Union County times

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Union County times
Uniform Title:
Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Lake Butler Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates:
30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1920?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID:
UF00028314:00451

Related Items

Preceded by:
Bradford County times

Full Text



Tigers batter Interlachen Stephen Bivins of LB processes

Rams in 39-0 shutout, 4B wild game, makes sausage, 5B


UNION COUNTY


USPS 648-200 LAKE BUTLER, FLORIDA


THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013


1131251
P.K. YOUNGER
UNVOF E
"xxv ovG Zt
PO Box I17007
GAINESVL0LE

AlAI


UC 10
IBRARy 010
L 32611 1

mono. -7007


101sT YEAR 22ND ISSUE 75 CENTS


New UC clerk of courts serves many clients


But Kellie Connell
calls people of Union
County her boss

BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN
Times Editor

The idea of Kellie Connell serving
in public office actually came from a
client and friend who suggested she
was qualified for the role of Union
County clerk of court.


And, of course, it was available
thanks to the retirement of Regina
Parrish who had served in the role for
20 years.
In fact, Parrish is one of three long-
term county officials who retired before
last year's election due to changes in
state retirement rules that didn't make it
viable for them to stay in office.
That opened up seats that had been
Filled by them for two decades or
more-clerk of court, tax collector,
and judge-and an active campaign
season last fall was evidence of that.


After. her friend's suggestion,
Connell researched the role and
decided that she, too, would be a good
fit while offering her the opportunity
to use her education and background to
serve the county.
As a certified public accountant
with accounting degrees from the
Universities of Florida (bachelor's)
and North Florida (master's), Connell
worked for Michael Metzler, CPA, PA,
in Gainesville for 13 years before being
elected to office. She also ,provided
bookkeeping services for private clients.


In spite of all that preparation and
experience, she said this new role in
public office is "very different," which
is perhaps an understatement.
"The responsibility of the job and
the idea that the buck stops with me,
that the responsibility 'is ultimately on
my shoulders" is the biggest challenge,
Connell said.
But that might be nothing compared
to the campaign to get her there.
"It was very. stressful, it was very
See CONNELL, 3A


Assisted living facility



coming to Lake Butler


It's


the result of a vision


BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN
-Times Editor
- "I'm basically here to announce that
Lake Butler Senior Living has become a
reality, rather than a dream," developer
Maggi Wetzel told the crowd at Lake
Butler Rotary on Tuesday. She also serves
"as the club's secretary.
This was one of many presentations
she's recently made on the planned
assisted living facility to gather support
and let everyone know the status of this
important project.
-- The ALF will be built on a 9.5-acre
parcel next to the elementary school-a
pecan grove bordering the west side on
S.R. 121. The official address is 930 SW
Sixth Street, Lake Butler.
It will be built approximately 700 feet
from the highway for noise abatement,
S andas many pecai trees as possible will
Sbe saved.
? The project is owned by a non-
profit corporation, Lake Butler Senior
S- Living,k LLC; being developed by Union
Development,& Management, Inc.; and
will be managed by Vantage Management
with 30 years of experience:
Construction will be handled by
S DeVere Construction Company, Inc.-a
40-year-old national firm that has the size
and strength necessary to put up the $9-
10 million bond required for this type of
Construction project.
When completed, it will be the
culmination of a vision born through
personal trial.
In 1998, Wetzel was diagnosed with
multiple sclerosis, or MS, and told she
would be in a wheelchair within two years.
"Knock on wood, I'm still functioning,"
Wetzel said.
Her dear friend, Cassa Neta Herndon,
assisted three seniors for a time and
together they realized there was a major
S- need in Union County.
H'endon is the procurement director
for the city of Lake, Butler and a board
member, and serves as its executive
secretary.
Wetzel's business partner, Dr. Wayne
Sinclair, learned that his father had been
mistreated while in the care of an ALF.


born from personal trials


"So it became personal for all three of
us," Wetzel said.. They began embarking
,on this project two years ago.
Other board members include area
leaders: Dr. Marvin Johnson, chairman;
Dr. Bill Leanon; executive director; Union
County Sheriff Jerry Whitehead; Spires
IGA Owner Tommy Spires; Union County
Commissioner Wayne Smith and Lake
Butler City Councilman Fred Sirmones.
The board is fully insured and
protected.
Doug Reddish is the certified public
aGcountant and secretary for Lake Butler
Senior Living, LLC.
Wetzel said the application process is
daunting, with 450-500 page documents
required along with revision after revision,
but it's worth it.
Approximately 10 years ago, a Lake
Butler city council member tried to
start an ALF. At that time, 75 elderly
citizens were being transported to other
communities such as Starke, Lake City
and Gainesville.
Along with its residents, Union County
lost that revenue as well.
Lake Butler Senior Living would allow
them to stay close to home.
The 60-bed facility will be a single-
level southern style building with two
sections covering a total area of nearly
60,000 square feet. One side will have
private and semi-private 45 beds for
residents and the other will have 15 beds
for memory care, or dementia, specially
equipped for those patients.
Each wing will have its own open
courtyard, which Wetzel said is unusual.
"Dementia will be kind of a lockdown,
but they'll have their own courtyard."
Amenities will include walking and
wheelchair tracts, exercise and stretching
stations, physical therapy with supervision
in the fitness center, recreation, computers
with weekly instruction, wireless access,
a formal dining room and more.
And the ALF will be affordable.
Three-fourths of the units will be
targeted to households at or below 60
percent of the area median income level.
At the City of Lake Butler's May 13
meeting,' two letters were read in support
of the facility.


One was from Mayor Lonnie Norman,
which stated, "There is currently a shortage
of quality affordable housing for our most
venerable elderly residents. The proposed
ALF will help to address this need."
Senator Bill Nelson also wrote in
support, saying, "The goal of this project
is to create a facility housing 60 bed-units,
45 assisted living units and 15 dementia
units in order to serve the area's aging
community. Lake Butler Senior Living,
Inc. seeks to keep local family and
friends close as they age and to allow
them to stay in their community. I hope
you will give this application appropriate
consideration."
The full cost of the project is $13
million, which will come mostly from
investors who are already lined up.
The facility will create anywhere from
35 to 42 part-time and full-time jobs,
including ones for those who are highly
skilled and experienced.
In fact, Wetzel said they already have a
list of proposed employees for the facility.
"Everyone wants the convalescent
center. I want the convalescent center,"
said Lake Butler City Manager Dave
Mecusker.
Wetzel is hoping many others agree as
with him as word spreads.
"It has been a personal, longtime dream
for me," Wetzel said, who hopes to break
ground soon. "I'm so close I can feel the
dates."

ABOVE: Building perspectives for
the ALF planned for Lake Butler.
BELOW:Developer Maggi Wetzel
shares details of the project at
Lake Butler Rotary.

lb A
S I '.


-,- .a a


Lake Butler Stop-N-Go

armed robbery suspect

caught within minutes


On Sunday, 1:51 p.m., a black
male 'entered the front door of
the Lake Butler Stop-N-Go,
located at 730 E. Main Street in
Lake Butler to commit an armed
robbery of the business.
The suspect entered wearing
a black mask and black jacket
and demanded money from the
store clerk..Witnesses stated .the
suspect flashed a small firearm.
The suspected was in the store
less than 20 seconds and departed
back out the front door with an
undisclosed amount of money
running southwest toward the
area behind Badcock Furniture.
The store clerk immediately
pressed the burglary alarm and
the first deputy arrive on scene
within seconds. The on scene
deputy gave suspect description
out to other units that arrived
within a minute to search the
area. Union County Sheriff's
Deputy Donnie Jones found the
suspect at S.W. Fifth Avenue and
S.E. Second Street immediately
after releasing the suspect
description. From the time the
crime was committed, to arrest
was less than four minutes.
Florida Department of
Corrections K-9 team and Florida
Highway Patrol assisted with
the search for evidence that the
suspect may have thrown or
dropped. Evidence found included
his black jacket and clothing.
The suspect later admitted that
the gun seen by. witnesses was
actually his silver cell phone he
flashed around to fool people.


Are you ready to
shop for health
insurance?

BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

One of the key elements of the
federal health care reform law
will soon be open to the public.
The federal Health InsUrance


The suspect, Calvin L. Hill
Jr, is a 17-year-old, 5'10" black
male from Gainesville and was
arrested for armed robbery with
a firearm (1st degree felony)
and felony larceny (3rd degree
Felony). There was no vehicle
used and no known accomplices
at this time. The suspect was
interviewed ,by UCSO's Major
Garry Seay and confessed
to this crime and stated his
involvement in another armed
robbery in Mayo. Investigators
from Lafayette County Sheriff's
Office came and interviewed the
suspect on his involved in their
crime.
After multiple interviews by
both sheriff's offices, the suspect
was turned over to Department
of Juvenile Justice.
Evidence recovered from
suspect includes cash from the
armed robbery, backpack, cell
phone and a black mask.
This crime was solved due to
the quick action on both the store
clerk/witnesses and responding
law enforcement units.
If anyone has any further
information concerning this
crime or any other crime they
are encouraged to contact the
Union County Sheriff's Office at
386-496-250.1.

ABOVE: The Lake Butler
Stop-N-Go was robbed on a
rainy Sunday afternoon.
BELOW: Evidence gathered
from the armed robbery.


Marketplace is set to debut on Oct. 1.
The marketplace will be
accessible through the website
www.healthcare.gov, established
as an information portal for
those seeking answers about the
Affordable Care Act.
The health care law requires
most adults to obtain insurance
to cover their health care either
on their own or through -their
See INS, 2A


DEADLINE MONDAY 5 P.M. BEFORE PUBLICATION PHONE 386-496-2261
,+^


IlLIJC tl ILUN 0!JO L.lW|j .gAJUJ.IOM/UN IONO


* FAX 386-496-2858


6 811111


U3869 2


I







2A UNION COUNTY TIMES THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013


Calling all former
UCHS band members
Attention all former
members of the Union
County High School band:
The 3rd Annual Alumni
Band E% ent will be on Nov. 1.
Regardless of age,
instrument, or ability ,
each former members is
encouraged to be part of
this Near's alumni band.
The) will participate in the
"Past, Present, and Future"
halftime show to be held on
Fri., No\. 1, Tiger Stadium.
The "past" is alumni,
the "present" is the current
Spirit of Union County
Tiger Marching Band, and
the "future" is the 7th grade
band along 'ith the little
Tigerettes from Lake Butler
Elementary' School and
Lake Butler Middle School.
Last 3ear, oer 200 people
participated on the field
during halftime. The goal
is to make this Near even
bigger, which means more
alumni need to come.
They will also ha'e an
opportunity to plan with
the band in the stands, or if
they prefer, sit in a reserved
section to reconnect with
former band mates.
For more information
contact Chris Hopkins. class
of 1990, at 904-263-8336 or
chrisryche@yahoo.com.
Or visit the band website at
www.unioncountyband.com
for registration information.
To stay in touch % ith current
alumni band events. % isit the
Facebook page at "Union
Count High School Band
SAlumni."












4-H registration
deadline is Sept. 30
Any student interested in
being a part of 4-H this Near
must register by Mon., Sept. 30.
For more information
call Colan Coody at
386-496-4263 or visit
lhttp://union.ifas.ufl.edu. The
Union County Extension
office is located at 25 N.E.
First Street in Lake Butler.


On Wed., Sept. 18, Union
County residents reported seeing
a suspicious vehicle around S.W.
First Way and S.W. Eighth Place
in the Westside Park area behind
Spires IGA store. Witnesses
stated the vehicle was a tan-
colored SUV and driving slowing
possibly watching children.
Shortly after calling the


INS
Continued from 1A


employer, who might also be
required to offer coverage.
You can shop for insurance
through the Health Insurance
Marketplace if you don't have
it, or if you are covered, you can
shop for another plan.
The marketplace can help
you determine if your income
entitles you to lower cost coverage,
compare options and get signed up.
Private insurance companies
offer the coverage available in the
Health Insurance Marketplace;
.deciding what plans to offer and
what they will cost. They are
certified by the marketplace and
the states in which they are offered.
A range of prices will be
available. Plans are divided into
four tiers: bronze, silver, gold and
platinum. Plans in the bottom
bronze tier will offer the lowest
monthly cost, or premium, but the
out-of-pocket costs paid when you
receive care-your deductible,
copayment or coinsurance-will
be higher. Platinum plans offer
the opposite, higher monthly
premiums in exchange for lower
deductibles and copayments
on hospital visits, prescription
medicine, etc. The other plans
will fall in the middle.
Accordingtowwwi1ealthcare.gov,
all of the plans will offer the
same essential benefits and the
tiers do not reflect the quality or
amount of care provided.
While Florida isn't expanding
its Medicaid coverage, submitting
an application through the
marketplace can help you discover
if you qualify for Medicaid based
on your income and family size
under the current rules.
Even if you don't qualify. .for
Medicaid, you may qualify for
lower monthly premiums based
on your income and family size.
Those savings come in the form
of the Advanced Premium Tax
Credit that will be applied directly
to monthly costs so the savings
are immediately realized.
You will generally be eligible
if you and your family fall
within the following ranges. The
lower the income, the higher the
savings.
$11,490 to $45,960 for
individuals.
$15,510 to $62,040 fdr a
family of two.
$19,530 to $78,120 for a
family of three.
$23,550 to $94,200 for a
family of four.
$27,570 to $110,280 for a
family offive.


T H In UC, suspicious
S,0 T vehicle goes viral


* $31,590 to $126,360 for a
family of six.
* $35,610 to $142,440 for a
family of seven.
* $39,630 to $158,520 for a
family of eight. i
You need not be alone in
making a decision. The Health
Insurance Marketplace will offer
online answers, online chat, or
you can call 1-800-318-2596 24
hours a day, seven days a week.
There is also a directory at
www.healthcare.gov to look
for local help. The only agency
currently listed after, a search
for the 32091 zip code is the
WellFlorida Council located in
Gainesville. After Oct. 1, they
will be offering application
assistance, including language
assistance. The main number is
352-313-6500. The email listed
isjfeller@wellflorida.org.
Health Insurance Marketplace
open enrollment starts Oct. .1,
2013, and ends March 31, 2014.
Coverage can begin as soon as
Jan. 1,2014, which is when many
of the benefits and protections
of the Affordable Care Act
like coverage for preexisting
conditions take effect.

Guidance for
businesses, too

The marketplace is not just
for individuals and families.
Businesses with 50 or fewer
full-time employees who want
to offer an insurance benefit can
also shop for plans through, a
section called the Small Business
Health Options Program.
Employers will be able to
compare plans, control how
much of their employees'
premiums they pay and the
coverage offered,. and ,. get.
information on the health care
tax credits available to small
businesses. These will only be
available to qualifying small
businesses that utilize the
Small Business Health Options
Program beginning in 2014.
There is also the option
of using an agent or broker,
including your existing broker,
to go through the process at no
additional charge.
Self-employed individuals
with no employees will still use
the marketplace for individuals
and families. Businesses with
up to 100 full-time employees
will become eligible to use the
Small Business Health Options
Program in 2016.
You can begin getting ready
for Oct. 1 now by gathering
the following information: your


Unton county ,imez

USPS 648-200
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3,1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
UNION COUNTY TIMES
125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054

(386) 496-2261
John M. Miller, Publisher


Subscription-Rate in Trade Area
$39,00 per year:
$20.00 six months ,
Outside Trade Area:
$39.00 per year:
$20.00 six months


Editor:
Sports Editor:
Advertising:
Typesetting:
Advertising and
Newspaper Prod.
, Classified Adv.
Bookkeeping:


Vincent AIk Brown
Cliff Smelley
Kevin Miller
Darlene Douglass
Eileen Gilmore
Earl W. Ray
Mary Johnson
Joan Stewart-Jones


Union County Sheriff's Office,
investigators and patrol units
stopped a vehicle matching the
description still in the same area
and made contact with a 48-year-
old white male that stated he was
just driving around the area. A
search of his vehicle did not reveal
anything suspicious or illegal.
Investigation and interviews
over the next few days revealed
that the suspicious vehicle/driver
never spoke to any children
anywhere within Union County


employer identification number;
your tax identification; the
number of employees you have;
and the birthdate information
for all of your employees and
their dependents if you plan on
offering dependent coverage.
Businesses can call 1-800-
706-7893 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday with
questions about the program.

Why buy health
coverage?

A contract to buy health
coverage is meant to guarantee
that you will have assistance in
paying your bills if you become
sick or injured. According
to www.healthcare.gov, the
average three-day hospital stay
costs $30,000. A health plan can
help'protect you from bills that
high and even promise you an
out-of-pocket maximum on what
you pay.
In addition to the creation of the
Health Insurance Marketplace,
beginning next year insurance
companies won't be able to
deny coverage or charge more
to individuals who are sick or
have preexisting conditions (that
does not apply to grandfathered
insurance plans that existed
before March 23, 2010). Women
also cannot be charged tMore
than men, and coverage cannot
be canceled because someone
gets sick, even if they are covered
by a grandfathered plan.
Young adult coverage has
been expanded up to those 26


or Lake Butler area. Within 24.
hours of the traffic stop, Facebook
posters stated a fictitious story
about a possible attempted child
abduction that occurred warning
everyone in Union County about
this incident. Posters attempted
to link it to another report of a
suspicious vehicle that occurred
weeks earlier in Raiford.
In both cases the sheriff's
office would like to commend
and applaud active neighborhood
watch groups for seeing the


years of age. They can continue
to be covered under their
parents' plan even if they are in
school, move away from home,
get married, are financially
independent, etc.
The law guarantees insurance
companies will provide
customers with an easy-to-
understand summary about-
a health plan's benefits and
coverage. Rate increases of 10
percent or more will have to be
publicly justified, and companies
are required to spend at least 80
percent of the money received
from premiums to pay medical
claims or improve care. If they


suspicious vehicle. They report
that no crime has been committed
but one never knows what crime
is avoided by calling in any and
all suspicious behavior. It is the
community responsibility to
continue to work together and
report any suspicious behavior.
UCSO takes all calls seriously
and will respond to any and all
suspicious person or vehicle calls.
Also in the event that a serious
emergency happened, such,
as a child abduction, UCSO


NOTING


A short drive to Macclenny could SAVE you Plenty!
MACCLENNY MOWER AND SAW, INC.
821-A South 6th Street, Macclenny, FL 32063
Tel: 904-259-2248
Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30am 5;30pmr Sat 8:00am 3:00pmr Sunday Closed
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WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS.
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--- -~ U U U U U U U~ U U U U U U U


Attention Residents of Union County



Agency for Health Care Administration Secretary

Liz Dudek and Senator Charlie Dean are hosting a public

meeting to discuss Agency priorities and programs.



October 1st at 11 am

Hal Maines Community Center

155 NW 3rd Street in Lake Butler


mRHSS .


