Citation
Union County times

Material Information

Title:
Union County times
Uniform Title:
Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Lake Butler Fla
Publisher:
Sprintow Pub. Co.
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates:
30.023443 x -82.337795

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Cf. Gregory, W. Amer. newspapers, 1937.:
Began in 1920?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Sprintow Pub. Co. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000405777 ( ALEPH )
01512086 ( OCLC )
ACF2020 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047168 ( LCCN )

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Bradford County times

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Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 904-964-6305 Fax 904-964-8628 uctimeseditor@gmail.com www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/unioncountytimes Union County Times Union County Times USPS 648-200 Lake Butler, Florida Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 105 th Year 32 st Issue 75 CENTS UC Public Library to Be Closed for Thanksgiving The Union County Public Library will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 23, Friday, Nov. 24 and Saturday, Nov. 24 so that library employees may spend the holiday with their families. The library will reopen on Monday, Nov. 26 with regular hours. Farm Share Distribution Set for Dec. 9 Farm Share and the City of Lake Butler will be hosting a free food distribution on Saturday, Dec. 9 at the Hal Y. Maines Community Center at Lakeside Park. The distribution will be from 9-11 a.m. Volunteers are asked to arrive at 7 a.m. If you need more information, or would like to volunteer to help, please call Dave Mecusker, Lake Butler City Manager, at 386-496-3401, ext. 23 or Sara Owen at 386-496-3401, ext. 30. Bradford Food Pantry to Begin Service UC Residents Dec. 4 The Bradford County Ecumenical Food Pantry will begin serving residents of Union County effective Dec. 4. People needing food can come to the pantry on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 1-4 p.m. Visitors must bring proof of Union County residency and proof of any children they will be claiming as dependents. The pantry is located at the Bradford County Fairgrounds at 2226 North Temple Ave. in Starke. For information, please call 904-964-3984, if no one answers leave a message. Your call will be returned. Worthington Springs Live Nativity The Morningstar Baptist Church in Worthington Springs will be presenting a live Nativity Village to celebrate the Christmas season. The birth of Jesus is the reason for the season and they are marking this occasion with this live presentation. Mark your calendars to attend on Saturday, Dec. 9 or Sunday, Dec. 10. The Nativity Village will be open from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Bring your children and let them see this live presentation and let them know what the season is all about! Morningstar Baptist Church is located at 11250 West C.R. 18 (off C.R. 121) in Worthington Springs. Second in state The Union County High School volleyball team came up short in its quest for a state championship, but the Tigers did better than every to Sneads on Nov. 17. It was the most successful season in UCHS Gracie Crawford BY TRACY LEE TATE UCT Editor Young people grow up so fast, sometimes they know things we would never imagine, or at least think they do. Many of the kids at Lake Butler Elementary School will, no doubt, be hanging out in the kitchen on Thanksgiving day to help out Mom and/or Dad prepare the feast (or, as the editor used to do, pretend to be there to help, but really to get into the food early and see what tasted best). Several students at LBES were good enough to tell just how a Thanksgiving turkey should be prepared for the family and to share any stuffing secrets they may have. Kindergartener Kiley Starling was caught leaving school with her mother when asked to share her cooking secrets. Kiley said to put the turkey in a 10-degreeFahrenheit oven for seven hours. When asked if she would stuff the bird, she said yes, it should be stuffed with meat. Javian Smith said he would use a frying pan and after buying a turkey to put in it, he would put the combination into the stove to heat it up. Then you just put it in a pan and have a Thanksgiving meal, he said. Jackson Crawford said a turkey should be roasted at 5 degrees for one hour after being stuffed with peas and stuff. Kinzley Scott wanted to stuff her bird with beans, potatoes and corn, then put it in the oven for four hours at 10 degrees. Jamie Webb seemed to want to rely on technology to get the bird done. You put it in the oven at 30 degrees until the little white thing (stuck in the turkey) pops up, Jamie said. Side dishes should include corn, string beans and black beans. Annabelle Ripley wanted to cook her turkey the old fashioned way by roasting it in a wood fire for one hour. She said the bird did not need to be stuffed for this process. Gracie Crawford said she liked her turkey stuffed with cotton candy and cooked in a 70-degree oven for five minutes. These kids are the future Rachael Rays and Wolfgang Pucks of the world, and we can hope they continue to share their ideas of what makes good food with us all, although it might be best to wait a few years and let them practice their craft. How do you cook a Thanksgiving Turkey LBES students offer advice BY TRACY LEE TATE UCT Editor About 100 Union County people assembled at the Hal Maines Lakeside Community Center to celebrate Farm-City Week with a dinner and program. The Union County Farm Bureau supplied the chicken and Florida Forestry Service officers, led by Jay Tucker, cooked it to perfection outside on a grill. Southern In-Laws provided the decorations for the event and 4-H youth, volunteers, leaders and parents volunteered their time and help to make sure everything ran smoothly and that there were side dishes and desserts aplenty. Union County Commissioner Karen Cossey was on hand to help UFIS Agricultural Extension Agent David Nistler set out iced tea for the diners. Grace was offered by District 5 Florida 4-H District Council Chaplin/Parliamentarian Kendal Stalnaker and everyone settled down to eat and socialize. Once the meal was complete, Nistler took the podium to introduce the events keynote speaker, Jason Davison, the director of the field services division of the Florida Farm Bureau Federation. Davison began his talk by asking the audience how many were farmers and how many generations they had on the land. He said he believed that most of the people in Union County who were not now involved in farming were only one or two generations from the farm. He cited legendary automaker Henry Ford, who, in 1933, said that industry and agriculture were natural partners and quoted an old adage that when there was plenty of food there were many, many problems in the world, but when their was not enough food, there was only one problem. Davison said that he believed that both the city and the farm were needed to have a successful civilization. The strong farms in our country have allowed people to leave them and pursue their strengths and talents and not have to worry about feeding their families because they know the farmers are there and working to produce the needed food, Davison said. Davison offered many interesting facts related to farming in the United States, such as: There are 2.1 million farms in the United States, with 99 percent of them family owned. On average, a single U.S. farm feeds 165 people. To keep up with current population growth, U.S. farms will need to produce 70 billion pounds more of food each year. He also had some surprising facts to offer concerning cities and the state: In 2012, large cities held 33 percent of the worlds population. Florida is the third most populous state in the U.S. (after California and Texas) and showed a 1.84-percent population growth last year. The state had a $815 billion Gross Domestic Product last year. Small towns in Florida, as in most of the south, grew by .2 percent last year. Davison concluded his talk by saying he always felt at home in Union County, at least partially due to his five-generation tie to the county, which he said was always calling him to return to his roots. After the keynote speaker, Nistler gave a short report about the new agricultural building, saying the project was not out for bids, a process scheduled to close Dec. 4. Union County 4-H Program Assistant Kristi MacCallister also thanked all of the 4-H members and families for their help in making the event a success. She also noted to the crowd that the 4-H Holiday Bakeoff was scheduled for Dec. 4. Union County comes together to celebrate Farm-City week

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2A Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Our Classified Ads Help Yourent apartments, houses, promote garage sales, hire people, find jobs, locate pets, sell your services, goods, real estate ... get your word out! Hitchcocks Harveys Family Dollar Store CVS Walgreens Winn-Dixie Ace Spires IGAServing the surrounding area for over years!THE Sports, Student Athletes & School & Community Teams Crime Reports & Arrests Government Social Happenings & Gatherings School Events & Information Graduating Seniors Straight A Students Community Events Church & Group Announcements Births, Weddings, Obits ... EXCLUSIVEin-depth localNews CoverageEXCLUSIVEin-depth localNews Coverage I want to stretch my shopping dollars and save money each week. Please send me 52 weeks of the for Only $39 We accept MC, VISA, Amex by mail or over the phone and cash in person at our offices.Call 904-964-6305 to subscribe or send check to: P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091Name Address City/ST/Zip Phone #s Email:GET YOURLOCAL NEWSSTORE SALES, DEALS, RESTAURANT COUPONS & SHOPPING INSERTSall together conveniently by mail!GET YOURLOCAL NEWSSTORE SALES, DEALS, RESTAURANT COUPONS & SHOPPING INSERTSall together conveniently by mail! Tractor Supply Walmart Dollar General Badcock Arbys Hardees Sears SAVE $$Sales Deals Coupons Insertsfrom*SAVE $$Sales Deals Coupons Insertsfrom*&*may vary by week & location Plus Subscribe to Subscribe to Want to reach people?Nows the perfect time to see just how well our classifieds can work for you. Whether youre looking for a great buy or a great place to sell, call our classified department today.904-964-6305Ask for Classified Ads Rotary supports food pantry Brenda and Gerald Moody from the Bradford Ecumenical Food Pantry recently accepted a $1,000 check from Starke Rotary Club President Mike Ricker and the club. Rotary also lent its support to Communities in Schools of Bradford County with a check for $1,000. Accepting from President Mike Ricker are Shannon Rowe and Cheryl Canova. One council member challenged in Lawtey BY PATRICE RUSSELL Special to the Telegraph There is one race in Lawteys city election on Dec. 5. Incumbent City Councilman Wayne Massey is running against Debra Jordan Norman and Amy Blom. Massey was born in Starke and has lived in Lawtey since he was 8 years old. He is a military veteran of six years, serving in the Army and the National Guard. Massey worked for the Division of Forestry until his retirement. He is married and has four children, all of which attended school in Lawtey and graduated from Bradford High School. He is currently serving on the Lawtey City Council and has served for the past two terms plus several other nonconsecutive terms. Norman was born in Starke and raised in Lawtey. She is married to Wayne Norman and has six children. Norman attended Lawtey Elementary and Bradford High School, and she graduated from The Stratford Womens College in Tampa. She is a licensed cosmetologist. Involved with pageants while growing up, she was crowned the 1975 Strawberry Queen in Starke. She is the daughter of Butch Jordan, the chief of police in Lawtey for 52 years. She currently has a resale store called The Pickled Pepper on U.S. 301 and considers herself an entrepreneur. Blom has lived in Lawtey her entire life except for a short period when she lived in Brooker. She said she was born and raised in Lawtey, went to school here, and has raised two daughters here. Blom is employed at Rowe Enterprises as a human resources manager. In the past, Blom has been employed by CNB Bank, Noegels Auto Sales, Community State Bank and as a legal assistant to Terrence Browns Law Office. She feels that all of her experiences will help her to be a good council member. Blom said that she loves Lawtey. She believes it is her time to give back to the community. She promises to listen to the communitys concerns, research the issues and come up with solutions. She said, I want to continue to see it grow for my children and one day grandchildren. Norman said her mother and her uncle served as council members in the past. Because her family has served the community for most of her life, Norman feels a deep connection, obligation and love for Lawtey and feels a need to serve the community and continue the family legacy. Norman has concern for the senior citizens and the lowincome families of Lawtey. She would like to open a food bank for those who need help and stimulate growth by bringing in new business or trying to make use of the empty buildings that Lawtey already has. She would like to see the Tatum Brothers Park used more often for events such as potluck dinners for the community, Christmas programs and social events, which might draw in revenue through donations. Norman says she is not afraid to be aggressive in getting things accomplished. Massey said he loves Lawtey and called serving on the city council a big responsibility. His reason for running for reelection is to be able to represent the citizens and to make the best decisions for the city. Massey is most concerned with what people in Lawtey want for their community but mentioned that only a few people attend council meetings. Without a vision we cant get anything done, he said. Massey has been involved and accomplished many things in his terms as a council member. He was appointed to name streets when there were no street signs in Lawtey, for example, and recounted how he gave certain streets their names. His said his biggest issue is coming together and working together to go forward with the other members of the council. Massey believes that a sense of camaraderie is most important in order to accomplish any vision the community has for their town. He would also like to see council seat elections be combined instead of having seats open in different years. This council race is the only one on the ballot this year as other officials, including City Clerk Lisa Harley and Police Chief Shane Bennett were unopposed. The election will take place at city hall on Tuesday, Dec. 5, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Debra Jordan Norman Wayne Massey Amy Blom Democrats meet Monday The monthly meeting of the Bradford County Democrats will be held on Monday, Nov. 27, at 7 p.m. in the Capital City Bank community meeting room. The bank is located at 350 N. Temple Ave. (U.S. 301) in Starke. All Democrats are invited. Coco showing schools Florida Twin Theatre has joined with Communities in Schools of Bradford County to raise funds through a showing of the new Disney Pixar release Coco on Monday, Dec. 4, at 7:15 p.m. Ticket prices are $6. For group sales, call 904-9645451.

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Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times 3A Fully Insured& Complete Tree ServiceNo Job Too Big or Too Small!WE DO IT ALL!!904-964-7906904-364-7065 cellDont let your tree issue become a tree problem! 50 %OFF!B lac k F r ida y Super Sale !U P T OLook for our insert in todays paper. N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: T arget your audience quickly Southside mentees contributing to school and community The mentoring program at Southside Elementary School got off to a good start this year. On Oct. 14, 12 Guys in Bow Ties and 12 Girls in Pearls joined The River of Life Church in the Fight for Hunger Feed The Backpack Initiative. They helped put together and pack over 17,000 meals that day. The following weekend, 12 Guys in Bow Ties and 12 Girls in Pearls came together to beautify their school campus. They weeded painted and mulched planter boxes, raked leaves and pine needles off of the kindergarten playground, and created a SSE monument in the center drive of the bus loop. A few members of Southside Student Council had helped also in this community service. When school was out Nov. 10 all other students were taking a day off, 12 Guys in Bow Ties and 12 Girls in Pearls were at school in teacher Edrick Hamiltons class working for our troops. They joined the Operation Gratitude Initiative at Southside Elementary by creating paracord bracelets and cool neckties and writing letters to the troops. The mentors of this group are very proud of our kids, Hamilton said. They work really hard and show up in numbers when its time to put in work for others! he said. Two special helpers were acknowledged: Mr. Linton, who is a mentor of this group as well as a third-grade teacher and an active duty member of the military, and Lorain Hamilton, who is the owner of The Clothes Clinic who runs the Tailor Shop for the military troops at Camp Blanding. Both took time out of their day to help our members server others, he said. 12 Guys in Bow Ties and 12 Girls in Pearls will be ringing the bell for The Salvation Army on Dec. 20 to raise money for families in need. They will have a group ringing at Winn Dixie and Walmart. If you see them, please let them know that they are doing a great job serving their community! Submitted by Edrick Hamilton. Nicolas Austin, Jordan Barton, Taylor Ritch, Justin Sanford and Sophia Carter Zaevion Small, Ian Shetler, Brayden Smyth, Sophia Cater, Brayden Smyth and Cameron Jones Santa Fe College awarded Strengthening Institutions Grant Santa Fe College is the recipient of a U.S. Department of Education Title III Strengthening Institutions Program grant. The project consists of a singular, significant activity: Promoting student success. Project goals include the personalized, and foundational skills, strengthened student success skills and student persistence through academic challenge. Santa Fe College will receive $2.07 million for this project over five years. Santa Fe College President Jackson Sasser said the grant money would help students achieve better grades and ensure their future success. Title III funds are granted to institutions of higher learning that commit to student excellence. Santa Fe College is honored to be the recipient of these highly sought and competitive funds. Santa Fe College is constantly exploring strategies to assist underprepared students and to move them rapidly through core courses and, ultimately, through to program completion. This goal to educate all of our citizens is being strengthened by reenvisioning the entire approach to remedial education. Using the grant funds, Santa Fe will establish a comprehensive Library Learning Commons that employs strategies known to improve student success. These strategies include: Activities designed to change the students mindset and enhance their belief in their ability to experience academic growth. Individualized learning lab instruction on college and life success skills, like time management and study skills. Personalized learning plans that are accessed by computer and contain exactly what the student needs to work on for the classes they are taking right now no more, no less. Tutoring by certified tutors. The Learning Commons essentially sets up a one-stop shop for students to receive the services they need for success at the college level and will be them for them for many years to come.

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4A Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Dine. Shop. Buy.L OCALLY SUPPOR T STRENGTHEN BUILD OUR COMMUNITY Benefit Local Civic & Community GroupsOur community merchants support local Civic, Educational, Student and School Activities including: Band Football Pop Warner Baseball Softball Tennis Golf Student Clubs FFA KRA 4-H Scouting Groups & Explorers Churches, Church Groups & Events Senior Citizens Organizations Food Banks Health & Wellness Programs Veterans Groups, Organizations & Events When local businesses do well, so do students and local organizations which help build and strengthen the fabric of our community. Your local merchant wants to help support these community groups and activities, but they need your support in order to continue. Fulfill your familys wants and needs by buying locally! Invest in your own community by supporting local businesses.Build Communities Economic FoundationsSupporting local small businesses including restaurants, goods and services means investing in our present and our future : Keep money in the neighborhood. Locally owned businesses recirculate 70% more money back into their own local community than big box chain stores and restaurants. Embrace what makes us unique. Where we shop, eat, work, play and hang out makes our communities home. If we wanted to live someplace that was like everywhere else, we wouldnt be living in this region of Florida. Get better service. In a local business you know the person behind the counter and they know you. They have a deeper understanding of the products and services they are selling and they take the time to serve their customers. Create & keep good jobs. Small local businesses are the largest employer nationally and account for the vast majority of job growth. Growing local businesses mean more jobs for residents and more taxes to invest in our own communities, churches, schools and groups. Bradford CountyTelegraph Congratulations for getting to the State Seminals Bradford Tornadoes GOOD LUCK FRIDAY!! Bradford County Emergency Medical Services Director community partners recently, including EMS Employee of the Year Dylan Rodgers. Photos courtesy of EMS. Allen presented another Community Patnership award at the Nov. 6 county commission meeting to Santa Fe College, which provides facilities EMS to bring in educators and train employees. Accepting was Andrews Center Director Cheryl Canova. Not pictured was another community partner, Bobby Autry of Madison Street Pharmacy. Community Partnership awards. Stuart Brandrick earned the Workhouse Award. The Stork Award went to David Weeks. Cole Smith is Paramedic of the Year. Rookies of the Year Alexandra Bush and Austin Polk are off to a great start. Cody Johnson was named EMT of the Year.

