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Union County times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028314/00330
 Material Information
Title: Union County times
Uniform Title: Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Lake Butler Fla
Publication Date: 5/1/2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates: 30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1920?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
sobekcm - UF00028314_00330
System ID: UF00028314:00330
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bradford County times

Full Text










Sntion Qountp

USPS 648-200 Two Sections Lake Butler, Florida Thursday, May 1, 2008


Note This!


Attention new
drivers: register
now for D.A.T.E.
course at UCHS
Union County High
School students eligible to
receive their first driving
permit can sign up for the
DATE course at the high
school campus. This 4-hour
course covering drug,
alcohol and traffic education
is required for all first-time
drivers in the state of
Florida. The course will be
held on Tuesday, May 13,
from 3 7 p.m. The cost is
$30. To sign up, see Debe
Stephenson at the school's
front office.

Lulu Day
Saturday, May 3
The 29'h annual Lulu
Homecoming Day
celebration will take place
on Saturday, May 3, at the
Lulu Community Center on
S.R. 100.
The event will begin at
10:30 a.m. and lunch will
begin at 12:30 p.m. Please
bring a basket lunch and
lawn chairs for everyone in
your party. There will be
games, music, prizes and
fellowship. A handmade
quilt will also be given
away.

Friday last day
to apply for
scholarship
The Lake Butler Woman's
Club is offering a $500
scholarship for a female
resident of Union County to
attend an accredited
university or college in the
State of Florida.
;f you are interested,
please pick up an application
packet from Beth Moore in
the Guidance Department at
Union County High School.
All applications must be
submitted no later than May
2.

Join the UCHS
Quarterback Club
Union County High School
Quarterback Club
memberships are now on sale.
For $50, members will
receive reserved parking for
all home football games, a
free meal at the first home
field game and a steak dinner
at homecoming for $5.
Membership proceeds and
other donations to the
Quarterback Club go towards
player meals, funding a
scholarship to Lake City
Community College and other
football programs and camps.
This year, the club is also
looking to add a coach's
tower on the visitor's side of
field. For more information or
to join the club, please
contact Billy' Woodington at
(386) 496-4950.

Attention
registered voters
Please stop by the
supervisor of elections office
prior to election time if you
need to change your name,
address, party or other
information. If you cannot get
to the elections office, please
call (386) 496-2236 between
the hours of 8 a.m. and 5
p.m., Monday through Friday
and the proper forms can be
mailed to you.

Tigerette try-outs
May 13-16
Tri-outs for the 2008-09
Tigerettes will take place on
Tuesday Friday, May 13-
16, from 3 5 p m. in the
I nion County High School
gymnasium. Try-outs are
open to girls entering into
eighth-grade through twelfth-
grade. Registration packets
can he picked up at either the
middle school or high school
frorin offices.


96th Year 3rd Issue 50 CENTS


___ -,__'_ ,'.
.'5 '.Z:..;'L i Lro v: -


Avery Hutchison, Nicholas Hamilton, Eric White and Wesley Courson of Cub Scout Pack 140 in Lake Butl
visited the Union County Times to learn about working for a newspaper. When the scouts visited, they
helped design the layout for this week's newspaper, picking the front page for their picture, of course.


Two UCHS athletes



receive scholarships


Dukes, Rengering earn
chance to keep playing
football.

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
One is going to a school not
far from home. The other is
going to one that feels just like
home.
Union High School seniors
Aaron Dukes and Daniel
Rengering may be heading
their separate ways after
graduation, but they will both
be allowed to fulfill a dream-
to play college football.
Dukes, a linebacker, signed
a letter of intent during a
signing ceremony on April 23
to attend Jacksonville
University, while Rengering,
an offensive lineman, will
attend LaGrange (Ga.)
College.
"I've been blessed to get the
chance to play college football
and to further my education,"
Dukes said.
Rengering said, "I'm excited
to get to play college football.
It's been a dream since day
one. It's what I've always
wanted. I'm really looking
forward to it."
What was a dream began to
materialize as reality for the
two players during the last two
years.
"I was starting to get letters
from small colleges (at the end
of last year)," Rengering said.
"It kind of set in that it was a
possibility. It made me work
extremely hard."


Union head coach Andrew
Zow can attest to that work
ethic.
"Regardless of what the
situation was. (Rengering) had
the desire to continue to work
hard at it and try to get better,"
Zow said.
In fact, hard work and
passion to play the game can
be attributed to both players,
Zow said. He shared a story
with the assembled crowd at
the signing ceremony
concerning Dukes getting
injured in the Tigers' game
against district rival Trinity
Catholic. When Zow walked
onto. the field to check on
Dukes, he saw a player with
tears in his eyes who felt he
was letting the team down if he
had to leave the game.
"That shows the passion ,he
has for the game," Zow told
the audience. "He was
apologizing because he had to
come off the field."
Zow, who was serving his
first season as head coach last
year, also found that Dukes
and Rengering were leaders.
Dukes was a vocal leader as
well as 'one who led by
example, Zow said. The
linebacker did anything asked
of him, whether it was an
assignment during a game or
praying to start a practice.
"All I had to say was, 'A.D.,
get 'em.' He knew what to
do," Zow said. "He did a great
job for me this.year."

See SCHOLARS p3A


The check's in

the mail!

The Internal Revenue
Service began sending out the
first of 130 million stimulus
payments this week. Individual
taxpayers are to receive $600,
couples $1,200 and an
additional $300 per child
claimed on 2007 tax returns.
The payments are being issued
as a means to stimulate the
slowing economy.. Payments
are being sent based upon the
last two digits of a filer's
Social Security number.
For those who elected to use
direct deposit to file their 2007
tax return, Social Security
numbers ending in 00-20 will
receive their payment on May
2, 21-75 will post on May 9
and 76-99 on May 16.
For those who elected to
receive their tax refund by
check, Social Security
numbers ending with 00-09
will by mailed out on May 16,
S 10-18 on May 23, 19-25 on
-- May 30, 26-38 on June 6, 39-
.* 51 on June 13, 52-63 on June
20, 64-75 on June 27, 76-87 on
July 4 and 88-99 on July 1.
Write and tell us how you
er plan to use your stimulus
payment at
uctimes@windstream.net.


Chamber asks, 'How can we help you?'


BY TERESA STONE-IRWIN
Times Staff Writer
-
Although the working office
of the North Florida Regional
Chamber of Commerce is
located in Starke, chamber
CEO Ron Lilly happily
reminds everyone that they are
there to serve not only
Bradford Coanty, but Union
County and Keystone Heights
as well.
"Because people don't see


--^ ,.r


-t0


Daniel Rengering (seated, second from left) signs a letter of intent to play for
LaGrange College. Seated to his right is his father, Danny. Seated to Rengering's
left are his mother, Kim Shatto, and his step-father, Tim Shatto. Union head coach
Andrew Zow is pictured standing.


an office for the chamber in,
say, Lake Butler, they might
forget %we are here for them.
We want to have a bigger
presence in Union County
because we have been asked
by several businesses and
residents to du so. Lily said.
The chamber has had a lar-ge
amount of success assisting
with the revitalization of the
downtown Starke area. where
older, historic buildings have
been fixed up and rented out.


bringing many new businesses
such as clothing stores and
restaurants to the community.
On the last Friday of every
month, downtown Starke hosts
a Friday Fest Cruz-in, a night
-full of classic cars and local
entertainment which has
greatly impacted retail sales in
the downtown area. Another
successful project involving

See CHAMBER p7A


North Florida Regional Chamber CEO Ron Lilly addresses Union County
business associates during a recent breakfast. Seated in the front row are
American Cancer Society Lake Butler representative Alee Gunderson; Live
Oak, Lake City, Jasper and Starke representative Brett Hipsley; High Five
Unit Executive Director Courtnie Douglas; Dan Reid and Rhonda Hamilton. In
the back row are Pam Whittle and Kim Skidmore of the chamber office.


Senior career fair May 6


I H d h,r', dI r I, '1,,1 i
IIu1, i nd H rjdi,,rd ,11. i ..
' l illciid j >. I .ircci 1.1 1 ii
'I uL'dJ.i\ M f' iih M.i I, 1 hIec
Ce\ n all hl\ h l, r..il I II.1 Ill
I 2 p i ll i l ii ,1 I l.il 'C F
Johns Conference C(enter
located at 1610 N. Temple
A\e.
The purpose of the career
fair is to gmnc local employers
the opportunity to publicize
positions that are current\ or
often -, available \wi'h their
companies. Also. potential
employees % %ill ha\e the
chance to fill out applications.


o rin i I..,''ii ii .. i,..Arh
b, iiii m l .il hu'ineise,, and
ilhi i. ii l', m\ miii nced-,
] ,,..il bt ne-,',,c'. i a "re
,., i ra d i bring dipl.is.
h.j nd, .I. emplh > menl
.ppl' i. Jl ihn J mp nl.%
literature to the e\ ent. There is
no fee for employers or
students.
'Io reserve a space for \< :ir
compa;.n\. a completed
application can be fa\ed to
\ou0. For more information,
contact Susan Bro\wn or Parn
Whittle w ith the North Florida
Regional Chamber of
Commerce at (904) 964-5278.


Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone (386) 496-2261


Stay informed. Get involved. Be entertained, ",r'p in touch. Express yourself. Know your community. J11II


.-p


J


I


Il.---


., Y i II


* Fax (386) 496-2858












Lake Butler gets ready to Relay For Life


Page 2A UNION COUNTY TIMES May 1, 2008
r i i i i i i n -l-li


To Order Luminaria for the
Relay for Life in Union County:


The 18-hour event will take
place on Friday, May 1,6
beginning at 3 p.m. and
ending Saturday morning at
9a.m.
The Relay for Life of Lake
Butler is just around the
corner. There are currently 25
registered teams with more
than 250 participants, who
along with the corporate
sponsors, have already raised
nearly $20,000.
This year's theme is "Music
Through the Decades." The
18-hour event will be held at
the track at the Union County
High School football stadium
from 3 p.m. on Friday, May
16, until Saturday, May 17, at
9 a.m.
Relay for Life is the
American Cancer Society's
version of an athletic relay, but
with a new twist. It is a family-
oriented event where teams


camp out at the track,
participate in games and hold
fundraisers to support the
American Cancer Society.
The event will begin with
the survivor's reception and
the ceremonial first lap around
the track by Union County
cancer survivors followed by
the teams.
Luminaries will align the
track, and as the sun sets, the
candles will be lit and a
moment of silence will be
observed in memory of loved
ones who have lost their battle
with cancer.
Teams will then take to the
track with their spirit sticks in
hand, as they compete for
numerous awards such as the
overall top fundraising team,
most outstanding team
campsite, most spirited team
and best relay stick, to name a
few.
There will be fun for
everyone, including such


things as food, drinks, chair
messages, silent auctions,
karaoke, a bubble blowing
contest, the Macarena, a
bounce house, promotional
items, haircuts, glow bracelets,
photo booth with costumes,
blood pressure checks, meteor
wishing well, angel necklaces,
face painting, hair braiding,
baked goods, a breakfast and
more.
There is still time to start
your own team today by
visiting the Lake Butler Relay
for Life Web site:
www.events.cancer.org/rfl lake
butlerfl or by calling Alee
Gunderson at the American
Cancer Society in Gainesville
(352) 3376-6866 ext. 120.
Participants can also register
their team and/or turn in
commitment fees at Bank
Night, scheduled for Tuesday,
May 13, from 6-8 p.m. at the
Lake Butler Church of Christ.


I Your name:


SYour address:

City:_


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Zip:


Phone (H): (W):
E-mail:

(Please check if you do not want to receive e-mails):

Please circle payment method:


Cash Check Visa MasterCard


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Discover I


I Account #: _.,,..___


I Cardholder name:


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I Signature:


I Name to be listed on the bag(s):


,W1

Members of the Lake Butler
Volunteer Fire Department
recently conducted rappel
t raintn9 exercises at the
RMC Tr gning Complex On
-the left. Frankle Ray lowers
himself down the side of
.. the tower as Lori Ash
-.looks on Below. after beins
. "" shown how to properly
'.wear -a harness. Lindsey
'. Kirkland works her way
- "~~' -t. own the tower


Cassels Christian
Academy golf
tourney May 31
Cassels Christian Academy
of Starke will hold a benefit
golf tournament on Saturday,
May 31, at the Starke Golf &
Country Club. Sign up now for
4-person teams, two shotgun
starts or captain's choice. The
cost is $200 per team.
All proceeds will benefit
Cassels Christian Academy in
Starke. For registration or
more information, please call
(904)-964-2245.

FCCD golf
tourney May 27
The Florida Council on
Crime and Delinquency
Chapter V will host a golf
tournament on Tuesday, May
27. to help raise money for
their many training and
community service events.
There will be 4-Man
Scramble and Captain's choice
for $50 per player or $200 per
team and Mulligans $2 each or
three for $5.
Awards will be provided for
first, second and third-place
teams and for the closest to the
pin and longest drive.
The tournament will take
place at Southern Oaks Golf
Elub in Lake City. IPre-.
registration is available now'
through May 21.
For further information,
please contact Joey Hill at
(386) 466-3018, Eddie
Winkler at (386) 466-1412 or
Dennis Crawford at (386) 876-
0674.

SRWMD meets
May 8
On Thursday. Ma) 8, at 9
a.m., the Suw\anncc River
Water Management District's
governing hoard will meet at


the Steinhatchee Community
Center on Riverside Dr. in
Steinhatchee. The meeting's
agenda includes district
business and a public hearing
on regulatory and land
acquisition matters. A
workshop will follow at 1:30
p.m. at Fiddler's Restaurant on
Riverside Dr.
On Friday, May 9, at 8:10
a.m., the governing board will
meet again at Fiddler's
Restaurant to continue the
workshop. All meetings,
workshops and hearings of the
SRWMD are open to the
public. For more information,
contact Lisa Cheshire at (386)
362-1001.

Energy assistance
funds available
Suwannee River Economic
Council announces the
availability of funds from the
Department of Community
Affairs for home energy
assistance and crisis energy
assistance through the Lnow
Income Home Energy
Assistance Program.
The program assists eligible
households in paying for home
heating and cooling costs.
Clients must meet income
guidelines and provide proof


Subscription Rate in
$30.00 per year:
$16.00 six months
Outside Trade Area
$30.00 per year:
$16.00 six months


of income, home ownership or
rental agreement and an energy
obligation.
Applications are available at
the Outreach Center located at
855 S.W. 6th Ave. in Lake
Butler. To make an
appointment or receive more
information, call (386) 496-
2342.


Football spring
jamboree May 29
Come out and support your
2008-09 Union County High
School football team at their
spring jamboree game when
the Tigers will face the
Hawthorne High School
Hornets. The game \will take
place on Thursday, May 29, at
7:30 p.m. at Hawthorne
Middle/High School located at
21403 S.E. 69"' Avenue in
Hawthorne.


nllion county Tiiite.


USPS 648-200
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3,1879
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
UNION COUNTY TIMES
125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054
Web address: UCTimesonline.com
(386) 496-2261
John M. Miller, Publisher
STrade Area Edor T
Sports Edilor Cliff Sntilley
Advertis.n-) Ko- n Mill


Ad',1, -,',j, and
Now' [>a( i(n Prod
n

EFirI W iiy
M ,I-r1., N,,r
K 1d A/ j ;+H+


(Check one) In Memory:


In Honor:


Donation Amount: $

Please make checks payable to the

American Cancer Society

Please return this form to your American Cancer Society o
American Cancer Society/RFL Lake Butler
2119 SW 16th Street
Gainesville, FL 32608


I

I

I

office:
I

I


or call:
(352) 376-6866, ext. 5062





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May 1, 2008 UNION COUNTY TIMES


SCHOLARS
Cont. from p.1 A

Zo\ said Rengering \\as a
great leader b\ example \\ho
also did a good job of holding
the team together.
"Being a leader's hard
because you haie to do it on
the field and off the field."
Zow said, "ihut IDaniel did a
great job throughout the year
keeping the team motivated."
Rengering said he visitedd
Wofford College a fe\ times.
while Georgia Southern
expressed interest in him as a
walk-on.
After visiting LaGrange.
Rengering said he knew \\here
he wanted to go. It is a small
town that feels like home, he
said. That was a big selling
point.
"It was a pretty big deal
because I don't want to go
somewhere where I'm
uncomfortable," Rengering
said. "I felt comfortable up
there. It seemed like home."
Another appeal is playing


time. Reniigering said I a(irange
coaches indicated he had a
good chance of pla ying early.
"It felt like a program I
could come into and make an
impact." Rengering said.
"That's what I want to do. If
I'm not impacting the
program, then I'm not doing
mi job. and I'm not going to
be happy. "
)Dukes said several schools
had shown interest in him at
some point, including
Wofford. Webber
International, Georgia
Southern and Valdosta State.
"Really ..JI Iw as the only one
that really showed any interest
after a visit or after (watching)
a highlight tape," Dukes said.
Dukes said attending
Jacksonville gives him the
opportunity to experience life
in a bigger town while still
being close to home.
It's also a chance to be a part
of something he hopes will
become special under second-
year head coach Kerwin Bell.
"It's going to be fun to help
build, hopefully, a powerhouse


program in D)ivision I-AA."
D)ukes said.
l)ukes will remain at the
linebacker position, though he
said whether he play s the
middle or outside position may
depend on whether or. not he
redshirts this season.
Rengering \\ill most likely
play either center or one of the
tackle positions.
Zow thinks Rengering will
wind up at center. That's fine
with Rengering, hbut in the end,
all he wants is the chance to
play.
"I prefer center over the
other, but if I get to play, I
don't care where I play,
Rengering said.
Rengering and Dukes will
both be joining relatively new
programs. The L.aGrange
Panthers are set to begin their
third season of football in
Division Ill, while the
Jacksonville Dolphins will
enter their 1 l' season.
"It's just an exciting time for
them and their families," Zow
said. "You just pray they take
advantage of this opportunity
and push forwardd"


Aaron Dukes (seated, center) signs a letter of intent to play football at Jacksonville
University. Seated to Dukes' right are his mother, Kelly, and his brother Austin. To
Dukes' left are brother Mason and his father, Bruce. Union head coach Andrew
Zow is pictured behind Dukes.


Union County Disaster Prepardness Fair May 10


No one can ever be too
prepared to face an emergency.
There are a lot of things that
can be done ahead of time to
prepare for a hurricane, flood,
tornado, fire, an act of
terrorism or loss of
employment.
Important papers needed
following one of these types of
losses should be prepared in
advance and preserved. How
will your family stay in touch
in case they are separated
during a disaster? Where will
you go if you have a medically
needy condition such as
oxygen or insulin'? How much
medication will you need to


Austin Parrish
caught this 12
1/4 Ib catfish
from his
grandparents'
Roland and
Rosie '.,arrish's
fishpond in Lake
'Butler. Grandma
said 8-year-old
Austin struggled
with the fish
that almost got
his reel, but he
managed to
keep it from
being the one
that got away.


have on hand? What will you
do with pets or livestock?
These and many other
questions will be answered on
Saturday, May 10 at the
second annual Union County
Disaster Preparedness Fair.
Between the hours of 9 a.m.
and I p.m., experts will be on-
hand to give first aid
instruction, tips for purifying
drinking water without
electricity, cooking without
power, preparing survival kits,
using hand-held radios,
fingerprinting for children,
using a GPS, gardening tips in
limited spaces and much more.
There will also be a house-


fire simulator to show families'
how to exit a fire and create a
safe meeting place. Florida
Surgeon General Dr. Viamonte
Ros will be a guest speaker
during the fair.
There wiJl be plenty of food,
drinks, prizes and fun. The
day's grand prize giveaway
will be a generator. The event
is free and open to the public.
To sponsor a booth at the
fair, please plan to attend the
last organizational meeting on
Monday, May 5, at 9 a.m. in
the Lake Butler Community
Center to receive your
accommodations.


For additional information,
please contact Angie Gibson at
. (386) 496-3250.



Are you

prepared for

an

emergency?


Otter Springs
Bluegrass and pot
luck dinner May 3
The Suwannee Valley
Bluegrass Pickin' and potluck
dinner will take place at the
Otter Springs RV Resort on
Saturday. May 3. Dinner will
begin at 5 p.m. followed by
music at 6 p.m. Some of the
musicians performing will be
the First Family of Gospel
Bluegrass, the Sullivan
Family, the Andrews Family,
Buck Lewis and the Broken
Stones and Gary Beach and the
Beachville Bo\s to name a
few.
The event is free and open to
the public. For those who wish
to reserve a campsite hookup
or cabin, please call Cloud
Hale\ at (352) 284-0668 or the
resort at (352) 463-0800.





Summer VPK
program
If your child \\ ill be entering
kindergarten this fall. there is a
summer voluntary pre-
kindergarten program for
children who \\ill turn fi\ec-
vears-old on or before
September I. 2008.
If vour child participated in
the VPK program at an\ of the
following locations, they are
not eligible for the summer'
program: Little Rainhowss
Learning Center. Tiger's Den
or I ake Butler Elementary
School.
Please call Trish Ranard' at
(386) 496-3047 for more
details.


*" 'W..'' ~,.' :'. I Great things are not
', ', .' *. accomplished by those
.... .. .. who yield to trend# and
fads and popular
opinion.
Charles Kuralt
American TV
Commentator.


Lega


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
UNION COUNTY,
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 63-2008-CP-004
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE THERESA SACCHETTI,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of
MARIE THERESA SACCHETTI,
deceased, whose date of death
was December 2, 2007, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Union
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 55 West
Main Street, Union County
Courthouse Room 103, Lake
Butler, FL 32054. The names and
addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
Notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is Thursday, April 24, 2008
Dated this 22"" day of April, 2008
Personal Representative
Donna Marie Thomas
5892 SW CR 241
Lake Butler, FL 32054
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Russell A Wade III Esq
Florda Bar No 251460


155 SE 61' Place
Lake Butler, FL 32054
Telephone No.: 386.496.9656
Fascimile No.: 386.496.0930
4/24 2tchg 5/1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 63-2008-CP
DIVISION: 0002
IN RE: ESTATE OF LOUIE GORE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
LOUIE GORE, deceased, whose
date of death was December 6,
2007, File Number 63-2008-CP-
0002, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Union County, Florida,
Probate Division: the address of
which is 55 W. Main St., Lake
Butler, FL 32054. The names of
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative s attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims and
demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured,
contingent, or unliquidated claims,
including but not limited to those
upon whom a copy of this Notice is
served, must file their claims with
this Court within the time periods
set forth in Section 733 702,
Florida Statutes, to wit: WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is May 1, 2008
Personal Representative.
Lorraine Gore
4683 Cable Rd
Sharon, SC 29742
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Jerry L Jester, Esq
Burrows & Jester. P A
150-B Fortenberry Rd
P 0 Box 541196
Merritt Island FL 32954-1196
Florid ; Bar No 174100
Telephone (321) 453-2190
5/1 2tchg 5/8


6 to- -236Months









a 0- o23mot CDpaig 3S 0%A P.AllyounedSi a 2,00




















minim m opningdepoit. his ate s aalbefralmtdtm


. ,*' s 1


Page 3A










i iiMLZ iViay i, Jd


4-H holds annual awards banquet


Millertown 4-H Club awards were given to (1-r) James Carter, Tristyn
Southerland, Katie Zipperer, Lilly Combs and Lexi Whitehead. Club
leader Barbara Zipperer is on the far right.


The 4-H Butler Buds receiving club awards were (1-r) club leader
Donna Harris, Madeline Kish, Brooke Waters, Ashley Harris, Lauren
Britt and club leader Allison Waters.


By Colan Coody,
4-H Program Assistant

On April 26, the annual
Union County 4-H awards
banquet was held at the
Lakeside Community Center
in Lake Butler.
The evening began with the
4-H/Tropicana Public
Speaking contest. Eight
students competed for a week
at Camp Cherry Lake
sponsored by Tropicana.
Fourth-grade speakers were
Lexi Whitehead, Morgan
Worrell, Chance Oody and
Jordan Howell. Fifth-grade
speakers were Savannah
Woodall, Lilly Combs,
Brianna Martin and Kelsey
Thornton. Oody was the first-
place winner in the
competition.


Multi-county 4-H special
agent Bill Helmets introduced
the 4-H club leaders and
presented them with official 4-
H club charters. Each club
gave a report of their yearly
project and what they had
completed during the past
year. The club leaders are
Barbara Zipperer of
Millertown 4-H, Allison
Waters with the Butler Buds,
Amanda Rhodes with the
Poultry Club, Randy Merritt
with the Livestock Club and


ABOVE: 4-H poultry
team awards were
presented by Colan
Coody. Awarded
were (1-r) Brandon
Bivens, Morgan
Worrell, Amber
Templeton and Lilly
Combs. Not pictured
was club leader
Amanda Rhodes.


LEFT: Lifestock Club
awards were given
to (1-r) Shane
Hendricks, Garrett
Williams, Macy
Adams, Morgan
Worrell, Luke
Crawford, Madison
Adams, Case
Emerson, Mitchell
Cribbs, Casie
Tomlinson and
Miranda Merritt.
Randy Merritt is the
Livestock Club
leader.


Duke Emerson with the
Shooting Sports team.
School board member Alvin
Griffis presented the 4-H
school enrichment tt chers
with certificates of
appreciation. Teachers
receiving the certificate were
Mary Anne Davis, Kelly
Dukes, Susan Hencin, Debbie
McMillan, Cristi Whitehead,
Rebecca Wolfson, Cindy
Short, Nadine Faulk, Allison
Waters, Verona DeLoach,
Nikki Snyder, Courtney
Denman and Lauren Maurer of
Lake Butler Elementary
School. The Lake Butler
Middle School teachers
receiving certificates were
Kimberly Shaw and Kistie
Carter.
The board of directors of the
Union County 4-H Foundation
presented the 4-Her's who
entered livestock and arts and
crafts project in the Bradford
County Fair (listed in last
week's newspaper) with cash
awards. The board of directors
is Maria Kish, Lisa Parrish,
Jennie Reed, Bill McGill and
Don Hicks. Record book
awards from 4-H were given to
Mitchell Cribbs (first-place
junior poultry division and
first-place junior rabbit
division), Katie Zipperer (first-
place junior goat division),
Lilly Combs (first-place
Intermediate goat division),
Case Emerson (first-place


junior breed record book and
second-place junior steer
division), Macy Adams (first-
place senior steer division),
Justin DeNunzio (first-place
senior swine division), Dustin
Hersey (first-place
intermediate swine division),
Brandon Bivins (second-place
intermediate swine division),
Miranda Merritt (first place
junior swine division), Luke
Crawford (second place junior
swine division) and Tristyn
Southerland (third-place junior
swine division).
County commissioners
Karen Cossey and Ricky
Jenkins presented the Union
County 4-H'er of the Year
awards to Case Emerson
(junior division), Thomas
Webb (intermediate division)
and Justin DeNunzio (senior
division). Union County 4-
H'ers with other exhibits
include Ashley Harris with an
oil painting, a dozen eggs, beef
jerky and a rabbit; Luke
Crawford with a photograph
and pig pen display; Mitchell
Cribbs with a goose, rabbit and
poster; Falyn Rimes with a
chicken and Case Emerson
with a photograph

All 4-H award pictures
.included with this article are
couiresy of Jacque Breman,
the director of the Union
County 4-H extension office.


