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Union County times ( April 18, 2013 )

UF00028314 UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
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Material Information

Title:
Union County times
Uniform Title:
Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Lake Butler Fla
Creation Date:
April 18, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates:
30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1920?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID:
UF00028314:00428

Related Items

Preceded by:
Bradford County times

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Union County times
Uniform Title:
Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Lake Butler Fla
Creation Date:
April 18, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates:
30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1920?
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID:
UF00028314:00428

Related Items

Preceded by:
Bradford County times

Full Text








*1 55iT20613 UC 20 "'B-010
LIBT OF FLORIDA HISTORY ii
2@5 SMA UNIV OF FLA


UNION U0 V NTJY GA
1(1U4-20PO BOX 1i7007
N J GAINESVILLE rL 32611-7007

USPS 648-200 LAKE BUTLER, FLORIDA THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 100l YEAR 51ST ISSUE 75 CENTS


Library closed
The Union County Public
Library will be closed the
morning of Monday, April 22,
for training. The library will re-
open at noon and resume normal
business hours.


History
presentation
on forestry set
The Union County Historical
Society's April program will
be the history of Union County
Forestry, since its inception
and its present operation today.
This presentation will be led by
William Warren and Jay Tucker
and perhaps Smokey the bear.
All are invited to attend this
presentation Monday, April 29,
7 p.m. at the historical museum
located at 410 W. Main St. The
public is invited to attend.


Law
enforcement
memorial set
The Union/Bradford Law
Enforcement Memorial will
be held Thursday, May 2, at
7:30 p.m. at the Hal Y. Maines
Community Center in Lake
Butler.


UC School
Board meeting
The Union County School
Board will meet on Tuesday,
April 23, at 1:30 p.m. The
School Board office/meeting
room is located across from the
Lake Butler Middle School on
S.R. 121. For more information,
contact 386-496-2045.


Kindergarten
registration
Lake Butler Elementary
School Kindergarten orientation
will be held Wednesday, May
8, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Pick
up a registration packet in
advance at the front office.
Once your packet is completed
and returned, your child will. be
registered for orientation and
school in the fall. Your child is
eligible for kindergarten, if he/
she turns 5 on or before Sept. 1.
For more information call Tricia
Ranard at 386-496-3047.


Historical
museum
seeks old
fishing tackle
The Union County Historical
Society would like to develop
a section in the museum for
pre-1960's fishing tackle to be
displayed. Reels, rods, lures, and
more. Loan or donate your items
to the museum to share with
others. The historical museum
is located at 410 W Main Street
in Lake Butler and is open on
Monday from 9 a.m. to noon.
Call 386-496-2258 for more
information.


Veteran Service
Office closed
The Union County Veteran
Service office will be closed on
Wednesday, May 8, for training.
The office will re-open on
Wednesday, May 15. Normal
business hours are from 8:30
a.m. to noon every Wednesday.
Call 386-496-4248 for more
information.


Local officials line up for Law Day


Judge Bo Bayer was presented with a plaque that included a proclamation designating May 1, as Law Day. (Pictured
I-r) City Manager Dave Mecusker, Vice Mayor Jimmy Beasley, Councilman Fred Sirmones, Mayor Lonnie Norman,
Judge Bo Bayer, Councilmen Leroy Stalvey and Randy Jenkins and City Attorney John Maines IV.
See Law Day, 3A


Landfill hasn't given up

on renewable energy


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor
A recent response to a request
for proposals has revived hopes
for a gas-to-energy project at the
New River Regional Landfill.
Judging by the name alone,
Landfill Energy Systems would
seem to be the perfect choice, but
it was the details of its proposal
that impressed. Following a
discussion with staff last week,
the New River Solid Waste.
Association decided to enter
contract negotiations with the
company.
Executive Director Darrell
O'Neal said there was a lot of
interest when the request for
proposals was advertised. In the
end, just four proposals were
submitted.
Landfill Energy Systems
proposes two electricity-
generating engines on site that
will turn gas released from the
decomposing waste into energy.
The company already has 45


energy projects, four of which
are in Florida, including the Trail
Ridge and Brevard facilities.
One of the deciding factors was
its existing power purchasing
contracts. Electricity produced
at the New River landfill would
be sent to Jacksonville Electric
Authority.
A prior project fell apart when
the chosen company could not
find an end user. Other proposals
submitted this time, including
one from a company who
wanted to sell the power to the
Department of Corrections, had
no purchasing agreements in
place.
Without end users, ,O'Neal
said the projects were just ideas,
and engineer Joel Woolsey ,of
Jones, Edumunds and Associates
agreed.
"You have one that rises to
the top because they've dotted
all there I's and crossed all their

See Landfill, 4A


Smith
removed from
chairman
position

BY TIFFANY CLARK
Times Editor

During the closing comments
at the conclusion of the Union
County commission meeting held
this past Monday, Commissioner
Karen Cossey motioned to have
Commissioner Wayne Smith
removed as the chairperson to
the board.
"We have always depended on
the chairperson to look out for
our best interests and to let us
know upfront what is going on,"
said Cossey. "I don't feel that we
have had that privilege."
Cossey claimed that on two
separate occasions, one of which
was recent, Chairman Smith had
used profanity when speaking
with her after a meeting.
"He cursed me out in the
parking lot after the last meeting.
I don't feel a fellow worker


should talk me to like that. I
make a motion that we remove
him as our chairperson," said
Cossey.
Commissioner Willie Croft
seconded the motion, which
carried 3/1, with Commissioner
Morris Dobbs opposing.
Smith said that he had a
new grandson, had no regrets,
and that he commended the
commissioners for dismissing
him.
"I've been a county
commissioner for 21 years," said
Smith. "I have been the chairman
18 of those years. I do not feel
the way I was attacked at the last
meeting was professional. I have
worked hard for this county. I
have spent a lot of hours in the
county office, on the phone and
filling out paperwork. If Mr.
Tallman would like to commit
the same amount of time as I
have, that's fine with me."
Tallman responded, "I will do
my best."
Smith nominated Croft for
the position of vice chairman.
Cossey seconded, the motion
carried unanimously.


SPECIAL

EDITION
Union
Correctional
Institution
celebrates 100
years.

Providence
and Palestine,
county funds
earmarked for
fire station

BY TIFFANY CLARK
Times Editor
Former county commissioner
Ricky Jenkins appeared
before the Board of County
Commissioners this past Monday
to request that a motion be made
to earmark the remaining funds
from the $300,000 the county
recently received from the tri-
county landfill to be used- to
build a fire station in Palestine
and Providence. Jenkins said that
both areas needed a fire station.
Chairman Wayne Smith
said that he had been working
with a contractor and putting
figures together on what it
would cost to build in each
location. His estimates came to
around $130,000 per building/
location. Smith made a motion
that $260,000 be used for the
Palestine and Providence area.
Vice-chairman Jimmy Tallman
seconded the motion, which
carried unanimously.
Jenkins thanked the
commissioners.
"The people need this, they
deserve this," said Jenkins.


Redistricting process has started for Union County


Redistricting is the process of
redrawing the electoral district
lines and boundaries for all levels
of government including the
U.S. House of Representatives,
state legislatures and many local
government organizations like
county commissioners, school
boards and city councils in order
to equalize district populations.
The purpose of redistricting is
to review the districts and where
necessary, redraw districts in
order to accommodate changes


in population.
Article 1, section 2 of the
U.S. Constitution requires the
federal government to conduct a
census of its population every 10
years, ,or a decennial census, to
attempt to count every person in
the country. Based on the latest
census conducted in 2010, the
Union County Board of County
Commissioners is responsible for
reviewing commission districts
and making the changes required
by law. Specifically, Article


Tigers win back-to-back
SMAC titles
Lake Butler Middle School captured its second straight
Suwannee Middle School Athletic Conference championship
in softball with a 12-2 win over Bradford on April. 12 in Fort
White. Plans are to run a story on the Tigers' run through the
tournament, as well as on their regular'season, in next week's
issue.

UC man killed Strawberry
in wreck Update


.Union County resident
Brandon Holly was fatally
injured in a crash on C.R. 238
last Thursday around 3 a.m.
According to the FHP report,
the 2004 Chevy, model not
reported, traveled off the road for
an unknown reason and onto the
shoulder. The driver attempted
to steer the truck back onto
the road but lost control of the
vehicle. The driver's side door
struck a telephone pole. The
vehicle traveled through a fence
and came to rest in a field. James
Spears was transported to Shands
at UF for his injuries. At the time
of the incident, who was driving
the vehicle was unknown.


Tree seedling
give-a-way
The Lake Butler Lions Club
in conjunction with the Florida
Forestry Service will host a free


Starke's Strawberry Festival is
coming up this weekend, April
20 and 21. Hours will be from 9
a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, and
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sun-
day. A variety of entertainment
is scheduled, including per-
formances by Clark Hill, Steel
Rockin', Tera Tillotston and
Jaelyn Jackson. Vendors from
all over will serve visitors from
far and wide, offering arts and
crafts, jewelry, homemade baked
goods and preserves, and much
more. There will be plenty of
other fun attractions, including a
zone for the kids, and more food
than you can sample in two days,
so don't miss out on the festival's
15th year.

tree seedling give-a-way Friday,
April 19, from 4 to 7 p.m. and
April 20, from 9 a.m. until noon
at Spires IGA. Trees available:
swamp chesnut oak, southern red
cedar, mayhaw, river birch and
cabbage palm.


VIII, Section l(e) of the Florida
Constitution provides that
after each decennial census the
board of county commissioners
shall divide the county into
districts of contiguous territory
as nearly equal in population as
practicable.
Once the Board of County
Commissioners has drawn the
district lines they will work with
the supervisor of elections to
alter or create precincts.
Supervisor of Elections


Debbie Osborne said that she
hopes to combine precincts in
order to save the county money.
"Election Day turnout is down
due to the increase in early and
absentee voting," said Osborne.
"Combining precincts will save
on printing, poll workers, voting
equipment and more."
Osborne appeared before the
board of county commissioners
during the regular meeting
held April 15, to suggest that
workshops be set up to work


on district changes to include
the commissioners, school
board members and members
of the community. She also
suggested to the board to use poll
workers from each district as the
community members.
The county commission
approved the workshops for
redistricting which will .begin
Monday, April 29, from 6-8 p.m.
at the Supervisor of Elections
office.


Lifting their way to state


Union County High School weightlifters Kevin Thornton (left) and Dustin Griffis have
qualified for the state finals. Griffis, who won the 238-pound class at the state-qualifying
meet, said it felt great to be able to advance, adding, "I've been working for it for about the
last four years." Thornton placed third in the 199-pound class at the state-qualifying meet and
had to wait three days before finding out he had made the cut. "I was ecstatic," Thornton said.
"I was jumping around the house." The Florida High School Athletic Association Finals will
be held April 19-20 in Kissimmee.


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DEADLINE MONDAY 5 P.M. BEFORE PUBLICATION PHONE 386-496-2261 FAX 386-496-2858







2A UNION COUNTY TIMES THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


...._. i Second grade Egg Drop


IR S
"L Winners ""-


...., ... . I
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(Above) Egg drop winners from the classroom of Judy Crews were: Layne Moore,
Tamia Young, Hayden Whitehead, Josilyn Jenkins, Daniel Shuler, Joseph Trowell,
Sahara Canada, Terrell Weeks, Carson Boyette. "They were so excited that their eggs
did not break," said Crews.


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,bove) Egg drop winners from the classes of Sandy Oden
and Leslie Elixson were: DJ Castleberry. Jesse Parker,
Macy Malphurs. Ian Halfacre and Johnny.Bennefield.


(Above) Egg drop
winners from the
classrooms of Tammy
Black and Julie Johnson
were: (I-r) Isabella
Manucy, Ethan Graham,
: Krista Fort, Ella Dicks,
Kennedy Dang, Hayden
Crews, Kyra Castleberry,
Nikiyah' Griffin and
Markus Strong.


(Above) Lindsey
.Harrison's egg drop
winners were: Dalton
Crpft, Kindall Johnson,
Madison Johnson,
Hance Jones, Max
Newman, Ben Cabral,
Justin Alford, Angela
Tucker and (not pictured)
Emma Jeffers.


(Above) The winners
from Celeste Saunders
class were: Caleb
Ripplinger, Karly
Shatto, Leah Clark,
Johniya Henderson,
Reagan Robinson,
Matthew Hedrick,
Drew Manning and
(not pictured) Karleigh
White.


MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE
Train ONLINE for Alli~d Health and Medical Management.
Job placement assistance. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized.
Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

Centura
COLLEGE


Russ



WADE z

Attorney at Law
155 SE 6th Place, Lake Butler, FL 32054
(Behind Badcock Furniture)

386-406-9656 12 Year's Experience *Admitted to State and Federal Bar (M and S. Dist.)
Probate Family Deeds Wills Adoption Litigation Corporate


Ltnion Countp TEitmes
USPS 648-200
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
^^ g^. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
UJ UNION COUNTY TIMES
H 125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054


(386) 496-2261
John IVI. Miller, Publisher


Subscription Rate in Trade Area
$39.00 per year,
$20.00 six months
Outside Trade Area:
$39.00 per year.
$20.00 six months


Editor:
Sports Editor:
Advertising:
Typesetting:
Advertising and
Newspaper Prod.
Classified Adv.
Bookkeeping:


Tiffany Clark
'Cliff Smelley ,
Kevin Miller
Darlene Douglass
Eileen Gilmore
Earl W. Ray
Mary Johnson
Joan Stewart-Jones


Union County EMS (left) Doug Davies and (right) Wayne
SClemons stand on ladders against a tree. They pull up
' the eggs to be dropped after (below) Chip Clemons loads
-' them into the bag. Each student designed a protective
apparatus for his or her egg. If the egg made it through
two drops without breaking, the student was named a
winner.

S WI FT C 1 QwLocations:
S \\I C EI T .1. ... ,2469 West SR 100 1140 SW Bascoin Norris Dr
R, E A L T-r Y Lake Butler, FL 32054 Ste. 106 Lake City, FL 32025
**_- "- L386-496-0499 800-833-0499
www.SwiftC reekRealty.net



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BEAUTIFUL GREAT TRACT 3BD/2BA COUNTRY HOME
3BD/2BA BRICK HOMi Locaited in Raitord' w'2,245 heated sq. ft. on I ac
w 1,323 healed sq ft in Lake Budcr $1,400 per Acre. in Lake Butler
$135,000 Call tbor more. land lisings' $179,900 .
l1 J(s1 IIl] [ :i "J =1 :q ]1[ s wku IT[o1'1* : I ,1 -l =1








THURSDAY. APRIL 18. 2013 UNION COUNTY TIMES


Three UC Gateway College March 8.
The students competed in
teams place five areas to include: soil.
water, wildlife, forestry and
first at current environmental issue,
Envirothon "Rangelands." ro four
Seventeen teams from four
The Suwannee Regioncounties participated. Union
The Suwannee Region County High School had three
Envirothon was held at Florida County High School had three
winning teams:


The first place wildlife team,
named the climate changers
included: Clay Abraham, Bekah
Harden, Kamil Mazal, Kent

Hli^Kl


Coburn,and CaptainTrey Spitze. Christie, Shelby McDowell, named the GMO's included:
The first place current Captain Amanda Snyder, Lethia Waylon Griffis, Holly Tucker,
environmental issue team named Johnson and Trey Owen. Santos Rodriguez, Colton Kelley
thecanetoads included:Courtney The first place overall team and Hayden Thompson. U,C's
winning overall team had the
highest total number of points.
The GMO's will advance to
the Florida Envirothon, April.
S a 27, at Hillsborough State Park.:


Enviro champs
The first place overall team named the GMO's included:
Waylon Griffis, Holly Tucker, Santos Rodriguez, Colton
Kelley and Hayden Thompson.


Church News
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Providence
Village special
service set
Victory Christian Center.
inviting the community to
celebrate the church and
Pastor Maxwell, 16 years of
ministering in Union County.
The banquet is scheduled
for Saturday; April 20, at 5
p.m. at the church, $5 per
person. Worship services
begin Sunday, April 21, at 11
a.m. The 5 p.m. service guest
speaker will be Pastor Rodney
Cutter, Growing in Grace
Ministries of Savannah, Ga.
For more information, contact
the church and leave at message
at 386-496-2115.


Revival set
. There will be a revival held
at the First United MethodiSt
Church and New Jerusalem
Full gospel church located


on S.R. 1,21 in Worthington
Springs beginning April 22-27
at 7 p.m. For more information,
contact 386-496-1461 or .386-
292-5185.

Old
Providence
celebrates 180
years
Old Providence Baptist
Church celebrates 180 years
of active ministry on Sunday,
April 21, at 10 a.m. during the
2013 homecoming celebration.
For more information, call
386-755-1648 or 386-984-
0785,


Santa Fe
Mennonite
Invitation
Santa Fe Mennonite Church
welcomes all to attend service


on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and
the 1st and 3rd Sunday of each
month at 6 p.m. The church is
located at 4555 SW 107th Ave.
Contact 386-984-0938 or 352-
339-2249 for more information.

MorningStar
revival set
MorningStar Baptist Church
will host revival beginning
Sunday, April 21-24. Sunday's
service will be at 6 p.m.,
services Monday- Wednesday
will begin at 7 p.m. Jeff Carter
is the guest speaker. For more
information, contact 386-496-
3479 or 3451. The church is
located at 11250, C.R. 18 west
in Worthington Springs -


If you wear a full or partial denture, you should consider dental
implants.to improve your ability to chew properly for your health.
Over 20 years experience placing
and restoring implants.
William K. Van Dyke D.M.D.
RachaelC. Van Dyke, D.M.D.
(386) 496-3492 (352) 377-1781


The Union County Public Library visited Lake Butler
Elementary School during career day. UCPL's Shannon
Chambers waves from the back of Brooke Barber's 18'
grade class. Participating students were: Brycen Boney,
"'Wyatt Chapman, Noelle Lindsey, John Griffis, Logan
Hires, Alexus Panozzo, Colby Peacock, Clayton Poppell,
'Chrissy Lynn Quiett, Carter Roberts, Sawyer Roberts,
Brailyn Rose, Erich Seager, Kody Stalmaker, Baler
Waters and Jack Henry Whitehead.


School News......

Lake Butler Elementary School
Every week, LBES teachers are given the opportunity to choose
at least one student in their class to be the Tiger Cub. Students are
chosen based on behavior, academic excellence or improvement.
Students receive a ribbon and certificate from their teachers for
being chosen.
Last weeks tiger cubs were: Hope Andrews Kayleigh Anthony,
Toby Bowles, Jessica Brooks, D)ylan Decueber, Landon Cason,
Dawson Crews, Natalie Gay, Landen Gibson Bradin Goff, Clayton
Hall, Keirsten Hardcastle, Jarrod Hendrickson, Bryce Hunt, Alex
Locke, Cloey McLaughlin, Eli Moppert, Lukas Morgan, Rylie
Parrish, Colby Peacock, Patricio Perez, Emily Regar, Austin Ray,
Jamaal Reynolds, Haylee Silcox and Maggie Wade.

A Prophet Like Moses
In Deuteronomy 18:18-19 God says, "I will raise up for them a
Prophet like you from among their brethren, and will put My
words in His mouth, and He shall speak to them all that I
command Him. And it shall be that whoever will not hear My
words, which He speaks in My name, I will require it of him."
The Prophet like Moses is Christ (Acts 3:22-26). One similarity
between Moses and Christ is that both gave a law. Christ came
and has given us a better law, the perfect law of liberty (James
1:25). Another similarity between Christ and Moses is that both
were faithful (Hebrews 3:1-2). However, the Prophet who came
is greater than Moses. Christ is not only faithful in all His house
but is the builder and "Son over His own house" (Hebrews 3:3-
6). We should hear Him and follow His teachings today
(Matthew 17:5).
Danville Church of Christ
8704 SW SR 121, Lake Butler, FL
386-496-3880
E-mail: lanvilleflchurchofchrist@yahoo.com

Bible Study at 9:00 AM on Sun and 7:30 PM on Wed
Worship at 10:00 AM and 5:00 PM on Sun.


Saves Lives

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Law Day
Continued from 1A


The City of Lake Butler:
recently proclaimed the first day:
of May as Law Day. .
Proclamation: Whereas, our
founding fathers knew that thej
rule of law is advanced through;
the protection of individual
rights and that equal justice:
under law is the unalienable right:
of every American.; and
Whereas, the principle -of:
guaranteed fundamental rights of
individuals under the law is the'
heart of our nation; and
Whereas, no nation can remain:
free unless its people cherish:
their freedoms, understand the
responsibilities the freedom
entail, and function as -an
involved, informed citizenry;
and
Whereas, the congress of
the United States, by a joint
resolution approved April 7,
1961, has designated the first
day of May of each year as Law
Day; and
Whereas, the observance of
Law Day is designed to foster
the deep respect for law and an
awareness of its essential place
in American life; and
Whereas, a day of national
dedication to the principle of
government under laws affords
us an opportunity to better
understand and appreciate the
manifold virtues of such a
government; and
Whereas, it is fitting that
the people of this nation
should remember with pride
and vigilantly guard the great
heritage of liberty, justice and
equality under law which our
forefathers bequeathed to us in
the Constitution and the Bill of
Rights; and
Whereas, it is our moral and
civic obligation as free persons
to preserve and strengthen that
great heritage.
Now, therefore, I Lonnie
Norman, Mayor of the City
Commission of- Lake Butler,
Florida, recognizing the
contributions of history and the
present day contributions of law
enforcement, attorneys, and the
judiciary, do hereby designate
and proclaim the 1st day of May
2013 as Law Day in the City
of Lake'Butler and the County
of Union, Florida. I call upon
the people of our community
to-pause and acknowledge the
foundation of equal justice for
all-the security and the freedom
it brings.
In witness whereof, I have set
my hand this 8th day of April
2013 done at the City of Lake
Butler.
I


3A^


NOTICE OF
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK
G RANT HOUSING REHABILITATION/
REPLACEMENT ASSISTANCE


. Union County has been awarded a Small Cities Community Development
Block Grant from the Florida Department of of Economic Opportunity for
1Housing Rehabilitation.

What does the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant offer?

Roof repairs, windows, structural repairs or
replacement houses

Who qualifies?

Housing Rehabilitation and Replacement: Low-and
Moderate-Income Persons* Whto Own Their Homes
and Reside in Unincorporated Union County

Additional information concerning the Community Development Block
Grant Program and application forms can be obtained from the County
Offices, located 15 NE 1st Street, Lake Butler, Florida, telephone number
386-496-4241. Please submit an application no later than 5:00 p.m. on
May 24, 2013.


*If the Number of People
Living in Household is... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Total yearly Household
Income Cannot be More $31,600 $36,100 $40,600 $45,100 $48,750 $52,350 $55,950 $59.550
Than...

