Union County times

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Title:
Union County times
Uniform Title:
Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Lake Butler Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates:
30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1920?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID:
UF00028314:00487

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Bradford County times


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Union County Times Union County Times USPS 648-200 Lake Butler, Florida Thursday, June 5, 2014 102 nd Year 6th Issue 75 CENTS etc. www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 386-496-2261 Cell 352-283-6312 Fax 386-4962858 uctimes@windstream.net www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/unioncountytimes Raiford Town Council meeting, June 6The Raiford Town Council will conduct its monthly meeting on Friday, June 6, at 5:30 p.m.WS bingo fundraiser, June 6; bake sale, June 14The Worthington Springs Senior Citizens Activity Program will host a fundraiser on Friday, June 6, from 6 to 9 p.m. It will include bingo, where theyll sell refreshments, and dinners for $6. They will also have a bake sale on Saturday, June 14, at Spires IGA from 8 a.m. till sold out.Clothes giveaway, June 7Sanderson Christian Revival Center, located at C.R. 229 and Sapp Road, will give away clothes and other items Saturday, June 7, beginning at 8 a.m.UCHS Class of 1956 reunion, June 7The Union County High School Class of 1956 will have its 58th year class reunion and invite anyone who would like to join them for a Dutch treat luncheon at 1 p.m. at Cedar River in Starke on Saturday, June 7.To the Ends of the Earth, June 7Kelly Christie Dance Academy will present To the Ends of the Earth, featuring local dancers and internationally acclaimed guest artist from Dance Alive National Ballet, on Saturday, June 7, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., at the Union County High School auditorium. Admission is $7.00 for ages five to adult.LB Commission meeting, June 10The Lake Butler City Commission will conduct its monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 10, at 5:15 p.m., following the Planning and Zoning Board meeting at that time.Pop Warner sign-ups, June 7 & 21Union County Pop Warner has opened registration for football and cheerleading during select Saturdays: June 7 & 21 and July 12 & 26and on July 4. Signups are at the Pop Warner building at the O.J. Phillips Recreation Complex. Football fees are $100 for May 23 to July 4 and $150 for July 5 to 26. Cheerleading fees are $125 and $175, respectively. Coaches, volunteers and sponsors are needed.Canoe the Santa Fe, June 12Will leave at 8 a.m. Cost is $25 and a maximum of seven youth. Bring bag lunch.Menu for one, two or more, June 12Union County Extension Office at 1:30 p.m. Call to pre-register at 386-496-2321.Andrews new ESE director at Bradford schools, 5B techniques, check out books, 5B BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor On May 23, the Florida Department of Education released the FCAT 2.0 Writing and third grade Reading and Mathematics scores. The Union County School District took the top spot in several categories. All three schools scored above the state average, said Carlton Faulk, superintendent of schools. As a district, fourth grade students tied for number one in the state, eighth grade students ranked number twelve in the state and tenth grade students tied with three other districts for number one in the state. The tenth grade students also had the highest percentage passing the FCAT Writing. He noted that the third grade students math scores tied with four other districts for highest percentage of students scoring Level 3 or above in the state. To be considered a proficient writer, a student should score an average of 3.5. While the state average fell short at 3.3, students at Lake Butler Elementary School scored an average of 3.6, which has Union County tied for first in the state with two other public school districts. The percentage scoring at Level 3.5 and above dropped from 81 percent last year to 70 percent this year. Those at Level 4 and above dropped from 65 to 47 percent. For math, the state average was 58 percent with Union County coming in at 73 percent proficiencythe same as last yearand an average score of 207. Once again, this ranks them first in the state tied with two other public school districts. According to the scale score in reading, LBES came in with a score of 200, which was at state average. However, the percentage of students at Level 3.5 and above dropped from 59 percent last year to 51 percent this year. At LBES we strive to incorporate more innovative teaching techniques to help our students develop higher order thinking skills to prepare them for these rigorous state assessments, said Principal Stacey Rimes. We are very proud of the hard work and dedication of both our students and staff. Lake Butler Middle School eighth grade students made great gains over last years FCAT Writing scores by improving 13 percentage points from 47 percent to 60 percenta gain of nearly 28 percent. Most impressive of the gains was the drop in Level 1 and 2 from 2013 of 69 students to a 2014 level of 18 students in these categories. There was also a significant gain in the number of Level 4, 5 and 6. In 2013 there were only 11 students who scored at level 4 or above with all 11 students being a Level 4. This years eighth-graders had UC schools tops in FCAT Writing and third-grade math UC cleared in public records request lawsuitReceived same email sent to other countiesBY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor On Oct. 30 of last year Dianne Hannon, executive secretary for the Union County Board of County Commissioners, received an email addressed to Union County from ask4records@gmail.com with a public records request. Bradford County, Sarasota County, Leon County and possibly others received the exact same email that same day. The sender, on behalf of a Florida company, demanded that the county provide a complete list of all the work email addresses of all the employees that work for your county that have email addresses. That Florida company is Consumer Rights LLC out of Lake City, managed by attorney Robert Earl Case Jr. The county had no further contact from the sender nor received any follow-up until slapped with a lawsuit on March 4 demanding enforcement of Chapter 119 of the Florida Statutes, more commonly known as Floridas Public Records Act. It was very, very, very odd, said Clerk of Court Kellie Hendricks Connell, which is why it was thought to be an attempt to hack or phishing scam or one of these dozens of attempts to somehow create problemsin some way, shape or formwhich is why it was disregarded. Furthermore, it was never followed up by phone call, a second email, a written notificationthere was never any follow-up from that email to indicate that it truly was a legitimate request and not an attempt at phishing or hacking. Phishing is the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money), etc., by masquerading as a trustworthy entity through email, instant messaging and websites. She made it clear that the email was not ignored, but rather it was purposely decided that it was in the best interest of the county to not answer, because we thought it was a potential for exploitation. At the time, the county did not maintain a list of email addresses, and so was not obliged to provide a document that did not exist. Public records requests only pertain to what is already available, or on recordall documents, papers, letters, maps, books, tapes, photographs, films, sound recordings, data processing software or other material, regardless of the physical form, characteristics or means of transmission, made or received pursuant to law or ordinance or in connection with the transaction of official business by any agency, as stated in the statute. In his ruling dated May 21, Circuit Judge Stanley H. Griffis III, referenced State v. Clearwater 863 So.2d 149 (Fla. 2003), wherein the Florida Supreme Court ruled that email addresses do not qualify as a public record because email headers, which contain the addresses, were neither purposely compiled nor maintained in the course of the agencys operations. However, even if such email lists are public record subject to disclosure, Griffis wrote in his ruling, Plaintiff must prove that a specific request for public records was made, the agency received the request, the requested public records existed and the agency improperly refused to produce the public records in a timely manner. See Hillier v. City of Plantation 935 So.2d 105, 106 (Fla. 4th DCA 2006). Here, the public records requested did not exist at the time of the request. Defendant did not improperly refuse to produce public records in a timely manner. Defendant was under no duty to create to satisfy Plaintiffs (sic) request. Connell See LAWSUIT, 5A See FCAT, 3A BY JOHN WALKER Director, Union County Office of Emergency Management Hurricane season started June 1 and ends Nov. 30. The Union County Office of Emergency Management would like to remind residents that taking time to prepare each year can prevent injury and damage to property. Its best to know our vulnerabilities and what actions to take to reduce the effects of these storms. We would like to assist the residents of our county be prepared in the event a hurricane should affect our area. Preparation is the key; know what to do, what supplies to have, and how to stay informed. We recommend three major steps that could help you and your family prior to and during a hurricane: 1. Prepare an emergency kit. Make sure you include prescription medications, and other medications that your family needs. You will need one gallon of water per person per day, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food and battery-powered radios (AM/FM and weather radio). Other items to consider in your kit include flashlights, batteries, a first aid kit, plastic bags and ties for sanitation, cellphone chargers, tools, a can opener and maps. Make sure your kit is portable in case you have to evacuate. 2. Make an emergency plan. Plan how you will contact family and friends just before and during the event. Keep contact information (including work information) for all members of your household. Record social security numbers and medical information for each family member as well. Prepare an evacuation plan and include a common meeting place near your neighborhood in case anyone gets separated. Plan to protect your property. Cover windows with plywood, store anything not tied down inside your residence or storage and try to keep trees and shrubs trimmed to minimize damage to property. 3. Stay informed. A hurricane can affect us with lightning, tornadoes, flooding and high winds. Use local news outlets, weather radios and any information received from local government to keep up-to-date on the latest status of any storm. Start getting prepared and monitor news outlets. Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify an impending hurricane. A Hurricane Watch means the effects of a hurricane are possible in your area. A Hurricane Warning means a hurricane is expected in your area. If instructed to evacuate, leave immediately. In almost every case, a Hurricane Watch will be issued before the Hurricane Warning in order to give you time to prepare. Hurricanes are classified into five categories: Category 5 being the most severe and Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes, though Category 1 and 2 still can produce major damage. Following these steps can minimize the effects a hurricane has on you and your family. Please take time to visit www.unionsheriff.us and click on the CodeRED button near the bottom right-hand side of the main page. This will allow you to enroll in community notifications of significant weather events using Union Countys CodeRED alert notification system. Enter your information so that you may stay informed. After entering your home address and phone, you can also enter your GPScapable cellphone number. This will provide you with location specific alerts based on your cellphones location. For more detailed information, checklists and forms to help you prepare, please visit www.ready.gov You can also visit Floridas site at www.floridadisaster.org The State of Florida has initiated a Sales Tax Holiday Be prepared as hurricane season begins See PREPARE, 5A Class of 2014 celebrates on a stormy nightThough afternoon storms delayed graduation for 133 anxious Union County High School seniors Friday, a Assistant Principal Bill Cross, looks on (far left) with pride. Thankful for years of a beautiful life, she then BY TAYLOR CROSS UCHS Class of 2014 Valedictorian As tradition follows there are some muchly owed thank yous that I would like to give. First, I want to thank God for truly blessing me with 18 years of a beautiful life. It is through this grace that I stand where I am today. I have been surrounded by amazing people who have nothing but their entire hearts to give, I have made friends that make every day an adventure, and I now have the privilege to be speaking to you all this evening. There are two special people however that deserve to know just how great they are and that is my mom and dad. Mappy, Pappy, there is not a day that goes by that I BY KAMIL MAZAL UCHS Class of 2014 Salutatorian Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to all the parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends. My name is Kamil Mazal and I am honored to have the privilege of addressing you tonight. Ive taken many classes throughout high school. Ive taken some courses that people considered hard. The hardest one, for me, was probably public speaking, so please bear with me on this. When Mr. Ripplinger let me know about being salutatorian, I thought about the message I could give to my fellow graduates. It seemed important as it did Valedictorian encourages classmates to live, run and leap Salutatorian challenges classmates to make it happenSee CROSS, 4A

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2A Union County Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 uctimes@windstream.net 386-496-2261 Vincents Cell 352-283-6312 John M. Miller, Publisher Editor: Vincent Alex Brown Sports Editor:Cliff Smelley Advertising:Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting:Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping:Joan Stewart-JonesUnion County TimesUSPS 648-200 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: UNION COUNTY TIMES25 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months 386-496-9656 275 West Main Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 (Suwannee Medical Building)12 Years Experience Admitted to State and Federal Bar (M and S. Dist.) DAWN CORBETTINSURANCE AGENCY(904) 964-7707FREE Insurance Quotes No obligation...Call Today! As a taxpayer I believe that our tax dollars should be utilized wisely and within the allotted budget. I have been involved with the youth for several years and would like to see some type of programs for them. Also, I have worked with non-profit organizations that involved the youth as well as the community as a whole. Most importantly Ive worked in the financial and accounting field for over ten years working with various types of budgets. Vote with confidence for someone you can trust as your vote can make a difference at local levels.Vote on to make a difference.Vote Robert Osbornefor Lake Butler City Commissioner Seat 3on Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Osborne for Lake Butler City Commissioner Seat 3 Revival, June 8; homecoming, June 15New River NC Methodist Church us hosting a revival from Sunday, June 8, to Wednesday, June 11. Sunday night service will begin at 6:00 p.m. with Rev. Randy Ogburn. Monday service will begin at 7:30 p.m. with Rev. Tommy Richardson. Tuesday service will be at 7:30 p.m. with Rev. Tommy Anderson. Wednesday service will be at 7:30 p.m. with Rev. Cody Griffis. The church will celebrate homecoming on Sunday, June 15, with lunch following the morning service.   Everyone is invited to come and enjoy spirit-filled preaching and singing. The church is located on C.R. 125. Rev. Jimmy Scott is the pastor. Call 386-431-1536 for directions. For more info, call the front office at 386-496-3040.VBS at FCC, June 16Starting Monday, June 16, First Christian Church of Lake Butler will host its annual Vacation Bible School program, each weekday from 6 to 8:30 p.m. This years theme is The Long Shot Faith,   w ith a great marketplace and lessons on seeing the long shot into greatness.   There will be games, crafts, snacks and great lessons about the mighty faith of Deborah. There are programs for ages pre-K to sixth grade. For more info, call Associate Minister David Tompkins at 386-496-3956.Librarys summer programs start June 1910 & Under, Thursdays at 10 a.m. June 19: Fizz, Boom, Science at Union County Public Library Mad science with mad scientists! June 26: Fizz, Boom, Todd Kay at Lake Butler Elementary School Juggling with a magical twist! Teens & Tweens, 11 & Up June 24, 3-5 p.m.: Electrifying Electricity workshop. Limited seating; pre-registration recommend ed. June 30, 5-7 p.m.: Ballad of America, featuring spe cial guest Matthew Sabatella. Refreshments will be served. Follow the librarys Facebook page for updates on programs and more at www.facebook.com/ unioncountylibrary etc. Woody Kitler running for UC commission(The following is a statement of intention to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) I am Woodrow Woody Kitler, and I am both humbled and excited to announce my candidacy for Union County Commissioner, District 2. I was born and raised in Union County, as was my wife Nicole. Both of our families are proud lifelong residents of this county. Nicole and I have been married for 16 years, and we are raising our family here as well. Our three sons Chase, Dalton and Dawson all attend Union County High School. After graduating from UCHS in 1990, I joined the U.S. Army where I served honorably until 1993. I then joined the Army National Guard until 1996. I am currently employed by US Foods in Jacksonville as a driver and have been driving trucks for the past 18 years. If elected as your county commissioner, my formal commitment to you will be to make myself accessible and listen to your thoughts and opinions. I will work hard to earn your trust and represent you to the best of my abilities. I have a strong belief in the need for elected officials to work alongside the people of the community to accomplish goals, both large and small. Over the next couple of months leading up to the primary election, I look forward to meeting and talking with each of you individually. I am anxious to hear your concerns and gather your thoughts and ideas regarding our community. I believe in this community and the people who live in it. We need to work hard today to build a strong community for our children tomorrow. My family and I are proud to congratulate the UCHS Class of 2014 on their great accomplishments! Please remember to vote August 26th. Let your voice be heard. Channing Dobbs running for UC commission(The following is a statement of intention to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) My name is Channing Dobbs and it is with extreme enthusiasm that I announce my candidacy for District 2 Union County Commissioner. For those of you who do not know me I was born and raised in Raiford and am blessed to call Union County home. After my mothers death I was raised by my uncle and aunt, Lamar and Marian Griffis, as well as my grandparents, Bud and Marjorie Dobbs. My family is deeply rooted in Raiford myself being fourth-generation. I am a member of Fellowship Baptist Church in Raiford. I have a beautiful 2-year old daughter whose name is Pamela Ela Dobbs and might I add she has my heart. I am a 2007 graduate of Union County High School. After school I began a career with the Department of Corrections at Union Correctional Institution in 2008 and was recently promoted to sergeant. It was a great honor to begin serving the Town of Raiford as a councilman in 2009. In 2010 I obtained a law enforcement certification from Lake City Community College. In 2011 while serving the Town of Raiford I became mayorthe youngest in Florida to do so. After much thought and prayer I have decided to run for this position for several reasons. I love my community and the people in it. I am blessed beyond words to call Union County my home. I look forward to raising my child here and never intend on leaving. I feel that I am without a doubt qualified for this position. As councilman and mayor of Raiford I was given the opportunity to receive your comments and suggestions regarding this district. I have used this information to make profound decisions concerning your tax dollars and policies outlined in the charter. I am experienced in the field of budget analysis, ordinance preparation, charter compliance, community developmental grants and audits. I have worked hand-inhand with the board of county commissioners as well as the DOC community partnership program on several occasions and to both I am greatly appreciative. I believe in order to reach goals we must work as a team. I am, have been and will continue to be honest, hardworking and dedicated to serve in the most professional manner possible. I am committed to serve you in every aspect within my span of control. I promise if elected to be available, accountable and welcoming to comments and suggestions to enhance our community as a whole. Please feel free to contact me any time at 904-263-8058. Thank you for your support. I look forward to seeing you soon, Channing Dobbs Get ready to voteOn Tuesday, (l-r) Tiffany Rollins and Tammy Roddenberry and from in Lake Butler to let residents changed for the county elections due to redistricting. If anyone needs to get registered   married and need to change your   You can change your address by   Regular qualifying will start at   instead of the petition method.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Union County Times 3A Hi. My name is Ray Crawford and I am running for Lake Butler City Commissioner, Seat 4.I am a Veteran and a longtime resident of Lake Butler and I was privileged and honored to serve as a City Commissioner in the years 2006 2009 and as a Mayor in the years 2009 2010. My future is tied up here and I want to contribute to make Lake Butler a prosperous Community for all. On a personal note, for the people that do not know me, I would like to reassure you that the main reason why I am running its because I love Lake Butler it is where I live with my family and where I have run a successful business until a few months ago, I am here to stay. Just for the record I would like to point out that, while I was serving my previous term, I was approached by Mr. Leroy Stalvey and asked to step aside to allow him to serve four more years as City Commissioner, in order for him to be eligible to collect his full retirement. I honored Mr. Stalveys request out of for respect for his age and health conditions; his Seat was vacated due to his recent death. I am running for the same Seat. I have recently retired and my desire is to regain Seat # 4 as a City Commissioner and dedicate full time to the challenges and most of all the opportunities of our little City. I love to solve problems and I want to be part of the solution to the problems facing our City. I try to lead by example. I work well with others to accomplish goals; I know when to listen and when to follow; I will stand up for the concerns of Lake Butler Citizens; I am not afraid to say I dont know, let me find out and I will get back to you. I want our tax dollars spent carefully and wisely. I strongly believe in fiscal responsibility, preservation, conservation and integrity. Cities exist to create environments in which people can succeed with their life, with their families, with their businesses; I believe that Elected Officials and Citizens alike should treat each other with dignity to produce constructive outcomes. A Commissioner must take the time to be fully informed on all issues at all times, in order to serve his Citizens properly. A Commissioner must be a credible and effective Ambassador for our City. I feel I can proudly be your Commissioner again. Please give me your vote. Our people know a thing or two about hard work, determination and often, hardship. I am ready to wor k with everybody to understand the true nature of problems and develop the strategies which will best deal with these problems. I will work hard to identify the highest priorities in City matters and make su re that the services will be delivered in a manner that preserves our Citizens rights and best reinforces th e strength and respect of all of as. Again, I believe that if we follow the vision of a Great Lake Bu tler, people of all ages and backgrounds will benefit. In the end, we should all remember that we are friends. Please know that I truly encourage, welcome and value your questions and comments, and look forward to hearing from you at anytime. I am asking for your support at the polls if you agree with my ideals. I will do everything I can to meet every single one of you personally and answer your questions and concerns. Only you, residents of Lake Butler, have the power to write the next chapter in our History, so please give me your consideration. Thank you, Dallas Ray Crawford Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for and approved by Dallas Ray Crawford for Lake Butler City Commission Elect Ray Crawford to Lake Butler City Commission Big Bass Fishing Big Bass Fishing Tournament Tournament Registration begins at 3:30am at the boat ramp. $50 entry fee per boat. 18yrs and older or accompanied by an adult. Valid FL fishing license required. 15hp motor minimum. Must have aerated livewell. Weigh-in at 11:00am Midway sponsored by Spotlight Amusements Games GamesBounce House Rock Wall Bounce House Rock Wall Buzz Light Year Buzz Light Year Bungee Trampoline Bungee Trampoline Pony Rides Pony Rides Crazy Worm Train Crazy Worm Train Kiddie Ferris Wheel Kiddie Ferris Wheel To the Ends of the EarthFeaturing local dancers of KCDA and internationally acclaimed guest artist from Dance Alive National Ballet Admission $7.00 for Age 5-Adult Presents (12 miles west of Lake Butler) S MITH & S ON S FEED AND SEED Nutrena River Run21/10$16 w/ this ad 79 students at Level 4 and above with 11 at Level 5 and one student who scored the perfect Level 6. The percentage scoring at Level 4 and above improved 11 points over last yearfrom 36 percent to 47 percent. The credit is due to the hard work the LBMS students put into FCATContinued from 1A School 2014 THIRD GRADE FCAT MATH SCORES Level 3 and Above Mean Score STATE AVERAGE 58% 201 UNION 73% (Tied for 1st) 207 (Tied for 1st) NEFEC DISTRICTS (North East Florida Educational Consortium) BAKER 67% 206 BRADFORD 46% 196 COLUMBIA 61% 202 DIXIE 67% 204 FLAGLER 63% 204 GILCHRIST 66% 205 HAMILTON 63% 202 LAFAYETTE 38% 193 LEVY 58% 200 NASSAU 73% 207 PUTNAM 51% 198 SUWANNEE 41% 194 *not including lab schools Mean Score 6 districts higher Tied for 7th STATE RESULTS Level 3 and Above No districts higher Tied with 4 districts 2014 THIRD GRADE FCAT READING SCORES Level 3 and Above Mean Score STATE AVERAGE 57% 200 UNION 51% (9th) 200 (6th) NEFEC DISTRICTS (North East Florida Educational Consortium) BAKER 64% 204 BRADFORD 57% 198 COLUMBIA 62% 201 DIXIE 64% 203 FLAGLER 65% 205 GILCHRIST 60% 202 HAMILTON 35% 191 LAFAYETTE 39% 193 LEVY 46% 196 NASSAU 73% 206 PUTNAM 48% 196 SUWANNEE 52% 198 *not including lab schools Mean Score Tied with 4 districts 33 districts higher STATE RESULTS Level 3 and Above Tied with 4 districts 45 districts higher 2014 FCAT WRITING SCORES Fourth Grade Eighth Grade Tenth Grade MEAN Levels 3.5 and Higher MEAN Levels 3.5 and Higher MEAN Levels 3.5 and Higher STATE AVERAGE 3.3 53% 3.4 56% 3.5 64% UNION 3.6 (1st in Region) 69% (1st in Region) 3.5 (Tied for 2nd) 59% (Tied for 5th) 3.7 (Tied for 1st) 76% (1st in State) NEFEC DISTRICTS (North East Florida Educational Consortium) Fourth Grade Eighth Grade Tenth Grade MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ BAKER 3.2 44% 3.5 60% 3.4 55% BRADFORD 3.2 48% 3.2 47% 3.4 56% COLUMBIA 3.2 48% 3.3 46% 3.3 52% DIXIE 3.2 51% 3.2 47% 3.4 58% FLAGLER 3.5 63% 3.5 59% 3.5 63% GILCHRIST 3.5 63% 3.3 54% 3.7 71% HAMILTON 3.0 39% 2.8 22% 3.5 71% LAFAYETTE 3.4 54% 3.6 72% 3.5 62% LEVY 3.0 40% 3.5 61% 3.4 61% NASSAU 3.4 60% 3.4 58% 3.7 72% PUTNAM 3.0 40% 3.1 39% 3.2 44% SUWANNEE 2.9 37% 3.1 44% 3.2 52% STATE RESULTS Fourth Grade Eighth Grade Tenth Grade MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ Tied for 1st with Hillsborough Tied for 1st with Hillsborough 10 districts higher; 10 districts tied 17 districts higher; 2 districts tied 3 districts tied for 1st No district was higher improving their writing skills and the driven instruction provided by the language arts faculty, said Principal David Campbell. The LBMS family couldnt be prouder of their efforts and congratulate them on their accomplishment. At Union County High School, tenth-graders tied other districts in the state with the highest average writing score of a 3.7up from 3.3 last yearand the district had the states highest percentage of students passingLevel 3.5 and abovewith 76 percent, which was a dramatic improvement over last year at 54 percent. Even more dramatic was the percentage scoring Level 4 and above, which increased went from 30 percent last year to 52 percent. I would like to congratulate our teachers and students for their outstanding performance on this years FCAT Writing exam, said Principal Mike Ripplinger. Our teachers worked hard in preparing our students for success on the exam and our students performed at a high level of achievement. I am very pleased that our students are making steady progress as we continue to transition to more rigorous standards, said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. She also complimented the daily work of students and teachers to improve. More test scores should be released in the next few weeks.