Attorney at Law
275 West Main Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054
(Suwannee Medical Building)

386"4959656 12 Year's Experience.- Admitted to State and Federal bar (M and S. Dist.)
Probate Family Deeds Wills Adoption Litigation Corporate


PUBLIC NOTICE
CONCERNING FAIR HOUSING
On January 20, 1992, the Board of County Commissioners of Union County, Florida
adopted Ordinance No.,91-07, which established the policy of the County.to promote
equal opportunity to obtain adequate housing by all persons, regardless of race, color,
religion, ancestry, sex, marital status, familial status, age, handicap or national origin.
These ordinances are available for public inspection at the Office of the Board of County
Commissioners, located at 15 NE 1st Street, Lake Butler, Florida, Monday through Friday
between the lHours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M. *
Any aggrieved person may file a complaint of a housing discrimination act with the:
Florida Commission on Human Relations
2009 Apalachee Parkway, Suite 100
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
Toll-free Telephone: 1.800.342.8170
or
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 451 7th Stree(, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20410
Toll-free Telephone: 1.800.669.9777
To request information or assistance locally, you may contact James Tallman, Chair, at the
County Offices or telephone 386.496.4241.
FAIR HOUSING COORDINATOR, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
COORDINATOR AND AMERICAN DISABILITIES ACT COORDINATOR
For questions about -Fair Housing, Equal Employment Opportunities and/or Section 504
procedures regarding thie Americans with Disabilities Act, please contact James Talman,
Chair, at the County Offices or telephone 386.496.4241, who serves as the Coordinator
for Fair Housing, Equal Employment Opportunity and Section 504, and Americans with
Disabilities Act.


would send out a CODE-RED.-
telephone emergency. to the -
neighborhood or area, or county- ,
wide if needed., CODE-RED.,.
would call your home phone,,,
or cell phone, if registered, and
report the necessary emergency ,
information. Find-out more at..
www.unionsheriff.us and click.,'
on the link for "CODE RED." .
Report any criminal behavior "
to UCSO at 386-496-2501 or....
anonymously to First Coast Crime ,.
Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS (8477)..:;


do not, customers are entitled to,,.
rebates. Companies also cannot'
set lifetime coverage limits for
essential health benefits, and
beginning in 2014, annual limits
are also prohibited.
Doctors are chosen from the
pool available through your
health plan's provider network,
but you cannot be charged more
if you have to use an out-of-
network emergency room.
Many plans are required to
offer free preventive care, such
as screening for blood pressure
and cholesterol, mammograms,
colonoscopies, etc. That also
includes vaccines.






THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 UNION COUNTy TIMES 3A


CONNELL
Continued from 1A

Tough on my family," she said.
"But at the same time I enjoyed
meeting new people."
'In spite of growing up in Union
County as part of a farming
family, she was surprised at how
many people she didn't know
here.
Overall it was a good campaign
experience, with little in the way of
rumor or personal attacks. "I was
pleasantly surprised," she said.
She won by 355 votes, a margin
of 53 to 47%, which many people
told Connell was not close, but


she thinks it was "way too close
for comfort.
"I felt like I was not the favored
candidate going into the race,"
she remembered. "My goal was
to win, I didn't care if it was one
vote or a thousand."
Her husband of 10 years stood
by her side, as did her three boys:
Tanner, 7, Judd, 4, and Tripp, 2.
Her husband Jeremy works for
Clay Electric as a substation.
technician out its Keystone
Heights office.
And she had the support
of the Lake Butler Church of
Christ where they attend. As
a lifelong member she has
taught Sunday School there and


assisted the church treasurer with
bookkeeping functions.
Connell's service goes beyond
church and into the community-
namely as event and accounting
chair, both of them twice, for
the American Cancer Society's
Relay for Life since it started in
Lake Butler in 2008.
And, again, her family was
there all the way-quite literally.
The first time Connell chaired
the event, she gave birth to one
of her children during the week
preceding it.
"Because I cannot walk away
from a job undone"',she wrote in
here official "intention to run"
letter published in the Union


County Times, "I followed
through with last-minute details
via telephone from the hospital.
"When Jeremy and I brought
the baby home, we settled in
and went to Relay for Life that
evening. I wanted to make sure
the event was successful."
That kind of passion drives
Connell in her newly elected
position, who was surprised by the
number of responsibilities she now
has. This includes clerk of court;
recording and official records;
pre-auditor and comptroller of
county funds; and clerk to the
board of county commissioners.
"Four major duties," she
concluded.
Adding to that workload is
a nomination by the Florida
Clerks of Court Operations
Corporation to its finance
and budget committee, which
"has turned into a huge
responsibility,"' especially for
being the only new clerk to the
organization, and only one new
to a clerk's office, period.
With, enough on her plate,
she might have begged off,
but she was "voluntold." The
organization wanted someone
from a small county to represent
the small counties, and they
liked her background supported
by a CPA license.
In early August Connell was
appointed to a two-year term
to the board of directors for
the North Florida Economic
Development Partnership.
The new roles and their
requisite duties pale in
comparison to her decision to
run for the job in Union County.
"When I decide to do it,
I decide to do it," Connell
said. "When I put my mind to
something, it's gonna happen.
"A lot of it was the county
politics," she said, "and my
desire to keep the clerk's office
to be the financial officer
and not be involved in county
policymaking."
By ,that she means that
she wanted to support the
county commissioners in
their policymaking decisions,
supporting them through
'financial guidance and spelling
out the impacts of. those
decisions.
Without hesitation- she calls
the people of Union County her
boss.
At the highest level, her
constituents include, of course,
County Judge Bo Bayer and the
county commissioners, plus the
circuit judges who come from
Gainesville, and the CCOC,
whose primary responsibility is
to oversee the budgets of the 67


clerk's offices across the state.
She also answers to the state
in regard to following its statutes.
Judge Bayer described Connell
as the new kid on the block, but
said she's "doing a great job."
It's no surprise, then, that it all
the adds up to many demands.
"I tell my husband my job's to
put out fires all day long," she
said, laughing. "That's why I
work late; it's the only time I get
work done."
Connell has 11 people on her
staff helping her succeed. One of
those brings a new facet to the
office: Chief Financial Officer
Justin Stankiewicz.
He comes from DDF CPA
Group, the firm that provided the
county's most recent financial
audit. At the June 17 county
board meeting, Connell said that
"he knows the county's finances
probably better than anyone
and he does have the ability to
produce this big fat book (the
county's financial audit report).
He's going to save the county
a good chunk of change in our
future audit contract."
Connell hired him to fill a
vacant position and strengthen
the support of that role.
"When I received his resume, I
knew it was a good fit," she said.
"But from working with him
as the auditor (or the county's
financial statements), I kind'of
got the feeling that we thought
the same way, we had the same
views as what constituted a
public purpose for use of funds
in the office.
"We had the same ideas of
how government money should
be spent, how government money
should be budgeted.
"I would say the same
conservative views."
Stankiewicz was also an
outsider to the community, which
Connell saw as an advantage. "He
would not be as compelled to get
into the politics of carelessness."
SHissixyearsofpublicaccounting
has been in governmental audits,
so Connell feels that he is well-
prepared for the job.
But he' hasn't been the only
major change inher office so far.
In 2005, the state legislature
voted that the court system
would be funded at the state
level, including clerk's office
employees, so about seven-and-
a-half of her employees are paid
by the state through a budget set
by the CCOC. Effective June
I1; the funding was changed,
dramatically as to how the
clerk's offices are funded-in
a very. good way, she said. And
through serving on the CCOC's
finance and budget committee,


NOTICE OF




PROPOSED TAX INCREASE




The Union County Board of County Commissioners has

tentatively adopted a measure to increase its property tax

levy.


Last year's proposed tax levy:


A. Initially proposed tax levy.... 2........ ,189,929

B. Less tax reduction due to Value Adjustment

Board and other assessment changes......... $ 24 858

C.Actual property tax levy...................... 265071




This year's proposed tax levy..................... $2,199391


All concerned citizens are invited to attend a public hearing

on the tax increase'to be held on:


DATE: Friday, September 27,2013

TIME: 5:30 P.M.
PLACE: Union County Courthouse

Board of County Commissioners Meeting

Room. 55 West Main Street, Room 101

TOWN: Lake Butler, Florida



A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the

budget will be made at this hearing.


e. "........... C or ,,..4
.. ..... ..... SO A0 1 "!
APPIO.COT


386-755-4328


Located in Providence
(12 miles west of Lake Butler)


she's had a major role in how that
state legislation is enacted.
Not bad for a freshman.
On Jan. 8, Connell was sworn
in with two fellow officials who
took over for incumbents who
had also held their posts for two
decades or more: Lisa Johnson
was elected to the office of
County Tax Collector that Patsy
Elixson served in for 24 years;
and Bo Bayer filled the seat of
County Judge David Reiman who
served on the bench for 29 years.
As the county worked on
preparing a budget for the
coming year and trying to
resolve a shortfall, Connell and
Stankiewicz have worked together
to assist the commissioners.
"We've looked at the budget
last year, expenditures to date, and
have cut the things that we see can
be cut" Connell said. Additional
cuts were still needed, but she gave
the commissioners their options
so they could decide on those.
That's because revenue-wise,
the county doesn't have a lot of
choices. Tax roles have gone up
only incrementally because there
is very little new development
across the county.
But the county will collect
more from its EMS billings.
She mentioned that many
counties have some major
highways from which they
receive revenue through traffic
tickets. Columbia County has
Interstates 75 and 10, Baker.
has 1-10, Bradford has U.S.
301. A lot of the money from
speeding tickets that the Florida
Highway Patrol writes goes to
the respective counties-and it's
revenue from outsiders.
"We don't have a lot of through
traffic," she observed. "There's a.
county in West Florida, only a
little larger than Union County,
where their fines are a $25,000 a
month; ours are $1,500 to $2,000
a month."
She also noted that Union is
the smallest county in the state
and so there is not much of a land
base to tax, and much of that land
is owned by the state.
"So we really kind of start
behind the eight ball," Connell
said, "just because of some
very weird dynamics of Union
County."
The county does get a lot
of grants and some "fiscally
constrained county money," she
said. "We search out any grant
that we're, applicable for."
Between' helping the county
commissioners make ends meet to
serving her many constituents, how
does she like this new phase in her
life-a second career, as it were?
"It's very overwhelming, but
I'm very happy in the job, yes."
She said she "absolutely" made
the right choice. "I'm getting a
handle on it."
She thinks she's been well
received by those she serves,
and credits being "blessed with a
great staff" to help her navigate
the waters. .
The job is very different than:
working for the accounting firm,
she observed, where preparing
someone's taxes and filing them
brought the satisfaction 'of a
completed project.
In the role of clerk of court,
"it's ongoing. Nothing ever gets
finished.".
And "it's way more hours," but
the family is adjusting.
For more information or
to contact the Union County
Clerk of Court office,
call 386-496-3711 or visit
www.unionclerk.com.


Brafor ContyTelgI


SSMITH & SON'S
FEED AND SEED


BUDGET SUMMARY

UNION COUNTY FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE UNION COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS ARE 8.92% MORE THAN LAST YEARS TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES

SPECIAL
GENERAL REVENUE
FUND FUNDS TOTALS
Cash Balance Brought Forward $86,000 $2,082,192 $2,168,192

ESTIMATED REVENUE:
TAXES MILLAGE PER 1,000
Ad Valorem 10.000 $2,141,600 $0 $2,141,600
Ad Valorem (VOTED) 0.500 0$0 $109,533 $109,533
Other Taxes $475,377 $796,351 $1,271,728
Licenses & Permits .$48,000 $494,720 $542,720
Intergovernmental Revenue $2,352,090 $3,681,122. $6,033,212
Charges for Services $29,300 $1,008,485 $1,037,785
Fines and Forfeiture $0. $54,900 $54,900
Miscellaneous Revenue $89,900 $80,150 $170,050
SUBTOTAL $5,136,267 $6,225,261 $11,361,528
Less 5% of Estimated Revenue -$256,813 -$133,088 -$389,901
Other Financing Sources $364,272 $884,846 $1,249,118
Total Revenue & Other Financing Sources $5,243,726 $6,977,019 $12,220,745
total Estimated Revenue & Balances $5,329,726 $9,059,211 $14,388,937

EXPENDITURES AND OTHER FINANCING USES: $ $ $5397
General Fund $5,329,726 $0 $5,329,726
Special Revenue Funds $0 $7,640,639 $7,640,63,
Total Expenditures and Other Financing Uses- $5,329,726 $7,640,639 $12,970,365
Reserve for.Cash Balance $0 $1,418,572 $1,418,572
Total Appropriated Expenditures & Other Financing Uses $5,329,726 $9,059,211 $14,388,937,

THE TENTATIVEADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 0 UNION COUNTy TIMES


3A





4A UNION COUNTY TIMES THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013


Lake Butler Hospital offering flu shot clinic in October
Lake Butler Hospital will be offering "Getting the flu vaccine is very high fever/chills, cough, heac
a flu shot clinic every Tuesday and important, especially for those at extreme tiredness, dry cough,
Thursday in October from 11 a.m. high risk," said Susan Rowe, ARNP, throat, runny or stuffy nose and n
to 2 p.m. The flu shot costs $25. at Lake Butler Family and Pediatric aches. High-risk individuals
Some insurance, including Medicare, Clinic. "The CDC reports that over above) who get the flu are at a g
Medicaid, BOBS and AvMed cover the the six years from 2005 to 2011, flu risk of being hospitalized due to


Townsend family to share history
The Union Countl Historical Societi) will resume meetings, after a summer
break, b\ hosting the J.W. To% nsend family\ as the) share the history\ of their
family and home.
Sandra Langley T\re righti and Gale Langle\ Cules i left, current oners of
the To% nsend House. \ ill lead the presentation on Men., Sept. 30. at 7:00 p.m.
T\re has a business office in the old Townsend House. located on S.W Fourth
Ave. in Lake Butler, and has researched its histor..
The program coincides %%ith the 92nd birthday\ of Union County, whichh is
being celebrated the nemt day, Oct. I, at the Linion Counti Public Librar.. (See
article belo\\..
Prior to the Historical Society presentation, the board of directors \ ill meet
at 6:00 p.m. A slate of officers % ill be recommended bN the board and presented
to the society for election at the October meeting.
The Historical Society is located in the Townsend-Ureen Building and
Museum (the old drug store) at 410 W. Main Street in Lake Butler.


cost of the shot.
The Center for Disease
Control recommends
getting a flu shot as soon
as it .is available. Although
flu activity usually peaks in
January or February, cases
can be reported as early as
October and as late as May.
According to the CDC
anyone six months and
older should get a flu
vaccine each year. This


Accord
to the
anyor
month
older s
get a
vacc
each


recommendation has been in place
since February 2010. They especially
urge those, who are at high risk for flu-
related complications to get the shot.
These persons include the following:
all children. aged six months to five
years; all persons aged 50 and older;
adults and children who have chronic
pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal,
hepatic, neurological, hematologic, or
metabolic disorders; persons who are
immune compromised; women who are
or will be pregnant during flu season;
residents of nursing homes and long-term
care facilities; American Indians/Alaska
Natives; persons who are morbidly
obese; healthcare personnel; and those
who live with or care for persons at high
risk for flu-related complications.


vaccination prevented an
estimated 13.6 million flu
rding cases, 5.8 million medical
CDC visits and nearly 113,000
ie six flu-related hospitalizations
is and in the United States."
sa, ~Side effects from the
shouldd shot are mild for most
a flu people and many don't
:ine report any. Side effects may
year. include soreness, redness or
Swelling where the shot was
given, hoarseness or cough,
fever, headache, itching and fatigue. If
these problems occur they usually begin
soon after the shot and last a maximum
of one to two days.
The CDC reports it's not possible to
get the flu from the flu shot because it
does not contain live flu virus.
Many states, including Florida,
.have seen a high number of flu cases
reported during recent flu seasons.
Good health habits like covering your
nose and mouth when you cough or
sneeze, washing your hands often,
getting plenty of sleep, being physically
active, managing your stress, drinking
plenty of fluids, and eating nutritious
food can all help protect you from
getting the flu.
Symptoms of the flu often include


complications such as pneumonia.
If you have symptoms you' shljould
see your doctor, even if you've had
the flu shot. There are medications
available that can help lessen the mn4
and severity of sickness if you'tackle it
early on.
If you need a pediatric flu shot or
are an adult unable to make it during
the times of the flu shot clinic, Lake
Butler Family and Pediatric Clinic will
offer them for $25 on Monday through
Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (closed
noon to 1:00 p.m.) throughout flu
season. No appointment is necessary.
The clinic is located at 575 SE Third
Ave. in Lake Butler and can be reached
at 386-496-1922. .
For more information on the flu
shot clinic being offered Tuesdays and
Thursday in October at Lake Butler
Hospital, please call 386-496-2323 or
stop by the information table set up at
the LBH's main entrance during flu
shot clinic hours.

LOWER LEFT: Employees at Lake
Butler Hospital got their flu shots
last week. Director of Nursing
Mandy Dicks gives Natasha
Green, RN, her flu shot.


, I-.


Library to
commemorate
Florida and UC
anniversaries'
On Tuesday, Oct. I. the LUinion
County Public LibrarN % ill
commemorate Florida's 500th
as well as Union Count.'s 92nd
anniversaries. The program %ill
begin at 6 p.m. with a stroll dm n
memory lane, followed by an
exciting performance of "The Real
Florida" by Matthew Sabatella.
(Learn more about Sabatella at
www.balladofamerica.com.)
In addition, the Union County
Historical Society has loaned items
from its museum to be on display.
,at the library. This free, program is
appropriate forthe entire family.
The library is located at 250 SE
Fifth Ave. iri Lake Butler. For more
information call 386-496-3432.


HAIR A
| Tue. thru Fri 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Satur
aura 352.283.4
YaheidR.-352.317.5432 A ,a, 04.7
Men Women Kis '
Cut: Color: Perm : Hi-Lite
SPECIAL: Men's Cut only $6 on Tuesdays
Located on CR-18, west of Worthington Springs, 4.2 miles from S&S Store


ABOVE: Main St. Lake Butler, early 1900s. TOP RIGHT:
Union Depot, Lake Butler. ABOVE RIGHT: Lake Butler
High School, built 1908.


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S. : .'. ..-. .- .- .-,.. ,, Ifr j
Your Photo Ad in 3 Weekly Papers M
covering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties plus a
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giveaway paper: The BirdDog Special
Email your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to:
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We'll help you design your ad cash/cheCk/credit cards accepted


BUDGET SUMMARY

Town of Worthington Springs Fiscal Year 2013-2014

The proposed operating budget expenditures of the Town of Worthington Springs
are the same as last year's total operating expenditures


General Fund


Cash Balances Brought Forward

Estimated revenues:
Taxes: Millage per $1,000
Ad Valorem Taxes -1.6622
Sales and Use Taxes
Franchise Fees
Intergovernmental Revenues
Licenses and Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Other Misc. Revenues

Total estimated revenues and other financing
sources

Cash Balances, revenues and other sources

Estimated
expenditures/expenses:
General Government
Public Safety,
Transportation
Parks and Recreation


Debt Service


Total estimated expenditures / expenses

Reserves for Contingencies

Total Estimated Expenditures and Reserves


$ 50,000



9,704
55,538
23,400
16,187
500
250
7.500

113,079

163&079



50,100
3,000
10,500
11,950


Total


- $ 50,000



9,704
55,538
23,400
16,187
500
250
7.500


163,079



.50,100
- 3,000
10,500
11,950


10,000 10,000


85,550


85,550


.77,529 77,529

$ 163,079 2 $63,079


NOTICE OF

BUDGET HEARING..

The TOWN OF WORTHINGTON SPRINGS has tentatively

Adopted a Budget for 2013-2014.
A Public hearing to make a TfDECISION on tI JfJDGET

And TAXES will be held on:

October 1,2013
7:30 pm
Community Building
Worthington Springs, Florida

A FINAL DECISION on the budget will be made at this hearing.


rd


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iache,
sore
muscle
(listed
;rgater
severe


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|







THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 UNION COUNTY TIMES 5A


BDGAMLA


UCT Legals 9/26/13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No: 63-2013-DR-143
.Joshua M. Lamb,
Petitioner
and
Edna L. Lamb,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Edna L. Lamb
4782 NW 177"1 St. Starke, FL 32091
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and that you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Joshua M.
Lamb 13057 SW 671' Way Lake But-
ler, FL 32054 on or before October
2, 2013, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court at Union County
Clerk of Court 55 W. Main St. room
103 Lake Butler, FL 32054 before
service on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a de-
fault may be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at. the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of you current
address. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law form'12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the
clerk's office.


WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure, re-
quires certain automatic disclosure of
documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions, in-
cluding dismissal or striking of plead-
ings.
Dated: August 27, 2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Carol Williams
Deputy Clerk
9/12 4tchg 10/3-UCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR UNION COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 63-2011-CA-000112
U.S. BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SUSAN B. FOLSOM; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SUSAN B. FOLSOM;
MICHAEL FOLSOM; IF LIVING,
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID DEFEN-
DANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUST-
EES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice ishereby given that, pursuant
to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-


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styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Union County, Florida, I will sell the
property situated in Union County,
Florida,. described as:
A parcel of land lying, being and situ-
ate in the Northwest 1/4 of Northwest
1/4 of Section 26, Township 5 South,
Range 20 East, Union County, Flor-
ida, more particularly described as
follows:
COMMENCE at the Northwest cor-
ner of said Section 26, and run North
8532'47" East along the North line
of said Section 26 a distance of
1326.31 feet to the Northeast corner
of said Northwest 14 of Northwest
1/4 of Section 26: thence run South
01 05'22".East, along the East line of
said Northwest 1/4 of Northwest 1/4
of Section 26, a distance of 906.17
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING
of the hereinafter described parcel
of land: Thence continue running
South 0105'22" East, continuing
along said East line of the Northwest
1/4 of Northwest 1/4 of Section 26, a
distance of 409.88 feet to the South-
east comer of said Northwest 1/4 of
Northwest 1/4 of Section 26; thence
run South 8542'09", West along the
South line of said Northwest 1/4 of
Northwest 1/4 of Section 26, a dis-
tance of 213.15 feet; thence run North
0105'22" West a distance of 409.88
feet: thence run North 8542'09"
East a distance of 213,15 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Subject to existing county land use
regulations, and to all easements of
record, or not of record. Together with
a 40 foot road easement for ingress,
egress and public utilities lying, being
and situate in the Northwest 1/4 of
Northwest 1/4, and in the Southwest
1/4 of Northwest 1/4 of the aforesaid
Section 26, Township 5 South, Range
20 East, Union County, Florida, more
particularly described as follows:
COMMENCE at the aforesaid North-
west corner of Section 26, and run
North 8532'47" East, along the
aforesaid North line of Section 26, a
distance of 539.85 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING of the hereinafter
described 40 foot road easement;
Thence continue running North
85032'47" East, continuing along said
North line of Section 26 a distance of
40.07 feet to the Northwest corner of
lands described in Official Records
Book 59, Page 84, Public Records
,of Union.County, Florida; thehce, run
South 01 "05'22" East along the West
line of said lands described in Official
Records Book 59, Page 84, Public
Records of Union County; Florida, a
distance, of 292.33 feet; Thence run
South 0715'35" West a distance
of 420.38 feet: thence run South
1616*26" East a distance of 166.29
feet; thence runSouth 3347'30" East
a distance of 307.09 feet; thence
run South 21"05'20" East a distance
of 181.17 feet; thence run South
01008'14" East a distance of 878.06
feet; thence run South 8542'09"
West a distance of 40.06 feet; thence
run North 0108'14" West a distance
of 582.16 feet to the Southeast corner
of lands described in Official Records
Book 179 Page 206, Public Records
of Union County, Florida; thence con-
tinue running North 0108'14" West,
along the East line of said lands, a
distance of 291.08 feet to the intersec-
tion with the North line of said South-
west 1/4 of Northwest 1/4 of Section
26; thence run North 2105'20" West
a distance of 169.68 feet; thence
run North 33047'30" West a distance
of 308.80 feet; thence run North
1616'25" West a distance of 180.79
feet; thence ran North 07015'35" East
a distance of 425.79 feet; thence run
North 0105'22" West a distance of
287.06 feetto the POINT OF BEGIN-
INING.
ALSO, TOGETHER WITH a 30 foot
road easement for ingress, egress


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and public utilities lying, being and
situate in the Northwest 1/4 of North-
west 1/4 of the aforesaid Section 26,
Township 5 South, Range 20 East,
Union County, Florida, more particu-
larly described as follows;
COMMENCE at the Northwest cor-
ner of said Section 26, and run North
8532'47" East, along the North line
of said Section 26, a distance of
1326.31,feet to the Northeast corner
of said Northwest 1A of Northwest
1/4 of Section 26: thence run South
0105'22" East along, the East line
of said Northwest 1/4 of Northwest
1/4 of Section 26, a distance of
1316.05 feet to the Southeast corner
of said Northwest 1/4 of Northwest
1/4 of Section 26; thence run South
8542'09" West, along the South
line of said Northwest 1/4 of North-
west 1/4 of Section 26, a distance of
213.15 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING of the hereinafter described 30
foot road easement: Thence continue
running South 8542'09" West, con-
tinuing along said South line of North-
west 1/4 of Northwest 1A of Section
26, a distance of 382.47 feet; thence,
run North 2105'20" West a dis-
tance of 31.34 feet; thence run North
85042'09" East a distance of 373.20
feet; thence run South 01 05'22" East
a distance of 30.05 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.
To include a:
2009 LIOH VIN LOHGA10911223A
0102794976
2009 LIOH VIN LOHGA10911223B
0102795033
A/K/A 11092 Ne 204th Ln, Lake But-
ler, FL 32054
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash. In. the lobby of the
Union County Courthouse, 55',W.
Main St., Lake Butler, FL 32054 at
11:00 a.m., on October 24, 2013.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens, must file a'
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 16" day of September,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By Crystal Norman
Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa,FL33619-1.328 ..,.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
(ADA) REQUESTS FOR ACCOM-
MODATIONS FOR NOTICE OF
COURT PROCEEDINGS:
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain as-
sistance., Please contact Ms. Jan
Phillips, ADA Coordinator, Alach-
ua County Family and Civil Justice
Center, 201 East University Avenue,
Room 410, Gainesville, FL 32601 at
(352) 337-6237 at least 7 days before
you." scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the sched-
uled appearance is less than 7 days;
if you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
If you are deaf or hard of hearing and
require an ASL interpreter or an as-
sisted listening device to participate
in a proceeding, please contact the
Court Interpreter Program at inter-
preter@circuit8.org
9/19 2tchg 9/26-UCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND


FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 63-2012-CA-000085
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS, CLINTON W., et al.
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu-
ant to an Order or Final Judgment
entered in Case No. 63-2012-CA-
000085 of -the Circuit Court of the
8TH Judicial Circuit in and for UNION
County, Florida, wherein, JPMOR-
GAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and, THOM-
AS, CLINTON W., et al., are Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash in the Courthouse lobby at
55 West Main Street, Lake Butler, FL
32054, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., on
the 12th day of December, 2013,
the following described property;
A parcel of land lying in the N 1/2 of
NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 19,
Township 5 South, Range 21 East,
Union County, Florida; said parcel
being more particularly described as
follows: Commence at the NW corner
of the N 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 of said Section 19 and run
South 00 10' 07" West, as a basis
of bearings, along the West line of
the N 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the SW
1/4, for a distance of 60.17 feet to the
Southerly R/W line of George Ander-
son Road; thence run North 85 49'
39" East, parallel with the North line
of said N 1/2 of NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 and
along said Southerly R/W line, for a
distance of 866.03 feet to the Point of
Beginning. From the Point of Begin-
ning thus described continue North
85 49' 39" East, along last said R/W
line, for a distance of 130.06 feet;
,thence run South 00 11' 39" West,
parallel with the East line of the N 1/2
of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4, for a
distance of 335.90 feet; thence run
South 85 49' 39" West, parallel with
said North line of N 1/2 of NW -1/4 of
SW 1/4, for a distance of 130.06 feet;
thence run North 00 11' 39" East,
parallel with said East line of N 1/2 of
NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, for a distance of
335.90 feet to a Point of Beginning.
Together with that Certain 1997 Shad
Doublewide Mobile Home with Vin#;s
FLA14611759A&B.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sate, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED this 16 day of Sept., 2013.
Kellie Hendricks Connell
Clerk of Courts
By: Crystal Norman
Deputy Clerk
GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain ps-
sistance* Please contact the Clerk
of the Court's disability coordinator
at 55 WEST MAIN STREET, LAKE
BUTLER, FL 32054 at least 7 days
before your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving
this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing or voice im-
paired, call 711.
9/19 2tchg 9/26-UCT

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO. 2013-CA-0020
CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES H. NORMAN, THERESA L.
NORMAN, UNKNOWN TENANT IN
POSSESSION and SECOND UN-
KNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
on the 24th day of October, 2013,
at 11:00 A.M. at. the Union County
Courthouse, 55 West Main Street,
Lake Butler, Florida, the undersigned
Clerk will offer for sale to the highest
bidder for cash the following real and
personal property more particularly
described as:
Situated in the County of Union and
State of Florida: commence at the
Northwest corner of the North 1/2 of
the Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast
1/4, Section 27, Township 4 South,
Range 21 East and run East 420 feet
and thence South 30 feet to a point
of beginning; thence continue South
105 feet, thence run East to the West
line of a county graded road, thence
run North approximately 105 feet
along said road to a point 30 feet
South of the North line of said forty,
thence run West approximately 526
feet to the point of beginning
TOGETHER WITH: all the improve-
ments now or hereafter erected on
the property, and all easements,
appurtenances, and fixtures now or
hereafter a part of the property.
The aforesaid sale will be made pur-
suant to the Final Judgment entered
in Civil No. 2013-CA-0020 now pend-
ing in the Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit in and for Union Coun-
ty, Florida,
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 16th day of September
2013.
Kellie Hendricks 'Connell
.Clerk of Court '
Crystal Norman
Deputy Clerk
Meredith L. Minkus, Esquire
Florida Bar No.: 41656
Burr & Forman LLP"
Email: mminkus@burr.com
200 S. Orange Avenue, Ste. 800
Orlando,FL 32801
Telephone: 407-540-6600
Fax:407-540-6601
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Under the Americans with Disabilities
Act, if you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceeding,'
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator
at (352) 337-6237, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court appear-
ance.
If you are hearing or voice impaired,
please call 711.
f you are deaf or hard of hearing and
require an ASL interpreter or an as-
sisted listening device to participate
in a proceeding, please contact Court
Interpreting at interpreter@circuit8.
org
.9/19 2tchg 9/26-UCT
LEGAL NOTICE
UNION COUNTY
TRANSPORTATION DISADVAN-
TAGED COORDINATING BOARD
MEETING
The North Central Florida Regional
Planning Council announces a pub-
lic meeting to which all persons are
invited.
DATE AND TIME: October 15,
2013 at 1:15 p.m.
PLACE: County Commissioners'
Meeting Room in the Union County
Courthouse located at 175 W. Main
Street, Lake Butler, Florida
GENERAL SUBJECT MATTER TO
BE CONSIDERED: To conduct the
regular business of the Union County
Transportation Disadvantaged Coor-
dinating Board.
A copy of the agenda may be ob-
tained by contacting: North Central
Florida Regional Planning Council,
2009 NW 67th Place, Gainesville,
Florida 32653-'1603.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommoda-
tions to participate in this meeting is
asked to advise the agency at least 2 '-
business days before the meeting by
contacting 352.955.2200. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, please
contact the agency using the Flori-
da Relay Service, 1.800. 955.8771
(TDD) or 1.800. 955.8770 (Voice).
If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with re-
spect to any matter considered at the
meeting, he/she will need to ensure .
that a verbatim, record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence from
which the appeal is to be issued.
9/26 itchg-UCT


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Contact us for all your mobile home nees, 3-494-2326
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Over 20years experience placing
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Truth
One reason the Bible is such a wonderful book is because it is
true. The Psalmist says of the word of God, "The entirety of
Your word is truth, and every one of Your righteous judgments
endures forever" (Psalm 119:160). Jesus states in His prayer to
God, "Sanilctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth" (John
17:17). The Bible is true when it comments upon historical,
scientific, and geographical matters. Most importantly, the Bible
is true when it comes to spiritual matters and its instructions on
how to be pleasing to God. In fact, the Bible is the only place
where we find out what God's will for us is (1 Corinthians 2:10-
13). Since the Bible is true, it is possible to know the truth (1
Timothy 2:4). By knowing and abiding in the truth, it is possible
to be set free from the bondage of sin (John 8:31-34).

Danville Church of Christ
8704 SW SR 121, Lake Butler, FL
386-496-3880 Email:
danvilleflchurchofchrist@yahoo.com
Bible Study at 9:00 AM on Sun and 7:30 PM on Wed
Worship at 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM on Sun.


Lake Butler Rotary adds

more members

Lake Butler Rotary recently welcomed new
members to the growing service club that meets
at First Christian Church every Tuesday at noon.
Lunch is provided, followed by a program.


LEFT: Rotary Past President Zack Smith welcomes
back former member Paul Lewis, manager and
co-owner of Union County's low power FM radio
station, WUCR 107.9.


RIGHT: Union Correctional Institution Warden
Diane Andrews gets some help with her Rotary pin
from Rotary Secretary Maggi Wetzel.






6A UNION COUNTY TIMES THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013


Victory Christian Center hosting
Family & Friends Day, Sept. 29
Victory Christian Center is hosting a "Family &
Friends Day" on Sunday, Sept. 29, at 11 a.m. They
invite all family and friends to come worship
and fellowship with them. Dinner will be served
after worship service.
The church is located. at 705 S.W. 6th
Street (on S.R. 121). in Lake Butler For more
information, contact them at 386-496-2115 or
vcclakebutler@aol.com or victorylakebutler.com.


UCI hosts legislative staff
Union Correctional Institution played host to
legislative staffers as well as staff members
from Central Office and the Region II Office on
Aug. 22. They spent the afternoon touring UCI's
unique and diverse facility, including Death Row,
a mental health inpatient dorm, one of the work
training programs offered to UCI inmates, one of
the confinement dorms and the re-entry/veterans
dorm.

TOP: Taking part in the tour were (back row, I-r)
Asst. Warden Stephen Rossiter, Lt. John Sandlin,
Major Stanley Peterson, Management Review
Specialist Scotti Vaughan, Operations and
Management Manager Tommy Maggitat, Attorney
with the House of Representatives Lauren Jones,


,MI




Providence Village Baptist
Church seeking vendors for
Ladies Expo I
Providence Village Baptist Church is seeking
.vendors for its sixth annual Ladies Expo on Nov.
2 from 9 a.m. till noon. Please contact Darlene
at the church on Tuesdays and Fridays at 386-
758-2040 or darlenelambsmith@gmail.com or
386-758-2040.. The deadline is Oct. 1.


Judiciary Committee Staff
Director Randy Havlicak,
Law Clerk at the Agency for
Health Care Administration
Paul Bennett, Col; Kevin
Box, Asst. Regional Director
Duane Spears, Legislative
Affairs Director Will
Kendrick (who serves as
chairman of the Committee
on Conservation and State
Lands in the Florida House
of Representatives). (Front
row, I-r) Regional Director
Eric Lane, Asst. Warden
David Maddox, Operations
and Management
Consultant Brittany Dover,
Staff Attorney with the
House of Representatives
Ryan Cox, Warden Diane
Andrews, Lt. Tina Morgan,
Classification Supervisor
Michael Davis, Major
Daniel Manning, Asst.
Classification Supervisor
Tommy Dicks, Sgt. Michael
Gillick.
ABOVE LEFT: Regional
Director Eric Lane and
Legislative Affairs Director
Will Kendrick (1-r, at left)
speak with Judiciary
Committee Staff Director
Randy Havlicak (right). Sgt.
Matthew Clemons speaks
with Region II Security and
Institutional Management
Warden Brian Riedl in the
background.


UCI welcomes
new addition
to leadership


Manning to lead new
work camp facility,
set to open in October
Union Correctional Institution
recently welcomed Major Daniel
Manning to its leadership team.
Manning will be supervising the
operation of the institution's new
work camp, which is scheduled
to open in October.
In that capacity, he will
be in charge of all aspects of
a separate facility that will
operate under the authority of
UCI's Warden Diane Andrews.
Manning was introduced to
the UCI supervisory staff at a
meeting held Aug. 20. Manning
was born in Union County and
grew up in Bradford County,
graduating from Bradford High
School. He was a member of
the 1986 Tornado football team
that was the runner-up state
champion team that year.
Manning followed his father,
Ferrell Manning, into a career in
corrections. The elder Manning
was a long-time member of
the UCI leadership team who
attained the rank of major prior
to his retirement.
The current Major Manning.
has 25 years of experience
in corrections. He started at
Reception and Medical Center
in Lake Butler as a correctional
officer and rose all the way to
the rank of lieutenant while
there. He transferred to New
River Correctional Institution
and was then promoted to
captain at Lowell Correctional
Institution in 2006. He also
served Lowell as acting major
in 2009. He transferred back
to RMC as a captain and was
promoted to the rank of major
at the Gainesville Work Camp
in February of this year.
He said during his career, he
has worked in every capacity a
correctional officer can \vork-
confinement, general population,
work detail supervision, inmate
transport-jlust name it.
When the major's slot at the
UCI Work Camp opened up,
Manning said it seemed like
a good fit for him. His ties to
the area are very strong. He
currently also works part-time
at the Bradford County Jail
and his wife teaches full-time
at Northside Baptist Church's
private school, just down the


Major Daniel Manning is a-^
new addition to the Union"
Correctional Institution ;
leadership team. He will bW
in charge of the UCI Work4:
Camp, which is scheduled :
to open in October.

road from UCI.
"I liked the idea of coming,
back, closer to home,":' said"
Manning, who still lives in,
Bradford County.
Manning was also a 20-year},
member of the Florida National'
Guard's 631st Maintenance-
Company in Starke. He attained&
the rank of staff sergeant and,.
senior inspector in the National:
Guard, prior to retiring from;
that service.. -
He said he was honored to6
serve at the .same institution.
where his father once served;-
"I'm looking forward to the.
challenges of opening a brand -
new facility and I am really
looking forward to meeting all
of the staff at UCI and getting toT
know everyone:' said Manning'-
Col. Kevin Box said Manning
should be ideal for his new post..
Running. a Work camp will
be a new endeavor for UCI!.:
which has primarily dealt with
medium and close custody,
inmates throughout most of?
its history. The inmates at the-
work camp will be classified as
minimum custody. :
"(Major Manning) has a;,
lot of knowledge about worle
camp operation. He did an
outstanding job serving at other
work camps and should do an
equally outstanding job at our
work camp:' said Col. Box.
SWarden Andrews said she
was impressed with Manning's
record -of service and with
his work" ethic. "We are very
pleased and proud to have
(Major Manning) guiding our
Snew work camp:' she said.
The institution is currently
.hiring correctional officers
to fill the new posts open
at the work camp. A person
does not need to be a certified
correctional officer in order to
apply. Once successfully hired,
the Department of Corrections
will pay the new officer's salary
while he or she attends training
in order to obtain certification."
For more information on
the full requirements, contact
Officer Candice Rossman at
386-431-2208.


