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 Section C: Features and Sports
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Union County times
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028314/00089
 Material Information
Title: Union County times
Uniform Title: Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Lake Butler Fla
Creation Date: October 12, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates: 30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1920?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID: UF00028314:00089
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bradford County times

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Paw Print
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B: Regional News
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B: Regional News: Editorial/Opinion
        page B 4
    Section B: Regional News continued
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
    Section C: Features and Sports
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
        page C 11
        page C 12
    Section C: Features and Sports: Classified Ads
        page C 13
        page C 14
        page C 15
    Section C: Features and Sports continued
        page C 16
        page C 17
        page C 18
Full Text










USPS 648-200 Three SectionsLake Butler, Florida

USPS 648-200 Three Sections Lake Butler, Florida


Thountrsday, Oct. 12, 200

Thursday, Oct. 12, 200<.


( ~ ._ .. -,....... 1

.., -=. "LN "... .-' ..- '

94th Year 27th IssueX-.50.CENTS
9.h ea '\- 27t s C
94th Year 27th Issue 50 CENTS


Family health
Workshop
today at
community
center
"Healthy Food, Healthy
Families" starts today,
Oct. 12, at the Lake Butler
community center.
Many community
organizations have worked
together to bring this
program to Union County
families to teach good
eating habits, nutrition and
other aspects of a healthy
family.
The first session runs
from 10-11 a.m. The
second is from 6:30-7:30
p.m. Prizes, food samples
and activities for the
whole family are planned.
These workshops will
be held the second
Tuesday of every month
with a new health
topic/activities each time.
For more information
on how to get your family
involved, or if you are a
business or organization'
who would like to sponsor
a monthly group, call
(386) 496-3432.

Schools have
early release
Oct. 11
Parents, remember the
Union Cotiunty Schools
will have an early release
day on Wednesday, Oct.
11.
The elementary school
will be released at 12:15
p.m. (walkers, pre-K and
K at 12:05 p.m.). Middle
and high school students
will be released at 12:30
p.m.

Raiford Day to
be held Oct. 21
The annual Raiford Day
will take place on
Saturday, Oct. 21,. at the
Raiford Community
Center.
The Raiford Day
planning committee
cordially invites the public..
to the 13th annual event,
with festivities beginning
at 3:30 p.m. A meal will.
be served at 5 p.m.
Games and activities for
the children will be
available, as well as music
and entertainment.
Bring a lawn chair and
relax, as. this is a great
opportunity for fun,
fellowship and seeing
friends/family you haven't
seen in a while.
The planning committee
urges everyone to not, to
miss this chance to
support the Raiford,
community.

UCHS class of
1986 reunion
set for Oct. 21
The Union County High,
School class of. 1986 has
set its 20-year reunion for
Saturday, Oct. 21, at 6
p.m.' at the Pritchett
farmhouse..
The cost of the reunion
is $40 per person, and $75
per couple.
This should be paid to
Jordania Bridges, .8126
S.W. C.R. 796, Lake
Butler, FL 32054. Please
respond by today,
Thursday, Oct. 12.
Along with the
registration, classmates
should also send to
Bridges five pictures from
their time at UCHS, These
will be made into a video
presentation that will be
show n at the reunion.
For more information.
contact Bridges at (386)
-196-2816, Dana King at
(386) 752-6888 or Jill
* Townsend at (386) 755-
9350. *


UCHS's High-Q team looks forward to season


The Union County High School 2006-2007 Junior Varsity High-Q team consists of
(front, I-r) Cindy Crawford, Roman West, Tricia Geisensburg, (back) James Shupe,
Brady Clark (captain) and Tommy Riherd..


The Union County High
School 2006-2007 High-Q
teams are off to a good start.
The varsity team consists of
MarshaHl- Riggs- (captain).
Lynne Riherd, Zach Sweat,
Kaleb Clyatt, Shawn Andrews
and Terri Brown. The junior
.varsity team consists of Brady
Clark (captain), Roman West,
James. Shupe, Tricia.
Geisenburg, Cindy Crawford
and Tommy Riherd. ,
I. Their first match was against
Williston High- School. The
varsity defeated Williston by a
score of 211 to 29. Zach Sweat,
was the top scorer with 35
points. Marshall Riggs and-
Lynne Riherd each scored 25
points while Shawn Andrews
and Terri Brown scored 10
points each.
The JV was defeated by
Williston. Captain Brady Clark
scored 30 points, Roman West
.scored 25 points and James


Shupe scored 15 points.
The second match of the
season was against Trenton
High School. The varsity
defeated Trenton in a close
one, 114-107.-Top scorer was
Riggs with 45 points. Andrews
scored 15 points while Brown
and Sweat scored 5 points
each.
The JV also defeated
Trenton by a score of 177-
150. Top scorer for the day
was Shupe with 35 points,
followed by Clark with 30
points and Geisenburg with 20
points.
The High-Q teams travelled-
to Bell High. School on"
Tuesday, Oct, 10, for the third
match of their season. Results
were not available as of press
time.
Information courtesy of
Renae Allen, UCHS High-Q
coach.


The Union County High School 2006-2007 Varsity High-Q team is made up of
(front, I-r) Lynne Riherd, Terri Brown, (back) Shawn Andrews, Marshall Riggs
(captain), Zach Sweat. and (not pictured) Kaleb Clyatt.


our troor

The Lake Butler Elementadr
'School Safer\ Patrol
participates in se-ieral" pr' jects
throughout the school year.
For 2006-200". safety patrol
has chosen to adopt soldiers
I serving abroad.
Safety. patrol members
. learned about the project from
www.soldiersangels.com.
For Christmas, satet) patrol
4 wants to put together small
care packages.
If you would'like to donate
any items, you may drop them
off at the front office' with
Tammy Black: The deadline is
,Nov. 17. .
The following items are
needed: DVDs .(TV series),
candy (n6n-melting items,
such as Hot Tamales, Tootsie
Rolls, Lemonheads, Red Hots,
Starburst and Mike & Ikes),
AT&T phone. cards (only
AT&T), magazines, beef jerky,
wipes and hand lotion.


Safety patrol members w ill
also rite letters-to-anonymous
soldiers \\ ho do not receive
mail.
Here, are a few excerpts from
letters written -by. LBES's.
fourth-grade safety patrol
students:
"I think I'm too younj to
completely understand why
our nation is at war. I do
remember the terrorists attacks
back on 9/11. I was at school
that day, and I remember
,teachers crying and saying that
innocenit.people in our country'
were killed. It made me really
feel sad arid afraid. Knowing
that people like you are there
to stop 'the terrorists from
doing, that, to people ever
again, it makes me feel proud
and safer. Thank -you for
sticking up-for us and caring

See TROOPS, p. 6A


LB man raises awareness '


for White Cane Day


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor
Blinded after he was stuck in
the eye with a pocket knife
when he was only 4 years old,
the vision in Lake Butler
resident Tom Fillyaw's other
eye soon deteriorated. He no
longer has vision in either eye.
At age 66, Fillyaw now has
been blind for more than 60
years.
After the death of Fillyaw's
guide dog. more than a year
go, he not only relied on
friends and family, but on his
White cane.
Though it is a part of his
everyday life, he said some
people are not aware of him
and his white cane when he's
out walking around town:
That's why it's important for
people to be aware of Florida's
White Cane Day, which is
Sunday, Oct. 15.
Fillya,' said his white cane
was run over when he lived in
Tampa. He was also hit by a
vehicle when he lived in
Jacksonville, resulting in a trip
to the hospital and surgery to
his knee.
He said if people were more
aware of a white cane with the


red tip, indicating a visually
impaired person, then,
accidents would be less
frequent.
States like Florida have
passed legislation to protect
people who are blind, such as
these state statutes:.
No person should carry
in a raise or extended
position ,a cane or
walking stick which is
white in color or tipped
in red, unless totally or
partially blind.
Whenever a pedestrian
is crossing or attempting
to cross a public street,
guided by a dog guide or
carry a white cane with
red tip, the driver of
every vehicle
approaching the
intersection or place
where such pedestrian is
attempting to cross
should fully stop before
arriving at such
intersection or place of
crossing and before
proceeding should take
precautions as 'necessary
to avoid injuring such
pedestrians.
Apyone who violates


these laws could be
guilty of a misdemeanor
of the second degree.
In an article written by the
past president of the Florida
Council of the Blind, Carl F.
McCoy, "there seems to be
little public awareness that
violating the legal rights of
blind pedestrians is a
punishable offense."
"We, the members of the
Florida Council of the Blind,
challenge Florida's drivers to
observe the rights of blind
pedestrians, and indeed all
pedestrians, to take into
account the lives of these
courageous pedestrians and
respect those who carry a
white cane or are led by a
guide dog."
Fillyaw, the former public
relations person for the council
and the president of the
Tallahassee chapter, said
walking around town with his
cane as his guide is dangerous
to a certain extent.
"I'm a little bit more leery
without my guide' dog," he
said.


Tom Fillyaw
stands outside
his Lake Butler
home holding
his white cane,
with a red tip to
indicate he is
visually
impaired.


See CANE, p. 3A


For crime, socials and editorials, see Regional News section. For sports, see Features and Sports section. | 11|

Deadline noon Monday before publication 386-496-2261 (phone) 386-496-2858 (fax) 6 8906 63869 2


JRead UCHS' "I)t JtaI it it inside this edition
.9fjj .!5


t 's"? *, .. *r ,._ "a i 'D E n '
.'.'-.' *h stuHelp LBESu

t K students support
$IiP.I


--






Page 2A UNION COUNTY TIMES Oct. 12, 2006


Tiger


Lake Butler Elementary
School names Tiger Cubs
each, week based on good
behavior, grades or on a
child's improvement in either
of these two areas.
Students who received this
award on Thursday, Oct. 5,
were:
Eric Abraham
Breyonce Cummings
Ryan Young
Taylor Morris
Jaikira Cobb
Matthew Wilson
Tameshia Waters
Macy Adams
Garrett Thornton
Kelsey Thornton
Deanna Olin
Tra'von Williams
Nathan Brand
Nathan Boone
Austin Harper
Patrick Montalbano
Tyrus Cook
Dylan Stephens
Kinedy Johnson
Jason Michael
Hunter Ash





Trolling for Trolls...


Cubs


Audrey Davis
Antanae Clark
Molly Zapp
Shelbylynn McGrath
Taylor Bennefield
Tommy Woods
Landon Roberts
Shelby McDowell
Darin Strickland
Sfawnie Reeder
Jacob Ricks
Kaitlin Moody
Darian Lyles
Victoria Suarez
Tyler Morton
Troy Tims
Garrett Norman
Braden Jackson
Morgan Eddy
Brandy Temes
Students receive a purple
Tiger Cub ribbon, a certifi-
cate and their names are rec-
ognized over the intercom
and in the school newsletter.
Tiger Cubs are also given
special privileges, such as
being line leaders or running
errands.


review student achievement data relative to the
FCAT and to recognize the long-term NEFEC
partnership with Just Read, Florida! Staff of both
schools had the opportunity to. share personal
stories of students' success with Bush.


SMore than 50 children and their parents went on a
magical journey at the Union County Public Library's
storytime program "Trolling for Trolls" on Oct. 4-5.
Pictured above, Children's library aide Joannie Harvey
helps these children with their art projects. Today's
(Oct. 12) program, "Are You a Prince or a Princess?," Is
set for 10 a.m.



Union County man

inducted into LCCC

honor society


Lake City Communiti
College % ill hold the induction
ceremony for its new members
of Phi Theta Kappa, including
one from Union County, toda\,
Oct. 12, at 4:30 p.m.
The ceremony will be held
in the Lake City Medical
Center auditorium on the
LCCC campus.
Phi Theta Kappa is the
international honor society of
the two-year college.
Phi Theta Kappa's mission is
two-fold: recognize and
encourage the academic
achievement of two-\ear
collegestudents, and prot ide
opportunities for indi dual
growth and development
through participation in
honors, leadership, service and
fellowship programming.
To be eligible to receive an
invitation to join Phi Theta
Kappa, the student must have
earned a 3.4 GPA during the
Spring 2006 semester and have
a minimum of 12 credit hours
and a 3.0 grade point average
overall.
While there are more than


40 students being inducted it to
the honor society, the onl) one
from Union Count\ was James
Trollinger.

Love is a fruit in season at
all tires, and within reach
-of every hand.
-Mother Teresa
r *


Subscription.Rate i
$30.00.per year:
I16 00 :1 monlhs
Outside Trade Area
$30,00 per year:


New
Jerusalem to
hold revival
Oct. 15
The New Jerusalem Full
Gospel Church will hold a
revival with anointed
evangelist Larry Richards on
Sunday, Oct. 15, at II a.m.
and again at 6 p.m.
Everyone is welcome. New
Jerusalem is located at the
comer of S.R. 121 and C. R.
18 at the caution light in
Worthington Springs.
For more information, call
Annette Seay at (386) 496-
3383 or Roseanna Barnett at
(386) 496-1461.




hosts Rejoice
Ministry on
Oct. 14
Rejoice Ministry Team from
Free Will Baptist Bible
College in Nashville. Tenn.
will conduct a service of
Christian music, testimony and
preaching at Harmony Free
Will Baptist Church in Lake
Butler on Sunday. Oct. 15.
Team members include
Casey Deel, Tiffany Johnson,
Kera Zint and David Gibson.
Accompanying the group are
college representatives: the
Rev. and Mrs. Bert Tippett.
The team and Rev. Tippett will
participate in both the 10 a.m.
Sunday school and the II a.m.
worship serve ice.
Free Will Baptist Bible,
College is a regionally
accredited four-year institution
specializing.. in *training_
Christian workers. In addition
to programs for ministers,
missionaries, church musicians.
and youth workers, the college
offers certified programs .for
elementary and secondary
teachers, and, degree programs
in business administration,
history and psychology.
' Harmony Church is located
in southwest Union County at
the junction of C.R. 239A and-
C.R. 239. Pastor Larry Clyatt
invites the public to attend.


Churches to
hold revivals
Oct. 15-18
Four area churches will hold
revivals from Oct. 15-18.
On Sunday, Oct. 15, the
New River New
Congregational-. Methodist
Church, located at C.R. 199
and C.R. 125 in Union County,


Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3,. 1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
1 UNION COUNTY TIMES
125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054
Web address: UCTiimesonlind.corn
(386) 496-2261
John M. Miller, Publisher
SoTradeArea 'Edtodr: Lindsey Kirkland
Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
Don Sams
Darlene Douglass.
S ,. Typesetting:: Joalyce Graham


Newspaper Prod.
" C assuid Ari,
E ,c : k K e,1:, r>", .i


Earl W. Ray
Virginia Daugh,-rty
K -ihi Bennett


will host a revival conducted
by the Rev. J.C. Lauramore at
6p.m.
On Monday, Oct. 16, the
New Hope Church in
Macclenny will have
evangelist Rev. Wayne
Williams at 7 p.m. The church
is located off C.R. 125 north of
Macclenny. Turn right onto
Papa Sid Griffis Road.
- The Rev. Jimmy Scott will
be at Crossroads to Victory on
Tuesday, Oct. 17, at 7 p.m. It
is located on C.R. 125 in
Raiford.
. The Rev. Neil Griffis will be
at Cedar Creek church, just
north of Sanderson, on
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at 7 p,mn
SAll revivals are open to the*
public.
For more information,
contact the Rev. Neil Griffis at
(386) 431-1158.


VFW holds
oyster night
Oct. 13
The Lake Butler VFW Post
10082 is having an oyster
night on Friday, Oct. 13.
SIt will start at p.m. at the
post, located on C. R. 231.
Tickets are $10 for 12
oysters and a drink. Proceeds
go to support the post.
Contact (386) 496-3263.


Benefit gospel
sing to be
held Oct. 14
The New Jerusalem Full


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964-576


Gospel Church will hold a-
benefit gospel, sing on
Saturday, Oct. 14, at 6 p.m.
The event will feature Larry
Richards and various gospel
singers. New Jerusalem is
located at the corner of S.R.
121 and C. R. 18 at the caution
light in Worthington Springs.
For more information, call
Annette Seay at (386) 496-
3383 .or Roseanna Barnett at
(386) 496-1461.


***. *
Courage is what it takes to.
stand up and speak;
courage is also what it
takes to sit down and
listen.
-Winston Churchill
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,


Guests of Governor Bush...

(L-R) Moseley Elementary School employees Cathy
Merritt, Marsha Hill, Libby Weaver and Tammy
Driggers, Lake Butler Middle School teacher Rhonda
Clyatt, LBMS Principal Mark Bracewell and Robert
Smith met with Governor Jeb Bush (fourth from
right) to discuss the reading success in FRI schools,





Oct. 12, 2006 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 3A



Union County shows its community spirit of giving


Revival center
gives fire vics
a second
chance
Second Chance Ministries of
Sanderson Christian Revival
Center (SCRC) helped donate
food, clothing, beds and
furniture to the victims of the
Sept. 24 fire behind Spires
IdA in Lake Butler.
Nancy Griffis of Raiford and
members of SCRC helped
organize food, clothing and
furniture to those who were in
need.
SCRC Pastor DuWayne
Bridges said, "Nancy Griffis is
a leader who really cares for
the kids and families of this
community. I am extremely
proud of her."
Griffis is Bridges' "right
hand," as she serves as the
church administrator.
If you would like to donate
good quality clothing,
especially children's and
teenage clothing, contact
Pastor Bridges at (386) 965-
0127.
Second Chance is in need of


From Second Chance Ministries, Nancy Griffis,
administrator of the Sanderson Christian Revival Center
and a Lake Butler Middle School teacher, unloads
furniture, appliances and other items victims of the Lake
Butler fire behind Spires will need. With her are (1-r)
Brttany Manning, John Michael Manning and Kody
Colson.

beds, furniture and appliances. .
All items are given to needy families in the community.


Couple gets
donated car
from revival
center
David and Judy Harris
recently received a car donated
by Sanderson Christian
Revival Center (SCRC).
The Harris' old car was torn
up. For 'almost a year, they
were without a vehicle.
Pastor DuWayne Bridges
said, "We love Judy and
David. They are wonderful
people."
"I am extremely proud of
our church family for buying
them this car," he said. "They
really needed it."
SCRC also bought a car for
another needy family as well.
Last year, the church bought
one vehicle and gave it to
another needy individual. The
church is working on fixing


h
""
.4'


David and Judy Harris received a car from the
Sanderson Christian Revival Center.


another car to donate to
another family in need by
Christmas.
SCRC 'also takes clothing,
furniture and appliance


donations.
For more information,
contact Pastor DuWayne.
Bridges at (386) 965-0127.


Mercantile: More than just money...


CANE
Continued from p. 1A

Fillyaw's daughter, Lora,
also shares her father's
concern.
"It worries me," she said.
Canes cannot tell you when
there's a low hanging branch or
car in the crosswalk, Fillyaw
said, so people who are blind
rely on the help of others to be
aware of their white cane with
a red tip.
"I've encountered people
who didn't know (what the
cane meant)," he said.
Putting questions about
white canes and their use on
driving tests, as is now'
common in Florida, Fillyaw
said, helps to get the
knowledge out to more people.
What it's like to
be blind
Fillyaw went to the St.
Augustine School for the,Deaf
and Blind from the time he
was 9 years, old until
graduation to learn how, to do
the things other people take for
granted.,
"I consider being blind a
nuisance," he said of not being
able to immediately sit down
and read something like his:
mail.
Fillyaw said when he wants
to make a simple trip to the
post office, which is'across
town from where he lives, he
said he has to call family
members or a transportation
service.
He said he sometimes uses
A&A Transport of Lake
Butler. The company has
grants, government_and'other
funding to transport people
who need to go to doctor's
appointments, who are
disabled or who are
transportation disabled.
Also, with new technologies,
, Fillyaw said he can bring in his
mail and with a scanner sit
down and read it straight out of
the mailbox. The equipment he
recently obtained allowed him'
to do this for the first time in
his life with no hassle. ',
Other technologies also,
allow him to send e-mail and'
receive voice alerts for such
things as time, temperature and


Bill Cervone checks out
Union's public library...


S.. .....


State Attorney Bill Cervone presents Union County
Public Library Director Mary Brown with a check for
$500 in support of the library's construction'fund-raiser.
The money will buy a limb on a tree in the fund-raising
mural created by Marie Wiggs Tyre. Cervone said in a
letter to Brown the money was provided through the
deferred prosecution program, which requires eligible
criminal defendants charged with relatively minor
offenses to make contributions in support of
community efforts, especially benefiting children.


Child abuse
prevention.
group meets
Oct. 18
Join. members for the4
Bradford-Union Prevention
Task Force for a brown bag


the date.,
"A lot of people in Lake
Butler know me and know that'
I'm blind."
"He said once more people
become aware, it %will be safer
for visually impaired people.
"Awareness is the name of
the game." he said.


lunch on Wednesday, Oct. 18,
at noon.
The task force, \ which works
to address the issues of child
abuse, domestic violence
prevention and foster
parenting, meets mofithly at
First Presbyterian Church of
Starke, 921 E. Call St.,


Fillyaw's daughter said her
father has never used his
blindness as an excuse.
"He worked every day of his
life," she said.
"He is my hero."
Fillyaw is a father of four
and has 11 grandchildren.


Employees of Mercaritile Bank of Lake Butler recently held a community food
drive to collect items for victims of three recent home fires. Helping gather food
and other supplies into baskets Friday were (I-r) Zack Smith (branch manager), -
Krystle Stalvey (teller), Joyce Tomlinson (head teller), Mary Summerall
(investment department) and Billie Yon (money manager). Smith said Mercantile's \
team of employees wanted to get involved in the community. With the fires, he
said, "It happened to work out that we had the need" .

U

Bra 3 or O nHS TA



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Page 4A UNION COUNt i TIMES Oct.i1, o


The Union County High School student-produced

newspaper of the Agriculture Communications class


TQhe


1000 S. Lake Ave.. Lake Butler. Florida 32054


patu


3rint


October 2006


Volume 2, Issue 1


UCHS welcomes its new principal


Meet the staff of the Paw Print, including (front, I-r)
Hannah Tucker, Morganne Schlipf and Amberlee
Crawford, (back) Gator Snyder.


Meet the staff
,The new members of the
2006-2007 Paw Print staff are-'
* Amberlee Crawford is an
I' l'h-grade student. During
her freshman sear she was
on the junior varsity
cheerleading squad. She'
was in gymnastics her
freshman and sophomore.
years. She loves to go
horseback riding and still
loves gymnastics. This. is
her second year as an FFA
member. By Morganne
Schlipf, Paw Priit Staff
Writer.
* Gator Snyder is a 15-
year-old sophomore who
Sh-,as many different talents.
H is. favorite free time
activities are, playing
baseball and football. Gator
has been an active FFA
/' member for four years, two
years 'in high school 'and :
also. two years in middle
school. By Amberlee


Crawford, Paw Print Staff
Writer.
* Hannah Tucker is a
; sophomore who 'tabs .len
in the FFA since the sixth
grade. She enjoys FFA
activities, and this is her
seventh year showing a
heifer in the Bradford-
Union Fa'ir. She also
participates in weightlifting
and plays softball. By
Gator Snyder, Paw Print
Staff Writer.
* Morganne .Schlipf is a
senior. ,She has been a
successful FFA member
for four' years. In 2005-
2006, she was on the meats
judging team. In 2006, she
showed a hog in. the
Bradford-Union Fair and
placed fourth in her class.
Some things she enjoys
doing in her spare time are
'singing, dancing and riding
horses. By Hannah Tucker,
Paw Print Staff It'riter.
T,


What's new at the

UCHS agriculture


department?


S---BY-NIORGANNE-SCHLIPF
Paw Print Staff Writer
The Union County High
School's Agriculture
Department is working on its
second year of the Agricultural
Communications class.
Charlotte Emerson wasN
instrumental in establishing
this course, including serving
as a curriculum writer. This
class is used to develop many
common communication skills
in the \outh that participate,
including speaking, writing
and broadcasting.
In the first year there are
three alternating rotations.
One rotation is the newspaper
rotation where each group,
member writes articles for the
Paw Print section of the Union
County Times.
The second rotation is the
video and picture editing
rotation. In this portion of the
course, students must take
pictures, edit them, video an
event, and edit it also.
Students learn to use a


Friendship is a word the
very sight of which in print
can make the heart warm.
-Augustine Birrell


variety of software programs
and the rules associated with
effective photography and
videography.
The most anticipated
rotation is the radio
broadcasting rotation. This is
where the students actually get
to make their own radio show
and broadcast it on WUCR
107.9 FMN out of Lake Butler.
Each rotation involves
something practical and hands-
on .
The second year of
Agricultural Communications
revolves mre around the
concept of marketing. These
students will actually create.
arid execute a marketing plan,
along with other activities.
Furthermore, ihese students
handle the communications of
all special events.
Students find this course
somewhat fast-paced. They
find it challenging, yet
rewarding. I would
recommend this course to
anyone at the high school!


An individual is more apt to
change, perhaps, than all
the world around him.
-Daniel Webster


BY MORGANNE SCHLIPF
Paw Print Staff Writer

.Union County High is proud
to welcome its new principal,
Alex Nelson.
In a recent interview with
Mr. Nelson, we discovered
many interesting things.


BY MORGANNE SCHLIPF
Paw Print Staff Writer
Have you ever heard the
slogan, "Live Green, Go
-Yellow"? This is the most
recent slogan for the latest in
fuel technology: ethanol.
Ethanol is a clean-burning
fuel because it is oxygenated.
It is an alcohol and resembles
the form of alcohol found in
alcoholic beverages. It can be
mixed with gasoline to make
products such as E10 and E85,
which have 10 percent and 85
percent ,ethanol in their
mixture. It is a clear, odorless
liquid that is cheaper than
-straight gasoline.
Ethanol is' very simple to
make because it is derived
from crops. It comes from the
sugars and starches in corn and
sugarcane. The corn or
sugarcane goes through a
process of fermentation, then
distillation, and finally
dehydration to become the fuel
ethanol. Processing a 'crop
into ethanol is much cheaper
than processing oil into
gasoline.
Iw I, m) opinion.. ethanol.
7'\would be'a much better source
of energy for the United States.
In fact, it can alreadN be found'
in some gas stations. Most
vehicles that were made after
1999 are able to run with a fuel
that has up to 85 percent
ethanol without having to be'


Nelson has been in the
administration of schools for
about nine years.
He came to Union County
from Kentucky and credits the
move to the weather here and
to his wife's family.
Like most people, Nelson
has goals for this school. He
wants this school to become an


modified. "Ethanol is also a
renewable source of .energy
because the crops can be
regrown-every year. It is also
made from crops that we grow
here in the U.S. Thus,: we
could become less dependent
on other nations and their oil
supply.
Not only could ethanol bring
down the price of fuel in the
U.S., but it will also help our
environment. It is clean-
burning. so it does not pollute.
If it is mixed with gasoline it
will give off some pollution,
but it will be nothing
compared to what is produced
by straight gasoline. Ethanol
will also increase agricultural
production and boost the
industry. We would become a
more self-sufficient country in
this aspect.
Ethanol does have, a few
negative aspects. It has -less
energy than gasoline, so it gets
34 percent fewer miles per
gallon. But, with gas prices at
or above $3 per gallon, and the.
fact that the price per gallon of.
fuel with more ethanol ,would
be significantly, lower., these"
fev.er miles compared.to'p'rice.
savings would still' allo'l"
ethanol 'to be the winning
choice.
So the next time you pull up
to a pump that has ethanol as
an alternative,, remember the
slogan: "Live Green, Go
Yellow."


*** *
Getting along with others is True courage is not the
the essence of getting brutal force of vulgar
ahead, success being heroes, but the firm resolve
linked with cooperation,. of virtue and reason.
S-William Feather, -Alfred North Whitehead



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Read bToether, lorida

Statewide Reading Event October 2006


Read the book.
Play The Zero Game online.
Compete in an essay contest
for college scholarships'
(high school students).
Register online for a drawiog-to
win a trip to'Washington, DC.
www.VolunteerFloridaFoundation.org
Sponsored by
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FOUNDATION '
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A school and for 100% of all
the incoming freshmen to
graduate.
He feels he is working with
high quality students and staff,
and he is confident that he can
achieve his goal easily.
Nelson said the most
interesting part of his job here
at UCHS is the interaction
with the students.
"Never do I have the same
day twice!" he said.
When asked what message
he would give to each and
every student if he could sit
.them all down he said, "I


would tell each student to put
God first, do what's right, get
your education and the doors
will open."
While Nelson loves his job,
he also enjoys all kinds of
sports. He supports the Gators
and says that he loves to see
kids having fun.
He enjoys different kinds of
music ranging from old rock to
bluegrass., He even played the
guitar for a contemporary
Christian band. He enjoys
music by Jimmy Hendrix,
Randy Travis and Buddy
Holly.


NATIONAL CLERGY APPRECIATION MONTH
IN APPRECIATION of your faithful
commRitment to helping us grow
spiritually in Jesus Christ, wi give 'I
our gratitude. Thank you for your -
dedicated service to God, God's
word and God's people. Thank You
for your awesome leadership,
genuine acts of kindness, life Pastor
Patrirck Maxwell


changing and humorous senrons,
Sunday school lessons, bible studies and fellowships.
Pastor we want you to know that you have made such a
,i\\ difference in our lives and the lives-of many others.
g ,- May God continue to bless you.
,') We Love You!


Your Wife Pergina Maxwell, Patrick Jr and the
Victory Christian Center of Lake Butler Church Family r


MMUNITflDSTTSS 'tatewdnt'of 0 W'rilrship, Mandg'ernfi and CirculatIon
S POSTAL SERVICE. (Requstr ~opPiub~~nlcationsnlv.,


S 'A. ""l .-Im 3 R"Dow
SUnion Counit Time, 6 14 8 2 0 0 Sept. 28, 2006
4., 6 A~ Su P
S\Veek .. 5 d" $30.00
.* M -9A.-og 0 Off- loo, a a, P-wu00 060 ZP.,Z C ...Pw. .,
L.mdse, Kirkland
125 E lair, St.. Lake Butler, FL 32054. Union County L',"md"iland
6 ce 'p g.U o....0oiaeo.-... a, G.n..I6.O. O..s .,6m0.
P.O. Draer A, Starke, FL 32091-9998- ,
9 Pd N""* oid C.- UN..A do. oiP-.-ln. E60..ld n..ggr ED |Donor ween-)
John M. Miller, P.O. Drawer A, Starke, FL 32091-9998
Edit.r PN4w.-d-compfetoi.* a
Lindsey Kirkland, P.O. Dra er A. Starke. FL 32091-9998

John M. Miller, P.O. Drawer A, Starke, FL 32091-9998
\- "'* 0,O0.'~6 Ill 0 000' 6 g .0' 6,1 00 N 000 600m001U, -M ~


NR, M-os.can 11.00000e 0,i0.
Bradfird Counr2 Teiegubph. Lne P(. Drmtter A, Starke, FL 32091-9993
John M, and MadgeA. Miller PC)orlDTb.er A, Sluke, FL 32091-9998


12 PAWN 0 6,OdnMM o6,00oft000..60,0..,Is p cftbpwosOlm w lb..l a 06l "110601 ,-'.0.J Tho i.00k h



13. 10,,6(6606 *'14.l..o. 0.1. oCk.AWMDoo l
Union County Times Sept. 28, 2006

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'Live green, go yellow'


I


................ ................


A


Fii


L'


( **





Oct. 12, 2006 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 5A


.... Experiencing

. 1 ^Animal Kingdom...


BY GATOR SNYDER
Paw Print Staff Writer


This year Future Business
Leaders of America had their
second annual trip to welcome
their new and returning
members.
The trip was to Animal
Kingdom in Orlando. For only
$40 each, 16 of 65 UCHS
FBLA members enjoyed the


SI-1- 11- 11
Pictured above are members of the Union County High School Future Business Leaders of America club on a trip
to Disney World's Animal Kingdom.


Golf team
tees off with
a winning
season

BY GATOR SNYDER
Paw Print Staff Writer
At UCHS, we take great
pride in the sports we play, but
one that deserves more credit
is the golf team.
The team had a record of 15-
3 as of the end of September. It
looks to be the first winning
record in two years.
The head coach of the golf
team, Duke Emerson, said that
with a 15-3 record, their most
rewarding game was Hamilton
County.
During this, game, Devin
Osbourne and Kris Bracewell
had their best two scores of the
year with a 3 under and a 5
under.
With districts already held,
we are proud of our 2006 team
members who are as follows:
Seniors: Devin
Osbourne, T.J. Good,
Tyler O'Steen and Greg


park and went to several
different shops to buy gifts and
souvenirs.
They also had the
opportunity to mingle with
other FBLA members from
around the state because twice
per year it is "FBLA Day" at a
major Florida theme park.
These future business
leaders wear their T-shirts to
represent while networking
and having fun!


UCHS grad is

newest ag teacher


BY AMBERLEE
CRAWFORD
Paw Print Staff Writer
Amanda James is a brand
new teacher at Union County
High School. I
She was influenced to
become a teacher by having
high quality teachers in the
past, along with her love for
FFA and wanting to help
others achieve their best.
She came to UCHS because,
.she said, "It's my alma mater!"
She believes Union County's
school system is unique and
more like family than, any
other.
James would like to achieve
the following: all of her


Members of the 2006-2007 Union County High School golf team are (front, I-r)
assistant coach Terry Hamilton, Greg Parrish, Devin Osborne, Mike Cairel, Case
Emerson, Chance Howell, Kris Bracewell, James Carter, coach Duke Emerson,
(back) T.J. Good, Tyler Hamilton, Tyler O'Steen and Thomas Cason.


