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 Section B: Regional News
 Section C: Features and Sports
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UF00028314 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Union County times
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028314/00050
 Material Information
Title: Union County times
Uniform Title: Union County times (Lake Butler, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Sprintow Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Lake Butler Fla
Creation Date: December 29, 2005
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake Butler (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Union County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Union -- Lake Butler
Coordinates: 30.021667 x -82.340833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1920?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 35 (Dec. 21, 1934).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000405777
oclc - 01512086
notis - ACF2020
lccn - sn 95047168
System ID: UF00028314:00050
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bradford County times

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        A 1
        A 2
        A 3
        A 4
        A 5
        A 6
        A 7
        A 8
    Section B: Regional News
        B 1
        B 2
        B 3
        B 4
        B 5
        B 6
        B 7
        B 8
    Section C: Features and Sports
        C 1
        C 2
        C 3
        C 4
        C 5
        C 6
        C 7
        C 8
    Section C: Features and Sports: Editorial/Opinion
        C 9
    Section C: Features and Sports: Classified Ads
        C 10
Full Text










USPS 648-200 Three Section (

USPS 648-200 Three Sections Lake Butler, Florida


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Thursday, December 29, 2005


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93rd Year 38th Issue 50 CENTS


www.UCS imesonlin mael.


City dedicates new building


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On Dec. 16, the city of Lake Butler officially dedicated above are some of the commissioners and employees
,its new city hall building. An open house was held that were part of the ceremony. From I-r, they are (first
during the afternoon so citizens could get a look at the row) Mike Banks, Hardy Clyatt, David Androlevich and
new facility. At 3 p.m., the city council, along with city Charles Harding (second row) Tillis, Linda Johns,
manager Richard Tillis, unveiled a plaque that Susan Shaw, Lynn Bishop, Fletcher Myers, Brantley
commemorated the event. The plaque, with the names CraWford, LeRoy Stalvey, Jimmy Beasley, Ricky
of the commissioners as well as the city employees, Jenkins and John Maines. For more pictures from the
will be hung in the lobby of the building. Pictured event, see the inside of this week's Union County
Times.


County's
growth hits

10 year high


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
Union County is beginning
to grow by leaps and bounds
and the county's tax rolls are
proof of it.
According to the Union
County Property Appraiser's
office, the final gross taxable
value for property totaled
$186,467,263. That is an
increase, of more than $14
million over 2004. Last year
the increase was just over $5.5
million.
The jump equates to an
overall increase of more than 7
percent. That increase is in
sharp contrast to the past 10
years. From 1994-2004, the
average increase in taxable
value was only 3 percent.
The jump also confirms a
recent study by the United
States Census Bureau that
found that Union County was
one of the top 10 counties in
terms of growth in the state. It
also showed it was one of the
top 100 counties in, the
country.
One contributing factor to
the increase is the number of
residential subdivisions that
have been approved in the
county. During 2005, the
county commission approved
12 new developments to be
constructed. The new
communities helped raise the
number of real estate parcels in
the county. According to the
property appraiser's office,
199 new parcels of land were
added to the tax rolls in Union
County. This is a substantial
increase over past years as,
well.
Ai-other, area. where growth.
in the county is bucking past
trends is in the number of site
built homes versus mobile
homes. In 2005, 37 single
family residences were added
to the tax rolls. This figure was
identical to 2004. The number
of mobile homes added was
32. This is down from last
year's number, 48.


See GROWTH, p. 2A


Union County
Times
announces
holiday hours
The Union County Times
will have modified office
hours on Friday, Dec. 23
and Dec. 30. The offices
will be closed on both days
so that employees can enjoy
the holidays with the
families. Deadlines have not
changed for either week.
Ads can be submitted up
until Tuesday at noon both
weeks. For more
information, call (386) 496-
2261.



Be SMART
about your


health...
The Self-Managing
Awareness Rural Team
(SMART) provides free
education to people in
Bradford or Union counties
who have diabetes or high
blood pressure.
1 The grant-funded program is
not aimed at low income
people, but at almost all
patients with diabetes or high
blood pressure. The free
program provides information
that will allow the patient to
better manage his. or her own
health.
For more information, call
Lake' Butler Hospital at (386)
496-0973..


"Chicken Fridays" a

favorite for everyone


Danny Ray Harris


By GAIL D. LIVINGSTON
Special to the Times .
Cook it and they will
come.
At about the same time
every week students,
teachers, faculty and even
some from the community
gather at the double doors of
the cafeteria, inhaling the
savory aroma that permeates
the air around them. There can
only be one cause for this
unusual phenomenon, it must
be "Chicken Friday" at Union
County High School.
The UCHS cafeteria has
been serving up "Broaster"
chicken for several years now,
with Friday becoming the day
you just have to eat in the
cafeteria. The popularity of
"Chicken Fridays" has become
well known among the staff at
the high school; even a
valedictorian speech several
years ago was partially
dedicated to "Chicken
Fridays" about how you
should never be late to the
cafeteria on this day .of the
week.
So, what is the secret behind
this scrumptious delicacy?
Some may say it's the way it
is cooked, which adds more
volume per hour and more
flavor per bite. The chicken is
cooked in a "Broaster"
pressure fryer, making the
chicken more tender and juicy.
The broaster cooking
method allows for a shorter


cooking time and uses less oil
than the traditional process.
The cafeteria staff at the high
school begins cooking the
chicken at around 7:45 a.m. on
Friday and is usually through
by 11 a.m. On most Fridays,
cafeteria staff cooks 11 batches
of chicken for a total of
approximately 150 pieces,
serving around 300 meals,
which are about'100 more
meals than on 'a normal
weekday. It takes less than 10
minutes to cook each batch of
chicken, which is cause for
less oil absorption and
therefore a healthier product.
However, the broaster magic
can't work without the help of
the cafeteria staff, which
consists of five full-time
employees and one part-time
employee.
Brigette Slocum is the new
manager at the UCHS cafeteria
having moved to Lake Butler
in 1999. Slocum was born in
Ft. Myers and lived in Venice,
then moving to Rocky Ford,
Ga., until she was fourteen.
She then moved to Orlando,
where she later met her
husband Art Slocumb III, who
works for an air
conditioning/refrigeration
company in Gainesville. The
couple has two sons, Preston
Kinsey and Dustin Slocumb
and two daughters, Amanda

See FRIDAY, p. 3A


Looks like chicken, smells like chicken ...tastes like chicken!
Cafeteria workers' T-shirts tell the whole story for "Chicken Fridays" at Union
County High School each week, boasting of the savory favorite for students, staff
members and many from the community that have come to love the delicious
"Broaster" cooked delicacy.


For crime, socials and editorials, see Regional News section. For sports, see Features and Sports section.


Deadline noon Monday before publication 386-496-2261 (phone) 386-496-2858 (fax)


SCRC hosts
New Year's Eve
singing
The Sanderson Christian
Revival Center will host a New
Year's Eve gospel sing on
Saturday, Dec. 31 beginning at
8 p.m. Featured singers will be
Danny Ray Harris, Jordaina
Bridges and the SCRC Fire
Choir. The event is free and all
are welcome. The church is
located on C.R. 229 in
Sanderson. For more
information, contact Duwayne
Bridges at (386) 965-0127.


Normal Deadline is 5
p.m. Monday before
the Thursday
publication date.
Articles can be
submitted to the Times
office on Main Street in
Lake Butler or to the
Telegraph office (131
W. Call St., Starke).
Phone 386-496-2261
or call 904-964-6305 in
Starke.





6 89076 63869 2


LZ


Note



This!


30Cs 'C-010




li


Page 2A UNION COUNTY TIMES Dec. 29, 2005


GROWTH
Continued from p. 1A
Nita Jones, chief deputy of
the property appraiser's office,
said it's been some time since
that has happened.
"Not since 1997 have we
had more site built homes
added to the tax rolls than
mobile homes," Jones said.
The figures only include
mobile homes that were built
in 2004 and added to the tax
roll in 2005. Older mobile
homes, 2003 and older, that
were placed are not part of the
figures.
Another factor driving the
increase in property values is
people who are coming to the
area are paying more and more
to live in the county.
"People from South Florida
and up north are coming in and
paying high amounts for
parcels," Jones said. "While
we might think it's high; they
think they're getting a good
deal."
The fact that property values
are increasing at a rapid pace
can easily be found in property
values on the east side of Lake
Butler. The county recently
purchased 4.834 acres of land
with a house for $160,000.
Butler Townhomes, while not
complete yet, will also
contribute to the increase in
property value. Townhomes in
the project will be sold with a
staring price of $125,000.
Another rapid increase in
property values is happening in
the corridor between S.R. 121
and S.R. 100 in the Providence
and Worthington Springs area.
According to Jones, the
average being paid for one acre
of land in the area is $6,000.
"Just a few years ago that
average was $4,800," Jones
said.
One development that will
keep this trend going is the
Plantations at Providence.
Developer Grand Legacy LLC
is creating the project to
actually be three smaller
subdivisions.
"It will be similar to the way
Haile Plantation in Gainesville
is divided," said Rebeeca
Sheppard, spokesperson for
Grand Legacy.
The deed restrictions will
also be similar. The.82-parcel
project will require owners to
build a site-built home of at
least 1,800.square.feet. It also'
will be required to have paved
driveways. All roads and
common areas will be
maintained by the
subdivision's homeowners
association.
While residential property
has helped the county increase
taxable value, commercial
property has not. In 2005,
value of commercial property
in Union County increased by
$197,831. In 2004, that
increase was more than double
at $400,000.
The increase in value in
agricultural land decreased as
Swell. In 2005, the value of
agricultural land increased
$873,587. In 2004, that same
figure was more than $1
million.
Jones said that a fire-year
fluctuation in timber prices has
helped contribute to the
decrease.
"The price that is being paid
for timber has steadily
decreased over the past several
years," Jones said. "The
decrease finally caught up to
the value of agricultural
property."
What happens after trees are
cut is also affecting the value.
If the land is replanted after
cutting, the value of the
property remains the same. If


the property is not, it is
reclassified, mainly as pasture
land, and the value decreases.
Jones said over the past
several years, not replanting
has been the trend.
"We are seeing more and
more land that is not being
replanted and as a result values
are decreasing," Jones said.

Exemptions take
away taxable value
While the county has more
than $186 million in taxable
property value, it has nearly as
much property it is not able to
tax. Federal, state and local
government land, the Save Our
Homes amendment and


Planning for the
future
While growth in Union
County has been on the rise,
county-provided services have
not. According to Union
County Emergency Medical
Services Director and Fire
Chief Allen Parrish, this could
be detrimental to the county.
During the board of county
commissioners' December
meeting, Parrish urged
commissioners to find ways to
increase services before the
issue became too big.
"I would really urge the
board, and I would call
*attention to the letter I gave


homesteads account for more everybody a couple weeKs ago,
than $178 million in property when we're looking at these
value that can not be taxed subdivsions, and I'm currently
each year. not opposed to them, I would
The largest contributor to really, really urge the board to
this total is the state. The look at the impact it has on all
property appraiser's office public services," Parrish said.
estimates that $68,601,053 in EMS, fire, the sheriff,
property value will not be emergency management and
taxed by the county in 2005 special needs, right on down to
because it is state owned. The the clerk's office. We are
Reception and Medical Center experiencing a tremendous
and Union Correctional amount of impact, and I can't
Institution account for most of urge that enough. I feel like
that total. I'm obligated as a department
The second largest head to try ,to head off
contributor to untaxable something down the road."
property value is homestead Parrish said he was not out
exemptions. Each year, to drain anybody of their
homeowners that claim a money, but by the same token
homestead exemption have the was trying to look out for his
first $25,000 of taxable value organization as well as other
taken, off the taxable value of public service organizations.
their property, "We approved quite a few
According to the property lots in the last couple months
appraiser's office, 2,149 homes and I really want the board to
in Union County qualified for understand the impact it has,
the break in 2005. It accounted Parrish said.
for $53,725,000 in taxable
value being removed from the James Redmond can be
tax rolls, reached at (386) 496-2261 or
Local government is another uctimes@alltel.net
large contributor to property
values being removed from tax
rolls.. According to the
property appraiser's office,
$20,360,517 was removed in
2005. This includes, the
courthouse, the city of Lake
Butler city hall and various
parcels the county owns.
Churches, schools and civic
groups also account for a large
portion. More than $11 million
in taxable property value was
removed from tax rolls in 2005 In the early 1940s, Prime
for these organizations. Minister Winston
The "Save Our Homes" Churchill ordered that
.amendment takes away another Britain's carousels be re-
estimated $21,721,331. Passed opened, despite
in 1992, the amendment allows ---. Mkat
taxes by. only.,3 .,percent, .r. , ;.A9ft- s-Iin fort tlo.
figure equal to the consumer boost morale during
price index, whichever is less. World War II.


S ". "" .'- ', '" '". .



-e-








Building gingerbread houses at LBES
Recently, Carolyn Parrish's first grade class at Lake Butler Elementary School made
gingerbread houses with help from their dads and grandpas. The event coincided
with the gingerbread unit the studnets were working on in class. Top: Travis Worrell
helps his son Taz Worrell build his house while Jake Whitehead looks on. Bottom:
Maggie Parrish (middle) gets.help with her building from her dad Brett Parrish (left)
and Grandpas Bobby parrish (second from right) and Larry Clyatt (right).


Body of
Christ
Assembly to
host service
The Body of Christ
Assembly Church of God in
Lake Butler will host a watch
night service on Saturday, Dec.
31, beginning at 9:30 p.m.
Sunday worship service will
begin at 8 a.m.
Elder Jacob D. James is
pastor. The public is invited.


BUSINESS & SERVICE


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145 SW 6th Ave.
496-3079


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Happy New Year
From


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CUSTOM CUTS
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FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed and.lnsured
386-496-2820


GMM 24 Log Home Packages To Be Offered At Public Auction.
Rogers Realty & Auction Co.
Saturday Jan.14th FLcense #AU2922
11:- A.M. 336.789.2926 or www.rogersrealty.com
Orlando, FL ,
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For More Information! 1.888.562.2246
Or Log Onto: www.auctionloghomes.com


Subscription Ra
$26.00 per yea
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Union County times
USPS648-200
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
UNION COUNTY TIMES
125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054
Web address: UCTimesonline.com
(386) 496-2261
John M. Miller, Publisher
Editor: James Redmond
ate in Trade Area Sports Editor: Clff Smalley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
:. Don Sams
r: .Darlene Douglass
Iths Typesetting: Joalyce Graham


Outside Trade Area: $26.00 per year: Newspaper Prod.
$13.00 six months Bookkeepig:


Earl W. Ray
Virglnia Vaugherty
Kathi Cone


V 1Thanks for your patronage through
the years, and we look forward to
serving you in the years to come.


1Un0on Countyp Timti

125 East Main St
Lake Butler, FL 32054
386-496-2261; Fax 386-496-2858

Visit us on the Web at: www.uctimesonline.com


Happy

New Year

to

Everyone!


NORTH FLORIDA
Equipments Rentals, Inc.
165 SW 4th Ave.
Lake Butler
386-496-2121


Wishing All
A Very
Nappy New Year!

KIRBY LASER
AND NEEDLE
EMBROIDERY
ENGRAVING
SCREEN PRINTING

JCeith... JCirby
OWNER and OPERATOR
395 W. Main St., Suite C
Lake Butler, FL 32054
Phone: 386-496-3792
Fax: 386-496-3796


UNION MEDICAL SUPPLY
Sal Perez
1386-496-36561
655 East Main StC
Lake Butler, FL


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I







Dec. 29, 2005 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page 3A


FRIDAY


Continued from p. 1A
and Randi Slocumb. Brigette
received her GED through the
Even Start program in Union
County in March 2004.
"I have only been working at
the UCHS cafeteria for five
months," said Slocumb, "I
enjoy working here and
couldn't ask for a better group
of people to work with. All the
kids are great and I look
forward to seeing them
everyday."
Paula Bennefield, who has
worked with the school system
for 15 years, recently had to
take a medical leave of
absence, but has since returned
to the cafeteria staff.
Bennefield was named the
School-Related Employee of
the Year last year at the high
school.
"I've been very blessed with
my husband of 34 years, four
children and eight
grandchildren," noted
Bennefield. "I enjoy my job
and serving kids."
Brenda Pittman has lived in
Lake Butler for the past 22
years and has been married to
Gary Pittman for the same
length of time. The couple has
two daughters, Kari, 17, who is
a senior at UCHS, and
Brittany, 14, who is in the
eighth grade at Lake Butler
Middle School. Pittman has
worked in food service for
seven years, the last three
years at UCHS. When not
working, Pittman enjoys cross
stitching, fishing and doing
wonder word puzzles. She
loves watching football games,
"Especially UCHS football,"
said Pittman. "I also enjoy
watching and taking part in the
UCHS band's halftime
performances, especially since
my daughters are in it."
"The kids here at UCHS are
greet," noted Pittman. "I enjoy
serving them every day. The
staff is wonderful and the
ladies I work with are all
outstanding."
Ramona Crawford has been
with the school system for five
years, off and on, over the past
21 years. She has been married
to Dwayne Crawford for 18
years and they have two
children, Justin, 16 and Trevor,
six. Crawford graduated from
the Union County Shool ,.
system.and is the daughter of
Virginia Lamb' who was" an i
employee of the school board
for 22 years.
"I am working at the high
school and I'm doing the same
thing my mom did all those
year ago," said Crawford. "I
really enjoy my job and I like
what I am doing here. We have
a good group of workers and I
like working with them. We
have changed managers and
workers since last year and it
has been a challenge, but a
good one to work with these
past and present workers.
Thanks for letting me be a part
of this school as an employee."
Regina Richard is new to the
staff at UCHS, however, she.
and her husband are natives of
Union County, having both
graduated from UCHS in 1983.
The couple has four daughters,
Beth, 18; Courtney, 16;
Breezy, 15 and Cathe, 13. The
couple also has a one-year old
grandson named Hunter.
"This is my first year
working at UCHS," stated
Richard. "I really enjoy
working here. The people I
work with are great and the
kids that come through my line
everyday are great also."
Rutha Mae Weeks is the
cafeteria's part-time worker,
although she has been with the
school system for 35 years.
Her husband of 51 years,
Cleveland Weeks, is also an
employee of the school system.
The couple has eight children.
"I started working for the
Union County School Board in
1969, working full-time for 30
years." said Weeks. "I retired
and came back and have been
working part-time now for five
years. I have enjoyed working
for the school system and I
enjoy serving the kids."
It takes a lot of hard work to
bring together a meal every
day to serve the students of
Union County. However, the
team work of the cafeteria staff
makes the job seem as simple
as just preparing a family meal
and still manages to smile and
greet everyone that comes
through the line.


M'm! M'm!
Good!
(Photo right)
Joseph Perry
finds his
chicken to be
"finger-
licking" good
at the UCHS
cafeteria.
(Photo below)
Rutha Mae
Weeks serves
up chicken
with a smile.


NRSWA to
meet Jan. 12
The New River Solid Waste
Association, the governing
board of the New River,
Regional Landfill in Raiford,
will meet again on Thursday,
Jan. 12, at 5:30 p.m. in the
boardroom at the landfill.
Please make note the new
meeting time.
: The-.association is cApr.Cigt
. of cpunty.o~ lipisipnes. fn.,
Bradford, -Baker: and Union
counties, and its meetings are
open to the public. Agendas
are available in advance. For
more information, call (386)
431-1000.

Focus on the
future
If you are 35 years or older
and have lost financial support,
the Displaced Homemaker
Program can help, you make
the transition to the job market.
Homemakers can develop
self-sufficiency and
confidence, learn job search
and interview skills, create a
master application and' resume,
and gain basic computer skills
while finding supportive
friends. There are even special
topic workshops covering
health care, legal and employer
issues.
Free classes and workshops
are offered monthly, and the
next classes begini Jan. 17. Call
the Displaced Homemaker
Program at' Santa Fe
Community College at (352)
395-5047 to make an intake
screening appointment.


Cornelius Van de
Steeg of Perry, Iowa
was a practicing
lawyer 'until the age 6f
,101. -


*


To out many felandse
and eustornriet, we wieh
the very best of happy,.
SeUieeeOs-fillied titnec,


Maines Insurance
& Real Estate
25 E. Main St., Lake Butler
496-3978


rm-


SCRC veterans help troops in Iraq

.' ., j ,

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Military veterans from the Sanderson Christian Revival Center assisted Sgt. Mike
Wilcox, a national guard recruiter, with Operation Christmas for the troops in Iraq.
The group collected cards and letters from local residents letting the troops know
they are appreciated. "The troops need to be encouraged from home," Wilcox said.
Along with the words of encouragement went baby wipes, non-perishable snack
items and magazines. SCRC Pastor Duwayne Bridges even challenged local groups
to help support the effort. "We support our troops and this let them know they were
appreciated," said Bridges. Items were sent Nov. 28. Above are the individuals who
participated in the drive. From left to right, they are: Larry Sluder, Al Wright, David
Williams, Marty Martin, Art Morris and Wilcox.



Parents get tips for preparing children


Parents of pre-kindergarten students from Little Rainbow Learning Center, Tiger's
Den Daycare and Lake Butler Elementary School Pre-K gathered recently at LBES to
learn ways to prepare their child for kindergarten next year. Elizabeth Vandiver and
Kelly Andrews, kindergarten teachers at LBES, showed parents the academic
expectations of today's kindergarten class. "Reading to your child is one of the best
ways to help them become good readers," Vandiver said. Patsy Fortner, parent
coordinator for the Union County School district, also shared reading strategies with
the parents. Another parent workshop will be held in the spring. Vandiver (right) is
pic~i't i&,1dv'speaRIc to parents during the workshop. For more information
aboulit fhe woi~kshopcnfact Vandiver atLBES at (386) 496-3047.