A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION


i











4A UNION COUNTY TIMES THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


UCT LEGALS 4/18
County Court
Union County
Campus USA Credit Union
Vs.
Richard A. Murphy, Jr.
& Mary M. Murphy
Case No.: 63-2011-CC-0156
AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S
SALE
Amended to include time of sale
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to a Writ of Execution issued in the
County Court of Union County,
Florida, on the 10th day of December,
2012 in the cause wherein Campus
USA Credit Union Plaintiff, and
Richard A. & Mary M. Murphy,
Defendants, being case number
S63-2011-CC-0156, in said court, I,
Jerry Whitehead as Sheriff of Union
County, Florida, have levied upon
all the right, title and interest of the
Defendant, Mary M. Murphy in and
to the following described personal
property, to-wit:
2010 Blue 2D Ford Mustang, VIN
1ZVBP8CH3A5101829
I shall offer this property for sale at 55
West Main Street, Room 102, County
of Union, Florida, on Tuesday, April
30th, 2013 at 10:00am or as soon
thereafter as possible. (9:00am
this day vehicle will be available for
viewing at sale site). I will offer for
sale all of the said Defendant's Mary
M. Murphy, right, title, and interest
in the aforesaid personal property,-
at public auction and will sell the
same, subject to taxes, all prior liens,
encumbrances and judgments, if any,
to the highest and best bidder for
CASH IN HAND plus Florida sales tax
if appropriate. The moneys received
through the levy on sale will be paid as
prescribed by Fla. Stat. 56.27 and in
accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to participate
in this proceeding shall contact the
individual or agency sending notice
not later than seven days prior to the
proceeding at the address given on
notice. Union County Sheriff's Office
386-496-2501
Jerry Whitehead, As
Sheriff of Union County, Florida
By: Lt. D.F. Williams
Deputy Sheriff
3/28 4tchg 4/18-UCT
County Court
Union County
Barnett Recovery Corporation
Vs. .
George W. Parrish & Mildred Parrish
Case Number: 93-25-CC
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to a Writ of Execution issued in the
County Court of Union County,
Florida, on the 15th day of February,
2013, in the cause wherein Barnett
Recovery Corporation, Plaintiff,
and George W. Parrish & Mildred
Crawford, Defendants, being case
number 93-25-CC, in said Court, I,
Jerry Whitehead as Sheriff of Union
County, Florida, have levied upon
all the right, title and interest of the
Defendant, George W. Parrish in
and to the following described re~l
property, to-wit:
Real Property:
The W 1/2 of the S 1/2 of the East
14 acres of the SW 1/4 of the SE
1/4, Section 31, Township 5 South,
Range 18 East. LESS and EXCEPT
A tract of land situated in Section 31,
Township 5 South, Range 18 East,
Union County, Florida, said
tract being more particularly
described as follows:
SCommence at the Southeast corner


Landfill
Continued from 1A

T's. In other words, they're not
hoping -to pull off a project;
they've demonstrated they
have a project to pull off," said
Woolsey. He called the company
a "sure bet."
Landfill Energy' Systems
also claims it can fully fund the
project,'as well, in contrast to one
company that wanted NRSWA
to pay for the project.
First year earnings for the
landfill for the use of its gas are
estimated to come in around
$200,000, with the annual
average being $160,000. Over
the life of the project-a 15-
year contract is proposed-the
landfill could bring in nearly
$2.4 million. That even takes
into consideration tre money
the landfill will have to spend
assuring the quality of the gas
being used.
The member counties foresee
splitting .the revenue. Union
County Commissioner Wayne
Smith also wants the board's
attorney to investigate how
property tax revenue from the
project, which would go to
Union County, can be shared by
all three members.
New River .will have some
other costs associated with the
project as its engineers work with
the developer. A new engineering
work' order for $69,500 was
approved. The amount approved
for outside attorney work was
not to'exceed $50,000.
Fifteen years was thought to
be a good term for the contract.
Woolsey said by the end of that
term there would be even more
gas from the.landfill's growth as
well as new technologies related
to the profitable use of that gas.
In the meantime, if landfill
gas production is higher than
expected, an additional engine
could be added to the project or
the board could opt to use it in a
compressed natural gas project to


of the aforementioned Section 31,
Township 5 South, Range 18 East
for a point of reference and run N
88*40'15" W, along the South line
of said Section 31, a distance of
1293.99 feet to a point that is N
01"40'15"E, 12.08 feet from the
centerline intersection
of State Road No. 238 (Section
39050-2504) and State Road No.
S-245 (Section 3950-151) as said
centerline intersection is shown on a
MAINTENANCE MAP by the State of
Florida State Road Department and
recorded in Road Book 1, Page 48 of
the Public Records of Union County,
Florida, thence, from said point, run
N 0131'00" E, a distance of 37.92
feet to an iron pipe on the North right
of way line of said State Road No.
238 and the True Point of Beginning;
thence continue N. 0131'00" E, a
distance of 247.20 feet to an iron
pipe; thence run N. 88029'00" W a
distance of 210.00 feet; thence run
S 0131'00" W a distance of 247.20
feet to an iron pipe on said North right
of way line, thence run S 8829'00"
E, along said North right of way line,
a distance of 210.00 feet to the True
Point of Beginning, containing 1.192
acres, more or less. PARCEL ID: 31-
05-18-00-000-0105-0.
I shall offer this property for sale at
the Union County Sheriff's Office,
55 West Main Street, Room -102,
Lake Butler, FL on May 16th, 2013
at 11:00 am or as soon thereafter as
possible. I will offer for sale all of the
said Defendant's, George W. Parrish,
right, title and interest in the aforesaid
real property, at public auction and
will sell the same, subject to taxes,
all prior liens, encumbrances and
judgments, if any, to the highest and
best bidder for CASH IN HAND plus
Florida sales tax if appropriate. The
monies received through the levy
on sale will be paid as prescribed by
Fla. Stat. 56.27 and in accordance
with the American with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participated in this
proceeding shall contact the agency
sending notice not later than seven
days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on notice. UCSO 386-
496-2501
Jerry Whitehead, As
Sheriff of Union County, Florida
By: Lt. Williams
Deputy Sheriff
4/11 4tchg 5/2-UCT
PUBLIC AUCTION
Our Auction at Lqke Butler Mini
Storage is scheduled for April 20,
2013 @ 10:00 AM. The unit #'s are:
#14-$163.00
#20-$84.22
#36-$168.00
#81 -$330.00
Lake Butler Mini Storage
P.O. Box 236
Lake Butler, FL 32054
P: 386-496-2264
4/11 2tchg 4/18-UCT
UNSPECIFIED SITE STRATEGY
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST
RELEASE OF FUNDS
April 18,2013
Union County Board of County
Commissioners
15 NE 1st Street
Lake Butler, FL 32054-1701
386.496.4241
On or about April 29, 2013 the
Board of County Commissioners of
Union County, Florida will submit a
request to the Florida Department of
Economic Opportunity for the release
of Community Development Block
Grant funds underTitle I of the Housing
and Community Development Act of
1974, as amended, to undertake a
Community Development Block Grant
Housing Rehabilitation project which
includes rehabilitation and demolition
and replacement of owner-occupied
dwelling units for low-to moderate
income families; other related
activities include temporary relocation


fuel haulers.
Currently the landfill's air
permit requires it to .collect the
gas from the landfill and flare it,
which actually costs money in
addition to destroying a source
of revenue.

In other business:
Bradford County's recent
Toxic Roundup collected
24,452 pounds of waste from 71
households, along with around
250 residents who disposed
of paint and fluorescent lamps
throughout the year. That
included 10,980 pounds of latex
paint,7,280 pounds of flammable
liolnid 1 0 of .1 ,-oil ,ndi


and administration. Funding for
this project is the Fiscal Year 2012
Florida Small Cities Community
Development Block Grant, Housing
Rehabilitation program in the amount
of $700,000.
The Board of County Commissioners
of Union County, Florida has
determined that the activities
proposed in the Unspecified
Site Strategy are categorically
excluded under U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development
regulations at 24 Code of Federal
Regulations Part 58 from the National
Environmental Policy Act of 1969
requirements. As eligible sites are
located, site specific checklist will be
completed prior to the commitment of
funds for each dwelling unit. Additional
project information is contained in the
Environmental Review Record on file
at the Office of the Board of County
Commissioners at 15 NE 1st Street,
Lake Butler, FL 32054
Any individual, group, or agency
may submit written comments on the
Environmental Review Record to M.
Wayne Smith, Chairman. Additional
project information is contained in
the Environmental Review Record on
file at Office of the .Board of County
Commissioners at 15 NE 1st Street,
Lake Butler, FL 32054 and may be
examined or copied weekdays 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. All comments
must be received by April 26, 2013.
Comments will be considered prior
to the Union County Board of County
Commissioners requesting a release
of funds.
The Board of County Commissioners
of'Union County, Florida certifies to
the Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity and U. S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development
that M. Wayne Smith in his capacity
as Chairman consents to accept the.
jurisdiction of the Federal Courts
if an action is brought to enforce
responsibilities in relation to the
environmental review process and
that these responsibilities have been
satisfied. Approval of the certification
by the Florida Department of
Economic Opportunity satisfies the
responsibilities of the State under
the National Environmental Policy
Act of 1969 and related laws and
authorities and allows the Board of
County Commissioners of Union
County, Florida to use the Community
Development Block Grant funds.
Florida Department of Economic
Opportunity will accept objections
to its release of funds and the
'Board of County Commissioners of
Union County, Florida certification
for a period of 15 days following
the anticipated submission date
or its actual receipt of the request
(whichever is later) only if they are
on one of the following bases: (a)
the certification was not executed
by the Certifying Officer of the Board
of County Commissioners of Union
County. Florida; (b) the Board of
County Commissioners of Union
County, Florida has omitted a step or
failed to make a decision or finding
required by U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development
regulations at 24 Code of Federal
Regulations Part 58; (c) the grant
recipient has committed funds or
incurred costs not authorized by 24
Code of Federal Regulations Part 58
before approval of a release of funds
by the State; or (d) another Federal
agency acting pursuant to 40 Code
of Federal' Regulations Part 1504
has submitted a written finding that
the project is unsatisfactory from the
standpoint of environmental quality.
Objections must be prepared and
submitted in accordance with the
required procedures at 24 Code
of Federal Regulations Part 58,
Sec. 58.76 and shall be addressed
to the Florida Department of
Economic Opportunity, Community
Development Block Grant Program,
MSC-400, 107 East Madison Street,


lubricants, and 2,225 pounds
of electronic equipment, plus
pesticides, batteries, propane
tanks, medications and more.

The board voted to purchase
a new compactor from Ring
Power for the state contract price
of $607,940, with a guaranteed
buyback of $200,000. The
purchase will be made out of
next year's budget.
To improve returns, the board
voted to allow staff to begin
to put together .an investment
policy, which should eventually
lead to hiring an investment
manager.


SM Maximum strength
analgesic creme for
E temporary relief from:
Joint .nd Muscle
.:,rerneSS
-r r* Arthritis
Back a.:hes
rrio



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Tallahassee, FL 32399-6508.
Potential objectors should contact
the Board of County Commissioners
of Union County, Florida to verify the.
actual last day of the objection period.
M. Wayne Smith, Chairman
Environmental Certifying Officer
4/18 ltchg-UCT
TAX DEED# 63 2012 TD -0004
Notice of Application for Tax Deed
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
James E. Whitehead, the holders) of
the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property, arfd the names in which
it was assessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATED 164
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: 04-
06-19-00-000-0052-0
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
Parcel 3
Commence at the Northwest comer
of Section 4,. Township 6 South,
Range .19 East, Union County,
Florida; Thence run S 89 degrees 30
minutes 20 seconds E 40.02 feet to
the East right of way of county road
no. 796A: Thence S 01 degree 08
minutes 14 seconds E along said
East right of way, 848.45 feet to a
point of curvature of a curve; Thence
run Southerly along said East right
of way along said curve concave to
the West having a radius of 11459.16
feet, a delta of 01 degree 29 minutes
00 seconds 296.67 feet to a point
of tangency: Thence S 00 degrees
20 minutes 24 seconds West along
said East right of way, 158.99 feet:
Thence S 89 degrees 30 minutes 20
seconds E 1647.31 feet to the Point
of Beginning: Thence continue S
89 degrees 30 minutes 20 seconds
E 600.00 feet: Thence North 01
degree 08 minutes 14 seconds W
145.00 feet: Thence N 89 degrees 30
minutes 20 seconds W 600.00 feet:
Thence S 01 degree 08 minutes 14
seconds E 145 feet to the Point of
Beginning. Containing 2.00 acres
more or less.
Also Ingress and Egress Easement
An easement of ingress and egress
being 60 feet in width and lying
60 feet to the right of the following
described line:
Commence at the Northwest comer
of Section 4, Township 6 South,
Range 19 East, Union County,
Florida: Thence run S 89 degrees 30
minutes 20 seconds E 40.02.feet to
the East right of way of county road
no. 796A; Thence S 01 degree 08
minutes 14 seconds E along said
East right of way, 848.45 feet to a
point of curvature of a curve: Thence
run Southerly along said East right
of way along said curve concave to
the West having a radius of 11459.16
feet, a delta of 01 degree 29 minutes
00 seconds, 296.67 feet to a point
of tangency: Thence S 00 degrees
20 minutes 24 seconds W along
said East right of way, 13.99 feet to
the Point of Beginning: Thence S 89
degrees 30 minutes 20 seconds E
3443.81 feet to the terminus point.
NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED:
Adolph J. "Jackie" Barringer.
Said property being in the County
of Union, State of Florida. Unless
such certificate shall be redeemed
according to the law the property
described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder in the
Courthouse lobby at 11:00 A.M., the
23rd day of May, 2013.


Kellie Hendricks Connell
Clerk of Circuit Court
Union County, Florida
Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to
participate in this proceeding should
contact (386) 496-3711.
4/18 4tchg 5/9-UCT
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL: HAY
FIELD
BID#LBPW-0003-13/14-(Rebid)
THE CITY OF LAKE BUTLER IS
ACCEPTING BIDS ON A SLUDGE
FIELD OPERATION BEARING
(15) ACRES, MORE OR LESS OF
NEWLY ESTABLISHED COASTAL
BERMUDA HAY.
UPON CONTRACT AWARD THE
RECIPIENTSHALLCUT, BALE/ROLL
AT MATURITY INTERVALS AND
REMOVE FROM THE PROPERTY.
ALL STORAGE,' EQUIPMENT AND
LABOR SHALL BE FURNISHED
BY THE CONTRACT AWARDED
VENDOR.
THE CITY SHALL CONTROL THE
WATER TO THE HAY FIELD SITE;
THE AWARDED VENDOR WILL
BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
ASSOCIATED IRRIGATION WITHIN
THIS AREA.
THE AWARDED CONTRACTOR
SHALL PROVIDE ALL REQUIRED
INSURANCE OR INDEMNIFY
THE CITY OF ALL LIABILITY AND
SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
ANY DAMAGES TO THE SPRAY
FIELD RESULTING FROM ITS
OPERATIONS.
A MANDATORY SITE INSPECTION
WILL BE CONDUCTED ON
TUESDAY, APRIL :30TH, 2013.
'ALL WHO WISH TO PARTICIPATE
SHALL MEET AT LAKE BUTLER
CITY HALL AT @2:00 p.m. THE
SITE INSPECTION WILL BE
CONDUCTED BY MR. DAVID
ANDROLEVICH. BOUNDARYS
WILL BE ESTABLISHED AND ALL
QUESTIONS ANSWERED AT THAT
TIME. CONTACT PHONE NUMBER
(386) 292-4590
ALL RESPONSES SHALL BE
FORWARDED TO THE CITY OF
LAKE BUTLER, 200 SW 1st STREET,
LAKE BUTLER, FL. 32054, PRIOR
TO (2:00) P.M. WEDNESDAY, MAY
8TH, TO BE CONSIDERED FOR BID
AWARD.
THE CITY RESERVES THE RIGHT
TO REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS IN
IT'S SOLE DISCRETION. DIRECT
ALL INQUIRES TO (386) 496-3401,
Cassa Neta Herndon
4/18 ltchg-UCT


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE
FILE NO: 63-2013-CP-0003
In Re: The Estate of
RANCE JAMES CARROLL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The name of the decedent, the
designation of the court in which the
administration of this estate is pending,
and the file number are indicated
above. The address of the court is 55
W. Main Street, Lake Butler, Florida
32054. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are indicated below.
If you have been served with-a copy
of this notice and you have any claim
or demand against the decedent's
estate, even if that claim is unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated, you must
file your claim with the.court ON OR
BEFORE THE LATER OF A DATE
THAT IS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS'
AFTER YOU RECEIVE A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims,
must-file their claims with the court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BARRED
BY THE LIMITATIONS DESCRIBED
ABOVE, ALL CLAIMS WHICH HAVE
NOT BEEN FILED WILL BE BARRED
TWO YEARS AFTER DECEDENT'S
DEATH.
The date of death of the decedent is:
November 27,2012.
The date of first publication of this-
Notice is: April 18, 2013.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
WAYNE CARROLL
Florida Bar No: 133454
P.O. Box 1898
Keystone Heights, FL 32656
Telephone: (386) 496-4799
Email: hampton.79@hotmail.com
Personal Representative:
TIMOTHY W. CARROLL
2803 Carroll Place
Orlando, FL 32804-3607
4/18 2tchg 4/25-UCT


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Worth

I Noting

Bake sale and
Bingo night
fundraiser set
The Worthington Springs
Senior's Activity program bake
sale fundraiser will be held at
Spies IGA on Thursday, May
11, from 8 a.m. until sold out.
Bingo night is set for Friday,
May 24, from 6:30 to 9 p.m.at the
Worthington Springs Community
Center. All ages are invited to
attend. All proceeds benefit the
seniors of Worthington Springs.
Refreshments will be available
for purchase. Raffle tickets will
also be available for $1.
Activity programs are also held
on Monday and Wednesdays at
he community center from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. A variety of games
are available. Non-expensive
meals are also available to help
raise funds.


Free pre-school
screening set
There will be a free preschool
screening for children ages 3
to 4 on Thursday, April 25,
and Thursday, June 20, by
appointment only at the Lake
Butler Elementary School. Not
for children who will be entering
kindergarten in the fall of 2013.
Referral and resources will
be available for concerns with
speech, sight, hearing, motor
skills, social' behavior, and
school readiness. Appointments
may be scheduled anytime
between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m'.
For more information or to
schedule an appointment, contact
Tricia Ranard at 386-496-3047.
Union County District Schools
and F.DLRS/NEFEC Child Find
sponsor screenings.


Scholarship
available
The Lake Butler Woman's
Club is offering a scholarship
for a female resident of Union
County to attend an accredited
university or college in the state
of Florida. The scholarship will
pay $500 to the individual. If you
are interested in'applying, you
can pick up an application packet
from Tangelia Mackey in the
guidance department at Union
County High School, 1000 S.
Lake Ave. All applications must
be submitted by May 13.


Ex-chamber exec makes comeback


DAN HILDEBRAN
Monitor Editor
It has been four years since
Ron Lilly was fiied as president
of the North Central Florida
Regional Chamber of Commerce
and three years since Bradford
County deputies arrested him for
stealing chamber funds.
Even though the State
Attorney's Office later dropped
the charges, it has been a long
and difficult recovery.
Over the last two years, Lilly
has developed his love for cars
and his talent for restoring them
into a burgeoning business.
On April 20 Team Lilly's
Classic Cars,along 'with Harvey's
Supermarket and Dollar General.
will present a classic car show
at the two retailers' locations
between Keystone Heights and
Melrose.
The show will mark one more
milestone in Lilly's comeback.
In October 2008, chamber
staff and board members accused
the president of stealing a variety
of items, including a golf cart, a
-tent and liquor mix. However,
the case eventually centered
around two payroll checks Lilly
allegedly coerced a staffer into
issuing to him.
According to court papers,
a Starke police investigator
was sceptical- of some of the
allegations from the beginning.
"Well they said he had
taken a whole bunch of stuff,"
investigator James Hooper said
in a deposition. "I mean, they
went from saying everything
from liquor mix, some kind of


drink.mix that they provided for
a fundraiser, all the way up to
pay checks to stereo equipment
to-I mean you just name it.
They went on. A tent, there was
supposedly a pop-up tent that
was missing."
Hooper said chamber staff
members later found some of
the allegedly stolen items at the
chamber building, a converted
bank office.
"It's an old bank," he said, "so
in the old vault, they kept some
of the items in there. And some
of those items were found in
there."
Hooper added that other
allegedly stolen items were later
returned by Lilly's wife Kim
Skidmore, who also worked at
the chamber.
Lilly's lawyer then asked
Hooper, "Are you saying that-
that these people at the chamber
were making these accusations
against Ron Lilly, and the
number of them were unfounded
accusations?"
"Yes. They were unfounded,"
replied the investigator. "I cannot
prove otherwise. Some of the
stuff was at Ron's house, but
he was the president. I mean it
wouldn't be uncommon for me
to think after a festival, being the
limited storage that the chamber
had, to store it in the space .that
Mr. Lilly had."
Over time, each allegation
brought by the chamber
evaporated" because of a lack
of evidence. Authorities never
charged Lilly for the tent, liquor
mix and other items. Another


to weekend cruise-ins and car
shows together, so word spread
fast about Lilly's skills.
Now he has 18 projects
in process with a three-year
backlog. He is trying to hire
some help to get him through
the work. He specializes in
Corvettes and Camaroes older
than 1980. It is a niche business
with few competitors and Lilly
has found a way to distinguish
himself by transparency. He
says he shows his customers all
the parts and materials invoices
he gets on a job and keeps a
visual and document record of
each project, compiling all the
information into.notebooks that


his customers can look over,
About 10 months ago, Lilly
started hosting cruise-ins at the "
Gator Bait Sports Bar in Melrose. -
He says the events have been a "
big draw, and the April 20 car
show is the next step to promote
his own operation along with
other local businesses. After the
car show at Harvey's, he will be'
hosting another cruise-in at the
Gator Bait Bar and Grill later that
same day.
Lilly says if the car show goes
well, it will mark one more step.
in his recovery.


The Florida Department of Correction's Union Correctional Institution Appreciation Day photo had information inadvertently left out of last week's -
edition of the Times. The corrected names and titles are: Councilman Fred Sirmones, City Manager Dave Mecusker, Vice Mayor Jimmy Beasley,
Mayor Lonnie Norman, UCI Warden Diane Andrews, Assistant Warden Stephen Rossiter, Major Kevin Box, classification supervisor Tommy Dicks,
councilmen Leroy Stalvey and 'Randy Jenkins, and city attorney John Maines IV.


A BEAUTIFUL
235 SW 4th Ave.
in downtown
Lake Butler


VINTAGE PROPERTY!!!
,':? *'I s "*'w e


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allegation that he purchased
a golf cart for himself with
chamber funds was the next to
go. Authorities dropped another
claim that Lilly and Skidmore
conspired to steal $8,500 by
using chamber funds to stock
an ATM owned by Skidmore.
However Skidmore had made
a deposit into" a chamber bank
account to replace the money.
The only remaining charge
involved two payroll checks.
The police claimed that Lilly
coerced a staffer into cutting the
negotiable instruments.
However, in order to make
the checks valid, two chamber
board members had to sign the
documents; and that is where the
case against Lilly fell apart. He
did not have possession of the
checkbook and he did not have
check signing authority.
The chamber claimed that
Lilly obtained unauthorized pay.
However, during depositions,
Lilly's attorneys David L.
Redfern and Kyle Tate appeared
to be building a case that when
the two board members signed
the checks, they authorized the
payments.
The State Attorney dropped,
the charges on Nov. 23, 2010,
citing a lack of evidence.
After the Chamber fired him;
Lilly spent two years working
at a Keystone Heights-area
ministry. Then in August 2010,
an acquaintance asked him to
restore a 1960 Corvette. He
finished the job six months later
and the happy customer started
talking. Classic car buffs travel


I










UNION COUNTY TIMES THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


S r 7 UCI staff members congratulated upon their promotion


Parrish

reunion set
The Parrish family reunion
will be held Sunday, May 19,
at the Lake Butler Community
Center. The reunion is usually
held on the 1st Sunday of May,
however, due to the availability
of the center, the date changed.



Lulu

homecoming
The 34t1 annual Lulu
Homecoming Day' is set for
Saturday, May 4, at the Lulu
Community Center. Events will
begin at 10:30 a.m. and the lunch
will be held at 12:30 p.m. Bring
a basket lunch for everyone in
your party. Bring lawn chairs
and come enjoy a day of games,
food, music and fellowship. A
quilt will be raffled off again this
year and t-shirts will be available
for purchase. An adult must
accompany all children who
attend.


Brannen

reunion set
The Brannen family reunion
is set for the descendants
of Benjamin Franklin and
Temperance Brannen. The
reunion will be held Sunday,
April 28, at noon, at the Brannen,
house located at 220 N. Lake
Ave. Bring a covered dish.
For more information call Roy
Brannen at 904-284-3156.



Take off

pounds

sensibly
TOPS (Take off pounds
sensibly) meet Thursdays at
5 p.m. at the rear 'of the Lake
Butler Church of Christ. For
more information call 386-496-
2107.


UCI administrators welcomed a newly promoted captain and four sergeants during a pinning ceremony held March 13. Shown here are (I-r)Asst.
Warden Tony Anderson, Col. David Maddox, Maj. Kevin Box, Sgt. Keith Fagin, Sgt. Chella Blocker, Capt. T.J. Robinson, Sgt. Millard Bell, Sgt.
Robert McGahee, Warden Diane Andrews and Asst. Warden Stephen Rossiter.


UCI also welcomed a newly promoted lieutenant, Julie Thomas (center), who moved from
Columbia Correctional Institution to UCI in the process of being promoted. Shown here are (I-
r) Asst. Warden Stephen Rossiter, Maj. Kevin Box, Lt. Thomas, Col. David Maddox and Asst.
Warden Tony Anderson.


In March, Union Correctional
Institution promoted four of its
own to-positions of leadership
and welcomed two newly
promoted additions to its staff.
T.J. Robinson of Raiford was
promoted to the position of
captain and is currently the shift
supervisor on D Shift, one of the
two night shifts that work at the
institution.
Robinson has been employed
with the Department of
Corrections since February of
1997. He worked his way up
through the ranks to reach the
position of administrative shift
lieutenant at UCI in July 2012.


As such, he was responsible for
running the institution's primary
confinement dorm, O Dorm.
As the D Shift captain, he
is responsible for running the
entire institution throughout the
evening when administrative
staff members are not on duty.
Julie Thomas of Macclenny
was a sergeant at Columbia CI
when she was promoted in March
to the rank of lieutenant at UCI.
She has worked for DOC since
January of 1999 and is currently
serving as lieutenant on C Shift.
UCI also welcomed a new
staff member, as well as a new
sergeant, in the person of Keith


Fagan of Lake Geneva. Fagan
came to UCI from Florida State
Prison when he was promoted to
sergeant at UCI in March. Fagan
has worked for DOC since June
of 2007 and is currently serving
as a sergeant on D Shift.
Three UCI officers earned
the rank of sergeant in March.
Millard Bell of Macclenny has
worked for DOC since February
of 2007 and is currently a
sergeant on D Shift.
Chella Blocker of Lake City
has worked for DOC since
November of 2004 and is now
serving as a sergeant on C Shift.
C Shift also welcomed newly


(L-R) UCI's Lt. Charles "Greg" Combs was promoted
to the rank of captain at FSP on April 12. Here, he is
being congratulated by FSP Warden John Palmer.


promoted Sgt. Robert McGahee
of Starke. He has also worked for
DOC since November of 2004.
All of these staff members
were celebrated in a pinning
ceremony at UCI on March 13.
FSP promotes
Combs to captain
On April 12, Florida State
Prison held a pinning ceremony
for its newly promoted captain,
Charles "Greg" Combs of


Raiford. Combs had been serving
as a lieutenant at UCI before
being promoted to the rank of
captain at FSP.
Combs had spent his entire
career at UCI before becoming
FSP's newest captain. He will
serve as shift supervisor for one
of the FSP's two night shifts and,
as such, will be the officer in
charge during the evening hours.


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B Section Thursday, April 18, 2013 FEATURES
CRIME
SOCIALS

AREGt I E I A 1 OBITUARIES
REGION E WS EDITORIAL
NEWS FROM BRADFORD COUNTY, UNION COUNTY AND THE LAKE REGION


Cancer survivors (I-r) Eugene Richardson, B.J. Warwick, Helen Padgett, Olivia Scott, Linda Tatum and Gloria
Gillenwaters take the lead in the survivors' lap to kick off the 2013 Bradford-Union Relay for Life.