Parrish.
* Sophomores:
Hamilton,


Tyler
Kris


Bracewell,
Howell and
Cairel.


Chance
Michael


Freshmen: Tyler
Thomas, Thomas Cason
and James Carter.


Football players define 'Fighting Tigers'


BY HANNAH TUCKER
Paw Print Staff Writer
.. A fe%% years ago the, song
that included the lyrics, "I get
S knocked down, but I get up
again. You're never gonna get
me down" was popular.
This song really testifies to
-our fighting Tigers.
The team has had a tough
--schedule and many injuries,
but the good newsis that our
guys' keep fighting. It is also
-exciting because we know'that
some years are simply building
years in which the team
prepares for a bigger and better.
season.
With three more games this
season, we wish the Tigers" the
very best. Congratulations to.
all our football players who are
- rfot kept down: #1 Jimmy
Simmons WR/DB, #2 Justin


Griffin WR/DB, #3 Josh
Mitchell RB/LB, #5 Deven
Perry RB,-#6"JOrdan GTvaTI"
, WRIDB,. #7 Brodie Elli.-.",TE.-
#8 Nevin Johns TE/DL, #10
Jay Cardona TE, #14 Chris
Alexander QB, #15
Rashawde Meyers TE/DL,
#16 Austen Roberts QB, #17
Brett Southwell- LB, #21
Adam Cason WR, .#22
Joseph Kinsler WR, #26
Dillan Clyatt RB/DB, #30
Jonathan Howe DB, #31
Russell Elixson RB/DB, #32
Zack Starling DB, #33 Justin
Hanson RB/DL, #36 Brandon
Shoup RB/DR, #38 Aaron
Dukes LB, #44 Zach Blunk -
LB, #45 Zeke Scaff LB, #51
Mason Dukes OG/LB, #52
Matt Thomas OG, #53.
Anthony Wiley. C/LB, #54
Zach Dowling DL, #55
Kendyl Willis OG, #56 Trey


Hobson OT, #57 Larry
Gernat LB, #58 Dustin Floyd
- OL/LB, #59,.Clint Williams -
DL, $160 Daniel Nazworth .
OL, #61 Jeremy Shuler OL,
#62 Marquez Perry OL/DL,
#63 James Rooney OL, #65'
Austin Highland OL, #65
Tyler Stone DL, #66 Daniel
Rengering OL, #67 Scott
Childress OL, #68 Caleb
Williams OL, #71 Phillip
Young OL, #73 Justin
Crawford OL, #74 Marvin
Brooks OL, #76 Brian
Williams OL, #78 Aaron
McRae OT/DT, #80 Michael
Thurman DL, #86 Jordan
Williams WR, #87 Andres
Estrada WR, #88 Shama'ri
Holland WR/DB, #89 Aitzol
Pozueta WR/TE, #92 Adam
Waters DL, #93 Ja'Quan*
Simmons DL, #94 Michael
Chandler DL, #96 Robert


Mooneyham is Tigers' voice


BY HANNAH TUCKER
Paw Print Staff Writer
Have you ever sat at a Union
County Tiger football game
and heard the voice
announcing the plays?
Well, this information is the
result :of an interview with that
voice- Wallace Mooneyham.
He has been announcing at
Union County football games
for 35 years.
-.He became the voice of the
Tigers by chance when at one
game the regular announcer
could not make it.
The beginning may have
been by chance, but it soon
became an every Friday night
happening.
--From a fan in the stands to
the press box, Mooneyham
was always .there. cheering on.
his team. When asked what the
most exciting game he has
announced was, he answered,
"When Trinity Christian broke
Union County's' 52-game
-winning streak."
Not only has Mooneyham
seen many games that the
Tigers have played, but he has
seem many of the players go to
college and further their
education.
He said he was very pleased
to see them go on to the
college level to play.

Trust also your own
judgment, for it is your
most reliable counselor. A
man's mind has sometimes
S-a way of telling him more
than seven watchmen
'posted on a high tower.
-Ecclesiasticus


We are proud to have"
Mooneyham and his


Alvarez family
reunion set
for Oct. 14
A family reunion of the
descendants of Joseph "Jos6"
and Juana Barbee Alvarez will
be held on Saturday, Oct. 14,
at Northside Baptist Church on


dedication as the voice of the
Tigers game after game.


SR-16 in the Fellowship Hall.
Friends and family members
are urged to bring old
photographs, covered dishes,
desserts and tea or drinks.
Eating and drinking utensils
will be provided.
Lunch will be served at
about 12:30 p.m.


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students to make A's and B's,-
to win several .state FFA
championships and to
encourage her students to do
what's right and to do things
with excellence.
In regards to her future, she
pictures herself continuing as
an agriculture teacher here at
UCHS and as an advisor to the
biggest and best FFA chapter.
The most interesting thing
about her job is the students.
If she could sit each student
down and give them a message
it would be to seek
righteousness.
James said, "When we strive
to do what is right and what
glorifies God, life will have.
purpose. So do what's right,
and do it with excellence."


A glance into a

science classroom...


BY GATOR SNYDER
Paw Print Staff Writer
This year in Gayle Boyle's
science class, the biology
students are doing a science
project on the effect of food
coloring on fish.
We are using Red-bellied
catfish. They will be placed in
a controlled environment, and


we will see if the color of the
food changes the color of the
fish.
In this class project, the
requirements are four people to
a group,.and there can be no
more than one kind of
observation.
I Hopefully this class project
will spur some exciting science
fair projects.


Wilson DL and #98 Donald
Rosier DL.
.. ,.








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Page 6A UNION COUNTY TIMES Oct. 12, 2006


Members of the 2006-2007 Varsity Volleyball team are (front, I-r) Miranda Kent,
Chasity Lloyd,.Jessica Parrish, Lacey Webb, (back) Markie Emery, Hannah Hayes,
Kelly Bennett and Bianca Clemons. Not pictured: Tianna Jarvis and Cassandra
Burgess.



UCHS varsity volleyball players


try to better the program


BY MORGANNE SCHLIPF
Paw Print Staff Writer
The Tiger varsity volleyball
team is having a great year.
At the end of September,
they had a 6-8 record.
However, the season is not
over!
Miranda. Kent, a senior,
spoke highly of her fellow
teammates, including
highlighting some of their
strengths.
Kent credited junior-Hannah
Hayes as, the team's leader in
kills, junior Chasity Lloyd as
the team's leader for)digs and
sophomore Lacey Webb with


the most assists.
Lloyd said this year is
looking a lot better.. They have
a new coach who is trying to
better the program.
"He runs a tough team, but it
is worth it," she said.
Jessica Parrish, also a junior,
agrees that the team is doing.
better. They have improved,
and that has given them more
attention from the public.
She said, "If we play like a
team, we could have a winning
season."
She feels they need to work
on their teamwork skills now.
Tomorrow, Oct.' 13, the
Lady Tigers (both junior
varsity and varsity) are having


a chicken dinner fund-raiser.
Don't miss an opportunity to
support the volleyball
program.
With district competition for
the Lady Tigers beginning
Monday, Oct. 16, in
Interlachen, we wish the girls
much success!
Congratulations to all varsity
team members: '
Lacey Webb, (#3), Tianna
Jarvis (#4), Markie Emery,
(#5), Chasity Lloyd (#11),
Jessica Parrish (#12),
Hannah Hayes (#13), Miranda
Kent (#24), Bianca, Clemons
(#32), Kelly Bennett (#34) and
Cassandra Burgess (team
manager).,


Members of the 2006-2007 JV Volleyball team are (front, I-r) Kiara Holland, Jordan
Windham, Quanita Griffin and Amanda Slocum, (back) Kiera Sellers, Ashton
Howard and Brianne Clyatt. Not pictured: Alisha Badger.



junior varsity team seeks to break

streak, have winning season


BY AMNBERLEE
CRAIVFORD
Paw Prini Staft II rite,
Rumor has it, the junior
varsity volleyballl team has not
had a winning season since
1996.
This year is exciting for the
Lady Tigers. and the team
hopes that this year will be the
year that breaks the streak.
This year. the team is
achieving much success.


Several members of the
junior yarsit t olle-ball team I
said 'their most challenging
game yet has been the
Keystone Heights game, but
their most rewarding game was
the Matanzas game.
Freshman Brianne CIlatt
said, "%We have had a great
season, and %e hope it
continues. We are the Lady
Tigers, and we will not be
outworked."
2006 team members are


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Kiara Holland (f4,), Ashton
Howard (t12), Amanda
Slocumb 0.#15), 'Jordan
Windham (#20), Kiera Sellers
(#.22i. Brianne Clyatt (#23),
Quanita Griffin '.(#24) and
Alisha Badger (#34).

',


Tiger

Spotlight:

Deven Perry

BY GATOR SNYDER
Paw Print Staff Writer
Deven Perry is a running
back for the Union-County
Tigers football team.
I recently caught up with
this fellow sophomore and
discovered .that his most
rewarding game was against
Chiefland, where he rushed for
89 yards and caught two.
consecutive passes for 18
yards.
His worst game yet has been
against Newberry, where he
had 12 carries for 1.6 yards. He
also got a severe ankle sprain
in that game and had to sit out
during the second half.
At the time of this interview,
the Tigers had a 1-1 record in
their district, but Deven says
he will try his hardest to do his
part to get them to the playoffs
this year. Go Tigers!



When two

worlds collide

BY MORGANNE SCHLIPF
Paw Print Staff Writer
The Union County Tigers'
Homecoming football game, is
scheduled for Friday, Nov. 3.
The Tigers will be facing the
Rutherford Rams traveling all
the way from Panama City.
As you all know with
homecoming we have the
annual Tiger Growl, with the
performance of .skits, the
crowning of King and Queen,
and the introduction of the
senior football players
accompanied by their parents.
The theme for this year is
"When Two Worlds Collide."
The theme is the basis for the
skits, which will be performed
on Thursday, Nov. 2.
On Oct. 19, each class
needs to turn in their script, the,
music for their skit, and a list
of the participants. There will
no cars or live animals used-in
the skits this year, so that ,we
can hate them in the
auditorium if it rains. Skits
will be recorded Monday Oct.
23. through Thursday, Oct.
26..
The Homecoming Parade
w ill.be held on Friday, Nov. 3.
-Each class and club will be.
responsible for putting a float
together. The floats will also
go along with the theme. The
homecoming king and queen.
and court \\ill all ride in the
parade. Be sure.to tune in to
WUCR 107.9 the morning of
the parade for a live broadcast.
We are all getting very,













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-. ,
Ligh Tteh


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ake Rein Mniw r

(004)964-305
FAX (904)964-8628


excited about the Homecoming
events and we hope that you
are too!


UCHS puts

pep in its step

BY MORGANNE SCHLIPF
Paw Print Staff Writer
This school year is off to a
great start. We have had the
pep in our step with two
exciting pep rallies to support
our fighting Tigers.
The seniors have come away
with the spirit stick from each
pep rally. Earning the spirit
stick involves a few things'.
First each class is
responsible for a spirit wall
inside the school and outside at
the football field where the pep
rallies are held.
The wall inside must show
spirit for the school, and the
banner outside must show
spirit for the class. The walls
are judged, and those scores
are combined with the
judgment of who is the loudest
at the pep rally.
This is what determines
which class will come out on
top and win the spirit stick.
The seniors were also the


LEGAL


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR UNION
COUNTY
CASE #: 63-CA-2006-0037
WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
ADAM M. BRANNEN AND
TENNILLE R. BRANNEN, HIS
WIFE; JOE BRANNEN AND
REVONDA BRANNEN. HIS WIFE
DEFENDANTSS.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order rescheduling
foreclosure sale dated September 27,
2006, entered in Civil Case No. 63-
CA-2006-0037 of thfe Circuit Court of
the 8th Judicial Circuit in and for
Union County, Florida, wherein
WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK,
Plaintiff and ADAM M. BRANNEN
AND TENNILLE R BRANNEN, HIS
WIFE AND JOE BRANNEN AND,
REVONDA BRANNEN, HIS WIFE,
are delendant(s), I will sell to the
highest and besi bidder for cash, AT
THE FRONT STEPS OF THE
UNION COUNTY COURTHOUSE,.
LOCATED.. AT 103 UNION
C* OUNTY-COURTHOUSE, LAKE
BUTLER, UNION COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AT 11 A.M. ON OCT. 26,
2006, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit
A PARCEL OF LAND, LYING,
BEING AND SITUATE IN SECTION
34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE
18 EAST, UNION COUNTY,
FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: '
COMMENCE AT THE-
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
SAID SECTION 34, AND RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF
342.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING OF I THE
"HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED
PARCEL OF LAND; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 88 DEGREES 12
MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 315.08 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 35 MINUTES. 09'
SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE
OF 325.23 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 88 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A
DISTANCE OF 315.02 FEET TO.
THE INTERSECTION WITH SAID
,EAST LINE OF SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF NORTHWEST,
QUARTER OF SECTION 34;.
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00,
DEGREES 35. MINUTES 09
SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
EAST LINE OF SOUTHEAST
QUARTER OF NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF SECTION 34, A
DISTANCE OF 321.43 FEET TO


winners in the dance
competition, which took place
at our last pep rally.
The first pep rally involved
quite an obstacle course in
which the juniors were the
champions. However, the spirit
stick still belongs to the
seniors.
With one pep rally left, we
are looking forward to another
great event. The pep rallies are
a blast! Keep up the good
work!!! Go Tigers!!



TROOPS
Continued from p. 1A

about our futures." -Taylor
"Dear Soldier, do not worry
because Jesus and God are
with you wherever you
go. Now, here's a Bible verse:
If you have faith, you can say
to this mountain, move from
here to there, and it will move.
Nothing will be impossible for
you." -Kayla

The basic test of freedom
is perhaps less in what we -
are free to do than in what
we are free not to do.
-Eric Hoffer


THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO THE
PRESCRIPTIVE RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF A COUNTY MAINTAINED
GRADED ROAD OVER, ACROSS
AND ALONG.THE EASTERLY
BOUNDARY THEREOF.
TOGETHER WITH DOUBLEWIDE
MOBILE HOME, YEAR: 2003,
MAKE: HORTON MIRAGE, VIN
NUMBER H179424GL and
H179424GR, PERMANENTLY
AFFIXED THEREON.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED at LAKE BUTLER, Florida,
this 27th day of September, 2006.
REGINA PARRISH
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Union County, Florida
By: Julia Croft
Deputy Clerk
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry Highway
,Suite 112
"Tampa, FL33618
(813) 880-8888 9 :
( 83 10/52tchg.10/12

INVITATION TO BID
.Notice is hereby given that sealed
iIs will be accepted by the Union .,
.Oounty Board of Oounty,
Commissioners for Type S III
asphalt for a paving Project of
approximately 1.9 miles. Sealed bids
will be accepted until 12:00 PM
October 15, 2008. Bid specifications
may be obtained from the Board of
County Commissioners office
located at 15 Northeast First Street,
Lake Butler, Flonda, 32054, Monday
through Friday, 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM,
excepting legal holidays. The sealed
bids are to be retumed to the Board of
County Commissioners Office, 15
Northeast First Street, Lake Butler,
Florida 32054.
Opening of the bids will be a regular
agenda item at the County
Commissioners meeting October 15,
2006 beginningat 7:00 P.M.
10/12 1tchg.

INVITATION TO BID
Notice is hereby given that sealed
bids will be accepted by the Union
County Board of County
Commissioners for limerock, in
place for a paving project of
approximately 1.9 miles. Sealed bids
will be accepted until 12:00 P.M.
October 15, 2006. Bid specifications
may be obtained from the Board.of
County Commissioners office
located at 15 Northeast First Street,
Lake Butler, Florida 32054, Monday
through Friday 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM,
excepting legal holidays. The sealed
bids are to be returned to the Board of
County Commissioners Office, 15
Northeast First Street, Lake Butler,
Florida 32054.
Opening of the bids will be a regular
agenda item at the County
Commissioners' meeting October 15,
2006, beginning at 7:00 p.m.
10/12 ltchg.


C'







'1:


Worskoi t th .Oe ofthSoe ets week

L The churches and businesses listed below

S urge you to attend the church of your choice!


* '~

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_, 200b ...... COUNT > ......i Paye 7A



September brought the first Tiger Idol event


BY HANNAH TUCKER
Paw Print Staff Writer
Sept. 21 was the first Tiger
Idol of the '06-'07 school year.
There are 13 contestants
participating in this year's
Tiger Idol. Each month they


How to
BY HANNAH TUCKER
Paw Print Staff Writer
Living in Florida people are
aware that hurricane season is'
from June until November.
The media always talks
about how we need to be
prepared with batteries, water,
candles, canned food items,
etc.
To a Florida farmer,
knowing about and having
these supplies is not enough.


will sing a song of a different
theme.
In September, .each
contestant sang a song of his or
her choice. This month the
Tiger Idol theme is country.
Contestants will give a
performance of their favorite


prepare
What about the cattle, horses
and other animals that live on
the farm? All that a person has
to do is load themselves up and
head to another state, but, a
farmer has to ensure that their
farms are ready as well. The
question is how do they get the
farm and animals ready'?
For a cattle farmer, make
sure your fence is secure and
that your pond or water source
is ready for the extra amount
of water that will be coming.


country song.
This month's Tiger Idol will
be held on Thursday, Oct. 19,
in the Union County High
School auditorium. At this
Tiger Idol, the first elimination
will be held.
Even though every one of


the contestants did
extraordinarily well at the first
Tiger Idol, this elimination
will have to cut a person who
the audience' thought was the
least talented.
We want to wish the best to
all Tiger Idol participants,


which include:
Michelle Hunter
Kaleb Clyatt
Ashley Crawford
Darren Clark
David Anthony Wallace
Ashley Benton
Melissa Dukes


Grace Rambo
Tyler Gordon
Tara Kirkpatrick
Trisha Berrier
James Wring
Camryn Wisner.


different animals for a hurricane


If you do not have a pond, you
need to collect water in barrels,
at least enough for a week in
case of an electricity outage.
Since water pumps off of
electricity and you do not-
know how long you will be
gone with your family, a week
is a good start.
Also, be sure to have ample
amounts of feed in your feed
bins. It may be necessary to
leave the cattle until the storm
passes. So be sure that the


feed bins do not require
electricity to release the feed.
On a horse farm you need to
check your stalls to be sure
that the roofs are secure and
that the latches can hold the
extra wind that is sure to
accompany a hurricane. You
also need to prepare the stalls
for the extra time that the
horses will be staying indoors.
Place a lot of bay for comfort.
A horse farmer, just as a
cattle farmer, will also need to


consider feed and water. A
s '-ill horse farrnei has the
luixirv of loading -ip their
horses and takinci them with
the family i min h,;,els wi 1
accommnodatc larin fami'ies
and their tIn,.'s. Simply 'call
before the storni to locate these,
hotels.
For the small animal farmer
of goats, sheep, chickens, or
even rabbits, the procedure is
really the same as the large
animal farmer. Secure the


animals. Collect the necessary
food items and be sure the:
animals have access to feed&
and water for at least a week. -
As far as pets, if leaving
home is necessary, never leave:
a dog or cat indoors alone-.
There are hotels and shelters-
that will accommodate smalLt
animals. However, when you-
are out gathering canned food,
and flashlights, remember your,
pet's food and enough water
for them_as well.


LBES gathers
at flag pole
for prayer
Students at Lake Butler
Elementary School
participated in See You at the
Pole on Sept. 27.
See You at the Pole is ai
national event where students


Toys for Kids
sign-up times
Families who are in need of
help at Christmas can sign
their children up at thp Lake
Butler Elementary School
Cafeteria on Saturday, Oct.
28, and Saturday, Nov. .4,
S from 10 a.m. -1 I p.m.
i An additional sign-up
opportunity will be Monday,
Nov. 6, from 4-6 p.m.

Toys for Kids
holds fund-
raisers
Toys-for Kids.js accepting,
donations f-.ot- baked -goods --
today,", Thurs'dlay, Oct. 1'2'-
. before 6 p.m. .
The actual bake sell will be
held Friday, Oct. 13, at Union
Correctional Institutior.
Toys for Kids is also now
taking orders for chicken and
rice dinners. Dinners are $5
and will be delivered Friday,
Oct. 27, from 11 a.m.- 12:30
p.m. Jerry Whitehead and.
Henry Fowler will be cooking
the dinners.
Call the library to preorder
I at (386) 496-3432. ,
Donations can be dropped
off at the Union County Public
Library, 175 W. Main St., in
" Lake Butler.
Additionally, there will:be a -
fund-raising car wash at Spires
IGA on Saturday, Oct., 21,
from 8 a.m.-1 p.m.


gather on a voluntary basis at
their school's 'flag pole for
prayer. It is held the fourth
Wednesday in September.
,LBES's service brought
students, as well as teachers
and parents, to the flag pole
shortly before 7:30 a.m. and
lasted about 10 minutes.
See You at the Pole first
started in Texas in 1990,


according to the Web site
www.syathp.com, when a
small group of teenagers
gathered at their flag pole to
pray for friends and their
school. Less than a year later,
the event had more than 1
million participants.
Now, there are several
million participants each year.


AT RIGHT: Students, teacher and members of the
community gathered at Lake Butler Elementary
School's flag pole Sept. 27 to pray in .the national event
See You at the Pole. Pictured are (1-r) Mikal Erwin,
Principal Lynn Bishop, third-grade teacher Rhonda
Willingham, second-grade teacher Celeste Saunders,
nurse Diane Sweat, Kate Deshong and Bruce Jewell
(from Sardis Baptist Church in Worthington Springs).


LBES parents
must pick up
report cards
It is nearing the end of the
first nine weeks, and report
cards are almost ready.


Parents or legal guardians
must pick report cards, up.
They will not be sent home
with the child. Contact the
child's teacher to set up an
appointment to discuss any
,questions or concerns you
have.


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Ill


EuergoIe Benefits!

When you shop with o ur
Union County merchant j
/youhelp out a lot'of
activities in your
community

your community -
,merchants Support High

School RcUtiliteS to

Band,0 oot all, Baseba

Tennis,, FF R, KRR, Pop
Warner, 4-li, Clubs,

.Rnd other...
SVeterans Organizations,
Seniors, Churches Scous,
and a lot more...
These organizations
make our community a n
better place to liue and
add value to our lives.
Your local merchant is
glad to help out but they
need your support.
when you have a need
that ou can fulfill in the

Union County area, your
patronage will be -0
appreciated...



The Union County Times encourages all to
shop with our advertisers...
For a stronger business community.


II


- _I






PageoA UNION


Aim.


Elections
office
announces
early voting
The Union County
Supervisor of Elections office
will hold early voting for the
Nov. 7 election from Monday,
Oct. 23, to Saturday, Nov. 4.
The elections office will
open on the two Saturdays
during that time, Oct. 28 and
Nov. 4, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
The elections office would
alsb like to remind residents to
update their voter information
with the correct 911 addresses.


Elzy Chapel
Cemetery
Assoc. to
meet Oct. 17
The Elzy Chapel Cemetery
Association will hold its
annual meeting on Tuesday,
Oct. 17, at 7 p.m.
All board members should.
attend the meeting to be held at
Sardis Baptist Church.



Veteran's Day
ceremony,
parade to be
held Nov. 10
The Union County Veteran's
Day celebratory events are
scheduled for Friday, Nov. 10.
They begin --with ceremony
at the Veteran's Monument on
Main Street in Lake Butler at 9
a.m., followed by a parade
through the town at 11 a.m.
The cadets of the Union
County High School Tiger
Battalion will present a tribute
to veterans of our nation's past
wars.
A selection of military relics
on loan from the Florida
National Guard Museum will-
be on display representing the
American Revolution, the
Civil War, World War I and II,
the Korean War and the two
wars in the Gulf. In' keeping
with the tradition .of the
JROTC program, the program
will be completely student run-,
.While the high school's
JROTC will be coordinating
the morning ceremony, at 11
a.m., the local' elerans' groups
will be parading along with the
UCHS Marching Band and
cheerleaders. Other
community organizations will
algo participate and follow a
route that passes by the
courthouse and. all .three
schools.
Line-up will be at 10:30 a.m.
adjacent to the Lake Butler
Seafood House and- Grille.
Cadet Lt. Col. Sarai Young
will serve as the parade
marshal.
Lake Butler VFW Post
10082 will have barbecue
dinners available at the Lake
Butler community center and
at the veteran's monument.

Sons of
Confederate
Veterans,
meets Oct. 12
The Sons of Confederate
Veterans, Camp 1463 Battle of
Olustee, meets Thursday, Oct..
12, at 7 p.m. at the Lake City-
Columbia County -Historiea-
Museum in Lake City.
.The museum is located at
157 S.E. Hernando Avenue.
SThe meeting is open to the
public, and everyone is
welcomed. Individuals who
have Confederate ancestors or
believe they do are encouraged
Sto attend to see what the SCV
has to offer.
SIndividuals who do not have
Confederate ancestors, but are
interested in the study of
history arnd the Civil War
should also attend.
S Contact Camp Adjuitant E.J.
Stanley at spectorl @alltel.net
for further information.
SCV meets the second
Thursday of each month.

Class of 2006


pictures need
to be picked
up
If you are a member of
Union County High School's
class of 2006 and submitted
pictures for the senior
presentation/video to Charlotte'
Emerson, these pictures need
to be picked up.
I See Darla Davis at Union
County High School to collect
your photos. For more
information, contact Davis at
(386) 496-4858.'


ABOVE: Union County resident Mel Howard sells
tickets for an entry into the drawing for door prizes
Oct. 4, at "Hold 'Em for Hope," a breast cancer
awareness fund-raiser and luncheon that included a
silent auction, Vera Bradley merchandise, giveaways
and guest speakers.


UCHS class
of 1996 sets
reunion for
Nov. 3-4
The Union County High
School class of 1996 has
.planned its 10-year reunion
for the weekend of Nov. 3-4.
The class of 1996 will meet
at the UCHS. cafeteria for
catered Tiger tailgating prior
,to the Homecoming game on


Friday, Nov. 3, against
Rutherford. Children of class
mefnbers are invited for free.
The reunion will extend to
the evening of Saturday, Nov.
4, at Plantation Oaks Turkey
Creek for dinner and
reminiscing. Price per adult
ticket is $50.

Call Karrie Patrick at (386)
496-0614 to reserve your spot
at the.reunion. Class members
should respond by Saturday,
Oct. 21.


The nine women who got the breast cancer awareness event started in Union
County were (1-r) Belinda Manukian, Nannette Starling, Paula Hawkins, Stacey
Hayes, Denise Dukes, Pam Woodington, Debbie Dolski, Mel Howard and
(kneeling) Courtnie Douglas.


I-- -I


OUnion County Public Library


Street:


Butler, Florida 32054


4.96-3432


1285


http ://union .newriver. lib. fl.us


Dear Library Supporter,
The Union County Public Library is getting ready to begin its ,. .
construction project for a new, larger facility. In an effort to raise funds ', '. ':','. -
for this much-needed building, the library is accepting-donations for 'f .'
parts of the picture shown on the next page. The painting that was ..T -,-* .-
created for this project (painted by Marie Wiggs Tyre) will be '
translated into a giant mural on the meeting room wall of the new
library, building. It is estimated that each animal on the mural will be ...
life-size or larger.Listed below are the prices for each item. Just think .
of the lasting benefits that you can have with your small investment-
the name of your business listed in the library for years, your family's ,
name showing support of the library, and our community's education,
dedication in memory of loved one, and much more... '
Each item listed will have a plaque that corresponds to the item. "

Leaf on the Tree:........................................ $200 Flying Egrets......................................$1,000/pair
Limb on the Tree:................................. ..... $500 Large Bird:........................... ....... $1,000
Small Bird:...................................................$500 Bear:...... ............... ...$1,000
Sm all R eptile:..............................................$500 A lligator:.................................................. $1,000
Squirrel:.......................................................$500 D eer:................. ....... ................$2,000
Raccoons:..............................$ 1,000/pair Panther: ......................................... ..... $2,000
Trunk of Tree:......................................... $5,000

If you are interested in helping build your new library

by making a donation for a part of the mural,

please call Mary Brown, library director, at 386-496-3432


Noer u edr.





Zh U~ot auft Pbirirrha oqbefatwl sr


Lake


175 West Main


Phone (386)
Fax (386) ,


~~1_:


49~36-









:Section B: Thursday, Oct. 12, 2006






News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region area




ARC seeks participants for Disability Mentoring Day


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Employers, are you looking
for dependable employees who
have a desire to work and do -
their best? Then you might
want to consider participating
in Florida Disability
Mentoring Day on Wednesday,
Oct. 18.
The program, which takes
place during National
Disability Employment'
Awareness Month, is part of a
national, broad-based effort to
promote career development.
The ARC (Association for
Retarded Citizens) of Bradford
County, as well as other ARC
programs throughout the state,:
are participating.
"We're hoping to --get
employers to see the benefits
of hiring a person with
disabilities," said Johnnie
Mosley, community
-eimployment specialist with the
Bradford ARC.
Mosley said from her
experience, employers who
hire people with disabilities are
hiring people who have three
qualities: they are dependable,
they show up for work every
day and they aim to please.
The problem is that many of
the consumers the Arc of
Bradford County serves do not
know what kinds of jobs are
out there for them.
Hopefully, Disability
Mentoring Day will change
that.
"Most of our individuals
have never worked, so they
don't know what's available to
them," Mosley said. "This is
our way of exposing them to
more job opportunities in the
community and exposing the
.employers to the excellence of
these (potential) employees."
The program is set up so that
it really is no hardship for a
participating employer. It costs-
nothing to participate and the
time devoted to either
shadowing or touring
opportunities depends upon
how much time the employee
can spare.
"It can be for a couple ol
hours," Mosley said, though
she added it would be
preferable if job shadows were
allowed to spend four hours a'
the work site.



New BC

branch office

to open

Monday
The Bradford County
Courthouse .officials' branch
office at the Santa- Fe
Community College Watson
Center will open this Monday,
Oct. 16, at 9 a.m.
. ""-Operating hours will be 9
a.m.-4 p.in. Monday through
Friday. I ,
Services, provided by the
clerk of the court, property
appraiser and tax collector will
be made available, while a
deputy with the, Bradford
County Sheriff's Office will
also make use of the space.
"What we hope to do is
provide as many serve ices there
as we feasibly can (to the
citizens of the southern portion
of Bradford County),"
Property Appraiser Jimmy.
Alvarez said.
Terry Vaughan, the
supervisor of elections, said
his office- woild not have as,
much of a presence as the
other offices' since people can
register to vote .when they.
obtain or renew their driver's
...licenses-which ihey will be
able to do at the Watson
Center. However, he did
anticipate having voter
registration drives .there from
time to time: '
The phone number of the
branch office is (352) 473-
5339. '


The most effective way to
cope with change is to help
create it.
-LW. Lynett


Cherish all your happy
moments: they make a fine .
cushion for old age.
S -Christopher Morley


In both shadowing and
group tour opportunities, Arc
personnel will be present to
assist so as not to place a
burden on employers. In fact,


it is the same when an
employer actually hires a
person with a disability. A job
coach works with the
employee to train him or her


on the skills required. The job
coach is always available to
follow up on the employee's
progress.
"Actually, they're getting


two employees tor one,"
Mosley said.
Anyone who is interested in
giving someone an opportunity
on Florida Disability


Mentoring Day may call
Mosley at (904) 964-7699. For
general information on Florida
Disability Mentoring Day, log
onto www.floridadmd.org.







