's burgeoning middle class.
The Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday. The museum lies within


Special to the Chronicle
LHS '95 class reunion in July
The Lecanto High School Class of
1995 10-year reunion is July 8 to 9 at
Citrus Hills. Contact Tom Hunt at (352)
219-3566 or tomh96@hotmail.com.
CRHS classes 1963-66 plan reunion
Crystal River High School classes of
1963, 1964, 1965 and 1966 are planning
a reunion on July 15, 16 and 17 at the
Riverside Resort in Homosassa.
Return your information sheets and
checks. Call Pat at 564-0334 or 795-3207,
John at 527-1471 or Jack at 382-3256.
LHS Class of 1985 saves
for trophy case
Lecanto Middle School is celebrating
its 25th year in existence. The 1985
graduates were the first to pass


the Citrus County Courthouse, which
appears on the National Register of
Historic Places. Admission is free.
The Citrus County Board of
Commissioners built the courthouse
in 1912 to provide expanded services
during the extensive phosphate, cit-
rus, lumber and dry-goods trade of the
early 20th century. It has since received
extensive restoration and was featured
in the 1961 Elvis Presley film "Follow
That Dream." Call the Citrus County
Visitors & Convention Bureau at (800)
587-6667.


through these halls.
The principal of Lecanto Middle
School, Mr. Kusmaul yes, the same
Coach Kusmaul from our days of ado-
lescence wants to have a trophy case
built that will honor all students from
years past and years to come.
The School Advisory Enhancement
Council is collecting donations to make
this vision a reality.
If the class of '85 alumni can collec-
tively donate $500, a gold plaque will be
permanently affixed to the trophy case.
If interested in donating, call Kim
Head (formerly Shields) at LMS, 746-
2050, Ext. 268, or mail donations direct-
ly to Lecanto Middle School at 3800 W
Educational Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.


See Florida 'in prints'


Special to the Chronicle
Harley the Pug, who is 1 1/2
years old, lives in Sugarmill
Woods with his family, Dan
and Germaine Farrell.


* WHEN: Now through August 21.
* WHERE: Old Courthouse Heritage Museum.


News ~..

Red, white & blue
celebration set
The Italian Social Club in
Hernando will host its monthly
dinner-dance on Saturday, July
9. This month we are celebrat-
ing Red, White & Blue.
We are asking all our friends
and members to wear some-
thing red white and blue to the
dance to honor the U.S.A. espe-
cially with our sacrifices at this
time.
Dinner will feature Yankee Pot
Roast with potato, vegetable,
dessert and, as usual, coffee
and setups are provided.
Come to our clubhouse at 6
p.m. and meet your friends and
table mates and get ready for a
sumptuous meal prepared by
our outstanding Chef Bill.
The Carriers will provide the
entertainment with some patriot-
ic as well as "our contemporary
music."
Tickets and reservations may
be obtained by calling either
John at 726-1328 or Marie at
726-8406.
Tickets at $10 for members
and $12 for non-members (join
and save $2).
The club is on County Road
486 in Hernando, about a mile
east of Citrus Hills.
Inverness Elks slate
July activities
The Inverness Elks Lodge
2522 will have its monthly meet-
ing at 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 26.
There will be an
Independence Day Picnic from
3 to 5 p.m. Sunday.
The cost is $7. The Tiki Bar
will open at 1 p.m.
The Annual Pig Roast will be
from 3.to 5 p.m. Sunday, July
17, at the cost of $10.
The fish fry will be from 5 to 7
p.m. Wednesday, July 20.
Friday evening dinners will be
from 5:30 to 8 p.m., with live
music from 7:30. July 8 is the
usual Friday prime rib dinner.
VFW to serve
chicken Monday
The H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills will host a
chicken dinner Monday. This is
a change from a previous
announcement.
The post will serve baked or
barbecued chicken, potato salad
and baked beans from 1 to 3
p.m. for $6.50 per person.
Tickets are available at the
canteen or at Friday night din-
ners.
Takeout is available. There
will also be desserts, including
cake and watermelon for sale.
Entertainment will be provid-
ed.
Also, there will be a "Closest
to the Pin" contest conducted
from noon to 2 p.m.by Kenny
McCabe.
For more information, call the
post at 746-0440.
The post is at 2170 W. Vet
Lane on County Road 491
behind the AmSouth Bank and
across from Haywire's.
Applebee's to offer
child ID program
To aid parents in obtaining
valuable, up-to-date information
to give authorities in case their
child is ever missing or kid-
napped, the Applebee's at 200
N. Suncoast Blvd. in Crystal
River will host a Child
Identification Program from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 16.
The Citrus County Sheriffs
Office will photograph, finger-
print and collect DNA samples
of participating children to be
distributed to parents for safe-
keeping.


Pet.. :- : T

Go ahead


Oregon's Cascade Mountains and Crater Lake area


Lahonna Bridges of
Lecanto visits her son,
Carver, in, Eugene, Ore.,
and ventures to the Oregon
Mountains. In September
2004, she packed up her
hiking boots, poncho and
day pack and headed to
Oregon to spend time with
Carver. No TV, radio, traffic
or crowds just fresh air,
huge trees, rustic trails
,.and the sound of falling
water. Crater Lake, in
t southern Oregon is more of
Al, a tourist stop than the
other sites, but worth the
17,trip. Created thousands of
..-years ago after a volcanic
eruption, Crater Lake is not
fed by any rivers or
streams, but rain and
snowfall causes the lake to
retain its constant level.
A The lake is 2,000 feet in
depth and the mountain
walls surrounding it are
1,000 feet high. It retains
this incredible blue color
because of its great depth.
You can appreciate its
beauty by car or various
hiking trails along the rim.
Submitted to the Chronicle









.4








'Sunday Chronicle.
D R EPA M At the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo duritig the
................. year and that photographer
will win a prize.
The Chronicle and The Please avoid photos with
Accent Travel Group are computerized dates on the
sponsoring a photo contest print.
for readers of the newspa- Please make sure photo-
per. graphs are in sharp focus.
Readers are invited to Photos should be sent to
send a photograph from the Chronicle at 1624 N.
their Dream Vacation with a Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
brief description of the trip. River, FL 34429 or dropped
If it'$ selected as a winner, off at any Chronicle office or
it will be published in the any Accent Travel office.

Special to the Chronicle
: Just off the road, Ms. Bridges found Clearwater Falls. This photo was taken while crossing the river; not on a bridge, but by picking her way from one
rock to another. She picked this particular location for its closeness to Eugene and gently its sloping path.


Area reunions set


.~~ ~ ~~~~~~~~ 7.** ./:./^.-^ ^ ^ fi ^ ^ ^


J|lt. ,, 2005








CITRUS CoUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


10A SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


-: --:---. :--.. Veterans NOT


New officers of H.F. Nesbitt
VFW Post 10087 are Commander
Elmo Walter; senior vice: Eugene
Perrino; junior vice Lee Ball; adju-
tant/quartermaster Jeff Simpson;
assistant quartermaster George
Blakey; post advocate Jim Freiheit;
chaplain Robert Bruce; surgeon Ed
Wicker; officer of the day John
Frank; first-year-trustee Louis
Kabat; second-year trustee Dick
McAllister; third-year trustee John
Bleier. House committee: Neil
McKernan, chairman; Irish O'Brien;
Gerald Brousseau and Elmo
Walter.
New officers for the H.F. Nesbitt
Post 10087 Men's Auxiliary are:
President Greg Bucko; senior vice
Richard Briglia; junior vice John
Meyers Jr.; chaplain Stan Scally;
* secretary/treasurer Larry Hanner;
and trustees: George Harris and
Ray Galinski.
The H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills will host a
chicken dinner Monday. Call the
post at 746-0440. The post is at
2170 W. Vet Lane on County Road
491 behind the AmSouth Bank and
across from Haywire's.
Post 10087 has bingo at 1 p.m.
Sunday in the main hall.
There is lounge bingo at 2 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post 10087
Ladies Auxiliary will host an all-
you-can-eat spaghetti dinner from
4 to 7 p.m. Friday, July 22, for $4.
Tickets in advance. Deadline on
tickets is July 17. Call 746-0440.
Rolling Thunder Chapter 7 will
meet from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 9
at Post 10087. Veterans
Administration official will be the
guest speaker. Call Eugene
Piranio, vice president, at (352)
302-1037.
N The Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 in Hernando will serve a
barbecue ribs or ham dinner with
salad bar and dessert from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. Friday. Included is great
music for dancing and listening
pleasure by Katie Lynn from 6:30
to 10:30 p.m. Cost is $5.50 for your
night out, and you do not have to


be a post or VFW member.
The post has bar bingo at 2 p.m.
Sunday. The Ladies Auxiliary
hosts bingo games at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, and doors open at 9.
Hot food and snacks available. The
auxiliary also sponsors bar bingo at
2 p.m. Tuesday.
The post Ladies Auxiliary is
starting a Junior Girls Division for
girls 5 to 16 years old. Call Judy
Prive at 726-3339.
Singles Nights are at 6:30 p.m.
the first and third Thursdays
monthly. Music is provided by Katie
Lynn for a $2 donation.
Our post Web page is at
www.debbiefields.com, where you
will find a two-month schedule of
events. You can e-mail us at
usavets@naturecoast.net.
The Independence Day celebra-
tion will be Sunday. Covered dish-
es are requested. Tickets will be on
sale for $5, and only 200 will be
available. You must have a ticket.
The dart league meets and com-
petes at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.
The next post and Ladies
Auxiliary meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 14. Call Bob Prive,
commander, at 726-3339.
The VFW Post 7122, Floral
City, and the Ladies' and Men's
Auxiliaries announce the following
events.
Today: Fourth of July celebration
and memorial service. The post
opens at 1 p.m. Barbecue plates
will be offered for sale and music
will be karaoke by Jannie Faye.
The Ladies Auxiliary will have raf-
fles for forthcoming programs.
Call the post at 637-0100 for eli-
gibility.
The Edward W. Penno Post
4864 of Citrus Springs will have its
general meeting at 7 p.m. on the
first Tuesday monthly; Ladies
Auxiliary will meet at 7 p.m. on the
second Tuesday; the Men's
Auxiliary will meet at 7:30 p.m. on
the third Monday; and the monthly
Staff meeting will be at 7 p.m. on
the third Tuesday.
We will be hosting .our annual
Independence Day Ceremony and


----------- School MENa' ,---------


CONGREGATE DINING
MENUS
Monday: Independence Day,
all sites closed.
Tuesday: Italian spaghetti
with meat sauce and parmesan
cheese, garlic spinach (HD:
squash medley with onions),
tossed salad with Italian dress-
ing, two slices whole wheat
bread with margarine, sugar
cookie and low-fat milk
Wednesday: Pork cutlet, gar-
lic mashed potatoes, mixed
vegetables, whole wheat bread
with margarine, chocolate
pudding and low-fat milk


Thursday: Chicken Caesar
salad, three bean salad, two
slices whole wheat bread with
margarine, mixed fruit cup
and low-fat milk
Friday: Chicken patty sand-
wich, creamy mashed potato,
broccoli, hamburger bun, may-
onnaise packet, oatmeal raisin
cookie and low-fat milk,
Congregate dining sites
include: East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness, and South
Dunnellon. For information,
call Support Services at 795-
6264.


Picnic on Monday, July 4; ceremo-
ny will start at 11 a.m. and this year
we will have hot roast beef sand-
wich super plate with all the trim-
mings. The Country Bluegrass
Band will be entertaining so bring
your lawn chairs.
Post 4864 will serve a pork roast
dinner on July 8, chicken fried
steak July 15, Italian sausage
sandwiches July 22 and fried
chicken July 29.


Dinners are served from 5 to 7
p.m. for $6 per person.
Entertainment will be provided by
the Country Bluegrass Band.
The post also serves a complete
breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m.
Saturday mornings for $4 per per-
son.
Don't forget the weekly activities:
Bingo at 1 p.m. every Tuesday;
shuffleboard at 7 p.m.
Wednesday; and dart tournament


In the MOiw --


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
Box Office 637-3377
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. Digital. No passes or
super savers.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) Noon,
2:25 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
9:55 p.m. No passes or super
savers.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G)
12:10 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 10
p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13)
12:40 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Madagascar" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:15
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Rebound" (PG) 12:10 p.m.,
2:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,


9:50 p.m.
"War of the Worlds" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:45
p.m., 10:15 p.m. Digital. No passes
or super savers.
"Bewitched" (PG-13) Noon,
2:20 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10
p.m. Digital. No passes or super
savers.
"Herbie: Fully Loaded" (G)
12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Batman Begins" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (PG-13)
12:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. Digital.
"The Longest Yard" (PG-13)
12:25 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Star Wars: Episode II" (PG-
13) 12:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:05
p.m., 10:10 p.m.


1'r


t. nneth hares



GELIN next to Smart Interiors
"The Tension Collection" 527-2s s6 -
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SWAPEMA O 2AuHeICOeNnLOW
ASTUTETE ASE 0 BL NACRE
THOSE ERRE NARD GREED
7-3 @ 2005 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


Post 10087

v .. .







3 .


Special to the Chronicle
From left are: New president Juanita Faunce giving Bettie
Ringwood, past president, her past-president pin at the
first meeting of the new year of the VFW Post 10087
Ladies Auxiliary. Other officers for the year 2005-06
include Trudy Willard; senior vice president; Ariene
McAllister, junior vice president; Mary Benfer, treasurer;
Donna Garvey, secretary; Sharon O'Brien, conductress;
Betty McAllister, guard; Brenda Foor, chaplain; Avis
Conley, first-year trustee; Esther Burney, second-year
trustee; and Mary Richter, third-year trustee.


Thursday at 7 p.m.
The Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 of Inverness
invites all veterans of Inverness
and Lecanto to join them. Meetings
are at 7:30 p.m. the first Thursday
monthly at the Key Training Center
,building, 130 Heights Ave.,
Inverness. The executive board
meets the third Thursday monthly.
Call the commander at 341-0971.
Navy Seabee Veterans of
America Island X-18 Citrus
County will meet at 11:15 a.m.
July 9 for its regular monthly meet-
ing at Ray's Bar-B-Q Restaurant
on U.S. 19 in Crystal River. All
Seabees and Honeybees are wel-
come to attend the meeting. Call
Commander George Staples, 628-
6927.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW.
Post 8698, 520 Highway 40 East,
Inglis (one mile east of U.S. 19).
Men and LAVFW meet at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly at
the Post. Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday month-
ly. Call Skeeter Fizz, (352) 447-
3495.
The Marine Corps League
Samuel R. Wall Detachment 1139
conducts its regular meeting at
7:30 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 7122 in
Floral City. Call Tom Heron, com-
mandant, at 637-2724, Bob Hines,
senior vice commandant, at 746-
6908 or Frank White at 302-0558.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Marine Corps League meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday
,monthly at the VFW 7122 in Floral
City.
The Military Order of Devil
Dogs Meeting: contact Chris at
795-7000.
The Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 is now
getting settled in its new meeting


I.








In the July 7th issue of The Citrus County
Chronicle you'll find great money-saving coupons
from these area businesses:

Al's TV Anternna & Satellite
Amerigas
Angus Meats
Best Buy Water.com
Bill Brown Air Conditioning Service
Bray's Pest Control
Bush Carpet Cleaning
Carolina Georgia Carpet & Interiors
Chilson's Garage
Cino's Car Care & Taxi Service
Consumer Car Care
Crystal Chevrolet
Crystal River Amoco
Dairy Queen
Eagle Buick GMC Truck, Inc.
Furniture Depot
Gulf Coast Ford
Horizon Cleaning Service
Joe's Carpet
Jazzercise
Kimberly's Ice Cream
Lakeshore Satellite
Michaels Floor Covering
NetSignia On Line
Powell Square Auto Repair
Remax Realty One / Barbara Mills
Roy Brown Lincoln Mercury
Satellite Man
Thea's Skin Care
I *Tires Plus I
Village Cadillac Toyota


Find it in the !







Inside the
C I T U **,C 0
caropNIcLer


hall at the VFW in Beverly Hills
located behind the AmSouth Bank
on County Road 491.
The meetings are at 7 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. All
Marines are invited to attend.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors of Citrus County meets at
2 p.m. on the fourth Thursday
monthly at Ray's Bar-B-Q in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at 621-
0617.
Yankee Air Force Inc. is
proud to have a "Commemorative
End of World War II" dance also in
conjunction with VJ Day, on Aug. 6
at American Legion Post 58 on
U.S. 41 next to Carolina Dental
Clinic in Dunnellon. There will be
live big band music, hors d'oeu-
vres, cash bar, social hour from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Live music from
7:30 to 11 p.m. Wear your uniform
proudly if you still have it.
Tickets are $15 per person or
$25 a couple. Make checks
payable to Yankee Air Force, Fla.
Div., and mail with a SASE to P.O.
Box 773364, Ocala, 34477.
Deadline for tickets is Aug. 1.
Proceeds to support Yankee Air
Force Museum. Call Carolyn at
(352) 489-3120 or the airport at
(352) 465-0727.
All LST Veterans and wives
are invited to monthly breakfast.
meetings at 9 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the Golden
Corral Restaurant in Brooksville.
Call (352) 799-1957.
Phone Cards for the Armed
Forces Help our U.S. soldiers
phone home. Simply purchase a
first-class phone card and deposit
it in the special box at the Lecanto
post office. The U.S. Postal
Service, in conjunction with the
U.S. Armed Forces, will make sure
that our men and women in Iraq
receive these cards as a gift.


The
Community Learning Center
Cordially invites you to our1st AnnualBeneftit

Some Enclhanted EveningJ

Saturday, July 9,2005
6 p.m. -9 p.m. ,
at te Bverly Hills Recreation Building

> qDinner, Dance, Show and Sitent Auction
a Semi-Formal'Event
Catered by: ferrara's


PaufStevio-Broadway Song Sty (
Angela 'Vick-Singer/Pelforner"
Tania Henry-S t

To purchase tick tact
Diane Alexander or .licida'.z t, A ..t
35 -56c0-eO
ByoB sodas and ice wilfie pfovided


__


Iqq*&,j p








SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 11A


Anniversaries =- Wedding ==- Engagement


The Runyons


Sanderson-Lambert


Staton-Johnson


Charles and Shirley
(Stewart) Runyon will cele-
brate their 50th wedding
anniversary on July 16.
Charles and Shirley Runyon
were married on July 16, 1955,
by the Rev. Henry Leeth in
Washington Court House, Ohio.
They are the parents of six
children, Glenn Runyon of
Oviedo, Mike (Debbie), Steve
(Marla), Larry (Cathy), Randy
(Kim) Runyon, all of Marion,
Ohio, and Gail (Raymond)
McClurg of Greenup, Ky. They
have 16 grandchildren, 19
great-grandchildren and four
step grandchildren.
Charles and Shirley are
retired from Pavement


William L. and Judy
Jorgensen Pickett will cele-
brate their 50th wedding
anniversary July 30 during a
reception hosted by their chil-
dren in the clubhouse at
Crystal River Village.
They were married Aug. 4,
1955, in St. Ansgar Catholic
Church in Copenhagen,
Denmark, while Mr. Pickett
was serving with the U.S. Army
in Germany.


Specialist Inc. Charles was
superintendent for 41 years.
Shirley was a truck driver for
28 years.


They moved here in 1995
from Indianapolis where Bill
was a sports writer and golf
and hockey columnist for the
Indianapolis Star for 23 years.
Judy managed the Star-News
employee recreation area dur-
ing that time.
They have four children liv-
ing around the country: Carole
Frank in Windsor, Colo.;
William J. in Loxley, Ala.; Patti
Robinson in Phoenix, Ariz.;
and Bobbi Burford in
Indianapolis, Ind.; 11 grand-
children and three great-
grandchildren.


Dennis and Pat Damato of
Crystal River celebrated their
30th wedding anniversary on
June 22.



SO YOU KNOW
SFind more Together
items on Page 12A


Stephen Alfred Lambert and
Jessica Enid Sanderson were
united in marriage on
Saturday, March 26, 2005, on
the Starlite Majesty Dinner
Yacht, Clearwater Beach.
Captain Kurt Gustafson per-
formed the service.
The bride is the daughter of
Warren and Mary Jo
Sanderson of Cherry Creek,
N.Y, and Patricia and Keith
Rager of Fredonia, N.Y.
The groom is the son of
Kathleen Lambert and Gary
Dunn of Citrus Springs.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father, Warren
Sanderson.
The bride wore a white satin
strapless gown with beaded
crystal bodice and inset of
asymmetrical drape skirt. She
carried a bouquet of wrapped
fresh red- 'and blue-tipped
white roses and blue baby's
breath.
Matron of honor was Terra
Beck of Charlotte, N.C., and
best man was Gary Dunn,
groom's stepfather, of Citrus
Springs.
The matron of honor's dress
was an apple red satin strap-
less ballgown with side ruch-
ing and embroidery. Her bou-
quet consisted of wrapped
fresh red and white roses and
white baby's breath.
The wedding reception


First I.-- yN fs


Jillian Anne Wyman cele-
brated her first birthday on
June 17. Jillian is the daughter
of James and Jonica Wyman of
Floral City. Maternal grand-
parents are Jack and JoAnn
LaBelle of Homosassa.
Paternal grandmother is Gail
Wyman of Floral City.


immediately followed the cere-
mony aboard the Starlite
Majesty Dinner Yacht
Guests traveled from New
York, Illinois, Wisconsin,
Virginia and North Carolina.
The bride is a graduate of
Appalachian State University,
Boone, N.C. She is communica-
tion resources director for
Citrus County Board of County
Commissioners.
The groom is a graduate of
Central Florida Community
College and is a registered rep-
resentative for AIG American
General.
The couple went on an 11-
day Royal Caribbean Cruise to
the Eastern Caribbean.
They will live in Beverly
Hills.

FORMS AVAILABLE
The Chronicle has
Together forms available.
Call Linda Johnson at
563-5660 for copies.








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Dr. R. Keeth and Mrs. Lauri
Staton of Citrus Springs
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Lyndsay Lee
Marie Staton, to Justin Luke
Johnson, son of Mr. Ray and
Mrs. Sandra Johnson of Citrus
Springs.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Covenant Christian
Academy, received an associ-
ate of arts degree from CFCC
and is a student at St. Leo
University, pursuing a bache-
lors in elementary education.
The future bridegroom is a
Lecanto High School graduate
serving in the U.S. Coast
Guard.
The wedding is set for Aug.
13 at Springs Presbyterian
Church.


FirstB


Emma Nicole Culbertson
celebrated her first birthday
on June 11. Emma is the
daughter of Chris and Brandi
Culbertson of Inverness.
Maternal grandparents are
John and Sharon Eichhorn of
Hernando. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Lynne Culbertson of
Minto, Alaska, and Dan and
Lanie Culbertson of
Florissant, Mo.


&*NW3MAG L-E
aI


BOADCRTIFIED HYICANSL







RSS
W ke 726-7667n. 726.6780
Exoito, Cemca .Pel, ot


Retyi an Masp Terp. ..?4yg 24


New


Congratulations to the fol-
lowing new parents:
To Tim and Kristi
McMahon, Inverness, a daugh-
ter, Erin Brinlee McMahon,
born at 12:53 p.m. Wednesday,
May 11, 2005, at Spring Hill
Regional Hospital in Spring
Hill. She weighed 6 pounds, 3
ounces.
Big sister is Hailey Jade
McMahon, age 4. Maternal
grandparents are Bill and
Kory Smith of Inverness.
Paternal grandparents are Jim
and Arlene McMahon of Long
Island, N.Y.
To Brian and Tabiatha
Martin, a son, Kyle Austin
Martin, born at 8:16 a.m.
Monday, June 20, 2005. He
weighed 8 pounds, 31/2 ounces,
and was 21 inches long.

SHARE YOUR
THOUGHTS
Follow the -in truc.tionr. ron
today's Opinion page to
send a letter to the edi-
tor.


C. A. Toumbis MD, PhD
Fellowship Trained In Spine
* Minimally Invasive Surgery
* Artificial Disc Replacement
* Laser Disc Surgery
* Cervical & Lumbar Spine


Dan Gardner M.S.
E aai n nei lM- bi^m iudiologiv
Free Consultatilon tars xperienc
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness, FL 352-795-5700
700 SE 5th Ter., Crystal River, FL 3 7
www.gardneraudiology.comrn


Notice of Public Workshop
The Florida Governmental Utility Authority (FGUA) announces a Public
Information Workshop for all interested persons. The public workshop
will be held at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 6, 2005 In Building A at
the Citrus Springs Community Center, 1570 West Citrus Springs Blvd,
Citrus Springs FL 34434. This is a workshop to disseminate information
and answer questions regarding the proposed water line extension capital
assessment program for the Citrus Springs and Pine Ridge areas.
The FGUA is a legal entity and public body created pursuant to the
provisions of Section 163.01, Florida Statutes, and an Interlocal
Agreement among Citrus.County, Florida, Osceola County, Florida and
Polk County, Florida.


ORTHOPAEDIC


Now SEEING NECK AND BACK PATIENTS

Dr. Andrew J. Petrella is pleased to
announce that C. A. Toumbis, MD, PhD
is joining him. Dr. Toumbis has recently
relocated from the Cleveland Clinic
Hospital and received his orthopaedic
training at Shands Hospital. He is
currently accepting, new patients.


Andrew J. Petrella MD
Board Certified
* Joint Replacement
* Sports Medicine
* Pediatric Orthopaedics
* Fracture Care
* Hand Surgery


Call the friendly office staff at 352-563-9959 for an appointment or
visit www.citrusortho.net for more information 582 S.E. 7th Ave


_EARNING E7OR HEALTH


FREE JULY PROGRAMS

FOR HEALTHIER LIVING
All Programs Are Free. Reservations Are Required.
Make Yours Today At 344-6513.


MEMORY TRAINING
Five Fridays, Starting July 1 CMH Auditorium
Robin West and Dana Bagwell from the University of Florida will
again be offering a five-week comprehensive memory-training
course. The classes are designed for healthy seniors, 55-75. There
is a $30 charge for the course, and only 60 people will be able to
participate. If you are interested, call 1-866-517-9795, ext. 300 to
register.
BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING
Friday, July 1, 10:00 11:00 AM CMH Auditorium
Make your attendance at this screening a monthly habit to help
keep your blood pressure in check! Call 344-6513 for a reservation.
THE NEW MEDICARE PART D:
WHAT WE KNOW SO FAR
Tuesday, July 12, 10:00 AM CMH Auditorium
"Part D" will be the new prescription benefit that will be available
for Medicare recipients starting January 1, 2006. Particularly if your
annual income is no more than $14,355 (single) or $19,245 (couple),
it will benefit you to attend this program and get the information
you need to sign up for this benefit. Our presenter will be Harvey
Roberts from SHINE. Call 344-6513 for a reservation.
MAKING THOSE SPIDER VEINS VANISH
Wednesday, July 13, 1:30PM CMH Auditorium
Spider veins are small, purple and blue swollen blood vessels that
twist and turn. Spider veins are easily visible and are found just
under the skin, most often on the legs. At this program, Catherine
Holder, RN, from Genesis Women's Center, will describe a laser
treatment for spider veins that could make your legs both look and
feel better. Call 344-6513 for a reservation.
BEHIND THE SCENES IN THE CMH LAB
Wednesday, July 20, 10:00 AM CMH Auditorium
Ever wonder what happens after you have a blood test? And besides
analysis of blood samples, what else happens in a hospital lab?
Join us as CMH Lab manager Donna DeSimone describes the role a
laboratory plays in your overall healthcare. After her talk, we will
take participants on a "behind-the-scenes" tour of the CMH lab. Call
344-6513 for a reservation.
MANAGING YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
Thursday, July 21, 1:30 PM CMH Auditorium
So many of us suffer from hypertension (or high blood pressure),
and it can lead to heart disease and other medical problems. Join
us as board-certified Internal Medicine specialist, V. Reddy, MD, of
CMH, discusses hypertension and how it can be managed in our
daily lives. Call 344-6513 for a reservation.
LANDSCAPING
Wednesday, July 27, 10:00 AM CMH Auditorium
Join us to hear Chet Olshewsky, Master Gardener from the Citrus
County Extension Office, give expert advice on "Controlling Pests
in Your Lawn and Garden." Call 344-6513 for a reservation.

CITRUS
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
502 WEST HIGHLAND BLVD. INVERNESS, FL 34452


The Picketts


The Damatos


In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing special accommodations or an
interpreter to participate in this meeting should call
866-347-1897 at least three business days prior to
the meeting date. If you have any questions, please
call 866-347-1897.


SUPPORT GROUPS
CARDIAC SUPPORT
\\ ill not meet until further notice
Contact: 3-t.6538.
CHILDBIRTH CLASSESi
A four-week Loirc- that -Tic.ets'
every Wednesday evening from
I (.) 00 to ) 0i PM Regiqtration
required Contact: 3-.-i656.
CITRUS CANCER SUPPORT
I Inrd lueJda .t -11 31 PM in tlie
CMIH (tatcr.n, Mleeting Room min
tEle main h pli.pi.l
Contact: Carol at 726-1551,
ext. 6596 or 3329.
DIABETES SUPPORT
Does not mnit in lul' and .\uguit
Contact: Carol McHugh
at 344-6504.
flBROMYALGIA SUPPORT
Sct'ond 5.iturda.an nd fourth Frid.iy
S1-JO PM I' in tlit (- prc,- R ooi
Contact:June Rogers at "--6.6122.
GRIEF SUPPORT'
Third NMonda) n 3:00 PM in the
Lake Room.
Contact: Dee Peters at 634-0608..
MAKE-A-WISH FOUNDATION
Contact: Dr. Frank Vascimnini
at 621-5437.
OSTOMY SUPPORT
Third Sunday at 2:00 PM in the
Cypress Room.
Contact: Bob at 746-6693, Ginny
at 795-0636 or Frank at 341-0005.
PAIN MANAGEMENT
Does not meet in July and August.
Contact: Dr. Ruben's office
at 746-1358.
PARKINSON'S SUPPORT
First Tuesday at 1:00 PM in the
Cypress Room.
Contact: Catherine Clark
at 344-9630.
PROSTATE: ACS MAN-TO-MAN
PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT
AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
First Wednesday at 11:30 AM at the
Robert Boissoneault Cancer Center
at the Allen Ridge Medical Mall,
522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Contact: 527-0106.
RESPIRATORY SUPPORT
Will not meet until further notice.


TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNvI'" (FL) CIIIONICI.!-


uo
f '9"'.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL,) CIIRONICLE,


12A SUNDAY, JuIx 3, 2005


S. .----------=. Weddings


Krings-Bechtel


Johns-Rainwater


William Patrick Dunn and
Laura Marie Wescott of
Beverly Hills were united in
marriage at 4 p.m. Saturday,
May 28, 2005, at The Wedding
Chapel in Heatherwood
Estates, Inverness. Chaplain
Sal Viglione performed the
Christian service.
The bride is the daughter of
Charles and Sandra Gates of
Hernando.
Maid of honor was Crystal
Ramadan and best man was
William Sciocchetti.
The flower girl was Sarah
Gates and the ring bearers
were Anthony Wescott and
Cameron Dunn.


Phillip Robert Bechtel and
Dawn Kelley Krings were unit-
ed in marriage at 2 p.m. on
Saturday, June 18, 2005, at
Shell Island in the Gulf of
Mexico. Notary Sandy Hagen
performed the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Carl and Sue Mortensen of
Crystal River. The groom is the
son of Marie Bechtel Demastus
and stepson of Jason
Demastus, also of Crystal
River.
Maid of honor was Jennifer
Harrison. Groomsmen were
Michael Langlois and Anthony
Quinones. Ring bearer was
Trevor Bechtel, son of the
groom.
The newlyweds took a short
trip to Blizzard Beach in


Orlando. They will reside in
Homosassa.


-- --- --First BIRTH DAY S


Madison Doreen
Lampasona of Citrus Springs
celebrated her first birthday
on May 19. Madison is the baby
sister of Brendan, daughter of
Ryan and Maggie and grand-
daughter of Bob and Pat
Lampasona of Pine Ridge. Fun
was had by all.


Jack Michael Lampasona of
Wauwatosa, Wis., celebrated
his first birthday on June 11.
Jack is the son of Anthony and
Kristin Lampasona and grand-
son of Bob and Pat Lampasona
of Beverly Hills. Lots of fun
was had by all.


James Rainwater and Ashley
Johns were united in marriage
in a double ring afternoon cer-
emony on Saturday, June 25,
2005, at Rock Crusher Canyon
in Crystal River. Jim and Robin
Falkenburg of Crystal River
officiated the ceremony The
bride was given away by her
father, Steve Johns.
The bride is the daughter of
DeAnna Johns of Crystal River
and Steve and Beth Johns of
Crystal River. She chose
Johnna Hall as her maid of
honor. Her bridesmaids were
Jamie Ellsworth, Jeannine
Clutter, Monna Morris and
Christy Johns. Flower girl was
Jordan Paradowski.
The groom is the son of
Lonnell Rice Sr. and Cora Rice
of Union, S.C. He chose Tavris
Orr as his best man. His
groomsmen were Lonnell Rice
Jr., Westley Rice, Brandon
Rainwater and Shon Kershaw.
Ring bearer was Zack
Kershaw.
A reception immediately fol-
lowed for family and friends at
Rock Crusher Canyon, catered
by Black Diamond Country
Club.
After a honeymoon trip to
Disney World, the newlywed
couple will reside in Beverly
Hills.


SO YOU KNOW
* Find more Together
items on Page 1 1A.


IRUSC 0ITU S_ C UNT S

CHR~cLE


' "' ,. Great hair sparks cc
7v- J


FANTASTIC COLOR
I

I HIGHLIGHTING
S... 459 I
I_^--_,a' --


I2 I
I; .I:':' Sr95" I
C 1... U|L I OlAg L[ k %








nfidence FRSBOTANICA
I STUDENT CUT



PERM/BODY WAVE
Iv /0 S3 95'"
Value'3 404
Exp 7/31/05- -


DAILY SPECIALS 3 P.M.-8 P.M.
SR. DISCOUNT Mon.-Fri. 8 A.M.- 2 P.M.
MONDAY Ladies' Night 1 095
TUESDAY Men's Night $ 1 O95
WEDNESDAY Kids' Night $595"
Includes Shampoo, Rinse, Light Dry


COUPONS INVERNESS
VALID AT
THESE (Across from Bealls)
LOCATIONS Parkside Plaza
ONLY 637-7244
S- Mon.-Fri. 8-8 Sat. 9-6


Each salon is independently owned & operated. *Prices may vary w/length, thickness, condition of hair.
Curling iron or set extra. Cliper Cuts or Designer Lines Extra.

Art League Cultural Center


Art Center Theatre
PRESENTS

Rodgers & Hammerstein's


Oklahoma!
Music by
Richard Rodgers
Book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Directed by Patty Villegas
Show dates July 7 July 17
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Evening performances 7:30 p.m.
Sunday performances 2 p.m.
Box office is open 1- 4 p.m
Tuesday through Saturday.
Tickets are $15, Mastercard/Visa
accepted, reserved seating.
J4 S 4 2Call 352-746-7606
The Art Center Theatre is located at the
corner of Annnapolis and CR 486 in Citrus
Hills at 2644 Annapolis Ave., Hernando

G -.. .


COMMUNITY PHYSICIAN

LECTURE SERIES


Dr. R. Crane Couch
Board Certified
Orthopedic Surgery


"Hip and Knee

Arthritis"


Date:
Time:
Location:


July 12th
1:00 pm
Community Center
at West Marion Medical Plaza


Please RSVP for this FREE lecture by July 11th
291-6401

THE
JOINT CARE CENTER
WEST MARION COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
Ocala, FL


tEST
(352) 564-0124 M'-




B QUALITY


BLINDS

I AND SHUTTERS I
PVC VERTICALS
Includes deluxe track,
* valance, and installation ,


726-4457


SALE ON
2" Faux-Wood
with Free Crown Valance
Savings of over
40%


Please mention ad for specials


Ls Mn.-i.9 --.bAint

S Are You On Oxygen?
SAVE $ SAVE $ SAVE $ SAVE
COMMUNITY AND MEDICAL INC
Tired of your LOUD concentrator and HIGH
electric bill giving you a headache?


-


Community Oxygen & Medical, Inc.
2 Inverness
S 860-2111 or 866-925-8600


Wescott-Dunn


HOMOSASSA
Walmart Plaza
628-0630
Mon.-Fri. 8-8 Sat. 9-6


~-^U~~"~~~~~~,"*~Uuswucx~r~,~arnrmsam


M ladwl wvIM|


TOGETI-IER







SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 13A


CITRUS CouNiT (FL) CHRONICLE


LIFT luncheon leads



to talk about home


T '"ill wonders
VV and sur-
V prises L s
never cease? I hope
not, because the dis-
coveries are just as
amazing.
Last week, I
attended the LIFT
luncheon with my Anne
friend, Victoria MEI
Suhr. The conversa-
tion at the table OF A
turned to travel. COUN
Marie VanLand-
Schoot began extolling compli-
ments about that "lady that
writes a weekly travel column
in the Chronicle," when she
suddenly realized that the
"lady" was sitting across the
table from her. Gales of laugh-
ter followed. Andrea Roche
asked where I lived in
Pennsylvania, and following
my reply, gave a smug smile
stating she lived in Tamaqua -
about 8 miles from my home-
town. Janet Wood piped up that
she came from Lancaster,
about 40 miles from Lansford.
With cries of surprise, the table
sounded like "Old Home
Week."
Then Joe Longchamps arid
Phyllis Kaulback got into the
conversation, asking several
questions that led to a discus-
sion on Pennsylvania cuisine,
since Andrea mentioned


IrIusillo
MOIRS
TRAVEL
SELOR


"pierogi," "golump-
ki" and "halushky."
This intrigued the
entire group, so I
had to explain that
although the state
was famous for its
Pennsylvania
Dutch and Amish
cuisine, there was a
strong Eastern
European Slavic
ethnic cuisine
which was readily
adapted by every-
one.


"Pierogi" are similar to ravi-
oli, except there are a variety
of fillings such as prune butter,
cottage cheese, mashed pota-
toes with American cheese and
fried cabbage. "Golumpki" or
"Holubki" is a stuffed cabbage
dish; "Halushky" are
dumplings that are excellent
served with roasts; "Kolachky"
are small pastries that melt in
your mouth and then, of
course, there's the ever popu-
lar nut rolls and poppyseed
rolls.
However, what seemed to
particularly intrigue the others
was eating ice cream with pret-
zels a typical Eastern
Pennsylvania dessert. At the
restaurant when we first
arrived in Pennsylvannia,
Marianne noticed the ketchup
bottle on the table another


typical ingredient for soups,
meat, etc. No, not on ice cream.
Driving toward Allentown
we camecame across a candy cot-
tage, which held a very unique
item as pictured in this col-
umn. Yes, the clock is absolute-
ly all chocolate. It boggled our
minds, particularly when read-
ing the attached information
scroll.
They had so many unusual
candies in the store. I bought
some caramels, white choco-
late discs, and chocolate cov-
ered blueberries that were
yummy. I had hoped they
would be huckleberries (a rela-
tive of the blueberry), which
grow wild in the woods, but are
much sweeter than the blue-
berries. Well, you can't have
everything.
The bakery also had some
unusual items. I couldn't resist
purchasing a loaf of peach
bread, which was great served
as a dessert.
We also visited Vanity Fair
Outlet Mall in Reading, which
is absolutely huge. I think this
was the precursor of outlet
malls. The place was jammed,
people taking advantage of the
May 30 special sales. Quite a
number of tents were set up by
other vendors selling their
goods. Fortunately, or unfortu-
nately, we arrived just 45 min-
utes before closing time, so


Dock. .
It's A


T,"oot Tall



Chocolate Cloch


Features..
Pounds Of Premise Maid Choc(
ApproYiimately 800,000 Calorie
Swiss Chocolate Movement
:50 Candyrnan Hours To Comple.




MARIANNE BECKTEL/Special to the Chronicle
A full-scale grandfather's clock made of chocolate? We came across this unusual bit of sweets at
the Candy Store. The attached scroll on the clock contains some interesting information. However,
the "n" is missing perhaps taken by a chocoholicc" to satisfy his/her appetite? Nah it broke
and was never replaced.
purchases were minimal but it
was fun! Our final chapter is o L P.
coming to a close and it does
close with a real "winner" -
an unusual event. Have a great, Casino Sun Cuz Sterling Grand Show
Fort.-V U3!' Pinirve5 WIse Gulfport Palace
Fourth. MagiC Ji2a July 81- Inverness & Ocala Pick-up
Aug. tSinp e t1 en Pick-up Only July 14-& August 18 Coming in abre
o A, August
W9 r' s -. Call for
Anne Fusillo and her hus- o,,., na0. _. S details \so, ov
band, Frank, owned a travel Atlantic Beau Bramson Rivership ae Radio City
agency in Wheaton, Ill., City Rivge 14Meals,6Show iWe(n o July24 Rocketles
for 17 years. Questions or Oco14th Aug.ept 697 $58,,, epSplcilo8 ,, o.
comments? Give her a *429 S 9 ot.i ,ov. 1 Ju 12 $ ....
call at 564-9552.(- --- .


SUBMISSION
DEADLINES
Follow these guidelines to
help ensure timely publi-
cation of submitted
material. The earlier
Chronicle editors receive
i submissions, the better
chance of notes running
more than once
0 Community notes: At
least one week in
advance of the event.
S Veterans Notes: 4 p.m.
r Wednesday for public
tion Sunday.
u Together page: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for public
S. tion Sunday.
S N Business Digest: 4 p.m.
:1 Wednesday for public
tion Sunday.
Chalk Talk: 4 p.m.
S Monday for publication
S Wednesday.
0 Health Notes: 4 p.m.
Friday for publication
Tuesday
M Religious events : 4 p.m.
Tuesday for publication
Saturday
S Real Estate Digest: 4
p.m. Thursday for publi-
cation Sunday.
S Photos and stories are
published as space is
available. The Chronicle
cannot guarantee place.
ment on color pages.
E Submit material at
offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at
563 3280; or news
desk@chronicleonline.co
Bim.













g 4 Nights For The
Price Of 3!
Sail on the 70,000 ton
Fantasy October 9'th
` S 296 per guest/dbi
JUST CWIL5E
r Travel
Hwy. 44, Inverness
726-2889 or (800) 306-7477




SKnights OfColumbus Fundraiser
S7 Night Caribbean Cruise
Ka Carnival Miracle
S' Sept 18'-25". 2005
5679 pp
4 Moiorioach Includedl
J ST CRIL
,< | ci Travel
Fiv H v. \. -44. In erne s-,
g 1 ": :* 2 ,',[ ',l'" i :" "
; C* *1 |u .. .... i ,n.lr ,,,- ,.,.,r.


A BETTER & SAFER RETIREMENT

-- THROUGH PLANNING & EDUCATION...


"u SEMINAR TOPICS INCLUDE:

Pensions-IRA and 401k Transfers *Wills


* Retirement Investment Options

* Durable Power of Attorney

* Trusts


IAk '


*Living Wills

* Health Care

SQ0 & A Session


Hosted by:
Francois Cousinet President of
American Insurance Advisors & Attorney Steven Bowman
Hosts of radio program "Planning for a better & safer
retirement" on WRZN 720AM now airing its 13th year,
each Saturday at 9:00am


CALL 746-3332 FOR RESERVATIONS


[JAT G jJr~AWy~Aj


7 nights on the Carnival Glory
Departing December 10, 2005
includes cruise, port and government
charges
W Per Person
Eastern Caribbean Cruise
BECKY'S TRAVEL STORE
Call for ocean view prices.
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465
352-527-8855
e-mail: beckystravelstore@earthlink.net
website: wwwbeckystravelstore.4mydeals.comrn



Nature Coast Maryland Club
Sponsored (Cruise
7-rnighh on the Cosia
Mediterranea to the Eaterr,
Caribbean
February) 5,.2006)
$100.00 early booking
discount on O\ and Verandas
if deposited before July 15
Call 352-746-1207
for irilrmniion jnd re-er.ii.'ris,


CITRUS UNITED BASKET
FUNDRAISER CRUISE
10/29/05 11/03/05
Sail from Tampa Bay on board
Carnival's Inspiration to the ports
of Cozumel and the Grand
Cayman Islands
Interior Cabins $483.35 per person*
Ocean View Cabins
$553.35 per person*
For more information and reservations
please contact
CITRUS UNITED BASKET
NOLA GRAVIUS
(352) 344-2242


HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
WILDLIFE PARK
Summer programs for
children in the third -
fifth grade -
Wildlife funshops
5 half days
Call Eileen
(352) 382-5300


CRYSTAL RIVER
ARCHAEOLOGICAL
STATE PARK
61 acres of
Native American
burial mounds.
Open 365 days.
(352) 795-3817




HISTORIC
ST. FRANCIS INN
B&B Located in the
oldest part of the city
Guests receive FREE
admission to lighthouse
1-(800) 824-6062
www.sffrancisinn.com


Capt. Mike's
Lazy River
Cruises
River Cruises
Withiacoochee River
*Rainbow Springs River

For Reservations 352-637-2726
rs.


._..- _'J LJ ,' 2. :.t./. ...

52 Weeks $1625

26 Weeks $1750
6 Weeks $2000
Open Rate $35
To place your ads,
call us today (352) 563-3231.
Publication every Sunday In the Citrus
County Chronicle and all week on
www.chronicleonline.com


Join Our Seminar
Thursday, July 7, 9:30am
Andre's of Citrus Hills
Lunch Served Following Seminar


K.


I I I


I


-A


"'. "


TRAVEL


- f








CIIrnsI COUNTY (FL) CoIIuONI:.


ho was the fool that invented the weed
wacker? What kind of sick, twisted
mind does it take to think up a labor-
causing device? Would anyone really trim
around their trees and garages if they had to
do it by hand? Most people would let
it slide. And face it, if you've got a
rusted-out, '83 Ford up on blocks on ,.
your front lawn, will weed wacking
around it make that much of a differ-
ence? So let me just say three words
to all you young inventors out there
- laborsaving devices got it?
I'm against this mania for wacking
weeds. What have they ever done to
me? They're easy to grow and they 1
don't need fertilizer. Who wouldn't
want something like that? My wife, -
Sue, for one. Most of my neat-freak
neighbors for two. As if I have noth-
ing better to do than go around making sure
there are no tall weeds around my trees. Can
they get together and figure out a way to waste
even more of my time?
What's the guy who invented the weed wack-
er working on now? A tree trunk vacuum? A
sidewalk steamer? A grass buffer? "Sick of
tired-looking, dull grass? With the Grass Buffer
you can polish your grass to an unearthly shine
that will be the envy of your neighbors. Do you
love the feel of slow, noisy, unreliable lawn
equipment? The Grass Buffer's for you! Feel
superior, get one today!"
Of course, as anyone with a string trimmer
knows, you spend precious little of your weed
wacking time wacking weeds. You spend most
of it trying to get more string to come out of the
string trimmer. "Gently tap the string spool
head on a hard surface to feed out more string
automatically," say the instructions that came
with my model. Those instructions were boiled
down from the original, which said: "Turn
string trimmer upside down, causing it to spill
a smelly mixture of oil and gas all over your
driveway. Locate the mass of weeds and plastic
string that is jamming the spool at the bottom
of the string trimmer. Try to loosen the giant,
twisted knot of hot plastic with your fingers.


After tearing off a few fingernails, stomp into
the house and get a pair of gloves. That won't
work either, so after about 15 minutes with no
progress, set down the string trimmer spilling
more gas and oil on the porch you just pres-
sure-washed. Stomp back inside and
find a pair of pliers. Try to loosen
the obstruction with them.
"Did we mention they should be
needle-nose pliers? Go back in the
house and get needle-nose pliers,
idiot. When those fail to do the job,
4 remove the outer spool covering and
j rewind 40 feet of green plastic string.
Try it a few times. Not like that, like
this. You've got it absolutely back-
ward. Yes, it's very frustrating, but
should you be saying things like that
where everyone can hear you?
"Wipe the sweat off your forehead
leaving a nasty, greasy streak on your face.
After winding the string around the base for
the fifth time, replace the spool cap by holding
the cap in your right hand the string in your
left hand while holding the string trimmer
steady with your third hand.
"Refill the string trimmer with a new mix-
ture of gas and oil. You will know when it is
full when the mixture bubbles out of the string
trimmer and onto your new flagstone patio.
Throw some kitty litter on that and clean it up
when you finish string trimming. It will never
get out the stain, but at least no one will slip on
it.
"Did we tell you to replace that screw that
holds on the spool cap? OK, repeat steps 1
through 13 and replace the spool cap screw,
No. 14. No, we don't know what you did with it.
Maybe it's over there by the electric leaf blow-
er you never use because it only has a two-foot
long power cord. We invented that, too. Pretty
nifty, huh?"
It's time for a break. If I could only find that
electric Martini shaker.


Jim Mullen is author of "Baby's First Tattoo."
Reach him atjim_mullen@myway.com.


Today S ....


Your Birthday: In the year ahead, you will make
several important and advantageous changes in your
basic lifestyle.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Try to keep every-
thing in perspective, because if you hone in on one
negative thought, it could usurp the good going on.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) When socializing with
friends, don't let one ugly statement made by some-
one spoil your day. Remain upbeat.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Everything you plan
today should go well for you but, of course, it never
pays to take anything for granted.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Luck will be with you
today in most all of your involvements, but this does
not mean you should push it to the limits.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You'll get a lot of
mileage today out of the funds you spend for things
that will be of benefit to your family as long as you
don't get reckless and blow some of your dollars on a
gamble.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Your initial
assessment of matters will be surprisingly accurate
today. The only time you can get yourself in trouble
and off-track,is when you begin to doubt yourself.


JOHN' S SHOE REPAIR
Your
"Cobbler on The Square"

25 Years
Complete Quality
Service


205 Courthouse Square John & Unda Millard
Old Inverness,FL 34450 (352) 341-3002 j

I , .- ~ i>*


Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Tasks and projects
you take a personal hand in managing should work
out quite well for you.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't allow yourself
to be jockeyed into a position today where you believe
you have to be supportive of a new acquaintance
instead of standing up for an old friend. Be loyal.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Focus your attention
on situations that can prove entertaining for you and
those you are with. Don't dilute your fun by letting
your mind wander onto tomorrow's problems.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your judgment may
be far better than you give yourself credit for, but
request additional time to study things.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Financial conditions
can always be slightly tricky, especially if there are
large sums involved, so be careful if you have a
money matter in the works today. If you go slow, all -
will work out well.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There's always the
possibility that someone on whom you're depending
may let you down today, but don't judge everybody
else by that person's behavior. Most who promise
won't renege.


C Patriotic Evening 2005



The City of Inverness invites the
public to attend the July 3rd
Patriotic Evening. The event will take
place at Liberty Park and Wallace
', Brooks Park on beautiful Lake
Henderson in downtown Inverness.
The evening of fun begins at 5 p.m.
with entertainment provided by TMC
Productions, children's rides, local
non-profit food booths and displays.
We will celebrate our independence
, with a breathtaking fireworks display
presented by Pyrotech Fireworks!
This year's Independence Day
celebration is dedicated to all the
.*>i men and women who are serving in
'.. our Armed Forces, to protect our
precious freedom! So bring your lawn
chairs or blankets and make plans to
attend the festivities on Sunday, July
3,2005.
For additional information on
taking part in the celebration, or to
make a donation toward the
fireworks, please contact the City of
'f! "2005 Patriotic Evening" Inverness Department of Parks and
City of Inverness Recreation at 726-3913.
^-f 212 W. Main Street
Inverness, FL 34450 Sponsored by:

'-' .'- r ;., ; - ,-' '- ,. / .- '. -, .. 4


Divorce leaves child



hurt over visitation


.


D ear Annie: I am an 11-year-old girl, and
my parents are going through a divorce.
Dad has a restraining order for the next
two years. The judge said I can't even call him.
I'm supposed to see him every other
weekend, in supervised visits.
My dad doesn't like this arrange-
ment, so he refuses to see my broth-
er and me. I have seen him only
once in the last five months. It
makes me think he is not exactly the
father I thought he was and that if
he were a good father, he would try
to see us every chance he could. It
makes me sad to know he's not will-
ing to go to a visitation center.
I don't know what to do, which is
odd for me because I am known to ANN
be very mature and a good advice
giver. My dad might not know I feel I 1,
this way. He expects me to be tough.
- Sad, Confused and Angry in Hawaii
Dear Sad: Being "tough" has nothing to do
with it. This man is your father, and he has an
obligation to act like one. We don't know what
he did to deserve a restraining order, but he
should be willing to follow the judge's instruc-
tions regardless. Two years is a long time for
you to lose touch, and he should make every
effort to see you, even under these limited cir-
cumstances. Once the restraining order is lift-
ed, it will be too late to undo the damage he
has caused.
Ask your mother to get a message to Dad
from you, saying it hurts you deeply that he
cannot swallow his pride for your sake. If he
still refuses, we hope you (and your brother)
will discuss your feelings with someone. You
should be in family counseling, but if not,
please discuss this with your school counselor,
favorite teacher or a trusted adult relative. You
should not have to deal with this on your own.
Dear Annie: As a retired educator, I current-
ly am working as a substitute teacher in sever-
al schools. I see a practice that, although not
intentional, subjects students to germs that
could cause illness. When students go to the
washroom, they take a wooden bathroom pass.
Where do the students put these passes when
they go to the bathroom? Enough said.
Knowing your column is read by many teach-


ers and parents, I felt writing you would be a
fast way to help eliminate this unsanitary and
dangerous practice. Concerned Sub
Dear Sub: You now have alarmed every
teacher, as well as every person
who takes a wooden key chain
because the doctor's office bath-
room is locked. You cannot protect
students from every germ they
encounter, nor should you. But if
this particular practice worries any-
one, we recommend having passes
made from plastic or laminated
cardboard, which can be sprayed
with a disinfectant after use.
Dear Annie: How do I tell my sis-
ter-in-law that an invitation to my
IE'S son's wedding does not automatical-
ly extend to her children, their
'X spouses and their children? My son
is not close to any of his cousins and
will not be inviting them. Auntie thinks if she's
invited, she should be able to bring the whole
family We're not talking youngsters here. The
"kids" are all in their early 30s and have their "
own families. They all live within blocks of one
another and have never completely cut the
apron strings.
When my daughter married a few years ago,
Auntie and Uncle brought four people we
weren't expecting, and Auntie was completely
oblivious (or indifferent) to the extra hassle.
How can I prevent unwanted guests? -
Stuck in the Middle Again
Dear Stuck: Since Auntie has done this
before, it merits a personal phone call to say,
"We're so sorry we cannot invite all the
cousins, but we have a limited guest list and
will not be able to accommodate your children
and their families."


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell
and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Please e-mail your questions
to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox;
and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


Sunday .


Puzzle answer is
ACROSS
1 Grew wan
6 Shut with force
10 Burn, in away
15 Ristorante fare
20 Excuse
21 Indian of the
southwest
22 Wild excitement
23 French painter
E 24 Salon ilerns
-25 Elderly
'26 Passion
27 Bring into accord
28 Oolong is one "
29 Grotto
31 Lofty
33 Bottle part
35 Periods
36 Got up
37 Roar
39 Cut down with an ax
41 Go ashore
44 Rabbit
45 breve
48 Ray flower
53 Steer clear of
54 Affectionate
55 New branch or bud
57 Cut
58 Darn
59 Charge for riding
60 New Zealand parrot
61 "Do others..."
63 Carpentry item
64 Cease
65 Witty remark
66 Wherewithal
68 Wheat portion
70 Work at
71 Brusque
72 Copy
74 Do a farm job
76 Musical drama
79 Not hidden
81 Gear teeth
83 Looking glass
87 Not as many
88 Approach
89 On your -
91 River in France
92 Handles
94 Essayist's pen name ,
96 Five (prefix)
97 Was gloomy
98 Encounter
100 Planet near the sun
102 Frond
104 Skill
107 Quantity of paper
109 Raises
110 Kind of oil or syrup


on Page 10A.
111 Carew or Stewart
114 Swerve
116 Be aware of
118 "...- I saw Elba"
119 Heavenly body
120 Engage
121 Perfect
123 Hit in baseball
125 Creature of myth
126 Waterway
127 Cher's ex
128 Town in Nevada
129 Coarse file
130 Botch
131 Ostrich relative.
133 Singing bird
136 Ditty
137 Exchange
141 Writer Lazarus
144 Solemn promise
145 Desktop picture
146 Moo
149 Supporting column
151 Prevent from
happening
153 Villain
in Shakespeare
155 Likeness
157 Shrewd
158 Pester playfully
159 Greek coin
160 Mother-of-pearl
161 A pronoun
162 Made mistakes
163 Ointment of old
164 Cupidity


DOWN
1 Agreement between
countries
2 vera
3 Peru's capital
4 Diminish
5 Lack of harmony
6 Barber service
7 Theater section
8 Simian
9 College exam
10 Wee
11 Monte -
12 A conjunction
13 Zoo denizen
14 Be brave enough
15 peeve
16 Poker stake
17 Tart
18 Singer Turner
19 War god
23 Libertine
30 Make inquiry
32 Cakes and -
34 Talk a lot
36 Foray
37 Reveal
38 Armed conflict
40 WWII servicewoman
41 Noblewoman
42 Regular
43 Strong connection
44 Stringed instrument
46 Gehrig or Ferrigno
47 An organ
49 Jose
50 Capture
51 Wickedness
52 Depend
54 Serve (2 wds.)
55 Close tightly
56 Sudden fear
59 Muff material
60 Retained
62 City in Utah
65 Divide into fourths
66 More cheerful
67 Sea ducks
69 Postal worker
71 The elite
72 Domain
73 Suffering
75 Solid evidence
76 Repeatedly,
poetically
77 ,- diem
78 Female sheep
80 A letter
82 Solidify
84 Tear
85 Mine's output
86 Crimson
90 Wild West bar


93 Try to find
95 Spinning 'round
96 Unadulterated
99 Childish outburst
101 Concern
103 Sea eagle
104 Rara -
105 Change the decor
106 Youthful suffix
108 Additional
110 -de grace
111 Boxers' locale
112 Spoken
113 Remove, in printin
115 Tried for office
117 Triumph
119 Reduce to pulp
120 Hover
122 Soap ingredient
124 Vessel for cooking
125 Mode
126 Like a fox
129 Furrow
130 Scary yell
132 Nothing more than
134 Stable occupant
135 Appraised
136 Censure angrily
137 Petty quarrel
138 "When you upor
a star..."
139 Singing voice
140 Word in arithmetic
142 Spouse
143 State positively
145 Prince in opera
146 Delicate fabric
147 Monster
148 Unwanted plant
150 Dined
152 Cup handle
154 Org. for lawyers
156 Impair


Mixing it up with weeds


~


14A SUNDAY, JUII 3, 2005


ii






Annika squares off
Sorenstam


('~


.1
L\ K'


u'Siy DoAY
JULY 3. 2005


Sports R FS
Competitors face off
at Sugarmill Woods
It's golf time at Sugarmill
,Woods.
Scores are in for the
ugarmill Woods Men's Golf
associationn competitions.
In the June 30 total team
'quota, Bob Elgart, Bill
Engelbrecht and John Peterson
'vere first in first flight, and
Warren Ley, Bob Grady, Bob
pCarriveau and Don Leeder took
second. In second flight, Jim
Melia, Tom Venable, Mike
iSchwabek and Roger Kessinger
finished first and John Holden,
.Bob Strausser, Alex Law and
'WVill Parks placed second.
In the June 23 best ball two-
.some competition, Erv Koch and
. Strausser tied Melia and Ray
Pozezinski at 12-under for first
-place in first flight, and Ed White
,and Holden tied Art Gennero
,and Todd Green for third place
.at 11-under. In second flight, it
-was Leeder and Bob
,Chadderton winning at 12-
under, with John Winner and
'Lowell Boatz second at 10-
*under, and Zane Megos and
*Parks tying Tom Viezbicke and
Don Spalding for third at seven-
under.
Rays put Munson on
'DL, call up Singleton
MINNEAPOLIS The
Tampa Bay Devil Rays placed
infielder Eric Munson on the 15-
day disabled list with bruised
ribs on Saturday and purchased
the contract of outfielder Chris
Singleton from Triple-A Durham.
Munson, the third pick in the
1999 draft by Detroit, was let go
by the Tigers after last season
and then by the Minnesota
Twins in spring training.
The Devil Rays purchased his
contract from Durham last
month, and he appeared in four
games with two hits in seven
at-bats plus three walks. He was
injured on an unsuccessful slide
into home plate Tuesday against
Toronto.
Singleton opened the season
with Tampa Bay, but he was
designated for assignment on
May 20 and released a week
later. He signed a minor league
contract with the Devil Rays ear-
lier this week.
"He's going to play," manager
Lou Piniella said. "We're not
going to have him here to sit."
Pepsi 400 starts
late after rain delay
After a two-hour, 3& minute
rain delay, NASCAR's Pepsi 400
egan after 10:45 p.m. at
aytona International
eedway. Results were not
available at press time.
Mark Martin and Rusty
allace began their final races
t the speedway, where they are
combined 0-84 in Nextel Cup
aces.
Dale Earnhardt Jr., currently
18th in the point standings, was
looking to begin a turnaround at
Daytona.
Jeff Gordon is also in a
slump, dropping from second to
14th in the standings in the last
.six weeks.
From staff, wire reports


All-st
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
jmsoracchi@hotmail.com
For the Chronicle
On opening day of the 2005
District All-Star Tournaments
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River, lopsided victories were
prevalent throughout every
division.
In the opening round of pool
play in 13-to-14-year-old soft-
ball, the Dunnellon All-Stars
led the entire duration before
eventually claiming an 11-1 vic-
tory over Inverness.
Dunnellon, the defending
Florida champion last year, put
together a complete game by
getting timely hits, solid pitch-


ars open
ing and taking advantage of Inverness pitcher
several Inverness.mistakes. Eldridge got Saman
Samantha Wright earned the to strike out swing
win by spreading out two hits dropped third strik
and striking out four over four throw to first to coi
innings of work out. The throw allow
Stacey Weimert, Danielle to score ahead oft
Burns and Dallas Towns com- throw to the plate
bined for six of Dunnellon's Dunnellon a 1-0 leach
eight hits and five RBI's to lead With. two outs,
the way offensively for induced Tara Good
Dunnellon. groundball that Inve
In fact, as Dunnellon took a looking for. But an in
2-0 lead in the second inning, it let the batter reach
was a result of a dropped third and scored Kalynn G
strike and a fielding error, a 2-0 lead.
Dallas Towns and Kalynn "Dunnellon is the 1
Goodloe singled between a sac- around," said Invern
rifice bunt to put runners on Scott Helt, whose tea
first and third with one out. 1 and will face Centra


tournament


er Brittany
tha Wright
ging but a
e forced a
)mplete the
wed Towns
the return
and give,
d.
Eldridge
loe into a
erness was
afield error
first safely
Goodloe for
best (team)
ness coach
m fell to 0-
al Citrus at


2 p.m. today. "But we helped
them a lot They turned our
errors into big innings."
Again, in the third inning,
two Inverness errors allowed
Dunnellon's first three batters
to score for a 5-0 lead after
three innings of play.
In the fourth, Inverness
scored their only run of the
game after Erica Stanley sin-
gled, stole second, tookthird on
an error by the catcher on the
throw down to second and
scored on a fielder's choice to
cut the lead to 5-1.
However, Dunnellon's
Wright got out of any ensuing
trouble by striking out the next
two batters looking to head


back to the dugout without any
further damage.
The only other real chance
Inverness had at scoring came
back in the bottom of the third
when a walk, a hit batter and a
passed ball put runners in
scoring position with one out
Yet a strikeout by Wright
became the second out and an
outfield assist by Marissa
Keeley at first base ended the
threat.
"I'm pleased overall," said
Dunnellon coach Steve
Goodloe, whose team
improved to 1-0 and will face
Crystal River at 4 p.m. today.
Please see TOURNEY/Page 3B


Athletes


ready for


triathlon

170 regtered for

July 4th event
C.J. RISK
cjrisak@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
There are already 170 ath-
letes pre-registered for the
Crystal River Fourth of July
Sprint Triathlon. And that
information comes from a
pretty reliable source the
director of the race, Chris
Moling.
"We'll push through 200 eas-
ily," Moling predicted, adding
the day-of-the-race turnout
depended on the weather.
Last year's Fourth of July
race attracted 205 competitors,
so thus far the numbers look
good. But that's not truly what
makes the event intriguing.
It isn't how many have
signed up, but who. Thus far,
anyway.
Considering this is the sec-
ond of three sprint triathlon
races, and the overall champi-
on is based on performance in
all three, one might think
those who did well in the first
race would carefully prepare
for Monday's competition,
which begins at 7:30 a.m. at
Fort Island Gulf Beach Park in
Crystal River.
Including registering in
advance.
Well, that just isn't the case.
In fact, neither the male nor
the female winner from the
Memorial Day Triathlon Tom
Lowery or Ashley Carusone -
will compete Mopday. Fact is,
only four of the top 10 men's
finishers from the earlier race
signed up in advance, and just
three of the top 10 women.
Also, neither of last year's
winners, Stephen Godlove nor
Amanda Hahn, had registered
to defend their titles.
So even though the numbers
appear high, will this field be a

Please see .-aiFi/Page 3B


Associated Press
Lance Armstrong pedals during the first stage of the Tour de
France, a 19-kilometer individual time trial between the coastal
town of Fromentine and the island of Noirmoutier.


Armstrong starts
Associated Press titles are already the Tour
record.
NOIRMOUTIER-EN-LILE, But this much is clear:
France No easing up for Armstrong's challengers will
Lance Armstrong in his last need the race of their lives to
Tour de France. catch him and if previous
Armstrong took a huge step years are any guide that still
toward winning his seventh may not be enough.
consecutive Tour on the very The only blot on an other-
first day of the three-week wise perfect Saturday for
race. He crushed his main Armstrong? He was beaten by a
rivals in an opening time trial fellow American and former
Saturday, opening up early teammate, David Zabriskie, by
time gaps that may be big 2 seconds over the 11.8-mile
enough to carry him through to course past oyster vendors and
victory at the finish in Paris on marshes from Fromentine to
July 24. the island of Noirmoutier-en-
"I was hungry today," said l'Ile on western France's
Armstrong, who is 33 and has Atlantic coast.
said he will retire after this But Zabriskie, for all his
year's Tour. "I didn't come to promise, is not considered a
ride a retirement race. I came contender for the overall title
to win." at the still tender age for a
A bad crash, an uncharacter- cyclist of 26.
istic drop in his devastating Armstrong, racing a special
form and the sheer unpre- aerodynamic bike, helmet and
dictability of a race that covers suit, set out last of the 189 rid-
2,242 miles, the Alps and the ers and had a minor mishap at
Pyrenees still could conspire the outset when one of his feet
against Armstrong, whose six popped out of a pedal. But he


strong n
quickly clipped it back and
then pedaled relentlessly
He dealt a severe psycholog-
ical and racing blow to his
main rival, Jan Ullrich, by
overtaking him along the way
- even though the German
had set out 1 minute earlier.
"The feeling of being passed
by Lance is not good," Ullrich
said later. He tried to put a
brave face on the defeat, say-
ing: "The Tour is still three
weeks long. I'll battle."
The closest of Armstrong's
main rivals was Alexandre
Vinokourov, Ullrich's team-
mate from Kazakhstan. He
placed third but was still 51
seconds slower than the Texan.
Ullrich placed 12th, a whop-
ping 1 minute and 6 seconds
slower than Armstrong. That
already is larger than
Armstrong's winning margin
over Ullrich in 2003, when he
won by 61 seconds by far the
narrowest of his victories.
Armstrong and Ullrich's
team both said the German,


n France
who has finished runner-up
four times since his only win in
1997, may have been affected
by a training crash on Friday.
Ullrich cut his neck after slam-
ming into the back of a car.
"That takes a lot out of you
and I can't say I won the Tour
de France just because of that,"
Armstrong said, suggesting that
he still regards Ullrich as a
challenger.
But Armstrong also savored
the satisfaction of overtaking
the German.
"I saw Jan in front of me at
the first time check and I
thought: 'It's going well today.' I
had him in my sights. Then I
did my maximum," he said.
"You can't lie. That's a good'
feeling in the sense that you
know you're having a good
day."
Armstrong's team coach,
Johan Bruyneel, was jubilant,
calling the ride "incredible."
Armstrong's rock star girl-
Please see LANCE/Page 3B


. *


The rebirth of Venus


Williams wins

first major title

in four years

Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England -
Venus Williams leaned
against the wall behind the "
baseline for several seconds,
gasping for air. At the other
end of the court, Lindsay
Davenport doubled over,
using her racket like a cane
to rest a bothersome back
Williams had just hit a fore- ,'
hand to win a 25-shot
exchange in the third set, the
longest point in the longest
Wimbledon women's final on
record, and neither she nor
Davenport looked particular-
ly eager to resume play.
They did, of course, and 10
minutes later, Williams' stam-
ina and strokes allowed her
to complete a 4-6, 7-6 (4), 9-7
victory over Davenport on ... '.
Saturday for her third
Wimbledon championship
and first Grand Slam title in
nearly four years:.
Barely, just barely, better
than the top-ranked
Davenport on this cloudy and
chilly afternoon, Williams
pulled off two impressive ,
comebacks all at once:
She is the first woman in 70
years to win at the All :;
England Club after facing a
championship point, and she
returned to the top of the ten-
nis world after two years of

Once No. 1 in the world,
then just second best in her
family, Williams had won
only one tournament in the
last 13 months and tumbled
in the rankings. At No. 14, she R7 T
is Wimbledon's lowest-seed-
ed women's champion.
"It has special meaning,"
Williams said. "I wasn't sup-
posed to win."
She hadn't been past the Associated Press
Venus Williams celebrates winning the Ladies' Singles final at Wimbledon Saturday. Williams
Please see ,-.i.u/Page 3B beat Lindsay Davenport, of the USA, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 9-7.


I~I~:; --. n. -. e rr -.. rl I;:!~'~~'IF.Vi~lt~i~ a~~n; 'li I;r'..'::YeW *JIPj~ll~l


~PII~rlP~


J


- --- -- -, -..- -1 - % -17 - -


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Marlins triumph over Mets


Associated Press I


NEW YORK Carlos
Beltran took a big swing, hit a
soft popup and barely left the
batter's box. He just stood
there sulking, watching and
it only got worse.
Beltran's lack of hustle
allowed the Florida Marlins to
turn an embarrassing double
play Saturday in a 7-3 victory
over the Mets, surely not the
kind of effort New York
expects from its $119 million
center fielder.
"There's nothing to say
Everyone saw that play I'm
sure he's embarrassed by it. I
just want to make sure it does-
n't happen again," Mets manag-
er Willie Randolph said.
Juan Encarnacion had four
hits and three RBIs, finally
providing some run support for
Marlins starter Brian Moehler.
Pinch-hitter Paul Lo Duca
added an RBI single in the
sixth inning, when Florida took
advantage of a key error by fill-
in first baseman Jose Offerman
and scored four times.
Beltran hit a two-run double,
but he had an up-and-down
performance appropriately
- on his own bobblehead day.
The Mets fell back to .500 and
last place in the NL East.
The speedy switch-hitter
doubled in the first and made a
diving catch in the second. But
he failed to run out a, weak
popup in the third, and first
baseman Carlos Delgado alert-
ly let the ball drop so he could
start a 3-6-3 double play.
"Take a chance. Columbus
did, discovered America,"
Delgado said. "It just worked
out well for us caught a
break there."
Beltran was booed by the


* .--, ?l:-oX4 -t


~#1.


