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By JENNY ODOMSpecial to the NewsEarly Saturday, those in close proximity to Woolley Park will smell the scent of fresh Gumbo wafting through the moist morning air. The Big Bend Seafood Festival gears up for a day full of entertainment, community involvement and fresh seafood. The volunteers putting on the event are part of the Big Bend Maritime Center, and Florida Foresights board. The Big Bend Seafood Festival is held annually to raise money and awareness around the BBMC and to garner support for long term goals of the center. New this year are the Gumbo Cookoff and the 5K race. The 5K race begins at 8:30 a.m. with a run along Dickerson Bay. Registration is available online prior to race day, or register on Saturday morning beginning at 7 a.m. Race winners will be announced shortly after 10 a.m. Gumbo cooks start their roux at around 9:30 a.m. and the judging begins at 11 a.m. Anyone is welcome to participate in the Gumbo cookoff. Its free, and details are online. Musical entertainment, in the Woolley Park bandshell, gets started early with the Rockulla Performers performing at 10:30 a.m. They will be followed by Hot Tamale, Cottonmouth Perry, Garade Band and Ronnie Bones Raynor. Mark Straubinger will host the day of entertainment, arts and crafts, seafood and contests. The proceeds from the Seafood Festival bene t the Big Bend Maritime Museum (BBMC), part of Florida Foresights, a local non-pro t with the mission to keep regional maritime history alive. Boat building camps at the BBMC run throughout the year for youth and adults, teaching the lost art of wooden boatbuilding. Turn to Page 15 By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWhile the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce has cut its operation budget again this year, the countys overall economic health is improving. On Tuesday, Sept. 22, Wakulla County Commissioners approved the 2014-15 annual operating budget of $42 million, which contained the trimmed down sheriffs office budget submission. The WCSOs five-part budget is packaged into an account called the Fine and Forfeiture Fund. With seven personnel positions and $400,000 cut, WCSO has reduced the sheriffs of ce total budget from $10.3 million in 2013-14 to $9.9 million this year. Total cuts made by the WCSO in the past two years have amounted to more than $650,000 or 11 positions, as well as losing a $150,000 reserve budget. The new budget does not even break the $10 million mark which is pretty astounding when you consider that our operation is open 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, Sheriff Charlie Creel said. We do not have the luxury of closing down after 5 p.m. and we dont have the luxury of closing the operation for weekends and holidays. County Administrator David Edwards said 50 percent of the countys budget goes toward the WCSO, and they must operate within the limits of the ne and forfeiture fund. They have to live within their means, Edwards said, adding that the WCSOs funding used to be hidden and scattered within the general budget, and the department was accustomed to asking the board for money and getting it. When I rst got here, I wanted to know whats the sheriffs of ce real budget. I wanted it to make sense, Edwards said. I broke out the sheriffs department, and gave them a bottom line. They struggle with the idea of being in their own fund. But other counties do that; its nothing new, just new to our sheriffs department. The 2014-15 WCSO position cuts included a systems administrator, dispatcher, detention deputy, detention assistant, two law enforcement of cers, and a maintenance of cer. The WCSO has also cut expenses by reductions in operating costs which has included combating the costs of motor fuel, utilities and vendor price increases. The WCSO has worked with vendors to keep service costs from increasing. Where vendors have been unable to compromise, the agency has gone to the effort to change vendors if the nancial agreements cannot be reached. Operating the sheriffs department and jail for so many hours a year also takes care and maintenance to make sure items like cell locks, patrol vehicles and law enforcement weapons work properly.Turn to Page 11 Public Notices ..................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page .......................................Pages 4-5 Church..............................................................Page 6 Obituaries ........................................................Page 7 Community .................................................Pages 8-9 School ............................................................Page 10 Outdoors ..................................................... Page 12 Water Ways ....................................................Page 13 Green Scene ..................................................Page 14 Street Beat .....................................................Page 15 Sheriffs Report ..............................................Page 16 Weekly Roundup ............................................Page 17 Week in Wakulla ............................................Page 18 Thinking Outside the Book ............................Page 19 Classi eds ......................................................Page 20 Legal Notices .................................................Page 20 Comics ...........................................................Page 23 In The Huddle ................................................Page 24 Sports ............................................................Page 25 Natural Wakulla .............................................Page 26INDEX OBITUARIES One Section One Section75 Cents 75 CentsServing Wakulla County For More Than A Century Serving Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyPublished Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyOur 119th Year, 41st Issue Thursday, October 9, 2014Sports SportsTurnovers doom War Eagles in Godby loss, 60-21 County Administrator David Edwards Wakulla Sheriff Charlie CreelSuspicious death possibly a homicidePage 25 news ewsThe Wakulla The Wakulla County, sheriff jostle over budgetSylvia Dean Woodall Cope Dennis Don Crabtree Helen B. RealPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCottonmouth Perry will perform at the festival. Sheri Creel has cut seven positions and $400,000; county administrator says sheri s o ce has to live within its meansBILL ROLLINSThe War Eagles take the eld. Big Bend Seafood Festival going all out this year BBMC focusing on community support for festival and forums2014 Seafood Festival Saturday, Oct. 11 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Woolley Park in Panacea FREE 5K Run 7 a.m. race day registration; 8:30 a.m. race Gumbo Cooko 7:30 9:30 a.m. Set up 11 a.m. Judging begins 1:30 p.m. Gumbo winners announced Music 10:15 a.m. Rockulla 11:15 a.m. Hot Tamale 1 p.m. Cottonmouth Perry 2 p.m. Garage Band 3:15 p.m. Ronnie Bones RaynorSpecial to The News Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies are investigating a possible homicide that was reported Monday, Oct. 6 at 10:21 a.m. in the northeastern section of Wakulla County, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. George Joseph Jody Kilgore, 50, of Crawfordville was pronounced dead at his home on Spring Court at 10:36 a.m. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) was called to the home to assist the WCSO with the investigation. The investigation is ongoing. Wakulla EMS also assisted at the scene. Anyone with any information about the incident is asked to call the WCSO Tip Line at (850) 745-7190. Pamper your pooch Pamper your pooch While Lucky doesnt look too happy about it, he While Lucky doesnt look too happy about it, he was one of about 90 dogs that left Hudson Park was one of about 90 dogs that left Hudson Park clean, trimmed and indulged following CHATs clean, trimmed and indulged following CHATs autumn Pamper Your Pooch event on Saturday, autumn Pamper Your Pooch event on Saturday, Oct. 4. e proceeds bene t the CHAT (Citizens Oct. 4. e proceeds bene t the CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment) Trap-Neuterfor Humane Animal Treatment) Trap-NeuterRelease program, and supports the senior citizens Release program, and supports the senior citizens pets Meals on Wheels program. pets Meals on Wheels program. PHOTO BY NICOLE ZEMA PHOTO BY NICOLE ZEMA Taylor Phillips announces candidacy for county commission, see Page 11.

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Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netAbilities of Wakulla Countys students were on parade at the Community Center on Oct. 3, as 150 people gathered for Focus on Ability. The event featured performances by students with special intellectual and physical needs, representing every school in the district. The celebration coincides with Disability Awareness Month, in cooperation with Special Olympics and the Legacy Caf. Tanya English, executive director of Exceptional Student Education, said the school district wants to focus on ability, and the abilities we have in common. Its also good to showcase the One Stop Community Centers services, English said. And the parents have an opportunity to learn about all the services offered here. Ray Gray, a school board member who serves on the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, welcomed guests to the One Stop and encouraged them to learn about the variety of services offered, mostly at no cost. Superintendent Bobby Pearce thanked all the students, educators, volunteers and parents who participated. About a dozen disability and service agencies were present. Lisa Rhoads-Lorenzo, a music therapist with the school district, led each schools ESE students in performances they practiced for weeks. I am so excited and proud of the students who put together their numbers, Lorenzo said. Its all fun, but there is a social and cognitive goal behind it. Coach Catherine Harris-Small, the counselor at Riversprings Middle School, took a moment to talk about Ability United a peer-driven program, led by cheerleaders at three local schools, that teaches the Ability United squad members jumps, stunts and cheers to be performed and football games and exhibitions. The stage was filled with Ability United cheerleaders who performed a cheer, and a dance performance to upbeat music. Student workers from Legacy Caf served hot dogs, chips and drinks to the participants after the performances. Legacy Caf is open to the public for lunch on Tuesdays and Thursday. Menus are available through www.wakullaschooldistrict. org. Student workers gain job and life skills by serving tables and prepping food. 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullane PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAStudents from every school in the district participated in Focus on Ability at the Community Center. Photos, from left: Michael Long-Wilde cheers with the Ability United squad. Tavis Fairchild, a pre-k student, has fun coloring at his table. Sixth graders Amber Sherrod and Saraiah Gay appear in a song number led by Lisa Rhoads-Lorenzo. Legacy Cafe server Sierra Bird, a senior, serves lunches to the crowd of 150 people. Hikers experience Wakulla Springs many sinkholes and swalletsBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.net While many Big Bend residents spent Saturday morning sleeping in or picking up game day supplies, about 45 people gathered at the entrance of the Riversink tract of Wakulla Springs State Park to get a close look at sinkholes and swallets that are a lesser known part of the parks delicate beauty. The Friends of Wakulla Springs hosted the Passages Into the Underground hike as part of the parks steppingout series. Since the turnout was large, the group was split between two springs experts: Jim Stevenson and Cal Jamison. Before commencement of the two-mile hike, Stevenson talked about the recharge area that feeds water to Wakulla Springs. Contaminants in the water owing to the 1,300 square-mile basin are ltered and buffered by the wetlands along the way. He talked about the Cody Scarp, which runs along Orange Avenue at the south end of Tallahassee and drops off towards the Wakulla Springs Basin. So what you do in Tallahassee affects Wakulla Springs, Stevenson said. Underneath hikers feet were 31 miles of subterranean caves have been mapped and documented, which connect to the sinkholes and swallets that guests saw on the hike. Jamison said he thought he had been swimming in all Wakulla Countys sinkholes when they started mapping the cave system. Turn to Page 12 PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAPhotos, from left: Cal Jamison stops to talk about sinks during the hike, hosted by Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. A ne layer of duckweed oats on Trench Sink. Jamison gently tickles an orb weaver spider on the trail. GET RECYCLED MATERIALSRACE IT. 3RD ANNUAL REGATTA AT THE FSU COASTAL MARINE LAB IN ST. TERESAJOIN US FROM 12PM-5PM**_________***----; **FOOD from Coastal Restaurant! *LIVE MUSIC! *Participate or come watch! *People s Choice *Most spectacular failure First boat to cross finish line *Most creative use of materials SEE RULES AND REGISTRATION AT: http://marinelab.fsu.edu/outreach/regatta/ m t t t t C C C C C o r r r r r h h h h * * P * * * * M * * * * * * * * * * * F Fi F * * * * * M M As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney WELCOMESJESSI NOWAKProfessional Dog GroomerJessi brings 9+ years of experience with her to our team!Open: Wakulla Animal Hospital 850-926-7153 WkllA i lH i tl W

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Special to The NewsThe Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) joined the Wakulla County One Stop Community Centerocated at 318 Shadeville Hwy. to provide residents in need with better access to public assistance services. The community center gives individuals and families of Wakulla County one, easily accessible location where they can obtain information on how to empower their families, enroll in programs and services, and enjoy healthy recreational activities. The partnership was made possible through the DCF Automated Community Connection to Economic Self-Suf ciency (ACCESS) Community Partner Network. The Community Partner Network engages community organizations in helping families achieve economic self-suf ciency and assists clients with applications for food assistance, temporary cash assistance and Medicaid. Assisted Economic Self-Suf ciency Services at the Community Center will be Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Starting Oct. 2, there will be a trained economic self-suf ciency representative available to assist clients in navigating the self-service application and answer general questions about MyAccess. The Wakulla One Stop Community Center is happy to welcome DCF as our latest opportunity provider for the families of Wakulla County, said Wakulla County One Stop Community Center Director Ray Gray. DCF recognized the need for improved accessibility to public assistance and services in Wakulla County. Now, families have a way to apply for food assistance,temporary cash assistance and Medicaid right at their nger tips. The ACCESS Program helps to promote strong and economically selfsufficient communities by determining eligibility for food, cash and medicalassistance for individuals and families on the road to economic recovery. Additional information on services provided at the Community Center can be found at: www.wakullaonestopcommunitycenter.com, or call 745-6042. For more information on the Community Partner Network, please visit:www.MyFLFamiles.com www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 3 Please Recycle PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. DCF now serving residents through community centerBecause of technical problems at The Wakulla News, the Budget Summary advertisement for the City of St. Marks that appeared in the Sept. 25 edition, had wrong information. The Notice of Non-Compliance for St. Marks that appears below is due to newspaper error. The Budget Summary and Notice of Budget Hearing are correct in this edition. We regret the error.CorrectionStaff Report At the Board of County Commission meeting on Sept. 22, David Moody, former tourist development director with the Tourist Development Council, gave a presentation about the new tourism website www.visitwakulla. com, and glossy, information-packed visitors guide. He talked about the marketing plan and branding of the local seafood industry, Fresh from Wakulla, and discussed the $500,000 BP grant that paid for it all. We want to brand Wakulla County as a destination for great seafood, Moody said. Moody said the website and visitors guide are unparalleled for a county of our size. He talked about additional marketing attempts, including local radio stations and television scrolls. Commissioner Ralph Thomas referred to visitwakulla.com as a Cadillac in the driveway, and said beyond a website, it is an interactive information and client management system. He said a website of this caliber could never have been built with funding from the tourist development tax. This money was a blessing to have it drop into our lap, and a lot of hard work went into spending it, Thomas said. We wanted to maximize that money, not just spend it a ash in the pan and its gone. We wanted to make sure that at the end of this process we had a toolbox, something that would live on.New tourism guide, website debuts in Wakulla County Notice of Public Hearing Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.OCTOBER 9, 2014 THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS ARE 1% MORE THAN LAST YEARS TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.The tentative, adopted and/or nal budgets are on le in the ofce of the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record.BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2014-2015 City of Sopchoppy REQUEST FOR STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS DESIGN AND ENGINEERINGOCTOBER 2, 9, 2014 Statement of Qualication-Downtown Park Design and Engineering If anyone wishing to participate in this solicitation for Statements of Qualications needs reasonable accommodations in order to participate they should contact Page Evans, Deputy City Clerk at the address above or by calling (850) 962-4611 at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. The City of Sopchoppy is an equal opportunity employer. THE PREVIOUS NOTICE PLACED BY THE CITY OF ST. MARKS HAS BEEN DETERMINED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE TO BE IN VIOLATION OF THE LAW, NECESSITATING THIS SECOND NOTICE.The City of St. Marks will soon consider a budget for scal year 2014-2015. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on Monday, October 13, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. at 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, Florida OCTOBER 9, 2014 PUBLIC NOTICEIn accordance with Wakulla County Resolution #2012-23, your monthly sewer bill will be increased 2.7%. The rate increase will be effective for the October 2014 usage. If you have any questions, please contact the Wakulla County Public Works Ofce at 926-5228.OCTOBER 9, 2014