Page 2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006



Carpentry class helps students find better future


BY MARCIA MILLER
Telegraph Staff Writer
Most teenagers with a high


school diploma cannot expect
to earn $14. an hour upon
graduation, but the students
working in the carpentry class










.: IF





4 .1


. .,


A recent workshop was held
:by Patrick Maxwell, Lake
:Butler Middle School's 21st
;Century Learning Center
Coordinator, to educate parents
;about MySpace.com and its
potential dangers.
MySpace is the latest online
,hot spot for young people to
!socialize. Free to users, the
Web site. is. paid for by
advertisers who have. also
caught on to the craze as a way
,to reach a younger audience,
the most profitable market
.today.
; In 1998, MySpace.com was
launched as an online storage
and file sharing site. The idea
!did not catch on and it was
shut down in 2001.
Reopened in 2003, the
.currently used MySpace.com
was started by a then
University) of California
studentn, Tom Anderson.
Currently the third most
popular website in the United
States, and the sixth most
'popular in the nation, as of
Sept. 8, 2006, MySpace.com
reported 106 million user
accounts, averaging 230,000
new users per day
i Up until about four months
.ago, Patrick Maxwell, also
pastor at Victory Christian'
;Center in Lake Butler, was not
'familiar with the phenomenon
.taking place at MySpace.com.
Young people at his church,
.where he has been the pastor
for 8 1/2 years, began to
encouraging him to create a
MySpace account.
He found that setting. up a.
MySpace account is relatively
easy. In fact. millions of young
people that create profiles can
hook up with their friends, get"
;to know new friends, and make,
contact with students in other
:area schools,
All that one needs to
jcreatp a MySpace profile is a
:valid e-mail address. The age
. requirement for opening an
account is 14 years of age, but,
many just simply bypass this
and falsify their ages. '.
Young people are readily


at the Bradford-Union Area
Career and Technical Center in
Starke can expect just that.
Tyler Moore is in the class
for his second year and is
working on completing his
final certification. There are
four certifications available in
the program and if a student
earns all of them, instructor
Mike Beville said a graduate
could expect to start out at
about $14 per hour.
"If they do a good job in the
apprenticeship program and
gain about two to three years
of experience, they can expect
a salary between $18 and $20
per hour," Beville said.
Two or three years of
experience-$18 to $20 per
hour ... sounds pretty good,
doesn't it? Moore said he
thinks so.
The apprenticeship program
is a work-study program. After
graduating from the technical
center program with the
certification, a student would
work in the industry-at about
$14 per hour-while


Now Showing
Kevin Costner in


GUARDIAN

Fri. 8:45
Sat. 8:45
sun 7:O0o
Wed. -Thurs. 7:15


the higher the wages earned.
The carpentry program
started out as a new program at
the technical center last year.
Moore started in the class at
that time. If' he completes the
course, he will be its first
graduate.
High school students from
Bradford and Union counties
can take the course free of
charge as a part of their high
school curriculum. Adults can
also take the course as a part of
the technical center program,
but they will have to pay
$2,100 in tuition for the full
course. A lab fee of $25 per
semester is also charged.
The class trains students
who work toward various skifl
levels. Each skill level carries
its own certification. The first
level is carpenter helper. It
takes about 300 course hours
to reach that certification. The
second, level is trim/finish
carpenter and industry
carpenter. The third is
frame/rough carpentry. The


Instructor Mike Beville talks to adult student Calvin completing additional training final level is full carpenter.
Instructor Mike Beville talks to adult student Calvin sponsored by his or her A student can exit the course
Lane about the proper way to use this saw as Lane employer. The more training
makes a dry run-before the saw is turned on. and experience a student gets, See CLASS, p. 9B



Parents receive education on MySpace

BY TERESA posting diaries (known as pull up his profile page, view Keystone Heights Jr. Sr. High
STONE-IRWIN blogs), photo albums, gossip, pictures and read all about has 228.
Telegraph Staff Writer their likes and dislikes, and him. Additionally, there are


Starts Fri., Oct. 13
Amber /I/ l.i ,,i




Fri. 7:05, 9:00
Sat. 5:05, 7:05, 9:00
Sun. 5:05. 7:05
Wed. Thurs. 7:30


sometimes even phone
numbers and home addresses.
Maxwell said, "It's a lot
easier for a shy person to make
contact with others using the
Internet. This way, they do not
have to fear being rejected in
public.
Kids who may not speak to
each other in a classroom
setting where their peers are
watching, will communicate
freely using MySpace. The
downside to this is that face to
face communication is now
being replaced with online
socialization."
One of Maxwell's most
surprising finds was that young
people have no problem at all
sitting in front of a computer
and revealing. personal
information about themselves
to millions of people whosthey
do not even know.
"These kids wouldn't dream
of letting their parents see
some of this stuff. This is not
only crazy, it's dangerous. I
don't think that they are aware
that what they are putting on
their profiles can be seen by
Internet predators who will
likely try to make contact with
them," said Maxwell.
To demonstrate how easy it
is to find a user's profile,,
Maxwell performed a
MySpace search on one of his
male students.
By simply typing in the
student's name, within 30
seconds, Maxwell was able to


iBy pulling up that one
person's profile, a user can
now connect with numerous
profiles of other students that
are added to his "friends list,"
and each of them will link to
even more students, and so on.
Potential sexual predators
are able to do the very same
thing. ,
Many teens will oftentimes
have provocative or otherwise
inappropriate photos posted
with their profiles.
"I've seen underaged
students from area schools
displaying pictures of them
and their-friends drinking beer,
smoking or engaging in drug
use. I have to deny adding that
person to my friends list
because of their photos or
some otherwise inappropriate
content on thelr profiles,"
Maxwell said. .
And just why do young
people feel the need to post
pictures like this to an Internet
audience?
Maxwell feels that it's just
another form of a popularity
contest. Everyone wants to feel
attractive.
Children as young as 8 years
of age have caught on 'to the
MySpace phenomenon and are
finding it as a means to
become popular.
According to an online
search, Bradford High School
has 487 youths registered as
current students, Union County.
High School has 288, and


numerous 'groups within
MySpace that users can join.
Within each group, members
can begin and participate in
forum discussions.
Along with class alumni,
area teens have set up groups
for JROTC, Christian youths,
high school bands and sports
teams, to name a few.
Users in these groups should
be aware that one does not
need to be a member of the
JROTC or the band to view the
group's page and forums.
One group belonging to an
area high school band has the
drawing of a nude male ahd
female for the band's profile
photo. The profile lists a 37-
year-old female as the group's
moderator.
See' MYSPACE, p".6
~ ~ ~ ~ r -"^~?"n


Measure twice and cut once ... (1-r) Jon Leonard, Chris
Knowles and Calvin Lane make measurements while
working on a project.


* ^*
**

Holiday Open House

at

Christie Allen's


Decorative Painting
October 19th 21st 10 a.m. 4 p.m.


Shop early for your ]Holiday Decor *
*J20% discount during Open House


Ornaments Candles & Accessories *


*


I land-painted decor
* Coturnet Foods & Chocolates
Baskets


i


.2 \ S. Walnut St.., across from Auto Zone *
964-9080

* t>< *^e ^f


River of Life, Church of God

Fall Bazaar and Craft Show

October 20 & 21

Fri 8am to 6pm Sat 8am to 2pm

.Hot Harvest Muffins will be ready early Friday morning & Soup and
Sandwich will be available at lunch on both days.

We will have a wide variety -of, crafts arid food items for everyone, young
and old. Christmas items, wooden crafts, handmade candles, quilted
items, soaps and lotions, ceramics, jams and jellies, candies, hot'n spicy
sauces, pickles and much more.,

_. MENTION THIS AD AND

1 ik WE'LL HAVE MINI MUFFINS & A HOT.CUP P4i
OF COFFEE FOR YOU TO SIT & ENJOY. u4&

Located across s from the Fairgrounds in Starke on US 301 North.

For more information call 904-964-8835


Florida Twin Theatre
.lII Sea, $5.1)0 Icrlore 6 p.m. 964-5451 '"CI.OSED MON & "TUES"D
Visit us on-line at WWW.FloridaTwinTheatre.com)


-ulu-laI
Now Showing
Martin Law"rence in,




Fri. 7:00
Sat. 5:00, 7:00
Sun 5:00


'-~~ "


.






Oct. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 3B


Pumpkin Escape offers

Sr' .candy, games and more


Dalton Cassell (left) and Justin Long draw diagrams of their cookies before they
begin attempting to remove the raisins.

Bradford Middle science


students 'dig cookies


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
He outran a giant boulder
that was barreling down on
him, ready to crush him if he
took a 'wrong step; He
overcame his fear of snakes
and outwitted Nazis.
It was hard work, to say the
least, but Indiana Jones finally
made it to the prize he was
seeking-a cookie with raisins
in it.
A cookie? OK, so maybe no
archaeologist, real or fictional,
would consider a cookie much


of a treasure, but Bradford
Middle School students
recently participated in a
classroom exercise in which
they acted as archaeologists
and cookies were what they
were probing with their
instruments.
Students in the science
classes of Roger Chilson and
John Tinsler were each given a
cookie with raisins in it. The
cookie represented a piece of
earth. The raisins represented
artifacts buried in the earth.
Since students couldn't visit


a real archaeological site,
Tinsler said the goal of the
exercise was, to bring the "site"
to them.
Tinsler distributed
instruments to students that
they were to use to "excavate"
the raisins from their cookies.
The cookies, however, could
not be picked up or
manipulated in any way. After
all, a real archaeologist can't
pick up a large piece of earth
and look underneath it in an
attempt to see what artifacts
are there,
"(The cookie) must stay
right side up, and you have to
dig in and find all of the
artifacts," Tinsler told his
students.
Students first had to measure
their cookies, then draw a,


See COOKIES, p. 9B


BY MARCIA MILLER
Telegraph Staff Writer
This year's Great Pumpkin
Escape promises to draw
thousands of children and
parents to downtown Starke on
Saturday, Oct. 28, from 5-9
p.m.
Pumpkin Escape is
sponsored by the Downtown
Business Community
Association and will be spread
out in the downtown area on
Call, Walnut and Thompson
streets.
The free candy will be given
out from 6-8 p.m., but the
carnival-style games,
entertainment, contests and fun
will last until 9 p.m.
Games are run by nonprofit
groups. Some are free and
some are run as fund-raisers
for the various groups. ,n
those, the prices to play range
from small change to $1.
"It should be a lot of fun for
everyone," said organizer
Norma Donn.
Steel Country will be the
featured band. The band will
perform on a stage set up in
the city parking lot adjacent to
city hall. Dancing contests will
be run throughout the evening
on the stage.
The city parking lot will also
play host to a spooky haunted
house. Admission for the
haunted house is $3.
.Proceeds from booth rental
go to fund next year's
Pumpkin Escaple, but the
proceeds from the' haunted
house are earmarked to fund a
business scholarship being set
up in memory of one of the
members of the DBCA, Naomi
Herres, who passed away.
Herres owned the Merle
Norman .store in -downtown
Starke and was very active in
the various events sponsored in
downtown. The scholarship


will be awarded to a Bradford
High School student who is
interested in pursuing a career
in business.
For the competitive among
us, there are a few contests
available. A costume contest
will take place on the stage at
city hall at 6:30 p.m. Judging
will oecur at 7 p.m.
Of course, what's a
Halloween event without a
jack-o-lantern? A pumpkin
carving contest will take place
at 5 p.m. on the corner of Call

The only kind of dignity
which is genuine is that
which is not diminished by
the indifference of others.
-Dag Hammarskjold


Auto Accidents
Work Injuries
Headaches
Neck and Back Pain


601 E. Call St.
Hwy. 230, Starke


and Thompson streets.
Pumpkin entries must be
'turned in by 1 p.m.
A variety of foods will also
be for sale by different
vendors.
Photos with live tigers and
live alligators will be available
during the event.
There are still a few spaces
left for vendors, so if your
group is interested in
participating, contact Donn at
(904) 964-4420.

Children aren't happy with
nothing to ignore, And
that's what parents were
created for.
-Ogden Nash


Dr. Virgil A. Berry
CHIROPRACTIC
PHYSICIAN I


964-8018


Melissa Clark digs into her cookie using a couple of
tools.


A ~h1A~AY ~ ~A' 4~h~~b1 ~


gThe Eu:>0











1 16 Grammy & Dove.Awards...and millions
of people world-wide say "AMMEN!"



Madison Street Baptist Church

Presents In Concert



"Larnelle Harris"



Sunday, October 1Sth @ 6:00 p.m.

"Come and join us for an evening of worship."


S900 W. Madison Street

r Starke, Fl 32091

Dr, Chad Everson, Sr. Pastor


2),.


TRERAPEUTIC MASSAU BY

Mary ColemanimParley LMT
I MA 34282 304357-00











Editorial/Opinion
rn
Thursday, Oct. 12, 2006 Page 4B
T'.
f Ti

I The Senate got it right this time


Let's cut to the chase immediately.
When the Senate refused (by one vote)
to approve an amendment that would
outlaw the burning of an American
flag, its head overruled its heart, and
it did the right thing by the slimmest
of margins.
Don't get me wrong. I abhor the
burning of an American flag as much
as anyone, and I hope no one ever
attempts to do so in-my presence. But
there is an overriding issue here that is
even more importantto everyAmerican
found in the First Amendment to the
Constitution, commonly referred to as
freedom of speech.
The U.S. Supreme Court has
interpreted the burning of an American
flag as being a freedom of speech issue,'
but I see the act as being a defiant act
of hostility fostered by ignorance,
ingratitude and -ignorance, because,
America, in spite of its imperfections,
is still the greatest government ever
conceived by the mind of man.
The country operates within a
Constitution that contains a Bill of
Rights. By desecrating the American
flag, individuals exhibit their lack of
appreciation for the founding fathers
and every serviceman or woman who
served in the military in war or peace
since, 1776.
The. Senate; in its vote, sent two
messages to the world; as individuals
senators dislike flag burners, but,
sitting as protectors of the Constitution,
they believe freedom of speech is
the overriding issue and must be
protected, even at the cost of being
misunderstood by many voters.
The Bill of Rights contains 14'
individual rights, five of which are
contained,4 ii the Firstt Amendiment.:
Among these rights are 1he freedom to.
-worship, freedom of speech, freedom
of the press, the right to peaceful
assembly and the right to petition the
government.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


BC children
and parents--
say thanks to
Fair Assoc.
The cirt of Starke Recreation
Board and staff would like to
express our most heartfelt
appreciation to Chub Johnson,
fair coordinator, and the Fair
AssociaUon for use of the
fairgrounds buildings and
midway area to house the 2006
summer day camp program.
Without your concern. 270
aBradf-rdCounty -frn-ilies-
would have been left without
summer child care.
We would like to extend to
you; the many, many thanks
expressed by the parents of the
children who attended the 2006


A story in the sports section of the
Gainesville Sun (Tuesday, July 4,
2006) related an incident of April 25,
1976, that warmed my heart. Rick
Monday, playing center field for the
Chicago Cubs, came to bat in the
fourth inning. Ken Crosby, pitching
for the Dodgers, had thrown the first
pitch when Monday realized that
two men coming on the field were
planning on burning an American flag.
Announcer Vin Scully said, "Wait a
minute, there's an animal loose. Two
of them! I'm not sure what he is doing
out there. It looks like he's going to
burn a flag. And Rick Monday runs
and takes it away from him!"
The two men, father and son, stopped
in left center field, put the flag down
and began putting lighter fluid on it.
Monday flew down the third base line
as fast as his feet would carry him,
snatched the flag from off the ground
and continued to outrun the two
would-be flag burners. Dodgers coach
Tommy Lasorda came off the bench
and began running toward the men,
and assisted security in apprehending
the two. The crowd of 25,167 rose to,
its collective feet and began singing
"God Bless America."
The same flag returned to Dodger
Stadium this past July 4 for the first
time in 30 years and will be featured
in a pre-game ceremony.
Freedom of speech. It is too precious
to be denied, even in part. Monday is
a hero for saving the flag on that
day 30 years ago, but he errs in his
support for an amendment to suppress
flag burning.
The U.S. Supreme Court is wrong
in classifying the issue as freedom
of -speechl g .g ipg phjql-,,.
,prqhi.bit.edlas an act of hostility, with
appropriate punishment.
By Buster Rahn,
Telegraph Editorialist


summer da) camp.
We feel this was our most
organized summer toadate, with
a record number of participants
which was afforded b. the
additional space at the
fairgrounds.
Thanks again from the
Recreation Department staff.
Recreation Board members and.
most of all, from the Bradford
County children who had a
blast this summer.
Pat Welch
Recreation Board Chainnan
Alica McMillian
Director of Recreation


Thanks from
NRVFR
Dear Editor:
The members of the New


River Volunteer Fire Rescue
(NRVFR) would like to thank.
(he public for its support of
our recent bake sale. The
turnout %was much greater than
we expected and the generosity
of our neighbors will make a
sizable addinon to our building
fund.
We invite everyone to stop
by and see the improvements
that are being made to both the
station and the meeting area.
Once again, thank you all very
much for your support
Joseph W.Gangi
Chief



An investment in
knowledge always pays the
best interest.
-Benjamin Franklin


OBITUARIES


Carl Carter
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS- Carl
Carter 1, 81, of Keystone Heights
died Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2006, at
Shands Alachua General
Hospital.
Born in Providence, R.I., Mr.
Carter was raised in
Jacksonville, moving to
Keystone Heights in 1979. He
was a merchant marine, retiring
in 1985 and a member of MEBA.
He was a member of Masonic
A&FM Park Place Lodge 1172
and Melrose Lodge. He also was a
member of the Order of Eastern
Star, Waldo Chapter 120. He was
a member of the Gethsemane
Lutheran Church in Gainesville.
Mr. Carter is survived by: his
wife, Pauline Carter of Keystone
Heights; five daughters, Donna
Robinson of Rockdale, Texas,
Paula Camp of Houston, Texas,
Carla Orth of West Palm Beach,
Lisa Seymour of Keystone
Heights and Teresa Reid of
Smith, Ala.; two sons, Bobby
Carter of Louisville, Tenn., and
Carl Carter II of Keystone
Heights; 13 grandchildren and
eight great-grandchildren.
Memorial services for Mr.
Carter will be conducted at 10
a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2006,
at Gethsemane Lutheran Church
in Gainesville with the Rev.
Ronald Will officiating and the
Rev. Michael Lozano assisting.
Arrangements are under the
care of Archie Tanner Funeral
Home of Starke.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Haven Hospice, 4200
N.W_ 90th Blvd., Gainesville,
Fla. or American Lung
Association of Florida, 136 S.
Main St., Belle Glade, FL 33430.

Richard Dekle
FAYETTEVILLE, GA. Richard
Nelson Dekle, 71, of
Fayetteville, Ga., died Tuesday,
Oct. 3, 2006, at his home
following an extended illness.
Born on Sept. 10, 1935, the
son of the late Nelson and Ruby
Dekle, Mr. Dekle served in the
United States Air Force and was
retired from the city of
Jacksonville where he was
computer administrative
supervisor. Following his
retirement he moved to Lake City
in 1991, where he lived .until
moving. to Fayetteville in 2005.
He was a member of the Church
of Christ.
Mr. Dekle is survived by: his
wife of 52 years, Evonda
Bielling Dekle of Fayetteville;
two daughters, Susan Dekle Skaf.
and Robin Dekle Cark, bqth.o, -
Fayetteville;:-,it.h,r'ee.> ;sis,,tars; -
Patricia John, of Lgke-.BUtler,
Donna -Coleman "andM ary
Frances Lewis, both of
McAlpine; a brother, Billy Dekle
of Lake -City; and five


grandchildren. He was preceded
in death by a brother, Robert
Dekle, and a sister, Betty
Gainey.
Funeral services for Mr. Dekle
were Oct. 7, 2006, in Lake Butler
Church of Christ with Brother
Daryl Townsend officiating.
Burial followed in Dekle
Cemetery in Lake Butler under
the care of Archer Funeral Home
of Lake Butler.

Roland Finley
LAWTEY Roland John
Finley, 72, of Lawtey died
Thursday, Sept. 28, 2006, at
Lake City Veterans Hospital
following a brief illness.
Born on June 1, 1934, in
Jacksonville, Mr. Finley was a
Navy veteran of the Korean War.
Mr. Finley is survived by: his
wife of many years, Claudette
Finley of Lawtey; a son, Roland
J. Finley Jr. a daughter, Rebecca
Lynn Gooding; and three
grandchildren.
A memorial service for Mr.
Finley was Oct. 10, 2006, in.
Florida National Cemetery in
Bushnell. Burial will follow
under the care of Veterans Funeral
Care of Clearwater.

Jane Hammock
LAKE CITY Jane Ann
Hammock, 50, of Lake City died
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2006, at her
residence.
Born in Savannah, Ga., Mrs.
Hammock lived most of her life
in Live Oak. She was a teacher's
aide with the Union County
School Board. She was a member
of Providence Village Baptist
Church.
Mrs. Hammock is survived by:
.a daughter, April R. Tomlinson
of Providence; a stepdaughter,
Deonna Willis of Lake City; a
son, Michael Meyer of Lake
City; three brothers, David
Smith of Dallas, Keith Smith of
Live Oak and James Smith of
Georgia; and three grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, James 0. Smith and Jill
Smith, and a brother, Richard
Smith.
Funeral services for Mrs.


Hammock were Oct. 8, 2006, in
Providence Village Baptist
Church with pastor Percy
Cunningham officiating. Burial
followed in Live Oak Cemetery
under the care of Archer Funeral
Home of Lake Butler.

James Kessler
STARKE James Thomas
Kessler, 57, of Starke died
Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2006, at his
residence in Starke following an
extended illness.
Born in Jacksonville on Oct.
2, 1949, Mr. Kessler was of the
Protestant faith. He was a veteran
of the Vietnam War, serving in
the U.S. Army. He worked, as a
bartender.
Mr. Kessler is survived by: his
stepfather, Ray Ragsdale of
Starke; a son, Dale E. Kessler of
Harvey, La.; three brothers,
Lawrence E. Kessler of Palm
Coast, Robert D. Kessler of
Alberville, Ala., and Michael
Ragsale of Gainesville; and one
grandchild.
Graveside services for Mr.
Kessler were Oct. 6, 2006, in
Kingsley Lake Cemetery with the
Rev. Larry Finley conducting the
services. Interment followed
under the care of Jones Funeral
Home of Starke.

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Oct. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 5B


OBITUARIES


Julia Lazzaro
MELROSE Julia A. Lazzaro,
90, of Melrose died Wednesday,
Oct. 4, 2006, at Bradford Terrace
in Starke following an extended
illness.
Born in Canastota, N.Y., on
Oct. 6, 1915, Mrs. Lazzaro was a
homemaker and member of St.
William Catholic Church.
Mrs. Lazzaro is survived by:
three children, Nicholas, James
and Guy; nine grandchildren, 11
great-grandchildren and five
great-great-grandchildren.
Memorial services for Mrs.
Lazzaro were Oct. 11, 2006, in
St. William Catholic Church
with Father Mike Williams
conducting the services.
Interment followed in Keystone
Heights Cemetery under the care
of Jones Funeral Home of
Keystone Heights.

Shane Martin
MACCLENNY Michael
"Shane" Martin, 36, of
Macclenny died suddenly on
Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2006, in a
motorcycle accident.
Born Dec. 7, 1969, in
Okeechobee, Mr. Martin was
raised in Starke and has lived in
Baker County'for the last four
years. He was a member of the
Free and Accepted Masons in
Starke. He worked for Union
Correctional Institution for 18
years prior to becoming an EMT.
Mr. Martin is survived by: his
wife, Tammy Walker Martin; his
mother, Glenda Martin-Moore;
his father, Donald W. Martin; his
children, JoshuaMartin, Wesley
Crawford, Alyssa Crawford,
Cassie Martin and Julie Ann
Martin; maternal grandmother,
Vera Suggs; maternal
grandfather, Ottis Adams; and
paternal grandfather, Donald J.
Martin. He was preceded in death
by a brother, Donald Martin.
Funeral services for Mr.
Martin were Oct. 7, 200.6, at
Christian Fellowship Temple
with pastors Timmy Thomas and
David Thomas officiating with
the Department of Corrections
Honor Guard serving as
pallbearers. Arrangements were
under the care and direction of V.
Todd Ferreira Funeral Services of
Macclenny.

James Mayben
ORLANDO James Edward
"Jimmy" Mayben, 64, of
Orlando died Saturday, Sept. 30,
2006, at his residence. following,,
a sudden illness.
o* rdTiit' Gadston, Ali,' Mr.
Maybenr I 'ed in Brooker before
moving to Orlando. He was the
son of the late Melves Mayben
and Wilma Mayben. He was an
electrician.
Mr. Mayben is survived by
several nieces and nephews. He
was preceded in death by his
brother, Richard Mayben.
Memorial services for Mr.
Mayberin were Oct. 6, 2006,' in
the chapel of Archer Funeral
Home of Lake Butler with the
Rev. Jason Reed officiating.
Cremation and burial will follow
at a later date.


f/, 1'


Ramona Price


Ramona Price
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Ramona Elaine Price, 38, of
Keystone Heights died Monday,
Oct. 9, 2006, at Shands Starke.
Born in Palatka, Ms. Price
moved to Keystone Heights from
Palatka. She was a member of
Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ.
Ms. Price is survived by: her
mother, Betty Sue Price of
Palatka; six sisters, Linda Hardee
of Belden, Miss., Janet Duncan
of Jacksonville, Karen Kise of
Palm Bay, Vanessa Smith of
Orange Park, Teresa Smith of
Keystone Heights and Michele
Hill of Madisonville, Ky.; a
brother, Michael Price of
Palatka. She was preceded in
death by her father, William
Thomas Price, a sister, Shirley
Wager, her paternal
grandparents, Thomas and Ruth
Price, and her maternal
grandparents, James Arthur and
Florie Hall.
Graveside services for Ms.
Price will be Thursday, Oct. 12,
2006, at Palatka Memorial
Gardens with Brother Tod Hill
officiating. Burial will follow
under the care of Masters Funeral
Home of Palatka.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the American Cancer
Society, Putnam Unit, 60 Zeagler
Dr., Palatka, FL 32177.


Joyce Phillips
JACKSONVILLE Joyce
Lucille Phillips, 60, of
Jacksonville died Saturday, Oct.
7, 2006, at Shands at University
of Florida.
Born in Grenada, Miss., Mrs.
Phillips, lived in La" teN before
moving to Jackson'ille 35 Nears
ago. She was a retired waitress.
Mrs. Phillips is survived by:
her husband, Leslie Phillips of
Jacksonville; a son, Paul Terrell
of Jacksonville; a daughter,
Angelique "Angel" Karna of
Atlanta;. her mother, Lucjlle
Bloodworth of Jacksonville; a
stepson, Byron Phillips of
Jacksonville; two sisters, Becky
Green of Palm Coast and Jan
Elliott of Greenville, S.C.; and
two grandchildren.
Memorial services for Mrs.
Phillips were Oct. 10, 2006, in
the chapel' of Archie Tanner


Ruth E. Scott

Ruth Scott
SATSUMA Ruth E Scott, 76,
of Satsuma died Tuesday, Oct. 3,
2006, at her residence following
an extended illness.
-Born in Starke, Mrs. Scott
lived in Satsuma for the past 20
years. She was a member of First
Baptist Church of Welaka and
was a cosmetologist.
"Mrs, Scott is survived by: a
daughter, Sherlyn Sanders of


Funeral Home of Starke with
Brother Ralph Wise officiating.


Frank Rieselman
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Frank
Joseph Rieselman, 81, of
Keystone Heights died Friday,
Sept. 29, 2006, at Shands AGH
in Gainesville following an
extended'illness.
Born in Covington, Ky., on
Oct. 23, 1924, Mr. Rieselman
moved to Keystone Heights in
1982 from Clearwater. He was a
retired truck driver and was of the
Catholic. faith.
Mr. Rieselman is survived by:
his wife, Karen Rieselman;
children, Terri Sunderman, Barry
Rieselman, Frank Rieselman Jr.,
John Rieselman, all of
Cincinnati; a brother, Robert
Rieselman of Las Cruces, N.M.; a
sister, Catherin Mullikan of
Cincinnati; four stepchildren,
Pamela Cascanet and Terry
Brock, both of Keystone
Heights, Ronald Brock of
Stevens, Pa. and Kenneth Brock
of Harinsburg., Ky; 14
grandchildren and five great
grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the American Heart
Association, 3801 N.W. 40th
Terrace, Suite B, Gainesville,FL
32606.


Williams will be held at 7 p.m.
on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006, at
First Baptist Church of Highland
with the Rev. Bill Clayton
officiating. Archie Tanner
Funeral Home of Starke is in
charge of arrangements.
Memorial contributions may
be made to First Baptist Church
of Highland Building Fund, 1409
U.S. 301 N., Lawtey, FL 32058.


(^W

Satsuma; a son, Wayne Scott;
four sisters, Dorothy Cruthirds of
California, Eunice Gilliard of
Hawthorne, Reba Ketter of
Satsuma and Myrna Dockery of
Ocala; three grandchildren and
five great-grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by her husband,
Glenn Scott, and a brother. Joe
Griffis Jr.
Funeral services for Mrs. Scott
were Oct. 6, 2006, at the
Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home
in Palatka with pastor Tom
Miller officiating. Burial
followed in Oak Hill West
Cemetery.


Carolton Smith
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Carolton Aaron Smith, 30, of
Keystone Heights died suddenly
on Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2006, at
his residence.
Born April 21, 1976, in
Gainesville, Mr. Smith moved to
Keystone Heights in 2004 from
Georgia. He worked for Country
Caterers.
Mr. Smith is survived by: his
mother, Candy Sullivan' of
Keystone Heights; three sisters,
Kimberly Levasaque of
Oklahoma. Carla Mauldin of
Orlando and Roseanna Valverde
of Keystone Heights; and his
maternal grandmother, Virginia
Donahue of Keystone Heights.
Memorial services for Mr.
Smith were Oct. 8, 2006, at the
home of Virginia Donahue with
family and friends conducting the
services. Interment will be at a
later date under the care of Jones
Funeral Home of Keystone
Heights.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Jones Funeral Home,
in memory of Aaron Smith, P.O.
Box 127, Keystone Heights, FL
32656.

Asher Sullivan
GAINESVILLE Asher Gerard
"Jerry" Sullivan Jr., 46, of
Gainesville died Sunday, Oct. 8,
2006.
Born in Live Oak, Mr.
Sullivan lived in Starke and Lake
City before moving to
Gainesville in 1995. He attended
Christ Central Ministries and
was an entrepreneur.
Mr. Sullivan is survived by:
his wife, Carlene Sullivan 'of
Gainesville; two sons, Asher G.
Sullivan III and Dalyn "Colby"
Sullivan, both of Gainesville;
two daughters, Ciji Sullivan and
KaLeigh Sullivan, both of
Gainesville; his mother and
, stepfather, ;.Loretta and:_. Bill
.Marchant of Lake City; three


brothers, Ricky Sullivan and
Todd Sullivan, both of
Gainesville, and Bret Marchant
of Apachee Junction, Ariz.; and
three sisters, Tara Marchant-
Krieghauser of Lake City, Misty
Waters and Mona Pooser, both of
Gainesville. He was preceded in
death by his father, Asher G.
Sullivan.
Funeral services for Mr.
Sullivan will be conducted on
Thursday. Oct. 12, 2006, at 3
p.m., at Christ Central
Ministries with Pastor Lonnie
Johns officiating and Chris
Doering and Dennis O'Neill
assisting. Interment will follow
at Crawford Lake Cemetery in
Suwannee County.
Visitation with the family will
be held from 6-8 p.m. on
Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006, at
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home, 3596 Hwy. 44,1, in Lake
City. A guest book is available
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Paul Williams
CLAY HILL Paul Winston
Williams, 64, of Clay Hill died
Saturday, Oct. 7, 2006, at St.
Vincent's Medical Center in
Jacksonville.
Born in Dup.line County, N.C.,
Mr. Williams lived in Clay Hill
for 29 years. He owned and
operated Williams Roofing of
Jacksonville and was a member
of First Baptist Church of
Highland, where he was chairman
of the building committee. He
was also a member of the
"Mountain Gang." ,
Mr. Williams is survived by:
his wife, Ruth Williams of Clay
Hill; a son, John Williams of
Middleburg; a daughter, Anne
Slater of Clay Hill; a brother,
Dick Williams of Kenansville,
N.C.; two sisters, Bobbie
Pigford of Kenansville and Kay
Cahoon of Surf City, N.C.; and
11 grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by a daughter,
Paula Williams Miller.
Memorial services for Mr,


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Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006


MYSPACE
Continued from p. 2B

Other groups were found to
use explicit words to describe
their schools or areas of town.
MySpace has received a
large volume of media
attention lately, warning young
people of the dangers of using
the site.
Maxwell believes that is like
somebody putting up a "No
Trespassing" sign to kids,
peaking their curiosity to see
,just what it is people are
trying to keep them away
from.
He said he doesn't want to
advise young people to stay
away from MySpace, but
wants parents and children .
alike to realize that any
information contained in their
profiles is open to public view
across the World Wide Web.
According to the safety
features .posted by
MySpace.com, they claim to
not allow any pornographic
images or obscene language on


Patrick
Maxwell,
Coordinator of
Lake Butler
Middle School's
21 stCentury
Learning
Center and
pastor of
Victory
Christian
Center, at a .
MySpace
workshop held
on Sept. 25


their site.
In reality, it is everywhere.
Maxwell believes that with the
millions of MySpace users out
there, it is virtually impossible
to properly staff site
moderators to investigate and
re-investigate user profiles all
day long.
Instead, MySpace.com opts
to asking users to report abuse
of this nature to the Web site.