- --i


Associated Press
Juan Encarnacion watches his first inning single drop into left field
allowing Juan Pierre to score against the Mets. Encarnacion went
4 for 4 and drove in three runs in the Marlins 7-3 win.


crowd of 41,290 then
cheered after his two-run dou-
ble with two outs in the fifth
gave the Mets a 3-1 lead.
But at the end of the day, it
was his lackadaisical blunder
that stood out.
"I was surprised," Beltran
said. "When I hit the ball, first I
was assuming he was going to
catch the ball. And when he let
it drop, it was too late:"
Moehler (3-6) got help from
his bullpen after allowing
three runs and nine hits in 5 1-
3 innings. He was 0-5 in his pre-
vious eight starts, getting only
1.58 runs of support per game.


"This is one game that we
owed him," Lo Duca said. "We
owe him a couple more."
The right-hander left with
the bases loaded, but Valerio
De Los Santos got pinch-hitter
Miguel Cairo to ground into an
inning-ending double play on
his only pitch and leaped for
joy on the infield.
Guillermo Mota worked two
perfect innings, and Todd
Jones finished Florida's sev-
enth victory in 10 games.
"It all evens out," Moehler
said. "It was good to get some'
runs."
Kris Benson (6-3) failed to


hold a two-run lead and lost for
the first time in six starts. He
gave up five runs three
earned and eight hits in six
innings. The right-hander was
6-1 with a 3.10 ERA in his pre-
vious nine starts.
The Marlins started the sixth
with four straight singles, the
last by Encarnacion to drive in
a run.
Damion Easley's RBI
groundout tied it at 3, and
Benson had a chance to escape
further damage when Alex
Gonzalez hit a potential dou-
ble-play ball to shortstop. But
Offerman couldn't come up
with Marlon Anderson's low
relay, and the go-ahead run
scored on his error.
"He just dropped the ball,"
Randolph said.
Gonzalez stole second and
third, then scored on Lo Duca's
single to make it 5-3.
1 "I take that approach, that
I'm going to play. I don't want to
get caught off-guard," said Lo
Duca, who was supposed to get
the day off. "I'm ready to come
in the game regardless if it's 10-
0 or 2-1."
With the bases loaded in the
ninth, Mets reliever Danny
Graves hit Encarnacion with
his first pitch. Gonzalez added
an RBI infield single, making it
7-3.
"You don't give them outs. A
team like the Marlins, they
have quality hitters and quality
runners," Mets catcher Mike
Piazza said. "We should have
come out and shut the door. We
didn't do that. We gave them
some insurance runs."
Encarnacion has reached
base safely in 10 consecutive
plate appearances, tying the
club record set by Derrek Lee
in September 2002.


NL: Phillies end slump, beat Braves


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Brett
Myers took a shutout into the
ninth inning, and the slumping
Philadelphia Phillies beat the
Atlanta Braves 6-3 Saturday.
Pat Burrell and David Bell
homered for the Phillies, who
won for just the third time in 13
games.
Myers (6-4) allowed three runs
and four hits in 81-3 innings. He
struck out nine, including seven
looking, in his first win since
June 4. In his previous two
starts, Myers was roughed up for
13 runs and 18 hits in just 7 1-3
innings.
Billy Wagner got the final two
outs for his 20th save in 22
chances.
Nationals 4, Cubs 2
CHICAGO Jose Guillen home-
red and Tony Armas won a road
start for the first time in more than
two years, leading Washington to its
fifth straight victory.
Armas (4-4) hadn't won a road
start since April 10, 2003 at
Wrigley Field and had been 0-6
in 10 starts since. He went five-plus
innings Saturday, allowing seven hits
and two runs.
Diamondbacks 7, Dodgers 5
LOS ANGELES Jose Cruz Jr.
hit one of four solo homers off Derek
Lowe, and added an RBI double as
Arizona snapped a four-game-losing
streak.
Arizona left fielder Luis Gonzalez
preserved the victory by diving into


I -! U 1
Associated Press
Billy Wagner celebrates after striking out Atlanta Braves' Brian
Jordan to end the game.


the stands to catch Jason Phillips'
bid for a game-tying, two-run homer
in the eighth.
Astros 4, Reds 3, 1st game
Reds 11, Astros 6, 2nd game
CINCINNATI -Adam Dunn hit a


two-run homer, and Felipe Lopez fell
a double short of the cycle
Cincinnati earned a doubleheader
split and snapped a six-game losing
streak.
A throwing error by Houston
starter Ezequiel Astacio led to four


unearned runs and helped the Reds
rebound from a 4-3 loss in the open-
er of the doubleheader, forced by
a rainout Thursday night.
Diamondbacks 7, Dodgers 5
LOS ANGELES Jose Cruz
Jr. hit one of four solo homers off
Derek Lowe, and added an RBI
double as Arizona snapped a
four-game losing streak.
Arizona left fielder Luis
Gonzalez preserved the victory by
diving into the stands to catch'
Jason Phillips' bid for a game-
tying, two-run homer in the
eighth.
Brewers 5, Pirates 3
MILWAUKEE Rickie Weeks
homered late to snap a tie for the
second straight game, hitting a
two-run shot in the eighth to give
Milwaukee a victory.
Weeks, the Brewers' top draft
pick in 2003, hit a three-run home
run in the seventh on Friday night
with the score tied at 4 and
Milwaukee went on to beat
Pittsburgh 8-4.
Rockies 3, Cardinals 1
ST. LOUIS Jamey Wright
pitched effectively into the sev-
enth inning and Brad Hawpe's
two-run single in the sixth broke
up a scoreless game, leading
Colorado over St. Louis.
The Rockies have taken two of
the first three games in the four-
game series against the team
with the NL's best record, moving
into position for their first road
series win of the year.


AL: Twins pitching silences Devil Rays


Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS Justin
Morneau hit a three-run homer,
Kyle Lohse pitched eight strong
innings and the Minnesota
Twins beat the Tampa Bay
Devil Rays again, 4-1 on
Saturday night.
Joe Mauer added an RBI
double for Minnesota, which
won for the fifth time in six
games.
Jorge Cantu, a strong candi-
date to represent the reeling
Devil Rays in the All-Star game,
drove in a run with a fourth-
inning single. The Devil Rays
have lost seven of their last
eight games overall and seven
in a row to the Twins.
Lohse (7-6) gave up just four
hits and one walk while striking
out six. He got help from left
fielder Shannon Stewart, who
made a diving catch of Travis
Lee's sinking liner to end the
second and leaped against the
wall in the eighth to take an
extra-base hit away from Nick
Green.
Joe Nathan worked the ninth
for his 22nd save in 24 chances.


I Orioles 4, Indians 0
BALTIMORE Daniel Cabrera
pitched seven innings of four-hit
ball and Jay Gibbons capped a
sixth-inning rally with a three-run
homer, helping the Baltimore
Orioles beat the Cleveland Indians
4-0 on Saturday.
Cabrera (6-7), who had been 0-3
in his last four starts, won for the
first time since June 5 at Detroit. He
walked two and struck out five,
becoming the first Orioles starter to
record a victory since Rodrigo
Lopez on June 21.
Tim Byrdak pitched the eighth
and B.J. Ryan worked the ninth, fin-
ishing the Orioles' fifth shutout of
the season. The Orioles, who had
lost eight of nine, stole a season-
high five bases.

Rangers 6, Mariners 5
SEATTLE Gary Matthews
homered with two outs in the ninth
inning, leading Texas to its fourth
straight victory.
The Rangers, who lead the
majors with 133 home runs, also
got a three-run shot from Michael
Young in the second and a solo


shot from David Dellucci his third
homer in three games in the
fourth.
Adrian Beltre had his first two-
homer game since joining the
Mariners, but struck out against
rookie Kameron Loe (2-1) with the
game tied and two men on to end
the seventh.
Yankees 8, Tigers 4
DETROIT Tony Womack hit
an RBI single with two outs in the
ninth to break a tie and Bernie
Williams followed with three-run
homer to lift New York over Detroit.
Williams finished with four hits and
five RBIs, matching a season high.
Dmitri Young's three-run homer
gave Detroit a 4-1 lead in the fourth
inning before the Yankees rallied
with two runs in the sixth, one in the
seventh and four in the ninth off
closer Troy Percival (1-2).
Angels 5, Royals 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Bartolo
Colon allowed one hit through
seven innings, then walked off the
field with the team trainer after sur-
rendering three more in the eighth
of the Angels' victory.


There was'no immediate indica-
tion what, if anything, was wrong
with the right-hander. Retiring 19 in
a row in one stretch, Colon (11-4)
wound up going 7 1-3 innings and
giving up three runs and four hits,
with five strikeouts and no walks.
Chone Figgins had three hits and
scored twice for the AL West-lead-
ing Angels. Francisco Rodriguez
earned his 15th save in 17
chances.
Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4
BOSTON Manny Ramirez hit
a tiebreaking, two-run homer in the
seventh inning, lifting Boston to a
comeback victory.
It was just Boston's third win in
10 games against Toronto this sea-
son and came one night after the
Red Sox lost 15-2.
Johnny Damon had a pair of
doubles, extending his hitting streak
to 18 games for the Red Sox.
After David Ortiz singled off
reliever Pete Walker (3-2), Ramirez
hit a fly ball down the right-field line
that hooked around the foul pole. It
was his 20th homer of the season,
the 11th straight year he has
reached the mark.


Boston
Baltimore
Toronto
New York
Tampa Bay

Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City

Los Angeles
Texas
Oakland
Seattle


Washington
Atlanta
Florida
Philadelphia
New York

St. Louis
Chicago
Milwaukee
Houston
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
46 33 .582 z-7-3
44 36 .550 2/2 2-8
41 40 .506 6 z-6-4
40 39 .506 6 z-4-6
27 54 .333 20 z-3-7
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
53 25 .679 z-7-3
44 34 .564 9 6-4
43 36 .544101 6-4
37 40 .481 15/2 z-3-7
26 53 .32927Y2 1-9
West Division
W L Pct GB L10
49 31 .613 z-8-2
42 37 .532 6/2 5-5
39 40 .494 9/2 z-9-1
33 46 .41815'/2 z-2-8
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB L10
49 31 .613 8-2
44 37 .543 5/2 6-4
41 37 .526 7 z-7-3
41 40 .506 8/2 z-3-7
40 40 .500 9 6-4
Central Division
W L Pct GB L10
50 30 .625 5-5
40 39 .506 9/2 4-6
38 42 .475 12 z-7-3
37 42 .46812/2 z-7-3
34 45 .430 15/2 2-8
31 49 .388 19 z-4-6
West Division
W L Pct GB L10


San Diego 43 37 .53
Arizona 40 42 .48
Los Angeles 38 42 .47
San Francisco 34 44 .43
Colorado 28 51 .35
z-first game was a win
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Toronto 15, Boston 2
Detroit 10, N.Y. Yankees 2
Cleveland 3, Baltimore 1
Minnesota 7, Tampa Bay 4
L.A. Angels 5, Kansas City 0
Texas 6, Seattle 2
Oakland 6, Chicago White Sox 2
Saturday's Games
Baltimore 4, Cleveland 0
Texas 6, Seattle 5
Boston 6, Toronto 4
N.Y. Yankees 8, Detroit 4
Minnesota 4, Tampa Bay 1
L.A. Angels 5, Kansas City 3
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Yankees (Wang 4-3) at Detroit
(Robertson 3-6), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Halladay 11-4) at Boston (Arroyo
6-4), 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Kazmir 3-5) at Minnesota
(Mays 4-3), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Rogers 9-3) at Seattle (Moyer 6-3),
4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 10-1) at
Oakland (Zito 4-8), 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Lee 8-3) at Baltimore (Ponson
7-5), 5 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Washburn 4-3) at Kansas
City (Greinke 1-9), 7:10 p.m.


FLORID

Pierre cf
LCstillo
Cbrera I
CDlgdo
JEcrcn r
Easley 3
AGnzlz
Tranor c
L Puca
Mehler p
VaSnts p
Mota p
TJones


. Marlins 7, Mets 3
)A NEW YORK
ab rhbi al
5 22 0 Reyes ss
2b 2 11 0 Cmeron rf
f 4 21 0 Beltran cf 4
lb 3 11 0 Floyd If
f 4 04 3 Piazza c
3b 4 00 1 MrAnd 2b
ss 5 11 1 Wright 3b
2 00 0 Offrmn lb .
c .,, 2 1 .-Beso.np. ;
S 3000 Daubch ph I
p 0 00 0 Cairo ph
-1 00 0 HBell p I
p 0 00 0 Ring p
Graves p 0
GeWIm ph


b r hbi
5 1 20
4 000
4 022
2000
3 000
4 01 0
4 1 20
4 0-1 0
2 ,1 1
S000
1 000
S0000
S0000
0000
1 000


Totals 35711 6 Totals 34 3 9 3
Florida 100 004 002- 7
New York 000 030 000- 3
E-LCastillo (4), Cameron (3), Offerman
(2). DP-Florida 3. LOB-Florida 10, New
York 7. 2B-Beltran 2 (19), Wright (21).
SB-Pierre 2 (20), AGonzalez 2 (3). S-
LCastillo 2, Easley.
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
MoehlerW,3-6 51-3 9 3 3 2 1
De Los Santos 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Mota 2 0 0 0 0 2
TJones 1 0 0 0 0 0
New York
BensonL,6-3 6 8 5 3 1 2
HBell 2 1 0 0 2 2
Ring 1-3 1 2 2 2 0
Graves 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Graves (JEncarnacion), by
Moehler (Floyd).
T-2:59. A-41,290 (57,369).
Phillies 6, Braves 3


ATLANTA


PHILA
ab rhbi


ab rh bi


Furcal ss 3 100 Rollins ss 4 1 1 0
Jhnson If 4000 Mchels cf 3 1 1 1
MGiles 2b 401 2 BAbreu rf 5 0 2 0
AJones ocf 4 00 0 Burrell If 4 2 2 1
LaRchel 1b 3 01 0 Utley2b 3 1 0 0
BJordn ph 1 000 DaBell 3b 4 1 2 3
JEstda c 3 000 Howard lb 4 0 2 0
Lngrhn rf 3000 Prattc 3 000
Btemit 3b 311 0 BMyers p 4 01 1
HRmrzp 1 00 0 BWgnrp 0000
Grybskp 0 00 0
Orrph 1 00 0
Kdlb p 000 0
Brnero p 0 00 0
Vsquez p 0 00 0
JuFrco ph 1 11 0
Totals 313 42 Totals 34 611 6
Atlanta 000 000 003- 3
Philadelphia 011 130 00x- 6
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Atlanta 2,
Philadelphia 9. 2B-MGiles (25), Rollins
(13). HR-Burrell (17), DaBell (5). SB-
Rollins (19).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
HRamirez L,7-5 42-3 8 6 6 3 1
Gryboski 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kolb 1 0 0 0 0 0
Bernero 1 1 0 0 0 1
Vasquez 1 2 0 0 1 0
Philadelphia
BMyers W,6-4 81-3 4 3 3 1 9
BWagner S,20 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by HRamirez (Utley). WP-
BMyers.
T-2:15. A-29,205 (43,826).
Twins 4, Devil Rays I


TAMPA BA

Crwfrd If
Lugo ss
Huff rf
Cantu 3b
Gomes dh
TLee lb
Hollins cf
THall c
NGreen 2b


MINNESOTA


ab rh bi
401 0 ShStwrt If
4 1.0 0 JCastro ss
401 0 Mauer c
4 01 1 THnter cf
3 00 0 JJones rf'
2 00 0 LFord dh
301 0 Mrneaulb
3 00 0 LRdrgz 3b
3 00 0 Rivas 2b


r h bi
000
00
02 1
000
1 2 0
1 2 0

0 1 0
1 0 0


Totals 301 4 1 Totals 31 4 8 4
Tampa Bay 000 100 000--- 1
Minnesota 030 010 00x- 4
E-Lugo (14). DP-Tampa Bay 2,


38 z-4-6
88 4 4-6
75 5 z-5-5
36 8 5-5
414Y2 6-4


Home
24-13
24-18
20-16
24-18
19-23

Home
27-12
25-18
19-17
19-21
15-23

Home
24-14
23-16
26-15
19-22

Home
29-10
24-12
23-17
24-17
25-17

Home
26-16
21-20
23-15
24-13
17-19
24-21

Home
25-16
20-20
22-19
17-22
21-19


Away Intr
22-20 12-6
20-18 8-10
21-24 8-10
16-21 11-7
8-31 3-15

Away Intr
26-13 12-6
19-16 8-10
24-19 15-3
18-19 9-9
11-30 9-9

Away Intr
25-17 12-6
19-21 9-9
13-25 10-8
14-24 10-8

Away Intr
20-21 12-6
20-25 7,8
18-20 10-5
17-23 7-8
15-23 5-10

Away Intr
24-14 10-6
19-19 69.
15-27 8-71
13-29 7-8.
17-26 5-7
7-28 7&8-

Away Intr
18-21 7-11
20-22 8-10
16-23 5-,13
17-22 6-12
7-32 6-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE ;
Friday's Games
Washington 4, Chicago Cubs 3 -
Atlanta 9, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets 7, Florjda 6
Houston 10, Cincinnati 7
Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 4
Saturday's Games
Florida 7, N.Y. Mets 3
Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 3
Washington 4, Chicago Cubs 2
Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Houston 4, Cincinnati 3, 1st game
Cincinnati 11, Houston 6, 2nd game -
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 3 .
Colorado 3, St. Louis 1
Sunday's Games
Florida (Willis 12-3) at N.Y. Iats
(V.Zambrano 4-6), 1:10 p.m.
Houston (Clemens 6-3) at Cincinnati
(Claussen 4-5), 1:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Fogg 4-4) at Milwaukee
(D.Davis 9-7), 2:05 p.m. ..-
Colorado (Jennings 4-8) at St. Couis
(Mulder 9-5), 2:15 p.m.
Washington (Drese 2-1) at Chicago Cubs
(C.Zambrano 5-4), 2:20 p.m.
San Francisco (Schmidt 6-3) at San Diggo
(Stauffer 1-4), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Sosa 4-1) at Philadelphia (Tejeda
1-1), 8:05 p.m.

Minnesota. 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 3,
Minnesota 7. 2B-Hollins (9), Mauer (10),
JJones (10), LFord (18). 3B-LRodriguez
(1). HR-Morneau (11). SB-Rivas (2).
IP H RERBB O
Tampa Bay
McClung L,0-4 6 6 4 4 3 8
Harper 1 1 0 0 0,0
TreMiller 1 1 0 0 0; 1
Minnesota
LohseW,7-6 8 -.. 4. 1 1 1 6
Nathan S,22 1 0 ,0..0 0 .0.
. HBP-by TreMiller (LFord). '-
Umpires-Home, Ted e.aiie. First, Terry
Craft; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Thlrd,
Brian Knight. '
T-2:05. A-26,393 (46,564).
Orioles 4, Indians 0 .
CLEVELAND BALTIMORE
ab rhbi. ab fhbi
Szmore cf 4 000 BRbrts 2b 401 0
Blake 3b 1 00 0 Bigbie If 3 0 0
Boone 3b 3 00 0 Tejada ss 3 1 1 0
Hafnerdh 401 0RPImo lb 3 t1'0 0
VMrtnz c 401 0 Mrrero rf 4 1' 0 1
Blliard 2b 401 0 Gbbons dh 4 1' -1 3
Brssrd lb 301 0 Gomez3b 4 00 0
JHrndzph 1 00 0 Newhn cf 1 000
Crisp If 3 00 0 Matos cf 0 0 Y 0
Gerutrf 2 00 0 GGilc 3 01 0
Corass 3 01 0 *"
Totals 320 5 0 Totals 29 4 4 4
Cleveland 000 000 000-- 0
Baltimore 000 004 00x--. 4
E-Belliard (7), BRyan (1). LOB-
Cleveland 7, Baltimore 6. 3B-Cora (2).
HR-Gibbons (11). SB-BRoberts 2 (T8),
Tejada 2 (3), Newhan (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland


Millwood L,3-6 6 3 4 3
Riske 2 1 0 0
Baltimore


5-3
0=-1


Cabrera W,6-7 7 4 0 0 2 5
Byrdak 1 0 0 0 0,-
BRyan I 1 1 0 0 0'2
T-2:50. A-38,059 (48,290). ,
Diamondbacks 7, Dodgers 5
ARIZONA LOS ANGELES:
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Cunsell 2b 5 01 1 Robles ss 5 1, 1 0
Tracylb 5 11 1 Perez 3b 4 1 1 0
LGnzlz If 5120 JDrewcf 5 233
Glaus 3b 4 00 0 JKent2b 4 0 1 0
ShGren rf 421 1 Werth rf 4 0 1 2
JoCruz cf 4 12 2 Choi lb 2 0 0 0
Terrero cf 0 00 0 Edwrds If 3 0 0 0
Cintron ss 422 1 Carrar p 0 0 00
Stnetc 403 0 Wunschp 0 0 b 0
Vargas p 1 00oo0 Snchez p 0 6 0 0
Crmer p 0 00 0 Saenz ph 1 (0,0 0
JrLopz p 0000 Osoria p 0 0 00
Aquino p 0000 JPhllps c 3 000
McCkn ph 1 00 0 DLowe p 0 06 0
Bruney p 0 00 0 CRoss ph 1 000
Dssens p 1 0 0
Grbwsk If 1 1'0 0
Totals 37712 6 Totals 34 5 7 5
Arizona 122 100 010--- 7
Los Angeles 102 010 100O-? 5
Grabowski reached first on catcher's
interference.
E-Glaus (15), Stinnett (2), Perez (6),
JKent (9). DP-Arizona 1, Los Angeleo 1.
LOB-Arizona 13, Los Angeles 8. B--
JoCruz (6), JKent (19). HR-Tracy (9),
ShGreen (13), JoCruz (12), Cintron: (2),
JDrew 2 (15). SB-Counsell (10). S-
Vargas 2, Cormier. -.
IP H RERBBSO


Arizona
Vargas W,3-4
Cormier
JrLopez
Aquino
Bruney S,9
Los Angeles
DLowe L,5-9
Desseps
Carrara
Wunsch
Sanchez
Osoria


9 5 5
2 1 1
0 0 0
1 1 1
00 0
0 0 0


JrLopez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.:
WP-Sanchez. Balk-Sanchez.


i~~ .-_ :


2B SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


SPORTS


4


AY


~r~L,& ~~tc 3~tf:: r~~f~OARB~









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BASEBALL
Astros 4, Reds 3
HOUSTON CINCINNATI
ab rhbi ab r hbl
Tveras cf 4 11 0 FLopez ss 5 00 0
Biggio 2b 4 01 0 Aurilia2b 4 1 1 1
Lamb 1lb 4 01 1 Casey 1lb 5 0 1 0
Ensbrg 3b 3 01 0 Grf Jr. cf 2 1 1 0
Lane rf 4 11 0 Randa 3b 4 0 1 1
AEvrtt ss 4 22 1 WPena rf 4 1 2 1
Burke If 4 01 1 LaRue c 3 01 0
Wheelr p 0000 Olmedo pr 0 000
RChavzc 3000 Vlentinc 0 000
Rdrgez p 2000 Romno If 2 0 0 0
OPImro ph 0 00 1 Dunn If 1 0 0 0
Bums p 0 00 0 Harang p 3 0 0 0
Brntlett If 0 00 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0
JaCruzph 1 000
Wthersp 0 0 00
Totals 324 8 4 Totals 34 3 7 3
Houston 010 001 200- 4
Cincinnati 100 101 000- 3
DP-Cincinnati 1. LOB-Houston 3,
Cincinnati 9. 2B-Biggio (24), Ensberg
(15), Lane (19), Burke (8), Randa (20),
WPena (11), LaRue (12). HR-AEverett
(7), Aurilia (7), WPena (11). SB-Taveras
(19). SF-OPalmeiro.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Rodriguez W,4-3 6 5 3 3 5 6
Bums 2 2 0 0 0 1
Wheeler S,2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
Harang L,4-7 7 8 4 4 1 4
Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 1
Weathers 1 0 0 0 0 1
Balk-Rodriguez.
Umpires-Home, Larry Young; First,
Chad Fairchild; Second, Fieldin Culbreth;
Third, Marvin Hudson.
T-2:35. A-0 (42,271).
Reds 11, Astros 6, 2nd Game
HOUSTON CINCINNATI
ab rhbi ab r hbi
OPImro If 5 12 1 FLopez ss 5 342
JVzcno ss 5 11 1 Olmedo 2b 4 1 2 1
Brkmnlb 4121 GrfJr.cf 5 222
Ensbrg3b 411 0 Dunnib 5 1 1 2
Lane rf 4010 WPena rf 4 1 2 1
Burke 2b 4 11 2 JaCruz If 3 1 1 1
Bmtlett cf 300 0 Romno If 0 0 0 0
Hrvlle p 0 00 0 Vlentin c 4 0 1 1
Asmusc 4 12 1 EEcrcn 3b 4 1 1 0
Astacio p 2000 ROrtiz p 3 000
Biggio ph 1 00 0 RWgnr p 0 000
Sprger p 0 00 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0
Lamb lb 1 00 0 Randa ph 0 1 00
Merckrp 0 000
Totals 37610 6 Totals 371114 10
'Houston 400 000 200- 6
Cincinnati 102 040 04x- 11
E-Astacio (1), Dunn (5). DP-Houston
1. LOB-Houston 5, Cincinnati 5. 2B-
Ensberg (16), Burke (9), Ausmus (7),
Olmedo (2), WPena (12), Valentin (5).
'3B-FLopez (2). HR-OPalmeiro (2),
FLopez (14), Griffey Jr. (15), Dunn (21).
SF-Olmedo.
IP H RERBBSO
'Houston
Astacio L,0-4 6 11 7 3 1 6
:Springer 1 0 0 0 0 2
Harville 1 3 4 4 0 0
Cincinnati
ROrtiz W,4-6 62-3 8 6 5 1 4
.RWagner 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 0
Mercker 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Harville (Randa). WP-
Harville, RWagner. PB-Valentin.
Umpires-Home, Eric Cooper; First,
Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Marvin Hudson;
Third, Chad Fairchild.
T-2:43. A-28,236 (42,271).
Nationals 4, Cubs 2
WASHINGTON CHICAGO
ab rhbi ab r hbi


,Wlkrsn cf 4 11 0 CPttson cf
Spivey2b 3 00 1 NPerez ss
JGillen rf 4 22 1 DeLee lb
Castilla 3b 2 10 0 Bumitz rf
Byrd If 3 00 0 ARmrz 3b
WCdero lb 3 01 1 TWalkr 2b
QBnntt c 401 1 HIndsw If
CCrdro p 0 00 0 Barrett c
Carroll ss 3 00 0 JeWms p
Ar Jr.p 2 00 0 HrstJrph
Mjwskip 0 00 0 Wuertzp
Short ph 1 00 0
Eschenp 0 00 0
HCrsco p 0 00 0
Schndr c 0 00 0


4000
4 01 0
4231
3 000
4 01 1
4 01 0
3 01 0
401 0
1 000
1 000
0000


Totals 294 5 4 Totals 32 2 8 2
Washington 100 210 000- 4
Chicago 000 101 000- 2
.DP-Washington 2. LOB-Washington
3,. Chicago 6. 2B-WCordero (2),
Hollandsworth (12). 3B-Wilkerson (4),
DeLee (2). HR--JGuillen (17), DeLee (25).
SS-Byrd, JeWilliams. SF-Spivey,
.WCordero.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
ArmasJr. W,4-4 5 7 2 2 1 6
Majewski 1 1 0 0 1 0
Eischen 1 0 0 0 0 2
HCarrasco 1 0 0 0 0 0
CCorderoS,29 1 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
JeWilliams L,1-3 7 5 4 4 1 3
Wuertz 2 0 0 0 0 4
Armas Jr. pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
-HBP-by JeWilliams (Castilla).
Umpires-Home, Brian O'Nora; First, Ed
Hi6kox; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third,
Tim Welke.
T-2:39. A-40,488 (39,538).

Angels 5, Royals 3
LOS ANGELES KANSAS CITY
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Figginscf 5230 DJesuscf 4 01 1
Erstad lb 412 1 Berroa ss 4 000
VGrero rf 3 01 1 MiSwy dh 4 0 1 0
GAndsn If 4 12 1 Stairs lb 4 0 00
JRivra dh 4 00 0 Brown rf 4 1 1 0
Izturis ss 412 1 Costa If 3 000
McPrsn3b 4021 Grffnno3b 3 1 1 0
BMolnac 4 02 0 Gotay2b 3 1 1 2
DVnon pr 0 000 ACstillo c 2 000
JMolna c 0 00 0 Long ph 1 0 0 0
AKndy 2b 4000 Buck c 0 000
Totals 36514 5 Totals 32 3 5 3
Los Angeles 101 110 010- 5
Kansas City 000 000 030- 3
E-ACastillo (2), Gobble (1). DP-
Kansas City 1. LOB-Los Angeles 5,
Kansas City 2. 2B-GAnderson (18),
Izturis (5), McPherson (13), DeJesus (13),
Brown (16). SB-Figgins (25). CS-
Figgins (6), DaVanon (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
ColonW,11-4 71-3 4 3 3 0 5
FRodriguez S,15 12-3 1 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
LimaL,1-7 6 10 4 3 1 0
Nunez 2 3 1 1 0 1
Gobble 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-Lima.
Umpires-Home, C.B. Bucknor; First,
Phil Cuzzi; Second, Ed Rapuano; Third,
Jerry Crawford.
T-2:33. A-16,051 (40,785).
Rangers 6, Mariners 5
TEXAS SEATTLE
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Dllucci dh 5 23 1 ISuzuki rf 3 2 2 0
MYongss 4 23 3 Winn If 4 1 1 1
Txeira lb 4 00 0 Beltre 3b 4 2 3 3
Blalock3b 5 01 1 Sexson lb 3 000
ASrano 2b 5 000 Ibanez dh 3 00 1
Mathws rf 4 13 1 BBoone 2b 4 00 0
Menchlf 5 01 0 Reedcf 3 00 0


SPORTS


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN) IndyCar Racing Argent Mortgage Indy 300. From
Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan. (Live) (CC)
(ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Sportsman Series. From
Englishtown, N.J. (Taped) (CC)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at New York Mets.
From Shea Stadium in Flushing, N.Y. (Live)
2 p.m. (WGN) MLB Baseball Washington Nationals at Chicago
Cubs. From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (Live) (CC)
7 p.m. (ESPN) 2005 MLB All-Star Selection Show (Live)
8 p.m. (ESPN) MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia
Phillies. From Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia. (Live) (CC)
BICYCLING
8:30 a.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 2. Stage
2, from Challans to Les Essarts, France. (Live)
11:30 a.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 2.
Stage 2, from Challans to Les Essarts, France. (Same-day Tape)
8 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Cycling Tour de France Stage 2. Stage 2,
from Challans to Les Essarts, France. (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
9 p.m. (FSNFL) Boxing Sunday Night Fights. Rydell Booker takes
on James Toney in a heavyweight bout from Sept. 23, 2004. (Taped)
EQUESTRIAN
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Horse Racing Bud Irish Derby. From County
Kildare, Ireland. (Taped)
GOLF
10 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Golf Smurfit European Open -
Final Round. From Dublin, Ireland. (Live)
1:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Golf Nationwide Tour Lake Erie Charity
Classic Final Round. From Findley Lake, N.Y. (Live)
2 p.m. (6 CBS) Golf HSBC Women's World Match Play
Championship Final Round. From Hamilton Farm Golf Club in
Gladstone, N.J. (Live) (CC)
(10 CBS) Golf HSBC Women's World Match Play Championship
- Final Round. From Hamilton Farm Golf Club in Gladstone, N.J.
(Live) (CC)
3 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) PGA Golf Cialis Western Open
- Final Round. From Cog Hill Golf and Country Club in Lemont, Ill.
(Live) (CC)
5:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Golf Champions Tour Commerce Bank
Championship Final Round. From East Meadow, N.Y. (Same-day
Tape)
RODEO
6 p.m. (OUTDOOR) Bull Riding PBR. (Taped)
TENNIS
9 a.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Tennis Wimbledon Men's Final. From
the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon,
England. (Live) (CC)
VOLLEYBALL
4:30 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Beach Volleyball AVP Nissan
Cincinnati Open Men's Final. From Cincinnati. (Live) (CC)
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Beach Volleyball AVP Nissan Series Women.
From San Diego. (Taped)


Nix cf 401 0 Blmqist ss 3 00 0
Brajas c 2 100 Hansen ph 0 0 0 0
Olivo c 3 0 00
Spiezio ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 38612 6 Totals 31 5 6 5
Texas 130 100 001- 6
Seattle 103 010 000- 5
DP-Texas 1, Seattle 1. LOB-Texas 10,
Seattle 6. 2B-Matthews (7), Winn (21).
HR-Dellucci (15), MYoung (12),
Matthews (4), Beltre 2 (8). S-Hansen.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Wilson 2 4 4 4 3 2
Wasdin 42-3 2 1 1 1 5
Loe W,2-1 11-3 0 0 0 0 2
FCorderoS,19 1 0 0 0 2 1
Seattle
Pineiro 5 7 5 5 4 3
JMateo 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Villone 2 2 0 0 0 1
JeNelson 0 1 0 0 0 0
PutzL,1-3 11-3 1 1 1 0 0
Wilson pitched to 3 batters in the 3rd,
JeNelson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by JMateo (Barajas). WP-
Pineiro.
Umpires-Home, Mike Reilly; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Bob Davidson; Third,
Paul Schrieber.
T-3:13. A-34,209 (47,447).
Brewers 5, Pirates 3


PITTSBURGH
ab rhbi


Lawton rf
Snchez 3b
Mckwk cf
Bay If
Ward lb
Castillo 2b
Cota c
TRdmn cf
JWilsn ss
Ross c
-Duke p
Hill ph
STorres p


MILWAUKI


3 01 1 BClarkcf
5 11 0 Weeks 2b
5 00 0 BHall 3b
2 11 1 CaLee If
4 02 0 DMillerc
301 1 Helms ib
2 10 0 Jenkins rf
1 00 0 Hardy ss
3 00 0 Bttlco p
1 00 0 Turnbw p
3 00 0 VSants p
1 00 0 Drgtn ph
0 00 0 Obrmlr p
Phelps p
Wise p
Ovrbay lb


EE
ab
3
4
4
4
3
3
2
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1


r hbi
1 2 0
1 1 2
1 1 2




000


000
000
S1 10
00 0
00 0





1 1 0


Totals 333 6 3 Totals 29 5 7 5
Pittsburgh 111 000 000- 3
Milwaukee 000 210 02x- 5
E-Jenkins (3). DP-Pittsburgh 1.
LOB-Pittsburgh 11, Milwaukee 2. 2B-
Lawton (20), Ward (16). HR-Weeks (3),
BHall (13). S-BClark.


Pittsburgh
Duke
STorres L,2-4
Milwaukee
VSantos
Obermueller
Phelps
Wise
Bottalico W,2-1
Tumbow S,15


IP H RERBBSO


2 2 2 0 0
22200


5 6 3 2
1 0 0 0
2-3 0 0 0
1-3 00 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


HBP-by Obermueller (Lawton), by
VSantos (Lawton). WP-Duke, Phelps.
Umpires-Home, Bill Hohn; First, James
Hoye; Second, Doug Eddings; Third,
Bruce Dreckman.
T-2:38. A-29,052 (41,900).
Yankees 8, Tigers 4
NEW YORK DETROIT
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Jeter ss 4 11 C inge 3b 4 0 1 0
Cano 2b 5 02 0 Planco 2b 4 1 1 0
Shffield rf 5 01 1 CGIllen ss 4 1 1 0
ARod 3b 431 0 MOrdz rf 3 1 1 1
Matsui If 4 12 0 IRdrgz c 4 0 1 0
Posada c 4 10 1 DYong lb 4 1 1 3
JaGbl lb 3 00 0 Shitndh 4 000
Wmack cf 1 11 1 Monroe If 4 0 1 0
BWllms dh 5 145 Logan cf 3 0 0 0
Crosby cf 301 0
TMrtnz lb 2 00 0
Totals 40813 8 Totals 34 4 7 4
New York 000 102 104- 8
Detroit 000 400 000- 4
E-Cano (9). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-New
York 10, Detroit 4. 2B--Sheffield (18),
ARodriguez (17), MOrdonez (1). 3B-
Cano (2). HR-BWIlliams (5), DYoung


(13). SB-Logan (17). CS-Crosby (1),
Inge (2).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Mussina 6 7 4 4 0 5
Gordon W,2-3 2 0 0 0 1 3
MRivera 1 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Douglass 6 7 3 1 2 6
Rodney 2-3 21 1 0 1
JWalker 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 2 0
Percival L,1-2 1 3 4 4 1 0
PB-IRodriguez.
Umpires-Home, Mike DiMuro; First,
Mark Carlson; Second, Joe West; Third,
Brian Gorman.
T-3:08. A-41,207 (40,120).
Rockies 3, Cardinals I


COLORADO ST. LOUIS
ab rhbi ab


Grabito 2b
Wtsick p
Fentes p
Sllivan cf
Helton 1b
Atkins 3b
Hawpe rf
Piedra If
Mceli p
Rlaford ss
LuGnzl ss
Closser c
Ardon c
Wright p.
Mohr If


4 00 0 Eckstin ss
0 00 0 Edmnd cf
0 00 0 RSndrs ph
4 00 0 Pujols lb
3 13 0 LWalkr rf
4 11 0 Rolen 3b
401 2 MabrylIf
2 00 0 Nunez 2b
000 0 Thmps p
1 00 0 EDiazc
4 02 0 Mrquis p
3 11 1 King p
1 00 0 Grdzln 2b
3000
0000


r h bi
020
0 2 0
001
0 1 0
0 1 0
020
000
000
000
000
0 0 0



020
000
000


Totals 333 8 3 Totals 35 1 8 1
Colorado 000 002 100- 3
St. Louis 000 000 100- 1
E-Garabito (1), Eckstein (10). DP-
Colorado 1, St. Louis 1. LOB-Colorado 5,
St. Louis 11. 2B-Helton (21), Atkins (12),
LWalker (13), Marquis (4). HR-Closser
(3). SB-LuGonzalez (1). CS-Piedra (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Wright W,5-8 61-3 5 1 0 1 3
Miceli 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Witasick 1 0 0 0 1 1
FuentesS,10 1 2 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Marquis L,8-6 7 6 3 3 2 5
King 11-3 1 0 0 0 2
Thompson 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Wright (Pujols). Balk-
Marquis.
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First,
Jim Joyce; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Dana
DeMuth.
T-3:03. A-47,913 (50,345).
Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4
TORONTO BOSTON
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Jhnson If 401 0 Damon cf 5 1 2h0
Rios rf 5 01 0 Rnteria ss 5 02 0
VWells cf 5 01 0 DOrtiz dh 3 2 2 1
Hlnbrn 1b 5 02 0 MRmrz If 5 1 22
AHill 3b 5 12 0 Varitek c 3 1 1 1
Zaunc 411 0 Millarib 3 1 1 0
Mnchno dh 2100 RVazqzpr 00000
Ctlnotto dh 1 00 0 Olerud lb 0 0 0 0
OHudsn 2b 4 13 2 Payton rf 2 0 0 0
JMcDIdss 401 2 Nixonrf 2 01 0
Mueller 3b 4 0 1 2
Bllhorn 2b 4 0 1 0
Totals 394124 Totals 36 613 6
Toronto 010 300 000- 4
Boston 000 112 20x- 6
E-DWells (2). DP-Boston 1. LOB-
Toronto 11, Boston 10. 2B-AHill (10),
Damon 2 (21), Mueller (15), Bellhorn (20).
3B-OHudson (3). HR-MRamirez (20).
SB-Renteria (7). SF-Varitek.
IP H RERBBSO


Toronto
Chacin
Walker L,3-2
Schoeneweis
Chulk
Boston
DWells
Timlin W,3-1
Embree
Foulke S,15


5 8 4 4 1
11-3 4 2 2 1
1 1 0 0 0
2-3 0 0 0 1

62-3 9 4 4 1
1-3 0 0 0 1
2-3 1 0 0 0
11-3 2 0 0 0


Chacin pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.


Timlin pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by DWells (Johnson). WP-
Chacin.
Umpires-Home, Larry Poncino; First,
Lance Barksdale; Second, Chris
Guccione; Third, Angel Hernandez.
T-3:17. A-35,268 (35,095).

TENNIS

Wimbledon
England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Purse: $18.5 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Andy Roddick (2), United States, def.
Thomas Johansson (12), Sweden, 6-7 (6),
6-2, 7-6 (10), 7-6 (5).
Women
Championship
Venus Williams (14), United States, def.
Lindsay Davenport (1), United States, 4-6,
7-6 (4), 9-7.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Stephen Huss, Australia, and Wesley
Moodie, South Africa, def. Bob and Mike
Bryan (2), United States, 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-7
(2), 6-3.
Women
Quarterfinals
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, and
Amelie Mauresmo, France, def. Elena
Likhovtseva and Vera Zvonareva (5),
Russia, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-1.
Semifinals
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber
(2), South Africa, def. Bryanne Stewart and
Samantha Stosur (11), Australia, 6-0, 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, and
Amelie Mauresmo, France, def. Anna-
Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Martina
Navratilova (8), United States, 6-4, 6-4.
Mixed
Quarterfinals
Kevin Ullyett, Zimbabwe, and Liezel
Huber (4), South Africa, def. Mike Bryan
and Martina Navratilova (5), United States,
3-6, 6-4, 9-7.
Jonas Bjorkman, Sweden, and Lisa
Raymond (3), United States, def. Todd
Woodbridge and Samantha Stosur (6),
Australia, 6-2, 7-6 (13).
Jesse Levine and Michael Shabaz,
United States, def. Christopher Llewellyn,
Britain, and Jurgens Strydom, Namibia, 7-
6 (4), 6-3.

AUTO RACING

NASCAR
Craftsman Trucks-O'Reilly Auto Parts
250
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Starting position in parentheses)
1. (10) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 170,
$58,350.
2. (3) Todd Kluever, Ford, 170, $35,450.
3. (4) David Reutimann, Toyota, 170,
$23,740.
4. (2) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 170,
$16,125.
5. (1) Bill Lester, Toyota, 170, $16,450.
6. (7) Jimmy Spencer, Dodge, 170,
$14,950.
7. (20) Terry Cook, Ford, 170, $13,200.
8. (27) Brendan Gaughan, Dodge, 170,
$13,025.
9. (23) John Andretti, Chevrolet, 170,
$12,950.
10. (16) Rick Crawford, Ford, 170,
$14,350.
11. (12) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet, 170,
$12,850.
12. (25) Bobby Hamilton, Dodge, 170,
$13,715.
13. (31) Ricky Craven, Ford, 170,
$12,640.
14. (9) Ted Musgrave, Dodge, 170,
$12,590.
15. (17) Chad Chaffin, Toyota, 170,
$10,790.
16. (8) Brandon Whitt, Toyota, 170,
$12,465.
17. (11) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet,
170, $12,390.
18. (6) Robert Huffman, Toyota, 169,
$12,340.
19. (19) Tracy Hines, Chevrolet, 169,
$12,290.
20. (30) Chase Montgomery, Dodge,
169, $11,390.
21. (26) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 169,
$10,965.
22. (22) Jimmy Kite, Chevrolet, 169,
$9,940.
23. (24) Kevin Hamlin, Chevrolet, 169,
$9,915.
24. (13) David Starr, Chevrolet, 169,
$9,890.
25. (18) Clay Rogers, Dodge, 168,
$9,865.
26. (34) Deborah Renshaw, Dodge, 167,
$9,840.
27. (21) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 164,
accident, $9,815.
28. (15) Johnny Benson, Toyota, 161,
$9,790.
29. (28) Chris Fontaine, Dodge, 152,
accident, $9,745.
30. (5) Jack Sprague, Chevrolet, 150,
engine failure, $9,715.
31. (32) Kelly Sutton, Chevrolet, 147,
accident, $9,690.
32. (14) Steve Park, Dodge, 136, acci-
dent, $9,665.
33. (33) Robert Pressley, Dodge, 135,
$9,645.
34. (36) Wayne Edwards, Chevrolet,
115, overheating, $9,615.
35. (29) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet,
73, vibration, $9,590.
36. (35) Justin Allgaier, Ford, 68, acci-
dent, $9,565.
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Purchased the
contract of LHP Tim Byrdak from Ottawa of
the IL.
BOSTON RED SOX-Plaed RHP Matt
Mantel on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP
Abe Alvarez from Pawtucket of the IL.
TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS-Placed INF
Eric Munson on the 15-day DL. Purchased
the contract of OF Chris Singleton from
Durham of the IL.
National League


ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Recalled
LHP Michael Gosling from Tucson of the
PCL. Optioned RHP Brandon Medders to
Tucson.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Recalled RHP
Ezequiel Astacio from Round Rock of the
PCL. Designated LHP John Franco for
assignment.
NEW YORK METS-Activated INF
Miguel Cairo from the 15-day DL. Optioned
OF Victor Diaz to Norfolk of the IL.
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Acquired RHP
Paul Quantrill from the New York Yankees
for LHP Darrell May, RHP Tim Redding
and cash. Activated 2B Eric Young from
the 60-day DL. Recalled RHP Brian
Falkenborg from Portland of the PCL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NEW YORK KNICKS-Signed C
Channing Frye and G Nate Robinson.
PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS-Signed
G Martell Webster to a multi-year contract.


LANCE
Continued from Page 1B

friend, singer Sheryl Crow,
snapped photos for the scrap-
book
Italian Ivan Basso, another
favorite, finished 1:24 slower
than Armstrong in 20th place.
Spanish racers Roberto Heras
and Iban Mayo will need
astounding rides in the moun-
tains where they are strongest to
have a hope of making up time
on Armstrong. Heras went 2:18
slower than Armstrong; Mayo



SPRINT
Continued from Page 1B

weak and relatively inexperi-
enced one?
Not necessarily, according to
Moling.
"They are the worst," he
answered when asked if the
favorites usually pre-register.
"My best and fastest runners
are day-of-the-race partici-
pants."
This despite Moling's efforts
to get them to sign up early to
help promote the event And
never mind saving as much as
$20 if they take the time to pre-
register
Of course, Moling won't deny
there could be an alternative
reason for their tardiness.
Strategy keep the opposi-
tion guessing.
"That's got to be somewhere
in the back of their minds,"
Moling admitted. "I know in
running races, a lot of runners
think coming out at the last
minute gives them a mental
edge."
So who's the favorite for this
year's race? Projections based
on current information are
possible, but not entirely reli-
able. .
In the men's division,
Lowery is a certain no-show.
The Gainesville native already
committed to the Grand
Canyon race. Same holds true
in the women's division;



VENUS
Continued from Page 1B

quarterfinals at a major since
losing the 2003 Wimbledon
final to younger sister Serena
while struggling with a torn
abdominal muscle. That was
just part of a long line of
injuries and losses, difficulties
that were easy to deal with
compared to the shooting
death of half-sister Yetunde in
September 2003.
"It's been a tough two years,"
said Williams' mother, Oracene
Price. "It's been a long time
coming for her."
Davenport's been waiting 51/2
years since her last major title,
and she looked poised to end
that drought Saturday. She won
the first set the only one
Williams lost this fortnight -
and served for the champi-
onship after breaking for a 6-5
lead in the second. But
Williams would not go quietly,
dialing up the volume of her
grunts and the power of her
groundstrokes to break at love
for 6-6 and then claim the
tiebreaker.
"I just spent so much time
behind that the only time I
think I was in front was when I
won the match," said Williams,
who had lost her past five
Grand Slam finals, all to her
sister. "I guess somehow I
stayed in there."
Did she ever
Little sis might be the one
with the nascent acting career,
but it was the elder Williams
who combined with Davenport
to script a 2-hour, 45-minute
drama worthy of London's West
End. It's a lot to live up to for
Roger Federer and Andy
Roddick, who meet Sunday in
a rematch of the 2004 men's
final.
Roddick's shirt, shorts and
arms were covered in dirt and
grass stains from dives and
tumbles Saturday as he com-
pleted a 6-7 (6), 6-2, 7-6 (10), 7-6
(5) semifinal victory over
Thomas Johansson. The match
was suspended because of rain
in the first set Friday, when


Federer easily beat Lleyton
Hewitt, and resumed at noon
Saturday
The women's final followed
on Centre Court, and if the play
didn't always sparkle in the
fading light Williams dou-
ble-faulted 10 times,
Davenport five, and they com-
bined for 56 unforced errors -
it was riveting.
There were gasps in the
stands when the normally
unflappable Davenport railed
at the chair umpire over a
clearly incorrect call. And mur-
murs when Davenport left the
court to get medical attention
for her lower back (a problem


SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 3B


was 3:13 back in 175th place.
Zabriskie's ride earned him
the overall leader's yellow jer-
sey and was the fastest in a time
trial in the Tour's 102-year histo-
ry a remarkable feat for his
first-ever day in the race.
"This feels really great," said
Zabriskie, who considered quit-
ting cycling after a bad crash last
year "I never thought this would
happen. Never, ever, ever"
Zabriskie still has screws in
one knee from another crash in
2003 when he broke his leg and
wrist after being hit by an SUV
in his hometown of Salt Lake
City.


Carusone is a member of the
University of Florida swim
team and has other obligations.
As for the men, Philip
LaHaye, Todd Fitzgerald and
Jack Haire, who placed sec--
ond, third and fourth, respec-
tively, on Memorial Day, would
have to be day-of-the-race reg-
istrants. Jamieson Cihak, who
hails from Marquette,
Michigan, is the top returning
competitor. He was fifth in the
year's first sprint triathlon.
Others returning who did
well in that first race include
Thomas Hoffman of Palm
Harbor (sixth), James
Thornton of Tarpon Springs
(seventh) and Edward Brown
of Homosassa (eighth).
As for the women's division,
Teresa Tinsley of Apopka will
race. She was second to
Carusone (and 18th overall) at
Memorial Day and is the only
one of the top six female fin-
ishers to pre-register. Others
among the top 10 certain to
compete are Tracy Parker of
Odessa (seventh) and Cristy
Bartalo of Tampa (ninth).
Whoever does eventually
show up, the race which con-
sists of a quarter-mile open
water swim, a 15-mile bike ride
and a three-mile run should
be a tight one. Still, Godlove's
winning time last year of
1:01:20 was 99 seconds better
than runner-up Leif Stringer.
So anything could happen. It
all depends on who finally
does show up.


she did not blame for her loss).
The tennis was most
enthralling in the longest third
set, by games, in a Wimbledon
women's final since 1949.
Trailing 5-4, Williams dou-
ble-faulted at 30-all to put
Davenport within a single
point of her fourth major title.
But Williams smacked a gutsy
backhand to stay in it, the sort
of perfect shot she hit repeat-
edly in her semifinal victory
over defending champion
Maria Sharapova.
Another chance for
Davenport came when she led
7-6, with Williams serving. Two
consecutive unforced errors by
Williams put her down 15-30,
and the next point was that 25-
stroke masterpiece, both play-
ers hitting hard shots until
Williams again came through.
It was one of her 49 winners, 19
more than Davenport.
"Every time the chips were
down for Venus, she played
unbelievable," Davenport said.
"She just was incredible.
Whenever I felt like I was just
about to shut the door com-
pletely, it was like, 'Oops, let's
open that back up.'"
Williams broke for an 8-7
lead, then served it out After
Williams wasted her first
match point with a double-
fault, Davenport missed a fore-
hand.
A moment later, Williams
extended her arm across the
net But Davenport knew this
match was worth more than a
simple handshake and pulled
Williams close for a hug.
Just participating in the
match was a rush for
Davenport, who said last year
she probably wouldn't return
to Wimbledon and planned to
retire at the end of 2004.
What a shame that would
have been. Since then, she's
reached two major finals -
she lost to Serena Williams at
the Australian Open and
returned to No. 1 in the rank-
ings.
"I'm playing better now than
I have in years," said


Davenport, 0-4 in major finals
since winning the 2000
Australian Open. "I don't really
feel like I have anything to
really hang my head for or be
ashamed of."
This was her 27th meeting
against the older Williams, and
while Davenport leads 14-13
overall, she trails 0-4 at the All
England Club, That includes
the 2000 final, when Williams
won her first Slam title.
It's been a long journey to
No. 5.
"Oh, no," Venus said. "I knew
my destiny was to be in the
winner's circle. There were
times along the way where I
didn't make it there. But I felt
my destiny was definitely to
win big titles, win lots of titles."







4B SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


Associated Press
Todd Bodine crosses the finish line with his first-ever victory in the
NASCAR Truck series.


Bodine gets first


truck series win

/1 e scary moment that brought out
U TeVer CjOyS a red flag late in the race.
With 13 laps to go, Chris
beStevfe ti hh Fontaine's truck hit the wall*
and crossed back into traffic.
Sutton's truck hit Fontaine and
Associated Press flipped onto its top, spinning
and skidding down the back-
KANSAS CITY, Kan. Todd stretch of the 1V2-mile tri-oval
Bodine withstood a series of before rolling back onto its
late restarts, then pulled away wheels on the apron.
from the pack in a three-lap Sutton, whose 33rd career
shootout to win Saturday's start broke the series' careord
NASCAR Craftsman Truck for race appearances by a
Series race- at Kansas for race appearances by a
Speedway. woman, got out of the truck on
It was the first victory of the her own. Both she and
season and third in the series Fontaine were checked and
for Bodine, a former Winston cleared at the infield medical
and Nextel Cup driver who center, although Sutton said
also owns 15 Busch series she would see a doctor
wins. It was also the first win Tuesday for a CAT scan.
for Toyota this year, breaking "You just hold on to the
Chevrolet's five-race streak steering wheel real tight,"
"My truck was so strong on Sutton said. "I was watching it
restarts that I could run wide slide across, and I saw the wall
open," said Bodine, who led 81 coming, and I thought, 'Oh,
of 170 laps of the O'Reilly Auto man, don't hit it too hard.' Then
Parts 250. "A green-white- it flipped back over."
checker is basically two laps, The final caution came with
and I knew I could run it wide three laps remaining, when
open for two laps." Matt Crafton made contact
Rookie Todd Kluever won a with Ted Musgrave and hit the
back-and-forth battle with wall. Once the green dropped
David Reutimann in the late again, Kluever found himself
laps to take second his best fending off Reutimann's chal-
finish this year in a Ford. lenge rather than chasing
Reutimann's Toyota was third, Bodine.
followed in the top 10 by Mike "I think as the day went on I
Skinner, pole winner Bill learned more about restarts,"
Lester, Jimmy Spencer, Terry he said. "Toward the end they
Cook, Brendan Gaughan, John weren't that good, because you
Andretti and Rick Crawford. had to block and protect what
Dennis Setzer, the points you have."
leader, finished 11th. He still Jimmy Kite, the only truck
widened his lead by 5 points racer also running in Sunday's
to 38 over Bobby Hamilton, Indy Racing League event, fin-
who finished 12th. ished 22nd. He will start 22nd
Kelly Sutton's record-break- in Sunday's Argent Mortgage
ing day, meanwhile, ended in a Indy 300.


Danica grabs pole


Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. Danica
Patrick has another first on her short
Indy Racing League resume.
The 23-year-old rookie won her first
IRL pole Saturday at Kansas
Speedway, becoming the second
woman to take the top spot.
Patrick, the first woman to lead a lap
at the Indianapolis 500, turned in a
quick lap of 214.688 mph on her second
try around the 1/2-mile tri-oval in qual-
ifying for Sunday's Argent Mortgage
Indy 300. Sarah Fisher was the first
female pole-sitter, starting first at a
race in 2002 in Kentucky.
With two teammates qualifying sec-
ond and third, Patrick's chances of
earning her first IRL victory are even
better.
"It's very satisfying," said Patrick,
who edged out Rahal Letterman team-
mate Buddy Rice for the pole. "I'm
very proud of how hard this team has
worked, how hard I've worked. I'm just
proud of the whole situation for this
team."
Patrick,. making her eighth career
start, was fastest in her morning prac-
tice session, too. Her pole-winning
time drew a big cheer from the capaci-
ty crowd waiting for the start of a
NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series race.
Her best previous start was second at
Twin Ring Motegi in Japan in April.
"This is not untouched territory,"
Patrick said. "What's going to make the
difference is going out tomorrow and
staying up there and competing with
my teammates who did such a great job
last year."
In May, Patrick finished fourth at the
Indianapolis 500, the best finish by a
woman in the 89-year history of the
race, and her second fourth in the IRL
series.
"I know a lot of this started because
I'm a chick in a race car," Patrick said.
"Now it's turning into, 'Look what this
rookie can do."'
Rice, last year's race champion, will
start on the outside front after qualify-
ing at 214.65 mph. Vitor Meira was
third at 214.548 mph, followed in the
top 10 by Tomas Scheckter, Darren
Manning, Dario Franchitti, Scott
Dixon, Tony Kanaan, Scott Sharp and
Sam Hornish Jr.
This year's Indy 500 winner and the
current points leader, Dan Wheldon,
qualified 13th.
"The car has been very slow since we
rolled it off the truck, and we really
don't know why," said Wheldon, who
has won four of seven events this year.
"We just don't have an answer for it.
Right now, I've got a lot of people in


Associated Press
Danica Patrick became only the second woman to be an IRL pole-winner when she
turned in a lap of 214.688 mph at the Argent Mortgage Indy 300.


front of me that are going to be difficult
to beat."
Helio Castroneves, who won last
week at Richmond, Va., qualified 14th.
"We tried a number of things in prac-
tice," he said. "We just couldn't find
what we needed."
Last year, Rice won the pole and
then held off Meira by 51 seconds to
win the second-closest race in IRL his-
tory
It was the first 1-2-3 qualifying by one
team since Scheckter, Rice and Eddie
Cheever did it at Michigan in 2002 for
Eddie Cheever Red Bull Racing.
"We'll just have to see," Rice said.
"But all three cars qualified strongly,
they've been strong all day, and there's


no reason we shouldn't all three be
running up front and going for a finish
like last year."
Patrick agreed to a point.
"That's the plan is that the three of
us will hopefully take off and you know,
tow each other out to a country mile
lead, and then we don't have to worry'
about anybody," she said. "In a perfect
world, that's what would happen.
"But it's not going to happen like
that. There are going to be twists and
turns in the race. There'll be yellow
flags and fuel strategy and changes
within the car as the race goes on. So
it's definitely helpful to have friends
around, but at the end of the day we're
all trying to individually win the race."


NASCAR: Martin, Wallace honored before Pepsi 400


Race to be their

final one at

Daytona

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH Mark
Martin and Rusty Wallace were
honored Saturday night before
their final race at Daytona
International Speedway.
The retiring NASCAR stars
were given framed photos of
the first cars they drove at
Daytona in 1982 and greeted
with a standing ovation during
the drivers meeting before the
Pepsi 400. The photos also con-
tained head shots that Martin
said reminded him of "Starsky
and Hutch."
"You got me beat with the
mustache, but I've got the hair,"
Wallace said.
Martin and Wallace entered
their final race at Daytona in
the top 10 in the Nextel Cup
series point standings. Martin
was fifth, and Wallace was one
spot behind.
Although both drivers have
run well at Daytona over the
years, neither has had much to


TOURNEY
Continued from Page 1B

"We worked hard to get to
this point We pitched well, we
hit the ball, I couldn't ask for a
whole lot more."
On the other hand, the 15-16
year-old double elimination
tournament featured a base-
ball meeting between
Inverness and West Hernando.
But the Citrus County team
saw the short end of the stick in
losing 16-3 because of a 11-run
inning by West Hernando.
Leading 5-3 after four
innings, West Hernando used a
huge fifth-inning to emphati-
cally close the door on
Inverness.
Danny Lebron took the first
pitch he saw from reliever


celebrate at NASCAR's most
famous track
Martin is winless in 40
career starts in Cup races at
Daytona. He is 0-for-21 in the
Daytona 500 and 0-for-19 in the
Pepsi 400.
Wallace, the 1989 series
champion, is 0-for-44 in Cup
races here. He is winless in 23
starts in the Daytona 500 and
winless in 21 starts in the Pepsi
400.
Throw in various other races
at Daytona, and the two aren't
much better.
Martin has three wins at the
track two in the
International Race of
Champions series (2003, 2005)
and one in the Bud Shootout
(1999) in a combined 108
starts. Wallace has two victo-
ries one in the Budweiser
Shootout (1998) and one in the
IROC series (1989) in 102
starts.
Martin said earlier this year
that he won't miss racing at
Daytona.
"I don't particularly love this
place," he said. "It never has
been that kind to me."
Wallace was much more nos-
talgic.
"I've had a lot of fun, and I
enjoy it," he said.

Lucas Van Gorder over the wall
in left field to give his team a 6-
3 lead.
Later, Lebron hit a two-run
shot for his second homerun in
the same inning. Overall, the
left-handed slugger went 4-4
with three RBIs and three
runs.
Jonart Paz pitched four
innings and gave up three runs
in earning the win on the
mound. Paz also went 2-for-3
with two runs scored.
In the face of that onslaught,
West Hernando coach Vince
Manda wasn't overly
impressed.
"They needed to loosen up a
little," said Manda of his team,
which advances through the
winner's bracket to play Fort
McCoy at 10 a.m. today "They
just weren't waiting for their
pitch."


Truex taken
When Martin Truex Jr. agreed to
a three-year contract extension
with Dale Earnhardt Inc., it took
one of the most coveted drivers off
the free-agent market.
Truex, the reigning Busch Series
champion, said he signed the new
deal right before Friday night's
Busch race at Daytona
International Speedway. He won
the race and announced the new
contract in Victory Lane.
"I'm glad it's out of the way and I
don't have to read all over the
Internet that I'm driving this car or
that car," Truex said.
Hours before signing the new
deal, Truex was reportedly being
wooed by Penske Racing to
replace Rusty Wallace in the No. 2
Dodge. He also was mentioned for
the Roush Racing seat that will
open when Mark Martin retires at
the end of the season.
The Wallace and Martin rides
are the two most prolific openings
on the horizon. Neither team has
indicated who they will hire, and
team owner Roger Penske said
Saturday he wasn't panicking.
'There are all sorts of options,
and I think we'll just sit tight right
here for a while," Penske said.

West Hernando opened the
scoring in the top of the second
with a single run, prompting
Inverness to respond in the
bottom half.
With two outs, Brent Hayes
and Colton Isenhour drew
walks and, one batter later,
both came home on Ricky
Oehm's double to left center-
field to give Inverness a 2-1
lead.
However, that would be
Inverness' only lead after
pitcher Cody Maguire ran into
trouble against the opposition's
batters in the fourth.
The first four batters of the
inning reached (and later
scored) on an error, a hit batter
and a pair of singles.
A Mike Manza double drove
in the inning's final run, giving
West Hernando a 5-2 lead.
Oehm was the table-setter


Emotional Ebersol
NBC Sports president Dick
Ebersol thanked the "NASCAR
community" Saturday for support-
ing him through what has been a
difficult time.
Ebersol's 14-year-old son,
Teddy, was killed in a plane crash
in November in Colorado. The pilot
and a flight attendant also were
killed. Dick Ebersol, Charlie
Ebersol and co-pilot Eric Wicksell
were injured.
"I wanted to tell you all from the
bottom of my heart, 'Thank you,"'
Ebersol said, holding back tears.
'This community more than any
other in sports has been there for
my family and for me through all of
this."
NASCAR driver Kyle Petty and
team owner Rick Hendrick also
have lost sons, and Ebersol said
both reached out to him.
'To Kyle and to Rick, who
belong to the same club that none
of you I hope will ever have to
belong to, I owe so much," said
Ebersol, who spoke during the
prerace drivers meeting and
received a standing ovation. "You
don't ever want to lose a child, but
if you do, you want to have your
faith in humanity renewed by the
love and good w6rks of the people

instead of the clearer in the
fourth inning, leading off with
his second double of the game
before coming home on a
Maguire infield single to cut
the lead to 5-3.
Inverness drops to the loser's
bracket and will face Lady
Lake at 1 p.m. today.
9-10 Softball
Crystal River 6, Dunnellon 3
Crystal River scored four runs
over the last three innings to
secure the three-run victory over
Dunnellon. Abbey Brown and
Kelsie Tomaine each pitched a
complete game with Brown picking
up the win. Crystal River plays
Central Citrus at 10 a.m. today
while Dunnellon plays Inverness at
noon.
11-12 Softball
Inverness 16, Central Citrus 5


around you trying to help you."
Rumsfeld reception
Secretary of Defense Donald
Rumsfeld signed autographs,
posed for pictures and was gener-
ally given a warm welcome as he
made his way through the
NASCAR garage area before the
Pepsi 400.
Rumsfeld also got a standing
ovation during the prerace drivers
meeting.
"Everywhere I go around the
world the troops talk about
NASCAR and how much it
reminds them of home," said
Rumsfeld, the honorary grand
marshall for the race.
Coaching VIPS
South Carolina coach Steve
Spurrier and Oklahoma coach Bob
Stoops were among the VIPs at
the Pepsi 400.
The NASCAR race was the first
for Spurrier, the former coach at
the University of Florida and for
the NFL's Washington Redskins. It
was the second race for Stoops,
but his first in about eight years.
Spurrier, who rode a few laps
around the track in one of the pace
cars, said drivers might be the
best athletes of all. "You don't see

Brittany Hibbard picked up the
win on the mound for an Inverness
team that scored five runs in the
opening inning before using a
seven-run fourth inning on their
way to victory.
13-14 Softball
Central Citrs 11, Crystal River 0
Denise Aleman and Codie
Warmolk combined to pitch a one-
hit shutout for Central Citrus while
Natalie Sperandeo scored three
times from the leadoff spot.
Central Citrus plays Inverness at 2
p.m. today while Crystal River
faces off against Dunnellon at 4
p.m.
11-12 Baseball
Crystal River 10, Dixie County 0
Joel Walker twirled a no-hitter
against Dixie County in four
innings while Brad Kidd singled


many fat drivers out there," he
said.
He also compared racing to golf,,
where dozens of individuals vie for'
victory weekly.
"In football, we've got two
teams, and one of is going to win,",
he said. "If it's an even game,
you've got a 50 percent chance.
So this is a much tougher sport,
when you have just one winner out
of so many competitors."
Lug nuts
Team owner Robert Yates
missed the Pepsi 400 after battling,
kidney stones earlier in the week.
He was expected to return next
week at Chicago ... Singer Lisa
Marie Presley, who performed sev-
eral songs during prerace cere-
monies, had quite an experience
when she rode around the super-
speedway with former NASCAR
Cup driver Wally Dallenbach. "I
want to kick his (butt) right this
minute," she said. "It would have
been great if we just went around.
really fast in the middle of the
track. But he perpetually wanted to
make me feel like I was going to
die every two seconds, riding me
an inch from the wall." ... PGA Tour
golfer Chris DiMarco also was rec-
ognized as a VIP at the race.

twice and Tyler Swanson went 2-
for-2 with a two-run triple and two
runs scored to lead Crystal River.
Crystal River plays Dunnellon at
10 a.m. today.
Dunnellon 1, West Hernando 0
Victor Torres scored the game's
only run in the top of the fifth and
Jarrett Mitchell and Gavin McArdle
combined to pitch a one-hitter to
lead Dunnellon through the win-
ner's bracket. Dunnellon plays
Crystal River at 10 a.m. today. In
other action, Shady Hills defeated
Fort McCoy 10-0.
15-16 Baseball
Fort McCoy 6, Lady Lake 0
Nectro Warens tossed a com-
plete game no-hitter and the first
four Fort McCoy batters of the third
inning reached and scored to pace
the team to victory.


SPORTS


CIRus COUNiY (FL) CHRONICLE






SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 5B


CTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Down to the wire


Bidsfor next

Olympics

wind down

Associated Press

SINGAPORE Fast for-
ward seven years from now.
Picture the possible scenes:
Beach volleyball at the
foot of the Eiffel Tower.
Tennis at Wimbledon.
Basketball at Madison
Square Garden. Soccer at
Madrid's Bernabeu stadi-
um. Gymnastics a short hop
from the Kremlin.
It's the ultimate global
beauty pageant, with five of
the world's iconic cities -
Paris, London, New York,
Madrid and Moscow -
vying for the right to host
the 2012 Summer Olympics.
After a two-year cam-
paign, the most glamorous
bid contest in -Olympic his-
tory comes to a climactic
vote Wednesday in a con-
vention hall in Singapore.
At stake is international
prestige, billions of dollars
in investment and economic
spinoffs, and the honor of
staging the world's biggest
sports festival.
Paris, the longtime front-
runner, goes in. as the
favorite, with London
regarded as the main chal-
lenger. But anything could
happen in secret balloting
by the International
Olympic Committee.
"For probably the first
time in the history of the
Olympic movement, the IOC
is presented with a list of
cities all of whom are capa-
ble of hosting excellent
Olympic Games," IOC presi-
dent Jacques Rogge said
Thursday
"So, on the one hand you
can say that the IOC is in a
very fortunate position. On
the other hand it makes the
choice arguably more diffi-
cult than ever."
The bid cities believe a
significant number of IOC
members remain undecid-
ed. Much could depend on
the candidates' final pre-
sentations to the IOC and
the order in which cities are
eliminated in the round-by-
round balloting.
"If I were betting on it, I'd
say it's theirs to lose,"
Canadian IOC member Dick
Pound said of Paris. "It
would be London's to win. It
depends who's the best on
the day."
British bookmakers list
the French capital as an
overwhelming 1-6 favorite,
followed by London at 7-2.
Madrid and New York are
rated as outsiders and
Moscow a long shot.
"I think it would be very
surprising if Paris doesn't
win," said John MacAloon, a
University of Chicago pro-
fessor and Olympic histori-
an. "There seems to be a
real bandwagon at this


Associated Press
With security tightened, a Gurkha soldier stands guard outside the Swiss Hotel in Singapore
where the International Olympic Committee session is being held. London, Paris, New York,
Moscow and Madrid are competing to win the right to host the 2012 Olympic games in a vote
which will be held July 6.


point. It seems to me it's
pretty much a done deal. It's
hard to imagine a disaster
that could knock Paris off
track."
But Gerhard Heiberg, an
IOC executive board mem-
ber from Norway and co-
organizer of the 1994 Winter
Games in Lillehammer, isn't
so certain.
"I'm not convinced that
Paris is front-runner any
more," he said. "Some
months ago I felt that, but
today I'm not so sure any
more."
New York's bid under-
went an 11th-hour upheaval
after state officials rejected
a proposed showpiece $2
billion Olympic stadium on
Manhattan's West Side. New
York quickly came up with
an alternative plan to use a
$600 million stadium in the
less-fashionable borough of
Queens that eventually
would replace Shea
Stadium as the home of the
Mets.
"I think we have regained-
momentum," New York bid
leader and deputy mayor
Dan Doctoroff said this
week. "I'm very optimistic
going in to Singapore ..,
People. recognize that when
tested, we will always find a
way. We faced the toughest
test you could possibly face
and responded with an
excellent plan within three
days."
Rogge, who will open a
sealed envelope to
announce the winner in a
live televised ceremony, has
said the race could be
decided by half a dozen
votes or so among the 100-
plus eligible members.
While some members may
vote on the technical merits
of the bids, others may
make their choice based on
emotion, sentiment, geogra-
phy, politics or self-interest.
The final 45-minute pre-
sentations on Wednesday -
featuring emotive videos -
should carry more weight


than usual because mem-
bers were barred from visit-
ing the bid cities under
ethics rules enacted after
the Salt Lake City scandal.
Conventional wisdom says
cities stand to lose more
from a poor presentation
than gain from a strong one.
The cities are leaving
nothing to chance, bringing
a glitzy array of political
leaders, athletes and
celebrities to this Asian
city-state to pitch their case.
British Prime Minister
Tony Blair and England soc-
cer captain David Beckham
will be lobbying for London;
French President Jacques
Chirac for Paris; Spain's
Queen Sofia and Prime
Minister Jose Luis
Rodriguez Zapatero for
Madrid; Mayor Michael
Bloomberg, Muhammad Ali
and Sen. Hillary Rodham
Clinton for New York, and
Russian Prime Minister
Mikhail Fradkov for
Moscow.
About 3,500 people have
been accredited for the
Olympic gathering at the
Raffles City Convention
Center. More than 2,000
armed police, military and
civil defense officers will
be on security duty.
The dynamics of this bid
competition are sharply dif-
ferent from the two most
recent summer Olympic
races. Athens won the 2004
Games because of strong
sentiment in favor of bring-
ing the Olympics back to
their birthplace, while
Beijing was selected for
2008 out of a political will to
take the games for the first
time to the world's most
populous nation. -
No such defining factors
are at play this time.
"It doesn't seem that any-
body has a killer weakness
or an absolute showstopper
case for," Pound said.
The vagaries of the voting
system could cause some
surprises.