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion PageMost popular stories online: Theres a big show out at Stony Bayou Pool No. 1 Its election season Its autumn, and insects prepare for winter Wakulla High School Homecoming week kicks off Monday Underwater Wakulla October 2, 2014 RMS Bears, 1-3, improve every game Wakulla native and band gear up for debut album Mysterious Waters Newsthewakullanews.com ank you, Ed Gardner and vision sta eft of political signs re ects badly Dont pass on double yellow lines Supporting Bill Anderson for commission Supporting Jerry Moore for commissionClerks o ce collecting cell phones against domestic violence Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Concern about TCC a quaculture program Editor, The News:Bill Anderson, Candidate for County Commissioner in District 4, will be a great addition to our Board of County Commissioners. He will bring to the Board a strong work ethic, his dedication to helping Wakulla County, and his ability to see both sides of an issue and promote those ideas that are in the best interests of our County. Bill Andersons experience in management and law makes him especially well equipped to help lead the county in the right direction with a vision for the future. You can read about his vision for a strategic plan on his website: www. billanderson2014.com. In a nutshell, his ideas for the County include collaboration of community, business, and government leaders and interested citizens to identify what the county aspires to be and then prioritizing all options and putting the plans into action. To start the strategic-plan conversation, Anderson believes Wakulla County could be a bedroom community for Tallahassee commuters, a retirement community, a destination for hunters, shers, boaters, bird-watchers and nature photographers and a thriving coastal community. We are already a community that encompasses all of these things, but with direction and effort we can improve on many of our strengths, we can develop jobs in the promotion of ecotourism, and at the same time we can keep our rural way of life and conserve our natural assets for which we are so well-known. Bill is trustworthy, honest, and dedicated to investing the countless hours required for this position. Please vote for Bill Anderson for District 4 Commissioner in November. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla newsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden ..................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ....................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey ............................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton .advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Editor, The News: It has come to my attention that Tallahassee Community College is sponsoring the Wakulla Environmental Institute with a focus and false promises concerning aquaculture. While the intent of this institute may be noble, I am afraid that TCC, the Board of Directors, and indeed the taxpayers of Florida have been, and are continuing to be sadly misled, and misinformed. This is especially the case in matters pertaining to aquaculture! Let me rst outline a few credentials to speak to this issue. More than four decades in aquaculture that included the culture of finfish, mollusks, and crustaceans and even early rearing of sea turtles. This ranged from the culture of striped bass in New England to Salmonids in the Paci c Northwest. Largemouth bass, cat sh, and shrimp in Florida to hard clams and oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Established the rst four year program in aquaculture at Florida Institute of Technology. This included a fundamental biological/environmental curriculum with options to support and enhance job opportunities with the myriad state and federal regulatory and management agencies. Served on the Aquaculture Council for Florida Gov. Bob Martinez. This provided for the opportunity to promote the realistic creation of viable resource related industries and job creation when possible and within reasonable expectations of viable success. Worked in conjunction with Harbor Branch Institute, and the Florida State University Marine Laboratory through funding under the Job Training Partnership Act to establish the rst hard clam industry in the state of Florida. An industry that after more than a decade is still struggling and affords no prospects for job opportunity or economic contribution to the local scal stability of the area. To this end it is essential that TCC come to understand that the concept for the establishment of aquaculture enterprises, job creation, nancial contribution, and business growth to the region is quite frankly a development scam. In my experience at FIT and across the nation, it was apparent, early on, that job placement was fundamentally centered on traditional biological careers. These ranged from aspects of Urban and Regional Planning, Business Management, and even Oceanography. The fundamental opportunities available were primarily with positions as low level technicians, further educational pursuit at the graduate level, or related elds. Virtually all job opportunities across the nation, speculated upon aquaculture, are essentially in biological elds related to sh and game management, and environmental monitoring. Speci cally, the WEI goals, in essence, provide quite nobly for an informed citizenry, quality environmental technicians, potential students for pursuit of the life sciences, but not for aquaculture entrepreneurs. Apply fundamental concepts in the biological, chemical and physical sciences to make informed decisions on environmental issues. Describe science as a process that relies on testable hypotheses, veri able data and evolving theories to explain natural phenomena. Operate and calibrate laboratory and eld instruments to analyze environmental surface water, groundwater, wastewater, potable water systems, sediment, ora and fauna Collect, analyze and calculate data related to natural environment. There are very limited stories of entrepreneurs establishing aquaculture enterprises that are nancially successful. Long term job creation and stability are likewise severely limited. More often than not aquaculture start-ups revert to abandoned facilities, financial chicanery, and economic devastation to local communities. Speci cally, the idea that aquaculture enterprises could be successful in Wakulla County belies the historical record of these activities, most notably those efforts with red sh. Moreover, recent actions by the Wakulla County Commissioners concerning coastal zoning for developmental purposes are draconian at the least. These actions are of such detriment to the local diminishing seafood productivity that further efforts toward enhancing natural production goes beyond reason. It is also these actions, speci cally, that will and shall serve to cripple the very environmental richness upon which the current local productivity depends. To further stress these environmental qualities with additional harvest under the guise of aquaculture is foolish. The concept of utilizing precious coastal zone regions for the promise of improving natural production is facetious. Logic, scientific reason, environmental sensitivity, inshore productivity, and natural production all have been shown to warrant any aquaculture venture to be pursued inland under closed/re-use systems; none of which are promulgated under the goals as set forth by the WEI. I urge immediate review of the WEI as it serves only as a function for the development of Wakulla County exclusive of natural resource enhancement via aquaculture. Moreover, I am encouraging an independent review and halt to all scal expenditures for the WEI in the interest of all Florida citizens. John Hitron Carrabelle jhitron@mediacombb.net Editor, The News: While others talk the talk, Commissioner Jerry Moore walks the walk. How many of you are aware of the generous gift of land on Highway 98 that Commissioner Moore made to the county, which enabled Talquin Water and Sewer to close the sewer station on Cut Off Road that served the Shell Point, Oyster Bay, and Spring Creek areas? Commissioner Moore recognized the need to relocate this facility, which was in a wetland area and often subject to ooding and polluting of the Apalachee Bay during storms. Deeply concerned about the threat that the sewer station posed, Commissioner Moore gave his land to the County without cost and/or fanfare. The sewer station on Cut Off Road is now closed, and the Apalachee Bay has been protected all because of the gift from Commissioner Moore. Thanks, Commissioner Moore! Sincerely, Linda Buytendorp Oyster Bay Editor, The News: I would like to take this opportunity to thank some individuals that have given their time and talents to many school children in Wakulla County. Ed Gardner, Optometrist and Tim Babcock, Optometric Technician who are located in the Wal-Mart Vision Center and Karen Stelling from the Wal-Mart Vision Center have volunteered in our schools this year and past years to perform vision screenings. Nearly 1,000 screenings were done this year alone. In addition to providing vision screenings they have assisted students in nding resources to buy glasses if they cannot afford them. I truly appreciate their service to our community. Thank you! Lori Lawhon R.N. School Health Coordinator Wakulla County Health DepartmentEditor, The News: Every year since 1981, Domestic Violence Awareness Month has been observed in October. In addition to raising awareness, I am taking this opportunity to encourage Wakulla County to become familiar with how the Wakulla County Clerk of the Court can help you or someone you know. Almost all of us personally know someone who is or has been a victim of domestic violence. National statistics show the primary victims to be female, and that one in four women are domestic violence victims at some point in their lives. This is unacceptable. With this in mind, it is important to focus on what we can do to help victims and, ultimately, how we can put an end to domestic violence in Wakulla County. Floridas Court Clerks are keenly sensitive to the needs of domestic violence survivors and take these matters very seriously. We are committed to assisting victims, with complete confidentiality and discretion, throughout the entire process of ling petitions for injunctions with the courts, and connecting victims with advocate programs. This year the Wakulla Clerks of ce is making a new effort to help by collecting used cell phones during October here at the Wakulla County Courthouse. If you have a cell phone you no longer need, even if not working, please bring it by and drop it off (with chargers if possible). Those phones that can be placed with the Refuge House for local victims of domestic violence will be, while the rest will become part of a program of recycling phones with the National Center Against Domestic Violence. So recycle those old phones and help victims at the same time. And if you or someone you know is suffering from domestic violence, please contact the Wakulla County Clerks of ce at 9260318 (M-F 8-5), or the Refuge House at 6812111 (24-7). The Wakulla County Clerks office stands ready to help protect community members and lend a helping hand for those in need of assistance. We work very closely with the local sheriffs office and the courts, so that safety and justice are achieved for victims and their families in the event that a domestic violence incident occurs. Let us all work toward ending domestic violence. Sincerely, Brent Thurmond Clerk Wakulla CountyEditor, The News: I am writing an open letter to Congressman Steve Southerland and his management team in hopes it will reach their eyes. Please speak to your constituents concerning the following issues. Stealing privately located Graham for US Congress yard signs is unacceptable. However, also, demolishing the Graham supporters 8 foot, 4x4 solid wood mail stand with paper delivery cabinet and metal mail box is down right criminal! This incident was reported to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce on Sept. 7. Please ask this criminal element of society supporting you to cease their behavior immediately. It does not speak well of your followers. Thank you, Debra Sparks Crawfordville Editor, The News: It continues to amaze me how many people Ive seen in this past two weeks pass on double yellow lines. Theres going to be a terrible accident from Crawfordville to Medart if this continues. Please obey our laws, your family wants you home at nights. Thanks, Darryl Blackwell blackwelld1948@yahoo.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 5readers speak out More OpinionsEditor, The News: Please be aware of the deadly economic impact the environmental terrorists are having on Wakulla County. The recent retreat of TCC on the Cherokee Sink development proposal should leave no doubt that these terrorists intend on holding Wakulla County hostage until their communist ideology is rammed down the throats of every Wakulla County citizen, especially the poor and middle/working class. There will be NO economic recovery, ever, if the terrorists are not defeated. These environmental terrorists make demands of concessions for a cease re and receive them, only to continue threatening innocent civilians and demanding more concessions. Our homegrown Alliance terrorists demand concession after concession from groups and agencies attempting to grow Wakulla Countys dormant economy and receive them. The result? The wetlands alliance reject all compromises and begin their attack anew. They depend on their one commissioner to carry their petulant issues before the commission. They have no concern for the best interest of Wakulla County, theirs is a ght for POWER. They want to dominate every conversation with their environmental wacko agenda, the baby gets thrown out with the bath water when these goons do not get their way. Fighting terrorism is a dirty business; any efforts at appeasement are self destructive. Do not be afraid to challenge these liberals, giving in to them only leads to more of their insane demands. This ght can be won at the ballot box on Nov. 4 when we vote down the communist wetlands buffer on top of buffer referendum and elect freedom loving, conservative commissioners who will position Wakulla County for future prosperity, job growth and less taxation. Defend your values and protect your ability to live in freedom, do not let the terrorists take hold here. Alex Jordan Ochlockonee BayEditor, The News: The Wetlands Ordinance is the topic of much discussion in our county, a lot of heated debate. I think everyone needs to look beyond the question of Do we need more protection than the state DEP and federal regulations provide? In their effort to have a document that was bullet-proof the Wetlands Alliance went too far and it could cost the county millions. The ordinance if passed cannot be changed without a 5-0 vote of the county commission or a citizen initiative for a new referendum. If you are for the ordinance this may sound good but actually it is terrible regardless of which side you are on. If you look at how science evolves you will know that there is a need for a way to change and amend the ordinance. Getting a 5-0 vote to change the ordinance would be near impossible. If you were making the ordinance more restrictive or less restrictive there would always be at least one commissioner against it. If we pass this ordinance and are sued because we have taken more of someones property than the state regulations require we are going to lose. After we lose a lawsuit we still cant change the ordinance because we will not get a 5-0 vote. We are a charter county and we have in our charter that a citizen initiative cannot be changed by the commissioners for two years after being adopted. Referendum item A needs to be defeated and then an ordinance can be drafted that does not over reach like this one does. Vote No on A. Bill Russell Ochlockonee BayEditor, The News: I believe with all my heart that we need to protect our wetlands, but Referendum A is not a good way to do it. After noticing the controversy over the recently repealed Wetlands Ordinance and Referendum A, I decided to research the effect on a lot we own at Shell Point and the subdivision it is in. I got con icting answers, so I decided to read the ordinance. The ordinance is ambiguous. First, the ordinance covers wetlands and surface waters. Second, it spells out that the existence of wetlands vegetation makes an area a wetland. Finally, it makes an exception for manmade water features. To complicate matters more, some surface water started as natural wetlands but was increased in size by developers. This hybrid condition is not addressed. Wetland vegetation occurs around many manmade water features. No one can know what you can do on certain lots. Ordinance supporters cannot tell you. Sellers, buyers, realtors cannot know for sure. I dont know how the property appraiser can tell the value of lots and land. Planning and Zoning has to navigate the ambiguity, and the county may find decisions generating lawsuits. We need to create an unambiguous ordinance. If Referendum A passes, it cannot be repealed for two years, and then only by a unanimous vote of all ve commissioners or another referendum. Please vote NO on Referendum A to avoid reinstating an ambiguous law. Helen Cleaveland Livingston Shell PointEnvironmental terrorists on our shores An ambiguous law is bad law e cost of the wetlands ordinance Wetlands issue isnt that di cultEditor, The News: Despite all the hype, the wetlands buffer issue is not that hard to understand. Four County Commissioners and their friends wanted their respective properties to be worth more money. To accomplish that, they ignored about one-third of Wakulla Countys registered voters who asked to vote on the issue and repealed a popular ordinance. They gave themselves a few months of time to submit applications for building permits that would have been rejected under the buffer law. At the very least, this resulted in two imminent effects: Taxes on properties containing wetlands will be taxed at a higher rate, whether or not they are developed within the former 75-foot buffer. The county will be exposed to potential lawsuits when the people vote Yes for the Wetlands Referendum and force the reinstatement of the Buffer Amendment (I mean, really, 16,000 voters signed the Referendum Petition). Beyond those two facts, there are a number of potential problems that could result from this window of development opportunities. For example, there is no way to tell if the tax increase will create enough revenue to cover any future environmental impact caused by development closer to wetlands. If not, taxpayers would have to cover it by paying even higher taxes. And there is never enough money to defend against litigation by folks with disposable incomes and selfish intentions. So, when the wetlands amendment is restored, dont be surprised when you see Commissioners Thomas, Harden, Moore and Merritt at the front of a very short line of taxrevenue-sucking plaintiffs suing the county for taking their property. Ill never understand how these guys got away with raising taxes, given the conservative attitude of their constituency. Ill give them credit for creativity and audacity, but on the issues of protecting my property rights and serving the general public, they have failed miserably. Heres why I think the 75-foot buffer was appropriate: 75 feet is the same distance required by law between my septic tank and my water well. The dont s*** where you eat rule applies in both cases. John Palumbo Crawfordville

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Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station The Reverend Bert MatlockBible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchSunday School 10 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. PASTOR ALAN GAYLORD 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.org Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE If everythings right, somethings wrong Wakulla Springs Baptist holding a pumpkin saleWakulla Springs Baptist Church, 1391 Crawfordville Hwy., will hold a pumpkin sale through Oct. 31, daily until sundown. Closed Sundays. Pioneer Baptist to hold garage-craft-bake saleThe Womens Missionary Union of Pioneer Baptist Church is having a garage, craft, and bake sale on Oct. 11. The hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The sale will take place inside the fellowship hall. The proceeds will bene t the womens ministry projects of Pioneer Baptist Church. We invite the community to shop a large variety of items. Pioneer Baptist is located at 486 Beechwood Drive in Crawfordville, four miles east of the courthouse, just north of the Spring Creek Highway and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road intersection. First Pentecostal to host free sh fryFirst Pentecostal Church will be having a free sh fry with all the xins and a community giveaway on Saturday, Oct. 18, beginning at 11 a.m. The church is located across from the Courthouse. Faith Holiness will have a pastor appreciation dayFaith Holiness House of Prayer Ministries will hold a pastors appreciation day on Sunday, Oct. 12 Evangelist Elizabeth McCormick will bring the morning message. There will be special singing. Lunch will be provided. Services start at 10 a.m. Come worship with us and be blessed. The chuch is located at 726 Woodville Hwy. in Crawfordville. For more information, contact Pastor Cris Thomas, (850) 4211324. Congregational Holiness churches to come togetherCome Together Homecoming Revival Carrabelle, Panacea, Sopchoppy and Tallahassee Congregational Holiness Churches are coming together to have Homecoming revival Oct. 2024 at Odom Memorial Campground in Sopchoppy. We will also be having supper at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25, at the campground. Bring a covered dish and join us. Services will begin at 7:30 p.m. with a different speaker each night. For more information please call 850-508-1895 or 850-5670375. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton to hold holiday craft fair St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold its second annual HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR SALE from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25. We wish to showcase local crafters. Anyone wishing to sell items they have created is welcome to join us. You will be able to set up inside the hall or outdoors. Vendor fee is $5. There will be free admission for all shoppers. For more information, contact Phylllis Berninger at 926-1453 or Nicky Lepp at 926-9750. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERIt was a week when everything went just the way I had planned. It is hard to express your feelings when something like this happens because it rarely happens. The infamous To-DoList from the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage was completed to her ecstatic satisfaction. That never happens. In fact, I nished it in time to have a little of Me Time. I sat on the back porch with a steaming hot cup of coffee and enjoyed an evening with nothing to do. I am not sure how long I sat there, but my coffee was just as hot as it was on my rst sip. I do not know how my wife does those things. I have never enjoyed a cup of coffee more. I had an appointment across town and in traveling across town I never hit one red light. I think that should go into the Guinness book of records. It has never happened to me before and I was reveling in the deepest kind of satisfaction I have ever known. I got to my destination 20 minutes early. I love early. After paying all my bills for the week and balancing my checkbook, I had $100 left over. What in the world, do you do with $100 left over after paying all your bills? It did not take long to come up with a solution. I decided to take my wife out for supper on Friday night at her favorite restaurant. It was a glorious night on the town and the service at the restaurant was superb. Never have I enjoyed a more wonderful time on the town. The steak was done to a perfect T, just the way I like it. The waitress kept my coffee cup lled to the brim. All through our meal, neither cell phones rang nor did we receive a text from anybody. Now seriously, how often does that happen? I checked several times to make sure my phone was still on. I sat back and decided to enjoy our anonymity. It is good to just chill together. As we came near the end of our delectable evening repast, I was about to mention to my wife what a tremendous week we were having and then... Then, I woke up. It was all just a dream. Why is it dreams never come true? Why is it that my dream life is so much superior to my actual life? For a brief moment, I experienced what a perfect week would look like, even if it was just in my dreams. A perfect week is not when everything goes our way, because, if everything goes right then you know something is wrong. Call it pessimism if you will or maybe just a dash of reality. It is when things go wrong that I begin to understand what life is all about. I begin to understand that nothing is perfect. And, if nothing is perfect, then neither am I. I like that. The only perfect person at our residence is my wife, and I have her word on that and she never lies to me. Demanding perfection is a rather foolish thing. If I demand perfection from someone, they in turn are going to demand perfection from me. That is more stress than I care to live with, especially at my age. After over four decades of marital bliss, I have made an astounding discovery that has made my life so much more pleasurable. It took me a long time to come to this, but I sure am glad I have. For many years, I was hard on myself trying to be perfect in everything I did. Then, I got married and all of that went away. It was a struggle at rst, but I came to one astounding conclusion that has changed my life and brought me to a point of chilling out for the rest of my life. In our home only one person needs to be perfect. That one person is not me. What a blessing it is to realize that you are not perfect and you do not have to live up to that standard of perfection. I can be goofy, make mistakes and act silly and nobody cares. All those years of trying to be perfect were wasted. Now I have come to the place where I have acceded to the fact that my wife is perfect. I gladly anoint her as Queen Perfection in our humble Castle. All of the burden now rests upon her. She does not need to worry; I am there to support her in that aura of perfection. The nice thing about all of this is, she does not need much help from me. It is almost like I am retired for the rest of my life with nothing else to do. The burden of perfection does not rest upon my shoulder. Oh yes, the checkbook. After looking at it while awake, I discovered I was $100 overdrawn. Solomon understood this when he wrote, All the ways of a man are clean in his own eyes; but the Lord weigheth the spirits, (Proverbs 16:2). Everything does not have to go right for me to rejoice in the goodness of the Lord.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30 orthoinfo.org/patientsafety The safest, most successful surgeries happen when physicians and patients team up as active partners. Which means plenty of candid questions and honest answers from each. Bone up on patient safety at orthoinfo.org/patientsafety. A public service message from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, reminding patients and doctors that communication is the best medicine. Patient Safety. It takes a team.GOING IN FOR SURGERY? DONT JUST LI E THERE. Letters of thanks I give thanks to all who assisted me with your nancial support for the breakfast brunch for Evangelist Sonya Nelson. Your generosity was overwhelming. Thanks so much, Mae Frances Baucham The family of Laveda Roberts Hodge Raker wishes to express sincere appreciation for all the prayers, food, cards, and other expressions of concern and sympathy shown to us during her battle with cancer and her recent passing. Your many expressions of love helped us get through a most dif cult time. We miss her greatly, but we know that our loss is Heavens gain. The Raker, Hodge and Roberts families

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 7Sylvia Dean Woodall Cope, 72, of Tallahassee, joined our heavenly father, she passed from natural causes on Oct. 2nd, 2014. Sylvia, daughter of Fred and Lucy Woodall, was born on July 17, 1942, in Miami. Survivors include two sisters, Glenna Myra Colson, Cheryle Lucille (Jodi) Bruffett, and ve brothers, Robert Woodall (deceased), Fred Linuall Woodall, William Franklin Woodall (deceased), Hershell Candy Woodall, and Vaughn Melton Woodall. She graduated from Jackson High School in Alapata. She married Alton Wayne Cope Jr. in 1958. She was diligently self-employed for more than 20 years. She was a beloved mother to Alton Wayne Cope III, 53, Cynthia Carol Cope, 53, Margaret Ann Cope, 51, and Sylvia Diane (DeeDee) Pritchard, 49. Grandmother to 17 grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. Sylvia Dean Cope will always be remembered by her many loved ones for the precious time spent together doing what she loved, such as, shing on the Wakulla River, gardening, shopping for gifts for her grandchildren, playing and always winning a long game of Monopoly. She was a devoted fan of FSU football, and Elvis Presley and George Jones. She will also be remembered for her love of hummingbirds and elephants. Family received loved ones for viewing on Sunday, Oct. 5 between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the Bevis Funeral Home, 3106 Crawfordville Hwy. in Crawfordville. Services were held at 2 p.m., Monday, Oct. 6, visitation from 1to 2 p.m., at the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 3251 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. She was laid to rest at Roselawn Cemetery on Piedmont Drive in Tallahassee after the church services. There will be a reception following the services, location to be announced. Todd Wahlquist of Bevis Funeral Home, (850) 9263333, www.bevisfh. com, is assisting the family with their arrangements.Dennis Don Crabtree, 67, passed away suddenly and unexpectedly on Oct. 3, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. Born on Aug. 18, 1947, in Neosho, Mo., Dennis relocated for the warmer weather of Florida in 1985. He was a remarkable father, husband, son-in-law, cousin and friend. Dennis is survived by his immediate family in Dunedin: wife of 26 years, Denise Whaley Crabtree, and sons, Jacob Taylor (23) and Spencer Thomas (19). He leaves behind the family members that he chose and the many friends that chose him throughout the years in Seneca, Joplin, and Kansas City, Mo., West Virginia, and Tallahassee and Dunedin. Dennis life will be celebrated on Thurs., Oct. 9, in Tallahassee at Culleys MeadowWood on Riggins Road at 5 p.m. A pre-service visitation period will begin at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations in Dennis memory to the American Heart Association or a charity of your choice. Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home is assisting the family.Helen B. Real, 88, of Smith Creek, died on Sept. 26, 2014 at Big Bend Hospice House in Tallahassee. She was born in Craven County, N.C. on May 3, 1926. She was predeceased by her husband, Hubert E. Real; parents Ruben and Lottie Bland; two brothers, Stanley and Manley Bland; one sister, Mable Jones; three nephews, two nieces and a greatnephew. Survivors include her daughter, Linda B. Davis (Bill) of Smith Creek; sons, Douglas Barnes of Orlando, and Patrick Real of Jacksonville; step-daughters Donna Wood (Greg) and Tracy Nichols, both of Winter Park; two stepsons, Hubert E. Real of Winter Park, and Mark Real (Jeanne) of Gainesville, Ga.; four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews; and her loving caregiver, Duchess Wesley (James). Memorial contributions can be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308; Florida United Methodist Childrens Home and Youth Ranch in Madison; or the Alzheimers Foundation. A memorial service was held at the First United Methodist Church, 973 Marion Ave. in Lake City on Oct. 5, 2014 at 2 pm. Arrangements were under the care of ICS Cremation and Funeral Home, Lake City, Florida 357 NW Wilks Lane 386-752-3436 www.icsfuneralservices.com.Sylvia Dean Woodall Cope Dennis Don Crabtree Helen B. RealDennis Don CrabtreeHelen B. RealSylvia Dean CopeObituaries go to thewakullanews.com, click on obituariesBy SHERYL H. BOLDT Ssssplack! Zacchaeus wiped the spit off his face, for the fourth time that morning. Nobody liked him. Nobody, except for the other tax collectors, of course. That is, until Jesus entered his life. Jesus actually sought Zacchaeus out to spend time with him. And soon, Zacchaeuss heart and his life changed! The same man who had built a career cheating his neighbors, joyfully welcomed Jesus into his home (read his remarkable story in Luke 19:1-9). Zacchaeus went from being a dishonest greedy man (hated by his own people), to a sincere and generous man (probably well-liked and respected by his community). What changed Zacchaeus? Are we willing to allow God to help us see others as He sees them even before theres evidence of a changed life? Or will we continue pointing our ngers and wagging our tongues until the person does something to deserve our compassion and support? If thats the criteria, what must a person accomplish before we begin to pull for her or hope the best for him? What if we prayed for the person who has taken steps in a wrong direction, or is caught up in bad behavior? What if we got involved, as God leads, when we see signs that someone is spiraling downward? How might our churches and communities bene t if we show Gods mercy to those caught in the consequences of their bad or sinful choices? Luke 6:36 (NASB): Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful. Sheryl H. Boldt is a sales executive for Wave 94 and the author of the Memorizing Scripture Blog. You can email Sheryl at sherylhboldt. wave94@gmail.com.Do you know someone who is spiraling downward? Found ladder on Crawfordville Hwy. on Oct. 5. If it belongs to you, call Lake Ellen Baptist Church at 926-2933.Found ladder on highway 000JESN SUNDAY 11 a.m. 4 p.m.Flounder .................................$12.95 Shrimp ...................................$10.95 Hamburger Steak ...................$10.95 Wee Platter .............................$13.95Shrimp Oysters Deviled CrabTUESDAY 5 p.m. 9 p.m.Alfredo Shrimp & Scallops ......$13.95 Alfredo Shrimp .......................$12.95 Alfredo Chicken ........................$9.95WEDNESDAY 5 p.m. 9 p.m.AUCE Scallops .........................$14.95 AUCE Catfish .............................$9.95THURSDAY 5 p.m. 9 p.m.Baby Back Ribs .......................$10.95 AUCE Shrimp ..........................$14.95FRIDAY 11 a.m. 2 p.m. & 5 p.m. 9 p.m.FRI. LUNCH Flounder ....................$10.00FRI. NIGHT Prime Rib ..................$17.95TUESDAY FRIDAY 11 a.m. 2 p.m.Country Style Blue Plate ...........$8.00 Winter hours: Tues. Thurs. 11-9 1506 Coastal Hwy., Panacea984-5243Discount cards may not be used for specials