More photos
on page 2B
(All photos by
Cliff Smelley)


Cancer survivor
Melanie
Fuhrman (left) -
is comforted
by sister Laura
Custead as .
Fuhrman listens
to her husband,
Mike, talk about
their experience
and what the
letter "H" in the
word "hope"
means to him.
The remaining
letters in "hope"
were discussed
by Cassandra
Kiser, Terry t
Vaughan and
Barry Warren.

Supporting the fight

with smiles, tears
It was 18 hours of games, themed laps and various other
fun activities, but it was also a time of reflection on how
devastating cancer can be and how it has touched so many lives.
A mixture of emotions best describes the American
Cancer Society's Relay for Life fundraisers, but in the
end, it's* all about raising money t6 assist those with cancer
and to fund research in hopes of one day finding a cure.
The annual event in Bradford County, which partnered with
Union County this year, continues to be successful. Record-
breaking totals are usually the norm year after year, and this year's
event, which was held April 12-13 at the Bradford High School
track, was no exception. More than $60,000 has been raised so far,
with more money coming in and several more fundraising events
planned in the near future.
Members of Bradford and Union counties certainly hit it out of
the park in supporting. this year's Relay theme: "Slug Out Cancer."


Kyle Starling, Mason Thompkins and Madison Thompkins find themselves waiting
for someone to post their bail as part of the Starke. Police Department's Relay
fundraiser.


-'A.'-
"'
.rs~;*
.t-.~
c.~


Bradford-Union Relay for Life chairwoman Dimple Overstreet (far right) watches
participants after the lights were turned off for the luminaria ceremony.


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THURSDAY, APRi 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 3B


Semi-pro
football team
to play home
games at
UCHS field
The Team Florida Stingrays
of the Gridiron Developmental
Football League have moved
from the Cape Coral-Fort Myers
area to Gainesville and will play
their home games at the Union
County High School field.
Team Florida, which is a
former member of the States
Developmental Football League,
will open the season May 4 in
Lake Butler. It will be the first of
three consecutive home games.
Kickoff times are at 7 p.m. All
games are played on Saturdays.
Team owner Melanice
Copeland said the team's vision
consists of mentoring, growth
and development, and making
an impact in the Lake Butler
community and beyond.
Mo Mitchell, a former
University of Florida offensive
lineman, will be the team's head
coach.
The team still has positions
open for players and cheer
dancers. There is a one-time
registration fee of $80 for players
and $35 for cheer dancers. (Fees
,can be negotiated.) Players
and cheer dancers will earn
commission from ticket sales.
Practices are held every
Tuesday and Friday at 6 p.m. at
S 2000 S.W. 43" St. in Gainesville.
Please call 407-408-9861
or 904-955-9293 for more
information. You may also visit
.the team website via www.gdfl.
": .; net.
A fan day has been scheduled

HARLIE'S COM
C4


for Saturday, April 27, at Sprinkle
Field in Lake Butler from noon
until 4 p.m. The event will
offer autographs, photos, face
painting, games and free food.

Keystone
Airport to host
Montgomery
Gentry, concert
for 'heroes'
Montgonery Gentry will
headline a concert for Florida's
heroes--service members and
first responders-on Saturday,
April 27, beginning at 11:30 a.m.
at the Keystone Airport.
Billy Gibbons, guitarist and
vocalist of ZZ Top, will also
perform, along with Ellis Hall,
Gannon Adams, Barry Michael,
Jordan Rager and Mike Corrado.
Tickets for the event, which
hopes to bring awareness to
post-traumatic stress disorder
and traumatic brain injury,,
are $15 for adults and $10 per
children. VIP tickets, which
allow purchasers to meet the
artists, are $35.
A portion of the proceeds will
go toward paying for a sum-
mer camp for the dependents
of deployed service members.
Donations will also be made
to local USOs and fam-
ily-readiness programs.
All of the proceeds will go
toward supporting Florida's
heroes in some way.
Please bring your own chair.
No coolers, please.
Visit www.flheroes.org to
purchase tickets.


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editor@bctelegraph.com

Sequestrian
cuts, cancer-
care impact
Dear Editor:
On April 1, 2013, the
Automatic Spending Cuts
(sequestration cuts) were made
effective with the potential of
impacting cancer care in America
beyond what most people can
even imagine. The government
permitted the sequester cuts to be
enacted for physicians' services
in all specialties. In addition, it
inappropriately allowed a severe
reduction to chemotherapy
coverage for Medicare patients
overnight.
Today, millions of Americans
are diagnosed and treated for
cancer, either with curative or
palliative intent. Approximately
80-85% of such patients are
treated in community cancer
clinics throughout the United
States and approximately 60%-
65% of all cancer patients
currently rely on Medicare for
their coverage.
Many oncology practices in the
United States (more than 1000
small and mid-size businesses)
have reported severe financial
constraints, declared bankruptcy,
or have joined larger groups or
hospital staff in 2012, due to a
series of ill-advised Medicare
reimbursement adjustments.
Moreover, many treatments
provided at community cancer
centers or clinics today are not


being reimbursed at appropriate
levels; many life-saving and
palliative medications are being
reimbursed significantly below
of the cost of acquisition, thereby
creating an untenable situation
for these practices.
Because smaller community
practices can no longer
afford these very expensive
chemotherapy drugs, they are
being forced to send many
Medicare patients to be treated
elsewhere, i.e., hospital facilities
or a clinic far away from a
patient's home - creating a
severe problem related to access
to care, since most treatments
are rendered as an outpatient.
Not only could access to care
be compromised, but there
may be a very sharp increase
in the costs related to cancer
treatment since such therapies
will be given at hospital-based
facilities, which are inherently
more expensive than outpatient
community settings. In addition,
patients may have to travel a
significant distance to large
hospital facilities to receive
chemotherapy, sometimes on
a daily basis, incurring higher
expenses for transportation,
lodging and possibly higher co-
payments.
Hopefully, the sequestration
impact can be reversed. If the
government does not intervene
soon, there will be noteworthy
disruption of community
cancer care in America.
The Community Oncology
Alliance (COA) website, www.
communityoncology.org,
strongly advocates for a review
of this matter. COA is a nonprofit
organization dedicated solely to
community oncology with the
mission to protect and foster the
community oncology delivery
system in The United States.


A' 1.


I would urge readers to please
take immediate action by calling
their legislators and by signing
the White House petition to stop
sequestration cuts for cancer
drugs. Contact information can
be found on the Florida Cancer
Specialists website: www.
FLCancer.com. The last thing
patients, friends, loved ones and
family members need is more
hardship when dealing with
cancer.
Sincerely,
Lucio Gordan, MD., Florida
Cancer Specialists
Gainesville

Agreed: More
participation
is needed
in Lawtey
Dear Editor:
I totally agree. We need more
participation from the local
citizens of Lawtey. They have
more value than they have been
led to believe.
As a former mayor/city


councilman, I have had the
opportunity to hear from the
people of Lawtey, many of those
that you refer to as being afraid
of retaliation from those in power
and from those in the audience
who will speak for those in
power to bully anyone that is not
going to agree with an issue that
they feel strongly about.
I will apologize to you for my
laughter, and at no time did I
try to make it a bully statement,
nor to "mock" you for your
question concerning only one
inspection having been done
on the refurbished recreation
building. Before being elected
to office, I spent many years
on the recreation committee
and know of all the struggles
we had in getting that building
completed, and that consisted
of many county inspections
prior to completion. Again, my
sincere apology because being
the person who was very upset
at the actions of your spouse at
the meeting prior to this, when
she did mock a very upset citizen
with valid concerns, I should
See LETTER, 4B


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COMMUNITY


STATE


BANK


WHERE TODAY MEETS TOMORROW




Community State Bank would like to thank all the local businesses and

individuals who supported our fundraising efforts for the Bradford/Union

County Relay for Life Event. Thanks to your generous support, we were

able to donate over $8,000 to The American Cancer Society! We could not

have done it without YOU!


Thank


You!


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A


r"D TELEGRAPH, lIMES


Unic

BYCL
Regional
Jerry Kelie
Gaffney, S.C
where Union
Keller ar
County Hig
-w o_ P.' Walter Mab
attending G;
Dylan Clark (left) and Chandler Mann sign their College on ft
letters of intent to play football at Campbellsville and "It's a gI
LaGrange. given the o
something y<
lark Man accept four more ye
Clark, Mann accept education,"K
an April 12 s


the UC]
Camnhpllsville Both


S U v vU W the opportuni
it is a chance
LaGrange offers path of refoc
Mabrey said
long way," ha
BY CLIFF SMELLEY tight end during his junior things in his
Regional News/Sports Editor season. field over th
"I was ready to do whatever Becoming a
In a way, Union County High it took to help my team win," summer help
School seniors Dylan Clark and he said.,"Now, I'm receiving the priorities in lif
Chandler Mann are similar in benefits from that." Calling h
that when it came to football, Clark said catching the ball Mabrey said I
they had a mindset of what they was a talent he didn't know he a private col
wanted to do, arid they did it. had, but he's now reached the where he car
Now, the two have another point where he's confident in his himself to suc
thing in common-they will ability in regard to that talent. "I'm used t
get the chance to play at the He said he needed to continue place, so I wa]
next level, with Clark signing to work on his quickness and where I'll be
with Campbellsville (Ky.) coming off the line of scrimmage learn and get
University and Mann signing after the snap, but added, "The he said.
with LaGrange (Ga.) College catching comes pretty natural to Union hea
during an April 12 ceremony in me." Pruitt said wl
the UCHS auditorium. Union head coach Ronny- at UCHS, pe,
"I'm excited," Mann said. Pruitt said what Campbellsville grades and
"I'm happy because all the-hard is getting in Clark is an ultra would preve
work's paid off. Everything that competitor who works hard and being a con:
I've been practicing for and wants to be the go-to guy. on the field. i
dreaming of, it's all coming Mabrey ded
together, so it's a great feeling." See SIGNINGS, 9B making life cl
Clark said, "I'm truly blessed.
I couldn't have done it without .'. .::', .: -
my teammates, my family, my .
coaches and everybody who ,
supported me. It's something ;
I've always wanted to do my .
entire life." ,,
The determination to play and =. ,
be a contributor was so great that
Clark, who was vying to play .
quarterback at UCHS, made a V- '',...' :..
position switch.to wide receiver/ -



LETTER
Continued from 3B
never have lowered myself to
that level.
T rndo nnt know nf the Pediication /


TT


ID


the I


T-.-.- .....


le'







THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 5B


Tigers' season
comes to end
i BY CLIFF SMELLE'Y
[Regional News/Sports Editor

ijnion County High School
will not get a chance to defend
its: regional championship and


make a return to the Final Four
in softball after losing 6-2 to
Dixie County in the semifinals of
the District 7-1A tournament on
April 16 in Newberry.
It was just the second loss to
a district team this year for the
Tigers (13-7), who were the
tournament's number-two seed.
During the regular season, Union
had wins of 3-2 and 12-6 over


Dixie.

Union defeats
Fort White to
cap regular
season
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Starting pitcher Holly Tucker
gave up four hits, while five
players drove in one run each in
the Union County High School
softball team's 5-2 win over
Class 4A Fort White to cap the
regular season on April 11 in
Lake Butler.
Players from both teams
were adorned in pink to raise
awareness for breast cancer.
Breast cancer statistics and facts
were shared with the crowd
between innings, while a portion
of the proceeds taken in at the
game \will be donated to the Side-
Out Foundation.
Jordyn Driggers and Ashlyn
Harden went 2-for-3 and 2-for-
4, respectively, and each had an
RBI. Harden had an RBI single


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in the first inning as the Tigers
went up 2-0.
The Tigers increased their lead
to 4-0 with the help of an RBI
single by Driggers in the third.
Kayla Andrews, Kendallyn
Johns and Tristyn Southerland
each drove in a run as well.
Fort White loaded the bases
with no outs in the top of the
fifth. Tucker recorded strikeout
for the first out of the inning, but
the Indians scored two runs on a
bloop single and a bases-loaded
walk. Tucker struck out two
straight batters to get out of the
inning.
Tucker gave up two walks and
struck out five in five innings.
Kaylan Tucker pitched the
final two innings, giving up one
hit and striking out five.
Visit www.starkejournal.com
to view photos from this game.

Earlier result:

Suwannee 8 UCHS 7
Harden had a perfect night at
the plate and drove in five runs,
but it wasn't enough for the
Tigers in an 8-7 loss to Suwannee
on April 9 in Live Oak.
Union scored three runs in the
third inning to go up 6-4, but the
Bulldogs scored four runs in the
fourth.
Suwannee had five extra-base
hits, including two home runs.
Harden was 3-for-3 with a
double and a home run, while
Randa Conner was 2-for-3
with a double. Harlee Rimes
was 2-for-4 with a triple, while
Andrews drove in a run.

BHS defeats
University
Christian 8-1
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
The Bradford High School
softball team scored seven
unanswered runs en route to
defeating University Christian
8-1 on April 12 in Jacksonville.
Bradford (22-2) went up 1-0
on an RBI single by Lindsey
Wiggins, but University
Christian tied the game in the
bottom of the third. Mackenzie
Gault scored the go-ahead
run in the fourth, reaching
on a dropped third strike and
eventually scoring following a
single by Jaci Atkinson.
Ashton Adkins hit an RBI
double as part of a six-run sixth
inning, 'which alsofeatitred a
two-run double by Annie Luke
and a one-run double by Taylor
Cruce.
Adkins, Atkinson, Luke and
Lainie Rodgers were each 2-for-
4, with Adkins driving in a run
and Luke driving in two.
Adkins earned the win, giving
up two hits and four walks,
while striking out six.
The Tornadoes will next play
in the semifinals of the District
5-4A tournament, which is
being hosted by Fort White
High School. Bradford, the top
seed, will play either fourth seed
Williston or fifth seed Fort White
at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 18.
If the Tornadoes win, they will
play either second seed Keystone
Heights, third seed Santa Fe or
sixth seed Interlachen for the
championship on Friday, April
19, at 7 p.m.

Earlier results:

BHS 4 Lafayette 2
Jordan Davis hit a two-run
homer in the bottom of the
seventh to give the Tornadoes a
4-2 win over visiting Lafayette
on April 9.


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Lafayette had a chance to build
on its 2-0 lead by loading the
bases with one out in the top of
the seventh. However, Bradford
was able to throw the lead runner
out at home on a ground ball
before getting out of the inning
on a ground out at second.
Cruce hit a single to lead off
Bradford's half of the seventh.
Rodgers was hit by a pitch
before an Adkins triple scored
both runners to tie the game.
Davis then homered to cap the
comeback.
Davis' hit was just one of four
allowed by Lafayette pitcher
Lacey Swafford.
Bradford pitcher Adkins gave
up eight hits and no walks, while
striking out eight.

BHS 16 Menendez 0
Cruce hit two home runs-
including a grand slam-while
Rodgers hit one and finished
3-for-3 at the plate in Bradford's
16-0 win over visiting Menendez
on April 11.
Cruce, who was 2-for-4, hit a
fwo-run homer as part of a six-
run first inning. Rodgers hit a
two-run blast as well that put
Bradford up 12-0 in the third.
A grand slam by Cruce capped
the scoring in the fourth.
Cruce, who was 2-for-4,
finished with six RBI. She
now has sole possession of the
school's single-season home run
record with 12.
Rodgers and Wiggins each had
two RBI, while Gault and Luke
each had one. Luke was 2-for-4
with a double, while Atkinson
was 2-for-3.
Cruce earned the win, giving
up one hit and no walks.

Bolles pulls
away for 8-3
win over
Keystone

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
A sacrifice fly by Kayla Walker
pulled the Keystone Heights
High School softball team within
one, but host Bolles scored four
runs in the bottom of the sixth in
the Indians' 8-3 loss on April 12
in Jacksonville.
Walker and Waters each hit
run-scoring doubles in the fourth
as Keystone tied the game at 2-2.
Bolles answered with two runs in
the bottom of the inning.
The Indians' last run came in
the top of the sixth.
Keystone was held to four hits,
while pitcher Waters gave up two
hits in four innings. She had five
strikeouts.
The Indians are the second seed
in the District 5-4A tournament,
which is hosted by Fort White
High School, and will play either
third seed Santa Fe or sixth seed
Interlachen in a semifinal game
on Thursday, April 18, at 5 p.m.
If Keystone wins, it will'play
either top seed Bradford, fourth
seed Williston or fifth seed Fort
White for the championship on
Friday, April 19, at 7 p.m.

Earlier result:

Belleview 8 KHHS 0
The Indians were held to five
hits in an 8-0 loss to Belleview
on April 5.
Waters and Kristen Wood.each
went 2-for-2, with Waters hitting
a triple.

Creekside 9 KHHS 1
The Indians struggled at
the plate again in a 9-1 loss to
Creekside on April 5.
Keystone had four hits, with


The win concluded the Tigers'
regular-season district schedule
with a 7-1 record.


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Ashley Maynard going 2-for-2
and Brooke Tussinger hitting a
double.
Maynard scored the team's
lone run after leading off the
bottom of the first with a single.:
She moved to second on a;
Morgan Gibbs ground out and
to third on a single by Waters.
Maynard scored on Walker's
sacrifice fly.

Naples 6 KHHS 2
Tussinger and Wood each had
an RBI in a 6-2 loss to Naples on
April 6.
Keystone went up 1-0 on
Tussinger's RBI single in the top
of the second.
The Indians didn't score again
until they were 'trailing 6-1.
Lyndsay Johnson hit a single'
to lead off the sixth. With two
outs, Cece Buckley and Wood
hit consecutive singles, with
Johnson scoring on Wood's hit.

P.K. Yonge 9 KHHS 1
Visiting P.K. Yonge hit a
three-run home run in the top
of the first en route to handing
Keystone a 9-1 loss on April 9.
The Indians were held
scoreless until the bottom of the
seventh. Buckley reached on a
single and scored on Maynard's
two-out single.

Union baseball

team rallies to
beat Fort White
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Visiting Fort White scored the
first five runs of the game, but
the Union County High School
baseball team rallied to take a 6-5
win over the Indians on April 15.
The Tigers (12-9 prior to April
16) scored three runs in the fifth
and three runs in the seventh to
pull out the win.
Josh Glover, who was 2-for-3,
drove in two runs with a double
in the fifth.
In the seventh, the Tigers
loaded the bases, with Troy Kite,
getting hit by a pitch and Glover
and Cole Kite each hitting a
single. Dustin Hersey drew a
walk to force a run home, while.
another scored on a sacrifice
bunt by Chris Starling.
Kyle Shealy drove in the
winning run with a single to left
field.
Cole Kite finished the game
2-for-3, while Shealy was 2-for-
4.
Dylan Allen earned the win. In
relief of Hersey, Allen gave up
one hit in one inning.
Union played Williston this
past Tuesday and will cap the
regular season by traveling to
Lake City to play Columbia on:
Thursday, April 18, at 7 p.m.
The Tigers will host the
District 7-1A tournament
beginning Monday, April 22.
Fourth seed Baldwin will play
fifth seed Dixie County at 6
p.m. that night, while the top-
seeded Tigers won't play until
the semifinal round on Tuesday,
April 23. The first game on April
23 will pit second seed Newberry
against third seed Chiefland at 4
p.m., while Union will play the
winner between Baldwin and
Dixie. at 7 p.m.
The championship game is set
for Thursday, April 25, at 7 p.m.

Earlier results:

Newberry 10 UCHS 5
Cole Kite drove in three runs;
but it wasn't enough as the Tigers
dropped a 10-5 district game to.
visiting Newberry on April 9.
Newberry outscored Union
6-1 in the first five innings.
Hersey drove in one run in
what was Union's first district
loss.
Kite hit a triple, while Troy
Kite hit a double.

UCHS 10 Chiefland 0
Troy Kite hit a grand slam as
part of a seven-run first inning,
while Shealy threw a no-hitter in
the Tigers' 10-0 win over district
opponent Chiefland on April 12
in Lake Butler.
Alien, who also homered, went
2-for-3 with four RBI, while
Hersey was 2-for-3 with an RBI.
Shealy, who drove in a run as
well, gave up no walks in earning
the win on the mound. He had six
strikeouts.


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communication ties.




The main auditorium, which includes the stage, altar,

chairs, or tables and chairs.




Grounds can be used for training demos, or car sales.


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6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013



CRIME ____


Recent arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union

The following individuals
were arrested recently by
local law enforcement officers
in Bradford, Union or Clay
(Keystone Heights area)
counties:
David Baker, 30, of Keystone
Heights was arrested April 9 by
Clay deputies for possession of a
controlled substance and selling
or manufacturing cannabis.
James William Barnes, 19; of
Starke was arrested April 10 by
Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
expired license. Bond was set
at $1,000 and he was released
April 10.
Bernard Vantaurous Beard,
26, of Starke was arrested
April 12 by Bradford deputies
for battery, resisting an officer
and driving with a suspended,
revoked or expired license.
Bond was set at $9,000 and he
was released April 13.
James Stephen Belflower, 39,
of Starke was arrested April 13
by Starke police for resisting an
officer. Bond was set at $2,000
and he was released April 14.
Howard Pinknen Berrier, 43,
of Lake Butler was arrested
April 10 by Union deputies for a
probation violation and reckless
driving.
Bryan Black, 26, of Melrose
was arrested April 9 by Clay
deputies for three probation
violations.
Bobbie Ozel Blue Jr., 23,
of Sanderson was arrested by
Union deputies for possession
of marijuana.
Kenneth Gerald Brinson, 21,
of Starke was arrested April 12
by Starke police for an out-of-
county warrant. He remained in
jail at press time.
Aaron Marshall Copeland, 35,
of Starke was arrested April 11
by Starke police for trespassing.
Matthew Irwin Foti, 20, of
Hampton was arrested April 10
by Bradford deputies for battery.
Jeneka Breanne Greene, 24,
of Starke was arrested April 13
by Starke police for driving with
a suspended, revoked or expired
license. Bond was set at $500
and she was released April 13.
Riley Leonard Griffis, 21, of
Starke was arrested April 9 by
Bradford deputies for a probation
violation. He remained in jail at
press time.
Beau Matthew Harrell, 26,
of Worthington Springs was
arrested by Bradford deputies
for driving with a suspended,
,revoked or expired license.
Bond was set at $500 and he was
released April 12.
Valerie Anne Harris, 41, was
arrested April 14 by Bradford
deputies for. a probation
violation. She remained in jail at










Looking for a new job,
a second job or a


press time.
David Joseph Amedeo
Harper, 20, of Starke was
arrested by Union deputies for
possession of drugs, possession
of marijuana and petit theft.
Mary Ann Henderson, 42,
of Jacksonville was arrested
April 13 by Bradford deputies
for driving with a suspended,
revoked or expired license.
Bond was set at $500 and she
was released April 13.
Jason Antwan Jefferson, 30,
of Jacksonville was arrested
April 14 by Union deputies
for possession of drugs and
possession of marijuana.
Godfried E. Joseph, 29, of
Starke was arrested April 15 by
Bradford deputies for a probation
violation. He remained in jail at
press time.
Antonio Voughntez Kee, 27,
of Jacksonville was arrested
April 10 by Bradford deputies.
for a probation violation. He
was released April 11.
Donald Nelson King, 28, of
Starke was arrested April 13
by Starke police for an out-of-
county warrant. He was released
April 16.
Shaun David Koonce, 30, of
Lawtey was arrested April 15 by
Bradford deputies for failure to
appear and withholding support.
Bond was set at $6,420 and he
remained in jail at press time.
Amber Nicole Lawson, 23, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 13 by Bradford deputies'
for a probation violation. She
remained in jail at press time.
Fermine Layman, 54, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 19 by Clay deputies for
failure to appear.
Katie Ann. Lovell, 32, of
Starke was arrested April 14 by
Starke police for larceny. Bond
was set at $500 and she was
released April 14.
Tarena P. Martin, 53, of
Starke was arrested April 14 by
Bradford deputies for battery.
Bond was set at $1,000 and she
was released April 15.
Kenneth Cornelius Mitchell,
38, of Jacksonville was arrested
April 15 by Bradford deputies
for two out-of-county warrants.
Bond was set at $3,500 and he
was released April 15.