In the first round, exactly
100 members are eligible to
vote members from coun-
tries with bid cities can't
vote while their candidate
is still in the race. The city
with the fewest votes goes
out after each round until
one candidate receives a
winning majority.
As cities are eliminated,
members from those coun-
tries can jump into the vot-
ing meaning there will be
more voters in each subse-
quent round. In other
words, if New York gets
eliminated early, the four
U.S. members become eligi-
ble to vote in later rounds.
Barring a surprise first-
round win, the result will
hinge on which cities go out
when and where their votes
go in subsequent rounds.
While many believe
Moscow will be eliminated
first, the Russian capital
could benefit from sympa-
thy votes in the opening
round that would put others
- mainly New York in
potential danger.
John Furlong, who led
Vancouver's winning bid for
the 2010 Winter Olympics,
can attest to the uncertain-
ty. The Canadian city went
in as the big favorite, but
only squeaked past little-
known Pyeongchang, South
Korea, 56-53 in the final
round.
"Members want to be
nice, but you never really
are sure about your sup-
port," Furlong said. "You
can have all the support
you need and none of it. I'm
just glad I'm only a specta-
tor this time."
Paris, which last hosted
the Olympics in 1924, is bid-
ding for a third time after
failed attempts for the 1992
and 2008 Games. The IOC
tends to reward cities that
keep trying Athens got
the Olympics after losing to
Atlanta for 1996; Beijing
came back after defeat to
Sydney for 2000.


Losers could win


in


New
just
majo
one Wedne
Rockefeller
Olympic del
a world awa
they will gi
Summer Ga
The chan
stay on ice
British odds
in their asset
rent world o
ing Paris a
Games, tho
London could
it away.
Whatever
the world's
cities will g.
Singapore,
national pri
People in
used to los:
less an Olyn
But this cou
best gift P
United Stat
Statue of Li
years ago
New York's
That's bei
for the Oly
careful wha
Sure, the
puff its che
politicians
reasserts th
one: Paris,
Madrid or Y
one will par
Then they
figure out
make the or
That's ti
work, and if
ask the peop
they're still
Games nea
after Bruce
medal in the
Or check
Athens, w
Olympic ha
proportions
members
hotels and
was cleared
Those wh
and those
them will
For 17 day
that (try ag
New York,
will be tl
world's atte
host of th
sporting ev
Those w]
might argue
If that le
anywhere,
where seve
Games, the
Olympics w
billion. W
detailed pl
the price h


Olympic bids
billion.
.-.S By the time the Games were
over, Greece had spent some
$14.2 billion, pushing the
country's budget deficit to
record levels. Athens got some
new roads out of the deal, but
now finds itself stuck with
world-class venues that have
largely been gathering dust
since the Games.
Columnist Anyone need a rowing facili-
ty cheap?
-..The cities bidding for 2012,
of course, say that can't hap-
pen in their hometowns. Their
York loves a party operating budgets are mostly
as much as any other projected to be in the area of
r city. So it's holding $2.5 billion to $3 billion, and in
esday morning at New York, city and state tax-
Plaza, when payers are on the hook for only
egates meeting half $250 million of any shortfall.
ty decide which city From there, the accounting
race with the 2012 gets a bit more tricky. New
mes. York is forecasting spending
apagne is likely to another $7.6 billion on infra-
e, if pundits and structure costs such as roads, a
makers are correct new stadium in Queens and an
essment of the cur- Olympic Village that would
order. They're pick- house some 8,500 athletes.
as the site of the Paris would spend $6.2 bil-
ugh they concede lion on similar items, while
Id sneak in and steal London's bid calls for $15.8 bil-
lion to get the city ready for the
happens, four of Games and complete other pet
s more, important projects.
o home losers from The history of Olympic bids,
with their civic and though, shows that initial esti-
de deeply wounded. mates (see Athens) used to win
the Big Apple aren't the Games are notoriously
ing anything, much low-balled in an effort to keep
npics, to the French. public opinion behind the
[ld end up being the bids. When Montreal was
aris has given the preparing for the 1976 Games,
tes since it put the the city's mayor famously pro-
iberty on a boat 120 claimed that the Olympics
and floated it into "can no more have a deficit
harbor than a man can have a baby."
cause those bidding While there's no word on
ympics need to be any men having babies in
t they wish for. Canada, the last payment will
winning city will be made next year on the city's
est out with pride, Olympic debt, most of which
will claim the win went toward building the ill-
e greatness of (pick fated Olympic Stadium.
London, New York, Already, organizers of next
Moscow), and every- February's Winter Olympics in
rty like crazy Turin have gone hat in hand to
Y'll go about trying to the Italian government asking
how to somehow for subsidies to fund shortfalls
dinary Joe pay for it in their operating budget.
he way Olympics And guess who pays to pro-
fyou need proof just tect the Olympics in this age of
ple in Montreal why terrorism? Little noticed in
1 paying off their the bids is that the U.S. gov-
arly three decades ernment has agreed to pick up
Jenner won a gold anything above $101 million
e decathlon, spent by New York to make the:
with the citizens of city safe, while the British and
ho awoke to an French governments plan to
hangover of massive do much the same.
3 the day after IOC Since it cost Athens $1.5 bil-
left their luxury lion for security the same
the athletes village amount it took to stage the
d out last year. Sydney Games four years ear-
1o run the Games lier and costs surely will
who profit from rise in seven years, taxpayers
1 insist it is worth it., in the winning country figure
s, they'll point out to be on the hook for a couple
ain: Paris, London, of billion dollars for security
Madrid .or Moscow) alone.
he center of the Yes, only one city will
ntion as the proud emerge with the winning bid
e world's biggest Wednesday.
ent. That doesn't mean citizens
vho pay the bills of the other four don't have
e that it's not. reason to break out the cham-
esson was learned pagne and do a little celebrat-
it was in Greece ing themselves.


*n years before the
e cost to host the
eas estimated at $1.3
Vhen the actual
planning was done,
iad jumped to $5.3


Tim Dahlberg is a national
sports columnist for The
Associated Press. Write to
him at tdahlberg@ap.org


Rednec

Associated Press

EAST DUBLIN, Ga. In his
garage, Melvin Davis keeps 230
trophies he's won racing
,motorcycles, go-karts and pick-
up trucks. But he's best known
for a sport that earned him four
trophies topped with crushed
Bud Lite cans.
"Yeah, looking back on it I'm
proud. But when I done it I felt
a little silly," said Davis, 68.
"People were going, 'There's
the bobbing-for-pigs-feet cham-
pion!'"
SBobbing for pig feet, the
mudpit belly-flop, the armpit
serenade they're all part of
the Redneck Games, a series of
good ole'ympic events for the
ain't-so-athletic celebrating
their 10th year in middle
Georgia.
Started as a Southern-fried
spoof of the 1996 Atlanta
Olympics, with a propane torch
lighting a ceremonial barbecue
grill, the gag games draw
tourists like moths to a back-
yard bug-zapper.
Organizers estimate 95,000
attended the July event during
its first decade in East Dublin,
a rural pit stop of 2,500 resi-
dents between Macon and
Savannah.
What started as a gathering
of about 500 during the 1996


games
Olympics ballooned to 10,000
by 2001 and reached an esti-
mated 15,000 last year. More
are expected when the 10th
Annual Redneck Games are
held next Saturday.
"It's hard to put your finger
on why it blew up to what it
was," said Jeff Kidd, program
director for WQZY, the country
radio station that cooked up
the Redneck Games as an
Olympic publicity stunt.
It worked. Media coverage
from MTV to London's BBC has
beamed word of the games
around the globe.
"We have families do their
reunions around the Redneck
Games. We've had weddings in
the past," Kidd said. "I don't
think anybody takes it that seri-
ously Everybody has fun with
it, and that's what it's' all
about."
The actual events, which
have changed little over the
years, hew to self-deprecating
stereotypes and backwoods
bawdiness.
The mudpit belly-flop judges
contestants on their flabby
form and sonic splat as they
drop gut-first into muddy
water, splattering nearby spec-
tators.
The armpit serenade rates
children on their musical skills
pumping air through a damp


celebrate a decade of


Young men jump into a mud pond, July 7, 2001,
Redneck Games in East Dublin, Ga. The 10th annive
Redneck Games is scheduled for July 9, 2005, at Buc


hand beneath their underarm.
The 12-year-old winner in 2000
squeezed out a recognizable
rendition of "Dixie."
There's also hubcap hurling
- think junkyard discus -
and redneck horseshoes,
played with toilet seats. The
most competitive sport, how-
ever, is bobbing for pig feet,
where contenders dunk their
heads in tubs of water to see
how fast they can remove raw
pork shanks with their teeth.
Davis, a retired state bridge


inspector, won the
Redneck Games'
years, and has be(
reclaim it ever
record, he says, w
seven pig feet in
His secret: bite fo
the hoof, not the fl
"Being that the
you can't grab th
shank part, so you'
it by the toes,"
"Now, there ain't n
who want to stick
in a tank of wate.


raw, frozen pig's
after what they'"
ing through."
Davis has
describing hims
neck. He has
Bubba. He loves
rabbit. His Chevy
homemade hood
an anatomically
dog (unquestioni
Still, he's flu
S ^" the Redneck
found such a lar
"They're so
Davis said. "Eve
hot, four or fiv
down from hea
All they've got is
Associated Press and they smell
during the got to hold your
rsary of the you get out."
ckey Park. Frank L. Fras
of Redneck Wo:
title in the sees the games
first four example along
en trying to ularity of cou
since. His NASCAR and th
ras clearing vision show "Bl
13 seconds. of folks emt
)r the tip of inner good-ole
esh. the baggage of
y're frozen, types.
iem by the "When I first
ve got to get neck is a guy w
Davis said. hobby is hanging
nany people trees," said Fra
their head mates his m
r and get a 350,000 readers


competition

foot out of it, "Most rednecks I know are
ve been walk- just hard-working people who
like barbecues and the out-
no problem doors."
self as a red- Kidd says some locals, "the
a dog named country-club people," have
s to eat fried looked down on the Redneck
y pickup has a Games as giving Laurens
J ornament of County a backward image of
correct bull- dirt roads and outhouses.
ably male). Many have stopped .sneer-
mmoxed that ing, he said, because its hard
Games have to bash proceeds from the $5
ge audience. admission going to the East
dang silly," Dublin Lions Club and the
;ry year it's so economic spillover to local
e people fall businesses.
t exhaustion. Willie Paulk, president of
porta-potties, the Laurens County Chamber
so bad you've of Commerce, said no eco-
r breath until nomic impact studies have
been done on the Redneck
ser, publisher Games, though she says it's
rid magazine, the third-largest public event
s as another in the county, behind the St.
gside the pop- Patrick's Day celebration in
untry music, neighboring Dublin and the
e comedy tel- Possum Hollow arts and
.ue Collar TV" crafts festival in nearby
bracing their Dexter.
-boy without "While we appreciate the
racist stereo- novelty of the Redneck
Games, I don't think it should
started, a red- be looked at as the sole deter-
'hose dadgum minant in labeling a county,"
g people from Paulk said. "So far it hasn't
ser, who esti- stopped our industries from
magazine has locating here, which is won-
in 43 states. derful."


SPORTS







CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sorenstam knocked out


Annika blows

lead, falls out

of match play

Associated Press

GLADSTONE, N.J. Candie
Kung had a simple explanation
for her quarterfinal victory
over Annika Sorenstam in the
HSBC Women's World Match
Play Championship.
"I made one more putt than
she did. That's how I won,"
Kung said.
Sorenstam, never comfort-
able with the slow pace on
Hamilton Farm's rain-soaked
greens, blew a two-hole lead
with four to play
"Of course I'm disappoint-
ed," Sorenstam said. "I had a
great chance 2-up with four
to go ... Candie played very
well. Sometimes it just doesn't
go your way To finish with a
bogey doesn't make you very
happy"
After conceding a 2-foot par
putt to the eighth-seeded Kung
on the par-4 18th, the top-seed-
ed Sorenstam slid her 8-foot
par try right of the hole to end
a frustrating week on the
greens.
"With all the rain that we've
had, they're very slow,"
Sorenstam said. "I don't think
they've been able to double-cut
them the way they wanted, but.
they're the same for everyone.
You've got to learn the speed."
Kung, the former Southern
California player from Taiwan
who won all three of her LPGA
Tour titles in 2003, will face
60th-seeded Marisa Baena in
the semifinals Sunday morn-
ing. Baena beat six-time major
champion Karrie Webb 2 and 1.
"Candie is a good player. She


1 -^-~. *;




.~~~~ '.& .

,'
S* .






.


Annika Sorenstam hits a shot onto the green on the second hole of an HSBC Women's \
Play Championship quarterfinal against Candle Kung, Saturday. Kung won, 1-up.


needs all the credit,"
Sorenstam said. "She was a
seeded player coming into this
week and she played really
steady She'was 2-down and she
turned it around. That takes a
lot of strength."
In the other semifinal, 14th-
seeded Wendy Ward will play
Meena Lee, a 23-year-old rook-
ie from South Korea seeded
47th. Ward beat 59th-seeded
Sophie Gustafson 2 and 1, and
Lee held off No. 39 Pat Hurst 1-
up.
Kung nearly took the lead on
the par-3 17th, but her 15-foot


birdie try lipped out.
"I was like, 'OK, it hit the lip.
Let's go to 18,"' Kung said.
Kung made an 18-foot birdie
putt on the par-4 15th to pull
within a hole and squared the
match with a par on the par-4.
16th after Sorenstam drove
into the left rough, failed to
reach the green in two and two-
putted for a bogey.
"I just told myself to hang in
there," Kung said. "I felt confi-
dent with my game. I was hit-
ting my shots closer than her
most of the day and just wasn't
making the putts."


They were all sqi
holes, with Kung
the first and
Sorenstam taking
and fifth. Sorensta
lead with an 18-foo
on the par-3 12th a
par-4 13th with a 6-
In their third-rou
Saturday morning,
A.J. Eathorne 4
Sorenstam held
nemesis Rachel H
2 and 1.
Sorenstam, 1-
Hetherington. in I
playoffs, won the


par when Hetherington made a
double-bogey 6, then hit her tee
shot within 3 feet on the 17th to
set up a conceded birdie that
ended the match. In the second
round Friday, Sorenstam need-
ed a 30-foot birdie putt to finish
off Tina Barrett in 21 holes.
Ward is the only one of the
semifinalists with a victory this
season. The 32-year-old
American won the LPGA
Takefuji Classic in April for
her fourth career title.
"Coming into this week, I
said I thought this was any-
body's tournament after just
playing the course one time,"
Ward said. "I doesfi't really sur-
prise me to see the final four
players that have gotten this
far."
Baena, winless in seven sea-
sons on the tour, beat No. 21
Jennifer Rosales in 20 holes
Saturday morning, birdieing
the par-5 second to win after
squaring the match with
birdies on Nos. 14 and 17. The
28-year-old Colombian beat
No. 5 Natalie Gulbis on on
Thursday and eliminated
major champion Grace Park on
Friday.
Associated Press "It has been an incredible
World Match week for me," Baena said.
"Match play is just golf, just 18
holes, and I think whoever is
uare after 11 hot that day, that's who wins."
winning the Divots
third and Gustafson eagled the par-5 ninth

m took theond in her match against Ward.
t birdie putt Gustafson hit a 300-yard drive and
tnd won the 220-yard 4-wood approach to set
footer up her 7-foot putt ... Ward held off
and matches Christina Kim 1-up in the third
Kung beat round, and Lee beatJJselotte
and 3, and Neumann 3 and 2 ... The third-
off playoff round losers received $25,000 and
tetherington the quarterfinal losers got $50,000
from the $2 million purse. The
3 against champion will receive $500,000
LPGA Tour and a gold necklace encrusted with
16th with a diamonds and rubies.


Curtis, Furyk pull ahead at Western Open


Associated Press

LEMONT, Ill. Ben Curtis
sure knows how to please a
crowd.
The 2003 British Open
champion sported another
Chicago Bears golf shirt and
visor at the Western Open on
Saturday, then rolled in a 3-
footer on 18 for a birdie and a
share of the lead with Jim
Furyk Curtis (66) and Furyk
(67) are at 12-under 201 after 54
holes.
But both should keep a close
eye on the scoreboard because
there are plenty of people
behind them including the
world's two best players.
Tiger Woods and Vijay Singh
may have gotten off to rough
starts, but they're, making up
for it Woods shot a 4-under 67
and is tied for fourth with
Shaun Micheel at 206, five
strokes back Singh flirted with
the course record of 63 before
settling for a 6-under 65 that
leaves him six strokes off the
lead.
Tim Herron (70) is alone in
second at three strokes back
Second-round leader Chris
Couch struggled to a 3-over 74,
and is at 6-under 207.
'At least I've got a shot going
into tomorrow," Woods said.
'Hopefully those guys don't
run away from it If they don't
put up three or four more
birdies, I should be all right"
Curtis hasn't won since
Royal St George's, and he's
made only three cuts this year
But he's looked sharp all week
here, and did again Saturday
with his second bogey-free
round of the week
While everyone else on the


leaderboard was bouncing
back and forth, Curtis was
steady. He made birdies on
Nos. 1 and 7, then got to 10
under with a birdie on the par-
5 No. 11.
He picked up another stroke
on the par-3 14th, then blew a
chance for a birdie on 15 when
his putt stopped about 3 feet
short But he ended the day in
solid fashion, getting within 3
feet of the pin on 18 and rolling
it in to the delight of the crowd.
Furyk, playing in the next
group, had a chance to keep
the lead to himself, but he had
to settle for par when his birdie
putt slid by the edge of the cup.
Flryk closed his front nine
with birdies on two of the last
three holes, but his big move
came on the par-5 15th. Stuck
at 10 under since No. 9, he had
a 35-foot putt for eagle. The ball
rolled slowly toward the cup
and looked as if it might burn
the edge.
But it dropped in, drawing a
roar from the crowd and mov-
ing Furyk to 12 under
Woods made things interest-
ing when he birdied Nos. 6, 7
and 8 and then headed to what
he calls the three easiest holes
on the course. ,But he ran
birdie putts a few feet past the
hole on both 9 and 10, then.
watched helplessly as a 25-foot-
er broke about a foot in front of
the cup.
As the crowd groaned,
Woods sank to his knees and
then looked back at the fair-
way
"If I would have gotten some-
where near 10, it would have
been great, but I didn't quite
get there," he said. "I got it to 7,
which is fine."


Associated Press
Jim Furyk watches his tee shot on the 16th hole during the third round. Furyk finished with a 4-
under-par 67 and is 12-under par for the tournament, sharing the lead with Ben Curtis.


HSBC Women's World Match
At Hamilton Farm Golf Club,
Highlands Course, Gladstone, N.J.
Third Round
Upper Bracket
Annika Sorenstam (1) def. Rachel
Hetherington (48), 2 and 1.
Candie Kung (8) def. A.J. Eathorne (56),
4 and 3.
Karrie Webb (29) def. Jeong Jang (13), 4
and 2.
Marisa Baena (60) def. Jennifer Rosales
(21), 20 holes.
Lower Bracket
Meena Lee (47) def. Liselotte Neumann
(31), 3 and 2.
Pat Hurst (39) def. Nicole Perrot (42), 22
holes.
Wendy Ward (14) def. Christina Kim
(30), 1-up.
Sophie Gustafson (59) def. Ai Miyazato
(43), 1-up.
Quarterfinals
Upper Bracket
S Kung def. Sorenstam, 1-up.
Baena def. Webb, 2 and 1.
Lower Bracket
Lee def. Hurst, 1-up.
Ward def. Gustafson, 2 and 1.
Sunday's Semifinals Tee Times (EDT)
7 a.m. Ward vs. Lee.
7:10 a.m. Kung vs. Baena.
PGA
Cialis Western Open
At Cog Hill Golf and Country Club
Third Round
Ben Curtis 64-71-66 201 -12
Jim Furyk 64-70-67 201 -12
Tim Herron 68-66-70 204 -9
Tiger Woods 73-66-67 206 -7
Shaun Micheel 71-67-68 206 -7
Vijay Singh 72-70-65 207 -6
Pat Perez 74-66-67 207 -6
Brett Quigley 69-69-69 207 -6
Chris Couch 66-67-74 207 -6
Billy Mayfair 72-69-67 208 -5
Brian Gay 68-70-70 208 -5
Craig Perks 67-71-70 208 -5
Duffy Waldorf 69-65-74 208 -5
Heath Slocum 72-70-67 209 -4
Todd Hamilton 70-71-68 209 -4
Neal Lancaster 70-70-69 209 -4
Jerry Kelly 70-70-69 209 -4
Mark Hensby 75-65-69 209 -4
Roland Thatcher70-70-69 209 -4
D.J. Trahan 71-69-69 209 -4
Jonathan Byrd 71-67-71 209 -4
Chad Campbell 66-71-72 209 -4
Steve Flesch 69-67-73 209 -4
Scott McCarron 70-67-72 209 -4
Bob Tway 74-68-68 210 -3
David Hearn 71-70-69 210 -3
Charles Warren 71-69-70 210 -3
Chris Smith 69-71-70 210 -3
Scott Verplank 69-70-71 210. -3
StuartAppleby 67-71-72 210 -3
Marco Dawson 73-68-70 211 -2
Alex Cejka 71-70-70 211 -2
Fredrik Jacobson73-68-70 211 -2
D.A. Points 70-70-71 211 -2
Robert Gamez 68-71-72 211 -2
Todd Fischer 64-72-75 211 -2
Mark Calcavecchia70-72-70 212 -1
Brandt Jobe 71-71-70 212 -1
James Driscoll 68-74-70 212 -1
Bernhard Langer73-68-71 212 -1
Camilo Villegas 73-68-71 212 -1
Joey Snyder III 69-72-71 212 -1
Hunter Mahan 70-71-71 212 -1
Joe Durant 72-67-73 212 -1
Scott Piercy 72-69-72 213 E
Robert Allenby 66-75-72 213 E
Kent Jones 68-73-72 213 E
Harrison Frazar 66-74-73 213 E
Joey Sindelar 68-72-73 213 E .
Ted Purdy 72-66-75 213 E
Robert Damron 71-71-72 214 +1
Geoff Ogilvy 72-70-72 214 +1
JohnSenden 73-69-72 214 +1
Stephen Ames 70-71-73 214 +1
Bob Estes 69-72-73 -- 214 +1
Brett Wetterich 69-71-74 214 +1
Woody Austin 70-69-75 214 +1
Champions Tour
At The Red Course, Eisenhower Park
Second Round
Ron Streck 62-68 130 -12
Tom Jenkins 69-63 132 -10
Craig Stadler 64-68 132 -10
Dave Eichelberger 65-67 132 -10
D.A. Weibring 66-67 133 -9
Dan Pohl 67-66 133 -9
John Harris 66-67 133 -9
Gary McCord 65-68 133 -9
Darrell Kestner 65-68 133 -9
Gil Morgan 67-67 134 -8
Tom Purtzer 70-65 135 -7
Jim Ahern 69-66 135 -7
Ed Dougherty 68-67 135 -7
Des Smyth 68-67 135 -7
Mark Johnson 68-67 135 -7
Morris Hatalsky 68-67 135 -7
R.W. Eaks 67-68 135 -7
Bobby Wadkins 70-66 136 -6
Dale Douglass 70-66 136 -6
Mark James 69-67 136 -6
Jay Sigel 68-68 136 -6
James Mason 69-68 137 -5
Jim Thorpe 69-68 137 -5
Lonnie Nielsen 69-68 137 -5
Bob Murphy 68-69 137 -5
Leonard Thompson67-70 137 -5
Vicente Fernandez 66-71 137 -5
Wayne Levi 65-72 137 -5
John Jacobs 72-66 138 -4
Bruce Fleisher 70-68 138 -4
Bruce Summerhays69-69 138 -4
Rodger Davis 69-69 138 -4
Joe Inman 69-69 138 -4
Hajime Meshiai 68-70 138 -4
Andy Bean 69-69 138 -4
Dave Barr 68-70 138 -4
Tom McKnight 66-72 138 -4
Walter Hall 72-67 139 -3
J.M. Canizares 72-67 139 -3
Brad Bryant 71-68 139 -3
Bob Eastwood 70-69 139 -3
Jerry Pate 70-69 139 -3
Jim Dent 69-70 139 -3
Jim Colbert 68-71 139 -3
Dana Quigley 67-72 139 -3


Streck leads


Associated Press

EAST MEADOW, N.Y. Ron
Streck didn't come close to
matching his spectacular open-
ing round at the Commerce
Bank Championship on
Saturday. Still, he's in the lead
entering the final round of a
tournament for the first time.
Streck, looking for his first
Champions Tour title, followed
his first-round 62 with a 3-under
68, staying two strokes in front
with a 12-under 130 total after 36
holes.
Tom Jenkins had a second-
round 63 on the 6,989-yard Red
Course at Eisenhower Park and
was tied for second with Dave
Eichelberger (67) and Craig
Stadler (68). Five players were


another stro
what could
straight play
ner
This is the
plus years
Champions t
entered the
lead.
"I was ju!
same thing
Streck said, r
birdie, no-bo
that had him
"I didn't hita
terday, obvio
I'll just try to
Streck is i
list this year
best finish w
week at the
Championsh


heading

ke back, setting up the PGA
be the tour's fifth in 1979 a
off to decide a win- He close(
rounds o
first time in his 28- Trevino
on the PGA and one stroke
ours that Streck has In 198
final round with a player to
competit
st trying to do the Dan P
I did yesterday," (67), Jol
referring to his nine- McCord (
gey opening round (68) were
two strokes in front could h
as close as I did yes- gallery cc
)usly, and tomorrow at Deepd
) play the same." miles aw
65th on the money "This i
with $98,000 and his ger than
'as a tie for 21st last said with
Bank of America Jenkin
ip. He won twice on money


into final round

Tour at San Antonio $959,000, about $250,000 behind
md at Houston in 1981. leader Dana Quigley He has one
d his first tour win with win (Allianz Championship last
f 63 and 62 to beat Lee month) and two seconds this
and Hubert Green by year, but this was his low round
ie. of the season and one shot off his
1, Streck was the first career best
use a metal wood in "You never know when these
ion on the PGA Tour rounds are going to happen,"
ohl (66), D.A. Weibring said Jenkins, who has six
hn Harris (67), Gary Champions Tour wins. "It was
68) and Darrell Kestner one of those special days when
all at 9 under Kestner you see the line, and the touch
ave Sunday's biggest and feel is there."
considering he is the pro Jenkins, who opened with a
lale Golf Club, about 6 69, had eight birdies Saturday -
ay. including five in a row starting at
s the only place I'm big- No. 9. His longest birdie putt was
Hale Irwin," Kestner a 20-footer on the par-4 11th and
a laugh. his last was a 5-footer on the par-
is is second on the 5 17th after a flop shot out of
list this year with some deep greenside rough.


I I

6:30AM 3PM....................................... 24.95 +TAx
3PM CLOSE..................................... 15.00 +TAX
JUNIOR GOLFERS ACCOMPANIED BY ADULT GOLFER...............Only '7.50 I

Driving Ranges Available Happy Hour 4.7pm I

------------------------------J


Jim Cassia, PGA, Director of Operations
Former New York State PGA Champion
Initiation Fee Has Been Reduce
Ope Dae vilbefi LausOtns&SeilEns


SPORTS


6B SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005











C

JULY 3, 2005
?., ,. ,'",, ,,'lI ,,.,, i A ,: I T.


Eminent


... imminent?


Has the Supreme

Court overstepped

the Constitution?

STEVE ARTHUR
sarthur@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
T he powers of government
implied in the last phrase
the Fifth Amendment has
of late been broadened by a
recent decision of the U.S.
Supreme Court, a decision that has
left many across the nation shaking
their heads.
The high court ruled recently
that local governments have the
right to seize people's homes and
businesses in order to clear the
way not only for roads and other
public uses, but now also for pri-
vate economic development.
County Attorney Robert "B utch"
Battista said that Florida is one of
several states that have laws pro-
tecting property owners from hav-
ing their property seized by the
government for other than strict ly
public use.
"The process we have to go
through to obtain property to build
roads, for example, is excruciat-
ing," he said.
Inverness City Manager Frank
DiGiovanni considers the decision
an overreach on the part of governi-
ment that should be of great con-
cern to citizens. .
"It in effect allows government to
act as agent for private interests,"
he said.
Crystal River City Manager Phil
Deaton said that he also disagrees
with the majority opinion that
gives governments the right to
acquire land for other than strictly
public interests.
"In my career in government we
have had to take one or two houses,
always at fair market value, and
only in areas that were blighted,
with falling property values. When
hospitals expand, they buy up the
land around them slowly and take
their time.
'"As a property owner, I would say
that this decision has gone too far."
University of Florida professor
Michael Alan Wolf said that while
the decision may sound alarming,
it is not as fraught with change as
news reports might imply.
"In Florida, our courts wouldn't
allow this kind of taking land by
government," he said. "The
Supreme Court majority did not
impose its will on the states.
"This is in fact not the disastrous
over-reaching decision on the part
of the liberal Supreme Court
judges as has been portrayed. The
decision means that the Supreme
Court refused to overturn 100 years
of precedence."
Consistently, the court has ruled
in favor of public purpose over pri-
vate use. Without eminent domain,
many important public works like
highways and railroads would have
been stymied by landowners who
insist on receiving more than a fair
market value for their property.
"It was those who dissented who
attempted to act as activist judges,"
Wolf said. "This decision means
that the court chose to respect the
judgments of state and local gov-
ernments."


I I


Carl Steelfox/Chronicle photo illustration


The case that brought the high
court to its 5-4 judgment came from
a group of working-class homeown-
ers in a New London, Conn., neigh-
borhood.
They sought relief from the
courts after city officials said they
were going to raze their homes for
a riverfront hotel, health club and
offices.
The city argued that the move
would boost economic growth. The
homeowners' property rights were
not as great as the public benefits
the private development would
provide.
In the past, parks, schools, roads,
highways and public lands in pub-
lic use could be expanded using
the power of eminent domain; but
malls, shopping centers and other
private businesses could not take
land from private owners.
In the majority ruling Justices
John Paul Stevens, Anthony
Kennedy, David H. Souter, Ruth


Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G.
Breyer said that local officials and
not federal judges are in the best
position to determine whether a
project will benefit the community.
- Justice Sandra Day O'Connor,
who wrote the dissenting opinion,
argued that cities should not be
given unlimited authority to uproot
families simply to accommodate
wealthy developers.
"Any property may now be taken'
for the benefit of another private
party, but the fallout from this deci-
sion will not be random," O'Connor
wrote.
"The beneficiaries are likely to
be those citizens with dispropor-
tionate influence and power in the
political process, including large
corporations and development
firms."
Chief Justice William H.
Rehnquist, and Justices Antonin
Scalia and Clarence Thomas also
disagreed with the decision.


Iraqi----- people must.take ownership of governance
Iraqi people must take ownership of governanc


L ike many of us, I have
been struggling with
what is in the best
interests of our country
regarding Iraq.
I recently received an e-
mail from one of my college
roommates at Colgate, Bob
Walsh, a retired Marine
colonel and a veteran of Lou
Vietnam, for whom I have
the highest respect. OTI
At a recent college VOI
reunion I had asked for his
opinion on Iraq and he said,
"We should get out." He just recently
sent a more detailed answer, which I
quote:
"My own opinion is that we should
withdraw as soon as possible. I believe
the logical time for a drawdown to
begin is when the people of Iraq adopt


HI
Ic


their constitution and elect a
permanent government.
Although I don't agree with
all of (Ray) McGovern's com-
ments, I do agree that we
become the problem the
longer we stay."
(Ray McGovern works for
Tell the Word, the publish-
Fe ing arm of the ecumenical
Frey Church of the Saviour in
IER Washington, D.C. Now
CES retired, he is a 27-year veter-
an of the analysis division of
the CIA, and more recently
co-founder of Veteran Intelligence
Professionals for Sanity.)
"I think establishing a withdrawal
date tied to the adoption of the consti-
tution provides us with a legitimate rea-
son for completing our mission," Walsh
wrote. "I do not subscribe to the theory


that a certain date will only encourage
the enemy.
"The Vietnamese army did not
become fully invested in their country's
efforts until President Nixon began his
program of 'Vietnamization.' Until then,
with some exceptions, the Army
depended inordinately on U.S. forces to
do the fighting. The same appears to be
true for Iraq. This does not mean we
should abandon Iraq. McGovern's idea
of an Arab security force augmenting
the Iraqis has merit, and the United
States must continue to provide finan-
cial, logistical, and political support.
'"At some point Iraq must assume
responsibility for itself. If our goal is to
truly establish an independent Iraq,
then what better time to begin than
when they adopt a constitution and
reenter the community of nations. If we
have other unpublicized goals, we can


be certain that they will be expose
longer we stay. The latter can only
to less security for the AmericanI
ple."
My opinion varies from Bob's.
agree that there are two impor
events coming up that the Iraqis r
complete by December of 2005. 1
clear that the insurgents will do ev
thing they can to disrupt these ev
and unfortunately the violence
increase through the end of the yea
Hopefully, when the elections
over, the Iraqis will take ownership
their political and military situal
Hopefully, they will become tired of
eigners coming into their country
blowing up their fellow citiz
Hopefully, by the start of 2006, the I
forces will have reached 200,000
Please see VOICES/Pag


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


The greatest

American?

That's easy

The Discovery Channel
recently held a contest
and asked viewers to
select the greatest American of
all time. Those who participat-
ed opted for President Ronald
Reagan as that greatest per-
son, and it would be hard to
argue against that decision.
But I'm going to anyway.
In my view, the greatest
American of all time has to be
our very first president -
George Washington. And I
want to tell you about the sin-
gle moment in his life that
makes him deserving of that
honor.
Washington has been gone a
long time, but on this July
Fourth weekend it's important
to remember why he is consid-
ered the Father of our Country.
Washington was a great
patriot and an incredible gen-
eral. But that's not what makes
him the greatest American. He
led the revolutionary army
when we had no nation and
most people had very little
interest in creating a national
government
With a ragtag bunch of mili-
tiamen, he managed to defeat
the mighty British. At times,
Washington had to payhliis sol-
diers due wages out of his own
accounts. But that's not what
made him the greatest presi-
dent
Please see WINDOW/Page 4C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Basking in

summer

memones


S ne of my favorite TV
shows, "CBS Sunday
Morning," recently had
a feature about a "mail boat"
on a lake in Wisconsin.
This sleek, 60-foot-long craft
makes its rounds on the lake
and teenagers hop from boat to
dock, placing mail in mailbox-
es, then scramble to hop back
aboard the boat, which keeps
moving forward the whole
time.
The tryouts for the delivery
'- kids were entertaining.
Accurate leaping and an abili-
ty to remove outgoing and
e deliver incoming mail in a
S matter of seconds are
required.
Most of the lakefront resi-
the dents were said to be wealthy
lead Chicagoans, if that's what
peo- they're called, and one woman
interviewed reflected on the
We melancholy feeling experi-
tant enced on Labor Day Weekend,
must when they close up their sum-
It is mer "cottages" and mail deliv-
'ery- ery via boat stops until the
cents next summer.
will Two thoughts came to mind:
lr. Imagine if they had that
are type of mail delivery on the
p of lake in Hernando. First, we'd
tion. need a 60-foot airboat Second,
ffor- the delivery kids would have
and to be some of the best boat-
ens: hoppers in the world to avoid
raqi latching onto the big propeller
and needed to drive the beast


Please see SHADES/Page 4C


FIFTH AMENDMENT
TO THE
UNITED STATES
CONSTITUTION
N No person shall be held to
answer for a capital, or other-
wise infamous crime, unless on
a presentment or indictment of
a Grand Jury, except in cases
arising in the land or naval
forces, or in the Militia, when in
actual service in time of War or
public danger; nor shall any per-
son be subject for the same
offence to be twice put in jeop-
ardy of life or limb; nor shall be
compelled in any criminal case
to be a witness against himself,
nor be deprived of life, liberty, or
property, without due process of
law; nor shall private property
be taken for public use, without
just compensation.


REil*UIIPLIElsl*~"i~~1C::2- KT'I; i'l ;'B


LBBIIlIII~IECIPI~PP~41









C( 7


S. '


JuLY 3, 2005
,:* r, , , ,i,' ,


"The Constitution not only is,
but ought to be, what the judges
say it is."I

Chief Justice Charles Evan Hughes
,,; ., ...... ". ,. .. '.. .; ^ i


GOLIATH WINS


Ruling puts



dollars before



individuals

he Supreme Court has put will lose their houses, the deci-
big money before individ- sion seems unjust. It's David vs.
ual property rights. And Goliath & Friends; and Goliath
that's wrong. big business with government
It would be hard to randomly connections has won.
-'stumble across nine people who A story by The Associated
have the collective intellect of Press quoted a Columbia
-our Supreme Court, so let the University law professor who
words of one of the nine justices said, "The message of the case to
communicate the common-man cities is yes, you can use eminent
perspective on the controversial 'domain, but you better be care-
Kelo v. City of New London deci- ful and conduct hearings."
sion. One need only to look to
"The specter of condemnation Crystal River and the
hangs over all property," Justice RealtfCorp/Wal-Mart fiasco to
-Sandra Day O'Connor wrote in see the influence big business
,:'her dissenting opin- can exert on a city.
ion. "Nothing is to With the Supreme
-'prevent the state THE ISSUE: Court ruling, city
'-from replacing any The Supreme Court officials across
Motel 6 with a Ritz- property seizure much of the country
-Carlton, any home ruling now can expect
'with a shopping increased pressure
mall, or any farm OUR OPINION* from big business at
with a factory." U the cost of individ-
O'Connor was one It doesn't seem fair. ual liberties.
of four justices Fortunately y,
opposed to the city Florida is among a
of New London, Conn., allowing handful of states that forbids the
for the destruction of a small use of eminent domain for eco-
neighborhood to make room for nomic development unless it is
a new hotel, health club and to eliminate blight, the AP arti-
offices adjoining the Pfizer Inc. cle notes. That is absolutely the
research center. high-ground stance and should
The dilemma is understand- never change.
able. City officials ID'd an oppor- Greed is inherent in human
tunity to give an aging area a nature. For the Supreme Court
facelift that should draw to condone the destruction of
tourists, bolster the tax base and good homes and the uprooting of
provide jobs. The high court's hard-working families in favor of
decision also is consistent with cozy relationships between gov-
allowing such decisions at the ernment and influential busi-
state not federal level. nesses is a knife in the heart of
Yet from the perspective of the the American Dream.
.working-class homeowners who It's just wrong.


'Thanks to guards S 0
Sunday afternoon in
.Inverness, when the pool
opened at 1 p.m. at
Whispering Pines, my wife
and I were there and a
mother told her child,
"Dive off, you can swim" ...
And within seconds, a CAL
female lifeguard was in the Ar
water on top of that child 563-
and brought him up.
Those lifeguards in pools
really need a lot of congratulations.
They're doing a terrific job. That
young girl who's there Sunday after-
noon next to the diving board was
right on the ball. I give her a lot of
credit. God bless those lifeguards.
Waiting room woe
Just another word on the topic of
physicians leaving Florida. As a
nurse, I see this all the time, that
patients aren't willing to stop their
lifestyle choices like smoking, drink-
,ing, overeating, and they want medi-
cine to fix things that they could do
.1for themselves. And again, people
l'just need to start realizing that
,there's going to be more waits,
There's going to be fewer people to
take care of you. Nurses and doc-
tors are overwhelmed.
And for the people who have
caused this with their frivolous law-
suits maybe you need to go see
your lawyer and see how much
compassion and care you get from
them, because doctors and nurses
are bailing out.
No way to win
In Saturday's (June 25) editorial, I
see where the federal funding cuts
were rejected which would allow
WUFT-FM to stay on the air for the


0579


TV and the radio, and I
think that's marvelous..
However, in that same
edition of the paper, I see
where Bright House is
going to tear down the
antenna that allows us to
be able to receive this pro-
gram on Channel 5. So we
lose either way, don't we?
Sad, sad.

Service dogs


I'm calling about the "Polly shop-
ping." This person was misinformed
that the only animals allowed in
shopping centers,and stores were
the seeing-eye dogs. I'd like to clari-
fy this. Any service dog and even
though you may not be able to see
what the problem is with the person
- if it's got the jacket on and
they're with a person, you can
assume that there is a problem and
they're allowed in any store and
public place.
Different approach
I was once a advocate for the war
on terrorism. I witnessed the 9/11
incident. I was just as horrified and
mad as anybody else was. I think
it's about time, though, based on all
the loss of life, that we perhaps
maybe look a different way ...
We're just losing too many lives
and maybe it's time that we try a
different approach in dealing with
people in Middle Eastern countries,
and perhaps learning their customs
and perhaps just going to the table
and talking ... We've just lost too
many lives. Too many innocent men
are coming home without arms and
legs.


Golf can be an emotional game


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
-f EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan ............................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................................. editor
Neale Brennan ...... promotions/community affairs
Kathie Stewart ........advertising services director
Steve Arthur ..................... Chronicle columnist
M ike Arnold ........................... managing editor
Jim Hunter .............................. senior reporter
by Albert M.891 Curt Ebitz ............................... citizen member
Williamson Mike Moberley......................... guest member
"You may differ uith my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


N fronted an entire block
devoted to wild untended
'. field grass, a block split
j-J down the long middle by a
long mountain range con-
sisting of piles of slag from
the nearby steel mills.
There were plenty of
things for kids to do in my
neighborhood back then.
You could walk a couple of
Arthur blocks to CVS, (Chicago
ILES Vocational High School),
IBLES where around in the back
and behind a scalable
chain link fence was a mag-
nificent scrapped-out World War II
bomber. There were bike rides to a
Lake Michigan Beach and there was
the Y!
Anyway, when we got plunked into
the village of Hinsdale west of Chicago
on the CB&Q line, those old pleasures
were no longer attainable. At first I
didn't even have a bike; once I bor-
rowed my sister's bike, and some big,
sloppy kid with a sneer started razzing
me about being a sissy riding a girl's
bike.
One thing Mike Novinsky in the old
neighborhood taught me is that you
can't allow that kind of disrespect to go
unchallenged. So I lit into my detrac-
tor with fists of fury and shortly we had
established an understanding that
would today have a kid like me. in
handcuffs for assault and battery on a
bully.
Finally, some of my new suburban
friends told me I could make some
money by going out to the golf club


down Madison Road, where kids could
sign up to become caddies.
The pay was $5 a game. This was in
an age before golf carts put caddies out
of work Standing downwind of some
duffer puffing on a cigar, however, was
not a big thrill for me. Hitting a ball
with a clubbed stick didn't seem to be
anything I would want to spend money
doing. I developed an attitude of dis-
dain for the game.
This summer, however, my son Alex,
about to enter sixth grade, got some
golf lessons and came away with an
enthusiasm for the game that has curi-
ously warmed my heart.
A few days ago, he got me out on the
driving range just before sunset. The
clouds were smudged with gray below
but piled high like gobs of whipped
cream turning molten. The slight
breeze was cool and fresh. Alex teed a
ball and gave it a solid whack that lift-
ed the orb high to drop at an impres-
sive goodly distance. Along with that
ball flew my thrilled heart in some
strange, ineffable way.
Then we both were hitting balls and
as we did, a great good feeling came
over me as I shared a pleasant experi-
ence with a son who is fast turning into
a man. A feeling like that; there's noth-
ing like it.
--m-

Steve Arthur is a Chronicle columnist
He can be reached at 564-2923 or at
sarthur@chronicleonline.com. Read
his blog, "Reporter's Notebook,"at
www.chronicleonline.com.


LF-T s T/\ to the Editor


Lunsford benefit success
We would like to thank everyone for
coming out for our benefit for the
Jessica Marie Lunsford Foundation
on June 18. The turnout was a great
success. Without you all, we could not
have pulled together so much for
such a worthy cause. We would also
like to express our thanks to the fol-
lowing businesses and people who
helped this special night come togeth-
er with their donations of raffle prizes
and food.
Joe and Staff from Pizza Hut of
Crystal River, Warren Hill from
Crystal River Harley Davidson, Jesse
Fisher, Cindy Ladd from PO.E.TS.
Karaoke, Tish Tramontana, Russ'
Coffee Depot Crystal River, Sue's
Hallmark-- Homosassa, Designs by
Nerissa, Home Depot-- Crystal
River, Domino's Crystal River,
Applebee's Crystal River,
Sportsters Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs State Wildlife
Park, Old Mill Tavern Homosassa,
Body Repair Shoppe Crystal River,
Homosassa Springs Florist, BP Gas
Station Homosassa, Seagrass Pub
- Homosassa, Adrian's Gift Baskets
- Crystal River, Parrot Heads of
Citrus County and MacRae's -
Homosassa.
A special thank you to: Emerald
Gypsy, our houseband and brothers:
Mark, John, Ronnie, Shades, Randy
and soundman Eric; Steven, Dustin,
Carissa, Liz, Rick and Paula for help-
ing us with the footwork on the flyers
and donations; Cindy, for her great
work emceeing for the night and sell-'
ing raffle tickets; Scott and Tessa
Wagner, for handling (with great
expertise) of the 50/50 drawing; Paula,
for taking charge of the food table;
Carissa and Carin, for their great
work behind the bar; and Brandon,
Ken and Dustin for their work at the
door and spillages.


Rotunda" and touched and hugged
sobbing with grief our disbelieving
farewells.
Dazed and lost in numbness, we
drove home with the heavy cloak of
death. For each of us the world had
stopped and even our home seemed
to sag with sorrow.
Somewhere along in the night, my
boys, Nick's three brothers, gathered
wood, nails and hammers, and set off
to build their monument to mark the
place.
Nick had died here, right here, and
don't forget! This was his place now
and everyone must know. This mark-
er, this tomato stake cross engraved
with magic marker Nick Wilson
July 23, 1999 would be a sign to all.
People came week after week,
month after month, leaving their
tokens of flower bouquets, letters,
cards and ribbons. Almost like a ritu-
Sal, they cared for and nurtured this
site by the road. Somehow we all
found a comfort and strength from
Nick's "Cross by the Way".


Since that night, I see them the
We appreciate you all, and again, others standing by the way reminding
our thanks. that there, too, is a "forget me not"
Mark and Jane Davis plea from someone's loved one.
The Gypsy Den, Crystal River Seeing these markers pulls at my
The Gypsy Den, Crystal River heart I know their feelings and can-
Mark Lunsford not pass without a prayer for both
Homosassa family members and loved one.


Cross by the road
Five years ago, our son, Nick, was
killed in a motorcycle accident and
just writing these words stirs the
depth of that sorrow that we, his fami-
ly, came to know.
Our oldest son was the last to arrive
at the hospital; it was a three-hour
drive through the mountains. We
embraced and our sorrowful emo-
tions bound us together as once again
we walked the hallway to "Nick's


This is a bond we share. I have
decided to make a photo journal of
these "Crosses by the Way" and col-
lect stories about the loved ones.
Perhaps you or someone you know
has a "Cross by the Way." I want to
share our stories. If you would like to
share your story, contact me at "By
the Way," P 0. Box 150, Cedar Key, FL
32625, or email me at Bart9090@
bellsouth.net
Roberta Wilson
Cedar Key


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions on any subject. You do not need to leave your name and have up to 30 seconds to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, personal attacks and good taste. This does not prohibit criticism of public figures. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


G olf is one of those
passions that I have
for decades neglect-
ed to acquire, but that may f-r
be changing after what hap-
pened last week
Just the way lovers of
classical music look down
upon rap or hip hop music,
the way readers of big dull
books gaze upon romance
novel junkies, or as drivers Steve.
of posh cars regard the rest FAB
of the world, so have I long" & FOI
considered golf as a mean-
ingless pastime.
Since youth it's been my opinion
that if you want to sniff fresh air and
feel the sun upon your skin, why use
golf as an excuse? Why cart all that
equipment around?
This goes back to when I was a kid.
See, I had just gotten used to being a
city kid on the south side of Chicago
when my parents decided that the
neighborhood was changing and it was
time to move to the suburbs.
So they went out and bought a low
filled-in swamp of a lot for a profligate
price of about $1,200 and had a house
built which they painted a dark,
gloomy green. This structure flooded
in the basement every time it rained. It
was my job to bail it out It rained a lot.
Life in the suburbs was culture
shock city. Why did we have to move?
The south side had been a glorious
place for a kid. It still had plenty of
vacant lots. Our urban dwelling, set in
a ragged scattering of bungalows on
the 8800 block of South Luella St.,


^I^W7


OPINIONS INVITED
" The opinions expressed in Chronicle edi-
torials are the opinions of the editorial
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. ~II_~___I


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2

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SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 3C


Victory, though sweet,


always has a price


M y wife says it
isn't a com-
petition.
She just doesn't
know.
We've competed
with each other in
everything from
playing cards to
Scrabble to shooting
free throws with a
basketball ever since
we've been married.
We are pretty
evenly matched with


Fred B
A SLI(
LII


the parlor games, but when it
comes to getting basketballs to
fall through a hoop, forget
about it! She always beats me,
and does so with ease.
What she believes isn't com-
petitive is our relationship
with the grandchildren. And,
as far as the major things are
concerned, she's right. We both
love all seven of them totally
and they love us the same way
in return. Even so, once in a
while, in the details, there's
room for a little bit of one-
upmanship.
Last year, for Mother's Day,


my son Fred's chil-
dren gave their
grandmother a
l delightful wall hang-
ing which listed 20
reasons why they
love her. Then, for
Father's Day, I got a
o similar item listing
20 reasons why they
rannen love me.
CE OF This year, for
FE Mother's Day, those
same little ones gave
my sweetheart a
plant potted in a pot they had
decorated with their hand or
foot prints. Nice. But when
Fred asked what I'd like for
Father's Day, I replied, "I want
one more reason!"
Grandmom may think there
isn't a competition, but I know
21 reasons is more than 20 rea-
sons.
Among my Father's Day
treasure trove this year was
reason number 21; and, I
quote, "We love granddaddy
because he lets us listen to "Hit
the Road Jack" as many times
as we want to when we are rid-


ing in his truck."
Victory is sweet, but it has a
price.
Do you know how many
times "Hit the Road Jack" can
be played between Inverness
and Crystal River? 11.5 times,
that's how many. Ocala?
Depending on the traffic, up to
15.6 times.
During the next 15 years, I
might have to listen to Ray
Charles sing that song some
20,000 times. I like Ray Chuck's
music, I really do, but in a
word, "OUCH!"
Oh, well. It's reason number
21, and I'm not going to renege.
ABC's classic television
show, "The Wide World of
Sports" used the catch phrase,
"The thrill of victory, the agony
of defeat."
It looks as though I could be
experiencing the agony of vic-
tory for years to come.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Building one's own


wedding canopy isn't easy


Letters to the ."-: '


Democrat discourse
Someone should tell Howard Dean by put-
ting his foot in his mouth so often he could
develop huge jowls. Look what it did for Ted
Kennedy.
Irene Bussing
Inverness

Thanks for the support
I want to thank each and every county
employee on the currier route for all the gifts,
cards and good wishes for me; the Board of
County Commissioners for my appreciation
plaque, and property appraisers in Inverness
and Crystal River.
Also, thanks to tax and tags, Inverness and
Crystal River, the girls at clerk's office in
Crystal River, all in road maintenance, in fleet,
.all in my Department of Public Works
Maintenance. Thanks to Extension office and
also to all at Central Ridge Library, Beverly
Hills. Thanks to all custodians and to all at the
Lecanto Government Building, Animal Control,
all in Court House. Inverness, those at the
sheriff's office Kenningston, Hazmat and at
the jail, EOC, also the landfill.
And to the girls at Mercantile Bank, and
transportation, parks and rec., and the lab.
,Also, utilities and aquatics. And to my friends
Sue Vines, Joe, Ronnie, Tom and Craig in fire
training. Hope I didn't leave anyone out.
I will miss you all, and I love you all.
Marilyn Hunt
Public Works
Maintenance Operation

Hits in the eye
An open letter to Sakkie Pretorius of
Homosassa and anyone else who's interested.
Ahhh, once again, evolution is just a theory.
"The analysis of a set of facts in their-relation
to one another" (Webster's Ninth New
Collegiate Dictionary-- 1983). Facts? Must we
deal with facts? What's wrong with SWAGs?
Myths? Legends? Facts are so incumbering.
Other than the Bible, a questionable scientif-


VOICES
Continued from Page 1C

most of them will be well-
trained.
Iraq is important to the
United States in many ways.
Having a free democratic
country in the Mideast is an
incredible asset. Having a free
nation that has survived all
that terrorists can do to bring it
down is a beacon of hope to
many countries around the
world. Having a country that
allows women to participate in
the election process and in the


government is a
Taking away a
and training g:
the United State
to live. Finishing
sends a strong -
those who war
spread of freedom
I believe that
for withdrawal
danger to our
allows the terr
they are winning
running will on
those who want
Bob is right, thi
resume response:
country. At the p
United States' t


ic source at best, what facts support creation-
ism?
And as far as irreducible complexity, Google
"eye evolution" and you will get something like
6.6 million hits. Pick one and read.
Oscar R. Fick Jr.
Beverly Hills

Medicaid options
As President Bush toured the country trying
to bamboozle Americans into dismantling their
own Social Security system, right-wing leaders
in Congress took the lead in passing the presi-
dent's other priority a $10 billion cut to
Medicaid, the nation's premiere health pro-
gram for low-income Americans.
The grisly details of these cuts propose sig-
nificant out-of-pocket health expenses for the
poor coupled with new limitations and
restrictions on health services. Why are con-
servatives picking on the most vulnerable
Americans?
Somebody has to pay for conservatives' gross
fiscal mismanagement and massive handouts
to the wealthy. Right-wing leaders have cleared
the way for $106 billion in new tax cuts for
those at the top massive tax breaks for oil
and gas interests and a gaping giveaway for
corporations to bring off-shore profits back into
the states virtually tax-free.
Conservatives count on the poor not voting,
hoping no one will notice if they take away
basic health care from a couple hundred thou-
sand low-income Americans.
Plenty of options exist to improve Medicaid's
performance without cost-shifting to states or
reducing coverage for people in need. A report
by the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the
Uninsured reveals that all 50 states enacted
some form of cost-containment measures in
response to the rising cost of Medicaid in the
past two years. Other progressive solutions
include basic drug re-importation programs,
multistate prescription purchasing pools and
small business health insurance pools.

Kathy Evilsizer
Crystal River

major success. be needed. We can all pray that
terrorist base this is sooner than later.
rounds makes There are two legitimate
is a safer place arguments that have been pre-
g what we start sented in this article. One can
message out to only hope and pray that the
At to stop the correct decision is made for
tt. these young men and women
setting a date who put themselves in harm's
increases the way every day.
rtrnqnr


r1L UUaJ n s IIU
wrists to think
ig. Cutting and
nly encourage
to do us harm.
ie Iraqis must
ability for their
Roperr time the
roops will not


Lou Frey Jr. is a political ana-
lyst, commentator and news-
paper columnist in Florida.
Send e-mail to:
lou.frey@lowndes-law.com.


J amie is Jewish,
Bill is Catholic.
They were '
married recently on
a lovely rooftop .
overlooking Wash-
ington, D.C., and .-.
during the ceremo-
ny they stood under .'
a chuppah, a tradi-
tional Jewish wed- Cokie al
ding canopy. V. R
Bill made the OTI
structure himself vON
out of strong wood-
en beams. His inten-
tion is to place the chuppah in
the garden of their home,
where vines can grow over it
and their children, someday,
can play under it.
In this wedding season, such
a story carries an important
lesson. Despite the ominous
divorce rate and a popular cul-
ture that seldom celebrates
married love or loyalty, the
search for a life companion is
still one of the most elemental
of human impulses.
But as young people leave
their neighborhoods and
tribes, and as they get married
.later in life, often to people
they meet at school or at work
rather than at home or at
church, they are more liable to
choose mates from different
cultures and communities.
(Jamie and Bill met in law
school.)
Most clergy, in most faiths,
resent and resist this trend and
make it harder, not easier, for
mixed couples to create rituals
that combine their different
backgrounds. That's why Jamie
and Bill had to take matters
into their own hands.
They asked Steve to co-cele-
brate their wedding, serving as
an elder of the Jewish tribe
and representing Jamie's fami-
ly origins. His partner was the
Rev. Joann Germershausen, an
old friend of Bill's family who
reflected the groom's Christian
beliefs.
"This is a ceremony," Joann
told the congregation, "created
by Bill and Jamie, woven from
the thread of two traditions, a
fabric that represents who they
are together."
The hard part, of course, is
staying together. As a mixed-
religious match (Cokie is


Sanely devout
I'm calling about the.person who wrote in
about the comic "Family Circus." I happen to be
a great-grandmother and a grandmother. Have
you ever listened to your children speak or your
grandchildren speak? It is quite funny how they
interpret things. I thought this was really funny.
You need to pick on something else besides
"Family Circus." And not all religious people are
fanatics and not all religious people are nuts.

Mouths of babes
As far as "Family Circus" is concerned, that's
the way children talk. Don't you remember your-
self ever thinking something was different than
what you realized later? If you don't like "Family


A little old
It's so cute. You have pictures of 18- and 19-
year-old men playing with their little skate-
boards. What do they do when they're not play.
ing with their skateboards ...?
Wear helmets
Well, I hope it was a lesson learned for the
skateboarders Tuesday at the mall, with that
head injury. Make it mandatory to wear helmets
and equipment when they're skateboarding or
the county's going to be more broke than what
they are from all these lawsuits. Make it manda-


nd Steven
oberts
HER
ICES


Catholic) that has
survived for almost
39 years, we are
often sought out by
young couples for
counsel and encour-
agement. They want
to believe marriage
is possible, despite
the odds, and their
own experience.
Every spring,
Steve deals with
seniors at George
Washington
University (where


he teaches) who are ripped
apart by the petty bickering of
estranged parents forced to
come, together for the gradua-
tion of their common offspring.
Often the graduates have to
play grownup,
placating their The pre
childish elders
with schedules marry
that allot valu-
able commodi- one0 '
ties time,
tickets, tender- remain!
ness with mil-
itary precision. strong t
Yet these
young people ticularly
still want mates wh
and matches of who Iwo
their own. And about t
the main reason about t
for this triumph Of id
of hope over
experience is
well-expressed in a new book
by Naomi Harris Rosenblatt,
"After the Apple: Women in the
Bible: Timeless Stories of
Love, Lust, and Longing"
(Miramax, 2005), a retelling of
Biblical stories focusing on
women.
A psychotherapist as well as
a scholar, Rosenblatt writes
about life in the Garden of
Eden before Eve's arrival:
"Surveying all He has created,
God observes with compassion
the loneliness of the human
being among the animals. He
says, 'It is not good for Adam to
be alone; I will make a fitting
helper for him.' The first
human emotion the Bible grap-
ples with is loneliness."
But marriage is not just
about easing pain, it's about
building a partnership. As
Adam and Eve leave the gar-
den, hand in hand, Rosenblatt


writes: "The male/female rela-
tionship in Genesis is not about
dominance and submission but
rather about interdependence
and cooperation."
In the earliest Biblical tales,
choosing a partner was a major
issue. Abraham returns to his
homeland to find Sarah, a
member of his own tribe, and
their son Isaac chooses a wife,
Rebecca, from the same tribe.
But when Isaac and Rebecca's
first-born, Esau, marries two
Hittite women, his decision is
"a source of bitterness" to his
parents.
The pressure to marry with-
in one's tribe remains just as
strong today, particularly for
Jews, who worry deeply about
the loss of their identity. Most
rabbis would
sure to not perform a
wedding like
within Jamie and
Bill's, and if
tribe their obstinate
attitude had
S Just as any hope of
preventing
today, par- inter-mar-
riage, perhaps
for JeWs, their position
ry deeply would make
sense.
heir loss But it does-
n't Jamie and
entity. Bill were get-
ting married
anyway, no
matter what any rabbi or
priest said to them. What
they desperately wanted was to
emphasize their common val-
ues, not their differences, and
that's why Steve said during the
ceremony that every couple,
even two Jews or Italians from
the same block, face the same
challenges: "The need to be tol-
erant of each other, respectful
of each other, inclusive not
exclusive, accepting not reject-
ing. You have to embrace your
different traditions and love
them as your own."
That's why so many young
couples like Jamie and Bill are
building their own wedding
canopies, for themselves and
their children.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can
be contacted by e-mail at
stevecokie@gmail.com.


Circus," go work the crossword puzzle.
Fond memories
To the person that thought the "Family
Circus" comic was disrespectful to the flag: This
maybe true in some sense, but it sure brought
back a lot of fond memories of when my chil-
dren were small and made the same mistakes.
Sorry you felt it was disrespectful.
Sour pickles
The person who wrote in about taking "Family
Circus" out of the-newspaper must have been
born with a pickle, amsour pickle, in their mouth.
I enjoy "Family Circus" and we need a little
more fun in the newspapers, so keep on doing
it.


tory to wear helmets and equipment if they're
going to be skateboarding. They do in Beverly
Hills.
Adult decision
I read the article in today's paper,
"Skateboarders display their skills." They also
display their stupidity by not wearing helmets.
And these aren't children; these are adults. The
kids are 18 and 19 years old. They should be
wearing helmets. They don't need a skateboard
park. They need a job. They need an education.
An education would tell them to at least put a
helmet on.


Hot Comer: FAMILY CIRCUS


Hot Corner: SKATEBOARDERS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


s
S
S






r

e







4 SUNDY, CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
4C SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


WINDOW
Continued from Page 1C

Washington was elected our first
president. He was the one man who
was beloved throughout the
colonies for the sacrifices he made
during the war. Differences were
already being realized in the
regions of the country, but everyone
found it easy. to support
Washington. In fact, many people
expected that he would become the
monarch of the loose confederation
of states once the war was done.
He could have had the job if he
wanted it But that's not what made
him the greatest
Washington was not the greatest
American who ever lived because
he gave a great speech. In fact,
many of his speeches were pretty
darned bad. Writers at the time
complained that he mumbled. His
comments were said to have made
more sense when they were


reprinted in newspapers.
Washington was the greatest
American who ever lived, in my
opinion, because he made a deci-
sion in 1796 to voluntarily give up
the office of president
Remember, back in 1796 there
was no history of government lead-
ers having a peaceful transfer of
power.
When leadership authority was
transferred in what we called the
civilized world of the time, it usual-
ly involved the death of a monarch
or one heck of bloody revolution.
But George Washington, in his
brilliant humility, decided he had
been president long enough. He
would have been easily re-elected
president for as long as he wanted
to be. His decision to step down
established a tradition in this coun-
try that is the bedrock of all of our
freedoms: The presidency isn't
about an individual it's about the
constitution.
Washington knew the importance
of showing respect for the position-


SHADES
Continued from Page 1C

Unlike in Wisconsin, missing the
boat and making a splash into the lake
could result in a mail-kid vs. gator
encounter.
Naturally, on occasion, the mail
boat would be delayed because some
errant tussock would inevitably get
lodged beneath the craft.
In drought years we'd need to dig
channels to each dock to so the beast
wouldn't get stuck in the muck
: And, at least one lakefront resident
would have to brace up their dock a
bit, or that might be the last we'd see


of the mail delivery kid.
The second thought is more of a
reflection on my childhood. Much like
the affluent Chicagoans, if that's what
they're called, my family had a sum-
mer home. Yes, our family of five split
a cottage with my uncle's family of
five on Lake Ontario, midway
between sunny Buffalo and sunny
Rochester.
The stately, roughly 800-square-foot,
three-bedroom, one-bath cottage -
with well water pumped directly from
the lake, seaweed and all was the
place of summer memories.
On alternating summers our family
would stay there in July while my rela-
tives would stay there in August We'd
switch each year, but we'd all gather


there on weekends. Naturally, each set
of parents had their own bedroom,
which left six kids and one bedroom.
More specifically, that left five girls
and one boy, who was the youngest of
the group.
I was little more than a toddler
when 'I developed my lifelong affinity
for sleeping on couches, floors, under
tables, on car seats, etc. anywhere
where I could avoid five female pre-
teeny and teeny-bopper sisters and
'cousins.
With this holiday weekend upon us,
it's easy to let thoughts wander back to
summers of yesteryear. There's noth-
ing like summer memories.
I remember adventure: Spying on
adult cocktail parties.


I remember mischief: Swimming
unsupervised.
I remember stupidity: Nearly drown-
ing while swimming unsupervised.
I remember boat rides, walks
through apple orchards and the ding-
ing of the ice cream truck as it came to
our rural lakefront community.
I remember wearing my Red Ball
Jets to bed during thunderstorms so
I'd be grounded if lightning struck
I remember seeing Northern
Lights, smelling cherry blossoms and
hiding under crates in a barn when
the farmer was trying to catch those
annoying kids who kept trespassing.
And I remember when Labor Day
weekend rolled around and most
everyone packed up their cottage to


resume life in the villages, towns and
cities where they came from. I
remember saying good-bye to friends
and, along with that, the anxiety about
having to return to school.
I remember wanting summer to
start all over again.
What would memories be without
summers?
I hope this July Fourth weekend is
a safe and memorable one for all.


Charlie Brennan is the editor of
the Chronicle. He can be e-mailed at
cbrennan@chronicleonline.com.
Read his blog at
www.chronicleonline.com.


l T R chrUS"", cu N T



www.chronicleonline.com


al power of the presidency. In 1797,
after John Adams was elected as
our second president and Thomas
Jefferson as vice president,
Washington introduced them to the
waiting crowds. As he did so,
Washington insisted that President
Adams and Vice President
Jefferson walk in front of him.
While Washington was still the
most popular political figure in the
land, his humble actions showed
the value he placed in the impor-
tance of the presidency. Today, 208
years later, the legacy of that action
is still with us.
We as a people have transferred
the power of the presidency for 208
years without interruption. It took
the greatest American George
Washington to make that happen.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. He can be
e-mailed at gmulligan@
chronicleonline.com.










STOCKS 2D
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NEws 4D
BRETT WATTLES: EDC 6D
BANK RATE CHART 6D


* ..,^' .


-: .:, .-, 7-- ,f _'.,;:..'_ *'': .'; ": .


'DAY
JUNE 3 1, 2005
www.chronicleonline.com


Net profit from net loss


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Rick Weeks and Jack O'Brien unload a crate of freshly caught fish at Shrimp Landing in Crystal River. The local seafood company suffered losses because of the
net ban, but has managed to find other ways to stay in business during the prohibition.

Recreational fihery grows on wave of decline in local commercial fish house industry


CHERI HARRIS
charris@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
A decade after the amend-
ment that banned gill net
fishing went into effect,
the lasting economic
impact on the local com-
munity is difficult to measure, even
for experts.
But it seems that the statewide ban
that forced nearly 200 local fishermen
to find other work and hurt local fish
houses, might have benefited the
recreational fishing industry.
A 1995 Department of Labor study
reported that 188 commercial fisher-
men holding saltwater products
licenses in Citrus County were
impacted by the net ban.
According to a Florida Sea Grant
College Program statewide study
released in 2000, the number of fami-
lies in the fishing business after the
ban decreased by 25 percent, and
families fishing full-time decreased
by 22 percent.
Family income from fishing
dropped 31 percent. One out of four
fishermen retired after the net ban.
Charles Adams, a marine econom-
ics specialist for Florida Sea Grant at
the University of Florida, said that
there are too many variables to put a
dollar figure on the economic impact
of the net ban.
Those other variables include other
changes in fishing regulations, mar-
ket factors and environmental condi-
tions.