"Get serious," said Maxwell.
"That's a nice try, but no one
is going to do that. Young
people need to be smart and
think about what they are
doing when they are online.
MySpace does have built-in
safety features, and the kids
need to use them."
Advertising on MySpace is
yet another issue. The site is
littered with banner ads that


Tree stand to be given away at LCS festival


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Terry Bradley of Terry's Huntin' and Fishin' has donated a Viper tree stand to
the Lawtey Community School fall festival. A drawing for the tree stand willbe
held at the festival, which is scheduled for this Saturday, Oct. 14, beginning at,
5 p.m. Bradley (center) is pictured with Tina Wilkerson, vice president of the
Lawtey Community School PTO, and Victory Wilkerson.


are nothing short of soft porn
advertisements for things like
dating services, enticing young
people to go to their Web site
to find "the one."
Another problem is that
upon opening a MySpace
account, users agree that their
email address may be given to
their third party advertisers.
Unsolicited e-mails are sent
to users with the a subject line
like "come view my webcam
and see me perform."
"We are talking about
pressure sensitive 14 and 15-
year-olds receiving these
messages," said Maxwell.
"There are obvious concerns
that many young people are
becoming desensitized to some
of the things they view on the
net."
Various experts have
reported that the average teen
is now spending less time on
their school work. and instead
spending one to three hours a
day on MySpace.
Thirteen-year-old Destiny
Young stated that the first
thing she thinks about when
she gets home from school
each day is logging on to
MySpace and checking for
new friend requests comments
or added pictures.
She thinks that it's fun
sending messages back and
.forth with her friends, putting
different backgrounds on her
profile page, and reading other
people's profiles.
When asked whether or not
she ever thought about
millions of online viewers,
including sexual predators,
seeing her profile, she stated
that if anyone like that ever
tried to make contact with her,
'she would block the user from
being able to reach her.
Interestingly, more and more
employers are doing Internet
searches or hiring firms to do
background checks on
potential as well as current
employees.
Students may not realize that
by listing their school, using
their full name or their e-mail
address, they are allowing
anyone to search and find their
page.
What's more is that
anything placed on that page
can come back to haunt users
some day, as Web pages can
be archived with some search
engines and archival programs.
S''Maxwell's advice? As a
general rule, never post any


photos or words that you
wouldn't want your mom or
dad to see. Any material
contained on the profiles of
those in your friend's list also
reflects on you.
Keep in mind that just as
many young people are posing
as being 18-year-olds when
they are actually only 14,
sexual predators, too, make up
profiles posing as a young
person, add a fake picture,
pretend to live in the same area
and send out friend requests.
As these predators make


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Crash victim
remains
hospitalized
A. 20-year-old Starke man
remains in serious condition as
of press time from an Oct. 6
crash.
Andrew B. Moore, driving a
1996 Oldsmobile, was
northbound on Northwest 71st
Avenue just before midnight,
according to Florida Highway
'Palrol Cpl. P.L. England.
I. For unknown reasons, Moore
failed to negotiate the curve of
the roadway and went into a
ditch. The front of the Olds
impacted the embankment. As
the vehicle exited the ditch, it
rotated counterclockwise back
onto the roadway and partially
ejected Moore, Cpl. England
said.
Moore N\as transported to
Shands Gaines\ ille.
. Moore was not wearing a
seatbelt. Charges are pending
alcohol results, JCpl. England
said.


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friends with other users, they
will gradually work towards a
meeting in person.
Even when meeting in a
public place, such as a football
game, this is a very dangerous
situation to be in.
Maxwell feels that most kids
have what he likes to call a fire
drill mentality.
When there's a fire drill at
school, kids 'go through the
motions, thinking this will
never really happen, but when
it does, they ask, how could
this happen to me?


*oW\


l I I


Gr. 7t your A
ricft:et,
[harfio Daniels
fichts Here!


IIAiggI


- ,-------- ~.---


1


r- c-;





Oct. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 7B


CRIME


I-----------


Union teen
Charged with
attempted
murder
A 19-year-old Lake Butler
man was charged with
attempted murder last week
after a stabbing.
Deputies were called to Lake
Butler Hospital at 6 a.m. on
Oct. 3 where the stabbing
victim was being treated,
according to Deputy Mindy
Goodwin. The victim stated he
had been with a white male by
the name of Dustin and that he
had been stabbed numerous
times, Deputy Goodwin said.
The victim stated that he and
Dustin had ridden around,
snorting cocaine. He stated
they pulled into a wooded area
near the cemetery, where they
engaged in sexual activity. The
victim stated Dustin then
started stabbing him. The
victim ran from Dustin,
entered his vehicle and went
home. His father then drove
him to the hospital.
The investigation into the
stabbing led deputies to
question Dustin Mitchell
McSpadden. McSpadden
admitted to the stabbing and
was placed under arrest for
attempted murder and
aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon, Deputy
Goodwin said. The weapon
was located, Deputy Goodwin
said.

Four charged,
with attack


Guest tensed and attempted to
pull away from the officer.
Once inside the patrol car,
Guest started kicking the
vehicle. It was necessary p. use
the Taser to make (Ouest
comply with orders, Patrolman
Brown said.
Guest was charged with
disorderly conduct, possession
of drug paraphernalia and
resisting an officer without
violence. Bond was set at
$10,000.
He was additionally charged
as a fugitive from justice from
South Carolina, assault on law
enforcement officer, trespass
after warning and grand larceny
without bond.

Children help
their father
commit
burglary
A 33-year-old Keystone
Heights man was arrested for
burglarizing a home on Ridge
Trail Road. He used his
children to gain entry into the
residence.
Elmer Gene Williams was
charged Oct. 6 with armed
burglary and grand theft by
Deputy A. Graff.
On Aug. 25, Williams, with
his three children, went to the
back of the Ridge Trail Road
residence. A son and daughter
entered through a hole in the
wall, where an air-conditioning
unit had been. The children
unlocked the back door for
Williams, Deputy Graff said.
Inside the home, they
removed items, including a,


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4820 NW 13th Street
Gainesville, FL
352-376-2637
WWW.STREITS.COM


establishments licensed to sell
beverages in the county.
Forty-five stores were visited
during the check. Businesses in
violation of beverage laws
included two Kangaroo Food
Marts in Keystone Heights.
They failed to check for
identification. Sunoco Food
Mart on S.R. 16 at Kingsley
Lake checked for identification,
but still sold alcohol to a
minor.
Arrested were Samantha Ann
Taylor, 20, of Keystone
Heights, Penny Marie Smith,
40, of Starke and Teshome
Hailermaniam, 35, of Starke.
They were charged with selling
alcohol to a minor and were
released on a notice to appear.


Recent
arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights area) or Union
County:
Gilbert D. Daughtry, 42, of
Live Oak was arrested Oct. 4
by Starke Patrolman P.A.
King for possession of
cannabis. During a traffic stop,
the officer found two baggies
of marijuana in Daughtry's
underwear. A $1,000 surety
bond was posted for his release
from custody.
Wesley G. Dunaway II, 32,
r^f P Wht dh/tp O innrrtI C~rt


ere oLU, a camera, numerous o UAtU1L ort ite was arrested cJ t..
on mailbox posters/puzzles and several 5 by Patrolman King for
On Oct. 3, Union deputies collectable swords and knives possession of drug"
responded to a complaint of a before fleeing the area, Deputy paraphernalia. During a traffic
mailbox being knocked off the Graft said. stop for faulty equipment, the
post on Southwest 126th Some of the stolen property officer found a marijuana pipe
Court. was recovered where Williams with residue in Dunaway's
The victim stated she heard a was staying, Deputy Graff pocket. A $1,000 surety bond
banging sound and saw a car said. was posted for his release.
drive off from her mailbox, The children, who are 11- and
according to Deputy James 12-years old, admitted to being Elizabeth McHale, 47, of
Goodwin. She grabbed her cell involved in the burglary, Gulf Port was arrested Oct. 6
phone and followed the car Deputy Graff said. by Starke Patrolman Shawn
until she could report a tag Williams remains in custody Brown for possession of drug
number. The car was occupied of the Clay County Jail under paraphernalia. A chrome crack
by two males and two females, a $300,006 bond. pipe was found in the'
Deputy Goodwin said. floorboard of McHale's vehicle
During the investigation into 11 Clay during a traffic stop. Bond on
the mischief, deputies charged the charge was set at $1,000.
Sumer Rayne Hamilton, ... st re -.. ., .-... ,
and Jennifer M. ,'-ackwefld'r, r uL.g\H-" '" '. .' .i-ni-, .& rnitrong,.
22, ~l6oth from.' Worthingto I-'V.IOli ... --'. of Lawite was arrested
Springs, and Bo James Oct. 4 by Starke Sgt. Richard
Dampier, 18, and a 16-year- liqUoI law' Crews for possession of
old, both from Lake Butler, Clay County deputies found cannabis. Armstrong's vehicle
Deputy G6odwin said. They 11 stores were not in was stopped on U.S., 301 for
admitted to bashing the compliance when .they unlawful speed. The K-9
mailbox with a wrench while conducted alcohol checks of alerted on the vehicle, where
drinking beer and smoking
J marijuana:.
S Hamilton was charged with
criminal mischief, disorderly H hs
intoxication and possession of
drug paraphernalia. She was
S placed under arrest Oct. 4. She A
was released from custody by
Judge David Reiman.
Sworn complaints were filed
on Dampier, Blackwelder and
the juvenile on the count of
criminal mischief.' .- L,


Carolina man
arrested in
Starke
A 27-year-old South Carolina
' man was arrested Oct. 6 for
creating a disturbance at
Murphy Oil. .
Travis Lamont Guest of
Santee, S. C., caused a crowd
to gather at the business on
Commercial Drive, according
to, Patrolman Shawn Brown.
During Guest's arrest, the
officer found a brass crack pipe
in his possession. As he,was
being placed in the patrol car,


" IHO-TDA

OPEN

HOUSE


the officer found a bag
containing marijuana under the
front seat, Sgt. Crews said.
Joanna Mariea Clance, 33, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Oct. 7 by Clay Deputy Lester
Ricks for possession of
cannabis, possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession of
a controlled substance without
a valid prescription. During a
search of Clance's purse, the
deputy found pills identified as
Loritab, marijuana and a
marijuana pipe. Clance was a
passenger in a vehicle that was
traffic stopped at 12:59 a.m.
for faulty .equipment, Deputy
Ricks said.
Dariel T. Fowler, 18, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 6 by
Starke Patrolman J.W. Hooper
for retail theft. Fowler is
charged with concealing new
baby clothing in a baby bag
while inside Family Dollar.
She was released from custody
after a $1,000 surety bond was
posted.
Clinton Russell Helmer, 22,
of Keystone Heights was
arrested Oct. 5 by Starke
Patrolman Michelle Davis for
loitering and prowling. Helmer
was charged with being in the
parking lot of a closed
business, Patrolman Davis
said. A $500 surety bond was
posted for his release from
custody.
Debra Segars, 47, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Oct. 2 by Patrolman Hooper
for possession of prescription
drugs without a prescription.
She was released from custody
after a $15,000 surety bond
was posted.
Ronnie Baker, 25, of Starke
was arrested Oct. 4 by Starke
Sgt. Kevin Mueller for
possession of marijuana and
possession of a controlled
substance. Baker was released
on his own recognizance by
Judge Hobbs.
Devon Deisha Rogers, 26, bf
Starke was arrested Oct. 5 by
Bradford Deputy Thomas Sapp
for possession of cannabis.
During a traffic stop the officer
found approximately two
grams, of .-cannabis, in -the ,
i .liar y .' E OA .O '.- "


vehicle. He was released after a
$1,000 surety bond was
posted. -
Malcolm Jamal Newby, 21,
of Starke was arrested Oct. 2
by Patrolman King for
possession of crack cocaine and
sale of crack cocaine within a
federal housing facility. Newby
sold cocaine to a confidential
source on Aug. 1. Bond was
set at $50,000.
Michael Wolf, 21, of
Melrose was arrested Oct. 9 by
Clay deputies for fraudulent
use of a credit card.

Ethelyn Itina McNeil, 23, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 5 by
Starke Patrolman Michelle
Davis on warrants for three
counts possession and sale of
controlled substance, crack
cocaine within a federal
housing facility. McNeil is
charged with selling crack
cocaine to undercover sources
on Aug. 1 and 15. Bond was
set at $150,000.
Charlie Lee Jonas, 19, of
Starke ywas arrested Oct. 5 by


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Monday through Saturday 8
October 23 through I





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Elections



ing lot of the






SCHEDULE
:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
November 4





Terry Vaughan
Supervisor of Elections
Bradford County, Florida
P.O. Box 58
Starke, FL 32091-0058
www.bradfordelections.com
"Freedom Rings With Every Vote"


- ,~. ,.rPr.r ~ nr'r, 'V sTt.'.t.


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Starke Patrolman Stephen
Murphy on warrants for
possession and sale of
controlled substance and
trespass after warning. Jonas
was charged as a co-defendant
with McNeil in the Aug. 15
sale. He had been ordered to
stay away from the T.H.E.
Apartments, where the crack
was sold to the undercover
source, Patrolman Murphy
said. Jonas remains in custody
under a $51,000 bond.
Michael Cam, 47, of
Hampton was arrested Oct. 3
by Deputy Moore for violation
of probation. A $15,000 surety
bond was posted for his release
from custody.
Edward 0. Smith, 54, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 5 by
Patrolman King on a warrant
for possession and sale of a
controlled substance within
1,000 feet of a school. Bond
was set at $50,000.
John Kuykendall, 56, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Oct. 3 by Clay deputies on
warrants for worthless checks.


^*-*M






Page 8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006

CRIME


Recent arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights area) or Union
County:

Carolyn Padgett, 51, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 4 by
Patrolman Davis on warrants
for violation of probation drug
paraphernalia and possession of
a controlled substance with no
bond.
Daniel Micah Morgan, 26, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 4 by
Patrolman Murphy on warrants
for failure to appear domestic
battery and driving while
license suspended or revoked
(DWLS).
William' Henry Ivey, 26, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Oct. 9 by Clay Deputy Trent
Cecrle for failure to appear,
possession of undersize black
bass with no bond.
David Bishop, 45, of
Interlachen was arrested Oct. 5
by Bradford Sgt. M.L.
McKenzie.for failure to appear
with bond set at $3,500.
Anthony Parker, 45, of
Myrtle Beach, S.C., was
arrested Oct. 5 by Bradford
Deputy C.M. Williams as a
fugitive from justice from
Virginia. Parker was picked up
at Florida State Prison.
James Frederick Harper, 70,
of Starke was arrested Opt. 7
by Starke Patrolman David A.
Bukowski for opposing a
police officer. Harper appeared
to be intoxicated or disoriented,
Patrolman Bukowski said.


,While patting him down for a
weapon, Harper tried to pull
away from the officer. He then
acted as if he was going to
strike the officer, Patrolman
Bukowski said. Harper ,,was
taken into custody with bond
set at $1,000.
David McBride, 22, of Starke
was arrested Oct. 2 by Starke
Patrolman Jason Crosby for
retail theft. He was released on
his own recognizance by Judge
Johnny Hobbs.
Dale Robertson, 41, of
Sarasota was arrested Oct. 4 by
Starke Patrolman Mark
Lowery for loitering and
prowling. He was released on
his own recognizance by Judge
Hobbs.
Tina Louise Wells, 36, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 4 by
Hampton Sgt. A.J. Gibson for
permitting unauthorized person
to drive. A $500 surety bond
was posted for her release from
custody. Wells was arrested
again on Oct. 5 by probation
officers for violation of
probation battery on a law
enforcement officer. She was
released Oct. 6 after a $5,000
surety bond was posted.
Brian Patrick O'Reilly, 20,
of Waldo was arrested Oct. 6
by Alachua deputies on a
Bradford warrant for grand theft
and credit card theft. Bond was
set at $35,000.
John William Albertson, 42,
of North Fort Myers was
arrested Oct. 6 by Lee County
deputies on a Bradford warrant
for failure to appear possession
of.marijuana. Bond was set at
$1,000.
Clarence Rassoola Green, 19,
of Lawtey was arrested Oct.. 3
by Starke Patrolman Shawn
Brown for violation of


probation forgery, uttering a
forged instrument with no
bond.
Christina Jones, 25, of
Melrose was arrested Oct. 1 in
Polk County on a warrant
from Bradford for battery on a
person 65 years or older. Bond
was set at $15,000.
David Lambert, 39, of St.
Petersburg was arrested Oct. 6
by Bradford Deputy Sherri
Mann for violation of
probation grand theft auto with
no bond.
Johnny Everett George, 42,
of Lake Butler was arrested
Oct. 3 by Union Deputy
Mindy Goodwin for failure to
appear trespass in an occupied
structure and resisting arrest
without violence. Bond was set
at $50,000.
Andrew Cottom, 23, of
Melrose was arrested Oct. 4 by
Clay deputies on a warrant for
lewd battery.
Tina Tannehill, 34, of
Gainesville was arrested Oct. 6
by Bradford Deputy Scott
Konkel for violation of drug
offender probation and, forgery
with no bond.
Ted Manning, 40, of Starke
was arrested Oct. 6 by Deputy
Moore for violation of
probation domestic battery. A
$5,000 surety bond was posted
for his release.

Richard Bedard, 52, of Lake
Butler was arrested Oct. 5 by
Deputy Mann on a warrant for
escape.
Sarah Johnson, 29, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Oct. 3 by Clay deputies on a
warrant for violation of
probation false police report.


Patricia A. Clark, 46, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
29 by Union Captain Garry
Seay on warrants for
aggravated assault and criminal
mischief. Bond was set at
$10,000. *-
Garner Daniels, 48, of
Gainesville was arrested Oct. 2
by Union Deputy James
Goodwin for violation of
probation ..
Joseph Mandel Hilliard, 36,
of Starke was arrested Oct. 2
by probation officers for
violation of probation. His
arrest Oct. 1 for domestic
battery violated his probation.
Ennis Lariscey, 30, of
Hampton was arrested Oct. 2
by Deputy Mann on a warrant
for uttering a forged instrument
and grand theft. Lariscey was
released after a $20,000 surety
bond was posted.
Ricky Gainey, 44, of Starke
was arrested Oct. 2 for
violation of probation
worthless check.

Traffic
Robert Lee Chastain, 34, of
Hampton was arrested Oct. 7
by Sgt. Gibson for driving
under the influence (DUI).
Chastain's blood-alcohol level
was .14 percent when his 1993
Chevrolet was stopped at 4:50
a.m. on C.R. 18, Sgt. Gibson
said. A $1,000 surety bond
was posted for his release from
custody.
Johnnie Benjamin Holton III,
of Callahan was arrested Oct. 6
by Bradford Deputy Robbie
Watkins for DUI and
possession of cannabis.
Responding to a report of a
suspicious vehicle on S.R.
100 at 2 a.m., the deputies
found Holton passed out
behind' the wheel of his 1995


Dodge truck. Further
investigation revealed Holton
was under the influence of
alcohol, Deputy Watkins said.
During a search, at the time of
arrest, the deputy found
marijuana in Holton's pocket.
He refused a breath test.
Holton was released after a
$1,000 surety bond was
posted.
Allen William Jones, 25, of
Gainesville was arrested Oct. 7
by Bradford Sgt. George
Konkel for DUI. Jones' blood-
alcohol level was .15 percent
when his 2003 Dodge pickup
was stopped at 2:12 a.m'. for
weaving on S.R. 16, Sgt.
Konkel said. He was released
after a $1,000 surety bond was
posted.
Christy Renee Jones, 28, of
Starke was arrested Oct. 7 by
Bradford Deputy Drew Moore
for DUI. Jones' blood-alcohol
level was .18 percent when her
1994 Ford pickup was stopped
at 2:26 a.m. on S.R. 16,
Deputy Moore said. A $2,000
surety bond was posted for her
release from custody.

Roger Kyle Bamett, .21, of
Raiford was arrested Oct. 8 by
Deputy Moore for DUI.
Barnett's blood-alcohol level
was .18 percent when his
1993 Chevrolet was stopped
on S.R. 16 at 3:13 a.m. He
was released from custody after
a $2,000 surety bond was
posted.
Joseph Hayward Rowe Jr.,
25, of Gainesville was arrested
Oct. 7 by Sgt. Gibson for
DUI. The charge is pending lab
results, Sgt. Gibson said.
Rowe's 1998 Ford pickup was
stopped on C.R. 18 at 11:20
p.m. A $1,000 surety bond
was posted for his release from
custody.


Gary Parrish, 42, of Melro'
was arrested Oct. 6: by Clay
deputies for DWLS. 'Parrish
was involved in an accident'
with injuries near the Lil
Champ Gizmo at 7:30 p.m.
Larry Watson Tew, 53, of
Lawtey was arrested Oct. 5 by",
Starke Sgt. M.D. Watson for
DWLS. A $500 surety bond
was posted for his release.
Kevin John Ogburn, 31, of.i
Lake Butler was arrested Oct. 5`
by Union Deputy Bretf
Handley for DWLS.
Harvey Sluder, 47, of.
Hilliard was arrested Oct. 4 by
Sgt. Gibson for DWLS. He
was released after a $15,000
surety bond was posted. .-
Aquarious Jefferson, 36, ofi
Middleburg was arrested Oct. 8i
by Patrolman Lowery fo F
DWLS. Jefferson was released.-
after a $500 surety bond was
posted. ;


Albert Jackson, 35, of Lake-
Butler was arrested Oct. 9 byf .
Deputy Moore for DWLES
habitual. -
Bryan Gentry, 48, of Lake-
Butler was arrested Oct. 8 bys
Florida Highway Patr6o
troopers in Clay County foFi
DWLS. ,
Walter Jewell, 22, of
Middleburg was arrested Oct. 9
by Patrolman Hooper for
DWLS from Clay.
Teddy Blevins, 18, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Oct. 7 by Deputy Moore for
failure to appear no valid
driver's license and failure to10
appear violation of probation
DWLS from Putnam County.
Bdnd was set at $5,000.


Cutting the ribbon recently at Capital City Bank in Keystone Heights: Doug Reddish,
Katherine Parks, Kim Oxley, Janel Triest, Sam Midgett, Jeff Oody and Melissa Griffin.


Chamber

can help

find

employees
Let ForidaWorks' and ihe
North Florida Regional
Chamber of Commerce help
you find your next employee.
Our professionally trained
staff can assist your company.
with advertising positions,
pre-screening applicants, col-
lecting applications, recruit-
ment and assessments to
include: typing test, TABE,
career scope and skills check
to determine MS Word and
E\cel proficiency .
There are no fees for these
services, so cafl Susan or
Pam'and let us assist you.
(904) 964-WORK.


Starlke Cruzin'
1 HEVRO LET

'j4asiA SARKE




Thursday, Oct. 12- 6-8 p.m.

Bill Adams Chevrolet of Starke
1901 N. Temple Ave., Starke :
For more information please contact the Chamber
at (904) 964-5278 Mon.-Fri. 9 am-5pm



~jm


Ka



CHAMBER OFCOMMERCE
C CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


Care of business

MAIN OFFICE :


Lake Butler


100 E. Call St., Starke

904-964-5278

www.northfloridachamber.com


Keystone Heights
Melrose


I


'ra& 1


MARK YOUR


CALENDAR Ii
MEETING BRADFORD TOURIST
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
When: Thursday, Oct. 19 '
Where: NFRCC Boardroom
Time: 12 Noon
STARKE

FRONT LINE LUNCH
When: Monday, Oct. 23
Time: 12 Noon
Where: Western Steer Steak House
Sponsorship: Xerox
STARKE

MEETING BOARD OF GOVERNORS
When: Thursday, Oct. 26'
Time: 12 Noon
Where: Capital City Community Room
STARKE

BEST PLACES TO WORK AWARDS DINNER
When: Thursday, Oct. 26


Time:
Where:


6-9 p.m.
Conference Center
STARKE


I I r I ,


1


J0011,





Oc rELEGRA-P, IIMES & MOaiOR--B-SECTION Page 9B


(L-R) Chad Burchfield pushes a piece of lumber through the table saw while
instructor Mike Beville helps guide it. Chris Knowles and Tyler Moore catch the


piece as it exits the saw.
be less than $14 per hour.
C LA S IHowever, a student could work
L Aat one of the lesser levels while
Continued from p. 2B attending class and working
toward one of the higher
at any of those levels and get a levels.
job, but the salary will likely The total course takes 1,200


p.-'


I'X'
.,', io, ,: -..s^


,:,,*- a **, ,*< ,,; ^Y ^l




".;i .. .' iB
r | :,\e-'' '







..1





Qhris Knowles (left) holds a piece of lumber in place
vWhile Tyler Moore (right) drills a hole to hold a bolt.


ka
-\ .I .


COOKIES

'
continued frm p. '3B
diagram of their cookies. They
tlqen measured the distance
fMpm the edge of their cookies
td two raisins.
-What you're doing is
S you're documenting where
S yoir artifacts were found,"
T'Insler said.
i Then it was time to dig, but
s .dents were warned to be as
careful as possible.


"Try not to break your
cookie," Tinsler said. "Once
you've destroyed your
archaeological site in the real
world, it's gone."
The students seemed to
enjoy the exercise, but they
were disappointed 'that they
could,not eat the cookies when
they were done. As Tinsler
pointed out, he touched the
cookies and the instruments
the students were using, were
not sterile.
Oh well. That's the way the
cookie crumbles.


e.-,.


hours, or about two years to
complete. *
Calvin Lane is an adult
student in the class. He is in
his first year of the class. He
works at a local restaurant at
night and attends the class in


the daytime. "He's looking to
move up the pay scale and
improve his earnings," said
Beville.
Students in the class, both
adults and teenagers, learn
how to operate a variety of
building equipment and tools,
how to plan a project and
figure out how much material
will be needed, safety
measures and much more.
Reading and using
blueprints, measuring
accurately and learning how to
determine the, proper tools and
materials for each job are also
taught in the class.
In order to be eligible, to
enter the course, students must
pass the Test of Adult Basic
Education (TABE) and score
out at the ninth-grade level on
reading, language and math.
The class is very hands-on.
Students are currently working
on a project to build
information kiosks for
Pumpkin Hill State Park. The
kiosks have to be weather-
resistant and sturdy. They also
have to provide the ability for
park rangers to change the
information offered from time
to time.
The class has planned a
design and is now building the
kiosks. Individual students also
have additional projects they
are working on. One is
building bat habitats.
Last year, the.class built a
mini one-room house with a
shingle roof so that they could
practice the various carpentry
skills needed for building
larger projects. Beville said
another project is being
planned for this year, but said


he has not settled on the exact
plans to use.
The class is also building
.sturdy picnic tables to sell as a
fund-raiser for $200 each. The,


money raised will be used for
special class projects. Call
(904) 966-6764 for more
information about the tables or
the class.


Chad Burchfield (left) holds a spacer that will help
maintain the proper distances as Tyler Moore uses a
hydraulic nail gun.


JIPRS


Jon Leonard makes "
measurements before
putting on his safety
glasses in order to use
a saw.

Bradford County
PONY CLUB
" ?. has arrived!,

Call for information.
EUPHORIA STABLES
BOARDING *TRAINING LEASING
Mike & Meridith Babnick
*Starke. FL


CRIME DOESN'T PAY BUT WE DO!
If you have information about a crime, you can call our
Tips Line and remain completely anonymous.

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Page 10B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & ijuNiiORH-:B-SELCTiOrJ dOcT. 12-006


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Section C: Thursday, Oct. 12, 2006 *, Telegraph Times Monitor




SFCC Starke Fall Festival takes place this weekend


BY TERESA
STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
This weekend, Oct. 14 and
15, Santa Fe Community
College presents their annual
Starke Fall Festival.
The festivities, featuring
over 50 talented artists from
the state, will take place from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday
and again from noon until 5
p.m on Sunday.
On hand will be a variety of
arts this year, including
categories of 3D mixed media,
ceramics, jewelry, fiber, glass,
computer generated graphics,
mixed media, photography,
painting, watercolor and wood.
Local artists include Jane
Honn, Martha Swift, Millard
Griffis, Howard Ashcraft and
Dexter Gillingham, all from
Starke.
Keystone Heights artists
include Alice Arp, Karin
Holloran and Bob Bird.
This year's-festival will also
include the Children's Creative
Corner, which will be located
just outside the Woman's Club



Enjoy the arts
at 1st UMC
First United Methodist
Church, will be open to the,.
public this weekend during the
Santa Fe Community College
Fall Festival in Starke.-
With the church pictured on
the festival poster, members of
United Methodist Women
decided it was time to welcome
visitors to the community. ;
Tours of the beautiful
sanctuary will be ongoing all
day, Saturday and Sunday
afternoon. I
Fellowship Hall will become
an Emporium, a store carrying
a great varietN of articles. Many
members are providing unique
items thaii will be for sale
during the weekend.
Holiday/seasonal crafts,.
flags, note paper, ornaments,
gourds, glass cubes, wreaths,
pillows, lap robes, wall
hangings and aprons are just-a-
few of the items on display.
Kwanzaa dolls, Egyptian
amuletes and thumb drums will
offer a glimpse of Africa.
The.. "Methodist" knives,.
cookbooks and "Holy" bears
will also be featured.
Nancy Roberts will have a
large selection of stain glass
from the old church windows
and other glass. (She will be on
S hand to repair pieces purchased
through the ears..i
The 2006 ornament, crafted
by Laurie NMullins %with Ruth
Johns and Eugenia Whitehead,
is .a replica of the church. The\
Will .-be on sale in the
Emporium.
Special desserts,in the bakery
* area will please everyone. There
will be cakes, pies, cookies and
candy.. Also an area of
homemade ---jams, jellies,
pickles, etc. will be displayed
along with prepared mixes.
Lunch will be served both
days for a $4 donation. There
will be a choice of chicken
salad on a croissant, french
onion soup or southwestern
salad with chicken strips and
tea or:coffee.
'The church 'ill be open
during the hours of the festi al


Starke

Kiwanis poker

tournament is
Oct. 20
. The Kiwanis Club of Starke
will be hosting a Texas Hold
*'Em, tournament on Frida\,
Oct. 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the
Starke Golf and Country Club.
Registrantion begins at 6 p.m.
and the entry fee is i50 L half
of the total collected on the
entry fee will be, returned to
Sthe winners). ;
Pizza and drinks will be
S' served. ," '
For more information, or to
reserve a :spot, please call
Steve Denmark at (904) 964-
' 5827. .


SWe can often do more for


other men by correcting our
own faults than by trying t6
correct theirs.
-Francois Fenelon


on Walnut Street.
Ongoing activities include
face painting, drawing and
collage, mask and shield
making, painting, and doll


making.
The Shriner's Parade will
begin lining up by Shand's
Hospital on Call Street at 10
a.m.


At 11 a.m;; the parade will
commence west down Call
Street to Thompson Street,
continuing south to South
Street, then turn west onto


Walnut Street, head north and
end at the Woman's Club
located at the corner of
Jefferson and Walnut.
Several performances are


scheduled to take place:
simultaneously on the irndo'or
and outdoor stages at the

Woman's Club. See page 3C-
for a schedule of events.






Page 2C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006



3 counties hold joint breast cancer luncheon


Sylvia Tatum
talks to more
than 150 people
about her
struggle with
breast cancer.
She said at
some point, she
just got a little
crazy insisting
to every person
in the grocery
store they get a
mammogram.


Pam
Woodington
speaks about
her cousin, Jill,
who died after a
five-year battle
with breast
cancer.


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor
Each county, Bradford,
Union and Alachua, had some
form of breast cancer
awareness event, but nine
Union County women wanted
to raise more money for breast
cancer after the death of a
friend.
Jill Hayes Tetstone died of
breast cancer at the age of 41,
leaving behind two children
after a five-year battle with
breast cancer.
"It changed our lives and
their lives," said her cousin,
Pam Woodington, a Union
County resident.
"(Jill) made us promise to
take care of ourselves," she
said. "That's a promise we
don't take lightly."
Woodington said she and the
other eight women, friends and
family of Jill, were tired of
being sad and decided to put
their promise into action. The
group included Nannette
Starling and Paula Hawkins
(Jill's cousins), Stacey Hayes
(Jill's sister), Belinda
Manukian, Denise Dukes,
Debbie Dolski, Mel Howard
and Courtnie Douglas (Jill's
friends).
They held their first event on
Aug. 10, and raised more than
$20,000.
"This was the group of nine
who didn't take no for an
answer," Woodington said.
Partnering with the
American, Cancer Society in
2005, they participated in a
cancer walk under the team
name of "Jill's Crawbabies."
They had 56 walkers.
At the luncheon Wednesday,
Woodington said their goal for
the upcoming walk was 100
people.
"It takes money for


.---.",-
~0~ ~.H ~


Bradford County residents (I-r) Joella Hafdy, Faye Andrews, breast cancer
survivor Sylvia Reddish, Barbara Reddish and Linda Hicks dine at Carrabba's
during the event.


research," Woodington said "It
takes money for education."
More money could come
through a bigger event, they
decided, and with the, help of
partners' in Bradford and
Alachua County, "Hold 'Em
for Hope" was created. :
The event was a luncheon
held at Carrabba's Italian Grill
in Gainesville on Oct. 4. It was
combined with a silent auction,
many drawings, a Vera
Bradley sale and guest
speakers.
More than 150 tickets were
sold for the event, news of
which was spread through
word-of-mouth and on the 850
AM radio station.


The event drew area
celebrities, such as Shelly
Meyer, wife of Gators coach
Urban Meyer, but most
importantly were area breast


cancer survivors.
Sylvia Tatum, who
contributed time and financial
See CANCER, p. 9C


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2 area golfers


make it out of


District 4 tourney

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
* / Telegraph Staff Writer


Bradford and Union County
!high schools each had one
|golfer advance out of their
Respective District 4-A
tournaments, which were
'played on Oct. 9.
i Heather Alvarez, a member
of the Bradford girls team,
earned a berth' in the Region 2
tournament with a score of 96.
Alvarez also earned- a trip to
last year's regional round as
Bradford qualified as a team,
. The top three individuals not
,on qualifying teams earn
region berths, which is how
,Alvarez and Union County
-boys golfer Devin Osborne
each qualified.
Osborne shot a 41 and a 43
to finish with an overall score
of 84 at the district
tournament.
Union coach Duke Emerson
believes it has been quite a
while since a golfer from


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Oct. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 3C


SCHEDULE OF PERFORMING
ARTISTS AT THE WOMAN'S CLUB


Japanese storyteller uses

music, origami and magic


Saturday, Oct. 14
Indoor Stage


Noon Pianist Benjamin Carter
12:30 p.m. Vocal duet of Tiffany Johns and Bethany Osborn
1:15 p.m. Violinist Amanda Spires
2:00 p.m. Gainesville Youth Choir
3:00 p.m. Kuniko Yamamoto
4:00 p.m. Pianist and composer Samuel Smith
Outdoor Stage
10:00 a.m. U.S.A. Gymnastics
10:45 a.m. Branford High Dance Team
11:00 a.m. Salsa queen Maria Stephenson


11:30 a.m.
Noon
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m..