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityIn September, Robert Mallow, Jonah Harvey, Zachary Windsor, Daniel Sullivan III, and Zachary Fogleman of Boy Scouts from Troop 5 in Wakulla County removed the old ag at the Wakulla Public Library and raised a beautiful new ag. The older ag will be retired during an of cial ag retirement ceremony at one of the Scouts upcoming camping trips. The boys were accompanied by one of the Troop 5 leaders, Greg Fogleman. By MICHELLE KIRBYR. Don McLeod 2469Members of R. Don McLeod 2469, United Daughters of the Confederacy recently celebrated their 32nd anniversary including tribute to the initial 20 women who chartered the Chapter Sept. 20, 1982. The ladies of R. Don McLeod 2469 have doubled in size these past 32 years with additional membership applications pending. Their objectives are relevant to the needs and interests of society today including educational, benevolent, historical, memorial, and patriotic. The UDC offers scholarships to students of all levels to further their education. They assist a plethora of community causes including Respite Care, Wakulla Pregnancy Center, Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center, Veterans Village, local schools, and many others. Their historical work is signi cant with numerous projects accomplished for the bene t of the whole community including collaborative efforts with the Wakulla County Historical Society and virtual Find A Grave cemeteries. They honor our current veterans as well as remember veterans of the past through monument dedications and offering military service awards. You may learn more about R. Don McLeod 2469 and the United Daughters of the Confederacy on their website www.rdonmcleod.org.Special to The NewsOn Sept. 28, the Wakulla County Democratic Executive Committee elected Nikki Barnes as Chair of the Wakulla County Democratic Party. Barnes said, Im extremely humbled and honored to be elected by this wonderful group of Democratic leaders. This is an important time for the state of Florida and the Second Congressional District. Our current elected leadership has failed to address minimum wage increases making it harder for Florida families to make ends meet, refuses to make our environment a priority, and continues a fight against ensuring Floridians have affordable healthcare. My rst goal is to ensure we move this state and this district in the right direction by electing leaders who will work for Floridians and not special interest groups. We have been failed by our current elected Florida leadership too many times. We cannot afford to let this continue. Nikki Barnes replaces Dr. Rachel Pienta as Chair after Dr. Pienta resigned earlier in the month to dedicate more time to public service in her new career. Dr. Pienta will remain on the board as State Committeewoman. Other elected board members include: David Pienta, Vice-Chair & State Committeeman; Dan Hauversburk, Treasurer; Verna Brock, Recording Secretary; Debra Sparks, Corresponding Secretary.R. Don McLeod 2469 celebrates 32nd anniversaryPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of R. Don McLeod 2469 are direct or collateral descendants of those who provided honorable service or aid for the Confederacy during the War Between the States. They also wish to sponsor a Children of the Confederacy Chapter. If you have an eligible child, please contact them at rdonmcleodudc@gmail.com. Barnes elected chair of the Wakulla Democratic Party Nikki Barnes ank you, Boy Scout Troop 5ROBYN DRUMMOND/LIBRARY DIRECTOROperation Santa registration in October onlyStaff ReportThose who need a hand-up this holiday season should be aware that registration for Operation Santa is ongoing throughout October only. Registration is at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at Shadeville Highway and Trice Lane in Crawfordville on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. To save time, OS volunteers encourage registrants to watch the informational video online, and ll out the application prior to the interview. Those without a home computer can pull up the site and fill out the application at the Wakulla Public Library. Visit www.operationsantawakulla.org for registration and the video. IS FALSELY REPRESENTING MILITARY SERVICE IMPORTANT?Florida law says it is a violation of the elections code for a candidate to falsely represent his or her military service. I thought that meant that if a candidate, such as Steve Cushman, who is running as a Wakulla County Commission candidate for District 4, said he was a U.S. Air Force pilot and he wasnt, he had broken the law. It looks like that belief was wrong. Cushman spent one year in ROTC at the University of North Texas and left as an airman, not a commissioned ofcer as required to y military airplanes. Cushman can misrepresent his military experience and can tell people he was an Air Force pilot for seven years, and tell people he taught F-16 pilots, and thats okay with Florida law. It seems candidates break the law only if they say they were in the military and they werent. I ew hundreds of missions (337) in Southeast Asia as a Marine Corps pilot during the Vietnam War with men who fought for our country. For Cushman to put himself in a league with my comrades makes me very upset. I plan to ask my fellow veterans to join me in petitioning Florida legislators to strengthen this law. For candidates to do what Steve Cushman has done is just not right.Paid Political Advertisement, for by Larry Roberts, 5506 Smith Creek Rd., Sopchoppy, Florida 32358, independently of any candidate. This advertisement was not approved by any candidate. Cushman claimed to be a retired Air Force pilot ..........False Cushman claimed to have been an F-16 instructor .........False Cushman claimed to have seven years in the Air Force ..FalseIt is very wrong for a person to so grossly misrepresent their military record. Larry C. Roberts, Maj. USMC ( Ret. ) invites you to join us at our Monday, October 13, 9AM-1PMat Lake Ellen Baptist Church, Family Life Center 4495 Crawfordville Hwy. Here are some of the organizations who will be present Big Bend Hospice Living Wills Wakulla Senior Citizens Center Benets Specialist from a Law Firm Pharmacy Brown Bag Check Home Instead Elder Care Funeral Services Shine Hearing Specialist HopewellPlease contact Pat Ashley at 850-984-5277 or Mary McMahan 850-510-1253. REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVEDThe following educational services will be provided:Monitoring Devices Simple Activity Ideas Screening for Blood Pressure, Oxygen and Sugar Levels Communication Styles Alzheimers Projectand u shot clinic Wakulla Alzheimers Respite Program Sandy LottRealtor, SFR, Notary Public(850) 926-1010Sandy@SandyLott.com Mar-LU Properties, Inc. R Ms Marias Grooming LLC PET GROOMING & BATHINGNow Taking Appointments850-519-19942500-A Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville19 Years of Experience PetGroomingByMaria

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 9Special to The NewsAshley Lee and Kyle Gibbs were married on June 28, 2014 at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church by William Meggs and Pastor Robert Johns (brides uncle). The reception was held at the Sopchoppy Historic Gymnasium. She is the daughter of Chris and Amy Lee of Crawfordville and the granddaughter of Harlan and Jeanette Chestnut of Crawfordville and the late Robert and Joyce Lee, of Crawfordville. He is the son of Travis and Jody Gibbs, (formerly of Sopchoppy), Wewahitchka and the grandson of Nora and Preston Gibbs of Wewahitchka and Mina Herring of Port St. Joe. The wedding party included bridesmaids Brandie Mans eld, Priscilla Lim, Susannah Hall and Meagan Chestnut. Groomsmen were Travis Gibbs, K.B. Holley, Reid Lamb and Jason Lowe. Both Ashley and Kyle are graduates of Wakulla High School. Ashley graduated from FSU in 2012 with Bachelor Degrees in both psychology and nursing. She is currently employed at Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare in the Family Care Unit. Kyle graduated from Chipola College (Fire Fighting Program) and is currently employed by Leon County Emergency Medical Services. Lee Gibbs married June 28100 Years Young! Lottie Mae Vause Garner Mann was honored at her 100th birthday celebration on Sept. 20 at First Baptist Church of Woodville surrounded by her ve children and their spouses, 15 grandchildren, 17 greatgrandchildren as well as a host of nieces, nephews and friends. Mrs. Mann was born and raised in Ft. Braden and attended Leon High school in Tallahassee. Wakulla County has been her home for over 30 years. Mrs. Mann retired from the State of Florida Department of Vehicle Commission in the mid-1970s. Special to The NewsOn Thursday, Oct. 16, families will gather together at St. Pauls United Methodist Church at 1700 North Meridian Road in Tallahassee from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. to honor the memory of babies who have passed away. During this free event, certi ed child care professionals will provide activities for children. Parking is available at the church. Inaugurated in 2002, Walk to Remember is held each year as part of National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day. This event is dedicated to grieving families in the Big Bend area. This event plays an important role in helping families with the heartbreak of losing a baby, said Kristy Goldwire, Executive Director of Capital Area Healthy Start Coalition. We are happy to offer as much support as possible to grieving families. At 5:30 p.m., a reception will be held with refreshments where guests can mingle and write a message on remembrance quilt squares. Vendors will be there to provide services and information, and grief counselors will be available to speak with guests. A memorial service will take place in the sanctuary at 6:30 p.m. Voces Angelorum will sing during the service. Families will have the opportunity to hear their babies names announced. At 7:30 p.m., participants have the opportunity to walk around Lake Ella paying tribute to their babies during a candlelit ceremony. The Tallahassee Pipe Band will play Amazing Grace during the walk. Each family will receive a carnation. Contact Kristy Goldwire at 488-0288 ext. 101 or Tracy Coomer at 488-0288 ext. 109 with questions about the event or sponsorship.Happy 100th birthday Lottie Mae Mann Special to The NewsJoin Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County and the Wakulla Chapter of the Tallahassee Board of Realtors at the 2014 Chili Cook Off from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, Oct. 17 at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center (33 Michael Drive) for a fun evening, great food, wine and cold beer. Cooks must be set up by 5:30 p.m., and judging begins at 6 p.m. Awards will be presented to the most unusual chili, hot and spiciest, meatiest, best overall, crowd favorite and best table theme. Be a sponsor, decorate your table with signs and freebies to promote your business. For more sponsorship information, or to be a chili cookoff team, call Tara Kieser 294-5955. Tickets to the event are only $10 per person, and includes chili, drinks and a few raf e tickets. For more information about tickets, call Susan Schatzman 519-2292.Habitat Chili Cooko is Oct. 17 Walk to Remember for infant loss on Oct. 16Lil Nicky Cotes, a local 6-year-old BMX racer, won a state championship last month, and his family is looking for sponsors as he heads to the Disney Cup Nationals in Orlando. Cotes has his eye on the Grands Nationals in Oklahoma in November. He has been racing since age 4. To become a sponsor, contact Lesly at 850-509-1393 or rodriguezlesly@hotmail.com. The Cotes family says thank you to current sponsors. Lil BMX racer competes nationally Pumpkin Patch and HayridesOpen Weekends Starting October 4 Saturday 10 a.m. 6 p.m. Sunday 1 p.m. 6p.mPumpkin Patch, Hayrides, Playgrounds, Corn Bin, Picnic Area, Cows, Donkeys, Peacocks, & Gift Shop This Project recieved nancial assistance from VISITFLORIDA.COM Unspoiled. Unexpected. 850-627-3434FIELD TRIPS WELCOME! Monday Friday By Appointment Call850-545-8088 Rocky Comfort Farms6441 Pat Thomas Pkwy. Quincy, Florida 323512014 FALL OPENING Let us help you focus on the future today! www.savaryacademy.com Standard High School Diploma PSAT, SAT and AP Exams Administered AP and Dual Enrollment Classes Available Individualized/Self-Paced Curriculum *FLVS/Online Classes McKay & SUFS Scholarships available Are you struggling to help your kids with their HOMEWORK? After-School Homework CenterGrades 3rd 7th We can help! ( 850 ) 926-9977 ( 850 ) 926-9977 Call Today!*Homework Help / Tutoring Its done before you get home! *Additional Educational Activities & Computer Games *School Bus available from Crawfordville Elementary/Wakulla Middle Private School (Grades 7-12) facebook.com/pages/Savary-Academy