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Church will celebrate Christ the King Sunday on Nov. 26 with a special program featuring the First Coast Highlanders, a bagpipe and drum group, during the 11 a.m. worship service. Bagpiping is part of Presbyterian heritage. Please plan to attend this special experience. 212 N. Church St., invites everyone to attend the third annual chili supper on Friday, Dec. 1, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Chili, dessert and a drink will be available for a donation of $7, with proceeds funding summer youth camp scholarships. Email the details of your congregations upcoming special events to editor@ bctelegraph.com. DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M. Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times 5A Y Across the Garden Fence Z Across the Garden Fence is sponsored by the Bradford County Extension Service. Readers who wish to pose gardening questions should forward them to Jim DeValerio at jtd@ufl.edu. Horticultural therapy Horticulture is defined as the art and science of growing plants. Horticultural therapy is the practice of engaging people in plant or gardening activities to improve their bodies, minds and spirits. Research has proven that people benefit from connecting with plants and nature by either interacting directly with plants or just viewing them. For centuries, horticulture has been utilized as a form of therapy. The father of American psychiatry, Dr. Benjamin Rush, noted in 1798 that his mentally ill patients benefited by the positive effects of gardening. Horticultural therapy was utilized after World War II as a form of occupational therapy for our returning veterans. In the 1970s, the concept of using nature to improve ones feeling of well-being and enhancing their mental health gained credibility. Today, horticultural therapy is practiced worldwide and is renowned as an effective treatment for patients of all ages for physical and mental abilities. It is practiced in many diverse settings such as rehabilitation, youth outreach and recovery programs, hospitals, nursing homes, prisons, schools, mental health facilities, botanical gardens, etc. Horticultural therapy has proven to be exceptionally beneficial in many life areas including: Cognitive benefits: stimulate memory, attain new skills, encourage observation, increase knowledge, increase vocabulary. Physiological benefits: can lower heart rate, relieve stress and lower blood pressure. Physical benefits: increase activities of daily living skills, develop/increase fine and gross motor skills, provides exercise, increased hand-eye coordination. Emotional benefits: relieve aggression/ tension, promote interest and enthusiasm, increase feelings of self-worth, self-esteem and confidence, promotes creative drive. Social benefits: increase interaction within and outside of the group, increase communication skills. I have been a Master Gardner for two years and have personally practiced Zen gardening for years before I ever knew what Zen gardening was! I have found that this practice goes hand in hand with everything noted in this article. Any garden you create can be a Zen garden. Regardless of how small the plot of land or your backyard is or if you have a raised bed or window box, all can be Zen gardens. And fortunately, it doesnt really matter what the garden specifically looks like. What does matter is how you feel in it. How you think, interact and behave in it. I have found that gardening teaches me profound lessons in patience, simplicity, compassion and acceptance. It teaches me to live in the present moment of life. To lose myself in mindful, productive and attentive work. This quote sums it up for me: In gardening we learn to let nature know best, to accept what we cant control, and to become a harmonious and helpful part of natures process. We become one with the natural world, letting it work through us. I believe gardening can affect most people in the same positive ways. It has been my experience that gardening heals and nourishes me, my body and my soul. I always find a sense of peace there. It refreshes and renews my spirit. I agree with Henry David Thoreaus observation that we can never get enough of nature. If you are interested in joining the Master Gardener community or have a horticultural inquiry, please contact the Bradford County Extension Office at 904-966-6299. Celina Rohman, Master Gardener UF/IFAS is an equal opportunity institution. 386-496-9656 620 East Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054(Across from Subway Plaza) Donate A Boat sponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 700 BOAT -(2628) a simple and inexpensive way to advertise in newspapers statewide Contact Terry Snyder 321.283.5280 Library Senior Center The Bradford County Public Library is located at 456 W. Pratt St. in Starke. For a full schedule of events, pick up a calendar from the front desk. You can also get the latest news on Facebook at www.facebook. com/bradfordlibrary. For more information on these programs or other services, please call 904-368-3911 or visit www. bcplibrary.com. Holiday hours In observation of the Thanksgiving holiday, the library will be closed on Thursday and Friday, Nov. 23 and 24. Online library resources are available at www.BCPLibrary.com. For your convenience, the drive-thru book drop is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The mean one returns Dec. 5 The big-hearted holiday icon, who is best known for his attempt to steal Christmas, is returning to the library to engage in a little holiday mischief and spread joy to all the girls and boys. Families can visit Bradford County Public Librarys Whoville from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 5. There will be family photo opportunities and refreshments to enjoy. Everyone is welcome. Craft for children and teens Dec. 11 Decorate a cup for Christmas to give as a gift or keep for yourself. Amy will provide the markers needed to create designs, candy to fill the cup and cellophane to wrap it up. Participants can bring their own white teacup or pay $1 prior to the event. Registration is required. The craft begins at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 11. Holiday painting Dec. 12 Paint a canvas to give as a gift or add to your homes dcor. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced artist, getting together with others to paint has its rewards. Get inspired by others, learn some new techniques, and meet some new people. Join us in the afternoon at 3:30 p.m. or in the evening at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 12. Stress-free painting Dec. 13 Take a break from Christmas crowded stores and long checkout lines. Relieve stress with art therapy at the library. Listen to the soothing sounds of musical legends, find inspiration in the artwork of others, and let the brushstrokes bring comfort to your soul. The program begins at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 13. Paper and paints are supplied at no cost. Canvas prices begin at $1. Registration is recommended but walk-ins are welcome. Children will not be admitted. Movie for adults Dec. 15 The library is showing a free movie that is based on a bestselling memoir by Jeannette Walls. The story is about free-spirited parents whose unconventional ways both inspire and inhibit their four children. The movie begins at 10 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 15. Activity day for adults Dec. 18 Join us from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the library on Monday, Dec. 18, to enjoy a variety of activities for adults. Play cards, participate in board games or relax with adult coloring pages. Attendees are welcome to bring a lunch. Coffee will be provided. Christmas party Dec. 19 Celebrate the start of Christmas break with fun holiday games, challenging trivia, delicious snacks and an entertaining superhero television special. Everyone between the ages of 8 to 19 are invited. Attendance is free. The program begins at 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 19. Books and brunch Dec. 21 December is a free read month for the librarys book club. Select a book that you would pick out as a gift for somebody else. We will discuss the novels on Thursday, Dec. 21. Bring lunch money; the discussion will take place at a local restaurant. Meet at the library at 11:30 a.m. Womens Expo Feb. 2 To help people connect, the library is hosting a Womens Expo on Friday, Feb. 2, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Space is available for organizations, vendors and demonstrators. To apply for a space, stop by the front desk of the library and request a form. Contact Kathy at 904-368-3921 for more information. Remembering his father and Florida On Nov. 6, Rick Smith took 47 Bradford County Public Library patrons on a visual journey through the back to a time when people came to Florida to go to St. Petersburg, and the coastline was not a canyon of concrete. Rick Smith took time to answer questions and pose for pictures after the presentation. Smith is shown here with Iva Harrell. www.StarkeJournal.com The Bradford County Senior Center is located at 1805 N. Temple Ave in Starke. If you have any questions or would like further information on any activities or events, please call 904-368-3955. A calendar of events can be found at www. bradfordcountyfl.gov. AARP Driver Safety Class The Senior Center will be hosting an AARP Driver Safety class Wednesday, Dec. 6, from 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. Reservations are required. Please call the Bradford County Senior Center at 904-368-3955 to reserve your seat or for questions about the class. Medicare help Have questions about your Medicare or prescription plans? SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders is available at the senior center every Wednesday from 13 p.m. Stop in and speak with a SHINE representative and get those questions answered. SHINE representatives can also review your current plan to ensure you have the best plan for your needs. Open enrollment is still going on until Dec. 7, so if you would like to make changes, now is the time. If Wednesday is not convenient, call 904-368-3955, in order to make an appointment before open enrollment closes. Yoga and tai chi Need to improve your balance? Maybe youre having issues with range of motion in a shoulder knee or hip. The senior center offers classes to help with these issues. Join the Chair Yoga and Tai Chi Hour Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. and Thursdays at 10 a.m. One hour twice a week will improve range of motion and balance, and refresh the mind. For a more advanced yoga class, join us for one hour every Thursday morning at 8:30 a.m.

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6A Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Advertising Works!! Bradford Legals NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS The Board of Supervisors (Board) of the Florida Green Finance Authority (Authority), hereby provides notice, pursuant to Sections 163.08(4) and 197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting non-ad valorem assess ments for more than one year to be levied within the area encompassed by the boundaries of Baker County, Florida; Bay County, Florida; Brad ford County, Florida; Calhoun County, Florida; Citrus County, Florida; Clay County, Florida; Columbia County, Florida; DeSoto County, Florida; Di xie County, Florida; Flagler County, Florida; Franklin County, Florida, Gadsden County, Florida; Gilchrist County, Florida; Glades County, Florida; Gulf County, Florida; Hamil ton County, Florida; Hardee County, Florida; Hendry County, Florida; Her nando County, Florida; Highlands County, Florida; Holmes County, Florida; Jackson County, Florida; Jefferson County, Florida; Lafayette County, Florida; Liberty County, Flor ida; Madison County, Florida; Mon roe County, Florida; Nassau County, Florida; Okaloosa County, Florida; Okeechobee County, Florida; Putnam County, Florida; Santa Rosa County, Florida; St. Johns County, Florida; Suwannee County, Florida; Taylor County, Florida; Union County, Flor ida; Wakulla County, Florida; Walton County, Florida; Washington County, Florida, and any additional counties or municipalities of the State of Flor ida subsequently joining the Author the cost of providing energy conser vation and efficiency improvements, renewable energy improvements and wind resistance improvements, in accordance with Section 163.08, Florida Statutes (collectively Qualify ing Improvements). The non-ad va lorem assessments contemplated by this notice are voluntary and only im posed by the Authority with the prior written consent of affected property owners who wish to obtain financing for Qualifying Improvements from the Authority. The Board will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uniform method of collect ing such assessments as authorized by Section 197.3632, Florida Stat utes, at a public hearing to be held at 2:00 p.m., EST, December 7, 2017, at the Town of Mangonia Park Mu nicipal Center located at 1755 East Tiffany Drive, Mangonia Park, Florida 33407. Such resolution will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal description of the boundaries of the real property that may be subject to the levy. Copies of the proposed form of resolution are on file at the Special District Services, Inc., 2501A Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410. All interested persons are invited to attend and present oral comments at the public hearing and/ or submit written comments to the Au thority through its Manager at 2501A Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410. Written comments should be received by the Authority on or before December 1, 2017. Any persons desiring to present oral com ments should appear at the public hearing. In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the Board with respect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Ameri cans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, per sons with disabilities needing special accommodation to participate in such public hearing should contact Special District Services, Inc. at 561-6304922 and/or toll free at 1-877-7374922 at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the date of the public hearing. DATED this 19th day of October, 2017. By Order of: BOARD OF SUPERVI SORS OF THE FLORIDA GREEN FINANCE AUTHORITY www.flgfa.org 11/9 4tchg 11/30-BCT NOTICE The City of Starke is conducting a comprehensive review of its Land Use Plan Map in an attempt to identi fy any properties that may have been unintentionally impacted by previous zoning and land map changes. Any landowner who has reason to believe their property is improperly zoned should contact the Zoning Office at City Hall, 209 N. Thompson St, by the close of business on November 28, 2017. If you have questions sur rounding this issue, call the Zoning Office at (904) 368-1332. 11/9 3tchg 11/23-BCT FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner vs. VANESSA G. WARREN, Case #40920 Respondent NOTICE OF ACTION TO: VANESSA G. WARREN, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Admin istrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in ac cordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hear ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Crimi nal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforce ment, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before January 14, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certifica tion pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: November 14, 2017 Dean Register, Professionalism Di rector FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By: -sAshley Black, Division Repre sentative 11/23 4tchg 12/14-BCT NOTICE Southern Towers, LP is proposing to install a monopole telecommunica tions tower to be located off of High way 301, Starke, Bradford County, The height of the tower will be 60.7 meters above ground level (105.5 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865/L-810). Specific information regard ing the project is available by calling Chad Stinnett during normal business hours at (205) 629-3868. Any inter ested party may submit comments within 30 days of this publication with Environmental, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the pro posed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects sig nificant in American history, archaeol ogy, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Pres ervation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/asr/ap plications by entering Antenna Struc ture Registration (Form 854) file no. A1092674. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Envi ronmental Policy Act rules of the Fed eral Communications Commission, 47 CFR 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environ ment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is may only raise environmental con cerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalre quest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. 11/23 1tchg-BCT NOTICE Southern Towers, LP is proposing to install a monopole telecommunica tions tower to be located near 700 ST-16, Starke, Bradford County, The height of the tower will be 60.7 meters above ground level (113.7 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865/L-810). Specific information regard ing the project is available by calling Chad Stinnett during normal business hours at (205) 629-3868. Any inter ested party may submit comments within 30 days of this publication with Environmental, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the pro posed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects sig nificant in American history, archaeol ogy, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Pres ervation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/asr/ap plications by entering Antenna Struc ture Registration (Form 854) file no. A1092677. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Envi ronmental Policy Act rules of the Fed eral Communications Commission, 47 CFR 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environ ment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is may only raise environmental con cerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalre quest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. 11/23 1tchg-BCT PUBLIC NOTICE THE PUBLIC IS HEREBY NOTI FIED that on Monday, December 4, 2017, immediately following the County Commission Meeting begin ning at 9:30 AM, the Board of County Commissioners of Bradford County, Florida will hold a workshop for the purpose of discussing a paid fire sys tem in Bradford County. The meeting will be held at the Bradford County Courthouse, inside the County Com mission Meeting Room, 945 North Temple Avenue, Starke, FL. Ques tions regarding this meeting should be directed to the Office of the County Manager at (904) 966-6327 11/23 1tchg-BCT PUBLIC NOTICE The regular scheduled meeting of the Bradford County Board of County Commissioners is scheduled Decem ber 4, 2017 at 9:30 a.m. in the Com mission Meeting Room located in the north wing of the Bradford County Courthouse, 945 N. Temple Ave., Starke, FL. A copy of the Agenda may be obtained from the Bradford County website www.bradfordcountyfl.gov or from the office of the Bradford County Manager located in the north wing of the Bradford County Courthouse. 11/23 1tchg-BCT NOTICE OF MEETING The Board of CareerSource North Central Florida will hold an Executive Committee meeting on Monday, No vember 27th, 2017, at 3:00pm at 10 NW 6th Street, Gainesville, FL 32601. For more information please contact Talia Pate at tpate@fmsworks.com. 11/23 1tchg-BCT NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: SPRATLIN TOWING & RECOVERY, INC. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 12/18/2017, 9:00 am at 10875 US Hwy 301 HAMPTON, FL 32044, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. SPRATLIN TOW ING & RECOVERY, INC. reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids. 1FMZU62XXYZB72130 2000 FORD 11/23 1tchg-BCT NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: SPRATLIN TOWING & RECOVERY, INC. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 12/18/2017, 9:00 am at 10875 US Hwy 301 HAMPTON, FL 32044, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. SPRATLIN TOW ING & RECOVERY, INC. reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids. 2G1WH55K829281587 2002 CHEVROLET 11/23 1tchg-BCT NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: SPRATLIN TOWING & RECOVERY, INC. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 12/18/2017, 9:00 am at 10875 US Hwy 301 HAMPTON, FL 32044, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. SPRATLIN TOW ING & RECOVERY, INC. reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids. 1FMRU18W3WLB62850 1998 FORD 11/23 1tchg-BCT Basketball tournament on Thanksgiving Concerned Citizens of Bradford County will host the 47th annual Charles Jackson Thanksgiving Basketball Tournament Nov. 2325. Youth will play 6 p.m. nightly and young adults will play at 7 p.m. at the RJE gymnasium on Pine Street in Starke. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for students 17 and under. Come out and support the players! Christmas on the Campus Hope Christian Academys community festival Christmas on the Campus returns for its fourth year on Saturday, Dec. 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Activities includes vendors with crafts, dcor and food, live music, a car and truck show, bounce houses, a hay ride, and much more. Come shop, relax and have fun, and register to win a helicopter or plane ride from the College of Missionary Aviation. Vendor applications are available online at www. myhopechristianacademy.org. Funds raised help purchase computer technology for the school. Jewelry and gift sale at the hospital Come to the Jesses Girl popup shop in the atrium of Shands Starke Regional Medical Center for buy one get one at 50 percent deal on jewelry and other gifts. The sale will take place Thursday, Nov. 30, from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday, Dec. 1, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Onsite monogramming available. Cash, credit cards and payroll deduction accepted. Proceeds benefit the Shands Starke Auxiliary. Faith-based play at BHS Daisy Davis will present the hit play You Dont Have a Clue About What Ive Been Through on Saturday, Dec. 2, at 6 p.m. at the Bradford High School auditorium. Ticket prices are $20 per person and can be purchased at Eventbrite.com or by contacting Davis at 352-7451106. This play is sponsored in part by Community State Bank and Roberts Insurance. The community is invited to attend.