: .11 r


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B Section Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 FEATURES
5 CRIME

N"i SOCIALS
FIG O SA NW OBITUARIES
NEWS FRO RADFR OUNY UO O T AD T EDITORIAL

NEWS FROM BRADFORD COUNTY, UNION COUNTY AND THE LAKE REGION


Celebrating life every day


Felicia and Max Ennis
support Great Strides
in effort to give infant
daughter a brighter future

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
At a glance, Felicia Ennis is no
different from any other loving
mother of an infant. She has a
collection of photographs and
videos, documenting the things
her daughter, Mariah, does from
day to day.
Ennis hopes that one day


in the future, she and her
grown daughter can look at
those photos and videos and
reminisce together. Life, though,
is uncertain for Mariab, who
turned 1 on Aug. 8. Mariah
has cystic fibrosis, a disease in
which a defective gene causes
the body to produce thick, sticky
mucus that can clogs the lungs,
obstructs the pancreas and
prevents enzymes from helping
the body break down and absorb
food.
"I have videos of her playing
peek-a-boo because I want to
remember that," said Ennis,
whose husband, Max, is a 2007


Bradford High School graduate.
"l'have videos and pictures of
every single thing because I
want to remember just in case.
Everything is a big deal. Every
birthday is a big event, even
though we hope to have tons
more. You just never know.
"We celebrate life every day."
Medical advances, though,
are helping people with cystic
fibrosis live longer, and the
hope is that one day there will
be a ,cure. That's why the Eunis
family supports the efforts of
the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
and its fundraising Great
Strides walks. The fifth annual


Bradford-Union Great Strides
event-a 3-mile walk-will take
place this Saturday, Sept. 28,
beginning at 9 amn. at Shands
Starke Regional Medical Center.
According to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation website,
the nonprofit organization funds
more cystic fibrosis research than
any other organization. Almost
every cystic fibrosis drug now
available is the result of Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation support.
"Great Strides is the main
source of the research funds,"
Ennis said. "Without Great
Strides, we wouldn't be making
great strides."
Ennis, her husband and Mariah
live in Virginia, so they won't
be a part of the Bradford-Union
event, but Bradford County
resident Diane Ennis, who is
Mariah's grandmother, will be
there, selling ribbons and bows
provided by a friend of Felicia's
who owns Eliza's Bowtique and
More in Virginia Beach.
Felicia Ennis, who is active in
a Great Strides event closer to
home, never envisioned any of
this. As a first-time mother, she
never thought she'd give birth to
a child with a terminal illness.
"You just don't expect that
as a parent'," she said. "I didn't
expect to be a parent of a child
with needs."
Diane Ennis said, "Nobody
does, I guess."
It has been quite an ordeal
already for the family, even
though Mariah has been in this
world for just a short time.

Maria's parents found out
Mariah's parents found out


Madiah Ennis is pictured with her mother, Felicia, and
her grandmother, Diane Ennis of Bradford County.
Mariah has cystic fibrosis, and Diane Ennis will be
helping her cause at the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's
Bradford-Union Great Strides event on Saturday, Sept.


there was something wrong
during the pregnancy. It was
discovered the unborn child had
air bubbles in her stomach. An
ultrasound revealed there was
something wrong with Mariah,
though doctors could only
narrow it down to one of five
possibilities, one of which was
cystic fibrosis.
Nothing could be confirmed
until the birth, and Mariah's
parents still held out hope,
though Felicia admitted that was
hard.
"You say, 'She's not born yet.
Let's not have a breakdown until
we know.' That's a whole lot
easier said than done," Felicia
said. "I had a whole lot of
support from my family."


Felicia eventually went
through induced labor at 39
weeks because of low amniotic
fluid. As soon as Mariah entered
the world, doctors knew what
was wrong with her.
"They were 99 percent sure it
was CF because her tummy was
distended," Felicia said. "They
could see it."
Mariah went into surgery
almost immediately due to a
blockage in her intestines. A
surgery the family was told
would last two to three hours
wound up being six. Mariah
spent 36 days in the neonatal
intensive care unit afterward,
Felicia stayed by her baby's side
See MARIAH, 10B


The Bradford-Union Great Strides event is Saturday,
Sept. 28, at 9 a.m. at Shands Starke Regional Medical
Center


Taking care of your heart in

the heart of our community


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2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013



The road to here: When U.S. 301 met Bradford County


Lucky 13 meets Bradford
County

Editor's note: This is part one of
an eight-part series.

BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Special to the Telegraph-7imes-
Mopitor
There may be folks around
who remember when U.S. 301
was born and a few less who re-
member Florida 200. But there
are even fewer folks still with
us who remember Road 13. In
Bradford County, all three were
essentially the same road.
Building roads in Florida has
never been a tidy process. In the


1500s, Spanish explorers, mis-
sionaries and cattle made fre-
quent use of American Indian
trails. In 1824, John Bellamy
built the first U.S. highway in the
Florida territory, a stump-knock-
er running from Tallahassee to
Picolata.
Early roads-dirt ruts of
wagon wheels-were widened
all over the state so two wagons
could squeeze past each other as
traffic volume grew.
After Cow Ford became Jack-
sonville, someone built a patch-
work of roads that would vaguely
follow the Florida Railroad line
from Fernandina. The bumpy,
dirt road passed the new semi-
nary that was becoming a college
in Gainesville, once known as


This is a pencil sketch illustrating an early Florida road,
now U.S. 301, running past Fort Harilee in Bradford
County. The drawing was done by Lt. J.C. Ives on Sept.
* 20,1837. When the sketch was made, this road ran from
St. Augustine to what would become Gainesville. A WPA
document from the 1930s placed Fort Harilee along what
by then was already Road 13,2.5 miles north of Waldo.
State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, httpJ:/norida
Smemory.com/Items/show/32536.


Hog Town. In Bradford County,
the road went through Lawtey,
Starke and Hampton. In Alachua,
it went through Waldo. Like the
railroad, it stopped at Cedar Key.
It was slow going, but it was at
least as quick, and maybe a little
safer, than trying to get to Flori-
da's other side by boat.
Then, road building got legis-
lative, and with legislation came
politics as the state legislature
authorized the Florida State
Road Department in 1915. Ac-
cording to the FDOT website, the
1916 Bankhead Act gave state
road departments the authority to
establish systems of roads, build
and maintain roads and accept
federal or local funds for use in
improving roads. In 1916 and
1917, the legislature and the road
department designated 14 state
roads and gave them numbers,
including Road 13. More state
roads followed.
There was one good reason
early 201 century legislators had
to get serious about roads: auto-
mobiles. By 1920, there were
nearly nine million automobiles
on U.S. roads, using over 400
million barrels of petroleum
products each year.
Florida's early and hefty auto
sales are thought to have been
connected to the state's land
booms of the 1920s. In the mid-
and late-1930s, Florida began to
require license plates and drivers'
licenses. The Road Department
began to publish and distribute
official state road maps. Sarasota
was home to the fourth largest
Studebaker dealership in the U.S.
By 1949, Florida's 2.8 million
residents owned three million
autos.
All those autos made new de-
mands; clay or gravel-topped


This unidentified
Bradford family
might have
taken a two- or
three-day trip ,
to Galnesville. '
Visiting St.
Augustine could
have been a
once-In-a-lifetime
experience.
They would
have driven over
nicely layered
dirt roads like .
the one behind
them-when
they were lucky.

surfaces came first, then slag,
chap, chat, brick, concrete and
asphalt roads appeared. During a
three-year period ending Decem-
ber 1931, Florida paved 1,026
miles of roads, and there were
many thousand more miles to go.
When U.S. 1 was built along
the eastern coast between 1926
and 1938, federal roads had odd
numbers if they ran north and
south. Roads running east and
west had even numbers.
The Florida state roads of
1916 had sequential single- and
two-digit numbers. By 1941,
Florida had added so many more
roads a new grid numbering sys-
tem was devised.
The 1923 Laws of Florida
set out Road 13 as "extending
from Baldwin to Cedar Key, via
Starke and Gainesville and Bron-
son.'" In Bradford County, Road
13 also passed through Lawtey
and Hampton, and in Alachua,
through Waldo.
The Laws of Florida, 1925,


Time is now for tree-planting preparation


BY JAY TUCKER SR.
Union County Senior CFA
Forester
As summer is quickly coming
to a close, our thoughts of hot
and muggy, d9g days of sum-
mer, afternoon- thundershowers,
weekly grass mowing or even
swimming are starting to fade.
: Most of us are looking forward
to the cool weather of fall and
hunting season.
The last thing on most minds
,is tree planting. If ydou have 1
-or 100 acres of land, and you're
:thinking of planting pines on
them, now is the time to start
planning.
- In north Florida, our tree plant-
ing season traditionally runs
,from December through Febru-
-ary. Keep in mind, the earlier in.
the season you get the trees in
the ground, the better seedling
-growth and survival will be.
If you have not already done
so, here are some things you
need to consider to ensure a suc-
cessful planting:
Will your site need any
preparation? Depending on what
practices are needed, you may
need to start now preparing land
for planting this winter. On idle
-agricultural fields and pastures,
a light site prep such as mowing,
scalping or a prescribe bum may
be needed. These practices can
be done just before planting.
On old, abandoned agricultur-
al fields and cutover land, more
extensive preparation practices
'may be needed. To ensure good
soil compaction and allow air
Pockets to settle out that can im-
pede planting and seedling sur-
vival, these practices will need
to be completed at least six-eight
weeks before planting. You will
need to hire a site prep contrac-
tor to do this work. Finding a
contractor and scheduling your
work now is important in getting
your trees planted early.
Have 'you lined up some-
one to plant your trees? Will you
need to hire a tree planting con-
tactor or do your own planting?
You need to find a reputable con-
tractor now and set up a plant-
ing date. Landowners who have
a few acres and a medium-sized
farm tractor might think about
doing their own. Tree plant-
ers, along with scalpers, can be


leased for a nominal daily fee
through the Florida Forest Ser-
vice.
Have you ordered your pine
seedlings? How many and what
species will you plant? As you
line up your tree planter, this is
also the time to order your tree
seedlings to ensure their avail-
ability.
Extensive tree improvement
programs and forest genetics
research on pine species-par-
ticularly slash and loblolly-
have been ongoing since the
mid-1950s. Today, a number of
genetically improved varieties,
which include first-, second-
and third-generation stock, are
available from the Florida Forest
Service and local private nurs-
eries. These trees have demon-
strated outstanding growth, but
also show higher resistance to
rust disease, with additional im-
provements in quality traits such
as stem straightness and wood
quality.
Seedling cost is a small part of
your establishment cost. When
selecting tree seedlings, make
sure you're getting the best seed-
ling available. A poor choice
will reduce the productivity and
value of the resulting plantation,
and have the potential to cause
outright failure.
Nurseries normally sell their
tree seeding in lots of 1,000, tak-.
ing orders on a first-come, first-
serve basis. Some nurseries will
sell seedlings in smaller num-
bers, but at a much higher cost
per seedling.
Generally, I recommend
planting 726 trees per acre. To
calculate the total number of tree
seedling you will want to order,
multiply your planting rate by
the number of acres being plant-
ed, then round this number up to
the next 1,000.
Which species you select
to plant should be based on
the site's soil type and your
objectives) for the stand. This
may be a good time to contact
your local county forester to
help select the right species for
your site.
Here in northeast Florida,
three pine species are commonly
planted: slash, loblolly and long-
leaf. On our typical flatwoods
sites, or poorly drained sandy


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soils, I would generally suggest
planting slash pine. On a site
with clay soils close to the soil
surface (within 20 inches), lob-
lolly pine would be best. With
either of these pines, you will
want to ask for rust-resistant
seedlings.
On sites with better-drained
soils, you might consider long-
leaf pine. Longleaf pine seed-
lings will cost more, but they
have a naturally higher resis-
tance to insects and disease.
They also'will produce a higher


quality product and have a high-
er wildlife habitat value.
For more information on or-
dering trees, tree planting or any
other forestry related question,
contact your local Florida For-
est Service Forester. In Union
County, contact Jay Tucker Sr.
at 386-496-2190 or Jay.Tuck-
er@f6eshfromflorida.com. In
Bradford County, contact Andy
Lambomrn Sr. at 904-964-2461
or AndyLambom@freshfrom-
florida.com.


defined Road 13 as "extend-
ing from Cedar Key to Yulee,
to Nassau County, via Bronson,
Gainesville, Starke, Baldwin and
Callahan'." The Laws of 1927
extended Road 13 to Yulee, then
to the Atlantic Ocean, making
the road truly a cross-Florida
route-just like the railroad.
A 1933 document, "The
State Road System of Flori-
da," provided by FDOT, de-
scribed Road No. 13 as a
"...Second System (road) except
Yulee to Gainesville, which is
First System: Extending from
Cedar Keys to Yulee in Nassau
County, via Bronson, Gaines-
ville, Starke, Baldwin and Calla-
han; extending in an easterly di-
rection from Yulee through Fer-
nandina to the Atlantic Ocean,
over and along that certain
12-mile stretch of new concrete
road just completed by Nassau
County."
There was an issue, and it was
a political and territorial issue.
After Road 13 was finished in
their area, the people of Cedar
Key held several days of. cel-


ebrations, with dinners, dances
and other activities.
But around northern Road
13, counties wrangled over a
"missing link" between Florida
1, U.S. 1, U.S. 17 and what had
been Florida 13 at Yulee. Why,
the counties downstream asked,
wasn't the section that went to
Calfahan and Baldwin also be-
ing paved? The spat would go on
until the mid-1940s.
In January 1937, advocates
from counties along Road 13
formed a motorcade to Tallahas-
see to convince the department
to complete the Yulee-Callahan
road. It was open knowledge
Jacksonville delegates opposed
completion of the missing link,
opting instead for a plan whith
directed upwards of 30 percent
of Jacksonville's (and Florida')
tourists into their city first be-
fore releasing them west toward
Road 13.
'In September 1936, the Jack-
sonville Realty Board charged
that Lawtey was running a speed
See 301, 3B


.The. ,-ey 2
bWednesday,. October 9, 2013


. ,I


Community Partners









|L A -If


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10:00 am. 3:00 p.m.


Inl n is s ,i 0 sa s .c la oS 0
sometmes ven eath S ~ 0 ~
A anua season *lu accneis he es0wa toreuceth
chne* ha o il e eaoa luadsredi o tes
" Wenmor pope gt. acinaedaginst he lules fl ca
sprea throgh tht com unity


Fo qesiosplas o ntat Croln* Rddsh t(04)96-7830


Community State Bank


811 South Walnut Street


Starke, FL 32091


INimliU






T-lJRSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIwES & MONITOR B SECrION 3B


Starke
Rotary golf
tournament

is Sept. 27
The Rotary Club of Starke
will host its annual fundraising
golf tournament Friday, Sept. 27,
at the Starke Golf and Country
Club at 1 p.m. (Registration is at
noon.)
The four-person scramble costs
$50 per person. That includes
cart, green fees and a meal after
the tournament, courtesy of the
Downtown Grill. Participants
will also have the chance to win
door prizes.
There will be putting, longest-
drive, closest-to-the-pin and
chipping contests.
Mulligan packages will be
available for $20.
Proceeds will benefit local and
international Rotary projects,
as well as the Cystic Fibrosis
SFoundation.
For more information,
please contact Jesse Gathright
at 904-545-6403 or jesse@
americandreamflorida.com, or
Jessie Myers at 904-955-8699 or
jmyersl220@gmail.com.


Johnson-
Underhill
family reunion

is Sept. 29
The Johnson-Underhill family
reunion is planned for Sunday,
Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. until ?
at the Lake Butler Community
Center at 125 E. Main St.
Please bring a covered dish
and beverage.


Time to
exercise
freedoms
Dear Editor .
, In 1917, the prolific and in-
sightful English writer GK.
Chesterton wrote, "There is no
bitterness in the heart of man like
the bitterness that follows the de-
nial of a right." These words will
likely find a home in the heart of
anyone who currently finds him-
self at odds with our increasingly
expanding federal government s
policies. Even though people's
rights come from our creator,
our bureaucrats, lawmakers and
executive officer are in high gear
as they race to erode (or replace),
and eventually withdraw, these
God-given privileges.
In every area of life, there is
government intrusion and usur-
pation of the principles upon
which this country was founded.
There is a huge, man-made eraser
at work. It deals with gun rights,
speech rights, privacy, how and
where you educate your children,
violation of your conscience,
what marriage is or isn't, job op-
portunities, what you can bum
as automobile fuel, what you
can plant, what light bulb you
can bum, how you handle your
health care need, where you can
live, how much you can keep of
what you earn and even whether
you are an actual person. (And
there is sooo much more.)
Every American should be
feeling an eternal resentment
toward their political leadership
because of these travesties. But
many, many do not. Instead, they
have fallen for the notion that
Washington knows best. Individ-
ual freedoms are disappearing as
federal-and sometimes state-
control of our lives increases.
It is tragic enough that so many
people have abandoned control
of their own future; to compound
their surrender, they wage war
upon other Americans, who will
not go quietly in the night. With-
out compelling arguments to
deploy, defenders of this federal
takeover resort to name calling.
Over and over, we hear defend-
ers of our Constitution called
"radicals," among other things.
Perhaps even worse are those
who agree in theory that govern-
ment is out of control, yet, do
nothing to slow or stop this take-
over. As Martin Luther King Jr.
wrote in 1963, referring to "mod-
erates" who gave lip service to
the cause of civil rights, but did
no more than that, "Lukewarm
acceptance is much more bewil-
dering than outright rejection."
I, too, am bewildered by so
many who sit idly by and watch
as this country fades into oblivi-
on. As Edmund Burke said long
ago, "For evil to triumph it's
only necessary that good men do
nothing." If, right now, we don't
exercise our freedoms, then we
will lose those freedoms. It's just
a matter of time.
Leonard C. Young
Retired teacher


Joint Starling
family reunion
to be held
Oct. 5
Descendants of Alma and Jo-
seph E., along with those of Ben-
jamin J. Sr. and Daisy Starling,
will have a reunion on Saturday,
Oct. 5, at the community center
in Lake Butler. Directional signs
will be posted.
Lunch will be served at 12:15
p.m. Please bring a covered dish,
dessert or drinks, and come early
to help set up.
Bring a copy of family pic-
tures or other documents that can
be added to the family treeinfor-
mation.

Daughters of
the American
Revolution
group meets
Oct. 7
Jill McGuire will talk about
native plants and conservation
at the Monday, Oct. 7, meeting
Sof the Col. Samuel Elbert
Chapter, National Society of
the Daughters of the American
Revolution, which begins at
10:30 a.m. at IHOP in Starke.
Any woman 18 or older,
regardless of race, religion or
Mocanr
ethnic background, who can
prove direct descent from a
person who aided in achieving
American independence
during 1776-1783, is eligible
for membership. The chapter
welcomes guests .and can help
you search for a Patriot ancestor
in your family tree.
The DAR Motto is: "God,
Home, Country."
Please contact Konnie
Beauregard at 352-475-1865 or
copnursel999@windstream.net
for more information.


