Union County times

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Title:
Union County times
Uniform Title:
Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Lake Butler Fla
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates:
30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1920?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID:
UF00028314:00473

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Bradford County times


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Union County Times Union County Times USPS 648-200 Lake Butler, Florida Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 101 st Year 44th Issue 75 CENTSRep. Ted Yoho speaks to members of the new Teen Age Republicans Club at UCHS and other students attending for extra credit. School Board Vice Chairperson Becky Raulerson and club co-founder and president Case Emerson listen in the foreground. Education scholarship available to womenThe Alpha Nu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma is offering a $500 scholarship for a Bradford-Union area female graduate and/or resident. The purpose of the scholarship is to encourage and enable them to obtain a degree in the field of education. Applicants must be enrolled full time at an accredited college or university and near completion of two years (four semesters) of undergraduate coursework. An official copy of an applicants transcript and three letters of recommendation are required. For more information and an application, please call 904964-6186 or 352-468-6884.Special Union County Commission meeting, Feb. 27 at noonThe Union County Board of County Commissioners will hold a special meeting on Thursday, Feb. 27, at noon.The Tea Party hosting meeting, Feb. 27A Tea Party is hosting a meeting on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the TownsendGreen Building.LBES annual spring play, Feb. 27Lake Butler Elementary School will host their annual spring play on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. at the Union County High School Auditorium. This one-hour musical entitled Joust! will be performed by thirdand fourth-grade students under the direction of LBES Music Director Pam Higginbotham. Tickets are $2 each and all LBES students are free.FBLA fundraiser, Feb. 28 and March 1Dimples and FBLA invite you to attend Kick off to Spring Shopping Days. Shop at Dimples on Friday Feb. 28 and Saturday, March 1, and 15 percent of your pre-tax purchase will support FBLA for its state competition. Dimples is located across from Spires IGA on the north side of State Road 100.UF Early Steps spring festival, March 1University of Florida North Central Early Steps, a support program for children with special needs and their families, will co-host a Spring Festival and Agency Fair with Childrens Medical Services and Alachua County Public Schools. This free event will feature hearing and vision screenings as well as face painting, arts and crafts and a puppet show. Representatives from more than 30 agencies and businesses will be on hand with information about their services for people with developmental delays and/or disabilities. Early Steps serves several counties including Union. Festival will be at Lincoln Middle School, 1001 SE 12th St. in Gainesville, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 1. etc. www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 386-496-2261 Cell 352-283-6312 Fax 386-4962858 uctimes@windstream.net www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/unioncountytimes BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor A month ago, Case Emerson pulled off a coup: He was able to get Rep. Ted Yoho to come speak to his new Teen Age Republican Club he and friends are starting at Union County High School. Admittedly Emerson had a little help from his mother, Charlotte, who got the ball rolling thanks to her connection to a Yoho staff member. Later, the congressman invited Case and fellow students Kent Coburn and Reed Cothren to attend a Young Republicans event at Yohos home for Super Bowl night, giving them an opportunity to mingle with fellow high school and college Republicans. All that will prove to be a big help to Emerson and his friends grow the new club, which he co-founded with Cobrun because they felt there was a need. We just got to talking in one of my classesa few buddies of mineand we wanted to start a Republicans Congressman Yoho visits new Republican club at UCHSShares thoughts on the American DreamSee YOHO, 2ACollins Institute report warns of tougher choices ahead for FloridaFinds need for stronger leadership and engaged citizens to improve FloridaOn Feb. 20, Florida State Universitys LeRoy Collins Institute (LCI) released a new research report, Tougher Choices: Shaping Floridas Future, which examines the past and predicts the future in state revenues, demographics, the Florida Retirement System, K-12 education, higher education and infrastructure. The report, which is authored by economists from the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida, is an update of the Tough Choices series of reports that have been released by LCI since 2005. Tougher Choices revisits the findings of the original Tough Choices report concluding that Florida is not on course to realize its true economic potential. While the outlook is unsettling, Tougher Choices homes in on the tough decisions Floridas leaders and citizens can make to put the state on the right path. Almost 10 years ago, the LeRoy Collins Institute published Tough Choices: Shaping Floridas Future, which analyzed Floridas revenue and spending trends and found that, while Florida certainly has boundless economic potential, there were tough decisions to be made to achieve that potential, said Dr. Carol Weissert, LCI Director and political science professor at Florida State University. This report, Tougher Choices, revisits these concerns and, unfortunately, finds that Florida has made little progress in addressing the key issues outlined in our initial report. We hope this new report will help to further illustrate the challenges facing the state and inspire appropriate reforms. The reports eight chapters re-examine Floridas past and future economic state and draw conclusions that can be used to create positive action in the areas of education, health care, infrastructure, retirement and more. Key findings include: Floridas education system is struggling across the spectrumfrom K-12 through higher education. Funding for the states public schools is lagging, and Floridas high school graduates are becoming less likely to earn a college degree than their peers in other states. Floridas reliance on retirees and tourists comes at a price as the demands of older residents and vacationers are disproportionately linked to lower-paid service jobs. To make matters worse, growing Medicaid demands due to baby boomer See REPORT, 2A BACK TO THE FUTUREStudents enjoy 5th Annual Celebration of Abilities PromBY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor The 5th Annual Celebration of Abilities Prom was held on Friday, Feb. 21, with a theme of Shake, Rattle and Roll, remembering the 50s with classic cars out front and students dressed in rock n roll getups. The new 2014 Prom King and Queen were crowned: Brent Norman and Kristin Akers Special guests in attendance were the 2014 Bradford Fest Queen and Strawberry Queen Kelsey Harrisonwho created the prom four years ago 2014 Miss U-Co High 1st Runner-Up and Strawberry Princess Alexa Rae Park, 2014 Bradford Fest Teen Queen Ashley Harris and 2014 Miss U-Co High Savannah Woodall. This prom is a special celebration for students of exceptionalities in Union County, allowing them to celebrate their special abilities and to have a special night dedicated just to them. Sponsors for this event were Knuckle Draggers, Odom & Moses, Royals Homes, Union Medical Supply, Love-N-Care Preschool, Gainell Elixson, Spires IGA, Alvin Griffis, Ronnie Pruitt, Dipped Delights, TD Bank, Union County High School Athletic Departments, Peggy Cason, George Green, Lisa Johnson, Pritchett Trucking, Robert Osborne, Christine Kight, Kammy Highland, Lola Lacy and CareerSource Florida Crown. ABOVE: Prom King Brent Norman and Queen Kristin Akers LEFT: Danielle Perry and Ossie Williams dance the night away. BELOW: Noah Kight with his mom Gwen. ABOVE: Akers (center) is surrounded by royalty: (L-r) Strawberry Princess Alexa Rae Park, Miss U-Co High Savannah Woodall, Bradford Fest Queen and Strawberry Queen Kelsey Harrison and Bradford Fest Teen Queen Ashley Harris. BELOW: Deanna Truett with her mom Danna.

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2A Union County Times Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 (386) 496-2261 Vincents Cell 352-283-6312 John M. Miller, Publisher Editor: Vincent Alex Brown Sports Editor:Cliff Smelley Advertising:Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting:Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Yvette Lieurance Bookkeeping:Joan Stewart-Jones Union County TimesUSPS 648-200 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: UNION COUNTY TIMES125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054 Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months 386-496-9656 275 West Main Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 (Suwannee Medical Building)12 Years Experience Admitted to State and Federal Bar (M and S. Dist.) Critical meeting for Project G.R.A.D. being held on March 3To the parents of the Class of 2014: Project G.R.A.D. is in need of your involvement in order for it continuing to be a great tradition for Union County High Schools graduating students. The few parents that have been involved in the monthly meetings and fundraisers are considering canceling the event. At this time, there are not enough parents to put this event on safely. In order to continue preparing for Project G.R.A.D., they must have all parents of graduating seniors involved. The next meeting will be held on Monday, March 3, at 6:00 p.m. at Lake Butler Middle School. A decision to cancel or to continue will be made at that time. They hope to see all parents of this years graduating class at that meeting.UCHS and LBMS football banquets, March 4The Union County High School and Lake Butler Middle School football banquets will be held Tuesday, March 4, at 6:30 p.m. The Varsity & JV team dinners will be at the UCHS cafeteria. The middle school teams will be at LBMS cafeteria. Both teams will join together at 7:30 p.m. in the UCHS auditorium for the awards ceremony.Revival in Worthington Springs, March 5-8Evangelist Charles Hunt will give the prophetic word out during a revival each night at 7 p.m., March 5-8, at United Methodist Church in Fellowship with New Jerusalem Full Gospel Church on S.R. 121 in Worthington Springs. Everyone is welcome. For more information call 386-496-1461.Classic car cruise-in at the lake, Mar. 7North Florida Regional Chamber of Commerce is hosting a classic car cruisein down by the lake in Lake Butler on Friday, March 7, from 5 to 8 p.m. Besides, of course, classic cars from the area, the years first Friday Fest Cruz will feature train rides, door prizes, a 50/50 drawing, food and music. There are no entry fees. Learn more at www.starkecruzin.com etc. club here at the high school, Emerson said. We kind of felt the need, and we felt like we had enough interest. He added, Floridas actually pretty big in the Teen Age Republicans. Its a pretty good showingkind of one of the larger of all the states. And we kind of wanted to be a part of that. According to Emerson, this is the first politically based club at the high school. The new organization actually has to go through a probationary period to prove they have enough interest to warrant becoming an official club. Emerson serves as president, Coburn as vice president, Cothren as secretary and Noah Wright as treasurer. Their adviser is science teacher Renae Allen. And though membership is only at about a dozen so far, its a start that Emerson is committed to growing throughout the year. The club members will help with elections by doing things like holding campaign signs and assisting candidates, and members will gain an understanding of the political process, develop leadership skills and participate in community service. According to the Teen Age Republicans (TARS) website, TARS is a national, youthbased organization challenging, training and assisting teens to become involved in their local, state and national political processes. TARS, College Republicans and Young Republicans are the only auxiliaries of the Republican Party. At the high schools new club meeting that Yoho spoke at, Emerson thanked the Union County School Board, UCHS Principal Mike Ripplinger and Allen for allowing them to start the club, and then introduced the congressman by presenting a brief bio of the former large animal veterinarian. (According to his official website, Yoho and his wife, Carolyn, sold his practice in 2010 to focus their time and energy on a new passionOur Nation. She owned court reporter agencies; he veterinarian practices.) Yoho, 58, represents Floridas 3rd District, which includes the entire counties of Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy, Suwannee and Union, along with the majority of Alachua and Clay counties, half of Madison county and a section of Marion county. He spoke to the new club members and other students and adults there in attendance. Its a great turnout, Yoho began. It must have been the Rice Krispies Treats, right? That, and you guys are getting credit for showing up here, rightextra credit for your grade? We are? one student asked, to much laughter. I appreciate the introduction and I appreciate your emails that you sent us, the congressman told Emerson. Yoho then told everyone, I want to congratulate you and commend you being here, getting involved. This is so important. Yoho says it surprises people when he tells them he first met his wife of 39 years in the fourth grade. They eventually married on Valentines Day, which is fitting for such a romantic tale. Its been a great ride, he said. They have three grown children: Katie, Lauren and Tyler. The congressman described him and his wife as broke, busted and disgusted, saying they both came from broken homes. For example, his familys house was repossessed when he was 15 and there wasnt anybody to fall back on. But we knew this: We knew if we got an education; we knew if we worked; and if we applied ourselvesbecause we lived in America, we could take advantage of that opportunity that is so unique to this country and if we kept working that we could achieve that thing we call the American Dream, he said. And some people talk about the American Dream as bygone era. What do you guys think? Is the American Dream irrelevant? Dont ever let it not become relevant. He then introduced his chief of staff, Kat Cammack, who put our campaign together and got us off on the right track, he said, praising her. But dont ever let anybody say the American Dream is dead, Yoho continued. He relayed an encountered he had with a couple from Great Britain while visiting Washington, D.C., shortly after being elected to Congress. After the woman finished berating America, I said, Maam, when you were a little girl growing up across the pond, did you aspire to achieve the English Dream? She goes, Well, of course not, there is no such thing. And I pulled out my (U.S.) Constitutiona small bound copy that Yoho carries in his pocket everywhereI said, Maam, weve got a thing called the Constitution that allows us to have the American Dream. And I think Ill hold on to both of these and you have a nice time while youre in America, at which the audience laughed. He drove home the point, saying, The uniqueness of what we have in this countryand I do believe that America is unique and that we are exceptional, for that document, because it says, All men are created equal. Our rights come from a creator, not from government. Government is instilled by men and women to protect those God-given rights. I mean thats in our founding papers, thats in our document. This document just didnt develop with our founding fathers, the congressman continued. This document came from hundreds of years of trial-and-error, starting with the Magna Carta, the Mayflower Compact and a couple other inbetween. Now weve got this Yoho said while holding up his pocket-sized copy of the U.S. Constitution. Is this a perfect document? No! Its the best thing on the planet, though. And through the processes that were set up, we can refine and change it as needed, and its something that cant be done rapidly. And thats a good thing, because you cant get somebody who just wants to come in there and change it. And so the uniqueness of America is that anybody, regardless of your background or regardless of where you come from or your political affiliation, or what your parents did or didnt do for you; you know, what your coach or teacher did or didnt do for you or say for you; or where you even come fromin this country, you take advantage of that opportunityand when I say, advantage, its taking work and applying work to that opportunityand if you do that, you can achieve for the level of achievement you desire. No place else on the planet can you reach that level of success. I believe that with all my heart, and I feel its under attack in this country, adding that others believe that too. Yoho then went on to explain why, talked about issues in Congress, shared his voting record and discussed the future, challenging everyone to vote, on whomever they decide, but to vote nonetheless. Afterward he answered questions, talked with students and adults in attendance and signed autographs. Cammack handed out a thin, booksize bound copy of the U.S. Constitution to anyone who wanted it. To learn more about Yoho, his voting record and Floridas 3rd Congressional District, visit http://yoho.house.gov To learn more about TARS, visit www.teenagerepublicans.org retirements and labor market polarization will likely lead to greater expenditures for the state in the near future. Floridas transpor tation congestion is among the worst in the country, es pecially in urban areas. The state continues to lack an appropriate amount of roads for its growing population, which is only compounded by its aging infrastructure and overcrowded highways. Twenty-five years ago Florida was closing in on building a diversified economy that could attract high-skill jobs, and modest continued investment might have gotten us there. Now, we have fallen far behind, and the investment needed to close the gap is huge, said Jim Dewey, a co-author of the report and Director of Economic Analysis for BEBR. Providing great vacations and comfortable golden years for retirees can provide a happy enough life for many Floridians. But, we could have done better. Perhaps we still can, but the cost will be much higher. We hope this report helps Floridians and their leaders make informed decisions that move the state in a positive direction. Through the release of Tougher Choices, LCI seeks to encourage public conversation on the future of the state and policies that can help it live up to its potential. Though recovery from the Great Recession is near at last, Florida now faces even tougher challenges than in 2005, said David Denslow, a co-author of the report and a Research Economist at BEBR. By highlighting structural trends and data-driven interpretative comparisons with other states, the LeRoy Collins Institute will help citizens make their own judgments about how their state can meet these challenges and what direction it should choose. A full copy of the report can be viewed here: http://fla.st/1jRY6gK For more information about this report and others published by the LeRoy Collins Institute, visit www.collinsinstitute.fsu.edu .YOHOContinued from 1A REPORTContinued from 1A

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Union County Times 3A ATTENTION UNION COUNTY RESIDENTS Aerosol Cans Antifreeze Batteries Computers Corrosives Diesel/Transmission Fluid Emergency Flares Fertilizers Fluorescent Lamps Gasoline Household Cleaners Household Electronics Insecticides Medications Oil Filters Paint & Paint Products Paint Thinners Pesticides Photographic Solutions Poisons Pool Chemicals Propane Tanks Televisions Used Oil If a container leaks, pack it in a larger container with an absorbent material such as cat litter or oil absorbent. Do not mix different or unknown materials together. Containers MUST be labeled. If you cannot identify the contents then label it unknown. Pack the containers in boxes with dividers. Explosives such as ammunition, dynamite and blasting agents. Reactives such as crystallized ethers, picric acid and sodium and phosphorus metals. Radioactive or infectious wastes.Saturday, March 8thUnion County Road/Solid Waste Department, 9am-3pmCALL JIMMY BEASLEY AT 386-496-2180FOR MORE INFORMATION.The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Union County Commission are sponsoring a project to collect, recycle, treat and properly dispose of these Household Hazardous Wastes. N SW 85TH TRL SW 85TH LOOPSW 84TH STSW 81ST TER 121 DAWN CORBETTINSURANCE AGENCY(904) 964-7707FREE Insurance Quotes No obligation...Call Today! The 52nd Annual Miss Bradford-Union Strawberry Pageant will be held next Saturday, March 1, in the Bradford High School auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. There are 10 amazing contestants between the ages of 13 and 24 this year, according to Executive Directory Laruen VanDuzer, and contestants will take home more than $4,000 in prizes. Six contestants are vying for Strawberry Princess, and four are in the running for Strawberry Queen. Shannon Rosieren Daughter of Donald and Linda Rosier of Raiford. She is sponsored by Nicaragua Missions & Outreach Foundation, and Shelby McDowellen Daughter of Cordellia McDowell of Lake Butler and Tearle McDowell of Tampa. She is sponsored by North Bobbie Grace Barber Daughter of Robert and Rhonda Barber of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Decker & Pomeranz Dentistry, and Stan Ciarra Hopkins Daughter of Chris and Angie Hopkins of Starke. She is sponsored by Knuckle Draggers and Bradford Madison Gibson Daughter of Bobby and Narie Gibson of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Gene and Shary Gordon, and Mykayla McLeod Daughter of Nick and Kellie McLeod of Keystone Heights. She is sponsored by Allstars Twirling Academy and Alyssa Farrah Duhart Daughter of Anthony and Ireta Duhart of Lawtey. She is sponsored by Brenda Hannah Tucker Daughter of Jay and Marcie Tucker of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Emerson Nursery and Rental Plants, and Allayna Norris Daughter of Michael Smith and Tori Norris-Smith of Starke. She is sponsored by Charnelle of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Shatto 52nd Annual Miss BradfordUnion Strawberry Pageant, March 1Six of 10 contestants come from Union Co. Princess contestants Queen contestants UC Riding Club saddles up to support St. Jude Hospital17th annual event to raise funds for kidsBY JOHN JOHNS Special to the Times The Union County Riding Club is hosting their 17th Annual Saddle Up for St. Jude 10-mile trail ride on Saturday, March 1, at 9 a.m. at Swift Creek Cemetery located north of Lake Butler on County Road 231 North. The event gives equestrians the opportunity to mount up and raise funds to help support the lifesaving mission of St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital. Located in Memphis, Tenn., it is one of the worlds premier pediatric cancer research centers. The event will include free lunch at the halfway point of the trail, complements of Avery Roberts, and a raffle drawing at the completion of the trail with prizes donated and purchased by the riding club and their members. Local businesses have also donated prizes. Members and volunteers have raised thousands of dollars for St. Jude since the clubs first event in 1998. This years goal is $8,000. We look forward to this event to help raise awareness and funds for the kids of St. Jude, said event coordinator John Johns. The Saddle Up for St. Jude event brings together horse enthusiasts in Union and the surrounding counties for a good cause to support the mission of St. Jude of finding cures to treat deadly childhood diseases. We get to enjoy what we do ride our horseswhile helping those in need. Since its founding in 1962 by entertainer Danny Thomas, St. Jude has treated children from all 50 states and around the world. No child is ever denied treatment because of a familys inability to pay. With a daily operating cost of $1.9 million, St. Jude depends mostly on public contributions and fundraising events such as Saddle Up for St. Jude. The riding clubs event is sponsored by many local businesses. Individuals may also contribute by sponsoring the event or riders online, and learn more about the event at http://tinyurl.com/saddleupstjude Learn more about St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital at www.stjude.org. To learn more about the Union County Riding Club, visit www.unionridingclub.com For more information about the club or event, contact John Johns at 352-222-0203 or johnsmel@gmail.com .

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4A Union County Times Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 B est Price Per Square Feet Call for our Free Floor Plan Book Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. UCT Legals 2/27/14 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA Case #63-2013-CA-0016 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL AS SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2005-SD2, ASSET-BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff vs BRUCE E. DICKSON; THE UN KNOWN SPOUSE OF BRUCE E. DICKSON; RETHA A DICKSON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RE THA A DICKSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HERIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4 THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the fol lowing described property: A PORTION OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NE COR NER OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 551.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF THE BEGINNING; THENCE CON TINUE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 313.50 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF FORMER ACL RR; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST. ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF FORMER ACL RR, A DISTANCE OF 265.23 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 437.76 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 228.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMA NENT FIXTURE AND APPURTE NANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS 1996 MOBILE HOME VIN NUMBER GAFLT34A23774SH21 WITH TITLE NUMBER 0073881446 AND VIN NUMBER GAFLT34B23774SH21 WITH TITLE NUMBER 73881445. A/K/A 12845 NE STATE ROAD 121 RAIFORD, FL 32083-2467 A/KA HIGHWAY 121 RAIFORD Shall be sold by the Clerk of the this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale in the above styled action dated February 3, 2014, at the Union Coun ty Courthouse in Lake Butler, Flori da, at 11:00 A.M. on April 27, 2014, to the best and highest bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other that the property owner as of the date of the notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 5th day of February 2014. Kellie Hendricks Connell Clerk of Court Crystal Norman Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff PO Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 Facsimile Eservice: servealaw@albertellilaw. com 2/13 3tchg 2/27-UCT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #:2010-CA-000003 DIVISION: W Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort gage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, -vs.Theresa H, Lajorie, Surviving Spouse of George J. Lajorie, Sr. a/k/a George J. Lajorie, Deceased; Green Tree Investment Holdings, LLC f/k/a CFN Investment Hold ings, LLC, Successor in Interest to Conseco Finance Corp., Successor in Interest to Conseco Finance Ser vice Corporation f/k/a Green Tree Financial Servicing Corporation; Point Recovery, Inc.; Unifund CCR Partners U.P.; Clerk of the Circuit Court of Union County, Florida; Un known Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of George J. Lajorie, Sr. a/k/a George J. Lajorie, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant (s) Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to an Order rescheduling foreclo sure sale, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000003 of the Circuit Court of the 8th Judicial Circuit in and for Union County, Florida, wherein Re gions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Plant ers Bank, N.A., Plaintiff and There sa H. Lajorie, Surviving Spouse of George J. Lajorie, Sr. a/k/a George J. Lajorie, Deceased are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Kellie Hendricks Connell, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT STEPS OF THE UNION COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATES AT 103 UNION COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LAKE BUTLER, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 24, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID TRACT OF LAND BEING KNOWN AS PARCEL NO. 7, OF OAKRIDGE ESTATES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION PREPARED BY ALACHUA COUN TY LAND SURVEYORS, INC., DATED MARCH 18, 1982, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE NORTH WEST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE AFOREMEN TIONED SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST FOR THE POINT OF REFERENCE AND EAST, A DISTANCE OF 22.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 791; THENCE EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 40.00 FEET TO CONCRETE MONU MENT AT THE INTERSECTION OF SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE WITH THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 40.00 FOOT COUNTY ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 1670 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF AND CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,); THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 82 DEGREES RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE ROD AND CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,) AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 89.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF AND CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,) THENCE EAST, A DISTANCE OF 597.31 CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,); THENCE EAST, A DISTANCE OF 250.00 CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,); THENCE RUN A DISTANCE OF 588.72 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1982, MAKE: SPRINGER, VIN#: GAFL2AC16340438 AND VIN#: GAFL2BC16340438, MAN UFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A FIX TURE AND A PART OF THE REAL ESTATE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 201 East University Av enue, Room 410, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (352) 491-4490 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice im paired, call 711. Kellie Hendricks Connell CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Union County, Florida Crystal Norman DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE. LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561)998-6700 (561)998-6707 2/20 2tchg 2/27-UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Nominating Committee Members on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10:00 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida. 2/27 1tchg-UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a Finance & Audit Committee Meeting on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 10:15 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida. 2/27 1tchg-UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Executive Committee Members on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10:30 A.M. at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW Live Oak, Florida. 2/27 1tchg-UCT PUBLIC NOTICE Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. will hold a pre-bid conference and walk-thru for the rehabilitation of six (6) single-family dwellings in the Union County SHIP and Rural Devel opment programs. This meeting will be held Friday, Feb ruary 28, 2014 beginning at 8:00 a.m. at Suwannee River Economic Coun cil, Inc., 665 SE 4th St., Lake Butler, FL. The conference and walk-thru is mandatory, no exceptions, for con tractors who plan to bid.   Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. re quires each contractor to be prop erly licensed, carry general liability insurance of at least $1,000,000.00 and Workers Comp insurance during construction. Bids for these units will be due by 12:00 noon Friday, March 7, 2014, at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., 665 SE 4th St., Lake Butler, FL. Please mark envelope Sealed Bid   Bids to be opened Friday, March 7, 2014 at 12:05 p.m. Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. has the right to reject any and all bids.   The bids will be awarded on the most cost effective basis. Union County is a fair housing and equal opportunity and ADA employer.   Minority and Women Contractors are urged to participate. MAY CONTAIN HOMES CON STRUCTED PRIOR TO 1978 WHICH MAY CONTAIN LEAD-BASED PAINT. 2/27 1tchg-UCT Legals UC Commissioner Smith attends special session of NCFRPCCity of Live Oak Mayor Garth Nobles, Jr., chair of the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council welcomed Chris Doolin, the legislative affairs consultant to the Florida Small County Coalition and also the Small School District Council Consortium. Also in attendance was Commissioner Wayne Smith from Union County. Doolins remarks provided Council members a review of issues facing rural counties that are anticipated to be addressed in the upcoming legislative session. The Council, in partnership with economic development organizations and local governments, promotes regional strategies, partnerships and solutions to strengthen the economic competitiveness and quality of life of the 11 counties and 33 incorporated municipalities in the north central portion of Florida. The Council, whose members are local elected officials and gubernatorial appointees, administers a variety of state and federal programs for north central Florida including Alachua, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor and Union Counties. Programs include development of the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, the Strategic Regional Policy Plan, technical assistance to local governments in development of comprehensive plans, land development regulations and grant management, and administration of developments of regional impact, local mitigation strategies, hazardous materials, homeland security and economic development programs. In addition, the Council staffs the Metropolitan Transportation Planning Organization for the Gainesville Urbanized Area, the North Central Florida Local Emergency Planning Committee, the North Central Florida Regional Hazardous Materials Response Team and The Original Florida Tourism Task Force. The North Central Florida Regional Planning Councils offices are located in Gainesville. Learn more at www.ncfrpc.org (L-r) City of Live Oak Mayor Garth Nobles, Jr., chair of the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council; Chris Doolin, legislative affairs consultant to the Small County Coalition; Wayne Smith, Union County Commissioner; and Scott Koons, executive director of the Council. Are you ready for Floridas new cattle ID program?BY BASIL BACTAWAR UC Extension Director/Agent The new cattle rules concerning cattle identification are now in effect as of February 19. The need for these rules was discussed over several years with input from the cattle industry. There are several benefits to cattle producers. The rules are expected to improve the government and the industry ability to respond to disease outbreak. For example, in the event of an outbreak of tuberculosis or mad cow disease, accurate traceability information is expected to be readily available thereby allowing investigators to shorten the investigation time. In addition, cattle identification is expected to quicken the control of the spread of certain diseases thereby reducing the number of animals to be quarantined. These improvements are expected to be transferred as savings to producers. How does the Florida Cattle Identification Program work? The rules require that cattle 18 months of age or older entering the state or moving within the state be tagged with an official ID. However, not all cattle are required to wear an official tag. Cattle that are moving to approved tagging sites, directly to slaughter and between pastures under normal ranching operations, are exempt under the rule. Cattle can be tagged at approved tagging sites such as livestock markets, stockyards and other locations authorized to apply official ID. The Depart. of Agriculture and Consumer Services will provide a period so that producers can learn about the new rules. The department is planning to enforce this rule starting on April 7. For more information or assistance, contact the Union County Extension Office at 386496-2321 or union@ifas.ufl.edu or visit http://union.ifas.ufl.edu