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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolBy ALYSSA HIGGINSPrincipalCOAST families came out for our Annual Title I Parent Night and Dinner on Sept. 18. With over 115 Stingrays and family members in attendance, the evening was a great success. While enjoying a barbecue dinner, COAST Principal, Alyssa Higgins, welcomed families and talked about the importance of volunteers. COAST is fortunate to have many volunteers this school year! Volunteers have already been hard at work planning for the Kid Zone at the Stone Crab Festival, reading to younger students during Storytime at the library, running the Book Fair and working in our Art Lab. Susan Flournoy, Instructional Coach, then addressed parents and students to give them a Title I overview and update. As a Title I school, COAST receives extra funding through this federal program and offers many extra services to our parents and students. Tonya Hobby, Tobacco Prevention Specialist, and Arien Hart, SWAT Of ce Assistant, also spoke to parents about Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) and their goals for the school year. COAST has a large SWAT membership and our students are very active in the club. Finally, parents went to their childs classroom and had a lesson with their children and teachers on classroom rules, procedures, the new Florida Standards and were shown a sampling of how the rigor and relevance has increased in the classroom. Parents enjoyed meeting the teachers and getting a better understanding of how the classrooms are run and what is expected of students. Teachers were happy to update parents and have face to face time to meet. Its an eaglet. Its a plane. No, its a super hero or princess! On Sept. 5, students and teachers at Wakulla and Sopchoppy Pre-K sported capes, masks, ball gowns, tiaras and character t-shirts to raise money for the Senior Citizens Center of Wakulla County. This fundraiser event collected almost $100 in coin donations. The annual donation drive known as Silver for Seniors also hosted two other events during the month. Crazy Hair and Silly Hat Day along with ice POPS also raised monies for the Senior Center. Students and teachers enjoyed participating in the events. All will agree its great to work and play at Wakulla Pre-K! Army Pfc. Edward Langston has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Langston is the son of Clarence and Leslie Langston of Crawfordville. He is a 2008 graduate of Wakulla High School. He earned an associates degree in 2012 from Tallahassee Community College.Edward Langston completes Army basic trainingSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School is pleased to be running at its fullest capacity in school history. With just over 1,375 students, its faculty and staff are working hard to ll schedules with classes and academic opportunities that will make this not only an incredible school year, but a stepping stone for great things to come. Homecoming week kicked off Monday with the theme Welcome to the Jungle. Friday is spirit day, with a student pep rally during sixth and seventh period, and the homecoming game at 7:30 p.m. The homecoming dance will be Saturday at the Historic Sopchoppy Gym from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. This last week, Wakulla High hosted its rst College Fair of the year. Wakullas gym was lled with representatives from local colleges and vocational schools as well as out of state institutions like Notre Dame, and all US Military Branches. Junior, Matt St. Martin spoke with a representative from Alabama University at Birmingham, and he lled out paper work for Nova Southeastern University. I found out they have a program for Marine Biology, and NSU is close to where I grew up, he said. With over 30 colleges and post-secondary institutions represented, our students had a wealth of information to help answer that age-old question, What am I going to do after I graduate? WHS Carpentry WHS Carpentry students recently built and donated a picnic table to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Department for Thank a Police Officer Day. Carpentry instructor, Mr. Freebeau Swindle, said, Our students worked diligently on this project, and were excited to be able to share their nished product. Thats what motivates our students. Two other tables are being donated to Florida Highway Patrol and Wakulla Correctional Institute. This is a small sign of our appreciation for their service to our community. For information on getting your own student-made picnic table, contact swindle@ wcsb.us, 926-7125. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMiddle school math teacher, Marsha Bowers with students and parents at Parent Night.Parents walk in their childs shoes at COAST Whats happening at Wakulla High School? PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAt left, a student talks with a West Point recruiter at college fair. At right, students built and donated a picnic table for the sheriffs department. Characters raise money f or seniors at Wakulla Pre-K YOUTH SOCCERREGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 10/11/14 & SATURDAY 10/25/14 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 10/06/14 TO FRIDAY 10/24/14 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 10/25/14, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF U.S. 98AGE DETERMINING DATE: SEPTEMBER 1st, 2014COST IS $40.00 PER CHILDAGES: 04 & UNDER DIVISION: Players must be 03 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 05 on or after 9/1/14 06 & UNDER DIVISION: Players must be 05 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 07 on or after 9/1/14 08 & UNDER DIVISION: Players must be 07 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 09 on or after 9/1/14 10 & UNDER DIVISION: Players must be 09 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 11 on or after 9/1/14 12 & UNDER DIVISION: Players must be 11 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 13 on or after 9/1/14 Practices may start in mid November and continue into December. Games will begin in January after the Winter holidays and run for approximately 5 weeks. Soccer practices and games will be held at Medart Recreation Park. Games will be held in the evenings on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, or Saturday mornings. Practice times are usually similar but are at the discretion of the coach of each individual team.COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD8 & 9 DIVISION: Player must be 08 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 10 on or after 9/1/14 10, 11, & 12 DIVISION: Player must be 10 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 13 on or after 9/1/14. Basketball practices and games will be held at the Community Center and Riversprings Middle School. Practices may start in November and continue into December. Games will begin in January after the winter holidays and run for approximately 5 weeks. Games will be held in the evenings on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, or Saturday mornings. Practice times are usually similar but are at the discretion of the coach of each individual team and the availability of the school gymnasium.YOUTH BASKETBALL All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Recreation Department. All volunteers must complete a criminal history background check.For questions or more information call 926-7227 visit www.mywakulla.com or facebook Wakulla County Parks and RecreationWAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION DEPARTMENT 2014 WINTER SPORTS -REGISTRATION -Featuring: Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae Price of Admission Includes Dinner and Show Tickets: $30.00 The most fun you will ever have at dinner Proceeds to support Meals on Wheels and other services provided at the center. Thank you for your generous support ALL STAR CAST A Murder Mystery Dinner Theater AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION FRIDAY, OCT. 17TH 6:30PM WAR EAGLE CAF AT WAKULLA HIGH SCHOO L Tickets on sale now. Call for more information 850.926.7145 Back by Popular Demand!!! Our first performance was so much fun we were asked to do another! Dont Miss This Show!!!!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 11Special to The NewsTaylor Phillips, a resident of Crawfordville for more than a decade, is the No Party Affiliation candidate for the Wakulla County Commission seat in District 2. Phillips is challenging Republican incumbent Randy Merritt for the seat. Phillips grew up in Atlanta in a home in which attendance at church, sports, Scouts, and Eagle Scout projects were required, as was summer reading. When he was in high school, his father became the Director of the Georgia Conservancy, but learning about and living in the environment was already a part of the Phillips family life. They traveled all over Georgia and Florida following their love of nature-based tourism. I can remember, once upon a time, riding on the glass-bottom boat at Wakulla Springs. Our tour guide would tell us to look down to watch Henry the Pole-Vaulting Fish. At the bottom, near the diving platform, you could see a sh swimming over a little bar. Its sad to me that the sign at Wakulla Springs says no glass bottom boat rides due to dark water. Phillips began his career as a high school English teacher before he was called to the ministry. He earned a Master of Divinity degree and is an ordained Presbyterian minister. His pastorates have included youth ministry, Christian education, preaching and pastoral care at one small and three large churches in the South. Since 2001, Taylor has served as the chaplain for the Westminster Oaks Retirement Community in Tallahassee, and ministers to the residents, staff, and families. Phillips holds a second masters degree in counseling psychology, has taken the family law mediation training course, and worked in residential mental health treatment centers as a part of his education. He has 30plus years of experience counseling families and engaging in con ict management as a part of his day job. Last month, the director of Westminster Oaks bestowed on Phillips the highest employee award in the company, the Legendary Service Award, for his work collecting and publishing the life stories of residents. Phillips has enjoyed a lifelong passion for soccer, organizing teams and programs at every age level from children, youth, and college to adult amateur, for women, men, and coed teams. When their son Isaac was 13, Phillips became the organizing coach of the U-13 Bobcats, the first team from Wakulla County to join the Top of Florida club in Tallahassee. Issues, as Phillips sees them: Hidden Taxes Phillips believes in working toward reducing the taxes which were hidden alphabet-soup on utility bills (until recently). At rst, my Talquin bill listed PST twice, once for electricity and once for water. How does the average person know they are being taxed? When you turn on your lights, cook your dinner, or ush your toilet, youre paying a tax, Phillips said. Access Everyone needs to be invited into the government process. Hosting workshops at 5:01 p.m. when 30 percent of the working adult population is in Tallahassee at the moment is a clear message that it doesnt matter what people think, Phillips said. Our current county government has failed to educate our citizens on the issues, invite people into the decisionmaking process, develop a truly comprehensive long range vision and plan, or follow through with commitments to any plan currently in place. Leadership It doesnt have to mean being an ideologue. I understand that a leader must listen, and make hard decisions. I will listen to what the people have to say about many issues, and I also will listen to my conscience and then vote what I think is best for the county, Phillips said. Local Control I believe in government that is respectful of the will of the people, Phillips said. As much as anything else, when the current commission announced that there was no intention to give in to that crowd or to listen to what the people wanted, to compromise or to hear the voice of the people, on one issue after another, then I was moved to action. Realignment of 319 I am not in favor of spending $10 million of taxpayers money on an intersection that will not be required for a decade and when it is needed, it will have to be redone. I am especially concerned that the additional funding to move the existing underground utilities approximately $400,000 today is an unfunded mandate that falls on the shoulders of the citizens of Wakulla. Phillips opponent, Commissioner Merritt, has voted in favor of the plan at every opportunity. Phillips is in favor of four-laning 319 as a needed hurricane evacuation route and as a major commuting route to the airport and to Tallahassee. Economic Development and Natural Resource Protection People from all over the world travel here to see and interact with the natural world from a busload of Westminster Oaks residents coming to St. Marks to see butter ies and have lunch at Wakullas restaurants, to shing and scuba diving. As the precious resources we have here continue to become even more precious, our citizens can reap the bene ts but only if we protect what we have. We need sustainable industries that create jobs for ourselves and our future. In Genesis, we are charged to replenish the earth as well as rule over it, and we are falling behind on our duty to replenish our world. It shows. As a result, Phillips thinks a debate over the precise width of the buffer zone has been allowed to grow and fester throughout our community. This debate keeps moving further away from actual data or problemsolving, becoming another us vs. them argument, even though smart, rightsized development can be achieved while sustaining the values and charms of Wakulla. My father lives in Louisiana. When he and his wife come for Christmas, we go to Wakulla Springs, every year. He always wants to go up to the top of the diving platform where he can take pictures of the manatees gathering below us. Even in the wintertime, we are joined up there by tourists from China and Germany, and then we all go in to the replace at the lodge. We live in paradise, and the world is nding out. We cant afford to mess it up. Taylor is a registered Democrat. His wife, Pam, is a registered Republican. They love each other very much and believe that as a county we can learn to get along too. Taylor Phillips is running for county commission PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS / MARKWALLHEISER.COMCandidate Taylor Phillips with his wife Pam. 000JF7S Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 850926-1841REGISTER AT GED.COMWakulla Adult Education Testing CenterCall Misty for InformationNOW OPEN! From Front PageIt costs money to keep Wakulla County safe and locked up, while we feed and clothe our inmates, Creel said. We have attempted to do the best job we can at the lowest possible cost. We are always looking for ways to enhance the way we do things at the sheriffs ofce and save money in the long run. Edwards said since ad valorem taxes decreased, all departments took a hard hit, and the sheriffs department expenses were continuing to climb. He credited Creel with making the tough choices to cut the departments budget. He had to do something to slow that down which he did, Edwards said. All the cuts that were made were 100 percent the sheriffs decisions. The board said you have a nancial problem; youve got to x it. I understand its tough for a constitutional of cer to do cuts. But there is no other funding out there to give to the sheriffs department, unless we were to cut out things like the library or recreation. Thats where we are. Creel said the cuts have come at a dif cult time, especially when it comes to retaining good personnel. We are in desperate need of dollars to support step salary increases in order to adjust salaries for years of experience, Creel said. With no pay raises in a ve-year period, we have lost too many trained and certi ed employees. Turnover and retraining is very costly and something we must act upon to prevent this from becoming an epidemic among the employees. All efforts in the future will be directed at retaining these valuable assets our employees. Edwards said if the WCSO would embrace the Fine and Forfeiture Fund, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Five years from now the sheriffs department will have enough money in their fund for different things they want to outside of what the countys doing, Edwards said. Its a matter of taking the pain now to get to the reward. They have to over attrition and over time continue to whittle this down some. If they operate their fund correctly, and continually trim down, they will actually build up enough money in the fund to be able to start increasing the salaries of their deputies. They need to take a strong look at that and they are. Edwards said if the WCSO will also continue to keep an eye on the jail bed revenue, he sees a positive outcome. The WCSO responded to a request made by the county commission to assist with efforts to decrease the reliance on the uctuating and uncertain jail bed revenue. The WCSO reported the county turned to the department for the full burden of the revenue de cit. A day doesnt go by that we arent watching the federal jail bed rental gures, Creel said. The WCSO must maintain a bed rental count of at least 85 detainees from the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency in order to make budget this year. Due to the efforts of many, the jail bed rental statistics have been increasing and we are expected to reach within $50,000 of the budget. At one point this year, loss projections were as high as $550,000. The reduction of the ICE detainee bed rentals was closely tied to the federal government shutdown which occurred early last year. WCSO officials said they are continuing efforts with ICE to negotiate a fixed or minimum jail bed contract. So far, these talks remain only at the discussion stage, as the federal government prefers not to commit to a speci c number of bed rentals. WCSO has also returned money to the county commission each year from federal jail bed rental. These types of jail bed rental fluctuations are what the county is trying to avoid, Creel said. We have played our part with these cuts, but trimming back has increased the workload for all divisions. With an increase of workload, its even more vital that we have trained and experienced employees. Edwards said the Board of County Commissioners understands the WCSOs frustrations. But we have to take care of every department, and every fund, Edwards said. When we have extra money at the end of the year, we are willing to roll that toward the Fine and Forfeiture Fund to help their bottom line. We also have other funds from time to time that need help as well. But right now, all funds across the board are in the black for the rst time in recent history. There is pain all over, but at the end of the day were where we need to be to move into the future.County, sheri jostle over budget

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From Page 2 Now there are more than 600 sinkholes in the database, and the system has not been mapped all the way to Spring Creek yet. At the start of the hike, Jamison said the water in the sinkholes will go from tannic brown colors to crystal clear. The first holes visited on the hike included Lagerhead Sinks 1 and 2, New Years Sinks 1 and 2. They often occur in multiples or pairs, Jamison said. There is a good chance the sinkholes are connected. These are kind of dark, unlike the ones closer to the cave system. Jamison said having so many sinkholes in Wakulla County is a blessing. He said sinkholes occur by either subsidence or collapse, which can happen instantly, or over thousands of years. The group also perused Trench Sink, which had a velvety layer of duckweed that was like a ne, green couture fabric. Jamison said duckweed is the worlds smallest owering aquatic plant, which makes a superb water lter blocking sunlight to prevent algae growth. Other sinks on the tour included Christmas Sink (which is actually a swallet, or a sink that takes water into the cave system), Window Sink, Fern Sink, Fish Hole Sink, Cream Sink and Venture Sink (also known as Smokeys Chimney), and many more. He said that all wetland features like sinkholes do not necessarily have a name usually just the ones frequented by swimmers and divers. Upcoming Friends of Wakulla Springs events: The Annual Friends Waterfront Pot Luck is Sunday, Oct. 19 beginning at 5:30 p.m. with a dusk boat ride on the river. Free to members, or sign up and become a member at the event. Springs Serenade Creature from the Blues Lagoon will be Saturday, Oct. 25 from 5:30 to 10:30 p.m. with the Jeff Jensen Band; Jamie Eubanks Band, ACME Rhythm and Blues Band. Advance tickets are $12, or $15 at the gate. Visit: wakullasprings.org/newsevents/ for tickets. Waterlogged: Manatees in Wetlands will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 1 at San Marcos de Apalache State Park, St. Marks. Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARJ LAW I know where theres a gun! my 4-year-old son said to me when we visited my parents one day long ago. No, you dont, I reply con dently. There are no guns here. Oh, yes, there is! he crows triumphantly. I seed two in the closet! Show me, I ask, and we tromp upstairs. Sure enough, two guns nestled against my fathers white shirts and neckties. My son followed me downstairs as I go to locate my father. Dad, I said, Please put your guns somewhere where it is impossible for my boys to get at them. Dad replied, They touch them and Ill tan their butts! I think this is the only time I ever sassed my father. No! Absolutely Not! Youre not going to spank my kids because you didnt put your guns away! I said furiously. You can take them to your of ce I dont care where you take them so long as my boys are safe! He was ticked. He stormed out of the room, and up the stairs. I heard the closet door slam, the front door slam, and the car leave the driveway. I snuck upstairs and opened the closet door. Sure enough, the guns were gone. He never said another word about it, and pretty soon everyone acted normal again. This is my greatest fear of gun ownership. I know that my guns belong to me. They are my responsibility. If a young person plays with my gun in my house, Im accountable. Once a young mother was working at a project in my home while I was away. Without my knowledge, she brought her daughter to the house. When I found out, I was so mad I was shaking. Theres a gun in the house, I informed her. You should never have brought her without talking to me rst. Its all right, she said. I was with her the whole time and she was doing her homework. No, its not all right! This was making me nuts. Do you mean to tell me that you didnt go to the bathroom for ve hours? Well, yes. She was honest and agreed that she did go to the bathroom. And she did shut the bathroom door. So, for that time period, she could not have been certain that her child stayed in her chair doing homework. Even upset, I was fairly sure that the child had indeed been very well behaved and didnt explore the house. But, as gun owners, can we take that chance? Im not willing to. Its easier to lock up guns than to worry about them. There are locks for the guns themselves, and metal locking storage cabinets for guns. You can keep your rearms in locked rooms, in locked cabinets. You can store them in a safe place away from your home. If you keep out only the one gun you use for protection, then thats the only one you need to worry about when you have family, friends or visitors come to visit. Then you only have that one to lock up. When women get together at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce range on Wednesday mornings, gun safety is a major topic of conversation. We discuss safety at the range, and we share with each other how we keep our guns safe at home as well. Gun safety knows no one location and all gun owners are responsible for their guns.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsGuns around family and visitors HOME ON THE RANGE www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 13 The following report was submitted by Duane Treadon. This past weekend our Flotilla had the honor of hosting the Divisions Fall meeting. This is where the leadership of all ve otillas in the Division get together with the division Commander, Vice Commander and staff. Through the efforts of member Dave Rabon, we were fortunate to secure the use of the meeting and training room at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. This was an excellent venue for a meeting with an added bonus of an expansive exhibition area where members learned about regional ecosystems and habitats during breaks. Many thanks to Anita Grove, Coastal Training Program Coordinator, for her assistance throughout the day. Her hospitality made our meeting all that more special. The meeting itself started at 10:00 with a training session covering end of the year tasks that Flotilla Commanders need to know. Division staff of cer of member training Lynn Mott and Pensacola flotilla staff of cer of nance Ed Warren explained the importance for accounting for Flotilla property and maintaining a balanced nancial statement. The next training session was covered by Division Vice Commander T.J. Del Bello, who spoke on the importance of having a viable and active mentoring program for new members. As with any organization we see many people come who are interested in joining but leave after a short time. The key, as T.J. explained it, is to help them nd their interest and then connect them with members who can mentor them in those program areas. A recognized concern with the Auxiliary is the long time it takes to process a new member application. Due to stringent governmental background checks it can take sometimes take six-plus months for a new member to get the nal approval of membership. To aid in this down time recent changes in the rules now allow members in the application process to take an active role in Flotilla actives and begin working on their quali cations for certain program areas. This is a great improvement over past rules where a new member had to wait until nal membership approval before starting program quali cations. The morning training session was followed with a lunch prepared and presented by our members Norma and Phil Hill, Fran Keating, Ron Eudy, Dave Rabon, Raye Crews, Mike Harrison and Chuck Hickman. During this time some attending took advantage and toured the exhibition area of the research reserve. There they saw various displays that told the story of the importance of the regional ecosystems. After lunch the Division Fall Business meeting began. The item of most importance and interest was the Division Elections for 2015. At all levels of the Auxiliary, Flotilla, Division, District, and National elections are held every year to put in place a leader and vice leader. Up for reelection was Division Commander Eric DeVuyst and Vice Commander T.J Del Bello. While a Vice Commander is not term limited, Commanders can only serve a maximum of two years in a row before having to step down. Eric and T.J. were reelected to their current offices. We wish them well and look forward to continuing to work with them and the staff they appoint in 2015. Of note: Flotillas cannot hold their leadership elections for Flotilla Commander and Vice Commander until after the Division elections. Flotilla 12 will hold its elections during the November meeting. Once again we want to give a nal plug and thanks to the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. Visit them at 108 Island Dr., on the left just before the bridge to St. George Island. Hours are Tuesday-Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux. net then contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources, Raye Crews, at Rayec@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at Duanet@uscgaux.net. If youre interested in a free vessel examination, send an email to our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Examinations, Steve Hults, at Steveh@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe boating is no accident Be prepared, not a statistic! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton & Travis Kersting Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Toxic algae, a threat to our shores? This summer brought a bountiful harvest of fresh sh to our local spear shing community. While late to get started due to the heavy early summer rains, the water cleared and warmed up compared to the last two summers. Everything was looking up for a strong fall season of spear shing and open water diving offshore. That all changed, sometime mid-September, when reports reached us of a toxic algal bloom in the Gulf and dead sh oating on the surface. The organism responsible for red tide is called Karenia brevis. This bloom has been observed extending in patches from the northeast Florida Gulf of Mexico down to St Petersburg. This algae can kill fish, cause health problems to swimmers, and is known for discoloring the surface water with a red or brown color. The state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has a website with an up-to-date map of where these algae bloom patches are taking place off our coastal boundary. They report the bloom is concentrated closer to Hernando County, with many grouper, snapper, hog sh and crabs oating on the surface. K. brevis is a microscopic, single-celled, photosynthetic organism whos population can explode under the right light and nutrient conditions frequently along Florida coastal waters. This algae naturally produces a suite of potent neurotoxins which cause gastrointestinal and neurological problems in other organisms (including people) and are responsible for large die-offs of marine organisms and seabirds. Some sources say Florida red tide blooms are about 10to 15-fold more abundant than they were 50 years ago. Red Tide outbreaks have been known to occur since the arrival of the Spanish explorers of the 15th century, although not nearly as common, or for as lengthy a duration as they occur now. Patches of alga blooms are routinely observed offshore along the west coast of Florida this time of the year. The University of South Florida and the FWC are collaborating to track these patches and develop a predictive model to better advise the public as to what to expect. Satellite images from the University of South Florida show only the northernmost section of the bloom extending offshore between Franklin and Citrus counties approximately 5 to 35 miles offshore, dependent on location. They are currently tracking patches of the algae southward between Wakulla and Taylor counties and east-southeast of Franklin County which are predicted to continue to move west. Offshore of Pasco and Hernando counties, the surface patch is predicted to move northwest, and bottom waters are predicted to move northeast along the coast. At the moment the bloom is not reported to be on our local beaches but offshore divers are still reporting oating dead sh to us. Fishermen and swimmers should stay informed before heading out for a day on the water until this seasonal menace completes its cycle. I wonder if the Red Tide affects the booming Lion sh population? Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Oct 9, 14 Fri Oct 10, 14 Sat Oct 11, 14 Sun Oct 12, 14 Mon Oct 13, 14 Tue Oct 14, 14 Wed Oct 15, 14 Date 4.0 ft. 2:49 AM 4.0 ft. 3:20 AM 4.0 ft. 3:51 AM 3.8 ft. 4:21 AM 3.6 ft. 4:53 AM 3.4 ft. 5:29 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:25 AM -0.2 ft. 10:07 AM -0.0 ft. 10:49 AM 0.2 ft. 11:32 AM 0.5 ft. 12:20 PM 0.9 ft. 1:17 PM 1.9 ft. 12:40 AM Low 4.0 ft. 3:49 PM 3.8 ft. 4:32 PM 3.5 ft. 5:15 PM 3.2 ft. 6:00 PM 3.0 ft. 6:50 PM 2.7 ft. 7:52 PM 3.1 ft. 6:18 AM High 1.1 ft. 9:30 PM 1.3 ft. 10:03 PM 1.5 ft. 10:35 PM 1.7 ft. 11:09 PM 1.8 ft. 11:48 PM 1.1 ft. 2:31 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:12 PM High Thu Oct 9, 14 Fri Oct 10, 14 Sat Oct 11, 14 Sun Oct 12, 14 Mon Oct 13, 14 Tue Oct 14, 14 Wed Oct 15, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 2:41 AM 3.0 ft. 3:12 AM 3.0 ft. 3:43 AM 2.9 ft. 4:13 AM 2.7 ft. 4:45 AM 2.5 ft. 5:21 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:36 AM -0.1 ft. 10:18 AM -0.0 ft. 11:00 AM 0.2 ft. 11:43 AM 0.4 ft. 12:31 PM 0.6 ft. 1:28 PM 1.4 ft. 12:51 AM Low 3.0 ft. 3:41 PM 2.8 ft. 4:24 PM 2.6 ft. 5:07 PM 2.4 ft. 5:52 PM 2.2 ft. 6:42 PM 2.1 ft. 7:44 PM 2.3 ft. 6:10 AM High 0.8 ft. 9:41 PM 0.9 ft. 10:14 PM 1.1 ft. 10:46 PM 1.2 ft. 11:20 PM 1.3 ft. 11:59 PM 0.8 ft. 2:42 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:04 PM High Thu Oct 9, 14 Fri Oct 10, 14 Sat Oct 11, 14 Sun Oct 12, 14 Mon Oct 13, 14 Tue Oct 14, 14 Wed Oct 15, 14 Date 3.8 ft. 3:25 AM 3.7 ft. 3:56 AM 3.7 ft. 4:27 AM 3.6 ft. 4:57 AM High -0.2 ft. 10:29 AM -0.2 ft. 11:11 AM -0.0 ft. 11:53 AM 0.2 ft. 12:36 PM 1.5 ft. 12:13 AM 1.6 ft. 12:52 AM 1.8 ft. 1:44 AM Low 3.7 ft. 4:25 PM 3.5 ft. 5:08 PM 3.3 ft. 5:51 PM 3.0 ft. 6:36 PM 3.4 ft. 5:29 AM 3.1 ft. 6:05 AM 2.9 ft. 6:54 AM High 1.0 ft. 10:34 PM 1.2 ft. 11:07 PM 1.3 ft. 11:39 PM 0.5 ft. 1:24 PM 0.8 ft. 2:21 PM 1.0 ft. 3:35 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:26 PM 2.6 ft. 8:28 PM 2.5 ft. 9:48 PM High Thu Oct 9, 14 Fri Oct 10, 14 Sat Oct 11, 14 Sun Oct 12, 14 Mon Oct 13, 14 Tue Oct 14, 14 Wed Oct 15, 14 Date 3.2 ft. 2:33 AM 3.1 ft. 3:04 AM 3.1 ft. 3:35 AM 3.0 ft. 4:05 AM 2.8 ft. 4:37 AM 2.6 ft. 5:13 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:04 AM -0.2 ft. 9:46 AM -0.0 ft. 10:28 AM 0.2 ft. 11:11 AM 0.5 ft. 11:59 AM 0.8 ft. 12:56 PM 1.9 ft. 12:19 AM Low 3.1 ft. 3:33 PM 3.0 ft. 4:16 PM 2.7 ft. 4:59 PM 2.5 ft. 5:44 PM 2.3 ft. 6:34 PM 2.1 ft. 7:36 PM 2.4 ft. 6:02 AM High 1.1 ft. 9:09 PM 1.3 ft. 9:42 PM 1.5 ft. 10:14 PM 1.6 ft. 10:48 PM 1.8 ft. 11:27 PM 1.1 ft. 2:10 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:56 PM High Thu Oct 9, 14 Fri Oct 10, 14 Sat Oct 11, 14 Sun Oct 12, 14 Mon Oct 13, 14 Tue Oct 14, 14 Wed Oct 15, 14 Date 4.1 ft. 2:46 AM 4.1 ft. 3:17 AM 4.0 ft. 3:48 AM 3.9 ft. 4:18 AM 3.7 ft. 4:50 AM 3.5 ft. 5:26 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:22 AM -0.2 ft. 10:04 AM -0.0 ft. 10:46 AM 0.2 ft. 11:29 AM 0.6 ft. 12:17 PM 0.9 ft. 1:14 PM 2.1 ft. 12:37 AM Low 4.1 ft. 3:46 PM 3.9 ft. 4:29 PM 3.6 ft. 5:12 PM 3.3 ft. 5:57 PM 3.0 ft. 6:47 PM 2.8 ft. 7:49 PM 3.2 ft. 6:15 AM High 1.2 ft. 9:27 PM 1.4 ft. 10:00 PM 1.6 ft. 10:32 PM 1.8 ft. 11:06 PM 1.9 ft. 11:45 PM 1.2 ft. 2:28 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:09 PM High Thu Oct 9, 14 Fri Oct 10, 14 Sat Oct 11, 14 Sun Oct 12, 14 Mon Oct 13, 14 Tue Oct 14, 14 Wed Oct 15, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 2:19 AM 3.1 ft. 2:44 AM 3.2 ft. 3:12 AM 3.2 ft. 3:44 AM 3.1 ft. 4:22 AM 3.0 ft. 5:08 AM High 0.4 ft. 8:46 AM 0.3 ft. 9:29 AM 0.3 ft. 10:13 AM 0.3 ft. 11:00 AM 0.4 ft. 11:53 AM 0.6 ft. 12:55 PM 1.9 ft. 12:35 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:11 PM 3.0 ft. 5:05 PM 2.8 ft. 5:58 PM 2.7 ft. 6:55 PM 2.7 ft. 7:54 PM 2.6 ft. 8:56 PM 2.8 ft. 6:04 AM High 1.5 ft. 8:52 PM 1.7 ft. 9:21 PM 1.8 ft. 9:53 PM 1.8 ft. 10:30 PM 1.9 ft. 11:22 PM 0.7 ft. 2:03 PM Low 2.6 ft. 9:54 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 9 Oct. 15First Oct. 31 Full Nov. 6 Last Oct. 15 New Oct. 232:06 am-4:06 am 2:33 pm-4:33 pm 8:44 am-9:44 am 8:16 pm-9:16 pm 3:00 am-5:00 am 3:27 pm-5:27 pm 9:47 am-10:47 am 9:02 pm-10:02 pm 3:54 am-5:54 am 4:21 pm-6:21 pm 10:47 am-11:47 am 9:50 pm-10:50 pm 4:47 am-6:47 am 5:13 pm-7:13 pm 11:44 am-12:44 pm 10:39 pm-11:39 pm 5:39 am-7:39 am 6:05 pm-8:05 pm 12:36 pm-1:36 pm 11:31 pm-12:31 am 6:30 am-8:30 am 6:54 pm-8:54 pm --:-----:-1:25 pm-2:25 pm 7:18 am-9:18 am 7:42 pm-9:42 pm 12:22 am-1:22 am 2:09 pm-3:09 pm Better Good Average Average Average Average Average7:35 am 7:13 pm 8:17 pm 8:45 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:35 am 7:11 pm 9:03 pm 9:48 am 7:36 am 7:10 pm 9:51 pm 10:48 am 7:37 am 7:09 pm 10:41 pm 11:45 am 7:37 am 7:08 pm 11:32 pm 12:38 pm 7:38 am 7:07 pm --:-1:26 pm 7:39 am 7:06 pm 12:24 am 2:10 pm94% 86% 79% 73% 66% 59% 53%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Karenia brevis, the toxic algae responsible for red tide. Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 www.coastalgems.comCrawfordville, FL850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233