Unfair
treatment
in Lawtey
Dear Editor
I am from Massachusetts.
My son left Sept. 15, travel-
ing to Florida to hopefully live
and make his new home. His 4x4
was packed with all his belong-
ings, so he set his truck on cruise,
knowing that speed would not
be an option for traveling. He
traveled the whole week like
this, with no problems until he
reached Lawtey. HIe was pulling
into a gas station to get gas, and
as he was pulling in, he noticed
a police officer sitting in the gas
station lot. For some reason,
this officer decided to approach
my son and tell him that e was
speeding. My son told the officer
that he was not speeding, and
how could he be speeding if he
was pulling into the gas station,
seeing that his 4x4 was so heavy
with being well packed? Mind
you, this officer was not follow-
ing my son into the gas station.
He was already inthe gas station
parking lot when my son pulled
in. My son asked the officer why
he assumed he was speeding. Of
course, there was no answer, just
a $190 speeding ticket. The of-
ficer then looked at my son and
said, "Have a good day." My
son's reply was,'Thanks for the
warm welcome to Florida."
This took place Thursday on
the 191h.of September. We have
had a strong family connection to
Florida for decades. Is this really
how the police of some counties
treat people? I can see something
like this happening in the '60s
with the good-ole-boy mentality,
but not in this day and age.
I was outraged to think this
sort of thing is still going on,
and not only that, but that some
police officers can still get away
with cowboy attitude. Needless
to say, my son made it safely to
his aunt's home with no more
problems. I think most people
should think twice before trav-
eling through Lawtey. It doesn't
seem like a very friendly city to
me. Mind you, my son is not a
teenager. He is a grown man of
40. Shame on this officer and the
city of Lawtey. PEOPLE BE-
WARE OF LAWTEY and UN-
FAIR SPEEDING TICKETS.
Pqtricia Caricchio
A much angered mother


301
Continued from 2B


trap racket. In the April 16,
1937, edition of the Telegraph,
Lawtey motorcycle cop DAvI.
Westberry was described as pur-
suing a speeding motorist out of
Lawtey and through Starke, and
still in hot pursuit near Kingsley
Lake.
Lawtey's mayor and its "speed
cop" denied the realty board's
charges. Tickets and arrests were
handed out impartially, they
said; they were merely enforcing
the law. Within a year, however,
Lawtey's Westberry was let go
with no explanation and no indi-
cation whether he'd be replaced.
The Great Depression was
certainly responsible for some
delays in finishing the Yulee
cutoff. At one point, the Florida
Road Department stopped work
all over the state because it ran
out of money. Nevertheless, a
Jan. 10, 1936, Telegraph head-
line read, "Starke Will Fight for
Road 13."
In 1937, the 20-mile project
was in Gov. Fred Cone's budget,
but suddenly disappeared again
due to lack of funds. Cone's
friends told Bradford resi-
dents that didn't mean the road
wouldn't be built eventually.
The Florida Citrus Commis-
sion urged the State Road De-
partment to give citrus growers
the shortest northern shipping
route possible. A completed
Road 13 was vital, the commis-
sion said.
In October 1938, the Tele-
graph repeated an item from the
Tampa Tribune, stating that the
Yulee-Baldwin Road 13 uonnec-
tion was to be paved. The fol-
lowing week, the paper printed
a retraction, adding that the
Tampa rumor was a long story
of no consequence. The very
next week, the Telegraph-this
time quoting the Florida Times-
Union-said the remaining 20
miles of unpaved road were in-
deed being prepared to be fin-
ished. The week after that, the
SRD said only 7 miles would be
paved. Paving the remaining 13
miles was not in next year's bud-
get either, the department added.
When the bid was released, con-
tractors would pave only 65
miles of the unfinished road.
Even without paving the
missing length from Yulee to
Baldwin, Road 13 was already
benefitting Bradford County.
In January 1938, the Telegraph
quoted two Starke hoteliers who
said business had increased 20
percent over prior years. Local
police officers said traffic had
















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gone up markedly during the
daytime and at night along SR.
13 and in downtown Starke. Ca-
fes, gas stations and other small
businesses agreed. A Telegraph
staffer surveyed license plates
on Call Street, finding out-of-
state tags and more than a few
from Canada.
By 1939, Starke and Ocala
had more service stations per
capital than any other Florida
city. Speaking to the Starke Ro-
tary Club in December, Stan-
dard Oil agent K.G. Duncan
explained why Starke had 22
service stations, one for every 60
residents in town.
"Approximately 1.5 million
gallons of gas are sold in Brad-
ford County annually," Dun-
can said. He attributed sales
to county and state roads that
ran through the area, especially
along Road 13, which brought
large numbers of tourists through
town each day.
The Yulee-Callahan project
would drag on to completion for
years, until only 4 miles of road
had been left unpaved. The miss-
ing link was finally completed,
not because of Pork Chop Gang
state politics, but by sudden
preparations for war.
Exactly when the' Baldwin-
Yulee link was finished is not
easily determined. Caught up
in a whirl of Camp Blanding
headlines, the Telegraph never
reported when or if the Yulee-
Baldwin stretch was done.
FOOT consultant Walter Lid-
dell couldn't pinpoint the end
date of the northern portion of
Roaxd 13 either- if the Baldwin-
Yulee, stretch was ever called
ihat.
"We do have copies of con-
struction and maintenance re-
cords... there does appear to be
a change in surface type around
the 1940s at different nuleage
points along the road." However,
the maintenance records Liddell'
fonvrwarded for inspection" were
for Road 13 below Baldwin, not
the Ytdee-CaLlahan ro-ad.
Whether at the directive of
the U.S. government or whether
Jacksonville opponents real-
ized the stall was over, paved
roads were probably in place
from Cedar Key to Yulee by the
mid-1940s. The segment of what
might otherwise have been the
northeast leg of Road 13, north-
east of Baldwin, was and is num-
bered SR. 200 and A1A.
When Road 13 became SR.
200 officially in 1941 and in the
public's mind around 1945, the
road still went through Starke
and Bradford County, but in-
stead of going to Gainesville, it
headed south at Waldo to Ocala
t


This 1953
Telegraph
photo shows
the confusing
signs Bradford
County residents
had complaints
about. Tourists
who booked
motel rooms in
Starke wound
up driving out
of their way and'
Into Jacksonville
141ES.4 because It was
M" difficult to figure
i out which way to
travel.


cause of bad signage.
Visiting the State Road De-
partment, some county represen-
tatives accused the road depart-
ment and Jacksonville officials
of deliberate skullduggery. The
Telegraph demanded the confus-
ing signs be corrected.
Once completed, and without
,having to rely on a missing link,
U.S. 301 soon became one of
Florida's most important roads.
And it would bypass Yulee
and the Jacksonville pipeline by
20 miles.
Next: Did US. 301 kill Hamp-
ton?


* Auto Accidents '| "
* Work Injuries
* Headaches Dr. Virgil A. Berry
CHIROPRACWTIC PHYSICIAN
Neck and Back Pain =21j.


PUBLIC MEETING
KEYSTONE AIRPARK AUTHOR-
rIY'S REGULAR SCHEDULED
BOARD MEETINGS WILL BE HELD
ON THE 1" TUESDAY OF EVERY
MONTH AT 600 P.M. LOCATION IS:
7100 AIRPORT ROAD, STARKE, FL
AGENDAS AND NOTICE OF CAN-
CELLATION WILL BE POSTED ON
THE AUTHORITY'S WEBSITE AT
www.keystoneairport.com NO LATER
THAN 72 HOURS IN ADVANCE.
9/26 ltchg-B-sect


601 E. Call St.
Hwy. 230, Starke


964-8018


and then to Hernando. In Waldo,
it was now SR. 24 that curved
west to Gainesville.
In September 1947, the Flor-
ida Road Department first an-
nounced to the public that SR.
200 would become U.S. 301.
The federal road was to run from
Baltimore to Tampa, entering
Florida through Folkston, Ga.
The scramble for tourists
continued, however. Once the
federal road was done and in
place, the Telegraph's Oct. 23,
1953, issue featured a front-page
article describing angry tourists
who showed up late to claim
their rooms at Starke motels af-
ter driving into Jacksonville, 20
to 100 miles out of their way, be-


0---
UrETTERS7 OM






4B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 20131


Tigers batter Ra


BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN
Times Editor
Union County High School
head football coach Ronny
Pruitt said he was proud of his
team, and for good reason: The
Tigers showed a consistent,
strong performance in shutting
down the Interlachen Rams 39-0
on Sept. 20 in Interlachen.
It was the first of three road
games in a row for Union
County.
The Tigers (4-0) were
consistent through both halves of
the game and consistent in both
modes of offense, revealing an
air attack that's finally matching
their running game.
They still had too many
penalties, but fortunately, they
didn't cost them.
Union County's first
touchdown came within the
first two minutes of the game
on a 9-yard rush by Alden
McClellon. That was set up a
couple plays earlier by a 33-yard
run by Daquin Edwards and an
early penalty by Interlachen.
Though the extra point was
no good, the touchdown put the
Tigers up 6-0 at the 10:13 mark
of the first quarter.
After getting the ball, the best
Interlachen (1-3) managed was
an 8-yard pass after a runner was
tackled in the backfield just two
plays earlier for a 5-yard loss.
Union County scored again on
its next possession. Quarterback
Caleb Cox connected with
McClellon for a 45-yard pass.
Then Edwards' 21-yard rush
and subsequent extra point put
the Tigers up 13-0 with 6:30
remaining in the first quarter.
It already looked like it was


going to be a long night for the
Rams, and it was.
Though the Rams had a big
run to the Tigers' 19-yard line,
the Tigers' Casey Driggers
intercepted a pass for what
looked like a touchdown, but a
penalty brought it back.
A couple more penalties
hampered the Tigers, who
unsuccessfully tried to convert
on a fourth-down play.
On the first play of the second
quarter-and after Interlachen
got a first down-the Tigers
again intercepted the ball-
this time by Josh Hedman.
Union, again, was plagued by
penalties, amounting to another
disappointing set of downs.
Halfway into the second
quarter, Union County quickly
scored with a 46-yard pass by
Cox to Dairon Alexander. That
put the Tigers up 19-0 at the 5:46
mark.
After a four-and-out by
the Rams, who were almost
intercepted again, the Tigers
followed with another
touchdown. Alexander had
a strong run before Edwards
sealed the deal with a 5-yard
touchdown run.
The Tigers were now up
25-0 after a failed two-point
conversion attempt, and that was
where the score would remain
after both teams had another
possession before the half.
Apparently time in the locker
room didn't help Interlachen's
prospects as the Rams were
intercepted a third time on their
first possession of the half,
thanks to the Tigers' Andrew
Jones.
Jones would be the star again


-> Union County's
Daquin Edwards
runs near the
sideline while
four Rams are in
Tigers' shutout
win.






ms 39-0

when Cox, after recovering his
own fumble on a previous play,
would toss Jones an explosive
80-yard pass to blow open the
second half and begin to kill any
attempts of the Rams coming
back to win the game.
In fact, according to
MaxPreps.com, "Ronny Pruitt's
team's dynamic duo of Cox
and Jones proved tough for
Interlachen to stop, as they were
the top passer and receiver in the
league this week."
The extra point put the Tigers
up 32-0 about three minutes into
the half.
Union County took possession
again shortly before the fourth
quarter. Solid runs by Princeton
Alexander and Robinson set
up a 28-yard pass from Cox to
Princeton for the Tigers' final
touchdown. The extra point put
them up 3970 with 6:48 to play.
In spite of the Rams' rallies
in the first and fourth quarters
to get deep into Tiger territory,
they just couldn't convert.
Pruitt told the team afterward
that it was a defensive game,
pointing to the scoreboard.
McClellon, Alexander, Josh
Hedman and Austin Dukes
were some of the key defensive
players.
"I'm proud of them," Pruitt
said. "I thought they played real
hard defense. They did their job.
So I'm real pleased with what
they did."
The undefeated Tigers head
to Jasper to take on fellow Class
1A team Hamilton County on
Friday, Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. The
Trojans (1-2) are coming off of a
25-10 win over Maclay.


Tornadoes defeat


Buffalo 25-8 for 1st win


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
The Villages' ball-control
offense limited the Bradford
High School football team to two
possessions in the second half,
but the Tornadoes scored on both
of those en route to a 25-8 win in
their District 5-4 opener on Sept.
20 in Starke.
"It's good," said Bradford head
coach Steve Reynolds, whose
team opened the season with two
straight losses. "We haven't had
a lot to celebrate around here the
last couple of weeks."
Bradford (1-2) held a double-
digit lead for most of the game,
but it wasn't until wide receiver
Kenny Dinkins took a screen
pass from Jacob Luke and turned
it into a 69-yard touchdown with
2:04 left to play that Reynolds
could breathe easy. The score
came after the Villages had
driven to the Bradford 6-yard
line before turning the ball over
on downs. A Buffalo touchdown
at that point would have made it
a one-score game.
"That sealed the game for us,"
Reynolds said of Dinkins' score.
"That was a big play."
The Tornadoes got off to a
fast start when Tra'Von Thomas
scampered 80 yards for a
touchdown on the game's first
play from scrimmage. Chris
Barron's PAT had Bradford up
7-0 just 16 seconds into the


Dawson Watson
(left) and
Jameaze McNeal
combine to make
a tackle for the
Tornadoes in
their District
5-4A opener-a
17-point win over
the Villages.


game.
As it did all night, the Villages
(2-2) utilized its option offense
to put together a time-consuming
drive, driving from its own 16 to
inside Bradford's 30. Bradford
defensive back Keaaris Ardley
came up with a big play when
he tackled Villages quarterback
Ben Mangum and limited him
to a 3-yard gain on a third-and-7
play. The Buffalo would come
up a yard short of converting the
ensuing fourth-down play.
Runs of 13 and 25 yards by
Thomas and Jarvis DeSue,
respectively, along with a
personal foul penalty on the


Villages, helped the Tornadoes
drive inside the Buffalo 10-yard
line. The Tornadoes, though,
would turn the ball over on
downs at the 8.
Ardley and Jameaze McNeal
came up with the big defensive
plays on the ensuing series, with
McNeal dropping Jabari Jiles for
no gain on a first-and-10 play
and Ardley tackling Tony Bryant
for a 3-yard loss on third-and-8.
The Villages punted the ball, but
a bad snap affected the punter,
who shanked the ball out of
bounds, resulting in a net punt of

See BHS, 8B


Frederick leads BHS at invitational


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Sarah Frederick earned an
I lt-place finish, while Alec
Nazworth and Thomas Hales
placed 23"rd and 24*', respectively,
for the Bradford High School
cross country teams, which
competed in the Leslie Baker
Invitational at Sandalwood High
School in Jacksonville on Sept.
21.
Frederick had a time of
22:34.3, while Nazworth and
Hales had times of 19:41.2 and
19:48.2, respectively:
Bradford fielded a full boys'
team, which placed seventh out of


10 teams and had the following
individual results: Greg Kersey
3411, 20:42.7; Donald Seymour


511, 21:59.3; Tyler Oliver 53"'.

See RUN, 8B


Union drops 3-1 volleyball match


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Visiting Bell put an end to
the Union County High School
volleyball team's four-match
win streak, defeating the Tigers
3-1 (20-25,25-17,25-23,25-22)
on Sept. 23.
The Tigers (6-4 prior to Sept.
24) got 10 points, three aces and
four blocks from Taylor Joyner,
while Kayla Nettles and Kaylan
Tucker each had nine points and
four aces. Tucker added three
blocks, while Nettles had two.
Nettles and Lilly Combs each
had nine assists.


Kayla Andrews and Tristyn
Southerland each had six kills,
with Andrews adding 13 digs,
11 points and three aces.
Prior to playing Bell, the
Tigers improved to 3-1 in
District 7-1A with a 3-2 (25-16,
21-25, 8-25, 25-20, 15-11) win
over Dixie on Sept. 17 in Cross
City.
Southerland had 11 kills, 10
points, nine digs and two blocks,
while Joyner had eight kills, six
points and two blocks. Nettles
and Andrews had seven and six
kills, respectively, with Nettles
adding 12 assists and eight
points, and Andrews adding 14


digs and nine points.
Tucker had 10 points, six digs
and five kills, while Combs had
13 assists, seven points and four
aces.
Union played Branford this
past Tuesday and will travel to
play Crescent City on Thursday,
Sept. 26, at 6 p.m. On Monday,
Sept. 30, the Tigers travel to
play district opponent Newberry
at 6:30 p.m. before returning
home to play Dixie County on
Tuesday, Oct. 1, at 6:30 pam.
Junior varsity matches will be
played at 5 pn.m. prior to each
varsity match.


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THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MoNfrIOR B SECTION SB


elA


Outdoors
outlook, game
processing
and Crosshorn
Ministries
SHunting and fishing will
never operate in isolation from
'.fhe weather, and the weather
"has been a factor since last
'eek. Northeastern winds have
mitigated some of the September
heat, but it is still early for
hunting.
-. Those same winds have had a
negative impact on coastal and
* offshore fishing on the east coast.
as well as on local lakes. The
plentiful summer rain has added
a lot of tanning to inshore waters
Son the west coast.
.Freshwater panfish are no
longer bedding, and we are in a
-lull between the summer fishing
patterns and hunting season.
The biggest excitement on
the fishing front seems to be the
tarpon bite inshore on the east
and west coasts. Tarpon from
25 pounds up to medium size
seem to be abundant for those
fishermen who can cope with
the wind on the eastern inland
waterways.
There are some reports of
crappie catches from Lochloosa
and Newnan's lakes, and the
cooler weather seems to have
stimulated the bass bite on the St.
Johns and in lakes to our south.

Stephen Bivins: game
processing
Every hunter wants to shoot


4 "%i li




Stephen Bivins of Lake Butler makes sausage and
processes wild game.


a deer or a wild hog, but what
happens once the kill is made?
Unfortunately, processing and
preparing the game is frequently
an issue that seems to occur with
little preparation. Wild game
processing is becoming a service
that is provided professionally
and more frequently, and the
wild game processor is a source
of good information for the do-
it-yourself hunter.
Fortunately for our needs,
Stephen Bivins ofLake Butleris a
knowledgeable and professional
wild game processor.
Bivins, who is married and
has three children, is a lifelong
resident of Union County. He has
worked in law enforcement and
is currently the owner of Bivins
Ole Fashion Sausage and Bivins
Wild Game Processing Inc. As
required by law, both businesses
are operated separately.
Meat processing has been
a longtime interest for Bivins
as it was for his father and
grandfather.
Since most hunters are
comfortable with small game,
Bivins primarily addressed the


needs in processing deer and
wild hogs. The first issue he
jumped into.was the dry and
lean quality of both venison and
wild pork. In order to provide
the moisture that people are
accustomed to, it is necessary
to supplement both venison and
wild pork with additional animal
fat. Most people will grind a
large amount of their venison,
and Bivins indicated that the
desired fat supplement should be
beef fat. Also, many wild hogs
that are shot will need some fat
supplement that will necessarily
come from domestic pork.
Secondly, Bivins confirmed
that each deer muscle is covered
with a thin sheath that is tough.
Unfortunately, the size of a deer
compared to cattle means that
more than two or three muscles
will invariably be involved in
many single, large cuts, which
makes it difficult to whole
cut a large portion of the deer.
The main exceptions to that
statement are the blackstrap and
the tenderloin. The blackstrap
runs parallel with the backbone
on the external side. The


tenderloin also runs along the
backbone, but inside the body
cavity. After those two choice
cuts, a few cubes of diminishing
size can come from the hams and
the neck.
Excluding those cuts, Bivins
said taking additional cuts from
a whitetail deer is not time
efficient, nor does it produce
quality cuts. He suggested that
hunters grind the remainder and
supplement it with beef fat. He
generally makes burgers and
sausage out of the remainder.
In summary, Bivins stated that
in regard to the average deer, a
third will be divided into whole
cuts, a third will be divided
into burgers and a third will be
divided into sausage. Of course,
that could vary some depending
on the individual's preference.
Regarding wild hogs, Stephen
suggested that the hunter decide
quickly on his or her plan for
boars. Some are considered
desirable trophies, but the quality
of meat from a wild boar kill is
really poor. According to Bivins,
the only effective way to produce
good quality meat from a wild
boar is to trap, neuter and feed
them for a month or so. Because
of that, he processes only female
wild hog kills.
As noted before, wild
female hogs will necessarily be
supplemented with domestic
pork fat when making sausage.

Crosshom Ministries
meetings resume
The monthly Crosshom
Ministeries meetings, after a
summer break, resume Thursday,
Sept. 26, at 7 p-m. the Starke
Golf and Country Club. The


subject will be hunting, and
Lamar Williams will be the guest
presenter.
Tight lines and safe hunting
until next week.