Benjamin Morris, 21, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 11 by Clay deputies for
breach of the peace.
Shaun Steven Morris, 43, of
Lake Butler was arrested April
10 by Union deputies for battery.
Cheryl Ann Oates, 54, of
Interlachen was arrested April
14 by Bradford deputies for
driving with a suspended,
revoked or expired license.
Bond was set at $500 and she
was released April 14.
Robert Austin Porter, 57,
of Starke was arrested April
9 by Bradford deputies for
battery and resisting an officer.
Bond was set at $6,000 and he
remained in jail at press time.
Kayla Christine Rathell, 18,
of Gainesville was arrested
April 9 by Union deputies
for possession of marijuana,
possession of drugs and larceny.
She was released April 10.
Jennifer Irene Rhoden, 26, of
Hampton was arrested April 13
by Bradford deputies for larceny
and disorderly intoxication.
Bond was set at $3,000 and she
remained in jail at press time.
Shelly Rogers, 36, of Starke
was arrested April 14 by Clay
deputies for possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession of
cocaine with intent to sell.
Brian Archie Rosier, 34,
of Hampton was arrested
April 12 by Bradford deputies
for possession of narcotics
equipment and marijuana
distribution. Bond was set at
$6,000 and he remained in jail at
press time. ,
Elmore Ross, 60, of Lawtey
was arrested April 12 by
Bradford deputies for possession
of drug equipment. He was
released April 13.
Abigail Rudine Rowe, 28, of
Lake Butler was arrested April
10 by Bradford deputies for
two probation violations. She
remained in jail at press time.
Osvaldo Santana, 28, of
Lithia was arrested April 15 by
Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
expired license. Bond was set
at $1,000 and he was released
April 16.
Morris Stephens, 31, of
Jacksonville was arrested,


April 13 by Bradford deputies
for driving with a suspended,
revoked or expired license.
Bond was set at $5,000 and he
was released April 14.
Jerry Sydenstricker, 33, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 13 by Clay deputies for
battery.
Tiffany Jones Sykes, 31, of
Starke was arrested April 14
by Bradford deputies for fraud-
insufficient funds check. Bond


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was set at $10,000 and she was
released April 15.
Derek Ray Voss, 27, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 11 by Starke police for
larceny. Bond was set at $500
and he was released April 11.
Albert Leo Whitmore, 26,
was arrested April 9 by Bradford
deputies for contempt of court.
Bond was set at $10,000 and he
remained in jail at press time.
Jeffery Wilson, 47, of Melrose


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was arrested April 15 by Clay
deputies for two counts of grand
theft.
Roddick Leon Winkfield, 31,-:'
of Starke was arrested April 9 :
by Bradfbrd deputies for an out- :
of-county warrant. Bond was set.
at $352.:50 and he was released
April 10..
Danie]li Wroblewski, 24, of
Keystone Heights was arrested. .
April 1 1 by Clay deputies for
retail th eft.




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Santa Fe College educational degree programs Include
Associate of Arts, Associate of Applied Sciences, Associate
of Science and Bachelor degrees. The college also offers
numerous Vocational Certificate programs. Information
on admissions can be found at http://www.sfcollege.edu/
admissions/.
Santa Fe' College Is commrriltted to an environment that
embraces diversity, respects the rights of all Individuals,
is open and accessible, and Is free of harassment and
discrimination based on, but not limited to, ethnicity, race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, marital status,
national origin, genetic Information, political opinions or
affiliations, and veteran status In all Its programs, activities
and employment. EA/EO notice Inquiries regarding non-
discrimination policies should be directed to: Lela Frye, Equal
Access/Equal Opportunity Coordinator 3000 NW 83rd Street,
R-Annex, Room 105, Galnesvllle, Florida 32606,
(352) 395-5420, lela.frye@sfcollege.edu


NOTICE OF NONAVAILABILITY AND PRACTICE
RELOCATION
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D.

All Patients of DOCTORS IMAGING GROUP, LLC
("DIG"), seenby JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., are notified
that, effective March 15th, 2013, JUDY M. YANCEY,
M.D., formerly practicing with DIG at:
Diagnostic Imaging Center
6716 NW llth Place
Gainesville, Florida 32605
became unavailable to patients at DIG. She will be relo-
cating her practice of Mammography and Ultrasound
imaging to:
Tower Hill Office Park
7550 West University Ave, Suite A
Gainesville, Florida 32607
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D. will practice as MAM-
MOGRAPHY & ULTRASOUND IMAGING CEN-
TER, PLLC. The new practice's phone number is (352)
727-4911. DR. YANCEY will be available to see pa-
tients beginning June 3rd, 2013.
Patients may obtain a copy of their medical records
currently at 6716 NW llth Place, Gainesville, Florida,
by coming to the office and signing a Request Form.
These forms can be obtained at the office of DIG. Pa-
tients may also request in writing that their records: (i)
be transferred to DR. YANCEY, (ii) remain with DIG, or
(iii) be transferred to another physician of the Patient's
choice. These requests can be made by either: (i) U.S.
Mail addressed to DIG's office address above, (ii) Telefax
to (352) 331-9744 or (iii) E-Mail to in-
fo@doctorsimaginggroup.com.


Sports & School Physical,;
Caring for Newborns to 14 years old
e Sick & Well Child visits

-- il


NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS ANNUAL MEETING

The annual meeting of the stockholders of

COMMUNITY STATE BANK CORPORATION,

STARKE, FLORIDA

for the election of Directors, and the transaction of any other business that may

come before the meeting, will be held at Charley Johns Conference Center, Hwy 301

North in Starke on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.
U


`---------


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THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 7B




qDAUuavie,&
s t. : /


George Bolden
George Bolden
MELROSE-George C. Bolden
passed away on Suiday, April 14,
2013, surrounded by his family.
He was born in Hazlehurst, Ga.,
on Sept. 12 1924, to the late Jerry
and Mattie Lou Bolden. A loving
husband, father and grandfather,
George lived a rich and faith-filled
life. Growing up during the Great
Depression, he graduated from high
school in Plant City, focused on his
studies and was a multi-year letter-
man in football.
In May 1943, he enlisted in the
U.S. Navy, where he served on the
USS Intrepid as a gun emplacement
captain. "The Fighting I" has one
of the most distinguished service
records of any Navy ship seeing
action in the Pacific Theater dur-
ing-World War II. In 1947, George
waS recruited by the government of
the pominican Republic to provide
training to their military on proper
methods to outfit their warplanes.
After returning from his military-
related ventures, he attended the
University of Miami before enter-
ing h varied and successful business
career.
George met his lovely wife of
40 :years, "Miss Pat," while he
was; the advertising manager of the
Claughton Theater chain in Miami.
In 1953, George and Pat owned and
operated Shook's Restaurant, a pop-
ular, local eatery in Boynton Beach.
Aft4r building the restaurant into a
profitable business, they sold it, and
George made a career change. Real-
izing his salesmanship abilities, he
went to work for Keller Industries
Inc., in 1955. He held a number of
positions of increasing responsi-
bilities until being promoted to vice
president in 1965.
At age 42, George suffered a
heart attack and realized a less
stressful pace might be a better
option. Shortly thereafter, he pur-
chased a 600-acre cattle farm in Flo-
rahome, where his father and broth-
er relocated to join him-on his new
endeavor. Privately-owned farming
was a hard way to make a living, but
a great way to get lifelong experi-
ence. As a result of this experience,
and: learning that farming meant
constant repairing of one thing or
another, George realized there was
a great opportunity to establish a
manufacturing corporation, Bolden
Industries Inc., that specialized in
the fabrication of panel and chain-
link- farm gates. As it turned out,
the 'gate business became a good
one, and the farm was sold in 1969,
and the manufacturing facility was
moved to Melrose.
George operated the factory until
he retired in 1986. Among George's
pleasures was the love of flying,
hunting and raising horses. Sonny,
one of his favorite horses, was a
champion at the World Champion-
ship of Barrel Racing Futurity in,
1998.
Along with his hobbies, George
was an active member of the Ma-
sonic Lodge for over 45 years. He
served as an officer in several ca-
pacities, including two terms as
Worshipful Master of the Melrose
Masonic Lodge. After presiding as
Worshipful Master, he was invited
to membership in the honor group
of York Rite Masons and named a
Knight of the York Cross of Honor.
George was also a member of the
Morocco Temple Shrine and espe-
cially enjoyed participating in their
parade events.
George was preceded in death by:
his wife, Pat; parents Jerry and Mat-
tie Lou; and three brothers, Hank,


June and Bob.
George leaves behind his loving
family: daughter Carolyn (Mike)
Watson of Raleigh, N.C.; son Don-
ny (Carla) Bolden of Debary; sister
Iva (Demp) Smith of Starke; grand-
children Scott, Stephen, Sarah and
Hannah; and nieces, nephews and
numerous other relatives.
.Services will be held Friday,
April 19, at 10:30 a.m. at Eliam
Baptist Church in Melrose, with
burial following at Eliam Cemetery.
All are invited to a lunch hosted
by friends and church members at
Eliam Baptist Church immediately
after the services.
In lieu of flowers, memorial do-
nations may be made to the George
Bolden Scholarship Fund by check
made payable to Masonic Charities
Inc., P.O. Box 1020, Jacksonville,
FL 32201.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
of Keystone Heights.
PAID OBITUARY


To Stella "My Rainbow"
9/11/1940-4/7/2013
Slow death is a terrible
thing to see. It tears you
up and tears you down.
It's painful to see and
painful to be. You try hard
to think back to a better
time, but death brings you
back to the present.
Rainbows come and go
but the memories of them
remains. Life is like a
rainbow, illusionary,
temporary, but not the
memory, that's forever.
Sweetheart You were my
Rainbow at sunset, you
were strong and I was
weak I cried but little did
you know. Some say you
were piquant, you were
but they didn't know what
I saw. Beneath the spice
was a such passion for
life. I will miss your
passion, I will miss My
Rainbow, but not the
memory of that Rainbow,
not the memory of you. As
I walk on the trail of life
maybe even my last walk
and I feel a breeze across
my face I will know it's
you giving me a kiss and
that you're waiting, so
when Ifinally take my last
short walk I'll be looking
for my Rainbow. I miss
you so very, very much. I
will not look for you at
some grave, I know
you're not there, but here
in my heart. You are the
diamond in my heart and
the gentle rain on a
summer night,
Love Bob


Rebecca Hardy
Rebecca Hardy
STARKE--Rebecca Bateman
Hardy ("Mimi") of Jacksonville
Beach and Starke passed away
peacefully on Sunday, April 14,
2013, in Starke..
She was born Sept. 25, 1914, in
Washington, D.C., to Frederick H.
White Sr., and Lillian Louise Rixey
White. She spent her early years
in D.C., graduating from Central
High School, and then studying art
at the Corcoran Gallery. She met
her first husband, Hilton Dickin-
son Bateman, while attending art
school. They were married in 1937
and moved to Arlington, Va., where
they raised their family.
In 1972, the Batemans retired to
Jacksonville Beach, and Rebecca
resumed her interest in art, focusing
her efforts on creating watercolor
florals and seascapes. She and Hil-
ton were instrumental in organizing
the original Beaches Art Guild in
1973.
After being widowed in 1974,
Rebecca continued her involvement
with the local art community, where
she met her second husband, Capt.
Willis A. Hardy, USN, Ret. They
were married in 1978. Together
they participated in workshops with
nationally acclaimed artists, which
included trips to Maine, Mexico,
the Caribbean Islands, France and
Portugal.
She was widowed a second time
in 1994.
Mrs. Hardy's paintings have re-
ceived numerous awards, including
several Best-in-Show, many first-
place awards and a Grumbacher
Award. She was a member of the
Florida Watercolor Society. She
continued painting and winning
awards well into her 90s.
Mrs. Hardy was predeceased by
her brother, Dr. Frederick Howard
White Jr.,-of Tallahassee and Starke.
She is survived by: her sister-in-
law Ginny Vance of Silver Springs,
Md.; her son, Dr. C. Fred (Joan)
Bateman of Chesapeake, Va.; her
daughter, Ginny (Bill) Brinkley
of Jacksonville Beach and Haw-
thorne; her stepson, Beau Hardy
of Tallahassee; her grandchildren,
Dr. David (Dr. Lisa Dorrill) Bate-
man of Carlisle, Pa., Debbie (Chris)
Fewster of Pilot, Va., Scott (Terri)
Hewitt, Esq., of Tampa and Brett
(Maryanne) Hewitt of Jackson-
ville Beach; her stepgrandchildren,
Bill (Kim) Brinkley Jr. of Jackson,
Miss., Bob Brinkley of Neptune
Beach and Samantha (Mike) Ryan
of Ponte Vedra Beach; her great
grandchildren, Lucas and Emma
Bateman, Forrest and Logan Few-
ster, Brittany (Rebecca), Matthew,
Ayden and Mila Hewitt, Brad,
Bobbie, Hunter, Presley, Marc and
Broc Brinkley, Kelli Conley, Gabby
Nickerson, and Gannon and Makay-
la Ryan.
The family would like to express
their deepest gratitude to the excep-
tional caregivers at Windsor Manor
in Starke for their compassionate
care during her last four years.
Arrangements by Jones-Gallagh-
er Funeral Home of Starke.
PAID OBITUARY

Shane Holley
LAKE BUTLER-Brandon
Shane Holley, 40, of Lake Butler
passed away suddenly on Thursday,
April 11, 2013, from injuries sus-
tained in an automobile accident.
He was born on March 2, 1973,


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in Jacksonville to Frank and the
late Judith Cashwell Holley. He
lived most of his life in Lake But-
ler. He was currently a contractor
with AT&T and was a member of
the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters union
#234.
He was preceded in death by: his
mother, Judith Cashwell Holley.
He is survived by: his father,
Frank Holley of Lake Butler; fi-
anc6 Tiffany Rollins of Lake But-
ler; brothers Steve (April) Holley
of Texas and Mike Holley of Lake
Butler; and sister Christel Holley of
Lake Butler.
Funeral services were conducted
on April 15 at Archer Memorial
Chapel. Internment followed at Mt.
Zion Cemetery.
Archer Funeral Home of Lake
Butler is in charge of all arrange-
ments.


Ottls McKinney

Ottis

McKinney
STARKE-Ottis Norman McK-
inney, 83, of Starke passed away
Sunday, April 14, 2013, at the Mal-
colm Randall VA Medical Center in
Gainesville.
He was born on Nov. 9, 1929, in
Graham to the late John A.J. McK-
inney and Bonnie Lee Youngblood.
Ottis proudly served his country
in the Korean War as a member
of the United States Army and re-
tired after 20 years of dedicated
service. Known as the "Mayor of
Polk Street," Ottis was very active
in the community. He would often
times gather food and newspapers,
and would deliver them to people
in need. He also was a member of
American Legion Post 56 and VFW
Post 1016 in Starke.
Ottis is survived by: his loving
wife of 41 years, Margaret McK-
inney of Starke; his children, Joan
Kuhn of Orange Park, Wayne Addi-
son Sr. of Starke, Leon Addison of
Orlando, Randy Addison of Colum-
bus, Ga., Georgia Hoffer of Gulf-
port, Miss., and Mary Breese of Ly-
ons, Kan.; his brother, James McK-
inney; his sisters, Rosalie Thornton
and Gloria Maddox; 13 grandchil-
dren; 20 great-grandchildren; and
five great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday, April 18, 2013, at 11 a.m.
at Archie Tanner Funeral Services,
with his grandson Johnny Stephens
officiating. Interment will follow at
Crosby Lake Cemetery. The family
will receive friends 30 minutes prior
to the service. Military honors will
be rendered at the graveside, with a
reception to follow at American Le-
gion Post 56 in Starke.\
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quest that donations be made in Ot-
tis' name to American Legion Post
56 at 709 W. Edwards Road, Starke,
FL 32091.
Arrangements are under the care
and direction of Archie Tanner Fu-
neral Services of Starke. Visit www.
archietannerfuneralservices.com to
sign the family's guest book.
PAID OBITUARY


Eugene

Woodard
FLORAHOME- Eugene Wade
Woodard, 70, of Florahome died
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, at North
Florida Regional Medical Center in
Gainesville.
He moved to Florahome from
Palm Springs in 1992. He was a
member of the Masons and IBEW
Local 728.
He is survived by: his wife of
49 years, Marsha Woodard of Flo-
rahome; sons Erron "Jamie" Wood-
ard of Bonney Lake, Wash., and
Mark "Beverly" Woodard of West
Palm Beach; seven grandchildren;
three brothers; and one sister.
A memorial service will be held
by family and friends on Saturday,
April 20, at his residence in Flo-
rahome from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to any Hospice facility of
your choice.
Arrangements are under the care
of Moring Funeral Home of Mel-
rose.


In loving memory of
Clarice Jarosz
1924-2011
Love from your children
Rosie (daughter-in-law)
Kathy, Carol, David,
Michael and Aunt Shirley.




We the family of Mary
Lou Green would like to
take this opportunity to
thank each of you for
your acts of kindnes
shown to us during our
time of bereavement.
Words cannot express the
gratitude we feel toward
each and every one of
you.
May God bless you.
The family of Mary Lou
Green.


In loving memory of
Owen James Phillips, Jr.
"OJ"
April 23, 1994
Well, we have reached 19
years without your smile,
your wit, your
intelligence, and most of
all your love. It seems like
the years are passing
faster and faster and yet
the days, hours, minutes,
and seconds go so slow
without you. I wish I
could express in words
how much you are
missed, but words are so
inadequate and feelings
are just that, feelings, not
words.
Your old black truck is
still running, and every
time it comes in the yard,
I smile thinking about you
and your lab, Pepper,
coming home. Your boat
still sets under the boat
shelter, and it also makes
me smile thinking of the
many hours you worked
on it in the carport. I
could go on and on, but
the smile on my face
would soon turn to tears.
Your kids, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren
are doing great and you
would be so proud of
them. Your memory is
shared with them and I
know you are watching
over each one. We love
and miss you and I know
the day will come when
we will see you again.
Love,
Pauletta, your children,
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.


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8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


Jason Hall, with a lot of help from Bradley, displays
the aggregate-weight winners at the Sampson Lake
open tournament on April 11.

Fishing report, Freshwater fishing
The bass spawn seems to be
Letroy Guion, slowing somewhat and should
show further decline after the
Hospice bass April 25 full moon.
Channel cats are currently a
tou rnament good bet on Black Creek and the
( St. Johns, and the shellcracker
SSummer continues to be more bite on Lake Lochloosa is going
apparent as the weather warms, strong.'
afid thefish bite takes notice. The Both should peak with the
bass spawn in southern waters next full moon,and the bluegill
appears to be waning, but bite should pick up as those
continues, though not as strong relax somewhat.
in the surrounding area. We Remember, the Kingsley
matched the first winter crappie Lake cycle is not consistent with
bite with the robin's arrival. We the other surrounding lakes and
tagged the shellcracker bite with should lag those.
the whippoorwill, and this week The Lake Butler Bass Club
Bob McNally with the Florida held a tournament on Hampton
Times-Union says the -bluegill Lake on April 6. Tournament
bite will escalate to a peak that winners were Charlie Hobson
should correlate with ihe-ma'ytf.v 'and-- De amne Ellis."' The 'two'
hatch.in,late April and NMa .'. .;, ,soid ,-chunnkst .bsi'o n uin.iieh
accompanying photo totaled
10.21 pounds, with the big one
weighing 5.3 pounds.
The Bald Eagle Bait and
Tackle bass tournament on April
10 turned in some good results,
.4:


with Chris Kadlec and Brooks
Morrell taking the aggregate
weight total and big fish. Kadlec
is shown in the accompanying
photo displaying the big bass
with a little help from a family
member.
SThe weights were somewhat
light, but Jason and Bradley Hall
were able to land enoughto win
the aggregate weight trophy at
the April 11 Sampson Lake open
bass tournament.

Saltwater fishing
The spring runs on both east
and west coasts seem to be hot
and heavy. Sheepshead are
readily available near jetties,
pier columns and shore reefs.
Whitings are very productive
on the east coast beaches.
*. The Spanish-'mackerel- run
appears to -be. underway on both
coasts, but the black drum bite
is slowing.
The cobia, king mackerel and
tarpon have pot yet caught on.
The croaker bite on the St.
Johns near Green Cove Springs


, ,Fins, Fur


i & Tails
By Mickey Agner -- -


LEFT: Charlie
Hobson and
Dewayne Ellis
with their
winning catch
at the April 6
S Lake Butler open
""Sg tournament
on Hampton
Lake. BELOW
LEFT: Letroy
Guion displays
a 7-plus-pound
channel catfish
caught on Santa
;.Fe Lake.



is also heating up.

Letroy Guion
Joey Tyson was preparing
to weigh the bass harvest from
his weekly Bald Eagle Bait
and Tackle bass tournament on
April 10 as a boat with three
fishermen pulled into the Little
Santa Fe boat launch. Watching
as the boat pulled in, Tyson said,
"Letroy Guion, over 300 pounds,
played football for Starke, plays
now for the Minnesota Vikings,
and he loves his fishing."
After loading his boat, Guion
strolled over to the weighing
table with a nice channel catfish
that was probably a product of
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
stocking program. With a broad
grin, he approached Tyson,
shook his hand and asked if he
would weigh his fish. The catfish
went over 7 pounds, and Guion
ended the ongoing conversation
by saying, "You know I love my
fishing."
Guion is a product of Bradford
County who has done well and
is enjoying life. He recently
attributed much of his success to
his parents, Connie and Robert.
Guion is the oldest of five
children in his family, and he has
a daughter, Zharianna.
Competing against some of
the toughest competition in
the NFL at Minnesota, he has
doubled his playing time in the
last two years and turned in some
good statistics, which include
two sacks and one blocked field
goal . .
Guion enjoys hunting and
fishing in Minnesota also and has
participated in the Governor's
Fishing Opener events for 2009
and 2010, teaching young kids
to fish. He also expresses an
interest in pursuing a career as a
game warden after football.


We wish Guion well in
football as well as in hunting
and fishing.

Haven Hospice to host
bass tournament on
April 27
Haven Hospice will host its
10th annual bass tournament on
Saturday, April 27, from safe
light until 3 p.m., with boats
launching from the Palatka city
dock.
There is a guaranteed'first-
place prize of $2,500 and a
$1,000 big fish prize, as well as
an 80-percent payback to one in
every seven boats and a $250
cash drawing at the tournament's
conclusion.
The entry fee is $i20 per boat.
For more information; visit
www.nefarbass.org.

Buckmasters banquet
set for April 27
The 16th annual Buckmasters
Banquet will be held Saturday,
April 27, beginning at 5:45 p.m.
at the Camp Blanding armory.
There will be silent and
live auctions, as well as prize
drawings another events.
Tickets ($90 per couple/$300


I:


Chris Kadlec, with a little
help, holds the big fish
' from the April 10 Bald
Eagle bass tournament.


lhe cie a td twellbeiny o youir elderLs

i; vetrL imrortait to the Stad[ at

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Located in Downtown Starke
Next to Wainwright Park
Coill Cothe, Pitts, AcJmlnistrotor. For DErectionr

(904) 964-2220
^ r


Telegraph
P.O. Drawer A
Starke, FL 32091
904-964-6305
socials@bctelegraph. corn


UC Times
125 E. Main St.
Lake Butler, FL 32054
386-496-2261
uctimes@windstream.net


LR Monitor
7382 S.R. 21
Keystone, FL 32656
352-473-2210
Irmonitor@bellsouth.net


per corporate table of eight
people) must be purchased in
advance. Please call Wavne
Oden at 352-745-1754 or
Bobbie Oden at 352-745-1752:
or 352-485-2575.

Outdoors calendar
Joey Tyson bass
tournaments at Santa Fe Lakei
every Wednesday; "
Open bass tournaments at
Sampson Lake every Thursday
evening;
Spring turkey season until
April 21 (Georgia season ends
May 21);
April 25, full moon;
April 27, Bradford Bass.:
Masters tournament at Santa Fe:
Lake;
May 25, Bradford Bass
Masters tournament at Sampson
Lake.
Tight lines and safe turkey
hunting until neXt week.
If you have a story, idea or'
photo to share, please contact '
Mickey Agner via email at mka@,"
maoutdoors.com, or by phone'
at 904-964-1488. Photos may.
also be submitted in person at;
the Bradford County Telegraph,
Union County Times or Lake.7}
Region Monitor.
i|.


LAKE BUTLER

CHRISTIAN SCHOOL



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for the 2013-2014 school year


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contact Ashley Lane
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386-266-9654


, facebook.com/LakeButlerChristianAcademy


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items. (Note that we cannot use faxed photographs.)
Cost is $10 by cash, check or credit card.


I I


I~J


^







THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION .... .: :.


H (^ . t~j
;-^* ^'^
^ !*'^ -:'^ '*-



" 4|eF/


KHHS baseball
team to 4-1 win

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Hoiden Huggins drove in three
runs, while pitchers Adam Bryan
and Noah Irwin gave up one
run on five hits in the Keystone
Heights High School baseball
team's 4-1 win over visiting
Ridge view on April 15.
Keystone ( 11 -12 prior to April
16) scored all of its runs in the
second and third innings. Huggins
drew a walk in the second, stole
second and advanced to third
on a wild pitch before scoring
on an error. In the third inning,
Huggins hit a two-out home run
that also scored Hunter Shannon
and Tristan Starling.
Bryan earned the win, giving
up four hits and four walks in 5.1
innings. He had five strikeouts.
Irwin, in relief, allowed one hit
and one walk, while striking out
one.
The Indians played Baker
County this past Tuesday and
will cap the regular season
Thursday, April 18, when they
travel to Green Cove Springs to
play Clay at 7 p.m.
Keystone will begin play in
the District 5-4A tournament,
which is hosted by Fort White
High School, on Monday, April
22. The fourth-seeded Indians
will play fifth seed Bradford in a
quarterfinal game at 7 p.m.
If Keystone defeats Bradford,
it will play top seed Williston in
a semifinal game on Tuesday,
April 23', at 4 p.m.
The championship game is
scheduled for Thursday, April
25, at 7 p.m.

