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Union County times
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028314/00052
 Material Information
Title: Union County times
Uniform Title: Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Lake Butler Fla
Creation Date: January 12, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates: 30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1920?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID: UF00028314:00052
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bradford County times

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
    Section B: Regional News
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section C: Features and Sports
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
    Section C: Features and Sports: Classified Ads
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
Full Text












U union

USPS 648-200 Three Sections Lake Butler, Florida


ount


Thursday, January 12, 2006


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City places


moratorium on


mobile homes


Lake Butler Fire Department Lieutenant Bryan Fritz puts out a fire during an exercise
back in April. Fritz was learning the proper way to extinguish a fire with the
extinguish during certification for Firefighter I. The city of Lake Butler city council
approved a name change for the department at its Jan. 9 meeting. The Lake Butler
Volunteer Fire Department is now known as Lake Butler Volunteer Fire Rescue. For
more about the change, see related story.



Commissioners approve fire department's

name change to fire rescue


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
By unanimous vote, city of
. Lake .. .But ler.' ... city
c6dibfissioneris changed the
name of the Lake Butler
Volunteer Fire Department to
Lake Butler Volunteer Fire
Rescue.
The change, according to
Chief Mike Banks, will allow
. the department to compete for
more funding.
"There are a few grants and
other funding sources we .are
not eligible for because we are
just a fire department," Banks
said. "The name change is just
that, a name change."
In the past, the department
would only respond to calls
involving fires. As of late, the
department has been
responding to a variety of
calls. According to department
records, along with fires,
members have been assisting
on accident scenes and calls
for emergency medical
services.
"I think the name change
will reflect what our run
reports already show," Banks
said.
The item brought little


discussion among' board
members. The motion to adopt
resolution 06-03 was made by
Lynn Bishop. Cilt Attorney
John,. Maines -read the
resolution by title only.
Commissioner LeRoy Stalvey
seconded the' motion and it
passed 5-0.
Something that never
entered into the discussion was
a letter received by the city.
Enclosed in all the
commissioners packets, the
letter opposed certain word', in
the new title.
The document; which had no
date or name, stated that the
word. volunteer be removed
from the department's title. It
stated ., that according to
National Fire Protection
Association regulation 1001:3-
1.1.1, that any firefighter that
received compensation to
respond to a call was
considered a paid-on-call
firefighter and not volUnteer.
'Currently the department
gives each member $10 to
respond to a fire and $10 for
every training session
attended. According to the
regulation, to be considered
volunteer, the person must not'
receive any compensation.


After 'the meeting, City
Manager Richard Tillis said he
did not consider what the
firefighters received payment.
'-Even though they are paid
for each call, the compensation
is a reimbursement for gas,
mileage and inconvenience,",
Tillis said. "We always
considered our people to be
volunteers. Yes they get $10 to
respond, but some of them
leave their jobs to respond and
I don't know that they get.
paid."
Tillis went on to say that
everywhere else he has been,
volunteers were always given-
some amount to offset gas and
mileage.
"Some of them run several
miles to respond to calls, they
use their own private vehicle to
get where their going," Tillis
said. "Even now, these
volunteers respond outside the
city's limits to answer calls."
Lake Butler is the only
department in the county that
pays its members to respond.
The Union County Volunteer
Fire Department and the
Worthington Springs
Volunteer Fire Department pay
their members nothing.


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
If you're planning to move a
mobile home into the Lake
Butler city limits, you'll have
to wait at least 30 days to do
so.
On Jan. 9, city
commissioners voted to
impose a temporary
moratorium on allowing any
mobile homes to be moved
into the city. City Manager
Richard Tillis told the board
that there are several areas of'
concern involved with moving
the homes into the city.
"There are several areas,
throughout the city, where
older mobile homes are not
being kept up to code," Tillis
said. "There are concerns
whether or not the older model
units will meet the 100 mile
per hour wind load that is
required of today's structures."
Tillis told the board while
everyone has to have a place to
live, the safety of the older
structures was truly the issue at
hand.
"A lot of these are being


brought in as rentals, I've got
some real concerns over those
in ways other than just
appearance," Tillis said.
"Many of the pre-1990 mobile
homes in South Florida,
especially last year, they found
out were not built to withstand
100 mph winds and most of
them were totally demolished."
As a result of these concerns
and requests, Tillis requested
the board enact the measure
until a resolution could be
proposed.
"We really don't currently
have a means to regulating that
permanently," Tillis said. "We
looked at preinspection, as is
done by some of the
neighboring counties, but that
does not do anything but f.i
plumbing, electrical and
broken glass. Those are only
code violations."
Tillis said even if the home
owners fix the problems it does


See HOMES, p. 2A


CVS to build new

store, city wants

annexation


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
At the city of Lake Butler's
Jan. 9 meeting, City Manager
Richard Tillis confirmed that
CVS pharmacy will build a
new building,in Lake Butler.
The building will be
constructed near the corner of
S.R. 121 and S.R. 100, next to
Lake Butler Hospifftal. The
hospital bought the property
two years ago from the county.
It was recently sold 'to a
developer for CVS,.
According to Tillis, CVS has
asked the city to provide it
with water and wastewater-
services for the facility. The
city will have a problem filling
this request because the parcel
does not currently lie within
the city limits.
"For several years when
individuals have wanted water
or wastewater service, we've
strongly encouraged them to
come inside the city," Tillis
said. "CVS has purchased the


property in front of the hospital
to build a new standalone
store. They indicated they
wanted water and sewer
service. I indicated that in
order to get that they needed to
annex that parcel into the city."
According to Tillis, CVS
seemed to be willing to do just
that until recently.
"The engineer was
communicating with different
people and everything seemed,
to be going fine," Tillis said.
"But at some point in time, he
met, upwith somebody who
seems to think they night not
have to do that."
Tillis said he put the issue on
the agenda to get sense of how
strongly the board felt about
making a property owner
annex into the city before
receiving water service.
"I think they should still do
that," said Commissioner Lynn

See CVS, p. 5A


Program gives stroke patients better chance


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
According to the American
Heart Association, every 45
seconds a person in the United
States suffers a stroke. Every
three minutes someone dies
from a stroke.
To help give stroke patients
a better chance to survive and
recover, Dr. Andrew Xavier, a
doctor at Shands Jacksonville,
recently introduced the Acute
Stroke Emergency Medical
Service Response program ,to
Union County EMS personnel.
The program sets the protocols
EMS personnel follow to treat
stroke patients.
"A stroke is a killer disease,"
Xavier said. "'But if treated in
time, the effects are reversible.
EMS response is the critical
part of the treatment."
A stroke occurs when al
blood vessel that brings
oxygen and nutrients to the


brain bursts or is clogged by a
blood clot or some& other
particle. The section of the
brain that the blood vessel was
supplying dies because of the
lack of oxygen. Brain cells do
not regenerate themselves and
the patient loses the function or
functions that section
controlled.
There are four main types of
strokes that effect individuals.
The first two types, cerebral
thrombosis and cerebral
embolism, account for 85
percent all strokes patients
suffer. They. are caused by
blood clots or particles that
plug an artery. Both of these
conditions are known as
ischemic strokes.
The other two types are
known as hemorrhagic or
bleeding strokes. Cerebral and
subarachnoid hemorrhages are
caused when blood vessels
rupture. They have a much
higher fatality rate than


-. -. .
-- 11
W.W-

*--\ <


Dr. Andrew Xavier


ischemnic strokes.
According to Xavier,
multiple studies have found
that a stroke patient's recovery


percentage is directly related to.
the amount of time it takes for
them to receive treatment.
"If a patient can get
treatment for a stroke within
the first three hours, the less
deficit they will experience,"
Xavier said. "These new
protocols will help us treat
patients within this window."
Florida law enacted in 2005'
directs paramedics to take a
patient, who they believe has'
had a stroke, to a stroke center.
Shands Jacksonville is the only
designated stroke center in the
North Florida area. Because an
ambulance ride from Union
County to the hospital would
take more than an hour,
paramedics are directed to call
for transport by helicopter to
the facility.
Before making that call,
paramedics must go through a
checklist to ensure a patient
meets the criteria for what is
known as a stroke alert. The


checklist has medical
personnel determine
'When symptoms started.
O If they are compatible with
a stroke.
o If the symptoms have been
present for less than three
hours.
0 If a patient might be
excluded because of past
medical conditions.
In a study done by the
hospital over a three-year
period, it was found that
patients who received
recombinant tissue
plasminogen activator within
three hours of having a stroke
had a 30 percent greater
likelihood of having minimal
to no disability. RTPA is a
drug used to dissolve blood
clots.
According to Xavier, one
day paramedics may be able to.

See STROKE, p. 4A


UC Historical
Society to
meet at King
House Inn
The Union County
Historical Society will hold
its regular January meeting
at the King House Inn Bed
and Breakfast in Lake
Butler. The inn is located
directly behind the former
site of Archer Service
Station. The meeting will
begin at 7 p.m. A tour of the
*house will be offered after
the meeting. For more .
information, call (386) 496-
3044.


UCHS class of
1986 planning
reunion
, The Union County high
School class of 1986 will
have a planning meeting for
its 20 year reunion on
Monday, Jan. 16, beginning
at 7 p.m. The meeting will
take place at Rhodes
Barbeque in Lake Butler.
Anyone interested in
helping with planning is
encouraged to attend. For
more information, contact
Jordaina Bridges at (386)
496-2816. :



UCHS offers
additional
.tutoring
classes
Union County, High
School will offer additional
tutoring classes on
Saturday in January and
February. Sessions will be
held from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
The dates for the classes are
Jan. 21, Jan. 28, Feb. 4, Feb.
11, Feb.18 and Feb. 25.
Those parents interested in
their child attending the
classes can pick up an
application at the front
office of UCHS. For more
information, contact
Geraldine 'Griffis at' (386)
496-3040 ext. 4946.


Commission
meeting
changed for
holiday
The Union County Board
of County Commissioners
will meet on Tuesday, Jan.
17 at 7 p.m. instead of
Monday, Jan. 16. The
meeting has been moved-
due to the Martin Luther
King, Jr. holiday
observance. For' more
information, call (386) 496-
4241.



NormnalDeadline is 5
p.m. Mpnday before
the Thursday
publication date.
Articles can be
submitted to the Times
office on Main Street in
Lake Butler or to the
Telegraph office (131
W; Call St., Starke).
Phone 386-496-2261
or call 904-964-6305 in
Starke.


For crime, socials and editorials, see Regional News section. For sports, see Features and Sports section. ll 11

Deadline noon Monday before publication 386-496-2261 (phone) 386-496-2858 (fax) 6 89076 63869 2


JO CENTS







Page 2A UNION COUNTY TIMES Jan. 12, 2006


City manager feels next 12

mnnths will hp hicv ennps


notr make the homes any safer. U I 1W I I 6 1
"It does not make them look
any better either," Tillis said. By JAMES REDMOND
"Those astatic issues are not Times Staff Writer
addressed in code violations in
much of any fashion." Lake Butler City Manger
Tillis said that he had talked Richard Tillis said he
with the North Central Florida anticipates to be very busy
Regional Planning Council and over the next 12 months.
City Attorney John Maines Tillis .said the city has
about the issue several projects planned that
."What 'd like to do is look will keep himself and city
at the possibility of the employees on the go.
requirement of the wind load "I think some of the more
factor current structures must pressing things that we need to
meet," Tillis said. "If you build deal with will be addressed in
a site-built home in Union the first six months," Tillis
County, it's got to be built to said. "We want to address our
meet the current building fire station issue, one way or
codes. I would like to see us the other."
investigate the possibility of us When the city sold its former
requiring that for any mobile building in June, the housing-
home being moved into Lake for the city's fire trucks went
Butler." away as well. The trucks were
Tillis said that he is stored in the garage next to the
confident that by the next building. Currently, they are
board meeting in February, he being housed at 'the city's
and Maines could come up waterworks building.
with a resolution that would "Right now we have land set
address the concerns, aside for 'he project," Tillis
"It would also add some said. "We are currently looking
criteria that will help us to- at our options to build the
i assure that its somewhat safer building."
than what we se6 out there Tillis said another area the
today," Tillis saith city would be looking at is the
He did inform the board that growth within the city
i any mobile home currently in "Wi'th the construction
place would not be required to we've had in the past, plus
meet the standards, townhomes that will be
"Anything here is going to occupied soon, CVS
be grandfathered in just like 'constructing a new facility, and
any other ordinance," Tillis prison expansion, we're going
said. "It can't be retroactive, to have to start the planning
but henceforth, it will help us phase of the expansion of the
in the long stretch to reassure wastewater plant," Tillis said.
people, especially if it's a "The last one was done in
rental unit, that it's a little safer 1998."
than it could have been." Tillis said the plant is
Maines. suggested -to the consistently running at 85
board that rather than putting a percent capacity everyday.
moratorium in place: that they "So now is not too early at
suspend the issue and suspend all to look at it," Tillis said. "It
S issuing concurrency permits will take this year and next
for mobile homes. The permits year before we ever get to
certify- that -all requirements, construction."
both zoning and building, have According to Tillis, the city
been met and allow would simply add on to the its
homeowners to move in, existing facility rather than
Tillis informed Maines that building a new one.
the city issued no such permits. "Our: expansion of the
"We don't actually issue a facility is only limited by the
concurrency permit for mobile space that we have," Tillis
homes," Tillis said. "The only
thing we do is issue a zoning said. "It's just a matter of
compliance certificate which making sure the funding is
says it is'gi fTim h'' areS "0 'f,.... .-".. ..
where the zoning doesn't LCCC offersila
prohibit it. It's all we require at
this point." enforcement
Commissioner Lynn Bishop 0
then made the motion that the training
city enact the moratorium. Lake City Community.
Commissioner Jimmy Beasley College will be offering an
seconded it. Bishop worded the Auxiliary Law Enforcement
motion so that the measure Officer Academy course
would be in place until such beginning February 6,.2006 -
time Tillis and Maines could through June 30, 2006 at a cost
bring a resolution before the of $1,377.55.
board. Tillis said that he' This program will be
anticipates being able to bring conducted on the Olustee
a resolution to the board by its Campus in Building 3, Lab 1.
February meeting. The hours will be 6 p.m. to 10
S The moratorium will p.m. Monday through Friday.
eveincluded all mobile homes, This course will not certify an
S even those that meet current individual, to be a full-time
wind, load requirements or are Florida: Law Enforcement or
brand new construction. Corrections Officer.
"There's no way to It is designed to .provide
discriminate between one we training for persons wishing to
know meets that wind load join law enforcement reserve
requirement and one we organizations and render law
suspect doesn't." Tillis said. enforcement volunteer service
"So, it has to be an all or assisting fully certified law
nothing kind of thing. That's enforcement officers.
why I say we'll try to move Applicants must meet state
pretty quickly and have minimum requirements for law
something ready by February. enforcement service to include
Commissioner Fletcher passing the Basic Abilities
Myers then inquired about the Test for Law Enforcement and
measure. a criminal history fingerprint
"What if we got a mobile check. Academy students must
home that meets this be 19 years of age before June
requirement?" Myers asked. 30,h 2006, have a high school
Tillis informed him that it diploma Or GED, and pass a
meant every mobile home. physical exam.
"That's why I wanted to There will be a mandatory
bring that up and make that preregistration/orientation
clear," Tillis said. meeting on Wednesday,
Thtevote was called for and January 18, 2006 at 6 p.m. in
the motion passed 4-1 with Building 3 on the Olustee
Myers casting the dissenting campus.
vote. As worded, the For registration materials
moratorium will remain in and additional information
effect until a resolution can be please call the Law
enacted. Enfo ,., t>.;, Di i i o38


James Redi
reached at (38
uctimes@alltel.


754-4391 or'(386) 754-4383,
mond can be or contact ,the Law
6) 496-2261 or Enforcement Division by e-
net m ail a t
:brownd@lakecitycc.edu or
through the Lake City
Community college Web page,
www. lakecitycc. edu
.


WIuio Countyailmeo


Subscription Ra
$26.00 per year
$1300 six month
Outside Trade /
$13.00 six mon


USPS648-200
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3,1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
UNION COUNTY TIMES
125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054
Web address: UCTimesonline.com
(386) 496-2261
John M. Miller, Publisher
Editor: James Redmond
ite in Trade Area Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
Don Sams
Darlene Douglass
lhs Typesetting: Joalyce Graham


Area $26:00 per year:
ths


Advertising and
Newspaper Prod.
Classified Adv.
Bookkeeping:


Earl W. Ray
Virginia Daugherty
Kathi Bennett


there."
Tillis estimates that the city
could double the size of the
existing plant with the space it
has available currently.
"We could add on another
800,000 gallon expansion in
the space we have now," Tillis
said. "That would double the
plant's capacity without having
to look for new space."
Paying for new
infrastructure is another area
Tillis said the city will be
looking to address.
"The city has not really
discussed impact fees," Tillis
said. "There's been a lot of
controversy over them. There's
ongoing court challenges. I
think we would want to wait
and see how a lot of that
shakes out."
Tillis said the city already
has a $350 connection fee to
tap into the city's water
system.
"Then you turn around and
want to tack on $4,000 per
residence fee on top, of that,"
Tillis said. "The builders
association is going to
challenge that."
Tillis said the city's stand is
that it would rather have
structured rates rather than an
up front fee.
"I would rather have rates
structured so that I could put
10 percent in capital reserve,
rather than having an upfront
fee," Tillis said. "The only
time we've actually done that
was when the state was willing
to do that."
According to Tillis, another
item the city needs to look at
in the next year or two is a new
fire truck.
"At some point, in the near
future, we're going to have to
address that we need a new fire
truck," Tillis said. "We will try
to go about getting that with a
grant, but if we don't get the
grant, it will still have to be
addressed."
The progress the city has had
with city parks Tillis said was
very encouraging.
"We got most of our parks
up to par with one on each side
"'A,. -4 -.,.


SREC has
alternate meal
site for seniors
The Suwannee River
Economic Council has an
"alterative congregate meal
site for seniors 60 and older.
On Tuesday and Thursdays,
from 10:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.,
seniors can come to the
Worthington Springs First
United Methodist Church to
enjoy free food, music and a
sing-along. For more
information, contact SREC at
. (386) 496-2342.


of town and at the lake," Tillis
said. "We have an application
in for a grant to build a
trailhead park for the path from
here to Palatka. Hopefully
we'll get funded for that."
Tillis said in the next 12
months the city will also move
forward with plans to acquire
the water treatment plant from
the Reception and Medical
Center. For more than a year,
the city and the Department of
Corrections have been in
communication about the city
taking over the plant.
"We have received a letter
from DOC indicating their
interest in making the
transition," Tillis said. "It will
have, to be upgraded before we
take it over and the state has
also indicated they are willing
to take care of that as well."
According to Tillis, if the
project comes to pass, it would
be a tremendous benefit to the
city.
"Having this extra facility
would allow us to take one off
line for maintaince," Tillis
said. "This ability would help
us avoid some of the situations
we must face when we have to
do it with one facility. We can
take our current facility off
line, but it is not a fun thing."
The second plant will also
allow for water service to be
affected in a very minimal
way.
"Having the second plant
would let us take one offline
and still have the same
capacity we currently have,"
Tillis said. "If we have to do it
now, water pressure becomes
very minimal."

James Redmond can be
reached at (386) 496-2261 or
uctimes@alltel.net


Nothing spoils the taste of
peanut butter like
unrequited love.
-Charlie Brown

. . .... ",. ;'.r


AARP offers
driver safety
program
AARP will offer driver
safety courses throughout the
month of January. Classes will
be held in. Gainesville on Jan.
12-13 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Jan.
21 and Jan. 28 from 9a.m-
1p.m. and Jan.27 and Jan. 30
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. There are
no tests. The eight hour
classroom instruction refines
driving skills and develops
defense driving techniques.
The certificate received by
class participants qualifies
them for a three year auto
insurance discount. For more
information, call (352) 333-
3036 and to register.


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HOMES
Continued from p. 1A


quarterly meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 19, beginning at 6:30 p.m.
The meeting will be held in
Fellowship Baptist Church in
Raiford.
All members are encouraged
to attend as well as anyone
who is interested in joining.


When a person can no
'longer laugh at himself, it is
time for others to laugh at
him.
-Thomas Szasz
***


Evangelism Conference
Jan. 23-24 (Monday/Tuesday)
Dauphin Way Baptist Church, Mobile, Ala. (exit #4,1-65)
THEME: "More Than Ever Before"; from 1 p.m. Monday to 8 p.m. Tuesday
MUSIC: Choirs from Cottaige Hill Baptist Church & Dauphin Way Baptist
Church; "Paid in.Fill" quartet; "Voices," from the University of Mobile
ADMISSION: Free to all, thanks to Cooperative Program; everyone welcome.




ou Steve Johnny David Dusty Bob
Chapelle Gaines Hunt Joyner McLenore Pitman




Darrell Peny Mike Robert Ted Robert
Robinson Sanders Satterfeld Smith Traylor While
Also:
Great Commission OTHER DETAILS:
Ministries Training www.ALSBOM.org,
Opportunities! Call or 264.1225 ext. 245
Don go on-line for details. 1.800.264.1225, ext. 245
Wilton '


VVIII N% %k) l~w


Worship ip& thekMose f 1the rd... Somwhere this wmV,

The churches and businesses listed below
urge you lo attend the church of your choice!


r


1_


I:


I


~eP~


122-14:0 mymrl


National Kidney DOF increases
Foundation price for
looking for prescribed
donated cars burning
The National Kidney The Florida Division of
Program ion's a Kidney Caritable Forestry recently increased the
Program is a charitable price it charges for performing
you to turn iplan ayour used car prescribed burn services for
van, truck or even boat ans d residents in Union County.
very likely receive two Fireline plowing will now cost
benefits you won't get from a $80 charge hour $50.th minimum
regular dealer trade-in (or from charge of $50. Previously the
a holiday song), charge was $65 per hour.
a holiday song). Assistance with your
You'll get a good feeling prescribed burn b y division
and you may even get a tax- presribed burn by divisionur
deduction. Eighty-four percent personal is now $22 pTher hours a
of Americans who donated per inimum charge of $100.is a
vehicles to the National mnu he o $0
Kidney Foundation's Kidney Previously the person hour
Cars Program last year charge was $20.
itemized their tax returns and Suppression services have
were able to reap a charitable also increased. DOF will
deduction for their charge $80 per hour from the
contribution. And if you want time personal are dispatched to
this possible tax saving, control a fire to the time the
this possible tax saving fire is brought under control.
remember to donate your There is a minimum charge of
vehicle to the foundation by $150 This service was
December 31. Ifyou happen to $150 previously $65 service was
be a last-minute shoppers no previously $65 per hour.
problem: that is the lastday of DOF has. decided to. leave
the year. the price of one service
Then there's that good unchanged. To contract DOF
feeling, the one you experience to perform: prescribed burn,
when you give something that the division charges $1o2 per'
hepsn you give something thatyour acre for the first 50 acres. The
own Call it pride, call it charge drops to $10 per acre
contentment, call it self- after the first 50 acres. There
satisfaction. Either way, it's os a minimum charge.of-$100.
stiton or ais For more' information about
dsomethibe. And g oen ly you can anyof these services, contact
describnate your vehicle. And wto then you Senior Forest Ranger. Buddy
donate your vehicle to the Broughton at (386)496-4944.
Kidney Cars Program, your Broughton at (386) 496-4944.
feel-good gift will provide
funds to help children who lGt u b to
suffer from kidney disease go Goat Club to
to camp, transport patients- to
dialysis and screen those at meet Jan. 26
risk for chronic kidney disease. The1 4-H Goat Club will
Your vehicles will also holds its next meeting on
pump dollars into public health Thursday, Jan. 26, at 6:30 p.m.
education, organ donation at the Bradford Fairgrounds
programs and medical research building p on i .S.t .301 N in
to prevent kidney disease. No Starke. The dateewas changed
wonder thousands of from Jan. 19 die to a
Americans have put the pedal scheduling conflict.
to the metal and accelerated. Other meeting dates 'will Ie
,their charitable giving at year's Feb. 16 and March 13. !
end by, donating to the Bradford and Union County
National Kidney Foundation's 4-H. yuth who are interested
Kidney Cars Program. To in participating in the 2006
donate online go to Bradford Youth Goat Show
www.kidney.ocg/support. should attend these meetings.
FFA members are also invited..
Legion Post For more information, cnll
,the Bradford County Extensiori
1 3 to meet, h i Offj, at (qQ4) 966-6224.

in Lake Butler will hold itW r l "I e va, o iiut jw-






Jan. 12, 2006 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 3A



County chairman feels Be a sweetheart to a soldier oversees UC
rl,-nv will e l+e f Courthouse is


wVUIlLy ll %III ) IS vI

growth


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the Union
County Board of County
Commissioners is quite
optimistic' about the growth the
county will see over the next
12 months.
County Chairman Wayne
Smith said he sees quite a bit
of development for 2006.
"There's going to be more
people in Union County than
you can shake a stick at,"
Smith said.
He was commenting on the
12 new subdivisions the
county approved in 2005.
Smith said that if just four'
people move into the 125 new
residences the county can
approve for subdivisions in
agricultural-zoned areas each
year, that 500 new residences
will be added to the county.
According to numbers from
the United States Census
Bureau, that could amount to a
5 percent increase in the
county's population each year.
While the growth will add
residents, it will also add
money to ad valorem taxes.
Grand Legacy LLP, the
developer of the Plantations of
Providence subdivision
estimates the average price of a
home in the development will
be $150,000. Smith said at that
price, the subdivision's 83
residences will add $207,500
in property tax revenue alone
each year. .
With the amount of growth
that is occurring, Smith
admitted that more
infrastructure, such as
emergency medical services,
law enforcement and solid
waste services would be
required. vut Smith said the
county would not look to add.
to those services until
development occurred.
"The county is looking to
add services as the county gets
bigger," Smith said. "We'll see
where we're going, and what
we need." -
' Smith said even if the.
county desired, there is no way
it could put the infrastructure
in place ahead of time.
"We just don't have the
funds to do it with," Smith
said. "We could probably
borrow it, but I doubt we could
borrow enough to do what we
want to do."
Smith said while the board
has discussed implementing an
impact fee for new growth, it is
not an option he is looking to
use. -
"I'm not in favor of impact
fees," Smith said.
Lack of funding. is also
keeping the county from
adding any services in the next
12 months.