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Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times 7A NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS The Board of Supervisors (Board) of the Florida Green Finance Authority (Authority), hereby provides notice, pursuant to Sections 163.08(4) and 197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting non-ad valorem assess ments for more than one year to be levied within the area encompassed by the boundaries of Baker County, Florida; Bay County, Florida; Brad ford County, Florida; Calhoun County, Florida; Citrus County, Florida; Clay County, Florida; Columbia County, Florida; DeSoto County, Florida; Di xie County, Florida; Flagler County, Florida; Franklin County, Florida, Gadsden County, Florida; Gilchrist County, Florida; Glades County, Florida; Gulf County, Florida; Hamil ton County, Florida; Hardee County, Florida; Hendry County, Florida; Her nando County, Florida; Highlands County, Florida; Holmes County, Florida; Jackson County, Florida; Jefferson County, Florida; Lafayette County, Florida; Liberty County, Flor ida; Madison County, Florida; Mon roe County, Florida; Nassau County, Florida; Okaloosa County, Florida; Okeechobee County, Florida; Putnam County, Florida; Santa Rosa County, Florida; St. Johns County, Florida; Suwannee County, Florida; Taylor County, Florida; Union County, Flor ida; Wakulla County, Florida; Walton County, Florida; Washington County, Florida, and any additional counties or municipalities of the State of Flor ida subsequently joining the Author the cost of providing energy conser vation and efficiency improvements, renewable energy improvements and wind resistance improvements, in accordance with Section 163.08, Florida Statutes (collectively Qualify ing Improvements). The non-ad va lorem assessments contemplated by this notice are voluntary and only im posed by the Authority with the prior written consent of affected property owners who wish to obtain financing for Qualifying Improvements from the Authority. The Board will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uniform method of collect ing such assessments as authorized by Section 197.3632, Florida Stat utes, at a public hearing to be held at 2:00 p.m., EST, December 7, 2017, at the Town of Mangonia Park Mu nicipal Center located at 1755 East Tiffany Drive, Mangonia Park, Florida 33407. Such resolution will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal description of the boundaries of the real property that may be subject to the levy. Copies of the proposed form of resolution are on file at the Special District Services, Inc., 2501A Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410. All interested persons are invited to attend and present oral comments at the public hearing and/ or submit written comments to the Au thority through its Manager at 2501A Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410. Written comments should be received by the Authority on or before December 1, 2017. Any persons desiring to present oral com ments should appear at the public hearing. In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the Board with respect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Ameri cans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, per sons with disabilities needing special accommodation to participate in such public hearing should contact Special District Services, Inc. at 561-6304922 and/or toll free at 1-877-7374922 at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the date of the public hearing. DATED this 19th day of October, 2017. By Order of: BOARD OF SUPERVI SORS OF THE FLORIDA GREEN FINANCE AUTHORITY www.flgfa.org 11/9 4tchg 11/30-UCT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 2017-CA-0077 DIVISION: MY HEALTHCARE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN EUGENE SMITH AND MARY E. LONG, AKA MARY ELIZABETH LONG AKA MARY ELIZABETH SMITH, AND ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIA RIES, DEVISEES, SURVIVING SPOUSES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN EES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PAR TIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF MARY E. LONG AKA MARY ELIZABETH SMITH, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: KEVIN EUGENE SMITH AND MARY E. LONG, AKA MARY ELIZA BETH LONG AKA MARY ELIZA BETH SMITH, AND ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVI SEES. GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUST EES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF MARY E. LONG AKA MARY ELIZABETH SMITH You are hereby notified that an ac tion to foreclose a mortgage against the following described real property situate and lying in Union County, Florida, to wit: Exhibit A LEGAL DESCRIPTION PARCEL 9-A UPLAND PINES PLAN TATION, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SEC TION 17, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICU LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 17 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 2490.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE. MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1340.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 1140.37 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 383.00 FEET TO AN IRON REBAR; EAST, A DISTANCE OF 760.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 120.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 384.88 FEET THENCE NORTH 120.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 384.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING. PARCEL 9-C UPLAND PINES PLAN TATION, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SEC TION 17, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICU LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 17 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 2490.56 FEET TO: A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1340.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 1140.37 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 383.00 FEET TO AN IRON REBAR; EAST, A DISTANCE OF 880.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 120.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 385.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 120.00 FEET.; THENCE NORTH 384.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING. PARCEL 9-E UPLAND PINES PLAN TATION, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SEC TION 17, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICU LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 17 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 2490.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 1340.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 1140.37 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 383.00 FEET TO AN IRON REBAR; EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1000.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING: THENCE CONTINUING OF 120.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 385.31 FEET; THENCE NORTH 120.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH, 385.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING. PARCEL 9-G UPLAND PINES PLAN TATION, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SEC TION 17, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICU LARLY DESCRIBED; AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 17 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 2490.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1340.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 1140.37 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 383.00 FEET TO AN IRON REBAR; EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1120.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE CONTINUING OF 122.12 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 385.55 FEET; THENCE NORTH 124.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH EAST, A DISTANCE OF 385.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EASEMENTS RE: SARA LANE AND JESSE LANE OF UPLAND PINES PLANTATION A STRIP OF LAND 60 FEET WIDE LYING 30 FEET TO THE RIGHT AND 30 FEET TO THE LEFT OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CEN TERLINE: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 17, TOWN SHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST THE EAST LINE OF SAID SEC TION, 2490.56 FEET TO A CON CRETE MONUMENT; THENCE TO AN IRON PIN; THENCE RUN S2E 130 FEET TO THE P.O.B. OF SAID CENTERLINE; ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 1753.49 FEET TO A POINT HERINAFTER KNOWN AS POINT A; THENCE TERLINE 1029.43 FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 293.99 FEET AND BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CENTERLINE CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 388.68 FEET (THROUGH A CEN POINT OF COMPOUND CURVE OF A CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 550 FEET AND BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CENTERLINE CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 575.95 FEET (THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 60). TO THE POINT OF REVERSE CURVE OF SAID CENTERLINE, SAID CURVE. HAVING A RADIUS OF 1145.92 FEET AND BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CEN TERLINE CURVE AN ARC DIS TANCE OF 474.14 FEET (THROUGH TO THE P.T. OF SAID CENTERLINE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 1955 FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 1145.92 FEET AND BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAlD CENTERLINE CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 481.08 FEET (THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 57.76 FEET TO. THE P.C. OF A CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 531.60 FEET AND BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST; THENCE RUN EAST ERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CENTERLINE CURVE AN ARC DIS TANCE OF 197.69 FEET (THROUGH TO THE P.T. OF SAID CURVE AND THE WEST R/W OF STATE ROAD NO. 791 (80 FOOT R/W) AND THE END OF SAID CENTERLINE RE TURN TO POINT A, SAID POINT BEING THE P.O.B. OF A STRIP OF LAND 40 FOOT WIDE, LYING 20 FEET TO THE RIGHT AND 20 FEET TO THE LEFT OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE; FROM ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 1056.51 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CEN TERLINE. ALL BEING AND LYING IN SEC TIONS 17, 20 AND 21. TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on John F. Hayter, Attorney For Plaintiff, of John F. Hayter, Attorney At Law, P.A., whose address is 1418 N.W. 6th Street, Gainesville, FL 32601, within thirty (30) days of the first publication of this Notice, which first publication date is 11/23/17, making the deadline for any written defenses or response you might want to file to this Notice being 12/26/17 (due to the intervening weekend of 12/23/17 12/24/17 and to the 2017 Christmas legal holiday of 12/25/17) and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service upon the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated this 20th of November, 2017. Kellie Hendricks Connell As Clerk Of Court By: Crystal Norman As Deputy Clerk 11/23 2tchg 11/30-UCT PUBLIC NOTICE RULE NAME: 4.12 Instructional Materials Se lection 5.04 Student Attendance PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To update Board Policies SUMMARY: To update Board Poli cies AUTHORITY: Florida Statutes LAW IMPLEMENTED: ECONOMIC IMPACT: None Policies can be viewed in the Office of the Superintendent of Schools, 55 SW Sixth Street, Lake Butler, Florida between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. IF A HEARING IS REQUESTED WITHIN 28 DAYS OF THIS PUBLI CATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 120.54 FLORIDA STAT UTES, IT WILL BE HELD ON JAN UARY 16, AT 6:00 P.M., IN THE SCHOOL BOARD MEETING ROOM. A COMPLETE TEXT OF THESE PROPOSED RULES MAY BE VIEWED IN THE OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 55 S.W. 6TH STREET, LAKE BUT LER, FLORIDA. 11/23 1tchg-UCT NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WORTHINGTON SPRINGS, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the ordinance, which title hereinafter appears, will be considered for en actment by the Town Council of the Town of Worthington Springs at public hearing on December 5, 2017 at 7:00 pm at the Council Room at 11933 SW 36th Drive, Worthington Springs, Florida. Copies of said Ordinance may be inspected by any member of the public at the Town Hall office on Wednesdays from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. All interested persons may ap pear on the above date, time and place to be heard with respect to the ordinance. The title of said ordinance reads as follows: TOWN OF WORTHINGTON SPRINGS ORDINANCE NO 2017-05 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNSEL OF WORTHINGTON SPRINGS, FLORIDA, PROHIBITING THE COMMERCIAL USE OF SIMU LATED GAMBLING DEVICES WITH IN THE TOWN LIMITS AND OUTLIN ING A TITLE, INTENT, LEGISLATIVE AUTHORICATION, DEFINITIONS, AREA OF ENFORCEMENT, EXEMP TIONS, CIVIL PENALTIES, CRIMI NAL PENALTIES, INJUNCTIVE RE LIEF, AND ENFORCEMENT, PRO VIDING FOR CONFLICTS WITH STATE LAW, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFICTIVE DATE. Any person requiring auxiliary aids and services at this meeting may con tact the Town Clerk at 352-316-6776 at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the Florida Relay Ser vice at 1-800-955-8770. 11/23 1tchg-UCT Union Legals Honor Roll STARKE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FIRST-GRADERS MAKING STRAIGHT A HONOR ROLL FOR THE FIRST NINE WEEKS: (front, l-r) Clayton Fugatt, London Lawrence, Osborn, Jada Clayton and Mason Starling. STARKE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FIRST-GRADERS MAKING STRAIGHT A HONOR Haygood, Iana Oliver, Emmerson Sturgell, (back) Alyssa Wilson, Emily Coleman, Wiggins and Mason Lowe. STARKE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SECOND-GRADERS MAKING STRAIGHT A HONOR ROLL FOR THE FIRST NINE WEEKS: (l-r) Madison Lee, Emily Miller, Brycen Nichols, Kingslee Phillips, Kadence Simmons and Mason Stone. STARKE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SECOND-GRADERS MAKING STRAIGHT A HONOR ROLL FOR THE FIRST NINE WEEKS: (front, l-r) Caleb Barber, Kiley Cole, Aiden Masey, (back) Makayla Pernell, Madison Woods, Ella Anderson and Ralph Byrd.

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BY TRACY LEE TATE UCT Editor Thanksgiving is here and many people are looking forward to their annual turkey fix. As many people as there are that seem to really like turkey, it is amazing how many only cook a whole bird once or twice a year usually at Thanksgiving and at Christmas. Perhaps it is the subconscious knowledge of the inherent danger of cooking such an item which curtails our efforts, or perhaps, its just two much trouble unless its for a holiday. According to State Farm Insurance, more cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving day than any other time of year (about 1,000 annually), with more then one-third of them taking place in the garage or on the homes patio. This is not a likely place to encounter a stove or oven so the logical conclusion it that the majority of these accidents involve a turkey fryer. These wonderful devices, which do produce delectable turkey, are responsible for $15 million in property damage annually and, according to a Reuters report, have caused five deaths, 60 injuries and the total destruction of 900 homes in the past few years. Newsweek credits the devices with 672 serious injuries since 2002. Now, no one is saying that turkey fryers should not be used, almost, but many say that people who use them need to pay attention to some safety rules. There are a few who would like to see them go away, such as those pesky people at Underwriters Laboratories and the National Fire Protection Association, who both advised against using them. Remember, in the Middle Ages, they executed people by boiling them in oil. While this is the desired effect with the turkey, one needs to keep in mind that the oil really is super hot and anyone coming into contact with it, such as in the case of a splash, is going to have burns so serious that a trip to the hospital may be necessary. State Farm has produced two instructional videos about safely using a turkey fryer one starring William Shatner and the most recent one starring Si and Jase Robertson, from Duck Dynasty. For those not inclined to watching instructional videos, no matter how humorous, they also offer a list of safety precautions. Fryers should be set up in a clear area, away from your home, vehicles, trees and other structures and never on decks or in garages. Make sure it is level and in a place where you will not have to move it until cooking is complete and the unit has cooled. Make sure the turkey is fully thawed and dry before you cook it. Any ice or water left on or in the bird can cause a flare-up when it contacts hot oil. Turn off the burner before lowering the turkey into the cooker and before removing it when it is done. Always place the burner unit at least two feet from the propane tank. Never put more oil in the fryer than the manufacturer recommends. Remember, oil is flammable and will flare quickly if it makes contact with the burner. Only cook if the weather is good; never in the rain or snow (it has been known to happen). Never leave a fryer unattended. It only takes a few seconds for a child or pet to overturn the cooker and create a disaster. Also, keep a constant eye on the oil temperature (your unit should come with temperature controls). If oil heats to the stage where it is smoking, the next thing you see will be flameslots of them! If you see smoke coming off the oil, turn off the fryer immediately and move yourself and others away until the unit has had a few minutes to cool. Keep yourself safe while cooking. No, you dont need a suit of armor, but goggles (or other eye protection) and gloves or cooking mitts are recommended and long sleeves and pants are not a bad idea, but avoid baggy or ragged clothing. Smaller turkeys (8-10 pounds) seem to cook better than larger ones, especially ones over 12 pounds. Also, remember that fried turkeys should not be stuffed and any marinade used before cooking should not be water-based. Do not allow anyone else around the fryer but the person doing the cooking. Near the fryer is not an area for socializing, children playing or pets trying to see what you are doing. Resist the urge to have people you really dont like near the fryer, because even if you have a legitimate accident, you will be blamed for it anyway. When you have turned off the fryer and removed the finished turkey, remember that the oil will remain hot enough to cause harm for several hours and it will always be flammable. Remove the pot from the burner with care and place it on a level surface in a place where it will not be bothered. Cover the pot loosely and let it sit overnight to cool before trying to dispose of the oil. Clean up any spills immediately to prevent risk of fire or slips. After all the safety consciousness and care, congratulate yourself on a job well done and eat that turkey. This Thanksgiving, lets all work so we can be thankful that no one was injured in the production of our feast and that our house, too, survived the ordeal. BY TED BARBER Special to the UCT At the Nov. 7 meeting of the Lake Butler Rotary Club a hearty meal of fried chicken and meatloaf, plus delicious side dishes by Spires Catering, was offered for the noon meal. Twenty members and guests also enjoyed the added gourmet dishes Donna Harris provided from the vegetables and fruit the Veggie Girl delivers to many of us. The winner of the grocery bag full of fruit and vegetables was Sara Owen and everyone was encouraged to help themselves to a table full of vegetables. The Community Update, a monthly agenda item, began by President Ted Barber told members that the park bench with a dedication plaque honoring Norman Stephenson would be secured in front of the UC Veterans Monument located at 325 West Main Street prior to November 11, 2017 (Veterans Day). The bench and plaque are complements of the American Legion Post 153 and the Lake Butler Rotary Club 4372. An informal dedication will be held at 6:00 PM, December 21, 2017 and a social will follow for Rotarians and their guests at Joe Stephensons newly renovated home 60 yards away from the dedication site. Barber also thanked the City of Lake Butler (Dave Mecusker, Sara Owen, Sissie Herndon and Cody Douglas), Tommy Spires, Steve Wellhausen and all the Lake Butler Rotarians for securing the Lake Side Park trash receptacles on the cement pier. This community service project will help in keeping our lake free of trash. He also mentioned that the County is assisting with flexible signs for the receptacles. The original signs were ridged and will be used for notification to motorists that our Rotary Club meets each Tuesday at noon. Dave Mecusker announced that the Lake Butler Christmas Parades December 16 theme is, Our Favorite Christmas Movie. Lineup will be on the Lake Road and the proposed start time is 6:00 p.m. Santa will be on hand for the children to see. Tommy Spires, Club Chairman for The Rotary Foundation, stated that he would be heading up a weekly 50-50 Club drawing to raise money for the Rotary Foundation. The original Foundation was started with a donation of $26.50. Today the Foundation is making a huge difference all over the world. As a District, our D6970 is the number one contributor in the world, and as a club, Spires wants us to provide the financial assistance that will help make this world a better place. Our Club Donation will be sent to District by the end of December 2017. Spires also thanked Barber for inviting him to meet with Russel Miller, past District Governor 2008-2009 and Rotary Foundation Coordinator on Nov. 6. Kellie Connell presented the Clubs profit and loss statement by class for the dates 7/2016 to 6/2017 and the proposed profit and loss budget overview from 7/2018 to 6/2019. Kellie asked that members contact her directly for individual statements and that she will try to provide each member a financial statement every three months. uctimeseditor@gmail.com 904-964-6305 fax 904-964-8628 USPS 648-200 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: UNION COUNTY TIMES131 W. Call Street Starke, FL 32091 Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months John M. Miller, Publisher Editor: Tracy Lee Tate Advertising: Kevin Miller Beth Tillman Typesetting: Eileen Gilmore Advertising & Newspaper Prod: C. Hurston Bookkeeping & Classified Adverts: Heather Wheeler Bookkeeping Asst: Linda Lacombe Congratulations P.F.C Shannon Rosier for graduating from Marine Boot Camp on November 3rd M.C.R.D. Paris Island South Carolina. Love from all of your family, Donald and Linda Rosier, Donnie and Brittany Rosier, Crystal and Markayla, Papa Shadd and Aunt Geraldine and aunt Mary Annette, Granny and Papa Gris, Sarah and Chloe, and Nana and Papa Scott. Advertising Works!! UCHS Class of 1963 to Meet The UCHS Class of 1963 is having a lunch on Wed., Dec. 6 at noon at the Steakhouse in Starke. Friends are welcome. Please contact Sharon Berry at 904-553-5123 or phillipberry@ att.net VFW Post 10082 Open Mic Night The VFW Post 10082, located off S.R. 231 in Lake Butler, is hosting an Open Mic Night on Saturday, Nov. 18 from 7-11 p.m. Jr. Crews and the Raiford Boys will be there. You do not have to be a member to attend or participate, so come on out and join the fun. City Seeks Sponsors for Christmas Parade The annual City of Lake Butler Christmas Parade is being held on Dec. 16 at 6 p.m. The city is asking the community to assist with making this event a success through sponsorships, helping them provide Santas gift bags for the children of Union County. Santa will be giving these bags to the children immediately after the parade under the Christmas tree at Lakeside Park. All contributions are tax-deductible and all sponsors will be acknowledged in the Union County Times after the event. Contact Lake Butler City Hall at 386-496-3401 with any questions. Free clothes at Fellowship Baptist Free clothing for all sizes and ages at Fellowship Baptist Church in Raiford. Winter coats are also available. Open in the second Saturday of each month from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Lake Butler Social Club on Saturdays Lonely? Looking for something to do on Saturday evenings? Non-smoking, nondrinking, good clean fun? The Lake Butler Social Club offers a live band, dancing, a potluck dinner and good fellowship. Doors open at 6 p.m., dinner is served at 7 p.m. and the dancing begins at 7:30 p.m., all at the Lake Butler Community Center. Admission is $10 for members and $12 for guests. Call Joe Miller at 352-284-9473 for more information. UC Recreation Board meets monthly Union Countys Recreation Board meets every second Tuesday of the month at 5:30 p.m. in the Pop Warner building. VFW Post 10082 plays bingo The VFW Post 10082, located off S.R. 231 in Lake Butler, has bingo on Thursdays at 7 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to come on out and play. Lake Butler American Legion Seeking Members Lake Butler American Legion Post 153 is asking U.S. military veterans to contact Thomas Fortner, Adjutant, at 386496-2473 or Ted Barber, Post Commander, at 386-496-2744 for information and possible membership.