Bass Country Cloggers
Islands steel drum duo of Bahama Pan
Dance with Next Generation
African drumming ensemble of Lost Safari
Celtic traditional music with Kanapaha
Bluegrass & gospel with Lonesome Highway


Shriner's Parade-Saturday, Oct. 14, at 11 a.m.


Sunday, Oct. 15
Indoor Stage
1:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Outdoor Stag
Noon
1:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.


S
T


;tarke Dance Academy
ammerlin


Bluegrass with Megan and Racheal Sweat
e
Guitar and vocals of Edy Richman,
Florida folk songs by Emmett Carlisle
Blues by the Reeves Brothers
Southern gospel & contemporary Christian music
with Camela Hodsdon,


Local artist returns home


BY TERESA
STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
For almost 20 years, Sheila
Crawford was a painter, one
who specialized in a style she
describes as "photo-realistic
collage," where she uses
acrylics and an airbrush to,
complete the paintings.
Today she is using the same
style that she once used in her
paintings and is applying it to0
:. digital photography.
Crawford shoots' 'her own
photographs, scans them onto
her computer,, and uses Adobe
SPhotoshop to manipulate and
enhance them. '
When desired, she. adds
photographic effects such as,
cyanotypes, where chemicals
are absorbed by the material or
object it is being processed on;
solarization, the exposing of a
photograph to different light
..sources while it is still' in the
developing stage; or selective
colorization, putting partial
color into selected areas of
black and white photos.
.Crawford's unique style is
-further enhanced with the added
touch of three-dimensional'
objects.
By implementing a technique
referred to as "camera-less
* photography," an image can be
produced from objects that are
placed on photo-sensitive.paper
and exposed to light
- Once they are complete.,
Crawford's images are printed
with a large format printer using
archival inks on a variety of


support media, such as
watercolor paper, canvas ,and
,fine art paper.
Each image is produced as an
original limited edition print of
50 or less.
Sheila grew up in Lawtey,
Where she attended Bradford
High School. She also. attended
the University of Florida, and'
went on to receive her.
bachelor's degree : in art
education from Bethune-
Cobkmian in 1974.. .of
-. After -teaching the., arts. of


drawing, painting and sculpture
for 30 years, Sheila retired from
the Flagler County Public
School System in 2005.
She now devotes her time to
the art show circuit. Says
Crawford, "I still have family in,
Lawtey, and I am very excited
about returning home and
having the opportunity to
display ,my work at the
festival."
S See ARTIST, p. SC.


BY TERESA
STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
Japanese storyteller Kuniko
Yamamoto will enchant
younger audiences using
myths and fables from ancient
Japan to both educate and
amuse.
In her show, 0 "Origami
Tales," Yamamoto uses her
own handcrafted masks,
puppets and origami-the
Japanese art of folded
paper-as she makes flowers,
animals, and even a 6-foot-
long dragon come alive.
A native of Osaka, Japan,
Yamamoto studied traditional
dance and music at the
renowned Konishi School in
Japan.
She received national
exposure performing Japanese
storytelling at the Silk Road
International Exposition and
on Kansai National Television.
Since her arrival in America
in 1986, Yamamoto has
performed in venues such as
the Leland Faulkner .Light
Theater, the Kennedy Center
in Washington D.C., and the
Epcot Japanese Pavilion, as
well as hundreds of schools,
colleges and theaters, all to
rave reviews.
With the help of her
husband, the world-renowned
magician Jon LeClair,
Yamamoto has been able 'to
add subtle magic and mystery
to her special performance.

Origami Tales
Artist: Kuniko Yamamoto
Time: Saturday, 3 p.m.
Where: Woman's Club,
201 N. Walnut Street in
downtown Starke

If you get fooled by a pitch
with less than two strikes,
take it.
-Ted Williams

To his dog, every man is
Napoleon, hence the
popularity of dogs.
-Aldous Huxley-


Butler
Seafood House & Grille
386-496-3700


This Week's "Lunch Specials" $7.95
Served II amn to 3 pm Ionh
Lunch Specials include lettuce, tomato, onion,
pickles & French fries served on a corn dusted I
Kaiser roll... Your choice of beverage included!
TUES Grilled or Blackened
Chicken Breast
WED 6 oz certified Black Angus
Hickory Burger glazed w/BBQ
Sauce & Melted Cheddar
THURS Chopped Smoked Pork or
Turkey... slow cooked in our in-
house open pit!
FRI Grilled or Blackened Mahi
Mahi
SAT Our Famous Lightly Breaded"
Fish Sandwich
"Tlis Bad Boy gets a Hoagie Roll"


Hope Christian Academy

"Helping Children Achieve"
Open from 6:30 a.in. to 6:00 p.m.
D2 year old through 12th grade
M M E D A T E Traditional classes
J 1V E 1VT 0 A, Beka 1 & inksfto f iteravIsed


OPENINGS!
Call today or stop by for a tour!


Coming Soon!
Hope Athletic League!
Sports program beginning in
November! For more information
call 904-966-0112


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* Alpha Omega used in 9th-i2th
* Providers of Episcopal, VPK, CTC,
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Want to do something

exciting for Jesus?
Come join our Teens For Christ Youth,
Group, and build a dragster for Jesus.
Teens from 13 to 19 years of age are
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Pastor Leon at 964-3189
Full Gospel Assembly
.icu:iuiuuiiaiiuiiii0iiiiim iiiuiiiiiiuumuiuiumi


)


4


a,


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Kuniko Yamamoto uses music, origami and a touch
of magic in her show "Origami Tales."


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Page 4C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006


-Goat Ranch tournament is a huge success


Dwight Elder lines up
a putt.


BY BUSTER RAHN
Special to the Telegraph
The first-ever Goat Ranch
Golf and Poker Invitaional,
which is being planned as an
annual event, was held at the
Starke Golf and Country Club
on Sept. 28, restricted to
former "High Rollers" who
played golf Wednesdays and
poker that night.
There was unconfirmed talk
the group played for high
stakes, but the amount of
money that changed hands was
a closely guarded secret, and
rank-and-file golfers could
never know for sure.
High Rollers were composed
largely of community leaders
who obtained the land and
built the golf course, and
contributed to the local
econonly through volunteer
efforts and/or their business
and professional lives. While
they loved to play golf, the
majority of them were to be
found in church on Sunday
mornings. Their reign began'
with the building of the golf
course in the late 1950s and
continued into the 1980s, when
old age and death began to
invade their close-knit family


Buford "Blue" McKinney comes close to the hole in
the Goat Ranch Golf Tournament.


of associates.
The group that met and
played golf on Sept.
28-approximately 30
strong-didn't resemble the


golfers they once were, but
what they lacked in finesse on
the course was offset by the
camaraderie of the past. While
names of absent members


won't be mentioned for fear of
leaving someone out, the ghost
of Dr. Herlong Adams was
present on the course in the
minds of many, along with Jim
Brown Godwin, who was a
commanding figure in any
group. Those two, and many
others, left their footprints on
the fairways and greens of the
Starke golf course and
contributed to its remaining
open during some difficult
times.
By one count, 25 of the 27
invited to the tournament were
able to attend. It was
determined, after the 18-hole
round of golf was played, that
some players shot lower scores
than others, but everyone was
declared a winner, and the
group planned to return for an
encore. The golf game,
however, was just one of the
three main attractions.
Sir Byron Terwillegar (note
the title), owner of the
acclaimed Blue Water Bay
restaurant in Melrose, catered
dinner for members of the
Goat Ranch Club (named years
ago by Tombo Smith),
consisting of a large prime rib
steak cooked to perfection,
with all the accompanying fine


cuisine one can envision for a
memorable meal.
The group, after dinner and
chit-chat of a social hour,
retired to the game room for a
round of poker, reminiscent of
the old days when the game
was played frequently, but the
stakes were not reported. It
was reported, however, that
one individual garnered most
of the chips, but his name will
remain anonymous in
deference to his creditors.
It was a great day for the
Goat Ranchers, and also for
those of us who knew them as
friends,, even as we played in
other groups. The joy in seeing
each member was tempered by
the memory of those who have
gone before us. They were our
friends, also.

Those who participated in
the tournament were: Jim
Biggs, Richard Gaines, David
Elder, Richard Burton, Buford
McKinney, Joey Bridges,I
James Womack, Greg Nichols,"
John Riggs, Bob King, Bill
Adams, David .Tew, Tom
Smith, Jimmy Epps, George
Fish, Jack Hazen, Clyde
Terwillegar, Scott Roberts,
Terry Gaines, Dwight Elder,
Mac Williams, George
Roberts, Larry Mercer, Hal
Seymour, John Fry, Charley
Flynn and Wiley Clark.


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Bradford Pre-School
Owner: Linda Bryant n Buseew, Sece 197
Child care for ages I & up
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MEMBER .(386-496-3333]


Southern Professional
Title Services, Inc.
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235 SW 4th Ave.,'Ste. 5 704 N. Lake St.
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Jackson Bulding Suiply
Hayes Electric
Jones Funeral Home
Capital City Bank
Sawyer Gas
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Mr. Auto
ULittle Caesars
Sporting Chance
Bradford Pre-School
Town and Country Ford
Results Fitness Center
Community State Bank


Kirby Laser g Needle
Stiarke Academy of Dance
Spires Grocery


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Oct. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 5C


Pictured (1-r): first row, Wei Lin, Raeann Roberts, Rachel Latham; second row,
Kimberly Tate, Rebecca Corbitt, Jessica McKinney, Deborah Cilley, Jabreena
Jackson, Amy Morton, Patricia Corbitt; third row, Sheryl Meng, Emily Sellers,
Brandi Donahue, Mindy Fulton, Sara Stills, Vanessa Warren, Claudia Edwards RN,
Core instructor. In the program, but not pictured is Sharon Moncrief.


CNA class ongoing at B-U Tech Center


The Bradford-Union Area Career Technical
Center started its CNA class on Aug. 15. The
Core class is a 90-hour course that meets for
four-hour sessions on Tuesday and Thursday
nights. Claudia Edwards. RN, is the Core
teacher.


Bobick and Schrader are engaged


Jerry and Patti Bobick of
Keystone Heights and Michael
and Hollie Schrader of
Hamden, Conn., announce the
eng ment of their children,
Nicole Kristin Bobick and
Kevin Ryan Schrader.
Nicole is a 2001 graduate of
Keystone Heights High School.
She is presently employed by
the Greater New Haven OB
Gyn Group.
Kevin graduated from
Hamden High School and is
employed by the U.S. Postal
Service.
The wedding will take place
on Saturday, Aug. 4, 2007, in
Gainesville.


BHS Class of
'76 is having
a reunion
meeting ,
The Bradford High School
Class of 1976 is having a
meeting to plan its 30-year
reunion. The meeting will
begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday,
Oct. 17, at Western Steer Steak
House in Starke.
Classmates who have not
received an invitation should
call (904) 964-8923 or e-mail
bhsreunionl976@yahoo.com.
The deadline has been extended
until Saturday, Sept. 30.

The Lawtey Recreation Board
meets on the second Tuesday of the
month at 7 p.m.


Clinical is taught on Monday and
Wednesday night, which started out in the class
room setting, and then hands-on training that is
done on all shifts, at Windsor Manor Nursing
Home in Starke. Clinical is instructed by
Robin Garland, RN, BSN.


McClellan and
Hall to wed
Oct. 14
Bobbie H. McClellan and
Hubert A. Hall, both of Starke,
announce their upcoming
marriage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Richard and Juanita
Norman of Raiford and the late
Bobby S. Hardin. She is a
graduate of Union County
High School. She works at
Joli Cheveux Salon and Spa
and is a member of Pine Grove
Cohgregational Methodist
Church.
* The groom-elect is the son
of Rodger and Cordella Hall of
Brooker. He works for CMC
Joist and is a member of Pine
Grove Congregational
Methodist Church.
The wedding will take place
on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2006, at
the Conference Center in
Starke. :
-A reception will immediately
follow the ceremony.
Family and friends are
invited.


mIlM m
Kevin Ryan Schrader and
Nicole Kristin Bobick


WORTH NOTING
Shands at Starke Auxiliary has
available several volunteer
opportunities including gift shop,
receptionn desk.\-ra. medical
records, pea.tcii 'er ce.rand filing
For info:mdatin call Heler- -
LeVangie, (352) 473-8580; Dolores
Morgan, (904) 964-5748; Kay
McKinley, (904) 964-7284; or
Sharon Gaines, (904) 964-6009.


I


BIRTHS

Kaeleigh
Johnson
EJ and Rhiannon Johnson of
Gainesville announce the birth
of their daughter, Kaeleigh
Anne Helen Johnson, on Sept.
25, 2006, at North Florida
Regional Medical Center in
Gainesville.
Kaeleigh weighed 6 pounds,
10 ounces and measured 19
inches in length.
Rhiannon is a graduate of
Bradford High School. EJ is a
graduate of Gainesville High
'School.
Maternal grandparents are
Gail Hiller of Alachua and the
late Daniel Townsend of Clark
Lake, Mich.
Paternal grandparents are
Eddie and Joeann Johnson of
Gainesville.

Alexis Lane
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E.
Lane of Alaciua announce the
birth of their daughter, Alexis
Nicole Lane, on Sept. 20,
2006, in Gainesville,
Maternal grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick B. Welch
of Starke, *...
Maternal great-grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
O'Brian of Starke.
Paternal grandmother is
Diane Lane of Alachua.

Three Wishes ,Inc makes available
power (electric) wheelchairs to
senior citizens and the permanently
disabled at.no cost to the recipient,
if they qualify. The power
wheelchairs are provided to those*
who cannot walk and cannot self-7
propel a manual wheelchair in their
home, and who meet the additional
guidelines of the program. No
deposit is required. Call toll free,
(800) 817-1871, to see if you
qualify.


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I WORTH NOTING
Health Start of North Central
Florida Coalition is seeking a
volunteer board member. Healthy
Start provides services for high-risk
women and children up to 3 years
old. The coalition is seeking a
volunteer to serve on the board who
either has been pregnant and
accessed prenatal care or who has
small children and has accessed
health care for his or her children.
The member will attend once-a-
month board meetings in
Gainesville. Contact Celia Paynter,
(352) 313-6500, ext. 118, for
additional information.
Starke Lions Club meets on the
second and fourth Tuesdays of the
month, 7 p.m., at Western Stepr
Steak House in Starke. For
information call Angel Hill, (904)
364-6215.


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A meditation and stress control
workshop is held every Thursday at
6:30 p.m. at the Senior Health Care
Center. Call to register (904) 782-
1069.
Bradford Lodge No. 35 F&AM, at
the comer of Orange and Call
streets, in Starke has slated
communications on the second and
fourth Monday of the month at 7:30
p.m. and a covered dish dinner on
the second Monday at 6:30 p.m.
The Alachua County
Organization for Rural Needs
(ACORN) Clinic offers free
mammograms and annual pap
smears to women 50 and older who
have little or no health insurance.
Hours: Mon.-Thurs., 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m.; Tuesday night clinic, 7-9 p.m.;
Friday, 8:30 -11 a.m. ACORN is
located in Brooker. Call (352) 485-
1133.


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Ilkl 1III- 91C~I~~~ ~LII -~s ~LI


~ ~ ~~_~~__~~~_~~_ _~~_ ~~~ ~~~~_~~~~ ~ _~~_ _~__~~;~~___ ~ ~ ; ~ ~







Page 6C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006


Late score lifts


ndians to 14-7 homecoming win


BY ARNIE HARRIS
LRM Staff Writer
Keystone Heights football
fans were treated to a nailbiter
of a game on Homecoming as
the Indians took a 14-7 lead
with just two minutes left in
the game and held onto it for a
victory on Oct. 6.
The Indians (5-1) struggled
with continuity on offense, but
two big plays-including Josh
Mangus' game-winning 42-
yard touchdown
reception-were all the team
would need. The defense kept
Newberry out of the end zone
after the Panthers scored
approximately six minutes into
the game.
*- Newberry running back
Antwan Ivey got his
yards-151 on 18 carries-but
he was held in check for the
most part as far as big-play
runs were concerned.
Keystone head coach Chuck
Dickinson said his defense,
after Ivey's 37-yard
touchdown run, adjusted to the
running back's speed and'
altered its pursuit angles.
"The, defense played
extremely well," Dickinson
said. "If they hadn't played as
well as they did, we probably
Wouldn't have won the game."
Newberry (4-2) drew blood
on its second drive of the game,
after a Keystone fumble.
Starting at their own 49, the
Panthers let Ivey carry the ball
four consecutive times, with
the back-after a spectacular
cutback to the right after
finding no running room in the
planned direction-dashing
: to the end zone on the fourth
carry.
That put Newberry up 7-0,
and the Panthers began what
Looked like another promising
drive after forcing the Indians
I to punt on their next series.
Newberry advanced the ball
from its own 15 to the
Keystone 45, but a fumble was


Cameron Yarbrough (shown making a catch in last
week's game against West Nassau) came up big on
defense for the Indians in their win over Newberry,
intercepting a pass in the third quarter. Keystone's
first touchdown of the game followed two plays


later.

recovered by Keystone
linebacker Jack Taylor.
It only took one play from
scrimmage, however, for the
Indians to return the favor as
running back Matt Story


coughed up the ball to
Newberry.
' Through the remainder of
the half, neither team was able
to sustain a productive drive as
the game became more or less


a punting contest.
Keystone's offense ran just
16 plays from scrimmage in
the first half. Dickinson said
mistakes by'the Indians were a
reason for that, but also
credited Newberry for its game
plan on defense.
"Newberry played tough,"
he said. "They've got a good
football team."
The Indians steadily moved
the ball from their own 29 to
Newberry's 22 on the first
drive of the second half, but
Keystone turned the ball over
on downs as quarterback Blake
Lott had no success connecting
with his receivers on the last
two plays.
Newberry took over and
moved the ball steadily
downfield to the Keystone 42
before quarterback, Guy
Brown attempted to hit
receiver Matt Robinson inside
the 20-yard line. The perfectly
thrown pass landed not only in
Robinson's hands, but also
into those of Keystone
defensive back Cameron
Yarbrough. The two wrestled
fiercely for the prize for a
second or two before
Yarbrough emerged with the
pigskin and raced 35 yards up
the sideline to the Newberry
48.
Two plays later, on second-
and-2, Greg Taylor took a
handoff from Lott and dashed
46 yards to, knot the
game-after Michael
McLeod's PAT-at 7-all with
3:03 remaining in the third
quarter.
Taylor finished the game
with 87 yards on 13 carries.
Keystone's defense stopped
another Newberry drive on
downs after the Panthers '
advanced the ball 39 yards
into Keystone territory.
thwarted.
As the final minutes of the
game ticked away, Keystone
began a drive on its own 11.


The running of Story and
Taylor, along with an 18-yard
reception by Yarbrough,
advanced the ball to the
Newberry 42. Lott then
dropped back in the pocket and
uncorked a long pass to
Mangus, who was racing deep
up the right side. Mangus
snagged the pass over his left
shoulder at about Newberry's
25 and outran his defender to
the end zone.
Mangus finished the game
with 66 yards on three
receptions.

Thanks...
Dickinson wished to express
his thanks to Keystone
Building Center, Tru-Value
and Lee Crane Insurance for
sponsoring the pre-game meal
and the Kiwanis Club of the
Lake Region for manning the
concession stands.


Score by Quarter
NHS: 7 0 0
KHHS: 0 0 7


0--7
7-14


Scoring Summary
N: Ivey 37 run (Warner kick)
K: Taylor 46 run (McLeod


kick)
K: Mangus 42 pass from
Lott (McLeod kick)


Team Statistics


First Downs
Rushes/Yds.
Passing Yds.
Passes
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties


K
10
28-133
104
6-16-0
5-35
3-2
4-25


Knowledge-full, unfettered
knowledge of its own
heritage, of freedom's
enemies, of the whole
world of men and ideas-this
knowledge is a free
people's surest strength.
-Dwight D. Eisenhower

Man is a gregarious animal,
and much more so in his
mind than in his body. He
may like to go alone for a
walk, but he hates to stand
alone in his opinions.
-George Santayana


SAN t ITrO S DFOw/
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04 907 Q
^^*^K^ I^t


KH volleyball team drops 2 straight


BY CLjFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Keystone Heights defeated
Interlachen on Oct. 3 to
complete a sweep of its fellow
District 6-3A volleyball
opponents, but the. Indians
have since dropped two
straight matches, bringing their
record to. 14-10.
The Indians have lost four of
their last five matches, but all
' but one of those losses have
come against bigger schools.
On Oct. 4, Keystone lost to
visiting Bishop, Kenny in four
games. Mallory Wasik had 17
kills for the Indians, while
Katie Taylor had eight. Wasik
also had 12 digs.
Michelle Houser led the
team in digs with 15, while
Russell contributed 11..,
Russell and Lori Albritton
had 15 and 13 assists,
respectiyel).
S Key.stone traveled to Nease
on Oct. 9, with the host
Panthers recording a 3-0 (25-
12, 25-15, 25-20) win.
Wasik had II kills and 14
digs,, while Russell had 12
assists.


House and Taylor had nine'
and eight digs, respectively.
- 'Tysee Willianis' led the te&in
in ser\ ice aces with three.
Keystone wraps up the
regular season tonight, Oct. 12,
against St. Johns Country Day
at 6 p.m. in Keystone. The
team's seniors will be


recognized.
The District 6-3A
totiiaram6iit, which "will be
hosted by Interlachen High
School,-begins Monday, Oct.
16. The Indians, as the top
seed, will not play until. the
semifinals on Tuesday, OcV.
17, at 6:30 p.m. .


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Oct. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 7C


BHS handles Vanguard


this year, wins 28-16


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Jernard Beard scored two
touchdowns and the defense
turned in a solid effort as the
Bradford football team
defeated visiting Ocala
Vanguard 28-16 on Oct. 6.
"The kids really wanted it
and we got the job done,"
Bradford head coach Chad
Bankston said. "It wasn't
pretty at times, but we got the
job done."
Bradford's offense misfired
at times, had trouble holding
onto' the ball with four
fumbles-the Tornadoes
recovered all but one-and
gave Vanguard two points
when quarterback Antwan
Brown was sacked for a safety.
However, there was little
doubt the Tornadoes (4-2)
were going to win the game.
Bradford, after recovering a
fumble on a kickoff, got a 3-
yard touchdown run from
Beard to go up 21-2 late in the
second quarter. The Tornadoes


Indians,


would not score again until
late in the fourth quarter, but
they had plenty of points for
the defense to work with.
The Tornadoes held
Vanguard to approximately 50
yards and three first downs in
the first half. The starting
defensive unit gave up less
than 120 yards and just five
first downs before some
younger players were put onto
the field late in the game.
That's when Vanguard scored
its only two touchdowns.
"Truthfully, that game
could've easily been 28-2,"
Bankston said.
The coach added it was
especially gratifying to defeat
the Knights after what
happened in last year's game
between the two teams.
Bankston wouldn't comment
specifically on the matter, but
the Torandoes were penalized
19 times in last year's 18-13
loss, which included two dead-
ball penalties after one play
that put Vanguard at
Bradford's 5-yard line with 20


seconds left to play. That set
the. Knights up to score the
winning touchdown.
There were no such issues
this year as the Tornadoes
were penalized only five times.
"We still made a ton of
mistakes at times, but for the
most part, the kids played
hard," Bankston said.
The Tornadoes wasted little
time in scoring. Jawan
Jamison, who led all rushers
with 183 yards on 15 carries,
scampered 44 yards into the
end zone to cap a seven-play,
80-yard drive that put
Bradford-with Glen
Velasquez' PAT-up 7-0 just
three minutes into the game.
Vanguard (2-4) made its one
serious threat against the
Bradford starting defense on
its first possession.
Quarterback Marquee
Williams completed a 12-yard
pass that moved the Knights to
the Bradford 39, but the drive
stalled as Vanguard turned the
See BHS, p. 8C


Tornadoes set to


meet in key district game


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Four teams are currently tied
for second place in District 3-
2A, but that field will be
narrowed after games on
Friday, Oct. 13.
Bradford and Keystone
Heights are two of those teams
who are vying for, a playoff
berth behind district leader
Bolles and they will face each
other tomorrow in Keystone at
7:30 p.m.
The two teams, along with
Ribault and West Nassau, each
have a 1-1 district record
(Ribault plays Bolles
tomorrow and West Nassau
plays Interlachen). Bolles sits
atop the district, with a 2-0
mark.
S Bollesti!itB 18 y team that
- has handed 'Keystone a loss
this season. The Indians (5-1)
are. coming off of a 14-7
homecoming: win over
Newberry, .
Keystone's offense has
generated 1,044 rushing yards
this season (174 per game).
Junior. running back Greg
Taylor leads the way both
rushing and scoring. He has
seven rushing touchdowns,
three of which have gone for
better than 30 yards. He had a
46-yard touchdown run and
rushed for 87 yards on 13
carries in the win over
.Newberry.
Taylor also has four
touchdown receptions on the
season.
Senior quarterback Blake
Lott has completed 48-of-99
passes, for 709 yards,. nine
touchdowns and, just o.ne
interception.


Senior wide receiver Josh
Mangus has three touchdown
receptions, including the
game-winner-a 42-
yarder-against Newberry.
Sophomore Cameron
Yarbrough has two touchdown
receptions and has scored three
overall as a member of the
defensive unit.
Yarbrough also has a
touchdown on defense-a 103-
yard interception return in a
35-6 win over Fort White. He
has three interceptions total
this season.
In all, Keystone's defense
has forced 12 turnovers. The
Indians have allowed '135
rushing yards" per game and
129 passing yards per game.
As for Bradford, which is
coming off of a 28-16 win over
-Vganuard, its --defense-. is.
wVeal'ng' _--rushmg' yars per
game and 73 passing yards per
game. The Tornadoes (4-2)
have forced opponents into
committing 14 turnovers.
Junior defensive lineman
Chuckie Covington has caused
two fumbles this season and
has recovered three fumbles,
including two in the win over
Vanguard.
Covington is the team leader
with 67 total tackles and nine
tackles for loss.
Sophomore defensive back
Eugene Blye has two
interceptions, while freshman
defensive back James Jamison!
has returned one pick for a,
score.
Offensively, Bradford is
averaging 277 rushing, yards
per game, with four backs, for
the most part, splitting carries.
Jamison has 515 yards on 60.
carries, junior Rob Harris has
427 on 54 carries, junior


Jernard Beard has 285 yards
on 42 carries and junior Dejor
Hill has 260 yards on 47
carries.
Beard leads the. team with
five rushing touchdowns
(Harris and Jamison each have
four) and also leads the team
with eight overall touchdowns.
He has been senior quarterback
Antwan Brown's favorite
receiver, catching three
touchdown passes.
Brown has five touchdown
.passes overall and has
completed 21-of-52 passes for
321 yards with four
interceptions in five games
(Blye had to play quarterback
for Brown in a 22-8 loss to
Baker County).
Brown has seven
touchdowns,,,py ,ll,, having
mrshe4 fotTo.', ,,,
Th .J prnadoe.s. are
averaging 67 passing yards per
game.
See KEY, p. 8C


4bi


PO

1, IS


Bradford running back Rob Harris (center) looks for a hole to run through in the
Tornadoes' win over Vangauard. Harris rushed for 61 yards on 12 carries.




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Page 8C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Oct. 12, 2006


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor
The opening kickoff of the
Oct. 6 match-up between the
Union County Tigers and the
Baker County Wildcats
seemed like the one to turn the
Tigers' losing season around.
However, the Tigers
couldn't keep the momentum
going in a 42-6 loss.
Aaron Dukes scored the
Tigers' only touchdown of the
night when he returned a
fumble by Baker's Jamar
Farmer on the opening kickoff.
On their first offensive
possession, the Tigers (1-6)
tried to punt, with the ball
flying over the head of Austen
Roberts. After he recovered
the ball, Roberts'. pass fell
incomplete, turning the ball
over to Baker at the Union 26-
yard line. The Wildcats scored
just a few plays later, changing
the direction of the game.
Within the first quarter,
Baker (4-3) had scored three'
more touchdowns, with two 2-
point conversions. Farmer


BHS
Continued


from p. 7C


ball over on downs at the 35.
That .one pass play
notwithstanding, the Bradford
defense demonstrated on that
drive what kind of night it was
going to be for the Vanguard
offense. Defensive linemen
Chuckie Covington and Corian
Garrison dropped running back
J.J. Smith for a 1-yard loss on
the first play of the drive, and
Garrison delivered a vicious
hit on Akai Milson on second
down, holding him to just a 1-
yard gain.
Covington finished the game
with nine tackles, two sacks
and two fumble recoveries.
Two of Vanguard's next
three possessions went three-
and-out, while the third was
stopped by an interception by
Bradford's Eugene Blye. :
Still, the Knights made it a
five-point game when Brown
was tackled in the end zone for
a safety. at-the- 1,:44 mark of
the second quarter.
That's as close as the game
would get. Jamison; after
fumbling the ball and losing 9
yards, ripped off a 65-yard run
on third-and-10 to the
Vanguard 18. A 6-yard carry
by Rob Harris, along with a
personal 'foul penalty on


LEGALS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
BRADFORD COUNTY -
SURPLUS PARCELS OF
LAND
Bids will be received by Bradford,.
County Commission at the Office of
the County Clerk, 945 .N. Temple
Avenue, P.O. Drawer B, Starke,
Florida until October 24, 2006 at 4:00
p.m. tfor the following described
property:
Two parcels of land located in the
North one-half of the Northeast
quarter NE 1/4) of Section 24,
ownship 8 South. Range 22 East,
Bradford County, Florida, locally
referred to as lots 17 and 18 of an
unrecorded plat of Paradise Lake
Acres.
Complete legal descriptions and map
are available upon request al the
Coui-.y Manager's Office, located at
945 N Temple Ave, Starke, Florida
904-966-6339. Bids must be SEALED
and clearly marked with the words
"Bids for Surplus Parcels" and must
be received by the Office of the
County Clerk no later than 4-00 p m.
*on October 24, 2006. Bids will be
opened in the County Commission
Meeting Room located in the Northn
Annex of the County Courthouse at
945 N. Temple Avenue. Starke,
Florida. Bradford County reserves
the right to reject any and all bids
1G05 2tchg. 10/12


made up for his fumble at the
start of the game, scoring.two
of those first-quarter
touchdowns and finishing the
game with three overall.
The Tigers, despite a hard-
fought game, were never able
to get the game going back in
their favor.
Union head coach Buddy
Nobles said, "I thought coach
(Bobby) Johns and them did a
good job preparing for the
game, obviously better than I
did our players."
Nobles said the Tiger
-players work hard during
practice, and that the loss
could not be attributed to .lack
of talent or work ethic, but
rather lack of experience.
"We had a bunch of mental
mistakes that a young ... team
makes," he said.
Leading in rushing and
passing for the Tigers was
Roberts. He rushed for 41
yards on 10 carries, while
completing 6-of-25 passes for
57 yards and two interceptions.
Brodie Ellis led in receiving


with 29 yards on three
receptions.
Next, the Tigers get a week
off before taking on District 4-
2B opponent P.K. Yonge on
Friday, Oct. 20, at 7:30 p.m. in
Lake Butler,


0 16-6
0 6-42


Scoring Summary
U: Dukes 10 fumble return
(pass failed)
B: Lee 28 run (Holton run)
B: Johns 4 run (pass failed)
B: Farmer 28 pass from Holton
(Moore run)
B: Farmer 35 run (pass failed)
B: Farmer 18 pass from Holton.
(Johns run)
B: Ruise 30 run (run failed)


Team Statistics
U
First Downs 12
Rushes/Yds. 33-115
Passing Yds. 69
Passes(C-A-l) 8-28-2
Fumbles-Lost 4-0


Vanguard, gave the Tornadoes Bradford
a first-and-goal at the 4. ensuing onsi
Covington would eventually drove 50 yar
cross the goal line from 3 score-a 5-y
yards out, putting the reception by
Tornadoes up 13-2 with 5:25 seconds remain
remaining in the half after a
failed two-point conversion.
Bradford recovered a fumble
on the ensuing kickoff and Score by Quai
went on to increase its lead to VHS: 2 0
21-2. Beard, who.had a 16- BHS: 7 14
yard reception on the drive,
scored on a 3-yard run. Brown Scoring Sumr
then hooked up with Michael B: Jamison 4
Kiser on the two-point (Velasquez kic
conversion to send the V: Brown tac
Tornadoes into the locker zone for safety
room up by 19 points. B: Covington
Vanguard drove past the 50 failed)
on its first two possessions of B: Beard 3 ru
the second half. However, both from Brown)
drives amounted to nothing, V: Milson 24
and Covington played a part in Williams (Smitl
that. He recorded a tackle for a B: Beard 5 p
loss on the first drive after-the Brown (Velasq
Knights had given themselves V: McChristo
a first down at the Bradford from Williams I
25, then recovered a fumble on
the second drive on the Team Statistii
Bradford 41-yard line.
- The Knights' offense finally First Downs
scored on a-- 2-'yard' Rushes/Yds.
ouci'lidown reception by. Passing Yds.
Milson with 3:19 left in the Passes
game, with Smith's run on the Punts
two-point conversion making Fumbles-Lost
the score 21-10. Penalties


B
19
37-297
69
5-11-0
2-1


recovered the
ide kick, then
ds for its final
ard touchdown
Beard with 36
ning.


rter
D 0 16-16
4 0 7-28

mary
4 run
k)
kled in end
3 run (run
in (Kiser pass
pass from-
h run)
ass from
uez kick)
Dn 64 pass
(no attempt)


cs
B
20 ;:i
53-299
45 '
4-7-0
1-15
4-1
5-30


20-89
166
11-24-1
3-41:
3,2
9-45


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U U U U U


U


Devin Osborne


GOLF
Continued from p. 2C
exhibits a -calm demeanor on
the course.
"He plays such consistent
golf," Emerson said of
Osborne, who finished with
the lowest score for the Tigers
in all but two of their 15
regular season matches. "He
doesn't get rattled."
The Region 2 boys and girls
tournaments will be played
Monday, Oct. 16, at Turkey
Creek Golf (Santa Fe is the
host school). The boys
tournament begins at 8 a.m.
and the girls tournament
begins at 11 a.m.
Only the top two teams and
top two individuals (regardless
of whether or not they're-
members of the top two teams)
advance to the Florida High
School Athletic Association
Finals, which will be held
Tuesday-Wednesday, Oct. 24-
25, in Vero Beach.