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May 1, 2008 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 5A


Case Emerson is the junior division 4-H'er of
the Year. He is pictured with commissioners
Karen Cossey and Ricky Jenkins.


4-H'ers with livestock and arts and crafts exhibits in the fair were
presented with cash awards. Pictured are (back, I-r) Shane
Hendricks, Tristyn Southerland, Brandon Bivens, board members Bill
McGill, Don Hicks, Lisa Parrish, Jennie Reed, Maria Kish, Katie
Zipperer, Luke Crawford, Mitchell Cribbs, Lilly Combs, Macy Adams,
Case Emerson, Miranda Merritt, Cassie Tomlinson, Morgan Worrell
and Lexi Whitehead. Not pictured were board members Robert
Osborne, Robin Clyatt and Shirley Kirby.

Computers will never take the place of books. You can't stand on
a floppy disk to reach a high shelf.
Sam Ewing


I I
I.


Tropicana speech contest participants were Savannah Woodall
(second-place), Chance Oody (first-place), Jordyn Howell (third-
place), Morgan Worrell, Lexi Whitehead, Kelsey Thornton (honorable
mention), Lilly Combs and county commissioner Ricky Jenkins. Not
pictured was Brianna Martin.


Farmers,. Market hours. ..


A grandmother pretends she
doesn't know who you are on
Halloween.
Marriage has no guarantees.
If that's what you're looking
for, go live with a car battery.
-Erma Bombeck


The Union County Farmer's Market will be open
every Saturday from 8 a.m. noon through the first
week of August. The farmers 'market is located next
to Jackson's Hardware and across from Spires IGA.


Alachua County grower Angela Agnew with a
customer at the grand opening of the Union
County Farmers Market on April 26. Photo
courtesy of Jacque Breman.


Man Pedals Nine Hours For Charity
Wearing White Pumps
BEXAR COUNTY- According to local ollicials, "*
after using Thera-Gesic' on his sore back. Tow W.
took only two breaks. while pedaling a small bike
nine hours in white pumps, all for charity. When
asked what charity, he painlessly replied: "None of '
,*b your dang business!"
Go painlessly with Thera-Gesic '



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C Tarey8 4s

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May 1, 2008 UNION COUNTY TIMES


Page 5A










Page 6A UNION COUNTY TIMES May 1, 2008


Union County Fire Dept.


learns how to create landing zone


BY JAMES REDMOND
Union County' Fire Dept.
Recently, members of the
Union County Fire Department
continued their ongoing
training by learning the proper
way to set up a landing zone.
A landing zone is an area
created for a helicopter, known
as' an Air Trauma Unit in
emergency circles, to land.
Patients who need to get to a
hospital in a very short amount
of time, commonly known as
the golden hour, are taken
using this. method.- These
patients include those who
have been in an accident or, in
certain instances, those who
have had a stroke.
A flight crew.,from Trauma
One Ilke City flew to Flying
Tiger Airport in Worthington
Springs to conduct the
training. Flight paramedic
Chris Drum, flight nurse Vicki
Coppen and pilot Al Lewis
came to Union County to help
the first responders learn what
they need to know to help the
crew land safely.
Drum began the program by
explaining the importance of
emergency personnel on the
ground.
"You're our eyes down
there," Drum said. "There are
many things from the air we
can't see.",
To demonstrate his point,
Drum used a. picture from his
Powerpoint presentation. It
showed a landing zone used by
the crew in Suwannee County.
He asked participants to locate
the/ power lines around the
landing'zone. No one was able
to.
"They are literally invisible
to us in the air," Drum said.
"We are depending on you to
see them for us."
He then explained what they
should be looking for before
the aircraft lands. Drum
emphasized that any loose
objects on the ground- can
become dangerous as- the
helicopter is approaching. The
wind coming from the
helicopters rotor blades,
known as rotor wash, can
create winds in excess of 100
miles per hour.
"Things flying around at that
speed can be dangerous to you
as well as the aircraft," Drum
said.
He also explained that any


loose items being worn, like
hats, should be removed before
the helicopter lands. Loose
items that hit the rotor blades
can damage them, preventing
the helicopter from lifting off.
Drum went on to show the
group how the helicopter could
be dangerous to them. He took
the group outside around the
aircraft to show them where to
approach it and where not to.
He demonstrated walking up to
the helicopter from the front at
a 45 degree angle. This serves
two purposes. The first allows
the pilot to know who is near
the aircraft, so he is able to
account for everyone before
takeoff. The second was the
position of the rotor blades.
While on the ground, the
blades bend down slightly.
Approaching from only certain
points ensures a .rescuers
safety. //
At the conclusion of Drum's
presentation, Worthington
Springs town council members
and airport founders John
Rimes III and Jeff Rimes
explained why the facility was
a predesignated landing zone
in Union County. John Rimes
told the group that the airport's
runway lights and rotating


The Union County School Board recently
presented Paul Lewis of WUCR 107.9 FM
with an appreciation plaque for his many
contributions to Union County schools,
especially his work with the Agricultural
Communications course and the
broadcasting of athletic- games.


I-r Agriculture Communications instructor Amanda
James, Paul Lewis and Superintendent Carlton Faulk.


light beacon could be turned
on using a specific radio
frequency.
"From the helicopter the
crew can fly over and press a
button and the lights come on,"
Rimes said.





RIGHT: Firefighters
Brian Jones and Trey
Tetstone prepare to
take a ride around the
area to get a first
hand look at what the
crew actually sees.

BELOW: Flight
Paramedic Chris Drum
explains some of the
finer points of the
aircraft to EMT Buddy
Broughton.


Add your
business to Lake
Butler Web site
The City of Lake Butler is
creating a list of organizational
and business contacts for the
its Web site. Non-profit
organizations, clubs and
businesses are encouraged to
add their listing on the site.
"As we develop the next
phase of our Web site, it's


important that we have these
contacts," said City Manager
John Berchtold. "So many
times, people-locally and out
of town-ask what is offered
in the community and this is
another way that we can be
citizen and business friendly."
Anyone interested in placing
his or her listing on the Web
site can contact Gwen Gooch
at City Hall at (386) 496-3401.
The Web site address is
www.cityoflakebutler.org.


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LAKE BUTLER
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Lawn Services
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UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 7A


CHAMBER
Cont. from p.1A

the chamber has been the
annual Strawberry Festival.
Lilly said he and others
involved with the chamber
have talked with many Union
County residents at these and
'other events who have
expressed their desire to see
more events brought to the
Union County area.
The chamber held a re-
introduction to the business
owners in the community at a
recent breakfast at Butler
Seafood and Grille. A number
of local businesses such as
Southern Professional Title
Services and Swift Creek
Realty attended the breakfast,
each giving an update on their
business and each encouraged
by Lilly to give input on how
the chamber can help them.
"We like to use this as a
time for addressing the needs
of.residents and businesses in
Union County," Lilly said.
"What businesses would
people like to see come to the
county," and, "What can the
chamber do to help existing
businesses attract more
clients," were just some of the
questions asked of those in
attendance.
Lilly said the most important
thing he wants to express to
Union County is that the
chamber doesn't want to try to
fit the county around its
programs. Rather, they want to
be a part of bringing programs
and events that residents want
to see.
For example, Lilly said
numerous people have
contacted him about holding a
classic car event in the Lake
Butler area, and the chamber is
currently working on such an
event to be held along the
lakefront in July or August.
Equipped with the necessary
skills to bring people to the
community, which in turn,
increases sales for local
businesses, the chamber wants
visioning from the Union
County community to know
ways they can help.
Lilly also introduced himself
at the city of Lake Butler's
commissioner meeting and
opened the door for city


Help mom save money


People all over the country
are helping their moms save as
much as $3,600 per year on the
cost of prescription drugs.
You can too!
Everyone knows the high
cost of medicine can be a
burden on mothers who have
limited income and resources.
But there is extra help-
available through Social
Security-that could pay part
of her monthly premiums,
annual deductibles and
prescription co-payments. The
extra help could be worth up to
$3,600 per year.
To determine if your mother
is eligible, Social Security
needs to know her income and
the value of her savings,
investments and real estate
(other than the home she lives
in). To qualify for the extra
help, she must be receiving
Medicare and also have:
-Income limited to $15,600
for an individual or $21,000
for a married couple living
together. Even if her annual
income is higher, she still may
be able to get some help with
monthly premiums, annual
deductibles and prescription
co-payments. Some examples
where income may be higher
include if she or her spouse:
Support other family
members who live with them;
Have earnings from work;
or


brought up his desire to sec a in touch with Keystone
officials to contact the skateboard park built in the Heights officials who just
chamber for help with any Lake Butler community. recently went through the
needs. Following a few chuckles process for building -a
At the city meeting, from Stalvey's constituents, skateboard park in their
Commissioner LeRoy Stalvey Lilly recommended the city get community.


Next SHINE
counseling
session May 12
The Union County SHINE
drop-in counseling session
scheduled at the library for
Wednesday, May 7, has been
re-scheduled for Monday, May
12 from 12:30 2:30 p.m.
Through SHINE, counselor
Bob Hakes provides insurance
advice and counseling for
senior citizens in Union
County.


Live in Alaska or Hawaii;
and
Resources limited to
$11,990 for an individual or
$23,970 for a married couple
living together. Resources
include such things as bank
accounts, stocks and bonds.
Social Security does not count
her house and car as resources.
Social Security has an easy-
to-use online application that
you can help complete for your
mom. You can find it at
www.socialsecurity.gov. To
apply by phone or have an
application mailed to you, call
Social Security at 1-800-772-
1213 [TTY 1-800-325-07781
and ask for the Application for
Help with Medicare
Prescription Drug Plan Costs
(SSA-1020). Or go to the
nearest Social Security office.
To learn more about the
Medicare prescription drug
plans and special enrollment
periods, visit
www.medicare.gov or call 1-
800-MEDICARE 11-800-633-
4227; TrY 1-877-486-2048).
So this Mother's Day, help
your mom save up to $3,600 a
year on her prescription drugs.
Long after the candy and
flowers are gone, the extra
help through Social Security
will keep on giving.
Submitted by Ann Mag wood-
Ward, Social Security district
manager, Gainesville.


Parrish family
reunion Sunday
The annual Parrish family
reunion for the descendants of
the Robert E. and Agnes
Sessions Parrish will be held
on Sunday, May 4, from 11
a.m. 4 p.m. at the Mount
Zion Church social hall in
Lake Butler. All guests please
bring a covered dish for lunch
at 1 p.m.


S1 Read our Classifieds on the Where one call .?


C aiSSlfled Ads- World Wide Web Joes itall!
Clsidd.. *www.BCTelegraph.com (904) 964-6305 *(352) 473-2210 *(386) 496-2261
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Reach over 20,500
Readers Every Week! I


INDEX
Lost/Found
Animals & Pets
Yard Sales
Keystone Yard Sales
Wanted
Trade or Swap
For Sale
Building Materials
Personal Services
Secretarial Services
Scriptures
Vacation/Travel


Love Lines
Business Opportunity
Help Wanted
Investment Opportunity
Hunting Land for Rent
Rent to Own
Food Supplements
Self Storage
Sporting Goods
Farm Equipment
Comput-rs & Computer
Accessories


40 Notice
41 Vehicles Accessories
42 Motor Vehicles
43 RV's & Campers
44 Boats
45 Land for Sale
46 Real Estate Out of Area
47 Commercial Property
Rent, Lease, Sale
48 Homes for Sale
49 Mobile Homes for Sale
50 For Rent


CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon


UTo place a Classified
, IJlSF YOUR PHONF


EXvREiSS


964-6305 473-2210 496-2261

NOTICE
Classified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been
established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all
billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to
the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be
held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The
newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject
or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be
accepted.


40
Notice
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY All real
estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an in-
tention to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination" Familial
status includes children
under the age of 18 living
w:th parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women
and people securing cus-
tody of children under
18 This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation ol
the law Our readers
are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office in
writing & paid in advance
unless credit has already
heen established with
this office A $3 00 SER-


VICE CHARGE wil l be
added to all billings to
cover postage & handling
THE CLASSIFIED STAFF
CANNOT BE HELD RE-
SPONSIBLE FOR MIS-
TAKES IN CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday
at 12 noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $9 50
for the first 20 words.
then 20 cents per word
thereafter
41
Auctions
PRIME DEVELOPMENT
AUCTION 3,645 +


ACRES Adjacent to Ce-
dar Creek DRI May 8th
at 11am Baker County,
FL, 800-448-2074 Ste-
phen F Burton, Broker/
Auctioneer, Burton Re-
alty and Auction. Inc Lic
AB587AU649
42
Motor Vehicles
1997 LINCOLN CONTI-
NENTAL 61K MILES
Asking $5.495 Call 413-
446-4176
DAVE'SAUTOSALES INC
'00 Taurus SE S2.500
cash Includes tax tag
and title Call 904-214-
9357 Middlebunig das-
middlebUrg corn SR2 1


15 miles north of Key-
stone Heights
DAVE'S AUTO SALES INC
'03 PT Cruiser, $8K cash
includes tax, tag and title.
Call 904-214-9357, Mid-
dleburg, dasmiddleburg.
corn, SR21,15 miles north
of Keystone Heights.
DAVE'S AUTO SALES, INC
'99 SENTRA XE, $4,450
cash. Includes tax, tag
and title Call 904-214-
9357, Middleburg das-
middleburg.com SR21,
15 miles north of Key-
stone Heights
SDAVE'S AUTO SALES, INC
'00 Grand Prix SE, $4,950
cash includes tax, tag and
title Call 904-214-9357,
Middleburg dasmiddle-
burg.com, SR21, 15
miles north of Keystone
Heights
DAVE'S AUTO SALE, INC
'99 CHEVY G1500,
$5,500 cash includes tax,
tag and title Call 904-
214-9357, Middleburg
dasmiddleburg com.
SR21, 15 miles north of
Keystone Heights
DAVE'S AUTO SALE, INC
'96 Camry DX, $4K cash
includes tax, tag and
title Call 904-214-9357,
Middleburg dasmiddle-
burg com SR21, 15
miles north of Keystone
Heights
DAVE'S AUTO SALES, INC
'99 Ranger XLT, $4,950
cash includes tax, tag and
title Call 904-214-9357
Middleburg dasmiddle-
burg com, SR21, 15
miles north of Keystone
Heights
DAVE'S AUTO SALES, INC
'97 Concord LX, $3,500
cash includes tax, tag and
title Call 904-214-9357,
Middleburg dasmiddle-
burg corn, SR21, 15
miles north of Keystone
Heights
43
RVs and
Campers
2004 32' CEDAR CREEK
FIFTH WHEEL2 slides,
rear kitchen and lots of
storage Excellent condi-
tion $20,000 OBO Call
904-219-9365 or 904-
782-9822
44
Boats and ATVs
BOAT FOR SALE 1997
LUND PRO V 5 pedestal


seats, electronics, trolling
motor, rod and tackle stor-
age, 70hp Johnson, trailer
needs upgraded, $5,300
Call 352-278-8166.
45
Land for Sale
ACREAGE AND FARMS
140 ACRES, 1 mile road
frontage. $6K/acre. Call
904-259-8028.
ONE ACRE WITH 28X80
4/2 MOBILE HOME, like
new. Financing available.
4 miles from Starke, call
386-496-1146
MIDDLEBURG/KEY-
STONE/PUTNAM Lots
for sale, 1/3 acre and
up, low down Owner
financing available Call
1-800-616-8373
1 75 ACRES. BEAUTIFUL
HIGH AND DRY PAS-
TURE LAND Mobile
homes and horses al-
lowed. Asking $29,900.
Call 904-422-0470 (own-
er/agent).
OWNER FINANCE -
STARKE/LAKE BUTLER
AREA 1 1/2 acres to 4
acre lots with pond and
river Granddaddy oaks
and rolling hills. Call 386-
496-0683 or 352-284-
7608
47
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease, Sale)
COMMERCIAL OFFICES
for lease in Starke, across
from Courthouse on 301,
perfect for Attorney, CPA,
Title Company, Appraisal,
etc Call Matt at 904-966-
0001
ONE STORE IN HEART
OF DOWNTOWN 111
Call St, $201,000 new
roof, designed for res-
taurant Also, one retail
store, downtown Starke,
$179,500 109 Call St,

ED'S
APPLIANCE
Sales g Service
Factory Trained
Authorized Service
For most major brands
WE DO
IN-HOME SERVICE
Call for appointment
904-964-2966
355 N Templc Ave Starke


new roof, good for office,
retail, etc. Call 904-964-
4111.
NEW PROFESSIONALOF-
FICES at 417 West Call
Street for lease. Ideal for
medical, legal, account-
ing or business offices.
$350 including utilities
and taxes, or all 4 offices
for $290 each plus utilities
and taxes. Call 352-275-
8531 today for a walk
through.
300 SO FT BUILDING -
HAS BATHROOM, utili-
ties included. On Walnut
St plenty of parking,
$375/mth. Call Bonnie
at 904-964-6433 or 904-
626-8488.
48
Homes for Sale
$500 DOWN, OWNER FI-
NANCING Lakefront
manufactured home on
1/3 acre, $99K. 5762
Silver Sands Circle, Key-
stone Heights, FL 32656.
Call 800-813-6180.
3/1 STUCCO HOME AT-
TACHED TO A 1/1 EF-
FICIENCY 6 acres with
additional above ground
septic, deep well with pos-
sibility of additional mobile
home or RV Located 2
miles from Starke on Hwy
100, 134th St. $184,000,
financing possible with
approved credit Call John
at 904-964-6305.
2 BED 1 BATH, 29 gage
metal roof, new electri-
cal wiring, plumbing, AC
unit, cabinets, floor cov-
ering, Florida Power and
Light utilities, 2 miles N
of Starke on 301, $85K
Price reduced, make offer.
Phone 352-745-0039.
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
3BR/1BA, 684-Epperson


St. Starke, $55,500. Call
352-745-0039 .
HANDYMAN 'SPECIAL
2BR/1BA 696 Epperson
St Starke, $49.500. Call
352-745-0039
KEYSTONE. CLAY COUN-
TY 3/2 DECORATIVE
CB HOME with 2 car
attached gaiage Buill in
2004 on 5 fenced acres
All appliances included.
Call 352-473-6955,
$199K.
49
Mobile Homes
for Sale
ONE ACRE WITH 2BR MO-
BILE HOME. 6860 NW_
204th Terr, Starke, FL.
Call 1-802-897-8624 or
904-782-3626.
NEW "2008" LOT MODEL,
1800sq ft. 3BR/2BA, up-
graded kitchen package,.
master bedroom retreat,
sliding glass door with
furniture & decor, setup
& delivery, A/C, skirting,
steps $62,900 Call Larry
at 904-259-1100
"2008" 28X44 3/2, FLEET-
WOOD, $29,900 Call
Larry at 904-259-1100
NEW "2008" 28X72 4/2.
1890 SOFT Sliding glass
door, side by side refrig-
erator, dishwasher, furni-
ture and decor $49,900.
904-259-8028
1 ACRE WITH 2000, 28X60
3/2 MOBILE HOME Like
new with well and septic.
Financing available In
Union County, $74K, call
386-496-1146.
ONE ACRE WITH MH 2BR.
6860 NW 204th Terrace
Call 904-782-3626
FOR SALE GREAT DEAL
JACOBSEN TRIPLE


AKeystone Hauling &

LYNN'S BATRMO N MORE Handyman Service, LLC
REMODEING + MORE
CONSTRUCTION, INC. HANDYMAN SERVICES carpmtry *Bu1HaMowing
Complete bathroom remodeling, including wall *rneRepair *wiaei'inming & Renoval
New Modular Homes andfloor tilework.Tub andshower conversions, P aureVWVing *SiteCkan'Up
New Construction & Remodeling remodeling. From kitchen, bath to exterior repairs, OddjJ ThriasRnoval
instruction & Remodeling all-foor-tile work built-in shower seating. 1r Work Pine Btari & CyprNs ,Mul
SNew Roofs & Re-roofing 2 ReferencesAfvailable. *GardenRotolin *mrwVodForSaie
Lc #202105 HO*ScIed & IIrnrd *Freenmtes
CALL TODAY! Call Steve, (9041465-0078 owner: K'er, w0hi,,l
5or [352 468-2515 M '.M ,
352-745-1189 1


WIDE, must be moved to
your lot/land -4/2 2.200
sq. ft., fireplace, office/
study, extra large master,
many upgrades. $49,500
negotiable, call for ap-
pointment 904-759-9629
or 904-591-0276.
TIRED OF ALL THE EX-
TRAS THAT YOU DON'T
KNOW ABOUT or don't
plan for? Then buy my
2008 28x80 for $67K, or
my 28x60 4BR for $52K.
Includes permits, well,
septic, power pole, all
hook-ups, set-up. A/C,
skirting, steps. No impact
fees. Call Bruce or Lynn,
352-378-2453
MUST SELL, NEVER TI-
TLED. 4/2 Fleetwood
2008 model. All warran-
ties apply. Will move and
set-up for only $39,995.
Call Matt at 352-378-
2453.
$750 DOWN W.A C. BUYS
YOU YOUR NEW HOME
3/2 and 2/2 available
Hidden Oaks MHC in
Lake Butler, FL For
more details, call 386-
496-8111
OWN YOUR OWN HOME
$455/MTH. 3/2 double-
wide HiddenOaks MHC,
Lake Butler, FL Call 386-
496-8111
HANDYMAN HOME -
NEEDS SIDING AND
A/C to be installed Low
monthly payment, 386-
496-8111
FOR SALE BY OWNER 2
years new 4/2. 2200 sq
It mobile home on 1 acre
with stocked fish pond
and new 12x24 utility
building NW 125th in
I awtey $135 000 Wont
last long call Dave at 904.
103-0686


LARGE DWMH ON DOU-
BLE LOT, APPROX. 3
ACRES. Hardi Plank
siding, new windows and
doors, all new kitchen,
bamboo floors, tile fire-
place, 2 car carport, close.
to Gainesville UF Great
for family or student,
horses and farm animals
allowed. Close to public
access for Lake Santa
Fe. $144,900, call 352-
494-7696
ONLY 2 LEFTi 3/2 NEW
HOMES, NOW $3,9,995
Land/home or home only,
low as $425/mth. Call
352-622-1059.
LAST ONE! NEW SWMH.
2/2 REDUCED to $36,995
Ready for delivery to your
property Hurry, 352-622-
1059
REDUCED $15K BRAND
NEW 3/2, 1800 sq ft,
now $78,995 Ready for
delivery to your lot, 352-
622-1059
CLAYTON HOMES, AMER-
ICA'S #1 RETAIL Mobile
Home Dealer, has 8 lot
models for quick sale
Save thousands, call 352-
622-1059
CLAYTON HOMES HAS
SINGLEWIDES, double-
wides, even triplewides
reduced Save as much
as $15K Call 352-622-
1059
OWN YOUR LAND, OR
HAVE FAMILY LAND?
Your land is your down
payment Own a new
home in 2 months Call
352-622-1059
CLAYTON HOMES WE
OFFER NO CLOSING
COSTS No prepayment
penalty, as little as 500
down Call 352-622-
1059


Pretty Little Cottage

2 BR, Treed Lot,' New Wall
To Wall Carpet, Fresh
Paint.
$455.00 per month
plus security

1-800-366-3419




Limerock Concrete Sand
Slag Rock Crusher Run
Crushcrete Masonry Sand
Millings Gravels

Bradford Limerockl
Since 1977-
Allen E. Taylor Owner
904-509-912%6lUE


o)SERVIC.


*Land Clearning V *.Demolition
*Ponds *Road Grading
*Dozer Work R.E. Jones *Fill Dirt
*Road Building *Limerock
*Driveways Owner ,Washout
*Heavy Brush -Site Prep
Mowing Licensed *Fire Line
& Insured Plowing

J ~ Otflice: 904-966-0065 *Cell: 904-364-8733
I I. I 4 i :,%'-r r L ,-,- ,, :Ta ,* : FL 32091


i


May 1, 2008


W











Page8A UNION CO' NtY TIMES May 1,2008


Classified Ads


f.. ,*
Si..


~1
-. ~


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web

www.BCTelegraoh.com


Where one call {I

(does it a3/i 2

(9041964-6305 *(3521473-2210 *(3861496-2261M


CLAYTON HOMES. #1,
OFFERS HOMEOWN-
ERS Insurance on every
home we sell Call 352-
622-1059
50
For Rent
BIG LAKE SANTA FE -
COZY 2BR FURNISHED
APARTMENT 120 foot
pier with covered fish-
ing and picnic deck, awe
inspiring sunsets First.
last, plus security $700/
mth, includes electric Call
352-475-5832
3/2 DOUBLEWIDE ON
2 ACRES Pole barn,
fenced with pond $675/
mth plus deposit. Call
904-368-9762 or 904-
334-7179
$500 DOWN, OWNER FI-
NANCING. Lakefront
manufactured home on
1/3 acre. $99K 5762
Silver Sands Circle, Key-
stone Heights, FL 32656.
Call 800-813-6180
2/2 HOME WITH DE-
TACHED CARPORT
AND WORKSHOP in Clay
County, close to Keystone
Heights. $750/mth, call
352-475-6260.
3 BEDROOM DOUBLE
WIDE NEWLY REMOD-
ELED trailer home on
lake, 5 acres. Keystone
Heights area $900/mth
Deposit required 352-
262-1980
2/1 LAKEVIEW HOUSE IN
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS,
near McRae Elementary
$625/mth. Call 904-614-
7170.
WALDO VILLAS 1 & 2BR
APARTMENTS AVAIL-
ABLE. Call Nita at 352-
468-1971
ONE ACRE LOT FOR RENT
MOBILE HOME READY.
No travel trailer or RV.
$200/mth, call 904-796-
0442.
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
RENT! COMPLETE with
CH/A. cable provided, all
utilities paid! Central loca-
tion. 10% discount on first
month's rent forsenior cit-
izens. Rooms with private
bath. $115 $135. /wk.
Room without bath, $100
Laundry facilities avail-
able Close to churches,
stores, downtown shop-
ping, theatre, and more!
See Manager at the Mag-
nolia Hotel, across from
the Starke Post Office.
904-964-4303.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, clean, close to prison.
Call 352-468-1323.
SPECIAL RENTAL 2 &
3 BR, NEWLY RENO-
VATED. Deposit required.
Call 678-438-6828 or 678-
438-2865.
LAKE BUTLER APART-
MENTS 1005 SW 6th
Street, Lake Butler,. Fl
32054. Ph: 386-496-3141,
TDD/TTY 711. Rental
assistance for qualified
applicants. 1,2,3 & 4 BR
HC & non HC acces-
sible apartments. Laun-
dry facility & playground.
Water, sewer & garbage
provided Equal Housing
Opportunity.
2/1 GARAGE APARTMENT
Private, but in town. $450,
first, last, deposit, lease.
Call 904-964-3579.
38R RENTAL -$900/MTH.
CALLSUSAN FAULKNER
O'NEAL, 352-745-1212,
owner/agent.
FOR RENT4BR unfurnished
house, AC, gas heat, 1
bedroom detached un-


furnished mother in law
apartment, $1000/month
lease with security Call
904-964-6305
ONE YEAR OLD HOUSE,
3/2 2 car garage, tile
floors, granite counter-
tops, Jacuzzi, tub and
walk-in shower, lake ac-
cess Available June 1st,
$1,200/mth One month
deposit, service animals
only Call 352-473-3560.
LOOKING FOR A ROOM-
MATE $350/MTH. FE-
MALE preferred. In Law-
tey. Call 904-894-2552
3/2 DOUBLEWIDE ON ONE
ACRE CH/A, fireplace.
deck Service animals
only. $625/mth plus
deposit. Call 352-468-
3221
2003 DWMH, 3/2, 1300
SO FT CH/A on 2 acres
with fishing pond, located
lust outside of Slarke city
limits $950/mth Call
904-364-7128 daytime or
904-364-6281 evenings
2/1 HOUSE WITH CEN-
TRAL AC. IN STARKE
$500/mth plus $300/dep
Call 904-964-6039.
3/2 SINGLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME WITH CH/A. All
electric. $450/mth. Call
904-964-6445
4/2 ON PARADISE LAKE
STOVE, REFRIGERA-
TOR, dishwasher. 333
SE 46th Loop, Keystone
Heights $895/mth plus
$800/dep. Call 352-475-
5533 or 352-226-9220.
3/2 WITH STOVE, REFRIG-
ERATOR, DISHWASHER.
455 SE 44th St., Keystone
Heights $795/mth, $700/
dep Call 352-475-5533
or 352-226-9220
2/2 MOBILE HOME WITH
WASHER AND DRYER,
carport $575/mth plus
$575/sec. Service ani-
mals only. Call 904-964-
9719.
2/1 MOBILE HOME, HAMP-
TON AREA. Remodeled
and clean, new kitchen
and bath.'$450/mth. Call
Debbie at 352-468-3510.
ROOM FOR RENT $90/
WK. Call 352-216-5111.
LAKE COTTAGE, 2/1 ON
BOLT LAKE, KEYSTONE
HEIGHTS. $500/mth,
$500/dep. Call 386-867-
1948.
3/2 HOUSE WITH GARAGE
IN STARKE. 317 Red-
grave St., $850/mth, call
904-964-8073.
2/2 MOBILE HOME ON 2
ACRES New carpet/vi-
nyl. $500/mth plus depos-
it. Call 352-235-1503.
2/2 SWMH RECENTLY RE-
MODELED. $500/mth,
$1,250 needed to move
in. Located at Lamplight-
er Mobile Home Commu-
nity in Gainesville, 5200
NE 39th Ave. Park is
well maintained, has a
swimming pool and paved
roads. Lease purchase
available. Call 386-684-
1040, 352-283-8674 or
888-999-1389.