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Debbie Nistler and her family, like so many others, will cook and eat a turkey on Thanksgiving, but they can also add the fact they hatched and raised it as well. In fact, Nistler, the Bradford County Extension director, will have done the same for multiple turkeys on families tables as part of a business shes started under the name of Southern Shades Farm. I wanted to do something that was kind of an unusual business venture, she said. Its really tough to find really good turkeys for Thanksgiving that are fresh, (with) no hormones. Theyre all fresh off the farm. All but two of the 12 turkeys Nistler had available in this first year of her business venture were purchased. She raised them all with the intent of having them ready by Thanksgiving, but shes looking to expand the number of turkeys she raises to be sold, dividing them into two cages. One cage will consist of turkeys that will be ready by Thanksgiving; the other will consist of turkeys that will be ready by Christmas. This first year of the business, which also consists of raising and selling Boer goats, has gone well, with Nistler saying she lost hardly any turkeys. Ive been super happy, she said. From hatching to now, I only lost three birds, which is pretty good. Two of them were from the hurricane, and one of them was just when he was a chick. The minute we put him in a bigger cage, something crawled in there and killed it. Nistler raises heritage turkeys, which differ in a few ways from broad breasted turkeys, which are the conventional turkeys people buy in grocery stores and consume on Thanksgiving. Heritage turkeys take longer to mature. Nistler said the turkeys shell have ready for Thanksgiving were hatched in June, whereas broad breasted turkeys can be started in July or August and be ready. Unlike broad breasted turkeys, heritage turkeys can fly and roost just like turkeys in the wild. The heritage turkeys use of muscles that broad breasted turkeys dont use affects the taste of the birds, Nistler said, comparing it to the marbling found in red meat, where fat is infused into the muscle. She said once broad breasted turkeys reach their maximum size, they start putting on extra fat. The Butterballs, they have a lot of external fat, she said, adding that the fat of heritage turkeys is kind of infused into the meat. It just really changes the taste of the bird. Though heritage turkeys dont produce the amount of breast meat that broad breasted turkeys do, they tend to be bigger birds overall. Nistler said many of her turkeys will be between 25 and 30 pounds, though she pointed out one she said will probably reach close to 50 pounds. The largest broad breasted turkeys tend to be approximately 20 pounds, she said. To get the turkeys to their mature weight, you have to feed them, of course. Nistler said finding the right kind of feed has been one of the challenges this first year of her business, but she found a 22-percent-protein feed at Tractor Supply Co. that shed been unable to find in other stores. She gives her turkeys that along with cracked corn. Thats why my mama and papa birds are so fat right now, Nistler said. Theyve been getting the 22-percent protein and loving it. Besides finding the right feed, Nistler has had to ensure the turkeys keep eating. She said turkeys tend to go off their feed if theyre upset by something. The aftermath of Hurricane Irma, for example, was a concern. We were giving them blackoil sunflower seeds for a little while to spark their appetites, especially after the storm because they were a little shaken, Nistler said. Nistler cannot process turkeys ahead prior to selling them, but once a person buys one, she can process it if they wish. The turkeys cost $65 plus an additional $15 if they want it processed. In Florida, they have to own the livestock because Im not a USDA-approved slaughter facility, Nistler said. Once they own the bird, if they would like for me to process it, Ill process it. Now that its their bird, they can do whatever they want with their bird. Nistler said she spent a couple of years thinking about the business, trying to figure out which breeds would work best and how long it would take to raise those breeds to maturity. She said she wanted breeds that were more naturally pestresistant so she didnt have to use artificial means to control pests. She also wanted breeds that were not aggressive. Heritage breeds fit the bill. Theyre very sweet-tempered birds, Nistler said. Still, there are challenges, BY SAMANTHA GRENROCK UF/IFAS Public Relations Specialist When Madison Bennett, 16, had a chance to raise poultry through her county 4-H youth development program, she wanted to think outside of the traditional chicken coop. I wanted to do something unique, so I decided to start my own business, Turkey Time, said Bennett, a member of the Bradford County 4-H program. Now I raise and sell turkeys for Thanksgiving and the holidays. As she developed her business model, Bennett wanted to capitalize on recent consumer food trends. My turkeys are farm fresh they live their whole lives in one place, where they get to roam free and arent raised with growth hormones or antibiotics, she said. This is the kind of product more and more people are interested in having on their holiday dinner table. Since starting the business with her first group of chicks just six months ago, Bennett has produced 13 finished turkeys and has already taken several orders for Thanksgiving. Bennett raises each of her birds from eggs, looking after their nutrition and living area until they are processed and sold. Shes also responsible for marketing Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH FINANCINGWe Will Beat All Competitor Pricing SHEET VINYL AS LOW AS $.59 CARPET AS LOW AS $.69 SF VINYL PLANK AS LOW AS $.89 SF WOOD LOOK TILE AS LOW AS $1.29 SF 25% OFF ALL CARPET & VINYL REMENTSFloor & Home Over 40 years of SALES ~ SERVICE ~ INSTALLATION See TURKEYS, 7B Madison Bennett is pictured with some of the raising for her the business she started six months ago, Turkey Time. Bennett and her grandfather built the structure that houses the turkeys. Bradford 4-H entrepreneur Bennett says its Turkey Time Not your typical Thanksgiving turkeys Debbie Nistler follows two of her production turkeys. From those turkeys and others, Nistler hatched and raised 12 turkeys to sell for Thanksgiving as part of Southern Shades Farm. One of the turkeys that has sold looks out from its enclosure. See BENNETT, 2B

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer When it was all said and done, the Sneads High School volleyball team captured the Class 1A championship as most wouldve predicted, but Union County head coach Jordan Windham and two of her seniors said the Tigers had nothing to hang their heads about following their 3-0 (25-14, 25-13, 25-10) loss to the Pirates on Nov. 17 at the University of North Florida. If you had watched us at the beginning of the season, nobody would have ever thought that we wouldve made it this far, said senior Madelyn Kish, who finished with five kills. I think that even though we lost just a couple of minutes ago, we played our hearts out. Thats all we came to do. I think that we did a great job and came together as a team. Its rough. Its tough to lose like that your last game, but Im proud of us. Only two teams make it to the final game of the season. Sneads was no surprise. The Pirates (264) walked off the court after their win over Union with their fifth straight championship trophy. Finishing as runner-up did nothing to take away from Unions accomplishment. Sure, there were tears afterward, but the fact remained that this Tigers team finished as the second-best team in the state. It was also the first time in program history Union has played for the state title. I think that God has bigger plans for us, said senior Taylor Beatty, who had four kills, four digs and three blocks. I think that we gave it all, and it wasnt enough. Thats OK. Thats just what (God) wanted to happen. I know weve set the foundations. The first time ever weve gone this far. I couldnt be more proud of my team. I couldnt be more proud of the other girls and the love and support we had. The Tigers finished the season with a 14-12 record, which Kish said gave no indication of just what kind of a team this was. Our record doesnt show the heart that we have, Kish said. I think that it honestly means more to me than a perfect record because it shows how much growth weve had throughout the season and how much we came together. Windham said, Ive said it for weeks that this is my dream team. For us to get here and to be their assistant for three years and then to finish this out this year as their head coach has just meant the world. Its meant everything. Theyve worked hard all season. An attack error by Sneads tied the score at 3-3 in the first set, while a kill by Kish off Michaela Edenfields block attempt tied it at 4-4. The Pirates scored eight of the next 13 points before scoring six straight with Alyssa Stagner serving. The last three points earned with Stagner serving came on two attack errors and a double hit. Edenfield had two kills as the Pirates continued to pull away, with Stagner dumping the ball over the net for the final set point. Union trailed 6-2 in the second set, but scored two straight points with Emily ONeal serving. Another point with Fulgham serving pulled the Tigers to within 7-6, but thats as close as it would get. Edenfield had a block and a kill that helped the Pirates go on a 6-0 run for a 13-6 lead. A Beatty kill later forced side-out and made the score 158. Sneads was then called for a double hit after a block by Unions Summer Fulgham kept play alive, making the score 159. Sneads scored 10 of the next 14 points, getting two more kills from Edenfield to help close the set out with a 12-point win. A 5-0 run by Sneads in the third set put the Pirates ahead 10-2. Beatty, Fulgham and Kish each had a kill, but the Tigers could do little to make a game of it, with the Pirates leading by as many as 15 points. Allie Ann McCord closed out the win for Sneads with two straight kills. Fulgham and Madison Adams each finished with two blocks, while Adams added six assists and five service aces. For Sneads, it was continued dominance against 1A competition. The Pirates havent lost to a 1A school from 2013 through 2017 and havent lost a set to a 1A school since Oct. 24, 2013. Windham said Sneads begins identifying and developing players starting at 10-12 years of age, which is something she and others are working to do in Lake 2B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Gas piping Madison Adams (right) tries to stay out of the way as Brooke Waters makes a play. Photo courtesy of Donny Joiner Photography. Tigers are 1A runners-up after 3-0 loss to Sneads Accepting the Class 1A runner-up trophy are (l-r) seniors Madelyn Kish, Madison Adams, Taylor Beatty and Brooke Waters and head coach Jordan Windham. Photo courtesy of Donny Joiner Photography. See STATE, 4B her business and even competed in the 4-H Gator Pit contest at 4-H University last July, where she gained experiencing pitching her business idea to a panel of judges. Raising these turkeys has taught me a lot about running a business and being an entrepreneur, said Bennett, an 11-year 4-H participant. Im able to run this business because of the life skills I learned in 4-H, such as public speaking and good decision making. Bradford County Extension Director Debbie Nistler said, Turkey Time has renewed Madisons enthusiasm for 4-H and agriculture. She is very proud of her turkeys and her business. Bennetts project is representative of the kind of impact 4-H can have on youth, Nistler said. Each 4-H members project is their passion, Nistler said. We want this passion to translate into life skills for the future. I hope more youth explore entrepreneurism as a way to expand the boarders of the classic 4-H livestock project. Bennett hopes to sell enough turkeys this holiday season to fund an expansion of her birds nesting area and ultimately produce more turkeys. To learn more about Turkey Time, contact the UF/IFAS Extension Bradford County office at 904-966-6224. To get involved in your countys 4-H program, go to florida4h.org. BENNETT Continued from 1B

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer One more round. It has been the mantra for the Bradford High School football team since Brian Tomlinson was hired as head coach in the spring the quest to always go one step farther. The Tornadoes have taken it to heart. One week after winning their first playoff game since 2004, they defeated visiting Dunnellon 24-14 on Nov. 17 to claim the Region 2-4A championship. Bradford (101) now hosts Raines (11-1) in a state semifinal game on Friday, Nov. 24, at 7:30 p.m. Oh, my gosh. Its like a dream, said senior quarterback Zion Barber, who threw for two touchdowns and rushed for another, along with kicking all three extra points as well as a 20yard field goal. Its like Im in a dream. We practiced all week for this. Dunnellon (8-3) eliminated Bradford in the first round of the playoffs the last two seasons. Defensive lineman Gerald Smith said he and his fellow seniors did not want to be put out by the Tigers again. We had to get it, Smith said. It was our last chance. We went and got it done. Smith recovered a fumble at his own 5-yard line to stop a Dunnellon scoring threat in the fourth quarter. In fact, the Bradford defense twice made stops inside its own 5 in the second half and thwarted three Dunnellon red-zone opportunities in all. Theyre unbelievable, Tomlinson said of his defensive players. Theyve done it all year long. Its just unreal what they do. Coach (Rob) Charles and the defensive staff, they get them playing hard. Its a heck of a team. The Tigers entered the game averaging 340 yards and 37 points per game, but left Starke with 236 yards and just two scores. If it wasnt for our defense, we wouldve had no chance in this game, Barber said. It was the Bradford offense that got the chance to make an initial impact as the Tornadoes received the opening kickoff. Jeremiah Vaughn (nine carries, 52 yards) bounced outside for 22-yard gain on the first play of scrimmage as he and Tally Chandler (14 carries, 69 yards) combined for 63 yards. Chandlers 17-yard gain on a reverse-field run resulted in first-and-goal at the Dunnellon 2. Barber then carried the ball three straight times, plunging into the end zone from a yard out on fourth down. His PAT made it 7-0 approximately two minutes into the game. On Barbers three carries, he was the lone back in the backfield, a formation the Tornadoes utilized to great advantage often as Barber finished with 127 yards on 19 carries. Tomlinson said he thought it was a way of having success against the Dunnellon defense. Its something we saw on film, he said, adding, Its something we thought we could take advantage of. We were able to a lot of times. Dunnellons offense gained first downs on three straight plays on the ensuing series. Decorian Patterson had a 10-yard reception to the Bradford 39, followed by Jase Williams 13yard run. Williams then turned a shovel pass into an 11-yard gain to the 15. The Tigers got as close as the 10, but after an incomplete pass on third down, Bradfords Jaquez Mosley held Williams to no gain on fourth down. Patterson, who also plays safety for the Tigers, intercepted a Barber pass on the next series, giving Dunnellon the ball at its own 43. Lee corralled a high shotgun snap and gained 10 yards on a third-down run to the Bradford 40. A 10-yard run by Patterson resulted in another first down, while Lee rolled out on a fourth-down play and found Patterson for a 9-yard gain that resulted in a first down at the 18. Runs by Williams and Braelan Edwards moved the Tigers to the 2, with Tyre Frazier eventually capping the drive with a 1-yard touchdown run at the 11:22 mark of the second quarter. Lees run on the two-point conversion put Dunnellon ahead 8-7. Bradford took advantage of a special-teams miscue the next time Dunnellon had the ball. Punter Maurice Goolsby had to field a snap that sailed over his head and was eventually tackled at his own 10-yard line. Barber had a 7-yard run to the 3, followed by a 2-yard run by Chandler. Defensive tackle Kyle Smith tackled Barber for a 2-yard loss on third down, so Bradford settled for Barbers 20-yard field goal, which put the Tornadoes up 10-8 with 4:56 remaining in the half. A pair of tackles for 1-yard gains by Bradfords Trace Barber helped force Dunnellon to go three-and-out on the ensuing series. The Tornadoes offense responded by putting together a 68-yard drive to increase their lead before halftime. Barber picked up the drives initial first down on a 7-yard run and then completed a 13-yard pass to Nathan Davis for another first down at the Dunnellon 42. Barber threw a 14-yard pass to Vaughn for a first down at the 30. Then, on third-and-10, Barber ran for 15 yards to the 15. The quarterback, who finished the night 9-of-14 for 126 yards, then hit Davis with a slant over the middle that turned into a 14yard touchdown with 27 seconds left before halftime. Barbers PAT made the score 17-8. Dunnellon got off to a fast start to open the second half, with Edwards running backward and reversing field as he returned the kickoff 42 yards to the Bradford 33. Lee completed passes of 11 and 10 yards to move the Tigers to the 12. Williams scored on a run from there, helped out by a fumble that bounced right back up into his hands as he never had to break stride. Bradfords Smith tackled Edwards short of the goal line on the two-point play, making the score 17-14 at the 10:49 mark of the third quarter. The team wasnt fazed by the quick score, Smith said, adding that Tomlinson told the Tornadoes at halftime not to give up. We just had to keep going, Smith said. We had to treat the score like it was 0-0. We just kept going. We didnt stop. Tomlinson said, We told them it wasnt going to be easy. Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 3B Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 27 years. Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back Pain Back & Neck Pain Clinic KEYSTONE AIRPARK MEETING be held on the 1st Tuesday of every month at 6:00 P.M. Location is: 7100 than 72 hours in advance. Roof Leaks Re-Roofs Shingles Metal Low Slope Mobile Home Commercial Lifetime Roofs Siding Rotten Wood Replacement FREE ESTIMATES Locally Owned www.LewisWalkerRoofing.comGuaranteed Best Service Guaranteed Best Warranties Guaranteed Best Prices Toll Free 866-959-7663 Legals See REGION, 6B Class 4A Final-Four matchups Raines (11-1) at Bradford (10-1) University (9-1) at Cocoa (11-1)