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Union County Times 5A is now located in the formerMaines Insurance BuildingGeorge Roberts Insurance25 East Main Street(Across from Union Co. Courthouse) TheVisit Our New Office!Call 386-496-2261or call 904-964-6305 to place all Classified Ads or Announcements, Special Events, and other related news.Vincent Alex Brown ~ Editor Cell 352-283-6312Serving Union County for over 102 years. UCSO arrests drug traffickerAccording to the Union County Sheriffs Office, on Monday evening, Feb. 24, after receiving a tip, sheriffs deputies searched a residence at 10209 SW 48th Terrace in a neighborhood near State Road 121 just north of Worthington Springs. They arrested 41-year-old James Lamont Jones on several warrants stemming from an ongoing investigation and surveillance with the North Florida High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). Sheriff Brad Whitehead advised that Jones, originally from Pennsylvania, had been living in the area and was also a registered sex offender. Sheriff Whitehead stated that deputies began watching the residence, and after a lengthy surveillance the deputies arrested Jones without incident. Jones is currently in the Union County Jail and awaiting transfer to Alachua County. Jones faces several charges, including cocaine trafficking, cocaine possession and using two-way communication devices while in the commission of a felony. His bond is set at $55,000. The investigation is continuing on other subjects. Truck catches fire in 3-car accidentBY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor At 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 19, Michael Christopher Frishkorn of Lake Butler, stopped while traveling northbound on State Road 121 in a 2000 Ford F-150 pickup to turn left, or west, onto Southwest 85th Trail just south of the ball fields. As Frishkorn, 19, waited on traffic to make his turn, Erin Elizabeth Brewer of Lake Butler slammed her 2008 Ford Edge into the back of Frishkorns truck, according to a crash report from the Florida Highway Patrol. Her vehicle came to rest in the northbound lane facing northwest. Brewer, 36, pushed Frishkorns truck into the southbound lane into oncoming traffic, causing him to collide with the left, or drivers, side of a 1999 Chevy C1500 pickup truck driven by Hope Ann Reinke, 47, of Lake City. That caused Frishkorns truck to rotate counter-clockwise and then hit the right rear of the Reinkes truck and then continued on to the southbound, or west, shoulder. Reinkes truck rotated clockwise and onto Southwest 85th Trail, coming to rest facing west. Frishkorns truck, owned by Jeff Personette of Lake Butler, caught fire and was completely destroyed, according to Lt. Lyn Williams with the Union County Sheriffs Office. According to the FHP report, Brewer stated that she was distracted by the crying baby and she took her attention off of the roadway prior to the initial collision. The baby was Jesse S. Acree, 14 months, who was accompanied by Anneke Brewer Acree, 33. Both reside in Alachua. The front airbag deployed in each vehicle and occupants in each one were wearing a seatbelt; the baby was in a forward-facing car seat. All five individuals were transported to UF Health Shands with minor injuries except for Reinke, who had more serious injuries. Williams said that units responded from UCSO (five in total), FHP, the Dept. of Corrections (to help with traffic control), the city and county fire depts. and Union County EMS. LB man dies in accident on I-75Three others injured in wreck involving pickup and tractor-trailerBY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor Early in the morning on Tuesday, Feb. 18, Lake Butler resident, Ronald Wayne Sapp, Jr. died in a two-vehicle accident on Interstate 75. According to a Florida Highway Patrol media release, at around 1:45 a.m., Sapp, 33, was traveling southbound in a 1998 GMC Sierra 1500 pickup truck in the center lane of I-75 near Archer Road in Gainesville. He moved into the right lane in front of a 2014 International ProStar tractor-trailer and abruptly stopped. The tractor-trailer collided into the rear of the pickup and both veered off the roadway onto the right, or west, shoulder. Sapps pickup overturned and ended up on its left, or drivers, side, facing west. The tractortrailer finally stopped at a group of trees, and ended up facing south. Sapp was pronounced dead on the scene shortly after 2 a.m. According to Sgt. Tracy HislerPace, he did not have a seatbelt on. Kristopher Doski, 29, of Ormond Beach, and Michael P. Hammer, 52, of Lake City, were passengers in the pickup and taken to UF Health Shands with serious but non-life-threatening injuries. According to FHPs report, neither was wearing a seatbelt. James A. Gloss, 62, of Longwood, was driving the tractor-trailer. He was also taken to UF Health Shands with serious but non-life-threatening injuries. Sapp leaves behind a fianc, Michelle Lobenthal, sons, daughters and stepsons, as well as his two parents and two siblings. According to the website TheTruckersReport.com, a fully loaded tractor-trailer can weigh up to 80,000 pounds or 40 tons and takes 40 percent more time to stop than the average car. By comparison, the website says the average automobile weighs around 5,000 pounds. LBMS baseball team defeats Chiefland after late game double, 12-7 Also takes down P.K. Yonge, 5-4BY AARON TETSTONE LBMS Head Baseball Coach The Lake Butler Middle School Tigers baseball team and Chiefland Middle exchanged the lead six times on Monday, Feb. 24, but the Tigers ended up on top with a 12-7 win in five innings over Chiefland. Lake Butler finally managed to grab the lead after a strong fourth inning. The Tigers scored on a two-run double by Marcus Howard, plating Caden Cox and A.J. Russell. Marcus reached base three times in the game for the Lake Butler. He scored two runs and had two RBIs. The Tigers jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in the top of the first. A single by Garrett Allen, bringing home Caden started the inning off. They then tacked on more runs when Russell and Trevor Rogers scored on a wild pitches. Chiefland survived Tigers surge and put up two runs of its own in the third. Chiefland Middle scored on an error and a wild pitch. A.J. recorded the win for Lake Butler. He allowed zero runs and struck out two over 1 2/3 innings. The Tigers tacked on another six runs in the fifth. A sacrifice fly scored Matthew Starling and Wyatt Lugenbeel to get Lake Butler on the board in the inning. That was followed up by Garretts single, scoring Caden. Due to the two-hour time limit rule, the game only lasted five innings. Colton Elixson and the Tigers were able to hold Chiefland to two runs in the bottom of the fifth inning. Colton struck out two and forced a fly ball to end the game. The Tigers defeated P.K. Yonge on Tuesday, 5-4, at home and now face Lake City Middle on Thursday, Feb. 27, also at home. Game time is 4:30 p.m. WS man deploys to AfghanistanSenior Airman Kody Williams was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, on Feb. 22 from MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. This is his second deployment to Afghanistan, as well as being deployed to Qatar and South Korea. Williams has been enlisted in the U.S. Air Force since 2007 prior to graduating from Buchholz High School in Gainesville. He is the son of Jack and Debbie Asbury of Worthington Springs (pictured) and Phillip Williams of Arizona; siblings, Nichole (Aron) McRae of Providence and John Johnson of Worthington Springs. He is also the grandson of the former John and Evelyn Brackett of Worthington Springs. The Education Department at the Reception and Medical Center in Lake Butler is showing great success with the Florida GED program. They currently have 72 students enrolled in Inmate Tutor Assisted Classes. Frank Quinn is ITA teacher and he has seven inmate tutors that assist him between RMC Main Unit, RMC West Unit and RMC Work Camp. Evan Brown is the Special Education teacher. He works with those inmates that are verified as Special Education from school records and are under the age of 22. RMC currently has a dozen Special Education students. These inmates attend classes throughout the week and are TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) tested every three months to check progress. Once they receive qualifying scores on their TABE, they are given the Pre-GED, in preparation for the Florida GED. In the past year RMC has had 40 inmates participate in formal graduation services and this month they will have seven others graduate. This program supports the Dept. of Corrections motto of Changing Lives to Ensure a Safer Florida. This week RMC received outstanding news from Region 2 Program Manager Nathan Herrod, who said, Congratulations to you and your staff. Because of the combined efforts of staff members across departments, inmates earned 1,025 GED diplomas in the second quarter of 2013. This is the largest quarterly GED total on record. Many of your facilities earned the highest number of diplomas in your institutions history. RMC was also informed that the statewide count for GEDs awarded in the first two quarters of this fiscal years is 1,720. This shows progress toward DOCs re-entry efforts.RMC, DOC find success with Florida GED programRecord number of inmates earning diplomas

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6A Union County Times Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 THE OFFICE SHOP130 West Call St. Starke, FL 32091PHONE904-964-5764FAX904-964-5764CALL OR FAX YOUR ORDER TODAY! CALL OR FAX YOUR ORDER TODAY!BARGAIN BUYS School Lake Butler Elementary School Perfect A Honor Roll First Grade (Top row, l-r) Nolan Beighley, Harrison Cunningham, Owen Johnson, Garrison Ritch, Michael-Ann Smith, Kamryn Southerland, Jameson Tetstone, Campbell Webb and Carter Whitehead. (Front row, l-r) Yasmine Givens, Rylan Jackson, Trenton Klein, Jeremiah McKenzie, Gabe Tallman, Maggie Wade, Jake Walker and Ava Walker. Not pictured is Tifton Roseke. McBride, Austin Ray, Taylor Smith, Maddox Wheeler and Krista Young. (Front row, l-r) ABOVE: (Top row, l-r) Jaylynn Moates, Jolene Moore, Hendricks, Eli Hendricks, Jolena Rogers and Krista Tanner. (Front row, l-r) Braden Adams, Darby Andrews, Newsom, Nadia Norman and Mack Smith. Not pictured is Leah Norcross. RIGHT: (Top row, l-r) Shyla Crowe, Devin Diggs, Zoe Elixson, Patrick Maxwell, Chainberlin Watts, Ava Westmoreland, Leah Brannen, Anabelle Dugard and Wyatt Keen. (Front row, l-r) Jelissa Garcia, Savannah Miller, Joshua Tyre, Bo Wilson, Camilia Carter, Preston Cranford, Syler Moates, Aubrie Muse, Hayley Sherrod, Taleya Smith and Nathan White. LBES A/B Honor Roll First Grade Dallen Cox, Dailynn Croft, Alec French, Miranda Hedrick, Andrew Mohl, Hannah Sepherd, Ansleigh Worrell, Landon Biddix, Kutter Durrance, Nash Kelley, Jalisia McMillian, Alyssa Glaspy, Reece Hendricks, Stephen Heslar, Emmalee Hollingsworth, Taylor Seay, Sonya Gutierrez, Emily Whitehead, Cian Smith, Shane Smith, Anthony Holmes, Desiree Thomas, Chloe Camarena, Nemecio Chavarria, Curtis Austin, Jalynn Brown, Karen Compton, Mikayla Shenk, Matthew Weston, Yalorie Wilds, Landon Barrett, Rachael Bloodsworth, Dillon Duenas, Kaitlin Mann, Americus Rocha, Heaven Scott, Destiny Thomas, Callie Combs, Emily Higginbotham, Landen Miller, Scarlet Stroud, Savannah Thompson, Addisyn Worrell, Jenna Bielling, Allen Carlisle, Jesse Chaikin, Morgan Rogers, Alexia Sapp, Lance Seay, Surie Sharp, Barron Walden, Jade Crawford, Beth Crawford, Kaitlyn Parrish, Colin Thomas, Jasper White, Raylyn Gunter, Jesse Harden, Carli Trent, Libbie Brant, Seth Cox, Kevin Crawford, McKenzie Flick, Cailynn Mattox, Kane Middleton, Karsen Middleton and Tyson Woodland.

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that are specifically geared to seniors, for which it is not necessary to get out of your chair. The Bradford County Senior Center (1805 N. Temple Ave.) offers Energizing Chair Yoga by Sherry Zak Morris. It incorporates yoga poses and sequences that bring energy to the body and encourage movement in every muscle and joint. The format is an easy-tofollow DVD that plays on a large screen. Senior Center Director Diane Gaskins said classes are offered Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. and Thursdays at 10 a.m., in combination with DVD Tai Chi instruction. Similarly, participants in the Medicare Silver Sneakers program at Anytime Fitness (448 W. Madison St.) can practice yoga without leaving their chairs, although there are opportunities Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL When things get painful, dont wait it out.ER Extra gives you advanced treatment and compassionate care in one full-service facility. Once youre here, youre cared for. Thats a sure thing. For information, go to ShandsStarke.com.IT CAN BE A SETBACK. WHEN SOMETHING IS BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor The Starke area has a number of options for fitness buffs who want to improve overall health by unifying mind and body in activities such as yoga and Tai Chi. The word yoga comes from a Sanskrit word meaning union, to join together. Yoga is one of the oldest mind/body activities in the world, having originated in ancient India. It has become very popular in the United States. A 2012 study indicated that 8.7 percent of American adults.4 million people practice yoga. Hatha yogathe yoga most widely practiced in the Westcenters on physical poses held for varying lengths of time. Modern yoga classes often include warm-up, poses, deep stretches and contemplation. Starke offers two yoga classes Unifying mind and body for better healthSee HEALTH, 6B Bradford Countys Dimple Overstreet is one of five who will be honored as a Santa Fe College Woman of Distinction during a Thursday, March 13, ceremony at 5 p.m. at the Fine Arts Hall on the colleges Northwest Campus in Gainesville. Tickets are $35 per person and are available online at www. sfcollege.edu/finearts or through the Santa Fe Box Office at 352395-4181. The annual ceremony recognizes outstanding female service in Alachua and Bradford counties, and was created by the Womens History Committee at Santa Fe College in 1987. Women of Distinction has honored more than 100 outstanding women in the community since its inception. Overstreet and her husband, Grady, have one daughter, Catrell Cooney, and three grandsons. Overstreet has been the owner of A&G Gifts in Starke for 21 years. She is an active member of First United Methodist Church, where she served as the finance treasurer for more than 20 years. Overstreet currently serves as GROUP 5 Treasurer for United Methodist Women. She was the event chair for the local Relay for Life from Overstreet to be honored as Woman of DistinctionSee HONOR, 2B Diane Gaskins leads Linda Hildebrand, Betsy Price and Kay Morrisson through yoga poses at Bradford Center. Karen Hardesty performs a boat pose during a Bradford-Union Technical Center stretch class.

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I always had to question her if I thought she was injured in any way because she had to be on that field, McCollum said. Shed crawl on the field if that was part of it. When she takes to the field for the first time at Florida Southern, Colaw said shes sure shell be nervous and excited, while mulling over the many scenarios that can happen on the field and how shell act in regard to each one. Also, Im going to be really grateful, she said. I already am. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, F eb. 27, 2014 Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* CLOSED MON & TUES SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 Starts Friday, Feb. 28 Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri, 7:00, 9:10 Sat, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10 Sun, 4:45, 7:00 Wed Thurs, 7:30 Now Showing PG-13Roma Downey inFri,8:00 Sat, 5:00, 8:00 Sun, 4:30, 7:05 Wed Thurs, 7:15 PG-13Kevin Costner in3 days to kill Son of God Promote Service Business with a TOOT YOUR OWN HORN! Email your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: b y 5pm Monday OR bring it to:Br adford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor(9 04) 964-6305We ll help you design your ad cash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk covering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in our weekly community giveaway paper: Stand out from the crowd Promote YOUR Servicewith aClassified Photo AdActual Size Ad Sample BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Though Bradford High School was not represented by a full team, it earned the right to advance to the state-level Science Olympiad after student Shane Shuman competed at the regional Olympiad on Feb. 1 at Lake Citys Florida Gateway College. BHS chemistry teacher Chelsea George said schools ideally take 15 students to the Olympiad to compete in events designed for two-student teams. The Friday before the event, George said she had six students who were going to compete. However, one backed out of the event, two got sick and another two got lost on the way to the event. That left Shuman, who was allowed to compete on his own. He was very nervous, George said. Despite that, Shuman, a sophomore, earned a secondplace finish in the anatomy and physiology event, while placing third in five other events: designer genes, rocks and minerals, technical problem solving, circuit lab and dynamic planet. The regional event was made up of teams from Union and Dixie County high schools (Union placed first) and also featured two Leon County BHS student competes in Science middle school teams. This is Bradford High Schools first participation in a Science Olympiad. George is excited about getting BHS more involved, saying the Olympiad gets students to think outside of the box, as well as giving them a different set of experiences. With the Olympiad, they get exposed to a lot more stuff they may not necessarily see at Bradford, George said. The state-level Olympiad will be held at the University of Central Florida on March 15. Georges goal is to take a full team. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Keystone Heights High School senior Madison Colaw signed a letter of intent on Feb. 25 to play soccer at Lakelands Florida Southern College. Colaw, a forward/midfielder, said thankful best described her feelings. Thankful and humble because I feel like God has blessed me with so many opportunities, she said. She also expressed a tremendous appreciation for her parents, James and Robin Colaw. I dont think a lot of people understand how much theyve had to sacrifice financially and just driving so long for tournaments every weekend, Colaw said. Colaw, who has played at KHHS since the seventh grade, said she was also excited about the future and what was in store for her at Florida Southern. She said when she first began considering colleges, she thought of big schools like the University of Florida. However, being a dual-enrolled student at Santa Fe College gave Colaw an appreciation for smaller classroom sizes. Colaw, who wants to become a pediatric oncologist, said she loves the academic program at Florida Southern, but said soccer coach Brittany Jones is a big draw as well. I think the coach really stood out, she said. That was a big part of my decision because she seems like she really wants to get to know the girls and connect with them. Former KHHS soccer coach David McCollum said Colaw, who has played premier club level ball since the age of 13, brings great skills to the field as well as the ability to put the team first. Shes just a great player and just a great person all around, McCollum said. Shes always supportive of her teammates. She was never one to put anybody down. It was always for the team. I guess I appreciated that more than anything. McCollum said another attribute of Colaws is her understanding of the game. She sees all of the field, and she understands the schematic as to how each player has specific responsibilities, McCollum said. She really took that in. Current KHHS coach Kenny Seneca said Colaw proved to be a good leader and was certainly missed when she wasnt on the field. She made her teammates so much better, Seneca said. She can draw the defense and dish the ball off. She can score goals, but she can also just make everybody around her better. Despite missing approximately 10 games this past season while recovering from an injury, Colaw still scored 24 goals, while dishing out 15 assists. It takes a lot to keep Colaw off the field.Keystones Colaw to play soccer at Florida Southern College2011 to 2013, with a record of more than $72,000 in donations being recorded during that span. Overstreet is now a Relay for Life team retention and monitoring chair until 2015. Overstreet is the current first vice president of Altrusa of Starke and is serving her second year as president of the Bradford County Educational Foundation. She has been in the mentoring program for Take Stock in Children for the past five years. Doris Weatherford, who is well known for her literary works and public service, will be the featured speaker at this years ceremony. Her writings include American Women and World War II, Women and American Politics: History and Milestones and The Womens Almanac. Weatherford currently serves as a columnist for LaGaceta, the nations only trilingual newspaper (published in English, Italian and Spanish), and sits as the only woman on the selection committee for historical statues on Tampas Riverwalk. Copies of Weatherfords new book about the history of women in Florida will be for sale at the reception. She will be available to sign copies. Other honorees at this years Women of Distinction ceremony are Patti Fabiani, Margaret Maples Gilliland, Shelley Fraser Mickle and Yvonne C. Rawls. This years event will also honor one Woman of Promise (ages 16-21): Haley Johnson. For more information on Women of Distinction, please contact event coordinator Teri McClellan at 352-395-5201.HONORContinued from 1B Madison Colaw (pictured with her parents, James and Robin) signs her letter of intent to play soccer Florida Southern College. Bradford High School sophomore Shane Shuman is pictured with chemistry teacher Chelsea George.

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Seven Bradford High School students in the Bradford-Union Technical Centers Automotive, Computer and Health Science programs competed in the Skills USA regional contest on Feb. 21 at Florida State College in Jacksonville, with Cole Johnson placing first in Computer Maintenance and Kristie Yates placing first in Medical Terminology. Johnson and Yates have now earned the right to compete in the state competition, which will be held April 27-29 in Pensacola. BHS students Dana Carney, Marshall James, Brandon Rhue, Teddy Stanze and Bryce Tibbitts also competed. After the competition, the students seemed very excited to come back next year, said Jeff Ledger, the technical centers Computer Systems 2 BHS students place 1st at Skills USA event Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B has CLOSED his Practice as of February 12, 2014For further information or to have your records transferred to another dentist, CALL 904-263-9200 and leave a message. Robyn and I would like to Thank You for your patronage since I first came to this wonderful area way back in 1988. May God Bless and Keep You. SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Saturday, January 25th, Ellen Bloodworth Roberts and James Reginald (Reggie) Flynn of Starke were united in marriage in Savannah, Ga., at the Foley House Inn. The bride is the daughter of James F. Bloodworth of Starke, and the late Betty Bloodworth. The groom is the son of George Flynn of Starke, and the late Neva Flynn. Attending the celebration were the brides son, Adam Roberts, Oviedo, sister, Carol Bloodworth Busby, Oviedo, the grooms daughter, Molly Flynn, Raleigh, N.C., brother, Gray Flynn, Middleburg, sister and husband, Neva and Jerry Kidd, Tallahassee, Lisa Richards, Middleburg, Richard and Marilyn Powers, Tallahassee, Ryan Dunson, Raleigh, N.C., and Richard and Pam Ritch, Brevard, N.C. The reception was held at the Foley House Inn, after which the wedding party toured the historic town. The newlyweds will reside in Starke.Roberts, Flynn wed Jan. 25 Ellen Bloodworth Roberts and James Flynn Lindsey Smith of Starke and Drew Carroll of Keystone Heights announce their engagement. Lindsey is the daughter of Jerry and Denise Smith of Starke. She is a 2003 graduate of Bradford High School, and a 2007 graduate of Santa Fe College in Dental Hygiene. She is employed by Talisha Cunningham, D.M.D. Drew is the son of Freddie and June Carroll of Keystone Heights. He is a 2001 graduate of Keystone Heights High School and is self-employed. The wedding will be March 8, 2014 at the Florida Agricultural Museum in Palm Coast with reception to follow. Invitations have been sent.Smith, Carroll to wed March 8 Drew Carroll and Lindsey Smith Socials ,The Andrew Crosby family reunion is Saturday, March 1, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish to the National Guard Armory on Edwards Road.Andrew Crosby family reunion is March 1 Bradford High School/Bradford-Union Technical Center students competing in the Skills USA regional contest were (front, l-r): Cole Johnson, Kristie Yates, Brandon Rhue, Teddy Stanze, Marshall James, Bryce Tibbitts and (not pictured) Dana Carney. Also pictured (back, l-r) are technical center instructors Teresa Jackson, Jeff Ledger and Mike Rensberger. I nt ernet C af e Hwy 301 S. Star keAcross from KOA904-964-3350 Sweepstakes Amusement Parlor 6pm to Midnight and Information Technology instructor. One thing I have to say is that all the students were well behaved. This competition really sparked a new excitement for the students. Cole Johnson (left) and Kristie Yates earned the right to compete state-level event. The Bradford-Keystone Heights Relay For Life teams are hosting a yard sale this Saturday, March 1, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Starke City Square in downtown Starke. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Starke to host Relay for Life yard sale on SaturdayNorm Myers of the Sons of the American Revolution will present a program on Writing Your Memoirs at the Col. Samuel Elbert Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolutions next meeting, which will be Monday, March 3, at 10:30 a.m. at IHOP in Starke. In addition, VetSpace of Alachua County representative Natalie Packnick, accompanied by her service dog, Eiesel, will accept two plarn (plastic yarn) mats made by DAR members for homeless, female veterans. (The Florida State Society Daughters of the American Revolution three-year project is centered on homeless, female veterans.) Visitors are welcome to attend this meeting.Local DAR chapter to meet March 3Any woman 18 or older regardless of race, religion or ethnic backgroundwho can prove direct descent from a person who aided in achieving American independence between April 19, 1775, and Nov. 26, 1783, is eligible for membership. Please contact Konnie Beauregard at 352-475-1865 for more information. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the Bradford County Extension Service would like to invite you to enter plants in the March 11-16 Bradford Fair offers chance to exhibit plantsCounty Fair. There will be three divisions this year. Along with the adult amateur division, there will also be an adult professional division for nursery owners and professional growers and a youth division. Entries can include potted houseplants, hanging plants, patio plants, cut or potted edible or food-producing plants, vegetables, fruit and nuts. There will also be a section for honey, cane syrup and eggs.   Plants may be entered at Building 2 of the fairgrounds on Monday, March 10, from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information about the agriculture/horticulture show, please call Laurie Compton at the Bradford County Extension office at 904-966-6299.