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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSON of the Extension Of ceOctober is a month to enjoy. The weather is cooling, many native wild owers are putting on a brilliant display of color and most gardeners have their autumn crops in the ground and growing. Some crops, such as tomatoes and green onions, are already delivering. A few, like sweet peppers, are continuing to produce proli cally into their sixth month. Local Satsuma trees are loaded with green orbs and many branches are drooping with anticipation of the sweet and easy to peel fruit which will ripen in about six to eight weeks. Another delightful fruit from the east is ready for picking and eating today. The Japanese persimmon is a species related to native persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), but originated in China and Japan. This tree from east Asia is capable of growing to about 30 feet at maturity. This is an excellent tree for fruit production and ornamental use as a specimen in the home landscape. Unlike other fruit trees native to those northern latitudes, the persimmon has very limited chill hour requirements and fruits well here. The tree is quite a striking sight when leaves have fallen in autumn, displaying the bright yelloworange fruit throughout the canopy. The distinct appearance cannot be confused with any other fruit tree in the area. Similar to the native persimmon, its preference is for a moist, well-drained soil in full sun locations. The tree has good drought tolerance and will ourish in most Wakulla County soils. The Japanese persimmon develops an attractive fall color much like Florida maples. The circular canopy and open branches make a distinct contrast to many other trees in the landscape or orchard. The placement of the tree can be problematic because the two to four inch diameter fruit can be a big mess when they fall from the tree. A good alternative is to pick the fruit off the tree when it is mature, but not quite ripe. Much like tomatoes and bananas, persimmons will ripen off the tree if they have been picked mature green. They should be left at room temperature, but not refrigerated or placed in direct sunlight. The ripe fruit is very sweet and juicy. The avor is unique and the fruits texture is similar to an overripe banana, but more moist. The example in the UF/IFAS demonstration orchard is a fuyu cultivar and is about 15 years old. They produce light orange persimmons when the fruit is mature and soften when ripe with a yield of about ten bushels per tree. Some sources indicate they may be consumed when mature, but not quite ripe. At that stage they are dryer and may have a hint of astringency. While not the best selection as a street or parking lot tree, the Japanese persimmon is an excellent selection in an ornamental landscape or in a dooryard orchard. If the tree is primarily an ornamental, locate it in a loose, low-growing groundcover so dropping fruit will be hidden from view in the foliage of the groundcover. To learn more about growing persimmons in Wakulla County, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla. ifas.u .edu or call 850926-3931.Les Harrison is UF/ IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director and Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent. Pa Pa Pa Pa a ge ge ge ge ge g g 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 TH TH TH TH TH E E E E E A WA WA WA WA U KU KU KU KU LL LL LL A A NE NE N Green Scene By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING In many of todays households, family meals and family members involved in its preparation has become a thing of the past. We all know the reasons activities, busy schedules, and different food preferences. Remember when we were not offered choices at meal time but instead realized that if we did not eat what was offered, you didnt eat anything that meal. Now we seem to cater to individual preferences instead of the cooks choice. I also have fond members of time spent at the table discussing the days events. I keenly remember my father asking what each of his children had learned at school that day and when, on most occasions we shrugged our shoulders and replied that we had learned nothing. His standard reply was that perhaps attending was a waste of time. We agreed and then we were on to the next conversation. In recent years, I have been promoting increased time spent together at meal time and while working together in the kitchen. Research suggests that having dinner as a family on a regular basis has positive effects on the development of adolescents. Family dinner have been linked to a lower risk of obesity, substance abuse, eating disorders and increased chance of graduating from high school. Families who have regular family dinners are most likely to understand, acknowledge, and follow boundaries than those who do not eat dinner together. Self-esteem, motivation and a decrease in high-risk behaviors are all related to the amount of time spent with family, especially during family meals. The Liberty County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent and I invite your organization to join us for a fun and delicious class, Rediscover Bread Baking and Jam-Making. Over time it seems that kitchen skills have been lost, so we designed a class that teaches or sharpen food preservation and bread baking skills. In addition, it is our desire to see families enjoying time together in the kitchen. In the class the family will preserve berry jam and make a loaf of yeast bread to take home. One adult and at least one child will make a family. Family members do not have to be related; consider adopting a child or a child adopting a grandparent for the event. We ask that families not have more than three people. The total groups should have a minimum of 14 people with at least 7 of those being adults. Maximum group size is 28 people. The cost is $15 per family and we will provide all supplies. The class can be taught at the local extension ofce or a location of your choice that has appropriate kitchen space. You choose a date and time (day or evening) for your organization from Jan. 20 to Jan. 31 for two and a half hours. Let me know your preference and we will be our best to accommodate your organization. Think about a youth and adult group working together. If you af liate with an adult service group, how about adopting a classroom of students? I would love to see an intergenerational experience between children and grandparents. Picture a father and daughter working together and offering an opportunity for positive interaction? We are open to travel to any location in Wakulla County and are willing to host your group at the Extension of ce. Baking bread and making preserves is not my primary goal. The primary goal is to provide opportunities for family members to work together and while doing so, enjoying conversation, storytelling and creating memories. Each family will be presented with a picture in full aproning for a future holiday card. There are limited times available during the rst launch of this experience so talk this up and see if an organization in which you af liate would be interested. As you consider my motivation for this activity, be reminded that families are the most important in uence in developing the individuals within. The greatest in uence is not from schools, churches, or peers. Families must work to strengthen their bonds. Meal time is one time and place to provide this opportunity. Have family dinners at least four to ve times a week; turn off the television, radio, MP3 players and the like during dinner; enjoy positive conversation meal and spend at least an hour eating dinner, conversing, preparing and cleaning up together. Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent.Quality family time from workshopPHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPeas in the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Demonstration Garden.Persimmons o er sweet fruit, distinct landscape contrast In the garden now: In the garden now:Persimmons Persimmons A MarkNet Alliance Member GAL AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388 Bidding Ends, Friday, October 28 at 4:00PMOffered Online Exclusively @ RowellAuctions.com 829 Acres Offered DividedExcellent Home Sites, Cropland & Timberland Quitman County, GA Beautiful Home Sites Potential Pasture Land 124 +/Acres of Cultivatable Land Excellent Recreational Tracts Hunting & Fishing Lake Eufaula Frontage Deeded Boat Ramp Access to Lake Eufaula Convenient to Albany, GA, Columbus, GA & Dothan, AL For Detailed Property Info Visit RowellAuctions.com The best walk-in tub just got better with breakthrough technology! Introducing the all new Safe Step Walk-In T ub featuring heated seating and two new foot massaging jets. Finally, our Walk-In Tub with a Heated Seat!NOW enjoy warm comfort NEW PRODUCT Safe Step Tubs have received the Ease-of-Use Commendation from the Arthritis Foundation MADE IN THE U.S.A.WITH PRIDE For more information call now1-800-912-4104 Financing available with approved credit. Special to The NewsSix days before Halloween, the Saturday, Oct. 25 event at Wakulla Springs State Park will do its best to raise the dead from their graves. The last in the Friends of Wakulla Springs benefit Spring Serenade series begins at 5:30 p.m. on the green at the park. Called Creature from the Blues Lagoon this years foot stomping extravaganza features three of the hottest blues and soul bands around. Local favorite, the Jamie Eubanks Band begins the evening. The Tallahassee native and his bassist Kevan McCann and drummer James Lewis had the audience on the edge of their feet at the 2013 International Memphis Blues Challenge, A steady local following is fast buying the advance tickets ($12 at wakullasprings.org) to this open-air concert. With the announcement that the Jeff Jensen Band from Memphis also will make a return appearance, blues lovers wont be disappointed. Headlining the event is the Acme Rhythm and Blues band featuring the FZB Horns. It is no secret that some of the Friends of Wakulla Springs members regularly dance and shake the night away when Acme plays at the VFW in Tallahassee. Seeing that over 60-crowd shake and dance should be reason enough for anyone to come. But Acme Rhythm and Blues has been shakin booty for 20-plus years. The rst two bands bring musical connections to a variety of blues styles. Acme R&B adds a blend of old-school rockin soul, Motown, and jazz. Shoes are optional. Wakulla Springs lodge will sell food and beverages outside at the Azalea Pavilion, including a cash bar. Advance tickets: $12, $15 at the entrance with free park admission. Bring your own lawnchair. Visit www.wakullasprings.org, Events, to purchase tickets.Blues fundraiser set for Wakulla Springs

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 15 < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked at the Florida Wild Mammal Association yardsale fundraiser:If you could be any wild animal, what would you be?CHERYLL OLAHWAKULLA TAX COLLECTORA little squirrel so I could be bright eyed and bushy tailed. They seem so happy. DAVIE LATIL STUDENTA deer that gets to live at the Florida Wild Mammal Association. In the woods, but protected and taken care of. JESSICA BEATTY FWMA MEDICAL ROOMA River Otter! They are my favorite animal. An owl, my spirit animal in Scouts. They are wise, powerful, enjoy company, but dont need it. They are an apex predator, but avoid con icts where possible. SETH WAGNERFWCNATHAN GREENCARPENTERA fox! Clever like a fox. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Pirates Landing Free Appetizer of your choice Ouzts Too Grilled Shrimp w/rice dinnerWinner Bobbie Connell drawn from Pirates Landing in St. Marks Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED Sandwiches Crab PattysSoft Shell Crabs Grouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator Bites Softshell Crab Are InDinners Ice Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days y s y s y s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant LOCAL SEAFOOD785 Port Leon Drive, St Marks Wed. Fri. 11am until Sat. Sun. Open for Breakfast at 6:30amWe have Gator & A Full Bar 850 925-64487968 Coastal Hwy. 98 Newport Historic Bridge WED.HOME COOKED MEALS THURS.PICKIN & GRINNINOUZTSTOO.COMFOOD BEVERAGEENTERTAINMENT$4 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Farrington Law Ofce SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW From Front PageLast summer volunteers and the community worked together to offer a week long boat building camp free to youth in the area, who would normally not be able to afford this kind of camp experience. Volunteer Julia Knight secured donations from local businesses, like Poseys, Crums, and SeaTow, to insure the youth would have lunch every day, and new tools to put in the toolboxes they made to take home at the end of the week. However, the Big Bend Maritime Center is at a crossroads. Wakulla County owns the buildings where the center is currently housed, along with the boat building camp. However, both buildings are in need of repairs and renovations. The citizens of Wakulla County are being asked to attend two citizen forums being held in October and November, in order to hear the BBMCs long term proposal and to view an architectural model of a future BBMC park, that includes a water park and an interactive museum. Heading up the program at the BBMC currently is Roger Pinholster, a retired educator from Tallahassee, with a passion for maritime history and teaching, and a vision for the long term potential of the BBMC. Our main mission now is to nd out what the citizens of Wakulla County want the Maritime Center to be and do, says Pinholster. If we can get a signi cant level of commitments, some large but many very small, then we can use that as leverage to obtain funding from larger groups, agencies, and most importantly as match for grant funding. Two community forums are planned for citizen input. At both events, citizens will be asked to look at the plans that have been created, and to offer their own ideas for the BBMC. The rst forum is scheduled for Oct. 23, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Welcome Center in Panacea; and the second will be held Nov. 11, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Wakulla Public Library. Our small band of board members is putting in an extraordinary amount of time and energy into creating a Maritime Center that adds to the quality of peoples lives. But we need the existing community leaders to step up, lead the design and funding efforts, says Pinholster. They need to take charge of making sure this 5.61 acres with two houses and a pier on the waterfront nally reaches the potential it has always had. If these efforts are not successful, there is a very good chance that the county will turn this site, and its assists, back to the state, says Pinholster. The property will sit idle, the buildings and pier will deteriorate, and no one will bene t, except the feral cats and raccoons. The Seafood Festival is an annual event, once called the Mighty Mullet Festival, and put on by the BBMC. But the larger goal is to get the community involved in the future of the Big Bend Maritime Museum, and its future plans. The event is free to the public. Big Bend Seafood Festival going all out