ED'S
APPLIANCE
Sales 6 Service
Nice selection of
Pre-Owned Refrigerators
Starting at $165
GREAT FOR
SUMMER VEGGIES
Or RENTAL PROPERTY
904-964-2966
355 N Temple Ave Starke


Smith & Smith Realty
SheilaDaughety,
Realter
(904) 964-6708 or
(352) 235-1131 cell
(904) 964-9222 office
*2BR/I BA, Comer of Oak St. & North St., in
Starke, Recently Remodeled.
$74,000 Bring Offers
*3BR/I BA on Orange Street, Hardwood FIs.
Floors & Above-ground Pool.
1 0 Reduced $106,000 MLS#421161
* 1 Acre Wooded in Pleasant Grove Area.
Mobile Home Allowed. $20,000
MLS #402345
*1.25 Acres on Comer of N.E. 12th Ave.
& 171st Street $20,000
M)S #424653
*2 Wooded Acres Just Off Griffis Loop
$32,000 MLS #420759
*49.87 Acres Wooded, Marketable Timber
$4 0 Reduced $423,895 MLS #323147
* 10 acres outside of Hampton. Wooded
Homes or Mobile Homes.
Reduced $99,000 MLS #323204


Quick Copy

WHILE YOU WAIT


110WESTCALLST.,STARKE
(904) 964-5764
Fax (904) 964-6905
Fast, Frienly, Professional Help


Refinance &
Purchases
- FHA VA
- Conventional
- New
Construction
~ Home Equity
Loans
- Mobile
Home/Land




EQUAL HOUSING
LENDER


HOUSEMATE NEEDED
3/2 HOUSE IN MEL-
ROSE Rent and utilities
average. $500/mth No
smoking Please call
352-222-7125
AVAILABLE NOW ON LAKE
GENEVA, 1/1 HOUSE
with large living room,
cathedral ceilings with
loft storage Ground level
with handicapped ramps
Excellent lakeview Yard
maintenance, water, sep-
tic included $500/mth
plus last and security.
Call 352-475-3440
RAIFORD 2/1 MOBILE
HOME AT END OF
PAVED STREET Very
quiet neighborhood close
toprisons $500/mth, call
386-431-1197.
51
Lost/Found
FOUND FEMALE HUNT-
ING DOG White with one
brown spot, unusual eyes,
on Speedville Rd. Call
904-368-3420 or 904-
368-1253
52
Animals
and Pets
RABBITRY FOR SALE 30
various size hutches 60
oversize litter pans (2 per
hutch) 48 water bottles
23 lifetime feed bowls
23 rabbits, common, N
Dwarf, and mini-Rex each
with name/breed/DOB
tags. $500 cash, contact
Bob Paine at 352-478-
2072 (H) or 352-473-4001
(W).
DOG TAGS DOG TAGS -
DOG TAGS! Buy them at
the Office Shop in Starke
on Call St. Only $4.75,
including postage. Many
colors, shapes and styles
to choose from. Call
904-964-5764 for more
information.
ADBA REGISTERED
AMERICAN BLUE PIT
TERRIERS 8 weeks old
All blue and white. $300
each Call 386-244-1669
or 386-867-2256.


53A
Yard Sales
SATURDAY ONLY, 8AM-
2PM GrilfisLoop Baby
items, children and adult
clothes, movies, DVDs,
novelties, plants and
much more
1511 E CALL ST. MAY 3RD
AND 4TH Rain date is
May 9th and 10th. Fur-
niture, sewing supplies,
material, kitchen misc ,
lamps and much more
5097 SE 109TH ST, CLOSE
TO HAMPTON ELEMEN-
TARY Friday, May 2nd,
8am-9

MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
FRIDAY AND SATUR-
DAY, May 2nd and 3rd,
9am-? Sampson City
Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment. Corner of CR227
and CR225. Clothes,
household items, way too
much to list.
TAMMY'S YARD SALE -
1010 ECALLST Friday
and Saturday, 8am-2pm,
4 families. Kids teens,
misc
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
8AM-? 1003 N Clark St.
Many items.
LARGE YARD SALE. 7AM-
2PM. Pit Stop Cafe,
Lawtey.
MAY 3RD, 8AM-2PM. GUN
CABINET, ODDS AND
ENDS 2087 NE 154th
St.
HUGE YARD SALE AT
NAPA AUTO PARTS.
SR16. Saturday, May
3, 8am-?
FRIDAY AND'SATURDAY,
MOVING SALE. Hospital,
turn by First Presbyterian
Church, go one mile, left
on NE 21st Ave., follow
signs. Baby items and
much more.
CR233 (MORGAN RD),
19772 NW 37TH AVE.
Clothes, furniture, tools,
etc. Saturday. 8am-?
TWO FAMILY SALE SAT-
URDAY. North301 Starke
at Safe Harbor Church,


originally known as Pine
Valley 8am-2pm, call
904-364-6731
1210 BRADFORD STREET
SARATOGA HEIGHTS
Yard sale. Saturday. May
3. 8am Mens clpthes (L-
XL), pants (44x30-36x31).
shirts (L-XL). shoes
(8/10). ladies clothes (14)
and shoes (9), sport coat,
suits and jackets, cur-
tains, fishing equipment,
youth bed (like new), nu-
merous items.
UNITED METHODIST
WOMEN CHURCHWIDE
YARD SALE. May 2nd
and 3rd. 8am-2pm. 200
N Walnut St., Starke.
SATURDAY, 8:30AM-4PM -
MULTI FAMILY GARAGE
SALE. Household items,
boy, girl and teen cloth-
ing (size 6 and up), L-3X
women and men cloth-
ing, bedding, tools, misc.
Tommy Parker, 352-468-
1093 or 904-571-6561.
South 301, turn L on
CR221 toward Hampton.
cross RR tracks, first brick
house on left.
SATURDAY, 8AM-? 8010
SE SR100 TOWARD
KEYSTONE. Misc items.
kitchen items, luggage
and clothing.
NEW THRIFT SHOP OPEN-
ING Saturday, May 3,
9am at old Post Office in
Worthington Springs. Ty-
ler's Thrift Shop working
with Lighthouse Missions
Outreach. All donations
accepted. Old fashioned
yard sale prices. Come
get the deal of a lifetime.
SR100 to SR121, turn L,
go 9 miles to town, look
for big sign. 386-496-
1904, evenings.
MAY 2ND AND 3RD, SOUTH
301, turn at Knuckle Drag-
gers just before WalMart,
follow our bright signs.
Thelma and Gang.
MAY 3, 8AM-? NORTH OF
LAWTEY ON CR125E
Turn at 2 motels, follow
signs. Sheila Hodges.
HUGE YARD SALE SEV-
ERAL FAMILIES. Furni-


v1ee Family Owned & Operated We Work From
sares Commercial Residential Sta to Finish!"


PO Box 82
Ft. White, FL 32038


Office: 386-497-1419
Toll Free 1-866-9LW-ROOF
Fax: 386-497-1452


Licensed Bonded
Insured
Workers Comp.
License # RC0067442


r (7he caie and wvellbeinu, o tou? elder

is ve7i i ioTtanPt to the stat at


ksis iig iide

Assisted Living Facility


"- M T. e irrl oL e3: r,. I,.-i a1 i ljO ,ri 3. Or.,' Oblhle a ', e. lr'i ,?a C ,l'u, -,- t Oi' l ..

Ldcated in Downtown Starke
Next to Wainwright Park II
Call Caorrev Pitts, Administrator, For Directions

(904) 964-2220



Faulkner Realty, Inc.
Susan Faulkner-O'Neal, Broker

405 W. Georgia St. Starke
faulknerrealty@embarqmail.com











HORSES ALLOWED on this approx. 5 acre Farmette with 4BR
Brick Home. Lots of space inside and out! Inground Pool!
Recent Price Reduction to $249,900

OFFICE SPACE Waterfront Lot
FOR RENT Crosby Lake in Lakewood
/.-- -.-in ..:,.REDUCED!


uomr II E)UIII
Lawtey
U.S. Hwy 301


Jenny W. Mann
Branch Manager/
Mortgage Consultant


1 acre w/septic & power pole
$29,900


S1107 S. Walnut St.
Starke, Florida
(Located behind
Bradford County Eye
Center)

argaret Ann Bennett
Mortgage Consultant


ture, dishes, tools, plants,
lots of kids clothes NW
45th Ave off Morgan Rd
(between 301 and SR16
Friday and Saturday,
8am-3pm
HUGE MULTI FAMILY
YARD SALE Saturday,
May 3rd, 8am-9 Baby
items, clothes, toys and
more. NW 216th St ,
Lawtey, follow signs
SATURDAY ONLY, MAY
3RD. Clothes, furniture,
decorations, electric
wheelchair and lots of
other stuff. 954 N Tem-
ple Ave across from
Courthouse at AAA Bail
Bonds.
BIG YARD SALE SAT-
URDAY, 8AM-2PM 417
Edwards Rd.
DINING ROOM SETS,
BUNK BEDS AND OTH-
ER MISC. Furniture,
household items, clothes.
etc. Saturday, May 3, 417
E Call St, Starke. The
sale will start at 8am.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
8AM-? 301 North to Cer-
emonial Fireworks, turn
right on dirt road and go
1-1/4 miles. Turn right
and follow private drive,
just follow the signs. This
will be one yard sale you
will not want to miss Lots
of good stuff Brand new
home interior (lots of it)
still in the box. bass boat.
lawnmower, pickup truck.
utility shelves, good tools,
like new clothes, furniture,
floral supplies, small ap-
pliances, tanning bed and
many other things.
FRIDAY, MAY 2ND, 9AM
831 EDWARDS RD.
From clothes to house-
hold items and furniture.
SATURDAY, MAY 3, 8AM.
NW 188TH ST. off Bay-
less Hwy. Cook and bake-
ware, linens and drapes,
vacuum, grill, picture


frames, VHS/DVDs, crys-
tal decor, clothing, shoes
and so much more
LARGE YARD SALE FRI-
DAY AND SATURDAY,
8am-5pm. Riding mower,
push mower, weed eater.
gas generator, pressure
washer, boat motor and
boat, fishing poles, tools.
clothes, kitchen stuff,
household stuff, games,
toys, crafts, lamps, TV,
VCR, lots of stuff Turn
on East Market Rd to
stop sign, turn left to Lau-
ra Baptist Church, turn
left on 21st Lane, follow
signs. Call 904-964-7209
for more info.
2 FAMILY YARD SALE -
LOTS OF CLOTHES,
household appliances,
tools. 8:30am-?, Satur-
day. Hwy 100 to CR18,
look for signs.
BIG GARAGE SALE AND
TOOL SALE. Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
10am-4pm at Waldo Mo-
torsports. 16258 301
South in Waldo.
SATURDAY, MAY 3, 9AM-
1PM Items include re-
frigerator, stove, exhaust,
vacuum and much more.
The corner of Westmo-
reland and Lafayette in
Starke.
MOVING SALE: 9AM-3PM,
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
May 2nd and 3rd. Tools of
all trade, MTX car audio
equipment, Sega and
games, legos, bicycles,
exercise equipment, craft
stuff, hospital bed, twin
bed, men and women
plus size clothes, A-Beka
books, dishes, tupper-
ware, recliners/rockers,
foot stools, gas stove.
New items 50 cents
and up (for pets, kitchen
and you). 1996 Dodge
pick-up, and much, much
more. Come see us.
More things added each


day 16E, turn left on
NE 19th Ave, make right,
first street just past Laura
Baptist, 17398 NE 21st
Lane, 904-964-5876
53B
Keystone
Yard Sales
LOTS OF STUFF -
CLOTHES, TOYS, 4-
wheel motorized chair.
6320 6th Ave, Postmas-
ter's Village off CR214,
8am-? May 2nd and
3rd
775 SE 44TH ST. LEFT AT
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
GOLF COURSE to end
Wood dinette, lots of
home decor, large bird
cage and much more
Saturday. May 3rd. 8am-
1pm.
SUNDAY ONLY, 8AM-2PM.
Multiple items including
10x20 Handi House shed,
5x12 open trailer, 16'car
hauler trailer, 3 refrigera-
tors and lots more. 6335
Little Lake Geneva Rd,
Keystone.
RECYCLED TREASURES
SALE FRESH START
FELLOWSHIP. 7191
SR21, North Keystone.
Friday, May 2nd. 9am-
4pm. Saturday, May 3rd,
9am-1pm. Saturday, $1/
bag day. Rain or shine
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
8AM-12PM. 150 SW
Citrus. Keystone Heights,


Homes For Rent
Homes, Lake Homes, Mobile Homes &
Vacation Properties for Rent in the Keystone,
Melrose, Starke, Hawthorne Area ranging from
$550 to $1,200 per month.
Call for Free List
Professional Property
Management Services
offered by Trevor Waters Realty, Inc.
352-473-7777
or call Trevor at 352-246-7776



Southern Timberco, 9nc.


We buy timber,

Pine and Hardwoods

Small & Large Tracts

Josh Crawford Michael Hardee

352-745-1565 904-364-6907


Reach







35,000


people in 4


different


counties


behind Clay Electric, took
for signs Furniture, col-
lectible tea pots and bird
houses, art, household
misc
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY, 8am-3pm
8134 County Line Rd
Freezer ($100 OBO),
tools, metal work tables,
smoker ($1000 BO). Call
352-473-3517
SATURDAY, MAY 3RD,
8AM-3PM. 6705 Spanish
Moss Dr off of Immokalee
Rd., follow signs.
MAY 1, 2, AND 3 PLANTS
AND YARD SALE. Mul-
tiple families, lots of items.
Many plants, many kinds.
Must sell all. 4984 CR
214 past new BP sta-
tion. Thursday through
Saturday.
53C
Lake Butler
Yard Sales
LARGE MULTI FAMILY
YARD SALE FRIDAY
AND SATURDAY. SR121
towards Worthington
Springs, turn right on
92nd St look for signs.
LAKE BUTLER HUGE
MULTI FAMILY GARAGE
SALE. Saturday, May 3,
8am-2pm. 11268 West
SR238. Everything from
A-Z, assortment too great
to list.
LAKE BUTLER BIG YARD
SALE Friday and Sat-
urday, May 2nd and 3rd,


.,, ..: .',
U*l~hll





S: "- ***" --"*'



... - __ '


6, '.- --


F2,nm"


SAVE THOUSANDS $$$
Buy Directly From The Builder
New Construction On Quiet,
Paved Street In Keystone Heights
3/2, Custom Cabinets, 2 Car Carport,
Covered Rear Porch, City Water,
Professionally Landscaped Yard
Home is move in ready and just in time to
enroll your children in Clay County Schools.
Call today and talk to the builder about
other possible buyer incentives.
352-473-5283 or 352-494-4104
Ask for Betty
You can view pictures of this home at
www.bfbuildingcontractors.com


* 1/1 Apt, private entrance, furnished &
utilities. $700/month & Security.
* 1/1 Apt, private entrance, unfurnished &
utilities. $700/lmQnth.: .
* 3/2 Home on Lakawana $1,200/month &
Security.
*2/1 Apt. Lake Geneva. $600/month &,
Security.
* 2/1 in Triplex, Clay County, Lake Access.
$600/month & security.
* Commercial Building in Keystone Heights
on SR-21. $900/month & security. (R-41)


:1


Ask about
our
"NEW"
Low Interest
Home
Improvement
Loans!


for very little money!



Advertise in the Lake Region

Special which is mailed to all box

holders in Keystone Heights, Melrose,

Geneva, Putnam Hall, Grandin,

Florahome, and part of Hawthorne.

Advertise your services to the

people that need you now!




Call Today...

Kevin Miller or Darlene Douglass

904-964-6305

kmiller@bctelegraph.com

darlene@bctelegraph.com

Fax: 904-964-8628


Call Us Today! RAGNKE
904-964-4000 -"' ...


I


- . .... ~. C. .


SFidelity
FUNDING MORTGAGE CORP.


". '










May 1, 2008 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 9A


Read our Classifieds on the 7 where one cal


C lassified A dS World Wide Web does/itall'/
www.BCTelegraph.com (9041 964-6305 3521473-2210 [ 3861496-2261


8am-9 Furniture, clothing,
toys and more SR100.
three miles east from
SR121. look for signs
LAKE BUTLER MULTI
FAMILY MOVING SALE
Saturday, May 3. 730am-
3pm 8834 SR121, next
to Douglas Truck Sales.
Tent. small appliance.
boat top, dishes, clothing
and furniture
55
Wanted
WANTED DISH NET-
WORK RECEIVERS. Will
pay cash and will pick up.
Call 352-284-8140.
57
For Sale
A SET' OF FOUR 17 inch
rims, with low profile sport
tires. like new Asking
$200 firm Call 352-745-
2333 or 352-745-1865
HORSE TRAILER 2002
Longhorn GN. combo 4
horse slant, drop down
windows, dressing room.
,'/AC cabinets, bed
$8,000 OBO. Call 352-
258-4473.
STORAGE TRAILERS
FOR SALE 48' LONG.
Herndon's Diesel, Lawtey,
FL. Call 904-769-9437 or
904-769-6351.
FORD COMMERCIAL
LAWNMOWER CM224.
The wife can now mow
with it too. Power steer-
ing, automatic trans. 4x4
if you need-it. It has a
steering wheel and qual-
ity seat. 5' front cut, only
118 hours. Commercial
means heavy duty con-
struction, this diesel is
very good on fuel, trouble
free 'and very powerful
Try it, you will like it. Only
$4,900 OBO. Call 352-
339-4132.
KENMORE WASHER and
dryer, new type $75 and
up each, electric stove,
written guarantee, de-
livery available. For ap-
pointments, call 904-964-
8801.
MATTRESS TWIN sets $89,
full sets $129, Queen sets
$159, King sets $189.
Mattress Factory, 441
East Brownlee St. Save
a lot. Cash and carry. Call
Sonia at 352-473-7173 or
904-964-3888.
USED COMPUTERS, $99.
WESTERN AUTO IN
STARKE, call 904-964-
6841.
GO-CART, TWO-SEATER,
5HP B & S MOTOR. Roll
bars, go fast, $400. Rid-
ing mower, 11LHP, 32" cut,
$250. Ford truck, 1991,
parts truck only. No motor
or trans, parts or whole.
Call 904-964-4739.
TANNING BED, $900. HAS
BRAND NEW BULBS.
Call 904-964-9575.
STEEL BUILDING SPE-
CIALS. Buyers mar-
ket discounts. 40x60-
100x100. Others avail-
able. www.scg-grp.com.
Source #OFE, 904-746-
4743.
SOFA, CHAIR, BOLD OF
MATCHING DECORA-
TOR FABRIC (pastel col-
ors), light green recliner,
matching decorator items,
'$250. Electric, smoker
grill, $20. Rocking chair,
$20. Call 904-533-2156
or 352-234-0009 (cell).
HORSE HAY FOR SALE,
$5 PER SQUARE BALE.
Delivery available, call
Mark at 352-258-9550.
59
Personal
Services
WILL CLEAN HOUSES
VERY THOROUGH,
good references, own


ROOMS

FOR RENT
Economy Inn
Lawtey, F $35 & UP
Low Daily & Weekly Rates
Daily Rm Service
Microwave Cable/HBO
Refrigerator Local Phone
(904) 782-3332


EXTRA CASH!
Could you use some
pow that the holidays
are over?
We specialize in helping
people sell through our
Classifieds!
YARD SALES *lAUTOS
*BOATS* CLOTHES
*APPUANCES_
The list goes on.
Call Melisa Today
904-964-6305


Quick Copy

WHILE YOU WAIT


110 WEST CALL ST, STARKE
(904) 964-5764
Fax (904) 964-6905
Fast, Frendly, ProfessloW lHtlp


cleaning supplies. Will
clean/bathe animals also.
Call 904-796-2319 or 352-
468-2196
SENIORS DISABLED I
PROVIDE ASSISTANCE
in your home. Errands,
meals, housekeeping,
laundry Years of experi-
ence Call 352-478-6003
(cell)
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS. INC Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills Level-
ing & raising Housesi
BIdgs. Pier Replacement
& alignment. Free Esti-
mates: Danny (Buddy)
Clark, (904)-284-2333 or
1-800-288-0633.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for
M.H. & land packages.
1-800-284-1144.
$$$ FOR JUNK CARS -
GET TOP MONEY for
your junk car. There is no
charge for this service and
we'll put some fast cash
in your hand. No title, no
problem. Call 877-695-
JUNK (5865).
BUSH HOG, BACK HOE,
PASTURE DRAGGING,
clean-up debris, fences,
etc. Reasonable rates,
free quotes. Call 904-
838-8069.
IMMIGRATION/NATURAL-
IZATION FORMS, LET-
TERS, document lists
prepared. Non-attorney.
Call 352-473-3394, leave
message.
EVENING CHILDCARE
CARE FOR INFANTS
AND TODDLERS in my
home. Years of childcare
experience. Call Lisa
Harden in Worthington
Springs, 386-496-8493
or 352-745-0111.


BASIC LAWN CARE, FREE
ESTIMATES Call 904-
769-0537.
JERRY'S HAULING WE
BUY JUNK CARS, run-
ning or not! Will pick
up anywhere $100 and
up Call 904-219-9365
or 904-782-9822
LAWN MOWING, LAND-
SCAPING and irrigation
service Reasonable
rates, in-town specials
Call 386-496-2592 or 352-
494-5043 before 3pm
, 64
Business
Opportunity
MAIN STREET PIZZERIA
IN LAKE BUTLER FOR
SALE. Owner financ-
ing available. Turn key
operation Call 904-314-
4366,
LIQUOR LICENSE Brad-
ford County. No transfer
fee. RealtyMasters, Real-
tors. 800-523-7651.
65
Help Wanted
IRS JOBS $18.46-$32.60/
HR NOW HIRING. Paid
training is provided. For
appointment and free
government job info, call
American Association of
Labor at 913-599-8244,
24hrs, emp. serve.
HIRING BEST QUALIFIED.
Aircraft maintenance
managers. High school
diploma graduates age
17-34. No experience
needed. We train with full
pay. Paid relocation. Call
800-342-8123, Mon-Fri,
9am-5pm.
PAINT PRODUCTION SU-
PERVISOR. Supervises
and trains workers pro-
ducing traffic marking


paint while assisting in
production scheduling,
materials procurement
and ciuslomer service
Also maintains woi place
safety and environmental
health regulatory proce-
dures and records Apply
online at https //www
adpselect com/apps/iob-
fitSel ispcst=1318010
(link is case sensitive)
TECHNICIAN ASSISTANT
NEEDED for shop and
field work Some duties
include collection of air
emissions samples and
shop work Occasional
heavy lilting, climbing of
ladders and stairs and
outdoor work is required
(applicant must not be
afraid of heights) Fre-
quent travel and overtime
required DFW, EOE
Contact Ambient Air Ser-
vices, In 904-964-8440
Please apply in person
or fax resume to 904-
964-6675
A REFERENCE ASSIS-
TANT AND CHILDREN'S
SERVICES ASSISTANT
for Bradford County Pub-
lic Library Applications
and job descriptions avail-
able at Clerk of Court's
office. Bradford County
Courthouse $8,37/hr,
applications close at 9am,
May 5, 2008 EOE Em-
ployer
CAREGIVER CNA and/or 2
- years experience working
with elderly or disabled
clients. 2 or 3 days per
week. Sunrise Homec-
are Services, Hampton
Phone 352-468-2619
FIBERGLASS LAMINA-
TOR AND PARTS TRIM-
MER NEEDED. 40 hr/wk,
FT Apply in person at


US Body. 1 5 miles S of
Hampton on 325
ELECTRICIAN WITH expe-
rience, Prestige Electric
Call 352-745-0650.
FULL TIME POSITION
Seeking a focused pro-
fessional, responsible,
motivated, and with great
people skills Must be
able to lift 150+lbs Fax
resume to 904-964-9233
or 904-259-9707.
HELPER NEEDED FOR
HOME REPAIR WORK.
Call 352-475-1596.
CNA OR ATTENDANT -
ALZHEIMER'S FACILITY
PT-FT, 3-11/11-7 shifts
Experience with elderly
dementia residents Call
904-284-8506 or 904-
284-8200 or 800-638-
3138 Penney Retirement
Community Drug Free
Workplace and EOE.
PARTS DEPT POSITION
AVAILABLE Must have
experience with comput-
ers, write legibly and be
familiar with tractors,
engines, lawnmowers,
etc. Apply in person at
Lazenby Equipment, Hwy
301 Drug Free Work
Place. 904-964-4238
HAIR STYLEST NEEDED,
at 0' Hair Call Whitney
at (352) 339-0644
MAKE MONEY giving away
FREE hNavel coupons
It's easy-NO SELLING-
NOT A TIME SHARE-not
a MLM Check out my
websille lor imle informa-
lion at www simplereler
iI t:iotll/iymnom Enter
"country mom" for the
coupon code to watch a
short video.
SALES CONSULTANT -
Farmers Furniture has
an immediate opening for


'R

V1LllTffitBI
B.Z

,,0*PPL iAT


Is 6MINfI


Secure your future...


in the Classifieds.