Earlier result:

Williston 4 KHHS 3
The Indians took a 3-2 lead
in the sixth, but couldn't hang
on as host Williston scored two
in the bottom of the seventh to
defeat Keystone 4-3 in a District
5 matchup on April 9.
With two outs in the top of the
sixth, Dalton Mclntrye drew a


; BY CLIFF SMELLEY
:: Regional News/Sports Editor
.The first offer Bradford High
School senior Murphy Allen
received from a Division I school
came from one in his home state,
arid to him, that school--Florida
Atlantic University--represents
th-e best fit for him as he gets the
opportunity to continue playing
football after high school.
,"I just feel real blessed on
being able to play at the Division
I level and am really excited
about it," said Allen, who is an
offensive lineman. "I'm excited
atiout the fact of going in and
competing for a starting job as a
freshman, too."
Akllen has been competing in
camps to develop his skills as a
lohg snapper. In fact, he is the top-
rainked Rubio Long Snapping-
Nike prospect in Florida.
B3radford head coach Steve
Reynolds said Florida Atlantic is


UCHS
Continued from 4B ___
toi do is give you everything he
hais from the time the whistle
blows to the time it ends," Pruitt
said. "That's why Jerry) got a
scholarship."
Keller is one of those players
everyone likes to be around,


3-for-3 with an RBI.
Shannon's first RBI of the
game came on a sacrifice fly in
the first, which also featured a
solo home run by Bracewell.
Tyler Keaton also had an RBI
for the Indians, hitting a sacrifice
fly with the bases loaded in the
third.
Keystone's Bass earned the
win, giving up four hits and three
walks in five innings. He had
eight strikeouts.
Irwin, Starling and Smith
combined to pitch two innings of
relief, giving up one hit.
The Tornadoes played
Gainesville this past Tuesday
and will cap the regular season
Thursday, April 18, with a home
game against Suwannee at 7 p.m.
Bradford and Keystone will
meet each other again in the
quarterfinals of the District 5
tournament, which is being
hosted by Fort White High;
School. The fourth-seeded
Indians and the fifth-seeded:
Tornadoes will play at 7 p.m. on
Monday, April 22. The winner
will advance to play top seed
Williston at 4 p.m. on Tuesday,
April 23.
The championship game is
Thursday, April 25, at 7 p.m.


Tornadoes
drops district
game by 1

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
A home run in the bottom of
the seventh propelled Santa Fe to
a 3-2 District 5-4A win over the
Bradford High School baseball
team on April 9 in Alachua.
Bradford tied the game at 2-2 in
the top of the seventh when B.J.
McNeal scored on a single by
Wyatt Barnes. McNeal reached
base on a walk and moved into
scoring position at third on an
errant pickoff attempt.
Jacob Luke hit a solo home run
in the third for the Tornadoes,.
who f'mished with just four hits.
Bradford batters struck out 15
times.
Starting pitcher Wyatt Collins
gave up six hits and two walks in
five innings.


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Sports items to be featured in future issues: Bradford High's Samantha
Cook receives a scholarship in track and field, the Lake Butler Middle
School so ftball team wins theSMAC championship, the Hope Christian
Academy basketball program experiences good year and the Keystone
Heights High School girls' tennis team puts together a 9-2 season.


SIGNING
Continued from 4B__ _
"Dylan wants to be the game
changer" Pruitt said. "He
practices that way."
Throwing the ball was not a
huge part of the UCHS offense,
so Clark didn't get many
opportunities to catch the ball.
Therefore, Pruitt said he is eager
to see Clark get the chance to


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walk. Bryan then singled before
Tucker Bracewell hit a home run
to right field to put the Indians up
3-2.
Williston loaded the bases in
the bottom of the seventh. Haydn
Cano was hit by a pitch to force
the tying run home, while Dylan
Blalock hit a sacrifice fly to score
the game winner.
Pitcher Austin Langworthy
held Keystone to three hits.

Indians defeat
Bradford 9-4
for district win

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Hunter Shannon drove in three
runs, while Robbie Davis hit
two doubles and a home run to
help the Keystone Heights High
School baseball team defeat
visiting Bradford 9-4 in a District
5-4A game on April 12.
Bradford (9-12, 3-7 in District
5 prior to April 16), which was
held to five hits by pitchers
Morgan Bass, Noah Irwin,
Tristan Starling and Morgan
Smith, cut a three-run Keystone
lead to two when Jacob Luke hit
a solo home run in the top of the
fifth.
The Indians (4-6 in District
5) responded in the bottom haft
of the inning. Tucker Bracewell
drew a leadoff walk, followed by
back-to-back doubles by Davis
and Shannon. Shannon's double
scored both Bracewell and Davis
to put Keystone up 5-1.
Keystone added two more
runs in the inning when Starling
drove in one with a two-out
double before scoring himself on
a single by Holderl Huggins.
The Tornadoes cut the
Keystone lead to 7-4 in the top
of the sixth. Singles by Wyatt
Collins and Jackson Reddish and
a walk drawn by Zach Dewitt
loaded the bases. McNeal drove
in a run with a single, while
David Best and Murphy Allen
each drew a bases-loaded walk
to score another two.
Davis capped the scoring in
the bottom of the sixth with a
two-run homer.
Davis finished 3-for-4 with
two RBI, while Starling was


Murphy Allen,
seated between
parents Lorrie
and Scott Allen,
signs his letter-
of-Intent to
play football at
Florida Atlantic
University. Photo
courtesy of
Shelley Rodgers.


steadily."
Allen said he had interest from
several sub-Division I schools,
but jumped at the opportunity
to sign with Division I Florida
Atlantic.
Plus, Florida Atlantic just
seemed like an ideal place in
regard to its locale in Boca
Raton.
"It's a perfect distance away,
four and a half hours fight
down 95, five minutes from the
beach," Allen said. "It's basically
football in paradise."
Of course, it would be a true
paradise if Allen gets onto the
field fight away as a freshman.
Reynolds said the three-year
starter at BHS can do it.
"They're not going to give
anything to him," Reynolds
said. "He has to go in there amd
compete at a very high level very
quickly, but I think he can do it.
I think he's got the capability,"


expecting Allen to compete for a
starting job right off the bat.
"I'm very excited for him,"
Reynolds said. "It's something
he's been going to camps for
and working for in his four-year
career. He lettered his freshman
year based on being a long
snapper.
"It's good ,to see a kid get
rewarded for his work."
Reynolds said the long-
snapping camps Allen has
attended have helped develop a
skill Allen already possessed.
"He can naturally be a good
long snapper," Reynolds said,
"but as he's perfected his craft
and as he's worked on it and
toiled at it, he's now become an
elite-level snapper."
Reynold said the camps also
helped schools become aware
of Allen. Allen said ever since
he began participating in camps
approximately a year and a half
ago, "schools have been coming


Keller seemed confident that
he would feel right at home at
Limestone. He said the people
he met" there were welcoming
and made him feel comfortable.
"It seemed like a good place
to be," Keller said.
In a way, though, it is home for
Keller, who is a South Carolina
native.
"I lived there for 13 years," he
said. "I'11 be close to some of my
family up there."
Plus, Keller gets to go to
Limestone with one of his high
school teammates.
"It's great," he said of the
opportunity to go to Limestone
with Mabrey. "You know you're
not alone. You know somebody.
It .makes you feel better when
you've got somebody with you."
Both Keller and Mabrey said
they will experience a wide
range of emotions when they
step onto the field for the first
time as college players. They
both said they'll be nervous, but
Keller said he's confident he can
! get past that and "leave it all on
the field."
Mabrey said he knows what
he can do on the field and awaits
the chance to do it.
"I know with my ability I can
do some great things, so I'm
really looking forward to it," he
said.


Pruitt said. He has a sense of
humor that brings teammates
together, but when it's time to
work, he motivates those around
him to get the job done.
"He's one of those charismatic
kids," Pruitt said. "You like to
have him around, and everybody
likes to be around him. He makes
the game fun to coach and fun to
play."


shine in college.
"When he gets up there, and
they start spreading it out, I'm
going to be real happy to see
what he can do," Pruitt said.
There were a few other schools
willing to give Clark the chance
to show what he can do, but he
said Campbellsville seemed to
him the right place to be.
"The moment I went to
Campbellsville, I just really
knew it was a place I wanted to
go," Clark said. "I felt at home
there."
Mann felt the same way
about LaGrange after receiving
interest from approximately 13
schools.
"I went to the campus, and
I just felt like. I was at home,"
Mann said. "It was a great fit. I
got along with everybody."
Just as Clark was determined
to get on the field in some way at
UCHS, Mann was determined to
play quarterback. He sat behind


a senior in Austin Harden in
2011 before finally getting the
chance to start last season.
"Chandler could've played
linebacker for us," Pruitt said.
"He could've played running
back for us, but he stuck with
(quarterback), and he found a
college that wanted him at that
position. That's a testament to
what he wanted to do."
Mann said he has heard
people question his abilities as a
quarterback. It will be a driving
force when he gets to LaGrange.
"It's going to be a huge thing
for me whenever I get out there
and actually prove somebody
wrong," he said.
Whether it's on the field or
off, Mann will have success,
Pruitt said. That's a testament to
.his work ethic in the classroom
and the values instilled in him
by his parents.
"He's going to be a leader in
life," Pruitt said.


1. PRESSURE CLEANING
2. PAINTING
3. CARPENTRY
4. TILE
5. DECKS
6. WOOD ROT REPAIR'
7. DRYWALL


8. LAMINATE
9. HARDIE SIDING
10. WOOD FENCES
11. PERGOLAS
12. LAWN MAINTENANCE
13. TRACTOR WORK
14. YARD CLEANUP
15. SOD /MULCH


Huggins' 3
runs held


- -- i*


Bradford's Allen signs with FAU


*( UW~tW |UMl V M11 _______ l. _
career svitch? I NORTH FLORIDA EQUIPMENT RENTALl


.


a cpnnrd inh nra


I








TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


Sheffield leads

BHS regional

.qualifiers at

district meet

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor

Bradford High School had 14
athletes-either as individuals
or as members of relay teams-
qualify for regional competition
after their performances at the
District 4-2A track and field
finals on April 10 in Palatka.
The top four finishers in each
event earned the right to move
on to the Region 1 finals at the
Bolles School iii Jacksonville on
Thursday, April 18, at noon.
Bradford's Tiana Sheffield
will compete in four events. She
was the district runner-up in the
high jump (5-0), long jump (16-
3) and 100m hurdles (15.95).
She also placed third in the triple
jump (34-8).
Fellow girls' team member
Samantha Cook will compete in
two events at the regional meet
after finishing as the district
runner-up in the discus (104-
8) and the shot put (36-1.25).
Cook's sister, Kristen, placed
third in the discus (99-11).
Bradford finished as district
runner-up in two of the boys'
:relays. The 4xl00m team of
Kenny Dinkins, Cody Hill,
Rashad Lane and Diontre Jonas
had a time of 43.08, while the
4x400m team of Dinkins, Chris
Barron, Anthony Tyson and
DeQuan Blount had a time of
3:33.59.


Barron earned a second-place
finish as an individual in the
400m with a time of 52.08, while
Dinkins placed third in the race
with a time of 52.61.
Two other boys' team
members earned second-place
finishes: Keaaris Ardley in the
high jump (6-0) and John Wesley
Gillenwaters in the 1600m
(4:44.60).
Thomas Hales and Cole
Whitehead will advance to the
regional finals as well with
fourth-place finishes. Hales
earned his spot in the 3200m
with a time of 11:16.20, while
Whitehead did so in the 800m
with a time of 2:06.64.
Ardley and Dinkins each
missed qualifying in another
event. Ardley placed fifth in the
long jump (20-3), while Dinkins
was fifth in the triple jump (41-
9.5).
Kristen Cook placed sixth
in the shot put (31-3), while
Sarah Frederick was sixth in the
1600m (6:08.97). KaShondra
McCallum placed seventh in
the shot put (30-3.5), while
Gillenwaters and Tyson earned a
pair of seventh-place finishes for
the boys' team in the 800m and
400m, respectively, with times of
2:17.43 and 53.61.
The boys' and girls' teams
also each had an eighth-place
finisher: Jonas in the 200m
(31.34) and Autumn Rodgers in
the 800m (2:51.26).
Also competing for the girls'
team, which finished tied for
third with Newberry in the team
standings with a score of 61,
were Amanda Hall in the 1600m
(6:28.31), Rachel Ricker in the
800m (3:38.09) and 1600m
(6:41.24), and Brooke Shireman


in the shot put (21-8) and discus
(52-5).
The remaining boys' results
for Bradford were as follows:
Blount in the triple jump (31-7),
Lane in the long jump (17-3) and
100m (11.75), Justin Carlisle in
the 1600m (5:27.40) and 3200m
(13:15.01), Jarvis DeSue in the
long jump (14-10), Alec Harden
in the discus (92-6) and Tra'von
Thomas in the 100m (11.63).
Bradford finished sixth in
the boys' team standings with a
score of 69.

2 from KHHS

advance past

district track

and field finals

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor

Two track and field athletes
from Keystone Heights High
School earned the right to
compete in next week's regional
finals after their performances at
the District 5-2A meet on April
10 in the Villages.
To qualify for the Region
2 finals, which will be held
Thursday, April 18, at the Bolles
School in Jacksonville at noon,
an athlete or team had to place
in the top four at the District 5
meet. Caitlin Cumbus finished
third in the 800m with a time
of 2:37.31, while Cheyenne
Singletary placed fourth in the
300m hurdles with a time of 56
seconds.
Cumbus is making her second
straight trip to the regional finals


after qualifying in the 400m last
season.
Girls' team member Riley
Dingman fell one place shy of
qualifying for the regional finals,
placing fifth in the 800m with a
time of 2:47.02.
Haley Arzie earned points for
the girls' team with a sixth-place
finish in the 400m (1:10.90),
while Blaine Metcalf and Nate
Smith .did so for the boys' team.
Metcalf was eighth in the 3200m
(13:46.30), while Smith was
seventh in the discus (102-10)
and eighth in the high jump (5-
2).
Also competing for the boys'
team were: Ty Johnson in the
discus (77-0) and shot put (32-
0), Nicholas Zagami in the
200m (27.23), James Rabb in
the 1600m (5:33.42) and 800m
(2:36.85), Lake Beck in the
1600m (5:48.86) and 800m
(2:29.11), Jacob Hopkins in
the 1600m (6:08.66), Thomas
Spencer in the 1600m (6:16.30),
C.J. Priest in the 400m (58.22).



UC's Hendrieth

earns 7th-

place finish

at districts

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor

Anthony Hendrieth was the
closest a Union County High
School track and field athlete
came to ,qualifying for the
regional finals as he placed
seventh in the long jump at the


District 3-2A finals at the Bolles
School in Jacksonville on April
11.
The top four finishers in each
event earned the right to move
on to the regional finals.
Hendrieth was the only Union
athlete to earn points at the
district meet after recording
a distance of 20-0 in the long
jump.
Daquin Edwards and Nancy
Slocum just missed out on
earning points, with Edwards
placing ninth in the shot put (41-
6.25) and Slocum placing ninth
in the 200m (27.79).
Slocum also placed 11th in the
shot put (28-7) and 141 in the
discus (63-10).


Jessica Brown placed 10th in
the shot put (28-9.5), while Carl
Alexander placed 12"h in the
boys' event with a distance of
39-5.
Walter Mabrey placed 131h in
the 100m (11.40), while Josh
Scott was 13t in the shot put
(39-1). Scott also competed in
the discus (85-2.5).
The following also competed
for the boys' team: Nate Bridges
in the 400m (55.63), Michael
Bryant in the shot put (37-6.5),
Dylan Durrance in the discus
(62-0.5), Case Emerson in the
discus (74-4), Andrew Jones in
the 100m (11.74), Malik Jones
in the 400m (59.28) and Spencer
Williams in the 200m (25.0).


Sfl Kids Roomi dnd much more!


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Classified Ads


(9041964-6305

(3521473-2210

'(3861496-2261


mWhere one call

S does it all!


f County Classifieds
Bradfordg-Union Clay
Reach over 27,000 Readers Every Week!


40 Notice
41 Vehicles Accessories
42 Motor Vehicles
43 RV's& Campers
44 Boats
45 Land for Sale
46 Real Estate Out of Area
47 Commercial Property
Rent, Lease, Sale
48 Homes for Sale
49 Mobile Homes for Sale
50 For Rent'


INDEX
51 Lost/Found
52 Animals & Pets
53 Yard Sales
54 Keystone Yard Sales
5 1W;anted
S56 -Trade or Swap
57 For Sale
58 Building Materials
59 Personal Services
60 Secretarial Services
61 Scriptures
62 Vacationtrravel


63 Love Lines
64 Business Opportunity
65 Help Wanted
66 Investment Opportunity
67 Hunting Land for Rent
68 Rent to Own
69 Food Supplements
70 Money to Lend
72 Sporting Goods
73 Farm Equipment
74 Computers & Computer
Accessories


CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon
TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE



964-6305 473-2210 496-2261

NOTICE
Classified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the
newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads
placed by phone are rad back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff
cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves
the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only
standard abbrevations will be accepted.


40
Notices
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office in
writing & paid in advance
unless credit has already
been established with
this office. A $3.00 SER-
VICE CHARGE will be
added to all billings to
cover postage & handling.
THE CLASSIFIED STAFF
CANNOT BE HELD RE-
SPONSIBLE FOR MIS-
TAKES IN CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER' THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday
at 12 noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $9.50
for the first 20 words,
then 20 cents per word
thereafter.
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real'
estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968, which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an in-
tention to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial
status includes children


under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women
and people securing cus-
tody of children under
18. This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate,
which is in violation of
the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion, call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777, the toll-
free telephone number
for the hearing impaired


is 1-800-927-9275. For
further information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-7082
ext #1005.
BINGO, Bradford trans-
portation taking people.
to bingo in Lake City,
Orange Park, Macclenny,
Jacksonville. Wednesday
and Thursday, for $45.
Departs at 3:30 pm. Ap-
pointment only Call 904-
964-2272.
41
Auctions
KERR AUCTIONS April
27 at 6pm. 23931 NW


CR 225A Lawtey, FL.
Animal sale, general
merchandise, tack, food,
furniture, appliances,
and farm equipment. All
consignments welcome.
Cash sales, 10% buyer's
premium. For more in-
formation call Lyndel at
904-838-8069 or Randy
at 904-591-4191. AB199,
AU429, and AU1896.
APRIL30th 2013 Swanon's
Towing & Recovery will
be holding a public auc-
tion for the following cars,
at 5892 S.W. County
Road 241 Lake butler,
FL 32054 @ 11:30am.
1996 Ford Vin number
FTDX1864VNA12691.
43
RV's and
Campers
1988 BAYLINER Cuddy
Cabin, 20'8". 125force
motor not working. W/a
performance trailer.
$2,000.- 352-281-9709.
44
Boats and ATV's
2006 TROPHY 125 HP.
Mercury. 18'Walk around,
cuddy cabin, GPS, oth-
er extras. Cash only,


$11,000 080. Must see,
call Jesse 904-263-2136.
47
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease, Sale)
FOR RENT PROFES-
SIONAL OFFICE,
1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/
mo.- up to 3,000 sq.ft.
Contiguous $2,000/mo.
WAREHOUSE SPACE
3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo.
Smith & Smith Realty.
904-964-9222.
DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro-
fessional Offices for rent,
$315 per month. Confer-
ence room, kitchen, utili-
ties and more provided.
904-364-8395.
RETAIL SPACE in busy
strip center. 1,000 sq.ft.
and 2,000 sq. ft. units.
South HWY 301 front-
age, across from the KOA
Campground. Call 352-
235-1675.
FOR RENT, rental space on
E. Call St. next to Chrissy
Restaurant. $400/mo.
For additional information
call 904-964-6305, ask
for John.
OFFICE SPACE DOWN-


"A CUT ABOVE THE REST"
Fully Insured

352-485-1956




i.1y549 ruth

For the 2 Bedroom/2 Bath

Oniy$629 rmth
For the 3 Bedroom/2 Bath

Only 729 mth
For the 4 Bedroom/2 Bath
Call for current
MOVE-IN SPECLALSI


KEYSTONE VILLAGE APARTMENTS^







* Convenient to shopping, restaurant, boat ramps, Keystone Heights public
beach, schools, banks & medical facilities
*All units have additional outside storage Full carpeting and vinyl flooring
*Central air conditioning and heating Custom cabinets
Ample parking One story only no stairs to climb
Lovely landscaping *Patios & Porches for outdoor living
.* Convenient laundry facilities

4 8 S.E. 41st Loop in Keystone qlub Estates
(5k (Next to the Golf Course) 00%
Handicapped Come in and see us or call us at 352 473-3682 EQUAL HOUSING
Equipped TDD dial 711 OPPORTUNI'
This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.


TOWN. 3 offices, kitchen,
reception area. $550 per
month. Call 904-364-
9022.
PROFESSIONAL OFFIC-
ES, downtown. Suitable
for attorney, doctors, oth-
ers. Downstairs' suite
includes 4 spaces with
reception area. Upstairs
include (3) offices with
reception area. Call 904-
364-9022 for more infor-
mation.
FOR SALE/OR LEASE
Commercial warehouse
retail. Approx. 4100 sq.
ft has 2 large offices
$105,000 155 W. Brown-
lee St. Starke. Owner
financing available call
John at 912-598-0261.
48
Homes for Sale
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Lake Brooklyn on the bay.
6720 Baja Court, Key-


stone Heights. 3BR/1 BA.,
1107 sq.ft. W/separate
850 sq. ft. garage apt.
(possible income). Great
neighborhood. Lake is
down so is the price.
$89,900. By appointment
only, 904-315-2303.
49
Mobile Homes
For Sale
16.1 AC.bDevil's Den Creek.
Handy man special. 3/2.5
1620 sq. ft. MH. Full of
appliances. $60,000.
Owner offers financing
w/low down payment. Call
Jim evenings 352-473-
6994.
3.5 AC. w/3/2 1680 sq.
ft. manufactured home.
Clean, full of appliances.
$74,000. Owner offers
financing w/ good credit
and $5,000 down. $700/
mo. with taxes & insur-
ance. Call Jim evenings


352-473-6994.
FORECLOSURE, 3BR/2BA.
On 2 acres $69,900. Ful-
ly remodeled, beautiful
pond. Call 904-259-4663.
Waynefriermacclenny.
com.
LIKE NEW SINGLEWIDES:
2BR.- $16,900 3BR.-
$19,900. Includes set
up, fully remodeled. Call
904-259-4663. 49
I BUY USED MOBILE
HOMES. Cash paid im-
mediately. Call 904-259-
4663.
BRAND NEW 4 BEDROOM,
1600 sq. ft. $49,900, set
up and delivered. 904-
259-4663. Waynefrier-
macclenny.com.
NEWLY RENOVATED Triple
wide, on one acre. New
well, carpet, metal roof,
vinyl siding, large wooden
deck. Owner financing.
Call Bill 352-745-0094.
Must See.


50
For Rent
Kingsley Lake 1st floor,
1 BR/1 BA. Apt overlooking
Kingsley Lake. Refrigera-
tor stove & water. Woodsy
setting, access to spa-
cious dock. Ideal for the
professional. $575 mo.
Immediate occupancy.
Security Deposit & credit
check required. Call 904-
533-2862.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, clean, close to pris-
on. Call 352-468-1323.
NICE MOBILE HOMES
in Lake Butler & Starke.
16x80 2BR/2BA, DW
3BR/2BA. 2 & 3 BR sin-
gle wides. Both fenced.
Deposit required. Call
678-438-6828.
MOBILE HOMES FOR
RENT starting at $525
per month. Hidden Oaks,
Lake Butler. Call 386-
496-8111.


"10B


"BEAT THE SUMMER HEAT"

LAWNS & MORE
"Quality work for your budget"

FREE ESTIMATES]
"Insured"

Mowing and More!!!