Outdoors calendar
Sept. 26, 7 pmn., Crosshorn
Ministries at the Starke Golf and
Country Club;
Lake Butler Open Bass
Tournament, Friday evenings;
Oct. 4, new moon;
Oct. 12, squirrel by gun;
Oct. 19, deer and turkey by
muzzleloader,_
Nov. 2, deer and turkey by
legal gun.
If you have a story, idea or
photo to share, please contact
Mickey Agner via email at mka@
maoutdoors.com, or by phone
at 904-964-1488. Photos may
also be submitted in person at
the Bradford County Telegraph,


I, ldT]


Hank Hodges of Lawtey
shows off a 10.5-pound
flounder he took off Nassau
Sound last weekend.
Union County Times or Lake
Region Monitor.


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RULES OF THE GAME


fg 1. Anyone, except Telegraph
employees and their immediate
famiily members, are welcome to
center. One entry per person per
s,. week please. Persons winning
-one week are not eligible to
?7win ag ain for at least three
Weeks.
<5I we. 2.- When picking up winnings, the
winner will have his or her
photograph taken for the paper.
3. Entry0 must be on an official
Form from the Telegraph and
submitted to one of our offices:


131 W. Call SL, Starke, 125 E.
Main St, Lake Butler or 7382 S.R.
21-N, Keystone Heights before 5
p.m. on Fridays. Fill in all the
blanks with the name of the team
you think will win. The person
who picks the most games
correctly will win $50.00 cash.
4. In case of a tie, the total points
scored in the JAGUARS game this
week is the tie breaker. Please fill
in the points you think will be
scored by the JAGUARS and their
opponent, combined, in the tie


breaker blank. (For instance, if '
the score of the JAGUARS
game was JAGUARS 19, ,,,
opponent 7, the correct score
will be 26 points )
5. Decision of the judges is /
final. A second tie breaker will :
be used, if necessary. Results
will be tabulated on Tuesday
and winners notified by /
telephone. Don't forget to list a
phone number where you can be 4A
reached.


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Owner. Ulda Bryant In Business Since 1987
iff. Child Care for ages I & up
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407 W. Washington St., Starke Uc. 6:30am-6:00pm
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6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, SEPT. 26,2013


''IT AR ES *


Laurel Bronson
STARKE-Laurel Lee Bronson,
75, of Starke died Saturday, Sept.
21,2013, at Windsor Manor Nursing
Home.
She was born Jan. 10, 1938, in
Milford, Conn., to the late Ervin and
Millicent (Ray) Bronson. She was
of the Protestant faith and a retired
librarian with the Putnam County
School System.
SThere are no services scheduled
at this time.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of
Starke.

Thomas
Brown Jr.
COLORADO SPRINGS-
Thomas F. "Frank" Brown Jr. passed
away on Friday, Sept. 6,2013, after a
long illness.
He was born to Thomas. F. and
Laura Belle Brown on June 4,1934,
in Hampton. He graduated from
Bradford High School (class of
'52). He attended the University of
Florida and graduated with a B.S. in
business administration. He married
Dorothy Ownbey (the daughter of
the late Hector and Vera Ownbey)
of Keystone Heights, and soon after
was inducted into the U.S. Army. He
did his Army time in Fort Carson,
Colo. After discharge, he was
employed as a CPA.
He is survived by: four children,
daughters Natalie, Cynthia and
Laura, and a son, Stephen; brother,
Emory (Topsy) Brown of Pomona
Park; three nephews, Randy, Ricky-
.and Reggy; niece, Robyn Bayes;
eight grandchildren; wife Betsey
Stime Brown, whom he married
after the death of Dorothy, and her
itwo sons, James and David.
A memorial service will be held
on Sept. 28 at St. Paul's Cathedral
in Winter Haven at 11 an.m. An
additional memorial will be held at
Episcopal Church of the Redeemer
in Sarasota on Oct. 4 at 1 p.m.
PAID OBITUARY


Juanita Carter
Juanita Carter
.,. STARKE-Juanita L. Carter, 77,
of Starke died ITuesday, Sept. 17,
1013, at Shands UF in Gainesville.
- She was a member of Greater
Bethlehem Freewill Baptist Church
for many years and later joined
-Harvest ,of Christ Century Church
of Starke. She attended the local
-schools of Bradford County.
She is survived by: six sons,
Andrew Carter of Ocala and Glenn
Carter, Isham Carter, Cedric Carter
;and Jermaine (arter, all of Starke;
five daughters, Shirley Sewell,
Darlene Blye, Connie Bellemy,
Sharon Nicholas and Regina Carter,
all of Starke; sister, Wanda Walter;
brother, Tom Lindsey of Fort
Lauderdale; 61 grandchildren; and
59 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at
11 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28, at
Church of God by Faith in Starke,
-with Pastor Kyle Harrison (eulogist)
-conducting the services. Interment
will be held at Bethlehem Memorial
Garden under the direction of Haile
Funeral Home Inc.
,,, Visitation will be held on Friday,
Sept. 27, at Cadrl D. Haile Memorial
Chapel, Family hour is from 4 p.m
until 5 p.m. Friends may visit from 5
p.m. until 7p.m. and one hour prior
o the service. The cortege will form
at the home of Carter at 10:30 a.m.
oi Saturday.

Joyce Coleman
i STARKE-Joyce Conner


Coleman, 82, of Starke died
Saturday, Sept. 21,2013, at Bradford
Terrace Nursing Home following an
extended illness.
She was born on Jan. 24, 1931,
in Bradford County to the late W.R.
and Pearl (Sapp) Conner. She was a
homemaker and a foster parent. She
was a member of Lawtey Church of
God.
Her husband of 54 years, Kenneth
N. Coleman, preceded her in death.
She is survived by: daughter,
Joyce Diane Coleman of Starke;
sons Gary Nolon (Gail) Coleman
of Keystone Heights and Thomas
Edward "Ed" Coleman of Starke;
four siblings, Donald Conner, Nancy
Coleman, and Betty Ann Griffis of
Starke and Barbara Crawford of
Kingsley Lake; seven grandchildren;
22 great- grandchildren; and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were Sept. 24
at Sampson City Church of God,
with Rev. Gene Bass and Rev.
Alton Coleman officiating. Burial
followed at Conner Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
of Starke.

Scott Gillen
GAINESVILLE-Scott
Anderson Gillen, 29, of Gainesville
died suddenly from a motorcycle
accident on Friday, Sept. 20,2013.
He was born in Jacksonville and
lived most of his life in Gainesville.
He graduated from Santa Fe High
School and was a student in Santa
Fe College's welding program. He
attended Advent Christian Church
in Lulu.
He was preceded in death by his
maternal grandmother, Jan Thrower.
He is survived by: his parents,
Geoffrey and Cindy Thrower Gillen
of Gainesville; sister, Kristin (John)
Smith; paternal grandparents,
Roland and Betty Gillen of Lulu;
and maternal grandfather, Al
Thrower of Keystone Heights.
Funeral services will be held
Friday, Sept. 27, at 11 a.m. at Advent
Christian Church of Lulu, with Rev.
Butch Nelson officiating. Burial
will follow at another date.
Visitation will be held at Archer
Funeral Home in Lake Butler on
Thursday, Sept. 26, from 6 p.m.
until 8 p.m.

Curtis Harvey
STARKE-Curtis Jimmie
Harvey, 75, of Starke died at E.T.
York Haven Hospice in Gainesville
on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, after
an extended illness.
He was born in Baker County and
lived in Starke for the last 20 years.
He was the son of the late Dewey
and Jessie Muse Harvey. He was a
heavy-equipment operator until he
retired.
, rHe was preceded in death by:
daughter Wanda Waters; -grandson
Christopher Harvey; and several
brothers and sisters.
He is survived by: his wife of
43 years, Judy Crawford Harvey;
daughter Angie Harvey of Palatka;
sons Eugene Harvey of Lawtey,
Danny (Brandie) Harvey of Lawtey,
Jessie (Donna) Harvey of Raiford,
Johnny (Kelly) Harvey ofMacclenny
and Robert Harvey of Starke;
sister, Catherine (Gene) Waters of
Macclenny; 14 grandchildren; and
eight great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Sept.
24 at Road to Calvary Full Gospel
Church in Glen St Mary, with Pastor
Tommy Anderson officiating.
Archer Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements.


Yvonne Hodges
Yvonne Hodges
HAMPTON-Yvonne "Lucy"
Brookins Hodges, 78, a resident of
Hampton, passed away Sept. 17,
2013, at her residence, with family
by her side.
She was born on July 10, 1935,
to the late Orville Brookins and
Fannie Killingsworth-Brookins.
Lucy was the secretary at Hampton
Elementary for 22 years and is
described as being an avid Florida
Gator fan, who absolutely loved
sweets, bowling and traveling.
She was preceded in death by: her
sons, Randy and Mark Hodges; and
her brothers, Rex and Ray Brookins.
Lucy is survived by: her loving
husband of 60 years, E.W. Hodges
Jr.; her daughter, Kim (Ralph)
Morgan of Starke; daughter-in-law,
Tonya Hodges of Hampton; sisters
Linda Parmenter and Sue Adams;
six grandchildren; seven great-
grandchildren; and one great-great-
grandchild.
Funeral services were held
on Sept. 19 at Trinity Baptist
Church in Keystone Heights, with
Pastor James Peoples officiating.
Interment followed at Dedan
Cemetery in BrookerJn lieu of
flowers, the family requests that
donations be made to the Leukemia
and Lymphoma Society or Haven
Hospice in Lucy's name.
SArrangements are under the care
and direction of Archie Tanner
Funeral Services of Starke. Visit
www.archietannerfuneralservices.
com to sign the family's guest book.
PAID OBITUARY

Imogene Lott
HAMPT1ON-Imogene Lott, 69,
of Hampton died at her home on
Tlhesday, Sept. 17,2013.
She was born on Oct. 11, 1943,
in Live Oak to the late Eli and
Palmer (Green) Thomas. She was a
retired health care provider and had
attended the Sampson City Church
of God.
She was preceded in death by:
her husband, Pies "Hank" Lott Jr.;
a granddaughter, Amanda Cross;
and siblings Lucille Clark, James
Thomas and Robert Thomas. -
She is survived by: daughters
Geneva Prevatt of Hampton and
Janice Lott of Keystone Heights;
sons Timothy (Tina) Bennett of
Taylor, CurtisBennett ofMacclenny,
Danny Bennett and David Cross
of Hampton and Donnie Lott of
Keystone Heights; siblings Oscar
Thomas of Atlanta and Annett
Durham of Dowling Park; 13
grandchildren; and numerous great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Sept.
20 in the DeWitt C. Jones chapel,
with Rev. Gene Bass officiating.
Burial followed at Hope Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
of Starke.


Virginia Miller
MELROSE-Virginia Louise
Miller of Melrose died on Friday,
Sept. 20,2013, at Windsor Manor in
Starke.
She was born tothe late Eddie and
Freddie McLeod on Nov. 30, 1926,
and was raised in Moultrie, Ga. She
was the wife of the late 'Harold D.
Miller, a homemaker and mother
and attended United Methodist
Church in Melrose. She resided in
Melrose for the past 25 years.
She was preceded in death by:
her late husband of 55 years; a sister,
Josephene McLeod; and brother
Johnathan McLeod.
She is survived by: daughters
Robin Phillips of Apopka and
Georgia Ross of Melrose; son,
Scott Miller of Fort Lauderdale;
five grandchildren; and eight great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
officiated by Pastor Jeannie Hill
on Saturday, Sept. 28, at 11 anm.
at United Methodist Church in
Melrose, with lunch to follow.
Arrangements are by Moring
Funeral Home of Melrose.

Barbara Smith
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-
Barbara Joan Smith, 83, of Keystone
Heights died on Sept. 22, 2013, at
her residence.
She lived in the Keystone Heights
area for over 50 years. She was
a member of Keystone United
Methodist Church.
She is survived by: daughters
Janice Goetzman, Leslie
Breedlove and Amy Starling; and
multiple grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
A private memorial service will
be held at a later date. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to
Keystone United Methodist Church,
4004 S.R. 21 South, Keystone
Heights, FL 32656, or Northeast
Community Hospice, 4266 Sunbeam
Road, Jacksonville, FL 32257.
Arrangements are under the care
of Moring Funeral Home.


moving to Mississippi.
He is survived by: his fiancee,
Kristin Hattaway, and his beautiful,
3-year-old daughter, Madison
Snyder, both of Mississippi;
his father, Gregory Snyder, and
stepmother, Leslie Snyder; three
brothers, Joshua Snyder, Gabriel
(Gator) Snyder and Jordan Snyder,
all of Lake Butler, his mother,
Debra Snyder of Louisiana; and two
sisters, Krystal Whaley of Georgia
and Winter Pearson of Mississippi.
Other family includes one uncle,
several aunts, one nephew and many
cousins.
Memorial services were held at
First Baptist Church of Nicholson in
Mississippi on Saturday, Sept. 7.
PAID OBITUARY


Delbert Stanley
Delbert Stanley
KEYSTONE' HEIGHTS-
Delbert Lee Stanley died on Friday,
Sept. 13,2013, at his home, following
a short illness.
Originally from West Virginia
and born on Feb. 11, 1948, Mr.
Stanley served 10 years in the U.S.
Navy, stationed at Cecil Field Navy


Base. He served aboard the USS
aircraft carriers Intrepid in Vietnam,
the Forrestar and the J.F. Kennedy.
He was actively involved in KRA
baseball, Pop Warner football and
Keystone Heights High School
sports for many years. Mr. Stanley
was a commercial construction
superintendent in Jacksonville for
years. He attended First Assembly
of God Church.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Delbert and Peg Stanley.
He is survived by: his wife fo
46 years, Judy; son Lee and his
wife, Terri; grandsons Logan and
Garrett; son Aaron, and wife, Holly;
granddaughters Mckenzie and
Reghan; two brothers, Greg and
Dean Stanley, and their families;
one nephew, Marty Stanley, and his
family; and one niece, Paula Hall,
and her family.
We will miss him forever, as he
was the center of our lives and loved
very much.
Memorial services will be held
Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, at 1 p.m. at
Keystone First Assembly of God at
8025 S.R. 100 in Keystone Heights.
PAID OBITUARY


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Jonathon Snyder
PICAYUNE-Jonathon Irvin
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30, 2013.
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THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 7B


Aoo /B -F *LB I A^QI^^^HISSIH~HIIIHIHfll^^^^H~fMllflllll^HI


Recent arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union

,The following individuals
Were arrested recently by
local law enforcement officers
in Bradford, Union or Clay
(Keystone Heights area)
counties:


Keystone
Matthew Bellman, 26, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 17 by Clay deputies for
DUI.
Jason Cross, 31, of Keystone
Heights was arrested Sept. 19
by Clay deputies for a writ of
attachment.
Wayne Lawson Crowe, 33, of
Keystone Heights was arrested


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Sept. 23 by Putnam deputies for
fraud-insufficient funds check.
Verna Foley, 31, of Keystone
Heights was arrested Sept. 22
by Clay deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
disqualified license.
Ada Griffis, 45, of Keystone
Heights was arrested Sept. 22
by Clay deputies for a probation
violation.
Michael Paul Hanks, 24, of
Melrose was arrested Sept. 23 by
Putnam deputies for an out-of-
county warrant.
Nicholas Hart, 35, of Keystone
Heights was arrested Sept. 20
by Clay deputies for domestic
battery.
William Johnell, 29, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 18 by Clay deputies for
contempt of court.
Sandy Lee Luna, 28, of
Melrose was arrested Sept. 23 by
Putnam deputies for dealing in
stolen property.
Kimberly Osborne, 38, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 23 by Clay deputies for
violating a pre-trial release
condition.

Bradford
Scott Patrick Adkins, 34, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 22
by Starke police for disorderly
intoxication.
Rickie Louis Bingham, 59, of
Orlando was arrested Sept. 18 by
Starke police for trespassing.


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Chad Alan Blom, 32, of
Raiford was arrested Sept. 19 by
Bradford deputies for failure to
appear.
Stevie Lee Branch, 31, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 23 by Starke police on an
out-of-county warrant.
Lawrence Cashmore, 38, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 21
by Starke police for disorderly
intoxication, aggravated assault
with a weapon and disorderly
conduct.
Susan Elaine Cayton, 33, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 17 by
Bradford deputies for disturbing
the peace and resisting an officer.
Idella Deion Chandler, 43,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 19
by Starke police for disorderly
conduct.
Brandon Gene Cox, 33, of
Hampton was arrested Sept. 21
by Bradford deputies for a non-
moving traffic violation.
James Lavon Davis, 52, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 19 by
Bradford deputies for possession
of marijuana and drug equipment
and for production of marijuana.
Lorenzo James Davis, 20, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
19 by Bradford deputies for
possession of marijuana and
production of marijuana.
Cody Dean Delong, 24, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 22
by Starke police for disorderly
conduct.
Troy Allen Deming, 43, of
Hawthorne was arrested by
Starke police on an out-of-
county warrant.
Stevie Desue, 23, of Starke
was arrested Sept. 20 by Starke
police for larceny.


Joseph Allen Devlaminck, 26,
was arrested Sept. 21 by Starke
Police for trespassing, disorderly
.i conduct, resisting an officer and
. disorderly intoxication.


Michelle Renetta Gloster, 46,
of Jacksonville was arrested
Sept. 21 by Bradford deputies
for possession of marijuana,
possession of cocaine,
possession of drug equipment, a
non-moving traffic violation and
an out-of-county warrant.
Ada Louise Griffis, 45, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 23 by Bradford deputies
for a probation violation.


Marjorie Griffis Havard, 46,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 19
by Starke police for possession
of drug equipment.
Jacob Sylvester Henderson,
35, of Lawtey was arrested
Sept. 19 by Bradford deputies
for three charges of possession
of marijuana, possession of
cocaine, delivering distributing
drugs and resisting an officer,
Adam George Hill, 50, of
Brooker was arrested Sept.
23 by Bradford deputies for a
probation violation.
Anthony Nelson Howard, 21,
of New Port Richey was arrested
Sept. 18 by Bradford deputies
for probation violation.
Tammy Hand Johns, 40, of
Georgia was arrested Sept. 21 by
Starke police for a non-moving
traffic violation.
;
David Carlos Johnson, 25,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 21
by Starke police for disorderly
intoxication and disorderly
conduct.
Harry Darryl Jones, 30, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 21 by Bradford deputies
for probation violation.
Jalisa Lacoie Jones, 22, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 19
by Starke police for disorderly
conduct.
Barry Albert J(Krajnovich, 52,
of Brooker was arrested Sept.
22 by Starke police for a traffic
offense.
Brandon Lee McDaniel, 18, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 17 by
Bradford deputies for aggravated
assault with a weapon.
Brandon Adrian Nelson, 19,
of Hampton was arrested Sept.
23 by Bradford deputies for five
charges of probation violation.
Shawn Daren Nettles, 47, of
Hampton was arrested Sept. 22
by Bradford deputies for a non-
moving traffic violation.
Donan David Ochoa, 37, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 21 by
Starke police for trespassing.
Luis Antonio Perez, 47, of
Homestead was arrested Sept.
17 by Starke police for a non-
moving traffic violation.
Michael Shane Pittman, 31,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 22
by Starke police for disorderly
conduct.