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Dear Editor: Situated on 167 acres just off SR 100 in southeastern Bradford County is a place set apart for welcoming all people to experience Christ and creation in ways that deepen faith and strengthen relationships. This place is the Montgomery Presbyterian Camp and Conference Center a.k.a. simply Camp Montgomery. Im thankful for this place and its ministry to all people. Every summer for the past decade, Camp Montgomery has welcomed a dozen or more of my students. These teens spend from six days to two weeks recovering from a school year and recreating on three lakes with swimming, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, and tubing behind the boat on the big lake. All other camp activities are offered: archery, dodge ball, singing, crafts, basketball, tie dying shirts, cookouts, smores under the stars, skits, talent shows, etc. So, what makes Camp Montgomery different? Well, very inconspicuously, as only God can, each campers needs are met without the camper ever Thankful for Camp Montgomery 4B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Thanks for visiting us on Halloween! VeRonica@VeRonicaROwens.com December SpecialFree Living Will with the purchase of any other Estate Planning Document Thanks for visiting us on Halloween! Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: The Bradford County Telegraph Nov. 9 article about Flooding indicates Connie Henderson said Chemours discharges 2-3 million gallons a day (mgd). The 2-3 mgd is the annual average and has no real meaning when evaluating flooding impacts. What Henderson failed to tell the County Commissioners and the public is Chemours reported to DEP that it discharged 57.85 mgd on 9/11/17, 63.13 mgd on 9/12/17, 79.15 mgd on 9/13/17, 39.81 mgd on 9/14/17, and 52.41 mgd on 9/15/17. The Chemours discharges of over 110 million gallons on September 11th and 12th may have represented over 1/3 of the water that flooded homes near the golf course and the homes and apartments on Bedford Court north of the Hospital. The impacts of the Chemours discharges were likely more damaging because of blockages in Alligator Creek caused by trees and debris. Some of the trees were in the Creek before Irma and many more fell into the creek during Irma. The impact of Chemours discharges on Lake Sampson and Crosby flooding is a little different. During August, Chemours discharges averaged 6.1 mgd and for the period 9/1/17 to 9/10/17 Chemours discharges averaged 9.2 mgd. These discharges would have impacted the level of Lake Sampson and the ability to lower Lake Sampson by opening one or more of the water control gates. If all the water discharged by Chemours since July 2017 were removed from Lakes Sampson and Rowell the lake levels would have been about 8 inches lower when Irma arrived. If the Chemours discharges were removed from the lakes for the period when Lake Sampson was over an elevation of 135 feet the lakes would have been 3 to 4 inches lower. Chemours discharges appear to have been greater than 10 mgd for the last 15 days of September and over 20 mgd for the first few days of October. These discharges after Irma would have slowed the rate that Lake Sampson and Crosby declined after Irma. Taking Chemours discharges out of Alligator Creek would reduce flood peaks on Lakes Sampson and Crosby and allow flood lake levels to recede faster. A significant part of the Chemours water discharges that had such devastating impacts on residents on Alligator Creek and Lake Sampson and Crosby could have benefited the Keystone Lakes. A clear alternative to flooding along Alligator Creek in Starke would be to have Chemours discharge the first 20 mgd of water to the Keystone Lakes. The old mine area would serve as a large stormwater retention basin holding water to eventually flow to the Keystone Lakes. This would benefit the Keystone Lakes and likely prevent most if not all the flooding along Alligator Creek. It would also make it easier to regulate the level of Lake Sampson. Henderson stated that 100 million gallons had gone to the Keystone Lakes since June. The proposal to move the first 20 mgd of discharges to the old mine area would have delivered over 1,000 million gallons to the Keystone Lakes. The two Water Management Districts could help by funding a Citing Chemours discharge average means nothing in regard to part of the infrastructure needed to increase the amount of water Chemours discharges to the Keystone Lakes. Henderson referenced the minimum flows and levels of the Santa Fe River. In the past the SRWMD has held the position that Bradford County must be flooded so the minimum flows for the Santa Fe River can be met. After Irma, this is a position I hope SRWMD is willing to change. Flood prevention is a core mission of the SRWMD and in my opinion, is more important than minimum flows. Paul Still Starke Dear Editor: One morning, I finished breakfast at the crack of day and went out on the front porch to water my flowers. Noticing that everything had a beautiful color, I next went to my back (East) door where there is no overhang. Then I stepped into a world of such glorious color that I was overcome with awe, gratitude and prayer. It seemed a sweet communion with God and I was a part of His whole universe. Such moments are treasures but they are so fleeting. We people who live in houses with four walls miss so much! But just a glimpse of Gods glory can change a gray day to a blessing. Hazel Wall Glimpsing Gods glory makes day Rhonda and Joseph Sikes will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary on Saturday, Nov. 25. U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Johnathan R. Watson graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Watson is the son of Sherri L. Watson of Silver Springs, and Charles R. Watson of Lake Butler. He is a 2017 graduate of Union County High School. Johnathan Watson Watson graduates San AntonioLackland The entire community is invited to join the congregation of First United Methodist of Starke for Celebration Sunday, which will be held Dec. 2 from 10:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Bradford County Fairgrounds. Free barbecue will be available. A bounce house will be provided for children, while the Ben Carter Band will provide musical entertainment. 1st United Methodist of Starke invites community Protect Your Investment Beautify Your Home ASPHALTSEAL-COATINGHot Rubberized Crack Filling Patching & Repairing Parking lot striping really voicing them. You see, the staff and summer counselors are kind of like disciples. We are all called to be Jesus hands and feet here on earth. These staff people do just that. Every camper, comes with at least a few disappointments and hurts from the school year. Camp Montgomery shares Gods message with every kid: Forget about the painful former things; do not dwell on the past. See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up! Do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland. Isaiah 43:18-19 A 4 x 5 bulletin board in my classroom is a collage of Pegs Kids over the years at Camp Montgomery. Former students return to look at the wall of photos. The most common remark is, That was the best summer of my life! Im very thankful for Camp Montgomery. Submitted by Peg Stanwix-Hay Butler. For example, Lake Butler Middle School coach Robbie Best carried enough players to have two teams, with the A team winning its conference championship. We are getting to a point where were trying to really start younger and really develop so that we can eventually get to this point, to get to that point that Sneads is at so that we can win several (state titles) in a row. Kish said, Theyre just fundamentally sound, and thats one thing we lack. We have younger girls that havent played as long. Thats OK. We make up for that in the effort we give, but its tough to play a team like that where were just not up to that caliber that they are. I think we played the best we couldve played against them. Windham hopes that her team playing for the state championship inspires younger girls to want to play volleyball, but she also wanted to stress to those potential players that it takes a lot of hard work to accomplish what the UCHS varsity team did. We spend hours upon hours training and just working to get things right, Windham said. If youre afraid of that, it may not work out for you, but if you arent afraid to come in there, put in the hours, put in the work and dedicate your heart to this team and come together, then Ive got a spot for you. There are several girls who are coming up from the middle school now who will make a starting impact on this team. Were very excited about that. So the future could be bright, but Windham was still emotional knowing that her seniors Adams, Beatty, Kish and Brooke Waters had played their last match after helping the program reach tremendous heights. We just hate to see this one end, Windham said. STATE Continued from 2B Madelyn Kish dives to the court to record a dig in the statechampionship loss to Sneads at the University of North Florida on Nov. 17. Photo courtesy of Donny Joiner Photography.

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Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 5B Financing Available for homeowners W.A.C.Call for details904-782-1375Mobile # 904-219-896321535 US 301 NORTH Lawtey FL 32058 Custom Barn Doors Custom Kitchen Custom Beams Custom Kitchen Island Custom Furniture Custom Cabinets We have the most moDern counter Tops, Custom Cabinets and laminate to make your home one of a kindcrawfordscustomwoodworks@gmail.com Family owned and operated over 30 years experience Made in the usa The Weekly Paw Print: October has been designated as Adopt A This week we salute the unsung heroes of veterinary medicine. Im talking about National Veterinary Technician Week. The individuals you see assisting the veterinarian do more than you can see in the exam room alone. Veterinary technicians deliver medications, administer and monitor anesthesia, assist the veterinarian in surgery, collect and run lab tests, and so much more. They do all that they do while remaining patient and compassionate. They never lose sight of what their mission is and why they are there. The veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and the veterinary receptionists make up the veterinary team. Veterinarians rely on their team to care and provide for their patients beyond just the medicine. This week I would like to personally thank my awesome team. I could not do what I do without their help, their inspiration to be the best, and their compassion. It is my privilege to work with each and every one of them. Next time you see a member of your veterinary health care team, give them two paws up! As we celebrate Thanksgiving this week our thoughts turn toward all the blessings we have received during the last year. Not to mention the food! As the smell of pies and meats ll the air, our pets are scheming how they can score some tasty morsels during the chaos of family and friends. We know that noone wants to leave their furriest family member out of the festivities, so here are some pointers of dos and donts for the holiday. DO Turkey. White meat only, no skin and no bones. DONT give onions, garlic, leeks, scallions or any other member of the onion clan. Even cooked these veggies can cause a toxic anemia in your pet. DO Mash Potatoes. These are easy on the tummy, just make sure you watch out for butter and milk. Just add a little broth to moisten them. DONT give grapes or raisins. These have been shown to cause kidney failure in pets. A tasty safe alternative is cranberry sauce but only in small amounts to cut down on sugars. DO Macaroni and cheese. A little goes a long way, also left over pasta is also fair game. DONT give any dairy to our feline friends as most are lactose intolerant. Great going down but not so much on the way back up. DO Green beans. Fresh is best. If cooked, be aware of additional ingredients (onions, bacon, etc) DONT give alcohol. It only takes a small amount to be toxic to pets. Also be aware of unlikely sources of alcohol; fruit cake, candies, and unbaked breads. Make sure your pets are secure during mealtime so they wont beg and so your visitors are not inclined to feed them. To make your pets feel like they are taking part even when they are separate, schedule meal time during the same time as the humans. On behalf of the entire staff at Town & Country Veterinary Clinic, Have a Happy and Blessed Thanksgiving! Bradford Christian Allen Bedell, 25, of Starke was arrested Nov. 17 by Lawtey Police during a traffic stop for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500. Kristy Lynn Brannen, 33, of Orange Park was arrested Nov. 16 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for felony probation violation. Cedric Carter, 37, of Lawtey was arrested Nov. 19 by Bradford deputies for a public order crime keep structure for drug activity and possession of cocaine with intent to sell. Carters girlfriend, Breanna Anquette Harris, 27, of Gainesville, was also arrested the same day by Bradford deputies for aggravated assaultwith a deadly weapon (see Telegraph A-section for more information). Bond was set at $75,000 for the charges against Carter and $50,000 for the charge against Harris. Ted Bernard Curtis, 38, of Brooker was arrested Nov. 15 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larcenygrand theft more than $300/less than $5,000 and grand theft vehicle. According to the warrant affidavit, Curtis somehow obtained the keys to a vehicle in Brooker and stole it to go to Alachua County on Nov. 10 in order to purchase drugs. A backpack and an iPad that were in the vehicle were also taken and not recovered. Curtis returned the vehicle to the victim later and told her that he didnt take it, blaming several other people for the theft. When a deputy arrived to investigate, the victims roommate said that Curtis had also stolen tools from a shed and her grandsons air rifle. Charges were forwarded to the State Attorneys Office, leading to the warrant for his arrest. Bond was set at $25,000. Gerard Delaney, 60, of Edgewater was arrested Nov. 19 by the Florida Highway Patrol during a traffic stop for driving under the influence. Bond was set at $5,000. Clarence Edward Desue, 44, of Starke was arrested Nov. 15 by Starke Police for possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, an officer responded to a complaint call at the Kangaroo on U.S. 301 and S.R. 16 in Starke about two men panhandling in the parking lot and refusing to leave after the manager asked them to do so. The officer encountered Desue in the parking lot, while the other man was in the store. A search of Desue led to the discovery of a metal crack stem in his back pocket. Desue admitted to smoking crack earlier after getting $5 panhandling. He was arrested Both men were trespassed from the store. Bond was set at $2,000. Courtney Rashard Kelly, 42, of Starke was arrested Nov. 14 by Bradford deputies on an outof-county warrant from Alachua for failure to appear on original charge of driving while license suspended or revokedfirst offense. Bond was set at $401. Jessica Rebecca Martin, 36, of Starke was arrested Nov. 14 by Bradford deputies on an outof-county warrant from Clay for probation violation on original charge of defraud financial institution. No bond was allowed. Desirea Patrice Mincey, 18, of Jacksonville was arrested Nov. 14 by Lawtey Police during a traffic stop for driving while license suspended or revoked and possession of marijuananot more than 20 grams. Bond was set at $10,000. Sean Garrett Morgan, 30, of Raiford was arrested Nov. 14 by Starke Police on an outof-county warrant from Baker for a probation violation on original charge of possession of a controlled substance. No bond was allowed. Tyler Dean Sykes, 20, of Fairborn, Ohio, was arrested Nov. 16 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for felony probation violation. No bond was allowed. Keystone/Melrose John Wayne Allen, 40, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 18 by Clay deputies for domestic battery. According to an arrest report, the victim and defendant have been married for 18 years. The victim stated the defendant had been drinking all day and that late in the afternoon, the victim arrived home and decided to celebrate the birthday of the couples daughter. While (the daughter) was opening presents, the deputy wrote in the report, J. Allen got upset because (the victim) did not put his name on a card. The defendant came at the victim, calling her a (redacted from report) and shoved the victim in the right shoulder. After being shoved, the victim had to exit the house to get away from the defendant to avoid further altercation. The incident was witnessed by all children in the residence. The deputy added that he observed redness, but no bruising, in the victims shoulder area. The officer wrote that he interviewed several witnesses before speaking to the defendant. I then made contact with the defendant, John Allen, the deputy wrote. The defendant was extremely intoxicated and extremely verbally abusive. While talking to the deputy, the defendant got aggressive toward the victim, yelling at her and balling up his fists. The deputy added that while escorting the man to his patrol vehicle, the defendant tried to pull away three times before the deputy put him on the ground. The defendants head was scratched during the maneuver, and Clay County Fire Rescue medically cleared the defendant before the deputy transported him to the jail in Green Cove Springs. Grant Cole Harris, 28, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 15 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, armed burglary of a structure or conveyance and a probation violation. According to court papers, on Nov. 1, the victim was conducting maintenance on one of his vehicles in his yard when he saw the defendant approach his property, armed with a machete and ax. After the defendant made a threat, the victim retreated into his home and instructed another occupant of the house to bring his weapons. The two occupants then observed the defendant break down their privacy gate and approach the residence. Armed with a pistol and shotgun, the victim told the defendant not to enter the home, warning the defendant that he was armed and would protect his family if necessary. The defendant kicked in the front door, breaking the lock and jamb, and entered the house still armed with the machete and ax. As the defendant crossed the threshold and stepped inside the residence, the victim fired one shot from the pistol, which struck the defendant in the abdomen. The defendant then dropped his weapons and fell onto the ground from the victims elevated porch. The victim held the defendant at gunpoint until deputies arrived. The defendant was transported to UF Health Shands in Gainesville. Brian Haugdahl, 19, was arrested Nov. 17 by Clay deputies for possession of not more than 20 grams of marijuana. According to an arrest report, a deputy was conducting a property check at Keystone Beach at 3:14 p.m. when he detected the odor of marijuana. I asked the defendant and his friends to come over, the deputy wrote in the report. They willingly complied, and I asked about the smell. The officer added that while talking to the defendant, I could smell a very strong odor of marijuana emitting from his clothing. After interviewing the defendant, the deputy searched the man and found two marijuana blunts weighing 1.2 grams. Arthur Alvin Letchworth, 65, of Starke was arrested Nov. 15 by Clay deputies for trafficking in or possession of 14 grams or more of amphetamine. According to an arrest report, a deputy was conducting traffic enforcement on S.R. 16 near Camp Blanding when he saw the defendant pass at 70 miles per hour, according to a laser speed detector. During the traffic stop, a police K-9 alerted to the odor of narcotics in the vehicle. Deputies found bags of methamphetamine in the center console of the vehicle with a total weight of 36.94 grams. Michael Shaun Winters, 36, of Keystone Heights was arrested Nov. 19 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Union Jeffrey Alan Phillips, 54, of Lake City was arrested Nov. 13 by Union deputies on a warrant for felony probation violation. No bond was allowed. Jody Bennett Snelgrove, 37, of Lake City was arrested Nov. 14 by Union deputies on a warrant for failure to appear for felony offense. No bond was allowed. Shawn Randall Thomas, 35, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 16 by Union deputies on a warrant for batteryfelony battery from strangulation. According to the offense report, in May, Thomas started arguing with his girlfriend over a pipe with marijuana in it when he started physically fighting with her in their apartment. The victim told deputies that Thomas started choking her and slamming her head repeatedly against different walls in the apartment and against a large mirror, breaking it in the process. Thomas left by the time law enforcement arrived. Charges were filed against him through the State Attorneys Office. Bond was set at $20,000. Megan Nicole Muncy, 29, of Lake City was arrested Nov. 14 by Union deputies on a warrant for petit theftless than $300, and for fraudillegal use of credit cards. According to the offense report, Muncy visited a friend in late September and stayed several days at a residence in Lake Butler. After she left to go back to Lake City, the girlfriend of Muncys friend discovered that her wallet was missing from the residence. The wallet contained several credit cards, a debit card, two gift cards and $100 in cash. The victim logged into her online banking account and discovered that Muncy had already used her debit card twice at CVS in Lake Butler and once at an ATM in Lake Butler, withdrawing over $550. The friend was able to contact Muncy a few days later. She admitted to the thefts and returned the wallet with everything in it except the $100 in cash and two gift cards. Charges were filed against her through the State Attorneys Office, leading to her arrest last week. Bond was set at $15,000. John Robert Dahl, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 18 by Union deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Dahl struck the male victim with his closed fist. Carl Evan Summerlin, 18, of Lake Butler was arrested Nov. 20 by Union deputies for petit theftunder $300. According to the arrest report, Summerlin and a 16-year-old runaway from Bradford County went into Circle K in Lake Butler and stole two packs of cigarettes and several candy bars. While the juvenile was grabbing several candy bars, Summerlin approached the cashier and asked for the packs of cigarettes. When the clerk put them on the counter, he grabbed them and, along with the juvenile, ran out of the store. The store manager was able to follow the two suspects to a nearby apartment and give deputies the residence number and a description of their clothing. A deputy then went to the apartment and found the suspects, in the clothing the manager described, smoking cigarettes. Both were arrested and transported to jail. t ARRESTS t