Have a


Prosperous
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Page 4A UNION COUNTY TIMES Dec. 29, 2u05


Commission rejects idea of
safety inspections


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
An i.'-. by Commissioner
Ricky Jenkins to conduct
safety inspections at county
facilities never even made it to
a vote at the board's Dec. 19
meeting.
While receiving information
from Emergency Management
Director Doug York, Jenkins
proposed that the county
conduct safety inspections of
all county-owned facilities.
"Mr. York and I have been
talking for the past two or
three weeks about looking into
the county facilities, like the'
road department, solid waste
and the collection centers and
somebody going out and
inspecting them to be sure
we're safe for fire and
hazardous materials and to
make our facilities safe for our
people," Jenkins said.
Jenkins then asked the board
to give York permission to
take the county down the path.
"He could come up with a
formula and meet with all the
department heads and work
with them to see what we can
do to make our work places a
better place," Jenkins said.
Chairman Wayne Smith said
he only saw one problem with
the idea.
"When he does that he'll
have to make that public
record," Smith said. "That
could be used in a liability suit
if someone got hurt."
Jenkins then suggested that
the inspections could be done
by York as an internal county
employee.
"All I want someone to do is
like an insurance company, an
internal county employee, who
would look at the road
department and say, 'Look,
you all are misusing this
area,'" Jenkins said.
Smith then turned to county
attorney Hal Airth for his
thoughts on the idea.
"It becomes public record
and it's documented and if you
have a situation that is not


Three-Rivers
Legal offers
services
Three Rivers Legal Services
will meet with potential clients
at the Bradford County
Courthouse in Starke from
1:30-3 p.m. on the first and
third Wednesday of each
month. The next dates for the
service will be on
Wednesday, Nov. 2 and 16.
For-the past 25 years, Three
Rivers Legal Services has
provided civil legal assistance
to low income residents of 12
counties in North Central
Florida, including Bradford
and Union counties. Assistance
includes advice,, brief services
and/or representation in a
variety of civil matters,
including landlord/tenant,
public benefits, consumer
issues, domestic violence and
family safety.
Three Rivers currently
serves the residents of
Bradford County with initial
contact made through
telephone appointments or
travel into Gainesville. With
new space created by the
expansion of the Bradford
County Courthouse and
approval of filing fee funds
directed to Three Rivers,
attorneys will once again be on


corrected, then you have a
situation the county has
knowledge of and didn't do
anything to fix," Airth said.
Jenkins then expressed the
need to do whatever was
necessary to move forward
with the program.
"What we need to do is what
we need to do," Jenkins said.
"That needs to be taken care
of."
Commissioner Melaine
"Red" Clyatt then expressed
full faith in the department
heads being able to do the job
themselves.
"We need to correct these
safety issues, but the
department heads need to do
that 6n their own," Clyatt said.
Jenkins then said a fresh pair
of eyes could only help the
inspections.
"You need an outsider every
now and then to come in,"
Jenkins said. "I'm not saying
anything about our department
heads."
Commissioner Morris Dobbs
said he totally disagreed with
the idea.
"I think our department
heads are capable of taking
care of the situation," Dobbs
said.
Jenkins agreed with Dobbs.
"I know they are, but there's
some things they don't see,"
Jenkins said.
After having three other
commissioners comment
against the idea, Jenkins
withdrew the idea.
"If you don't want to do it,
that's fine," Jenkins said.
"Doug, thank you."
York was suggested by
Jenkins to do the inspections
because of York's background.
He spent many years with the
state fire marshal's office as an
arson investigator, fire safety
inspector and personnel
trainer.
According to the fire
marshal's office,, it is not
mandatory for the county to do
any type of safety inspections
on any of its. facilities.
James Redmond can be
reached at (386) 496-2261 or
uctimes@alltel.net


site tor interviews and working
w'ith" clients.
Three Rivers Legal Services
is a federally and privately
funded local nonprofit
organization based in
Gainesville with a second
office in Lake City. It is
funded for the sole purpose of
providing free civil legal
services to low income,
eligible clients. Clients must
meet federal poverty
guidelines and cases must fall
within the program priorities
set by the board of directors.
Potential clients may call
(800) 372-0930 or (352) 372-
0519 for an appointment. Go
to the clerk's office at the
courthouse to find out where
Three Rivers will be for the
day.


Union County
Adult School
offers classes
The Union County Adul
School is offering classes t(
help individuals receive thei
-General Education Diploma.
Teachers at the school wil
help students improve theii
basic reading, writing anc
math skills. Students are taught
in small groups. Instructors
provide one-on-one instruction
as well. Students may enroll at
anytime during the school
year. Regular classes are held
on Monday and Thursdays
from 6-9 p.m.
The program helps students
prepare for all five areas of the
GED exam. Language arts,
reading, language arts writing,
social studies, science and
math are all covered in the
course. Classes are free of
charge to students. The school
offers GED testing on a
frequent basis.
The program also has a way
for parents to earn their
diploma. The Even Start
program offers parents with
children ages birth to 7 years, a
way to get their education. The
program offers free child care
while parents attend classes.
Classes for this program are
held Monday-Thursday from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Parenting classes are offered
through this program as well.
The school is located at 208
S.E. Sixth Street in Lake
Butler. For more information
contact Barry Sams at (386)
496-1300 or Darla Davis at
(386) 496-4858.


Ombudsman
Council seeks.
volunteers
The Long-Term Care
Ombudsman Council is a
group of concerned citizens
whose goal is to improve the
quality of life and care for
people who live in licenses
long-term care facilities such
as nursing homes, assisted
living facilities, adult family
care homes and long-term care
units in hospitals. A trained,
certified volunteer ombudsman
is given authority under
Florida, law., -to identify,
investigate and resolve
complaints made by, or on
behalf of, long-term care
facility residents.
The North Central Florida
Long-Term Care Ombudsman
Council serves residents in 11
counties, including Alachua,
Bradford and Union. The
ombudsman's job is to
advocate, defend and protect
the rights of residents and
assure that residents receive
fair treatment and quality care
by investigating and resolving
complaints, visiting each
facility to evaluate conditions


and to conduct annual
inspections.
The council is seeking
qualified and caring volunteers
to serve residents in the 11-


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c'J


Lane named UCHS top youth volunteer


Jessica Lane was recently presented with the Prudential Spirit of Community Award.
The award was presented to her for being the top youth volunteer at Union County
High School for the 2005-06 school year. Her many hours of community service
helped her win the award. Some of those include directing youth activities and
choirs. The award has propelled Lane to the state-level, where she has the chance to
win $1,000 and a trip to Washington, D.C. Lane is a senior and is the daughter of
Steve and Marlene Lane of Lake Butler. She pictured above with Superintendent of
Schools Carlton Faulk, who presented her with the award at the school board's Dec.
13 meeting.


county area. For more
information, please contact
Jody Dolsberry at (352) 955-
5015 or (888) 831-0404.


Call before
you dig-
be safe
Sunshine 'State One Call, of
Florida, Inc. wants a message
sent to everyone in Florida.
That message is "call before
you dig." There is a Florida
law that requires anyone doing
any digging anywhere in the
state to first call. Sunshine'
State One Call at (800)" 432-'-
4770. The company's goal is
to prevent costly damages to
underground utility lines and
cables and loss of services to
businesses and the public.
Unfortunately, damage and
sometimes personal injuries do
occur because companies fail
to call Sunshine State One Call
two full business days before
they start a project that
involves excavation.
Remember to call before you
dig.


Success is to be measured not so much by the position
that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he
has overcome while trying to succeed.
-Booker T Washington
***


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Dec. 29, 2005 UNION COUNTY TIMES Page SA


EMS -director urges

residents to post new

address


By JAMES REDMOND
Times Staff Writer
Union County Emergency
Medical Services is asking all
Union County residents to
make sure their new 911
addresses are clearly posted in
an area emergency personnel
will be able to clearly see it.
At the county commission's
Dec. 19 meeting, Emergency
Medical Services Director
Allen Parrish urged
commissioners to speak with
people in their district about
posting their new address.
"It's critical that citizens
have these numbers posted so
that emergency personnel can
use the system to get to them
in a timely manner," Parrish
said.
He told commissioners that
that while most emergency
personnel knew the layout of
- the county, new personnel not
familiar with the county might
struggle to find residents
without the number in place.
"Being able to find a
residence quickly could
literally be a matter of life or
death," Parrish said. "By
making sure your 911 address
is in place, you assure a
quicker response from
emergency personnel."
When the county enacted
legislation for the new system,
it required residents to post the
new address in two places. The
first being the dwelling in
which residents lived. The
second was for residents to
post the number at the entrance
of their driveway.
The numbers need to be at
least 3 inches tall. The must
also be at least 1.5 inches in
width. All numbers. must
contrast in color with the
background on which they are
affixed and must be visible day


or night.
While this is the minimum
standard, Parrish told
commissioners that it was vital
that the addresses could be
seen, especially at night.
"The easier it is for
personnel to spot the address,
the faster emergency personnel
can get to a resident to assist
them," Parrish said.
Parrish told commissioners
that, as the county grows, it
will be more and more
important that the system is in
place.
"As the county expands, it
will be necessary to put more
emergency personnel in place,"
Parrish said. "Many of those
people will not be from this
county and will rely on the
system to get to residents
quickly."
When emergency
management first distributed
the new addresses to residents,
each was provided with two
sets of numbers that met the
county's minimum standard.
"If residents have lost those
numbers, we-will replace them
so that they can ensure the
address is posted," Doug York
said, director of emergency
management. "If residents
have lost their new address,
they can call OEM for that as
well."
In June the county fully
converted all addresses to the
new system. It a universal
system that is used in most
towns and counties across the
United States. The system
helps first respeonders, such as
fire, EMS and police find a
location even if they had never
been in the county previously.
James Redmond can be
reached at (386) 496-2261 or
uctimes @alltel.net


AARP offers from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. There are
driver safety no tests. The eight hour
classroom instruction refines
prOgrag.r ""' M"''"' drirtg:-sldlland devaops...,
AAR.P will offi d ive Thfen, d~vi techniijes..
safety courses throughout the The certificate received by
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?2 rom?.1^ and Jan2 and^ Ja.3


4-H'ers ready cattle/swine projects for fair


By COLAN COODY
4-H Program Assistant
Union County 4-H'ers were
ready and 15 4-H cattle
projects were registered to
show.
This was the second step in
preparation for the upcoming
Bradford/Union Fair in March.
With 108 days until the final
weigh in, 4-H'ers will be
feeding, training and grooming
the cattle projects. Steer
projects must gain 2.5 pounds
per day, or 270 pounds to
qualify for the final weigh in
on March 20.
Saturday, Dec. 10, 21 Union
County 4-H'ers tagged their


swine projects for the fair. The
4-H'ers will have 100 days to
get their pigs trained and ready
to show.
The pigs are almost ninety
90 pounds and will need to
weigh at least 240 pounds by
March 20. Normally, pigs gain
about 1.7 pounds per days.
This does not leave much room
for error by the project
managers.
4-H'ers will have a lot of
time, money and work getting
their cattle projects ready to
exhibit in March. Each one is
hoping for a Grand Champion
and blue ribbon.
So, make your plans to come
to the Fair and see what the 4-
H'ers have accomplished.


Recipe for success: Study while others are sleeping; work
while others are loafing; prepare while others are playing;
and dream while others are wishing.
-William A. Ward
***


A Bright

New Year
May the New Year bring
the best of everything to
our friends and neighbors.
Thanks for letting us
serve you!


Sandra L. Gass, m
386-496-1878
235 SW 4th Ave., Suite 2,
Lake Butler


- -~3~T~


*' -




-. '; i-
_, ,* '*p. "* *f "-:, i


Stacie Ellis, of the Millertown 4-H club, and Teigan
Renering of the County Wide Livestock 4-H club wait
with their entire to be weighed in.


Keep in mind that neither success nor failure is ever final.
-Roger W. Babson


Homeowners with money worries
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Page 6A UNION COUNTY TIMES Dec. 29, 2005


Forest Operations program begins at LCCC


Page.6AUNION CUNTY.T-ES De-.29,-200


National Kidney
Foundation
looking for
donated cars
The National Kidney
Foundation's Kidney Cars
Program is a charitable
contribution plan that enables
you to turn in your used car,
van, truck or even boat and
very likely receive two
benefits you won't get from a
regular dealer trade-in (or from
a holiday song).
You'll get a good feeling
and you may even get a tax-
deduction. Eighty-four percent
of Americans who donated
vehicles to the National
Kidney Foundation's Kidney
Cars Program last year
itemized their tax returns and
were able to reap a charitable
deduction for their
contribution. And if you want
this possible tax saving,
remember to donate your


Americans have put the pedal-
to the metal and accelerated
their charitable giving at year's--
end by donating to the
National Kidney Foundation's
Kidney Cars Program. To
donate online go to
www.kidney.org/support.


vehicle to the foundation by
December 31. If you happen to
be a last-minute shopper, no
problem: that is the last day of
the year.
Then there's that good
feeling, the one you experience
when you give something that
helps people in need in your
own Call it pride, call it
contentment, call it self-
satisfaction. Either way, it's
something only you can
describe. And when you
donate your vehicle to the
Kidney Cars Program, your
feel-good gift will provide
funds to help children who
suffer from kidney disease go
to camp, transport patients to
dialysis and screen those at
risk for chronic kidney disease.
Your vehicles will also
pump dollars into public health
education, organ donation
programs and medical research
to prevent, kidney disease. No
wonder thousands of


Recently the students of the Lake City Community College Forest Operations program
enjoyed an industry appreciation luncheon beginning the new one-year program. The
students were also awarded scholarships to the program. The lunch was an old-fashioned
barbeque with meat supplied by Greg Driskell, of Plum Creek (formerly Georgia-Pacific),
and the forestry club funds purchased all the trimmings from Chartwells, the on-campus
food service. The industry advisory members are all volunteers and devote many hours of
service this program and in addition, are future employers for the students upon
completion of the program. They were Instrumental in establishing the curriculum of the
new program going into effect in the 2005-06 semester. Pictured above are, (kneeling, I-r)
Mark Crow, Florida Division of Forestry, Lake City; Mike Conlon, committee chairman,
Rayonier Inc., Lake City; and Greg Driskell, Plum Creek Timber, Lake Butler, (standing, I-r)
Kurt Havird, LCCC faculty; Don Curtis, The Forestry Company, Perry; Tommy Spencer,
USFS Osceola National Forest, Olustee; Steve Vani, Cochran Forest Products, Lake City;
Wally Ellis, Greenville Timber Corporation, Lake Cit#; John Piersol, GLF division chairman
and Jim Grimes, LCCC faculty. Not Pictured: Bobby Armstrong, PCA; Dr. George Blakesly,
University of Florida; Earl Clark, Robbins Manufacturing, Webster; Jeff Doran, Florida
Forestry Association; Derrick Herring, Smurfit Stone Container; Bill Foster, USFS, Osceola
National Forest; Charlie Houder, Suwannee River Water Management District; Roger
Hunziker (retired) Georgia-Pacific; Mike Long, Florida Division of Forestry; Matthew
Simpson, Natural Resources Planning Services. Pictured below are students who
received scholarships and advisory board members and faculty. They are, (kneeling, I-r)
Felicia Gainous, Tallahassee; Dwayne Davitt, Tallahassee; Lodlsca Beichner, Lake City;
Justin McAlpine, Starke; Chris Clark, Trenton; George Ross, Lexington, Miss; and Steve
Lantrey, Lake City, (standing,l-r) Fred Brown, Zachery, LA; Kurt Havird, LCCC faculty;
Blake Cooper, Branford; Don Curtis, Perry; Amanda Yeagr, Green Cove Springs; Mark
Crow, Florida Division of Forestry, Lake City; Cody Richards, Lake City; Tommy Spencer,
USFS, Osceola National Forest; Mike Conlon, Rayonler Inc.; Samantha Curry, Lake City;
Steve Vani, Cochran Forest Products, Lake City; Wally Ellis, Greenvill Timber Corp., Lake
City; Greg Driskell, Plum Creek Timber, Lake Butler; and Jim Grimes, LCCC faculty.


Map the AtW pear
bring cntinueb peace
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96 E. Main St.
Lake Butler


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Imagination is not a talent
of some men but is the
health of every man.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
*.**


395 WEST MAIN STREET
LAKE BUTLER, FL 82054
(386) 496-6099


County
commission
meets third
Monday
The regularly scheduled
meeting of the Union
County Board of County
Cpothmissioners is scheduled
for Monday, Jan. 16 at 7
p.m. The board the meets on
the third Monday of each
month. For more
information, call (386) 496-
4241.


Narconon
offers help
with addiction
Narconon offers free
addiction counseling,
assessments and referrals to
rehabilitation centers
nationwide and to your local
community. Call (800) 468-
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and two-sided modes), Internal Finisher, and
a helpful, segregated Job Separator. Long-
life components and a lower total cost of
ownership makes the CS-1650 the affordable
and Intelligent choice.


I

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[S7N uh IMM


CALL RUSTY FOR INFORMATION


THE OFFICE SHOP
20-YEARS EXPERIENCE ON ALL OFFICE MACHINE REPAIRS

(904) 110 W. Call St., Starke, FL FAX:
964-5764 ,ZA us quite yaur .iet oi&r--. (904) 964-6905


Best Wishes
for a Great








With thanks for
another
year of trusted
service.

Union County
Extension Service
Jacque Breman Colan Coody
Agriculture 4-H Youth Program
Diana Smith
General Information
496-2321
25 NE 1st St.
Lake Butler, Fla.


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K& COMPANY
OLD FASHIONED PHARMACY
395 WEST MAIN STREET
LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054
(386) 496-8099
efFAST, PERSONAL SERVICE
f REE LOCAL DELIVERY
3fDISCOUNT PRICES
efMOST MAJOR
PRESCRIPTION PLANS HONORED
[fALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
I~eSPECIAL ORDERS UPON REQUEST*


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American aviator
Charles Lindbergh is
said to have ridden a
carousel to relax before
taking off on what
became the first
successful solo nonstop
trans-Atlantic flight.


I


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I


29, 2005 UNION COUNTY 1iMES Page 7A


College to host LCCC offers la
science and enforcement
engineering training
fairs Lake City Commun
LCCC hosts the 2006 College will be offering
LCCC hosts the 2006 Auxiliary Law Enforcem
Columbia County Science and Auxiliary Law Enforcem
Engneeri Fair and Regonal Officer Academy cou
Engineering Fair andRegional beginning February 6, 20
Science and Engineering Fair. through June 30 2006 at a c
The local Columbia County of $1,377.55.
Science and Engineering Fair This program will
will be hosted by Lake City conducted on the Olust
Community College. The Campus in Building 3, Lab
annuary 18fair. &9 illn the Howard The hours will be 6 p.m; to
Gymnasium on LCCC the Howard p.m. Monday through Frid,
The fair includes projects from This course will not certify
The fair includes projects from individual to be a full-tir
elementary, middle, and high Florida Law Enforcement
schools in the county. Corrections Officer.
The fair this year includes Corrections Officer.
approximately 250 student Its designed to provi
projects in the fields of training for persons wishing
behavioral and social science, join law enforcement reser
chemistry, biochemistry, organizations and render l
boemistay, cp erscie, enforcement volunteer servi
borthnany, computer science, assisting fully certified l
earngianeering space sciencta ,enforcement officers.
engineering, environhentalth Applicants must meet sta
medicine and health minimum requirements for h
microbiology, physics and enforcement service to inclu
LCCC students will judge passing the Basic Abiliti
the elementary projects and 30 Test for Law Enforcement a
local community business a criminal history fingerpr
leaders will judge thbue middle check. Academy students mu
and high school projects. First, be 19 years of age before Ju
second and thirdplace ribbons 30, 2006, have a high schc
second and third place ribbons diploma or GED, and pass
will be awarded at each diploma or GED and pass
educational level. The 40 Best physical exam.
in Fair of the advanced levels There will be a mandate
will go on to compete in the preregistration/orientation
Regional Science and meeting on Wednesda
Engineering Fair. Judging of January 18, 2006 at 6 p.m.
Engineering Fair. Judging of Building 3 on the Olust
the projects will take place on Building 3 on the Olust
Wednesday, January 18 from 8 campusregistration material
a.m.-3 p.m. Open house for the and additional informati
community will be on the 18 lease call the La
from 3 p.m.- 6 p.m. The Enforcement Division at (38
awards ceremony will be held 754-4391forcement D (386) 754-43
oi Thursday, January 19, 6-7 74-439ontr 3 he L
p.m. for elementary and 7:30- or contact the La
8:30 p.m. for middle and high Enforcement Division byi I a
school in the Alfonso Levy brownd@lakecitycc.edu
Performing Arts Center on through the Lake Ci
The Suwannee Valley Community college Web pag
Regional Science and www.lakecitycc.edu
Engineering Fair will also be held on the Lake City
Community College campus
February 22 and. 23. The
region is comprised of 10
counties: Columbia, Union,
Suwannee, Bradford,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Baker,
Gilchrist, Dixie, and Madison.
Judging of the projects will
take place on Wednesday,
February 22 from 8 a.m.-3
g.m. Open house for the
immunity will be on the 22 About nine percent of
m3pmn- 6 p.m. The the.America,
FasqKe --wny-wil *-be-he" \ y?,BIa t a6-b on
Tlursdiy, Febriiary 23, 10 irr another country.
4m. in the Alfonso Levy
performing Arts Center on
&mpus. The winners will be
4le to participate in the State Wishini
Science and Engineering Fair
r Orlando, Florida on April \ S r
20. Some students.from prior E v R
*irs have even made it to the
international competition. U
fatie Reichert and Jessica
3tanton, both current students HaPPV
it Columbia High School have
rade it to the International NOW Yog
lair. Jessica Stanton placed
fourth in the 2005 Intel
International Science and
Engineering Fair in Phoenix,
Arizona. The 2006 Intel
International Science and
engineeringg Fair will be held
SIndianapolis, Indiana, May
"-13,2006. OJ=
S The fairs are coordinated by E NMAL CON.MuG
[igh School instructor, Renae
allen, Union County High
school instructor and Sa al the
acilitated by LCCC faculty
member Dr. Cheryl Boice, SoathaSte
science professor and Dr.
avid Murdock (retired) PCS llited States
engineer.
SFor more information, 40 S. Lake Avenue
contact Charleen Kelley at
tolumbia High School, Renae Lake Butler, FL 3209
Allen at Union County High
School (386) 496-4811 or 386-496-3107
Cheryl Boice at LCCC (386) 364631
7"d-4.7S1 _________


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ost
be
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1.
10
ay.
an
me
or
de
to
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ude
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ory
ay,
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ials
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83,
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St
or
ty
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telephone
marketers?
The Federal Trade
Commission reminds
consumers that the National
Do Not Call Registry has
accepted personal cell phone
and home phone number
registrations since it opened
for consumer registrations in
June 2003. There is no
deadline to register a home or
cell phone number on the
registry.
To register a telephone
number, or to file a complaint,
consumers should visit
www.donotcall.gov or call
(888) 382-1222 [TTY: (866)
290-4236].
Consumers registering a
phone number online will be
asked to provide a valid e-mail
address to which a
confirmation of the registration
will be sent. A registration is
not complete until the
consumer clicks on the link in
this e-mail.
Consumers registering by
phone must call from the
phone number they wish to
register.