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Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Saturday, Sept. 27, Kendrick Davonche Franklin, 37, an inmate at the Wakulla County Jail, was arrested for battery after striking another jail inmate. The 23-year-old victim was struck in the head and kicked in the chest during an altercation in the pod. WCSO medical staff treated the victim who was also transported to Capital Regional Medical Center for an examination. Franklin was placed in segregation housing. Detention Deputy Scott Delbeato investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce:THURSDAY, SEPT. 25 Bernard M. Gardner of Panacea reported a theft at Port Panacea Village. He observed two juveniles riding bicycles around the entrance of the subdivision while they placed something on a bike. Contact was made with the juveniles and six post tops were recovered from the entrance sign. The post tops are valued at $100. The juveniles, ages 13 and 14, were identified and charges are pending. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. The WCSO Narcotics Unit responded to a location in the southern portion of Wakulla County. The unit spoke to a citizen who issued a complaint about four marijuana plants growing near their property line. The plants were in plastic planters and were eight inches tall. The plants were pulled from their containers and submitted to the Property and Evidence Division for destruction. David Denmark of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was stolen from the victims home. Later during the shift, Sgt. Jeremy Johnston observed the stolen vehicle on Spring Creek Highway near Walkers Cemetery. The vehicle was transported to the WCSO Impound Yard for processing. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks also investigated.FRIDAY, SEPT. 26 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A female subject was observed taking cosmetics from the store without paying for them. The cost of the items was $22. The suspect ran from the store and left a companion behind. A 33-year-old Apalachicola suspect has been identi ed and a warrant is being issued for shoplifting. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. Shannon Larson of Amazing Mail Solutions reported a suspicious package that had a strong smell of drugs. Drug paraphernalia was discovered inside the box. After interviewing the suspect, the paraphernalia was seized for destruction and the man was not charged. Deputy Adam Pendris and the WCSO Narcotics Unit investigated. Deputy Roy Gunnarsson was operating stationary radar on U.S. Highway 319 and observed a vehicle traveling at an unlawful speed. The driver could not produce a vehicle registration or driver license. The drivers license was permanently cancelled. April Wimberley Arrington, 40, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving with a suspended or revoked license with knowledge. She was given a verbal warning for unlawful speeding.SATURDAY, SEPT. 27 Ronald Weiss of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A motorist damaged a tree and fence on the victims property. Later, Dylan Spears Clark, 23, of Crawfordville reported striking a tree on the victims property. He was arrested for leaving the scene of an accident involving property damage. Damage was estimated at $3,200. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Wilbur Harris of Crawfordville reported that someone damaged his property overnight. A tree was damaged by a vehicle and was valued at $3,000. A 30-yearold Tallahassee suspect was identi ed as having crashed her vehicle on the victims property before leaving the scene with another motorist. The crash investigation was turned over to the Florida Highway Patrol. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Misty Weeks of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was attempted at her home and $100 worth of damage was done to a door. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Clifford Ransom of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A at screen television was removed from a friends home. The television is valued at $450. The home was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated.SUNDAY, SEPT. 28 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Sandashia Larae Dennis, 24, of Tallahassee was observed attempting to leave the store with $162 worth of unpurchased merchandise. She was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated.MONDAY, SEPT. 29 Abbieann Greene of Crawfordville reported a burglary at the Crawfordville Womens Club. A window screen was observed on the floor and a heater was on. Two juveniles were observed sleeping on the kitchen oor. Damage to the building window is estimated at $150. The juveniles were reported missing by their parents but left the scene before law enforcement arrived. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Harold Slayton of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Two unsecured vehicles were entered at the victims home. The victim also left his garage door open. There were $1,495 worth of items removed from the garage and two vehicles including change and electronics. Sgt. Derek Lawhon investigated. Ashley Harris of Tallahassee reported a vehicle re on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road and Steeplechase. The victim noticed an odor of something burning. Thereafter the victim and passenger noticed smoke and flames coming from the glove box. Harris stopped the vehicle and removed a young child from a car seat. The vehicle was totally engulfed in ames when Deputy Vicki Mitchell arrived. Wakulla Fire Rescue put out the re but the vehicle was a total loss. The re was ruled accidental.TUESDAY, SEPT. 30 Kimberly Nabors of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Two unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account at Wal-Mart in Jacksonville. The charges totaled $310. Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. King D. Howard of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone struck the victims mailbox with a vehicle. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $28. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Jane Gregory of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim received a yer in the mail that referenced gift cards and she called and gave her debit card number to the individual who answered the telephone number on the yer. The victim never received the gift cards but noticed ve unauthorized charges on the account. The unauthorized charges totaled $128. Detective Randy Phillips found the phone number was no longer in service. Sgt. Ray Johnson also investigated. Deputy Matt Helms conducted a follow-up to a Sept. 28 traf c stop when he stopped a motorist for unlawful speed on U.S. Highway 98 east of Highway 365. During the traf c stop Deputy Helms was given a false name. Traf c citations were issued for unlawful speed and driving while license suspended or revoked. Deputy Helms determined that Travis Nolan Rigdon, 30, of Crawfordville had given a false name during the Sept. 28 traffic stop. Rigdon was also arrested for giving a false name to law enforcement. The citations issued to the false name were voided.WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Stephanie Lynn Stamps, 38, of Crawfordville was observing failing to scan diapers at the checkout. The diapers are valued at $41 and Stamps was issued a notice to appear in court for retail theft after passing the last point of sale. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated.THURSDAY, OCT. 2 Alice Robinson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Wireless headphones, valued at $150, were stolen from the unsecured vehicle. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,129 calls for service during the past week. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY340 Trice Lane Public Works Annex 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m FOR WAKULLA COUNTY RESIDENTIAL HOUSEHOLDS AND CONDITIONALLY EXEMPT SMALL QUANTITY GENERATORS ONLY! What's under your kitchen sink, in your garage, in your bathroom, and on the shelves in your laundry room? Household cleaners -such as oven cleaners, wood and metal cleaners and polishers, toilet bowl cleaners, disinfectants, drain openers. Automotive products -such as oil and fuel additives, grease and rust solvents, carburetor and fuel injector cleaners, air conditioning refrigerants, starter fluids, body putty, antifreeze/coolant, cont aminated motor oil, gasoline, diesel and kerosene Home maintenance and improvement products -such as paint, paint thinners, paint strippers and removers, adhesives Lawn and garden products -such as herbicides, pesticides/ rodenticides, fungicides, wood preservatives *Electronics (anything that plugs into an electric outlet) -such as old computers, computer parts, televisions, DVD players, VCRs, radios, cell phones, satellite dishes, and other small appliances Miscellaneous all batteries such as lithium, alkaline, car and button batteries, fingernail polish remover, pool chemicals, photo processing chemicals, reactive material, aerosols/compressed gas, fluorescent bulbs and tubes. NO TIRES NO BIOLOGICAL WASTES SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2014(CESQGs WILL BE CHARGED FOR DISPOSAL AND MUST REGISTER BY OCTOBER 9TH AT 926-7616) JEWELRY$10All Jewelry, Scarves & LeggingsWHEN YOUVE PURCHASED 10Receive ONE FREE! FREE2510 Crawfordville Hwy. 850745-8153Sundance850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 17By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 3 With Gov. Rick Scott, the entire Cabinet and many of the states 160 lawmakers out on the stump campaigning for re-election, the news about government in Florida has largely moved elsewhere. Theres some work being done by the courts, which, at least in theory, comprise the least political branch. And the Public Service Commission, with members whose jobs are only indirectly on the line this fall, is still keeping an eye on utilities. But even those tasks seem to be infused with campaign implications in an overly political season. A lawsuit against the states voucher system could cause some headaches for former Gov. Charlie Crist, whose base is divided over the issue. And politicians are sensitive to any PSC decision that could hit consumers also known as voters in the wallet. Meanwhile, the campaign chugs on, with Scott and Crist trading blows over everything from lagoons to wedding dresses. Even as a tragic case in the Gilchrist County town of Bell served as a painful reminder of the real-life decisions that the winners will face when the campaigns end and the work of governing begins. A 911 CALL TO THE FLORIDA SUPREME COURT Ironically, one of the most politically combustible cases working its way through the courts made the quietest progress this week, with the 1st District Court of Appeal deciding to send a challenge to the states congressional districts straight to the Florida Supreme Court. A three-judge panel of the appeals court, in a 2-1 decision, agreed to the relatively unusual move, which is known as certi cation. It marked a victory for votingrights groups fighting the congressional map, the latest chapter of a long-running battle between opponents of the lines and legislative Republicans. The organizations opposed to the congressional districts argue that they violate a state constitutional ban on political gerrymandering. The lengthy battle over the lines was one reason that the appeals-court majority said the case should get fasttracked. In this case, any doubts about the need for immediate review by the Supreme Court should be resolved in favor of certi cation, said the opinion, written by Judge Philip Padovano and joined by Judge Simone Marstiller. But in a dissent, Judge Scott Makar disputed the need to quickly send the case to the Supreme Court because the new districts wont take effect until 2016. Certi cation amounts to a 9-1-1 call to the Florida Supreme Court: Youre needed now! Makar wrote. That call is not justi ed in this case; ample time existing for the normal appellate process to be followed over the next two years. This (appeals) court can handle the matter expeditiously, leaving more than adequate time for Supreme Court review, if it deems it necessary. Leon County Circuit Judge Terry Lewis ruled this summer that two of the states congressional districts were unconstitutional, but later found that a revised map approved by the Legislature couldnt be implemented in time for this years elections. Voting-rights organizations object to the revised map and have laid the groundwork to appeal Lewis approval of some of the original districts that he didnt strike down. Meanwhile, a group calling itself the Save Our Scholarships Coalition pushed for the Florida Education Association to drop a lawsuit challenging the states de-facto voucher program. The coalition, which emphasized the benefits of the program to lower-income students, provided the latest reminder of how the battle over vouchers divides the Democratic base in Florida. The organization consists largely of African-American, Hispanic and Jewish leaders some of whom have constituents who are parts of key Democratic voting blocs. But the coalition is at odds with the states largest teachers union, which often provides resources and organizational muscle for Democratic candidates. I cannot for the life of me fathom why these educators are willing to jeopardize the well-being of the states poorest students, civil-rights leader H.K. Matthews said. At the same time, the fact that the lawsuit challenging the voucher program is also supported by the Florida NAACP and a Jewish rabbi shows how complicated the fissures within Democratic voting blocs really are. POLITICAL POWER There are a few groups that politicians will rarely lose points for bashing during a campaign. Bureaucrats are near the top of the list. So are insurance companies. And somewhere in the mix are utility companies, which make a pro t from something that is a necessity in everyday life. So with pressure mounting from Tampa Bay-area politicians, many up for re-election, the Florida Public Service Commission unanimously rejected a staff recommendation to wait, and instead moved ahead with approval of a $54 million credit for Duke Energy Florida customers because of payments made toward a nuclear power plant that wont be built. The PSCs staff wanted the panel to hold off until Duke completes a legal battle with Westinghouse Electric Co. Dukes 1.7 million customers in Central and North Florida wont actually see the money. Instead the credit will be used to shave a few months off an ongoing monthly charge on residential customers of $3.45 per 1,000 kilowatt hours that is imposed for the scuttled nuclear plant in Levy County. In my book, I view that (the PSCs decision) as a credit, Commissioner Ronald Brise said after the vote. If I had to pay x amount over two or three years and ultimately Im paying less, Im receiving a credit. Thats the way I perceive it, and I think that is the way our customers are going to view it. In 2012, the utility regulators agreed in a settlement to impose the $3.45-a-month charge to cover previously approved costs and equipment already purchased for the Levy County plant. The fee was set to run into 2017. Staff noted it could be a year or two before Dukes legal issues with Westinghouse are settled. But political currents have been battering utilities lately. This week, a number of legislators announced plans to push bills during the 2015 session aimed at Duke and other power companies, with the proposals ranging from imposing state lobbying requirements on utility representatives hired to sway the commission to prohibiting a utility from being able to charge customers at a higher rate due to an extended billing cycle. Prior to the commission meeting, Attorney General Pam Bondi sent a letter to Commission Chairman Art Graham before the meeting urging the money be refunded. The commission staffs recent recommendation fails to consider the reality that these customers have been left on the hook for a failed project through no fault of their own, Bondi wrote Monday. Duke needs to do the right thing and credit its ratepayers now. ANTICIPATING A SENSELESS MURDER Meanwhile, the Department of Children and Families released its first effort this week at piecing together what led up to a Gilchrist County man murdering his daughter and six grandchildren before committing suicide, the latest incident in what has become a wave of tragic headlines about the agency. DCF said Wednesday that it would undertake increased staff training and other reforms in response to the incident, but concluded the rampage could not have been foreseen. A preliminary report released by the department said the family was involved in 18 child-protective investigations from February 2006 to last month, with the grandfather, Don Spirit, involved in six of the investigations and alleged to be the perpetrator in three of the cases. In one instance, for example, investigators con rmed that Spirit physically abused his thenpregnant daughter, Sarah. She became one of his murder victims Sept. 18 and was the mother of the six dead children. In an email accompanying the report, department Interim Secretary Mike Carroll announced a series of actions the agency will take, including immediate retraining for Chie and-based investigative staff members who handled the Spirit case. STORY OF THE WEEK: State utility regulators approve a $54 million credit for Duke Energy Florida customers because of payments made toward a nuclear power plant that wont be built QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I have been with the department for 25 years. And I thought I had seen it all until this tragedy occurred. Interim DCF Secretary Mike Carroll, on a murder-suicide that left eight people dead in Bell.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Politics dominates, but reality breaks through WHITES WINESWine need not fear rise of beerBy DAVID WHITEWine industry executives are worried about the growing interest in craft beer and spirits from Americas 20and 30-somethings. Thats one takeaway from a fascinating new survey of the wine industrys top executives by Robert Smiley, dean and professor emeritus at the University of California Davis Graduate School of Management. Smileys survey is conducted each year and always generates headlines, since Smiley is able to connect with some of wines heaviest hitters. This year, for instance, senior executives at E&J Gallo, The Wine Group, and Constellation Brands participated. The nations three largest wine companies, these rms account for nearly half the wine sold in the United States. Worrying about Americas 75 million millennials makes sense. But fearing millennials interest in craft beer and spirits is misguided. Americas thirst for wine appears insatiable. Last year, the nation consumed 892 million gallons of wine, a 40 percent increase from just ten years ago. The United States consumes more wine than any other nation in the world, and one in four adults drinks wine regularly. This trend shows no sign of slowing. In Smileys survey, many executives were excited about these numbers and the interest theyre seeing from young consumers. We nd that the millennials are fabulous, said one participant (the responses were unattributed). Theyre adopting wine at a faster pace and theyre a different type of consumer than weve seen in the past. But many fretted about other alcoholic beverages. Smiley asked executives how their branding strategies ensured competitiveness in the growing market of craft beers and cocktails. Spirits are going to intrude onto the dining room table, said one executive, and the mixologist is going to be working with the chef to do cocktails that are paired with foods. Noted another, Im worried about it, in that its sort of a share of stomach issue. These concerns ignore Americas changing food and drinks culture. Researchers at the Beverage Information Group recently examined American drinking habits from 2001 to 2011. While they found that liquid consumption is a zero-sum game, Americans are willing to replace non-alcoholic beverages with alcoholic ones. Indeed, consumers are abandoning juice, soft drinks, milk, and cheap light beer and embracing bottled water, tea, wine, and spirits. This shift makes sense. In the 1950s and 60s, Coca-Cola was synonymous with American culture. Todays youngest consumers grew up alongside Starbucks, so theyve always been comfortable with bitter beverages. Food preferences are also changing. The highend steakhouses and fast-food burger joints of yesteryear are being replaced with farm-to-table restaurants and designer salad shops. Put simply, younger consumers are eating and drinking adventurously. This bodes well for the wine industry. Todays consumers have more access to more wines from more places than ever before. Consider that an average upscale supermarket now carries more than 1,500 wine selections, a number that dwarfs the variety of breakfast cereals. Those who are interested in craft beer and small-batch spirits are willing to explore the unknown. Wine offers in nite choices. Global wine brands do have some reason to worry. As one executive noted, younger consumers in particular are interested in authenticity and it seems to me that the craft beer and craft spirits business looks a lot more like the wine business these days. But that concern has nothing to do with craft beer and spirits per se. Rather, as consumers think more critically about consumption, purchases will shift away from huge producers who churn out industrialized, soulless wines and toward small wineries, unheralded wine regions, and esoteric grapes. Thats a good thing. Dinner tables across the country will certainly have more room for craft beer and cocktails in the years ahead. But wine will also be there.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Oct. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the 8 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE at the Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m. NAMI CONNECTION FREE every Tuesday morning at the library in Medart, beginning at 10 a.m., and every Tuesday evening at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, (just south of Lindys), beginning at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10 Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, self-defense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For information contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. BOOK CLUB meets at the library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042. Saturday, Oct. 11 Help with TAGGING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge is needed every Saturday morning through Nov. 22. For more information, contact David Cook at 850/570-1329 or david_cook@myfwc.com. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the SECOND SATURDAY of the month for a breakfast meeting at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Sunday, Oct. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. Monday, Oct. 13 VFW POST 4538 monthly meeting at the post the SECOND MONDAY of each month. Dinner at 6 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. for post and auxiliary members only. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the FIRST MONDAY of every month, 1 p.m. Respite care is available during the meeting at the church. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, Oct. 14 C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness for the whole family. Tuesday 5-6 p.m. at the Wakulla Community Center Contact 850-745-6045 or CORE at 850-224-1177. Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, self-defense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee St., Crawfordville. For information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, meets at the library in Medart at 10 a.m.; and also meets at 6:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce 2140-C Crawfordville Highway (just south of Lindys). CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. NAMI, Wakullas FAMILY TO FAMILY class for caregivers for the mentally ill will be Tuesdays from 6 to 8:30 p.m. in the Community Center. Call the NAMI of ce to enroll at 926-1033.Wednesday, Sept. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy. Government MeetingsThursday, Oct. 9 CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library.Monday, Oct. 13 The Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (WILD) Governing Board will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the library. For information, call 997-7400.Tuesday, Oct. 14 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting 3 p.m. at the Best Western Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville.Tuesday, Oct. 21 PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Medart Park Of ce, 79 Recreation Dr. Crawfordville.Wednesday, Oct. 22 CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Fall Into Fashion with Coastal Optimists Senior Center 6:30 p.m. Big Bend Seafood FestivalWoolley Park8:30 to 4 p.m.Christmas in Panacea fundraiserMoose Lodge 25106 to 8 p.m.Senior Center Dinner Meeting Senior Center 6 p.m. ThursdaySaturday SaturdayTuesday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla AMAZON SMILE The Friends of the Wakulla County Library are proud to present Amazon Smile. When you shop Amazon will donate 0.5 percent of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to the Friends of the Library. AmazonSmile is the same Amazon you know and love. Same products, same prices, same service. To shop in support of the Friends of the Library simply visit: smile.amazon. com/ch/59-3125252 FREE FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Our Free Friday night movie for Oct. 10 features Hazel, who suffers from stage IV cancer, although a medical miracle bought her a few more years. At a cancer support group, she meets fellow cancer patient Augustus Waters. The teenagers share the same unconventional sense of humor and fall in love, despite the inevitable fate they face. Join us for this poignant, PG-13 lm at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. BYOT (bring your own tissues). Children must be accompanied by an adult. BOOK BOUTIQUE A new feature at the circulation desk this week is our Book Boutique. Books selected for display on this adoption cart are squeaky clean and recently released. Please see tags for suggested donation amounts. All donations generated for the Friends of the Library from the book boutique will go towards our childrens programs. DIGITAL CAMERA WORKSHOP Join our Technology Instructor, Deanna Ramsay, Friday, Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to noon to learn camera basics, operating tips, and maintenance. Then, take a walk-a-bout to practice! Download pictures from your camera and save them on your computer. Learn how to organize them into folders. Using an online free photo editing program, you will learn how to do basic photo editing and enhancements. Students need to bring their own digital camera and USB cord to class. Please note this is a two-session class. Call 926-7415 to register. CHILDRENS ROOM UPDATE The new oors in the childrens room are complete! Just a few more final touches and the children will have a completely new place to meet and let their imaginations run WILD! Please encourage those that you know with little ones to join Leilania Nichols for our Book Babies and Book Bunch programs. Have an idea about a childrens program that you would like your little ones to attend at the library? Just drop us a line through our contact form on the website, give us a call, or come by and see all that is going on. We welcome your suggestions!Library News... Thursday, Oct. 9 FALL INTO FASHION as the Optimist Club presents a fall fashion show at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Senior Center. Tickets are $30, and are available through club members, or call Sally Gandy 984-2203 or Bill Versiga 2948480. Dinner catered by Poseys Steamroom. Also enjoy live music and fashions from local retailers. All proceeds go toward local scholarships. Friday, Oct. 10 FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present the musician Dustin Allen from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy.. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, limited seating. A BLOOD DRIVE to Unite in the Fight Against Cancer will be at Walmart in Crawfordville from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. All donors will receive a $10 Walmart gift card and a wellness checkup. Saturday, Oct. 11 The 2014 BIG BEND SEAFOOD FESTIVAL will be all day until 4 p.m. at Woolley Park in Panacea, featuring the rst annual Seafood Gumbo Cook-off and 5K race. The race begins at 8:30 a.m. The Seafood Gumbo Cookoff, will name the Big Bend Gumbo Master of the year. Judging will begin at 11 a.m. Enjoy entertainment, food vendors, maritime demonstrations, games, arts and crafts for kids, and t-shirts for sale. A HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at ESG Service, 340 Trice Lane. Florescent tubes (in small quantities), lithium batteries, paints, gas, electronics and more will be accepted. E-mail helpkwcb@gmail.com with questions. WORLD WATER MONITORING DAY is an international education program to involve citizens in water quality monitoring and increase awareness of local water quality issues. At Wakulla Springs, volunteers are needed to collect water chemistry information from four springs and 20 sinkholes. To register, call Jackie Turner 561-7281. The descendants of John Cecil Council will hold their ANNUAL COUNCIL REUNION at the Council family reunion picnic grounds in Crawfordville. A sh fry will be Oct. 11 at 5 p.m., and a covered dish lunch is Sunday, Oct. 2 at 11 a.m. Call Amanda Slayton with questions 528-9182. A CHRISTMAS IN PANACEA FUNDRAISER for local kids will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Moose Lodge 2510 on Jer-Be-Lou Boulevard. Dine in or carry out a pork chop or pork steak, tomato gravy and rice, greens, cornbread and dessert for $12. For tickets: Sherrie Miller at Poseys, Crums Mini Mall or the Wakulla Moose Lodge at 9842510. Sunday, Oct. 12 PINOCHLE keep an old game alive. Come and play pinochle with other players at 2 p.m. New and veteran players are invited to participate in a mini tournament at the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department, 1448 Shell Point Rd., Crawfordville. $5 entry fee covers prizes. It will be fun and will give pinochle players a chance to meet up with one another. Call Ed at 926-9748 or Cyndi at 9269254. Monday, Oct. 13 A COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR and u shot clinic, hosted by the Alzheimers Project of Tallahassee and Wakulla Respite Program, will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Churchs Family Life Center, 4495 Crawfordville Hwy. Tuesday, Oct. 14 The annual SENIOR CENTER DINNER MEETING and election of of cers and Board of Directors will be at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Senior Center. Special guests will be the dancers Mays Gray and his wife, Delores Greene performing as Elvis and Priscilla. Upcoming EventsThursday, Oct. 16 WALK TO REMEMBER, a free memorial event for parents and families experiencing the loss of pregnancy or an infant will be from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at St. Pauls United Methodist Church at 1700 North Meridian Road in Tallahassee. A reception with refreshments will be until 6:30, followed by a sanctuary memorial service, and then a candle-lit walk around Lake Ella at 7:30. For information: 488-0288 ext. 109. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. Spouses, caregivers and friends are welcome. For more information, call 926-6050. THE ROTARY 2014 DISTINGUISHED CITIZENS BANQUET will be at 6 p.m. at the Senior Citizens complex. Guest presenters are Maurice Langston, Susan Payne Turner and Bob Myhre. Guests can purchase tickets at the door. Friday, Oct. 17 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY CHILI COOK OFF will be from 6 to 8 p.m. a the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center for a fun evening, great food, wine and cold beer. Tickets to the event are $10 per person, and includes chili, drinks and a few raf e tickets. For info: 519-2292. Saturday, Oct. 18 The rst annual RELAY FOR LIFE HARVESTING FOR A CURE FALL FESTIVAL and chili cookoff at Hudson Park 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Enjoy a parade at 10 a.m., food, activities for the kids, entertainment, vendors and more. For info: 322-2652. The NORTH FLORIDA NATURAL BODYBUILDING CLASSIC show will be at 6 p.m. at Wakulla High School. The event is open to women and men, men over 50, gure, bikini and teenage bodybuilders, with pre-judging beginning at 9 a.m. Trophies will be awarded. For entry form or tickets: Ezekiel Davis 408-9516. Sunday, Oct. 19 FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK ANNUAL WATERFRONT POTLUCK begins at 5:30 p.m., with a dusk boat ride on the river leaving at 5:45. Free to members, or sign up and become a member at the event. Following the cruise will be a social event lit by tiki torches and the marvelous mist rising from the river. Bring new potential members. The membership alone would be worth the free admission and boat ride that evening. For info: 222-2899 Oct. 9 Oct. 14Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 19 Area ArtsCharacteristicCity Cloud Crow Diet Eldest Else Every Exits Eyed File Filled Flew Gives Glue Hearty Huts Inch Into Invade Item Kick Killed Kilogram Later Leaf Left Lies Lion List Loser Lumps Mile Milk Miner Moves Need Notes Odor Over Parcels Pile Pilots Plays Pole Punch Roped Score Seen Shoe Sister Site Snow Solo Solved Sore Sort Sour Southward Swamp Threads Tops Useless Vase Veto Votes With The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSUREDA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 850528-2371 or 850926-7461 Call for All of Your Lawn Care Needs!FREE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Specialty Cuts F lat TopsCuts F eather Locks Low Lights Low L i g g h h t t s s 850 926-602027 AZALEA DR. Behind CVS & Bealls, Crawfordville F acial WaxingsColor Highlights Perms Page 20 TH E E E E E E WA WA W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WA W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WA W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WA W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W A KU L Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEP IT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 Todays New Ads ALLIGATOR POINTThursday Oct 9, through Sunday Oct. 12th 8am-6pm Furniture, Appliances Clothing & MISC. 676 Alligator Drive Orange Neutered Male Tabby cat, Last seen on Labor Day,in yard. Please call w/ any details. (850) 528-8229 Poseysin Panacea FLPT/FT Waitress neededMust Apply in Person 1506 Coastal Hwy Driver Trainees Needed NOW! Learn to drive for CON-WAY TRUCKLOAD NO Experience Needed. Local CDLTraining Apply Today! 1-800-876-7364 EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE DRIVERSCDL-A:Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/ Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down,1-855-971-8525 AIRLINE CAREERS START HERE-Get FAAapproved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 ALLIGATOR POINTThursday Oct 9, through Sunday Oct. 12th 8am-6pm Furniture, Appliances Clothing & MISC. 676 Alligator Drive ATTENTION: VIAGRAand CIALIS USERS!Acheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special $99. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed. CALLNOW: 1-800-943-8953 Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors.Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. Happy Jack Mites:Kills ear m ites on contact on dogs AND cats!. Ashley Feed & Hardware (850-421-7703) (www.happyjackinc. com) N WAKULLA3 bedroom 2 bath, triplewide $1100. mo. $1000. dep. VERY NICE!REVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 Quincy3bd/2ba w/land in St. John also accepting Section 8 (407) 680-5065 or (850) 508-1952 SOPCHOPPY3 bedroom 2 bath Singlewide on Forest $700. mo. $600. dep.REVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 Wakulla Gardens Large 2 BR, 2 BA SWMH, Updated. $615. + deposit. References. 850-524-4090 Previously BANK FORECLOSED 5.65 Acres ONLY$14,900! 29.1 Acre Creek Front $29,900 Mountain Views, Rushing Trout Stream, Minutes to 40,000 Acre Lake, Adjoins State Park Roads, Utilities, Financing, Call 877-520-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700 24 HR. ELDERL Y CARE Fullfilling the special needs, that are unique to the Elderly in a Private Home Setting. Rebecca Darfus 850-524-5217 5260-1009 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Coastal Plastering & Repair located at 65 Eighth Ave., Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 30 day of Sept., 2014. /s/ Neal S. Turlington Owner Published Oct. 9, 2014. 5263-1016 TWN vs. Zanco, Walter L. 2012CA000084 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2012CA000084 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. WALTER L. ZANCO; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR UNITED WHOLESALE MORTGAGE; LULAMAE I. DEVORE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LULAMAE I. DEVORE; ROBIN MELISSA ZANCO A/K/A ROBIN ZANCO; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 3rd day of Sept., 2014, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000084, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and WALTER L. ZANCO LLULAMAE I. DEVORE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LULAMAE I. DEVORE; and ROBIN MELISSA ZANCO A/K/A ROBIN ZANCO UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6 day of Nov., 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 17, WINDSONG, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 85 AND 86 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 17, WINDSONG, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 85 AND 86 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 17, A DISTANCE OF 208.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 430.06 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF WIND SONG CIRCLE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 208.72 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 17, A DISTANCE OF 430.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 5 day of Sept., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Choice Legal Group, P.A.P.O. Box 9908, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-9908 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com Published October 9 & 16, 2014. 11-26573 5264-1016 TWN vs. Johnson, Josette E. 14-123 CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 14-123 CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-ABC1 Plaintiff vs. JOSETTE E. JOHNSON, JOHN A. JOHNSON, JR. a/k/a JOHN A. JOHNSON, HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., WOODVILLE SOUTH II HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendant( s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENpursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 10/01/2014, and entered in Case No. 14-123 CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit, in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, where in THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-ABC1, is the Plaintiff and JOSETTE E. JOHNSON, JOHN A. JOHNSON, JR. a/k/a JOHN A. JOHNSON, 5266-1016 TWN vs. Sapp, David Morris 65-2014-CA-000025-CAAX-MX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2014-CA-000025-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE MLMI TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE5 Plaintiff, vs. DAVID MORRIS SAPP A/K/A DAVID M. SAPP, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, I will sell the property located in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 90 OF THEHARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. (ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 24,TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AND MARKED BY A U.S.FORESTRY SERVICE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES33 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OFLOT 90, U.S., 165.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTRIGHT OF WAY OF CASORA DRIVE; THENCE RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES43 MINUTES 4 SECONDS EAST, 335.61FEET ALONG EAST RIGHT OFWAY OF CASORA DRIVE, TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCECONTINUE ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF CASORA DRIVESOUTH 50 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 4 SECONDS EAST, 545.74 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT AND POINT OF BEGINNING OF TRACTHEREIN CONVEYED; FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 373.15 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF CLOVERDADDY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF GLOVER DADDY ROAD, 260.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST 599.58 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF CASORA DRIVE; THENCE RUN NORTH 50 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 4SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF CASORADRIVE 210.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYINGAND BEING IN LOT 90 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID LAND BEING OTHERWISEDESCRIBED AS TRACT 19 OF AN UNRECORDED PLAT OF CASORA ESTATES, UNIT II. A/K/A 182 Casora Dr., Crawfordville, FL 32327. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 oclock, A.M. on Nov. 6, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 2 day of Oct., 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published October 9 & 16, 2014. 104925 HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., WOODVILLE SOUTH II HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, the Clerk of Court shall offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash on Nov. 6, 2014, at 11:00 am, at Wakulla County Courthouse 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in WAKULLA County, Florida, to wit: WOODVILLE SOUTH, UNIT II, (UNRECORDED) LOT 17 Commence at the Southeast corner of Lot 1, Block A of WOODVILLE SOUTH, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 31, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 10 degrees 48 minutes 46 seconds East 700.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 10 degrees 48 minutes 46 seconds East 875.25 feet, thence run South 75 degrees 56 minutes 14 seconds West 183.49 feet, thence run North 19 degrees 25 minutes West 877.67 feet to the centerpoint of a centerline having a 50.00 foot radius, thence run North 75 degrees 56 minutes 14 seconds East 315.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a cul-de-sac and utility easement over and across the Northwesterly corner thereof. NOTICE: If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Wakulla County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Wakulla County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE SALE. NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN. DATEDthis 1st day of October, 2014. Brent X Thurmond CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk STRAUS & EISLER, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff 10081 Pines Blvd, Suite C, Pembroke Pines, FL 33024, 954-431-2000 Published October 9 & 16, 2014. APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE COMMERCIAL1,500 sq. ft. $1,500HOUSE3BR2BA 1,196 sq. ft. $1,000DUPLEX2BR/1BA 784 sq. ft. $650 2BR/1BA 784 sq. ft. $650TOWN HOME3BR/2BA 1,440 sq. ft. $900MOBILE HOMES4BR/2BA 1,680 sq. ft. $850 3BR/2BA 1,152 sq. ft. $775 RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, tapes, dishes, household items, small kitchen appliances, clothes, new & used items. Something for everyone! Annual Super Yard Sale and Bake Sale First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station 945 Woodville Hwy. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad inFor As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Please Recycle