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer In times of disasters, such as the approach and aftermath of hurricanes, one would expect to find officials representing the various levels of government, emergency management and law enforcement working together. Also included in that group are county Extension agents. At this years Bradford County Extension Farm-City luncheon, which was held Nov. 6 at the Bradford County Fairgrounds, featured speaker Angie Lindsey discussed the role county extension offices and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences play in preparing for and assisting with disasters. Lindsey is one of four UF faculty members working with the UF/ IFAS Center for Public Issues Education, which is known as the PIE Center. Lindsey said the PIE Center conducts research on complex agricultural and natural resource issues in developing education and informed decisionmaking. My work falls into helping communities adapt to these changing issues within agriculture and natural resources, Lindsey said. As we know, disasters greatly impact the agricultural and natural resource issues, which greatly impact all of our communities, especially in our state. When partnered with the Extension Disaster Education Network, which consists of Extension professionals and IFAS faculty from throughout the country as well as representatives from state and federal agencies, resources can be shared for how to best prepare for and recover from disasters, Lindsey said. Its wonderful at linking up with federal and local agencies as well as providing really good information credible, timely, research-based information on how best to prepare for disasters, how to mitigate disasters and, lastly, how best to recover from disasters, Lindsey said. Lindsey spoke specifically to efforts undertaken before and after Hurricane Irma. Before the arrival of Irma, the dispersal of information and education was a key component as well as being involved with the State Emergency Response Teams Emergency Support Function 17, which deals with animal and agricultural issues. Phone calls were made daily within the IFAS network in the state as well as utilizing the GroupMe app for texting. We were trying to meet the needs of our county Extension offices as much as possible, Lindsey said. If they were working in our communities to get ready, we were trying to help them as much as possible to get ready for this. Post-Irma efforts sounded a lot like pre-Irma efforts. Communication played a major role in determining what needs were out there and informing those who could lend assistance. Determining needs in the southern part of the state was difficult. We really didnt know what was going on down in south Florida, Lindsey said. It was troublesome. We were trying to figure out was going on down there. Involvement with Emergency Support Function 17 continued. Lindsey described how she was at an incident command post outside of Orlando for four days helping to make sure there was enough hay and feed being distributed throughout the state to those areas that needed it, as well as helping the State Agricultural Response Team rescue animals from flooded areas. County personnel stepped up to help personnel in other counties. Lindsey singled out the efforts of personnel from the panhandle, who were very good about coming down and saying, Where do we need to go? Lindsey said efforts were focused on the areas that were hardest hit, but it was a difficult knowing how widespread Irmas impact was. Even though south Florida and southwest Florida were very much hard hit, areas like here and Duval County were flooding and had other issues as well, Lindsey said. It was very hard to try to help everybody all at one time. In looking at some of the post-Irma response highlights, Lindsey mentioned a 4-H mother in Highlands County who approached a lineman who had just restored her electricity and asked if there was anything she could do to help him. He jokingly replied, You can wash this shirt. The woman told him to hand it over. Thus was the start of Linemen Laundry Ladies a group of women who washed uniforms at Sebring International Speedway, with companies such as Tide and Home Depot donating detergent and washers and dryers. A farm in Pasco County had all of its newly planted blueberry bushes blown over. Lindsey said Kevin Folta, chair of the UF/IFAS horticultural sciences department, called graduate and undergraduate students he knew were still on campus, recruiting them to make a trip to the farm and re-plant all the bushes. Personnel at the Citrus County Extension Office turned their facility into a drop-off site for donations and then a site for the distribution of items like ice and water. They quickly became flexible in trying to help the needs of the folks there, Lindsey said. Lindsey said efforts are now underway to address what couldve been done better during and after Irma and how to have a more pro-active response. I felt like we were very reactive, Lindsey said. I feel like moving ahead we can do some pro-active things, not during hurricane season, but starting early in 2018 that can help us be better prepared for the next hurricane season. The UF/IFAS disaster handbook as well as other materials needs to be streamlined and updated, Lindsey said. Plus, issues like mental health need to be taken into account. Lindsey said Extension personnel heard some citrus farmers, for example, who suffered a tremendous financial loss, talk of suicide. With that in mind, a Rapid Response Grant has been applied for, with the hopes of creating a first-aid/mental-health tool kit that Extension personnel can be trained to use after disasters. Its definitely an issue we want to look at, Lindsey said. Brian Johns, who recently retired as Bradford Countys director of emergency management, also spoke, discussing how farmers have been affected by virtually no rain from January to June, followed by heavy rains that lasted through Hurricane Irma. Since Irma, wet got back on the dry side, Johns said. Johns said weather personnel make predictions on whether a year is going to be good or bad, but it only takes one hurricane to come through to make it a bad year, regardless of what weather forecasters project. When its a bad year for emergency management and believe you me, its been a bad year for emergency management its also a bad year for our farmers, Johns said. Johns said he could relate to what farmers are going through, citing the fact that his grandparents were farmers as well as his father. Hopefully, this will be a better winter for our winter-crop growers, Johns said. I certainly hope and pray it is. Extension agent Jim DeValerio recognized farmers Fred and Julia Pendarvis at the luncheons start. He motioned to a table that displayed numerous plaques that have been awarded to the couple for the strawberries theyve entered at the Bradford County Fair as well as in recognition of their support for youth in organizations like 4-H. DeValerio said, When you go out to their farm, and you ask them for something, they say, Oh, we wouldnt charge for it. Is it for the youth? Well give it to you. Just go to the cooler and get it when you need it. DeValerio presented the couple with a commemorative mug and a gift certificate at the events conclusion. As with every Farm-City luncheon, a member of FFA recites the FFA creed. This year, the honor went to Xander Vanzant: I believe in the future of agriculture, with a faith born not of words, but of deeds achievements won by the present and past generations of agriculturists; in the promise of better days through better ways, even as the things we now enjoy have come to us from the struggles of former years. I believe to live and work on a good farm is pleasant as well as challenging; for I know the joys and discomforts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for those associations which, even through hours of discouragement, I cannot deny. I believe in leadership from ourselves and respect from others. I believe in my own ability to work efficiently and think clearly, with such knowledge and skill as I can secure, and in the ability of progressive agriculturists to serve our own and the public interest in producing and marketing the product of our toil. I believe in less dependence on begging and more power in bargaining; in the life abundant and enough honest wealth to help make it so for others as well as myself; in less need for charity and more of it when needed; in being happy myself and playing square with those whose happiness depends upon me. I believe that American agriculture can and will hold true to the best traditions of our national life and that I can exert an influence in my home and community which will stand solid for my part in that inspiring task. 6B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 (Dunnellons) not going to quit. We fought hard the entire game. Indeed. All Bradford did was answer with a 69-yard scoring drive to go up by 10. Barber, who had a 24-yard run to put the Tornadoes in Dunnellon territory, completed a 35-yard touchdown pass to Davis, who was behind the secondary and grabbed the ball in the end zone with 8:24 to play in the third quarter. Barbers PAT put Bradford up 24-14. Davis caught four passes in all for 74 yards. The Tigers drove inside the Bradford 5 on a possession that began at the Bradford 41. Williams and Jaquon Edwards each had a 9-yard run to help set up first-and-goal at the 8. Williams had a 3-yard run that put the Tigers at the 3, but Smith then dropped Williams for a 2-yard loss on third down. Lees pass to Goolsby in the end zone on fourth down was incomplete, with Taro Ward providing the coverage. Goolsby, a University of Florida commit, was held to three receptions for 12 yards. Dunnellon had another drive that began on Bradfords side of the 50, with a pass-interference penalty giving the Tigers a first down at the 15. Jaquon Edwards had a 7-yard run to set up firstand-goal at the 4, but Edwards then fumbled the ball on the next play, with Bradfords Smith recovering at the 5. I just took it out of his hands, Smith said. Bradfords offense consumed almost five minutes off the clock before punting. Davis and Trace Barber tackled punt returner Patterson at his own 2, but a personal-foul penalty on the Tornadoes moved the ball to the 17. Patterson caught a tipped pass for a 35-yard gain to the Bradford 48, but Chris Cummings broke up a pass on the following play. Mosley and Smith then tackled Jaquon Edwards for a 2-yard gain. An incomplete pass set up fourth-and-8. The Tigers were flagged for illegal procedure before Lee, under heavy pressure from Taz Curry, threw another incompletion for a turnover on downs. With 3:38 to play, Barber picked up a first down on a 15yard run. Then, after he exited the game due to cramping, Davis stepped in at quarterback, picking up two more first downs on runs of 5 and 10 yards, allowing the Tornadoes to line up in victory formation. Tomlinson couldnt say enough about his teams effort. This is a testament to what they do, he said. This is what we get from them week in and week out. Theyre a heck of a ball club. A team that entered the season with a new head coach and staff and lost several players from last season who transferred to other schools has now won 10 straight after a season-opening loss and is one more win away from playing for a state title. Its amazing, Smith said. Weve worked so hard for this, ever since spring. All our other coaches left. Some of our players left. Our teammates that stuck around, we did it. Raines, the number-one seed in Region 1, set up the Nov. 24 matchup with a 57-15 win over West Nassau, a team the Tornadoes beat 48-21 in the regular season. Bradford Farm-City speaker highlights IFAS work during disasters Angie Lindsey served as speaker. FFA student Xander Vanzant recites the FFA creed. REGION Continued from 3B

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Church. He was preceded in death by: his first wife of 34 years, Elisa Moon; and a sister, Frances Barbara Jandeisek. His survivors are: his wife of 29 years, Constance (Taylor) Moon of Melrose; four children, Linda Moon (Kenny) Eubanks of Melrose, James Farland (Tina) Moon, Jr. of Ft. McCoy, Mary (Tim) Galbraith and Frances Moon all of Melrose; four grandchildren; and two greatgranddaughters. Funeral services were held Nov. 17 in Eliam Baptist Church with Pastor Art Johnson officiating. Interment followed at Hickory Springs Cemetery in Dunnellon. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, Keystone heights. Theodore Phillips Theodore Phillips LAKE BUTLER Theodore Allen Phillips, 87, of Lake Butler passed away on Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Theodore was born in Lake City to the late Troy and Dora Phillips. In 1950, Theodore Phillips joined the United States Air Force, where he proudly served his country for three years. Mr. Phillips served our Nation in the Korean War. Theodore was later employed by the University of Florida as an electrician. After 35 years, he retired. He enjoyed working on his farm and raising cattle. Theodore enjoyed restoring and crafting hand tools. He is preceded in death by: his oldest sister, Lovita Clawson; and his brother, Troy Phillips. Theodore leaves his loving family to treasure his memory. Theodore Phillips is survived by: his adoring wife of 63 years, Mrs. Nethra Parrish Phillips; daughter, Regina Phillips Quick; son, Greg Phillips; sister, Earlene Phillips Good; a very special niece, Tanya Tilberg; six precious grandchildren, Michael, Candy, Courtney, Dylan, Cassie, and Skylar; and six greatgrandchildren. He is also survived by several nephews, nieces, and cousins. Theodore was loved by many and will be missed. Services were held Nov. 20 at Archer Funeral Home Memorial Chapel. Arrangements are under the care of Archer Funeral Home located at 55 North Lake Ave Lake Butler. For more information, please call (386)496-2008. PAID OBITUARY Lucille Powell Lucille Powell LAKE CITYLucille Powell, 96, of Lake City passed away on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. Lucille was born in Live Oak to the late Frank and Myra Howard. Lucille loved cooking for others, just as much as everyone loved her cooking. She enjoyed taking care of people. Lucille especially loved her family and friends. She was a member of Gadara Baptist Church. Lucille loved her church and her church family. She is preceded in death by: her beloved husband of 60 years, Lucious Adrion Powell; and one son, Dallas Arnold Powell. Lucille was loved by many and will be missed. Lucille Powell is survived by: two sons, Lucious A. Powell, Jr. and Franklin Gene Powell; one daughter, Frances Powell Johnson; seven grandchildren; and six greatgrandchildren. Services were held Nov. 20 at Archer Funeral Home Memorial Chapel. Arrangements are under the care of Archer Funeral Home located at 55 North Lake Ave Lake Butler. For more information, please call (386)496-2008. PAID OBITUARY Phillip Lyons Phillip Lyons STARKE Phillip Randall Randy Lyons, 46, of Starke passed away on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. Randy enjoyed spending his time hunting and fishing. He enjoyed watching Nascar. Randy loved Florida Gator football. He was a member of Sampson City Church of God and he deeply loved the Lord. Randy leaves his beloved family to cherish his memory Phillip Randall Lyons is survived by: his father, Phillip L. Lyons; mothers, Elizabeth Luke Payne (Calvin Henley) and Sheila Marie Lyons; daughter, Makyllah Kirkland; two brothers, Shane (Chelsea) Lyons and Jimmy (Jessy) Crowe; two sisters, Shandah (Dinky) Crawford and Kimberly (Jimmy) Lewis; three aunts, Phyllis, Denise, and Maryann; two nephews, Troy Testone, Jr. and Braxton Cole Testone; one niece, Amber Nychole Parker; several cousins; and his dear friend, Patricia Lyons Kirkland. A memorial service will be held in Randys honor at the Sampson City Church of God on Saturday, Nov. 25 at 11 am. Arrangements are under the care of Archer Funeral Home located at 55 North Lake Ave Lake Butler. For more information, please call (386)496-2008. PAID OBITUARY James Moon, Sr. MELROSE James Jim Farland Moon, Sr., 87, of Melrose died Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. He was born in Ocala on Sept. 22, 1930 to the late James Rufus and Olive Moon. After graduating from P.K. Yonge High School, he attended the University of Florida, and also served in the National Guard. He retired as a supervisor with wastewater management. He was a member of Eliam Baptist Philip Cloud Jr. Philip Cloud Jr. HAWTHORNEPhilip Sharden Cloud Jr. born June 29, 1945 in Washington, DC passed away unexpectedly on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. He grew up in Virginia and relocated to Jacksonville. Phil began his career with the former Seaboard Airline Railroad and retired from CSX Transportation with over 37 years of service. Phil was an active member of the Local Railroad Union and served as President and local chairman. Phil was a member of the William B. Barnett Lodge #187; 43 year member of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, and the Morocco Shriners. One of Phils greatest passions was the game of golf. He enjoyed the game with his many friends as well as watching on television seven days a week. Phil was a previous member of both Hyde Park Golf and Country Club and Keystone Heights Golf and Country Club. Another favorite pastime of Phils was barbecuing for friends and family. Phil is predeceased by his parents, Philip and Lucy Cloud; and son, Philip Sharden Cloud III. He is survived by: his loving wife of 33 years, Jaunell Cloud; three children and six grandchildren. Services will be held at 11:00 am on Saturday, Nov. 25 at the Lenox Avenue Church of God, 3349 Lenox Avenue, Jacksonville with Reverend Eric Burch officiating. Family would love for all who attend to stay for a luncheon in the reception hall. Arrangements are under the care of Russell Haven of Rest Cemetery, Funeral Home and Cremation Center, 2335 Sandridge Road, Green Cove Springs. (904) 284-7720 www.RHRFH.com PAID OBITUARY Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 7B rfntbbnfnbntttroll through the 1856 plantation home decked out in an array of n352-336-9096 hailedocent@yahoo.com www.hailehomestead.org A Rare Opportunity to see the Homestead at Night n tnntb Victorian Santas: Sunday, Dec 3rd 12 4 pm Friday, Dec 8thCandlelight Visits Free Admission Free Carriage Rides! Santa Arrives 2 pm T h e h i r i n g o f a l a w y e r i s a n i m p o r t a n t d e c i s i o n t h a t s h o u l d n o t b e b a s e d s o l e l y u p o n a d v e r t i s e m e n t s B e f o r e y o u d e c i d e a s k u s t o s e n d y o u i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t o u r q u a l i f i c a t i o n s a n d e x p e r i e n c e Archer Funeral Home Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 20 Ga. Metal Casket(4 colors)Vault, Graveside or Chapel Service with one hour prior visitation$5,59520 Ga. Metal Casket(4 colors)Vault, Graveside or Chapel Service with one hour prior visitation$5,595 FUNERAL SERVICE WITHMemorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel$1,895WITHMemorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel$1,895CREMATION 386.496.2008pre-payment arrangements available55 NORTH LAKE AVENUE LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054 Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 STARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:00 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 d Obituaries d such as dealing with the turkeys lack of a flight instinct when approached by a threat. Nistler said she had one female turkey that was sitting on eggs and refused to move when confronted by dogs. Chickens, if something comes up, they are in the highest corners in the rafters, keeping away from something, Nistler said. The turkeys wont do that. Chickens are also easier to corral and put back into their pens, Nistler, said, explaining that trying to get the turkeys back into their enclosures is like herding cats. The turkeys, though, are fun to have around. I just love having them on the property, Nistler said. Theyre so funny. Nistler described an incident in which one of her roosters, who was acting up, was put into his place by some of her turkey hens. They all ganged up on him, she said. He was putting his feathers up, but they all sent him running. All I saw was his little head down, running away. Those hens told him what to do. Nistler said the turkeys have personalities and are attached to her. They do imprint, so theyve imprinted on me, she said. Im their mama. The turkeys begin making noise when they see Nistler drive up in her car. They follow her around the yard and seem to talk to her as well. During the interview for this story, Nistler demonstrated by going, Chuk chuk chuk chuk, which prompted all the turkeys to gobble in response. They actually like to be around humans, Nistler said. Theyre very social animals. So, is it tough to have that kind of relationship with animals that are eventually going to wind up on dinner plates? Nistler admitted it can be, but its something shes at peace with, having grown up on a farm. At the age of 5, she began learning the importance of raising animals to provide food for her family and others. Its sad, but thats the circle of life, she said. We provide a service, a pretty valuable service as far as Im concerned. Nistler said she does make it a point to give her turkeys the best care possible. We try to be very respectful, she said. We try very hard to treat our animals well make sure they have plenty of feed and shelter and that when we do process them, its very humane. We try to be as gentle as we can in the process. A successful first year has Nistler turning her thoughts to the future. Shes considering going solely with the Bourbon Red breed of heritage turkey, which she describes as so pretty, and has to also think about replacing her production birds the ones that provide the eggs. The turkeys tend to live four to five years. Nistler is also ready to expand her business. My idea for next year is to try to have them in two separate cages one for Thanksgiving and one for Christmas. TURKEYS Continued from 1B StarkeJournal.com