People with goals succeed,
because they know where
they're going.
-Earl Nightingate


LEGALS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2005-CA-0084
UCN: 632005CA000084XXXCICI
WALTER MORTGAGE COMPANY
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY JOHN VARNES; JANET L.
VARNES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JANET LVARNES; UNION
COUNTY, FLORIDA;
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO THE FOLLOWING
DEFENDANTS):
JANET L VARNES
ROUTE 1, BOX 410
LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054
ALSO ATTEMPTED:
JANET L VARNES
7462 NW COUNTY RD. 225, LOT 5
STARKE, FL 32091
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JANET L. VARNES
ROUTE 1, BOX 410
LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054
ALSO ATTEMPTED:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JANET L VARNES
7462 NW COUNTY RD. 225, LOT 5
Z,STARKE, FL32091:..'
"YOUtAREtOTIFIsD that an actm,
to foreclose mortgage on the
following property In UNION County,
Florida:


JIoping 2006 is a
great year for you..



Roberts Land

& Timber
INVESTMENT CORP.
496-3509


THESOUH HLF.S....O.TH


THE SOUTH HALF (S1/2) OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4)
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
(SE1/4) OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER (NW1/4) OF SECTION
TEN (10), TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 20 EAST. CONTAINING 5
ACRES MORE OR LESS WITH A
FIFTY FOOT EASEMENT OVER
THE EAST FIFTY FEET OF THE
EAST HALF (E1/2) OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/4)
OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5,
RANGE 20 EAST.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on the
attomey for the Plaintiff:
NIXON & ASSOCIATES
3105 W. WATERS AVE., SUITE 204
Tampa, FL 33614
on or before January 23, 2006, or
within 30 days of the first publication
of this notice of action, and file the
Original with the Clerk of the Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
DATED on Dec. 12,2005.
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
UNION County
UNION COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054
Julia Croft
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH
DISABILITIES NEEDING A
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD
CONTACT THE A.D.A.
ADMINISTRATOR FOR THE
CLERK OF THE COURT NOT
LATER THAN 7 DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING, AT IF
HEARING IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-
800-955-8771. VOICE 1-800-955-
8770. THIS IS NOT A COURT
INFORMATION LINE.
Refer to File: FC 7365
12/22 2tchg. 12/29
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 05-0102-CA
EMC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
PAUL A. JONES A/K/A/ PAUL
JONES; CHANDA W. JONES;
UNKNOWN TENANT I;
UNKNOWN TENANT II; BOBBIE
LEE JONES; VIRGINIA A. JONES;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BOBBIE
LEE JONES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF VIRGINIA A. JONES; STATE OF
FLORIDA; and any unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and
other unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through and
under any of the above-named
Defendants.


I


p1


Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHANDA W. JONES
RR 4, BOX 3695
LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054
OR
RR5, BOX 5273
LAKE BUTLER, FL 32054
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
and any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors and other
unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through and
under the above-named
Defendantss, if deceased or whose
last known address are unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose Mortgage
covering the following real and
personal property described as
follows, to-wit:
A parcel of land lying in Section 1,
Township 6 South, Range 19 East,
Union County, Florida; said parcel
being more particularly described as
follows: Commence at a found 3"x3"
concrete monument located at the
Intersection of the Northwesterly right
of way line of CSX Transportation
Railroad and the West line of said
Section 1, for the Point of Beginning.
From the Point of Beginning thus
described run North 01 degrees 24
minutes 12 seconds West, as a basis
of bearings, along the West line
thereof, for a distance of 399.00 feet to
a set nail with cap; thence run North
82 degrees 07 minutes 36 seconds
East for a distance of 10.00 feet to a
set ,1/2" Iron rod located on the
Easterly right of way line of SW 85th
Trail (as maintained); thence
continue North 82 degrees 07
minutes 36 seconds East for a
distance of 429.50 feet to a set 1/2"
Iron rod located on the Northwesterly
rTght of way line of CSX
Transportation Railroad, thence run
South 42 degrees 49 minutes 54
seconds West, along last said right of
way line, for a distance of 626.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning.
SUBJECT TO the right of way of SW
85th Trail (as maintained). The above
described parcel being the same land
as described and recorded in Officiql
Records Book 196, Page 183, of the
Public Records of said County.
Together with a 2004 Homes of
Legend Double wide mobile home,
with ID #221-00030A and #221-
00030B, located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Frank
Albert Reder, Butler & Hosch, P.A.,
3185 South Conway Road, Suite E,
Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the
original with the Clerk of the above-
styled Court on or before 30 days
from the first publication, otherwise a
Judgment may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court on the 14th day of


III


I


ryo Benefith u

w)hen you shop ith g your

Union County rperchant
you help out a lot of
activities in your


conl


nminilty.


z9, 2005 UNION COUNTY ,IMES Page 7A
i


11


r


your community

merchants support High
School Rctiuities to

include:

Band, Football, Baseba
Tennis, FFR, KRRPopop

Warner, 4-H, Clubs,
find other,..

Veterans Organizations,

Seniors, Churches, Scouts,


.nu a lot more.,
2 mt mre...


These organizations

make our community a
better place to live and
JL-0%15 uesq-


add ualue to uu, ,. -
..,,,. inrnl merchant is


TUU ,-"_- u-- .. h
glad to help out but the

need your support.
When you haue a need

that you can fulfill in tu
Union County area, you

patronage Will be

appreciate ed...


I


I1


A


he
r


The Union County Times encourages all to

shop with our advertisers...
For a stronger business community.


May you find
peace, joy and happiness
today and in the New Year.
CITY OF LAKE BUTLER
Brantley Crawford, Mayor
Jimmy Beasley,
Vice Mayor
Commissioners
Lynn Bishop
Fletcher Myers
Leroy Stalvey
Richard Tillis, City Manager
John E. Maines IV
City Attorney


December, 2005.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court
Administration at the Union County
Courthouse, Lake Butler, Florida
32054, Telephone (904) 496-3711, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding. If hearing impaired,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V()
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay
Service.
Regina H. Parrish
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Julia Croft
Deputy Clerk
12/22 2tchg. 12/29
NOTICE OF PROPOSED
APPROVAL OF AN
APPLICATION FOR A
SUBDIVISION BY THE
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
ACTING AS THE PLANNING
AND ZONING BOARD
Notice is hereby given that on
January 9, 2006 at 11:30 A.M., the
Board of County Commissioners of
Union County, Florida, will meet as
the Planning and Zoning Board in a
Public Hearing to be held in Room
101 of the Union County Courthouse,
Lake Butler, Florida, for final approval
of Grand Legacy Phase I. Said
proposed application may be
inspected by the public at 15
Northeast First Street, Lake Butler,
Florida, during the hours of 8:00 A.M.
through 12:00 P.M., Monday through
Friday, excepting legal holidays. All
interested parties may appear at the
meeting and be heard with respect to
the proposed subdivision.
12/29 2tchg. 1/5
NOTICE OF PROPOSED
APPROVAL OF AN
APPLICATION FOR A
SUBDIVISION BY THE
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA
ACTING AS THE PLANNING
AND ZONING BOARD
Notice is hereby given that on
January 9, 2006 at 11:40 A.M., the
Board of County Commissioners of
Union County, Florida, will meet as
the Planning and Zoning Board in a
Public Hearing to be held in Room
101 of the Union County Courthouse,
Lake Butler, Florida, to consider an:
Application by Grand Legacy to
establish a Phase II. Said proposed
application may be inspected by the
public at 15 Northeast First Street,
Lake Butler, Florida, during the hours
of 8:00 A.M. through 12:00 P.M.,
Monday through Friday, excepting
legal holidays. All interested parties
may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed
subdivision.
12/29 2tchg. 1/5


X


3


I


I


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1





v _


y


I




f


Page 8A UNION COUNTY TIMES Dec. 29, 2005


Scenes from the new city of Lake Butler city hall


This fountain adorns the entrance to the new building.


, =.' :,.,. -,"' ";.. ^ -! ^ ^ ... **.... -
^ *. *'i,. .. *-.*' ,- '" ".; "-, l.
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.. .. ... ,, *. : '" -
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S ... ,.i.l. C _,-
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.. .._-,. .... ., .... .
-,. ~~... .. ..... .. -..; .. ..-.- ..
"~~ .


This photo shows when footers were being poured for
the foundation.


A new drive-up window makes paying bills easier.


Health,
happiness and
best wishes for a
terrific new year

11io0 CouMty/
School Koard
Superintendent CarltonFaulk
Chairman Allen Panish, Diis. I
Alvin Griffis, Dt 2
Marsan Carr,Dist3
Sandra Floyd, Dist 4


we wnitnead, Dis t.
Dan Webb, Board ttony


I


i


City Manager Ricahrd Tillis shows Russell Wade the
new walk-up counter.


This file photo shows the building during its
framing phase.


Tillis is shown busy inside his new office.


Eric Jackson, Fletcher Myers and Tom Jackson
inspect the new offices of Hardy Clyatt.


Mayor Brantley Crawford and Commissioner
Fletcher Myers unveil a sign marking the
occasion.


fishing you everything bright and
beautiful this coming year. Thank you
for the continued support you have
extended to us.


MAIN STREET HOBBY SHOP


50 E. Main St.
Lake Butler


M-F 9:30-6; Sat. 9-4
496-1367 496-1880


Easy To Reach.

Touchstone Heating and Air, Inc.


100% Customer Satisfaction Guaranteed!
0% Financing for 12 mos*
Licensed & Insured
Preventive Maintenance & Repairs
8RRR-496-3467 O -ME


Mark Touchstot
President
Lic. # CAC05809S


ne 49
9 *With approved credit L


0 S.E. 3rd Ave.
,ake Butler, FL


I


Curtis &'
their families

CLYAT[
WELL DRILLING
Hwy 121
Lake Butler, FL
496-2488


a


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liS~w


0 .


0FREE
ESTIMATES


U 4 V


7-


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Y


S- .Section B: Thursday, Decemrber-29, 2005




News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region area ....


FWC seeks input on changes to hunting in Blanding


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) and the
Camp Blanding Joint Training
Center have created a proposal
that could open the south
portion of the post to hunters.
Since Sept. 11, 2001, the
lands in the Camp Blanding
Wildlife Management Area
lying south of S.R .16 have
been closed by the Department
of Military Affairs. These
lands, needed for training
exercises and troop
mobilization, are under tight
security that prohibits
recreational access under the
current hunting format.
"This closure resulted in the
loss of all recreational access to
the south post," said Roland
Garcia, director of FWC's
North Central Region, based in
Lake City.
He said Camp Blanding and
FWC staffs have maintained
communications in an effort to
reopen the closed portions of
the area. In recent weeks, both
parties have hammered out a
concept that would reopen the
south post and restore deer-dog
hunting for the 2006-07
hunting season. The proposal
would require changes to rules
and hunting formats, including
locations of current still and
dog hunt areas and locations
where :special quota hunts
would take place., .
The proposal provides for
the same types and amount of
hunting days that currently
exist for still hunting, while
adding the deer-dog hunting
'format back into the hunting
scheme.
;"Camp Blanding is still
under heightened force
-protection and will remain so
for the foreseeable future,"
;Garcia said. "This makes it
unacceptable for the public and
their equipment (including
dogs) to encroach on sensitive
areas of the post, including the
artillery impact area and the
closed portion of the post that
lies south of S,R "16 and west
of D Avenue. For this reason,
it is necessary to relocate the
deer-dog hunting area from its
- previous location if we are to
proceed with the reopening the
south post."
The proposal is to:
nMove the deer-dog hunting
north of S.R. 16.
*Recognize that deer-dog
hunting is a more efficient
harvest method than -still
.hunting. There is no impact
area on the north post to serve
as a "safe haven" for deer. The
deer herd on the north post
cannot withstand the same 58-
day hunting season s that
currently exists with still


Use caution
with holiday
burning
Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson is urging Floridians
to be cautious when engaged in
any type of outdoor burning.
The recent cold temperatures
have made frost-killed
vegetation very dry and easy to
burn meaning the potential
for wildfires has increased.
"The last 'two hurricane
seasons have also left us with
tons of debris including dead
trees and limbs that could be a
potential tinder box for
wildfire," Bronson said.
Outdoor burning of yard
trash is allowed in most.
Florida counties, but there have
been several changes to the
outdoor burning laws in recent
months. It is no longer legal
to burn household paper
producis as yard waste, and a
few of the required set back
distances have changed.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services" Division of Forestry
oversees all outdoor burning
for the State of Florida.
"Homeowners who are
unsure how to burn legally and
safely should contact the local
office of the Florida Division
of Forestry or their nearest fire
department," said Bronson.
Since Jan. I, 2005, 2,161
Florida wildfires have burned
26,850 acres. Eighty-nine
percent of these fires were
caused by humans, including
32 percent that were
attributable to escaped debris
burning.


hunting. The proposal calls for
a season consisting of two
nine-day regular quotas for
deer-dog hunting on the north
post.
*Move the still hunting
opportunities south of S.R .16,


including the special archery
and muzzle loading gun quota
hunts.
*Allow locations and rules
for the "archery-only" areas to
remain unchanged.'
*Allow regular and special


quota numbers to remain the
same: 200 for the muzzle
loading gun, 400 for each
general gun still hunt and 320
for each general gun dog hunt.
*Allow rules regarding
spring turkey season and


supervised youth hunts to
remain unchanged. However, if
this proposal is enacted, these
activities could be considered
for both the north and south
posts.
*Consider that new and


more restrictive military
regulations regarding buffer
areas surrounding artillery
impact areas are in place. This
change makes it necessary to
See HUNT, p. 6B


2006 Ford F-150 Truck
V6, Auto., A/C, AMIFM StereoCD Player,
Privacy Glass 1v;

Stock # 62007
wm .. ., ', .. .. ',' ., r .. rT i ' ' / ,, ', r ',, "", & ... __-4 t 'L- 3 .. J -- L 2 L t ",


PHOTOS SHOWN ABOVE ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES O'LY.


. ,. ...'....i


i AlO'lK LL"a W E 00


2001 FORD MUSTANG GT COUPE 2003 INFINITY G35
V8, 4.6 Liter, 5 Speed, A/C, 62705A V6, 3.5 Liter, Auto, RWD,
Leather, Power Seats, Kelley: $11,820 A/C, Leather, Moon Roof,
Rear Spoiler, Power SALE PRICED AT Bose Premium Sound,
Locks, Power Windows, $11o370 ASS, Cruise Control,
Power Steering | U U Premium Wheels


2003 GMC ENVOY I
V6, AT, Leather,
A/C, DVD &
Much Morel



1999 LINCOLN CON1


Sedan, V8, 4.6 Liter, FWD,
A/C, Leather, Traction
Control, Premium Wheels,
All Power, Cruise, ABS,
Premium Sound


2005 FORD MUSTAI
V6, 4.0 Liter, RWD, 5
Speed, A/C, Leather, All
Power, Premium Wheels,
Dual Front Air Bags,
Cruise Control


iL in20
#1V387 oDI
Kelley: $21,670 -
SALE PRICE AT AT,

1U,40- Ext

TINENTAL i 20
63014A 250(
Kelley: $11,065 RWI
SALe PRICED AT SteI
Stec
9,970 Fror


NG COUPE 201
P1220 4
Kelley: $20,765 4 cFw
SALE PRICED AT c F

19,960 B


00 F-250 CREW I
ESELI


A/C, Leather,
w Package,
ra Low Miles!
000 miles


03 CHEVY EXPIRE
3 Cargo, V8, 4.8 Liter,
D, A/C, ABS, Power
ring, AM/FM, Dual
it Air Bags



14 NISSAN SENT
I., 1.8 Liter, Auto,
, A/C, Tilt, All Power,
Player, Dual Front Air
Is


SEDAN
5162A
Kelley: $25,500
SALE PRICED AT

'23,770 0

BAB LARIAT,

Kelley: $26,850
SALE PRICED AT9t

*24,990
a
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Page 2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


OBITUARIES: ..


Gussie Bright
LAWTEY Gussie Mae
"Mubba" Bright, 87, of Lawtey
died Monday, Dec. 26, 2005, in
Halifax Medical Center in
Daytona Beach following a brief
illness.
Born in Sirmans on May 23,
1918, Mrs. Bright was a member
of Pilgrim Rest Free Will Baptist
Church #2 in Lake City where
she was a member of the Mother's
Board, Usher Prayer Band,
chaplain of ministers wife and
widowed.
"Mrs. Bright is survived by: a
son Willie Bright of Deland;
seven daughters, May Lois
McCray of Lawtey, Mary B.
Palmer of Palatka, Patricia B.
Lovell of Crescent City, Ophelia
B. Hines of Starke, Gwen B.
Baker of Jonesboro, Ga., Laura B.
Ellis and Delphrine J. Jackson,
both of Daytona Beach; two
adopted children, Bishop Henry
.Rodmnon of Lakeland and
Dorothy Smith of Plant City; 23
grandchildren, 45 great-
grandchildren and seven great-
great-grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by -hier
husband Bisholf Daniel Bright
and sons Sylvester Bright and
Leon Bright.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Bright will be held at 12 noon,
on Friday, Dec. 30, 2005, in True
Vine Outreach Ministries Church
in Starke with Bishop Henry
Rodmon, eulogist, and Elder
Ross Chandler, pastor, and
Eldress Mae Lois McCray, pastor,
conducting the services.
Interment will follow in
Peetsville Cemetery in Lawtey
under the care of Haile Funeral
Home of Starke.
Visitation will be in Haile
Memorial Chapel on Thursday,
Dec. 29, 2005, with family hour,
3-4 p.m. and friends 5-8 p.m.,

Carl Green
TAMPA Carl A. Green, 71, of
Tampa, formerly of Hampton,
died Thursday, Dec. 22, 2005, at
his residence following an
extended illness.
Born in Hampton on Nov. 15,
1934, Mr. Green moved to
Tampa from Hampton. He was a
retired foreman and served in the
LU.S. Air Force during the Korean
War. He graduated from RJE
High School and was of the
Baptist faith
Mr. Green is survived by: his
mother Mary Lou Green of
Hampton; a daughter Michelle
Green of Tampa; a son Keith
Green of Tampa; two sisters,
Cynthia Brown and- Sylvia
Patterson, both of Hampton;
* three brothers, Patrick Williams,
..Rd.irdlt-p McG -ggor- of
Hampton and Tommy Harris of
Dalton, Ala.
Funeral services for Mr. Green
will be held at 3 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec.- 31, 2005, in
Macedonia Missionary Baptist
Church in Hampton with the
Rev. J.B. Richardson conducting
the services. Interment will
follow in Hampton Cemetery
under the care of Haile Funeral
Home of Starke...
Visitation will be in Haile
Memorial Chapel on Friday, Dec.,
30, 2005, with family hour 3-4
p.m. and friends 5-8 p.m.

Joan Hamilton
LAKE BUTLER Joan
Carolyn Hamilton, 48, of Lake
Butler died Thursday, Dec. 22,
2005, at her residence following
an extended illness.
Born in Jacksonville where she
lived most of her life, Ms.
Hamilton moved to Lake Butler
in 2001. She was a retail sales
person and was of the Baptist
faith. '
Ms. Hamilton is survived by:
two daughters, Tama Mason and
Amylya Mattox, both of Lake
Butler; two sisters, Cheryl
Daughter and Robin Davis,
both of Jacksonville; four
brothers. Harley Crawford, Troy
Catlin. Tommy Crawford and
Keith Catlin, all of Jacksonville;
and three grandchildren.
There will be no services.


Joel Jackson
STARKE -- Joel Sidney
Jackspn, 70, of Starke died
Thursday, Dec. 22, 2005.
Born in Chiefland, Mr.
Jackson moved to Starke at an
early age. He was a 1955
graduate of Bradford High
School and retired from the
Florida National Guard after
serving for 33 years. He was a
member of Madison Street
Baptist Church.
Mr. Jackson is survived by: his
wife of 50 years LaVonne
Duncan Jackson of Starke; a
daughter CeeCee Box of Lake
Butler; a son Michael Jackson of
Starke; sisters, Julia Alvarez and
Sue Tilley, both of Starke; a
brother Bill Jackson of Lake
City; and six grandchildren. He
was preceded in death by his dad
Joel, his mom Bernie and a sister
Elizabeth.
Funeral services for Mr.
Jackson were Dec. 26, 2005 at
Madison Street Baptist Church
with Dr. Chad Everson
officiating and the Rev. Charles-
Warren assisting. Burial followed
".-in Conner Cemetery under the
care of Archie Tanner Funeral
Home of Starke.