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 21 5255-1009 TWN vs. Raflowski, William J. 2009 CA 000063 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2009 CA 000063 Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp. Plaintiff, vs. William J. Raflowski, The Unknown Spouse of William J. Raflowski; If Living, Including any Unknown Spouse of Said Defendant(s), if Remarried, and if Deceased, The Respective Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees, and all other Persons Claiming by, Through, Under or Against the Named Defendant(s) Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated Sept. 22, 2014, entered in Case No. 2009 CA 000063 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp. is the Plaintiff and William J. Raflowski, The Unknown Spouse of William J. Raflowski; If Living, Including any Unknown Spouse of Said Defendant(s), if 5256-1009 TWN vs. Schimmel, Stephen P. 652014CA000083CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 652014CA000083CAAXMX CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN P. SCHIMMEL A/K/A STEPHEN SCHIMMEL, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of foreclosure dated September 03, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652014CA000083CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is Plaintiff, and STEPHEN P. SCHIMMEL A/K/A STEPHEN SCHIMMEL, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 30 day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: LOT 6, SAVANNAH FOREST, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: at Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida, this 8 day of Sept., 2014 Brent X. Thurmond Clerk of Said Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk CITIMORTGAGE, INC. c/o Phelan Hallinan, PLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303. 850-577-4401. At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published October 2 & 9, 2014 PH# 49812 5257-1009 TWN vs. Deware, David P. 2014-CA-104 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-104 MCDRSCJ, L.L.C., Plaintiff, vs. DAVID P. DEWARE and KARLENE B. DEWARE, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against them; ASSET ACQUISITION GROUP LLC; SHADEVILLE SOUTH PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 10, Shadeville South, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page 19 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER with a 1994 70 x 38, Peach State Mobile home, Serial number PSHGA15805A and PSHGA15805B, Title Numbers 66731424 & 66731425. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse at 11:00 a.m., on October 23, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale other than the property owner must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. /s/ ANDREW J. POWER FLORIDA BAR NO. 0013856 SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A 3520 Thomasville Rd., 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Telephone: (850) 893-4105 Facsimile: (850) 893-7229 E-mail: andrewp@stslaw.com Attorneys for Plaintiff Published October 2 & 9, 2014. 5258-1009 TWN vs. Ard Sr., Aubry J. 13-31-CA Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 13-31-CA DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. AUBRY J. ARD, SR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Sept. 2, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Aubry J. Ard, Sr. also known as Aubrey J. Ard also known as Aubry J. Arda, Jennifer M. Ard, Tina M. Ard, Janet M. Ard, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Unknown Spouse of Aubry J. Ard, Sr. also known as Aubrey J. Ard also known as Aubry J. Arda, The Unknown Spouse of Jennifer M. Ard, The Unknown Spouse of Tina M. Ard, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 23rd day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 10, OF MILLWOOD ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 23, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 53 GREENLEAF LN CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327-5779 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 2nd day of September, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 Published October 2 & 9, 2014. 5259-1009 TWN vs. Johnson, Mable 2013-CA-000211 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2013-CA-000211 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MABLE JOHNSON; WAILON JOHNSON A/K/A WAILON R. JOHNSON A/K/A WAILON ROCKWELL JOHNSON; JAMIE JOHNSON A/K/A JAMIE MICHELLE BANKS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE; WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 5, 2014, and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 11, 2014, both entered in Case No. 2013-CA-000211, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and MABEL JOHNSON; JAMIE JOHNSON A/K/A JAMIE MICHELLE BANKS; WAILON JOHNSON A/K/A WAILON R. JOHNSON; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Clerk Conference Room in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 16th day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTION a/k/ 319 LOST CREEK LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327. DATED this 26 day of Sept., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Heller & Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, FL 33131 Telephone: (305) 373-8001, Facsimile: (305) 373-8030 EXHIBIT A Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the point of beginning. From said point of beginning, run thence South 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds West along the south boundary of said Northeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter 444.87 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds West 718.76 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 444.87 feet to the East boundary of said Northeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter, thence run South 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds East along said boundary 718.76 feet to the point of beginning. (Tract No. 6) SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to the following described roadway easement: Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the point of beginning of herein described. From said point of beginning, run thence North 17 degrees 07 minutes 42 seconds West 104.40 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds West 588.93 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds West 414.87 feet, thence North 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds West 30.0 feet, thence North 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 444.87 feet to the East boundary of said Northeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter, thence South 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds East along said boundary 718.76 feet to the point of beginning. Together with that certain 2007 Homes of Merit Mobile Home serial no. 5261-1016 TWN vs. Linton, Mary Liddy 65-2014-CA-000021 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2014-CA-000021 DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO COMMONWEALTH UNITED MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK OF INDIANA, Plaintiff, vs. MARY LIDDY LINTON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Sept. 22, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2014-CA-000021 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, Successor By Merger To National City Bank, Successor By Merger To Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division Of National City Bank Of Indiana is the Plaintiff and Mary Liddy Linton, Wilma V. Linton also known as Wilma S. Linton, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 6th day of November, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, LESS THE NORTH FORTY (40) FEET. LESS AND EXCEPT:A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, BETTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, AND RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 40.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 244.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 165.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH A DISTANCE OF 244.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO A 20-FOOT RIGHT OF INGRESS AND EGRESS, BEING BETTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 145.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 185.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 185.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.ALL OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY LYING IN THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 87 WALDEN RD CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327-5950 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 22 day of September, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 Published October 9 & 16, 2014. 015349 5262-1016 TWN vs. Chatham, Bryan Alan 65-2010-CA-000084CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 65-2010-CA-000084CA Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Carrington Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2006-FRE1 Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Plaintiff, vs. Bryan Alan Chatham; April Chatham, a/k/a April Carlton Chatham, a/k/a April Carlton Johnson; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 5, 2014, entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000084CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Carrington Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2006-FRE1 Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates is the Plaintiff and Bryan Alan Chatham; April Chatham, a/k/a April Carlton Chatham, a/k/a April Carlton Johnson; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the Nov. 6, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 81 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 33.17 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 758.04 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECOND WEST 50.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 25.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF J.K. MOORE ROAD MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 29 SECOND WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 244.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 321.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ADAM LANE, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 229.51 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 55 SECOND FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 134.12 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 46 DEGRE3ES 18 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 132.22 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 30 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 38 SECOND EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 120.71 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 132.84 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 13 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.25 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 38 SECOND EAST 114.39 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 76.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5 day of May, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brock & Scott PLLC, 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Attorney for Plaintiff Published October 9 & 16, 2014. 11-F02712 FLHMLC30793A/B Published October 2 & 9, 2014. 11826.2971 Remarried, and if Deceased, The Respective Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees, and all other Persons Claiming by, Through, Under or Against the Named Defendant(s) Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 30th day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, WAKULLA SPRINGS ACRES, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 103, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 22 day of Sept., 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brock & Scott PLLC, 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Attorney for Plaintiff Published October 2 & 9, 2014. 13-F06995 5254-1009 TWN Greene, George Lee 14000083CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 14000083CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE LEE GREENE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of George Lee Greene, deceased, File 14000083CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is October 2, 2014 Personal Representative: Herman E. Greene 41 Greenlin Villa Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq., Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Published October 2 & 9, 2014. 5265-1016 TWN Brackins, Vonceal O. 14000084CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 14000084CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF VONCEAL O. BRACKINS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Vonceal O. Brackins, deceased, File 14000084CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is October 9, 2014 Personal Representative: Jennifer Bradley 44 Winthrop Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 Attorney for Personal Representatives: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq., Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Published October 9 & 16, 2014. 5227-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 048 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1672 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-043-000-09801-029 Description of property: LOT 43 HS P-1-29-M-11 TRACT 60 OF UNRECORDED PLAT OF RAKIRK RANCHETTES IN W 1/2 OR 77 P 648 & 871 OR 179 P 846 OR 181 P 21 Name in which assessed HEIRS OF JESSE C PALMER JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5228-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 049 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1676 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-043-000-09807-000 Description of property: LOT 43 HS P-8-M-11 A PARCEL OF .43 AC IN E 1/2 OF LOT 43 HS LESS STATE RD R/W OR 22 P 197 & OR 66 P 764 OR 309 P 219 Name in which assessed DONNA J BASSIN Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5229-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 050 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 380 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 23-5S-02W-056-02817-013 Description of property: JOSEPH LEE ESTATES BLOCK B LOT 6,7,8,9 OR 37 P 117 & OR 67 P 963 Name in which assessed DALE & ESSIE LONG Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 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Page 22 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5221-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 026 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property as amended, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1086 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-034-012-09561-000 Description of property: WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 5 BLOCK 48 LOT 32 OR 42 P 401 OR 610 P 563 Name in which assessed SELASSIE, INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 23, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5222-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 042 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 485 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 24-2S-01W-000-03980-000 Description of property: 24-2S-1W P-14-1-M-65 5.06 AC M/L IN THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 IN SEC 24 OR 68 P 847 OR 225 P 18 Name in which assessed CODY BLAKE SMITH Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 28, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5223-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 043 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 164 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 01-5S-02W-000-02440-000 Description of property: 1-5S-2W P-9-M-52 LYING IN NW 1/4 OF SEC 1 DB 41 185 & OR 96 P 732 Name in which assessed THOMAS P POSEY Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 28, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5224-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 044 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK CUSTODIAN FOR TLCF 2012A, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1023 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 17-3S-01E-000-05261-000 Description of property: 17-3S-1E P-7-M-72 W 1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 DB 11 P 284 Name in which assessed JANE GILMORE Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 28, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5225-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 045 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ALL SEASON the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 142 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 25-3S-02W-332-01601-052 Description of property: SAVANNAH FOREST S/D LOT 52 OR 726 P 628 OR 730 P 401 Name in which assessed WAKULLA FOREST GENERAL PARTNERSHIP Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5226-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 047 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1030 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 22-3S-01E-236-05401-007 Description of property: DOE FOREST RECORDED SUB LOT 3 CONTAINING 5.01 AC M/L OR 302 P 689 Name in which assessed SHERRI S CHASON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. Brain Teaser 12345 6789 10111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2223 24 25 26 2728 293031 3233 34 35 3637 3839 4041 42 4344 45 46 47 48 49 5051 52 5354 55 5657 58 596061 62 6364 65 666768 69 70 7172 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 Across 1 Cars for celebs 6 Cries loudly 10 Ride-sharing service 14 Expect 15 Ear cleaner 16 Bona ___ (real) 17 Sticky toy 19 Former GM make 20 Explosive letters 21 Hawaiian necklace 22 Baby boy, e.g. 24 Make up a story 25 Fixes 27 Maybe soon 29 Coke or Sprite 32 Unhappy 34 Use a shovel 35 Confuse 38 Sweet words to read 42 Long fish 43 Uncle ___ 45 Health resort 46 "Now I understand!" 47 Made a burrito 50 Actor Christian ___ 52 "What is it?" 53 Obtain 55 "The Heat ___" 56 Invented 59 $1,000, in slang 62 Time of history 63 Pea holder 65 "First of all..." 66 Toothpaste brand 69 Uninteresting 71 Candy man 74 Having the power 75 Not good 76 Songs 77 Potato chip brand 78 Cincinnati team 79 Sirloin, e.g. Down 1 Go the distance 2 Champion's shout 3 ___ liquor 4 Sesame or canola 5 Way 6 Sea creatures 7 Mel of baseball fame 8 Small amounts 9 Watch secretly 10 Sky sight 11 Males that go "maa" 12 Murphy or Money 13 Bowling alley button 18 Bic product 23 "We won't be doing business together!" 25 Atlas page 26 Actor Mineo 28 The ___ Man 29 Ending for mob or gang 30 Popular cookie 31 Waste time 33 Two, in Spanish 36 Exhausts 37 Tablet 39 Company execs 40 One of the Huxtable children 41 Make, as money 44 Coffee cup 48 Robert E. ___ 49 Coat holder 51 First ___ kit 54 Mythical creatures 56 Gold, silver or bronze 57 Caribbean island 58 Button on a TV 60 Whatever number of 61 Slimy creatures 64 Jump into a pool, maybe 66 Actress Bancroft 67 Swedish furniture store 68 Part of a Halloween costume 70 "___ Miserables" 72 Tupperware top 73 Not safe, in baseball Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 12 3 345 67584 29 74 58 4165 35 942 869 135 2009 HometownContent 495 1827 3 6 138746259 627953184 269 578341 571634928 843219675 356 897412 782461593 914325867 LIMOS SOBS UBER AWAIT QTIP FIDE SILLYPUTTY OLDS TNT LEI SON LIE MENDS NOTYET SODA SAD DIG TRIPUP LOVENOTE EEL SAM SPA AHA ROLLEDUP SLATER YES GET ISON MADEUP GRAND ERA POD ONE AIM DULL WILLYWONKA ABLE EVIL TUNES LAYS REDS STEAK Snow akes by Japheth Light: There are 13 black hexagons in the puzzle. Place the numbers 1 6 around each of them. No number can be repeated in any partial hexagon shape along the border of the puzzle.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 23 1. GAMES: How many squares are on a chess board? 2. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the common name for sodium bicarbonate? 3. MEDICAL: What does the acronym stand for in the term CAT scan? 4. MUSIC: What nationality was Chopin? 5. GEOGRAPHY: The Dolomites mountain chain is located in what country? 6. HISTORY: Which U.S. state was the last to secede in the Civil War and the first to be readmitted to the union? 7. PHOBIAS: What fear is represented by the condition called astrophobia? 8. LANGUAGE: What are bangers in British slang? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of rhinoceroses called? 10. TELEVISION: What were the names of the two main characters in the Gilmore Girls? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. 64 2. Baking soda 3. Computerized Axial Tomography 4. Polish 5. Italy 6. Tennessee 7. A fear of outer space 8. Sausages 9. A crash 10. Lorelai and Rory Gilmore ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You could be caught in a torrent of advice from well-meaning friends and colleagues this week. But remember, Lamb, you are at your best when you are your own inimitable self. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Expect strong efforts to get you to accept things as they are and not question them. But ignore all that and continue your inquiries until youre sure you have all the answers you need. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Heavier than usual family and workplace duties compete for your time this week. Try to strike a balance so that youre not overwhelmed by either. Pressures ease by weeks end. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Its a good time for the Moon Child to show off your uniquely inspired approach to the culinary skills especially if theyre directed toward impressing someone special. LEO (July 23 to August 22) You might be happy about the re-emergence of a long-deferred deal. But dont pounce on it quite yet. Time can change things. Be sure the values you looked for before are still there. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Try to rein in your super-critical attitude, even if things arent being done quite as you would prefer. Remember: What you say now could create an awkward situation later on. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Although you can expect on-thejob cooperation from most of your colleagues this week, some people might insist on knowing more about your plans before they can accept them. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Creating another way to do things is commendable. But you could nd some resistance this week from folks who would rather stick with the tried-and-true than try something new. SAGIT TARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You usually can keep your aim focused on your goal. But you might need to make adjustments to cope with unsteadiness factors that could arise over the course of the week. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) News arrives about a projected move. Be prepared to deal with a series of possible shifts, including starting and finishing times, and how much the budget will actually cover. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A new relationship needs time to develop. Let things ow naturally. It could be a different story with a workplace situation, which might require faster and more focused attention. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Accept a compliment without trying to troll for any hidden reason beyond what was said. After all, dont you deserve to be praised every now and then? Of course you do. BORN THIS WEEK: You like to weigh all possibilities before making a decision. You would be a ne judge, or even be a star in a jury room. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Page 24 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com By MARTY COHEN COHENS CORNER: Whenever a dubious achievement took place, Steve Spurrier, with needle planted rmly in his own teams balloon, would say, I told you we were going to break a lot of records around here, the most notable coming in Year Two after Florida had gotten swallowed up at Syracuse and wound up with minus-17 rushing yards. It actually wasnt the record for the worst output, but his Gators eventually did eclipse the mark with minus-78 yards on the ground in a forgettable road loss at Mississippi State in 2000. Well, the Gators didnt of cially break any records on Saturday, unless anyone keeps track of angry unprintable remarks hurled at the television by fans. Yet Florida did accomplish one feat in its 10-9 triumph of second-tier SEC football over Tennessee for the first time in 46 years, since a 9-3 decision over Florida State in Tallahassee in 1968, the Gators won a game scoring just 10 points. That has to count for something, right? By and large, it was downright ugly, two teams showing why they are not ready for primetime football, guided by two coaches who played it so close to the vest that former Ohio State coach Jim Tressel would have been proud. The only true body blow delivered was to the starting days of quarterback Jeff Driskel. The fourth-year junior simply does not have what it takes at the moment, if ever, to lead this offense. The passing attack with Driskel is a shambles. He and the receivers are not in sync, and the throws are just not where they need to be for the receivers to make plays. Again it is not all on Driskel, there were drops as usual, and it is painfully obvious that this receiving group is struggling under the tutelage of Chris Leak, who has never coached or played the position. Its a bit unfair to blame Leak, who was thrust into this role, but the revolving door of coaches at that spot (six receiver coaches in the last six years), has stunted the growth of the unit. There simply is no way to sugarcoat it Driskel was awful again. In the last two games, he has completed 20 of 51 passes (39.2 percent) for 152 yards with one touchdown and ve interceptions. His inaccuracy has caused the offense to be completely dysfunctional and ineffective. So now the keys to the kingdom belong to Treon Harris. While Will Muschamp did not make the official announcement after the game, and didnt need to, there is no conceivable way he could let Driskel keep his starting spot without causing a major revolt among the proletariat. He doesnt need to bury Driskel necessarily the fan base will do that for him since he may need him the rest of the way and his ability could still be an asset. But there was a marked difference in the Gators giddyup with Harris calling the signals. (As of Monday, Harris is suspended inde nitely for sexual assault.)FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators By TIM LINAFELT After a week when the Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 6 teams all suffered their rst losses of the season, No. 1 Florida State wasnt about to apologize for its 21st consecutive win. No matter how much they labored at times to get it. Florida State hasnt always looked dominant during its rst ve games of this season, but the Seminoles are still winning. Thats more than college football heavyweights Oregon, Alabama, Oklahoma and Texas A&M can say. Every win is a big win, junior defensive back Tyler Hunter said. A lot of teams, like you see, theyre getting knocked off. So you just have to appreciate it. Like each of Florida States wins this season, this one didnt come easy. The Seminoles offense sputtered for much of the rst half and FSU actually trailed the Demon Deacons 3-0 after a quarter. Even after nishing with 475 yards of total offense, Jameis Winston and Co. never quite hit their stride. That just meant, though, that the Seminoles got production in other areas. A week after a frustrating performance littered with missed tackles, FSUs defense responded with an impressive effort that limited the Demon Deacons to a paltry 40 rushing yards on 39 attempts and 126 yards total. And redshirt sophomore Roberto Aguayocontinued his assault on perfection with a 5-for-5 kicking performance which included a 52-yard eld goal that he made look easy. Like Coach Fisher says, we found a way to win, Aguayo said. No matter what adversity, clutter, the media, stuff like that. Were the team that gets it the most, because were No. 1, obviously. But we manage that. The Seminoles still need to get better, they dont argue that. Beating No. 9 Notre Dame with the same type of efforts they had against North Carolina State and Wake Forest will be a tall order. But given that they dropped from No. 1 to No. 2 in the coaches poll and had to listen as several college football pundits placed them outside their playoff projections, the Seminoles are plenty happy to relish in the fact that, unlike so many other teams, they just keep winning. People in the media talk, like were on the outside looking in for the playoff, Aguayo said. A wins a win. Obviously, last year we would blow out teams and this year all the wins have been pretty close. Coach Fisher has taught us to take a win as a win. No matter if its ugly, a win is a win. Obviously we havent played our best football yet, and thats what were looking forward to. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Savannah State at Florida A&MSaturday, Oct. 11 at 5 p.m.The game can be seen online at famuathletics.com. Radio 96.1 FM.LSU at FloridaSaturday, Oct. 11 at 7:30 p.m.The game can be seen on SEC Network or ESPN3. Radio 93.3 FM.#1 Florida State at SyracuseSaturday, Oct. 11 at NoonThe game can be seen on ESPN. Radio 103.1 FM.The Gators relied heavily on tailback Matt Jones who responded with 114 tough yardsFSU gets by unscathed on upset SaturdayTHE OSCEOLA/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS GATOR BAIT Home Center2709 Crawfordville Hwy. 926-3141 SEASON SAVED AS SEASON SAVED AS DRISKEL ERA ENDSDRISKEL ERA ENDSRoberto Aguayo made ve eld goals to help FSU get past Wake Forest. FSU fans celebrate the Seminoles 21st consecutive victory. ACE HOME CENTER 2709 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE FL *850-926-ACE1