Tigers place fifth in
team standings
The Union County boys
team wrapped up. its season
with a fifth-place finish at the
District 4-A tournament. That
left the Tigers out of the
regional picture, but Emerson
was more than pleased with
the season the team had. The
Tigers finished the regular
season with a 17-4 record.
"I really thought it was
going to be a rebuilding year"
Emerson said, alluding to the
fact that the team was-'


Broadcasting LIVE
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Listen to win.
All prizes awarded in connection with this event, including
the grand prize, will be distributed from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Saturday. October 14 at the WEAG broadcast location on
the porch of the Woman's Club in Starke.


composed of several golfers
who didn't play last year.
The Tigers capped the
regular season by defeating
Chiefland twice and losing to
Williston.
Against Chiefland, Union
outshot the Indians 165-220
and 174-213. Osborne was the
leader for the Tigers in each


KEY
Continued from p. 7C

A win tomorrow night will
certainly be huge for either
team, but as last year showed,
the loser still has a chance to
finish as district runner-up
with two more district games
remaining.
Bradford defeated Keystone
6-3 last year, but the
Tornadoes would go on to lose
their next two district games,
while the Indians won their
next two. Consequently, it was
Keystone that took second
place and advanced, to the
playoffs.
That game between the
Indians and the Tornadoes last
year ended in bizarre fashion
after it appeared Keystone was
going to get the win.
Keystone's offense had the
ball and drove to the Bradford
30-yard line, but fumbled the
ball away with less than two
minutes remaining.. Bradford


match with scores of 38 and
42. Kris Bracewell and Tyler
Osteen each shot a 41 in the
first match and a 43 in the
second match.
The Tigers then lost to
Williston by 20 strokes, 164-
184. Osborne led the way with
a 42, while T.J. Good shot'i
45.


recovered and graduate James
Jamison returned the ball to
the Keystone 32. -.
Bradford, trailing 3-0, was
forced to attempt a last-sdcond
field goal, which Keystone
graduate Nick Salsbery
blocked. It is a little confusing
as to what happened afterward,
but the end result was that
lineman Kyle Mercer, a senior
on this year's team, wound up
with the ball and crossed the
goal line for a game-winning
touchdown.
Mercer said a Keystone
player picked up the ball after
the blocked field goal attempts
and tossed it toward him.
Keystone head coach Chuck
Dickinson said the player in'
question told him he did pick'
the ball up, but he then took at
knee. Afterward, the player
.supposedly tried to hand the
ball to an official, who simply
glet the ball fall to the ground. ;,
"I've never seen anything ;
like that," Bradford head coach:"
Chad Bankston said after the'
game. "It was unbelievable."


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new this year, professional children's theater perfor-
mances. The Shriners lead the parade at 11 a.m. Sat-
urday and there's great Southern cuisine all weekend,
including sweet potato pie and ribs. Don't miss it!


Things start well, then go


bad for Tigers in 42-6 loss


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Oct.. TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 9C


ARTIST
Continued from p. 3C

.Sheila Crawford has been in
numerous professional artist
competitions since 1981.


CANCER
Continued from p. 2C

Support to the event, also
helped with an awareness
luncheon held in Bradford
County in February
. The event combined lunch
a nd Vera Bradley products,
sold locally by Dimple
Overstrect of A&G Custom
Framing and Gifts. Twenty
percent of Overstreet's sales,
from the prior event and this
.year's event, goes to breast
-cancer research.
* "Breast cancer is the most
common type of cancer among
women in the' U.S.,'" Tatum
said.
"If one person makes an
appointment (for a


Some of her most recent
meritorious juried competitions
were Images: A Festival of the
Arts, 2006 George E. Musson
Award, Winter Park Sidewalk
Art Festival, 2006 Award of
Merit, Tarpon Spring Art on the
Bayou, 2006 Award of
Excellence, Melbourne Arts


mammogram) after today, it's
worth it."
Tatum said it was nice to
have October as Breast Cancer
Awareness Month, but it
wasn't enough.
"We appreciate that, but
there are 11 other months in
the year, and we're not going
to forget it," she said.
Another guest speaker was
Dr. Sheryl Hayes, who was
Tatum's radiologist during her
bout with breast cancer.
Hayes said 220,000 women
will be diagnosed with breast
cancer this year, and 40,000
will die.
Self exams and early
detection can help lower these
numbers, she said. Research,
funded by events like the
luncheon, will also bring about
change.


4.


Festival 2006, Second Place; College, Central
Other Media. Community College,
Dayton Art Institute, in


Various collections by Sheila
Crawford include the Deland
Museum of Art, the Polk
Museum of Art in Lakeland, the
Harn Museum in Gainesville,
Daytona Beach Community


Other speakers included
Bryn Warner from the
American Cancer Society and
ROCK 104 of Gainesville.
The cancer walk will start
this Saturday, Oct. 14, in
Gainesville at Northeast Park
and continue through the duck
pond area.
Woodington said area
residents should get involved.
She has, even sparked the
interest of the Union County
High School cheerleading
squads of which she is a coach.
The majority of the JV and
varsity cheerleading squads
will be at the walk, she said.
"They're a very active group
of young ladies."
To be a walker or for more
information on how you can
help, call Woodington at (386)
496-4950.


'I

.9


Florida
and the
Dayton,


Ohio. display this Saturday and
You can meet and see Sheila-. Sunday at the SFCC Starke Fall
Crawford's photography on Festival, Booth # 9.


Together with her background as a painter and her love for photography, Sheila
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Oct. 12, 2008 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--D-SECTION Page 2D




Churches play an important role in history


New River Baptist is oldest church in
Bradford Cou ntv\
There are about 100 churches in
Bradford County today, but the New
River Baptist Church is the oldest, dating
back to the days of the Seminole Indian
Wars. Bradford County did not exist
when the New River church was
founded on July 17. 1833. A group of 14
pioneer settlers got together on that day
and unanimously agreed to form
themselves "into a constituted body near
New River, independent of any church
or churches, presbytery, or synod." The
group petitioned Pigeon Creek Church,
which had been established in 1821 in
Nassau County, for "letters of.
dismission" so the New River group
could form a new church congregation.
Members of this original founding group
included Isaac Carter, Thomas Prevatt,
Levy Pullum, Sarah Prevatt, Kisiah
Jones, Margret Ann Carter, Mary Tucker
and Elizabeth Prevatt. John Tucker,
Fleming Bates and Paul B. Colson were
listed as members of the first
"presbytery." Tucker was also the first
pastor.
Indians still held sway over the entire
region when the New River church was
founded. Minutes from a church meeting
held in 1835 said, "The church and
congregation were thrown into confusion
at Indian alarm and meeting broke up."
The rites of communion and "foot
washing" were postponed until February
1836. At the time, when an "Indian
alarm" was raised by ringing bells or
firing warning shots at the sight of a
raiding party in the area, settlers often
packed up their entire families and
camped in the vicinity of one of the
many forts which dotted the Florida
interior. They would remain camped
.near the fort for several days, or even
longer, until it was deemed safe to return
to their homes. Churches in those early
days usually did not meet every Sunday.'
One preacher usually had a "circuit"
consisting of several churches where he
held services on a rotational basis.
With no law enforcement in the area.
it was the church congregation that
exercised punishment for wrongdoing.
The church was judge and jury and the
minutes throughout this time reflect the
judgments that were handed down. In
New River's minutes from the 1830s and
1840s can be found notations like,
"Sister Snowden up for dishonesty, but
exonerated... Buril Jones up for
falsehood and excluded... Elizabeth
Townsend excluded for dancing..."
.Being "excluded" was the same as being
shunned. No one would have anything to
do with the miscreant until such time as
the congregation deemed the person had
been, sufficiently humbled. One entry in
the minutes read "a certain William
Jeffries, who called himself a Baptist
preacher, was proved by Brother
McDonald to have acted dishonestly in a
horse-swapping deal." Jeffries defended
himself in the hearing by invoking
"caveat emptor" (let the buyer beware)
and "claiming it was not dishonest to
swap a blind horse to a man if said man
had examined the horse and had not
found him to be blind."
The minutes of the New River Baptist
Church say that Pastor Tucker was
"missionary" for the Home Board of


New York for all of Florida and received
a salary of $200 per year. He was
described as being "rough when
occasion demanded it" and was known
in the area as "the sledgehammer
preacher." On trips around his circuit, he
sometimes had to travel at night. He was
often shot at by Indians and it was said
he carried the marks of their bullets in
his body to the grave. He was also said
to have "funeralized" more people killed
by Indians than any other preacher in
Florida..
Starke First United Methodist
The First Methodist Church founded
in Starke in 1863 is believed to be the
oldest church in the city. It began when a
group of people met in a one-room log
building on Church Street near the
present location of the St. Mark's
Episcopal Church. The site for the
church was donated to the congregation.
by Capt. John C. Richard, a prominent
local merchant and a former officer in
the Civil War. The building was the only
church building in the entire town at the
time and was also used by other
congregations for their meetings. In
1886 the Leithtiat.Vmnoedl to another
location on Palmnicli Stlr,., i;n the north
section' of Starke. Simon J. Temple, an
early lumber man, donated the property
and the lumber for this building. It was
later moved to a new location at the
corner of Walnut and Jefferson streets.
The present church, built in 1950-51 still
stands in this location. A new fellowship
hall was constructed in 1978 after the
church purchased a lot north of its 1950
site. This fellowship hall continues to be
a meeting place for local civic
organizations.,A number of renovation
projects have been carried out at the
church since it was first built, including
refurbishing the sanctuary and the cupola


under the spire, adding new decorative
solid wood doors and laying out a
memory garden in one courtyard area.
Starke First Baptist Church
The second oldest church in the city is
the Starke First Baptist. It- was founded
when a group of citizens met to establish
"a fellowship with one accord in one
place." The result was a Baptist group
with 14 members: George W. Adams,
Sarah L. Adams, Rev. S.S. Brown,
Rachel Brown, Robert Keith, Mrs. E.A.
Keith, J.F. Talliaferro, Anna M.
Talliaferro, Robert Talliaferro, W.R.
Glisson, Rachel Glisson, Mrs. S.G.
Sanders, Joseph Thomas and Mary
Thomas. The first services were held in a
public school building located where the
Starke Women's Cluab now stands. Judge
Keith, a retired Baptist minister living in
Starke, served as supply pastor. On Jan.
6, 1879, a deed for the initial plot of land
at the church's current site was recorded
from James D. Jones and his wife, Ally,
to the deacons of the "First Baptist." A
building fund was started and in 1884
plans for a building were drawn by
George Thomas, a northern. architect
~ ho,"N a'l ctm i'Siarke to visit his
father, one of the deacons of the church.
Thomas also supervised construction of
the white frame building which served as
the church's first permanent home. It
was dedicated in July of 1884.
The church grew steadily and in 1944
a building drive was stalled for a larger
building to accommodate the church's
growing membership. The first service
was held in this new church auditorium
on Feb. 12, 1950. Several expansion and
renovation projects have been carried out
over the ensuing years, so that the church
,is now exclusively red brick with a large
education building and office space in
addition to the sanctuary. The largest


project 'was the construction of a new
and larger sanctuary which was just
completed recently. -
Starke First Christian Church
The third congregation to be organized
in Starke was that of the First Christian
Church. I was chartered in 1881, but had
held services prior to that time. Professor
G.P. Young, a teacher, and his brother
organized a school in Starke .called
Orange College. They also brought a
group together to found the First
Christian Church. The group met in the*
building used as the school. When the
building later burned, the congregation
built a new one on West Call Street in
1887. Several years later the group built
a building on the site of the present
church on the corner of Call and
Christian streets. A new sanctuary was
also completed recently by this
congregation.
St. Mark's Episcopal Church
While the first mention of a Starke
Episcopal Church was found in the
Diocesan Journal in 1890, it is likely that
a group of people had been meeting in
Starke as an Episcopalian cthn,'rt.gation
i'.r ,es er.il ve.ir',:by thtt ime-ne Si: nk h'ad
bci 'n ai priachli n s.,in,' -.r'.i by
visiting preachers for years. A fcvf
families had begun meeting in private
homes in the 1860s and later began to
meet in the upstairs room of a building
near the railroad tracks. In May of 1890.
the congregation had no name and
consisted'of 10 families totaling about 40.
people. By May 1981 the congregation
had officially been named St. Mark's. In
1891, the Diocese acquired the church's
present site on Church Street from
George E. Pace, a local store owner.
Pace .and his partner, Capt. John C.'
Richard, donated a frame building to the
congregation. It had served as a cotton


a


Classified Ads


Read our Classifieds on the Where one call

World Wide Web does itall!
www. RCTlonrn ai. n m 964-6305 473-221i0496-2261


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Bradford Union Clay

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Readers Every Week!


INDEX
40 Notice N
41. Vehicle Parts & Accessories
42 Motor Vehicles
43 RV's & Campers .
'44 Boats
45 Land rorSale
46 .Real Estate Out ofArea
47 Commercial Property
Rent, Lease, Sale
S48 Homes nor Sale
49 Mobile Homes for Sale
50 For Rent
51 Lost/Found
52 Animals & Pets
53 Yard Sales
54 Keystone Yard Sales
55 Wanted .
.56 Trade or Swap
57 For Sale.
58 Building Malernals
59 Personal Ser ices
60 Secretarial Services
61 Scriptures
62 Vacation/Travell
63 Love Lines
64 Business Opportunity
65 Help Wanted
r66 Investment Opportunity
67 HunUng Land for Rent
68 Rent to Own
69 Food Supplements
70 Self Storage
72 Sporting Goods
73 Farm Equipment
74 Computlers& Compulr Accessories
CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon
To place a Classified
USE YOUR PHONE
964-6305 473-2210 496-2261
NOTICE
Clm.ird Ad.en. in hoMuld be i a id d lc, u.noke catdil I.. *lidy hen b a- blihi.d wi5h ihc
newppet, A ,00 u-iat char ll be added ll b d 1 .lllj| 10 vert pltJ|e lld handlin All ,4
placed by pio- m ead hback In the dvnlatr 11 Id l Ae of, pilc-me tnlor e 1he clniriA d atf4
no. i b 1. hed rtepc|,ibl. or mlee.k. in ,l .0iid .dvlingl aMke.n by pho.. Thi. nh- ap.,r r tu-
0he lighl t o. ,nllIy lIly AAd a ll .1 W o. 1 o 1cep e or a ,d o a y ..dy rlini n le at I ny II-M. O.ly
andrd hbrbvalice. l he accepted.


Get all your local
O news... government,
crime, obituaries,'
classified, school,
weddings, births, etc.
Sforon

Scopy


Since1879


r w .
131 West Call Street Starke, Forida 32091

904-964-6305 Fax: 904-964-8628
editor@bctelegraph.com




1993 Ford F-150 XLT
short wheel base. 5.0 V8, Automatic,
AC, 2 new tires 31.50/15. 2 gas tanks,
goose neck receiver in bed, Drawtite
hitch, diamond plate toolbox, Cobra
CB radio w/7' antenna. Engine
jumped time,... has slight miss. Have
new parts to fix: timing chain and
gears, oil pump, distributor, etc. A
steal at $1,500.00.
Call 386-496-1215
before 9 pinm please


40
Notice
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
It Illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
. discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an
intention to make any
such preference, limita-


tiort or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age of
18 living with parents or
legal custodians, preg-
nant women and people
securing custody of chil-
dren under 18. This
newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any adver-
tising for real estate
which Is In violation of the
law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in
this newspaper,are avail-
able on an equal oppor-


READERS BEWARE
You need to Investigate' any work at home and Financial
offers. Be careful and investigate all offers before sending
your hard earned dollars to these companies. The
Telegraph screens these Ads but cannot always' catch
them all.lf you have any questions, call 904-964-6305.


FOR SALE
Get ready for Hunting Season!
I have several used Cobra 29 CB Radios
for sale that are priced right."Have a few
antennas, coax. other misc. items.
386-496-1215
before 9 pit please



For Sale





1999 Grand Manor DWMH
Fully Furnished, 4 BR/2 BA
Living rm, Family rm w/Fireplace,
Dining rin, Large Kitchen, Utility
rm, Front & Back Decks
Lot 100' x 100'

$35,000
For additional in cail
904-964-7488 or 90 164-6900


tunity basis..To complain
of discrimination, call
HUD toll-free at 1-800-
669-9777; the toll-free
telephone number for the
hearing impaired is 1-
800-927-9275. For fur-
ther information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-
7082 ext #1005.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office in
writing & paid in advance
unless credit has already
been established with
this office. A $3.00 SER-
VICE CHARGE will be
added to all billings to
cover postage & han-
dling. THE CLASSIFIED
STAFF CANNOT BE
HELD RESPONSIBLE
FOR MISTAKES IN
CLASSIFIED D
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday at
12 noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $8.00
for the first 20 words,
then 20 cents per word
thereafter.
41
Auctions
B & F AUCTION Will open
Oct. 5th, 2006. Every-
body is welcome. Vendor
spots will be for bid. All
153/AB1542. 6551 NW
CR 225.
ABSOLUTE AUCTION -
Highest Bidders Buyl
Beautiful lake lot on
Hampton Lake, old
coins, stamps, collec-
tions, fine English Bone
China, furniture and
much more. Saturday,
October 14, 2006 at
10am. Between
Gainesville and Starke, 1
mile West of Hwy 301 on
CR18. Ben Campen
Auctioneers, www.
CampenAuctions.com.
352-375-4152, AU#201,
AB#2118. 10% Buyers
Premium.
42
Motor Vehicles
1988 DODGI DAKOTA,
$975. MAZ;.-\ B2300,
5sp, cold ac, dings, runs


good;, now reduced to
$1500. Also 94 Chevy'
Lumina Van, cold ac,
runs, reduced to $595-
trans problems. Call 904-
964-4111.
CASH VEHICLES '92
BONNEVILLE, $1,750.
'88 Cadillac, $1,500. '94
Cougar, $1,500. '00
Chevy S-10, $4,600. All
cars plus tax, tag and
title. 352-277-7759.
'94 4X4 GMC YUKON -
5SPDTRANS, 5.7L 350,
A/C, cruise; seats 5.
Rear seat folds down flat.
Tom, 904-964-7285 or
cell 352-262-0762..
MOTORCYCLE 2006
SUZUKI BOULEVARD
C50, like new. Asking
$5995, excellent condi-
tion. Call 904-964-5019.
Must sell or trade due to
health reasons.
43
RV's and
Campers
30' REVCON MOTOR
HOME in Starke, $4,000
.or trade for 20' class C
motor home. Call 352-
327-2753.
45
Land for Sale
2.5 ACRES CLEARED with
new driveway on N.W.
180th Street in Starke.
$57,900. Call 904-964-
6708 leave message.
47
Commercial
Property
Rent, Lease,
Sale
1/3 ACRE LOT mostly
level, on a paved road, 5
minutes from downtown
Keystone Heights. Ask-
ing $22,000, owner fi-
nancing possible with
$5,000 down, wac. Call
904-553-3301.
FOR LEASE OR sale. Ideal
location 2 parcels! 2800
SOFT building with of-
fice, barn, mini storage,
5 acres, off of South 301.
Also 8 acres, partially
cleared. Both lots 3/10th
of a mile from new
Walmart. Call 904-964-
3827 for more informa-
tion.


COMMERCIAL/ RETAIL
space by Starke Post
Office for rent or lease.
For more information
please call 904-964-
6305 and ask for John..
DOWNTOWN STARKE
prQfessional offices for
rent. Conference room,
kitchen, utilities and more
provided. Call 904-964-
2616.
TWO COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS downtown
Starke. One set up for
restaurant. Huge square
footage. One needs
roof. Only $376,500 for
both. Call904-964-4111.
48
Homes for Sale












MORTGAGES TAILoREDLO
time home buyer, no:

bankruptcy ok Call fors

BRAADFORD COUNTY -11

3/2. Contractor special
custom throughout,.
metal roof, granite-
counters, safe room,;
Beautiful property with?
stocked pond. Very prid-
inquairies only, 904-964-:

7145 KING ST, KEY-:
STONE. 4/2.5,2400 SF,ky.
home. New windows
roof, siding, decks an



STONE, on large lot,
3Br2BA, garage, 1500
ome, like new. Rento


gin. but it was moved to the Church
Street site and became the meeting hall
for the congregation. Richard also late
donated some additional property which
adjoined the church properly donated by
Pace.
When the Big Freeze killed the orange
groves, the entire area had to work
through an economic disaster. The town
of Fairbanks (now a residential area
between Waldo and Gainesville) nearly
became a ghost town and could nc
longer support its Episcopal Church.
When the church building fell into.
disuse, the wealthy founder of the town
(whose family name was Fairbanks, ol
Course) gave the Fairbanks building tc
the Starke congregation. William Kalch.
a carpenter from Hampton, took the,
church apart piece by piece and rebuilt il
in Starke for a total fee of $480. Thai
building is still in use today, although
several additions have been made ovei
the years.
Starke Presbyterian Church
The First Presbyterian Church of
Starke celebrated its 100th anniversary
in October of 1984. It owes its,
beginnings to a small group of well-to-
do northern, families who came here in
the 1880s seeking a warmer climate anc
an opportunity to invest in orange groves
and other activities. They met on Dec.
15, 1884, to organize a Presbyterian
group since there, was none in Starke at,
the time.
Three members of the group, headed
by J.M. Truby, donated property neaw
their homes on North Cherry Street as a;
site for the new church. Work began
immediately and before the end of the
year, the "carpenter gothic" styled
church was completed using the finest
'long-leaf yellow pine lumber. The
interior woodwork was all done by hand.
In July of 1978 the historic structure
was mounted on a "cradle" and moved
to its present location on East Call Street
so that an expansion project could be
completed. An addition provided needed
room for a growing congregation.
Hope Baptist Church
Hope Baptist Church in the
community of Theressa was organized
on Jan. 15, 1876, in a presbytery called'
together by Elder L.W. Kicklighter and
Silas Weeks. The organizational meeting
was held in the log house belonging tc
Mr. and Mrs. .John Philips. The
congregation continued to meet there
until a new church was built about 1(
years later on property donated by th(:
same family. Kicklighter came to th(
Kingsley Lake area from Georgia ir:
iS93. He joined the Baptist faith there ir,
-,4-70 and J .as ordained in '-'" '
Lr\ted 27 ditllrent chinche-,s in Brddt'oit;
and ihe adjoining counties during hi.;
tenure. He was also a member of the!
Bradford County 'School Board for.,a'
number of years and served in the state
legislature as a member from Clay!
County.
In the early days, services were held;
one weekend each month, beginning on.
Saturday and lasting through Sunday. Nc.
evening services were held on Sunday.
because the pastor was a "circuit:
preacher" who served several towns anc.
would have to leave Hope Baptist te6
return home by horse and buggy.


NO, 0





Page 3D TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--D-SECTION Oct. 12, 2008


SRead our Classifieds on the Where one call

ClassifSed Ads World Wide Web does f a/l/
,k, iwww.BCTeleqraph.com 964-6305*473-2210.496-2261
I I I .. .. .. ....


or rent to own, 5K mini-
mum down. $189K,
$1,100 per month. Call
904-276-6446.
GENEVA LAKE ESTATES
- between Keystone and
Melrose on paved street.
3BR/2BA, 1837 sq ft.
Just remodeled, includes
fans, appliances, shed,
screened porch, 2 car
garage, $199,900. Day
352-475-1800 or eve-
nings 352-475-6255.
49
Mobile Homes
for Sale
HILLIARD/ NEWJacobsen
32 x 48: 3BR/2BA, set up
on 2 acres with well, sep-
tic & power pole in-
cluded, $734 per month.
Call 1-888-546-4707 or
1-904-424-7345.
NEW JACOBSEN 3 AND 4
BR HOMES on our land
or yours, with little or no
money down, easy quali-
fying loans. Call 1-888-
546-4707 or 904-424-
7345.
1983 MH 1BR/1BA14x52
on lot in Highridge Es-
tates, Keystone Heights.
$28,000, call 904-966-
0765.
SPECIAL FINANCE PRO-
GRAM Guaranteed ap-
provals. Call Bruce at
904-259-0945.
COUNTRY LOTS, '1-3
acres. Mobile homes &
complete package. We
finance. Call Bruce 904-
259-0945.
LAND HOME PACKAGE -
New 1560 sq ft, 4/2 on
1/2 acre in Baker County,
$110,000. Call 904-259-
8028.
BAKER COUNTY 1 1/2
lots. North Macclenny on
St. Marys River. Well,
septic, power pole
$60,000. Call 904-259-
8028.
50
For Rent


6522 TREIS'r AVE, KEY-
STONE, o n large lot,
guaranteed financing.
3BR/2BA, c',arage, 1500
sqft home, li ike new. Rent
or rent to o wn, 5K mini-
mum dow n. $189K,
$1,100 per month. Call
904-276-64,46.
FURNISHEID ROOMS
FOR REiNT! COM-
PLETE witl i CH/A, cable
provided, at I utilities paid!
Central location. 10%'
discount on first months
rent for ser lior citizens.
Rooms with private bath,
$110-$120./wk. Room
without bath 1, $95. Laun-
dry facilities s available.
Close *to churches,
stores, downtown shop-
ping, theatre:, and more!
See Manaiger at the
Magnolia hotel, across
from the Stcirke Post Of-
fice. 904-96-4-4303.
WE HAVE 2 O'f 3 bedroom
MH, clean,, close to
prison. Cail 352-468-
1323.
SOUTHERN VILLAS OF
StarkeApts. 2BR HC &
non HC apartments.
Central ac/heat, on site
laundry, playground, pri-
vate and qcluiet atmo-
sphere. Located or
SR16, 100 1 Southern
Villas Drive, Starke, Fl or
call 904-964-7295, TDD/

I BUJY

HOUSES

CASH!
Stop Foreclosure
Double Payments
No)
Commiss ion/Fees
352-69:2-4963


ABBOT'
HOME. IMPROVEMENT CO.
~ Handy Man
'Carpentry *Painting
*Plumbing Drywall
and more!

CallDavid
352-473-9075' Cell 904-76 9-2627









Bill AMlimga aiiJ BIa/. Ph, i-
Phone: 904-964-739)
Cell: 904-591-9377 or 904-2 19-4648
3085 SE 113' Way Starke, FL 320 91
Licensed & Insured


BANANA B1AY
LANDSCAPE INC.
Specializing' in
PALMS and TROPICAL
Residential ~ Col imercial


ndseape with Sophistication & AlIttitude
ady owned & operated by Charlie Revay
352-214-1320 352-475-2885


T.H.E. Apartments
922 E. Brownlee St. Starke, .Florida
Newly Remodeled'
2 & 3 Bedrooms Available
Rent is based on Income
S.Water, Sewer
On-Sit'e Laundry Facility & Play Arcus
O office Open: Monday Friday 8:00 to'4:130 p.m.
Call (904) 964-7133




WA.TE5D


Small or Large Parceills
With or Without
i Homes

Call Glen Loircey
ss 352-485-1t l18


"Come .Slradgkf6o


CALL
TODAY!


TTY 711. Equal Housing
Opportunity. *I
SPECIAL-RENT 2 & 3BR
homes, newly renovated.
Deposit required. No
pets. First month free.
Call 678-438-6828 or
678-438-2865, for more
information.
2BR/1BA FOR RENT, CH/
A, $550 per month, good
condition, no pets, first &
last plus deposit, lease.
Call 904-964-4111, leave
message.
WORTHINGTON
SPRINGS DOUBLE-
WIDE MH. 3/1, heating
and air, stove and refrig-
erator furnished. Call
386-496-3253.
2BR SW in Union County.
$600 per month plus a
$600 security deposit.
Call 904-966-0765.
3BR/2BA ON A PRIVATE
lot, paved, road, CH/A,
$650 per month, first, last
and $350 security de-
posit. References re-
quired and $25 applica-
tion fee. Pets okay. Call
904-553-3301.
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/1 BAApt,
1000 sq ft, hardwood
floors, screened porch,
refrigerator, electric
range, washer/dryer

FOR SALE
2 Parcels
13+ Acres in all
500 ft frontage on 301
South -Only 3/10 mile
from Super Walmart.
Office
2800 sq ft Building
Mini-storage and Barn
*Ideal Location*
Call (904) 964-3827

ROOMS
FOR RENT
Economy Inn
Lawtey, FL
Daily $35 & up
Wkly $169 & up
Daily Rm Service
Microwave,- Cable
Refrigerator Local Phone
(904) 782-3332


hookups. In Starke, close
to schools. $550 per
month, first, last, security
deposit, and references
required. No pets. Call
904-966-1334.
LAKE SANTA FE COT-
TAGE 2/1 washer/
dryer, furnished or unfur-
nished, sandy beach.
Lawn service included.
$950/mth, call 352-468-
2386.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE HOUSE Starke
area. 2 rooms available,
$400/mth negotia,ie and
partial utilities. First
month's rent plus de-
posit. Small pet wel-
come. Call 904-769-
3529.
MOBILE HOME FOR
RENT 2/1, RAIFORD.
$400/mth. Call 386-431-
1197.
TRAILER RENTAL 2/2
SINGLEWIDE. SE Wil-
son Rd. Very clean.
$600/mth, $600/security
deposit. References re-
quired, no pets. Call
904-964-8425, leave
message.


p


Homes
3/2 Home on 1 acre lot. 1 block -
from Country Club. $214,000'

3/2 1200 SF frame home on SR16,
just outside city limits. $75,000

3/2 home built in 1999. Like new
condition on over an.acre. Bayless
Hwy. $219,000

3/2 home on 5.acres. Lots of extras.
$345,000


Land
1 Acre Dead end street. Zoned for
mobile homes $29,000

Union County 6 Acres with 24 x 60
barri/4 horse stalls. Can be divided.
$149,000

5 Acres near Providence. Union -
couity. Fenced for horses. $95,000

25 Acres. 5 Minutes from town.
$250,000 ,


(66e Source"


IVAN] :1(E MORI( GAG


904-964-4000 p A Division of Central Pacific Mortga
866-964-4207


1107 S. Walnut St





ASSOCIATION t ,a n M n1n,,g ,'
in est nog no I ntle Morgange C Inrigran


E Refinance &
Purchases
ge FHA VA
~ Conventional
SNew Construction
Home Equity Loans
No Income Verification
Loans

www. iyanhocmomrgagestarkccoum

(O Jh


Suzanne Gordon
Mortgag C cnsultanr


2/1 HOME, EXTRA
CLEAN, CH/A. $500/
mth, in Theressa. Call
352-473-3073 or 352-
745-4039.
SMALL BUT NICE trailer in
country, very clean, 2BR/
1BA, A/C, mini blinds,
wood deck. SE 49th
Ave, Starke. $375/mth
plus deposit. Call 352-
468-1093 or cell 904-
571-6561.
MOBILE HOME 2/2 OFF
.301, HAMPTON AREA.
$500/mth, first and last.
Call 352-473-8981.
BRAND NEW HOME
NEAR HOSPITAL. 109
Parker St, Starke, FL. 3/
2/2, 1500 sq ft, $950/
mth. Call 904-317-4511.
NEATLY NESTLED LOCA-
TION: Well-kept
doublewide mobile
home, 3BR, galley
kitchen, fireplace. Must
see! Keystone Heights.
No pets. $800/mth, first
month rent, last month
rent, $500/security de-
posit, 1 year lease,.credit
report and reference re-
quired. Carroll Rentals &


We Cart It

CONCRETE


Management, Inc. Call
352-473-1025.
MELROSE 3/2 GARAGE,
FIREPLACE, tile, appli-
ances, .washer/dryer,
large fenced back yard.
Water and lawn service
provided, $950/mth. Call
352-475-9609. t
3/2 DWMH RECENTLY
REMODELED. Central
heat, air, washer, dryer,
on private lot and paved
road. $650/mth, $650/
security. 'Call 904-553-
3301.
51
Lost/Found
LOST DOG REWARD.
Female black Chow mix
with white chest, short
hair. Answers to Mindy..
Lost 10/6 around Spring
Lake Animal Hospital.
Purple collar with rabies
tags. Skittish around
people, but otherwise
very friendly. Family pet,
very missed. Call 352-
478-2100.
52
Animals & Pets


OPEN 24/7
owner : Budch,i Browder


19563 NW SR 16
Starke, FL


"sWe Haul Redi-Mixed Concrete
in our 1-Yard Mixing Trailer from
our plant to vour redi-forms.
">- $149 per vd + tax... deliveredto you!
7M "(" Il-yard = 80 sq. It. at 4" deep

LEWIS WALKER ROOFING INC.
"AFFORDABLE QUALITY"


PO B
Ft. W


ROOF
RE-ROOFS
METAL SINGLES
FLAT ROOF
LOW SLOPED
GRAVEL


FREE
EXTENDED
WARRANTY
LICENSED
INSURED


REPAIRS
MOBILE HOMES
NEW ROOFS
TILE WOOD SHINGLES
MAINTENANCE
STORM DAMAGE


CHIHUAHUAS 2 MALES,
2 FEMALES. Parents on
premises, $200 each.
Call 352-473-3709.
PURE BRED BOXER
PUPPIES FOR SALE -
Fawn and white, $350.
Call 904-964-6335.
GOLDEN RETREIVER
PUPPIES, $300. Call
352-258-3040.
53A
Yard Sales

American

S./VX I.T, ) /r> '. ,
RENTALS
311 Large Apt
$525 mth
1 Bdm Apts
$350 mth
3/2 Large House
$850 mth
4/2 Lake Front
Fish & Ski'
$1,250 mth
Large House
2 bdrms
$1,200 mth

(904)964-7227


.r




Sheila Daugherty
Realtor


Commercial
Lot
1/2 ac..
Adjacent to
Courthouse
Georgia St.


imestaentiai
Acreage
49.87 ac.
Wooded
Fronts CR
18 & SE
49th Ave.