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Dear Editor: On (Feb. 13), as I sat under the hair dryer correcting my gray challenged hair, I looked across the room and I could see two ladies facing each other talking. Over the roar of my hair dryer, I couldnt hear what they were saying and could only imagine. You might ask what did these ladies have in common. Well within just a few days of each other they both lost their spouses. And who were these two ladies; Sherry Strickland and Sharon Jones. But in reality their husbands led very similar lives; both were long time business owners. One was the owner of Leonards Outboard Shop here in Keystone and the other in Jacksonville, Economy Printing. Leonard repaired the motors and Bobby loved fishing. Their word and handshake meant more than any signed contract. Both served our country in the United States Navy. While in my eyes that certainly makes them heroes, but they are what I call everyday life heroes. They got up each morning went to work, paid their bills, loved their families, served their community, supported the schools, and held integrity to the highest level. When they were around people felt secure and safe. Sherry and Sharon must have had a lot to share and I am glad that these two gentlemen shared their lives with my family and the entire Keystone Community. Rest in Peace Bobby Strickland and Leonard Jones. Sincerely, Tina Bullock 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thu rsday, Feb. 27, 2014 Armbands on Sale Now!Save Now, Dont Wait! Advance Armbands are $15 Good for 1 Day at the Fair SAVE & BUY IN ADVANCE! For more information go to www.BradfordCountyFair.net (904) 964-5252 Bradford County Fair Association 64thANNUALFAIR FAIRNew Entertainment New RidesSame Great Fun with Family & Friends Available at: (904) 964-7555134 East Call Street Starke, FL Its Tax Time! Corporate and Individual Income Tax Services Full Bookkeeping & Payroll Services Audit & Accounting Services Business Consulting including Quickbooks & Accounting. Set up new Corporations, LLCs and Partnerships. back (l-r): Cindy Ward, Kara Wainwright, Brad Million front: Job White and Doug Reddish Let the professionals atReddish & White CPAsget the refund you deserve FAST Commercial Residential Fleets Autogas Farms Industry Piping for NewConstruction or Home Remodeling Most Major Brands Factory Trained4031 S.W. SR 121 Lake Butler, FL 32054 WilliamsLPGas.com wlpgas@windstream.net(386) 496-3725 Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: Is the Sheriffs Office a family business or do the citizens have a voice in the matter? Explain to us how five people put in for the appointment for the Sheriffs position, four have more experience, and the one with the least amount of experience gets the interview, and also the Appointment. Furthermore what good is the Undersheriff when he cant even carry out the duties of being sheriff when the unthinkable happens? Thats not saying much for our county. This is not a family business and there has to be a change. When you apply for a job, all qualified applicants usually get an interview and then the decision is made on the position, but in our case it was not like that. We the citizens of Union County have a choice to make this election and we think the decision is clear, Change is for the better. Concerned citizens of Union CountyCitizens want to be heard in regard to UC Dear Editor: Mr. Buster Rahns editorial Capital Punishment in Florida: time for a new look? in your 2/20/14 edition was much appreciated by me and, perhaps, others who are struggling with this emotional question The States responsibility is to provide security for society but does it have to kill its inmates to protect its citizens from convicted, first degree murderers? Most penal authorities agree that this security can be assured when a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole is given. Thus the question, Why does the State kill individuals? And further, How does the State promote a reduction in senseless killings among its citizens when it kills its prisoners even though a non-killing option is available! As one who has been present in the designated Protest area across the road from the death chamber on S.R. 16 for many executions, I have never been there three times in just two months. If Gov. Scott continues this pace, there will be 18 executions in 2014 the most since capital punishment was re-instituted in 1979. Our nation and the civilized world is moving away from the death penalty as Florida is going in the opposite direction. I have a sick feeling in my Florida moving in opposite direction in regard to death penaltystomach that this dramatic acceleration in state-sponsored killings is a part of Gov. Scotts re-election strategy. If so, this is not only morally and ethically reprehensible but, also politically short-sighted in my view. Mr. Rahns closing thoughts in his perceptive editorial suggests that Floridians may be considering another way. There may be an alternative to capital punishment. If so let us move forward into a new era in which the sacredness of life is paramount, even for those who do not share our values. John X. Linnehan HamptonRemembering everyday life heroesDear Editor: The botched rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace last October per provision of Expand Medicaid as called for by Affordable Care Actthe Affordable Care Act added momentum to Republican attacks against Obamacare.   Mind you, the Republican Party has been trying to dismantle or defund the Affordable Care Act from the time it was signed into law by President Obama in 2010.   I think the Republicans have been largely successful in creating distrust so much so that many have probably forgotten that the American people have long been asking for health care reform.   When President Obama was elected in 2008, 49 million U. S. residents had no health insurance. The United States is the only industrialized nation that does not guarantee access to health care for all their citizens.   45,000 uninsured Americans die every year for lack of medical treatment.   Medical bills are a leading cause of bankruptcy in the U.S.   Surprisingly, most of medical bankruptcy filers are from the middle class.   The Affordable Care Act was a political compromise to change some of the shortcomings of our health care system but without dethroning the powerful forprofit health care industry. The law does not regulate, or place caps on, health insurance premiums, medical treatment costs, or prices of prescription drugs.   Supposedly competition in the market will drive down those costs.   I believe, on the other hand, that we will not see reasonable health care costs because capitalistic greed will continue to find ways to make their profits.     The Affordable Care Act provides subsidy in the form of advanced premium tax credit for insurance purchase on the Health Insurance Marketplace.   However said subsidy is available ONLY to people with income ABOVE 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level.   The Affordable Care Act intended to provide health insurance to people BELOW the Poverty Level through expansion of the Medicaid program.   The federal government will pay 100 percent of the cost of Medicaid expansion for the first three years, and 90 percent thereafter.      Heres the rub.   The Medicaid program is administered by each individual state although funding comes from both federal and state funds.   In 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of most of Obamacare but ruled that the federal government could not require states to expand their Medicaid program.   Instead, individual states could choose whether or not to expand Medicaid in their state.   Nearly 4 million Floridians have no health insurance.   Medicaid expansion will provide health coverage to 1.2 million low-income Floridians who do not earn enough to qualify for premium tax credit but are too poor to afford insurance without financial help. The Florida Senate passed a Medicaid expansion plan in the 2013 legislative session.   However the bill died in the Florida House of Representatives on the pretext that our Republican legislators doubted the ability of the federal government to finance Medicaid expansion. It is my opinion that the decision by our Florida Legislature to opt out of Medicaid expansion is politically driven and certainly not in the interest of the people.   Florida has the second highest percentage of uninsured in the U.S.   If Florida were to expand the Medicaid program, our state can gain 50 billion dollars in additional revenue for the next ten years.   Such revenue would be an economic boost to Florida.   At the same time, Medicaid expansion will benefit individuals and families living at and below the poverty level.   By opting out of   Medicaid expansion, Florida legislators are choosing to deny care to the neediest of the needy.   It should be pointed out that, in anticipation of Medicaid expansion, the Affordable Care Act drastically reduces funding for hospitals mandated to provide uncompensated emergency room care, again penalizing   uninsured Floridians. To bring the issue closer to home, allow me to share statistics who could be our relatives, or friends, or neighbors, or simply persons we have encountered in our community.   According to the 2010 census, 16 percent of Bradford residents live in poverty.   This figure is higher than the statistic for Florida in general (15.6 percent) and significantly higher than the statistic for the U.S. (14.9 percent).   Bradford County is predominantly white.   The median age of Bradford County residents is 39.5 years.   To me, it means that, under present circumstances, many of the   u ninsured in our county will likely remain uninsured for a long time. The next regular Florida legislative session will start on March 4, 2014 and will continue for 60 days until May 2, 2014.   I urge Floridians to tell Florida Legislature to expand the Medicaid program as provided by the Affordable Care Act so that low-income Floridians, the neediest of the needy, can gain access to health care.   Some readers may be interested to know that the law does not provide health coverage to illegal immigrants. A group in Gainesville called Just Health Care is circulating a petition for the expansion of Medicaid in Florida without privatization.   The organization believes that access to health care should be considered a human right and should be available to   ALL citizens.   The petition is available at www. justhealthcareflorida.org. We tell the world that America is a Christian nation and we take pride in our Christian values.   In the eyes of the Lord, there are no Republicans or Democrats, the poor are just as worthy as the rich, we are all His children.   Christian values preach love and charity.   He who has pity on the poor lends to the LORD, and He will pay back what he has given. (Proverbs 19:17)   Isnt it right and just to practice our faith?   And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (Matthew 25:40)   Mrs. Fe Ripka Hampton

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B STARKE 904-368-0131 1101 S. Walnut St. (Hwy 301 South) KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 352-473-4001 101 Commercial Drive (Facing SR-100 East) PALATKA 386-385-5658 625 Hwy 19 South Need a New Mower? $0 Down & 0% Interest for up to 48 Monthson all Zero Turn & Riding Lawn Tractors We Take Trade-Ins We Warranty & Service All Makes & Models 3 Locations to Serve You(formerly Ace Parts & Service in Starke & Keystone Hts.) Auto Home Life RV Motorcycle FREE QUOTES116 N. Walnut St Starke(next to the Post Office downtown)(904) 964-7707dawncorbett@allstate.com t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: BradfordJoseph Heath Beavins, 26, of Brooker was arrested Feb. 20 by Bradford deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Bond was set at $2,500. Jerry David Bradham, 48, of Cleveland, Tenn., was arrested Feb. 23 by Bradford deputies for three charges of probation violation for original charges of grand theft, grand theft motor vehicle, and battery. He was also arrested for failure to appear for original charge of driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $3,000 for the failure to appear charge, while bond was not allowed for the other three charges. Tyrone Syrus Brazle, 58, of Jacksonville was arrested Feb. 19 by Bradford deputies for an outof-county warrant. Bond was set at $15,003. Nathaniel Kendrick Brown, 45, of Gainesville was arrested Feb. 24 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for withholding child support. Brown was already in the Alachua County Jail and was transported to Bradford with bond set at $3,070. Chad Austin Carpenter, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 18 by Bradford deputies for obstructing justice. According to the arrest report, the victim was calling law enforcement as she was concerned for her safety during an argument with Carpenter over a bill. Carpenter grabbed the phone from the victim and told dispatch everything was OK. A deputy was dispatched to the home, and Carpenter was arrested for the obstruction charge. Bond was set at $5,000. Jacob Sabaistian Crews, 23, of Starke was arrested Feb. 19 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Crews was stopped for a traffic infraction by several deputies, including one with a K9 drug dog. During the stop, the K9 alerted on the vehicle, and the drugs and equipment were found. A 14-year old in the vehicle was also arrested for possession of marijuana and drug equipment. Bond for Crews was set at $2,000, while the juvenile was released to his mother, and his charge was forwarded to the Department of Juvenile Justice. Jessie Lee Dell, 56, of Lawtey was arrested Feb. 24 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, the victim was trying to leave a residence with her things when Dell grabbed her by the arms and pushed her to the floor. Bond was set at $1,000. Levi Zebulon Gaylord, 33, of Starke was arrested Feb. 19 by Starke police for shoplifting. According to the arrest report, Gaylord was observed putting headphones in his pocket at Walmart and then walking out without paying for them. He was detained by a Walmart employee until police arrived. Bond was set at $500. Autumn Lafferty, 33, of Lancaster, Ohio, was arrested Feb. 21 by Bradford deputies for disorderly intoxication. According to the arrest report, a deputy was called to the Kangaroo at U.S. 301 and S.R. 16 in Starke for an intoxicated person in the store. At the store, the deputy observed Lafferty yelling and causing a disturbance inside. Once outside, Lafferty continued to raise her voice and place her hand on the deputy. She wouldnt remove her hand when ordered to do so. Lafferty was arrested and, after being placed in the police vehicle, began to hit her head and shoulder against the glass while transported to the jail. Christopher Lee Malone, 26, of St. Cloud was arrested Feb. 20 by Bradford deputies for two charges for failure to appear. Bond was set at $5,000. Demetrius A. Martin, 20, of Starke was arrested Feb. 20 by Starke police for failure to appear on an original charge of possession of paraphernalia for storage. Crystal Shiko Masters, 29, of Starke was arrested Feb. 21 by Starke police for larceny. According to the arrest report, police were called to Cato Fashion in Starke about a possible shoplifting by Masters. A store employee said Masters entered the store and was trying on many items in the fitting room. The employee was assisting in handing her things to try on in the fitting room when she noticed Masters had not returned a pair of shoes and several necklaces. Masters left the store, but by then the officer had arrived and approached her at her vehicle before she left. After the officer asked to speak with her, she put her purse in the vehicle and wouldnt retrieve it for the officer. After several minutes and several requests by the officer, she reached in to get the purse, but dumped the contents on the floor in the back of the vehicle. The officer saw a pair of shoes and later found the two necklaces in the vehicle. Masters was arrested, with bond set at $500. Grover Lewis Norton, 38, of Orange Park was arrested Feb. 23 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Norton was stopped for an expired tag and tag not assigned to vehicle when Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay or Unionthe officer smelled marijuana coming from the car. A search of the vehicle turned up the drugs and drug equipment. A passenger in the car, Kyle Edward Sweeny, 27, of Jacksonville, was also arrested and charged with possession of marijuana and drug equipment. Bond for Norton was set at $1,500, while bond for Sweeny was set at $1,000. Cody Scott Qualls, 19, of Starke was arrested Feb. 23 by Bradford deputies for carrying a concealed weapon and for possession of marijuana and drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Qualls was stopped for a headlight not working by a deputy. The deputy smelled marijuana coming from the vehicle, and a search turned up the drugs, equipment and the concealed weapon. Efrain Rodriquez Jr., 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 19 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant for original charge of lewd or lascivious molestation, battery, tattooing a minor without consent of parent or legal guardian and exposure of sexual organs. Bond was set at $115,015. Cody Patrick Smith, 21, of Starke was arrested Feb. 24 by Starke police for fraud by swindle. According to the arrest report Smith, a former Walmart employee, was observed taking two bags of bird feed from the garden section (value of $27.73) and returning them at the service desk for a refund. Smith was detained by a Walmart lossprevention employee until police arrived. Amanda Shae Stevens, 32, of Hawthorne was arrested Feb. 24 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Stevens pulled into the Do Not Enter side of McDonalds in Starke and almost hit a deputys vehicle, then continued to the adjacent gas station. When the deputy went to speak with her, he could smell marijuana coming from the vehicle. A search of the vehicle turned up the drugs and drug equipment. Stevens told the deputy she had been pulled over by the Gainesville police the day before and issued a sworn complaint for possession of marijuana, and told someone on the phone she had forgotten the drugs and other stuff were in the vehicle. She was also issued a citation for her tag being expired less than six months. Trevor James Wall, 22, of Starke was arrested Feb. 22 by Bradford deputies for driving under the influence. Rebecca Lynn Wheeler, 42, of Starke was arrested Feb. 22 by Starke police for battery and criminal mischief-property damage. According to the arrest report, Wheeler was in an argument with the victim and struck and damaged his vehicles window with a stone candlestick holder. The victim stated that when he went to stop her from further damaging his vehicle, she threw the candleholder at the truck and missed. She then struck him in the side of the neck with her fist. Wheeler left, but police arrested her later at her residence. Keystone/Melrose Thomas Baker, 30, of Starke was arrested Feb. 18 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Kurt Helmich, 43, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 20 by Clay deputies for possession of child pornography and for soliciting a parent or guardian to allow a child to participate in sexual activity. Timothy Hobgood, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 24 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and battery. Shane Merritt, 21, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 24 by Clay deputies for contempt of court. Chadwick Richardson, 25, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 23 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Frank Toms, 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 20 by Clay deputies for leaving the scene of an accident and driving with a permanently revoked license. Tony Wills, 22, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 22 by Clay deputies for contempt of court.UnionJoseph Anthony Gillihan, 18, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 24 by Union deputies for failure to appear. James Lamont Jones, 41, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 24 by Union deputies on out-ofcounty warrants from Alachua for cocaine trafficking, for using two-way communications device to facilitate a crime and for possession of cocaine. Bond was set at $55,000. Derek Scott Nipper, 28, was arrested Feb. 22 by Union deputies for driving under the influence. According to the arrest report, a deputy first heard a vehicle squealing its tires near Meridian Health Center, and then he observed it spinning its tires, power braking and spinning the tires again in front of Full House Saloon in Lake Butler. Once the deputy stopped the vehicle, with Nipper driving, he observed several open beer cans in the truck and then conducted field sobriety tests and took breath samples, which came back at .181 and .171 above the legal limit for alcohol consumption. Benjamin James Sherrod, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 23 by Union deputies for assaultintent threat to do violence and for battery. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a disturbance, where family members of Sherrod said they thought he was high on meth and alcohol. He was making threats to do bodily harm to them. He also grabbed a family member when he tried to escort him out of the home, and once outside, he threw chairs, clothes and many other items off a porch onto the ground. Sherrod is already on felony probation, according to the arrest report. Thomas Robert Bruce, 28, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 20 in Alachua County on a warrant from Union County for failure to appear. Astrid Leonard Watkins, 40, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 17 by Union deputies for felony battery-strangulation. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a residence in Worthington Springs about a disturbance. The victim told deputies Watkins got mad at her because she wouldnt do some laundry and then started throwing clothes out of the door. Watkins and the victim started arguing, and Watkins grabbed her around the neck, choking her and shoving her into a closet. The victims brother was at the home, and he intervened between the two before the deputy arrived. Brandon Joseph Croft, 28, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 21 by Union deputies for contempt of court-child support. Bond was set at $500.PUBLIC MEETING KEYSTONE AIRPARK AUTHOR ON THE 1st Legals

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to do a variety of standing poses. Yogastretch Classes are led by Ben Bridgman, a certified group fitness instructor who is also certified by the Silver Sneakers program. I really enjoy working with senior adults, many of whom have never had a fitness regimen before they became active with Silver Sneakers, Bridgman said. There are Silver Sneakers classes especially for cardio fitness and weightlifting, but Yogastretch is different. Participants may feel that there isnt any benefit to a class where they dont break a sweat, but all they need to do is try it. They always leave feeling better, more flexible and more relaxed after the session. Bridgman also teaches a combination yoga/Pilates stretch class following his popular indoor cycle classes at the Bradford Union Technical Center on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Indoor cycle classes start at 5:15 p.m. and typically last an hour. Following that, cyclers are ready to stretch and tone their muscles. Its really the best thing to do after an hour on a stationary bike, which can cause muscles especially the large muscles of the legsto become shortened and tight, Bridgman said. The Pilates work emphasizes strengthening the core muscles, such as the abdominals and back muscles, but the yoga work really helps increase flexibility and decrease muscle tightness. We do a few minutes of relaxation at the end, and I am constantly amazed at how effective it is. You wouldnt think lying on a thin yoga mat on a hard tile floor would be relaxing, but it is. People dont want to get up, mainly because its the only time they allow themselves to be completely relaxed. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese exercise practiced in slow motion for relaxation, vitality, health and grace. Described paradoxically as a non-aggressive martial art, it is based on yielding and awareness rather than force and resistance. Tai Chi takes seven to 10 minutes to practice, requires no special equipment except flat shoes and open space, and can be enjoyed by people of all ages. Starke does not currently have live Tai Chi instruction, although Bridgman has been studying the martial art for several years and hopes to be able to add it to his offerings. The Bradford Senior Center offers DVD Tai Chi training in combination with its chair yoga classes. If youre willing to travel to Gainesville, there are plenty of options for in-person Tai Chi training. Paul Campbell, who is also a licensed massage therapist and licensed mental health counselor, runs the School of Tai Chi Chuan at 1409 N.W. 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Please join us as we honor the women who honor our community. Thursday, March 13, 2014, in SFs Fine Arts Hall rfntbr n rr r bn r bn nrrrt rrbnt For tickets and information, please visit www.sfcollege.edu/wod 3000 NW 83rd Street Gainesville, FL 32606 r eceived her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of D r. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, for hopefully a very long time! T here is a Were pleased to welcome to our staff! Complete Care. Close To Home Every Fri. Night$5 Yager Bombs Starting at 8pm P REVATT SRESTAURANT(904)368-9156 NOW OPEN127 E. Call Street Located in Downtown Starke Owners:Jackson, Jason & Brandon PrevattEVERYDAY WE HAVE SELECT APPETIZERS AT 1/2 PRICE LUNCH SPECIALS$750DailyMONDAY NIGHT starting at 7pm$6 Pitchers $375 Royal FlushesTUESDAY NIGHT Draft Beers 2/$350 Wells 2/$450WEDNESDAY FAMILY NIGHT60 Wings starting at 5pm $11 Domestic Buckets of Beer ON SUNDAYSWITH CHURCH BULLETIN10% OFFTHURSDAY Buy 10 Wings(Boneless or Bone-in)Get 10 at 1/2 Price!SAT & SUN Buy 25 WingsGet a FREE Pitcher of Beer, Tea or Soda Includes drink HEALTHContinued from 1B My fear was of not living for realliving a life that was not really by my choice, but what was acceptable, what I was taught to want, a pre-programmed agenda. He started to get results through the practice of Tai Chi and meditation, realizing what was generating the fear in my mind was ignorance, not understanding how to work with the mind, how to process the existing fear and how to awaken the natural human state that is fearless. Finding both religious dogma and exclusively rational approaches to living lacking because they failed to satisfactorily address ethical principals for decisions as well as mans profound spiritual nature, Campbell found a home at the Shr Jung Tai Chi School in New York Citys Chinatown section, studying under the legendary Cheng Man-ching. Cheng, who died in 1975, was known for Tai Chi Chuan and his Yang-style short form, which is composed of 37 movements that take less than 10 minutes to practice instead of the 20 to 30 minutes required by the Yang long form. Campbell also had the benefit of the teachings of Oscar Ichazo, the Bolivian-born founder of the Arica School, a human potential movement group that teaches a body of techniques for inherent consciousness-raising and an ideology to relate to the world in an awakened way. Ichazo eventually introduced his school to Chengs school. Anthony Korahais, like Campbell, was attracted to the spiritual, healing aspects of Tai Chi, which he hadnt found in other martial arts such as karate and kung fu. He began his Tai Chi journey, also in New York City, as a result of an inner struggle, specifically a debilitating case of clinical depression. He recalled living with a fog of despair that returned each morning, engulfing him in darkness. Through the study of Qigonga practice of aligning breath, movement and awareness for exercise, healing and meditationas well as Tai Chi, he found relief. In Malaysia, studying with Grandmaster Wong, Korahais learned that when human energy systems Sixth St., Suite 220 (352-3713718). Anthony Korahais directs the Flowing Zen Studio at 5127 N.W. 39th Ave. (352-672-7613, flowingzen.com.) Campbell, who teaches 10 classes a week, often starts students with a course called the Eight Ways of Tai Chi Chuan, a gentle exercise program developed especially for elderly people, although it is appropriate for anyone who would like an introduction to Tai Chi. Unlike exercises which use exertion and stress to build muscular strength, the Eight Ways uses gentle, flowing movements to relax and loosen the body and the joints, to stimulate circulation, to build stability in the legs and feet, and to develop an awareness of ones internal strength. For seniors, this can translate into grace in walking, better balance and greater confidence in movement. Everyday tasks such as lifting, reaching into cupboards, opening doors and walking up and down stairs or curbs are emulated in movements taught in the class. This simplified version of Tai Chi is ideal for people who are unable or unwilling to make the commitment to learn the complete Tai Chi form, a process that can take several years. Each of the exercises of the Eight Ways has an image associated with it, such as sculling, which mimics the motion of an oarsman rowing a gondola on a canal. These mental images enhance the learners experience, making it imaginative and enjoyable. Regular practice of the Eight Ways, like the Tai Chi form, builds a firm foundation by exercising the legs and feet, developing stability and balance, stimulating circulation by sending warmth to the extremities of the body, and loosening and relaxing the joints. Participants develop internal awareness and confidence that provides a sense of well-being. Campbell began his journey with Tai Chi in 1973 as part of a personal search for the life he wanted to live. I was in a state of intense indecision about how to proceed, Campbell said. I recognized that what was between me and living the life I wanted to live was fear. I was looking for ways of dealing with that fear that werent just theoretical. were functioning optimally, it was possible to reach a state that Chinese masters called a harmony of yin and yang. When this happened, he said, the energy that mobilizes and powers the immune system, produces the proper enzymes for digestion, repairs damaged cells, flushes away toxic wastes and balances the emotionsall of this energy starts to flow harmoniously, thus keeping us happy and healthy. After Korahais began to experience harmonious energy flow and balance for himself, he quit his job as a network engineer at the school of architecture at Columbia University in New York City. He said it was the right job for many years, especially with a schedule that gave him the freedom to travel and learn the discipline of his true calling teaching Qigong and Tai Chi. Eventually, he earned the title of Sifu, a Chinese word that means father and teacher. Korahais followed his parents, who were professional musicians, when they retired and relocated to Florida. He enrolled in an acupuncture school in Gainesville, where he met his wife, Akemi, a native of Venezuela. Eventually, Korahais dropped out of school to teach Qigong and Tai Chi full time. Akemi continued her acupuncture studies and later opened the Painless Acupuncture Center, which is located in the same building as her husbands studio, Flowing Zen. Now, Korahais teaches 12 classes per week at Flowing Zen. Zen means meditation, said Korahais. Meditation can be drinking coffee, eating food, not just sitting meditation, which is difficult for a lot of people. Everything I do has a flowing component. All students at Flowing Zen begin with a threehour Qigong workshop that costs $47. Also available are monthly memberships, which include classes and one-on-one instruction. Most of Campbells classes cost $100 for 10 weekly one-hour sessions. Campbell notes that in a culture which celebrates youth, Tai Chi offers a more positive perspective on growing older. Understanding the training of the human body as the ground for training the human spirit, Tai Chi tunes us to inner principles that lead to continually fuller, healthier life, Campbell said. The first principle is uprightness, which means being in perfect equilibrium with gravity and facing reality without pretense. The second principal is relaxation, meaning that at rest, a person is serene and attentive, while in action every cell is available for the simplest, most complete response. The third principle is the Tan Tienthe bodys physical center of gravity. Having our heart-mind focused at the Tan Tien means harmony in all aspects of our life, means our full being, our spirit, our internal unity can manifest, Campbell said. Seeing the human body as an exact expression of the maturing human spirit and training it accordingly, Tai Chi Chuan is like fine winethe older you get, the better you get. Ada Reddish, Mary Rahn, Esther Romaro, Annie Barker, June Keefe and Tom Houlihan enjoy the Silver Sneakers yoga stretch class.