Check out the Classifieds for a job
fit just for you.


Slje rtabforb Count 1 Tlegrapl)

131 West Call Street Starke, FL
904-964-6305 Fax: 904-964-8628


Auctions
ABISOLUTI: lESTATtE
Auction Saturday. May 3.
10 am I MI Centre.
Alabama. 55 0+-
('onliC uous A rcr ill
Tracis. Ahunildatii Road,
Frontlagc. ('recks.
( 866 ) 7 89 5 169.
%% "( i\ l m e r i c ;I 1 -
auctioncecrs.com. Keith i
BaldtwiimAL 1416.
MAJOR REAl. ESTATE
AUCTION. I rinda. Mti
6Ih. Niion Radlrdi. \'A.
78 .'- i-cr le.rn7f r m Sainl
Alhans Iospital campus.
"ill hbe ofcreid i 7 parcel,
Pi operty I.'1ailtrc' 1i1
1I0 6.8 ill0 - ,q 1 (. ti. ,\
o7ff7le hiiibld1n Il ni,' i
hospital. a 42.)000 11 it
himoric bulhilhni. a 2.3X11
- I It hoIlliC L olt.'ce
-itippoiring htliiiid'l' .lld
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Radlord. VA 241-411 VI
,V. i, \, olt/ Cwill c i n ,i all
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Prcick.,: WeVId.. Api 23.
Wed Ap i .311. Fri Ni
),. froni 12-3 I'M and
Thurs Ma\ 15. Ionim 3-5
PM. Woll/ & Associate,.
InM (VA, : I I). Real
II' C I i"rokel, &
Auclioneelcl. (N(1li)51-
35SN. RoInokc. VA
24011

Business Opportunities
ALL C'ASII (ANDY'
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sales consultant Position
offers competitive com-
pensation and benefits
package Apply in per-
son at 835 W Walnut St,
Starke Only candidates
selected for an interview
will be contacted. EOE.
COLLECTOR CAREER
OPPORTUNITY We
are looking for energetic
people who enjoy the
challenge of working in
collections If you are
a self-motivated person
with good communica-
tion and organizational
skills, please consider
joining our team Ap-
plicants must possess a
high school diploma or
equivalent, six months
of practical payment col-
lection/clerical experi-
ence, and a valid driver's
license The position
offers competitive salary
and benefit package. To
apply visit our web site
www.farmersturniture
corn or send resume to or
apply at Farmers Home
Furniture, 835 S Walnut
St, Starke, FL 32091.
DRIVERS WANTED CDL
CLASS A FOR HIGH
PAYING local position
Please call National, 877-
33-1186
STAFF NEEDED to work
with person with disabili-
ties in Graham area Must
have HS diploma/GED, 1
yr experience, and abil-
ity to pass a local, state,
and federal background
screening Pay $7.50 per
hour, call 904-966-2100
FRONT OFFICE WORKER
FULL TIME Medical
Manager, dental experi-
ence preferred Benefits,
fax resume to 352-485-
1961.


LOOKING FOR EXPE-
RIENCED COOK TO
WORK the morning shift
at Consolidated Dining
Facility as part time. could
eventually work into full
time Please call Sheila
Turner or Jeanette Perry
for more info, 904-682-
3166
ENJOY WORKING OUT-
DOORS? Like to earn a
good income? Consider
welding at Lake City Com-
munity College. Classes
begin August 18. Finan-
cial aid available. No high
school diploma required
Call 386-754-4352
ENJOY DOING REPAIRS?
SLike to earn a good in-
come and/or start your
own business? Con-
sider Heating/AC at Lake
City Community College.
Classes begin August 18.
Financial aid available.
No high school diploma
required Call 386-754-
4352 for details
FOOD SERVICE PERSON-
NEL FOR CORREC-
TIONAL FEEDING PRO-
GRAM Food production
experience Clean back-
ground and drug screen
ing required. Benefits,
call 386-965-1902.
BRADFORD TERRACE IS
NOW ACCEPTING AP-
PLICATIONS lor LPNs
and RNs, full time for
all shifts. Excellent pay
and benefits. Apply in
person at 808 S Colley
Rd, Starke, FL 32091,
904-964-6220, DFWP,
EOE
BRADFORD TERRACE IS
NOW ACCEPTING AP-
PLICATIONS for CNAs for
the 3/11 and 11/7 shifts.
Excellent pay and ben-


Rj Corman W
S ~ Railroad Company [j
Material Sales, LLC

Laborer/Driver
RJ Corman Material Sales seeks CDL-A Driver.
Mechanical and Boom experience a plus. full-time
position with competitive pay and benefits.

Call 904-964-2100
Apply in person:
14550 SE 43rd St., Starke, FL 32091
or email resume to:
jobs@rjcorman.com
EOE



? Works
AItclua/srarsdfo A Coamunil7 Partnership

FloridaWorks will be conducting a
Career Fair for graduating Bradford/
Union Co. Seniors on Tuesday, May
6th. Any employers interested in
being a part of "this Career Fair,
please contact Susan or Pam at 904-
964-5278.
www.floridaworksonline.com


Connect with a Driving
Career...

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$2,000 Sign-On Bonus
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Class A CDL Required
Recent Grads Welcome






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Out of Area Classifieds


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TACO
BELLE


efits. Apply in person at
808 S Colley Rd, Starke,
FL 32091,904-964-6220,
DFWP, EOE
DRIVER PEMBERTON
TRUCK LINES, INC
Dedicated Southeast
New pay package with
great benefits Home
weekends, 6mth OTR
888-PEMBERTON (888-
736-2378).
SECRETARY FOR CHRIS-
TIAN OFFICE. Must be
computer literate. No
smoking ordrinking. Send
resume to PO Box 2002,
Keystone Heights, FL.
HOME SUPPORT STAFF
to work with developmen-
tally disabled individuals
in group homes in Starke.
Requires HSD or GED,
valid FL drivers license
with good record. $8.25/hr
plus benefits EOE M/F/D/
V 904-964-1468 or 904-
964-8082
PLANNER I THE UNION
COUNTY HEALTH DE-
PARTMENT is seek-
ing a Planner I, PSN
#64086066. This posi-
tion supports Bradford
and Union CHDs in re-
sponding to health/medi-
cal emergencies result-
ing from terrorist acts or
natural disasters. Must
have a bachelor's degree
from an accredited col-
lege or university Must
be willing to work during
emergencies and disas-
ters in both counties and
outside the area. Train-


ing in ICS 100, 200 and
NIMS 700 (preparedness
courses) preferred Ex-
perience providing train-
ing to adults, working
in disaster/emergency
situations and writing re-
ports/papers preferred
Must be willing to work
with diverse populations.
Must be willing to work a
flexible schedule, which
may include nights and
weekends Must be fin-
gerprinted. Salary range
is $991.31 $1,538 47
bi-weekly Applications
will be accepted online
at https://peoplefirst
myflorida.com/. State
of Florida applications
may be mailed to State
of Florida, People First,
Staffing Administration.
PO Box 44058, Jackson-
ville, FL 32231 or faxed to
904-636-2627 by 5/1/08
EEO/AA/VP Employer
MACCLENNY NURSING
- AND REHAB is looking
for CNAs for full-time for
11pm-7 30am shift Must
pass background check
and be a team player.
Ask for Sharon or Melves.
Apply in person, no phone
calls please
71
Farm
Equipment
HORSE HAY FOR SALE,
$5 PER SQUARE BALE.
Delivery available, call
Mark at 352-258-9550


Connect With A Driving



Local and OTR Drivers Needed



Excellent Benefits
"X" Endorsement Required
Recent Grads Welcome







CONNECTED


1-877-967-5222

www.driveCTL.com EOE


Manager Position


Successful and Growing local Fast Food
establishment is seeking experienced
management candidates, minimum 6
months, for Shift Manager positions.
Competitive wage + bonus and benefit
package. For immediate consideration,


apply online at www.TeamMomex.com. Or apply in person
at 808 South Walnut, Starke, FL.


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J ____________________ ._______________________L_______________________I_______________-


T.H.E. Apartments

922 E. Brownlee St. Starke, Florida

Newly Remodeled
2 & 3 Bedrooms Available

Rent is based on Income
Water, Sewer
On-Site Laundry Facility & Play Areas
Office Open: Monday Friday 8:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Call (904) 964-7133 11
Voice TrYAcr-s 1-800-545-1833, Ex. 381 6


Free Medicine
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.


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Davis Express, Inc., a North Florida refrigerated carrier using company
drivers servicing the Southeast states, is growing. We have an opportunity for
highly motivated and professional individuals to help strengthen and grow our
team. We have job openings in:
Operations Customer Service
Driver Management Accounting
These positions require a commitment to meeting company goals and
objectives. Applicants must have excellent people and computer skills,
including knowledge of basic Windows operation, and be willing to work in a
fast paced environment.
Davis Express, Inc.
offers competitive compensation and benefits:
BCBS Health Insurance
Free Dental Insurance Free Life Insurance Policy
401K & Disability Available Paid Vacation

Apply confidentially to Kayla at:
kayla@davis-express.com or fax to 904-964-5419
or apply personally at Davis Express, Inc.
Equal Opportunity Employer Drug Free Workplace
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE


*s.______________ ____ __ __ ____ ___ __ 00_


-1 1


1-1







Page 1OA UNION COUNTY TIMES May 1,2008


L


Giurch News


perform on Saturday, MaN 3 at
6 p.m. and again on Sunda),
May 4. at I I a.m. and 6 p.m.
The church also offers food,
furniture and clothillng
assistance to families in need.
-or more information about
these church events, pic se call
DuWa\ne Bridges at (386)
965-0127.
New Beginnings Holiness:
Pastor Samuel I-. Jackson and
('o-Pastor S. Session-Willis of
New Beginnings Holiness
Church of Lake Butler invite
ever one to experience an
encounter with the Holy Ghost
on Sunday, May 4, at 3 p.m.
The event is sponsored by
WKSG 89.5 FM and will
include a musical concert


featuring Di ine Destiny of
I.ake Butler. God's Chosen
Vessel of the St. Johns, Sacred
Soul Gospel Singers of
Gainesville, the Spiritual
Highlights of Danville and the
Southland Gospel Singers of
Atlanta. The church is located
on the corner of S.R. 100 and
NW 99"' Avenue. For more
information, please call (386)
496-1742 or (352) 260-8708.
Providence Village:
Providence Village Baptist
Church Food Pantry and
Clothes Closet is now
available to families in need.
Located at 4504 SW S.R. 238
in Providence, please call
(352) 672-4114 for an
appointment.


High-Q team members who competed at state were (back, I-r) Zach Sweat,
Tommy Riherd, team assistant Barbara Riherd, coach Renae Allen, Brady
Clark (front) Terri Brown and Tricia Geisenburg.




High-Q team deserves a big high five


The Commissioner's
Academic Challenge is a state
academic tournament
sponsored by the Department
of Education, Florida Lottery
and other businesses. Each
year, the tournament hosts the
brightest and best academic
team members from every
county in Florida.
Counties compete in a
double-elimination tournament
format. The top 12 counties


make it to the semi-final round
and the top six counties then
move on to the final round.
On April 10-12, the Union
district academic team traveled
to Orlando with the top scoring
members of the UCHS Varsity
High-Q Team. Union County
defeated Levy, Sumter,
Franklin and Jefferson
counties to make it to the semi-
final round of competition.
They were edged out of the


finals on the second to last
question by Gadsden County,
who ended up placing second
overall.
The Union team consisted of
Zach Sweat, Terri Brown,
Tricia Geisenburg, Brady
Clark and Tommy Riherd. The
team was coached by Renae
Allen, who was assisted by
Barbara Riherd.


Students compete, bring home awards from slate science air


U A ~ A


Students who participated in this year's state science fair
were (front, I-r) Kelsey HarrisQn, Holly Tucker and Molly
Parker of LBMS and Emily Bland of UCHS, (back) Andrew
Framer, Zach Sweat, Ricky Allen and Lindsey Saunders
also of UCHS. LEFT: Also participating in the state fair
was Emily Brown of UCHS.


Carbon
Credit
workshops
scheduled for
UC and BC
Two carbon credit
workshops will be held on
Thursday, May 8 to serve
both the residents of Union
and Bradford counties.
In Lake Butler, a
workshop will take place
from 6:30 p.m. 9 p.m. at
Lake Butler Middle School
(one mile south of S.R. 100
on S.R. 121). In Starke, a
workshop will take place


from i p.m. 3:30 p.m. at
the UF-IFAS Bradford
County Extension
Conference Room (U.S.
301, approx. 2 miles north
of S.R. 100).
In addition to traditional
agricultural and forest
products, landowners may
now realize potential
income from the sale of
carbon credits. This
workshop will help
landowners, foresters,
farmers and others gain a
better understanding of the
carbon market, how it
works and if they might
benefit from carbon credits.


Either workshop is free
and open to the public.
Contact Union County
forester Jay Tucker at (386)
496-2190 or Bradford
County forester Nicole
Howard at (904) 964-2461
to pre-register. Space is
limited.




Marriage has no guarantees.
If that's what you're looking
for, go live with a car battery.
-Erma Bombeck


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Nine students from Lake
Butler Middle School and
Union County High School
attended the 53rd annual
Florida State Science and
Engincerineeing Fair held April
16-18 in Lakeland.
Kelsev Harrison. Holly
Tucker and Moll% Parker of
I.BMS competed in the junior
di\ ision. Parker was awarded a
fifth-place Award of Merit for
the junior behavioral and
social sciences category.
EnIill Bro\\ in. Emilx Bland.
Lindsey Saunders. Andrew\
Framer. Rick\ Allen and Zach
Sxh\eat of unionn ('ouinty High
School competed in the senior
dix vision.
l.indse\ Saunders \xas the
fourth-place \\inner in senior
behavioral and social sciences.
Allen and S\\eat reccie\d a
special award from the Florida
Junior Academr of Sciences
for the best interdisciplinary\
team project. The award
included certificates. letters
and $120 from the science
acadcmi. Allen \\as also
a\xarded with the Pegasus
(old Scholarship from the
University' of ( central Florida
in Orlando. This scholarship is
a S 10000 axxard to be spread
out o\ecr4 cars.
Saunders. Allen, S\xeat and
Brad ('lark \\ill be competing
at the International Science
Fair to he held in Atlanta in
later thi s month.


in The Union

in our May


Name: _-
I Address: __

Phone:
Message:


I


Payment: I
Cash Check I
Credit: MC __ Visa __ Am. Ex.
Card Number:________ I
Name on Card:
Expiration Date: __ /__
- 3 digit Security Code:
--


County Times,

8th edition.


Your personalized message
can be faxed, mailed, or
emailed to us. We accept
Visa, Mastercard, American
Express, Checks and Cash.
All photos can 'be picked up
after publication. The size
of the ad will be 1 column
by 3 inches. No photo is

necessary to place ad.


Happy Mother's
Day!!

Dad. ;Zc & 5'ad





Mail:
P.O. Drawer A
Starke, FL 32091
Fax:
904-964-8628
Email:
ads@ bctelegraph.com


Sanderson Christian
Revival Center Bible School:
Sanderson Christian Rel i\al
Center adult Hible school is
held e\er\ Monda) night from
6:30-7:30 p.m. The church is
located at 14302 Sapp
Road/CR 229 S. For more
information, contact Stecve
Hutcheson at (386) 496-2512.
Sanderson Christian
Revival Center events: On
Saturday, May 3, from 8 a.m. -
2 p.m.. the church will hold a
car wash at Skip's Deli at the
corner of S.R. 100 and C.R.
231. All proceeds are to
benefit the church sign project.
Country Christian music
artist Danny Ra) Harris will


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g i Section B: Thursday, May 1, 2008




Regional News
News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region area



Bradford Relay for Life event set this Friday


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
'1'he annual American
Cancer Society Relay for Life
is important in that it raises
funds for support services to
those diagnosed with cancer,
but hopefully %what the event
will also accomplish is to
provide inspiration to those
Xwho have cancer and
encouragement to those who
do not know if they have
cancer.
This year's Relay for Life in
Bradford County starts at 6
p.m. on Friday, May 2, at the
Bradford High School track. It
runs through 8 a.m. on
Saturday, May 3.
Brett Hipsley, the American
Cancer Society's North
Central-area community
representative, said perhaps the
most important thing the Relay
for Life does is honor those
who have survived the disease.
Participation in the event by
survivors, who will walk the
opening lap, will also
hopefully send a positive
message to others. Hipsley
said cancer survivors, by
stepping forward and saying
they survived the disease, give
hope to others who have
cancer as well as convey that
the key to survival is early
detection.
"That message will
hopefully inspire others to do
the same," Hipsley said. "One
of the biggest ways to beat
cancer is early, detection."
Melanie Fuhrman, a breast
cancer survivor who is the
manager of the Walgreens in
Starke, said she wished people
would not be so afraid to see
their doctors.
"If you're diagnosed early
with breast cancer, there's a
93-percent survival rate,"
Fuhrman said. "You can't
ignore symptoms. If you have
pain in your body or
something's not right, you
have to go to the doctor and
find out why."
Breast cancer survivor
Nancy Odom, who works in
the finance department at
Bradford High School,
encourages women to have
mammograms done. The
importance of mammograms is
displayed on a poster on a wall
in her office.
"I am just the mammogram
lady of Bradford High
School," Odom said.
The Relay for Life, of
course, is a fundraiser. Money
raised through the event goes
toward such efforts as
advocacy legislation. For
example, Hipsley cited the
successful passage of
Amendment 4, which made all
restaurants in Florida smoke
free.
Money raised also goes
toward supporting programs
and services that benefit
people with cancer. One such
program, Hipsley said, is
"Road to Recovery."
"Drivers volunteer their time
and their car to take people to


and from their cancer
treatments," he said.
Another program is "Look
Good, Feel Better." It is for
women who are undergoing
radiation treatments and
chemotherapy. A
cosmetologist will consult with


women, free of charge, and
help match them with a
makeup kit (traditional
makeup is often not effective
for women going through
cancer treatments). The
program also provides wigs
and decorative head wraps..


Fuhrman said that is one of
the main reasons she is
involved in the Relay for
Life-because of the support it
helps provide to'those who are
going, or will go, through what
she has been through. Fuhrman
said she had plenty of support


from family and friends, but
some people don't have that.
"One of the biggest reasons I
decided to get involved with
the Relay for Life and the
American Cancer Societ\ is
because they're there for
people who don't haie that


II"I


. || .....1 9 D O WNnA . . .. . . .


support network," Fuhrman
said.
Odom said the service she
took advantage of was where
to go to purchase a wvig, but
there is so much more the
See RELAY page 2B


.m P, M ,,M1199 O-... ... . -


Arnieta Estelle Williams
Allen

Allen
celebrates
100th year
Arnieta Estelle Williams
Allen of Union County
celebrated her 100th birthday on
April 22.
Allen is a former employee of
the Union County school
system and in her youth was the
first African-American in Union
County history to register to
vote.
She is the daughter of the late
Callie and Onie Williams. She
celebrated the occasion with her
family.


-AUTO SALES


-I







Page 2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION May 1, 2008



Local breast cancer survivors remain positive


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
It can be such devastating
news to receive, but when
Melanie Fuhrman and Nancy
Odom were diagnosed with
breast cancer, they figured the
best way to deal with it was to
maintain a positive attitude and
employ a sense of humor.
"1 kind of freaked out for
about five minutes," Fuhrman
said, "but then said, 'OK, I
have to trust God in this and
have faith that everything's
going to be OK.'"
It was unsettling news for
Odom, too, when she was first
told she had cancer.
"My initial thought was I
was going to die," she said.
"Once I realized that was not
most likely going to happen, I
was much better with it."
In fact, Odom was able to
enjoy some laughs since that
.. diagnosis. She remembered
talking to the nurse practitioner
at the oncologist's office and
asking if she was going to lose
her hair during radiation
treatments. The nurse
practitioner said Odom would
lose her hair, but said the good
news was that she might be in
for a surprise when it grew
back because it might be a
different color or texture.
"Well, my son happened to
be with me," Odom said. "We
just burst out laughing because
I had no idea what my natural
hair color was anyway."
When she did begin losing
her hair, Odom said it made
her think of the song "Hair"
from the Broadway musical of
the same name. Her hair was
everywhere-all over the
house.
"You just try to keep your
sense of humor about that,"
Odom said. "When you think
about it, you find that things
like hair are really not that
important."
What Odom and Fuhrman
do feel 'is important is sharing


RELAY
Continued from p.1 B


their experiences with others
and to let people know that
cancer can be overcome. That
is why both will be
participating in the Bradford
County Relay for Life. The
event, sponsored by the
American Cancer Society, will
take place this Friday and
Saturday, May 2-3, at the
Bradford High School track
(see related story). It begins at


6 p.m. with a survivors' lap,
which Odom and Fuhrman will
both be a part of.
Fuhrman. the manager at the
Walgreens in Starke, would
like to see as many cancer
survivors in this area as
possible be a part of that lap as
well.
"I realize there are shy
people out there who just keep
to themselves," Fuhrman said,


Breast cancer survivor Melanie Fuhrman (right) is
pictured with Janice Frye, a fellow survivor and the
"driving force" behind the Starke Walgreens team's
fundraising efforts.


Florida Twin Theatre


All Seats $5.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451 *CLOSED MON & TUES*
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Starts Fri., May 2
Robert Downey Jr. in



... ,
Fri, 7:00, 9:15
Sat, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15
Sun, 4:30, 7:00
Wed-Thurs, 7:15


Sians Fri., Ma ) 2
Al Pacino in


NMIIMUITES

Fri, 7:05, 9:20
Sat, 4:45, 7:05, 9:20
Sun, 4:45, 7:05
Wed-Thurs, 7:30


Nancy Odom
"but I really hope that they at
least come out and walk the
survivors' lap and realize


they're not alone."
Being alone was something
neither Fuhrman nor Odom
had to worry about. They both
talked of the tremendous
support they received while
undergoing treatment.
Odom, who works in the
finance department at Bradford
High School, received support
from her family, including her
son Matt, who went to all of
her doctor's appointments with
her.
"When you're in a stressful
situation, you might not be
able to take in everything that
is said to you," Odom said.
"You're taking in a lot of
information. It's very helpful
for somebody to go with you."
Various family members
took Odom to her
chemotherapy sessions. Matt
was usually able to drop by as
well.


"Sometimes I went to chemo.
with three people," Odom said.
"I think they thought I was-
quite the brat at the:
oncologist's."
Odom's co-workers at
Bradford High School and her:
church family at First United
Methodist Church have all
been great with their support,'
as has Becky Dubolsky, a:
fellow cancer survivor. Odom.
said Dubolsky called her often ,
and was an inspiration to her.
"I could just see that Becky
was fine," Odom said. "She
went through it. I think just
seeing someone healthy and
functioning helps you so
much."
Fuhrman talked about how
her mother stayed with her and
how much help she received
from not only her mother, but
See SURVIVE page 1 2B


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Saturday 9-3 (904) 964-9826 ok. (904) 964-,W27 N 1 i.S t.


American Cancer SocietN
offers.
"They have so much helpful
information," Q,(?m S'id,.., r
"They're great."
SThe Starke Golf ania CounirN
Club will be sponsoring a
survivors' reception at the
BHS track from 5 p.m until 6
p.m. Survivors can also
register for the Relay for Life
during that time.
Anyone can attend the Rela\
f6r Life.
"We welcome everyone.,"
Hipsley said, while also
.. -reminding people that bic) cles.
skateboards and scooters % ill
not be allowed. Dogs, unless
they are service animals, %%ill
not be allowed either.
There will be many fun
activities taking place, the bulk
of which will take place
between 6 p.m. and midnight.
If you would like more
information on the Relax for
Life or the American Cancer
Society and its services, please
contact Hipsley at (352) 3-6
6866, ext. 5060, (888) 295-
6787, ext. 5060, (352) 21q-
2208 or (352) 336-3861. You
may also e-mail him at
brett.hipsley@cancer.org.


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May 1, 2008 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 3B


;: Mr. and Mrs. Domenic
Joseph McLeod

iillyard and
McLeod are
married
BRaina Renee Gillyard and
Iomenic Joseph McLeod were
riarried April 12, 2008 in Green
cove Springs State Park.
;The bride is the daughter of
"*annon James of Wildwood
a~d Moultrie and Christy
dillyard of Green Cove Springs.
Se is the granddaughter of
I4 rla and Paul White. The
bhide's siblings are Meagan
James, Austin James, Nicole
iillyard and Moe Gillyard.
,The groom is the son of
IJavid and Loretta McLeod of
keystone Heights. He is the
grandson of'George Hand and
tle late Millie Hand, and Sandra
aAd Calvin McLeod. The
groom's siblings are Kyle
McLeod, Lauren McLeod and
Niicole McKenzie.
SDeAna Adams performed the
ceremony and the bride was
given in marriage by her father.
!The bridal party consisted of
maid of honor Kimberly
Phillips and bridesmaids Tessa
Adams, Jessica Mills and Katy
Sayers.
The groom was attended by
best man Kyle Mcleod and
groomsmen Luke Wise, Joel
Johnson and Troy Johnson.
,A ., reception followed the
ctemify'. The feceptiofi was
held it the GreenCGove Springs
\\& ndni 's C 'l.ub "-" ....), "
Following a honeymoon trip
to south Florida, the couple will
reside in Keystone Heights.









Mr. and Mrs. Richard D.
Barnes

Raymond and
Barnes marry
Jerri Lynn Raymond and
Richard D. Barnes were married
on April 26, 2008, at their home
in;Lawtey.
tThe bride is the daughter of
Lynn Evans of Jasper and is a
graduate of Hamilton County
High School.
The groom is the son of
M'arilyn and Robert Crosier of
G.uetli Laager, Tenn., and is
employed by Gilman Building
Products in Maxville.
Samuel Bird gave the bride in
marriage and the ceremony was
performed by Louann Rigano.
Maid of honor was Samantha
Raymond.
The gown x\as designed by
the bride. The wedding color
theme was pink and ivory.
A reception followed the
ceremony at the couple's home.


Barbara R. Norman and
William R. Chapman

Norman and
Chapman are
engaged
Herbert and Ruth Norman.
residents of lrad4'iord County,
announce the engagement and
approaching miorriiice of their


daughter, 1Barbara R. Norman,
to William R. Chapman of
Starke.
The groom-elect is the son of
the late James Thomas
Chapman and Lena Mae
Chapman of Green Cove
Springs.
The date of the ceremony will
be announced at a later time.


Ambrosia Cortina-Morel
and Philip John Kistler

Cortina-Morel
and Kistler
engaged
Ari and William Cortina-
Morel of Starke announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Ambrosia Cortina-Morel to
Philip John Kistler, the son of
John Kistler of Ohio.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of the University of Florida.
The wedding ceremony will
take place on Sunday, May 4, at
11 a.m. at the Epping Forest
Yacht Club. A reception will
follow. Invitations are being
sent.