Michael Manning
LAKE BUTLER Michael
Jack Manning, 60, of Lake
Butler died Monday, Dec. 26,
2005, in the VA Medical Center
in Gainesville following an
extended illness. -
Born in Jacksonville, Mr.
Manning'lived most of his life in
Lake Butler. He served in the
U.S. Marine Corps and was a
Vietnam veteran. He was a paint
contractor until ill health forced
his retirement. He was of the-
Baptist faith.
Mr. Manning is survived by:
his wife of 36 years Virginia
Thornton. Manning; his mother
Lillian Royals of Jacksonville;
two daughters, Alaina Imler of
High Springs and Alisha
Redding of Raiford; a son
Michael Manning of Lake
Butler; three brothers,' Ray
Manning of Clermont, Pat
Manning and Mark Royals, both
of Jacksonville; a sister Ginger
Hoffman of Jacksonville; two
grandchildren, Hunter Redding
of Raiford and Ciara Manning of
Lake Butler.
,Funeral services for Mr.
Manning will be held at '11 am.
on Friday, Dec. 30, 2005, in the
Chapel of Archer Funeral Home
of Lake Butler with the Rev.
Randall Griffis officiating.
Burial will follow in Sapp
Cemetery.
The family will receive friends


The family ofAlva Padgett wishes
to express its heartfelt gratitude to
those who were so caring during
our time of soArow.
Your prayers, flowers, food and
visits were greatly appreciated.
Your donations to Haven Hospice
in her-memory were very-generous
and are a lasting tribute to her.
A special thank you to her nurse,
Jaquelin, her "angel," and the
other staff of Haven Hospice who
were so good to her and have been
so supportive to all of us.
Your acts of kindness will not be
forgotten.
Stanley,
Doug, Jimmy and Susan


SStaff Sergeant


Jacob Lucas Livingston,

United States Air Force
Entered this life May 17,1981
Departed this life Dec. 26, 2004


OCe'j ,pd 9aCIC,6


Sou were always so ready with a smile,
hug or kiss How were we to know you were
an angel in our midst. -"
By just walking in you could light up a room -
No way to prepare us, God took you so soon.
You had so much more of this life left to live .
More important than that was love and happiness
to give.
You had such a presence,joyous spirit and that
grin! We miss you so much our precious son,
brother, friend.
Hearts are still broken. sometimes it's insane.
SWhatdo we do with all this love-pain?
We'll hold to it closely and still let love in.
S And pray it's not long till we're together again.

You accomplished more in your short life than many
people do in their entire lives. You made many sacrifices
for your country and others unselfishly. You taught us
and-showed us what real love is. We'll cherish your
memory always.
All our love,
Mother Brenda Creamer Cunningham,
brother John Lewis Livingston and all the many fr ends
and relatives who were blessed to know you
-.&-ALA-A a-AL-Ah&- "--


.4

'4


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____A- _______-N& A_7 'I


Rogers of Ocala, Richard W.
Rogers of Leesburg and Wayne E.
Rogers of Webster; a sister
Mickey McVeigh of
Jacksonville; seven
grandchildren and 21 great-
grandchildren.
A celebration of life for Mrs.
Rogers will be held on Thursday,
Dec. 29, 2005, in the Chapel of
Archie Tanner Funeral Home of
Starke. Interment will be in
Keystone Heights Cemetery.


Charles Teal
STARKE.- Charles Wayne Teal
Jr., 82, of Starke died Thursday,
Dec. 22, 2005, at Bradford
Terrace Nursing Home following
an extended illness.
Born in Mullins, S.C. on June
25, 1923, Mr. Teal moved to
Starke in September from Eustis.
He was a former resident of West
Palm Beach. He was a retired
electrician and served in the


United Stoates Mvarine Corps
during World War II. He was a
member of the American Legion,
the VFW, the Masonic Lodge, the
IBEW electrical union and was a
former member of First Baptist
Church of Starke.
Mr. Teal is survived by: his
wife Dorothy Pergerson Teal of
Starke; a daughter Dee Shepherd
of Eustis; three sons, Ken Teal
See OBITS, p. 3B


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and family at the funeral home
Thursday, Dec.-29, 2005; from 6-
8 p.m.

LaDufsie Neylans
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
LaDufsie "Ducky" Neylans, 80,
of Keystone Heights died
Sunday, Dec. 25, 2005, at
Woodlawn Care Center in
Gainesville.
Born in Tift County, Ga. on
Aug. 8, 1926, Mrs.. Neylans
moved to Keystone" Heights in
1970 from Gainesville. She was a
retired nurse.
Mrs. Neylans is survived by:
her husband of 55 years William
E. Neylans Sr. of Keystone
Heights; -two daughters, Janet
Bolduic of Gainesville and
Catharine Lavwhon of Polk City;
two sons, William Neylans Jr. and
Jesse Neylans, both of Keystone
Heights; two sisters, Elizabeth
Taylor of Tifton, Ga. and
Virginia Schoenbaum; three
grandchildren and one great-
grandchild.. .
- Graveside 'services for Mrs.
Neylans were Dec. 28, 2005 in
Keystone Heights Cemetery with
Father Harold Ritchie
conducting the services.
Interment followed under --th6
care of Jones Funeral Home of
Keystone Heights.

Mildred Rogers
OCALA Mildred V. Rogers,
87, of Palm Garden in Ocala died
Friday, Dec. 23, 2005.
A former resident of
Jacksonville and Keystone
Heights, Mrs. Rogers was a
member of Trinity Baptist
Church and was a homemaker.
Mrs. Rogers is survived by: her
husband Richard W'' Rogers of
Gainesville; three sons, Robert L.


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Dec. 29,2005 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-B-SECTION Page 3B


SLICE B ....

POLICE BEAT:. -e$6d a


BCSO car
involved in
traffic crash
Only minor injuries resulted
from a traffic crash involving a
Bradford County Sheriff's
Office (BCSO) vehicle.
According to the Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP) report
by Lt. T.R. Hines, BCSO
Deputy Drew Moore was
traveling south on CR-229 on
the afternoon of Dec. 26 when
a 1998 Honda Civic came to a
stop on the road ahead of him
in an attempt to make a left-
hand turn into a driveway.
Deputy Moore did not see
that the vehicle was stopped
until the last -moment, and
steered to the right while
applying the brakes in an
attempt to avoid the crash.


OBITS
Continued from p. 2B
and Stan Teal, both of Starke,
and David Teal of West Palm
Beach; five grandchildren, 'four
great-grandchildren and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mr. Teal.
were Dec. 27, 2005 in the DeWitt
C. Jones Chapel in Starke with
Dr. Alan Holden conducting the
services. Interment followed in
Florida National Cemetery in
Bushnell.

Edna Wasdin
WALDO Edna Alharez
Wasdin, 98, of Waldo died
Thursday, Dec. 22, 2005, at her
- residence, following ah extended
illness.
Born in Br4dford County on
Jan. 1, 1907, Mrs. Wasdin was a
member of First Baptist Church
of Waldo. She was a homemaker
and farmer's wife.
Mrs. Wasdin is survi.ied by:
four daughters,. Greta Fa)
Whitehead of Lake Butler, Erlene
W. Bargin of Dade City. Shirley
A..Blackmon of Lake City and
Arvida C. Carr of Gainesville; a
son Jerry G. Wasdin of Waldo;
many-grandchildren and great--
grandchildren. She was preceded
in death by her husband Eddie E,.
Wasdin.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Wasdin were Dec. 28,, 2005 in
First Baptist Church of-Waldo
with Pastor Jim ;i-bo6r ."'
-,conqducting- -the s'evi'ces-.
Ihterment followed in Santa Fe;-
Cemetery in Hampton. Lake.
under the care of Jones Funeral
Home of Starke
Memorial contributions may
be made to Haven Hospice of
Central Florida, 4200 N.W. 90th
SBlvd., Gaines ille. FL 32606. :

Beulah Whitaker
LAKE BUTLER Beulah
. Green Fleming Whitaker, 93, of
Lake Butler died Thursday, Dec.
22. 2005, at Shands AGH in
Gainesville following an
Extended illness.
Born in Oakfield, Ga. on Dec.
14, 1912, Mrs. Whitaker lived in
New York where she worked as a
nurse before moving to Lake
Butler in 1943. She was a
member of' Greater Elizabeth
Missionary Baptist Church. -
Mrs. Whitaker is survived.by a
host of nieces and nephews. She
was preceded in death by a sister
Ethel Dillard and her husband
Emitt Whitaker.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Whitaker will be held at 11 a.m.
'on Saturday, Dec. 31, 2005, in
Greater Elizabeth Baptist Church
in Lake Butler. Viewing will be
from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec.
30, 2005, at Haile Funeral Home,
802 North Oak Street in Starke.
'The family will meet at, the
home of the late Mrs. Whitaker .
-on SaturdaN., Dec. 31, 2005, at
10-30 a.m.,' 715 West Main St.,
Apt. #185 in Lake Butler.


According to the report,
Moore's 2004 Ford Crown
Victoria cruiser struck the right
rear of the Honda Civic and
caused the smaller qar to
rotate. The cruiser continued to
the right and came to rest on
the shoulder of the road.
The Honda was driven by
Taunya K. Durant, 23, of
Melrose. Durant and passenger
Amy M. Sellers, 27, of
Florahome, were listed with
minor injuries. Moore was also
listed with minor injuries.
Damages to the Honda Civic
were estimated at $2,000.
Damages. to the Crown
Victoria cruiser were listed at
$10,000.
Charges are pending as the
investigation continues, said
Lt. Hines.

Md. man
arrested for
possession,
eluding police
A Silver Springs, Md., man
was arrested on Dec. 24 by
Lawtey Police Officer Johnny
Hernandez when a routine
traffic stop ended with the
confiscation of almost 159
grams of marijuana, a little.
more than one-third of a
pound.
According to Lawtey Police
Major Nathan Blom, Officer
Hernandez' was operating a
traffic control laser station on
U.S.- 301 when he noted a
vehicle traveling at an
excessive speed.
When Officer Hernandez
attempted to make a traffic
stop, the vehicle fled down
side streets in Lawtey and then
returned to 301 to head into
Starke. Hernandez pursued the
vehicle and contacted the
'Starke Police Department
(SPD) as well.
SPD Sergeant Matthew;
Watson took up the chase at
the Starke city limits and
pursued the vehicle down
several streets in Starke.
According to Blom, Sgt.
Watson saw the driver throw
some bags out the window at
one point during the pursuit.
The bags were collected and
were found to contain 158.9
gramsof marijuana. -., .- .-
Officers were finally able to
"stop te vehicle at the junction
of S.R. 100 and U.S. 301 and
Officer Hernandez arrested the
'driver, John Glenn McDermid,
21, of Silver Springs, Md;
McDermid was charged with
possession of cannabis


29, of
Dec. 22


I


I -- ;


(marijuana) and fleeing and
attempting to elude.
Bail was set at $10,000 and
McDermid remained in the
Bradford County Jail as of
press time Tuesday.

Burglary

reported in
Keystone
Anyone with information
about a burglary that occurred
at a residence on Duke Street
in Keystone Heights on the
evening of Tuesday, Dec. 20,
should contact the Clay
County Sheriffs Office
(CCSO) at (904) 284-7575.
According to the incident
report filed by CCSO, the front
doors were pried apart with an
unknown type tool and one or
more burglars entered the
house.
Stolen were a microwave
oven, a Playstation 2, a number
of .Playstation games and
several DVD movies.


Arrests
'Arrests in Bradford and
Union counties and the
Keystone area of Clay County
are as follows:
Tracy K)le Davis, 32, of,
Lake Butler was arrested Dec.'
20 by Union County Sheriffs.
Office (UCSO) Deputy Kevin
Dice and charged with
domestic battery. 2
SScan Samuel Todd, 21, of..
Jacksonville was arrested by
UCSO Deputy H.M.
Tomlinson on a Union County
capias Dec. 20. The original
charges on the capias were
burglary of a structure, larceny
and property damage/criminal
mischief. Bond was set at
$10,000.
Michael Cam, 46, of
Hampton was arrested Dec. 22
by Starke Police Department
(SPD) Officer Don Spriggle
for interfering with a railroad
track. Bond was set at $5,000
and he was released on bond
Dec. 24.
Howard Johnson, 39, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 22 by
"Bradford County Sheriff's
Office (BPSO) Deputy George.
Konkel on a writ of' bdil,
attachment. He purged the
charge for $155.76 and was
released on Dec. 22.


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by SPD Officer David
Bukowski for contempt, of
court on a writ of attachment.
Bond was set at $250 and he
remained in jail as of press
time Tuesday.
Kenneth Carder, 41, of Port
Richey was arrested in Orange
County and transferred to
Bradford County Dec. 22 due
to a Bradford County capias
for failure to appear in court on
original charges of violation of
probation-driving while license
is suspended or revoked
(DWLSR). Bond was set at
$4,000. aid Carder remained in
jail as of press time Tuesday.
Christina Fields, 42, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 22 by
BCSO Deputy Lee Garnto for
domestic battery. Bond was set
at $1,000 and she was released
on bond Dec. 22.

Angela Mathis, 21, of Starke
was arrested Dec. 24 by SPD
Officer Jesse Small for failure
to appear in court on an
original charge of attaching a
tag not assigned. Mathis paid a'
cash, bond of $255 and was
released Dec. 24.,
'Donald. Brown, 41, of
Hampton was arrested Dec. 24r
by Hampton Police Officer Joe
Landon for driving under the
influence (DUI) and DWLSR.
Bond was set at $3,000 and he
was released on bond Dec. 24.
Percie Massey, 37, of
Lawteyv was arrested Dec. 24
by BCSO Deputy Thomas
Sapp on an Alachua County.
capias for violation of
probation on an original charge
of possession of cocaine.
Massey remained. in jail as of
press time Tuesday.
Matthew Gawley, 23, of
Keystone Heights Was arrested
in Bradford County Dec. 24
for DUI by Florida .Highway
Patrol Officer Peck. Bond was
set at $1,000 and he was
released on bond Dec. 26.
SRaymond Sorrells, 32,., 'of
Starke was arrested Dec. 25 by'
SPD Officer Richard' Crews
for failure to pay child support,
DWLSR and attaching tag not
assigned. Total cash purge was


-set at $2,460 and he was.
released on bond Dec. 26.

Charlie Jonas, 18, of Starke
was arrested Dec. 25 by SPD
Officer -Jason Crosby for
aggravated domestic assault.
Bond was set at $10,000 and
he remained in jail as of press
time Tuesday.
Thomas Arnold, '24, of
Waldo was arrested Dec. 25 by
BCSO Deputy Joe Jones for
aggravated assault. Bond was
set at $15,000 and he remained
in jail as of press time
Tuesday.
Jimmy Bridges, 21, of
Florida was arrested Dec. 25.
by SPD Officer Crosby for
DWLSR. Bond was set at'
$1,000 and he remained in jail
as of press time Tuesday.
Dameon Harrell, .31, of
Orange Park was arrested Dec.
25 by SPD Officer Paul King
for possession of cocaine,
possession of drug'
paraphernalia, possession of
cannabis (less than 20 grams)
and giving law enforcement
officers a false name. Total
bond was set at $20,000 and he
remained in jail as of press
time Tuesday.
Eldon Cornett, 43, of
Raiford was arrested Dec. 27


Nothing that was worthy in the past departs; no truth or
goodness realized by man ever dies, or can die.
-Thomas Carlyle


The best measure of a man's honesty isn't his income tax
return. It's the zero adjust on his bathroom scale.
-Arthur C. Clarke
*


I


by SPD Officer Buko\wskl for
willful, wanton, reckless
driving, and 'refusing to sign a
traffic citation. Total bond was
set at $1,000 and he remained
in jail as of press time
Tuesday..
Michael Gallimore, 20, of
Starke was arrested Dee. 27 by
BCSO Deputy Josh Luke for
domestic battery. Bond had not
been'set as of press time.
Joyce Rollins, 49, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 23 by Clay County
Sheriff's Office (CCSO)
deputies for battery.
William Nelson, 41,' of
Starke was. arrested Dec. 20 by
CCSO deputies on a worthless
check charge.
Ocie Randall, 50, of Putnam
Hall was arrested Dec. 23 by
CCSO Deputy D. Eshelman'
for grand theft auto after he
was seen driving a vehicle
stolen in Bradford County.
The son of the Bradford
Countian who reported the
vehicle stolen passed it on S.R.
100 near Keystone.
Recognizing his father's
vehicle, the young man waved
it down and called police.
The vehicle had been
reported stolen on Dec. 14 in
the Bradford Cbunt) section of
Melrose.


--


-


- - - - -


I.


.I1


Michael Jenkins,
Lawtey was arrested


/


A fi N &A I A. A A%


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p


Page 4B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-B-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


Mate's Billabong: Neighborhood


tavern with Down Under style


in August of 2003 and talked
Debbie Lumley, Jessie's
manager at the time, into
staying on for a year to help
them get a handle on things.
They knew from day one
they wanted to make a lot of
changes, though.
"We wanted it to be a
tavern, a local bar where
people would feel safe coming
in to have a drink with their
spouse," said Linda.
"We had a lot of work to
do," said Mate. "And we have
a lot more to do. We have a lot
of improvements planned to
make the place better."
The Napiers put on a new
roof and installed windows in
what was once a dark,
windowless room. They also
uncovered a second set of


By MARCIA MILLER
Telegraph Staff Writer


Mate's Billabong in Starke
offers Australian imports to
area residents-both beer and
the owner.
Although Mate grew up in
Parramatta, New South Wales,
Australia, he has lived in the
United States for the.past 30
years. His wife, Linda, is from
Ohio, but their seveh-month-
old son, -Cole, will- claim
S'arke as his hometown.
"We're settled in Starke
now," said Mate. "We are a
part of, the community. We
have done a. lot of charity
things and plan to do more."
Mate's Billabohg has
sponsored and cosponsored
poker runs and other events to
raise money for various
charitable efforts. The Napiers
are also working on a plan to
raise money for a college
scholarship to provide a local
young person w.ith- the-
7--opportunityi to continue his or
her education.
The Napiers met in Ohio.
Mate was transferred there by
the chemical company he
worked for and Linda was in
the National Guard there as an
occupational safety. specialist.
Mate retired from the chemical
company and the couple came
south to get out of the cold.
Mate explained that he.grew
up where the temperatures
were more than 100 degrees on
an .average day for most of the
__yeaL_ When- -he --retired, the
couple went to Australia for a
while. -
"But home wasn't home
anymore," said Mate. His 30
years in America had made
this country "home", -:but the
northern states were still too
cold for him.
One of his two daughters,
both of whom were born in,
America, lives in Orlando, so
the couple began looking at
Florida as a residence.


Although retired, Mate. 'is
not a person whowants to sit doors that had been- blocked
home and watch television, ff. They madeimprovements
The Napiers began looking to the wiring tp bring the
around for a spot.where they. .uildig up to code, and
"could run a n neighborhoodd ifistalled a surveillance system
tavern and Jessie's Lounge in to improve safety for their
Starke was for sale. customers.
"I did a whole feasibility A new bar was installed and
study on my computer," said A new bar was installed and
Linda. "I found 70 percent of its location in the room
the residents ,,of. Bradford changed from where the old
County were homeowners (as bar had been.
opposed to renters) and 77
percent of the people heremwere-:-- "We plan to do a lot of vork
unemployed either by the state or on the landscaping this year,"
by Dupont," she said. "I put said Mate. "We 'want to
that together with the number improve the outside
of cars that travel down 301 appearance."
and it looked like a good Linda's background in
investment." safety and the couple's
iThe Napiers bought Jessie's concern for the community


made safety a big issue for
them.
"When we first came to
town, we went down and
talked to the police chief," said
Mate. "We told him about our
plans and told him that if we
were out of compliance with
anything, we wanted him to let
us know. We want to
cooperate fully."
He said he and Linda have
worked with the' police
department to keep
disturbances to a minimum.
The bar's surveillance cameras
even helped capture a person
who was trying to pass
counterfeit money at the bar.
Linda said they do
everything they can to prevent
trouble from starting-like
keeping people from sitting in


their cars in the parking lot and
drinking. "We had some
trouble with that at the
beginning, but we just went
out and told them to leave.
You can head off a lot of
trouble by just letting them
know you won't tolerate it,"
said Linda.
Stopping trouble before it
starts also prompted the
Napiers to provide
transportation for their
customers on special party
nights.
On New Year's Eve, for
example, Mate has hired a
driver that will take customers
home (within a reasonable
mileage limit).
"It keeps them off the road
See MATE'S, p. 7B


Teresa Dollar tends bar at Mate's. Billabong.


SPRING

2006


CLASSES
Jan. 3-6,2006


LAKECT


w AcadremyofTeacherPreparat onProg ram
EarlyChildhoodEducatin


LAKE CITY
COMMUNITY CIOL8IE


For more information call
(386) 754-4287
wwwlakecitycc.edu
LCCC Is an Equal Access/Equal
Opportunity Institution


~e da3i.


We wish

ll of the


fine people


*


n ,our


community


A


Very Happy


New Year '


Badcock,X6.
HOME FURNITURE llIUre
710 L Main St.L
Lake Buter
386496-3334


" HOME FURNISHINGS CENTER
128 S. Walnut St.
StIrke
904-964-5289


Linda and Mate Napier own Mate's Billabong.
I***
Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a
distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.
-Thomas Carlyle
'* ',


We celebrate the
Happy 70th Birthday of
Larry Cochran Sr.

Loving father,


great-grandfather and .
frTiend I


W ith love,
Your entire family

Daddy,
I watch through a small rectangular glass window as you
sit in the recliner and let the machines do what your body
cannot. I listen to the symphony of beeps, squirts, spurts,
and alarms as you are cleansed with the manmade filtering
systems of the Dialysis machine.
How did you get to, such a place as this? After your years
.of investigating'-. searching for.clues years of missed-..
dinners, birthdays, anniversaries, parties and holidays.
Lost hours of sleep will never be recovered, but what about
the host of merchandise you returned to grateful owners,
domestic disputes you refereed, and the mysterious murder
cases that you solved.
As you worked your life away, following your heart and
answering your calling into law enforcement, we sat at the
dinner table,' the entire family, minus you, and we would
wave as you drove past in your patrol car with lights flash-
ing brilliant. Wrapped leftovers in foil and Saran Wrap
went home in Mom's loving hands', to wait in the
*microwave for you. Your children grew up and had their
own, but still you were never home.
Then the life you knew closed like a book, with the page
marked for your return, it was never to be visited again.
Almost eight years later, I now sit in the lobby and read as
Dialysis gives you time, time for birthdays, anniversaries,
holidays, and for all those who missed you as you drove by
in the night with your patrol car lights flashing blue and
white,


__


. .........