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 263 N. Temple Ave Hwy 301 North STARKE(across from Winklers) M Alterations Embroidery Wedding Gowns Dry Cleaning(904) 966-2002Family Owned & Operated since 1993 d Obituaries d Roger ElixsonLAKE BUTLERRoger Lee Elixson, 68, of Lake Butler died on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014 at the Haven Hospice in Gainesville surrounded by his family. He was born in Worthington Springs where he lived his entire life. He graduated from Union County High School. He was a member of the Woodman of the World and of Sardis Baptist Church. He is preceded in death by his father, Roy Elixson. He is survived by: his mother, Mary Seay Elixson; daughters, Tina (Stacy) Lloyd of Worthington Springs and Lynn Parrish of Lake Butler; sons, Johnny Ray Elixson of Worthington Springs and Brad (Julie) Elixson of Providence; one brother, Clifford (Willlene) Elixson of Providence; six grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter. Funeral services were held Feb. 25 in the Archer Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Brandon Elixson officiating. Burial followed in Elzey Chapel Cemetery. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.Lori HallLori HallSTARKELori Elaine Hall, age 46, of Starke, passed away on Feb. 20, 2014 at Park Meadows Health and Rehabilitation Center in Gainesville. Lori was born on Feb. 14, 1968 in Lakeland. She was raised in Lakeland and recently moved to Starke this past year. Lori enjoyed writing biographies and poetry. She had a big heart and a passion for helping people. Lori was an advocate for people with disabilities and she enjoyed teaching people how to read. She also enjoyed listening to music. Lori is survived by: her mother, Mae Hall of Lakeland; her son, Zachary Hall of Lakeland; her two brothers; one granddaughter; and her three loving close friends, Rebekkah Baker, Samantha Luke, and Dorothy Luke all of Starke. Memorial services were held on Feb. 23 at Archie Tanner Funeral Services Chapel with Reverend Jimmy Scott officiating. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARYMax HearstKEYSTONE HEIGHTSMax Ray Hearst, 75, of Keystone Heights died Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 at Shands in Gainesville. He was born on July 14, 1938 in Norfolk, Va. to the late Ray and Debra M. (Roundtree) Hearst and was a longtime area resident. Prior to retirement he worked as a tool and die maker for the Civil Service and served in the United States Army. Survivors are: wife of 21 years, Patricia (Mentzer) Hearst of Keystone Heights; son, Charlie Edward Hearst of Keystone Heights. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights. Gere JohnsKEYSTONE HEIGHTSGere Howard Johns, 82, Mother, Creative Designer, Needlepoint Artist, and Conservationist. Gere Howard Johns died at home peacefully on Thursday Feb. 20, 2014 after a courageous battle with lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis.   She was born April 26, 1931 in Dukes at her Grandfathers home. Gere was predeceased by her beloved husband Jerome of 56 years, her mother and father, John Marcus and Blanche Roberts Howard. Gere graduated from Union County High School in 1949 as the Class Valedictorian.   She was active in extracurricular activities (State and National Officer of the Future Homemakers of American (FHA), a captain of the basketball team, and was a cheerleader). She attended Stetson University where she was Captain of the Cheerleaders, a member of Alpha Xi Delta Sorority, and the Glee Club. She also attended the University of Florida. Gere completed a 10 year study of the piano at the St. Louis Institute of Music, St. Louis, Mo. Gere was a founding member and president of the Crystal Lake Environmental Organization (CLEO).   She was a self-taught water and ecosystem expert. She was a member and past President of the Starke Womens Club, past President of the Friends of the Library, a Girl Scout Leader, a Boy Scout Den Mother and a teacher at Youth Camp. Gere was a master of Needlepoint.   She created six pieces of needlepoint entitled, The Creation and donated the work to the United Methodist Church in Keystone Heights, where she was a member and was loved by many. This work took hundreds of hours to complete. Over the years she used her talent of needlepoint to create personal gifts to show her love for family and friends. She is survived by: daughter, Debra (Frank Williams) Johns of Pomona, Calif.; son, Phillip (Linda) Johns of Santa Fe Lake; her brother, John Marcus (Cheryl) Howard of Dukes; seven grandchildren; nine great grandchildren; one great-great grandchild, and many cousins and friends. A Celebration of Geres Life will be held Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. Keystone United Methodist Church on State Road 21, Keystone Heights. A private interment for immediate family will be prior to the Celebration of Life. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to Haven Hospice, 4200 NW 90th Blvd, Gainesville, FL 32606. Arrangements are under the direction of Jones-Gallagher Funeral home of Starke 904-9646200. On-line condolences may be left at www.jonesgallagherfh.com.   PAID OBITUARYAmber LawsonHAMPTONMs. Amber Nicole Lawson age 24, of Hampton suddenly passed away Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014. Amber was born on Feb. 6, 1990 in Gainesville and was a homemaker. She was a member of Madison Street Baptist Church, enjoyed singing, dancing, and making people smile. She was preceded in death by her paternal grandfather Henry Lawson. Survivors are: children, Trenton Holt and Trinity Holt both of Starke; her father, Marvin Marty (Sharon) Lawson of Starke; her mother, Misty (Koehler) Lawson and fiance Johnnie Holton of Hampton; sisters, Destini Lawson, Chasiti Lawson, both of Starke; brother, Chad Lawson of Starke; paternal grandmother, Janice Lawson of Starke; maternal grandparents, Steve and Gail Varnum of Hampton; aunts, Lori (Paul) Bateman of St. Augustine, Randee (J.J. Strickland) Varnum of Hampton, Lisa (Michael) Giles of Lawtey; uncles, Mike (Ron Evans) Lawson of Starke, Stanley (Jennifer) Varnum and Brad Varnum both of Hampton; special niece, Sereniti. Services were held on Monday, Feb. 24 at Dewitt C. Jones Chapel. Interment followed at Hope Cemetery with Reverend Matt Dyal officiating. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke 904-964-6200. On-line condolences may be left at www. jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARY   Dwight Lintz Sr. LAKE BUTLERDwight O. Lintz Sr. 86 of Lake Butler died Friday, Feb. 21, 2014 at the Haven Hospice in Lake City. He was born on Sept. 10, 1927 in Deerfield, Michigan to the late Howard and Georgiang Rutherford Lintz. He worked at Lockhead Martin as a computer engineer. He was also a proud Veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is preceded in death by two brothers. He is survived by: his wife, Betty Jane Lintz; sons, Dwight (Paula) Lintz, Jr. of Portville, Colo. and Charles (Jean) Lintz of Lake Butler; daughters, Delilah (Karl) Fike of Belfair, Wash. and Rebecca Ann Lintz of Lakewood, Colo.; nine grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren; brothers, George (Geraldine) Lintz of Harrison, Michigan; sisters, Twila (Richard) Stone of Oxford, Mich., Caorl (Jim) Cooper of Apoka, Nona (Elijah) Childers Glanwin of Michigan and Shirley Gurganious (Robert) Atkinson, North Carolina. A memorial service will be held Thursday, March 13, at 11:00 am in the Chapel at Archer Funeral Home, with Bro. Ralph Durham officiating. Burial will be at a later date. Family ask that in Lieu of Flowers please make donations to the Haven Hospice    Lake City Suwannee Valley Care Center 6037 W US Highway 90, Lake City, FL 32055, or to the National Parkinson Foundation. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Diane McNealDiane McNeal, Our Beloved, Wife, Mother, Great and Grandmother, Sister and Aunt, passed away on Feb. 13, 2014 at the age of 77. She gave a valiant fight but lost her battle to cancer. ( ( S he was preceded in death by: her daughter, Lori Diane McNeal; granddaughter, Terra Michelle Hunter; mother, Edith Agnes Register Trowbridge Hunt; step-father John Hunt; niece, Carolyn Aldridge; and nephew, Roderic Yepp. ( ( Mrs. McNeal is survived by: her husband, Norman McNeal, Sr. and her four children, Terrie Vernon, Norman McNeal, Jr., Nancy Mitzel and Kenneth McNeal; and also survived by two grandchildren, Roger Mitzel, Jr. and Candise McNeal; two great-grandchildren, Madison and Ty Mitzel; her sisters, Nancy Aldridge and Miriam Trowbridge; and nieces, nephews and cousins. ( ( At Mrs. McNeals request there will be no services held. ( ( T here will be a memorial posted online in the near future at Crevasses Cremation Services in Gainesville. It will be open for comments to be posted by those who would like to. Family will be sent information once the memorial is posted (link). ( ( I n lieu of flowers you can make a donation to the following: ( N orman McNeal, Sr., or her great-grandchildren, thru Nancy Mitzel, or her grandchildren, Roger Lee Mitzel, Jr. (RJ), thru Nancy Mitzel and Candise McNeal, thru Terrie Vernon, or Haven Hospice E.T. York Care Center, 4200 NW 90th Blvd., Gainesville, FL, 32606. Haven Hospice also has memorial bricks that can be purchased in her name to be placed on their memorial walkway with the funds going to their operating account as they are a non-profit organization. ( ( T hank you Haven Hospice Center staff and nurses for the loving care given to Mrs. McNeal and the extra help given to the family in this time of need.PAID OBITUARYDakota MobleyDakota MobleyKEYSTONE HEIGHTS Dakota Jacob D.J. Mobley, age 15, of Keystone Heights passed away at his home Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014. D.J. was born in Gainesville on March 18, 1998 and was a 10th grade student in Clay County. He was an Explorer at the Keystone Heights Fire Department, involved with the Clay R.O.T.C., and Boy Scout Troop 146. D. J. also enjoyed being outdoors hunting and fishing. D.J. was preceded in death by his twin brother Austin Jesse Mobley. Survivors are: his loving parents, Kevin and Racquel (Singletary) Mobley; one brother, Matthew Kaleb Singletary; maternal grandparents, Keith and Debbie Singletary; paternal grandparents, Don and Kit Mobley all of Keystone Heights; paternal grandmother, Linda Brophy of Palm Coast; aunt, Rhonda Singletary of Gainesville and uncle, Brian (Tara) Singletary of Keystone Heights; aunt, Lauren (Griff) Thomas of Atlanta, Ga.; along with additional aunts, uncles, and cousins. Funeral services for D.J. were held Saturday, Feb. 22, at Trinity Baptist Church with Pastor Marty Franks and Pastor Rob Morford officiating. The burial followed at the Keystone Heights Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family has requested contributions be sent to the Clay Electric Credit Union, P.O. Box 308, Keystone Heights, FL 32656, where an account has been set up for D.J. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Dr., Keystone Heights. 352473-3176. www.jonesgallagherfh. comPAID OBITUARYRonald Sapp Jr.LAKE BUTLER Ronald Wayne Sapp Jr., 33, of Lake Butler, died suddenly on Feb.18, 2014 from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was born in Jacksonville on May 9, 1980 to Ronald Wayne Sapp, Sr. and Regina Grace Price. He lived most of his life in the Lake City area, having moved to Lake Butler eight years ago, and was a carpenter. He is survived by: his father, Ronald Wayne Sapp, Sr. of Callahan; mother, Regina Grace (Gregory) White of Lake City; fianc, Michelle Lobenthal of Lake Butler; sons, Brandon Wayne Sapp of Lake Butler, Jacob Allen Sapp of Lake City and Kage Brady Sapp of Lake Butler; daughters, Christian Alese Harvey of Wellborn and Lana Darlene Sapp of Lake Butler; step-sons, Sean Lobenthal and Kaleb Renaldi both of Lake Butler; brother, Richard Lee (Chelsea) Sapp of Branford; and sister, Robin Renee Sapp of Orlando. Memorial services were conducted on Feb. 25 in the chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home with Rev. John Welkner officiating. Arrangements are under the care of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home of Lake City. William SingletaryJACKSONVILLE 1SGT William Samuel Sambo Singletary, age 47, of 499 McMath Mill Rd., died Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. A native of Jacksonville, he was born March 5, 1966, the son of William S. and Sandra M. Singletary, Sr. Mr. Singletary was employed at Southerfield Aviation as an A & P Mechanic. He served in the United States Army for 22 years at several locations including Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., Ft. Benning, Ga., Ft. Eustis, Va. and ending with the 1/111th AVN REDT in Jacksonville. He did several tours of duty in Egypt, Kuwait, Bosnia and Iraq. Mr. Singletary was an avid genealogy and history researcher and enjoyed looking for long lost relatives. He loved motorcycles and riding the open road. Mr. Singletary was a 1984 graduate of Southland Academy. He received an Associates degree from Florida Community College Jacksonville, A & P certificate from South Georgia Technical College and attended Florida Theological College. He also was a member of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, St. Johns Presbyterian Church in Jacksonville and attended First Presbyterian Church of Americus. Survivors in addition to his parents are: his wife, Angie Bass Singletary of Americus; a daughter, Ashton Singletary of Atlanta; three sons, Caleb Singletary of Atlanta, Jake Hood of Americus and Justin Hood of Americus; one grandson, Brantley Singletary of Jacksonville; a sister and brother-in-law, Kim Singletary Christmas and Charles of Riverview; a brother and sister-inlaw, Doug Singletary and Charlotte of Jacksonville; one niece and two nephews. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, William and Mollie Singletary, and Lewis and Eva Akins. Graveside services were held Feb. 25, at Ebenezer Baptist Church Cemetery on Crisp Academy Dr. in Cordele, Ga., with Rev. Donny Loffredo officiating. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Southland Academy Athletic Fund, P.O. Box 1127, Americus, Ga. 31709. You may sign the online guest book and share your own special thoughts and memories by visiting www.greghancockfuneralchapel. com. Greg Hancock Funeral Chapel is in charge of these arrangements.PAID OBITUARYAnna StephensAnna StephensKEYSTONE HEIGHTSMrs. Anna Rita Stephens, age 82, of Keystone Heights passed away Monday, Feb. 17, 2014 at North Florida Regional Medical Center following a brief illness. She was born in New York City, N.Y. on Feb. 19, 1931 to the late Henry and Anna (Oskay) Haberman, and had moved to Keystone Heights 13 years ago from Coral Springs. Prior to retirement, Mrs. Stephens was a Customer Service Representative at AT&T Telephone Company for 36 years. She attended the Keystone United Methodist Church where she was actively involved with the Womens Circle; she was a member of the Keystone and Melrose Womans Clubs and the Red Hats Society. Mrs. Stephens enjoyed playing Bridge; she was always looking for a good bargain, and she loved going to garage sales. Survivors of Mrs. Stephens are: her husband of 59 years, Donald C. Stephens; one son, Don (Cheryl) Stephens all of Keystone Heights; three grandchildren, Jessica, Nicole, and Austin; and one great granddaughter, Madylinn. Services for Mrs. Stephens were held Friday, Feb. 21, in the Keystone United Methodist Church with Dr. Craig Moore and Dr. Tom Farmer officiating. The burial will follow at a later date. In lieu of flowers the family has requested contributions to be made to the Keystone Heights Womans Club 6747 Womans Club Dr, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 or the Melrose Womans Club, 303 Pine Street, Melrose, FL 32666. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Dr. Keystone Heights. 352-473-3176. www. jonesgallagherfh.comPAID OBITUARYWendell ThomasALMA, GEORGIABrother Wendell Ray Thomas, age 75, passed away Monday, Feb. 24, 2014. Brother Wendell was a native Alma and pastored his first church Shiloh Congregational Methodist Church in Homerville for nine years, and then moved to Gordon where he pastored Snow Hill Congregational Methodist Church for nine years. In 1985 Brother Wendell fulfilled his vision for building a non-denominational church in Milledgeville, Ga. which led to the formation of Freedom Church where he was the senior pastor. He was preceded in death by his parents Prentis and Vodice Thomas, a granddaughter Mary Ashley Thomas and his sister Debbie. He had a love for Hunting, Fishing and Gardening. Survivors include: his wife Patricia Pat Thomas of Milledgeville; three sons, Kelly Thomas of Interlachen, Rev. Randal (Patsy) Thomas and Rev. Tim (Heidi) Thomas of Milledgeville; and a daughter, Tammy (Rev Carrol) Smith of Milledgeville; two brothers, Dwain Thomas and Novack Thomas both of Florida; one sister, Joann Vines of Ga., seven grandchildren; and four great grandchildren. The family will receive friends Wednesday evening from 5-8 at Freedom Church 500 Underwood Rd. Milledgeville,   Ga. Services will be held at 2:00 P.M. Thursday, February 27, at Freedom Church with burial to follow at Scenic Memorial Gardens. Visit mooresfuneralhome.com to express tributes. Moores Funeral Home & Crematory has charge of arrangements.PAID OBITUARY   Charles VickoryHAMPTONCharles Addison Vickory of Hampton passed away Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville. He was 57. Mr. Vickory was born Aug. 27, 1956 in Gainesville, to Billie Vickory and Frances Vaughn Vickory. He was a graduate of Rolling Green Academy class of 1974 and pastor of Hampton Baptist Church for 18 years. He is survived by: his wife, Marcia Vickory of Hampton; son, Charles J. Vickory of Hampton; two daughters, Melissa Taylor of Keystone Heights and Mindy Vickory of Orange Park; sister, Linda Jaffray of Lake Butler; and grandson, Kyle. Graveside funeral services will be at 1:00 pm Friday, Feb. 28, at Newnansville Cemetery. Arrangements are in the care of Evans-Carter Funeral Home, High Springs, FL (386) 454-2444. PAID OBITUARY Jo es Tires 13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) 964-(8473)

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 4322 NW 13th Street Gainesville, FL Does your business have a story to tell? A product or service to sell?The Bradford County Telegraph Advertising Department can provide you with the in depth coverage you desire...Call 904-964-6305or email us atDarlene Douglassdarlene@bctelegraph.comor Kevin Millerkmiller@bctelegraph.comAdvertorial Advertising Works! Fins, Fur & Tails Among people who have eaten fish, there are few who will not acclaim their culinary value.   There are many however, who will mention the complication of bones. It also follows that many of those complainers will have eaten small fish, or they will have eaten fillets that were not boneless. The above conundrum is usually due to a row of small bones that runs along the lateral line connecting the rib cage with the outer skin. These bones, which are usually referred to as pin bones, are quite small and are easily overlooked until they are in your mouth. Because of this issue, some fishermen will discard all meat on the fillet that is south of the rib cage. Others will cut through the pin bones and rib cage and will use a pair of bone removers to remove the rib cage and pin bones.   Obviously the latter would be rather involved. Another alternative is to cook the fish whole and remove the bones while eating.   This is most often done when cooking smaller pan fish, and it is more functional for those who are familiar with the location of the bones. Another alternative that is highlighted here will maximize the salvaged flesh and remove the rib bones and pin bones efficiently during the filleting process.   J.T. Prevatt, who credits Avoiding pin bones when his son Jimmy Prevatt with teaching him, illustrates the process. Prevatt starts his fillet along the dorsal fin and cuts vertically to the rib cage.   Once he cuts adjacent to the end of the rib cage, he pushes the fillet knife through the entire width of the fish and fillets through to the tail.   He then pulls the northern part of the fillet back carefully along the rib cage until he feels the knife touch the pin bones.   From there he will follow the pin bones outward until he reaches the skin. Subsequently, he fillets the flesh from the skin until he cuts the pin bones from the skin. After that, he returns the knife edge to the unfilled edge of the pin bones and cuts adjacent to the pin bones and back to the rib cage. From there, he uses the knife tip to complete the fillet process. He emphasizes that a sharp blade and recognition of blade contact with bones are important. The accompanying photos are made while filleting crappie, but the shape of the pin bones will vary somewhat according to the fish species. The largest anomaly will present with the plain pickerel, locally known as a jack. The pin bones in the jack are actually Y bones and better resemble small wishbones in a chicken breast. This results in the jack being labeled as too bony to eat, but once the Y bones are removed, you might be surprised that the mild, delicate flesh will rival that of a crappie.Outdoors outlookThis winters late cold weather seems to have complicated a good understanding of the crappie spawn. In deeper lakes like Kingsley, the spawn is actually taking place in deeper water.   Newnans has been the most productive local lake, and it is has been giving up a lot of spawning fish along the shoreline cover. The crappie bedding activity should diminish somewhat from this last full moon. As crappie season wanes, the bass bite will escalate in the next few weeks, but most reports indicate that the only bass fanning beds in our area are the smaller bucks. Len Andrews is now staying at Kingsley Lake and sight fishing from his originally designed boat with a ladder attached and stabilized in the bow. Andrews specifies that the only action in the lake shallows is from male bass. Ed Allen also reported last week that Sampson Lake was not providing any action from the larger females. Local bass fishermen can also look forward to an active year for tournaments. The Bald Eagle open tournaments will start on March 12 at Santa Fe Lake.   Shortly afterward, the Sampson Lake open tournaments will start.   The Murphys Law Relay for Life Bass Tournament is scheduled for March 15. Mike Oglesbee is co-director of the OGS Tournament Trails in Palatka, and he has teamed up with Gene Crossway to greatly increase the reach of the organization.   The organization is working with the Wolfsons Childrens Hospital Tournament and the NEFAR Haven Hospice Tournament with hopes of increasing the reach of both events.   Those two charity tournaments are traditionally the largest bass fishing events in North Florida. Tight lines until next week.    Outdoors calendar Feb. 27-March 2, Florida Challenge at Bradford Sportsmens Farm. March, turkeys and quail begin breeding in North Florida; March 2: Florida s Zone C squirrel and quail season ends. March 8-9, youth spring turkey season. Union Correctional Institution is looking for a forever home for one dog that has been trained by the ROCK Hounds (Rehabilitation of Castaway K-9s) program. Shanti is a female boxer-beagle mix that stands about knee high and weighs approximately 29 pounds. She is about three years old and has an easy-going personality. Her trainers describe her as an intelligent dog that loves to be petted. The dogs in the ROCK Hounds program are all former strays rescued from a kill shelter. The dogs are trained by UCI inmates, ensuring they are fully housebroken, trained to walk on a leash and obey voice commands, and trained to behave themselves around other dogs and people they dont know. The dogs are trained to sleep in a crate/kennel at night. Cost to adopt a dog is $50, which includes spaying or neutering and all needed shots. According to Re-entry Officer Rachelle Parrish, UCIs dog training program has two major objectives. One is to train the dogs and make them more adoptable thus preventing them from being euthanized. The second is to provide inmates in UCIs veterans dorm many of whom suffer from depression or PTSD with a program that will improve their mental state. If you are interested in adopting Shanti, contact Officer Parrish at 386-431-2000, ext. 2248 or Officer Marcia Miller at 386-431-2168 during work hours. Union Correctional program seeking forever home for Shanti comes running when she is called. The brindled dog is mostly boxer, but her beagle mom gave her a smaller size. J.T. Prevatt along the dorsal through to the ribs. Shortly beyond this point, he will encounter the row of pin bones. Cut upward to the top of the pin bones and cut between the pin bones and skin. Remove the remainder of the cage. University of Central Florida freshman center and 2013 Bradford High School graduate Justin McBride was named the American Athletic Conferences Rookie of the Week following his performance in games against Memphis (Feb. 12) and South Florida (Feb. 15). McBride averaged 9.5 points and 6 rebounds off the bench, shooting 72.7 percent from the field (8-of-11) as the Knights split a pair of American Athletic Conference games. He scored six points and had seven rebounds in a 76-70 loss to Memphis, while scoring 13 points and grabbing five rebounds in a 75-74 win over South Florida. In the South Florida game, McBride was 5-of-6 from the field. McBride has played in nine games and is shooting a teamhigh 73 percent from the field. Hes averaging 6 points and 3 rebounds per game.BHS grad McBride earns American Athletic Conference honor 904-368-0687 ph 904-368-0689 faxMARGARET ANDERSON 1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B 40 Notices 47 Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 49 Mobile Homes for Sale 50 For Rent 1BR UPSTAIRS APART 51 Lost and Found 53A Yard Sales 53B Keystone Yard Sales 53C Lake Butler Yard Sales 57 For Sale 59 Personal Services 65 Help Wanted (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! Youll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at the We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time and PRN RNs and LPNs. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more!For more info, contact: EOE/AAP/DTR Out of Area Classifieds will help you, unconditionally love & be hands on with your baby; maintain contact. 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Job related duties for Water distribution, Sewage Collections and Maintenance Perform the various tasks associated with the maintenance of a water distribution system Learns the proper use of tools and equipment required to perform the job Participates in routine maintenance activities such as system flushing, valve exercising and fire hydrant maintenance. 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10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Jacob Luke and Jackson Reddish each had an RBI as the Bradford High School baseball team improved to 1-1 in District 5-4A with a 3-1 over Santa Fe on Feb. 20 in Alachua. Pitcher Wyatt Barnes (2-0) threw a complete game, giving up four hits and striking out five. Reddish finished 2-for-3 at the plate, while Luke was 2-for-4. Bradford (2-3) hosted Gainesville prior to playing Santa Fe, losing 8-4 on Feb. 18. Barnes and Carson Yowell were each 2-for-3. Both of Barnes hits were doubles, while Yowell hit one double and had an RBI. Reddish and Cody Tillman each had an RBI. The Tornadoes played district opponent Interlachen this past Tuesday and will travel to play Suwannee on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. On Friday, Feb. 28, Bradford hosts Middleburg at 7 p.m. Bradford hosts Forrest on Monday, March 3, at 6 p.m.Tornadoes even district record in baseballAshton Adkins struck out 16 batters and went the distance in a 12-inning, 3-2 win over District 5-4A opponent Santa Fe on Feb. 19 in Starke. Santa Fe scored both of its runs in the top of the third, with Bradford answering with a run in the bottom half of the inning. The Tornadoes (4-0, 3-0 in District 5) scored again in the fifth before finally getting the winning run in the 12th. Adkins, who gave up six hits, also hit a double and drove in a run. Jaci Atkinson, who was 2-for-5, scored twice. Mackenzie Gault went 2-for5, while Lainie Rodgers hit a double. Bradford played Gainesville this past Tuesday and will host Providence on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. On Friday, Feb. 28, the Tornadoes host district opponent P.K. Yonge at 6:30 p.m. Bradford takes on Santa Fe again on Tuesday, March 4, in Alachua at 7 p.m.BHS edges Santa Fe in softballKeystone Heights High School scored two runs in the final two innings to defeat visiting St. Augustine 10-9 in a Feb. 18 baseball game. Kyle Hix, who was 2-for-3, hit the second of his two home runs to lead off the bottom of the sixth, tying the score at 9-all. In the seventh, Blake Valenzuela drew a lead-off walk, advanced to third on an error and scored the winning run on a wild pitch. Hix drove in a total of two runs, while Bryce Plummer, who was 2-for-4, had three RBI. Blake Richardson added an RBI, while Morgan Bass was 2-for-2.2 late runs propel Indians to 10-9 winIt was a tough week for the Union County High School baseball team, which suffered a 5-0 loss to District 7-1A opponent Williston on Feb. 18 and a 6-1 loss to Fort White on Tigers drop 2 in baseballJordan Howe homered and drove in four runs as the Union County High School softball team earned its second win of the season, defeating District 7-1A opponent Williston 16-1 on Feb. 20 in Lake Butler. The Tigers (2-5, 1-2 in District 7) had lost five in a row, but got back in the win column, with Kaylyn Ingram, who was 2-for2, Kendallyn Johns and Madison McClellan each driving in two runs, while Devin Lewis, Kaylan Tucker and Katie Zipperer each drove in one.Union stops losing streakDefiance (Ohio) College freshman Samantha Cook, a 2013 Bradford High School graduate, won the shot put at the Feb. 22 Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference Indoor Championship. Cooks throw of 12.39 meters set a Defiance school record as well as Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference record. By winning the event, she was named to the All-HCAC first team. Defiance, which won the team championship, also got a seventh-place finish from Cook in the weight throw.Cook wins conference championshipStorm Miller, who pitched two innings of relief, earned the win. Keystone (2-1) played Buchholz this past Tuesday and will travel to play Williston on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. On Saturday, March 1, the Indians travel to play District 5-4A opponent Santa Fe at 1 p.m. before returning home to play district opponent Fort White on Tuesday, March 4, at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 20. T.J. Rogers hit a double in the loss to Williston, but Union (3-2, 0-1 in District 7) was held to just three hits. The Fort White game was tied at 1-1 going into the fifth, but the visiting Indians scored two runs in the fifth and another three in the sixth. Chris Starling drove in the only run, while Colten McAlister hit a double. Again, the Tigers were held to three hits. Starting pitcher Corey Hersey gave up one run on four hits and two walks in three innings of work. The Tigers will travel to play district opponent Dixie County on Friday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m. Union then returns home to play district opponent Newberry on Monday, March 3, at 7 p.m. Pitcher Holly Tucker (2-2) threw a complete game (four innings), giving up two hits and one walk. Prior to playing Williston, the Tigers lost 9-8 to host Suwannee on Feb. 18. Kaylan Tucker was 3-for-4, while Lewis was 2-for3 with a double and two RBI. Johns, Jordyn Driggers and Valerie Seay were each 2-for4, with Johns hitting a double and driving in three runs, and Driggers hitting a home run. Ingram added an RBI. Union played district opponent Newberry this past Tuesday and will host district opponent Chiefland on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. On Monday, March 3, the Tigers host Newberry at 6 p.m. before traveling to play district opponent Dixie County on Tuesday, March 4, at 7 p.m.