"Right now we are not
looking at adding to any of the
services the county currently
provides," Smith said.
"Funding will just not allow
it."
Smith said the only growth
the county will experience in
2006 will be at the road
department.
"We are looking at building
one more records storage
facility, but that will be it,"
Smith said. "The facility will
be for the road department and
solid waste, and we'll add it
there."
According to Smith, the
building was part of the 2005-.
06 budget fiscal year. He said
unlike the records storage
facilities built last year that
were built with a state grant,
this one will come entirely
from county funding.
One other improvement the
county is I' king to complete
S'is at the O.J Phillips
recreational complex. Last
year the county received
$200,000 to upgrade the fields
at the complex. Smith said the
county is going to-use another
$100,000 grant to upgrade or
replace the building at the
facility.
"We got a $100,000 grant to
improve the facilities at the
park," Smith said. "We'll use
those funds to either refurbish
the current building or put up a
new metal building for extra
bathrooms."
Roads are one area where'
Smith expects some progress
in 2006.
"We recently finished C.R.
229 from Columbia County to
Baker County," Smith said.
"We will start resurfacing C.R.
18 next week. Once that's
complete, we'll move on to
C.R. 239A."
According to Smith, both
projects are being completed
with funds from the state. C.R.
18 will be funded using the
state's Small County Road
Assistance -Program. C.R.
239A will be repaved thanks to
the state's Small County
Outreach Program. Both allow
countiesAtqmn.aiain roads with
funding i[would,not otherwise
have4h b in;,b *. l.'
One area Smith said he sees
going in the right direction is
the county's current financial
situation.
"Right now. I don't
anticipate any difficulties with
the upcoming fiscal year,"
Smith said. "Everything looks
good and everything is -running
. smooth. We have ample funds
to keep us going from month
to month."
James Redmond can be
reached at (386) 496-2261 or
uctimes@alltel.net


Union county Riding Club

has first show of season


This Saturday night,.Jan.14,
the Union County RidingClub
will begin a new show season
for Union County riders.
The show promises to extra
special as the junior girl flag
team will be performing for the,
first time. The team consists of
2005 queen, Jessica Norris,
2005 princess and 2006 queen
contestant Mallory Martin,
Jessica Thornton', Amber
O'Neal, Amanda Parrish and
Kale Cubbedge who are also
running for the title of 2006
UCRC queen. junior girl riders'
Jessica O'Steen and Brittany
Kirkland join. the girls to
complete the team; .
'The girls will be presenting
our club colors as they ride to a
routine directed by Priscilla'
Seay. The team has worked
hard and this promises to be a


real, treat. They will be
performing at 6:45 p.m., just
before the ride begins.
'In other news, members are
reminded that the arena is open
Tuesday and Thursday -nights.
for practice. Also, club dues of
'$30 are due Jan. 14 before the
ride begins. Any points earned
will not be counted if dues are
not paid.
Members ofthe riding club
thanked the club's 2005
officers for a job well done.
They included President
Clenton Gay, Vice-President
Clarence Seay, secretaries Lori
Mehall and Sue Lagasse,
Treasurer Philip Lagasse and.
Arena Directors :Ronnie
Williams and John Johns.
"All members, let's get ready
to ride-2006 promises to be a
great year," said Janice
Parrish.


is~~


/

I, -~


A new initiative by the
Manhattanville My Soldier
program, I Heart My Soldier,
asks civilians to send a
heartfelt greeting to a soldier
deployed far from home for
Valentines Day.
The program hopes to ease
the hardship for soldiers who
are spending yet another
holiday away from family and
friends and was designed in
response to the letters and
emails received from soldiers
at www.mysoldier.com that
said the frequency of letters
and packages dramatically
declines after the December
Holidays.
"Traditionally Valentine's
Day is a time to reach out to
loved ones, family and friends"
said My Soldier co-founder,
active duty army sergeant and
Manhattanville College
student Juan Salas. "We are
asking that you consider
adding another group of
recipients to your list. Please
send a valentine to let a soldier
know you are thinking of him,
or to thank her for all she has
done."
While the regular My
Soldier program attempts to
foster an ongoing pen-pal
relationship, I Heart My
Soldier is tailored to those
groups or individuals who
want to send some support
without making a continuing
commitment. Participants may
opt to adopt one soldier or an
entire platoon but must be
willing to send each a care
package that includes the
following items:
'Homemade valentines.
'Traditional Valentines
candy such as sweethearts
"Conversation Hearts and/or
Hershey Kisses and a small
"friendly" gift such as warm
socks or a stuffed animal.
Salas, who spent 14 months
in Iraq, where he saw active
combat duty and was
commended for: his part in
saving the life of a child, has
first-hand knowledge of what
such a project means to
soldiers there. His mission was


guidelines for writing letters to
their deployed United States
Armed Serviceperson and a
red My Soldier bracelet to
publicly show their support for
American troops. The program
is free, but donations are
encouraged from those
participants that can afford it.
Since Manhattanville President
Richard A. Berman and active
U.S. Army Sergeant Juan
Salas-who also is a
Manhattanville student-
launched My Soldier, at a
Veterans' Day press
conference in 2004 lover
400,000 participants have
signed up to adopt over
175,000 deployed military
personnel.


to "win the hearts and minds of
the Iraqi people. It was long,"
said Salas. "But the thing that
kept me going was getting
letters and cards from families,
kids, boy scouts, students, my
teachers and yes strangers.
Receiving heartfelt messages
from unfamiliar people who
cared about me was uplifting.
Each letter was like a piece of
gold. Something you will keep
for the rest of your life."
Those wishing to participate
are asked to contact
Manhattanville My Soldier
Project Coordinator, Mike
Seminara, before January 23rd
by phone at (914) 323-5439 or
email seminaram@mville.edu
to select a soldier or platoon
for whom to provide Valentine
cards and gifts. The My
Soldier team has.assembled a
Hot List with suggested items
for a Valentine Care Package
that stresses the importance of
handmade cards since they
have demonstrate you care
more than a store-bought card
ever could.
"Homemade cards are the
best" Salas said. "Soldiers are
really touched when they get
handwritten cards with
personal messages, or an
individual's artwork. This is
such a simple way to express
gratitude and show support for
our troops while providing.
them with something they will
truly appreciate, even cherish."
For more information about
the I Heart My Soldier
program or how to participate -
visit www.mysoldier.com and
click on the "I Heart My
Soldier" link.
My Soldier is a program that
puts politics aside aid lets U.S.
soldiers know that someone
back home cares. The goal of
the program is to show support
for troops serving in hardship
areas Iraq, Afghanistan,
Africa by establishing pen-
pal relationships with them.
When a person enrolls in the
My Soldier program, they
agree to adopt a soldier. They
receive .a starter kit with


City of Lake
Butler meets
second Monday
of month
The city of Lake Butler city
commission meets the second
Monday of month' beginning
at 5:15 p.m. Commissioners
meet in the commission's
chambers inside city hall'
located at 200 S. W. 1t Street
in Lake Butler For more
information, call (386) 496-
3401.


Older


Americans Act
helps UC
seniors
The Older Americans Act
provides a variety of services
to seniors in Union County.
Home delivered meals,
nutrition education, telephone
reassurance, recreation, health
support and congregate meals
are just some of the many
services the program offers.
Fro more information about
the program, contact the
Suwanee River Economic
Council at<386) 496-2342; : .
go -'.a UDn ^SiiO -l i''W


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closed for
holiday
The Union County
Courthouse will be closed
Monday, Jan. 16, to celebrate
Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
The office will reopen on
Tuesday, Jan. 17.


UCBOCC meets
third of each
month
The Union County Board
of County Commissioner
meets on the third Monday of
each month at 7 p.m.
Commissioners meet in the
board room located inside the
Union County Courthouse
located at 55 W Main St. in
Lake Butler. For more
information, call (386)
4964241.


Newfoundland and
Labrador are on
Newfoundland time,
which is one-half hour
ahead of Atlantic time
in eastern Canada and :
1-1/2 hours ahead of,
Eastern time.



Town of WS
meets first
Tuesday of
month
The town of Worthington
Springs holds its monthly
meeting of the first Tuesday
of each month at the
Worthington Springs
Volunteer Fire Department
beginning at 7 p.m. The
station is located on S.R. 121
in Worthington Springs.






Page 4A UNION COUNTY TIMES Jan. 12, 2006


STROKE
Continued from p. 1A
administer the drug.
"We are currently working
on trials and protocol that
would allow EMS personnel to
give stroke patients the drug,"
Xavier said. "It all relates to
the patient receiving it in the
three-hour window."
So what else are doctors
doing to help patients once
EMS personnel get them to the


"Even if they go away, don't
ignore them. Rapid diagnosis
and treatment are the key to a
successful recovery."

Risk factors for
stroke
The American Heart
Association has also identified
several risk factors, both
controlled and uncontrolled,
that could lead to a stroke.
Those that an individual can
control include:
High blood pressure.


hospital? Tobacco use.
"Our program is a dedicated Diabetes.
stroke unit that takes a more Heart disease.
comprehensive look at a 0 High cholesterol.
patient," Xavier said. 'Physical inactivity
According to Xavier, most 'Obesity.
stroke patients who are not Excessive alcohol.
treated by a stroke unit die 0 Use of some illegal drugs.
within six weeks of their Risk factors that can not be
stroke, controlled included:
"Stroke units cut this Increasing age.
mortality rate by half," Xavier Gender.
said. "There are several ways Heredity and race.
we go about doing this." Prior stroke or heart attack.
One tool doctors are using to
detect the source of a stroke is James Redmond can be
what is known as a 64 slice reached at (386) 496-2261 or
scanner. As its name implies, uctimes@alltel.net
the device scans the brain and
shows it in 64 different layers.
The scan takes approximately SHINE looking
10 minutes and-according to
Xavier, is far more for volunteers
comprehensive than a CT scan. i
"The scan helps us in
determine where a problem is Are you looking for a
occurring," Xavier said. "This flexible volunteer opportunity
helps us to not only treat it that enables you to make a real
quickly, but more effectively difference in the .lives of
as well." seniors in your community?
Other medications doctors Do you like to help others
are using to treat strokes are resolve problems? If you
those that bust the clot into answered yes to these
pieces. questions, then the Florida
"There are four medications Department of Elder Affairs,
that, in trials, worked better may have the perfect volunteer
than was expected," Xavier position for you.
said. "While their success rate Volunteers are needed in
is high, they are very limited in Union County for the award-
their scope of use." winning Serving Health
According to Xavier, the Insurance Needs of Elders'
medications must be used Program. SHINE is a free
within three hours of the Medicare and health insurance
patient having their stroke. information and counseling
They can only be used in program that helps elders make
specific situations as well. .informed decisions. SHINE
"These drugs can only be counseling takes place at
used on patients that have had designated community centers
a mild to moderate stroke," or by telephone.
Xavier said. "Even then they Seniors and their caregivers
must be used within the three receive information and
hour window." assistance on programs that
For those patients where may help to reduce their health
medication does not work, insurance and, prescription
doctors are using mechanical medidaTfi'b "c6sst;' "-SHINEIL
de ices to open blocked-.-v.o.luantete-s..help Medicare
path\Nays. Xaier said %hile recipients compare
there are several devices used supplemental insurance
by doctors, none of them work policies, interpret coverage,
in every situation. and review Medicare and
One of the most popular health insurance forms. SHINE
devices in use is known as the volunteers can also help
Merci Device. It is a wire that seniors understand the hnew
has several coils at the end. Medicare prescription drug
Doctors insert the' wire into the benefit.
pathway that is blocked. The Free comprehensive training
coil grabs the clot and it is is provided. Please contact the
removed. Elder Help Line.and tell them
"But the coil cannot always' you would"like to find out
grab the clot," Xavier said. more about becoming a
"Even if it can, it does not SHINE volunteer.
always completely remove the Apply now for SSHINE's
clot." next training class. For more
One last device is currently information, call (800) .262-
in clinical trials. The device 2243.
mirrors that of one used to
break up kidney stones. Ultra NCFA observes
sonic waves are sent out from
the device. The waves are FOlic Acid
designed to break the clot into A
small pieces that are able to Awareness
pass through the blood stream.
"But all our advances come W
back to the time it takes for a The National Council on
patient to first receive Folic Acid (NCFA) will
treatment," Xavier said. "If a observe National Folic Acid
patient does not get to us in Awareness Week, January 9-
time, his or her brain is gone." 15, 2006, by helping Hispanic
wnmt...-- nnl--,tnn th- d h b fi


Signs and symptoms
of. a stroke
The American Heart
Association has identified
several signs and symptoms
that indicate someone might be
experiencing a stroke. They
include:
O Sudden numbness or
weakness of the face, arm or
leg, especially on one side of
the body.
Sudden confusion, trouble
speaking or understanding.
Sudden trouble seeing in
one or both eyes.
Sudden trouble' walking,
dizziness, loss of. balance or
coordination.
Sudden, severe headache
with no known cause.
-"It is important to seek
medical attention immediately
if you experience any of these
symptoms," Xavier said.


women unll erstania tl UIeneIi ts
of increasing folik acid
consumption as a part of their
regular diet.
Hispanic women in the
United States have 1.5 to 2
times higher risk of delivering,
babies with neural tube defects
(NTDs), serious birth defects
of the.brain and the spine, than
non-Hispanic whites. Research
indicates that consumption of
folic acid before and during
early pregnancy can lower the
rate of NTDs by up to 70
percent.
""Helping Hispanic women
and their families to
understand the role folic acid
can play in reducing neural
tube defects is a priority for
this initiative," says Adriane
Griffen, chair of the NCFA.
"We need to educate 'all
women, especially Latinas,
that folic acid can help prevent
birth defects such as spina
bifida, which is the most


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common, permanently
disabling birth defect. As half
of all pregnancies are
unplanned, all women who
have started their menstrual
cycle should take folic acid,
whether or not they are
planning to become pregnant."
The U.S. Public Health
Service recommends that all
women of childbearing age
take 400 micrograms of the B
vitamin folic acid daily by
taking a multivitamin and
consuming fortified grains as a
part of a healthy diet.
Increasing consumption of
folic acid among Latina
populations may be the easiest
way to decrease the number of
pregnancies affected by NTDs.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention, Hispanic women


have the lowest reported folic
acid consumption of any racial
or ethnic group, and NTDs
occur with the most frequency
among Latina populations in
the United States.
The National Council on
Folic Acid is a partnership of
national organizations,
associations and state folic
acid councils reaching over
100 million people a year with
the folic acid message.For
more information about folic
acid and National Folic Acid
Awareness Week, visit
www.folicacidinfo.org.


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2, 2006 uii.N COUN I .'S Page 5A


CVS College to host
Continued from p. 1A science and


Bishop.
Several other commissioners
agreed with Bishop's
statements. Tillis went on to
discuss the benefits CVS
would receive if they annexed
the property.
"Anyone outside the city
limits is outside our fire
service area," Tillis said. "I
would think that a an ISO 4
rating would heavily offset the
2:25 mills they are going to
have to pay in property tax."
Tillis was referring to the
city's rating it has with
insurance companies. The
lower an ISO rating an area
-has, the less many residents
pay for homeowner's
insurance. The ratings are
based on the amount of fire
protection service in a given
area. To compare these ratings,
any homeowner outside the
city limits in Union County has
a rating of 9. It is the highest
rating the ISO gives.
Tillis also pointed out that
* the city has no way to recoup'
capital outlay for anyone not
inside the city limits.
"We have no impact fees,
we simply have the cost of the
service," Tillis said. "If a water
customer comes into the city,
then at least there is some
other revenue collected to help
offset some of the costs to the
city."
Tillis said this fact was
illustrated in customers who
have water service, but whose
property is not annexed.
"These customers pay a 25
percent upcharge for service,"
Tillis said. "But that doesn't do
anything to replace capital."
According to Tillis, what he
was really looking for was
something in writing to present
to the company to show that
this was the board's policy.
"I know we did something at
one time to make this a policy,
it's just been so long ago that I
can't find it;" Tillis said. "I'm
asking the board to make a
motion to reaffirm that this is
the policy they want to
follow."
Tillis told the board that he
felt it was the best way the city
could tackle the issue.
"This has been our approach
for seirael..years," Tillis said..
"I bSR t-l-"6Ein'the best:
interest of the growth of the
city and the utility system."
Tillis told the council he
indicated to CVS that they
would be responsible for
putting in the necessary
hardware to receive water
service.
"I conveyed to them that
they would be responsible for
putting in their own lines and a
pump station," Tillis said. "I
did point out to them that; if
they annexed, we would be in
a position to apply for
economic development grants
to assist them based on jobs
created. We can't do that if
they stay out in the county."
Tillis told the board that he
felt; he needed the board to rule
on the matter.
"In the letter I got from
CVS, it asked if I had anything
that I could show them that
this was a policy," Tillis said.
"What I could convey, is that
the; board voted and that it
reaffirmed this policy."
Commissioner Lynn Bishop
made the motion that we
reiterate that it is the city's
policy to expect annexation
into the city by any entity that
desires to receive water and
wastewater utility service. The
motion passed 5-0.
Tillis told the board he
would draft a resolution to this
affect and have it ready for the
Snext commission meeting.

r Jzmes Redmond can be
Reached at (386) 496-2261 or
ucttmes@alltel.net


engineering
fairs
LCCC hosts the '2006
Columbia County Science and
Engineering Fair and Regional
I Science and Engineering Fair.
The local Columbia County
Science and Engineering Fair
will be hosted by Lake City
Community College. The
annual fair will be held
January 18 &19 in the Howard
Gymnasium on LCCC campus.
The fair includes projects from
elementary, middle, and high
schools in the county.
The fair this year includes
approximately 250 student
projects in the fields of
behavioral and social science,
chemistry, biochemistry,
botany, computer science,
earth and space science,
. engineering, environmental,
medicine and health,
microbiology, physics and
zoology. /
LCCC students will judge
the elementary projects and 30
local community business
leaders wi' judge the middle
and high school projects. First,
second and third place ribbons
will be awarded at each
educational level. The 40 Best
in Fair of the advanced levels
will go on to compete in the
Regional Science and
Engineering Fair. Judging of
the projects will take place on
Wednesday, January 18 from 8
a.m.-3 p.m. Open house for the
community will be on the 18
from 3 p.m.- 6 p.m. The
awards ceremony will be held
on Thursday, January 19, 6-7
p.m. for elementary and 7:30-
8:30 p.m. for middle and high
school in the Alfonso Levy
Performing Arts Center on
campus.
The Suwannee Valley
Regional Science and
Engineering Fair will also be
held on the Lake City
Community College campus
February 22 and 23.. The
region is comprised of 10
counties: Columbia, Union,
Suwannee, Bradford,
Hamilton, Lafayette,. Baker,
Gilchrist, Dixie, and Madison.
Judging of -the projects will
take place on Wednesday,
February 22 from 8 a.m.-3
^ p'mI- .-perihous^ f.9r th$e
- comni iiyj:ill-be-on the" 22-
from 3 p.m.- 6 p.m. The
awards ceremony will be held
on Thursday, February 23, 10
a,,m. in the Alfonso Levy
Performing Arts Center on
campus. The winners will be
able to participate in'the State
Science and Engineering Fair
in Orlando, Florida on April
20. Some students from prior
fairs have even made it to the
International competition.
Katie Reichert and Jessica
Stanton, both current students
at Columbia High School have
made it to the International
fair. Jessica Stanton placed
fourth in the 2005 Intel
International Science and
Engineering Fair in Phoenix,
Arizona. The 2006 Intel
International Science and
Engineering Fair will be held
in Indianapolis, Indiana, May
7-13, 2006.
The fairs are coordinated by
Charleen Kelley, Columbia
High School instructor, Renae
Allen, Union County High
School instructor and
facilitated by LCCC faculty
member Dr. Cheryl Boice,
science professor and Dr.
David Murdock (retired) PCS
engineer.
For more information,
contact Chaileen Kelley at
Columbia High School, Renae
Allen at Union County High
School (386) 496-4811 or
Cheryl Boice at LCCC (386)
754-4251.


Emery named

Sunshine

Scholar
Austin Emery, a graduating
senior at Union County High
School, has been designated
the Union District Sunshine
State Scholar in Mathematics
and Science for the current
year. He will compete with the
other 74 district scholars from
around Florida on Thursday,
Jan. 19, to become one of the
six regional scholars who then
will vie in March for the title
Statewide Sunshine State
Scholar in Mathematics and
Science for 2006.
The six regional scholars and
their teachers receive further
recognition from the governor
and cabinet, the Florida
legislature, he department of
education and private
businesses.
Established in 1997, the
Sunshine State Scholars
Program is coordinated through
the Florida Institute of
Education at the University of
North Florida and receives its
major financial support from
the Florida Department of
Education, the Florida Lottery,
and the Technological Research
and Development Foundation.
Further information can be
found on the Web at
http://www.unf.edu/dept/sunshi
ne/.

LEGALS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 63-2005-CA-0025
CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff
vs.
DEBORAH L. FLOYD; PACIFIC
PREMIER BANK F/K/A LIFE BANK;
THE PROVIDENT BANK; BEN
CAMPEN; DONALD E. FLOYD;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BEN
CAMPEN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF DEBORAH L. FLOYD;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD
E. FLOYD; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Motion and Order
Resetting Foreclosure Sale Dated the
22nd day of December, 2005, and
entered in Case No. 63-2005-CA-
0025, of the Circuit Court of the 8th
..Judicial, ,, ,it .-in .and for Union


(904)
964-5764


County, Florida, wherein CITIBANK,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE, is the Plaintiff
and DEBORAH L. FLOYD; PACIFIC
PREMIER BANK F/K/A LIFE BANK;
THE PROVIDENT BANK; BEN
CAMPEN; DONALD E. FLOYD;
UNKNOWN SPOUSF FP RBEN


Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
1/52tchg. 1/12


I
E
S
V
C
A
1
N


CAMPEN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE M
OF DEBORAH L. FLOYD; EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN A
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD AND FOR UNION COUNTY, 5
E. FLOYD; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE FLORIDA T
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN CASE NO. 2005-CA-04 N
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT CIVIL ACTION M
PROPERTY are the defendants. I will MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC C
sell to the highest and best bidder for REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., S
cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF Plaintiff, L
COURTHOUSE at the Union County vs. F
Courthouse, in LAKE BUTLER, CHRISTIE L. FORSYTH, et al, B
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 26th day Defendant(s) H
of January, 2006, the following NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED P
described property as set forth in said FORECLOSURE SALE C
Final judgment, towit: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN D
Mortgage: LOT 49-B OF UPLAND pursuant to an Order Rescheduling S
PINES PLANTATION foreclosure Sale dated Dec. 14,2005 A
DESCRIPTION and entered in Case No. 2005-CA-04 R
A TRACT OF LAND LYING IN of the Circuit Court of the EIGHTH C
SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP "6 Judicial Circuit in and for UNION D
SOUTH, RANGE 18 EAST, UNION County, Florida wherein T
COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC VW
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., G
FOLLOWS: is the Plaintiff and CHRISTIE t. T
COMMENCING AT THE FORSYTH, UNKNOWN D
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF D
SECTION 20 (ALSO BEING THE THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY
NORTHWEST CORNER OF N/K/A ALBERT PERRY; UNION C
SECTION 21) AND THENCE RUN COUNTY, A POLITICAL c
N 86027'24" E ALONG THE NORTH SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF D
LINE OF SECTION 21, A FLORIDA; UNKNOWN PERSON T
DISTANCE OF 2021.94 FEET; (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE D
THENCE S 246'29" E, A SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY N/K/A
DISTANCE OF 619.62 FEET TO ALBERT PERRY are the Defendants, N
THE NORTH .RIGHT-OF-WAY I will sell to the highest and best M
LINE (R/W) OF SARA LANE; bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR D
THENCE S 3032'36" E, A OF THE MIDDLE OF THE UNION T
DISTANCE OF 60 FEET TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 11 U
SOUTH R/W LINE OF SARA LANE; a.m. on the 19th day of Jan. 2006, the A
THENCE S 86027'24" W, ALONG following described property as set F
SAID SOUTH R/W LINE, A forth in said Final Judgment: W,
DISTANCE OF 1955.00 FEET TO A PARCEL OF LAND LYING, th
THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF BEING AND SITUATE IN SECTION
A TANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE 4, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE
TO THE SOUTH, HAVING A 19 EAST, UNION COUNTY,
RADIUS OF 1115.92 FEET AND A FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2342'25"; DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: E
THENCE WESTERLY ALONG COMMENCE AT THE P
SAID R/W CURVE, A DISTANCE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF Ta
OF 461.73 FEET TO THE END OF. SECTION 4, THENCE RUN Fp
SAID CURVE; THENCE S 3032'38" NORTH 00 DEGREES 59 A
E, A DISTANCE OF 174.41 FEET MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, In
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID D
THENCE CONTINUE S 3032'38" E, SECTION 4, A DISTANCE OF di
A DISTANCE OF 309.40 FEET TO 1297.48 FEET TO A POINT OF THE ai
THE NORTH R/W LINE OF A 40 SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY pr
FOOT COUNTY ROAD; THENCE LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. S- 3
S 87013'09" W, ALONG SAID R/W 796; THENCE RUN NORTH 87 (\
LINE, A DISTANCE OF 142.23 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 20 S
FEET; THENCE N 3032'38" WEST, SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
A DISTANCE OF 309.40 FEET; SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
THENCE N 87013A09" E, A LINE, A DISTANCE OF 842.77
DISTANCE OF 142.23 FEET TO FEET TO THE POINT OF TI
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; SAID CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO C
DESCRIBED TRACT THE LEFT; THENCE RUN M
CONTAINING 1.010 ACRES, EASTERLY, CONTINUING ALONG F
MORE OR LESS. SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF- C
In accordance with the Americans WAY LINE, ALONG THE ARC OF A C
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (AQA), CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY p.
disabled persons who, because of AND HAVING A RADIUS OF T
their disabilities, need special 1472.40 FEET, A CHORD BEARING pi
accommodation to participate in this OF NORTH 80 DEGREES 01 p
proceeding should contact the ADA MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST w
Coordinator at 55 W. Main Street, AND A CHORD DISTANCE OF sl
Room 103, Lake Butler, FL 32054 or 402.38 FEET TO THE POINT OF B
Telephone Voice/TDD (904) 496- TANGENCY; THENCE RUN 3:
3711 prior to such proceeding. NORTH 72 DEGREES 09 0o
Dated this 28th day of December, MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, N
2005. CONTINUING ALONG SAID m
REGINA PARRISH .SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY ci
Clerk of the Circuit Court LINE, A DISTANCE OF 191.9.05 S
By: Julia Croft FEET TO THE POINT OF
*D. .-urvC ,, u C Ry E Of, A. CURVE. TO,


TTt RIGHT; THENCE' FUN
EASTERLY, CONTINUING ALONG
SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-
VAY LINE, ALONG THE ARC OF A
CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHERLY
AND HAVING A RADIUS OF
869.86 FEET, A CHORD BEARING
IORTH 80 DEGREES 21
MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST
AND A CHORD DISTANCE OF
33.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF
AGENCY; THENCE RUN
IORTH 88 DEGREES 33
MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST,
CONTINUINGG ALONG SAID
OUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
INE, A DISTANCE OF 293.97
EET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE
HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED
ARCEL OF LAND; THENCE
CONTINUE RUNNING NORTH 88
DEGREESS 33 MINUTES 15
SECONDS EAST, CONTINUING
LONG SAID SOUTHERLY
IGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD NO. S-796, A
INSTANCE OF 186.56 FEET TO
HE INTERSECTION OF THE
NEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A
RADED COUNTY ROAD;
HENCE RUN SOUTH 05
DEGREES 13 MINUTES 01..
SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
VEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A
COUNTY GRADED ROAD, A
DISTANCE OF 152.34 FEET:-
HENCE RUN SOUTH 88-
EGREES 33 MINUTES 15
SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF
86.56 FEET; THENCE RUN
ORTH 05 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST A
DISTANCE OF 152.34 FEET TO
HE POINT OF BEGINNING,
NION COUNTY, FLORIDA. -
/K/A RR 4, Box 3330, Lake Butler,
L32054
VITNESS MY HAND and the seal of-
his Court on Oec. 27,2005.
REGINA PARRISH
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Julia Croft
Deputy Clerk -
chevarria, Codilis & Stawiarski
.0. Box 25018
ampa, Florida 33622-5018
05014379
mericans with Disabilities Act
i accordance with the Americans-
isabilities Act, persons with
disabilities requesting reasonable
accommodation to participate in the'
proceeding should'contact (904) 496-
711 (Voice) or (904) 374-3639
Voice or TDD) or via Florida Relay
service at 1-800-955-8771.
1/52tchg.1/12


PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
he Board of Directors of the Florida
rown Workforce Board will meet on
monday, January 23, 2006.at' the
lorida Crown Employers' Service
enter, 840 SW Main Blvd., Lake
ity, Florida. Meeting time is 4:00
.m.
hese meetings are oped 'to the
public.
erson(s) interested in participating
ho have a disability requiring
special assistance should contact
renda Cruz, 386-755-9026, ext.
220. TTY users dial 711 and ask the
operator to dial 386-755-9026. -
otice has been made of this
meeting, through publication, to
comply with the "Government in the
unshine" Law.
1/12 ltchg


20-yat 84pwriene
ON ALL OFFICE MACHINE REPAIRS

, FL FAX:
.o (904) 964-6905


.,oh


o PGAetED


THE OFFICE SHOP


Heads are wisest when they are cool, and hearts are
strongest when they beat in response to noble ideals.
-Ralph J. Bunche


The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you're
still a rat.
-Lily Tomlin
t*


I 'IO ofROAL goier


110 W. Call St., Starke
,Ct us quote yur Nert forer.


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I I







Page 6A UNION COUNTY TIMES Jan. 12, 2006


The 2004 hurricane season in Florida was historic not only for the number of named storms that
struck the state, but also for the amount of damage caused. The 2005 season, already underway,
has produced a tropical storm and a hurricane that have made landfall along the northern Gulf of


Mexico.
Some of the storm damage sustained in 2004
involved the infrastructure of Florida's investor-
owned electric utilities, including power lines,
poles, substations and transformers. The five
investor-owned utilities under the jurisdiction
of the Florida PSC (Florida Power &-Lighlt,
Progress Energy Florida, Tampa Electric
Company, Gulf Power Company, and Florida
Public Utilities Company) reported damages
of $1.45 billion from hurricanes Char!.y,
Frances, Ivan and Jeanne.. These utilities
combined are responsible for approximately
78 percent of the state's retail electric energy
sales to about 8.6 million customers.