- -






Dec. 29,2005 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 5B


Timbuktu: A


biker friendly


bar


Sports

-* By MARCIA MILLER
Telegraph Staff Writer
Dec. 31 will be a milestone
for Vickie Nobles and Todd
Anderson. They are getting
married that day at the site
where one of their dreams has
already come true.
The two have long wanted
to manage a neighborhood
sports bar, and they were
recently given that chance at
the newly remodeled Timbuktu
on U.S. 301 across from the
4. fairgrounds in Starke.
Nobles has tended bar and
waited tables in a number of
establishments. She was
tending bar at a lounge in
Middleburg when a man
started talking about wanting
to buy a bar. She told him
about the old 301 Liquors
location that was for sale in
Starke. .....
The man, who wishes to
remain anonymous, looked at
the location and saw a lot of
potential. He began talking gto
Nobles about managing the
place for him. She introduced
him to Anderson, who works
in construction. Since the bar


Timbuktu received a complete facelift with its new ownership.


needed a major facelift, the
whole arrangement seemed
like a natural fit, said Nobles.
Anderson has done a lot of
the remodeling work himself
and Nobles will tend bar. The
couple will work together at
Timbuktu on the weekends.
"We plan to eventually buy
the bar from him (the owner),"
Nobles said. "We've always
wanted to have a bar of, our
own."
Nobles is from Clay County
and has worked around this
area most of her life. Anderson
came here from Texas,
Following a job he had at the
time. They are currently
looking for a house in
Bradford County. They plan to
tie the knot Saturday, Dec. 31,
with a biker wedding at the
Timbuktu.
They will wear leathers and
walk down the aisle between
rows of Harley Davidsons.
As you might suspect, the
Timbuktu is, very biker-
friendly. Nobles and Anderson
ride a 1997 Harley Fat Boy
every chance they get, which is
pretty much every day.
"We don't ride with a club,
we just ride," Nobles said.


; Rlrn~ ll~-----'' 1


Vickie Nobles and Todd Anderson, soon to be Mr. and Mrs. Todd Anderson, will
manage Timbuktu.


SAllison Kemp Ph.D.
LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST
Counseling Psychotherapy
Psychological Evaluations
I Most afor Isurnces ^a, e
Associated with The ITM Group
(877) 225-7486 (toll free)


Starke


I


SOUTEL EVECARE


General Eye Care & Surgery


EYE EXAMS* CATARACT SURGERY GLAUCOMA
MACULAR DEGENERATION DIABETES- LASERS GLASSES
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, Amencan Board of Ophthalmology
Medical. Medicaki Avmed. Blue CrsI/EBlu Shdiel & rmer msra.re ..cepled
Se habla espanol.
620 E. Main SL, Lake Butler 386496-2928


Happy New Year


BROWN

. BROLING.


486 N. Temple Ave..
Starke
Email:
tmbrown@amnetline.com


of


Terence M. Brown
John L. Beoling


For more ideas on where to celebrate
your New Year's Eve, see page 7B


.1


TEAL TILE i CARPET ONE
131 N. Cherry Street, Starke 964-7423
"2003 Carpet One Dealer of the Year"


Oldest and Largest Carpet and Tile Facility in the Area!
WE WILL BE THERE THE NEXT TIME YOU NEED CARPETING.


Our family and staff would like to thank you for
allowing us to help you with your cellular needs
,R
these past four years. '

,"May God richly bless you andyour families. ;

Merry Christmas & 1Happy New Year! W

Terry, Virginia, Dusty,
Ashley, Victoria and Preston Denmark






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The hard work at
remodeling Timbuktu cut into
their riding time somewhat, but
the transformation is now
nearly complete.
"We wanted a bar with a
clean feeling, something that
would be a comfortable and
safe place for people to come,"
said Nobles.
The building was painted a
bright pink when the owner
bought it, so that color was the
first thing to go. A cedar deck
See BIKE, p. 7B






Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES &MONITOR-B-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


HUNT
Continued from p. 1B
close portions of the current
walk-in area adjacent to the
artillery impact area. This plan
incorporates the remaining
walk-in portion into the new
still hunt area.
"This plan retains ,ll of the
current .still-hunting
Opportunities, reinstates .deer-
dog hunting, is acceptable to
FWC from a biological
perspective, is acceptable to
Camp Blanding from a security
perspective and reopens the
. south post," Garcia said. "We
are fast-tracking the process for
these changes so we can
provide the new format for next
hunting season. If this proposal
is not acceptable to a
significant portion of our
constituents, FWC will need
additional time to rework the
proposal."
That would mean that
necessary changes would not
take place in time for reopening
the south post for the 2006-07

CAMP BLAM)IN(;



a'nd t s ,1: .--1
hu: : nt 'r.- ;-*a.

\y4.-^

\L1


V


hunting season.
""We' hope thehunters who
want to use the area will
support this proposal. We
strongly believe this plan is in
the best interest of all
concerned parties, especially
the hunting community. We're
asking for public input on the
proposal. We will then compile
the public comments and
present them at an open house
at a date' and location to be
determined. All comments and
suggestions received will be
used by staff to develop a final
recommendation," Garcia said.
FWC. staff will present an
overview of this proposal -to
commissioners at the Feb. 1-2
commission meeting in
Gainesville. This meeting takes
place at the University of
Florida Conference Center-
Hilton at 1714 SW 34th St. It
begins at 7:30 a.m. each day.
"We plan to present staff's
final recommendation at the
April 5-6 Commission meeting
in Tallahassee. If changes are
adopted, they would become
effective July 1, 2006," Garcia
said.


-. .., -.. .' -


lI -*
...... ... .. ..... .. ...... .
L.; **: *j! *. ,i.i' m ,} 1

4 ".'. / '. Z
..^ ^ L.. :

I D,.O .'. W' .' .1...
.....* .. .. .. ,, .."e'' ..MY a <-w'
.: r .. . :'," .,,,,,

i_ I v P ,c'hj lK IIBB
K iiff a. 3;


'Interested persons can
submit comments to Karen
Parker, regional public
information coordinator,
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission,
3377 E. U.S. 90, Lake City, FL
32055, or by e-mail to
Karen.Parker@MyFWC.com.

Never think badly of
anyone, not even if the
words or conduct of the
person in question give
good grounds for doing so.
-Josemaria Escriva


Growth of
education
system mirrors
county growth
Today most people take it
for granted that a child will be
able to attend 12 years:, of
school at no cost to the family
-- they tend to forget that this
was not always the case.


Traditional one-room
schoolhouses were located
throughout Bradford County
from early days. Many school
children of the time did not
even have access to a specific
schoolhouse. In the early
history of the county it was not
unusual for a teacher to board
with a local family who
allowed nearby children to
attend classes in the family
home. These classes were
usually held only three or four


months out of the year so that
children could help with the
family farm.
One of the earliest organized
schools was located in Lake
Butler (the county seat of
Bradford County at the time)
near the canal off the lake
(near the present-day First
Baptist Church). A log
building was used as' a school
and as a meeting hall for the
See HISTORY, p. 8B


S -


it.


J


Comm ity State Bank


STARKE


MNIBER FDIC


LAKE BUTLER
255 SE 6th St.
(386) 496-3333


Melisa Noble


When you need help with
color copies, faxing,
printer cartridges,
storage boxes for end-of-
year closeout and any
office or home computer
supplies, come where you
will get personal
attention,


The Office Shop family


wishes you and your family a


Very Happy New Year!


John Hughes



Melisa Noble and John Hughes have years of
experience in home and office equipment.


THE OFFICE SHOP
.'0,


(904) 964-5764
FAX: (904) 964-6905


W. Call St:
Starke


e are a full service copier, printer, fax and office
machine sales and repair center ...yes, that means
pewriters, cash registers and adding machines.
asty Greek has 30 years experience in.copiers and
fice machines. He is the distributor forCopystar,
department of Kyocera Mita Technology
irporation. Copiers from the smallest to the heavy
dustrial high speed are
ailable through Rusty.
)pystar has a new generation,.
printers that are adaptable for
me computers. These printers
e very affordable and the
pies are very good and
onomical. If you have a need .
r color copies that fit your /
budget, you need to talk to
Rusty. Rusty Greek

Don't forget, he can also
fix your old typewriter or
new fax machine.
C.J. Greek is our newest
employee. He will bring
your product to your .4.,"
home or : ,
office now. Minimum
e order required. _


qe hfiometown bank ou know and trust
has' holiday wish for a
r iMappy New Year

for you andyourfamily!

Best wishes from alyourfiends and neighbors who
-providezfryour banking amnd investing needs.


I


I


811 S. Walnut St.
(904) 964-7830


20- Vars expKrie~ e 110 v
ON ALL OFFICE
MACHINE REPAIRS''"" ,1., iutatio". urDosc- only


A LOOK BACK AT BRADFORD HISTORY:
[ra~it~onl one-roo mnsouoiteyAr- s Atna


I


II II .I I I I I rl


I


A.


----- --~-------"d ,,~,----~~T-~slRI~is~~.J


*)


C.J. ureeK





Dec. 2.,, TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONilOR--B-SECTION Page7B


w
e
1


Frank of Energy Entertainment will provide the
Music. Tickets are $10 each.


J What have you got Whit
e planned for New S.R. 10
Year's Eve? Free ci
4Yspecial
S,$1.50
S Sugar Tree Cafe: Comem
S.R. 16 in Kingsley Lake
(h A semiformal prime rib dinner will be
New the feature of this party. Hors ,
Year 0' d'oeuvres will be served at 6:30 p.m. Red
C and the prime rib full dinner at 7 p.m. US. 3C
N&e The party will continue to 1 a.m. and Party f
f will include a champagne toast at includii
fes midnight and an omelet breakfast at feature
rea" /12:30 a.m., all for $50 per person. champ
*tties-... nI


'e Elephant:
0 East of Keystone
champagne all night and lots of drink
s will be featured (50-cent draft and
bottles). Special music is planned.
watch the ball drop in Times Square!


Dog Saloon:
01 south of Starke
avor giveaways and free food,
ng ham and chips and dip, will be
ed here beginning at 8 p.m. A
agne toast at midnight will be included.


Slab Fish Camp:
SW 75th Ave. off S.R. 100 west of Starke
Karaoke begins at 6 p.m. A cookout-with free
food-including turkey, ham and a whole hog-
will be held with champagne and party favors.


Madison Street Station:
Madison Street at S.R. 100 in Starke
Karaoke with Bryan will highlight this party.
Party favors will be given away.


Howlin' Wolf:
S.R. 100 at S.R. 26 in Putnam Hall
There will be no cover charge for this party. Bitter
Injun will provide music and a champagne toast will
be provided at midnight.


MATE'S
Continued from p. 4B
ff they shouldn't be driving,".
lie said. "They do that at home
ji Australia and I thought it
Was a brilliant idea."
Sew Year's Eve...
' Flashback will provide
Aiusic at the annual New
-Year's Eve Bash at Mate's. A
F10 per person reservation fee
.will cover munchies;, party
favors, door prizes and a
champagne toast at midnight.
REots of contests are also
planned .
i Mate's also offers lots of
special activities on a regular
basis, including pool and
bowling tournaments, etc.


BIKE
Continued from p. 5B
was added to the front of the
bar. Patio tables will allow
people to take advantage of
mild weather for a drink under
the stars.
Inside, a major
transformation took place.
,"We basically redid
everything," said Noqbles.
A brand new bar sports
Harley handlebars' as a
waitress station. A new ceiling
and completely remodeled
bathrooms have improved the
customer appeal of the place.
As a sports bar, it also
boasts a wide screen television
and seven other televisions to
cater to the varying' viewing
desires of the customers. There.
is even a television on the


patio so sports eninusiasts can
enjoy the stars in the sky and
the stars on the field or the
court at the same time.
A surround sound system on
the deck will make the music
enjoyable for those who want
to sit outdoors.
Brand new pool tables will
offer a little live competition to
those who prefer it to the
televised type.
"The only thing we haven't
done is redo the floor," said
Nobles. "We plan to do that
after the new year."
Other upcoming plans are to
install deck all the way around


tlihebuilding, instead of just in
the front.
Timbuktu also offers. a
package store and has special
attractions like tournaments for
pool, Texas hold'em, bowling,
etc.
New Year's Eve...
A special New Year's Eve
party is also being planned.
Admission will be $3 per
person and Centerline will be
on stage. Door prizes and party
favors will be given out and a
free champagne toast will be
provided at midnight. The bar
will be open until 2 a.m.


January 1, 2006

First Baptist Church of Starke

163 W. Jefferson Street ~ Starke FL


(Across from the Santa Fe Community College parking lot)


Presented by

Dr. Rodney G. Coe

CREATION


OR


In the Beginning What?
Jan. 1st
Darwinism Dissected
S-Jan. 8th
The Case for Creation
Jan. 15th
A Six Day Creation? h
-Jan. 22nd
What Happened to the
Eli .maa ... S


W UilanllaursiP

-a
d8?tffr^ WWhyaml Here?
JL A B>.C L.AL.*s& *., ... '! ; * ,:i. _


Jan. 29th

Feb. 5th


--------\ g ie aleS' --

VedieConneons
--- M : Connecting to a Powerful Relationship with God.

1 You'll Visit: .

/ie^BJ^^-^D-LM.T^ -


auaindmC DIUCbCrly 0 LCC
House, Flibber-O-Loo,


Snoodleburg, Dodgeball City, The
Chocolate Factory, & The Veggie
Lagoon.


At each of these sites, you'll learn a valuable tool
for building your relationship with God, as each-
site's message will be modeled after some of the
most unforgettable people during Bible times and
-. will include:


EVOLUTION?


CRAFTS.~ PUPPET TIME


~ VEGGIE MUSIC


Sunday at 10:15 a.m.

For more information call (904) 964-6562


Our Town Tavern:
S.R. 21 north of Keystone
Tickets are on sale for a "reservations only" bash
that will include a dinner of finger foods from 7:30-
9 p.m., a full breakfast from 12:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.,
nartv favors and free champaane at midnight. DJ


I


Double Deuce:
SW 4th Avenue in Lake Butler
Champagne and a meal of black-eyed
peas and rice (just for good luck) will
be served at midnight. Door prizes will
also be given away while a DJ spins
tunes for the party-goers. Begins at 8
p.m. and lasts until closing.


J & ROverhead

METAL SALE
36 inch wide metal in various colors.
CUT TO LENGTH.
352-473-7417


r.


d


I-' II I I I II I I


I


Starke Country Club:
S.R. 230 just east of Starke
Come make a meal off the "heavy" hours
d'oeuvres that will be served for this party
that will begin at 8 p.m. and last into the
new year at 1 a.m. Music will be provided
by Steel Country. A free champagne toast
will be provided at midnight. Attire is
casual and a cash bar will be provided.
Tickets for members are $10 each and
non-members can attend for $12 each.


I


I


I


I -


':: %


.j'




---7
z


Page 8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


HISTORY
Continued from p. 6B

Christian Church prior to
1880. Around 1880, a two-
story frame building on Main
Street in Lake Butler provided
classrooms on the first floor
and _a_ meeting -hall for-the--
Masonic Lodge on the second
floor. That building is still in
use today as the.Lake Butler
Masonic Hall more than 100
years later. The building was
.surrounded in early days by a
white picket fence that had no
gate. Inste ad, a set of steps was
built on each side of the fence
so that people walked up the-
steps on the outside of the
fence and down the steps on
the inside to enter the school
yard. Boys and girls were not
allowed to play together at
recess and each group had
their own play area in the yard.

Public education was
not always free...
- Free public education was
first seriously discussed in
Bradford County in 1869 when
the superintendent of schools
at the time, J.P. Richard.
proposed a plan to offer free
schooling to the estimated
1,400 young people who lived
in the county. However, free
schooling for all children in
the county %would not become a
reality until the mid-1920s.
In 1887, the first public
school in Starke opened its
doors. Called the Starke Male
and Female Institute, or just
the Starke Institute, it was later
replaced b. what is now
Bradford High School. Prior to
that time, education in the
Starke area was offered only in
the one-room schoolhouses or
through private, tutoring groups
which met in a home. Other
public schools did exist in
various parts of the county
before 1887, but most were
small and a far cry from the
more organized public schools
which were established in the
later 1800s. By 1880 Bradford
County, which included what
is now Union County, had 37
public partial-tuition schools,
each with an annual budget of
$2,305.
There were also a number of
private .schools-in early -years,
most of them grade schools,
which were fully funded by
tuition and had- no-access to
p.Ubjc,. ta-. funas. Orange
College was established in
1881 as the county's first
private secondary school. It
was founded by the Christian
Church and was located in
Starke. Although called a
college, the school operated as
a coeducational grade school
and high school. As the
number of schools which
offered public education grew,
the students available to
Orange College dwindled and
it closed its doors in the 1890s.

Early Bradford High:
sterling and healthy
In a Bradford County
Telegraph newspaper article in
1890, the advantages offered
by Bradford High School were
touted. The school was owned
by a corporation consisting of-
Starke business and
professional men. Professor
G.C. Looney, a "high-toned
Christian gentleman" %was in
charge of the school and was
described as "a profound
scholar and a teacher of the
highest grade." The article also
urged parents to have their
children attend school in
Starke by saying that. in seen
years during which average
daily attendance was 300
students for all schools in


Reception for
Chris and Kim

Willis is set

for Jan. 7
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Luther
will honor Chris and Kim
Willis with a reception on
Saturday, Jan. 7, 2006, at 3
p.m. The couple will be married
on Tuesday, Dec. 31. 2005 in
AnnapolisMd.
.The local reception will be
held at the Luther home at 615
Melton Terrace in Starke.
No invitations will be


mailed. All family and friends
are invited.

Oddfellow

Cemetery Inc.

plans meeting
Oddfellow Cemetery Inc.
will meet at Eden Learning
Center on Monday. Jan. 2,
2006, at 5 p.m.
Anyone who has an interest
in- the cemetery is urged to


Starke, "there was not a single in later years and in 1922, an back into the school
death." This may sound like a article in the Bradford County population. The same article
strange thing to be advertising, Telegraph noted that figures noted that the average life
but medicine was still in its released for the nation showed expectancy for an American
infancy and no one knew how unsanitary conditions in was only 38 years. The
most diseases were passed schools contributing to the advertisers urging parents to
from one person to another. It deaths of children throughout have children attend Bradford
was known, however, that America. Death rates for High School knew what they
proximity to people who were school children under the age were doing when they talked,
ill would make a healthy of 12 were on the rise and-aboutheathy-sunoundings--
-person-ill -atsr.-iseases-like-were-artr ,iute iTn part, to
yellow fever and influenza overcrowding, lack of ParentS paid for kids
could go through the playground space, poor Prn d
population like wildfire, so plumbing, inefficient heating, to attend BHS
healthy surroundings were a bad ventilation, unsanitary In 1890 the school had two
major concern of the day for drinking water and the sessions which ran from
any activity that required failure of parents to nurse October through May eight.
people to gather in groups. children with contagious months. However, this was
Health considerations diseases for an appropriate split into two four-month
I remained a high priority even time before allowing them sessions and most students


(AUTO SALES]


attended 'one session or the
other. The school was also
advertised as one of the most
-economical in the state. A
student could expect his or her
parents to pay the following
costs: $1 per month for reading
up to fourth grade; $2 per
month 'for intermediate..
arithmu c-, -grammar, or
geography; other common
school courses $3 per month;
collegiate algebra, science,
languages, higher
mathematics, etc. $4 per
month. Special courses were
also offe ed at the following
rates: instrumental music $4
per montl for eight lessons per
month; voice $5 per month;


class singing (chorus) $2.5,0
per month; modern language
$3 per month per language; art
painting or drawing $3 per
month; and telegraphy $5 pej
month with a lesson every day
Students usually boarded witf
families in town because
traveling-back- -and forth-tW
school-each day could be a real
hardship in a horse-drawn
wagon over bad roads. Tt coa
about $10-$12 per month for
student to board with a Starke
family in 1890. ,


1














eat u re s d oort

Section C: Thursday, December 29, 2005 Telegraph Times Monitor,



Area residents make their New Year's resolutions


By LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Telegraph Staff Writer

The end of the year is here,
and with that comes a chance
for people to reflect on the past
and look forward to the future
b\ making resolutions for the-
ne\ \Near.


FWC set to
unveil last leg
of Fla. birding
trail
Snail kites will dazzle you.
Mangrove cuckoos will amuse
%ou, and black-whiskered
vireos will lure you in when
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conser action Commission
iFWC) unveils the long-
awaited South Florida Section
of the Great Florida Birding
Trail.
With completion of the
2.000-mile trail, bird watchers
will be able to glimpse some of
Florida's remarkable avian
attractions at 446 premier sites
throughout the state. The
unveiling will take place Jan.
14 at a dedication at Corkscrew
Swamp Sanctuary in Naples.
The trail is a conseration
tool. fueled by the rapidly
expanding popularity of bird-
watching. FWC selected the
sites based on the quality of
bird-watching experiences they
offer and their resilience. The
agency compiled and published
trail guides representing four
geographic regions.
The south leg is the fourth
and final section of the birding
trail and has 116 sites. It winds
through 12 counties: Broward.
Charlotte. Collier. De Solo,
Glades. Hendry. Lee. Martin.
Miami-Dade, Monroe, Palm
Beach and Sarasota. The East
Florida portion debuted in
2000 .fol-lHwed by We-st
Florida and the Panhandle.
The trail includes nine
"gateway sites," including two
south loop locations the
Arthur R. Marshall
Loxahatchee National Wildlife
Refuge in Palm Beach County
and Corkscrew Swamp
Sanctuary. At these sites, both
beginning and avid birders can
borrow binoculars, pick up
field guides (written in
English or Spanish) and gather
other educational materials. --
South Florida offers bird
watchers a magnificent show.
Its coastlines act as migration
superhighways for many birds,
and, of course, the expansive
Everglades shelter an
abundance of birds. most
notably Florida's signature
herons and egrets. Grants from
the Federal Highway
Administration, the state
Department of Transportation
and the Wildlife Foundation of
Florida ha\e helped fund the
trail. Partners include the
Florida Park Service, the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, the
National Park Service and
Audubon of Florida.
Completion of this finai
section is a conservation coup.
harnessing the might of Florida
tourism to benefit our delicate
wild lands. For more
information, visit
wwwv.floridabirdingtrail.com.



SFCC offers
cardiovascular
imaging
program
The Cardiovascular
STechnology Program at Santa
Fe Community College is
scheduling the general public
for free cardiac ultrasound
studies, vascular ultrasound
studies and pulmonary
functions testing.
These studies will take place
at Santa Fe on select Friday
mornings beginning in January.
These studies are for
educational purposes only and
should not be considered
diagnostic.
Call (352) 395-5688 to
schedule an appointment


You are the music while the
music lasts.