Laura Jean Gray and
Joseph Michael Hyde

Gray and Hyde
announce
engagement
Chip and Amanda Gray of
Melrose announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Laura Jean Gray to Joseph
Michael Hyde, the son of Joe
and Kaye Hyde of Tallahassee.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Florida State University and
is employed by Broadview
Assisted Living Facility in
Tallahassee.
The groom-elect is also a
graduate of Florida State
University and is currently
employed by Capital City Bank
in Tallahassee. He will, also be
reporting to spring training with
independent professional
baseball in May.
The wedding will take place
on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2008, in
Jacksonville at St. 'Marks
Episcopal Church.


Douglases to
celebrate
50th

anniversary
The children of Pete and
Ethel Douglas invite all friends
and family to attend their 50th
anniversary celebration on
Saturday, May 3. at Waldo
First Baptist Church's Life
Center from 2-4 p.m.
The family is requesting
your presence in place of gifts.


UMW offers
scholarships
United Methodist Women
of Starke First United
Methodist Church are offering
two $500 scholarships for the
2008-09 academic year.
Anyone enrolled in a post
secondary program may apply.
Forms may be secured at the
church office at 200 N. Walnut
St. (Jefferson Street entrance)
Deadline is May 22.

The man who is
dissatisfied with himself,
what can he do?
Henry David Thoreau
1817-1862, American
Essayist, Poet,
Naturalist.


Shuford and
McRae to wed
Saturday
Mr. and Mrs. Ken Shuford of
Lawtey announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Amber Michelle Shuford, to
Jeremy Scott McRae, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey McRae of
Starke.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Bradford High School and is
currently attending Santa Fe
Community College. She is
employed by Invision
Outpatient Imaging.
The groom-elect is a graduate
of Keystone Heights High
School and is employed by
Jacksonville Fire-Rescue.
The wedding will take place
on Saturday, May 3, 2008, at 6
p.m. at Camp Keystone. A
reception will follow, also at
Camp Keystone. All friends and
family members are invited to
attend.


Amy Thorne
and Adam Gifford


Thorne and
Gifford to wed
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick
Gifford of Lawtey announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their son, Adam
Gifford, to Amy Thorne of
Dublin, Va.
The groom-elect currently
resides in Sunrise and is a
mechanical engineer employed
by the Motorola Corporation.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Thorne of Hillsville, Va., and is
a seventh grade English teacher
min the Pulaski County school
system.
A summer wedding is being
planned for 2009.


BIRTHS:


Julee Kay Gunter and
Dustan Shawn Ricketson

Gunter and
Ricketson
to marry
Joseph and Glenda Gunter of
Raiford announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter, Julee
Kay Gunter, to Dustan Shawn
Ricketson, the son of Connie
Gibson of Perry.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Union County High School
and the University of North
Florida. She is currently
working toward a graduate
degree from the University of
Florida and is employed as a
special education teacher by the
Union County school system.
The groom-elect graduated
from Taylor County High
School and is employed by the
Florida Department of
Corrections.
The wedding ceremony is set
for Saturday, June 14, at 6 p.m.
at New River New
Congregational Methodist
Church. All family and friends
are invited to attend.


Gabriel DuWayne
Bridges


Gabriel Bridges
DuWayne and Jordaina
Bridges of Lake Butler
announce the birth of their son,
Gabriel DuWayne Bridges, on
March 18, 2008.
Gabriel joins siblings,
Leslie, David, Daniel and
Carmen.
Maternal grandmother is
Loretta Cagle of Lake City.
Paternal grandparents are
DuWayne and Pat Bridges of
Valley, Ariz. Paternal great-
grandmother is Ruby Berry of
Valley, Ariz.


Jackson Arlen Thames

Jackson Thames
Buddy and Stephanie
Thames of Starke, announce
the birth of their son, Jackson
Arlen Thames, on April 27,
2007, in Jacksonville.
Jackson joins a brother,
Reed Allen Thames.
Maternal grandparents are
Ronnie and Janine Sellers of
Starke.
Paternal grandparents are
Allen Thames of Owensboro,
Ky., and Ann and Clif Carver
of Lake City.
Maternal, great-grandparents
were the late Arlen and Susan
Gay of Jacksonville.
Paternal great-grandparents
are Ruth Harvey and the late
S.A. Harvey of Palatka.


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SN, i Merle Norman Cosmetic studio will offer facials, massages and foot detox.

Date: Saturday, May 10, 2008

l Time: 8:oo a.m. until 12:00 p.m.
Thc Bradfotrd C(ount\ Hecalth Department is having a Womcn's I Icalth Fair that's being held in
conjULntion with the Farmer's market. Thie event is located inside the Bradford (ountn I Icalth
De)partmecnt. Please come and bring VOLI mothers, sisters, \\wi\es or girlfriends along.
< We are honored to have as our distinguished guest the State Surgeon General, '>
Dr. Viamonte Ros, who will read the proclamation. ,
:, New River Community Health Care will be offering chicken
- i dinners for a $5.00 donation (chicken, beans, coleslaw and
f4 -^ roll). Pick up dinners from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00p.m.
7 HiOOA I LPAKTM H


Contact person: Bobbie Strickland
or Winfred Holland at 904-964-7732


Bradford County Health Department
1801 N. Temple Avenue
Starke, FL 32091


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Starke Rec.

Ed itorial/Opinion d tinsofba


Thursday, May 1, 2008 Page 4


Now for the good news!
Bradford County real estate is looking up
-"There's good news tonight." These tightening of mortgage money, a long
words were the nightly bylines of radio overdue move by banks and financial
commentator Gabriel Heatter while institutions. Financing continues to be
broadcasting from London during available, but purchasers are now required
World War II that brought comfort to to have excellent credit ratings, down
Americans, although some nights Heatter payments and reasonable expectations
had difficulty in finding good news to for a continued income. Minimum down
report. payments may be as low as 3 percent, but
After leading daily reports on the status more like 5 percent.
of real estate in the United States, arind.----ATn-othr factor of serious concern to real
especially.JrLFlorida-.and--Calif6fiia, it estate agents is the impact of inflation,
came as a surprise to find Bradford especially in the cost of gasoline, heating-
County real estate agents upbeat and fuels and other essentials, leaving people
confident that real estate in the local living on fixed incomes and salaried
market has seemingly turned the corner people less disposable money, not for
since the first of the year and is looking luxuries, but for everyday necessities.
up. Some families can no longer afford
Tom Smith, Charleen Gathright and house payments, especially those with
Susan Faulkner O'Neal are veteran real flex-rate mortgages that have increased
estate agents in the local market whose. dramatically. Those mortgages began
credentials are rock solid, and all three with a low rate of interest, and went up
report a detectable upturn in business, sharply. Reductions in rates are very
Is Bradford County a shining light in an slow in following the market down. But
otherwise gloomy picture? If so, why? homebuyers are not alone; renters are
Smith, an owner in Smith and Smith having difficulty in meeting monthly rent
Realty, says he has seen many ups and payments and owners of rental property
downs in real estate in the past 30 years, are facing problems.
and this period, while difficult, will pass. Bradford County has not experienced
In fact, he said, it has already moved construction of large subdivisions,
upward. He sees the downturn as an apartment complexes or speculative
adjustment period following excesses in homes, seemingly a disadvantage while
building and financing, other areas were booming, but in this
Smith said the industry was overdue for downturn in the industry, the lack of
corrections and time to review builders' activity has proven to be a blessing and
and investors' plans for new homes and real estate sales, while slowed, haven't
apartments to bring construction in line disappeared. As result of slowed sales and
with the market rather than continue foreclosures, the lending agencies have
"speculative" building. In talking about taken a breather from funding speculative
local conditions., Smith says he has not lost plans for real estate ventures, and all
any sales personnel to the slowed market, plans for development in Bradford have
nor is he cognizant of any foreclosures been put on hold.
among clients or acquaintances. Each of. the three real estate agents
"There were poor business decisions in reported commercial property as being
financial circles that had to be corrected, largely unaffected by the downturn in
including little or nothing down, and" residential properties, with prices holding
sales of homes beyond the buyer's ability ,.,teady with planned construction moving
'to pay," said Smith. on schedule.
This observation comes as no surprise, Old-timers-really, really old-timers'-
to older Americans who know from remember the Florida Land Boom of
experience that a too high debt ratio is the mid 1920s when Florida land sold
destructive to family life. Unfortunately, so rapidly deeds often changed hands
it seems, each generation has to learn several times before being recorded, and
for itself that living within one's means many people became millionaires (on
strengthens family life and living in a paper), but the bubble burst overnight
house one can afford surpasses a mansion and Florida land became worthless.
on a hilltop if payments are burdensome. Prior to WWII it wasn't unusual for
Faulkner, owner of Faulkner Realty, Florida land to sell for its taxes, and-
confirmed the confidence expressed by turpentine operators- often-acquired land
Smith in saying that the last quarter in, ..along-With turpentine leases. The virgin
2007 was flat, but sinesshas--imprtved stand 'of yellow pine in Bradford County
Tm recent weeks, and she is optimistic (including the western area which is now---
the worst of the downturn has passed Union County) was harvested between
for local homeowners and real estate 1890 and 1910, and cutover land sold for
agents. Faulkner knows of only one home $5 per acre.
being foreclosed, a situation in which The state of Florida paid $5 per acre for
a couple never made the first payment the bulk of the 20,000 acres comprising
after purchasing the house. They lived in the prison complex in Bradford and
the house less than a year, and the house, Union counties.
sold for less than the couple initially In, today's market, real estate took a
paid. Faulkner did not reveal who took hit and many people suffered losses, but
the loss, but in this case, it probably was essentially every loss can be attributed to
the lender. poor decisions by banks and other lenders
Gathright, owner of American Dream making loans that defied good business
Realtors, reflects the same outlook on sense from the get-go. Sometimes we
local conditions. She is concerned about must be protected from ourselves and
the outlook for the overall economy part of being a banker requires them to
and thinks the market will remain in stand in the door and insist on sound
the doldrums until after the election, business practices.
a view held by many economists. The By Buster Rahn,
three realtors see sales slowed by a TelegraphEditorialist


Starke Rec.
Dept. offers
kiddie camp
This summer, the Starke
Recreation Department wYill
offer a kiddie day camp for all
children ages 3-5. The camp
will be offered Mondays-
Fridays from 7 a.m. until 6
p.m. at the' Thomas Street
Park.
The camp begins June-16
and runs through Aug. 8. Lots
of fun, activities, arts and
crafts, weekly field trips and/or
movies and games- ill be
offered.
Slots are limited to 15
children, so register your child
today. Cost .is $200. An
installment/payment plan is
available, with fees required to
be paid in full by June 13.
For more information, stop
by the Starke Recreation
Department on U.S. 301 across
from Bradford High School, or
call (904) 964-6792.


We ain't the old


package X
301 ANYMORE!!


Fri-May 2 Fri-May 9
Starts at 9pm Starts at 9pm
TRIPLE IAMOND
SHOT BACK
Country & Country &
Southern Rock ,- Southern Rock
MONDAY FREE Pool and $5 Pitcherzs
TUESDAY $2 Well Drinks ~ 8pm til Midnight
.WEDNESDAY Ladies Night
THURSDAY Karaoke and $2 Longnecks
SATURDAY Bike "Day & Night" $2 Longnecks
SUNDAY Karaoke and $2 Bloody Marys
PACKAGE STORE & LOUNGE
OREN-7 DAYS A WEEK 11 AM -1 AM
17420 HWY 301 N STARKE 904-966-2229
(Across from the Bradford Fairgrounds)


May 20
A meeting for adult softball
will be held Tuesday, May 20,
at 6 p.m. at the Starke
Recreation Department.
Anyone interested in
participating in this league
should have a representative at
this meeting.
For more information,
please call the Starke
Recreation Department at
(904) 964-6792.

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ELECT



RANDALL


A tremendous


FOR
BRADFORD COUNTY SHERIFF

"Experienced Leadership with Character'


of Bradford


thanks to the citizens


County!
Your recent response to my campaign for Sheriff during
our local Fair was almost overwhelming. I was humbled at
the support shown for my candidacy and your excitement of
having a choice in the Democratic Primary of a qualified,
experienced and honest candidate for Sheriff. In every case,
your repeated encouragement is sincerely appreciated and I
look forward to hearing from all of you on ways we can
work together to make the Bradford County Sheriff's Office
an even more efficient and effective agency.

Elect
"Experienced Leadership with Character"

Elect

Randall Zipperer for Sheriff
Paid tlr iiand appro\cdl by Randall Zippercr fior Sheriff. Demoi t'i


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May 1, 2008 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 5B


OBITUARIES


Lillian Justice


Lillian Justice
LAKE BUTLER Lillian
Josephine Justice, 74, of Lake
Butler died on Sunday, April 13,
2008.
Mrs. Justice was born on Dec.
23, 1933, to the late James Cecil
Solano and Edna Mae Dixon. She
was a resident of northeast Florida
for the majority of her life.
She loved spending time with
her family and reading. She was
Lake Butler's best library patron.
Lillian loved her canine
companion, Sweetie.
Mrs. Justice was preceded in
death by her first husband, Sonny
LaHay, her second husband,
James L. Mace, her third husband,
Doug Justice, and her sister,
Christine Case.
Mrs. Justice is survived by:
daughters, Kaletyo Rogers
(husband Richard) of Starke and
Karen Sue Wincz (husband Bob)
of Hernando Beach; sons, James
L. Mace, Jr. of Atlantic Beach and
Jerrold L. Mace of Hudson;
brothers: Henry "Hank" Alex
Solano of Bowie, Texas and
Clifford Goodwin of Wichita
Falls, Texas; sisters, Marie
Hocutt (husband Bill) of Ponder,
Texas, Patsy Ann Chandler
(husband Eddie Ray) of Bowie
and Marie Katherine Case of
Bowie; four grandchildren, Kelli
Marie, Shelly Maree, Kerri
Monique and Keith L.; and three
great-grandchildren, Kendallynn
Johns, Katelyn Johns and Aston
Douglass.
A private memorial service will
be held at a later date.
Arrangements are under the care
of Archie Tanner Funeral Home of
Starke.
PAID OBITUARY


Agnes T. Seed


Agnes Seed
JACKSONVILLE Agnes T.
Seed, 83, of Jacksonville died
Wednesday, April 16, 2008.
Born in Glover, Vt., to Alfred
and Selena Valley on Oct. 3, 1924,
Ms. Seed worked for many years
as a cosmetologist in
Massachusetts. She was also a


certified nursing assistant at the
HolN Family Hospital in Methuen,
Mass.
Ms. Seed is survived by: her
companion and friend, Lorraine
Sabin of Jacksonville; a godchild,
Paula Belanger of Salisbury, N.H.,
and a close friend, Gail Martin of
Methuen, Mass.
Ms. Seed was preceded in death
by both of her parents and by her
brother, Edwin Valee.
A memorial mass will be held
on Saturday, May 17, in the
chapel of the Hardage-Giddens
Funeral Home in Jacksonville.
Interment in Ridgewood Cemetery
in North Andover, Mass., will be
held at a later date.

Anna Covington
STARKE Anna Covington,
95, of Starke died Thursday, April
24, 2008, at Shands Starke,
following an illness.
Mrs. Covington was a lifelong
resident of Starke, who attended
local schools and was a member
of Calvary Baptist Church and
New Hope Baptist Church. She
was a homemaker.
Mrs. Covington is survived by:
her niece and caregiver, Carolyn
Hampton of Starke, and her
special friend Elaine D. Haile.
Family hour will be held on
Friday, May 2, from 3-4 p.m. at
Haile Funeral Home in Starke.
The family will receive friends
from 4-8 p.m. Visitation will also
be held at the church one hour
prior to the funeral services.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Covington will be held Saturday,
May 3, at 11 a.m. at New Hope
Baptist Church with the Rev. Jake
Davis conducting the services.
Arrangements are under the care
of Haile Funeral Home of Starke.

Johnny Cox Sr.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS John
"Johnny" Edward Cox, Sr., 61, of
Keystone Heights died Tuesday,
April 22, 2008, at his residence
following an extended illness.
Born in Melrose on July 21,
1946, Mr. Cox was a lifelong
resident of this area. He served in
the Florida National Guard and
was a retired mechanic who
worked on automobiles,
motorcycles and airplanes. He was
of the Baptist faith.
Mr. Cox is survived by: his
wife of 37 years, Barbara Foster
Cox of Keystone Heights; sons,
Jason Cox of Keystone Heights
and John E. Cox Jr. of Theressa;
his mother, Margaret Elouise Cox
of Keystone Heights; sisters, Ann
Rains and Pat Hague, both of
Keystone Heights; his mother-in-
law, Mary Foster of Keystone
Heights; and one grandson.
Graveside services for Mr. Cox
will be held today, Thursday, May
1, at Keystone Heights Cemetery
with Frank Johnson conducting
the services. Interment will follow
under the care of Jones-Gallagher
Funeral Home of Keystone
Heights.

Ella Crawford
STARKE Ella Elizabeth
Crawford, 78, of Starke died on
Tuesday, April 22, 2008,
following an extended illness.
Mrs. Crawford was born in
Bradford County on Nov. 10,
1929, to Calvin and Ruby Carter
Glisson. She was a homemaker
and a retired store clerk. She was a
member of Laura Baptist Church.
Mrs. Crawford was preceded in
death by: her husband, James E.
Crawford; and a daughter, Joann
Crawford.
Mrs. Crawford is survived by:
sons, Michael J. Crawford of
Starke, Paul E. Crawford of St.
Augustibe, and Patrick M.
Crawford of Orange Park; sisters,


Dorothy Parker and Betty Starling,
both of Starke: a brother, Everett
Glisson of Hampton: six
grandchildren and two great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Crawford were held April 26 at
the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel with
the Rev. Lester Austin conducting
the services. Interment followed in
Kingsley Lake Cemetery under
the care of Jones-Gallagher
Funeral Home of Starke.

Jerry Crockrell
GAINESVILLE Jerrold
"Jerry" Lee Crockrell, 50, died
Saturday, April 26, 2008.
I Born in Starke on Jan. 7, 1958,
Mr. Crockrell has been a resident
of Gainesville for the past 26
years. He was the supervisor of
the grounds department at
Tacachale in Gainesville for 27
years. He was also a member of
the North Florida Street Rods
organization.
He is survived by: his wife of
27 years, Frances Whitaker
Crockrell; daughters, Tamera
Crockrell and Ashlee Crockrell,
both of Gainesville; his father, H.
John Crockrell of Starke; and
siblings, Michael Crockrell and
Vicki Tucker, both of Keystone
Heights.
Mr. Crockrell was preceded in
death by his mother, Dorothy
"Dot" Crockrell.
Graveside services were held
on April 29 with Pastor Gene
Keith conducting the services.
Interment followed in Crosby
Lake Cemetery under the care of
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of
Starke.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that donations be made to
Gainesville Pet Rescue 5403 SW
Archer Road, Gainesville, FL
32608, or Haven Hospice, 4200
NW 90"' Blvd., Gainesville, FL
32606.

Ronald Davis
STARKE Ronald Phillip
Davis, 71, of Starke died
Saturday, April 26, 2008, at
Acosta-Rue Center for Caring in
Jacksonville.
Born in Miami on Sept. 24,
1936, Mr. Davis was a longtime
resident of Starke. He was a
retired dental technician with the
Florida Department of
Corrections. He was a member of
the Florida Peace Officers
Association and was a competitive
marksman who won numerous
awards.
Mr. Davis is survived by: a
close friend, Victor Sorinne of
Alachua.
Funeral services for Mr. Davis
will be held privately at a later
date. Arrangements are under the
care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral
Home of Starke.

Bonnie Dorris
STARKE Bonnie Jean
Dorris, 77, of Starke died on
Tuesday, April 22, 2008.
Mrs. Dorris was born in Galltin,
Tenn., as the daughter of the late
Charles V. Burton and Bertha
Odem. She was a longtime
resident of Starke and a member
of the Sampson City Church of
God.
Mrs. Dorris was preceded in
death by: her husband, Billy 0.
Dorris; a daughter, Debra Jean
Dorris; and brothers, Oscar
Burton, Luther Burton and Paul
Burton.
Mrs. Dorris is survived by:
daughters, Brenda Fay Lee of
Starke and Pamela Jo Fowler of
Lake Park, Ga.; sons, Charles
Henry Dorris of Starke, Jeffery
Thomas Dorris of St. Petersburg
and Michael Dale Dorris of
Archer; 11 grandchildren; and 12


ereat-grand children.
Funeral services for Mrs. Dorris
were held April 25 at thic Sampson
City Church of God will the Rev.
(Gene Bass conducting thec
services.
Arrangements were under the
care of Archie Tanner Funeral
Services.

Amy Hutchings
GREAT MILLS, MD. Am'y
Latrelle Hutchings, 40, of Great
Mills, Md., died Saturday, April
26, 2008, in Hospice at Golden
Isles in Brunswick, Ga.
Ms. Hutchings was born in
Jacksonville to Linda Rigdon
Nelson and the late Ronald Milton
Sikes'on July 5, 1967. She spent
.the early part of her life in north
Florida.
Mrs. Hutchings is survived by:
her husband of 24 years, Kevin
Dewayne Hutchings of Great
Mills, Md.; a son, Niconna
Hutchings of Great Mills, Md.; her
mother and stepfather, Linda
Rigon Nelson and William Nelson
of Folkston, Ga.; brothers, Ronald
Sikes Jr. of Starke, Shane Sikes,
Brian Nelson of Wichita, Kan.,
and Dwayne Nelson of El Paso,
Texas; sisters, Wendy Bell of
Hilliard, Laura Reed of Folkston,
Ga., Nicki Sikes of Starke, and
Melissa White of Hilliard; and an
uncle, Ronnie Rigdon of Folkston,
Ga.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Hutchings were held on April 29
in the V. Todd Ferreira Funeral
Services Chapel in Macclenny
with Pastor William Anthony
conducting the services. Interment
followed at South Prong Cemetery
under the care of V. Todd Ferreira
Funeral Services.

Darrell Martin
NEWBERRY Darrell
Douglas Martin, 64, of Newberry
died Thursday, April 24, 2008, in
Starke.
Born in High Springs on Nov.
8, 1943, Mr. Martin was a 1961
graduate of Newberry High
School. He. served in the Army
National Guard and was the owner
of Touch of Green landscaping
company at St. Luke's Hospital in
Jacksonville. He recently retired to
become a cattle rancher.
Mr. Martin is survived by: his
daughter, Dana Martin of
Jacksonville; his son, Jeff Martin
of Orlando; sisters. Nancy M.
Rogers and Carroll Sue Mixon;
and brothers, Sidney Martin, Terry
Martin, Chuck Martin and Riley
Martin.
Funeral services were held on
April 29 at Union Baptist Church
in Trenton. Interment followed in
Union Baptist Church Cemetery
under the care of Milam Funeral
and Cremation Services of
N ew berry, ;"- :' ;* ... ... ... '* !t":'


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Bill Shipe
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
William "Bill" Shipe, 72, of
Keystone Heights died suddenly
on Monday, April 14, 2008, at
Shands Starke.
Born in Trenton, N.J., on July
15, 1935, Mr. Shipe moved to
Keystone Heights four years ago
from Jacksonville. He retired after
a career as a lineman, chief clerk
and dispatcher with the New
Jersey Power and Light Company.
Mr. Shipe is survived by: his
wife of 52 years, Barbara
Baremore Shipe of Keystone
Heights; daughters, Robin
Schaffer of Indiana, Dawne S.
Reeder of New Jersey, Bonnie
Fear of Georgia, Marcy Ann Shipe
of New Jersey and Diane
Armstrong of Pennsylvania; his
mother, Hazel Britton of Trenton,
N.J.; two sisters; one brother; six
grandchildren and three great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mr. Shipe
were held April 19 at Cole Funeral
Home in Cranbury, N.J. Interment
followed in Cedar Hills Cemetery
in New Jersey under the care of
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of
Keystone Heights.

Jaye Slater
WORTHINGTON SPRINGS
- Jaye Caldwell Slater, 84, of
Worthington Springs died
Tuesday, April 29, 2008, at
Windsor Manor in Starke
following an extended illness.
Mrs. Slater was born in
Mississippi and lived in Miami for
much of her life. She moved to
Delaware in 1957 and then moved
to Worthington Springs in 1990.
She was a homemaker and was of
the Methodist faith.
Mrs. Slater was survived by:
her husband of 66 years, William
M. Slater of Wothington Springs;
a daughter, Rebecca Frasca of
Baton Rouge, La.; sons, Richard
Slater ,of Newark, Del., and
Ronald Slater of Mt. Joy, Penn.;


and nine grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, three brothers and one
sister.
The family will receive friends
at Archer Funeral Home in Lake
Butler on Friday, May 2, from 10-
II a.m.
Funeral services for Mr. Slater
will be held on Friday, May 2, at
II a.m. in the chapel of Archer
Funeral Home in Lake Butler with
the Rev. Terry Dean Elixson Sr.
conducting the services.
Cremation will follow.

Hazel Warren
FRANKLIN, TENN. Hazel
Sapp Warren, 85, of Starke died
Monday, April 28, 2008 in
Franklin, Tenn.
Born in Bradford County on
Feb. 9, 1923, to Jake Sapp and
Vicie Norman Sapp, Mrs. Warren
moved back to Bradford County
from Jacksonville in 1979. She
then moved to Tennessee from
Starke five years ago.
She was a homemaker and a
member of Union Primitive
Baptist Church.
Mrs. Warren is survived by:
sons, Madison Dewey Warren Jr.
of Knoxville, Tenn., and Phillip A.
Warren of Nashville, Tenn.;
sisters, Margaret Reyes of
Jacksonville, Marie Tilley of
Hendersonville, N.C., and Selma
Ray of Franklin, Tenn.; four
grandchildren and two great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Madison Dewey
Warren Sr.
The family will receive friends
today, Thursday, May I, from 6-8
p.m. at Jones-Gallagher Funeral
Home in Starke.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Warren will be held Friday, May
2, at II a.m. in the DeWitt C.
Jones Chapel with Elder David
Crawford conducting the services.
Interment will follow in Crosby
Lake Cemetery under the care of
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home.


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Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION May 1, 2008


OBITUARIES Drip irrigation workshop will be helc


Chad Smith
HlAM 'ON Chad A
Smith. 34. of Hampton
Sunday April 27. 2008, at
residence.
Born in Gainesville on .iun
1973, to Donald and Wanda S
Smith, Mr. Smith was a life
resident ofl Bradford County.
was an auto mechanic and wa
the Mormon faith.
Mr. Smith is survived by:
parents, "Donnie" and Wa
Smith of Hampton; his long
companion, Stanley Crouch
Hampton; and brothers, Ran
Smith of Starke, and Do,
"'Lucky" Smith of Keyst
Heights.
Funeral services for Mr. Sr
will be held at a later date
arrangements under the care
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
Starke. In lieu of flowers,
family asks that donations
made to help meet fun
expenses. Send donations
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Ho
P.O. Drawer H, Starke, FL 320
or call (904) 964-6200.