Residential
Acreage
3.73 ac.
Wooded
SE49th
Avenue


Residential
Acreage
1.1Str
-d
e77th
Street


Residential Residential 312 Frame 3/2
Acreage Acreage House Frame
6.08 ac. 10 ac. 1276 sq. ft. House
Wooded Wooded Great 1200 sq. ft.
County Rd S.E. Starter or Move-In
18 49th Investment Lafayette
Avenue Lafa eftSt Street
Each Office is independently Owned and Operated.








"nShte
itle & Escrow



"A Full Service Title Company"


* Title insurance
* Title searches
Over 13 years
in the title industry


Carny
Office F


www.sonshi


ARCHERY BOWS PSE'
NOVA. Never shot,
$180. Bear white-tail 2,
has case, sites, detach-
able quiver and arows,
$150. Call 904-966-
0631.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
- SW CR225 off CR227,
1 mile down on right.
5pc living room set, din-
ing room set, 2 TV's,
treadmill and exercise
bike and many other
items.


-HIDAY AND SATUI DAY,
9AM-2PM. Lots of differ-
ent things. Country Club
area, follow pink signs.
TREE SALE TULIP
POPULAR, Red
Maple, Peach and
Apple, Corkscrew,
Weeping and Pussy Wil-
lows. $12 each, 2 or
more $10 each. Call
904-796-0118.
2 FAMILIES LARGE AS-
SORTMENT. Saturday,
October 14, 8am-5pm
and Sunday, October '5,


HERITAGE VILLAS

APARTMENTS



2


Bedrooms

607 Bradford Ct.
Starke, FL
For more info call

964-6216
6%. TDD# 1-800-840-2408 '


True 30-year fixed rate
Commercial loans

(WITH-GUARANTEED RATE REDUCTION EVERY
5 YEARS WITH GOOD PAYMENT HISTORY)


"THE BEST POSSIBLE ROOF AT THE BEST POSSIBLE PRICE"
Office: 386-497-1419
ox 82 Toll Free 1-866-9LW-ROOF
white, FL 32038 Fax: 386-497-1452


Usl WLAND
PUP ERIC


"FOR EXPERT WATER WELL SERVICE"

3601 S.E. 35th Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32641
(352) 378-1910


.Harold "Rip" ..'. .i ,,
wne()\IIIl/ Opera'tilotr


24 Hour Service
7 days


Smith & Smith
Realty


HIMDSAL UIESOFTEYA
BYTE OTHFOi'i,' .iONLCABROFCMEC


904-964-8111
TOLL FREE 866-964-8111
V 105 Edwards Rd., Starke
www.Trinit Morngagt'FL.om




American

SDream
of Northeast Florida,Inc.
REAL LTOC)RSo
205 N. Temple Ave.
Starke
( 904]96465424


I Guraneed owet Bis!


HOMETOWN


"Where You Come First"


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE
(904) 964-9222 BUSINESS
(904) 964-6708 DAYTIME
(904) 964-7802 EVENING
|l! Q3 El.1N:ll.o= Aa


* Real estate closings
- purchases, refinances
- cash transactions
- loan packages


U


HUGE


OPEN HOUSE

EXTRAVAGANZA

This Saturday,

Oct. 14,

10 a.m.-2 p.m.

10 houses

to see.

Refreshments,

free gift, prizes.

Come by the

office to pick

up your map.


SSevice



priority,

Skelly Jan Jackson
Manager
107-F Edwards Rd., Starke, FL
inetitle.com (904) 964-2363


lul I


IM


I __ I _


Irb


I HMPTN HAPTN SAR


www.-HomelownFirstReally.com
904-964-7330 1 Fax: 904-967,4-7371n'
107 East Call.Strect, Starke, I'l,4


I


/


, 1


w







us 2, zUU8 TELEGRAPH, TIMES NITOR-



Read our Classifieds on the Where one call


C lassiied A ds World Wide Web doesita ll
l ii A I www.BCTelegraph.com 964-6305* 473-2210 '496-2261

.....- --LLv~~~~rIn00 borrs Cas-ACD


8am-5pm. 1502 Dodd
St, Starke. From 301,
West on 16, left on Gene
St, right on Dodd St.
MULTI FAMILY YARD
SALE SATURDAY,
8am-4pm, Griffis Loop.
Name brand clothes,
shoes, novelties,
kitchenware, movies,
DVD's, plants and more.
YARD SALE FRIDAY,
8AM-3PM. 230 E, left on
17th (Flume Rd), right on
161st. Size 0and 1 de-
digner jeans, rainbow
vacuum, much more.
3 BOWL SS SINK 6X2'.
Pots,pans, small" apli-/
ances, electric heaters,
misc. hand and power
tools, tables, small furni-
ture, wicker cabinet,
large mirror, gun cabinet,
6' display case, white
truck topper 5'x6'x3".
Lots of stuff! Friday and
Saturday, 8am-3pm.
Hwy 16W to NW 211th
St. Go one mile to sign.
BIG YARD SALE GAS
RANGE, CONSOLE TV,
rocking chairs, old but-
tons, lots of this and that.
Follow SR16 East to
SR225, turn left, go
about 2 miles to 219th
St, turn right, about one
mile. 9079 NW 219th St.
BIG YARD SALE FRI-
DAY, OCTOBER 15TH,
8am-? Go 5 miles on
16W to 216th St
(Crawford Rd), turn on
216th St, one mile on
right.
53B
Keystone Yard
Sales
ESTATE SALE 4426 Lori


*Carpentry

- ResaeWasihig
*-kklJobs
" Yard Work
"*Gar-den Roto-llhig
-LaeNsed&TIansmred


Loop, off Trawick, off of
315C, near McRae El-
ementary School. Oct
13,14, and 15. 8am til ?
Household items, an-
tiques, 6 acres, DWMH,
secluded, mostly woods.
SAT 8AM TIL 2PM. 7692
Kaibab Ave, in Big Tree
Lakes.
YARD SALE FRIDAY,
9AM-4PM AND SATUR-
DAY, 9AM-12PM. 280
Bere6 Ave.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER
14, 9AM-? 221 SW
Grove St. Family mov-
ing sale. A Iot o.rmise-
--iteisgEveithing must
go.
YARD SALE ON BROOK-
LYN BAY ROAD. Furni-
ture, household items
and toddler clothing.
Saturday, 8am-2pm.
SATURDAY, 8AM-1PM.
More antiques, more
tools, more kitchenware,
lots of new stuff. I'm still
unpacking. Come back
if you were here, stop by
if not. See what I found
in my closets. 6489
Brooklyn Bay Rd.
SATURDAY AND SUN-
DAY, 8AM-? Heskett Ln.
Take 214 by White El-
ephant, 7.5 miles, follow
signs. Lots of items un-
der $5.
YARD SALE KEY-
STONE. Saturday only.
Bed frames, mower, crib,
lots of stuff. 5630 Chero-
kee St. Big Tree 214
to Monongahela to
Cherokee.
BIG SALE FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY. 6356
CR214S, 9am-3pm.
Lots of furniture, 2 sets
of bunk beds, wedding


*Buish s~g~bin
.leTrhe'finug&Retmo'sl

*ThshlRanova
*PwnBark& QypmMolds
-I'lreswood ForSaie


accessories, books,
household items, new
gifts. Think Chris(mas!
53C.
Lake Butler
Yard Sales
SATURDAY, OCTOBER
14, 8AM-2PM. 1/2 mile
down VFW road.
THREE FAMILIES: FUR-
NITURE, HOUSE-
HOLD, clothes (ladies 8-
10, mens S), etc. Thurs-
day, Friday and Satur-
day. 1.5 miles SW of
Lake-Butler off SR121
on 92nd St, follow signs.
55
Wanted
D/S/W/M Disabled Vet, 56
years old. Wanting effi-
ciency or cottage for rent
for self, under $350.
Larry Fore 352-390-
5104, call anytime.
I BUY COIN collections:
Morgan & Peace silver
dollars, silver quarters &
dimes, Buffalo nickels,
Indian head pennies,
gold coins, proof & mint
sets, etc. Call 904-964-
3321.
57
For Sale
JIM'S CATFISH FARM
AND U-FISH. Open Sat-
urday and Sunday, 7am-
7pm. Free admission.
Baby Koi available. Lo-
cated north of Lawtey.
Fill dirt also available.
Call 904-782-1694.
KENMORE WASHER and
dryer, new type $100
and up each, electric
stove, written guarantee,
delivery available. For
appointments, call 904-
964-8801.
BED KING SIZE
Pillowtop mattress and
boxspring with manufac-
tures warranty. Brand


new still' in plastic. Can
deliver. Sell for $170.
Call 352-372-7490.
BEDROOM SET 7 piece
Gorgeous cherry queen/
king bed, dresser, mirror,
2 nightstands, chest
available, dovetail con-
struction. New still in
boxes. Retail $6100,
sacrifice for $1100. 352-
377-9846.
DINING ROOM SUITE-
beautiful cherry table, 6
chippendale chairs and
lighted hutch and buffet.
Brand new still boxed.
Can deliver. Retail
$5800, sacrifice $1100.
352-377-9846.
MATTRESS TWIN sets
$89, full sets $129,
Queen sets $159, King
sets $189. Mattress Fac-
tory, 441 East Brownlee
St. Carpets also- large
room size pieces. Save
a lot. Cash and carry.
Call Sonia at 352-473-
7173 or 904-964-3888.
BED-QUEEN orthopedic
Pillowtop mattress and
box. Name brand, new in
plastic, with warranty.
Can deliver. Sacrifice
$100. Call 352-372-
8588.
LAWNMOWERS AND
TRAILER, tool boxes
and bed liners. Honda
moped and golf cart.
Call 904-964-4118.
WASHER AND DRYER,
$100. Sofa bed, $100.
Stand-up freezer, $100.
Call Mike at 904-364-
7026.
7 INCH WET PORTABLE
TILE SAW, $60. Electric
chain saw sharpener,
$50. Both new in origi-
nal box. Electric range,
$50. 12" JBL sub woof-
ers in a box, $100.
Brand new ladies size 5
wetsuit, $60. Call 386-
878-3240 before 4pm.
1000 1-IAI YV SPOcRIT -


STER 1200. Call 904-
964-5257.
46" RIDING MOWER -
RUNS GOOD, just ser-
viced, $550 cash. Call
352-468-2256.
TREE SALE TULIP
POPtULARS, Red
Maple, Peach and
Apple, Corkscrew,
Weeping and Pussy Wil-
lows. $12 each, 2 or
more $10 each. Call
904-796-0118.
RASCAL SCOOTER 600 -
Little over 2 years old,
$800 OBO. Call 904-
964-2220.
SALE ON END TABLES,
LAMPS, SEWING MA-
CHINES and cabinets.
Priced to sell at Key-
stone Heights Pack Rat,
352-473-2183.
BALDWIN ELECTRIC
ORGAN, model 56A.
Two sets of 44-key key-
boards, everything
works, $450, OBO. Key-
stone Heights Pack Rat,
352-473-2183.
59
Personal
Services
BRADFORD LIMEROCK
SALES. Limerock,
crush create, asphalt
millings, building sands,
gravels, tractor work.
We haul, we spread.
Business 904-782-3172,
mobile 904-509-9126.
d Monday through Satur-
day.
DIVORCE/CHILD SUP-
PORT/CUSTODY
FORMS PREPARED.
$125-$150. We come to
you. Call 904-964-5019.
CONCEALED WEAPONS
PERMIT, $50. One hour,
call 904-964-5019.
Classes second Satur-
day of the month, by ap-
pointment. Call for res-
nrvation.


*Pum QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964

*Sales

*Service 964-7061

Myers" STATE LICENSE #1305
p Rotary Well Drilling 2-6" L.. E .05
-GPDA 864 N. Temple Ave. US Hwy 301I N.
Siarke.FIL l


Bruce orman's GIrrairia on

"Good Quality, Good Service, Great Price"


"5 .

/


.~ --


I FeeEstames Techs- Lare o Smll


ULAHKn I-UiUATIniUB


ULAHK i-UUNUAIIUON
REPAIRS, INC. Cor-
rection of termite & wa-
ter-damaged wood &
sills. Leveling & raising
Houses/Bldgs. Pier Re-
placement & alignment.
Free Estimates: Danny
(Buddy) Clark, (904)-
284-2333 or 1-800-288-
0633.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for
M.H. & land packages.
1-800-284-1144.
CUSTOM CUTS Lawn &
Landscape, customized
lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, landscape design.
Reasonable rates, free
-_estimates. -Commercial
& residential. Licensed
and insured. Call 386-
496-2820, if no answer
please leave message.
SECRETARIAL SER-
VICES Typesetting, re-
sumes, etc. Call Melissa
at 904-364-6463.
CALL REESE BUILDERS
FOR ALL YOUR home
and business remodel-
ing needs. Ceramic tile,
hardwood floors and vi-
nyl installation. Call for
free estimate, 386-336-
3929.
HOUSEKEEPING PLUS -
Honest, dependable,
hard-working, top to bot-
tom house keeping, fall
clean up for yards or put
up holiday decorations.
All at reasonable rates to
boot. Keystone and sur-
rounding areas. Call
352-478-4210.


SfI 'lerI
S!d


63
Love Lines
WIDOWED W/M, 70,
LOVES LIFE. Do you?
Seeks S/W/F. Letter
about yourself plus
phone number. Mail to
c/o Owner, 6137 Hunter
Ave., Keystone Heights,
FL 32656.
65
Help Wanted
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
FOR SECURITY OF-
FICERS in Palatka area,
class "D" security license
and valid FL drivers li-
cense required. Hiring
bonus to qualified appli-
cants. Call 386-325-
2001x4351 for appoint-
ment. EOE M/F/DN.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
FOR FULL AND PART
TIME EMT certified Se-
curity Officers in Palatka
area. EMT Certification,
and valid FL drivers li-
cense required. Class
"D" Security License pre-
ferred, training assis-
tance available. Hiring
bonus for qualified appli-
cants. Call 386-325-
2001 ext 4351 or 904-
281-0070 ext 206 for
appointment.
Palala EOE M/F/DN.
RESIDENTIAL FRAMING
CARPENTERS
NEEDED in Gainesville
area. Call 386-623-7064
or 386-623-7063.


Hours:
Tues-Fri 10-5:30
Sat 10-3


Cabinets Doors

Windows Sinks

We Buy & Sell New & Used
Building Materials

352-379-4600
622 S.E. 2nd St. Gainesville, FL





Driveways Sidewalks
Slabs Footings

*Decorative Concrete
Coaling in many colors

Pumping & Finishing
FREE ESTIMATES
Bus: (904) 964-3827
Mobile: (904) 364-7153


Out of Area Classifieds


Adoption
ADOPIONI A nurturing
Iamluily seeks Io adopi tan
i 'alin t Io love and
cherish. We are
fIinanic lllv secure. Ito
provide '. I I.,,, _.
Christine 'and D)avid at
(888)322-(924.
#1704154 ,
\iui i . ... l i. G o l l
S ... ,,,,I .-
)Developed Residential
I.ots aid Undeveloped
Tnir'ls. Saturday. October
2 S D a iail s
il'miinlri sel's ict i ii.cOi, n t i "or
(80.011)997-2248
NCAL#3936.
AUCTION 2.500 Acres
Timberland IBladen &
" .," p .., Countics. NC.
I.. 1 .. 24. 6:00 p.m.
.32 itraicts 'rom 2 to 200
ac(es. Merchanlablc
limber. Call for ino.
(800)479-1763
NCAI.8397 10l()/ buyer's
"niliniml .John I)ixln &
Asso'e.
\,w w.ijoilndixon.comn
A ctiio il- Historiic
Springlield Homes:
October 21. i i I ,1 1 ,1 1
& M a inii *. I 1. ...
llicatre. Niew all
properties.
Ill Good
I I .. \ lct nl
i, 4.1789.
':l I ING 182+/-
t il* AND HOME at
Auction, (SCHI.EY CO.
iGA. NOV. 4) OIffcred in
Parcels. Pond. 'Two'
Creeks. Timber. Pasture
hlind. Wildlife and
uipmeiincl I(8661o300-
7653
WWW.I.AND2AUCTO1'10
N.COM.
AlBSO(LUTEl AUC'I'ION.
:Estales ol' ,' .. 'Cove
adjoins (, ., nmokv
Mimunlainls Nationa'l
Park. 'lownseniid. .T'N.
Saturday. Ocilober 21.
I 0 *3 0 AM:
WWW.:FUROW.COM.
1-800-4-FURROW. TN
l.ic. #62.
Iusiness1 opportunities
VIiND)NG( ROUTtE': All
Snacks/C('ndies. Drinks.
I!ere'v Drinks 'Too" All
ran' ls. All Sizes. reall
I'q iip nCInt. (G re1t
S ai)| rt.. Fi'nancinu
Available will $S5K
do i. 'loim: 1877)843-
.1726 AIN B0(12012-0137.
ALL. (CASH CANI)Y
ROU()T I ) \ till earn
$. 0(/davl'.' 0 Machlines.
Free Candv All I'or
$9.995.. iS 1.. ..
1102(000037 .1 ] I
We will nol hel
unldersold!


Help Wanted
DAT)A ENTRY! Work
F r n m An where.
Flexible Hours. I rsnal
Conrmputer Reqtuired.
Excellent Career
Opportunity. Serious
Inquiries (Jnly (800)344-
9636 Ext. 700.
tarn Up to $550
WI.EKLY Workimng
i,, ,i,'i, ie eovernnment
I i :. I -p.. ,., i. i.
,,~u 4- ,t"_''.' I
.. h' Depart ient

INTI'ERESTED IN A
POSTAL JOB Earning
!'"K'., Avg Minimum
e, lIIr services catii
hep you pirepare for the
Postal Battery Exam,
Find Out How! CallI
'lToday For More
Inlormation... (800)584-
1775 Ref' Code #P115799.
Car hailinlg career.
Exe epionl pa y!
GiREA HOME TIME!
Outstanding Company
Paid Benel'ils! Paid
Training! Minimum I
vear frR experience
'CLI uired. Call anytime
(912)571-9668 OR
(866)413-3074.
AMERICA'S DRIVING
ACADEMY Start 'your
driving career today!
Offering courses in CDL
A. Low tuition fee!
Many payment options!
No re istralion feel
I ii
adenly.con.

Driver-HIRING
QUALIFIED DRIVERS
'for Central Florida Local
& 'National OTR
positions. Food grade
tanker. no l aznlail. no
iplnl)ps, t treat benefits.
nipelili ve pay & new
equipment. Need 2 years
experience. Call Bynum
Transport for your
o ortu nity Ioday.
(8 )()741-795).0
ARE YOU TOUGH
ENOUGH TO HAUl.
FLOWERS? Class A
Teams or Solos wanting
o letean. Home Weekly.
'lTop Pay & Benefits. Call
(8(00)428-0343.
www.Armellini.comin.
DRIVER: YOU WANT
lT. WE HAVE IT! Solo.
eilals, iownelr ioperalors.
colnpalVy drivers.
studepits. recentt grads.
re ional. dedicate. llonl
htaul. Van. I'lathed. Mut
be 21. CRST Cari'eCr
C'eier (. 800)940-2778.
www.drivel'orcrsi.c'mn.
Driver- A(Ir
NOW...Hiring OTR &
.ical Drivers Earn
$4.(000 in bonuses voiur
e sI Veiltr Ncw
Equi n mIent 'Premlium
Pa\y Package %No


HazMat Required -Call
(877)882-6537-Oakley
Transport. We care about
our drivers!
We have drivers
proijected to earn $56.0(X)
this year! How iiuIchi will
YOD earn'? How much
will YOU earn? Home
weekly! HEARTLAND
EXPRESS (800)1441-
4953
www.heartlandexpress.co
in.

Homes For Sale
PA ALM HAR BOR
Factory Liquidation, Sale.
2006 Models Must (Go!
Modular. Mobile & Stilt
Homes. 0% DOWN
When You Own Your
Own Land!! "Call .our
Factory for FREE Color
lBrochure. (800)622-
2832.. -
$0 DOWN HOMES
(iov't & B a n k
Foreclosures! Low or no
down! No credit OK!
Call Now!' (800)749-
2905. .
FOR SALE BY OWNER
-- 213R condo. St.
'etershlurg. I mile from
(iulf of Mexico/Don
Cesar. On Isla Del Sol
Boulf course. Comlpletely
furnished. $370.00(.
Call (859)608-2213.
Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR TRAINING
FOR EMPLOYMENT:
Bulldozers. Backhoes.
I.oaders. Dump 'rucks.
Ciraders. Scrapers.
Excavators: National
Certification. Job
Placement Assistanlce:
Associated Trainine
Services (80(11)251-3274
www.cquipr entoperaitr.
cool.
Heavy liquip-ment
Operator CERTIFIED.
Haililds on 'Training. Job
Placement Assistance;
Call "lTll Free (866)933-
1575. ASSOCIATED
TRAINING SERVICES.
5177 Homosassa Irail.
Lecanto. Florida. 34461.
l.and.ForSale .
20 acres with pond near
State & Nat 1 parks.
Camp. Fish. Hunt.
$89.900 owner fin.
$4995 down (800)352-
5263 llorida Woodland
Group. Inc. l.ic RE
Broker, .
Medical Sup)plies.
1- R 1:E DI)IABETIC
SUPI'I.IES!
M EDICAREI
IA II:N'TS.! (.'ill Us Toll
Frec (I66)294-3476 and
receive i REE METER!
Am-Med Quality
)iabhetic Supplies.
Miscellaneous
ATTI'EIND COLI.EGE E
ONLINE from Hiome.


*Medical. PBusiness.'
*rParalegall. "Computers
"Criminiiil Justice. Job
placemenl t ,, I ,,.,
Conipuierd. r.'i"
Financial Aid if'
utialified. Call (866)858-
121
wvw.otline'T'idewaterTe
ch.com.
DIVORCE$275-
$350'*COVERS
children, etc. Only one
sinatllure required!
l excludess ovtI. fees!
Call weekdays (800)462-
2000. ext.600. (8am-
6pm) Alta Divorce. LLC.
Established 1977.
DISH NETWORK
FREE 4 Rooms! Over
240 Channels! FREE
iPod Shuffle! FREE
Movie Channels! FREE
)DVR! FREE HD
Upgrade! Call Now!
(s81)318-4039
AIRLINE MECHANIC -
Rapid training for high
paying Aviation Career.
FAA predicts severe
shortage. Financial aiid if
qualify Job placement
assistance. CALL AIM
1888)349-5387.
' Mountain Property
Mou n tain Walerftront
Sale. I.ake front
homesites & condos
w/boat slips on beautiful
Lake Chtlalue in Western
NC. Call now for Nov. 4
reservation. (877)234-
8850 x.102.
Pools/Miscellaneous
20006 MOD El.
BLOWOUT!!!
Warehouse Clearancec
Sale on the New Kayak.
Pool. SAVE $ thousands
on selected models
limited" supply I'REE
ESTIMATE ES Easy
Finance Fast Installation.
Call (866)348-7560
www.kayakpoolsflorida.
comn.
Real Estate
Wit h Tennessee's
Beautiful Lake.s &
Moiintains. Vyo are sure


with 2.000 sf Lo" Cabin
Package Only $59.900!
Call Now! (866)950-
5263 Ext. 1705.
BEAUTIFUL N .
CAROLINA. ESCAPE
THE HEAT IN THE
BEAUTIFUL.
PEACEFUL
MOUNTAINS F1:
WESTERN NC Homes.
Cabins. Acreage &
'INVESTMENTS.
CHEROKEE '
MOUNTAIN GMAC
REAL ESTATE.
cherokeemountainrcalty.
corn Call for free
brochure (8(X00)841-5868.
HOT! HOT! HOTr!
Sparta. TN. Land.
magnificent views. only
5 tracts left. Call
immediately! (888)485-
3141. Jane or Ruby @
Century 21 The Wright
Choice.
www.century21 thewright
choice.met

NORTH GEORGIA
.Lovely 7-acre retreat.
located on tihe
Cherokee/Pickens
County Line. Has 600 ft.
trout stream frontage ini
rear. 5B/4BA house.
pool. hot tub. pasture &
woodlands. Listed for
$575.000. Ron Zalkind.
MetroBrokers/GMAC.
(706)273-0459.
East Tennessee- Norris
Lake 5.6 acre wooded
LAKEFRONT I..I
$66.500 5.1 A. l1
WOODED view lot-
$28.900 Call Lakeside
Realty .0'1 (423)626-5820
O r Visit
www.lakesidereally-
Inm.coln.
IQUIID)ATION LAND
SALE. 5 to 138 Acres. A
limited number of
spectacular parcels are
being sold at 30% below
apprtised value. Located
in Central Fl. w/ good
access. utils. survey.
recent appraisal & exc
fin. Call today (866)352-
2249 x 847.


to find the perfrect spot lo
call home. Call Nancy VA MOUNTAIN LOG
Gaines. Gables & Gates CABIN nfiiinislshed
(865)388-7703. inside. view. Irees.
(865)777-9191 private. large creek and
www.naicvygaines.colil river nearby. $139.500
owner (866)789-8535
Gulf Ifront lots $595k. VA94.com..
Homes starting mid
$300k. New rimsler GEORGIA/ NORrTH
planned ocean front CAROLINA Caplivating
community on beautiful mountain views, lakes.
Mustang Island. near rivers, waterfalls.
Corpus Clhristi. TX. Honmesites starting @
www.ciianmoinshore.co $39.900. loand/Los home
m. (866)891-5163. kits packages @ $99.900.
Limited availability. Call
LAKEFRONT I.AND (888)389-3504X701.
SAI.E I.AKEFRONTS
FROM $29.900( LAKEFRONT
TENNESSEE PREDEVELOIPMENT
MOUNTAINS! GRAND OPPORTUNITY!
OPINING! TWO DAYS www.grandelarbor.info
ONLY! OCTOBER 28- All water- access
29 I.ake Access Parcel homesites directly romt Ihe


HOE OPERATOR with
CDL Class A. FrT, M-F.
Apply in person,
Dampier Septic Tank,
7030 NW 2 3rd Way,
Gainesville, 352-378-
2659. DFWP, EOE.
HELPER NEIEiDED for
home repair work. Call
352-475-159(5, leave a
message.
SHOP HELP NEEEDED, fi-
berglass mar lufacturing
and trimming will train.
Full time 401 l our week.
Apply in pers on at U S
Body Source, 1.5 miles
-South of Ha mpton on
CR 325.
CARE GIVER 2 years
experience wi 3rking with
elderly or di,;abled, cli-
ents. 2 or 3 days per
week. Su-lE I's Retire-
ment Home, Hampton.
Phone 352-4f68-2619.
NURSERY HELP
NEEDED, viweed pulling,
fertilizing etc. Full time
40 hour wei:ek. Apply in
person at IU S Body
Source, 1.5 rniles South
of Hampton on CR 325.
COMPANY S;PECIALIZ-
ING in Erofsion control
now hiring the following
positions: C ro Sw leaders,
equipment orl erators. la-





LAJCE CITY
CIMNNI01TY COLLEGE
Instrai actors
Needed
For Spring irerm 2007
ANATOMY &
PHYSIOIL OGY II:
(Online Course)
Requires Masi her's degree
with 18 graduate hours in
disciplined or MD.
COMPUTER. SCIENCE:
Computer Al )plications
and CISCO Nt networking
Requires Mast her's degree
with 18 graduc ite hours in
computer t sciencee
MATHEM ATICS:
SCollege Li4 vel Math
Instructors ft )r class in
Trentc in.
Requires Masi ;r's Degree
with 18 gradus ite hours in
discipline. 1 lay/night
instructor in needed.
SPreparatory Level Math
Instrutc tors
Requires M:ii limum of
Bachelor's degree.
Day and night instructors
needed for ma in campus
and class i n Bell.
EARTH S SCIENCE
(Nig6 It)
Requires Mast :r's with 18
graduate houi s in Earth
Science or Phys ical Science
PHYSICAL SCIENCE
(Niglh it)
Requires Mas ter's with
18 graduate, hours in
Physical S science
Contact Paula (Zifuentes at
(386) 754- 4260 or

cifuentesp@lak ecitycc.edu


*ART& MUSIC
ENGLISH
HIS'1lORY
SPHILOS OPHY
.-&RELIGION
S- PSYCHOLOGY
SPEIE'CH
Requires Mas t er's degree
with minimitim of 18
graduate hours in discipline
Contact Holil y Smith at
(386) 754-43di i9 or email
smithhoHly@lai tecitycc.eda
Persons interest ed iri adjunct
positions mus ;t submit a
College appli cation and
provide phot )copies of
transcripts. A 11 foreign
transcripts/degi ees must be
submitted witl i an official
translation and evaluation.


developer. BeCaultiful
East Terinesse Lake
Living. 1I ost amenities
already i'n.. From only
$79.90P. Possible 18 mol
NO PAYMENTS! Call
Now! (88i; )BY-LAKES.
Grand 'Vision Inc.
Broker.

MOUNTA'r IN GOLF
RESORT .LIVING
Beautilfu.I Blue Ridge
Mountaiimn l location.
Cashiers NC. 70 degree
J ul v a y s.
Preconsiur fiction event
October '7- 29 during
leaf season n. so call n0ow
io attend and lfor more
i2plormiation. (888)743-
297 59 : aind
www.rmivirrocknc.com.
Vision Rock L.S.
Broker.
New. P re"-Construction
(;oIl Commlunitv-
Coastal (icorlia. I.lareec
lots w/ deepwaiter.
11tirsh. ol l,. iiltire
views. i3ated. Goll.
Fitness C'enter. Tennis.
Trtils. O:iik Park. Docks.
$70k's $300K
(877) ....
www.coo l)crspoint.conl.
Western New Mexico
Private 3 6 Acre Ranch
$52,990 Mt. views.
trees'. rolling hills.
SIasturelaind. close to
BLM. Horseback riding.
iiking., hunting. Plerfecl
for vtac at n io1.
diversi 'ying your
...i i; relire ieni t.
L i.. i,, ... 10 0 '
I'ianci n i' Additional
parcels available.
(866)365-2825.

WATER FRONT
RESORT' I.IVING
WILMIN'G;TON. NC
Histl ri: I'nrt City
Coastal Developmetlle
The Bluffs on thick Cape
Fear. 1tm stest Growing
County .in NC. Public
Grand Oipening Oct 21.
Direct ceuan Access.
Pre-const ructioni
incentive s to call now.
www.ibtt hluffsnc.coni
(866)72^:5-8337 Cape
Fear Ii[ luhfs. I.LC
Broker.
A LANI' BARGAIN -
WYOMII G(; 35 acres -
$49 '"111 50 acres
$59 *i l.ocatecd ]90
minutes cast o1' Sflti
Lake in (he foothills ol
tihe Uinil a Mounliains.
Snow-cadI ped mountain
views. :S urrouiided h'
gov' Ia id. dRccreatio;uil
biardise EZ Termis. Call
illh I tinclles. L-LC.
(888)54 1-5263.
Steell Buildinrs
STEEL BUILDINGS.
Factory [)cals. Save $$$
40 x 60' to 100 x 200'
Ex: 50 i 100 x 12' =
$3.60/sq ft. (800)658-
2885. :
www.rigi dbuilding.com.


borers, Class A CDL
drivers- valid Drivers li-
cense a Must! Fax re-
sume to 904-275-3292
or call 904-275-4960,
EOE. Drug Free Work-
place.