-T. S. Eliot


While 'there have been
different attempts to explain
how or why people began
making New Year's
resolutions, mythology
provides one explanation.
In Roman mythology, there
was a eod named Janus. for


which January was named.
Janus had two faces. One
face was to look backward and
reflect on the past, while
another was to look forward to
things to come.
Since January is the first
mnonrh of the vear. it is said


that people began looking back
on one year in order to prepare
for the next.
Therefore, it was called
making a resolution, but could
this tradition be a dying one?
After asking dozens of
random area residents at


various convenience stores, the
Starke post office and Wal-
Mart, many said they simply
do not make resolutions
anymore or never have made
them to begin with.
It is easy to guess wh) most
Deonle do not Darticioate in


this thousand-year tradition.
Many, residents said they
would break resolutions soon
after making them, so they
don't'even bother making them
anymore.
See RESOLVE, p. 2C




r


Page 2C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


RESOLVE
Continued from p. 1C
With this aside, there are
those people who still do make
resolutions.
According to
www.firstgov.gov, the most
popular New Year's
resolutions are losing weight,
paying off debt, saving money,
getting a better job, getting
physically fit, eating right,
getting a better education,
drinking fewer alcoholic
beverages, quitting .smoking,
reducing overall stress,
reducing work-related stress,
taking a trip and volunteering
to help others.
But what do the people in
the area resolve to do in 2006?
The following are some of
their responses.


+04,

V,- w


While Christmas shopping with her friend Jennifer White on
Thursday, Dec. 22, Becky Bridges (right) resolved to make next
year better than this year.


Wendy Floyd
works with the
New River Public
Library
Cooperative, and
she said her reso-
lution for 2006 was
to maintain her
current weight.
Floyd recently lost
25 pounds after
having a-baby.


Michele Etcher wants "to
spend more quality time with
my family," she said.
"Mine is always to be the
wife, mother, aunt, daughter
and sister that God would have
me to be," said Pam Saxon, of
Keystone, who also wanted to
lose weight because she
recently had a baby.


Lawtey resident
Dan Munger, (left)
while shopping at
'the Wal-Mart
Supercenter, said
he should spend
less money alto-
gether.


[i.;5


JIZ]


Centoya Chandler,
20, hadn't really
made a New Year's
resolution yet, but
wanted 2006 to be
a better year than
2005.


Phalbe Henriksen,
the librarian of the
Bradford County
Public Library, had
a resolution relat-
ing to hier job. "I'm
going to try in the
next year to build
,. the best libPary -r'
everr" she said.
The groundbreak-
ing ceremony for
the new library on
Pratt Street is set
for 2 p.m. on.
January 27.


Darlene Dykes,
who was visiting
her daughter in
Starke for the holi-
days,.wantsto,. "
lose.weight.in, ,
2006 and "get a
man." "If I succeed
at the first one,
then maybe I'll get
the second," she
said.


r- .. Me


i, : i
i Page 2C 'TELEGRAPH, TI ES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005
I


LEGALS
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING CONCERNING A
VARIANCE AS PROVIDED
FOR IN THE BRADFORD
COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF
ADJUSTMENT OF BRADFORD
COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that. pursuant to the
Bradford County Land Development
Regulations, as amended, hereinafter
referred to as the Land Development
Regulations. objections, recom-,
mendations and comments
concerning a variance, as described
below, will be heard by the Board of
Adjustment of Bradford County,
Florida, at a public hearing on
January 9. 2005 at 6:30 p.m.. or as
soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, in the County Commission
'Meeting Room, North Wing, County
Courthouse located at 945 North
Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida.
V-05-16, a petition by John E.
Daughany II, to request a Variance be
granted as provided for in Section
12.3.1.2 of the Land Development
Regulations to allow a variance on
yard setbacks in an Residential
Estate zoning classification from t
required 15 feet side setbacks to
requested 10 feet on each side, on
property described, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
22, Township 8 South, Range 22
East, being Parcel Number: 05695-0-
00000, Bradford County, Florida.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any
'continuation of the public hearing
shall be announced during the public
hearing and that no further notice
concerning the matter will be
published, unless said continuation
exceeds six calendar weeks from the
date of the above referenced public
hearing.
At the aforementioned public hearing,
all interested parties may appear to
be heard with respect to the special
exception..
Copies of the variance application are
available for public inspection at the
Office of the Director.f Zoning,
Planning, and Building, County
Courthouse located at 945 North
Temple Avenue, North Wing, Starke,
Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public
:hearing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, they may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the
proceedings Is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal isto be based,
i ......-12/291tchg.


Jones Funeral Home
Steve, Cindy & Staff
Starke Keystone Heights
964-6200 473-3176


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'Planet Ag'
.will help
students with
fair projects
Do you know a student who
is looking for a science fair
project idea?
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services would like to help in
the search by encouraging
students to consider a topic in
,agriculture.
The department has
developed "Planet Ag," a Web
site designed to assist middle
and high school students in
developing a science fair topic
and seeing the project through
to completion. The site can be
accessed at http://www.flor;ida-
agriculture.com/PlanetAg.
"A science fair project is a
great way to begin to learn
about agricultural science."
Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson said. "Agricultural
science is the science of
growing plants, breeding
animals, and producing food.
It's an exciting field,'and it's
vital to the future of Florida
and our nation. This Web site
allows students to begin to
explore the world. of
agricultural science and to start'
to think about the many
interesting questions and
challenges associated with food
production."
Planet Ag provides students
with an explanation of the
scientific method, the step-by-
..step process that will enable
them to complete their science,


I


LI I I


.


fair project. Students learn how
to come up with a hypothesis,
decide on a procedure for the
experiment, record the results,
and come to a conclusion based
on those results.
Planet Ag also offers practice
projects for students to review
and presents topic ideas in the
areas of biochemistry, botany,
chemistry, engineering,
environmental sciences,
medicine and health,
microbiology, and zoology.
Among the dozens of topic
ideas included on the Web site
are:
How can animal pests be
genetically controlled?
Why do salts build up in
soils? How can this be
avoided?
Do different colors attract
different kinds of pollinators?
Integrating agriculture into
the science curriculum is a very
important process. More and
more rural areas are becoming
urbanized and families are
becoming further removed from
their agricultural, roots.
Bringing agriculture into the
classroom provides students
with an opportunity to learn
where their food comes from. It
also allows them to moae
beyond book learning and get
hands-on experience in science.
"Associating science lessons
with 'real world' experiences
like growing a garden or
-raising animals makes learning
relevant to students' liess"
Bronson said. "Performance
improves, and kids begin to
think about career ideas."
A visit to Planet Ag might
be the first step toward a career
See PLANET, p. 3C






Dec. 29, 2005 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 3C



Melrose woman finds teddys beary collectible


By MARCIA MILLER
Telegraph Staff Writer


Teddy bears
stethoscopes, teddy
wearing race car outfits,
bears in Santa suits,


with
bears
teddy
teddy


bears in kilts, teddy bears that
move... you can probably find
almost every type of teddy
bear you have ever seen in the
possession of Kathy Blanchard
of Melrose.
Blanchard, who owns and


operates Bobkat's Cafe on
.Call Street in Starke, has
more than 1,000 teddy bears at
her home and another 250-plus
at the cafe.
She said she 'fell in love
with teddy bears when she was


a child and started collecting
them seriously at the age of
12.
"People just started giving
them to me, for birthdays and
Christmas, and I started
collecting more and more,"
Blanchard said.
"I never met a bear I didn't
like," she affirmed with a grin.
"They just make you feel
good. They're so cuddly and
soft."
Blanchard has lived in
Melrose all of her life. She
and her husband, Bob, who is
now deceased, opened Bobkat's
four years ago. They named
the restaurant after themselves
- Bob and Kathy, hence
Bobkat's.
When Bob died about a year
ago, his son, Ford Blanchard,
came on board to help
Blanchard cook and keep the
restaurant going. Blanchard's
granddaughter Katie spends a
lot of her free time helping
out at the restaurant after
school and on holidays.
'"It's a'family concern," said
Blanchard.
Katie and Blanchard's
grandson Robert. have made a
tradition of sending Christmas
and lbrthday %wishes to their
grandmother in the hands of
tedd) bears. The two children
have picked out matching boy-
girl pairs of teddy bears for


Many of Blanchard's bears have a unique character of
their own.


their' grandmother ever since
they were toddlers.
"I have 13 sets now. It's
what I get every year," said
Blanchard, smiling.
Blanchard said she doesn't


really actively seek teddy
bears, teddy bears just seem to
come to her. She doesn't order,

See BEARS, p. 4C


Kathy Blanchard with just a few of the more than 1,000 stuffed bears in her
collection. The 100th Anniversary Theodore Roosevelt Teddy Bear on her left is one
of the prizes of her collection, but she said she loves every single bear.


PLANET
Continued from p. 2C
in agricultural science. The
Web site examines many
interesting career possibilities
in agriculture-including
veterinarian, aquaculturist,
plant pathologist, forester, and
agricultural economist-and
offers suggestions, to students
onh courses t(M idelW i
school and college.
There's anadded incentive
for students to consider an
agricultural topic for their
science fair project. Bronson
will present a $1,000 United
States Savings Bond to junior
and senior division students
whose agricultural projects are
selected as winners during the
51st annual state Science and
Engineering Fair of Florida in
2006.
The fair is administered by
the Florida Foundation for
Future Scientists. The
Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services is among numerous
government agencies,
businesses, and organizations
that contribute awards for the.
fair.


;~A i~1


01 61i


904-964-8788


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M Mon.,Tues., Wed.,Fri Medicare,Medicaid
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Pictured (I-r): Lisa Hutto, Shannon Elder, Heather Bennett,
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904-964-5152


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Page 4C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-C-SECTION uec. 29, 2005


BEARS
Continued from p. 3C
fancy teddy bears from foreign
countries or go to a store just
to buy a teddy bear.
"I just kind of stumble onto
them and they come home
with me," she said.
Many of the bears on
display at the restaurant came
to Blanchard as gifts from
customers. "Customers find
bears at yard sales and Good
Will stores and buy them for
me," she said.
-Blanchard said that she
doesn't normally go out and
-shop for collectible bears, but
she did spend $500 on a teddy
bear once. It was a giant
version of the original
1 ::x,-c Roosevelt teddy bear
that was f rst sold more than
\\ tile that is the most
Btfharid herself has ever
on a tedOdy bear, she does
owA m& \onrth $1,000: It was
a,: .4i ii-n' her brother-in-law.
\ -.. .'s are insured in case
of ft or fire and she has
s.w,.ki for their disposition
"If i.acchhing happens to
tmA m8 children and
kaliid'itn will pick out the
eas they want to keep and all
the others will go to the
,AWh s department," she said.
The sheriff's department
speasms a program that
p-,a.?. toddy bears for the
child v icnims of crime.
Most of Blanchard's bears
I-:z,< n.ames. Many are named
afte- her brother, children and
gr.michildren and with
every conceivable version of
sh names.
Some are named for the
people who gave the bears to
k~r .rnd some have names that
just seemed to fit at the time.
Blanchard's restaurant is a
gathering place for a group of
people Blanchard refers to as.
the "Lunch 'Bunch." The
mostly male group is
composed of people who work
in businesses around Starke.
They gather at lunch and
conversations and
sometimes good-natured
arguments often extend to


include several tables, if not
everyone in the restaurant.
The Lunch Bunch can be
found at Bobkat's every
weekday at lunch.
Blanchard got started in the
restaurant business as a
waitress. She worked at
Howard Johnson's, Skeeter's,
the Trading Post, etc., as a
part-time job. She worked for
Georgia-Pacific full time for
many years.
"I always wanted to own my
own restaurant, but I could
never afford it," she said.
Her late husband finally
talked her into it one day. "He
said we should just quit our
jobs and open up a restaurant,"
she said. "We ran it together
for two years before he died. If
it wasn't for him, I'd still
probably be working for
someone else."
Blanchard's first wish was to
open a restaurant in her
hometown of Melrose. She
said she really wasn't sure
about running a restaurant
anywhere else.
"But Starke has been just
wonderful," she said. "Now, I
can't imagine having a
restaurant anywhere but here."

Bobkat's is known for its
home-baked breads and
pastries. Blanchard said the
Lunch Bunch particularly likes
the meat loaf, spaghetti plate
and salad platter.
The restaurant is open for
breakfast and lunch, 6 a.m. to
2 p.m., and is divided into two
sections -, one for the drop-in
diners, and' one reserved for
events and functions.
Bobkat's has hosted
weddings and wedding
receptions, baby showers,
graduations, meetings of civic
groups, etc. All of those
events have been held under
the watchful eyes of hundreds
of cuddly teddy bears.
The restaurant is due to be
remodeled in January. The
bears may have to be removed
during the work, but Blanchard
said they will be back in full
force with a few new
additions, no doubt.


TimBukT

:eP00


Bears line the shelves on every wall in Blanchard's restaurant, as well as every nook and cranny of her home.


Bears and more bears everywhere you look in Bobkat's.


o Long & g
Io We


DANCE TO CENTERLUNE


* Admission $3 Door
* FREE Party Favors Prizes
* FREE Champagne Open liH
at Midnight 2 a.m


COME JOIN THE FUN!!!


season's retin gs


S Wed www.timbuktulounge.com '
17420 Hwv. 301 N, Starke SECURITY PROVIDED
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Dec. 29, 2005 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION i Page 5C .


3 from Bradford High earned state medals in 2005


Baseball and boys
track and field,
teams account for all
6 BHS district and
regional titles


By CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer

Bradford High School
athletes Justin Forsyth, Letroy
Guion and Kayla Hartsfield
each received medals in state
finals competition during
'.2005, with Forsyth and Guion
also capturing district and
* regional championships.
Hartsfield, as a member of
the girls weightlifting team,
earned the first medal of the
year for Bradford. She placed
fourth in the 199-pound class
at the Florida High. School
Athletic Association (FHSAA)
Finals with a bench press of
165 pounds and a clean and
jerk of 170 pounds.
Those totals equalled those
that Hartsfield at the state-
qualifying meet.
In all, Bradford sent three
lifters to the FHSAA Finals.
Kelly Leigh just missed out on
a medal, finishing seventh in
the 139-pound class with a
bench press of 135 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 145 pounds.
.Cassi Padgett placed 15 in the
S110-pound class with a bench
press of 110 pounds and a
clean and jerk of 115 pounds.
Hartsfield and Leigh each
won their respective classes at
the state-qualifying meet,


. .* .


.: " Op- t


MAO:I :'",,-


while Padgett was a runner-up.
Bradford wrestler Forsyth
placed fifth in the 140-pound
class- at the FHSAA Finals to
earn his medal, finishing his
season with a record of 41-2.
Forsyth won his first two
matches at the finals, pinning
one of his opponents in 5:44
and defeating the other by a 5-
4 score.
He then lost two straight by
scores of 16-5 and 3-2 before
rebounding for a 10-4 win to
earn a medal.
Forsyth's road to the
FHSAA Finals began when he
captured his second straight
district championship at the
District 5-Class A met. He
defeated both of his opponents
there by scores of 10-0 and 14-
7.
At the Region 2 meet,
Forsyth pinned his first three
opponents in times of 3:34,
1:05 and 4:11. He then took a
7-5 win to give him the
regional title.
Likewise, Guion won
district and regional
championships to propel his
run to the FHSAA Track and
Field Finals.
Guion's titles came in the
discus, where he had throws of
162'11" at the District 5-2A
meet and 156'10" at, the
Region 2 meet. He then placed
fifth at the FHSAA Finals with
a throw of 143'9".
Boys weightlifter Eric
Palmer was also a state
qualifier for Bradf6rd after his
615-pound total in the
heavyweight class at the
sectional meet.


"
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The Bradford baseball team won a district program since 1998. The Tornadoes advanced to the
championship in 2005-the first such title for the regional semifinals before losing.


Boys win a total of 5
track and field titles
Guion's district and regional
championships gave the boys
track and field team a total of
five championships in.2005.
Allen Perry and the 4x400m
relay team won championships
at the District 5 meet. Perry
won the 300m hurdles with a
time of 42.47 seconds, then
helped the relay team win its
race with a time of 3:35.60.
Joining Perry on the team were
Brance Chiadikobi, Ryan
Robinson and Ma-rcus
Sainrilus. I
The 4x100m relay team won
the Region 2 championship
with a time of 43.55 seconds.
The team was comprised of
James Jamison, Jimmy
Hankerson, J.R. Petteway and
Rob Harris.
Bradford- also captured
several runner-up finishes at
district and regional
competition.
Harris was district runner-up
in both the 100m and 200m
with times of 10.67 seconds
and 22.56 seconds. He and the
remaining 4xl00m team
members placed second at the
district meet with a time of
44.0 seconds.
Harris was also a runner-up
in the 100m at the Region 2


meet with. a time of 10.89
seconds.
Other district results of those
who qualified for the regional
tournament were: Petteway in
the 200m (third place, 22,63),
Guion in the shot put (fourth,
46'5"), Jamison in the 100m
(fourth, 10.98), Robinson in
the 800m (2:08.50) and
Derrick McBride in the 400m
(54.31).
Harris joined Guion and the
4xl00m relay team at the
FHSAA Finals after his
performances at the Region 2
meet. Besides finishing second
in the 100m, Harris placed
fourth in the 200m with a time
of 22.54 sebonds.
Other -regional results:
Jamison in the 100m (fifth,
11.23), 4x400m relay (sixth,
3:31.66), Perry in the 300m
hurdles (seventh, 45.08),
Guion in the shot ptit (eighth,
45'I"), Petteway in the 200m
(10 23.48), Robinson in the
800m (11th, 2:04.44) ,and
McBride in the 400m (l'6
54.86).

Baseball team ends
title drought
Late-inning heroics helped
provide a memorable season
for the baseball team, which
vwon its first district"


championship since' 1998.
The Tornadoes trailed 2-0
against Keystone Heights
going into the bottom of the
seventh inning of the District
4-3A championship game, but
Bradford rallied and won the
game 3-2 in the eighth inning
on an RBI single by Jonathan


Duncan.
Ryan O'Neal sent the game
into extra innings when his
single scored both Derek
Saucer and John Sanford in the
,seventh.
Keystone's lead-off batter in
See BHS, p. 9C


,J


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Justin Forsyth was the lone member of the Bradford
wrestling team to advance to the state finals, where
he earned a medal with a fifth-place finish in the 140-
pound class. Forsyth also won district and regional
championships.


KEYrn


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Page 6C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


Union's

Union, Bradford anc
Keystone have 11
players named to
Gainesville Sun's
Class A-2A first
team


Spiller receives top honor from Gainesville Sun


I


By CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
It should come as no
surprise that one of the area's
top recruits was tabbed as one
of three players of the year as
named by The Gainesville
Sun.
Union County senior
running back C.J. Spiller, who
has narrowed his list of college
choices to ,Florida, Florida
State, Miami and Southern
Cal, rushed for 1,840 yards on
176 carries this past season. He
also caught 15 passes for 249
yards and scored 31
touchdowns to help lead his
team to the regional
semifinals.
Spiller shared player of the
year honors with Eastside's


Micguel Johnson and Tim
Shankle.
Union senior linebacker
Kevin Alexander was a Class
A-2A co-defensive player of
the year. Alexander, who
shared the award with
Lafayette's Aaron Gresham,
had 115 tackles on the season.
He also had nine sacks, five
forced fumbles and four
fumble recoveries.
Spiller and Alexander were
joined by five of their
teammates as first-teamers on
either offense or defense.
Senior linemen Spencer Bell
and Darin Hendricks were
first-team offensive selections,
as was senior tight end Kasey
Nobles, who finished the year
with 283 yards on 19
receptions.
Senior linebacker Brendan
Odom and senior lineman
Willie Oliver were first-team
defensive selections. Odom
finished the year with 130
tackles, three sacks, three
fumble recoveries and one
forced fumble. Oliver had 44
tackles, six sacks, two fumble
recoveries and one forced


fumble.
Bradford and Keystone each
had two first-team selections.
On offense, Bradford senior
running back James Jamison
and Keystone junior
placekicker were selected.
Jamison, who made the team
as an athlete, rushed for 942
yards, breaking his school's
all-time rushing mark. McLeod
made eight field goals and 20
PATs. His longest field goal
was 50 yards.
Bradford senior Shauntell
Carter and Keystone junior
Jack Taylor, both linebackers,
were defensive selections.
.Carter, chosen as a utility
player, recorded 145 tackles,
five tackles for loss, four
fumble recoveries and three
forced fumbles. Taylor, chosen
as an athlete, had 151 tackles,
five forced fumbles, one sack,
one interception and one
fumble recovery.
Keystone had four players
earn second-team honors.
JRnior tight end/wide
receiver Josh Mangus made
the offensive team after
catching 25 passes for 332
yards and three touchdowns.:


2 KHHS volleyball players

are Sun first-team picks


:Keystone coach
receives top honor,
while 6 players from
Keystone, Bradford
are honored

By CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
S Two members of' the
Keystone Heights volleyball
team were named to The
Gainesville Sun's all-area first
team (for Class 3A-6A), while
head coach Scott Conkling was


named a coach of the year.
Conkling, who shared 3A-
6A coach of the year honors
with Santa Fe's Michele Faulk,
guided the Indians 'to a
program-best 27-2 record this
past season. The Indians won
their district for the first time
since 2001 and advanced to the
regional semifinals before
losing to eventual state
champion Lake Highland Prep.
Helping Keystone achieve
what. it did this year were
senior setter Jessica Ford and
junior outside hitter Mallory
Wasik, who were both first-
team selections. Ford had 662
assists, 149 kills, 158 digs, 65


service aces and 39 blocks this
past season, while \Vasik had
367 kills, 212 digs, 53 aces and
43 assists.
Senior middle blocker
Jessica Whitfield, x- ho had 123
kills, 69 aces, 53 digs and 51
-blocks, was a third-ieam
selection.
Receiving honorable
mention for'Keystone, were:
senior libero Cassandra Bruey
and senior middle blocker
BrendA Ward.
Bradford senior outside
hitter Tosha Newman 'also
received honorable mention as
she helped the Tornadoes
finish as district runners-up.