The extent of the damages and the power
outages caused by the storms led many in
Florida to ask whether the state should adopt
a policy of burying its power lines. A statewide
decision on this matter rests with the
Legislature. However, the Public Service
Commission was asked by the Florida House
of Representatives to provide an estimate of
what it might cost, over a 10-year period, to
put transmission and distribution lines
underground.

The preliminary estimates of the cost of placing
transmission and distribution lines
underground is $146 billion. This figure applies
only to the lines owned by the investor-owned
electric companies and does not include those
operated by.-municipal utilities or electric
cooperatives.

Florida's investor-owned utilities have a total
of 14,566 miles of transmission lines, the value
of which is about $2.4 billion, only 183 miles
of which are underground. Transmission lines
are those that carry high voltage current -
typically 69,000 to 500,000 volts significant
distances. A transmission normally ends at
an electric substation, where the voltage is
reduced for distribution. The estimated cost
to bury these transmission lines is $52 billion.

Those same utilities have approximately
115,961 miles of primary distribution lines
worth an estimated $7 billion. Distribution lines


Dial a Story
available to
children
-_Young children-ol -Unfi-
County are in\ ned to call Dial
a Story. Children can hear a
story by calling (386) 496-
2542. Dial a Story is free
telephone service provided by
the Union County Public
Library. Stories are geared
toward children ages 12 and
younger. Stories are changed
weekly. For more
information, call (386) 496-
3432.


SREC offers
home repair
help
Is your home suffering
from draftiness,- leaky roof,
lack of insulation, restricted
entrance or lack of heated
water? If-so, the Suwannee
River Economic Council has
a program that may help pay
for those needed repairs.
Assistance is based on
income. Applications for the
program can be picked up at
SREC, located on S.R. .231.
across from Tigers Den
Daycare in Lake Butler. For
more information, call (386)
496-2342.


Historical
society accepts
items
The Union County
Historical Society accepts
historical items for the
Marjorie Driggers Museum
every Monday from 9 a.m.
until noon. The museum is
located on S.R. 100 in Lake
Butler in the Townsend
Building. For more
information, contact Cindy
North at (386) 496-3044.


normally transport lower voltage current -
usually 2,400 to 35,0.00 volts shorter
distances. Distribution lines may take
electricity to "step-down" transformers for
distribution directly to homes and businesses.
The estimated cosftf burying distribution lines
is $94 billion.

Because these figures are estimates, they
could change substantially subject to a number
of variables.

Some cities and counties in Florida require
power lines in new residential developments
be placed underground. In addition, in the
wake of the 2004 hurricane season, a number
of communities around the state have initiated
plans to bury power lines.

A decision to place power lines underground
is one that is carefully weighed by those
communities engaged in the process.
Underground power lines may be less
vulnerable to wind damage, for example, but
may be more susceptible to flooding. Cost is
a major factor as is the additional time required
to diagnose and repair underground facilities
when problems do occur.

Elected officials, with their unique grasp of
their local communities, are the logical
decision-makers on the cost-benefit of placing
electric facilities underground.



Five investor owned utilities.
33 municipal utilities.
18 rural electric cooperatives,
including two located outside Florida,
serving customers in the state.

Braulio L. Baez Is the Chairman of the Florida
Public Service Commission. The PSC sets the
rates regulated utility companies charge for
natural gas, electric and telephone service
within the state. In 36 counties, it sets the price
you pay for the water you drink, if your water
company is privately owned.


UCHS offers
tutoring
classes
.- .Uion County' High-School
will be offering tutoring
classes Monday-Thursday
from 3:15 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
Subjects can receive help in a
variety of areas. Parents
wishing to enroll their
children can pick up an
application at UCHS front
office. For more information,
contact Geraldine Griffis at
(386) 496-3040 ext. 4946.


Trust also your own
judgment, for it is your
most reliable counselor. A
man's mind has sometimes
a way of telling him more
than seven watchmen
posted on a high tower.
-Ecclesiasticus


Accident prompts action
When Hilda Mallard was involved in an accident at S.R.. 238 and S.W. 9th Ave. in Lake
Butler, she decided it was time someone do something about the dangerous
intersection. For years the crossing has been known as the scene of more than its
share of accidents. After Mallard went to city officials and nothing could be done she
went directly to the state. She contacted the Florida Department of Transportation to
see what could be done. "And she stayed on them," sid Lake Butler City Manage
Richard TIllisdnrust-a-short time, DOT contacted the city to see what could-be--
worked out.'T"We told-them if the would supply the materials we would supply the
labor," said Tillis. A deal was struck and the state provided the city with two
oversized stop signs and two flashing lights to adorn them. The city promptly
installed them and the state will pay the city to maintain them. Pictured with the new
traffic fixture, from I-r, are Commissioners Jimmy Beasley and Fletcher Myers, city
employee and county commissioner Ricky Jenkins, Mayor Brantley Crawford,
Mallard, Jim Itocha representative with DOT, city engineer Hardy Clyatt, John
Romanski with DOT and Tillis.


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Section B: Thursday, January 12, 2006





News from Bradford Counrty, Union County and the Lake Region area


BHS gospel mass choir a


'Long' time coming


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Telegraph Staff Writer
-Verdell Long has been
teaching for more than four
decades.
Most of those years have
been in Bradford County with
her four children and husband,
Harvey.
Long received her degree
from the University of Florida
and started teaching
exceptional student education
in 1978.
Her college professors told
her it was a field that she
would only be able to stay in
for maybe five years.
"I've been in the same
profession all my career,"
Long said. "I love what I do."
Through the years, she has
seen a lot of changes.
When Long graduated from
high school, it was still
segregated. This influenced
what kind of teacher she
wanted to be.
"I don't see colors," she
said. "I see children who have
needs."
From 1983 to 1984, she
started a gospel choir at BHS.
When she moved to Southside
Elementary School and later
Bradford Middle School to
continue her career, the high
school's gospel choir didn't
continue without her.
Within the past few years,
the idea of restarting the
gospel choir seemed like an
attainable goal for some BHS
students.
They asked Long for help,
and she was happy to sponsor
them.



Pesticide
-cannot be
used for
termite
control
Florida Agriculture and
-Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson recently reminded
builders, pest control operators
and consumers that insecticides
containing a particular active
ingredient chlorpyrifos -
cannot be used for termite
control as of Jan. 1, 2006.
At one time this product was
the most widely used method
for termite protection, but this
use has been removed as a
result of a federal registration
action. The department has
removed' all products
containing chlorpyrifos from
the list of products registered
for termite protection on its
Web site.
This action does not affect
other legal uses of the product.
Pest control products
containing chlorpyrifos can
still be used as an insecticide
for one of the other uses found
on the label of the product,
including treating underground
utility cable and conduit (non-
residential), utility poles and
fence posts (non-residential),.
treatment of railroad ties,-
landscape timbers, logs, pallets,
and other wood products in
manufacturing, industrial, or
right-of-way settings, and pest
control on outside surfaces and
around buildings in industrial
sites such I as commercial
facilities, office buildings, and
other non-residential buildings.
For information on the
registered termiticides approved
for .preventive treatment of
termites, please consult the
table of "Termiticides
Registered in Florida for
Preventive Treatment of New
Construction" located at
http://www.flaes.org the web
- site of-theiElorida Department
Sof Agriculture and Consumer
Services, Division Agricultural
and Environmental Services.
SPest control companies and
consumers who hiiave products--
that can no longer be used for
termite control can take
advantage of the "Operation
SCleansweep" program operated
..... jointly- bythe- department and.
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. This
program -will collect and
dispose of cianeled, suspended,
or unusable pesticides at no
cost.(with some exceptions).
Consumers with questions
about pest control should call
the department's toll-free help


line at 1-800-HELPFLA (1-
800-435-7352) for information.


She was not able to get the
gospel choir up and running
last year, but the idea was still
in the students' minds.
"Students were interested in
it enough to approach me
about it [this year]," she said.


The BHS Gospel Mass
Choir now has 33 members.
Mass means that the choir-is
nondenominational.
BHS students Harold
English plays the piano and
drums for the choir.


He said he joined the choir
so he could "praise the Lord
while I have a chance."
Patrise Jackson, a teacher at
BHS, and Alice Searcy, a
grandparent of two choir
members, also help Long with


the students and their music.
Searcy said the reason she
volunteers with the choir is
because she is interested in
seeing young people advance
in life.
"Singing brings out the love


in your heart," she said.
The choir practices two days
a week after school for almost
two hours in Long's

See GOSPEL, p. 3B


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-SINS, '61,


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Superintendent of Schools HaIry
Hatcher told the Starke Rotary Club
last Wednesday the events of the past
few months have been traumatic for
him and he is glad the situation has
eased, allowing the Bradford County
school system to move along with its
mission of teaching children.
While the situation was hectic for
students and faculty, it was a learning
experience for the superintendent and
his administration. He was forthright
in saying the lesson is, "Go with your
gut instinct," and secondly, "Trust the
people."
Hatcher outlined the situation at
Bradford High School in which a
female student was allegedly fondled
by male students, and was later beaten
by two or more female students in
retaliation for "ratting" on the boys. A
few days later she was beaten again,
and unconfirmed rumors circulated
throughout the community, some of
which were patently untrue.
On advice from council and other
advisors, the school administration
kept quiet, thinking the talk would die
of its own accord, but the second
episode added fuel to the fire,
resulting in, the rumors expanding at
the expense of the school system. In a
regularly scheduled school board
meeting only three people asked
permission to speak to the board and
did so, but another newspaper falsely
reported that the superintendent
wouldn't let everyone speak.
The situation was getting out of
hand, climbing rapidly toward critical
mass, requiring the superintendent to
go public with the situation as seen by
school administrators and personnel.
A town hall meeting was called to


allow the public to vent its opinions
and feelings and provide a forum for
school administrators to present their
version of the situation.
Hatcher thought that "maybe a
hundred folks would attend," but
when he arrived cars were
everywhere, and 400-500 people were
in attendance. Everyone that wanted
to speak had the opportunity, and the
people took advantage of the occasion
to berate the school for every real and
imaginary situation. f
In the meantime, the victim's home
and a neighbor's home had been set
fire, with evidence pointing to arson,
and investigators found evidence
implicating the victim in the school
beating case. This information
discredited, to some extent, the
charges she had made in the school
case, and Hatcher could feel the
animosity toward the school system
begin to subside.
Hatcher resolved to cast aside
advice to remain quiet "and hope for
the best" by advisors and level with
the public. He faced the audience and
told it the school system had moved
quickly and expeditiously, using
every legal means to determine the
veracity of the charges, to determine
the identify of the perpetrators and
improve surveillance of halls and rest
rooms.
His rebuttal was warmly accepted
and committees formed to look at
various elements of the system and
make recommendations for
improvements.
Stonewalling may have its place in
some situations, but, as Hatcher says,
"Trust the people."
By Buster Rahn, Editorial Writer


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


What is-
'Intelligent

Design', ?
Dear Editor:
During the last few months I
have heard of or read many
articles concerning the theory
of "Intelligent Design." Most
articles show that the authors
either never read the books or
somehow just can't grasp the
concept. When an evolutionary
scientist ridicules Intelligent
Design they never have
answers to what questions
Michael Behe (1) or Michael
Denton (2) ask in their books.
There is, to date, no:
evolutionary explanation of
life's foundation at the
chemical level. I find this most
fascinating because it gives
insight into a war that is being
waged, and it is a war within
two camps of world views, and
it is sometimes fought within a
single person., The outcome of
this war hits to the absolute
core of our being/because it is
the foundation ofou'r thinking.
I would like first to explain
in a measure just exactly what
"Intelligent Design" is. I am a
lay person and this is my
opinion.
Back in the 1980s and 90s--
scientists and groups of
scientists came to the
conclusion that Darwinian
Evolution, by Darwin's own
statement, completely breaks
down knowing now what we
know concerning what is call
the "Irreducible Complexity"
(3) that we see in biological
systems. Darwin states, "If it
could be demonstrated that any
complex organ existed which
could not possibly have been
formed by numerous,.-
successive.- sli h t
modifications, my theory
would absolutely break down"
(4).
In Darwin's time the reasons
why and how life systems
worked was almost a total
enigma as was the mystery of
heredity. Life works at the
chemical level and everything
we see is built upon this.
During the last fifty or so years
our knowledge of biochemistry
has shown vast amounts of
growth. From this growth and
the advent of electron
microscopy came the
knowledge that life's
functions: from photosynthesis
to building cellular structures
are carried out by machines
(systems) and these systems
are irreducibly complex. This
means that for the system to
function, the system must have
all of its parts. Loss of a single
part (chemical) means that the


system would not work. Life's
systems cannot be formed by
the numerous, successive,
slight modifications envision.
by Darw% inObne could-entertaitr'
the thought. howe'er,-that in
the billions of years (we are
told) when life evolved on
earth that a multi-mutational
event produced such a system
all at once. This does seem
plausible until you try to
figure the odds of this
happening. To produce just one
of these systems by chance
would be like the odds of
picking one particular atom out
of all the atoms contain in the
earth. To these scientists the
thought that the random chance
mutation of DNA sites
producing all of these
irreducibly complex systems
was absolutely absurd. The
other possibility, "Intelligent
Design" of life, leaped out to
them as the answer.
Some of the scientist
privately ascribe Intelligent
Design to be God, others
aliens, or as yet some unknown
force. The theory of Intelligent
Design is scientific not
metaphysical, though it does
have profound religious
implications. It was not
motivated by religious views,
as some would say.
-In the beginning. I started
this letter talking of a war
being fought. There are
scientists who cannot entertain
the possibility of there being
intelligence out there because it
tampers with their world view.


To be fair, this also applies to
many devout scientists who
cannot entertain the thought
Stha.tU life is just a pointless
existence brought into being
by random mutation.
The atheist sees the struggle
as a fight for knowledge and
against superstition and
upsetting his world view.
The devout see the war as
against a dark force creeping
into the lives of his children
and others, erasing absolutes
derived from a creator replacing.
them with emptiness, and he
does not want his world view
upset either.
Evolution has no right to be
exempted from examination
simply because to question-
might allow God's foot in the
door. Facts are facts and truth
is truth regardless where it
leads.

-References
(1) Behe, M (1996)
Darwin's Black Box,
The Free Press
(2) Denton, M (1985)
Evolution: A Theory in Crisis,
Adler and Adler '
(3) Behe M (1996) Darwin's
Black Box,( 1996)
The Free Press, New York
p. 39
_(4) Darwin, C (1872) Origin
of Species, 6th ed. (1988),
New York University Press,
New York, p. 154
Stephen Foster Smith
Brooker


Florida Twin Theatre


(All Seats $4.00 Before 6 p.m. 964.5451 *CLOSED MON & TUES*)
(Visit us on-line at WWW.FloridaTwinTheatre.comn)


Now Showing
Jim Carrey in
Fn

DMJa ne
Fri. 9:00
Sat. 9:00
Sun. 7:00


Now Showing
Walt Disney's




Fri. 7:45 -
Sat. 5:15, 8:00
Sun. 5:30
Wed. Thurs. 7:15


SOUTEL EVECARE

General Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY GLAUCOMA
MACULAR DEGENERATION DIABETES LASERS GLASSES
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Medicare, Medicaid, Avrned, Blue Cross/Blue Shield &other insurance accepted.
Se haba espanol.3864962928
620 E. Main St., Lake Butler 386-496-2928


Never too late to learn


Kudos to
Starke city
manager
Dear Editor:
I want to thank Ken Sauer,
our city manager, for getting
the tarps up covering"the cages
at the animal shelter protecting
the.-animals ,from, the ;cold
winds we had last weekend.
This just goes to show that
if the citizens will get involved
it helps. I'm sure our city
government has a lot to keep
their minds busy and for us to
help them think/remember
things would be appreciated.
Being an animal lover I was
concerned so I asked Mr Sauer
about getting this done and,
voila, it was done.
Sharon Foster
Starke


Arbor
foundation
offers free
trees
Ten free flowering trees will
be given to each person who
joins The National Arbor Day
Foundation during January,
2006.
The free trees are part of the
nonprofit foundation's Trees
for America campaign.
The 10 trees are two white
flowering dogwoods, two
flowering crabapples, two
Washington hawthorns, two
American redbuds and two
Kousa dogwoods.

"These compact trees were
selected for planting in large or
small spaces, "John Rosenow,
the foundation's president,
said. "They will give your
home the beauty of lovely
pink, white and yellow flowers
and also provide winter
berries and nesting sites for
songbirds."
The trees will be shipped
postpaid at the right time for
planting between Feb. 1 and
May 31 with enclosed planting
instructions. The 6- to 12-inch
trees are guaranteed to grow, or
they will be replaced free of
charge;
Members also receive a
subscription to the
foundation's colorful
bimonthly publication, Arbor
Day, and The Tree Book with
information about tree planting
and care.
To receive the free trees, send
a $10 membership contribution
to Ten Free Flowering Trees,
National Arbor Day
Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave.,
Nebraska City, NE 684L0, by
Tuesday, Jan. 31 or go online
to arborday.org.


LRCT general
membership
meeting
Join friends and neighbor's
as the Lake Region
Community Theatre hosts its
2006 general membership
meeting on Monday, Jan. 23,
at 7 p.m. in the theater's new
home at 218 N. Walnut St. in
Starke.
Come share the excitement,
the drama and the thrill of live
theater. Have you ever yearned
to stand in the spotlight, create
a costume. sing a song or
dance on stage, direct a
production, make a room full
of people laugh out loud or
support the folks that do?
Anyone with an interest in
theater .or theater craft is
encouraged to attend the
general membership meeting.
LRCT is a not-for-profit
corporation dedicating to
fulfilling its mission to
encourage interest in art and
'the performing arts in the
'community. Make 2006 an
exciting year for you and your
family by coming to the
meeting and seeing what
community theater is all about.
E-mail tcurtis@georgerob
ertsins.com for more
information

.3.

Lpove is a fruit in season at
all times, and Within reach
of every hand.
-Mother Teresa
***


Ijb .jboQ N 'bo'a e I'JboE) I

The NEW L's are LOADED!

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CT
C,

nn


A ~~ ~ LZOUU AN1DU LM 0U
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AU IV I IlearWII CI





C'.
4502 NW 13th Street in Gainesville c%
jAr,'orss trm Gene, Jim & Ray's Wesigale Ablaile Home-91
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ELL


Open auditions
are Jan. 29-30
LRCT is making a open call
for auditions that will take
place on Sunday, Jan. 29, at 2
p.m. and Monday, Jan. 30, at 7
p.m. in the LRCT theater
building at 218 N. Walnut St.
in Starke.
All interested parties are
encouraged to attend one of
the two audition dates. LRCT
is looking for singers, actors,
dancers, comedians, etc. of all
ages and both genders. Please
be prepared to read from a
provided script and, if you
desire, sing a few verses of a
song a cappella.
The show calendar for 2006
is March 24-26, March 31, and
April 1-2 for the spring
production; Sept. 8-10 and 15-
17 for the fall production; and
Dec. 8-10 and 15-17 for the
winter production. There are
additional opportunities for
special performances and
events throughout the year.
For more information, e-
mail tcurtis@georgeroberts
ins.com.


Required
Divorce Class
Court approved
parenting class &
certificate same
morning. Last Saturday
of each month starting
1/28/06 in Macclenny.
1-800-767-8193
(Also offered in Gainesville)


I


-lU=s'Ia


Starts Fri., Jan. 13
Glenn Close in




Fri. 7:05
Sat. 5:00, 7:05
Sun. 5:05
Wed. Thurs. 7:30


"lr- p-- 'Y.'~"- ~7~11- m~lll~l 11


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Page 2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006






Jan. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-B-SECTION Page,3B


GOSPEL
Continued from p. 1B
classroom.
She said the chorus and band
directors have let the choir use
each of their rooms when they
were able.
The gospel choir sings only
songs that the teenagers will be
able to relate to, said Long.
Some of the songs include
"Falling in Love (with Jesus),"
"Hallelujah," "He's Able" and
"Center of My Joy."
Even then, the group is not
all about singing notes and
words on a page.
The gospel choir lets
students, who want to be a part
of the group, "forget about
problems, and put faith in
God," Long said.


Alice Searcy
Religious denominations,
discipline problems and race
are all set aside when black
and white students come
together to participate in the
program.
"It lets children know we


Consumers
urged to
research
health clubs
Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services
* Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson is urging consumers
to get some background
information on health clubs
prior to signing a contract.
Many people put losing
weight and getting into shape
.at the top of their New Year's
'to-do list.. But unriless :he) dp
'some research in advance,; the,
only thing they may lose is
money. State law provides
some protections for
consumers, and they should be
aware of what those are.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services administers the
Health Studio Law, which
spells out the rights and
responsibilities of the gyms
and consumers. It also
provides some recourse against
health clubs that do not follow
the law.
All health clubs are required
to register with- the
department's Division of
Consumer Services and many
must also post a bond that can
be used to repay members if
the facility goes out of
business. In 2005, the
department collected $67,000
in fines against health clubs for
various violations of the
Health Studios Law, including
registration, problems and
advertising.
There are 1,720 health
studios registered with the
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, an
increase of 379 over last year;
149 clubs went out of business
over the same time period.
"Joining a health club can be
a positive but costly endeavor,
and it's important that people
know as much as possible
about a particular facility
'before entering into a
contract," Bronson said.
"They need to know exactly
what. they are getting for their
money and what steps they can
take to seek redress if
something goes wrong."
The law provides consumers
with the. right to cancel a
contract for certain reasons
including: cancellation within
three days of signing a
contract, exclusive of holidays
and weekends, but it must be,
done in writing; if the facility.
moves more than five miles
away from the original
location and fails to provide,
within 30 days, a facility of
equal quality located within
five miles; if a person becomes
physically unable to use most
of the services for which they
contracted, until the disability
ends.
Bronson also recommends
consumers follow these tips
before signing a contract:.
I* Call the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer


See HEALTH, p. 6B


can build a bridge and get over
any kind of situation," she
said. "This is a way we let
students know God is still in
control."
By checking their problems
at the classroom door, Long
said the students have actually
overcome some of those
problems.
"A lot of referrals have been
diminished by the gospel
choir," she said.
The students have gotten
involved in the community by
ministering through song, she
said.
They have performed in
Gainesville for minister and
church anniversary
celebrations. They recently
performed at the March of
Dimes event at the BHS
auditorium.
In Tampa, they attended a
district conference the week
before Thanksgiving. The
group sold baked goods and
received a donation from the
BHS Key Club to be able to
pay for the trip.
If a church needs a gospel
choir or speaker for {heir youth
program, the BHS group is
happy to perform for free
outside of school on any day
except Sur.uay morning.
"Anything we can help in
the community, we are here,"
Long said.
She plans to retire next year
and is in her first year of
school to become a preacher.
Jackson is heading in the same
direction and is a youth
coordinator.
Both these women say their
main goal is to reach the
youth.-
"Teenagers need this in their
life," said Long, who still
plans to help out with the choir


esLIIng assure
compliance
Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson today announced two
major changes in food labeling
laws one that could literally
save lives of those with severe
food allergies and another that
promises to steer consumers
away from products with
arner)-'logging ingredients..
The first change, which 'went'
into effect Jan. 1, requires food
manufacturers to disclose in
.simple, straightforward
language any of the eight major
food allergens contained in
their products.
The second, which also took
effect Jan. 1, requires
manufacturers to disclose the
amount of trans fat, which
contributes to elevated
cholesterol levels and can lead
to coronary artery disease,
contained in their products.
Bronson stated that
inspectors and scientists in his
Food Safety Division will
sample an.d test random
products in grocery stores and
other retail markets to make
sure that the manufacturers are
complying with the new laws.
"We're very encouraged by
these new requirements, which
will protect those with acute
food allergies and empower all
consumers to make informed
dietary choices," Bronson said.
"We will be sampling and
testing food products to assure
consumers that they are getting
the protection that the new
labeling laws provide." .
While both requirements
became effective Jan. 1,
products manufactured before
that date that remain on store
shelves are not subject to the
new requirements.