John Wood ~ 352-281-7821
lawnsmore@yahoo.com


$$CASH$$
FOR YOUR UNWANTED CARS!!!
JUNK?
RVS, TRUCKS, WRECKS,
YOU NAME IT!
UP TO $1,000, PAID!!!
ACT NOW!!
(386) 292-2430


Keenan


TREE SERVICE

Trimming & Removal
Insured

FREE Estimates
Home: 352-473-4420
011Cell: 352-603-3318 or 904-540-1437


ESTATE AUCTION
Sat., April 20 o10am
450498 SR-200E, Callahan, FL
Auction to settle estate. All personal property consisting of
household goods, garage, shop, tools, and hundreds of
mid-50's & 60's Chevrolet car parts.
Items consisting of: Household furniture, shop tools,
tool cabinets, hundreds of hand tools, bolt bins, welding
tools, shop vacs, compressors, battery chargers, tow bars,
grinder, bead blaster, Ryobi portable saws, vice, trailers,
jack stands, engine blocks, shop manuals, truck bed
fenders, (2) Chevy truck cabs, hoods, wheels, rear ends,
trim pieces, plus hundreds of items more. Too many items
to list. Many items may be sold in bulk.
TERMS: Cash or approved check w/bank letter, credit
cards (3%), cashier's check, money order. 10% B.P.
Inspection: Fri., April 19, noon -4pm and Sat. 8am until
auction.
For more information call:
(904) 384-4556
First Coast Auction & Realty, Inc., P.O. Box 7878,
Jacksonville, FL 32238.
www.firstcoastauction.com AB150 AU289


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CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2010 TAKE ON PAYMENTS WITH 0 MONEY DOWN OF .................................................................... $278.22/MO
CALL JULIAN AT 904-504-9805 FOR MORE INFO
CADILLAC SRX 2007 CALL JULIAN AT 904-504-9805 AND TAKE OVER PAYMENTS OF .................................................... $285/MO
NISSAN TITAN 2013 LOW MILES SPOTLESS CONDITION, MAKE PAYMENTS OF ........................................................$388/MO0
OR CALL FOR CASH PRICE $99 DOWN
CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2013 CREW CAB TAKE ON PAYMENTS OF....................................................................... $399/MO $99 DOWN
CHEVROLET SUBURUBAN 2007 LEATHER, LOW MILES, DVD, FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILYI........................................................ $379/MO
NISSAN ARMADA 2008 8 PASSENGER SEATING. NEW TIRES, LOW MILES, MAKE PAYMENTS WITH
0 MONEY DOWN OF ONLY .............................................................................$358/MO WAC$99 DOWN
HONDA ACCORD 2010 WARRANTY TO 100K MILES, GREAT ON GAS, STYLISH AND SPORTY!......................... $15,888 OR $279/MO
NISSAN MAXIMA 2009 DRIVE IN STYLE! FULLY LOADED! PREVIOUSLY TURNED DOWN? WE SAY YES
REGARDLESS OF YOUR CREDIT HISTORY! $99 DOWN SPECIAL THIS WEEK.................................. $279/MO
LEXUS RX350 2009 LUXURY FOR LESS, WARRANTY, DRIVE IN STYLE!............................................................................WAC
NISSAN XTERRA 2002 ONLY 80K MILES, LOOKS AND RUNS GREAT..............................................................................$249/MO
GMC SIERRA 2007 4X4 Z71, LOW MILES SPOTLESS CONDITION, LEATHER SUNROOF, MUST SEE!..............................$388/MO
DODGE CARAVAN 2005 50K MILES, SPOTLESS CONDITION! YOU QUALIFY REGARDLESS OF CREDITI.............................$8,990 080
DODGE CHARGER 2009 WARRANTY TO 100K MILES, ATTENTION GETTER! MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!
100% CREDIT APPROVALS.......................................................................................................$16,850
TOYOTA CAMRY 2012 STILL UNDER WARRANTY! CALL CHRIS AT 352-672-8439 TO ASSUME PAYMENTS OF ..................... $429/MO
WITH 0 MONEY DOWN
HONDA ODYSSEY 2007 LEATHER, LOW MILES, ALL SERVICE RECORDS AVAILABLE...........................................................$18,995
CHEVROLET COBALT 2006 GREAT ON GAS, RUNS AND LOOKS LIKE NEW. MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!I......................................$7,500
INFINITI G37 2010 STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD! LOW MILES, GREAT ON GAS! CALL FOR BEST
CASH PRICE OR EVEN BETTER FINANCE PRICE!........................................................................ $378/MO
NISSAN MURANO 2009 LEATHER, SUNROOF, ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES AND WARRANTY!
100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVALS!.................................................................................$388/MO
FORD MUSTANG 2003 CONVERTIBLE, DRIVE TOPLESS ALL YEAR ROUND! LEATHER.70K MILES.
YOU CAN TELL THIS ONE WAS GARGAGE KEPT!.....................................................$10,995 OR $199/MO
DODGE CARAVAN 2005 ONLY 59K MILES, EXCELLENT CONDITION..................................................................................$8,995
FORD FOCUS 2002 VERY LOW MILES, FINANCINGAVAILABLE REGARDLESS OF YOUR PAST............................... $5,500 OBO
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2002 80K MILES, SUPER CLEAN, MUST SEE!.................................................................................$7,995 080
ACURA MDX 2005 LEATHER, THIRD ROW SEATING, SPOTLESS CONDITION. GREAT ON GAS!
ANYONE QUALIFIES FOR FINANCING.......................................................................................$259/MO
CHEVROLET IMPALA 2011 PREVIOUSLY TURNED DOWN AT OTHER BANKS? WE HAVE 100% CREDITAPPROVALS.
CALL TODAY FOR INFORMATION..............................................................................................$278/MO
CHRYSLER T&C 2008 A RELIABLE RIDE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! CALLABOUT OUR $99 DOWN SPECIAL!................$13,800 OBO


I


x I ,*'
vi oWlUN








THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 0 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION


G Classified Ads


1904J 964-0305

(3523 473-2210

(3863 490-2261


11B


Where one call

does it a/i


iCVERMANENT ROOMS
,,,for rent at the Magnolia
Hotel. Both refrigerator
'a' and microwave. Special
rates, by the month. Call
904-964-4303 for more
information.
i'LAKE BUTLER APART-
.iMENTS, Accepting ap-
plications for HC and
.'-non-HC. 1,2,3, & 4 BR.
2r,,,This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
.ta.employer. 1005 SW 6th
:s St. Lake Butler, 32054.
TDDrTTY 711.Call 386-
496-3141.
;'iSBR/1.5BA house located
one mile east of Shands
of Starke on 230. Block
home built well, low
electric bills, fireplace
4- warin built in bookcases
%an-1 real wood flooring in
,that room, Florida room!
patio, formal/informal
dining area, carpeted in
.all rooms, 2 car garage,
~ paved driveway, sits on
full acre lot, great yard for
-children, fruit trees, close
.o everything! $1,100,
-,rr'.-. (negotiable) first, last
'A-lana $350 security. Ser-
WPCo animals only. Please
l.reav'e message at 352-
..-t:. LJ7 Available May
S 1 or
'4BR I e.A H/A. clean, sit-
lrnq porch, lake property
-, *sla side of Keystone
t-e;qhir.r Ideal for 1 or 2,
'ereto.n. $475/mo. with
-tzrrllor discount. Lawn
Care rincuded. 352-226-
.4,,'622 6.
UR/2BA. Trailer-Starke for
4one or two people max.
4i-Service animals only, 630-
901-5949.
,YEAR-OLD 3BR/2BA.
~rour-.,: Granite counters,
mrorl- I.:.ors, gas fireplace,
,.,and .acuzzi tub. 2-car
egtarag- l i .:.IKeystone,
14. mrr al .k..-:ea; to Lake
,HuT.'rin.rolri. Keystone
F.1 rr'.:t r 000/mo.
..11 C''n, C. ill Dave



WEDDING &

- Estate Mattress
Sets
4. wins $69 Full $79
ueen,$89 King $129
Bunk Beds with
Mattress $329
',,Call A Mattrepss
,_,A41 E. Brownlee St.,
-Starke 904-964-3888


~WIdo Vpiqr~

Mo ve-In

: Special
V 2


-b0 $100 .-rwr:rCk -j
1/2 OFF Ist a
33nd i v it.'t'. .rent
_qual housing opporunity.

opportunity provider &
emJfoyel.
CaiN Nita at
tTO 800-955-97 71
MID 800-955-9771


Looking for a new job.
a scoetti job or a
ii*,etSjlnr lt"l












- Check the classifiedts first for
tire most comlltldle, rip-Is-date
emrployment liaiinrt itre
area.


904-964 I -630 5


2BR/1BA, MH. CH/A.
Freshly painted, on the
water. W/D hookup, lawn
service provided. $525/
mo. plus deposit. call Dal-
las, 904-364-8135.
FOR RENT- 1 bedroom
cottage on river. Unit is
furnished and all utilities
are included, $800 per
month. Please call Elaine,
904-966-2937.
HOUSE FOR RENT,
3BR/1BA. 7839 SW.
126th Ave, East of the
groves. Very clean in-
cludes, refrigerator, un-
limited phone, cH/A. 225
channel dish network,
pest control, lawn care,
washer and dryer avail-
able. Electric included
at cost of $150/mo. call
386-496-1747 leave mes-
sages. cell phone 941-
773-3670.
SWMH 3BR/2BA. Recently
remodeled w/attached
front porch. Lawn care
and pest control provid-
ed. Service animals only.
$500 security deposit,
$650/mo. Union co. area,
386-965-3363.
2 STORY round house.
3BR/2BA. W/detached
carport. Over 2,000 sq.
ft. Paved drive, lawn care
and pest control provid-
ed. Recently remodeled.
$600 security deposit,
$1,000/mo. Union co.
area, 386-965-3363. con-
veniently located between
Lake Butler, Lake city,
and Gainesville.
3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME,
on 1 acre, highway front-
age. and water includ-
ed..Quiet, 2 miles from
worthington Springs.
$550/mo.. first, last, $300
deposits. 386-266-0816.
2BR/2BA. MH. CH/A.
screened in back porch.
$595/mo. Call Dallas 904-
364-8135. Pets welcome.
53A
Yard Sales

Orangewood Apartments
801 South Water Street
Starke, FL 32091
904-964-4214
TDD/TTY 711
Accepting Applications!
Rental Assistance!
1,2, & 3 bedroom HC &
Non-HC accessible
apartments.
This institution is at equal
opportunity provider, and employer."
'Equal Housing Opportunity"


Auctions
Online Only Real
Estate Auction-
Oceanfront Lot in
Holden Beach &
17+/- Acre Water
Front Tract in
Hertford, NC.
Direct ICW Access,
Selling Regardless
of Price in Excess
or $399,000 on the
Day of the Auction,
4/29 at 8am to 5/9
at 3pm, Iron Horse
Auction Co., Inc.
800-997-2248.
NCAL3936. http:/
www.ironhorseauct
ion.com

Help Wanted
Driver One Cent
Raise after 6 and
12 months. $0.03
Enhanced
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or
Weekly Pay,


Fri. & Sat., 8am. -2pm., 2
miles west 301 on 16 in
Conerly Estates.
YARD SALE Fri. Sat, Sun in
Lawtey 7:30am -4pm. Boy
clothes, adult women and
men clothes, and misc.
items. 4 1/2 miles out of
Lawley SR. 225 west turn
left on NW 53rd Ave. look
for signs.
MOVING SALE, Fr. Sat,
8am. -2pm. 1578 161st
street. Near Starke Coun-
try club. Toys, clothes
& more.
53B
Keystone Yard
Sales
GARAGE/YARD SALE. Fri.
Sat. 9am. -1pm. Loch
Lommond Drive, Key-
stone Heights.
GARAGE SALE, Fri. Sat.
8am. -4pm. 5154 S.E.
7th Ave. Keystone Hts.
Items: books on tape.
music boxes, old dishes,
stereo with speakers, quilt
rack, VCR, DVD players.
wheat pennies, tilt saw,
tools, lots of extras.
55
Wanted
CASH FOR JUNK cars $300
& up. Free pick up. run-
ning or not. Call 352-
771-6191.
57
For Sale
FOR SALE, due to illness,
all good condition. 1994
6400 John Deer Trac-
tor w/canopy-MFWD 85
hp 3. Hitch-2 remotes.
640-loader 15 ft. bat wing.
1964 Gallon grader. 1957-
8N Ford tractor w/straight
blade-4 ft. bush hog w/
Hardee sprayer. 1995
Ferguson roller. Cultiva-
tor, disk. 1989 Ford 350
Dually diesel truck. 1996
Hamark 8x16.5 ft. en-
closed trailer. 1970 F 750
Ford dump truck w/equip-
ment trailer. 1984 Lincoln

Southern Villas of
Starke Apts.
$199
Move-in Special
1 & 2 BR HC & non-HC
apartments. Central ac
heat, on-site laundry,
playground, private and
quiet atmosphere. Located
on SR-16, 1001 Southern
Villas Dr., Starke, FL or call
904-964-7295. TDD/TTY
711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employer."


H o m e t i m e
Options. CDL-A,
3 months OTR
exp. 800-414-
9569.www.drivekn
ight.com}

Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers
earn 50 up to 55
cpm loaded. $1000
sign on to
Qualified drivers.
Home most
weekends. Call:
(843)266-3731 /
www.bulldoghiwa
v.com. EOE

D R I V E R
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
US Xpress! Earn
$700 per week! No
experience
needed! Local
CDL Traning. Job
ready in 15 days!


Town Car. 1993 Cadillac
Deville, 14 ft. boat w/
trailer, 5hp mercury mo-
tor, and trolling motor, 12
ft. Jon boat. 4 new oak
Amish buggy wheels, Call
386-496-0683.
LAWN MOWER and gas-
oline-powered edger.
Mower is Bolens, 38-inch,
6-speed and needs a bat-
tery. 352-473-7007.
FARMiNG Cultivator, 1 row.
3pt. hitch, $175. Antique
(late 40' early 50') toy
riding tractor, $400. Truck
bed liner, complete. Fits
Ford short bed, $40.
Mountain bike (Next) 24"
21 speed. $35. Call 904-
964-4739. OBO on each
item.
59
Personal
Services
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Level-
ing & raising Houses/
BIdga. Pier Replacement
& alignment. We do all
types of tractor work,
excavation and small
demolition lobs. Free Es-
timates: Danny (Buddy)
Clark, 904-545-5241.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for MH
& land packages. 1-800-
284-1144.
65
Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED PROP-
ERTY preservation sub-
contractors. Must be ii-
censed, insurance, expe-
rienced in home repairs.
provide equipment, and
available to travel within


Florida. You will also need
knowledge of camera and
computer use for sending
picture files daily to office.
Call 352-473-0095.
HIRING experienced prop-
erty preservation sec-
retaries. Prefer vendor
360, Mars &. Zephyr
knowledge. MUST have
knowledge of Windows
7 or 8 & Excel. Construc-
tion, Building materials
and use of cost estimator
a plus call 352-473-0095.
2ND SHIFT Storeroom
Clerk, Must have com-
puter knowledge. We are
an EECC, drug free work-
place. We offer 401k,
Health/Dental/Life Insur-
ance, paid Holidays and
vacation. Apply at Gilman
Building Products, CR
218 Maxville, and FL or
fax resume to 904-289-
7736.
ARE YOU A WRITER? If
you have experience and
wantto work as a reporter
for local newspaper part-
time. Send resume to
P.O. Drawer A, Starke,
Fl. 32091.
HIGH SCHOOL student,
looking for part-time work
as a school reporter, for
local newspaper. Apply
after school at Bradford
Telegraph. 135 W. Call
St. Starke.
FLORIDA CROWN Work-
force Board, Inc. (FCWB).
Lake City, Florida is ac-
cepting applications for
an Executive Director
serving Columbia, Dixie,
Gichrist and Union Coun-
ties. Must be or become a
resident of these counties
within 90 days of hire.
Position is responsible for
leadership, management,
oversight and execution
of all responsibilities


DOUGLASS LAWN CARE
Lawn Cuts & Mforel
Nojob too small..give me a call!
Quality Lawn Care at a Great Price!


; Johnathan Douglass
904-964-4407






ou GATEWAY
o-_) COLLEGE


ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
PRACTICAL NURSING
224 Duty Days
Conduct the learning experience in the
classroom, laboratory, and/or clinical
areas. Prepare for instruction syllabi,
lesson plans, tests-, use assessment
- .'trategies-to-assist the continuous-
development of the learner, use
effective communication techniques
with students and others. Demonstrate
knowledge and understanding of the
subject matter. use appropriate
technology in the teaching and learning
process, Minimum Qualifications:
Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree
and be licensed in Florida or be eligible
for licensure in Florida. Three years of
experience as staff nurse (acute care
preferred). Ability to present
information in a coherent manner and
the ability to fairly evaluate student
retention of that information. Desirable
Qualifications: Willingness to work
towards a Masters Degree in Nursing.
Computer Literate. Teaching
experience.
SALARY: Based on degree and
experience.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 5115113
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: r,.,'d,., 'A' oc ?(I
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (336) 754-4814
E-MVail: '. n .*r ii
FCGC is accredited by the Cooninission on Colleges of
tihe Soulthern Xssocdation oft lid,. I Schools.
VPAI)ADA.EXTOQ College ius Education and
Etnploynteut


Out of Area Classifieds


(888)368-1964

Investment
Opportunity
Protect your IRA
and 401(k) from
inflation by owning
physical gold or
silver! Tax-free,
h a s.s le fr e e
rollovers. Free
"Gold Guide"
AMERICAN
BULLION, (800)
527-5679

Miscellaneous
ATTEND
COLLEGE
ONLINE from
Home. *Medical, *
Business,
Criminal Justice, *
Hospitality. Job
p I ac e m e n t
assistance.
Computer and
Financial Aid if


qualified. SCHEV
authorized. Call
800-443-5186
www.CenturaOnli
ne~com

MEDICAL
CAREERS
BEGIN HERE -
TRAIN ONLINE
FOR ALLIED
HEALTH AND
MEDICAL
MANAGEMENT.
1 0 B
PLACEMENT
ASSISTANCE.
COMPUTER
A N D
FINANCIAL AID
IF QUALIFIED.
S CHEV
AUTHORIZED.
CALL 888-203-
3 1 7 9
WWW.CENTURA
ONLINE.COM


related to federal and
state workforce activities.
Min. Exp: Masters de-
gree in business, public
administration or related
discipline. 5 years of ex-
perience required. Extra
consideration given for
workforce experience
and to veterans. Salary
based upon experience.
Full benefit package
available after 90-day
probation. Successful ap-
plicant must pass back-
ground check and drug
screening. Refer to www.
employfiorida~com. Job
order #9767596. See our
web site at www.floridac-
rown.org for application.
Application, cover letter,
resume and 3 letters of
reference (references will
be contacted) must be
sent to Anna Mendoza at
almendozafifcrown.org.
Deadline: 4/26/13. An AN
EEO/ADAVVP employer.
FCWB reserves the right
to Withdraw this lob open-
ing at any time.
TIP/SPIB Lumber Graders.
We are an EECC, drug
free workplace. We offer
401k, Health/Dental/Life
insurance, paid Holidays


and Vacation. Apply at
Gilman BuildingProd-
ucts, CR 218 Maxville,
and FL or fax resume to
904-289-7736.
TIRE SERVICE tech
needed, Must have 2
yrs. experience in heavy-
duty tire maintenance
including mounting and
installing commercial ve-
hicle tires in a shop envi-
ronment as well as road-
side service calls, Driver
License/Clean MYR a
must. Pay based on ex-
perience. Benefits include
Health/Life Insurance,
Paid vacation and 401K.
Applications available
at 1050 SE 6th St.
(Hwy. 121) Lake Butler,
FL.
EXPERIENCE cooks,
servers, & bar tenders
McHenry's Pub, 323 NE
Commercial Circle, and
Keystone Heights 32656.
Apply in person between
2pm-5pm.
FULL TIME COOK
NEEDED. Experience
in large-scale food ser-
vice. Apply on line www.
shandsstarke.ccm. EOE,
M/FN/D, Drug-free work-
place.


Mriugems.scii ye
plae al35-1951









11W o P)kTI;

i"Works
Aiachua/Bradford A Community Partnership



904-964-0092
www.FloridaWorksOnlin e.com




ent GATEWAY
COLLEGE


DIRECTOR, LIBRARY,
POSITION# A99957
Supervise all aspects of the library,
including technical services, reference,
collection department, and circulation.
Serve on college committees, provide
leadership for all library staff, and
evaluate library performance using a
variety oBfyPOrts and sur'.ey~s Provide
leadership for online learning
resources via library databases, and
ensure that the library communicates
with faculty and staff in order to keep
the collection relevant and current.
Requires Master's degree in Library
Science (MLS) or Information Studies
from a program accredited by the
American Library Association, and a
minimum of three years of work
experience in a library. Knowledge of
library cataloging practices, library
computer applications including online
searching, reference techniques, and
library instruction, This position
requires the ability to communicate
effectively with all library users, the
general public and the college
community. Experience working in a
community college library preferred.
SALARY: $47,500 annually plus
benefits
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 4/30113
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: Liu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: FI'l. H .; "..'
FGC is accredited by the C omnlissi o lotl Colletes of the
Solthe'rr Association of Colleges and Schools.


AIRLINE
CAREERS -Train
for hands on
A v i a t i o n
Maintenance
Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified
housing available
CALL Aviation
Institute of
Maintenance 866-
314-3769

Satellite TV
DIRECTV Official
TV Deal
America's top
satellite provider!
DIRECT Plans
starting at $29.99!
mo for 12 months
after instant rebate.
Get the best in
entertainment.
800-253-0519


Adoption
A childless
married couple
seeks to adopt.
Financial security.
Homestudy
approved!
Let's help each
other. Expenses
paid. Carolyn &
Ken. Call Sklar
Law Firm 1-800-
218-6311.
Bar#0150789
OTR Drivers
Wanted

IN A RUT?
WANT A
CAREER, NOT
JUST A JOB?
Train to be a
professional truck
driver in ONLY 16
DAYS!
The avg. truck
driver earns $700+
/wk*! Get CDL
Training @
NFCC/


Roadmaster!
Approved for
Veterans
Training. Don't
Delay, Call
Today! 866-467-
0060
*DOL/BLS
2012

Schools &
Instruction
Heavy
Equipment
Operator
Career! 3 Week
Hands On
Training School.
Bulldozers,
Backhoes,
Excavators.Nati
o n a I
Certifications.
Lifetime Job
Placement
Assistance. VA
Be n e f i t s
Eligible! 1-866-
362-6497


I I I I .1


FLORIDA
.u GATEWAY
--V-COLLEGE

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SUMMER TERM 2013

NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in
nursing preferred. At least two years of
recent clinical experience required.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368
or mattielones(0fcicedu
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master's degree in mathematics or
Master's degree with 18 graduate hours
in mathematics. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at 386,754.4260 or
------- -- -ioerr.e5 1 : for more
information.
HEALTH INFORMATION
Certified RHIA or RHIT and a minimum
of a baccalaureate degree. Please email
resume and transcripts to Michele P.
Cuadras at michelecuadrsfgedu
HORTICULTURE
Part-time position for developing and
teaching online courses in Horticulture.
Master's degree in horticulture or similar
and at least three years of experience in
online course development and teaching
horticulture or similar required.
Horticulture industry experience
desired. Ability to work with full-time
faculty in the golf and landscape
programs to convert existing credit
courses for online delivery. Send
resumes to John R. Piersol at
iohn.oiersok~5Dfqc.edu or call 386-754-
4225 for more information.

Collegre-application and copies of
transcripts required. A 11foreign transcripts
must be submitted wiirth a translation and
evaluation. Application available at
IwwwJ.fcc.edt
FGC is accredited by the Sotlter mA ociaatinn
of Colleges and Schools
VP. AD.VAT.1'O College in Education & Emoploynment



FLO"RIDA
o GATEWAY
COLLEGE


INSTRUCTORICOORDINATOR,
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
PROGRAMS
POSITION #: F99950
l-464-Duty Days- %s. -...
The primary responsibility of an
Instructor/Coordinator at FGC is to
teach college level courses, advise
students and to develop schedules and:
curriculum. Instructor! Coordinators are.
involved in the budgeting and planning
process within their department.
Establish and maintain a relationship
with service area stakeholders.
Allocate time for'scheduled teaching
assignments, office hours during which
the students may have access to the
instructor, and for planning and support
for programs under them. Requires
Master's degree in Early Childhood
Education/Child Development or
Master's degree with at least 18
graduate credit hours in Early
Childhood Education/Child
Development. One year of
responsibility for the professional
growth of another adult through career
advising, mentoring, job coaching
sessions or. other training related
activities. One year experience in a
child care setting serving children ages
birth through eight. Ability to use
effective communication techniques
with students and others. Ability to
work with various educational
professionals and other stakeholders in
continuous improvement of the
educational experiences of students.
Ability to use technology in the
teaching and learning process. Ability
to coordinate scheduling of classes for
the area. Ability to coordinate with
other departments to provide quality
education. Ability to evaluate program
plans and recommend improvements.
Ability to present information in a
coherent manner and the ability to
fairly evaluate student retention of that
information. Ability to manage data and
complete industry reports. Skills in
~interpersonal relationships. Must be
computer literate.
SALARY: Based on degree and
experience
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Open
Until Filled
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fcic.edu
Human Resources


Reward offered


Cuz -J.apptxid ri.I
95!urday hEr'ror R ,'
Heo vas playing int the
bi .' l lk i large

Lat- C'JZ ;3Z
Sjailordshire t:rTi.r
rinA cs jrey qand ahhit
.rlih clipped arr z CU
'nil ie !he lab htie
mE rie 1rn r ar INr
if i Cu E- CiL heois
fnrsridty bul c h,;
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A $150 reward is being offered to anyone who is
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; NV,





. APRI 18, 2013


JUL


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Medical Bio
* Graduate University of Wisconsin Medical School in
2002
* Family Medicine Residency at Naval Hospital Camp
Pendleton Oceanside, California
* Pakistan 2002 Earthquake Medical Relief Supervison o
Primary Care to Women and Children Marine Corp.
* Afghanistan 2009 Physician for Camp of 450
Army Infantry Soldiers at Mazar-e-Shariff, Northern
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* Okinawa Japan Family Practice with credentials in
Women's Healthcare, Colposcopy, Newborns and
Pediatric
* Associate Professor Uniformed Services
University of Healthsciences 2010


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Graduate, Board Certified
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Active practice in Family
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Thursday, April 18, 2013

01U 7From 1913 to 2013:
UCI Has Served the
Citizens of Florida
UCI 100 YEARS

UNION CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION CELEBRATES A CENTURY OF EXCELLENCE


The facility that is now known as UCI was born in 1913 as a stockade to house inmates that were too
old or infirm to be leased as workers to various companies throughout hte state. They weren't too
old or infirm to work on a farm, however, and the facility became known as the State Prison Farm, or
just State Farm. Inmates spent their days tending the fields.


?,


In the early days, inmates could always be seen in the
fields workirig in their distinctive black and white striped
pants.


The facility opened as the state farm in 1913 and in those
early days, it had a fully functioning dairy, as well as
farmland, cows, pigs and laying hens.





STATE PRISON FARM


Capt. D.W. Purvis was the first leader of the facility that
later became UCI. Since the facility was born as a farm,
the person in charge naturally rode a horse or drove a
buggy in order to get around. Purvis' tenure was from
1913-1918.