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4A Union County Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 ______________________________ ______________________________ ROBERT OSBORNE ANNETTE REDMAN DEBRA BROWNINGDALLAS RAY CRAWFORD dont know just how lucky I am to have two individuals as strong, passionate, and loving as you are guiding me and supporting me. You may be proud of me right now but know that Im so proud of you both each and every day for not only being parents and providers, but also for being my rock and my friend. I love you both so much. Finally I want to personally thank everyone that I face now. The saying it takes a village to raise a child is embodied in the town of Lake Butler. In my eyes you all have been a part of my life and Im so thankful for everyones contribution. Now, Id like to point out that theres something about a small town unique to any other. All of the young adults who gather on this field here today are the same people I walked into kindergarten with. Eighteen years of memories have been made as we have watched each other grow from pencil boxes to cap and gowns and I have to tell you all it has been an honor. But it also makes this day just a little bittersweet. You dont realize just how close you become to your classmates as we have all traveled down the street together one school at a time. It wasnt that far of a walk either. But lets talk a little about what so many call the best years of our life: high school. Its crazy to think that its all over. I can personally still remember not having a worry in the world as a freshman. At that time I had a personal chauffer and the word job was completely taboo to me. Then came sophomore yearthe big Sweet 16 for us all. This may have been when our parents started to find out we really could cause them to gray. But dont worry, we totally knew how to drive right? Unfortunately, it turns out I really cant drive, or at least thats what my friends say, but as far as I can see theyre all here so no harm done. Now, onward to junior year where the word responsibility became just a little bit more real. Turns out you needed money for gas and food. It was around this time that we learned the true power of the dollar menu. But at the same time we were starting to evolve into unique individuals, slowly we had begun making our own paths. Now, here we aresenior year. Everyone tries to tell you just how fast it goes by but youll never realize it until one day the entire town is looking back at you as you walk across stage. But, Id like to point out that the Class of 2014 has endured quite a bit of hardship this year as we have lost some of those closest to us. However, I hope everyone knows just how strong they really are. Through the hurt, we have prevailed. And now as we prepare to turn our tassels and say goodbye to the one and only UCHS, I only have a few wishes for us all. It is my hope that everyone who gathers with me here today may never see a day wasted because there was no laughter. It is my hope that we never prioritize anything over happiness, and it is my hope that each and every one of us live to our full potential. It turns out life really is too short to let it be a sedentary one. We are blessed every time we get to see the sun come up. So go out in the real world, see extraordinary views, be inspired, fall in love, make friends who will stay with you for the rest of your lives, never try to be perfect because there isnt such a thing, and of course put your heart into everything you do. There will be times that we may stumble but know this is only a time to learn. Always pick yourself up and push harder into tomorrow because youll eventually run out of them. Let each day from here on out be an adventure as you not only find yourself but what makes you truly at peace. And when you do, hold onto that and go as far as you can go. Run with happiness until your legs grow weak and then crawl even farther. Because in the end, the question wont be what we did and didnt have. In the end, the most important thing we can ask ourselves is, Did I do the best I possibly could with what I had in front of me? You see, we arent all given the same set of circumstances but we all have the potential to be great. Life is what you make it. So make it fun. Make it memorable and make it your own. The path in front of us is wide open. Go now, get a running start. Leap over all the obstacles that try to slow you down and never look back. Life has only just begun my friends. Its our time to make our mark in the world. Let it be one that no one forgets, and thank you again for the last 18 years. I will forever cherish them. School CROSSContinued from 1A imperative for me to share with you something I discovered in 2011 that has kept me motivated since. It is my favorite poem, and it is called Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost. Ill read the short poem for you: Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sounds the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. How has this kept her motivated? you may ask. Well, I believe that the message here is to not settle for something that merely makes you content, but to make promises to yourself, lofty goals that you will strive to reach. I want you to ask yourselves, What do I want to accomplish? After you have your answers, set out to make it happen. I chose to share this message with you because I believe that a passionate individual can accomplish anything. And when obstacles are presented, follow Sir Winston Churchills advice to Never give up. Along the way, please never forget the people who helped you get there, and give thanks to them. I, personally, would like to thank my mom, dad, and brother, LTC Steverson, CSM North, MSG Black, Mrs. Allen, Mrs. Sharma, Mr. Williams, Mrs. Imler, Congressman Yoho and Greg Rawson, Ms. Mackey, Mrs. Tana, Mrs. Dot, Mr. Rip, Mr. Cross, Hannah, my fellow classmates and everybody else at this wonderful institution who has given me a hand. I hope youll find what I just said useful, and that you remember it through all of the endeavors you embark upon in life. Thank you. Continued from 1A Tragedy and triumph of Union County Tiger Band played Pomp and Circumstancea series of marches composed by Sir Edward and homecoming queen, started things off. RIGHT: During the benediction, a moment of silence was held in memory last year. Later, cheers went up when able to attend the ceremony and share the momentous occasion with her daughter.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Union County Times 5A The Bible records several miracles performed by God. They were given to show Gods power and confirm the word being spoken by those performing the miracles (Mark 16:20; Hebrews 2:3-4). For example, the miracles performed by Jesuswere given so people may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God (John 20:30-31). They confirmed the claim being made by Jesus. God has finished revealing His will to mankind (Galatians 1:6-9) so miracles are not needed to confirm that one is receiving revelation from God. Instead, the word of God is confirmed by the signs recorded in the text. In the Christian age, the ability to perform miracles was limited to the apostles and those on whom they laid hands (Acts 8:14-18). Since there is no one on earth today who is an apostle or who received the laying on of the apostles hands, no one has the ability to perform miracles today. Bible Study at 9:00 AM on Sun and 7:30 PM on Wed Worship at 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM on Sun. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. UCT Legals 6/5/14 NOTICE The Union County Board of County Commissioners are accepting bids for a Wind Retrofit of the Providence Community Center. Interested con tractors should send sealed propos als to 15 NE 1st Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 by June 12, 2014. Request for bid packets and all questions should be directed to John Walker at 386-496-4330. 5/29 2tchg 6/5 UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a Finance Audit and Executive Committee Meeting on Wednesday, June 18, 2014; Finance Audit Com mittee Meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M.; and Executive Committee Meeting will follow at 10:30 A.M. at the Suwannee River Economic Coun cil, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida. 6/5 1tchg-UCT NOTICE Lake Butler Mini Storage will hold an auction on Saturday, June 14, 2014 at 10 AM, located at 1015 SW 3RD Street, Lake Butler, FL. Hwy 121. We have 3 units up for auction #62 10x10, #28 5x10, #27 5x10. 6/5 2tchg 6/12-UCT Legals that started May 31 and ends at 11:59 p.m. on June 8. Qualifying items are listed as follows: Selling for $10 or less: Reusable ice (reusable ice packs). Selling for $20 or less: Any portable, self-powered light source, battery-powered flashlights, battery-powered lanterns, gas-powered lanterns (including propane, kerosene, lamp oil, or similar fuel), tikitype torches, candles. Selling for $25 or less: Any gas or diesel fuel container (including LP gas and kerosene containers). Selling for $30 or less: Batteries, including rechargeable batteries, and excluding automobile and boat batteries; AA-cell, C-cell, D-cell, 6-volt, 9-volt; coolers (food-storage; nonelectrical) ice chest (foodstorage; nonelectrical), selfcontained first-aid kit (already tax-exempt). Selling for $50 or less: Tarpaulins, visqueen, plastic sheeting, or plastic drop cloths, and other flexible waterproof sheeting, ground anchor systems, tie-down kits, bungee cords, ratchet straps, radios (selfpowered or battery-powered), two-way radios (self-powered or battery-powered). Selling for $750 or less: Portable generators that will be used to provide light, communications, or to preserve food in the event of a power outage. The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 through November 30. You may reach the Union County Office of Emergency Management at 386-496-4300, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. till 5 p.m. The Union County Sheriffs Office can be reached 24/7 at 386-496-2501. In the case of an emergency, always call 911. Online resources: www.unionsheriff.us (Click CodeRED button to sign up for alerts.) www.ready.gov (Detailed information, checklists and forms to help you prepare.) www.floridadisaster.orgPREPAREContinued from 1A The judge further noted what Connell also pointed out: that the email was not even addressed to the proper records custodian for the county but sent to a decidedly generic BOCC address. Hannon did forward the original email to Justin Stankiewicz, chief financial officer for the Clerk of Court, which is the correct agency. Hence, Plaintiff made no effort before the request to confirm it was being sent to the proper person or entity, Griffis observed. The judge agreed with the county that the email seemed to be an attempt at phishing. Ironically, since the lawsuit was first and only verification that the original email was in fact valid, the county did actually create a record to satisfy the request and then provided that to Plaintiff. Once we determined that it truly was a legitimate request and not some kind of hacking scam, we made a good faith effort to give the information; we actually created the document when we didnt have to, Connell said. So, were trying to be transparent. Until we had a suit we did not realize it was a legitimate request, Connell added. We thought it was an attempt to attempt to abuse the government. And understand that after four months (between the time of the email and the lawsuit) of receiving no follow-up correspondence, that confirmed our suspicion that that was an illegitimatethat it was not truly a public records attempt. It was an attempt to hack emails. Connell said that Bradford County also did not respond to the email was similarly ruled in favor and not obligated to pay Plaintiff. Finally, in denying Plaintiffs lawsuit and in not awarding attorneys fees and costs, Griffis concluded that, Plaintiff has failed to establish that Defendant unlawfully refused to permit a public record to be inspected or copied. Defendant did not possess, nor did a record exist to fulfill Plaintiffs public records request. Connell said the county received legal representation at no cost. Fred Baggett, an attorney for Greenberg Traurig LLP is the general counsel for Florida Court Clerks and Comptrollers, a statewide association. Connell called him regarding the lawsuit and Baggett connected her with an attorney in his firm that knew (Chapter 119 of the Florida Statutes) very well, and did not charge the county for the representation, she said. The day that (the attorney) contacted the Plaintiff, Connell said, the Plaintiff offered to settle for $4,800. However, the county declined. We talked about it and decided that we did nothing wrong, that we were absolutely legitimate and that we were not going to spend the countys dollarsfor that, Connell said. Apparently the judge agreed.LAWSUITContinued from 1A County Cub Scouts Cub Scouts check things out Fire Department on April 28 to get a tour of the trucks FAR LEFT: The scouts pose on the bumper Lake Dillon Duenas, Cameron Christie, Sonny Sargent, and Cubmaster Nellie Sargent. extinguisher is better than water in cooking situations, here spraying a garden hose on a outdoor grill Public Library. The scouts began their tour at the Promise as well as the Pledge of Allegiance. The boys learned a bit about library operations and toured the staff-only areas of the library including going behind the front desk where they each had the opportunity to check out books. check out a book to fellow scout Sonny Sargent.

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6A Union County Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service is accepting applications now through June 27 for its Longleaf Pine Landowner Incentive Program, which offers Floridas non-industrial private landowners incentive payments for longleaf pine restoration. Longleaf pine forest once covered some 70 million acres (more than 60 percent of all the uplands) on the southeastern coastal plain from Southeast Virginia to Central Florida to East Texas. Today only about three million acres remain, mostly due to conversion to other land uses, said Jay Tucker, Union County Senior CFA Forester with the Florida Forest Service. Longleaf pine forests are highly valued for their resistance to damage by insects, disease, wildfire and storms and for their yield of high quality wood products, biological diversity and scenic beauty. He said that people often under estimate where longleaf will grow, thinking it only thrives in on dry, well-drained sites. In the contrary, it is native to a wide range of sites from wetter flatwoods (commonly found throughout the county) to dry, rocky mountain ridges, he said. As a general rule of thumb, if a site will burned every two to five years then longleaf pine will most likely grow there. The longleaf pine forest is fire-dependent ecological community. This means without frequent fires, other less fire tolerant plant species (i.e., such as oak species, red maple and slash pine) will invade and out-compete the longleaf pine. Historically fires would burn through the upland forest every year or two on dryer site and three to five years on the wetter flatwoods sites. As fire frequency decreases, naturally or manmade, longleaf pine is replaced by slash and woody shrubs replace native grass understory. In recent years, we have learned a lot about planting, growing and managing longleaf pine, said Tucker. Some areas that have greatly improved are seedling quality, survival rates and tree growth in the first one to three years. The program works to increase the acreage of healthy longleaf pine ecosystems in Florida by helping non-industrial private forest landowners to make the necessary investments required to establish and maintain longleaf pine ecosystems. Funding is provided through a grant and support by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Southern Company, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, Natural Resource Conservation Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Program participants receive incentive payments for various land improvements completed including invasive species control, prescribed burning, longleaf planting, and other practices that improve longleaf pine ecosystems and associated wildlife habitat. The program is offered for private lands in Florida counties located west of the Apalachicola River and those near the Ocala and Osceola National Forests. Interested applicants should visit their local Florida Forest Service office or visit www.floridaforestservice.com for program requirements and procedures. For more information or questions, landowners in Union County can contact Tucker at jay.tucker@freshfromflorida.com or 386-496-2190. Qualifying applicants will be evaluated and ranked for funding approval. The Florida Forest Service manages over one million acres of public forestland while protecting over 24 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com or follow Commissioner Adam Putnam on Facebook, Twitter or Google+.Florida announces longleaf pine incentives for landowners Womans club celebrates annual federation dayBY CHRISTY HENDRICKS PR Chairperson, LBWC GFWC Federation Day is an annual celebration of the General Federation of Womens Clubs, which was officially formed on April 24, 1890, in New York City. The history of GFWC is traced back to 1868 when a pioneering woman journalist named Jane Cunningham Croly (1829-1901) sought to attend a dinner honoring British novelist Charles Dickens at an all-male press club. Croly was denied admittance based on her gender, and in response, she formed a club for women. In 1890, Croly extended an invitation to womens clubs throughout the United States to attend a convention in New York City. Representatives from 63 clubs throughout the nation attended the convention and took action to form the GFWC. The Civic League was the forerunner of the Lake Butler Womans Club. The club was organized in 1912 and federated in 1914. Mrs. S.A. Draper, wife of high school principal S.A. Draper, was the first president. Meetings were held in homes of the members and later at the Masonic Lodge until Union County built a new brick courthouse and gave the two-story wooden building to LBWC in 1935. In the early years and today, club members did civic, school, health-related and community activities. The club installed the first dock at Butler Lake. They donated a tennis court, which was on the lot across the street from the current park. They held Teen Town at the clubhouse and many of the local residents remember the fun and activities held at that time. At one time the clubhouse was the home to the Union County Health Department and the members moved to the current Hal Y. Maines (Lake Butler) Community Center and managed the building. Along with the Lake Butler Rotary Club, LBWC purchased acoustical tile that was installed in the community center. The first library in the county was started by LBWC. More recent projects have included Operation Smile, Heifer International, recycling, scholarship, Relay for Life, HOBY student leadership and monetary donations for local, state and national projects. Presently the club holds its meetings at the clubhouse at 6 p.m. on the third Monday of each month, September through May. The womans club seeks new members and visitors are always welcome.

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Bradford High School seniors were able to 30, eating pizza, running obstacle course, playing kickball and getting wet, among other things. doused, no one was safe... not even Principal Bryan Boyer, who gets a cooling off, courtesy of senior Bradley Davis. all? I thought I did, Ricker said. I dont know. I wasnt expecting it. It proved to be an interesting experience from start to finish. Ricker was told beforehand there wouldnt be a problem with her carrying her project onto the plane for the flight to Houston. When she got to the airport, Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL New friends Amazing experiements Untamed games Lip-smacking snacks Surprising adventures Incredible music Saturday, June 14th 1:00:00pmWe will be kicking off the week with an afternoon of fun!! There will be inflatables, train rides, sno-cones & more... Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:05, 9:10 Sat: 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 Sun: 5:00, 7:05 Mon Thurs: 7:30EXPENDABLESNOW SHOWING Fri: 7:00, 9:15 Sat: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: 4:45, 7:00 Mon Thurs: 7:15 PG-13Angelina Jolie Adam Sandler PG BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School freshman Tessa Ricker earned a silver medal at this years International Sustainable World (Energy, Engineering, Environment) Project Olympiad, an international science fair held annually in Houston. Ricker, whose project, The Rate of Decomposition of Compostable Packing Materials, received one of 40 silver medals in the Environment division, shared her I-SWEEEP experience with the Kiwanis Club of Starke on May 27. I wasnt expecting this at all, to say the least, Ricker said of earning a medal. Ricker was one of more than 600 participantssome of whom were part of group projects from more than 40 states and more than 70 countries at the April 30-May 5 event. More than 300 medals (gold, silver, bronze) and honorablemention awards were presented, which made for a long awards ceremony. Ricker admitted she almost didnt accept her medal. After sitting through a portion of the ceremony, she told her older sister Hannah, who accompanied her on the trip, Im not going to get anything. Lets go. Her sister persuaded her to stay just a little longer, which was good. Ricker heard her name called and went up to accept her award, though according to her sister, you couldnt tell she was excited about it. When I got back, Hannah was like, Why didnt you smile at Ricker earns medal at international science fairTessa Ricker is shown with her project, The Rate of Soon-to-be BHS grads soak up fun on last day Dinkins. Please see page 6B for more photos. Photos are also available for viewing

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I was confident on about 75 percent of it, Yates said. The other 25 percent were some BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer John Andrews looked forward to going to school after enrolling in the Bradford County School Districts Academy of Academics. Four years later, he is preparing to accept his high school diploma. Andrews said he wouldnt have gotten through school were it not for the Academy of Academics, a voluntary performance-based program for middle-school and high-school students that are behind in terms of grade level, and at risk for dropping out of school. Andrews enjoyed the environment and being exposed to more one-on-one attention from teachers who seemed compassionate in helping him and other students. Its like family here, Andrews said. You dont see teacherstheyre just like my moms and dads. I love it here. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, J une 5, 2014 $499 lb $399 lbPRICES AVAILABLEJ UNE 04 JUNE 10 2 $3$499$100 $299 O SCAR MAYER Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.S atisfaction Guaranteed $199lb $499 $299 lb1 6 OZ FAM PAK$259 lb 8 LB BAG FAM PAK$279lb $1 $149 $299lb lb O pen 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1 371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 RICE SIDES WYLWOOD KRAFT SINGLES IMPERIAL PILLSBURY $100 $199 $100GINGER EVANS 4LB BAGCRYSTAL O2 MAXWELL HOUSE CHIPS VARIETY PACK $189 $229 $449 $399 $100 were not present.Academy of Academics students recognized for their effortsTeachers handed out certificates of achievement on May 29, with Andrews receiving several, including one for overall excellence. Teacher Peg Stanwix-Hay said Andrews really blossomed in the program and took advantage of the welding program at the Bradford-Union Technical Center as well. Andrews has one more welding area to become certified in. John Andrews receives a for overall excellence from BradfordCenter Director Christy Reddish. Also pictured (foreground to are Academy of Academics teachers Peg Stanwix-Hay, Linda Rudoi, Cindy Bagley, Bish Bishop. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School junior Kristie Yates earned a third-place finish in the area of medical terminology at the April 27-29 Skills USA Florida Leadership and Skills Conference in Pensacola. Teresa Jackson, a health sciences teacher at the BradfordUnion Technical Center, said, I am very proud of Kristie. I had no doubt that she would be successful. Yates, who advanced to the state event after placing first at the Feb. 21 Region 2 SkillsUSA Florida Conference in Jacksonville, had to take a 100-question multiplechoice test. A college medical terminology class was a big help to her.BHS junior Yates earns 3rd place at SkillsUSA Florida event

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and part of his hand. I thought he probably didnt want this war any more than I did, Mandeville said. The people that want it the least suffer the most. Art Butler of Lake City also participated in the D-Day invasions, landing on Utah Beach on June 19. Like Towers, he was 27. We didnt know what we were getting into, Butler said. It was noisy. There was shelling over us all night. Butler said he didnt worry about making it home because he had a wife and two children and knew he had to. He settled in Lake City after the war, pursuing a career in lumber and building and construction supply. Asked about whether he felt the eyes of the world upon him during those harrowing days, Butler paused before answering. We went over there knowing we had a big job to do, he said. We were hell-bent to make good.Remembering those who served and sacrificed their livesTowers is one of the founders of Les Fleurs de la Memoire, an association that arranges for French families to adopt the grave of an American soldier buried in Normandy in perpetuity, making at least one visit annually to place flowers on it. The associations website includes an excerpt from a letter Towers wrote to Claude Lavieille, a co-founder of the association: When I come to Europe, it is most difficult for me to visit the American cemeteries wherein my comrades lie at eternal rest. As a liaison officer, I knew many of them personally. Each of these visits is hard on mefor when I am standing in silence in front of a tomb, images of my comrades life come to mind, and it is like that for each visit. But I have to do it. I cant miss visiting each of them. Soon, neither I nor any of my companions will be able to visit the graves of American service men and women at eternal rest in Europe. Then what? Will they be BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor The men who landed on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day during World War II and lived to tell about it are quickly fading into history, yet the significance of their sacrifices and valor will be remembered, especially this year, the 70th anniversary of the invasions. The commemorations will culminate Friday, June 6, in Ouistreham, France, where President Barack Obama, French President Francois Hollande and Britains Queen Elizabeth II will gather to remember the more than 9,000 Allied soldiers killed or wounded on June 6, 1944. Frank W. Towers of Alachua County will also be there. Towers, hale and hearty at 97, was there on D-Day plus six, landing in France on his 27th birthday. He reminisced about his experiences recently at a meeting of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida at Conestoga Restaurant in downtown Alachua. I was on a Liberty ship, taking packets from the Isle of Wight to the beaches, Towers said. Towers unit was supposed to land on Omaha Beach, but ended up at Utah Beach, 40 miles to the west, by mistake. Because there was a foot-long drop to the beach from the landing ramp, the service vehicles could not be reloaded. They traveled by land and met the ship when it landed at Omaha Beach later that day, the only unit to land at both beaches. There was no fighting at Omaha Beach when Towers landed. He could hear artillery fire, and he saw the carnage. There were wrecked vehicles and ships and stacks of bodies waiting to be shipped to England, he said. There were a lot of wounded and field hospitals. It was not pleasant. For the five months leading up to D-Day, Towers had been training in England. It was all playdummy bullets, he said. But this was the real thing. Towers wife of 71 years, Mary, remembers how she felt back home in the U.S., waiting to Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B HOPE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY SALUTES OUR 2014 SENIORSHope Christian Academy 352-473-40403900 S.E. State Road 100, Starke, FL Honors Honors Honors Honors HonorsTrain up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old he will not depart from it. Proverbs 22:6 (KJV)Photos: Teddy Bear Portraits SALUTATORIAN SUMMERLYN BYRD Magna Cum Laude: 3.59 weighted GPA. Dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. VALEDICTORIAN KATIE KRUZAN Summa Cum Laude: 4.47 weighted GPA. Earned AA degree through dual enrollment while attending HCA. GARHETT WILSON Dual Enrolled CHLOE WALKERTIFFANY GEORGSSONANDRE CANADY Dual Enrolled JOSEPH MOORE Dual Enrolled CHRIS TRESTERRYAN SILCOXOLIVIA SANDERSJOHNNY GIBSONCLASS MOTTO: We Were Made to Thrive.NOW ENROLLINGINFANTS 12TH GRADECurrent Enrollment: 330 students Curriculum: Abeka and A.C.E. Dual Enrollment: Currently, 27 students are dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. Scholarships: McKay and Step Up Award-Winning Sports Program: Tackle Football Flag Football Cheerleading Baseball Fast-Pitch Softball Volleyball Basketball Before/After Care & Summer Programs: Contact the school Hot Lunches: Order online Yearbook: Produced by students Praise Team/Band: Performs at chapel Safety Patrol: Elementary students School Uniforms: Variety of choices Spring Formal: Grades 9th-12th Title I:Intensive math & readingWorld Languages: Spanish Tours: Tuesdays & Thursdays Call for appointment Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 21 years. Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back PainBack & Neck Pain Clinic Remembering D-Day 70 years later pictured with his wife, organization that arranges Americans interned in soldiers across the hear from Frank with his mother in Boston. I was scared to death, she said. I pictured him in every one of the pictures. Because there was no TV in those days, she went to the movie theatre to see newsreels. We wrote letters to each other each day, Mary said, noting that the first letters arrived about 10 days after her husbands landing. They numbered their letters, so when several arrived at once, she could put them in order for reading. Towers served in Europe for 18 months and was due to go to the Pacific when atomic bombs dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war. His commission was deactivated, although within six months he returned to Germany, where he was stationed for three years. Mary went with him, and their three children were born there. The family settled in Alachua County, where they raised chickens and eventually opened a country store. Years later, Frank took a computer course and went to work at the University of Florida. Frank and Mary Towers have made many trips to the Normandy beaches over the years, although Mary is no longer able to fly due to medical issues. This time, their 17-year-old grandson will accompany Frank. Don Mandeville of Gainesville, also a member of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida, was in the Navy, working aboard a rhino bargea long, wide, floating platform built of steel pontoons joined together by steel angle irons during the Normandy invasions. We werent scared. We were petrified, he said. Mandeville compared the devastation of the battle to destruction left by fierce tornadoes. We made 26 trips carrying soldiers across, he said. The following November, Mandevilles ship hit a mine and sunk, although the water was shallow so it didnt go completely under, and he was able to board another ship. The incident left him shell-shocked and jumpy. He recalled seeing a terribly wounded German soldier, who was missing a leg forgotten? Thanks to the efforts of Towers and other American and French citizens who share his concern, approximately 95 percent of the graves have been adopted. Towers also works hard to keep the memories alive at home, volunteering every Tuesday afternoon at the the Camp Blanding museum. The American monument on Omaha Beach commemorates those who lost their lives during the bloody D-Day battle. D-Day will be commemorated at the Keystone Heights Airport on Saturday, June 7, at 8 a.m. with a Wings of Dreams flyin breakfast. All veterans will receive a free breakfast, which will be followed by a program honoring those who participated in the Normandy campaign.Wings of Dreams to remember