Here, in summary, are the
details of the two major food
labeling changes:


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Members of the Bradford High School Gospel
Mass Choir are (front, I-r) Marquita Brown,
LaQuita Campbell, Valoria Haile, Michael Bass,
Jakear Simmons, Kierra Mosley (assistant
secretary), (second row, I-r) Teesha Randolph,
Brittany Bolton (parliamentarian), Ebony
Smith, Doretha Snell, Emmali Ramseur,


after she retires.
She said the group is very
talented.
"Some think they cannot
sing, but all they have to do is
open their mouths, and they
can," she said.
The BHS Gospel Mass
Choir will soon be selling
products from the Yankee
Candle Co. to raise funds for
future trips and events they
want to participate in.
But these events will not be
singing competitions.
"I don't want them to be


hung up on being better than
the others," she said.
One performance Long said
she would like to see occur is a
concert with gospel choirs
from 'several different areas,
including Gainesville.
The idea would be for each
choir to sing and then sing one
song together at the end, she
said. It would feature the
different style of each group,
but then show they are all
coming together under one
God.
Long said, "When they all


randomly select products as it
has in recent years to make sure
that calories, carbohydrates and
other nutrients listed on food
labels are accurate. In the last
four years, the department has
documented more than 1,100
food labeling violations.

"Consumers must be able to
rely on the accuracy of food
labels because inaccurate labels
can endanger people's health,"
Bronson said.


nO


Enacted by Congress, the
law is designed to protect the
estimated 11 million Americans
who suffer from food allergies.
According to one of the bill's.
sponsors, some 30,000
Americans are treated at
hospital emergency rooms each
year for allergic reactions to
food, and as many as 250 die
each year.
The law requires food
manufacturers to list in plain
English in 'their list 'of
ingredients on the package
label the presence of any of the
eight major food allergens that
are responsible for the vast
majority of such attacks -
peanuts, nuts, fish, shellfish,
eggs, milk, soy and wheat.
Previously, ingredients such as
whey and calcium caseinate
may have been listed on a label
rather than the more common
term milk. Similarly, lecithin
had frequently 'been substituted
for soy.

TRANS FAT PRESENCE
Trans, fat is an undesirable
fat that contributes to high
levels of cholesterol and can
lead to heart disease. It is
formed when liquid oils are
made into solid fats like
shortening and hard margarine
- a process that increases the
shelf life and.flavor stability of
foods.
While many food
manufacturers have phased out
or eliminated trans fat in their
products altogether because of
growing health concerns,
companies only now' are
required by federal law to list
the amount, if any, contained in
their products. It is required to
be listed in grams in the
"Nutrition Facts" panel of the
food label.
In addition to the sampling
and testing that will be
conducted regarding the two
news laws, Bronson's
department will continue to


Latayvia Henderson, Jalisa McDuffie, Michelle
Partee, Latierra Partee, Verdell Long
(advisor), (back, I-r) Danni Betterson
(president), Nikita Slocum (secretary), Eli
Hamilton (treasurer), Josh Bell, Wayne Long
(parliamentarian), Harold English (musician)
and George Lott (vice-president).


get to singing on the last song,
there will be a halo over the


* Auto Accidents
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* Neck and Back Pain


auditorium for all of Bradford
County to see."


Dr. Virgil A. Berry
CHIROPRACTIC
PHYSICIAN


TEAPETI ASNB


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Hwy. 230, Starke


964.8018


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* ..


CRIME _


Man arrested
for forging
checks
A 24-year-old Lake Butler
man was arrested Jan. 5 after
receiving cash from checks he
had forged.
Jeremy Randall Stephens
was charged by Deputy Mac
Johns with petit theft, fraud
and forgery. Stephens allegedly
forged the victim's name on
three of her personal checks.
He then got a friend to cash the
checks for him at a local bank,
each in the amount of $475,
Deputy Johns said.
The friend was questioned at
the bank where he was
attempting to cash a fourth
check, Deputy Johns said.
Stephens admitted to asking
the friend to cash the checks,
telling him he (Stephens) did
not have a local bank account.
The friend was paid $25 for
cashing each check, Deputy
Johns said.

Starke man
flees ----
deputies,
gets arrested
A 24-year-old Starke man
was arrested Jan. 8 after he fled
from deputies while in his car
and on foot.
Timothy Lavain Flowers Jr.
was sitting in his vehicle just
after midnight in the Pleasant
Grove area when he was
approached by Sgt. Ray White.
Flowers dropped a prescription
bottle on the ground .during
questioning, then pulled away,
Sgt. White said. The deputy
attempted to stop the 1991
Chevrolet sedan as it travelled
at a high rate of speed.
The vehicle crashed in a
ditch on Northwest 180th
Street and Flowers fled into the
woods. Starke K-9 with Sgt.
Richard .Crews was requested
and the area was searched.
Flowers was found hiding in a
wooded area, Sgt. White said.
Flowers received minor
injuries when he was bitten by
the K-9. No medical attention
was required, Sgt. White said.
The prescription bottle, was
recovered and found to contain
crack cocaine. Flowers was
charged with. aggravated
fleeing, eluding and possession
of cocaine with intent to sell,
Sgt. White said.
Bond on the charges was set
at $10,000.

Starke man
faces
charges
of battery
A 46-year-old Starke man
was arrested Jan. 6 for battering
two victims after breaking into
their house.
Raymond Konrad Secrest
was charged by Officer Mark
Lowery with two counts
battery, burglary of a dwelling,
disorderly intoxication and
resisting arrest _without
violence. ..
Secrest is charged with
kicking the victim's door open,
grabbing the victim and
slamming him into the wall
with enough force to make a
hole, Officer Lowery said. He
then grabbed and shook a
second victim. When
approached at another address,
Secrest stated he was there
when the incident occurred.
Witnesses stated he had arrived
just before the officers.
During the investigation,
S--Seerest-becam btie o -F and
abusive, calling the officer
I; names. He smelled strongly of
an alcoholic beverage, Officer
I; Lowery said.
Bond on the charges was set
at $15,000.

Man arrested
at BHS for
trespassing
A 48-year-old Starke man
was arrested Jan. 7 when he
: was found on school property
in an area that should have
been closed to any pedestrian
traffic.
Ernest Charles Vanwart was
charged trespassing on school
property by Officer Mark


Lowery. Vanwart was seen at
11:09 p.m. at Bradford High
School. He could give no good
explanation for his being on
school property, Officer
Lowery said. A pipe containing
cannabis was found on Vanwart
and he was additionally charged
with possession of drug
paraphernalia, Officer Lowery
said.
He was released Jan. 8 on
his own recognizance by Judge
Elzie Sanders.


Recent
arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights) or Union County:
Reynaldo Aviles, 23, of
Hampton was arrested Jan. 4
by Bradford Deputy Stephen
Bivins for 'aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon. Aviles
is charged with threatening the
victim while displaying a
handgun following a verbal
altercation. No weapon was
located, Deputy Bivins said.
Bond was set at $15,000.
Manuel Garcia, 30, of
Hampton was arrested Jan. 7
by Bradford Deputy Joseph A.
Jones for domestic battery.
Garcia is charged with kicking
the victim several times in the
back. No visible injuries were
noted, Deputy Jones said. The
incident occurred at 1 a.m.
Garcia was released on his own
recognizance by Judge Elzie
Sanders.
Peter Alden Roberger, 51, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 9 by Clay Deputy Lejeune
for domestic battery. Roberger
is charged with striking the
victim in the face several times
with his fist. He was
intoxicated at the time of the
incident, Deputy Lejeune said.
Angela Hyland, 34, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 5 by Green Cove Springs
officers for possession of a
controlled substance,
possession of drug
paraphernalia, possession of
marijuana and driving while
license suspended or revoked
(DWLS) knowingly.
William T. White, 37, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 7 by
Starke Officer Paul King for
possession of drug
paraphernalia. White was seen.
parked in a vehicle outside a
residence. The officer knew
White did not have a valid
driver's license and approached
him to question him. White
was attempting to conceal
something 4 as the officer
approached. A metal crack pipe
was found on the floorboard
between White's feet, Officer
King said. Bond was set at
$1,000.
Kelly Robinson, 36, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 3 by
Officer King' for possession of
drug paraphernalia. A $1,000
surety bond was posted for
Robinson's release from
custody.
Michael Stoneman, 27, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 7 by
Officer King for possession of
controlled substance and on a
warrant from Seminole County
for violation of probation
possession, of cannabis. A
plastic bag containing four
-Ecstasy pills were found where
Stoneman was sitting. Bond
was set at $5,000. Stoneman's
vehicle was stopped at 1:04
a.m. on North Temple Avenue
for a cracked windshield.
Freddie\M. .Stephens III, a


passenger in the vehicle, was
charged with possession of
marijuana when a marijuana
cigarette was found in his
cigarette package, Officer King
said. Stephens, 25, of Starke
was released on his own
recognizance by Judge Sanders.
Two Lake Butler teenagers
were arrested Dec. 30 by Union
Deputy Mindy Goodwin for
stealing batteries from the
Family Dollar Store in Lake
Butler. The 14-and 17,-year-olds
said the batteries were bought
at CVS but they did not have a
receipt. The price tags indicated
they were from the Family
Dollar, Deputy, Goodwin said.
William Grayer, 23, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 6 by
Starke Officer J.W. Hooper for
possession of cannabis.
Marijuana weighing less than
20 grams was found in
Grayer's vehicle when it was
stopped on S.R. 16 at Water
Street, Officer Hooper said. He
was released Jan. 7 'n his own
recognizance by Judge Sanders.
George Michael
Hammontree, 45, of Alachua
was arrested Jan. 7 by Starke
Patrolman Jason Crosby for
retail theft. Hammontree is
charged with stealing
merchandise valued at $126
from Dollar General in Starke.
A $1,000 surety bond was
posted for his release from
custody.
Michael Devitt, 42, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 5 by Clay deputies, for
possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Troy Perry, 23, of Starke
was arrested Jan. 6 by Clay
deputies on a warrant for
contempt of court.
Patti Williams, 27, of Lake
Butler was arrested Jan. 4 by
Deputy Jones for failure to
appear possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond was set at
$4,000.
Christopher Chastain, 19, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 4 by
Starke Sgt, Robert Melton for
violation of probation forgery,
grand theft.
Raymond Robinson, 46, of
Melrose was rested Jan. 4 for
failure to appear worthless
check. Bond was set at $2,000.
Lonnie Thompsori, 44, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 3 by
Bradford Deputy R. Watkins on
an order of arrest for violation
of probation.


Michael Cam, 46, of
Hampton was arrested Jan. 6
by probation officers for
violation of probation
aggravated assault with a deadly
weapon and purchase and
possession of cocaine. Cam's
arrest Dec. 22 for interference
with railroad track violated his
probation. Cam stated he had
been waiting for a train for
some time. He decided to find a
place to cross and his vehicle
became disabled on the tracks,
according to Sgt. Donald
Spriggle. The incident occurred
at 6:30 a.m. on Dec. 22, Sgt.
Spriggle said.


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Dennis Sheffield Jr., 35, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 4 by probation officers for
violation of probation sexual
battery.
Regina Randolph, 39, of
Lake Butler was arrested Dec.
29 by Union Lt. H.M.
Tomlinson on warrants for
failure to appear with bond set
at $1,500 on each charge.
Sandra Lee Terry, 56, of
Gainesville was arrested Jan. 4
by Union Raymond J. Shuford
on a warrant from Volusia
County for failure to appear
with bond set at $1,000.
Lavar Demerion Mills, 27,
of Jacksonville was arrested
Jan. 4 by Lt. Tomlinson on a
warrant from Duval County for
failure to appear with bond set
at $10,000.
Edward Earl Mitchell Jr., 22,
of Lake Butler was arrested Jan.
3 by Lt. Tomlinson on
warrants for failure to appear
with bond set at $10,000 on
each charge.
Shirley Ritchie, 38, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 3 by Clay deputies on a
writ of attachment.
Kimberly Strickland, 25, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 3 by
on a warrant from Levy
County for failure to appear
larceny and violation of
probation domestic battery.
Total bond was set at $11,000.
Randall Wainwright, 37, of
Hawthorne was arrested Jan. 4
by Starke Officer William
Murray for violation of
probation. He was transported
to Putnam. County.
Gregory Parrish, 28, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 4 by Bradford Correctional
Deputy Jason Clark for
violation of probation
possession of controlled
substance. He was released on
his own recognizance.
Brandon J. Croft, 22, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 6 by
Officer King on a warrant for
failure to appear battery from
Bradford County and violation
of probation battery from
Alachua. Bond was set at
,$4,000..


Nathan Prosser, 38, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 8 by
Officer King for failure to
appear violation of probation
battery. Bond was set at
$4,000.
Lannie McCauley, 34, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 8 by
Officer Hooper for violation of
probation robbery.
Larry Wiggins, 45, of Glen
St. Mary was arrested Jan. 6 by
probation officers for violation
of probation by his use of
marijuana.
Heather Johnson, 20, of
Keystone Heights was .arrested
Jan. 9 by Clay deputies on a
warrant for violation of
probation grand theft.

Traffic
Russell Grill, 45, of Sunrise
was arrested Jan. 7 by Officer
King for driving under the
influence (DUI). Grill's blood-
alcohol level was .15 percent
when his 1987 Ford was
stopped on U.S. 301 at
Edwards Road. He was released
on his own recognizance by
Judge Sanders.
Dawn E. Green, 41, of Lake
Butler was arrested Jan. 1 by
Union Deputy Robert Manning
for DUI. Green was found
sitting in her vehicle on
Southwest 89th Street just
after midnight. She admitted
she had been drinking and failed
the field sobriety test, Deputy
Manning said. Her blood-
alcohol level was .18 percent,
Deputy Manning said.

Darius Donley, 21, of
Melrose was arrested Jan. 6 by
Deputy Bivins for DWLS
habitual offender, resisting
arrest without violence and
DWLS third 'conviction. A
$15,000 surety bond was
posted for his release from
custody.
Christopher Ballou, 20, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 6 by Clay deputies for no
valid driver's license and
DWLS.
Michael Norris, 26, of Lake
Butler was arrested Jani. 5 by
Bradford Deputy Casey Moore
for MDS. A $500 surety


bond was posted for his release
from custody.
Michael Thornton, 20, of
Lake Butler was arrested Jan. 6
by Lawtey Officer J.W. Padgett
for DWLS with knowledge. He
was released after a $500 surety
bond was posted.
Duane Grochowski, 36 of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Jan. 5 by Clay deputies on a
warrant for violation of
probation DUI, DWLS and
failure to comply DUI, DWLS.
Kristy Sauls; 22, of Lake
Geneva was arrested Jan. 5 by
Deputy Clark for violation of
probation DUI from Alachua
County. A $500 surety bond
was posted for Sauls' release.
Lori Reid, 32, of Starke was
arrested Jan. 3 by Bradford
Deputy Sapp for failure to
appear DWLS. Bond was set at
$5,000.
Lintallifero Chandler, 28, of
Starke was arrested Jan. 8 by
Officer King for failure to
appear DWLS. Bond was set at
$205. Chandler was released on
his own recognizance by Judge
Sanders.



Starke man
charged in
Union crash
A Starke man was charged
after his vehicle was sideswiped
on C.R. 121 in Union County.
Merle H. Haddock, driving a
1996 Chrysler, was
southbound on C.R. 121 Jan.
5 at 11:30 a.m., according to
Florida Highway Patrol
Trooper Childress. A 2004
Mack semi attempted to
overtake the Chrysler as
Haddock slowed to make a left
turn, Trooper Childress said.
The semi struck the Chrysler,
causing approximately $5,500
in damages and $500 damage to
the semi, Trooper Childress
said.
Haddock was charged with
improper change of course
while being overtaken.
Both drivers were wearing
seat belts and received possible
injuries.


TOLLFREE1-80-54-649 3846-303


Page 4B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & h, ,,,lTOR-b-.-' ....- .ai. 12, 2006


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Jan. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 5B


Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Dean Cason


Crawford and Cason are wed


Carrie Beth Crawford of
Lake City and Matthew Dean
Cason of Lake City were
married on Dec. 10, 2005 in
Islamorada.
The bride is the daughter of
Stanley and Mary Ann
Crawford of Lake City.
The groom is the son of
DeWitt and Sherri Cason and
Eugene and Sandra Robertson,
all of Lake City.
Tim Williams officiated the
ceremony.
Flower girl was Korie Cason
and Rebekah Welch Huffman
was the maid of honor.
Ethan Umstead was the ring
bearer. Caleb Umstead was the
best man and Brian Crawford


and Bryan Cason were ushers.
The bride is a graduate of
Union County High School
and the University of Florida.
She is currently employed with
Westfield Realty Group.
The groom is a graduate of
Columbia High School. He is
employed with Stanley
Crawford Construction, Inc.
and Westfield Realty Group.
The couple will reside in
Lake City.
There will be a reception
held at the Crawford home at
4280 SW C.R. 242 in Lake
City on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2006
from 6-9 p.m.
All friends and family are
invited to attend.


BIRTHS
Kymberlyn Williams and
Hunter Collins.
Maternal grandparents are
i ^ "'^ Karen McQuiston of Kansas
and Bryant O'Neill of West
Virginia.
'Maternal great-grandmother
S -- is lone Russell of Kansas.
", Paternal grandparents are
S\ Frederick and Mildred Crews
Sr. of Lake Butler.
Paternal great-grandmother
Sis Lucille Regar of Lake
SButler.
Christian Fuller Donohue Aiden Clemons

Christian Aiden
Donohue Clemons
Kevin and Jessica Graham Victoria Clemons of Lake *
Donohue announce the birth of Butler announces the birth of '.
their son, Christian Fuller her son, Aiden James.
Donohue, on Dec. 23, 2005 at Clemons, on Dec. 6, 2005.
Martin Memorial Hospital in Aiden weighed 7 pounds, I
Stuart. ounce and measured 20 inches
Christian weighed 8 pounds, in length.
14 ounces and measured 20 Grandparents are Kenneth
inches in length. He joins two and Paula Clemons of Lake Jack H Whitehed
sisters, Allisort Michelle Butler. Jack Henry Whitehead
Donohue and Kaitlin Marie Great-grandparents are
Donohue. Ernest and Alma Addison of Jack
Maternal grandparents are Lake Butler and the late Archie
SPhilip "Flip" and Joan Graham and Thelma Clemons of Lake W hitehead
of Orange Park and the late Butler and the late Paul Archer
Patricia Graham of of Lacrosse. Jerry and Tammy Whitehead
Gainesville. announce the birth of Jack
Paternal grandparents are Henry Whitehead, born on
Patricia Markovic and Milan Dawson Dec. I1, 2005 in Gainesville.
Markovic and the late William Dawson He weighed 8 pounds and was
Donohue. COeWS 19 inches long. Jack has a
s____ sister Chelsea and three broth-
Birth announcements are consid- Frederick and Renee Crews ers, Jake, Matt and Brad, all of
ered news and are a free service of Jr. of Raiford announce the Lake Butler.
the Bradford County Telegraph, birth of their son, Dawson Grandparents are Larry and
Union County Times and Lake
Region Monitor. Announcements are Frederick Crews, on Dec. 31, Joan Kitchens and John and
edited for style and content. A I-col. 2005 in Gainesville. Vivian Whitehead of Lake
photo may be included for $12. Call Dawson joins siblings Butler. Great-grandmother is
(904) 964-6305 for information. C h r i stop her Williams, Hazel Smith of Baldwin.


Jolleen Johnson and
Rob Cason


Johnson and
Cason to wed
in October
Phyllis Johnson of
Plattsburg, N.Y. and Tom
Johnson of Fergus Falls, Minn.
announce the engagement of
their daughter. Jolleen
Johnson, to Rob Cason, son of
Robert and Peggy Cason of
Lake Butler.
An October wedding is
planned.



WORTH NOTING
Veterans with an honorable
discharge who are interested in
reactivating Post #314 are urged to
call 964-5373, Maurice J. White,
anytime after 7 p.m.
The Lawtey Recreation Board
meets on the second Tuesday of the
month at 7 p.m.


Hanas and Archey are engaged


Rick and Susan Hanas of
Oviedo announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Erin Alaina Hanas, to Clayton
Henry Archey, son of Allan
Archey and Judy Archey of


Clayton Henry Archey and
Erin Alaina Hanas


Starke.
The bride-elect graduated
from Florida State University
in May 2003 with a bachelor's
degree in business
management and received her
masters of agribusiness, degree
from the University of Florida
in December 2004. She is
currently employed as an
economic ,anal slI for ,ler
family\ 's agribusiness company,
A. Duda and Sons. Inc.
The groom-elect graduated
from the UniversitN of Florida
in August 2003 1 'iih a
bachelor's degree in business
administration and received his
masters of agribusiness degree
in December 2004. He is
employed bN Lennar Homes-
Orlando Land Di- ision.
The wedding is planned for
Saturday, December 30, 2006
at St. Luke's Lutheran Church
in Oviedo.


Bradford Printers


Lisa Vickery and David
Vickery, both of Starke,
announce the upcoming
marriage of their daughter,
Christina Lynn Vickery, to
Travis Wayne Williams of
Lake Butler, son of Thomas
and Denise Williams of Starke
and Jennifer Williams, also of
Starke.
The bride-elect is a 2002
graduate of Bradford High
School. She works for
Partnership For S-trong
,Families.. She is the
granddaughter of Wayne and
Diane Mundorff of Keystone
Heights and Edwin and Lucille
Vickery of Starke. She is the
great-granddaughter of Helen
Burnette of Keystone Heights.
The groom-elect graduated
from Union County High
School in 1998. He works for
RMC Correctional Institute.
He is the grandson of Mildred
Bridgeman.
The wedding will take place


110 W. Call St. 964-5764
Askfor!Ron qGimore


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Christina Lynn Vickery
and Travis Wayne
Williams

on Saturday, Jan. 14, 2006, at
6 p.m. at Trinity Baptist
Church in Lake Butler.
All family and friends are
invited.


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(9;







Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006


OBITUARIES:


Darrell Ansley
HAMPTON Darrell C.
Ansley. 40, of Hampton died
Wednesday, January 4, 2006, in
Jacksonville.
Born in Green Cove Springs,
Mr. Ansley lived in Clay County
most of his life.
Mr. Ansley is survived by: his
wife Stacie Hughes Ansley; his
parents Annette Williams and
Fred Ansley:; a son Jalin D.
Ansley; a daughter Shonni C.
Ansley; three step-daughters,
Shaleigh D. Peterson, Shakura E.
Patterson and Samatha L.
Denson; two sisters, Tanya D.
Aldrich and Tammy L. Ray; two
step-sisters, Diane Ansley Tillie
and Linda Ansley; and two step-
brothers, Anthony and Brian
Ansley:
Funeral services for Mr. Ansley
were Jan. 9, 2006 in Hardage-
Giddens Rivermead Funeral
Home of Orange Park. Burial
followed in Macedonia Cemetery
in Macclenney.



Ellen Bailey
STARKE Ellen Louise
Morgan Bailey, 78, of Starke
died Sunday, Jan. 8, 2006, at her
residence following a brief
illness.
Born in Miami on Jan. 13,
1927, Mrs. Bailey moved to
Starke in 1978 from Key Largo.
She was a longtime member of
First Baptist Church in Starke
where she worked in the nursery.
She was the owner/operator of
Bailey Advertising for more than
30 years.
Mrs. Bailey is survived by:
three daughters, Jacquelyn
Taylor of Hollywood, Ellen
"Bootsie" Lowe of Ft. Walton
Beach and Carolyn Jean Lohr of
Miami; two sisters, 'Joyce
Chambers of Lake Butler and
Judy Somerville of Starke; six
grandchildren, 13 great-
grandchildren and one great-
great-grandchild. She was
preceded in death by her
husband Jackson Bailey.


A LOOK

BACK AT

HISTORY


Providence is the
second oldest village
in the state
"1nformaiion for this portion
of the history\ was taken from-
an article written by Gail D.
Livingston in the 110th
anniversary edition of the
Telegraph.) Records show that
not long after settlers from
Spain established St.
Augustine in 1565, parties of
explorers were sent out into
the interior of Florida by
Menendez. The Spanish
explorer had returned to
Florida after the forts at San
Mateo and St. Augustine were
destroyed by De Gourges, in
an effort to Christianize the
natives. Menendez sought to
'learn more about the interior,
and .armed with knowledge
given to the Spanish by the
Indians at St. Augustine,
parties of explorers made their
way into the interior, braving
dense, swampy wilderness and
attack by unfriendly Indians.
The Indians tere generally
vicious in their attacks since
the' Spanish. had killed and
tortured many of the Indians in
forcing them to leave land that
had been claimed by Spain.
Indians from the interior were
captured and returned to St.
Augustine and used essentially
as slave labor to help build
fortifications.
The exploration parties
made their way west to a
location near Olustee Creek
which is in what is now known
as Union County. They built
living quarters there. It is
believed that what is now
known as Providence was on
the direct path taken by the'
Spanish explorers who won
their way to Pensacola and
settled there. Legend says that
one party of these settlers had
a large treasure chest with
them. When they were
attacked by Indians, the legend
claims the box was thrown into
the Suwannee River near
Providence. Four miles from
the settlement of Providence,
Ft. Call was built to provide
protection for the Spanish
settlers of the area. Ft. Ward,
located a few miles southeast
of Ft. Call, was also built about
this time.
Providence continued as a
settlement long after the
Spanish had turned Florida
over to English control. Years
later, Providence Village
became the first county seat of
the land which now includes
Columbia, Bradford and Union
counties. Col. W.T. Weeks
served as clerk of the couet
while the county seat was
See HISTORY, p. 8B


Funeral services for Mrs.
Bailey were Jan. 11, 2006 in First
Baptist Church of Starke with the
Rev. Wailon Haston and Dr.
Rodney Coe conducting the
services. Interment followed in
Crosby Lake Cemetery under the
care of Jones Funeral Home of
Starke.
Memorial contributions may
be made to First Baptist Church
of Starke Nursery, P.O. Box
12:,6, Starke, t-L .Lu9l.