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Union County Times Union County Times USPS 648-200 Lake Butler, Florida Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 101 st Year 44 th Issue 75 CENTS Rep. Ted Yoho speaks to members of the new Teen Age Republicans Club at UCHS and other students attending for extra credit. School Board Vice Chairperson Becky Raulerson and club co-founder and president Case Emerson listen in the foreground. Education scholarship available to women The Alpha Nu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma is offering a $500 scholarship for a Bradford-Union area female graduate and/or resident. The purpose of the scholarship is to encourage and enable them to obtain a degree in the field of education. Applicants must be enrolled full time at an accredited college or university and near completion of two years (four semesters) of undergraduate coursework. An official copy of an applicants transcript and three letters of recommendation are required. For more information and an application, please call 904964-6186 or 352-468-6884. Special Union County Commission meeting, Feb. 27 at noon The Union County Board of County Commissioners will hold a special meeting on Thursday, Feb. 27, at noon. The Tea Party hosting meeting, Feb. 27 A Tea Party is hosting a meeting on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the TownsendGreen Building. LBES annual spring play, Feb. 27 Lake Butler Elementary School will host their annual spring play on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. at the Union County High School Auditorium. This one-hour musical entitled Joust! will be performed by thirdand fourth-grade students under the direction of LBES Music Director Pam Higginbotham. Tickets are $2 each and all LBES students are free. FBLA fundraiser, Feb. 28 and March 1 Dimples and FBLA invite you to attend Kick off to Spring Shopping Days. Shop at Dimples on Friday Feb. 28 and Saturday, March 1, and 15 percent of your pre-tax purchase will support FBLA for its state competition. Dimples is located across from Spires IGA on the north side of State Road 100. UF Early Steps spring festival, March 1 University of Florida North Central Early Steps, a support program for children with special needs and their families, will co-host a Spring Festival and Agency Fair with Childrens Medical Services and Alachua County Public Schools. This free event will feature hearing and vision screenings as well as face painting, arts and crafts and a puppet show. Representatives from more than 30 agencies and businesses will be on hand with information about their services for people with developmental delays and/or disabilities. Early Steps serves several counties including Union. Festival will be at Lincoln Middle School, 1001 SE 12th St. in Gainesville, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 1. etc www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 386-496-2261 Cell 352-283-6312 Fax 386-4962858 uctimes@windstream.net www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/unioncountytimes BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor A month ago, Case Emerson pulled off a coup: He was able to get Rep. Ted Yoho to come speak to his new Teen Age Republican Club he and friends are starting at Union County High School. Admittedly Emerson had a little help from his mother, Charlotte, who got the ball rolling thanks to her connection to a Yoho staff member. Later, the congressman invited Case and fellow students Kent Coburn and Reed Cothren to attend a Young Republicans event at Yohos home for Super Bowl night, giving them an opportunity to mingle with fellow high school and college Republicans. All that will prove to be a big help to Emerson and his friends grow the new club, which he co-founded with Cobrun because they felt there was a need. We just got to talking in one of my classesa few buddies of mineand we wanted to start a Republicans Congressman Yoho visits new Republican club at UCHS Shares thoughts on the American Dream See YOHO, 2A Collins Institute report warns of tougher choices ahead for Florida Finds need for stronger leadership and engaged citizens to improve Florida On Feb. 20, Florida State Universitys LeRoy Collins Institute (LCI) released a new research report, Tougher Choices: Shaping Floridas Future, which examines the past and predicts the future in state revenues, demographics, the Florida Retirement System, K-12 education, higher education and infrastructure. The report, which is authored by economists from the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida, is an update of the Tough Choices series of reports that have been released by LCI since 2005. Tougher Choices revisits the findings of the original Tough Choices report concluding that Florida is not on course to realize its true economic potential. While the outlook is unsettling, Tougher Choices homes in on the tough decisions Floridas leaders and citizens can make to put the state on the right path. Almost 10 years ago, the LeRoy Collins Institute published Tough Choices: Shaping Floridas Future, which analyzed Floridas revenue and spending trends and found that, while Florida certainly has boundless economic potential, there were tough decisions to be made to achieve that potential, said Dr. Carol Weissert, LCI Director and political science professor at Florida State University. This report, Tougher Choices, revisits these concerns and, unfortunately, finds that Florida has made little progress in addressing the key issues outlined in our initial report. We hope this new report will help to further illustrate the challenges facing the state and inspire appropriate reforms. The reports eight chapters re-examine Floridas past and future economic state and draw conclusions that can be used to create positive action in the areas of education, health care, infrastructure, retirement and more. Key findings include: Floridas education system is struggling across the spectrumfrom K-12 through higher education. Funding for the states public schools is lagging, and Floridas high school graduates are becoming less likely to earn a college degree than their peers in other states. Floridas reliance on retirees and tourists comes at a price as the demands of older residents and vacationers are disproportionately linked to lower-paid service jobs. To make matters worse, growing Medicaid demands due to baby boomer See REPORT, 2A BACK TO THE FUTURE Students enjoy 5th Annual Celebration of Abilities Prom BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor The 5th Annual Celebration of Abilities Prom was held on Friday, Feb. 21, with a theme of Shake, Rattle and Roll, remembering the 50s with classic cars out front and students dressed in rock n roll getups. The new 2014 Prom King and Queen were crowned: Brent Norman and Kristin Akers Special guests in attendance were the 2014 Bradford Fest Queen and Strawberry Queen Kelsey Harrisonwho created the prom four years ago 2014 Miss U-Co High 1st Runner-Up and Strawberry Princess Alexa Rae Park, 2014 Bradford Fest Teen Queen Ashley Harris and 2014 Miss U-Co High Savannah Woodall. This prom is a special celebration for students of exceptionalities in Union County, allowing them to celebrate their special abilities and to have a special night dedicated just to them. Sponsors for this event were Knuckle Draggers, Odom & Moses, Royals Homes, Union Medical Supply, Love-N-Care Preschool, Gainell Elixson, Spires IGA, Alvin Griffis, Ronnie Pruitt, Dipped Delights, TD Bank, Union County High School Athletic Departments, Peggy Cason, George Green, Lisa Johnson, Pritchett Trucking, Robert Osborne, Christine Kight, Kammy Highland, Lola Lacy and CareerSource Florida Crown. ABOVE: Prom King Brent Norman and Queen Kristin Akers LEFT: Danielle Perry and Ossie Williams dance the night away. BELOW: Noah Kight with his mom Gwen. ABOVE: Akers (center) is surrounded by royalty: (L-r) Strawberry Princess Alexa Rae Park, Miss U-Co High Savannah Woodall, Bradford Fest Queen and Strawberry Queen Kelsey Harrison and Bradford Fest Teen Queen Ashley Harris. BELOW: Deanna Truett with her mom Danna.

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2A Union County Times Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 (386) 496-2261 Vincents Cell 352-283-6312 John M. Miller, Publisher Editor: Vincent Alex Brown Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting: Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Yvette Lieurance Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-Jones Union County TimesUSPS 648-200 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: UNION COUNTY TIMES125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054 Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months 386-496-9656 275 W est Main Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054 (Suwannee Medical Building)12 Years Experience Admitted to State and Federal Bar (M and S. Dist.) Critical meeting for Project G.R.A.D. being held on March 3 To the parents of the Class of 2014: Project G.R.A.D. is in need of your involvement in order for it continuing to be a great tradition for Union County High Schools graduating students. The few parents that have been involved in the monthly meetings and fundraisers are considering canceling the event. At this time, there are not enough parents to put this event on safely. In order to continue preparing for Project G.R.A.D., they must have all parents of graduating seniors involved. The next meeting will be held on Monday, March 3, at 6:00 p.m. at Lake Butler Middle School. A decision to cancel or to continue will be made at that time. They hope to see all parents of this years graduating class at that meeting. UCHS and LBMS football banquets, March 4 The Union County High School and Lake Butler Middle School football banquets will be held Tuesday, March 4, at 6:30 p.m. The Varsity & JV team dinners will be at the UCHS cafeteria. The middle school teams will be at LBMS cafeteria. Both teams will join together at 7:30 p.m. in the UCHS auditorium for the awards ceremony. Revival in Worthington Springs, March 5-8 Evangelist Charles Hunt will give the prophetic word out during a revival each night at 7 p.m., March 5-8, at United Methodist Church in Fellowship with New Jerusalem Full Gospel Church on S.R. 121 in Worthington Springs. Everyone is welcome. For more information call 386-496-1461. Classic car cruise-in at the lake, Mar. 7 North Florida Regional Chamber of Commerce is hosting a classic car cruisein down by the lake in Lake Butler on Friday, March 7, from 5 to 8 p.m. Besides, of course, classic cars from the area, the years first Friday Fest Cruz will feature train rides, door prizes, a 50/50 drawing, food and music. There are no entry fees. Learn more at www.starkecruzin.com etc club here at the high school, Emerson said. We kind of felt the need, and we felt like we had enough interest. He added, Floridas actually pretty big in the Teen Age Republicans. Its a pretty good showingkind of one of the larger of all the states. And we kind of wanted to be a part of that. According to Emerson, this is the first politically based club at the high school. The new organization actually has to go through a probationary period to prove they have enough interest to warrant becoming an official club. Emerson serves as president, Coburn as vice president, Cothren as secretary and Noah Wright as treasurer. Their adviser is science teacher Renae Allen. And though membership is only at about a dozen so far, its a start that Emerson is committed to growing throughout the year. The club members will help with elections by doing things like holding campaign signs and assisting candidates, and members will gain an understanding of the political process, develop leadership skills and participate in community service. According to the Teen Age Republicans (TARS) website, TARS is a national, youthbased organization challenging, training and assisting teens to become involved in their local, state and national political processes. TARS, College Republicans and Young Republicans are the only auxiliaries of the Republican Party. At the high schools new club meeting that Yoho spoke at, Emerson thanked the Union County School Board, UCHS Principal Mike Ripplinger and Allen for allowing them to start the club, and then introduced the congressman by presenting a brief bio of the former large animal veterinarian. (According to his official website, Yoho and his wife, Carolyn, sold his practice in 2010 to focus their time and energy on a new passionOur Nation. She owned court reporter agencies; he veterinarian practices.) Yoho, 58, represents Floridas 3rd District, which includes the entire counties of Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy, Suwannee and Union, along with the majority of Alachua and Clay counties, half of Madison county and a section of Marion county. He spoke to the new club members and other students and adults there in attendance. Its a great turnout, Yoho began. It must have been the Rice Krispies Treats, right? That, and you guys are getting credit for showing up here, rightextra credit for your grade? We are? one student asked, to much laughter. I appreciate the introduction and I appreciate your emails that you sent us, the congressman told Emerson. Yoho then told everyone, I want to congratulate you and commend you being here, getting involved. This is so important. Yoho says it surprises people when he tells them he first met his wife of 39 years in the fourth grade. They eventually married on Valentines Day, which is fitting for such a romantic tale. Its been a great ride, he said. They have three grown children: Katie, Lauren and Tyler. The congressman described him and his wife as broke, busted and disgusted, saying they both came from broken homes. For example, his familys house was repossessed when he was 15 and there wasnt anybody to fall back on. But we knew this: We knew if we got an education; we knew if we worked; and if we applied ourselvesbecause we lived in America, we could take advantage of that opportunity that is so unique to this country and if we kept working that we could achieve that thing we call the American Dream, he said. And some people talk about the American Dream as bygone era. What do you guys think? Is the American Dream irrelevant? Dont ever let it not become relevant. He then introduced his chief of staff, Kat Cammack, who put our campaign together and got us off on the right track, he said, praising her. But dont ever let anybody say the American Dream is dead, Yoho continued. He relayed an encountered he had with a couple from Great Britain while visiting Washington, D.C., shortly after being elected to Congress. After the woman finished berating America, I said, Maam, when you were a little girl growing up across the pond, did you aspire to achieve the English Dream? She goes, Well, of course not, there is no such thing. And I pulled out my (U.S.) Constitutiona small bound copy that Yoho carries in his pocket everywhereI said, Maam, weve got a thing called the Constitution that allows us to have the American Dream. And I think Ill hold on to both of these and you have a nice time while youre in America, at which the audience laughed. He drove home the point, saying, The uniqueness of what we have in this countryand I do believe that America is unique and that we are exceptional, for that document, because it says, All men are created equal. Our rights come from a creator, not from government. Government is instilled by men and women to protect those God-given rights. I mean thats in our founding papers, thats in our document. This document just didnt develop with our founding fathers, the congressman continued. This document came from hundreds of years of trial-and-error, starting with the Magna Carta, the Mayflower Compact and a couple other inbetween. Now weve got this Yoho said while holding up his pocket-sized copy of the U.S. Constitution. Is this a perfect document? No! Its the best thing on the planet, though. And through the processes that were set up, we can refine and change it as needed, and its something that cant be done rapidly. And thats a good thing, because you cant get somebody who just wants to come in there and change it. And so the uniqueness of America is that anybody, regardless of your background or regardless of where you come from or your political affiliation, or what your parents did or didnt do for you; you know, what your coach or teacher did or didnt do for you or say for you; or where you even come fromin this country, you take advantage of that opportunityand when I say, advantage, its taking work and applying work to that opportunityand if you do that, you can achieve for the level of achievement you desire. No place else on the planet can you reach that level of success. I believe that with all my heart, and I feel its under attack in this country, adding that others believe that too. Yoho then went on to explain why, talked about issues in Congress, shared his voting record and discussed the future, challenging everyone to vote, on whomever they decide, but to vote nonetheless. Afterward he answered questions, talked with students and adults in attendance and signed autographs. Cammack handed out a thin, booksize bound copy of the U.S. Constitution to anyone who wanted it. To learn more about Yoho, his voting record and Floridas 3rd Congressional District, visit http://yoho.house.gov To learn more about TARS, visit www.teenagerepublicans.org retirements and labor market polarization will likely lead to greater expenditures for the state in the near future. Floridas transpor tation congestion is among the worst in the country, es pecially in urban areas. The state continues to lack an appropriate amount of roads for its growing population, which is only compounded by its aging infrastructure and overcrowded highways. Twenty-five years ago Florida was closing in on building a diversified economy that could attract high-skill jobs, and modest continued investment might have gotten us there. Now, we have fallen far behind, and the investment needed to close the gap is huge, said Jim Dewey, a co-author of the report and Director of Economic Analysis for BEBR. Providing great vacations and comfortable golden years for retirees can provide a happy enough life for many Floridians. But, we could have done better. Perhaps we still can, but the cost will be much higher. We hope this report helps Floridians and their leaders make informed decisions that move the state in a positive direction. Through the release of Tougher Choices, LCI seeks to encourage public conversation on the future of the state and policies that can help it live up to its potential. Though recovery from the Great Recession is near at last, Florida now faces even tougher challenges than in 2005, said David Denslow, a co-author of the report and a Research Economist at BEBR. By highlighting structural trends and data-driven interpretative comparisons with other states, the LeRoy Collins Institute will help citizens make their own judgments about how their state can meet these challenges and what direction it should choose. A full copy of the report can be viewed here: http://fla.st/1jRY6gK For more information about this report and others published by the LeRoy Collins Institute, visit www.collinsinstitute.fsu.edu YOHO Continued from 1A REPORT Continued from 1A

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Union County Times 3A ATTENTION UNION COUNTY RESIDENTS Aerosol Cans Antifreeze Batteries Computers Corrosives Diesel/Transmission Fluid Emergency Flares Fertilizers Fluorescent Lamps Gasoline Household Cleaners Household Electronics Insecticides Medications Oil Filters Paint & Paint Products Paint Thinners Pesticides Photographic Solutions Poisons Pool Chemicals Propane Tanks Televisions Used Oil If a container leaks, pack it in a larger container with an absorbent material such as cat litter or oil absorbent. Do not mix different or unknown materials together. Containers MUST be labeled. If you cannot identify the contents then label it unknown. Pack the containers in boxes with dividers. Explosives such as ammunition, dynamite and blasting agents. Reactives such as crystallized ethers, picric acid and sodium and phosphorus metals. Radioactive or infectious wastes.Saturday, March 8thUnion County Road/Solid Waste Department, 9am-3pmCALL JIMMY BEASLEY AT 386-496-2180FOR MORE INFORMATION.The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Union County Commission are sponsoring a project to collect, recycle, treat and properly dispose of these Household Hazardous Wastes. N SW 85TH TRL SW 85TH LOOPSW 84TH STSW 81ST TER 121 DAWN CORBETTINSURANCE AGENCY(904) 964-7707FREE Insurance Quotes No obligation...Call Today! The 52nd Annual Miss Bradford-Union Strawberry Pageant will be held next Saturday, March 1, in the Bradford High School auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. There are 10 amazing contestants between the ages of 13 and 24 this year, according to Executive Directory Laruen VanDuzer, and contestants will take home more than $4,000 in prizes. Six contestants are vying for Strawberry Princess, and four are in the running for Strawberry Queen. Shannon Rosier Daughter of Donald and Linda Rosier of Raiford. She is sponsored by Nicaragua Missions & Outreach Foundation, and Shelby McDowell Daughter of Cordellia McDowell of Lake Butler and Tearle McDowell of Tampa. She is sponsored by North Bobbie Grace Barber Daughter of Robert and Rhonda Barber of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Decker & Pomeranz Dentistry, and Stan Ciarra Hopkins Daughter of Chris and Angie Hopkins of Starke. She is sponsored by Knuckle Draggers and Bradford Madison Gibson Daughter of Bobby and Narie Gibson of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Gene and Shary Gordon, and Mykayla McLeod Daughter of Nick and Kellie McLeod of Keystone Heights. She is sponsored by Allstars Twirling Academy and Alyssa Farrah Duhart Daughter of Anthony and Ireta Duhart of Lawtey. She is sponsored by Brenda Hannah Tucker Daughter of Jay and Marcie Tucker of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Emerson Nursery and Rental Plants, and Allayna Norris Daughter of Michael Smith and Tori Norris-Smith of Starke. She is sponsored by Charnelle of Lake Butler. She is sponsored by Shatto 52nd Annual Miss BradfordUnion Strawberry Pageant, March 1 Six of 10 contestants come from Union Co. Princess contestants Queen contestants UC Riding Club saddles up to support St. Jude Hospital 17th annual event to raise funds for kids BY JOHN JOHNS Special to the Times The Union County Riding Club is hosting their 17th Annual Saddle Up for St. Jude 10-mile trail ride on Saturday, March 1, at 9 a.m. at Swift Creek Cemetery located north of Lake Butler on County Road 231 North. The event gives equestrians the opportunity to mount up and raise funds to help support the lifesaving mission of St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital. Located in Memphis, Tenn., it is one of the worlds premier pediatric cancer research centers. The event will include free lunch at the halfway point of the trail, complements of Avery Roberts, and a raffle drawing at the completion of the trail with prizes donated and purchased by the riding club and their members. Local businesses have also donated prizes. Members and volunteers have raised thousands of dollars for St. Jude since the clubs first event in 1998. This years goal is $8,000. We look forward to this event to help raise awareness and funds for the kids of St. Jude, said event coordinator John Johns. The Saddle Up for St. Jude event brings together horse enthusiasts in Union and the surrounding counties for a good cause to support the mission of St. Jude of finding cures to treat deadly childhood diseases. We get to enjoy what we do ride our horseswhile helping those in need. Since its founding in 1962 by entertainer Danny Thomas, St. Jude has treated children from all 50 states and around the world. No child is ever denied treatment because of a familys inability to pay. With a daily operating cost of $1.9 million, St. Jude depends mostly on public contributions and fundraising events such as Saddle Up for St. Jude. The riding clubs event is sponsored by many local businesses. Individuals may also contribute by sponsoring the event or riders online, and learn more about the event at http://tinyurl.com/saddleupstjude Learn more about St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital at www.stjude.org. To learn more about the Union County Riding Club, visit www.unionridingclub.com For more information about the club or event, contact John Johns at 352-222-0203 or johnsmel@gmail.com

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4A Union County Times Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 B est Price Per Square Feet Call for our Free Floor Plan Book Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. W orship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. UCT Legals 2/27/14 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA Case #63-2013-CA-0016 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL AS SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2005-SD2, ASSET-BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff vs BRUCE E. DICKSON; THE UN KNOWN SPOUSE OF BRUCE E. DICKSON; RETHA A DICKSON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RE THA A DICKSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HERIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TENANT #4 THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the fol lowing described property: A PORTION OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NE COR NER OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 21 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 551.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF THE BEGINNING; THENCE CON TINUE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 313.50 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF FORMER ACL RR; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST. ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF FORMER ACL RR, A DISTANCE OF 265.23 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 437.76 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 228.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMA NENT FIXTURE AND APPURTE NANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS 1996 MOBILE HOME VIN NUMBER GAFLT34A23774SH21 WITH TITLE NUMBER 0073881446 AND VIN NUMBER GAFLT34B23774SH21 WITH TITLE NUMBER 73881445. A/K/A 12845 NE STATE ROAD 121 RAIFORD, FL 32083-2467 A/KA HIGHWAY 121 RAIFORD Shall be sold by the Clerk of the this Court, at public sale, pursuant to the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale in the above styled action dated February 3, 2014, at the Union Coun ty Courthouse in Lake Butler, Flori da, at 11:00 A.M. on April 27, 2014, to the best and highest bidder for cash. Any person claiming an interest in any surplus from the sale, other that the property owner as of the date of the notice of lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal in the State and County aforesaid this 5 th day of February 2014. Kellie Hendricks Connell Clerk of Court Crystal Norman Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff PO Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 Facsimile Eservice: servealaw@albertellilaw. com 2/13 3tchg 2/27-UCT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #:2010-CA-000003 DIVISION: W Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort gage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, -vs.Theresa H, Lajorie, Surviving Spouse of George J. Lajorie, Sr. a/k/a George J. Lajorie, Deceased; Green Tree Investment Holdings, LLC f/k/a CFN Investment Hold ings, LLC, Successor in Interest to Conseco Finance Corp., Successor in Interest to Conseco Finance Ser vice Corporation f/k/a Green Tree Financial Servicing Corporation; Point Recovery, Inc.; Unifund CCR Partners U.P.; Clerk of the Circuit Court of Union County, Florida; Un known Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of George J. Lajorie, Sr. a/k/a George J. Lajorie, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant (s) Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu ant to an Order rescheduling foreclo sure sale, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000003 of the Circuit Court of the 8th Judicial Circuit in and for Union County, Florida, wherein Re gions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Plant ers Bank, N.A., Plaintiff and There sa H. Lajorie, Surviving Spouse of George J. Lajorie, Sr. a/k/a George J. Lajorie, Deceased are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Kellie Hendricks Connell, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT STEPS OF THE UNION COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATES AT 103 UNION COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LAKE BUTLER, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 24, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID TRACT OF LAND BEING KNOWN AS PARCEL NO. 7, OF OAKRIDGE ESTATES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION PREPARED BY ALACHUA COUN TY LAND SURVEYORS, INC., DATED MARCH 18, 1982, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE NORTH WEST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE AFOREMEN TIONED SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST FOR THE POINT OF REFERENCE AND EAST, A DISTANCE OF 22.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 791; THENCE EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 40.00 FEET TO CONCRETE MONU MENT AT THE INTERSECTION OF SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE WITH THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 40.00 FOOT COUNTY ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 1670 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF AND CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,); THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 82 DEGREES RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE ROD AND CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,) AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGIN NING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 89.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF AND CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,) THENCE EAST, A DISTANCE OF 597.31 CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,); THENCE EAST, A DISTANCE OF 250.00 CAP (A.C.L.S., INC.,); THENCE RUN A DISTANCE OF 588.72 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1982, MAKE: SPRINGER, VIN#: GAFL2AC16340438 AND VIN#: GAFL2BC16340438, MAN UFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A FIX TURE AND A PART OF THE REAL ESTATE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceed ing, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 201 East University Av enue, Room 410, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (352) 491-4490 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice im paired, call 711. Kellie Hendricks Connell CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Union County, Florida Crystal Norman DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE. LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561)998-6700 (561)998-6707 2/20 2tchg 2/27-UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Nominating Committee Members on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10:00 A.M. at Su wannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida. 2/27 1tchg-UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a Finance & Audit Committee Meeting on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 10:15 A.M. at Suwannee River Eco nomic Council, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW in Live Oak, Florida. 2/27 1tchg-UCT LEGAL NOTICE The Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting for the Executive Committee Members on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10:30 A.M. at Su wannee River Economic Council, Inc. Administration Office located at 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW Live Oak, Florida. 2/27 1tchg-UCT PUBLIC NOTICE Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. will hold a pre-bid conference and walk-thru for the rehabilitation of six (6) single-family dwellings in the Union County SHIP and Rural Devel opment programs. This meeting will be held Friday, Feb ruary 28, 2014 beginning at 8:00 a.m. at Suwannee River Economic Coun cil, Inc., 665 SE 4th St., Lake Butler, FL. The conference and walk-thru is mandatory, no exceptions, for con tractors who plan to bid. Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. re quires each contractor to be prop erly licensed, carry general liability insurance of at least $1,000,000.00 and Workers Comp insurance during construction. Bids for these units will be due by 12:00 noon Friday, March 7, 2014, at Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., 665 SE 4th St., Lake Butler, FL. Please mark envelope Sealed Bid Bids to be opened Friday, March 7, 2014 at 12:05 p.m. Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. has the right to reject any and all bids. The bids will be awarded on the most cost effective basis. Union County is a fair housing and equal opportunity and ADA employer. Minority and Women Contractors are urged to participate. MAY CONTAIN HOMES CON STRUCTED PRIOR TO 1978 WHICH MAY CONTAIN LEAD-BASED PAINT. 2/27 1tchg-UCT Legals UC Commissioner Smith attends special session of NCFRPC City of Live Oak Mayor Garth Nobles, Jr., chair of the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council welcomed Chris Doolin, the legislative affairs consultant to the Florida Small County Coalition and also the Small School District Council Consortium. Also in attendance was Commissioner Wayne Smith from Union County. Doolins remarks provided Council members a review of issues facing rural counties that are anticipated to be addressed in the upcoming legislative session. The Council, in partnership with economic development organizations and local governments, promotes regional strategies, partnerships and solutions to strengthen the economic competitiveness and quality of life of the 11 counties and 33 incorporated municipalities in the north central portion of Florida. The Council, whose members are local elected officials and gubernatorial appointees, administers a variety of state and federal programs for north central Florida including Alachua, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor and Union Counties. Programs include development of the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, the Strategic Regional Policy Plan, technical assistance to local governments in development of comprehensive plans, land development regulations and grant management, and administration of developments of regional impact, local mitigation strategies, hazardous materials, homeland security and economic development programs. In addition, the Council staffs the Metropolitan Transportation Planning Organization for the Gainesville Urbanized Area, the North Central Florida Local Emergency Planning Committee, the North Central Florida Regional Hazardous Materials Response Team and The Original Florida Tourism Task Force. The North Central Florida Regional Planning Councils offices are located in Gainesville. Learn more at www.ncfrpc.org (L-r) City of Live Oak Mayor Garth Nobles, Jr., chair of the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council; Chris Doolin, legislative affairs consultant to the Small County Coalition; Wayne Smith, Union County Commissioner; and Scott Koons, executive director of the Council. Are you ready for Floridas new cattle ID program? BY BASIL BACTAWAR UC Extension Director/Agent The new cattle rules concerning cattle identification are now in effect as of February 19. The need for these rules was discussed over several years with input from the cattle industry. There are several benefits to cattle producers. The rules are expected to improve the government and the industry ability to respond to disease outbreak. For example, in the event of an outbreak of tuberculosis or mad cow disease, accurate traceability information is expected to be readily available thereby allowing investigators to shorten the investigation time. In addition, cattle identification is expected to quicken the control of the spread of certain diseases thereby reducing the number of animals to be quarantined. These improvements are expected to be transferred as savings to producers. How does the Florida Cattle Identification Program work? The rules require that cattle 18 months of age or older entering the state or moving within the state be tagged with an official ID. However, not all cattle are required to wear an official tag. Cattle that are moving to approved tagging sites, directly to slaughter and between pastures under normal ranching operations, are exempt under the rule. Cattle can be tagged at approved tagging sites such as livestock markets, stockyards and other locations authorized to apply official ID. The Depart. of Agriculture and Consumer Services will provide a period so that producers can learn about the new rules. The department is planning to enforce this rule starting on April 7. For more information or assistance, contact the Union County Extension Office at 386496-2321 or union@ifas.ufl.edu or visit http://union.ifas.ufl.edu