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Andrews really excelled in the subject of math and helped assist other students who were having problems understanding it. You would not believe how many kids today give John credit for them knowing their multiplication tables, said Stanwix-Hay, who also said she has many photos of Andrews up at the board teaching fellow students how to do math problems. Basically, Andrews demonstrates what good citizenship is all about, StanwixHay said. Hes the kind of kid everybody wants to help because hes so helpful himself, she said. Andrews just never fit into a regular classroom setting, which is true of many students, Stanwix-Hay said. Some students just cant maintain the same level as others. Many, many kids arent cut out for that, which is why kids drop out of school, StanwixHay said. They just cant sit in a class where everyone is on page 51 at the same time. Some of them should be on page 98, and some of them shouldnt even be in that book. The Academy of Academics use of an individual educational plan is beneficial to a lot of students. Like Andrews, Jacob Slayton is set to graduate, and it wouldnt have been possible otherwise. Slayton was so behind on his credits he didnt think it would be possible to graduate after enrolling in the academy this school year. Slayton gave a lot of credit to the academy teachers, saying, Everybody here cares and wants to help you out. An appreciation for teachers Stanwix-Hay, Cindy Bagley, Harold Bish Bishop, Anna Kirley, Linda Rudoi and Robin Tatumas well as guidance counselor Cynthia Rossseems to be share by many of the academy students. Charlotte Carter, who said she would be sitting at home doing nothing if not for the program, stressed how the individual attention students receive is a big plus. They want you to succeed, she said of the teachers. Aaron Akridge said the teachers have helped him make tremendous progress since he joined the program last year. Theyve brought me a long way, he said. Like Andrews, Akridge has been participating in the Bradford-Union Technical Centers welding program. He became certified in two areas this past year. Akridge now sees a future for himself. If not for the Academy of Academics, he said, I probably wouldve left (school). Akridge and Andrews received certificates at the May 29 ceremony for the achievements in welding. Andrews and Slayton received Florida Ready to Work certificates, while Shania Rosier received a certificate for meeting the requirements to become a Microsoft Office specialist. Certificates of achievement 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, J une 5, 2014 (352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PM N OW OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.tomsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq SAT JUNE 14THMOVIE NIGHT Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night SAT JUNE 21STLOTS OF WATER FUN! 10% OFFTotal PurchaseWith this Ad Expires 6-30-14 Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: In response to your article about the temporary fire station in Keystone for CCFR Station 11, I would like to offer the following information. 1. CCFR has been living in the house and utilizing the facilities owned by KHVFD rent free for 30 years! In 2004 CCBOCC entered into a 15 year agreement/contract with KHVFD to resolve the inadequate living quarters for the paid crews that are assigned there when the county staffed a paid fire engine in Keystone in addition to the rescue unit which increased staffing from 2 to 5. This allowed them to renovate the twostory building to resolve those issues that were recognized and were rushed due to the important nature in 2004. When the contract was signed by the County Commissioners, a quote was provided for the amount of $250,000 in which Clay County had budgeted for the project. Had your county administration followed through with the contract they entered into (for their benefit) none of this nonsense would be taking place today. Had the County administration completed the renovation as contracted to do they could have had this problem CRIME DOESNT PAYBUT WE DO!REWARDS UP TO $3,000 CRIME DOESNT PAYBUT WE DO!P AID FOR BY THE FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUNDREWARDS UP TO $3,000R EMAIN ANONYMOUSCALL TOLL FREE S TOPPE RSSubmit a TIP ON-LINE at: www.F CCrimeStoppers.com INTERNETAVAILABLE 904-388-9279 $ 24 99 USA Gymnastics Registrationnow underway MonFri 3-8pm (904) 368-0006 Ronnie McReynolds Registration: $10Evening Classes: $50/month (Begins June 9) 5-Day Camp: $100All Camps run 9am 3pm and include movie fieldtripUSA Gymnastics of FL is proud to announce registration for our summer programs. If the kids are looking for something fun to do this summer, let us help. With 26 years of experience USAGF is a proven hit for all ages! Like us on at Shooting Stars Gymnastics June 9 13 July 28 Aug 1 July 14 18 Continued from 2B were also awarded in the following areas: Math: Rosier Joshua Hundley, Justin Mann and Markayla Smith. History: Smith, Javone Blackshear and Tahlera Sweeting. English: Andrews and Smith. Science: Carter, Rosier and Slayton. Edmentum (online learning program)/Reading: Sweeting and Kristen Harris. Some information regarding CCFR Station 11solved 10 years ago. I would also remind you that CCBOCC vetoed the contract in April of 2013 with KHVFD, yet KHVFD continues to allow the career CCFR staff to reside there and to continue to use the facilities to store the fire engine, spare engine, and spare rescue all while paying no rent. Clay County is kind enough to pay the utilities, insurance, and partially maintain the buildings while they continue to use KHVFD to operate from. KHVFD has yet to file or enter into any litigation for the breach of contract in hopes Clay County would resolve the deficit they have caused. Over the last 12 months, KHVFD directors and individual Volunteer firefighters have made several attempts to work things out with Clay County and put KHVFD back to work to provide fire and first responder services to the area and Clay County will not even respond to our phone calls or emails any longer. KHVFD is negotiating with Bradford County to serve Southeast Bradford County as the primary fire protection and that would reduce homeowners insurance rates for all of those that are uninsurable in Bradford County because they are more than 5 road miles from Theressa Station 2. Yet Bradfords County Manager wants permission from Clay County to allow a non-profit fully functional, self-sustaining fire department to provide additional fire/rescue services to the citizens of Bradford County. (Clay County does not even recognize KHVFD as a department any longer) If you were not aware, Bradford Station 2 is covering fire/rescue services for Hampton now on a regular basis which has them spread thin due to lower manpower and a larger response area. In closing, I would encourage and challenge each person in Clay County and Bradford County to contact your respective County Commissioners, and Manager and express to them how much KHVFD could save the property owners in insurance rates, provide fire and medical response quicker and more efficiently supplementing the services provided by Bradford County currently, and why Bradford County needs permission to use KHVFD for the benefit of the citizens which Clay County Commissioners took from the Lake Region last year. Kevin Lee Mobley Firefighter/Paramedic/ Instructor/Inspector/Officer Dear Editor: So one of the issues that the town of Hampton was scolded for was nepotism...ok. What makes Bradford County so superior? Chapter 112.3135 Florida Statutes clearly defines that law. Yet, Bradford County thumbs their nose at that law and employs a County Commissioners Niece and the County Managers Son. The County Attorney, who Nepotism OK for county, but not Hampton?apparently is supposed to be smarter than everybody else, allows the BOCC to adopt resolutions (2012-04 and 201210), to circumvent the state statutes, and no big deal. So.. if Im clear on this, the local governments can adopt resolutions to circumvent any law the State of Florida has set forth?   Thats convenient. Not a single Commissioner questioned the legality of this... no surprise, being as the two public officials whose relatives benefit from this have a history of termination from the DOC scandal and Ethics Commission violations. So what else are they up to? Hampton was nearly abolished for wrong doing... Think about this as an election is coming up. Change is needed, and there is competition out there against the way we always do it Paul McDavid Resident, Bradford County District 5 Dear Editor: Last night as we were going to church, the weather got real stormy. The wind was blowing rain and limbs in sheets across the roads. Lightning and thunder came as we got into the church. The preacher was preaching about the miracle of creation, Storm a time on faithwhich I liked a lot, but I was distracted by the sounds of the storm and the words of the 19th Psalm kept running through my head. The Heavens declare the glory of God and the firmament showeth His Handiwork Music of the spheres: Gods orchestra blessing the earth and all we who are aware of it! It is no wonder that I like stormy weather. When I got home, I read the whole Psalm and found it so familiar, I think I know most of it by heart. In the night, I lay there saying it over and over. The last verse: Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight O Lord. My strength and my Redeemer. Those are good words to go to sleep on. Hazel Wall 24-month CD Special $10,000 min. cu.org 1.46 % APY* 1.00 % APY* Deposits are federally insured by the NCUA, a US Government Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective 3/13/2014 and subject to change at any time. 36-month APR is 1.45%, 540 penalty days. 24-month APR is 1.00%, 360 penalty days. Offer expires 6/30/14. 36-month CD Special Federally Insured by the NCUA.

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BY MICKEY AGNER Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District, and he knows and loves his job. He will answer any related question and transition into new, but related, topics extemporaneously and without hesitation. Discussing the recent growth specifically in the autism spectrum area during a May 30 interview, Andrews said, The question quickly arises as to whether environmental issues are causing a growth of autism spectrum disorders, or have we just become better at evaluating and identifying them?   I dont know the answer to that question, but what I do know is that in the last few years, we have gained massive amounts of information about how people learn and how to help those with disabilities grow. Andrews indicated that the requirements and regulations for the ESE program are mandated and regulated according to the Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act. Moreover and according to that disabilities actthe necessary instruction required for identified disabilities was previously provided in separate classes, but research indicates that including the students with disabilities in the regular classa process known as inclusionis much more effective. When reminded that many people say that inclusion lowers the standards of the regular class, Andrews quickly responded that the claim is simply not true. Each student with disabilities is given a weight based upon the complexity and severity of the identified disability, and every public school is provided additional funding to address those needs according to the disability. The classes with more noted disability presence are provided additional teacher support. With that additional teacher support, the class is better able to address the skill diversification of each class, whether that is the student with educational disabilities or the Andrews passionate about students with disabilities Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Brandi Barrington of Starke and Jackson Tatum of Lawtey announce their wedding on June 21 at 3 p.m. at Madison Street Baptist Church in Starke. Brandi is the daughter of Halbert and Nadine Barrington. She attended Bradford High School (Class of 2010) and just graduated from the University of North Florida in April, earning a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Jackson is the son of John and Christina Tatum. He attended Bradford High School (Class of 2008) and works at his familys business. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Barrington, Tatum to wed June 21 Brandi Barrington and Jackson Tatum Chelsey Marie Collins of Starke and Davin Sloan Crews of Lawtey announce their upcoming wedding. Chelsey is the daughter of Rex and Lisa Collins of Starke. She is a Graduate of Bradford High School. Davin is the son of Herman and Sandra Crews of Lawtey. He is a graduate of Bradford High School, Santa Fe College, Criminal Justice. The wedding will be on June 20, 2014 at Crystal Lake in Keystone Heights at 11:00 am. Roy Spaulding is the minister. The bride will be given in marriage by Clinton Collins, her brother. Lisa Collins will be Maid of Honor. The Best Man will be Herman Crews, grooms grandfather. Collins, Crews to wed June 20Davin Crews and Chelsey Collins Born in 1920 when the life expectancy was only 66 years, Margaret Peek has definitely defied the odds by 28 years. Four generations of her family came together to celebrate her 94th birthday with lunch in the park. We all enjoyed reminiscing about previous get-togethers throughout the years. A highlight of the celebration was watching her great-grandchildren interact with each other and the adults. We all delighted in sharing new and old memories as we celebrated the 94th birthday of our mother, mother-in-law, and nana. Peek celebrates 94th birthday Socials ,John Edward Parker graduated Magna Cum Laude from Elon University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics. He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honors society. John is the grandson of Mary Ann Soud of Keystone Heights. Parker graduates from Elon UniversityJohn Parker Anna Sucsy of Keystone Heights, was named to the Deans List at Bates located in Lewiston, Maine, for the winter 2014 semester -a distinction earned by students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.71 or higher. Deans List students at Bates are exemplary high academic achievers. They model the good things that come from being goal-oriented, hard-working and persistent, said Matthew R. Auer, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Bates. Sucsy is the daughter of Peter V. Sucsy Ph.D. of Keystone Heights, and is a 2013 graduate of Eastside High School. Sucsy named to Bates deans listHis parents are Tim and Esther Parker, and sister, Laura Soud Parker, all of Raleigh, N.C. Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District.

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Bradford High School seniors enjoyed food and lots of 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 Going out with a fun day of memories through a gauntlet of balls are (foreground Richardson, and Janell Danielle Clark Detlefsen seem to have the hang of it in the three-legged hang of it as they go crashing to the ground. obstacle course. easy. as she makes sure BHS football coach Steve Reynolds gets dunked. Tillotson Haleigh Clary are all smiles as they look for unsuspecting victims to Chadwick has a water gun ready Scotty Peirce up to no good. He has a tub full of water balloons. prepares to put some power into it during throws a football.BHS graduation: June 6, 8 p.m.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Dr. Anubha Gupta received her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of PALMS MEDICAL GROUP facilities in Starke every Tuesday. She will be seeing pediatric and adult clients for routine health maintenance and sick visits. Dr. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, hopefully for a very long time! NEW DOCTOR IN TOWN t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: BradfordThomas Henry Anderson, 63, of Jacksonville was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for driving a vehicle not registered or licensed with the state. Jeremy Christopher Brewer, 21, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Brewer slapped his wife and pulled her to the ground by her hair before almost pushing her down the steps of the front porch as she tried to get away from him. The police were called, and Brewer was arrested. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Chad Austin Carpenter, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested June 2 by Starke police for trespassing. According to the arrest report, Carpenter went to an auto parts store in Starke where a relative works and caused a disturbance, yelling obscenities and threatening several employees. He had been trespassed already in February from the same store. Tonya Gisela Carter, 32, of Starke was arrested June 2 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Carter was irritated with a male at the residence. He was sitting outside on the front porch when she ran out the door, headbutted the victim and then tried to shove him off the porch. The victim was able to catch himself before falling and called law enforcement. A witness verified the victims account, and Carter was arrested. Rolando Carreno of Miami was arrested May 30 by the Florida Highway Patrol on two out-of-county warrants. Bond was set at $7,000 for the charges. David Orman Cox, 52, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon. According to the arrest report, Cox had been drinking and got into an argument with his son. Cox had purchased a new knife and had it in a sheath on his side, and threatened to stab his son with it during the argument. The son called law enforcement after Cox passed out on the couch. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Elmer Ray Cox, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Clay for domestic battery. Bond was set at $5,002 for the charge. Brittany Mae Daugherty, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for making a false report of child abuse. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charge. Willie Kevin Dolison, 35, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Dolison was arguing with his girlfriend when he came up behind her and grabbed her, pushed her against the wall and took her cell phone. He then threw the phone in the yard. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Marc Howard Duncan, 21, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, Duncan threw a bag of marijuana out of the vehicle before being pulled over by the officer. Crack cocaine was found during a search of the vehicle, along with more marijuana. Bond was set at $17,000 for the charges. Nicholas Shane Faulkner, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. John Anthony Faust, 28, of Salisbury, N.C., was arrested May 27 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for two charges of possession of marijuana and for five charges of possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $29,000 for the charges. Timothy Lavain Floweres, 33, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on four warrants for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charges. Christopher Daniel Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and UnionGeistlinger, 27, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, producing marijuana, possession of drug equipment and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, deputies received a tip that Geistlinger had a marijuana-growing operation at his residence, and after going to the residence once and smelling the marijuana, they returned later to speak with him. After gaining entry into the home and observing marijuana plants, they obtained a search warrant for the residence and found six pots with marijuana growing in them, along with other equipment used to grow the plants. Bond was set at $62,000 for the charges. Aaron Roy Griffis, 21, of Lawtey was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Danielle N. Hamm, 36, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Starke police for failure to appear. Lucella Hill, 37, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Tyrise D. Jackson, 19, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for battery. According to the arrest report, Jackson got into an argument with a 14-year-old relative over the use of a phone and slammed her head into a dresser, causing a knot the size of a baseball on the back of her head. Richard Kelly, 24, of Lady Lake was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Jeremy James Manning, 35, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for battery. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Demetrius A. Martin, 20, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Richard Craig Nipper, 46, of Brooker was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-petit theft second degree, third subsequent offense. Bond was set at $15,000 for the charge. Shynequia M. Oneil, 18, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Mathew R. Padgett, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Alphonso Leon Pernell, 34, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon, two charges of battery, kidnapfalse imprisonment, criminal mischief-property damage, resisting an officer, disturbing the peace and obstructing justice. According to the arrest report, the police were called to a residence about a disturbance. Pernell was at his mothers home in Starke washing his clothes when he became irate over something and started threatening to shoot and kill everyone in the house. While his mother was on the phone calling 911, Pernell snatched the phone out of her hand and broke it. Police arrived shortly thereafter, though, with several deputies and a K-9 unit to assist. Pernell refused to come out of the home and threatened that he had something for the officers if they went in the home. Pernells mom then snuck out of the house in the back and was talking to the officers from the front porch when Pernell stepped out onto the porch. She quickly went back inside and locked the front door, leaving him outside. After Pernell wouldnt comply with the officers to get on the ground, they released the K-9, but Pernell hit and kicked the dog several times. An officer then used a Taser, but Pernell continued to resist. Another officer used a Taser before Pernell was handcuffed and arrested. Bond was set at $1,102,000 for the charges. Timothy Warren Potts, 31, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-grand theft of a dwelling. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Dennie Rae Randolph, 34, of Starke was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $1,500 for the charge. Daryl S. Risby, 40, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for violation of conditional release by the Florida Parole Commission. No bond was allowed for the charge. Ronald Eric Sawyer, 42, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of opium or derivative. According to the arrest report, during a traffic stop it was discovered that Sawyer had 19 Methadone pills he intended to distribute to another individual. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Rosamarie Denice Simmons, 34, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Putnam. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Rachel Marie Smith, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. No bond was allowed for the charge. Robert Gerald Swanson, 41, of Baldwin was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge.Keystone/MelroseJacqueline Fraga, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for DUI. Dana Charles Hoffman, 55, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for perjury. Justen Kelley, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 2 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Jessica Nail, 21, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for burglary. Amanda Smith, 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Derick Luther Phillips, 23, of Melrose was arrested June 1 by Putnam deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Ronnie Allen Stratten, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 28 by state troopers for driving with a suspended or revoked license. John Waters, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 28 by Clay deputies for lewd or lascivious battery. UnionMarion Eugene York, 52, of Lake Butler was arrested May 28 by Union deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a disturbance, where it was eventually determined that York struck his girlfriend in her face during an argument. According to the victim and a friend staying at the residence, this wasnt the first time York struck the victim during arguments. He was arrested and transported to jail. Stephen Louis Heslar, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested May 30 by Union deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Bradford. A 16-year-old juvenile from Lake Butler was arrested May 27 by Union deputies for three charges of possession of marijuana, possession of narcotic equipment and obstructing justice-tamper or destroy evidence.