Donald Hayes
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Donald Stephen Hayes, 56, of
Keystone Heights died Thursday,
Jan. 5, 2006, at Shands UF


Mr. Delancey is survived by:
his mother Dorothy Croft of
Fairhope, Pa.; a daughter Noreen
Delancey of Pennsylvania; two
sons, James Delancey of
Keystone Heights and Larry
Delancey of Reading, Pa.; a
brother Ronald Delancey of
Fairhope; three sisters, Bonnie
Wilson of Mt. Pleasant, N.C.,
Donna Croft of Hamilton, N.J.
and Deborah Versnel of Wichita,
Kansas; and four grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by a
daughter Mary Catherine.
A celebration of the life of Mr.
Delancey was Jan. 10, 2006 at
Moring Funeral Home in
Melrose.


following a brief illness. |
Born in Jacksonville on July LOnZO Starling
2, 1949, Mr. Hayes moved to LAWTEY Lonzo Ray
Keystone Heights 20 years ago. "Judge" Starling Jr., 76, of
He was of the Catholic faith and Lawtey died Monday, Jan. 9,
retired from Bellsouth as an 2006, at Shands at Starke
electronic engineering tech in following a brief illness.
Orange Park and Jacksonville. Born in Heilbronn Springs on
Mr. Hayes is survived by: his Feb. 14, 1929, Mr. Starling was a
children, Brandy Leigh Davis of lifelong resident of Bradford
Jacksonville, Casey Marie County. He was a member of
Murray of Green Cove Springs, Sampson City Chusch of God.
Kelly Anne Hayes of Keystone He was a retired heavy
Heights; his mother Elizabeth equipment operator for E.I.
"Betty" Silock Fuwox of Dupont and served in the United
Keystone Heights; a sister Carole States Army during the Korean
Anne Hayes of Tallahassee; and Conflict.
six grandchildren. Mr. Starling is survived by: his
Memorial services for Mr. wife of 52 years Louise Ilene
Hayes will be held at 12 noon on Hawkins Starling of Lawtey; five
Saturday, Jan. 14, 2006, at Mr. daughters, Helen Padgett of
Hayes' residence. Jones Funeral Macclenny, Deborah Passwater of
Home of Keystone Heights is in Lawtey, Amy Head of
charge of arrangements. Gainesville, Joy Schiller and
Memorial contributions in Mr. LydiaSpratlin, both of Starke;
Hayes' name may be made to a two sons, Steven 'Starling -of
local charity. Raiford and Enoch Starling of
Enterprise, Ala.; three sisters, Inez
Batten of Port St. Lucie, Naomi
Larry Delancey, Starling of Starke and Ruby
INTERLACHEN Larry Harris of Jacksonville; three
Edward Delancey, 59, of brothers, Vernon "Dick"
Interlachen died Friday, Jan. 6, Starling of Lawtey, Paul Starling
2006, in Interlachen. of Starke and Carlos Norman of
Born in Sommerset, Pa., Mr. Lawtey; 16 grandchildren and
Delancey moved to Interlachen seven great-grandchildren.
21 years ago from Morrisville, Funeral services for Mr.
Pa. He was a contractor in the Starling will be held at 2 p.m. on
construction industry and served Thursday, Jan. 12, 2006, in
in the U.S. Marine Corps. Sampson City Church of God
with the Rev. Gene Bass and the
Rev. Robert Johnson and the
EA L H Rev. Wayne Spratlin conducting
H EA T H the services. Interment will be in
H EA LTH Kingsley Lake Cemetery under
Continued from p. 3B the care of Jones Funeral Home
of Starke.
Services' helpline at (800) The family will receive friends
435-7352 to make sure the at Sampson City Church of God
health studio is registered and on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2006,
to check its complaint history. from 7-9 p.m.
Find out if the studio has Memorial contributions may
posted a bond with the be made to J.T. Kirkland
department, as most that Scholarship Fund, 2225 N.
collect fees in advance ar Temple, Starke, FL 32091 or
collect tees in advance are March of Dimes, 4161
",requiredtio.jo ask 'abut- amichael Ave.', Suite 212,'
Pior,to joining, ask about.. Jacksonville, *FL- 32207- or the


the clubs cancellation policy
should you move or become
physically unable to use the
facility.
* Before signing up, visi
the club during,the hours yoi
intend to use it to determine
whether it is overcrowded and
the equipment you plan to usi
is available.
* Find out if any of the
services offered require ai
additional fee.
Bronson said it is important
to read proposed contracts
thoroughly and make sure yoi
get all promises made by clul
personnel in writing. Ask
questions to make sure yoi
understand the terms of you
membership.


HOMES INC
(904) 964-331
Cell (352) 235-55


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Green and the Rev. Charles Clark
officiating. Burial will follow at
New River Cemetery under the
care of Archer Funeral Home of
Lake Butler.
The family will receive friends
on Saturday, Jan. 14, 2006, from
10 a.m. until noon at New River
Baptist Church.

Christopher Jackson
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Christopher Lee "Chris"
Jackson, 24, of Keystone Heights
died Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2006, from
injuries sustained in an
autulo'oonlC d uIOaIIL,.
Born in Charleston, W.Va. on
Jan. 3, 1982, Mr. Jackson lived
in Keystone Heights most of his
life. He was a foreman at JB
Coxwell and was a member of
Lake Hill Baptist Church.
Mr. Jackson is survived by: his
sons, Alexander Lee Jackson and
Hunter, both of Keystone
Heights; his mother Leisa Morris
Jackson of Keystone Heights; his
father Randy Jackson of West
Virginia; and his grandmother
Nellie Cook of West Virginia.
Funeral services for Mr.
Jackson were Jan. 7, 2006 at
Lake Hill Baptist Church with
the Rev. Jim Snell officiating.
Burial followed in Gadara
Cemetery under the care of Jones
Funeral Home of Keystone
Heights.

Walter Martell
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Walter Martell Jr., 56, of
Keystone Heights died Monday,
Jan. 2, 2006, at his residence.
Born in Lowell, Mass. on Sept.
12, 1949, Mr. Martell was a
welder and served in the U.S.
Army.
Mr. Martell is survived by: his
wife Denise Wichman Martell of
Keystone Heights and a step-
daughter Danielle Arnold.
Memorial services for Mr.
Martell will be held at a. later
date under the care of Jones
Funeral Home of Keystone
Heights.

"When You Say It With Flowers
It's Beautifully gaid" ,
Since lT3S

Jalia

FPoiest

(904)964-7711
218 N. Temple Ave.
,:, Starke ::


Home, Idaho; a daughter Lily
Joplin of Beaufort, S.C.; his
mother Albina Wolf of Mason
City, Iowa; sisters, Mary
Christofferson of Gainesville and
Judith Ann Ramker of Leesburg;
brothers, Tom'Wolf,. of Sheffield,
Iowa, Ralph Wolf Jr. of Mason
City, Richard Wolf of Rockford,
I11. and Joseph Wolf of Hiawatha,
Iowa. He was preceded in death
by an infant son John Paul Wolf.
Arrangements by Williams-
Thomas Funeral Home Westarea:
in Gainesville.

%^~et< 76444


Ressie Colson
STARKE Ressie Arnold
Colson, 94, of Starke died
Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2006, at the
home of his caregiver following
a brief illness.
Born in Brooker on Nov. 4,
1911, Mr. Colson was a lifelong
resident of Bradford County and
member of First Baptist Church
of Starke. He was a retired
owner/operator of Colson and
Sons Grocery in Brooker and
served in the United States Army
during World War 11.
Mr. Colson is survived by: his
wife of 64 years Clara Flume
Colson of Starke; two daughters,
Dianne Moody of Lake Butler
and Kay Colson Waters of Starke;
a son-in-law S. Lakue Williams
of Ormond Beach; seven
grandchildren and nine great-
grandchildren. He was preceded
in death by his daughter
Margaret Colson Williams.
Funeral services for Mr. Colson
were Jan. 7, 2006 in First Baptist
Church of Starke with Dr.
Rodney Coe conducting the
services. Interment followed in
Crosby Lake Cemetery under the
care of Jones Funeral Home of
Starke.




Paul Wolf
GAINESVILLE Paul John
Joseph Wolf Sr., 59, of
Gainesville died Monday, Jan. 2,
2006.
Born in Stacyville, Iowa, Mr.
Wolf retired after 20 years of
employment with the Florida
Department of Corrections and
worked part time as a substitute
teacher for the Alachua County
School District. He served in the
U.S. Navy during the Vietnam
War and also served in the
Florida National Guard.
Mr. Wolf is survived by: his
wife of 32 years Mary Louise
Wolf. of Gainesville; a son Paul
Joseph Wolf Jr. of Mountain


There is no way to express how
thankfid I am for all the love and
support everyone showed to my
family.
It truly helped my heart to know my
son, Chris Jackson, was loved so
much. The love that everyone has
showed for him is amazing. I know
he loved you all dearly.
Chris worked hard, played hard
and loved deeply.


Ijust cannot
for all your
my son.


it thank you all enough
support and for loving

With love and gratitude,
LeisaJackson &family


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t LAKE BUTLER Charlotte
u Marie Bryant Hendry, 63, of .
e Lake Butler died Thursday, Jan. *
d 5, 2006, at her residence
e following an .extended illness. B
Born in Jacksonville, Mrs.
Hendry moved to Lake Butler in
S1966. She was a homemaker and i- hing
member of Air Park Baptist
t Mrs. Henry is survived by: r"THE LIFE ACTION CRUSADE"
s her husband the Rev. John Mack
u Hendry of Lake Butler.
b Funeral services for Mrs. Through a series of services & seminars at Northside Baptist
k Hendry will be held on.Saturday, Church. "The Life Action" team will be focusing the crusade on
u Jan. 14, 2006, at 12 noon at New
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TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONi iOR--B-SECTION Page 7B


Baby proves big miracles come in small packages


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Telegraph Staff Writer
Jessica Hoover was already
under some stress knowing
that her husband probably
wouldn't be able to make it
home for the birth of their
second child.


Like any other day as a
military wife, Jessica, 23, also
worried if her husband,
Spencer, 23, who was
deployed to the Middle East,
would even make it home at
all.
But June 10, 2005, was a


Three-year-old Spencer holds his sister 7-
month-old sister, Lillian, who shies away from
the camera.


very different day.
It started off when the
Hoovers' attic fan stopped
working, the stove broke and a
tree fell on the house.
She was scheduled for a
routine pregnancy ultrasound,
but the way her luck was
going, she knew the results
would not be what she wanted
to hear.
Unfortunately, she was right.
While her husband's home
base was Fort Bragg, N.C.,
Hoover went to the Womack
Army Medical Center
(WAMC) for her appointment.
She felt she was being
ignored and at her insistence, a
doctor at WAMC checked her
more thoroughly. He found the
baby did not have enough
fluids.
To compound the problem,
Jessica had developed
preeclampsia, a condition that
causes a pregnant woman to
have high blood pressure and
other complications. It could
even be fatal for both mother
and baby.
She was taken by ambulance
from WAMC to the University
of North Carolina hospital at
Chapel Hill.
Jessica said she started to


wonder why all of this was
happening to her again.
Almost three years earlier,
the Hoovers' son had been
premature too.
Even though Jessica's doctor
said the chances of pregnancy
complications for a second
time were small, she took
every precaution to prevent
them.
"He had so many
complications," she said. "I
was expecting the roller
coaster as before."
The only difference was that
this time, she said the roller
coaster was 10 times faster
with more ups and downs.
While her body fought
against her child as if it were
something that did not belong
there, the baby had other plans.
She fought back.
A day later on June 11, UNC
doctors took the baby in an
emergency procedure.
They called her Lillian
Grace Hoover, Lilly for short.
Others called her a miracle.
Lilly was due on Sept. 16, so
she was only at 24 weeks

See MIRACLE, p. 8B


A.


-A


/


~1


Now out of the military,
to spend with Lillian.


Hoover has more time


Historic days, medieval knights
pastries and sweet potato fries
are the norm. It's not
...... uncommon to see a young lord
of the court munching happily
sugary funnel cake.
*' Visitors are encouraged to
arrive early for the "meet and
Sf ., greet session" during the first
S. '' 30 minutes of the Faire, when
-' ..& '* ..1 '^ actors and dancers gather each
: "' ,.,,i. day at the front gate to
S .. entertain the early crowds.
S "That's my favorite part of
the day," Piper says. "It's great
S"to see all the performers at the
S, gate to greet the guests. The
sights and sounds are simply
breathtaking; I get so much
pleasure from watching the
I i faces of the visitors as they
enter Hoggetowne."
S .- .' ,' ,- :' The Faire, which is produced
by the City of Gainesville
Department of Cultural Affairs,
is one of North Florida's most
1'" -"': i'-- "' 'popular events. The Alachua
County Fairgrounds is located
east of Gainesville, on 39th.
Avenue and SR 24, adjacent to
/ the Gainesville Regional
,'-" / 6 f "'"Airport.
,For more information call
334-ARTS or visit
S /' www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.


The Hoggetowne bag lady welcomes
festivalgoers at the gate.
For two weekends each year, of Hoggetowne, flanked by
the clear blast of trumpets their guards and heralds. It's
Mingles with the laughter of here where, over the course of
children as the kingdom of the Faire, more than a thousand
fioggetowne opens its gates. children will become knights
Dancers and singers in and ladies, dragon slayers and
Cnedieval garb perform to the damsels of the royal court.
delight ofpassers-by. Vendors And as these children, newly
kawk their fine wares and. honored by the King and
blacksmithss demonstrate their Queen, wander through the
Skills. Magicians amaze crowds Faire, they'll be met by dozens
With their secret arts. Knights of different attractions, vendors,
Ikattle one another from and merchants.
horseback and warriors meet in Seven stages of continuous
combat as pieces in a living entertainment feature jugglers,
cessboard. jesters and magicians.
| The Hoggetowne Medieval Musicians play medieval
-aire is a beloved Gainesville melodies on period instruments
Oadition, and for the 20th year and belly dancers perform in
it will delight many thousands the street. Thrilling human-
6f guests over two weekends, powered push rides attract lines
hfn. 28-29 and Feb. 3-5, of eager children and vendors
Hundreds of actors, volunteers call out to the crowds to try
and merchants work together to their hand at crossbow
produce the award-winning shooting and knife throwing.
event. The Faire features talent The astounding "Birds of
from all over the country, but Prey" show features trained
it's not only the actors and hawks and falcons who perform.
.merchants who travel to for the pleasure of the crowds.
Hoggetowne. Guests can visit one of,
"We're expecting upwards of Hoggetowne's mysterious
50,000 guests this year," said fortune-tellers to learn the
inda Piper, events coordinator secrets of the future, or they
fr the Faire. "Some people may visit artisans have their
wait all year to come to the hair braided or faces festively
Iaire, and we're thrilled to painted..
ave them." One of the Faire's most
On School Day, thousands notable attractions is the joust,
children come to the Faire to where knights in full plate
.tgke a field trip back in time armor charge each other on
id learn about the medieval horseback, clashing in the
~a first hand. middle of the field and battling
- Admission for the Faire is for the honor of the King and
$10 for adults and $5 for Queen. After the joust, children
Children ages 5-17. Children are encouraged to meet the
tider 5 enter free. Admission knights and their steeds.
dai School Day, Friday, The marketplace has more.
F february 3, is half-price. The than 150 skilled artisans,
lFaire is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. whose specialties include
on the weekends and 9 a.m. to weaving, jewelry making,
4fp.m. on Friday's School Day. blacksmithing, leather working,
EThe Faire offers attractions woodcarving and ceramics. It's
f specially for the younger of-a-kind items not available
members of the kingdom. anywhere else in Gainesville.
Animal rides, games of chance Guests can make their own
and skill, and of course, the candles or even buy a colorful
rbyal pavilion await visitors, wax replica of their own hand.
T-he br-igtly colored pavilion Past the marketplace is the
i- erected near the entrance of food court, where the delicious
the Faire. A green overhang aromas of cooking food entice
shades the royal throne, upon those passing by. Tasty onion
Vhich sit the king and. queen blossoms, soups, fresh-baked


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Jan.


1








Page 8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006


MIRACLE
Continued from p. 7B

gestation.
She was born at the weight
of 14.5 ounces and was 11
inches long. This is a weight
less than a soup can and not
much longer than a ball point
pen.
Jessica's in-laws had
scheduled a visit to North
Carolina from Lake Butler that
weekend, so they happened to
be there to watch her son.
Spencer was able- to come
home on emergency leave
soon after.
Jessica said, "I was left
speechless after she was born."
SIt* had taken almost all of
three years and almost all of
her -energy to get her son
through his countless therapies
resulting from being a
premature baby.
Now, the Hoovers would
have to do the same thing all
over again with Lilly.
S.Children born weighing
more than 500 grams are given
S a 10 percent.chance of living.
She only weighed 420 grams.
- ."'They told us she wasn't


I~hA


going to make it, so we prayed
a lot," said Spencer.
Lilly's first 50 days of her
life were spent on life support.
Dozens of tubes and machines
were hooked up to her tiny
body.
She had many
complications, including
retinal detachment, 12 blood
transfusions and ruptured
intestines (they were not
formed completely at birth).
Dealing with each
complication as it came, the
doctors told-the Hoovers it
would take Lilly longer to get
past each episode that
occurred.
Some of the babies in the
same neonatal intensive care
unit as Lilly weighed more, but
were struggling to stay alive.
One even died.
"We had high hopes," said
Jessica. "That put a damper on
our spirits."
About a month after she was
born, the Hoovers were
allowed to fully hold their
baby.
With all the odds stacked
against her, Lilly pulled
through.


14












Ik


-Both Lillian Hoover, left, and Spencer Hoover,
right, were born premature. The small pink and
blue hats, knitted by the babies' grandmother,
were about as big as a three-inch cell phone.


She came home from the
hospital on Sept. 16, the date
she was originally due to be
born, weighing 5 pounds, 2
ounces.
Lilly turned 7 months old on
Wednesday, Jan. 11, but is at
an adjusted age of 4 months
because of her size. She
weighs 9 pounds, 11 ounces.

She still has to have oxygen
sometimes at night to help her
breath. There are a few other
complications, and she has to
see five doctors.

"We have to be super
vigilant about washing hands,"
said Jessica.

There haven't been many
outings for the Hoovers in
their almost five years of
marriage because of both of
their children being premature.

"She [Lilly] can't go out-on
every little shopping
excursion," said Jessica.
Lilly should catch up to
where she is supposed to be
over the next couple of years
like her brother did.
Jessica said, "My children
beat all the odds."

Things are just beginning to
get back to some sort of
normal for the Hoovers.

Spencer has finished with
the military and is looking
forward to graduating from
college with his bachelor's
degree. Soon, he will start his
new job in Gainesville.

Jessica said she will be glad
when she gets to the point
heree she can just go and see a
movie.

The Hoovers are looking
forward to building a home in
Lake Butler and their future as
a family, even though it
probably won't include
another child.
Jessica said, "It takes going
through severely hard times to
appreciate the good times. I
count my blessings every day."


HISTORY
Continued from p. 6B

located in Providence. In early
days, mail for the village was
delivered by horseback from
Starke a grueling 30 miles
through the wilderness. John
D. Harden was one of the first
mail carriers who had to find
solid ground through swamps
and safe passage over rivers
and-streams-ofter swollen by
rainfall. Animal or Indian
attack was always a
possibility, as was robbery..
Schools were unheard of for
many years and education was
available only through private
lessons. One teacher in these
early days who was well
respected was Miss Moore
from South Carolina. She was
employed by the Summerall


family and taught children
from other families in the
'JSummerall home. In addition
to the reading, writing and
arithmetic offered, Miss Moore
also taught music. Few
churches existed in the early
days of Providence, but circuit
riding preachers served New
Zion, Ft. Call and Old
Providence churches near


Providence Village. The
village had drug stores, -
blacksmith shops, carpenters
and general mercantile stores
which did a good business
with people who traveled for -
miles over rough roads from -
Lake Butler, High Springs and -
Lake City in the days before
those towns had outgrcwn
Providence.


There are no secrets to-success. It is the result of
preparation, hard work and learning from failure.
-Colin Powell

Love is a fire. But whether it is going to warm your heart or
burn down your house, you can never tell.
-Joan Crawford

I am neither especially clever nor especially gifted. I/am
only very, very curious.
-Albert Einstein


Spencer and Jessica Hoover are happy to have their daughter, Lillian, at
home with them. When she was born in June, the doctors gave her less
than a 10 percent chance of surviving.


~w~Bi














Section C: Thursday, January 12, 2006 Telegraph Times Monitor


UC's


Spiller doesn't get many touches in Army Bowl


Senior running back
does, however, earn
recognition for his
work in the
classroom


The drive stalled when
Tebow was sacked for a 5-yard
loss at the 45 on a third-down
play.
Spiller did not carry the ball


again until the last series of the
game. He first recovered an
onside kick attempt by the
West team, then had two
consecutive carries. Spiller


gained 4 yards on the first
carry, but was dropped for a 7-
yard loss on the second.
Wells, an Ohio State
commitment from Akron,


Ohio, had 13 carries for 67
yards and three touchdowns,
earning the game's MVP
honors.
Spiller, prior to the game,


received a U.S. Army scholar-
athlete award for maintaining a
GPA of at least 3.5. He was
one of 26 players to receive the
award.


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
It was a chance to showcase
his talents on a national stage,
but Union County senior
running back C.J. Spiller was
overshadowed by East
teammate Chris Wells in the
U.S. Army All-American
Bowl played Jan. 7 in San
Antonio, Texas.
Spiller did not get into the
annual all-star game, which
was won by the East 27-16, for
many offensive series, carrying
the ball just five times for 13
yards. His first touch came-in-_
the second quarter, on which
he was dropped for no gain.
However, Spiller did have
two carries for 15 yards on a
potential scoring drive late in
the second quarter that began
at the East team's 5-yard line.
Quarterback Tim Tebow, a
University of Florida
commitment from Florida's
Nease High School, scrambled
for a 17-yard gain and a first
down at the East 44. Spiller
then had a 9-yard carry to the
West 47, followed by a 7-yard
carry.


Starke Rec.
Dept. summer
program
starts May 30
The Starke Recreation
Department's summer program
will begin May 30 and last
through July 28.
The nine-week program,
which costs $105, will include
sports, games, movies,
scavenger hunts and trips as
well as free lunches.
For more information, call
the Starke Recreation
Department at (904) 964-6792.

Starke
Recreation
Department
is registering
--for baseball
The Starke Recreation
Department is currently
registering players through
Friday, Feb. 17, for this year's
baseball season.
Children will be placed in
one of four leagues: rookies
(ages 6-8), minors (9-10),
majors (11-12), BabeRlath
(13-15) and Babe Ruth (16-
18). The determining date for
the child's age is April 30.
Children 8 or 10 may play in
the next higher league only if
they have exceptional skills
and a parent signs a waiver.
The cost of registration is
$55 ($65 after Feb. 17), plus
there is a $1 fee if a child has
never played before to cover
the cost of a Babe Ruth birth
card.
Also, if a child has never
played before, a birth
certificate must be shown at
the time of registration.
Children must live in any
area of the county but Lawtey,
Brooker or Hampton to play
with the Starke division, or
they must attend a Starke
school. If a child played in
either Lawtey, Brooker or
Hampton last year, he or she
has the option to play in that
same area this year. However,
once a child plays with the
Starke league, he or she must
stay in this area to play
baseball unless he or she
moves.
Players will need to
purchase a pair of baseball
pants. Rubber cleats or tennis
shoes may be worn in the
rookie, minor and major
leagues. It is suggested that
Babe Ruth players wear rubber
or metal cleats.
For more information, call
the Starke Recreation
Department at (904) 964-6792.

Love is an exploding cigar
we willingly smoke.
-Lynda Barry


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Page 2C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006



Helping people is what it's all about in EMS


Paramedics, EMTs
overcome many
stresses to get the
job done

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
"Why do I do it?"
It's a question paramedics
and emergency medical
technicians sometimes ask
themselves.
EMT Ryan Lowery said the
question pops into his mind
during certain calls, such as
going to one of the prisons at 3
a.m. and having to transport an
inmate to a hospital in
Jacksonville.
For paramedic John Nichols,
it may occur when people are
screaming at him and seem
unappreciative of his efforts.
Paramedic Matt Maloney
asks himself the question when
he has to respond to a call that
turns out to not be a true
emergency.
So why do they do it? Why
do they put up with the long


hours of working under
stressful conditions with little
sleep and sometimes not even
getting the chance to eaV? It's
the desire to help people-to
make a difference in their lives
and to possibly save those
lives.
"That's why all of us got
into it in the very end,"
Nichols said.
And once you get into the
EMS field, it's hard to get out
of it, Maloney said. The job is
addictive, he said, a sentiment
shared by fellow paramedic
Bethany Hunsinger. She and
the rest of the crew that was
working at the station Jan. 9
joked that if they won the
lottery, they would leave EMS
that second. Hunsinger then
thought about that and
reconsidered.
"I don't know, most of us
are still addicted to that
adrenaline rush," she said.
"Even if we won the lottery,
we'd still work here-not the
hours that we're doing now,
but probably a shift a week."
Hunsinger, Lowery,


Maloney and Nichols are four
of 24 part-time and full-time
paramedics who work for
Bradford County's Emergency
Medical Services. As
paramedics and EMTs, they do
more than drive an ambulance.
Theirs is a specialized
profession that requires two
years of college as well as
continuous training to remain
licensed.
However, they are not
doctors and there is a limit to
what they can do, which is
difficult for some people to
comprehend.
"We're not doctors,"-
Nichols said. "We have to tell
people that all the time. They
look at us when we walk in the
door and they assume we
know everything."
For example, Nichols cannot
tell somebody if they're having
a heart attack or not. He has to
explain to them that for a
doctor to make such a
diagnosis, several tests have to
be conducted and even then


the diagnosis may be wr
"All we can tell them


Bradford
paramedic
Matt Malor
scrubs on
the EMS
trucks-a
typical chi
when their
some dow
time at the
station.


Paramedic
Kat Fluegel
performs a
supply check
in one of the
Bradford
Emergency
Medical
Services
vehicles.
Trucks are
checked
every
morning as
part of daily
routines.


ong. look like you're having serious
i is you signs and symptoms," Nichols
said. "We're going to treat
you like you're having a heart
attack because, obviously,
that's what we're most
concerned about."
Said Maloney: "Our biggest
benefit to the public is early
recognition and identification
of a potential illness or injury.
It's all about getting an early
recognition so we can get you
to the appropriate facility." .
ney -' Nelson Green, Bradford
ney, County's EMS director, said
e f what paramedics and EMTs
can and cannot do is a public
misconception.
ore' "Some people view them as
e is nothing more than ambulance
drivers, while others think we
can do everything in the world
for them," Green said. "We're
sort of in the middle of the
road."
Speaking of middle of the
road, Green said another
public misconception is that
the majority of calls EMS
responds to are traffic crashes.
That couldn't be further from
the truth.
The department responded
to more than 4,060 calls in
2005. Of those calls, 261 were


traffic crashes. That number is
less than responses- to medical
emergencies (illness,
respiratory distress, cardiac
arrest and injury) that year,
which totaled 2,391.
Green said that holds true
regardless of the time of year
and regardless of the amount
.of traffic that may be on the
roads.
"My friends say, 'Oh, I bet
you were busy this weekend
with all the traffic on the
road,'" Green said, referring to
New Year's weekend. "We
just don't respond to that many
motor vehicle accidents.
People see that more than
anything else, but that's not the
majority of our call load."
In fact, Nichols was
anticipating this past weekend
being busy-not because of
traffic but because of the
weather.
"This weekend's probably
going to have a lot of
respiratory calls because you
had warm temperatures and it
dropped really quickly to cold
temperatures," Nichols said on
Jan. 6. "That always seems to
trigger everybody's breathing
difficulties."
So medical emergencies are


the typical calls paramedics
and EMTs respond 'to, but
that's the only thing typical'
about their shift. Some people
may go through the same grind
day in and day out at work, but
there is no such thing as a
typical day at EMS. It may be
busy one day, slow the next.
"It is feast or famine, it
seems like," Green said. "We
can go from nothing going on
to all the trucks 1 out on
different calls within 10
minutes. There are days where
you run four or five calls
between all three trucks and
there's days where we'll run
28 or 29 calls between all three
trucks."
Maloney added: "Every day
is going to be different. You
never know what's going to be
thrown at you. That's one of
the things we like. You show
up and it could be a calm day
or could just be the most hectic -
day of your entire life. You
never know."
Don't think there's nothing.
going on during those times
when the call load is light.
There are chores to be done
around the station to keep the
crew busy during "business
"On.e day, we" might, detail
the. truck., clean. everything
out of the cabinets and wash
them down," Lowery said.
"Other days, we'll clean the
kitchen and clean out the bays
with water hoses.
"We try to do something
every day to make the station'
better."
Even a light call load can
keep the crew busy away from
the station. Green said crews
can spend up to an hour or
more cleaning the trucks and
restocking medical supplies
after every call.
"It's got to be done before
you go on another call," Green
said.
Plus, those calls can take
longer for paramedics and
EMTs in Bradford County than
for those who work in larger
cities. That's because people in
Bradford. County may have to
be transported to either
Gainesville or Jacksonville to
receive the proper medical
attention.
See EMS, p. 3C



Warriors travel
team holding
tryouts twice
this month
The Gainesville Warriors
fastpitch softball organziation
will be holding tryouts for the
spring/summer season on
Sunday, Jan. 15, and Sunday,
Jan. 29.
Both tryouts are at 2 p.m.
and at the Alachua Recreation
Center softball fields in
Alachua.
Age groups are 8U, 10U,
12U, 14U, 16U and 18U.
For more information,
please call coach Robert
,.Atwood at (352) 246-6905 or
(352) 377-0795.