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Union County Times 5A is now located in the formerMaines Insurance BuildingGeorge Roberts Insurance25 East Main Street(Across from Union Co. Courthouse) TheVisit Our New Office!Call 386-496-2261or call 904-964-6305 to place all Classified Ads or Announcements, Special Events, and other related news.Vincent Alex Brown ~ Editor Cell 352-283-6312Serving Union County for over 102 years. UCSO arrests drug trafficker According to the Union County Sheriffs Office, on Monday evening, Feb. 24, after receiving a tip, sheriffs deputies searched a residence at 10209 SW 48th Terrace in a neighborhood near State Road 121 just north of Worthington Springs. They arrested 41-year-old James Lamont Jones on several warrants stemming from an ongoing investigation and surveillance with the North Florida High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). Sheriff Brad Whitehead advised that Jones, originally from Pennsylvania, had been living in the area and was also a registered sex offender. Sheriff Whitehead stated that deputies began watching the residence, and after a lengthy surveillance the deputies arrested Jones without incident. Jones is currently in the Union County Jail and awaiting transfer to Alachua County. Jones faces several charges, including cocaine trafficking, cocaine possession and using two-way communication devices while in the commission of a felony. His bond is set at $55,000. The investigation is continuing on other subjects. Truck catches fire in 3-car accident BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor At 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 19, Michael Christopher Frishkorn of Lake Butler, stopped while traveling northbound on State Road 121 in a 2000 Ford F-150 pickup to turn left, or west, onto Southwest 85th Trail just south of the ball fields. As Frishkorn, 19, waited on traffic to make his turn, Erin Elizabeth Brewer of Lake Butler slammed her 2008 Ford Edge into the back of Frishkorns truck, according to a crash report from the Florida Highway Patrol. Her vehicle came to rest in the northbound lane facing northwest. Brewer, 36, pushed Frishkorns truck into the southbound lane into oncoming traffic, causing him to collide with the left, or drivers, side of a 1999 Chevy C1500 pickup truck driven by Hope Ann Reinke, 47, of Lake City. That caused Frishkorns truck to rotate counter-clockwise and then hit the right rear of the Reinkes truck and then continued on to the southbound, or west, shoulder. Reinkes truck rotated clockwise and onto Southwest 85th Trail, coming to rest facing west. Frishkorns truck, owned by Jeff Personette of Lake Butler, caught fire and was completely destroyed, according to Lt. Lyn Williams with the Union County Sheriffs Office. According to the FHP report, Brewer stated that she was distracted by the crying baby and she took her attention off of the roadway prior to the initial collision. The baby was Jesse S. Acree, 14 months, who was accompanied by Anneke Brewer Acree, 33. Both reside in Alachua. The front airbag deployed in each vehicle and occupants in each one were wearing a seatbelt; the baby was in a forward-facing car seat. All five individuals were transported to UF Health Shands with minor injuries except for Reinke, who had more serious injuries. Williams said that units responded from UCSO (five in total), FHP, the Dept. of Corrections (to help with traffic control), the city and county fire depts. and Union County EMS. LB man dies in accident on I-75 Three others injured in wreck involving pickup and tractor-trailer BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN Times Editor Early in the morning on Tuesday, Feb. 18, Lake Butler resident, Ronald Wayne Sapp, Jr. died in a two-vehicle accident on Interstate 75. According to a Florida Highway Patrol media release, at around 1:45 a.m., Sapp, 33, was traveling southbound in a 1998 GMC Sierra 1500 pickup truck in the center lane of I-75 near Archer Road in Gainesville. He moved into the right lane in front of a 2014 International ProStar tractor-trailer and abruptly stopped. The tractor-trailer collided into the rear of the pickup and both veered off the roadway onto the right, or west, shoulder. Sapps pickup overturned and ended up on its left, or drivers, side, facing west. The tractortrailer finally stopped at a group of trees, and ended up facing south. Sapp was pronounced dead on the scene shortly after 2 a.m. According to Sgt. Tracy HislerPace, he did not have a seatbelt on. Kristopher Doski, 29, of Ormond Beach, and Michael P. Hammer, 52, of Lake City, were passengers in the pickup and taken to UF Health Shands with serious but non-life-threatening injuries. According to FHPs report, neither was wearing a seatbelt. James A. Gloss, 62, of Longwood, was driving the tractor-trailer. He was also taken to UF Health Shands with serious but non-life-threatening injuries. Sapp leaves behind a fianc, Michelle Lobenthal, sons, daughters and stepsons, as well as his two parents and two siblings. According to the website TheTruckersReport.com, a fully loaded tractor-trailer can weigh up to 80,000 pounds or 40 tons and takes 40 percent more time to stop than the average car. By comparison, the website says the average automobile weighs around 5,000 pounds. LBMS baseball team defeats Chiefland after late game double, 12-7 Also takes down P.K. Yonge, 5-4 BY AARON TETSTONE LBMS Head Baseball Coach The Lake Butler Middle School Tigers baseball team and Chiefland Middle exchanged the lead six times on Monday, Feb. 24, but the Tigers ended up on top with a 12-7 win in five innings over Chiefland. Lake Butler finally managed to grab the lead after a strong fourth inning. The Tigers scored on a two-run double by Marcus Howard, plating Caden Cox and A.J. Russell. Marcus reached base three times in the game for the Lake Butler. He scored two runs and had two RBIs. The Tigers jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in the top of the first. A single by Garrett Allen, bringing home Caden started the inning off. They then tacked on more runs when Russell and Trevor Rogers scored on a wild pitches. Chiefland survived Tigers surge and put up two runs of its own in the third. Chiefland Middle scored on an error and a wild pitch. A.J. recorded the win for Lake Butler. He allowed zero runs and struck out two over 1 2/3 innings. The Tigers tacked on another six runs in the fifth. A sacrifice fly scored Matthew Starling and Wyatt Lugenbeel to get Lake Butler on the board in the inning. That was followed up by Garretts single, scoring Caden. Due to the two-hour time limit rule, the game only lasted five innings. Colton Elixson and the Tigers were able to hold Chiefland to two runs in the bottom of the fifth inning. Colton struck out two and forced a fly ball to end the game. The Tigers defeated P.K. Yonge on Tuesday, 5-4, at home and now face Lake City Middle on Thursday, Feb. 27, also at home. Game time is 4:30 p.m. WS man deploys to Afghanistan Senior Airman Kody Williams was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, on Feb. 22 from MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. This is his second deployment to Afghanistan, as well as being deployed to Qatar and South Korea. Williams has been enlisted in the U.S. Air Force since 2007 prior to graduating from Buchholz High School in Gainesville. He is the son of Jack and Debbie Asbury of Worthington Springs (pictured) and Phillip Williams of Arizona; siblings, Nichole (Aron) McRae of Providence and John Johnson of Worthington Springs. He is also the grandson of the former John and Evelyn Brackett of Worthington Springs. The Education Department at the Reception and Medical Center in Lake Butler is showing great success with the Florida GED program. They currently have 72 students enrolled in Inmate Tutor Assisted Classes. Frank Quinn is ITA teacher and he has seven inmate tutors that assist him between RMC Main Unit, RMC West Unit and RMC Work Camp. Evan Brown is the Special Education teacher. He works with those inmates that are verified as Special Education from school records and are under the age of 22. RMC currently has a dozen Special Education students. These inmates attend classes throughout the week and are TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) tested every three months to check progress. Once they receive qualifying scores on their TABE, they are given the Pre-GED, in preparation for the Florida GED. In the past year RMC has had 40 inmates participate in formal graduation services and this month they will have seven others graduate. This program supports the Dept. of Corrections motto of Changing Lives to Ensure a Safer Florida. This week RMC received outstanding news from Region 2 Program Manager Nathan Herrod, who said, Congratulations to you and your staff. Because of the combined efforts of staff members across departments, inmates earned 1,025 GED diplomas in the second quarter of 2013. This is the largest quarterly GED total on record. Many of your facilities earned the highest number of diplomas in your institutions history. RMC was also informed that the statewide count for GEDs awarded in the first two quarters of this fiscal years is 1,720. This shows progress toward DOCs re-entry efforts. RMC, DOC find success with Florida GED program Record number of inmates earning diplomas

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6A Union County Times Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 THE OFFICE SHOP130 West Call St. Starke, FL 32091PHONE904-964-5764FAX904-964-5764CALL OR FAX YOUR ORDER TODAY! CALL OR FAX YOUR ORDER TODAY!BARGAIN BUYS School Lake Butler Elementary School Perfect A Honor Roll First Grade (Top row, l-r) Nolan Beighley, Harrison Cunningham, Owen Johnson, Garrison Ritch, Michael-Ann Smith, Kamryn Southerland, Jameson Tetstone, Campbell Webb and Carter Whitehead. (Front row, l-r) Yasmine Givens, Rylan Jackson, Trenton Klein, Jeremiah McKenzie, Gabe Tallman, Maggie Wade, Jake Walker and Ava Walker. Not pictured is Tifton Roseke. McBride, Austin Ray, Taylor Smith, Maddox Wheeler and Krista Young. (Front row, l-r) ABOVE: (Top row, l-r) Jaylynn Moates, Jolene Moore, Hendricks, Eli Hendricks, Jolena Rogers and Krista Tanner. (Front row, l-r) Braden Adams, Darby Andrews, Newsom, Nadia Norman and Mack Smith. Not pictured is Leah Norcross. RIGHT: (Top row, l-r) Shyla Crowe, Devin Diggs, Zoe Elixson, Patrick Maxwell, Chainberlin Watts, Ava Westmoreland, Leah Brannen, Anabelle Dugard and Wyatt Keen. (Front row, l-r) Jelissa Garcia, Savannah Miller, Joshua Tyre, Bo Wilson, Camilia Carter, Preston Cranford, Syler Moates, Aubrie Muse, Hayley Sherrod, Taleya Smith and Nathan White. LBES A/B Honor Roll First Grade Dallen Cox, Dailynn Croft, Alec French, Miranda Hedrick, Andrew Mohl, Hannah Sepherd, Ansleigh Worrell, Landon Biddix, Kutter Durrance, Nash Kelley, Jalisia McMillian, Alyssa Glaspy, Reece Hendricks, Stephen Heslar, Emmalee Hollingsworth, Taylor Seay, Sonya Gutierrez, Emily Whitehead, Cian Smith, Shane Smith, Anthony Holmes, Desiree Thomas, Chloe Camarena, Nemecio Chavarria, Curtis Austin, Jalynn Brown, Karen Compton, Mikayla Shenk, Matthew Weston, Yalorie Wilds, Landon Barrett, Rachael Bloodsworth, Dillon Duenas, Kaitlin Mann, Americus Rocha, Heaven Scott, Destiny Thomas, Callie Combs, Emily Higginbotham, Landen Miller, Scarlet Stroud, Savannah Thompson, Addisyn Worrell, Jenna Bielling, Allen Carlisle, Jesse Chaikin, Morgan Rogers, Alexia Sapp, Lance Seay, Surie Sharp, Barron Walden, Jade Crawford, Beth Crawford, Kaitlyn Parrish, Colin Thomas, Jasper White, Raylyn Gunter, Jesse Harden, Carli Trent, Libbie Brant, Seth Cox, Kevin Crawford, McKenzie Flick, Cailynn Mattox, Kane Middleton, Karsen Middleton and Tyson Woodland.

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that are specifically geared to seniors, for which it is not necessary to get out of your chair. The Bradford County Senior Center (1805 N. Temple Ave.) offers Energizing Chair Yoga by Sherry Zak Morris. It incorporates yoga poses and sequences that bring energy to the body and encourage movement in every muscle and joint. The format is an easy-tofollow DVD that plays on a large screen. Senior Center Director Diane Gaskins said classes are offered Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. and Thursdays at 10 a.m., in combination with DVD Tai Chi instruction. Similarly, participants in the Medicare Silver Sneakers program at Anytime Fitness (448 W. Madison St.) can practice yoga without leaving their chairs, although there are opportunities Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL When things get painful, dont wait it out.ER Extra gives you advanced treatment and compassionate care in one full-service facility. Once youre here, youre cared for. Thats a sure thing. For information, go to ShandsStarke.com.IT CAN BE A SETBACK. WHEN SOMETHING IS BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor The Starke area has a number of options for fitness buffs who want to improve overall health by unifying mind and body in activities such as yoga and Tai Chi. The word yoga comes from a Sanskrit word meaning union, to join together. Yoga is one of the oldest mind/body activities in the world, having originated in ancient India. It has become very popular in the United States. A 2012 study indicated that 8.7 percent of American adults.4 million people practice yoga. Hatha yogathe yoga most widely practiced in the Westcenters on physical poses held for varying lengths of time. Modern yoga classes often include warm-up, poses, deep stretches and contemplation. Starke offers two yoga classes Unifying mind and body for better health See HEALTH, 6B Bradford Countys Dimple Overstreet is one of five who will be honored as a Santa Fe College Woman of Distinction during a Thursday, March 13, ceremony at 5 p.m. at the Fine Arts Hall on the colleges Northwest Campus in Gainesville. Tickets are $35 per person and are available online at www. sfcollege.edu/finearts or through the Santa Fe Box Office at 352395-4181. The annual ceremony recognizes outstanding female service in Alachua and Bradford counties, and was created by the Womens History Committee at Santa Fe College in 1987. Women of Distinction has honored more than 100 outstanding women in the community since its inception. Overstreet and her husband, Grady, have one daughter, Catrell Cooney, and three grandsons. Overstreet has been the owner of A&G Gifts in Starke for 21 years. She is an active member of First United Methodist Church, where she served as the finance treasurer for more than 20 years. Overstreet currently serves as GROUP 5 Treasurer for United Methodist Women. She was the event chair for the local Relay for Life from Overstreet to be honored as Woman of Distinction See HONOR, 2B Diane Gaskins leads Linda Hildebrand, Betsy Price and Kay Morrisson through yoga poses at Bradford Center. Karen Hardesty performs a boat pose during a Bradford-Union Technical Center stretch class.

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I always had to question her if I thought she was injured in any way because she had to be on that field, McCollum said. Shed crawl on the field if that was part of it. When she takes to the field for the first time at Florida Southern, Colaw said shes sure shell be nervous and excited, while mulling over the many scenarios that can happen on the field and how shell act in regard to each one. Also, Im going to be really grateful, she said. I already am. 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Florida Twin TheatreAll Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451* CLOSED MON & TUES SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 Starts Friday, Feb. 28 Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.comFri, 7:00, 9:10 Sat, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10 Sun, 4:45, 7:00 Wed Thurs, 7:30 Now Showing PG-13Roma Downey inFri,8:00 Sat, 5:00, 8:00 Sun, 4:30, 7:05 Wed Thurs, 7:15 PG-13Kevin Costner in3 days to kill Son of God Prom ote Service Business with a TOOT YOUR OWN HORN! Email your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to: b y 5pm Monday OR bring it to:B r adford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor( 9 04) 964-6305W e ll help you design your ad cash/check/credit cards accepted all for only /wk co vering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties a in o u r weekly community gi veaway paper: Stand out from the crowd Pr omote YOUR Servicewith aClassified Photo A dA ctu al Size Ad Sample BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Though Bradford High School was not represented by a full team, it earned the right to advance to the state-level Science Olympiad after student Shane Shuman competed at the regional Olympiad on Feb. 1 at Lake Citys Florida Gateway College. BHS chemistry teacher Chelsea George said schools ideally take 15 students to the Olympiad to compete in events designed for two-student teams. The Friday before the event, George said she had six students who were going to compete. However, one backed out of the event, two got sick and another two got lost on the way to the event. That left Shuman, who was allowed to compete on his own. He was very nervous, George said. Despite that, Shuman, a sophomore, earned a secondplace finish in the anatomy and physiology event, while placing third in five other events: designer genes, rocks and minerals, technical problem solving, circuit lab and dynamic planet. The regional event was made up of teams from Union and Dixie County high schools (Union placed first) and also featured two Leon County BHS student competes in Science middle school teams. This is Bradford High Schools first participation in a Science Olympiad. George is excited about getting BHS more involved, saying the Olympiad gets students to think outside of the box, as well as giving them a different set of experiences. With the Olympiad, they get exposed to a lot more stuff they may not necessarily see at Bradford, George said. The state-level Olympiad will be held at the University of Central Florida on March 15. Georges goal is to take a full team. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Keystone Heights High School senior Madison Colaw signed a letter of intent on Feb. 25 to play soccer at Lakelands Florida Southern College. Colaw, a forward/midfielder, said thankful best described her feelings. Thankful and humble because I feel like God has blessed me with so many opportunities, she said. She also expressed a tremendous appreciation for her parents, James and Robin Colaw. I dont think a lot of people understand how much theyve had to sacrifice financially and just driving so long for tournaments every weekend, Colaw said. Colaw, who has played at KHHS since the seventh grade, said she was also excited about the future and what was in store for her at Florida Southern. She said when she first began considering colleges, she thought of big schools like the University of Florida. However, being a dual-enrolled student at Santa Fe College gave Colaw an appreciation for smaller classroom sizes. Colaw, who wants to become a pediatric oncologist, said she loves the academic program at Florida Southern, but said soccer coach Brittany Jones is a big draw as well. I think the coach really stood out, she said. That was a big part of my decision because she seems like she really wants to get to know the girls and connect with them. Former KHHS soccer coach David McCollum said Colaw, who has played premier club level ball since the age of 13, brings great skills to the field as well as the ability to put the team first. Shes just a great player and just a great person all around, McCollum said. Shes always supportive of her teammates. She was never one to put anybody down. It was always for the team. I guess I appreciated that more than anything. McCollum said another attribute of Colaws is her understanding of the game. She sees all of the field, and she understands the schematic as to how each player has specific responsibilities, McCollum said. She really took that in. Current KHHS coach Kenny Seneca said Colaw proved to be a good leader and was certainly missed when she wasnt on the field. She made her teammates so much better, Seneca said. She can draw the defense and dish the ball off. She can score goals, but she can also just make everybody around her better. Despite missing approximately 10 games this past season while recovering from an injury, Colaw still scored 24 goals, while dishing out 15 assists. It takes a lot to keep Colaw off the field. Keystones Colaw to play soccer at Florida Southern College 2011 to 2013, with a record of more than $72,000 in donations being recorded during that span. Overstreet is now a Relay for Life team retention and monitoring chair until 2015. Overstreet is the current first vice president of Altrusa of Starke and is serving her second year as president of the Bradford County Educational Foundation. She has been in the mentoring program for Take Stock in Children for the past five years. Doris Weatherford, who is well known for her literary works and public service, will be the featured speaker at this years ceremony. Her writings include American Women and World War II, Women and American Politics: History and Milestones and The Womens Almanac. Weatherford currently serves as a columnist for LaGaceta, the nations only trilingual newspaper (published in English, Italian and Spanish), and sits as the only woman on the selection committee for historical statues on Tampas Riverwalk. Copies of Weatherfords new book about the history of women in Florida will be for sale at the reception. She will be available to sign copies. Other honorees at this years Women of Distinction ceremony are Patti Fabiani, Margaret Maples Gilliland, Shelley Fraser Mickle and Yvonne C. Rawls. This years event will also honor one Woman of Promise (ages 16-21): Haley Johnson. For more information on Women of Distinction, please contact event coordinator Teri McClellan at 352-395-5201. HONOR Continued from 1B Madison Colaw (pictured with her parents, James and Robin) signs her letter of intent to play soccer Florida Southern College. Bradford High School sophomore Shane Shuman is pictured with chemistry teacher Chelsea George.

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Seven Bradford High School students in the Bradford-Union Technical Centers Automotive, Computer and Health Science programs competed in the Skills USA regional contest on Feb. 21 at Florida State College in Jacksonville, with Cole Johnson placing first in Computer Maintenance and Kristie Yates placing first in Medical Terminology. Johnson and Yates have now earned the right to compete in the state competition, which will be held April 27-29 in Pensacola. BHS students Dana Carney, Marshall James, Brandon Rhue, Teddy Stanze and Bryce Tibbitts also competed. After the competition, the students seemed very excited to come back next year, said Jeff Ledger, the technical centers Computer Systems 2 BHS students place 1st at Skills USA event Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B h as CLOSED his Practice as of February 12, 2014For further information or to have your records transferred to another dentist, CALL 904-263-9200 and leave a message. Robyn and I would like to Thank You for your patronage since I first came to this wonderful area way back in 1988. May God Bless and Keep You. SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Saturday, January 25th, Ellen Bloodworth Roberts and James Reginald (Reggie) Flynn of Starke were united in marriage in Savannah, Ga., at the Foley House Inn. The bride is the daughter of James F. Bloodworth of Starke, and the late Betty Bloodworth. The groom is the son of George Flynn of Starke, and the late Neva Flynn. Attending the celebration were the brides son, Adam Roberts, Oviedo, sister, Carol Bloodworth Busby, Oviedo, the grooms daughter, Molly Flynn, Raleigh, N.C., brother, Gray Flynn, Middleburg, sister and husband, Neva and Jerry Kidd, Tallahassee, Lisa Richards, Middleburg, Richard and Marilyn Powers, Tallahassee, Ryan Dunson, Raleigh, N.C., and Richard and Pam Ritch, Brevard, N.C. The reception was held at the Foley House Inn, after which the wedding party toured the historic town. The newlyweds will reside in Starke. Roberts, Flynn wed Jan. 25 Ellen Bloodworth Roberts and James Flynn Lindsey Smith of Starke and Drew Carroll of Keystone Heights announce their engagement. Lindsey is the daughter of Jerry and Denise Smith of Starke. She is a 2003 graduate of Bradford High School, and a 2007 graduate of Santa Fe College in Dental Hygiene. She is employed by Talisha Cunningham, D.M.D. Drew is the son of Freddie and June Carroll of Keystone Heights. He is a 2001 graduate of Keystone Heights High School and is self-employed. The wedding will be March 8, 2014 at the Florida Agricultural Museum in Palm Coast with reception to follow. Invitations have been sent. Smith, Carroll to wed March 8 Drew Carroll and Lindsey Smith Socials The Andrew Crosby family reunion is Saturday, March 1, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish to the National Guard Armory on Edwards Road. Andrew Crosby family reunion is March 1 Bradford High School/Bradford-Union Technical Center students competing in the Skills USA regional contest were (front, l-r): Cole Johnson, Kristie Yates, Brandon Rhue, Teddy Stanze, Marshall James, Bryce Tibbitts and (not pictured) Dana Carney. Also pictured (back, l-r) are technical center instructors Teresa Jackson, Jeff Ledger and Mike Rensberger. I nt ernet C af e Hwy 301 S. Star keAcross from KOA904-964-3350 Sweepstakes Amusement Parlor 6pm to Midnight and Information Technology instructor. One thing I have to say is that all the students were well behaved. This competition really sparked a new excitement for the students. Cole Johnson (left) and Kristie Yates earned the right to compete state-level event. The Bradford-Keystone Heights Relay For Life teams are hosting a yard sale this Saturday, March 1, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Starke City Square in downtown Starke. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Starke to host Relay for Life yard sale on Saturday Norm Myers of the Sons of the American Revolution will present a program on Writing Your Memoirs at the Col. Samuel Elbert Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolutions next meeting, which will be Monday, March 3, at 10:30 a.m. at IHOP in Starke. In addition, VetSpace of Alachua County representative Natalie Packnick, accompanied by her service dog, Eiesel, will accept two plarn (plastic yarn) mats made by DAR members for homeless, female veterans. (The Florida State Society Daughters of the American Revolution three-year project is centered on homeless, female veterans.) Visitors are welcome to attend this meeting. Local DAR chapter to meet March 3 Any woman 18 or older regardless of race, religion or ethnic backgroundwho can prove direct descent from a person who aided in achieving American independence between April 19, 1775, and Nov. 26, 1783, is eligible for membership. Please contact Konnie Beauregard at 352-475-1865 for more information. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the Bradford County Extension Service would like to invite you to enter plants in the March 11-16 Bradford Fair offers chance to exhibit plants County Fair. There will be three divisions this year. Along with the adult amateur division, there will also be an adult professional division for nursery owners and professional growers and a youth division. Entries can include potted houseplants, hanging plants, patio plants, cut or potted edible or food-producing plants, vegetables, fruit and nuts. There will also be a section for honey, cane syrup and eggs. Plants may be entered at Building 2 of the fairgrounds on Monday, March 10, from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information about the agriculture/horticulture show, please call Laurie Compton at the Bradford County Extension office at 904-966-6299.

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Dear Editor: On (Feb. 13), as I sat under the hair dryer correcting my gray challenged hair, I looked across the room and I could see two ladies facing each other talking. Over the roar of my hair dryer, I couldnt hear what they were saying and could only imagine. You might ask what did these ladies have in common. Well within just a few days of each other they both lost their spouses. And who were these two ladies; Sherry Strickland and Sharon Jones. But in reality their husbands led very similar lives; both were long time business owners. One was the owner of Leonards Outboard Shop here in Keystone and the other in Jacksonville, Economy Printing. Leonard repaired the motors and Bobby loved fishing. Their word and handshake meant more than any signed contract. Both served our country in the United States Navy. While in my eyes that certainly makes them heroes, but they are what I call everyday life heroes. They got up each morning went to work, paid their bills, loved their families, served their community, supported the schools, and held integrity to the highest level. When they were around people felt secure and safe. Sherry and Sharon must have had a lot to share and I am glad that these two gentlemen shared their lives with my family and the entire Keystone Community. Rest in Peace Bobby Strickland and Leonard Jones. Sincerely, Tina Bullock 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Armbands on Sale Now!Save Now, Dont Wait! Advance Armbands are $15 Good for 1 Day at the Fair SAVE & BUY IN ADVANCE! For more information go to www.BradfordCountyFair.net (904) 964-5252 Bradford County Fair Association 64thANNUALFAIR FAIRNew Entertainment New RidesSame Great Fun with Family & Friends Available at: (904) 964-7555134 East Call Street Starke, FL Its Tax Time! Corporate and Individual Income Tax Services Full Bookkeeping & Payroll Services Audit & Accounting Services Business Consulting including Quickbooks & Accounting. Set up new Corporations, LLCs and Partnerships. back (l-r): Cindy Ward, Kara Wainwright, Brad Million front: Job White and Doug Reddish Let the professionals atReddish & White CPAsget the refund you deserve FAST C ommercial Residential Fleets Autogas Farms Industry Piping for NewConstruction or Home Remodeling M ost Major Brands Factory Trained4031 S.W SR 121 Lake Butler, FL 32054 W illiamsLPGas.com wlpgas@windstream.net(386) 496-3725 Letters editor@bctelegraph.com Dear Editor: Is the Sheriffs Office a family business or do the citizens have a voice in the matter? Explain to us how five people put in for the appointment for the Sheriffs position, four have more experience, and the one with the least amount of experience gets the interview, and also the Appointment. Furthermore what good is the Undersheriff when he cant even carry out the duties of being sheriff when the unthinkable happens? Thats not saying much for our county. This is not a family business and there has to be a change. When you apply for a job, all qualified applicants usually get an interview and then the decision is made on the position, but in our case it was not like that. We the citizens of Union County have a choice to make this election and we think the decision is clear, Change is for the better. Concerned citizens of Union County Citizens want to be heard in regard to UC Dear Editor: Mr. Buster Rahns editorial Capital Punishment in Florida: time for a new look? in your 2/20/14 edition was much appreciated by me and, perhaps, others who are struggling with this emotional question The States responsibility is to provide security for society but does it have to kill its inmates to protect its citizens from convicted, first degree murderers? Most penal authorities agree that this security can be assured when a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole is given. Thus the question, Why does the State kill individuals? And further, How does the State promote a reduction in senseless killings among its citizens when it kills its prisoners even though a non-killing option is available! As one who has been present in the designated Protest area across the road from the death chamber on S.R. 16 for many executions, I have never been there three times in just two months. If Gov. Scott continues this pace, there will be 18 executions in 2014 the most since capital punishment was re-instituted in 1979. Our nation and the civilized world is moving away from the death penalty as Florida is going in the opposite direction. I have a sick feeling in my Florida moving in opposite direction in regard to death penalty stomach that this dramatic acceleration in state-sponsored killings is a part of Gov. Scotts re-election strategy. If so, this is not only morally and ethically reprehensible but, also politically short-sighted in my view. Mr. Rahns closing thoughts in his perceptive editorial suggests that Floridians may be considering another way. There may be an alternative to capital punishment. If so let us move forward into a new era in which the sacredness of life is paramount, even for those who do not share our values. John X. Linnehan Hampton Remembering everyday life heroes Dear Editor: The botched rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace last October per provision of Expand Medicaid as called for by Affordable Care Act the Affordable Care Act added momentum to Republican attacks against Obamacare. Mind you, the Republican Party has been trying to dismantle or defund the Affordable Care Act from the time it was signed into law by President Obama in 2010. I think the Republicans have been largely successful in creating distrust so much so that many have probably forgotten that the American people have long been asking for health care reform. When President Obama was elected in 2008, 49 million U. S. residents had no health insurance. The United States is the only industrialized nation that does not guarantee access to health care for all their citizens. 45,000 uninsured Americans die every year for lack of medical treatment. Medical bills are a leading cause of bankruptcy in the U.S. Surprisingly, most of medical bankruptcy filers are from the middle class. The Affordable Care Act was a political compromise to change some of the shortcomings of our health care system but without dethroning the powerful forprofit health care industry. The law does not regulate, or place caps on, health insurance premiums, medical treatment costs, or prices of prescription drugs. Supposedly competition in the market will drive down those costs. I believe, on the other hand, that we will not see reasonable health care costs because capitalistic greed will continue to find ways to make their profits. The Affordable Care Act provides subsidy in the form of advanced premium tax credit for insurance purchase on the Health Insurance Marketplace. However said subsidy is available ONLY to people with income ABOVE 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level. The Affordable Care Act intended to provide health insurance to people BELOW the Poverty Level through expansion of the Medicaid program. The federal government will pay 100 percent of the cost of Medicaid expansion for the first three years, and 90 percent thereafter. Heres the rub. The Medicaid program is administered by each individual state although funding comes from both federal and state funds. In 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of most of Obamacare but ruled that the federal government could not require states to expand their Medicaid program. Instead, individual states could choose whether or not to expand Medicaid in their state. Nearly 4 million Floridians have no health insurance. Medicaid expansion will provide health coverage to 1.2 million low-income Floridians who do not earn enough to qualify for premium tax credit but are too poor to afford insurance without financial help. The Florida Senate passed a Medicaid expansion plan in the 2013 legislative session. However the bill died in the Florida House of Representatives on the pretext that our Republican legislators doubted the ability of the federal government to finance Medicaid expansion. It is my opinion that the decision by our Florida Legislature to opt out of Medicaid expansion is politically driven and certainly not in the interest of the people. Florida has the second highest percentage of uninsured in the U.S. If Florida were to expand the Medicaid program, our state can gain 50 billion dollars in additional revenue for the next ten years. Such revenue would be an economic boost to Florida. At the same time, Medicaid expansion will benefit individuals and families living at and below the poverty level. By opting out of Medicaid expansion, Florida legislators are choosing to deny care to the neediest of the needy. It should be pointed out that, in anticipation of Medicaid expansion, the Affordable Care Act drastically reduces funding for hospitals mandated to provide uncompensated emergency room care, again penalizing uninsured Floridians. To bring the issue closer to home, allow me to share statistics who could be our relatives, or friends, or neighbors, or simply persons we have encountered in our community. According to the 2010 census, 16 percent of Bradford residents live in poverty. This figure is higher than the statistic for Florida in general (15.6 percent) and significantly higher than the statistic for the U.S. (14.9 percent). Bradford County is predominantly white. The median age of Bradford County residents is 39.5 years. To me, it means that, under present circumstances, many of the uninsured in our county will likely remain uninsured for a long time. The next regular Florida legislative session will start on March 4, 2014 and will continue for 60 days until May 2, 2014. I urge Floridians to tell Florida Legislature to expand the Medicaid program as provided by the Affordable Care Act so that low-income Floridians, the neediest of the needy, can gain access to health care. Some readers may be interested to know that the law does not provide health coverage to illegal immigrants. A group in Gainesville called Just Health Care is circulating a petition for the expansion of Medicaid in Florida without privatization. The organization believes that access to health care should be considered a human right and should be available to ALL citizens. The petition is available at www. justhealthcareflorida.org. We tell the world that America is a Christian nation and we take pride in our Christian values. In the eyes of the Lord, there are no Republicans or Democrats, the poor are just as worthy as the rich, we are all His children. Christian values preach love and charity. He who has pity on the poor lends to the LORD, and He will pay back what he has given. (Proverbs 19:17) Isnt it right and just to practice our faith? And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. (Matthew 25:40) Mrs. Fe Ripka Hampton