Commercial seal
industry declil
Since 1959, Phil Kofmel
has operated Charlie's Fi
and Seafood Market in Crys
Back then, he said there
eral other commercial sea
nesses on the bay front, a
about 150 commercial
based in that area.
"It was a good way for a
low to make money," Kofi
"We didn't have much ofa c
in those
days and
there
weren't a lot
of jobs
around." ma
He said Com
about 30 comm
commercial
fishermen
used their
fish house
regularly.
They could
sell their
catch to the fish house, ti(
boats and buy supplies si
and fuel.
The fish house sold m
seafood to buyers who tran
by truck to other parts of F
the Southeast.
Kofmehl estimated that
to 60 percent of the fish h
ness was derived from seafi
in gill nets.
That all changed on Ju


food when a state constitutional amend- and Crab of Homosassa Inc.
ment went into effect that banned Bob Gill, owner of Shrimp Landing,
ne their use. said the net ban changed the whole
hl's family To make up for the lost business, fabric of local 'fisheries and shrank
ish House Kofmehl, 64, who now owns Charlie's the market for fresh mullet because it
stal River, with his brother, James, said they was no longer regularly available.
were sev- focused more on the waterfront He said the number of full-time net
food busi- restaurant they had opened a few fishermen he does regular business
along with years earlier and solicited fishermen with has dropped from about 20 in
fishermen from other fisheries, such as for stone 1995 to six.
crab. "Eventually mullet fishing will dis-
young fel- But it wasn't the same. appear," he predicted.
nehl said. "The fishing part of our operation Though he diversified his business
communityy just became a much smaller entity," before the net ban started, he estimat-
ed that it decreased his
revenue by 15 percent.
Gill said he has more
It was a good way for a young fellow to employees now, about
ike money. We didn't have much of a 13, espartly because heb
unity in those days and there weren't a and grouper processing
and wholesaling.
lot of jobs around. Many of the net fish-
ermen found other fish-
eries, but in the last
Phil Kofmehl decade, Gill said most
his family has operated Charlie's Fish House and Seafood Market since 1959. have dropped out.
"Every year I hear,
Kofmehl said. "We became basically a 'I'm getting a land job,'" Gill said.
e up their retail market and the wholesale oper- Gill said that there also used to be
ich as ice ation was certainly impacted." several fish houses in Yankeetown.
The Kofmehls were able to avoid "They're gone, every one of them,"
ost of the layoffs by transferring some employ- Gill said.
sported it ees to the restaurant. Gill said other pressures on the
lorida and He said that when the net ban local commercial seafood industry
began, the other Kings Bay fish hous- include cheaper foreign-import
50 percent es were-already gone. seafood, continued government regu-
ouse busi- Now, Citrus County has three pri- lation and skyrocketing values for
bod caught mary fish houses: Shrimp Landing in waterfront property that make selling
Cr stal River Cha7 ? J (rlie's, Fish Hous,;


ly 1, 1995,


Seafood Market and Cedar Key Fish


Business DIGEST


Photo courtesy Bay News 9
The new Bay News 9 facility provides additional protection
during severe weather that will ensure safety during hurri-
cane coverage. It is a technologically advanced facility fea-
turing the latest automation and server technology.


Bay News 9
re t headquarte
The headquarters of Bay News 9
television have been moved. The
Bright House Network's main office is
now at 700 Carillon Parkway, Ste. 9,
St. Petersburg.
Bay News 9 operates in partner-
ship with the Citrus County Chronicle
and has a satellite office at the
Chronicle Meadowcrest office near
Crystal River.
The new St. Pete headquarters
provides enhanced technology, addi-
tional protection during severe
weather and brings various units of
the Tampa Bay Division of Bright
House under one roof.
Bay News 9's Web site is
baynews9.com and by telephone,
the station can be contacted at (727)
329-2300. The numbers to the news


desk are (727) 329-2400 and (888)
437-1239.
ABC plans evening
of tasting, smoking
ABC Fine Wine & Spirits, 822 U.S.
19 S.E., will host the Crystal River
Wine Tasting and Cigar Smoker from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July
13.
Cost for the evening will be $7.
Wines to be poured will include
Italians such as the new Strade
Vecchie and wines from Torre Spina.
Caf6 on the Avenue will be the
restaurant partner for the event.
The public is invited.
Dr. Julie Howard
moves office
To better serve her patients, Dr.
Julie Howard of West Coast Eye


Please see ':-/Page 6D


Institute has moved her Inverness
Office on Forest Drive.
Patients may call the Lecanto
office at 746-2246 to schedule an
appointment in either the Lecanto or
the new Citrus Springs office. Both
locations have optical boutiques, and
the Lecanto location also offers
Saturday appointments.
Lenore Deck earns
counselor designation
Lenore Deck of Just Cruise &
Travel recently achieved the CLIA
Elite Cruise Counselor designation
from the Cruise Lines International
Association. Deck is part of a presti-
gious group of only 35 travel agents
in the United States and Canada to
reach this milestone.

Please see DIGEST/Page 6D


Lisa Nichols
IN THE
WORKFORCE



Interns,


business


work


together
As you of you know,
CLM Workforce
Connection is the
local, business-led organiza-
tion that plans and coordi-
nates quality employment
and training services for
businesses and individual
career seekers in Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties.
In response to an employ-
er survey, CLM Workforce
Connection recently hosted
a seminar to discuss intern-
ship opportunities as a
means for Citrus County
businesses to identify and
develop skilled workers.
Edith Gandy, a human
resources consultant with
TriSource Associates, con-
ducted the seminar. Gandy
has extensive experience in
corporate human resources,
as a national conference
presenter and as a college
instructor. The seminar was
held at the Central Florida
Community College (CFCC)
campus in Lecanto.
Gandy presented guide-
lines for implementing a
successful internship pro-
gram that is mutually benefi-
cial to both interns and busi-
nesses. Information was also
provided about existing pro-
grams through CFCC and
Citrus County Public
Schools.
Interest in the seminar
was very high: 18 companies
called in reservations to

Please see : -' .."/Page 6D


Bruce Williams
SMART


Too much


credit can


bury you

DEAR BRUCE: My
husband and I
through our business
had accumulated a good
deal of credit card debt,
about $35,000, but nothing
we couldn't manage. We pay
three or four times the mini-
mum payment. We recently
sold some property at quite a
profit and paid off all the
card debt. My question is,
should we cancel some of
the cards? Five cards range
from $15,000 to $18,000. Two
range from $5,000 to $8,000
and a couple are in the
$3,000 to $4,500 range. If you
advise canceling, which
ones? Is it a good or bad
reflection on our credit rat-
ing to keep or cancel? Thank
you for your wonderful
columns and I await your
answer. CA, via e-mail.
DEAR C.A: Congrat-
ulations on reducing your
debt, but please allow me to
disabuse you of a notion
when you say "it's nothing
Please see MONEY/Page 6D


.I .. : '" ,'';, :I_; ...'.-'.^.7 _,(:o.i.. ::^^l......aj,.-


~I~ ~ _~_I


~ ~ ____________l___lX__I____________


SS











CITRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STOCKS


2D SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Pfizer 1633820 27.10 -1.42
MBNA 1484320 25.77 +4.32
GenElec 1269083 34.74 -.04
Lucent 1216159 2.94 -.08
BkofAms 1034118 44.98 -1.77

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Enesco 2.94 +.84 +40.0
AdvAmern 16.70 +3.49 +26.4
StarGsSr 2.91 +.60 +26.0
MBNA 25.77 +4.32 +20.1
Consecowt 3.40 +.52 +18.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
AltanaAG 48.05 -9.10 -15.9
Libbey 16.04 -2.06 -11.4
BradPhm i 10.48 -1.26 -10.7
Teradyn 11.86 -1.34 -10.2
ImpacMtg 18.88 -1,95 -9.4


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


DIARY
2,504
1,009
411
101
3,580
67
9,337,004,795


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
SPDR 2440513 119.53 +.55
iShRs2000s1006212 63.98 +1.77
SemiHTr 876789 33.79 -.31
SP Engy 595347 45.44 +.50
DJIADiam 368710 103.12 +.26

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
GeoGlobal 6.71 +3.32 +97.9
EmpireFn 2.39 +.94 +64.8
Refac 6.19 +1.10 +21.6
RegeneRx n 3.45 +.60 +21.1
BotTech 6.85 +1.12 +19.5

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Minefnd g 4.45 -1.25 -21,9
Nephros n 3.09 -.58 -15.8
Terremkrs 6.77 -1.23 -15,4
ArenaRwt 4.50 -.75 -14.3
Metalico n 3.26 -.54 -14.2

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


610
464
98
68
1,128
54
1,223,042,023


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Wkly
Nasd100Tr3568187 36.73 -.25
Oracle 3472513 13.29 +.79
Microsoft 3133962 24.71 -.33
SiriusS 3095355 6.55 +.59
Cisco 2216887 18.99 -.31

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
Uonbrdg 6.89 +2.09 +43.4
ColGenex 7.15 +2.15 +43.0
GMXwtA 3.36 +.97 +40.6
NeoseT 3.40 +.98 +40.5
Castelle h 3.99 +1.00 +33.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name Last Chg %Wkly
BanierTh 7.85 -7.56 -49.1
Innovo 2.15 -1.65 -43,4
BrantCp If 6.07 -4.28 -41.4
DayStrwtA 5.98 -2.23 -27.2
Catuity rs 9.50 -3.02 -24.1

DIARY


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,934
1,361
240
126
3,372
77
7,840,905,873


Here are the 400 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 325 most
active on the Nasdaq National Market and 50 most active on the American Stock
Exchange. Mutual funds are 800 largest.
52 wk HI/Lo: High and low price over the past 52 weeks.
Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company's full name (not Its abbrevia-
tion). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock.
PE: Price to earnings ratio.
PPE: Projected price to earnings ratio based on analysts' forecasts of earnings for next
12 months.
Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the week.
YTD % Chg: Loss or gain for the year. No change indicated by unc.
Chg: Loss or gain for last day of Week. No change indicated by unc.


Stock Footnotes: cc PE greater than 99. cld Issue has been called for redemption by company., d New
52-week low. dd Loss In last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging
Company Marketplace, g Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars, h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq
capital and surplus listing qualification, n Stock was a new Issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low
figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock issue, pr Preferences. pp Holder owes
iniralTi.e.r .ri purcra-e opri a CluC1.ednu rnulual iurn, no PE B-al.:uiatlea ri Right to buy security at
a perliadpice SiuLtl' .aFnp iat leuIt"Oparcanr .,thl irial1 yar A Trades will be settled when
the stock Is Issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
rhigr. un =- U l inciluirn more nman one Scecurity vj CoTr.par, in '.".k'upi:y ", re.,larsr.rp or aoren reor.
gar,'.:id und-er Itr 15 r.tkruri lair Appearc 5n irc.,.-r or [rn ,ame
Dividend Footnotes a Epira dier.oE aar paid Pu' are. n:, ir.juded 0 Anrnual late iplus I:."i *
Ll udahl1r.o.J dl eri O e a A.TiOur ll dei la'i or pail in Id.i I? mu.r.r. C ajriea-i l s 31 r1t3 e Ah.,r. ,ra
nrcie ,:lo tU rrm r6ec ril ,'luune d arn,',-uncamar. l Su r. ti ,-,, Qla.i3 1 ater Ick k i:plI r.,:. 'i eular r316
j jrrI ol t ilvi Iris pa l, iris year M ':rf.ost ea.; r a i vj,,d-r,] a TiO l1d i0 ,Jletrr. iO Dr ciar-j or pa . irI,:
,ar a curmulll.u inSuae At'h Olv.ar-3i; In arroear: m Currnmr annual riae awri.l, wea ,era,ea- 0, mf
.ocer- l..ii 1 nr.3ano rcemearI In.ai1,a d e.',dr an nual .,s ni knOwrn .10 rt.e l sh.,T De.'I.areU c.
p la ,r.n pr.:e in.In. 1 rrmiontrs plus l-strC dvadend I Pa .n sIoO '. ,app-. ale *. ain ,ralu: :. r i bul.e'.,,,
oale Source: The Associaled Press. Sales figures are unotlicial.


STCK F0 OCLINERS


Name


Dlv PE YId Last


AT&T .95 ... 5.0 19.19
AmSouth 1.00 15 3.8 26.02
BkofAm s 2.00 11 4.4 44.98
BellSouth 1.16 11 4.4 26.65
CapCtyBk .76 18 1.9 39.90
Citigrp 1,76 14 3.8 46.16
Disney .24 21 1.0 25.09
EKodak .50 20 1.9 26.77
ExxonMbl 1.16 14 2.0 58.31
FPLGps 1.42 18 3.3 42.69
FlaRock .90 27 1.2 73.50
FordM .40 7 3.9 10.31
GenElec .88 21 2.5 34.74
GnMotr 2.00 46 5.8 34.65
HomeDp .40 17 1.0 39.49
Intel .32 20 1.2 26.21
IBM .80 15 1.1 74.67


Wkly YTD
Cha %Cha


+.29 +.7
+.32 +.5
-1.77 -4.3
+.25 -4.1
-.76 -4.5
-.79 -4.2
-.95 -9.7
+.20 -17.0
+.16 +13.8
+1.29 +14.2
+4.95 +23.5
+.10 -29.6
-.04 -4.8
+.57 -13.5
+1.25 -7.6
+.11 +12.1
+.66 -24.3


Wkly YTD
Div PE YId Last Chg %Chg


LowesCos
McDnlds
Microsoft
Motorola
Penney
ProgrssEn
SearsHIdgs
SprntFON
TimeWarn
UniFirst
VerizonCm
Wachovia
WalMart
Walgrn


.4 57.60
2.0 27.94
1.3 24.71
.9 18.27
.9 53.11
5.2 45.51
.. 151.75
2.0 25.11
1.2 16.59
.4 42.10
4.7 34.57
3.7 49.17
1.2 48.28
.5 46.08


IINDEXE


52-Week
Hlah Low


10,984.46
3,889.97
390.49
7,455.08
1,554.75
2,191.60
1,229.11
656.11
12,110.00


9,708.40
2,959.58
274.52
6,215.97
1,186.14
1,750.82
1,060.72
515.90
10,268.52


DaLly Wkty Wkly Yu
Last Net Chg Net Chg % Chg % Chg


Name


Dow Jones Industrials
Dow Jones Transportation
Dow Jones Utilities
NYSE Composite
AMEX Index
Nasdaq Composite
S&P 500
Russell 2000
Wilshire 5000


10,303.44
3,508.67
390.36
7,245.59
1,554.74
2,057.37
1,194.44
643.04
11,916.22


+5.60
+97.43
+9.68
+36.53
+23.22
+4.10
+2.87
+12.63
+72.34


+.05 -4.45
+2.86 -7.62
+2.54 +16.54
+.51 -.06
+1.52 +8.39
+.20 -5.43
+.24 -1.44
+2.00 -1.31
+.61 -.46


NE KST


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last


A-B-C
7.10 4.86 ABB Ltd ...... 15 6.42 -.59 +13.4
8.45 7.82 ACM Inco .66 q ... 8.31 +.02 +1.8
18.13 9.09 AESCp .. 23 18 16.59 +1.25 +21.4
44.15 33.85 AFLAC .44 17 16 43.87 +.82 +10.1
38.89 28.51 AGLRes 1.24 16 16 39.10 +1.90 +17.6
18.22 5.01 AK Steel ... 5 5 6.43 +.09 -55.6
33.11 '26.76 AMLIRs 1.92 12 ... 31.40 +.95 -1.9
14.95 6.34 AMR .. dd ... 12.06 +.11 +10.1
45,81 33.15 ASA Ltd .40 q ... 38.31 -.27 -5.3
20.01 13.59 AT&T .95 dd 12 19.19 +.29 +0.7
28.48 19.12 AXA .79e ...... 24.94 -.13 +0.8
49.98 38.26 AbtLab 1.10 24 19 49.03 +.01 +5.1
13.99 12.07 AdamsEx .90e q ... 12.88 -.03 -1.8
24.85 15.11 Adesa .30 19 15 21.91 +.31 +3.3
24.95 10.76 AMD ... cc 48 17.45 +.28 -20.8
9.23 6.15 Ahold ... ... ... 8.17 +.03 +5.1
15.56 7.40 AirTran ... dd ... 9.28 +.25 -13.3
34,99 25.91 Alcoa .60 19. 12 26.14 -.32 -16.8
50.33 30.76 Alletes 1.261 18 22 50.10 +1.45 +36.3
49.90 32.35 AlliCap 2.43e 19 15 46.61 +.59 +11.0
12.86 10.94 AIIWdd2 .89 q ... 12.49 +.20 +0.9
37.48 24.35 AllmrFn ... 13 12 37.13 +.45 +13.1
21.0688 9.39 Alpharma .18 dd 28 14.76 +.50 -12.9
69.68 44.50 Altna 2.92 14 12 65.03 -.12 +6.4
55.84 42.00 'Ameren 2.54 19 18 55.62 +1.12 +10.9
37.00 30.27 AEP 1.40 12 15 36.86 +.79 +7.3
58.03 47.70 AmExp .48 19 16 53.54 +.05 -5.0
73.80 49.91 AmintGpilf.50 14 11 58.61 +4.07 -10.8
12.75 10.88 AmSIP3 .96 q ... 11.05 -.22 -10.2
21.16 13.10 AmTower dd 20.93 +.57 +13.8
32.88 25.55 Amengas2.24f 21 19 32.57 +.43 +10.0
27.12 23.80 AmSouth 1.00 15 12 26.02 +.32 +0.5
54.62 44.85 Anheusr .98 17 16 45.88 +.21 -9.6
30.98 18.90 AquaAm .52 34 29 30.28 +1.30 +23.1
4.24 2.25 Aquila dd ... 3.63 +.27 -1.6
55.76 30.10 ArchCoal .32 76 18 55.03 +.45 +54.8
25.37 14.95 ArchDan .34 19 16 21.48 +.22 -3.7
10.50 7.76 AsdEstat .68 dd ... 9.19 +.39 -10.1
29.34 24.40 ATMOS 1.24 15 16 29.10 +.60 +6.4
17.76 7.76 Avaya ... 18 13 8.42 +.16 -51.0
34.07 18.00 Aviall ... 23 17 31.35 -.40 +36.5
46.65 35.64 Avon .68 21 17 37.80 +1.69 -2.3
31.01 17.20 BHPBillLt.46e ...... 27.40 +.58 +14.1
20.00 13.70 BMCSfi ... 54 21 18.33 +1.19 -1.5
66.65 51.41 BPPLC 1.87e 13 ... 63.23 -.27 +8.3
25.10 19.00 BRT 2,00f 14 ... 23.12 +.42 -5.0
46.45 34.12 BallCps .40 13 12 35.56 -.47 -19.1
47.47 41.70 BkofAms2.00f 11 10 44.98 -1.77 -4.3
34.09 26.93 BkNY .80a 15 13 29.00 -.06 -13.2
46.88 36.74 Banta .721 17 15 46.12 +1.09 +3.0
26.32 18.14 BarrickG .22 50 44 25.28 +.36 +4.4
83.30 57.17 BauschL .52 26 22 81.78 +5.48 +26.9
28.96 24.85 BellSouthl.161 11 15 26.65 +.25 -4.1
38.15 26.52 BIkHlCp 1.28 19 18 37.38 +.38 +21.8
16.07 15.20 BlkFL808 .75a q ... 15.44 -.02 -2.6
6.94 5.86 BlueChp .56e q ... 6.50 +.26 -2.7
66.85 46.40 Boeing 1.00 29 22 64.68 +4.09 +24.9
27.47 21.20 Borders .36 15 14 25.22 +.88 -0.4
27.95 19.55 BostBeer ... 22 21 22.68 -.04 +6.5
70.17 49.12 BostProp 2.72f 28 33 70.99 +2.35 +9.8
44.00 26.50 BostonSci ... 19 13 26.89 -.62 -24.4
26.60 22.22 BrMySq 1.12 24 19 25.20 +.24 -1.6
56.47 33.51 BurdNSF .68 20 12 47.99 +1.31 +1.4
57.18 34.92 BurdRsc .34 14 12 56.81 +1.41 +30.6
49.20 42.07 CH Engy 2.16 20 19 49.09 +1.59 +2.2
109.45 58.00 CIGNA .10 8 15 106.78 -.06 +30.9
36.65 28.98 CSSInds .48f 14 11 33.21 -.14 +4.6
29.68 19.31 CVSCps .15 28 19 29.05 +.35 +28.9
15.55. 9.28 CallGolf .28 dd 25 15.43 +.41 +14.3
4.67 1.32 Calpine dd .... 3.38. +.05 -14.2,
31.60 25.21 CampSp .68 19 17 30.82 -.20 +3.1
84.75 64.93 CapOne .11 16 11 78.80 +5.44 -6.4
14.20 11.68 CapMpfB1.26 ... 13.08 .-.16 -3.8
70.22 36.08 CardnlHIth.241 21 17 58.17 -2.28 unc
102.98 868.50 Caterpillr 2.00f 16 11 95.93 -.93 -1.6
25.00 19.04 Cendant .36 15 14 22.29 +.28 unc
13.27 9.78 CenterPnt.28m dd 16 13.41 +.66 +18.7
86.00 75.00 CnlLt pl 4.50 ...... 84.50 -.50 +3.7
35.54 29.55 CntryTel .24 14 15 34.76 +.73 -2.0
15.85 7.53 ChmpE ... 24 17 9.91 +.17 -16.2
19.35 14.38 Checkpnt .01 13 15 18.20 +.49 +0.8
24.00 13.69 ChesEng .201 16 12 24.19 +1.20 +46.6
63.15 46.21 Chevron sl.80f 9 10 56.97 +.28 +8.5
4.88 3.14 CinciBell ... 28 19 4.45 +.23 +7.2


YTD 52-Wk YTD
chg %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


45.30 36.95 CINergy 1.92 21 15
49.99 42.10 Citigrp 1.76 14 10
27.41 18.84 ClairesStrs .40 17 14
37.24 28.75 ClearChan.75f 24 21
51.39 38.30 CocaCl 1.12 22 19
29.02 18.45 CocaCE .16 19 16
9.31 8.00 Collntln .65a q ..
32.99 23.35 CmcBNJs .44 18 15
30.24 22.70 ConAgra 1.09 19 16
61.35 35.64 ConocPhilsl.24 9 9
47.23 39.12 ConEd 2.28 20 16
31.60 17.70 ConstellAs ... 23 18
15.76 12.30 Cnvrgys ... 19 14
17.08 9.29 Corning .. dd 21
11.90 7.05 CorusGr
16.24 5.02 Crompton .20 dd 14
14.92 8.45 CypSem ... dd 38
D-E-F
11.95 10.24 ONP Selct.78a q ..
27.84 18.85 OPL .96 14 19
39.20 18.58 DRHortns.36f 10 8
48.31 39.31 DTE 2.06 22 13
48.63 38.77 DaimlrC 1.93e ... 10
20.23 10.90 DanaCp .48 70 .11
33.68 19.30 Darden .08 19 16
74.73 56.72 Deere 1.24 10 10
16.05 15.00 DeefdTrin ... ... ...
10.80 3.20 Delphi If .06m 16 ..
8.17 2.46 DeltaAir .. dd ..
52.31 31.61 DevonEs .30 12 11
18.25 13.88 DirecTV .. dd 46
29.99 20.88 Disney .241 21 17
22.80 17.69 DollarG .181 19 17
76.87 62.07 DomnRes 2.68 20 14
49.45 9.81 DoralFin .72 4 8
56.75 37.95 DowChm 1.34 10 8
54.90 39.88 DuPont 1.481 21 14
29.98 19.84 DukeEgy 1.241 14 18
38.95 34.00 Duq pfA 2.10 ..
19.74 16.93 DuqUght 1.00 15 16
6.09 3.21 Dynegy ... dd .
15.09 9.24 EMCCp ... 35 24
61.80 42.19 EastChm 1.76 13 9
35.19 24.63 EKodak .50 20 10
13.15 7.09 ElPasoCp .16 dd 16
30.49 3.00 Elan
24.45 19.53 EmpDist 1.28 31 17
55.66 45.51 EnbrEPtrs3.70 28 25
23.65 17.81 Endesa .92e ......
30.15 17.35 EnPro ... 19 16
41.42 26.95 ENSCO .10 44 16
76.60 54.43 Enlergy 2.16 20 16
13.65 8.41 Eqtyinn .60 cc 53
52.01 32.69 Exelon 1.60 18 16
64.37 44.00 ExxonMbl1.16f 14 13
42.72 31.21 FPLGps 1.42 18 16
77.80 49.75 FannieMitf1.04 10 8
101.87 76.25 FedExCp .321 17 15
19.18 13.80 FedSignl 24 dd 21
22.27 19.28 Ferreligs 2.00 dd 26
27.10 16.77 Ferrolf .58 37 18
44.90 36.50 FirstData .24 19 16
22.17 13.72 FFInFds5.10e q ..
20.71 18.87 FtTrFid n 1.60 q ..
73.81 39.75 FlaRock .901 27 21
16.10 9.07 FordM .40 7 9
91.75 68.47 FortuneBr1.32 17 16
G-H-I
35.60 23.02, GATX .80 11 19
9.40 7.64 GabelliET.72a q ..
25.59 18.12 Gap .18 17 13
37.75 31.42 GenElec .88 21 18
53.89 43.01 GenMills 1.32f 15 ,16
47.90 24.67 GnMotr 2.00 46 54
114.2583.29 GoldmanS1.00 12 11
42.98 29.39 Goodrich .80 28 19
16.09 8.70 Goodyear ... 11 14
32.30 27.86 GtPlanEn 1.66 14 16
30.88 24.80 GMP 1.00 15 ...
27.78 18.35 Griffon ... 15 13
20.74 13.10 GuangRy .71e ......
75.55 49.95 Guidant .40 39 23
49.39 26.45 Hallibin .50 dd 19


52-Wk YTD 52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg


16.17 14,32 HanJS 1.16e q
10.09 8.65 HanPtDiv .55 q
12.30 10.05 HanPtDv2 .78 q
50.85 33.40 Hanson 1.71e ..
63.75 45.14 HaheyD .64f 16
75.05 43.94 HarrahE 1.32 21
21.50 16.90 Hasbro .36 22
29.79 24.60 HawaiiEl 1.24 18
38.15 31.11 HitCrREIT2.481 28
42.11 35.25 HIthcrRI 1f2.621 27
10.01 5.74 HellnTel .21e ...
24.70 16.08 HewlettP .32 19
30.54 22.62 HighwdPIfl.70 cc
44.30 32.39 HomeDp .40 17
39.50 31.85 HonwIllntl .83 21
34.51 25.29 HughSup s.361 14
40.00 15.51 Humana ... 20
32.95 26.05 Idacorp 1.20 16
43.45 28.46 Imation .48f 26


87.92 62.05 IngerRd 1.00
99.10 71.85 IBM .80f1
39.22 24.20 IntlGame .48
44.81 30.16 IntPap 1.00
14.09 10.47 Interpublf ...
35.09 26.66 IronMtn ...
J-
40.45 33.35 JPMorgChl.36
69.99 54.37 JohnJn 1.321
63.98 50.97 JohnsnCtJl.00
34.02 26.52 Kaydon .48
46.89 39.88 Kellogg 1.01
43.74 24.40 Kellwood .64
34.50 29.00 Keycorp 1.30
41.53 35.19 KeySpan 1.82
19.96 14.65 Kroger ...
8.29 4.74 LLE Ry .36e
8.75 4.01 LSI Log ..
21.99 16.24 LTCPrp 1.32
18.24 11.50 LaZBoy .44
32.80 26.31 Lactede 1.38
6.80 5.51 LbtyASG .59e
11.21 8.33 LIbtyMA
72.41 50.34 UllyEli 1.52
49.42 40.78 UncNat 1.46
29.51 17.50 Undsay .22
65.46 50.55 LockhdM 1.00
4.16 2.35 Lucent ...


11 72.00 +.40 -10.3
14 74.67 +.66 -24.3
20 28.24 +.25 -17.9
19 30.34 -2.11 -27.8
22 12.25 -.81 -8.6
35 30.87 +1.62 +1.2


-.17 -10.1
-.63 +2.4
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-.45 -9.4
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-.08 -21.8


35.65 16.51 Lyondell .90 19 7 26.45 +1.37 -8.5
M-N-0
108.75 86.43 M&TBk 1.801 17 15 105.58 +1.08 -2.1
29.01 18.28 MBNA .56 15 12 25.77 +4.32 -8.6
29.34 23.66 MDU Res .72 16 14 28.87 +1.29 +8.2
9.06 8.23 MCR .50 q .. 8.80 +.10 -0.2
11.00 6.52 Madeco ... ... ...9.20 -.02 -13.1
85.27 60.00 Magnalg 1.52 10 9 70.62 +1.12 -14.5
6.99 5.96 MgdHi .52 q 6.33 -.02 -3.7
49.25 38.43 Manulifg 1.20f ... 13 47.97 -.88 +3.8
55.90 33.55 Marathon 1.12 15 11 55.54 +.76 +47.7
37.49 8.30 MStewr ... dd ... 29.25 -.21 +0.8
18.16 10.26 MatScllf ... dd 11 14.52 +.42 -19.3
25.16 9.21 Maytag .36m dd 23 15.96 -.07 -24.4
34.56 25.64 McDnlds .55f 14 14 27.94 -.34 -12.9
55.44 46.88 Medtmic .34 35 23 51.87 -.75 +4.4
47.74 25.60 Merck 1.52 12 13 31.06 +.51 -3.4
61.99 47.35 MerrillLyn .80f 13 11 55.05 +.04 -7.9


45.84 32.99
15.39 9.32
46.52 35.13
24.00 14.59
4.44 1.88
57.61 42.01
63.80 43.79
68.80 34.15
60.51 46.54
20.27 12.47
19.25 12.37
11.60 9.90
21.19 14.24
39.84 21.01
29.75 24.20
52.39 38.84
22.38 11,85
26.70 24.25
2.29 1.91
48.42 39.54
49.98 34.90
7.64 4.72
18.88 15.01
19.41 15.61
25.00 20.42
41.87 32.37
92.43 68.61
64.60 34.15
17.70 10.89


MetUife .46f 11
MicronT ... 30
MidAApt 2.34 99
Midas ... 41
Milacron ... dd
Millipore ... 26
MillsCp 2.51 22
Monsnto .68 51
MorgStan 1.08 13
MSEmMkt.09e q
Motorola .16b 27
MunienhFd.73 q
MylanLab .24f 25
NCRCps ... 21
NatFuGasl.161 15
NatGrid 2.17e ...
NatSemi .08 21
NeuStarn ..
NewAm .21a q
NJRscs 1.36 17
NewmlM .40 40
NwpkRs ... 74
NewsCpA n.16e ..
NewsCpB n.06e'...
NiSource .92 16
Nicor 1.88 18
NikeB 1.00 21
NobleCorp .08 51
NokiaCp .44e ..


+.88 +12.2
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-1.10 +1.1
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unc unc
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-.77 -13.6
-.83 -12.3
+.46 +9.5
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-3.34 -5.2
-1.27 +24.4
-.36 +8.1


52-Wk YTD
HI Low Name DIv PEPPE Last chg %chg


24.77 NorlkSo .44 13 12 31.45
2.26 NortelNet ... dd 22 2.64
25.05 NoFrkBc s .88 15 12 28.36
17.17 NoestUt .70f dd 17 20.99
38.61 NoBordr 3.20 17 19 49.25
49.54 NorthropG1.04f 16 14 55.32
23.01 NSTARs 1.16 18 16 31.22
13.95 NvFL .88 q ... 15.46
14.09 NvlMO .89 q ... 15.56
24.10 OGEEngyl.33 18 16 29.45
47.20 OcciPet 1.24 11 10 79.66
15.93 Olin .80 14 8 18.25
48.32 OshkshTrk.531 20 15 77.84
37.34 OutbkStk .52 21 16 44.93
P-Q-R
20.09.PNM Res .74 19 16 29.17
56.20 PPG 1.88f 17 12 63.01
43.85 PPLCorp 1.84 17 14 60.43
9.20 PaylShoe ... 94 17 19.76
13.59 Pengrth g 2.76 ...... 22.38
34.00 PenVaRs2.48f ... 17 48.36
34.03 Penney .50 23 15 53.11
11.83 PepBoy .27 cc 35 13.81
47.37 PepsiCo 1.04f 21 19 53.51
18.29 PepsiAmer .34 20 18 25.50
8.96 Prmlan 1.13e 15 ... 15.59
24.55 PetroKazg.80 5 6 37.99
21.99 Pfizer .76 22 13 27.10
20.15 PiedNGs .92 21 18 24.37
10.17 PimcoStrat.89a q .. 12.3b
40.62 PitnyBw 1.24 20 16 43.55
30.44 PlumCrk 1.52 20 23 36.63
27.50 PostPrp 1.80 18 ... '36.29
37.59 Praxair .72 21 17 46.29
50.53 ProctGam1.12f 20 18 52.90
40.47 ProgrssEn2.36 15 14 45.51
3.02 ProsStHiln .30 q ... 3.44
12.93 Providian ... 14 11 17.78
38.10 PSEG 2.24 20 17 61.32
67.00 PSEG pfA4.08 ...... 78.09
20.73 PugetEngyl.00 41 17 23.93
6.31 PHYM .38 q ... 7.11
9.13 PIGM .60 q ... 9.63
6.00 PPdrT .36a q ... 6.48
26.87 Quanexs .54 12 10 53.27
2.56 QwestCm ... dd ... 3.68
13.85 RPM .60 19 13 18.33
23.11 RadioShk .25 12 12 23.23
33.63 Ralcorp 1.00e 18 17 42.44
21.77 RJamesFn.32 16 14 28.30
42.70 Rayonier 2.48 24 24 53.50
19.68 RItylncosl.34 23 23 25.34
29.24 RegionsFnl.36 16 13 34.11
19.92 Repsotl. .63e ...... 25.55
6.02 RetailVent dd 26 13.65
1.96 Revlon ... dd ... 3.07
3.02 RiteAid ... 10 61 4.25
48.94 RoylDut 2.82e 11 ... 66.01
16.70 Royce 1.66e q ... 18.98
S-T-U
22.78 SBCComr 1.29 17 16 23.93
35.66 SCANA 1.56 19 15 42.77
39.33 Stoe .56 68 43 81.40
12.37 SalEMlnc21.65a q ... 13.48
11.36 SalmSBF.14e q .. 13.03
23.30 SJuanB 2.94e 16 ... 42.80
19.24 SaraLee .79 13 13 19.65
16.56 SchergPI .22 dd 45 18.92
58.64 Schimb .84 30 24 76.61
8.25 Schwab .09f 57 20 11.33
28.30 ScottPw 1.65e ...... 35.69
10.11 SeagateT 32f 22 9 17.35
18.95 Senslent .60 14 13 21.03
13.75 ShopKo .. 16 15 24.43
36.26 Shurgard 2.24f 56 74 45.85
7.51 SierrPac ... 28 21 12.67
.66 SilcnGph h ... dd ... .72
48.65 SimonProp2.80 51 51 73.51
21.62 SmithAO .64 21 14 27.03
3.08 Solectm ...... 18 3.75
28.67 SouthnCol.49f 17 16 35.08
13.18 SwstAirl .02 31 25 13.81
20.05 SovrgnBcp.16 16 12 22.60


+1.11 -13.1
-.06 -23.9
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-.08 +1.6
-.09 -1.3
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-.12 -1.9


-.62 +15.3
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unc -1.5
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-.01 +33.5
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+.28 -7.1


52-Wk T D
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last chg %chg
25.87 17.10 SpmntFON .50 dd 17 25.11 +.45 +1.0
30.31 21.55 Standex .84 21 .. 28.56 +.86 +0.2
26.33 19.80 Steris .16 21 18 26.08 +1.00 +9.9
36.82 22.95 StorTch ... 21 19 36.22 +.03 +14.6
12.30 6.41 SturmR .40 56 18 8.43 +.24 -6.6
40.76 33.90 SunCmts 2.52 dd ... 37.50 +.75 -6.8
75.00 63.50 SunTrst 2.20 14 13 73.04 +.89 -1.1
19.12 9.55 SymblT .02 26 25 10.02 -.58 -42.1
32.62 24.55 TCFFncls.85 14 13 26.30 +.67. -18.2
32.35 24.35 TDBknorth.80 21 13 29.73 +.08 +1.7
19.05 11.83 TECO .76 dd 16 19.00 +.54 +23.8
87.25 38.34 TXUCorp2.25 dd 12 84.50 +2.32 +30.9
71.51 43.62 TXUpfD 4.06 ...... 68.35 +1.65 +19.6
9.57 6.29 TaiwSemi .32r ...... 9.18 -.19 +13.5
56.24 40.03 Target .40f 15 20 54.56 +.49 +5.1
13.43 9.77 TenetHIt ... dd ... 12.19 -.13 +11.0
45.45 37.42 Teppco 2.65 25 21 41.69 +.32 +5.8
22.79 10.80 Teradyn ... 34 ... 11.86 -1.34 -30.5
9.38 5.50 Terra ... 15 12 6.75 -.168 -24.0
27.80 11.01 TerraNitro2.45e 10 ... 27.84 +1.54 +24.8
32.57 23.71 TetraTech .. 35 17 31.85 1.85 +12.5
29.18 18.06 Texinst .10 26 22 28.03 +.02 +13.9
4.70 3.04 Theragen ... dd .. 3.21 -.04 -20.9
30.98 23.94 ThermoEl .. 12 16 26.80 unc -11.2
33.88 23.19 ThmBet ... 17 15 28.38 +.35 -7.7
90.29 72.25 3MCo 1.68 19 16 73.00 -2.48 -11.1
38.13 27.00 Tiffany .321 15 21 32.86 +.51 +2.8
19.90 15.41 TimeWam .20 23 20 16.59 -.51 -14.7
29.50 22.50 Timken .60 13 9 23.08 -.77 -11.3
22.87 11.15 TitanCp ... dd 18 22.85 +.27 +41.0
20.15 14.85 ToddShp .40 12 ... 18.91 -.09 +4.5
8.22 5.70 TorchEn .68e ...... 6.60 +.05 +1.5
57.57 49.28 Trchmrk .44 12 11 52.33, -.01 -8.2
45.58 31.81 TorDBkg 1.60 ... 12 44.31 -.03 +6.3
122.7593.54 TotalSA3.53e ...... 118.23 +.98 +7.6
26.66 20.89 TotalSys .24f 29 23 23.80 +.50 -2.1
29.50 24.00 TwnCtry 1.72 cc ... 29.06 +.96 +5.2
58.19 25.94 Transocn ... 80 19 54.14 -2.74 +27.7
20.71 14.37 Tredgar .16 19 14 15.55 +.42 -23.1
18.45 15.79 TriContl .24f q ... 17.79 -.04 -2.7
36.58 27.27 TycolntI .40 27 13 29.11 -.72 -18.6
54.66 44.50 UIL Hold 2.88 10 24 55.08 +2.10 +7.4
43.95 25.50 UniFirst .15 19 17 42.10 +2.40 +48.9
24.80 18.83 UDomR 1.20 43 ... 24.26 +.24 -2.2
4.35 3.08 UtdMicro .32t ... 42 4.16 +.02 +17.8
31.65 26.80 US Bancrpl.20 13 11 29.05 +.21 -7.2
63.90 32.12 USSteel .40f 3 5 34.80 +.33 -32.1
54.20 43.91 UtdTechs .88 18 16 51.38 -.74 -0.6
53.64 29.67 Utdhhths .02 25 20 52.81 +1.51 +20.0
66.50 34.65 Unocal .80 13 13 65.84 +.16 +52.3
V-W-X-Y-Z
27.37 16.75 ValeantPh .31 dd 56 17.81 -.39 -32.4
82.25 31.79 ValeroEs .401 11 10 81.23 +1.66 +78.9
4.60 3.40 VKHilncT .36 q 3.77 +.09 -7.8
28.98 24.08 Vectren 1.18 20 16 29.15 +1.00 +8.8
42.27 33.71 VerizonCmi.62 12 13 34.57 +.10 -14.7
38.99 31.90 ViacomB .28 dd 32.18 -.46 -11.6
35.67 15.11 VintgPt .22f 6 11 31.33 +1.40 +38.1
28.54 20.83 Vodafone .75e 24.17 -.27 -11.7
30.91 21.82 Wabash .18 11 8 23.24 -.75 -13.7
56.28 43.05 Wachovial.84 13 11 49.17 -.73 -6.5
57.89 46.20 WalMart .60 19 17 48.28 +.91 -8.6
47.39 34.89 Walgm .21 30 26 46.08 +1.70 +20.1
42.97 36.80 WAMuti 1.88f 13 11 41.00 +.59 -3.0
15.42 6.38 Wellmn .20 dd 7 10.19 +.01 -4.7
64.04 -56.12 WellsFrgol.92 15 13 61.27 +.55 -1.4
48.50 31.74 Wendys .54 95 19 47.64 +1.11 +21.3
24.29 19.49 WestarEn .92 12 15 24.30 +1.09 +6.3
13.85 11.94 WAstTIP2.82a q ... 12.63 +.03 -1.5
16.10 6.39 WDIgit ... 16 11 13.76 +.51 +26.9
71.85 57.90 Weyerh 2.00f 11 14 '63.89 -1.22 -5.0
18.98 14.00 WilmCS 1.45e 11 ... 16.72 +.50 +4.7
19.48 11.36 WmsCos .20 30 20 19.16 +.39 +17.6
40.64 28.32' Winnbgo .36f 17 14 33.23 +.37 -14.9
39.31 31.12 WiscEn .88 15 16 39.12 +1.77 +16.0
22.73 15.11 Worthgtn .68 8 12 15.75 +.07 -19.6
71.50 59.50 Wrigley 1.12 30 26 68.85 +.16 -0.5
45.67 33.50 Wyeth .92 39 15 44.53 +1.78 +4.6
36.50 19.05 XTOEgys.20 21 14 35.23 +1.67 +32.8
19.65 16.32 XcelEngy .88f 25 15 19.66 +.44 +8.0
17.24 12.82 Xerox ... 17 13 13.66 -.25 -19.7
34.64 26.42 YankCdl .25 19 15 32.21 +.80 -2.9
5.36 4.99 ZweigTI .54 q ... 5.12 unc -4.3


I ASDAQNATIONALMREI


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last


A-B-C
31.89 19.97 ACMoore ... 38 25
22.96.12.25 ADCTelrs ... 21 19
18.84 12.33 ASMLHId 15
20.66 11.29 ATITech ... 17 16
4.75 2.85 ATS Med ... dd
4.36 .63 Aastrom ... dd
11.98 6.45 Abgenix ... dd ...
26.49. 3.27 AbleLabs ... 4 ...
18.71 9.12 Actiisn ...25 25 22
34.48 19.66 AdobeSys ... 28 24
33.61 15.75 Adtran .32 29 23
27.19 19.73 Advanla .451 7 ...
29.44 20.30 AdvantB .54f 7 13
55.10 24.48 Affymet ... 53 43
6.85- 3.20 AirspanNet ..dd ...
18.27 10.64 AkanaT ... 40 23
46.84 30.88 Akzo 1.54 ......
14.18 6.73 Alamosa ... dd 33
24.62 8.85 Aldila .40 10 ...
15.61 8.48 Aikerm ... dd .
6.52 .95 AltalrNano ... dd ...
24.26 17.50 AlteraCp ... 27 23
16.01 7.87 Alvarion ... dd 28
54.70 30.60 Amazon ... 25 41
37.63 23.07 Amedisy ... 23 18
25.01 16.15 AmegyBcs.12 23 18
.60 .02 AmrBiowt ... ... ...
32.68 13.75 AEagleOs.30f 19 15
27.16 14.55 APwCnv .40 26 21
19.00 9.35 Ameritrade ... 28 22
65.24 52.00 Amgen ... 31 19
8.75 2.87 AmkorT .. dd ...
24.95 14.50 Amylin ... dd ...
51.89 37.73 Antogic .32 24 40
4.63 2.75 Analysts ... 31 ...
8.74 1.01 AnlySur ... 10 ...
94.31 62.55 ApolloG ... 63 26
45.44 14.37 AppleCs ... 41 24
4.96 2.84 Apldlnov ... ... ...
19.83 14.33 ApldMat .12 19 20
5.35 2.50 AMCC ... dd 25
18.15 7.25 aQuantive ... 28 40
6.78 4.23 AnHId .04 ......
9.18 3.73 Aris ... dd 17
39.45 21.28 AskJvs ... 36 19
35.16 28.67 AssodBancl.081 15 13
5.96 2.05 Atmel ... dd ..
17.94 12.31 Audvox ... 5 23
39.90 18.01 Autodsks .03j 33 26
40.70 22.99 AvoctCp ... cc 19
6.80 2.29 Aware ... dd ...
9.86 5.92 BEASys ... 26 19
22.40 7.85 BarmerTh ... dd ..
18.29 12.90 BeasleyB ... 26 22
44.92 33.88 BedBath ... 24 20
70.00 33.18 Biogenldc ... cc 20
49.64 34.25 Biomrnet .25e 25 18
6.96 1.21 Biopurers ... dd ...
28.54 19.91 BobEvn .48 22 22
47.05 25.25 Brdcom ... 52 29
8.17 3.77 BrodeCm If ... 13 10
10.58 5,57 C-COR ... dd 15
44.60 30.00 CBRLGrp .48 17 14
7.75 2.37 CDCCpA ...... 20
59.61 41.14 CHRobn .60 34 27
12.00 7,16 CNET ... cc 34
24.70 11.28 CVThera ... dd ...
45.98 33.33 CapCtyBk .76 18 19
48.25 26.22 CareerEd ... 20 14
43.23 23.33 Celgenes ... 79 51
54.96 37.35 Cephln ... dd 13
38.97 17.83 Ceradynes ... 22 14
27.16 16.46 ChkPoint ... 19 15
14.98 9.75 Checkers ... 14 12
48.09 29.00 Chiron ... cc 21
48.30 33.31 ChrchlD .50 88 24
3,84 1.64 CienaCp ... dd ..
6.79 3.70 Cirrus ... dd 25
23.98 17.01 Cisco ... 23 17
26.00 15.02 CitdxSy ... 23 19
24.06 8.03 CleanH ... dd 15
38.25 15.50 Cogentn ... 48 37
50.31 22.84 CogTech ... 61 39
47.40 28.90 Cognosg ... 23 20


YTD 52-Wk YTD
cho %chg Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last cho %cha


52-Wk YTD
Hi Low Name Div PEPPE Last -cha %cho


.- -. -u D I "


+2.19 +11.8
+.97 +16.6
-.55 -2.0
-.22 -39.2
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-.49 -17.7
-.08 -84.5
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unc -4.0
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unc -48.8
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unc -48.8
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-.31 -1.7
-.86 -12.5
-.04 +47.4
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+1.24 +11.6
-1.40 -23.4


9.15 5.45 Comarco
34.50 26.25 Comcast
34.16 25.89 Comcsp
7.60 4.35 Compuwre
'26.10 15.25 Comvers
2.95 1.35 ConcCm
32.61 20.45 Conmed
25.11 9.99 ContrihC
79.45 51.65 CorpExc .
50.46 39.05 Costeo .41
13.81 5.76 CredSys
42.44 17.88 CreeInc
13.54 7.71 CubistPh
16.65 3.47 Cytogen


4.90 1.14
16.89 1.43
42.57 32.71
5.80 3.50
4.80 1.02
30.29 22.29
8.75 4.52
45.22 2.71
59.21 30.78
15.58 7.80
11.99 8.11
34.38 26.95
13.70 9.70
30.29 16.25
5.44 2.12
71.16 43.38
21.40 15.29
5.00 2.93
22.58 6.26
34.57 23.18
21.25 4.20
58.40 45.15
52.50 29.15
7.25 4.03
47.92 10.93
59.12 21.40
54.28 40.24
28.85 24.12
44.25 32.20
16.26 10.06
23.38 1.90
19.77 14.61
14.54 7.95
13.45 7.05


6.39 2.93
20.27 15.10
65.13 44.14
2.59 .65
46.16 27.79
309.25 95.96
33.50 25.10
88.39 17.75
37.92 26.51
12.40 4.25
40.72 17.77
23.49 13.85
12.79 10.06
13.85 8.51
25.03 15.88
51.45 31.15
30.83 19.16
14.35 2.43
87.24 29.51
9.02 5.36
6.61 1.10
27.27 17.36
13.88 8.88
28.00 19.64
60.59 46.07
13.93 2.11
21.70 13.69
47.13 35.84
6.50 .87


Panka
DayStar
Dellinc
Dennys n
DobsonCm
DllrTree
DbleCIck
DynMal .2
eBays
EZEM .3
ErthUnk
EchoStarl.0
EduDv .1
ElectSci
ElctrgIs
ElectArts
EmmisC
E.piphany
EpixPhar
EricsnTl .3
ExideTc
Expdlntl .3
ExpScript s
ExtNetw
Eyetech
F5Netw
RfthThird 1.
FstMerit 1.
Fiserv
Flextm
Forward
FosterWh n
Foundry
FuelCell


Gemstar
Gentex s .34
Genzyme ...
GigaMed ...
GileadScis ...
Google n ..
HMN Fn .88
Hansen
HarbrFL .80
Harmonic ...
Hologic ...
HotTopic ...
HudsCitys.26f
HumGen
HunUB s .24
HyperSolu ...
IAC Interac ...
IPIX Cp ...
Imclone
Informat
Innovo
IntegCirc ...
IntgDv ...
Intel .32
IntlSpdw .06
Intmtln'J ..
Intersil .16
Intuit
Isonkcs


... 56 37
... 55 38
... 36 19
... 65 36
.. dd 40
... 29 15
... 16 16
40 55 41
46f 22 19
.. dd 23
... 21 20
... dd ...
dd ...

D-E-F
... dd
dd ...
... 31 22
... ... 33
... dd ...
... 15 14
... 42 40
20 cc ...
... 53 35
30r 16 93
... 9 10
Oe 24 13
5f 17 ..
...27 28
... dd ..
... 35 32
... dd 28
... dd ..
... dd ...
6e ... ...
01 34 27
.. 26 19
... 34 25
... dd 46
... 37 29
40 15 13
08 19 15
... 20 18
... 23 15
.. 27 ..

.. 32 23
.. dd ...


3.63
23 18.49
24 59,73
13 2.30
29 44.13
48 291.25
12 32.00
24 84.87
17 37.83
12 4.92
39 39.26
17 19.12
20 11.51
... 11.68
13 19.55
20 42.40
20- 23.76
... 2.90
19 30.71
24 8.71
12 2.15
22 20.68
18 10.76
17 26.21
18 57.01
... 7.67
28 19.00
19 44.99
... 2.96


unc -7.0
-.55 -8.5
-.62 -9.8
+.34 +12.3
-1.24 -3.8
-.01 -29.7
+1.35 +10.0
+.03 -31.4
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+.01 -7.2
+.26 +2.7
-1.26 -36.9
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-.22 -54.3


+.07 -53.2
-2.23 +323.4
-.15 -6.6
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-.28 +145.3
+.63 -16.1
+.03 +8.1
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-1.49 -43.5
+.22 -0.7
-.43 -23.4
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-1.72 -8.9
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-.94 +2.2
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+.99, +7.3
-.04 -4.6
-.37+327.8
+2.87 +36.1
-.25 -34.7
+.57 +1.9


+.11 -38.7
+.59 -0.1
-.89 +2.9
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+2.38 +26.1
-6.00 +51.1
+2.04 -3.0
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+.95 +9.3
-.35 -41.0
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-.08 +11.2
-.07 +0.2
+.66 -2.8
+.73 -12.8
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-.54 -14.0
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-1.16 -33.4
+.43 +7.3
-1.65 -15.0
-.20 -1.1
-.24 -6.9
+.11 +12.1
+1.91 +8.0
+1.27 +57.5
-.77 +13.7
+.61 +2.2
+.10 -48.1


J-K-L
31.00 17.06 JetBlue ... 58 56 20.33 +.11 -12.4
30.25 19.65 JnprNtw ... 83 30 24.89 -.71 -8.5


51.56 35.02
12.19 7.28
33.11 9.42
5.72 2.62
56.12 33.25
10.97 4.80
28.06 13.28
14.36. 8.40
32.26 19.71
42.47 15.27
10.45 2.55
46.00 28.45
40.73 34,01
9.02 3.87
19.75 13.10
2.30 .57


KLA Tnc
KnghtCap
Komag
KopinCp
Kronos
Kulicke
LKQ Cp
LSI lnds
LamRsch
Lasrscp
LexarMd
Uncare
UnearTch
Lionbrdg
LodgEnt
LookSmad

MCI Incn1
MGI Phr
MTS
Macrmdia
MagelPt
MarvellT
Maxim
MaxwIlT
McDataA
Medlmun
Medarex
MedAct
Merclntr
Micrel
Microchp
Mcromse
Microsoft .
MillPhar
Misonix
Moment
MnstrWw
MovieGal
Myogen
Napster
Nasd10OTr
Nasdaq n
Nastech
NatAtlH n
NeighCar
NektarTh
Net2Phn
NetwkAp
Nexte[C
Neffetl
NitroMed
NobityH .
NorTrst
NwstAirl
NvIWdls
Novell
Novlus
NuHoriz
NuanceC
Nvidia
OSI Phrm
OmniVisn
OnAssign
OnSmcnd
OpnwvSy
Opsware
Oracle
Orthfx
OtterTail 1


PETCO
PMC Sra
Paccar
PacSunwr
PalmSrce
palmOne
ParmTc
PAttUTI
Paychex
PnnNGm s
PetDv
PetsMart


.48 19 21
... 14 23
... 17 9
... dd 71
... 26 22
...72 19
.. 26 20
.40 24 17
.. 14 16
... 55 42
dd ..
... 16 19
.40 27 25
... 49 21
... dd

M-N-0
.60 dd ...
.. dd 19
.32 22 20
.. 69 33
... dd ..
...61 29
.80 24 23
.. dd ..
... dd 16
... dd 59
.. dd ..
... 17 14
... 39 22
... 32 28
.28 28 23
... 50 19
32a 24 17
... dd ..
... 36 15
.. dd ...
... 42 27
.12 17 8
... dd ...
.. dd ...
.41e q 26
... cc 33
... dd ...
... ... 6
... 78 27
.. dd ..
.. dd ...
.. 48 33
... 12 16
... 65 29
.. dd ...
20e 21 16
.84 20 17
... dd ...
.. 24 21
... 6 50
... 21 22
... 38 26
... dd ...
...33 17
... dd ...
... 11 11
... dd ...
... dd 15
... dd 23
... dd ...
... 24 16
... 19 16
1.12 17 16


P-Q-R
.. 20 ...
... 46 33
84f 12 9
... 16 13
... 7 62
... 41 17
... 18 17
16 33 13
52 34 27
.. 45 20
... 14 14
12 25 22


-1.54 -6.4
-.02 -29.2
+.22 +50.6
+.75 +35.7
+.60 -20.6
+.09 -8.5
-.14 +32.4
+.31 +25.7
+.16 +0.4
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-.45 -37.5
-1.69 -3.3
-.99 -5.7
+2.09 +2.5
+.74 -3.3
+.02 -67.1


-.10 +27.4
+1.28 -22.3
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-1.09 +22.5
..09 +84.8
-1.20 +7.1
-.71 -10.0
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-.50 -1.2
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-.05 +12.6
+.07 -0.2
-.33 -7.5
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-1.06 +174.6
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-1.15 +38.0
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-.25 -8.0
+.64 +81.7
-.52 +17.1
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+.22 +9.0
-.30 -15.5
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-.85 -15.2
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-1.60 +29.0
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+.07 +12.9
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-.49 -59.5
+.84 -35.8
-.12 -8.9
-.64 -11.9
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-.06 +7.7
-.25 +13.9
-2.85 -47.2
-.18 -23.8
+.04 -2.9
-.30 +0.4
-.50 +4.7
-.04 -31.3
+.79 -3.1
-.95 +11.8
+.94 +8.2


-2.02 -26.3
-.45 -18.0
+.38 -15.3
+.27 +3.6
-.75 -33.5
-.17 -7.8
+.14 +10.2
+.92 +47.0
+2.96 -4,0
+1.87 +21.1
+1.79 -15.6
+1.61 -14.9


52-Wk
Hi Low Name Div PE PPE Last


25.96 12.60
54.57 32.75
24.07 14.44
29.00 21.00
10.67 4.54
11.58 7.05
24.40 8,50
15.18 5.00
43.66 21.44
44.99 32.08
8.04 3.40
16.59 9.61
7.79 3.77
23.91 9.75
27.95 16.11
27.85 12.34
23.10 10.37
16.28 12.26
103.5652.25


Photrln
Pixar s ...
Polycom
Popular .64
Powrwav ..
Prestek
ProgPh
QiaoXing ...
Qlogic
Qualcom s.36f
QuanFuel ...
QuestSftw ...
RF McD ...
RSA Sec ...
Radware
Rambus
RedHat ..
RepBcp .44
RschMotn ..


S-T-U
14.32 4.15 SBACom .. dd .. 13.72
31,96 19.28 SanDisk ... 16 14 23.64
9.35 3.74 Sanmina ... dd 13 5.40
158.90 61.76 SearsHIdgs .. 15 19 151.75
4.75 2.53 SeeBeyond .. cc 57 4.18
50.48 33.58 Selctln .76 12 12 50.04
23.60 15.94 "Semtech .. 23 23 16.55
66.55 39.85 Sepracor ... dd .. 59.52
11.26 6.97 SiebelSys .10 68 36 8.82
45.50 13.79 SIgmaTel ... 9 11 17.02
10.95 9.50 SilcnMotn ... ... ... 10.66
9.43 2.01 SiriusS ... dd .. 6.55
11.10 5.02 SkywksSol ... 26 18 7.48
20.10 10.11 SmudStne .. dd 22 10.10
7.02 3.16 Sonusn, .. 59 44 4,73
19.00 13.85 SouMoBc .36 22 ... 13.90
22.60 17.25 Staples s .17 22 17 20.99
64.26 42.05 Starbucks .. 47 36 -51.05
6.77 1.24 StemCells ... dd ... 4.38
5.65 3.29 SunMicro ... 18 60 3.65
26.65 20.50 SusqBnc .92 16 14 24.84
4.35 3.18 Sycamrelf .. 86 .. 3.44
34.05 18.01 Symantecs... 29 19 21.22
12.00 6.29 Symetric ... 33 21 10.37
39.00 8.99 Syneronn ... 28 24 38.18
12.70 6.95 Synovis .. cc .. 7.99
29.60 19.15 TakeTwos ... 19 17 25.41
33.45 7.33 TASERs ... 40 91 10.10
46.00 33.04 TechData .. 13 14 36.34
2.01 .82 Tegal ... dd ... 97
22.90 9.78 TelwestGI n ... 40 22.72
10.32 6.56 Tellabs ... dd 21 8.69
3.78 1.44 Terayon .. dd 14 3.09
34.25 22.82 TevaPhrm.24e 19 ... 31.02
8.42 2.96 3Com ..4 dd .. 3.58
13.50 5,53 TibcoSft ... 26 25 6.47
7.75 3.45 TiWo Inc ... dd ... 6.52
36.81 12.83 Tmskry ... dd ... 37.02
2.52 1.01 TmSwtc ... dd .. 2.18
41.11 21.55 TrimbleN ... 30 25 38.60
5.48 2.88 TriQuint ... dd ... 3.34
14.19 10.73 TrstNY .60 17 16 13.13
32.78 26.69 Trustmk .80 15 14 29.40
23.98 15.07 UCBHHds.10 18 14 16.50
6.04 4.26 USUnwirn ... 17 50 5.99
30.97 6.70 UTStrcm ... 17 47 7.52
8.07 2.10 US Enr ... dd ... 3.60
44.55 28.54 UnivFor .10 15 13 41.52
V-W-X-Y-Z
14.65 6.31 ValueClick ... 29 24 12.19
36.09 16.21 Verisign ... 33 24 28,53
29.28 16.30 Veritas ... 25 20 23.60
17,06 8.06 VertxPh ... dd ... 16.33
28.23 8.76 Vicuron ... dd .. 27.80
5.07 1.95 Vitesse ... dd ... 2.10
31.20 25.01 Volcomn ... ... ... 28.99
10.57 6.46 WebMD ... 78 16 10.13
6.97 .69 WetSeal ... dd ... 6.78
76.45 34.18 Wynn ... dd 67 48.06
40.89 23.55 XM Sat ... dd ... 34.82
33.61 25.21 Xilinx .28f 29 25 25.48
39.79 25.52 Yahoo .. 53 51 34.44
64.47 38.25 YellowRd .. 12 8 50.71


YTD
cha %chq


+1.25 +43.5
-7.00 +0.6
-1.65 -36.5
+.52 -11.9
+.24 +20.6
+.76 +19.1
+.72 +24.7
-.97 -28.5
+.74 -16.2
+.02 -20.8
-.57 -22.8
+.21 -14.2
+,21 -21.1
-1.37 -43.5
-4.59 -41.4
-.52 .-42.2
+1.88 +7.2
+.37 -1.6
-3.82 -11.1


+.67 +47.8
-1.05 -5.3
-.09 -36.2
+3.73 +53.4
+1.01 +16.8
+1.14 +13.1
-.92 -24.2
-1.63 +0.3
+.15 -15.9
-4.82 -52.1
unc +1.5
+.59 -14.0
-.02 -20.7
-.64 -45.9
-.18 -17.5
-.59 -24.8
-.58 -6.6
-1.39 -18.1
+.22 +3.5
-.05 -32.3
+.46 -0.4
+.04 -15.3
-.03 -17.6
-.26 +6.8
+3.31 +24.8
+.02 -26.1
-.85 +9.6
-.25 -68.1
+.51 -20.0
-.05 -40.5
-.12 +29.2
-.16 +1.2
unc +14.0
-.24 +3.9
-.06 -14.1
-.13 -51.5
-.28 +11.0
+.50 +45.8
+.08 +41.6
-.21 +16.8-
-.02 -24.9
+.25 -4.8
+1.22 -5.4
-.21 -28.0
+.48 +31.4
+.15 -66,0
-.03 +21.6
+1.09 -4.3


+.78 -8.6
-1.94 -15.1
-.21 -17.3
+.55 +54.5
-.09 +59.7
-.18 -40.5
unc +8.3
-.15 +24.1
+.94 +198.7
-1.45 -28.2
+.90 -7.4
-.58 -14.1
-1.65 -8.6
+2.82 -9.0


AMERI AN T CK E C AN E :


52-Wk
HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last
6.90 5.65 AbdAsPac .42 q ... 265
25.80 12.50 AdmRso .301 8 ... 20.10
6.40 2.90 AmO&Gn ... dd ... 4.83
22.02 11.51 ApexSilv ... dd ... 14.15
3.85 1.55 AvanirPh ... dd ... 2.84
3.87 1.70 BemaGold .... dd ... 2.39
175.80127.79 BiotechT .04e q ... 168.29
3.46 1.51 Camborg ... ... 20 2.20
20.83 16.90 CarverBcp .28 17 ... 17.05
39.77 7.89 Chenleres ... dd ... 31.84
13.60 7.55 CornSys .28 18 16 10.47
4.68 2.00 Crystallxg ... 3.64
22.70 6.50 DHBInds ... 12 10 8.53
109.83 97.27 DJIADiam2.09e q ... 103.12
17.70 5.52 DanlHd .. 17 ... 12.22
3.61 2.02 EldorGldg ... dd ... 2.78
8.25 7.15 Elswth .30e q ... 7.66
15.70 13.71 FTrVLDv .38a q ... 14.72
20.24 15.90 FlaPUtil .62f 17 19.20
4.30 2.85 GascoEnn ... dd .. 3.91
9.35 .77 GeoGlobal ......... 6.71
4.05 2.52 GlobeTeln ......... 283
6.65 2.33 GoldStrg ... dd 26 3.09
8.00 3.75 GreyWolf ... 44 13 7.41
15.57 12.00 INGGRE 1.26 q .. 15.53
25.99 14.11 IShBrazil .46e q ... 24.90


YTD 52-Wk
chg %chg HI Low Name Div PE PPE Last


-.05 -3.4
-1.10 +13.9
-.42 +50.9
+1.10 -17.6
+.16 -16.7
+.01 -21.6
+.99 +10.1
+.19 -17.6
+.15 -14.8
+3.59 unc
-.01 -12.8
-.08 +1.4
-.24 -55.2
+.26 -4.1
+.56 +44.6
+.26 -5.8
+.17 -5.3
+.05 -4.7
+.50 +0.3
+.38 -8.2
+3.32+591.8
-.26 -27.8
-.05 -22.9
+.13 +40.6
+.50 +2.6
+.96 +12.0


18.87 14.49 ishuerm .19e q
12.57 1.00 IShHK .27e q
11.09 9.36 iShJapan .04e q
34.80 21.59 iShKor .10e q
7.80 6.26 iShMalasia.16e q
28.09 18.28 iShMexico.28e q
13.00 9.51 iShTaiwan.08e q
123.36106.64 iShSP5002.46e q
74.17 50.77 iShEmMkts.80e q
58.99 51.98 iShSPBaGl.32e q
63.97 54.17 IShSPBaV1.25e q
97.00 82.17 iSh2OTB4.04e q
87.49 82.10 iSh7-10TB3.20e q
82.85 80.62 IShl-3TB1.94e q
55.36 44.47 iSh EAFE s.80e q
119.56 93.03 iShRsMCV2.02e q
69.90 54.92 iShSPMid s.70e q
43.45 31.08 iShGSSft .24e q
76.19 61.22 IShNqBio .. q
68.81 57.34 iShRlO18V1.53e q
70.70 55.58 iShMCBaG s.42e q
49.45 43.06 iShR1000G.58e q
66.32 56.79 iShRus10001.28eq
65.41 52.10 iShR2000Vsi.08eq
67.99 52.02 iShR2000G.26e q
66.14 51.11 iShRs2000s.77e q


YTD
chg %chg'


Foreign Exchange
Value I Pre vValue Todays S / Prev
Country name Currency In dollars value In currency
Argent Peso .3465 .3463 2.8862 2.8880
Australia Dollar .7503 .7594 1.3328 1.3168
Brazil Real .4247 .4258 2.3545 2.3485
Britain Pound 1.7694 1.7887 .5652 .5591
Canada Dollar .8054 .8147 1.2416 1.2274
Chile Peso .001727 .001726 579.05 579.50
China Yuan .1208 .1208 8.2759 8.2759
Colombia Peso .000430 .000430 2327.00 2323.05-
Czech Rep Koruna .0398 .0402 25.11 24.87
Denmark Krone .1604 .1622 6.2358 6,1645
Dominican Rep Peso .0353 .0353 28.35 28.35
Egypt Pound .1730 .1730 5.7800 5.7810
Euro Euro 1.1947 1.2083 .8370 .8276
Hong Kong Dollar .1287 .1286 7.7723 7.7732
Hungary Forint .0048 .0049 206.47 204.50
India Rupee .0230 .0230 43.480 43.513
Indnsla Rupiah .000102 .000103 9782.00 9700.00
Israel Shekel .2184 .2192 4.5788 4.5625
Japan Yen .008953 .009013 111.70 110.95
Jordan Dinar 1.4118 1.4115 .7083 .7085
Kuwait Dinar 3.4235 3.4247 .2921 .2920
Lebanon Pound .000664 .000663 1506.48 1507.39
Malaysia Ringgit .2632 .2632 3.7999 3.7999
Mexico Peso .093127 .092885 10.7380 10.7660
N.Zealand Dollar .6811 .6952 1.4682 1.4384
Norway Krone .1516 .1529 6.5970 6.5401
Pakistan Rupee .0168 .0168 59.63 59.63
Peru New Sol .3074 .3073 3.253 3.254
Philpins Peso .0179 .0178 55.87 56.03
Poland ZIoty .2976 .2994 3.36 3.34
Russia Ruble .0349 .0349 28.6300. 28.6800
SDR SDR 1.45623 1.45661 .6867 .6865
Saudi Arab Riyal .2667 .2667 3.7500 3.7501
Singapore Dollar .5907 .5934 1.6928 1.6851
Slovak Rep Koruna .0313 .0315 31.99 31.79
So. Africa Rand .1465 .1504 6.8260 6.6511
So. Korea Won .000967 .000976 1033.90 1025.10
Sweden Krona .1260 .1280 7.9347 7.8100
Switzednd Franc .7710 .7794 1.2971 1.2830
Talwan Dollar .0316 .0316 31.65 31.63
Thailand Baht .02417 .02422 41.37 41.29
U.A.E. Dirham .2723 .2723 3.6727 3.6729
Uruguay New Peso .0407 .0406 24.5750 24.6350
Venzuel Bolivar .000466 .000465 2147.00 2160.00


Spot Metals


NEW YORK (AP) Spot nonferrous metal prices Friday.
Aluminum -76.1 cents per lb., London Metal Exch. Fri.
Copper -161.00 cents Cathode lull plate, U.S. destinations.
Copper 153.65 cents per Ib., N.Y. Mere spot Fi.
Lead $868.00 per metric ton, London Metal Exch.
Zinc -59.42-59.67 cents lb., delivered.
Gold-$432.60 Handy Harman(only daily quote).
Gold $427.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri.
Silver $6.865 Handy & Harman (only daily quote).
Silver $6.851 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fr.
Mercury $900.00 per 76 Ib flask N.Y.
Platinum -$887.00. troy oz., N.Y. (contract).
Platinum $872.90 troy oz., N.Y. Mer spot Fri.
n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised


Money Rates

Prime Rate
Discount Rate Primary
Fed Funds close 3
T-BIlIs:
3-month
6-month
T-Bill, annualized, adjusted for
constant maturity:
1-year
T-Notes:
1-year
2-year
5-year
10-year
T-.Bond:
30-year
Ubor:
3-month
6-month
FHLB Cost of Funds, 11th District:
Eff. June. 30
FNMA 30-year mortgage commitment:
30-days
Money market fund:
Merrill Lynch Ready Assets:
30-day avg yld;


Today Prev.
6.25 6.00
4.25 4.00
3.3125 3.0625

3.10 3.41
3.27 3.17


3.40 3.39

3.63 3.44
3.75 3.58
3.84 3.69
4.05 3.92

4.30 4.22

3.53 3.48
3.73 3,85

2.622 2.515

5.42 5.36


2.47 2.44


Choil Cl assfe





156K=5966mLS


+.85
-.34 -12.9
-.33 -7.5
-.28 +6.2
+1.00 +28.3
+.76 +.6
+3.73 +53.4
+.45 +1.0
-.51 -14.7
+2.40 +48.9
+.10 -14.7
-.73 -6.5
+.91 -8.6
+1.70 +20.1


I OEYAD EALI


tf-------------------------------


.



.
.

.













CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MLrTJALS


SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 3D


TAL


12-mo. 12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn Name_ NAV 5chg ccrotn


AARP Invmst:
CapGyr 44.14 +.08 +6.7
GNMA 15.06 -.02 +4.9
Global 27.43 -.08 +19.6
Grwinc 21.77 +.06 +7.7
Int0 44.04 -.15 +14.0
MgdMuni n 9.23 -.02 +7.1
PathwayCnsv x11.60 -.07 NA
PathwyGro 13.16 +04 NA
ShtTermBd 10.08 -.01 +2.1
SmCoSIk n 25.48 +.52 +13.7
ABN AMRO Funds:
GrwthN 22,19 +.23 +1.0
M&CGroN 22.54 -.05 +0.5
AIM Investments A:
Agrsv p 10.37 +.13 +7.1
BalA p 25.27 -.09 +6.0
BasicValA p 32.41 -.12 +7.4
BIChlpA p 11.37 .. +2.0
CapDev p 18.56 +.26 +12.4
Chartp 12.71 ... +4.6
Constlp 22.33 +08 +3.5
HYIdA p 4.45 +.01 +10.3
IntGrow 20.26 +.01 +17.7
MdCpCrEq 29.27 +.20 +8.6
MuB p 6.21 -.02 +8.0
PremEqty 9.84 .. +5.3
RealEst p 27.37 +.45 +34.3
SaelEqty 17.61 +.12 +7.6
SmCpGrA p 28.11 +.51 +7.3
Summil 10.95 +.04 +9.3
WeingA p 13.02 +.04 +4.9
AIM Investments B:
BascValB t 30.50 -.12 +6.6
BlueChipB I 10.75 .. +1.2
CapDpvB t 17.28 +.25 +11.7
ChartB I 12.16 -.01 +3.7
PremEqty 9.09 .. +4.4
AIM Investor CI:
Dynam 16.71 +.22 +11.0
Energy 35.49 +.55 +47.0
HlthSci 50.78 +.45 +3.2
SmCoGrl p 12.50 +.24 +10.6
Tech 23.82 -.18 -0.1
TotRtnl 23.88 -.10 +3.0
Utilies 13.26 +.27 +35.3
AIM/INVESCO Invstr:
CoreStock 10.39 +1.7
AMF Funds:
AdjMtg nx 9.74 -.01 +1.9
Advance Capital I:
Balanced np 17.89 +.03 +8.0
Retlnc n 10.10 -.04 +9.1
Alger American:
Growth 35.58 +.23 +5.6
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr t 4.51 +.11 +11.6
Alger Funds Inst:
MidCpGr 17.06 +.28 +8.9
Alleglant Cl I:
SCapVall 21.55 +.40 +12.4
AllianceBem A:
AmoGlncA +.01 NA
BalanAp 17.14 +.04 +8.5
GIb[TechAp 54.74 -.15 +2.5
GrolncA p 3.71 +.02 +6.4
GrowthA p 33.77 +.18 +6.7
IntlValAp 16.22 -.06 +19.0
LgCapGrAp 18.13 +.02 .+5.5
SmCapGrA 22.41 +.42 +6.9
AlllanceBem Adv:
GdencAdv 3.73 +.02 +1.9
InSiValAdv 16.42 -.05 +19.4
LgCapGrAdv 18.70 +.02 +5.8
AllianceBern B:
AmGvlncB +.01 NA
CorpBdB p 12.22 -.04 +8.6
GIblTechB t 49.44 -.15 +1.6
GrInco p 3.65 +.02 +7.7
GrowthBl 1 23.44 +.12 +5.86
LgCpGrBI 16.37 +.01 +4.7
SmCprB t 18.88 +.3 ++6.0
USGotB p 7.10 -.03 +5.3
AlllanceBem C:
Grthlnc t 3.66 +.02 +7.7
SmCapGrCt 18.93 +.35 +6.1
Alllanz Funds A:
SmCpV A 30.52 +.78 +20.4
RenalsA 24.42 +16 +60.6
Value A 17.30 +.02 +52
Allianz Funds B:
RenalsB 22.91 +.15 -0.2
Alllanz Funds C:
RenalsC t 22.76 +.14 -0.2
ValueC t 16.75 +.02 +4.5
GwhC t 17.45 +.04 +3.6
TargetC 15.57 +.16 +4.6
AmSouth Fds Cl I:
Value 16.93 +.11 +14.1
Amer Beacon AMR:
BanAmr 14.43 +.06 +13.5
LgCapAmr 20.30 +.15 +18.0
Amer Beacon Insti:
InSEqlns 19.86 -.07 +14.4
SmCaplnst 20.73 +.51 +18.2
Amer Beacon Plan:
SmCpPlan 20.35 +.50 +17.9
Amer Century Adv:
EqGro p 22.36 +.13 +11.5
Etylnc np 8.11 +.06 +9.2
Amer Century Ins:
Eqtylndex 4.76 +.01 +7.4
Ultra 28.64 +.07 +2.0
Amer Century Inv:
Balanced n 16.62 +.03 +9.0
EqGrolnv n 22.37 +.12 +11.7
Eqlnco n 8.11 +.06 +9.5
GNMAI n 10.38 -.03 +4.3
Gftn 16.04 +.22 +10.56
Growth n 19.37 -.03 +6.4
Hedrtagel n 12.49 +.19 +11.4
InCGro n 30.69 +.09 +10.0
InaBnd 13.55 -.25 +4.6
IntDiso nrC 13.36 -.05 +11.2
IntlGroln 8.91 -.03 +10.8
LUeScI n 5.17 +.06 +11.7
NewOpp nr 5.56 +.18 +6.1
OneChgAggn 10.88 +.05 NE
RealEstl n 26.53 +.37 +31.3
Seletl n 36.78 -.02 +12
SGovn 9.46 -.02. +1.8
SmCapVal n 10.48 +.22 +15.7
SmallCo 10.30 +.24 +20.6
StrMod n 6.71 +.01 +8.1
Ultra n 28.32 +.07 +1.8
Ui ln 13.37 +.28 +35.0
Valuelnv n 7.41 +.07 +9.4
VIta n 14.45 +.34 +5.6
Amer Express A:
Cal 5.26 -.02 +8.1
Discoovery 8.85 +.19 +14.9
DEWIx 11.30 +.04 +16.7
DirBtd 4.88 -.02 +5.8
DvOppA x 7.33 ... +19.2
EqSelect 13.04 +.20 +6.9
EqtyVal px 1028 -.02 +14.4
Growth 27.58 +.14 +11.5
HIYIdBond 2.89 +.01 +11.3
HiYield 4.48 -.01 +6.6
Insr 5:49 -.02 +6.6
LgCpEqAp 5.13 +.02 +7.2
MgdAI px 9.55 ... +11.2
Mass 5.44 -.02 +7.0
Mich 5.34 -.02 +6.6
Minn 5.35 -.01 +6.5
Mutual px 9.78 -.03 +9.2
NewD 2327 -.04 +0.6
NY 5.17 -.02 +6.8
Ohio 5.34 -.01 +6.7
PrecMt 8.67 +.02' -0.1
Select 8.67 -.04 +5.4
SDGovt 4.78 -.01 +1.7
SmColndex 8.56 +.21 +14.4
Stock px 19.18 +.01 +6.4
TE Bond 3.92 -.01 +7.1
ThdIln8 5.74 ... +16.7
Thdilnl 7.02 -.03 +10.5
Amer Express B:
DivrEqlnc x 11.26 +.06 +15.8
EqVal px 10.30 ... +13.5
NewDt 21.96 -.04 -0.2
Amer Express Prtnr:
IntlSalVal p 8.26 ... +17.8
SmCpVIA p 6.85 +.14 +12.3
Amer Express Y: -
NewD n 23.40 -.04 +0.8
American Funds A:
AmcapFA p 18.18 +.12 +6.7
AmMuIIAp 26.48 +.16 +9.1
BtlAp 17.88 +.04 +6.7
BondFdAp 13.46 -.06 +6.3
CaplnBtAp 52.62 +.13 +15.4
CapWidA p 19.21 -.16 +10.2
CapWGrAp 33.06 +.16 +17.1
EupecAp 36.02 +.13 +15.6
FundlnA p 32.38 +.15 +12.8
GostAp 13.72 -.06 +4.8
GwlhFdA p 27.69 +.04 +10.1
HITrstAp 12.30 +.03 +9.9
HIlncMunAi 15.66 -.02 +7.9
IncoFdAp 16.41 +.07 +12.1
InlBdA p 13.64 -.05 +3.1
InvCoAAp 30.60 +.11 +8.6
LtdTEBdAp 15.43 -.04 +4.4
NwEconAop 20.81 +.08 +8.3
NewPerAp 2723 +.01 +9.7
NewWoddA 33.88 +.25 +25.8
SmCpWAp 32.05 +.29 +16.4
TaxExptAp 12.59 -.04 +7.0
TxExCAAp 16.85 -.05 +7.7
WshMutA p 30.60 +.13 +8.1
American Funds B:
AmcapBt 17.59 +.12 +6.0
BalonBt 17.83 +.04 +5.9
BondB I 13.46 -.06 +5.5
CapitalBBt 52.62 +.13 +14.5
CapWGrBt 33.72 +.15 +16.2
EurpacBt 35.62 +.13 +14.8
FundlnvBt 32.32 +.15 +12.0
GrowthB I 27.01 +.03 +9.3
HI TrostB I 12.30 +.03 +9.1
IncomeB t 18.31 +.06 +11.1
ICAB0 30.49 +.10 +0.0
NewPerep I 26.60 +.01 +8.9
WashBt 30.44 +.12 +7.3
AmeostckMF 39.72 +.10 +4.0
Ardel Mutual Fds:
Apprec 47.70 +.69 +10.2
Ariel n 54.14 +.63 +11.9
Artlssn Funds:
Inll 21.70 -.11 +10.5
MIdCap 29.49 +.21 +8.9
MidCapVal 18.96 +.43 +28.7


SmCapVal 18.53 +.49 +19.0
Baron Funds:
Asset n 53.85 +1.17 +18.8
Growth 46.51 +.90 +21.2
Partners p 17.32 +.57 +28.3
SmICap 23.01 +.53 +17.7
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 13.40 -.04 +5.9
CaMu 14.34 -.03 +4.5
DivMun 14.18 -.04 +4.3
NYMun 14.03 -.04 +4.6
TxMgdlntiVI 22.12 -.11 +12.3
IntVal2 20.80 -.09 +12.3
EmgMkts 36.64 +.04 +47.8
BlackRock A:
Aurora A 40.29 +.90 +8.6
HiYdlnvA 8.06 +.03 +10.5
LegacyAp 13.35 +.07 +6.0
BlackRock Fds Birk:
CoreBIrk 9.75 -.04 +5.8
Bramwell Funds:
GrowthFd p 19.50 +.17 +3.4
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd 28.87 +.39 +15.8
Brandywine n 28.43 +.49 +17.0
Brinson Funds Y:
HighYIdYn' 7.18 +.04 +9.7


Buffalo Funds:
SmlCap 27,685 +.67
CGM Funds:
CapDov n 30.81 +.79
FocusFd n 3408 +.12
Mull n 27.43 +.05
Realty n 32.58 +.67
CRM Funds:
MidCapVall 26.48 +.31
Calamos Funds:
Gr&lncC t +.16
Grtdh&lncAp +.16
GrowthAp +.11
GrowlhBt +.12
GrowthCt +.10
Calvert Group:
Incop 17.13 -.03
IntlEqA p 18.33 -.09
MuBdCAl 10.35
Munlnt 10.92 -.01
SocialA p 27.72 +.08
SocBdp 16.29 -.03
SocEqA p 34.59 +.12
TxFLId n 10.58 +.01
TxFLng p 16.80 +.01
TxFVT 15.93 -.01
Causeway IntI:
Institutional 16.12 -.05
Investor r 16.05 -.04
CItiStreet Funds:
DivBond 12.06 -.03
LgCoStk 11.75 +.04
Clipper 88.12 -.10
Cohen & Steers:
InsltRly n 48.20 +.88
RtyShrsn 74.12 +1.36
Columbia Class A:
Acorem I 26.32 +.41
FedSec 10.74 -.05
TxExA p 13.84 -.05
Columbia Class B:
Acorn I 25.47 +.40
'Columbia Class C:
Acorn I 25.45 +.39
Columbia Class Z:
Acorm Z 26.90 +.42
Acormln0lZ 29.43 -.06
IntmBdZ n 9.06 -.04
LgCapGrwth 20.57 +.05
LargeCo n 27.69 +.08
MidCapGrZ 21.11 +.31
QltyPlusBd 10.87 +-.06
SmCaZ 1882 +.49
SmallCo n 21.82 +.53
Columbia Funds:
HiYId Zn 6.64 +.01
IntlStkZn 14.82 -.08
ReEsEZx 27.50 +.25
CG Cap Midt Fds:
Intl0Eq 10.47 +.01
LgGrw 12.11 -.01
LgVali n 11.20 +.06
Davis Funds A:
NYVen A 31.39 +.12
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 30.00 +.10
Davis Funds C &Y:
NYVenY 31.77 +.11
NYVenC 30.19 +.10
Delaware Invest A:
LgCapValA 16.43 +.10
TrendA p 20.23 +.25
TxUSAp 11.74 -.03
Delaware Invest B:
DelchB 3.30 +.02
SelGrB I 20.44 +.12
Del-Pooled Trust:
EmgMkt 15.67
IntlEq 19.34 -.02
Dimensional Fds:
EmgMkVal 19.45 -.01
IntSmVa n 15.98 -.18
TMUSSm 21.28 +.46
USLgCo n 35.05 +.10
USLgVa n 20.69 +.1
USLgVa3 n 15.92 +.13
US Micro 14.74 +.31
US Small n 19.40 +.42
US SmrVal 27.03 +.69
IntlSmCo n 14.61 -.15
EmgMkt n 17.08 +.03
Fxd n 10.18
IntVa n 1594 -.05
Glb5Fxlnc 10.61 -.02
LrgCaplntn 17.39 -.07
TM USSmV 23.79 +.56
TM IntlValue 13.98 -.04
TMMktwdeV 14.17 +.16
TMUSEq 12.55 +.07
2YGIFxd n 9.88 -.01
DFARIEst n 24.71 +.47
DIverslfd Inv Fds:
CoreBond 12.57 -.04
EqGrow p 18.79 +.05
Val&lnc 24.55 +.08
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced nx 79.10 -.50
IncomeFdx 12.77 -.14
Inll Stk 31.05 -.22
Stock x 129.80 -.51
Domini Soc Inv:
SoclalEqn 28.46 +.16
Dreyfus:
Aprec 39.09 -.04
BasicS&P 24.90 +.07
Discp 32.05 +.09
Dreyfus x 10.05 -.01
DreyMid r 27.32 +.54
Drey500ln I 35.00 +.10
ErgLead 44.69 +1.16
FLIntr 13.37 -.04
GNMA px 14.62 -.07
GrInc nx 15.06 -.04
InsMunnt 18.11 -.07
Interim nr 13.52 -.04
MidcpVl r 32.55 +.31
MunBdr 11.99 -.02
NYTax r 15.03 -.05
SrValA0 r 28.71 +.20
Dreyfus Founders:
GrowthB 9.77 -.01
GrowthF np 10.24 -.01
Dreyfus Premier:
CaoTxExBdZ 15.02 -.05
CoreEqAt 14.57 -.02
CoreVIlrpx 30.08 -.06
EmgMiA 20.30 -.04
LtdHYIdA p 7.36 +.02
NwLdrs n 43.84 +.49
TaxMgdGCt 15.48 -.05
TechGroA 21.62 -.16
TechGrowR
Eaton Vance Adv:
tllgRat t 9.86
Eaton Vance CI A:
TMG1.0 521.40 +2.25
ChInaA p 14.6 8 -.13
FloalRate 10.20 ...
GrowthA 7.00 +.09
HlthSclAp 9.98 -.12
IncBosA 6.39 +.03
LgCpVal 17.51 +.08
NaulMun 11.30 +.03
SpcEqlA 4.59 +.07
TMG1.1 22.24 +.10
MunBdl 10.78
TmadGvA 8.72 -.02
Eaton Vance Cl B:
FLMunlBI t 10.97
HIthOcIpt 10.56 -.12
NatiMunBt 10.55 +.03
TMG1.11 21.05 +.08
Eaton Vance Cl C:
FloatRtt 9.86
GovtC p 7.52 -.01
NatlMCt 10.05 +.03
Enterprise Cl A:
GwlhAnp 16.34 -.04
Evergreen A:
AstAllA p 13.76 +.02
AdJRateA 9.33 -.01
SpValuA p 28.76 +.70
Evergreen B:
AstAIlodB I 13.59 +.02
BalanB t 8.45
DvrBdB t 14.99 -.04
MunlBondB t 7.56 -.03
Evergreen C:
AdjRateC 1 9.33 -.01
AstcAloCt 13.37 +.02
Evergreen I:
CoreBdl 10.70 -.06
AdjRatal 9.33 -.01
IntlEqtyl 8.98 -.01
LgCapEqtyl x 15.00 +.06
PAMuBdl 11.52 -.03
ShlntBdl 6.09 -.03
SIMunil 10.04 -.01
SpecVal 28.91 +.70
StrGrolx 26.17 +.01
Excelsior Funds:
Energy 23.89 +.58
HiY0eld npx 4.58 +.02
ValRestr nx 43.55 +.54
FAM Fundsa.
Value n 47.59 +.42
FBR Funds:
SmaolCap 43.17 +.97
FMI Funds:
Focus n 34.02 +.55
FPA Funds:
Cap8 x 42.26 -.33
Newlncx 10.94 -.12
FPACres nx 24.49 -.01
Federated A:
AmLdrA 25.01 +.16
CapAppA 24.92 +.01
MIdGrStA 31.27 +.52
HilncBoA 7.94 +.04
KaulmA p 5.35 +.08
MkdOppA px 13.21 -.11
MunOocA 10.85 -.02
USGoSecA x 7.80 -.04
Federated B:
AmLdrBt 25.07 +.16
KaumonBop 5.23 +.07
StrlncB 8.68
Federated C:
MktOppCx 13.13 -.09
Federated InstI:
Kaufman 5.35 +.07
MidCap 21.67 +.43


StockTr 37.27 +.27
Fidelity Adv FocT:
HI8CarT 21.57 +.17
NatResT 38.89 +.57
Fidelity Advisor A:
DlvrlIntA r 18.67 -.06
EqGrAt 44.61 +.03
EqlncA px 27.85 +.01
MidCapAp 24.16 +.12
Fidelity Advisor B:
EqGrB n 42.09 +.02
MldCpB np 23.36 +.12
Fidelity Advisor I:
DsIntl n 18.90 -.05
DiOGNhl 11.65 +.02
EqGrl n 47.15 +.03
Eqlnl x 28.50 -.01
IntBdl n 11.09 -.05
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT x 15.83 -.03
DIvInlT p 18.53 -.05
DWGrthT p 11.47 +.02
DynCapAppTpl4.05 -.02
EqGrT p 44.74 +.03
EqlnT x 28.17 +.02
GovInT 10.15 -.03
GrOppT 30.23 -.06
HllncAdvT p 9.84 +.08


NC TFA p 12.43 -.03 +8.4
OhlolTFA p 12.73 -.03 +8.6
ORTFAp 12.00 -.03 +8.9
PATFAp 10.55 -.02 +8.2
ReESecA p 28.24 +.40 +35.5
RIsDOvAp 31.40 +.42 +4.3
SmCpGr2Ap 11.74 +.22 +6.1
SMCpGrA 34.39 +.60 +10.9
Strallncpx 10.23 -.07 +9.4
USGovApx 6,58 -.03 +4.5
UtliesAp 12.17 +.23 +32.4
VATFAp 11.99 -.02 +8.8
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
IncomeAdvx 2.49 +.02 +14.1
Frank/Temp Fmnk B:
IncomeB1 px 2.50 +.02 +13.3
IncomeB lx 2.49 +.02 +13.0
Frank/Temp Fmk C:
FoundFAlp 12.27 +.05 +11.8
IncomeCtx 2.51 +.01 +13.2
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
BeaconA 16.19 +.08 +14.2
DiscovA 25.01 +.06 +19.7
QualitledAt 19.85 +.13 +17.0
SharesA 23.48 +.10 +12.9
Frank/Temp Mtl C:
DiscCot 24.03 +.05 +18.9
SharesCnt 23.24 +.10 +12.2


12-mo.
Name NAV chg. % rtn
IntBdT 11.08 -.04 +4.5
MkICapT p 2433 +.12 +9.8
MunilncTp 1327 -.04 +8.4
OvrseaT 17.42 -.16 +11.1
STFiT 9.49 -.02 +2.4
SmICapT p 24.91 +.54 +15.2
StrInT 11.66 -.02 +10.9
ValSlraT 34.41 .13 +5.7
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2000 n 12.15 -.01 +4.9
FF2010 n 13.64 -.01 +6.8
FF2020 n 13.94 +01 +8.2
FF2030 n 14.04 +.01 +.6
FF2040n 8.24 +.01 +9.2

FF2020p 11.25 +.01 +8.5
IncomeFd nx 11.30 -.03 +4.5
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGr r 16.36 +.16 +3.2
AMgrx 15.99 -.08 +5.0
AMgrGrn 14.63 +.02 +5.1
AMgrlnx 12.72 -.02 +6.6
Balanc x 18.10 +.01 +11.3
BlueChipGr 40.89 +.03 +2.6
Canada n 36,05 -.04 +29.
CapApp n 25.30 -.04 +5.5
Caplnco nr 8.,40 +.04 +14.4
ChinaReg n 17.86 -.14 +23.0
CongrStn 369.22 -.87 +4.5
Contra n 59.96 +.37 +13.3
CnvSecx 21.09 -.03 +6.4
Deslinyl 12.74 +.10 +4.6
Dastinyll 11.31 +.05 +5.1
DisEq n 26.01 +.18 +12.6
Diverlnll n 2.76 -.10 +15.5
DvGth n 27.95 +.05 +4.3
EmrgMkt n 13.9 +.05 +37.5
Equlno nx 51.25 -.09 +7.5
EQII x 23.36 -.03 +8.9
EurCapAp n 21.99 +.07 +16.6
Europe n .35.15 +.11 +26.9
ExchFd n 265.87 +.46 +7.8
Exportn 20.07 +.17 +11.9
FidelFdx 29.66 -.0 8 +5.6
Fifty nr 20.17 +10 +4.5
FltRaeHi r 9.94 ... +4.2
FoutlnOne n 25.18 +.0 +9.5
NMA n 11.08 -.03 +4.9
Govtlncn 10.30 -.05 +5.5
GroCo n 55.86 -.19 +7.6
Grolnc 37.43 -.05 +6.5
Grolncll x 9.27 -.02 +2.7
Highlnc'mr 8.85 +.03 +9.0
Indepndnce n 17.62 +.09 +7.4
InProBnd 11.45 -.05 +8.1
IntBdn 10.45 -.04 +4.2
IntGov 10.20 -.04 +3.5
ntlDlsc. 28.37 -.07 +15.4
tInlSmCap m 24.68 -.07 +23.5
invGB n 7.50 -.03 +6.3
Japan n 12.21 -.08 -2.9
JpnmCo n 12.75 -.02 -1.0
LatAm n 23.85 +.67 +58.7
LevCoStock 24.50 +.52 +25.6
LowPr rn 41.18 +.66 +17.7
Magellan n 102.47 -.14 +5.4
M+dCapn 23.60 +.11 +10.0
MIgeSecn 11.24 -.04 +5.2
NewMktnr '14,31 +.0 +21.4
NewMill n 30,37 +.47 +2.8
OTC 34.15 -.06 +4.7
Ovsean 34.80 -.31 +11.6
PacBasn 20.09 -.14 +12.7
Puritan x 18.71 -.11 +7.2
RealEst n 31.49 +.58 +35.5
STBF n 8.94 -.01 +2.7
SmCapind 20.38 +.53 +14.8
SmalCapS nr 17.44 +.34 +8.0
SE Asian 17.84 -.17 +31.5
SkSl 6 n 22.81 +.06 +7.6
Stratlncn 10.56 -.02 +11.3
Trend n 53.44 +.13 +7.6
USBIn 11.11 -.05 +6.1
UtShtBdmn 10.04 ... +2.1
Utilty nx 14.32 +.20 +26.8
ValStra I 35.96 +.15 +6.2
Value n 74.71 +.58 +18.0
Wdrdwden 18.01 -.09 +9.4
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 34.09 +.47 +7.9
Auto n 32.89 +.48 +4.0
Banking n 37.365 +.29 +.1
Biotech n 54.73 +.60 -+.0
Broker n 59.80 +1.35 +26.2
ChemAn 65.32 +.78 +21.7
Comp n 33.75 -.34 -0.1
Conlnd n 24.56 +.03 +9.9
CstHou n 46.90 +1.26 +33.3
DfAer n 70.82 +1.01 +21.2
DevComn- 17.80 -.27 +0.2
Eledr n 39.29 -.39 +1.3
Energy n 40.93 +.69 +49.0
EngSvcn 52.586 +.42 +44.7
Enviro n 14.62 +.27 +6.5
FinSvc n 108.27 +1.58 4.1
Food n 50.35 -.35 +9.1
Goldrm 24.21 +.14 +11.0
HeaThn 136.4 +1.06 +11.0
HomeFinI n 57.58 +.87 +1.4
IndMeatn 36.84 +.42 +11.1
Insur n 63.88 +1.46 +10.1
Leisr n 74.17 -.37 +8.5
MedDaein 50.13 +.49 +49.7
MedEqSysn 24.15 +.13 +7.6
Multimed n 44.47 -.39 +6.5
NatGas n 34.10 +.30 +46.6
Paper n 27.26 -.33 -14.5
Pharma n 8.63 -.07 +0.4
Retail n 52.96 +.60 +17.1
Softwr n 49.01 +.07 +2.8
Tech n 58.41 -.15 +0.5
Telecom n 36.14 +.17 +10.6
Transn. 39.43 +.78 +12.4
U1Grn 42.63 +.73 +26.4
Wireless n 6.19 -.02 +22.1
Fidelity Spartan:
CA Munon 12.63 -.04 +8.3
CTMunnr 11.70 -.04 +6.5
Equtlndx n 42.27 -.05 +7.6
ExIidMklnd 32.70 +.58 +15.3
5001ndx nr 82.45 +.23 +7.6
FLMuOm 11.76 -.04 +7.6
Govlnn 11.10 -.06 +5.7
nltmMuni n 10.13 -.03 +6.1
Intllndx 31.36 -.15 +13.2
lnvGrBd n 10.69 -.04 +6.5
MDMum 11.07 -.04 +6.9
MAMunin 12.21 -.04 +8.3
MI Muni n 12,10 -.03 +6.9
MNMunn 11.62 -.04 +6.6
Munlnc n 13.14 -.04 +8.5
NJ Munr 11.82 -.05 +8:3
NY Mun n 13.11 -.04 +8.0
Oh Mun n 12.02 -.04 +6.1
PAMunnr 11.02 -.03 +7.1
ShilntMu n 10.29 -.02 +2.8
TotMktlnd 33.09 +.20 +9.6
Fifth Third Inst:
QualtyGr n 15.50 +.01 +0.5
First Amer FdsY:
CoreBond 11.29 -.04 +5.6
Eqtylnco np 13.57 +.03 +7.0
Eqldxnl np 22.35 +.06 +7.4
IntBond 10.08 -.04 +4.3
Inlbn 11.36 -.07 +10.0
LgCpGrOp 27.84 +.13 +5.8
LgCapVal np 19.22 +.03 +12.6
MdCpGrOp 41.39 +.56 +16.0
STBnd 9.99 -.01 +1.8
First Eagle:
GlobalA 39.78 -.02 +15.5
OverseasA 22.42 -.04 +17.6
First Investors A
BIChipA p 20.18 +.02 +6.0
GlobalAp 6.55 -.02 +7.7
GovLA p 10.98 -.02 +3.7
GrolncApx 13.40 +.13 +11.1
IncomeA p 3.07 +.01 +4.7
InvGrdA p 9.94 -.06 +5.5
MATFAp 12.13 -.04 +6.6
MITFAp 12.78 -.02 +6.0
MIdCapA np 26.76 +.42 +18.6
NJTFAp 13.11 -.03 +6.0
NYTFAp 14.59 -.05 +6.1
PATFAp 13.31 -.03 +5.8
SpS6Ap 19.59 +.41 +10.5
TanExptAp 10.24 -.04 +6.2
TotRelAp x 13.79 +.03 +8.6
ValueBpx 6.52 +.04 +11.7
Firsthand Funds:
GlobTech 3.72 -.01 -9.3
Tech Value n 27.99 -.07 NA
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AGEApx 2.10 ... +11.1
AdJUS px 9.00 -.01 +2.4
ALTFAp 11.64 -.03 +7.4
AZTFAp 11.32 -.03 +10.2
Batlnvp 69.31 +1.01 +19.7
CAHYBdp 10.41 -.04 +10.3
elIlnsAp 12.63 -.03 +9,3
CAIntermAp 11.67 -.04 +6.5
CalTFrApx 7.30 -.04 +10.2
Cap~rA 10.54 +.02 -0.8
COTFAp 12.13 -.04 +8.7
CTTFAp 11.20 -.03 +9.2
CvtSecAp 16.28 +.16 +11.0
DblTxFrA 12.10 -.02 +9.7
DynaTechA 23.59 -.13 +1.6
EqlncAp 20.57 +.09 +7.9
Fedlntorm p 11.59 -.05 +6.6
FedTxFrApx 12.24 -.07 +6.9
FlexCap~rA 36.77 +.03 +5.5
FIRtDApx 10.11 +.01 +3.5
FLTFAp 1807 -.04 +6.5
FoundFAlp 12.36 +.05 +12.6
GATFAp 12.24 -.04 +6.7
GoldPtMA 17.92 +.01 +11.4
GrowhA p 33.34 -.01 +5.6
HYTFAp 10.95 -.02 +10.9
IncoSerA px 2.50 +.02 +13.9
InsTFA p 12.47 -.03 +4.0
NYlntmlTFp 11.10 -.03 +5.6
LATFAp 11.73 -.03 +7.7
LMGvSecAx 10.00 -.03 +1.9
MDTFAp 11.60 -.03 +6.0
MassTFAp 12.08 -.04 +8.4
MchTFAh p 12.41 -.02 +7.6
MNInsA 12.26 -.03 +7.3
MOTFAp 12.42 -.03 +9.0
NJTFAp 12.26 -.03 +9.0
NYlnsAp 11.75 -.04 +8.0
NYTFApx 11.99 -.06 +8.2


StrlncA p 7.00 -.01 +10.7
USGIbLdrs n 26.73 -.03 +0.2
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 7.30 -.01 +9.9
Julius Bear Funds:
IntlEql r 32.05 ... +19.3
TotalRett 31:47 +.01 +18.9
Laudusa Funds:
USSmCp n 13.82 +.33 +11.9
Lazard Instl:
EmgMkl 15.42 +.22 +46.0
IntlEqlnstl 12.56 -.09 +11.8
Legg Mason: Fd
OpportTr t 15.11 +.13 +3.6
Spinv np 45.43 +.79 +6.4
Vanrrp 63.42 -.04 +7.1
Legg Mason Instl:
BFM SmCp 11.19 +.25 +13.4
ValTrFI p 68.52 -.03 +7.8
VaoTrlnst 89.48 -.02 +8.2
LeutholdCI nx 16.21 +.19 +11.5
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 31.04 +.20 +3.7
Intln 15.79 +.12 +5.5
SmCap 31.33 +.36 +14.6
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 13.63 -.02 +13.5
Lord Abbott A:
A1lllatdA p 14.27 -.07 +6.9


Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for
last day of the week.
Chg: Weekly net change in the NAV.
12 mo % rtn: The percent gain or loss for one share, Including
reinvestment of dividends, over 12 months.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: e Ex-capital gains distribution, f -
Previous day% quote. n No-load fund. p Fund assets used to
pay distribution costs. r Redemption fee or contingent
deferred sales load may apply, s Stock dividend or split. t -
Both p and r. x Ex-cash dividend. NA No Information avail-
able. NE Data in question. NN Fund does not wish to be
tracked. NS Fund did not exist at start date.
Source: Lipper, Inc. and The-Associated Press


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
Frank/rempTemp A:
DevMktA p 19.55 -.06 +31.8
ForelgnAp 12.1B -.06 +14.1
GIBondAp 10.41 -.13 +10.9
GISmCoA p 9.38 -.05 +18.4
GrowthA p 22.84 -.14 +12.3
IntlxEMp 14.66 -.11 +14.0
WoddAp 17.95 -.04 +14.3
FranklTemp Tmp Adv:
FrgnAv 12.16 -.06 +14.3
GrthAv 22.87 -.14 +12.6
Frank/TempTmp B&C:
DevMklC 19.16 -.06 +31.0
ForgnC p 12.00 -.06 +13.3
GrwrIhCp 22.32 -.14 +11.5
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Income n 11.50 -.05 +5.6
S&S PM n 45.02 +.12 +6.8
TaxEx 11.97 -.04 +7.9
Trusts n 53.76 -.04 +5.4
GMO Trust II:
Foreign 14.59 -.08 +13.8
GMO Trust IIIl:
CurHIntBd 10.02 ... +12.8
CorePIsBd 10.54 -.05 +7.9
DmBd 9.99 -.03 +6.5
EmgMkr 18.70 +.05 +44.0
ECD 11.68 +.08 +28.7
Foreign 14.64 -.09 +13.9
IntiGthn 26.59 -.15 +15.7
IntllntrVal 28.48 -.06 +16.3
IntlSmCo 17.50 -.08 +19.8
US Core 14.25 +.14 +9.7
GMO Trust IV:
EmrgCnDt 11.69 +.08 +28.9
EmerMkt 18.67 +.05 +44.1
Foreign 14.65 -.09 +13.9
IntlGntrVal 28.47 -.06 +16.4
US Core 14.23 +.14 +9.8
USQualEq 19.98 +.11 +2.5
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMkVI r 18.68 +.05 +44.1
USCoreVI 14.23 +.14 +9.8
Gabelll Funds:
Asset 42.20 +.34 +14.0
Growth 26.14 ... +6.0
Value 19.52 +.11 +11.5
Gartmore Fds D:
Bondx 9.76 -.05 +6.7
GvtBdO x 10.36 -.04 +5.9
GrowthD 6.73 +.01 +7.2
NalionwD 20.32 +.09 +9.1
TxFrerxn 10.69 -.03 +7.7
Gartmore Fds Instl:
IntldxI n 8.09 -.04 +13.4
NwBdIdxI1nx 11.05 -.06 +6.1
S&PSOO51nsll n 10.30 +.03 +7.5
Gateway Funds:
Gateway 24.96 +.08 +6.8
Glenmede Funds:
Intl -.03 NA
Goldman Sachs A:
CapGrA 19.45 +.09 +3.3
GrIncAnx 25.16 -.08 +12.6
GrthOppsA 21.30 +.23 +9.3
HiYialdA 7.97 +.02 +10.8
HYMunlAp 11.30 +.03 +12.1
MGCapVA p 35.57 +.56 +22.5
SmaCapA 42.03 +1.03 +12.7
Goldman Sachs Inst:
CoreFxc 10.15 -.04 +6.4
HYMuni 11.30 +.03 +12.4
MIdCapVal 35.83 +.58 +23.0
UltraSDG 9.29 +.01 +2.2
Guardian Funds:
GB0 IntGrA 13.20 -.04 +13.6
ParkAvA 30.28 +.02 +3.1
Stock 27.45 +.02. +3.5
Harbor Funds:
Bondx 11.89 -.19 +7.0
CapApplnst n 28.77 -.08 +7.6
Inll nr 42.61 -.09 +15.1
SCpVllnst 19.81 +.38 +25.5
Hartford Fds A:
AdvrsAtpx 15.04 -.06 +3.4
CapAppAp 33.99 +.35 +10.6
DivGrhA px 18.71 -.01 +10.0
MIdCapA p 25.64 +.39 +18.8
SrICoAp 17.35 +.32 +12.5
StockA p 17,67 +.03 +2.2
Hartford Fds B:
CapAppB pn 31.64 +.32 +9.8
Hartford Fds C:
CapAppCo t 31.72 +.32 +9.9
Hartford HLS IA:
Bond 11.78 -.04 +6.7
CapApp 51.56 +.50 +11.2
DIvSGrnth 20.44 +.06 +10.4
GlblLdrs 17.07 -.04 +1.2
Grwth&lnc 12.17 +.07 +6.9
GrwthOpp 28.09 +.40 +10.5
Advisers 22.94 ... +3.8
Stock 45.44 +.09 +3.2
Index 30.81 +.09 +7.3
IntlOpp 11.80 ... +12.9
MIdCap 29.57 +.46 +19.5
SmallCo 16.98 +.32 +13.3
Hartford HLS IB:
Advisors p 23.07 ... +3.6
BondAp 11.70 -.04 +6.4
CapApprecp 51.30 +.49 +10.9
Div&Gro p 20.35 +.05 +10.1
StockP 45.26 +.08 +2.9
Heartland Fds:
Value 47.44 +.91 +1.1
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrow 16.53 +.32 +17.2
HollBalFd 15.22 -.09 +1.3
Hotchkis & Wiley:
LgCpVal 23.56 +.44 +19.3
LgCapValAp 23.48 +.44 +19.0
MdCpVaIAp 28.58 +.54 +21.7
MidCpVal 28.72 +.54 +22.1,
HussmnStrGr 15.92 +.06 +5.1
ICAP Funds:
Equity X 45.03 -.10 +12.2
ICM SmICo 37.18 +.93 +14.8
ING Funds Cl A:
IntValAp 16.86 ... +10.1
ING Partners:
TRPGrEqI nx 49.03 -.07 +6.6
INGT,M,Q&I:
IntVall 16.69 ... +10.5
SI Funds:
NoAm px 7.52 -.06 +10.1
Ivy Funds:
GINatRsAp 22.69 +.11 +29.2
JPMorgan A Class:
Inv Balp 12.06 -.04 +7.7
InvGr&lnA p 13.00 +.02 +8.4
MdCpVal p 23.30 +.40 +18.8
JPMorgan B Class:
InvG&l p 12.94 +.03 +7.7
JPMorgan C Class:
MdCpValupn 22.87 +.39 +18.1
JP Morgan InstI:
MidCapVaIn 23.61 +.40 +19.4
JPMorgan Select:
IntlEqx 29.09 -.24 +12.5
MdCpValu ... +19.1
TxAwreEqx 16.76 -.05 +6.3
USEquityx 10.74 +.03 +q.4
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBond 10.86 -.10 +5.6
CorePlusBd n 7.92 -.06 +6.1
DIvMdCpGr 24.86 +.23 +12.0
DivMdCpVI x 19.21 +.30 +16.7
Eqlndx x 27.19 -.03 +7.4
GovBond x 10.42 -.10 +7.2
HiYldBondx 8.31 -.01 +9.7
IntBondi n 10.61 -.09 +4.7
IntmdTFBd x 10.85 -.06 +4.6
IntlEql 19.64 -.04 +14.6
IntrdAmer 23.00 +.22 +15.5
LgCapValx 15.78 +.02 +12.5
LgCapGrx 14.73 +.10 +2.7
MCpMkNeur 11.01 +.02 +5.2
SmCpCore 43.58 +.97 +11.9
TaxFrBond nx 13.00 -.07 +6.8
UltrSTBd 9.63 -.03 +2.5
JP Morgan Ultra:
MtgBacked 10.64 -.09 NS
Janus :
Balanced nx 21.35 -.09 +8.2
Contrarian 13.35 +.09 +20.2
CoreEq 20.82 +.03 +121
Enteryrn 37.83 +.37 +12.2
FedTxEx n 7.09 -.03 +5.8
FIxBond 9.65 -.04 +5.5
Fund n 24.01 +.03 +1.6
GI Ufeoci nr 18.58 +.16 +7.9
GITech nr 10.28 -.08 +0,3
Srthlncn 32.67 -.04 +12.1
Mercury n 21.02 .. +6.0
MIdCapVal 22.87 +.34 +13.9
olympus n 28.93 +.14 +7.2
ODeon n 7.28 +.08 +13.2
Overseas nr 24.81 ... +23.2
ShTmBd 2.89 -.01 +2.0
SCVInst 31.06 +.52 +12.2
SVInv 30.88 +.52 +12.0
Twenty 44.58 -.08 +13.9
Venturn 57.61 +1.36 +11.2
W4dW nr 40.10 -.18 +6.2
Janus Adv I Shrs:
Forty 26.57 -.02 +18.7
Janus Aspen InstI:
Balanced x 24.40 -.32 +8.4
LgCp~nwthx 19.59 -.02 +1.5
Wordw~rnx 25.75 -.33 +5.4
JennlsonDryden A:
alendA 15.59 +.07 +9.8
GovlncA 9.10 -.05 +5.1
GrowthA 14.26 -.00 +7.2
HiYIdA p 5.75 +.02 +9.0
InsuredA 11.05 -.04 +6.9
UtilrtyAx 13.50 +.28 +40.7
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 13.16 -.04 +6.5
HiY4dB nt 5.74 +.02 +0.5
InsuredB 11.07 -.04 +6.4
JennlsonDryden Z&h:
GrowthZ 14.64 -.04 +7.5
Stkldxl n 26.80 +.08 +7.5
StkidxZ 26.78 +.06 +7.4
Jensen 23.57 +28 -0.3
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.28 -.06 +6.6
ClaselcVal p 23.58 +24 +11.9
RogBkA 41.32 +.39 +0.7
SvlnvAp 18.99 -.05 +2.5


Name NAV


12-mo.
chg % rtn


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
AIIValueA 11.79 +.02 +9.9
Balance r 11.32 -.02 +6.8
BondDebA p 7.92 +.03 +7.3
GlIncA p 7.20 -.09 +5.2
GvHSecA p 2.63 -.01 +5.8
MidCapAp 22.67 +.20 +17.4
RsSmCpA 28.02 +.56 +14.2
RsArValpx 12.24 +.02 +13.2
Lord Abbett B:
AffildB p 14.31 -.07 +6.2
BdDbB p 7.92 +.02 +6.4
MidCapV p 21.93 +.19 +16.7
Lord Abbett C:
AftildCp 14.28 -.07 +6.2
BdDbC p 7.93 +.03 +6.6
MidCapVIC p 21.86 +.19 +16.7
Lord AbbettY:
AffY 14.30 -.07 +7.3
MFS Funds A:
MITAp 17.19 -.01 +9.6
MIGAp 12.07 +.02 +5.4
BondA p 12.99 -.04 +7.0
CapOpp 13.02 ... +7.2
EmGrAp 31.40 +.14 +6.7
GvScA p 9.71 -.04 +5.3
GrOpA p 8.64 +.02 +5.6
HilncA p 3.89 +.01 +9.2
IntNwDAp 21.59 -.01 +16.6
MCapA p 8.54 +.03 +2.6
MuBdA 10.78 -.03 +7.0
MuHIA 8.46 -.02 +10.9
MuFLAp 10.25 -.02 +6,3
RschA p 20.33 +.05 +12.0
ResrchlnolAp 15.39 +.04 +12.2
SItVaIlAp 15.85 ... +10.6
ToIRAp 15.96 -.02 +10.1
Ul8A p 11.90 +.21 +34.2
ValueA px 23.35 -.02 +13.7
MFS Funds B:
MAITB 16.78 -.01 +.9
EmhGrBn 29.02 +.12 +5.9
MIGB 11.06 +.01 +4.7
GVScBt 9.69 -.05 +4.4
HilnB I 3.90 +.01 +8.3
MulnBt 6.70 -.02 +7.3
ToIRB I 15.96 -.01 +9.5
ValueB x 23.23 +.01 +13.0
MFS Funds C:
ToURIC I 16.02 -.01 +9.4
ValuC px 23.21 +.01 +13,0
MFS Funds I:
RelnTt 15.72 +.04 +12.5
Valualx 23.43 -.04 +14.1
MFS Funds Instl:
IniEqty 15.50 -.03 +10.9
MainStay Funds A:
HIYIdBdAx 6.32 -.01 +10.4
MalnStay Funds B:
BIChpGrB6p +.07 NA
CpAppBt 27.00 +.24 +3,6
ConvBtx 12.93 ... +5,5
GovtStx 8.37 -.04 +4.2
HIYIdBB8tx 6.30 .. +9.7
InFEqB 12.55 -.05 +12.0
SmCpGrB p 14.45 +.30 +7.9
TotRIBtx 18.84 -.02 +6.7
MainStay Funds I:
S&P5001dx 27.72 +.08 +7.4
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 69.50 +.08 +7.3
Managers Funds:
FremontBdn 10.55 -.04 +7.2
SpclEq 88.87 +1.81 +9.2
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 16.43 +.09 +12.4
Growp 17.52 +.09 +12.2
MassMutual Inst:
CoreBdS 11.17 -.04 +5.9
Master Select:
Equity 14.63 +.06 +3.3
Intl 17.37 +.01 +18.1
Matthews Asian:
AslanG&Ix 16.45 -.31 +23.3
PacTiger 16.43 -.19 +29.0
Mellon Funds:
BondFundx 12.67 -.09 +5.0
EmgMkts 21.31 -.04 +30.4
IntlFund 15.35 -.11 +8.6
LrgCapStkx 9.58 +.03 +8.1
MidCapStk 14.14 +.31 +17.9
SmICapSt 16.88 +.42 +9.5
MergerFd n 15.51 +.08 +2.8
Meridian Funds:
Growth 35.88 +.53 +4.0
Value 38.25 +.33 +9.3
Merrill Lynch A:
BalCapAp 26.58, -.04 +5.8
BasValAp 31.11 -.17 +4.9
FdGrAp 17.20 -.02 +4.4
GIbAAp 16.67 +.02 +12.1
.HealthA p 6.47 +.07 +10.9
NJMunlBd 10.75 -.01 +10.6
S&P500p p 14.70 +.04 +7.2
USGovtA 10.28 -.04 +4.5
Merrill Lynch B:
BalaCapB t 25.80 -.04 +5.0
BmsVIBt 30.46 -.17 +4.1
BdHilnc 5.04 +.03 +6.0
CalnsMB 11.74 -.04 +6.9
CoreBdPtfB t 11.82 -.05 +5.1
CplTBt 12.00 -.05 +5.2
EquftyDiv 14.86 +.06 +16.0
EuroBt 14.56 +.04 +16.3
FocusValuet 12.36 -.03 +5.7
FundlGrBt 15.73 -.02 +3.6
FLMBt 10.52 -.03 +9.0
GIAIBt 16.31 +.03 +11.3
HeallhBt 4.89 +.05 +10.2
LatAmB tI 26.46 +.91 +62.8
MnlnsBt 7.96 -.01 +7.6
ShtTrmUSGvtl 9.19 -.01 +1.6
MunShtTm 9.99 -.01 +0.9
MulntmTrBt 10.61 -.03 +6.1
MNtlB 0 10.64 -.02 +7.9
NJMBI 10.74 -.01 +10.1
NYMnBtI 11.18 -.01 +7.8
NatResTrB t 39.43 +.20 +45.8
PacBI 18.81 -.13 +7.8
PAMBt1 11.46 -.01 +8.1
ValueOpp tI 24.60 +.53 +8.0
USGovt 10.28 -.04 +4.0
Utmcm1t 11.68 +.21 +32.6
WIdlncB I 6.21 -.07 +12.6
Merrill Lynch C:
BasVICt 29.73 -.17 +4.1
FdGrC1 15.62 -.02 +3.5
GIlobAICt i 15.87 +.03 +11.3
Merrill Lynch I:
IntlVal 26.30 +.07 +14.4
BalaCapl 26.68 -.04 +6.1
BasVall 31.27 -.16 +5.2
BdHIlnc 5.03 +.02 +6.8
CatnsMB 11.74 -.03 +7.5
CoreBdPtfl I 11.82 -.05 +5.9
CplTI 12.00 -.04 +5.9
DevCapI p 17.85 +.13 +33.8
EqultyDIv 14.85 +.08 +17.3
Eurolt 16.98 +.05 +17.6
FocusVaouel 13.58 -.03 +6.8
FundIGrl 17.59 -.02 +4.6
FLMI 10.52 -.03 +9.5
GIAII I 16.73 +.03 +12.4
Healthl 7.01 +.07 +11.2
LatAml 27.79 +.95 +64.4
Mnlnsl 7.99 -.01 +8.6
MunShortTm 9.99 -.01 +1.3
MulnlTrl 10.61 -.03 +5.4
MNCIll 10.64 -.02 +8.7
NalResTr t 41.69 +.23 +47.3
Pacl 20.54 -.13' +9.0
S&P500 14.75 +.04 +7.5
ValueOppty 27.39 +.59 +9.0


USGovt 10.28 -.05
UtbTcrmlt 11.72 +.21
Widlnci 6.22 -.06
Metro West Fda:
TotalRelBondl 9.76 -.03
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd n 1.97 -.01
Monetta Funds:
Moneltta n 11.06 +.52
MontagGr I 22.62 -.05
Morgan Stanley A:
AmOppA 24.12 +.03
DivGthA 34.62 +04
GlobDivA 13.58
US GA 9.21 -.03
Morgan Stanley B:
AmOppB 22.70 +.03
DivGIhB 34.74 +.04
EqWeighB 3723 +.30
GIbDivB 13.71 -.01
GrowthB 1213 +.06
SP500B 12.54 +.03
StratB 17.86 -.01
US GVlB 9.22 -.03
Morgan Stanley D:
TaxExD 11.86 -.03
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMkt n 20.32 +.20
CrPIFInstn 11.79 +.02
GIValEqA n 17.59 -.01
InllSmCpAn 25.55 -.15
IntlEq n 20,65 -.06
IntlEqB np 20.49 -.06
LtdDurPt n 10.36 -.01
MCGrAdv p 21.24 +.36
SmCGrB np 12.77 +.34
USReal n 25.26 +.44
ValueAdvn 17.72 -.02
Muhlenkmpn 81.93 +1.08
Munder Funds A:
InternetA 17.66 -.09
Mutual Series:
BeaconZ 16.2 +.08
DIscZ 25.24 +.06
QualldZ 19.96 +.13
SharesZ 23.63 +.10
Nations Funds Inv A:
FocusEqAt 18.26 +.10
InlnalueA r 21.11
MarsGroAt 17.48 +.05
Nations Funds Inv B:
FocEqtyB t 17.33 +.10
MarsGrwBI 16.56 +.04
Nations Funds Pd A:
BondFdPrA 9.92 -.04
ConSecPldAx 16.88 -.04
FocusEqAt 18.53 +.11
IntMPA n 10.20 -.03
IntEqPA n 13.35 +.03
IntlValPrA n 21.21
LgCapldxPrA 23.18 +.06
MarsGrPrA 17.71 +.04
ManlnOpp r 10.96
MiOCpdxPrA nl1.36 +.23
STInPA 9.84 -.02
STMuPA 10.23
SmlCapldxPrA n20.01 +.49
StralGroPrA 12.26 +.05
ValuePAox 13.15 -.02
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus n 37.31 +.19
Genesis n. 32.34 +.92
Genealnstl 44.32 +1.26
Guard n 16.49 +.03
HIghtncoBd x 9.29 +.02
Inll r 19.05 -.03
Partner n 27.19 +.45
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis n 46.23 +1.31
Nicholas Applegate:
EmgGrol 10.23 +.27
Nicholsas Group:
Nicholn 61.43 +.66
NichlncI 2.17 +.01
Northeast Investors:
Trust 7.58 +.03
Northern Funds:
FrIn n 10.12 -.04
GrEq 15.88 +.03
HIYFxInc n 8.13 +.03
IntGrEq n 10.10 -.06
LrgCapVal 13.45 -.04
SmiCapldxn 10.18 +21
Technly n 10.91 -.07
Northern Instl Fds:
EqldxA 15.21 +.05
Nuveen Cl A:
HYG MuBd p 22.11 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
InMun R 11.06 -.02
InLmDurMuBd 9.15 -02
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhIOakSIGr n30.67.
Oaknark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 24.07 +.11
Global r 22.7 +.06
ntIr 21.58 +.03
rnlSmCp r 20.58 +.06
Oaumark r 41.02 +.03
Select r 33.40 +.20
Old Westbury Fds:
IntQn 10.16 -.10
MidCapEqp 16.16 +.24
Olsteln Funds:
FnclAle4C 17.61 +.14
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFrMuA 10.17 -.02
AMTFrNY 12.98 -.02
CAMunlAp 11.51 -.02
CapAppAp 40.25 -.19
CaplncAp 12.35 +.04
ChlncAp 9.46 +.03
DevMktA p 29.29 +.29
DiscFd p 41.94 +.71
Equity A 10.97 +.03
GlobalA p 60.43 -.06
GbOppA 3239 +.03
Gold p 18.30 +.18
GrowthAp 27.37 -.01
HighYIdA p 9.46 +.03
InBdA p 5.92
LTGovAp 10.07 -.02
LtdTrmMu 15.864
MnStFdA 35.37 +.15
MajnStrOpAp 13.15 +.09
. MnStSCpAp 20.29 +.44
MidCapA 16.63 +.30
PAMunlAp 12.83 -.01
RealAslAp 8.11 -.11
SSMdCpVIA 32.61 +.59
StIncA p 4.31
USGotp 9.75 -.04
Oppenheilmer B:
AMTFrMuB 10.14 -.01
AMT-FrNY 12.99 -.02
CapApp9p 37.03 -.18
CaplnoBt 12.23 +.04
ChlncB I 9.45 +.03
Equity B 10.58 +.02
GloblB I 56.48 -.07
GIbOppB 31.09 +.01.
H2YdB t 9.31 +.03
MnStFdB 34.25 +.14
StrlncB 1I 4.32 -.01.
Oppenheimer C&M:
GlobalC p 57.39 -.07
MnStFdC 34.24 +.14
StrlncC I 4.30
Oppenhelm Quest:
QBa1lA 16.10 +.14
QBalanC 17.83 +.14
QBalanB 17.81 +.14


Name NAV chg *
QOpptyA 32.55 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LIdNYA p 3.38 -.01
LIdNYC I 3.37
RoMu Ap 18.38 ...
RoMu B 18.34
RcNIIMuA 12.59 +.01
OppenhelmerY:
CapApprecY 41.26 -.20
PBHG Funds:
ClprFocus 17.01 -.04
SelGrowth n 20.49 -.13
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ReiRetAdp 11.50 -.07
ShtTmAdp 10.02 -.01
TotRetAd n 10.77 -.05
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAssat 13.01 -.03
CommodRR 15.72 -.61
DIverdnco 11.15
EmMktsBd 11.16 +.05
FrgnBd n 10.77 -.01
GlobalBd n 9.86 -.16
HIYId n 9.85 +.02
LowDur n 10.13 -.04
ModDur n 10.31 -.06
RsealRsturn 12.26 -.08
RealRtlnsll 11.50 -.07
ShoroT 10.02 -.01
TotRet n 10.77 -.05
TRnIIn p 10.21 -.06
TRill n 9.52 -.04
PIMCO Funds A:
All Asset p 12.96 -.03
CommodRR p 15.65 -.60
HlYIdA 9.65 +.0 +
LowDurA 10.13 -.04
RealRetAp 11.50 -.07
TotRtA 10.77 -.05
PIMCO Funds B:
RealRtB t 11.50 -.07
TotRIBt 10.77 -.05
PIMCO Funds C:
AIIlAsseIC I 12.88 -.04
CommRRo p 15.54 -.61
HiYIdC 9.85 +.02
LwDurCnt 10.13 -.04
RealRHeC p 11.50 -.07
ToRtC t 10.77 -.05
PIMCO Funds D:
CommodRR p 15.66 -.60
RealRtYnp 11.50 -.07
TotlRIn p 10.77 -.05
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylnco nx 24.67 +.03
Pax World:
Balanced 23.38 +.15
PennMutCp 10.01 +.20
Phoenix Funds:
BalanA 14.76
Phoenix-Aberdeen:
IntlA 10.07 -.05
WidOpp 8.40 -.01
Phoenlx-Engemann:
CapGrthA 14.55 -.07
Pioneer Funds A:
BalancA p 9.60 -.01
BondA p 9.37 -.03
EqlncAp 29.27 +.26
EuroSalEqA 29.69 ..
GrowthAp 11.86 +.01
HIghYldAop 11.23 +.04
InIlValA 16.84 +.01
MdCpGrA 14.91 +.16
MdCpVaA p 25.99 +.26
PionFdA p 41.62 +.16
TaxFreeAp 11.84 -.01
ValueA p 17.81. -.02
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYialdBt 11.28 +.04
MdCapValB 23.25 +.24
Pioneer Funds C:
HIYSdC1 11.37 +.03
Preferred Group:
InStVal n 15.99 -.05
Price Funds Adv:
BIChip p 30.47 +.08
Eqtylncpx 26.16 -.01
Growth pn 26.26 +.09
HIYmd p 6.97 +.02
Price Funds:
Balance nx 19.41 -.14
BlueChlpG n 30.47 +.06
CalTxn 11.14 -.03
CapAprn 19.75 +.07"
DivGro nx 22.66 +.03
EmrMktSn 21.12 +.11
Eqlnc nx 26.20 -.03
Eqldxvnx 32.12 -.03
Europe n 19.61 +.01
FUltm n 10.97 -.03
GNM n 9.60 -.02
Growth n 26.43 +.09
Gwthlnnx 21.55 -.06
othSci n 22.52 +.27
HiYId n 6.98 +.02
ForEqn 15.21 -.02
InlBd n 9.69 -.16
InlDis n 33.31 -.13
ntStk n 12.70 -.03
Japan n 8.43 -.09
LatAomn 18.73 +.56
MdShI n 5.17
MdToxFrn 10.82 -.03
MediaTI n 29.22 -.15
MiCap n 50.98 +.62
MCapVat n 23.19 +.13
NewAm n 32.60 +25
N Asian 10.74 -.02
NewEra n 37.57 +29
NwHrzn n 30.27 +.46
Newtnco n 9.14 -.04
NYTxF n 11.46 -.02
PSBal Onx 18.12 -.05
PSGrow n 21.96 +.09
PSInco nx 14.76 -.08
RealEstnx 18.85 +.14
R2010 n 14.068 +.03
Relre2020 n 14.91 +.05
ScOichn 18.55 -.06
ST Bdn 4.72 -.01
SmCapStk n, 31.67 +.63
SmCapVal n 36.16 +.89 +
SpecGr 16.95 +.07
Specln n 11.69 -.04
TxFrea n 10.12 -.03
TxFrHYn 11.99 -.01
TFIntmvn 1127 -.04
TxFrSI n 5.40
US Int 5.45 -.03
US Long 12.32 -.12
VATFn 11.81 -.03
Value n 23.00 +.01
Principal Inv:
PtrLVIn -.02
Putnam Funds A:
AmSGvAp 9.08 -.04
AABalA p 10.78 +.03
AZTE 9.39 -.02
CATxAp 8.49 -.03
ClassilcEqAp 12.81 +.04
Convedrt p 16.80 +.07
DiscGr 17.18 +27
DvdrnAp 10.26 -.01
EqlnA p 17.50 +.05
EuroEqA 20.76 +.06
FLTxA 9.35 -.03
GeoAp 18.12
GIGvAp 1259 -.14
GIbEqty p 8.47 +.02
G0nAp 19.37 +.08
HNthAp 61.54 -.02
HiYdA p 8.03 +.03
HYAdA p 6.06 .03
IncrmAp 6.89 -.03
..i i :. 23.35 -.07
,.,,.c ,' p 11.67 -.02
InvAp 12.76 +.11
MITxp 9.12 -.01
MNTxa 9.11 -.02
NJTxAp 9.33 -.03
NwOpAp 41.70 +.29
NwValAp 18.02 +.06
NYTxA p 8.67 -.03
OTCAp 7.34 +.15
PATE 9.23 ,-.01
TxExAp 8.92 -.02
TFInAp 15.17 -.03
TFHYA 13.02 -.02
US0vA p 13.24 -.04
USIlAp 10.88 +.17
VslaA p 9.51 +.06
VoyAp 16.38 +.12
Putnam Funds B:
CapAprt 17.98 +.21
ClaslcEqBat 12.71 +.03


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
DiscGrwth 15.66 +25 +4.5
DvrlnBt 10.18 -.01 +9.0
Eqlnct 17.37 +.05 +10.4
EuEqty B 20.01 +.06 +16.0
FLTxB t 9,35 -.03 +6.7
GeoB t 17.95 ... +7.4
GlIncB I 12.55 -.14 +5.5
GIbEqty 7.72 +.02 +11.6
GINtRs t 26,62 +.29 +36.8
GrInBst 19,09 +.07 +7.9
HlthB t 56.09 -.03 +11.5
HIYIdB t 7.99 +.03 +9.2
HYAdvBt 5.98 +.03 +9.7
IncomeBt 6.85 -.02 +5,1
InllEq p 22.45 -.07 +12.9
InGrIn t 11.44 -.02 +12.6
IntlNop t 11.19 -.02 +14.3
InvBt 11.71 +.10 +11.0
NJTxB I 9.32 -.03 +6.7
NwOppBI 37.54 +27 +8.0
NwValp 17.71 +.05 +11.0
NYTxBI 8.866 -.02 +6.5
OTCBt 6,50 +.14 +5.2
TxExBI 8.92 -.03 +7.0
TFHYB t 13.05 -.01 +9.5
TFInBt 15.19 -.04 +6.3
USGvBt 13.16 -.05 +3.4
U61B1t 10.63 +.17 +26.5
Vista t 8.32 +.06 +11.5
VoyBt 14.29 +.11 +2.5
Putnam Funds M:
Dvrlncp 10.18 -.01 +9.6
Putnam Funds Y:
George 18.17 ... +8.5
Gr&lnc 19.40. +.07 +9.0
Income 6.93 -.03 +6.1
InEq 23.51 -.07 +14.1
Voyager 16.92 +.12 +3.5
RS Funds:
RSEmGr np 30.90 +.51 +7.1
RSNatRes np 27.22 -.04 +36.4
RSPartners 36.24 +.78 +27.0
Value Fd 23.12 +.23 +30.0
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 29.88 +.56 +15.3
Royce Funds:
LowPrStk r 14.75 +.22 +4.5
MicroCapl n 15.24 +.22 +6.3
Opptyl r 12.92 +24 +6.1
PennMul r 10.45 +.21 +15.5
Premierl nr 15.14 +.29 +9.7
TotRtl r 12.45 +.24 +13.5
Russell Funds S:
DIvBOndS 23.66 -.09 +5.6
DlvEqS 43.59 +.16 +10.3
IntISecS 60.7 -.25 +11.7
MstratBondS 10.57 -.03 +6.3
QuantlEqS 37.74 +.17 +8.7
RESecS 47.22 +.85 +34.6
ShortDuraBdS 18.94 -.03 +1.6
SpeclalGrS 51.73 +1.10 +10.0
Russell Instl :
Eqty II 30.21 +.11 +10.6
Eqty QlI 34.73 +.16 +8.8
FIxncmel 21.41 -.08 +5.9
Inl+ 37.63 -.15 +12.1
Russell LfePts C:
BalStrC p 10.82 +.01 +9.4
Russell LfePts D:
BalSiraIp. 10.90 +.02 +9.9
Rydex Advisor:
OTC n 9.67 -.07 -0.8
Rydex C Class:
JunoC pn 16.93 +.22 -16.8
Rydex Investor:
Juno Fdn 17.61 +.22 -16.0
OTCn 10.02 -.08 -0.2
SEI Portfolios:
CoreFxlnAn 10.56 -.04 +5.8
EmMktlbt n 11.29 +.06 +25.3
EmgMkt np 13.70 +.05 +33.7
EqlndxA nx 36.73 -.05 +7.5
H8Yd4n 8.50 +.03 +.69
InIMunlA 11.00 -.03 +4.8
InoEqAn 10.84 -.04 +12.6
InlFLxAPn 11.73 -.19 +5.7
LgCGroAn 18.22 +.07 +3.9
LgCValAnx 21.67 +.03 +14.4
SmCGroA n 16.85 +.31 +5.2
SmCValAnx 20.85 +.46 +17.8
TaxMgdLCx 11.29 +.03 +9.4
SSgA Funds:
EmlgMkt 16.21 +.09 +37.2
SP500 n 19.68 +.06 +7.6
SmCap 28.69 +.52 +13.0
STI Classic:
CapAppLp 10.91 +.03 -1.4
CapAppA p 11.4 +.03 -1.1
CapAppTn 12.11 +.03 -0.4
DrowtlncTnp 16.32 +.07 +13.7
HighYIdI x 11.06 +.03 +8.6
SmCapGrT n 20.68 +.45 +10.9
TxSenGrT np 24.33 +.12 +3.7
TaxSenGriL 22.864 +.11 +2.7
VallncoSkA 12.49 +.07 +9.6
VallncTnp 12.52 +.06 +9.9
Salomon Brothers:
BalancBp 12.71 -.04 +4.5
HiYIdA 6.43 +.04 +11.8
IncoesVal 2041 +.07 +6.0
Opport 49.49 +.53 +16.9
Schroder Funds:
NAmEqlnvn 10.95 +.04 +9.9
Schwab Funds:
InlSSenr 15.85 -.08 +13.1
1001onv r 34.72 +.16 +6.9
100alSeln 34.73 +.16 +9.0
S&P Invn 16.51 +.05 +7.4
S&P Sal n 1.58 +.05 +7.6
SSPInstlSel 9.42 +.03 +7.7
SmCplnvn 22.14 +.46 +12.8
SmCapSe[ n 22.18 +.47 +13.0
TotBond n 10.08 -.05 +6.1
YidPlslnv 9.68 ... +2.7
YdPIsSel 9.668 +3.0
Scudder Funds A:
CapGrthp 43.82 .+.08 +6.3
DrmHiRA 43.79 +.39 +15.4
FgCormAp 17.50 +.42 +19.8
HilncA 5.46 +.03 +11.4
MgdMunl p 922 -.01 +6.8
RREEFp 21.65 +.41 +34.1
TechA 10.55 +.02 -2.6
TotlRetA 8.98 +.03 +5.5
USGovnA 8.58 -.02 +4.4
Scudder Funds B:
DnnHiRB 43.67 +.37 +14.4
Scudder Funds C:
DmnHIRC 43.71 +.37 +14.5
Scudder Funds S:
EmMkIn 11.11 +.08 +25.2
EmgMkGr nr 18.72 +.06 +33.6
GlblBdSr 10.19 -.07 +7.2
GlobDIs 36.28 +.14 +23.6
GlobalS 27.43 -.07 +19.8
Gold&Prec 15.79 +.03 +29
GrEurGro 27.16 -.09 +17.4
GrolncS 21.74 +.08 +7.8
HIYldTxn 12.93 -.01 +9.0
Income S 13.00 -.05 +7.0
IInrTxAMT 11.40 -.D4 +5.4
IntemaSS 44.15 -.14 +14.4
LgCoGron 23.69 +.06 +4.6
LatAmern 36.40 +1.14 +55.9
MgdMunIlS 923 -.01 +7.1
MATFS 14.64 -.02 +6.7
PacOppsnr 13.78 -.09 +24.3
ShtTmBdSn 10.08 -.01 +21
SmCoValSr 27.17 +.52 +162
Scudder Instl:
Eqty500SOIL 13523 +.38 +7.6
Scudder Investment:
Eq500lnv 133.685 +.38 +7.5
Selected Funds:
AmerShsD 37.55 +.11 +10.0
AmShsS p 37.51 +.10 +9.7
Seligman Group:
ComunAt 24.48 +.11 +2.8
FrontlerAt 12.64 +25 +3.1
FrontierDt 11.15 +.22 +2.3
GObSmCoA 15.63 +.15 +17.6
GlobTechA 12808 +.04 +0.6
HiYBdA p 3.40 +.01 +6.1
Sentinel Group:
ComnStk A p 29.27 -.01 +7.3
SmCoAp 7.56 +.15 +9.1
Sequoia 150.11 +1.56 +1.2
Sit Fonds:
IfargeCpar n 34.40 +.05 +9.1
Smith Barney A:
AgGrA p 83.65 +.07 +6.1
ApprAp 14.38 -.01 +0.3
FdValA p 14.70 +.64 +1.8
HIlIncA 1 6.86 +v.4 +9.2
IntlAIICpirA p 13.37 -.05 +12.3
LgCapGAp 20.95 -.10 -3.7


12-mo.
Name NAV chg % rtn
MgMuAp 15.43 +.04 +4.6
SBCaplncA 16.60 +.09 +10.9
Smith Barney B&P:
AgGrB 64.09 +.05 +5.3
ApprB t 14.08 -.01 +4.4
FdValB t 13.82 +.03 +0.9
LgCapGB t 19.77 -.16 -4.4
SBCaplnctI 16.48 +.09 +10.3
Smith Barney C:
AggGrC 84.64 +.05 +5.3
FdValC 13.82 +.03 +0.9
LgCapC p 19,76 -.16 -4.4
Smith Barney 1:
DivStra 16.97 +.04 0.0
Grolnc 1 15.09 +.06 +4.8
Smith Barney Y:
AggGroY t 97.16 +.09 +6.6
LgCapGroY 21.57 -.17 -3.4
SoundShnx 9 36.32 ... +9.5
St FarmAssoc:
Balannx 49.39 -.88 +5.0
Gwth nx 47.65 -.52 +6.3
Stratton Funds:
DOidend nx 36.86 -.26 +24.9
Growth X 41.97 -.24 +22.0
SmCap e 42854 +.71 +25.1
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.54 -.03 +5.6
SunAmerica Focus:
FLgCpAp 17.07 -.05 -0.4
TCU SheoDur 9.60 -.02 +2.6
TCW Galileo Fda:
SelEqty 18.25 -.32 +0.1
ValueOpp 22.34 +.08 +4.8
TCW Galileo N:
SelEqtyN p 17.88 -.31 -0.2
TD Waterhouse Fds:
Dow30OFds 10.41 ... +1.5
TIAA-CREF Funds:
BondPlus 10.33 -.08 +6.1
Eqtylndex 86.61 +.06 +9.3
Grolnc 12.10 -.02 +7.5
GroEqty 8.96 -.03 +28
HiYldBond 9.22 -.01 +9.0
InflEqty 10.36 -.04 +6.6
MgdAloe 11.03 -.06 +8.5
ShITrmBond 10.46 -.06 +2.5
SocChcEqty 9.15 +.09 +8.3
TaxExBond 10.96 -.07 +7.1
Tamarack Funds:
EnterSmCp 32.13 +.64 +6.9
Value 44.89 -.03 +12.2
Templeton Instlt:
EmMSp 15.91 -.05 +31.5
ForEqS 20.03 -.13 +17.3
Third Avenue Fds:
Intl r 19.45 -.11 +25.5
RealEstVal r 29.66 +.33 +31.0
SmICap n 23.60 +.31 +16.0
ValueA 5.52 +.31 +21.9
Thompson Plumb:
Growth 44.84 +.02 -2.1
Thomrnburg Fds:
InlValA p 20.78 +.09 +16.4
UdMunAp 13.69 -.03 +2.9
ValueA x 31.11 +.09 +9.7
Thrivent Fda A:
HlghYdx p 5.14 +.01 +9.6
Income x 8.76 -.03 +6.0
LgCapStock 25.40 +.07 +7.3
MidCapStk 16.92 +.30 +16.4
MuniBdx 11.55 -.03 +7.5
Torray Funds:
Fundx 39.25 -.26 +2.4
Inshx 112.32 -.30 +3.0
TA IDEX A:
FedTxExAop 11.87 -.02 +6.3
JanGrow p 23.72 -.07 +8.0
GrCoGlobp 23.74 -.07 +6.2
TrConHYBp 9.29 +.03 +9.1
TAWtexnIcop 9.56 -.03 +7.3
TA IDEX C:
AsAIModGrt 11.48 +.07 +7.3
Turner Funds:
MidcpGwth 24.76 +.43 +11.4
SmlnCpnrwth 23.13 +.56 +5.3
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 24.72 +.04 +14.3
UBS Funds Cl A:
GlobAllot 13.32 +12.2
UBS Funds CI C:
GlobAlo p 13.07 .0 +11.3
UBS PACE Fds P:
LCGEqP n 19.97 +.11 +13.9
UMB Scout Funds:
Worid 24.66 +.03 +17.2
US Global Investors:
AIEIAM 24.53 +.21 NA
GIbRs1cn +.12 NA
GIdShr 7.70 +.08 NA
USChlna +.01. NA
WIdPrcMin n +.04 NA
USAA Group:
AgsvGth n 29.26 +.19 +12.3
CABdn 11.32 -.03 +8.7
ComstStrn 26.62 ... +8.2
GNMA 9.72 -.03 +42
GrTaxStrnx 14.80 -.01 +11.6
GnAth n 13.93 +.14 +12.0
Gr&lncnox 18.43 +.03 +7.9
IncStknx 16.89 +.14 +12.8
Income nx 12.43 -.10 +6.8
Int n 21.32 -.08 +10.5
NYBdt6 12.16 -.03 +8.9
PrtMM 14.97 +.10 +7.5
S&P Idxn 17.90 -.02 +7.5
SaTech 9.23 -.05 +0.1
ShtTBndn 8.90 -.01 +2.5
SmICapStkn 14.19 +.34 +18.1
TxEITn 13.37 -.04 +6.8
TxELT n 14.30 -.04 +9.2
TxESh n 10.70 +2.
VABd 11.80 -.02 +7.9
WIdGrn 17.45 -.09 +8.9
UtdAssoc00 nx 8.64 -.01 +7.7
Value Une Fd:
LevrgeGthnn 26.11 +.50 +11.4
Van Kamp Funds A:
AggGrAp 14.36 +.19 +6.5
CATFAp 19.04 -.06 +6.5
CmstA p 18.20 -.02 +11.9
CorpBdA p 6.75 -.02 +7.6
EmGroAp 36.46 +.20 +5.0
EntA P 12.35 +.08 +5.4
EqtylncAp 8.59 +.01 +11.6
ExchFd 357.06 +.36 +6.9
GIblFran p 23.34 +.03 +12.4
GvSoAp 10.39 -.D4 +5.8
GdnAp 20.45 +.05 +14.0
HarbAp 14.15 +.05 +2.5
HighYidA 3.60 +.01 +8.4
HYMuAp 10.97 +.01 +11.9
InTFAp 19.06 -.05 +7.9
MunlnAp 14.64 -.06 +7.4
PATFAp 17.61 -.05 +8.0
PaceFndAp 9.16 +.05 +6.1
StMunInc 13.38 ... +11.4
USMtgeA 13.90 -.02 +4.5
USItyAp 18.62 +.38 +31.3
Van Kamp Funds B:
CmsaBt 18.20 -.03 +11.0
EmGrB I 32.91 +.17 +4.1
EnterpBt 1129 +.06 +4.5
EqlncB t 8.46 +.01 +10.7
GrlnoBt 20.29 +.05 +13.1
HYMuBt 10.97 +.01 +11.1
MunlnBn 14:82 -.09 +6.7
PATFBnt 17.56 -.04 +7.3
StrMunlnc 13.38 +.01 +10.7
US Mtge B 13.85 -.01 +3.8
UtIB 18.60 +.38 +30.3
Van Kamp Funds C:
CormmSkG 18.21 -.03 +11.0
EqlncCt 8.50 +.02 +10.8
Vanguard Admiral:
AssetAdml n 54.56 +.16 +9.0
BalAdm In 19.41 +.04 +8.4
CAITAdmrn 11.17 -.04 +5.2
CALTAdm 11.89 -.04 +8.3
CpOpAdI n 70.23 -.12 +9.6
Energy n 93.46 +1.35 +46.4
EqlncAdml 46.97 +.30 +12.1
EuropAdml 60.62 +.02 +16.9
ExplAdml 70.14 +1.35 +11.2
ExntdAdm n 32.19 +.56 +16.1
500Admln 110.12 +.31 +7.7
GNMA Admn 10.41 -.02 +5.6
GrolncAdm 49.76 +.20 +9.1
GOretAdml n 25.96 +.07 +4.0
HoheGre n 5868 +.02 +1280
HtYldCp n 6.27 +.01 +8.5
HIPIdAdmn 10.80 -.03 +6.1
InsdLTAdmen 12.87 -.04 +7.9
ITBondAdml 10.64 -.07 +7.4
IasyAdmln 11.22 -.07 +5.6
IntGrAdml 59.19 -.06 +13.1


FUTUE


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

CORN (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Jul05 215.00 217.00 213.00 216.00 +4.00
Sep05 222.00 226.00 222.00 225.00 +3.00
Dec05 233.00 236.00 233.00 235.00 +4.00
Mar 06 239.00 244.00 239.00 243.00 +3.00
May 06 244.00 246.00 244.00 247.00 +3.00
Jul06 246.00 251.00 246.00 251.00 +3,00
Sep 06 249.00 250.00 249.00 250.00 +2.00
Es. sales 114,634. ThulS s sales 158,661
ThuvA2ss open Int. 697,419. -1,458
OATS (CBOT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Jul05 152.00 161.00 152.00 160.00 +8.00
Sep05 156.00 1689.00 156.00 164.00 +8.00
Dec05 164.00 172.00 159.00 168.00 +4,00
Mar06 173.00 173.00 173.00 173.00 +6.00
May 06 173.00 173.00 173.00 173.00 +5.00
Sep06 173.00 173.00 173.00 173.00 +5.00
Mar07 173.00 173.00 173.00 173.00 +5.00
Est. sales 2,645. Thus 2s sales 849
Thu1uas open int. 6,897, -252
WINTER WHEAT (KCBT)
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Jul05 331.00 331.00 327.00 329.00 +1.00
Sep05 336.00 338.00 334.00 337.00 +2.00
Dec05 349.00 349.00 345.00 348.00 +2.00
Mar06 357.00 358.00 355.00 358.00 +4.00
May06 361.00 361.00 361.00 361.00
Jul06 362.00 365.00 362.00 365.00 +4,00,
Sep06 370,00 370.00 370.00 370.00
Es. sales 10,100. ThuS es sales 17.838
Thuunos open Int. 73,781, -1,688
COTTON 2 (NYBT)
50,000 Idbs.- cents perlb.
Jul05 52,00 52.15 51.50 52.15 +.15
Oct 05 54.50 54.50 53.40 54.40 -.07
Dec05 56.50 56.50 55.00 56.15 -.24
Mar 06 58.50 58.50 57.55 58.15 -.35
May06 59.10 59.10 58.40 58.95 -.15
Jul 06 59.85 59.85 59.85 59.85 -.15
Oct 06 60.60 60.60 60.60 60.60 -.15
Est. sales 8,756. Thug/ass sales 25,363
Thulue open Int. 92,057, +2,920
COCOA (NYBT)
10 metric tons-$ per ton
Jul05 1453 1453 1439 1439 -1
Sep05 1445 1465 1445 1451 -1
Dec05 1482 1489 1475 1479 -1


Exp.