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Jan. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 3C


EMS
Continued from p. 2C

"Our average call load last
year was 12-14 calls a shift,"
Maloney said. "That doesn't


sound like a lot, but if you
think about it, one call can take
up to two, two-and-a-half
hours."
Those longer transports,
however, give the Bradford
paramedics and EMTs an
opportunity their larger-city


John Nichols, a Bradford paramedic, sits at the
computer, performing work on a soon-to-be-
operational electronic reporting system.


counterparts don't have.
"We get to see how we've
them helped them while on the
way rather than just getting
them to the hospital," Lowery
said.
"It's kind of a unique
experience to work out here,"
Nichols said.
When they are not spending
time with patients, cleaning
and stocking their trucks or
performing chores around the
station, the paramedics and
EMTs are most likely trying to
get some sleep. Nichols said
anytime, and anywhere, he and
his colleagues can take a nap is
helpful because there is no
guarantee of sleep beyond that
while working a shift.
"The pager can go off any
time of the day- or night,"
Nichols said.
That fact alone prevents any
sleep from being relaxing,
Lowery said. It's always in the
back of his mind that the pager
will go off at any time.
Maloney said sometimes
when he and paramedic Kat
Fluegel go out on a call, he
will sleep in the back of the
truck while she drives or vice
versa.
If a nap Won't do, then there
are beverages that can help.


"You see all the caffeine we
keep at the station, readily
available," Hunsinger said,
pointing to the many two-liter
bottles of soft drinks stocked
in the station's kitchen.
Maloney, cradling one of the
bottles, said, "This is my
friend."
The paramedics and EMTs
do have friends beside their
favorite caffeinated soft
drinks--each other. They have
a bond because their
experiences are something that.
family members and other
people can never relate to
unless they, too, work in
emergency medicine.
Plus, paramedics and EMTs
often find themselves spending
more time with each other than
they do with family.
"I probably spend three
times as much time with my
partner as I do with my
husband," Hunsinger said, "I
see my husband one day a
week. I see my partner two to
three times a week for 24
hours straight."
Lowery said, "If you break
out the days I work in a month,
I'm here more than I am at my
own house. You get to know
these guys. They are like a
family to you."


A LOOK BACK AT AREA HISTORY


Fort Call was
established to
protect settlers
(Information for this history
was provided by Marjorie
Driggers of Lake Butler for the
110th anniversary edition of
the Telegraph.) Today, only a
cemetery remains of the fort
which once helped protect
early settlers of the Providence
area from Indian attack. Built
more than 150 years ago,
probably during the Seminole
Indian Wars (1835-37), Fort
Call was located about four
miles west of Providence. The
fort was named after General
Richard Keith Call, who was
commander of part of Florida's
Volunteer Militia when it
fought the Creek Indians in
1813. General Call later
became Florida's first
governor and held that office
twice. According to Driggers,
who was long an accepted
historical-authority on Union
County; number of -thd early
settlers were killed or injured
in fights with the Indians. The
fort housed military men who
could answer a call for help
and served as a deterrent to
make the native residents think
twice about attacking the
settlers. Driggers described the
fort as being surrounded by a
high board fence with a few,
small huts inside where
families lived. In the center
was a large shed to house the,
guards or soldiers and their
equipment and supplies.
Driggers said that when
trouble was spotted, farm bells
would ring and about 18
families from the surrounding
area would abandon their
homes and head for the fort to
wait out the danger.
After the fort was
constructed, a church was built
nearby. The structure was.
completed under the eyes of
John C. Ley, a Methodist
circuit-riding preacher. About
1940 the church building was
moved to Worthington Springs


where it was remodeled and
used as the parsonage of the
Sardis Baptist Church for at
least 30 years. When the
church was moved, the
cemetery remained, of course,
and is now the only marker
that can be used to help
determine the location of this
early fortification. Its exact
location, however, is still
disputed by long-time
residents. There is a federal
document which says the fort
was located on Bluff Creek
between the cemetery and the
community of Dukes, but
many long-time residents
question the accuracy of that
document. Since most early
maps depended on springs,
creeks and rivers as markers,
the accurate location of any
site depends on whether or not
these features have remained
unchanged. Springs dry up or
get filled in over the years and
several area waterways have
had their courses changed in
,that time '
I The general area is known to
have been settled in early years
because artifacts have been
found like the hammer of a
flintlock rifle, glassware
common to the period and half
dimes. Of course, there are
also legends of buried treasure
associated with the fort, as
there often are with early
settlements that no longer
exist. Some of the older
citizens in the area claimed
that a search party set out in
1934 or 1935 to find this
buried treasure., They
supposedly had a map, n
"instrument" which located
gold under ground, and a
woman who claimed to
possess the power to ward off
the evil spirits who were
supposed to inhabit the
immediate environs of the fort
site. Rumor had it that the
party found the treasure, but no
record or report exists to verify
this.
The cemetery at Fort Call is
one of the oldest graveyards in


the area well over 100 years
old but no records exist to
verify when the first burial was
held there. Graves were
marked with pine knots instead
of tombstones and these have
long since decayed. In later
times gravestones were used to
mark the final resting places
and these are marked with
names like Weeks, Brown,
Mizelle, Clyatt, Crawford,
Doke and McNeal.
Fort Call was known in early
days for soil that contained
ideal components for brick
building. H.F. York, one of the
earliest settlers of the region,
had a brick making business in
the area in 1882. It folded after
two years when York died.


Some of the brick and pottery
from the Fort Call has been
displayed in museums. The
area was also known for
having some of the fertile
farmland in the region -
which was one of the more
important factors :that
influenced early settlement in
the area. Fort Call was born, as
were hundreds of other forts
- during the period of early
settlement before 1850. Some
of these forts, like 'Ft.
Lauderdale and Ft. Meyers,
grew into large cities. Most,
like Fort Call and Fort Harllee,
'passed into obscurity as people
no longer needed the security
of a fortification and began to
choose homesites using other
criteria.


Everyone has talent. What is rare is the courage to follow
that talent to the dark place where it leads.
-Erica Jong

Hope is the comppanfon.Qf power ad the.mother of.
success. For those of Ous who hope strongest have within
us the gift of miracles.
-Sydney Bremer


, p .;,
:.


0


S;T BU


li\ ta,.
'a,,

a,,
'-"a,,
'-a
*55
Iei~ .Z'~.~b* -


Ryan Lowery, a part-time EMT at Bradford EMS who
also works full time in Union County, inspects the
expiration date on the station's drug supply.


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Page 4C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006


UC girls defeat Baker for 11th win


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer


_


Bradford's Tosha Newman (center) gets sandwiched
between two Santa Fe players as she battles for a
rebound.


BHS girls defeat

Raiders in battle

of district's best
BY CLIFF SMELLEY game with nine points, nailed
Telegraph Staff riter after the Raiders had
... .--- pulled to within four points
Khalaa Hill scored a team- with 3:16 remaining.
high 16 points as the Bradford Santa Fe had its chances late
girls basketball team grabbed as the Tornadoes turned the
sole possession of first place in ball over and took shots when
District 3-Class 4A, defeating they didn't need to. The
visiting Santa Fe 46-42 on Jan. Raiders, however, made only
5. two field goals in the final five
Bradford got key 3-point minutes and went 1-of-6 from
baskets from Tosha Newman the foul line during that
and Jerica Warren in the fourth stretch.
quarter to hold off the Raiders Hill got the Tornadoes off to
and improve to 6-0 in district a quick start, scoring the first
play and 10-0 overall, two baskets of the game, but
Npn ari-_.o pointe. e Raiders s4l12-.
earl in the quarter, thIen
Warren -.ho"' fintsh'ed the% -" t'See-BHS"V.' 7C


KH girls no match

for 5A Eastside


BY CLIFF $SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Keystone Heights was going
for its fourth straight win, but a
16-1, Class 5A Eastside squad
proved to be too much for the
Indians to overcome in a 74-37
loss in a girls basketball.
matchup on Jan. 9 in
Gainesville.
The Indians (12-6) were
outscored by eight points in
the opening quarter, but the
host Rams really put the game
away in the third quarter,


UC to host
jv basketball1
tournament
this Monday
Union County's junior
varsity girls -,'basketball
program will'be hosting a
Martin Luther King Jr. holiday


outscoring Keystone 30-4.
Jessica Whitfield led the
Indians with 15 points, while
Kim Russell had eight.'
Keystone hosts district
opponent Union County
Thursday, Jan. 12, at 7:30
p.m., following a junior varsity
game at 6 p.m. The Indians
then host Bradford Friday, Jan.
13, at 6 p.m. before traveling
to take on district opponent
Crescent City Tuesday, Jan.
17, at 6 p.m.
See KHHS, p. 6C


tournament on Monday, Jan.
16. -
The Tigers will be hosting
the first game of the day,
taking on Bratiford at 10:30
a.m. That will be followed by
Keystone Heights against St.
Francis at 11:30 a.m.
The losers of the two games
will play each other at 1:30
p.m., while the winners will
play. at 2:30 p.m.


Score by Quarter
BCHS: 19 5 15 13-52
UCHS: 10 11 16 23-60
Union Scoripg (60): Bryant 2,
Clemons 6, Davis 11,
Franzluebbers 10, Holmes 21,
Kent 10. 3-pointers: Kent.
Free throws: 11-20.
Earlier results:

UC 57 Taylor 19
Despite having to shake off


assists.


Score by Quarter
UCHS: 11 18 9
HHS: 10 9 19


Union Scoring (53): Bryant 8,
Clemons 6, Davis 7,
Franzluebbers 10, Holmes 15,
7-53 Kent 7. 3-pointers: Clemons,
9-55 Kent 2.


Tiffany Holmes led four
.*.. players in double figures with
21 points as the Union County
girls basketball team defeated
visiting Baker County 60-52
on Jan. 9.
Union (11-4 prior to Jan. 10)
trailed 39-37 heading into the
fourth quarter, but then
outscored the Wildcats 23-13.
Amika Davis added 11
:"? points for the Tigers, who have
.,' won four of their last five
games. Amber Franzluebbers
and Miranda Kent each had 10
points.
Holmes led the team in
rebounding with 16, while
Vanessa Clemons had a team-
high five assists.
The Tigers played district
opponent Interlachen Jan. 10
and will travel to play district
* opponent Keystone Heights
Thursday, Jan. 12. Union then
travels, to play Vort White
Tuesday, Jan. 17.
Both games are scheduled
g- ^ for 7 p.m., following junior
varsity games at 5:30 p.m.


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some rust, the Tigers had no
problem handling district
opponent Pierson Taylor,
defeating the visiting Wildcats
57-19 on Jan. 6.
It was the first game for the
Tigers in three weeks and head
coach Perry Davis said the
offense took a little while to
get going.
The defense, however, held
Taylor to two points in the first
quarter and none in the fourth.
Union also had 37 steals,
with Franzluebbers and Amika
Davis each having eight.
Franzluebbers led all scorers
with 20 points, while Davis
and Holmes added 16 and nine
points, respectively.
The win improved the
Tigers' record in District 6-
Class 3A to 4-1.
Score by Quarter
THS: 2 7 10 0-19
UCHS: 18 16 19 4-57
ULion Scoring (57): Bryant 3,
Davis 16, Franzluebbers 20,
Gidbeig 2, Holmes 9, Kent 7. 3-
pointers: Davis.

Hilliard 55 UC 53
The Tigers suffered through
'turnovers and a horrible
shooting night in a 55-53
overtime loss to host Hilliard
on Jan. 7.
Holmes had a double-double
to lead the Tigers, scoring 15
points and grabbing 17
rebounds. She also had four
blocks.
Franzluebbers added 10
points, while Davis had six
steals and Clemons had seven


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Jan. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 5C


6 area players .

chosen for Florida ,

Shrine Bowl ... r-


Proceeds from the
game will support
Shriners Hospitals in
effort to provide
free medical care
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Bradford, Keystone Heights
and Union County will each
have two representatives in the
17"t annual Florida Shrine
Bowl, which will be played at
2:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, at
Orange Park High School.
This is the third straight year
at least six players from the.
three schools have been chosen
for the all-star game. Six were
selected following the. 2003
season and 12 were chosen for
the 2005 game.
Four of this year's six
players selected for the South
team will line up on the
defensive side of the ball:
Bradford linebacker Shauntell
Carter, Keystone lineman Lans
Hardin, Keystone defensive
back Michael Williams and
Union County linebacker
Brendan Odom.
Union County tight end
Kasey Nobles will join
Bradford running back James
Jamison on the offensive side
of the ball.
Jamison, if history is any
indicator, could be in for a big
game. Three former Bradford
running backs have won team
MVP awards in previous
years: DeWhitt Betterson,
Demetrice Hankerson and
Milton Sumpter, who captured
the award in last year's game.
Union County head coach -
Buddy Nobles will be a
member of the South team
coaching staff. NObles also
coached in last year's game.
Tickets are $7.50 for adults
and $3 for children under 12,
and are tax deductible as a
charitable donation.
Tickets can be obtained by
calling (904) 642-5200 (ext.
12).


Net proceeds from this game
will help support the network
of 22 Shriners Hospitals for
Children, all of which provide
free medical care to crippled
and burned children.
Two such children will
preside over this year's game
as Queen and King.
Nine-year-old Katelynn
Childress was born with
clubbed feet and had her first
surgery when she was just 8
months old at the Shriners
Hospitals facility in Tampa.
She underwent a second
procedure six weeks later and
spent more than a year in a
cast.
Today, the A-B honor roll
student at Wilkinson
Elementary School in
Middleburg has no trouble
participating in a favorite
activity-jumping on her
trampoline.
"You would never know
Katelynn as born with club
feet unless you were told,"
Theresa Childress, Katelynn's
mother, said. "I can't say
enough great things about the
Shriners. They helped my
daughter live a normal life."
This year's Florida Shrine
Bowl king is Phillip
Wetherington, who is also 9.
Phillip, one of two surviving
triplets, weighed just 1 pound,
10 ounces at birth. He stayed
in the neonatal intensive care
unit for more than three
months.
Phillip has cerebral palsy
and is a regular patient at
Shriners Hospitals in Tampa.
Doctors there have provided
him with night braces to'
control his leg spasms and
. hand splints to train him not to
tuck his thumb under his palm.
Still, Phillip, who is tops in
reading in his fifth-grade class
at Biscayne Elementary
School, enjoys many activities.
He loves watching football and
is looking forward to meeting
the players in this year's
Shrine Bowl.


Team unity on and off the court
' The Bradford Middle School boys and girls basketball players all have matching team shirts (as shown in the
accompanying photos), thanks to the generous donation made by parents Dewayne and Latanya McBride. Players
were also treated by all the parents to a potluck dinner recently. The girls basketball team is comprised of: (front
row) Tricia O'Quinn, Shantavia Jackson, Kanetra Jenkins,.Shantell Guion, Coyia Chandler, leashel Chandler, (back
row) coach Annie Williams, Ashley Johnson, Alagria Chandler, Quinessa Portis and India Williams. The boys
team, which is currently 7-2 and in first place in its division of the Suwannee Middle Athletic Conference, is
comprised of: (front
row, from left) Carlton
Covington, Juwan
Jamison, Rodney
Mosley, James
Ramsuer, Darrin Blye, ,
(second row) Isaiah
Jenkins, Terrence ",
Davis, Tramaine /""
Harris, James ... -
McBride, (third row)
Shanon Kiser, Reggie ,r". .
Thomas, Donelle ..
Williams, Marcus
Ardley, (fourth row)
Bobby McGee, Chris .
Walton, John Clark, .
Sean Andrews, (back .
row) Nevin Johns,
Caleb Crews and
David Shealy.


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Page 6C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006


UC boys pull

out last-

minute win

over BHS
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Ted Young had three big
plays in the last minute of the
game to help the Union
County boys basketball team
defeat Bradford 50-46 on Jan.
7 in Starke.
The score was tied at 46-all
when Young misfired on a
shot attempt. However, he
rebounded the errant shot, then
put up another jumper that
swished through to give the
Tigers a two-point lead.
Young then came up with a
steal. That led to teammate
Justin Griffin getting fouled.
Griffin went to the line and
sank both free throws for the
final margin.
It was the third straight win
for the Tigers (8-5 prior to Jan.
11), but they had to rally to get
it.
Bradford, paced by 13 points
from Clinton Cubbedge, held a
S 32-25 lead, but the Tornadoes
could not find the basket in the
second half, making just two
field goals. Bradford missed
19 attempts and rebounded
only seven of those misses.
The ,Tornadoes also had
trouble holding onto the ball,
committing 11 tiirnovers.
One of those turnovers came
midway through theb third
quarter on a steal by Young,
who then hit a short jumper
and drew a foul. Young's
basket pulled the Tigers within
33-31.
Young missed the ensuing
free throw, but teammate
Brendan Odom grabbed the
miss and scored to tie the
game.
:i1 Two free throws by Griffin
gave Union its first lead of the
game at 35-34.
Bradford finally converted
on a field goal attenipt (its only
one of the quarter) when
Jimmy Hankerson scored on a
rebound putback. That tied the
game with 25 seconds left in
the quarter, but Union's'Chris
Perry drove down the middle
of the lane and scored on a
layup to send the Tigers into
the, quarterr up 40-38. ,..
e spite'ih'eir'hootng woes,"
thdeTrnatioes were very much',"
in the game because the Tigers
weren't shooting a whole lot
better. Union made just two
field goals in the fourth quarter
and the Tigers eventually
relinquished their lead when
Bradford's Eugene Blye made
two free throws, putting the
Tornadoes up 45-44.
Rodencia Austin made a
basket with 2:10 to play to put
the Tigers up by one. The
Tornadoes' Roderick DeSue
made a free throw to tie the
game again before Young's
rebound score at the end of the
quarter.
Odom, who scored. 14 points
in the first half, led the Tigers
with 19 points, while Young
finished with 10.,
Cubbedge, who was held
scoreless in the second half,


led Bradford with 13 points.
Blye had nine points.
Odom and Bradford's
Marcus Wilson each helped
their team's cause by being a
force on the boards, especially
in the second half with all of
the two teams' missed shots.
Odom had six rebounds ?n the
second half and Wilson had
eight.
Union played Eastside Jan.
11 and will travel to play
district opponent Interlachen
Thursday, Jan. 12. The Tigers
then host district opponent
Crescent City Saturday, Jan.
14, and Hawthorne
Wednesday, Jan. 18.
All games are scheduled for
7:30 p.m. following junior
varsity games at 6 p.m.
Bradford, which fell to 2-10,
played district opponent Santa
Fe Jan. 10 and will travel to
play Newberry Thursday, Jan.
12. The Tornadoes host
Keystone Heights Friday, Jan.
13, then'travel to Orange Park
to play district opponent
Ridgeview Tuesday, Jan. 17.
Bradford's games are also
scheduled for 7:30 p.m.
following junior varsity games
at 6 p.m.
Score by Quarter
UCHS: 14 11. 15 10-50
BHS: 18 14 6 8--46
Scoring
Union (50): Austin 6, Griffin 4,
Kasey Nobles 2, Odom 19,
Willie Oliver 6, Perry 3, Young
10. 3-pointers: Young 2. Free
throws: 12-30.
Bradford (46): E. Blye 9, Josh
Blye 2, Cubbedge 13, DeSue
2, Hankerson 8, J.R. Petteway
3, Kyle Wilson 2, M. Wilson 7.
3-pointers: Cubbedge 3. Free
throws: 13-24.


Union defeats Taylor
to remain unbeaten
in district, while
Bradford still seeks
district win after
Suwannee-loss .. -

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Ted Young scored 25 points
to lead the Union County boys
basketball team to an 83-44
win over district opponent
Pierson Taylor, on Jan. 6 in
Lake Butler.
Young was one of three
players to score in double
figures as the Tigers improved
their record in District 6-Class
3A to 3-0.. Justin Griffin and
Chris Perry each scored 14
points.
Brendan Odom added nine
points for Union, which
outscored Taylor 25-11 in the
second quarter to take a 40-22
lead.
The Tigers held the visiting
Wildcats to just one point in


the final quarter.


Score by Quarter
THS: 11 11 21
UCHS: 15 25 22


1-44
21-83


Union Scoring (83): Austin 4,
Griffin 14, Jackson 6, Mitchell
3, Nobles 2, Odom 9, Oliver 6,
Perry 14, Young 25. 3-
pointers: Jackson, Mitchell,
Young 2. Free throws: 13-27.

BHS falls by 5 in
overtime to Bulldogs
Bradford had a chance to
break a six-game losing streak
and earn its first win in district
play, but the Tornadoes could
not get it done in overtime,
losing 63-58 to Suwannee on
Jan. 6 in Live Oak.
The Tornadoes, who were
coming off of a 70-63 loss to
Interlachen on Jan. 3, found
themselves trailing by 10
points after the first quarter,
but then outscored the
Bulldogs 14-4 in the second
quarter to tie the game at 25-all
heading into halftime.
Bradford outscored
Suwannee by one point in the
fourth quarter to send the game
into overtime before being
outscored 9-4 in the extra
period.
The loss put the Tornadoes
record in District 3-Class 4A at
0-4. -
Marcus Wilson led the
Tornadoes with 18 points,
while Clinton Cubbedge and
Kyle Wilson had 16 and 11
points.
Bradford Scoring (58): E.
Blye 4, J. Blye 2, Cubbedge
16, DeSue 5, Hankerson 2, K.
Wilson 11, Marcus Wilson r18.
3-pointers: DeSue, Cubbedge
2, K. Wilson 3. Free throws: 0-,
2.


The Keystone Heights boys
basketball team dropped to 2-4
in District 6-Class 3A, losing
71-40 to host Interlachen on
Jan. 6.
Keystone was outscored 23-
4'b.y. 4he Rams. who. were
plOWtsly tanked ifii'et1p
10,'::;n;ithe;first quarter. By
halftime, Interlachen had put
46 points on the board and led
the Indians by 27 points.
It was the second straight
loss for Keystone (5-9), which
was. coming off of two straight
wins in a tournament at Father
Lopez High School in Daytona
Beach.
Chad Evans led the Indians
with 11 points.-
Keystone will travel to
Starke to play Bradford Friday,
Jan. 13, at 7 p.m., following a
junior varsity game at 5:30
p.m. On Tuesday, Jan. 17, the-
Indians travel to play district
opponent Crescent City. at 7
p.m.
Score by Quarter
KHHS: 4 15 6 15-40
IHS: 23 23 17 8-71


Keystone Scoring (40):
Bannon 2, Brunink 5, Dow 3,
Evans 11, Fogg 6, Ruiz 3,
Snowberger 5, Taylor 5. 3-
pointers: Ruiz, Taylor, Fogg 2,
Evans 3. Free throws: 3-10.

Earlier result:

Oak Hall 57 KH 37
Keystone could not build
upon its fifth-place finish at
the Father Lopez tournament,
returning from Gainesville
with a 57-37 loss to Oak Hall
on Jan. 5.
Greg Taylor was the only
player to reach double figures
(11) in scoring.
Score by Quarter
KHHS: 5 9 6 16-37
OH: 10 11 13 23-57
Keystone Scoring (37):
Bannon 7, Dow 4, Ruiz 2,
Rund 6, Taylor 11, Yarbrough
7. 3-pointers: Rund 2,
Yarbrough 2. Free throws: 7-
10.



KHHS
Continued from p. 4C


Score by Quarter
KHHS: 1.4 11 4
EHS: 22 12 30


8-37
10-74


Keystone Scoring (37):
Knabb 2, Reddish 6, Russell 8,
Spaulding 6, Whitfield 15. Free
throws: 11-17.

Earlier results:

KH 43 Oak Hall 42
Whitfield and Kellie
Spaulding each scored 16
points as the Indians rallied in
Sthe fourth quarter to defeat
Oak Hall 43-42 on Jan, 5 in
Gainesville.
The Indians outscored the
host Eagles 15-4 in the fourth
quarter in picking up the win
in their first outing ofthe new


year.
Score by Quarter
KHHS: 7 11 10 15-43
OH: 14 11 13 4-42
Keystone Scoring (43): Gray
3, Reddish 4, Russell 4,
Spaulding 16, Whitfield 16.
Free throws: 11-25.

KH 58 Rams 26
Keystone remained
undefeated in district play,
defeating the visiting
Interlachen Rams 58-26 on
Jan. 6.
Russell scored 18 points for
the Indians, who held the


Rams to 10 points in the first
half. Spaulding and Karlyn .
Reddish scored 14 and 11
points, respectively. -
The win improved the
Indians to 6-0 in District 6-
Class 3A.


Score by Quarter
IHS: 8 2 4
KHHS: 23 10 23


12-26
2-58


Keystone Scoring (58): Gray
2, Knabb 4, Passwater 2,
Poupard 2, Reddish 11,
Russell 16, Spaulding 14,
Whitfield 7.. Free throws: 11-
25.


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1-3 DAY REFUND LOANS 904-964-33 5


I:11


Euery0one Benefits

When you shop with your

Bradford unCounty

merchant you help ut a ,


community ,1



merh ant S support i.gh

School RctltieS

include: ea
Band, F football, Baseba

Tennis, FFR! KRR, Pop
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and other...
Uieterans Organizations,


and a lot more...
These organizations

make our community a
better place to live and

add ualue to our lives.
Your local merchant isadut

glad to help out but they
need your support.
When ou a need
That you can fulfill in the

BradfordoCountyarea,
Sour patronage will be
appreciated.-. ,1,



The Bradford County Telegraph encourages all

to shop with our advertisers...

For a stronger business community.