Betty Tomlinsol
LAKE BUTLER B
Clark Tomlinson, 75, of L
Butler died Sunday, April
2008, at Kindred Hospital
Green Cove Springs following,
extended illness.
Born in Shreveport, La., as
daughter of the late Frank C
and Edna Gongre Clark, N
Tomlinson lived in Lake Bu
for most of her life. She wa
homemaker and a member of
Bible Baptist Church in Starke.
Mrs. Tomlinson is survived
her husband of 58 years, Fl
Tomlinson of Lake But
daughters, Kathy Lundy
Jacksonville and Betty Finley
Lake Butler; sons, Floyd Wa
Tomlinson of Heniger, Ala.,
David Tomlinson of Lake But
brothers, Charles Clark
Shreveport., La., and Kenn
Clark of Bath, Maine: sist
Bernice Simmons of Naeid
La., and Eva Sams of Hous
Texas; II grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
The family will receive frie
on April 30 from 3-5 p.m.
Archer Funeral Home' in L
Butler.
Funeral services for N
Tomlinson will be held to
Thursday, May 1, at 11 a.m
Bible Baptist Church, in Sta
with the Rev. Roger Wo
conducting the services. Intern
will follow in Mt. Zion Ceme
in Lake Butler under the care
Archer Funeral Home of L
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There w ill be a %workshop on
Tuesday May 6 that will
feature tours of lvwo cropping
systems on two locally owned
farms.
The workshop will begin at
the Franklin Farm in Lawtey at
5 p.m. and w ill then proceed to
Cognito Farm north of Starke
at 6:15 p.m. Topics include the
advantages of drip irrigation,
ho\w to install a small fertilizer
injection system, building a
customized fertilization
program and how to conserve
water by using Best
Management Practices.
Speakers include Jim
DeValerio (Bradford County
extension), Bob Hochmuth
(North Florida Research &
Education Center) and Eric
Simonne (UF/IFAS
Horticultural Sciences
Department).
The workshop is open to the
public. To register and get
directions to the workshop,
call the Bradford County
Extension Service at (904)
966-6299.
For many years, the
University of Florida/IFAS
Extension Service has actively
assisted farmers in growing
quality produce. In north
Florida, these efforts are
currently accomplished
through the UF/IFAS Small
Farms program, based at the
North Florida Research and
Education Center in Live Oak.
The Small Farms team works
with local county extension
personnel and other
appropriate specialists to
customize educational
programming to meet the
specific needs of local
growers.
Two farms in Bradford
County have recently adopted
drip irrigation for niche market
production. Both farms have
relatively small production
areas of less than one half acre
and are good examples of how
small, niche market producers


implementation team) and
DeValerio (Bradford County
extension agent).
Many farms in Bradford
County have soil with a
shallow hard pan that presents
rapid water percolation. As a
result, local farmers have had
an advantage over those who
farm on deep, sandy soils since
they do not require as much
irrigation. Despite having
traditionally rich water
availability, last year's drought
proved a trying season for
farmers who did not have drip
irrigation.
This was the case on the 80-
year old Franklin farm. For the
majority of the farm's history,
only natural irrigation was
utilized to produce
strawberries and field crops.


More recently, overhead
irrigation has been used for
frost protection and transplant
establishment for strawberries.
Ho\\ever, the strawberry
crop in 2007 was severely
impacted by drought.- The
overhead irrigation ran off the
bedding plastic and into the
row middles, feeding the
weeds or becoming lost to
evaporation. This circumstance
provided the perfect
opportunity to install a drip
irrigation system and to teach
water and fertilizer
management via drip
irrigation.
The Franklins planted their
strawberry crop on Nov. 4,
2007. To date, the drip
irrigation system has been used
to inject fertilizer when sap


can utilize water and/or 41( -, lr Player of thE
Mrs. nutrient conserving practices 5" Year
day, to efficiently produce their Lead'in
. at crops. These farms will serve .. Rebouner
arke as demonstration farms for "eo.u Award
rten area producers on May 6 so A 'r "
nent they can learn how to adopt .. / i High Point
tery these practices. The Small Scorer for
e of Farms team members working- ..~ Most Game
oa. ......,.on taesc t..t o denmnstralion ..., -- "
a rms include Hbchii'ulh
-.r..(truli-couniv ,",' v'erab'te '' R230 E (2 miles east of US-3CI) "-
production extension agent),
Mace Bauer (UF/IFAS Best
Management Practices


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test results indicated
necessary. Fertilizing
drip irrigation has


it was
using
been


beneficial to the Franklins
because the recent heavy rains
would have washed away
granular fertilizer had it been
applied at planting time.
Should drought conditions


I May 6
arise, the lhar\est \\ill not
stiller from a lack of afterer .
The water usage will be the
amount the crop needs \\ hen it
needs it.
C('ognito Farm is owned and
operated by Sandra "Sam" and
Jerry Williams. Cognito I arm
specializes in raising grass fed
beef, free-range chickens and
"natural," fresh market
produce. T'heN produce
specialty crops for the local
farmers market and the
community .
Samn and Jerry choose not to
sell certified organic produce.
However, they do not use
pesticides or chemical
fertilizers in their production.
During the of season, they
build up the organic
component of the soil to
increase the moisture-holding
capacity. They use raised beds
for selected crops and take
advantage of natural mulches
to help retain soil moisture. If
the crop needs additional water
they can use drip irrigation.
An added benefit to drip
irrigation on ('ognito Farm is a
decrease in disease pressure
since foliage is not saturated.
This is significant because they
do not regularly use

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.Anllne\ ( nc ril", ()l'nic -(' l; r Spence snil\r
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Mace Bauer helps install a drip irrigation system on the Franklin Farm.


21


MAY 777


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Safe K








May 1, 2008 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 7B


CRIME


Man steals
vehicle, tries
to outrun
deputies
A 24-year-old Hawthorne
man was arrested April 25 in
Bradford County after he led
deputies on a high-speed chase
for several miles.
James Timothy Ivey III ws
charged with stealing a 1998
Jeep that was parked at the
Speedville Community Park in
Melrose, according to Sgt.
Robert Smith. Deputies saw
Ivey travelling eastbound on
38th Avenue and attempted to
stop the vehicle, Sgt. Smith
said.
Ivey refused to stop and
continued to flee in the vehicle
with Sgt. Brian Davis and Cpl.
Thomas Sapp in pursuit. The
stolen Jeep travelled at speeds
in excess of 60 mph in the
residential area of Speedville.
At one point, the Jeep headed
directly toward the patrol
vehicle, Sgt. Smith said.
Sgt. Davis fired at the
vehicle, striking the rear tire.
While the Jeep was still in
motion, Ivey jumped out of the
driver's side window and
attempted to flee on foot, Cpl.
Sapp said. Ivey was ordered to
stop, but continued to flee until
Cpl. Sapp sprayed a chemical
agent in Ivey's face.
Ivey stopped resisting and
was placed in handcuffs.
During a search of the
vehicle, the deputies found a
plastic bag containing powder
cocaine on the floorboard.
Ivey was charged with two
counts aggravated assault on
law enforcement officer, grand
theft auto, possession of
cocaine, habitual traffic offender
driving while license
suspended, aggravated fleeing or
eluding, reckless driving and
resisting arrest without
violence, Sgt. Smith said.
Ivey remains in custody
under a $50,000 bond.

Man arrested
for. stealing
new doors
A 43-year-old Starke man
was arrested- April 21 for
stealing doors from
construction sites in the Reno
area.
Lafayette Nathaniel Chandler
was charged with multiple
counts of burglary, grand theft,
dealing in stolen property and
criminal mischief, according to
Starke Investigator James
Hooper. Between Feb. 21 and
March 21, Chandler stole the
doors from the sites on'the Dell
Street area, Investigator Hooper
said. He then traded the doors
for dope, Investigator Hooper
said. Two of the stolen doors
were recovered.
Bond on th.e charges was set
at $40,000.


Starke couple
charged with
stealing,
selling
property
A Starke couple were arrested
April 26 for selling stolen
property.
Brian Bailey, 33, and Julie
M. Bennett, 37, were charged
with driving a pickup truck to
property on Northeast 19th
Avenue, where they removed a
4x8 sheet of diamond-plate


aluminum, according to Sgt.
Wayne Mclntire. The
aluminum, valued at $475, was
taken to a recycling business
where it was sold for $29, Sgt.
McIntire said.
The two then drove to
Southeast 71st Street where
they entered a closed gate
posted with no-trespassing
signs, according to Deputy
Brian Waldorf. They removed
an- aluminum truck camper top
valued at $250, two aluminum
walkers valued at $100 and a
100-yard roll of galvanized wire
valued at $100. The stolen
items were taken to the
recycling business where the
two were arrested on the prior
offense, Deputy Waldorf said.
Bailey and Bennett were
charged with two counts grand
. theft, trespass and dealing in
stolen property.
They remain in custody, each
under a $25,000 bond.

Man arrested
for having sex
with teen
A 27-year-old East Palatka
man was arrested last week in
Bradford on three counts of
child molesting.
Timothy Paul Anderson was
charged with engaging in
sexual activity with the victim
who was 15 at the time, Cpl.
R. Watkins said. Between
March 1 and the time of his
arrest, Anderson admitted to
dating the victim for two
months. He said their
relationship became physical
during the last of March and
they performed sexual acts
several times, Cpl. Watkins.
said.
Anderson was charged with
lewd or lascivious molestation
upon a person under 16. His
bond was set at $100,000.
Anderson was also charged
by probation officers with
violation of drug offender
probation from Putnam
County.
The mother of the victim
was also arrested for child abuse
(neglect of a child), according
to Investigator Roger Crase.
The 27-year-old mother was
aware of her daughter's
relationship with Anderson.
The mother admitted to
allowing the two to date
without supervision,
Investigator Crase said.
The mother was released
from custody after a $5,000
surety bond was posted.


Recent
arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following indiViduals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights area) or Union County:
Alfred Eugene Griggs, 55, of
Keystone Heights was .,arrested
April 27 by Clay Deputy R.E.
Russell for aggravated assault
domestic and resisting law
enforcement without violence.
Griggs was charged with
threatening the victim with a
.22 caliber handgun., He refused
to cooperate with deputies until
they used a Taser.
Belinda Michelle Burch, 21,
of Panama City Beach and
Mark James Helmbrecht, 48, of
Starke were arrested April 27
by Starke Patrolman David
Schlofman for resisting an
officer without violence. Burch


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and Helmbrecht. locked
themselves in an apartment at
the Dempsey Motel. The
officer tried numerous times to
talk with them, but they
refused to. come to the door,
Patrolman Schlofman said.
They could be seen inside
through broken blinds in the
window, Patrolman Schlofman
said. Burch and Helmbrecht
remain in custody, each under a
$1,000 bond. Helmbrecht was
additionally charged with two
counts violation of probation
.with no bond.
Truin Lyvel Blye, 36, of
Starke was arrested April 25 by
Bradford Cpl. Thomas Sapp for
possession crack cocaine.
Approximately 3.9 grams of
crack cocaine were found in
Blye's vehicle during a traffic
stop on Old Lawtey Road, Cpl.
Sapp said. A $15,000 surety
bond was posted for Blye's
release from custody.
Carolyn P. Padgett, 53, of
Starke was arrested April 26 by
Starke Patrolman P.A. King
for possession of cocaine and
possession drug paraphernalia.
During a traffic stop at 5:38
a.m. the officer found cocaine
in Padgett's jeans' pocket. She
was a passenger in the vehicle.
After her arrest, the officer
asked her to remove her shoe,
where a glass crack pipe with
residue fell from her pants' leg,
Patrolman King said. Padgett's
bond was set at $20,000.
Daniel Gallegos, 19, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 23 by Clay for
possession of alcohol under 21.
Royce Riley Oglesby, 60, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 22 by Deputy Russell for
possession of drug
paraphernalia. Oglesby was
charged after the deputy found a
pipe, rolling papers and a push
rod with drug residue on the
kitchen table during an
investigation. Remain Henry
Cuffee, 28, of Hawthorne was
arrested for failure of sexual
offender to report address
change when he was found
inside Oglesby's residence,
Deputy T.R. Cotchaleovitch
said. Bond was set at $2,504.


Audrey Elizabeth Brown, 19,
of Keystone Heights was
arrested April 26 by Clay
Deputy M.P. Kirchner on a
warrant as a fugitive from
justice, military desertion.
Linnie C. Shepherd, 42, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 25 by Starke Patrolman
James Stutler on warrants for
uttering forged instrument,
.forgery of a bank check and
petit theft. Shepherd was
charged when police responded
to a disturbance at Krystal's.
Surety bonds totalling $4,500
were posted for her release from
custody.
Joseph Rocco Rivers, 43, of
Ocala was arrested April 25 by
Bradford Deputy Lori Jestes for
failure to appear violation of
probation possession drug
paraphernalia. Bond was set at
$4,000.
Ritocka Mekia Hinson, 27,
of Starke was arrested April 25


by Bradford Deputy Joseph
Jones on a writ of bodily
attachment for child support.
She may purge by paying
3,167.78.
Charles Talmadge Roberson,
21, of Keystone Heights was
arrested April 25 by Clay
deputies on warrants from
Putnam County for three
counts grand theft and dealing
in stolen property: Total bond
was set at $19,524.
Christina Stewart, 30, of
Florahome was arrested April
25 by Clay deputies on a
warrant for contempt of court.
Stephen Allen Dennis, 24,
of Hampton was arrested April
26 by probation officers for
violation of probation lewd
lascivious on child under 16.
Dennis violated his curfew.
Janice Brooke Watson, 33,
of Starke was arrested April 24
by Bradford deputies for failure


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to appear. Bond was set at
$2,000.


Hampton
woman
arrested
A 55-year-old Hampton
woman was arrested April 23
for domestic battery.
Glenda Green was charged
with scratching the victim
while he was gathering his
belongings from the home,
according to Patrolman S.
Donaldson. A $1,000 surety
bond was posted for her release
from custody.
Green. was again arrested
April 27 for violation of
injunction domestic violence,
Chief John Hodges said. Green
violated-a restraining order by
calling the victim on her cell
phone, Chief Hodges said. She
remained in custody without
bond.


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Page 8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION May 1, 2008


Recent arrests gives a perspective
in Bradford, Cancer gives Hatcher different perspective


Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights area) or Union
County:
Eugene Calvin McClain, 58,
of Green Cove Springs was
arrested April 25 by Bradford
Deputy Scott Konkel on capias
for trafficking in stolen
property, possession drug
paraphernalia and resisting
arrest without violence. A
$19,000 surety bond was
posted for his release from
custody.

Danielle Hewitt, 25, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 23 by Clay deputies for
contempt of court traffic
charge.

Traffic
Gretchen Marie Wilkinson,
29, of Lawtey was arrested
April 21 by Patrolman King or
driving while license suspended
or revoked (DWLS). A $500
surety bond was posted for her
release from custody.

Rhonda Lou Gray, 47, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 24 by Clay deputies for
violation of probation grand
theft with no bond. She was
also charged with DWLS.

John Perry, 23, of Raiford
was arrested April 22 by Clay
deputies on a warrant for
contempt of court DWLS.

Dale Johnson, 55, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
April 28 by Clay deputies on a
warrant for DUI.


May FHP
checkpoint
locations
The Florida Highway Patrol
will be conducting driver's
license and vehicle inspection
checkpoints during May in
Bradford and Union counties.
The checkpoints are as
follows:

Union County
C.R. 238 and S.R. 238 west
of Lake Butler, S.R. 121 in
Raiford, north of Raiford and
in Worthington Springs, C.R.
16 west of Starke, C.R. 18 west
of Worthington Springs, S.R.
231 south of Lake Butler, C.R.
229 north of S.R. 121, C.R.
231 Bradford/Union line.

Bradford County
S.R. 230 east of Starke, C.R.
100A east of Starke, C.R. 231
in Brooker, C.R. 225 west of
Lawtey, C.R. .225 at C.R. 227,
C.R. 229 north of Starke,
Speedville Road, C.R. 221 in
Hampton, Southwest 75th
Avenue west of Starke, C.R.
18 at C.R. 221, C.R. 18 in
Hampton, C.R. 225 east of
Lawtey, C.R. 225 at C.R. 229,
S.R. 16 west of Starke, Market
Road north of Starke, C.R. 18
west of Hampton, S.R. 227.


BY CLI FF SMNLLFY
Telegraphl S // Ill1'ii'er
Sometimes it's cas\ for us to
overlook the little things in
life, but Harr\ Hatcher III
finds himself pa ing more
attention to those thin gs after
being diagnosed w ith cancer.
Hatcher, w\ho is the iBradford
County superintendent oft
schools, learned he had cancer
in his tonsils and the Iimph
nodes in his throat in 2006. He
has undergone radiation
treatments and clihemotherap\,
and said today his strength and
energy le els are almost hack
to \where they were prior to his
treatments.
Yet Hatcher can think ahoult
the difficulties he had
swallowing at times. or the
simple act of standing up in
church to sing, only to find lihe
had no voice to do so.
"The little things that \\c
take for granted God really
made me aware of," Hatcher
said. "I'm thankful that he
did."
As a cancer survi\ or,
Hatcher said he plans to attend
this year's Relay for Life. The
event, sponsored by the
American Cancer Society, is
scheduled to start at 6 p.m. this
Friday, May 2, at the hBradford
High School track (please see
related story).
Hatcher's involvement in the
Relay for Life predates his
cancer diagnosis. He and his
family were involved in the
event after his mother, May,
died from cancer 1.1 years ago.
His mother's death had a
profound impact on his life.
Hatcher said. It made him
change his behavior and hoxw
he approached things in life.
However, Hatcher said he
began slipping back into the
rat race again, forgetting that
'there was more to life than
that. He feels his own cancer
diagnosis two years ago was
God's way of giving him
another reminder on how he
should live life.
Hatcher said he's trying to
take advantage of that, even
using his own experiences as a
way to minister to others.
"I just prayed that this would
make me look at my life and
live it to the fullest every day,"
he said.
Hatcher first suspected
something was not quite right
with his body when he felt a
lump in his neck. He described
it as the size of a little English
pea. He waited for it to
disappear after a week or two,
but it did not.
Hatcher's doctor first
suspected it was the result of
an infection, but the lump
never did go away. Hatcher
was referred to an eye, ear and
nose surgeon. He went through
a quick exam and was then
questioned by the surgeon. She
asked him if he felt any pain.
The only pain, Hatcher replied,
was in his throat when he
yawned.
The surgeon asked Hatcher
what he thought it might be.
Though he couldn't tell her
why,, he responded that he
thought he had cancer. She
agreed and scheduled a biopsy,


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which confirmed that he had
cancer.
Hatcher went to see a
radiologist. Her
recommendation w'as for him
to undergo radiation and
chemotherapy treatments. He
could undergo surgery and
perhaps avoid radiation and
chemotherapy, but the
radiologist did not recommend
surgery because it could've
disfigured Hatcher and created
some problems for him. Her
top concern for Hatcher was
the quality of life he would
have alterw'ard.
"You learn a deep
appreciation for that," Hatcher
said. "If you survive the
cancer, but don't have the
capacity to live life, it sheds a
different light on it a bit."
Within 10 days to two weeks


of his diagnosis, 1-latchIer
began treatments.
"Every day I went for
radiation for almost eight
weekss, hlie said. "One da\ a
week, I went for chemo."
Hatcher admitted lie's kind
of a private person, but when
he went for chemotherapy, he
found himself in a room with
10 to 15 other patients, all
sitting side by side. He sawm all
kinds of people. Some were
sicker than he was. Some
suffered more adverse effects
from their treatments.
"It's a real eye-opener,"
Hatcher said. "It's a \ ery
humbling experience. It makes
you very grateful for a lot of
things you took for granted."
Hatcher remembered one
man who had almost the same
exact cancer as he did, yet that
man was not handling his
treatments as well as Hatcher.
The man's wife asked Hatcher
what he was doing to be able
to handle the treatments as
well as he was.
Hatcher did not know that he
was doing anything differently.
He just knew that he had a
tremendous amount of support,
which was very helpful. That
support came from his family,
of course. He gave a lot of
credit to his wife, Joann,
saying it has to be difficult for
spouses to be supportive while
at the same time being fearful
that they will lose their
husbands or wives.
Support, though, came from
outside of his family as well.
"I really felt like the
community supported me in


prayer lihe said. "1 remember
people coming up to me and
saying, 'You must feel the
prayers, Harry.' 1 did. I still
do."
What also helped Hatcher
was the way he looked at his
situation. He has a strong faith
in God, but he said other
people with strong faiths do
not live through their cancer
treatments. True faith, Hatcher
said, comes in trusting God, no
matter what the outcome of a
situation is.
Hatcher remembers a news
story he read about a man in
his 40s or 50s who had
terminal cancer.
"What he said was, T"'ni
either going to he healed-tIhe


word'ss going to let me live
here a little bit longer-or I'm
going to die and go to heaven.'
He said. '"Either way, it's going
to be all right.'"
Hatcher goes to see his
doctors every four months now
(hlie was seeing them every
month), but hlie admitted he
does not \wake up in the
morning thinking about how'
lie has gone through cancer.
Instead, lie tries to keep
thinking about his life and
living it the way he thinks God
wants him to.
"It's eas) to lose your
focus," Hatcher said. "It's easy
to lose the lesson that you've
learned. I just pray that I don't
lose the lesson."


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May 1, 2008 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 9B


Indians'
season ends 1
game shy of
Final Four
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Defending Class 3A state
champion Trinity Prep took
advantage of two errors, six
walks and one hit batter to
score seven unearned runs in
handing the Keystone Heights
softball team a 10-2 loss in the
regional finals on April 29 in
Winter Park.
Trinity Prep (17-8) will now
play a state semifinal game
against either McKeel
Academy or St. Petersburg
Catholic on Monday, May 5.
Keystone ends its season with
a 20-9 record.
The Indians had six hits
against Trinity Prep, including
a solo home run by Kari Minor
in the seventh inning. It was
:Minor's second home run of
,the season-the first occurred
in the District 6 semifinals
against Union County.
Keystone scored its first run
in the third inning. With two
outs, Cortney Casas and
Jessica Knight each reached on
a single. Sam Sibley then hit
the ball right back up the
middle. Trinity Prep tried
unsuccessfully to throw Casas
out at home, but did get Knight
out at third to end the inning.

Tornadoes
shut out by
Crusaders in
quarterfinals

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Bradford entered the Class
4A regional softball playoffs
having won five of its last nine
games, but host Bishop Kenny
handed the Tornadoes their
second straight shutout in a 6-0
quarterfinal loss on April 22 in
Jacksonville.
The Tornadoes (11-16) got
just two hits off of Bishop
Kenny pitcher Brittany Eppley,
who recorded 10 strikeouts.
Eppley also helped her
team's cause at the plate,
hitting a two-run home run.
Bishop Kenny (16-8) would
go on to lose 5-1 to Baker
County in an April 25
semifinal game.
Baker County (23-3), which
beat Bradford 4-0 for the
District 3 championship,
played Navarre (19-5) this past
Tuesday in a regional
championship game.

Bradford Pop
Warner sign-
ups are Sat.
The Bradford County Pop
Warner Association will hold a
registration day this Saturday,
May 3, at the Bradford County
Fairgrounds from 9 a.m. until
noon.
Registration is open to
children 5-13. The cost is $100
for football players and $150
for cheerleaders.


Tori Jolley,
shown taking a
strike, would
"deliver the
game-winning
hit for
.,"Keystone in the
\ .regional
semifinals.







KH goes 11 innings

to earn finals berth


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Tori Jolley made several key
defensive plays in extra
innings, then delivered the
game-winning hit in the
bottom of the 11'h to give the
Keystone Heights softball
team a 2-1 victory over
visiting Fort White in a Class
3A regional semifinal game on
April 25.
The win put the Indians in
this past- Tuesday's regional
championship (see related
story), while Fort White,
which won its first-ever
postseason game to advance to
the semifinals, ended its
season with a 17-9 record.
It was a game highlighted by
quite a duel between pitchers
Jessica Knight of Keystone
and Taylor Douglass of Fort
White. Hits were hard to come
by, with Keystone having just
three until Jolley's single in
the I 1'". Cortney Casas, who
was on first with two outs,
never hesitated as she rounded
second on Jolley's hit. The
throw to third got away from
the third baseman, allowing
Casas to head home and score
the game's third run.
"We knew we could do it,"
Keystone head coach Kathy


Smith said. "They came
through, but I about had a
heart attack."
The outside fastball Jolley
got a hold of wasn't even the
pitch she was expecting.
"I was looking for a
changeup, honestly," she said.
Jolley said Fort White's
Douglass kept her and her
teammates off balance with a
"nasty" changeup that came
right down the middle of the
plate. The Indians were
expecting Douglass to work
the outside of the plate more,
Jolley said.
Douglass' counterpart did
not do so bad herself. Knight
allowed just seven hits and no
walks. She struck out 11.
"She definitely got better (as
the game went on)," Smith
said of Knight, who allowed
three hits in the final seven
innings. "She wanted it bad."
Fort White did have two hits
in extra innings, but could
have possibly had more if not
for some fine defensive work
by the Indians. That included
Jolley snagging a low line
drive just inches off the ground
for an out in the eighth.
"Yesterday I couldn't have
See KHHS, p. 11B


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BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
He had hopes of going
higher, but the bottom line is
Bradford High School
graduate Letroy Guion was
taken in this year's NFL draft,
which was all he was asking
for.
"I'm just happy to have the
opportunity," Guion said.
Guion, a defensive tackle
who played three years at
Florida State University, was
selected in the fifth round
(152"d selection overall) by the
Minnesota Vikings. He leaves
for Minneapolis today, May 1,
where he will meet with
coaches and the team's other
rookies, tour the city and
participate in a three-day mini-
camp.
"I'm just going to go in,
work hard and play football
like 1 know how to play
football," Guion said.
Guion is the first Bradford
County native taken in the
NFL draft since Larry Shannon
was drafted in the third round
by the Miami Dolphins in
1998. Guion said when he first
declared his intention to enter
the draft, he heard he could
possibly go in the first round,
with one Web site predicting
he would be taken by the
Pittsburgh Steelers with their
first-round pick. Guion said he
was initially rated as the
fourth- or fifth-best defensive
tackle in the draft.
"I don't know what


Florida State player and Bradford High School
graduate Letroy Guion (number 93) is shown
pressuring an opposing quarterback. Guion was
taken in the fifth round of the NFL draft by the
Minnesota Vikings. Photo courtesy of FSU Sports
Information.


happened (after that)," he said.
His performance at the NFL
combine could've hurt his


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Page 10B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION May 1, 2008


Bradford'


Smyth just misses


out on state championship


BY CLIFF SMELLY
l'/ legra'' l h Stif lI'riler
Bradlford High School's
Jennif'er Sm\th earned t\\o
medals at tllie Florida High
School Athletic Association
Track and Field Finals for the
second straight \ear and
narrowly\ missed claiming the
state championship in one
e\'nt.
Smv\th competed in both the
long jump and the triple jump
at the April 26 finals, which
\\were held in Winter Park. She
was runner-up in the triple
jump with a distance of
38'2.5", which tied her
personal record. Champion
Gissell Warner of Chaminade
had a jump of 38'5".
Third place went to Briana
Santiago of Gulf Breeze, who
had a jump of 37'1.25".
In the long jump, Smyth was
third with a distance of 18'7".


Jennifer Smyth earned
two medals and almost
captured a championship
at the state track and
field finals.