Open High Low Settle Chg I Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg


Mar06 1511 1511 1507 1507 +1
May 06 1527 1527 1527 1527 +2
Jul06 1550 1550 1540 1546 +2
Sep06 1562 1562 1562 1562
Es0. sales 6,544. Thur2us sales 10,273
Thuses open Int. 116,8688, -723
SUGAR-WORLD 11 (NYBT)
112,000 bs.- cents per lb.
Jul05 9.34
Oct05 9.30 9.30 9.10 9.16 -.17
Mar 06 9.36 9.36 9.21 9.27 -.13
May06 9.19 9.19 9.11 9.15 -.07
Jul 06 9.00 9.02 8.96 9.00 -.03
Oct 06 8.92 8.95 8.90 8.94 +.01
Mar 07 8.95 9.00 8.93 8.98 +.04
Est. sales 39,191, ThuRos sales 56,589
Thuas open Int. 376,275, -652
CATTLE (CME)
40,060 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Aug 05 79.50 80.05 79.25 79.32 +.02
Oct05 82.60 83.10 82.55 82.85 +.30
Dec 05 84.65 85.00 84.50 84.62 +.07
Feb06 86.40 86.80 86.40 86.42 +.02
Apr06 85.00 85.15 85.00 85.12 +:15
Jun 06 80.85 80.85 80.70 80.80
Est. sales 12,667. Thuetes sales 17,364
Thuvlns open int. 123,406, -486
FEEDER CATTLE (CME)
50,000 Ibs.- cents per Ib.
Aug05 109.90 110.60 109.85 110.30 +.87
Sep05 109.40 110.00 109.25 109.85 +1.15
Oct05 107.80 108.45 107.75 108.10 +.62
Nov05 105.65 106.10 105.65 105.90 +.70
Jan06 102.90 103.50 102.90 103.30 +.80
Mar06 100.10 100.10 99.90 99.90 +.25
Apr06 99.70 99.70 99.50 99.50 +.25
Eet. sales 2,825. Thula sales 2,092
ThuwSe open int. 21,674, +325
HOGS-Lean (CME)
40,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Jul05 65.85 66.70 65.70 66.30 +.77
Aug05 65.45 66.85 65.40 66.05 +1.02
Oct 05 56.85 58.20 56.85 58.05 +1.50
Dec 05 54.70 55.90 54.70 55.60 +1.25
Feb 06 57.45 58.65 57.40 58.55 +.95
Apr06 57.00 57.85 57.00 57.85 +.95
May 06 58.50 58.70 58.50 58.70 +.55
Est. sales 13,201. Thu tim sales 15,592
Thusms open int. 92,395, +538


GOLD (COMX)
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
Jul05 427.80 427.80 427.,80 427.80 -8.10
Aug 05 436.50 438,20 428.00 428.80 -8.30
Sep05 430.30 430.30 430.30 430.30 -8.30
Oct05 439.50 440.00 431.00 431.80 -8.30
Dec05 442.50 444.00 434.00 434.70 -8.30
Feb 06 438.00 438.00 437.50 437.70 -8.20
Apr06 446.50 446.50 440.70 440.70 -8.20
Est. sales.... Thuss sales 44,553
Thus12ss open int 312,922, +3,057
SILVER (COMX)
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
Jul 05 705.0 706.0 684.0 685.1 -17.7
Aug 05 686.7 686.7 686.7 686.7 -18.0
Sep05 707,5 710.4 685.0 689.5 -18.0
Dec 05 714.0 716.0 691.0 695.3 -17.7
Jan06 696.6 696.6 696.6 -696.6 -17.7
Mar06 716.5 716.5 699.2 699.2 -17.3
May 06 7Q1.4 701.4 701.4 701.4 -17.1
Est. sales .... Tui sales 27,681
ThuA2ss open int. 115,021, -4,012
HI GRADE COPPER (COMX)
25,000 Ibs.- cents per lb.
Jul 05 156.00 156.90 152.35 153.65 -1.70
Aug 05 154.50 154.50 149.30 150.05 -3.45
Sep05 151.00 157.55 146.00 147.35 -3.85
Oct05 147.80 147.80 144.10 144.10 -3.50
Nov05 142.00. 142.00 141.15 141.15 -3.20
Dec 05 141.65 142.20 136.30 138.25 -2.85
Jan 06 135.25 135.25 135.25 135.25 -2.75
Est. sales....Thu12s sales 17,766
ThuRes open int. 110,883, -1,961
EURODOLLARS (CME)
$1 million-pts of 100 pct.
Jul05 96.395 96.402 96.375 96.382 -.017
Aug 05 96.,260 96.260 96.240 96.245 -.030
Sep05 96.160 96.160 96.100 96.115 -.035
Oct 05 96.030 96.030 96.030 96.030 -.065
Nov05 95.995 95.995 95.975 95.975 -.086
Dec 05 96.040 96.045 95.910 95.930 -.100
Mar06 96.020 96.025 95.875 95.895 -.115
Est. sales 302,185. ThuAmes ales 1,945,280
Thuloe open Int. 7,656,144, +68,933
LUMBER (CME)
110000 bdit.-$pern,000 bd.ft.
Jul05 325.3 332.0 321.5 330.9 +5.6
Sep 05 323.4 -329.5 319,8 328.5 +2,5
Nov05 319.8 324.6 316.0 323.3 +3.3


Exp. Open High Low Settle Chg

Jan 06 325.0 328.2 325.0 328.2 +43.2
Mar06 327.1 327.1 327.1 327.1 +.1


May06 327.2 327.2 327.2
Est. sales 1,090. ThuAs s sales 988
Thu'es open Int. 3,554,-136
NATURAL GAS (NYMX)
10,000 mm bltum, $ per mmr btu
Aug 05 6.980 7.200 6.949
Sep 05 7.030 7.240 7.020
Oct05 7.107 7.283 7.090
Nov05 7.720 7.910 7.720
Dec 05 8.290 8.463 8.290
Jan 06 8.673 8.828 8.670
Feb 06 8.690 8.860 8.680
Est. sales... Thutss sales 82,054
Tusenas open Int. 470,677, +265
UNLEADED GASOLINE (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gal
Jul05
Aug05 157.26 165.20 157.00
Sep05 159.35 164.30 157.01
Oct05 149.43 155.01 149.36
Nov05 149.58 154.96 149.58
Dec 05 150.03 155.36 149.95
Jan06 151.25 156.66 151.25
EsL sale ... ThultW sales 57,397
Thu'ma open Int. 144,387, -1,966
HEATING OIL (NYMX)
42,000 gal, cents per gel
Jul05
Aug05 163.80 173.50 163.70
Sep05 1685.98 175.00 165.68
Oct05 168.03 175.50 167.95
Nov05 170.68 177.42 170.56
Dec05 173.03 181.00 173.03
Jan 06 175.75 182.50 175.75
Est sales.... ThuReAs sales 69,131
Thulaes open Int. 187,619, -73
LIGHT SWEET CRUDE (NYMX)
1,000 bb.- dollars per bbl.
Aug 05 56.56 59.15 56.45
Sep05 57.75 60.40 57.62
Oct 05 58.43 60.70 58.31
Nov 05 58.84 '60.95 58.69
Dec05 59.10 61.30 58.98
Jan06 59,50 61.11 59.41
Feb06 59.23 61.06 59.23
Estl. sales ,... Thu aen sale 334,976
Th meS open Int. 788,730, +298


327.2 -.8




7.171 +.190
7.215 +.184
7.283 +.180
7.893 +.170
8.463 +.165
8.828 +.155
8.848 +.155




157.21
164.85 +8.27
164.01 +7.48
155.01 +86.13
154.96 +6.08
155.38 +6.08
156.66 +8.08




161.91
171.11 +7.50
173.07 +7.56
174.97 +7.41
177.42 +7.26
180.12 +7.18
182.12 +7.01




58.75 +225
59.81 +2.17
60.43 +2.07
60.75 +1.95
61.00 +1.88
81.11 +1.82
61.06 +1.75


I


12-mo.
Name NAV chg %rtn
ITAdmlIn 13.54 -.05 +5.8
ITCoAdmrd 10.01 -.06 +6.7
LTdTrmAdm 10.81 -.02 +2.5
LTGrAdml 9.92 -.10 +18.3
LT Adml n 11.50 -.04 +7.8
MCpAdmIn 74.18 +1.15 +20.4
NJLTAdn 12,09 -.05 +7.2
NYLTAdm 11.55 -.06 +7.6
PrmCap r 62.92 -.05 +7.0
PALTAdmn 11.59 -.04 +7.1
REITAdmI r 64.04 +1.52 +33.3
STsryAdml 10.41 -.03 +2.1
STBdAdmIn 10.05 -.03 +2.5
ShITrnAdm 15.58 .. +1.8
STFedAdm 10.35 -.02 +2.3
STIGrAdm 10.58 -.03 +2.9
SmICapAdmi n27.25 +.60 +14.8
TxMCapr 56.91 +.30 +9.7
TxMGdnc r 53.47 +.16 +7.7
TOBdAdml n 10.26 -.05 +6.1
TotStkAdmn 28.60 +.17 +9.6
USGroAdmlIn 41.71 +.11 +4.7
ValueAdmI n 21.49 +.09 +14.2
WellslAdmn 52.61 -.06 +9.8
WeCltnAdm n 52.13 +.05 +10.7
WIndeorAdmn 60.47 +.04 +10.7
WdsdiAdm 55.69 +.29 +15.4
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.30 +.07 +8.9
CAITn 11.17 -.04 +52
CALTn 11.89 -.04 +6.2
CapOpp n 30.39 -.05 +9.5
Convti n 12.69 +,.03 +1.6
DOvIdendGro 11.92 -.02 +7.2
Energy 49.76 +.72 +46.3
Eqlncn 23.36 +.14 +12.0
Explorer n 75.28 +1.45 +11.0
FLLTE n 11.68 -.05 +7.1
GNMAn 10.41 -.02 +5.6
GlobEq n 18.01 -.02 +15.9
Gmrol n 30.47 +.12 +8.9
GrowthEq 9.48 +.03 +3.3
HYCorp n 6.27 +.01 +.4
HthCare n 131.92 +.05 +11.9
InflaPron 12.53 -.05 +6.0
InlExpilrn 16.93 -.06 +23.7
IntGr 18.60 -.02 +13.0
InlValn 31.00 -.03 +15.4
ITI Grade 10.01 -.06 +6.6
ITTsry n 11.22 -.07 +5.5
UFECon n 15.20 +.01 +7.4
UFEGron 19.91 +.06 +10.0
LIFEIncn 13.49 -.02 +6.4
UFEMod n 17.83 +.02 +9.0
LTinGraden 9.92 -.10 +162
LTTEry n 11.99 -.12 +14.6
Morgan n 16.31 +.07 +7.6
MuHYn 10.90 -.03 +6.1
MulnsLgn 12.87 -.04 +7.9
Mulntn 13.54 -.05 +5.7
MuLtdon 10.81 -.02 +2.4
MuLongon 11.50 -.04 +7.7
MuShtn 15.58 .. +1.7
NJLTn 12.09 -.05 +7.1
NYLTn 11.55 -.06 +7.5
OHLTTxE n 12.25 -.04 +7.0
PALTn 11.59 -.04 +7.1
PrecMosMIn r 17.61 +.13 +33.2
Prmcp r 60.62 -.05 +6.8
SelValu r 19.59 +.35 +22.2
STARna 18.84 +.01 +10.1
STIsrade 10.58 -.03 +2.8
STFedon 10.35 -.02 +2.3
STrtryn 10.41 -.03 +1.9
StratEqn 22.24 +.43 +18.6
TgtRat2015 11.29 +.01 +8.2
TgtRet2025 11.46 +.01 +8.7
TgtRet2035 11.76 +.03 +9.3
TxMCAp nr 28.27 +.15 +9.0
TxMGl r 26.02 +.08 +7.7
TaxMngdInO mlO.17 -.02 +13.6
TaxMgdSCr 21.77 +.54 +15.7
USSron 16.09 +,.04 +4.4
USValue n 14.13 +.18 +13.8
Wellslyn 21.71 -.03 +9.6
Weldn+ n 30.18 +.03 +10.6
Wndsron 17.92 +.01 +10.6
Wndsll 91.37 +.16 +152
Vanguard Idx Fds:
503 n 110.11 +.31 +7.6
Balanced n 19.41 +.04 +6.3
Devkltn 9.06 -.01 +13.5
EMkt n 15.55 +.08 +35.7
Europe n 25.81 +.01 +16.8
Extend n 32.16 +.57 +16.0
rowthrn 25.96 +.07 +3.9
ITBondn 10.64 -.07 +7.4
LgCapldx n 21.31 +.07 +8.9
LTBondn 12.25 -.12 +15.3
MIdCap 16.35 +26 +20.3
Paciien 9.05 -.086 +6.3
REITr 19.70 +.36 +332
SmCap n 27.23 +. 14.6
SmrCpGrow 15.25 +.32 +10.9
SmICapVal 14.31 +.32 +18.3
STBondn 10.05 -.03 +284
TotBond n 10.26 -.05 +6.0
To.iln 12.51 -.01 +15.7
TotStkn 28.59 +.17 +9.4
Value n 21.49 +.10 +14.0
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Balnsth n 19.41 +.04 +8.5
DevMklnst n 8.98 -.01 +13.7
Euromlnstl n 25.84 +.01 +17.0
Ex0n n 32.21 +.568 +16.2
Growthlna 25.96 +.07 +4.0
InsUldxn 109.21 +.31 +7.7
InsPI n 109.22 +.31 +7.8
TotBdldx n 51.76 -25 +6.2
MidCaplnstn 16.40 +26 +20.5
Paclnseln 9.07 -.06 +6.6
SmCpIn n 27.27 +.60 +14.8
TBIstn 1026 -.05 +6.2
TSInst n 26.60 +.17 +9.6
Valuelnseln 21.49 +.09 +14.2
Vantagepoint Fds:
AggrOpp 10.91 +.15 +11.0
AssetAloc 7.29 +.02 +8.3
CoreBondldxl x10.13 -.08 +5.8
Eqtylnc 9.17 +.05 +13.0
Growth n 7.97 +.03 -02
Grow&lnc 10.07 +.02 +6.7
MPLongTermnGrS21.03 +.06 +6.9
MPTradGreth 21.72 +.03 +6.5
Victory Funds:
DvsSkA 16.39 -.01 +8.2
WmBlInstlnt 16.48 +.17 +18.5
WM Blair Ml Fds:
IntlGrowthlr 22.93 +26 +10.1
WM Str Asset Mgmt:
BalancedApx 1322 -.02 +7.8
BalancedBtx 13.20 +.01 +6.9
ConGwB0 1 14.06 +.03 +7.7
ConGvwAp 14.45 +.05 +8.7
StrotGrAp 15.68 +.07 +9.1
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Accumulv 6.31 +.05 +10.4
CorelnvA 5.79 +.02 +12.2
HlghInc 7.39 +.03 +6.0
NwCcptAp 9.14 +.11 +10.7
ScTechA 10.863 +.13 +15.3
VanguardA 8.86 +.14 +8.6
Wasatch:
CoreGrth 44.25 +.63 +16.9
SmCapGrth 41.10 +.78 +16.1
Weitz Funds:
PartVal x 23.38 +.03 +9.5
Value nx 36.61 -.12 +6.9
Wells Fargo A:
AsetAII A 19.68 +.02 +8.9
Wells Fargo Admin:
DIosEql I 40.12 +.16 +62
GrthBal n 29.71 +.10 +6.9
LgCoGt 45.01 +29 +1.3
Eqlylncn 35.17 ... +9.7
Index 46.23 +.13 +7.5
Wells Fargo Funds:
CmStk 22.868 +.13 +11.5
GovSeon 10.75 -.05 +5.3
Growthlnv+n 19.05 +.12 +6.5
Opplntylnvn 46.03 +.40 +112
SCapValZ p 29.39 +.67 +16.3
UlSt0nv 9.17 -.01 +2.6
Western Asset:
CorePlua 10.69 -.02 +8.6
Core 11.46 -.03 +6.0
Westport Funds:
SmallCapln 25.97 +.54 +16.7
William Blair N:
GrowlhN 10.65 +.07 +6.2
Inot~hN 22.62 +.23 +10.6
Yacklman Funds:
Fundtp 15.10 +.01 +7.6













4D

SUNDAY


Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce





(hbmber Connection


JULY 3, 2005
0 0 0 --'and' Ho.- Es aS. a


Chamber Staff


Kitty Barnes ...................... .... .Executive Director
Suzanne Clemente ............Inverness Office Manager and
Special Events Coordinator
Debi Shields ................. Crystal River Office Manager
Marion Elson ................Office Assistant (Homosassa)
Diane McInnis .............. Office Assistant (Crystal River)
Diane Nally .................... Office Assistant (Inverness)
Sarah Marx ................ Office Assistant (Crystal River)


Inverness . ......................... ...... .726-2801
Hom osassa ........................... ..... 628-2666
Crystal River ......................... ..... 795-3149


Nominations for chamber board


elections are now being accepted


In September of this year
members of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will be
asked to vote for nine candi-
dates to fill positions on the
board of directors.
These directors will be select-
ed from a slate of candidates
selected by the Chamber's nom-


nation committee and will
serve a term of three years
beginning Jan. 1, 2006
Any member of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce
may submit their name along
with signatures from 25 other
members in good standing to
the nominations committee.


All names should be submit-
ted by 4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8,
2005 to Kitty Barnes at the
Crystal River office at 28 NW
U.S. 19 Crystal River, Fl 34428.
A list of candidates for the
final ballot will go before the
board for approval at the regu-
lar August board meeting and


then be mailed out to members
by Sept. 15.
All ballots must be returned
to the Crystal River Chamber
offices by Friday, Sept. 30, for
final tabulation. Signature
forms for interested candidates
can be picked up at any cham-
ber office beginning July 5.


www.citruscountychamber.com


Franklin Realty Consultants of Citrus County, Inc.




ii--ii-iijll Jll!!II


On the new two-speed Five Star C
Edition of the Infinity System! & redi'
The world's first self-monitoring residential air conditioning
system, designed and programmed to run a daily
diagnostic check. It actually adjusts itself to maintain
maximum efficiency.
(Offer ends 8/31/05. W.A.C. & purchase of qualifying
equipment. See Bay Area for details. Homeowner occupants only)
AIR CONDITIONING 1Sr'
4- & HEATING TL. '

w.b eo.cm ww Citrus 795- C e
Marion489 12 5
.... Levy 447 t/Ir
www.bayareacool.com www.carrier.com www.natex.org State Certified CAC01 0415


Hectic Day at the Office?

...Unwind

-in Ours!

.. Evening
Appointments
now Available


ABITARE PAQI6
Day (Spa v (S alone A VEDA
Hwy. 44 Crystal River Next to Publix Plaza 563-001 I1


Kt people take about 9,000 steps per day.
ing and other aerobic exercises also put
sure on the feet. No wonder that aches
pains in this part of the body are common.
"ors such as flat or over-pronated feet and
e wrong type of shoe can increase irritation.
these factors can also affect the health of
t@ back, knees and legs.
H61 pain is one of the most common foot
ailments. The cause is usually inflammation of
the plantar fascia, a band of connective tissue
that surrounds the muscles on the bottom of
e foot. It connects the heel bone to the ball
Lofthe foot, supporting the arch, protecting
.e foot and absorbing shock.
patientss with plantar fasciitis often have pain
.when getting up out of bed and standing up after
They have been sitting for a while. The pain
originates in front of the heel bone, but can spread
over the entire bottom of the foot. Over time,
inflammation associated with the condition can
lead to scar tissue, calcium deposits and heel
spurs. These spurs, which are a bony growth on
the front part of the heel bone, can cause sharp
stabbing pain when walking. A chiropractor will
be able to determine the basis of the problem
and the best treatments. These might include
ultrasound, joint manipulation, muscle stretching
and strengthening exercises, and orthotics.
Let the caring professionals at
Neck and Back Care Center help you
regain the joy's of living life, pain free!


Neck a Back
Care Center


Anthony B. Oliverio DC
563-5055


Jeffery S. Kinnard DC
527-5433


the Source of Your Pain" next to the Boy's & Gils Club In the Winn Dixie Shopping Center
Chiropractic Care Fitness Center Occupatlonal/Rehab Therapy Massage AquaBed Therapy


Special to the Chronicle
Recently the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony for Franklin Realty Consultants of Citrus
County, Inc. to welcome them as new members. Participating were: front row, from left, Reyna Bell, chamber ambassador; Jose
Mejia; Robin Walter; Luz Taboada; Hazel and Roger Carlson, Brokers; Betty Leonarczyk; Shirley Muse; Rhonda Lestinsky,
chamber ambassador; Lillian Smith, chamber ambassador; Kandy Kremnetz, chamber ambassador; and Nancy Coffey, chamber
ambassador; back row: John Porter, chamber ambassador; Steve Levine; Charles Richer, chamber ambassador; Joyce
Delgado; John Wilson; Marc Altman; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador; and John Callaway. Franklin Realty Consultants are
located at 2965 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy jn Inverness. The firm invites everyone to call them for all of your real estate needs. The
office number is 341-1365, the cell number is 634-4013 or call toll free at 877-499-7653.



Chamber luncheon scheduled for July 8


Make your reservations for
the upcoming Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce lunch-
eon.
Brett Wattles from the Citrus
County Economic Development
Council will be the guest speak-
er at the July 8 luncheon at
Sugarmill Woods Golf &
Country Club.
The luncheon begins at 11:45
a.m. and advanced reservations
are required by Thursday, July
7, at noon.
The cost of the luncheon is
now $13. For reservations, call
795-3149 or 628-2666.


Chamber News


Nominate a member
of the week
Do you know a member who
has contributed to the communi-
ty, offered excellent customer
service and/or shown support to
the chamber of commerce?
You can get them the honor
they deserve by submitting
three or four paragraphs to us.
If you have a picture, we will
accept it too!


Don't worry about the perfect
wording. Jist submit the infor-
mation about their accomplish-
ments and we will word it for
you.
E-mail the submission to:
ccommerce2 @ tampabay.rr.com.
If you do not have a picture or e-
mail capabilities, you can fax
your information to 795-1921.
For any questions, please call
Debi at 795-3149.


Chamber newsletter
insert information
Have you reserved your space
in the monthly newsletter for an
insert? As a reminder, all inserts
must be 8 x. 11 and contain no
folds or staples.
There must be a minumum of
1,200 copies. The paper can be
colored and you do have the
option of using both sides of the
page.
This helps us to put out a pro-
fessional publication and keeps
the inserts intact during mailing.
Thank you members for your
co-operation.


Recreational scallop

...n. season has arrived


www.citruscountychamber.com


Ip n h aitof. if.


Be sure to have
proper equipment
and know all
the regulations
Get. your buckets and nets
ready and head off shore for
your scallops!
Be sure to have a valid
Florida saltwater fishing license
and a regulation dive flag with
you. Recreational harvesters are
limited to two gallons of whole
bay scallops in the shell, or one
pint of bay scallop meat per day
during the open season.


In addition recreational scal-
lopers may possess no more
than 10 gallons of whole bay
scallops in the shell, or V gallon
of bay scallop meat aboard any
vessel at any time.
Bay scallops may be harvest-
ed only by hand or with a land-
ing or dip net.
They may not be harvested
for commercial purposes. For
more information, call 628-
9305.
Check with the local dive
shops for guided trips or to pur-
chase proper equipment for the
trip. Be safe and happy scallop-
ing!


r








Promotional information from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce


Honneteion


'A.


Chocolate Fountains by Anna Maria


5D

SUNDAY


JULY 3, 2005





Fireworks will illuminate

Kings Bay on July 3


The Crystal River Special
Events Foundation will once
again be sponsoring Fireworks
over Kings Bay on Sunday, July
3, around 9 p.m.


These are made possible by
the generous donations of the
public. If you would like to
support this program, please
call 795-2946.


Inverness is set to host

Patriotic Evening July 3


Beautiful Lake Henderson at
Wallace Brooks Park and
Liberty Park in Inverness will
be the site for a Patriotic
Evening on July 3.
The fun begins at 5 p.m. with
children's rides and food booths.
Entertainment will be provided.


Fireworks are scheduled to
begin shortly after dark.
This year's Independence
Day celebration is dedicated to
all the men and women who are
serving in our armed forces,
protecting and preserving our
precious freedom.


Special to the Chronicle
At a recent Chamber luncheon, following a demonstration and sampling of a decadent chocolate fountain, a ribbon cutting cer-
emony was held to welcome Chocolate Fountains by Anna Maria as a new member. Front row, from left, Janet Yant, chamber
director and past president; Reyna Bell, chamber ambassador; Odalys Smith, chamber ambassador; Vickie Phillips, county
commissioner, Joanie West, chamber ambassador; owners Anna Maria and Frank Briercheck, Dharma Murphy; Renee
Melchionne, chamber ambassador; Betty Murphy, chamber ambassador; Jackie Marx, chamber ambassador; and Lillian Smith,
chamber ambassador; back row, Dennis Miller, chamber member; Jack Reynolds, chamber director; Charles Richer, chamber
ambassador; Larry Blanken, chamber ambassador; Rhonda Lestinsky, chamber ambassador; and John Porter, chamber ambas-
sador. Gourmet Belgian chocolate cascades off of each layer as guests dip fresh fruit, pretzels and other savory items into the
chocolate flow. Anna Maria invites you to add a fountain of rich, creamy chocolate to your next event and make a lasting
impression on your guests. Wedding receptions, anniversary parties, corporate events, trade shows, banquets, bridal showers,
holiday and birthday parties are specialties. Call Anna Maria at 563-5267 or email her at annaschocolate@ tampabay.rr.com


Member News


Abel A. Garibaldi, MD has
joined the CITRUS
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
staff in vascular and thoracic
surgery.
His is certified by the
American Board of Surgery and
by the American Board of
Thoracic Surgery. He comes
here from the Texas Heart
Institute in Houston, where the
completed advanced training in
endovascular techniques.
Dr. Garibaldi has trained in
general, vascular and thoracic
surgery. He will be performing
peripheral angiograms, throm-
bolysis, and peripheral angio-
plasty and stent insertions.
He also performs the usual
vascular surgery interventions,
including carotid endarterec-
tomies, aneurysm resections,
and extremity revasculariza-
tions, hemodialysis access.sur-
gery and thrombectomies, and
vein surgery, including varicose
veins, chronic venous insuffi-
ciency and deep vein thrombo-
sis, among other procedures.
Dr. Garibaldi, an Homosassa
resident, will participate in the
general surgery emergency dall
schedule at Citrus memorial
Hospital.
He is working from the office
of Inverness Surgical Associa-
tion at 403 W. Highland
Boulevard in Inverness. The
phone numbers is 726-3646.
Dr. Garibaldi will be accept-
ing major insurances including
Blue Cross/Blue Shield and
Medicare. Citrus Memorial
Hospital is a 171-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital.

MIE

The team of Jody Broom and
Lorene Logan has been very
productive during the month of
June. With over 1.7 million in
closed sales volume in June,
they have sailed past the three
million dollar mark in total
sales.
Broom and Logan are both
very experienced agents in the
Citrus County marketplace.
Together they have over 39
years experience in the real
estate profession.
"The Realty Express Team"
has been one of the leading
teams in Citrus County for
many years. They specialize in
the Homosassa area including
Riverhaven Village and
Sugarmill Woods.
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX REALTY ONE con-
gratulate Broom and Logan on
their continued success. The
brokers and staff of RE/MAX
Realty One are proud to recog-
nize several associates who
have achieved the Multi-


Million Dollar sales level
recently.
Each of these associates has
closed more than $2 million in
sales volume.
Larry Scinta, Linda Meahl,
Vic McDonald, Marvia Korol,
Peter Korol, Dianne Mac-
Donald, Jennifer Stoltz, Vicki
Love and Joy Bily have each
joined this prestigious club.
In less than half a year, all of
these associates have been able
to accomplish what only a
handful of Citrus County
Realtors do in a year. All of
these associates can be reached
at one of three Citrus County
locations.

mo m

Welcome Aboard! TALLY-
HO VACATIONS welcomes
their newest employee, Sheree
Monroe, who will be handling
group motor coach tours as well
as individual travel.
Monroe has been a resident
of Citrus County for over 23
years, and has worked in vari-
ous industries, including serv-
ing as chamber executive for,
over nine years with the Crystal
River Chamber of Commerce.
During her tenure at the
chamber, Sheree administered
the operations for the 800-
member organization and took
an active role in long range
planning and representing the
area business community.
She served as public relations
director and spokesperson for
Rock Crusher Canyon
Entertainment Complex and as
membership director for Black
Diamond Golf and Country
Club.
Among her experience,
Monroe worked as a sole pro-
prietor in marketing services
and public relations consulting.
Monroe is serving as volun-
teer president-elect of the
Nature Coast Chapter of the
Florida Public Relations
Association, and will be
installed as president in
September for a one-year term
as president.
Monroe has worked in plan-
ning conferences, group outings
and travel for her church and
her hobbies include singing,
piano, walking, camping and
spending time with family and
friends.
Monroe is an accomplished
vocalist who performs for local
events and organizations.
"I love people, and I'm look-
ing forward to the opportunities
and challenges this position
offers," she said.
"I am glad to be part of the
experienced team of Tally-Ho
Vacations, and our sister com-


pany, Educational Tours. I
anticipate this will be fun and
fulfilling," Monroe said.
Sheree is married to Joe
Monroe, Citrus County's hous-
ing director, and has two grown
children, Nick and Stephanie.


Hard work doesn't get unno-
ticed when it comes to improv-
ing the care delivered to
Florida's Medicare and
Medicaid beneficiaries.
OMNI HOME CARE,
Homosassa, was presented the
Outstanding Achievement for
Outcome Based Quality
Improvement for 2002-2005 by
Florida Medical Quality
Assurance, Inc. (FMQAI) in
recognition of the successes
achieved by participating in the
Home Health Quality Initiative
(HHQI).
The Home Health Quality
Initiative (HHQI). The Home
Health Quality Initiative is part
of the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services', an agency
of the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services,
ongoing quality initiative that
also focuses on improving the
quality of care in nursing homes
and hospitals.
Omni Home Care collaborat-
ed with the Florida Medical
Quality Assurance, Inc., the
Medicare Quality Improvement
Organization for Florida, from
November 2002 to October
2003 and worked on improving
specific areas of care.
"We applaud the efforts Omni
Home Care has achieved with
the Home Health Quality
Initiative,"" said Susan Stone,
MSN, RN, FMQAI Home
Health Community of Practice
leader. "Their involvement in
the HHQI demonstrates their
commitment of providing a
high level of quality care and
their dedication to quality
improvement deserves to be
recognized," she added.
The national Home Health


Quality Initiative was launched
in November 2003 and is a
broad-based initiative that
includes CMS's continuing reg-
ulatory and enforcement sys-
tems, programs, and partner-
ships and collaborative efforts.
Quality improvement organi-
zations provide technical sup-
port to home health agencies,
and many fruitful' collabora-
tions and partnerships have
evolved. The enhanced con-
sumer information includes
CMS's release of home health
quality measures on Home
Health available at
www.medicare.gove.
Medicare's online tool
empowers consumers with
quality of care information to
help them make more informed
decisions about their health
care.
The Home Health Compare
information is also available
from Medicare's helpline at 1-
800-633-4227.

III

ERA AMERICAN
REALTY & INVESTMENTs
is pleased to welcome Jocelyn
D. Adams to "The American
Team."
Adams will work as a sales
associate in the company's
Beverly Hills office. She relo-
cated to Citrus County in June
of 2004 from Virginia Beach,
Va.
Adams, who is a member of
the Citrus Springs Civic
Association, and her husband
are proud parents of a 16-year
old-son. Leisure time activities
find Adams enjoying walking,
running, reading, gardening,
and following her son's basket-
ball games.
ERA American Realty, a Top
10 ERA company nationally,
has served the real estate needs
of Citrus County since, 1980
and invites you to contact
Adams at 746-3600 with all
your real estate needs.


Workforce has professional openings!
Submit your resume: ProJobs@clmworkforce.com


To view current openings
www.clmworkforce.com
click Career Seekers/Job Search/Professional


ONE STOP
WORKFORCE
3SV EEill~


EinFormIctl sliudin tit worwk"'


Contact the Professional
Placement Team today!
352-873-7950 ext. 202


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The original, award
winning magazine of
Citrus County...
Call today to advertise
in the magazine with
proven results!
www.ncvg.com
352-344-1184


Our 23rd Edition


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Customized service is the specialty of Ward Eye Center, so we hope
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1








CInRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6D SUNDlrA, JULY 3, 2005


-DIGEST
Continued from Page 1A

The Elite Cruise Counselor is
the third level of cruise expertise
.with CLIA. This designation is
achieved only after attending class-
es in Tampa and at the University
of Miami, as well as taking classes
online. Deck has also inspected
more than 30 ships, along with tak-
ing numerous cruises to increase
her knowledge of the cruise indus-
try.
Deck can be contacted at Just
Cruise & Travel at 726-2889 or
(800) 306-7477.
Marie Sandras joins
Raymond James
Marie Sandras has joined
f Raymond James Financial
Services Inc. in The Shoppes of
Citrus Hills as client service man-
ager.
Sandras brings more than six
years of experience in customer
service.
The leading nationwide financial
services firm is at The Shoppes of
Citrus Hills at Publix, 2657 N.
Forest Ridge Blvd. They can be
reached at 527-3700, or by visiting
the Web site at www.raymond-
james.com/TheShoppesofCitrusHill
s/.
Founded in 1974, Raymond
James Financial Services has
' more than 2,100 independently
owned offices nationwide and is a
member of the National
Association of Securities Dealers
(NASD) and the Securities Investor
Protection Corporation (SIPC).
Raymond James Financial


MONEY
Continued from Page 1A

Swe couldn't manage." Three or
Four times the minimum pay-
ment is not acceptable. I can
see no reason for having all of
these cards. You have at least
eight, which is about six too
many Keep one, possibly two
bank cards (assuming there are
no annual fees), and keep the
one travel and leisure card
(like American Express), which
will have a fee.
There's no reflection on your
credit for canceling unneces-
sary cards. One thing that can
affect your credit is having too
much available, which appears
That you do. Just looking at the
totals at five with $15,000 is
$75,000, two at $5,000 makes
the total $85,000 and two more
at $3,000 is $91,000, plus your
Travel and leisure card.
You didn't indicate what
your income is, but that is an
enormous amount of available
credit, which could very easily
dissuade a lender from enter-
ing into an arrangement with
Syou.
DEAR BRUCE: I am in the
enviable position of being
retired, with my pension and
my wife's totaling $115,000 a
'year plus Social Security. We
have 403(b)s and investment
accounts totaling $500,000. My
only substantial debt is a
$200,000 mortgage on my home
(purchased in 2002, now worth
more than $550,000) in Delray
Beach.
My question is whether I
should be carrying the large
mortgage. Our monthly expens-
es including the mortgage
'leave us with a substantial
amount each month, which
'goes into an account because I
was turned down for a long-


Services provides a wide range of
services through its affiliate,
Raymond James & Associates,
member of the New York Stock
Exchange.
Raymond James Financial
Services and Raymond James &
Associates, headquartered in St.
Petersburg, are wholly owned sub-
sidiaries of Raymond James
Financial Inc. (NYSE-RJF).
Medical center has
new leadership
Quehuong H. Pham, M.D., has
been appointed chief of surgery
and Gustavo A.
Fonseca, M.D.,
has been
appointed chief
of medicine at
Seven Rivers
Regional Medical |
Center. Each will
serve a one-year
term in his and
her respective '.
position.
Rajendra P.
Bellam, M.D., will continue his two-
year term as chief of staff at Seven
Rivers Regional.
Pham, board
certified in gener-
al surgery, has
been on the hos- ,", ,
pital's medical
staff since 2002.
She received her \
medical degree ..."'
from Medical .-,-- .,- -
College of Ohio i: ;i .
in Toledo and
completed her general surgery res-
idency at Western Pennsylvania
Hospital in Pittsburgh.
Fonseca, board certified in inter-
nal medicine, hematology and

term care insurance, so I am
self-insuring myself. Reader,
via e-mail.
DEAR READER: You're
familiar with "if it ain't broke,
don't fix it." I do not see any-
thing broken here. You have
compensating balances for the
debt on your home and the
home itself has substantial
equities, so if you do need long-
term care insurance some-
where in the future, the house
can be converted to cash.
It seems to me the only pos-
sible chink in the armor might
be that your house in Delray
could go down in value. It
would be a good gamble to stay
right where you are, do what
you are doing, and enjoy -
you've earned it.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 50 years
old and have two retirement
accounts: a Roth IRA and a
403(b) with a 2 percent employ-
er match from the hospital
where I work Should I contin-
ue to contribute to the 403(b)
and face tax consequences
upon withdrawal, or stop fund-
ing it and contribute that
money to the nontaxable Roth
IRA? T. P., New Hampshire.
DEAR T.P.: I would not give
up the contribution to the
403(b) as long as you are getting
the 2 percent employer match,
or on the amounts that you are
getting the 2 percent match.
That is like a 2 percent bonus,
why would you want to give
that up? If you have after-tax
dollars that you would like to
invest, by all means continue to
contribute to a Roth IRA.
I am certain you know that
you must pay all of the income
tax on the contribution, but no
tax, if you hold cash at age 59
1/2; or, if you are older than 54
1/2, when you make the deposit
for five years there is no tax on
the money earned. You can at
any time take out the principal


ohcology, has been on the hospi-
tal's medical staff since 1998. He
received his med-
ical degree from
Universidad del
Norte School .
of Medicine in r
Barranquilla, '
Columbia, and *.
completed his
residency in inter-
nal medicine at Gustavo
University of Fonseca
Miami -
Veterans Administration Medical
Center in Florida.
Bellam, board certified in internal
medicine, has been on staff at
Seven Rivers Regional since 1992.
He received his medical degree at
Andhra University, Rangaraya
Medical College in India and com-
pleted his residency in internal
medicine at St. John's Episcopal
Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y.
The hospital also recognizes
outgoing leaders Andrew J.
Petrella, M.D., past chief of surgery
and Vikram N. Shah, M.D., past
chief of medicine.
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center is a general, medical/surgi-
cal acute care facility that opened
its doors in 1978. The hospital has
grown to 128 beds serving the
communities of Citrus, Levy and
South Marion counties. Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center is
fully accredited by the Joint
Commission on Accreditation of
health care Organizations
(JCAHO) and is licensed by the
Florida State Department of Health
and Human Services, Health Care
Financing Administration, for partic-
ipation in Medicare/Medicaid pro-
grams. Seven Rivers can be found
on the Web at www.srrmc.com.

with no penalty or tax.
Bruce Williams is a
columnist with Newspaper
Enterprise Association. Send
your questions to:
Smart Money, P.O. Box 503,
Elfers 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams. com.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume
of mail, personal responses
cannot be provided.


EDC awards two




new micro loans


During the past four years the Citrus
County Economic Development Council
(EDC), in cooperation with the Service
Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and local
financial institutions, has offered
micro loans to small businesses oper-
ating in Citrus County. Loans from
$1,000 to $5,000 are available to busi-
nesses that might not otherwise be -
considered "bankable," but are of | '
sound condition.
Recently, the EDC awarded new -
micro loans to two businesses and is \
pleased to announce these loans and
the recipients.
The Full Belly Deli, owned and Brett V
operated by Tracey Babich and CITI
Melanie Willis, is at 9707 West Fort COUN1
Island Trail in Crystal River. A full
deli-style menu is available and you
may phone them at 564-0211 to order take-out,
or seating is available. Operating hours are
from 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday, and from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday They are closed on Monday
The second micro loan was awarded to Citrus
Computer Training operated by Laura Termini
at 6290 South Esmeralda Terrace in Lecanto.
She may be reached by calling 628-3774. Laura
has 22 years of experience, including eight
years of teaching and tutoring computer skills.


NET
Continued from Page 1D

out an attractive option.
"It's a shrinking world," Gill
said, -"not entirely due to the
net ban."
Mike Hampton, who owned
the Cedar Key Fish and Oyster
Co. from 1985 until he sold it
last year, said regulations
before the net ban had already
affected his business. When it
started, he said, he lost about
40 percent of his revenue and
60 percent of the product he
was selling.
As a result, he said he had to
lay off half of his 16 full-time
employees.
Hampton said many small
retail outlets also went out of
business as a result of the net
ban because they couldn't get
the supply of fish they needed
to stock their markets.
Recreational fishery
reaps the benefits
Kevin Cunningham, who was
the leader of the county's eco-
nomic development organiza-
tion when the net ban began,
said the net ban had at least
one positive result.
To help displaced local com-
mercial fishermen, Cunning-
ham said that the local work-



WORKFORCE
Continued from Page 1D

attend and others declined, but
asked for information to be
mailed to them.
If you are interested in
learning how an internship
program could help your busi-
ness recruit and retain skilled,
dedicated employees, give me
a call. We plan to hold another
seminar on this very topic at
the CFCC campus in Ocala. If
you don't mind the drive, we'll
save a seat for you at the next
internship seminar in late
' August or early September.
Call me at (352) 873-7939, Ext.


MARKET


3-MUNT H b-MUN H
C.D. C.D.


R
T)


She will provide training at the client's home or
business.
Both the Full Belly Deli and Citrus Computer
Training were awarded loans in the amount of


$5,000 payable in three years.
s Interest rates for the EDC's micro
loans are based on the prime rate
-. quoted by the Wall Street Journal,
t- with payments due monthly Loans
may be repaid in advance without
penalty.
The following financial institutions
have participated in the micro loan
program: AmSouth Bank, Brannen
Banks, Bank of America, Regions
Battles Bank, Wachovia (formerly SouthTrust
MUS Bank) and SunTrust Bank The EDC
Y EDC is currently seeking support from
these and other financial institutions
that have locations in Citrus County.
The program qualifies participating banks for
Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) points.
Any business or financial institution interest-
ed in learning more about the micro loan pro-
gram can contact Lisa or Teresa at 795-2000.


Brett Wattles is executive director of the
Economic Development Council
Contact the EDC at 795-2000.


force board wanted to start a
scallop replenishment pro-
gram that would eventually
lead to creation of a commer-
cial scallop fishery off the
coast of Citrus County.
Though that didn't happen,
Cunningham said the scallop-
reseeding program has been a
success for recreational scal-
lopers.
Mary Craven, the county's
tourism development director,
said a Florida Sea Grant study
on the economic impact of the
2003 recreational scallop sea-
son in Citrus County showed
that local businesses surveyed
had a revenue increase of
$483,000 from scalloping.
Researchers estimated that
scalloping-related activities in
2003 generated a total of about
$1.4 million in Citrus County.
Some in the local recre-
ational fishing-related indus-
tries believe the net ban has
been good for their businesses.
Dick Yant, a local fishing
guide who represents the
sport-fishing industry as a
member of the Citrus County
Economic Development
Council, said local fishing has
improved in the past 10 years,
which has led to an increase in
the number of fishing guides
and recreational anglers eager
to fish here.
Yant said other economic


212, or e-mail lnichols@clm-
workforce.com
CLM Workforce Connection
sets policy and directs expen-
ditures of approximately $5
million in funds that under-
write services provided
through the One Stop
Workforce Connection offices.
In 2003-04, approximately 1,000
businesses and 30,000 career
seekers received services
through the One Stop Work-
force Connection. Services
include professional and tech-
nical recruitment, training, job
fairs, employment statistics
and financial incentives.
The One Stop Workforce
Connection is a member of the
Employ Florida statewide net-


C.D.


C.D.


benefits that come from better
recreational fishing include
more business for local hotels,
increased fishing license
sales, as well as increased
sales of other supplies such as
fishing tackle.
Joe Bega, who has owned
Apopka Marine in Inverness
for 20 years, thinks that better
fishing has also helped him
sell more boats.
"Of course the population
growth has helped boat sales,
but I know that fishing is better
since the net ban for the sport
fishermen," Bega said. '"And
that has to equate to better
sales, at least I believe it does."
Capt. Jim Long is a fishing
guide and president of the
Homosassa Guides
Association. He is also a for-
mer commercial fisherman.
Long said that though recre-
ational fishing has improved,
which is good for business, he
believes alternative methods
could have achieved the same
result without banning gill
nets and he is not certain that
the net ban is what increased
local fish populations.
But he is certain that the
number of fishing guides has
increased.
"Sport fishing has grown
dramatically," Long said, by
leaps and bounds over the past
10 years."


work of workforce services and
resources. To locate an Employ
Florida member anywhere in
the state, go to the Web site at:
www.EmployFlorida.net or
call toll-free (866) FLA-2345.
The One Stop Workforce
Connection is funded by and a
program of CLM Workforce
Connection.


Lisa Nichols is director of
marketing and business
development for CLM
Workforce Connection. To
learn more about CLM
Workforce Connection or the',
One Stop Workforce
Connection, call 873-7939.


tu-murN I
C.D.


S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY S/I APY

FIRST FEDERAL BANK 0.65 0.65 1.50 1.51 N/A N/A 2.00 2.02 3.10 3.15 2.50 2.53 3.50 3.56 3.75 3.82
(352) 637-4741
METLIFE BANK 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.14 1.153.25 3.30 3.44 3.50 N/A N/A 3.63 3.70 4.16 4.25
(877) 326-2210
SOUTHTRUST BANK 0.95 0.95 0.90 0.90 1.14 1.15 1.73 1.75 2.47 2.50 2.47 2.50 2.86 2.90 3.54 3.60
(352) 795-2265__
STATE FARM BANK 1.49 1.50 2.62 2.65 3.00 3.05 3.20 3.25 3.83 3.90 N/A N/A 4.02 4.10 4.26 4.35
Call your local agent _
SUNTRUST BANK .75 .75 N/A N/A N/A N/ /N/A N/A N/A N/AA N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
(352) 795-8202 I

RAYMOND JAMES BANK N/A N/A 3.22 3.27 3.35 3.41 3.60 3.67 3.73 3.80 N/A N/A 3.87 3.95 4.31 4.40
(352) 527-3700 ____

Please note: Each bank has its own set of requirements
Banks interested in listing their rates can call to qualify for the rates listed above. Contact the bank
the Citrus County Chronicle at (352) 563-5660. directly for up-to-date information.


- .... Good Neighbor.
fl GREAT RATES

-. Bank


Ed Buckley
Inverness, FL
726-6000


APY
4,350'0
r, Vmnr rn^^


IKEAG(OD)NIGiHBOR
STrIAF IARM IS THERE 'Z i
Chuck Everidge
"Ainuall rcenl.lg. o cddia a Ssil s 1 atesonallpindu suhjLcmdLn iln i ,oulllnlek I'c onSa\inpandM'llcyM.vkltAi-mnlUmoluld radute .cinim Ml rutl eni[lgdtpl an SIIKtur.S. l A-oUloand su frMno aon ) M aiw mn rorC[ f! Inverness, FL
STATEl" FARMd BANK OM OFFI BLOO INGTON, LLN OIS r statefiu'maco1 ti r 726-4183
STATE FARM BANK HOME OFFICE: BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS statefarm.com r


Seven Rivers Regional Stars


Special to the Chronicle
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center's Stars of the Month for June have been chosen.
Four employees and one volunteer were recognized by their peers for providing excellence
in health care to the community. Back row are: Hugh McElvey and Brian Templeton. Front
row are: Joyce Brancato, CEO; Liz Stacklin (standing in for award-winner Jean Kelly); Sue
Thorne; and Teresa Wright, R.N. Not pictured is Lori Raynes.


tAPY
110B0%I^^


------- ------------~


BUSINESS


























Serving all of Citrus County, including Crystal River, Inverness, Beverly Hills, Homosassa Springs, Sugarmill Woods,
Floral City, Citrus Springs, Ozello, Inglis, Hernando, Citrus Hills, Chassahowitzka, Holder, Lecanto and Yankeetown.
|ljll^ LL* ^p e



^B _^H ^^^ ^^^. ^ ^B^B H-^H^B B ^^^. ^el^gBH^ iB~r~flr-0y@.


- 563-5966




726-1441


Outside of Citrus County or Citrus Springs call:

1-888-852-2340


Sunday Issue................5pm Friday.
Sunday Real Estate..........3pm Friday
Monday Issue........... 5:30 pm Friday
Tuesday Issue........... .... 1pm Monday
Wednesday Issue.......... 1pm Tuesday
Thursday Issue........ 1pm Wednesday
Friday Issue............. 1pm Thursday
Saturday Issue............... 1pm Friday


6 Lines for 10 Days!
2 items totaling

' -'150 ...................$550

$151 *400.............$1050

'401 '800.............'15'0

801 -$1500 ..........2050
Restrictions apply. Offer applies to private parties only.


All ads require prepayment.







-* "

VISA


Be sure to check your advertisement the
first day it appears. We cannot be
responsible for more than one incorrect
insertion. Adjustments are made only
for the portion of the ad that is in error.




Advertisements may be canceled as
soon as results are obtained. You will be
billed only for the dates the ad actually
appears in the paper, except for specials.
Deadlines for cancellations are the same
as the deadlines for placing ads.


SPTE DI [UNOTICES 02-065HELPWANIUU T J.'f105 160 F [U~INANCAL 10-1 1 SEVIEU'S 201-664AIM~ALSKr 400 I -415 MOBMIE [OM ES FR ETIRSA LE 500-545.

1' 0 RE L E T T O'ET 5 5 6 0 RE L E T T O A E 7 1 5 VA C A R P Y 8 0 8 0TAN S O RAAO 9 0 4 -9 3 5 1


-In y

62-YEAR-OLD
220 Ib WORKING
LONELY WHITE MALE
in search of lonely lady
for live-in companion,
under 55 yrs, under
140lbs, any race.
Write to or visit
316 NE 2nd, Lot 12,
Crystal River 34429
Honest, SWM, 5'10, 170
lbs, brown hair & eyes,
Smoker, that has It all
except a slim SWF 49-62
yrs young to share it

LETS SMELL THE
ROSES TOGETHER!
Seeking attractive Lady
40-55 who enjoys dining
out & weekend trips out
of town. Looking to
share quality times
together & wants the
nicer things in life.
Call 228-1579
SINGLE BLACK MALE
50, own 4 bedroom,
pool home in Beverly
Hills, by himself, looking
for soul mate, 35-47,
female. New in the
state. Enjoy walking
on the beach, movies,
travel, etc. Call
(352) 746-1659




Cat, male
neutered
(352) 637-0935



-r* FREE SERVICE**
Cars/Trucks/Metal
Removed FREE. No title
OK 352-476-4392 Andy
Tax Deductible Receipt
2 Cats, 1 male,
neutered, declawed,
1 female, litter box
trained, declawed,
spayed, (352) 628-9085
5 YR OLD FULL BLOODED
Chocolate lab, no
papers for sire.
(352) 637-2651
8 Hens, 1 Rooster, Rho-
de Island. Red. good
layers, 1 Hen, 1 Drakes,
Peking Ducks, free to
Farm. (352) 563-6310
20 Mature Pines
for Timber
352-447-5371 wkends
or 352-726-2722
weekdays after 5pm
*WANTED* Dead or
Alive. Vehicle Removal
No title okay. (352)
563-6626 or 697-0267
COMMUNITY SERVICE
The Path Shelter is
available for people
who need to serve
their community
service.
(352) 527-6500 or
(352) 794-0001
Leave Message











Yourworld first



Need a job

or a


qualified

employee?



This area's


#1


employment

source!






6 jd 0 *


25ft. Dual Axle Travel
Trailer, Would make
good flat bed.
352-447-5371 wkends
or 352-726-2722
weekdays after 5pm
FREE
2 cats, Calico Female,
& Long hair Siamese
Both Spayed
(352) 795-9281


ALSO FREE HAMSTER
WITH CAGE
TO GOOD HOMES
(352) 613-7007
FREE CALICO CAT
female, I'm 11 yrs old,
spayed & declawed,
my owner has passed
and I need a good
home. My name Is
'Patches" Please call
(352) 634-2549 (cell)
FREE GROUP
COUNSELING
Depression/Anxiety
(352) 637-3196 or
628-3831
Free Hospital Bed/?
You pick up, requires
pick up truck & strong
back. (352) 564-0690
Call through the 4th
FREE KITTENS
to good home,
Inverness
(352) 560-0291
FREE LOVEABLE KITTENS
TO GOOD HOME,
7-wks old,
(352) 726-4534
FREE PALM TREE & THREE
6FT tall Yucca plants
(352) 860-2585
FREE PITBULLS
Two 7 mo. males
REDNOSE & BLACK
Have shots'
(352)795-4905
Free Refrigerators
Good for recycling or
parts. (352) 628-3987
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
FREE TO FAMILY HOME
ONLY, gorgeous young
adult male, blue/red
nose Pitbull, very loving
family raised dog,
needs a fenced yard to
play In. Serious Inquiries
only. Please call
(352) 860-0882, leave
message if no answer
Please save from the
Pound


Requested donations
are tax deductible
Pet Adoption
Saturday, July 9,
9:30am 12:30pm
Barrington Place,
Rt 486, Lecanto
Cats
Black DSH 16weeks
ready to play gets
along with other pets
489-5121
Gray tabby M 6 wks
socialized and cuddly
628-4200
Kittens to young
adults M&F various
colors all ready for
their special family
746-6186
Himalayan Lilac F
adult & Siamese F
adult loveable lap
cats 527-9050
Calico 20wks F beau-
tiful, active and
friendly 726-5591 bet.
10AM 2:30 PM
D=gs
BIchon M adult retir-
ees / Shih-Tzu adora-
ble red and white M -
needs eye Rx daolly -
retirees / Chihuahuah
adult shy good com-
panion retirees
527-9050
Choc, Lab M 9yrs
great pet diabetic
on Insulin retiree
home preferred &
Brindle Boxer Mix F
puppy 12wks both
are socialized and
get along with other
pets 628-4200
Yellow Lab F mix 3yrs
great family pet
249-1029
Wanted poodles and
small dogs suitable for
seniors adoptive
homes available
527-9050
All pets are spayed /
neutered, cats tested
for leukemia/aids,
dogs are tested for
heart worm and all
shots are current


KITTENS
Free to good home.
ADORABLE
(352) 344-8290
KITTENS PURRFECT PETS
spayed, neutered,
ready for permanent
loving homes. Available
at Elleen's Foster Care
(352) 341-4125
Pitt/Lab Mix, 7 mo. old.
Need big fenced In
yard, very friendly
352-634-0939
Realister Now FREE
Kindergarten thru 6th.
For families that
financially qualify. Call
West Coast Christian
School, (352) 795-2079
THE HOME STORE
a Habitat for
Humanity of Citrus
County Outreach,
isseeking Donalionsof use-
able
building
materials, home
remodeling and
decorating items,
furniture, and
Appliances. No
clothing please.
Volunteers are needed h ihe
Home Store.
Store hours are:
9am-5pm
Mon-Sat.
Call The Home Store
3685 Forest Drive
Inverness
(352)341-1800
for further
information.




LOST
Wedding Ring & band
In the vac. of
Plantation.
Reward.
(352) 804-7826
O TOMATOES 0
MARTINS' U PICK
Hwy 44 E to CR 475 N
Oxford
(Closed Sundays)
(352) 303-0566



LOST ADULT MALE CAT
Black with white chest
and paws. Area of
Westmoreland and Lee
Way, Homosassa.
REWARD
(352) 621-9119
LOST BLACK LEATHER
KEY RING with 5 keys
Vicinity: Homosasso
area (352) 621-1272
Lost Dog Full Blooded
Boxer, tan In color,
male, In the vicinity of
Holiday St. Crystal River
(352) 628-2761
Lost
Dog, Chow/Chihuahau
Mix. Last seen in CR at
Mayo Dr Apart.
(352) 634-4327
LOST FEMALE
BEAGLE MIX
Last seen vicinity of
Applebees on Hwy. 44
Inverness. Brown body
with white legs and
some black. REWARD
(352) 341-4306
Lost,
BIk & Wht Puppy
(Emmy) in Citrus Springs
Near Mendoza Way
(352) 465-6303
PARROT
gray w/ bright red tall.
(352) 382-1168
$800 REWARD




FOUND HOUND
Young, well behaved,
Call to Identify, found
on Gospel Is. Rd.
(352) 344-0303

FOUND WEIMARANER
female, Vicinity: Citrus
Springs area.
(352) 637-1188


SDivorces
Bankruptcy
SNameChange
ChildSupport

henm ......63740221



-CHRONICLE*
INV. OFFICE
106 W. MAIN ST.
Courthouse Sq. next
to Angelo's Pizzeria
Mon-Fri 8:30a-5p
Closed for Lunch


-U

"MR CITRUS COUNTY'












ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956






REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
t35279s-nnAn.


iIACbIVlve awr
seeking male
companion. Candi,
352-628-1036



2 BURIAL SPACES
Memorial Gardens
in Beverly Hills, Garden
of Ten Commandments
$4,200. (502) 935-8756



AAA EMPLOYMENT
CSR $7.50-$10.00
MED.INS.BILLER $9.50
LABORERS $8.50
RECEPT. $8.00
SECRETARY $8.00
SALES ASSIT. $200WK+
MED. RECEPT. $9.00
FRONT DESK $7.00
For Appt. Call 795-2721
NO FEE TILL HIRED!
ACCOUNTS
PAYABLE CLERK
Position entails data
entry, Invoicing and
filing. Must be
proficient In MS Office
and a Degree Is
preferred. Seeking an
Independent worker
with the ability to
multi- task. FAX
(352) 563-5810 or
emall: dcooper@
merhomes.com
EOE/DFW

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Mercedes Homes
seeks Individual with
a college degree
and 3 years
professional
adminstrative exp.
Must be skilled In MS
office, organized,
detailed oriented,
and able to
multi-task.
Construction
knowledge a plus.
E-mail
oalderson@
merhomes.com
or fax to
352-563-5810
EOE/DFWP
JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
P/T & F/T DATA
PROCESSING
CLERK
Keypunch or other
numeric experience
preferred: Will
consider training you
if you can use a
10-key adding
machine by touch.
Must understand
debits & credits, be
detail oriented &
good w/ figures. May
assist w/ statement
rendering. Will work
M F. Position at our
Data Center In the
Town of Hernando.
Interested applicants
please call for
appointment
352-726-9001
BRANNEN BANKS
OF FLORIDA
320 U.S. Highway 41 S.
Inverness, FL 34450
EEO/M/F/V/D/DFWP


LEGAL SECRETARY
/RECEPTIONIST
For small very busy
Law Office, PT 2 3
months, then FT. Per-
sonable, good phone
etiquette, grammar,
letter composition
& computer skills
required. Legal exp.
a plus. Fax resume to:
352-795-0432 or mail
to PO Box 2019,
Crystal River, Fl. 34423

RECEPTIONIST
Responsible position
assisting the general
public. Excellent
customer service skills
and ability to handle
multi-line telephones
In a fast-paced
environment. Team
player In a
multi-tasking position;
computer skills,
typing, filing, faxing
and copying. H.S
diploma and
minimum of one
year's related work
experience.
$8.79 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Apply at
Citrus County Human
Resource Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 283,
Lecanto, FL 34461
no later than
Friday, July 8, 2005.
EOE/ADA

TELLERS
FT & PT. Teller positions
available for various
locations. FT- 40 hrs
per wk. PT- hours will
vary. Teller exp.
preferred, but will
consider training
Individual with
previous cashiering
and office exp.
Competitive salary
and benefits.
Call for appt.
726-9001
Bank of Inverness
320 US Hwy 41S,
Inverness FL 34450
EOE M/F/V/D DFWP




F/T HAIRDRESSER
Call (352) 628-5023

HAIR DESIGNER
& ASSISTANT
NEEDED
658 SALONSPA
(352) 795-8643





$ 2500 $
SIGN ON
BONUS FOR
LPN/RN -F/T
3-11 & 11-7

Also Hiring Taking
applications
CNA's

*Competitive pay
based on exp.
*Generous extra -
shift bonus & shift dif.
*Paid vacation after
90 days
Contact Cheryl Fix,
DON
Health Center @
Brentwood
352-746-6600
ext. # 8694
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug-free facility


a skilled facility-
needs a

COOK
P/T to F/T. Excellent
pay. Must have
Institutional cooking
exp. w/knowledge of
therapeutic diet
and consistencies.
Apply at
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hemando
(352) 249-3100


A+ Healthcare
Home Health
Agency

FT Insurance
Clerk
Must have
experience In
bling/collections,
Fax Resumes
(352) 795-4037


Adult Case
Manager

the Centers
Is seeking an Adult
Case Manager for
Citrus County to
advocate for, & link
clients to needed
services In the
community. BA In the
Human Services field
& relevant exp reqd.
Salary
$10.89-$12.26/hr
Comprehensive
benefits pkg.
Vac/slck/hollday/
med benefits/401K
DFWP/EOE, send, fax,
or email resume to:
HR, 5664 SW 60th
Ave., Ocala, FL 34474
hr@thecenters.us
(352) 291-5580


CARING
INDIVIDUAL
Male & female.
Min. 2 years Exp.
working with
developmentally
disabled. Reliable
transportation,
Sumter & Citrus Co.
area. FT/PT, days,
evenings & weekends
Call
MOVING MOUNTAINS
(352) 637-9001


Citrus Memorial
Hospital, the
community's
preferred resource for'
acute care, is excited
about our plans for a
healthy future
Join us now for the
following
opportunities:

CHEMISTRY
SUPERVISOR
To oversee, supervise
and provide
technical support In
lab clinical chemistry.
Requires Bachelor's
Degree;
Florida License at the
Supervisor level In
Clinical Chemistry;
and minimum of 5
years CLS experience
(1 year supervisory
experience
preferred).

CT
TECHNOLOGIST
Requires current
Florida license ARRT
registry and working
knowledge of CT and
computers. Ability to
move/transport
patients a must.
Flexible hours Include
evenings, weekends,
nights and holidays

PHYSICAL
THERAPY
ASSISTANT
Interesting outpa-
tient/ Inpatient
opportunity to treat
adults with a broad
range of medical
diagnoses and issues.
Requires current
Florida PTA license,
Experience In
Inpatient care
desirable, but not
required.

NUTRITIONAL
SERVICES
Smiling faces and
positive attitudes are
needed for our
Nutritional Services
Department. Full
time, part time and
PRN positions
available.

For other
opportunities or to
apply on line, please
vist us at
www.cltrusmh.com
EOE

(MEMORIAL
NllrHOSPfTAL


CASE
MANAGER

Must be experienced
In Long-term,
subacute or acute
care MSW preferred
but not required.
Call JobUne at
(352) 291-7007
Or apply In person to
TimberRidge
Nursing & Rehab. Cntr
9848 SW 110 Oth St.
Ocala
EOE/ DFWP

Children's
Case-
Managers

the Center's
is seeking Children's
Case Managers for
Citrus County to
advocate for, and
link clients to needed
services In the
community.
Bachelor's degree In
human services with 1
yr. exp. working with
SED children required.
Background check
reqd. $10.89 $12.26
per hr.
Vac/slck/hollday/
med beneflts/401 K
DFWP/EOE, send, fax,
or email resume to:
HR, 5664 SW 60th
Ave., Ocala, FL 34474
hr@thecenters.us
(352) 291-5580

CHIROPRACTIC
ASSISTANT
Exp. In collections,
billing, front desk &
physical therapy. PT,
3V2 days/wk. Fax a
complete resume to
352-795-0803

CNAs

JOIN THE TEAM
We are expanding
our services. Now
accepting
applications for
3-11 and 11-7 shift.
Full Time and Part
Time. We offer:
* New Wage Scale
*Medical/Dental
Insurance
*Tuition
Reimbursement
*Bonuses
*Baylor
*Shift Differential
*Pay for Experience
Apply In person
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness
EOE

CORRECTIONS -
JUVENILE

Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for 96 high and
maximum risk males
committed to the
Dept. of Juvenile
Justice Is recruiting for
Juvenile Corrections
Officer. Supervise
and maintain
custody of male
offenders In
a secure and con-
trolled atmosphere.
Must be 21, have a
satisfactory back-
ground screening
and complete
required talning In
accordance with DJJ
rules and regulations.
Apply In person at:
Cypress Creek
2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL

ENVIRONMENTAL
OPPORTUNITIES
Arbor Trail Rehab Is
growing-we are
looking to expand
our team, great
opportunities,
excellent benefits,
day shifts, full time
and part time
positions.
*HOUSEKEEPING/
LAUNDRY SUPERVISOR
FLOOR TECHS
HOUSEKEEPERS
LAUNDRY AIDES
Apply In person
611 Tumrner Camp
Road
Inverness, FL
EOE


NETWORK
SPECIALIST
Citrus Memorial
Hospital, the
community's
preferred resource for
acute care, is excited
about our plans for a
healthy future
As a Network
Specialist, your
responsibilities will
Include network
security, administra-
tion, design, support,
Implementation, and
trouble shooting of
Inter/Intra/extranet
systems, Including
firewalls. Virtual
Private Network
(VPN), Intrusion
detection, and
authentication
systems; providing
support for ongoing
operational projects;
and Installing,
configuring, trouble-
shooting and
managing network
Infrastructure, firewalls
and servers
The selected
candidate will
possess an Associate's
degree or
equivalent
experience; hands-on
experience with
server applications
and strong working
knowledge In TCP/IP,
port assignments,
Windows, firewall
administration,
network topologies,
protocols and
security; ability to
effectively
communicate both
orally and In writing
with managers,
technicians
end-users, and
vendors. Rotational
call 24/7 duties, some
nights and weekends
is also required.
For more information
and to view other
career opportunities,
visit us online at
www.citrusmh.com
Or call 352-355-6588;
fax your resume to
352-341-0136 or apply
In person at: Citrus
Memorial Hospital,
502 West Highland
Blvd, Inverness, FL
34608.

MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL


r CN. s q DENTAL OFFICE
| NAsl STERIL. TECH P/T
| 11-7 I MON. WED. FRI. AM
Will Train. Apply 259 E.
Shift differential Highland Blvd. Inv.
| Bonuses abundant I
Highest paid in
Citrus County. DIETARY AID
I Join our team, DIETARY AIDE
Cypress Cove FULLTIME
Care Center
L 32) 795-83 Apply in person to
Crystal River
Health & Rehab
GET RESULTS IN 36 N.E. 12 thAve.
N C ECrystal River
THE CHRONICLE (352) 795-5044 EOE






N -


Celebrate Summer...

Join a Winning

Team!!
The following are positions
for which we are accepting applications:
RNs: Surgical Services (FT or Per Diem)
Women's & Family Center/OB (Per Diem)
Women's & Family Center/OB (Nurse
Manager)
ER & Psych (Per Diem)
MedSurg, Telemetry, ICU
Clinical Educator
Other Opportunities:
Physical Therapist (FT or Per Diem)
Physical Therapy Assistant (FT or Per
Diem)
Respiratory Therapist (nights)
Medical Thranscriptionist (FT & Per Diem)
Inquire about our sign-on bonus
for select positions!
SRRMC is part of the
HMA Corporation
For information about these and other
opportunities; please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax 352-795-8464
Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email:
Linda.Macaulay@srrmc.hma-corp.com jy/"l
Web Site: www.srrnc.com S
EOE/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE T IV. i 1

L SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


Ii







1ST ANNUAL CITRUS COUNTY


VETERANS FOUi N

4 Man Best Ball Golf Scramble
Proceeds benefit Veterans
DATE/TIME: 23 July 2005
8 a.m. Tee Time & Shotgun Start
PLACE: Twisted Oaks Golf Course
Forest Ridge Blvd Beverly Hills, Fl
PRICE: $60.00
Sign up & payment: Due by the 8 July 05 or first 128 players
(Individuals and Groups short of 4 will be combined to make
a 4 Man Team)
INCLUDES: Golf & Cart, 2 beverage tickets, Barbecue
lunch (Pork, Ribs, & Chicken), Cash prizes: 1st, 2nd & 3rd
place, lots of door prizes, three closest to the pin prizes, and
free gift for everyone.
Reduced beverages on the course (draft and domestic Beer)
Hole sponsorship available for $100 & donations gladly
accepted
Send Check or Money Order Payable To: Citrus County
Veterans Foundation, 3600 W Sovereign Path, Suite 180,
Lecanto, Fl 34461 352 527-5425


NAME


ADDRESS


Sponsor*edA. .*. .* .*;

Sponsored by: CH i)NICLE


~~I


I -L --I


SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2005 7


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS Coirl7T (FL) CHRONIC.IE









SUNDAY, JULY 3,


C 1 I


FULL TIME
CNA's
3-11 & 11-7
PT LPN's
7-3 & 3-11
For ALF. Sign on Bonus
Paid by experience,
Benefits after 60 days
Vacation After 90
Days. Apply in Person:
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Build.
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE



MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
For family practice
office. Call (352)
341-1050 or Fax resume
to (352) 341-1744


NEED HELP
Call AA Hotline
352-621-0599 or www.
ncinterorou"" "'


A WHOLE HAULING
& TREE SERVICE
352-697-1421 V/MC/D
www.ataxidermist.com
S AFFORDABLE, -
I DEPENDABLE I
I HAULING CLEANUP. I
Trash, Trees, Brush,
I Apple, Furn, Const, I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126

DAVID'S ECONOMY
TREE SERVICE, Removal
& trim. Lic. 99990000273

DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,



Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272.
JOHN MILL'S TREE
SERV., Trim, top, remove
Lic #7830208687 (352)
341-5936 or 302-4942
Mr Bill's Landscaping
No Job Too Big or Small.
Tree Work and Land-
scaping. 352-220-4393
R WRIGHT TREE SERVICE,
tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins,& Lic
#0256879352-341-6827
STUMP GRINDING
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
Billy (BJ) McLaughlin
352-212-6067
STUMPS FOR LE$$
"Quote so cheap you
won't believe Itl"
(352) 476-9730
TREE SURGEON
Lic#000783-0257763 &
Ins. Exp'd friendly serve,
Lowest rates Free
estimates.352-860-1452




*Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
AFFORDABLE PAINTING
WALLPAPERING & FAUX
Lic, 17210214277 & Ins.
(352)697-1564
All Phase Construction
Quality painting & re-
pairs. Faux fin. #0255709
352-586-1026637-3632
CHEAP/CHEAP/CHEAP
DP Pressure Cleaning
& Painting. LiUcensed &
Insured. 637-3765


EARN AS YOU LEARN
CNA Test Prep/CPR
Continuing Education
341-2311/ Cell 422-3656

NOW HIRING
CNA's/HHA's or
Dependable
Compassionate
People who want to
become CNA's/HHA's
CALL LOVING CARE
M-F, 9:00 AM to 4:00PM
(352)'860-0885

PART TIME
COOK

1 years experience.
Will Train.
Variable Hours.
Competitive pay.
Apply at:
Highland Terrace
700 Medical Court E.
Inverness
or call: (352) 860-2525


FERRARO'S
PAINTING SERVICE
Interior, Exterior,
Free Estimates.
Senior Discount.
(352)465-6631
George Swedlige
Painting- Int./Ext.
Pressure Cleaning- Free
est. 794-0400 /628-2245
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J., Hupchlck Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Mike Anderson Painting
Int/Ext Painting & Stain-
ing, Pressure Washing
also. Call a profession-
al, Mike (352) 628-7277




Affordable Boat Maint.
& Repair, Mechanical,
Electrical, Custom Rig.
John (352) 746-4521




AT YOUR HOME Res.
mower & small engine
repair. LUc#99990001273
Bob, 352-220-4244
MOWER REPAIR
Hernando, $10 Pick-Up
& Delivery, Don Mead
(352) 400-1483




BATHTUB REGLAZING
Old tubs & ugly
ceramic tile Is restored
to new cond. All colors
avail. 697-TUBS (8827)




v/Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.AII work
2 full coats.25 yrs. Exp.
Exc. Ref. Lic#001721/
Ins. (352) 795-6533
AFFORDABLE PAINTING
WALLPAPERING & FAUX
Lic. 17210214277 & Ins.
(352) 697-1564




CLEANING. Reliable,
affordable, Weekly,
bi-weekly, monthly
Joy, 352-266-8653 cell
HOMES & WINDOWS
Serving Citrus County
over 16 years. Kathy
(352) 465-7334
I Do House Cleaning,
errands to doctors
& grocery shopping
home health, 25 yr.
exp. lic., 352-476-3192,
PENNY'S Home & Office
Cleaning Service Ref.
avail., Ins., Lic. &
bonded (352) 726-6265




Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Lic. & Ins, CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
ROGERS Construction
Additions, remodels,
new homes. 637-4373
CRC 1326872
TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357


MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/LPN
Experience needed.
Please send resume to
P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
FL 34447
RN
for endoscopy center.
fulltime position or PRN
position. Benefits. Hours
7-3. Fax resume to
(352) 637-2525

[ RN/LPN 7-3
I Apply at:
Cypress Cove Care
I Center, 700SE 8th I
SAve. Crystal River
(352) 795-8832

RN'S/LPN'S
ALL SHIFTS
Apply In person to
Surrey Place
2730 W Marc
Knighton Ct. Lecanto
SCHEDULER
needed for busy
practice. Applicant
must be professional In
appearance & speech
with excellent inter-
personal skills & team
attitude. Exceptional
phone, computer &
organizational skills
required, Knowledge of
Insurance preferred,
Fax resume to:
352-746-0720




CASE
MANAGER

Must be experienced
in Long-term,
subacute or acute
care MSW preferred
but not required,
Call JobUne at
(352) 291-7007
Or apply In person to
TimberRidge
Nursing & Rehab. Cntr
9848 SW 110th St.
Ocala
EOE/ DFWP


FL RESCREEN 1 panel or
comp, cage. 28yrs exp
#0001004. ns. CBC avail
352-563-0104/795-2807




ARK POWER WASH
Full Service, Fast
Response, Free Est.
Uc. Ins. (352) 795-3026
AUGIE'S PRESSURE
Work Low Prices. FREE
Estimates: 220-2913
PICARD'S PRESSURE
CLEANING & PAINTING
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses.driveways. 25 yrs
exp. Uc./Ins. 422-1956




"The Handyman" Joe,
Home Maintenance &
Repair. Power washing,
Painting, Lawn Service
& Hauling. Uc 0253851
(352) 563-2328
#1 IN HOME REPAIRS,
paint, press.wash, clean
roof&gutters, clean up,
haul #0169757 344-4409
A HIGHER POWER
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Elec. etc. Lc. #2251
422-4308/344-1466
AAA HOME REPAIRS
Maint & repair prob-
lems Swimming Pool
Rescreen99990000162
352-746-7395

. AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE I
HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const, I
I Debris& Garages
352-697-1126











--- --- El
All Around Handyman
Free est. Will Do Any-




REPAIRS #0256687
352-422-2708
Andrew Joehl
Handyman. General
Maintenance/Repairs
Pressure & cleaning.
Lawns, gutters. No Job
too small Reliable. Ins
0256271 352-465-9201

Get My Husband Out
Of The House!
Custom woodwork,
furniture repalrs/reflnish,
home repairs, etc.
Lic. 9999 0001078
(352) 527-6914
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONEI
MovlngCleonouts, &
Handyman Service
Uc 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
Home Repairs & Maint.
Quality Workmanship
Lic99990001061
(352) 621-3840
NATURE COAST HOME
REPAIR & MAINT. INC.
Offering a full range of
services.LIc.0257615/Ins.
(352) 628-4282 Visa/MC
PAUL/Mobile Home
Maintenance, painting
& clean up, Llc9999000
2321 (352) 344-8131
or (352) 697-4197


City of Crystal
River

Position Opening:
Accounting Clerk

The City of Crystal
River is accepting
for an Accounting
Clerk In the Finance
Department.
Two years of
accounting/
bookkeeping
experience
necessary.
Knowledge of
word/excel
processing essential.
Duties Include
accounts payable
processing and grant
administration.
Applicant must be a
high school graduate
or equivalent,
Position closes
5:00P.M., July 8th,
2005
Applications
available
Finance Department
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL
34428


FIRE FIGHTER/EMT
(Pool/Part Time)

The City of Dunnellon
Is Accepting
Applications For The
Position of Pooled
Fireflghter/EMT.
Requirements Include
High School Diploma
or GED, Minimum
Standards Fireflghter
Certification, Gradu-
ated From An Ac-
credited School of
Emergency Medical
Technology, & Cur-
rent CPR Certification.
Applications Must Be
Received By 4:00 PM,
July 15, 2005. Appli-
cation and Complete
Job Description Avail-
able At City of
Dunnellon, City Hall,
20750 River Drive,
Dunnellon, FL 34431
Or By Calling
(352)465-8500
EOE, Drug Free
Workplace.


TMark Construction Co.
Additions, remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357
X/CHEAP HANDYMAN
CLEAN UP/HAULING
"FREE" SCRAP REMV
.i.iw mA(' g oAnon


JT'S TELEPHONE SERVICE
Jack & Wire Installation
& repair. Free esti-
mates: CALL 527-1984




GENERATOR
INSTALLATIONS
CITRUS ELECTRIC INC.
ER13013233
(352) 527-7414
I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Lic#0256991
(352) 422-5000




#1#1 -A-A QUICK PICK
UPS & hauling, Garage
clean-outs, tree work.
Reasonable, 302-4130
r AFFORDABLE,
I DEPENDABLE
I HAULING CLEANUP.
Trash, Trees, Brush,
Appl. Furn, Const. I
SDebris & Garages
352-697-1126 *
All of Citrus Hauling/
Moving Items delivered,
clean ups.Everything
from A to Z 628-6790
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER IT DONE
Mavlng,Cleanouts, &
Handyman Serice
c. 99990000665
(352) 302-2902
HAULING & GENERAL
Debris Cleanup and
Clearing. Call for
free estimates
352-447-3713
Junk & Debris Removal
Good prices &
prompt service.
(352) 628-1635
ON SIGHT CLEANUP
M.H. demolition, struc-
ture fire & Const. debris
cleanup (352) 634-0329




CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
(352) 637-2411
CUTTING EDGE Ceramic
Tile. Lic.#2713, Insured.
Free Estimates,
(352) 422-2019




BEACH FENCE
Free est., Lic. #0258336
(352)628-1190
813-763-3856 Cell
BEST PRICES
Free Estimates. All Types
20 yrs exp. AC#27453
(352) 795-7095, Dallas
GO OWENS FENCING
All types of Fencing,
Comm./Residential,
Free Est. 628-4002


CLASS























IMMEDIATE NEED
for the following
posltlons:
* Warehouse /
Inventory, multi-
task, organized
Individual needed
* Class A CDL
License, clean
driving record
* Mobile Eqpmnt
Operator, certified
in operating boom
truck and backhoe
Seeking candidates
for the following
positions:

* Project
Superintendent, exp
In a mngmnt level
position in HVAC
Industry preferred
* Pipe Foreman, mln
2 yrs previous exp
required
* Sheet Metal
Mechanics all
levels, Including
helpers

Fax or e-mail resume
with salary req, to
352-237-6258 or
mainda@ccs
mechanical.cbm
Apply in person at
737 SW 57th Avenue,
Ocala
DFWP/EOE



GET RESULTS IN

THE CHRONICLE


JAMES LYNCH FENCE
All kinds of fences,
Free estimates.
(352) 527-3431




Stack Underground
Sprinklers Installation &
Service, Honest,
Reliable, Lic & Insured.
Low Pricesi CL#2654
+i_ CUM 9A- I AS_


John Gordon Roofing
Reas. Rates. Free est.
Proud to Serve You.
ccc1325492.
628-3516/800-233-5358




Benny Dye's Concrete
Concrete Work
All types Uc. & Insured.
RX1677. (352) 628-3337
BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveway-Patlo- Walks,
Concrete Specialists.
Uc#2579 /Ins. 746-1004
CONCRETE WORK.
SIDEWALKS, patios,
driveways, slabs. Free
estimates. Lic. #2000.
Ins. 795-4798.
DANIEL ENO CONCRETE
All types, All Sizes.
Lic #2506. Ins.
352-637-5839
DECORATIVE CONCRETE
COATINGS. Renew any
existing concrete,
designs, colors, patterns
Lic. Ins. (352) 527-9247
RIP RAP SEAWALLS &
CONCRETE WORK
LIc#2699 & Insured.
(352)795-7085/302-0206
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE tear out
Drive & replace,
Slab. Lic.1476 726-6554




Additions/ REMODELING
New construction
Bathrooms/Kitchens
Uc. & Ins. CBC 058484
(352) 344-1620
DUKE & DUKE, INC.
Remodeling additions
LUc. # CGC058923
Insured. 341-2675
TMark Construction Co.
Additions; remodels &
decks, Uc. CRC1327335
Citrus Co (352)302-3357




AM SIDING INC.
Soffit, Fascia, & Siding,
Home Improvement.
352-489-0798, 425-8184




CERAMIC TILE INSTALLER
Bathroom remodeling,
handicap bathrooms.
Llc/Ins. #2441 634-1584




D&C TRUCK & TRACTOR
SERVICE, INC.
Landclearing, Hauling
& Grading. Fill Dirt,
Rock, Top Soil & Mulch.
Lic, Ins.(352)302-7096


CITRUS CouNTY (FI) CHRONICLE


INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
PRIVATE SCHOOL
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
Full Time + Benefits
Fax resume to
608-825-6496
or call
800-383-7364 Ext 102
Associated Training
Services
Lecanto, Fl.





Metal Industries, Inc.
A manufacturer of
air distribution
products is seeking
Individual with
mechanical/
electrical/ a/c
and refrigeration
skills. Must have at
least 5 years
experience in
above field.
Apply in person at
400 West Walker Ave
Bushnell, Fl or
on line at
rblack@metal
aire.com
Competitive benefit
package with 401 k.



PART-TIME
FULL-CHARGE
BOOKKEEPER
Needed for large
homeowner's
association.
Responsibilities
Include A/R, A/MP
payroll, Including
quarterly and annual
reporting, and
general ledger
through financial
statements. Minimum
AA degree preferred.
Corhpetitive pay,
pleasant, yet busy
working environment.
Please send resume
to Property Manager
at 5690 W. Pine Ridge
Blvd., Beverly Hills, FL
or fax to
(352) 746-0875


BUSHHOGGING, Rock,
dirt, trash, trees, lawn
service, &driveways.
Call (352) 628-4743.
FILL DIRT, ROCK, TOP
SOIL. Small (6-yard)
loads. Landclearing
Call 352-302-6015
FILL, ROCK, CLAY, ETC.
All tvwes of Dirt Service
Call Mike 352-564-1411
Mobile 239-470-0572
FLIPS DIRT WORKS
Top soil, sand, stone &
mulch, (13 yards)
(352) 382-2253
Cell (352) 458-1023
LARRY'S TRACTOR
SERVICE Finish grading
& bush hogging
(352) 302-3523,
(352) 628-3924




MOST AFFORDABLE*
& REASONABLE *
Land & Lot Clearing
Also Fill Dirt deliveries,
Free est. Lic. insured.
(352) 795-9956
All Tractor Works, By the
hour or day lx Clean
Ups, Lot & Tree Clear-
ing, Fill Dirt, Bush Hog,
Driveways 302-6955






Excavation & Site Dev
BJL Enterprises
Uc. #CGC062186
(352) 634-4650
HAMM'S BUSHHOG
SERVICE. Pasture
Mowing, lots, acreage.
(352) 220-8531
VanDykes Backhoe
Service. Landclearing,
Pond Digging &
Ditching (352) 344-4288
or (352) 302-7234 cell




CALL CODY ALLEN
for complete lawn,tree
& hauling services
(352) 613-4924 Uc/Ins
D's Landscape & Expert
Tree Svce Personalized
design. Cleanups &
Bobcat work. Fill/rock &
Sod: 352-563-0272
McBEE LANDSCAPING
Shrubs, Trees,
Landscape packages,
Installation & redos
Avail. Uc. #24715


A DEAD LAWN? BROWN
SPOTS? We specialize In
replugging your yard.
Uc/Ins. (352) 527-9247
Affordable Lawn Care
$10 and Up.
Professional & Reliable
Call 352-563-9824
0 LAWN MOWING & 0
0 PRESSURE WASHING 0
Drives, Sidewalks, Patio,
Very reasonable rates.
352-257-5658
Bill's Landscaping &
Complete Lawn Service
Mulch, Plants, Shrubs,
Sod, Clean Ups, Trees
Free est, (352) 628-4258


PSYCHOLOGIST/
LCSW
as Independent
contractor
Flex. Hours/Days.
Toll free
(866) 940-8182


REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Uc. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060

STATE FARM
Hiring licensed P/C
and/or L/H CSR for
Chuck Everidge's
Agency. Salary, bene-
fits, commission, bonus.
Fax resume to 726-3019

TITLE INSUR. CO.
* RECEPTIONIST
* EXAMINER
*SEARCHER/
ABSTRACTOR
A great opportunity
for exp. Individual to
join a growing
company. Great pay
and benefits. Fax
resume 352-368-1635
sandyt@advance
title.info






ASSIST TO OWNER
Must have cooking,
bartending and
ordering skills.
FULL TIME COOK
(352) 447-5572
or 447-4470, Inglis

CART ATTENDANT,
POOL ATTENDANT,
HANDYMAN/
WOMAN
3 jobs In 1. Good
Starting pay. Call
Inverness Golf &
Country Club for appt
(352) 637-2526


CALL CODY ALLEN
for complete lawn,tree
& hauling services
(352) 613-4924 Uc/Ins
DETAIL YARD CLEAN
John Hall Lawn Maint.
Free est. Uc. & Ins.
(352) 344-2429
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
EXPANDING BUSINESS
Need new customers
Citrus Hills, Pine Ridge,
SMW. (352) 527-2701
INVERNESS AREA Mow,
Trim, Cleanup, Hauling,
Reliable, Res/Com.
(352) 726-9570
Jimmy Lawn Service
Reliable, Dependable
Lawn Main. at
Reasonable Rate. Call
(352) 249-8186
LAWN LADY. Cheap
prices, good service.
Mowing, landscaping,
pressure wash.563-5746
MARK'S LAWN CARE
Complete Full Service,
Hedge Trimming
(352) 794-4112
MIKE CORNWELL
Lawn & Garden Service
Cuts $10 & up. Uc. & Ins.
352-621-3292/476-1265
NEIGHBORHOOD KIDS
Lowest price lawn serv-
ice. Mowing, mulching,
trimming, 352-634-0138
ELI'S LAWNCARE *
Landscaping -Tree Srv
Fertilizing "Mowing
I11 Ins t. (524 A1-.58lA


CRYSTAL PUMP REPAIR
(352) 563-1911
Subs, let pumps, filters
FREE ESTIMATES
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs on all makes
& models. Uc. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard





"MR CITRUS COUN '


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956




RAINDANCER
Seamless Gutters, Soffit
Fascia, Siding, Free Est.
LIc. & Ins. 352-860-0714




DIRTY ROOF?
Low Pressure Chemical
Roof Cleaning. Call For
Est, (352) 212-0876


ALL POSITIONS
Apply In Person
HOMOSASSA
RIVERSIDE RESORT
5297 S. Cherokee
Way, Homosassa
COOK
Scampi's Restaurant
(352) 564-2030
EXP'D LINE COOKS
SERVERS,
DISHWASHERS
& BARTENDERS
Must be 18
Crystal River Ale House
1610 SE Paradise Cir.
Experienced
Breakfast Cook
Apply In person
Muddy Waters Cafe
14 Hwy 19 N
(352) 447-2555
FULL TIME
WAIT STAFF
For Retirement
Center. Includes
Holidays & weekends.
Positions include
vacation after 90
days, health
insurance available
after 60 days
Apply In person
Brentwood Retirement
Community
Commons Building
1900 W. Alpha Ct
Lecanto 746-6611
EOE, DFWP
HIRING FRIENDLY
SERVERS
Frankle's Grill
(352) 344-4545
HUNGRY HOWIE'S
PIZZA & SUBS
Now Hiring for our
newest location in
Dunnellon,
F/T, P/T inside store,
Delivery Drivers
Please apply at
Hungry Howles
3601 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills
Taking applications
dally. Opening In
mid-July.
LINE COOK
Apply Seyen Rivers
Golf & Country Club
7395 W. Pinebrook St.
RELIABLE
EXP. SERVERS
Good Attitude a must.
We offer top pay,
benefits,
Full or part time
Apply in person
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club.
505 E Hartford Street
.Citrus Hills
(352) 746-6855





AAA AUTO
CLUB SOUTH
Offers a Sales Career
In Inverness/Lecanto
Beverly Hills area.
Paid Training.
Company Benefits.
Strictly Full time
with flexible hours,
High Income Potential
Call Les Singleton
352-237-6251
Fax Resume
352-237-1748
or email
Isingleton@
aaasouth.com

AGENTS

SAct Now.v-


Ready for an
EXPLOSIVE Career

We offer the
opportunity to
reach$75K to $100K In
your 1st year.
Licensed Insurance
Agents or quality
unlicensed people
may apply.
*We provide free
preset apts, no
prospecting.
*We advance 1st
year comm.
*We give large
monthly bonuses
*We take trips all over
the world
*We offer 1st yr
renewals
Call Milcah Buck for
interview
352-726-7722
Fax Resume:
W9EO TO.Af '51


c= Sales Hel

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES
The Citrus County
Chronicle
is seeking an
energetic individual to
consult businesses on
he use Of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire
to work in a fast
paced, fun,
environment please
apply today.
Essential Functions
b e-v elop-classified
customers through
cold calling and
prospecting.
Strong rapport
building,
professional
communication
and good listening
skills
Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing.
Maintain
customers through
servicing after
the initial sale.
Qualifications
High School
diploma or
equivalent.
Prior sales
experience
Advertising or
marketing
experience
preferred.

Send resume to:

10 1. IRI ZIN U
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd.,
Crystal River, Fl 34429
Fax: (352) 563-5665
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant


Positions Available!

Service Writer's

* Assistant Parts Mgr.

* Lot Porters/Drivers

Full Time, Full Medical

Benefits, 401 k, Great Pay

with Room for Growth.






LOVE NISSAN/HONDA
352-628-9444
2021 S. Suncoast Blvd.
11 H-.,, 10 in Horrn, O .$0
II


-=SlsgeI


$$$ SELL AVON $$$
FREE gift. Earn up to 50%
Your own hrs, be your
own boss. Call Jackle
I/S/R 1-866-405-AVON

Highly Motivated
SALESPEOPLE
for expanding,
accredited water
treatment facility.
Guaranteed earnings
$3000 plus per month.
Fax resume 621-0355
& call for Interview
621-0403








NOW RECRUITING
Uc. R.E. Associates
Call Frank for confiden-
tial Interview. inverness
Horizon Realty 212-5222
PETRA FASHIONS
Lingerie & Outerwear.
Book a party. Ju.y
Specia buy 2, get one
FREE or become a
consultant. Call Donna
220-6086; Ivy 220-8241
or Kim 228-7825

REAL ESTATE
AGENTS WANTED
Must have licence.
CALL 564-1810

REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Uc. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.

SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Nature
Coastlines
& Real Estate
News

Maintain
established accounts
and prospect
successfully for new
advertising revenue
opportunities within
an assigned
geographic area.
Meet goal objectives
each month through
sales of products,
deliver sales
presentations to
prospective
advertisers, develop
sales promotions to
attract new revenue
sources for the
products.
Ability to plan,
formulate and
present sales
presentations, possess
aptitude and
motivations for
professional setting.
Exceptional written
and verbal
communications skills
required.
Must possess valid
driver's license and
drive own car to sales
calls dolly.
Full time position.
Fax resume and
cover letter to HR
352-564-2935
Drug Screen required
for successful
applicants




Van Wants YOU!!


CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP
For Local Printing
Company. Greet
customers, answer
phone, process
orders. Print exp.
preferred
Fax Resume to:
352-795-0754



Enjoy Working
with People?

Immediate Opening
for
PART-TIME SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
WITH

C TIZE' E

established territory
with great potential
for growth.
Base salary
plus commission.
Please FAX resume to:
(352)854-9277 or
e-mail to tjenkins@
chronicleonline.com




Advertising
Sales
Assistant

The Citrus County
Chronicle Is now
accepting
applications for a
Full Time position of
Advertising Sales
Assistant.
Assist sales &
designers to sell &
create advertising,
manage work flow,
ensure accuracy of
ads, oversee billing
and proofread.
Computer
proficiency a must.
Must type 45wpm
accurately. Must
have excellent
organizational and
customer service skills.
Fax or mail cover
letter and resume to
S HR at:
352-564-2935




1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FL
34429
Qualified
applications must
.undergo drug
screening, EOE
,#A A- ,A-


What is ez? ,
It's the 24-hour,
C .... u *- do-it-yourself website .
for creating ads that will
appear in the Chronicle's
CLASSIFIEDS classified section I
-geialr ,,: w ..... I


$$$$$$$$$$$$
LCT WANTS YOU!I

Immediate
processing for OTR
drivers, solos or
teams, CDLA/Haz.
required Great
benefits
99-04 equipment
Call Now
nnAO.n61o OA 0,4 ,,,


f-










CITRUS CouArr (FL) CHRONICLE


FRAMERS
Local-Steady
352-302-3362

A/C INSTALLERS


Exp.preferred,
but will train.
Great pay & benefits
including health
& 401 K.
Apply: Bay Area A/C
8021 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-2665
EOE DFW

ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Looking for
experienced but
willing to train
motivated person,
Construction
experience helpful
Driver's License
A Mustf
CMD INDUSTRIES
352-795-0089

ALUMINUM
INSTALLER
Must have Florida
driver's license, hourly
or piece rate. Exp.
preferred, but will
train. Framing exp.
helpful. Apply today
& start tomorrow.
352-726-6547
AN EXP. FRAMER &
LABORERS NEEDED
(352) 637-3496
AUTO TECH
ASE preferred. Drivers
Lic. a must. Tools
required. Salary nego.
w/Exp. Nice, well equip.
shop. 352-341-4040
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
Busy shop, competi-
tive pay. Call Brian
(352) 726-1828
or Lee (352) 563-5130
BONDED SEPTIC
TANK, INC.
*SEPTIC TANK
INSTALLER/OPERATOR
*PUMP TRUCK
DRIVER/OPERATOR
*YARD WORKER/HELPER
Drug Free Workplace
(352) 726-0974
Mon-Fri. 8am-4pm
CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH

Apply in Person at:
920 E Ray Street
Hemando
Or call 344-2400

-CLASS B
DRIVERS NEEDED
ROOF LOADING
EXPERIENCE,
PHYSICAL LABOR
INCLUDED
Excellent Pay And
Benefits.
Bradco Supply
1-800-829-7663
DFWP
CONCRETE
FINISHER
Exp. A Must. Good Pay.
1-877-398-6698
CONCRETE
FINISHERS, BLOCK
LAYERS &
LABORERS

(352) 563-1873




CaS


Currently seeking
candidates for the
following position:
SService Technician,
experienced and
qualified EPA
certification req
Competitive pay &
benefits
Fax or e-mail resume
to 352-237-6258 or
malinda@ccs
mechanical.com
DFWP/EOE

ELECTRICIANS
NEEDED
(352) 341-2004















OPERATOR
Accepting
Application for exp
heavy equipment
operators.
Knowledge of Dozers,
Excavators, back
Hoes, Graders &
Loaders Is helpful. Full
Time Employment w/
full benefits package
PAVE- RITE
3411 W. Crigger Ct.,
Lecanto.
352-621-1600
DFWP/EOE

EXP. DUCT
MECHANICS &
HELPER
Willing to train Helper
Excellent pay rate.
Company vehicle.
Full family medical
paid in full, 401 K,
* vacations. Call
795-3042 for further
info. F&H Contractors


EXP. EQUIPT
OPERATORS &
OPERATORS

For Utility Instillation. Full
Benefits & Retirement.
Background Checks
& drug testing
Conducted.
Call our Job Site.
352-799-8223
EOE
EXP. FRAMER
Must have own tools
and transportation
Call (352) 341-3259


"ABTrade
cmSklls~


Part-time. Must have
ability to perform a
variety of general
maintenance duties
Including minor
plumbing & electrical,
painting, carpentry,
etc. PT hours will be
scheduled as required.
Generally between
Mon, & Fri. Please call
for appt. 726-9001
Brannen Banks of Fla
Inc. P.O. Box 1929
Inverness, FL 34451
EOE/M/F/V/D DFWP
MARINE
FORKLIFT
OPERATOR
Fulltime position. Prior
marine forklift exp
req'd, Competitive
pay w/benefit pkg.
Apply in person
Riverhaven Marina,
5296 S. Riverview Cir.
Homosassa 628-5545


EXP. FRAMER
WANTED
Top pay and benefits,
The Villages Area.
(352) 307-9671
or 352-516-6563
EXP. FRAMERS ONLY
(352) 726-2041

EXP. FRAMERS/
CARPENTERS
With tools and trans-
portation. Local work,
352-302-3927

EXP'D PAINTER
5 years minimum.
Must have own tools
& transportation:
(352) 302-6397

EXPERIENCED
DUMP TRUCK &
TRACTOR
TRAILER DRIVERS

Class A or B License
(352) 795-7170
EXPERIENCED
ROOFERS
Tools & transportation
a must. Dependable,
733 N Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River.
(352) 628-3516








GARAGE DOOR
INSTALLER HELPER
NEEDED

Some Experience
Required. 746-2154
GUTTER
INSTALLERS

MUST HAVE CLEAN
DRIVER'S LICENSE.
Willing to Train!
Call:(352) 563-2977












EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT





r,.
Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders,
Scrapers,
Excavators.
Next Class: July 11th
-National
Certification
Financial Assistance
-Job Placement
800-383-7364
Associated Training
Services
www,
atsn-schools.com
INSTALLERS
Ceramic, Carpet,
Wood & Vinyl
Top Quality, Top Dollar.
Call:
877-577-1277option 5











LABORER

Looking for hard
working person for
Roof coating. Must
have good drivers
license and own
transportation. Serious
Inquires Only .DFWP.
352-489-5900
LABORERS NEEDED

For Lawn Service. Clean
driver's lic. Exper. a must
& shrub exp. a plus.
(352) 382-2287
LOCAL DELIVERY
DRIVER

Florida Public Utilities
Is seeking a propane
delivery driver.
Applicants must have
a valid Class "B" CDL
with an "X"
endorsement or the
ability to attain one.
Must have a good
driving record, and
pass a physical and
drug test.
Interested
candidates
Apply In person or
send to:
FLORIDA PUBLIC
UTILITIES
50 Diana St, Inglis Fl
34449
(Equal Opportunity
Employer)

MAINTENANCE
PERSON


MECHANIC
Own tools, self
motivated apply
FOX AUTOMOTIVE
7996 Hwy 44
Crystal River
MECHANIC HELPER
MARINE TRADE

Apply in person.
55 N Inglls Ave. Inglis.

PIKE'S
ELECTRIC
Bonded Licensed
Residential &
Commercial
Lake Sumter Polk
Don't miss the
opportunity to work
for the fastest,
growing electrical
contracting business
In Central Florida.
Many positions may
be available at our
Groveland/
Wildwood branches,
SIGN ON BONUS
MAY APPLY FOR
RESIDENTIAL
ROUGH LEADS &
RESIDENTIAL
TRIM LEADS
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED
Top wages and
excellent benefits,
Including health &
dental, 401K plan.
Company.trucks are
available for some
positions. Valid DL
required. Helper
positions also
available.
DFW, EOE
Apply today.
Openings will
fill quickly
352-748-6251

PLASTERERS
PERMENTANT Positions
or Weekends $16/hr.
(352) 302-1240

PLASTERERS &
LABORERS

Local work, benefits,
vacation pay, must
have transportation.
(352) 302-0894
B & F STUCCO
After 5pm. Iv. msg.

Plywood Sheeters
& Laborers
Needed In Dunnellon
area. Please call:
(352) 266-6940

PROFESSIONAL
DRIVERS
WANTED

Will train. Must have
clean CDL w/ 2 years
driving exp. Good
attitude, hard
working &
dependable need
only apply. 24/6 shift.
Good Pay.
Long Hours.
Call 352-489-3100
PUNCH OUT
PERSON
Experienced In all
aspects of-punch out.
Fax resume to
352-746-5972
SHOPMAN/
INSTALLER
Growing local
company, seeking
young energetic
shopman/Installer.
DFWP/EOE
352-628-6147
STORE CLERK
Computer Skills,
automotive
knowledge a plus.
Apply In person.
WALLY'S AAmco
806 NE US Hwy 19
*STUCCO
CREW LEADER
*PLASTERERS
*LABORERS
*LATHERS
*STONE MASONS
Wages negotiable.
Call for immediate
employment 746-5951

STUCCO
PLASTERERS
& LABORERS

Must have
transportation.
Pay based on exp.
Starting at $9 Laborers
$15 Plasters
(352) 302-9047
(352) 302-9064

WANTED SOLID
SURFACE
COUNTER TOP
FABRICATORS

18 yrs or older, Heavy
lifting. Must be
reliable.
Apply In person
DCI Countertops,
Shamrock Ind, Park
6843 N. Citrus Ave.
(Rt 495)
Crystal River, FL

WRECKER DRIVER

Experienced ONLY
need respond.
Benefits offered.


APPLY AT THE KEY
TRAINING CENTER
BUSINESS OFFICE
HUMAN RESOURCE
DEPT. AT 130 HEIGHTS
AVE. INVERNESS, FL
34452 OR CALL 341-4633
EXT 347) EOE
KEY PINE VILLAGE ICF/DD
LOCATEDINCRYSTAL RIVER
HABILITATIVE TRAINING
INSTRUCTOR:
$7.75 AFTER 90 DAYS!
Rewarding work assisting
developmentally disabled
adults learn basic living
skills in a residential
setting. 2nd shift 3:30 pm -
12:15 am.
On the job Training.
HS Diploma/GED required.
Background checks and
employment health physicals





3447 E Gulf to Lk.
Hwy. Inverness
No Phone Calls
Looking for a career?
training people in the
pest control industry.
Must have good
attitude andu not
afraid of work. Good
pay and benefits.

CEMENT PLANTE
LABORERS
CEMEX, Inc. is takIng
applications fori
in Brooksvrlle, FL
Requirements
Included ability to
perform labor work
including ability to lift
and climb 2-a3 years


CAREER
OPPORTUNITY!
Laboratory Assistant/
Trainee. Potential full
time with tuition
reimbursement.
No experience
necessary. High
school diploma or
equivalent required
Please reply to the:
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Blind Box #857
Crystal River, FL 34429


CHILD ADVOCATE
$8/hr. 30/hrs. wk.
Afternoons, some
Saturday. Flexible hrs,
Facilitate groups,
arrange activities,
advocate for
individual needs.
Drop off resume or fill
out application at
CASA
112 N Pine Ave.
Inverness, FL 34451

CLEANING HELP
Valid DL. DFWP
(352) 860-0596
CONCRETE
FINISHER NEEDED
For new company, call
Joe at (352) 464-3548

CONCRETE
WORKERS
Benefits offered. Valid
Drivers Lic. & Heavy
Lifting Required
Gardners Concrete
8030 Homosassa Trl.

DECCA

Golf Course
Mechanic
Exp. Only
Apply At:
Decca at Oak Run,
7 ml off 1-75 on SR 200
Apply 8am-12 noon
Mon Thurs
Call for more info
(352) 854-6557
Decca Is a Drug Free
Work Place.
EOE

DECCA
CABLE TV
TECHNICIAN
Candidate should
possess strong
technical ability in
CATV. Familiar
w/CATV construction
maintenance,
troubleshooting,
hardline & CLI.
On -Call duty required
and valid FL Drivers
Lic. with good driving
record.

Apply At:
Oak Run,
SR 200
M-Thur 8am-Noon
or Call
(352) 854-6557

Exp. Service Tech
SWIMMING POOLS
CITRUS, must have
own truck, excel, pay,
Call Jeff 727-599-6155












F/T SEWING
MACHINE
OPERATORS
*P/T SALES
Call for Appt. Mon -
Fri 9am -5pm
(352) 628-5980

FLEXIBLE
P/T CLERK
Apply in person,
Coastal Station,
1017 SEHwy. 19,
Crystal River

FULL-TIME
POSITIONS
Are available for
drug-free, 18 and up
people who are up to
the challenging job
of roofing. No exp.
needed.
Apply at
Boulerice Roofing
4551 W Cardinal St.
Suite 4, Homosassa

HOUSEKEEPER &
HANDYMAN

Good Benefits
Apply in person at:
Best Western
Crystal River







Sute4 -0os2!-1
HOSKEE*


SUNDA


cEn A 771


C(LASSIFIEDS


ADVERTISING
NOTICE:
This newspaper
does
not knowlingly
accept
ads that are not
bonatide
employment
offerings. Please
use
caution when
responding to
employment ads.

REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.


JOBS GALORE!!!
www.AAA
EMPLOYMENT.NET
LABORER
Experienced preferred
for Gas Piping,
Will train right
applicant Clean
Drivers License
Apply In person only.
4280 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River
(1/2 ml N of CR Mall)
No Phone Calls
LABORERS NEEDED

For Lawn Service. Clean
driver's lic. Exper. a must
& shrub exp, a plus.
(352) 382-2287










LANDSCAPING
& IRRIGATION
Help Wanted
(352) 628-5865












Must have clean
Class D License,
352-795-2999
LOT PERSON
DRIVER

FT Male or Female
computer skills pre
feared, must have clean
driving record. Pay
asked on qualifications
Please fax resume or
qualifications 746-7736
MAINTENANCE
WORKER WANTED

Apply in person.
D/F/W/P EOE
El Diablo Golf &
No Phone Calls
NEEDED CONCRETE
WORKERS

Layout/form, Placers,
Finishers, Block Masons,
Tenders & Laborers
Competitive pay, Call
352-748-2111
PART TIME LABORER
Needed on Call. No
exp. (352) 220-8630
POOL CLEANING
Part Time, Mature
person. Will train. Must
have own vehicle
Call for appt.
(352) 637-1904

PRESS
OPERATOR




The Citrus County
Chronicle
is currently accepting
applications for a
lead press operator
on the day shift.
Applicants must have
web press
experience,
preferably on a Goss
Community. We offer
an excellent benefits
package.
Apply to:
Citrus County
Chronicle
Attn: Tom Feeney
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429
Fax: 352-563-5665
PT & FT COUNTER
HELP
Mature person
w/counter experience
needed in Inverness, Lt.
cooking, Call Rob or
Caren 352-637-2955
R&R&
SWING PERSONS
Needed very busy
transmission shop.
Exc. Salary, Benefits,
Vacation. Experienced
Only need apply,
Days (352) 489-5580
Eve (352) 465-4437
REAL ESTATE CAREER
Sales Lic. Class $249.
Now enrolling 8/2/05
CITRUS REAL ESTATE
SCHOOL, INC.
(352)795-0060.
RESIDENTIAL DRIVER

Needed for Citrus
Waste, Exp. required,
great pay. Please Call
726-7440

RESIDENTIAL
PLANNER/
ESTIMATOR
Seeking an experi-
enced Individual to
assist homebuyers
with the selection
and pricing of
options. Located In
the Ocala area, over
100 homes construct-
ed each year, Good
opportunity for
advancement and
benefit package.
Send resume In word
doc format to


black glass door, exc.
cond, $150.
(352) 795-1127
REFRIGERATOR
Amana, 5 yrs old
Freezer on Bottom,
$200.(352) 637-1397
Refrigerator,
Magic Chef, almond,
Stove, Almond,
Both for $150,
(352) 637-3403
WASHER & DRYER
$125/both
(352) 628-4140
Washer & Dryer
1 yr old
$250 for pair
(352) 503-3104
WASHER & DRYER Exc.
cond. like new, $250 90
day guar. Free del.& set
up 352-797-6090
WASHER & DRYER,
Excellent cond.
Clean $150 for both
(352) 341-3000


ROOFERS/
SHINGLERS
Exp Only. Paid
Vacations, Benefits.
352-347-8530

SHEET METAL
WORKERS &
LABORERS

Needed for growing
company. No
experience needed,
paid vacations,
benefits, paid
holidays, bonuses.
Plenty of overtime
available. Apply at
Gulf Coast
Metal Products
in Rooks Industrial
Park, Homosassa,
(352) 628-5555
START YOUR
CAREER NOW
Earn while you learn.
Inverness Dental Lab
seeks Indiv. for difficult,
high-stress profession.
Start at the bottom,
earn your way up. Only
hard-working, highly
motivated Indlv. need
apply. (352) 341-4919
*STUCCO
CREW LEADER
*PLASTERERS
*LABORERS
*LATHERS
*STONE MASONS
Wages negotiable.
Call for immediate
employment 746-5951
SWIMMING POOL
MAINTENANCE
and REPAIR
TECHNICIAN
Needed, highly Experi-
enced only need apply
good opportunity for
right person. Call Dave
352-527-3999

r TELEMARKETER

The Citrus
County
Chronicle
PART TIME
TELEMARKETER
NEEDED

15hrs
per week,
5pm-8pm.
Monday thru
Friday
Experience in
telephone
sales and customer
service a must.
Applications are
being accepted
atthe
Citrus County
Chronicle
1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd
Crystal River
Apply in person
or fax resume and
cover letter to
564-2935
EOE, Drug screening
for all final
applicants


SCHkONICL ,

WE BUY HOUSES
Ca$h........Fast l
352-637-2973
lhomesold.com
WELDERS
Needed for
Communication
Industry. Some travel.
Good Pay & Benefits,
O/T, Valid Driver's
License required. DFWP
352-694-1416 Mon-Fri




CHIRO. ASSIST.
Happy Energetic Staff
seeks same. Apply at
6166 W Hwy 44. CR
DISTRIBUTION
Earn $10,000. to
$13,000/yr. as carrier
for USA TODAY In the
Ocala, Gainesville,
Crystal River,
Inverness, Dunnellon,
Beverly Hills &
Hernando areas.
Early AM hrs., M-F, no
wknds. Need reliable
vehicle, valid FDL
& Ins. To apply call
800-944-5543 option 2





TYPIST/
PRODUCTION
ASSISTANT

Type editorial copy
for hand written/
typed sources Into
the computer.
Transfer copy from
email, and disk,
code and edlt
properly. Newspaper
production
knowledge needed,.
High typing speed
and high degree of
accuracy required.
high stress, noisy
environment.
29 hour part tlme
position. Monday
through Wednesday,
Saturday, may at
times be required.
Fax Cover Letter
and Resume to
352-564-2935
Qualified applicants
must pass
drug screen
EOE


FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITY

JOIN THE
INDUSTRY
LEADER
Start your own
business with as little
as $1,500 down!

COVERALL
CLEANING CONCEPTS
V Guaranteed Customers
Complete Training & Support
V Equipment & Supplies
V Guaranteed Financing
Our Secret
can be your Success!
Over 7,500
franchise owners
servicing more than
36,000 accounts.
Franchise Opportunities
Available in
Central Florida
Call Now (800) 249-2532

1, 2 Successful W
Lawn Service 1
Businesses
Both in Sugarmill
Woods, est. 14 years,
S 60 accounts +
I1 equipment. $60,000 41
I 72 accounts + '
Equipment. 65,000
Great cash flow!
| Don't miss this great 1
S opportunity! |

SCall Gate House '
S Realty
1 352-382-4500

LAWN BUSINESS for sale
80 accts, equipment,
Pine Ridge, $15,000
(352) 697-1290 Iv msg.




BAIT & TACKLE STORE
$6,500 Will consider
trade for boat, car,
truck, etc 352-867-3203




"LIVE AUCTIONS"
www.charliefudge.com
For Upcoming Auctions
1-800-542-3877




1960 Stan
Musical BB Card.
$50,
Joe (352) 344-9502




3 PERSON JACUZZI
works good, needs
1 switch, $250
(352) 628-2769
A+ SPAS, INC.
Hydro spas- wholesale
pricing. 5 person, $1695.
(352)572-7940/351-9935
HOT TUB/SPA
like new, 5 person,
24 jets, cabinet,
digital LED, loaded,
Must sell. $1,495
(941) 234-3394

SPA's
By DreamMaker
Starting as low
as $1,195.
Other models Aval.
(352) 398-7202




3 YR OLD
REFRIGERATOR
& STOVE,
good condition,
$500 or best offer.
(352) 726-6856
A/C & HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS. New in box
5 & 10 year Factory
Warranties at
Wholesale Prices
-a 2 Ton $827.00
-* 3 Ton $927.00
-*4 Ton $1,034.00
install kits available
or professional
installation also avail.
Free Delivery
*ALSO POOL HEAT
PUMPS AVAILABLE
Lic.#CAC 057914
Call 746-4394
APPLIANCE CENTER
Used Refrigerators,
Stoves, Washers, Dryers,
NEW AND USED PARTS
Visa, M/C., A/E. Checks
6546 Hwy,44W, Crystal
River. 352-795-8882
CONVECTION OVEN
exc. cond. Imperial
model No DFE 103 12
rack on legs with cast-
ers, 8 amp 70,000 BTU,
gas convection $1,100
Ask for David
(352) 341-5400
ELECTRIC RANGE
Whirlpool, white. Exc.
cond, 6 mos. old, $100
(352) 628-5911
ESTATE BY WHIRLPOOL
electric dryer, 4 cycle,
3 temps. 2-yrs old
$175 obo
(352) 637-4613
KENMORE STACKED
washer dryer combo,
white, like new, used
less than 1 yr. Over $900
new Sell for $350
(352) 249-1016
KENMORE WASHER
AND DRYER
2 years old. Moving
Sand cannot take. $400
352-466-1017
QUASAR 10,000 BTU
window A/C,
runs perfect, $75
(352)344-2171
RANGE w/ Self cleaning
oven, GE, white w/


2 LEATHER SOFA'S
almond color, $300
each or $500 for both
(352) 746-9917
Adjustable Bed
$300.
Refrigerator, Whirlpool,
Freezer In the bottom,
Ice maker, $500.
Dinette Set, $75.
(352) 746-4787

"MR CITRUS COUNT'













ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956


,Y,JULY 3
[-,-


I ---- E
> ESTATE 4
MERCHANDISE
AUCTION
*THURS. JULY 7"
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
Hwy. 41 -S, Inverness
PREVIEW: 3 PM
I AUCTION: 5 PM
Furn., glassware,
tools, mower, golf
clubs, artwork, Box
lots See Web: www.
dudleysauctlon.com
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246 I
12% Buyers Premium
2% disc.ch cschekoe


Sofa
black, soft leather
$300.
(352) 795-4532
Sofa & Loveseat
Blue Plaid, very good
cond. $100.
2 TV Stands, 1 Is dk grey,
1 bik, $20 ea exc. cond.
(352) 249-1252
SOFA AND LOVESEAT
Teal and mauve floral
print on light
background. Good
condition. $300.
(352) 746-0124
SOFA
Beautiful, like new,
county French Style,
pale yellow. $400.
(352) 527-8043
SOFA, off white, rarely
used, 3 loose cushions
on back, $150 obo
(352) 628-3514


FRAMING GUNS,
saws & yard tools

Mekita Sharpener,
Model 9820-2, w/ 60 grit
and 1000 grit wheels.
New $260, Asking $150,
Bob(352) 746-7023
Pressure Washer
2200PSI Honda Engine,
Barely used, $225.
(352) 220-6011




4 SHELF SPEAKERS
Two 6"x6", two -15"x9"
$30. Two Pioneer Stereo
Speaker CS707 w/
16" Woofer $50.
(352) 726-9964
36" HITACHI, surround
sound & PIP, 8-yrs old,
works like new, great
picture, $300 obo
(352) 228-1055
Audio Digital,
Tower Speakers
2 37 x 9 $250. Pr.
(352) 726-9964
JVC 32"
2 tuner, D series, exc.
cond. $275.
(352) 746-9348, Iv. msg.
Stereo,
Kenwood tuner/
cassette, Yamaha
5 discchanger, Sony
Speakers w/ stands,





LUMBER
24 Treated used, 2 x 4,
1Oft. long $36.
36 Untreated 8ft. 2 x 4's,
8ft. L $27.
(352) 795-4384



-U
COMPUTER,
complete w/monitor,
mouse & keyboard,
Internet ready. $100.
(352) 564-1564
CRYSTAL WIND
Repair, upgrade,
networking. On-site &
pick-up services.
(352) 746-9696
DELL DIMENSION 2400
computer. 2.2 GIG
Pentium 4 processor,
768 Megs of Ram CD
burner, DVD ROM drive
40 GIG hard drive, 17"
monitor, very nice wire-
less keyboard & mouse
HP Printer/Scanner/
Copier, 1 yr old. Nice
fast system, $525.
(352) 637-0210
DIESTLER COMPUTERS
Internet service. New &
Used systems, parts &
upgrades. Visa/
MCard 637-5469
http://www.rdee.net




GOOSNECK TRAILER
hitch, 3-car hauling
trailer, new tires and
new tie downs,
(352) 795-6911




MASSEY 231
47HP, a real work horse
Only 6 hours. $10,500.
(352) 746-4703




2 CHIMINIAS, $50 ea.
Lawn swing, $35.
(352) 726-8567
8 PC. PVC PATIO SET
matching 48" round
table, w/4 chairs on
casters, lounge chair,
end table, tea cart,
exc. cond $475
(352) 746-5246
11 PC PATIO SET
(PVC/cush). 2 recliners
w/ottomans, 1 round
53" table, 4 chairs, on
casters. 2 small end
tables, Exc. cond, $425.
(352) 382-8996
48" Round, Fiber Glass
Table 4 chairs, w/ cush-
ions + 4 extra cushions,
Tea Cart & lounge
chair all PVC $150. obo
(352) 382-4324
Porch Rocking Chair,
Cypress, large. Cost
$318. Asking $150.
(352) 726-2721
PVC PATIO FURN.
Rd. Table, 5 Cush
Chairs, Ottoman
$299. 352-563-2500
SWING
Wicker Swing $75,00.
Girls bike w/ helmet


5 PIECE BEDROOM SET
Antique. Pecan wood.
All hand dovetailed.
$200. (352) 527-2280
ARMOIRE, for TV/stereo
equip. Light natural
wood finish, $200 obo
(352) 628-3514
BABY GRAND PIANO
Krell, $1,800.
OLD LARGE ROLLTOP
DESK. marble green
top, $1,200
(352) 726-3062
BEAUTIFUL GLASS
1 pc. china hutch,
lighted, w/Interior
glassware, $200.
(352) 344-8126
BED:
New Mattress Sets.
*PT King: $195
*PT Queen: $155
*PT Full $125
Warr. (352) 597-3112

BED:
New, Memory Foam
Mattress Sets.
As low as $495. 20 yr.
non pro-rated Warr.
(352) 597-3140
Delivery Available
Bedroom Set, full sz.
custom made, black
lacquer, mirrored back
unit, dresser & 7 lights
make up table $1,000.
take all, (352) 860-1242
BEDS BEDS BEDS
Beautiful fact closeouts.
Nat. Advertised Brands
50% off Local Sale
Prices.Twin $78 Double
$98-Queen $139- King
$199. (352)795-6006
Black Chaise Lounge,
$200; Mauve Chair, $0.
Both In exc. cond.
(352) 746-1705
Brown LA-Z-BOY 3-seat
and 2 seat recline,
$400. Two antique
chairs, $100 ea. Hall
tree, $100. Broyhill pe-
can sideboard, $50.
Tea cart, $30. Burroughs
antique adding mach.
B.O. (352) 560-7059
BUNK BED w/computer
desk underneath $250
KITCHEN TABLE, wood
with 4 chairs, oval, plus
2 wood bar stools, $150
(352) 726-8596
BUNK BED, $250 obo
DRESSER w/mirror,
$100 obo
(352) 634-2549
DINING ROOM TABLE
Travertine marble base
with glasstop, very
unusual, must see, $150
obo (352) 628-3514
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
27" TV and cabinet
$100.00. Bike $35.00
(352) 795-2825
Entertainment Center
UIght Cherry. 74H x 44W,
35" TV Inc. $800OBO.
(352) 422-3875
Glass Top
End Tables &
Cocktail Table.
$160.Set
(352) 746-9897
INDUSTRIAL
steel desk, $20.
Office chair, $15.
(352) 746-5988
KING SIZE BED
Mattress & box spring.
$100.
(352) 726-6805
King Water Bed, soft
side w/ tubes excel.
cond. $250. Patio Set,
white table w/4
chairs/cushions &
umbrella w/ base
$75. (352) 795-1321
KINGSIZE BEDwithout
headboard, $200 obo
Full/Queen headboad
$50 obo
(352) 634-2549
Kitchen Set,
48"D Round glass top
table, 4 chairs on rollers,
perfect, $275.
(352) 527-8043
LazyBoy Chair
w/Ottoman, 1 /2 yrs. old,
excel cond. $225,
(352) 746-6998
LEATHER SECTIONAL
Contemp. Couch, exc.
cond Off white, $700/
obo; DR Tbl, glass top,
w/dolphin base, 4 up-
hal, chairs, very nice,
off white, $500. Exc.
cond, (352) 860-1426
LIGHTED CHINA HUTCH,
2-pc. w/curved glass,
real wood, $600 Match-
ing server, w/fold down
extensions, $300.
2 Matching cushioned
arm chairs, $200.
Mahogany high boy 7
drawer dresser, real
wood $500
(352) 527-0763
Moving
2 Dressers, Ent. Center,
Dining Room Table,
Canoe,dog Kennel
& Misc. Items
(352) 302-7985
Moving Sale, 3 sets all
wood dressers, large
dining Rm. table, misc.
Items. (352) 628-9037
Packing Material
$30.
Two, 6 drawers dressers
& 1 night stand
$100.
(352) 527-3463
Preowned Mattress Sets
from Twin $30; Full $40
Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
QUEEN ANN STYLE OAK
TABLE 4 chairs, one
captains chair, $200
CUSTOM MADE OAK
TABLE 42"x78" with 6
chairs, $300 (352)
489-1549 ask for Phil
Rattan Entertainment
Center, holds 25" TV,
Rattan Coffee Table,
$199/both. Sofa,
Loveseat, Chair, $199.
(352) 564-4214
RATTAN GLASSTOP
table with 4 cushioned
chairs, $75 obo.
(352) 344-0837
SECTION SOFA,
multi colored
Exc. cond. like new.
Must see. $200
(352) 746-3542


Apply In person at:
Scally's Lube & Go,
12059 N Florida Ave.
(next to Front Porch
Restaurant),
Dunnellon.
860-0550 or 489-6823





SALES
CONSULTANTS
Wanted For
Growing Post Control
Company. Must be
Self Motivated,
Independent, Goal
Oriented Team
Players Who Are
Willing to Learn.
Call 352-754-5188
or Apply In Person
PEST
ENVIRONMENTAL
1445 W. Jefferson St
Brooksville, FL


experience In farm-
Ing, mining, industrial,
or construction work;
willingness to work
any shift and
overtime; good
mechanical aptitude;
a proven work
record; ability to
accept directions
and work well with
others; be at least 18
years of age.
Starting rate
$10.50/hr.
Benefits include,
pension plan, health/
dental/ life insurance
coverage, 401(k),
paid vacations and
holidays.
Apply in person at
the CEMEX Brooksvllle
Cement Plant
located at
16301 Ponce DeLeon
Blvd, Tuesday thru
Thursday between
the hours of 9 a.m.
and 3:30 p.m. In the
Sales and Operations
office located on the
second floor.


sales@tvrs.com or
Fax to 352-489-4126
EOE, DFWP

SERVICE TECH
NEEDED

For busy company
for maintenance
and servicing of
residential waste-
water systems. Need
to be self motivated
.and able to work on
their own. Need to
have a class A or a
Class B with Tanker
endorsement license,
Premium pay plus
commissions and
benefits
Apply within
Monday Friday
between the hours
of 8am 5pm
A Able Septic
2190 N. Crede Ave
Crystal River
(352) 795-1554










10C SUNI)A, JULY 3, 2005
C4 C"4 Garde


SOLID LIGHT OAK
china cabinet.
$350 or best offer,
(352) 628-5038
SUGARMILL WOODS
SALE WED. & THURS.
7 P, Bone Mica bdrm.
set, $350; Trundle Bd
mattress/sgl. frame, $30
Trundle Bd, mattress
$25; Lamps; Sewing
Mach, $10; Lt. Bone
leather Scandinavian
Recliner & Ottoman,
$300; Leather beige
recliner, $200; 4 Lucite
Bridge chairs, $30;
Quantumexerclser,
$100; 2 patio recllners/
cushions, $30 ea; Ampli-
fier; Receiver; Cassette
Plyr; Bone color TV Stnd,
Kitchen items; Foyer
console w/mirror, $300;
Toys; Cookout; Silk Flow-
ers; Call 352-382-4991,
NO ANSWER CALL
732-974-0016
SUGARMILL WOODS
SALE WED. & THURS.
7 Pc. Bone Mica bdrm.
set, $350; Trundle B.
mattress/sgl. frame, $30
TrundleBd. mattress
$25; Lamps; Sewing
Mach, $10: Lt. Bone
leather Scandinavian
Recliner & Ottoman,
$300; Leather beiae
recliner, $200; 4 Lucite
Bridge chairs, $30;
Quantumexerciser,
$100; 2 patio recliners/
cushions, $30 ea: Ampli-
fier Receiver Cassette
Plyr; Bone color TV Stnd.
Kitchen Items; Foyer
console w/mirror, $300;
Toys Cookout Silk Flow-
ers; Call 352-382-4991,
NO ANSWER CALL
732-974-0016
Twin Beds, dresser,
nightstand, like new,
$395; Dining Rm. Table,
4 upholstered chairs on
rollers, It. oak color,
$295; (352) 564-4214
UNUSUAL LIGHT OAK
Dining room table, 2
leaves, 4 chairs and
server, $800 set,
(352) 344-8126
USED QUEEN SOFT SIDE
WATERBED, good cond.
$50.
(352) 527-8760
WINGBACK CHAIR
Excellent condition
$50.
(352) 726-8567




1996 LAWN TRACTOR
642 MTD w/grass
catcher, $225.
(352) 795-5151
CRAFTSMAN 14HP
LAWN TRACTOR,
$500
(352) 726-1872
CRAFTSMAN ROTOTILLER
5HP, 18", transmission &
new tires, exc. cond.
$235 (352) 726-5372
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
Lawn Mower, 2 yr old,
Club Cadet, 6,5 hp Ka-
wasaki engine, 6 spd
rear wheel drive,
mulch or bag, $250
Riding Lawn Mower,
Murray, 8 hp, 30" cut,
7yrs old, low hrs,
exc. cond, $200.
(352) 382-2934
(352) 634-1642
LIKE NEW EXMARK 13HP
Kaw, 36" ECS controls,
new bagger, never
Installed, $2,500
(352) 860-1416
MTD LAWN TRACTOR
18HP, 46" cut,
Rubbermaid dump
cart, $400,
(352) 489-0962
RIDER LAWNMOWER
Runs, drives & cuts
$200 (352) 628-2769


Riding Lawn Tractor,
Craftsman, 1982
w/44" Deck, $200,
(352) 564-4598
Snapper Rider,
33", 14.5HP, new blade
and tune up ready to
run. $550. obo,
Yard-man 5HP 22" gas
trimmer, needs work
$60. (352) 697-3124
Two Craftsman
Riding Mowers,
42" & 46" Cut
$400. for both
(352) 489-2537




6' RED MAPLE TREE
$20; 5' Magnolia Tree,
$20; In Pots.
Or both for $30.
(352) 795-6693
ANGEL TRUMPETS,
peach, pink & yellow
one gal. pots, $10
(352) 637-2147
WEEKEND BLAST!!!!
NURSERY PLANT SALE
Assort. varieties & sizes,
BEAUDRY'S NURSERY
8856 E, Midwater Ct.
(352) 344-9752




BEVERLY HILLS
Must Sell Cmpng Eqp
Canoe 2 WtrCrft tbls
chairs clothes Antqus
3 S Barbour St
BEVERLY HILLS
Watermelons. Saturday
and Monday. $5 each.
27 S. Melbourne
All proceeds to benefit
The Path Rescue Shelter
(352) 527-6500
CRYSTAL RIVER
Bodacious Garage
Sale, U Lock It Storage
US 19, Sat. & Sun., 8-?
Some Restaurant Equip
HOMOSASSA
Fri-Sun 7am-4pm
Big Yard Sale. Lots of
Electronics, housewares
& ladies clothing.
All under a Shelter
Highland St. Across from
Suncoast Furniture on
Hwy 19
HOMOSASSA
Sat, Sun & Mon
8am-3:30. Yard Sale


4 NEW GOODYEAR
Wrangler HT Tires
245/75/16R
Must purchase all
$450/obo
(352) 613-6132

2005

SPECIALS
6 lines 10 days
Items totalling
$1-$150...........$5.50
$151-$400......$10.50
$401-$800.......$15.50
$801-$1,500....$20.50
CALL CHRONICLE
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
726-1441 OR
563-5966
-Two general
merchandise Items
per ad,
private party only.
(Non-Refundable)
Some Restrictions
May Apply

24' ft ROUND ABOVE
ground pool. Liner Is
only 1 yr old, $500 -
you remove.
(352) 563-0466
-or 697-2181.


Metal Roofing
Direct from
Manufacturer

Tr-County


Metals, LLC

(Located Behind the Dollar
General Trenton, Florida)

Many colors in stock -

All Accessories
Cut to Length
Delivery Available
State of Florida
Approved

for fast quotes call:
(352) 463-8400 or

(800) 823-9298
www.tricountymetals.com,





Junk today

... is not always Treasure tomorrow.


instead of donating that broken, run down TV, sofa, or table and chairs to
ihe many nonprofit thrift stores and agencies across Citrus County, why not
take It to the landfill. It's free. For residential self-haulers.
Your good donations help lund theseagencies and make these hems available
to those less fortunate than you. Donaftons made after hours hurt more than help,
Don't make them pay f
to haul off your old junk.
Call to verify acceptable Items,
Habitat4Home Store

KeyTralning Center
Thrift Stores 726-0271
Annie Johnson
Thrift Store 465-7957
Hospice of Citrus County
Thrift & Gift Shops
341-2220
Florida Sheriff's
Youth Ranches
795-8886
The Salvation Army
341-2448 ".
This message brought to you by the Division of Solid Waste Management
527-7670 and TDD Telephone 5275214 landilinfo@b0occcitrfus. ,us


EB--
* BURN BARRELS *
$8 Each
860-2545
Aquariums
30 Gal., $15
50 Gal. $25
Good Cond, Not Equip.
(352) 628-2613
CARPET
100's of Rolls left from
carpet Inst. Many
colors 352-341-2146
CARPET FACTORY Direct
Restretch Clean *
Repair Vinyl Tile *
Wood (352) 341-0909
(352) 637-2411
Chest Freezer
$275.
Ab Scissor Exerciser
$300.
352-476-3192
CHEST FREEZER
Excellent condition
$85 (352) 726-2459
CUISINART FOOD
PROCESSOR, $50.
Jack LaLanne
juicer, $60
(352) 726-1296
DECORATIVE RUG black
with gold, 11FTx7'8", like
new cond. Pd, $530 Sell
for firm price of $225
(352) 746-9955
GOT STUFF?
You Call We Haul
CONSIDER II DONE
Moving.Cleanouls, &
Handyman Service
Uc. 99990000665
t352) 302-2902
*King Size mattress &
Frame o5 piece
bedroom Set *2 swivel
chairs, coach, o2 Twin
Oak headboards
Ladder, fiberglass, 8ft,
(352) 382-4102


I WILL REPLACE YOUR
LIGHT OR FAN with a
fan with light starting at
$59.95 Llc#0256991
(352) 422-5000
Louver bi-fold
wooden door, new,
$30.
(352) 628-1092
or cell 212-8294
Mobile Home Carport
w/shed, 15 x 35. You
remone, $1,500.
Screen Room for
Mobile home Scr. Rm,
12x 20 w/8'Slider, You
remove, $1,500. (352)
341-1456 L/M
MOVING. Reclining
chairs, desk, yard
equip,, bar stools, misc,
Items (352) 341-1621
Mulcher/Mower
Craftsman, $100.
Commercial Smoker
Grill, $225.
(352) 628-3868
OFF WHITE, LEATHER
NATUZZI COUCH and
love seat, $300 for both
ORTHOPEDIC BOOT
$100 (352) 249-1010
OVER THE PHONE
GARAGE SALE
Too much to list.
(352) 527-7880
PIANO, $500
Butler server, $50
(352) 344-8537
POOL FILTER, Jacuzzi,
Landslide LS 70, $50
(352) 228-7670
PRESSURE TREATED 3-VA"
tongue & groove floor-
ing, 8' & 12', 600+ sq.ft.
$500 takes all. HEAVY
WAGON WHEEL 42" P/T,
12 spokes, (will hold
kitchen utensils,) $50
(352) 726-3062


Range w/ self cleaning
oven GE, almond w/
blk. glass door. $150.
Sm, computer table &
chair $25. ea.
(352) 527-9330
SOD. ALL TYPES
Installed and delivery
avallable.352-302-3363
STAINLESS DOUBLE SINK,
faucet, 6 month old
Sears disposal, $75
WOOD KITCHEN TABLE,
4 chairs, cushions, $35
(352) 422-5000
Swimming Pool, Intex
Easy set up, 16R x3.5 D,
new w/extras $100.
After 5pm
TELESCOPE
Refractor, 234power,
60mm, altazlmuth, $45.
Rarely used. In original
box w/ tripod
(352) 249-1090
UTILITY SINK
Almost new, $25.
(352) 564-0646
or (352) 422-1874
Washer & Dryer,
$150
Lawn Roller,
$75.
(352) 628-3868
Washer Whirlpool, used
2 weeks, Warr 03/06,
$300 OBO.Computer,
HP Pavilion 6360 HP
upgrades, lots of extras
$375 OBO 352 447-1582
WESTINGHOUSE AIR
PURIFIER, like new, cost
over $200. Sell for $100
abo (352) 228-1055
White Fabric Sectional,
excel. cond. w/
matching swivel
tub chair $350.
(352) 527-0785


EFIEDS




CONVECTION OVEN
exc. cond. Imperial
model No DFE 103 12
rack, on legs w/casters,
8 amp 70,000 BTU, gas
convection $1,100
Ask for David
(3521 341-5400




INDOOR OUTDOOR
PACESAVER RF Scout
power wheelchair with
charger & cover $1,500
obo (352) 527-0763

LIFT
RECLINER CHAIR
Brown. Excellent
condition, $500 .
(352) 527-3276

LIFT CHAIR
Exc. cond. Taupe
Microfiber Suede.
$400.
(352) 726-6805


GRAND PIANO
New keytops Installed,
bench incl, needs
refinishing, $1000.00
352-563-1173
LESSONS: Piano, Guitar,
etc. Crystal River Music.
2520 N. Turkey Oak Dr.
(352) 563-2234
PEAVY CLASSIC 50 watt
all tube amp with road
case, on casters, $400
(352) 201-0804
Piano
Dark Mah, nice
cond w/ bench
$500 08O.
(352) 860-1426
SPINET ORGAN
Two 61, Note
Keyboards, Midi In &
out, 3.5 floppy drive,
white lacquer finish
$1,750. Call for Details
(352) 746-6898




GAZELLE CARDIO
GLIDER, as on TV, $55
(352) 341-3000


'01 MURRAY
off-road
GO-CART.
EXC. COND. $900.
352-422-2634
American 180, 155
Round .22 Cal,
Pre Ban, Mint, $600.
Lulgl Franchi 12 gage
$400.(352) 302-4199
Black Diamond Ranch
3 D Viewers
of the Quarry Course,
3 for $20.
(352) 464-2861
COLT, AR 15, Pre Ban,
.223 w/ M-16 Marksman
Scope, Elite model
8-mags, mint cond.
$1,650. (352)302-4199
Complete Set of Wom-
en's Golf Clubs
Including shoes, balls,
tee's, etc.. super buy at
$150.
(352) 628-9660
GOLF CART
E-Z Go. Good
condition, $1400,
(352) 527-3698
MURRAY 26" American
classic cruiser series.
Basket, mirror & light,
rear carrier, kick stand,
exc. cond. $150 firm
(352) 344-5174
Norinco, AK-47, Pre
Ban, 4 mags, Mint.
$425.
1-75 Round drum $100
352-302-4199

POOL TABLE
New, 8 ft, 1"
Italian Slate,
leather pockets,
Life Time Warranty.
$1,295
(352) 597-3140


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


U .poin
[ic~n Goodsl


VINTAGE VALLEY
BUMPER POOL TABLE
with balls and 8 pool
cues. $400/obo
(352) 628-7934




16FT CAR HAULER
with ramps,
$900 obo
(352) 302-0441
BUY, SELL, TRADE, PARTS
REPAIR, CUSTOM BUILD
www.ezoulltrailers.com
Hwy 44 & 486
CHEROKEE, 6 x 12
enclosed cargo trailer,
custom model, ramp
back door, $2,250.
(352) 628-2126




SPORTS CARDS AND
MEMORABILIA
WANTED
call @ 352-560-7007 or
352-266-0595
VW BEETLE DIESEL
5 speed, wanted to
buy.
(32C1 AA7. 081


2 Tame Ball Pythons
4 ft., large cage,
all accessories, $200
Firm (352) 465-6456
Dachshund, mini, long
hair, 9 wks old, health
cert., shots & papers
$375 (352) 382-7796

DOBERMAN PUPPIES
Black & rust. Champion
bloodlines. Warlock/
Kimbertal Due 7/7.
Father Search &
Rescue. Call for details
Linda, (352) 527-7784

FAWN PUG
Male, 2+ yrs. Shots
current. Friendly.
$150 to good home
(352)563-0801

Free to good home.
Akita, 1 /2 yr. old, male,
neutered, need fenced
yard. (352) 344-9768,
212-6679


7J!" n l: i i a R au ",. : :' u'-: '~i W :







,,
ai ..ia












'-., .