Geneva Bennett Prevatt, 42,
of Hampton was arrested Sept.
21 by Bradford deputies for
disorderly intoxication.
Kenneth Alton Pye, 29, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 22 by
Starke police for a traffic offense
and two charges of resisting an
officer.
Dennie Rae Randolph, 33, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 23 by
Bradford deputies for probation
violation.
Quantavian Darnel Reed, 18,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 23
by Bradford deputies for lewd
and lascivious behavior.
James Allan Roberts, 41, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 22
by Lawtey police for dealing ii
stolen property.
Derrick Smith, 19, of Starke
was arrested Sept. 17 by Bradford
deputies for failure to appear.
Stephen Ryan Smith, 21, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 20 by
Starke police for a moving traffic
violation.
Freddie Monroe Stephens,
33, of Jacksonville was arrested
Sept. 19 by Bradford deputies for
withholding child support. :,
Ernest Steven Varnes, 32, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 20 by
Bradford deputies for probation
violation.
Willie Leterrance Weaver, 22,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 17
by Starke police for battery.
Matthew Duane Wilkinsoti,
25, of Starke was arrested Sept.
23 by Starke police for larceny
and dealing in stolen property.
Alexander B. Williams, 39, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 17 by
Starke police for larceny.

Union
Dana Diane Atcheson, 26, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept. 23
by Union deputies for probation
violation.
Christopher Burns, 43, Of
Chiefland was arrested Sept. 19
by Union deputies for possession
of marijuana.
Benny Leroy Cook, 65, Of
Lake Butlerwas arrested Sept. t6
by Union deputies for aggravated
assault by throwing missile
(brick) into occupied vehicle.
Michael Jared Dilas, 32, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept. 18
by Union deputies for possession
of drugs.
Christopher Lee Jenkins, 40,
of Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
18 by Union deputies on an out-
of-county warrant.
Thelma Priscilla Jenkins,
32, of Lake Butler was arrested
Sept. 19 by Union deputies on'a
warrant for burglary andbattery.
Nicholas Lyn Miller, 33, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept. 19
by Union deputies for disorderly
conduct.
Denise Nicole Padgett, 18, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
18 by Union deputies for battery.
Teavon Lee Williams, 22, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
24 by Union deputies for failure
to appear.


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8B TELEGRAPH, IIMEs & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013


Keystone
Indians post 21 1st- drops


quarter points in 35-7 win match to
...... .. *.f..I, Ridgeview


BY iDAIN JHLItBUKAN
Monitor Editor
Anton Noble rushed for 104
yards and three touchdowns
as the Keystone Heights High
School football team notched its
second win of the season, beating
Umatilla 35-7 in Lake County.
Michael Carroll also had a
rushing touchdown, while Blake
Valenzuela completed an 11-yard
touchdown pass to Micah Brown
to give the Indians (2-1) a victory
in the District 5-4A opener for
both teams.
Keystone got off to a fast start,
posting 21 points in the first
quarter.
Head coach Chuck Dickinson
said Umatilla's defense dared the
Indians to pass, lining up all 11
of its defenders within 5 yards of
the line of scrimmage. Dickidnson
responded by calling play-action
pass plays, allowing Valenzuela
to complete six of 14 passes for
93 yards and one touchdown.
That touchdown came with
10:12 left in the first quarter
when Valenzuela found Brown
for the game's first score. Brown
had a total of four catches for 84
yards.
Keystone missed the PAT,
resulting in a 6-0 score.
The Indians' next touchdown
came a little over a minute after
their first score on a 3-yard run
by Carroll. Valenzuela completed
a 2-yard pass to Darein Gilio for
the two-point conversion, and
Keystone was up 14-0 with 9:01
remaining in the first quarter.
With 2:26 left in the first
quarter, Noble scored the first
of his three touchdowns on a
3-yard run. JJ. Schofield kicked
the extra point, and Keystone
enjoyed a 21-0 lead after 12
minutes of play.
Noble struck again just


RUN
Continued from 4B


22:082; and Kristopher Padgett
62nd, 23:13.6.
In the junior varsity girls' race,
Meghan Harris placed first with
a time of 22:57.4, while Tessa
Ricker was third with a time of
23:492.
The following also competed:
Kristina Rowe eighth, 24:56.7;
Sabrina Almodovar 10th,
25:13.9; Bethany Bryan 16t,
25:55.8; Rachel Ricker 20',
26:37.9; Simran Patel 26*,
28:10.1; Chelsey Bradley 27",


before halftime with a 1-yard
touchdown run. Schofield added
the PAT, sending the Indians to
the locker room with a 28-0 lead.
Noble's last score came on
a 68-yard gallop with 3:54
remaining in the game.
Umatilla (04) also scored
in the fourth quarter with an
11-yard rush by Josh Enfinger,
resulting in a 35-7 final.
The Keystone defense had
another strong showing. Gilio
led the team with seven tackles
and six assists. Lane Blanton
had five tackles and four assists,
while RJ. Harvin had five
tackles and one assist.
Gilio also picked off two
passes. Harvin intercepted one
pass.
Dickinson said Brown's
success in getting behind
Umatilla's defense was key in
the Indians' early scoring fest.
'"They loaded the box on us,
and we ran play-action pass,"
he said. "Micah was able to get
behind them, and Blake made
some good throws."
Dickinson said he has seen a
similar defense from Umatilla
before.
"Two years ago they locked


28:14; Emily Canova 311,
30:08.4; Chelsea Hilts 32'd,
30:57.6; Muskaan Patel 36t,
33:49.4; and Zoelle Fulton 37r,
33:51.2.
Adam Wilson placed ninth in
the junior varsity boys' race with
a time of 21:01.1.
SThe following also competed:
Robert Martin 171- 22:203;
Lane Gillenwaters 34"', 30:01.8;
and Matthew Sherin 37r,
35:37.5.
Prior to the Leslie Baker
Invitational, Bradford competed
in the Sept. 14 University
of Florida Mountain Dew
Invitational.


Anton Noble
breaks free
for a first half
touchdown. The
junior running
back finished
with three
touchdowns and
104 yards. Photo
by Tonya Gibbs.


up in man coverage and put
eight in the box," he recalled.
"We had two wide receivers, and
we threw for about 280 yards on
them. That year they dared us to
throw, and I guess this year they
wanted to stop our run. We were
fortunate to come out with the
play-action pass and hurt them."
Dickinson said he is now
less concerned with one of
his primary worries over the
summer conditioning. He
said late game cramping-one
measure of fatigue-was rare
during the Umatilla game. Two
weeks ago in Wildwood, Indian
trainers treated several players
on the field for leg cramps.
Dickinson also said missed
blocking assignments, which
plagued the team during its
spring game last May and in a
preseason game at Ridgeview,
have largely subsided.
"We have got to get better at
staying with the block and .get
movement," he said. "That's our
whole key."
On Friday, Sept. 27, Keystone
hosts Class 1A Newberry at
7:30 pmn. The Panthers (2-2)
are coming off of a 34-0 loss to
Chiefland.


Bradford had the following
compete in the varsity race:
Nazworth 20:55.93, Kersey
20:58.34, Oliver 22:05.41,
Seymour 22:18.42, Padgett
22:35.56, Taylor Sanders
22:3958 and Martin 24:06.49.
Scotty Peirce and Hales
competed in the junior varsity
boys' race, finishing with times
of 18:22.79 and 20:49.81,
respectively.
Frederick placed 21st in the
junior varsity girls' race with a
time of 23:0337. Tessa Ricker,
who was 649, and Rachel Ricker
had times of 24:5529 and
29:32.40, respectively.


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
They came close to forcing a
fifth set, but the Keystone Heights
High School Indians instead lost
3-1 (25-22, 25-10, 22-25, 26-
24) to Class 5A Ridgeview in a
varsity volleyball match on Sept.
19 in Orange Park.
Keerston Skinner had 10 kills
for the Indians (3-3 prior to Sept.
24), while Hanna Crane had 21
assists. Alexa Born and Caiylen
Gonzales each had seven digs,
while Bailey Zinkel had four
service aces.
Keystone played Oakleaf
this past Tuesday and will
host District 5-4A opponent
Bradford on Thursday, Sept. 26.
On Tuesday, Oct. 1, the Indians
travel to Glen St. Mary to play
Baker County.
Matches are scheduled for 6
p.mn. following JV matches at 5
p.mn.


BHS
Continued from 4B


6 yards.
That set the Tornadoes up at
the Buffalo 36-yard line. One
play was all they needed to
increase their lead, with Luke
hooking up with Dinkins for a
touchdown at the 6:44 mark of
the second quarter. The PAT was
no good, leaving Bradford with
a 13-0 lead.
The Villages put together
another drive that crossed
midfield and took the Buffalo as
far as the Bradford 28. Thomas
made his mark on defense for the
Tornadoes, intercepting a pass to
keep the Tornadoes up by 13.
Having been turned away
several times in the first half, the
Buffalo came out at the start of
the second half and put together
a 14-play, 79-yard scoring drive.
Viet Nguyen capped the drive
with a 1-yard touchdown run. A
successful two-point conversion
made the score 13-8 with 4:16
remaining in the third quarter.
An 11-yard run by Desue
(12 carries, 62 yards) and a big
10-yard, third-down scramble
by Luke had the Tornadoes on
the move as they successfully


Indians even District
5-4A record
The Indians bounced back
from a 3-0 (25-14,25-10,25-10)
loss to district opponent Santa
Fe on Sept. 10, defeating district
opponent Interlachen 3-0 (25-20,
25-13,25-8) on Sept. Sept. 17 in
Keystone.
. Born and Skinner had eight
and seven kills, respectively, for
the Indians, who improved to
2-2 in district play. Crane had 21
assists and seven service aces.
Gonzales had five digs.


4 KHHS

runners finish

in top 100 at

Alligator Lake

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Three girls' team runners
placed in the top 100, while one
boys' team member did so as the
Keystone Heights High School
cross country teams competed
in the Alligator Lake Invitational
on Sept. 21 in Lake City.
Riley Dingman, Caitlin
Cumbus and Jennie Getz placed


answered the Villages' scoring
drive. Thomas, who finished
the game with 119 yards on four
carries, added a 25-yard run to
the Villages 16-yard line before
Barren later caught a 13-yard
touchdown pass from Luke with
eight seconds left in the quarter.
Bradford led 19-8 after the
unsuccessful PAT.
The Buffalo put together
another lengthy drive that
resembled the one they opened
the half with. They marched
to the Bradford 19 in 11 plays
before settling for a 36-yard field
goal attempt. A roughing the
kicker penalty on the Tornadoes,
though, gave the Buffalo a first
down at the 9-yard line.
Bradford defensive lineman
Todderick Reed was in on two
consecutive gang tackles that
prevented the Buffalo from
gaining any yardage. After a
run of 3 yards on third down,
Mangum threw a pass into the
end zone on fourth down, which
defensiveback Hojden Huggins
broke-up toforce'a turnover on
downs.
"In the face of adversity,
we stood up and made plays,"
Reynolds said.
Five plays after the change of
possession, Dinkins capped the
scoring with an electrifying run


55-, 60-' and 61- with times of
24:32.47,24:46.69 and 24:52.88,
while Luke Dennis was 80'h in
the boys' race with a time of
20:11.30.
Also competing for the girls'
team, which placed 121h out of
18 schools, were Nina Horten
(27:29.87), Cheyenne Singletary
(27:58.90) and Naomi Proctor
(28:20.98).
CJ. Priest (21:12.29), Lake
Beck (21:15A.45), Conner Getz
(23:31.69), Josh Prendergast
(25:12.33) and Aaron
Prendergast (26:41.02) competed
for the boys' team, which was
16 out of 19 schools.
Keystone started the season by
participating in the University
of Florida Mountain Dew
Invitational on Sept. 14. Results
for the girls team, which was
45th out of 56 teams, were: Anika
Henanger 23:48.40, Dingman
24:29.80, Cumbus 25:06.99,
Getz 25:36.01, Singletary
29:14.62, Horten 29:21.78 and
Erika Dingman 29:23.73.
The boys' team, which placed
55th out of 61 teams, had the
following results:, Dennis
20:07.19, Priest 21:21.48, Beck
21:31.17, Steven Rodriguez
22:28.09, Getz 24:0928 and
Josh Prendergast 25:29.60.


after a short pass, giving him his
second touchdown of the night
and a final total of 118 yards on
three receptions.
Luke, who finished the game
with three touchdown passes,
completed 4-of-10 passes for
131 yards.
Though they took their
lumps at the start of the season,
including a 43-6 loss to Baker
County, the Bradford players
have continued to work hard and
get better, Reynolds said. It was
good, he said, to see them finally
get rewarded for their efforts ;
"Our kids-better than
anyone else around-have been
awesome at being resilient,"
Reynolds said. "Our kids are
bouncing back and bouncing
back and bouncing back. I think
it was very important for them to
reap the benefits of all the hard
work that they've done."
Bradford hosts. Class 5A
Palatka in a non-district game
this Friday, Sept. 27, at 7:30
p.m.. The.Panthers (2-2) opened
the season with a 53-20 loss to
Vanguard and a 20-14 loss to
Trinity Catholic, but have since
defeated Creekside 40-0 and
Ridgeview 28-12.
Palakta took a 30-20 win over
the Tornadoes last season.


Classified Ads -


(9043 964-6305

13521473-2210

(386 496-2261


Where one call

| does it a///l


40
Notices
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising In this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes


it illegal to advertise 'any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an in-
tention to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination.' Familial
status includes children


under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women
and people securing cus-
tody of children under
18. This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of


Set Right Mobile Homes
Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Dispoisal
Rodney A. Carmichael, Owner 904-364-6383
Email: setright_homes@yahoo.com
aicn enSefiIM3Wtwi't fW62H5 ,;# ,,


the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion, call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777, the toll-
free telephone number
for the hearing impaired
is 1-800-927-9275. For
further information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-7082
ext #1005.

47
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease, Sale)
DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro-
fessional Offices for rent,
$315 per month. Confer-
ence room, kitchen, utili-
Sties and more provided.
904-364-8395.
RETAIL SPACE in busy
strip center. 1,000 sq.ft.
and 2.000 sq. ft. units.
South HWY 301 front-
age, across from the KOA
Campground. Call 352-
235-1675.
FOR RENT PROFES-
SIONAL OFFICE, 1,500
sq.ft.- $1,000/mo.- up to
3,000 sq.ft. contiguous
$2,000/mo. Warehouse
3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo.
Smith & Smith Realty.
904-964-9222.


FOR RENT: Retail Space.
by Starke Post Office.
Retail or business office.
Lease 6 months, $300/
mo. 904-364-9022.
Commercial office space
for lease. 2 office spaces
available off Hwy. 301.
Allelectric, cleaning and
pest control is included in
monthly rent $300/Month
& $300/Deposit Contact
Listing Agent Christina
Sanford. Property Manag-
er, Chamelle Whittemore
Realty. (904) 964-3948.
OFFICE SPACE, main area
315 sq.ft. fumished with
2 desk, 2 chairs, file cabi-
net, and decor. Plus back
room 265 sq. ft. includes
bathroom, and utilities.
$900/mo. 904-626-8488.
RETAIL SPACE, downtown
Starke. off Walnut St.

Orangewood Apartments
801 South Water Street
Stake, FL 32091
904-9644214
TDD/TTY 711
Accepting Applicationsl
Rental Assistance!
1,2, & 3 bedroom HC &
Non-HC accessible
apartments.
S"This tiion is m equal
"Oppft*n provide, and employee'
'EquM Houing Oppotiit--


Plenty of paidng, large
space, bathroom, utilities
included. $550/mo. 904-
626-8488.
49
Mobile Homes
For Sale
EX-LARGE DW. ON 2/3
acre. Fireplace, new
metal roof-AC-rugs. To-
tally refurbished. Owner
financing. 352-745-0094.
ATTENTION We buy used
mobile homes] Singles or
doublewides. Call Rusty
at North Pointe Homes.

NOW
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
Southern Villas
of Starke
Ask about our
$199 Move in Special
1&2 BRApartments HC &
non-HC Units. Central.AC/
Heat, on-site laundry,
playground, private, quiet
atmnosphere.
Located on SR-16.
1001 Southern Vilas Dr.
Stake, FL
Call 904-964-7295
TDDI/TTY 711
TVqA Housing ppo i


352-872-5566.
NEW 2013 28x52- 3/2
Jacobsen, only 1 left,
$45,900. inc delkset-AC-
skirting, and steps. No
gimmicks North Points
Homes, Gainesville, 352-
872-5566. Free credit by
phone till 9pm.
NORTH POINT HOMES
in Gainesville has the
largest selection of New
Jacobsen Homes in Flor-
Ida. All at Factory Outlet
Prices We also have 10
display models being sold
at cost North Point Hwy.

Waldo Villas
Move-In
Special
2 Bedroom
Townhome
$100 scurity
1/2 OFF 1st &
2nd meoBt's rent
Equal housing oppounit.
This institution Is an equal
opporfnityDproider&

Call Nita at
352-468-1971
TDD 800-955-9771


441 N. Gainesville 352-
872-5566.
BRAND NEWV 2014 4 Bed
Doublewkide. $49,900. Set
up & delivered. Wayne-
friermacclenny.com.
904-259-4663.
LIKE NEW. HUGE 4 Bed
Doublewide Remod-
eled. $49,900. Set up
with new AC. Waynefti-
ermacclenny.com. 904-
259-4663.
I BUY USED MOBILE


HOMES. CASH!I Paid im-
mediately. 904-259-4663.
BAD CREDIT? Owner fi-
nance or rent to own. 3
BR/2 BAon 1 acre. $650/
mo. Call Mike @ 386-
418-0424
COUNTRY LIVING or 5
acres with 4BR/2 BA. 2
living areas, island kItch-
en with appliances. easy
commute to work. Call
Mike @ 386-418-0435,


Tri-County Classifieds
Bradford Union -Clay
SReach over 27,000 Readers Every Week!

INDEX
40 Notices 51 Lst/Found 61 Scrt,
41 Auctions 52 Animals & Pets 62 Vacalonrvel
42 Motor Vehides&AcaNSia S3AYard Sales 63 Love Limes
43 RVs & Campers 53B Keyne Yard Sales 64 Buness Opportities
44 Ba &ATV S3C Lake BulerY Sa 65 Help Wanta
45 Land for Sale 54 Produce 66 lnvestitOpporumitiad
46 Real Estate Out ofArea 55 Wanted 67 Hnnfi LandtffforRent
47 Commercial Property 56 A tiques 68 Carpet-Cleaing
Rer, Leas a 57C For Sale 69 FoodSupplemets
48 Homes for Sale 58 Child/AdltHeoeCare 70 Money toLend
49 Mobile Homes for Sale 59 Personal Semrvices 71 Farm Equipment
50 For Rent 60 Home Improvement 72 Computenrs&Acmmiei

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Thesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display ,Tuesday, 12:00 noon
TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE



964-6305 473-2210 496-2261
NOTICE
Classified Advertising should be paid in advance nless credit has already beat established w th fe
newspaper. A S3.00 service _darge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads
placed by pne are read back to the advertiser at the time ofplacement. However, he classified staff
stndard abbreviatow il be acwefte


0D$549 mth
edroom/2 Bath
Only 629 mth
ior the 3 Bedroom/2 Bath


Only $729 mth
For the 4 Bedroom/2 Bath
Call for current
MOVE-IN SPECIALS!


EXTRA CASH!

Could you use some now
that the holidays are over?
We specialize in helping people
sell through our Classifieds!

* YARD SALES AUTOS.- BOATS
* CLOTHES APPUANCES-
17e list goes oDL

Call Mary Today at

904-964-6305


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Now's the perfect time to see just how well our classified
can work for you. Whether you're looking for a great buy or a
great place to sell, call our classified department today.