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 Page 25By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe expectations were so high for Friday nights showdown against district rival Godby. Wakulla was ranked No. 2 in the state in Division 5A, and Godby was No. 4. Whether it was a case of nerves for the big game, some semi-wet conditions from rain earlier in the day or something else, but the War Eagles could not hold on to the ball turning it over nine times, including seven fumbles. And Godby made Wakulla pay for every mistake, and the Cougars made it look easy in a 60-21 thumping of Wakulla. It was just a bad night, said Head Coach Scott Klees. He took responsibility for the loss, saying he hadnt prepared his players well enough. Things just seemed to snowball on the young team and some forget that the War Eagles are a young team with only three senior starters. Most of the players, like quarterback Feleipe Franks and receiver Keith Gavin are juniors. To Klees, this is the real test of his players character how they bounce back after that kind of loss. There are things we can take from this, Klees said of the loss. There are things we can learn. Coming up this week is Bradford, a team having an off-season. At the same time, its homecoming for the War Eagles and that is a distraction for the team. Klees praised Wakullas fans for their support, once again packing out J.D. Jones Stadium.sports news and team views SportsWakulla falls to Godby NEXT GAME: The War Eagles host Bradford on Friday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m. for homecoming.PHOTOS BY BILL ROLLINSOne of the few highlights of the night was Keith Gavins kickoff return for a touchdown to open the second half. Wakulla lost seven fumbles, and had nine turnovers overall in the game. By EDDIE METCALFWMS CoachThe Wakulla Middle School Wildcats football team improved its record to 5-0 with a 3812 win over the Shanks Middle School Tigers on Tuesday. The Wildcat offense rushed 23 times for 279 yards and five touchdowns behind some strong blocking by Tristion Brown, Noah Melton, Reece Barwick, Trenton Lawhon, Hunter Reeves and Jazonte Hicks. Jeremy Harvey lead all rushers with three carries for 87 yards and a touchdown, Keyshawn Greene rushed nine times for 73 yards and a touchdown Jared Roddenberry had two carries for 43 yards and a score, Mikel Keith ran four times for 43 yards and a touchdown and Andrew Eskelund ran two times for 26 yards respectfully. Dorian Allen was 3-3 passing for 41 yards and two 2-point conversions. Allen also rushed for a two yard touchdown on a quarterback sneak. The rst team defense played lights out and held Quincy scoreless. Chandler Crum, Gabe Keith, Hunter Nichols, Jared Roddenberry and DJ Reynolds all played very physical all night long. The secondary, including Hunter Lawhon, Jamey Harvey, Jeremy Harvey and Dorian Allen played exceptionally well for the Wildcats. Jeremy Harvey intercepted a pass and broke up two passes and Hunter Lawhon had an interception as well. The Wildcats extended their winning streak to 13 games and have an open week before they face their county rival, Riversprings. The Wildcats will be back in action on Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. and will play Riversprings for the county championship. Come out and support the Wildcats.By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachAs a cold front made its way through the Big Bend area on Friday evening, the WHS cross country runners anticipated their first meet of the season on a flat course in cool weather a combination they had been looking forward to all season. Prior to their scheduled Saturday meet at the Rutherford Relays in Panama City, all of their meets had been run on tough courses and/or in brutally hot conditions and even though they had competed well, their times were slower than they had hoped they would be. When the Rutherford Open/JV race started at 9:30 am with the temperatures in the low 60s, they knew their opportunity had come and the 13 WHS boys in the race took full advantage of the course and the weather. Freshman Caleb Wiedeman had a breakout performance, covering the 5K course in 20:12 and placing 6th overall. His time was almost two minutes faster than his current PR (personal record). Within the next minute, six other WHS runners crossed the nish line, with all of them also setting new PRs. These included: Alex Smythe (21:04), Dalton Wood (21:08), Dalton Gray (21:11), Tyler Westcott (21:13), Will Thomas (21:17) and Jacob Dismuke (21:32). Others setting new PRs included: Scott Lloyd (24:25), Brice Jolly (24:38) and Deanthony Albert (24:32). The varsity girls were up next and the local squad had its best outing of the year. Once again, Haleigh Martin led the way for the WHS girls, nishing 5th overall, in a new season best time of 20:31. At the half way point, Connie Lewis and Lydia Wiedeman were once again battling for the second spot on the team, but this time Lewis turned the tables on Wiedeman and pulled away over the nal mile to nish in 17th place in a new PR of 22:26, with Wiedeman nishing 20th in 22:53. Juliana Prestia and Emily Lawrence worked together the entire race, ghting to run a varsity qualifying time, and helping each other. With about 300 meters to go, and both in full sprint mode, Prestia opened a slight gap, nishing in 31st place in 24:20, with Lawrence finishing 32nd, in 24:24 and rounding out the scoring for the WHS team. New runners Alyssa McIver (26:12, 43rd) and Jeanna Prisco (26:19, 45th) also ran strong races, with both setting new PRs by almost three minutes. Peri Thompson also ran well and set a new PR of 27:23. The girls team nished in third place out of nine teams, with a scoring team average time of 22:55 and Martin, Lewis and Wiedeman were recognized individually for nishing in the top 21. By the time the varsity boys toed the starting line, the temperatures had climbed into the 70s, but they didnt let that affect their race. Fort Walton Beach, one of the top programs in the state, took the rst three places, but WHS sophomore Bryce Cole fought hard the whole way and finished 5th overall in the outstanding time of 17:40 and breaking the 18:00 barrier for the first time. Senior Lane Williams, who ran off Coles shoulder for most of the race held on to finish in 8th place in the time of 18:02. Completing the scoring for the local squad was Travis Parks (15th, 18:40), Evan Guarino (19th, 18:52) and James Story (20th, 18:53). Freshman Dylan Pebbles (21st, 18:56) also ran an excellent race and broke the 19:00 barrier. Seniors Alan Pearson and J.P. Piotrowski were just behind Pebbles, nishing 24th and 25th respectively, with both nishing in 19:01. Senior Mitchell Atkinson (28th, 19:19) was the last WHS runner to nish under 20:00 and senior Riley Welch set a new PR of 20:02. The WHS team finished in second place out of eleven full teams, with a scoring team average of 18:25. Cole, Williams, Parks, Guarino, Story and Pebbles were also recognized for nishing in the top 21. The teams compete next on Saturday, Oct. 11, at the FSU Invitational, which is also this years pre-state meet. The meet will be held on the state meet course at ARP (Apalachee Regional Park) east of Tallahassee off Apalachee Parkway. ARP is recognized as one of the ve best cross country courses in the country. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms Stone Crab Season Opens Oct. 15 th LIVE BAIT HERE Get YourGREAT FISHING IN-SHORE! Cooler Weathe r Cooler Weathe r G 50% OFF *VACCINE CLINICVACCINES AT*WITH PAID FULL EXAMWed. 2pm-6pm & Thurs. 8am-NoonOpen: Wakulla Animal Hospital850-926-7153 W k ll A i l H i t l CROSS COUNTRY MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLCool weather means hot times at Rutherford meetWMS beats Quincy, stays undefeated Players of the WeekOFFENSIVE LINE The whole line did a great job blocking. PAT HARVEY6 tackles (TD catch on offense)CODY OCHATO enseDefenseSpecial Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor

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Page 26 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe recent cool temperatures in the evenings have announced the beginning of autumn in Wakulla County. With this distinct change of seasons comes the alteration of scheduled activities and events. The most popular mass market sporting events are transitioning from the diamond to the gridiron. The World Series is just around the corner, but football team rankings are still in the making. Leaves are beginning to drop so homeowners can spend more time collecting material for mulching the flowerbeds. Sweet gums, Florida maples, and many others are just starting their annual defoliation. Lawnmowers, both push and rider, are not being used as frequently since the growth of grass has slowed noticeably. When the thermometer drops below 70 degrees at night most grasses cease their push to conquer new territory. The exception to this dormant takeover effort is bamboo, the tallest grass in North Florida. There are more than 700 species of bamboo worldwide, ranging in height from 12 inches to 100 feet or more in ideal growing conditions. In the U.S., only two species occur naturally (Arundinaria gigantea and A. tecta). Neither of these two plants is used for human food, but other bamboos are a dietary staple or avoring condiments in Asia and Africa. Bamboo holds two impressive records in the plant kingdom: It is the largest perennial grass on the planet and it can be the fastest growing plant under the perfect environment. It has been deliberately propagated and used as an ornamental plant for many years in Florida and other locations. The wide variety of colors and shades combined with the exotic shaped and delicate leaves add to the landscaping appeal. Generally speaking, the two native bamboos are not extremely weedy and are relatively easy to manage. However, there are scores of imported bamboos which are highly invasive and exceedingly difficult to contain in a limited area. The most common invasive bamboo (Phyllostachys aurea) is commonly known as shing pole or golden bamboo. It was imported into this country in the 1880s as an ornamental, being popular as a cold-hearty and quick growing privacy screen. Because of its weight and relative strength it became an inexpensive and popular source of cane fishing poles. Curiously, bamboo y fishing rods are usually made from a less common, but stronger bamboo species native to China. This and other invasive bamboo varieties have large and complex underground root systems called rhizomes. These shallow roots maintain the plants viability by storing and distributing large volumes of nutrients. Once an invasive bamboo is established the root system supports rapid growth and expansion. Other plants are quickly overwhelmed and pushed out. To control these invasive varieties, the entire rhizome network must be exhausted and killed. This makes control of bamboo expensive, intensive, time consuming and dif cult. Being a grass, bamboo easily tolerates occasional mowing, but regular and intensive mowing is much more effective for destroying this plant. The mowing frequency is similar to that used on home lawns if success is to be achieved. The removal of the plants above-ground portion is required to deplete the rhizomes and control or eliminate the population. It usually takes one or two seasons of rigorous mowing before control is achieved. To learn more about bamboo and its use in Wakulla County, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla.ifas.u edu or call (850) 9263931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.A stand of bamboo. While other grasses go dormant in cooler weather, bamboo keeps growing.Bamboo is the fastest growing grass in Wakulla Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Please accept my 12 month subscription at the price of $27Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:TheWakulla newsor go to www.thewakullanews.com and click subscribeSavings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.Promo Code: FALL Expires: 11-15-14All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $27. Local delivery area only. 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