LAJiECITY
CIHNIITY COLLEttE
CUSTODIAN
FLOOR CARE
SPECIALIST
Night shift, 10 p.m.-6 a.m.
Tuesday Saturday
RE-ADVERTISED
Manual work in routine
housekeeping, cleaning and
caring for campus buildings.
Must be able to lift and
carry 44 pounds. Must read
and write English.
Salary: $16,127 annually,
plus benefits.
Deadline to apply:
October 20, 2006
College application required.
Position details and
application available on the
web at: www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries:
Human Resource Dev.
Lake City Com. College
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail:
boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
LCCC is accredited by the
Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education&
Employment






LAKE CITY
CINNINITY COLLEGE
Instructors Needed
For Spring Term 2007
Nursing Skills Lab
Instructor
Full time 168 days;
Salary based on education
and experience.
(Grant Funded)
Assist with learning
experience in the nursing
skill lab; assist students with
learning the skills taughL
assist faculty with laboratory
preparation for class.
Responsible for general lab
organization, and inventory.
Must have ASN degree, FL
,license or benL eligible.
Two years RN experience in
Saute and/or skilled care
facilities. Excellent clinical
skills, knowledge of
computers and computer
literacy required BSN and
zleching e'pcnence
preferred.
c RegistlerellA Nursing
Program:
Acute Care Clinical facility
for 16 hours/week (16.
weeks). Lake City positions
available. Must have BSN,
FL RN license and 2 years
recent acute/skilled care
experience. MSN and
teaching experience
preferred. (4 Positions)
Registered Nursing
Program:
Clinical faculty for 16
hours/week (16 weeks),
Thursday, Friday OR
Saturday positions available
Gainesville only. Must have
BSN, FLRN license and 2
years recent maternal/infant
or pediatric nursing
experience. MSN and
teaching experience
preferred. (4 positions)
Half-Time Clinical
Instructor Positions:
Must have BSN, FL RN
license and 2 years recent
acute care experience. MSN
and teaching experience
preferred. Salary depends
on degree and experience.
Grant Funded, Renewable
annually.
Position 1 Gainesville,
20 hours'per week including
one 12 hour clinical oh
Saturday "
for 16 weeks.
Position 2 20 hours (three
days) per week. Some
classroom teaching required.
Patient Care Assistant
Course:
Part-time position
18 hours/week for 11 weeks
beginning 1/22/07.and
ending 4/13/07. Must have
FL RN license and
experience in acute or long
term care nursing..
(1 position)
Practical Nursing
S Program:
Clinical Instructor three days
per week between 1/29/07
and 4/5/07.
Must be RN with FLRN
license and 2 years recent
experience in acute or long
term care. BSN and
teaching experience
preferred. (3 positions).
Contact Robbie Carson at
(386) 754-4304 or
email
carsonr@lakecitycc.edu
Human Diseases
(HSC 2524)
Master's degree with 18
graduate hours in related
field (health sciences,
biological sciences, health
careers)
Contact Patty Smith at
.(386) 754-4239 or
email
smithp@lakecitycc.edu
Emergency Medical
Services Programs.
Teach EMT Basic courses in
College's five county service
area. Must be instructor


certified at EMT-B or
Paramedic level. Associate
degree required. Teaching
experience preferred. Must
have BLS, ACLS, PALS
certification; instructor
certification preferred. I
Contact Dr. Abraham Pallas
at (386) 754-4487 or e-mail
at pallasa@lakecitycc.edu.
Persons interested in adjunct
positions must submit a
College application and
provide photocopies of
transcripts. All foreign
transcripts/degrees must be
submitted with an official.
translation and evaluation.


LANDSCAPE

LAWN SERVICES
Commercial Residential
MOWING, EDGING
LINE TRIMMING AND MORE!
30+ years experience
,.. ,Licensed & Certified

Call Bruce Kenworthy
Florahome: 386-659-2888
Cell Phone: 386-916-9805


Keystone Hauling &

Handyman Service, LLC


Owner: Kerry Whitford

: s sm .. -


In just 71 Days...

you can have the skills
you need to get a job as a


Dental Assistaht

10 week course, Saturday only
TuilioiT$1950 -Payment Plans
call Christi@ ,
Jacksonville Dental Assistant

School
for info packet:
904-398-3401
next class starts:
Nov. 4, 2006
Reg. by FL Commission for Independent Educaiton


Bobby Campbell


Roofing, Inc.

Licensed & Insured

(904) 964-8304


FREE


ESTIMATES!
l.i,. #C(C-.13672

Employment opportunities available.
Call for more information.


11


L.


)URRANCE PUlr ~ -- Il





Page 5D TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--D-SECTION Oct. 12, 2008


Classified Ads


4
'1
f-i
I-l
I,


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web
www.BCTelearaDh.com


3 1 Where one call !
41, does it all!
964-6305 473-2210 *496-2261


ARE YOU A WRITER?
We ate looking for
someone to cover local
meetings, write features
and cover community
events in Bradford,
Union and Clay Coun-
ties. Must have a knack
for writing, be experi-
enced on computers.
Hours are varied, in-
cludes occasional week-
ends. Mail or email re-
sume to PO Drawer A,
Starke, FL 32091,
editor@bctelegraph.com.
THE STARKE POLICE
Department is searching
for a responsible indi-
, vidual who is committed
to serving the commu-
nity as a Communication
Officer. Must be able to
handle themselves in
Stressful situations, com-
municate ideas, and give
directions. Must be able
to work nights and/or
weekends and be able to

cover many different
shifts. This position pays
$8.00 an hour, plus ben-
efits. You must have -a
High School Diploma or
GED, type 40 correct
wpm, good interpersonal
'skills and some com-
puter knowledge. On the
job training and CJIS
certification will be pro-
vided. Pick up an appli-
cation at the Job Career
Center at the Vo-Tech or
at the Starke Police
Dept., 904-964-5400.
TELLER/CLERK immedi-'
ate opening in credit
union for mature indi-
vidual.Attentive to detail,
good communication
skills, basic computer
knowledge and experi-


ence working with cash.
Will train. Fax resume to
386-431-2027 or call
386-431-2017.
NOW HIRING FT/PT re-
ceptionist at Lazenby
Equipment. Drug free
work place. Monday thru
Friday, 9am to 5pm. Sat
9am til 2pm. Call 904-
964-4238.
The Bradford County
Community Develop-
ment office is seeking a
part-time Home Owner-
ship Counselor. Appli-
cant will work closely
with individuals and
families wanting to pur-
chase a home through
the Bradford County
State Housing Initiative
Partnership Program.
Good communication
skills and computer skills
are required. Applica-
tions may be obtained at
the Bradford County
Community Develop-
ment Office, Bradford
County Courthouse An-
nex, 925-E North Temple
Avenue, Starke, Florida.
Applications must be re-
turned to the Community
Development Office by
3:00 p.m., October 19,
2006.
DRIVER- ARE YOU get-
ting a 2006 pay in-
crease? Roehl drivers
are paid more with prac-
tical route mileage pay
plus top 10 pay rate. 53'
van/48' FB. Students
welcome. $3000 sign on
bonus. ClassA required.
Roehl, "The take home
more, be home more
carrier." Call 7days/week
$$$ 888-356-1140 $$$
www.GoRoehl.com.
COUNTY PLANNER -
BRADFORD COUNTY:


Bradford County is ac-
cepting applications for a
full-time County RPanner.
The Planner will be re-
sponsible for technical
work and production of
planning documents as
well as making recom-
mendations to land de-
velopment proposals,
MSBU's, capital im-
provements budget,
comprehensive plan
proposals, subdivisions,
DRI's, housing pro-
grams, economic devel-
opment activities and
land development code
revisions. Will prepare
complex, detailed re-
ports on such areas as
land use, public facilities
and infrastructure sys-
tems, urban design, so-
cial issues, land devel-
opment code interpreta-
tion and revision and site
plan review. The mini-
mum qualifications in-
clude a Bachelor's De-
gree in Urban Planning,
Public Administration,
Geography or a related
degree in business. Ex-
perience in planning is
preferred, but not re-
quired. Applications may
be turned in or mailed to
Clerk of the Court, P. 0.
Drawer B, 945 N.
Temple Avenue, Starke,
FL 32091. The deadline
for accepting applica-
tions is Friday, October
27, 2006 at 4:00 p.m.
Applications and job de-
scription forms are avail-
able at the County Man-
ager Office located in the
Bradford County Court-
house, North Wing. The
North Florida Regional
Chamber of Commerce,


100 East Call Street,
Starke, FL 32091 or via
the county website at
www.bradford-co-
fla.org. The county re-
serves the right to reject
any and all applications.
Equal Opportunity Em-
ployer.
SALES MANAGER
NEEDED for flooring
company. Salary plus
commission. Call 352-
473-6610 or fax resume
to 352-473-6416.
TELLER FT. FLORIDA
CREDIT UNION has a
FT teller position avail-
able at our Starke
'branch. Experience with
high volume cash han-
dling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing,
cross-selling ability, and
customer service exper-
tise is required. Prior
credit union/bank expe-
rience is a plus. We of-
fer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our
branch at 1371 South
Walnut to complete an
application or send re-
sume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR,
PO Box 5549,
Gainesville, FL 32627.
Fax: 352-264-2661. E-
mail: kross@flcu.org. M/
F/D/V EOE Drug Free
Workplace.
ARMED SECURITY OF-
FICER/D-G, Gainesville,
FL. Full-time, $10/hr.
Call 904-399-1813.
Training provided. EOE,
M/F/D/N.
REAL ESTATE ASSOCI-
ATES is money impor-
tant to you? Earn up to
70% of the commissions
you bring through the
door. For a confidential


WHITEHEAD BROS.,INC. LAKE CITY LOGISTICS


Over-The-Road Drivers Needed!
New trucks with ThermoKing AI'U'S. 1800 wat inverters, top of ithe line leather seals. walk-in condo sleepers. and new air-
ride froit suspension for i smoother ride than you have ever experienced. Hotte several nights most weeks ,is we have it
good mixture of regional nd over the road. Home iost weekends. Personalized dispatching Ithalt comes Iril only
dispatching 25 trucks locally. Earn up to 30% of revenue immediately. NO WAITING!!( New increased layover pay. Up to
$100.00 per day. 2 weeks vacation. $1200.00 per year Safety Bonus. Driver of the Year bonus. Driver recruitment bonus.
Medical and dental insurance. Need 2 years experience.
CALL JIM OR DEBBIE LAWRENCE 904-368-0777 or 888-919-8898



0' JENNINGS PAINTERS INC

Sis seeking a

TOP QUALITY PAINTER


E Experenced Professionais Only
Full Time Position


Pay based on experience
Driver License & Transportation Necessary


Must be at least 18 yrs of age
Reporting to work between the Lake Butler/
Worthington Springs area

COME JOIN OUR TEAM!!

Jennings Painters is a professional company that is serious about
quality workmanship. We at Jennings Insulation and Jennings
Pai nters Inc have served North Central Florida for over 10. years,
and our team is based on quality, honesty and customer
satisfaction!


Ifyoiu understand the value of having a good job, working with
good people and are committed to providing yourself a better lie,
you owe it to yourself to call. '


Please call the Job Hotline to schedule an interview
352-379-1774












The world's largest retailer is looking for motivated individuals to join our logistics
team in Alachua, FL. Wal-Mart offers competitive wages, a generous benefit
package, and growth opportunities.
We otter a competitive pay scale and benefit package, Medical, Dental,
Associate.Life,rOptional Life, Dependent Life; AD&D, STD, LTD,
Paid holidays, vacation, Stock Purchase plan, Profit Sharing, 401k,
Wal*Mart discount card and more.
Warehouse Positions Available:
Weekday, Week Night, and Weekend shifts available
JReceiving Shipping Orderfilling
Quality Assurance Quality Control
Starting Pay $13.30
-Start 3 months 6 months 12 months 18 months 24 months 30 months


$13.30 $13.80


$14.30 $14.80 $15.30 $15.80 $16.30


PLUS.....
$0.351hour 2ndl3rd shift differential $1.351hour weekend shift differential $0.751hour quarterly bonus potential


appointment, call Dean
Weaver at 352-473-
6201, Watson Realty
Corp.
GILMAN BUILDING
PRODUCTS COM-
PANY is accepting appli-
cations for Security
Guard at the Sawmill lo-
cated in Lake Butler. A
high school diploma or
equivalent is required.
Computer knowledge is
required. We have com-
petitive rates and 401 K,
dental and health insur-
ance, paid vacation and
holidays and promo-
tional opportunities. In-
terested applicants
should apply in person
Monday through Friday
from 8am-3:30pm at the
front office. Applicants
must bring SS card, pic-
ture ID and diploma.
DIRECTOR OF MAINTE-
NANCE A truck carrier
in Lake Butler, FL with
335 company trucks and


550 trailers is accepting
applications for its Direc-
tor of Maintenance
position. This individual
will manage the mainte-
nance of all company
fleet assets and assist
an owner-operator fleet
of 75 trucks in their main-.
tenance requirements.'
This includes regular
preventative programs
and procedures; evalua-
tion and purchase of
equipment and parts;
development and super-
vision of maintenance
staff; development of
professional vendor rela-
tionships; and develop-
ment, expenditure and
administration of an an-
nual maintenance bud-
get. This position re-
ports to the company's
Vice President. The
ideal candidate will have
minimum of 5 years in a
leadership role as the
maintenance director of


Driver Dedicated Regional




Avg. $825 $1025/wk
65% preloaded/pretarped
Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL-A req'd 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com




Employment

Opportunity For










2 yrs experience min.
Paid vacation
401k Major medical ins.
Competitive wages
contact:


SAWYER GAS
YOUR LOCAL FLULL-SERVICE PROPANE DEALER
e9449 US Hwy 301 Suth-
Hampton, FL
(352) 468-1500
1-800-683-1005
no- ~


a medium-sized or larger
trucking company. Com-
petency in Microsoft Ex-
cel and Word is essen-
tial. Salary based on
experience and educa-
tion. Company benefits
include matching 401K,
group health, vacation
and sick leave. Call 800-
808-3052.
MECHANIC NEEDED.
Call 904-964-7535.
UTILITY WORKER
NEEDED for EEO and
Drug Free established
company. We offer
401K, health/dental in-
surance, paid holidays
and vacations. $1 raise
after 6 months. Apply in
person at Gilman Build-
ing Products, CR218 in
Maxville, FL.
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Drainage, jail


issues in 1910


Aug. 26, 1910
(Drainage was a much discussed topic in 1910,
with many of the lower-lying areas of the county
being limited in land use due to the potential for
flooding. A number of plans for diverting excess
water were proposed, some which would have
been costly and difficult. Others, like the one
below, which proposed to enhance natural
drainage outlets at a minimum of cost and effort.
Of course, as we are still reminded today, no plan
can totally alleviate the danger of flooding in
Bradford County, or anywhere else in Florida for
that matter.)


The proposed

drainage district
Mr. Peek gives interesting
figures regarding the enterprise
What will it cost? Ask also what it is costing us
to do without it? What our losses are this season
alone for want of it? What they may be many
seasons to come?
With all this alluvial soil of Alligator Creek and
its tributaries drained, thereby draining also for
safe cultivation the thousands of acres of fertile
lands adjacent whence the water flows into said
creek and its branches, we would have one of the
most attractive and profit producing sections in all
Florida.
The undulating flatwood pine lands, the deep
loam top soil and clay subsoil, are proving out as
the best class in the state. Some of our farmers
have already reached 50 to 65 bushels of corns per
acre, 1,000 to 1,300 pounds Sea Island cotton per
acre, 100 to 130 bushels strawberries per acre, and
splendid crops of oats, hay, potatoes, and a great
variety of vegetables. Our best soil, however, is
that which requires the most drainage. By ditching
the fertile lowlands we are at the same time
making safe the undulating upper lands and thus
more than double the value of the whole.
Here is the approximate estimate:
Commencing at Rowell Lake and following up
Alligator Creek and its several branches as far east
as the Clay County line, the drainage area would
be about 20,480 acres.
Four miles canal 40 feet wide, five feet deep,
70 per cubic yard $10,500
three miles canal 20 feet wide, five feet deep,
70 per cubic yard $3,960
four miles lateral ditches 10 feet wide, five feet
deep, 70 per cubic yard $2,500
Total: $17,080
Allow for other ditches that may be found
necessary and make it an even $20,000. We would
have six years to pay this by special drainage tax,
payable one-sixth annually. This would be only
$3,333 and interest annually, which, assessed on
.all realty in the drainage district, based on present
'assessments, would' make individual annmiual
{payments small indeed ,when compared with the
benefits .arising from. the drainage. When
engineers estimate the cost scrip could be issued
for the whole amount, payable in six years at six
percent interest. This scrip could be sold for cash
to dig.the canals and ditches at once.
The 40-foot and 20-foot canals would require a
steam dredge. This dredge outfit would cost
whoever bid in the contract about $2,000. It would
dig and pull out stumps in the right of way and
dump them .out on shore. The 10-foot lateral
ditches would have to be'dug by hand.
As the great benefit to town and,county would
exceed the cost so many times over, the drainage
would simply prove a wise and conservative
business proposition for the good and gain of all
concerned..
The gain in land values alone would be at least
$200,000. The gain on city property values would
be correspondingly great. The greatest benefit to6
our town would be the sewerage outlet the canal
would furnish. The canal from the lake up to the
railroad could be dug so that the Rowell Lake
water would tide up opposite the town, and give us
boat communication to Sampson Junction as well
as sewerage outlet.
We can do this drainage right now. No use to
wait. The quicker it is done the easier we can pay
the cost. The increase and safety of crops annually'
would easily pay the whole cost in possibly one
crop year.
I would suggest that a few citizens who are most
.interested in securing this drainage, meet in Starke
Saturday,, 27th, at' 3 o'clock p.m., organize for
work and go to work, get up maps and
descriptions of drainage district, present assessed
values of all realty therein, approximate location
of canals and ditches proposed and probable cost
of same. Have some good lawyer prepare the
pei'ints strictly in accordance with the, statute
relating to drainage districts. Then solicit the
signature of every property owner in the drainage
territoryy and present the petition before the board
of county commissioners at their regular meeting
on Monday. Sept. 5.
Should the commissioners entertain dit
favorably, they will advertise, etc., as set forth in
my first article on this subject of drainage. It is a
great move for the good of all. If you want to carry
it through, give enough of your time and energy
and do what the law requires in the premises.
S*C.L. Peek

S(Although it took longer than Peek expected,
the petitions were duly drawn up 'ind began to
circulate in late September (of 1910.
Unfortunately, .this is the last that is heard of the
issue that y)'ear, with said petitions seemingly never
being presented to the county commission. The
Telegraph did its part to motivate the county,
; however In the same issue as Peek's ambitious
plan were two items, apparently selected to
influence by example and through humor.)

Plunged into deep

water


EA., Bowers had exciting
experience in crossing creek
' Those who work for the creation of a drainage
district of this section can now present tangible
proof..that beats columns of arguments to show
that they are right in their assertions. When an'


episode like that
related below can
happen on the most
traveled road out of
Starke, almost within
* the town limits, it is
time that something
should be done.
E.A. Bowers, who
lives on the Peek
Road, had been to
Gainesville to buy a
mule and wagon, and .u**
Wednesday evening
about 8 o'clock he
reached Alligator
Creek on the return
journey. He crossed
the first bridge safely, .
then plunged into girt-
deep water. He
thought he was off the
road and in the ditch \
and pulled the mule to
the right. This was a
bad move, for now
both mule and wagon
went into the ditch.
Mr. Bowers got out
When the wagon box
began to float and
found the water above
his head. He swam
along till he reached
the north bridge, and
finding that he could
do nothing alone in
the inky darkness,
hurried to Phillips and
Crews' stables and
told his trouble. Jeff
Johns and Jesse
Strickland were there **
and they procured .l
lanterns and -went
with Mr. Bowers. This is the jail built
They found the mule located on Pratt St
standing in the ditch Center, this was an
with eyes and nose This "old" jail was
just out of the water,
still fast to the wagon.
After some heroic
work they managed to
unhitch the mule and get
him up on the bridge, then
they got the running gear of
the wagon up and next
located and rescued the
wagon box, which had
floated across the road. The
only part of the outfit lost
was the seat, but it will
probably be found when the ..
water'recedes'. .;


Hunting

for the,

road /
An .instance of
resourcefulness that borders
on the sublime has come to ,
the reporter's knowledge.
The. other day a farmer
living out,on the Wall Road,
.and his 12-year-old son,
were kept in town until after
dark on account of some
heavy rain. When they had
started and were opposite.
the power house the old
man, who was driving, '
.looked down Call Street and 2 ., :
could see nothing but water. --"
where the street crosses the
swamp. "0 Lord!" he
complained, "How will I be Prohibition was
able to steer so as to get interesting peri
across the bridges?" Bradfo
"I know, paw," said the
boy. "Keep in line with the electric lights and you
can't miss it."
.The farmer did as directed, but as he went down
the slope the lights formed themselves into a
vertical line.
"Consar your smartness," said he to the boy,
"See what a mess you have got me into! Where are
your lights now?"
"Never mind, paw," replies the young hopeful,
whose 'prospects of'becoming a good lawyer or
book agent are excellent, "I know. While we were
a-gwine straight by the lights I noticed that that
'gator in there bellered on the right hand side and
that bullfrog grunted on the left. You steer right
twixtt the 'gator and the frog and you can't miss
it." .
The boy was right. After slushing knee-deep in
water for some distance the horse stumbled when
he struck the bridge and fell. This frightened a
cow that had been lying on the bridge and she
made a bee-line for the next bridge.
'"Foller the cow, paw, and you can't miss the
next bridge," was the boy's sound advice.

Sept. 2,1910
(A humorous commentary on the city jail,
known as the "jug" makes light of the poor
condition of the building. The need for a new jail
is expressed, arid wfas indeed'realized later in the
year.)

The little gray jug
Municipal hostelry is a marvel
of ingenuity


Wednesday morning Marshal Austin had a
general fall house-cleaning at the "jug," as the
municipal jail is called. The name is not
farfetched, for the little square structure with the
pyramidical roof looks just like a Schiedam
Schnapps bottle, and if the place had a stove with
,a piece of pipe outside, it would very much
resemble a jug.
To the casual observer the interior presents only
four bare walls and a bunk but there are many


in 1910. While the building that most Bradford Countians refer to as the "old" jail was
reet and recently torn down to make way for the Santa Fe Community College Stump
even older "old" jail. It was located behind the old courthouse, and was built in 1910.
torn down in 1985 when the renovations to the 1902 courthouse began for the SFCC
Andrews Center.


not as dangerous to Bradford lawmen as the period between 1885 and 1912. It was an
od, however. Shelkiff Will Epperson, son and brother to the Eppersons who had died as
>rd lawmen, and Deputy Will Baisden pose with a confiscated moonshine still.


traditions associated with the place to make it many of which were connected with on
interesting, and if the walls could speak they could areas many churches. As always, humo
tell some startling tales. The first to be remarked is sense of fun characterized these events,,
the total, absence of writing on the walls and the persistent tendency and ability of the
defacing of any kind; but the guests are not of the area to be able to laugh at themsel'
anxious to write their names on the wall and
carving is made impossible because they have to J .
leave their pocket knives.outside. .E n eavorers give
Just under the north window is a large burned
spot showing ho,, a prisoner tried to burn himself D Supper
out. Once a couple of stout farmers were The Christian Endeavor Society
incarcerated but-nearly set themselves at liberty by Presbyterian Church gave another of their
overthrowing the jug (pushing over the building. entertainments at the Sternburg reside:
itself). Thursday evening. The guests, who numb
A new and stronger jail was proposed, but the were first treated to good music by Miss
Solomons who then decided the weal or woe of Sternburg and Mabel Wills and Messrs.
the town saved expenses in a way worthy of the Crook and Cosmo Alvarez.
"wise men of Gotham." They filled the space Then came the "cold" supper. The Ion
between the ceiling and the shingles with sand to table was covered with sheets reaching
weight the structure down. This way of placing floor. Benches, which allowed the gues
ballast, while contrary to the mode used aboard close together, were used instead of cha
ship, is, nevertheless, effective, and quite in Rufus Hodges sat at the head of the table
keeping with the condition of the guests, who are a pan full of such things as a bunch oft
troubled with top-heaviness. It serves also another feathers, a bunch of chickens' feet, an.
.purpose. The sand sifting down through the cracks chickens' heads, a glove full of salt, some
falls into the eyes of those sleeping on the bunk, and an oyster shell with a piece of raw b<
and they must therefore get under the bunk to These articles were, one by one, passed
sleep, whereby the bedclothes are kept clean. Hodges to the guest nearest him, and then
Until a few days ago the jug has been provided one to theother. Each guest was told to ke
with a padlock and hasp, but the modern spirit of her eyes closed when the item was put
improvement has struck even here. As the hands.
unwilling prisoner must be shoved in with the left The objects had been kept on ice and fell
hand while the marshal quickly closes the door and clammyand uncanny that they
with the right, the old arrangement was awkward sometimes dropped by the lady guests,
and often a failure, for the prisoner would get hold each offense had to pay a fine of 25 cents
of the hasp first and hold it so that-the door could wanted to see what was handed them ai
not be shut, and the club had to come into play. A fined a dime for each look. The exclamation
new lightning spring lock has done away with all those who felt "creepy" provoked mirth
trouble on this score. the doors being open, was heard outside,
The shingles are pretty rotten and the birds soon laughter dooer is contagious, soon the
drop seeds through the cracks upon the ballast. neighborhood was laughing,
Wonder how the jug would look when surmounted Refreshments were served, consist
by some vigorous Jerusalem oaks? The jug is so different kinds of sandwiches and cake,
well preserved by the fumes of alcohol that it will salad, pickles and coffee.
last forever. T.h .^ .,. ., ....... o r1W -


(Bradford County persisted in offering a wide
variety of opportunities for social gatherings,


i1 ,UUL UI LUo town guests were, YY.I]
and niece, Miss Olie Porter and Mr.,
Strickland, of Waldo, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. B.


e of the
*r and a
showing'
residents
ves.)


of' the
*piquant
nce last
ered 60,
es Ethel
Herman
g dining
; to the
ts to sit
airs. Mr.
and had
chicken
other of
gherkins
eef in it.
by Mr.
ice from
ep his or
in their

t so cold
y' were
who for
. Others
nd were
*ns from
Which,
and as
whole
ting of
chicken
[. Porter
Charles
ailey, of












Same thing only different?

Animal control and zoning

also issues in 1910


Aug. 12, 1910
I (Civic animal control had a whole different
meaning in 1910. While the occasional mention of
a stray dog or two may be found in the pages of
the Telegraph over the years, stray cows are
unique to the 1800s and the early days of the
century, but presented a serious and messy
problem in 1910 nonetheless.)

Cows or no cows
Citizens are becoming restless
about the bovine nuisance
Cows, or no cows, on our streets and sidewalks
that is the question. Some years back our city
council passed an ordinance, on plea of nuisance,
requiring cattle to be penned at night. Our
population then did not reach the number fixed by
law that would authorize absolute "prohibition" of
the cow. It was hoped that all cattle owners in the
town, from love of neatness and decency, would
pen their cows on or before 8 o'clock each
evening. Of late years this is utterly neglected, and
droves of cattle, owned in and out of town, roam
our streets and roost on the sidewalks all through
the stilly night."
The nuisance is becoming so unbearable that
some of the ladies of the town have requested help
to abate the nuisance. The point is to ask cattle
owners not to allow their stock out at night 6n the
streets. Also to ask the council ,to appoint enough
scavengers to clean the sidewalks each morning, if
they cannot enforce said ordinance. And, if
nothing else will avail, they believe the present
census will give the necessary population to
prohibit the town cow, and they will insist upon it.
C.L. Peek
(Temperance and prohibition was a
frequent topic in the Telegraph, 'especially in
1910 as statewide prohibition of the
manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages
in the state was being considered by the
legislature. In addition to numerous articles
about the activities of members of the
temperance movement, a near-weekly
column, called the WCTU (Womens
Christian Temperance Union) Department,
edited by Mrs. D.E. Knight, frequently At
graced the front page. While the Telegraph
gave ample space to the temperance
movement, and sometime., by editorial "
comment, seemed in favor of it, it should be
noted that the publication continued to run
advertisements for liquor and spirits,
although never on the same page as
temperance issues.)

Temperance

entertainment
Able addresses and fine
music made enjoyable
program
The entertainment which was given for
the temperance cause at the Baptist Church
last Friday evening was well attended and a
success in every respect. The program as
given in last week's Telegraph (no copy of
which still exists, ed.) was carried out, with
the exception of Dr. Freeman's address on
"the effect of temperance on the morale of
the community," which was not delivered as
the doctor was unavoidably absent.
The Rev. W.T. Morgan greeted the Dr
audience-with an address which was not on grc
the program, and thus no number was
missed. The singers were a mixed choir from
the Baptist, Methodist and Presbyterian
churches, and their singing was faultless, as
was also the instrumental music. The
difficult subject, "the political and business
phase of prohibition," was handled by D.E.
Knight, esq., in a manner that evinced a
thorough study of the theme and it was well
received.
(Progress is often fraught with problems
and when the old meets the new a clash is
very often the result. The coming of the
automobile distressed many people, what
with the noise and smell these rtew-fangled
machines produced. As can be seen below,
people were not the only ones who objected
to what many referiedto, as an "infernal
machine.")

Ice mule got-

excited
Pratt Street is a very quiet neighborhood
and has an excitement only once in every 12
years. The last took place Tuesday morning
and was caused by a mule whose occupation
should make him too cool-headed for such
carryings-on.
Tuesday, as the ice man was making his
second matutinal round and was on north
Walnut Street, near Pratt, delivering ice at a
residence, the ,large mule that draws the'
wagon became frightened at an automobile
that approached from behind, and (the mule)
ran down Pratt Street as fast as he was able
to pull the heavy vehicle, looking to the right Thi
and to the left and uttering brays of distress.
The wagon in its headlong flight resembled a
tug boat in a choppy sea and the cakes of ice it
contained were scattered over the street, breaking
into bits. At last two of the wheel's broke and there
was a stop to the proceedings. A perceptible
coolness, like that between two men, each of


whom suspects the other of having killed his dog,
pervaded Pratt Street until the ice melted.
(Bradford Co ". ,s tso. wowing in 1910,
although not as s.,ckly as in the late 1800s. New
business openings were not as frequent and seem
to have been based on existing need rather then
the creation of it through availability.)


New grist mill
I have put up a grist mill on my place just south
of Starke, and will grind your corn into meal or
hominy at any time during the weekdays. I grind
to suit you and will give you satisfaction. I also
keep a wood yard and will furnish any size stove
wood on short notice.
G.M. Bennett
(While the city and county were developing,
much of Bradford County was still very much a
wild area. The clash between man and wild nature
went on much as it does today, with wild animals
competing for the space needed to carry on with
their lives. While sightings of catamountss," also
known as panthers, are very rare today in the
county, this was not always so and it must have
been a frightening experience indeed to meet one
of these large cats face to face.)

Wildcat sighted at

Dowling's Mill
A few nights ago Lee Lamb, night watchman at
the Dowling Mill, heard something growl at him
from behind a pile of lumber. Mr. Lamb paid no
attention, thinking it was someone who wanted to
scare him, but the growls continued. He then
thought he would fire a shot in the air to scare the
growler, but just then an animal sprang out in the
open, which looked like a catamount. Mr. Lamb
fired upon it, but the shot did not take effect.
Next morning on inspection numerous large
catamount tracks were seen, leading to and from a
can of tallow that had been used for greasing the


-.. . .


Free range was the law of the day in early Starke. Cattlemen did not have to fence
their livestock. It was up to the people in town, or the people who owned a tasty-
looking garden, to fence the cows out. At one time, the entire city of Starke had a
fence around it, but the cows still got through on occasion. Here you can see the
wrought-iron fence around the courthouse which was meant to keep the cows
out, not the people In.


essing up and having a picnic on the banks of one of the many creeks and rivers in the area was a favorite weekend activity. This
oup was picnicking on the banks of Alligator Creek in 1894. They area (back row, I-r) Julius Adams, a local milliner whose name is
now unknown, Eddie Duncan, Kate Burroughs Duncan, Annie Matthews, OrrinMatthews, Ida Witkovski, (front row, I-r) Julia Wall
Hoffman, Will Hoffman, Alice Wall, Orville Wall, Eugene S. Matthews and Felix Witkovski.


e Women's Christian Temperance Union held parades and lobbied for years before Prohibition finally came into play. This parade
was held in Starke in the early 1900s.


pulleys in heavy iron blocks. It is supposed that
the animal had been driven from the swamps by
high water and had wandered to the mill in quest
of something to eat.


Sept. 9, 1910
(Too much of a good thing is never a good thing
and nature's contribution to the power plant in
Starke was less than appreciated one dark and
stormy night.)


Lightning strikes

generator
Engineer Bessent knocked down
but not injured
Saturday evening at 6:45, during a
thunderstorm, lightning struck an electric wire and
the town was suddenly thrown into darkness. At 7
o'clock the lights again thrown out.
At the power house. n hen lightning struck,
a sheet of dazzling liglit shot t1 ofl the large


generator and Engineer Lawrence Bessent, who
was standing near by, was knocked down, but was
soon on his feet again, having suffered no injury.
He lighted a lantern, put the belts on the small
generators and set them running and the welcome
lights again peered through the darkness.
The armature of the large generator had been
destroyed by the lightning and it took several days
before a new one could be put on.

Those who do not remember the
past are doomed to repeat it.






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