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! Thrift Store Lawtey, FLWatch for sign at Red Light on right. Cross Railroad. Were the first building on right after crossing RR.904-964-2524 Blake Valenzuela, between and Jennifer Valenzuela, and brothers and Jacob signs to play College. seated between Athletes for mother, Holly Hudson, signs Christian of intent. signs his letter of intent to attend Southeastern joined by sister, Courtney, and parents, Jodi and Sean Carroll. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Three recent Keystone Heights High School graduates signed letters of intent to play football during a May 22 ceremony. Tight end Micah Brown, who also played safety, will join former teammate Nate Smitha 2013 KHHS graduateat Kentucky Christian University in Grayson, Ky., while quarterback Blake Valenzuela will attend Wilmington (Ohio) College. Fullback/kicker Michael Carroll, who also played the linebackerdefensive end hybrid position, will join the first-year program at Lakelands Southeastern University. Each player generated interest from more than 20 schools through the Athletes for College recruiting service. Brown said it was a stressful time, talking to various coaches every day, but it was an experience he also enjoyed. It was a mixture of feelings at the signing ceremony as well. Im nervous and excited really excited, Brown said. Brown said he believes the small, Christian school will be a good fit for him. Plus, he enjoys the fact he gets to join a friend in Smith. Keystone head coach Chuck Dickinson said Brown possesses a 6-3, 6-4 frame that could use a little more weight. He said Brown probably weighs approximately 200 pounds now, but could see him putting on 25 to 30 pounds. As it was, though, Brown did the job he needed to do at tight end. Even though he wasnt real heavy, he came off the ball, Dickinson said. We ran quite a bit to his side. He was able to get people moved out of there just because of leverage. Brown already catches the ball well, though Dickinson said thats something hell have to continue to work on. Hes got above-average hands, Dickinson said, but thats something he can improve on. Brown feels good about his chances to contribute. I think Ill get the opportunity to play a lot at this school, he said. Carroll seemed almost at a loss for words in describing what it felt like to get a chance to keep playing. I dont know, its just mind blowing getting this far, he said. Its crazy to think of. It was a hard decision to choose a school, Carroll said. He narrowed his choices to Southeastern and Faulkner University in Montgomery, Ala. In the end, Carroll said he liked Southeasterns commitment to academics and its closer location to home. As far as the football side of Southeastern, Carroll said hes not sure where hell end up playing, though he does have a preference for lining up in the offensive backfield. Id like to get the ball, but its just wherever the coaches need me, Carroll said. Dickinson said Carroll is a strong blocker, with an emphasis on strong. Michael benches 335, 340, and cleans over 300, Dickinson 3 KHHS football players receive college opportunitiessaid. From a strength standpoint, hes already there. Hes just got to fit into their system. Its a new system in the sense of being a first-year program, so maybe hell have a chance to get in and have some early playing time. Carroll proved his worth at KHHS as a kicker as well with his ability to kick off into the end zone. He was a very big asset to the team, Dickinson said. Valenzuela admitted he didnt like talking during his interview with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor, but he had no trouble putting into words what the day meant to him. Im pretty happy, he said. Ive always wanted to go play a sport in college. Its always been my dream. Now, its happening. Valenzuela helped lead the Indians to the District 4-4A championship last season. That accomplishment will only help as he attempts to make his mark at the collegiate level. It helped me because it showed that anything can happen, Valenzuela said. Nobody determined that we would go as far as we did (in 2013). We were supposed to be the underdogs, and we proved everybody wrong. Dickinson said Valenzuela was a big part of that district championship by adding another dimension to his game. Valenzuela showed the ability to run the ball and did so successfully in key games, such as a win over district opponent Bradford. I think that helped our offense tremendously with him being able to be a run threat, Dickinson said. He still was able to throw, but I think thats part of the game hell have to work on a little bit more at the next level. Hopefully, A girls basketball/softball camp will be held at the Keystone Heights High School gym from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. starting June 30 and running through July 2. A session will be offered for girls in second through fourth grade, while another will be offered for those in fifth through seventh grade. The cost is $130 (or $65 for those who want to do only one sport) and includes lunches, drinks, T-shirts and awards. Applications may be obtained at Keystone Heights Elementary School. For more information, please call Keystone Heights Elementary School at 352-4734844 and speak to either Jessica Carter (ext. 2315) or MaryAnne McCall (ext. 2270). Keystone girls basketball/ softball camp starts June 30

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B Caregiver for Mother she lives near Hampton 3 to 5 days a week 5 to 6 hours a day Pay is negotiable CONTACT: (c) Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 d Obituaries d Mildred CopelandLAKE BUTLERMildred Dansie Copeland, 93, of Lake Butler passed away Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at her residence from an extended illness. Mrs. Copeland was born on Jan. 23, 1921 in Salt Lake City, Utah to the late Mahonri Dansie and Estella Starling Dansie. She was a homemaker. She was a lifetime member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, currently of the Lake Butler Ward. She is preceded in death by a son, David Copeland. Mrs. Copeland is survived by: her loving husband of 72 years, William O. Copeland; seven daughters, Ellen Virden, Mary (Robert) Porter, Donna (Glenn) Milton, Christine (George) Bradberry, Nancy (Tom) Price, Barbara Trambley, and Sarah (Mark) Hill; two sons, Tommy Copeland and James (Carolyn) Copeland; brother, Wesley Dansie; sisters, Dorothy Dansie and Stella Benson; 36 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services for Mrs. Copeland were held May 31 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler Ward. Burial took place after the funeral in the Jacksonville Memory Gardens, 111 Blanding Blvd. Orange Park. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. 386-4962008. please sign the guestbook at archerfuneralhome.com   PAID OBITUARYWanda JonesSTARKEWanda Leen Jones, age 77, of Starke passed away at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville on Friday, May 30, 2014. She was born on Nov. 18, 1936 in Kings Mills, Ohio to the late Edward and Edith Robinson. Wanda was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Reverend Reed Jones. While a resident of Starke, Wanda worked as a Preschool Teacher at St. Marks Daycare and Little Peoples Daycare. She and Reed then moved to Shelby, North Carolina where they pastored New Bethel Nazarene Church for 22 years. Wandas two favorite things were spending time with her family and sharing the love of the Lord through time spent with her church family. Wanda is survived by: her children, Rhoda (Wayne) Wainwright, Danny Jones and Jeanetta Skinner all of Starke; her brother, Jimmy Robinson of Manchester, Ohio; her sister, Beulah Reese of Little Valley, N.Y.; her grandchildren, Kenneth Wainwright, Kristen Quinones, Tarah Jones and Daina Skinner; her great-grandchildren, Tyler, Carson and Kencie Wainwright, Ava and Luka Quinones, and Libby and Hannah Jones. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, June 7, at 11:00 am, with visitation beginning at 10:00 am, followed by a memorial service at Madison Street Baptist Church. Wanda lovingly requested donations be made to Haven Hospice, 4200 N. W. 90th. Blvd. Gainesville, Fl 32606, in her memory. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book.PAID OBITUARYRoy KnightBROOKER Roy Edward Knight, 63 of Brooker passed away Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville. He was born Dec. 11, 1950 in Brooker to the late James Knight and Geraldine McNeal Knight. Mr. Knight was a heavy equipment operator. He enjoyed gardening, his dogs, and being a mechanic. He was preceded in death by his brothers, David and Jack Knight. Mr. Knight is survived by: his loving wife, Bethany Goodrich Knight; three brothers, Richard Knight, John Knight, and Vernon Knight; two sisters, Alice Sanford and Thelma McQuaig. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the funeral arrangements. 386496-2008PAID OBITUARYShirley MarshallSTARKE Shirley Tyson Marshall, 64, of Starke, died on Thursday, May 29, 2014 at Shands at University of Florida Hospital Gainesville. She was a lifelong resident of Starke. She was a member of Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church. She was a graduate of RJE High School Class of 1968. She was also employed with Head Start and Episcopal Children Services for 34 years. She is survived by: son, Mark A. Marshall; and daughter, Stacy L. Marshall, both of Starke; sisters, Helen Pitts of Cocoa, Gloria Mack and Hazel Hamilton, both of Starke; brothers, Clinton Kelly of Cocoa, Vernon Tyson of Gainesville, Oliver Tyson of Starke, and Gad Tyson Jacksonville; and three grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m on Saturday, June 7 in the Church of God by Faith in Lawtey with Rev Carl Tyson Presiding and Rev. Alvin Green Eulogist conducting the services. Interment will be held in Bob-Love Cemetery in Starke. Viewing Family Hour, Haile Funeral Home Chapel Friday June 6, 2014 3-4:00 p.m. Viewing for Friends will be held at Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church 5-7:00 p.m. and 1 hour prior to the services on Saturday at the church. The Cortege will form at the Home of Ms. Shirley Marshall 17285 N. W 55th Avenue in Pleasant Grove at 1:15 p.m. Arrangements are under the Haile Funeral Home, Inc. of Starke.Lujune SoutherlandLAKE BUTLERLujune Rush Southerland, 56, of Lake Butler died Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville after an extended illness, surrounded by her family. She was born on June 15, 1957 in Ocala to the late James Rush, Sr. and Velva Gay Rush. She was employed with medical records at Shands in Gainesville for many years. She is survived by: her husband of 35 years, John Earl Southerland, Jr.; daughter, Jennifer Dawn Southerland; one granddaughter; brother, James Rush, Jr.; sisters, Penni (Anthony) Williams and Teresa McGill. Funeral services will be held Friday, June 6 at 11:00 a.m. in the chapel of Archer Funeral Home, with Rev. Steve Hutchinson officiating. Burial will be at New Zion Cemetery following the services. Family invites friends for visitation Thursday, June 5 from 6 to 8 pm at the funeral home. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Daniel WilliamsLAWTEY Daniel Wayne Williams, 67, of Lawtey died June 3, 2014 at the V.A. Medical Center 1954 On behalf of the family of Mal colm H. Crews, Jr. we would like to thank all those who surrounded us with prayer, encouragement, food and flowers during this most difficult time. We are truly overwhelmed with gratitude for the love you have shown us.   God bless you all Card of Thanksin Lake City. He was born July 27, 1946 in Jacksonville. He is preceded in death by his brother, Dale Walker Prescott and his mother, Lavada Ivey Prescott. He served in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. He is survived by: his brother, Eugene Prescott of Lawtey. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke.things I had never seen before, so I just kind of guessed. BHS sophomore Cole Johnson also competed at the state event in the area of computer maintenance. He placed fifth after earning a first-place finish at the Region 2 event. The winner in each area at the state event will compete in the SkillsUSA national event. This was the first year of SkillsUSA competition for Johnson and Yates. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry representatives working to provide the U.S. with a skilled labor force. Yates said she wasnt expecting to come out on top at the Region 2 event, which featured 12 other students competing in medical terminology. In fact, she said she was hesitant about even placing due to a soccer injury that had her on crutches. I was recovering from an ACL reconstruction, Yates said. They were going to make me walk up to the stage and walk across it. Mrs. Jackson walked up (to the stage) with me and went on stage and got my award. I was thankful for that. By virtue of a top-three finish, Yates earned the right to compete at state along with Johnson, who also placed first at the Region 2 event. I was really excited because I had never been to Pensacola before, she said. At the time of the SkillsUSA event, though, the area was deluged by rain and experienced flooding. Jeff Ledger, a computer systems and information technology teacher at the Bradford-Union Technical Center who went on the trip, said it was the craziest weather hes ever seen. The electricity at the Bay Center, where the SkillsUSA event was held, went out halfway through the competition. When it came back on, Ledger said, they said, Just so you know, theres a funnel cloud Continued from 2B about a mile from us. Well keep you alerted. Yates said, We got like 21 inches of rain overnight. There was actually a lightning bolt that hit the hotel and shook the whole building. It woke me up from a dead sleep. Still, the SkillsUSA event was fun, Yates said. She competed against approximately 20 people in medical terminology. She was off crutches by that time, but that didnt make hearing her name announced as a third-place finisher any less intimidating as the state event had more competitors overall than at the Region 2 event. I was a bit more nervous, Yates said. I was off crutches, but I still had to walk down about three flights of stairs and get on stage with all those people looking at me. It was nerveracking. Yates believes competitions hosted by such organizations as SkillsUSA and Health Occupations Students of America can help students plan out a career path. However, she made up her mind to do something in medicine years ago, citing her parents as influences. Her father, Rusty, works for Philips and provides service for medical equipment, while her mother, Susan, works for the Cardiac and Vascular Institute in Gainesville as a nuclear technologist. Ive known from a young age I always wanted to go into the medical field, said Yates, who is contemplating becoming either an obstetrician/gynecologist or a neonatologist. I think these classes here (at the BradfordUnion Technical Center) help solidify that. Ledger said he wished to thank the following for their support in allowing Yates and Johnson to compete in the SkillsUSA events: George Roberts Insurance, Starke Chiropractic, Mosley Tire, Denmark Enterprise, Knuckle Draggers, Capital City Bank, State Farm, Community State Bank, Bradford County Education Foundation, Tatum Brothers Saw Mill, Jackson Building Supply   and Ameriprise Financial. Network $2999 904-388-9279

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student with gifted skills. Additionally, those classes with additional teacher support are better able to intensify the support for students learning new skills and gradually withdraw that support as the student progresses, a successful process known as scaffolding. That, Andrews said, is not his opinion, but the conclusion of research. From there, his conversation with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor quickly flowed into the area of specific learning disabilities because it is by far the largest area of disabilities in every public school district.   According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, nearly 2.5 million school-age children in the United States today have been identified as having learning disabilities, and this does not include the students enrolled in private or religious schools.   That number of students represents about 42 percent of hell continue to progress. The fact that Valenzuela progressed each year while at KHHS has the coach believing he can do the same at Wilmington. I think if he does what hes supposed to, hell have an opportunity to do well, Dickinson said. The three players cant wait to suit up for their respective schools. Its something Ive always wanted to do, Valenzuela said, while Brown said, I cant wait. Its so exciting. Carroll said, Its going to be an adrenaline rush, definitely. Dickinson, of course, is proud of all three for achieving their goals and putting in the work necessary in the classroom to do so. Hopefully, they found the (school) that will best fit them, and theyll have success, Dickinson said. 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial Property (Rent, FOR RENT PROFESSIONAL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Conference room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. Home for Sale3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more information call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. VERY CLEAN NEWLY PAINTED, 2BR/1BA SW. W/D hookup, CH/A, 1 acre, in country. $450/mo. $500 deposit, no lease. Call 904-769-9559. 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Downtown STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. 2BR/2BA. Lake front. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Electric range, refrig. Wall to wall carpet. $400/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: Target your audience quickly A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Fri, June 13th @ 10am Online & Onsite 10950 N Kendall Dr, 2 nd Fl, Miami, Fl 33176 Office Furniture & Equipment Cubicles Computers/Laptops Phone System & more! 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties all U.S. students enrolled in any kind of ESE class. Unlike many common perceptions, these disabilities are not a discriminator of people. They are caused by genetics and problems in pregnancy, at birth or after birth.   Additionally they can be caused after birth by head injuries, poor nutrition or chemical exposures to elements such as lead. According to Andrews, a major factor in the students educational growth, regardless of the relevant type or severity of disability, is early detection. Even when a young child encounters brain damage from accidents, he or she has a better chance of regaining the original neurological function compared to adults. Likewise, the younger the child is when a disability is identified, the better chance he or she has of overcoming those disabilities educationally. Consequently, the district places much emphasis upon its relationship with childcare programs, voluntary pre-K programs and early organizations like Child Find and Early Steps. Andrews indicated that good communications between parents and people who work with children in preschool organizations are very important.   Those professional childcare workers have been trained to recognize disability indicators that are age specific to those children. Some of the more profound and physical disabilities are easily identified, but specific learning disabilities are manifested in subtle expressions. Andrews concurred that the identifying behaviors and skills listed on the idonline.org website are good indicators of the lessobvious learning disabilities of preschool-age children to look for. Those identifying skills and behaviors are: Speaks later than most children. Pronunciation problems. Slow vocabulary growth, often unable to find the right word. Difficulty rhyming words. Trouble learning numbers, alphabet, days of the week, colors or shapes. Extremely restless and easily distracted. Trouble interacting with peers. Difficulty following directions or routines. Fine motor skills are slow to develop.   When you listen to Andrews talk about children with disabilities, you not only get the impression that children with disabilities can be successful, but that they are also very significant assets to all of our schools and community.Continued from 5B Continued from 8B

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 11B KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Electric range, refrig. Hard wood floors. $495/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Village in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 14 BY 70. 2BR MOBILE HOME on Private Lot. 301 Hampton. Like new. $525/ month. 904-966-3212 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $600/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 CH/A $600/mo. $300/ deposit. Between Lake Butler & Raiford. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $950/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 DW 3BR/2BA. On 2 acres with add. 2 acres fenced w/pond/horses. Lawn maintenance included. Has water softener. $1,150/mo. First & last plus deposit $200.00. Call 904-769-1636 LARGE FURNISHED ROOM WITH BATH for rent $80/weekly. Located on State Rd 100 Starke. Ride to & from doctors, food store, low income are welcome. Monthly rent can be arranged. 904-769-8077. KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 2BR/1BA HOUSE. Across from RJE in Reno. Nice clean, freshly painted. Must see. Kitchen com pletely redone. Contact Marvin 904-742-3406 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 2BR/1BA HOUSE in Starke city limits. $500/month plus $500/deposit. Call 352-235-6319 RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet welcome. 904-964-2747 LAWTEY CHURCH OF GOD yard sale. Sat. 8am-2pm. FRIDAY 8AM-2PM. 10321 NW CR 225 Starke. Lots of nice miscellaneous items. Kamado-Joe XL Grill, brand-new used 3x $500.00. Sm. furniture, attic fan, clothes, some tools. MULTI FAMILY. MISSION TRIP FUNDRAISER. Fri & Sat 8am-1pm. House wares, clothes, shoes, toys, tools, elec tronics & more. Harvest Church N of Starke on 301. FRI & SAT 8AM-2PM. Come see. 5062 NW 182nd way. Conerly Estates. Rain date June 13th & 14th. YARD SALE SATUR DAY ONLY! SE SR 100 8am-2pm SAT 8AM-5PM. Huge sale. 3 miles past Hospital on 230. Follow signs on left. SalesA FUNDRAISING YARD SALE will be held at Key stone Heights VFD on Fri & Sat 8am-3pm. The funds raised from this yard sale will assist with the cost of the cemetery monument for DJ Mob ley. 231/121 go south as if go ing to RMC. 9515 CR 231 on right side of hwy. $2.00 coupon for 30. 00 carton cigarettes all new custom ers on 1st. carton. FIFTY FIVE (55) GAL LON AQUARIUM. Fully equipped and stocked in operation call Charles. 904-966-2911 BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 Child/Adult Home CareCAREGIVER IN YOUR HOME. 25 years experience excellent refer ences live-in available cell 352-328-1883 home 352-475-3900 Personal ServicesCLARK FOUNDATION REPAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Estimates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 DRIVERS: Company. Home Every Week. Excellent & Loaded. No Touch, 50% D&H. CDL-A, 3 yrs exp. 800-588-7911 x225. LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! Please email employment app or resume to vtoddf@ gmail.com. HELP WANTED; RETAIL COUNTER SALES, FT position-40 plus hours. Applicant should have High School Diploma. Must have Retail Sales exp., and basic knowl edge of the computer. Lake Butler Farm Center Phone Number 386-4963921. Fax Number 386-496-1294. Email address: farm538@ windstream.net THE CITY OF HAMPTON WILL BE ACCEPTING applications through June 12, 2014 for a part time position of Street/Maintenance Worker. Ability to lift 50 lbs.> operate lawn and outdoor equipment, general knowledge of street and maintenance duties desired. This position will work in conjunction with the Utility Distribution Op erator and other city em ployees including evening and weekend work as needed. Applications can be picked up and returned at/to the Hampton City Hall, 5784 Navarre Ave, Hampton, Fl. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! for positions of and Full Time in Keystone in Gainesville 352-473-0680 Excellence Through Senior AdvocacyServing Clay County and Surrounding Areas.105 Commercial Drive Keystone Heights, FL 32656HHA29991306Must have been a registered nurse for at least a year and prefer home health care experience, but not required for right candidate. with resume in hand. Episcopal Childrens Services has openings for a for our Head Start program in Starke.A bachelors degree in early childhood education preferred; associates required for Lead position. Salaries vary by position & credentials ($11-$17 per hour) Excellent benefits package, including:Health, Dental and Life Insurance Retirement Plan w/ Employer Matching Paid Vacation & Holidays Employer Paid Training & Tuition AdvancementEmail resum to hhodges@ecs4kids.org or Fax to (904) 726-1520 ATTN HRECS is an Equal Oppo rtunity / Affirmative Action / Drug Free E m ployer. DURRANCE PUMP QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service STATE LICENSE #1305 rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HCaccessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity W/D Hook-ups Pool Business Center Fitness Room Kids CornerPETS WELCOME !Call 904-368-0007Spacious 2, 3 and 4 Bedroom Apartments AVAILABLE NOW!STARTING AS LOW AS $550/moCall today to hear about our current special to help get you moved in! (904) 964-3948 Cell (904) 364-6890204 West Adkins St Starke, FLTONYA THORNTON Realtor Cell (904) 364-6890 Large screened porch, separate utility room, storage shed w/covered carport. Large city lot, walking distance to area schools. On Pratt Street in Starke. on 1 acre in Starke fenced yard. nestled in the middle of a Pecan grove on SR-16 in Starke on 4+ acres. Pool &much more! in Union County on 1/2 acre lot. Many upgrades! acres on CR125, Bradford County. Country Living! PERFECT Getaway HomeFully furnished LOG CABIN within minutes to Georges Lake in Florahome, FL. 3/1 with unfinished loft being a 3rd room. CallSherry AshleyREALTOR Coldwell Banker Smith & Smith Realty Cell: 904-364-6517Office: 904-964-9222 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPEN

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12B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 however, she was told her project would have to be considered checked baggage. We got it back when we were in Houston, and there was this black line down the back of it, Ricker said. The black line could be removed, though, so no harm done. Upon arriving at the Hilton Americas-Houston, where she was supposed to be staying, Ricker found out her name was not on the hotel list. She was asked if she could provide her I-SWEEEP project code, but she didnt have it on her. I had to call my parents, but they were in Gainesville, Ricker said. There was no way they could get me the project code on time. Im calling random people and asking them if they are in Starke. I finally got a hold of one of my youth directors. She was like, Yeah, Ill get it for you. She had to break into our house and get my project code for me. Ricker said it was intimidating showing up at the George R. Brown Convention Center with her project. There were so many people and so many projects she thought looked better than hers, she said. She said she didnt feel good about her chances. Then you start to talk to the kids, Ricker said. Its not like youre in a competition with them. Youre friends. I didnt meet a single rude person while I was there. It wasnt that kind of environment. Everyone was so nice. Prior to the project judging, there was a flag ceremony in which some of the I-SWEEEP participants showed off their countries flags and traditional attire. It was interesting, Ricker said. She said she saw kids from Mexico wearing reindeer headdresses, while Bangladeshi kids wore what she could only describe as Mrs. Claus-type outfits. The girls from Puerto Rico had these huge, pink dresses, Ricker said. I was wondering how they walking. More interesting attire awaited Ricker when I-SWEEEP participants visited Johnson Space Center on May 4, which happens to be Star Wars Day. She said there were crazy people dressed in costumes from Wookies to Galactic Empire stormtroopers. It was an interesting cultural experience, she said. Ricker got to visit the Houston Museum of Natural Science, at which she found a vending machine that sold flavored crickets. She bought salt and vinegar and bacon and cheddar varieties and offered them to any Kiwanis member who was bold enough to try them. (Two members did.) I brought them back originally for my dad, but he wouldnt eat them, Ricker said. I ate one for him. I got like cricket stuff in between my teeth. It was not fun. I was one and done. A STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) Expo was held prior to project judging as well. It was an event open to the public that featured more than 100 physics, chemistry and math demonstrations. Ricker said there was a robotics competition in which you raced against another person to build a robot and then use the finished robot to pick up balls and place them in a bin. I was going up against this kid who looked like he was 5, Ricker said. Im like one third of the way through my robot, and hes already putting balls into the bin. It was not fair, so I just gave up. It was embarrassing. The expo also featured the Texas A&M University Chemistry Roadshow, a publicservice program designed to entertain as well as educate students. Dr. Jim Pennington, a senior lecturer and research associate at Texas A&M who coordinates the roadshow, made quite an impression on Ricker with his colorful tie-dyed smock and propensity for scaring people with a contraption that made loud noises. He was insane because he kept blowing things up and not telling you (beforehand), Ricker Continued from 1B said. At one point, Pennington called Ricker to the stage and asked her to provide him with a monetary bill. I gave it to him and he sprayed something on it and lit it on fire, Ricker said, adding, Then he just handed it back to me, and it wasnt even hot. It was the coolest thing, but he really scared me. Ricker got her money back safely, plus went home with a little extra, receiving a $400 check for earning a silver medal after project judging. Despite a rough beginning with the inability to carry her project on the plane and not being on the hotel list, it turned out to be quite a trip. I really did just have so much fun at I-SWEEEP, Ricker said. Medals and honorablemention awards are given to participants in three divisions: Environment, Engineering and Energy. A grand winner is named in each division. This years grand winners were Albert Kima student at Manhasset High School in Long Island, N.Y.in Environment, Drew Prevosta student in the Huntsville, Ala., Covenant Christian Academy home-schooled programin Engineering and Raymond Yina student at Ward Melville High School in East Setauket, N.Y.in Energy. money seemingly burns, but Pennington coated the bill with something to prevent