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The history\ of Union Correctional Institution is. tor a large pan.
(he hision of corrections in the state of Florida. UiCI is the oldest
state prison tfacilir, that is still operational in the state E\en though
it has been knoil n hi, a number of different names. the prison %%Is
founded in It. current location KI.l \ear ag'o in0 1913
Through the \ear?. the faciliv has been called the Raiford siaie
Penitentian. the Florida State Prison Fann. the Raiford Prison.
Florida State Pnson and. finally Union Correctional Instltution.
When it %as bomiln in 113. the facility \%%as constructed on land that
\6as in the western portion of Bradford Count\. In 1921. Bradford
Counn% \as split i half and the land on \"Inch the facility\ sits
official\ became Union Countr. Embracing and in some cases.
enduring change has been the normal state of things at the facility,
from its earliest dja\ .
In order to understand the history of UiCI. \ou mniust understand
the hisiorn of corrections in the state of Florida the mto are
inextricabl\ bound together The first penitentiary in the state "as
built in Charahoochee in 1865 and recejled its first convictt"
in November of that \ear. This penitentialN later became a state
hospital for the mental ll When the Chatahoochee facility \\%as
built, the mentall, ill \\ho committed crimes "ere usually sent to
prison. Inmates \\ho %ere mentally ill %ere housed alongside those
\\ho %ere not mental\ ill. The mentalli ill received little, if anm
treatment v.'hile in prison. Few treatments facilities
%ere available and the onl\ consideration at the
tunme %as protecting society from these indil iduals. '^,I1
Chatahooclhee is still in operation as a state hospital 'a-l i
for the mentally 11i. but is not considered a prison i.
and Is not l\erseen b\ the Flonda Department ofl
Corrections S M R a

See MORE. page 2


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TOP: UCI's front entrance today. LEFT: The side entrance to the state
farm in the 1920s, where the River Gate is today. ABOVE: What the
front entrance looked like in 1948.


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LEFT: The second leader of the Raiford state prison farm
was former state Senator J.S. Blitch. His tenure was from
1918-1932. ABOVE: Superintendent Leonard F. Chap-
man preferred using a buggy to tour the extensive land
occupied by the state prison farm. His tenure was from
1932-1955.


- ; 4


Prior to 1954, the facility housed both male and
female inmates. This female inmate is sewing at
the shirt factory that once operated at UCIL


* FLORIDA STATE PRISON


* UNION CI


The name has changed in 100 years, but UCI still protecting the public


. : T/>. : Yii .f A ,
for th grea.>t jo..?.--'

We trul appreciate you!RO*
1-:Fre Delivery"ia
Hoshl etTrieCnto e p&Acoe
169S ant tSak 0-6-11


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2 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013
I


Continued from 1

Convict leasing meant
few prisons were
necessary
In 1877, Florida had to reduce
the debt it incurred during the
Reconstruction Era following
the Civil War. One of the funding
decisions made at the time was
to begin the practice of "leasing"
inmates. Prisoners were leased
to companies that paid the state
for the inmates' services. The
inmates worked for the company
throughout their sentences and
the company was responsible for
providing security, food, medical
care and for seeing to all the
inmates' needs.

Inmates were leased to
farming operations, road crews,
phosphate mining companies,
turpentine operations,
transportation companies and a
wide variety of others. In 1877,
companies paid the state $26 per
year for each inmate, but that
amount increased significantly
over the next few years to reach
a rate of $150 per year. County
sheriffs received a bonus of $20
for each person arrested and
convicted in their county who
was later leased out by the state.
This system was a two-fold
financial boon to the state it
brought the state funds from the
companies who leased inmates
and it meant the state did not
shave to pay for the custody and
care of the inmates who were
convicted.

Leasing led to inmates
being abused
However, many of the
companies who .leased inmates
were more concerned with their
financial bottom line than with
'the care of the inmates. Abuses
were said to be rampant. Inmates
wore leg irons day and night to
prevent their escape. They were
often beaten. They worked long
hours under difficult conditions
:and most received little food
and almost no medical care. It
was said that some sheriffs in
the state arrested people without
cause in order to receive the $20
bonus. Many inmates died and,
since records were not well-
kept, many of them were buried
in unmarked graves without the
knowledge of their f eaiili's
Because this practice-was still
in full swing in 1913, there was
no need for a large number of
prison facilities to be built.

UCI began as stockade for
old, infirm inmates
There were those inmates
who were considered too old or
infirm to be leased, however.
Companies did not want to pay
good money for an inmate who
might not be able to give them
a good day's work. So in 1913,
an 18,000-acre tract of land in
what was then western Bradford
County was purchased by the
state on the banks of New River
at a cost of $5 per acre. According
to a July 13, 1914, article in the
Bradford County Telegraph,
written months later, the land was
chosen because of the fertile soil
and its geographical location.
Construction began and was
overseen by Capt. D.W. Purvis to
include several buildings, a road
from the facility into the town of
Raiford and a bridge over New
River. The construction was
carried out by inmates, of course,


and the facility housed some 400
during its first year of operation.
The facility also suffered its first
inmate uprising during its first
year. Inmates on the construction
crew barricaded themselves
inside their housing area on Nov.
12, 1914, and refused to go to
work until the governor heard
their complaints. One inmate
died during this incident.

In early days, facility
housed both men and
women
In 1918, the prison
superintendent earned $166.67
per month. The captain earned
$70 per month and foremen on
the construction crews earned
$40-$60 per month. In an era
when few women worked
outside the home, the facility
had one prison matron, listed as
L. Carriger, who earned $65 per
month. Female inmates were
housed in a separate area in the
facility.

By 1919, records show that
the facility employed 40 guards
who earned $35 per month. They
were also provided with housing
and had access to the produce
grown on the farm, meat from
harvested animals, and eggs.
A male inmate kept their yards
clean and a female inmate acted
as cook and housekeeper. The
facility had 4,000 acres under
cultivation, extensive pasture
lands, a garment factory and a
shoe factory.

In 1919, former state Senator
J.S. Blitch was appointed captain
at the facility. Conditions for
the inmates began to improve.
as visitation was expanded
and the community became
more involved at the facility.
Community members provided
plays and other entertainments
for the inmates. Blitch went
on to play a major role at the


RIGHT: When
the facility first
opened, most
"convicts" were
not housed in
prisons; they
were leased
to private
companies. The
companies paid
the state an
amount per year
for the inmate's
labor and the
company was
supposed to
provide food,
clothing, shelter
and medical
care. Many
convicts in this
area of Florida
were leased
to turpentine
companies, which was big business
back then. The men pictured in this
photo are not inmates, but this is a
view of an early turpentine still, similar
to the ones where the Inmates would
have worked. BELOW: This Inmate was
leased to a transportation company
where he hauled goods in wagons.


facility, soon rising to the rank of
superintendent.

Tabert death leads to
end of convict leasing
The beginning of the end of
the convict leasing program can
be pinpointed by an incident
that occurred in 1921. A man
named Martin Tabert got on a
freight train without a ticket and
got caught. He was convicted in
Leon County and fined $25. If he
didn't pay, he would be ordered
to serve three months at hard
labor. His family sent the mohey,
but it got lost in the bureaucracy
and was never received by the
court. He was leased to a lumber
company in Putnam County.
Tabert went to work in the
swamps cutting wood. He soon


to ma oft-,~ av dc
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yThrIu~ ise, March 20 94 arictlep l in the Brado Clount ia










This Mearh r,194,e andthce tim he' en traker onaty










Telegraph describes the work being done on the new
state prison farm on the banks of New River.


got sick
with fever,
headache
and oozing

He was
flogged
50 times
with a five-
foot strap
for not
working
f a s t
enough.
A doctor
was finally
called and
left Tabert some quinine tablets
to take for the malaria he was
diagnosed with. He died later
that night.

His family brought the case to
the attention of the government
officials in Tallahassee. Gov.
Cary Hardee outlawed the
practice of flogging and started
the process to outlaw the practice
of leasing convicts to private
companies. Convict leasing was
not completely abolished until
1923, however.


No more leasing
means huge growth
at Raiford prison
When the state stopped leasing
inmates to private companies,
it meant the number of inmates
who had to be housed in prisons
increased dramatically as a result
and the "Raiford Prison" grew by
leaps and bounds. The facility's
inmate population doubled
between 1921 and 1929. Note
that inmates continued to work
for the state on chain gang road
crews for many years following


that incident, but they were not
leased to private companies aftek
1923. The use of chain gang
ceased in 1945, although inmate
continued to work on road crews.
Ironically, the use of the chail
gang was revived many year
later, but was short-lived. Th
inmate work crews who nod'
work out in public do not wear
leg irons while, doing so.
See MORE, page

April 19: Event at UCI
386-431-2164 for info


0:-:r o w ------ -.1- -!F "A

PROCLMATION
THE CITY OF LAKE BUTLER
PROCLAIMS APRIL 19, 2013,
AS FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION'S
UNION CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
APPRECIATION DAY

WHEREAS, The City of Lake Butler recognizes the 100th year of Union
Correctional Institution's commitment to the citizens of the State of Floridaa
specifically residents of Union County, Florida.

WHEREAS, The City of Lake Butler recognizes the significant work and
unique contributions of Union Correctional Institution (UCI) officers
and all other staff employed with UCI, who are effectively providing
custody, care, and supervision of offenders incarcerated at that facility.

WHEREAS, UCI officers and employees place their lives on the line each
day by continually demonstrating true commitment to ensuring our public
safety and protecting the incarcerated offenders from increasing violence
and crime; and

WHEREAS, UCI officers and employees are an integral part of the
criminal justice framework and coordinate with other state and local law
enforcement professionals, constantly striving to provide a correctional
system which exceeds recognized standards; and

WHEREAS, UCI officers and employees maintain a high degree of
professionalism through career development, training, and education,
making them as asset to the State of Florida in a job of continuing high
stress and challenge; and

WHEREAS, the morale of correctional officers and employees is affected
by many factors and the public perception of the role regarding UCI and its
importance in the performance of their duties as they perform their work
with courage, pride and true professionalism;

NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council; Mayor Lonnie Norman, Assistant:
Mayor Jimmy Beasley, councilmen Leroy Stalvey, Fred Sirmones and
Randy Jenkins, by virtue of the authority vested do hereby proclaim April
19th, 2013 as

UNION CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
APPRECIATION DAY

The City of Lake Butler in recognition of the professionalism and
dedication exhibited by the officers and employees urges all residents to
show their gratitude for their dedicated efforts improving the criminal
justice system.

Mayor Lonnie Norma.


We truly appreciate the

Department of

Corrections!









Congratulations Union Correctional

Institution on your Centennial!


904-964-5278 NorthFloridaChamber.com

Serving Bradford, Union, and southwest Clay counties.








THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS 3


Continued from 2


Electric chair first
,housed at what is
now Union CI
In 1922, inmates constructed
;the first electric chair, which
was considered a more humane
,execution technique than
;hanging. (Note that the last public
.hanging in Bradford County had
:occurred on Nov. 27, 1914.) The
Chair and "death house" were
both at the Raiford prison site,
:which is now UCI.
The current electric chair,
iahid death house are located at
iFlorida State Prison, across New
:River from UCI. (UCI continues


to house some 300 Death Row
inmates, however.)

In 1924, Frank Johnson
became the first inmate executed
by electrocution in the state of
Florida. By this time, the facility
was being called Florida State
Prison, but the buildings where
the execution took place were
located on the site that is now
called UCI.
The superintendent was the
official executioner in those
early days, but he often ceded
this task to a deputy executioner
who actually pulled the switch.
This was usually the sheriff of

See MORE, page 4


Although this photo was taken later in the facility's history, it shows the "death house," which was built in 1935 at
what later became UCI. Called The Flat Top, the building on the right, inside the encircling wall, was where Death
Row inmates and the electric chair were housed. Note that the building in the upper left-hand corner of the photo
was the West Unit, where female inmates were housed before a separate facility was built for them.


-'TOP: This inmate was tracked down by the dog team and treed during a training exercise. ABOVE: Early tracking
dog handlers were inmates. They trained the dogs as well, under the guidance of a staff member.


The infamous sweat box was a small enclosure, so small
a single man barely had enough room to sit. A man could
stand up or sit, but could not lie down. He would often
stay in the box for two days with two or three other men.


------------------------------AW1 J3 -- ---
Servn gStare, radord nd urrundig cuhtes fr mre han 4 yars


904=964=8018e







4 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


Continued from 3
the county where the inmate
committed his crime.

Tag plant, shirt factory
among first job
training projects
In 1927, the tag plant opened
at the Raiford prison and inmates
began production, making all of
the Florida license plates for
motor vehicles. The tag plant
is still in operation today and.
continues to train inmates in
manufacturing techniques. A
shirt factory also opened in 1927,
but is no longer in operation.
Guards were listed as earning
$50 per month that year and
the facility began organizing, its
own dog team to track inmates
who escaped. Prior to that time,
if the facility needed to track an
inmate, it had to borrow tracking
(logs from private individuals.
Superintendent Blitch was
commended that year by the
Florida Legislature for doing
an outstanding job of running
a facility that was growing
dramatically.

Leg irons, shotguns
sweat boxes,
horizontal stripes...
Inmates in all state facilities
often worked in leg irons, under
the gaze of shotgun squads.
They wore horizontal stripes,
and although flogging had been
outlawed, inmates were still
sometimes whipped. Sweatboxes
were used as punishment for
inmates who broke the rules.
These were small, windowless
wooden boxes that required the
inmate to either stand or crouch
all night because there was no
room to lie down. Inmates often
had to stay in the box for two days
at a time. Sweatboxes continued
to be utilized until 1958.
The inmates who worked on
the state road crews were under
the jurisdiction of the county
in which the construction was
taking place. They lived in
wheeled metal cages when they
weren't working.
The cages were kept at sites
near the work location, and it
does not appear that any were
used at the Raiford prison. These
cages had three bunks slung on
each side, with hardly room to
walk between the tiers.
In a 1924' report, Supervisor
of State Convicts B.H. Dickson
wrote, "These old cages are
unsanitary, uncomfortable,
unhealthy and in every way
undesirable... It is impossible to
provide any place in these vans
for the men to take a bath, and it
is a difficult matter to keep these
cages clear of vermin."
He recommended that the
counties who were responsible for
the road crews should be forced


The tag plant first opened in 1927 and made all the The facility that is now UCI once operated both a shirt factory and a shoe factory.
license plates for Florida vehicles. The plant still These inmates are making shirts.
operates today, although the manufacturing process has
been much improved since its infancy, used instead. He implemented for the inmates. He removed until the end of the 1930s. After


to provide permanent barracks
for the inmates. Some counties
did provide better quarters for
the inmates and in 1941, state-
operated "road prisons" began to
appear throughout Florida.
Another recommendation
made by Dickson was to increase
the amount of money an inmate
was given upon release. In the
mid-1920s, inmates received
$10 upon release and had to
buy a suit of clothes and pay
for transportation himself. Of
course, that usually meant the
inmate had no money to live
on. If he didn't get a job right
away, and many didn't, the
inmate often turned to criminal
activity to make money. Today,
an inmate receives up to $50
cash upon release and the state
provides him with a change of
clothing and transportation to his
destination. The state also helps
ensure the ex-inmate has housing
and a job upon his release.

Prison expands and
grows The Rock is
born in 1928
'Ii' an article published in the
Bradford County Telegraph
on Jan. 27, 1928, the writer
discussed an expansion project at
the Raiford prison that included
a single building covering three
acres of land. It was described as
being "built of concrete and tool-
proof steel interlaced throughout
the walls, every position giving
prisoners advantage of sunlight
and air."
The building was built
by convict labor at a cost of


approximately $300,000. It
would come to be known as "The
Rock" because it was "solid as a
rock." The Rock was to stand as
the largest and longest operating
single inmate housing area for
many years. It was closed in
1984 and was torn down in 1999.
In 1928, guards earned $720
per year, along with room and
board. They worked six 12-hour
days at the time.
In a March 29, 1929, article in
the Bradford County Telegraph,
the Raiford prison was described
as having 18,000 acres of land.
A total of 15,000 acres was
fenced and 2,000 acres were
under cultivation. The facility
had 1,200 cattle, 600 hogs, 3,000
laying hens and 100 mules and
horses. By 1932, the inmate
population was 2,000 male
and female inmates. Another
1,210 inmates were working in
road crews. The facility had 85
employees:
In 1932, Blitch died and
Leonard F. Chapman was
appointed as superintendent. He
served in that capacity for 25
years and, while Blitch had made
many improvements that were
of benefit to both the state and
the inmates, Chapman, proved
to be an even more progressive
influence.

Chapman proves
to be even more
progressive than
Blitch
Under Chapman's leadership,
the word "convict" was
forbidden and "inmate" was


improved health services tor the
inmates and educational classes
including grade school and job
training. Some of the courses
that provided job training for
the inmates were carpentry,
millwork, plumbing and auto
mechanics.
He also implemented programs
that encouraged improving work
habits and introduced measures
that increased community contact


the solid wooden fencing that
surrounded the institution in its
early days and replaced it with
chain-link fencing that allowed
the inmates a view of the outside
world.
During Chapman's tenure,
guards were first issued
uniforms. Prior to that, they had
worn normal clothing. Inmates
continued to wear the horizontal
black and white striped pants


that point, the current inmate
uniform with a single stripe
down the leg was introduced.

Would-be presidential
assassin executed
In 1933, the Raiford prison was
the site of a famous execution that
had the whole world watching.
U.S. President Franklin D.:


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THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS 5

Continued from 4 classification system. Prior project. Note that women were have on prisons and prison
Sto that time, minor criminals housed at the Raiford prison until management," Chapman wrote.
Roosevelt was visiting Miami ,7C were housed side-by-side with what is now Lowell Correctional "A number of members of
on Feb. 15, 1933. A man fired --- dangerous violent offenders Institution opened in 1954. the staff have been called into
five rounds at FDR as he sat without regard to much of The Raiford prison's female military service and there has
in a convertible talking to anything except sex and race. population was transferred to been considerable difficulty in
constituents at Miami's Bayfront , In the 1930s, a system was Lowell at that time. securing materials needed in the
PaFk. All five rounds missed of . i i implemented that housed'the operation of the prison: However,
FDR, but hit other members of dangerous offenderstogether in In 1937, a system whereby all all the effort of the prison has
the entourage, including Chicago '
Mayor Anton J. Cermak.. 'l LEFT: The Rock was built in 1928, but this view was taken in 1936. The giant housing"
The man was arrested and facility came to be known as "The Rock" because it was built solid as a rock. BELOW:
identified as Giuseppe Zangara, ..C. This aerial view of the institution was taken prior to 1985 when the Southeast Unit was
a naturalized Italian immigrant constructed. Note The Rock still standing to the left of the main gate complex. It was
who said he wanted to kill "kings torn down in 1999.
and presidents" and didn't seem
to be too picky about specifically as a record for the swiftest
which kings and presidents, execution in Florida history. : .... -
According to witnesses, he ;' ... ... -
When Cermak died from his cursed at the minister sent to pray 2 ...
injuries a month later, Zangara with him and ordered him out of ; -.. . -
insisted on pleading guilty to the room. He insisted on placing ''
murder charges, telling anyone himself in the electric chair and -- a a '
who would listen why he wanted yelled, "Pusha da button!" at *'. '. .. >
to:shoot the president. "I shoot the sheriff who was preparing .
kings and presidents. Capitalists .to throw the switch. When FSP .
got all-a money... I kill became a separate entity in 1972,
capitalists because they kill me," the electric chair was moved- "... ": -' i -
he said (as quoted in a book by there and the Raiford prison : !
Blaise Picchi, which recounted that became UCI no longer held .. '
the incident), executions. '*: = '' ': i;.; .
Zangara was electrocuted on Also notable in the 1930s was
March 20, 1933, which stands the implementation of the inmate ~ '' '
housing units separate from the inmates would be fingerprinted been devoted to helping the war
more manageable inmates, was introduced, although effort in every way possible,
comparing fingerprints at the and it is good to note that the
Improvements at time was a tedious and time- prisoners have made successful
facility continue consuming job that was handled contributions." Besides the
Improvements in the Raiford by a person holding a magnifying ration books, inmates donated
prison's infrastructure continue glass. Copies of the fingerprints blood, harvested pulpwood for
and a report submitted to the were filed in Tallahassee. the war effort, and even made
state on Jan. 16, 1935, indicated In 1942, a guard earned $50 a camouflage nets to help conceal
: that the Raiford prison and other month and housing was provided allied gun emplacements,
.. .. camps around the state, "are now to him. His laundry was done equipment and personnel.
o ,, equipped with pumping systems at the prison and utilities were In the letter, Chapman noted
S, from deep wells, elevated water included as a part of his salary, that the inmate population had
tanks, sanitary flush toilets, He still had an inmate yardman dropped, "due doubtless to the
Shower baths, and hot and and inmate housekeeper, and. lack of idleness and poverty.
cold water, all connected with was allowed access to farm There has been no, idleness
Sanitary sewerage systems, and produce, meat and dairy products except willful idleness and no
where power lines are accessible produced at the farm. poverty except willful poverty;
Share equipped with electric lights; therefore there has been little
.e e d kitchens, mess halls and barracks World War II takes its crime." Chapman also noted that
are kept clean and neat, and toll on prison the prison was preparing for a
S- prisoners are required to take World War II affected the rapid increase in population once
shower baths and change from Raiford prison, as it did the the war was over.
work clothes to, night clothes entire world. Inmates addressed It appears Chapman was right
S! < =before retiring; food is not only and mailed the ration books that in that prediction. In 1947, two
good, but excellent and plentiful, .allowed citizens to purchase the years following the end of the
with a change of diet from day to items that were in short supply war, the population of Florida
.day." (Note that electricity wasn't due to the war. A letter from prisons showed an increase of
S. .. : available to the Raiford prison Superintendent Chapman to 17.2 percent in one year. Also,
site until 1938.) A maximum- state officials in 1943 provided in 1947, the guard's 12-hour
The Rock had two interior courtyards that were used as exercise yards. security housing unit called "The a glimpse at life during the war workday was shortened to the
Flat Top" was built in 1935 to from a corrections standpoint: same eight hours worked by
house Death Row. inmates and "The, past two years have other government employees.
the electric chair:- shown the effect that war can : '
o In 1935 the Raiford prison See MORE, page 6
also opened a cigarette factory, -
which produced tobacco in '
pouches with rolling papers. The
label read, "Dee Cee Smoking
Tobacco." It was produced for w r.
inmates until 1972. After 1972,
inmates could still buy loose
tobacco and rolling papers or
packages of cigarettes, if they had '
the money from the canteens.
In 2011, the Department of e- i
Corrections changed all of .
its facilities to non-smoking
facilities. Today, no UCI inmate
At Sonny s of Starke we re is allowed to possess cigarettes,
n n Dr. D Jmloose tobacco, rolling papers .
or lighters. Only Death Row
inmates can possess smokeless ..
tobacco.


CELEBRATINGwomen's ward built .'
In 1936, several new buildings .;
I ~opened at the Raiford prison, at ..
Sa construction cost of $305,102. -.o t
2. S Two new women's dormitories, :
one for white women and one .... '
for "colored" women, opened
that year. An infirmary and a This inmate was being fingerprinted at the institution
Hospital were also part of that after fingerprinting was first implemented in 1937.





YEARSTank You
Y EA RAll DOC employees for your service

and your patronage to our business
With.Union Correctional Institution
SCo ngra.ttl(ations LUnion Correctional

All DOC personnel tIistitittioni l on your Centennial!

will receive an Employee Discount offer --

Friday, April 19th thru Sunday, April 21st BRADFORD COUNTY EYE CENTER

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b TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


Continued from 5


Prison population continued
to increase through the 1950s
and the emphasis moved from
punishment to rehabilitation
of the inmates. The population
increase caused some severe
overcrowding problems at the
Raiford prison, which had a
population of 1,497 at that time.
Superintendent Chapman wrote
a letter in 1954, talking about the
overcrowding issue.
"While the removal of the
women from the State Prison
(to what is now Lowell) offers
some relief of the crowded
condition at present, the steady
ahd rapid increase of men in
the prison population indicates
that new facilities must be
provided in the near future,"
wrote Chapman. "More than
200 prisoners are now housed
in tin buildings of the Quonset
type and some of them sleep in
tiers three deep. Good sanitary
conditions are impossible in such
circumstances and security is
likewise impossible." Chapman
noted in his letter that narcotic
addicts were a large part of the
influx of new prisoners.
Godwin dies trying to
prevent escape
of inmate
S In 1955, the Raiford prison
irourned the loss of Asst.
Superintendent James G.
Godwin, who died at the hand
of an escaping inmate. A visitor
snuggled a gun into the facility
to inmate George Arthur Heroux,
who used it to escape. Godwin
was shot while attempting to
siop Heroux's escape. Wounded
ii that same incident were staff
raember Louie Wainwright
ajid Officer Les Dobbs. Staff
remember Lawrence E. Dugger
voas also in the group that
tied to foil Heroux's escape
attempt, but he was not shot.
Ironically, Wainwright would
.o on to become the secretary
of the Florida Department
of Corrections and Dugger's
spn, Richard, .would take
Wainwright's place as secretary.
East unit (now FSP)
begins construction
Prison population continued
to grow and construction began
oh the Raiford prison's "east"
unit. Located just across New
River, the unit opened in 1958
as a maximum-security unit, and
was called the "O Unit." The
entirety of the east unit was not
completed until the late 1960s.
Expansion continued and the east
unit grew until it was split off in
b172 to form an entirely different
prison facility. What is now
Florida State Prison was bor
al that time and the west unit of
the Raiford prison became Union


Correctional Institution.
The six-digit inmate numbering
system was inaugurated in
1960 and is still in use today.
Executions were suspended in
Florida in 1964. Inmates were
still housed on Death Row, but
death warrants were not signed.
Executions in Florida resumed in
1979 with the execution of John
Spenkelink on May 25 of that
year. That execution was carried
out at Florida State Prison, which
by that time was a completely
separate facility from UCI.
. In 1971, one year prior to the
division of the Raiford prison
into the present two facilities, a
series of riots and disturbances
at the facility was blamed on
overcrowded conditions. The
rioting lasted for an entire week
and resulted in five officers and
74 inmates being injured. The
facility suffered some $2,000
worth of the property damage.
Female correctional officers
were first hired in 1970s and
the training for all officers was
expanded during the 60s and 70s.
Prisons fighting
'escape fever'
In 1978, a rash of escapes
plagued Florida correctional
facilities statewide and Union CI


the fences showed two strands of
barbed wire had been cut.
Hostage situation
leads to dramatic
rescue
"Escape fever" appeared to
return to Florida facilities in the


Asst. Superintendent James G. Godwin was killed in
1955, as he tried to stop an inmate's escape attempt. Two
other staff members were wounded in the same incident.


was not an exception. On Nov.
27, .1978, a correctional officer
spotted an inmate climbing the
outer perimeter fence at UCI.
An emergency master count
revealed that Billy Bryant Jr. and


Louis Ayendes were missing.
The facility staff and local
law enforcement mobilized and
both inmates were eventually
recaptured. Ayendes was
recaptured within hours and
Bryant was recaptured some
time later. An examination of


1980s and, again UCI had its
share of dramatic incidents. In
February of 1981, UCI inmates
Jerry Raspberry and Ray Mitchell
decided to attempt escape by
taking hostages. Raspberry was
a habitual violent offender who
was serving a life sentence and
Mitchell had four life sentences
for the murders of four people
in Miami. The two armed
themselves with bladed weapons
and made their way to the offices
of the assistant superintendent.
They took two secretaries hostage
and demanded to be released and
provided with a vehicle full of
gas and a multi-channel radio
(presumably in order to be able
to monitor the officers pursuing


them).
Col. Donald Jackson,
Officer Dennis Dowling and
Administrative Assistant J.T.
Richardson kicked in the door of.
the office and pulled one of the :
women to safety. They were not
aware until that moment that the
second woman was also being
held hostage. Raspberry held a
knife to her throat and threatened
to kill her, so they backed off.
Negotiations with the inmates
began and Inspector Ed Sands.
offered to take the place of the
remaining secretary as a hostage.
The inmates didn't buy it,
however. Negotiations continued

See MORE, page 9


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Congratulations
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on their
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Congratulations to UCI


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INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
OF
RAIFORD

431-1898 A non-profit organization for
CR-229, Raiford disabled citizens.