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BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer One Bradford High School baseball player has a win before the season has even begun as senior Tucker Stack accepted a scholarship from St. Johns River State College. Its unreal, Stack said following a Nov. 13 signing ceremony. Its something Ive worked my whole life for. Its a blessing. Stack said it was easy to settle on St. Johns River as the school for him. When I went there and took a visit, I just felt like I was at home, he said. They welcomed me with open arms. Its just the best place for me to go. He can play in the infield, but Stack will go to St. Johns River as a pitcher. He had 80 strikeouts in 60 innings the last two seasons. I always wanted to be a position player like first base, Stack said, but colleges started looking at me from a pitching standpoint. I thought that was the best bet. Cory Elasik, a St. Johns River assistant coach, said Stack sticks out as a left-hander who can get leftand right-handed batters out. His fastball is what stands out, Elasik said. Its got a lot of run and sink. Its got late life. It really gets up on you. He hides the ball really well. Elasik said a pitch Stack needs to develop is a slider. In order to get left-handers and right-handers out, hes got to have a three-pitch mix, Elasik said. His fastball and changeup are where they need to be, but the sliders something that needs to get better. He throws more of a traditional curveball. We want to tighten it up with a slider or a cutter. I think with his work ethic and how he attacks everything, hell have problem adjusting to it. St. Johns River would seem to be a good option for a pitcher looking to develop. Elasik said pitchers from the program have gone on to four-year schools such as Coastal Carolina and any ACC or SEC school you can name. We had a pitcher last year selected in the fourth round of the draft who was committed to Mississippi State, Elasik said. He ended up signing for $560,000. Pitching is something were known for. Developing arms is something were known for. For his part, Stack is willing to work not just on developing a certain pitch, but on his overall game. He knows hell be playing against better-overall athletes in college than in high school. Im really going to have to step my game up and work hard in the offseason, Stack said. Bradford head coach Stewart Duncan said he expects Stack will have to develop physically and get a little stronger as well. He already has the arm strength, though. He can go right now, Duncan said. He can go seven innings for you. Duncan said Stack has a bulldog-type attitude and is a fierce competitor. What hes added in recent years is the ability to not let his competitiveness prevent him from overcoming adversity. Duncan said there was a time when things didnt go right, hed have to pull Stack out of the game. Hes grown to be able to deal with failure, Duncan said. Hes learned how to handle that, and hes learned how to overcome it. Stack brings more to the table than athletic ability. Elasik said his school wants to bring in student-athletes of high character. Duncan described Stack as respectable and the poster boy for what St. Johns River is looking for. Hes a kid who works extremely hard both athletically and academically, Elasik said. Hes a kid I can put my name on, who I can trust to do the right things. Hes accountable. He represents his familys name in a 8B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 rfnt KeYsToNe InDiAnS vS. WiLdWoOd WiLdCaTs UnIoN CoUnTy TiGeRs vS. FoRt WhItE InDiAnS, FlOrIdA G aToRs vS. TeXaS A&M A gGiEs FsU SeMiNoLeS vS. DuKe BlUe DeViLs, AuBuRn TiGeRs vS LsU TiGeRs, SoUtH CaRoLiNa G aMeCoCkS vS. TeNnEsSeE V oLuNtEeRs, OkLaHoMa SoOnErS vS. TeXaS LoNgHoRnS, UtAh UtEs vS UsC TrOjAnS, GeOrGiAn TeCh YeLlOw JaCkEtS vS. MiAmI HuRrIcAnEs, L.A. RaMs vS. JaCkSoNvIlLe JaGuArS, MiAmI DoLpHiNs vS. A tLaNtA FaLcOnS, T aMpA BaY BuCcAnEeRs vS. ArIzOnA CaRdInAlS, DeTrOiT LiOnS vS. NeW OrLeAnS SaInTs, PiTtSbUrG StEeLeRs vS. KaNsAs CiTy ChIeFs, N. Y GiAnTs vS. DeNvEr BrOnCoS N. Y GiAnTs vS. DeNvEr BrOnCoSPiTtSbU rGh S tEeLeRs vS. KaNsAs C iTy C h I e F s D eTrOiT L iOnS vS. N e W O rLeAnS S a I nTs T a M pA BaY BuCcAnEeRs vS. A r I zOnA C aRdI nAlSMiAmI D oLpHiNs vS. A tLaNtA FaLcOnS L A R a M s vS. JaCkSoNvI lLe JaGuArSGeOrGiA TeCh YeLlOw JaCkEtS vS. MiAmI HuRrIcAnEs UtAh UtEs vS UsC TrOjAnS OkLaHoMa SoOnErS vS. TeXaS LoNgHoRnS, SoUtH CaRoLiNa G aMeCoCkS vS. TeNnEsSeE V oLuNtEeRs AuBuRn TiGeRs vS LsU TiGeRs FsU SeMiNoLeS vS. DuKe BlUe DeViLs FlOrIdA G aToRs vS. TeXaS A&M A gGiEs UnIoN CoUnTy TiGeRs vS. FoRt WhItE InDiAnS KeYsToNe InDiAnS vS. WiLdWoOd WiLdCaTs r fn PLAY OUR WEEKLY FOOTBALL CONTEST WIN $50.00 811 S Walnut Street Starke, FL, 32091 (904) 964 7830 255 South East 6th Street Lake Butler, FL, 32054 (386) 496 3333 WWW.COMMUNITYSTATEBANK FL.COM Serving N.E. Florida for 34 yearsAT&T DirecTV & Dish Commerical & Residential Dealer Dishnet Internet Business Telephone/Alarm Systems HD Camera Systems Computer Networking Sound System864 N. Temple Ave StarkeHWY 301 North Detroit vs. Washington HOLD ON TO YOUR FAITH MINISTRIES COME FEEL THE LOVEPastors D.A. and Joelle GreenwoodWorship with us Saturdays @ 11am Outreach Feeding Program every 1st Friday of the month October 2014 Breast Cancer Awareness ProgramVisit us at www.holdontyf.com or call us at 904-368-1296 for more info Owner: Linda BryantIn Business Since 1987 (Next to Bradford High School)Open MON-FRI 6:30am-6:00pm 964-4361 Lic. #30969 1. Anyone, except Telegraphemployees and their immediate family members, are welcome to enter. One entry per person per week please. 2. When picking up winnings, the winner will have his or her photograph taken for the paper. 3. Entry must be on an official form from the Telegraph and submitted to one of our offices: BCT: 131 W. Call St., Starke; UCT: 25 E. Main St., Lake Butler, or LRM: 7382 S.R. 21N, Keystone Heights before 5 p.m. on Fridays. Fill in all the blanks with the name of the team you think will win. The person who picks the most games correctly will win $50.00 cash. 4. In case of a tie, the total points scored in the GATORS game this week is the tie breaker. Please fill in the points you think will be scored by the GATORS and their opponent, HURRY!ENTRY DEADLINE IS 5:00 PM FRIDAY, NOV. 28 Cars, Trucks, or SUVsJust Come On!(866) 561-1524273 E. Macclenny Ave. Macclenny, FL 32063 MELROSE (352) 475-2400 INTERLACHEN (386) 684-2811 HARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERKEYSTONE HEIGHTS (352) 473-4006 STARKE (904) 964-4642 J B SJacksonBuilding SupplyServing Our Community For Over 50 YearsSTARKEUS-301 S.964-6078 LAKE BUTLER145 SW 6th Ave.496-3079 John 3:16 Buffalo vs. New York Jets www.CommunityStateBank-fl.com Win $50.00!RULES OF THE GAME Submit by Fri. Nov. 28 5 p.m. PLAY OUR FOOTBALL CONTEST combined, in the tie breaker blank. (For instance, if the score of the GATORS game was GATORS 19, opponent 7, the correct score will be 26 points.) 5. Decision of the judges is final. A second tie breaker will be used, if necessary. Results will be tabulated on Tuesday and winners notified by telephone. Dont forget to list a phone number where you can be reached.Bradford Pre-School Premier Realty Dawn Corbett Ins. Community State Bank Burkins Chevrolet Norton Telecom Archie Tanner Bryans Ace Little Caesars Dicks Wings Jackson Building Supply Capital City Bank Bradford County Telegraph Spires IGA Hold on to you r Faith Ministries The Office Shop GATORS are this weeks TIEBREAKER SCORE: Name: Address: Phone: of Starke missed 2 of Starke missed 2 Your Ad could be here for over 30,000 readers to see!Call Darlene at 904-964-6305 or darlene@bctelegraph.com Detroit vs. WashingtonHOLD ON TO YOUR FAITH MINISTRIES COME FEEL THE LOVEPastors D.A. and Joelle GreenwoodWorship with us Saturdays @ 11am Outreach Feeding Program every 1st Friday of the month October 2014 Breast Cancer Awareness ProgramVisit us at www.holdontyf.com or call us at 904-368-1296 for more info Owner: Linda BryantIn Business Since 1987 (Next to Bradford High School)Open MON-FRI 6:30am-6:00pm 964-4361 Lic. #30969 1. Anyone, except Telegraphemployees and their immediate family members, are welcome to enter. One entry per person per week please. 2. When picking up winnings, the winner will have his or her photograph taken for the paper. 3. Entry must be on an official form from the Telegraph and submitted to one of our offices: BCT: 131 W. Call St., Starke; UCT: 25 E. Main St., Lake Butler, or LRM: 7382 S.R. 21N, Keystone Heights before 5 p.m. on Fridays. Fill in all the blanks with the name of the team you think will win. The person who picks the most games correctly will win $50.00 cash. 4. In case of a tie, the total points scored in the GATORS game this week is the tie breaker. Please fill in the points you think will be scored by the GATORS and their opponent, HURRY!ENTRY DEADLINE IS 5:00 PM FRIDAY, NOV. 28 Cars, Trucks, or SUVsJust Come On!(866) 561-1524273 E. Macclenny Ave. Macclenny, FL 32063 MELROSE (352) 475-2400 INTERLACHEN (386) 684-2811 HARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERKEYSTONE HEIGHTS (352) 473-4006 STARKE (904) 964-4642 J B SJacksonBuilding SupplyServing Our Community For Over 50 YearsSTARKEUS-301 S.964-6078 LAKE BUTLER145 SW 6th Ave.496-3079 John 3:16 Buffalo vs. New York Jets www.CommunityStateBank-fl.com Win $50.00!RULES OF THE GAME Submit by Fri. Nov. 28 5 p.m. PLAY OUR FOOTBALL CONTEST combined, in the tie breaker blank. (For instance, if the score of the GATORS game was GATORS 19, opponent 7, the correct score will be 26 points.) 5. Decision of the judges is final. A second tie breaker will be used, if necessary. Results will be tabulated on Tuesday and winners notified by telephone. Dont forget to list a phone number where you can be reached.Bradford Pre-School Premier Realty Dawn Corbett Ins. Community State Bank Burkins Chevrolet Norton Telecom Archie Tanner Bryans Ace Little Caesars Dicks Wings Jackson Building Supply Capital City Bank Bradford County Telegraph Spires IGA Hold on to you r Faith Ministries The Office Shop GATORS are this weeks TIEBREAKER SCORE: Name: Address: Phone: of Starke missed 2 of Starke missed 2 Your Ad could be here for over 30,000 readers to see!Call Darlene at 904-964-6305 or darlene@bctelegraph.com Detroit vs. WashingtonHOLD ON TO YOUR FAITH MINISTRIES COME FEEL THE LOVEPastors D.A. and Joelle GreenwoodWorship with us Saturdays @ 11am Outreach Feeding Program every 1st Friday of the month October 2014 Breast Cancer Awareness ProgramVisit us at www.holdontyf.com or call us at 904-368-1296 for more info Owner: Linda BryantIn Business Since 1987 (Next to Bradford High School)Open MON-FRI 6:30am-6:00pm 964-4361 Lic. #30969 1. Anyone, except Telegraphemployees and their immediate family members, are welcome to enter. One entry per person per week please. 2. When picking up winnings, the winner will have his or her photograph taken for the paper. 3. Entry must be on an official form from the Telegraph and submitted to one of our offices: BCT: 131 W. Call St., Starke; UCT: 25 E. Main St., Lake Butler, or LRM: 7382 S.R. 21N, Keystone Heights before 5 p.m. on Fridays. Fill in all the blanks with the name of the team you think will win. The person who picks the most games correctly will win $50.00 cash. 4. In case of a tie, the total points scored in the GATORS game this week is the tie breaker. Please fill in the points you think will be scored by the GATORS and their opponent, HURRY!ENTRY DEADLINE IS 5:00 PM FRIDAY, NOV. 28 Cars, Trucks, or SUVsJust Come On!(866) 561-1524273 E. Macclenny Ave. Macclenny, FL 32063 MELROSE (352) 475-2400 INTERLACHEN (386) 684-2811 HARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERKEYSTONE HEIGHTS (352) 473-4006 STARKE (904) 964-4642 J B SJacksonBuilding SupplyServing Our Community For Over 50 YearsSTARKEUS-301 S.964-6078 LAKE BUTLER145 SW 6th Ave.496-3079 John 3:16 Buffalo vs. New York Jets www.CommunityStateBank-fl.com Win $50.00!RULES OF THE GAME Submit by Fri. Nov. 28 5 p.m. PLAY OUR FOOTBALL CONTEST combined, in the tie breaker blank. (For instance, if the score of the GATORS game was GATORS 19, opponent 7, the correct score will be 26 points.) 5. Decision of the judges is final. A second tie breaker will be used, if necessary. Results will be tabulated on Tuesday and winners notified by telephone. Dont forget to list a phone number where you can be reached.Bradford Pre-School Premier Realty Dawn Corbett Ins. Community State Bank Burkins Chevrolet Norton Telecom Archie Tanner Bryans Ace Little Caesars Dicks Wings Jackson Building Supply Capital City Bank Bradford County Telegraph Spires IGA Hold on to you r Faith Ministries The Office Shop GATORS are this weeks TIEBREAKER SCORE: Name: Address: Phone: of Starke missed 2 of Starke missed 2 Your Ad could be here for over 30,000 readers to see!Call Darlene at 904-964-6305 or darlene@bctelegraph.com 134 East Call Street Starke ReddishandWhite.com904-964-7555 Salute To All the 4-H Teams!SMITH BROTHERSBODY SHOPUS 301 N., Starke964-5267Specializing in Insurance ClaimsForeign & Domestic CarsFREE ESTIMATES8-5 Mon.-Fri. 8-12 Sat. HURRY!ENTRY DEADLINE IS 5:00PMFRIDAY WINNERName: Address: Phone:rfnrttffnt bftfff tt ttttbr rttttrttrrtr rrbr ftbfbfrrnftnb trbf tnttrtrrfbrfrtttrr trffttr btrtntrfrttrt trtrttnrnrtftn trtttbrbrf rttt ttbrntnttntbt nnnttnrbtrf rrnYour AD could be on this page for over 30,000 customers to see!Call John Ryan, Beth or Kevin @ 904-964-6305 or email adsales@bctelegraph.com rf 228 S Walnut St Starke, Florida 32091http://starkehvacservice.com Detroit vs. Washington 18865 US HWY 301 N. STARKE, FL 32091 Phone: (904) 368.2277COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRwww.transformations122.org facebook.com/transformations122Building SupplyServing Our Community For Over 50 Years John 3:16 Handi-House of Starke We Finance Rent-to-Own No Credit CheckHandi-Houses: THEYRE PORTABLEThe economical building with hundreds of uses1670 S. Walnut Street Starke, FL 32091 904-964-33301. Anyone, except Telegraphemployees and their immediate family members, are welcome to enter. One entry per person per week please. 2. When picking up winnings, the winner will have his or her photograph taken for the paper. 3. Entry must be on an official form from the Telegraph and submitted to one of our offices: BCT: 131 W. Call St., Starke; UCT: 25 E. Main St., Lake Butler, or LRM: 7382 S.R. 21-N, Keystone Heights before 5 p.m. on Fridays. Fill in all the blanks with the name of the team you think will win. The person who picks the most games correctly will win $50.00 cash. 4. In case of a tie, the total points scored in the GATORS game this week is the tie breaker. Please fill in the points you think will be scored by the GATORS and their opponent, combined, in the tie breaker blank. (For instance, if the score of the GATORS game was GATORS 19, opponent 7, the correct tiebreaker score will be 26 points.) 5. Decision of the judges is final. A second tie-breaker will be used, if necessary. Results will be tabulated on Tuesday and winners notified by telephone. Dont forget to list a phone number where you can be reached. HURRY!ENTRY DEADLINE IS 5:00 PM FRIDAY, NOV. 18 PLAY OUR WEEKLY FOOTBALL CONTESTWin $5000!RULES OF THE GAME Submit by Fri. Nov. 18 5 p.m. Beck Chevrolet of Starke New & Pre-Owned Sales & ServiceStarkeChevrolet.com Hwy 301 North HARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERKEYSTONE HEIGHTS (352) 473-4006 MELROSE (352) 475-2400 STARKE (904) 964-4642 INTERLACHEN (386) 684-2811 Pol. Ad Apprvd & Pd by Farnsworth for BC Superintendent of SchoolsPol. Ad Apprvd & Pd by G. Smith for BC Sheriff Ready for football! J B SJacksonSTARKEUS-301 S.964-6078 LAKE BUTLER145 SW 6th Ave.496-3079 JACKSONVILLE vs. DETROIT Closed for Thanksgiving NOV 24thth Your Ad could be on this page for over 30,000 customers to see!Call Bruce 904-964-6305 or email BLawton@bctelegraph.com Doug Reddish, CPA Detroit vs. Washington 18865 US HWY 301 N. STARKE, FL 32091 Phone: (904) 368.2277COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRwww.transformations122.org facebook.com/transformations122 Building SupplyServing Our Community For Over 50 Years John 3:16 Handi-House of Starke We Finance Rent-to-Own No Credit CheckHandi-Houses: THEYRE PORTABLEThe economical building with hundreds of uses1670 S. Walnut Street Starke, FL 32091904-964-33301. Anyone, except Telegraphemployees and their immediate family members, are welcome to enter. One entry per person per week please. 2. When picking up winnings, the winner will have his or her photograph taken for the paper. 3. Entry must be on an official form from the Telegraph and submitted to one of our offices: BCT: 131 W. Call St., Starke; UCT: 25 E. Main St., Lake Butler, or LRM: 7382 S.R. 21-N, Keystone Heights before 5 p.m. on Fridays. Fill in all the blanks with the name of the team you think will win. The person who picks the most games correctly will win $50.00 cash. 4. In case of a tie, the total points scored in the GATORS game this week is the tie breaker. Please fill in the points you think will be scored by the GATORS and their opponent, combined, in the tie breaker blank. (For instance, if the score of the GATORS game was GATORS 19, opponent 7, the correct tiebreaker score will be 26 points.) 5. Decision of the judges is final. A second tie-breaker will be used, if necessary. Results will be tabulated on Tuesday and winners notified by telephone. Dont forget to list a phone number where you can be reached. HURRY!ENTRY DEADLINE IS 5:00 PM FRIDAY, NOV. 18 PLAY OUR WEEKLY FOOTBALL CONTESTWin $5000!RULES OF THE GAME Submit by Fri. Nov. 18 5 p.m. Beck Chevrolet of Starke New & Pre-Owned Sales & ServiceStarkeChevrolet.com Hwy 301 North HARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERKEYSTONE HEIGHTS (352) 473-4006 MELROSE (352) 475-2400 STARKE (904) 964-4642 INTERLACHEN (386) 684-2811 Pol. Ad Apprvd & Pd by Farnsworth for BC Superintendent of SchoolsPol. Ad Apprvd & Pd by G. Smith for BC Sheriff Ready for football! J B SJacksonSTARKEUS-301 S.964-6078 LAKE BUTLER145 SW 6th Ave.496-3079 JACKSONVILLE vs. DETROIT Closed for Thanksgiving NOV 24thth Your Ad could be on this page for over 30,000 customers to see!Call Bruce 904-964-6305 or email BLawton@bctelegraph.com Service Specials! Technicians Needed! 10% OFF Air Conditioning Repairsexpires 5/2/16 $3995 5 quarts, 4 tire rotation & multipoint vehicle inspection; most V-6 & V-8 engines, conventional oil excludes ACDelco Dexos, full synthetic oil and diesel engines.expires 12/31/16Seeking GM CERTIFIED Automotive TechniciansNeed ASE certification, strong diagnostic skills including driveability, heavy line, diesel and electrical. Full-time Competitive Pay Great Benefits with paid holidays, insurance, 401K Must have own tools Must pass pre-employment screening Apply in person or online atwww.rjgclientservices.com/BeckApplication.php We Service ALL MAKES & MODELS MF 7:30 5:30 | Sat. 8 1 p.m.StarkeChevrolet.com1911 N. Temple Ave(Hwy 301 North)Starke, FL 32091 HAYESElectric & Air ConditioningResidential & Commercial904-964-8744 (Inser t D ealer inf o her e)3 Col x 7I n s t a l l a n A m a n a b r a n d A S X 1 8 S E E R a i r c o n d i t i o n e r w i t h R 4 1 0 A r e f r i g e r a n t a n d y o u l l g e t p r e m i u m e n v i r o n m e n t a l l y f r i e n d l y a n d e n e r g y s a v i n g c o o l i n g p e r f o r m a n c e A s k f o r f u l l d e t a i l s r e g a r d i n g t h e A m a n a b r a n d L i f e t i m e U n i t R e p l a c e m e n t L i m i t e d W a r r a n t y B E C O O L B E I N GG R E E N* R e s t r i c t i o n s a p p l y a s k y o u r D e a l e r f o r f u l l d e t a i l s F o r f u l l w a r r a n t y i n f o r m a t i o n v i s i t w w w a m a n a h a c c o m A m a n a i s a t r a d e m a r k o f M a y t a g C o r p o r a t i o n a n d i s u s e d u n d e r l i c e n s e t o G o o d m a n C o m p a n y L P A l l r i g h t s r e s e r v e d Corner of S.R. 16 & HWY 301 North StarkeMASTER LICENSEDLIC. #ER-0003575 RA 0033644INSURED rf f n tf nnf rb r fff n frrf b r r Open late on Friday nights for Bradford Tornado football games. Open late for College and Pro football games. 904-964-2716 n ntb f Jaguars Bradford Tornadoes vs. Crescent City Raiders Union County Tigers vs. Williston Red Devils FSU Seminoles vs. Louisville Cardinals Keystone Indians vs. The Villages Buffalo Miami Hurricanes vs. Syracuse Orange Kentucky Wildcats vs. Mississippi St. Bulldogs Auburn Tigers vs. Arkansas Razorbacks Michigan Wolverines vs. Penn St. Nittany Lions USC Trojans vs. Notre Dame Fighting Irish Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Indianapolis Colts N.Y. Jets vs. Miami Dolphins Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs. Buffalo Bills Denver Broncos vs. L.A. Chargers Seattle Seahawks vs. N.Y. Giants Atlanta Falcons vs. New England Patriots. Jaguars Jaguars Jaguars Jaguars Bradford Tornadoes vs. Hamilton County Trojans Keystone Indians vs. Interlachen Rams Union County Tigers vs. Taylor County Bulldogs Georgia Bulldogs vs. Florida Gators FSU Seminoles vs. Boston College Eagles Penn St. Nittany Lions vs. Ohio State Buckeyes TCU Horned Frogs vs. Iowa St. Cyclones Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets vs. Clemson Tigers N.C. State Wolfpack vs. Notre Dame Fighting Irish Oklahoma St. Cowboys vs. West Virginia Mountaineers Carolina Panthers vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers L.A. Chargers vs. New England Patriots Houston Texans vs. Seattle Seahawks Dallas Cowboys vs. Washington Redskins Pittsburgh Steelers vs. Detroit Lions This Weeks Winner Casey Cloud Missed 1 GatorsGatorsGators GatorsGators Missed 3 Gators New England Patriots vs. Oakland Raiders FSU Seminoles vs. Delaware State Hornets Bradford Tornadoes vs. Dunnellon Tigers Florida Gators vs. UAB Blazers Miami Hurricanes vs. Virginia Cavaliers Georgia Bulldogs vs. Kentucky Wildcats Texas A&M Aggies vs. Ole Miss Rebels Michigan Wolverines vs. Wisconsin Badgers Texas Longhorns vs. West Virginia Mountaineers Kansas State Wildcats vs. Oklahoma State Cowboys Syracuse Orange vs. Louisville Cardinals Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Cleveland Browns Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs. Miami Dolphins Philadelphia Eagles vs. Dallas Cowboys L.A. Rams vs. Minnesota Vikings Bradford High School senior Tucker Stack (third from right) gets a congratulatory handshake from St. Johns River State College assistant baseball coach Cory Elasik at a Nov. 13 scholarship-signing ceremony in the BHS media center. Pictured with Stack (l-r) are his brothers, Trey and Jack, and his parents, Sonya and Clay Stack. See STACK, 9B