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Union County Times Union County Times USPS 648-200 Lake Butler, Florida Thursday, June 5, 2014 102 nd Year 6 th Issue 75 CENTS etc www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 386-496-2261 Cell 352-283-6312 Fax 386-4962858 uctimes@windstream.net www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/unioncountytimes Raiford Town Council meeting, June 6 The Raiford Town Council will conduct its monthly meeting on Friday, June 6, at 5:30 p.m. WS bingo fundraiser, June 6; bake sale, June 14 The Worthington Springs Senior Citizens Activity Program will host a fundraiser on Friday, June 6, from 6 to 9 p.m. It will include bingo, where theyll sell refreshments, and dinners for $6. They will also have a bake sale on Saturday, June 14, at Spires IGA from 8 a.m. till sold out. Clothes giveaway, June 7 Sanderson Christian Revival Center, located at C.R. 229 and Sapp Road, will give away clothes and other items Saturday, June 7, beginning at 8 a.m. UCHS Class of 1956 reunion, June 7 The Union County High School Class of 1956 will have its 58th year class reunion and invite anyone who would like to join them for a Dutch treat luncheon at 1 p.m. at Cedar River in Starke on Saturday, June 7. To the Ends of the Earth, June 7 Kelly Christie Dance Academy will present To the Ends of the Earth, featuring local dancers and internationally acclaimed guest artist from Dance Alive National Ballet, on Saturday, June 7, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., at the Union County High School auditorium. Admission is $7.00 for ages five to adult. LB Commission meeting, June 10 The Lake Butler City Commission will conduct its monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 10, at 5:15 p.m., following the Planning and Zoning Board meeting at that time. Pop Warner sign-ups, June 7 & 21 Union County Pop Warner has opened registration for football and cheerleading during select Saturdays: June 7 & 21 and July 12 & 26and on July 4. Signups are at the Pop Warner building at the O.J. Phillips Recreation Complex. Football fees are $100 for May 23 to July 4 and $150 for July 5 to 26. Cheerleading fees are $125 and $175, respectively. Coaches, volunteers and sponsors are needed. Canoe the Santa Fe, June 12 Will leave at 8 a.m. Cost is $25 and a maximum of seven youth. Bring bag lunch. Menu for one, two or more, June 12 Union County Extension Office at 1:30 p.m. Call to pre-register at 386-496-2321. Andrews new ESE director at Bradford schools, 5B techniques, check out books, 5B BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor On May 23, the Florida Department of Education released the FCAT 2.0 Writing and third grade Reading and Mathematics scores. The Union County School District took the top spot in several categories. All three schools scored above the state average, said Carlton Faulk, superintendent of schools. As a district, fourth grade students tied for number one in the state, eighth grade students ranked number twelve in the state and tenth grade students tied with three other districts for number one in the state. The tenth grade students also had the highest percentage passing the FCAT Writing. He noted that the third grade students math scores tied with four other districts for highest percentage of students scoring Level 3 or above in the state. To be considered a proficient writer, a student should score an average of 3.5. While the state average fell short at 3.3, students at Lake Butler Elementary School scored an average of 3.6, which has Union County tied for first in the state with two other public school districts. The percentage scoring at Level 3.5 and above dropped from 81 percent last year to 70 percent this year. Those at Level 4 and above dropped from 65 to 47 percent. For math, the state average was 58 percent with Union County coming in at 73 percent proficiencythe same as last yearand an average score of 207. Once again, this ranks them first in the state tied with two other public school districts. According to the scale score in reading, LBES came in with a score of 200, which was at state average. However, the percentage of students at Level 3.5 and above dropped from 59 percent last year to 51 percent this year. At LBES we strive to incorporate more innovative teaching techniques to help our students develop higher order thinking skills to prepare them for these rigorous state assessments, said Principal Stacey Rimes. We are very proud of the hard work and dedication of both our students and staff. Lake Butler Middle School eighth grade students made great gains over last years FCAT Writing scores by improving 13 percentage points from 47 percent to 60 percenta gain of nearly 28 percent. Most impressive of the gains was the drop in Level 1 and 2 from 2013 of 69 students to a 2014 level of 18 students in these categories. There was also a significant gain in the number of Level 4, 5 and 6. In 2013 there were only 11 students who scored at level 4 or above with all 11 students being a Level 4. This years eighth-graders had UC schools tops in FCAT Writing and third-grade math UC cleared in public records request lawsuit Received same email sent to other counties BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor On Oct. 30 of last year Dianne Hannon, executive secretary for the Union County Board of County Commissioners, received an email addressed to Union County from ask4records@gmail.com with a public records request. Bradford County, Sarasota County, Leon County and possibly others received the exact same email that same day. The sender, on behalf of a Florida company, demanded that the county provide a complete list of all the work email addresses of all the employees that work for your county that have email addresses. That Florida company is Consumer Rights LLC out of Lake City, managed by attorney Robert Earl Case Jr. The county had no further contact from the sender nor received any follow-up until slapped with a lawsuit on March 4 demanding enforcement of Chapter 119 of the Florida Statutes, more commonly known as Floridas Public Records Act. It was very, very, very odd, said Clerk of Court Kellie Hendricks Connell, which is why it was thought to be an attempt to hack or phishing scam or one of these dozens of attempts to somehow create problemsin some way, shape or formwhich is why it was disregarded. Furthermore, it was never followed up by phone call, a second email, a written notificationthere was never any follow-up from that email to indicate that it truly was a legitimate request and not an attempt at phishing or hacking. Phishing is the attempt to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money), etc., by masquerading as a trustworthy entity through email, instant messaging and websites. She made it clear that the email was not ignored, but rather it was purposely decided that it was in the best interest of the county to not answer, because we thought it was a potential for exploitation. At the time, the county did not maintain a list of email addresses, and so was not obliged to provide a document that did not exist. Public records requests only pertain to what is already available, or on recordall documents, papers, letters, maps, books, tapes, photographs, films, sound recordings, data processing software or other material, regardless of the physical form, characteristics or means of transmission, made or received pursuant to law or ordinance or in connection with the transaction of official business by any agency, as stated in the statute. In his ruling dated May 21, Circuit Judge Stanley H. Griffis III, referenced State v. Clearwater 863 So.2d 149 (Fla. 2003), wherein the Florida Supreme Court ruled that email addresses do not qualify as a public record because email headers, which contain the addresses, were neither purposely compiled nor maintained in the course of the agencys operations. However, even if such email lists are public record subject to disclosure, Griffis wrote in his ruling, Plaintiff must prove that a specific request for public records was made, the agency received the request, the requested public records existed and the agency improperly refused to produce the public records in a timely manner. See Hillier v. City of Plantation 935 So.2d 105, 106 (Fla. 4th DCA 2006). Here, the public records requested did not exist at the time of the request. Defendant did not improperly refuse to produce public records in a timely manner. Defendant was under no duty to create to satisfy Plaintiffs (sic) request. Connell See LAWSUIT, 5A See FCAT, 3A BY JOHN WALKER Director, Union County Office of Emergency Management Hurricane season started June 1 and ends Nov. 30. The Union County Office of Emergency Management would like to remind residents that taking time to prepare each year can prevent injury and damage to property. Its best to know our vulnerabilities and what actions to take to reduce the effects of these storms. We would like to assist the residents of our county be prepared in the event a hurricane should affect our area. Preparation is the key; know what to do, what supplies to have, and how to stay informed. We recommend three major steps that could help you and your family prior to and during a hurricane: 1. Prepare an emergency kit. Make sure you include prescription medications, and other medications that your family needs. You will need one gallon of water per person per day, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food and battery-powered radios (AM/FM and weather radio). Other items to consider in your kit include flashlights, batteries, a first aid kit, plastic bags and ties for sanitation, cellphone chargers, tools, a can opener and maps. Make sure your kit is portable in case you have to evacuate. 2. Make an emergency plan. Plan how you will contact family and friends just before and during the event. Keep contact information (including work information) for all members of your household. Record social security numbers and medical information for each family member as well. Prepare an evacuation plan and include a common meeting place near your neighborhood in case anyone gets separated. Plan to protect your property. Cover windows with plywood, store anything not tied down inside your residence or storage and try to keep trees and shrubs trimmed to minimize damage to property. 3. Stay informed. A hurricane can affect us with lightning, tornadoes, flooding and high winds. Use local news outlets, weather radios and any information received from local government to keep up-to-date on the latest status of any storm. Start getting prepared and monitor news outlets. Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify an impending hurricane. A Hurricane Watch means the effects of a hurricane are possible in your area. A Hurricane Warning means a hurricane is expected in your area. If instructed to evacuate, leave immediately. In almost every case, a Hurricane Watch will be issued before the Hurricane Warning in order to give you time to prepare. Hurricanes are classified into five categories: Category 5 being the most severe and Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes, though Category 1 and 2 still can produce major damage. Following these steps can minimize the effects a hurricane has on you and your family. Please take time to visit www.unionsheriff.us and click on the CodeRED button near the bottom right-hand side of the main page. This will allow you to enroll in community notifications of significant weather events using Union Countys CodeRED alert notification system. Enter your information so that you may stay informed. After entering your home address and phone, you can also enter your GPScapable cellphone number. This will provide you with location specific alerts based on your cellphones location. For more detailed information, checklists and forms to help you prepare, please visit www.ready.gov You can also visit Floridas site at www.floridadisaster.org The State of Florida has initiated a Sales Tax Holiday Be prepared as hurricane season begins See PREPARE, 5A Class of 2014 celebrates on a stormy night Though afternoon storms delayed graduation for 133 anxious Union County High School seniors Friday, a Assistant Principal Bill Cross, looks on (far left) with pride. Thankful for years of a beautiful life, she then BY TAYLOR CROSS UCHS Class of 2014 Valedictorian As tradition follows there are some muchly owed thank yous that I would like to give. First, I want to thank God for truly blessing me with 18 years of a beautiful life. It is through this grace that I stand where I am today. I have been surrounded by amazing people who have nothing but their entire hearts to give, I have made friends that make every day an adventure, and I now have the privilege to be speaking to you all this evening. There are two special people however that deserve to know just how great they are and that is my mom and dad. Mappy, Pappy, there is not a day that goes by that I BY KAMIL MAZAL UCHS Class of 2014 Salutatorian Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to all the parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends. My name is Kamil Mazal and I am honored to have the privilege of addressing you tonight. Ive taken many classes throughout high school. Ive taken some courses that people considered hard. The hardest one, for me, was probably public speaking, so please bear with me on this. When Mr. Ripplinger let me know about being salutatorian, I thought about the message I could give to my fellow graduates. It seemed important as it did Valedictorian encourages classmates to live, run and leap Salutatorian challenges classmates to make it happen See CROSS, 4A

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2A Union County Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 uctimes@windstream.net 386-496-2261 Vincents Cell 352-283-6312 John M. Miller, Publisher Editor: Vincent Alex Brown Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting: Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-JonesUnion County TimesUSPS 648-200 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: UNION COUNTY TIMES25 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months 386-496-9656 275 W est Main Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 (Suwannee Medical Building)12 Years Experience Admitted to State and Federal Bar (M and S. Dist.) DAWN CORBETTINSURANCE AGENCY(904) 964-7707FREE Insurance Quotes No obligation...Call Today! As a taxpayer I believe that our tax dollars should be utilized wisely and within the allotted budget. I have been involved with the youth for several years and would like to see some type of programs for them. Also, I have worked with non-profit organizations that involved the youth as well as the community as a whole. Most importantly Ive worked in the financial and accounting field for over ten years working with various types of budgets. Vote with confidence for someone you can trust as your vote can make a difference at local levels.Vote on to make a difference.Vote Robert Osbornefor Lake Butler City Commissioner Seat 3on Political advertisement paid for and approved by Robert Osborne for Lake Butler City Commissioner Seat 3 Revival, June 8; homecoming, June 15 New River NC Methodist Church us hosting a revival from Sunday, June 8, to Wednesday, June 11. Sunday night service will begin at 6:00 p.m. with Rev. Randy Ogburn. Monday service will begin at 7:30 p.m. with Rev. Tommy Richardson. Tuesday service will be at 7:30 p.m. with Rev. Tommy Anderson. Wednesday service will be at 7:30 p.m. with Rev. Cody Griffis. The church will celebrate homecoming on Sunday, June 15, with lunch following the morning service. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy spirit-filled preaching and singing. The church is located on C.R. 125. Rev. Jimmy Scott is the pastor. Call 386-431-1536 for directions. For more info, call the front office at 386-496-3040. VBS at FCC, June 16 Starting Monday, June 16, First Christian Church of Lake Butler will host its annual Vacation Bible School program, each weekday from 6 to 8:30 p.m. This years theme is The Long Shot Faith, with a great marketplace and lessons on seeing the long shot into greatness. There will be games, crafts, snacks and great lessons about the mighty faith of Deborah. There are programs for ages pre-K to sixth grade. For more info, call Associate Minister David Tompkins at 386-496-3956. Librarys summer programs start June 19 10 & Under, Thursdays at 10 a.m. June 19: Fizz, Boom, Science at Union County Public Library Mad science with mad scientists! June 26: Fizz, Boom, Todd Kay at Lake Butler Elementary School Juggling with a magical twist! Teens & Tweens, 11 & Up June 24, 3-5 p.m.: Electrifying Electricity workshop. Limited seating; pre-registration recommend ed. June 30, 5-7 p.m.: Ballad of America, featuring spe cial guest Matthew Sabatella. Refreshments will be served. Follow the librarys Facebook page for updates on programs and more at www.facebook.com/ unioncountylibrary etc Woody Kitler running for UC commission (The following is a statement of intention to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) I am Woodrow Woody Kitler, and I am both humbled and excited to announce my candidacy for Union County Commissioner, District 2. I was born and raised in Union County, as was my wife Nicole. Both of our families are proud lifelong residents of this county. Nicole and I have been married for 16 years, and we are raising our family here as well. Our three sons Chase, Dalton and Dawson all attend Union County High School. After graduating from UCHS in 1990, I joined the U.S. Army where I served honorably until 1993. I then joined the Army National Guard until 1996. I am currently employed by US Foods in Jacksonville as a driver and have been driving trucks for the past 18 years. If elected as your county commissioner, my formal commitment to you will be to make myself accessible and listen to your thoughts and opinions. I will work hard to earn your trust and represent you to the best of my abilities. I have a strong belief in the need for elected officials to work alongside the people of the community to accomplish goals, both large and small. Over the next couple of months leading up to the primary election, I look forward to meeting and talking with each of you individually. I am anxious to hear your concerns and gather your thoughts and ideas regarding our community. I believe in this community and the people who live in it. We need to work hard today to build a strong community for our children tomorrow. My family and I are proud to congratulate the UCHS Class of 2014 on their great accomplishments! Please remember to vote August 26th. Let your voice be heard. Channing Dobbs running for UC commission (The following is a statement of intention to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) My name is Channing Dobbs and it is with extreme enthusiasm that I announce my candidacy for District 2 Union County Commissioner. For those of you who do not know me I was born and raised in Raiford and am blessed to call Union County home. After my mothers death I was raised by my uncle and aunt, Lamar and Marian Griffis, as well as my grandparents, Bud and Marjorie Dobbs. My family is deeply rooted in Raiford myself being fourth-generation. I am a member of Fellowship Baptist Church in Raiford. I have a beautiful 2-year old daughter whose name is Pamela Ela Dobbs and might I add she has my heart. I am a 2007 graduate of Union County High School. After school I began a career with the Department of Corrections at Union Correctional Institution in 2008 and was recently promoted to sergeant. It was a great honor to begin serving the Town of Raiford as a councilman in 2009. In 2010 I obtained a law enforcement certification from Lake City Community College. In 2011 while serving the Town of Raiford I became mayorthe youngest in Florida to do so. After much thought and prayer I have decided to run for this position for several reasons. I love my community and the people in it. I am blessed beyond words to call Union County my home. I look forward to raising my child here and never intend on leaving. I feel that I am without a doubt qualified for this position. As councilman and mayor of Raiford I was given the opportunity to receive your comments and suggestions regarding this district. I have used this information to make profound decisions concerning your tax dollars and policies outlined in the charter. I am experienced in the field of budget analysis, ordinance preparation, charter compliance, community developmental grants and audits. I have worked hand-inhand with the board of county commissioners as well as the DOC community partnership program on several occasions and to both I am greatly appreciative. I believe in order to reach goals we must work as a team. I am, have been and will continue to be honest, hardworking and dedicated to serve in the most professional manner possible. I am committed to serve you in every aspect within my span of control. I promise if elected to be available, accountable and welcoming to comments and suggestions to enhance our community as a whole. Please feel free to contact me any time at 904-263-8058. Thank you for your support. I look forward to seeing you soon, Channing Dobbs Get ready to vote On Tuesday, (l-r) Tiffany Rollins and Tammy Roddenberry and from in Lake Butler to let residents changed for the county elections due to redistricting. If anyone needs to get registered married and need to change your You can change your address by Regular qualifying will start at instead of the petition method.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Union County Times 3A Hi. My name is Ray Crawford and I am running for Lake Butler City Commissioner, Seat 4.I am a Veteran and a longtime resident of Lake Butler and I was privileged and honored to serve as a City Commissioner in the years 2006 2009 and as a Mayor in the years 2009 2010. My future is tied up here and I want to contribute to make Lake Butler a prosperous Community for all. On a personal note, for the people that do not know me, I would like to reassure you that the main reason why I am running its because I love Lake Butler it is where I live with my family and where I have run a successful business until a few months ago, I am here to stay. Just for the record I would like to point out that, while I was serving my previous term, I was approached by Mr. Leroy Stalvey and asked to step aside to allow him to serve four more years as City Commissioner, in order for him to be eligible to collect his full reti rement. I honored Mr. Stalveys request out of for respect for his age and health conditions; his Seat was vac ated due to his recent death. I am running for the same Seat. I have recently retired and my desire is to regain Seat # 4 as a City Commissioner and dedicate full time to the challenges and most of all the opportunities of our little City. I love to solve problems and I want to be part of the solution to the problems facing our City. I tr y to lead by example. I work well with others to accomplish goals; I know when to listen and when to follow; I will stand up for the concerns of Lake Butler Citizens; I am not afraid to say I dont know, let me find out and I will get back to you. I want our tax dollars spent carefully and wisely. I strongly believe in fi scal responsibility, preservation, conservation and integrity. Cities exist to create environments in which people can succeed with their life, with their families with their businesses; I believe that Elected Officials and Citizens alike should treat each other with d ignity to produce constructive outcomes. A Commissioner must take the time to be fully informed on all issues at all times, in order to serve his Citizens properly. A Commissioner must be a credible and effective Ambassador for our City. I feel I can proudly be your Commissioner again. Please give me your vote. Our people know a thing or two about hard work, determination and often, hardship. I am ready to wor k with everybody to understand the true nature of problems and develop the strategies which will best deal with these problems. I will work hard to identify the highest priorities in City matters and make su re that the services will be delivered in a manner that preserves our Citizens rights and best reinforces th e strength and respect of all of as. Again, I believe that if we follow the vision of a Great Lake Bu tler, people of all ages and backgrounds will benefit. In the end, we should all remember that we are frie nds. Please know that I truly encourage, welcome and value your questions and comments, and look forward to hearing from you at anytime. I am asking for your support at the polls if you agree with my ideals. I will do everything I can to meet every single one of you personally and answer your questions and concerns. Only you, residents of La ke Butler, have the power to write the next chapter in our History, so please give me your consideratio n. Thank you, Dallas Ray Crawford Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for and approved by Dallas Ray Crawford for Lake Butler City Commission Elect Ray Crawford to Lake Butler City Commission Big Bass Fishing Big Bass Fishing Tournament Tournament Registration begins at 3:30am at the boat ramp. $50 entry fee per boat. 18yrs and older or accompanied by an adult. Valid FL fishing license required. 15hp motor minimum. Must have aerated livewell. Weigh-in at 11:00am Midway sponsored by Spotlight Amusements Games GamesBounce House Rock Wall Bounce House Rock Wall Buzz Light Year Buzz Light Year Bungee Trampoline Bungee Trampoline Pony Rides Pony Rides Crazy Worm Train Crazy Worm Train Kiddie Ferris Wheel Kiddie Ferris Wheel To the Ends of the EarthFeaturing local dancers of KCDA and internationally acclaimed guest artist from Dance Alive National Ballet Admission $7.00 for Age 5-Adult Presents (12 miles west of Lake Butler) S MITH & S ON S FEED AND SEED Nutrena River Run21/10$16 w/ this ad 79 students at Level 4 and above with 11 at Level 5 and one student who scored the perfect Level 6. The percentage scoring at Level 4 and above improved 11 points over last yearfrom 36 percent to 47 percent. The credit is due to the hard work the LBMS students put into FCAT Continued from 1A School 2014 THIRD GRADE FCAT MATH SCORES Level 3 and Above Mean Score STATE AVERAGE 58% 201 UNION 73% (Tied for 1st ) 207 (Tied for 1st) NEFEC DISTRICTS ( North East Florida Educational Consortium) BAKER 67% 206 BRADFORD 46% 196 COLUMBIA 61% 202 DIXIE 67% 204 FLAGLER 63% 204 GILCHRIST 66% 205 HAMILTON 63% 202 LAFAYETTE 38% 193 LEVY 58% 200 NASSAU 73% 207 PUTNAM 51% 198 SUWANNEE 41% 194 *not including lab schools Mean Score 6 districts higher Tied for 7th STATE RESULTS Level 3 and Above No districts higher Tied with 4 districts 2014 THIRD GRADE FCAT READING SCORES Level 3 and Above Mean Score STATE AVERAGE 57% 200 UNION 51% (9th) 200 (6th) NEFEC DISTRICTS ( North East Florida Educational Consortium) BAKER 64% 204 BRADFORD 57% 198 COLUMBIA 62% 201 DIXIE 64% 203 FLAGLER 65% 205 GILCHRIST 60% 202 HAMILTON 35% 191 LAFAYETTE 39% 193 LEVY 46% 196 NASSAU 73% 206 PUTNAM 48% 196 SUWANNEE 52% 198 *not including lab schools Mean Score Tied with 4 districts 33 districts higher STATE RESULTS Level 3 and Above Tied with 4 districts 45 districts higher 2014 FCAT WRITING SCORES Fourth Grade Eighth Grade Tenth Grade MEAN Levels 3.5 and Higher MEAN Levels 3.5 and Higher MEAN Levels 3.5 and Higher STATE AVERAGE 3.3 53% 3.4 56% 3.5 64% UNION 3.6 (1st in Region) 69% (1st in Re gion) 3.5 (Tied for 2nd) 59% (Tied for 5th) 3.7 (Tied for 1st) 76% (1st in State) NEFEC DISTRICTS (North East Florida Educational Consortium) Fourth Grade Eighth Grade Tenth Grade MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ BAKER 3.2 44% 3.5 60% 3.4 55% BRADFORD 3.2 48% 3.2 47% 3.4 56% COLUMBIA 3.2 48% 3.3 46% 3.3 52% DIXIE 3.2 51% 3.2 47% 3.4 58% FLAGLER 3.5 63% 3.5 59% 3.5 63% GILCHRIST 3.5 63% 3.3 54% 3.7 71% HAMILTON 3.0 39% 2.8 22% 3.5 71% LAFAYETTE 3.4 54% 3.6 72% 3.5 62% LEVY 3.0 40% 3.5 61% 3.4 61% NASSAU 3.4 60% 3.4 58% 3.7 72% PUTNAM 3.0 40% 3.1 39% 3.2 44% SUWANNEE 2.9 37% 3.1 44% 3.2 52% STATE RESULTS Fourth Grade Eighth Grade Tenth Grade MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ MEAN 3.5^ Tied for 1st with Hillsborough Tied for 1st with Hillsborough 10 districts higher; 10 districts tied 17 districts higher; 2 districts tied 3 districts tied for 1st No district was higher improving their writing skills and the driven instruction provided by the language arts faculty, said Principal David Campbell. The LBMS family couldnt be prouder of their efforts and congratulate them on their accomplishment. At Union County High School, tenth-graders tied other districts in the state with the highest average writing score of a 3.7up from 3.3 last yearand the district had the states highest percentage of students passingLevel 3.5 and abovewith 76 percent, which was a dramatic improvement over last year at 54 percent. Even more dramatic was the percentage scoring Level 4 and above, which increased went from 30 percent last year to 52 percent. I would like to congratulate our teachers and students for their outstanding performance on this years FCAT Writing exam, said Principal Mike Ripplinger. Our teachers worked hard in preparing our students for success on the exam and our students performed at a high level of achievement. I am very pleased that our students are making steady progress as we continue to transition to more rigorous standards, said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. She also complimented the daily work of students and teachers to improve. More test scores should be released in the next few weeks.