I Congrats to Union Correctional I
Institution on their 100th Anniversarv! I


To all DOC employees:

Thank you for your service
and patronage to our
communities and local
businesses.


Congratulations on 100 years
Union Correctional Institution

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14 'i


THURSDAY,, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS 7

LeadershSipThroughtheYeaei


Union Cl's first leader was "Captain" .W.
Purvis, who oversaw the operation of
the stockade in its earliest years. J.S.
Plitch took over in 1919, also as cap-
tain, but "captain" and "superintendent"
were sometimes interchangeable in those
early years. The institution's leader was
then called a superintendent until 1999
or 2000, when the top official became
known as a "warden." Today, Warden
Piane Andrews leads the facility.


The current administration at UCI includes (seated) Warden Diane Andrews, and (I-r, standing) Major
Kevin Box, Asst. Classification Supervisor Tommy Dicks, Asst. Warden for Programs Stephen Rossiter,
Asst. Warden for Operations Tony Anderson, Classification Supervisor Michael Davis and Col. David
Maddox.


D.C. Sinclair 1955-1968








Xi'~

J.C. Wade 1990-1992



Thank


D.R. Hassfurder 1968-1971


C.P. Worthington 1992-1993


you


Centennial


of Serv


CC.


L.E. Dugger 1971-1973


D.T. O'Neil 1993-1999


R.D. Massey 1973-1984


B.D. Carter 1999-2001


M.R. Hicks 2006-2009


TL. Barton 1984 to 1986


P.C. Decker 2001-2004


B.V. Reddish 2009-2012


W.M. Ellis 1986-1990


W.C. Whitehurst '04-'06


D.S. Andrews 2012-


All current and former employees of UCI are invited to
attend a special event tomorrow, Friday, April 19,.at the
Massey Training Building near the institution on SR. 16 west
ofStarke. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., theprogram
begins at 11 a. m. and lunch will be served at noon. Local
officials from Bradford and Union counties are also invited.
For more information: 386-431-2164 or 386-431-2165 (8 a.m.-5 p.m.)


'14
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8 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


have always worked hard during their incarceration. Today,
is a management problem or physically or mentally incapable
he has an assigned job that he does five days each week.
Give him training that will help him gain employment once he
returns to society.


II


.4~J Il .


I-


, -, y' ,' .. . .. ,-.,
... .~~.. ,;: -: P + 2
'' "" ? -* .
: .. _"* .- ... .. : -. ",. " "- '* -

C I
',.;--," "*, 5 "-- -*-^ "- .c ... ..
_ ,, : - -,; -: -" _.: '.- -" ."-I: ... .. ..".-; - 1' ;" .*t *l ^ ^ *. ,*' * J

^..~1 *- .- .i^.-. ^ -: ,




i-i. ..




...... . ...... . . . . . . . . . . .. .. -
. . 7 . + : t ''* ^ '

.."++ :' + +"* +- *
..... . .. ,






+.. ,:.:!::: :'..,'.". *?. "^ , .., : ."- .
-. .
:---~ ~ ".- ,: x ,.
., : ",. -.-
~ .: 'i:,. ,

] :.'. . '" .. ., ;
. -,; ---
L '" --'
: .
ci ,? i.,F -:
j .:"":- ,.. + ++ -. .
.. .. ? .
.. + ; ;2'


These inmates were working on the ditch bank near the West Unit, which would
eventually become the primary portion of the current UCI. Note the striped pants,
whose use was discontinued at the end of the 1930s.


Hardware.
BRYAN'S Ace & Garden
"Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters"




P C ....s- C re . l


.. .. : "

-- .-- : -


This smoke stack on the old steam plant was emblazoned with the words "State
Prison" in early days. UCI was known as Florida State Prison until 1972, when the
current Florida State Prison was split off from the current UCI and became a separate
facility. The steam plant smokestack was just recently torn down.


,.. I .k~
.U
~"' "`
-- i '4
-- ., -- i": ~e6~a ~
: ec~;-
7
rc-bqjc:'
'* ~C: i
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904-964-4642


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INTERLACHEN
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Thank You

UCI and all correctional employees
for your patronage.


We appreciate you!






of Lake Butler


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Congratulations to
Union Correctional Institution
on your 100th Anniversary


NORTHSIDE CHRISTIAN

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on their
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for 67 of our 75 years

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409:94


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THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS 9q
-- -- -----


zT ~c~- l

A';'""


Continued from 6
with the help of the Duval County
hostage Negotiation Team. The
Duval County SWAT Team was
standing by.
i Ten hours passed with no
progress and Superintendent
1;aymond Massey and eight
armed officers prepared to
storm the office. Those officers
were: Col. Jackson, Major Gene
L. Tomlinson, Lt. Raymond
Wilkerson, Lt. Michael
Rathmann, Lt. Gene Griffis,
Set. John Newman, Sgt. Roger
Murrhee and Col. Tom Barton.
,AI of them were UCI staff
niembers, with the exception
of Barton. He worked at FSP
aid was known as a superb
niarksman. He also had a proven
ability to remain calm under
pressure, as he had already been
involved in a hostage situation at
FSP during that same period of
"escape fever."
Lt. Griffis knew Raspberry
after supervising him on
work details in the past, so he
acted as a go-between to relay
messages to the two inmates.


The officials provided Griffis officers involved received high
with the superintendent's two- praise from DOC officials and
shot Derringer, the only weapon even from the grand jury that
small enough to conceal from the later investigated the incident.
inmates. Griffis hid it in a Red


Man chewing tobacco pouch and
entered the room with orders to
use the Derringer, if he could get
a clear shot.
Officials put through a phone
call from Raspberry's mother
and, while he was distracted
with the call, Griffis fired on
Mitchell, who was holding a
knife to the secretary's throat.
He then immediately turned and
fired into Raspberry's chest.
Mitchell fell unconscious, but
Raspberry managed to grab the
secretary. The Derringer was out
of ammunition, but Col. Barton
used a shotgun to blow open
the door and the other officers
stormed in and fired five more
times into Raspberry's body. He
released the hostage, although
she had received a superficial
laceration across her neck and
shoulder.
Mitchell died, but Raspberry
miraculously survived. He died
in prison on Jan. 5, 2000. All the


r3 UCI escapees kill
FHP trooper
Less than two months later,
another incident resulted in the
death of a Florida Highway
Patrol officer and a civilian who
was assisting with the search
for three escaped UCI inmates.
James Malone, Edward Kennedy
.and James Bonaventure had
escape paraphernalia buried
outside their housing area at UCI.
They strangled the dorm
officer until he was almost
unconscious and then tied him
up and locked him in a cell.
They stole his keys and wallet
and made their way out of the
building. They used some wire
cutters they had buried to cut
through two of the three fences.
They climbed the third and made
their way through an extremely
foggy night. An officer walking
fog patrol saw one of them and
fired on him, but the foggy night


concealed the inmates and aided
in their escape.
The alarm was raised,
however, and canine officers
Sgt. William B. Jackson and
Officer Duane Jordan caught
Malone and Bonaventura after
only four hours. Kennedy
eluded the pursuit and made it
to Baldwin, where he killed FHP
Trooper' Robert P. McDermon
and civilian Floyd Hartford
Cone Jr., when they tried to help
capture him. Kennedy took a
woman and child hostage, but
later surrendered to authorities.
He was later executed at FSP on
July 21, 1992, for the murders of
McDermon and Cone.

Dennard dies after
attack in The Rock
UCI had weathered the 1981
hostage incident with no loss
of life to DOC staff, but a May
5, 1983, incident left them
mourning the loss of one officer
and the injury of three more. The
officers were attacked by inmates
in the main housing unit, The
Rock. Sgt. John Steven Dennard
was brutally stabbed multiple
times and died at the age of 29.
Also injured in the unprovoked
attack, were Mitch Anderson,
Richard Harvey and Tommy
Baker. They were hospitalized,
but survived. Dennard had been
with DOC since 1978, but had


LEFT: Wooden walls like these surrounded the facility
in its early days. Superintendent Leonard Chapman had
the wooden walls removed and replaced with chain-link
fencing so that inmates could see the outside world.
BELOW: Inmates who were called "trustees" were
posted in the towers in early years to act as guards.


Sgt. John Steven
Dennard was brutally
stabbed multiple times by
an inmate on May 5, 1983,
during an incident at The,
Rock that also injured three
other officers.

been a sergeant for only one
week at the time of his death:
The entire institution, and
hundreds of fellow officers froni
other institutions, mourned his
passing.

PRIDE bright spot in
dangerous era
for prisons
Although the 1980s were
marked with tragedy, UCI
also saw the advent of Prison
Rehabilitative Industries and
Diversified Enterprises, ot


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Congratulations
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Union Correctional Institution
on their 100th Anniversary!








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10 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013
ii


ABOVE: These homemade weapons were confiscated from UCI inmates over a period of several years.
They tell a story of the danger and violence that is always a possibility in any prison setting. LEFT:
During Superintendent Leonard Chapman's tenure, Inmates were first provided with the opportunity to
further their education, both through grade school classes like these and through job training programs'
-"EFTT.,"-"I T-r-. Ir a- - A --,- i;


Continued from 9
PRIDE. PRIDE is a nonprofit
organization that provides job
training for inmates.
This training often leads to
employment upon their release.
UCI now has a furniture factory
and a dental lab inside its
walls, both of which are run by
PRIDE. The furniture factory
manufactures metal furniture and
the dental lab crafts dentures,
partial plates, bridges, etc. The
tag, plant which was one of
the facility's first job-training
ventures and is still going strong
- is also operated by PRIDE.
All three facilities train inmates
and give them experience that
will help them land a job once
they are released.
80s see overcrowding
problems, DOC
expansion
Overcrowding continued to be
a problem in the state through
the 1980s as new facilities
were built and some inmates
were even housed in tents until
other housing could be found
for them. Administrative gain
time was introduced, allowing
inmates to earn time off their


sentences in addition to the population area, are close
normal gain time. The measures custody inmates and many have
that were implemented to ease life sentences. The facility has
overcrowding resulted in inmates four confinement housing units
serving less and less of their for inmates who are receiving
sentences. mental health treatment. It is one


In the late 1980s, the
department began a building
campaign in an effort to meet the
demand for more bed space and
growing public sentiment that
inmates should serve more of
their sentences. The percentage
of an inmate's sentence that is
actually served by that inmate
went from approximately 30
percent in the 1980s to 80-plus
percent in 2000.
Today's UCI a unique
facility providing
housing for general
population, Death Row
and mental health
UCI is still going strong today
and houses some 2,000 inmates,
approximately 300 of which are
on Death Row. Approximately
half the population is. housed on
a "general population" basis and
the other half are confinement
inmates which are inmates
who are more difficult to manage.
Most of the inmates housed
at UCI, even in the general


of the major facilities in the state
where inmates can receive such
treatment on an inpatient basis,
and inmates are often transferred
to UCI so they can be provided
with that treatment.
The general population
unit, consisting of 13 different
dormitories and called the
Southwest Unit, was constructed
in 1974. The Southeast Unit,
two dormitories that are used to
house confinement inmates who
do not necessarily have mental
health issues, was built in 1985
and the new Death Row complex
was built in 1992.
The mental health units were
opened later, the two dorms in
the Northwest Unit were opened
in 1998 and 2000, respectively,
and the North Central Unit
dorms were both opened in
2003. Current staffing levels for
the entire facility range from
750-780, including security staff,
medical staff, mental health
treatment providers and support
See MORE, page 11


Lr I. 1 is is a 94 I pioto
of the official staff at the
Florida State Prison at
Raiford, which is now UCI.
Superintendent Leonard
Chapman is in the center
of the photo (wearing the
light hat). Uniforms were
first worn by staff during
his tenure. RIGHT: In the
earliest days, the prison
used to borrow tracking
dogs from neighboring
farmers in the event of
'an inmate escape. In this
photo, Superintendent J.S.
Blitch (left) and Prison Capt.
Strickland pose with an
inmate bloodhound handler
in the prison compound.


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Wishes all at
Union Correctional Institution
Happy 100th Anniversary!


(Insurance Claims Specialist
Owners:
Randy & Kimberly Alldredge

(904) 964-4239

SR-16 West Starke, FL


Congratulations to

Union Correctional Institution

on their 100th Anniversary!


Happy 100th


Anniversary


to UCI!


Spires IA


610 SW 1st St.
Lake Butler


386.496-3361


py 100TH ANNIVER#Sa
r to 4
UNION CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION

, We welcome all correctional
staff and employees to Skip's


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correctional ID


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496-3900


Congratulations UCI

Sandra Langley Tyre
Certified Public Accountant
at the
TOWNSEND HOUSE
235 S.W. 4th Avenue Lake Butler, FL ~ 386-496-1878


From one Centennial plus 18 years to one celebrating its Centennial!
"Thank you and all DOC employees for your service!"


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Congratulations to all the
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THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS 11


iContinued from 10
i
taff like maintenance, clerical,
ood service and other workers.
F. A new housing unit is currently
imnder construction on the banks
of New River and will be under
the control of UCI. It will house ;
inmates of a lower custody level
ihah those currently housed at
UCI. These inmates will provide
community work squads that
'will serve government entities
throughout the area. The unit
js expected to be ready to open
(,on, although a date has not yet
en set.
.Corrections in Florida,
liough the years, moved away
Sbm punishment and toward
the goal of preparing inmates
to successfully re-enter society.
WVith that purpose firmly in mind,
1CI now supports a number of
re-entry efforts. The largest of
these are the three major PRIDE
operations, which are carried out
within the secure perimeter -
which means they operate inside
the encircling fence.


The tag:plant trains inmates to
work in a major manufacturing
plant. The furniture factory
trains them to operate machinery
and use techniques related to
manufacturing metal furniture.
These skills can be translated
into other areas of manufacturing
as well. The dental lab trains
inmates to do the highly skilled
tasks related to producing
dentures, bridges and other dental
prosthetic devices. Inmates who
gain those particular skills are
usually hired by major companies
immediately upon their release,
and are usually paid a significant
salary.
Between the three operations,
approximately 250 inmates are
in specialized training each
weekday.
Death Row inmates and
inmates who are behavior
problems spend much of their
day in confinement. Some of
the inmates with mental health
issues do not work due to their
medical problems.
Every other able-bodied inmate


housed at the institution works
each weekday. Approximately
half the institution's population
spends five days a week working
in some type of job inside the
facility's fences. These are
jobs that can provide skills that
could assist them in finding
employment upon their release.


were more plentiful than the
big females. Mike Cheesly
and Billy Starling took the
aggregate weight with 11.18
pounds and the big fish at 5.5
pounds.
By the time this column is
published, the mayfly hatch
should be underway, and the
shellcrackers, bluegills and
redbellies should be fanning
and biting.
Do not forget the channel
catfish bite in Santa Fe Lake,
Santa Fe River, Black Creek
and the St. Johns. Note also
the saltwater report about the
stripess and croakers in the St.
Johns.
Please note that beginning
Monday, April 29, the Hampton
Lake public boat ramp will be
closed for repairs.

Saltwater fishing
Just like freshwater, saltwater
is hot and heavy in the spring.
This time of year, good catches
of trout, reds, blues, black drum,
writings, flounder, Spanish
mackerel, cobia, kings and
sheepshead are readily available
inshore if your timing is right.
On the east coast, there
seems to be a little more action
south of the Jacksonville
area when comparing Jim
Sutton's St. Augustine report
to Bob McNally's. Trout,
reds and flounder seem to
be readily available in both
locations. Spanish mackerel are
hit and miss in both locations.
Some cobia seem to have
appeared around Matanzas Inlet.
What was interesting to
hear was that both stripes and
croakers were in the St. Johns as
far south as Lake George. These
fish typically follow the shrimp,
and their timing is a little early.
You should remember, in regard
to croakers and stripes, that
c atching saltwater fish in fresh
water does require a saltwater
license.
Gary Simpson gave a similar
report for the west coast. He also
noted some cobiaaction on near-
shore reefs.
Tommy Reddish was headed
to a trout tournament in
Steinhatchee for the April 20
weekend.

Haven Hospice bass
tpyrnament.:
All oii4oci bass hs*hiermen
.should be aware of the 10'
annual Haven Hospice bass
tournament, which will be held
Saturday, April 27, at the Palatka


"" .'----


Q i L C e' an' UGe.,
I T^i


andtennibta

brought in the big bass that'
weeige 73 oud.The




The ovrl recto of the./ PS I
grou wa tha th sml bucks.-' !> *)*wfH S


JOB~ ?"$


city.ock., theSt..ohns iver
The total payot will be mor
.i'=r:"i :t '" =$" "..: ,-,rei........ ...
guaanee or-,rt lac .d.
$1,00 guarntee or bi fish


"*. ^ '... .. -:,.,'l.,.
... ,. *. '.. .* ',- ,,:.' ,".**


Santa Fe Lake every Wednesday;
Open bass tournaments at
Sampson Lake every Thursday
evening;
Spring turkey season until
April 21 (Georgia season end.s
May 21);
April 25, full moon;
April 25, Crosshorn
Ministries meeting at the Starke
Golf and Country Club at 7 p.m.;
April 27, Bradford Bass
Masters tournament at Santa Fe
Lake;
April 27, Buckmasters
banquet, 5:45 p.m. at Camp
Blanding;
April 29, Hampton Lake
boat ramp closes for repairs;
May 25, B'radford Bas's
Masters tournament at Sampson
Lake.
If you have a story, idea or
photo to, share, please contact
Mickey Agner via email at mkaCa)
maoutdoors.com, or by phone
at 904-964-1488. Photos may
also be submitted in person at
the Bradford County Telegraph,
Union County -Times or Lake
Region Monitor.
season, without a doubt. The
HCA Lions fielded their first JV
boys basketball team for fifth-
eighth graders. Tony Bellis, JV
head coach, was assisted by
John Mitchell.
In its first season of play, the
team finished with a tremendous
record of 5-5. The team wiis
able to advance through the
playoffs all the way to the final
championship game. Although
it lost to Brunswick Christian
Academy, HCA still brought
home the conference's first
runner-up trophy.
The future of HCA basketba 11
looks bright with its best days
ahead.


Is celebrating its 100th anniversary on


Friday, April 19

at the Massey Training Building near the institution on S.R. 16

west of Starke. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. The program will

begin at 11 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. All current

and former employees of the institution are invited to attend the

ceremonies. Local officials from Union and Bradford counties

are also invited.

For more information, contact Ann Brown at 386-431-2164 or
386-431-2165, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday-Friday..


II" II i


TOP: Baseball has always been a popular pastime for the inmates at UCI, even in the|
1920s. SECOND FROM TOP: This inmate band was organized in 1937-1938 and played
several times a day, every day. They played as other inmates went to and from meals;
and they played in evening concerts. Today, the institution still has an inmate band |
that performs at special events. THIRD: This Raiford prison baseball team set a new;:
record with 52 consecutive scoreless innings in 1939. (Back row, I-r) Players Steve
Jenkins, Tom Gowan, C. Daugherty, Lefty Ellisington, Ben Craft, Chappie and Manager
Ritch. (Front row, I-r) Tex Hayes, Robert Fritz, Bob Harrison, W. Jabolonsky and
Robert Walton. BOTTOM: This inmate football team was scrimmaging in the late 1950s
or early 1960s. Jim Brown Godwin was one of the coaches. He was the son of Asst. I:
Superintendent J.G. Godwin who was shot in 1955. Jim Brown Godwin can be seen inr
the upper right hand corner. This second Godwin followed his father into corrections
and was staff member at UCI for many years.


UNION CORRECTIONAL

INSTITUTION




1010. WOuOiDFENCE
11. PERGOLAS
12 LAW MAITNAC
13. TRSA CTR WR
14." YARDCLENUP


SrLabforb Countp EelegrapF
131 W. Call St. Starke, FL
904-964-6305


Union County Times


LAKE REGION MONITOR


125 East Main St. Lake Butler, FL 7382 SR-21 Keystone Heights, FL
386-496-2261 352-473-2210


Marriage is sacred yet
sometimes difficult.
Before you consider divorce or separation..
please call 352-219-5017
for FREE Counseling


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fishing report,
,Hospice
:tournament,
'Jigger fishing
The weather is currently on a
;:warming trend, and most of the
:4ays are full of sunshine, despite
4hat was predicted for April 20-
The bass beds are getting a
jittle thinner, but the bass bite'
qontinues strong. We have
rhissed a few rain opportunities,
!4ut have not gotten into the dry.
itiends that have exemplified our
,previous springs. Hopefully, we
;will maintain sustainable rains
'tbat will preserve the local lake
Ievels.
The full moon is coming
up on Thursday, April 25,
*hich should motivate the big
'-shellcrackers to start fanning
;their beds.
Spring gobbler season ended
,on April 21, but the diehard bird
-ays ftiVcKqg
the Georgia line and-6Yhtiud6-
lunting through May 21.
*rpshwater fishing
The weekly Ba Id Eagle Baith


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Classified Display Miesday, 12:00 noon
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N 0 T I C E
P1.Clam d Ad e in Id d n ad e n1e, edi, ead been e a hed w"h he
,, '* 0 0 c u c ' t P y g d' 'a,,5d"n A, a,
ag j Op, 0, 0 C, c_ .1 _y
I f P 10 cove 0' 0
y h... ad b. k 0
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c' A e-'ce cha"e w, d '0 ed e e a e e en a 0."
v -Ze d ad n n b h w e
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T&N.: RS. D,
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r
Ps~8IPg .pp~lrrp.:U~~fPI .~6-.r~li-~- ;i.~C' l~l~i~ r')B~'I.C1~.... n


LEFT. Sebastian
O'Neal did
not win the
Bald Eagle
tournament, but,
for good reason,
was proud
o shi catch.
BELOW LEFT.
Mike Cheesly
with the April 17
Sampson Lake
j tournament big
fish.
drawings and other events.
Tickets ($90 per couple/$300
per corporate table of eight
people) must be purchased in
advance. Please call Wayne
Oden at 352-745-1754 or Bobbie
Oden at 352-745-1752 or, 352-
485-2575.
Tight lines until next week.
Outdoors calendar
Joey Tyson/Bald Eagle Bait
and Tackle bass tournaments at


this easo by arey nd Lllia
~ 'c: 'rallied to win five of its nexts
: ~ ,'** egh g-ames.dl In af, iWti the
.*lik Sportsmanship.S Award' at
~~~~~h cofrec playoffs.': ThisI~~g l rfS







12 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR UCI 100 YEARS THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013


This is the early hospital at the state prison farm. It was
sometimes referred to as an infirmary. It had to be kept
separate from the other buildings because tuberculosis
was a problem at the time. A larger and more modern
facility was built in 1936.


The shirt factory kepta large number of inmates busy in the late 1920s and 1930s. LEFT: This is a photo of
the old Bachelor Officers'
Quarters, or BOQ. Parked
.... in front of it is a bus that
~ was used to transport
Inmates.
RIGHT: This 1918 payroll
statement shows the
::: superintendent received
:"" $166.67, the captain $70;
the office clerk $30 and
.' i ..foremen between $40 and
,$60 for the month of April.


Inmates spend time with visitors in this photo, which was taken sometime in the early
1930s.


Thank you for your support and patronage!



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Al b e I nfrmd
Beasuscribertoouro
update o the mot recen


All current andformer employees of UCI are
invited to
attend a special event tomorrow, Friday, April.
19, at the Massey Training Building near the'
institution on S.R. 16 west ofStarke. Registra-
tion begins at 9:30 a.m., theprogram
begins at 11 a. m. and lunch will be served at
noon. Local
officials from Bradford and Union counties
are also invited.
For more information: 386-431-2164 or 386-431-2165
(8 a.m.-5 p.m.)