That left her trailing champion
Sonnisha Williams of Raines,
who had a jump of 19'7.5",
and runner-up Jenicia
McFadden of Cocoa Beach,
who had a jump of 18'9.25".
"I'm really proud of how she
did," Bradford coach John
Loper said. "She represented
the school well."
Smyth earned medals in both
the triple jump and long jump
at last year's finals.
The only other area athlete
competing at the' finals was
Nathan Buchanan of Keystone
Heights. Buchanan competed
in the 800m, missing out on a
medal with a seventh-place
finish (the top six finishers in
each event earn medals). He
had a time of 1:58.66, which
left him trailing sixth-place
finisher Blair Beeler of Crystal
River, who had a time of
1:58.38.


Keystone Heights baseball players pose with the District 6-3A championship
trophy. Pictured (1-r) in the front row are: Dustin Packham, Robbie Latner, Austin
Alvers, Nick Reimer, Colton Crews, Andrew Secules and Scott O'Steen. Pictured in
the back (1-r) are: Brantley Lott, C61le Stanford, Kyle Cravey, Zach Davis, Ryan
Latner, Brett Anderson, Tori Ward (manager), Chase Chambers, Cole Belote and
Clayton Mosley.


Indians defeat Tigers 6-4 to


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i claim District 6 championship


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Back-to-back hits by
Clayton Mosley and Robbie
Latner scored two runs in the
bottom of the sixth inning to
lead the Keystone Heights
baseball team to a come-from-
behind 6-4 victory over Union
County in the championship
game of the District 6-3A
tournament, which was played
April 24 in Crescent City.
'Union defeated Keystone for
last. year's district
championship, but this year
Keystone earned the right to
host a regional quarterfinal
game. The Indians hosted P.K.
Yonge this past Tuesday,
while the Tigers traveled to
play Williston.
It was starting to look as if
the Tigers would make it two
straight district championships
in a row over Keystone. The
Indians trailed 4-2 entering the
sixth, but three straight walks
given up by two Union
pitchers loaded the bases with
two outs. Mosley ripped a
double into center field that
scored two runs and tied the
game. Latner then hit a single
to the same location, which
brought home another two
runs.
"We finally were able to get
the hit when we needed it,"


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Keystone head coach Alan
Mattox said.
The rest was left up to
Keystone pitcher Kyle Cravey.
He did give up a one-out single
to Zeke Scaff in the top of the
seventh, but he recorded a
strikeout and forced a
groundout to end the game.
In two innings of relief,
Cravey (2-0) gave tip two hits
and struck out four in earning
the win.
"He's really been a godsend
for us this year," Mattox said
of Cravey, who has thrived in
the role of closer. "We
purposely held him out (of the
semifinals on April 22) just to
make sure he was fresh (for the
championship game)."
Three Union pitchers,
however, combined to give iup
10 walks, which eventually
cost the Tigers in the end.
"You can't do that against a
good team," Union head coach
Brian Tomlinson said.
"(Keystone's) obviously a
good team."
Still, Tomlinson could not
say enough about the effort of
Union starter Thomas Cason.
Cason is just a sophomore, but
he worked his way out of
several jams without giving up
runs. That included the first
inning, in which Keystone had
runners at the corners with one
out.
"He did a remarkable job,"
Tomlinson said.
Just as Keystone rallied with
two outs, Union took an early
lead with two outs in' the top of
the first. Kaleb Windham hit a
double, which was followed by
a home run over the fence in
right-center field by Mason
Dukes.
It has been that kind of
season for Dukes, who, like
Cason, is just a sophomore. He
has been the Tigers' leader in
RBI the entire season and he is
batting over .300. The home
run was his second of the


season.
"He has a beautiful swing
from the left side," Tomlinson
said.
After Cason worked his way
out of a jam in the first inning,
he found himself in another
one in the second. Keystone
had two runners -on with one
out. Cason forced Ryan Latner
to fly out for the second out,
but the next batter, Andrew
Secules, hit a ball back to
Cason, that caromed off the
pitcher's foot. Scaff, at
shortstop, was able to field the
ball, which resulted in the
Tigers recording the inning's
final out.
Keystone scored -its first run
with two outs in the fourth.
Ryan Latner singled, the
scored on a double by Secules.
The Tigers increased' their
lead to three in the fifth. Lead-
off batter Ryan Liptrap
reached on a passed ball third
strike. That was followed by a
single by Scaff. Keystone then
threw the ball away on a pick-
off attempt at second, which
allowed Liptrap to "score;
makingit a 3,1,game., S-caff,-
later scored on a ball put into'
play by Windham.
Keystone answered with a
run in the bottom of the inning.
The 'Indians loaded the bases
with no outs on two walks and
a single. Robbie Latner's pop-
up to shallow center field
dropped, allowing Scott
O'Steen to score.
The Tigers would record two
of the inning's outs by
throwing runners out at home.
The third out was recorded
when catcher Windham, after a
wild pitch, flipped the ball
back to Cason, who tagged a
runner out at home.
Union got off to a good start
in the sixth when Cason
singled off Cravey to lead off
the inning. Cravey would then
See DISTRICT, p. 11 B


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May1 "


Bradford

season ends

in districts
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Jernard Beard homered
twice, but it was not enough
for the Bradford baseball team,
which saw its season come to
an end in a 7-3 loss to
Ridgview in the quarterfinals
of the District 3-4A
tournament on April 21 in
Middleburg.
Beard's second home run, a
two-run shot, allowed
Bradford (8-17) to tie the game
at 3-all in the fifth inning.
Ridgeview, though, would
score four runs in the bottom
of the sixth on four singles and
a walk.
Bradford coach Lamar
Waters said one of those
singles appeared to have hit
one of the Panthers' base
runners, which would have
resulted in an out. An appeal to
the umpires was unsuccessful.
Another hit in the sixth
inning was a two-hopper on
which the ball bounced 25 feet
in the air on the second hop,
* Waters said. Two runs scored
on that play.
"It was weird," Waters said
of the way things played out.
"We had nine hits and didn't
make any errors. We hit 'five
doubles and two home runs."
The Panthers went up 3-0 in
the second inning on three
singles and a double.
Beard hit a solo home run in
the third for Bradford's first
run, before adding his second
homer of the game one inning
later.
Beard finished the game 2-
for-4, while Trey Winkler was
3-for-4 with two doubles. John
Ryan Palladino was 2-for-4
with a double.


Local drivers

finish at top

or near top

April 26
Two Bradford County
drivers won their classed,
while two other local drivers
finished as runners-up during
action at Columbia
Motorsports Park on April 26.
Jason Garver earned the win
in the Super Late Model class,
while A.C,,Morrow topped, the-
V-8 Bombers. Earning second-
place finishes were Charlie
Seroki of Union County in the
Sportsman class and John
Roling of Bradford County in
the Pure Stock class.
Bradford's Doyle
Boatwright placed third in the


Super Late Model class, while
Bradford's Jimmy Andrews
was fifth. Bradford drivers
Mark Nicklas and Tim
Alldredge were fourth and
fifth, respectively, in the Pure
Stock race.
Complete results, by class,
were as follows:
Super Late Model-
Garver, Eddie Gainey,
Boatwright, Carl Yeoman and
Andrews.
Sportsman-Jeff Prescott,
Seroki, Nevin Gainey, Brad
Fiene, Mike Marcellino, Brian
Hull, Sean Monaghan and
Clint Clark.
Pure Stock--Wesley
Keller, Roling, Randy O'Neal,
Nicklas, Alldredge and Willard
Driggers.
Southern Welterweights-
Tony Smith, Jerry Heflin,
Bruce Menger, Harvey
Johnson and John Parsons.
V-8 Bombers- Morrow,
Eric Hofmann, Shawn
DeSotle, Mark Chinell, John
Shipp, Beverly Harry and
Curtis Harry.
Hornet "A"- Bert
Daugherty, Don Davis, Josh
Wise, Wesley Daugherty,
Brian Hull, Raurk Hanover,
Tony Kuhr and Danny
Brickert.
Hornet "B"-Cliff Suber,
Anthony Gerhold, Shawn
Creech, Don Cruce, Curtis
Harry, Carl Taylor and Jerry
Navin.

Keystone to

host British

soccer camps
United States soccer
company Challenger Sports
has been invited to hold one of
its nationwide British soccer
training camps in Keystone
Heights during the week of
June 2-6 at Twin Lakes Park.
The camp will run Monday
through Friday, and each child
will be coached by a member
of Challenger's British
coaching staff, flown to the
U.S. exclusively to work on
these programs. This camp is
just one of 1,600 that
Challenger Sports is running
throughout the U.S. and
Canada for a record-breaking
92,000 boys and girls of all
ages.
Each day the children will
practice and master new
individual skills and
understand small-group and
team tactics. Campers will also
scrimmage each day in the
always-popular Camp World'
Cup.
Challenger has also teamed
up with restaurant chain Mr.
Goodcents Subs and Pastas to
introduce a new and much
needed element to the young
athletes on health and


nutrition. Challenger has
created a fun and interactive
way to help the campers learn
how important it is to cat a
balanced diet. Campers will
get to design and draw their
own healthy sandwich,
selecting a balance of
ingredients from each of the
food groups.
The most popular part of
each camp is the Camp Word
Cup. The coaches use this
daily tournament to teach the
players about life, customs and
traditions of other countries.
The campers are asked to
make up cheers, bring flags,
dress up and learn as much as
they can about the country
they represent.
British Soccer camp sessions
are offered for the following
ages: 4-5, 5-7 p.m., and 6-18,
5-8 p.m. The cost for 5-7-year-
olds is $84 and $99 for 6-18-
year-olds.
Teams are also welcome to
attend and receive a week of
focused instruction to prepare
them for the fall season.
Each camper will receive a'
camp T-shirt, soccer ball,
player evaluation and end-of-
camp gift.
To sign up for the camp,
either visit
www.challengersports.com or
contact Phil Nash at (800) 432-
7506.



DISTRICT
Continued from page 10B

strike out three in a row.
Keystone starting pitcher
Secules gave up four hits and
three walks, while striking out
six.
The game had only three
multiple hitters: Union's Scaff,
who was 2-for-3 and
Keystone's Mosley and
Robbie Latner, who were 2-
for-3 and 2-for-4, respectively.

Indians, Tigers
record big wins in
semifinals
Keystone and Union each
had an easy win to get to the
district championship, getting
strong performances from their
pitchers.
Mosley gave up three hits
and two walks, while striking
out 16 in Keystone's 8-0 win
over Pierson Taylor. Scaff
gave up four hits and two
walks, while striking out six in
Union's_ 12-3 win over
Interlachen.
The Indians scored all the
runs they would need in a
three-run second inning. They
would go on to score two each


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Scheduled Lawn and Landscape
Maintenance for the New River
Solid Waste Association (NRSWA),
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Florida on State Road 121 in Union
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4/24 2tchg 5/1
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Bradford County Board of
County Commissioners will hold their
regular meeting on Monday, May 5,
2008 at 9:30 a.m. in the County
Commission Meeting Room at the
Bradford County Courthouse. The.
Calendar of Meetings and Agenda
for each meeting may be found on
the County's website at
www.bradford-co-fla.org or may be
obtained from the County Manager's
Office in the north wing of the
Courthouse.
5/1 ltchg


in the fifth and si\th innings.
Union scored eight runs in
the second inning of its w\in.
getting RBI singles from Scaff
and Liptrap.



KHHS
Continued from page 9B

made that play, I don't think."
Jolley said.
Jolley has received some
extra attention in recent
practices to shore up her
defense.
"We've been really working
with her," Smith said. "We're
very proud of her."
It appeared that Casas would
score the game's first run
when she led off the bottom of
the third with a triple.
However, she was thrown out
at home when Knight hit a
grounder to Fort White
shortstop Jordan Spires.
Knight, though, would
eventually round the bases to
give the Indians a 1-0 lead.
She stole second and moved to
third on a passed ball with just
one out. Sam Sibley, who
reached first by drawing a
walk, attempted to steal
second. She was thrown out,
but while Fort White was
making the plate, Knight was
on her way to crossing home
plate to give her team the lead.
Fort White tied the score in
the 'fifth. Kayla Williams
reached on a fielder's choice
and scored on a single by
Alison Wrench.

Indians score 6 in
fifth to beat P.K.
Keystone scored all of its
runs in the fifth inning-which
included a three-run triple by
Chandler Singletary-to take a
6-2 win over P.K. Yonge in a
regional quarterfinal game in
Gainesville on April 22.
Casas, Sibley and Jolley all
hit doubles in the fifth, with
Casas scoring Keystone's first
run off of Jolley's hit. Sibley
came home on a single by
Alyssa Velazquez to give the
Indians a 2-1 lead.
Knight drew a walk to load
the bases, which was then
followed by Singletary's triple.


Singletary was brought home
with Keystone's last run on a
single by Ashlee Cirigliano.
Sibley finished the game 3-


GUION
Continued from page 9B

quadriceps injury, which
resulted in a 40 time of 5.3. At
pro day at FSU after the
combine, Guion posted faster
times.
Bradford High School head
football coach Steve Hoard
said it just shows the ability
Guion has if hlie's healthy. The
coach said nagging injuries
prevented Guion from
reaching his full potential at
FSU.
"Whenever. he wasn't
injured, he was spectacular,"
Hoard said.
Many media members said
Guion would benefit from
playing his senior year at FSU,
but Guion said he made the


for-3, while Casas was 3-for-4.
Knight earned the win,
giving up three hits and
striking out five.


move he felt he needed to
make.
"I'm trying to help my
family out as much as I can,"
he said.
Guion started eight of 12
games during this junior
season at FSIJ. He made 31
tackles (17 solo), had one
quarterback sack and
recovered two fumbles.
Hoard said Guion is in an
ideal situation in that he gets to
play behind Pro Bowl tackles
Kevin Williams and Pat
Williams. That will give Guion
a chance to learn the game
from two of the game's best,
Hoard said.
Guion has a chance to make
a big impact, Hoard said. The
key is avoiding injuries.
"They got a steal if he can
stay well," Hoard said. "It's a
special opportunity for him."


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Page 12B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION May 1, 2008


SURVIVE
Continued from p.2B
from her husband and children.
"'If I had not had the support
fI'rom m family, I don't know
how I would've made it
through as well as I did,"
Fuhrman said.
Fuhrman's best friend,
Madeline, has been very
helpful as well. She has taken
Fuhrman to chemotherapy
treatments and still does today
if Fuhrman's husband, Mike,
has to work.
"I'm very blessed," Fuhrman
said.
Aside from sharing a
tremendous support system,
both women had no idea they),
had cancer when they received
their diagnoses. Odom, in
August 2003, simply decided it
was time for 'her to start having
mammograms on a regular
basis. She had had only one
before.
"I suspected and detected
nothing," she said, "but I had
decided I was going to do
better about this, so I made an
appointment."
The doctor told Odom she
probably had breast cancer and
scheduled an appointment for
her with a surgeon the
following week. She
underwent a biopsy, which
was followed soon afterward
by a radical mastectomy.
Fuhrman did discover a
lump in her breast, which
prompted her to go to the
doctor in April 2007.
However, she had had lumps
develop before from non-
cancerous cysts, so she
admitted she wasn't panicky
about the situation. She never
thought she had cancer.
Coinciding with the lump
was a sharp pain that shot
through her arm. She knew
that was not a symptom of
breast cancer. She thought it
was something else. So did her
doctor. Still, a biopsy was
performed, the result of which
indicated she had invasive
ductal carcinoma, which
accounts for the majority of
breast cancer.
Fuhrman's husband, who is
a member of the Florida Army
National Guard, was in school
in Georgia at the time. When
he was told the news, he said
he was returning home
immediately, but Fuhrman
persuaded him to stay since he
was close to finishing up his
requirements. He did stay in
Georgia, but made it home a
week before Fuhrman's
surgery.
"He was here for me," she
said.
Following surgery, Fuhrman
was informed she was eligible
to undergo the relatively new
MammoSite radiation
treatment. That involves
inserting a balloon into the site
where the cancerous mass was
removed. The balloon, which
is inflated with saline, is
connected to a catheter. That
allows radiation to be directly
applied to where the cancerous
mass was removed.
"Instead of having to have
radiation for five to six weeks,
I only had to have it for five
days," Fuhrman said.
Both women had to undergo
the ensuing chemotherapy.
Fuhrman said she is done with
her "main" chemotherapy, but
she is still undergoing
treatments that will last
through July (she goes every
three weeks for treatments).
Fuhrman said she took
additional medication to
combat nausea, but she still
felt bad. "
"They work really well," she
said. "However, it makes you
feel like you have the worst flu
in the world."
Odom said chemotherapy is
certainly nothing a person
would choose to go through.
"I think the last time I
thought, 'I just can't do this
again,'" she said. "My family
just said, 'Well, yes you can.'"
Odom and Fuhrman both
had wigs to wear, but Fuhrman
did not wear hers long. She
wore it when she returned to
work, but it itched too much
for her liking. She said she
called her boss and asked if
she had to wear her hair. He
replied that she should do
whatever made her
comfortable.
"A friend of mine told me,


'Embrace your baldness,' so I
did," Fuhrman said.
What Fuhrman found was
that when she stopped wearing
her wig, she was approached
by several customers \who
identified themselves as cancer
survivors.
"They would introduce
themselves to me and tell me
how\ many years they 've been
a survivor," Fuhrman said. "I
think I related to a lot of my
customers at that point. I didn't
know they were survivors."
Everyone will know who the
cancer survivors are during the
first lap of the Relay for Life.


Fuhrman is looking forward to
participating this year. After
last year's event was
postponed several times, the
Walgreens team had to \walk
without Fuhrman, who was
undergoing surgery the same
weekend the event wound up
being held.
"My employees still went
out there and walked in the
rain," Fuhrman said. "They
called me. I said, 'You guys
are crazy,' but they), were doing
it in honor of me. I have a
great crew here. They're very'
supportive."
Fuhrman said the Starke
Walgreens team had raised
approximately $2,000 as of
April 28. Janice Frye, the head
photo specialist at the store
who also happens to be a
cancer survivor, has raised
approximately $700.
"She's the driving force


behind our fundraising,"
Fuhrman said of Frye. "She's
done yard sales and photo
shoots (to raise money)."
Odom has participated in the
local Relay for Life every year
since her bout with cancer. It is
a wonderful event, she said.
"You feel such a bond with
the other survivors," Odom
said, "but then to see the
people clapping and cheering,
you just get so much support
and energy from that."


DRIP
Continued from p.6B
fungicides.
There are several reasons
why small farms and niche
market producers should use
drip irrigation to irrigate and


fertilize their crops. Current
consumer trends indicate there
are good markets for fresh
market produce. Utilizing drip
irrigation allows the grower to
produce a quality crop because
it creates the ability to feed the
crop the water and fertilizer it
needs when it needs it.
In the past, water was
plentiful and fertilizer was
inexpensive, so the time it took
to switch to drip irrigation was
not justified. However, with
today's rising cost of fertilizer
and fuel, producers need to
hold costs to a minimum
v wherever possible.
Submitted by Jim DeValerio
of the Bradford County
Extension Service.


Bob Hochmuth (left) teaches Cognito Farm co-owner
Sam Williams how to assemble her drip irrigation
system.


I


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Moonshine

Prohibition was not as
dangerous a time in Bradford
County as it was in some
other areas of the country.
Local lawmen seized their
portion of illegal moonshine
operations, however. In this
photo, Sheriff Will Epperson
and Deputy Will Baisden
pose with a confiscated
moonshine still in the 1920s.
This Sheriff Epperson was
son to one, and brother to
another, of the Eppersons
who had died as Bradford
lawmen during the bloody
period between 1885 and
1912. Their story is related
below.


BC law enforcement a bloody business


While any job in law
enforcement has the potential
to be deadly, being a sheriff or
deputy during Bradford
County's early days often
proved fatal. Six sheriffs,
three deputies and two city
marshals died attempting to
carry out their sworn duty
during a 27-year period from
1885 to 1912.
Of the nine sheriffs who
served during that violent
period of the county's history,
five were murdered in the line
of duty and a sixth died of
bullets fired either by himself
or an unknown party. Three
deputy sheriffs were also
killed in office, as were one
city marshal and one acting
night marshal.
The most perilous period of
all was a six-year span from
1885 to 1891 when three out
of four sheriffs were killed
after completing only one or
two years of their terms two
were father and son, and the
third was a victim of the-
notorious outlaw, Harmon
Murray.
Wash Epperson first
of two family
members to die in
uniform
The story begins on Jan. 5,
1885, when George
Washington (Wash) Epperson
of Lake Butler, took office as
the eighth sheriff to be elected
after New River County was renan
1861. Eleven months later, th
Epperson to die in office wa
attempting to arrest a wanted ma
this area and "holed up" in Valdos
In spite of the protests of his far
son of Wash) who had always dr
sheriff some day, was named to su
in office. He served out the unex
was re-elected to a full-year term i
decreed, however, that he was to
tragic death as his father. After ser
his new term, he was killed while
arrest a notorious gambler and
boasted that he had already kille
men in south Florida.
Third on the list was D.L. (
Alvarez, a city marshal who had
appointed to fill out the une:
sheriff's term of Henry Epp
Alvarez was killed in a shi
between a local posse and the di
desperado, Harmon Murray The la
had Murray trapped in the homc
friend of Murray's just south of Sta
was a moonlit night in 1891 ai
sheriff's white shirt made an ex(
target for Murray and his
Winchester rifle with which
believed to have killed at least 12
in a wide-ranging area be
Gainesville and Fernandina.
After the murder of three sher
the space of six years, things
comparatively peaceful on the
enforcement front for several year
Crews was appointed to serve o
unexpired term of Sheriff A
without mishap, and in the next r
election of 1892, Everett E. Johns,
of the state senator and former
governor, Charley E. Johns, was
to take over the hard-hit office and
one term before being defeated h
Denmark, who served from 1897 t
1900 without bodily harm. Johns
elected in 1900 for the 1901-1905
office, serving a full four years
being defeated by J.P. (Joe) Bennel
election of 1904.
Former sheriff ambush
Nassau County
While Johns was not actually a
here at the time of his murder, he


"..sop, deputy sheriff in
Nassau County. He.
iA had moved there with
S" ; his family because he
feared for their safety
'l w i. following the hard-
fought election. The
two candidates were
e backed by the two
predominant factions
in the county at that
time. In a later
interview, Senator
Johns said the family
home was set on fire
two times by political
enemies, but
fortunately the
SBradford Guard unit
was in session on at
least one occasion, and
quickly organized a
"bucket brigade" to
put out the blaze.
S' Noting the seriousness
with which the
i factions took their
pel politics in those days,
Senator Johns said that
during his father's
term as sheriff, if he
had to make a trip to
Lake Butler, he would
go there by one route
and return by another
Sheriff Henry W. Epperson, who in an attempt to elude
served from 1886-1888, was one of anyhwhack planned
two Eppersons who lost their lives After his defeat at
while wearing a Bradford County the polls, Everett Johns
badge. sought employment
with his good friend,
med Bradford in Sheriff Higginbotham of Nassau County, where
e first Sheriff he was appointed chief deputy. It was there that a
s killed while trap was set by an unidentified assassin. He was
n who had fled murdered on the lonely sand dunes of Amelia
ta, Ga. Island. In December of 1905 the Telegraph carried
mily, Henry (the the following account of the murder as published
earned of being in the Thursday Dec. 14, issue of the Fernandina
icceed his father Star:
expired term and "The story is now familiar how a strange white
n 1888. But fate man, assuming, the name of Abe Brown, faked a
meet the same warrant for the arrest of another for stealing
ving one year of fishing nets to the value of $500 and with this
e attempting to lured Mr. Johns to the beach, where he was slain
desperado who with a single bullet, fired through his head from
-d two ear to ear, while
riding along with the
(Levy) man in his buggy.
been "They left town
expired together about 2:30
person. p.m. Wednesday
ootout afternoon (Dec. 6).
readed Not more than an
wmen hour later, a white
e of a man was seen by a
arke. It colored boy to lead
nd the Mr. Johns' horse
cellent across the shell road
famed from the north side,
he is between James
people Drummond's house
tween and beach, and tie
the horse to a tree.
iffs in Thursday night, a
were large posse searched
e law the north end of the
s. P.S. island, and about 2
ut the o'clock in the
lvarez morning Mr. Harry
regular Starbuck was the
father first to discover the
acting body between the
elected fort and the jetties,
served Sheriff Everett E. Johns, and within about 300
by S.B. who served from 1897 to yards of the beach.
through 1901, died in an incident in The abandoned and
was re Nassau County where he blood-stained buggy
term of became a deputy sheriff stood near by."
before after losing a bid for re- (Note: The fort
tt in the election. His death occurred referred to must have
under mysterious been Fort Clinch.)
d in circumstances and was d "While ep-fothun de d
thought to be related to his suspicion as to the
sheriff time as sheriff in Bradford motive and the
was a County. source of the dreadful


crime there is not at this writing any substantial
clue as to the identity or the whereabouts of the
villain who did the foul deed. While the body was
rifled of watch, revolver, and a diamond pin, the
robbery is considered only incidental, and that the
motive was revenge, and that the murderer was a
hireling. Fate seemed to conspire to the advantage
of the .murderer in every way. The awakening
fears caused by the absence of the deputy sheriff,
were allayed for some hours the next day by a
telephone message from a friend in Jacksonville
who made a mistake in concluding that Mr. Johns
was there, where he was due that day as a witness
in United States Court. By the time this was
corrected and a posse could be collected to make
the search, the second night had closed down on
the body lying in the lonely spot in the sandy
wastes of the beach and the murderer could be a
thousand miles away.
"A man got on the train at O'Neil on the
evening of the murder and got off before the train
reached Jacksonville who may have been him (the
murderer). Possibly he took Mr. Johns' watch,
revolver, and pin with him as proofs that the deed
was done, met his party in Jacksonville and got his
pay, and has since put many miles between him
and the scene of his crime. Chief Muller went to
Jacksonville Saturday in response to a call from
Chief Vanzant, and spent the day there. The
Jacksonville papers reported they were working
on a strong clue, but Mr. Muller admits they have
nothing.
"Heart-rending were the scenes at the home of
the murdered officer when
the dreadful news was
broken; a home endeared
by his faithful care and
love and devotion. Could
the fiend who committed
the crime have witnessed
the grief of the devoted
wife and the crushed
hearts of the little children
around the mute form of
the father, if a spark of 'i
human feeling was left in
his breast, his portion in
hell would begin right
there. The revolver used
by the murderer has been
found lying on top of a
sand hill at the scene of
the murder, with three
cartridges in it."
Senator Johns later said
that his father made the
trip to Amelia Island by
himself and stopped at the
assigned spot to hitch up
his horse when he was
shot from ambush by the
unseen assailant.
Fifth victim died
under mysterious
circumstances
Two years after the
death of Everett Johns, his
successor in the Bradford
sheriff's office, Joe
Bennett, of Lawtey,
became the fifth to die in Sheriff John N. La
office. In August of 1907, 1907 to 1912, also
Sheriff Bennett, after incident that was
serving only two years of squabble overta
his term, was found dead of squabble over a g
gunshot wounds, under
mysterious circumstances, at his home in Starke.
For lack of evidence, the death was presumed to
be a suicide, although foul play was suspected by
some.
J.N. Langford, of Lake Butler, was appointed to
fill Bennett's unexpired term and was then re-
elected to a full term in 1910. But he was fiarked
as number six in the long line of Bradford sheriffs
to "die with their boots on."
After serving little more than 18 months of his
new term, Langford was killed on Aug. 23, 1912,
in a room of the old Everett Hotel in Jacksonville.
He was in the company of W.T. Andrews of
Raiford, and J.W. Hatcher of Worthington
Springs. There were rumors that the fatal shooting
resulted from a squabble over a gambling game,
during which Langford and Andrews struggled for
possession of a gun. So far as is known, there was
no indictment in the case.
In addition to the six sheriffs who died violent


deaths, three deputies of that period were also
victims of gun shot wounds. Deputy Henry 0.
Richard was killed in November of 1903 at
Lawtey, where he had gone to make an arrest.
Deputy Mallie Jones of Starke met his death in the
line of duty, but not until he had gone to serve as
a deputy in Jacksonville. Lake Butler Deputy
Andrew Kite was fatally shot in the back with four
bullets fired 'by an unknown party, while
attempting to make an arrest in 1899.
Acting Night Marshal Jeff Jones was fatally
wounded in November 1903 in J. Crabb's saloon
on Call Street in Starke, where he was called to
investigate a bar room disturbance.
Denmark lived long enough to get
re-elected
Following the death of Sheriff Langford, ex-.
Sheriff Denmark sought another term and was
frequently described as the only sheriff of that
period who lived long enough in office to seek a
second term. But at any rate, with the death of
Langford the "tragic era" for Bradford County
sheriffs seemed to end and lengthy careers with
repeated re-elections became traditional in the
sheriff's office.
In 1916, another member of the Epperson
family, defying the jinx that had doomed his father
and older brother, offered himself for the office
that had brought so much unhappiness to the
family. Will Epperson defeated Sheriff Denmark
in the primary by a 2-1 vote of 1,182 to 680 and
began a career in law enforcement that lasted ,19
years. He died of
V V natural causes.
The late Joe Hill

prominent
attorney and
assistant state
attorney, said of
Epperson's
decision to seek
the then-
hazardous
office: "Will
was a good
friend of mine
and I begged
him not to run
for the job. I
thought that two
men out of one
family was
enough. But
Will. went ahead
anyway and
served a long
time without
personal injury.
He was just as
brave as the
others, but had a
bump of caution
that seemed to
r pull him through
many a tight
.. .. spot."
Epperson
seemed to set the
pace and he was
followed in
ngford, who served from office by O.A.
died in office during an (Oscar) Andreu
rumored to have been a a Starke barber
ambling game. who was elected
in 1936 and
continued to serve for 13 years until 1949. Andreu
was succeeded by P.D. (Pete) Reddish who holds
the record for the longest term in the sheriff's
office 24 years.
No sheriff since Langford has died while
carrying out law enforcement duties.