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4A Union County Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 ______________________________ ______________________________ ROBERT OSBORNE ANNETTE REDMAN DEBRA BROWNINGDALLAS RAY CRAWFORD dont know just how lucky I am to have two individuals as strong, passionate, and loving as you are guiding me and supporting me. You may be proud of me right now but know that Im so proud of you both each and every day for not only being parents and providers, but also for being my rock and my friend. I love you both so much. Finally I want to personally thank everyone that I face now. The saying it takes a village to raise a child is embodied in the town of Lake Butler. In my eyes you all have been a part of my life and Im so thankful for everyones contribution. Now, Id like to point out that theres something about a small town unique to any other. All of the young adults who gather on this field here today are the same people I walked into kindergarten with. Eighteen years of memories have been made as we have watched each other grow from pencil boxes to cap and gowns and I have to tell you all it has been an honor. But it also makes this day just a little bittersweet. You dont realize just how close you become to your classmates as we have all traveled down the street together one school at a time. It wasnt that far of a walk either. But lets talk a little about what so many call the best years of our life: high school. Its crazy to think that its all over. I can personally still remember not having a worry in the world as a freshman. At that time I had a personal chauffer and the word job was completely taboo to me. Then came sophomore yearthe big Sweet 16 for us all. This may have been when our parents started to find out we really could cause them to gray. But dont worry, we totally knew how to drive right? Unfortunately, it turns out I really cant drive, or at least thats what my friends say, but as far as I can see theyre all here so no harm done. Now, onward to junior year where the word responsibility became just a little bit more real. Turns out you needed money for gas and food. It was around this time that we learned the true power of the dollar menu. But at the same time we were starting to evolve into unique individuals, slowly we had begun making our own paths. Now, here we aresenior year. Everyone tries to tell you just how fast it goes by but youll never realize it until one day the entire town is looking back at you as you walk across stage. But, Id like to point out that the Class of 2014 has endured quite a bit of hardship this year as we have lost some of those closest to us. However, I hope everyone knows just how strong they really are. Through the hurt, we have prevailed. And now as we prepare to turn our tassels and say goodbye to the one and only UCHS, I only have a few wishes for us all. It is my hope that everyone who gathers with me here today may never see a day wasted because there was no laughter. It is my hope that we never prioritize anything over happiness, and it is my hope that each and every one of us live to our full potential. It turns out life really is too short to let it be a sedentary one. We are blessed every time we get to see the sun come up. So go out in the real world, see extraordinary views, be inspired, fall in love, make friends who will stay with you for the rest of your lives, never try to be perfect because there isnt such a thing, and of course put your heart into everything you do. There will be times that we may stumble but know this is only a time to learn. Always pick yourself up and push harder into tomorrow because youll eventually run out of them. Let each day from here on out be an adventure as you not only find yourself but what makes you truly at peace. And when you do, hold onto that and go as far as you can go. Run with happiness until your legs grow weak and then crawl even farther. Because in the end, the question wont be what we did and didnt have. In the end, the most important thing we can ask ourselves is, Did I do the best I possibly could with what I had in front of me? You see, we arent all given the same set of circumstances but we all have the potential to be great. Life is what you make it. So make it fun. Make it memorable and make it your own. The path in front of us is wide open. Go now, get a running start. Leap over all the obstacles that try to slow you down and never look back. Life has only just begun my friends. Its our time to make our mark in the world. Let it be one that no one forgets, and thank you again for the last 18 years. I will forever cherish them. School CROSS Continued from 1A imperative for me to share with you something I discovered in 2011 that has kept me motivated since. It is my favorite poem, and it is called Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost. Ill read the short poem for you: Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sounds the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. How has this kept her motivated? you may ask. Well, I believe that the message here is to not settle for something that merely makes you content, but to make promises to yourself, lofty goals that you will strive to reach. I want you to ask yourselves, What do I want to accomplish? After you have your answers, set out to make it happen. I chose to share this message with you because I believe that a passionate individual can accomplish anything. And when obstacles are presented, follow Sir Winston Churchills advice to Never give up. Along the way, please never forget the people who helped you get there, and give thanks to them. I, personally, would like to thank my mom, dad, and brother, LTC Steverson, CSM North, MSG Black, Mrs. Allen, Mrs. Sharma, Mr. Williams, Mrs. Imler, Congressman Yoho and Greg Rawson, Ms. Mackey, Mrs. Tana, Mrs. Dot, Mr. Rip, Mr. Cross, Hannah, my fellow classmates and everybody else at this wonderful institution who has given me a hand. I hope youll find what I just said useful, and that you remember it through all of the endeavors you embark upon in life. Thank you. Continued from 1A Tragedy and triumph of Union County Tiger Band played Pomp and Circumstancea series of marches composed by Sir Edward and homecoming queen, started things off. RIGHT: During the benediction, a moment of silence was held in memory last year. Later, cheers went up when able to attend the ceremony and share the momentous occasion with her daughter.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Union County Times 5A The Bible records several miracles performed by God. They were given to show Gods power and confirm the word being spoken by those performing the miracles (Mark 16:20; Hebrews 2:3-4). For example, the miracles performed by Jesuswere given so people may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God (John 20:30-31). They confirmed the claim being made by Jesus. God has finished revealing His will to mankind (Galatians 1:6-9) so miracles are not needed to confirm that one is receiving revelation from God. Instead, the word of God is confirmed by the signs recorded in the text. In the Christian age, the ability to perform miracles was limited to the apostles and those on whom they laid hands (Acts 8:14-18). Since there is no one on earth today who is an apostle or who received the laying on of the apostles hands, no one has the ability to perform miracles today. Bible Study at 9:00 AM on Sun and 7:30 PM on Wed Worship at 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM on Sun. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. W orship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. UCT Legals 6/5/14 NOTICE The Union County Board of County Commissioners are accepting bids for a Wind Retrofit of the Providence Community Center. Interested con tractors should send sealed propos als to 15 NE 1st Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 by June 12, 2014. Request for bid packets and all questions should be directed to John Walker at 386-496-4330. 5/29 2tchg 6/5 UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a Finance Audit and Executive Committee Meeting on Wednesday, June 18, 2014; Finance Audit Com mittee Meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M.; and Executive Committee Meeting will follow at 10:30 A.M. at the Suwannee River Economic Coun cil, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida. 6/5 1tchg-UCT NOTICE Lake Butler Mini Storage will hold an auction on Saturday, June 14, 2014 at 10 AM, located at 1015 SW 3RD Street, Lake Butler, FL. Hwy 121. We have 3 units up for auction #62 10x10, #28 5x10, #27 5x10. 6/5 2tchg 6/12-UCT Legals that started May 31 and ends at 11:59 p.m. on June 8. Qualifying items are listed as follows: Selling for $10 or less: Reusable ice (reusable ice packs). Selling for $20 or less: Any portable, self-powered light source, battery-powered flashlights, battery-powered lanterns, gas-powered lanterns (including propane, kerosene, lamp oil, or similar fuel), tikitype torches, candles. Selling for $25 or less: Any gas or diesel fuel container (including LP gas and kerosene containers). Selling for $30 or less: Batteries, including rechargeable batteries, and excluding automobile and boat batteries; AA-cell, C-cell, D-cell, 6-volt, 9-volt; coolers (food-storage; nonelectrical) ice chest (foodstorage; nonelectrical), selfcontained first-aid kit (already tax-exempt). Selling for $50 or less: Tarpaulins, visqueen, plastic sheeting, or plastic drop cloths, and other flexible waterproof sheeting, ground anchor systems, tie-down kits, bungee cords, ratchet straps, radios (selfpowered or battery-powered), two-way radios (self-powered or battery-powered). Selling for $750 or less: Portable generators that will be used to provide light, communications, or to preserve food in the event of a power outage. The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 through November 30. You may reach the Union County Office of Emergency Management at 386-496-4300, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. till 5 p.m. The Union County Sheriffs Office can be reached 24/7 at 386-496-2501. In the case of an emergency, always call 911. Online resources: www.unionsheriff.us (Click CodeRED button to sign up for alerts.) www.ready.gov (Detailed information, checklists and forms to help you prepare.) www.floridadisaster.org PREPARE Continued from 1A The judge further noted what Connell also pointed out: that the email was not even addressed to the proper records custodian for the county but sent to a decidedly generic BOCC address. Hannon did forward the original email to Justin Stankiewicz, chief financial officer for the Clerk of Court, which is the correct agency. Hence, Plaintiff made no effort before the request to confirm it was being sent to the proper person or entity, Griffis observed. The judge agreed with the county that the email seemed to be an attempt at phishing. Ironically, since the lawsuit was first and only verification that the original email was in fact valid, the county did actually create a record to satisfy the request and then provided that to Plaintiff. Once we determined that it truly was a legitimate request and not some kind of hacking scam, we made a good faith effort to give the information; we actually created the document when we didnt have to, Connell said. So, were trying to be transparent. Until we had a suit we did not realize it was a legitimate request, Connell added. We thought it was an attempt to attempt to abuse the government. And understand that after four months (between the time of the email and the lawsuit) of receiving no follow-up correspondence, that confirmed our suspicion that that was an illegitimatethat it was not truly a public records attempt. It was an attempt to hack emails. Connell said that Bradford County also did not respond to the email was similarly ruled in favor and not obligated to pay Plaintiff. Finally, in denying Plaintiffs lawsuit and in not awarding attorneys fees and costs, Griffis concluded that, Plaintiff has failed to establish that Defendant unlawfully refused to permit a public record to be inspected or copied. Defendant did not possess, nor did a record exist to fulfill Plaintiffs public records request. Connell said the county received legal representation at no cost. Fred Baggett, an attorney for Greenberg Traurig LLP is the general counsel for Florida Court Clerks and Comptrollers, a statewide association. Connell called him regarding the lawsuit and Baggett connected her with an attorney in his firm that knew (Chapter 119 of the Florida Statutes) very well, and did not charge the county for the representation, she said. The day that (the attorney) contacted the Plaintiff, Connell said, the Plaintiff offered to settle for $4,800. However, the county declined. We talked about it and decided that we did nothing wrong, that we were absolutely legitimate and that we were not going to spend the countys dollarsfor that, Connell said. Apparently the judge agreed. LAWSUIT Continued from 1A County Cub Scouts Cub Scouts check things out Fire Department on April 28 to get a tour of the trucks FAR LEFT: The scouts pose on the bumper Lake Dillon Duenas, Cameron Christie, Sonny Sargent, and Cubmaster Nellie Sargent. extinguisher is better than water in cooking situations, here spraying a garden hose on a outdoor grill Public Library. The scouts began their tour at the Promise as well as the Pledge of Allegiance. The boys learned a bit about library operations and toured the staff-only areas of the library including going behind the front desk where they each had the opportunity to check out books. check out a book to fellow scout Sonny Sargent.

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6A Union County Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service is accepting applications now through June 27 for its Longleaf Pine Landowner Incentive Program, which offers Floridas non-industrial private landowners incentive payments for longleaf pine restoration. Longleaf pine forest once covered some 70 million acres (more than 60 percent of all the uplands) on the southeastern coastal plain from Southeast Virginia to Central Florida to East Texas. Today only about three million acres remain, mostly due to conversion to other land uses, said Jay Tucker, Union County Senior CFA Forester with the Florida Forest Service. Longleaf pine forests are highly valued for their resistance to damage by insects, disease, wildfire and storms and for their yield of high quality wood products, biological diversity and scenic beauty. He said that people often under estimate where longleaf will grow, thinking it only thrives in on dry, well-drained sites. In the contrary, it is native to a wide range of sites from wetter flatwoods (commonly found throughout the county) to dry, rocky mountain ridges, he said. As a general rule of thumb, if a site will burned every two to five years then longleaf pine will most likely grow there. The longleaf pine forest is fire-dependent ecological community. This means without frequent fires, other less fire tolerant plant species (i.e., such as oak species, red maple and slash pine) will invade and out-compete the longleaf pine. Historically fires would burn through the upland forest every year or two on dryer site and three to five years on the wetter flatwoods sites. As fire frequency decreases, naturally or manmade, longleaf pine is replaced by slash and woody shrubs replace native grass understory. In recent years, we have learned a lot about planting, growing and managing longleaf pine, said Tucker. Some areas that have greatly improved are seedling quality, survival rates and tree growth in the first one to three years. The program works to increase the acreage of healthy longleaf pine ecosystems in Florida by helping non-industrial private forest landowners to make the necessary investments required to establish and maintain longleaf pine ecosystems. Funding is provided through a grant and support by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Southern Company, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, Natural Resource Conservation Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Program participants receive incentive payments for various land improvements completed including invasive species control, prescribed burning, longleaf planting, and other practices that improve longleaf pine ecosystems and associated wildlife habitat. The program is offered for private lands in Florida counties located west of the Apalachicola River and those near the Ocala and Osceola National Forests. Interested applicants should visit their local Florida Forest Service office or visit www.floridaforestservice.com for program requirements and procedures. For more information or questions, landowners in Union County can contact Tucker at jay.tucker@freshfromflorida.com or 386-496-2190. Qualifying applicants will be evaluated and ranked for funding approval. The Florida Forest Service manages over one million acres of public forestland while protecting over 24 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com or follow Commissioner Adam Putnam on Facebook, Twitter or Google+. Florida announces longleaf pine incentives for landowners Womans club celebrates annual federation day BY CHRISTY HENDRICKS PR Chairperson, LBWC GFWC Federation Day is an annual celebration of the General Federation of Womens Clubs, which was officially formed on April 24, 1890, in New York City. The history of GFWC is traced back to 1868 when a pioneering woman journalist named Jane Cunningham Croly (1829-1901) sought to attend a dinner honoring British novelist Charles Dickens at an all-male press club. Croly was denied admittance based on her gender, and in response, she formed a club for women. In 1890, Croly extended an invitation to womens clubs throughout the United States to attend a convention in New York City. Representatives from 63 clubs throughout the nation attended the convention and took action to form the GFWC. The Civic League was the forerunner of the Lake Butler Womans Club. The club was organized in 1912 and federated in 1914. Mrs. S.A. Draper, wife of high school principal S.A. Draper, was the first president. Meetings were held in homes of the members and later at the Masonic Lodge until Union County built a new brick courthouse and gave the two-story wooden building to LBWC in 1935. In the early years and today, club members did civic, school, health-related and community activities. The club installed the first dock at Butler Lake. They donated a tennis court, which was on the lot across the street from the current park. They held Teen Town at the clubhouse and many of the local residents remember the fun and activities held at that time. At one time the clubhouse was the home to the Union County Health Department and the members moved to the current Hal Y. Maines (Lake Butler) Community Center and managed the building. Along with the Lake Butler Rotary Club, LBWC purchased acoustical tile that was installed in the community center. The first library in the county was started by LBWC. More recent projects have included Operation Smile, Heifer International, recycling, scholarship, Relay for Life, HOBY student leadership and monetary donations for local, state and national projects. Presently the club holds its meetings at the clubhouse at 6 p.m. on the third Monday of each month, September through May. The womans club seeks new members and visitors are always welcome.

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Bradford High School seniors were able to 30, eating pizza, running obstacle course, playing kickball and getting wet, among other things. doused, no one was safe... not even Principal Bryan Boyer, who gets a cooling off, courtesy of senior Bradley Davis. all? I thought I did, Ricker said. I dont know. I wasnt expecting it. It proved to be an interesting experience from start to finish. Ricker was told beforehand there wouldnt be a problem with her carrying her project onto the plane for the flight to Houston. When she got to the airport, Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL New friends Amazing experiements Untamed games Lip-smacking snacks Surprising adventures Incredible music Saturday June 14th 1:00:00pmWe will be kicking off the week with an afternoon of fun!! There will be inflatables, train rides, sno-cones & more... Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 STARTS FRIDAY Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri: 7:05, 9:10 Sat: 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 Sun: 5:00, 7:05 Mon Thurs: 7:30EXPENDABLESNOW SHOWING Fri: 7:00, 9:15 Sat: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: 4:45, 7:00 Mon Thurs: 7:15 PG-13Angelina Jolie Adam Sandler PG BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School freshman Tessa Ricker earned a silver medal at this years International Sustainable World (Energy, Engineering, Environment) Project Olympiad, an international science fair held annually in Houston. Ricker, whose project, The Rate of Decomposition of Compostable Packing Materials, received one of 40 silver medals in the Environment division, shared her I-SWEEEP experience with the Kiwanis Club of Starke on May 27. I wasnt expecting this at all, to say the least, Ricker said of earning a medal. Ricker was one of more than 600 participantssome of whom were part of group projects from more than 40 states and more than 70 countries at the April 30-May 5 event. More than 300 medals (gold, silver, bronze) and honorablemention awards were presented, which made for a long awards ceremony. Ricker admitted she almost didnt accept her medal. After sitting through a portion of the ceremony, she told her older sister Hannah, who accompanied her on the trip, Im not going to get anything. Lets go. Her sister persuaded her to stay just a little longer, which was good. Ricker heard her name called and went up to accept her award, though according to her sister, you couldnt tell she was excited about it. When I got back, Hannah was like, Why didnt you smile at Ricker earns medal at international science fair Tessa Ricker is shown with her project, The Rate of Soon-to-be BHS grads soak up fun on last day Dinkins. Please see page 6B for more photos. Photos are also available for viewing

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I was confident on about 75 percent of it, Yates said. The other 25 percent were some BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer John Andrews looked forward to going to school after enrolling in the Bradford County School Districts Academy of Academics. Four years later, he is preparing to accept his high school diploma. Andrews said he wouldnt have gotten through school were it not for the Academy of Academics, a voluntary performance-based program for middle-school and high-school students that are behind in terms of grade level, and at risk for dropping out of school. Andrews enjoyed the environment and being exposed to more one-on-one attention from teachers who seemed compassionate in helping him and other students. Its like family here, Andrews said. You dont see teacherstheyre just like my moms and dads. I love it here. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 $49 9 lb $39 9 lbPRICES A VAILABLEJ UNE 04 JUNE 10 2 $3$499 $100 $299 O SCAR MAYER Amazing quality Fantastic prices.S atisfaction Guaranteed $199lb $499 $299 lb1 6 OZ F AM PAK$25 9 lb 8 LB BAG F AM PAK$279lb $1 $149 $299lb lb O pen 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1 371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 RICE SIDES WYL WOOD KRAFT SINGLES IMPERIAL PILLSBUR Y $100 $199 $100GINGER EV ANS 4LB BAGCR YSTAL O2 MAXWELL HOUSE CHIPS V ARIETY PACK $189 $229 $449 $399 $100 were not present. Academy of Academics students recognized for their efforts Teachers handed out certificates of achievement on May 29, with Andrews receiving several, including one for overall excellence. Teacher Peg Stanwix-Hay said Andrews really blossomed in the program and took advantage of the welding program at the Bradford-Union Technical Center as well. Andrews has one more welding area to become certified in. John Andrews receives a for overall excellence from BradfordCenter Director Christy Reddish. Also pictured (foreground to are Academy of Academics teachers Peg Stanwix-Hay, Linda Rudoi, Cindy Bagley, Bish Bishop. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Bradford High School junior Kristie Yates earned a third-place finish in the area of medical terminology at the April 27-29 Skills USA Florida Leadership and Skills Conference in Pensacola. Teresa Jackson, a health sciences teacher at the BradfordUnion Technical Center, said, I am very proud of Kristie. I had no doubt that she would be successful. Yates, who advanced to the state event after placing first at the Feb. 21 Region 2 SkillsUSA Florida Conference in Jacksonville, had to take a 100-question multiplechoice test. A college medical terminology class was a big help to her. BHS junior Yates earns 3rd place at SkillsUSA Florida event

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and part of his hand. I thought he probably didnt want this war any more than I did, Mandeville said. The people that want it the least suffer the most. Art Butler of Lake City also participated in the D-Day invasions, landing on Utah Beach on June 19. Like Towers, he was 27. We didnt know what we were getting into, Butler said. It was noisy. There was shelling over us all night. Butler said he didnt worry about making it home because he had a wife and two children and knew he had to. He settled in Lake City after the war, pursuing a career in lumber and building and construction supply. Asked about whether he felt the eyes of the world upon him during those harrowing days, Butler paused before answering. We went over there knowing we had a big job to do, he said. We were hell-bent to make good. Remembering those who served and sacrificed their lives Towers is one of the founders of Les Fleurs de la Memoire, an association that arranges for French families to adopt the grave of an American soldier buried in Normandy in perpetuity, making at least one visit annually to place flowers on it. The associations website includes an excerpt from a letter Towers wrote to Claude Lavieille, a co-founder of the association: When I come to Europe, it is most difficult for me to visit the American cemeteries wherein my comrades lie at eternal rest. As a liaison officer, I knew many of them personally. Each of these visits is hard on mefor when I am standing in silence in front of a tomb, images of my comrades life come to mind, and it is like that for each visit. But I have to do it. I cant miss visiting each of them. Soon, neither I nor any of my companions will be able to visit the graves of American service men and women at eternal rest in Europe. Then what? Will they be BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor The men who landed on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day during World War II and lived to tell about it are quickly fading into history, yet the significance of their sacrifices and valor will be remembered, especially this year, the 70 th anniversary of the invasions. The commemorations will culminate Friday, June 6, in Ouistreham, France, where President Barack Obama, French President Francois Hollande and Britains Queen Elizabeth II will gather to remember the more than 9,000 Allied soldiers killed or wounded on June 6, 1944. Frank W. Towers of Alachua County will also be there. Towers, hale and hearty at 97, was there on D-Day plus six, landing in France on his 27 th birthday. He reminisced about his experiences recently at a meeting of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida at Conestoga Restaurant in downtown Alachua. I was on a Liberty ship, taking packets from the Isle of Wight to the beaches, Towers said. Towers unit was supposed to land on Omaha Beach, but ended up at Utah Beach, 40 miles to the west, by mistake. Because there was a foot-long drop to the beach from the landing ramp, the service vehicles could not be reloaded. They traveled by land and met the ship when it landed at Omaha Beach later that day, the only unit to land at both beaches. There was no fighting at Omaha Beach when Towers landed. He could hear artillery fire, and he saw the carnage. There were wrecked vehicles and ships and stacks of bodies waiting to be shipped to England, he said. There were a lot of wounded and field hospitals. It was not pleasant. For the five months leading up to D-Day, Towers had been training in England. It was all playdummy bullets, he said. But this was the real thing. Towers wife of 71 years, Mary, remembers how she felt back home in the U.S., waiting to Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B HOPE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY SALUTES OUR 2014 SENIORSHope Christian Academy 352-473-40403900 S.E. State Road 100, Starke, FL Honors Honors Honors Honors HonorsTrain up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old he will not depart from it. Proverbs 22:6 (KJV)Photos: Teddy Bear Portraits SALUTATORIAN SUMMERLYN BYRD Magna Cum Laude: 3.59 weighted GPA. Dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. VALEDICTORIAN KATIE KRUZAN Summa Cum Laude: 4.47 weighted GPA. Earned AA degree through dual enrollment while attending HCA. GARHETT WILSON Dual Enrolled CHLOE WALKER TIFFANY GEORGSSON ANDRE CANADY Dual Enrolled JOSEPH MOORE Dual Enrolled CHRIS TRESTER RYAN SILCOX OLIVIA SANDERS JOHNNY GIBSONCLASS MOTTO: We Were Made to Thrive.NOW ENROLLINGINFANTS 12TH GRADECurrent Enrollment: 330 students Curriculum: Abeka and A.C.E. Dual Enrollment: Currently, 27 students are dual enrolled at Santa Fe College. Scholarships: McKay and Step Up Award-Winning Sports Program: Tackle Football Flag Football Cheerleading Baseball Fast-Pitch Softball Volleyball Basketball Before/After Care & Summer Programs: Contact the school Hot Lunches: Order online Yearbook: Produced by students Praise Team/Band: Performs at chapel Safety Patrol: Elementary students School Uniforms: Variety of choices Spring Formal: Grades 9th-12th Title I:Intensive math & readingWorld Languages: Spanish Tours: Tuesdays & Thursdays Call for appointment Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIANServing the area for 21 years. Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back PainBack & Neck Pain Clinic Remembering D-Day 70 years later pictured with his wife, organization that arranges Americans interned in soldiers across the hear from Frank with his mother in Boston. I was scared to death, she said. I pictured him in every one of the pictures. Because there was no TV in those days, she went to the movie theatre to see newsreels. We wrote letters to each other each day, Mary said, noting that the first letters arrived about 10 days after her husbands landing. They numbered their letters, so when several arrived at once, she could put them in order for reading. Towers served in Europe for 18 months and was due to go to the Pacific when atomic bombs dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ending the war. His commission was deactivated, although within six months he returned to Germany, where he was stationed for three years. Mary went with him, and their three children were born there. The family settled in Alachua County, where they raised chickens and eventually opened a country store. Years later, Frank took a computer course and went to work at the University of Florida. Frank and Mary Towers have made many trips to the Normandy beaches over the years, although Mary is no longer able to fly due to medical issues. This time, their 17-year-old grandson will accompany Frank. Don Mandeville of Gainesville, also a member of the D-Day Veterans of North Central Florida, was in the Navy, working aboard a rhino bargea long, wide, floating platform built of steel pontoons joined together by steel angle irons during the Normandy invasions. We werent scared. We were petrified, he said. Mandeville compared the devastation of the battle to destruction left by fierce tornadoes. We made 26 trips carrying soldiers across, he said. The following November, Mandevilles ship hit a mine and sunk, although the water was shallow so it didnt go completely under, and he was able to board another ship. The incident left him shell-shocked and jumpy. He recalled seeing a terribly wounded German soldier, who was missing a leg forgotten? Thanks to the efforts of Towers and other American and French citizens who share his concern, approximately 95 percent of the graves have been adopted. Towers also works hard to keep the memories alive at home, volunteering every Tuesday afternoon at the the Camp Blanding museum. The American monument on Omaha Beach commemorates those who lost their lives during the bloody D-Day battle. D-Day will be commemorated at the Keystone Heights Airport on Saturday, June 7, at 8 a.m. with a Wings of Dreams flyin breakfast. All veterans will receive a free breakfast, which will be followed by a program honoring those who participated in the Normandy campaign. Wings of Dreams to remember