904-964-6305
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THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 9B


Classified Ads -


(9041 964-6305

(3521 473-2210

(3863 496-2261


Where one call

does it all -m


RENT-TO-OWN. 3 BR dou-
ble-wide remodeled on 1
acre short drive to town.
-ClI Marsha @ 386-418-
S0424.
OEEN TURNED DOWN?
-575 or better beacon 10%
S'down, you're approved
New 4BR/2BA or new
3BR/2BA. Call for de-
tails. 386-418-0424,13Th
Street Homes.
NEW 3BR/2BA, 1130 sq. ft.
home. 10% cash down
.pmt. Only $345 per
month. WA.C. Call Mike
0 386-418-0438.
NEW 14 Wide singlewide,
Deli & Setup w/alir. Galley
kitchen, LG. living area.
$279/mo. W.A.C. Call
Marsha @386-418-0435.
JUST LISTED 4BR/2BAon
over 4 acres. 1900 sq.ft.
Being remodeled now.
Call for details, ask for
Mike @ 386-418-0424.
OWNER FINANCE
3BR/2BA, remodeled on
n blot $525Ano. Cal Marsha
S...@ 386-418-0435.
3BR/2BA garage, carport,
Q.20x10 storage shed, on
,5 acres, 3 miles from
" Melrose. $67,500 Call
904-982-6365.
>^5O
,- For Rent
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, dean; dose to pris-
'dn. Call 352-468-1323.
,.NICE MOBILE HOMES
in Lake Butler & Stasce.
't"6x80 2BR/2BA, DW
3BR/2BA. 2 & 3 BR sin-
gle wides. Both fenced.
Deposit required. Call
678-438-6828.
-MOBILE HOMES FOR
RENT starting at $525
:i6r month. Hidden Oaks,
..,,Lake Butler.- Call 386-
S" .64&8111.
'PERMANENT ROOMS
for rent at the Magnolia
Hotel. Both refrigerator
a nd microwave. Special
;:I ates, by the month. Call
. .-904-964-4303 for more
Information.
LAKE BUTLER APART-
,. ,MENTS, Accepting ap-
".cationsforHC and non-
'*,HC. 1,2,3,&4BR.Equal


ho- 0~j 1006
SW 6th St Lake Butler,
32054. TDD/TTY 711.
Call 386-496-3141.
STARKE across from Coun-
try Club. Available Oct
1st. 3BR/1BA. house. .
complete renovated. New
carpet, vinl ca binets ap-
pliances, on 1/2 acre, In-
cludes lan care. Service
animals only, no smok-
Ing, references. $700hAno.
$700 deposit. Immediate
occ4pancy. Ideal for small
famlyof couple. Call 904-
S662-3735 please leave
message if no answer.
MOBILE HOME for rent In
good condition. For more
information call, 904-290-
0083 OR 904-964-5006.
KEYSTONE Rentals,
2BR/1BA CHIA house,
$600Ano. 2BR/1Ba mo-
bile homes, $475-$5501
mo. All on small spring
feed lake, sandy beach.
Call for more information.
352-226-6226.
KEYSTONE HGTS. One
BR. Mobile, on Private
Land. fully furnished,
real nice condition. $325.
352-473-5745.
2BR/1 BA. Singlekide be-
tween Ralford & Lake
Butler. CH/A. 14 ft wide.
$300 deposit $550n/mo.
904-305-8287. 904-263-
3999.
DOUBLE-WIDE. Very nice,
extra clean. 3 BR/2 BA.
Service animal only.
South of Starce on S.E.
49th Ave. $575/mno. plus
deposit 352-468-2674.
2BR/ 1 BA. CH/A. VERY
dean. Quiet area. Wa-
tar & lawn maintenance
provided. $495n/mo. Plus
deposit 904-364-8135.
LAKE ALTO ESTATES,
Waldo mobile homes,
2BR/1BA. $5251mo.
3BR/2BA. $650An/mo. New-
ly updated, washer/dyer
hook-ups, storage sheds,
nioe porches. Service anl-
mals only. 317-748-7912.
2BR/1BA. CH/A washer/
dryer, new carpet, new
stove, on acreage. $600/
mo. $600 deposit. $150
non refundable pet de-


posit Call 386-631-6381.
3BR/2BA Single wide on
Grifs Loop. CH/A service
animals only. $450/mo.,
plus deposit. 352-284-
3310.
3BR/2BA HOUSE, Just out-
side of Stance. Large liv-
ing room, fenced back
yard. FPL elec. $12001
mo. 904-769-6626.
51
Lost/Found
LOST, REWARD for Love
Bird, green body, blue
tall & peach on face. Lost
230A and area around.
904-964-2441.
53A
Yard Sales
HUGE Yard Sale, Fri. Sat
8am.-2pmn. rain or shine.
Morgan Road, SR. 233.
look for signs, some of
everything, guns, knives,
LP records, DVD's, CD's,
VHS tapes, TV. speakers,
books, comes, kid stuff,
household, collectibles &
more. Some really good
Stuff you'll wantfor Xmas.
Many items make after.
GRACE BAPTISTChurch is
having a rummage sale,
Fri. &Sat 8-2pm.
THURS. FRI. 8AM.-? 879
NE 185th St Starke. Fire-
works store at the end of
road. Toys, household
items, men & women
clothing. Look for signs.
YARD SALE- 9127 & 2/28.
9am. 740 S. Epperson SL
Baby items- Pack n Play,
booster seats. Clothes:
adult-size 14-18 w. As-
sorted children's clothes.
Small appliances, fumli-
ture, household items,
books, etc. Much much
more. PLEASE NO EAR-
LY BIRDS.
MULTI1 FAMILYYARD SALE.
Sept 28. 8am-2pm. Arts


& crafts items, candles,
household Items,nurses,
scrubs, desk & chair, tools
& electrical supplies, toys
& exercise equipment.
Old Olln's Sales Lot High-
way 100 W. Just passed
Pine Forest Apartments.
BIG YARD SALE. Thurs.
Fri. Sat 8am.-? 100 west
to 225 (Bayless Hwy.) go
right 1 mile on right look
for signs. Jackets, men
& women clothes, lots of
girls baby clothes, toys,
big TV. cabinet, coffee
and end tables, 2 Prin-
cess bikes, w/tralning
wheels, household items,
much more.
GIGANTIC Yard Sale. 3402
NW 183RD St 3 miles N.
on 301, turn on road by
Daughter Land Survey-
or. 1st triple wide on left
Fr. Sat 9am.-? Little bit of
everything except tools.
53B
Keystone Yard
Sales
MOVING YARD SALE, OCT.
3,(Thurs.) Oct4, (Fri.) Oct
5,(Sat.) 8a.-?. Lots and
lots of Misc. items. Plus
lots of Christmas d6cor,
catering items. Price to
sale, Everything must
go. 6311 Baker Road,
Keystone Heights. Look
for signs.
55
Wanted
CASH FOR JUNK cars $300
& up. Free pick up, run-
ning or not. Call 352-
445-3909.

57
For Sale
FOR SALE, due to illness,
all good condition. 1994
6400 John Deer Trac-


Fsis ,IAI


Huge Estate Auction

Saturday, Sept 28th, 9 AM
; for the Late Richard Beymer
4904 SW 144th Street, Starke (behind Knuckledraggeron 301).
2 Harley bikes, few guns, hundreds of tools, mowers, household.
See Keystone Auction Service web site @ auctionzip.comn for
listings and pictures, updates through the night before auction.
S Cash/check w/ID, Visa, MC, Debit. 12% B.P.+ tax,
2 % B.P. discount w/cash/check.
!Food & soda available, bdring a chair.

KEYSTONE A fnhN SERICM E
ABt1648, Col. Ken Mitchell, AU 62225
_ "_ Call for information (352) 283-6297





NEEDCASH?FIT

I Sell your car, home, boat or 'stuff

wh a Classified Photo Ad


S ,aLBauD ^ .11.41b1'


anlforonly

Your Photo Ad in 3 Weekly Papers
covering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties phs
a DM M)inourwedyfree
community shopper The BirdDog Specia/

Emil your med4oiesolution digital photo (150dpft+) & ad text to:
Badib it LCG1n by 5pin Monday or bring It to:
Bradford County Tdelegraph* Union County Times Lake Region Monitor
(904) 964-6305
cas c h cm d t it cds aepted


Auctions
AUCTIONS-
Roofing Company
Liquidation, Online
Auction Only, Bid
September 17 thu
September 26, Items
Locatedin Maryland &
Florida. Motley's
Auction&Realty
Group, 804-232-3300,
www~motlevs.con
VAAL#16.
Autos Wated
Sell Your Cludassic!
Get top dollar for your
classic car at Lake
Minor Classic Auto
Auction in Lakeland, Fl


tor wlcanopy-MFWD 85
hp, 3 hitch-2 remotes.
640 loader 1964 Gal-
lon grader. 1995 Fer-
guson roller. 1989 Ford
350 Dually diesel truck.
1998 Hallmark 8x16.5
ft. enclosed trailer. 1970
F 750 single-axle Ford
dump truck w/ equipment
trailer. 12 ft. Jon boat
Table saw, Fert spreader,
Wuriltzer-Melville-Clark
spinet piano, Hammond
spinet organ L-133 has
LES LER speakers. Call
386-496-0683.
KENMORE ELITE DUAL
FUEL RANGE. Perfect
baking like magic, with
convection oven. Ceramic
glass. 5 burner gas cook
top $519. Beautiful 7
piece Portland oak cabi-
nets. 2 have glass front,
one is a corner carousel,
$480. Call 352-519-2400
or 352-226-6461.
BANANA TREES. Plants
are approx. 3 ft tall. $10
eachor3 for$25. Located
in Stance. Call 904-796-
0781.
ELECTRIC 4 HORSE walk-
er, $675. Goose neck 3
horse slant, all aluminum,
$6,800.352-468-1455.
1985- 35' TRAVEL TRAIL-
ER. Good condition. 2
porches. $800. Buyer
must move IL Needs tires.
904-984-6259. No an-
swer, leave message.
RAIFORD ESTATE SALE.
14016 C.R. 229N. Oct.
4-6; 8-3prm. Lawn, camp-


ing, 8x10 shed, rifles,
safes, collectibles, electri-
cal, AXC tech, tools, gen-
erators, security lights,
dehumidifiers, furniture,
household, washer, grill,
pool, more, 386-431-
1164.
59
Wanted
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Level-
ing & raising Houses/l
Bldgs. Pier Replacement
& alignment. We do all
types of tractor work,
excavation and small
demolition jobs. Free Es-
timates: Danny (Buddy)
Clnark, 904-545-5241.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has moneyto lend for MH
& land packages. 1-800-
284-1144.
HOME DAYCARE all hours.
Great rates. 30 pius years
experience. All hours, lots
of TLC. HRS certified.
CPR certified and First
Aide certified. Call 386-
496-1062.
DURRANCE PUMP & well
drilling. 24 Hr. pump ser-
vice. Call 904-964-7061.
65
Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED PROP-
ERTY preservation sub-
contractors. Must be li-
censed, Insurance, expe-
rienced in home repairs,
provide equipment, and


available to travel within
Florida. You will also need
knowledge of camera and
computer use for sending
picture fles dallyto offIce.
Call 352-473-0095.
HIRING experienced prop-
erty preservation secre-
taries. Prefer Vendor 360,
Mars & Zephyr knowl-
edge. MUST have knowl-
edge of Windows 7 or 8
& Excel. Construction,
Building materials and
use of cost estimator a
plus. Call 352-473-0095.
Drivers: $5,000
Sign-On Bonusl
Great Payl Con-
sistent Freight,
Great Miles on This
Regional Account.
Werner Enterprises:
1-888-567-3110 65
EXPERIENCED HEAVY
equipment operators, for
road & underground utili-
ties contractor. Pay based
on experience, EOE. drug
free work place. Call 904-
781-7304.
UNION COUNTY SOLID
WASTE is looking for
a Call Time/As Needed
to fill in for our Garbage
Collection Sites. This po-
sition requires applicants
to lift at least 50 pounds,
be able to stand in the
heat and help residents
unload trash, debris and
other items. You must
be able to pass a drug
screen and submit to
random testing. Our Sites
are open Wed-Sun so


WATSON REALTY Is OFFERING
Training for new associates
* Great state of the art tools for experienced associates
* Online education and training courses available 24 hrs. a day
* Do business from any intemrnet.connection in the world
* Office locations in Starke and Keystone Heights
* 41 offices from St Mars Georgia to Kissimmee in Central Florida
* Full time and referral positions available
* Licensing course 3 consecutive weekends, 8 am 6pm:
Gainesville: October 5th October 20th
Palatka: October 26th November 10th

V Call
Dean Weaver
Vice President/Broker
(352) 473-6201
(904) 964-7330


Yawn 3hlkyCmm RE lU S-


I iOut of Area Classifieds


onOctober 19th Call
1-800-257-4161 M..
Higgenbotham FL
Lic#AU305AB158
Help Wanted
DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Leamto drive for US
Xpress! Earn $700 per
week! No experience
needed! Local CDL
Taning. Job readyin
15 days! (888)368-
1964
Expenced OTR
Flatbed Drives cam
50 upto55cpm
loaded. $1000sign on


to Qualified drivers.
Home most weekends.
Call: (843)266-3731 / .
www.bulldobhway.com
.EOE
CRST offers the Best
Leam Pucha
Program! SIGN ON
BONUS. No Down
Payment or Credit
Check. Great Pay.
Class-ACDL required.
Owner Operators
Welcome! Call: 866-
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Miscellaneous
AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here-Get FAA
approved Aviation


Maintenance
Technician training.
Housing and Financial
aid for qualified
students. Job
placement assistance.
CallAIM 866-314-
3769
Real Estate/Land
for Sale
Blue Ridge
MountainLand
Liquidation! 137
acres, national forest
access, only $9,800.
Was
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lOB TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONiTOR B SECrION THURSDAY, SIIPT. 26, 2013


MARIAH
Continued from 1B

for as long as she was allowed,
crying every day when she was
asked to leave by hospital staff.
"That was the hardest 36
days of my life," she said. "I
spent every waking hour in that
NICU. Looking back, it was so
traumatic. I didn't realize how
traumatic it was on me until I got
a chance to breathe. I guess when
you're in the moment, you just
tough it out. Then you look back
and go, 'Oh, my gosh. That was
so hard.'"
It's also hard for Felicia to
think about what Mariab has
to go through daily because
of cystic fibrosis. The child
spends approximately an hour
each day doing three breathing
treatments-two with an inhaler
and one with a nebulizer. The
nebulizer treatment requires
Mariah to wear a mask.
"As a mom, it's real hard to
watch her try to cope with that,"
Felicia said. "She screams and
fights. It's not a fun process."
Mariah has to take six types
of medication daily. Enzyme
supplements have to be taken
with each meal to help her digest
food.
Weight gain is a concern. As
a result, Mariah has to consume
high-calorie foods. Felicia
said she tries to give Mariah as
healthy a diet as possible, but
she must also feed her cookies
and snacks just to try to get her
to gain weight. Mariah enjoys
celery, for example, but celery
gets served with ranch dressing
or peanut butter.
Unfortunately, as a result
of a diet centered on weight
gain, many children with cystic
fibrosis develop diabetes at a
young age.
Then there are the doctors'
visits, which occur at least once
a month.
"She's absolutely petrified to
go to the doctor," Felicia said.
"All the blood draws and the
poking. They squish around on
her belly. She's petrified. That's
going to be hard to deal with in
the near future even. The last
time we went to an appointment,
she screamed the whole three
hours we were there.
"That's really hard to watch
her be so afraid."
Despite saying herdaughterhas
experienced more trauma than
she and her husband combined,
Felicia can look at the positive
side of things. A book on cystic
fibrosis given to her by doctors
to read stated the average life
expectancy was approximately
21 years. That book, though, was
published in the early 1980s. The
life expectancy has increased by
more than 10 years since that
time.
."They're saying, give or take,
by the time (Mariah)'s in high
school, they're hoping to have
. medical advances that really,
really help treat the underlying
cause of this disease," Felicia
said.
Another positive is to look at
the life of 22-year-old Katelyn
Sims, a 2009 Bradford. High
School graduate who helped
start the Bradford-Union Great
Strides event.
"She is very inspirational,'
Diane Ennis said. "If I did not
know Katelyn personally, I
would be much more distraught
about Mariah's future."
mom

Sims, who was diagnosed with
cystic fibrosis at the age of 4,
has remained active throughout
her life, participating in such
activities as cheerleading and
competing in pageants.
Felicia Ennis said if someone
didn't know Sims personally,
they wouldn't know she had
cystic fibrosis. That's how
Felicia would like life to be for
her daughter.
"One of the great things about
Katelyn, I think, is I've never
really seen it get her down,"
Felicia said. "Katelyn just
pushes through. She's always
smiling. You would never know
something's wrong with her
unless she willingly gave you
that information."
Felicia said a description that
is used in regard to cystic fibrosis
and how it affects a person's
lungs is breathing through a straw
for three minutes while holding
your nose. Like anyone else with
cystic fibrosis, Sims has to deal
with that loss of lung function,
but it is her belief that an active


lifestyle has helped her lungs that
inspires Felicia. Felicia said she
does not discourage Mariah from
being active.
"Mariah goes out and plays,"
Felicia said. "I'm going to get
her into swimming lessons, and
she's going to do sports."
Sims has been involved in
each of the Bradford-Union
Great Strides events, though she
went against doctors' orders in
participating in the past two. In
2011, she ran the entire course,
which was approximately 6 miles
instead of the 3 it is today, despite
having fresh stitches in her side
after having an IV port removed.
Sims was sick leading up to last


year's event, having to go to the
hospital for IV treatments.
Diane Ennis said Sims' life
and her dedication to Great
Strides has certainly been a big
part of why the Bradford-Union
event is as successful as it is.
The money raised at the event
has increased each year, with
last year's Great Strides raising
approximately $23,000.
"It's encouraging to watch
what Katelyn does" Diane said.
"What a full life she lives. She
handles her medical care, but
she's very active in what she
does."
mo m

Whether or not Mariah's life
turns out to be anything like
Sims' remains to be seen. At
the moment, though, she is like
Sims in that you wouldn't guess


she had a terminal illness. Ask
Felicia Ennis to tell you about
her daughter, and you'll learn
that Mariah likes to look in the
mirror and talk to her reflection.
She'll start dancing when she
hears music. Ducks and bears are
her two favorite animals, and she
can often be heard growling like
a bear, which is quite amusing if
she's out in public. Mariah likes
to carry a purse and be a "girly
girl'," Felicia Ennis said, but she
is also quick to "play in the dirt
just as quick as any boy."
"You wouldn't know from
looking at her on the outside that
she deals with (cystic fibrosis),"
Felicia said.
Still, Felicia knows what her
daughter has to deal with every
day, which is why she prays a
lot and why she never misses
an opportunity presented to her
by the sight of a shooting star
in the sky or a dandelion on the


ground.
"Every time I get an
opportunity to make a wish, my
wish is they find a cure in her
lifetime that saves her," Felicia
said. "I'm going to cry saying
that, but that is what I wish for
every day of my life."
. If you'd like to know more
about Mariah or make donation
in support of Felicia Ennis'
South Hampton Roads-Neptune
Park Great Strides team, go to
www.cff.org/great_strides and
enter Felicia Ennis' name and
select the state of Virginia in the
"Find a Walker/Team" prompt.
You may also enter "Mariahs
Militia" in the "Find a Team"
prompt.
For more on the Bradford-
Union event, select the
state of Florida and Florida
Chapter-North Florida Office-
Jacksonville in the "Register
Now" prompt. Donations may


I lilmmm- :
Mariah Ennis surrounded by her parents, Max (a 2007.
Bradford High School graduate) and Felicla.


be made online or at the event.
If you'd like to register to
take part in the Bradford-Union
Great Strides, you may also do
so online or at Shands Starke


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TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, SEPr. 26, 2013


10B


MKI ARM


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