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B STARKE 904-368-0131 1101 S. Walnut St. (Hwy 301 South) KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 352-473-4001 101 Commercial Drive (Facing SR-100 East) PALATKA 386-385-5658 625 Hwy 19 South Need a New Mower? $0 Down & 0% Interest for up to 48 Monthson all Zero Turn & Riding Lawn Tractors We Take Trade-Ins We Warranty & Service All Makes & Models 3 Locations to Serve You(formerly Ace Parts & Service in Starke & Keystone Hts.) Auto Home Life RV Motorcycle FREE QUOTES116 N. Walnut St Starke(next to the Post Office downtown)(904) 96 4 -7707dawncorbett@allstate.com t Crime t The following individuals were arrested recently by local law enforcement officers in Bradford, Union or Clay (Keystone Heights area) counties: Bradford Joseph Heath Beavins, 26, of Brooker was arrested Feb. 20 by Bradford deputies for an out-ofcounty warrant. Bond was set at $2,500. Jerry David Bradham, 48, of Cleveland, Tenn., was arrested Feb. 23 by Bradford deputies for three charges of probation violation for original charges of grand theft, grand theft motor vehicle, and battery. He was also arrested for failure to appear for original charge of driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $3,000 for the failure to appear charge, while bond was not allowed for the other three charges. Tyrone Syrus Brazle, 58, of Jacksonville was arrested Feb. 19 by Bradford deputies for an outof-county warrant. Bond was set at $15,003. Nathaniel Kendrick Brown, 45, of Gainesville was arrested Feb. 24 by Bradford deputies on a warrant for withholding child support. Brown was already in the Alachua County Jail and was transported to Bradford with bond set at $3,070. Chad Austin Carpenter, 27, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 18 by Bradford deputies for obstructing justice. According to the arrest report, the victim was calling law enforcement as she was concerned for her safety during an argument with Carpenter over a bill. Carpenter grabbed the phone from the victim and told dispatch everything was OK. A deputy was dispatched to the home, and Carpenter was arrested for the obstruction charge. Bond was set at $5,000. Jacob Sabaistian Crews, 23, of Starke was arrested Feb. 19 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Crews was stopped for a traffic infraction by several deputies, including one with a K9 drug dog. During the stop, the K9 alerted on the vehicle, and the drugs and equipment were found. A 14-year old in the vehicle was also arrested for possession of marijuana and drug equipment. Bond for Crews was set at $2,000, while the juvenile was released to his mother, and his charge was forwarded to the Department of Juvenile Justice. Jessie Lee Dell, 56, of Lawtey was arrested Feb. 24 by Bradford deputies for battery. According to the arrest report, the victim was trying to leave a residence with her things when Dell grabbed her by the arms and pushed her to the floor. Bond was set at $1,000. Levi Zebulon Gaylord, 33, of Starke was arrested Feb. 19 by Starke police for shoplifting. According to the arrest report, Gaylord was observed putting headphones in his pocket at Walmart and then walking out without paying for them. He was detained by a Walmart employee until police arrived. Bond was set at $500. Autumn Lafferty, 33, of Lancaster, Ohio, was arrested Feb. 21 by Bradford deputies for disorderly intoxication. According to the arrest report, a deputy was called to the Kangaroo at U.S. 301 and S.R. 16 in Starke for an intoxicated person in the store. At the store, the deputy observed Lafferty yelling and causing a disturbance inside. Once outside, Lafferty continued to raise her voice and place her hand on the deputy. She wouldnt remove her hand when ordered to do so. Lafferty was arrested and, after being placed in the police vehicle, began to hit her head and shoulder against the glass while transported to the jail. Christopher Lee Malone, 26, of St. Cloud was arrested Feb. 20 by Bradford deputies for two charges for failure to appear. Bond was set at $5,000. Demetrius A. Martin, 20, of Starke was arrested Feb. 20 by Starke police for failure to appear on an original charge of possession of paraphernalia for storage. Crystal Shiko Masters, 29, of Starke was arrested Feb. 21 by Starke police for larceny. According to the arrest report, police were called to Cato Fashion in Starke about a possible shoplifting by Masters. A store employee said Masters entered the store and was trying on many items in the fitting room. The employee was assisting in handing her things to try on in the fitting room when she noticed Masters had not returned a pair of shoes and several necklaces. Masters left the store, but by then the officer had arrived and approached her at her vehicle before she left. After the officer asked to speak with her, she put her purse in the vehicle and wouldnt retrieve it for the officer. After several minutes and several requests by the officer, she reached in to get the purse, but dumped the contents on the floor in the back of the vehicle. The officer saw a pair of shoes and later found the two necklaces in the vehicle. Masters was arrested, with bond set at $500. Grover Lewis Norton, 38, of Orange Park was arrested Feb. 23 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Norton was stopped for an expired tag and tag not assigned to vehicle when Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay or Union the officer smelled marijuana coming from the car. A search of the vehicle turned up the drugs and drug equipment. A passenger in the car, Kyle Edward Sweeny, 27, of Jacksonville, was also arrested and charged with possession of marijuana and drug equipment. Bond for Norton was set at $1,500, while bond for Sweeny was set at $1,000. Cody Scott Qualls, 19, of Starke was arrested Feb. 23 by Bradford deputies for carrying a concealed weapon and for possession of marijuana and drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Qualls was stopped for a headlight not working by a deputy. The deputy smelled marijuana coming from the vehicle, and a search turned up the drugs, equipment and the concealed weapon. Efrain Rodriquez Jr., 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 19 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant for original charge of lewd or lascivious molestation, battery, tattooing a minor without consent of parent or legal guardian and exposure of sexual organs. Bond was set at $115,015. Cody Patrick Smith, 21, of Starke was arrested Feb. 24 by Starke police for fraud by swindle. According to the arrest report Smith, a former Walmart employee, was observed taking two bags of bird feed from the garden section (value of $27.73) and returning them at the service desk for a refund. Smith was detained by a Walmart lossprevention employee until police arrived. Amanda Shae Stevens, 32, of Hawthorne was arrested Feb. 24 by Bradford deputies for possession of marijuana and possession of drug equipment. According to the arrest report, Stevens pulled into the Do Not Enter side of McDonalds in Starke and almost hit a deputys vehicle, then continued to the adjacent gas station. When the deputy went to speak with her, he could smell marijuana coming from the vehicle. A search of the vehicle turned up the drugs and drug equipment. Stevens told the deputy she had been pulled over by the Gainesville police the day before and issued a sworn complaint for possession of marijuana, and told someone on the phone she had forgotten the drugs and other stuff were in the vehicle. She was also issued a citation for her tag being expired less than six months. Trevor James Wall, 22, of Starke was arrested Feb. 22 by Bradford deputies for driving under the influence. Rebecca Lynn Wheeler, 42, of Starke was arrested Feb. 22 by Starke police for battery and criminal mischief-property damage. According to the arrest report, Wheeler was in an argument with the victim and struck and damaged his vehicles window with a stone candlestick holder. The victim stated that when he went to stop her from further damaging his vehicle, she threw the candleholder at the truck and missed. She then struck him in the side of the neck with her fist. Wheeler left, but police arrested her later at her residence. Keystone/Melrose Thomas Baker, 30, of Starke was arrested Feb. 18 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Kurt Helmich, 43, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 20 by Clay deputies for possession of child pornography and for soliciting a parent or guardian to allow a child to participate in sexual activity. Timothy Hobgood, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 24 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and battery. Shane Merritt, 21, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 24 by Clay deputies for contempt of court. Chadwick Richardson, 25, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 23 by Clay deputies for a probation violation. Frank Toms, 44, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 20 by Clay deputies for leaving the scene of an accident and driving with a permanently revoked license. Tony Wills, 22, of Keystone Heights was arrested Feb. 22 by Clay deputies for contempt of court. Union Joseph Anthony Gillihan, 18, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 24 by Union deputies for failure to appear. James Lamont Jones, 41, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 24 by Union deputies on out-ofcounty warrants from Alachua for cocaine trafficking, for using two-way communications device to facilitate a crime and for possession of cocaine. Bond was set at $55,000. Derek Scott Nipper, 28, was arrested Feb. 22 by Union deputies for driving under the influence. According to the arrest report, a deputy first heard a vehicle squealing its tires near Meridian Health Center, and then he observed it spinning its tires, power braking and spinning the tires again in front of Full House Saloon in Lake Butler. Once the deputy stopped the vehicle, with Nipper driving, he observed several open beer cans in the truck and then conducted field sobriety tests and took breath samples, which came back at .181 and .171 above the legal limit for alcohol consumption. Benjamin James Sherrod, 30, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 23 by Union deputies for assaultintent threat to do violence and for battery. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a disturbance, where family members of Sherrod said they thought he was high on meth and alcohol. He was making threats to do bodily harm to them. He also grabbed a family member when he tried to escort him out of the home, and once outside, he threw chairs, clothes and many other items off a porch onto the ground. Sherrod is already on felony probation, according to the arrest report. Thomas Robert Bruce, 28, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 20 in Alachua County on a warrant from Union County for failure to appear. Astrid Leonard Watkins, 40, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 17 by Union deputies for felony battery-strangulation. According to the arrest report, deputies were called to a residence in Worthington Springs about a disturbance. The victim told deputies Watkins got mad at her because she wouldnt do some laundry and then started throwing clothes out of the door. Watkins and the victim started arguing, and Watkins grabbed her around the neck, choking her and shoving her into a closet. The victims brother was at the home, and he intervened between the two before the deputy arrived. Brandon Joseph Croft, 28, of Lake Butler was arrested Feb. 21 by Union deputies for contempt of court-child support. Bond was set at $500. PUBLIC MEETING KEYSTONE AIRPARK AUTHOR ON THE 1 st Legals

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to do a variety of standing poses. Yogastretch Classes are led by Ben Bridgman, a certified group fitness instructor who is also certified by the Silver Sneakers program. I really enjoy working with senior adults, many of whom have never had a fitness regimen before they became active with Silver Sneakers, Bridgman said. There are Silver Sneakers classes especially for cardio fitness and weightlifting, but Yogastretch is different. Participants may feel that there isnt any benefit to a class where they dont break a sweat, but all they need to do is try it. They always leave feeling better, more flexible and more relaxed after the session. Bridgman also teaches a combination yoga/Pilates stretch class following his popular indoor cycle classes at the Bradford Union Technical Center on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Indoor cycle classes start at 5:15 p.m. and typically last an hour. Following that, cyclers are ready to stretch and tone their muscles. Its really the best thing to do after an hour on a stationary bike, which can cause muscles especially the large muscles of the legsto become shortened and tight, Bridgman said. The Pilates work emphasizes strengthening the core muscles, such as the abdominals and back muscles, but the yoga work really helps increase flexibility and decrease muscle tightness. We do a few minutes of relaxation at the end, and I am constantly amazed at how effective it is. You wouldnt think lying on a thin yoga mat on a hard tile floor would be relaxing, but it is. People dont want to get up, mainly because its the only time they allow themselves to be completely relaxed. Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese exercise practiced in slow motion for relaxation, vitality, health and grace. Described paradoxically as a non-aggressive martial art, it is based on yielding and awareness rather than force and resistance. Tai Chi takes seven to 10 minutes to practice, requires no special equipment except flat shoes and open space, and can be enjoyed by people of all ages. Starke does not currently have live Tai Chi instruction, although Bridgman has been studying the martial art for several years and hopes to be able to add it to his offerings. The Bradford Senior Center offers DVD Tai Chi training in combination with its chair yoga classes. If youre willing to travel to Gainesville, there are plenty of options for in-person Tai Chi training. Paul Campbell, who is also a licensed massage therapist and licensed mental health counselor, runs the School of Tai Chi Chuan at 1409 N.W. 6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Please join us as we honor the women who honor our community. Thursday, March 13, 2014, in SFs Fine Arts Hall rfntbr n rr r bn r bn nrrrt rrbnt For tickets and information, please visit www.sfcollege.edu/wod 3000 NW 83rd Street Gainesville, FL 32606 r eceived her family medicine training from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in New York City and her fellowship training in geriatric medicine from the VA Medical Center in Gainesville. She received her medical degree from Terna Medical College, Navi Mumbai, India. Dr. Gupta will be joining the staff of D r. Guptas husband is attending the University of Florida with a Fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology & Pediatrics ICU. The joy in the doctors lives is their toddler son. They are making their home in Gainesville, for hopefully a very long time! T here is a W ere pleased to welcome to our staff! C omplete Care. Close To Home Every Fri. Night$5 Yager Bombs Starting at 8pm P REVATT SREST AURANT(904)368-9156 N OW OPEN127 E. Call Street Located in Downtown Starke Owners:Jackson, Jason & Brandon PrevattEVERYDAY WE HAVE SELECT APPETIZERS AT 1/2 PRICE LUNCH SPECIALS$75 0DailyMONDA Y NIGHT starting at 7pm$6 Pitchers $375 Royal FlushesTUESDA Y NIGHT Draft Beers 2/$350 W ells 2/$450WEDNESDA Y F AMILY NIGHT60 W ings starting at 5pm $11 Domestic Buckets of Beer ON SUNDAYSWITH CHURCH BULLETIN10% OFFTHURSDA Y Buy 10 W ings(Boneless or Bone-in)Get 10 a t 1/2 Price!SA T & SUN Buy 25 W ingsGet a FREE Pitcher of Beer, Tea or Soda Includes drink HEALTH Continued from 1B My fear was of not living for realliving a life that was not really by my choice, but what was acceptable, what I was taught to want, a pre-programmed agenda. He started to get results through the practice of Tai Chi and meditation, realizing what was generating the fear in my mind was ignorance, not understanding how to work with the mind, how to process the existing fear and how to awaken the natural human state that is fearless. Finding both religious dogma and exclusively rational approaches to living lacking because they failed to satisfactorily address ethical principals for decisions as well as mans profound spiritual nature, Campbell found a home at the Shr Jung Tai Chi School in New York Citys Chinatown section, studying under the legendary Cheng Man-ching. Cheng, who died in 1975, was known for Tai Chi Chuan and his Yang-style short form, which is composed of 37 movements that take less than 10 minutes to practice instead of the 20 to 30 minutes required by the Yang long form. Campbell also had the benefit of the teachings of Oscar Ichazo, the Bolivian-born founder of the Arica School, a human potential movement group that teaches a body of techniques for inherent consciousness-raising and an ideology to relate to the world in an awakened way. Ichazo eventually introduced his school to Chengs school. Anthony Korahais, like Campbell, was attracted to the spiritual, healing aspects of Tai Chi, which he hadnt found in other martial arts such as karate and kung fu. He began his Tai Chi journey, also in New York City, as a result of an inner struggle, specifically a debilitating case of clinical depression. He recalled living with a fog of despair that returned each morning, engulfing him in darkness. Through the study of Qigonga practice of aligning breath, movement and awareness for exercise, healing and meditationas well as Tai Chi, he found relief. In Malaysia, studying with Grandmaster Wong, Korahais learned that when human energy systems Sixth St., Suite 220 (352-3713718). Anthony Korahais directs the Flowing Zen Studio at 5127 N.W. 39 th Ave. (352-672-7613, flowingzen.com.) Campbell, who teaches 10 classes a week, often starts students with a course called the Eight Ways of Tai Chi Chuan, a gentle exercise program developed especially for elderly people, although it is appropriate for anyone who would like an introduction to Tai Chi. Unlike exercises which use exertion and stress to build muscular strength, the Eight Ways uses gentle, flowing movements to relax and loosen the body and the joints, to stimulate circulation, to build stability in the legs and feet, and to develop an awareness of ones internal strength. For seniors, this can translate into grace in walking, better balance and greater confidence in movement. Everyday tasks such as lifting, reaching into cupboards, opening doors and walking up and down stairs or curbs are emulated in movements taught in the class. This simplified version of Tai Chi is ideal for people who are unable or unwilling to make the commitment to learn the complete Tai Chi form, a process that can take several years. Each of the exercises of the Eight Ways has an image associated with it, such as sculling, which mimics the motion of an oarsman rowing a gondola on a canal. These mental images enhance the learners experience, making it imaginative and enjoyable. Regular practice of the Eight Ways, like the Tai Chi form, builds a firm foundation by exercising the legs and feet, developing stability and balance, stimulating circulation by sending warmth to the extremities of the body, and loosening and relaxing the joints. Participants develop internal awareness and confidence that provides a sense of well-being. Campbell began his journey with Tai Chi in 1973 as part of a personal search for the life he wanted to live. I was in a state of intense indecision about how to proceed, Campbell said. I recognized that what was between me and living the life I wanted to live was fear. I was looking for ways of dealing with that fear that werent just theoretical. were functioning optimally, it was possible to reach a state that Chinese masters called a harmony of yin and yang. When this happened, he said, the energy that mobilizes and powers the immune system, produces the proper enzymes for digestion, repairs damaged cells, flushes away toxic wastes and balances the emotionsall of this energy starts to flow harmoniously, thus keeping us happy and healthy. After Korahais began to experience harmonious energy flow and balance for himself, he quit his job as a network engineer at the school of architecture at Columbia University in New York City. He said it was the right job for many years, especially with a schedule that gave him the freedom to travel and learn the discipline of his true calling teaching Qigong and Tai Chi. Eventually, he earned the title of Sifu, a Chinese word that means father and teacher. Korahais followed his parents, who were professional musicians, when they retired and relocated to Florida. He enrolled in an acupuncture school in Gainesville, where he met his wife, Akemi, a native of Venezuela. Eventually, Korahais dropped out of school to teach Qigong and Tai Chi full time. Akemi continued her acupuncture studies and later opened the Painless Acupuncture Center, which is located in the same building as her husbands studio, Flowing Zen. Now, Korahais teaches 12 classes per week at Flowing Zen. Zen means meditation, said Korahais. Meditation can be drinking coffee, eating food, not just sitting meditation, which is difficult for a lot of people. Everything I do has a flowing component. All students at Flowing Zen begin with a threehour Qigong workshop that costs $47. Also available are monthly memberships, which include classes and one-on-one instruction. Most of Campbells classes cost $100 for 10 weekly one-hour sessions. Campbell notes that in a culture which celebrates youth, Tai Chi offers a more positive perspective on growing older. Understanding the training of the human body as the ground for training the human spirit, Tai Chi tunes us to inner principles that lead to continually fuller, healthier life, Campbell said. The first principle is uprightness, which means being in perfect equilibrium with gravity and facing reality without pretense. The second principal is relaxation, meaning that at rest, a person is serene and attentive, while in action every cell is available for the simplest, most complete response. The third principle is the Tan Tienthe bodys physical center of gravity. Having our heart-mind focused at the Tan Tien means harmony in all aspects of our life, means our full being, our spirit, our internal unity can manifest, Campbell said. Seeing the human body as an exact expression of the maturing human spirit and training it accordingly, Tai Chi Chuan is like fine winethe older you get, the better you get. Ada Reddish, Mary Rahn, Esther Romaro, Annie Barker, June Keefe and Tom Houlihan enjoy the Silver Sneakers yoga stretch class.