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Andrews really excelled in the subject of math and helped assist other students who were having problems understanding it. You would not believe how many kids today give John credit for them knowing their multiplication tables, said Stanwix-Hay, who also said she has many photos of Andrews up at the board teaching fellow students how to do math problems. Basically, Andrews demonstrates what good citizenship is all about, StanwixHay said. Hes the kind of kid everybody wants to help because hes so helpful himself, she said. Andrews just never fit into a regular classroom setting, which is true of many students, Stanwix-Hay said. Some students just cant maintain the same level as others. Many, many kids arent cut out for that, which is why kids drop out of school, StanwixHay said. They just cant sit in a class where everyone is on page 51 at the same time. Some of them should be on page 98, and some of them shouldnt even be in that book. The Academy of Academics use of an individual educational plan is beneficial to a lot of students. Like Andrews, Jacob Slayton is set to graduate, and it wouldnt have been possible otherwise. Slayton was so behind on his credits he didnt think it would be possible to graduate after enrolling in the academy this school year. Slayton gave a lot of credit to the academy teachers, saying, Everybody here cares and wants to help you out. An appreciation for teachers Stanwix-Hay, Cindy Bagley, Harold Bish Bishop, Anna Kirley, Linda Rudoi and Robin Tatumas well as guidance counselor Cynthia Rossseems to be share by many of the academy students. Charlotte Carter, who said she would be sitting at home doing nothing if not for the program, stressed how the individual attention students receive is a big plus. They want you to succeed, she said of the teachers. Aaron Akridge said the teachers have helped him make tremendous progress since he joined the program last year. Theyve brought me a long way, he said. Like Andrews, Akridge has been participating in the Bradford-Union Technical Centers welding program. He became certified in two areas this past year. Akridge now sees a future for himself. If not for the Academy of Academics, he said, I probably wouldve left (school). Akridge and Andrews received certificates at the May 29 ceremony for the achievements in welding. Andrews and Slayton received Florida Ready to Work certificates, while Shania Rosier received a certificate for meeting the requirements to become a Microsoft Office specialist. Certificates of achievement 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 (352) 473-9873Open Every Day 10:30AM-9PM N OW OPEN BBQ Burgers Steaks Salads7154 S.E. CR 21B Keystone (intersection of SR100 & 21B) www.tomsrealpitbbq.comfacebook.com/tomsrealpitbbq twitter.com/tomsrealpitbbq SAT JUNE 14THMOVIE NIGHT Bring in your church bulletin on Sunday and well donate 10% of your purchase back to your church! For more info visit: Friday & Saturday Steak & Shrimp Night SAT JUNE 21STLOTS OF WATER FUN! 10% OFFTotal PurchaseWith this Ad Expires 6-30-14 Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: In response to your article about the temporary fire station in Keystone for CCFR Station 11, I would like to offer the following information. 1. CCFR has been living in the house and utilizing the facilities owned by KHVFD rent free for 30 years! In 2004 CCBOCC entered into a 15 year agreement/contract with KHVFD to resolve the inadequate living quarters for the paid crews that are assigned there when the county staffed a paid fire engine in Keystone in addition to the rescue unit which increased staffing from 2 to 5. This allowed them to renovate the twostory building to resolve those issues that were recognized and were rushed due to the important nature in 2004. When the contract was signed by the County Commissioners, a quote was provided for the amount of $250,000 in which Clay County had budgeted for the project. Had your county administration followed through with the contract they entered into (for their benefit) none of this nonsense would be taking place today. Had the County administration completed the renovation as contracted to do they could have had this problem CRIME DOESNT PAYB UT WE DO!REWARDS UP TO $3,000 CRIME DOESNT PAYB UT WE DO!P AID FOR BY THE FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUNDREWARDS UP TO $3,000R EMAIN ANONYMOUSC ALL TOLL FREE S TOPPE RSSubmit a TIP ON-LINE a t: www.F CCrimeStoppers.com INTERNETAVAILABLE 904-388-9279 $ 24 99 USA Gymnastics Registrationnow underway MonFri 3-8pm (904) 368-0006 Ronnie McReynolds Registration: $10Evening Classes: $50/month (Begins June 9) 5-Day Camp: $100All Camps run 9am 3pm and include movie fieldtripUSA Gymnastics of FL is proud to announce registration for our summer programs. If the kids are looking for something fun to do this summer, let us help. With 26 years of experience USAGF is a proven hit for all ages! Like us on at Shooting Stars Gymnastics June 9 13 July 28 Aug 1 July 14 18 Continued from 2B were also awarded in the following areas: Math: Rosier, Joshua Hundley, Justin Mann and Markayla Smith. History: Smith, Javone Blackshear and Tahlera Sweeting. English: Andrews and Smith. Science: Carter, Rosier and Slayton. Edmentum (online learning program)/Reading: Sweeting and Kristen Harris. Some information regarding CCFR Station 11 solved 10 years ago. I would also remind you that CCBOCC vetoed the contract in April of 2013 with KHVFD, yet KHVFD continues to allow the career CCFR staff to reside there and to continue to use the facilities to store the fire engine, spare engine, and spare rescue all while paying no rent. Clay County is kind enough to pay the utilities, insurance, and partially maintain the buildings while they continue to use KHVFD to operate from. KHVFD has yet to file or enter into any litigation for the breach of contract in hopes Clay County would resolve the deficit they have caused. Over the last 12 months, KHVFD directors and individual Volunteer firefighters have made several attempts to work things out with Clay County and put KHVFD back to work to provide fire and first responder services to the area and Clay County will not even respond to our phone calls or emails any longer. KHVFD is negotiating with Bradford County to serve Southeast Bradford County as the primary fire protection and that would reduce homeowners insurance rates for all of those that are uninsurable in Bradford County because they are more than 5 road miles from Theressa Station 2. Yet Bradfords County Manager wants permission from Clay County to allow a non-profit fully functional, self-sustaining fire department to provide additional fire/rescue services to the citizens of Bradford County. (Clay County does not even recognize KHVFD as a department any longer) If you were not aware, Bradford Station 2 is covering fire/rescue services for Hampton now on a regular basis which has them spread thin due to lower manpower and a larger response area. In closing, I would encourage and challenge each person in Clay County and Bradford County to contact your respective County Commissioners, and Manager and express to them how much KHVFD could save the property owners in insurance rates, provide fire and medical response quicker and more efficiently supplementing the services provided by Bradford County currently, and why Bradford County needs permission to use KHVFD for the benefit of the citizens which Clay County Commissioners took from the Lake Region last year. Kevin Lee Mobley Firefighter/Paramedic/ Instructor/Inspector/Officer Dear Editor: So one of the issues that the town of Hampton was scolded for was nepotism...ok. What makes Bradford County so superior? Chapter 112.3135 Florida Statutes clearly defines that law. Yet, Bradford County thumbs their nose at that law and employs a County Commissioners Niece and the County Managers Son. The County Attorney, who Nepotism OK for county, but not Hampton? apparently is supposed to be smarter than everybody else, allows the BOCC to adopt resolutions (2012-04 and 201210), to circumvent the state statutes, and no big deal. So.. if Im clear on this, the local governments can adopt resolutions to circumvent any law the State of Florida has set forth? Thats convenient. Not a single Commissioner questioned the legality of this... no surprise, being as the two public officials whose relatives benefit from this have a history of termination from the DOC scandal and Ethics Commission violations. So what else are they up to? Hampton was nearly abolished for wrong doing... Think about this as an election is coming up. Change is needed, and there is competition out there against the way we always do it Paul McDavid Resident, Bradford County District 5 Dear Editor: Last night as we were going to church, the weather got real stormy. The wind was blowing rain and limbs in sheets across the roads. Lightning and thunder came as we got into the church. The preacher was preaching about the miracle of creation, Storm a time on faith which I liked a lot, but I was distracted by the sounds of the storm and the words of the 19 th Psalm kept running through my head. The Heavens declare the glory of God and the firmament showeth His Handiwork Music of the spheres: Gods orchestra blessing the earth and all we who are aware of it! It is no wonder that I like stormy weather. When I got home, I read the whole Psalm and found it so familiar, I think I know most of it by heart. In the night, I lay there saying it over and over. The last verse: Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight O Lord. My strength and my Redeemer. Those are good words to go to sleep on. Hazel Wall 2 4 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l $ 1 0 0 0 0 m i n c u o r g 1 4 6 % A P Y* 1 0 0 % A P Y* D e p o s i t s a r e f e d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A a U S G o v e r n m e n t A g e n c y f o r u p t o $ 2 5 0 0 0 0 A n n u a l P e r c e n t a g e Y i e l d ( A P Y ) e f f e c t i v e 3 / 1 3 / 2 0 1 4 a n d s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e a t a n y t i m e 3 6 m o n t h A P R i s 1 4 5 % 5 4 0 p e n a l t y d a y s 2 4 m o n t h A P R i s 1 0 0 % 3 6 0 p e n a l t y d a y s O f f e r e x p i r e s 6 / 3 0 / 1 4 3 6 m o n t h C D S p e c i a l F e d e r a l l y I n s u r e d b y t h e N C U A

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BY MICKEY AGNER Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District, and he knows and loves his job. He will answer any related question and transition into new, but related, topics extemporaneously and without hesitation. Discussing the recent growth specifically in the autism spectrum area during a May 30 interview, Andrews said, The question quickly arises as to whether environmental issues are causing a growth of autism spectrum disorders, or have we just become better at evaluating and identifying them? I dont know the answer to that question, but what I do know is that in the last few years, we have gained massive amounts of information about how people learn and how to help those with disabilities grow. Andrews indicated that the requirements and regulations for the ESE program are mandated and regulated according to the Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act. Moreover and according to that disabilities actthe necessary instruction required for identified disabilities was previously provided in separate classes, but research indicates that including the students with disabilities in the regular classa process known as inclusionis much more effective. When reminded that many people say that inclusion lowers the standards of the regular class, Andrews quickly responded that the claim is simply not true. Each student with disabilities is given a weight based upon the complexity and severity of the identified disability, and every public school is provided additional funding to address those needs according to the disability. The classes with more noted disability presence are provided additional teacher support. With that additional teacher support, the class is better able to address the skill diversification of each class, whether that is the student with educational disabilities or the Andrews passionate about students with disabilities Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Brandi Barrington of Starke and Jackson Tatum of Lawtey announce their wedding on June 21 at 3 p.m. at Madison Street Baptist Church in Starke. Brandi is the daughter of Halbert and Nadine Barrington. She attended Bradford High School (Class of 2010) and just graduated from the University of North Florida in April, earning a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Jackson is the son of John and Christina Tatum. He attended Bradford High School (Class of 2008) and works at his familys business. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Barrington, Tatum to wed June 21 Brandi Barrington and Jackson Tatum Chelsey Marie Collins of Starke and Davin Sloan Crews of Lawtey announce their upcoming wedding. Chelsey is the daughter of Rex and Lisa Collins of Starke. She is a Graduate of Bradford High School. Davin is the son of Herman and Sandra Crews of Lawtey. He is a graduate of Bradford High School, Santa Fe College, Criminal Justice. The wedding will be on June 20, 2014 at Crystal Lake in Keystone Heights at 11:00 am. Roy Spaulding is the minister. The bride will be given in marriage by Clinton Collins, her brother. Lisa Collins will be Maid of Honor. The Best Man will be Herman Crews, grooms grandfather. Collins, Crews to wed June 20 Davin Crews and Chelsey Collins Born in 1920 when the life expectancy was only 66 years, Margaret Peek has definitely defied the odds by 28 years. Four generations of her family came together to celebrate her 94 th birthday with lunch in the park. We all enjoyed reminiscing about previous get-togethers throughout the years. A highlight of the celebration was watching her great-grandchildren interact with each other and the adults. We all delighted in sharing new and old memories as we celebrated the 94 th birthday of our mother, mother-in-law, and nana. Peek celebrates 94th birthday Socials John Edward Parker graduated Magna Cum Laude from Elon University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics. He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honors society. John is the grandson of Mary Ann Soud of Keystone Heights. Parker graduates from Elon University John Parker Anna Sucsy of Keystone Heights, was named to the Deans List at Bates located in Lewiston, Maine, for the winter 2014 semester -a distinction earned by students whose cumulative grade point average is 3.71 or higher. Deans List students at Bates are exemplary high academic achievers. They model the good things that come from being goal-oriented, hard-working and persistent, said Matthew R. Auer, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Bates. Sucsy is the daughter of Peter V. Sucsy Ph.D. of Keystone Heights, and is a 2013 graduate of Eastside High School. Sucsy named to Bates deans list His parents are Tim and Esther Parker, and sister, Laura Soud Parker, all of Raleigh, N.C. Drew Andrews is the new director of exceptional student education with the Bradford County School District.

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Bradford High School seniors enjoyed food and lots of 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 Going out with a fun day of memories through a gauntlet of balls are (foreground Richardson, and Janell Danielle Clark Detlefsen seem to have the hang of it in the three-legged hang of it as they go crashing to the ground. obstacle course. easy. as she makes sure BHS football coach Steve Reynolds gets dunked. Tillotson Haleigh Clary are all smiles as they look for unsuspecting victims to Chadwick has a water gun ready Scotty Peirce up to no good. He has a tub full of water balloons. prepares to put some power into it during throws a football. BHS graduation: June 6, 8 p.m.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Dr. Anubha Gupta received her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of PALMS MEDICAL GROUP facilities in Starke every Tuesday. She will be seeing pediatric and adult clients for routine health maintenance and sick visits. Dr. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, hopefully for a very long time! NEW DOCTOR IN TOWN t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: Bradford Thomas Henry Anderson, 63, of Jacksonville was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for driving a vehicle not registered or licensed with the state. Jeremy Christopher Brewer, 21, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Brewer slapped his wife and pulled her to the ground by her hair before almost pushing her down the steps of the front porch as she tried to get away from him. The police were called, and Brewer was arrested. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Chad Austin Carpenter, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested June 2 by Starke police for trespassing. According to the arrest report, Carpenter went to an auto parts store in Starke where a relative works and caused a disturbance, yelling obscenities and threatening several employees. He had been trespassed already in February from the same store. Tonya Gisela Carter, 32, of Starke was arrested June 2 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Carter was irritated with a male at the residence. He was sitting outside on the front porch when she ran out the door, headbutted the victim and then tried to shove him off the porch. The victim was able to catch himself before falling and called law enforcement. A witness verified the victims account, and Carter was arrested. Rolando Carreno of Miami was arrested May 30 by the Florida Highway Patrol on two out-of-county warrants. Bond was set at $7,000 for the charges. David Orman Cox, 52, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon. According to the arrest report, Cox had been drinking and got into an argument with his son. Cox had purchased a new knife and had it in a sheath on his side, and threatened to stab his son with it during the argument. The son called law enforcement after Cox passed out on the couch. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Elmer Ray Cox, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Clay for domestic battery. Bond was set at $5,002 for the charge. Brittany Mae Daugherty, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for making a false report of child abuse. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charge. Willie Kevin Dolison, 35, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, Dolison was arguing with his girlfriend when he came up behind her and grabbed her, pushed her against the wall and took her cell phone. He then threw the phone in the yard. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Marc Howard Duncan, 21, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, Duncan threw a bag of marijuana out of the vehicle before being pulled over by the officer. Crack cocaine was found during a search of the vehicle, along with more marijuana. Bond was set at $17,000 for the charges. Nicholas Shane Faulkner, 27, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charge. John Anthony Faust, 28, of Salisbury, N.C., was arrested May 27 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for two charges of possession of marijuana and for five charges of possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $29,000 for the charges. Timothy Lavain Floweres, 33, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on four warrants for probation violation. No bond was allowed for the charges. Christopher Daniel Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and Union Geistlinger, 27, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana, producing marijuana, possession of drug equipment and destroying evidence. According to the arrest report, deputies received a tip that Geistlinger had a marijuana-growing operation at his residence, and after going to the residence once and smelling the marijuana, they returned later to speak with him. After gaining entry into the home and observing marijuana plants, they obtained a search warrant for the residence and found six pots with marijuana growing in them, along with other equipment used to grow the plants. Bond was set at $62,000 for the charges. Aaron Roy Griffis, 21, of Lawtey was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Danielle N. Hamm, 36, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Starke police for failure to appear. Lucella Hill, 37, of Starke was arrested June 1 by Starke police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Tyrise D. Jackson, 19, of Lawtey was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police for battery. According to the arrest report, Jackson got into an argument with a 14-year-old relative over the use of a phone and slammed her head into a dresser, causing a knot the size of a baseball on the back of her head. Richard Kelly, 24, of Lady Lake was arrested June 1 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Jeremy James Manning, 35, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for battery. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Demetrius A. Martin, 20, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Richard Craig Nipper, 46, of Brooker was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-petit theft second degree, third subsequent offense. Bond was set at $15,000 for the charge. Shynequia M. Oneil, 18, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $5,000 for the charge. Mathew R. Padgett, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Alphonso Leon Pernell, 34, of Starke was arrested May 28 by Bradford deputies for aggravated assault with a weapon, two charges of battery, kidnapfalse imprisonment, criminal mischief-property damage, resisting an officer, disturbing the peace and obstructing justice. According to the arrest report, the police were called to a residence about a disturbance. Pernell was at his mothers home in Starke washing his clothes when he became irate over something and started threatening to shoot and kill everyone in the house. While his mother was on the phone calling 911, Pernell snatched the phone out of her hand and broke it. Police arrived shortly thereafter, though, with several deputies and a K-9 unit to assist. Pernell refused to come out of the home and threatened that he had something for the officers if they went in the home. Pernells mom then snuck out of the house in the back and was talking to the officers from the front porch when Pernell stepped out onto the porch. She quickly went back inside and locked the front door, leaving him outside. After Pernell wouldnt comply with the officers to get on the ground, they released the K-9, but Pernell hit and kicked the dog several times. An officer then used a Taser, but Pernell continued to resist. Another officer used a Taser before Pernell was handcuffed and arrested. Bond was set at $1,102,000 for the charges. Timothy Warren Potts, 31, of Starke was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for larceny-grand theft of a dwelling. Bond was set at $50,000 for the charge. Dennie Rae Randolph, 34, of Starke was arrested May 27 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. Bond was set at $1,500 for the charge. Daryl S. Risby, 40, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for violation of conditional release by the Florida Parole Commission. No bond was allowed for the charge. Ronald Eric Sawyer, 42, of Starke was arrested May 29 by Bradford deputies for possession of opium or derivative. According to the arrest report, during a traffic stop it was discovered that Sawyer had 19 Methadone pills he intended to distribute to another individual. Bond was set at $20,000 for the charge. Rosamarie Denice Simmons, 34, of Starke was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Putnam. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Rachel Marie Smith, 24, of Jacksonville was arrested May 30 by Bradford deputies for failure to appear. No bond was allowed for the charge. Robert Gerald Swanson, 41, of Baldwin was arrested May 31 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Keystone/Melrose Jacqueline Fraga, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for DUI. Dana Charles Hoffman, 55, of Melrose was arrested May 30 by Putnam deputies for perjury. Justen Kelley, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 2 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Jessica Nail, 21, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for burglary. Amanda Smith, 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 30 by Clay deputies for failure to appear. Derick Luther Phillips, 23, of Melrose was arrested June 1 by Putnam deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Ronnie Allen Stratten, 49, of Melrose was arrested May 28 by state troopers for driving with a suspended or revoked license. John Waters, 18, of Keystone Heights was arrested May 28 by Clay deputies for lewd or lascivious battery. Union Marion Eugene York, 52, of Lake Butler was arrested May 28 by Union deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a disturbance, where it was eventually determined that York struck his girlfriend in her face during an argument. According to the victim and a friend staying at the residence, this wasnt the first time York struck the victim during arguments. He was arrested and transported to jail. Stephen Louis Heslar, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested May 30 by Union deputies on an out-ofcounty warrant from Bradford. A 16-year-old juvenile from Lake Butler was arrested May 27 by Union deputies for three charges of possession of marijuana, possession of narcotic equipment and obstructing justice-tamper or destroy evidence.