UC, BHSet KH boys lose

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Telegraph Staff Writer


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Jan. 12, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-C-SECTION Page 7C


KHHS girls

lifters are 6-0

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer

It was close, but the
Keystone Heights girls
weightlifting team still came
out on top in a three-team meet
on Jan. 6, keeping its perfect
record intact.
The Indians, who have yet to
lose a match in the program's
eight-plus years of existence,
scored 45 points to edge out
Gainesville, while Belleview
had 22 points.
Six Keystone lifters won
their classes, while two others
finished as runners-up.
First-place finishers were:
Kelly Michalos (129-pound
class) 120-pound bench press,
120-pound clean and jerk, 240-
pound total; Jessica Ford (139)
105-125-230; Brenda Ward
(154) 145-145-290; Lauren
Stobbie (169) 160-145-305;
Rachel Lingerfelt (183) 185-
150-335; Danielle HengI (199)
125-140-265.
The two runners-up were
Julie Myers (199) with a bench
press of 125 pounds and a
-clean and jerk of 120 pounds
S for a 245-pound total and
0 ctavia C'openhaver
(unlimited) with a' bench press
of 155 pounds and a clean and
jerk of I10 pound for a 265-


pound total.
Keystone also had three
lifters earn third-place finishes:
Amanda Wood (101) 80-85-
165, Paige Cole (154) 120-
120-240 and Lasey Mitchell
(183) 115-115-230.
Keystone, which is currently
6-0, opened the season with a
69-21 win over Clay on Dec.
7.
The following lifters won
their classes: Wood 85-85-170,
Courtney Pace (119) 90-95-
185, Michalos 125-120-245,
Ford 105-115-220, Ward 155-
i 145-300, Stobbie 170-155-325,
Lingerfelt 185-130-315, Hengl
135-125-260 and Copenhaver
145-105-250.
Earning runner-up finishes
were: Ashley Poplin (110)
105-85-190, Lindsey Harp
(139) 105-85-190, Cole 130-
125-255, Beth Frampton (169)
120-105-225, Mitchell 110-
110-220, Myers 135-120-255
and Danielle Leopold
(unlimited) 115-105-220.
Amanda Paredes earned
third place in the 110-pound
class with a bench press of 95
pounds and a clean and jerk of
60 pounds for a 155-pound
total. Becca Rembert, in the
119-pound class, also earned
third place with a bench press
of 95 pounds and a clean and
jerk of 90 pounds for a 185-
pound total.
Keystone again won every
class but one in its second


meet of the season, a 64-19
win over Palatka on Dec. 12.
Winning their classes were:
Wood 85-85-170, Poplin 105-
90-195, Pace 95-95-190,
Michalos 120-125-245, Ford
105-120-225, Ward 160-150-
310, Stobbie 175-155-330,
Lingerfelt 185-135-320 and
Hengl 135-130-265.
Six lifters placed second in
their classes: Rembert 95-95-
190, Cole 130-125-255,
Frampton 125-105-230,
Mitchell 115-110-225, Myers
135-120-255 and Copenhaver
150-110-260.
Placing third were Paredes
95-65-160 and Hanna Johns
(129) 90-70-160.
The Indians had 11 lifters
place either first or second in a
win over Bradford and
Ridgeview in a tri-meet on
Dec. 15.
Keystone scored 61 points,
while Bradford had 32 and
Ridgeview 12.
Keystone's winning lifters
were: Michalos 125-120-245,
Ward 160-135-295, Stobbie
175-155-330, Lingerfelt 185-
140-325, Hengl 135-140-275
and Copenhaver 155-115-270.
Second-place lifters were:
Poplin 95-85-180, Pace 90-95-
185, Ford 105-120-225,
Frampton 120-110-230 and


Myers 135-125-260.
Five lifters finished in third
place: Sara Griffin (101) 65-
60-125, Tabitha Call (110) 60-
50-110, Rembert 105-80-185,
Cole 130-135-265 and
Leopold 115-110-225.
Keystone will host a sub-
sectional meet-the first step
toward qualifying for the state
finals-this Saturday, Jan. 14,
which will begin at
approximately 11 a.m. The top
three lifters in each class at this
meet will move on to the
sectional meet Saturday, Jan.
27, which Keystone will also
host.
The Indians host Union
County in a meet on
Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 3:45
p.m.



BHS lifters

earn 4 wins

in last outing

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer

Four Bradford girls
weightlifters won their classes
in a three-team meet on Jan. 4
in Alachua.


Cassie Padgett (110-pound
class), Cortnee Patterson
(119), Kelly Leigh (129) and
Jachael Nichols (154) placed
first for Bradford, which
finished third as a team with
29 points. Buchholz won the
meet with 40 points, while
Santa Fe had 33 points.
Padgett had a bench press of
110 pounds and a clean and
jerk of 120 pounds for a 230-
pound total. Patterson also had
a 230-pound total with a bench
press of 120 pounds and a
clean and jerk of 110 pounds.
Leigh compiled a 285-pound
total with a bench press of 140
pounds and a clean and jerk of
145 .pounds. Nichols had a
bench press of 125 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 140 pounds
for a 265-pound total.
Two Bradford lifters earned
second place: Reba Bennett
(129) 115 -pound bench press,
105-pound clean and jerk, 220-
pound total; Julie Detlefsen
(169) 105-120-225.
Placing third were:
Samantha Schmidt (101) 70-
-.85-155, Sintoria Brown (139)
*90-95-185 and Vanessa
Dayton (unlimited) 100-105-
205.
Bradford (3-3) opened the
season by.defeating both Clay
and Ridgeview in a meet on


Dec. 5 in Orange Park. The
Tornadoes then placed second
in a meet with- Keystone
Heights and Ridgeview on
Dec. 15 in Keystone.
The Tornadoes had six
lifters place first or second to
compile 32 points. That put the
Tornadoes ahead of
Ridgeview, which had 12
points, but behind host
Keystone, which had 61
points.
Winning their classes were:
Schmidt 70-85-155, Padgett
110-115-225, Patterson 125-
115-240 and Leigh 135-140-
275.
Placing second for Bradford:
Bennett 105-105-210 and
Nichols 125-140-265.
' Bradford will compete at a
sub-sectional meet-the first
step toward qualifying for the
state finals-this Saturday,
Jan. 14, in Keystone,
beginning at approximately 11
a.m. The top three lifters in
each class at this meet will
move on to the sectional meet
Saturday, Jan. 27, which
Keystone will also host.


Cherish all your happy
moments: they make a fine
cushion for old age.
-Christopher Morley


Khalaa Hill
puts up a
shot in the
lane for
Bradford in a
win over
Santa Fe. Hill
scored a
team-high 16
points.


BHS
Continued from p. 4C
i tf. A b ,*.. e
lead iTto tie'secofid quarter','
Bradford's Tosha Griffin,
following a rebound by
teammate Kita Goodian,
promptly pulled the Tornadoes
within one with a 3-point
basket to start the second
quarter.
A steal by Hill later in the
quarter sparked an 11-1 run
that sent the Tornadoes into
the half up 22-15. Hill scored.
four points-both off of
offensive rebounds-and
grabbed a total of five
rebounds during the run.
griffin added another 3-
poTiter, while the Tornadoes


40 Notices
ECIUAL HOUSING OP-,
igORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising In this



EXTRA

CASH!
Could you use
some now that the
h lidays are over?
Ve specialize in
helping people sell
Ittough our
Chpssifieds!.

SUE wUS.IS
-ATS -SCIOTHES
0 NuiCES-
JiS IIM SMW 91L

4alll Virginia Today
|04-964-6305


READERS

BEWARE
i- u need to
investigate any
v~rk at home and
FJhancial offers. Be
direful and
investigate all
ciffers before
sending your hard
erned dollars to
t se companies.
The, Telegraph
screens these Ads
blt cannot always
citch them all. If
ypu have any
questions, call 904-
9A4-6305.


newspaper is suoject iH
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
It Illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an
intention to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status Includes
children under the age of
18 living with parents or
legal custodians, preg-
nant women and people
securing custody of chil-
dren under 18. This
newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any adver-
tising for real estate
which Is in violation of the


j~i- jp," dd ,964-6305 aa

lClassified Ads where one call does it all! 73-2210


,n an r Is ,,i,,t to .. .. .. been established with cca MNAI rD N I- ..... -.... .MA- A


law. uur readers are
hereby Informed that all
dwellings advertised In
this newspaper are avail-
able on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain
of discrimination, call
HUD toll-free at 1-800-
669-9777, the toll-free
telephone number for the
hearing impaired Is 1-
800-927-9275. For fur-
ther information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-
7082 ext #1005.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office In
writing & paid in advance
unless credit has already_


this office. A $3.00 SER-
VICE CHARGE will be
added to all billings to
cover postage & han-
dling. THE CLASSIFIED"
STAFF CANNOT BE
HELD RESPONSIBLE
FOR MISTAKES IN
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday at
12 noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $8.00
for the first 20 words,
then 20 cents per word
thereafter.
41 Auctions
AUCTION EVERY Thurs-
day & Saturday night,. at


"FEATURED HOME"
UNIQUE HOME ON SANTE FE LAKE


I ELNHESY ELT


Starke. Starts 7:00pm.
Will take new and used
Items for consignment,
sold 1 piece.at a time
ABMO 0001542, AUMO
0001153.
42 Motor
Vehicles
WANTED: CARS AND
trucks, running or not.


Must be complete. $100
and up. Call 904-964-
5405, 904-263-8933.or
904-964-2432.
88 MAZDA EXT CAB
pickup, 5 spd, cold ac,
need possible head gas-
ket, but runs great,
$1755. Also 94 Chevy
Lumina Van, cold ac,
needs transmission


work $650. Call 904-964-
4111.
1994 CHEVY 1500 pick up,
177,000 miles, with tow-
ing package, runs good,
$2800. Call 352-514-
7348
1984 NISSAN KING CAB.
Pick up for restoration.
Need not be running.
Call 352-478-2595 eves,


leave message.
WANT A CAR, truck, or
van? Bad credit? No
money down. If you have
a job call Dean at 904-
284-9846.
97 FORD F150 green, 5
speed, AC, aluminum
..wheels, good condition.
$3000 OBO. Call 904-
964-7469.


also, got baskets from
Goodman and Destiny Bass.
Goodman was also
instrumental, in the run with
u her fefheis~.-oming up \titr

basket.
Hill scored three straight
baskets for Bradford in the
third quarter as the Tornadoes,
who forced eight turnovers in
the quarter, held onto their
lead.

Score by Quarter
SFHS: 12 3 10 17-42
BHS: 8 14 10 14-46

Bradford Scoring (46): Bass
3, Goodman 4, Griffin 8, Hill
16, Newman 6, Warren 9. 3-
pointers: Warren, Griffin 2,
Newman 2. Free throws: 1-3.


MUSIANU DRAG CAR
Cindy Crawfords mus-
tang. Featured in Muscle
Mustang & Fast Ford
magazines. 1998 Mus-
tang convertible, SHM
Cobra engine, T-trim, C-
4, 659 HP. $25,000 will
consider partial trade.
Call 352-473-5256 or
352-473-9065.


TENNESSEE
LAKESIDE RETREATS
New gated community.
Incredible lake &
mountain views. I to 5
acre building sites from
the $40s. Lake access,
boat ramp, private slips
(limited).Don't miss out.
Call (866)292-5769.
ASHEVILLE, NC
AREA Peaceful gated
community. Incredible
riverfront and mountain
view homesites. I to 8
acres from the $60s.
Custom lodge, hiking
trails. 5 miles to natural
hot springs. Call
(866)292-5762.
Government Foreclosed
Homes!!! $0 or Low
Down! No credit OK!
Bank & Gov't Rep's
available now! HUD,
VA, FHA For Listings
(800)749-2750.
Steel Buildings
BUILDINGS DIRECT!
25 YEARS. Order now
for spring delivery, and
save! Extensive range of
sizes and models. Built
to last. Priced to sell!
Pioneer (800)668-5422.
ALL STEEL BLDGS!
UP TO 50% OFF!!
Engineered for Hurricane
Coast! Ship Factory
Direct for quick delivery.
24x30 Up to 100x200!
Call Now! (800)499-
6401 Eddie.
Your Ad Could Be Here
Run your ad
STATE DE!!! For
only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified
ad in over 150
newspapers throughout
the state reaching over 5
MILLION readers. Call
this newspaper or
Advertising Networks of
Florida at (866)742-
1373. Visit us online at
www.florida-
classifieds.com. Display
ads also available.


Out of Area Classifieds


$79,900. Free Info
Available!
(828)256-1004.
East Alabama Mountain
Property For Sale One
hour west of Atlanta in
Piedmont, AL Beautiful
.View 48 acres $144,000
14,400 down 1,087 per
month owner financed.
Call Glenn (850)545-
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MOVE TO
TENNESSEE!
LOOKING FOR LAKE
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M OR
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trees, waterfall & large
public lake nearby, paved
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owner (866)789-8535
www.NC77.com.
TENNESSEE
LAKEFRONT
HOMESITES I to 6
acres from the $40s.
Spectacular lake,
mountain and wooded
nature sites newly
released. Just 1-1/2 hours
to Nashville. Don't miss
out! Call (866)339-4966.


Announcements
Is Stress Ruining Your
Life? Read DIANETICS
by Ron L. Hubbard Call
(183)872-0722 or send
7.99 to Dianetics, 3102
N. Habana Ave., tampa
FL33607.
Books
FREE Publishing Guide.
Have you written a
book? Publish your book
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worldwide. (888)232-
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Building Materials
METAL ROOFING
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colors in stock with all
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Help Wanted
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outside sales for new
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Home For Sale'
SEEKING A QUALITY
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High Commissions,
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CALL (888)325-PILL
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Real Estate
North Carolina Gated
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1.5 acres plus, 90 miles
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discounts, 90%
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CALL FOR FREE
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Of Murphy 317
.Peachtree St. Munhy.
N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.co
m.
NC MOUNTAINS-Log
cabin $89,900. Easy-to
finish cabin on secluded
site. Million $$$ Views
Available on 1-7 acre
parcels $29,900-


..1 -1 11 1114, I -- --


I


t








Page 8C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006



S A 964-6305

Classified Ads where one call does it all! 473-2210
496-2261


2005 HONDA SHADOW
VT 750C. Shadow Areo
motorcycle, black/
chrome, windsheild,
saddlebags, 3800 miles.
Take over payments of
$166 per month. Call
904-964-5488 after 5pm
for more information.
1997 PLYMOUTH
BREEZE 124K, auto,
new tires, battery &
starter, 25 to 30 mph.
$950 call 904-964-2722.
44 Boats and
ATV's
2002 STILLWATER Ca-
noe. 3 HP Mercury troll-
ing motor and trailer.
$1400 OBO. Call 352-
473-9850.
15'6" GRIFFCRAFT with
50 HP Mercury motor.
Very good condition.
$6000 OBO. Call 386-
431-1584.
2001 19'BAYLINER cuddy
cabin, 3.0 Mecruiser w/
75 hrs. Full canvas top,
swim platform w/ladder.


Galvanized trailer. Excel-
lent cond. NADA avg. re-
tail $14,550. Asking
$12,000. Call 904-964-
3645 M-F after 5pm. All
day Sat/Sun.
47 Commercial
Property
FOR LEASE OR sale. Ideal
location 2 parcels! 2800
SOFT building with of-
fice, barn, mini storage,
5 acres, off of South 301.
Also 8 acres, partially
cleared. Both lots 3/10th
of a mile from new
Walmart. Call 904-964-
3827 for more informa-
tion.
COMMERCIAL/ RETAIL
space by Starke Post
Office for rent or lease.
For more information
please call 904-964-
6305 and ask for John.
DOWNTOWN STARKE
professional offices for
rent. Conference room,
kitchen, utilities and
more provided. Call 904-
964-2616.
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE


space adjacent to the
courthouse, leasestart-
ing at $300 per month.
Two (2) offices available
sizes are 13'6" x 13'9"
and 12' x 13'6". Call 904-
964-4111.
INDUSTRIAL PARK office/
warehouse 3000sq ft,
750$ per month, call
904-964-9222.
48 Homes for
Sale
OWNER FINANCING.
Brand new constructirh,
site built home, 3BR/
2BA, large wooded 2/3
acre lot, Keystone
Heights area. $1995
down. Call 352-692-
4343. www.new
house411 .com.
WE BUY JUNKY
HOUSES, nice ones too.
Can close in under 72
hours. 352-258-0865 or
webuyjunkyhouses.com.
INVESTOR SPECIAL Vic-
torian home on B-2
(Business or Residential)
lot, 2 story, needs com-
plete renovation. Starke
home.Reduced to


$65,500! Call 904-964-
4111.
2BR/1 BA BLOCK home on
1 acre, tile floors, com-
pletely remodeled, down
VFW road, beautiful
land, cute home,
$127,000. Call 904-334-
2741 or 386-496-2403.
49 Mobile
Homes for Sale
3BR/2.5BA DWMH 1996
w/ 3 plus acres in Gra-
ham, (30 min to
Gainesville, 15 min to
Starke). Fenced with 2
gates, 2 pastures, bring


Home

For Sale

Relt

35-7388


the kids and the pets.
Horses welcome. Well
kept, great starter home,
large back deck, all elec-
tric appliances included.
$85,000, call 352-625-
6926 or visit
vfoustl1 @wm
connect.com.
1991 HOMES OF Merit,
DWMH, 28x60, 3BR/
2BA, vinyl siding, FP,
large covered back
porch, very good condi-
tion. $25,000 OBO. You
move. Call 904-964-
4020.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
3BR/2BA on wooded lot.
Walk in closets, garden
tub, refrigerator, stove.
$44,900, call 352-468-
3221.
1996 DWMH Homes of
Merrit. 24 X 52, very
clean, must move.
$28,000 call 352-494-
0124.
BRAND NEW Jacobsen
5BR/3BA over
2000Sq.Ft',18" Ceramic
Tile, finished drywall, 2 x
8, 2 x 6, 2 x 4 construc-
tion on all 16" centers.
Home only $76,900. Call
904-548-1480.
HILLIARD/ NEW Jacobsen
32 x 48: 3BR/2BA, set up
on 2 acres with well, sep-
tic & power pole in-
cluded, $734 per month.
Call 904-548-1480.:
8 BRAND NEW HOMES
just bought out Double J
Mobile Home dealership


on US 17 just south of
A1A. We are selling out
all existing inventory at
huge discounts! Call
904-548-1480 or come
by 850712 HWY 17 in.,
Yulee.
OWNER FINANCING
3BR/1.5BA SWMH with
addition. Carport, new
AC, $51,900. Call Kathy
Weise at Trevor Waters
Reality inc. for more infor
352-214=-2988 or 352-
473-7777.
50 For Rent
1 BR FURNISHED Apart-
ment on Bedford Lake,
very nice, discounts
available, no pets, fully
furnished. Call 352-473-
7769.
HOUSE FOR RENT, safe,
quiet neighborhood.
3BR, new carpet, hard
wood floors, large private
backyard. Starke. Refer-
ences, credit check, de-
posit required. $625, call
814-257-9825.
RENT-TO-OWN Brand
new construction, site
built home, 3BR/2BA,
large wooded 2/3 acre
lot, Keystone Heights
area. $1995 down. Call
352-692-4343.
www.newhouse411 .com.
WATERFRONT, BRAND
NEW, 3BR/2BA 2150 sq
ft, site built home, on 2/3
acre with paved roads,
$154,900. Call 352-692-
4343. Information avail-
able at www.new
house4l11.com.


904-964-8111


* Commercial loans
* Constructionl/Perm loans with one-time closing
and guaranteed rate
* Up to 107% financing
on purchases & -
refinances .
with no PMI
requirements .
* Fixed-rate
censelldatlen loans
* Low reflnance and <
purchase mortgage
rates.,.
*' Uw rates for .
manufactured and
,modular homes
* Christian-owned & Jeremy Crawford,
locally Operated Adam Chalker &
Keith Marshall


FURNISHED ROOMS
FOR RENT! COM-
PLETE with CH/A, cable
provided, all utilities paid!
Central location. 10%
discount on first months
rent for senior citizens.
Rooms with private bath,
$105 $115./wk. Room
without bath, $90. Laun-
dry facilities available.
Close to churches,
stores, downtown shop-
ping, theatre, and more!
See Manager at the
Magnolia Hotel, across
from the Starke Post Of-
fice. 904-964-4303.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, clean, close to
prison. Call 352-468-
1323.
SOUTHERN VILLAS OF
Starke Apts. Looking for
applicants. 1& 2 BR HC
& non HC apartments.
Central ac/heat, on site
laundry, playground, pri-
vate and quiet atmo-
sphere. Located on
SR16, 1001 Southern
Villas Drive, Starke, FI or
call 904-964-7295, TDD/
TTY 711. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
FOR RENT- 2 & 3BR
homes, newly renovated.
Deposit required. Call
386-496-3067, 678-438-
6828 or 678-438-2865,.
for more information, tf
FOR RENT; 14x70 mobile
home, 2BR/2BA, A/C,
heat, $550 per month. A
security deposit plus first
and last months rent is


required. Call 904-964-
8431 or 352-745-1189.
NEWLY REMODELED up-
stairs apartment in down-
town Starke. 2/BR, CH/
A. $450 month, 1st, last,
and security deposit.
Available beginning of
December, call Joan at
904-964-4303.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
2BR/1BA SWMH par-
tially furnished $410/mth
plus security and utilities.
Large 2BR/2BA SWMH,
CH/A, dishwasher. $460
per month plus security
and utilities. Lake
Geneva MH Park ON
SR 100. Urider new own-
ership! Must have good
rental history. Call Rick
352-473-3569.
2BR/2BA FOR RENT,.CH/
A, $550 per month, good
condition, no pets, first &
last plus deposit, lease.
Call 904-964-4111.
1 BR FURNISHED Apart-
ment on Bedford Lake,
very nice, discounts
available, no pets, fully
furnished. Call 352-473-
77,69.
SPACIOUS, HAMPTON
LAKE, 2BR/1BA apt.
Electric, cable, & trash
included. Handicap
ready. $1000 per month,
available Feb. 1st. Call
352-468-2060
3BR/2BA BRICK HOME
with 2 car garage, on cul
de sac, fine homes, quiet
subdivision. $1100 per
month, $1100 security
deposit. Available mid
Feb. Call 352-473-2947
or 904-626-0874 for
more information.
LAKE GENEVA 1BR apt.
$450 per month, with
$200 security deposit,
water & garbage in-
cluded. Call 352-478-
2697.
3BR/2BA, SWMH on 1
acre, quiet area, no pets.
$435 per month plus de-
posit. Call 352-468-3221.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS,
large 3BR/2BA DWMH,
CH/A, 1 porch, large
yard, $650 per month
plus security deposit.
Call 352-213-4563.
DELIGHTFUL 2BR/1BA
shaded with pecan trees,
CH/A, storage shed,
washer/dryer hook up,
garden site. 21st Avenue
off Bessent Rd. Call 904-
472-6256 or 904-384-
8013.
SPACIOUS 3BR/28A with

American
Dream
o iiNortMwcast Ftolda.lnc.
REALTrOR S

RENTALS

$340,S395/,,


First Month Free

(904) 964-5424


fenced acre, W/D, CH/A,
huge kitchen, beautiful
landscape. $700 per
month, First, last plus
$500 deposit. Must hae
references. Call 352-
473-1870.
EXTRA CLEAN & in be-
tween 2BR MH in Key-
stone Heights. Spacious
Split bdr plan, CH/A, cov-
ered deck and more. No
pets. $500 per month
rent, $700 security de-
posit, credit report re-
quired. Carroll Rentals &
Management, Inc. 352-
473-1025
CONVENIENT KEY-"
STONE Hts. location.
2BR stilt home, CH/A, Ig.
deck and more. No pets.
$675 per month rent, .
$1000 security deposit,
credit report required.-
Carroll Rentals & Man--
agement, Inc. 352-473-
1025
WALK TO Keystone
schools. Spacious 3BR
DW, split plan, CB ga-
rage and more. 1 st, Last
&.security. $650 per
month rent, $650 secu-
rity deposit, credit report
required. Carroll Rentals
& Management, Inc.
352-473-1025 -",
LARGE 1BR apt. No pets.
6 Month lease, $450 per
month, $450 deposit.
Call Mike at 904-364-
7026.
MELROSE 107 Eliam Rd.
3BR/2BA House. Stove,
refrigerator, microwave,
DW, large fenced yard,.
front porch, screened
back porch, W/D hook
ups. $895 per month
$700 deposit. Call 352-
475-5533 or 352-475-
0690.
3BR/2BADW, CH/A, on 1
acre lots, in Sampson
City. $1500 down & first.
months payment total
$2,037 move in. $537
per month. Call 352-468-
2959.
ZONED MIXED use. 3BR/
S1.5BA house. Enclosed
back porch w/laundry'
room. 1 BLK W of 21 in
Keystone Heights. Key-
stone schools. Walk tb
Keystone beach, town
ect. $900 per month, first
month plus $800 secu-
rity deposit. Call 352-
256-5196. :*
CUTE COTTAGE Lake
Brooklyn, 2BR/1BA-,
$500 per month, plus
security. Call 352-473-
0002.
52 Animals and"
Pets
BULL MASTIF lyr male.
Very friendly, good with'
children, $250 OBO. Call
386-496-1364.
-FULL BLOODED German-
,, .Roe,iee,Puoup1es,.,One
- male one female, 4
months old. Also one,'
lyr old male very healthy
perfect markings. CallU
Cindy before 8pm at
352-473-7233. .
DACHSUND CHIHUA-
HUA mix, 5 month o!d,


(904)

964-5424
205 N. Temple Ave.,I
Starke, FL 32091


Fisherman's Paradise Beautiful Lots
1996 3 BR/2 BA, 1216 sq. ft. situated Located within feet from 400 acre
on 1.39 ac. and ready to move in. lake with boat access. Lots ranging
Walking distance to Crosby Lake in size from 1.52 to 2.19. Any lot
boat launch. Sellers motivated $29,500 Homes Only, Bring OffersI


.Paying Rent May Be


J(, Hazardous To Your

Paycheck!


BUY A HOME OF YOUR OWN!
START BUILDING EQUITY NOW!

2,3, & 4 Bedroom Models Available!

LAND/HOME
VA- FHA Conventional Loans wn
All credit applications accepted!l


rfries Scot Bilt General

i ay IToo ,


Visit Us Before You Buy! c


Jerry's Quality Homes

(352) 473-9005

6969 SR 21 N. Keystone Heights, FL
Jerry Ted oAnn


Former HRS Building located

in Lake Butler.

Government Built Security Locks
Keypad Entrance to back offices
Walk-in Safe Moveable Interior Walls

GREAT FOR MEDICAL, GOVERNMENT
OR ANY RETAIL BUSINESS!


Call Maggie at Butler Townhomes
386-496-1969 (or) 954-650-7016


I


IVANHOE


Ivanhoe Financial, Inc.