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Serving F amilies in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The area s largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 263 N. T emple Ave Hwy 301 North STARKE(across from Winklers) M Alterations Embr oidery Wedding Gowns Dry Cleaning(904) 966-2002Family Owned & Operated since 1993 d Obituaries d Roger Elixson LAKE BUTLERRoger Lee Elixson, 68, of Lake Butler died on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014 at the Haven Hospice in Gainesville surrounded by his family. He was born in Worthington Springs where he lived his entire life. He graduated from Union County High School. He was a member of the Woodman of the World and of Sardis Baptist Church. He is preceded in death by his father, Roy Elixson. He is survived by: his mother, Mary Seay Elixson; daughters, Tina (Stacy) Lloyd of Worthington Springs and Lynn Parrish of Lake Butler; sons, Johnny Ray Elixson of Worthington Springs and Brad (Julie) Elixson of Providence; one brother, Clifford (Willlene) Elixson of Providence; six grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter. Funeral services were held Feb. 25 in the Archer Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Brandon Elixson officiating. Burial followed in Elzey Chapel Cemetery. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Lori Hall Lori Hall STARKELori Elaine Hall, age 46, of Starke, passed away on Feb. 20, 2014 at Park Meadows Health and Rehabilitation Center in Gainesville. Lori was born on Feb. 14, 1968 in Lakeland. She was raised in Lakeland and recently moved to Starke this past year. Lori enjoyed writing biographies and poetry. She had a big heart and a passion for helping people. Lori was an advocate for people with disabilities and she enjoyed teaching people how to read. She also enjoyed listening to music. Lori is survived by: her mother, Mae Hall of Lakeland; her son, Zachary Hall of Lakeland; her two brothers; one granddaughter; and her three loving close friends, Rebekkah Baker, Samantha Luke, and Dorothy Luke all of Starke. Memorial services were held on Feb. 23 at Archie Tanner Funeral Services Chapel with Reverend Jimmy Scott officiating. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Archie Tanner Funeral Services of Starke. 904-964-5757. Visit www. archietannerfuneralservices.com to sign the familys guest book. PAID OBITUARY Max Hearst KEYSTONE HEIGHTSMax Ray Hearst, 75, of Keystone Heights died Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 at Shands in Gainesville. He was born on July 14, 1938 in Norfolk, Va. to the late Ray and Debra M. (Roundtree) Hearst and was a longtime area resident. Prior to retirement he worked as a tool and die maker for the Civil Service and served in the United States Army. Survivors are: wife of 21 years, Patricia (Mentzer) Hearst of Keystone Heights; son, Charlie Edward Hearst of Keystone Heights. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Keystone Heights. Gere Johns KEYSTONE HEIGHTSGere Howard Johns, 82, Mother, Creative Designer, Needlepoint Artist, and Conservationist. Gere Howard Johns died at home peacefully on Thursday Feb. 20, 2014 after a courageous battle with lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. She was born April 26, 1931 in Dukes at her Grandfathers home. Gere was predeceased by her beloved husband Jerome of 56 years, her mother and father, John Marcus and Blanche Roberts Howard. Gere graduated from Union County High School in 1949 as the Class Valedictorian. She was active in extracurricular activities (State and National Officer of the Future Homemakers of American (FHA), a captain of the basketball team, and was a cheerleader). She attended Stetson University where she was Captain of the Cheerleaders, a member of Alpha Xi Delta Sorority, and the Glee Club. She also attended the University of Florida. Gere completed a 10 year study of the piano at the St. Louis Institute of Music, St. Louis, Mo. Gere was a founding member and president of the Crystal Lake Environmental Organization (CLEO). She was a self-taught water and ecosystem expert. She was a member and past President of the Starke Womens Club, past President of the Friends of the Library, a Girl Scout Leader, a Boy Scout Den Mother and a teacher at Youth Camp. Gere was a master of Needlepoint. She created six pieces of needlepoint entitled, The Creation and donated the work to the United Methodist Church in Keystone Heights, where she was a member and was loved by many. This work took hundreds of hours to complete. Over the years she used her talent of needlepoint to create personal gifts to show her love for family and friends. She is survived by: daughter, Debra (Frank Williams) Johns of Pomona, Calif.; son, Phillip (Linda) Johns of Santa Fe Lake; her brother, John Marcus (Cheryl) Howard of Dukes; seven grandchildren; nine great grandchildren; one great-great grandchild, and many cousins and friends. A Celebration of Geres Life will be held Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. Keystone United Methodist Church on State Road 21, Keystone Heights. A private interment for immediate family will be prior to the Celebration of Life. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to Haven Hospice, 4200 NW 90th Blvd, Gainesville, FL 32606. Arrangements are under the direction of Jones-Gallagher Funeral home of Starke 904-9646200. On-line condolences may be left at www.jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARY Amber Lawson HAMPTONMs. Amber Nicole Lawson age 24, of Hampton suddenly passed away Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014. Amber was born on Feb. 6, 1990 in Gainesville and was a homemaker. She was a member of Madison Street Baptist Church, enjoyed singing, dancing, and making people smile. She was preceded in death by her paternal grandfather Henry Lawson. Survivors are: children, Trenton Holt and Trinity Holt both of Starke; her father, Marvin Marty (Sharon) Lawson of Starke; her mother, Misty (Koehler) Lawson and fiance Johnnie Holton of Hampton; sisters, Destini Lawson, Chasiti Lawson, both of Starke; brother, Chad Lawson of Starke; paternal grandmother, Janice Lawson of Starke; maternal grandparents, Steve and Gail Varnum of Hampton; aunts, Lori (Paul) Bateman of St. Augustine, Randee (J.J. Strickland) Varnum of Hampton, Lisa (Michael) Giles of Lawtey; uncles, Mike (Ron Evans) Lawson of Starke, Stanley (Jennifer) Varnum and Brad Varnum both of Hampton; special niece, Sereniti. Services were held on Monday, Feb. 24 at Dewitt C. Jones Chapel. Interment followed at Hope Cemetery with Reverend Matt Dyal officiating. Arrangements are by Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of Starke 904-964-6200. On-line condolences may be left at www. jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARY Dwight Lintz Sr. LAKE BUTLERDwight O. Lintz Sr. 86 of Lake Butler died Friday, Feb. 21, 2014 at the Haven Hospice in Lake City. He was born on Sept. 10, 1927 in Deerfield, Michigan to the late Howard and Georgiang Rutherford Lintz. He worked at Lockhead Martin as a computer engineer. He was also a proud Veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is preceded in death by two brothers. He is survived by: his wife, Betty Jane Lintz; sons, Dwight (Paula) Lintz, Jr. of Portville, Colo. and Charles (Jean) Lintz of Lake Butler; daughters, Delilah (Karl) Fike of Belfair, Wash. and Rebecca Ann Lintz of Lakewood, Colo.; nine grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren; brothers, George (Geraldine) Lintz of Harrison, Michigan; sisters, Twila (Richard) Stone of Oxford, Mich., Caorl (Jim) Cooper of Apoka, Nona (Elijah) Childers Glanwin of Michigan and Shirley Gurganious (Robert) Atkinson, North Carolina. A memorial service will be held Thursday, March 13, at 11:00 am in the Chapel at Archer Funeral Home, with Bro. Ralph Durham officiating. Burial will be at a later date. Family ask that in Lieu of Flowers please make donations to the Haven Hospice Lake City Suwannee Valley Care Center 6037 W US Highway 90, Lake City, FL 32055, or to the National Parkinson Foundation. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Diane McNeal Diane McNeal, Our Beloved, Wife, Mother, Great and Grandmother, Sister and Aunt, passed away on Feb. 13, 2014 at the age of 77. She gave a valiant fight but lost her battle to cancer. She was preceded in death by: her daughter, Lori Diane McNeal; granddaughter, Terra Michelle Hunter; mother, Edith Agnes Register Trowbridge Hunt; step-father John Hunt; niece, Carolyn Aldridge; and nephew, Roderic Yepp. Mrs. McNeal is survived by: her husband, Norman McNeal, Sr. and her four children, Terrie Vernon, Norman McNeal, Jr., Nancy Mitzel and Kenneth McNeal; and also survived by two grandchildren, Roger Mitzel, Jr. and Candise McNeal; two great-grandchildren, Madison and Ty Mitzel; her sisters, Nancy Aldridge and Miriam Trowbridge; and nieces, nephews and cousins. At Mrs. McNeals request there will be no services held. There will be a memorial posted online in the near future at Crevasses Cremation Services in Gainesville. It will be open for comments to be posted by those who would like to. Family will be sent information once the memorial is posted (link). In lieu of flowers you can make a donation to the following: Norman McNeal, Sr., or her great-grandchildren, thru Nancy Mitzel, or her grandchildren, Roger Lee Mitzel, Jr. (RJ), thru Nancy Mitzel and Candise McNeal, thru Terrie Vernon, or Haven Hospice E.T. York Care Center, 4200 NW 90th Blvd., Gainesville, FL, 32606. Haven Hospice also has memorial bricks that can be purchased in her name to be placed on their memorial walkway with the funds going to their operating account as they are a non-profit organization. Thank you Haven Hospice Center staff and nurses for the loving care given to Mrs. McNeal and the extra help given to the family in this time of need. PAID OBITUARY Dakota Mobley Dakota Mobley KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Dakota Jacob D.J. Mobley, age 15, of Keystone Heights passed away at his home Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014. D.J. was born in Gainesville on March 18, 1998 and was a 10th grade student in Clay County. He was an Explorer at the Keystone Heights Fire Department, involved with the Clay R.O.T.C., and Boy Scout Troop 146. D. J. also enjoyed being outdoors hunting and fishing. D.J. was preceded in death by his twin brother Austin Jesse Mobley. Survivors are: his loving parents, Kevin and Racquel (Singletary) Mobley; one brother, Matthew Kaleb Singletary; maternal grandparents, Keith and Debbie Singletary; paternal grandparents, Don and Kit Mobley all of Keystone Heights; paternal grandmother, Linda Brophy of Palm Coast; aunt, Rhonda Singletary of Gainesville and uncle, Brian (Tara) Singletary of Keystone Heights; aunt, Lauren (Griff) Thomas of Atlanta, Ga.; along with additional aunts, uncles, and cousins. Funeral services for D.J. were held Saturday, Feb. 22, at Trinity Baptist Church with Pastor Marty Franks and Pastor Rob Morford officiating. The burial followed at the Keystone Heights Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family has requested contributions be sent to the Clay Electric Credit Union, P.O. Box 308, Keystone Heights, FL 32656, where an account has been set up for D.J. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Dr., Keystone Heights. 352473-3176. www.jonesgallagherfh. com PAID OBITUARY Ronald Sapp Jr. LAKE BUTLER Ronald Wayne Sapp Jr., 33, of Lake Butler, died suddenly on Feb.18, 2014 from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was born in Jacksonville on May 9, 1980 to Ronald Wayne Sapp, Sr. and Regina Grace Price. He lived most of his life in the Lake City area, having moved to Lake Butler eight years ago, and was a carpenter. He is survived by: his father, Ronald Wayne Sapp, Sr. of Callahan; mother, Regina Grace (Gregory) White of Lake City; fianc, Michelle Lobenthal of Lake Butler; sons, Brandon Wayne Sapp of Lake Butler, Jacob Allen Sapp of Lake City and Kage Brady Sapp of Lake Butler; daughters, Christian Alese Harvey of Wellborn and Lana Darlene Sapp of Lake Butler; step-sons, Sean Lobenthal and Kaleb Renaldi both of Lake Butler; brother, Richard Lee (Chelsea) Sapp of Branford; and sister, Robin Renee Sapp of Orlando. Memorial services were conducted on Feb. 25 in the chapel of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home with Rev. John Welkner officiating. Arrangements are under the care of the Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home of Lake City. William Singletary JACKSONVILLE 1SGT William Samuel Sambo Singletary, age 47, of 499 McMath Mill Rd., died Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. A native of Jacksonville, he was born March 5, 1966, the son of William S. and Sandra M. Singletary, Sr. Mr. Singletary was employed at Southerfield Aviation as an A & P Mechanic. He served in the United States Army for 22 years at several locations including Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., Ft. Benning, Ga., Ft. Eustis, Va. and ending with the 1/111th AVN REDT in Jacksonville. He did several tours of duty in Egypt, Kuwait, Bosnia and Iraq. Mr. Singletary was an avid genealogy and history researcher and enjoyed looking for long lost relatives. He loved motorcycles and riding the open road. Mr. Singletary was a 1984 graduate of Southland Academy. He received an Associates degree from Florida Community College Jacksonville, A & P certificate from South Georgia Technical College and attended Florida Theological College. He also was a member of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, St. Johns Presbyterian Church in Jacksonville and attended First Presbyterian Church of Americus. Survivors in addition to his parents are: his wife, Angie Bass Singletary of Americus; a daughter, Ashton Singletary of Atlanta; three sons, Caleb Singletary of Atlanta, Jake Hood of Americus and Justin Hood of Americus; one grandson, Brantley Singletary of Jacksonville; a sister and brother-in-law, Kim Singletary Christmas and Charles of Riverview; a brother and sister-inlaw, Doug Singletary and Charlotte of Jacksonville; one niece and two nephews. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, William and Mollie Singletary, and Lewis and Eva Akins. Graveside services were held Feb. 25, at Ebenezer Baptist Church Cemetery on Crisp Academy Dr. in Cordele, Ga., with Rev. Donny Loffredo officiating. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Southland Academy Athletic Fund, P.O. Box 1127, Americus, Ga. 31709. You may sign the online guest book and share your own special thoughts and memories by visiting www.greghancockfuneralchapel. com. Greg Hancock Funeral Chapel is in charge of these arrangements. PAID OBITUARY Anna Stephens Anna Stephens KEYSTONE HEIGHTSMrs. Anna Rita Stephens, age 82, of Keystone Heights passed away Monday, Feb. 17, 2014 at North Florida Regional Medical Center following a brief illness. She was born in New York City, N.Y. on Feb. 19, 1931 to the late Henry and Anna (Oskay) Haberman, and had moved to Keystone Heights 13 years ago from Coral Springs. Prior to retirement, Mrs. Stephens was a Customer Service Representative at AT&T Telephone Company for 36 years. She attended the Keystone United Methodist Church where she was actively involved with the Womens Circle; she was a member of the Keystone and Melrose Womans Clubs and the Red Hats Society. Mrs. Stephens enjoyed playing Bridge; she was always looking for a good bargain, and she loved going to garage sales. Survivors of Mrs. Stephens are: her husband of 59 years, Donald C. Stephens; one son, Don (Cheryl) Stephens all of Keystone Heights; three grandchildren, Jessica, Nicole, and Austin; and one great granddaughter, Madylinn. Services for Mrs. Stephens were held Friday, Feb. 21, in the Keystone United Methodist Church with Dr. Craig Moore and Dr. Tom Farmer officiating. The burial will follow at a later date. In lieu of flowers the family has requested contributions to be made to the Keystone Heights Womans Club 6747 Womans Club Dr, Keystone Heights, FL 32656 or the Melrose Womans Club, 303 Pine Street, Melrose, FL 32666. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Dr. Keystone Heights. 352-473-3176. www. jonesgallagherfh.com PAID OBITUARY Wendell Thomas ALMA, GEORGIABrother Wendell Ray Thomas, age 75, passed away Monday, Feb. 24, 2014. Brother Wendell was a native Alma and pastored his first church Shiloh Congregational Methodist Church in Homerville for nine years, and then moved to Gordon where he pastored Snow Hill Congregational Methodist Church for nine years. In 1985 Brother Wendell fulfilled his vision for building a non-denominational church in Milledgeville, Ga. which led to the formation of Freedom Church where he was the senior pastor. He was preceded in death by his parents Prentis and Vodice Thomas, a granddaughter Mary Ashley Thomas and his sister Debbie. He had a love for Hunting, Fishing and Gardening. Survivors include: his wife Patricia Pat Thomas of Milledgeville; three sons, Kelly Thomas of Interlachen, Rev. Randal (Patsy) Thomas and Rev. Tim (Heidi) Thomas of Milledgeville; and a daughter, Tammy (Rev Carrol) Smith of Milledgeville; two brothers, Dwain Thomas and Novack Thomas both of Florida; one sister, Joann Vines of Ga., seven grandchildren; and four great grandchildren. The family will receive friends Wednesday evening from 5-8 at Freedom Church 500 Underwood Rd. Milledgeville, Ga. Services will be held at 2:00 P.M. Thursday, February 27, at Freedom Church with burial to follow at Scenic Memorial Gardens. Visit mooresfuneralhome.com to express tributes. Moores Funeral Home & Crematory has charge of arrangements. PAID OBITUARY Charles Vickory HAMPTONCharles Addison Vickory of Hampton passed away Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville. He was 57. Mr. Vickory was born Aug. 27, 1956 in Gainesville, to Billie Vickory and Frances Vaughn Vickory. He was a graduate of Rolling Green Academy class of 1974 and pastor of Hampton Baptist Church for 18 years. He is survived by: his wife, Marcia Vickory of Hampton; son, Charles J. Vickory of Hampton; two daughters, Melissa Taylor of Keystone Heights and Mindy Vickory of Orange Park; sister, Linda Jaffray of Lake Butler; and grandson, Kyle. Graveside funeral services will be at 1:00 pm Friday, Feb. 28, at Newnansville Cemetery. Arrangements are in the care of Evans-Carter Funeral Home, High Springs, FL (386) 454-2444. PAID OBITUARY Jo es Tires 13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) 964-(8473)

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8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 4322 NW 13th Str eet Gainesville, FL Does your business have a story to tell? A product or service to sell?The Bradford County Telegraph Advertising Department can provide you with the in depth coverage you desire...Call 904-964-6305or email us atDarlene Douglassdarlene@bctelegraph.comor Kevin Millerkmiller@bctelegraph.comAdvertorial Advertising Works! Fins, Fur & Tails Among people who have eaten fish, there are few who will not acclaim their culinary value. There are many, however, who will mention the complication of bones. It also follows that many of those complainers will have eaten small fish, or they will have eaten fillets that were not boneless. The above conundrum is usually due to a row of small bones that runs along the lateral line connecting the rib cage with the outer skin. These bones, which are usually referred to as pin bones, are quite small and are easily overlooked until they are in your mouth. Because of this issue, some fishermen will discard all meat on the fillet that is south of the rib cage. Others will cut through the pin bones and rib cage and will use a pair of bone removers to remove the rib cage and pin bones. Obviously the latter would be rather involved. Another alternative is to cook the fish whole and remove the bones while eating. This is most often done when cooking smaller pan fish, and it is more functional for those who are familiar with the location of the bones. Another alternative that is highlighted here will maximize the salvaged flesh and remove the rib bones and pin bones efficiently during the filleting process. J.T. Prevatt, who credits Avoiding pin bones when his son Jimmy Prevatt with teaching him, illustrates the process. Prevatt starts his fillet along the dorsal fin and cuts vertically to the rib cage. Once he cuts adjacent to the end of the rib cage, he pushes the fillet knife through the entire width of the fish and fillets through to the tail. He then pulls the northern part of the fillet back carefully along the rib cage until he feels the knife touch the pin bones. From there he will follow the pin bones outward until he reaches the skin. Subsequently, he fillets the flesh from the skin until he cuts the pin bones from the skin. After that, he returns the knife edge to the unfilled edge of the pin bones and cuts adjacent to the pin bones and back to the rib cage. From there, he uses the knife tip to complete the fillet process. He emphasizes that a sharp blade and recognition of blade contact with bones are important. The accompanying photos are made while filleting crappie, but the shape of the pin bones will vary somewhat according to the fish species. The largest anomaly will present with the plain pickerel, locally known as a jack. The pin bones in the jack are actually Y bones and better resemble small wishbones in a chicken breast. This results in the jack being labeled as too bony to eat, but once the Y bones are removed, you might be surprised that the mild, delicate flesh will rival that of a crappie. Outdoors outlook This winters late cold weather seems to have complicated a good understanding of the crappie spawn. In deeper lakes like Kingsley, the spawn is actually taking place in deeper water. Newnans has been the most productive local lake, and it is has been giving up a lot of spawning fish along the shoreline cover. The crappie bedding activity should diminish somewhat from this last full moon. As crappie season wanes, the bass bite will escalate in the next few weeks, but most reports indicate that the only bass fanning beds in our area are the smaller bucks. Len Andrews is now staying at Kingsley Lake and sight fishing from his originally designed boat with a ladder attached and stabilized in the bow. Andrews specifies that the only action in the lake shallows is from male bass. Ed Allen also reported last week that Sampson Lake was not providing any action from the larger females. Local bass fishermen can also look forward to an active year for tournaments. The Bald Eagle open tournaments will start on March 12 at Santa Fe Lake. Shortly afterward, the Sampson Lake open tournaments will start. The Murphys Law Relay for Life Bass Tournament is scheduled for March 15. Mike Oglesbee is co-director of the OGS Tournament Trails in Palatka, and he has teamed up with Gene Crossway to greatly increase the reach of the organization. The organization is working with the Wolfsons Childrens Hospital Tournament and the NEFAR Haven Hospice Tournament with hopes of increasing the reach of both events. Those two charity tournaments are traditionally the largest bass fishing events in North Florida. Tight lines until next week. Outdoors calendar Feb. 27-March 2, Florida Challenge at Bradford Sportsmens Farm. March, turkeys and quail begin breeding in North Florida; March 2: Floridas Zone C squirrel and quail season ends. March 8-9, youth spring turkey season. Union Correctional Institution is looking for a forever home for one dog that has been trained by the ROCK Hounds (Rehabilitation of Castaway K-9s) program. Shanti is a female boxer-beagle mix that stands about knee high and weighs approximately 29 pounds. She is about three years old and has an easy-going personality. Her trainers describe her as an intelligent dog that loves to be petted. The dogs in the ROCK Hounds program are all former strays rescued from a kill shelter. The dogs are trained by UCI inmates, ensuring they are fully housebroken, trained to walk on a leash and obey voice commands, and trained to behave themselves around other dogs and people they dont know. The dogs are trained to sleep in a crate/kennel at night. Cost to adopt a dog is $50, which includes spaying or neutering and all needed shots. According to Re-entry Officer Rachelle Parrish, UCIs dog training program has two major objectives. One is to train the dogs and make them more adoptable thus preventing them from being euthanized. The second is to provide inmates in UCIs veterans dorm many of whom suffer from depression or PTSD with a program that will improve their mental state. If you are interested in adopting Shanti, contact Officer Parrish at 386-431-2000, ext. 2248 or Officer Marcia Miller at 386-431-2168 during work hours. Union Correctional program seeking forever home for Shanti comes running when she is called. The brindled dog is mostly boxer, but her beagle mom gave her a smaller size. J.T. Prevatt along the dorsal through to the ribs. Shortly beyond this point, he will encounter the row of pin bones. Cut upward to the top of the pin bones and cut between the pin bones and skin. Remove the remainder of the cage. University of Central Florida freshman center and 2013 Bradford High School graduate Justin McBride was named the American Athletic Conferences Rookie of the Week following his performance in games against Memphis (Feb. 12) and South Florida (Feb. 15). McBride averaged 9.5 points and 6 rebounds off the bench, shooting 72.7 percent from the field (8-of-11) as the Knights split a pair of American Athletic Conference games. He scored six points and had seven rebounds in a 76-70 loss to Memphis, while scoring 13 points and grabbing five rebounds in a 75-74 win over South Florida. In the South Florida game, McBride was 5-of-6 from the field. McBride has played in nine games and is shooting a teamhigh 73 percent from the field. Hes averaging 6 points and 3 rebounds per game. BHS grad McBride earns American Athletic Conference honor 904-368-0687 ph 904-368-0689 f axMARGARE T ANDERSON 101 1 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties

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Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B 40 Notices 47 Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 49 Mobile Homes for Sale 50 For Rent 1BR UPSTAIRS APART 51 Lost and Found 53A Yard Sales 53B Keystone Yard Sales 53C Lake Butler Yard Sales 57 For Sale 59 Personal Services 65 Help Wanted (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! Youll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at the We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time and PRN RNs and LPNs. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more!For more info, contact: EOE/AAP/DTR Out of Area Classifieds will help you, unconditionally love & be hands on with your baby; maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 800-9184773.-Susan StockmanFL# 0342521 Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-7419260 www.FixJets.com Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1877-994-9904 earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.co m EOE Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-3681964 : $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipartners.com on 10+ acres only $89,900 3 Bed, 2 bath log home w direct river access. Convenient to downtown Jacksonville. Excellent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x.19 Constructed weathertight log home shell. EHO Ready to move in. Seller Financing (subject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 VMFhomes.com Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 MARCH 1-2 SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5 ATLANTA EXPO CENTER (3650 JONESBORO RD SE) BUY-SELLTRADEINFO: (563) 927-8176 Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training. 1-877214-3624 New Pay Package and $2500 Sign-On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out, full benefits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-9783791/apply www.heyl.net FR I MAR 7 9AM 2PMSAT MAR 8 9AM 2PM 303 Pine Str eet Melrose YARD SALE AND BAKE SALE! *REWARD* FOR STOLEN CAR1974 Chevy Nova. Two door, bright yellow with big black racing stripes down hood and trunk lid. Barb wire pin stripes, big block 386 engine chromed out. Job related duties for Water distribution, Sewage Collections and Maintenance Perform the various tasks associated with the maintenance of a water distribution system Learns the proper use of tools and equipment required to perform the job Participates in routine maintenance activities such as system flushing, valve exercising and fire hydrant maintenance. Under direction, follows established policies and procedures in repair of equipment to ensure proper working order Operates city vehicles and equipment according to established safety procedures and policies Performs other duties as assigned Available for emergency response, 24 hours/day, seven days/week WORKS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE CITY OF STARKE SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER & WASTEWATER 1. CHECK LIFTSTATION RUNNING TIMES AND PROPER OPERATION OF LIFTSTATION EQUIPMENT AND CONTROLS. 2. FIX OR MAKE NECESSARY REPAIRS TO ALL EQUIPMENT, PIPING AND CONTROLS ASSOCIATED WITH LIFTSTATIONS. 3. AVAILABLE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO FIX OR ASSIST, 24 HOURS/DAY, SEVEN DAYS/WEEK. I. ASSIST IN OTHER WORK AT WATER, WASTEWATER AND BCR PLANTS AS NEEDED. WORKS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE CITY OF STARKE SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER & WASTEWATER. 1. Performs routine maintenance on pumps, electrical motors, and all equipment associated with water and wastewater. Maintain wastewater plant, water plants and lift station yards. i.e. mowing, weed eating, painting, and pressure washing. 2. Keep track of tools used to perform duties. 3. Take or given written or verbal commands of issues that needs to be addressed. This position will call for inmate training certification upon hiring to be completed when classes are available. Will need to obtain a class B CDL driver license within 2 months of hiring date. The right candidate may be asked to obtain wastewater and drinking water license or distribution and collection license under the direction of the Superintendent of Waste of Wastewater. ALL JOBS ARE ADVERTISED WITH FLORIDA WORKS, 819 WALNUT ST., STARKE, FL 32091. APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AND RETURNED TO SAME. THE CITY OF STARKE IS AN E.O.E. JOB CLOSES 3-14-14 Class A CDL Drivers Needed!Drivers needed immediately for bulk commodity carrier Class A CDL, 1 yr. Verifiable T/T exp. & Driving School. Minimum 23 years of age. No Haz-Mat needed. Clean MVR and job history required.Apply online at PritchettTrucking.com Sandhill ForestApartments E qual housing opportunity. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. 1 Bd rm $654 2 Bdrm $740 3 Bdrm $801 visit 2 Bedroom Townhome$100 security1/2 OFF 1st 3 m onths rentEqual housing opportunity This institution is an equal o pportunity provider & employer. 1 Bdrm $460 2 Bdrm $485 3 Bdrm $515 J armons OR NAMENTAL CONCRETE 2000 N. T emple Ave Hwy 301 North Starke B sBoutique(904) 966-0020 Hwy 301 N. Starke D URRANCE PUMP 964-7061QU ALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 904-964-8092 www.CareerSourcencfl.com Set Right Mobile Homes Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal Rodney A. Carmichael, OwnerEmail: set_right_homes@yahoo.com904-364-6383 Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity

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10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Jacob Luke and Jackson Reddish each had an RBI as the Bradford High School baseball team improved to 1-1 in District 5-4A with a 3-1 over Santa Fe on Feb. 20 in Alachua. Pitcher Wyatt Barnes (2-0) threw a complete game, giving up four hits and striking out five. Reddish finished 2-for-3 at the plate, while Luke was 2-for-4. Bradford (2-3) hosted Gainesville prior to playing Santa Fe, losing 8-4 on Feb. 18. Barnes and Carson Yowell were each 2-for-3. Both of Barnes hits were doubles, while Yowell hit one double and had an RBI. Reddish and Cody Tillman each had an RBI. The Tornadoes played district opponent Interlachen this past Tuesday and will travel to play Suwannee on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. On Friday, Feb. 28, Bradford hosts Middleburg at 7 p.m. Bradford hosts Forrest on Monday, March 3, at 6 p.m. Tornadoes even district record in baseball Ashton Adkins struck out 16 batters and went the distance in a 12-inning, 3-2 win over District 5-4A opponent Santa Fe on Feb. 19 in Starke. Santa Fe scored both of its runs in the top of the third, with Bradford answering with a run in the bottom half of the inning. The Tornadoes (4-0, 3-0 in District 5) scored again in the fifth before finally getting the winning run in the 12 th Adkins, who gave up six hits, also hit a double and drove in a run. Jaci Atkinson, who was 2-for-5, scored twice. Mackenzie Gault went 2-for5, while Lainie Rodgers hit a double. Bradford played Gainesville this past Tuesday and will host Providence on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. On Friday, Feb. 28, the Tornadoes host district opponent P.K. Yonge at 6:30 p.m. Bradford takes on Santa Fe again on Tuesday, March 4, in Alachua at 7 p.m. BHS edges Santa Fe in softball Keystone Heights High School scored two runs in the final two innings to defeat visiting St. Augustine 10-9 in a Feb. 18 baseball game. Kyle Hix, who was 2-for-3, hit the second of his two home runs to lead off the bottom of the sixth, tying the score at 9-all. In the seventh, Blake Valenzuela drew a lead-off walk, advanced to third on an error and scored the winning run on a wild pitch. Hix drove in a total of two runs, while Bryce Plummer, who was 2-for-4, had three RBI. Blake Richardson added an RBI, while Morgan Bass was 2-for-2. 2 late runs propel Indians to 10-9 win It was a tough week for the Union County High School baseball team, which suffered a 5-0 loss to District 7-1A opponent Williston on Feb. 18 and a 6-1 loss to Fort White on Tigers drop 2 in baseball Jordan Howe homered and drove in four runs as the Union County High School softball team earned its second win of the season, defeating District 7-1A opponent Williston 16-1 on Feb. 20 in Lake Butler. The Tigers (2-5, 1-2 in District 7) had lost five in a row, but got back in the win column, with Kaylyn Ingram, who was 2-for2, Kendallyn Johns and Madison McClellan each driving in two runs, while Devin Lewis, Kaylan Tucker and Katie Zipperer each drove in one. Union stops losing streak Defiance (Ohio) College freshman Samantha Cook, a 2013 Bradford High School graduate, won the shot put at the Feb. 22 Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference Indoor Championship. Cooks throw of 12.39 meters set a Defiance school record as well as Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference record. By winning the event, she was named to the All-HCAC first team. Defiance, which won the team championship, also got a seventh-place finish from Cook in the weight throw. Cook wins conference championship Storm Miller, who pitched two innings of relief, earned the win. Keystone (2-1) played Buchholz this past Tuesday and will travel to play Williston on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. On Saturday, March 1, the Indians travel to play District 5-4A opponent Santa Fe at 1 p.m. before returning home to play district opponent Fort White on Tuesday, March 4, at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 20. T.J. Rogers hit a double in the loss to Williston, but Union (3-2, 0-1 in District 7) was held to just three hits. The Fort White game was tied at 1-1 going into the fifth, but the visiting Indians scored two runs in the fifth and another three in the sixth. Chris Starling drove in the only run, while Colten McAlister hit a double. Again, the Tigers were held to three hits. Starting pitcher Corey Hersey gave up one run on four hits and two walks in three innings of work. The Tigers will travel to play district opponent Dixie County on Friday, Feb. 28, at 7 p.m. Union then returns home to play district opponent Newberry on Monday, March 3, at 7 p.m. Pitcher Holly Tucker (2-2) threw a complete game (four innings), giving up two hits and one walk. Prior to playing Williston, the Tigers lost 9-8 to host Suwannee on Feb. 18. Kaylan Tucker was 3-for-4, while Lewis was 2-for3 with a double and two RBI. Johns, Jordyn Driggers and Valerie Seay were each 2-for4, with Johns hitting a double and driving in three runs, and Driggers hitting a home run. Ingram added an RBI. Union played district opponent Newberry this past Tuesday and will host district opponent Chiefland on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. On Monday, March 3, the Tigers host Newberry at 6 p.m. before traveling to play district opponent Dixie County on Tuesday, March 4, at 7 p.m.