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Senior defensive back Nick
Salsbery, junior linebacker
Brandon McGuire and
sophomore defensive back
Greg Taylor were defensive
selections. Salsbery had 92
tackles and two interceptions,
McGuire 127 tackles and
Taylor 59 tackles and three
interceptions.
Union senior defensive back


Chris Perry was a second-team
selection as well. Perry had 41
tackles, six interceptions and
one forced fumble.
Receiving honorable
mention for Union were:
senior defensive tackle Steven
Baggett, senior defensive
tackles Josh Blunk, junior
running back Josh Mitchell
and junior quarterback Austen


Roberts.
Keystone had six players
receive honorable mention:
senior running back Wil
Breton, senior noseguard Tony
Hamner, senior defensive end
Lans Hardin, junior defensive
tackle Jeramy Lewis, junior
quarterback Blake Lott and
senior defensive back Michael
Williams.


Bradford boys lose 2 1-

point games in tournament


By CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer


The Bradford boys
basketball team lost its second
straight game by one point and
its fifth straight game overall,
falling 80-79 to Forrest on
Dec. 17 in the' Kiwanis



Holiday

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to all our

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US-301 S
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%% "w,.getyourford.com


Christmas Tournament at Lee
High School in Jacksonville.
Forrest outscored Bradford
(2-7) 23-10 in the second
quarter Ao take a 41-28 lead
into the half. The Tornadoes
rallied in the fourth quarter,
outscoring Forrest 31-19.
Bradford's Clinton
Cubbedge poured in a game-


high 33 points, while Roderick
DeSue added 12 points.
Cubbedge and DeSue each
made three 3-pointers.
The Tornadoes will be back
in action Tuesday, Jan. 3,
when they travel to play
district opponent Interlachen at
See TEAM, p. 12C


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Dec. 29, 2005 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 7C



KH soccer, volleyball teams reach new heights in '05


Keystone teams and
athletes combined to
win 3 district titles
and 2 state medals

By CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer

Two teams at Keystone
Heights High School had their
best seasons ever in 2005-a
yar in which the school laid
claim to three district
championships and had
regional and state participants
in 12 sports.
The boys soccer team won
its second consecutive district
) championship and went the
farthest it ever had in the
postseason before losing 3-1 to
Bolles in the Region 1-3A
championship match, while the
volleyball team compiled a
program-best 27-2 record
1.before losing 3-0 to Lake
Highland Prep in the Region 2-
Class 3A semifinals.
En route to its first regional
final appearance, the boys
soccer team went undefeated
i; in district play and defeated
Santa Fe 3-2 in penalty kicks
to win the District 4 title.
Chad Hapner scored both
Keystone goals in regulation
off of assists from Sean
Gillespie and Derek Tornwall.
The Indians, after two
scoreless overtime periods,
then converted ..on all, four of
| their penalty kicks by Michael
SMcLe-od, KeniinyTurner, Derek
Tornwall and Keith Wheeler to
wii the match.
Keystone would then defeat
Episcopal 2-0-its first win
over Episcopal in four
attempts-in, the regional
quarterfinals and Wakulla 4-0
in the semifinals. Hapner
scored both goals in the win
over 'Episcopar' (with assists
from Turner and Brad -Gober)
| and added two more in the win
over Wakulla. Gober and
Turner added the other, two
goals.
Defensively, the Indians
allowed only two shots on goal
in the loss to Bolles, which
t ended their season with a 15-6
record. Gillespie scored the:,
team's lone goal.
Keystone's \olleyball team-,
lost_ only one-match during the
YTgtitl WeiB andowrwww
"undefeated in District 6,
r culminating in a 3-0 win over
i Interlachen to win its first
1 district championship since
2002.
The Indians advanced to the
district championship match
by defeating Pierson Taylor 3-
0. Jessica Ford had 19 points,
38 assists and eight digs,
Mallorie Wasik had 23. kills
and Autumn Lindsey had 15
service points.
In the win over Interlachen,
Wasik had 13 kills, eight
points and three digs, Ford had
26.assists, 20 service points
and six aces and Brenda Ward
.iad nine kills.
Keystone defeated Chiefland
;3 -0 in the regional
quarterfinals, getting 39
assists, 12 service points and
Shee blocks from Ford, 16
:ills and eight points from
" Vasik, 10 kills from Ward,
ine points from Lindsey,
ight digs from Cassandra
." iruey and four blocks from
ssica Whitfield.
Ford had 12 assists. and
lasik ha.. nine kills in the
idians' semifinal loss to Lake
'ighland Prep, which went on
win the state championship.

rane also captures
district championship
Keystone's third district
Siampionship came from
-: achel Crane, who shared first
lace in the high jump at the
". districtt 5-Class 2A meet.
s Crane had a jump of 4'10"
S nd 'she advanced to the
i egion 2 meet along with bbys
;am member Warren Tillery,
'ho placed third in the 3200m
ice with a time of 10:59.
I-
S KHHS athletes
i arn state medals
Boys weightlifters Kraig
assanante and Jesse Vasquez
id something no other KHHS
athlete could do in 2005-they
arned medals in state finals
competition.


Passanante earned fifth place
i the 219-pound weight class
'ith a bench press of 375
ounds and a clean and jerk of
75 pounds. Vasquez had a
80-pound bench press and a
90-pound clean and jerk to
lace sixth in the 119-pound
4- ass.

more compete for
tate titles
Besides Passanante and
asquez, Keystone was also


represented in state finals
competition by five girls
weightlifters and one girls
cross country runner.
Kasey Fagan won the
unlimited class in the girls
weightlifting state qualifying
meet with a bench press of 205
pounds and a clean and jerk of
145 pounds to advance to the
state finals. She was joined by
Brenda Ward, who placed
second in the 139 class at the
state qualifying meet (145
bench press, 130 clean and
jerk), Rachel Lingerfelt, who
was second in the 199 class
(160, 130), Angie Mengelson,
who was third in the 129 class
(115, 120) and Lauren Stobbie,
who was third in the 154 class
(155, 135).
At the state finals, Ward and
Lingerfelt earned top-10
finishes, placing eighth and
ninth, respectively.
Margaret Walker was
Keystone's other state
.competitor, earning her berth
in the cross country finals by
placing 15th at the Region 2-
Class 2A meet with a time of
21:32.10. She qualified for the
regional meet by placing third
at the District 3 meet with a
time of 20:23.83.
Walker went on to place 37th
out of 185 runners at the state


meet, duplicating her regional
time.
Keystone's entire girls cross
country team qualified for the
regional meet with a fourth-
place finish at the district meet.
The rest of the team was
comprised of Liz Wheeler,
Julie Rund, Jordyn Davis,
Rachel Fonvielle and
Stephanie Hoffman.
Boys team member Warren
Tillery also competed at the
regional meet by virtue of
placing seventh at the district
meet.

5 teams finish as
district runners-up
Keystone's girls soccer, girls
basketball, softball, baseball
and football teams also
competed in postseason play'
by virtue of capturing second
place in their respective
districts.
The girls soccer team was
the number-one, seed in its
district tournament and
defeated Interlachen 8-0 to
advance to the championship
match. Sarah Poncher scored
twice in that win, while Julie
Campbell, Rachel Crane,
Garra Patton, Brittany Sabo,
See KHHS, p. 9C


Kraig Passanante (left) and Jesse Vasquez each
earned medals for Keystone at the Florida High
School Athletic AssociationWeightlifting Finals.
- --^ --


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W.








Har







E








Pris







Mor







M


Iarc Jackson


Co-Founder


riette Jackson
rriette Jackson


ic Jackson
ric Jackson


Jackson


Bruce Jackson


Tom Jackson


Jackson Building Supply


LAKE BUTLER

496-3079


Happy New Year to all of you

from all of us at Jackson's!

At this time of year our attention is focused on Christmas. On behalf of the stockholders, officers,
directors and employees of Jackson Building Supply, I would like to thank you all for your support.
We realize that without you and more importantly, without the Grace and Mercy of Almighty God, we
could not exist as a business or even as individuals. Because you have been so good to us and likewise
God has been, we feel that we need to share with you what we believe Christmas is all about.
Christmas is surely a time of giving, as is evidenced by the giving or exchanging of many gifts.
Wheh we think about Christmas giving we need to remember, "For God so loved the world, that he
gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on him should not perish, but have everlasting
life," (John 3:16). God gave that we might believe on His Son and have a place In Heaven. Jesus paid
our sin debt and rose again to show that His payment was enough. However, if we reject what He
gave, we have a place in Hell.
Christmas needs to be a time for receiving, for no one can give a gift unless it is received. The Bible
says that the Gift of God, His Son, Jesus, "came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as
many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God. Even to them that believe
on his name; Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of
God." (John 1:11-13)
Christmas is a time of happiness, as evidenced on the face of many. Happiness depends on happenings
and can be short lived to gain real Joy and Peace this Christmas, why not right now receive the
greatest gift ever given, The Lord Jesus Christ? Jesus loves us and invites us to believe in Him. If you
have not made this commitment, you should right now receive Jesus Christ as your. personal Savior. If
you have just now received Him...you can know the real Joy of Christmas for the first time. For those
of us who already know Him may we be drawn to a closer walk this Christmas.
We thank God for the opportunity He has given us to serve your building supply and hardware needs
-'we also thank Him for allowing us to share Jesus Christ with you. After all, without Christ there
would be no Christmas.
Marc Jackson, President


The Keystone boys soccer team celebrates after winning its district in 2005.
Keystone would go on to play for the Region 1-Class 3A championship. It was the
farthest the Indians had ever advanced in the postseason.


Becky Scott


STARKE

964-6078


Mike Shemer


Josh Luke Mac ouglas
Josh Luke Mac Douglas


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,,-----


I






SPage 8C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Dec. 29, 200


Union's Brown wins area's only state title in 2005


Union County High
School athletes
finish year with 3
state medals and 5
district titles

By CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer

The area's three high
schools-Bradford, Keystone
Heights and Union
County'-produced just one
state champion in 2005 and
that was Union County's
Jeremy Brown, who did so at
the Florida High School
Athletic Association (FHSAA)
Boys Weightlifting Finals.
Brown did not fare as well
as he would've liked in the
2004 FHSAA Finals,
scratching on one of. his lift
attempts and finishing, seventh.
He vowed to return more
focused in 2005 and he was,
successfully completing every
lift. His 370-pound bench
press and 310-pound clean and
jerk gave him the state title in
the 219-pound class.
Winning his weight class at
the sectional meet is what
propelled Brown to the
FHSAA Finals. His 650-pound.
total at the sectional meet was
the best out of all sectional
meet totals throughout the state
in the 219-pound class
(Nease's Charlie Kirschman,
whom Brown bested by 25
pounds at the state finals, also,
had 65Q pounds).

Waters, Spiller earn
state medals
Two other Union athletes
earned medals in FHSAA
Finals. competition this past,
year-John Adam Waters of.
the boys weightlifting team
and C.J., Spiller of the boys
:track and field team. -
Waters earned a berth in the
state finals' by Ninning the
169-pound weight class at the
sectional meet w ith a 560-
pound total. At the FHSAA
Finals, he placed fourth with a
bench press of 305 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 280 pounds.
His clean and jerk total tied a
school' record.
Two Union lifters just
missed out on state medals
With seventh-place finishes at
the state finals Trais Harrell
had a bench press of 190
pounds and a clean and jerk of
175 pounds in the 119-pound
class and 'Donny Clyatt had a
bench press of 215 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 190 pounds
in the 129-pound class.
Ke\in Alexander also
represented Union at the
FHSAA Finals He finished
12" in the 219-pound class
with a bench press of 340
pounds and a clean and jerk of
270 pounds.
Spiller won district and
regional championships to earn
his trip to the track and field
state finals. where he placed
si\th in the 100m with a time
of 10.88 seconds. His times at
the District 3-Class 2A and
Region 1 meets were 10.64
seconds and 10.60 seconds,
respectively.
bAlso earning state finals
berths, but not winning
medals. :ere the boys 4x100m
rela% team-comprised of
Spiller. Jarin Moorefield.
Mathis Jackson and Rodencia
Austin-and Francis Highland
in the discus.

Track and field teams
win 5 district titles
Spiller's in in the 1l00m
.as just one of five district
championships claimed by
members of both the boys and


Union County's Kerrie
Lynch won district
championships in
both the 800m apd
1600m races.


girls track and field teams.
Girls team member Kerrie
Lynch earned two of those
championships, winning the
1600m with a time of 5:59.14
and the 800m with a time of
2:43.44.
Amika Davis won the triple
jump with a distance of
31'9.5".
Boys team member Brandon
Shoup won the title in the
800m with a time of 2:10.14.
Davis and boys team
member Francis Highland each
finished as district runner-up in
two events. Davis' second-
place finishes came in the long
jump (14'7.5") and the 200m
(28.34), while Highland's
came in the shot put (54'5")
and discus (139'2").
The boys 4xl00m relay
team placed third with a time
of 44.24 seconds to qualify for
the Region 1-2A meet. Spiller,
Jarin Moorefield, Byron
Jenkins and Rodencia Austin
.made up the team.
Union's results at the
Region 1 meet (besides
Spiller's result 'in the 100m)
were: 4xl00m relay (second
place, 42.98), Highland in the
discus (fourth, 145'2.5"),
Highland in the shot put (sixth,
48'4.5"), Shoup in the 800m
(seventh, 2:05.28), Lynch in
the 1600m (seventh, 5:49.23),
Davis in the triple jump (ninth,
31'3"), Davis in the long jump
(12"t, 14'10"), Lynch in the
800m (12th, 2:42.09) and
Whitney Worthington in the
400ni(14a, 1:07.37).
3 girls lifters earn
state finals berths,
Kerrie Lynch, Whitney
Sykes and Shayla Hollis
,qualified for the FHS.LA Girls
Weightlifting Finals after their
performances at the state-
qualifying meet.
Lynch %won the 119-pound


class at the state-qualifying
meet with a bench press of 115
pounds and a clean and jerk of
115 pounds. Sykes was third in
the 139-pound class with a
bench press of 110 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 125 pounds,
while Hollis placed seventh: in
the unlimited class with a 290-
pound total.
Lynch would go on to finish
in the top 10 at the FHSAA
Finals, placing ninth with a
bench press of 110 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 120 pounds.

Football team ,places
second in district
Union's football team
earned a trip to the playoffs for
the third straight year after
finishing as runner-up in
District 4-2B.
The'Tigers defeated district
opponents Chiefland and
Newberry by a combined score
of 68-0, then locked up a
playoff berth by defeating
district opponent P.K. Yonge
34-26.
Union and P.K. "Yonge
traded scores early, 'but the
Tigers went into the'half'up
21-12 after a 99-\ard kickl(ff
return for a touchdown. n by C I.
Spiller. i .:
The Tigers then receiv'dd the
second half kickoff, held the
ball for 10:47 and scored on a
2-yard touchdown run by
Spiller to go up 27-12.
Spiller also scored on a 414:
yard run, while Josh i c he ll
scored on a 39-yard run.
Rodencia Austin scored the
games first touchdown n on.a
55-yard punt return.
The win set up a battle for
the district title against the
state's top-ranked team,.
Trinit:, Catholic. The. Tigers
were the first team to lead at,
any point against Trinity and
held a halftime lead, but they,


Union
County's
Jeremy
Brown won
the state title
in the 219-
pound weight
, class at the
Florida High
School
Athletic
Association
Weightlifting
Finals.


just came up.short in a 23-21
loss.
Spiller, who finished the
game with 120 all-purpose
yards, scored three
touchdowns in the first half on
runs 'of 1, 9 and 16 yards to
give the Tigers a 21-20
halftime lead.
The only points in the
second half came on a 30-yard
field goal by Trinit\.
Union's defense forced three
turnovers, but allowed Trinity
quarterback John Brantley to
complete 12-of-17 passes for
265 yards. Brantley had
touchdown passes of 53 and 57
yards.
The Tigers traveled to
Jacksonville to play Trinity
Christian in the Region 2
quarterfinals. Spiller scored all
four of the team's touchdowns
in a 27-7 win.


C.J. Spiller (right) earned a state medal for Union
County by placing sixth in the 100m dash. Spiller
also won district and regional championships in the
event.


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Spiller scored on a 44-yard
run in the first half, but the
Tigers went into the locker
room trailing 7-6.
Union's defense held Trinity
to 12 yards rushing in the
second half and Spiller scored.
on a 36-yard run and a pair of
2-yard runs.
Trinity entered the game
averaging 305 yards rushing
per game. but was held to 150,
by the Tigers.
Spiller finished the game
with 172 yards on 19 carries.
while Mitchell added 71 yards
on 18 carries.
The win set up another
showdown between Union and
Trinity Catholic in the Region
2 semifinals. This time, Trinity
held a halftime lead and went
on to defeat the Tigers 31-20.
Brantley had touchdown
passes of 31 and 43 yards as



Vow- --
So04a


Trinity built a 17-0 first half
,lead.
Union %would pull to within
three points %when the\ scored
two touchdowns in the third
quarter. Ke in Alexander
scored on a 76-yard run on the
opening drive of the second
half before Spiller found the
end zone from 30 yards out.
Trinity responded when
Brantle)i tossed a 23-yard
touchdown n pass. The Celtics
then scored another touchdown
one play after a botched fake
punt attempt by the Tigers to:
go up 31-14.
The Tigers' last score came
on a 15-yard touchdown pass
from Austen Roberts to Justin
Griffin.
Trinity Catholic would go
on to win the state
championship, defeating
Pahokee 37-30.


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Editorial/Opinion


Thursday, December 29, 2005 Page 9C


We watched with interest as the
ground was cleared and the building
began to rise from its foundation, to
take shape as an attractive church
building beside S.R 16 in Reno.
The Reverend Isaac P. Brantley,
pastor of the New Covenant Baptist
Ministries, provided background for
the church and insight into his career,.
from serving 22 years in the military
to serving mankind through a church
ministry.
Brantley said he first felt the call to
the ministry at age 19, but evaded the
call by enlisting in the U.S. Air Force,
rising to the rank of master sergeant
air controller and serving a tour in
Korea during hostilities and two tours
tof- 'duty in Germany. He left the
military .service in 1972 while living
in' Utah.
His formal education in religion,
which culminated in a doctoral
degree, stretched over the next several
years, during which time he served as
a minister and evangelist.
The local church is aligned with the
Missionary Baptist Church, the
Florida General Baptist Church and


BHS
Continued


/


from p. 5C


the eighth inning doubled, but
Duncan, entering the game as a
relief pitcher, promptly picked
the runner off, then struck out
two batters to end the inning.
Jason Smyth led off the
bottom half pf the eighth with
a double of his own, allowing
him, to e'entuall\ score on
Duncan's hit.
The Tornadoes' found
'themselves trailing 1-0 in the
;bottom of the seventh of a
:Region 1 quarterfinal game
against Episcopal before
rallying for a 2-1 win,
Saucer reached on an error,
Cole Rhcden drew a walk and:
Sanfordc waas hit by a pitch.,
- Lance.Griffis then hit an RBI
single to tie the score, followed
by O'Neal's RBI single that
won the game., ..;
.Drew Jackson, the winning
pitcher, allowed only two hits.
Episcopal's run was unearned.
Bradford's run came to an
e end with a 3-1. loss ,to
Pensacola Catholic in the
regional semifinals. Evan
Denmark's RBI single
provided the Tornadoes with
Their only run.







I


the Florida Baptist Church, and
received considerable financial
support from the New River Baptist
Association. It is the only church of
its denomination in Bradford County.
The grounds are ample for church
expansion and parking. The building
presently contains the sanctuary, with
seating for 150 parishioners, a
pastor's office, restrooms, utility
rooms, etc., and there are plans for
Sunday school rooms to be added.
The church offers Sunday school at
9:30 a.m. and worship services at 11
a.m., each Sunday. It also offers a
noonday service Wednesdays and
prayer meetings Wednesday evenings
at 7 p.m.
Brantley says that although Starke
has several churches, he sees the need
for "serving the whole man,"
including counseling in the area of
domestic living, economic needs,
spiritual needs, job referrals, and drug
and alcohol recovery.
Fulfilling those needs, says
Brantley, is his calling.
By Buster Rahn, Editorial Writer


2 teams finish as
district runners-up
The Bradford boys
basketball and volleyball
teams were both runners-up in
their respective districts in
2005.
Bradford's basketball team
got a huge game from Japan
Ruise in defeating Union
County 85-63 in the District 4-
3A semifinals to advance to
the championship game. Ruise
scored a game-high 36 points,
including 26 in the second
half.
The Tornadoes led the entire
way and held Union without a
field goal until the 1:05 mark
of the first quarter.
Marcus Wilson scored 15
points, while Letroy Guion and
Darryl Hankerson scored 14
and I 1.
Bradford then played a
back-and-forth game against
Santa Fe in the championship
game before losing 63-54.
The Tornadoes trailed by
one point entering the fourth
quarter, but Santa Fe put
together a 13-3 run with
several Bradford players on the
bench in foul trouble.
Ruise led all scorers with 20
points. Guion scored 15 and
Wilson had- 11 before fouling


Letroy Guion (right), pictured with Bradford coach
Annie Williams, earned a medal at the state track
and field finals after winning district and regional
championships in the discus.


out.
The loss sent the Tornadoes
on the road to face fifth-ranked
Ribault in the Region 1
quarterfinals. The game, with
the exception of. its early
stages, was never close as
Bradford lost 73-42.
A basket by Wilson put the
Tornadoes on top 10-9, but
Ribault put together a 15-2 run
and never looked back.
Guion and Ruise each
scored 16 points for the
Tornadoes.
Bradford's volleyball team
defeated Middleburg on its
home court to advance to the
District 3-4A championship
match, where,-the"'Tornadoes
settled for second place
following a 3-1 loss to 10-th
.ranked Santa Fe.
Middleburg needed to score
just two points to defeat
Bradford in the semifinals, but
the Tornadoes- scored four
straight points to win the
match 3-2. Tosha Newman had
21 kills, 13 digs, six service
aces and four blocks, while
Kierra Mosley had 30 assists
and six aces. Samantha
Stocker had 13 digs and
Jachael Nichols had 11 kills
,and five blocks.
Following its loss to Santa
-Fe, Bradford would travel to
'Jacksonville and lose 3-0 to
*eighth-ranked Bishop Kenny
in the Region 1 quarterfinals.