L -icen sed Mortgage


Call Today! Call Today!
Jenny W. Mann Suzanne Gordon
Branch Manager Mortgage Consultant
Mortgage Consultant


Reinance anI Purchases

FHIA*VA iCenventienal


100% ancingAvailable~


New Cmnstructien-

Him Imnurivemnt leags


Toll Free
1-866-964-4202
^XI-I Wy Q W-E..+ QWvWa+


LENDER


I r


i u/ Twainut Street
US 301 South Starke, FL
(Located behind Bradford County Eye Center)


352-671-9210
TOLL FREE

1-800-544-6429
Fax 352-671-9217
Take 1-75 to exit 352, go east to US Mobile Homes
441/301, go south to location on right 2410 S. Pine Avenue
before bridge. I Ocala, FL 34471
Wslt our webslte at
www.SouthplneMoblleHomeSalos.ihrtaller.com
i-ir a7TCm~ n G-


LOCATED
AT
105 Edwards Rd
cross from Community State Bank)
Starke
TrinityMortgageFL.com
TOLL FREE
866-964-8111


I '


[ S~mese Prvedy


v









Jan. ,_, TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 9C


^ 1964-6305


Classified Ads where one call does it all! 473-
496-2261R

'S A73 o ro r k n,.I, .U ,- .C .. OCC c;IDJWASHING. .


male, shots, wormed,
health certificate. $330
cash, call 904-364-
7152.
LARGE GERMAN
SHEPARD pups. Large,
smart, trainable, ap-
proved homes only,
$200 each. Cal 386-496-
.1279.
, 4 FOUND DOG Yorkie,
male, not neutered, on
SR 100. Call 229-848-
325 Tera. Please pay
fees for ads and meds.
53 A Starke
Yard Sales
MOVING SALE 10 X 10
shed, dryer, furniture,
misc. 9am to 4pm,
Thursday only!!! corner
of 225 & 229, blue
framed house, follow the
signs.
DOWNSIZING HOUSE,
depression glass,
collectables, books,
tools, fishing supplies,
-baby & adult clothes,
household items, to
much to list. SR16 west
to CR 233 left one mile
on the left. 6266 NW CR
233. Follow signs. Can-
cel if rain. Sat only!! 8am
to ?
GIANT YARD SALE in
.Hampton. Sat the 14th to
-Mon the 16th. 9am to
6pm. Behind the post
office, follow the signs, 4
sale! Mowers, tools, fish
stuff, household, turn,
toys, electronic & much
morel!!
SATURDAY ONLY Jan
1l4th 8am till ? Every-
thing must go. From
Starke take SR 100 east
.(Griffis Loop), cross RR
tracks twice, third home
on left.
:53 B Keystone
Yard Sales
7460 SR 21 NORTH elec-
tric stove top, dish-
washer, gas grill and
more. 9am til ? Sat. Jan,
,1.4th.
55 Wanted
Paying $1000 for Bradford
-County porcelain auto
tags dated 1911-17 and
S $25+ each for Bradford
Co Florida tags starting
;with #45 in good condi-
-tion for years
-t938,39, 40,43,44,
46,49;50,52,and 53. I
:need these for a mu-.

I1 Buy
Houses
in need of repair
And Land
352-475-2283


seum display. Also want
other Fla tags prior to
1958. Jeff Francis, PO
Box 41381, St. Peters-
burg, FL 33743-
1381 727 345 6627
e m a i I
gobucs13@aol.com
www.floridalicenseplat
es.com In Starke this
Friday Dec 16 and can
meet in person. ,,
57 For Sale
PRIVATE RECORD COL-
LECTION. 2000 Albums,
from 1930 to 1990. Best
offer. Call 904-966-0641.
BED $100. NEVER USED!
Full size orthopedic
pillowtop set. Still in plas-
tic with factory warranty
from Posturecraft. Can
deliver. Call Brian 352-
376-1600.
BEDROOM 6PC SET
never used Still in
boxes. I have in truck
and can deliver. $395,
call 352-376-1600.
COUCH AND LOVESEAT,
plush microfiber suede
set. Call 352-494-0333.
QUEEN PILLOWTOP
mattress set. $130 real
pillowtop set. Anything
cheaper is cheap. Brand
new made by
Posturecraft. Still in plas-
tic. Can deliver, call
Brian 352-264-9799.
BED BRAND NEW KING
Sacrifice $195. 3pc or-
thopedic pillowtop set.
Never used set, still
wrapped in plastic with
original warranty. Name
brand Posturecraft. Can
deliver call Brian at 352-
494-0333.
HOT TUB/SPA $1795.
Brand new. Loaded with


ECONOMY STUMP GRINDING iNc
Guarntee Loest ids


(904) 769-9641
(352) 284-1977 Cell


f Const. Clean Up


MAIN. *DEBRIS

*CARPENTRY PAINT *TREES

PRESSURE CLEANING

All Jobs Large or Small

JOHN 352-468-3786
Lic #024973 Insured


Keystone Hauling &
Handyman Service, LLC
OFWtenry *BmshHogMowing
*HoneRqpir *T.'eibnning& Rwi
.*P1r.1' wading *Sitek anUp
M lOddJobs TrahRemobrv
YamdWorik .PineBark&CMss ulch
GardenRol.ThIfing '*FhrewodForSale
*I.cesed& Insrd *FheEstimates
SOwner: Kerry Whitford




HOUSECLEANING

r1'- -Time Clean
NEED YOUR HOUSE ORGANIZED?
.NcEUP TM


Don't Wdste Precious Time
Callu ITIMATE LEAN
.(904) 964-8740 j


therapy jets, waterfall,
LED lights. cupthlders,
110v energy efficient.
With warranty. Free de-
livery call 352-376-1600.
BEDROOM CHERRY 7pc
set. All wood custom
built Louis Phillipe sleigh
bed. All dovetail con-
struction, trueglide
drawers. Never been .
used! Still in boxes. Re-
tail $6500 sacrifice
$1300. Can deliver. Call
Brian at 352 264-9799.:
POOL TABLE georgous 8'
all wood table. Leather
pockets, Italian 1" slate,
carved legs. Brand new
still in crate. Cost $4500
sell for $1350. Call 352-
246-9799.
MATTRESS TWIN sets
$89, full sets $129,
Queen sets $159, King
sets $189. Mattress Fac-
tory, 441 East Brownlee
St. Carpets also- targe
room size pieces. Save
a lot. Cash and carry.
Call Sonia at 352-473-
7173 or 904-964-3888.
KENMORE WASHER and
dryer, new type $100
and up each, electric
stove, written guarantee,
free local delivery. For
appointments, call 904-
964-8801.
BED-QUEEN orthopedic
Pillowtop mattress and
box. Name brand, new in
plastic, with warranty.
Can deliver. Sacrifice
$140. Call 352-372-
8588.
BED-KING SIZE Pillowtop
mattress and boxspring
with manufactures war-
ranty. Brand new still in
plastic. Can deliver. Sell
for $200. Call 352-372-
7490.


BEDROOM SET 7 piece
Gorgeous cherry queen/
king b, 1, dresser, mirror,
2 nightstands, chest
available, dovetail con-
struction. New still in
boxes. Retail $5200,
sacrifice for $1400. 352-
377-9846.
DINING ROOM SUITE-
beautiful cherry table, 6
chippendale chairs and
lighted hutch and buffet.
Brand new still boxed.
Can deliver. Retail
$5800, sacrifice $1100.
352-377-9846.
MATTRESS TWIN sets
$89, full sets $129,
Queen sets $159, King
sets $189. Mattress Fac-
tory, 441 East Brownlee
St. Carpets also- large
room size pieces. Save
a lot. Cash and carry.
Call Sonia at 352-473-
7173 or 904-964-3888.
HEAVY DUTY SCROLL
saw with stand. $200
OBO. Call 352-475-
0890.
HESS MODEL TRUCKS,
about 13 years of mod-
els. Asking $15 each
OBO. Call 352-473-
2715.
42" WHITE TILE top
kitchen table with leaf,
extends to 56" oblong.
Empire style, pedestal
base, great condition.
Asking $75. Call 352-
473-0247.
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER, fits a 34" TV, with
built in shelves and glass
doors. Asking $75 OBO.
Call 352-473-0247.
2 TWIN MATTRESSES
only. Both are new &
eclipse. Memory Magic
Luxary firm. $ 300 each
or both for $500. Call


Bobby Campbell

Roofing, Inc.
Licensed & Insured

(904) 984-8304

FREE

ESTIMATES!
Lie. #CCC-132672
Employment opportunities available.
Call for more information.


3 5-4U-3. uc or
Betty.
EASY GO GAS golf cart.
White, excellent me-
chanical condition, lift kit,
tires, wheels, rear seat
kit, accessories and in-
stallation also available.
90 day warranty. $2000
call 352-745-0548.
STOVE REFRIGERATOR
almond with brown trim.
Hotpoint electric appli-
ances. Stove has black
glass on front door. Re-
modeling kitchen. In use
and good condition.
$250 for both. Will sell
separate, call 904-424-
3112.
KENMORE HEAVY duty
washer & dryer, white,
like new, $250. Car tow
dolly with lights, new
tires, winch $850, Magic
Chef electric range $50.
Call 352-473-0721.
59 Personal
Services


FOR SALE
Oak finish
bedroom suit
wldresser, mirror,
chest, nightstand,
headboard and full
size mattresses
Very nice
$299.00
Twin bed mattress,
/box spring
$25.00

Serta Perfect Sleeper
Queen Mattressibox
Like New
(paid $800 new)
Only $349.00

African style sofa,
chase, two end tables
I Elephant coffee
table, lamp & rug
$349.00

New Guitar
$29.00

Kenmore side by side
Refrigerator
$299.00

Kenmore electric
stove
$99.00

Call
352-475-2283


,Newly Built Home For Sale.

740 EppersonSt. /.
Starke" s



dt6o ,000 .. _




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Single Car Garage
Appliances included Berber Carpet


MASTERS CONSTRUCTION

da~ 352-745-0039


(C- ld I ll ,, l i-Ii], ;MlIl. [i]'









1,459 sq. ft .brana new home on a 92-ocre fishing lake
Open floor plan. Blinds throughout. 3BR/2BA, attached
garage, paved road, Keystone Heights.
-din $139,900
\o nd Financing available with only $2,495 down.




-



2,042 sq. ft. brand new home on a 92-acre fishing lqke.
Open floor plan. Blinds throughout. 3BR/2BA, attached
garage, paved road, Keystone Heights.
n\uCg .$154,900
\od\ Financing available with only $2,995 down.











1,134 sq ft. home, 3BR/2BA, brand new home on 1/3 acre
lot in Keystone Heights. Open floor plan. Blinds throughout.
\c\d09 $112,900
\0oar\ Financing available with only $1,995 down.
INFORMATION ON HOMES AVAILABLE AT
WWW.NEWHOUSE411.COM

QualityLand Investments, Inc.
(352)692-4343


J & P IUOME SERVItCES,
home repairs, painting
tree trimming & more.
Local references avail-
able. Reasonable rates.
Call Johnny or Pam at
352-473-2344.
CLARK FOUNDATION
REPAIRS, INC. Cor-
rection of termite & wa-
ter-damaged wood &
sills. Leveling & raising
Houses/Bldgs. Pier Re-
placement & alignment.
Free Estimates: Danny
(Buddy) Clark, (904)-
284-2333 or 1-800-288-
0633.
CHAIN LINK FENCE -
Free estimates. Handy-
man Fence Co., owner
Tommy Reddish, 904-
964-8559.


CLC home exterior
cleaning. Roofs, siding,
decks, driveways, side-
walks. Free estimates,
call Curtis, 904-964-
4940.t
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for
M.H. & land packages.
1-800-284-1144. tfn
CUSTOM CUTS Lawn &
Landscape, customized
lawn care, sod, trim-
ming, landscape design.
Reasonable rates, free
estimates. Commercial
& residential. Licensed
and insured. Call 386-
496-2820, if no answer
please leave message.
CONCEALED WEAPONS
permit course. 1 hour


s(352) 275-8531
o 904-626-4550

Jonathan Ferguson, Owner
Lic. No. CBC1250311
133 West Call Street Starke, FL 32091


35$ for indiviaual or
group. call 904-9Q4-
5019.
KENDO KAN DO, -need
something done around
your house? Pressure
washing, lawn care.
landscaping, carpentry,
cleaning, house paint-
ing, all sorts of odd jobs.
Reliable, references pro-
vided, reasonable rates.
Call 904-964-3704.
HOUSE CLEANING years
of exp. For information
call Tina before 4pm at
904-964-5505.
64 Business
Opportunities
DIABETIC BREAK-
THROUGH. Millions are
beina helped. Millions to


be made. uall 407-332-
4422 or visit the web site
at www.sportron.biz/
care
65 Help
Wanted
GROWING CHILDCARE
Center is looking for
teacher assistants &
cook in Keystone
Heights. Please call 352-
473-2008 for informa-
tion.
INSTRUCTORS NEEDED
for afterschool position-
at Waldo. BA degree
required. Monday Fri-
day approximately 23
hours a week. Pay range:
is $15-$20 per hour.
Contact Rena Gibson af
352-468-1451.


$205,000

Fer uson
0 Homes inc.


SPu mp QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964
*Sales
umps

* Parts' .
*service 964-7061

Myers STATE LICENSE #1305
gm& Rotary Well Drilling 2-6"
SGPDAf 864 N. Temple Ave. US Hwy 301 N. I
Starke, FL

*I "iii -["u'j "I Ij


I AN AO


ALACHUA COUNTY
43+ acres Natural woodlatns, lots of
wetland, some dry. Good duck, turkey and
deer hunting. Minutes from 1-75,
Gainesville &Alachua on 20019 NW 91st
Street. Broker / Owner.


. ,CidI ge Dai S'l a o


Drivers Calling 0/0
Best Mileage Pay
We pay fuel
sur-charge
loaded & emptyl!!!!
Home Most
Weekends
No Touch Dry Van
Currently $1.07
all miles
Hogan eoe
800-444-6042
Class A -


RaE


Contracting, Inc.
is searching for an

Office Assistant
Qualified applicants will be familiar
with Microsoft Excel & Word.
Experience in Quickbooks a plus.
A k al


T.H.E. Apartments 386-496-4956
922 E. Brownlee St. Starke, Florida 386496-4956

Newly Remodeled 'Equal Emplopyment Opportunity
2 & 3 Bedrooms Available AffirmativeAction Employer
Rent is based on Income Drivers
WaterSewer
On-Site Laundry Facility & Play Areas
Office Open: Monday ., Friday 8:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Call (904) 964-7133 1f I Transport System, Inc.
-,- -- AF


Limited Openings
GREAT Pay ~ GREAT Benefits
GREAT Hometimes
6 MO. T/T Experience &
Class A CDL Req'd.


Call Doug today at
1-800-587-1964
epestransport.com


The Wackenhut Corporation is now hiring several
Custom Protection Officers for the Camp Blanding area.
Candidates with prior career military experience are highly preferred, but we are
also seeking officers with experience in either law enforcement, corrections, police
academy graduates or a criminal justice degree..
Wackenhut


-James & Unda Dailey
-Owners & Operators
? Licensed & Insured
TP -


Divorce Wills
S-Name Changes Adoptions
+*Corporations Notary
$35 to $250
COMPLETE DETAILS BY PHONE

8 (904) 964-5019
(352) 235-4350
Iu_ 8 am- 8 pm Since 1985


1.


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Page 10C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Jan. 12, 2006


Classified Ads


- where one call does it all!


ASSISTANT PARTS MAN-
AGER needed at ACE &
Garden in Keystone
Heights. Commerial
small engine experience
and computer knowl-
edge critical. Apply in
person to complete ap-
plication & initial inter-
view. Ask for Bob. Phone
352-473-4001.
LPN or RN, busy, friendly,
Pediatric office, benefits:.
Fax resume to 352-376-
4959 ore mail notneb @
bellsouth.net.
DIESEL MECHANIC
wanted, M-F, benefits,
pay according to experi-
ence, will train the right
person. Calll 352-468-
1644.
DAIRY FARM LABORERS
needed, hardworking
Dependable transporta-
tion, shift work, holidays
& weekends, starting
pay $7 per hour. Alachua
area. For more informa-
tion call 386-462-1016.
DRIVER- ARE YOU get-
ting top 10 pay? Leading
home time? Optional
Per Diem pay? Van or
Flatbed? Owner opera-
tors/students welcome.
Sign on bonus. Class A
required.-Roehl, "The
take home more, be
home more carrier." Call
7days/week $$$ 800-
626-4915 --$$$--
www.GoRoehl.com.
HELP WANTED- Con-
Sstruction Contractor and
sub-contractors several
openings in various ar-
eas of building (framing,
finish, roofing, concrete/
block, plumbing, electri-
cal & siding) must have
experience in one or
more of construction
phases, own tools and


transportation. Call 352-
258-0865.
AVON REPS needed in all
areas. Start up and earn
50%, total investment
$10. Start today, local
training. Call Sherry at
904-964-8851.
DISCOVER HOW ANY-
ONE can earn $25, $50,
even $100 or more in as
little as 2-3 minutes per
day taking easy "No-
Brainer" surveys! Start
today! http://
clickbank. net/
?countrymom/sponline.
SHOP HELP NEEDED, fi-
berglass manufacturing
and trimming will train.
Full time 40 hour week.
Apply in person at U S
Body Source, 1.5 miles
South of Hampton on
CR 325.
CARE GIVER 2 years
experience working with
elderly or disabled cli-
ents. 2 or 3 days per
week. Su-EI's Retire-
ment Home, Hampton.
Phone 352-468-2619.
NURSERY HELP
NEEDED, weed pulling,
fertilizing act. Full time
40 hour week. Apply in
person atU S Body
Source, 1.5 miles South
of Hampto on CR 325.
SECRETARY/BILLING
CLERK &LPN NEEDED
full time.Will be working
with juvenile offenders
age 12-19 in a treatment
program. Union County
area. Back ground
check required, benefits,
vacation time, sick days,
401K offered. Call 386-
431-1999 or fax resume
to 386-431-1089.
CAREGIVER EXP. FT for
Christian Assisted living
facility. Night shift 11pm


to 7am. Must work ev-
ery other weekend. No
phone calls please. Ap-
ply at Park of the Palms
706 Palms Circle, Key-
stone Heights FI.
PHARMACY TECHNI-
CIAN certified needed.
Fax resume to Melrose
Pharmacy 352-475-
1467. 65
PAINTERS HELPER in
Union or Bradford Co.,
report to work in
Worthington Springs,
must havn reliable trans-
portation, call Heathg?'t
Jennings Painters Inc
532-373-9744-or toll free
877-229-4180.
CO DIRECTOR for large
childcare center to open
*in February. Competitive
salary DOE. Call 904-
769-1348.
FREE CHURCH PEWS.
we have 24 pews in
good condition. Call 904-
769-1198 ask for Mark.
CUSTOMER SUPPORT
needed immediately for
outgoing support & sales
calls. Sales, phones &
computer exp. neces-
sary. Smoke free envi-
ronmenI Fax resume to
352-473-5151 or email
to adminOstreet
graphics.com.
FULL TIME BRAKE and
Tire Mechanic,
Worthington Springs
area. Full benefits, 7:30
am to 5pm M-F, vaca-
tion, holidays & 401K.
Must have current DL.
Call 386-496-2251
JANITORAL POSITION
PT, Worthington Springs
area. Flexible afternoon
.hours, around 3 hours
per day M-F, cleaning
shop area. Call 386-496-
2251.


We're continuing to grow and in need of
qualified people to work at out Lake Butler
facility. Good benefits, pay based on
experience.. Apply in person at 1050 SE 6th
St. in Lake Butler or call 1-800-808-3052.

0 PRITCHETT TRUCKING


SERVICE DISPATCHER N E E 0 E 0

Full Time Position

Benefits Available-

Experience a plus, but not necessary
Please apply inh person at:

l Craig

2 FALSTREAUX
KlY i HEATINGAND AIR, INC.
228 South Walnut St. Starke, FL


t Get AJOB!!
jts 2006 and time for you to do what mom and dad says,
-except this is going to be fun! We are hiring 18-20 girls
and guys to Work and Travel all major cities and resort
areas! Earn $300-700 wk. No experience needed, we train!
SQhyeah, your transportation-&-lodging 1i--0ovi-d-ed too!
Sounds pretty .cool huh? That's because it is! There is a
catch, you must be sharp, 18 or over. Free to travel, and
free to start now!
PICK UP THE PHONE, CALL 1-800-701-1442
parents welcome @ interviews


GARFIELDS CLEANERS
(formerly-Allens Laun-
dry) PT help wanted.
Keystone & Melrose lo-
cations. Laundry mat
experience a plus but
not necessary. Pick up
applications at either lo-
cation. No phone calls
please.
COORDINATOR 4-5
hours weekly from home
for non profit, govt moni-
tored H.S. exchange
program: Work locally
with high schools, host
families & foreign teens.
Supplemental income,
training, international
travel opportunities.
background in travel or
education preferred.
Call 1-877-417-WORLD.
SUPPORTED LIVING
-coach for developmen-
tally disabled adults.
Must have 4 years of
experience in medical,
child care, or other re-
lated field. Must be on
call 24/7. Background
check required. Apply
ARC of Bradford 1351 S.
Water St.. Starke FL


32091. Call 904-964-
7699.
CARPENTERS & AP-
PRENTICES needed
exp required. Must be
willing to travel, have
own insurance,, trans-
portation and tools. Call
800-290-2983.
ENVIRONMENTAL
TECHNICIAN trainee
career opportunity. Entry
level position. Shop and
Field helper, one ton,
truck driver towing utiltiy
trailer over Easter US to
assist Senior Techni-
cirians collecting pollution
samples Irom smoke
stacks. Cannot be afraid
of heights, some heavy
lifting, work outdoors,
climb stairs and ladders.
Frequent travel and
overtime required. Work
in'the shop maintaining
vehicles and equipment
when not in the field.
DFWP screening and
DMV report required.
contact: AmbientAir Ser-
vices, Inc. 904-964-8440
Starke FL
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
PT Dependable and


NEEDED


Fast Track Foods Convenience Store
Company is seeking highly motivated
individuals with initiative to excel for
full and part-time employment at our
Lawtey location. Please call store
Manager at 904-782-1228 or call
Supervisor at 352-333-3011 ext. 43
and leave your name and number.


Drivers /FLATBED

Run the Southeast

HOME WEEKLY
* Lease Purchase Program -
* 100% Owner Operators
* Free Base Plates
* Paid Cargo / liability.
* 1 yr flatbed exp. Req.
* Excellent fuel-Surcharge
Call Faye @ 1-800-325-4436
or Vince @- .
1-888-522-5046 Ext 3220


trustworthy caregivers
needed to provide com-
panionship & home
helper services to senior
adults in their homes.
Flexibility and reliable
transportation required.
Call today 904-350-
1648.
ALL YOUR AUTO Me-
chanic needs for very
affordable prices. Spe-
cializing in Engine repair
and Transmission
changes. Will transport
your vehicle. Need a
.mechanic for-cheaper;
Call Bruce at 386-496-
2639.
THE YMCA is looking for


1 Part-time Position Available

4 Competitive starting salary

based on experience and education

4 Insurance Retirement Vacation


WHITEHEAD BROS., INCJLAKE CITY LOGISTICS, INGC
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED "
Go through Home several times most weeks"
Home most weekends. Personalized dispatching
that comes from only dispatching 25 trucks ai
our location here in Starke. Vacation pay, Safety
Bonus up to $1,200 per year. Driver of the Year
-'-bonus, and driver recruitment bonuses. Blue
Cross Blue Shield medical and dental insuranc-
Need 2 years of experience and a decent driving
- record.
CALLA JIM OR DEBBIE LAWRENCE i
904-368-0777 or 1-888-919-8898


a Program Supervisor,
over the age of 21 who
loves children, depend-
able, and has transpor-
tation. It is a part time
position for before and
after school care at Key-
stone Elementary. If in-
terested, please call
904-272-4304 ask for
Kim or Marilyn,
GILMAN BUILDING Prod-
ucts company is accept-
ing applications for Se-
curity Guard/Grounds
keeper at the Sawmill
located in Lake Butler. A
high school diploma or
equivalent is required.
Computer knowledge is


HELP WANTED
Shift Worker For
ASSISTED
LIVING FACILITY
Apply in person at Parkside ACLF
329 Church St., Starke
(904) 964-2220


required. We have com-
petitive rates & 401K,
dental & health insur-
ance, paid vacation, holi-
days & promotional op-
portunities. Interested
applicants should apply
in person, Monday
through Friday from
8:00am to 3:30pm at the
front office. Applicants
must bring SS card, pic-
ture ID and diploma.
LAKE BUTLER APART-


MENTS, maintenance
position available, 32
hours, w/benefits. Expe-
rience in: plumbing,
electrical, carpentry,
painting/sheetrock-re-
pair. Drug free work-
place, must have valid
DL and transportation.
Some travel required.
Call 386-496-3141 or
send resume to 1005
SW Sixth St, Lake BMt-
ler, Fl 32054. Equal Op-
portunity.Employer. -


Driver CDL A req'd --
HOME EVERY NIGHT &-
WEEKEND GUARANTEED


Avg. $707 $907/wk
No Touch Freight |
85% Preloaded/Pretarped |
Jacksonville, FL-Terminal:
877-428-5621
www.ctdrivers.com _


-Servers & Cashiers

. Needed --
- Local Full-Service Restaurant
CompetitiveSalary-BasedainExp.
S... ..(Positive attitude essential)
Call Matthew at

352-316-2934
M-W-F 2-4pm
." A Great Working Environment"
DFWP -EOE



." Wendy's of Waldo
i 15408 NE US-301 S.



NOW HIRING

SMILING FACES

,at competitive wages.

.Come work with us in a

fun, friendly atmosphere.


INTERVIEWS AT
10 AM AND 11 AM
MON thru FRI


NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE



/-


Oi ]I Y 1TI iii$


Q PRITCHETT

TRUCKING

$1,000 Sign On Bonus!
We have immediate positions for both local and
regional Day or night shift available. 401K,
Health Ins., Paid Vacation, Performance and
Safety Bonus... -,


I
r.
]..*


ASSISTANT MANAGER &
CUSTOMER SALES ASSOCIATES PRE-SCHOOL TEACHERS


I


U '


HEAVY TRUCK SHOP MANAGER


Must be experienced in all areas of the day-to-day .

operations of a large tractor-trailer fleet. Minimum of 5 yrs-

tractor-trailer fleet management experience required.

Excellent Salary and Benefits --


PAT SALMON & SONS OF FLORIDA .

Apply in person at 1501 Pickettville Rd. Jax, FL 32220

^.r~nv~xri ^ v^ o+ /nAi '79o1 -oI^ v


Il


uk '... rIay ia ui;I.ll. U aL U 7L r /UI 01 vr.-'


U


We have extended our sign on bonus for
a limited time! If you are considering

coming to work for Davis Express,


NO W IS THE TIME!!












Stay in the "Sweet Part" of the south
FL, GA, SC, NC, TN, AL

.40 cpm w/5 years OTR exp.
Guaranteed Hometime
Health & Disability Ins. Avail.
Life & Dental Ins. Provided
Additional Safety Bonus


904-964-6619 #6
Highway 301 South, Starke, FL
www.davis-express.com


TRUCK & TRAILER MECHANICS NEEDED


1


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