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40 Notices EQUAL HOUSING OPPOR TUNITY. All real estate paper is subject to the preference, limitation or discrimination based on tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children tody of children under are hereby informed that available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 42 Motor Vehicles & Accessories $CASH$ FOR JUNK cars, up to $500. Free pick up, 771-6191. 45 Land For Sale 4.080 ACRES. 10291 SW 1-561-512-7366 47 Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) DOWNTOWN STARKE Af rent. 113 E. Call St. Call Jerry at 904-364-8395 48 Homes For Sale ed office separate from 1005 Palm St. Starke, Fl. borhood, near school. Move in ready. $177,000. Call 904-364-9022 for appointment to see home. 50 For Rent RENTALS various mobile homes on lots and acre ences required. Call Jim at 352-317-5880. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 NEWLY RENOVATED mo 6828 OFFICE SPACE for rent. tion area, kitchen, handi cap accessible. Fenced area for vehicle secu rity. $1400/mo. Lease required. Please call 904364-9022. from Country Club, off 230. Service pets only. Non-smoker. References. $900/mo, $900/deposit. occupancy. 904-662-3735 11/24, Keystone. Lake mo. All maintenance and may qualify for special discounts, call for de tails. 352-478-8321 or 904-613-5715 SINGLE RETIRED LADY vate bath. Kitchen privi deposit. 386-496-1062 or 904-263-0366 904-234-6481. 53 A Yard Sales MULTI-FAMILY yard sale in 3pm. 53 B Keystone Yard Sales YARD SALE. 6332 Hutchinson Avenue. Ap pliances, electronics, Saturday 8am-1pm. 65 Help Wanted HIRING AT PRIVATE ACAD EMY: 1) Part-time Early Education staff M-F (3 p.m. 6 p.m.). CALL 2) Part-time PE teacher, and 3) Direc tor of Education. Call 352.473.4040. PRE-SCHOOL years at the same loca tion in Melrose. We are part-time and substitute teachers for our class rooms and a cook. Prefer that have completed the Florida 40 hour childcare diploma is required. Contact Ms. Pat at (352) 475-2132 or Pat8682@ additional info or come see us. INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUC TION $16/hr. minimum. pick me up in Raiford. Please call Jimmy for de tails. 904-796-9227 struction Plumber need ed. 352-485-2181. tion at Union County Pub lic Library, 0-29 hours per license required. Must be at least 18 years old, skills. Apply in person Union County Public Li brary 250 SE 5th Ave 5pm, Mon-Fri. Position erence. EXPERIENCED APART MENT CLEANER as needed. Apply at The Court, Starke Fl 32091. maintenance person needed for apartment Ct., Starke. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section 9B DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 Handicapped AccessibleThis Institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.Now Accepting Applications1 AND 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS 607 Bradford Court Starke, FLCall for more info 904-964-6216Hearing Impaired Only call 800-955-8771 E Q U A L H O U S I N GO P P O R T U N I T Y Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 1 & 2BedroomsNOW AVAILABLE$460 $505 Equal housing opportunity. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. 1, 2 3 & 4BEDROOM APARTMENTSHC & Non-HC accessible.1005 SW 6th St. Lake Butler, FL386-496-3141TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & NonHC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity Our family is seeking a Caregiver for a diabetic member of our family for ve hours per day. We invite you to email your resume to meysamsadathossienidsh@gmail.com for consideration. This position will require compassion and professionalism as well as experience caring for a diabetic individual. We are oering 18 dollars per hour. This is an incredible opportunity, please email your resume today! Caregiver Needed OTR Flatbed/Heaver Haul Driver KCE, a family owned Trans. Co., specialize in OW/OD loads We Oer: Comp. per mile rate, pay wkly. Class A CDL, 5+ yr OTR Exp, Clean MVR/PSP, DOT drug screen, TWIC and Port pass a +, 3 6 wks out, positive Attitude, Non-Smoker preferred. Fax resume 904-275-3292 Local Class A Driver KCE, a family owned erosion co. Needs local driver to haul constr. Equip/sod/hay to projects. We Oer: Comp. pay wkly Class A CDL, 5+ yr Clean MVR/PSP, DOT drug screen, positive Attitude, Non-Smoker preferred. Fax resume 904-275-3292 Exp. Diesel Mechanic KCE, a family owned erosion and trans co. Needs exp. Diesel mechanic repair/maintain Semi trucks/constr. Equip and eet vehicles We Oer: Comp. pay wkly (15-30 per hr) drug screen, positive Attitude, Non-Smoker preferred. Fax resume 904-275-3292 NOW HIRING EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Today904-964-6305Ask for Classified Ads first-class manner. I truly believe hes going to represent our program in a first-class manner and help us get to where we want to be. Stack hopes to play beyond St. Johns River. When it comes to considering a four-year school to play for or a Major League franchise hed love to be a part of, he has Georgia on his mind, as in the University of Georgia and the Atlanta Braves. For now, though, its finishing out his days at BHS and then embarking on a new journey at St. Johns River. Its just going to feel like a dream come true, Stack said. It is, just to be playing college ball. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Goalie Caleb Cushman made nine saves, but it wasnt enough as the Keystone Heights High School boys soccer team got only seven shots on goal in a 3-1 loss to Eastside on Nov. 17 in Gainesville. Cushman provided the team with its lone goal, converting on a penalty kick in the second half. Prior to the match, the Indians traveled to play Suwannee on Nov. 16 and settled for a 1-1 tie. Dean Hogg scored off a Peyton Box assist, while Cushman made 11 saves. Keystones junior varsity team a first-year program won 2-1 at Eastside, getting goals from Logan Spence and Kaden Hubner, who converted his off a penalty kick. Spence had the lone goal in a 9-1 loss to Suwannee. The varsity Indians traveled to play West Nassau this past Monday and will host District soccer team suffers 1st loss 5-2A opponent Santa Fe on Tuesday, Nov. 28, at 7 p.m., following a JV match at 5 p.m. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer It was a tough shooting night for the Bradford High School girls basketball team, which opened the regular season with BHS girls open hoops season with 53-16 loss a 53-16 loss to host Trenton on Nov. 20. Jahmya Henderson led the Tornadoes with eight points, while Jade Baker and Meghan Harris had five and two, respectively. Regina Roberts added one point. Henderson and Olyvia Griffin each had three steals, while Harris had two steals to go along with four rebounds. Roberts and Raynisha Hunter also had four rebounds each. Bradford, which was coming off an 0-2 preseason, hosted Fleming Island this past Tuesday and will host District 4-5A opponent Fort White on Tuesday, Nov. 28, at 7 p.m., following a junior varsity game at 5:30 p.m. STACK Continued from 8B

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10B Telegraph, Times and Monitor B Section Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017