Golfers and girls
track team members
earn regional berths
The girls golf team qualified
for its regional meet by placing
third .at the District 4-A
tournament with a team score
of 435, which was good for
third place.
Michael Tew of the boys
team also earned a regional
berth by shooting an 87 at the
District 4-A tournament.
In track and field, Destiny
Bass qualified for the. Region
2-2A meet in two events and
was a member of the 4xl00m
relay team that also qualified.
The 4xl00m relay team,
which ,was also comprised of
Ebony Smith, Khalaa Hill and
Shanaira Hampton, placed
third at the District 5 meet with
a time of 55.10 seconds. Bass
placed fourth in boththe 100m
.and 200m with times of 13.30
seconds and 28.34 seconds,

Win together, lose together,
play together, stay together.
-Debra Mancuso '


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

A animal be a place of refuge for the what is necessary to provide a
animals not a place like proper facility. We have
shelter I this. enough businesses that could
' ham an These animals should not donate money and supplies to
shame and have to suffer through the cold build a place that we could be
i nights ahead. The dogs are in proud of instead of a place that
d isg race open shelters with little or no makes you hang your head and
Dear Editor: bedding. The cats are in cages cry.
For the first time I went to out in the open with a plastic Please, go see the shelter for
see the animal shelter in Starke. tarp around them. The tarp will yourself and then do whatever
This is a shame and disgrace to stop the wind but .it will not you are able to do to change
the city. I know there are many make the cages warm. How can this horrible scene into a thing
good people here who care, So we sleep in a warm bed at of beauty and love and
my only conclusion is that night while these poor something that shows the. true
they must not know the poor creatures are cold, scared and colors of the people of Starke.
condition. of the shelter, alone?
Everyone should go there and Surely, there are enough Carolyn Wortham
see for themselves. This should good people in the city to do Waldo


A possible the decision to leave animals have no idea if the animals are
on a cold cement floor in still out in the cold."
SOlutiOn tO freezing weather should try it Obviously the police officer
out themselves for one night to, who I spoke to is not an
our animal see how.,comfortable they are, animal lover if he has no
Why not put hay in the cages concern.
control mess for the animals? No need to I have an idea. Why don't we
Dear Editor: wash it, just throw out with get fewer officers to stand on
I was disgusted and outraged the built up feces and other the side of the road and shoot
upon reading the recent article waste. speed guns at motorists on
about the deplorable conditions I wanted to donate blankets U.S. 301. Instead, let some of
at the Bradford County Animal but was told no one is there to them care for the animals.
Control. This city is supposed even ask about it. After all, it shouldn't take
to be saving animals instead of I called the Starke Police two or three to hunt down
further vctimizing, abusing and Department and was told that speeders.
neglecting them. no one is manning the animal Tammy Pye
I believe that whoever makes control facility and that, "I Waldo


Keystone's volleyball team won its first district championship since 2002 en route


to putting together a program-best 27-2 record.


KHHS
Continued from p. 7C

Kaiti Thompson and Tysee
Williams each scored once.
Keystone could not defeat
Santa Fe to claim the District
4-3A crown, losing 3-1.
Williams scored the lone ,goal,
heading in a free kick by
Poncher.
The Indians would go on to
lose 4-0 to 10th-ranke.d
Episcopal in the Region 1
quarterfinals.
Kellie Spaulding helped the
girls basketball team earn a
postseason berth by scoring 11
points and grabbing nine
rebounds in a 58-48 win over
Bradford in the District 4-3A
semifinals. Mindy Poupard
added nine points for the
Indians, who would then go on
to lose 46-34 to Santa Fe in' the
district championship game.
The Indians Were .without
injured starters Spaulding and
Sara Crane against Santa Fe..
Still, the 'Indians managed to
pull within six points of the
Raiders late in the fourth
quarter with three consecutive
3-pointers, two of which came'
from Poupard. The Raiders,
however, scored the final six
points of the game.
Keystone traveled to Green
Cove Springs to play Clay in
the Region 1 quarterfinals,
losing 52-41.
Crane and Spaulding were
still on the bench and starting
point guard Leanne Harris was
limited due to an illness.
Jessica Whitfield led
Keystone with nine points.
Keystone's softball team
also had injuries to deal with,
but the Indians were still able
to finish as District 4-3A
runners-up.
Starting pitcher Mary Anne
'McCall was out with an injury
and Kasey Fagan, the team's
other starter, had to leave
Keystone's district semifinal


Shands at Starke Auxiliary has
available several volunteer.,
opportunities including gift
shop, reception desk, X-ray,
medical records, patient services
and filing. For information call
Helen LeVangie, (352) 473-
8580; Dolores Morgan, (904)
964-5748; Kay McKinley,( 904)
964-7284; or Sharon Gaines,
(904) 964-6009.


game against Bradford after
aggravating an existing
shoulder injury.
A strong performance from
Ashley Steimke, who had
never pitched a varsity game
before, and late heroics by
Spaulding led the Indians to a
6-5 win over Bradford.
Spaulding hit a triple and
turned it into the winning run
in the bottom of the 11"
inning. It was only the fourth
hit of the game by Keystone.
Steimke, in relief of Fagan,
allowed three hits and no
walks in six-and-one-third
innings.
Steimke also had an RBI at
the plate, while Cheirsh Beck
and Michelle Houser each had
RBI singles. Fagan hit a solo
,home run and Beck added
another run by scoring on an
error. ,
Keystone's offense
struggled in its next two
games. The Indians got just
two hits in a 6-1 loss to Santa
Fe in the district championship
game and one hit in a 7-0 loss
to West Nassau in the Region
1 quarterfinals.
A home run by Spaulding
provided the team with its only'
run during that stretch.
Keystone's baseball team
rallied several times, with the
help of a couple of doubles by
Blake Lott, to defeat Santa Fe
5-4, ,in, the District 4-3A
semifinals, but the Indians then
watched Bradford rally in a 3-
2 loss in the district
championship game.
The Indians' Wil Breton hit
an RBI single and Tyson Paulk
scored on an error, giving -the
team a 2-0 lead, which it took
into the bottom of the seventh.
Bradford tied the game, then
won with' a run in the eighth
inning.
Breton and Lott each went
2-for-4 at the plate.,
The Indians then played
Bolles in the Region 1
quarterfinals, losing 10-3. The
score was just 4-3 before


Hospice is in need of
volunteers. There will be a
volunteer training program soon,
and if interested in this
important volunteer
opportunity, call Carolyn Long,
386-328-7100.
The Ladies Auxiliary of
American Legion Post 56 in
Starke will meet monthly on the


Bolles. scored six runs in the
bottom of the sixth.
Keystone's football team
seemed to hurt its chances of
claiming second place in its
district after a 6-3 loss to
Bradford, but the. Indians went
on to defeat district opponents
Interlachen and Ribault, while
Bradford lost to its two
remaining district opponents.
That allowed the Indians to
finish as District 5-3A runners-
up and earn their first playoff
berth since 1998.
Defense was a big key for
the Indians, who allowed a
total of 207 yards in the wins
over Interlachen and Ribault.
The Indians managed just
two field goals of 32 and 34
yards by Michael McLeod in
the Interlachen game, but they
were enough as Keystone held
the Rams to 62 total yards in a
6-0 win. Keystone's defense
forced four turnovers.
Keystone followed that up
by forcing three turnovers-all
interceptions-in a 19-3 win
over Ribault. Running back
Greg Taylor scored two
touchdowns on a 7-yard
reception from Lott and a 9-
yard run. McLeod added field
goals of 32 and 33 yards.
That win gave the Indians a
3-2 mark in the district (they
also defeated West Nassau,
while losing to district
champion Bolles).
The Indians' postseason
road was a short one as they
drew a tough first-round
match-up against South
Sumter. South Sumter defeated
Keystone 35-0 and went on to
finish as the Class 3A runner-
up.
Two members of the girls
golf team were also able to
advance to regional
competition after their
performances at the District 5-
A tournament.. Valerie Eddins
finished with .a score of 97 at
the district tournament, while
Megan Kennedy. had a score of
105.


second Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the
American Legion Building on
Edwards Road.
Morning Star Lodge #26 of
Starke urges all members and
past members to attend on the
first and fourth Monday
evenings at 7. The lodge is at 709
E. Brownlee St. in Starke. Call
904-964-8474.


The church beside the road


7 cm V"Ir %rr -,-. TIP


I


1


t f-' I !"-. Ir Elf iiTNB w_-WIP u & \








Page 10C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-C-SECTION Dec. 29, 2005


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INDEX
51 Lost/Found
52 Animals & Pets
53 Yard Sales
54 Keystone Yard Sales
55 Wanted
56 Trade or Swap
57 For Sale
58 Building Materials
59 Personal Services
60 Secretarial Services
61 Scriptures
62 Vacation/Travel


63 Love Lines
64 Business Opportunity .
65 Help Wanted
66 Investment Opportunity
67 Hunting Land for Rent
68 Rent to Own
69 Food Supplements
70 Self Storage
72 Sporting Goods
73 Farm Equipment
74 Computers & Computer
Accessories


CLASSIFIED DEADLINES


Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon

To place a Classified F3

USE YOUR PHONE

964-6305 473-2210 496-2261
NOTICE E
assied Adv eisingsh depaidinadvan uesscred hasaready been swished wi enewspar A $3.0o service charge wi e added n t billing o ovr
postage andh andlo g All ads placed byphone are read back to hc adyirtlser at the tmo .rplacementlg.owever, the classified staff cannot be held responsib for rmstakes nn
classille .adverismng take~n.by phog ne. Th nwspaper reserves tre night to correctly ciS~lassrfyl andedt all copy or to reJect or cancel any advertisements at any trae. Ouly


' Subscribe

Today
Call Virginia at
904-964-6305


HELP WANTED

Shift Worker For
ASSISTED
LIVING FACILITY
Apply in person at Parkside ACLF
329 Church St., Starke
(904) 964-2220


40 Notices
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, se;.
or national origin, or an
intention to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age of
18 living with parents or
legal custodians, preg-
nant women and people
securing custody of chil-
drenu.under 18. This'
newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any'adver-
tising.-fdr real estate
which is in violation of the
law. iOur readers are
hereby Informed tnal all
dwellings advertised in
this newspaper are avail-
able on an equal oppor-
luniry Oasis Tocomplain
of discrlminalon call
lHUD toli-free at 1-800-
669-9777 me toll-free
telephone number for the
hearing impaired is 1-
800-927-9275. For fur-
ther information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa


Sutherland 850-488-
7082 ext #1005.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office In
writing & paid in advance
unless credit has already
been established with
this office. A $3.00 SER-
VICE CHARGE willbe
added to all billings to
cover postage & han-
dling. THE CLASSIFIED
STAFF .CANNOT BE
HELD RESPONSIBLE
FOR MISTAKES. IN
CLASS I FIELD
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday at
12 noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $8.00
for the first 20 words,
then 20 cents per word
thereafter.


Homes


FogSl


C a l H e e. H r e


American .(904)
Americam 964-5424

of Northeast Iloridu.Inc 205 N. Temple Ave.
REALLTfIRSo Starke, FL 32091

U


it all! 473:-2210
496-2261 ^^


41 Auctions Vehicles 88 MAZDA EXT CAB
AUCTION, Truck loads of WANT A CAR, truck, or need possible head gas-
furniture; bedroom, van? Bad credit? No ket, but runs great,
chest, home interior moneydown. If youhave $1755. Also 94 Chevy
Dealers Welcome, Satur- a job call Josh at 904- Lumina Van, cold ac,
day night, at 6551 NW 284-0028. needs transmission work
CR 225, Starke. Starts WANTED: CARS AND $650.Call904-964-4111.
7:30pm. Will take new trucks, running or not. WANT A CAR, truck, or
and used items for con- Must be complete. $100 van? Bad credit? No
, signment, sold 1 piece at and up. Call 904-964- money down. If you have
a time. 5405, 904-263-8933 or a job call Teresa at 904-
42 Motor 904-964-2432. 284-0431.


i II ll ig i-' iI iIM


1 i 3 sq T hrme 3Bi 2BA, rari,,d new hTome on 1/3 acre
lot in Keystone Heights, Open floor plan .,Blinds throughout.
nc\d\n09 o $112,900 -
\nd6\ Financing available with only $1,995 down.
INFORMATION/DIRECTIONS
AT WWW.NEWHOUSE411.COM


Li en dMota Led


I !. fi d'ilnd hindlcup
hierrmalubL, himne hekhiilr uMi -'.lhlg.
$142,000. MLS#248775.


.BIiAWimJL, inlneh.livieion.mn.,-2 ts ..
I/4BR/2BA ,n ,nne atir. Nt% paint. li4 uana.
L-it. fetIru, and thunn, Shtd an he
pu rchsed fr $3,000. MI.S#252289.


Ii I S.


Commercial loans
Constructlon/Perm loans
and guaranteed rate
Up to 107% financing
on purchases a
refinances
with no PMI
renulrements
Fixed-rate
consolidation loans
Low refinance and
purchase mortgage
rates
Low rates for
manufactured and
modular homes
Christian-owned a
locally operated


wwwam*.an e Sfloid.com


F,-


a

U S.


New Home for Sale


S (352)275-8531
904-626-4550

Jonathan Ferguson, Owner
Lic. No. CBC1250311
133 West Call Street Starke, FL 32091


The Carriage Home
All new 3BR/2BA brick & hard board
bome, fireplace, cathedral & tray
ceilings, 2 car garage, attic storage,
jacuzzi tub, walk-in closet, separate
laundry room, 102' x 180' lot, at NE
15th Lane, off SR 230 near Country
Club in Five Oaks.


$205,000

er"guson
SHomes in


* Announcements
Is STress Rulnimr YouI
Life' Read DIANETICS
Ron L Hubb.rd Call
13,S"'2.O'2 or -end
7.00 i.: Danerics 3102
N. H-abr,.- A-e Tampa
FL33 .6-


Auctions
24 LOG HOME
PACKAGES io be
Offered at Public
Auction. Sararday.
January 14, II 00 AM,
Orlando, FL iPor o1
Sanford), Rogeri Reali
& Auction, License S
AU2922. Free bhlcchre.
Buffalo Log Homes
(888)562-2246 or
www.auctionloghoiiies.c
om.
Building Materials
METAL ROOFING
SAVE. $$$ Buy Direct
From Manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick Turn
around! Del erN\
Available Till Free
(888)393-0333
Business Opportunities
ALL CASD CANDY
ROUTE Do ou earn
$800/day? 30 Machines,
Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US:
We will not be
undersold!
LOG HOME DEALERS
WANTED Great Earning
Potential, ExcellenT
Profits, Protected
Territory, Lifetime
Warranty, American
Made Honest Value.
Call Daniel Boone Log
Homes (888)443-4140.


SAWMILLS from only
$2,795.00 Convert your,
LOGS TO VALUABLE
LUMBER with your


Out of Area Classifieds


Norwood ponable band
a%.m;Ill Log ikladers
also a a i label e
.,S nom.x'indusines
corn Free information
18005"'S-1363 em 300N
Health
MEDICARE 'D" DRUG
PLAN CONSULTANTS
INDEPENDENT
PHYSICIAN
MANAGED WE WILL
SAVE YOU MONEY'
WE WORK FOR YOIU.
NOT INSURANCE
COMPANIES CALL
i6S88325-PILL
WW' MEDICAREDR
UGHELPNET
Help Wanted
Small dealership looking
for parts person and
outside sales for new
territory upcoming fIor
new year Call ior
Ajplicalion 18006556-

EDUCATIONAL
SALES REP. Sell books
10 chc.ols in your local
area To apply visit
www.DeeBoojs.com
Click on'Join DEE'.
C) PRESS TRUCK
LINES. INC Drier
Designed Dispatch FLA
ONL .Flal Bed siuderns
welcome Home Eters
WeekEnd Mosi Nighis
(800iM45-1351
www.cypresstruck.com.


Driver- COVENANT
TRANSPORT. Excellent
Pay & Benefits for
Experienced Drivers,
O/0. Solos, Teams &
Graduate Students.
Bonuses Available.
Refrigerated Now
Available. (888) MORE
PAY (888-667-3729).
SALES
RPPRFSPNTATIVES


WE ARE SO
CONFIDENT IN OUR
LEADS WE PAN OLU
TO RUN THEM EL'EN
IF YOU DON'T SELL
Are ou d self-mornvaTed
posiiise person' Are ,ou
piesenil) eirning k1 *"
1500 per "eek'
Qualified guaranteed
income during training
period. Qualified $200
SIGN-ON BONUS. We
offer... a solid training
program with 2-3 Pre-set

qualified confirmed leads
daily With our "NEW"
cedit process means All
leads are pre-approved
before you run the
appointments.
Management
opportunities. Unlimited
income potential. Call:
ERIC (888)563-3188.
Drier. NOW HIRING
QUALIFIED DRIVERS
for Cenral Florida Local
& National OTR
positions. Food grade
tanker, no hazmat, no
pumps, great benefits,
competitive pay & new
equipment. Need 2 years
experience. Call Bynum
Transport for your
opporiunii, loda\
LegalSen ices
DI' ORCES2"5-
,350-CO ERS children.
erei Onl one sgnaiure
required! *Excludes
govt. fees! Call
weekdays (800)462-
2000, ext.600. (8am-
7pm) Alta Divorce, LLC.
Established 1977.
ARRESTED Need a
Lawyer? All Criminal
Defense. *Felonies
*Misdemeanors
*Domestic Violence
*DUI *Wron ful Death
"Protect Yourlights" A-
A-A Attorney Referral


Ser' ice 1888)733.5342
2-I HOURS DAYS A
WEEK
ACCIDENT VICTIMS
ALL Accident & Inlur)
Claims
"AUTOMOBILE
"BIKE/BOAT(BUSL
*ANIMAL BITES
*WORKERS
COMPENSATION
WRONGFUL DEATH
*NURSING HOME
INJURIES A-A-A
Attorney Referral
Service (888)733-5342.
Miscellaneous
EARN DEGREE online
from home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers. Job
Placement Assistance
Computer & Financial
aid iI qualify. (866858.
2121
www.onlinetidewaerne
ch.com.
Real Estate
North Carolina Galed
Lakefrc.nt Cc.n-munis
I 5 acres plus. 90 mile
of shoreline Neser
before ollered wion
200:- pre des elopmeni
discount. 90%'
financing Call
l8iUi09 5.53
BEALrTIFUL NORTH
CAROLINA MUST
SEE BEAUTIFUL &
COLORFUL FALL
FOLIAGE' WESTERN
NC MOUNTAINS
Homed. Cabins.
Acreage & Inse.sments
Cherokee Mountain
Really GMAC Real
Estae., Murph)
nw 4cherokeemounita
rrealh\ comn Call I'or
Free Brochure
(800)841-5868,
Tennessee Waterfront
Land Sale! Direct


Waierfroni parcels from
onls $9900' Cabin
Package frpm W64.900'
- 5 acre; suiable for -3
homes and docks onl\
$99.900' All properneis
are ne, to the market'
Call toll-free (866)"70-
5263 emi 8
MURPHY NORTH
CAROLINA .COOL
SUMMERS MILD
WINTERS Affordable
Homes & Mountain
Cabins CALL FOR
FREE BROCHURE
(877)837-2288 EXIT
REALTY, MOUNTAIN
VIEW PROPERTIES
www.exitmurphy.com.

WES TERN N C
MOUNTAINS North
Carolina Where there ,:
Cool Mounlain Air,
View & Streams,
Homes. Cabins &.
Acreage CALL FOR
FREE BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN
PROPERTh SALES
1800)642-5333 Reahll
Of Murphy 317
Peachtree St. Murphy,
N.C. 28906.'
www.realtyofmurphy.co
m.i
NC MOUNTAINS-Log
cabin $89,900. Easy to
finish cabin on secluded
site Million $$$ Views
Available on 1-7 acre
parcels $29,900-$79,900.
Flee Info Available!
18281256-1004.
Coastal Southeast
Gecigia Large wooded
water access, marsh
- ie. lake front, and golf
oriented homesites from
the mid $70's Live oaks,
pool, tennis,' golf.
* (877)266-7376.
www.cooperspoint.com.


East Alabama Mounlain
Properni For Sale One
hour c.si ol Atlanta in
Piedmont. AL Beautiful
%\iec 48 acres $1-1-1.000
14.400X down I,0(" per
month oaner I nanced
Call Glenn 1850)545-
-1028
ASHEVILLE NC
AREA ACREAdE I to 8
acre mountain view and
riverfront homesites from
the $60s. Gated
community, custom
lodge. Near natural hot
springs. Don't miss out!
Call (866)292-5762.
TENNESSEE
ACREAGE FOR SALE
Near Chattanooga.
Beautiful new lakeside
community. 1 to 5 acre
homesites from the $40s.
Limited number of
private boat slips. Call
for appt. (866)292-5769 .
Steel Buildings
BUILDING SALE!
"Extended 3 Weeks!"
20x26 Now $3340.
25x30, $4790. 30x40,
$7340. 40x60, $11,490
Factory Direct 25 Years.
Many others.
Ends/accessories ,
optional. .Pioneer
(00)668-5422.
,Your Ad Could Be Here
Run your ad
STATEWIDE!!! For
only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified
ad in over 150
newspapers throughout
the state reaching over 5
MILLION readers. Call
this newspaper or
Advertising Networks of
Florida at (866)742-
1373. Visit us online at
Www.florida-
classifieds.com. Display
ads also available.


(


//


H N ESEYETI


T.H.E. Apartments

922 E. Biownlee St. Starke, Florida

Newly Remodeled
2 & 3 Bedrooms Available

Rent is based on Income
Water, Seser
.On-Site Laundry Facility & Play Areas
Once Open: Monday Friday 8:00 to 4:30 p.m.,
Call (904) 964-7133 0
Voke TTrrY Access o-8O-5-1a833, Ext. r381 w


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wANTED



Small or Large Parcels
With or Without
4^ Homes

Call olen Lourcey


Qult Landnv. met. ,Inc

1 326244


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