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! Thrift Store Lawtey, FLWatch for sign at Red Light on right. Cross Railroad. Were the first building on right after crossing RR.904-964-2524 Blake Valenzuela, between and Jennifer Valenzuela, and brothers and Jacob signs to play College. seated between Athletes for mother, Holly Hudson, signs Christian of intent. signs his letter of intent to attend Southeastern joined by sister, Courtney, and parents, Jodi and Sean Carroll. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Three recent Keystone Heights High School graduates signed letters of intent to play football during a May 22 ceremony. Tight end Micah Brown, who also played safety, will join former teammate Nate Smitha 2013 KHHS graduateat Kentucky Christian University in Grayson, Ky., while quarterback Blake Valenzuela will attend Wilmington (Ohio) College. Fullback/kicker Michael Carroll, who also played the linebackerdefensive end hybrid position, will join the first-year program at Lakelands Southeastern University. Each player generated interest from more than 20 schools through the Athletes for College recruiting service. Brown said it was a stressful time, talking to various coaches every day, but it was an experience he also enjoyed. It was a mixture of feelings at the signing ceremony as well. Im nervous and excited really excited, Brown said. Brown said he believes the small, Christian school will be a good fit for him. Plus, he enjoys the fact he gets to join a friend in Smith. Keystone head coach Chuck Dickinson said Brown possesses a 6-3, 6-4 frame that could use a little more weight. He said Brown probably weighs approximately 200 pounds now, but could see him putting on 25 to 30 pounds. As it was, though, Brown did the job he needed to do at tight end. Even though he wasnt real heavy, he came off the ball, Dickinson said. We ran quite a bit to his side. He was able to get people moved out of there just because of leverage. Brown already catches the ball well, though Dickinson said thats something hell have to continue to work on. Hes got above-average hands, Dickinson said, but thats something he can improve on. Brown feels good about his chances to contribute. I think Ill get the opportunity to play a lot at this school, he said. Carroll seemed almost at a loss for words in describing what it felt like to get a chance to keep playing. I dont know, its just mind blowing getting this far, he said. Its crazy to think of. It was a hard decision to choose a school, Carroll said. He narrowed his choices to Southeastern and Faulkner University in Montgomery, Ala. In the end, Carroll said he liked Southeasterns commitment to academics and its closer location to home. As far as the football side of Southeastern, Carroll said hes not sure where hell end up playing, though he does have a preference for lining up in the offensive backfield. Id like to get the ball, but its just wherever the coaches need me, Carroll said. Dickinson said Carroll is a strong blocker, with an emphasis on strong. Michael benches 335, 340, and cleans over 300, Dickinson 3 KHHS football players receive college opportunities said. From a strength standpoint, hes already there. Hes just got to fit into their system. Its a new system in the sense of being a first-year program, so maybe hell have a chance to get in and have some early playing time. Carroll proved his worth at KHHS as a kicker as well with his ability to kick off into the end zone. He was a very big asset to the team, Dickinson said. Valenzuela admitted he didnt like talking during his interview with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor, but he had no trouble putting into words what the day meant to him. Im pretty happy, he said. Ive always wanted to go play a sport in college. Its always been my dream. Now, its happening. Valenzuela helped lead the Indians to the District 4-4A championship last season. That accomplishment will only help as he attempts to make his mark at the collegiate level. It helped me because it showed that anything can happen, Valenzuela said. Nobody determined that we would go as far as we did (in 2013). We were supposed to be the underdogs, and we proved everybody wrong. Dickinson said Valenzuela was a big part of that district championship by adding another dimension to his game. Valenzuela showed the ability to run the ball and did so successfully in key games, such as a win over district opponent Bradford. I think that helped our offense tremendously with him being able to be a run threat, Dickinson said. He still was able to throw, but I think thats part of the game hell have to work on a little bit more at the next level. Hopefully, A girls basketball/softball camp will be held at the Keystone Heights High School gym from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. starting June 30 and running through July 2. A session will be offered for girls in second through fourth grade, while another will be offered for those in fifth through seventh grade. The cost is $130 (or $65 for those who want to do only one sport) and includes lunches, drinks, T-shirts and awards. Applications may be obtained at Keystone Heights Elementary School. For more information, please call Keystone Heights Elementary School at 352-4734844 and speak to either Jessica Carter (ext. 2315) or MaryAnne McCall (ext. 2270). Keystone girls basketball/ softball camp starts June 30

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B Caregiver for Mother she lives near Hampton 3 to 5 days a week 5 to 6 hours a day Pay is negotiable CONTACT: (c) Serving F amilies in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The area s largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 d Obituaries d Mildred Copeland LAKE BUTLERMildred Dansie Copeland, 93, of Lake Butler passed away Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at her residence from an extended illness. Mrs. Copeland was born on Jan. 23, 1921 in Salt Lake City, Utah to the late Mahonri Dansie and Estella Starling Dansie. She was a homemaker. She was a lifetime member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, currently of the Lake Butler Ward. She is preceded in death by a son, David Copeland. Mrs. Copeland is survived by: her loving husband of 72 years, William O. Copeland; seven daughters, Ellen Virden, Mary (Robert) Porter, Donna (Glenn) Milton, Christine (George) Bradberry, Nancy (Tom) Price, Barbara Trambley, and Sarah (Mark) Hill; two sons, Tommy Copeland and James (Carolyn) Copeland; brother, Wesley Dansie; sisters, Dorothy Dansie and Stella Benson; 36 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services for Mrs. Copeland were held May 31 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Lake Butler Ward. Burial took place after the funeral in the Jacksonville Memory Gardens, 111 Blanding Blvd. Orange Park. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. 386-4962008. please sign the guestbook at archerfuneralhome.com PAID OBITUARY Wanda Jones STARKEWanda Leen Jones, age 77, of Starke passed away at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville on Friday, May 30, 2014. She was born on Nov. 18, 1936 in Kings Mills, Ohio to the late Edward and Edith Robinson. Wanda was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Reverend Reed Jones. While a resident of Starke, Wanda worked as a Preschool Teacher at St. Marks Daycare and Little Peoples Daycare. She and Reed then moved to Shelby, North Carolina where they pastored New Bethel Nazarene Church for 22 years. Wandas two favorite things were spending time with her family and sharing the love of the Lord through time spent with her church family. Wanda is survived by: her children, Rhoda (Wayne) Wainwright, Danny Jones and Jeanetta Skinner all of Starke; her brother, Jimmy Robinson of Manchester, Ohio; her sister, Beulah Reese of Little Valley, N.Y.; her grandchildren, Kenneth Wainwright, Kristen Quinones, Tarah Jones and Daina Skinner; her great-grandchildren, Tyler, Carson and Kencie Wainwright, Ava and Luka Quinones, and Libby and Hannah Jones. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, June 7, at 11:00 am, with visitation beginning at 10:00 am, followed by a memorial service at Madison Street Baptist Church. Wanda lovingly requested donations be made to Haven Hospice, 4200 N. W. 90th. Blvd. Gainesville, Fl 32606, in her memory. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARY Roy Knight BROOKER Roy Edward Knight, 63 of Brooker passed away Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville. He was born Dec. 11, 1950 in Brooker to the late James Knight and Geraldine McNeal Knight. Mr. Knight was a heavy equipment operator. He enjoyed gardening, his dogs, and being a mechanic. He was preceded in death by his brothers, David and Jack Knight. Mr. Knight is survived by: his loving wife, Bethany Goodrich Knight; three brothers, Richard Knight, John Knight, and Vernon Knight; two sisters, Alice Sanford and Thelma McQuaig. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the funeral arrangements. 386496-2008 PAID OBITUARY Shirley Marshall STARKE Shirley Tyson Marshall, 64, of Starke, died on Thursday, May 29, 2014 at Shands at University of Florida Hospital Gainesville. She was a lifelong resident of Starke. She was a member of Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church. She was a graduate of RJE High School Class of 1968. She was also employed with Head Start and Episcopal Children Services for 34 years. She is survived by: son, Mark A. Marshall; and daughter, Stacy L. Marshall, both of Starke; sisters, Helen Pitts of Cocoa, Gloria Mack and Hazel Hamilton, both of Starke; brothers, Clinton Kelly of Cocoa, Vernon Tyson of Gainesville, Oliver Tyson of Starke, and Gad Tyson Jacksonville; and three grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m on Saturday, June 7 in the Church of God by Faith in Lawtey with Rev Carl Tyson Presiding and Rev. Alvin Green Eulogist conducting the services. Interment will be held in Bob-Love Cemetery in Starke. Viewing Family Hour, Haile Funeral Home Chapel Friday June 6, 2014 3-4:00 p.m. Viewing for Friends will be held at Pleasant Grove United Methodist Church 5-7:00 p.m. and 1 hour prior to the services on Saturday at the church. The Cortege will form at the Home of Ms. Shirley Marshall 17285 N. W 55th Avenue in Pleasant Grove at 1:15 p.m. Arrangements are under the Haile Funeral Home, Inc. of Starke. Lujune Southerland LAKE BUTLERLujune Rush Southerland, 56, of Lake Butler died Monday, June 2, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice in Gainesville after an extended illness, surrounded by her family. She was born on June 15, 1957 in Ocala to the late James Rush, Sr. and Velva Gay Rush. She was employed with medical records at Shands in Gainesville for many years. She is survived by: her husband of 35 years, John Earl Southerland, Jr.; daughter, Jennifer Dawn Southerland; one granddaughter; brother, James Rush, Jr.; sisters, Penni (Anthony) Williams and Teresa McGill. Funeral services will be held Friday, June 6 at 11:00 a.m. in the chapel of Archer Funeral Home, with Rev. Steve Hutchinson officiating. Burial will be at New Zion Cemetery following the services. Family invites friends for visitation Thursday, June 5 from 6 to 8 pm at the funeral home. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Daniel Williams LAWTEY Daniel Wayne Williams, 67, of Lawtey died June 3, 2014 at the V.A. Medical Center 1954 On behalf of the family of Mal colm H. Crews, Jr. we would like to thank all those who surrounded us with prayer, en couragement, food and flowers during this most difficult time. We are truly overwhelmed with gratitude for the love you have shown us. God bless you all Card of Thanks in Lake City. He was born July 27, 1946 in Jacksonville. He is preceded in death by his brother, Dale Walker Prescott and his mother, Lavada Ivey Prescott. He served in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. He is survived by: his brother, Eugene Prescott of Lawtey. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. things I had never seen before, so I just kind of guessed. BHS sophomore Cole Johnson also competed at the state event in the area of computer maintenance. He placed fifth after earning a first-place finish at the Region 2 event. The winner in each area at the state event will compete in the SkillsUSA national event. This was the first year of SkillsUSA competition for Johnson and Yates. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry representatives working to provide the U.S. with a skilled labor force. Yates said she wasnt expecting to come out on top at the Region 2 event, which featured 12 other students competing in medical terminology. In fact, she said she was hesitant about even placing due to a soccer injury that had her on crutches. I was recovering from an ACL reconstruction, Yates said. They were going to make me walk up to the stage and walk across it. Mrs. Jackson walked up (to the stage) with me and went on stage and got my award. I was thankful for that. By virtue of a top-three finish, Yates earned the right to compete at state along with Johnson, who also placed first at the Region 2 event. I was really excited because I had never been to Pensacola before, she said. At the time of the SkillsUSA event, though, the area was deluged by rain and experienced flooding. Jeff Ledger, a computer systems and information technology teacher at the Bradford-Union Technical Center who went on the trip, said it was the craziest weather hes ever seen. The electricity at the Bay Center, where the SkillsUSA event was held, went out halfway through the competition. When it came back on, Ledger said, they said, Just so you know, theres a funnel cloud Continued from 2B about a mile from us. Well keep you alerted. Yates said, We got like 21 inches of rain overnight. There was actually a lightning bolt that hit the hotel and shook the whole building. It woke me up from a dead sleep. Still, the SkillsUSA event was fun, Yates said. She competed against approximately 20 people in medical terminology. She was off crutches by that time, but that didnt make hearing her name announced as a third-place finisher any less intimidating as the state event had more competitors overall than at the Region 2 event. I was a bit more nervous, Yates said. I was off crutches, but I still had to walk down about three flights of stairs and get on stage with all those people looking at me. It was nerveracking. Yates believes competitions hosted by such organizations as SkillsUSA and Health Occupations Students of America can help students plan out a career path. However, she made up her mind to do something in medicine years ago, citing her parents as influences. Her father, Rusty, works for Philips and provides service for medical equipment, while her mother, Susan, works for the Cardiac and Vascular Institute in Gainesville as a nuclear technologist. Ive known from a young age I always wanted to go into the medical field, said Yates, who is contemplating becoming either an obstetrician/gynecologist or a neonatologist. I think these classes here (at the BradfordUnion Technical Center) help solidify that. Ledger said he wished to thank the following for their support in allowing Yates and Johnson to compete in the SkillsUSA events: George Roberts Insurance, Starke Chiropractic, Mosley Tire, Denmark Enterprise, Knuckle Draggers, Capital City Bank, State Farm, Community State Bank, Bradford County Education Foundation, Tatum Brothers Saw Mill, Jackson Building Supply and Ameriprise Financial. Network $2999 904-388-9279

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student with gifted skills. Additionally, those classes with additional teacher support are better able to intensify the support for students learning new skills and gradually withdraw that support as the student progresses, a successful process known as scaffolding. That, Andrews said, is not his opinion, but the conclusion of research. From there, his conversation with the Telegraph-TimesMonitor quickly flowed into the area of specific learning disabilities because it is by far the largest area of disabilities in every public school district. According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, nearly 2.5 million school-age children in the United States today have been identified as having learning disabilities, and this does not include the students enrolled in private or religious schools. That number of students represents about 42 percent of hell continue to progress. The fact that Valenzuela progressed each year while at KHHS has the coach believing he can do the same at Wilmington. I think if he does what hes supposed to, hell have an opportunity to do well, Dickinson said. The three players cant wait to suit up for their respective schools. Its something Ive always wanted to do, Valenzuela said, while Brown said, I cant wait. Its so exciting. Carroll said, Its going to be an adrenaline rush, definitely. Dickinson, of course, is proud of all three for achieving their goals and putting in the work necessary in the classroom to do so. Hopefully, they found the (school) that will best fit them, and theyll have success, Dickinson said. 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal cus todians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 Commercial Property (Rent, FOR RENT PROFESSION AL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro $315 per month. Confer ence room, kitchen, utili ties and more provided. 904-364-8395. Home for Sale 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more infor mation call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. VERY CLEAN NEWLY PAINTED, 2BR/1BA SW. W/D hookup, CH/A, 1 acre, in country. $450/mo. $500 deposit, no lease. Call 904-769-9559. 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Down town STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. 2BR/2BA. Lake front. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Elec tric range, refrig. Wall to wall carpet. $400/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 EXTRA CASH! Could you use some now that the holidays are over? We specialize in helping people sell through our Classifieds! YARD SALES AUTOS BOATS CLOTHES APPLIANCES... The list goes on..Call Mary Today at 904-964-6305 N EED C ASH F AST! E mail your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: by 5pm Monday or bring it to:B radford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 904) 964-6305 c ash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk c overing Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly f ree c ommunity shopper: T arget your audience quickly A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Fri, June 13th @ 10am Online & Onsite 10950 N Kendall Dr, 2 nd Fl, Miami, Fl 33176 Office Furniture & Equipment Cubicles Computers/Laptops Phone System & more! 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties all U.S. students enrolled in any kind of ESE class. Unlike many common perceptions, these disabilities are not a discriminator of people. They are caused by genetics and problems in pregnancy, at birth or after birth. Additionally, they can be caused after birth by head injuries, poor nutrition or chemical exposures to elements such as lead. According to Andrews, a major factor in the students educational growth, regardless of the relevant type or severity of disability, is early detection. Even when a young child encounters brain damage from accidents, he or she has a better chance of regaining the original neurological function compared to adults. Likewise, the younger the child is when a disability is identified, the better chance he or she has of overcoming those disabilities educationally. Consequently, the district places much emphasis upon its relationship with childcare programs, voluntary pre-K programs and early organizations like Child Find and Early Steps. Andrews indicated that good communications between parents and people who work with children in preschool organizations are very important. Those professional childcare workers have been trained to recognize disability indicators that are age specific to those children. Some of the more profound and physical disabilities are easily identified, but specific learning disabilities are manifested in subtle expressions. Andrews concurred that the identifying behaviors and skills listed on the idonline.org website are good indicators of the lessobvious learning disabilities of preschool-age children to look for. Those identifying skills and behaviors are: Speaks later than most children. Pronunciation problems. Slow vocabulary growth, often unable to find the right word. Difficulty rhyming words. Trouble learning numbers, alphabet, days of the week, colors or shapes. Extremely restless and easily distracted. Trouble interacting with peers. Difficulty following directions or routines. Fine motor skills are slow to develop. When you listen to Andrews talk about children with disabilities, you not only get the impression that children with disabilities can be successful, but that they are also very significant assets to all of our schools and community. Continued from 5B Continued from 8B

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Thursday, June 5, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 11B KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 2BR/1BA APT. CH/A. Elec tric range, refrig. Hard wood floors. $495/mo. sec. deposit. References, call 904-966-1334. 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Vil lage in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 14 BY 70. 2BR MOBILE HOME on Private Lot. 301 Hampton. Like new. $525/ month. 904-966-3212 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $600/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 CH/A $600/mo. $300/ deposit. Between Lake Butler & Raiford. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $950/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 DW 3BR/2BA. On 2 acres with add. 2 acres fenced w/pond/horses. Lawn maintenance included. Has water softener. $1,150/mo. First & last plus deposit $200.00. Call 904-769-1636 LARGE FURNISHED ROOM WITH BATH for rent $80/weekly. Located on State Rd 100 Starke. Ride to & from doctors, food store, low income are welcome. Monthly rent can be arranged. 904-769-8077. KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 2BR/1BA HOUSE. Across from RJE in Reno. Nice clean, freshly painted. Must see. Kitchen com pletely redone. Contact Marvin 904-742-3406 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 2BR/1BA HOUSE in Starke city limits. $500/month plus $500/deposit. Call 352-235-6319 RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet wel come. 904-964-2747 LAWTEY CHURCH OF GOD yard sale. Sat. 8am-2pm. FRIDAY 8AM-2PM. 10321 NW CR 225 Starke. Lots of nice miscellaneous items. Kamado-Joe XL Grill, brand-new used 3x $500.00. Sm. furniture, attic fan, clothes, some tools. MULTI FAMILY. MISSION TRIP FUNDRAISER. Fri & Sat 8am-1pm. House wares, clothes, shoes, toys, tools, elec tronics & more. Harvest Church N of Starke on 301. FRI & SAT 8AM-2PM. Come see. 5062 NW 182nd way. Conerly Estates. Rain date June 13th & 14th. YARD SALE SATUR DAY ONLY! SE SR 100 8am-2pm SAT 8AM-5PM. Huge sale. 3 miles past Hospital on 230. Follow signs on left. Sales A FUNDRAISING YARD SALE will be held at Key stone Heights VFD on Fri & Sat 8am-3pm. The funds raised from this yard sale will assist with the cost of the cemetery monument for DJ Mob ley. 231/121 go south as if go ing to RMC. 9515 CR 231 on right side of hwy. $2.00 coupon for 30. 00 carton cigarettes all new custom ers on 1st. carton. FIFTY FIVE (55) GAL LON AQUARIUM. Fully equipped and stocked in operation call Charles. 904-966-2911 BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 Child/Adult Home Care CAREGIVER IN YOUR HOME. 25 years expe rience excellent refer ences live-in available cell 352-328-1883 home 352-475-3900 Personal Services CLARK FOUNDATION RE PAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Es timates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 DRIVERS: Company. Home Every Week. Excellent & Loaded. No Touch, 50% D&H. CDL-A, 3 yrs exp. 800-588-7911 x225. LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience necessary! Please email employment app or resume to vtoddf@ gmail.com. HELP WANTED; RETAIL COUNTER SALES, FT position-40 plus hours. Applicant should have High School Diploma. Must have Retail Sales exp., and basic knowl edge of the computer. Lake Butler Farm Center Phone Number 386-4963921. Fax Number 386-496-1294. Email address: farm538@ windstream.net THE CITY OF HAMPTON WILL BE ACCEPTING applications through June 12, 2014 for a part time position of Street/Mainte nance Worker. Ability to lift 50 lbs.> operate lawn and outdoor equipment, gen eral knowledge of street and maintenance duties desired. This position will work in conjunction with the Utility Distribution Op erator and other city em ployees including evening and weekend work as needed. Applications can be picked up and returned at/to the Hampton City Hall, 5784 Navarre Ave, Hampton, Fl. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! for positions of and Full Time in Keystone in Gainesville 352-473-0680 Excellence Through Senior AdvocacyServing Clay County and Surrounding Areas.105 Commercial Drive Keystone Heights, FL 32656HHA29991306Must have been a registered nurse for at least a year and prefer home health care experience, but not required for right candidate. with resume in hand. Episcopal Childrens Services has openings for a for our Head Start program in Starke.A bachelors degree in early childhood education preferred; associates required for Lead position. Salaries vary by position & credentials ($11-$17 per hour) Excellent benefits package, including:Health, Dental and Life Insurance Retirement Plan w/ Employer Matching Paid Vacation & Holidays Employer Paid Training & Tuition AdvancementEmail resum to hhodges@ecs4kids.org or Fax to (904) 726-1520 ATTN HRECS is an Equal Oppo r tunity / Aff i r m ative Action / Drug Free E m ployer. DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity W/D Hook-ups Pool Business Center Fitness Room Kids CornerPETS WELCOME !Call 904-368-0007Spacious 2, 3 and 4 Bedroom Apartments AVAILABLE NOW!STARTING AS LOW AS $550/moCall today to hear about our current special to help get you moved in! (904) 964-3948 Cell (904) 364-6890204 West Adkins St Starke, FLTONYA THORNTON Realtor Cell (904) 364-6890 Large screened porch, separate utility room, storage shed w/covered carport. Large city lot, walking distance to area schools. On Pratt Street in Starke. on 1 acre in Starke fenced yard. nestled in the middle of a Pecan grove on SR-16 in Starke on 4+ acres. Pool & much more! in Union County on 1/2 acre lot. Many upgrades! acres on CR125, Bradford County. Country Living! PERFECT Getaway HomeFully furnished LOG CABIN within minutes to Georges Lake in Florahome, FL. 3/1 with unfinished loft being a 3rd room. CallSherry AshleyREALTOR Coldwell Banker Smith & Smith Realty Cell: 904-364-6517Office: 904-964-9222 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPEN

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12B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 5, 2014 however, she was told her project would have to be considered checked baggage. We got it back when we were in Houston, and there was this black line down the back of it, Ricker said. The black line could be removed, though, so no harm done. Upon arriving at the Hilton Americas-Houston, where she was supposed to be staying, Ricker found out her name was not on the hotel list. She was asked if she could provide her I-SWEEEP project code, but she didnt have it on her. I had to call my parents, but they were in Gainesville, Ricker said. There was no way they could get me the project code on time. Im calling random people and asking them if they are in Starke. I finally got a hold of one of my youth directors. She was like, Yeah, Ill get it for you. She had to break into our house and get my project code for me. Ricker said it was intimidating showing up at the George R. Brown Convention Center with her project. There were so many people and so many projects she thought looked better than hers, she said. She said she didnt feel good about her chances. Then you start to talk to the kids, Ricker said. Its not like youre in a competition with them. Youre friends. I didnt meet a single rude person while I was there. It wasnt that kind of environment. Everyone was so nice. Prior to the project judging, there was a flag ceremony in which some of the I-SWEEEP participants showed off their countries flags and traditional attire. It was interesting, Ricker said. She said she saw kids from Mexico wearing reindeer headdresses, while Bangladeshi kids wore what she could only describe as Mrs. Claus-type outfits. The girls from Puerto Rico had these huge, pink dresses, Ricker said. I was wondering how they walking. More interesting attire awaited Ricker when I-SWEEEP participants visited Johnson Space Center on May 4, which happens to be Star Wars Day. She said there were crazy people dressed in costumes from Wookies to Galactic Empire stormtroopers. It was an interesting cultural experience, she said. Ricker got to visit the Houston Museum of Natural Science, at which she found a vending machine that sold flavored crickets. She bought salt and vinegar and bacon and cheddar varieties and offered them to any Kiwanis member who was bold enough to try them. (Two members did.) I brought them back originally for my dad, but he wouldnt eat them, Ricker said. I ate one for him. I got like cricket stuff in between my teeth. It was not fun. I was one and done. A STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) Expo was held prior to project judging as well. It was an event open to the public that featured more than 100 physics, chemistry and math demonstrations. Ricker said there was a robotics competition in which you raced against another person to build a robot and then use the finished robot to pick up balls and place them in a bin. I was going up against this kid who looked like he was 5, Ricker said. Im like one third of the way through my robot, and hes already putting balls into the bin. It was not fair, so I just gave up. It was embarrassing. The expo also featured the Texas A&M University Chemistry Roadshow, a publicservice program designed to entertain as well as educate students. Dr. Jim Pennington, a senior lecturer and research associate at Texas A&M who coordinates the roadshow, made quite an impression on Ricker with his colorful tie-dyed smock and propensity for scaring people with a contraption that made loud noises. He was insane because he kept blowing things up and not telling you (beforehand), Ricker Continued from 1B said. At one point, Pennington called Ricker to the stage and asked her to provide him with a monetary bill. I gave it to him and he sprayed something on it and lit it on fire, Ricker said, adding, Then he just handed it back to me, and it wasnt even hot. It was the coolest thing, but he really scared me. Ricker got her money back safely, plus went home with a little extra, receiving a $400 check for earning a silver medal after project judging. Despite a rough beginning with the inability to carry her project on the plane and not being on the hotel list, it turned out to be quite a trip. I really did just have so much fun at I-SWEEEP, Ricker said. Medals and honorablemention awards are given to participants in three divisions: Environment, Engineering and Energy. A grand winner is named in each division. This years grand winners were Albert Kima student at Manhasset High School in Long Island, N.Y.in Environment, Drew Prevosta student in the Huntsville, Ala., Covenant Christian Academy home-schooled programin Engineering and Raymond Yina student at Ward Melville High School in East Setauket, N.Y.in Energy. money seemingly burns, but Pennington coated the bill with something to prevent