For a copy of "Bradford
County: Its History and Its
People", contact Santa Fe
Community College in Starke.
SFCC's Matthews Museum of
Bradford County History still
has a few copies.
(904) 964-5382


ai

Sr
gI










.1L.


Now a


sleepy


town, once


a major


hub for


travel...


LEFT: Now a sleepy little
community with less than a
handful of businesses,
Hampton once had several
hotels and served as a
major travel hub for the
area. Since two rail lines
crossed in town, the
Hampton train depot was
always a busy place. This
photo was taken in July of
1899.

BELOW: Pearl Horne and
Ruth Matchett were at work
at the Horne grocery in
Hampton in the late 40s or,
early 50s. The Horne family
owned, the store for years.


Hampton began life as Crossroads


(A major portion of this history was first
written by Brenda Bawek Thornton in the
110th anniversary edition of the Telegraph)
Hampton, located about six miles south of
Starke, was incorporated in 1893 and has
gone through phases of boom and bust
throughout its history. Hampton was known
as Crossroads primarily because the Atlantic-
to-Gulf railroad was builtthrough the area in
1859 and the settlement grew up around it.
Good farmland prompted further settlement
and several small-stores were established. A
second railroad, the Georgia Southern and
Florida Rail Line, passed through town a little
later and prompted a boom. Crossroads was
renamed Hampton when the first post office
was established there in 1882. The town was
named after a 10 -year-old boy, Hampton
Terry, whose father owned a farm near the
railroad tracks.
The town grew up around this farm and
when Blanton and Cameron, town merchants,
opened a post office in their business, the
name of Hampton was officially given to the
town in honor of the family whose farm had
provided the nucleus of the settlement.
Today Hampton boasts a post office, a
minute market, a city hall, an elementary
school and a volunteer fire department. Those
are the only commercial or government
buildings in town today, but the 1880s
railroad boom gave the town an entirely


different face. Hampton had a bank, a hotel, a
drug store, a lumber mill, several large
merchandise stores, a shingle mill, a cotton
gin, a turpentine still and the railroad depot.
Simon Temple established the lumber mill
in an area referred to as Thurston in those
days. Once located just north of town on the
road to Starke, Thurston no longer exists
today. Temple was a pioneer lumberman who
had such a thriving operation that it was given
its own fourth-class post office to serve the
needs of the mill workers. As the railroad
expanded, so did Hampton and several
churches were established. The first was the'
Methodist church which was located across
from the Hampton Cemetery. It also no
longer exists today.
In the late 1800s, two brothers who were
also ministers moved into the Starke and
Hampton area. The Rev. G.P. Young and the
Rev. William B. Young were religious leaders
and educators. W.B. Young opened the
Hampton school in 1883 and 1886 he had
established the Lake Navarre Academy.
Hampton's main street, then as now, was
called Navarre Avenue and the academy took
its name from there. Hampton Lake was once
referred to as Lake Navarie. W.B. Young also
established the First Christian Church in
1884.
Two other brothers, Jack R. and Tom
Williams of Alachua, felt Hampton would be


a good base of operations for their traveling
sales business since access could be had to
both rail lines and they established a
headquarters in town in 1889. The Williams
brothers were also credited with establishing
the Hampton Baptist Church in 1891.
The Hampton Hotel was established in
1891 by another Williams brother, R.M. It
was a two-story,16-room hotel with
accommodations for 25, a large kitchen,
dining room and lobby. The hotel attracted
salesmen to the area who would arrive on the
afternoon train, stay overnight in the hotel
and then travel out into the countryside to sell
their wares by buggy. Many other travelers
also chose to eat and rest at Hampton.
The town was incorporated in 1893, but it
also allowed its charter to lapse and had to be
reincorporated in 1911 and 1925. The Big
Freeze adversely affected Hampton's
economy as it did any town which relied
on oranges and other agricultural crops -
and caused an end to the boomn. Rapid use of
timber in the area led to an exhaustion of the
crop and a decline of the timber industry
around Hampton.
With timber and oranges declining, farmers
turned to cotton and strawberries. The town
once had two cotton gins in operation.
Hampton struggled to survive, but as cars
replaced trains as the main mode of travel,
Hampton declined. Road 13 (now U.S. 301)


was re-routed and bypassed Hampton. The
road had a curve, called the Hampton Curve,
which was considered dangerous and the state
road department re-routed Road 13 in the
1930s to straighten out this curve.
With rail. travel on the decline and a
booming road travel passing the town by,
Hampton became a ghost town. Businesses
closed, property values hit rock bottom and a
series of fires destroyed many of the
commercial buildings and residences. In 1934
one of those fires destroyed the Hampton
Hotel. Late in the 1930s another of these fires
destroyed one whole side of a street,
including the post office and telephone
exchange.

Hampton appeared to be dying, but when
Camp Blanding's boom hit the area, the small
town near Starke also benefited. Troops were
carried to the camp on the train and their
families rented rooms and homes in town.
When Blanding's boom ended, however,
Hampton subsided back into the sleepy little
hamlet it is today. A privately-owned water
system had served the town in the 1970c, but
the system couldn't satisfy 'state
environmental standards and the town took it
over and constructed a new system in 1978.
Hampton remains the sleepy little town it
became after Blanding stopped training
troops for World War II.


While Bradford County had
several doctors, much of the so-
called medical treatment that
people sought was in the form of
patent medicines. It seems that
these "miracle cures" were
available for every conceivable
type of malady and most were
advertised using "testimonials"
from satisfied users. It also
seems that the drugstore of J.L.
Gaskins in Starke carried a large
selection of these remedies, and
advertised many of them in the
pages of the Telegraph.
These are excerpts from patent
medicine advertisements
published in the Telegraph on
March 30, 1900:

Dyspepsia...
Rev. W.E. Sitzer, W. Canton,
N.Y., writes, "I had dyspepsia


over 20 years, and tried doctors
and medicines without benefit. I
was persuaded to use Kodol
Dyspepsia Cure and it helped me
from the start. I believe it to be
a panacea for all forms of
indigestion." It digests what you
eat. J.L. Gaskins.

A monster devil
fish...
Destroying its victim, is a type
of constipation. The power of
this murderous malady is felt on
organs and nerves and muscles
and brain. There is no health till
it is overcome. But Dr. King's
New Life Pills are a safe and
certain cure. Best in the world
for stomach, liver, kidneys and
bowels. Only 25 cents at J.L.
Gaskins.


Cold steel or
death.,.
"There is but one small chance
to save your life and that is
through an operation," was the
awful prospect set before Mrs.
I.B. Hunt, of Lime Ridge, Wis.,
by her doctor after vainly trying
to cure her of a frightful case of
stomach trouble and yellow
jaundice.
He didn't count on the
marvelous power of Electric
Bitters to cure stomach and liver
problems, but she heard of it,
took seven bottles, was wholly
cured, avoided the surgeon's
knife, now weighs more and
feels better than ever. It is
positively guaranteed to cure
stomach, liver and kidney
troubles and never disappoints.


Price 50 cents at J.L. Gaskins' widow of the brave General
drug store. Burnham, of Machias, Me.,
when the doctors said she could
Rheumatismm not live till morning," writes
SRheumatism.. Mrs. S.H. Lincoln, who attended
If troubled with rheumatism, her that fearful night.
give Chamberlain's Pain Balm'a
trial. It will not cost you a cent All thought she must soon die
if it does no good. One from pneumonia, but she begged
application will relieve the pain. for Dr. King's New Discovery,
It also cures sprains and bruises saying it had more than once
in one-third the time required by saved her life and had cured her
other treatments, cuts, burns, of consumption. After three
frostbites, quinsy, pains in the small doses she slept easily-all'
side and chest, glandular and night, and its further use
other swellings are quickly completely cured-her."
cured by applying it. Every
bottle warranteed. 25 and 50 This marvelous medicine is
cents. For sale by J.L. Gaskins. guaranteed to cure all throat,
chest and lung diseases. Only 50
A night of cents and $1. Trial bottles free at
Aw xig ty fl J.L. Gaskins.
tf rror
'Awful anxiety was felt for the


For a copy of
"Bradford County:
Its History and Its
People", contact
Santa Fe
Community College
in Starke. SFCC's
Matthews Museum
of Bradford County
History still has a
few copies.

(904)

964-5382















From


Chicago


to


Lawtey?


TOP: An early view of Lawtey's main street, Lake Avenue,;Ilooking west. LEFT: Most of the Chicago
settlers left Lawtey when the orange groves failed. This photo of "Mr. Crawshaw," one of the original
Chicago settlers, was taken in January 1903. (The dog's name is recorded as "Hero.") ABOVE: Lawtey
was once a rival to Starke as a bustling shipping center for Bradford County produce. Lawtey had
hotels and all the amenities associated with a thriving community, including civic and social clubs.
The Lawtey Woman's Club was a very active civic organization and this was the float they entered in a
parade.


Lawtey began as a Chicago dream


(A major portion of this history came from
a story written by Sue Ellen Smith in the
110th anniversary edition of the Telegraph.)
Lawtey is a small but thriving community
located on US-301 just north of Starke. The
business district is small, but thanks to its
location on one of the major thoroughfares in
Florida, it perseveres. The town began its
history as a town when 30 Chicagoans moved
south in 1877 to find a better life under the
warm Florida sun.
Tales of money to be made in the orange
groves and rich farmland of north Florida
brought them to the area and they settled near
a sawmill that had been established by
Thomas J. Burrin. He operated his sawmill on
18,000 acres of virgin timberland and one
member of the "Chicago Colony," Dr. Harris,
somehow convinced him to donate 220 acres
for the town and to sell additional land to the
colony at $5 an acre.
The initial land which comprised the town
was laid out in a square of one-acre lots
totaling 60 acres. Members of the colony
drew lots to determine who received which
plot. Proceeds from the sale of the lots went
to fund the establishment of churches and
schools. Acreage outside the town was
divided into 60- and 80-acre farm tracts.
Colony members decided to name the town
after William Lawtey, who was the son-in-
law of colony member Col. V.J. Shipman.
Lawtey is also thought to have been a friend
and business associate of Burrin's.
One of Lawtey's early settlers, Erastus G.
Hill, kept a diary and from this record we get
a glimpse of what the town was like in 1877.
"The town looks very primitive, with only 20
acres cleared around the (train) station," Hill
wrote. "The rest is all pine forest. I spaded up
several places and found very good soil with
a clay subsoil two to three feet down. It seems
to me that stuff ought to grow on such land."
Lawtey had about 250 residents by 1885
and had a schoolhouse which accommodated
30 students and a thriving business district. A
cotton gin operated by Ward Knickerbocker
was operating at full speed. Records also
show that Lawtey had problems even in those
days with standing water. Records indicate
the town had 10 miles of drainage ditches
even then. In the mid-1880s there were 82
acres of orange trees which were expected
to be the main agricultural export of the town
and other acreage boasted apples, peaches,
pears, grapes, bananas and st. wvberries.
During this period, La -tey's in! 'itants
were mostly wealthy nortl rners who looked
askance at the tow fe / crackc ." The
displace nor ,ern( avoided mix ig with
the settlers who had come to the area in
earlier years fro parts further south. They
also looked on ocw arrivals as outsiders and


made little
effort to t ''
incorporate |.
them into a
the town. ::
Chicago n
members
built many 1
stately B EBii
homes in the
area. The
t o ,w n
continued to
thrive and
t h e
telephone
arrived in
the late
1 900s.
Frequent
social affairs
hosted by
the wealthy
townspeople
and a
healthy
winter
tourist
season
prompted
town fathers
to make
plans for a
library, an
opera house
and a road to A photo of "Old Man" Rober
link the town
Lawtey store, chewing the fe
to Kingsley of the-town.
Lake -
which was
the summer retreat of the wealthier residents
of Starke.
The Big Freeze of 1895 killed those plans
as well as the orange trees. Most of the
Chicagoans who had planned to have the
orange groves make their fortunes for them
found their investment in ruins and were
forced to abandon their holdings and leave for
other areas.
Lawtey was handed over to a different
group of people who had also come to
Lawtey with hopes of establishing thriving
farms, They came from Georgia and other
southern states and it was they who saw the
potential of the strawberry. Families with
names like Griffis, Reddish, Prevatt, Rosier,
Bennett, Starling and Carter had seen the red
berry survive the freeze and established
thriving farms cultivating it for shipment by
rail.
When advancements in methods of


rts (left) and Buddy Norman, sitting outside a
at. Roberts' family was among the founders

shipping the fragile berry and cultivation
of a hardier strain made it possible for
local farmers to ship larger quantities, the
strawberry quickly became king of Bradford
produce and Lawtey became the seat of the
throne. The "crackers" the Chicagoans had
looked down on came into their own.
The economic setback experienced after the
Big Freeze was soon negated and in 1905
Lawtey was incorporated with 27 of the 35
qualified voters voting in favor of the act.
However, LaWtey's history showed town
government in an off-again, on-again light.
The charter lapsed a number of times and the
town had to be reincorporated in 1911, 1917
and 1931. Lawtey made improvements
throughout the early 1900s.
In 1906 Lawtey's female population
spearheaded a beautification and civic
improvement effort that gained statewide
recognition. The Ladies Village Improvement
Society of Lawtey ..as organized by Mary


Todd as the second oldest club of its type
in Florida. Under Todd's guidance, oak
trees were carted in on wagons and set
along the town streets. Many of those oaks
still stand today.
While there were many citizens in
Lawtey like Todd, who worked for the
betterment of the community, there was
also a somewhat violent element.
Shooting incidents were common and
those who ventured outside after dark
usually carried guns for protection.
Lawtey was something of a mini-
Chicago long before the gangster wars. In
the early 1900s, rival gangs vied for power
and murder was frequent. Law
enforcement officers often fell victim to
violence. In 1903, Lawtey's marshal was
even forced to call out that day's
equivalent of the National Guard -
Starke Guard Unit Company E, 2nd
Florida Infantry to help bring peace
after a disturbance.
In spite of this violence, the majority of
Lawtey's residents, who merely wanted to
live quiet lives and prosper, carried on
building. A new brick schoolhouse for
grades one through nine was built on Park
Street and the old wooden one moved to
Lake Street to serve as a town hall.
The Depression hit Lawtey in the 1930s
as it did everywhere and economic
progress came to a standstill. Lawtey
businesses closed and stood vacant. Many
of the stately homes built by the
Chicagoans burned during this time. Even
strawberries suffered.
At its height, the strawberry industry
saw 13 to 14 train car loads of berries
shipped per day from the Lawtey platform.
The Depression, increased labor costs and
competition from California and Mexico
caused growers to begin to abandon the vast
fields in the early 1940s. They left the
strawberry fields and went to Camp Blanding
to work high-paying construction jobs as
America geared up for World War II.
Lawtey's economy languished, although
DuPont's construction of a sand mineral mine
in the mid-1950s provided one boost.


For a copy of "Bradford
County: Its History and Its
People", contact Santa Fe
Community College in Starke.
SFCC's Matthews Museum of
Bradford County History still
has a few copies.
(904) 964-5382















Lake Butler




once largest




town in BC


(This portion of the history was researched and
compiled by Gail D. Livingston for the 110th
anniversary edition of the Telegraph.)
The city of Starke is the county seat of Bradford
County and is now the most thriving town in
either Bradford or Union counties, but Lake
Butler once more than rivaled that status. When
the two counties were still one, Lake Butler was
the county seat.
The area was settled early on, but it was in 1859
that 40 acres of land was purchased from the
government and streets were laid out for Lake
Butler, the county seat of what was then New
River County. When Baker County was divided
from New River in 1859, the remaining portion of
that county was renamed Bradford-and Lake
Butler remained the county seat.
The town was named by an early surveyor and
the reasons for the choice of "Lake Butler" are not
clear. Late in the 20th Century stories circulated
that the town was named for a "Captain" Butler
who died during the Seminole Indian War and was
buried on the north shore of the lake. It was later
proven that the heroic soldier who gave his life
protecting the white citizens of the area did not
actually exist, although the battle he was supposed
to have died in did actually occur and soldiers did
lose their lives during it.
When Lake Butler was established, some of the
names of the early residents found in various
records were similar to names which are found
among families there today. William J.D. Prevatt,
Capt. H.F. York. Capt. Roll Thomas. Col. L.B.
Rhodes, John Croft and M.L. McKinney were
men listed as being from Lake Butler when they
were inducted into Company A of the 7th Florida
Infantry in 1862. They joined Bragg's Army in
Tennessee shortly after induction.
Other records list early residents of Lake Butler
and include Dr. O.V. Walton, Dr. Sol Newsome,
Thomas Irving Dekle, Grancer Palmer, W.S.
Epperson and Major Joseph L. Hill. Capt. York
served as the first clerk of the court and was also
a partner in a general merchandise store, called
York and Rhodes. The Rev. R.H. Barnett, an early
circuit riding preacher for the Methodist Church,
once worked for York and Rhodes. In early days it
was customary for Methodist ministers to serve
several churches and ride out to a different one
each Sunday.
Since Barnett traveled a lot, he once made the
back room at the merchandise store his sleeping
quarters and took his meals in the home of Col.
L.B. Rhodes. The store 'was not much different
from the typical country store of the day. It had a
cracker barrel, pickle barrel and even a barrel of
liquor which was kept in a side room. Portions
were sold to customers who brought their own
mugs into the store. The presence of the liquor
barrel prompted Barnett to leave employment
with the store, although he reported in his
biography that he liked both the owners and
enjoyed his job. He did a lot of praying for the two
men and seemed to feel justified in the effort as
Rhodes later became a Methodist minister himself
and York became a deacon in the Baptist church.
Toward the end of the Civil War, Lake Butler's
business district began to grow. John Croft opened
a grocery store. M.L. McKinney returned from
war and married Matilda Dekle. The couple
established a cotton gin in the western portion of
the town.
The first post office was located inside a general
store owned by J.H. Porter, who acted as the first
postmaster. O.W. Maines, grandfather of the
famed Lake Butler historian and late "country"
attorney Hal Y. Maines, assisted Porter as
postmaster. The present Masonic Hall, located on
Main Street adjacent to the First United Methodist


Dr. Seeber King and his wife Agnes in the
canal. Photo from "Back to Union County"
Fowler.


Church, was one of the i "
earliest public schools in
the town. F.G. Shelle ..,'-
served as editor of the
town's first newspaper, the
now defunct Lake Butler
Star. --
Joseph P. Richard (also
pronounced Ri-shard) had
his Wayne County, Georgia An early view of
plantation destroyed in the the county seat
Civil War and he relocated from one portion
his family to the
Providence area. Around
1875 he purchased a large
section of land near Lake
Butler, which included the
Johnstown area, an
unincorporated settlement
between Lake Butler and
Raiford. He also purchased '- ,
other tracts in various areas .
and operated, a grits mill, .------.
cotton gin and sawmill in 7-
addition to his farm. He -:
served as county judge for .
14 years.
F.M. Rivers founded the
Rivers Hardware Store in "' .-
Lake Butler during this .
early period about 1880
and continued in. Another early
operation until it burned in
1985. Rivers attained fame
by manufacturing his own invention, the"
Rivers "double stock" plow, which was
popularly used all over Florida and the South.
The business passed on to C.F. Rivers and then
to Wilson Rivers, who still lives in Union
County today.
W.C. Townsend came to Lake Butler from
Georgia as a school teacher. Townsend
married Susie Dekle and Townsend's brother
J.W. Townsend, later married Susie's sister,
Lola. The Townsend brothers had a successful
partnership in farming and the turpentine
business. They bought large quantities of land
and built a successful clothing store in town.
They built numerous commercial buildings in
town, .including the 1911 building which once
housed the Farmers and Dealers Bank. It has
since been renovated and is now the Driggers
medical-office building on Main Street.
The construction of most of the early brick
buildings in town can be laid at the door of the
Townsend brothers, including the building
which is currently being renovated to serve
Lake Butler as a museum and meeting hall.
Most of these buildings where two-story brick
buildings with the top floor used as hotel
rooms and the bottom used for business
operation.
Around 1880 Tom P. Register, a Civil War
veteran, arrived in Lake Butler. Register was a
carpenter and was father of Charles H.
Register, who served as Union County's
representative in the Florida Legislature when
Union County was born in 1921.
Other early settlers of the town included F.P
and E.L. Odom who established a
mercantile store onthe corner of Main Street
and Lake Avenue D.F. McDonald, Nathan
Varnes and Mrs. Eyder Knight. Other early family
names included Proctor, Anthony, Johnson,
Brannen, Thomas, Dukes, Addison, Johns,
Andrews, Richards, Harper, Colson, Chapman,
Hendricks, Dowling, Jones, Mizelle, Biellings,
Roberts, Croft and Hall.
About 1882 O.W. Maines moved from Georgia
to Ft. White and
S then to Lake
Butler. Maines
operated a store
on Main Street,
S near the present-
day courthouse,
which was
referred to as
Truby-Sternberg
and Company. it
was a long
wooden building
which had a
warehouse for
ginned cotton in
the rear.
John A. King
left Missouri and
was on his way to
the rich land in
Providence
around Christmas
of 1884 when he
stopped for a rest
in Lake Butler.
He and his family,
including an ill
daughter for
whom King
hoped the climate
and local doctors
would be
beneficial, had
arrived in Starke
by train and
rented a surrey
and a wagon and
team of horses
with which to
finish the move.
The family
arrived in Lake
Butler and met a
group of citizens
who were more
accomplished
than a chamber of
commerce.
ir boat on Lake Butler Citizens gathered
CD compiled by Seeber round the family
out of curiosity


Lake Butler, a town which was once larger than Starke and served Bradford County as
until Starke finally won a series of election battles. In 1921, Union County was created
i of Bradford County. Lake Butler is now the county seat of Union County.


view of Main Street, from the top of the hill looking west. Photo from "Back to Union
County" CD compiled by Seeber Fowler.


Lake Butler retort plant, exploded 1907. Wood was processed using heat. Photo from
"Back to Union County" CD compiled by Seeber Fowler.


--FFT
Farmers and Dealers Bank in 1911. Photo from "Back to Union County" CD compiled
by Seeber Fowler.


and then talked King into changing his plans and
living in Lake Butler. John Dekle had a medicine
shop in town and Dr. Walton lived nearby, so
King's concerns for his daughter's health were
answered. King and Dekle later opened a drug
store together, located where the Maines Real
Estate office is today. In 1894 King built the
building that later housed both the Tomlinson-
Maines Drug Store and the post office.
In 1889, the railroad also boosted growth in
Lake Butler. The Georgia Southern and Florida
rail line reached town at that time and the Atlantic
Coast Line rail line came through town in 1900-
01. A large depot was built at the intersection of
the two rail lines in 1913. A beautiful park was
adjacent to the depot. The park, with its white
picket fence and numerous benches, was a project
of the Lake Butler Woman's Club. People came to
town to sit on the benches, visit with friends and
meet "40," the afternoon train from Jacksonville.

L.A. Duncan came to town in the 1890s and
established a large general store which sold
furniture, shoes, dry goods, groceries, hardware
and almost anything else. He also owned a stables
which was operated by Dick Hewitt. Mrs. Onie
Pons operated a millinery shop next door. The
"Duncan's House" was actually a large hotel on
Main Street, located where CVS Drugs is now.
Two large, circular porches on the front of the


two-story house made it an attractive lodging for
travelers who came in on the trains.
Traveling salesmen and drummers often stayed
there. The hotel was well-known for its large
"lazy-susan" table which was always generously
laid with food cooked by Mrs. Duncan and Kibby
Lamar. The hotel even had shuttle service from
the depot. A beautiful black horse named Prince
pulled a carriage driven by George Marklee who
met all the trains and drove people to and from the
hotel.
In the early 1990s an addition was built onto the
hotel and called the "annex." This housed the post
office with Oscar Brown as postmaster. It also
housed a barber shop operated by Elzey Loadholtz
and the local pool room. The second story of the
annex housed additional hotel rooms. The hotel
burned down in 1914.
The Duncans also owned a cotton gin, located
where Howard Auto Parts is today. The gin did a
prosperous business and records indicate that at
one sale alone, enough ginned cotton changed
hands to bring $1 million to the farmers of the area
- an astronomical amount in the early 1900s. The
town continued to prosper through the 1920s, but
as the automobile began to replace the train as
America's chosen means of travel, business
dwindled. S.R. 100 and S.R. 121 are traveled, but
not nearly so heavily as U.S. 301, so Starke easily
outstripped Lake Butler in growth rate.