.^ ljAE


SALE PRICE ',988

'02 OLDSMOBILE
S ALERO





SSALE PRICE . FS,98

'01 TOYOTA
TACOMA SR5





SALE PRICE iO988

'02 GMC ENVOY
S.L.T.





SALE PRICE 14 88

'04 JEEP
LIBERTY 4X4
. . ii ,i



SALE PRICE '17,988

60 5CHRYSLERA1
TOWN& COUNTRY





SALE PRICE 19,888


YUKON XL SLT




SALE PRICE 21,988


'04 CHEVROLET'
SILVERADO



4x4 ...L PR.. I -
(iSALE PRICE


'97 MERCURY '98 BUICK '98 DODGE '01 DODGE
VILLAGER CENTURY 1500 RAM SPORT INTREPID





SALE PRICE 6988 SALE PRICE 6,8 SALE PRICE n 086 SALE PRICE OB

'98 GMC '00 TOYOTA '02 FORD '99 GMC 1500
SIERRA SLE CAMRY LE MUSTANG SIERRA SLE





SALE PRICE '8,988 SALE PRICE 9,488 SALE PRICE 8 SALE PRICE 1090
SALE'0 P ONTEIAC9


'98 CHEVROLET
1500 4X4





SALE PRICE -10 9 8
'04 CHEVROLETi
TRACKER Z82 4X4





SALE PRICE '15,988

'04 GMC SIERRA
1500 SLE
12K _. .




SALE PRICE 17i 988

'O1 GMC
YUKON XL SLT
35K




SALE PRICE 1 989

'02 PONTIAC
TRANS AM



T ',
SALE PRICE o2,988

'04 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO Z-71



SALE PRICE
SALE PRICE 2998 '2-?


'02 CHEVROLET
BLAZER LS





SALE PRICE 1 1,988

'02 FORD
SPORT TRAC





SALE PRICE '1gs988


'05 PONTIAC
GRAND AM GT





SALE PRICE '14,988


'04 DODGE
DAKOTA
Low




SALE PRICE '196881


'03 GMC SONOMA
SLS





SALE PRICE '11,988


XL-7





SALE PRICE e15,988

'O1 G0 MC
SIERRA





SALE PRICE


'04 GMC '04 CHEVROLET '03 GMC
ENVOY XUV 1500 Z71 4X4 YUKON XL





SALE PRICE 25,988 SALE PRICE '25,988 SALE PRICE S a 988

Do you have '03 CHEVROLET '03 OMC
Credit Issues? SUBURBAN 4x4 LT DENALI XL
NO PROBLEM I %- ~tl
Marc or Doug 'tI,.
1-888-449-9892 .
For A Pra e SAEP ,.RI,.C ,. SL '33,9 8:.,,-:
Corlaultatlon SALE PRICE s29,988 SALE PRICE -13.98


C= Pets


C4 Musical
Ph
cb. InstrumeInt










CITRUS CoUNY (FL) CHRONICLE


JAPANESE CHIN 11 wk.
old, blk. & wht. $500
(352) 465-6659
PUPPIES
Pit Bull Pups $150 O.B.0
9 weeks old,
4 Females 1 Male.
795-2590 or 476-5780
YORKIE, MINI, 221ib girl
11 mo. AKC, friendly,
smart, lap dog, good
companion for retiree.
$300. (352) 628-2448




BEGINNER RIDING
INSTRUCTION
Learn to ride and learn
about horsemanship,
from Ann Monaghan.
Licensed/Insured with
over 25 yrs. experience.
Morning lessons given
at scheduled times.
For more Information,
call STICKHORSE RANCH
352-489-7616
FOR RENT 2 Stalls, 6 ac.,
4 stalls, 10 ac. Across
from State Forest.
(352) 628-0164
Horse for Sale, mare,
great riding horse, $900
w/ new tack.
New Pony Saddle, $100.
(352) 726-4367
One APHA Mare, One
AQHA Mare, both with
fold and rebred. Will
separate (352)726-4090
(352)212-2934
Reg. Qtr. Horses
For Sale. Foundation
4 yr. olds + 3 yr. olds
(352) 346-3478




Alpacas Males
2 gelded. I breeding.
All for S1900
352-628-0156
GOATS- 2 milk goats,
9 pygmy's 5 PEACOCKS,
9 Golden Red
pheasants,
(352) 726-8582
PIGS FOR SALE
35-451bs, $20 ea.
(352) 854-4933
YORK/SPOT PIGLETS
weaned, approx 40ibs.
$40. Also rabbits, $8.
(352) 628-4636




15hp MERCURY, 2003
boat motor. Excellent
condition. Retail $1720,
will sell for $1000.
(352) 382-1735
18' to 20' Galvanized
PONTOON TRAILER
In like new condition.
$1150. (352) 746-2084'
Manual Jet Ski Lift
Harness type
$300.
(352) 564-0856
(352) 628-3090
STRAIUS DRIVE-ON
BOAT TRAILER, 20'.
$300
(352) 423-3088




KAYAKS, w/ paddles,
Pamlico, double, $475.
2 Mallard, Single, $300.
ea. (352) 465-0949
SEADOO
2000 GTX RFI, 3-seater
Serviced for the sum-
mer. Runs great. $4500.
527-1043; cell 228-9219




$$$$$ The Boat $$$$$
Consignment Store.
We Need Boats,
Motors & TrallersI
No Feesf352-795-9995
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

0000
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
-^--,


We need Clean
used Boats
NO FEES !!
AREAS LARGEST
SELECTION
OF CLEAN PRE
OWNED BOATS
U. S. Highway 19
Crystal River
563-5510
1985 MARATHON
24' Cruiser-Deep "V'





New Merc 5.7/250hp
Inboard w/ approx.
50/hrs (60 gal. fuel tank)
forward & after cabins
.* w/ fold out bunk at the
helm. Will sleep 6. All
new seating, JRC
closed array RADAR (16
mile range) Lowrance
"LMS-160" map
plot/GPS-JRC model
200 VHF marine radio
Fullyloaded enclosed
camper/weather pkg.
AM-FM, CD, Sound Sys.
w/ 2002 Performance
alum. trailer Survey
Avail. $17,000.
Larry.(352) 341-4606
14' F-GLASS JON BOAT,
mtr. & trir. Johnson 9.5
Troll mtr, fish finder,
many extras. $1800obo.
Must see. 352-464-1616
BASS TRACKER
1987, 16', 45hp Merc,,
few hours, new parts w/
extras, $2750 OBO.
(352) 382-1273
BASS TRACKER
2000,818. 185, on 2001
trailer, 50hp Merc.,
?0/hrs use, take over
payments 352 621-9774
CANOE OLD TOWN
Discovery 17, $500
2.5 HP Evinrude Motor,
and mount, $200
(352) 746-4429
CANOE, OLDTOWN
14", 7", w/ paddles and
life Jackets, used 3 times
$395.00
(352) 628-0825
CAROLINA SKIFF
2000
With 25HP Honda,
bowmount trolling mo-
tor, eagle depthfinder,
pro style seats, and gal-
vanized trailer, like new.
ready to fish. $4,000
352-302-1003
CHASSAHOWITZKA
"Cricket Boat" L 24', B 9',
flat tunnel boat, 85HP
2002 Suzuki & 15HP
Yamaha, $8500 obo.
(352) 382-1735


3 state room, twin 871
Detroit, radar & GPS,
Great live aboard or
cruiser, $89,900 OBO
Will trade for land.
Possible Financing.
(352) 344-4288
(352) 302-7234
S- -k # -
CONSTRUCTION
SALE
Here We Grow Again!

HURRICANE
DECK BOATS
17' to 23'
SWEETWATER
15'-24'

POLARKRAFT
JONS
12'-20'

POLAR OFFSHORE
21'-23'

CLEAN PRE-OWNED
BOATS
Crystal River
Marine
(352) 795-2597
Open 7 Days
MALIBU
14ft. V Hull 25H elect.
start, low hrs. great
boat $2,000.
(352) 860-2408
MECHANIC'S
SPECIAL
23' Weekender, 200HP
w/tandem trailer. Extra
engine, $800.
(352) 423-3088


PONTOON
1993 Fiesta, 18', new
canvas, has motor, no
trailer asking $2800.
(352) 628-9741
RINKEN 28'
Walk around cuddy,
'95, GPS, rods, reels,
VHS, compass, FF, fresh
Needs some repair,
$4500. 795-2300, Stacy
SEA LION
141/2 Ft. fiberglass Fishing
Boat, 50HP force motor,
F.C. trolling motor, fish
finder, w/ trailer
$1,900. (352) 726-7239
SPORTSCRAFT
$4995.
20'11 flberglass.i/O.
3795 S. Suncoast,
Homosassa -
SUN CHASER
004, Pontoon, 24 Ft.,
60HP Yamaha 4-stroke,
Performance Trir., low
hrs., + extras $16,000.
(352) 596-3823







SPECIAL
New 17' Sport ProLine
90HPYamaha
$15,2950,
1976 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448



TRACKER CANOE
17ft., 2 person,
aluminum, $200
(352) 563-1096
VIKING
'80, 22ft. Tr-lhull Deck
Boat, Engine & outdrive
redone last year.
$3,500., 352-220-8158
WANTED TO BUY
SEXTANT
(352) 563-0022
WANTED to BUY:
Center console,
14'-16', no motor.
Call (352) 746-7649




2 FIXER RV,S
1994 Scotty 29' ram
cummings desel AT.
roof dmg, $6,995 OBO.
1986 Newmar 27' Ford
7.5L AT. $3,250 0BO
both drivable need
work. Lecanto,
260-377-9662 cell
COACHMAN
'99, 32ft., dblesllde 5th
wheel, very nice, Only
$11,900., (352) 795-7901
FLEETWOOD
1988, 33FT, w/ attch
porch 10 ft x 30 under
roof shed, Must sell
$7,500 (352) 344-4016
FORD
1991 Class C
motorhome. 27'. 50,000
ml. Extras. $8000.
(352) 795-5151
HOLIDAY
1992, 32', Rambler, 33K,
self cant, Q. bed, A/C,
3 way Fridge, 1 owner,
$15,000(352) 726-8126
PACE ARROW
1994, 33'Class A, 60K
Air, generator, much
storage, 460 Ford,
2 TVs, $21,900.
(352) 563-6558




2003 ROCKWOOD
POP UP
AC, awning, loaded
$5,995. (352)795-7901
2005 TRAVEL TRAILER
35ft., with 14ft. slide.
Rent It while you build
your New Home.
(352) 464-2481
AVION
'94, 5th Wheel, excel.
cond. 17 ft. liv. area
slide, queen bedrm.
many extras. must sell
$16,500. (352) 527-4697


KING OF THE ROAD
RV STORAGE, RV Repair
/UHaul, Store your Boat,
RV or Auto $15. mo.
Hwy 19, N. of the Mall.
(352) 795-7901
YELLOWSTONE
89, 23', self cont. A/C,
extra clean, $4,500.
(352)527-9133




1974 Ford Pickup Body
8' Box Cab, front clip
complete good cond.
$1,500. neg
352-422-2554
BLACK TOPPER
for small truck,
good cond., $100.
(352) 726-2722
After 5pm
CHEVROLET
1995, Caprice, for parts
motor runs great, new
tires, driver side
damaged, $1,000 OBO.
(352) 860-1343/
302-5451
FLATBED 8' long,
6'7" wide, $200.
Front & rear bumper
6'X8" wide, rear bumper
has lights & H/D trailer
hitch, $125. Will fit 1/2
ton or 3/4 ton pickup.
(352) 563-2941
MACCO COMMERCIAL
air compressor, $500
ENGINE HOIST
$150
(352) 302-0441
MOTEGI RIMS/TIRES
4 "18 MOTEGI RACING
WHITE RIMS W BRAND
NEW TIRES 225/40/ZR18
$6000BO 352-697-2056
SCOTT
Tall Gate Extended,
Like new for Nissan
Pickup, 2000-present.
Org. $209. Asking $75.
(352) 527-1123
VINYL BRA for Dodge
Intrepid, like new, fits
93-97 model, $35.
Also Red Carpet dash
cover, $20,
(352) 746-1262
Wood Decked Steel
Frame Flat
Truck Body
75" Wide, 96" Long
$350. neg.
352-422-2554













ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC
Gocarts, 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
CONSIGNMENT USA
CASH OR CONSIGN
98% Sales Success
No Fee to Seller
909 44W and US19-
airport. 212-3041
FREE REMOVAL OF
Mowers, motorcycles,
Cars. ATV's, 628-2084
VEHICLES WANTED,
Dead or Alive.
Call Smitty's Auto
628-9118











99FORD TAURUS LX
V-s, Loaded, Clean.... $3,995
95 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER SUV
V-6,Sunroo, Loaded.........$4,995
'98 CADDY SEDAN DEVILLE
'V- Lealthe Loaded............$7,995
97 LINCOLN TOWNCAR EXEC.
vory Pearl, Leather,Nice...$7,995
MANY MORE IN STOCK ALL
UNDER WARANTY





Auto

; Truck
RV

Sales &
Service
Get Financed!!

CALL JIM






100 + CLlN DfPENDAmLE 9
FROM.d 3o-DOWN













(352)548-2104
30 MIN. E-2 CREDIT
1675 US 19 HOMOSASSA








BUICK
1995; Park Avenue,
all pwr, all leather very
(352) 746-9375
(352) 634-0619
BUICK

equipped. 18.240 MILES
$6000. Call from 9 to 5
(352) 489-2104
BUICK
cond. new Michelen


tires, 1 yr. warr. 37k ml
$12,500. (352) 527-1026
CADILLAC
1986 DeVllle, looks and
runs good, good trans.
$650.
(352) 795-8085
CADILLAC
1996 Sedar. DeVille.
Pearl white w/maroon
top. All leather. Exc.
cond. $6000. 527-8682
CADILLAC
1998, Sedan Deville,
Pearl white w/mar. Ithr.
Int. excel, cond, $5,800.
(352) 382-5309
Cadillac
'93, Fleetwood, Brough-
am, blue, rear wheel,
RWD, 80k ml., $6,295.
(352) 382-0635
or 302-6774
CAMARO
1987, runs great, cold
AC. T-tops. $2000 obo.
(352) 400-2364


CAMARO
1988, Flowmasters. Runs
good. $800 or best offer
(352) 726-4623
CARS, TRUCKS. SUVS
CREDIT REBUILDERS
$500- DOWN
Clean, Safe Autos
CONSIGNMENT USA
909 Rt44&US19AIrport
564-1212 or 212-3041
CHEVROLET
2000, Corvette, silver,
warr avail., $28,800.
(352) 382-4331
CHRYSLER LEBARON
'93, 27K orla. ml, Estate
Car. All pwr, new
tires, PERFECT 30MPG.
$4700. (352) 563-9815
CHRYSLER SEBRING
Limited 2004. Exc. cond.
Less than 6,000 ml.
(352) 726-0318
COUGAR
'88, P/S,P/B,P/W. Opera
top. 1-owner, always
araged, 118,000 ml.
1700 obo. 527-3560
COUGAR
'94 XR7, 78,000, $3000
'91 Caddy Brougham,
Gold Series, 118K $3200
Mus (352) 621-3541
Did You Know
That Sometimes You
can Make more
money donating
your vehicle by taking
It off your taxes then
trading It In.
Donate It to the
THE PATH
(Rescue Mission for
Men Women &
Children)
at (352) 527-6500
DODGE
'91 Diplomat, Ice cold
air, no dents, every-
thing works, $750
(352) 563-5986
FORD
1991 Tempo GL
44.1K ml., exc. cond.
moving, $1,500
(352) 344-5372
FORD
1997, Escort, runs great,
cold A/C, good Cond,
$2,000 OBO
637-4051/302-5844
FORD
1999, Taurus, 49K, good
cond, PW, PL P/Seat
owned by older senior,
$5,100. (352) 726-6228
FORD FOCUS
2002 ZTW wagon, Zetec
engine, auto., sliver,
leather, all power, 16'
Alloys, 6-CD changer,
front side alrbags, ABS,
tinted, new tires, 16K ml.
100K mile warranty
$9,300 (352) 344-0632
FORD
Lady's '89 Tempo
4dr, 79K, Super clean,
AC, PWR, Real prizel
$3600. (352) 628-5790
FORD MUSTANG
'00, Cony. Red, all pwr,
dual CD/Tape player.
Bg. top/Int. 59k, exc.
$11,000. (352) 527-0809
FORD
Steal it $6300, 2002
Focus SE. Mint. Great
on gas. 70K+ ml.
Contact (352) 249-1121
FORD TAURUS
2001 wagon, 64K ml.,
great shape, $6,800
(352) 344-2752
GEO
TRACKER
$1500 or best offer.
(352) 527-3975
KIA
'01 Rio, 52K, CD player,
tinted windows, new
tires, good cond. $4,000
obo 352 344-3046
KIA
'01, Rio, 4DR, PT, AC,
new tires. 39,500ml., ex-
cel cond. $4,900. obo
352-527-1812, 302-9498
KIA
01, Sephia,
white, manual,
$3500 FIRM
(352) 527-3519
LINCOLN
'89 Towncar, Cartier
Exc. running cond.
Nice ride, clean,
dependable, $1,495
(352)341-0610
LINCOLN
'96, Signature Towncar,
Jack Nicklaus, wht. w/
burgundy cloth top,
22-25 mil pep gal. 113k
mi. excel cond. $5,000.
obo (352) 628-3363
Lincoln Town Car
1992. Clean. Good ride,
looks good, minor
mechanical repairs.
$1800. (352) 527-1139



100 + CLEAN DEPENDABLE CIS
FROM-3SO-DOWN'
30 MIN. E-Z CREDIT
675-U 19-H MOSA A


MAZDA
2002,.MIata, 11,800k ml.,
silver ext., 5 spd., pris-
tine $15,500.
(352) 628-4497
MERCURY
1994, Marquis LS, 85K,
AC/ stereo, Spoked
Thubs, leather Int. new
brakes, $4,000 BO.
352464-1032
MERCURY
1999 Cougar, black,
A/C, radio, $6,000
cash (352) 726-3084
MERCURY
'98, Sable, auto trans.,
cruise contraioll, Ice cold
air, good tires, high ml.
runs good, $2,500.
(352) 220-4927
NISSAN MAXIMA
'99, SE, very clean, runs
great, sun rf. AC, CD,
5sp. stick. 128k ml.
$4400/obo 352-220-2709
OLDSMOBILE
'92 Cutlass Supreme


A/C, good cond. runs
good, $1,200 obo
(352) 344-0551
PONTIAC
'93, Grand Am, 2 DR,
PW, cold AC, 16' tires &
wheels, new, 129k ml.
$1,600. 352-697-0889
PONTIAC
'95 Bonnevllle. Good
cond. Has a '98 eng. &
trans. $3950
(352) 795-0063
PONTIAC FIREBIRD
1992 Formula, V-8,
T-tops, auto trans, pwr
accessories. $2500 obo
(352) 465-3942



100 +CIEAN DEPENDABLE CAIS
FROM-350-DOWN
30 MIN. E-Z CREDRI
SF5- US 19 -HO UOS
E-1&II


SAAB
'97, 95k, Immaculate,
electric sunroof, 5sp.,
$4,500 obo
(352) 628-9559
SATURN
2000 station wagon,
original owner, 37 mpg,
never In accident, exc.
cond. (352) 382-7661
TOYOTA CELICA
2002
80,000, Air Cond,,
Sliding Sun Roof, Single
Compact Disc, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Cruise Control,
$9500 OBO Call any-
time 352-476-3260 or
352-302-0816




FLORIDA SWAP
MEETS
No Shows July or
Aug.
Next Show 09/04
Sumter Co.
Fairgrounds
1-800-438-8559
FORD
1954 2-dr, good eng. &
trans. No body rust.
Restorable, $3500. After
4pm call (352) 212-4839
MERCURY
'70, Cougar, good look-
Ing, fast, dependable,
too many new parts to
list. $3,700. 352-860-2556
MUSTANG
1968 Coupe, 302 V-8.
Automatic. New tires
& morel $7200.
(352) 726-6779
MUSTANG COUPE
1965, 6cyl., lots of new
parts, good cond
need some work.
$4,800. (352) 628-2126
VW SUPER BEETLE
1973, Lt. Blue, 96,814 ml.
Runs good, many after
market perf. parts. All
stock parts ncl. $4,200/
obo. 443-655-7209 or
(352) 746-1955










BOX TRUCK
1990 GMC 16'
Maintained, good
shape, $4500.
(352) 422-2821
CHEVEROLET
1984, 510 Sport Model,
new engine w/ 9000ml
$2,500 OBO.
(352) 795-9490
CHEVROLET
'02, Silverado 2500,
auto, towing package
60k ml. $13,500.
(352) 613-7277
CHEVROLET
1999 S-10, 4-cyl5-spd.
air, stereo, runs great,
$4,500 (513)320-4953
Crystal River
CHEVROLET
2004, Slverado Ext.
cab, 1500ml, loaded,
Must See.
(352) 634-5665
CHEVROLET
'85, Pickup, full size, one
owner, orig '85 title,
excel cond. $3,500.
(352) 527-8499
CHEVY
1972 Stepside. 350, 4
spd, 8" lift. Good shape.
$4000 obo. or trade
boat?- (352) 613-3579
CHEVY
1981 P30 Step Van
(UPS style) Alum body,
completely rebuilt.
Everything new. Drive
anywhere, $5995 obo.
352-527-3756
CHEVY
'97, SI0 Pickup, ext,
cab, runs good, body
rough, 150k V6, AC
$1,500. (352) 746-2982
DODGE
1987 Dakota Pickup.
Runs good, new tires.
$1500 or best
offer. (352) 464-2055
DODGE
1989 Sport Pickup
convertible $3,000
(352) 637-0057
DODGE DUALLIE
DIESEL, 1997
High mileage, well
malnt. $7500/obo
(352) 212-0699
FORD
'97, F150, Pickup, ext.
cab., V6, 5sp., 48k ml.
on factory second.
motor, $5,800. obo
(352) 628-7414
FORD
2001 F150 XLT. Super
cab. 5.3 liite; V-8,factory
tow pkg. rated 8,400
Ibs. 5th wheel hitch
rated 15,000 Ibs. 5 disc
CD player. Alum tool-
box. 46,000 ml. $14,000.
(352) 382-7316
FORD
2001, Ughtning, bick,
show rm cond, only
8300ml, garaged,
$27,000. 352-560-6186
FORD
2003, F350, Dually
$27,000.
YAMAHA 250.
& 2003 Raotor
CALL (352) 563-0869
FORD RANGER
2001 XLT, 4 door, auto,-
loaded, 98K ml. exc.
cond. $7,200/obo
352-422-7910/795-9090
GMC
1991 pickup. New
motor, roof rack & tool-


box Included. $1500
obo. (352) 489-1759
MAZDA
'92 5-spd. cold air, ext.
cab, easy on gas, 4 cyl.
clean, little truck, $1,200
(352) 860-0948
TOYOTA
1984, Pick up, topper,
chrome wheels, new
clutch, $1,195 00B.
(352) 422-6661
TOYOTA
2002 Tacoma, 5-spd.,
green, $10,900 obo
(352) 344-4497
TOYOTA
PU truck, 1983, good
running condition.
$600/obo.
(352) 860-1426



imI


CHEVROLET
1993, Suburban, 350
engine, cust. paint &
ent, radar, Ice cold
A/C, runs great, $5,800
OBO. (352) 621-8021
(352) 302-0725
CHEVY BLAZER
2002 LS, 40K ml.
Garage kept, Perfect
cond. Like newly $9800
(352) 746-7970
CHEVY SUBURBAN
1981 Air Condition,
Power Steering, Power
Windows, Power Door
Locks, Tilt Wheel,
AM/FM Stereo, Single
Compact Disc, Rear
Wheel Drive, $800.00
fair condition, 454c.I.
engine. Call Crckett at
352-382-1439.
FORD BRONCO II
'86 Eddie Bauer edition,
4 cyl., 4x4, new tires,
100K plus miles. CB
hookup, roof rack,
covered spare tire on
back, Exc. transport.
(needs valve guide re-
pair) asking $1,995 obo
or will trade for 3/4 ton
pickup, V-8, with a trail-
er hitch. Also need a RV
tow dolly. Must be com-
plete with chains & tire
straps, Will pay up to
$500 for used tow dolly.
Call (352) 344-8334
leave msg. or call my
cell (352) 302-0850
FORD EXPLORER
1996, 4X4, 4dr, rebuilt
engine, runs like newl
$3500.
(352) 563-2130
JEEP WRANGLER X
2004, low ml., loaded,
mint cond. New
$23,900, sell for, $17,900.
352-228-7772
MITSUBISHI
2002 Montero XLS,4wd,
6 cyl. All pwr. Sunroof. 7
pass. 60K ml. Exc. cond.
15,500. (352) 746-0625




KING OF THE ROAD
RV STORAGE, RV Repair
/UHaul, Store your Boat,
RV or Auto $15. mo.
Hwy 19, N. of the Mall.


FORD BRONCO
1995 Sport. 1 owner,
red on red. Loaded,
AC, etc.Uke new, $5000
obo. 352-422-5522






















CHEVY
1981 P30 Step Van
(UPS style) Alum body,
completely rebuilt.
Everything new. Drive
anywhere, $5995 obo.
352-527-3756
CHEVY
1987 C20 h-tp conver-
sion van w/elec wheel-
bed. Runs excellent.
$2500obo.352-465-8779

1995 Capt chairs, Ice
cold AC & very clean.
148k miles $2,900.
(352) 476-7229.
DODGE
1992, Passenger Van,
rebuilt engine & trans.
$1,200 (352) 344-9266
(727) 415-7266
DODGE
1999, Grand Caravan,
white, high milage, mint
cond. loaded, 1st
$3,000. (352) 302-4326
DODGE
2000 hl-top conversion
van.19.000K ml. Loaded
w/luxuries. $12,500 NEG.
(352) 746-5044
DODGE
2000, Ram Wagon,2500
8 passenger, 5.2, V8,
loaded, 8,500k ml.,
$7,200 obo
(352) 628-0825
FORD
1965 van,needs TLC,
$500 obo
(352) 344-4531
FORD
2000 E150 XLT, Trailer
pkg. Tinted windows,
PL PW, rear AC. Run-
ning boards, 72,000 ml.
Excellent cond. $11,500.
(352) 637-4640
HONDA
2001 Odyssey, 5.1,000 ml
5 door, CD player,
MIchellns, exc. cond.
$14,900. (352) 795-9004
LEISURE VAN
Beautiful cond.
Hurricane escape,


AMrIIDlUUS AIV
1984 Scrambler, $1,995.
New starter, master cyl.
(352) 621-1241
or (727) 432-3426
ATV + ATC USED PARTS
Buy-Sell-Trade ATV, ATC,
Go-carts 12-5pm Dave's
USA (352) 628-2084
Go kart
$300.
(352) 795-7766
Go Kart
engine less than 200hrs
$350.
(352) 628-9266
after 5pm


q


ALAN NUSSO
BROKER
Associate
Real Estate Sales
Exit Realty Leaders
(352) 422-6956

BUELL XB9S
2003, Lightning, 2500ml,
warr, till Aug., Corbin
Seat, Extras, Adult
owned flawless $5,500
(352) 746-1366


Vicles
'0 og eB


DurangoK SL


337-0710 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Audit Committee is requesting pro-
posals for the purpose of retaining an I1dependent
Certfiled Public Accounting firm or IndMdual to per-
form a financial and compliance audit of the records
of Citrus County. The audit will Include the records of
the following Citrus County Constitutional Officers:
Board of County Commissioners, Clerk of Courts, Sheriff.
Property Appraiser, and Supervisor of Elections. The
proposal should be for a three year period, auditing Fis-
cal Years 2004/2005, 2005/2006, and 2006/2007. A pro-
posal packet should be requested from Sarah Koser, Fi-
nance Director at (352) 341-6449.
Proposals should be delivered to Susan Sullivan, AssLs-
tant Finance Director, Citrus County Clerk of Courts,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Room 101, Inverness, Flori-
da 34450. Proposals must be received by 2:00 P.M. July
15, 2005.
Vicki Philips, Chairwoman
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, and 10, 2005.

338-0703 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a regular
business meeting Wednesday. July 13. 2005 at 9:00
a.m. In the Lecanto Government Building. 3600 W. Sov-
erelan Path. Room 166. Lecanto. FL 34461.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact the Executive Offices of the
Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida,
34450 (352) 34.1-6560, at least one day before the
meeting, if you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
VICKI PHILLIPS, CHAIRWOMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the Governing Body with respect
to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may
need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding Is made, which record Includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based
(Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, 2005.

339-0703 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID
Bid # 05-B-07
Engineering Services for SIdewalk Construction
The City of Crystal River Is soliciting bids for Engineering
Services for construction of sidewalks In designated
areas of our city. Proposals will be accepted until 11:00
a.m., July 19, 2005, at the Office of the City Clerk. 123
NW Highway 19, Crystal River; Florida 34428.
Scope of work: Design Services, Permitting, Construc-
tion Administration and Inspections, Cost Estimating,
and related Implementation Services. The location of
the proposed sidewalks are as follows:
1. "E 8th Avenue from SE 5th Street to Highway 19
2. NE 12th Avenue from State Road 44 East to SE 5th
Avenue
3. NE 3rd Street from NE 8th Avenue to NE 9th Avenue
4. NE 9th Avenue from NE 3rd Avenue to State Road
44
5. NE 8th Avenue from NE 11th Street to NE 13th Ter-
race
6. NW 6th Street from NW 7th Avenue to NW 14th
Place.
The proposal must be submitted as follows: One (1)
original (plainly marked "original") and three (3) copies,
all In a SEALED ENVELOPE, PLAINLY MARKED ON THE
OUTSIDE with the Company's name and address and
labeled: "BID NO. 05-B-07 ENGINEERING SERVICES
FOR SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION. Proposals should be
addressed to City Clerk, at the address listed above,
and must be received no later than 11:00 a.m., July 19,
2005.
Informational pockets are available at the Public Works
Department, which may be obtained by. contacting
(352) 795-6149, or can be picked up at 123 NW High-
way 19, Crystal River.
Please contact: John J. Lettow, Interim Public Works
Director at (352) 795-6149. The City of Crystal River re-
serves the right to waive Irregularities and reject any
and all companies, firms or Individuals responding. The
city accepts no responsibilityy for the costs Incurred In
the preparation and delivery of proposals.
By: /s/ Darcy H. Chase, City Clerk
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, 2005.

340-0703 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 102-05
Crystal River Airport Access Road
The cost for the plans and specifications Is a
non-refundable fee of $150.00. To obtain additional In-
formation concerning the announcement, please visit
the Citrus County Webslte at: www.bocc.cltrus.flus and
click on the Bid Information option or call
Onvla/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 4, 2005 at 2:00
p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 4, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461,
A Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. local time,
on the 13th day of July, 2005, at Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 218 Lecanto,


HONDA
'04, Rancher ES, 329CC,
2WD, garage kept, per-
fect cond. only 280 hrs.

HONDA
1998 CR 125.
Exc. cond. Runs great.
$1750 or best offer.
(352) 489-6377
HONDA
2004 TRX 450R.
Less than 20 hours,
Uke new. $4900 obo.
(352) 489-6377
POLARIS
2001 Trailblazer 250 cc.
new transm. lots of
Performance parts,
$2,000 352-572-2903
YAMAHA
2001, Raptor 4 wheeler
660, w/ many extras
$4,000.OBO.
(352) 344-0304






MRCITRUSCOUNT"


fications In a sealed envelope marked on the outside,
"Request for Quallfications for Medical Director, EMS'.
All RFQ's must remain valid for a period of one hundred
twenty (120) days.
Specifications and/or further Information may be ob-
tained by contacting Teresa L. Gorentz Executive Di-
rector, 3380 E. Gulf to Lake Highway, Inverness, Florida
34453, (352) 637-4121.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all re-
quest for qualifications, to waive Informalities In any or
all request for qualifications, and to re-advertise for re-
quest for qualifications,
The Board also reserves the right to separately accept
or reject any item or items of the request for qualifica-
tions and to award and/or negotiate a contract In the
best Interest of the Foundation.
NATURE COAST EMERGENCY MEDICAL FOUNDATION
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: -s- Teresa L. Gorentz
Executive Director
Published five (5) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 7. 10. 17, 24, and 31. 2005.


2 Honda Mopeds
For Sale &
Go Karts.

HARLEY DAVIDSON
'01, Deuce, 340 ml., fuel
Inj., orig. owner, sliver,
health forces sale.
$17,250. (352) 621-0143
HONDA GOLDWING
1986 Asplncade, runs
great, 42K ml. $3300/
obo. (352) 637-5052
leave message.
KAWASAKI
1993 KLX 650, Street/
Trail, exc. cond. low
miles, $2,500 obo
(352) 860-0176
KAWASAKI
1999, KLR 650, 27K, w/
extras runs great
$2500. OBO
(352) 302-8046
KAWASAKI
2003 250 NInja.
Very low miles. $2200.
(352) 726-6779
KAWASAKI
2004 Vulcan 1600, low
miles, beautiful., Paid
$10,500, asking $8500.
(352) 302-6311
Motorcycle Carrier
Versahaul, 5001b ca-
pacity, class 3 hitch
$260.
(352) 382-7046
SUZUKI
'05 Boulevard, 800cc,
700 ml. fully dressed,
.under warr. Uke new,
$7,350 726-6351

SUZUKI
2002, Savage 650,
9,000ml, looks & runs
good, $3,000. OBO.
352-726-4753 after 8am
SUZUKI
'94 Intruder 800
Excellent condition.
Must see $3,000
(352)341-1854
YAMAHA
Scooter, 125cc, 8Korg
ml, garaged, Sr driven,
as new w/ helmets,
$1,500 (352) 563-0022


CLASSIFIED


FL 34461. Contact 352-527-5488 for directions.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path. First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
The plans and specifications can be examined at the
following locations:
Tampa Builders Exchange
4302 Henderson Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33606
Mid State Builders Exchange. Inc.
19 NW 8th Street
Ocalo, FL 34475
South Marion Underground
4125 NW 44th Avenue
Ocala, FL 34482
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
5102 W. Laurel Street, Suite 500
Tampa, FL 33607
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
320 E. South Street, Suite 100
Orlando, FL 32801
Gulf Coast ABC,
2008 N. Himes Avenue
Tampa, FL 33607
Citrus County Builders Association
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vicki Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, 2005.




341-0703 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Bid Information
The Citrus'County Board of County Commissioners will
accept sealed bids for:
Bid No.: 103-05
Inverness Airport Airfield Marking and
Runway Pavement Sealing
The cost for the plans and specifications Is a
non-refundable fee of $150,00. To obtain additional In-
formation concerning the announcement, please visit
the Citrus County Website at: www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and
click on the Bid Information option or call
Onvia/Demandstar at: (800) 711-1712.
Deadline for the receipt of bids: August 4, 2005 at 2:00
p.m.
A public bid opening will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Au-
gust 4, 2005 at the Lecanto Government Building, lo-
cated at: 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461.
A Pre-Bid meeting will be held at 11:00 a.m. local time,
on the 13th day of July, 2005, at Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 218 Lecanto.
FL 34461. Contact 352-527-5488 for directions.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the Management & Budget Of-
fice, 3600 West Sovereign Path, First Floor, Lecanto, Flor-
Ida 34461, (352) 527-5203 at least two days before, the
meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
The plans and specifications can be examined at the
following locations:
Tampa Builders Exchange
4302 Henderson Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33606
Mid State Builders Exchange, Inc.
19 NW 8th Street
Ocala, FL 34475
South Marion Underground
4125 NW 44th Avenue
Ocala, FL 34482
McGraw Hill/F.W. Dodge Reports
5102 W. Laurel Street, Suite 500
Tampa, FL 33607
McGraw HIII/F.W. Dodge Reports
320 E. South Street. Suite 100
Orlando, FL 32801
Gulf Coast ABC
2008 N. Himes Avenue
Tampa, FL 33607
Citrus County Builders Association
1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Vlckl Phillips, Chairwoman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
July 3, 2005.

336-0731 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
that on Monday, August 1, 2005 at 10:00 a.m., at the
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Services Office,
sealed proposals will be opened for the following:
MEDICAL DIRECTOR
Emergency Medical Services,
Nature Coast Emergency Medical Foundation,
Citrus County. Florida
"SCOPE OF WORK"
The services provided shall be as described In the Re-
quest for Qualifications specifications and "draft" con-
tract and shall Include but not necessarily be limited to
the following:
1. The Medical Director shall be responsible to the Na-
ture Coast Emergency Medical Foundation, Inc., Board
of Directors and report to the Executive Director.
2. The Medical Director shall comply with the respon-
sibilities as set forth in Florida Statutes 401, Medical Di-
rectors. These include supervising and assuming direct
responsibility for the medical performance of pre-
hospital emergency response employees.
3. The Medical Director shall comply with the duties
and responsibilities as set forth In Florida Administrative
.Code 64E-2, Emergency Medical Services, Medical Di-
rection.,
4. The Medical Director shall be available 24 hours a
day for.emergency consultations from system provider.
He/she shall provide for and be available by either
pager or cell phone at all times and shall provide for
an electronic email address for messaging and corre-
spondence. He/she shall respond In a timely manner
to specified pages, cell phone calls or messages and
email: In the event the Medical Director shall be una-
vailable he/she shall appoint a similarly qualified physi-
clan to cover all responsibilities.
All requests for qualifications must be received by the
office of the Executive DIrector; 3380 E. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Inverness, Florida 34453 on or before 1000
a.m. on Monday. August Ist. 2005.
All requests for qualifications, Including the recom-
mendation of the Executive Director and/or Executive
Committee, will be presented to the Nature Coast
Emergency Medical Foundation Board of Directors for
final awarding at otherwise.
The Board will automatically reject the RFQ of any per-
son or affiliate who appears on the convicted vendor
list prepared by the Department of General Services,
State of Florida, under Section 287.133(3)(d), F.S. (1999).
All submissions must Include two (2) signed originals
and four (4) complete copies of each request for quall-








CIRnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


12D SUNLDA, J.ULY 3, 2005


El


E


To listen and respond to ads using your


=0[& call 1-866-529-4742

To respond to ads at $1.99 per min, call

1-900-226-1602 Must be 18+.


To bcom- a mmbe,-cal 1-866268521


YOUNG & VIBRANT
Artistic SWE 18,5'3", 160lbs, brown/green,
smoker, N/D, enjoys drawing and dancing.
Seeking WM, 18-23, smoker, light drinker
ok, for friendship. Z718404
EASYGOING PERSONALITY
Educated, positive, level-headed,
secure SWF, 52, 5'2", blond/blue, will-
ing to talk things through, enjoys trav-
el, cooking. Seeking SWM, 50-58,
H/W-proportionate, with a similar out-
look on life for LTR. 0469082
HEY, TALL GUYS
Attractive, well-built, long-haired, Libra
SWF, 50, 5'9", N/S, enjoys movies,
tropical fish keeping, cats, and music.
Seeking stable, honest, caring .SM,
45-60, 6'-6'6". Life is short. Let's enjoy
some together. 07625057
MY GUY WANTED
This 55-yr-old/blonde young-at-heart,
seeks a guy of her own. Friendly, lov-
ing, and kind who is ready for a rela-
tionship. Looking for my guy, 47-57,
N/S. V5898611
NEW AGE
Blonde, fair, 5'3", mature, freethinker,
good with people, poetry, singer, his-
torical novels, kind, fun to be with,
N/children. Seeks emotionally avail-
able partner 60-80. 0580103
WEEK WACHEE GIRL
SWF, 46, 130lbs, blonde/blue, smok-
er, enjoys the outdoors, water, music,
tv, and chatting. Seeking WM, 45-55,
smoker, with similar interests. Need a
good friend? 0684286
KNIGHT AND SHINNING AMOR
I have a great personality, love to
laugh and really love water, I'm outgo-
ing yet a little shy. I'm very old-fashon-
ed with a slight twist. Treat me like a
lady!!! 0'727217
PEOPLE PERSON
SWF, 57, 5'6", N/S, does a lot of hugging,
looking for neat, clean, honest SWM, 52-
70, for possible LTR. 0#722071
HERE I AM
SWF, tall,slender, pretty, brown/brown,
N/S, loves classical music, art, books,
intelligent conversation, boating,
cooking. Seeks rugged interesting
N/S, SWM, 57-63, for companionship,
possible LTR. 0#223790
WHERE ARE YOU?
Honest SWF, 21, chubby, 5'5", brown/
brown, mother, Scorpio, smoker, loves
movies, flea markets, seeks man, 25-
45, for possible romance. W710346
NEED A NEW FRIEND?
Devoted SBF, 41, God-fearing, moth-
er of 1, interested in going to church,
flea markets, strolls in the park, seeks
SBCM, 37-53, w/similar interests.
0Z643952
BROWN EYED GIRL
Looking for a friend thar's furn o be with.
into rock music, cusiorn anr3 classic car-:,
movies, travel,, animals,: nature, and
more. Call and check me out. 0#916643
ACTIVE WOMAN SEEKS...
SWF, 39, looking for a SWM, 39-45, to
enjoy a good glass of wine with over a
great conversation.. 0719170
NO TIME FOR FOOLISHNESS
Open SWF, 58, 5'2", average build,
N/S, really likes to go out for Italian
food, loves flea markets, animals, trav-
el, seeks SWM, 56-65, N/S, for possi-
ble LTR. 0714884
GOOD FRIENDS
SWF, 26, 5', brown/brown, with 2 chil-
dren, smoker, loves classical jazz, rap,
and soul music. Seeking BM, 19-35,
smoker, goal-oriented, fun to be with.
V570398
LOYAL AND LOVING
SWF, 46, N/S, seeks good, Christian
SWM, 35-60, N/S, who enjoys ani-
mals, likes to walk, talk, hit the beach,
shop at the mall. 0Z715937
SO MANY BOYS. ISO THAT...
one man. WF, 26, occasional smoker,
with son, quiet at first, has sarcastic
sense of humor. Seeking frank,
straightforward WM, 33-40. 0723332
GOOD COMPANIONSHIP
Fairly attractive, active SWF, 63, N/S,
interested in fishing, dancing, flea mar-
kets, travel, cards, seeks SWM, 60-70,
N/S, for possible long-term relationship.
0669086 ,
MOTHER OF TWO
WF, 28, 5'1", 170lbs, would like to meet
a loving SWM, 28-36, who would like to
spend time with us. 0Z628205


LIKES COUNTRY LIFE
WF, 39, 5'2", 120lbs, looking for a gen-
tleman, 38-48, N/S. I enjoys working
out, going to movies, dining out, hik-
ing, gardening and most anything out-
doors. 0T564449
GREAT WOMAN LOOKING...
For great guy, I'm fun loving, enjoy din-
ner, movies and love to dance. I'm an.
active person, I enjoy the simple
things in life. Seeking someone to
have fun with. 0734342
GAME-FREE LTR
SBF, 51, 5'4", enjoys cooking, church,
yard sales, flea markets. Seeking hon-
est, commitment-minded, family-ori-
ented SBM, 50-55, for LTR. No
games, serious replies only 0r427683
IT MUST BE YOU
SBF, full-figured, 30, 5'5", Capricorn,
N/S, mother, seeks family oriented
BM, 25-42, who knows what they
want in life. 0696938
LOOKING TO LOVE...
someone. Want to date with possible
long term relationship I am a sexy
blonde 31, looking for Mr. right.
0710152
WHATTAYA SAY...
we go catch a flick? SBF, 31, smoker,
enjoys Las Vegas casinos. Seeking
BM, 27-45, to chill with. V685193
CHRISTIAN WOMAN
WF, 27, enjoys camping, going to
movies and having fun. Looking for a
Christian man, 25-40, who likes the
same. If that's you, call me. 0673671
LET'S HAVE A GOOD TIME
SWF, 59, N/S, enjoys dining out,
dancing, cookouts, fishing, flea mar-
kets, seeks special SWM, 55-65, to
spend some time with. 10713370
HONESTY A MUST
SWF, 35, 5'4', N/S, blonde/blue, single
mom, overweight, seeks honest guy,
19-55, who loves having fun. 0679735
WOW!
Super fit SWF into outdoor adven-
ture's, foreign films, cultural events, is
seeking a non-smoking, very fit, intel-
ligent, creative SWM, 30-45, for LTR.
Must love peanut butter. 0277278
TAKE IT EASY
SWF, 50, Aquarius, N/S, seeks sweet,
loving, HF, 35-55, N/S, for possible
romance. 0#695759
SOMEONE TO LOVE FOREVER
SF, 35, likes camping out, fishing, car
races, amusement parks. Looking for
SM, 35-45, with same interests.
0269410
NEW TO AREA
Jamaican lady, 55, N/S, university
graduate, former teacher, enjoys quiet
evenings at home, theater, dining out,
musicals, cooking, sewing. Seeking
marriage-minded DM, 35-50, for good
friendship, possible LTR. 0693050
"HOW ABOUT ME?
SWF, 43, smoker, h4 1 child, loves
cookouts, beaches, boating, races, hors-
es, laughter, seeks SWM, 40-58, smok-
er, 6'+, who loves to hug. 0664002
EMOTIONALLY AVAILABLE
Independent, free-spirited SWF, 59,
5'8", spontaneous, creative, N/S, enjoys
kayaking, camping, photography, travel-
ing, and good conversation. Seeking
WM, 55-68, N/S, who believes life is an
exciting adventure. 0'708586
SWF, 37, brown/blue, 5'9", medium
build, two children. Seeking SWM, 37-
45, who's honest, dependable,
w/great SOH for LTR, enjoys outdoor
activities, movies and family functions.
If sounds good contact me. 0712551

ISO SINCERITY
SWF, 40, 5'6", single mother of 2 (son,
20, daughter, 11), smoker, works in
nursing field. Seeking truthful, com-
patible, fun WM, 30-45, for LTR.
0681370
A REAL MAN
Attractive SBF, 48, 5'5", N/S, in the
medical profession, likes movies, din-
ing, dancing, quiet evenings at home,
long walks. Seeking honest, mature
SM, 35+, N/S, financially stable.
0690857
LADY RANCHER
Widowed female, 54, 57", average
build, Taurus, loves horses -and most
other critters, country lifestyle, easy-
going but hard-working, not too hard
on the eyes, ISO SWM, 46-59, with
similar interests. 0#682019


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JUST BE YOU
SWF, 50, sincere, honest, caring,
looking for the same in a good-heart-
ed, happy man. Why not call?
0693109
WE CAN BE TOGETHER
SWF, 44, marriage-minded, smoker,
homebody, would like to share
evenings in with a special man, 40-55,
who likes to watch movies, read, cook,
go out on the town. 0587120
LET'S GET TOGETHER
SWF, 62, N/S, enjoys crocheting.
Seeking WM, 60-70, N/S, who likes to
cuddle, sample local eateries, watch
movies, and take walks. 0630231
KISSES AND HUGS
Seeking true love, not lust. No cowards,
and no games, please. BCF, 50, single
mom, seeks honest, mature, strong,
hardworking male, for a monogamous
relationship and true love. 0840803
ONE IN A MILLION
Attractive DBF, 43,5'2", 118lbs, moth-
er of 10-yr-old. Black/indian decent, in
the nursing profession.Looking for
someone who likes movies, flea mar-
kets, camping, beaches and cooking.
0#595051
THIS IS MY TIME
41-year-old single mother of 2, blonde/
green, medium build, works in the insur-
ance field, loves to bowl, cook, watch
movies, work in the yard. ISO SM, 36-
46, who likes kids. 0Z498280
JUST A CALL AWAY
Compassionate, kind, considerate
SWF, 51, light auburn hair, 5'2", medi-
um build, enjoys people, likes cooking,
travel, boating, fishing. Seeking simi-
lar, loving, active, open-hearted and
true gentleman. V232518
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
SWF, 5'7", big blue eyes, long blonde
hair, 43, likes music, art. Seeking intel-
ligent, open-minded, drama-free, sin-
cere, honest, loving SWM, 30-50, with
good sense of humor, for friendship
first. 0P404773
STOP LOOKING! READ.
DWF, 57, full-figured, blonde/blue, 5'3",
enjoys dancing, movies, occasional din-
ing out, cooking.Seeking S/DWM, 55-
65, for dating, possible LTR. 0I853666
WITH LOVE
SBF, 18, 5'3", 120bs, N/S, loves romance
movies. Seeking BM, 18-26, 5'4"+, N/S, for
friendship, possible romance. 0660691
SEEKING PLEASANT MAN
WiWF, 60, would like 'to meet a WM,
55-70, N/S, social drinker, who likes
day trips, going to movies and dining
out. 0594035
7 IN CATYEARS
SWCF, professional, seeking some-
one SWCM, with savvy, who likes gar-
dening, travel, friendship, dominos,
board games, chess, photography,
reading, writing5 painting, and other
arts and crafts. 0630114
GOOD LISTENER
SBF, 50, 5'6", 145lbs, black/brown,
Gemini, N/S, loves movies, long
walks, and occasional dining out.
Seeking BM, 45-55, into serious dat-
ing and relationship. 0661326
SEEKING CHRISTIAN MALE
SBCF, 40, 6', large build, N/D, N/S,
loves kids, going to church, movies,
more. Seeking SWCM, 35-60, who
loves life, is very honest and mar-
riage-minded. 0596730
BROWN SUGAR
SBF, 21, looking for someone, 21-30,
who is down-to-earth, fun, sweet, and
not really religious. V645309
MAYBE YOU'RE MY GUY
Easygoing SWF, 57, smoker, loves
the country life, country/oldies music,
cooking, camping. ISO outgoing man,
57-62, who likes movies, dining, quiet
times and laughter, for sharing a last-
ing, loving relationship. 0588873
NEW TO THE AREA
SWF, 5'6", 1261bs, smoker, many
interests, seeks SWM, 62-72, smoker,
to share the best years. V646004
PRETTY WOMAN
SWF, 5'4", 115lbs, seeks SWM, 50-.
63. You and I are in great shape, fun,
active, attractive, sensuous, clean,
N/S, healthy, kind, genuine, trustwor-
thy, intelligent, classy, secure. Call for
further details. 0956254
SEEKS ONE-WOMAN MAN
SWF, young 67, 5'7", N/S, has car,
stays out after dark, very active,
romantic, misses the things a woman
does for a man. Seeking WM, 66-79,
who has similar interests. V536212
LIKES THE SIMPLE THINGS
WF, 5'2", 125lbs, blonde/blue, would
like to find a true friend. Someone who
is cheerful, pleasant to be with, likes
long conversations, dancing, dining out
and have simple fun. 52-60. 0515437



GOOD-LOOKING GUY
WM, 39, brown/brown, in good shape,
wants to meet a WF, 30-41, to go out
and have fun with. 0716349
SEEKING SOMEONE SPECIAL
DWM, 38, professional, likes riding Harleys
and waterskiing, enjoys life and would love
to enjoy your company. 0542587
READY TO START AGAIN
SBM, 28, handsome, Taurus, N/S,
seeks nice woman, 20-36, to date, to
share wonderful times with. 0594317
GREAT DAD
SWM, 33, smoker, single dad, full-time
student, has weekends free to share with
special SWF, 24-36, smoker. 0717513
NO COUCH POTATOES
Active, healthy SWM, young 63, enjoys
the water, boating. Seeking classy, attrac-
tive, active SWF, 50-62, N/S, for possible
relationship. 0757364
TAKE A CHANCE
SWM, 40, likes Italian cuisine, home-
cooked meals. Seeking sociable, fun-
loving, spontaneous woman to enjoy
travel, sunshine, the sea, the sand,
quiet times, dancing, friendship, last-
ing love and romance. 0644820


CUDDLY BEAR
SWM, 45, 6'1", 250lbs, brown/green,
lives locally, smoker, enjoys Nascar,
football, bowling, pool". Seeking petite
WF, 25-45, smoker. 0256201

# LET'S HAVE FUN
SHM, 63, dark/blue, average build,
seeks lady, 57-63, N/S, who's pleasant
to be with, enjoys life, likes going to
movies, day trips, dining out. 0719784
LET ME KNOW YOU'RE THERE
SWM, 19, 6', 180lbs, smoker, tan
complexion, looking for a female, 18-
23, who is good-looking, has a nice
sense of humor, enjoys life. 0690796

LOADS OF FUN
SWM, 64, 5'11", 200lbs, enjoys '50s
and '60s music, dancing, gardening,
animals, very open-minded, seeks
full-figured lady who is fun to be with.
0690280
TALENT SEARCHING
SWM, 67, 5'11", 170lbs, N/S, enjoys
flying, Disney parks, church, square
dancing, travel, movies, Nascar, din-
ing out, animals. Seeking A/W/HF, 30-
60, N/S, who shares a passion for
travel. 0#717150
HEARTS AND FLOWERS
SBM, 40, 6'5", 2351bs, Leo, smoker,
enjoys simple pleasures of life, seeks
sexy, woman, 29-40, for possible
romance. 0712805
NEW TO GAINSVILLE AREA
SWM, 55, relocated from Maine, N/S,
loves movies and beaches. Seeking
woman, 35-59, smoker, to help me get
acquainted with the area. 0662489
POSSIBLY YOUR MAN...
who knows how to treat a woman. A
giver, intuitive listener. Not a puppy
dog or couch potato. Outside thrill
seeker, Inside romantic, charming
WM, 40, seeks WF, 30-42. V666718
GREAT MAN AVAILABLE
At present time, looking for a lady to
date and have some fun. I enjoy the
company of youth and smile with hap-
piness. Be great to be pen pals.
V726368
PLAYFUL PISCES
SWM, smoker, loves oldies music,
fishing, beaches, quiet times, and flea
markets. Seeking woman, 48-58,
smoker, for LTR. 0679528
CARING HEART
SM, 36, works in home improvement,
spends free time playing sports, swim-
ming, likes music and partying, seeks
female for LTR. 0714080
LONESOME
SWM, 72, retired, 5'2", N/S, N/D, likes
dining out, movies. Looking for slen-
der, fit W/HF, under 5'3", 135lbs, 60-
80, for friendship maybe more.
W718022
A NEW BEGINNING
Commitment-minded DM, 47, 6';
brown/brown, 180lbs, ISO a special lady,
someone who enjoys life, the outdoors
and classic rock, for sharing happiness
and a lasting relationship. 0610840
TOO MUCH FUN
SWM; 20, 5'9", 1381bs, N/S, brown/
blue, seeks single woman, 18-24,
N/S, who knows what she wants out
of a relationship. V560749
WANTING LONG LASTING
Average type of person, good sense
of humor, quiet, creative, sensitive and
caring. Looking for the person who
has the right chemistry and that I can
click with. 0728327
RETIRED MILITARY
WM, 71, 6', 180lbs, brown/blue, enjoys
bowling, dancing, long walks, exploring
new eateries and new places. Searching
for a lady, 60-80, who is broad-minded
and affectionate, with similar interests.
0716376
A LITTLE QUALITY TIME
SBM, 34, N/S, loves movies. Seeking
fun, loving, honest, game-free BF, 33-
46, ready to have fun in life. 0#709291
I LET'S GO SEE IT
Semi-retired SWM, 53, smoker, seeks
SWF, 50-59, smoker, who would like
to travel and see the world. 0716580
LET'S GETTOGETHER
Open-minded, compassionate, affec-
tionate DWM, 35, 5'8", 1601lbs; smok-
er, enjoys cookouts, movies. Seeking
WF, 25-45, H/W proportionate, smok-
er, who wouldn't mind being swept off
her feet. 0680448
INTELLECTUAL
SM, 6', 1981bs, likes biking, skating and
long walks, Interested in meeting a fun
WF, 20-50, who is interesting arqd smart,
to get to know and enjoy life. 0428687
PURE COUNTRY
SWM, 32, father of 2, tired of games,
ready to settle down with someone
honest, 30-43. 0691926
CITRUS COUNTY
DWM, 50, 6'2", brown/blue, attractive,
with 2 children, N/S, enjoys cruising,
weekend getaways, and good conver-
sation. Seeking attractive woman, 40-
55, H/W proportionate. V710072
OUTDOORS ADVENTURES
SWM, 33, 6', 1751bs, Cancer, mar-
riage-minded, smoker, mechanic, sin-
gle father of 2, seeks SWF, 32-42, for
wonderful relationship. 0675133
BE YOURSELF
Brown-complected SBM, 30, 5'10",
N/S, seeks very spontaneous, ener-
getie, outgoing, nice-looking woman,
20-42, N/S, who knows how to make
her own decisions. 0674730
SEE WHAT HAPPENS
Single male, 33, 2401bs, Cancer, N/S,
would like to meet a woman, 21-50,
N/S, who likes sports and trying new
things. 0651103
WHY NOT CALL?
DWM, 42, heavy machinery operator,
likes '70s/'80s rock, exploring life.
Seeking easygoing, energetic woman
to share outdoor adventures, boating,
4-wheeling, life, laughter and possible
LTR. 0701300
I WANT IT ALL
Active, attractive SWM, 55, 5' 7", 1751bs,
athletic build, Cancer, N/S, seeks
woman, 25-45, N/S, for LTR. 0677768


LOOKING FOR YOU
DWM, 37, with 1 child and dog, search-
ing for special woman, 25-40, HPTW,
physically fit, in shape, enjoys the out-
doors, loves traveling. 0976306
BOWL ME OVER
Fully employed, honest, respectful,
understanding SBM, 38, Pisces,
smoker, enjoys dining out, movies,
shopping, shooting pool, and playing
cards. Seeking BF, 40+, short, cute,
shapely. 0503353
LET'S HAVE FUN!
SWM, 63, enjoys reading, movies,
dinners in or out, and going to the
gym. Looking to meet a SF, 40-62,
with similar interests. 0#713773
VERY OUTGOING
SBM, 29, 5'11", athletic build, Virgo,
smoker, loves to have fun. Seeking
BF, 25-45, smoker, for friendship,'pos-
sible romance. 0633324
NO TIME FOR FOOLISHNESS
Very open SBM, 24, 5'9", athletic
build, seeks woman, for friendship,
romance, possible relationship. Let's
get to know each other. 0614026
TAKE A CHANCE
Dark-complected SBM, 21, 5'9",
Libra, smoker, really intelligent, inde-
pendent, seeks single.woman, 18-33,
smoker, for relationship. 0691104
IT'S ALL TRUE
Widowed WM, 47, 6', with 2 sons,
smoker, enjoys camping, football,.and
watching car racing. Seeking WF, 35-
50, smoker, for honest LTR. 0709372
INTELLIGENT, HONEST...
young-looking, dependable, attractive
DWPM, 43, 5'6", 140lbs, N/S, D/D-
free, w/daughter at home, loves-
sports, reading, movies, ISO intelli-
gent, non-smoking female. 0713278
LET'S TALK
WIWM 70, looks younger, very ener-
getic, enjoys dining out, sports, the
water, air boating, flea markets.
Looking to meet a caring, fun woman
who enjoys the same. 0Z695772

Q BROKEN-HEARTED
Attractive WM, 43, 5'7", 150lbs, seeks
attractive WF, for repairs. Tools must
include love, trust, communication,
friendship, and possible marriage,
with TLC bedside manner. Hurry!
Need meds ASAPIl! 680509
I'LL COLOR YOUR WORLD
SWM, 57, 5'6", 160lbs, in great shape,
active, healthy, N/S, loves painting and
'sailing. Seeking adventurous, sponta-
neous WF, 40-57, N/S, for LTR. 0686477
JOIN ME
Compassionate, fun-loving, light-
hearted SM, 64, Cancer, enjoys boat-
ing, simple times. Would like to meet a
kind, attractive, fun female to share
dinner dales quality talks roman,:ce
anid inen whro knows? 0'631 763.
GERMAN/ITALIAN BLEND
SWM, 22, 5'9". 1751bs. browrtbrown.
medium build, Cancer, s-moket. loves
darts, billiards, movies, theme parks,
beaches, and clubs. Seeking WF, 18-
26, open-minded. 0686494
POSITIVE ROMANTIC
Easygoing DWM, 57, 6', thoughtful,
non-prejudiced, handsome, enjoys
music, beaches, weekend getaways,
travel, more. Seeking SF, 30-55, sharp
and shapely, for LTR. 0446408
AVERAGE JOE LOOKING'
SWM, 55, looking to ppend quality
time with someone who enjoys life,
good food, and good conversations.
Seeking SF, 30-45. 0#720056
AS THE SUN SETS
Hard-working SWM, 40, father of 1,
smoker, likes going out to beaches,
movies, enjoys watching the sunset,
seeks SWF, 34-46, for possible romance.
'2682823
LOVE AND DEVOTION
SWM, 62, 5'8", 155lbs, healthy, dark
complexion/blue eyes seeks female
52-62, H/W-proportionate, for the love
of the life time.Brooksville area.
V563600
RETIRED MILITARY
DWM, 48, 5'10", 185lbs, brown/blue,
moustache, lots of fun, likes outdoors,
the beach, camping, fishing, more. If
you're interested, leave a message.
V670253
SPECIAL LADY WANTED
SWM, 48, enjoys fishing, movies,
cooking, quiet times at home. Seeking
SWF, 38-52, in shape, down-to-earth,
who appreciates a good loyal man.
Friends first. V412132
MR MELLOW
Handsome,. passionate SWM, 48,
athletic build, from Israel, marriage-
minded, N/S, heavy equipment opera-
tor, seeks a gentle WF, 18-48, N/S, for
fun and dating. W665111
A NEW BEGINNING
SWM, 62, 175lbs, Libra, N/S, active,
seeks WF, 50-60, active and healthy, for
good times and possible LTR. 0433493
STARTING OVER
WiWM, 72, 5'9", 180lbs, N/S, social
drinker, very active, likes dancing, din-
ing out, travel. Looking for SWF, 65-
75, for companionship, travel, talks,
fun times. '679020
FUN, FUN, FUN
SWM, 46, 5'10", 1701bs, retired from
the navy, N/S, fitness-minded, low-
keyed, beach bum, surfer, seeks intel-
ligent WF, 42-50. 0666383
TELL IT LIKE IT IS
Sharp, good-looking, rugged 67 year-
old ex-marine, seeks attractive, older,
financially secure female to travel and
have fun with. If you like to have a
good time, let's talk. 0204397
REALLY GREAT GUY
DWM, 56, 5'9", medium build, enjoys
the outdoors, fishing, loves flea mar-
kets, dining in/out, 50s to 60s music,
bowling, tennis, horseback riding.
Seeking SF for possible relationship.
0433284
LOOKING OUT MY BACK DOOR
Fit SWM, 63, 5'8", average build, N/S,
N/D, big fan of Creedence Clearwater
Revival, seeks SWF, 50-70, N/S, for
possible LTR. 0646822


YARD DOG, SHORT HAIR
Affectionate, house broken, all paper
shots, warm feet, cold nose, doesn't
drink from porcelain or chase cars or
cats, likes to dig, seven years old.
SWM, ISO SF. 0948521
NATURE AND ME
SWM, 42, 6'1", N/S, gentleman,
homeowner, enjoys time spent in the
great outdoors, seeks attractive, hon-
est SWF, 35-50, N/S, for dating, possi-
ble LTR. V226878
KNOWS HOW TO TREAT A LADY
SWM, young 57, 5'7", 175lbs, N/S,
very active, honest, educated, intelli-
gent, financially secure, farmer/ranch-
er, enjoys dining out, outdoors, foot-
ball, weekend getaways. Seeking hon-
est SWF, 35-55, petite/slender, friend-
ship, companionship, possible LTR.
V261794
ALL CALLS RETURNED
Honest SWM, 63, 6'4", 2601bs, smok-
er, loves cooking, fishing, watching
Nascar. Seeking SWF, 50-65, to
spend some time with. V566775
LET'S GETTOGETHER
Caring, decent, physically appealing,
SBPM, 42. ISO sexy, attractive, SBF, 27-
45, for possible relationship. 0480766
HORSE NEEDS RIDER
SM, 54, 170lbs, 5'9", ruggedly hand-
some, horse ranch owner, Capricorn,
enjoys road trips, cook outs, riding,
dancing, socializing, country life.
Seeks adventurous, well-adjusted
woman, 42-56, country and horse
lover. 0435846
ROMANTIC-AT-HEART
WM,' 47, looking for a woman, 35-47,
who likes fishing, boating, gardening,
.. country life, romance, country music,
playing pool, more. V665851
R U A CUDDLER?
SWM, 18, 5'7", 200lbs, nice build,
blond/hazel, enjoys fishing, hanging
out, horror movies, looking for SF, 18-
30, who likes to cuddle, similar inter-
ests. '284401
HOPE IT'S YOU
Hard-working SBM, 41, 145lbs, enjoys
children, amusement parks, woodwork-
ing, weightlifting, running, fine dining
and good movies. Seeking a nice, affec-
tionate,- romantic lady to treat like a
queen. #607942
COULD IT BE YOU?
SWM, a youthful 79, enjoys the out-
doors, fishing, hunting, camping, boat-
ing. ISO attractive SWF, 50+, N/S, for
friendship and possible LTR. '550451
SINGLE FATHER
WM, 42, enjoys sports, Nascar, swim-
ming, fishing, the ocean, more.
Looking for WF, 25-50, to possibly
share life with. V658668
SEEKING SOULMATE
Good-looking, respectful SWM, 60,
N/S, believes life is an exciting adven-
lure. seeks SWF. 50-65. N'S. wro nas
- a wyrAenrul outlook on.lie..'511502.-
HONEST DUDE
Widowed WM 8: *5'10". Gemini.
smoker, nature lover, loves traveling.
Seeking WF, 48-60, for friendship,
possible romance. 0638041
WHAT I REALLY WANT
SWPM, 49, 6', 1951bs, brown/brown,
smoker, loves traveling up and down
the east coast. Seeking a sincere,
financially stable WF, 45-53, N/S, who
is not a bar fly. 0664898
LOVE HORSES?
SWM, 47, N/S, works on horse farm,
enjoys the outdoors, hunting, fishing,
pickup trucks, country and rock-n-roll
music, seeks SWF, .35-50, who likes
horses, similar interests, for friend-
ship, possible LTR. V652549
LAID-BACK GUY
SWM, 6'1", 200lbs, in good shape,
likes flea markets, going to movies,
boating, fishing. Looking for an easy-
going, happy WF, 38-45,'who likes the
same things. 0628452
COUNTRY LIFE
SWM, young-looking 44, 5'9", 1851bs,
very short hair, mustache, goatee,
muscular build, N/S, heavy equipment
operator, financially stable, seeks WF,
30-50, kids? 0245245"'`', ' '



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WINDSTAR
#J050607A
$13,888t



05 CHEVY
VENTlRE
#8235L


03 GMC
SIERRA X-CAB
#25329A
17,888'


04 DODGE
INTREPID
#J60010A


04 DODGE
NEON
#8217P


03 JEEP
LIBERTY SPORT
#J050532A


05 CHEVY 05 DODGE 02 FORD F-350 02 BMW
UPLANDER RAM 1500 4X4 LARIAT 330i
Blue. #JO50697A Lava red. #B69637A Diesel. #8278P #8331 P
.,9 o 88 $23 %80 29,888'"t $35 88w
tPrlces and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee (299.50 )and includes all factory Incentives, rebates anc

CHEVROLET
-1515 877MY CRYSTAL
95-1515 t(877) 692-7998
1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA


01 DODGE
CARAVAN
Loaded. #8170T
7,888'


MALIBU LS
Loaded. #8091P
$9,728t



04 CHEVY
CAVALIER LS
Power windows/locks. #8239P
$ 10,426



02 CHEVY S-30
EXT CAB V6
Reliable, clean. #N5300A
$11L483t


02 GMC
SONOMA
Auto, reliable. #N5291 B


04 CHEVY AVEO
Auto, A/C, economy, factory
warranty. #N5205A
%9,875'


01 FORD
WINDSTAR


97 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
All the options. #B50796A
$ 11.488'


00 CHEVY
MALIBU LS
LOOK, loaded. #N5224B
s8.976'


04 CHEVY
MALIBU
3 To Choose From HURRY!
s9,986'


99 OLDS
INIRIGUE
Affordable. #8135P


04 FORD
FOCUS
Loaded, pw, pl. #8267A
11,284'


03 CHEVY
MALIBU
Loaded, sunroof. #N5312A
$11,893'


02 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
LTD, loaded. #J050647A
$ 14.888


04 DODGE 05 DODGE 04 DODGE 05 CHEVY 1500
DURANGO RAM DURANGO Z71 EXT CAB
All power, leather. #8276T Quad cab. #8275T S LT, 4x4. #8257T Uke New, $AVE. Alot of extras. #8033P
S19,488' s20,988' 21,888' *33,291a
customer loyalty. Dealer incentives subject to change. See Dealer for Details. Photos for Illustration purposes only.

< CHEVROLET
1 877-MY CRYSTAL
637-5050 (877) 692.7998
2209 HwY. 44 WEST, INVERNESS


00 DODGE RAM
3500 QUAD CAB
Burgundy. #JO50686B
$12,888t


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